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Full text of "Report on the Census of Cuba, 1899"

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WAR DEPARTMENT, 
0*'P"ICIG DIRKCrOit CKNBTJS Om CUBA.. 



KEPORT 



OS THB 



CENSUS OF CUBA, 



18 9 9. 



LT. OOL J. P. SANOER, Inspector-General, 

DIRECTOR. 

HENBY a-A.N"N"KTT, "WA-LTEK If. ■WILI..COX, 

STATISTICAL EXPERTS. 



I 

I WASHINGTON: 

I 

>j GOVERNUBNT FRINTINO OFFICB. 

i» 1900. 



\ 



H 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 

Letter of transmittal of the Director of the Censos to the Secretary of War ... 9 

Proclamation of the President authorizing the census 10 

Organization of census 10 

The field work .' 11 

Greography 17 

Political divisions ^ 17 

Coast r^ons 18 

Orography :, 19 

Drainage systems 20 

Mineral resources 20 

Climate.... 21 

Flora 22 

Fauna 23 

History 24 

Discovery of the island 24 

First settlement 25 

Colonization and early government 25 

Causes affecting progress 27 

Trade restrictions and monopolies 28 

Export and import duties 28 

Smuggling 29 

Excessive taxation ■ 29 

Lack of banking facilities 31 

Economic, rather than political, conditions the cause of the slow prog- 
ress of the island 32 

Governors, character and administration of 32 

Lisurrections, causes and results of 33 

Intervention by the United States 40 

Political organization 43 

Municipal government 44 

Provincial government 50 

Insular government 51 

Former repxeeentation in the Spanish Cortes 55 

Cuban republics declared 55 

United States military government 55 

The judiciary «. 55 

Population, aboriginal, history of 65 

Population, black, history of 67 

Population, coolie, history of 69 

Discussion of the tables 72 

The total population 72 

Density of population 73 

Urban population j 76 

3 



I I 



4 CONTENTS. 

Discussion of the tables — Continued. 

Center of population 77 

Distribution in altitude 80 

Sex 80 

Age 84 

Age by provinces 90 

Age by sex 92 

Nativity and race 96 

Foreign-bom population in cities 99 

Citizenship 100 

Of Habana province 103 

Of Habanacity 103 

Of Matanzas 106 

Of Puiardel Rio 107 

Of Puerto Principe 108 

Of Santa Clara 109 

Of Santiago de Cuba 110 

Families 112 

Marital condition 117 

The married 118 

Persons living together as husband and wife by mutual consent 131 

The widowed 142 

The single 145 

Literacy 147 

School attendance 150 

Literacy among persons over 10 years of age 152 

Occupations 154 

Sanitary condition of dwellings and unoccupied houses 167 

Dwellings and families 167 

Source of water supply 170 

Di8i)osition of garbage 175 

Disposition of excreta 176 

POPULATION TABLES. 

L Total population at different censuses 179 

II. Total population, by provinces, in 1899, 1887, ahd 1861 179 

III. Total population by municipal districts in 1899 and 1887 179 

IV. Total population by wards and by cities 181 

V. Rural population by municipal districts, with area and density. . . , 191 

VI. Sex, general nativity and color, by provinces and municipal dis- 
tricts 194 

VII. Percentages of population by sex, general nativity, and color, by 

municipal districts 200 

VIII. Sex and age groups, by municipal districts 202 

IX. Race, nativity, sex, and 5-year age periods 206 

X. Birthplace, by provinces and municipal districts 218 

XI. Country of birth, by race, and by provinces and cities 220 

XII. Citizenship, by provinces and municipal districts 225 

XIII. Citizenship, literacy, and education, by provinces and municipal 

districts 228 

XIV. Citizenship, by age, sex, race, and nativity, by provinces and 

cities 251 

XV. Conjugal condition, by provinces and municipal districts 299 

XVI. Conjugal condition, by race, sex, and nativity 302 



' CONTENTS. 5 

I 

XVII. Conjugal condition, by race, sex, nativity, and age, by provinces 

and cities 306 

XVIII. Illegitimate children, by provinces and cities 354 

XIX. School attendance, literacy, and superior education, by provinces 

' and municipal districts 358 

XX. Literacy, by age, sex, nativity, and race, by provinces and cities. 361 
XXI. School attendance, by months, by sex, race, nativity, and age, by 

provinces and cities 385 

XXII. Higher education, by age, sex, race, and nativity, .by provinces 

■ and cities 401 

XXIII. Occupation groups, by sex, race, and nativity, by provinces and 

cities 403 

XXIV. Occupation groups, by sex, race, and nativity, by municipal districts 406 
XXV. Occupation groups, by agej sex, race, and nativity, by provinces 

and cities 438 

XiVI. Occupations, by sex, race, and nativity, for the island 462 

XXVII. Occupations, by ageand sex, for the island 463 

XXVIII. Occupations, by citizenship and sex, for the island 465 

XXIX. Occupations, by sex and education, for the island 467 

XXX. Occupations, by sex and conjugal condition, for the island 469 

XXXI. Occupations, by sex and country of birth, for the island 472 

XXXII. Occupations, by provinces 476 

XXXIII. Selected occupations, by age, sex, and race, by provinces 477 

XXXIV. Selected occupations, by age and sex, by provinces 480 

XXXV. Selected occupations, by sex and citizenship, by provinces 485 

XXXVI. Selected occupations, by sex and education, by provinces 489 

XXXVII. Selected occupations, by sex and conjugal condition, by provinces. 494 

XXXVin. Selected occupations, by sex and country of birth, by provinces. . - 499 

XXXIX. Number and size of families, by provinces and municipal districts. 507 

XL. Dwellings and families, by provinces and municipal districts 512 

XLI. Source of water supply, by provinces and municipal districts 514 

XLII. Disposition of garbage, by provinces and municipal districts. ..... 517 

XLIII. Disposition of excreta, by provinces and municipal districts 520 

Agriculture, history of, in Cuba 523 

Sugar 524 

Tobacco .• 533 

Coffee.... 537 

Cocoa 539 

Fruit 539 

Inferior agricultural implements 539 

Poor country roads 539 

Stock raising 539 

Number of coffee, sugar, and tobacco plantations, cattle ranches, and cattle . . 540 

Discussion of results 541 

Farm areas 542 

Farm tenure 544 

Size of farms 546 

Products 547 

Tables of agriculture 553 

XLIV. Farm areas '.- 553 

XLV. Tenure, by race and by size of farms, number 555 

XLVI. Tenure, by race and by size of farms, cultivated area 556 

XLVII. Products 558 

XLVni. Sugar plantations, classified by area 560 



b CONTENTS. 

Tables of agriculture — Continued. Page. 

XLIX. Sugar plantations, number and average size 560 

L. Tobacco plantations, classified by area 560 

LI. Tobacco plantations, number and average size 560 

LII. Live stock 561 

Education in Cuba, history of '. 5fi5 

Royal University of Habana 566 

Public schools under the Spanish regime 566 

School laws and systems 577 

Teachers' pensions and substitute teachers 582 

Salaries of teachers 583 

Schoollawof June30, 1900 585 

Institute collegiate course, 1900 ». 600 

University of Habana, reoiganization of 605 

Discussion of tables 615 

Tables of schools 618 

UIL Schools 618 

LTV. Pupils 619 

APPBNDICBB. 

I. War Department orders oiganizing the census 621 

II. War Department orders appointing disbursing officers of the cen- 
sus in Cuba ^ 625 

III. Report of the assistant director, V. H. Olmsted 625 

Reports of the supervisors 627 

IV. Province of Habana, Sefior Manuel Rasco 627 

V. Province of Matanzas, Prof. Claudio Dumas 631 

VI. Province of Pinar del Rio, Sefior Pedro Pequeflo 638 

VII. Province of Puerto Principe, Sefior Augustin H. Aguera 640 

VIII. Province of Santa Clara, Sefior Juan Bautista Jiminez 647 

IX. Province of Santiago de Cuba, Sefior Sabas Meneses 652 

X. Report of enumerator of Zapata Swamp, Sixto Agramonte 658 

XI. Report of enumeration of the north coast of Matanzas 665 

XII. Report of enumerator Maria Nunez de Villavioencio 666 

XIII. List of enumerators 668 

XIV. Contract with the Tabulating Machine Company 695 

- XV. List of the Governors of Cuba 696 

XVI. List of municipal districts, with dates of organization and memo- 
randum on territorial changes since 1861... 698 

XVII. Memorandum on previous censuses 702 

XVIII. Memorandum on vital statistics 714 

XIX. Article on population, translated from Pezuela's Dictionary 727 

XX. Bibliography .• 737 

XXI. Statement of estimates and dlBbursements on behalf of the census. 738 

Index 740 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



MAPS. 

Map of Cuba 18 

Increase and decrease of population 72 

Density of rural population 74 

Size of cities 76 

Distribution of sex 80 

Proportion of native white inhabitants 96 

Proportion of foreign white inhabitants 98 

Proportion of colored inhabitants , 100 

Average size of families 114 

Proportion of married persons to population 118 

Proportion of those living together by mutual consent to total population 132 

Proportion of illiterates to total population 152 

DIAGRAMS. 

Population classified by sex, race, and nativity, by provinces 82 

Population by age and sex 84 

Citizenship by birthplace and illiteracy 102 

The city of Habana - 114 

Size of families 116 

Conjugal condition, by race, sex, and age 120 

Conjugal condition, by provinces 124 

Illiteracy by race and nativity 148 

Illiteracy by provinces 150 

Occupations by race, sex, and nativity 156 

Occupations by provinces x 160 

Birthrates 716 

Marriage rates 718 

Death rates 719 

PHOTOGRAPHIC REPRODUCTIONS. 

Supervisors of the Cuban census Frontispiece. 

Yumuri Valley 20 

General landscape of cultivated farms 20 

Cave of Ballamar, near Matanzas 22 

Ruins of copper mines at £1 Cobre and Sierra Maestre 24 

Surrender Tree, near San Juan 40 

Habana 42 

Habana 44 

Matanzas 46 

Bridge over Yumuri River at Matanzas 48 

7 



8 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 

PinardelRio 50 

Puerto Principe 52 

Santa Clara 54 

Santiago de Cuba 56 

Entrance to harbor of Cienfuegoe 58 

Nuevitas 60 

Trinidad 62 

Sancti Spiritua, from roof of orderly quarters 64 

Baracoa and entrance to harbor 66 

Dimas, village in province of Pinar del Rio 68 

Native white family 70 

Native colored family 70 

Native plow 522 

Plowing with oxen •. 522 

Sugar mill, province of Santa Clara 524 

Cutting and stripping cane 526 

Transporting cane to sugar mills 528 

Central Conchita 530 

Sugar machinery, "Central Caracas," province of Santa Clara 532 

Tobacco plant 534 

Setting out young tobacco plants 534 

Tobacco plantation, province of Santa Clara 536 

Tobacco-drying house 536 

Sorting tobacco and putting it in bundles 536 

Baling tobacco 538 

Tobacco train 538 

Fruit exhibit 540 

Ready to cut pines and bananas 542 

Cocoa grove 544 

Pinery 546 

Avenue of Royal Palms, Matanzas 548 

Climbing the royal palm 550 

Roping cattle 562 

Typical municipal school building 566 

School for girls, Matanzas 570 

Municipal school, Matanzas 572 

Pupils of the coU^^ " Olayarrette,'* Habana 576 

Exterior * * University of Habana, ' ' as seen from O' Reilly street 584 

Class in the corridor of the ** Royal College,'* Habana 588 

College "Maria Louisa Dolorosa," 592 

Royal College of Belen, Habana 600 

Supervisor and enumerators, province of Habana 628 

Supervisor and enumerators, province of Matanzas 632 

Super\'i8or and enumerators, Pinar del Rio 638 

Supervisor and enumerators, province of Puerto Principe 640 

Supervisor and enumerators, province of Santa Clara i 648 

Supervisor and enumerators, Santiago de Cuba 652 

Female enumerators, Habana 658 

Enumerators of the city of Matanzas 662 

Enumerators, city of Cardenas 666 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



War Department, Cuban Census, 

Wcuthmgton^ Aitfftist ^5, 1900. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the census 
of Cuba: 

In the early part of July, 1899, I received instructions from the 
Hon. Russell A. Alger, Secretary of War, to prepare a "memoran- 
dum-' for a census of Cuba. In August, immediately after your 
arrival in Washington, this "memorandum" was submitted to the 
Director of the United States Census, Hon. W. R. Merriam, the 
Assistant Director, Dr. F. H. Wines, and Mr. William C. Hunt, chief 
statistician. After consultation with the War Department it was 
decided that a census covering the field of inquiry usual in the United 
States was not expedient for Cuba, in view of existing conditions; 
that the schedules should be limited to population, agriculture, and 
education, as the three subjects of most importance; that the general 
plan of the United States census should be followed; and that, to save 
time, the schedules and other blank forms necessary for the enumera- 
tion of a population estimated at 1,600,000 be printed at once. The 
estimated cost of taking the census on this basis, together with a 
statement of the amount disbursed, will be found in Appendix XXI. 
As the Senate Committee on Cuban Relations, of which Senator 
O. H. Piatt is chairman, will publish an itemized statement of the 
expenditures, they are omitted, to avoid unnecessary repetition. 

It was proposed in the ''memorandum" that the census be taken 
under the supervision of the Military Governor of the island by cer- 
tain Cuban officials, assisted by officers and enlisted men of the United 
States Army, but as the census was primarily for the benefit of the 
Cubans, and as the work would demonstrate in some measure their 
capacity to perform an important civil duty, it was decided by the 
Secretaiy of War that the offices of supervisors and enumerators 
should be filled by Cubans, and that the field work should be per- 
formed by them, under the supervision of an experienced officer of 
the United States census, so that when the enumeration should be 
completed it would be a census of Cubans by Cubans. 

No decision could have been more fortunate, and, coupled with the 
proclamation of the President, in which the census was declared to 

9 



10 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899 

be a preliminary step in the establishment of an effective system of 
self-government, was the first, as it was the highest, expression of con- 
fidence on the part of the Government of the United States in the 
capacity and patriotism of the Cubans, removing all feeling of sus- 
picion as to the object of the enumeration, and placing the census at 
once en rapport with the people. Hundreds of intelligent and trust- 
worthy men and women volunteered to serve as enumerators without 
pa}'^, and the order of the President was received throughout the 
island with great satisfaction. 

In no other way could such a manifestation of good feeling and of 
.faith in the intentions of this Government have been elicited, and 
the result proved the wisdom of the measures. While some errors 
may have crept into the work, and while possibly there are some 
omissions, it should not be forgotten that this is the first attempt of 
the Cubans to take a census, and that the difficulties attending it have 
been numerous, serious, and not easily surmounted. But whatever 
its defect*}, it is the opinion of the people of Cuba and of the expert 
tabulators and statisticians who have been engaged in compiling and 
analyzing the figures that they bear the impress of honest work, that 
the census was taken rapidly and far more accurately than could have 
been expected, and that in this respect it will compare favorably with 
any census of the United States. 

The diflferent steps by which this was accomplished were as follows: 
An estimate was prepared of the probable cost of the census, based on 
the supposed population and the employment of Cubans as superv^isors 
and enumerators; a careful study was made of the necessary organiza- 
tion in all its details, and the best way to carry on the work in harmony 
with the general administration of the island. At the same time the 
Military Governor of Cuba was directed to nominate suitable Cubans 
as supervisors of the census for the six provinces of the island and to 
order them to Washington. This was done, and on their arrival, 
August 17, they were received by Dr. Wines and Mr. Hunt, of the 
United States Census Office, and by Mr. Olmsted, of the Department 
of Labor, and for two weeks were carefully instructed in their duties 
as supervisors with a view to their becoming, in turn, instructors of 
the enumerators. 

On August 17 the following proclamation of the President was 
issued: 

ExBCDTiVB Mansion, Ampigt 17, 1899, 
To the people of Cuba: 

The disorganized condition of your island resulting from the war and the absence 
of any generally recognized authority aside from the temporary military control of 
the United States have made it necessary that the United States should follow the 
restoration of order and peaceful industry by giving its assistance and supervision to 
the successive steps by which yon will proceed to the establishment of an effective 
system of self-government. 



LETTEB OF TRANSMITTAL. 11 

As a preliminary step in the performance of this duty, I have directed that a census 
of the people of Cuba be taken, and have appointed competent and disinterested 
citizens of Cuba as enumerators and supervisors. 

It is important for the proper arrangement of your new government that the 

information sought shall be fully and accurately given, and I request that by every 

means in your power you aid the officers appointed in the performance of their 

duties. 

William McKinley. 

As there were no general census laws in Cuba it was necessary to 
promulgate orders which would have the eflfect of laws, organizing the 
census, defining the duties of the census officials, and the obligations of 
the people in respect thereto. Accordingly, August 19, the necessary 
Executive orders were issued (Appendix I), and on the 23d the order 
appointing the disbursing officers (Appendix II). These orders were 
sent to the Military Governor of Cuba for promulgation in English 
and Spanish. 

Having beop thoroughly instructed in their duties, and in the mean- 
ing of the regulations, schedules, and other blank forms for carrying 
on the work, and being duly impressed by the Secretary of War with 
the responsibilities of their office, the supervisors left for Cuba, August 
23, and were followed, August 27, by the Assistant Director of the 
census, with his office force. 

Thus far the work of the census had been confined to Washington. 
The field work, attended with many difficulties, was now to follow. 

THE FIELD WORK. 

This was carried on under the immediate supervision of the Assistant 
Director, Mr. Victor H. Olmsted, an experienced official of the 
United States Census, who exhibited from first to last the mental, 
moral, and physical qualities necessary for the successful prosecution 
of the work. By dint of great patience, perseverance, unusual activ- 
ity, and tact he was able to win the confidence of the supervisors and 
enumerators, to instruct th^m in their duties, and to carry the work 
to a successful conclusion — no easy task for a foreigner and nonresi- 
dent of the island, as for many years its inhabitants had always con- 
nected the census with taxation and compulsory military service, 
toward which they had a strong natural aversion. 

Mr. Olmsted was directed to establish his office in the city of Santa 
Clara, which was selected as a geographical center and as affording 
sanitary and other conditions favorable to the work. His report is 
submitted herewith. (Appendix III.) 

The first step in organizing the field work was the formation of the 
enumeration districts, and for this purpose accurate maps of the 
provinces and municipalities were almost indispensable. Foreseeing 
this, the Military Governor was directed, August 8, to have such maps 
prepared, butit was not until the arrival of Mr. Olmsted in Habana, 



12 BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

August 31, that much progress was made in this direction. On that 
date, learning that the military authorities in Habana had no suitable 
maps, he telegraphed to the military, civil, and judicial authorities 
throughout the island to furnish him such maps as they had, and later 
discovered in the insular state department a map, said to be the only 
one of its kind in existence, showing the boundaries of the judicial 
and municipal districts in each province, but several years old, and 
requiring revision. 

As soon as the available maps had been collected the number and 
boundaries of the enumeration districts were determined, subject to 
such changes as might be necessary after the supervisors had looked 
over the ground. This was a work of great difficulty. 

Paragraph VIII of the order organizing the census prescribed that 
the boundaries of the enumeration districts should be described by civil 
divisions — rivers, roads, public surveys, and other easily distinguished 
lines. But it was soon ascertained that, owing to the ^imperfections 
of the maps, lUtle reliance could be placed on their topographical 
representations, and that, except in the cities, the boundaries of the 
minor civil divisions were not always given, and even when they were 
the lines of surburban and rural wards could not be determined, 
because, as was subsequently discovered, they had apparently over- 
lapped in some locations or were situated in two different municipali- 
ties, and the claims of the respective local authorities had not been 
adjusted. 

To avoid the double enumemtion liable to result from this, it was 
decided to indicate the areas of rural and suburban enumeration dis- 
tricts which could not be defined as the orders prescribed by desig- 
nating the ward or wards to be included in their limits and by directing 
the enumerators to inquire whether the persons and premises visited 
by them had been visited and enumerated before, and if they had, to 
pass them by. Each enumerator was also required to post a printed 
notice on all buildings visited by him, giving the date of his visit, 
which was designed as an additional safeguard against double 
enumeration. 

By September 13 Cuba had been divided into 1,315 enumeration 
districts. Later on, owing to the scattered state of the population, 
the great difficulties of communication in the rural districts, and 
the importance of completing the enumeration within the time desig- 
nated by the President, it was found necessary to increase this number 
to 1,607, 

The enumeration districts having been established, the appointment 
of enumerators followed. As the value of the statistics to be col- 
lected depended entirely on the fidelity and intelligence of the enu- 
merators, the supervisors were cautioned to exercise great care in 
their selection, and were informed that women were not necessarily 



LETTEB OF TRANSMITTAL. 13 

disqualified on account of their sex. One hundred and forty-two 
women were appointed enumerators and rendered excellent service, 
and it is said that for the first time in the history of Cuba, women 
were given public employment. 

To prepare the enumerators for their work and, §o far as practicable, 
to guard against errors in the returns, one or more enumerators in 
each municipality were directed to report to the supervisor for 
instruction, becoming in turn the teachers of the other enumerators 
in the district. This they did by assembling in classes and going care- 
fully over the orders, schedules, etc. , and testing their knowledge 
by the actual preparation of the papers required in the regulations. 
All enumerators were told that in doubtful cases of literacy the person 
to be enumerated should be required to read and write in the pres- 
ence of the enumerator, and, as far as could be ascertained by very 
careful inquiries, this was done. 

As soon as appointed each enumerator was given a commission and 
full field kit, and was then ready for the work. Some of those assigned 
to rural and suburban districts performed their duties at the peril of 
their lives, and all of the rural enumerators were subjected to much 
personal risk and discomfort, owing to the condition of the roads and 
streams, the prevalence of rain, and the depleted and sparsely settled 
state of the countiy. (Appendix IV to XII.) 

A full list of the enumerators will be found in Appendix XIII, and 
among the illustrations groups of those with whom the Director came 
in contact during his tour of inspection in November and December. 

For the accuracy with which this census has been taken the Cubans 
connected with it are certainlv entitled to the credit and distinction of 
being faithful and intelligent pioneers in the discharge of civil duties 
never before intrusted to them. 

On the 10th of November the Director of the Census left Washing- 
ton on a tour of inspection, to enable him to ascertain, as far as possi- 
ble, in what estimation the work of the census was held by the peo- 
ple; to inspect the oflices of the assistant director and supervisoi*s; to 
see and question as many enumerators as could be collected together 
in the large cities; to determine the best disposition to be made of the 
census property, and on what date the clerical work incident to the 
examination of the schedules could be closed, and the latter shipped to 
Washington. 

The result of this inspection was satisfactory. The offices of the 
supervisors were found in good order, the secretaries, clerks, and the 
enumerators intelligent and very much interested in their work, and, 
as a rule, the schedules accurately and neatly prepared. 

After consultation with Mr. Olmsted, it was decided to close the 
work December 31, discharging all Cubans who might be connected 
with it on that date, except the supervisors, and to bring the latter, 



14 BEPOET ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

with their schedules, and Mr. Ohnsted and party from Cienfuegos to 
Washington January 6. It was thought advisable to bring the super- 
visors to Washington, that they might make the gross count of the 
population and be on hand to explain any ambiguities or defects which 
might be discovered, in the schedules; to supervise the punching of 
the cards from which the tables were to be made, and to learn tlio 
entire method of handling the statistics. This progranmie was car- 
ried out, and Mr. Olmsted and his companions, with the -records, 
arrived in Washington January 15. 

The gross count of the population was completed and certified by 
the supervisors by January 31, and on February 1 a contract was 
made with the Tabulating Machine Company of Washington (Appen- 
dix XIV), and the work of punching the cards was commenced. This 
was continued under the supervisors until completed, March 24, and 
between April 1 and 10 they returned to their homes, having labored 
conscientiously, intelligently, and successfully in the discharge of their 
important duties. Their reports are submitted. (Appendices IV 
to IX.) 

As much public interest had been shown in the results of the census, 
it was decided not to await the preparation of the full report, but to 
publish census bulletins containing condensed tables with a brief anal- 
ysis of their contents. The first bulletin, in English and Spanish, 
appeared May 10, and the others at intervals until all, three in num- 
ber, had been published and distributed, the English edition in the 
United States and Europe and the Spanish in Cuba. Other tables 
essential in deciding questions connected with the municipal elections 
were compiled and mailed to the military governor of Cuba April 14, 
1900. 

In the preparation of the bulletins and report I have had the assist- 
ance of Mr. Henry Gannett, of the Geological Survey, and Mr. 
Walter F. Willcox, of the United States Census, both well known to 
the scientific world and thoroughly familiar with census work. 

In addition to the account of previous Cuban censuses Appendix 
XVII and the analysis of the tables to be found in this report,' it 
has been thought advisable to present a description of the island and 
a brief sketch of so much of its history as bears on its population, 
economic condition, and government. A list of the authors consulted 
in this connection will be found in the Appendix (XX). 

The maps, diagrams, and views which illustrate the report were 
selected with sole reference to their practical or historic value. No 
attempt at a general collection of photographs was made. The cities 
represented are either the capitals of the provinces or, like Baracoa, 
among the oldest settled by the Spaniards. The landscapes give some 
idea of the most noticeable topographic features, viz, the great cen- 



LETTEB OF TBAN8MITTAL. 15 

tral uplands, or sugar zone, the mountains, the beautiful valleys, and 
the caves. The agricultural industries of sugar, tobacco, fruit cultiva- 
tion, and stock raising are presented in some of their more interesting 
details, while the groups of supervisors, and enumerators, and the 
family groups are fair types of native Cubans, whose tragic and heroic 
struggle for liberty has excited the interest of the whole civilized world. 

Very respectfully, 

J. P. Sanger, /?m. Gei)L^ 

Director of the Cenmis, 
Hon. Elihu Root, 

Secretary of War. 



CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Geography. 



The government of Cuba has jurisdiction not only over the island 
of that name, but also over the Isle of Pines, lying directly to the 
south of it, and more than a thousand islets and reefs scattered along 
its northern and southern coasts. 

For administrative purposes Cuba is divided into six provinces 
which, named from the west eastward, are Pinar del Rio, Habana, 
Matanzas, Santa Clara, Puerto Principe, and Santiago de Cuba. These 
provinces are divided into municipal districts, of which Pinar del Rio 
contains 20, Habana 36, Matanzas 24, Santa.CIara 28, Puerto Principe 
5, and Santiago 19, making a total of 132 municipal districts. 

The municipal districts are in turn divided into barrios or wards, 
which correspond in extent and organization somewhat with our elec- 
tion districts. The number of these in the entire island is between 
1,100 and 1,200. Both municipal districts and wards differ widely in 
area and population. The five districts of Puerto Principe are large 
in area, while several in Habana and one or two in Santiago are in 
area little more than cities. In population, on the other hand, the dis- 
tricts range from Habana, with nearly a quarter of a million people, 
down to districts containing little more than 1,000 inhabitants. In 
popular language, the island is divided into the Vudta Aba^o^ or the 
portion from.the meridian of Habana to Cape San Antonio; the Vudta 
Arriba^ from the meridian of Habana to that of Cienfuegos; Las 
Cmca Villas^ from the meridian of Cienfuegos to that of Sancti 
Spiritus, and Sierra Adentro^ from the latter to Holguin and Cape 
Maysi. 

Cuba, the most populous of the West India islands, lies directly 
south of Florida. Habana is a trifle west of south of Key West and 
is distant from it, as the crow flies, about 100 miles, being separated 
from it by the Strait of Florida. East of Cuba lies Haiti, the second 
in size of the West India islands, and south of it lies Jamaica. The 
first of these islands is only 64 miles distant from Cape. May si the 
easternmost point of Cuba. The latter is 85 miles distant from its 
southern coast. On the west, Cuba is separated by Yucatan Channel, 
130 miles wide, from the Peninsula of Yucatan, Mexico. 

24662 2 17 



18 REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

Thus from a military point of view Cuba occupies a strong strategic 
position, controlling the entrance to the Gulf of Mexico by the Strait 
of Florida, the Windward Passage to the Caribbean Sea between Cuba 
and Haiti, and Yucatan Channel, connecting the Gulf of Mexico with 
ilie Caribbean Sea. The first and last of these are the bnlj entrances 
to the Gulf of Mexico, which is thus controlled completely by the 
island of Cuba. 

Cuba is included between the meridians of 74^ and 85° west of 
Greenwich and between the parallels of 19° 40' and 23° 33'. Its length 
from Cape Maysi on the east to Cape San Antonio on the west is 730 
miles. Its breadth differs greatly in different parts, ranging from 100 
miles in the cast, in the province of Santiago, to 25 miles in the neigh- 
borhood of Habana. Its area, which is more fully discussed elsewhere, 
may be set down as 43,000 square miles, including the Isle of Pines 
and the keys. It is, therefore, a little larger than the State of Virginia 
and somewhat smaller than Pennsylvania. 

The north coast is for the most part bluff and rocky, and in the prov- 
inces of Matanzas, Santa Clara, and Puerto Principe bordered by lines 
of islands and reefs of coral formation, the passages through which 
are extremely intricate and diflScult. These islands are low, are in the 
main covered with mangrove forests, and contain few inhabitants. 

The coast is low in the western part of the island, the bluffs ranging 
about 100 feet in height in Pinar del Rio and rising gradually east- 
ward. About Matanzas they reach 500 feet in altitude. In Santa Clara 
and Puerto Principe they are lower, but in Santiago the coast is abrupt 
and rugged, almost mountainous, rising in a succession of terraces. 

The south coast from Cape Maysi to Cape Cruz is mountainous. 
Indeed, from Santiago westward to Cape Cruz the Sierra Maestra 
rises abruptly from the water to altitudes of several thousands of feet. 
The shores of the gulf of Buena Esperanza, into which flows the Rio 
Cauto, are low, and from this plftce westward, excepting a short stretch 
between Trinidad and Cienf uegos, the coast is low and marshy as far 
as Cape San Antonio, the westernmost point of the island. This coast 
strip of marsh is in the main narrow, but west of Cienf uegos it broadens 
into a great expanse, forming the Zapata Swamp, an almost impene- 
trable region, 75 miles in length with a maximum breadth of fully 30 
miles, clothed with the densest vegetation and teeming with tropical 
life. It was within the protecting limits of this marsh that the Cubans 
during the recent revolution maintained a hospital for their sick and 
wounded. 

Off the south coast are hundreds of low, marshy, mangrove-covered 
islands and islets. 

Most of the harbors on both coasts are of peculiar shape, resembling 
nothing so much as pouches with narrow, often sinuous, entrances, 
opening within into broad expanses completely sheltered. This is the 




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OEOGBAPHY, 19 

character of the harbors of Habana, Santiago, Cienfuegon, Guantanamo, 
and many others less known. 

In its relief the island of (^ba is not a simple orographic unit, but 
presents great variety and irregularity, which renders it incapable of 
simple description and generalization. The middle portion of the 
island, including the provinces of Habana, Matanzas, Santa Clara, and 
Puerto Principe, presents little relief, but consists in the main of broad, 
undulating plains and shallow valleys, the land rising only in a few 
places to any considemble altitude. It is only at the two extremes of 
the island, in the province of Pinar del Rio on the west and Santiago 
on the east, that the island presents any considerable or well-defined 
relief features. Throughout Pinar del Rio there runs a range of hills, 
a little north of the middle line of the province and closely paralleling 
in direction the northern coast. This range, which is fairly well defined, 
is known as the Cordillera de los Organos, or Organ Mountains, and 
rises in many places to altitudes exceeding 2,000 feet, culminating in 
Pan de Guagaibon, having an altitude of 2,500 feet. From the crest 
of this range the land descends northward and southward to the coast 
in long, undulating slopes, the southward slopes forming the celebrated 
tobacco lands known as Vu^ltu Ahajo. 

The central provinces of Cuba, Habana, Matanzas, Santa Clara, and 
Puerto J^rincipo consist mainly of broadly rolling plains, with shallow 
stream valleys. In Habana, Matanzas, and Santa Clara these plains 
are, or were prior to the late revolution, in a high state of cultivation, 
while in Puerto Principe they are, in the mdin, used for the grazing 
of cattle. The valley of the Yumuri, in Matanzas, is a type of the 
beautiful, highly cultivated region of this part of the island. 

The Sierra de los Organos ceases as a range a little west of Habana, 
but traces of this uplift can be followed through the central pirt of 
Habana, Matanzas, Santa Clara, and the western part of Puerto Prin- 
cipe in the form of lines of hills of no great altitude dotting these 
extended plains. They are seen south of the city of Habana in the 
little timbered hills known as* the Tetas de Managua, and farther east 
in the Areas de Canasi, the Escalei'as de Jaruco, and the Pan de Mat- 
anzas, just south of the city of Matanzas. This rises to an altitude of 
1,300 feet and serves as a landmark to sailors far out in the Atlantic. 
In the eastern pail of Matanzas province these hills disappear, but 
they reappear again in Santti Clai^a, taking the form of elongated crest 
lines and flat top summits, and as such extend into the western part of 
the province of Puerto Principe. 

In the southern part of the ptovince of Santa Clara is a group of 
rounded hills, occupying an area between Cienfuegos, Trinidad, and 
Sancti Spiritus. The highest of these, Potrerillo, has an altitude of 
2,900 feet. Among these hills are many beautiful valleys. 

Santiago, at the other end of the island, is a province presenting 



20 BEPOBT ON THE 0EK8U8 OF CUBA, 1899, 

great relief. Its surface is extremely broken with high, sharp moun- 
tain ranges, broad plateaus of considerable elevation, and deep valleys — 
some of them broad, others narrow and resembling canyons. The 
dominating orographic feature of the province — indeed, of the whole 
island — is the Sierra Maestra, which, commencing at Cape Cruz, south 
of Manzanillo, extends eastward, closely paralleling the coast, from 
which it rises abruptly, as far east as the neighborhood of Santiago. 
In this part it contains many points exceeding 5,000 feet in altitude, 
and culminates in Pico Turquino, which is reputed to have an altitude 
of 8,320 feet. From Santiago it extends to the east end of the island, 
but is much more broken and has more of a plateau-like form, with a 
great diminution in altitude. This portion of the range takes on a 
different name, being known as the Cobre Range. It contains numer- 
ous flat summits, approximating 3,000 feet in altitude,- one of which, 
known as La Gran Piedra, is said to have an altitude of 3,300 feet. 

North of Sierra Maestra lies the broad and fertile valley of the 
Cauto, beyond which the country rises gradually to a high plateau 
occupying the interior of the province, with a summit elevation of 
1,000 feet or more, on which stands the city of Holguin. The eastern 
part of the province consists of a maze of broken hills, with altitudes 
ranging from 1,000 to 2,000 feet, in which are many small and fertile 
valleys. 

The Isle of Pines, with an area of 840 square miles, is a municipal 
district of the province of Habana. It is in effect two islands, con- 
nected by a marsh, the northern being somewhat broken by hills, the 
southern low, flat, and sandy. 

The rivers of Cuba, though numerous, are short, and few of them 
are of any importance for navigation. The largest stream is the Rio 
Cauto, which heads in the interior of Santiago province and in the 
north slopes of Sierra Maestra, and flows westward through a broad 
valley to its mouth in the Gulf of Buena Esperanza, after a couree of 
about 150 miles. This stream is navigable for light-draft boats to 
Cauto Embarcadero, about 50 miles aboVe its mouth. * 

The next stream of importance for navigation is the Sagua la Grande, 
on the north slope of the island, in Santa Clara province. This, which 
enters the sea near the city of Sagua la Grande, is navigable for some 
20 miles above its mouth. 

Several other streams are navigable for a few miles above their 
mouths, but in most cases only through what may be regarded as Cvstu- 
aries. Taking the island as a whole, its internal communications, 
except along the coasts, are dependent almost entirely upon its very 
few and poor wagon roads and its few railroads. 

MINEIUL BESOURCES. 

The mineral resources of Cuba, so far as developed, are few in num- 
ber and not of great importance. The principal product is iron ore, 



I 



CLIMATE. 21 

which is found at various points near the south base of Sierra Maestra, 
between Santiago and Guantanamo. The ore is mainly hematite, with 
some limonite, and is found principally as float, in great masses of 
bowlders. It is easy to work and of excellent quality, containing 
about 62 per cent of iron. A few occurrences have been discovered 
and mined of ore in place in the rock. There are three companies 
owning this mining property, one of which, the Juragua Company, 
has mined and shipped a considerable quantity of ore, nearly all of the 
shipments having gone to the United States. Up to 1895 the product 
of this company is stated at a trifle over 3,000,000 tons. Operations 
by the other two companies have consisted mainly in development 
work, only a small quantity of ore having been shipped by them. The 
late war, of course, put a stop to mining operations and much of the 
mining plant wafi destroyed. 

A copper deposit, reputed to be of extraordinary richness, is known 
in the vicinity of El Cobre, in the southern part of Santiago province, 
but since 1868 mining upon it has been at a standstill. Deposits are 
reported in other parts of the island, and much of this metal may yet 
be produced. 

Asphaltum is found in various places, notably in the vicinity of the 
city of Santa Clara, where it has for many years been used in making 
illuminating gas for the city. 

A little gold and silver has been mined in the island in past times, 
but for many years the island has not produced either of these metals. 

CLIMATE. 

The climate of Cuba is comparatively simple in its character and 
can be briefly described. With the long, narrow shape of the island, 
its great extent of coast line and small breadth, it has in the main an 
insular climate with a high mean temperature, slight extremes of 
temperature, great humidity of the atmosphere, and (an ample rainfall. 

At Habana, on the north coast, the mean annual temperature is 77°. 
The range of temperature between the mean of the hottest month and 
that of the coldest month is from 82° to 71°, or only 11°. The high- 
est temperature on record in Habana is 100.6°, and the lowest 49.6°. 
This maximum recorded temperature is no higher than in northern 
cities of the United States, but the duration of high temperatures is 
much greater in Cuba and explains the high mean temperature. But, 
notwithstanding the long-continued high temperature, the climate of 
the northern portion of the island is tempered by the trade winds 
which blow with but little variation throughout the year, and the 
nights in l>oth winter and summer are cool. The mean annual tem- 
perature at Habana fairly represents that of the island, it being per- 
haps a little hotter upon the south coast and inland than upon the 
north coast. The range of temperature between summer and winter 
does not differ probably materially anywhere on the coast from that 



22 EEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

at Habana, but inland is probably a little greater. The mean relative 
humidity at Habana averages about 75 per cent and remains tolerably 
uniform at all times of the year. Inland the humidity becomes some- 
what less, but not decidedly so. 

The mean annual rainfall at Habana, derived from observations of 
many years, is 62 inches. The record shows, in different years, a 
rainfall ranging from 40 to '71 inches. This represents quite closely 
the rainfall upon the north coast of the island. Inland and upon the 
south coast it is probably somewhat less, although observations are 
lacking. This is decidedly less than upon the Gulf coaist of the United 
States and but little greater than that of the northern seaboard cities. 
As regards the distribution of rainfall through the year, there is a 
wet and dry season, the former being from May to October, during 
which time about two-thirds of the precipitation of the year is received. 
Rain falls during about one-third of the days during each year, 
although this does not represent by any means the proportional amount 
of rainy weather. The days are usually clear up to about 10 o'clock, 
from which time till night, during the rainy season, it is frequently 
showery. The nights are conmionly clear. Thunderstonns are fre- 
quent, but not violent. 

The prevailing winds throughout the island are the northeast trades, 
which blow with great persistency, but seldom with violence. The 
island is occasionally, though not frequently, visited by hurricanes. 
These break upon the coast, causing the maximum destruction in its 
neighborhood, and rapidly lose their force and violence as they proceed 
inland. 

In winter, when the trade winds extend farthest to the southward, 
the island not infrequently comes within the influence of '' northers," 
from the North Temperate Zone, greatly and suddenly reducing the 
temperature on the north coast. These occur during the winter 
months and follow the severe storms of the United States, when the 
temperature sometimes falls as low as 60°, causing much suffering, as 
very little provision is made against cold in the construction of the 
Cuban houses. 

FLORA. 

Owing to the richness of the soil, the equable, moist temperature and 
abundant rainfall, the island is a veritable garden, abounding in flowers, 
luscious fruits, and a great variety of vegetables. Uncultivated nature 
has a wild luxuriance of jungle, grove, and forest to be traversed only 
by the aid of machete or along well-worn pathways. To illustrate the 
great variety of its native flora, it may be stated that over 3,360 native 
plants have been found in the island besides those introduced. They 
include many species of valuable wood, such as the mahogany, ebony, 
granadilla, majagua, cedar, walnut, ceiba, lignum-vitaj, oak, pine, and 
the palm, of which there are over 30 species, among them the royal 



FAUNA. 28 

palm, which, to the poor Cuban, is the most valuable of all, as the 
leaves provide him with a roof and the trunk with walls for his pi-imi- 
tive dwelling. In the interior the forests are in large part made up 
ot Cuban pine, which forms excellent lumber. Although a large pro- 
portion of the island has been cleared during the past three hundred 
years for the purposes of cultivation, yet it is estimated that 13,000,000 
acres^ or nearly half its area, still remain clad in original forests. 
These areas are found mainly in the eastern part of the island, in the 
provinces of Santiago and Puerto Principe. 

Over a large part of the cleared or cultivated areas are luxuriant 
grasses, which, like the parana and guinea grasses, grow to a' height 
of several feet and are abundant and nutritious. 

FAUNA. 

Throughout Cuba game is abundant; deer, though not native, have 
flourished and multiplied greatly. Rabbits are also plentiful. The 
wild boar, so called, the wild dog, and the wild cat are simply 
domestic animals run wild. They are quite numerous in all parts of 
the island. Wild fowl, especially ducks and pigeons, abound, the 
former crossing from the Southern States during the winter season, 
while the latter remain on the island the year round. Pheasants, quail, 
snipe, wild turkeys, and wild guinea fowl are also numerous, with 
several varieties of game birds, such as the perdiz^ tqjoaas^ rahiches^ 
and the guanaroa. 

The only distinctively native animal is the jutia or hutia^ ratlike 
in appearance, and black, which grows to a length of 16 or 18 inches, 
not including the tail. While eatable, it is not especially palatable. 

Cuba has more than 200 species of native birds, including those 
already mentioned as game birds, many possessing the most beautiful 
plumage, but those with song are rare. 

In swampy localities crocodiles and American alligators {caimans) 
are found, and although these frequently grow to an enormous size, 
but little attention is paid to them by the natives. 

Chameleons, small lizards, tree toads, and similar harmless silurians 
of diminutive size are very conunon, while occasionally the iguana 
and other large varieties of the lizard species are seen. 

Few varieties of snakes exist in Cuba. One of these, the maja^ 
from 10 to 14 feet in length, is a semidomesticated reptile, if such a 
term may be liged, for it is most frequently found about the huts, 
farmhouses, and small villages, its favorite living place being in the 
palm-leaf thatches of the older buildings, while its favorite food is 
poultry. Another snake, named the^'wJa", is more vicious in disposition 
than the mxija^ although never reaching more than one-third its size. 
It is not poisonous. The other varieties are still smaller in size, are 
seldom seen, and are not venomous. 



24 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

The land cmb» are very abundant and annoying. They vary in size 
from an inch to 8 inches or more in diameter. Scorpions, centipeds, 
and tarantulas are plentiful, and, although they are poisonous, their 
bites are rarely, if ever, fatal. 

HISTORY. 

Many books have been written about Cuba, but few detailed and 
reliable histories. Such infoimation as is available is in fragmentary 
fonn, and many important events connected with the affairs of the 
island are unrecorded, or so briefly touched on as to be unintelligible. 
The time allowed for the preparation of this report will not admit of 
an extended compilation of historic facts and no attempt has been 
made, therefore, to do so. But it has been considered advisable, aa 
pertinent to this census, to refer to the discovery and first settlement 
of Cuba, its government, and the causes which have apparently 
affected its progress. An effort has also been made to collect all 
reliable data in regard to the movement of population, agriculture, 
and education, and these are presented by way of preface to the 
analysis of the tables. 

Cuba was discovered by Columbus Sunday, October 28, 1492. 
According to the most reliable evidence, he landed in, or a little to 
the west of, what is now called the bay of Nuevitas, on the north 
coast of the province of Puerto Principe. He took possession of the 
island in the name of Christ, Our Lady, and the reigning Sovereigns 
of Spain, and named it Juana in honor of Prince John. 

Continuing his voyage, Columbus sailed west as far as the Laguna 
de Moron, where he arrived October 31. From here, on November 
12, he commenced to retrace his steps. It is somewhat difficult to 
decide from his journal where he sailed between November 12 and 26. 
He appears to have returned to the vicinity of the Guija Islands and 
then to have cruised about among the keys and islands off the prov- 
ince of Puerto Principe, finally reaching the Bay of Nuevitas. 

On November 26 he sailed southeast along the coast of Santiago de 
Cuba to Bai*acoa, where he arrived on the evening of November 27. 
From there he sailed, on December 4, to Point Maysi, the eastern end 
of the island, and on the following day to the island of San Domingo. 

On the 3d of May, 1493, Pope Alexander VI issued a bull conferring 
on Ferdinand and Isabella all lands already discovered, or to be dis- 
covered, in the Western Ocean, thus confirming by divine right, to 
all Christendom, the claims of Columbus. 

Columbus visited Cuba three times after this. In 1493, during his 
second voyage, he followed the southern coast from Point Maysi as 
far as Bataban6 and the Lsle of Pines, which he reached June 13, 
1493, discovering in the meantime the island of Jamaica, which he 
visited while eti ix>ute from Santiago de Cuba to Cape Cruz. During 



HTSTOBY. 25 

this voyage Columbus visited Qtiantanaino, Trinidad, and probably 
Cienfuegos. 

During his fourth and last voyage, be touched at Cayo Largo, 
off the south (5oast of the province of Santiago de Cuba, in July, 1602, 
while en route to, and again in May, 1503, when returning from, the 
mainland. 

From this time to its permanent occupation by the Spaniards, Cuba 
does not appear to have been visited often by other explorers, although 
in 1508 Sebastian Ocampo, acting under the orders of Nicolas de 
Ovando, Governor of San Domingo, reported that Cuba was an island, 
but this was known, probably, to other explorers several yeara before. 
Nevertheless, it does not appear that Cuba received much attention 
from the Spanish authorities prior to 1511. 

In that year Diego Columbus, Admiral of the Indies and Governor 
of San Domingo, sent Capt. Diego Velasquez, one of the companions 
of Columbus in his second voyage, to subdue and colonize Cuba. With 
a force of 300 men he sailed from San Domingo and landed near Point 
Maysi, going thence to Baracoa, where the first settlement was made 
in 1512. In 1614 Velasquez founded Trinidad and Santiago de Cuba, 
on the southern side of the island, to facilitate communication with the 
Spanish colonies of Jamaica and the mainland, Sancti Spiritus near its 
middle point, and Bemedios, Bayamo, Puerto Principe, and San Cris- 
tobal de la Ebibana, the latter on what is now the site of Bataban6. 
In 1519 this name was transferred to a settlement on the present site 
of Habana. The same year, Baracoa, having been raised to the dig- 
nity of a city and bishopric, was declared the capital, and so remained 
until 1522, when both were removed to Santiago. Habana became 
the capital in 1552. 

On the death of Ferdinand, January 23, 1616, Velasquez renamed the 
island Fernandina in his honor. It was subsequently named Santiago, 
after the patron saint of Spain, but the name was again changed to 
Ave Maria^ in honor of the Virgin. Through all these official changes, 
however, it retained its native original name. 

Velasquez continued to govern Cuba as addcmtado^ or lieutenant- 
governor, under the governor and avdiencia of Santo Domingo, until 
his death in 1524. He had five successors in the office of lieutenant- 
governor. (See Appendix for list of Governors. ) The first Governor, 
Hernando de Soto, was appointed in 1536; he was also addantado 
of Florida. The first Captain-General was Don Gabriel de Lujan, 
appointed in 1581. During this interval the Spanish population had 
increased very slowly; but two additional towns, Guanabacoa and £1 
Cobre, were founded, 1555 and 1558, and not another town wajs built 
for more than one hundred years. 

In the seventeenth century but two towns of any importance, Matan- 
zas and Santa Clara, were founded, and in the eighteenth but nine. 



26 REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

At the end of this period the' population of the island is said to have 
numbered 276,000 souls, while the developnaent of its wealth had 
scarcely begun. In fact, for many years after its colonization, Cuba 
was not a wealth-producing colony, and, therefore, not an object of 
much solicitude or patronage. In the general scheme of colonizing 
the West Indies, both Cuba and Jamaica were occupied to facilitate 
trade with the rich colonies of the Spanish main, and while still a 
young colony Cuba, as a depot of supply, was severely taxed by the 
numerous expeditions which sailed from her shores bet\^een the years 
1512 and 1538. 

. If the situation and many natural advantages of Cuba be considered, 
it is evident at a glance that either the Cubans have been blind to 
their opportunities or that causes generally beyond their control have 
retarded the growth of the population and the development of the 
island's i*esources. The latter would seem to be the case, although it 
can not be said that the Cubans were not in some measure accountable. 

The principal staples of Cuba, and those upon which its wealth mainly 
depends, are sugar and .tobacco. The largest sugar crop, 1894r-95, 
was 1,054,000 tons; the largest tobacco crop (same year), about 2,480,000 
arrobas, or 62,000,000 pounds; and its population at the outbreak of 
the recent war was probably between 1,800,000 and 2,000,000 souls. 
It is the opinion of experienced and enlightened judges that the island 
could easily have produced a crop of sugar and tobacco five times as 
large and had a population of 5,000,000 people had its administration 
been characterized by different theories of government. 

That, in the administration of her colonies, Spain was a bad excep- 
tion to a general rule of liberal and generous government on the part 
of other countries toward their colonial dependencies is by no means 
the case. In fact, much the same ideas appear to have influenced 
all of them at the outset, although the results were different, as might 
be expected of governments having different origins, forms, and 
theories. The prevailing idea appears to have been that the political 
and economic interests of colonies were always to be subordinated to 
those of the home country, no matter how injurious the consequences, 
and, while in some instances this course was modified with most 
beneficial results, it was followed unremittingly b}*^ Spain to the end 
of her supremacy over Cuba. 

Aside from the fact that during the early history of Cuba Spain had 
little sui-plus population to dispose of, and that through the expulsion 
of the Jews and Moors she lost a large and valuable pa^i: of it, her 
trade restrictions, established at the beginning of the colonial period 
in her history and continued without essential modification for nearly 
three hundred years, would account, in some measure, for the slow 
increase in the population and industries of Cuba. These restric- 
tions appear to have originated in the royal cedula of May 6, 1497, 



HISTORY. 27 

granting to the port of Seville the 'exclusive privilege of trade with 
the colonies. At the same time the Ccmi de Co^itratdcion^ or Comicil 
of Trade, was established, upon which was conferred the exclusive 
regulation of trade and conmierce, although later the Council exercised 
its functions under the general control of the Council of the Indies. 
San Domingo, and later Vera Cruz, were the only colonial ports author- 
ized to trade with Seville. In 1717 the trade monopoly of Seville was 
transferred, by royal order, to the port of Cadiz, in Spain. 

While Santiago was the capital of Cuba, trade between the island 
and the home ports mentioned was restricted to that place, and when, 
in 1562, the capital was transferred to Habana, that city became the 
sole port of entry until 1778, except during the English occupation of 
the island, 1762-63, when Habana was opened to free trade. By the 
royal decree of October 12, 1778, trade between Santiago, Trinidad, 
Batabano, and other Spanish ports was authorized. This privilege 
was extended to Nuevitas in 1784, to Matanzas 1793, Caibarien 1794, 
and Manzanillo and Baracoa in 1803. Prior to this Cuban ports were 
practically under an embargo of the strictest kind. Even between 
the ports of Habana and Seville or Cadiz, there was no free communi- 
cation, but all trading vessels were gathered into fleets, or "j^>^a«," 
from time to time, and made the voyage accompanied by Spanish 
war ships, partly for protection against freebooters and pirates, but 
chiefly to prevent trade with other ports. In 1765 this restriction was 
removed. 

The maritime laws regulating trade and conunerce forbade trade 
even between the colonies, and as early as 1592 trade with foreigners 
was only permitted by special authority, and in 1614 and 1680 trade 
with foreigners was prohibited under pain of death and • confiscation 
of the property concerned. 

The treaties of the period appear to have recognized these prohibi- 
tions as entirely justifiable under the rules of international intercourse 
as they existed at that time. Thus by the treaties of 1648 and 1714 
between Spain and the Dutch provinces it was agreed by the con- 
tracting parties to abstain from trading in the ports and along the 
coast of the Indies belonging to each of the treaty nations. Again, 
by the treaty of Madrid between England and Spain, similar engage- 
ments were made, although article 10 provided that in case vessels 
arrived at the prohibited ports under stress or shipwreck they should 
be kindly received and permitted to purchase provisions and repair 
damages. This privilege was subsequently withdrawn by royal orders 
of January 20 and April 15, 1784, which prescribed that no vessel 
belonging to a foreign nation should be permitted to enter, even under 
the pretext of seeking shelter. The severity of these restrictions was 
modified later on and, by a royal order of January 8, 1801, Cuban 
ports were thrown open to the commerce of friendly and neutral 
nations. 



28 BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

Other commercial privileges were granted in 1805, 1809, 1810, and 
1812, due, in great measure, if not entirely, to the French invasion of 
the Peninsula and its effect on Spanish possessions in the West Indies 
and America. But these concessions to trade with Spanish colonies 
were but temporary, as by royal orders of January 10, November 17, 
and July 10, 1809, foreign commerce with Spanish-American * ports 
was prohibited. Against these last restrictions of trade the various 
Spanish colonial Governors, and especially the Captain-General of 
Cuba, protested on the ground of the necessities of the colonies and 
the inability of Spain to meet them. These objections having been 
favorably considered by the Council for the Indies, foreign trade with 
Habana was extended for six months. 

Many other decrees and royal orders affecting trade with Cuba and 
the other Spanish colonies were promulgated during Ihe period between 
1775 and 1812, but they throw no additional light on this subject. It 
is plain that Spain was always averse to granting trade facilities with 
her colonies, and only did so for a time when forced by her necessities; 
but having once opened Cuban ports and to that extent established the 
privilege of foreign trade, which it was diflBcult to recall, the next step 
was to restrict it as far as possible by duties, tonnage, and port dues, 
and arbiti'ary tariffs imposed from time to time in such a way as to 
render foreign commerce unprofitable. Without going into details it 
may be said that up to 1824 duties on foreign commerce were much 
greater than on Spanish merchandise, and while from that year they 
were generally less restrictive, still they were always high enough to 
compel Cubans to purchase from Spanish merchants, who, as Spain 
did not herself produce what was needed, bought from French, 
German, American, or other sources, thereby raising prices far above 
what they would have been under a system less hampering. In 
fact, up to 1818 Cuba does not appear to have had a tariff system. In 
that year a tariff was promulgated making the duties 26i per cent on 
agricultural implements and 43 per cent ad valcrreni on other foreign 
merchandise. This was modified in 1820 and 1822 and the duties reduced 
to 20 per cent on agricultural implements and 37 per cent ad valorem 
on foreign industrial products. On all Spanish importations under 
this classification the duties were two-thirds less. The tariff of 1824 
was less prohibitive. 

Not satisfied, apparently, with this arrangement for excluding 
foreign ti'ade or with the amount of customs revenue, an export tariff 
was established in 1828 on sugar and coffee', which had by that time 
become important products. On sugar the duty was four-fifths of a 
cent per pound, and on coffee two-fifths of a cent per pound. If 
exported in foreign vessels, the duty on sugai' was doubled and on 
coffee was increased to 1 cent per pound. With slight modifications 



HI8TOBY. 29 

these duties continued to August 1, 1891, when, under the McKinley 
tariff law, a reciprocal commercial agreement was proclaimed by Presi- 
dent Harrison between Spain and tl^e United States, which enabled 
Cuba to seek its nearest and most natural market. In a short time 
nearly the entire trade of Cuba was transferred to the United States, 
and Cuba enjoyed a degree of prosperity never before attained. 

But with the termination of this agreement by the tariff law of 1894, 
the old practice of differential, special, and discriminating duties 
against foreign tiude was reestablished, thus forcing lipon the Cubans 
compulsory trade with Spain. There seems to be no question among 
impartial and intelligent judges as to the injurious effect of this system 
on the growth of Cuba's population and material progress, both largely 
dependent on conunercial advantages. • 

Another evil born of the system and given a certain amount of 
immunity through the reverses and disasters of the Spanish navy, in 
consequence of which Spain was unable to protect her commerce or 
fully enforce trade regulations, is smuggling, which began with trade 
restrictions and monopolies and has continued to this day, the amount 
of merchandise snauggled being, for many years, n^rly equal to 
that regularly imported and exported. From smuggling on a large 
scale and privateering to buccaneering and pirac»y is not a long step, 
and under the name of privateers French, Dutch, English, and 
American smugglers and buccaneers swarmed the Caribbean Sea and 
Gulf of Mexico for more than two centuries, plundering Spanish 
f/ota» apd attacking colonial settiements. Among the latter, Cuba 
was the chief sufferer. Sallying forth from Santo Domingo, Jamaica, 
the Tortugas, and other islands and keys, these marauders raided the 
island throughout the whole extent of its northern, eastern, and south- 
ern coast line, levying tribute, kidnaping individuals, and carrying off 
whatever was needed. In 1638 they attacked and burned Habana. 
In 1544 they attacked Baracoa, Matanzas, and Habana, which they 
again sacked and burned. In 1604 Giron, a French buccaneer, landed 
twice in Santiago, capturing the Morro, and in 1679 French buc- 
caneers again raided the province. Incursions on a smaller scale were 
frequent, causing the Captain-General to issue an order requiring all 
men to go anned and all persons to retire to their homes after night- 
fall. • By the terror they excited these raids retarded somewhat the 
development of agriculture by compelling the people to concenti-ate 
in the towns for protection. On the other hand, they stimulated the 
construction of fortifications in the harbor of Habana and other ports, 
which, a few years later, made them safe against such incursions. 

Coupled with trade restrictions and extending throughout the entire 
life of Cuba as a dependency of Spain, excessive taxation has always 
prevailed. Apart from imports and exports, taxes were levied on real 



30 BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

and personal property and on industries and commerce of all kinds. 
Every profession, art, or manual occupation contributed its quota, 
while, as far back as 1638, sea^ and stamp taxes were established on 
all judicial business and on all kinds of petitions and claims made to 
official corporations, and subsequently on' all bills and accounts. 
These taxes were in the form of stamps on official paper, and at the 
date of American occupation the paper cost from 35 cents to $3 a 
sheet. On deeds, wills, and other similar documents the ^aper cost 
from 35 cents to $37.50 per sheet, according to the value of the prop- 
erty concerned. Failure to use even the lowest-priced paper involved 
a fine of $50. 

There was also a municipal tax on the slaughter of cattle for the 
market. This privilege was -sold by the municipal council to the 
highest bidder, with the result that taxes were assessed on all animals 
slaughtered, whether for the market or for private consumption, with 
a corresponding increase in the price of meat. 

Another tax established iii 1528, called the derecho' de a/veria^ 
required the payment of 20 ducats ($16) by every person, bond or 
free, arriving*in the island. In 1665 this tax was increased to $22, 
and continued in force to 1765, thus retarding immigration, and, to 
that extent, the increase of population, especially of the laboring 
class. 

An examination of these taxes will show their excessive, arbitrary, 
and unscientific character, and how they operated to discourage Cubans 
from owning property or engaging in many industrial pursuits .tending 
to benefit them and to promote the material improvement of the island. 

Taxes on real estate were estimated by the tax inspector on the 
basis of its rental or productive capacity, and varied from 4 to 12 
per cent. Similarly, a nominal municipal tax of 25 per cent was 
levied on the estimated profits of all industries and commerce, and 
on the income derived from all professions, manual occupations, or 
agencies, the collector receiving 6 per cent of all taxes assessed. 
Much unjust discrimination was made against Cubans in determining 
assessable values and in collecting the taxes, and it is said that bribery 
in some form was the only effective defense against the most flagrant 
impositions. 

Up to the year 1638 the taxes were collected by royal officers 
appointed by the King, and their accounts were passed on by the 
andlencla of Santo Domingo. In that year contadores (auditors) were 
appointed who exercised fiscal supervision over the tax collectors, 
until, by royal cedula of October 31, 1764, the intendancy of Habana 
was created, the administration of taxes being conducted as in Spain. 
Since 1892 the taxes have been collected by the Spanish Bank under a 
ten years' contract, the* bank receiving a commission of 5 per cent. 
About 18 per cent of the assessed taxes remained uncollected between 



HISTOBY. 81 

1886 and 1897, and the deficits thus caused were added to the Cuban 
debt, ever a subject of. universal discontent.' 

If to high taxes, high tariffs, and utter indifference, apparently, to 
the needs of the island be added a lack of banking facilities of all 
kinds, and a system of currency dependent entirely on the Spanish 
Government and affected by all its financial difficulties, we have some 
of the reasons why the economic development of Cuba has been slow. . 
"All her industrial profits .were absorbed by Spain, leaving no surplus 
to provide for the accumulation of capital and the material progress 
of the island,"" which was apparently regarded as a government 
monopoly, whose productive capacity was in no wise connected with 
its economic interests. Accordingly, such interests were invariably 
subordinated to those of Spain — with which they rarely accorded — no 
matter how injurious the result. That this course should have been 
followed in the early period of Spanish colonization is not strange. All 
sorts of economic experiments, based on what are now considered 
absurd economic theories, were tried about that time by European 
countries in vain efforts to promote national prosperity by entirely 
unnatural methods. Thus, for many years Cuba was prohibited, in 
common with other colonies, from the cultivation of raw products 
raised in Spain, thus reversing the theory and practice under which 
England subsequently developed her manufacturing industries at home, 
successfully colonized all parts of the habitable globe, and established 
her enormous colonial ti*ade, by the very natural process of paying for 
the I'aw products of her colonies in manufactured articles. No nation 
in Europe during the sixteenth century was in a better condition than 
•Spain to establish such a system, as she was essentially a manufactur- 
ing country. But with the expulsion of the Moors her manufactures 
were practically ruined; the wealth which for many years had poured 
in from the colonies in exchange for the supplies shipped them now 
passed through her to other countries in consequence of her extinguished 
industries, and she became little more than a clearinghouse for foreign 
products. I)ive-sixths of the manufactured articles used in Spain were 
imported, and foreigners, in direct violation of Spanish laws, soon car- 
ried on nine-tenths of the trade with her colonies. 

It may be said that results equally unfortunate appear to have attended 
all other branches of Spanish colonial government. Under a policy so 
shortsighted that it was blind to the most ordinary precautions, and 

^According to the data of the tribunal of accounts {tribunal de suerUas) of Habana, 
referred to by Sefior la Sagra, Cuba received as ordinary and extraordinary ^^tituados^^ 
from Mexico, trom 1766 to 1788, 57,739,346 paoB Jueries, and from 1788 to 1806 the 
sum of 50,411,158 p^soff/uertes. 

'The proof of this is the bad condition of the roads and harbors, the absence of 
docking facilities, the lack of adequate water supply in cities, of sewers, paved streets, 
schoolhouses and other public buildings essential to every cummumty and provided 
by private or public enterprise. 



32 BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

long after repeated warnings should have suggested a greater measure 
of economic and political independence for Cuba, the entire system of 
Cuban government and administration was retained in the hands of 
Spanish officials to the exclusion of native Cubans, thus substituting 
for home rule a government which, however necessary in the earlier 
history of the island, became, with the lapse of centuries, an object of 
, suspicion and hatred to a large majority of Cubans, as the medium 
through which Spain exercised despotic power over them and appro- 
priated, to herself the wealth of the island. That these feelings would 
have yielded to greater economic and political freedom, there can be 
no question. Political independence was not generally advocated at 
first. Autonomy under the protection of Spain was as far as the 
industrial classes cared to go, and had this been granted ten years 
earlier Cuba might and probably would have remained a Spanish col- 
ony. It was the economic rather than the political aspect of the island 
that concerned the greater part of its population. But in Cuba polit- 
ical and economic conditions were inseparable under the theory of 
colonial government which prevailed, and economic concessions were 
not to be thought of if the practice of stripping Cuba by the various 
means described without giving Cubans the least opportunity to pre- 
vent it in a peaceful way was to continue. 

That they would ever resort to force was not believed, or if believed, 
not feared, in the face of a despotic Governor-General with a local ai*my 
and navy to enforce his authority and the whole power of Spain in 
reserve. Besides, the Cubans had given ample proof of their loyalty. 

But the rulers of Cuba, usually blind to its interests, were to test 
the loyalty of her people beyond the limits of endurance, and, as a- 
result, to lose for Spain her *'ever faithful island." 

From the time of Velasquez, 1612, to General Don Adolpho Jim- 
enez Castellanos, 1898, Cuba, had 136 rulers. A list of them will be 
found in Appendix XV, and it may be said that, with but a dozen excep- 
tions, they did nothing toward the development of the island or the 
welfare of the people, although clothed with despotic power since 
1825. A large number of them were Spanish politicians, appointed 
without special reference to their fitness, but as a reward for services, 
personal or political, rendered to the Spanish Gt)vcrnment. The 
resources of Cuba were always available to the home party in control 
for this purpose, which accounts in some measure for the unanimity 
of Spanish opinion respecting political concessions to the island. It 
was necessary that its control should remain absolutely in the hands 
of the Captain-Generals representing the home government; but there 
is very little question that had all of them exercised their authority 
with moderation, lightened the burden.of taxation, removed or modi- 
fied many trade restrictions, promoted publicworks, and used their 



HISTORY. 83 

authority to extend the influence of the Cubans in the administration 
of the island, the dominion pf Spain might have been continued for 
years to come, as much of the political agitation would have been 
avoided, the gulf between Spaniards and Cubans would have been 
bridged over, until, through these and other influences, an adjustment 
of the economic situation would have brought peace and prosperity to 
the people. 

The first serious opposition to the insular government was brought 
out by the attempt of Captain-General Vicente Roja to enforce the 
government monopoly in tobacco, decreed in 1717. Several bloody 
riots occurred and Roja was obliged to withdraw temporarily from the 
island. 

Apart from uprisings among the negroes, stimulated no doubt by 
the success of their race over the French in the neighboring island 
of San Domingo there were no other attempts at insurrection on 
the pait of Cubans until after the conspiracy of 1823, planned by a 
secret society known as the ''Soles de Bolivar." This conspiracy 
resulted from the attempt of Captain-General Vives to carry out the 
instructions of Ferdinand VII, after the abrogation of the Spanish 
liberal constitution of 1812, and was intended as a protest against a 
return to absolutism in Cuba; but, apparently, it failed of effect, and 
there was no relaxation of efforts to reestablish the old order. The 
conspiracy was of a serious character and extended over the entire 
island, but centered in Matanzas, where among the revolutionists was 
Jose Maria Heredia, the Cuban poet. The conspiracy failed and the 
leader, Jose Francisco Lemus, and a large number of conspirators were 
arrested and deported. A feeling of bitter resentment against the 
Government was the result, and a period of agitation and public 
demonstration followed. Frequent uprisings were attempted in 1824, 
but failed. 

It would have been well for Spain had Ferdinand VII been warned 
by these events and endeavored, by conciliatory measures, to allay 
such manifest feelings of discontent. But neither he nor his advisors 
would seethe ''handwriting on the wall." With characteristic sever- 
ity, the royal decree of May 28, 1826, was issued, conferring on the 
Captain-General "all the powera of governors -of cities in a state of 
siege * * * with full and unlimited authority to detach from the 
island and to send to the Peninsula all officials and persons employed 
in whatsoever capacity, and of whatsoever rank, class, or condition, 
whose presence may appear prejudicial, or whose public or private 
conduct may inspire you with suspicion * ♦ * and further to 
suspend the execution of any order or general regulations issued ir 
whatever branch of the administration and to whatever extent you 
may consider convenient to the royal service, etc., to see that faithful 
24062 3 



84 BEPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

servants of His Majesty be remembered, at the same time punishing 
without delay or hesitation the misdeeds of those, etc."* 

An army from Spain, intended for the subjugation of former Span- 
ish colonies in South America, which was to have been dispatched from 
Cuba, was retained there, and a military commission was permanently 
organized to try political offenses under the above decree and the arti- 
cles of war. 

Political agitation having taken the form of revolutionary demon- 
strations, there was a gradual separation on political lines between 
the Cubans and Spaniards, and numberless Cuban secret societies were 
formed throughout the island for political propaganda. Allied with 
the Cubans were all of the more radical, as well as the more moderate 
liberal members of the community, while the Spanish party included 
beneficiaries of former monopolies and the conservative and reac- 
tionary elements, which, under the policy of the Captain-Generals, had 
(Crystallized around the officials of the government and their coadjutors 
in the church. 

The political agitation continued, and in 1826 a small uprising took 
place in Puerto Principe, directed by the Sociedad de la Cadena, and 
aimed against the abuses of the regiment Leon quartered there. The 
same year (June 22) the Congress of American Republics assembled 
at Panama, to which the President of the United States appointed Mr. 
John Sergeant, of Pennsylvania, and Mr. Richard Anderson, of Ken- 
tucky, as envoys extraordinary and ministers plenipotentiary. Mr. 
Anderson was United States minister to Colombia and died en route 
to the congress, which had adjourned before Mr. Sergeant arrived, to 
meet at Tacabaya. But it did not meet again, and consequently the 
United States delegates took no part in its deliberations. 

The objects of this congress, as set forth in the correspondence, were 
to urge the establishment of liberal principles of commercial inter- 
course, in peace and war, the advancement of religious liberty, and 
the abolition of slavery, to discuss the relations of Hayti, the affairs 
of Cuba and Porto Rico, the continuation of the war of Spain on her 
Spanish colonies, and the Monroe doctrine, which announced as a 
principle, "that the United States could not view any interposition 
for the purpose of oppressing them (governments in this hemisphere 
whose independence had been declared and acknowledged by the United 
States), or controlling in any other manner their destiny, by any Euro- 
pean power in any other light than as a manifestation of an unfriendly 
disposition toward the United States." 

While the United States no doubt sympathized with the objects of 
the congress, the debates in the Senate and House of Representatives 
indicated a desire to avoid interference with Spain, a friendly nation, 

^Promulgated again in the royal decrees of March 21 and 26, 1834. 



HISTOBY. 35 

or the slavery question, and that it was not prudent to discuss ques- 
tions which might prove embarrassing to the United States if called on 
to consider them at a future time. As a result, the American dele- 
gates were given limited powers, and this, coupled with the conserva- 
tive attitude of the United States, resulted in the failure of the congress 
to achieve any result. 

The year before Francisco Aguero and Manuel Andres Sanches, a 
second lieutenant in the Colombian army, had been sent from Cuba to 
the United States and to Colombia to urge their interference and assist- 
ance. An expedition was organized in Colombia to be led by the 
famous Colombian patriot, Simon Bolivar, but the failure of the 
Panama congress caused the abandonment of the expedition. On the 
return of the emissaries to Cuba they were arrested, tried, and 
executed. 

Following this effort, in 1830, a revolution was planned by the 
society of the "Black Eagle," a Masonic fraternity having its base of 
operations in Mexico, with secondary bases in Habana and at various 
points throughout the island. The conspiracy failed, and several of 
the conspirators received sentence of death, afterwards commuted by 
Captain-General Vives to life imprisonment. The object of the con- 
spiracy was the independence of Cuba, the pretext a report that the 
island was to be ceded to Great Britain. 

In 1836 the constitution of 1812 was reestablished in Spain, but 
proved of no benefit to Cuba. On the contrary, the deputies sent 
from Cuba to the constitutional convention in Madrid were excluded, 
and, by a royal deci:ee of 1837, the representation in the Cortes which 
had been given Cuba in 1834 was taken away, and it was announced 
that Cuba would be governed by special laws. These, the Cubans 
claim, were never published. From this time to 1847 several upris- 
ings or insurrections occurred throughout Cuba, followed in that year 
by a revolutionary conspiracy organized by Narciso Lopez, and hav- 
ing in view the liberation of the island or its annexation to the United 
States. It had been arranged to make the first demonstration on the 
4th of July, in the city of Cienf uegos, but the plot was made known 
to the Spanish Governor, and Lopez and his companions fled to the 
United States, where, in 1849, they organized a fillibustering expe- 
dition, which was prevented from leaving by the vigilance of the 
Government. In 1850 Lopez organized a second expedition, which 
sailed from New Orleans May 10 and landed with 600 men at Carde- 
nas, attacking its small garrison. A portion surrendered with Gov- 
ernor Ceniti and the remainder went over to the insurgents. As 
the uprising upon which Lopez depended did not take place, he 
reembarked the same day and made his escape to Key West. 

Undeterred by these failures, he organized a third expedition of 480 
men in 1851, which sailed from New Orleans and landed, August 12, 



86 REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

at Playitas, near Bahia Honda, 55 miles west of Habana. Colonel 
Crittenden, of Kentucky, with 150 men formed part of the force. On 
landing Lopez advanced on Las Pozas, leaving Colonel Crittenden in 
El Morrillo. Meeting a Spanish force under General Enna, Lopez 
was defeated after a gallant fight, his force dispersed and he with some 
50 of his men captured and taken to Habana, where he was garroted. 
In attempting to escape by sea Crittenden and his party were captured 
and on the 16th of September were shot at the castle of Atares. 

In the same year an uprising took place in Puerto Principe, led by 
Juaquin de Agtiero, but the movement came to naught and he and 
several of his companions were executed. 

Following the attempt of Aguero came the conspiracy of Vuelta 
Abajo, organized in 1852 by Juan Gonzalez Alvara, a wealthy planter 
of the province of Pinar del Rio. Associated with him were several 
other prominent Cubans, and among them Francisco de Fras, Count of 
Pozos Dulces. This attempt at revolution was discovered and the 
leading conspirators arrested. They were tried and sentenced to death, 
but were finally transported under sentence of life imprisonment. 

Meantime the Liberal Club of Habana and the Cuban Junta in New 
York were raising money and organizing expeditions destined for Cuba. 
Some of them sailed, and in 1859 an attempt was made to land at Nue- 
vas Grandes. But these expeditions accomplished little, except to 
keep alive the spirit of revolution. 

From this time to the outbreak of the revolution of 1868 the con- 
dition of Cuban affairs does not appear to have improved. Taxes 
continued excessive and duties exorbitant, reaching at times an 
average of 40 per cent ad valorein on all imports, and so distributed 
as practically to prohibit trade with any country except Spain. Small 
uprisings and insurrections were frequent and there were many exe- 
cutions. Meanwhile the results of the civil war in the United States, 
and more particularly the abolition of slavery, encouraged the Cubans 
to hope for liberal reforms, especially in the trade and industries of 
the island, but no concessions appear to have been made until the year 
1865, when, by a royal decree of November 25, a commission was 
appointed by Isabella II to consider the question of reforms in the 
administration of Cuba. Nothing came of it, however, although it 
afforded an opportunity to the few Cuban delegates who were present 
to formulate their views. They demanded greater political and eco- 
nomic liberty, a constitutional insular government, freedom of the 
press, the right of petition and assembly, the privilege of holding 
oflBce, and representation in the Cortes. It would have been well for 
Spain had she listened to these complaints and made some effort to 
satisfy them, but nothing was done and as a result the revolution of 
1868 was commenced at Yara in the province of Puerto Principe. 
It was ended by the capitulation of Zanjon, February 10, 1878, and 



HISTORY. 37 

in its more serious phases was confined to the provinces of Santiago 
and Puerto Principe. No battles or serious engagements were fought, 
although a guennlla vjrarfare of great cruelty and intensity was carried 
on. While the casualties of the fighting were compai^atively few for 
a war of such duration, there were many deaths from disease, exe- 
cutions, and massacres, and the Spanish troops suffered severely from 
yellow fever, which prevailed at all times in the sea-coast cities. 

The effect of the ten years' war on the material condition of Cuba 
can not be stated with accuracy. The population had increased in the 
ten years previous at the rate of 17 per cent during the war, and for 
ten years after the increase was but 6 per cent. A large number of 
lives and a large amount of property were destroyed, and an enormous 
debt was incurred, while taxes of all kinds increased threefold. The 
war is said to have cost the contestants $300,000,000, which was charged 
to the debt of Cuba. 

By the capitulation of Zanjon ^ Spain agreed to redress the griev- 
ances of Cuba by giving gr-eater civil, political, and administrative 
privileges to the people, * with forgetfulness of the past and amnesty 
for all then under sentence for political offenses. It has been claimed 
by Cubans that these promises were never fulfilled, and this and the 
failure of the Cortes to pass the bill reforming the governilient of 
Cuba, introduced in 1894 by Senor Maura, minister for the colonies, 
are generally given as the causes of the last rebellion. On the other 
hand, Spain has always insisted that everj'^ promise was observed, and 
that even more was granted than was asked for or stipulated in the 
articles of capitulation. Thus, by the decree of March 1, 1878, Cuba 
and Porto Rico were given representation in the Spanish Cortes, upon 
the basis of their respective populations, and the provincial and munic- 
ipal laws of 1877 promulgated in Spain were made applicable to Cuba. 
By proclamation of March 24, 1878, full amnesty was given to all, 
even to Spanish deserters who had served in the insurgent army; on 
May 23, 1879, the penal code of Spain and the rules for its application 
were given effect in Cuba; on April 7, 1881, the Spanish constitution, 
full and unrestricted, as in force in Spain, was extended to Cuba by 
law; in 1885 the Spanish law of civil procedure was given to Cuba, and 
on July 31, 1889, the Spanish civil code, promulgated in 1888, was put 
in operation in Cuba and Porto Rico. 

After examining all the evidence, however, the student of Cuban 
history will probably conclude that while the Spanish Government was 
technically correct in claiming to have enacted all laws necessary to 
make good her promises, there was a failure usually to execute them, 
and that, as a matter of fact, political conditions in Cuba remained 

' Sometimes referred to as the "Treaty" or "Compromise" of Zanjon. 
' Same as people of Porto Rico. 



38 BEPOET ON THE 0EN8TT8 OF CUBA, 1899. 

practically as before the war, although very much improved on the 
surface.* 

A serious permanent fall in the price of sugar in 1884 and the final 
abolition of slavery in 1887 added to the economic troubles of the 
people, and in conjunction with continued political oppression, kept 
alive the feelings which had brought on the war. The Cubans believed 
that notwithstanding the capitulation of Zanjon they were still mere 
hewers of wood and drawers of water, with but little voice in the 
government of the island, and that Spain was the chief beneficiary 
of its wealth. And such would appear to have been the fact if the 
following figures, taken from official sources, can be relied upon: 
From 1893 to 1898 the revenues of Cuba, under excessive taxation, 
high duties, and the Habana lottery, averaged about $25,000,000 per 
annum, although very much larger in previous years," depending on 
the financial exigencies of the Spanish Government. Of this amount 
$10,500,000 went to Spain to pay the interest on the Cuban debt, 
$12,000,000 were allotted for the support of the Spanish-Cuban army 
and navy and the maintenance of the Cuban government in all its 
branches, including the church, and the remainder, less than $2,500,000, 
was allowed for public works, education, and the general improvement 
of Cuba, independent of municipal expenditures. As the amounts 
appropriated annually in the Cuban budget were not sufficient to cover 
the expenditures and there was a failure to collect the taxes, deficits 
were inevitable. These were charged to the Cuban debt, until, by 
1897, through this and other causes, it aggregated about $400,000,000, 
or an amount per capita of $283.54 — more than three times as large as 
the per capita debt of Spain and much larger than the per capita debt 
of any other European country. 

Under such perverted economic management it is not surprising 
that another rebellion was planned, and that the war of 1895-1898 
followed. 

The United States had always shown a friendly interest in the affairs 
of Cuba, and the question of its annexation had been discussed as far 
back as 1825, when Mr. John Quincy Adams was President, partly, it 
is said, to prevent the island from passing under the control of any 
other nation, in violation of the Monroe doctrine, and partly for the 
purpose of extending the slave territory of the United States. To 
this end a popular movement was started in the Southern States dur- 
ing the Mexican war (1846). Two years later (1848) President Polk 
made propositions to the Spanish Government, through the American 
minister in Madrid, having in view the purchase of the island. 

* It was the interpretation and execution of the laws by Governors having but little 
sympathy with the natives rather than the laws themselves that caused most of the 
trouble in Cuba. 

«In 1860, $29,610,779; 1880, $40,000,000; 1882, $35,860,246.77. Cuba was expected 
to contribute whatever was demanded. 



msTOEY. 39 

Again, in 1854, the strained relations between Spain and the United 
States, growing out of the detention of the American steamer Black 
Warrior in the harbor of Habana, charged with violating the customs 
regulations, and the search of several American vessels by Spanish 
cruisers elicited the "Ostend Manifesto," drawn up by the American 
ministers to England, France, and Spain, in which it was declared 
"that the possession of Cuba by a foreign power was a menace to the 
peace of the United States, and that Spain be offered the alternative of 
taking $200,000,000 for her sovereignty over the island or having it 
taken from her by force." Finally, during the ten yeara' war. Presi- 
dent Grant, while expressing his belief to the Spanish Government 
that only independence and emancipation could settle the Cuban ques- 
tion and that intervention might be necessary to end the war, repeat- 
edly proffered the good offices of the United States in reestablishing 
peace. Meanwhile, in 1873, the capture of the Vtrgvaivs and the 
tragic execution of 53 of her passengers and crew in the city of San- 
tiago de Cuba by order of the Spanish commander came near to involv- 
ing the countries in war, happily avoided by diplomatic action. * 

As the rebellion of 1895 proceeded, much sympathy was felt for the 
Cubans by the people of the United States, which being reflected in 
Congress resulted in a concurrent resolution of strict neutrality, but 
coupled with a declaration that the United States should proffer its 
good offices to Spain, through President Cleveland, with a view of 
ending the war and securing the independence of the island; but 
nothing came of it. As the war continued it excited much interest in 
the United States, and, in 1896, both Republican and Democratic 
national conventions passed resolutions of sympathy for the Cubans 
and demanded that the Government take action. 

Although the Committee on Foreign Relations in the Senate of the 
Fifty-fourth Congress reported a resolution, December 21, 1896, 
recognizing the republic of Cuba, it was never taken from the calen- 
dar. Meanwhile reports of outrages and indignities to American 
citizens in Cuba and of the dreadful effects of reconcentration were fre- 
quently conmiunicated to the Government or published in the press. 

In May, 1897, Congress appropriated $50,000 for the purchase of 
supplies for the reconcentrados* as it was reported that many of them 
were, or claimed to be, American citizens. The supplies were sent 
under permission of Spain, and were distributed to the reconcentrados^ 

^ The records of the State Department show conclusively that, notwithstanding 
serious provocations, the United States up to the time of the recent war had always 
observed strict neutrality toward Spain in dealing with Cuba, and had always stood 
ready to recognize her control over the island. Nor were the Cubans ever encour- 
aged by the President to believe that either belligerency or independence would 
receive acknowledgment. 

' ReconcentradoSy or, as they were called, ^^ PacificoSy** were the country people (small 
farmers), who sympathized with the insurgents and gave them such assistance as they 
could. The proclamation of Captain-General Weyler, issued in 1S96, required them to 
abandon their homes and property of every kind and move into the nearest towns, 
where many of them died of starvation and disease. Their homes were destroyed 



40 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1809. 

whether Americans or not, and soon after the revocation of the edict 
of reconcentration and the recall of Captain-General Weyler were 
requested by the United States. While these requests were favorably 
received by Spain, it was very evident that little was being done, and as 
the war continued apparently on the same lines, it was thought advisable 
to send a man-of-war to Halmna for the pi"otection of American citizens. 
The battle ship Maine was selected for this duty, and sailed in January, 
and soon after the Spanish cruiser Viscaya was ordered to visit New 
York, as evidence of existing friendly relations. On the night of 
February 15 the Maiiie was blown up and 2 officers and 264 sailors 
lost their lives. Spanish officials at once insisted that the explosion 
was due to an accident caused by carelessness and lack of discipline. 
A toard of naval officers was convened by the President to examine 
into the circumstances, and after a careful investigation, extending 
over a month, reported that the ship had been blown up from the out- 
side. A contrary report was the result of a Spanish investigation. 
The report of the naval board was laid before Congress by the Presi- 
dent, who meanwhile had used every effort to avoid war by diplomatic 
action. 

Early in April it became known that Spain had proposed to the 
insurgents a suspension of hostilities, to be followed by a capitulation, 
and had appropriated $600,000 for the relief of the reconcerUrados^ but 
that the proposal had been rejected by the insurgent leadei*s. As it 
was evident from this that the war would continue, the President sent a 
message to Congress on April 11, requesting authority to end the war 
and to secure in Cuba the establishment of a stable government capa- 
ble of maintaining order and observing its international obligations. 
On April 19 Congress passed joint resolutions, which, after reciting 
the conditions existing in Cuba, demanded the withdrawal of Spain 
from the island, and empowered the President to use the military and 
naval forces of the United States to carry the resolutions into effect. 

This was practically a declaration of war, and, on April 23, the 
President issued a proclamation calling for 125,000 volunteers, which 
number was subsequently increased to 200,000, and the Regular Army 
to 60,000 men. By a formal declaration of April 30, Congress 
announced that war had existed since April 21. 

On April 24 Commodore Dewey, commanding the Asiatic Squadron, 
was notified by the Secretary of the Navy that war with Spain had 
begun, and to proceed to the Philippine Islands and capture or 
destroy the Spanish fleet. On Apr?! 27 he sailed from Hongkong in 
the execution of this order, and on the afternoon of April 30 arrived 
at the entrance of Manila Bay, where, on the following day, he cap- 
tured or destroyed all the vessels of the Spanish fleet. 

On June 14 an American army, numbering 15,000 men, under com- 
mand of Gen. W. R. Shafter, sailed from Port Tampa, Fla., for 
Santiago de Cuba, where it arrived on the morning of June 20, and 



i 



i 



1 



HI8T0BY. 



41 



on July 1 and 2 the battle of San Juan took place, resulting in the 
defeat of the Spanish troops and the investment of Santiago.^ On the 
morning of July 3, the Spanish fleet, under Admiral Cervera, attempted 
to escape from the harbor, but was intercepted by the Americ>an fleet 
under Capt. William T. Sampson and totally destroyed. On July 16, 
articles of capitulation were signed at Santiago de Cuba, followed by 
the formal surrender of the Spanish forces in the eastern district of 
Santiago on July 17. 

On August 12 a protocol provided for a cessation of hostilities, and 
on December 10 a treaty of peace between the United States and Spain 
was signed at Paris. It was ratified by the President February 6, 
1899, and by the Queen Regent of Spain March 19, and proclaimed in 
Washington, D. C, April 11, thus ending the last act in the drama. 

Cuba was to be free at last on the single condition that '^ she estab- 
lish a stable government capable of maintaining order and observing 
international obligations." With this question she is to deal presently. 

While the ten years' war was not without disastrous effects on the 
economic development of Cuba, they were trifling as compared with 
the war of 1895-1898, which resulted in a large decrease of population 
and of the wealth-producing power of the country. It may be said 
in general, on a conservative estimate, that the population of the island 
decreased 12 per cent and its wealth two-thirds. 

As an indication of the financial stress prevailing in the island, the 
ratio of mortgage indebtedness to the value of real property, as 
assessed by the Spanish Government, is interesting. The mortgages 
and censos are from the reports of the registers of property to the 
treasurer of the island for January, 1900, and are shown in the fol- 
lowing tables: 

KURAL REAL ESTATE, 



Provlncse. 



Habana 

Matanxas 

PinardelRio 

Puerto Principe . . 

Santa Clara 

Bantlago de CuUk. 



Total 



Value of prop- 
erty. 



944,140.610.00 
45,694^977.40 
28,982,950.60 
8,466,736.90 
41,838,395.00 
20,701,166.20 



184,724,836.00 



Amount of mort- 
gage indebted- 
ness. 



918,797,063.00 

35,754,486.38 

8,080,996.31 

2,706,196.62 

87,422,559.71 

4,135,946.40 



U06,897,249.32 



Amount of quit 
rents (censos). 



$7,037,047.42 
9,178,964.43 
4,833,798.36 

984,795.10 
3,445,936.78 

188,915.72 



a 26, 679, 452. 81 



1 68 per cent, approximate. ' 14 per cent, approximate. 

CITY REAL ESTATE. 



Uabana 

Matanzaa 

PinardelRio 

Puerto Principe . . 

Santa Clam 

Santiago de Cuba. 



Total 



984,804,600.00 

17.704,963.60 

8,278.783.80 

2,428,446.00 

19,761,472.80 

10,938,944.10 



138,917,059.70 



989,622,541.96 

4,685,557.49 

640,609.89 

461,078.83 

8,965,725.36 

1,454,449.99 



100,729,943.61 



911,900,842.61 
1,264,729.11 
286,744.55 
888,335.40 
497,992.04 
270,206.77 



3 14,608,860.48 



1 79 per cent, approximate. 



s 10 per cent, approximate. 



^Thifl included the operations of Ijawton at El Ganey, July 1. 



42 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

It should not be forgotten in discussing these ratios that there has 
been no valuation of real property since American occupation, and that 
the values given are those made by Spanish officers some time prior 
thereto. 

The actual value of real estate, especially of city property, is much 
greater than is given in the tables. It is probable that the amount of 
encumbrances is also greater than has been stated. It is quite certain 
that had the war continued under the same conditions for another year, 
nearly the entire rural population of the central and western provinces 
would have been destroyed, as also their agricultural wealth. There- 
fore American interference did not come too soon, and the Cubans 
have every reason to be thankful that the declaration of President 
McKinley made to Congress April XI, 1898, "that the war in Cuba 
must stop," was not made in vain. 

Prominent among the causes tending to retard the material prosper- 
ity of Cuba has been the lack of educational interest and facilities. 
For nearly three hundred years there were practically no schools in 
the island. 

A history of education in Cuba is presented elsewhere in this report 
as an introduction to the analysis of the tables of education. It is suf- 
ficient in this connection to say that prior to 1842 there were no pub- 
lic schools in Cuba. In that year, largely through the efforts of the 
Sociedad Economica de Habana and of other patriotic residents of the 
island, provision was made by the Spanish Government for public 
schools. But if any reliance can be placed in the following figures, they 
did very little toward educating the masses. 

By the census of 1861 there were 793,484 white people in Cuba, 
of whom 552,027, or 70 per cent, could not read, and of the 603,046 
colored persons, 576,266, or 95 per cent, could not read. 

By the census of 1887 there were 1,102,889 whites, of whom 715,575, 
or 64 per cent, could not read, and of the 528,798 colored, 463,782, or 
87 per cent, could not read. No statistics of the degree of literacy in 
the island in 1842, when the public-school system was commenced, are 
available, but the state of education nearly fifty years after affords some 
idea of the sufficiency of the schools and of their influence in eradicating 
a potent cause of stagnation. An increase of 6 per cent in literacy of the 
white population in twenty -six years indicates either that very little 
importance was attached to public education as a means of general 
improvement, or that no such improvement was expected. 

From the contemplation of this picture of prolonged misrule, we 
turn in closing to a few incidents in the history of Cuba from which 
she derived substantial and lasting benefit. First in chronological 
order was the invasion and occupation of the island by the British in 
1762, assisted by troops from the Anglo-American colonies. Habana 
was surrendered August 13, after a two months' siege. The English 



GOVERmcEirr. 48 

held the country as far east as Matanzas until the following spring, 
when, by the treaty of Paris (February, 1763), which ended the war 
between England, France, and Spain, Cuba was ceded back to Spain in 
exchange for Florida. Up to this time Habana had been the only port 
of entry since it became the capital in 1558, and even trade with 
Habana was confined strictly to Seville and Cadiz. The English opened 
this port at once to foreign and domestic commerce, thus removing at 
a stroke all the restrictions which had fettered it, and, although the 
English occupation lasted but six months, the benefit to Cuba was per- 
manent, as after the recession of the island to Spain it was found 
impracticable to reestablish former trade restrictions entirely. The 
cession of Florida to England caused the migration of a large number 
of Spaniards from Florida to Cuba. 

The next event, in point of time, which, however unfortunate for 
Spain, proved of great benefit to Cuba, was the revolution in the 
neighboring island of Haiti, the cession of that island to France 
in 1795, and the race war between the whites and negroes which 
followed, and which was continued at intervals for ten years. 
Thousands of French and Spanish settlers fled or emigrated to Cuba, 
where they located, chiefly in the provinces of Santiago and Puerto 
Principe, introducing the cultivation of coffee and adding materially 
to the wealth and agricultural prosperity of the island. 

Similarly, the cession of Louisiana to the United States in 1803 and 
of Florida in 1819 and the revolution of the Spanish South American 
colonies and of Mexico caused a notable increase in the population of 
Cuba, to which many loyal Spaniards emigrated or fled for refuge. 

In truth, the loyalty of Spaniards to their Government and its insti- 
tutions, their patriotic devotion to their country, their steadfast cour- 
age, and their patient endurance through many trials and provocations 
are among the traits which contributed to the remarkable ascendency 
of Spain and her former dominion over more than half the known earth. 
Yet, combined with these characteristics, was the leaven of personal lib- 
erty and a love of political freedom born of ancient privileges, and for 
which they have e\er contended. These qualities, under the influences 
of the nineteenth century, were destined to establish republics even 
as in past centuries they had founded empires. 

QOVEBNMENT. 

The government of all Spanish colonies was conducted on the the- 
ory that newly discovered territory belonged to the Crown rather than 
to the Government and that all political control was vested in the King, 
who appointed all the Viceroys, Captain-Generals, and Governors. 

When Cuba was colonized by Velasquez this control was mainly 
exercised through the Council of the Indies. The Cortes of Castile 
was seldom called except to vote funds or supplies for the King, and 









,-^*.^i>«''-zr<?.'!r'«' 



"f"- or'»'«.D„i, ■'-'o 



r^W°°>ol?!?''.'eI.«'-.- 









'^'jZ ^""^4" '"""00 «1 '"" ««<( „!,'"■'««, «,! """"o pJan 



44 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

every branch of colonial administration, civil as well as military, was 
under the jurisdiction of the Council, which appointed all officials not 
appointed by the Bang. Thus all government control centered in the 
Council and the King, and local self-government, which was developed 
at an early stage in the English colonies, became practically impossi- 
ble in the Spanish colonies, no matter to what extent it may have 
existed in theory. 

Coupled, with secular control, as an important part of the plan of 
colonization, was that of the church, and in every colonial expedition 
there were abbots, bishops, priests, friars, or monks, who, while they 
were largely interested in the material prosperity of their order by the 
acquisition of land, the erection of churches, monasteries, and convents, 
devoted themselves zealously to the conversion of the natives and pro- 
tected them as far as possible against the cruelty and rapacity of the 
invaders. On the other hand, it must be conceded that while in the 
early history of the island its purposes were ostensibly benevolent, the 
Spanish Church has persistently and rigorously opposed freedom of 
conscience, the spread of public education, and every effort on the part 
of the Cubans to establish self-government. By the year 1867 the 
property of the church in the island amounted to about $7,162,685, 
and the adjustment of church claims is now one of the most difficult 
questions before the insular government. 

The plan of Spanish colonization in America, as well as the laws 
governing the colonies, was essentially Roman in origin. Up to the 
year 1621 the laws of Spain applied equally to all her colonies, but 
thereafter they did not unless declared to do so by the council of the 
Indies. 

Special regulations, decrees, etc., modifying the application of the 
laws to the colonies or promulgating new laws were frequent, and 
their compilation in 1680 was published as the "Law of the Indies." 
This and the " Siete Partidas^^ on which they were largely based, 
comprised the code under which the Spanish American colonies were 
governedi 

All the colonies were founded practically on the same plan. This 
included the presidio^ or military headquarters, the pueblo^ or town, 
and the mission for the conversion and education of the Indians, usu- 
ally located at some distance apart from the other two. The land set 
aside for the pueblo was laid out in the form of a square or rectangle. 
The plaza^ or public square, was then laid out near the central point, 
and after that the streets of the town, dividing it into blocks. The 
public buildings and church were erected around the plaza^ facing it, 
the remaining space being occupied with dwellings. This is the plan 
of all the oldest cities and towns of Cuba. To the military garrison 
was intrusted the protection of the puMo and mission and the con- 
duct of all expeditions for any purpose. 



J 



GOVERNMENT. 45 

After establishing the municipality the next step was the exploration 
and pacification of the country, and after that the disposition of the 
spoils captured, including the land and natives. These were usually 
divided among the Spanish followers of the military commander, one- 
fifth of all gold, silver, and Indians being turned over to the revenue 
officers of the Crown. 

As in the mother country, the colonial municipality was the local 
political unit, and its government was vested in an ayuntamiento^ or 
municipal council, consisting of mayors {alcaldes) and councilors {re^ir 
dores). There was also an alguacil^ or sheriff, and in the large towns a 
procurador syndico^ or city attorney. The alcaldes acted as judges and 
conducted trials. 

In the early history of Spanish municipalities they were, to a limited 
extent, self-governing, electing the mayors and councilors. With the 
extension of the royal authority following the union of the Spanish 
provinces the control of these offices was gradually assumed by the 
Crown and they were filled by nomination or appointment, being sold 
to the highest bidder, and often made hereditary. With the return of 
more liberal government this practice was discontinued, and finally they 
again became elective. This was the experience of Cuban municipali- 
ties. Not all the councilors were selected in this way, however, as 
some were elected. For such elections a royal decree of 1658 con- 
ferred the elective franchise on the forty largest taxpayers and on 
those who had academic or university degrees. The alcaldes were 
appointed by the Governor-General f roni the members of the council. 
This plan of government continued with slight variations until 1812, 
when it was modified, but was reestablished in 1814. 

In 1859 each municipality was given a council consisting of 1 mayor, 
1 syTidic^ and 6 aldermen, if the population was 6,000, and 2 deputy 
mayors and 10 aldermen if the population was 10,000. Exception 
was made of Habana, which was given 7 deputy mayors, 4 syndics^ 
and 16 aldermen. All councilors, except those appointed for life, were 
elected in each municipality by the largest taxpayers, subject to the 
approval of the Governor-General, the number 'of electors being twice 
or thrice as many as the number of councilors to be elected, according 
as the population was less than or exceeded 10,000. The elections 
were held annually, and the Cubans claim that under this system the 
offices were generally filled by Spaniards, although they did not com- 
prise one-fifth of the white population. 

By the electoral law of August 20, 1870, amended by that of Decem- 
ber 16, 1876, the elective franchise was confeiTed on the heads of fam- 
ilies actually engaged in some profession or trade, who had resided in 
the district for two years at least, and who paid a tax of 6 pesos on 
their own property one year before the formation of the electoral list, 
or who were civil employees of the state, the province, or municipal- 



46 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

ity, in active service, or retired or pensioned from the army or navy, 
and all adults who had resided in the district two years who could fur- 
nish proof of their professional or academic education by means of 
an official certificate. Other electoral laws, orders, and decrees regu- 
lating the elective franchise have been promulgated since the law of 
1876. Property education and tax tests were always qualifications of 
both provincial and municipal electors until 1897, when universal suf- 
frage in municipal elections only was granted. 

Very little authority, especially in fiscal affairs, was conferred on 
the municipal councils, the members of which performed a variety of 
duties, and their existence as well as their acts were absolutely under 
the control of the Governor-General. 

By a royal decree of 1878, the organic municipal and provincial laws 
of the peninsula, somewhat modified, were extended provisionally to 
Cuba. By these laws a municipality is defined to be the legal asso- 
ciation of all persons who reside in a municipal district, and is to be 
represented by a municipal council as a financial administrative corpo- 
ration. A municipal district is the territory under the administra- 
tion of a municipal council. Municipal districts are established, 
increased, diminished, annexed to other municipal districts, wholly or 
in part, or abolished, by the Military Governor as the lawful suc- 
cessor of the Governor-General. They correspond in a measure to 
American counties or townships, and as prerequisites to their estab- 
lishment must contain not less than 2,000 inhabitants, a territory pro- 
portioned in extent to the population, and be able to meet the obligatory 
municipal expenses. 

Municipal districts differ in area, and each forms part of a judicial 
district and of a province, but can not belong to different jurisdictions 
of the same order. There are 6 provinces, 31 judicial districts, and 
132 municipal districts in the island. 

To facilitate the administrative service, each municipal district is 
divided into subdistricts and the latter into wards {barrios)^ depending 
on the number of residents in the subdistricts. For political purposes 
the subdistricts are further divided into electoral districts and. the 
latter into electoral sections. 

As far as practicable, ward limits are arranged so that the wards 
shall have approximately the same population; but every part of the 
municipal district must form, or be included in, a ward, no matter 
what its population may be. 

Thus the province of Matanzas has 24 municipal districts and 128 
wards, so that the entire province is embraced within district and ward 
lines. The seat of municipal government is the principal town or city 
in the district where the enumeration of the subdistricts and wards 
begins. 

£ku?h municipal district has a municipal council and a municipal 



i 



GOVERNMENT. 47 

boaixl. The council governs the district, subject to the supervision of 
the governor of the province and Military Governor of the island, and 
is composed of a mayor, a certain number of deputy mayors, and 
aldermen taken from the members of the council/ 

The census of the population determines the number of councilors 
to which each municipal district is entitled, as follows: Up to 500 
inhabitants, five; 500 to 800, six; 800 to 1,000, seven; between 1,000 
and 10,000, one additional councilor for every additional 1,000 people; 
and between 10,000 and 20,000, one for every additional 2,000 people. 
For more than 20,000, one for every add^ ional 2,000 inhabitants until 
the municipal council has the maximum umber of 30 councilors. 

The number of deputy mayors is determined on the same principle. 
Municipal districts of less than 800 inhabitants have no deputy may- 
ors; between 800 and 1,000, one; 1,000 to 6,000, two; 6,000 to 10,000, 
three; 10,000 to 18,000, four; 18,000 or more, five. Up to 800 inhab- 
itants there is but one subdistrict, and between 800 and 1,000 two, but 
thereafter the number of subdistricts corresponds to the number of 
deputy mayors. Each deputy mayor is in charge of a subdistrict as 
the representative of the mayor, discharging such administrative duties 
as he may direct, but having no independent functions. 

Up to 3,000 inhabitants there is but one electoral district; between 
3,000 and 6,000, three; 6,000 to 10,000, four; 10,000 to 18,000, five; 
18,000 or more, six. 

The councilors are elected from the municipality at large by the 
qualified voters of the district, one-half being renewed every two 
years, the councilors longest in service going out at each renewal. 
They are eligible for reelection. The regular elections are held in the 
first two weeks in May, but partial elections are held when, at least 
six months before the regular election, vacancies occur which amount 
to a third of the total number of councilors. If they occur after this 
period they are filled by the governor of the province from among 
former members of the council. 

All male citizens over 25 -•^'^^rs of age who enjoy their full civil 
rights, and have lived at le' o years in the municipality, are enti- 

tled to vote, provided the^ are not disqualified by sentence for certain 
criminal offenses, bankruptcy or insolvency, or are not delinquent tax- 
payers or paupers. 

The mayors and deputy mayors are appointed by the Military Gov- 
ernor from among the councilors on the recommendation of the coun- 
cil. But while under the law the deputy mayors must be selected 
from the council, the Military Governor may appoint any person as 
mayor, whether he belongs to the municipality or not. 

In each ward there is also an alcalde de harrio or ward mayor. He 

^ This law was in force when the census was taken. 



48 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

is appointed by the mayor of the municipal district, who can also sus- 
pend or remove him. He is required to keep a register of the horses, 
mules, and cattle in his ward, and to discharge such administi-ative 
duties as the deputy mayor of the subdistrict in which his ward is 
located may direct. 

Each council has a secretary, who is appointed by the Military Gov- 
ernor of the island on the recommendation of the council. The coun- 
cil also appoints from among its members one or more fiscal attorneys 
{procuTodorea gyndtcas)^ whose duty it is to represent the council in all 
legal suits which may be instituted, and to revise and audit all local 
accounts and budgets. After the council is fully organized the coun- 
cilors who are not appointed to other offices in the council are called 
aldermen. The mayor and secretary are the only salaried municipal 
officers, the office of deputy mayor, fiscal attorney, alderman, associate 
member of the municipal board, and mayor of a ward being described 
in the law as ''gratuitous, obligatoiy, and honorary." The mayor, 
deputy mayors, and fiscal attorneys have the same right to speak and 
vote as the members of the council, and, in fact, the first two are 
obliged to vote on every resolution. 

The duties and responsibilities of the municipal council are those 
which usually devolve on such bodies in European countries. The 
mayor is president of the council and represents it on all occasions. 
He presides at the meetings when the governor of the province is not 
present. He votes by right of memberahip, and in case of a tie casts 
the deciding vote, but has neither the veto nor the appointing power. 
As a result, there is no division of responsibility between the mayor 
and the council in administrative matters, the council, as a whole, 
making every appointment and deciding every question of municipal 
administration as far as the laws and the provincial and insular gov- 
ernors will permit, distributing the work of departmental management 
to permanent committees of their own number, which they organize 
and constitute as may seem best. These committees have associated 
with them such experts and specialists as may be necessary, and take 
the place of the several independent departments and boards which are 
features of municipal government in the United States. 

The sessions of the municipal council arc determined by that body, 
but can not be less than one each week. Every member is required to 
attend punctually or pay a fine. Neither the mayor, the deputies, 
aldermen, nor ward mayoi*s can absent themselves from the municipal 
district unless they receive permission as follows: The mayor from the 
governor of the province, and if the latter does not appoint a tempo- 
rary mayor the senior deputy acts; deputy ma3'ors and aldermen require 
the permission of the council; ward mayors of the mayor. The gov- 
ernor of the province can suspend the mayor or the deputies and 
aldermen, as well as the resolutions and decisions of the council, while 



1 



GOVERNMENT. 49 

the Military Governor can remove all municipal officers and appoint 
others to their places, and modify or annul the proceedings of the 
council. 

The municipal board is composed of the municipal council and an 
equal number of associate members elected from among the taxpayers 
of the district, who hold office during the fiscal year. It is the duty of 
the board to revise the annual budget of municipal expenses prepared 
by the council and to establish the taxes according to law. 

By a royal decree of November 25, 1897, municipalities were granted 
the power to frame their own laws regarding health, public education, 
public highways by land, river or sea, and municipal finances, and 
freely to appoint and remove their own employees. Municipal councils 
were empowered to choose their own mayors from among the coun- 
cilors, and provision was made for a minority representation in the 
councils. Owing to the war this decree did not become operative. 

General Wood, the Military Governor of Cuba, under date of March 
24, 1900, intrusted to the municipal authorities, without any interven- 
tion on the part of civil governors, the maintenance of public order, 
the execution of municipal ordinances, the administnition of the munic- 
ipal police, the regulation of public amusements, and the granting of 
permits for public parades, assemblies, and meetings within their 
respective districts. 

By a civil decree of April 18, 1900, the power to elect mayoi-s, 
councilors, treasurers, municipal judges, and correctional judges, to 
hold office for one year, was conferred on municipalities. This decree 
further provided for the registration of voters, the nomination of 
candidates, tickets, boards of elet;tion, voting, methods of challenge, 
and penalties for all kinds of election frauds. 

The qualifications of voters at municipal elections were established 
as follows: 

1. The voter must l)e a native male Cuban, or the son of a native male Cuban, 
born while his parents were temporarily residing abroad, or a Spaniard included 
within the provisions of article 9 of the treaty of Paris, who has not made declara- 
tion of his decision to preserve his allegiance to the Crown of Spain, as provided in 
said article. 

2. He must be of the age of 21 years or upward on the day preceding the day of 
election. 

3. He must have resided in the umnicipality in which he intends to vote at least 
thirty days immediately prei^eding the first day of registration, and in addition to 
the above he must possess any one of the following qualifications: (a) Ability to 
read and write; (6) ownership of real or personal property to the value of $250, 
American gold; (c) service in the Cuban army prior to July 18, 1898, and the 
honorable discharge therefrom, whether a native Cuban or not. 

Disqualifications. — No person shall be qualified to vote who is insane or an idiot, or 
who is a resident in, or supported by, any public charitable institution, or wlio is 
deprived of or suspended from the exercise of his political rights by sentence of a 
court, except in cases where the conviction is for a <;rime of a political character. 

24662 i 



50 BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 18»9. 

PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT. 

Under the laws of Spain, a province is composed of the municipal 
districts within its limits. Up to the 8th of October, 1607, Cuba 
formed a single province, but by royal decree of that date, it was 
divided into two provinces, the Oriental and Occidental, the capitals 
of which were the cities of Santiago de Cuba and Habana, respec- 
tively. The Grovernor-General resided in Habana and a provincial 
government was established in Santiago. Over the Occidental prov- 
ince he had immediate supervision, and over the Oriental through its 
governor. 

This continued to be the provincial division of the island until July 
17, 1827, when by royal decree it was divided into three departments, 
to wit: The Occidental, Central, and Oriental, with capitals in Habana, 
Trinidad, and Santiago, respectively. 

The departments were further divided into districts, the Occidental 
having 11, the Central 6, and the Oriental 4. To each department n 
lieutenant-governor was appointed — a general officer of the Spanish 
army — and to the districts military officers of subordinate rank. The 
officers were appointed by the Governor-General, to whom they were 
directly responsible for the administration of civil and military affairs 
within the territorial divisions to which they were assigned. 

In 1850, on the recommendation of the Captain-General, the Central 
department was discontinued, and the municipalities of Puerto Prin- 
cipe, Neuvitas, and Trinidad were all annexed to the Occidental depart- 
ment; the far eastern part of its territory was incorporated with the 
Oriental department, which now constitutes the province of Santiago. 

By a royal decree of June 9, 1878, Cuba was divided into the 
provinces of Pinar del Rio, Habana, Matanzas, Santa Clara, Pueito 
Principe, and Santiago de Cuba, with capitals in the cities bearing the 
names of the provinces. The provincial government was vested in a 
civil governor, a provincial deputation, and a provincial committee. 
The governor was appointed and removed by the Governor-Genei*al 
and received a salary of from $4,000 to $8,000 in Spanish gold, accord- 
ing as the province was first, second, or third class. 

The provincial deputation was composed of deputies elected for four 
years by the qualified voters of the municipalities. The number of 
deputies depended on the number of electoral districts in the province 
as determined by the provincial deputation, and approved by the Gov- 
ernor-General. In the same way the judicial districts of the province 
were allowed to elect twelve deputies, more or less, depending on 
whether the number of deputies elected by the municipalities exceeded 
or was less than twenty. The deputies served without pay. 

The provincial committee and its vice-president were appointed by 

f K« ^i'^'-^o.rnor-General from among the members of the deputation and 

)f five deputies who received a salary of from $1,200 to 



l[:;lan 
fjiiitt 

-^aeral 

.itT to 

» 

*:preni 

:Mvini 

Hie 

4rboi 

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ippoii 

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and] 
who 
and 
prov 
civil 
regi 
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. 1 



tra 
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OOVEMOHENT. 51 

2,000 a year in Spanish gold, according to the classification of the 
province. The deputation met in regular session in November and 
April and held such extra sessions as were necessary. The permanent 
committee represented the deputation when not in session, and acted as 
an advisory body to the governor in respect to matters which the laws 
did not impose on the deputation. 

The governor of the province, as the representative of the Governor- 
Greneral, presided over the deputation and permanent committee and 
acted as the chief executive of the province in all matters. It was his 
duty to inspect the councils and the municipalities, informing the 
Governor-General of all cases of negligence or disaffection. He had 
supreme authority, subject, of course, to the Governor-General. He 
was responsible for public order, and the military authorities of the 
province were under his control. 

The provincial deputation had charge generally of the public roads, 
harbors, navigation and irrigation, and all kinds of public works of a 
provincial character, the charitable institutions and those of instruc- 
tion, fairs, expositions, etc., and the administration of the provincial 
funds. The secretary, auditor, and treasurer of the deputation were 
appointed by the governor of the province on the recommendation of 
the deputation. 

By a decree of 1892 Cuba was divided into three "Regions" 
under the name of Habana, Matanzas, and Santiago de Cuba. The 
first one comprised the provinces of Habana and Pinar del Rio, the 
second Matanzas and Santa Clara, and the third one Santiago de Cuba 
and Puerto Principe. The " Regions" were under regional governor's, 
who resided in Habana, Matanzas, and Santiago cities, respectively, 
and were at the same time civil governors of the provinces. The 
provinces of Pinar del Rio, Santa Clara, and Puerto Principe also had 
civil governors who were under the authority of the governors of the 
regions. 

The regional governors had a consulting cabinet called ^'Conseijo 
Regixmal^'^ composed of five members appointed by the Governor- 
General of the island, on the nomination of the regional governors. 

The civil governors of the provinces of Pinar del Rio, Santa Clara, 
and Puerto Principe had the same authority they had prior to the 
establishment of the regions. 

It is said that the regions were formed for the purpose of decen- 
tralizing the administration of the island, which had always been car- 
ried on in Habana, but this result did not follow, and the change only 
served, apparently, to introduce further complications. 

INSUUIR GOVERNMENT. 

Valasquez and his successors to the time of De Soto, 1538, were 
lieutenant-governors, with limited power exercised under the super- 
vision of tiie governor and audiencia of Santo Domingo. De Soto was 



52 BEPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

tho first Governor-General, and had nine successors with that title to 
1581, when Gabriel de Lujan was appointed Captain-General. This 
title was continued to the end of the Spanish control, a period of four 
hundred and six years. ^ 

While the Governor-General, as the representative of the Crown, 
was the civil, military, and political head of Cuba, and as a matter of 
fact exercised the highest prerogatives of government, his authority 
in reference to disbursements was limited by the direct appointment 
of the Crown of the officers intrusted with the collection of the reve- 
nues. He was also under the jurisdiction of the audiencia of Santo 
Domingo, which had authority, on complaint, to examine into his acts, 
to suspend him and other officials from office, and to make provisional 
appointments subject to the decision of tho supreme court of Spain on 
appeal. In 1795 the audiencia of Santo Domingo was transferred to the 
province of Puerto Principe, when that island was ceded to France. 

Up to 1556 the Governors were frequently appointed from civil life, 
but the military needs of the island, occasioned by the attacks of buc- 
caneers and privateei's, suggested a modification. This was made grad- 
ually, the office of Governor-General being held by both soldiers and 
civilians until the year 1716. From that date to 1898 the Governor- 
General was a general officer of high rank in the Spanish army, in 
whom were united all civil and military powers. 

No change of importance appears to have taken place in the insular 
government of Cuba until 1812, when Spain became a constitutional 
monarchy and so remained until 1814, when it was abrogated b)^ Ferdi- 
nand. This brief period of constitutional government was not without 
liberalizing influences in Cuba, and a division was made between the 
civil and the military powers of the Governor-General. With the 
abrogation of tho constitution of 1812 the Governors of Cuba resumed 
their former prerogatives and the system of centralization, character- 
istic of the government, was fully reestablished. 

By the revolution of 1820 the constitution of 1812 was again reestab- 
lished in Spain, but was set aside in 1823, 

By a royal .decree of May 28, 1825, "all the powers conceded to the 
governore of cities in a state of siege" were conferred on the Gov- 
ernor-General. This decree was never revoked, and conferred des- 
potic powers on the Governor-Genei*al. 

In 1836 the constitution of 1812 was restored, but its provisions 
were not extended to Cuba, which was to be governed under a special 
system of decrees, orders, etc. 

Associated with the Governor-General and fonning part of the pub- 
lic administration of the island were certain special corporations and 
boards, as of public works, health, charity, and public instruction. By 
a royal decree of August 17, 1854, the active administrative functions 
of these boards, etc. , were vested in the Governor-General, and they 



OOVEBNMENT. 53 

were declared to be " consultative councils of the Governor." In 1881 
the constitution of 1876 was extended to Cuba, which regulated in some 
measure the powers conferred on the Governor-General by the decree 
of 1825. 

By the law of March 15, 1895, the government and civil administra- 
tion were reorganized and the Governor-General given a council of 
administration consisting of 30 councilors, 15 of whom were appointed 
by the Crown and 15 elected by voters having the right to vote for 
memljei's of the provincial assemblies, who were elected at the same 
time. 

The teim of office of councilor was four years, one-half of the 
councilors going out every two years, and the office was dec*lared to be 
honorary and gratuitous. 

While the council of administration was given authority to take the 
initiative by resolution in respect to any matter pertaining to the 
proper management of the island, and the Governor-General was 
directed to carry out such resolutions, he had full authority to stay 
their execution and to take such measures as he thought advisable, sub- 
mitting the matter to the minister of the colonies. He had authority 
to suspend the council of admin isti*ation after hearing the council of 
authorities, and any members without such hearing, provided there 
were councilors enough left to form a quorum. 

The council of authorities consisted of the Bishop of Habana or 
the Archbishop of Santiago, the commander of the naval station, the 
Military Governor, the presiding judge of the supreme coui-t of Haliana, 
the attorney -general, the head of the department of finance, and the 
director of local administration. This was a purely advisoiy council, 
submitting its views in the fonn of resolutions, which were not bind- 
ing on the Governor-Geneml. 

The law of 1895 made more libeml provisions for the government 
of the provinces and nmnicipalities and the election of mayors and 
aldermen. 

By a royal decree of Novemlwr 25, 1897, Culia was given an insular 
parliament consisting of two chambers, which, with the Governor- 
General, representing the mother country, constituted the government 
of the island. The parliament was to consist of two bodies of equal 
legislative powers, to })e known as the chamber of representatives and 
a council of administmtion, the latter of 85 members, 18 elected and 
17 appointed })v the Crown on nomination hy the Governor-Geneml. 
The representatives were apportioned at the rate of one for every 
25,000 inhabiUints, and were chosen for five years. The Crown repre- 
sentatives were appointed for life. The insular parliament was to 
meet annuallv, and while given ample authority to legislate for the 
island, the veto of the (Jovernoi'-General ena))led him to suspend the 
publication and execution of the laws, etc., until Madrid could be 
heard from. 



• . 



I 



54 REPORT ON THE 0EN8U8 OP CUBA, 1899. 

The decree provided for a cabinet of five secretaries of department, 
to wit: grace, justice, and interior; finance; public education, and public 
works; posts and telegraphs; agriculture, industry and commerce. 
The cabinet was inaugurated January 1, 1898. A modification of the 
provincial and municipal government and a number of other measures 
were contained in the decree, to which the reader is referred for a 
more detailed account of its provisions. One of the most important 
of these conferred on the insular government the framing of the 
tariff, always a cause of grave economic disturbance while it had been 
under the home government. 

As the country was involved in war, the execution of this decree 
was not carried out except as to the organization of the parliament 
and cabinet, and possibly in some of its minor prescriptions. The 
chambers were inaugurated in May and dissolved by Captain-General 
Blanco in October. The cabinet was abolished shortly before Ameri- 
can occupation, and the autonomous government came to an end. 

On the withdrawal of Spain the government of the island devolved 
on the Army of the United States under the laws of war, and Maj. 
Gen. John R. Brooke was appointed Military Governor. He entered 
on his duties January 1, 1899, and in order to acquaint the people of 
the island with the intentions of the President as Commander in Chief 
of the Aimy, issued the following proclamation: 

2b the People of Cuba: 

Coming among you as the representative of the President, in furtherance and in 
continuation of the humane purpose with which my country interfered to put an end 
to the distressing condition in this island, I deem it proper to say that the object of 
the present government is to give protection to the people, security to person and 
property, to restore confidence, to encourage the people to resume the pursuits of 
peace, to build up waste plantations, to resume conmiercial traffic, and to afford full 
protection in the exercise of all civil and religious rights. 

To this end the protection of the United States Government will be directed, and 
every possible provision made to carry out these objects through the channels of 
civil administration, although under military control, in the interest and for the 
benefit of all the people of Cuba, and those possessed of rights and property in the 
island. 

The civil and criminal code which prevailed prior to the relinquishment of Span- 
ish sovereignty will remain in force, with such modifications and changes as may 
from time to time be found necessary in the interest of good government. 

The people of Cuba, without regard to previous affiliations, are invited and nrge<l 
to cooperate in these objects by the exercise of moderation, conciliation, and gocxl 
will one towanl another; and a hearty accord in our humanitarian purposes will 
insure kind and beneficent government. 

The military governor of the island will always be pleased to confer with those 
who may desire to consult him on matters of public interest. 

On January 11 he revised the cabinet, vesting the administration of 
the (^ivil government in a department of state and government, depart- 
ment of finance, department of justice and public Instruction, and 
department of agriculture, commerce, industries, and public works. 



54 

Th.> 
U)wil 
work 
The, 
prov! 
wer<' 
nior< 
of 1! 
tarii 

UD<1' 



1^ 



\ 



GOVERNMENT. 55 

Many changes, having in view the better administration of the govern- 
ment, wei'e made by General Brooke and his successor, General 
Wood, but the scope of this report will not permit a detailed account 
of them. The object has been gradually to confer on the Cubans full 
civil rights, together with all the powera of local self-government — 
municipal, provincial, and insular — and to do this as rapidly as local 
conditions and the serious international obligations to protect life and 
property in the island, assumed by the United States under the treaty 
of Paris, will permit. 

REPRESENTATION OF CUBA IN THE SPANISH CORTES. 

By a royal decree of 1810 Cuba was given representation in the 
Cortes. Two deputies were sent, one each from Habana and Santiago, 
who took part in framing the Spanish constitution of 1812. With 
the abrogation of this constitution in 1814 the representation ceased, 
but was reestablished in 1820. It ceased again in 1823 and there was 
no representation in the Cortes until 1834, when, under a royal statute 
of that year, representatives were again admitted. 

By a royal decree of 1837, however, a resolution of the Cortes of 
1836 was published, which provided that the provinces in America 
and Asia be governed and administered under laws especially adapted 
to them and that they cease to be represented in the Cortes. 

The electoral laws of 1877-1879 again gave Cuba representation in 
the Cortes, in the proportion of 1 deputy for every 60,000 people. 
Under the electoral law of 1892 Cuba sent 13 senators and 30 repre- 
sentatives to the Spanish Cortes, but, as a majority of the deputies 
were Spaniards, the native Cubans felt that they were never fairly 
represented. 

CUBAN REPUBLICS. 

« 

A republic has been twice proclaimed in Cuba by revolutionists, 
viz, during the ten years' war and again in 1895, but these govern- 
ments proved to be provisional and expired with the revolutions 
which produced them. 

THE JUDICIARY. 

Intimately connected with the government of Cuba was the judi- 
eiaiy, and as no account of administration under Spain would be 
complete without some reference to the courts, a brief outline is pre- 
sented. 

At the date of American occupation the jurisdiction of the Spanish 
Government over court officials was exercised through the department 
of grace and justice, which, by the military decree of January 11, 
1899, beoame the department of justice and public instruction, and by 
a decree of January 1, 1900, the department of justice. The duties 



R6 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1809. 

which devolve on the department of justice are those which usually 
pertain to such depaHments, but in Cuba it has also supervision 
over the registers of property and notaries public, to which reference 
will be naade further on. 

The courts of Cuba were essentially Insular, the judges being 
appointed either directl}^ by the Government or indirectly through 
its officials, and were of four classes or kipds, viz, municipal judges, 
judges of first instance and instruction, criminal audiencias^ and terri 
torial audieneias. The last named were reduced to three by a decree 
of June 15, 1899, giving all the audiencias the same civil and criminal 
jurisdiction. The municipal judges were distributed to the municipal 
districts, one or more in each, and were appointed by the presiding 
judges or presidents of the mtdieiiclas from among three persons 
nominated by the judges of first instance of the judicial districts; 
they held office for two years. At the same time a substitute was 
appointed, who perfonned the duties when from sickness or other 
cause the regular judge could not officiate. 

The municipal judges receive no salary or allowances and their serv- 
ices are requited by fee^, paid according to regular schedule. 

They had and still have civil jurisdiction over all suits not involving 
more than $200, and of suits to effect settlements without trial; they 
take cognizance in first instance of cases involving the challenge of 
other municipal judges; they appoint the family council for the care 
of minors or incapacitated p3rsons and commence the investigation of 
all cases of emergency requiring an immediate decision by a judge of 
first instance, when the latter is not available, to whom the record is 
sent for a continuance. In criminal cases they have jurisdiction over 
all misdemeanors where the penalty imposed does not exceed thirty 
daj^s" confinement or a fine of 325 pesetas. They make thQ prelimi- 
nary investigation into all kinds of crimes, if urgent, and the judge of 
instruction is not present. The municipal judges also keep the civil 
registers of births, deaths, and marriages. Each municipal court has 
a public prosecutor (Jl^cal)^ and a substitute prosecutor, who are 
appointed by the fiscals of the territorial avdi^yicfas; a secretary 
appointed by the judge of first instance and instruction; and a bailiff 
or constable. All officials of the court were paid from court fees, 
according to schedule. 

The judges of first instance and instruction are located at the seat of 
the judical districts to which they are appointed, and there are as many 
judges as districts (see ''Government"). They are appointed by the 
Governor-General and when unable to perform their duties are substi- 
tuted by one of the municipal judges in the district. They are paid 
accoi'ding to their classification, those in Habana receiving $4,500 per 
annum, those in the cities of Puerto Principe and Santiago de Cuba 
$2,750, those of Matanzas, Cardenas, Pinar del Rio, Guanajay, Santa 



H 



J 



GOVEBNMENT. 57 

Clara, Cienfuegos, and Sagua la Grande, $2,250, and those of Bejucal, 
Guanabacoa, Guinea, Jaruco, Marianao, San Antonio de los Bafios, 
Marin, Alfonso XII, Colon, Guane, San Cristobal, San Juan de los 
Remedios, Sancti Spiritus, Trinidad, Baracoa, Bayamo, Guantanamo, 
Holguin, and Manzanillo, $1,875 per annum. 

The judges of first instance have original civil jurisdiction in all 
cases where the amount involved exceeds $200, and appellate jurisdic- 
tion from the municipal courts; they decide questions of competency 
arising between municipal judges of the same judicial district, take 
cognizance, in first instance, when the competency of other judges of 
first instance is in question, and of appeals in similar cases of munici- 
pal judges; they hear cases in bankruptcy and for the discharge of 
such commissions or other duties as may be devolved on them by 
superior courts or of courts of the same category of other judicial 

districts. 



The other officials of a court of first instance are one secretary, four 
court or record clerks (escribanos)^ one physician, and two bailiffs or 
constables. The secretaries are appointed b}'^ the judges of first 
instance, while the clerks are appointed by the government on the 
recommendation in ternary of the audieiicias. The secretaries and 
clerks are paid from fees according to a schedule established b}^ the 
government and collected from litigants. 

Prior to American occupation there were three criminal axidiencias 
and three territorial avdieiicias. The criminal audi^^icias were located 
in Pinar del Rio, Santa Clara, and Puerto Principe, and each was com- 
posed of a presiding judge and two associate justices. They were 
appointed by the Governor-General and paid as follows: Presiding 
judge $4,280 per annum; associates, $3,500. These courts had original 
and exclusive jurisdiction over all crimes committed in the island from 
chicken stealing to murder, until the establishment by Genei-al Wood 
of the special criminal court (^Juzgado de Ouurdld) of Halmna, by a 
decree of February 1, 1900, a brief account of which will l)e given 
later. The criminal audienclas had no civil jurisdiction. 

The other officials of the criminal audi^ndas were one public prose- 
cutor {fiscal) one deputy prosecutor, one secretary, one assistant secre- 
tary, and two clerks. 

Territorial audiencias were established in the provinces of Habana, 
Matanzas, and Santiago, and had criminal jurisdiction in the provinces 
where located, and civil jurisdiction in the territory assigned them; 
thus, the a/udiencia of Habana had criminal jurisdiction in that prov- 
ince and civil jurisdiction over Pinar del Rio and Habana; the terri- 
torial avdienda of Matanzas had criminal jurisdiction over that 
province and civil jurisdiction over Matanzas and Santa Clara; the 
territorial avdienda of Santiago had criminal jurisdiction over the 
province of Santiago and civil jurisdiction over Santiago and Puerto 



58 EEPOET ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

Principe. Thus the territorial andiendds had a criminal chamber and 
a civil chamber or sola. The judges were appointed by the Governor- 
General in council with the secretaries. The presiding judges of the 
audienda of Habana received a salary of $6,750; the nine associate 
judges $6,000; the other court officials were the same as for the crim- 
inal avdiencias with the addition of an assistant deputy fiscal or public 
prosecutor. 

By a decree of June 16, 1899, civil and ciiminal jurisdiction was 
conferred on the six audiendaa within the provinces where established. 
Certain^ministrative functions and duties were also imposed on them, 
and the fees which were formerly paid to the secretaries of audiencias 
in stamped paper of the state were also suppressed. 

Other court officials under the laws of Spain were the solicitors, who 
represented contending parties in civil and criminal causes. Formerly 
the office of solicitor was sold as a source of revenue to those who 
paid the highest price, the insular government agreeing not to 
increase the number of such officials. Their intervention in lawsuits 
and practically in all legal proceedings was made obligatory, and the 
monopoly of their duties was left to a certain number in each town in 
consideration of the price paid for the office. Other officials, although 
not judicial, were the notaries, who were authorized to certify to con- 
tmcts and other extra-judicial instruments in accordance with the 
notarial law of 1862. Solicitors are now appointed by the secretary 
of justice and their employment is no longer compulsory. 

While attorneys are not, properly speaking, court officials, they had 
this character in Cuba because the laws made their intervention in a 
large majority of cases indispensable as counsel for the parties to civil 
and criminal suits. As a result, the qualification of the attorneys are 
regulated by the state, the diplomas being issued by the Governor- 
General after an examination by boards of the university in the fol- 
lowing subjects: Philosophy and law, metaphysics, general and 
Spanish literature, Spanish history, political economy, natural law, 
Roman law, canonical law, political law, penal law, civil law, adminis- 
trative law, public treasury, history of Spanish law, law of civil and 
criminal procedure, and international law, public and private. 

In all towns where there is a territorial avdiethcia there is a college 
of lawyers for the equitable distribution of offices, and to preserve 
order and discipline among the lawyers of the territory of the audi- 
enda. 

Other officials connected with the administration of real property 
are the registers of property, classified, according to the importance of 
the locality in which they reside, as first, second, and third class. 
They are appointed by the Government and are required to give bond 
for the faithful performance of their duties; they charge the fees pre- 
scribed by law. It is the duty of registers to make a record of all 



GOVEENMENT. 59 

acts and contracts, mortgages, etc., transferring, encumbering, or limit- 
ing the ownership or administration of real estate or property rights 
or contracts; constituting, altering, or dissolving conuuercial associ- 
ations, and transfers of vessels. They can not be removed or trans- 
ferred against their will except by judicial decision. They are 
entitled to a pension when, on account of their age or physical incapac- 
ity, they are prevented from performing the duties of their office, and 
this pension passes to the widow and children. 

Such, in brief, is an outline of the Spanish courts as they were con- 
stituted on the 1st of January, 1899; and while the composition of the 
courts and the codes of law were no doubt sufficient for the needs of 
the island, the judiciary, as the creation of the government and exist- 
ing at its pleasure, had but little independence, and the administration 
of the courts was characterized by arbitrary arrests, the incommuni' 
cado^ exorbitant fees to court officials in both civil and criminal trials, 
and not infrequently by corrupt and dishonest practices. As a rule, 
the judiciary was monopolized by Spaniards, and no Cuban could hope 
for appointment to the bench, and a speedy and impartial trial where 
Cubans were concerned was quite unusual. Many of the prisoners 
found in the jails of the island at the time of American occupation had 
been in confinement without trial for yeai*s, and of those who had been 
tried only a few were serving sentence, although in some ^instances 
years had elapsed since their appearance in court. 

If the impai*tial and speedy administration of justice is a reliable 
indication of good government, then it must be confessed that the 
government of Cuba lacked that attribute. 

As a result of the withdrawal of Spain from Cuba a supreme court 
was established by a decree of General Brooke, April 14, 1899, to hear 
cases and appeals which under Spanish rule would have been sent to 
Spain for decision. 

The court has its seat in Habana, and is composed of a president or 
chief justice, 6 associate justices, 1 fiscal or prosecuting attorney, 2 
assistant fiscals^ 1 secretary, 2 deputy clerks, and other subordinate 
officials. 

Another court, established by General Ludlow, military governor 
of Habana, January 6, 1899, was the police or correctional court of 
Habana. In his report to the Military Governor of the island, June 
10, explaining his action, General Ludlow writes: 

Article 220 of the municipal police laws of Habana provides that the imposition of 
fines for violation of city ordinances is within the '* exclusive jurisdiction" of the 
city government, the mayor, the assistant mayors, and the deputies and inspectors 
of the municipal service. 

During the period when the organization of the police and the regulation of the 
other city business were in progress, and numerous arrests were made for misde- 
meanors, usually of a minor character, drunkenness and the like, largely by Ameri- 
cans, soldiers and civilians, I designated an officer of my staff as a supervisor of 



60 KEPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

police, giving him certain discretionary authority with reference to the police force 
and its methods and the due carrying out of its executive and disciplinary purposes. 

Owing to the lack of proper accommodation for transient prisoners, and with the 
view to expedite the administration of justice, the supervisor of police held at the 
N'^ivac a trial court for sifting out the police cases and summarily disposing of such 
as did not require the action of the municipal judges for criminal offenses. 

For this purpose, after hearing the evidence in each case, fines were imposed or 
alternatively continuance of detention, at the rate of a day's detention for an unpaid 
dollar fine, this procedure being in conformity with the methods of the American 
|)olice courts, and practically also with the municipal laws of Ilabana, though by a 
less roundabout and dilatory process. 

The procedures have proved to answer their purpose admirably, and are recog- 
nized as both advantageous and effective; so much so that it has been ui*ged to make 
the practice a general and permanent one in the disposition of police cases. 

Certain criticisms have come from two sources, viz: Those who for personal 
reasons objected to the enforcement of penalties for infractions of municipal laws, 
and from certain professional sources which found their fees diminished by the 
prompt and equitable disposition of police cases. These contentions, however, repre- 
sent personal and pecuniary interests only, and are opposed to the public interests, 
which call for prompt action in police cases. 

I therefore commend to the consideration of the division commander the drafting 
of a d€»cree which shall provide formally for the establishment of police courts in 
Habana or elsewhere, in such numbers and with such stipulations as shall be con- 
sidered expedient for the summary and effective disposal of police arrests, substan- 
tially as now practiced in the United States. 

While the action taken by General Ludlow does not appear to have 
received the foniial approval of Geneml Brooke, the court wan con- 
tinued an organized, and under the administration of Maj. W. L. 
Pitcher, Eighth Infantry, who succeeded Major Evans as supervisor 
of police, has proved of inestimable value in restraining and punishing 
the disordorly clement in Habana. Recognizing its value, General 
Wood, on April 10, formally continued it in a decree of that date, and 
gave it jurisdiction over all offenses known as ^/a/^o* (light crimes), 
and all minor breaches of the peace; the trial and punishment of 
authors and publishers of all immoral or obscene literature, or false, 
malicious, or scandalous statements, whether printed or oral, tending 
to injure reputation or the professional, official, or private standing 
in the community; the punishments to be imposed not to exceed $30 
fine or thirty days in jail, or both, and the court to have authority to 
issue warrants, search warrants, and subpoenas; the trials to be oral 
and summary. 

By a decree of April 14, the organization of the police court was 
modified so that all trials except for libel and scandal are conducted by 
a single presiding judge designated by the military governor, and all 
other trials, when from the nature of the offense a greater penalty 
than $10 fine and ten days^ imprisonment should be imposed, are con- 
ducted by the full court, consisting of the presiding judge and two 
associate judges selected by lot from the municipal judges of Habana. 

This system of police courts has been applied recently to the whole 



-I 



POPULATION. 61 

island, and is said to be a great improvement over the niagi-strate's 
courts, which have been suppressed in all but the chief towns of muni- 
cipal districts. The municipal and police judges are now elected. 

In addition to the establishment of these courts, other changes have 
been made and more are contemplated, having in view an administra- 
tion of the courts more in accordance with American ideas of justice 
than those prevailing in Cuba heretofore. The main diflSculty in the 
way is the Spanish law of procedure and the entire absence of remedial 
writs, which, like the writs of habeas corrms^ certiorari^ etc., are relied 
on in this country as a protection to personal liberty and against 
various kinds of injustice. These beneficent changes will no doubt 
follow if they do not precede the establishment of free government, 
toward which steady progress is being made. 

Population. 



FORM OF SCHEDULE AND METHOD OF TABULATION. 

If the population schedule adopted for the Cuban census be com- 
pared with the schedule of the Eleventh Census of the United States, 
it will be found that, while in general design they are the same, they 
differ in respect to the number of inquiries, and that the latter is the 
more comprehensive of the two. This is quite natural, and results 
from the complex and diverse condition of the population of the United 
States, in which a more extensive investigation is necessary to deter- 
mine the state of the population than in Cuba, where the industries 
of the people are quite limited and a very large majority of the popu- 
lation is native. • 



62 



REPORT OH THE OSNBVB OF CUBA, 1899. 









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POPULATION. 



68 



To present the information contained in the schedules in a satisfactory 
way, it was decided that complicated tables would be necessaiy; that 
to save time, which was important, the tabulation should be done by 
machine, and not by the old hand-tally system. 

As the electric tabulating machines, invented by Mr. Herman Hol- 
lerith, had been successfully used in tabulating the Eleventh Census 
of the United States, and were to be used again in the Twelfth, and as 
his system was known to be accurate and expeditious, it was adopted. 
The operation is described by Mr. Hollerith as follows: 

" The population of each enumeration district was first established 
by a so-called ' rough count;' that is, the number of persons recorded 
on each schedule were counted by two clerks independent of each other, 
and where such counts disagreed, a third, or even a fourth, count was 
made to determine the correct population of each enumeration district. 

'^The detailed tables were then prepared by means of the electric tab- 
ulating system. For this purpose all the necessary data relating to 
each person were expressed by means of holes punched in certain places 
in a card by means of the key-board punch. 

PaUem of the card. 



1 2 


3 


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X 


1 


2 


B 


V 


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60 65 70 75 80 


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If the record related to a white person, B — standing for bianco 
(white) — was punched, while N was punched for a negro, or M for 
mixed, Ch for Chinese, etc. For males, V was punched, and H for 
females. The age was recorded by punching for less than 1 year, 1, 
2, 3, or 4 for the respective yeai's, 5 for the group 5-9, etc. Conjugal 



64 BEPOET ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

condition was recorded in the next field or division of the card. Birth- 
place was recorded by punching in another division of the card, Cu 
for Cuba, P. R. for Porto Rico, Esp. for Spain, It. for Italy, OC for 
other countries, etc. Citizenship was similarly recorded. For each 
occupation, two holes were punched according to the number assigned 
to the given occupation in the corresj)onding classification of occupa- 
tion, NG being punched for those without gainful occupation. Liter- 
acy, school attendance, education, and the sanitary condition of the 
dwellings, size of families, etc., were similarly recorded by punching 
in the respective divisions of the card. 

''At the extreme left a space of four rows of twelve holes was used 
to record the province, municipal and enumemtion district to which 
the card related. This combination of holes would, of course, be the 
same for all the cards of a given district, and was done by means of 
the ''gang punch." 

"In addition, each card was provided with a double number, one 
number indicating the sheet of the particular enumeration district on 
which the record of the corresponding person could be found, and the 
other indicating the particular line or person to which the card related. 
By means of the gang-punched holes and these numbei's any one of 
the million and a half cards corresponding to the population of Cuba 
could be identified and the correctness of the punching verified. 

"The punched cards were then passed through the electric tabulating 
machines. In this machine a series of electro-magnetically operated 
counters are arranged, according to the tables it is desired to com- 
pile, in electric connection with a circuit-closing device, the circuits 
through which are controlled by the holes in the punched record card, 
which -is placed on the bedplate of such circuit-closing device. 

"The cards relating to a given enumeration district were fed one by 
one into the tabulating machine, which recorded the number of native 
white males, foreign white males, colored males, native white females, 
the number born in Cuba, in Spain, how many less than 5 years of 
age, 6 to 9 years of age, etc. The sum of the details of each group 
of facts should equal the total number of cards tabulated, and, of 
course, should be equal to the population of the enumeration district 
as established by the rough count, thus providing a third check on the 
accuracy of the count. 

"Atihesame time that a card operates the counters it opens one 
compartment of the sorting box, into which it is placed when removed 
from the circuit-closing device. The object of such sorting is to 
arrange the cards to facilitate subsequent tabulation by means of 
which the more detailed tables were obtained. 

" By thus tabulating first one group of data and then another with 
intermediate sorting or arranging of the cards the various tables were 
obtained." 



ABORIGINAL POPULAIION. 65 

The tabulation of the population was commenced February 2 and 
completed July 5, an unparalleled record of speedy work. Its celerity 
is fully equaled by its accuracy, as the application of numerous tests 
has shown. 

ABORIGINAli POPULATION, 

The population of Cuba at the date of its discovery has been vari- 
ously estimated at between 200,000 and 1,000,(XK) Indians. The latter 
is the estimate of Bishop I.«as Casas, who visited their villages and was 
always their friend and protector. 

The natives were found living contentedly under nine independent 
chiefs, whose government was of the simplest character, their orders 
being received as law. The natives are described by Columbus, Las 
Casas, and Peter Martyr as of a gentle and friendly disposition, having 
a simple religious belief, and, unlike the natives of some other West 
India Islands, not addicted to cannibalism. In physique they were 
rather slight, with pleasant faces; they had excellent nets, tishhooks, 
and fishing tackle, and lived mainly on fish, Indian corn, and fruit. 
Their huts were well built, and were made of the bark and leaves of 
the palm, as those of poor Cubans now are; they were not arranged 
in village streets, but scattered about irregularly, very much as shown 
in the picture of the village of Dimas, Province of Pinar del Rio, 
opposite page 68. 

They cultivated cotton, Indian corn, the potato, tobacco, the pine- 
apple, and manioc, all of which were indigenous, and had a rude potteiy 
and some stone weapons, but no domesticated animals except the dog. 
Other domestic animals, as also the orange, the lemon, and the sugar 
cane, were introduced afterwards by the Spaniards. 

The disappearance of the Indians, whatever their number, has been 
attributed to the combats and massacres which occurred during the 
exploration and pacification of the island by Velasquez, and thereafter 
to unaccustomed occupations, privations, disease, executions resulting 
from religious fanaticism, and slavery, both foreign and domestic. In 
the colonies the latter took the form of repartimtentos and encomitmdas^^ 
which, commencing with grants of land and the temporary possession 
of the Indians for work on the plantations and in the mines, ended 
finally in the slavery of the entire native population. 

For a full description of Indian slavery under this system, and its 
effect on the population, the reader is referred to the history of 

^A reparlimento was a grant of land, which carrieil with it the right to the labor of 
the Indiana occupying it or living within a short distance of it, at first for cultivating 
the soil. This privilege was subeequently extended eo that the Indians could be used 
in any kind of labor. 

An encondenda was practically a grant of Indians, irrespective of the land. At 
first the grant expired with the grantee. It was subsequently extended through two 
or three lives, and in effect, became perpetual. As a result the Indians were slaves. 

24662 5 



66 BEPOKT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

"Spanish Conquest in America," by Sir Arthur Helps, the ''History 
of the Indies," by Las Casas, and to the "Discovery of America," by 
Prof. John Fiske. These authorities agree in ascribing the disappear- 
ance of the Indians largely to the profligate waste of native life by the 
colonists through all forms of wanton cruelty, oppression, and neglect, 
and the introduction of negro slavery as the direct consequence of it. 

It is due the Spanish Government to record the fact that while at 
first authorizing repartvniientos^ ericorriiendas^ and the enslavement of 
all Indians who were cannibals or taken in war, it later spared no 
efforts to mitigate the horrors of Indian slavery, and finally to pre- 
vent and abolish it. These measures were initiated and earnestly sup- 
ported by the Dominican and Franciscan monks and by the church in 
general. Through the efforts of Bishop Las Casas and other prelates 
the laws of Burgos in 1512, and many orders and decrees were pro- 
mulgated between the landing of Velasquez and the " New Laws" of 
Charles V, 1542, for the protection of the Indians. The latter pre- 
scribed "that for no cause whatever, whether of war, rebellion, ran- 
som, or in any other manner, should any Indian be made a slave." 

But however well intended, these measures proved of little avail in 
saving the Indians of Cuba, as at that time very few remained. It 
was reported to the Queen in 1537 by the contador of the island that 
in 20 farms visited by him only 130 Indians were found, including 
those which had been imported. In the neighboring island of San 
Domingo at the date of its discovery there were, according to Las 
Casas, about 3,000,000 Indians; according to the licentiate, Zuazo, 
1,130,000. An average of these two estimates is probably more exact. 
When the treasurer, Pasamonte, came to San Domingo in 1508 there 
were 70,000, and when Don Diego Columbus was appointed governor 
of San Domingo in 1509, 40,000. According to Sir Arthur Helps the 
number of Indians in San Domingo in 1514, as determined by a repar- 
tition of the Indians made by Rodrigo Albuquerque, who was sent 
there by the King for that purpose, was between thirteen and four- 
teen thousand. By this repartition the Indians were practically 
enslaved for life, as they were given for the life of the person to 
whom Albuquerque made the repa/rtimiento^ and for the life of his 
next heir, whether son or daughter. After this there were numbers 
of repartitions or divisions of Indians among the Spaniards, resulting 
in their rapid diminution, owing to changes of climate, changes of 
oi*cupation, and of masters, and the indifference of the latter to the 
welfare of the Indians. 

The difficulty about the enforcement of the laws and royal instruc- 
tions and orders for the freedom and protection of the Indians appears 
to have l)een their vague or ambiguous meaning, which enabled 
unprincipled and rapacious officials to construe them as they wished, 
ntul the fiu't that the Crown and nearly all the officials of the govern 



OOLOKED POPULATION. 67 

ment, colonial and peninsular, held repartimientos or encmnhmdas of 
Indians or held them for personal services. The new laws had in 
view the prevention of Indian slavery, but they were partially revoked 
in 1545, and (m<iomiend(i8 were continued in the islands until the 
Indians had disappeared, and on the Spanish main until the reign of 
Charles III, when the system was abolished, 1759-1788. 

Under the royal decree of 1854 promulgating regulations for the 
importation of "colonists" into Cuba, a number of native Yucatan 
Indians were brought to Cuba, and some of them no doubt married 
Cuban women. At all events, one Indian woman is reported by the 
enumerator of the Zapata Swamp as living with a colored Cuban. 
There are doubtless remnants of these Indians still in Cuba, but of 
the native Cuban Indians no traces have been found in the course of 
this census, and it is not probable that any exist. 

BLACK POPULATION. 

The importation of negro slaves into the West Indies commenced 
some years before the extinction of the Indians and was stimulated by it. 
In a letter of instructions from the King to Ovando, Governor of Santo 
Domingo, in 1501, Jews, Moors, and new converts were prohibited 
from going to the Indies; but an exception was made in the case of 
negro slaves, who were allowed to pass, the officers of the royal reve- 
nue to receive the money paid for their permits. 

Again, in 1505, in a letter to Ovando, King Ferdinand wrote: "I 
will send more negro slaves, as you request. I think there may be 
100 at each time." The Spaniards were familiar with negro slavery, 
the slave trade having been carried on by Portugal since 1442. They 
had discovered the capacity of the negro for work, his patience and 
endurance, and his superiority to the West Indian as a laborer in the 
mines and fields. . 

The first license to import negroes into the West Indies was given 
by Charles V in 1517 to Governor de Bresa, grand master of the King's 
household, for the importation of 8,000 slaves in eight years, 1,000 to 
go to Cuba. A second monopoly on the same terms and for the same 
number was given him in 1523, but this grant was revoked and a license 
given to imi)ort 750 men and 750 women, 300 to go to Cuba. In 1527 
1,000 negroes were imported into Cuba, and again in 1528 a license was 
given to import 4,000 negroes into the Indies. 

In 1536 a monopoly was granted to import into the Indies 4,000 
males and 1,000 females, and again in 1542 one for 23,000, a portion 
of each to go to Cuba, Jamaica, and Santo Domingo. The annual 
importation into Santo Domingo under license was about 2,000, and the 
same number were smuggled. It was estimated by one of the King's 
chaplains, who traversed the island of Santo Domingo in 1542, that there 
were 30,000 negro slaves in the island. As up to the year 1763 the 



68 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

people were engaged almost exclusively in cattle raising, very few 
slaves were imported prior to that date, at which time it is said there 
were not more than 32,000 slaves in the island. 

The number of slaves imported between 1521 and 1763 is estimated 
by Humboldt at 60,000, and by 1790 at 90,875. From 1790 to 1820 
the importation of slaves into Habana, as shown by the returns of the 
custom-house, was 225,575, to which should be added one-fourth for 
those smuggled, making the total impoi-tation from 1521 to 1820, 
372,449. Between this date and 1853 it is estimated that there were 
271,659 importations, lawful and contraband, a total of 644,108, about 
one-third being females. 

From 1853 to 1880, when the slave trade was finally suppressed, over 
200,000 slaves were smuggled into the island, making a grand total of 
between 950,000 and 1,000,000. ^ 

It is not proposed to give a detailed account of the Cuban slave trade 
or of negro slavery in the island. While it was fraught with all the 
horrors of this nefarious business elsewhere, the laws for the protec- 
tion of slaves were unusually humane. Almost from the beginning 
slaves had a right to purchase their freedom or change their masters, 
and long before slavery was abolished they could own property and 
contract marriage. As a result the proportion of free colored to slaves 
has always been large. Of the efforts to abolish the slave ti-ade in 
Cuba much might be written; it is sufficient for this report to state 
the principal facts. 

By the treaty of Vienna, 1815, to which Spain was a party, slavery 
was abolished. By a treaty with England signed September 24, 1817, 
Spain agreed to stop the slave trade May 30, 1820, in consideration of 
the sum of £400,000. Again, on June 28, 1835, another treaty was 
made with England abolishing the slave ti-ade. In addition to these 
treaties the Spanish Government pronmlgated several decrees and laws 
after 1835 for the suppression of the slave trade and the abolition of 
slavery. Despite these measures, however, and the active cooperation 
of the native Cubans, who were zealously opposed to the slave trade, 
and the repeated protests of the British Government, it continued to 
1880 with but little interruption. The correspondence between Eng- 
land and Spain fully explains the failure of Spain to enforce her laws 
and treaty engagements. 

Under what is now known as the Moret law, enacted by the Spanish 
Cortes July 4, 1870, the gmdual abolition of slavery was commenced. 
The civil war in the United States and the Cuban insurrection of 
1868-78 hastened it, as did the law of February 13, 1880, which abol- 
ished slavery. Nevertheless, it continued in remote parts of the island 
for several years thereafter, although generally abolished b\' the year 
1887. 

Further on in this report the number and literacy, age, sex, and 



CHINESE. 69 

occupation of the colored population and the provinces in which they 
are most numerous are stated. Their condition for many years has 
been far better than the colored population of our Southern States or 
of anj'^ of the West India Islands under foreign control, and their per- 
sonal privileges much greater. No hard and fast '^ color line" has 
sepamted the colored and white Cuban population, although outside 
of the Cuban army there has not been much of what may be called 
social intercourse; but in respect to all public benefits, whether eccle- 
siastical, civil, or militaiy, they have had about the same consideration 
from the Spanish Government as the white Cubans. 

No doubt the free association of colored and white Cubans resulted 
largely from the common struggle in which they were engaged against 
Spain, and the fact that the laws made no discrimination between 
them. Colored men made up a large proportion of the Cuban army 
of 1895-98, some of them, like Antonio Maceo, holding high rank. 

While the statistics of Cuba show a larger proportion of colored 
than white criminals, the colored population are in some respects 
superior to the colored population of our Southern States, being more 
self-reliant, temperate, frugal, and intelligent, and since the abolition 
of slavery showing a strong desire to own their homes, to educate their 
children, and to improve their condition. In certain kinds of agricul- 
ture they are preferred to any other race, and in every discussion of 
the labor question in Cuba they must be seriously considered. 

CHINESE. 

While the number of Chinese in the island is now insignificant and 
they have ceased to attract much attention as a separate I'ace, a short 
account of their appearance, increase, and disappearance may be not 
without interest. 

When the law of 1845 suppressing the slave trade was promulgated, 
the ^^ Junta de F(miefnt<>^'^ or ofBcial board of agriculture in Habana, 
decided to send an agent to China to contract for Chinese ''colonists" 
(coolies). The first shipload of male Chinese arrived in 1847, under 
contract. This contract bound the Chinese to service for a term of 
eight years. In consideration they were to receive from 20 to 30 
cents jy^ diein^ \k pounds of salted or jerked beef, and \\ pounds of 
potatoes or other farinaceous food, and two cotton suits annually. 
Each was to be furnished with a blanket and medical attendance. 

For several years the trade in Chinese languished; 28 per cent of 
the first cargo died from the effects of the voyage, change of climate, 
food, and excessive labor, and some committed suicide in the belief 
that after death they would be miraculously returned to their homes 
in China. The experiment of Chinese immigration had apparently 
failed, but in 1853 it was revived by the importation of 5,150 Chinese, 
of whom 843, or 19 per cent, died en route. 



70 REPORT OTH THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

On March 22, 1864, a I'oyal decree was issued promulgating regula- 
tions for the impoHation and management of ^^ colonists ^^ fi-om Spain, 
China, and Yucatan. But as pointed out by Lord Howden, English 
minister to Spain, in a letter of October 6, 1854, to Seilor Pecheco, 
Spanish minister of foreign aflfairs, contracts under this decree meant 
slavery for the Chinese as the period of service was not mentioned. 

On June 6, 1860, another royal decree regulating the importation of 
Chinese was promulgated, and while it was evidently designed to pro- 
tect the Chinese against personal abuse, privation, or cruelty, Para- 
graph YII made them apprentices, or what was the same thing, slaves, 
as long as they remained in the island unless they were able to ransom 
themselves, and this, under the conditions imposed, was practically 
impossible. 

On October 10, 1864, a treaty between China and Spain regulating 
emigration between the two countries, as well as the reciprocal employ- 
ment of the subjects of one state by those of another was signed at 
Tientsin. Articles IV and X of this treaty permitted Chinese with 
their families to embark from any open port of China, whereas, prior 
to this time embarkation was restricted to the port of Macao. All 
Chinese wei*e landed in Habana. 

The conti*acts to be made under this treaty were to include the 
following items: 

1. The age, sex, and place of birth of the colonist. 

2. The time for which the contract is to be in force. 

3. The wages, kind, quantity and quality of food and clothing he is to receive. 

4. The obligation to afford him medical attendance during illness. 

5. Whether the wages were to be stopped during the illness of the colonist from 
any cause not connected with his work, or independent of the will of the master. 

6. The hours of work and whether the master can increase them if a proportionate 
reduction were to be made on other days. " 

7. The obligation of the colonist to indemnify the master for hours of labor lost to 
him by the fault of the colonist 

8. The obligation of the same colonist to subject himself to the discipline of the 
estate, workshop, or establishment in which he might labor. 

9. A clause in these terms, *^ I, A. B., assent to the rate of wages above stipulated, 
although I know that the free laborers and slaves of the island get much greater, 
because I consider this difference to be compensated by the other advantages which 
my master has to afford me as stated in this contract." 

10. The signature of the colonist, if he can write, and that of the contractor. 

The treaty contained many other provisions, and among them the 
right of the colonist to purchase his discharge, or, in short, to ransom 
himself. Of course it was not contemplated that under this treaty 
Chinese contractors would import Cubans into China, and therefore 
the terms of the contract were all in favor of the master as against 
the apprentice. For example, the terms specifying the hours of labor, 
etc., placed the latter absolutely in the power of the contractor, who, as 
he kept the records, could easily bring the Chinaman so irretrievably 



n 

t 



CHINESE. 71 

into bis debt for time lost that his freedom by purchase, or even after 
the expiration of the original term, was improbable if not impossible. 

As many of the Chinese had become fugitives, instructions for a 
general enrollment of Chinese were issued December 31, 1868, and 
again December 13, 1871. By a royal decree of 1870 Chinese who 
had been discharged after fulfilling the terms of their conti'act were 
permitted to remain in the island, whereas prior to this they were 
obliged to leave or be reindentured. 

Between 1853 and 1873 there were shipped from China to Cuba 
132,435 Chinese, of whom 3,973 — 13 per cent — died en route or shortly 
after their arrival. These losses, the large number of fugitives, the 
willingness of free negroes to work, the iomiigration of other coolies, 
the continuation of the slave trade, which appeared to thrive notwith- 
standing the attempts to stop it, seem to have put a stop to the impor- 
tation of Chinese, which ceased in 1873. 

By a convention between China and Spain, signed at Pekin Novem- 
ber 17, 1877, the emigration of Chinese subjects under contract as 
authorized in Article X of the treaty of 1864 was discontinued, and 
the emigration of Chinese into Cuba or elsewhere was declared free, 
Chinese subjects in Cuba to be treated as the subjects of the most 
favored nation, thus permitting them to leave the island unless under 
judicial supervision. It was also agreed on the part of Spain to expa- 
triate at its own expense all Chinese who formerly had literary occu- 
pation or an official position in China, and their families, also old men 
unable to work, and Chinese orphan girls. 

Owing to the large percentage of criminals among the Chinese, a 
decree was issued October 15, 1878, by the captain-general requiring 
all Chinese whose contracts had been terminated to either reconti-act 
or leave the island within two months. 

By the census of 1861 the number of Chinese is stated to be 34,834, 
of whom 57 were women. On December 31, 1877 there were 43,811. 
Whether this is the maximum number of Chinese in the island at any 
one period can not be determined. 

Their gradual disappearance has been attributed to many causes, 
among them the suppression of negro slavery, the large number of 
free black and colored Cubans willing to work, and their superiority 
as laborei*s over the Chinese, the low wages paid them, the excessive 
labor imposed on them, and the frequent insurrections which disturbed 
the island. Be this as it may, Chinese immigration had practically 
ceased in 1873, and the few who now remain in the island are mainly 
old men, employed as truck gardeners, laundrymen, or day laborers. 
The small number of women as compared with the numl)er of men 
resulted probably from restrictions, which in the beginning not only 
prevented women from leaving China, but from landing in Cuba. 



72 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS 0¥ CUBA, 1899. 



Discussion of the Population. 



THE TOTAL POPULATION. 



The total population of Cuba, including the Isle of Pines and the 
neighboring keys, was, on October 16, 1899, 1,672,797/ 

The latest prior census was taken under Spanish authority in 1887. 
The total population as returned by that census was 1,631,687. 
Whether that census was correct may be a matter of discussion, but if 
incorrect, the number of inhabitants was certainly not overstated. 

Comparing the total population of these two censuses, it is seen that 
the loss in the twelve years intervening amounted to 58,895, or 3.6 per 
cent of the population in 1887. This loss is attributable to the recent 
civil war and the reconcentration policy accompanying it, but the fig- 
ures express only a part of the loss from this cause. Judging from 
the earlier history of the island and the excess of births over deaths, 
as shown by the registration records, howevei* imperfect they may be, 
the population probably increased from 1887 up to the beginning of 
the war, and at the latter epoch reached a total of little less than 
1,800,000. It is probable, therefore, that the direct and indirect 
losses bv the war and the reconcentration policy, including a decrease 
of births and of immigration and an increase of deaths and of emigra- 
tion, reached a total not far from 200,000. 

The earliest census of Cuba of which there is record was taken in 
1774. Others were taken in 1792, 1817, 1827, 1841, 1861, 1877, and 
1887. The following table shows the population at each of these suc- 
cessive censuses, with the absolute increase in intervening periods and 
the average rate of increase per decade: 



Year. 



1775 
1792 
1817 
1827 



Popula- 
tion. 



171,020 
272,900 
672,363 
704,486 



Incrcaac. 



100,680 
300,063 
182,123 



Rate of 
increase 

per 
decade. 



81 
34 
23 



Year. 



1841 
1861 
1877 
1887 



Popula- 
tion. 



Increase. 



1,007,624 
1,396,630 
1,509,291 
1,631,687 



803,138 
388.906 
112,761 
122,396 



Rate of 
Increase 

per 
decade. 



29 

18 

5 

8 



It will be seen that the increase between 1774 and 1792 was at the 
average rate of 31 per cent per decade; from 1792 to 1817, twenty-five 
yeai's, the rate of increase was 34 per cent per decade; in the ten years 

' All Btatemeuts of population presented in tliis volume refer to the organization of 
the island as it existed at the date of the census, October 16, 1S99. Many changes 
have been made since that date in the numl>er and limits of municipal districts, but 
it would be obviously impossible to modify the census figures to accord with these 
changes. Such modifications might be made in the total population, but it would be 
impossible to carry them through the classifications of the population by sex, age, 
race, conjugal condition, nativity, etc., since the changes have been made, as a 
rule, by using the ward as a unit, while tlie classifications of the iK)pulation have not 
been made in terms of this small unit. 



Ml 



J^ 



ff: 


' f 


^ 




ff 


7 


/ 




d .-F^/ 




s 








5 

s 


V : h 




< 


S 




2 S 



DENSITY OF POjeXTLATION. 73 

between 1817 and 1827 it was 23 per cent, and in the fourteen years 
between 1827 and 1841 it was 29 per cent. Then from 1841 to 1861 
the rate of increase stood at 18 per cent per decade, and between 1861 
and 1887 it dropped to 5 and 8 per cent. The small rate of increase 
in the period last mentioned was doubtless due . in great part to the 
ten years' war which occurred within this period. 

The rate of increase between 1774 and 1841 compares quite favor- 
ably with the rates of increase in the United States, which prior to 
1870 mnged from 32 to 36 per cent per decade. Such rates of increase 
are very large and are commonly found only in regions which are 
sparsely populated, where the population is under little or no pressure 
for obtaining means of livelihood. The rapid and great diminution in 
the rate of increase after 1861 is, however, by no means accounted for 
by the increase in density of population, and the reasons therefor must 
be sought for among the extraordinary causes, such as pestilence, 
war, etc. 

The distribution of these losses in population between 1887 and 1899 
is also brought out by the following statements: In the province of 
Habana there was a loss in 28 districts and a gain in but 8; in Matan- 
zas a loss in 20 and a gain in 3; in Pinar del Rio 17 districts lost popu- 
lation and but 3 gained; in Santa Clara the numbers which lost and 
gained were equal, while in Puerto Principe and Santiago there was a 
gain in every district. 

Summing up the districts of the island, 79 lost population, while 
only 47 gained, the remaining 6 districts being new ones, formed since 
1887, and here included in those from which they were formed. These 
facts are set forth in detail in Table III. 

The map opposite page 72 shows the increase and decrease of the 
population of Cuba by municipal districts, the areas colored red being 
those in which the population has suffered a loss since the Spanish 
census of 1887, and those colored blue where it has made a gain. 

It is seen that the losses are confined to the four western provinces, 
the districts of the two eastern provinces having without exception 
gained in population. The districts in the four western provinces 
which have gained are of two classes: EHrst, those in which the recon- 
centrados were collected; and, second, those remote districts from 
which there was little or no reconcentration, and into which presum- 
ably the people fled for refuge. This is the case with the districts in 
the westei'n part of Pinar del Rio and along the south shore, including 
the great Zapata Swamp. The north shore of Santa Clara, too, is in 
the main a region in which the population has increased. 

DENSITY OF POPULATION. 

The area of Cuba is and can be known only approximately because 
its limits have never been mapped with any approach to accuracy. 
Measurements based upon different maps show wide variations in the 



74 BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

area of the island and its provinces. To illustrate the differences in 
published areas of the island the following are given: 

Square miles. 

Johnson^B Encyclopedia 43, 220 

Lippincott's Gazetteer 43, 319 

Chambera's Encyclopedia 40,000 

Appleton's Encyclopedia 43, 319 

Reclus 46,883 

Cuba, Past and Present 35,000 

Cuba, by Wm. J. Clark 43, 500 to 47, 000 

Stanford's Compendium of Geography and Travel 43, 000 

Our Island Empire, Morris 48, 447 

The Island of Cuba, Rowan & Ramsay 45,000 

Industrial Cuba, Porter 47,338 

Measurements made in this office from different maps show similar 
differences. Measurements made from Chart E, United States Coast 
and Geodetic Survey, give for Cuba and the Isle of Pines 46,675 
square miles; the chart published by the Hydrographic Office in 1896 
gives 45,883 square miles; the map of the Information Division of the 
War Department, scale, 1 : 500,000, gives 44,000 square miles. Assum- 
ing this to be as good a map as we have, where all are poor, the areas 
of the provinces, of the municipal districts, and of many of the barrios 
or wards have been measured upon it, the lines of the districts and 
wards having been laid down by the supervisors of census. The 
areas of the provinces are as follows, with the total population and 
the number of inhabitants per square mile: 



Province. 



HabanA 

Matanzas 

PlnardelRlo... 
Puerto Principe 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 





Inhabitants 


Area. 

• 


per square 
mile. 


Sq. miles. 




2,772 


153 


8.700 


65 


6.000 


35 


10,500 


8 


9,560 


37 


12,468 


26 



Habana, with the densest population, is as thickly inhabited as the 
State of Connecticut, and Puerto Principe, the most sparsely popu- 
lated, is in this respect comparable with the State of Texas. 

The great difference in density of population in the different prov- 
inces is in part due to the presence of large cities, especially in the 
case of Habana. Still, after excluding the cities of 8,000 inhabitants 
or more, notable differences are seen to exist, as shown below: 

Rural inhabitanU to a square mile. 



Habana 55. 3 

Matanzas '. 39.0 



Puerto Principe 6. 

Santa Clara 28.5 



Pinardel Rio 32.8 | Santiago ^ 21.7 

Puerto Principe, with hut G rural inhabitants to a square mile, is a 
pastoral province. 



\ 



1 



DENSITY OF POPULATION. 



75 



The map on page 74 shows the density of the rui*al population, 
grouped in certain grades, which are expressed by color distinctions. 
The method of preparation of this map was as follows: The ai'ea of the 
municipal districts, and of the wards in cases where the districts are 
large, were measured by planimeter on the map of the War Depart- 
ment, as was stated above. 

The population of all cities of 8,000 inhabitants and more was sub- 
tracted from that of the districts or wards, the remainder being 
regarded for this pui'pose as rural population. This iniral population 
was then divided by the area and the results platted on the map. In 
sketching the lines separating bodies of population of different density 
regard was had to geographic considerations affecting the distribution 
of population within the districts, such as the existence of swamps, 
mountain ranges, etc. Hence the lines separating bodies of popula- 
tion of different degrees of density are not exactly those which would 
be indicated by the figures. 

The salient features of the map are as follows: 

The presence of several small bodies of very dense population, 90 or 
moi*e to a square mile in Habana and Matanzas provinces, and one 
small area of similar density in the western part of Pinar del Rio; a 
dense population generally throughout Habana and Matanzas provinces, 
becoming less dense to the east in Santa Clara, and to the west in 
Pinar del Rio. Toward the western part of Pinar del Rio the density 
increases and then diminishes again near the west end of the island. 
The eastern part of Santa Clara is not heavily populated, while in 
Pueiix) Principe the population is sparse. The density increases again 
in Santiago but not uniformly. Indeed, the population in Santiago 
province is distributed with the greatest irregularity. The keys bor- 
dering the north coast and the marshes on the south coast, the Sierra 
Maestra, and most of the Isle of Pines are very sparsely populated. 

The density of population of municix)al districts with their areas is 
presented in Table V. 

The following table presents (1) the distribution of the rural popula- 
tion, in areas of differing density, corresponding with those repre- 
sented on the map; (2) the percentage of the rural population in each 
of these areas; (3) the number of square miles of each such area; and 
(4) the percentage which each area bears to the area of Cuba: 



feiBOtis to a tiquare milt. 



2 

2-6... 
6-18.. 
! l»-45. 
4^90. 
90+.. 



Rural popu- 
lation 
(lu thou- 
sands). 



85 
2,123 
3.051 
3.340 
2,010 



Percentage 
of toUl 

rural pop- 
ulation. 



0.8 
20 
28.8 
31.5 
18.9 



Area 
(square 
miles) . 



4.259 
6.280 
14.016 
13, 140 
4.184 
1,031 



Percentage 

of total 

area. 



9.9 

14.5 

32.7 

30.7 

9.8 

2.4 



76 



BEPOBT ON THE OENBUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



URBAN POPULATION. 

In coDnection with the population of cities, it must be understood 
that the cities of Cuba have no corporate limits separating sharply 
the urban element from the surrounding rural population. The cities, 
like the iiiml districts, are divided into wards, and many of these 
wards extend from the borders of the cities out into country districts, 
much as do New England towns, and thus include both urban and rural 
population. On this account it is impossible to state the population 
of cities with exactness, although it is believed that the best separation 
possible has been made. 

The population of cities by the census of 1899 can not be compared 
with that given by the census of 1887, because the figures of the latter 
embrace the entire municipal district, including the city, which in 
most cases adds to it a large population. 

Table IV shows the population of all cities of 1,000 inhabitants or 
more which can be given separately. The number altogether is 96, 
of which 16 have a population in excess of 8,000, 5 in excess of 25,000, 
and 1 (Habana) a population of 235,981. 

The urban population of Cul>a, including all citias down '^' 1,000 
inhabitants, numbers 741,273, or 47.1 per cent of the entire popula- 
tion. Including in the urban population only the inhabitants of cities 
of 8,000 or more, as is done in the United States census, the number 
of the urban element is 507,831, and the proportion to the total popula- 
tion is 32.3 per cent. The corresponding figures in the United States 
in 1890 were 29.2 per cent. 

The number of urban inhabitants in each province, under each of 
the two definitions of urban population used, with the percentages 
of the total population, are given in the following table: 



Pn>viiu'e. 



Urban 




Urban 




population 
in cities of 


Percent- 


population 
in cities of 


Percent- 


1,000 or 


age. 


8,000 or 


age. 


more. 
828,947 




more. 


65.4 


77.4 


277,636 


103,578 


51.2 


68,314 


28.8 


22,837 


12.9 


8,880 


5.1 


86,543 


40.1 


25,102 


28.4 


141,131 


89.5 


80,345 


22.5 


108,747 


33.2 


57,554 


17.5 



Habana 

Matanuifl 

PinardelKio... 
Puerto Principe 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 



A striking feature in the distribution of Cuban cities is the fact that 
the great majority of them are situated on the seacoast, comparatively 
few and small cities being in the interior. Of the 16 cities of the 
island which have a population of 8,000 or more no fewer than 10 
are upon the seacoast. The above peculiarity of distribution is still 
more marked when we consider the population, since the 10 cities upon 
the seiu^-oast contain no fewer than 431,068 inhabitants, while the 6 
interior cities contain only 76,768 people. 



1 






CENTER OF POPULATION. 77 

The map opposite page 76 shows the distribution of the cities of 
the island, the size of the colored circles surrounding each city repre- 
senting, rudely, its population. In the ease of Habana the circle is 
necessarily so large as to include numerous other cities, and it is, 
therefore, represented in shading instead of in solid color, in oixler to 
let the others appear. 

The great preponderance of Habana over all the other cities of the 
island is forcibly illustrated; also the location of the larger cities at 
or close to the seacoast, the only large cities in the interior being 
Puerto Principe, Sancti Spiritus, and Santa Clara. In the interior are 
numerous small cities, which are abundant in the provinces of Habana, 
Matanzas, and the central part of Santa Clara. Pinar del Rio and 
Puerto Principe are almost without cities of magnitude, and in Santi- 
ago they are few in number and are widely scattered. 

CENTER OF POPULATION. 

The center of population is the center of gi-avity of the people, 
assuming each individual to have the same weight and to press down- 
ward with a force proportional to his distance from this center. 

Suppose Cuba to be a plane surface, without weight, and to be 
loaded with its population, distributed as at the time of the census, 
then the island would be equally balanced about this center. 

The method of computing the center of population is as follows: 
The position of the center of population of each municipal district was 
first estimated. Where the district was a small one and uniformly 
populated it was at its center of area. In case the district was large, 
or the population was distributed unequally over it, the location of 
its population center was estimated after an examination of the distri- 
bution of population over the district, as shown by the figures for the 
wards. Thus, in the case of Habana and Matanzas, and of the large 
municipal districts composing the province of Puerto Principe, the 
center of population was not at its center of area, and such an examina- 
tion was made, as also in most of the districts of Santiago and certain 
of those of Santa Clara. 

The positions of the centers of the districts having been thus esti- 
mated, a point was assumed as a tentative center of population of each 
province, lines were drawn through it east and west, north and south, 
and the distances of each of these centers from this assumed point, 
expressed in terms of latitude and departure, were measured, using 
the large War Department map of the island. The population of each 
district was then multiplied by its distance in latitude, whether north 
or south, and in departure, whether east or west, from the assumed 
center, and the sum of the products in each of the four directions 
obtained. The difference between the sum of the products north and 
south of the assumed position divided by the population of the prov- 



78 



REPOKT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



ince gave a correction in latitude to the assumed position. Similarly, 
the products of the population of the districts by the departures were 
summed up east and west of the assumed center, and the difference 
between them divided by the total population of the province gave a 
correction in departure to the assumed center. 

In this manner the centers of population in 1899 and in 1887 were 
obtained for each of the 6 provinces. 

The centers of area of each of the 6 provinces were obtained by 
a similar process, using, however, square miles of area instead of 
numbers of inhabitants. 

The center of population of the island was determined by a similar 
use of the centers of population of the provinces. For this purpose 
the position of the city of Santa Clara was assumed as a tentative 
center of population of the island, and the differences of latitude and 
of departure of the computed center of population of each of the 
provinces from this assumed point, Santa Clara, were measured, were 
multiplied by the population of the provinces, the products added, and 
the differences between the sum of the north and of the south products 
obtained and divided by the total population of the island, giving a 
correction in latitude to the assumed position. The correction in 
departure was obtained in a similar manner. 

Thus the center of population was obtained for the census of 1899 
and of 1887, together with the center of area of the island. 

The following are the results: 

Pinar dd Rio, 





LaUtQde. 


Lonflltnde. 


Center of population: 

1899 


o / 

22 84 
22 85 
22 29 


o / 

88 29 
88 23 
88 36 


1887 


Center of area 





The center of population in 1899 was 15 miles northeast of the city 
of Pinar del Rio. It had moved from its position in 1887 1 mile 
south and 6 miles west, owing to the partial depopulation of the east- 
ern part of the province by the civil war. The center of area is 
located about 7 miles northeast of the city of Pinar del Rio, and there- 
fore about 8 miles southwest of the center of population in 1899. 

Habaruu 



I 

1 


Latitude. 


Lotagltude. 


(Vnterof population: 

1899 


/ 

23 02 
23 00 
22 33 


o / 

82 21 
82 18 
82 22 


1887 


('enter of area 





I 



CENTEB OF POPULATION. 



79 



The center of population in 1899 was 7 miles south of the city of 
Habana, not far from the north coast and some distance north of the 
center of area of the province. It is drawn into this eccentric posi- 
tion by the weight of the great city of Habana, in which are more 
than half of the inhabitants of the province. In 1887 the center of 
population was 2 miles south and 3 miles east of its position in 1899. 
The center of area of this province is in Caribbean Sea, being drawn 
to this position by the Isle of Pines, which forms part of the province. 

McUamas. 





Latitude. 


Longltudef 

o / 

81 21 
81 22 
81 12 


Center of population: 

1899 


o / ' 

22 60 
22 60 
22 44 


1887 


Center of area 





The center of population in 1899 was 19 miles southeast of the city 
of Matanzas and 14 miles northwest of the center of area, being to 
this extent eccentric in position. The center of population in 1887 
was in the same latitude as in 1899 and 1 mile farther west. 



Santa data. 





Latitude. 


Longitude. 


Center of population: 

1899 


o / 

22 23 
22 28 
22 19 


o / 

80 02 
80 02 
80 00 


1887 .• 


Center of area 





The center of population in 1899 was 5 miles southwest of the city 
of Santa Clara and identical with its position in 1887, indicating that 
whatever had been the movements of population in the intervening 
years they had balanced one another. The center of area was 5 miles 
nearly southeast of the center of population. 

Paerto Principe. 



1 

1 


Latitude. 


Longitude. 


Center of population: 

1899 


o / 

21 29 
21 31 
21 82 


o / 

78 02 
78 04 
78 07 


1887 


Center of area 





The center of population in 1899 was 10 miles northwest of the city 
of Puerto Principe, and it had since 1887 moved 3 miles in a south- 
easterly direction. The center of area was but 8 miles distant in a 
northwesterly direction from this center of population. 



80 



BEPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Santiago. 





Latitude. 

o / 

20 21 
20 20 
20 22 


Lonj^itude. 


Center of population : 

1899 


O t 

76 03 
76 64 
75 61 


1887 


Center of area 





The center of population was, in 1899, 29 miles northwest of the 
city of Santiago, having moved in the preceding twelve years 9 miles in 
a direction nearly west. The center of area was in nearly the same 
latitude, but 9 miles nearly east of this center of population. 



CSiba. 



Center of population: 

1899 

1887 

Center of area , 



lAtitude. 


Longitude. 


o / 

22 15 
22 24 
21 61 


o / 

80 23 
80 41 
79 18 



The center of population in 1899 was in Santa Clai-a province, 30 
miles southwest of the city of Santa Clara and 8 miles northeast of 
Cienf uegos. In 1887 it was 24 miles northwest of its position in 1899, 
showing a net movement of the population in the twelve intervening 
years toward the southeast, represented by this 24 miles of movement. 
The center of area is 10 miles east-southeast of the city of Sancti 
Spiritus, at a distance of 76 miles east-southeast of the center of 
population in 1899 and 100 miles from the center in 1887. 



DISTRIBUTION IN ALTITUDE. 



By the aid of a sketch map prepared by Mr. Robert T. Hill it has 
been made possible to distribute the population in elevation above sea 
level, with the following results: 



t 
Altitude. 


Fcei. 

- 100 

100-1,000 

+1,000 



Population. 



697.000 
827,000 
134.000 




SEX. 



(See Table VI.) 

Culm had 57,613 more males than females, an excess equal to 3.6 per 
cent of the population. In this respect it agrees with nearly all coun- 
tries which are receiving many immigrants, for immigrants to new 







Xi M 



3 o 2 ; 






- 



SEX. 



81 



countries or to countries of little industrial development are predomi- 
nantly men. This excess of males in Cuba, therefore, which distin- 
^ishes it from neighboring West Indian islands like Jamaica, Porto 
Rico, and the Bahamas, is evidence that, as with the United States, 
immigi-ation has been a large factor and emigration a small factor in 
the growth of its population. 

The following table shows the total population and total males, 
together with the facts, by race, for the censuses selected as most 
trustworthy. Where the information has not been found the space 
has been left blank. 

Table showing populcUion and number of males at successive censuses. 



Date of censoB. 



1775 
1792 
1817 
1827 
1841 
1861 
1877 
1887 
1899 



Total. 



Population. 



171,620 

272,800 

672,363 

704,486 

1,007,624 

1,396,530 

1,509,291 

1,609,076 

1,672,797 



Males. 



166,234 



403,906 
684,097 
800,636 
845,596 
866,407 
816,206 



White. 



Population. 



96,440 

153,559 

257,380 

811,051 

418,291 

798,484 

1,023,394 

1,102,889 

1,067,3&1 



Malcfl. 



56,476 
82,299 



168,663 
227,144 
468,107 
698,395 
607,187 
577,807 



Colored. 



Population. 



76.180 
118,741 
814,983 
393,435 
689,333 
603,046 
485,897 
528,798 
506,443 



Males. 



72,936 



235,252 
856,953 
332,528 
247,200 
275,413 
237,398 



In the foregoing table the Chinese, in conformity with the practice 
of Spanish censuses, have been grouped with the whites. Where pos- 
-sible the dejure population has been given. Hence in 1887 the details 
by race being given only for the de facto population, do not sum to 
the dejure population given in the total column. From the preceding 
table the following table of percentages has been derived: 



Year. 


Per cent of males in- 


Total 
population. 


White 
population. 


Colored 
population. 


1775..... 




57.5 
53.6 
54.2 
54.3 
59.0 
68.5 
55.1 
54.1 




1792 


57.0 
57.3 
58.0 
57.3 
56.0 
53.9 
51.8 


61.4 
69.8 
60.6 
56.1 
50.9 
52.1 
47.0 


1827 


1811 


1861 


1877 


1887 


1899 





The proportion of males in Cuba apparently reached its maximum 
al)out the middle of the century, when it was nearly the same as that 
of the Pacific coast States in 1890 (Washington, 62.3 per cent; Ore- 
gon, 58 per cent; California, 68 per cent). Since then it has gradu- 
ally decreased until the proportional excess of males was in 1899 about 
the same as in several States bordering on the Upper Mississippi 
River (Wisconsin, 51.9 per cent; Iowa, 52 per cent; Illinois, 61.6 per 
cent). Among the whites the proportion of males reached its maxi- 
24662 6 



82 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



mum somewhat later, perhaps owing in part to the immigration of 
many thousand Chinese males in the years preceding the census of 
1861. Yet, even if these be excluded, the per cent of males among the 
true whites or Caucasians of Cuba in 1861 was 67.1, or higher than it 
had been since the first census of the island. 

While the slave ti'ade was thriving the excess of males was much 
greater among the colored than among the whites. This suggests that 
the supply of colored labor was maintained primarily by importation 
rather than by rearing slave children. But since 1841 the excess of 
colored males has steadily decreased, and before the last census was 
taken it had disappeared. The increase between 1877 and 1887 sug- 
gests the possibility that the Chinese, who were not separately returned 
in the census of 1887, may have been included at that time with the 
colored. But such an interpretation is doubtful. On comparing the 
results of the present census with those of the Spanish census of 1887 
the excess of males is seen to have decreased rapidly in twelve years. 
In 1887 the excess of males in the de jure population was 123,739, 
while in 1899 it was less than half that amount. During the twelve 
years the number of males and of females apparently changed in oppo- 
site directions, that of the females having increased by nearly 15,000 
(14,924), and that of the males having decreased by over 60,000 (51,202). 
Thus the females increased 2 per cent and the males decreased nearly 
6 per cent in twelve years. 

The excess of males in 1899 was distributed through the provinces *^ 
as follows: 



Proyinoe. 



Santa Glaia 

JPinar del Rio 

Uabana (excluding city) 

Habana city 

Matanzas 

Puerto Principe 

Santiago 

Cuba 



Total popu- 
lation. 



866,636 
178,064 
188,823 
236,961 
202,444 
88,284 
827,716 



1,672,797 



Absolute 

excess of 

males. 



21,678 

10,812 

8,641 

10,686 

5,008 

1,661 

—26 



57,613 



Per cent 
that excess 
makes of 
total popu- 
lation. 



6.1 
6.0 
4.6 
4.6 
2.6 
1.8 



3.6 



From this table it appears that in the eastern provinces — Puerto 
Principe and Santiago — the two sexes were almost equal in numbers, 
and that the excess of males was in the western half of the island, 
whore immigration has been most influential. 

The main point at which immigrants into Cuba disembark is 
Habana. Hence one would expect to find a large preponderance of 



' As the statistics of a great city like Habana differ widely from those of a more 
scattered population , the province of Habana will often be divided into two parts, 
the city and the rest of the province. 



CENSUS Of CUBA, 1899 



TOTAL POPULATION 

CLASSIFIED BY SEX, RACE. AND NATIVITY 
HABANA MATANZAS 





1 ■ 


















'"t|"t" 










-^ 








+ :;. :l 


±^1 





' 




























1 ; 














1-1 jij " 










J- 






X 


.1- 







PINAR 


DEL RIC 






1 1 1 M 






- 


-f 




, 1 




















i ! 






i 






r 






1-1 ' ^ 


wm 


■^-uiipi 


H 


tF 


LS j 1 




Tl :|. . 1 . 1 



PUERTO 


PRINCIPE 
































































































































































b 








' 












7 


^Tnt-; 


" 


— 


- 



SANTA CLARA 













-!-[4- 






















; ; 


: 






;r 


- 


rt t' 










Liii. 



I j NATIVE WMITI. M 

en] - ■■ ,, 







1 










r 


















- 


-- 


i 


r 


- 


- 




- 


' r 


^1 








K^ 




r 


K 


- 


^ 




I 1 
















1 












_Li. 


1 


1 



CZI 



SEX. 



8S 



males in that city. The foregoing table, however, Hhows that the 
proportion of males in the province of Uabana, outside the city, was 
somewhat greater than the proportion in the city itself. It may, be 
worth while, therefore, to see whether other cities had a lower pro- 
portion of males than the rural districts. The following table gives 
an answer to the question. The 14 cities referred to include al) those 
having a population exceeding 10,000, together with the city of Pinar 
del Rio. 



DiHtrlct. 


Number of— 


I*or cent of— 


Males. 

240,86*2 
674,363 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Fourteen cities scDaratoly returned 


260,662 
606,940 


49.0 
63.1 


61.0 


Ruml di8triet8 


46.9 






Cuba 


816,206 


767,602 


61.8 


48.2 







The excess of males in Cuba is thus seen to hold only in the rural 
districts. In the cities there were nearly 10,000 more females than 
males, but in the country about 07,000 more males than females. In 
an average group of 1,000 city folk there were 20 more females than 
males, but in an average group of 1,000 country folk there were 62 
more males than females. 

In the following table the distinction between urlmn and iniral popu- 
lation has been extended to the provinces, and for purposes of sim- 
plicity only the columns for males have been retained: 



Province. 



Habana 

Matanxas 

Pinar del liio... 
Puerto Principe 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 



Number of males 


Per cent of males 1 


In- 


in 


— 


Urban 


Rural 


Urban 


Rural 


districts. 


districts. 


districts. 


districts. 


186,662 


86,438 


61.9 


52.8 


27,132 


76,694 


46.5 


63.2 


4,266 


87,432 


47.9 


53.3 


10,912 


83,987 


43.5 


53.8 


36,660 


152,497 


45.6 


66.2 


26,440 


137,405 


45.9 


60.9 



Difference in 
proportion of 

males be- 
tween urban 
and runl 
districts. 



0.9 
6.7 
5.4 
10.3 
9.7 
5.0 



The difference between city and country in all other provinces is 
several times as great as it is in Habana, and rises to a maximum in 
Puerto Principe, where in every 100 country residents there are 10 
more males than there are in the capital city of that province. It is 
in Habana province alone that males outnumber females in the cities. 
Elsewhere they are in a decided minority. This difference may plaus- 
ibly be connected with the large number of immigrants in the cities 
of that province, notably in Habana. In every one*bf the 14 cities 
separately returned, except Habana and its suburb Regla, the females 
outnumber the males. 



84 



BBPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 18d9. 



AGE. 



(See Table IX.) 



CUBA AS A WHOLE. 



Probably the best single and simple expression for the age of a great 
number of people like the inhabitants of Cuba or the United States is 
what is called tiie median age; that is, the age such that half the mem- 
bers of the population group under consideration are younger and 
half are older. To compute it accurately the census tables should 
present the ages by single years. That information being given, it is 
easy to ascertain within what single year of life the median age must 
lie. It is then assumed that within the year of age thus fixed the per- 
sons were evenly distributed; in other words, that there were as many 
persons living in the first tenth of the year or the first month as in 
each other tenth or month. In this way the median age of the popu- 
lation of the United States in 1890 has been fixed at 21.92 years. The 
present census of Cuba reports ages not by single years, but, in most 
cases, only by five-year periods.^ Hence to get the median age it has 
been necessary to distribute the population of Cuba in a single five- 
year period to the several years. For this purpose it has been assumed 
that the number at each year of age in the five-year group bears the 
same proportion in Cuba, as in the United States, to the total for the 
five years. Thus the median age in Cuba has been found to be 20.78 
years. That in Porto Rico is 18.18 years. The people of Cuba, there- 
fore, were more than a year younger than those of the United States, 
but more than two and a half years older than the people of Porto 
Bico. 

The median age is a summary expression of the age constitution and 
gives only a preliminary idea of the facts. The analysis is carried a 
step farther by the following table, in which the three population 
groups are compared in more detail. Here and elsewhere no com- 
parison is made with Spain because of the meager statistical informa- 
tion about that country. The table states the proportion that the 
number of persons in each ten-year period from the beginning to the 
end of life made of the total population of all ages. 

' The diviBion of the group 16-19 at 17 enables one to know the population of school 
age, 5-17, and that of age to aerve in the militia, 18-44. The division of the group 
20-24 at 20 enables one to know the potential voters. The division of the group 0-4 
into single years allows a study of the balance ])etween birth rate and death rate 
during the early years before it is seriously affected by migration. 



u . 



> • « .•• i/ 1 1.* • « 



CENSUS OF cue*, 1 



CUBA 



DISTRIBUTION OF POPULATION 
BY AGE AND SEX 



^ 


1 : 


, r^ 






































I'll 







TT^ 



t 



AGE. 



85 



Age cangiHulion of the. population of Cuba compared vrUh thai of Porto Rico and the DniUd 

StateSy by ten-year age periods. 



Age period. 

« 


Per cent of total population 
in a^ periods named. 


Cuba 
(1899). 


Porto 

Rico 

(1899). 


United 
States 
(1890). 


0-9 


1 

22.70 ' Sn A4 94 QQ 


10-19 


25.81 

18.46 

13.88 

9.24 

5.81 

3.08 

1.09 

.85 

.11 

.02 

.01 


22.82 

18.12 

11.74 

7.41 

5.06 

2.63 

.90 

.36 

.10 

.01 

.01 


21.70 

18.24 

13.48 

9.45 

6.38 

3.94 

1.75 

.45 

.05 

.01 

.26 


20-29 


80-39 


40-49 


60-69 


60-69 


70-79 


80-89 


90-99 


100+ 


Of unknown aire % 


Total 


100.00 1 100.00 1 100.00 











This table shows that the proportion of children under 10 in Cuba 
was less than in the United States and much less than in Porto Rico. 
On the other hand, the proportion of persons between 10 and 20 was 
much higher and that of persons between 20 and 40 somewhat higher 
than in either of the other countries. The proportion of persons in 
Cuba between 40 and 90 was somewhat less than in the United States, 
but, with a slight exception for the last ten years, greater than in 
Porto Rico. The proportion beyond 90, which was larger than in Porto 
Rico or the United States, points not to a greater proportional number 
of very aged persons in Cuba, but to greater errors in the returns, 
whereby the true age has been exaggerated. If the age composition 
of the population in the United States be taken as a standard, there 
were in Cuba few children, many youth, an average number of young 
adults, and a small number of persons who had passed the meridian 
of 40. An accessible summary* giving the proportion of children 
under 10 and of adults over 60 in 18 European countries at the last 
censuses shows that Cuba had proportionally fewer children under 10 
than 14 of these countries, but a larger per cent than Belgiiun (22.4), 
Switzerland (21.7), Ireland (20.8), or France (17.5). The per cent of 
persons over 60 (4.6) was lower than in the United States (6.2), and 
that was lower than in any of the 18 countries of Europe. The small 
proportion of aged persons in the United States may be explained by 
the rapid gi'owth of its population; but in Cuba, where the population 
has increased only 4 per cent in twenty -two years, the cause must be 
sought rather in unsanitary conditions, ignorance regarding care of 
the health, and poverty, all of which are widely prevalent among 
certain classes on the island and result in a short life. 

The analysis may be carried one step farther by finding the propor- 

* Allgemeines StaUstisches Archiv 111, 472 (1S94). 



86 



REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



tion of the population belonging to each period of five ^^ears between 
birth and death. The results, in comparison with those for the United 
States and Porto Rico, and also with an artificial stationary population 
from which the errors due to misstatement of age or to uneven growth 
of population have been excluded, are contained in the following 
table: 

Age covM^tUum of the population of Cuba compared with thai of Porto Rico and the 

United States j by five-year age periods. 



Age period. 


Cuba 

(1899). 


United 
states 
(1890). 


Porto 

Rico 

(1899). 


0^ 


8.82 

14.88 

13.99 

11.32 

9.72 

8.74 

7.55 

6.83 

5.43 

8.81 

3.66 

2.15 

2.19 

.89 

.75 

.28 

.28 

.07 

.08 

.08 

.02 

.01 


12.19 

12.10 

11.23 

10.47 

9.89 

8.35 

7.81 

6.17 

5.09 

4.36 

8.71 

2.67 

2.88 

1.61 

1.12 

.63 

.33 

.12 

.04 

.01 

.01 

.26 


15.78 


5-9 


15.06 


10-14 


13.05 


15-19 


9.77 


20-24 


9.28 


25-29 


8.81 


80-84 


6.76 


85-39 


4.99 


40-44 


4.64 


45-49 


2.77 


60-^ 


8.45 


65-59 


1.61 


60-64 


1.93 


65-69 


.70 


70-74 


.65 


75-79 


.25 


8CK-84 


.28 


85-90 


.08 


90-94 


.07 


95-99 


.03 


100+ 


.01 


Of unknown age 


.01 


Total 




100.00 


100.00 


100.00 



Farr'8 
EngliHh 

life 
table. 



100.00 



The deficiency in young children previously noted is here more 
accurately defined. The children between 6 and 10 were more numer- 
ous in Cuba than in the United States and not much fewer than in 
Porto Rico, but the children under 5 were only about two-thirds as 
numerous as in the United States and not much more than half as 
numerous as in Porto Rico. No country for which figures are acces- 
sible had so small a proportion of children under 5 as Cuba. This 
small number of survivors of the children born between 1894 and 
1899, when taken in connection with the large number of survivors of 
those born between 1889 and 1894, must be attributed to the economic 
and political misfortunes by which the island has been aflJicted during 
the past five years. Compare the memorandum on vital statistics, 
1890 to 1899, in Appendix XVIIL Such misfortunes usually exercise 
more influence on population by preventing births or increasing infant 
mortality than by causing death of adults. In every country in which 
the popidation is stationary or increasing one ordinarily finds that the 
children under 5 outnumber those between 5 and 10, and if the popu- 
lation is to be maintained this clearly must be so. Hence the numl)er 
of children in Cuba 5-9 years of age may be deemed a minimum limit to 



AGE. 



87 



what the number 0-4 years of age would have been had it not been for 

the recent sufferings of the island. This gives the following estimate: 

Children 5-0 226,109 

Children 0-4 130,878 

Difference 95, 229 

This difference of nearly 100,000 may approximately represent a 
minimum limit to the loss of infant life in Cuba both by death and 
prevention of birth consequent upon her recent sufferings. 

An examination of Table IX shows that during adult life, especially 
the later years, the reported numbers of persons in Cuba belonging to 
the successive quinquennial groups vary irregularly. One would 
expect the niunber in each group through middle life to fall below that 
in the next younger group by a somewhat constant proportion. That 
it does aot do so is clear from Table IX but the fact is more distinctly 
brought out by the following derived table: 

Number and per cent by which the reported popuiaHon at the age group named fell below 

the number in the preceding age group. 



Age group. 



10-14 
1^19 
20-24 
25-29 
80-34 
35-39 
40-14 
45-49 
aM>4 
55^50 
60-64 
65-69 
70-74 
76-79 
80-84 
85^ 
90-94 
95-99 



Difference 
between thifi 
group and 
preceding 
quinquen- 
nial group. 



• 6,060 
-42,014 
-25,076 
-15,664 
-18,593 
-19,248 
-14,072 
■25,553 

- 2,350 
-23,830 

-20,402 

- 2,230 

- 7,447 

4 

■ 3,161 

31 

737 



Per cent that 
difference 
makes of 
total in pre 
ceding quin- 
quennial 
group. 



- 2.68 
-19.09 
-14.09 
-10. 17 
-13.53 
-16.20 
-14. 13 
-29.89 

- 8.92 
-41.38 
■t- 1.97 
-59.27 
-15.90 
-63.17 

- .92 
-72.84 
+ 2.63 
-60.90 



Such irregularity in the decrease with advancing years is counter to 
all the probabilities in the case. . The most simple hypothesis that arises 
to explain it is errors in the reporting of ages. Where such errors 
occur they reveal themselves in the large number of persons whose 
age is reported as a multiple of 5 or especially of 10. Hence quin- 
quennial groups containing' a multiple of 10 are erroneously swollen 
and the intervening groups correspondingly diminished. An exami- 
nation of the preceding table will show that this is true of the reported 
ages in Cuba. Further evidence of the irregularity may be found in 
the following table. The number of persons in each quinquennial group 
has been compared with half the sum of the numbers in the groups 



88 



REPORT OK THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



immediately preceding and following. If the curve representing the 
population by age groups were a straight descending line (for a station- 
ary population and through the years of adult life it closely approaches 
a straight line), the number thus found would in each case be 100 per 
cent. The departures from 100 per cent, therefore, in the following 
table measure approximately, and the departure from the figures in 
the first column measure more accurately, the irregularity and probable 
error in the reported ages in Cuba. Columns for the United States 
and Porto Rico are introduced for comparison. 

Per cent that population in each quinquennial group makes of the arithmetical mean of 

population in the next younger and next older groups. 



Ago group. 


EngliRh 

life table, 

No. 8. 


Cuba. 

(1899.) 


United 
StateH 
(1890). 


Porto 
Rico. 
(1899.> 


5-9 


84.2 

96.8 

100.4 

100.4 

100.2 

100.2 

100.2 

100.2 

100.4 

100.6 

101.0 

101.4 

101.6 

100.4 

95.8 

85.8 

69.6 

50.4 


128.8 
109.0 

95.4 

97.0 
101.2 
100.4 

97.4 
107.2 

83.8 
123.0 

78.4 
144.0 

60.6 
128.4 

53.8 
157.2 

42.4 
146.4 


103.2 
99.6 
99.2 

105.2 
97.0 

100.6 
99.6 
96.6 
99.2 

105.6 
88.4 

108.6 
93.6 

100.0 
86.8 
87.0 
66.2 
58.4 


104.5 
105.2 

87.6 

99.8 
105.4 

97.7 

87.7 
119.6 

68.6 
157.6 

59.9 
f67.9 

64.3 
128.8 

54.8 
175.0 

47.1 
140.0 


10-14 


15-19 


20-24 


26-29 


80-34 


85-S9 


40-44 


46-49 


50-54 


55-59 


60-64 


65-69 


70-74 


75-79 


80-84 


85-89 


90-94 





Disregarding the first two age groups and finding the difference 
between each following group and the figures in the first column gives 
a measure of the real or alleged excess or deficiency of population in 
certain age periods. 



Meatiure of excess (-f-) or deficiency (— ) of population in age group namtd. 



Age group. 


Cuba 

(1899). 


Porto Rico 

(1899). 


United 

States 
(1890). 


16-19 


- 6.0 

- 8.4 
+ 1.0 
+ .2 

- 2.8 
+ 7.0 
-16.6 
+22.4 
-27.6 
+42.6 
-41.0 
+28.0 
-42.0 
+71.4 
-27.2 
+96.0 


-12.8 

- .6 
+ 5.2 

- 2.6 
-12,6 
+19.4 
-31.8 
+56.9 
-41.1 
+66.6 
-47.8 
+87.9 
-41.6 
+89.2 
-22.1 
+89.6 


- 1.2 
+ 4.8 
-8.2- 
+ .4 

- .6 

- 8.6 

- 1.2 
+ 5.0 
-12.6 
+ 7.2 

- 8.0 

- .4 

- 9.0 
+ 1.2 

- 8.4 
+ 8.0 


20-24 


26-29 


80-84 


85-89 


40-44 


45-49 


60-64 


56^ ^ 

60-64 


65-69 


70-74 


76-79 


80-84 


86-89 


90-94 





AOE. 



89 



In all three countries the population in age groups including a mul- 
tiple of 10 was usually in excess and that in othei age groups in 
deficiency. In Cuba the deviation from the standard after the age of 
30 was greater and in most instances many times greater than in the 
United States, and in Porto Rico with few exceptions it was much 
greater than in Cuba. In the United States where ages are reported 
by single years it can easily be shown that the irregularity of the age 
cuiTe is due to the reporting of ages as 80, 40, etc., when the persons 
are near but not at those ages. This tendency is most marked among 
the uneducated. The preceding table shows that a similar t^uidency 
worked in Cuba at the present census with gi'eater effect than in the 
United States, and that in Porto Rico it was even more controlling 
than in Cuba. 

In a single case this 'explanation may })e further tested. In Table 
IX the number of persons 20 years of age is given as well as that 21-24. 
In Farr^s Life Table the persons 20 years of age are 20.3 per cent of 
the total in the group 20-24. In the United States the proportion for 
both sexes was 20.7, but as males in the United States are fond of saying 
they are of voting age, and hence the year 21 is a favored one with 
them, it may be better to compare the Cuban figures for this group with 
those for females in the United States. Of all females in the United 
States 20-24, 22.4 per cent reported themselves as 20 years of age. 
In Cuba, on the contrary, of all persons 20-24, 26.4 per cent reported 
themselves as 20. This confirms the explanation already offered, that 
the Cubans stated their age in round numbers as some multiple of ten 
far more commonly than the Americans did in 1890. 

Ageft under 5 hy single years, — The ages under 5 are reported for 
each year. This allows a study of the balance })etween Inrth rat<» and 
death rate before it is seriously affected hy migration. The very 
small number of children under 5 in Cuba has been shown. But 
the distribution of these to the single years is also significant. The 
following table gives the number of children belonging to each year 
and the ratio of that number to the total under 5. Similar i*atios are 
included for the United States in 1880, when the form of the age 
question was the same as in Culm in 1899, and also for Porto Rico. 



Age period. 



L 



0-1. 
1-2. 
2-3. 
8-4. 
4^. 



Number of 
children. 



24,145 
16,873 
23,690 
80,^40 
35,830 



0-6 130,878 



Ratio to toUil under 5. 



Cuba. 



18.45 
12.89 
18.10 
23.18 
27.38 



100.00 



Porto Rico. 



17.49 
16.99 
21.94 
21.99 
21.59 



100.00 



United 
States 
(1880) . 

20.94 
18.18 
20.64 
19.98 
20. 2tl 



100.00 



90 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899 



In Guba over 50 per cent of the children under 5, at the date of the 
census, were 3 or 4 years old; while in Porto Rico the corresponding 
per cent was 43.6, in the United States (1880) it was 40.2 per cent, 
and by the English Life Table No. 3, 37.5 per cent. This apparently 
shows that the birth rate was higher or the infant mortality lower in 
Cuba during 1895 and 1896 than it was in 1897, 1898, and 1899. 
Apparently, also, in Porto Rico the conditions affecting the lives of 
young children were better in 1895-1897 than they were in 1898 or 
1899. 



THE SEVERAL PROVINCES. 



Tlie inedian age, — ^The median age of the several provinces was as 
follows: 



Province. 



Santiago 

Puerto Principe 

PlnardelRio 

Santa Clara 

Habana (exclusive of dty) 

Matanzas 

Habana (city) 



Median 
age. 



18.0 
18.1 
19.8 
21.0 
21.4 
22.0 
24.8 



There was a difference of nearly seven years between the median age 
in Santiago and in the capital of the island. As the two provinces 
which were closest in age, Santiago and Puerto Principe, were those 
which have the largest proportions of colored and of white, respec- 
tively, it is clear that the median age of the two races probably did not 
differ widely except where immigration has entered to cause a difference. 

Age hy B-year j)eriod%. — ^The wide difference in median age between 
Habana city and the eastern provinces is in some measure explained 
by the following table: 

Fo' cent of total poptdation belonging to age period staled. 



Habana 
Age period. (excluding 

city) . 


Habana 
city. 


Matanxas. 

• 


Flnar del 
Rio. 


Puerto 
Principe. 


Santa 
Clara. 


Santiago. 


0-4 


6.94 

12.98 

14.16 

12.29 

11.47 

9.89 

7.67 

6.16 

6.06 

3.56 

8.68 

2.09 

2.02 

.84 

.66 

.26 

.22 

.06 

.06 

.03 

.02 

.01 


■ 7.64 

10.82 

10.17 

10.78 

11.70 

11.17 

9.81 

7.67 

6.03 

4.32 

8.91 

2.48 

2.21 

1.05 

.70 

.82 

.21 

.07 

.05 

.02 

.02 

.00 


7.93 

13.38 

13.48 

10.94 

9.63 

8.79 

7.12 

6.98 

B.37 

4.10 

4.28 

2.77 

2.86 

1.26 

1.09 

.35 

.89 

.10 

.12 

.08 

.02 

.01 


9.14 

15.57 

14.71 

11.98 

11.21 

9.81 

7.11 

6.01 

4.67 

2.90 

2.98 

1.45 

1.73 

.60 

.66 

.17 

.24 

.06 

.07 

.08 

.02 

.00 


11.15 

16.55 

15.10 

10.94 

7.08 

5.78 

6.74 

5.99 

5.28 

8.96 

8.74 

2.29 

2.47 

.97 

.98 

.35 

.89 

.10 

.12 

.04 

.03 

.00 


7.31 

14.34 

14.40 

11.42 

9.59 

8.85 

7.67 

6.47 

5.63 

8.87 

8.78 

2.15 

2.23 

.87 

.71 

.26 

.27 

.07 

.07 

.08 

.02 

.00 


9 81 


6^ 


17 56 


10-14 


15 84 


16-19 


11.07 


20-24 


7.43 


26-29 


6 40 


80^1 


6 82 


85-39 


6 32 


40-44 


6 50 


45-49 


8.79 


60-64 


8 36 


66-69 


1.88 


60-M 


1.98 


66-69 


.73 


70-74 


.73 


76-79 


.27 


80-84 


.27 


85-89 


.08 


90-94 


.09 


96-99 


.04 


100 + 


.02 


(Joknown 


.01 


Total 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 



AGE. 



91 



In proportion of children under 15, Santiago and Puerto Principe 
ranked first and second, and the city of Habana ranked hist, or, in one 
case, next to the last. The ratio of children under 15 to the total 
population varies, in close agreement with the median age, as follows; 



Province. 



Santiago 

Puerto Principe 

Pinardol Rio 

Santa Clara 

Habana (exclusiye of city) 

MatanzaH 

Habana (city) 



Median 
age. 



18.0 
18.1 
19.3 
21.0 
21.4 
22.0 
24.8 



Ratio of 
children 
0-16 to 
total pop- 
ulation. 



43.0 
42.8 
39.4 
36.1 
34.1 
84.8 
28.0 



A powerful and usually a controlling influence in detei-mining the 
median or average age is the proportion of children. 

Puerto Principe had the largest proportion of children under 5, 
suggesting that it may have suffered least from recent disorders. 
From 5 to 15 years of age the maximum was in Santiago, pointing to a 
high birth rate under ordinary conditions in that province. From 20 
to 50 years of age the maximum was unifomily in the city of Habana; 
from 50 to 80, in Matanzas. 

The smallest proportion of very young children was found in Habana 
province outside the capital. Of children 5-19 years old there were 
fewest in Habana city; of young adults 20-34 years old, fewest in 
Puerto Principe; of adults 35-79, fewest in Pinar del Rio. The small 
ratio of adults 20-35 yeara old in Puerto PrincipQ and Santiago may 
possibly be an echo of a lowered birth rate during the ten years' 
war, 1868-1878, which was confined for the most part to the eastern 
provinces. 

All the provinces showed a much smaller number of children under 5 
than of those between 5 and 10. Perhaps the best measure of relative 
loss of infant life during the past five years is found by computing 
the per cent by which the number of children under 6 fell below that 
luHBtween 5 and 10. This is given in the following table: 



Province. 



Habana city 

Puerto Principe 

Matanz&s 

Pinar del Rio 

Cuba 

Santiago 

Habana (excluding city) 
Santa Claxa 



Per cent by 
which chil- 
dren 0-4 fall 
below that 
5-9. 



•26.9 
32. C 
40.7 
41.3 
42.1 
44.1 
4(5. 5 
48.9 



92 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



The number of children in the first five years of life was uniformly 
below that in the next five-year period, and the deficiency ranged from 
one-fourth in Habana city to nearly one-half in Santa Clara. The 
three provinces which apparently suflFered most were Santiago, Santa 
Clara, and Habana outside the capital. It is likely that the apparent 
losses in the capital were decreased and those in the vicinity increased 
by the removal of families containing children from the rural districts 
to the protection of the city. These losses probably are the result of 
a much lower birth rate and a much higher infant death rate during 
the past five years. 

It may be possible to derive from the figures for children under 5 
further light regarding the provinces which suffered most at various 
periods. The following table has been prepared by finding the ratio 
of children of each year of age under 5 to the total under 6. 



Province. 



Habana (excluding city). 

Habana city 

Matanzas 

PinardelRio 

Puerto Principe 

Santa Clam 

Santiago * , 



0-1. 


1-2. 


2-8. 


8-4. 


4-5, 


16.6 


12.2 


18.4 


23.8 


29.0 


16.8 


16.4 


19.8 


23.4 


24.6 


17.4 


11.8 


18.4 


24.2 


28.2 


22.1 


11.5 


16.6 


22.6 


27.2 


18.3 


13.6 


19. S 


23.5 


25.3 


16.0 


11.9 


19.0 


24.5 


29.6 


21.7 


13.7 


16.6 


21.4 


26.7 



0-«. 



100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100. 00 
100.00 



Of the children ])orn between October, 1898, and October, 1899, 
there was the smallest proportion in Santa Clara and the largest in Pinar 
del Rio. Of the children 1 and 2 years old Habana city had the most 
relatively to the other provinces and Pinar del Rio the fewest. Of 
those boi'n in the last months of 1894, in 1895, and 1896 Santa Clara 
had most. Of those 3 years old the fewest were in Santiago, and of 
those 4 years old the fewest in Habana city. 

The last Cuban revolution began early in 1896 and during that year 
seems to have centered in Santiago province. In the fall of 1895 the 
revolutionists advanced into the western provinces, and during 1896 
militaiy operations apparently centered in the western part of the 
island, notably Pinar del Rio. After the death of Maceo in December, 
1896, Santa Clara was perhaps the center of operations. The Spanish 
policy of concentration began early in 1896. These facts may be con- 
nected with those shown in the preceding table. It indicates that the 
birth rate in Santiago was probably abnormally low in 1896 and 1897, 
that in Pinar del Rio was relatively lowest in 1897 and 1898, while 
that of Santa Clara was at its minimum in 1899. 

A(/e and Sex. — The median age of the two sexes in Cuba compared 
with that in Porto Rico and the United States was as follows: 





Country. 


Date. 
ISliO 

isw 

1X90 


Median ago of— 


Excess of— 




Males. 


Females. 


Male.s. 
1.6 


Females. 


CuImi 


21.7 
17.6 
22.8 


20.1 
18.7 
21.5 




PoHo Uico 


1.1 


ITiiltivl States 


.8 











AGE. 



93 



The nudes were four years older in Cuba than in Porto Rico, but 
about seven and one-half months younger than in the United States. 
The females were not quite seventeen months older than in Porto Rico, 
but were seventeen months younger than in the United States. The 
males were nineteen months older than the females, while in the United 
States the difference was only half as great, and in Porto Rico the 
females were thirteen months older. The greater age of males is made 
clear by the following table, in which the ratio of the total number 
of each sex in a given decennial age group to the total population of 
that sex is stated. 

Age composition of male ami female poinddiimi of Ctilxi by devennial jteriwii^. 



Age period. 


Per cent of all in sex 
named who belong 
to age period Htatea. 


Exces 
Males. 


BOf— 

Females. 


Males. 


FenmleH. 

23.3 

26.6 

18.2 

13.3 

8.6 

6.6 

3.0 

1.1 

.4 

.1 

.0 


0-9 


22.2 

24.1 

18.7 

14.5 

9.9 

6.1 

8.1 

1.0 

.3 

.1 

.0 


1.1 
2.5 


10-19 




20-29 


.6 

1.2 

1.4 

.6 

.1 


30-39 




40-49 




50-69 




60-69 




70-79 


.1 
.1 
.0 


80-89 








100+ 




1 



This table shows that the relative number of females was greatest at 
the extremes of age 0-19 and 70+, while during the years 20-69 males 
w^ere more numerous. The absolute numbers for each sex in these 
three age groups 0-19, 20-69, and 70-+- are given below. 



Sex. 



Males 

Females. 



Age period. 


0-19. 


20-69. 


70 + . ! 


.377,436 
377,636 


426,300 
3(>7,663 


11,413 i 
12, 265 



At the two extremes of life there were more female than male 
Cubans by over 1,000, but during the working years 20-69 there were 
nearly 60,0<J0 more males than females. To the great excess of males 
at those years must be attributed the higher median age of the males 
in Cuba. The excess of females in the group 70+ may be actual or 
simply reported; that is, it may be duo either to a lower mortality 
and longer lifetime or to greater errors in the reports from females. 
Such errors manifest themselves not merely, as already explained, in 
concentration on round numbers, but also among old persons in exag- 
geration of the true age. It is of importance, therefore, to ascertain 
whether concentration on round numbers is more common among 
males or among females. 



94 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Following the method already explained, the table below gives thr 
proportion of each sex at each quinquennial period: 

Age composition of male atul femcUe population by quinquennidl periodjs. 



Age period. 


Ter cei 
Males.. 


itof— 
FemaU'S. 

8.58 

14.69 

14.21 

12.37 

9.76 

8.47 

7.23 

6.04 

6.02 

3.53 

3.53 

1.92 

2.18 

.85 

.79 

.29 

.31 

.09 

.09 

.03 

.02 

.00 


0-4 


8.09 

14.08 

13.79 

10. :» 

9.69 

8.98 

7.85 

6.61 

5.82 

4.07 

3.79 

2.35 

2.20 

.93 

.71 

.26 

.24 

.06 

.07 

.03 

.02 

.01 


5-9 


10-14 


15-19 


20-24 


25-29 


80-34 


86-39 


40-44 


46-49 


50-54 


65-59 


60-€4 


65-69 


70-74 


76-79 * 


80-84... 


85-89 


90-94 


96-99 


100+ 


Unknown 


Total ^ 


100.00 


100.00 




1 



An examination of this table shows no conspicuous difference 
between the two sexes until about the. age of 45, but from that age 
on the decrease in the column for males is more regular than that in 
the column for females. This is probably due to the greater frequency 
with which the ages of elderly women were reported as multiples of 
10. The difference between the two is made more visible by the fol- 
lowing table. The method employed in its preparation has been 
already explained. 

Per cent thai populaiion t?i each quinquennial period makes of tlu* arithinetirnl mean of 

population tn the next younger and nest oUier periods. 



Age period. 



25-29 

80-34 

85-39 

40-44 

45^9 

50-^ 

65-59 

60-64 

66-69 

70-74 

75-79 

80-84 



Males. 


Females. 


102.4 


98.8 


100.3 


100.2 


9().7 


98.6 


109.0 


104.9 


81.7 


82.6 


118.1 


129. 5 


78.5 


67.3 


134. 2 


157. 4 


6:^9 


67.2 


119.3 


138.6 


61.7 


52.7 


150.0 


163.2 



Prior to the ago of 45 no uniform difference between the two sexes 
clearly appears, but after that the excess in periods including a 
multiple of 10 and the shortage in the intervening periods are much 
more marked among women than among men. 



AOE. 95 

Corroborative evidence may be found in examining which sex was 
more fond of reporting the age as exactly 20. In a stationary popu- 
lation about 20.3 peii^cent of all persons between 20 and 25 are actually 
20, but in Cuba 25 per cent of the males and 27.8 per cent of the 
females 20-24 reported themselves as 20. This seems to show a 
decidedly greater error among females, but there are many foreign- 
ers in Cuba belonging to this age period and the large majority are 
males. As they belong mainly to the later years of the period, it may 
be fairer to exclude them from the comparison. Among the colored 
and native white males 20-24, 27.1 per cent were reported as 20, but 
among the females of these classes the per cent was 28. It appears 
that women's tendency to answer in round niunbers even at this age is 
a very little higher than men's. 

One may safely conclude that erroneous statements of age, at least 
after middle life, are more conmoion among Cuban women. Where 
errora of age occur during the later years, they are likely to exag- 
gerate the real age. For example, in the United States in 1890 
among every 100,000 colored 128 claimed to be 90 years old or more, 
but among every 100,000 native whites of native parents only 45 
claimed to be 90 or more, yet the whites certainly live longer. As 
elderly Cuban women are more prone to report their ages in multiples 
of 10, so they are probably more prone to exaggerate their age, and 
part of the high proportion of women 70 years old or more may be 
thus explained. At the same time, as general experience testifies to 
a somewhat lower mortality of women in civilized countries, the greater 
proportion of women in the later ages may probably be accepted as 
correct, althougli the census figures exaggerate the difference. 

Referring to the table in which the age composition of the sexes is 
given by five-year periods (p. 94), one notices a striking difference in 
the proportion of males and of females belonging to the age period 
15-19. The proportion of females in that period was more than 2 per 
cent higher than the proportion of males, while in all other cases the 
proportions of the sexes differed by less than 1 per cent. This is true 
not merely of the proportions, but also the absolute numbers. In this 
age period there were nearly 10,000 (9,343) more females than male^, 
while in every other five-year period under 70 the males outnumbered 
the females. It is obvious that such a massing of the females in the 
age period 15-19 is highly improbable. The most simple explanation 
is that for some reason a considerable number of males l)elonging to 
that age period reported themselves at other ages, or that a considei-able 
number of females belonging to other age periods reported themselves 
as in this period. The same difference occurs in the United States, 
where the age period 15-19 is the only five-year period under 80 in 
which the females outnumbered the males. The phenomenon, how- 
ever, is much more marked in Cuba than in the United States. In 



96 REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

Cuba there were 1,111 females to every 1,000 males 15-19, while in the 
United States there were only 1,019 females to 1,000 males in the same 
age period. Probably the most effectual cause is ijiie transfer of women 
really belonging to other age periods into this. As the five-year 
period in the tables is divided into two parts, one may probe the ques- 
tion a little more closely. In the two years 18-19 there were 1,056 
females to 1,000 males, while in the three years 15-17 there were 
1,150 females to 1,000 males. Hence it is the earlier period in which 
the difference is especially manifest, although it clearly appears in 
both. The actual concentration is much greater than the apparent, 
since there belong to this period about 5,000 more foreign white males 
than foreign white females. It may be noticed that in the English 
figures a similar concentration of women has been pointed out, 
although the ages there favored fall into the next quinquennial period, 
20-24. The concentration of colored in these ages was far greater 
than of the native white and the concentration in all Cuba far greater 
than in the city of Habana. 

NATIVITY AND liACE. 

The native whites constituted 57.8 per cent, or considerably more 
than one-half of the population of Cuba. The foreign whites consti- 
tuted but 9 per cent; the colored, including the negro and mixed ele- 
ments, amounted only to 32 per cent, or less than one-third, while 
the proportion of Chinese was trifling, being less than 1 per cent. 

In every province the native whites formed a majority of the popu- 
lation, but in the city of Habana, owing to the large element of foreign 
birth, they formed a trifle less than one-half, or 49 per cent. The pro- 
portion of native whites was greatest in the province of Puerto Prin- 
cipe, the sparsely settled^ pastoral province, where it reached 75.2 per 
cent, or more than three-fourths of all the inhabitants. It was next 
largest in Pinar del Rio, which is mainly a fanning province, where it 
reached t>tj.5 per cent, or nearly two- thirds. Santa Clam had 60 per 
cent, Habana, 57.3 per cent, and Matanzas had 50.7 per cent, or but a 
trifle more than one-half. 

The proportion of the foreign born ranged from 4 per cent in San- 
tiago to 16.2 in Habana province, and even to 22.4 per cent in Habana 
city. Between a fourth and a fifth of the population of Habana city 
was of foreign birth. Puerto Principe had a very small foreign ele- 
ment, and in Matanzas and Pinar del Rio it was by no means large. 
The colored element, including the negro and mixed races, ranged 
from 20 per cent in Puerto Principe up to 45 per cent in Santiago. 
It was large in Matanzas, reaching 40 per cent, was 30 per cent in 
Santa Clara, 27 per cent in Pinar del Rio, and 26 per cent in Habana 
Province, while the proportion in Habana city was 27.3 per cent. 

The Chinese did not form an element of importance in any of the 



RAGE. 



97 



provinces, but were most numei'ous in Matanzas, where they formed 
2.1 per cent of the population. 

In a]l of the censuses of Cuba since and including that of 1774, the 
distinction of white and colored has been made, and the latter have been 
distinguished as free and slave up to the time of the abolition of 
slavery. • 

The following table shpws the numbers and proportions of white and 
colored in Cuba, as shown by each census. As the Chinese have been 
by the Spanish censuses classed with whites, they are so classed here 
in the census of 1899, for purposes of comparison: 



Census. 



1776 
1792 
1817 
1827 
IMl 
1861 
1877 
1887 
1899 



Whites. 



Number. 



96.440 

163,659 

257,880 

811.061 

418.291 

793,484 

1,023,394 

1.102,889 

1,067,364 



Percent- 
age. 



56.2 
56.4 
46.0 
44.2 
41.5 
66.8 
67.8 
67.6 
67.9 



Colored. 



Number. 



76,180 
118, 741 
814,983 
893,485 
689,333 
603,046 
485,897 
628,798 
506,443 



Percentr 
Age. 



43.8 
43.6 
56.0 
55.8 
68.5 
43.2 
82.2 
82.4 
82.1 



The table shows that the number of whites has steadily increased up 
to the last census, which shows a diminution of 35,535 from that of 
1887. The colored increased up to 1861. In 1877 there was a decided 
decrease of 117,149. In 1887 there was an increase of 42,901, followed 
by a decrease of 23,355 in 1899. 

In proportion of total population it will suffice to trace the history 
of one element only — the colored — starting a century and a quarter 
ago with 43.8 per cent of the population. The proportion diminished 
slightly in the succeeding eighteen years. But between 1792 and 1817 
it increased greatly, the colored becoming largely in the majority, with 
the proportion of 55.0 colored to 45.0 white. A trifling diminution 
followed in 1827, succeeded by an increase in 1841, when the propor- 
tion of colored reached its maximum, with 58.5 per cent. Since then 
it diminished rapidly and in 1861 was but 43.2 per cent, leaving the 
whites largely in the majority again. In 1877 it again, diminished, 
this time to 32.2, or less than one-third of the population, since which 
time it has not changed materially. 

The reason for the great increase in number and proportion of the 
colored up to 1841 is doubtless the continued importation of blacks 
from Africa, which pei'sisted, in the form of smuggling, long after 
its official prohibition. Their diminution relative to the whites, dur- 
ing the last half century, is doubtless but another illustration of the 
inability of an inferior race to hold its own in competition with a 
superior one, a truth which is being demonstrated on a much larger 
scale in the United States. 
24662 7 



98 



REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



From the earliest times of which we have statistical record there 
have been large numbers of free negroes on the island, and they 
existed there in varying numbers and proportions up to the time of 
emancipation. The following table shows the numbers and propor- 
tions of the free and slave population at each census from 1774 to 
1877: 



CensuB. 



1776 
1792 
1817 
1827 
1841 
1861 
1877 



Free colored. 



Number. 



30,847 
54,151 
115,691 
106,494 
152,838 
225,843 
272,478 



Percent- 
age. 



41.0 
45.6 
36.7 
27.1 
25.9 
37.4 
55.7 



Slaves. 



Number. 



44,333 
64,590 
199,292 
286,942 
436,495 
877,203 
199,094 



Percent- 
age. 



59.0 
54.4 
68.3 
72.9 
74.1 
62.9 
44.3 



With the exception of the census of 1827, the free colored increased 
numerically at each census, and in 1877 were nine times as numerous 
as in 1774. The slaves showed a rapid numerical increase up to 1841, 
and since that time an equally rapid reduction in numbers, a move- 
ment doubtless dependent upon the importation of slaves. 

The total foreign born numbered 172,636, of which 142,153, includ- 
ing 66 unknown, or 82.6 per cent, were white, and 30,382, or 17.6 per 
cent, were colored. This included 14,614 Chinese, leaving 16,768 
foreign-born negroes and mixed bloods. 

Of the total foreign born 129,240 were born in Spain. These formed 
74.9 per cent, or very nearly three-fourths of all the foreign bom. 
The next largest contributor to the foreign-born population was China, 
whose natives altogether numbered 14,863, or 8.6 per cent of the 
foreign element. Next to them were natives of Africa, nearly all of 
whom were negroes, numbering 12,953, or 7.6 per cent of the foreign 
born. Following these in numbers were natives of the United 
States, most of them whites, numbering 6,444, or 3.7 per cent of the 
foreign born. No other country contributed to this element to the 
extent of even 1 per cent. Even the neighboring island of Porto Eico 
contributed only 1,108, and all of the other West Indies together only 
1,712. South America contributed only 752 and Central America 108, 
while Mexico, although a near neighbor, contributed only 1,108 per- 
sons. Altogether these closely neighboring Spanish speaking coun- 
tries contributed only 4,788 persons, or less than 3 per cent of the 
foreign element, a fact which speaks volumes for the sedentary char- 
acter of this people. All Europe contributed only 3,668, or about 2 
per cent of the foreign element, and only a little more than half as 
many as the United States contributed. 

The fact has already been stated that of the foreign colored, num- 
bering 30,382, 14,614 were Chinese, leaving 16,768 negro and mixed 
bloods. Of this number no fewer than 12,897, or more than four- 
fifths, came from Africa, the source of the remainder being widely 



K 



NATIVITY. 



99 



scattered. These African negroes are nearly all of advanced age, 
indicating that they constitute the last remnant of imported African 
slaves. 

Again, while among the foreign born, taken generally, males far 
outnumber females, in a relation of about four to one, it appears that 
among the immigrants from the West Indies, South and Central 
America, and Mexico the number of females is about equal to that of 
males; indeed, among those from Mexico the number of females out- 
numbers that of males greatly. 

The distribution of the foreign born between city and countiy is 
much the same as in the United States. The foreign-born element, 
consisting mainly of persons of Spanish birth, congregates in the cities 
much more than in the country, and among the cities it affects the 
larger in preference to the smaller. In the city of Habana, the largest 
and most important of the island, is found the greatest disproportion- 
ate number of foreign born. Out of the total foreign-born white 
element of the island, numbering 172,536, 52,901, or nearly one-third, 
were found in the city of Habana. These constituted 22.4 per cent of 
the entire population of the city. 

In the smaller cities, including all those down to a population of 
10,000, taken as a whole, the proportion of the foreign element was 
9.2 per cent, while in the remainder of the island, including the rural 
districts and all cities having a population less than 10,000, the propor- 
tion of the foreign born was but 6.1 per cent. 

While the proportion of foreign born in the cities having a popula- 
tion above 10,000, but excluding Habana, was 9.2 per cent, this pro- 
portion ranged widely among the different cities, being generally, but 
not invariably, greater where the population was greater, and less 
where it was smaller. Seacoast cities, as a rule, had a larger propor- 
tion than inland cities, for obvious reasons. The following table gives, 
for the cities of 10,000 inhabitants or more, the total population, the 
foreign-born population, and the proportion which the latter bears to 
the former. 

Foreignrbom population of cUies, 



Oitiefl. 



Habana 

Santla^ 

Matanzas 

Clenfuegoe 

Puerto Principe 

Cardenas 

Manzanillo 

Guanabacoa . . . . 

Santa Clara 

Sa^iia la Qrande 
Sancti Spiritus . 

Regla 

Trinidad 

PlnardelRio... 







Percent- 


Total pop- 


Foreign 


age 


ulation. 


bom. 


foreign 
bom. 


285,981 


62,901 


22.4 


43,090 


3,440 


8.5 


86,374 


8,644 


10.0 i 


80,038 


8,485 


11.6 


25,102 


1,283 


5.1 ; 


21,940 


2,081 


9.6 ' 


14,464 


919 


6.8 i 


13,965 


1,091 


7.8 1 


13,763 


915 


6.6 ' 


12,728 


1,137 


9.0 


12,696 


891 


8.1 


11,363 


1,666 


14.7 


U,120 


247 


2.2 


8,880 


1,024 


11.6 



100 BEFOBT ON THE CENSUS O? CUBA, 18»9. 

CITIZENSHIP. 

Of the population of Cuba 89 per cent were born in the island, 8 per 
cent in Spain, and only 3 per cent in other countries. Those born in 
Cuba, of course, included not only native whites, but negroes and 
mixed bloods. The proportion was greatest in the province of Santi- 
ago, where it reached 96 per cent, and was least in the city of Habana, 
where only a little over three-fourths of the inhabitants were native 
born. Three-fourths of the foreign born were of Spanish birth. The 
proportion of those born in Spain was naturally greatest in the city 
of Habana, where it reached nearly 20 per cent of all the inhabitants, 
and was least in the province of Santiago. 

In the matter of citizenship, 83 per cent of the population claimed 
Cuban citizenship, only 1 per cent the protection of Spain, while 11 
per cent were, at the time of the census, in suspense, not having 
declared their intentions. Five per cent of the population claimed 
citizenship other than Cuban or Spanish. The purest Cuban citizen- 
ship was found in the province of Santiago, where 91.7 per cent of 
the inhabitants claimed to be citizens of Cuba. On the other hand, in 
the city of Habana only 64.2 per cent were Cuban citizens. It is 
interesting to note that in the city of Habana only 5.3 per cent of the 
inhabitants claimed citizenship other than Cuban or Spanish, while in 
the province of Habana 11.6 per cent were found in this class. 

Table XIII presents the male population of Cuba 21 years of age 
and over, classified according to race, nationality, citizenship, literacy, 
and superior education. The immediate object in preparing these 
tables was to ascertain the effect of certain provisions of the election 
laws proposed and recently promulgated by the military governor of 
Cuba on the male population of voting age. These provisions limit 
the suffrage to such of the citizens of Cuba as are able to read and 
write. 

The males over 21 years of age are classified primarily as whites 
born in Cuba, in Spain, or in other countries, or as colored, the last 
class including blacks, mixed, and Chinese. Each of these classes is 
then grouped according to citizenship — as Cuban citizenship; Spanish 
citizenship; citizenship in suspense, i. e., of Spanish subjects who at 
the date of the census had not decided whether to remain Spanish 
subjects or to become Cuban citizens; or as other foreign or unknown 
citizenship. Again, each of these classes is further divided, as to 
literacy, under the following heads: 

Can neither read nor write. 

Can read but can not write. 

Can read and write. 

Have superior education. 





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li 
P 



J 



CITIZENSHIP. 



101 



The population of the island, as a whole, is classified as above out- 
lined in the first table, and in succeeding tables the population of each 
province and of the city of Habana are similarly classified. 



TOTAL OF THE ISLAND. 



CHUzenshipf literacy ^ and education. 





All 
classes. 


Whlt^ 

bom In 

Cuba. 


Whites 

bom In 

Spain. 


Whites 

bom In 

other 

countries. 


Colored. 


Total of Yotinff a^e 


417,993 


187,818 


96,068 


6,794 


127,296 






Cuban citizens 


290,905 


184,471 


142 


78 


106,214 




Can neither read nor write 


172,627 
4,182 

105,285 
8,861 


94,301 
2,089 

79,452 
8,629 


84 


18 
1 

89 
25 


78,279 


Can read but can not write 


2,042 
25,695 


Can read and vrrlte 


99 
9 


With superior education 


196 






Bn^lifb cltlsReTiB . , , -, 


9,500 


144 


9,341 


6 


9 






Can neither read nor write 


1,149 
108 

7,929 
814 


18 

2 

105 

19 


1,126 
106 

7,816 
298 


1 


4 


Can read but can not write 




Can read and write 


3 
2 


5 


With superior education 








Citizens In suspense ^ 


76,669 


1,296 


75,249 


87 


87 


Can neither read nor write 


16,945 

858 

56,704 

2,162 


812 

18 

861 

105 


16,590 

887 

56,771 

2,051 


7 

1 

24 

6 


86 


Can read but can not write 


2 


Can read and write 


48 


With superior education 


1 






Foreiirn and unknown citizens 


40,919 


1,902 


11,856 


6,678 


20,968 




Can neither read nor write 

Can read but can not write 


26,641 

293 

11,914 

2,071 


191 

8 

1,152 

551 


7,434 

158 

8,682 

87 


872 

84 

4,877 

1,890 


18,144 
96 


Can read and write 


2,708 
43 


With superior education 







The total number of males of voting age in Cuba was 417,993, or 
26 per cent of the total population. This is a little less than the pro- 
portion, in 1890, in the United States, where it was 27 per cent. The 
excess of males of all ages in Cuba is somewhat greater than in the 
United States. 

Classifying the potential voters of Cuba by birthplace and race, it 
is seen that 44.9 per cent were whites, born in Cuba; that 30.5 per cent 
were colored, and as nearly all the colored were born in the island it is 
seen that fully seven-tenths of the potential voters of Cuba were native 
born, 23 per cent were born in Spain, and 1.6 per cent in other 
countries. 

Classifying the whole number of potential voters by citizenship, it 
is seen from the following table that 70 per cent were Cuban citizens, 
2 per cent were Spanish citizens, 18 per cent were holding their citi- 
zenship in suspense, and 10 per cent were citizens of other countries, 
or their citizenship was unknown. 



102 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Citizenship of males SI years of age and over in Cuba. 



Citizenship. 



Cuban 

Spanish 

In suspense 

Foreign or unknown 

Total 



Number. 



290,905 

9,600 

76,669 

40,919 



417,993 



Per cent of 

total males 

21 years of 

age and 

over. 



70 

2 

18 

10 



100 



The degree of illiteracy of tliese classes was as follows: 



Citizenship. 



Cuban.. 
Spanish 



Unable to 
read. 



Percent. 
69 
12 



Citizenship. 



In suspense 

Foreign or unknown. 



Unable to 
read. 



Percent. 



22 
65 



Tlie Cuban citizens, numbering 290,905, were composed almost 
entirely of persons bom in Cuba, there being among them but 220 
white persons, and probably not more colored, of alien birth. The 
white Cuban citizens, who were natives of the island, numbered 
184,471, and of these 94,301, or 51 per cent, were unable to read. 
The colored Cuban citizens numbered 106,214, of which not less than 
78,279, or 74 per cent, were unable to read. 

The people of Cuba who claimed Spanish citizenship numbered 
9,500, and of these nearly all were born in Spain, there being but 159 
born elsewhere. 

Those whose citizenship was in suspense numbered 76,669. These 
also were nearly all of Spanish birth, the number born elsewhere 
being but 1,420. 

The number of persons of other or unknown citizenship was 40,919. 
Of these, fully one-half were colored, most of them being Chinese, 
and much the larger proportion of the remaining half were of Spanish 
birth. 

Summing up the situation, it appears that the total number of males 
of voting age who could read was 200,631, a little less than half the 
total number of males of voting age. Of these 22,629 were of Spanish 
or other foreign citizenship -or unknown citizenship. The number 
whose citizenship was in suspense was 59,724, and the number of 
Cuban citizens able to read was 118,278, or 59 per cent of all Cuban 
citizens of voting age. 



S OF CUBA, 1899 

CUBA 

BIRTHPLACE, CITIZENSHIP AND ILLITERACY OF MALES 
OP 21 YEARS AND OVER 




CD -".T. 
CZl »" 



aPANIflH aiRTH, 



OOLORED OF OTHER CITIZENSHIP 



Viati 
fei Vi 

■.ill n 



Can I 






"^^^ 



Can 

Can 






JJ-Bt 






h 



CITIZENSHIP. 



103 



HABANA (province). 

CiHzenshipj literacy y and education. 





All 
classes. 

. 127,047 


Whites 

bom in 

Cuba. 


Whites 

born in 

Spain. 


Whites 

bom in 

other 

countries. 


Colored. 


iv»t*»-i or vot*nBr ^^- ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ' 


62,621 


43,273 


3,499 


27,654 




Cuban citizens 


73,939 


51,163 


36 


45 


22,705 




Can neither read nor write 


30,346 
1,528 

37,669 
4,397 


16,898 

688 

29,265 

4,312 


4 


2 

1 

28 

14 


18,441 
839 


Can read but can not write 


Can read and write 


80 
2 


8,356 
ftQ 


Willi superior education 






Spanisli citizens 


4,718 


49 


4,661 


5 S 








Can neither read nor write 


380 

52 

4,137 

149 


4 


374 

52 

4,095 

140 


1 


1 


Can read, but can not write 




Can read and write 


87 

8 


3 
1 


2 


With superior education 








Citizens in suspense 


39,207 


678 


38,471 


21 


37 






Can neither read nor write 


6,442 

491 

31,174 

1,100 


129 

9 

469 

71 


6,800 

479 

30,669 

1,028 


2 
1 

18 
5 


11 


Can read, but can not write 


2 


Can read and write 


23 


With superior education 


1 






Forelirn and unknown citizens 


9,183 


741 


106 


8,428 


4.909 




C!t^T\ Ti^^lthnr rpfid "nnr wHtP , .,.,.,,,.. 


4.188 

67 

4,120 

818 


11 

1 
607 
222 


8 


248 

15 

2,588 

577 


8,921 
41 


Can read, but can not write 


C^m read and write 


88 
9 


937 


With superior education 


10 







HABANA CITY 



Citizenship, literacy, and education. 





All classes. 


Whites 

born in 

Cuba. 


Whites 
bom in 
Spain. 


Whites 

bom in 

other 

countries. 


Colored. 


Total of vot^Tiff wr^. . --•■.- - , 


75,306 


23,790 


82,779 


2,787 


15,919 




Cuban citizens 


85,460 


22,729 


23 


37 


12,671 




Can neither read nor write 


8,804 

976 

22,790 

3,391 


2,565 

'S4b 

16,507 

3,312 


1 


2 


5,736 
630 


Can read, but can not write 


Can read and write 


20 
2 


23 
12 


6,240 
65 


With superior education 






Spanish citizens 


4,136 


39 


4,089 


5 


3 






Can neither read nor write 


327 

62 

3,623 

134 


1 


824 

62 

3,688 

126 


1 


1 


Can read, but can not write 




Can read and write 


30 

8 


3 

1 


2 


With superior education 








Citizens in suitpense 


29,079 


450 


28,689 


16 


26 






Can neither read nor vrrite 


8,216 

389 

24,581 

894 


37 

5 

317 

61 


8,170 

381 

24,211 

827 


1 
1 
8 
6 


7 


Can read, but can not write 


2 


Can read and write 


16 


With superior education 


1 






Foreisn and unknown citizens 


6,630 


572 


78 


2,730 


8,250' 




Can neither read nor write 


2,628 

48 

8,253 

706 


8 

1 

386 

177 


6 


139 

11 

2,067 

518 


2,470 
86 


Can read, but can not write 


Can read and write 


64 

8 


736 


With superior education 


8 







104 REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

Of the greater subdivisions of the island of Cuba, Habana city con- 
tains the largest proportion of foreign born, both as to total of popu- 
lation and of males over 21 years of age. The total number of 
potential voters in the city was 75,305, or 32 per cent of its entire 
population, a very large proportion, both as compared with the entire 
island and with the United States. 

This number of potential voters was composed, first, of whites born 
in Cuba, numbering 23,790, or 32 per cent of all. Of this number, 
22,729, or 96 per cent, were Cuban citizens. The remainder, 1,061, 
were ahnost all in suspense as to citizenship, or were citizens of coun- 
tries other than Cuba or Spain. Only 39 native white Cubans were 
Spanish citizens. 

Second, of white persons born in Spain, who numbered no fewer 
than 32,779, or 44 per cent of all males of voting age, a much larger 
number and proportion than the Cuban whites. These natives of 
Spain comprised 4,089 citizens of Spain and 28,589 persons whose citi- 
zenship was in suspense. Only 23 persons of Spanish birth were 
Cuban citizens. 

Third, of whites of other countries, numbering 2,787, or 4 per cent. 
Nearly all of these were citizens of other countries. 

Fourth, colored, who numbered 15,959, or 21 per cent of the males 
of voting age. Of this number 12,671, or four-fifths, were Cuban 
citizens, the remainder consisting mainly of Chinese. As elsewhere 
in the island, Cuban citizens of Habana city were confined almost 
entirely to white or colored natives of Cuba. Their total number was 
85,460, or 47 per cent, less than one-half of all males of voting age. 
The whites among them numbered 22,729, of whom only 2,565, or 11 
per cent, were illiterate. The colored among them numbered 12,671, 
of whom 5,736, or 46 per cent, were illiterate. The total number of 
illiterates among the Cuban citizens of the city was 8,304, or 23 per 
cent, leaving as the total number of literate Cuban citizens of voting 
age 27,156. 

The citizens of Spain in the city numbered 4,136, including 327 
illiterates and 3,809 literates. The number of persons whose citizen- 
ship was in suspense numbered 29,079, composed of 3,215 illiterates 
and 25,864 literates. It is seen that in case all those who were in sus- 
pense as to citizenship should declare in favor of Cuban citizenship, 
they would still be outnumbered slightly by the native literate Cuban 
citizens of voting age. Those of foreign or unknown citizenship num- 
bered 6,630, including 2,623 illiterates and 4,007 literates. 

The literate Cuban citizens of voting age formed 45 per cent of all 
literates of voting age. 



CITIZENSHIP. 



105 



HABANA PROVINCE (kXCLUDINQ CITY). 

Citizenship, literacy , and education. 





All 
classes. 


Whites 
bom in 
Cuba. 


Whites 
bom in 
Spain. 


Whites 

bom in 

other 

countries. 


Colored. 


Total of votf njr ase. 


61,742 


28.831 


10,494 


712 


11,705 




f TllbAf^ HtlfPTIff . . r , 


88,479 


28,424 


18 


8 


10,034 




Can neither read nor write 


22,041 

668 

14,879 

1,006 


14,833 

343 

12,748 

1,000 


• 8 




7,706 
209 


Can read, but can not write 


1 
6 
2 


Can read and write 


10 


2,116 


With superior education 








Spanish citizens 


682 


10 


572 












Can neither read nor write 


58 


3 


60 






Can read, but can not write 






Can read and write..... 


514 
15 


7 


607 
16 






With superior education 














Of tf Kenif In qninperiiie , 


10,128 


228 


9,882 


6 


12 






Can neither read nor write 


8,227 
102 

6,693 
206 


92 

4 

122 

10 


8,130 

98 

6,458 

196 


1 


4 


Can read, but can not write 




Can read and write 


5 


8 


With superior education 










Fnralgn und unVnnwn rftif^ns . . , . , 


2,558 


169 


27 


698 


1,669 




Can neither read nor write 


1,565 

9 

8C7 

112 


8 


2 


109 

4 

521 

64 


1,461 
5 


Can read, but can not write 


Can read and write 


121 
45 


24 

1 


201 


With superior education 


2 







The total number of males of voting age was 51,742, forming 27 per 
cent of the population. 

This number was composed, first, of 28,831 whiter of Cuban birth, 
constituting 66 per cent of all males of voting age. All of these were 
Cuban citizens, with the exception of 407, most of whom were in 
suspense as to citizenship. 

Second, of 10,494 persons born in Spain, forming 20 per cent of all 
males of voting age. These included 572 citizens of Spain and 9,882 
persons whose citizenship was in suspense. Only 13 out of this num- 
ber of persons of Spanish birth were Cuban citizens. 

Third, 712 persons born in other countries than Spain and Cuba, or 
of unknown nativity. 

Fourth, of 11,705 colored persons. These included 10,034 Cuban 
citizens, the remainder being mainly Chinese. 

The total number of Cuban citizens in the province, outside of 
Habana City, was 38,479, or 74 per cent of all persons of voting age. 
With the exception of 13 persons of Spanish birth and 8 born in other 
countries this body of Cuban citizens was composed of whites and of 
colored persons born in Cuba. The white citizens of Cuba numbered 
28,424, 14,333 or about 50 per cent of whom were illiterates. The 
total number of illiterate Cuban voters of the province, outside of the 
city, was therefore 22,041, or 67 per cent, leaving as the number of 



106 



REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



literate voters 16,438. The total number of literate males of voting 
age was 24,856, of which Cubans formed 66 per cent. 



MATAN2AS. 



CUizenshipj lUeracyy and edticoHon. 





All 
classes. 


Whites 

bom in 

Cuba. 


Whites 

bom in 

Spain. 


Whitiw 

bom in 

other 

countries. 


Colored. 


* 

Total of votinif Ain?. ,,,-.--,, ^ , - - r 


55,595 


21,320 


10,217 


665 


23,893 






fhihan citlzeiiA 


87,544 


20,848 


17 


11 


16,678 




Can neither read nor write. 


28,988 

543 

11,938 

1,085 


10,062 

281 

9,432 

1,068 


2 


4 


18,915 
262 


Can read, but can not write 


Can read and write 


10 
5 


4 
3 


2,487 


With Bunerior education 


9 






Rnanlfih citixenfl 


1,083 


16 


1,016 




1 








Can neither read nor write 


112 
16 

865 
40 




112 
15 

868 
86 






Can read, but can not vrrite 


1 

11 
4 






Can read and write 




1 


With Bunerior education 












Citizenfi in susDenae 


5,798 


91 


5,705 


1 


1 






Can neither read nor write 


749 

62 

4,782 

255 


6 

2 

77 

6 


741 

60 

4,655 

249 


1 


1 


Can read, but can not write 




Can read and write 






With Bunerior education 












FofPljm and nn known rftiw»nR 


11,220 


370 


3,479 


653 


6,718 




Can neither read nor write 


8,677 

77 

2,195 

271 


• 88 

2 

201 

79 


2,279 
56 

1,108 
86 


132 

1 

865 

155 


6,178 
18 


Can read, but can not write 


Can read and write 


521 


With sunerior education 


1 







The total number of males over 21 years of age is 55,595, or 27.5 
per cent of the total population of the province. This total number 
of potential voters is composed, first, of 21,320 whites bom in Cuba, 
of whom all except 477 are Cuban citizens; second, 10,217 whites born 
in Spain, of whom only a trifling number were Cuban citizens; 1,016, 
or about 10 per cent, were Spanish citizens; 5,705, or more than one- 
half, were in suspense as to citizenship, and 3,479, or about one-third, 
were citizens of other countries, or their citizenship was unknown; 
third, of 665 whites born in other countries, and fourth, of 23,393 
colored, including blacks, mixed, and Chinese. Of these 16,673 were 
Cuban citizens, and 6,718 were citizens of foreign countries, or their 
citizenship was unknown. The last number, of course, includes 
Chinese. 

Of the above number of potential voters of the province, namely, 
55,595, citizens of Cuba numbered altogether 37,544, or 68 per cent 
of the total number; Spanish citizens numbered 1,033, or 2 per cent; 
those whose citizenship was in suspense numbered 5,798, or 10 per 
cent, while the citizens of other countries and those whose citizenship 
was unknown numbered 11,220, or 20 per cent of the total number. . 

The number of Cuban citizens above given, namely, 37,544, was 



CITIZENSHIP. 



107 



composed of 20,843 native white persons of Cuban birth, forming 66 
per cent of the whole nmnber; of 16,673 colored persons, forming 44 
per .cent, and the trifling remainder were born in Spain or other 
countries. 

Of the native white Cuban citizens above mentioned 10,062, or 48 
per cent, were unable to read, and of the colored Cuban citizens 
13,916, or 83 per cent, were similarly illiterate. Of the total number 
of Cuban citizens in this province 64 per cent were unable to read. 
The total number of Cuban citizens able to read was 13,661, out of a 
total of all citizens able to read of 22,074, or 61 per cent. 



FINAB DBL BIO. 



Citizenskipf liierdcy^ and education. 



m 


All 
classes. 


WhitM 

bom in 

Cuba. 


Whites 

bom in 

Spain. 


Whites 

bora in 

other 

countries. 


Colored. 


Total of votinir aire 


43,750 


24,a;24 


8,242 


308 


10,876 






Cuban citizens 


33,479 


24,104 


6 




9,369 








Can neither read nor write 


25,424 

234 

7,415 

406 


17,118 

163 

6,422 

401 


1 




8,305 
71 


Can read, but can not write 




Can read and write 


5 




988 


With superior education 




5 










Spanish citizens 


662 


16 


646 












Can neither read nor write 


54 

5 

593 

10 


8 


51 

5 

580 

10 






Can read, but can not write 






Can read and write 


13 






With Ruperior education 














Citizens in suspense 


7,765 


171 


7,577 


1 


6 






Can neither read nor write 


3,140 

56 

4,439 

120 


91 

1 

76 
8 


3,048 

65 

4,357 

117 




1 


Can read, but can not write 






Can read and write 


1 


5 


With superior education 










Foreiirn and unknown citizens 


1,854 


33 


13 


307 


1,501 




Can neither read nor write 


1,653 

10 

260 

31 


4 


1 


105 

9 

170 

23 


1,443 


Can read, but can not write 


Can read and write 


22 

7 


11 
1 


67 


With superior education 








1 





The total number of males 21 years of age and over of this province 
was 43,760, amounting to 26 per cent of the total population. This 
number was composed, first, of 24,324 whites, born in Cuba, of whom all 
excepting 220 were Cuban citizens; second, of 8,242 whites of Spanish 
birth, of whom only a trifling number were Cuban citizens, 646 were 
citizens of Spain, while the citizenship of 7,677 was in suspense; 
third, of 308 whites born in other countries than in Cuba or Spain, 
and, fourth, 10,876 colored, including black, mixed, and Chinese. Of 
these 9,369 were Cuban citizens, while 1,607 were citizens of other 
countries or of unknown citizenship. 

Of the total number of males, 21 years and over, in this province, 77 
per cent were Cuban citizens, leaving 23 per cent citizens of other 



108 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



countries. This body of Cuban citizens is made up almost entirely of 
whites and colored persons who were born in Cuba, the number of per- 
sons of Spanish birth or other foreign birth being trifling. Of the 
whites born in Cuba who were Cuban citizens not less than 71 per cent 
were reported as unable to read, while of the colored citizens no less 
than 89 per cent were unable to read, and of the total number of Cuban 
citizens in the province 76 per cent, or more than three-fourths, were 
illiterate. It is because of the high percentage of illiteracy in this prov- 
ince that it has been called the ''dark province" of Cuba. 

The total number of males of 21 years of age and over who were able 
to read was 13,579. Of this number, 8,055, or 59 per cent, were Cuban 
citizens. 



PUERTO PRINCIPE. 



CUizeruhipj literacy y and education. 





All 
classes. 


Whites 

bom in 

Cuba. 


Whites 

bom in 

Spain. 


Whit«i 
bom in 

other 
countries. 


Colored. 


Total of votlnir ajre 


20,181 


12,618 


2,962 


261 


4.420 






Cuban citizenB 


16,769 


12,861 


4 


2 


8,892 




c^n neither read nor write 


7,810 
318 

6,972 
669 


6,037 
214 

5,476 
636 


1 




1,772 
104 


Can read, but can not write 


Can read and write 


2 

1 


1 
1 


1,494 
22 


With Bunerior education 






Snaniiih citizenn 


446 


26 


420 




1 








Can neither read nor write 


224 
10 

189 
23 


9 


214 
10 

176 
20 




1 


Can read, but can not write 






Can read and write 


13 
3 






With superior education 












Citizens in suspense 


2,606 


66 


2,647 




2 








Can neither read nor write 


783 

43 

1,607 

m 


10 


773 

43 

1,666 

166 






Can read, but can not write 






Can read and write 


40 
6 




2 


With superior education 












ForelRn and unknown citisK^ns 


1,371 


76 


11 


269 


1,025 








Can neither read nor write 


901 

12 

281 

174 


• I 

24 
46 


8 


14 

1 

119 

126 


877 


Can read, but can not write 


10 


Can read and write 


1 
2 


137 


With superior education 


1 







This, the smallest province of the island in point of population, 
contained but 20,181 males 21 years of age and over, being 23 per 
cent of the population of the province. It was composed, first, of 
12,518 whites born in Cuba, of which number all but 157 were Cuban 
citizens; secx)nd, of 2,982 whites born in Spain, 420 of whom were 
citizens of Spain, and the citizenship of 2,547 was in suspense; third, 
of 261 whites born in other countries, and, fourth, of 4,420 colored, 
including negro, mixed, and Chinese. Of these 1,025 were of foreign 
or unknown citizenship, while 3,392 were citizens of Cuba. 

Of the total number of males 21 years of age and over, 15,759, or 




CITIZENSHIP. 



109 



78 per cent, were Cuban citizens. This number was made up almost 
entirely of native white and colored Cubans, the number of persons 
born in Spain or in other countries being trifling. Of the native white 
Cuban citizens, 49 per cent, or nearly one>half, were illiterate, and 
of the colored citizens, 52 per cent, or a little more than one-half. 
About one-half, therefore, of the Cuban citizens, taken as a whole, 
were unable to read. 

Of the total number of males of voting age, 10,460, or 52 per cent, 
were able to read. The Cuban citizens able to read numbered 7,949, 
or 76 per cent of all liteiute males of voting age. 



SANTA CLARA. 



CfUizenship, lileracy, and education. 



• 


All 
classes. 


Whites 

bom in 

Cuba. 


Whites 

born in 

Spain. 


Whites 

bom in 

other 

countries. 


Colored. 


Trkf Hi nf vntlnff fUTfl r 


100.113 


46.534 


21,953 


899 


81,727 






Cuban citizens 


71,462 


44,976 


66 


11 


26,409 






Can neither read nor write 


46,0S4 
915 

23,475 
968 


25,118 
520 

18,374 
964 


22 


6 


20,938 
396 


Can read but can not write.......... 


Can read and write 


43 

1 


4 

1 


6,054 


With sunerior education 


22 






Snanish citizens. 


1,481 


32 


1,447 


1 


1 






Can neither read nor write 


88 

17 

1,330 

46 


2 
1 

25 
4 


86 

16 

1,304 

41 






Can read, bnt can not write 






Can read and write 




1 


With superior education 


1 








Citizens in snsDense. ..................... 


12,947 


182 


12,744 


2 


19 






Can neither read nor write 


3,043 
117 

9.556 
231 


41 

4 

125 

12 


2,992 
113 

9,420 
219 




10 


Can read, but can not write 






Can read and write 


2 


9 


With sunerior education 










Foreign and unknown citisens 


14,223 


344 


7,696 


885 


5,296 




Can neither read nor write 


10,304 

123 

8,567 

239 


73 

3 

210 

68 


5,113 
95 

2.455 
83 


262 

6 

472 

145 


4.856 
19 


Can rrad. but can not write 


Can read and write , 


420 


With superior education 


3 







The total number of males 21 years of age and over in this province 
was 100,113, or 28 per cent of the total population. This total num- 
ber was composed, first, of 45,534 whites of Cuban bii*th, all of whom, 
excepting 558, were citizens of Cuba; second, of 21,953 whites born 
in Spain, of whom 66 only were citizens of Cuba; 1,447 were citizens 
of Spain, and 7,696 were citizens of other countries or their citizen- 
ship was unknown, while 12,744, or considerably more than half of 
the whites of Spanish birth, were '* in suspense;" that is, they had not 
yet decided upon their future citizenship; third, of the total number 
899 were born in other countries, and, as a rule, their citizenship 
followed the country of birth; and, fourth, of 31,727 colored persons, 
including black, mixed, and Chinese. Of these 26,409 were Cuban 



110 



REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



citizens and 5,298 were citizens of other or unknown countries, most 
of them being Chinese. 

The total number of Cuban citizens in this province was 71,462, or 
71 per cent of all persons 21 years of age and over; the citizens of 
Spain formed but 2 per cent of the total; those in suspense formed 13 
per cent, and the citizens of other or unknown countries formed 14 per 
cent. 

The above number of Cuban citizens was composed almost entirely 
of the two classes of white and colored of Cuban birth. There was a 
trifling number of persons of Spanish birth and of those born in other 
countries who claimed Cuban citizenship, but their number is too 
small to be worth consideration in this connection. The white Cuban 
citizens numbered 44,976, or 63 per cent of the total number of Cuban 
citizens. Of these 25,118, or 56 per cent, were unable to read. The 
number of colored Cuban citizens was 26,409, or 37 per cent of all, 
and of these not less than 20,938, or 79 per cent, were unable to read. 

The total number of males of voting age who were able to read was 
40,594, or 41 per cent of all males of voting ago. The Cuban citizens 
able to read numbered 25,378, or 63 per cent of all able to read. 



SANTIAGO DE CUBA. 



OUizenshipt literacy ^ and ediuxUion. 



Total voting agt3. 



Cuban citlzous 



Can neither read nor write. 
Can read, but can not write 

Can read and write 

With superior education . . . 



Spanish citizens. 



Can neither read nor write. . 
Can read, but can not write. 

Can read and write 

With superior education — 



Citizens in suspense. 



Can neither read nor write. . 
Can read, but can not write. 

Can read and write 

With superior education 



Foreign and unknown citizens 



Can neither read nor write. . 
Can read, but can not write. 

Can read and write 

With superior education 



All classes. 



Whites 

bom in 

Cuba. 



71,807 31,496 



68,7-Z2 



31, (m 



3tf,981 

mi 

17, 821 
1,326 



19,068 

223 

10,494 

1,249 



Whites 

bom in 

Spain. 



1,160 



291 

8 

815 

46 



6 



8,367 



2,788 

89 

5,196 

284 



118 



35 
2 

74 
7 



3,068 



1,015 

14 

1,601 

638 



338 



10 

1 

188 

139 



52 



25 
2 

19 
6 



Whites 

bom in 

other 

countries. 



Colored. 



9,421 


1,162 


29,228 


13 


9 


27,666 


4 


1 


19,908 
871 


9 


2 

6 


7,816 
71 






1,151 




3 








289 




2 


8 






808 




1 


46 












8,205 


12 


22 


2,736 

87 


4 


13 


5,106 
277 


8 


9 



1,141 



111 

2 

663 

865 



1,537 



869 

9 

631 

28 



The total number of males 21 years of age and over in this province 
was 71,307, or 22 per cent of the population of the province. 




OITIZENBHIP. 



in 



This number was composed — 

First, of white persons born in Cuba, to the number of 31,496, or 
44 per cent of all, nearly all of these being Cuban citizens; 

Second, of whites of Spanish birth, numbering 9,421, or 13 per cent 
of all; of this number much the larger proportion were in suspense as 
to their future citizenship; 

Third, whites bom in other countries, to the number of 1,162, or 2 
per cent of all; and. 

Fourth, colored, including black, mixed, and Chinese, to the number 
of 29,228, which formed 41 per cent of the total number of voting age, 
most of whom were of Cuban birth and Cuban citizenship. 

The total number of Cuban citizens was 68,722, or 82 per cent of all 
males over 21 years of age. This was composed of 31,056 whites and 
27,666 colored. Of the total number of Cuban citizens 38,981, or 66 
per cent, were unable to read; of the white Cuban citizens 61 per cent 
and of the colored Cuban citizens 72 per cent were illiterate. 

Spanish citizens numbered 1,160, or 2 per cent of all. The illiterates 
among them numbered 291, forming 25 per cent. Those in suspense 
were mainly of Spanish birth, numbering 8,367, or 12 per cent of all 
males over 21 years of age. Among these the illiterates numbered 
2,788, or 33 per cent. The number of persons who were citizens of 
other countries than Cuba or Spain, or whose citizenship was unknown, 
numbered 3,068, forming 4 per cent of all. Of these 1,016, or 33 per 
cent, were unable to read or write. 

The total number of males of voting age who were able to read was 
28,232, or 40 per cent of all males of voting age. Of these 19,741, or 
70 per cent, were Cuban citizens. 

The following table brings together the proportion which the males 
of voting age bear to the population in the several provinces and the 
city of Habana, the proportion being least in the province of Santiago 
and greatest in the city of Habana: 

Proportion of males of voHng age to population. 



PioTinoe. 


Per cent. 


Province. 


Per cent. 


^o.ntlAfr'^T T-T-T - -- 


22 
23 
25 
27 


Matanzas 


27.5 


PuertcTPrinciDe 


Santa Clara 


28 


Pinar del Rio 


Hfibana city 


32 


Habana. exdudlDfr city 











The following table brings together the proportion of the literate 
males of voting age who were born in Cuba to all literate males of vot- 
ing age in the several provinces and the city of Habana. It is seen 
that this proportion is least in Habana city, where less than half the 
literate voters are of Cuban birth, and is greatest in Puerto Principe, 
where they constitute more than three-fourths. 



112 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Proportion of literate males of voting age who tvere horn in Cuba to all literate mcUes of 

voting age. 



Province. 



Habana city * 

PinardelRio 

Matanzas 

Santa Clara 



Per cent. 



45 
69 
61 
63 



Province. 



Habana, excluding city 

Santiago 

Puerto Principe 



Per cent. 



66 
70 
70 



STATISTICS OF FAMILIES. 

A family, in the ordinary or popular sense of the word, means a 
group of persons bound together by ties of kindred. Usually they 
live together, but this is not necessarily involved in the word, for a 
married son or daughter occupying a sepamte house is regarded as still 
a member of the family. On the other hand, not all persons who live 
with the family are deemed members, for servants, laborers, or board- 
ers are excluded. 

. The census finds such a definition of the family inapplicable to its 
field of work. The test of kindred can not be applied by the enumer- 
ator. In many cases families of relatives are dispersed through the 
community, returns about them come through different enumemtors, 
and their names and the facts about them can not be assembled on the 
schedules or tabulated together. Accordingly in this field, as in sev- 
eral others, the census is forced to abandon the effort to bring together 
data that belong together and confine itself to the simpler and more 
practicable task of tabulating together data that arc found by the enu- 
merators conjoined. The census test of a family is not kinship by 
blood, but association in home life. Persons living in the same home 
are for census pui*poses members of the same family. 

In census usage, therefore, the word "family" means the group of 
people, whether related by blood or not, who share a common dwelling 
and table. If one person sleeps and eats alone, he constitutes for- cen- 
sus purposes a family. On the other hand, if a large group of people 
sleep and eat in a common dwelling, like a hotel or convent, they 
make up a single census family. Census families, therefore, may be 
divided into two classes: Natural families or families in the popular 
sense of that word, and *' other families." Members of a natural 
family are bound together primarily by ties of kindred. Members of 
other families are bound together primarily by other motives, usually 
of an economic character. The latter may perhaps without great vio- 
lence to the facts be called economic families. These two classes of 
motives may and often do coexist, but the family should be classed 
with natural families or with economic families according to the class 
of motives which is primary. For example, a family having only one 
boarder should doubtless be grouped with natural families, but a fam- 



SIZE OF FAMILIES. 113 

ily in which the boarders largely outnumber the blood relatives should 
be grouped with economic families. 

SIZE OF FAMILIES. 
(See Table XXXIX. ) 

The limits of size are much wider in the economic family than in 
the natural family. The economic family may consist of one person 
living alone, of two partner living together at their place of business, 
of three or more boarders living with a housekeeper, or of hundreds 
of guests, nuns, or prisoners living together in a hotel, convent, or 
prison. On the basis of number of members alone no sharp lines can 
be drawn between natui-al families and economic families. Still, 
the only classification of Census families presented in the tables of this 
volume is that by size, and on this basis, therefore, an attempt may 
perhaps be ventured to divide census families into two classes, one of 
which should consist mainly of natural families and the other mainly 
of economic families. 

As a natural family can not be composed of a single member, the 
lower limit of size for a natural family may be drawn with confidence 
between two members and one. The higher limit is more vague and 
uncertain. Yet it seems that if all families of more than ten persons 
are grouped as economic families, a large proportion, if not a majority, 
of the persons in them might be assumed to be living apart from their 
kindred — that is, as farm laborers in their employer's family, or as 
boarders, lodgers, or residents of hotels, schools, prisons, or other 
institutions treated by the census as a family, but not so regarded in 
ordinary speech. On this basis, therefore, the families in Cuba may be 
drvided into the following three groups: 

1. Families of one member. 

2. Families of two to ten members. 

3. Families of more than ten members. 

Of these groups the second consists mainly of natural families, the 
tii'st entirely and the third largely, if not mainly, of economic families. 

Families of one member. — ^This class in Cuba numbered 30,614, or 
1.96 per cent of the population, while in the United States and Poi*to 
Rico the corresponding per cents were only 0.74 and 0.82 respectively. 
The first hypothesis that arises to explain the relatively large number 
of Cubans living alone is that many families may have broken apart 
by the events of the last few years. But when the provinces and 
Habana City are examined separately, Pinar del Rio is found to have 
had much the smallest ratio of persons living out of families and 
Habana City the largest. While this result disproves the hypothesis 
just mentioned, it suggests another, viz, that the proportion living 
24662 8 



114 



BEPOKT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



out of families may be connected with the proportion of urban popu- 
lation. The following table tests the second theory: 



Province or city. 



HabanaCity 

Mataiuas proviiice 

Puerto Principe province 

Santa Clara province 

Habana province (excluding Habana City) 

Santiago province 

Pinar ael Rio province 



Per cent 
of urban 
popula- 
tion 
8.000 (+). 



100 
28.8 
28.4 
22.6 
22.1 
17.6 
5.1 



Per cent 
of popu- 
lation liv- 
ing in 
families 
of 1 mem- 
ber. 



8.96 
2.41 
2.48 
1.48 
1.67 
1.40 
.70 



This table shows that the proportion of* persons in Cuba living 
alone varies directly with the proportion of urban population, or, in 
paradoxical form, as people crowd together into cities living alone 
becomes more common. To test this inference still further, the fol- 
lowing table has been prepared: 



14 cities separately reported. 
Bestof Cutm, 



Total pop- 
ulation. 



491,604 
1,061,293 



Popula- 
tion in 
families 
of 1 mem- 
ber. 



15,806 
14,808 



Per cent 
of total 
popu- 
lation. 



3.2 
1.4 



In less than half a million urban residents there were more persons 
living alone than in the million of rural population, and in the cities 
the per cent of persons living alone was more than double what it was 
in the country. In each of the fourteen cities separately reported the 
per cent of such persons is higher than the rural average. The range 
of per cents for these cities is from Puerto Principe (4.1) and Habana 
(4) to Pinar del Rio (1.8) and Trinidad (1.8). 

Families of 11 or more members. — Such families in Cuba included 
202,175 persons, or 12.9 per cent of the entire population — that is, 
between 6 and 7 times as many persons were living in these big families 
as were living alone. In this respect Cuba diflfers widely from the 
United States, where only 6.7 per cent of the population lived in such 
families, and from the South Central States of this country, where 
race conditions and agriculture are somewhat like those of Cuba, but 
where the proportion of population in families of more than 10 mem- 
bers was the same as the average for the entire United States. 

As hotels, boarding houses, and institutions are more common in 
cities than in the country, the hypothesis suggests itself that these 
large census families, like the very small ones, are most common in 
the cities. 



*r 



CENSUS OF CUBA, 11 



CITY OF HABANA 

SEX, RACE, AND NATIVfTY 



4- JM IL 4_ 


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TL" " ilLi i 1 1 1 1 1 1 T 


TiNi4^r%-^i 


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CONJUGAL CONDITION 





FfV^ 


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IT 
























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LITERARY AND EDUCATION 




BIRTHPLACE 













































1 










o 






CI/BI 






































t-- 




































- ^ 


^ 


i 


rfc 

« 


tt 









CITIZENSHIP 










I I 


T 












I i 










1 




1 










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1 


















a 


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: 


3 





A. 



SIZE OF FAMILIES. 



115 



The following table tests the conjecture. 



14 cities separately reported. 
Rest of Cu 



ET!" 



Total pop- 
ulation. 



491. SOI 
1,061,293 



Popula- 
tion in 

families 

of 11 + 

members. 



58»675 
143,500 



Percent 
of total 
popula- 
tion. 



11.9 
13.3 



These very large families therefore were more common, or at least 
embraced a larger proportion of the population, not in cities, but in 
the rural districts. Still the difference is but slight. The per cent 
of population in the rural districts living in these very large families 
was least in Santiago (11 per cent) and greatest in Pinar del Rio (17 per 
cent). In Matanzas and Habana it was 12 per cent, in Puerto Principe 
and Santa Clara 14 per cent Among the 14 cities the proportion of 
population living in very large families was perceptibly less in those 
lying in the eastern half of Cuba. 

Families of from 2 to 10 vfiembers. — Ab Cuba had a much larger pro- 
portion of its population in economic families than had the United 
States, it follows necessarily that the proportion of the population liv- 
ing in natural f aniilies or families within the ordinary range of sizes was 
less. While in the United States nearly 93 per cent (92.6) of the pop- 
ulation were living in families of 2 to 10 members, in Cuba only 85 per 
cent (85. 2) were so 1 i ving. The proportion of population living in fam- 
ilies of this size varied in different provinces as follows: 



Provinces. 



Habana City ... 
Pinar del Rio... 

Santa Clara 

Puerto Principe 



Per cent 
of popu- 
lation in 
families 
of 2 to 10 
mem- 
bers. 



82.1 
83.9 
84. 9 
86.6 



ProTinces. 



Matanzas 

Habana, excluding city 
Santiago 



Per cent 
of popu- 
lation in 
families 
of 2 to 10 
mem- 
bers. 



85.9 
86.4 
87.7 



The small proportion of persons in such families in Habana was con- 
nected with tiie large representation of very small and very large fam- 
ilies, while in Pinar del Rio it was connected with the proportion of 
large families, so great as to more than offset the very small number 
of persons living alone. 

These families having from 2 to 10 members may conveniently be 
subdivided into three classes: Small families — that is, those having 2, 
3, or 4 members; families of medium size — that is, those having 6, 6, 
or 7 members, and large families — that is, those having 8, 9, or 10 
members. The members of natuml families, or families having 



\ I 



116 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



between 2 and 10 members, in each province have been thus sufcdi- 
vided, with results shown in the following table: . 



Province. 



Habana, excluding city 

Habana city 

Matanzas 

PinardelRio 

Puerto Principe 

Santa Clara 

Santiago de Cuba 

Cuba 



Absolute number of persons in fami- 
lies of— 



2 1010 
members. 



163,214 
193,760 
173,897 
143,388 
75,559 
302,665 
287,535 



1,340,008 



2to4 
mem- 
bers, i. e., 

small 
families. 



56,011 
80,912 
62,838 
38,608 
23.805 
97,126 
84,028 



443,328 



5to7 
mem- 
bers, i. e., 
families 
of medi- 
um dze. 



70.488 
74,584 
72,683 
62,757 
80,609 
129,825 
122,147 



563,093 



8 to 10 
mem- 
bers, i. e., 

larpe 
families. 



86,715 
88,254 
38.376 
42,023 
21.145 
76,714 
81,360 



333,587 






Percentage of persons in 
families of 2 to 10 mem- 
bers living in — 



Small 
families. 



C4.3 
41.8 
36.1 
26.9 
81.5 
32.1 
29.2 



33.1 



Families 
of medi- 
um size. 



43.2 

38.5 

41.8 

43. 

40 

42.9 

42.5 



rl 



42.0 



Large 
families. 



22.5 
19.7 
22.1 
29.8 
28.0 
25.0 
28.3 



24.9 



Apparently the size of families among white and colored in Cuba 
was about the same. For in the preceding table the percentages for 
Santiago, where there were most colored, diJ9fered little from those for 
Puerto Principe, where there were most whites. 

Families of 2 to 4 members included about one-third of all the per- 
sons living in families of 2 to 10 persons — that is, the great number of 
such families just compensated for their small size. L^rge families on 
the contrary, i. c., those with 8 to 10 members, were so few relatively 
that the number of persons living in them was only one-fourth of the 
total. The deficiency in this group must be made up, as it is, in the 
group of medium-sized families, 6 to 7 members, in which over two- 
fifths of the population in the entire group lived. 

The following t^ble shows the proportion of the total population of 
Cuba living in families of specified size, and for purposes of compari- 
son columns have been added giving the same ratios for the United 
States and Porto Rico: 



Number of members in family. 


Per mille of total population 
livins in families with 
specified number of mem- 
bers. 


Cuba. 


Porto 
Rico. 


United 
states 
(1890). 


1 


19 

64 

96 

120 

126 

122 

109 

90 

70 

52 

130 


8 
43 
85 


7 

63 

ini 


2 


3 


4 


116 163 
136 141 
135 136 
122 121 
102 96 
81 , 69 
58 66 


6 


6 . . . 


7 


8 '.[ 


9 


10 


11 + 


115 


67 




Total 


1,000 
4.8 


1,000 
5.3 


1.000 
4.9 


A verRfre «lKe of family , t . - t 





CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899 



CUBA 

NUMBER OF FAMILIES, AND OF PERSONS, CLASSIFIED 

BY SIZE OF FAMILIES 



PERSONS TO A FAMILY 

10 



6 
5 



3 

2 

I 




NUMBER OF INHABITANTS 



NUMBER OF FAMILIES 



A ll..yKM«CCi B*iTlM-»««- 



8IZE OF FAMILIES AND HABITAL CONDITION. 117 

In comparing Cuba with the United States, as one may from the 
figures of the preceding table, it appears that the average size of the 
family in Cuba was somewhat less than in America. Small families 
of 1 or 2 members and also very large families of 11 members or 
above were more common in Cuba, while families of medium range, 
from 3 to 10 (with a slight exception at 9), were more common in 
the United States. The smaller average size of the family in Cuba 
was apparently due to the great numbei* of families of one or two 
membera 

The differences which appear from a comparison of Cuba with Porto 
Rico are similar but somewhat more sharp. Small families — that is, 
those of from 1 to 4 members — and also large families of over 11 
members, were relatively more numerous in Cuba than in Porto Rico, 
while, on the other hand, families of from 6 to 10 members were more 
prevalent in Porto Rico. In both these islands the proportion of 
persons living in very large families was about double what it was in 
the United States. 

MARITAL CONDITION. 
(See Tables XV to XVIII.) 

A natural family, in distinction from groups of persons called fam- 
ilies only by the census, usually originates when a man and a woman 
begin to live with each other and apart from their kindred. If the 
man or the woman goes to live with the kindred of the other party, 
the census does not regard this as a new family. Under American 
law such a commencement of cohabitation is usually preceded by an 
expression of social approval on the union in the ferm of a marriage 
ceremony, civil or religious. American legislation tends to encourage 
such public announcement of the intent of the parties by making the 
ceremony easy and inexpensive. American courts also incline to 
hold parties married, if they were legally able to marry and intended 
to do so, even though they did not meet all the requirements of the 
law. For example, emancipated slaves in the United States have 
usually been held to be married to the persons with whom they were 
cohabiting and the court has not insisted that a ceremony should be 
proved. The Spanish law, on the contrary, like the law of most Catholic 
countries, holds that a ceremony of marriage is necessary to institute 
a lawful relation of husband and wife, and under its provisions the 
intent of the parties is by no means so decisive a factor as it is under 
American decisions. 

As a result of the transitional condition of affairs in Cuba when the 
present census was taken, a class of persons has been recognized who 
would not be legal husband and wife, or legal parent and child, under 
Spanish law, but in most cases would be under American law. These 
are persons who were living together as husband and wife without 



118 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

legal sanction of their union and also the children of such persons. 
While this census thus recognizes a marital class in addition to such 
as ordinarily appears in statistical returns, it omits one class conmionly 
reported — that of divorced persons. The reason for this is that divorce 
is not allowed by Spanish or Cuban law. The classes which do appear 
are (1) the single, within which is included everyone who has never been 
lawfully married and who on the census day was not living without 
legal sanction as the husband or wife of another; (2) those living 
together by umtual consent but without sanction of law as husband 
and wife; (3) those living together in lawful wedlock, and (4) those 
who have been lawfully married, but whose marriage before the census 
day had l)een ended by the death of the other party. These may be 
roughly classed as the never married, the partly married, the fully mar- 
rlotl, and the widowed. 

The rnarried. 

From the point of view of the family, perhaps the primary group 
among those four is the lawfully married. The number of such persons 
I'oported by the present census is 246,361, or between one-sixth and one- 
sovonth (15. 7 per cent) of the total population. The only two preceding 
coiiHUsos, wo believe, in which the same information was reported 
arc those of 1841 and 1861. In 1841 8 per cent and in 1861 16.6 per 
cent of the population were married. The proportion of married 
has thus decreased slightly in the last thirty-eight yeai's — a decrease 
the more surprising when one considers that during the same period, 
as shown in the discussion of sex (p. 81), the relative number 
of females has rapidly increased, and the sexes become much more 
nearly equal in numbers. As the present proportion of children in 
Cuba is below that in 1861, the proportion of married to the adult 
population has decreased faster than these figures would indicate. 
The present proportion is somewhat less than that in Porto Rico (16.6 
per cent) and less than half that in the United States in 1890 (35.7 per 
cent). As the attitude of American law toward marriage is widely 
different from that of Spanish law, it may be fairer to compai-e Cuban 
conditions in this regard with those of Catholic Europe. In every 
one of the great countries in Europe except Ireland and Scotland the 
proportion of married persons in the total population is at least twice 
what it is in Cuba. The same is true of Mexico, where, by the census 
of 1896, 31 per cent were reported as married. Among the other West 
Indian islands too, for which information is obtainable, notwithstanding 
the great proportion of negroes in maay of them, and the readiness of 
members of that recentiy emancipated race to establish a family with- 
out an initial ceremony of marriage, the proportion of married is some- 
what higher than in Cuba — Martinique (10.8 per cent married) and 
Trinidad (14.4 per cent married) being the only exceptions. If, as is 





■■) 1 


^ 


§1 


M 






i 
3 


if 


^ hail 


IM 

1 < 


MAP OF 

TMe PROPORtlON OF WIRBIED PEHB 



THE HABBIBD. 



119 



commonly asserted, a low proportion of married usually witnesses to 
poverty and distress, the proportion in Cuba, lower than almost any- 
where else and lower than in I8W9 ^^7 b® partly due to her recent 
economic disasters. 

The proportion of married to population varied in the provinces of 
Cuba as appears from the following table: 



Province. 



Puerto Principe 

Habana (excluding city) 

Habana city 

Santa Clara 

PinardelRio '. 

Matanzas 

Santiago 

Cuba 



Per cent of 


population 


married. 


19.6 


18.8 


17.8 


16.0 


15.7 


18.4 


12. S 



15.7 



The two adjoining eastern provinces had respectively the lowest 
and highest proportions of married. Some reasons for this difference 
will appear later. 

Whether the married persons in Cuba were found more in cities or in 
the country is shown by the following table: 



District. 



Fourteen cities 
Rest of island.. 



Total popula- 
tion. 



491,604 
1,061,293 



Married. 



Number. 



82,226 
164,126 



Per 
cent. 



16.7 
16.8 



This seems to show that marriage was more common in the urban 
districts of Cuba. But such a difference might arise from a grouping 
of the cities mainly in provinces where marriage was most common. 
Hence in the following table the analysis is pushed one step farther: 



« 

Province. 


Per cent married in— 


Urban dis- 
tricts. 


Rural dis- 
tricts. 


Habana 


17.7 
15.8 
14.9 
19.7 
16.1 
14.0 


19.1 
12.4 
16.6 
19.4 
16.2 
12.0 


Matanzas 


Pinar del Rio 


Puerto Principe 


Santa Clara 


Santiago 


Cuba 


16.5 


16.0 





This table brings to light differences between the provinces which 
were hidden in the summary. In two provinces, Habana and Santa 
Clara, marriage was more prevalent in the rural districts; in the other 
four the reverse was true. Puerto Principe and Habana led in propor- 
tion of married, both in the urban and in the rural districts, and in 



120 



KEPORT ON THE CEN8U8 OF CUBA, 18»9. 



both classes Santiago was the last. But in the other three provinces the 
position of the urban groups did not agree with that of the rural 
population. 

In the proportion of married to the total population, the cities stood 
as follows: 



City. 



Regia 

Puerto Principe 

Habana 

PinardelRlo... 

Cardenas 

Cienfaegos 

Matancas 



Per cent 
married. 



21.0 
19.7 
17.8 
17.2 
16.6 
16.0 
15.4 



City. 



Sancti Spiritus . . 

Trinidad 

Quanabacoa 

Santa Clara 

Sagua la Grande 

Santiago 

Manzanillo 



Per cent 
married. 



15.4 
15.2 
14.7 
14.2 
13.5 
13.3 
11.7 



The relatively high proportion of married in the capital and its 
suburb, Regla, and the low position of the two cities in Santiago 
province are noteworthy. But why Quanabacoa should rank so much 
below the other two cities of Habana province or the cities of Matan- 
zas and Santa Clara provinces should come next to those of Santiago 
does not appear. 

The married classified hy sex. — Among the maiTied 125,067 were 
males and 121,284 were females. The proportion of each sex who 
were married is shown in the following table: 



Sex. 



Males 

Females 



Total. 



815,205 
767,592 



Married. 



Number. 



125,067 
121,284 



Per 
cent. 



15.3 
16.0 




The proportion of married women to the total of that sex was above 
the proportion of married men, and, if one assumes that the number 
of men having lawful wives on the island was no greater than the 
reported number of married women, the ratio of such men to all 
males (14.9 per cent) was over 1 per cent below that of the married 
women to all females. The excess in the number of married males 
was found mainly in Habana province, a!x)ut seven-tenths of it being 
concentrated there. This fact suggests that the excess of husband.s 
was probably due to the immigration of married men without their 
wives. The only previous census giving comparable facts is that of 
1861. At that time 14.8 per cent of the males and 18.7 per cent of the 
females were married, and the difference between the two sexes was 
over five times what it now is. The change is doubtless connected 
with the growing numerical equality between the sexes. 

The ma/rried classified by age, — Marriage never extends through the 
entire life. All persons are born single and probably only a minority 
attain adult years and marry. The age at which marriage occurs 



CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899 



CUBA 

CONJUGAL CONDITION BY RACE, SEX, AND AGE 



OverW 
M-ae 

ss-« 
m-3i 






TOTAL 
MALE 


POPULATION 

FEMALE 




ff\ 


1 




T 




' 


1 


^^^H 


/' 










il 




^^^H 




, 


J , 




1 








r^i^^H 




^!^ 






— 


4m 


i^iJH 


iB-as 
Under IB 


! 1 
111, 




"T 


Ill ! 


jFii 









MALE 


NATIVE 


WHITE 

FEMALE 








verK 




f'l 








1 


1 


[ 


'\^ 


64-« 






1 










1 » 




\ 1 


43^ 


r n 1 














ill 






»s-« 


1 


















1 








■a-M 


h^ 


1— I— 








— 




- ^r-i- 


_ 


_ 




»■ 


- 


ift-as 


U^ 


— U- 




— 




— 




-T^-t- 


?- 


— 




^r^^ 


er li 


; ■ ■ ; 1 










i 1 i 











MALE 




COLORED 


FEMALE 




er** |l : 




! 1 




'l : ' 


■ in III 


46-65 ; II 


ii 1 


1 


;;!jJ''-'' 


=^1, 


^ 




1 1 1 i i , . 1 1 


Om. IM n 


n 


10 M t 


SO 


ai Id 






<» IM 






Lin 

iJli 
II 






THE Mi^BBXED CLASSIFIED BY AGE. 



121 



varies with sex, class, and social customs. Of the minority who 
marry half become widows or widowers before their own death. The 
likelihood of this . separation increases with age. Hence, it is of 
fundamental importance to study the age composition of the married. 
It is usual to assume that marriage does not begin with either sex 
until the age of 16. In fact the present census showed 67 persons under 
16 to be married, but probably some of these are enumerators' errors. 
When- the children under 15 are excluded, the proportion between 
those of marriageable age and those actually married becomes more 
significant. It is as follows: 



Country. 



Cuba 

Porto Rico 

United States (1890) 



Population 

15 years and 

over. 



995,761 

534,941 

40,380,060 



Married. 



Total. 



246,351 

158,570 

22,329,990 



Per 
cent. 



24.7 
29.6 
55.3 



In a fonner paragi*aph (p. 118) it was shown that the proportion of 
maiTied in Cuba was slightly below that in Porto Rico and lower than 
anywhere else in the West Indies except Trinidad and Martinique. 
From this table it appears that when adults alone are considered the 
difference between Porto Rico and Cuba is increased, since Cuba had 
few and Porto Rico very many young children. In Ti'inidad, if the 
East Indians be excluded, the proportion of married in the adult 
population (29 per cent) was decidedly greater than in Cuba, so that 
among adults marriage is apparently less common in Cuba than else- 
where in the West Indies except Martinique. 

The following table shows the number of persons living in each age 
group and the number and per cent reported as married: 



• 

Ago period. 


Number of 
persons. 


Married. 


Per cent 

married 

in United 

States 

(1890). 


Numl)er. 


Per 
cent. 


15-19 


178,035 

152,959 

137,405 

118, 812 

185,056 

117, 528 

68,182 

37,699 

85 


5,753 
23,495 
39,538 
44,060 
72,(537 
38,788 
16,881 

6,624 
8 


3.2 
15.4 
28.8 
37.1 
39.3 
33.0 
24.0 
14.9 

9.4 


5.0 
32.8 
61.7 
75.3 
80.0 
79.3 
71.8 
53.3 
83.1 


20-24 


25-29 


30-34 


85-44 


45-54 


65-64 


65+ 


Unknown 


Total '... 


995,761 


246,281 


24.7 


55.3 





From this table it appears that the relative number of married among 
Cubans between 16 and 20 was rather more than half what it was in 
the United States; that from 20 to 45 the number was very close to 
half, but at later periods it diminished until it was between one-third 
and one-fourth the American proportion. 



124 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 
Per ccrd married, fiy provinces and age perwdn. 



. MALES. 



Age perigd. 


Habana 
city. 


Habana, 

excluding 

city. 


Matanssaa. 


Pinar del 
Rio. 


Puerto 
Principe. 


Santa 
Clara. 


Santiago. 


15-19 


0.3 
5.5 
17.7 
30.2 
41.9 
48.6 
37.8 
82.0 
11.1 


0.2 
7.8 
26.3 
42.1 
49.5 
45.5 
87.9 
26.1 
5.9 


0.1 
4.2 
17.6 
30.6 
37.2 
30.2 
20.5 
14.6 
8.8 


0.2 
6.1 
20.8 
37.8 
45.0 
44.7 
38.3 
24.7 


0.8 
7.7 
26.1 
44.4 
55.5 
53.7 
47.7 
82.1 
r. 


0.2 
4.5 
18.5 
84.1 
42.5 
36.9 
26.2 
17.7 


0.1 


20-24 


5.4 


25-29 


19.3 


30-34 


81.1 


35-44 


85.4 


45-54 


35.8 


56-€4 

65+ •- 


32.8 
27.0 


IJnknow^n 


27.3 












15+ 


24.2 


27.5 


20.0 


24.3 


83.5 


23.2 


22.3 



FEMALES. 



16-19 


6.0 
24.3 
85.5 
39.1 
35.5 
25.2 
14.9 

5.8 


7.1 
29.4 
45.1 
46.9 
41.0 
29.0 
19.0 

7.2 


8.7 
19.9 
33.6 
35.4 
80.7 
2L4 
11.5 

5.2 


7.1 
26.9 
39.8 
40.8 
89.9 
3L1 
19.4 

9.2 


8.7 
37.0 
60.6 
54.1 
49.3 
37.8 
23.9 
11.3 


5.8 
27.7 
42.5 
43.8 
88.6 
25.3 
13.9 

5.9 


5.5 


20.24 


23.4 


25-29 


33.7 


30-34 


83.1 


35-44 


28.8 


45-54 


20.5 


56-64...'. 


13.6 


65+ 


6.8 


Unknown 


20.0 


















15+ 


25.4 


29.6 


21.1 


27.7 


34.7 


27.1 


21.2 



The highest proportion of married in each sex and at each age 
was in Puerto Principe, the single exception being among the males, 
25-29. At that period a few more males were married in Habana 
province outside the capital than in Puerto Principe. The smallest 
proportion of married at the extremes of life, 15-29 and 55+ (or 45+ 
for males), was found for both sexes in Matanzas. For the intervening 
age periods the smallest proportion was found, with one slight excep- 
tion, in Santiago. The women 30-54 years old in 1899 were all under 
35 when the ten-years' war, which was fought mainly in the eastern 
part of the island, ended by the capitulation of El Zanjon. Hence 
they lived through the years in which marriage usually occurs amidst 
confusion and struggle that doubtless postponed or prevented many 
marriages. This may explain in part the low proportion of married 
women 30-54 3^ears of age in Santiago. 

Among men the highest proportion of married was usually in the 
period 35-44, but in the city of Habana and in Santiago it was in the 
later period, 45-54. Among women the highest proportion was in the 
group 30-34, but in Santiago it fell five years earlier. This suggests 
that there was probably a wider average difference in Santiago than 
elsewhere between the ages of husband and wife. 

The warriedcldssifiedbyrace, — In a previous table (p. 119) it appeared 
that the ratio of married to population was higher in Puerto Principe 
and lower in Santiago than in any other province. It had already 
appeared (p. 96) that the proportion of whitej was higher in Puerto 



THE MABBIED CLASSIFIED BY SEX. 



128 



Age period 



15-19 

20-24 

2&-29 

30-34 

8^-44 

45-54 

66-64 

66+ 

Unknown 

All ages > 



Per cent married in 
Cuba among total 
pt age and sex speci- 
fied. 



Males. 



.2 
5.5 
20.0 
84.3 
+42.1 
39.4 
31.6 
23.1 
10.5 



15.8 



Females. 



6.0 

25.9 

88.8 

+40.4 

35.8 

25.8 

15.0 

6.7 

7.2 



16.0 



Per cent married in 
United States flSQO) 
among total oi age 
and sex specified. 



Males. 



.5 
16.9 
52.7 
71.3 
80.9 
+84.3 
82.3 
70.5 
28.1 



34.9 



Females. 



9.5 
46.7 
71.4 
79.8 
+80.6 
73.9 
60.4 
35. 4 
41.9 



86.4 



The highest ratio of married men was found between 35 and 45, while 
the highest ratio of married women was found between 30 and 35. In 
the United States the highest ratio for men was ten years and for women 
five years later. The ratio of married men 20-24 years old was less 
than one-third what it was in the United States, while the ratio of mar- 
ried women 15-24 years old was more than one-half what it was in the 
United States. This suggests that the early marriages just shown to 
be somewhat more common in Cuba than in the United States may be 
marriages in which only the bride is especially youthful and that early 
marriages of men may be no more common than in the United States. 
To test this the per cent that the married men under 25 years of age 
made of all married men and the married women under 20 made of all 
married women is shown in the following table: 

Per cent that married persons of sex and age specified made of married persons of sex 

specified but all ages. 



Country. 



Cuba 

United States (1890) 



Males 
under 25. 



3.6 
5.4 



Females 
under 20. 



4.7 
3.5 



The marriage of women under 20 in Cuba was more common, rela- 
tive to the married of all ages, than in the United States, but the 
marriage of men under 25 was decidedly less common. This difference 
is doubtless a result of the recent economic disasters in Cuba, which 
have greatly increased the difficulty of supporting a wife and family. 
These disasters have apparently delayed the marriage of men, but 
perhaps not of women. The early marriages of women may no doubt 
be connected with a fact to appear from analysis of the occupation 
tables (p. 157), that the proportion of women engaged in gainful occu- 
pations was smaller in Cuba than in Porto Rico or the United States. 

The married^ classified hy sex and age^ hy provinces. — In the following 
two tables the analysis of marriage by sex and age is extended to the 
several provinces. 



■„-4hS 



^ 



^7 



-^ ..t»»" 



/^ 












.^ 



CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899 



CUBA 



CONJUGAL CONDITION 



HABANA 




MATANZAS 




|. 


— -Ji 




1 


- - 


~ — •* 




3 



PINAR DEI RIO 





^ 




1 


. — . - 










- - - ■ 















PUERTO PRINCIPE 



, 



SANTA CLARA 



SANTIAGO 





SINGLE 



LIVING TOGETHER BY MUTUAL CONSENT 



1 ] MARRIED 



f J WIDOWED 



A • «.N % ( • »«A M| 



THE MARRIED CLASSIFIED BY RACE. 



125 



Principe and lower in Santiago than in any other province. This sug- 
fifcsts that white blood and lawful marriage may be related phenomena. 
The following table shows that they vary together through the provinces: 



Province. 



Puerto Principe 

Habana (excluding city) 

Habanajcity , 

Santa Clara , 

PinardelRio 

Matanzas , 

Santiago 



Per cent of total 


population. 


Married. 


White. 


19.5 


79.8 


18.8 


76.4 


17.8 


71.4 


16.0 


68.6 


16.7 


72.6 


18.4 


58.3 


12.3 


55.3 



Hence it seems probable that legal marriage in Cuba was more com- 
mon among the whites than among the colored. The following table 
raises the probability to a certainty: 




Total popu- 
lation. 


Lawfully married. 


Number. 


Per 
cent. 


1,052,397 
520,400 


214,543 
31,808 


20.4 

6.1 ] 

1 



Legal marriage w^ more than thrice as general among the whites as 
among the colored. But even among the whites it was not much more 
than half as general as it was in the United States. In two former cen- 
suses, those of 1841 and 1861, comparable returns have been made. 
From them the following table has been compiled: 

Per cent married among total population. 



White.. 
Colored. 



1841. 



10.4 
6.2 



1861. 



22.8 
8.1 



1899. 



20.4 
6.1 



In both races marriage is less frequent than forty years ago. 
In the following table the analysis of the subject by race is extended 
to the provinces: 



Province. 



Habana (excluding city) 

Habana city * 

Matanzas 

PinardelRio 

Puerto Principe 

Santa Claia 

Santiago 

Cuba 



Per cent married. 


Whites. 


Colored. 
6.7 


22.6 


22.7 


5.7 


21.1 


2.6 


19.2 


6.8 


21.4 


12.1 


20.3 


6.6 


16.6 


7.1 


20.4 


6.1 



• f 



126 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1890. 



When the proportion of married in each province is obtained for the 
two races separately, it appears that white and black were affected by 
different influences. The highest proportion of married for the whites 
was not in Puerto Principe, but in and around the capital, and the pro- 
portion in the other provinces, except Santiago, was not much below 
that in Puerto Principe. In this last province the high relative num- 
ber of married is due in great measure to the fact that the married 
among the colored are almost twice as many as in any other province. 
Matanzas and Puerto Principe furnish a striking contrast. In each the 
married whites were about one-fifth the total whites, but among the 
Puerto Principe colored one in eight were married, and in Matanzas 
only one in thirty -eight. 

In the following table the analysis of the prevalence of lawful 
marriage by race has been extended to the fourteen cities separately 
repoited: 



District. 



Fourteen cities separately reported. 
Rest of Cuba 



Per cent of married 
among — 



Whites. 



21.4 
19.0 



explored. 

7.0 
' 5.7 



With both races marriage is slightly more common in cities than in 
the rural districts, but the difference for the whites is greater than 
for the colored. 

The rrharri'ed classified iy race and sex, — The following table shows 
the nural>er of married by race and sex: 



Race and sex. 



White males.... 
White females. . 
Colored males . . 
Colored females 



Total. 



663,113 
489,284 
252,092 
268,808 



Married. 



Number. 



109,760 

104,783 

15,307 

16,501 



Per cent. 



19.5 

21.4 

6.1 

6.2 



This shows that the larger proportion of married among the females 
already noted (p. 120) was confined almost entirely to the whites, and 
supports the explanation offered that the excess was due mainly to the 
immigration of husbands without their wives. 

The ma/rried cUissifieil hyrace and age. — ^It has already appeared that 
marriage wa^ more than three times as common among whites as 
among colored. The same was true of the people over 15 as appears 
from the following: 



THE XARBIBD 0LA8SIFIED BT RACE. 



127 



Per cent married ia total aduU popuJUUion (15-{-), 



Race. 


Per cent 
married. 


White 


82.4 
9.6 


Colored 





In the following table the per cents are given by provinces for each 
race: 

Per cent married in total advU popuUUion (i5-f-). 



Province. 



(city.) 
(< 



Habana 

Habana (excluding dty). 

Matanzas 

PlnardelRio... 
Puerto Principe. 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 



Cuba. 



Whites. 


84.5 
31.3 
83.1 
81.5 
88.4 
32.8 
29.3 


82.4 



Colored. 



8.0 

9.9 

8.9 

10.5 

19.1 

9.8 

12,4 



9.6 



Among both races marriage was much more common in Puerto Prin- 
cipe than in any other province. But the difference was more marked 
among the colored than among the whites. The proportion of married 
among the colored adults of Puerto Principe was one-half greater 
than in any other province. But among the white adults of that prov- 
ince the married, while twice as numerous as among the colored, were 
only about one-seventh more numerous than among the whites in 
Habana city. Marriage was far more evenly distributed among whites 
than among colored. In the province where it was most general (Puerto 
Principe) it was less than one-third more commion than among the. 
whites of the adjoining province of Santiago, where the proportion of 
married whites was lowest. But among the colored adults of Puerto 
Principe marriage was almost five times as conmion as among the col- 
ored adults of Matanzas. The table shows that the local influences 
favorable to marriage differed widely for the two races. To show this 
more clearly the provinces may be arranged in the order of the preva- 
lence of marriage among white and among colored adults as follows: 

Provinces arranged in the order of vncreanng prevcHence of marriage among — 



White adults: 
Santiago. 

Habana (excluding city). 
Pinar del Rio. 
Banta Clara. 
Matanzas. 
Habana (citjr). 
Puerto Principe. 



Colored adults: 
Matanzas. 
Habana (city). 
Banta Clara. 

Habana (excluding city). 
Pinar del Rio. 
Santiago. 
Puerto Principe. 



No relation whatever can be discerned between these two series. 
Why should Santiago have few marriages among whites and many 



128 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



among colored, or Matanza^ few among colored and many among 
whites? 

The ittarried eUwsificd by race and sex and age, — In the following 
table the proportion of married in the adult population of each sex and 
I'ace is stated. 



Ruce and sex. 



White nifties 

Colored mtilcR.. 
White females. . 
Colored femaleu 





Adult 
population 

(15+). 


Married. 




Number. 


Per 
cent. 




364,261 
157)855 
299,022 
174,623 


109. 7ao 

15,307 

104,783 

16,501 


30.1 
9.7 

35.0 
9.5 











In preceding paragraphs it has appeared that the proportion of 
married women in Cuba was slightly greater than the proiX)rtion of 
married men (p. 120), and that this difference was confined to the whites 
(p. 126); that the difference between the sexes for the total population 
was less than 1 per cent, but for the whites alone was nearly 2 per cent. 
The laist table shows that for white adults the difference between the 
two sexes was nearly 5 per cent. 

In the following table the facts are given in the same way, by sex 
and race for the several provinces. 

Per ami of adult popuUttion (15-\-) of acx and race specified who were married. 



l*rovln(t*. 



Habana (city) 

Habana (exeludinf? city) 

Matanza8 

Finar del Rio 

Puerto Principe 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 



Males. 



White. Colored. 



28.4 
82.6 
31.0 
28.8 
87.5 
29.4 
28.9 



9.0 

9.9 

3.9 

10.5 

18.8 

9.2 

13.1 



Females. 



While. Colored. 



35.4 
36.8 
36.5 
a'i.O 
39.4 
86.0 
29.8 



7.3 
9.8 
3 8 
10.4 
19.4 
10.4 
11.9 



From the preceding table it appears that among white adults the pro- 
portion of married females was greater in each province than the pro- 
portion of married males. Among colored adults in five of the seven 
provinces the reverse was true. The difference is due to the excess of 
males among white tulults and of females among colored adults. In all 
monogamous countries, if either sex is decidedly in the minority, it is 
almost sure to have a larger proportion of married than the sex which 
outnumbers it. Among the white adults of Cuba 54.9 per cent were 
male, but among the colored adults only 47.5 per cent were male. 
Hence the chance of marriage in the one race is greater among females, 
and in the other greater among males. This excess of males among 
white adults appeared in every province of Cuba, and accordingly the 
higher proportion of married among females was equally general. The 
excess of females among colored adults appeared in five of the seven 



THE MAREIED CLASSIFIED BY BAOE. 



129 



divisions, and in each of these five the proportion of married was higher 
among colored males. Santa Clara had more colored men than women, 
and accordingly, in that province, the proportion of married was higher 
among colored women. In Puerto Principe, while the women were 
slightly in excess (51.7 per cent) among colored adults, the slight dif- 
ference was probably offset by the earlier age at which women marry. 
In the following table the facts for all Cuba are given by sex and 
race and eight age periods. 

Per cent of married in populatmi grmip of aex, race, and age specified. 



Age period. 


MaleR. 


Females. 


White. 


a>lored. 


White. 


Colored, j 


16-19 


0.2 
6.2 
23.1 
40.4 
51.0 
54.7 
52.5 
44.2 
12.5 


0.1 

8.8 

10.3 

16.4 

17.7 

12.7 

8.8 

7.0 

5.9 


7.6 
38.4 
51.1 
54.8 
50.0 
87.5 
23.1 
10.9 
16.7 


1 

2.6 
10.8 
15.7 
14.9 
12.3 

8.0 

5.1 

2.8 


20-24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-44 


46-54 


56-64 


65+ 


Unknown 


Total adults (15+) 




80.1 


9.7 


85.0 


9.5 





Marriage was about 3.1 times as general among white men as among 
colored men, but 3.7 times as general among white women as an^ong 
colored women, the difference being due, as just explained, to the excess 
of white men and of colored women in Cuba. Taking these ratios as 
the standard, it appears from the preceding table that prior to the age 
of 30, and for males prior to the age of 46, the proportion of married 
among colored was uniformly higher than when all ages are included. 
This suggests that relativel}'^ to the white the generation of colored 
which has grown up since emancipation have entered upon legal mar- 
riage rather more commonly than their parents did. The difference 
may also be connected with the excess of males among the aged col- 
ored. At each of the age periods above 45 the colored males outnum- 
bered the females. There were 12,897 colored persons born in Africa 
reported by this census (Table XI), the great majority in the higher age- 
groups, and nearly three-fifths (59 per cent) were males. Then, too, 
there were 14,614 colored persons bom in China, most of whom also 
belonged to the higher ages, and of these practically all (99.7 per 
cent) were males. That, notwithstanding this difference, a larger pro- 
portion of the colored men than of colored women at those ages were 
married must be due to the marriage by old men of younger women. 

The married clamfied hy place ofhirth. — The tables make it possible 
to analyze the conjugal condition of the population of Cuba witn refer- 
ence to one further element — nativity. This tabulation is confined to 
the white race alone. The question may be asked: Was marriage 

24C62 9 



130 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. * 



more common among native whites or foreign-born whites? The 
following table appears to give an answer: 



NaUvlty. 


Total 
number. 


Married. 


Number. 


Per 
cent. 


Native whites 


910,299 
142,098 


1G9,3&I 
45,189 


18.6 
31.8 


Foreign-boni whites 





These figures seem to show that marriage was far more common 
among the foreign-born than among the native. But no such infer- 
ence is warranted, because the immigrant population of Cuba is com- 
posed mainly of adults of marriageable age. Of the native white 
population over two-fifths (42.1 per cent) were under 15 years of age, 
while of the foreign-born whites only one twenty-fifth (4 per cent) 
were in those age periods. When the children of both classes are 
excluded the figures tell a different story, as follows: 



NaUvity. 



Native whites 

Foreicrn-bom whites 



Number of 

adults 15 

years and 

over. 



526,867 
136,416 



Married. 



Number. 



169,354 
45,189 



Per 
cent. 



32.1 
33.1 



With this correction introduced it appears that the proportion of 
married in the two classes was almost the same, but with the foreign- 
ers slightly larger. As the difference is so slight, it may be affected 
by the sex composition of the two classes. Hence that further classi- 
fication is introduced in the table below: 



Nativity. 



Native white males 

Foreign-bom white males. . 

Native white females 

Foreign-bom white females 



Number of 

adults 16 

years and 

over. 



251,655 

112,606 

275,212 

28,810 



Married. 



Number. 



75,464 
34,306 
93,900 
10,883 



Per 
cent. 



30.0 
30.5 
34.1 
45.7 



The table seems to show that foreign-born white men were married 
in slightly greater proportion than native white men, and foreign-born 
white women in far greater proportion than native white women; but 
although all persons under 15 have been excluded, yet the adult native 
. whites must have had a far larger proportion than the foreign-born 
have in the ages 15-25, at which marriage is comparatively infrequent. 
Hence the question can not be decisively answered until the proportion 
of married for each age period is ascertained. This is done in the 



^ 



OONSENTUAL MARRIAGES. 



131 



following table, and to economize attention only the per cents are 
given: 

Per cent married ofpopuUUion in sex, doss, and age specified. 



Age period. 


White males. 


White females. 


Native. 


Foreign. 


Native. 


Foreign. 


16-19 


.3 
7.2 
27.8 
46.6 
64.1 
66.9 
62.8 
62.8 
8.3 


.2 
4.0 
16.6 
31.0 
46.4 
62.9 
61.9 
44.6 
18.7 


7.4 
82.7 
50.6 
64.2 
49.1 
36.6 
22.8 
10.4 

9.1 


14.9 
46.3 
58.7 
61.1 
67.6 
44.3 
27.7 
13.2 


20-24 


26-29 


80-34 


86-44 


46-64 


66-64 


66- 


Unknown 







With this table a final answer is reached to the question under 
examination. At every age period the native white men were married 
in greater proportions than the immigrant white men, but the immigrant 
white women were married in greater proportions than the native white 
women. This doubtless means that a large proportion of the women 
who have gone to Cuba from elsewhere have gone with their husbands. 



PERSONS LIVING TOGETHER AS HUSBAND AND WIFE BY MUTUAL 

CONSENT. 

On the schedules in the present census there are many cases in 
which a man and woman of about the same age were reported as occu- 
pying the same house but as bearing different names and standing in 
no admitted relations to each other. In most cases the census family 
included one or more children bearing the woman's name. All such 
census families were tabulated as cases of persons cohabiting as 
husband and wife without formal legal sanction upon the union, and 
the children were tabulated as technically illegitimate. Any one 
familiar with Cuban life knows that in certain classes and regions such 
unions are frequent and often as permanent and secure as good care 
and nurture for the children as if the law had sanctioned the rela- 
tion. It was impossible to detect from the schedules every such case, 
and in some few instances persons may have been assigned to this 
cliEiss by an error, but probably whatever mistakes occurred have 
usually been of omission. This is the first time that such a return has 
ever been tabulated, and therefore no comparisons can be made with 
past Cuban censuses or with censuses of other countries except Porto 
Rico. The returns for these two countries under this head were as 
follows: 



Counti'y. 



Cuba 

FortoRloo. 



Total popu- 
lation. 



1,672,797 
963,243 



Living 

U^ether by 

mutual 

consent. 



181,732 
S4,24I 



Per cent 

living 
together. 



8.4 
8.8 



132 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



In each country about 1 person in 12 was living in such relations, but 
the proportion was slightly less in Cuba than in Porto Rico. A fairer 
comparison may be made with the married couples. For every two 
lawful unions there is one union by mutual consent. 

The several provinces of Cuba have the following proportions of 
pei'sons living together by mutual consent: 



Province. 



Puerto Principe . 

Habana 

Pinar del Rio. . . . 

Santa Clara 

Matanzas 

Santiago de Cuba 



Total popu- 
lation. 



88,234 
424,804 
178,064 
866,536 
202,444 
827,716 



Living together by 
mutual consent 



Number. 



8.606 
28,780 
12,886 
26,607 
20,942 
39,662 



Per 
cent 



3.9 
6.8 
7.2 
7.6 
10.4 
12.1 



Reference to a preceding table shows that the provinces arranged 
as above in the order of increasing proportion of persons living 
together agree closely with the provinces arranged in the order of 
decreasing proportion of married (p. 119). The two are brought 
together in the following table: 



Province. 



Puerto Principe 

Habana 

Pinar del Rio... 

Santa Clara 

Matanzas 

Santiago 

Cuba 



Per cent 
living to- 
gether as 
nusband 
and wife by 
mutual 
consent. 



3.9 
6.8 
7.2 
7.5 
10.4 
12.1 



8.4 



Per cent 

legally 

marrlra. 



19.6 
18.8 
15.7 
16.0 
18.4 
12.3 



16.7 



Per cent 

belonging 

to eitber 



23.5 
26.1 
22.9 
23.6 
23.8 
24.4 



24.0 



In Santiago there were three times as many of these unions as in the 
adjoining province of Puerto Principe, but as an oflfset there were in 
Santiago less than two-thirds as many married persons as in the neigh- 
boring province. 

The figures for the 14 cities separately reported are as follows: 



City. 



Cardenas 

Cienfuegos 

Guanabucoa . . . 

Habana 

Manzanillo 

Matanzas 

Pinar del Rio.. 
Puerto Principe 



Per cent 


living 


together. 


7.3 


8.4 


8.0 


7.7 


10.0 


7.7 


7.7 


3.1 



City. 



Regla 

Sagna la Grande. 
Sanctl Spiritus . . 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Trinidad 

Total cities 



Per cent 

living 

together. 



6.3 
9.0 
8.7 
6.9 

7.7 
6.2 



7.4 



CONSENTUAL MARKIAOE8. 



133 



In 9 of the 14 cities the relative number of persons living together 
was less than in the entire province containing the city, while in 5 
cities it was greater. The difference between urban and rural pop- 
ulation in this regard is summarized in the following two tables for 
the island and its provinces: 





Population. 


Living together by 
mutual consent. 


Number. 


Per 
cent. 


14 cities BCDarately reported 


491,504 
1,061,293 


36,500 
95,232 


7.4 

8.8 


Rest of Cuba 




Total 


1,572,797 


131,732 


8.4 



This is not a conclusive proof that the cities have a smaller propor- 
tion of persons living together than the surrounding rural districts, 
for the cities are massed in the western central part of the island. 
Hence it seems best to treat the urban and rural districts of each prov- 
ince separately, as is done in the following table: 



Province. 


Per cent living together 
by mutual consent- 


In urban 
districts. 


In rural 
districts. 


Puerto Principe 


3.1 
7.7 
7.7 
7.2 
7.6 
8.2 


4.3 
5.3 
7.1 
7.5 
11.5 
12.9 


Habana 


PlnardelRio 


Santa Clara 


Matanzas 


Santiago 





The relative number of persons living together without being law- 
fully married was greater in the four cities of Pinar del Rio and Habana 
provinces than in the rural districts, but elsewhere the cities had a 
smaller number than the country. The rural districts of Matanzas 
and Santiago are evidently the regions in which this mode of family 
life is most prevalent. 

There were 25 municipal districts out of 132, or nearly 1 in 5, in 
which the number of consentual unions exceeded the number of legal 
marriages. But only 1 of the 14 cities separately reported, Manza- 
nillo, is included in any of the 25 districts. Three provinces, Puerto 
Principe, Santa Clara, and Habana, had no such district. Pinar del 
Rio had 3 adjoining each other on the north coast and Santiago had 11 
stretching along the south coast from Niquero to Guantanamo. The 
other 11 were in Matanzas. 

CloMijicatiiyn hy sex. — Of the 131,732 persons reported as living 
together, 65,793 were males and 65,939 were females. Ah there were 
over 60,000 more males than females in Cuba (p. 80), the proportion of 
females living in marriage relations unsanctioned by law (8.7 per 
cent) was greater than the proportion of males (8.1 per cent). 



134 



REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OP CUBA, 1899. 



Clussijiccdion Try age, — Drawing the line at fifteen years between 
those who were and those who were not old enough to marry one finds 
the following result: 



Country. 



Cuba 

Porto Rico. 



Total pop- 
ulation 
15-f. 



996,761 
534.941 



Llylng together. 



Number. 



131,782 
84,241 



Per 
cent 



18.2 
16.7 



As the proportion of children under 16 was much less in Cuba than in 
Porto Rico, the diflference between the two islands already noted (p. 131) 
was not clearly defined by the table there given, showing the propor- 
tion of persons living together to the population of all ages. The 
table just given is, therefore, a more exact measure of the diflference 
between the two islands. In the following table the figures for Cuba 
are given by provinces: 

Per end of adultn {I5-\-) who ^oere living together by muttuU consent. 

Puerto Principe 7.0 

Habana (excluding city) 8. 4 

Habana (city) 10.7 

Santa Clara 11.7 

PinardelRio 11.8 

Matanzas 15. 9 

Santiago 21.3 

Cuba 13.2 

There is but one diflference between the order of the provinces here 
and that in the table already given (p. 132). Among adults, as shown 
in this table, Santa Clara had a slightly larger proportion of persons 
living together than Pinar del Rio, while in the total population the 
relation is reversed. It is due to the fact, brought out in the discus- 
sion of the age tables (p. 91), that Pinar del Rio had more children and 
fewer adults than Santa Clara. 

In the following table the relative number of persons living together 
by mutual consent to the total population is given for the several age 
periods. For purposes of comparison a second column reports the 
proportion of persons married in Cuba at the same age periods. As 
both these classes together include probably about all who were married 
either by mutual consent alone or with the sanction of the law, a third 
column gives the proportion that the sum of these two classes makes 
to the total population of the age named, and for comparative pur- 
poses the figures for the United States are added in a fourth column. 



0OK8KNTUAL XABBIAGDS. 



135 



Age period, 


Per cent 
living to- 
gether. 


Per cent 
married 


ToUl. 


Per cent 

married 

in United 

SUtefi. 


15-19 


2.6 
9.5 
14.6 
17.9 
19.1 
17.7 
15.2 
12.4 
4.7 


8.2 
15.4 
28.8 
87.1 
89.3 
83.0 
24.0 
14.9 

9.4 


6.8 
24.9 
48.4 
66.0 
58.4 
60.7 
89.2 
27.3 
14.1 


5.0 
32.8 
61.7 
76.8 
80.8 
79.8 
71.8 
58.8 
83.1 


20-24 


26-29 


80-34 


86-14 


45-64 


66-64 


65+ 


Unknown 


Total 15+ 


13.2 


24.7 


37.9 


55.3 





It will be noticed that between the ages of 25 and 65 the proportion 
of persons married was uniformly about double the proportion of per- 
sons living together without marriage, but in the younger and older 
age periods the proportion of pei'sons living together to those married 
was higher. The larger proportion between 15 and 25 suggests that 
unions of this sort are entered upon at a somewhat younger age than 
ceremonial marriage. This may best be tested by finding what pro- 
portion of the total number of each class were under 25. Among the 
married about one-ninth (11.9 per cent) were under 25, but of the 
persons living together without a marriage ceremony about one-seventh 
(14.6 per cent) were under 25. 

The large proportion of persons over 65 who were living together by 
mutual consent is probably connected with the presence in Cuba of 
many aged negroes born in Africa and imported before slavery was 
abolished or the slave trade effectually suppressed. It is probable 
that such persons before living together seldom go through a formal 
ceremony of marriage. There were also many Chinese males in Cuba 
and their median age was over 53 years. The same remark would hold 
true of them. The decreasing proportion of colored to the total pop- 
ulation of Cuba during the last forty years is also a factor to be con- 
sidered in explaining the difference. 

CUisaificaiwn hy age and sex. — As the age during which marriage, 
lawful or unlawful, occurs varies widely with the sex, it is important 
to supplement the age analysis already given by one in which the sex 
difference is also included. That is done in the following table, in 
which the proportion of persons living together at each period and for 
each sex is given. The proportions of persons mamed of the same 
sex and the same age are added in parallel columns, and as these two 
together make up the total of persons living in any sort of marriage 
relationship in Cuba, a third column gives the total, while a fourth 
column gives the proportion of persons of the same sex and age 
married in the United States in 1890. In each column the maximum 
ratio is marked by a + prefixed. 



136 



REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 





Malefl. 


Females. 


Age period. 


Married. 


Living 
together. 


Total. 


Married 

males In 

United 

States 

(1890). 


Married. 


Living 
together. 


Total. 


Married 
females 

in 

United 

States 

(1890). 


16-19 


0.2 
5.5 
20.0 
84.8 
+42.1 
89.4 
81.6 
23.1 


0.4 
6.6 
12.2 
16.8 
18.9 
+19.7 
18.5 
17.0 


0.6 
11.0 
82.2 
60.6 
+61.0 
59.1 
60.1 
40.1 


0.5 
18.9 
52.7 
71.3 
80.9 
+84.8 
82.3 
70.6 


6.0 
25.9 
88.8 
+40.4 
85.8 
26.3 
15.0 

6.7 


4.6 
18.8 
17.4 
+19.8 
19.4 
15.2 

n.2 

7.7 


10.6 
89.7 
66.2 
+60.2 
55.2 
40.5 
26.2 
14.4 


9.5 


20-24 


46.7 


25-29 


71.4 


80-34 


79.8 


85-44 


+80.6 


45-54 


73.9 


65-64 


60.4 


66+ 


85.4 






Total 15+ 


24.0 


12.6 


86.6 


54.1 


25.6 


13.9 


39.5 


56.8 



In the preceding table it will be noticed that the maximum propor- 
tion of persons married was reached in Cuba for each sex ten j^ears 
earlier than in the United States. It may be that this is a remote 
result of the ten years' war, 1868-1878. It is a familiar fact that 
maiTiages decrease during periods of war or serious economic calam- 
ities. This fact is conspicuously illustrated by the vital statistics of 
Cuba during the last ten years, discussed elsewhere in the present vol- 
ume (Appendix XVIII). It is probable, therefore, that the number of 
marriages in Cuba during the ten years 1868-1878 was materially 
reduced and that the number of marriages celebrated after the capitu- 
lation of El Zanjon was above the normal. Many men over 45 yesLTS 
of age may have been prevented from marrying by the disturbances 
during the years of their early manhood, and, on the contrary, men 
between 35 and 44 would have been at the threshold of the age at 
which marriage is most common, when peace returned to Cuba in 1878. 
This hypothesis may also explain the proportion of children in Cuba 
between 10 and 20, which was shown in the discussion of age (p. 85) 
to be larger than in the United States or Porto Rico. Such children, 
aside from the few immigrants, must have been born in Cuba between 
1879 and 1888. 

The preceding table shows that for every 100 married men over 
15 years of age there were 52 living together by mutual consent 
(126-^240=52.5 per cent), and for every 100 married women over 
15 years of age there were 54 living together by mutual consent. The 
difference is due to the fact that the married men in Cuba 6utnumbered 
by 3,783 the married women. The ratio of those living together by 
mutual consent to the married was below the average for males 
25 to 54 years of age and for females 20 to 44 years of age. The 
proportion of persons living together by mutual consent was therefore 
excessive in both sexes during the earlier and later years of life. 



CONSENTUAL MABBIAGES. 



137 



Classijicdtion hy rdce. — ^The following table gives the facts by i-ace 
in the briefest way: 



Race. 


Population. 


Persons living to- 
gether by mutual 
consent. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


White 


1,052,397 
520,400 


60,027 
81,705 


4.8 
16.7 


Colored 


Total 


1,572,797 


131,732 


8.4 





Legal marriage has already (p. 125) been shown to be more than three 
times as common among whites as among colored. The present table 
shows that unions by mutual consent were more than three times as 
prevalent among colored as among whites. The comparison may be 
made more clear by the following table: 



Race. 



White 

Colored 

Total 



Number 
lawfully 
married. 



214,543 

81,806 



246,351 



Persons living to- 
gether by mutual 
consent. 



Number. 



50,027 
81,706 



131,782 



To each 
100 mar- 
ried. 



23 
257 



53 



Of the total unions among whites 81 per cent were lawful marriages. 
Of the total unions among colored 28 per cent were lawful marriages. 

In the following table the facts are given by race for the several 
provinces: 



Province. 



Habana city 

Habana (exclusive of city) 

Matanzas 

Pinardel Rio 

Puerto Principe 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Total 



Whites. 



Married. 



38,247 
32,500 
24,907 
24, 131 
16,a57 
49, (KM 
80,097 



214,543 



Living 

together by 

mutual 

consent. 



7,807 
3,819 
3,762 
6,263 
2,220 
9,507 
16,649 



50,027 



Colored. 



Married. 



8,824 
2,976 
2,180 
2,969 
2,153 
7,321 
10,386 



31,808 



Living 

together by 

mutual 

consent. 



10,446 
6,658 

17,180 
6,123 
1,285 

17,100 

22,913 



81,705 



Living together to 
each 100 married. 



White. 



20 
12 
15 
26 
16 
19 
55 



23 



Colored. 



273 
224 
788 
206 
60 
234 
221 



257 



This table brings out noteworthy differences between the several 
provinces and shows that the differences do not run parallel for the 
two races. Among whites the smallest proportion of conscntual 
unions to lawful marriages was in Habana province outside the city, 
where only about 1 union in 9 was merelj'' consentual. At the opposite 
extreme comes Santiago, where among whites more than 1 union in 



138 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



3 was merely consentual. Next to Santiago, but at a long remove, 
comes the province at the other end of the island, Pinar del Rio, where 
about 1 union in 5 was by consent only. Among colored, the province 
having the fewest merely consentual unions, Puerto Principe, had about 
1 in 3, or rather more of such unions than the province of Santiago 
had among whites. Next to Puerto Principe at a long interval comes 
Pinar del Rio, where there were 2 unions by consent among colored for 
each lawful marriage. Matanzas stands out conspicuously in the column 
for colored, with nearly 8 consentual unions for 1 legal marriage, a 
proportion about thrice as great as in any other province. It is note- 
worthy that the provinces in which this form of married life was least 
common among colored, Puerto Principe and Pinar del Rio, are those 
in which the colored formed the smallest proportion of the population, 
and the province in which consentual unions were most common 
among whites, Santiago, is the one in which the whites are but little 
more than half the population. 

In the following table the facts are given separately for urban and 
rural Cuba, and as the conditions in Habana city are often widely dif- 
ferent from the average conditions in other Cuban cities, urban Cuba 
has been subdivided into Habana and the remaining 13 cities separately 
reported: 





White. 


Colored. 


Living together to 
each 100 married. 


Division. 

• 


Married. 


Living 

together by 

matual 

consent. 


Married. 


Living 

together by 

mutual 

consent. 


White. 


Colored. 


Habana city 


38,247 

32,142 

144,154 


7,807 

7,167 

35,058 


8,824 

8,018 

19,971 


10,446 
11,080 
60,179 


20 
22 
24 


278 


Thirteen other cities 


138 


Rest of Cuba 


801 







This table shows that among both races consentual unions were most 
common in the ruiTil districts, but that for the white race the minimum 
of such unions was found in Habana city, while for the colored race 
the minimum was in the other 13 cities, and that the proportion of 
consentual unions among colored, both in the rural districts and in 
Habana, is double the average for the other cities. It will be of 
interest to see whether the same relation holds when both consentual 
unions and lawful marriages are compared with the population. This 
comparison is made in the following table: 



Division. 


Population. 


Married. 


Living together. 


White. 


Colored. 


White. 


Colored. 


White. 


Colored. 


Habana city 


168,488 
159,645 
724,819 


67,548 

95,878 

856,974 


88,247 

82,142 

144,154 


8,824 

8,013 

19,971 


7,807 

7,167 

• 85,058 


10,446 


Thirteen other cities 


11,080 


Rest of Cuba 


60,179 






Total 


1,062,897 


520,400 


214,648 


81,806 


60,027 


81,705 







OONSENTUAL HABBIAGES. 



139 



From the preceding table the following percentages are computed: 



Division. 


Per cent married. 


Per cent living 
together. 


White. 


Colored. 


White. 


Colored. 


Habana city 


22.7 
20.1 
19.9 


5.7 
8.4 
5.6 


4.6 
4.6 
4.8 


15.6 
11.6 
16.9 


Thirteen other cities 


Rest of Cuba 


Total 


20.4 


6.1 


4.8 


15.7 





This table confirms the preceding in showing that for both races 
consentual unions were most common in the rural districts. An appar- 
ent difference of result between the two methods is that the former 
indicated that among whites consentual unions were least common iti 
Habana city while this table fixes the minimum of such unions in 
the 13 other cities. The two may be reconciled by noticing that the 
proportion of married to population among whites in Habana was 
decidedly greater than in the other cities. Hence when the consentual 
unions are compared with the numew)us legal marriages as in the first 
table, they appear fewer than they do when compared with the popu- 
lation. These secondary cities had the smallest proportion of con- 
sentual unions for each race, but by an interesting anomaly they had 
the largest proportion of married among the colored. It may be that 
the social standards or economic situation of the colored in these 
cities is somewhat higher than elsewhere, or it may be that the cities 
lie mainly in the center of the island and reflect the average condi- 
tions in their immediate vicinity. The last possibility may be tested 
by the following table: 

Urban population. 



Division. 



Qnanabaooa, Regla, and Habana city . . . 

Cardenas and Matansas 

PlnardelRio 

Puerto Principe 

Ctenfnegos, Sagua la Grande. Sancti Spir 

ituf , Santa Clara, and Trinidad 

Manzanillo and Santiago 

Total 



Population. 



White. Colored. 



186.915 

38,618 

5,933 

17,788 

60,874 
27,951 



328,079 



74,394 

19,696 

2,947 

7,814 

29,471 
29,608 



163,425 



Married. 



White. 



42,292 
8,248 
1,178 
3,987 

9,629 
5,055 



70,389 



Colored. 



4,216 
992 
146 
969 

2.485 
3,029 



11,837 



Living together. 



White. 



8,610 

1,430 

318 

418 

2,510 
1,688 



14,974 



Colored. 



11,469 

2,992 

368 

867 

3,274 
3,066 



21,526 



The following table shows the same facts in the form of percentages: 

Per cent urban population. 



Division. 


Married. 


Living together. 


White. 


Colored. 


White. 


Colored. 


nnA^nAfMAnn.. IRaoIii.. KJ^t\ Hftbl^Pa C^ITt ^ '.iT.TTt'-..-^,r«...... 


22.6 
21.4 
19.9 
22.4 

18.9 
18.1 


6.7 

6.0 

4.9 

13.2 

8.4 
10.2 


4.6 
3.7 
5.4 
2.3 

4.9 
6.0 


15.4 


Card4*nfui and MatanBaii -r ^-,-,,^,,^^^^., ^ ^-r 


16.2 


Pinar del Bio 


12.6 


Puerto Principe 


6.0 


Cienfueg08.8upia la Grande, Sancti Spirltus, Santa Clara, 


11.1 


MunnunlllQ a^fwl SailtlaffO 


10.8 







140 



REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



In the following table are shown the facts for the rural population; 

Rural population. 



Province. 


Population. 


Married. 


Living together. 




White. 


Colored. 


White. 


Colored. 

2,583 
1,188 
2,823 
1,184 
4,836 
7,357 


White. 


Colored. 


Habana 


125,675 
79,299 

119,692 
52,599 

193,894 

153, 159 


87,820 
64,831 
44,492 
10,533 
82,297 
117,002 


28,455 
16.659 
22,953 
11,070 
39,975 
25,042 


8,016 
2,332 
5,945 
1,802 
6,997 
14,961 


5,635 

14,188 

5,755 

918 


Mataiiza.s 


Pinardel Rio 


Puerto Principe 


Santa Clara 


13,826 


8iviiti<Mr<^ 


19,857 




Total 


^724, 318 


356,975 


144,154 


19,971 


85,053 


60,179 





Below appear the percentages derived from this table: 

Per cent rural j)opulalion. 



Province. 


Married. 


Living together. 


White. 


Colored. 


White. 


Colored. 


Habana 


22.6 
21.0 
19.2 
21.0 
20.6 
16.4 


6.8 
1.8 
6.3 
11.2 
5.9 
6.3 


2.4 
2.9 
5.0 
3.4 
8.6 
9.8 


14.9 
21.9 
12.9 
8.7 
16.8 
17.0 


Mf^t-apswp 


PInar del Rio 


Puerto Principe 


Santa Clara 


SantiafTO 





This table incidentally reveals the proportion of white and of colored 
in the urban and rural districts of Cuba. The results may be stated as 
follows: 



Division. 



Per cent of— 



White. 



Habana city 

Thirteen other cities 
Rural districts 



72.4 
62.6 
67.0 



Colored. 



28.6 
87.4 
S3.0 



The whites were most numerous in Habana city, the colored in the 
13 other cities of Cuba. In the following table the proportion of each 
race is given for the urban and rural districts of each province: 



Province. 


Per cent of whites in- 


Per cent of colored in- 


Urban dis- 
tricts. 


Rural dis- 
tricts. 


Urban dis- 
tricts. 


Rural dis- 
tricts. 


Habana 


7L6 
66. 3 
66.8 
70.9 
63.3 
48.6 


76.9 
55.1 
73.0 
83.2 , 
70.2 ' 
56.7 1 
1 


28.4 
33.7 
83.2 
29.1 
36.7 
51.4 


23.1 
44.9 
27.0 
16.8 
29.8 
43.8 


Matanzas 


llnardel Rio 


Puerto Principe 


Santa Clara 


Santiago 





In every province of Cuba except Matanzas the whites were most 
largely represented in the rural districts and the colored in the urban 
districts. The preeminence of Habana city in its proportion of whiter, 



0ON8ENTUAL MARBIAGES. 



141 



when compared with the other cities or the rural districts as a whole, 
disappears when it is compared with the urban districts of Ilabana, 
Pinar del Rio, or Puerto Principe provinces. It is probable that the 
migration of colored from rural districts to cities in quest of employ- 
ment has exercised greater influence even in Habana upon the distribu- 
tion of population than the migration of whites from abroad. 

Returning to an examination of the tables (pp. 139, f) with reference 
to the question they were immediately designed to answer, it appears 
that among the colored in the four eastern provinces marriage was 
more conmioh in the cities than in the country, and that in Matanzas 
the difference was at its maximum. But in the two western provinces 
marriage was more common among the rural population. Among the 
whites the proportion of married was greater in cities except in Habana 
province, where it was the same for city and country, and in Santa 
Clai-a. 

Clamficaticyn hy hirthplace, — ^The classification by birthplace, and 
therefore the following analysis of the tables, is confined to the whites. 
It may be conjectured that white immigrants coming to Cuba unmarried 
and intending not to remain for life would form unions without the 
sanction of the law. This is the general experience where a large 
number of male immigrants enter a country in which the marriage 
law is rigid while at the same time social opinion in certain quarters 
tolerates a consentual marriage. Whether such a conjecture is in 
accord with the facts in Cuba will appear from the following analysis. 

The table below gives the facts for the two classes of whites: 



Nativity. 



Native white . . 
Foreign white. 



Population 
15+. 


Tjlving together by 
mutual consent. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


626,867 
136,416 


41,a')2 
8,975 


7.8 
6.6 



This seems to negative the conjecture under examination. But such 
an hypothesis could hardly apply to women, and therefore the sex dis- 
tinction should be introduced as is done in the following table: 



Nativity. 


Population 
15+. 


Living together by 
mutual consent. j 


Number. 


Per cent. 


Native white males 


261,656 

112,606 

275,212 

23,810 


20,095 
7,516 

20,957 
1,469 


8.0 
6.7 
7.6 
6.1 


Foreign white males^ 


Native white females 


Foreiim white females 





With both sexes the proportion of persons living together by mutual 
consent is greater among the native white than it is among the foreign 
white. But the immigrants are almost uniformly adults, and are 
probably decidedly older than the native whites over 15. Hence 



142 



BEPOBT OK THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



an examination by age periods is needed. As the foreign bom white 
women are so few the examination by age periods may be confined to 
males. 

Per cent of males living in consenltud uniona. 



Age period. 


Native. 


Foreign. 


Age period. 


NaUve. 


Foreign. 


16-19 


0.8 

8.8 

9.1 

12.2 


0.2 
2.8 
5.8 

7.8 


36-44 


18.4 
18.1 
10,6 
10.6 


9.8 


20-24 


4&-M 


9.7 


25-29 


55-64 


7.2 


30-84 .• 


66+ 


4.8 









At every age the proportion of white men of foreign birth living in 
consentuai unions was less than the proportion of native white men. 
The following table shows whether this is true throughout the several 
provinces. 



Province. 



Habanaclty , 

Habana province 

Matanzafl , 

Pinardel Rio 

Puerto Principe . 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Cuba 



NaUve. 



7.9 
4.0 
5.0 
7.8 
5.4 
5.9 
17.9 



8.0 



Foreign 
bom. 



5.7 
4.4 

7.8 
7.1 
6.8 
6.5 
11.6 



6.7 



This table shows that the figures heretofore reached are the net 
result for the island of conditions widely different in the different 
provinces. Habana city and the two provinces at the ends of Cuba 
agrree in having a proportion of consentuai unions among the native 
white men larger than among the foreign-born white men. In the 
other four divisions the opposite was true. Among females, on the 
contrary, consentuai unions were less common with the foreign born 
than with the native white not merely in Cuba as a whole but in every 
province except Habana. The lower proportion of consentuai unions 
is closely connected with the higher proportion of married already 
noted (p. 131) among foreign-born white women. 

THE WIDOWED. 

It might be anticipated that the very high death rate of Cuba during 
the last few years, to which attention is called in the discussion of the 
vital statistics of the past ten years, would leave its traces in an exces- 
sive number of widows and widowers. The facts for all Cuba in com- 
parison with those for Porto Rico and the United States are given in 
the following table: 



Country. 



Cuba 

Porto Rico 

United States (1890) 



Population 
15+. 



995,761 

534,941 

40,380,050 



Widows and 
widowers 



85,167 

46,062 

2,970,062 



Pe 
cent. 



8.6 
8.6 
7.4 



THE WIDOWED. 



143 



These figures indicate a proportion of widowed in Cuba not much 
above that in the United States and not at ail above that in Porto Rico. 
But obviously only persons who had been lawfully married would be 
reported to the census as widowed. Persons who had been living in 
consentual marriages, but whose unions had ended before the census 
by death of the other party, would appear in the census not as widowed 
but ajB single. Hence a fairer basis for the comparison may be found 
in the persons reported as married. Such a comparison yields the 
following result: 



Country. 



Cuba 

Porto Rico 

United States (1890) 



Married. 



246,351 

158,670 

22,381,424 



Widowed. 



85,167 

46,052 

2,970,052 



Per cent 
widowed 

to 100 
married. 



84.6 
29.0 
18.8 



On this basis it appears that there was in Cuba one widow or widower 
for every three married persons, while in the United States there was 
one widow or widower for every eight married persons. In Cuba in 
1861 there was one widow or widower for every five married persons. 
This large proportion of widowed is emphasized by the following table 
in which the proportion of widowed to married is given for the last 
available census of a number of Spanish- American countries, or West 
Indian Islands: 



Country. 



Argentina 

Barbados 

Bermuda 

British Honduras 

Chile 

GostaRica 

Guatemala 

Jamaica 

Leeward Islands 

Bfartinique 

Mexico 

Trinidad 

Turk's Island.... 

Portugal 

Spain 

Porto Rico 

Cuba 



Date of 
census. 



1895 
1891 
1891 
1891 
1885 
1892 
1893 
1891 
1891 
1894 
1895 
1891 
1891 
1890 
1887 
1899 
1899 



Widowed 

to 100 
married. 



17 
22 
23 
29 
19 
16 
20 
21 
25 
84 
25 
22 
20 
19 
17 
29 



The evidence thus shows conclusively that the proportion of widows 
and widowers in Cuba was far higher than in the other countries with 
which comparison would naturally be made. Whether the excess is of 
widows or widowers may be doubtful. In the following table the sex 
classification is introduced: 



Country. 


Husbands. 


Widowers. 


Widowers 

to 100 
husbands. 


Wives. " 


Widows. 


Widows 
to 100 
wives. 


Cuba 


125,067 

78,689 

11,205,228 


23,059 

12,023 

815,437 


18.4 

15.3 

7.8 


121,284 

79,881 

11,126,196 


62,108 

34,029 

2,154,615 


51.2 


Porto Rico 


42.6 


United States (1890) 

1 


19.4 



144 



BEFORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



This table shows that both the West India Islands had more than 
double the proportion of widowed to married that prevails in the 
United States, but that the proportion in Cuba was noticeably higher 
than in Porto Rico. For every six husbands there was a widower and 
for every two wives a widow. 

In the following table the classification is carried into the several 
provinces: 

Widowers I Widows 

Province. Husbands. Widowers. to 100 Wives. Widows. to 100 

wives. 



Uabana city 

Habana (excluding city) 

Matanzas 

PlnardelRio 

Puerto Principe 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Cuba 







Widowers 






Husbands. 


Widowers. 


to 100 
husbands. 


Wives. 


Widows. 


22,008 


3,372 


15 


20,068 


11.427 


18,080 


4,371 


24 


17,395 


9,442 


13,602 


2,760 


20 


13,485 


7,329 


13,783 


2,772 


20 


13,317 


6,192 


8,512 


1,203 


14 


8,668 


3,926 


28,681 


5,791 


20 


28,244 


14.319 


20.376 


2,790 


14 


20,107 


9,473 


125,067 


23,059 


18 


121,284 


62,108 



67 
54 
54 
46 
45 
60 
47 



51 



Widows were most numerous in the capital of the island and least 
numerous in Puerto Principe. Widowers were most numerous in 
Habana outside the city, and least numerous in Puerto Principe. 
Probably Puerto Principe suffered as little as any province during the 
last five years, and the high proportion of widows in Habana city may 
result from migration of widows to the capital or from the presence 
in the city of many widows of Spaniards. The facts regarding the 
classes of the population of Habana city are as follows: 



Race. 



Native whites 

Foreign-bom whites 
Colored 



Wives. 



13,528 
4,19t 
2,W6 



Widows. 



7,242 
2,M6 
1,639 



Widows 
to 100 
wives. 



58 
57 
80 



While the figures show a larger proportion of widows among the 
foreign born than the native white, the proportion of widows among 
the colored was far greater. This is a result so unexpected that one 
asks at once whether 14; was true throughout Cuba. The following 
table gives the facts: 

Widows 
to 100 
wives. 



Race. 



Native whites 

Foreign-born whites 
Colored 



Husbands. 


Widowers. 


Widowers 

to 100 
husbands. 


Wives. 


Widows. 


75, 4M 
84,306 
15,307 


15,207 
5,199 
2,653 


20 
15 
17 


93,900 
10,883 
16,501 


46,652 
5,847 
9,609 



50 

54 
58 



Apparently widows were most numerous relatively among the colored 
and least numerous among the native white, while widowers were most 
numerous among the native white and least so among the foreign 
born. 



THE WIDOWED — ^:^E Sni^GLE. 



145 



Perhaps the best measure of the progressive increase of widow- 
hood with advancing years is found by comparing the widowed with 
the married of each age group. This is done in the following table: 



Age period. 



15-19 
2(^24 
25-29 
80-84 
8(h44 
46-54 
66-64 
66... 







Widowen 






Husbandii. 


Widowen. 


to 100 
husbands. 


Wives. 


WldowR. 


109 


45 


27 


5,584 


280 


4.868 


262 


6 


19,142 


2,228 


14,612 


1,190 


8 


24,926 


4,542 


21,948 


2,284 


10 


22,112 


5,804 


42,629 


5,986 


14 


80,006 


13,885 


25,247 


5,600 


22 


18,541 


15,065 


11,706 


4,455 


88 


4,678 


12,166 


4,878 


8,280 


74 


1,246 


8,201 



Widows 
to 100 
wives. 



5 

12 

18 

26 

46 

111 

260 

658 



The table shows the uniform and steady increase of widowhood for 
each sex with advancing years, and also the far greater proportion of 
widows than of widowers at any given age. This diflference between 
the two sexes increases with age. Between 20 and 35 the proportion 
of widows to wives was about double that of widowers to husbands. 
At the next age period it was treble, at the next five times, at the next 
seven times, and at the latest age nine times. For this difference a num- 
ber of cooperating causes may be assigned. As the husband is usually 
older than the wife and the chance of death increases with age, more 
marriages are broken by the death of the husband than by the death 
of the wife. Then, too, at the same age the mortality of men is usually 
rather greater than the mortality of women. And a widower is more 
likely than a widow to reenter the group of married by a second union. 

THE SINGLE. 

The small proportion of married in Cuba has already been mentioned 
(p. 118). Even if the consentual unions be included with the. mar- 
riages, the proportion of the total was much less than in the United 
States (p. 135). The widowed, while very numerous with reference to 
the married, were not much more numerous than elsewhere with ref- 
erence to the total or the adult population. There are no divorced 
persons in Cuba. The only other marital class, the single, must then 
be unusually numerous. For purposes of comparison with other coun- 
tries, however, the persons living in consentual unions in Cuba should 
be classed with the single. In the following table the proportion of 
single to total population over 15 is given for the countries with which 
comparison would most naturally be made. The countries are arranged 
in the order of increasing proportion of single. 
24662 10 



146 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899, 



CSountty. 



Hniiffaryi 

Mexico 

Fmnoe 

Italy 

United States 

Denmark 

Oermany 

England and Wales 

Austria 

Sweden 

Netherlands 

Switzerland 

Belgium 

Turks Island 

Ouatemala> 

Scotland 





Per cent 


Date of 
census. 


of single 
to popu- 
lation 




15+. 


1890 


23.2 


1896 


84.9 


1886 


85.8 


1881 


86.6 


1890 


86.9 


1890 


36.7 


1890 


38.8 


1891 


S9.6 


1890 


40.4 


1890 


40.7 


1889 


40.8 


1888 


42.8 


1890 


48.9 


1891 


48.9 


1898 


44.7 


1891 


45.2 



Country. 



Chile 

Porto RIco» 

New Zealand 

Costa Rica 

Argentina 

Queensland 

Ireland 

British Honduras 

Cuba* 

Leeward Islands. 

Barbados 

Porto Rloo« 

Trinidad* 

Cuba* 

Martinique 





Percent 


Date of 
census. 


of single 
to popu- 
lation 




16+. 


1885 


45.3 


1899 


45.9 


1891 


46.4 


1892 


47.6 


1895 


47.9 


1891 


48.3 


1891 


60.8 


1891 


61.4 


1899 


68.4 


1891 


67.7 


1891 


61.5 


1899 


61.7 


1891 


63.6 


1899 


66.6 


1894 


78.5 



1 Population 16+ is the basis. 

* Population 14+ is the basis. 

* Excluding persons living together by mutual consent. 

* Including persons living together by mutual consent 
ft Excludlxig the East Indians. 

This table shows that the proportion of single among the adults of 
Cuba is higher than in any other considerable country known to statis- 
tics. In the United States not much more than one-third of the adults 
were single, while in Cuba over one-half and, including the persons 
living together in consentual unions, two-thirds were single. In the 
subsequent discussion the word single will be limited by excluding 
the persons living together by mutoal consent as well as the married 
and widowed. 

In the following table the two sexes are compared: 




PopulaUon j gj^,^ ^^^ 



15+. 



522,116 
473,645 



808,081 
224,317 



Fer cent 
single. 



69.0 
47.4 



The excess ol single males over single females, amounting to 83,729 
is due partly to the excess of 48,471 males in the adult population 
and partly to the excess of 39,049 widows over widowers. 

The proportion of single decreases with advancing yeai's, as follows: 



Age period. 



0-14 
l(Hl9 
20-24 
25-29 
80-84 
86-44 
45-54 
56-64 
66+. 



Per cent single 
among— 


Per cent single in 

United States (1890) 

among— 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


99.9 


99.8 


100.0 


100.0 


99.3 


89.1 


99.5 


90.3 


88.6 


67.8 


80.7 


51.8 


67.2 


36.7 


46.0 


25.4 


45.9 


29.2 


26.5 


15.2 


83.1 


28.3 


15.3 


9.9 


82.1 


31.3 


9.1 


7.1 


38.0 


34.6 


6.8 


6.8 


42.9 


41. b 


5.6 


6.6 



THE SINGLE — LITERACY. 



147 



In Cuba over two-fifths of the population apparently go through 
life single, while in the United States only about one-eighteenth do so. 
Next to this noteworthy difference between the two countries the most 
interesting inference from the table is that the proportion of single 
does not decrease steadily from youth to old age, as might be expected 
and as it does in the United States. On the contrary, a distinct min- 
imum is reached for men at 45-54 years of age and fot women ten 
years earlier. After these ages the proportion of single increases. 

Some light is thrown on this difference by the following table: 



Age period. 


Per cent single among— 


Males. 


Females. 


White. 


Colored. 


White. 


Colored. 


15-19 


99.4 
90.0 
67.2 
44.6 
29.6 
21.2 
18.0 
-17.1 


99.0 
84.6 
68.6 
49.7 
-43.0 
61.2 
60.6 
62.6 


88.9 
64.0 
29.5 
19.8 
16.8 
15.4 
-14.9 
15.8 


89.7 
68.9 
50.1 
-45.8 
47.4 
54.0 
58.9 
66.0 


20-24 


25-29 


80-84 


86-44 


45-64 


66-64 


65+ 





From this it appears that the increase in the proportion of single 
with advancing years was almost confined to the colored race. It is 
probably due in large part to the inclusion with the single of persons 
who had earlier in life lived in consentual unions, but whose married 
life h&d ended by separation of the parties through death or other- 
wise or who having no children living with them were classified as 
single although really belonging to the class of persons living together 
by mutual consent. 

LITERACY. 

A census can take cognizance of the degree of education of a peo- 
ple only as it is indicated by certain simple tests. These tests refer 
usually to formal or book education, not because that is necessarily 
the most important, but because it is the most easily tested. The tests 
used by the pi'esent census were attendance at school, ability to read, 
ability to write, and possession of higher education. It is obvious that 
attendance at school certifies nothing regarding a person's educational 
attainments, yet if the entire population is to be classed acoording to 
degree of education some assumption must be made regarding children 
attending school. It can not introduce serious error to assume that all 
children attending school were able to read and write, and all under 10 
years of age and not attending school were not able to read. On these 
assumptions the population of Cuba may be classified as follows: 



Number. 



Per cent 
of total. 



Having higher edacation 

Able to read and write 

Able to read 

Population answering edacatlonal inquiries 



19,158 

688,496 

666,601 

1,571,886 



1.2 

34.0 

86.0 

100.0 



148 



BEPORT ON THE CKNSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



In the preceding table the classes are not mutually exclusive, but 
each succeeding class includes all those in the preceding. From that 
table the following may be derived by taking the differences in the 
successive numbers of the preceding: 



Number. 



Unable to read 

Able to read but unable to write 

Able to write but without superior education 

With higher education 

Unknown 

Total population 



1,004,884 

88,003 

614,340 

19,158 

1,412 



Per 
cent. 



1,672,797 



63.9 
2.1 

82.7 

1.2 

.1 



100.0 



From this table it appears that the three classes of those able to 
read but imable to write, those with higher education, and those not 
answering the educational questions, including together little more 
than one-thirtieth of the total population, were numerically insignifi- 
cant. Attention may therefore be centered on the other two classes. 
The several provinces of Cuba had the following proportion of per- 
sons able to I'ead: 



Province. 



Habana 

Ma tan^ a 'T 

PinardelRio... 
Puerto Principe 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 



Population. 



424,804 
202,444 
173,064 
88.234 
856.636 
327,715 



Able to read. 



Number. 



226,524 
70,393 
82,684 
33,884 

116,799 
87,717 



Per 
cent. 



53.1 
84.8 
18.9 
37.8 
82.8 
26.8 



Habana province had the largest and Pinar del Rio the smallest pro- 
portion of persons able to read. Earlier in this analysis (p. 76) it was 
shown that Habana province had the largest and Pinar del Rio the 
smallest proportion of urban population. That the two vary together 
will appear more clearly from the following: 



Provinces in the order of — 



Litenicv: 
Habana. 
Puerto Principe. 
Matanzas. 
Santa Clara. 
Santiaeo. 
Pinar ael Rio. 



Urban population: 
Habaiia. 
Matanzas. 
Puerto Principe. 
8anta Clara. 
8antia(P0. 
Pinar del Rio. 



It seems probable, therefore, that the ability to read is more usual in 
Cuban cities than it is in the rural districts. In the following table the 
facts are given for the 14 cities separately reported in Table XIX. 



CENSUS Of CUBA, 1699 



CUBA 

THE PROPORTION OF ILLITERATES TO POPULATION 
10 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER. 



















1 . 




























T^ 














T' 




- 










NATIVE 












































"* 




















a 


■ 


a 


£ 


^ 


— 




— ^_ 


■ 


■ 


- 


- 


R 










- 


^ 


A:^:-rmmwmmmmmmmSi 












JS^n^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 



LITEBAOY. 



149 



Cities. 



Cardenas , 

Cienfnegoa 

Guanabaooa 

Habana 

Manzanillo 

Matanxas 

PinardelRio.... 
Puerto Prindpe . 

Regla 

Sagua la Grande 
SanctiSpiritufl .. 

BantaCuira 

Santiago 

Trinidad 



PopalaUon. 



21,940 
80,088 
18,966 
286,961 
14,464 
86,874 
8,880 
25,102 
U,868 
12,728 
12,606 
18,768 
43,090 
11,120 



Able to read. 



Number. 



12,074 

18,062 

8,090 

156.684 

8,182 

21,447 
4,101 

15,496 
6,618 
6,666 
6,798 
7,872 

26,906 
6,114 



Per 
cent 



65 
60 
58 
66 
56 
59 
46 
62 
67 
52 
53 
57 
60 
55 



Twelve of the 14 cities had a larger proportion of persons able 
to read than any of the 6 provinces, and all had a larger proportion 
of literates than any province but Habana. This shows clearly that 
illiteracy is especially prevalent in the rural districts of Cuba. The 
facts for city and country are summarized in the following table: 



District 



Habana 

Thirteen other cities 
Rest of Cuba 

Total 



Population. 



285,961 

255,523 

1,081,293 



1,572,797 



Able to read. 



Number. 



155.534 
147,253 
263,714 



566,501 



Per 
cent 



65.9 
57.6 
24.4 



86.0 



Rather more than one-third of the total population of Cuba were able 
to read, but the proportion rose in Habana city to nearly two-thirds, 
and in the 13 other cities it averaged nearly three-fifths, while in rural 
Cuba it was not quite one-fourth. The per cents for the several cities 
have already been given, but the figures for the provinces after the 
cities have been subtracted are given below: 



Province. 



Habana v> 

Puerto Principe 

Matanzas 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

PinardelRio 



Rural popu- 


Able to read. 






lation. 


Number. 


Per 
cent 


163,495 


55,887 


34 


63,182 


17,889 


28 


144, 180 


86,872 


26 


276,191 


71,808 


26 


270,161 


63,680 


20 


164,184 


28,568 


17 



The largest proportion of literates is found in rural Habana, where 
one-third of the total population was able to read; the smallest propor- 
tion in the provinces at the ends of the island, Santiago and Pinar del 
Rio, where from one-sixth to one-fifth were able to read. The four 
central provinces all had proportions above the average for rural 
Cuba. 



150 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



There are two Spanish censuses, those of 1861 and 1887, in which the 
number of Cubans able to read was reported. In the following table 
the results of those censuses are brought into comparison with the 
present: 



Date of cenmiB. 



1861. 
1887. 
1809. 



Population. 



1,896,680 
1,681,687 
1,672,797 



Able to read. 



Number. 



268,287 
462,880 
667,913 



Per 
cenL 



19.2 
27.7 
86.1 



In thirty -eight years the per cent of the population able to read has 
nearly doubled. 

SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 

The total number of persons attending school in Cuba during the 
year preceding October 16,1899, was 87,935 (Tables XIX and XXI), 
or between 5 and 6 per cent of the total population. But in the dis- 
cussion on age it was shown (p. 86) that the children in Cuba between 
5 and 15, and so at the ages when school attendance is most common, 
were unusually numerous. Hence it is better to compare the children 
attending school with those of school age. From Table XXI it 
appears that only 1,295 children under 5 or over 17 attended school, 
that is, less than li per cent of the entire number. The school age 
may therefore be assumed to be 5-17, and this slight proportion of 
persons over or under these limits neglected. 





Population 
5-17. 


Attending achool. 


Population 
6-17. 


Per 
cent 


Cub« 


662,928 


86,640 


16.7 







It has already been shown that the proportion of persons able to 
xead, and probably also the proportion of children attending school, 
was much higher in the cities of Cuba than in the rural districts. In 
the following table the facts for the five cities included in Table XXI 
are given: 



City. 



Matanias 

Cienfuegot 

Habana 

Puerto Principe 
Santiago 

Total 



Population 
6-17. 



11,908 
9,786 

62,888 
8,417 

14,946 



107,885 



Attending achool. 



Population 
5-17. 



4,846 
8,794 
20.060 
2,542 
4,397 



35,628 



Per 
cent. 



40.7 
88.8 
81.9 
80.2 
29.4 



33.0 



CENSUS OF CUBA. 1899 



EDUCATION 

POPULATION OVER 10 YEARS OF AGE 



HABANA 



MATANZAS 





PINAR DEL RIO 




PUERTO PRINCIPE 




SANTA CLARA 



SANTIAGO 



^•m 



ILLITERATE 



L I LITERATE 



ATTENDED SCHOOL 



SUPERIOR EDUCATION 



A KoallftCO BAUlMoltK 



1 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 



151 



On the average in the five cities almost exactly one-third of the 
children 5-17 attended school during the year preceding the census. 
If the figures for these cities be subtracted from those for all Cuba, 
the following results are reached: 





Population 
5-17. 


Attending BChool. 




Population 
5-17. 


Per 
cent 


Cuba ootflide five cltleit 


446,048 


51,012 


11.5 





The proportion attending school in the large cities was almost three 
times that in the rest of the island. 

In the following table the figures are given for the six provinces 
after the five large cities have been excluded: 



Province (excluding all cities of 25,000+). 



• 

Matanzas 

Habana 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Puerto Principe 
PinardelRlo... 

Cuba 



Population 
5-17. 



56,566 
64,866 
117,803 
116,912 
25.720 
64,656 



445,043 



Attending school. 



Population 
5-17. 



9,742 
10,090 
16,271 
0,694 
1,828 
8,387 



51,012 



Per 
cent 



17.6 

15.6 

18.9 

8.8 

7.1 

5.2 



11.5 



Both in its capital city and in the rest of the province Matanzas had 
a larger proportion of children attending school than any other city 
or province. It will be noticed that the rank of the provinces in 
school attendance is often at variance with the rank in regard to the 
proportion able to read. Thus Puerto Principe ranks next to Habana 
in literacy, and yet the proportion of persons at school in Puerto 
Principe was lower than in any other province except Pinar del Rio. 
The anomaly may be explained by assuming that in the sparsely settled 
districts children are often taught at the home rather than in a school. 
In that case the figures regarding school attendance lose much of their 
significance. 

Sex. —The following table gives the facts for Cuba by sex: 



Males 

Females . . . 

Total 



Population 
5-17. 



276,881 
276,047 



562,928 



Attending school. 



Population 
6-17. 



48,697 
42,948 



86,640 



Per 
cent 



15.8 
15.6 



15.7 



The two sexes attended school in about equal proportions. 



152 



EBPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Race. — ^The following table gives the facts regarding school • i»nd- 
ance for Cuba by race: 



Race. 



White 

Colored 

Total 



Population 
&-17. 



875,882 
177,046 



562,928 



Attending schoi 



Population 
&-17. 



62,140 
24,500 



86,640 



16.5 
18.8 



15.7 



The school attendance of the whites was somewhat higher than that 
of the colored, but the difference was not very great. 

Age. — In the following table the proportion of school attendants in 
the several age classes is given: 



Age. 



0-1 

5-9 

10-14 

15-17 

18+ 

Total 



Population. 



180,878 
226,109 
220,049 
106,770 
888,991 



1,672,797 



School at- 
tendants. 



688 

89,876 

43,826 

8,438 

612 



87,935 



Per cent 

attending 

school. 



0.5 

17.6 

19.^ 

8.2 

0.1 



5.6 



The maximum proportion of school attendants was between 10 and 14, 
but the preceding five-year period shows almost as high a proportion. 

LITERACY AMONG PERSONS OVEK 10 TEARS OF AGE. 

The majority of persons able to read probably learn to do so in 
early childhood. Hence it is the usual practice for a census in gath- 
ering information on this topic to disregard all children under a cer- 
tain age. This has not been done in censuses of Spain or the 
Spanish colonies, but in American census practice all children under 
10 are omitted from the illiteracy tables. This classification is made 
in the present census of Cuba and will be regarded in the following 
discussion. For reasons already explained, only two classes will be 
considered — ^those who are and those who are not able to read. The 
following table gives the facts for all Cuba: 



Claas. 


Population 
10+. 


Per 
cent. 


Able to read 


625,245 
690,565 


43 
57 


Unable to read 




Total 


1,215,810 


100 





Rather more than two-fifths of the population of Cuba, excluding 
young children, were able to read, a proportion rather greater than that 
of New Mexico in 1880 (35 per cent) and less than that of South Car- 
olina in the same year (44.6 per cent), but decidedly less than the pro- 



ABILITY TO BEAD. 



158 



portion in any American state in 1890, owing to the rapid develop- 
ment of the American school system in the last score of years. 
Sex.— In the following table the facts are given for Cuba by sex. 



Cla& 


Population 10 +. 


Per cent. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Able to resd 


282,824 
851,691 


242,421 
888,874 


45 
65 


42 
68 


TTnable to reiMl 


Toua 


684,615 


581,295 


100 


100 





The corresponding per cents for the United States are males, 87.6; 
females, 85.6; so that in both countries; and indeed in most countries 
where the information is obtainable, the ability to read is somewhat 
more general among men than among women. 

Hace. — In the following table the number of persons able to read is 
given for Cuba with distinction of race and sex: 



Race and sex. 



White, males 

White, females 

Colored, males .... 
Colored, females .. 

Total whites. 
Total colored 



Number. 



Able to 
read. 



282,117 

180,528 

60,707 

61,898 



412,646 
112,600 



Unable to 
read. 



206,962 
191,868 
142,729 
147,606 



400,880 
290,286 



Total. 



441,079 
871,896 
198,486 
209,899 



812,976 
402,836 



Percent. 



Able to 
read. 



52.6 
48.6 
26.2 
29.6 



60.8 
28.0 



Unable 
to read. 



47.4 
61.6 
78.8 
70.4 



49.2 
72.0 



From this table it appears that one-half of the whites and rather 
more than one-fourth of the colored were able to read. But among the 
colored the illiteracy was greater among the males, thus reversing the 
usual rule. Two reasons for this anomaly may be suggested. Colored 
men work more largely in the country and less largely in the cities of 
Cuba than colored women do. In the five cities of over 26,000 were 
found 27.6 per cent of all colored females over 10 years of age, but 
only 22.2 per cent of all colored males over 10 years of age. It has 
been shown that school attendance was larger and illiteracy smaller in 
the cities than in the rural districts. Hence the sex which is most 
numerous in cities has better facilities for learning to read and proba- 
bly city life tends to strengthen the desire for this attainment. Then, 
too, the colored females outnumber the colored males at every age 
period from 15 to 50 and the males outnumber the females between 50 
and 80. This is probably due in part to the survival in Cuba of some 
thousands of negroes born in Africa, two-fifths of whom are males, 
and to almost 15,000 Chinese, nearly all of whom are males. Its effect 
is to make the median age of colored males over 10 fully two years 
higher than the median age of colored females. And as illiteracy in 
Cuba is greater among elderly people than it is among those in middle 
life this higher median age of the colored males would tend to accen- 
tuate the illiteracy of that sex. 



154 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Age. — In the following table the proportion of persons able to read 
in each age group is given for the total population and for the two 
races: 



Age period. 


Per cent lilemte. 


Total popu- 
lation. 


White. 


Colored. 


10-14 


86.0 
45.9 
+60.8 
49.6 
47.8 
45.1 
89.0 
88.4 
28.1 


88.3 
49.0 
54.8 
+55.8 
55.2 
55.2 
58.7 
68.0 
62.9 


81.3 
89.2 
+40.6 
86.0 
29.4 
23.4 
15.6 
10.7 
7.4 


15-19 


20-24 


25-29 .-.. 


80-34 


85^44 


45-54 '. # 


55-64 


65+ 


Total 


48.2 


50.8 


28.0 





It appears that the largest proportion was in the age period 20-24; that 
is, the class whose school years were lived between 1878 and 1895. The 
illiteracy among whites never rises to one-half except for the age 
periods 10-19, and is quite uniform. The aged colored are very largely 
illiterate, but the proportion is lower in the younger groups, reaching 
its minimum at the period 20-24. These figures indicate an educational 
system which, during the past generation, has been reaching about the 
same proportion of whites but a constantly increasing proportion of 
colored until the confusion and warfare of the last few years seriously 
impaired its efficiency. 

OOOUPATIONS. 

The instructions issued to the Cuban enumerators in Spanish with 
reference to filling this part of the schedule may be translated as 
follows: 

This inquiry (oolamn 11) applies to every person 10 years of age and over having 
a gainful occupation^ and calls for the profession, trade, or branch of work upon 
which each person depends chiefly for support, or in which he is engaged ordinarily 
during the larger part of the time. In reporting occupations avoid general or 
indefinite terms which do not indicate the kind of work done. You need not give 
a person's occupation just as he expresses it. If he can not tell intelligibly what he 
is, find out what he does, and describe his occupation accordingly. For wives and 
daughters at home engaged in the duties of the household only, write "at home" 
(en casa). For children not actually at work, write ''at school" (estudiante) or 
" at home " (en casa), as the case may be. Spell out the name of the occupation and 
do not abbreviate in any case.^ 

^It is desirable that some brief terms should be introduced to describe persons 
covered by the preceding instructions and accurately but clumsily described as 
persons engaged in gainful occupations. In the following discussion the terms 
breadwinners or persons at work will sometimes be used for one class and dependents 
for the other. Any term must be understood in accordance with these instructions 
rather than with its usual and popular meaning. 



0C0UFATI0N8. 



155 



The number of Cubans reported as having gainful occupations was 
622,330, or 39.6 per cent of the total population.^ The figures for 
Cuba are compared with those for the United States and Porto Bico in 
the following table: 



Canntiy. 



Cuba 

Porto Rioo... 
United States 



Date. 



18W 



Total popu- 
lation. 



1,673,797 

968,348 

62,023,260 



In galnlol occnpa- 
tlonfl. 



Number. 



816,866 
22,786^661 



Per 
cent 



89.6 
88.2 
86.8 



From these figures it appears that Cuba has about two-fifths of its 
population engaged in some gainful occupation, while in Porto Rico 
the proportion is only one-third and in the United States about mid- 
way between the two. Some reasons for the difference will appear as 
the subject is probed farther. 

^ Among these there were 2,053 children under 10 reported aa haymg a gainful 
occupation. These may all be regarded as enumerators' errors, but the maigin of 
error they introduce, less than one-third of 1 per cent, is far leas than that to which 
all occupation returns are subject, and may, therefore, be neglected. It is probably 
true that a certain number of children under 10 in Cuba do work which is a fah* 
equivalent for their living. The number of such children must vary in different 
parts of the island. But, according to the instructions quoted above, none of these 
should have been reported. Hence the reported number is dependent upon two 
variables, first, the actual number in the districts, and secondly, the heedlessness of 
the enumerators in reporting such answers contrary to the instructions.. The pro- 
portion of such returns to the total of persons reported as having gainful occupations 
may afford, therefore, a very rough test of the exactness with which enumerators 
followed their instructions in this particular. From this point of view the follow- 
ing table is of interest: . 



PzoTlnoe. 



Puerto Principe 

Hahana city 

Habana (excluding city) 

Santiago 

Santa Claia 

Mantanxas 

Pinardel Bio 

Caba 



In galnlol occupations. 



Total. 



81,822 
106,000 

76,961 
106,777 
144,612 

86,296 

67,862 



622,380 



Children 
under 10. 



80 
224 
190 
817 
601 
868 
848 



2,068 



Per 
cent. 



.094 
.207 
.260 
.291 
.409 
.414 
.618 



,880 



This instruction was most carefully observed in Puerto Principe and most over^ 
looked in Pinar del Bio. 



156 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



The absolute and relative number of persons engaged in gainful 
occupations in the several provinces was as follows: 



Province. 



Santiago 

Puerto Principe 

Pinardel Rio 

Habana (excludiDg city) 

Santa Clara 

Matanzas 

Habana (city) 



Population. 



327,715 
88,234 
173,064 
188.823 
856,536 
202,444 
235,961 



In gainful occupa- 
tions. 



Number. 



108,777 
31,822 
67,862 
75,961 

144,612 
85,296 

108,000 



Per 
cent. 



33.2 
86.1 
89.2 
40.2 
40.6 
42.1 
45.8 



The relative number of breadwinners was as low in Santiago as in 
Porto Rico and as low in Puerto Principe as in the United States. In 
Pinar del Rio it was about the average for the island, while in the three 
central provinces it was above the average, and highest of all in Habana 
city. The range in Cuba between the highest and lowest divisions was 
12.6 per cent, while in the United States the range between the high- 
est (Montana) and lowest (West Virginia) states was 25.4 per cent. 

The position of Habana city in the preceding table suggests that 
gainfid occupations may be more general in cities than in rural dis- 
tricts. To determine whether this is true, the following table has 
been prepared: 



City. 



Cardenas 

Cienfuegoe 

Guanabucoa 

Habana 

ManzaniUo 

Matanzas 

Pinar del Rio . . 
Puerto Principe 

Regla 

Sagua la Orunde. 
Sancti Spiritus.., 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Trinidad 

Total citieH 
Rural 

Cuba 



Population. 



21,940 
30,038 
13,965 
235,981 
14,464 
36,374 
8,880 
25,102 
11.363 
12,728 
12,696 
13,763 
43,090 
11,120 



491,501 
1,081,293 



1,672,797 



In gainful occupations. 



Number. 



8,741 

11,485 

5,281 

108,000 

4,595 

14,320 

8,986 

8,438 

4,305 

5,229 

8,868 

5,222 

16,741 

2,947 



203,158 
419,172 



622,330 



Per cent. 



39.8 
38.2 
87.8 
45.8 
81.8 
89.4 
44.9 
83.6 
87.9 
41.1 
30.5 
37.9 
88.9 
26.5 



41.3 

38.8 



89.6 



Per cent in 

provincte 

containing 

city. 

42.1 
40.6 
43.3 
43.3 
83.2 
42.1 
89.2 
86.1 
43.3 
40.6 
40.6 
40.6 
33.2 
40.6 



Gainful occupations are more common in cities than in the rural 
districts; but the figures for the several cities show that this is due 
to the dominant influence of Habana, which had nearly as many inhab- 
itants and more than as many persons engaged in gainful occupations 
as all the other thirteen cities combined. Of the other thirteen cities 
ten had a smaller proportion of breadwinners than the province in 



CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899 



CUBA 

OCCUPATIONS 
BY RACE, SEX, AND NATIONALITY 




AGRICULTURE 



PROFESSIONS 



TRADE AND TRANSPORTATION 



PERSONAL SERVICE 



MANUFACTURING 



NO GAINFUL OCCUPATION 



A >«*■ «' C <AI •• i» 



J 



OCCUPATIONS. 



157 



which they lie. In the 58 American cities containing each over 
50,000 inhabitants the per cent in gainful occupations in 1890 was 42.8, 
while for the rest of the country it was only 34.8. In this respect the 
difference between city and country in Cuba is apparently less than 
half what it is in the United States. This difference between the two 
countries may be connected with the high proportion of females in 
Cuban cities already mentioned in the paragraph on sex (p. 83) and 
with the small proportion of female breadwinners on the island, which 
will appear from the next paragraph. 

Breddhirinnera classified hy sex. — ^The following table gives the abso- 
lute and relative number of males and of females reported as engaged 
in gainful occupations in Cuba. For comparative purposes the figures 
for Porto Rico and the United States have been included. 



Country. 



Cuba 

Porto Rico 

United States (1890) 



Males. 


In gainful occupa- 
tions. 


Number. 


Per 
cent. 


816,206 

472,261 

32,067,880 


656,974 

268,664 

18,821,0UU 


68.2 
56.9 
68.7 



Pemalefl. 



767.692 

480.982 

80,564,870 



In gainful occupa- 
tions. 



Number. 



Per 
rent. 



66,866 

47,701 

3,914,671 



8.8 

9.9 

12.8 



From this table it appears that the larger proportion of breadwin- 
ners in Cuba holds only of the males. Among Cuban women the pro- 
portion in gainful occupations was smaller than it was in either Porto Rico 
or the United States, but with males the case was very different. The 
percentage of them remuneratively employed in Cuba was one-sixth 
higher than in either of the other countries. Among 10 males of all 
ages in Cuba 7 were at work, while in Porto Rico and the United States 
fewer than 6 were so engaged. Further information regarding this 
difference will be obtained in the course of the analysis. 

In the following table the relative number of breadwinners is given 
for each province, classified by sex: 



Province. 



Habana 

Matanzas 

Pinar del Rio . . 
Puerto Principe 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 



Males. 



221,990 
108,726 
91,688 
44,899 
189,067 
163,846 



In gainful occupa- 
tions. 



Number. 



169.614 

71,721 

63,974 

27,352 

132,788 

100,525 



Per 
cent. 



71.9 
69.2 
69.8 
60.9 
70.2 
61.4 



Females. 



202,814 

98,718 

81,876 

43,335 

167.479 

163,870 



In gainful occupa- 
tions. 



Number. 



24,347 

13,575 

3,888 

4,470 

11.824 

8,252 



Per 
cent, 

12.0 

13.7 

4.8 

10.3 

7.1 

6.0 



The maximum proportion of breadwinners among males was in 
Habana and the minimum in Puerto Principe. But with females the 
maximum was in Matanzas and the minimum in Pinar de Rio. Hence 
the two sexes are affected by different conditions. 



158 



EEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



The high position of Pinar del Bio in the column for males suggests 
that gainful occupations for males may be quite as common in the 
country as in the cities. That Santiago had fewest breadwinners is due 
to the fact that in the column for each sex it ranks next to last. That 
Puerto Principe had more is because a large number of female bread- 
winners somewhat neutralize the small number of males, which was less 
than anywhere else. In Pinar del Rio the conditions were reversed, a 
high proportion of male breadwinners was partly offset by few females. 
In Santa Clara more males were at work than anywhere else except 
Habana. Matanzas held fourth place among males, but was lifted to the 
second place for the total by the fact that more females were at work 
there than in any other province. Habana, holding first place among 
males and second among females, was first in the total. 

Closer examination shows that female breadwinners were apparently 
more numerous in provinces with large urban population. To test this 
the provinces may be arranged as follows: 

Prouinces in the order-- 



Of urban population: 
Habana. 
Matanzas. 
Puerto Principe. 
Santa Clara. 
Santiago. 
Pinar del Rio. 



Of females in gainful occupations: 
Matanzas. 
Habana. 
Puerto Principe. 
Santa Clara. 
Santiago. 
Pinar del Rio 



That the two vary together supports the hypothesis. It will there- 
fore be more closely tested by the following table: 

Per cent of total femaiea who were reported as in gainful occupations tmih distinction of city 

and country. 



Province. 


Urban. 


Rural. 


Habana 


15.6 
19.1 
24.6 
14.1 
18.0 
14.0 


6.1 
11.8 
8.6 
8.5 
5.0 
2.9 


MatannM. 


Pinar del Rio 


Puerto Principe ^ . 


Santa Clara 


Santiago 


Cuba 


15.6 


5.4 





Female breadwinners were always more numerous and usually sev- 
eral times more numerous in the cities than in the surrounding country. 
The proportion of women in gainful occupations in the rural districts 
was lowest in Santiago and highest in Matanzas; but in the cities it was 
lowest in Santa Clara and highest in Pinar del Rio. The high pro- 
portion of women at work in the city of Pinar del Rio is probably 
connected with the character of the industries. The city above all 
others is a tobacco town. In no other of the fourteen cities separately 
reported was one-fifth of the female population engaged in gainful 



OCCUPATIONS. 



159 



occupations, but in Pinar del Rio nearly one-fourth were so occupied. 
The smallest proportion of women in gainful occupations was in Trin- 
idad and Manzanillo. In the United States in 1890 20.1 per cent of 
the females in cities of over 50,000 inhabitants and 11.1 per cent of the 
females in the rest of the United States were breadwinners. With 
regard to the projwrtion of women at work, therefore, urban Cuba 
differs much more from rural Cuba than urban United States does 
from rural United States. But in this comparison the line between 
urban and rural is drawn at 50,000 inhabitants in the United States 
and with a single exception at 10,000 in Cuba. 

Breadwinners clasffified hy age, — According to the instructions already 
quoted, the question about occupation was put only to persons ten 
years of age or more. Hence, in comparing the persons engaged in 
gainful occupations with the population, it is better to disregard the 
children under 10. This is done in the table below. 



Coantry. 



Cuba 

Porto Rico 

United States (1890) 



Pen»nslO+. 


In gainful opcapa- 
tiona. 


Number. 


Per 
cent 


1,215,810 

e60,2M 

47,413,660 


022,830 

816,365 

22,785,661 


51.2 
48.0 
47.9 



With the elimination of the children under 10, who were nearly 31 per 
cent of the total in Porto Rico, but less than 25 per cent in the United 
States, the difference between those two countries, shown in a former 
table (p. 155), almost disappears. But the difference between these two 
countries on the one hand and Cuba on the other still persists. 

In the following table the analysis is carried into the provinces: 



Province. 



Santla^ 

Puerto Principe 

Habana (excluding city) 

San ta Clara 

Pinar del Rio 

MatansBS 

Habana (city) 





In gainful occupa- 




tions. 


Persons 
10+. 




Number. 


Per 

cent. 


288,017 


108,777 


• 46.7 


68,786 


81.822 


49.9 


151,206 


75,961 


60.2 


270,827 


144,612 


51.8 


130,807 


67,862 


52.1 


160,297 


85.296 


58.5 


193,870 


108,000 


66.7 



The difference between Santiago aqd Habana city, which was 12.6 
per cent when the total population was used as a basis (p. 156), was 
only 10 per cent, owing to the fact already noted (p. 91), that Habana 
city had few and Santiago many children. Pinar del Rio, having a 
larger population under 10 than Santa Clara or Habana province out- 
side the city (p. 90), stood above these two in the proportion of persons 
engaged in gainful occupations as soon as the children were excluded. 



160 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1809. 



With this exception, the order of the provinces remains the same, 
(rainful occupations among adults were more common in the western 
half of the island, and reached their maximum in the city of Habana. 
As it has already been shown that outside of Habana gainful occupa- 
tions were less common in Cuban cities than in the provinces contain- 
ing them (p. 156), no further analysis by cities seems needed. 

In the following table the number and per cent of persons in gain- 
ful occupations is given by details of age: 



Ag« period. 



0-9 

10-14 

16-19 

20-24 

25-29 

80-84'. 

86-14 

46-64 

66-64 

66+ 

Unknown. 

Total 



Number of 
persons. 



866.987 

220,049 

178.066 

152,969 

187,406 

118,812 

186,056 

117,528 

68,182 

87,099 

86 



1,672,797 



In gainful occupations. 



In Cuba. 



Number. 



2,068 
64,189 
86,948 
86,932 
79,896 
70,484 
1U,778 
70,816 
40,687 
19,606 
48 



622,380 



Per cent. 



0.6 
24.6 
48.8 
66.2 
67.7 
69.8 
60.4 
60.8 
69.6 
62.0 
60.6 



Per cent in 

the United 

States 

(1890). 



8.6 
42.9 
61.4 

69.1 

67.7 
56.4 
64.1 
41.6 
69.6 



39.6 



36.8 



Nearly one-fourth of all Cubans between 10 and 16 years of age and 
nearly half of those between 15 and 20 were engaged in some form of 
gainful occupation. Between 25 and 65 the proportion was uniformly 
about three-fifths, and in the latest age period, including all persons 
above 65, more than half the population were at work. When the 
figures in the last two columns of the preceding table are compared 
some noteworthy differences between Cuba and the United States 
appear. Among children 10-14 gainful employment was nearly three 
times as common in Cuba as in the United States and almost as com- 
mon as among the colored population alone of the United States (25.1 
per cent). This fact is closely connected not merely with the poverty 
of the masses in Cuba, but also with her backward industrial condi- 
tion and the slight development of the school system, which has 
appeared from the illiteracy and education tables. For the years 
20-36 the proportion of breadwinners in the two countries waa about 
the same, but the percentage falls off more rapidly in the United 
States than in Cuba. These proportions indicate that gainful work 
begins earlier in life and continues to a later age in Cuba than it does 
in the United States. 



CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899 



CUBA 



OCCUPATIONS BY PROVINCES 




1 

I i 



r-HABANA - 



> > 



- MATAN^A^-- 



-t- 



PINAR DEL Hi 



PUERTO PRINCIP 



.: u-,-i--. 



p 



-f- f 



iSANTA CLARA 



- 4- 

I 



, --, ■ - 
■ -f- 1 , l- 
SANTIAGO 

.-J J . 

I I . 
i I i I 



AGRICULTURE 



PROFESSIONS 



TRADE AND TRANSPORTATION 



PERSONAL SERVICE 



MANUFACTURING 



NO GAINFUL OCCUPATION 



A MO«« » . O HAITI*" Ml. 



i 



OCCUPATIONS. 



161 



breadwinners classified iy age a/nd sex. — ^In the following tabic the 
number of persons of each sex and the specified age engaged in gainful 
occupations is given: 

Number of persona of sex and age specified who were engaged in gainfid occupations. 



Age period. 



0-9 

10-14 

1^19 

20-24 

25-29 

30-84 

85-«4 

45-54 

65-64 

65+ 

Unknown age 

Total ... 



Total peraonA. 


Penonfl in gainful 
occupations. 


Malef 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


180,690 

112,899 

84,346 

79,008 

73,206 

64,023 

101,305 

64,096 

87,099 

18,976 

57 


176,297 
107,660 
93,689 
73,961 
64,199 
54,789 
83,751 
63,432 
31,083 
18,723 
28 


1,638 
49,398 
77,308 
77,515 
72,183 
63,126 
99,567 
62,463 
35,677 
17, 115 
39 


415 
4,791 
9,645 
8,417 
7,762 
7,358 
12,211 
8.852 
4.910 
2,491 
4 


815,205 


757,592 


555,974 


66,356 



From the figures contained in the preceding table the per(*entagos 
contained in the following have been computed, and for comparison 
the percentages for the United States are included: 

Per cent of persons of sex and age specified who v)ere engaged in gainful occupations. 



Age period. 


Males in— 


Females in— 

1 


Cuba. 


United 
States. 


Cuba. 


United 
Statefi. 


0-9 


0.9 
44.0 
91.6 
98.1 
98.5 
98.6 
96.3 
97.5 
96.2 
90.2 
68.4 


te 


0.2 

4.5 

10.3 

11.4 

r 12.0 

t 13.4 

14.6 

15.6 

15.8 

13.3 

14.3 




10-14 


11.2 
58.6 
92.0 

} 97.4 

97.9 
96.6 
92.9 
73.8 
75.8 


5.9 
27.4 
30.6 

} 17.3 

13.2 
12.9 
12.0 
8.3 
80.8 


15-19 


20-24 


26-29 


80-84 


86-44 


45-54 


55-64 


65+ 


Unknown age 


Total 


68.2 


68.7 


8.8 


12.8 





Perhaps the most noteworthy conclusion to be drawn from this table 
is that the large proportion of males of all ages who were gainfully 
employed in Cuba as compared with the United States (see p. 157) is 
due not so much to a larger proportion during the years of maximum 
efficiency, for the proportion of men between 25 and 55 years old who 
were at work in the two countries was not very diflferent, but is due, 
i*ather, to the fact that men begin to work in Cuba as young boys and 
continue to work into advanced years. This appears clearly in the table, 
but perhaps the difference between the two countries can be made more 
conspicuous by the following table, in which the proportion of males 
of a given age in the United States who were at work is treated as 100 
24662 11 



162 BEPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

per cent and the relative proportion of persons of the same age at work 
in Cuba is computed on that basis: 

Ratio betwe«n proportion of males al work in Cuini at age specified and those at loork in the 

United States ( =100 per cent). 



Age period: 

1(K14 392 

15-19 • .' 166 

20-24 107 

26-34 101 

36-44 100 

45-64 101 

55-^ 104 

65+ 122 



Of boys between 10 and 16 nearly four times as large a proportion 
were at work in Cuba as in the United States. The proportion of young 
men 15-19 at work. is over 50 per cent greater, and of those 20-24 the 
excess was 7 per cent; but between 25 and 55 the average difference 
was only about 1 per cent. For men 55 to 64 it rose again to between 
3 and 4 per cent, and of men over 65 the proportion at work in Cuba 
was over one-fifth greater than in the United States. The difference 
between the two countries may be due in part to the difference in the 
character of the industries. An effort to ascertain whether this is so 
will be made when the figures for classes of industries are analyzed. 
But in very large part doubtless it is a result of the burdens, indus- 
trial and political, under which the island has been struggling of recent 
years. Boys and old men in Cuba have had to work in order to earn 
a livelihood, while in the United States many of the former have been 
securing for themselves, b^' school attendance and otherwise, a greater 
earning power in later years, and many of the latter class have with- 
drawn from gainful occupations and live on their own savings or on 
the surplus from other members of the household. 

In the two columns for women a remarkable difference appears 
between the two countries. The proportion of Cuban women who were 
engaged in gainful occupations, while always small, rises steadily, 
though slowly, to a maximum at the age period 55-64. In the United 
States it rises very rapidly to a maximum almost twice as great in the 
age period 20-24. It then falls almost as abruptly, and for ages above 
35 it is actually lower than in Cuba. This suggests that in Cuba the 
duties of wife and mother may be combined not infrequently with 
some gainful occupation, while in the United States the two classes of 
duties are more often successive and less often simultaneous. From 
the figures in Table XXX one may compute that among the female 
breadwinners of Cuba, nearly thi*ce-fourths of whom were colored, 
(p. 163) over one-fifth (21.2) were living in lawful or consensual mar- 
riage. Among the female breadwinners of the United States in 1890 



OCCUPATIONS. 



163 



about one-eighth (13.2 per cent) were married, but among the colored 
female breadwinners of that country over one-fourth (27.7 per cent) 
were married. 

Breadnjoinners classified hy race. — ^In the following table the absolute 
and relative number of persons engaged in gainful occupations is given 
with distinction of race: 



Per cent of breadwinners by race. 




4 

• 


Race. 


Fopaladon. 


In gainful oocupa- 
tiona. 


Number. 


Per 
cent. 


White 


1,062,807 
620,400 


408,069 
219,271 


88.8 
42.1 


Colored 


Total 


1,672,797 


022,380 


39.6 





This shows that the proportion of breadwinners was somewhat higher 
among the colored than among the whites. In the following table the 
corresponding per cents for the United States (1890) and Porto Rico 
are introduced: 

Per cent of breadwinners. 



• 

Country. 


Among 
whites. 


Amone 
oolored. 


Differ- 
ence. 


Cuba 


88.3 
S2.2 
86.6 


42.1 
84.8 
41.8 


8.8 
2.6 
6.3 


Porto Rioo 


United States, 1890 





The difference between the two races appears in all three countries, 
but in Cuba is greater than in Porto Rico and less than in the United 
States. To understand these differences better the classification by 
sex may be added to that by race. 

Breadwinners classified hy ro/ce amd sex. — ^The following table gives 
the absolute and relative numbers for all Cuba: ' 

Breadwinners dastified by race and sex. 



Race and sex. 



White males 

Colored males.. 
White females.. 
Colored females 

Total 



Total popu- 
lation. 



668,118 
262,092 
489,284 
268,808 



1,672,797 



Number. 



In gainful 
occupa- 
tions. 



886,470 

170,604 

17,689 

48,767 



622,880 



Per 
cent. 



68.4 

67.6 

8.6 

18.2 



39.6 



The difference between white and colored among males Ls too small 
to be weighty or significant. The difference between the two races is 



164 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



due entirely to the fact that gainful occupations are followed by col- 
ored women to about five times the extent that they are by white 
women. To determine whether this is true also of other countries 
the percentage figures are given side by side in the following table: 

Fer cent of breadtnnnen. 



Country. 


Among males. 


Among females. 


White. 


Colored. 


White. 


Colored. 


Cuba 


68.4 
67.0 
58.9 


67.6 
56.7 
57.4 


3.6 

7.6 

11.0 


18.2 
18.8 
25.8 


Porto Rico 


United Stateb (1890) 





In all three countries the proportion of breadwinners among white 
males was slightly higher than the proportion among colored males; 
but in all three this difference is outweighed by the fact that colored 
women are at work much more generally than white women. The 
difference between the women of the two races in this regard, how- 
ever, was far more marked in Cuba than in either Porto Rico or the 
United States. Cuba had a proportion of males of each race at work 
much larger than in either other country. The proportion of white 
women at work was about one-half that in Porto Rico and one-third 
that in the United States. But the proportion of colored women 
at work, while below that in the United States, was higher than that 
in Porto Rico. 

Breachmnners clasaijied as native a/nd foreign horn. — ^This distinction 
is made in the occupation tables only for the whites. The colored for- 
eign born, of whom Table X shows that there are about 30,000 (30,382) 
in Cuba — mainly Chinese and Africans — must be disregarded. The 
facts for the whites are given in the following table, by i*ace and sex: 



Race and sex. 



Native white males 

Foreign-bom white males . 

Native white females 

Forelgn-bom white females 

Total whiteo 



Population. 



447,378 

115,740 

462.926 

26,868 



1,0&2,897 



In gainful occu- 
pations. 



Number. 



274,366 

111, 105 

14,884 

2,705 



408,069 



Per 
cent. 



61.8 

96.0 

8.2 

10.8 



38.8 



Hardly a moment's reflection is needed to detect the cause of the 
wide difference indicated in the preceding table between the native and 
the foreign-born of each sex and to reveal the insignificant character 
of such a table taken alone. The immigrant whites of both sexes are 
mainly adults, and the large proportion of workers among them is not 
because they are of foreign birth but is because they are adult. Hence 
if there is any real difference between these two classes of whites, to 



OCCUPATIONS. 



165 



discover it groups of the same age must be compared. This is done 
in the following table: 

Per cent of breadwinnera classified by race, nativity, sex, and age. 



1 




Males. 




Females. 


Ag« period. 

• 


Native 
white. 


Foreign 
white. 


Colored. 


Native 
white. 


Foreign 
white. 


Colored 


0- 9 


0.7 
48.8 
90.0 
97.2 
96.0 
96.0 
97.6 
96.4 
94.2 
87.7 
62.5 


1.8 
57,9 
97.3 
99.3 
99.1 
99.2 
96.5 
96.7 
93.8 
83.1 
87.5 


1.2 
48.6 
98.5 
98.8 
98.9 
99.1 
99.2 
99.0 
96.7 
93.3 
58.8 


0.1 
2.2 
5.1 
5.1 
4.6 
4.9 
5.1 
4.3 
3.9 
2.3 
9.0 


0.0 

4.8 

9.6 

11.1 

18.2 

13.2 

12.6 

10.2 

9.1 

5.5 

0.0 


0.6 


10-14 


9.1 


15-19 


20.6 


20-24 , 


28.2 


25-29 J 


24.9 


80-34 ." 


27.2 


8544 - 


29.2 


45-54 


80.8 


55-64 


29.6 


65+ , 


22.9 


UP)fT10^"^n T - , - T 


0.0 







This table shows that among females the foreign-born whites uni- 
formly were at work in larger proportions than the native white but in 
much smaller proportions than the colored. This may be connected 
with the concentration of the foreign-born of both sexes in the cities 
and the larger opportunities which cities afford for women to find work. 
Among males ttie proportion of foreign-born whites below 35 who 
were at work is greater than the proportion in either other class, but 
at later ages the proportion of colored breadwinners was higher, and 
after 66 the proportion of native whites was also higher. It is note- 
worthy, too, that the maximum proportion in gainful occupations for 
each sex was reached later for the colored than for either class of whites. 

Breadwinners cldssijied hy kvnd of occupation. — ^The occupations in 
which persons are engaged are grouped by the census into five main 
classes. Arranged in the order of their prevalence, the groups are: 

1. Agriculture, fisheries, and mining. 

2. Domestic and personal service. 

3. Manufacturing and mechanical industries. 

4. Trade and transportation. 

5. Professional service. 

The first class includes all persons engaged in the so-ealled extractive 
industries or those concerned with getting the wealth out of the 
earth or water, the third class includes those who transform the raw 
material furnished by the exti-active Industries into new forms or 
combinations, the fourth class includes all engaged in giving place or 
time values to wealth by moving it from a place where it is less needed 
to a place where it is more needed, or by saving it from a time when 
it is less needed till a time when it is more needed, while the second 
and fifth classes include all whose contribution to society is in the 
fonn of personal services rather than of goods or of services upon 
goods. The line of division between these groups or classes is often 
obscure, and in many individual cases serious difficulties arise regard- 



166 



BBPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



ing the best group to which a person or an occupation should be 
assigned under the imperfect description found on the schedule. 

The population of Cuba engaged in gainful occupations was divided 
as follows among the five groups: 



Occupation group. 

"^ ] ■ 

.Acrricultnie, flshcries, and mining 

Domestic and personal service '. 

iManufacttiring and mechanical pursuits 

iTrade anq transportation 

Prof eesioi^al service... 

! Total 



Number, 



299,197 

141,986 

93,034 

79,427 

8,786 



Per cent of 

totalin 
gainful oc- 
cupations. 



48.1 
22.8 
14.9 
12.8 
1.4 



622,380 



100.0 



Nearly one-half of all workers were engaged in agriculture and over 
one-fifth in domestic and personal service. About one in seven was in 
manufacturing and mechanical industries, and one in eight in trade 
and transpoilation. In the following table the per cents for Cuba and 
the United States are put side by side. 

Per cent of breadtmnners in each group of occupatUms, 



Occupation group. 



Agriculture, fisheries, and mining 

Domestic and personal service 

Manufacturing and mechanical pursuits 

Trade and transportation 

Professional service 

Total 



Cuba. 



48.1 
22.8 
14.9 
12.8 
1.4 



100.0 



United 
States 
(1890). 



89.7 
19.2 
22.4 
14.6 
4.1 



100.0 



The main difference in occupations between the two countries is 
that Cuba is more confined to agriculture and gives less attention to 
manufacturing and mechanical pursuits than do the United States. 
The small proportion of the professional class in Cuba is also note- 
worthy. 

Breadwinners hy class ofoocupaiion amd sex. — The sex of the work- 
ers has great influence upon the character of the work chosen or 
assigned. This appears in the following table: 

Breadwinners hy oocupaiion, group, and sex. 





Bex named in gainful occupations in class named. 


Occupation group. 


Number. 


Per cent 


Per cent in United 
States (1890). 




Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Agricnlture, fisheries, and mining . 

Domestic and personal service 

Manufacturing and mechanical 
pursuits 


292,881 
96,769 

82,012 

78,766 

7,096 


6,866 
46,167 

11,022 

661 

1,640 


62.6 
J7.2 

14.7 

14.2 

1.3 


10.8 
69.6 

16.6 
1.0 
2.6 


44.3 
14.3 

21.6 

16.4 

8.4 


17.4 
42.6 

26.2 


Trade and tmnsportation 


%.S 


ProfentonAl service 


8.0 






Total 


665,974 


66,866 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 







OCCUPATIONS AND PERSONS TO A BUILDING. 



167 



One-half of the males at work in Cuba were engaged in agriculture, 
etc., but only one-tenth of the females. In the United States the 
proportion of males in agriculture was less, but of females was 
greater. In both countries the females were mainly in the class of 
domestic and personal service, but in Cuba this class includes about 
seven-tenths of all women at work, while in the United States it 
includes only a little over four-tenths. In both countries women who 
go to work at all go into manufacturing and mechanical industries in 
rather larger proportions than men do. 

SANITARY CONDITION OF DWELLINGS AND UNOCCUPIED HOUSES. 

■ 

In the present census all buildings, whether occupied October 16, 
1899, or not, were reported by the enumerators, and the facts regard- 
ing the provisions in them for supplying water and for disposing of 
garbage and excreta were ascertained. Before proceeding to a dis- 
cussion of these topics a brief analysis of this return of building^ may 
be made. 

The total number of buildings in Cuba, whether occupied or not, 
was 297,906, or 5.3 persons to a building. The average number of 
persons to a building, occupied or unoccupied, may be computed from 
those tables. The provinces itinge as follows: 



Province. 



Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Matanxas 

Habana (excluslTe of city) 



PenouD 

toa 
building. 



4.7 
4.8 
4.8 
6.U 



Province. 



Puerto Principe 
Pinar del Rio . . 
Habana city . . . 



PeiBons 

toa 
building. 



5.2 
5.4 
8:8 



In Habana city there was one building of some sort to each 9 pereons; 
elsewhere in Cuba one to each 5. In Porto Rico there were 5.3 persons 
to a building, or about the same as in Cuba outside Habana. The pre- 
ceding table suggests that in the cities of Cuba the ratio of buildings 
to population was probably less than in the rural districts. The facts 
upon this point are brought out more clearly in the following table: 



District. 



14cities 

Best of Cuba 



Popula- 
tion. 



401,504 
1,061,288 



Buildings. 



79,077 
218,828 



Persona 

toa 
building. 



6.2 
4.9 



The average number of persons to a building was much less in all cities 
together than it is in Habana. Hence the other cities must have had a 
relatively small number of persons to a building. All 14 cities except 
Pinar del Rio and Habana had a smaller number of persons to a building 
than the average for all cities, and 8 of the 14 had as small a number as 



168 



REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



the average in the rural districts of the island. The smallest number 
of persons to a building was found in the cities of Santa Clara province, 
except Cienfuegos. 

Of the 297,905 buildings in Cuba, 262,724, or about seven-eighths 
(88.2 per cent), were occupied, and 36,181, or one-eighth (11.8 per cent), 
were unoccupied. The number and ratio of unoccupied buildings to 
the total was as follows: 



Provlxice. 



Habana 

Puerto Principe 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

PinardelRio... 
Matansas 



Total 
buildings. 



64,229 
1G,997 
74.995 
67,891 
82,042 
'41,761 



Unoccu- 
pied 
buildingB. 



5,474 
1,672 
9,099 
8,678 
4,155 
5,608 



Per cent 
unoccu- 
pied. 



8.6 
9.8 

12.8 

12.8 

13 

18.4 



The positions of Habana and Pinar del Rio suggest that unoccupied 
buildings may be more common in the country. The following table 
gives the number and proportion of unoccupied buildings in the 14 
cities separately reported: 



District 



14 cities 

Rest of Cuba 



Buildings. 



78,915 
218,990 



Unoccu- 
pied 
buildings. 



8,888 
26,848 



Per cent 
unoccu- 
pied. 



10.6 
12.8 



To ascertain whether the number of unoccupied buildings was unusu- 
ally large because of recent disturbances, the figures for Porto Bico 
may be used for comparison. On that island 11.3 per cent of the build- 
ings were reported as unoccupied. It seems, therefore, that the pro- 
portion in Cuba was not exceptional. 

Passing to the occupied buildings or dwellings, one may examine the 
average number of persons to each. In this respect the provinces 
i*ank as follows: 



Province. 



Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Habana (exclusive of city) 

Matanzas 

Puerto Principe 



Persons 

toa 
dwelling. 



5.5 
6.5 
5.6 
5.6 
5.8 



Province. 



Pinar del Rio 
Habana city . 

Cuba... 



Persons 

toa 
dwelling. 



6.2 
9.4 



6.0 



In the United States in 1890 there were 5.5 persons to a dwelling. 
The table does not show that the average dwelling was more crowded in 
Hal)ana city than in Santa Clara, for in the one case the dwelling may 
be more roomy. The dwelling is an unsatisfactory unit of measure, 
just because it can not be defined. Hence thorough and accurate 



FKB80NS TO A DWSUiING. 



169 



knowledge of local conditions is requisite to interpret such a table as * 
the foregoing. Yet, if the dwellings of Cuba be divided into two 
classes, city dwellings and country dwellings, some progress may be 
made. This is done in the following table: 



District. 



Ucitiea 

Rest of Cnba 



FopnlA- 
tfon. 



491,fi04 
1,081,288 



Dwellings. 



70,789 
191,085 



Penons 

toa 
dwelling. 



6.9 
5.6 



There were rather more persons to a dwelling in the cities of Cuba, 
but the difference is in no wise what the figures for Habana city in the 
earlier table would lead one to expect. In many of the other cities of 
Cuba, therefore, the number of persons to a dwelling must be low. 
Indeed, when the figures as a whole for the 13 cities outside Habana 
are compared with the rural districts, it appears that in those cities 
there were on the average 5.6 persons to a dwelling, or just the same 
number as in the country. In the following table the figures are given 
for the urban and rural population of each province: 



Froyince. 


PeisouB to a dwell- 
ing. 


In urban 
diBtricti. 


In rural 
diBtricto. 


HftbAna. • 


8.9 
5.9 
7.6 
5.2 
5.4 
5.5 


5.6 
5.5 
6.2 
6.0 
5.5 
5.6 




Pinar del Rio 


Puerto Principe 


Santa Clara 


Santiago 


Cuba 


6.9 


5.6 





In the three western provinces there were more persons to a dwelling 
in the cities, although outside of Habana province the difference was 
slight; but in the three eastern provinces the position is reversed. 
It may be inferred that the dwelling in Cuban cities outside Habana 
is not much more roomy than it is in the rural districts, for space in a 
city is usually more valuable than in the country, and if the average 
city dwelling were larger it would probably contain more inhabitants. 
In this respect there is a marked difference between the Cuban figures 
and those for the large cities of the United States. The fifty -eight 
American cities each having over 50,000 inhabitants had 7.3 persons 
to a dwelling in 1890, and the rest of the country only 5.2. Still only 
three American cities had more persons to a dwelling than Habana. 

Dwellings and families. — By comparing the number of dwellings 
with the number of families in Table XL, one may ascertain the ratio 
between the census families and the dwellings. Every dwelling con- 
tains at least one family, for, as already explained, one person living 



170 



BEFOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



alone is for census purposes a family, and an unoccupied place of 
habitation is not a dwelling. As certain dwellings contain two or 
more families, the number of census families must exceed the number 
of dwellings. The figures for Cuba, compared with those for the 
United States and Porto Rico, are given below: 



Gountxy. 



Cuba 

Porto Rico. . . 
United States 



Number of 



327,965 

181,694 

12,690,15(2 



Number of 
dwellings. 



262,724 

158.905 

11,483,318 



Families 
to 100 
dwell- 
ings. 



125 
115 
111 



From these figures it appears that there were more families to 100 
dwellings in Cuba than in either Porto Bico or the United States. In 
the following table the figures are given separately for each province 
and for the city of Habana: 



Provincje. 



Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Pinardel Rio 

Habana (excluding cUy) 



Families 
to 100 
dwell- 
ings. 



110 
110 
112 
118 



Province. 



Puerto Principe 

Matanzas 

Habana (city) . 



Families 
to 100 
dwell- 
ings. 



122 
124 

227 



The families to 100 dwellings in Cuba, outside the city of Habana, 
were 114, or slightly less than in Porto Bico, but rather more than in 
the United States. Habana city had more than 2 families to each 
dwelling, a relation which held in the United States only for New 
York, Brooklyn, and Fall Biver among the fifty largest cities of the 
country. 

SOUBCE OP WATEB SUPPLY IN CUBA. 

The original source of water supply in Cuba, as elsewhere, is rain- 
fall. This rain may fall on a building and be guided into and stored 
in a cistern, or may fall on and percolate through the ground either 
under or upon the surface. Flowing water may be obtained for 
human use as it comes to the surface either in a natural spring or an 
artificial well. Or it may be obtained as it flows over the surface 
either in a natural water course or in an artificial water course or 
aqueduct. Accordingly the census recognizes four sources of water 
supply, as follows: 

1. Cistern for rain water. 

2. Spring or well for ground water. 

3. Water from a natural stream. 

4. Water from an artificial aqueduct. 



8OUB0E OF WATER SUPPLY. 



171 



As many homes in Cuban cities take water from street vendors, the 
answei*s given to the enumerators at the houses regarding the source 
from which the vendors obtain it may be open to some slight question, 
but there seems little reason to deny the substantial correctness of the 
returns. 

These four sources are drawn upon for a water supply in the f ol- 
lowing proportions: 



Souioe of water supply. 



Glstems for rain water 

Stream 

Aqueduct 

Sprang or well 

Not specified 

Total 



Number 
of dwellngs 

supplied 
fromsooroe 

named. 



120,flZl 

74,868 

41,748 

13^766 

8,226 



262,721 



Percent 
ol total 
dwell- 
ings 



46 

28 

16 

7 

8 



100 



Nearly half the dwellings in Cuba got water from cisterns and more 
than one-fourth from streams, or three-fourths from these two sources. 
The proportion using each of these four sources in each province is 
shown in the following table: 



Province. 



Habana(clty} 

Habana (excluding city) 

Matansas 

PlnardelRlo 

Puerto Prlndpe 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Cuba 



Per cent of dwellings obtaining vrater from 
source named. 



Cistern. 



4 

79 
78 
34 
66 

55 
18 



46 



Stream. 



1 
9 
4 
61 
20 
20 
61 



28 



Aque- 
duct 



82 
5 

14 
1 

9 

14 



16 



Well. 



1 
3 
1 
2 
21 
14 
6 



Not 
Qieclfled. 



12 
4 
3 
2 
3 
2 
1 



Total. 



100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 



100 



Cisterns were used least in the capital, but with that exception were 
least common in the two provinces at the ends of the island, where 
one-sixth (Santiago) or one-third (Finar del Rio) of the houses derived 
water from this source. The other four provinces fall into two groups, 
an eastern, Puerto Principe and Santa Clara, in which one-half of the 
houses used cisterns, and a western, Habana outside the city and 
Matanzas, in which nearly four-fifths of the houses relied on cisterns. 
Where cisterns were most used streams were least used for water. In 
the provinces at the ends of Cuba about three-fifths of the houses relied 
on streams; in the east central group one-fifth, and in the west central 
group less than one-tenth. About%ve-sixths of the houses in Habana 
city derived water from an aqueduct. In Matanzas and Santiago the 
proportion was about one-seventh, elsewhere less than one-tenth. 

In the following tables the per cent of dwellings using these several 



172 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



sources of water supply is given for each of the fourteen cities sepa- 
rately reported and then for the districts outside those cities by 
provinces. 



city. 



Cardenas 

Cienfue^os 

Guanabacoa 

Habana 

Manzanillo 

Matanras 

PinardelRio.... 
Puerto Principe. 

Regla 

Sa^a la Grande 
Sancti Spiritufl . . 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Trinidad 



Per cent of urban dwellings obtaining water 
from sources named. 



Aque- 
duct 



Urban Cuba. 



25 
42 

1 
83 


56 





1 

58 
73 


94 





58 



Cistern. 



68 

7 

86 

4 

31 

89 

90 

54 

46 

1 

8 

89 







28 



Stream. 








80 

6 


8 

17 

3 

11 



8 



Well. 



8 
47 

8 

1 
88 

1 

1 
41 
45 
86 


10 

1 
87 



14 



Not spec- 
ified. 



4 
4 

10 
12 
1 
5 
8 
5 
8 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 



Total. 



100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 



100 



The most incomplete returns under this head were from the cities in 
Habana province. The seven cities which apparently had a municipal 
water supply stand out sharply in the first column, and in the order 
of the proportion of houses supplied with water through an aqueduct 
they rank as follows: Santiago, Habana^ Sancti Spiritus, Matanzas, 
Sagua la Grande, Cienfuegos, and Cardenas. 

The following notes regarding the water supply of these cities have 
been derived from various sources: 

CARDBNAB. 

Since 1872, Cardenas has had an aqueduct which supplies water from a subterra- 
nean liver one mile distant from the town, which furnishes an abundant supply at 
a cost of about $3 gold per month for each faucet. The well water and that from 
underground cisterns is brackish and not potable, so that, as a rule, the poor purchase 
water from the street carriers. (Military Notes on Cuba.) 

CIEMFUfiQOS. 

The commencement of a waterworks system has been made, and the water tower, 
standing at an elevation of over 100 feet above the harbor level, is one of the striking 
features of the landscape; but at last accounts the company had not begun to furnish 
water, and the sole source of supply was from underground cisterns, the owners of 
which derive a handsome revenue; from selling water to their less fortunate neigh- 
bors. (Clark.) 

The supply of water is absolutely inadequate to the demands of the city. The 
hotels and a few residences have cement cisterns built in the ground and use rain 
water; but the chief supply comes from a small stream, the Jicotea River, a small 
branch of the CanniMi. The w&ter is pupaped into two aqueducts. The principal 
one, which is called after the Jicotea River, holds 400,000 liters; a smaller one, the 
Bouffartique, holds 300,000 liters. Pipes from these two aqueducts run through a 
few of the streets above ground alongside the curbing. The gates are open only two 
hours daily. The hospitals use this water after boiling. As a remedy for this con- 
dition, I am told there was a project to bring water from a point 20 miles distant from 



fc 



80UBCE OF WATEB SUPPLY. 173 

the falls of the Havabanilla River, 1,200 feet above the sea. Absolute freedom from 
pollution was claimed. It was abandoned on account of the war. The estimated 
cost of this work was $1,000,000. The Jicotea aqueduct is simply a large open cistern 
built of rocks and cement There are about 200 wells in the city, but infected. 
(United States Sanitary Inspector D. E. Dudley, quoted by B. P. Porter.) 

HABANA. 

• 

The present water supply of Habana is excellent, being derived from the pure and 
extensive springs of Vento, about 9 miles distant from the city. The present aque- 
duct, completed in 1893 or 1894, was begim in 1861, and is known as El Canal de 
Albear. At the source of supply there is a large stone basin into which the springs 
or, more properly, subterranean streams bubble. At one side is a magnificent gate- 
house. From this runs the aqueduct, which is an ^g-shaped brick tunnel, generally 
under grpund, but marked at frequent intervals along its route by turrets of brick 
and stone. The present water supply enters the city through the suburb of Cerro, 
which formerly had few, if any, connections with it, the population of this suburb 
purchasing their water from the street carriers. There is an old aqueduct also run- 
ning into the city, built as early as 1597, known as the Zanja. The source of this 
water supply was, or is, the Almendares River, only about 2 miles away, the water 
of which was unquestionably impure. There are but few wells and cisterns in the 
city, and to-day nearly all of the water used is pure. It should perhaps be said that 
the waterworks enterprise is a municipal affair. (Clark.) 

The present water supply of Habana is excellent, although it is used by only a por- 
tion of the population. It comes from the enormous springs on the banks of the 
Almendares River, about 8 miles due south of the city. These springs are inclosed 
in a masonry structure about 150 feet in diameter at its base and 250 feet at the top 
and 60 feet deep. Masonry drains are laid around the upper surface to prevent any 
surface water from washing into the spring. At the base of this spring the water is 
constantly bubbling up and appears to be of remarkable purity. The supply is so 
large that it more than fills all the present requirements, and a laiige portion of it 
runs to waste. From the spring the water is conveyed under the Almendares River by 
pipes situated in a tunnel, and from the north side of the river the water is conveyed 
in a masonry tunnel or aqueduct for a distance of about 6 miles, where it discharges 
into a receiving reservoir, the altitude of which is 35 meters, or about 108 feet, above 
the sea level. From the distributing reservoir the water is carried into the city by 
gravity in pipes, the highest point in the thickly populated portion of the city being 
68 feet. The pipes in the streets are said to be small, and there Js not sufficient pres- 
sure to carry the water to the upper stories of the small number of buildings which 
exceed one story in height. In these buildings pumping is necessary. There are 
said to be about 18,000 houses in the city, and from a report made by the municipal- 
ity in 1897 it appears that the number of houses directly connected with the water 
pipes is 9,233. The poorer houses, which are not thus connected, obtain water either 
by purchase from the street vendors or by getting it from public taps, of which there 
are a certain number scattered throughout the city. (General Greene, quoted by 
R. P. Porter.) 



MATANZAS. 



Since 1872 it has had a fine water supply, though only about half the houses are 
connected with the water system, and many of the people still buy water of street ven- 
dors without knowledge as to the source of supply or purity of the water. (Porter. ) 



SANTIAGO. 



The city has a good water supply furnished through an aqueduct named El Paso 
de la Viigen. (Clark. ) 



174 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OP CUBA, 1899. 



There is no city in which one-third of the houses obtain water 
directly from a natural stream, and in more than half of the cities this 
source of supply is not recognized. The only cities in which it is 
important are Manzanillo, Sancti Spiritus, and Trinidad. 

MANZANILLO. 

Manzanillo lies on the coast of Santiago, about three-quarters of a 
mile from the mouth of the Yara. "The water supply formerly came 
from the river Yara, but proved to be so unhealthy that now the 
inhabitants rely entirely upon cisterns." (Clark.) In the light of the 
preceding figures this is evidently a statement of what should be 
rather than what is. 

BANCn 8PIRITUS. ^ 

"Sancti Spiritus is situated on both banks of the Yayabo, which 
flows 5i miles to empty into the Zaza at a point about 20 miles from 
the sea." (Military Notes on Cuba.) 

TRINIDAD. 

"The course of the river Guaurabo lies within half a mile of Trini- 
dad." (Clark.) 

Regai-ding the water supply of the other five cities, Guanabacoa, 
Pinar del Rio, Puerto Principe, Begla, and Santa Clara, the following 
notes are submitted: 

GUANABACOA. 

"Guanabacoa is noted for its numerous springs and wells and for 
the excellence and abundance of its drinking water." (Military Notes 
on Cuba.) 

PINAR DBL RIO. 

"The river on the outskirts has good water." (Military Notes.) 
"The river which skirts the town could be utilized as a source for a 
pure water supply." (Clark.) 

PUERTO PRINCIPE. 

"A small rivei'runs through the town." (Military Notes.) 

The following table shows by provinces the per cent of all dwellings 

in the districts outside the fourteen cities supplied with water in the 

manner specified: 



Ptovinoe. 



HftbaiiA 

MaUuuaa 

Pinar del Rio.... 
Puerto Principe.. 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Rural Cuba 



Per cent of dwelling in rural districts obtaining 


water from sources specified. 


Cistern. 


Stream. 

• 


Well. 


Aque- 
duct 


Not 
specified. 


80 


10 


1 


6 


3 


88 


6 


1 


3 


2 


81 


64 


2 


1 


2 


66 


29 


12 





8 


65 


26 


7 


1 


2 


20 


72 


4 


s 


1 


64 


88 


4 


2 


2 



Total. 



100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 



100 



A small number of dwellings in rural Cuba are reported to derive 
water from an aqueduct. The municipal districts containing as many 



WATER 8UPPLY AND GARBAGE DISPOSAL. 



175 



as 100 such dwellings are as follows: In Habana province, Marianao 
(196), San Antonio de los Banos (369), Batabano (505), Guines (500); 
in Matanzas province, Jovellanos (408) and Bolondron (188); in Pinar 
del Rio province, Mariel (193); in Santa Clara, Abreus (139), Bodas 
(188), and Sagua la Grande outside the urban part (127); in Santiago, 
El Caney (427) and Baracoa (687). 

The general I'eliance upon water from streams in the two provinces 
at the ends of Cuba — ^Pinar del Rio and Santiago — and upon cisterns in 
the four central provinces is clearly shown in the preceding tables. 
There seems some reason for doubt whether the line of division 
between cisterns for rain water {dljtbe) and well or spring for ground 
water {pozo) was clearly- understood by the enumerators and those 
who answered their questions. 

DISPOSITION OF GARBAGE. 

The enumerators were instructed to write in the column for answers 
to this question ^^Municijxd^^ (municipal), ^^Particular^^ (private), or 
" Se quema^^ (by burning), according to the method of disposition used 
at the dwelling where the question was put. In addition to these three 
classes it was necessary to introduce a fourth for unspecified or insuffi- 
ciently specified, but only 2 per cent of the houses fell into this last 
class. The facts for Cuba as a whole are shown in the following table: 



Method of dispoflingr <^ gartMge. 



Mnnicipal ... 

Burning 

Private , 

Not specified 

Total., 



Number of 
dwellingH 
sore- 
porting. 



88.229 

84,856 

88.287 

6,868 



202,724 



Per cent 
of all 

dwell- 
ings. 



34 

S2 

82 

2 



100 



In this respect, as in that of water supply, the main difference is 
between the city and the country districts. In the following table, 
therefore, the methods of disposing of garbage in the several cities are 
given: 

Per cent of urban divellings uging specified method of garbage disposed. 



city. 


Munici- 
pal. 


Burning. 


Priyate. 


Not 
specified. 


Total. 


Cardenas...... • 


79 
92 
81 
91 
95 
90 
98 
98 
92 
74 
81 
83 
91 
67 


9 
2 
7 
1 
2 
8 

1 
1 
9 
9 

13 
6 

26 


9 
6 
6 
2 
2 
4 
4 
2 

16 
8 
S 
2 
6 


3 

1 
7 
6 

1 
3 
8 
4 

7 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 


100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 


Cienfuegoe 


QnanabfUMM ...... ^ . ^ x x . . 1 1 


Habana 


Msncanlllo .•. 




PI nar del Rio 


Puerto Principe 


Regla :. 


f^gii||. 1a Or^nd^ , . . . 


Sancti Sniritus 


Santa Clara 


Bantlago r , ^ , 


Trinidad 


Urban Cuba 


88 


4 


4 


4 


100 





176 



BEPOBT OK THE CENSUS OP CUBA, 1809. 



From this table it is clear that, taking the dwellings as a whole, in 
the 14 cities, 7 in every 8 of them had some municipal system of dis- 
posing of garbage. The cities of Santa Clara, except Cienf uegos, were 
apparently least well provided in this respect. In the cities of that 
province, more commonly than elsewhere in Cuba, garbage was dis- 
posed of by burning. 

In the following table the same facts are given by provinces for the 
rural districts of Cuba: 

Per cent of rural dwellings wnng specified melJiod of garitage disposal. 



Province. 



Habana 

MatanzEfl 

Pinardel Rio.... 
Puerto Principe . 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Rural Cuba 



Munici- 
pal. 


Burning. 


Private. 


Not 
specified. 


Total. 


ao 

20 
10 
5 
12 
11 


22 
28 
2 
64 
43 
79 


54 
50 
86 
28 
43 
9 


4 

2 
2 
S 
2 

1 


100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 


14 


42 


42 


2 


100 



Outside of the 14 cities about 1 dwelling in 7 enjoyed some public 
means of garbage disposal, and the prevalence of this varies in rough 
agreement with the density of rural population as given on page 74. 
The only private means specified is that of burning, and this is increas- 
ingly prevalent from west to east. To show this, the provinces have 
been arranged in the following list in their order from west to east 
and the per cent of rural dwellings burning their garbage indicated. 



Province. 



Pinar del Rio 

Habana 

Matanzaa .... 



Per cent 
of rural 
dwell- 
ingi 
burning 
garbage. 



2 
22 
28 



Province. 



Santa Clara 

Puerto Principe 
Santiago 



Percent 
of rural 
dwell- 
ings 
baming 
garbage. 



43 
64 
79 



The houses having other means of garbage disposal obviou.sl}'^ vary 
in the reverse way; that is, when burning is common, other private 
means are uncommon, and vice versa. 



DISPOSITION OF EXCRETA. 

The entries which the enumerators were allowed to make in the 
column containing the answers to this question were pozOy inodoro^ 
or ninyuna (none). In addition to the three thus allowed there will 
be found in the tables a fourth class of ^^ not specified'' to cover cases 
where the question was not answered. The only recognized methods 
of disposal, therefore, were pozo and tnodoro. As it is difficult to find 



LATRINE SYSTEM. 



177 



any exact English equivalent for these words, they will be retained in 
the following discussion of the tables.^ 

The following table shows the frequency of these various modes of 
disposal: 



Mode of disponing of excreta. 



No form 

POK> 

Inodoro 

Not gpecilied 

Total.. 



Number of 

dwclliugN 

uaing it iu 

Cuba. 



129,245 

110,696 

18,644 

9,140 



Per feut 
of total 
dwell- 
ings. 

49 

12 

5 

4 



262,724 



100 



About half the dwellings in Cuba had no provision of any kind for 
this purpose. It is said that in rural Spain the inhabitants commonly 
have no closets or outhouses, but resort to the fields, and the same u 
apparently true of Cuba. Of the houses having conveniences of this 
sort nine- tenths (8.9 per cent) reported apozo and one-tenth an inodoro. 
In this respect the provinces stand as follows: 

Per cent of total dweUingn supplied tiHih specified mode of ditsjHMial of excretd. 



Province. 



Habaiia (city) 

Habana (excluding city) 

Matanias 

Pinar del Rio 

Puerto Principe 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Total 



Pozo. 


Inodoru. 


No ftirm. 


43 
67 
48 
20 
40 
47 
36 


48 


3 
85 
47 
77 
57 
50 
63 


2 










42 


6 


19 



Not 
bpeciiled. 



6 
8 
3 
3 
8 
3 
1 



It is clear that outside of Habana City and Matanzas province the 
inodoro is hardly known. In the following table the facts arc given 
for the thirteen other cities separately reported: 

Per cent of urlxin dwellings usiruj specified method of disjtositu; of exvreUi. 



City. 


Poio. 


Inodoro. 


None. 


Not 
Hpecilied, 


Total. 


Cardenas 


87 
93 
83 
94 
78 
94 
69 
91 
89 
82 
75 
98 
96 


3 
4 


7 
2 

10 
5 
8 
2 

26 
1 
5 

16 

22 
4 
2 


3 

1 

p. 
/ 

1 

3 

4 

5 

7 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 


100 


Cienf uegos 


100 


(lUnnabacoA 


100 


Mnnzanlllo 




100 


Matanzas 


11 


100 


Pinar del Rio 


100 


Puerto Princine 




100 


Regla 


1 
4 


100 


Btunia la Grande t 


100 


Sancti Snirltus 


100 


San ta Ciara 


1 
1 


100 


Santiago 


100 


Trinidad 


100 








Urban Cuba (excluding Habana) 


85 


8 


9 


3 


100 







^Noie on meaning of pozo and inodoro. The ** inodoro** includes every receptacle 
for excreta in which an effort is made to destroy or decrease the foul odors arising 

24662 12 



178 



REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



This table shows that Matanzas is the only city besides Habana in 
which an inodoro was found in one-tenth of the dwellings and that in 
half the other 12 cities it did not occur in an appreciable number of 
cases. In 4 of these 13 cities at least 10 per cent of the houses were 
without closet conveniences^ and in 2 moi'e than 1 dwelling in 5 was 
thus unprovided. 

In the following table the facts are given for the rural districts of 
Cuba: 

Ptr cent of rural dwelling* unrig «j»ecified method of disposing of excreia. 



Province. 


POW). 


luoduro. 


None. 

• 


Nut 
speclfled. 


ToUl. 


HiilMina 


62 
96 
17 
25 
35 
23 





• 




40 

61 
81 
72 
61 
76 


8 
3 
2 
3 
4 
1 


100 


Mat&iuiM 


100 


Pinar del Rio 


100 


Puerto PrinciDe 


100 


Santa Clara 


100 


Santlam). ,^^,.-,., ,-. 


100 






Rural Cuba 


32 





65 


3 


100 







In rural Cuba thei'e was a pozo in connection with about one-third 
of the dwellings, while two-thirds were without this or any other form 
of receiving excreta. 

therefrom, usually by the addition of such substanceti as lime, dry clay, or ashea. 
The pozo includes all other forms of closet. The modem form of closet flushed by 
water froin a system of pipes, called escusado ingles^ is very unusual in Habana, and 
unknown elsewhere in Cuba. Either the inodoro or the pozo is cleaned, when it 
is cleaned at all, by scavengers hired by the property owner. 



J 



POPULATION TABLES. 
Tablb I. — Total jMipuUUion (U different censuses. 



Year. 



1774 
1792 

1817 
1827 



Popula- 
tion. 



172,620 
272,801 
fU)3,028 
704,487 




Popula- 
tion. 



I.007,fi24 
1,396,530 
1,631,687 
1,572,797 



Tablk IL — Population of Cufni ami its provinces at various ceiisuses. 



Province. 



Habana 

MatansM 

PtuardelRlo.... 
Puerto Principe . 

Santa Clara 

Santiago de Cuba 

, Cuba 



1861.» 



393,789 
234.524 
116,68.'i 
85,702 
271,310 
264,520 



1887. 



451,928 
259.578 
225,891 
67, 789 
3M, 122 
272,879 



• 1899. 



421,811 
202,462 
173,082 
88,237 
356,537 
327,716 



1,896,530 



1,631,687 



1,572,845 



1 Population of provinccH estimated. See Appendix XVI. 



Table III. — PopukUian of municipal districts in 1887 and 1899, as constituted at the 

latter dcUe, with gain or loss of population. 



HABANA PROVINCE. 



Municipal districts. 



Aicuacate 

Albulcar : 

Bainoa 

Batabano 

Bauta 

Bejucal 

Cano 

Caaiffuas 

CataUna 

Ceiba del Agua 

Ouanabaooa 

Guara 

Guinea 

Gnira de Mel^na 

Habana 

Isla de Pinos 

Jaruco 

Madruga 

Managua .•. 

Marianao 

Melena del Sur 

Nueya Paa 

Pipian 

Qulvican 

Regla 

Salud 

San Antonio de las Vegas 

San Antonio de los Banos 

San Felipe 

San Jose de las La)as 

San Nicolas 

Santa Crux del Norte (formerly San Antonio de Rio Blanco 

and Jibacoa) 

Santa Maria dfel Rosario 

Santiago de las Vegas 

T^MMte 

VeredaNuera 



1887. 



8,846 
8,314 
4,188 
8,016 
8,070 
7,902 
8,745 
8,886 
6,112 
8,232 

28.&13 
4,549 

12, 618 

8.721 

200,448 

2,040 

12,182 
7,514 
5,850 
7,352 
5,275 
9,571 
8,414 
4.585 

10,316 
4,896 
4,469 

12,423 
2,313 
6,218 
6,72-1 

9,210 
4,885 
12,081 
6,143 
3,277 



1899. 



8,163 
8,746 
1,725 
6,528 
6,142 
5,756 
4,210 
1,004 
2,718 
2,197 

20,080 
1,835 

11,391 

11.518 
242,065 
8,199 
4,076 
3,744 
2,887 
8,593 
8,207 
7,761 
1,101 
2,423 

11,363 
3,293 
1,^55 

12. (ai 
1,915 
4,154 
4,568 

2,965 
2,730 
10,276 
1,551 
2.416 



Gain. 



432 



465 



2.827 

41,607 

1,150 



1,241 



1,047 



206 



Loss. 



183 



2,463 
1,493 
2,928 
2,146 



2. 882 
3,394 
1,035 

7,9(a 

2,714 
1,224 



8,106 
8,770 
2,963 



2,068 
1,810 
2,313 
2,162 



1,603 
2,614 



398 
2,064 
2,156 

6,245 
2,155 
1.805 
4,592 
861 



179 



180 



REPOKT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table III. — Population o/municijtal districts in 18S7 and 1899 j etc. — Continued. 

MATANZAS PROVINCE. 



Municipal districts. 



AlacFsnes (lormerly Alfonso XII) 

Bolondron 

Cabezas 

Ganasi 

Cardenas , 

Carlos Rojas (formerly CimarroncM) . . 

Colon 

CuevitAS 

Quamacaro 

Jaguey Grande (formed from Colon). 

Joyellanos 

MaoEiffua 

Macuri^eB 

Marti (formerly Guamutas) 

Matanxas 

Maximo Gomez 

Mendez Capote 

Palmillas 

Perico (formerly Cervantes) 

Roque 

Sabanilla 

San Jose de los Kamos 

Santa Ana (formerly Cidra) 

Union de Reyes 



18OT. 



9,711 
11,816 

8,802 

4,524 
23.354 

6.879 
16,679 

6,823 
10,245 



8,518 

6,410 

18,874 

11,589 

56,879 

8,132 

5,349 

8,818 

3,204 

8,216 

8,871 

9,031 

6,219 

8,135 



1899. 



8.110 
9,179 
5,184 
1,993 

24,861 
8,174 

12,195 
5,807 
6,000 
5,853 
7.529 
5.042 

10,405 
8.905 

45.282 
4,046 
2,158 
7,647 
4,449 
4,464 
5,205 
6,765 
2,965 
5,226 



Gain. 



1.507 



1.245 



Low. 



1,601 
2,637 
8,618 
2,531 



3.705 



516 
4,245 



989 
868 
2.969 
2,6m 
11.097 
4,066 
3,191 
1,171 



8,752 
8,666 
2.2H6 
8,254 
2.909 



PINAR DEL RIO PROVINCE. 



Artemisa (includinir CayaJabos) 

Bahia Honda 

Cabanas 

Candelaria (including Mangas) 

Consolacion del Norte 

Consolaclon del Bur (including Alonso Rojas) 

Guanajay 

Guane 

Guayabal 

Mantua (including Baja) 

Maricl 

Palacios 

Julian Diaz (formerly Paso Real de Ban Diego) . . 

PinardellUo 

San Cristobal (including Banta Crux de los Pinos) 

San Diego de los Banofl 

San Diego de Nunes 

San Juan y Martinez 

San Luis 

Vinales 



15,775 
8,506 
8,560 
9,876 
7,934 

20,328 
9,512 

22.708 
6.887 

U,122 
7.902 
6.601 
4,920 

29,497 
9,066 
6,317 
4,180 

17,974 
7,327 

11,550 



9,817 
2,117 
3,853 
4,866 
7,399 

16,665 
8.796 

14.760 
2,710 
8,366 
3,631 
2,466 
1,871 

88.843 
4,263 
2,419 
1,137 

14,787 
7,608 

17,700 



8,846 



281 
6,150 



6,458 
6,389 
4.707 
6,009 

535 
8,663 

716 
7,948 
8,627 
2,766 
4,271 
4.045 
8,049 



4,808 
3,896 
3,018 
3,187 



PUERTO PRINCIPE PROVINCE. 



Ciegode Avila 

Moron 

Nuevitas 

Puerto Principe... 
Santa Cruz del Bur 



7,929 


9,801 


1,872 


8,919 


9,630 


711 


6,618 


10,355 


3,737 


40.958 


53,140 


12,182 


8,365 


• 5,308 


1,9*13 



SANTA CLARA PROVINCE. 



Abreus 

Caibarien 

Calabazar 

Camajuani 

Cartagena 

Ccjaac Pablo 

Clenfuegos 

Cifucntcs (formerly Amaro) 

Cnices 

Esperanza 

haSt^ilM) 

Palmira 

Plaoetofl 



3,819 
5,106 

12,957 

10,537 
7,029 
9,723 

40,964 
7,251 
6,490 

12,769 
8,014 
4,709 
9,337 



8,995 
8,650 

13,419 

14,495 
6,244 
6,954 

59,128 
8,825 
7,953 
7,811 
9,608 
6,527 

11,961 



176 
3,544 

462 
8.958 



18.164 
"i,'468" 



1.589 
1,818 
2,624 



785 
2.769 



8,426 
'4,'9i8 



POPULATION BY WABD8 AND OITIBS. 



181 



Table III. — PopuUUton of municipal districts in 1887 and 1899, eU\ — OontiDued. 

SANTA CLARA PROVINCE-GonUnue<l. 



Municipal districts. 



Quemado dc Quines 

Kancho Velos 

Banchuelo ^. . 

Remedios 

Rodas 

Sa«:ua la Grande 

San Antonio de las Vneltas 

Sancti Spiritns 

SanDlcgodel Vfdle 

San Fernando (formerly Camarones) 

San Joan do las Yeras 

Santa Clara 

Santo Domingo 

Trinidad 

Yaguajay 



1887. 



11,4G7 

6,391 

4.671 

15,474 

8,163 

18,330 

16,656 

29,278 

9,831 

6,688 

7,702 

32,491 

13,667 

29,448 

6,280 



1899. 



8,890 

7,582 

5,059 

14.833 

9,562 

21,342 

12,832 

25,709 

5,869 

6,445 

5,600 

28,437 

10,372 

24,271 

9,718 



Qaln. 


Lorn. 




2.677 


1.141 




488 






Gil 


1,409 




8,012 






2,824 




8,569 

4,462 

243 








2,102 




4.054 




3,296 




5.177 



3,438 



SANTIAGO DK CUBA PROVINCB. 



AltoSongo 

Baraooa 

Bayamo , 

Campechnela (formed from Mansanillo) 

Caney 

Cobre 

Crlsto (formed from MansanlUo) 

Oibara , 

Guantanamo 

Holguln 

Jiguani 

Manzanillo 

Hayari 

Nlquero (formed from Manxanillo) 

Palma Soriano ( formed from Santiago) 

Puerto Padre (formerly Victoria de las Tunas). 

Sagua de Tanamo 

San Luis (formed from Santiago) 

Santiago dc Cuba 



10.221 
18,067 
17,676 



8,686 
8,261 



26,342 
23,741 
82,288 

7,808 

84,220 

7,990 



12,049 
6,476 



59,614 



12,770 

21,944 

21,198 

7,369 

9,126 

10,707 

1,194 

31,594 

28,063 

34.506 

10,496 

32,288 

8,504 

2,718 

12,305 

19,964 

6,796 

11,681 

45,478 



2.549 
3,887 
3,517 



440 
2,446 



5,252 
4,322 
2,268 
2,687 
9,349 
514 



7,985 
320 



9,850 



Table IV. — PopukUion by toards and by citif», 
PROVINCE OP HABANA. 



TOTAL POPl^LATIOK 424,804 

Agnacatc District 8, 163 

Aguacate and Zabaleta 2,196 

Rcloj and Compostlxo 967 

Alqnizar District 8,746 

Alqulzar, Prlmero 1,837 

Alquisar, Scgundo 1, 877 

Guanimar 485 

La Pas 1,011 

Palenquc 1,933 

San Andres 293 

Tumbaden) 1 , 810 

Bainoa District 1, 725 

Bainoa and Santa Cruz 482 

Quaballo 495 

Mamey Dnro and Relo) 748 

Batabano District 6,623 

Batabano 1,026 

Gnanabo... 436 

Mayagnano 352 

Quinnnal and San Angustin 976 

Surgldero 3.683 

Islan d s 51 



Bauta District 5,142 

HoyoCoIorado 1,046 

Baracoa, Anafe, and CorraliUo 1 , 025 

Pnnta Bmva and Cangrcjcras 2,205 

San Pedro and Guatao 866 

Bejncal District 6,756 

Prlmero 997 

Segundo 1,068 

Tercero 1,093 

Pledras 1,670 

Remainder of district 928 

Cano District 4,210 

Arroyo Arenas 1,008 

Cano and Jaimanitas 1,320 

Wajay 1,887 

Casignas District (not given by wards) ... 1 , 001 

Catalina District (not given by wards) ... 2, 718 

Celba del Agtia District 2, 197 

CeibadclAgua 909 

Virtudes and Chicharron 621 

Remainder of district 667 



182 



EEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table IV. — Population by ivardji and by cities — Continued. 
PROVINCE OP HABANA— ConUnoed. 



Quanabacoa District 20,060 

Asuncion, Este 1,606 

Asuncion, Oesto 2,795 

Bacuranao 1, 457 

Campo Florido 691 

Cojimar 1,585 

Corral Falso, Bste 1,838 

Corral Palso, Oeste 1,991 

Cruz Verde 2,485 

San Francisco, Este 2,043 

San Francisco, Oeste 1,807 

San Miguel del Padron and Pepc An- 
tonio 2,482 

Guam District (not given by wards) 1 , 885 

Gulnc« District 11,394 

Firatand Cruz 1,348 

Second and Rublo 8,357 

Third and Yamaraguas 2,a'30 

Fourth 1,094 

Candela North and South and Oua- 

nalo 609 

Canada Baja, San Pedro, and San 

Julian 966 

Nombro de Dios , 1,681 

Guira do Melena 11,548 

Cajio 963 

Gabriel 764 

Jerez 1,274 

Juribacoa 311 

Helena 1,452 

Norte... 2,620 

Bur 2,396 

Sll)anacan 1,136 

Tiunbadero 632 

Habana District 242, 066 

Habana City- 
Arroyo Apolo 2, 166 

Arsenal 6, 131 

Atares 7,674 

CasaBlanca 2,440 

Celba 6,783 

Cerro....". 10,741 

Chavez 7,598 

Colon 7,371 

Dragones 6,604 

Guadalupe 7,617 

JesusdelMonto 9,869 

Jesus Maria 8, 916 

Luyano 1, 254 

Martc 6,002 

Monserrate 7, 829 

Paula 8,791 

Penalver 8,557 

Pilar 6,111 

Pueblo Nuevo 8,376 

Punta 10,637 

San Felipe 8,660 

San Francisco 4, 216 

San Juan deDios 4,420 

San Lazaro 20, 616 

San Leopoldo 7,494 

San Nicolas 6, 534 

Santa Clara 4,667 

Santa Teresa 6, 726 

Santo Angel 4,766 

Santo Cristo 4, 637 

Sanlstdro 6,806 

Tacon 6,506 

Templete 2,838 

Vcdado y Principe 9,980 

Villanueva 6,063 

VIves 6,0fi0 

Institutioufl 2,»10 



Habana District— Continued. 
Remainder of district- 
Arroyo Naranjo 1,771 

Calvario l.Ofl 

Puentes Grandes 3,262 

Isla de Plnos Jtstrict 8,199 

Caleta Grande 315 

Santa Fe 1,060 

Remainder of district , 1,831 

Jaruco District 4,076 

Guanabo 906 

Maceo, Garzo, Guaicanamar, and 

Tablas 766 

Plaza, Jaruco. Cuartel, and Comercio. 1,189 

Remainder of district 1,263 

Madruga district 3,744 

Concordia, Majagna, and San Bias. . . 9*48 

Madruga, Este 676 

Madruga, Oeste 1,328 

Remainder of district 812 

Managua District 2,887 

Managua 1,063 

RenuUnder of district 1,824 

Marlanao District 8,593 

Cocoaoto 2,602 

Usa 680 

Playa 574 

Pocito 1,560 

Quemados 8,177 

Melcna del Sur District (not given by 

wards) 3,207 

Nueva Paz District 7,761 

Bagaez 1,229 

Nueva Paz 2,294 

Palos 2,630 

Vegas 1,608 

Pipian District (not given by wards) 1 , 101 

Quivican District (not given by wards) . . 2, 428 

ReglaDlstrict 11,368 

First 2,818 

Second 3,084 

Third 3,001 

Fourth 2,510 

Salud District (not given by wards) 8, 293 

San Antonio de las Vegas District (not 

given by wards) 1, 865 

San Antonio do los Banoe District 12, 631 

Armonla 672 

Chicharo 401 

Este 2,065 

Govea 671 

Monjas 925 

Norte 2,966 

Quin tana 706 

Santa Rosa 467 

Seborucal 4S2 

Sur 3,147 

Vallc 167 

Han Felipe District (not given by wards) . 1, 915 



POPULATION BY WABDS AND CiriE.-^. 



183 



Tablb IV. — Population hy ivarda and by cttien— Continued. 
PROVINCE OP HABANA-Continued. 



San Joee de las Lajaa 4,151 

Primero ..' 92S 

Segrondo 2,096 

Remainder of digtrict 1,180 

San Nicolan District 4,568 

Bablney Prleto and Caimlto 577 

Barbucio 786 

Paradero and Gabriel 1,923 

San Nicolas and Jobo 1,382 

Santa Cms del Norte District 2,965 

San Antonio de Rio Blanco del Norte. 965 

Santa Cruz del Norte 934 

Remainder of district 1,066 

Santa Maria del Rosario District 2. 780 

San Pedro 1,285 

Santa Maria del Roaario M4 

Remainder of district 901 



Santiago de las Vegas District 10,276 

Boveros 1,553 

Calabazar 1,152 

Dona Maria 531 

Norte 3,062 

Rincon 920 

Sur 3.068 

Tapaste District 1, 551 

Santa Barbara and Jaula 272 

Tapaste and San Andres 1,279 

Vereda Nueva District 2, 416 

Norte 1,125 

Sur 1,291 



PROVINCE OP MATANZA8. 



Total population 202,214 

Alacranes District 8, 110 

Estante 2,823 

Este 716 

Oaleoncito 474 

Norte 1,267 

Oeste 1,777 

Sur 1,063 

Bolondron District 9,179 

Bolondron 1 933 

Bolondron 2 824 

Bolondron 3 847 

Quira 1,676 

Lucia and Gonzalo 2, 826 

Picdras and Cienega 577 

Punta and Al vercs 1 , 363 

Zapata aud Galeon 638 

Cabesas District ,. 5,184 

Bermeja 1,871 

BiJa 751 

Cabesas 1,721 

Uma 612 

Magdalena 229 

Canasi District 1,993 

Norte 1,624 

Sur 869 

Cardenas District 24, 861 

Cardenas City— 

DUtrictl, Barrio 1 1,659 

District 1; Barrio 2 8,564 

District 2. Barrio 1 1.374 

District 2. Barrio 2 8,720 

District 3, Barrio 1 8,967 

District 3, Barrio 2 2,306 

District 4, Barrio 1 8,145 

District 4, Barrio 2 2,186 

Cantel and Guasimas 1,581 

Pueblo Nueyo, Pundicion, and Ver- 

salles 311 

Varadero 1,029 



Carlos Rojas District (not given by bar- 
rios) 3,174 

Colon District 12,196 

Amarillas 1,746 

Calimete «,274 

Colon, Barrio 1 1,412 

Colon, Barrio2 1,658 

Colon, Barrio 3 919 

Colon, Barrio 4 787 

Colon, Barrio 5 1,299 

Colon, Barrio 6 1, 105 

Cuevitas District 5,807 

Asiento 609 

Cuevitas 2, 634 

Jabaco 997 

Venturtlla 1,667 

Guamacaro District 6,000 

Canimar 161 

Caobas 1, 197 

Coliseo 620 

Guamacaro 552 

Umonar, Este 1, 898 

Ldmonar, Oeste 1,483 

SanMiguel 874 

Sumidero 220 

Jaguey Grande District 5,853 

Cienaga de Zapata 16 

Gallardo 760 

Jaguey Grande 1, 999 

Lopez 1,445 

Ruylra 827 

Sinu 816 

Jovellauos District 7,629 

Asuncion 427 

Jovellanos, Barrio 1 1,942 

Jovellanos, Barrio 2 1,617 

Joyellanos, Barrio 3 1, 162 

Realengo 363 

San Jose 2.018 



184 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OP CUBA, 1899. 



Table IV. — PopnkUion by tvardu and by cities — Oontinned. 
PROVINCE OF MATANZAS-<JoiiUnued. 



MacBgiia DiHtrict 5, 042 



Arab08 

Mayabon . . . 
Monte Alto. 
Oe#ite 



2,241 

1,092 

680 

1,029 



Maouriges District 10, 406 



Batalla 

Cicgo 

Claudlo 

Macurigefl, Este 

Macuriges, Oestc . . . 

Macuriges, Sur 

Nayajas 

Platanal and Linch 

Punta Brava 

Rio Blanco 

Tramojoe 



795 

595 

1,390 

965 

1,071 

1,056 

731 

818 

1,506 

1,577 

404 



Marti District 8,905 



Qnamutas . . 

Itabo 

LaTeja 

Los Cayos . . 
Marti. Norte 
Marti, Sur.. 
Motembo . . . 



2,505 
252 
695 
874 

2,495 
896 

2,188 



Matanzas District 45,282 



Matanzas City- 
District 1, Barrio 1 

District 1, Barrio 2 

• District 2, Barrio 1 

District 2, Barrio 2 

District 3, Barrio 1 

District 3, Barrio 2 

DLstrict 4, Barrio 1 

Pueblo Nuevo •- 

VcTsalles 

Asylums, convents, and hospittils. 

Arroyo and Campana 

Canarioca 

Canlmar and Paso Seco 

Ceiba Mocha : 

Chlrino 

Corral Nuevo 

Cumbre and Bacunayagua 

Guanabana 

San Francisco 



1,600 

2,570 

4,147 

8,596 

5,050 

2,305 

8,270 

8,420 

4,812 

704 

1,143 

814 

697 

1,828 

702 

754 

1,831 

1.005 

234 



MaximoGomez District 4,046 



Altamisal 

Maximo Gomez . . . 
Rancho del Medio. 
Sabanilla 



776 

2,292 

701 

277 



Mendez Capote District 2,158 



Contreras 

Mendez Capote, 1. 
Mendez Capote, 2. 



921 
812 
425 



Palmillas District 7,647 

Cnmanayagua 969 

Ouareiras 798 

Jacan 1,642 

Mangul to 3, 289 

Palmillaa 964 



Perico District. 



4,449 



Altamisal 1,689 

Perico, Norte 2,436 

Perico, Sur 324 



Roque District 4, 464 

Caobillas 1,434 

Guamalales 499 

Moetacilla 688 

Quintana and Tomeguin 861 

Roque 1,482 



Sabanilla District 5,205 



Mondejar and Auras 401 

Palmaand Canimar 1,023 

Sabanilla a, 781 



San Job6 de los Ramos District 6, 765 



Banaguises, Pueblo 931 

Banaffuises, Rural 2,016 

Puebio Nuevo 1, 487 

San Jofl6 de los Ramos 2,301 



Santa Ana District 2,965 



Barrio 1 1,421 

Barrio 2 285 

Barrio 8 722 

Barrio 4 453 

Barrio 5 84 



Union de Reyes Distritrt 6,226 



Pueblo Nuevo 545 

Iglesial 1,969 

Iglesia2 1,707 

IglcsiaS 1,005 



PROVINCE OF PINAR DEL RIO. 



Total population 173, 064 



ArtemisH District ^ 9,317 

Artemisa : : : : . 4, 179 

Canas 984 

Capellanias 223 

Cayajabos 1 , 022 

Dolores 1,692 

Piierta de la Guira 498 

Virtudes 719 



Bahia Honda District 2,117 

Bahia Honda and Aguacate 1 , 278 

C>>rralilIo and Mulata 214 

San Miguel and Manimani 625 



Cabanas District 3, 858 



Cabanas and San Miguel 1,917 

(>qJI)^ _^ J ggg 

Conchlta and Dcliclas * 228 

ViglaandSan Ramon 342 



Candelaria District 4,866 

Bajatc, Puerto Rico, and San Juan 

del Norte 680 

Candelaria 1,697 

Carambola, Lomas, and Rio Hondo . . 803 

LasMangas 1,280 

San Juan de Barracones, Mira Cielos, 

andFrlas 456 



POPUIiATION BY WARDS AND crtTES. 



185 



Tablk IV. — Population by loards and by eitieg — Continued. 
PROVINCE OF PINAR DEL RIO— (;ontiiiued. 



Ooiunlacion del Norte Dintrict 7, 899 

BerracoB..; 1,066 

Caieuanabo 439 

LaJafua 1,567 

La Palma and Rio de Puerco0 1,240 

LosPuentes 594 

Rio Blanco and Arroyo Naran jo 888 

San Andres 671 

Vegas Nueyas 944 

Gonsolacion del Sur District 16, 665 

Aloni»Roja8 2,132 

Colmenar and Hato Quemado 676 

Consolacion del Sur City, not given by 

wards 3,062 

Horcones 1,608 

Lajas and Caperaza 702 

Lena 914 

Naranjo and Caimitos 1, 073 

HlotOB 1,918 

Rio Hondo and la Jagua 2, 346 

San Pablo and Camarones 1, 589 

Santa Clara 645 

Goanajay DlBtrict 8,796 

Cabriales 533 

GuanaJay, Norte 2, 676 

GQana]ay,Sur 3,808 

San Francisco 626 

San Jose 389 

Santa Ana 765 

Gnane District 14,760 

Cabo de San Antonio 270 

Cortes and Serranofl 1,355 

Guane 1,088 

Juan Gomez 912 

LaGrifa 2,113 

Martinas 1,746 

Paso Real and Catallna 890 

Portales and Teneria 1,253 

Punta dc la Sierra and Los Acostas . . 1, 502 

Remates 3,014 

Sabalo, Trinidad, and Santa Teresa ... 667 

Quayabal District 2,710 

CaJmlto 1,269 

Guayabal and Banes 879 

Qnintana 662 

Julian Diaz District 1,871 

Herradura and Ceja de la Herradura. 516 

Julian Diaz and PalacioB 1,260 

Santa Monica and Guajiro 95 

Los PalacioH District 2,456 

Toro and Bacunaguas 198 

Los Palacios 1 , 549 

Macuriges 238 

Sierra, Santo Domingo, and Limoncs. 471 

Mantua District 8,366 

Arroyos and Santa Isabel 1,079 

Bala 3,741 

Cabezas'and La Ceja 1, 281 

Guayabo and Lazaro 283 

Mantua and Montezuelo 802 

Santa Maria and San Jose 423 

Sierra Derrumbado 757 



Mariel District 3,681 

Jobaco and Rayo 253 

Macagual and Quiebra Hacha 1, 058 

Mariel and Boca 2 , 085 

Molina, Mosquitos, and Guajaybon ... 161 

San Juan Bautista and Playa 74 

Plnar del Rio District 38,343 

Cabecas 1,521 

Cangre 4,208 

Guayabo 1,894 

Isabel Maria 1, 136 

Marcos Vazquez 974 

Ovas 2,383 

PasoViejo 2,351 

Pinardel Rio,Nortc 3,949 

PinardelRio.Sur 4,981 

RioFeo 1,034 

RloSoqulto 4,278 

San Jose 2, 512 

Simiidero 2,478 

Taironaa 4,694 

San Cristobal District 4,263 

Mayari,land2 277 

Minasand Rio Hondo 402 

San Cristobal 1,996 

Santa Cruz de los Pinos 1,357 

SitioHerrero 231 

San Diego de los Banos District (not given 

by wards) 2,419 

San Diego de Nunez District (not given 

bywards) 1,137 

San Juan y Martinez District 14, 787 

Arroyo Hondo 1,918 

Galafro and Guillen 558 

Lagunillas 1,238 

Luis Lazo 4,193 

Primero de Martinez 1,097 

RioSeco 1,920 

San Juan v Martinez 2, 970 

Segundo ae Martinez 893 

San Luis District 7,608 

Barbaooa 1,085 

Barrigonas 544 

Tlrado 648 

Llanada 415 

Palizadaa 608 

Rio Seco 760 

San Luis 8,653 

Vinales District 17,700 

Albino 739 

Ancon 926 

Cayos de San Felipe 417 

Cuajani 2,021 

Laguna de Piedra 2,328 

Rosario 2,061 

SanCayetano 2,920 

San Vicente 1,987 

Santa Fe 657 

San Tomas 1 , 570 

Vinales 1,600 

Yayal 624 



18(i 



REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Tablr IV. — PoptUalian fty vardu and by cities — Continueci. 
PROVINCE OF PITERTO PRINCIPE. 



Total PomiLATiON 88,234 



Ciogo do Avlla District », 801 

Arroyo Blanco 862 

Ceiba 208 

Ciegode Avlla 3,892 

Guanalci* 508 

Iff uara 419 

Jlcotea 414 

Jucaro 468 

Lazaro Lopez 1, 121 

Nuevas 967 

Nuevaa do Jobosi 464 

SanNlcolai* 493 



Moron District 9, 630 

Chambas 925 

(Jupeyes 633 

Guadalupe 1,5M 

Marroqum 1,073 

Moron Este 1,439 

Moron Oeste 1, 731 

PunU Alegro 495 

Sandoval 1,028 

Santa Gertrudls 752 



Nucvltas District 10, 855 



Ba«ra 277 

Lugareno 1, 510 

Nuevlta«l 1,093 

Nuevitas 2 1, 673 

Nuevltas3 1,462 

Redencion 830 

Sabinal 107 

San Miguel 716 

Senado 2.687 



Puerto Principe District 63,140 

Altagracia 1,240 

CaoWUaa 1,728 

Cascorro 1,904 

Contramaefitre 2,368 

Ecuador 2,215 

Guaimaro 2,910 

Guanaja 848 

Limones 830 

Magarabomba 1,304 

M araguan 1, 110 

Minaa 2,818 

Pueblo Nuevo 1 , 656 

Puerto Principe 1 2,876 

Puerto Principe 2 2,474 

I^orto Principc3 6,115 

Puerto Principe 4 6,184 

I'ucrto PrincipeS 2,080 

Puerto Principe 6 1,960 

Puerto Principe? 2,407 

Puerto Principe 8 1, 667 

Puerto Principe 9 1,349 

Quemado 806 

SanGeronimo 986 

Sibanicu 1,768 

Vista UermoMi 981 

Yaba 2,296 

Ycguaa 748 



Santa Cruz del Sur District 5,308 



Buenaventura 852 

Calzada and Playa Bonlta 2,098 

Guaicanamar 898 

Guayabal 987 

Junco 1,083 

San Pedro 240 



PROVINCE OP SANTA CLARA. 



Total population 356, 536 

Abn'us District (not given by wards) 3, 995 



Calliarien District 8,650 

Caiharien 7, 013 

Omuco 496 

Guajabana 478 

Taneo 663 



Calabazar District 13,419 



Centre 8,756 

Encruoljada 2,689 

Mntay Barro 1,267 

PasftRcal 433 

Santo 2,573 

Sltlo Grande 590 

Viana 2,111 



Camajuani District 14, 495 

Camajuani 5,082 

Egidos 700 

Guadalupe 2,6C9 

Sabana 1,621 

Salamanca 1, 704 

Santa ClariU 1, 501 

Zulueta 1,318 



Cartagena District 6, 244 

Arricto and Banos 556 

Cartagena 1, 917 

Cascajal 2,017 

ClcgoMontero 433 



Cartagena District— Continued. 

Santiago 

Soledad 



669 
762 



Ceja de Pablo District 6, 951 



Ceja de Pablo . . 

Corralillo 

Palma Sola 

Sabana Grande. 
Sierra Morena . . 



273 
2,588 

201 
1,190 
2,702 



Clcnfucgoe District 69, 128 



Agiiada de Pasajeros , 

Arimao 

Auras 

Caiinanera 

Callcito 

Ca.MtlIlo 

Caunao 

Cayofi 

Charcas 

CienfuegosCity (not given by wards). 

Cumanayagua 

Gavilan and Gavllanclto 

Jlcotea 

Manacas 

Mandlnga , 

Ojo de Agua 

Ramirez 

Sierra , 

Yaguaramas 



8,777 

3,015 

487 

717 

499 

1,383 

3,697 

lis 

736 
30,088 

1,408 
364 
706 

1,610 
488 
493 
680 
538 

8,609 



Clfuentos District 8,825 



Alacran 
Amaro. . 



446 
248 



POPULATION BY WARDS AND CITIES. 



187 



Table IV. — Population by wards and by cUi^s^ — Continued. 
PROVINCE OF SANTA CLARA— Continued. 



Clfuentes Districts-Continued. 

Barro 279 

Cifuentes .": 2,172 

Sltio Grande 680 

Cnicea Dlrtrict 7,963 

Cmces 4,173 

Maltiempo 2,284 

Monteflrme •. 678 

Pueblo Nnevo 818 

Esperanza District 7, 811 

AsientoVielo 576 

Esperanzii Norte 997 

Eflperanza Sur 1, 180 

Jabonillar 720 

Nuevas 1, 809 

Purlal 916 

San Jofle 976 

San Vicente 1,188 

Palmira District 6,627 

Amngo 2,008 

Palmira 4,619 

Placetaa District 11,961 

Ouaracabulla 1,194 

Hernando and Sltio Potrero 1, 216 

Nazareno 719 

Placetas and Tibisial 7, 866 

San Andres and Vista Hermosa 1, 467 

Qucmado deOuines 8,890 

Casroagnas 640 

Carahatas 1,615 

Gulnes 1,174 

PasoCabado 1,288 

Quemado de Gulnes 3,082 

San Valentin 343 

Zambumbia 848 

Rancho Veloz District 7, 582 

Aguas Claras , 1,218 

Cfiayex : 1,156 

Crimea 1,240 

Guanillas 936 

Santa Fe 2,982 

Ranchuelo District 5,059 

Poso de la China 1,101 

Ranchuelo 1 2,170 

Ranchuelo 2 849 

Sltio Viejo , 989 

Rodas Distrkst 9,562 

Congojas 2,171 

Jabacoa 139 

Limones 2,635 

Medidas 1,327 

Rodas 8,890 

Sagua la Grande District 21,342 

Chinchila 1,654 

Isabela de Sagua 2,352 

Jumagua 2,478 

Sagua la Grande, Norte 7, 069 

Sagua la Grande, Sur 5, 659 

San Juan 769 

Sitiecito 1,366 



Snn Antonio de las Vucltas District 12, 8S2 

AguadadcMoya 1,065 

Bosque 2,019 

CejadePablo 1,545 

Charco Hondo 1, 013 

Egidos 634 

Piedras 1,204 

Quinta 1,422 

Sagua la Chica and Cayos 512 

San Antonio de las Vueltas 1, 336 

Taguayabon '. 912 

VegaAlta 1,140 

Sancti Spiritus District 25,709 

Banao 436 

Bellamota 981 

Chorrera Brava 83 

Gabaiguan 1,135 

Guasimal 1,500 

Guayos 1, 430 

Jibaro 433 

Manacas 475 

Paredes 578 

Paula 2,066 

San Andres and Pueblo Nuevo 1, 086 

Santa Lucia 654 

Taguasco and Pedro Barba 1,298 

Tunas deZasa 1,014 

Sancti Spiritus City, not given by 

wards 12,696 

San Diego del Valle District 5,2(69 

Centre 1,298 

Hatilio 461 

Jicotea 665 

Maguaraya Abajo y Muguaraya Arriba 1, 1 54 

Mango 302 

SitioNuevo aw 

Yabu 1,130 

San Fernando District 6,445 

CiegoAlonzo 1,238 

Escarza 1, 770 

Lomas Grandes 786 

Paradero 1, 673 

San Fernando 1,078 

San Juan de las Yeras District 5,600 

AgUBS Bonitas 415 

Bemla 613 

Guayo 927 

Potrerillo 741 

Quemado Hilario 508 

San Juan 2,401 

San Juan de los Remedies District 14, 833 

Bartolome 512 

Buenavista 4,071 

Cangrejoand Remate 1,718 

Carolina 558 

G uanillbes 1,047 

Remedios 6, 633 

Tetuan 294 

Santa Clara District 28,437 

Bae« 1,456 

Carmen S, 051 

Condado 1 , 110 

Egidos 1,987 

La Cruz 2,111 

Manicaragua 2, 916 

Parroquia 3,349 



188 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OK CUBA, 1899. 



Table IV. — Population by wards and fiy citien — Continued. 
PROVINCE OF SANTA CLARA— CtonUnued. 



Santa Clara District— Continued. 

Pastora 3,171 

Provincial 1, 195 

iniente 2,SM 

Ban Gil 3,411 

Seibabo 1,«» 

Institutions 488 

Santa Isabel de las Lajas District 9, 60S 

Centro 6,916 

Nuevas 265 

Salado and Santa Rosa 407 

Salto 1,199 

Terry 817 

Santo Domingo District 10, 872 

Alvarez and Mordazo.... 1,085 

Baracaldo,-:PotrerilIo, and Arenas — 1, 346 

Jicotea and San Bartolome 1, 246 

Jiquiabo and Juqui 431 

Hanacas and San Marcos 886 

Puerto Escondido 741 

Rio and Cerrito 734 

Rodrigo 683 

Santo Domingo, £stc 1,184 

Santo Domingo, Ocste 895 



Santo Domingo District— Continued. 

San Juan » 521 

Yabuclto 720 

Trinidad District 24,271 

Caba^n 762 

Garacusey 676 

Casilda 2,234 

Fomento ; 1,769 

Guanlquical 985 

Guinia de Miranda 1,056 

Jiquimas 825 

RiodeAy 2,417 

San Francisco 646 

San Pedro 892 

Tavaba 989 

Trinidad City, not given by wards 11, 120 

Yaguajay District 9.718 

Bamburanao 981 

Centeno 447 

Mayajlgua 1, 284 

Meneses 1,668 

Seibabo 1,371 

Yaguajay 2, 692 

Keys and Institutions 1,336 



PROVINCE OF SANTIAGO. 



Total Popuijition 827,716 

Alto Songo District 12, 770 

AltoSongo, Norte 1,692 

Alto Songo, Sur 1,466 

Florida Blanca 1,081 

Jara Hueca « 544 

Loma del Gato 586 

Mayari Arriba 976 

Moron 927 

Falenquc 1, 900 

Socorro and Maya 1, 586 

Ti-Arriba 2,015 

Bamcoa District 21, 944 

Baracoa City, not given by wards 4, 937 

Cabacu 715 

Canete 322 

Duaba 1,186 

Grantierra 632 

Guandao 1,636 

Guinlao 1,686 

HoyoR 729 

Imlaa 647 

Jamal 1,024 

Jtiaco 1, 426 

Maisi 108 

Mandlnga 910 

Mata 738 

MontcCristo 739 

Nlbujon 614 

Quemado 363 

Sabana 654 

Sabanilla 780 

Sltio 473 

Toar ,.-.. 735 

Veguita 641 

VerUentea 650 

Bayamo District 21, 193 

Barrancas 1, 696 

Bueydto 1,590 

Cauto del Embarcadero 1.571 

Cristo 1.788 



Bayamo District— Continued. 

Datll 2,142 

Guamo 769 

Gulsa 3,565 

Homo 1,298 

Laguna Blanca 1, 856 

San Juan 1,234 

Veguita 3,784 

Campechuela District 7, 369 

Campechuela Ci ty , not given by wards 3, 264 

CelbaHueca 2,149 

San Ramon 1, 966 

Caney District 9,126 

Ban jagua 174 

Caney 844 

Daiquiri 1,880 

Dcmajayabo 1, 782 

DosBocas 1,217 

Guanlnicun 1, 247 

Lagunas l , 206 

Paz de los Naranjos 284 

SevlUa 561 

Zacatccas 462 

Cobre District 10,707 

Ascrradero 469 

Botlja 324 

Brazo Cauto 1, 150 

Caimanes 696 

Cayo Smith 265 

Cobre 1,028 

DosPalmas 1,226 

Ennltano 240 

Hongoloflongo 1, 987 

Maclo 92 

Manacas 1, 426 

Nimanima 421 

Rio Frio €06 

Santa Rita 614 

Sevllla 272 

Cristo District, not given by wards 1, 194 



POPULATION BY WABDS AND CITIB8. 



189 



Table IV. — PojnUcUwn by tvards and by citieH — Continued. 
PROVINCE OF SANTIAGO— CouUuued. 



Glbara District S1,SW 

Arroyo Blanco 1,789 

Banes 6,780 

Barlai 1,047 

Bocas 8,028 

Candelaria 486 

Cantimplora 615 

Fray Benito 2,663 

Qlbara City, not given by wardn 6, 841 

Jobabo 1,266 

Potrerillo 920 

Pueblo Nucvo 826 

Sama 1,606 

SantaLucia 3,486 

SantaRoealia 878 

Yabaaon 678 

Gnantanamo District 28, 063 

Arroyo Hondo 1,040 

Baitiqnlri 164 

Bano 838 

Caimanera 620 

Camarones 767 

Caridad ,.■- 516 

Casimba 687 

Caiiisey Abaio 508 

Caaisey Arriba 448 

Corrallllo 562 

Cuatro Caminos 441 

Glorieta 2,062 

Gobiemo 1,219 

Guaso 1,514 

Hospital 1,594 

Isleta 80 

Indioe 107 

Jaibo Abajo 320 

Jaibo Arriba 296 

Jamaica 2, 161 

Le^as 1,871 

Macuriges 492 

Mercado 915 

Ocujal and veNsels 90 

Palmar 1,165 

Palma de San Juan 281 

Parroqnia 1,640 

Rastro 881 

RioSeco 1,884 

Signal 402 

Tlguabos 1,688 

Vinculo 754 

Yateras 1,661 

Holguin District 34,506 

Agnail Claras 681 

Alcala 2,022 

Alfonsos 1,086 

Auras 1, 604 

Bijaru 2,152 

Camasan '. , 1, 267 

Corralito 1,026 

Cuabas 1,228 

Holgnin City, not given by wards 6, 045 

La Caridad 1,068 

Ia Palma 2, 101 

MalaNocbe 708 

Pumio 980 

Ban Agustin 2,163 

San Andres 1,181 

San Lorenzo 1,060 

San Pedro de Cacocum 1,823 

Sao Arriba 1,080 

Tacajo 896 

Tacamara ; 882 

Unas 1,824 

Velasco 1,777 

Yareyal 927 



Jiguanl District 10,496 

Babiney 2,766 

Baire 2,972 

Calabasar 1,026 

J iguani 655 

Rlnconada 1,012 

Santa Rita 839 

Ventas 1,225 

Mansanlllo District 32,288 

Blanquizal 1, WO 

Calicitos 738 

Cano 1,112 

Congo 796 

DosCuartones 643 

Esperanza 1 , 726 

Jibacoa 2,024 

Manzanillo City, not given by wards. 14, 464 

Media Luna 3,319 

Portillo 440 

Tranquilidad SM 

Vicana 1,642 

Vara 1,234 

Zarzal 2,276 

Mayari District 8,604 

Barajagna 723 

Biran 529 

BragnetudoB 1 , 454 

Cabonico 688 

Chavaleta 1,230 

Chucho 494 

Guayabo 1,398 

Sabanilla 177 

SanGregorio 1,821 

Niquero District 2, 718 

NiqueroCity 1,660 

Veliz 580 

Cabo Cms and Punta dc Practicos ... 578 

Palma Soriano District 12, 305 

Canto Abajo 889 

Cauto Baire 777 

Conoepcion 1, 526 

Dorados 691 

Las Cuchillas 1 , 988 

Palma Soriano 1,776 

Remanganaguas 1,688 

San Leandro 1,003 

Santa Filomena 682 

Sitlo 1,835 

Puerto Padre District 19,984 

Arenas 1,119 

Caisimu 1,653 

Cauto del Paso 1,500 

Cbaparra 1,038 

Curana 1,000 

Manati 1,064 

Manlabon 996 

OJo de Agua 1, 157 

Oriente 2,471 

Palmarito 1,072 

Playuelas 1,038 

San Manuel 2,783 

Tunas 663 

Vedado 1,200 

Yarey 1,231 

Sagua de Tanamo District 5,796 

Bazan 781 

Calabazas 952 



190 



REPORT ON THE CEN6U8 OF CUBA, 1899. 



Tabus IV. — PopulcUiuri Inj wards aiui by cities — Continued. 
PROVINCE OP SANTIAGO— ConUnuod. 



Sagua de Tanamo Districtr-Continued. 

E8teron 545 

Juan Diaz 714 

Migruel 666 

Sagna de Tanamo 1 , 252 

Zabala 887 

San Luis Diatrict 11,681 

D<M Camiucw 3,991 

LaLu2 618 

Monte don Leguaa 2, 013 

San LuIb 6,059 



Santiairo de Cuba District 46,478 

Belen 6, 86-> 

Catedral 5,152 

Criato 6,310 

DaJao 1,56» 

Dolores 9,011 

Ramon de> las Yaguas 2,388 

BantoTomas 8,085 

Trinidad 6,887 

Institutions 775 



POPULATION OF CITIES. 



City. 



AbreuB 

Aguacate 

Alquizar 

Alto Songo 

Artemisa 

Barncoa 

Batabano 

Bavamo 

Beiucal 

Bolondron 

Cabezas 

Caibarien 

Calabazar 

Camajuani 

Campcchuela 

Cardenas 

Ciego de Avila 

Cienfuegos 

Cifucntea 

Cobrc 

Colon 

Consolacion del Sur. 

Corral Falao 

Cristo 

Cruces 

Cucvitas 

Daiquiri 

Encrucijada 

Esperanza 

Gibara 

Guanabacoa 

Guanajay 

Guantanamo 

Guinea 

Guira 

Habana 

Holguin 

Jaruco 

JovellanoH 

Limonar 

Macagua 

Madniga 

Managua 

Manguito 

Manzanillo 

Marianao 

Matanzas 

Maximo Gomez 

Mavari 

Melena 

Moron 



Province. 



Santa Clara 

Habana 

....do 

Santiago 

PinaraelRio.... 

Santiago 

Habana 

Santiago 

Habana 

Matanzas 

do 

Santa Clara 

do 

do 

Santiago 

Matanzas 

Puerto Principe , 

Santa Clara 

do , 

Santiago 

Matanzas 

PinardelRio.... 

Matanzas 

Santiago 

Santa Clara 

Matanzas 

Santiago 

Santa Clara 

.....do 

Santiago 

Habana 

PinardelRio.... 

Santiago 

Habana 

Matanzas 

Habana 

Santiago 

Habana 

Matanzas 

....do 

do 

Habana 

do 

Matanzas 

Santiago 

Habana 

Matanzas 

do 

Santiago 

Habana | 

Puerto Principe . . ,' 



Popula- I 
tion. 



City. 



1,300 
1,655 
8,714 
8,168 
2,812 
4,937 
1,025 
8,022 
4,828 
2,604 
1,721 
7,018 
1,575 
6,082 
3,254 

21,940 
2,919 

30,038 
1,485 
1,028 
7,175 
3,062 
8,823 
1,191 
4,173 
2,631 
1,380 
1,726 
2,177 
6,841 

18,965 
6,483 
7,137 
8,149 
1,676 
236,061 
6,015 
1,189 
4,721 
2,876 
1,467 
2,004 
1,063 
1,631 

14.464 
6,416 

86,874 
1,743 
1,821 
6,016 
2,084 



Province. 



Niquero 

Nueva Paz 

Nuevitas 

Palma Sorfano 

Palmira 

Perico 

Pinardcl Rio 

Placetas 

Puentes Grandes . . 

Puerto Padre 

Puerto Principe 

Quemado de Guines 

Quivican 

Rancho Veloz 

Ranchuelo 

Regla 

Remedios 

Rodas 

Roque 

Sabanilla 

Sagua de Tanamo . . 

Sagua la Grande . . . 

San Antonio de lou 
Banoe. 

Sancti Spiritus 

San Felipe 

San Fernando 

San Jose de las La- 
jas. 

San Jose de los Ra- 
mos. 

San Juan de las Ye- 
ros. 

San Luis 

Santa Ana 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz del Sur . 

Santa Fe 

Santa Isabel de las 
Laias. 

Sanuago 

Santiago de las Ve- 
gas. 

Santo Domingo 

Surgidero 

Trinidad , 

Vereda Nueva 

Vinalcs 

Vueltas 

Ygiena 



Santiago 

Habana 

Puerto Principe , 

Santiago 

Santa Clara 

Matanzas 

PinardelRio .. 

Santa Clara 

Habana 

Santiago 

Puerto Principe 
Santa Clara . . . . , 

Habana 

Santa Clara 

do 

Habana 

Santa Clara 

do 

Matanzas 

do 

Santiago 

Santa Clara 

Habana 



Santa Clara 

Habana 

Santa Clara 
Habana .... 



Matanzas. 



Santa Clara 



Santiago 

Matanzas 

Santa Clara 

Puerto Principe 

Habana 

Santa Clara .... 



Santiago 
Habana . 



Santa Clara . . 

Habana 

Santa Clara . . 

Habana 

Pinar del Rio 
Santa Clara . . 

do 

Matanzas 



Popula- 
tion. 



1,660 
2,294 
4,228 
1,776 
4,619 
2,496 
8,880 
5.409 
2,683 
1,729 

25,102 
1,582 
1,800 
1,514 
8,019 

11,363 
6,683 
8,300 
1,482 
2,200 
1,252 

12,728 
£,178 

12,606 
1.450 
1,078 
8.024 

2,810 

1,469 

5,059 
1,421 
13,763 
1,210 
1.060 
8,042 

48,000 
7,151 

2,079 
8,683 
11,120 
2.416 
1,600 
1,836 
1,206 
8,441 



DENSITY OF POPULATION, 



191 



Tablk v. — RurtU po/ndation excluding cities o/S,000 inhabUaniit or morr.y wUh area and 

density, by munidjxd districts. 



UABANA PROVINCE. 



Districto. 



Aguocate 

Alquisar 

Bafnoa 

Batat>an6 

Bauta 

Bejucal 

Cano 

Casiguas 

Catalina 

Celba de Agua 

Goanabaooa 

Oflaia 

Oaines 

Golra de Melena 

Habana 

IsladePlnoe 

Jamoo 

Mad ruga 

Managua 

Marianao 

Melena del Bur 

Nueya Pas 

Plplan 

Qulvlcan 

Salud 

San Antonio de Ice Vegas 
San Antonio de loe Bano« 

San Felipe 

San Joee de laa Lajas 

San N icolas 

Santa Cnu del Norte 

Santa Maria del Rociario. . 

Santiago de las Vegas 

Tapaste 

VeredaNueva 



Rural 


Area in 


popula- 
tion. 


square 


miles. 


8,168 


63 


8,746 


78 


1,725 


11 


6,523 


70 


5.142 


76 


5,756 


36 


4,210 


26 


1,004 


23 


2,718 


92 


2,1»7 


'34 


6,115 


85 


1,885 


29 


8,245 


88 


11,548 


63 


6.074 


57 


8,199 


840 


4,076 


74 


8,74-1 


58 


2,887 


58 


8,593 


25 


8,207 


137 


7,761 


151 


1,101 


66 


2,428 


65 


3,293 


43 


1,855 


42 


4,453 


80 


1,915 


18 


4,154 


56 


4.568 


ia'> 


2,965 


81 


2,730 


27 


10,276 


29 


1,551 


80 


2,416 


14 



Density 

per 

wjuArc 

mile. 



50.2 

112.1 

156.8 
93.2 
67. (5 

159.9 

161.9 
45.0 
29.5 
&1.6 
71 
63 
85 

183 

106 

3.8 

fv>. 1 

&I.5 

iO. M 

313.7 
2:^. 1 
51.1 
16.7 
37.3 
76.6 
44 

118 

111 
74.2 
13.6 
86 

100 

3G0 
52 

171 



MATANZAS PROVINCE. 



Alacranes 

Bolondron 

Cabesas 

Canasi , 

Cardenas 

Oarlos Rojas 

Colon 

Cuevitas 

Guamacaro 

Jaguey Grande 

Jovellanos 

LosCayos 

Macagua 

Macuriges 

Marti 

Matansas 

Maximo Gomez 

Mendez Capote 

Palmillas 

Perico 

Roque 

SabanlUa 

San Joe6 de los Ramos 

Santa Ana 

Uni6n de Reyes 



8,110 
9,179 
6,184 
1,993 
2,921 
3,174 

12, 196 
6,807 
6,000 
5,853 
7,529 
374 
5,012 

10. ta*) 
8,531 
8,908 
4,046 
2,158 
7.647 
4,449 
4.464 
5.205 
6,765 
2.965 
5,226 



n 



25 
3i 
61 
31 
62 
45 

107 
71 
38 
IH 

l'J3 

JS 
43 
21 
28 
27 
28 
IS 
101 

:vj 

G8 

46 

49 

145 



192 



REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table V. — Rural jHtpulaiion excluding cUwh of 8,000 inhabitanU or morCf etc. — Cont'cL 

PINAR DEL RIO PROVINCE. 



DistrictH. 



ArtemiMb 

Bahla Honda 

Gabefias , 

Candelaria 

Consolacl6ii del Norte. 
Ck>nBolacl6n del Bur ... 

G uanajay 

Ouane 

Guayabal 

Julian DiaE 

LosPalacion 

Mantua 

Mariel 

PinardelRio 

San Cristobal 

San Diego de los Bafioa 
San Diego de Nufiez. . . 
San Juan y Martinez . . 

San Luis 

Viflales 



PUERTO PRINCIPE PROVINCE. 



Rural 

]x>pula- 

tlon. 



9,137 
2,117 
8,853 
4,866 
7,399 

16.665 
8,796 

14,760 
2,710 
1,871 
2,456 
8.366 
3,631 

29,463 
4,263 
2,419 
1,137 

14,787 
7,608 

17,700 



Area in 
square 
miles. 



181 
286 

89 
203 
203 
360 

12 
1,155 

37 
103 
199 
634 

95 
361 
235 
202 
138 
154 
154 
208 



Density 

per 

square 

mile. 



61 
7 
43 
24 
86 
46 
733 
13 
73 
18 
12 
13 
38 
81 
18 
12 
8 
96 
49 
85 



Ciegode Ayila .... 

Moron 

Nuevitas 

Puerto Principe . . . 
Santa Cruz del Sur 



9,801 

9,630 

10,355 

28,038 

5,306 




6 
C 
10 
6 
5 



SANTA CLARA PROVINCE. 



Abreos 

Caibarien 

Calabazar 

Camajuani 

Cartagena 

Cejade Pablo 

Cienf uegos 

Cifucntes 

Cnices 

Esperaivza 

Palmira 

Placetas 

Quemado de Guines 

Rancho Veloz 

Ranchuelo 

Rodas 

Sagua la Grande 

San Antonio de las Vueltas 

Sancti Spiritus 

San Diego del Valle 

San Fernando 

San Juan de las Yeras 

San Juan de los Remedioe . 

Santa Clara 

Santa l8at)el de las Laju* • • 

Santo Domingo 

Trinidad 

Yaguajay 



8,995 


62 


8,650 


55 


13.419 


279 


• 14,495 


100 


6,244 


180 


6,954 


337 


29,090 


2,119 


8,825 


72 


7,953 


50 


7,811 


159 


6,627 


132 


11,961 


226 


8,890 


167 


7,682 


161 


6,059 


40 


9,562 


153 


8,614 


205 


12,832 


208 


13,013 


1,262 


5,869 


95 


6,445 


67 


6,600 


115 


14,833 


158 


12,674 


540 


9,603 


136 


10.372 


291 


13,150 


828 


9,718 


442 



77 

157 
48 

145 
85 
21 
14 
63 

159 
49 
49 
53 
63 
47 

126 
62 
42 
62 
10 
66 
96 
48 
94 
23 
71 
86 
16 
22 



DENSITY OK POPULATION. 



193 



Tabl.k v. — Jiural ptfpuJtUion excluding cities of 8^000 inhabilnnltt or more^ etc, — Cont'd. 

SANTIAGO PROVINC?E. 



Districts. 



Alto Songo 

Baracoa 

Bayamo 

Campecliuela 

Caney 

Cobre 

Gibara 

GuantAnamo 

Holffuin 

Jlgiiani 

Manzatilllo 

Mayarl 

Niqiiero 

Paima Soriano 

Puerto Padre 

Sagua dc Tanamo 

San Luis 

Santiago de Cuba. 



24662 ^18 



Rural 


Area in 


Density 


popula- 
tion. 


square 
miles. 


per 

fequare 

mile. 


12,770 


450 


28 


21. M4 


1,676 


13 


21,193 


1,034 


20 


7,369 


51 


144 


9.126 


201 


46 


10.707 


870 


12 


31.594 


466 


68 


28.063 


1.216 


23 


34,606 


1.589 


22 


10,495 


495 


21 


17.824 


491 


86 


8,W4 


1,009 


8 


2.718 


145 


19 


12.305 


244 


60 


19,984 


1,215 


16 


5,796 


628 


9 


11,681 


68 


172 


2,388 


7 


341 



194 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table VI. — Sex, general nalivily^ and color. 
[Figures in italic are included in thutie for the province or district.] 



1 
2 
8 
4 
5 
6 
7 

8 



Province«. 



Habana 

CUyo/Habana 

Matanzas 

PinardelRio 

Puerto Principe . . 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Cuba 



All classes 


1. 


Native white. 


Foreign white. 


Total. 


Hale. 


Female 


Total. 


Male. 


Female 


Total. 


Male. 


Female 


424,804 221,990 
236,981 123,268 
202,444 108,726 
173,064 91,688 
88,234 44,899 
356.536 189,057 
327,715 163,845 


202,814 

112, 723 

, 98,718 

81,376 

48,335 

167,479 

163,870 


243 619 
116,632 
102,682 
114,907 
66,349 
214, M5 
167,797 


116,838 
62, 9U) 
50,324 
58,5?3 
32,575 

106,771 
82,292 


126,781 
62,692 
52.a58 
56,334 
33,774 

108, 174 
85,505 


68,971 
62,901 
15,235 
10,718 
4,038 
29,823 
13,313 


54,162 
UU190 
11,850 
9,447 
3,499 
25,336 
11,446 


H,809 
11,711 
8,885 
1,271 
539 
4,487 
1,867 


1,572,797 


815,205 


757,592 


910,299 


447,373 


462,926 


142,098 


115,740 


26,:V» 



PROVINCE OF HABANA. 



DiHtricts. 



All clases. 



Total. Male. Female 



1 
2 
8 
4 

5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
28 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 

80 

31 
32 
83 
34 
35 

36 
37 
38 

39 



Aquacate 

Alquizar 

Bainoa 

Batabano 

Bauta 

Bejucal 

Cano 

Casiguas 

Oatalina 

Celba del Aqua 

Guanabecoa 

CUy of Otumabacoa 

Quara 

GQines 

Guira de Meldna 

Habana 

City of Habana 

Isla de Pinofl 

Jarueo 

Mad ruga 

Managua 

Marianao 

Helena del Sur 

Nueva Paz 

Pipian 

Quivican 

Regla 

Salud 

San Antonio de las 

Vegas 

San Antonio de los 

Baflo6 

San Felipe 

San Jofi6 de las Lajas. 

San Nicolas 

Santa Cruz del Norte. 
Santa Maria del Ro»- 

ario 

Santiago de las Vegas. 

Tapaste 

Vcroda Nueva 

The province 



8,163 

8,746 

1,725 

6,523 

5, 142 

5,756 

4,210 

1,004 

2,718 

2,197 

20,080 

13,966 

1,835 

11,894 

11,548 

242,055 

236,981 

8,199 

4,076 

8,744 

2,887 

8,593 

3,207 

7,761 

1,101 

2,423 

11,863 

8,293 

1,855 

12,681 
1.915 
4,154 
4,568 
2,965 

2,730 

10,276 

1,551 

2,416 



424,801 



1,640 
4,814 

^58 
8,600 
2,837 
2,738 
2,840 

561 
1,853 
1,174 
9,805 
6,629 

925 
5,725 
6,486 
126,776 
123,268 
1,782 
2,152 
1,807 
1,549 
4,582 
1,650 
8,834 

582 
1,286 
5,765 
1,787 

951 

6,631 
939 
2,040 
2,548 
1,603 

1,410 

5,270 

849 

1,297 



221,990 



1,528 
8,982 

767 
2,923 
2,805 
8,018 
1,870 

443 

1,365 

1,023 

10,275 

7,455 

910 
5,669 
5,062 
115,280 
112,723 
1,417 
1,924 
1,987 
1,338 
4,011 
1,567 
3,927 

519 
1,187 
5,508 
1,506 

904 

6,000 
976 
2,114 
2,025 
1,362 

1.820 

5,006 

702 

1,119 



202,814 



Native white. 



Foreign white. 



Total. Male. Female Total. Male. 



1,667 
5,472 
1,271 
4,131 
8,625 
4,462 
8,328 
667 
2,040 
1,748 
13,150 
8,232 
1,395 
7,092 
7,372 
119,816 
115,632 
2,480 
3,041 
2,423 
2,268 
4,758 
1,847 
4,890 
962 
1,772 
7,493 
2,874 

1,465 

9,877 
1,209 
2,965 
2,797 
1,706 

2,002 
7,160 
1,260 
2,142 



243,619 



826 

2,837 

690 

2,093 

1,982 

2,049 

1,785 

871 

986 

897 

6,307 

3,767 

692 

8,379 

3,907 

55,193 

62, 9kO 

1,809 

1,574 

1,100 

1,206 

2,807 

911 

2,109 

485 

872 

3,512 

1,524 

717 

4.701 

588 

1,367 

1,487 

924 

1,029 

8,406 

667 

1,119 



116,838 



841 
2,635 

581 
2,038 
1,693 
2,413 
1,59;) 

296 
1,054 

851 
6,843 
k,U6 

703 
3,713 
3,465 
64,623 
62,692 
1,171 
1,470 
1,323 
1,062 
2,451 

906 
2,281 

477 

900 
3,981 
1,350 

748 

4,676 

621 

1,598 

1,310 

781 

973 
3,754 

583 
1.023 



126, 781 



205 

833 

74 

878 

440 

416 

396 

23 

152 

170 

1,484 

1,091 

89 

833 

1,221 

53,877 

62,901 

198 

206 

230 

110 

1,159 

126 

877 

33 

118 

1,666 

193 

55 

1,220 
125 
189 
230 
136 

108 

1,202 

68 

101 



171 
727 

57 
764 
358 
306 
835 

19 

113 

125 

1,113 

90lt 

62 

664 

1,069 

42,008 

Ul,190 

185 

160 

182 

88 
932 

97 
318 

28 

120 

1,229 

151 

50 

974 

87 

155 

'204 

97 

92 

997 

58 

77 



Female 



84 

106 

17 

114 

82 

110 

61 

4 

39 

45 

371 

287 

27 

169 

162 

11,869 

11,711 

18 

46 

48 

22 

227 

29 

59 

5 

28 

437 

42 



246 
38 
34 
26 
39 



16 

2a5 

10 

21 



68,971 M,162 



U.MW 



SEX, NATIVITY, AND COLOR. 



195 



Tablk VI. — Seu'f general natiinlijy ami color. 
[Figures in italic are included in those for the province »>r district.] 



Negro. 


Mixed. 




Chinese. 






Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 

3,886 

4,206 
603 
472 

5,194 
496 


Male. 


Female. 




54,849 
28,750 
47,793 
28,811 
6,975 
48,524 
47,786 


23,892 
ll,tli 
22,389 
14,495 
3,590 
24,717 
22,815 


30,957 
17,538 
25,4(M 
14,316 
3,385 
23,807 
24,971 


53,479 
36,001, 
32,5'28 
18,025 
10,400 
58,050 
98,323 


23,293 
J.5, 179 
14,964 
8,598 
4,773 
27,061 
46,811 


30,186 
g0,8i6 
17, b^ 
9,427 
6,627 
30,989 
51,512 


3,805 

2,737 

4,199 

575 

462 

5,172 

481 


81 
57 
7 
28 
10 
•22 
15 


1 

I 

4 

5 
6 
7 


234,738 


111,896 


122,840 


270,805 125,500 


145,305 


14,857 


14,694 


163 


" 



PROVINCE OF HABANA. 



Negro. 



Total. 



900 
1,404 
2(H 
916 
673 
415 
276 
239 
819 
151 

S,173 
225 

2,186 

1,678 
29,175 
£8,750 
'2ffl 
425 
717 
281 

1,390 
877 

1,989 

76 

351 

1,138 
187 

288 

1,109 
413 
660 

1,027 
779 

379 
912 
160 
107 

54,849 



Male. 



438 

701 

120 

449 

835 

177 

155 

136 

161 

84 

1,142 

89U 

117 

1,036 

845 

11,456 

11, tit 

164 

210 

843 

143 

685 

439 

896 

52 

168 

496 

71 

131 

535 
185 
331 
551 
388 

184 

418 

90 

60 

23,892 



Female. 



Total. 



462 

703 

84 

467 

338 

238 

121 

108 

158 

67 

1,524 

l,t79 

108 

1,150 

833 

17,719 

17,538 

103 

215 

374 

188 

705 

438 

1,093 

24 

183 

642 

66 

107 

574 
228 
319 
476 
391 

196 

491 

70 

47 

30,957 



348 

996 

172 

548 

390 

451 

201 

73 

206 

126 

2,714 

t,W8 

122 

1,145 

1,196 

36,339 

36,00i 

252 

382 

3'13 

227 

1,197 

329 

912 

29 

146 

960 

89 

»i 

905 
158 
312 
450 
316 

237 

987 

?2 

62 

53,479 



Mixed. 
Male. 



162 

508 

87 

244 

198 

197 

106 

33 

92 

66 

1,189 

l,0t5 

50 

510 

594 

15,327 

15, 179 

122 

191 

151 

111 

571 

145 

418 

16 

70 

412 

41 

50 

402 
70 
119 
237 
165 

102 

437 

33 

37 

•23,293 



Female. 



Total, 



Chinese. 



186 

488 

85 

3^1 

192 

257 

95 

40 

114 

60 

1,525 

1,383 

72 

6:{5 

602 

21,01? 

i0,Sjr> 

i:.v» 
191 
192 

nr> 

■ 62<J 

181 

491 

13 

76 

5;W 

48 

44 

503 
88 
163 
213 
151 

135 

550 

39 

25 

30,186 



43 
41 

4 
.W 
14 

9 

9 
•I 



66 

61 

4 

i:« 

81 

2,M8 

-', 79U 

2 

19 

31 

1 

89 

28 

93 I 

1 

6 

116 



Male. ' Female. 



3 

20 
10 
38 
64 
29 

4 

15 

1 

4 

3,886 



43 

41 

4 

50 

14 

9 

9 

2 

1 

2 

54 

1^ 

4 

136 

81 

2,791 

t,737 

2 

17 

31 

1 

87 

28 

98 

1 

6 

116 



3 

19 
9 

:% 

64 
29 

3 

12 

1 

4 

3,805 



12 
It 



57 
67 

"•2 



1 

2 
3 
4 

5 
6 
7 

8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
. 20 
.J 21 
2 1 22 
'£i 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 



2 



1 
1 



1 
3 



81 



29 

30 
31 
32 
33 
3^1 

35 

:^i 

37 
38 

39 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OK CUBA, 1899. 

Tahlr VI. — Sex, general nativity, luut cotin — Contiiii]«i. 

Plguns 111 llallc ■n; iiicLuded In thme (or the pruvluue or dinlrttl.] 

FBOVINCE OF HATANZAS. 





^..„, 


All ,■!««», 


N«tl»B white. 


Fnrelm white. 




TouU. 


Hate. [Female 


Total. 1 Male. 


Female 


Total. 


Male. 


Fomale 






8,110 

m 

6:807 

Is 

6.WZ 
10. «& 

M.STl 
^IW 
4;«9 

i 


t.bT3 1 8,587 
t,f60 4,3M 

li:7M 1 1S.J17 


IfOSSi 6,381 


_'lS9 

1,306 

1.960 

l,96-,I 
H.734 

'877 

1.609 
812 
909 

I.IM 


4W 
789 

81 

430 

191 

1.B12 

267 
227 


42S 

ez8 

)B8 

«92 
269 
3fi2 

8T0 

a.2so 

?.S9J 

861 
196 


17 

1 

66 

1 












Cardenu 






6, 'Jib 

a'.wi 

li 

4.S31 
21,905 
IB,*™ 

sis 

2.hn 
2,em 
8,eft( 


b.Vft 

a.%6 

i:S 
J:S 

ilser 
sliia 


6,706 

4,ooa 

^837 
2,630 

!:S 

2,287 


2,76.^ 

\.m 

lias 
12,837 

'wo 

1,093 






I 


JagUeyanTtiv 


1» 


S3S;:::::::::::: 










1 
1 
1 


Hcndei Copote 














^ 


B«nJosedel«ilt«nnia 




"""Z'Z:-^'::. 


27 


««,«. 


I*,,™ 


■*■"" 


10!, «W 


60,3M 1 62,858 


15,235 


11.850 


S.M& 



PROVINCE OF PINAK DEL RIO. 







S:J1I 

^863 
4,966 
T.399 

16,66.5 
8;796 

14,760 
2,710 
1871 
2;45« 
fl.S66 

41263 

,!:!| 


6.013 

IS 

i 

'983 
1,308 
4,537 
1.M02 

i.ao'j 

8.170 
3,988 
9,350 


4,8CH 

i:!l! 
1 

11271 

!:| 


'■S 

1,313 
2,109 
5,233 
9 842 

5:ftiB 

0,'47I 
26! 023 

10. 'AK 
12.' 885 


754 
1,549 

2; 693 

3.377 
l.OW 
12.940 

l|468 

5.278 
«;4S7 


402 
569 
1.390 
2,513 

sioss 
■m 

210 

6:418 


■m 

664 

667 

l.OM 
1,300 


291 

S 

1,1186 
12 

2,435 
39 


49 

40 
75 

92 

M 

i 

28 
82« 

70 

ire 












Cuidelaiia 

Connlaelan del Sur.. 
Guanajay 














12 


Hanliu 


t£ 


HnardelBlo 




SanCrlnobal 


% 


Ban Diego deNunei.. 
HanJuaayMartinei.. 








TheproYlnce... 


n 


'"•"" 


01,688 


...» 


...,» 


58,573 


»■*" 


10,718 


9,447 


1,271 



PROVINCE OF PUERTO 



1 


CleKOdcAvlla 


9,»l 
9,680 

63,' 140 


4,979 
26,225 


4.re2' 8,034 
4.70M , 8,436 

■X'.'iib: 39:190 


8,999 4.085 
4,209 4,1KJ 
3.61^ 3.606 

S: !;g; 


813 

''aw 


j! 1 
1:1 Z 

234 { 05 






t 


Puerto Prinelpa 

AaDlaCnudelSur... 
Theprovmee... 




88,2^4 [44,899 


43,335 1 60. M9 


"■■"i"-'" '■■" 


8.499 .'139 



SEX, NATIVITY, AND COLOR. 



197 



Tablb VI. — SeXj general ncUivityy and color — Continued. 

[Figureis in italic are included in those for the province or district.] 

PROVINCE OP MATANZAS. 



Negro. Mixed. 


Female. 


Chinese. 




Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 




2,470 
2,833 

756 

686 
3,981 
5,599 
1,223 
2,856 
1,470 
2,067 

973 
2,677 
1,346 
3,664 
2,431 
5,722 
4.S7tf 
1,356 

628 
2,215 
1,421 
1,405 
1,612 
1,830 

761 
1,621 


1,306 

1,341 

364 

280 

1,519 

1,SS1 

680 

1,329 

718 

988 

609 

1,115 

706 

1,779 

1,216 

2,362 

1,889 

631 

357 

1,122 

710 

743 

697 

921 

377 

720 


1.166 

1,492 

892 

806 

2,462 

t,t68 

643 

1,627 

762 

1,069 

464 

1,562 

639 

1,885 

1,215 

3,360 

9,987 

725 

271 

1,093 

711 

662 

816 

909 

384 

901 


1,246 

1,495 

4S2 

270 

4,082 

5,999 

566 

2,432 

801 

886 

727 

1,432 

877 

1,777 

1,463 

7,117 

6,580 

677 

198 

1,351 

842 

693 

596 

1,471 

832 

880 


649 
691 
198 
144 
1,663 
l,5n 
260 
1,052 
406 
441 
840 
664 
416 
817 
723 
3,066 
9,780 
367 
180 
627 
446 
308 
290 
710 
179 
408 


697 

804 

234 

126 

2.429 

9,555 

296 

1,380 

396 

446 

387 

768 

461 

960 

740 

4,061 

5,800 

320 

63 

724 

896 

286 

806 

761 

163 

472 


222 

243 

22 

18 

399 

569 

42 

377 

101 

93 

49 

174 

106 

262 

469 

360 

5kS 

87 

69 

317 

267 

188 

66 

179 

28 

84 


222 

243 

22 

18 

399 

569 

40 

377 

101 

98 

49 

169 

106 

262 

469 

860 

5k5 

87 

69 

317 

267 

183 

66 

179 

28 

84 




1 




? 




8 




4 




6 




6 


2 


7 
8 




9 




10 




11 


6 


12 
13 




14 




16 




16 




17 




18 




19 




?0 




21 




22 




V!8 




24 




26 




26 


• 








47.793 


22,389 


25,4(M 


32,528 


14,964 


17,664 


4,206 


4, 1^9 


7 


27 



PROVINCE OF PINAR DEL RIO. 



1,783 

766 

1,702 

1,022 

1,105 

3,489 

1,312 

1,386 

431 

631 

455 

928 

797 

0,014 

1,668 
838 

366 

416 

2,118 

1,217 

2,146 


920 
314 
862 
632 
662 

1,729 
660 
782 
226 
280 
232 
474 
359 

8,086 

657 
451 

205 
176 

1,124 
628 

1,094 


863 
462 
840 
490 
643 

1,760 
762 
664 
206 
261 
223 
464 
438 

2,978 

1,011 
387 

160 
240 
9»1 
689 
1,062 


1,262 

477 

688 

674 

721 

2,662 

1,100 

1,146 

162 

227 

419 

496 

627 

3,385 

1,179 
443 

226 
198 

1,161 
735 

1.446 


649 
227 
803 
341 
863 

1,272 
488 
668 
76 
108 
197 
241 
227 

1,625 

L53 
205 

116 
89 
645 
811 
722 


613 
260 
286 
888 
868 

1,380 
612 
678 
76 
124 
222 
266 
300 

1.860 

719 
238 

110 
109 
606 
394 
724 


46 

9 

97 

10 

9 

18 

71 

28 

6 

7 

'22 

3 

14 

162 

107 

8 

3 
20 
16 
16 
41 


46 

9 

97 

10 

9 

18 

63 

28 

5 

7 

*22 

3 

14 

146 



107 

8 

3 
20 
16 
11 
41 




1 




•/ 




3 




4 




6 




6 


8 


7 

8 




9 




10 




11 




12 




13 


16 


14 

16 




16 




17 




18 




19 


4 


20 
VI 






28,811 


14,496 


14,310 


18,02;'i 


8,698 


9,427 


603 


676 


28 


22 



PROVINCE OF PUERTO PRINCIPE. 



276 

217 

986 

5,168 

5,191 
338 


144 

113 

626 

2,609 

1,590 
198 


182 

104 

360 

2,649 

1,S71 
140 


1,167 
774 
948 

6,404 

A,0A1 
1,107 


542 
359 
460 

2.845 

1,668 
567 


625 
416 

488 
3,659 

9,575 
640 


11 

6 

830 

123 

89 
2 


11 

6 

828 

116 

76 
2 




1 




2 


2 

8 

6 


3 
4 

6 
6 






6,976 


3,690 


3,385 


10,400 


4,773 


6,627 


472 


462 


10 


7 



198 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OE CUBA, 1899. 



Table VI. — Sex^ general naiivilyy and cohr — Continued. 

[Figures in italic are included in thofie for the province or district.] 

PROVINCE OP SANTA CLARA. 



Districts. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

ft 

A 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

1<1 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 
22 

23 
24 
25 
26 

27 
28 
29 

30 
31 
32 
33 

34 



Abreus 

Caibarien 

Calabazar 

Caraajuani 

Cartagena 

Ceja de Pablu 

Cienfuegos 

Ciiy of Clcv/uegt>if . 

Cifuentes 

(Truces 

EHperanza 

Palmira 

PIaceta.H 

Queniado de Guines. . 

Rancho Veloz 

Ranohuelo 

Rodas 

Sagua la Grande 

City of ,Sagua la 

Orandc 

Han Antonio de Iim 

Vueltas 

Sanctl Spiritus 

City o/Sancti S^ir- 

uua 

San Diego del Valle . . 

San Fernando 

San Juan de las Yeras. 
San Juan de lo8 Re- 

medios 

Santa Clara 

City of Sfinta Clara 
Santa Isabel de las 

Lajas 

Santo Domingo 

Trinidad 

ei7y 0/ THnidad.. 
Yaguajay 

The province... 



All classes. 



Total. Male. 



3,995 

8,650 

13,419 

14,495 

6,244 

6,954 

69,128 

30,038 

3,825 

7,953 

7,811 

6, 527 

11,961 

8,890 

7,532 

5,a59 

9.562 

21,342 

li, 7fiS 

12.832 
25, 709 

12,696 
5,369 
6,445 
5,600 

14,833 
28,437 
15, 763 

9,603 
10,372 
24,271 
Ji,i20 

9,718 



356,536 



2,112 
4,606 
7,552 
8,407 
3,553 
3,486 
32,173 
U,589 
1,938 
4,170 
4,145 
8,569 
6,481 
4,7(^ 
4.024 
2,521 
5,367 
10.907 

6,163 

7,121 
12.046 

5,030 
2,89(> 
3,742 
2,938 

7,605 

14,582 

6,g6i 

5,606 
5,496 
11,688 
U,616 
5,664 



Female 



189,067 



1,883 
4,144 
6,867 
6,088 
2,691 
3,468 
26,955 
16,l,i9 
1,887 
3,783 
3,666 
2,968 
5,480 
4,128 
3,508 
2,538 
4,195 
10,435 

6,665 

5,711 
13,663 

7,666 
2,473 
2,703 
2,662 

7,228 

13,855 

7,501 

3,997 
4,876 
12,583 
6,60U 
4,054 



167,479 



Nat 
Tot^l. 


ive whl 
Male. 


te. 


Foreign white. 1 


Female 


Total. 


Male. 


Female 


2,227 


1,047 


1,180 


404 


387 


87 


5,620 


2,599 


3,021 


1.068 


908 


165 


7,600 


3,988 


3,662 


1,016 


888 


128 


7,933 


4,000 


3,983 


3,233 


2,496 


737 


3,852 


2,035 


1.817 


604 


486 


18 


4.190 


2,109 


.2,081 


216 


185 


90 


32,209 


16,028 


16, 181 


6,376 


5,587 


839 


16,735 


7,045 


8,690 


3,1,86 


t,900 


585 


2,450 


1,206 


1,244 


166 


183 


33 


4,084 


1,951 


2.133 


716 


616 


99 


5,602 


2,892 


2,710 


262 


237 


25 


3,238 


1,569 


1,679 


556 


683 


23 


7,214 


3,559 


3,665 


1,408 


1,141 


267 


6,737 


2,893 


2,844 


611 


443 


68 


3,823 


1,917 


1.906 


474 


400 


74 


3,067 


1,449 


1,618 


233 


221 


12 


6,427 


2,764 


2.663 


866 


767 


99 


11,709 


6,582 


6.127 


2,043 


1.768 


275 


7,0U6 


3,186 


3,859 


1,137 


9ffl 


170 


9,363 


4.780 


4,583 


1,864 


1,468 


401 


18,738 


8,770 


9,968 


666 


589 


77 


8,170 


3,166 


6,00U 


391 


3bS 


18 


4,098 


2,163 


1,936 


212 


184 


28 


4,176 


2.242 


1,984 


691 


613 


81 


4,105 


2,094 


2,011 


189 


165 


24 


9.094 


4,355 


4,739 


1,436 


1,199 


287 


18.300 


8, 994 


9,306 


1,972 


1,658 


314 


8,g76 


3,601 


A, 775 


916 


807 


108 


4,872 


2,683 


2,189 


565 


509 


56 


7,000 


3,691 


3,409 


431 


374 


57 


13,746 


6,688 


7,058 


639 


479 


60 


5,U73 


t,t60 


3,tt3 


«7 


t07 


iO 


6,471 


2,883 


2,588 


1,305 


1,082 


223 


214,945 


106,771 


108,174 


29,823 


25.336 


4,487 



PROVINCE OF SANTIAGO. 



1 

2 

8 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 



22 



AltoSongo , 

Baracoti 

Bayamo 

Camp(*ch uela . . .^ 

Caney 

Cobre 

(!ri8to 

Gibara 

Guantanamo , 

llolguln 

Jiguani 

Manzanillo 

City of ManzaniUo 

Maynri 

Ninuero , 

Pa ima Soriano 

I*uerto Padre 

Sagua de Tanamo 

San Luis 

Santiago de Cuba 

City qf Santiagtt de 
Ctiba 

The province.., 



12, 770 

21,944 

21,193 

7,369 

9,126 

10,707 

1,194 

31,594 

28,063 

34.506 

10.495 

32,288 

14,46'4 

8,5(M 

2,718 

12,305 

19,9(M 

5,796 

11,681 

45,478 

/43,090 



327,715 



6,525 

11, 141 

10,311 

4,107 

5,478 

6,443 

563 

16, 126 

14,476 

17,020 

5.101 

15,666 

6,518 

4,280 

1,373 

6,396 

9,940 

2,973 

6,805 

21,118 

19,9et 



163,845 



6,245 

10,80:3 

10,882 

3,262 

3,648 

5,264 

631 

16,468 

13,587 

17,486 

5,391 

16,622 

7,9i6 

4,224 

1,345 

5,909 

10,044 

2,823 

5,876 

24,360 

g3,168 



163,870 



2,971 
9,394 

11,110 

3,971 

2,616 

2,259 

510 

24,244 
7,028 

29,610 
6,179 

18,115 
8,333 
5,143 
1,863 
5,947 

14,659 
3,500 
2,967 

15,711 

16,958 



1,544 
4,765 
5,386 
2, 151 
1,363 
1,191 
243 

12,1&1 
8,489 

14,468 
3,022 
8,491 
3,666 
2,590 
940 
3,064 
7,279 
1,759 
1,440 
6,943 

6,70S 



167,797 



82,292 



1,427 
4,629 
5,724 
1,820 
1,253 
1,068 
267 

12,080 
3,539 

15, 142 
3,167 
9,624 
U,768 
2,553 
923 
2,883 
7,380 
1,741 
1,527 
8,768 

8,666 



85,505 



232 
618 
219 
318 

1,692 

244 

77 

1,505 

1,843 

681 

63 

1,224 
919 
134 
62 
128 
267 
83. 
465 

3,458 

3,U0 



13,313 



208 
542 
207 
306 

1,629 

222 

65 

1,194 

1,569 

573 

60 

1,080 
810 
119 
57 
116 
249 
80 
358 

2,812 

2,796 



11,446 



24 

76 

12 

12 

63 

22 

12 

311 

274 

106 

3 

144 

109 

15 

6 

12 

18 

3 

107 

646 

645 



1,867 



SEX, NATIVITY, AND COIiOR. 



199 



Tablk VI. — «S5rj*, general mUivUyy and color — Continued. 
[Figuri'8 ill italic are included in thoee for the province or district.] 
PROVINCE OF SANTA CLARA, 



Negro. 


Total. 


Mixed. 
Male. 




Chlnc8i>. 




Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 




748 

819 
2,897 
1,642 

890 
1,291 
7.468 
3,068 

673 
1,603 

579 
1,688 
1,335 
1,509 
2,142 

892 
1,:)99 
3.790 

1,899 

747 
1,»19 

987 
275 
892 
237 

2,033 
2,401 
l,t67 

2,598 
1,610 
3,22:^ 
l,li6 
1,291 


330 

386 

1,571 

868 

519 

574 

3,856 

1,209 

336 

787 

3:n 

828 
687 
759 

1.076 
432 
802 

1,650 

738 

426 
904 

57f 
145 
556 
138 

957 

1,161 

600 

1,487 
783 

1,619 
it6 
749 


418 
433 
• 1,326 
774 
371 
717 

8,612 

1,869 
387 
816 
248 
760 
648 
750 

1,066 
460 
597 

2,140 

1,161 

821 
1.045 

615 

130 

336 

99 

1.076 

1.243 

757 

1,111 
827 

1.601 
70a 
M2 


470 
1,029 
1.677 
1,298 

928 

1,125 

11,888 

7,W1 

496 
1,326 
1,332 

990 
1,756 

9:12 

916 

834 
1,692 
3,244 

2,£8A 

784 
4,815 

s,m 

742 

770 

1,048 

2,042 
5,628 
3,217 

1.433 
1,197 
6,?28 
i,2i9 
1,529 


223 
504 
826 
654 
443 
485 
5,570 
5,090 
225 
591 
649 
494 
845 
466 
454 
386 
856 
1.362 

916 

878 
1,742 

1,116 
362 
418 
520 

870 
2,686 
1,366 

792 

615 

2,867 

1,608 

828 


247 
625 
751 
644 
485 
640 
6,818 
A, 311 
273 
735 
683 
496 
910 
466 
462 
448 
836 
1,882 

1,368 

406 
2,673 

1,999 
380 
352 
528 

1,1?2 
2,992 
1,961 

641 

582 

3,861 

t,6Al 

701 


146 
114 
329 
889 

70 

133 

1,187 

3i9 

38 
225 

36 
155 
249 
201 
177 

83 
178 
556 

565 

74 
41 

54 
42 
13 
21 

228 

133 

98 

185 

134 

35 

26 

1*22 


145 
114 
829 
389 

70 

133 

1.182 

545 

38 
225 

86 
155 
249 
201 
177 

33 
178 
&15 

356 

74 
41 

54 
42 
13 
21 

724 
183 

98 

135 

188 

85 

25 

122 


1 


1 
2 




3 




4 




5 




a 


5 

4 


7 

8 
9 




10 




11 




12 




13 




14 




15 




16 




17 


11 
7 


IS 
i9 

?0 




?1 




n 




23 
?4 




V5 


4 


26 
?7 




28 




79 


1 


80 
81 




»2 




fa 






48,524 


24,717 


23.807 


58,050 


27,061 


30,989 


5,191 


5.172 


•22 


34 



PROVINCE OF SANTIACJO. 



5,456 
2,294 

908 

274 
1,917 
3,647 

226 
2,083 
8,988 

962 

360 
1,719 
1,103 

369 

13 

1,812 

1,090 

650 

3,621 

11,397 

10,319 


2,?21 

1,146 

428 

157 

1,014 

1,796 

94 

976 

4,345 

455 

184 

781 

440 

197 

8 

959 

539 

352 

1,756 

4,907 

4,598 


2,735 

1,148 

480 

117 

903 

1,851 

132 

1,107 

4,643 

507 

176 

988 

663 

1?2 

5 

853 

551 

296 

1,865 

6,490 

5,921 


4,106 
9,684 
8,954 
2,775 
2,898 
4,554 
880 
3,682 

10,025 
8,248 
8,889 

11,197 
4.085 
2,855 
780 
4,414 
8,952 
1,563 
4,621 

14,796 

13,957 


2,047 
4,684 
4, '288 
1,462 
1,469 
2,-231 

160 
1,719 
4,894 
1,519 
1,884 
5,283 
1,679 
1,871 

868 
2,253 
1,857 

782 
2,244 
6,346 

5,917 


2.059 
4.950 
4,666 
1,313 
1,429 
2,323 

220 
1,963 
5,131 
1,729 
2,055 
5,914 
«,404 
1.484 

412 
2,161 
2,095 

781 
2,877 
8,450 

8,040 


5 
4 

2 

81 

3 

3 

1 

80 

179 

5 

4 

33 

26 

8 


5 
4 

2 

31 

3 

3 

1 

73 

179 

5 

4 

81 

f4 

8 




1 




2 




3 




4 




5 




6 




7 
8 

11 


7 






2 

a 

- 


12 
13 
14 




15 


4 

16 


4 

16 




16 




17 




18 


7 
116 

116 


7 
110 

110 




19 


6 
6 


20 
21 


47,786 


22,815 


24,971 


96,323 


46,811 


51,512 


496 


481 


15 


'22 



200 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table VII. — Percentage o/populaiion hy ttex, general natimty, and color, 

[FigrurG8 in italic arc included in those for the province or district.] 

PROVINCE OF HABANA. 



DistrlctJ). 



Aenacate 

Alouizar 

Bainoa 

BHtaban6 

Bauta 

Bejucal 

Cano 

Casiffuaii 

Catalina 

Ceiba del Agua 

Guanabacoa 

City qf Otuinabacoa 

Guam 

Gaines 

Gnira de Melena 

Habana 

CUy ofJIabana 

Islade Pfnoe 

Janico 

Madruga 

Managua 

Marianao 

Melena del 8ur 

Nueva Pax 

Plpian 

QuIvicAn 

Regla 

Salud 

San Antonio de las V^:a8 
San Antonio de los Bafios 

Ban Felipe 

San Jos6 de las Lajas . . 

SauNicolAs 

Santa Cms del Norte 

Santa Maria del Rosarlo . 

Santiago de las Vegas 

Tapaate 

Vereda Nneva 

The province 



Total 
popula- 
tion. 



»,163 
8,746 
1,725 
6,S23 
5,142 
6,766 
4,210 
1,004 
2,718 
2,197 

20,080 

13,965 
1,835 

11,894 

11.548 
242.066 
gS5, 981 
8,199 
4,076 
3,744 
2.887 
8,698 
3.207 
7,761 
1,101 
2,423 

11.363 
3,293 
1,865 

12,631 
1,915 
4,1M 
4.568 
2,965 
2.730 

10,276 
1,661 
2,416 



Sex. 



Nativity and color. 



Male. 



51.8 

66.1 

65.6 

66.2 

66.2 

47.6 

65.6 

65.9 

49.8 

63.4 

48.8 

1,6.8 

60.4 

60 

66.2 

62.4 

5g.t 

65.7 

62.8 

48.3 

68.7 

53.4 

61.4 

49.4 

62.9 

61.1 



7 
3 
3 
5 



60. 

64. 

61. 

52. 

49 

49.1 

65.7 

54.1 

61.6 

61.3 

64.7 

68.7 



424,804 I 62.3 



Female. 



48.2 

44.9 

44.5 

44.8 

44.8 

62.4 

44.4 

44.1 

60.2 

46.6 

61.2 

63. S 

49.6 

50 

43.8 

47.6 

U7.8 

44.3 

47.2 

61.7 

46 3 

46.6 

48.6 

60.6 

47.1 

48.9 

49.3 

45.7 

48.7 

47.6 

51 

50.9 

44.3 

45.9 

48.4 

48.7 

45.3 

46.3 



Native 
whites. 



52.7 

62.6 

78.7 

68.3 

70.5 

77.5 

79.1 

66.4 

75.1 

79.6 

65.6 

59 

76 

62.2 

63.8 

49.6 

i9 

77.5 

74.7 

64.7 

78.6 

66.4 

67.J6 

66.6 

87.4 

73.1 

66.9 

87.3 

79 

74.2 

63.2 

71.4 

61.3 

67.8 

73,3 

69.7 

80.6 

88.6 



Foreign 
whites. 



6.6 
9.6 
4.3 

18.6 
8.6 
7.2 
9.4 
2.3 
6.6 
7.7 
7.4 
7.8 
4.9 
7.3 

10.6 

22.3 

tt.U 
6.2 
6 

6.2 
3.8 

13.5 
3.9 
4.9 
8 
6.1 

14.7 
6.9 
2.9 
9.7 
6.5 
4.5 
6 

4.5 
3.9 

11.7 
4.4 
4.2 



Colored. 



40.8 
27.9 
22.0 
23.2 
20.9 
16.3 
11.6 
81.3 
19.3 
12.7 
27.1 
55. f 
19.1 
30.6 
25.6 
28.2 
98.6 
16.8 
20. S 
29.1 
17.6 
31.1 
38.6 
88.5 

9.6 
20.8 
19.4 

6.8 
18.1 
16.1 
90.3 
24.1 
88.7 
37.7 
22.8 
18.6 
15.0 

7.2 



47.7 



67.4 



16.2 



26.4 



PROVINCE OF MATANZAS. 



Alacranes 

Bolondr6n 

Cabezas 

Canaal 

C&rdcniui 

CUy of (yirtlcnoji 

Carlos KojBs 

Colon 

Cuevitas 

Guamacaro 

Jagtiey Grande 

Jovellanos 

LosCayos 

Macagua 

Mucuriges 

Marti 

Matanzas 



City qf Matansii*. 
>-G6m(>z 



MAxlmo-< 

Mi^ndes Capote 

Palmillas 

Perico 

Roque 

Sabanilla 

Han Jos6 de los RamoH 

Santa Ana 

Uni6n de Reyes 



Thi- provinre 202,441 



8,110 

9,179 

6,184 

1,993 

24.861 

ftl,9W 

8,174 

12,196 

5,807 

6,000 

6,863 

7,529 

374 

6,042 

10,405 

8,531 

45, 282 

36,37 It 

4,046 

2.168 

7,647 

4,449 

4.464 

6.205 

6,765 

2,965 

6,226 



66.4 


43.6 


46.3 


6.1 


48.6 


52.8 


47.2 


41.6 


8.6 


49.8 


60.2 


49.8 


71.1 


6.5 


23.4 


64.4 


45.6 


52.1 


4.1 


43.8 


47.2 


62.8 


66.7 


9.3 


31.0 


IS. 5 


53.5 


5L5 


9.5 


58.0 


60.9 


49.1 


37.1 


5.5 


57.4 


61 


49 


46.8 


6.8 


46.4 


64 


46 


62.3 


6.9 


40.8 


61.6 


48.5 


43.4 


6 


60.6 


62.8 


47.2 


62.8 


7.3 


29.9 


47.5 


62.6 


37.6 


5.5 


66.9 


79.1 


20.9 


48.9 


40.1 


11.0 


52.9 


47.1 


S0.1 


3.8 


46.1 


62.4 


47.0 


38.5 


6.7 


64.8 


64.3 


45.7 


46.2 


3.3 


GO. 5 


48.4 


61.6 


60.9 


10 


29.1 


IS. 5 


53.5 


57. 6 


10 


Si.k 


52 


48 


44.2 


3.4 


62.4 


62.3 


37.7 


62.9 


5.8 


41.3 


54.3 


46.7 


43.6 


5.6 


GO. 8 


r>5.9 


44.1 


87.3 


6,8 


66.9 


67.7 


42.3 


46 


6.1 


48.9 


51.5 


48.5 


60.5 


7.7 


41.8 


64 


46 


39.5 


9.1 


51.4 


63.2 


46.8 


63.7 


8.5 


37.8 


50.2 


49.8 


42.8 


7.7 


49.6 


51. 'J 


4H.K 


50.7 


7.5 


41.8 



I 



SEX, NATIVITY, AND COLOB. 



201 



Table VII. — Percenlnge of population by fex^ general nativilyf and rolor — Continued. 

[FigtircH in italic .are included in those for the province or district.] 

PROVINCE OF PINAR DEL RIO. 



Districtfi. 



Artemlfla 

Bahia Honda 

Cabaflas 

Candelaria 

Gon861aci6n del Norte . . 

Con86Iacl6n del Bur 

Guanajay 

Guane 

Guayahal 

Julian Diaz 

Lo8 Palacios 

M&ntua 

Mftriel 

Pinar del Rio 

CityofPinardHRio. 

San Cristobal 

San Diego de los Bafios . 
San Diego de Nunes . . . . 

San Juan y Martina 

San Luis 

Viflalea 



Total 
popula- 
tion. 



9,817 
2,117 
3,858 
4,866 
7,899 

16,665 
8,796 

14,760 
2,710 
1.871 
2,456 
8,366 
3,631 

38,343 
8,880 
4,263 
2,419 
1,137 

14,787 
7,608 

17.700 



Theprovince 173.064 



Sex. 



Nativity and color. 



Male. 



53.8 
47.4 
66.7 
63.9 
63.3 
51.3 
47.8 
56.9 
63.1 
62.6 
63.1 
45.8 
49.6 
62.3 
U.9 
53.4 
53.8 
50.3 
55.3 
62.4 
52.8 



53 



Female. 


Native 
whites. 


Foreign 
whites. 


Colored. 


46.2 


61.8 


5.1 


83.1 


62.6 


87.9 


3 


69.1 


44.3 


84.1 


8.9 


62.0 


46.1 


60.4 


4.6 


85.0 


46.7 


70.7 


4.6 


24.8 


. 48.7 


69 


4 


87.0 


52.2 


64.2 


7.6 


28.2 


43.1 


74.7 


8 


17.3 


46.9 


69.4 


8.9 


21.7 


47.6 


66.6 


2.6 


40.9 


46.9 


60 


3.6 


36.6 


54.2 


77.3 


6.6 


17.1 


50.4 


59.2 


3.9 


36.9 


47.7 


67.9 


7.2 


24.9 


52. i 


M.5 


11.6 


SS.t 


46.6 


66.2 


8.6 


30.2 


46.2 


72.8 


3.1 


24.1 


49.7 


40.3 


4 


55.7 


44.7 


69 


8.K 


22.2 


47.6 


67.9 


6.3 


21.8 


47.2 


?2.8 


6.7 


20.5 


47 


66.4 


6.2 


27.4 



PROVINCE OF PUERTO PRINCIPE. 



Ci^o de Avila 

Mor6n 

Nuevitas 

Puerto Principe 

City qf Puerto Principe 
Santa Crux del 8ur 

The province 



9,801 

9,630 

10,365 

68,140 

f5,iOf 

6,808 



88.234 



60.8 
61.1 
66. 8 
49.4 

64.4 



50.9 



49.2 
48.9 
43.2 
50.6 
BC.5 
46.6 



49.1 




82 

87.6 

68. K 

73.8 

B5.8 

67.1 



PROVINCE OF SANTA CLARA. 



Abreu.1 

Caibarien 

Calabazar 

Camajuani 

Cartagena 

C<»ja de Pablo 

Cienfuegos 

City of Cieufnegr}* 

Cifuentes 

Cnices 

Esneransa 

Palmira 

Placetas 

Qnemadn de Gtihien 

Rancho Vclos 

Ranchuelo 

Rfxias 

Sagua la Grande 

City o/Hagwa la Grande 
Snn Antonio do la.s Vueltas 
Sancti-SplritUM 

City qf Sanrti-Sitiritua .. 

San Diego del Valle 

S.ia Fernando 

Him Juan de las Yeras 

Siin Juan de Icis Remcdios . 
Santa Clara 

City qf Santa Clara 

Santa IsaDel de las Lajas . . 

Santo Domingo 

Trinidad 

CUyqf Trinidad 

Yaguajay 

The province 



3.996 


82.9 


8,650 


62.1 


18,419 


56.3 


14,496 


58 


6,244 


56.9 


6,964 


60.1 


59.128 


M.4 


50,058 


1^.6 


8.825 


50.7 


7,953 


62.4 


7,811 


63.1 


6,5'27 


64.7 


11,961 


64.2 


8,890 


63.6 


7.632 


53.4 


5,069 


49.8 


9,562 


66.1 


21,342 


61.1 


It, 7i8 


AS. 4 


12,832 


55.5 


25,709 


46.9 


If, 696 


S9.6 


5,369 


53.9 


6,445 


58.1 


5,600 


62.5 


14,833 


51.3 


28,437 


6L3 


15,755 


1^.5 


9,608 


68.4 


10,372 


63 


24,271 


48.2 


tl,ltO 


W.6 


9.718 


58.3 



356,5.% 



5:} 



47.1 

47.9 

48.7 

42 

43.1 

49.9 

45.6 

51. i 

49.3 

47.6 

46.9 

46.3 

45.8 

46.4 

46.6 

50.2 

43.9 

48.9 

51.6 

44.5 

53.1 

60.1, 

46.1 

41.9 

47.5 

48.7 

48.7 

5i.5 

41.6 

47 

61.8 

59. t, 

41.7 



47 



56.8 

66 

56.6 

64.7 

61.7 

60.2 

54.6 

St.i 

64.1 

51.3 

71.7 

49.6 

60.3 

64.6 

50.8 

60.6 

66.7 

54.9 

55. U 

73 

72.9 

6i.5 

76.3 

61.8 

73.3 

61.3 

64.4 

60.1 

50.7 

67.5 

56.6 

U9.2 

66.3 



10.1 


34.1 


12.3 


22.7 


7.6 


85.8 


22.3 


23.0 


8 1 


80.2 


8.1 


36.7 


10.8 


34.7 


11.6 


56.0 


4.3 


31.6 


9 


39.7 


3.4 


24.9 


8.5 


41.9 


11.8 


27.9 


5.7 


29.7 


6.3 


42.9 


4.6 


34.8 


9.1 


34.2 


9.6 


8'>.5 


8.9 


5.5.7 


14.5 


12.5 


2.6 


24.5 


.11 


St. 6 


4 


19.7 


9.2 


26.0 


3.4 


23.3 


9.7 


29.0 


6.9 


28.7 


6.7 


55. f 


6.9 


43.4 


4.2 


28.3 


2.2 


4L2 


f.f 


i8.6 


13.4 


80.3 



60.3 



8.4 



81.3 



202 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1809. 



Table VII. — Percenlage, of popiUation hy «<^r, genend luUitnitf, and color — CV)nti illicit 1. 

PROVINCE OF SANTIAGO. 
[FiguroM in italic are Included In thoiic for the province or district.] 



Districts. 



Alto del Hongo 

Baracoa 

Bayamo 

Cunipechiiela 

Caney 

(^obre 

Criflto 

Gibara 

(inantananio 

Holguin 

Jiguanl 

Manzanillo 

CUu of Manztui di > 

Mayari. 

NIaiiero 

Palma Soriano 

Puerto Podro 

Sagua de T&namo 

Ban Luia 

Santiago de Cuba 

City of SafUia/fit .. 



The province 





Sex. 


Nativitv and color. 


Total 

l>onulrt- 

tion. 






Native 
whites. 






Male. 


Female. 


Foreign 

WhitA«. 


(!nlorr«1. 


12.770 


51.1 


48.9 


23.3 


1.8 


• 
74.9 


21. M4 


50.8 


49.2 


42.8 


2.8 


hi. 4 


21. 1»3 


48.7 


51.3 


62.4 


1 


46. C 


7,369 


55.7 


44.3 


53.9 


4.3 


41.8 


9,126 


60 


40 


28.7 


18.5 


52.8 


10,707 


50.8 


49.2 


21 


2.3 


76.7 


I.IW 


47.2 


52.8 


42.7 


6.4 


50.9 


31,594 


51 


49 


76.7 


4.K 


18.5 


28,06:? 


51.6 


48.4 


25.1 


6.9 


68.0 


3-1, 500 


49.3 


60.7 


85.8 


2 


12.2 


10,195 


48.6 


51.4 


58.9 


.6 


40.5 


:«.2as 


48.5 


51.5 


56.1 


3.8 


40.1 


U,i6U 


Ut.l 


liU.9 


67.6 


6.4 


38. 


8,5W 


50.3 


49.7 


60.5 


1.6 


87.9 


2,71H 


50.5 


49.5 


68.6 


2.3 


29.1 


12.3a5 


52 


48 


48.3 


1 


50.7 


19.98^1 


49.7 


fiO.3 


73.4 


l.S 


25.3 


5.790 


51.3 


48.7 


60.4 


1.4 


88.2 


11.6S1 


49.7 


50.3 


25.4 


4 


70.6 


45,478 


46.4 


53.6 


a4.5 


7.6 


57.9 


hS,oyo 


W.9 


US. 8 


S6.A 


8 


fie.6 


327, 715 


50 


50 


61.20 


4.09 


14.71 



Tablk VIII. — Afft' and ftcr. 
[FlgnrcM in italic an* inc,hide<l In those for the pn)vlnce or district.] 



Provin(H*s. 



Total 
popula- 
tion. 



Habana ' 424.8tM 

City of JltitHi mi ;?.W. USl 

M&UiiiYAis I 202, 444 

PInar del Hio i 173, OM 

Puerto PrinciiH! 88, 2:il 

Kanta Clara .'Wi, fiiU'i 

Santiago ; :«7,715 

Cuba ,1.572,797 



Age and sex. 



Under 5 
yearn. 



Male 



Fe- 
male. 



5 to 17 years. 



Male. 



15,31215,585 63,502 
S,7(Mf^ 9,09l\ A), 615 



8,07;i 
8,13:< 
5,051 



7,995 
7,tWl 

4.788 



13,058,13.013 



16,274 



15,882 



33.5:«) 
32. 741 
17. 197 
ca, «i7 

66.214 



Fe- 
male. 



01, 127 
3i, SIH 
:fij, 939 
31,915 
16, 910 
63,4.V2 



18 to 20 
years. 



Male. 



Fe- 
male, 



16,06915,512 



8, 6.^8 
6,528 
7,0W 
2.467 
12.219 



65,67110,050 



65, 9tXl 6-1, 974 276, 881 -276, (M7;M, 427 



8, 052 
7.527 
7, 162 
2, 7'27 
12. 706 
11,614 



21 to 41 
years. 



Male. 



95,578 
57,SSg 
35,690 
32, 725 
13.031 
70,937 
49,801 



Fe- 
male. 



77,508 
lU>,OSt 
33,9(39 
26,914 
12,449 
56.420 
48. 872 



67,1481297,7651256,157 



45 years and 
over. 



Male. 



31,409 
17,9iS 
19,905 
11,025 
7.150 
29,170 
21,503 



Fi»- 
male. 



30,067 
W,5W 
1.'>,2S8 
7,674 
6,431 
21,858 
21,928 



120, 228j 103,266 



PROVINCE OF HABANA. 



Districts. 



ToUil 
popula- 
tion. 



Age and sex. 



Tnder 5 
years. 



Agiiacate 

Aluuizar 

Btifnoa 

Batabano 

Bauto 

Bejucal 

(Hmo 

C4i8igua.s 

Catiillna 

(k'ibadel Agun 

Uuanabacoa 

City «/ GuaMtlHU'iHi 



Male 



3,163 


94 


8,746 


327 


1,725 


53 


6,523 


251 


6, 142 


l.\s 


5,75<J 


i'.n» 


4,210 


137 


I.OIM 


Xi 


2,718 


(» 


2.197 


82 


20,080 


72:j 


/.1. 905 


5U 



mall' 




21 to 44 
years. 



Male. 



629 

1,917 

395 

1.477 

1.104 

1,088 

916 

2^ 

4(»i 

462 

3.64;8 



Fe- 
male. 



587 

1,383 

289 

l.(M8 

814 

1,091 

678 

162 

477 

383 

3. 825 

S, 857 



4.') years and 
over. 



Male. 



20S 
598 
\0S 
488 
394 
332 
277 
52 
167 
132 
1,»43 
9t() 



Fe- 
male. 



l.VS 

473 

72 

320 

276 

40K 

217 

86 

150 

109 

1.590 

I,€1S 



AOK AND SEX. 



203 



Tablb VIII. — Age ami »ex — C<mtiniio<l. 

PROVINCE OP HABANA— Omtinued. 
[Flgurcfl in italic arc included in tboHC for the pmvinco «ir district.] 



DistrictA. 



Total 
popula- 
tion. 



Age and sex. 



Under ft 
yeanc 



Guam 

Guinea 

Ouira de Mclena 

Habana 

CSly of Habana 

Isla de Pfno« 

Janice 

Madniga 

Mani^:ua 

Marianao 

Helena del Sur 

Neu va Pa* 

Pipian 

Quivican 

Regla 

Sahid 

San Antonio de las Ve- 
gas 

San Antonio de los 
BafiOB 

San Kellpc 

San JoN^ de las LAJaA . . 

San Nicolas 

Santa Cruz del Norte. . 

Santa Maria del Romrio 

Santiago de las Vegas . 

Tapaste 

Vereda Nueva 

The province 



Male. 



l.SSft 

11.3941 

11,&48| 

24^,055 

255,981 

3,199 

4,076 

3,744 

2,887 

8,693 

3,207 

7,761 

1,101 

2,423 

11.363 

3,293 

1,855 

12,631 
1,915 
4,154 
4,568 
2,965 
2,730 

10,276 
1,551 
2,416 



424,804 



Fe- 
male. 



61 

309 

454 

8, 909 

8,700 

195 

112 

96 

91 

341 

106 

287 

17 

82 

444 

106 

67 

496 

n\ 

136 
142i 
68 
84 
392 
36 
82 



66 

298 

403 

9.292 

9,091 

158 

102 

117 

103 

313 

116 

296 

26 

71 

445 

108 

62 



5 to 17 years. 



Male. 



391 

1,982 

2,083 

31,630 

50,615 

547 

826 

666 

674 

1,296 

601 

1,317 

210 

449 

1,787 

656 

883 



Fe- 
male. 



470 2, 167 



15,812 



66 

116 

167 

78 

59 

407 

31 

83 



15,585 



369 
769 
847 
550 
495 
1,579 
285 
488 



63,562 



348 

1.990 

1,886 

33, 123 

92, tl8 

528 

757 

690 

517 

1,300 

570 

1,349 

215 

468 

1,812 

6(M 

337 

2,147 
338 
761 
719 
496 
502 

1,635 
272 
398 



18 to 20 
years. 



21 to 44 
years. 



Male. 



Fe- 
male. 



64,127 



76 
403 
588 
8,911 
H,63S 
106 
159 
139 
126 
328 

96 
206 

43 

90 
374 
151 

I 
69. 

5:J7, 
50 
130 
161 
124 
117 
380 
71 
106 



Male. 



16,069 



83 

529 

427 

8.251 

H,05i 

97 
IM 
162 
127 
296 
144 
297 

46 

89 
394 
133 

90 

514 

591 

186 

182 

137 

130 

394 

68 

85 



15,512 



317 

2,210 

2,547 

58.880 

B7,S82 

671 

790 

621 

561 

1,881 

591 

1,385 

241 

443 

2,301 

692 

310 

2.596 
312 
701 
990 
603 
531 

2,170 
362 
455 



Fe- 
male. 



45 years and 
over. 



Male. 



95,678 



330 

2,076 

1,710 

45.931 

U5,0ti 

473 

711 

703 

451 

1,446 

553 

1,418 

182 

4*23 

2,134 

521 

318 

2,086 
368 
IGh 
680 
493 
465 

271 
421 



I 



77,603 



Fe- 
male. 



801 
821 
864 
18,442 
17,925 
'263 
265 
285 
191 
736 
256 
639 
71 
172 
85(i 
182 

122 

835 
135 
301 
403 
258 
183 
749 
95 
166 



83 
776 
636 
18,680 
18,5m 
161 
200 
265 
140 
656 
174 
667 
50 
136 
783 
140 

97 

783 
146 
283 
277 
158 
164 
733 
60 
132 



31,469 30,087 



PROVINCE OF MATANZAS. 



Alacranes 

Bolondron 

Cabezoii 

Canasi 

Cardenas 

City of (UrdenoH . . 

Carlos Kojafl 

Colon 

Cuevitas 

Guamacaro 

Jagiley Grande 

Jovellanofl 

Macagua 

Macuriges 

Marti 

Matanzas 

City o^ MfUanzcut . . 

Maximo Gomes 

Mendez Capote 

PalmlUas 

Perico 

Roqne 

Sabanilla 

San Josu do Ics Ramos 

Santa Ana 

Union de Reyes 

The province... 



8,110 

9,179 

5,184 

1,99:} 

24.861 

21, 9W 

3,174 

12,195 

6,807 

6,000 

5,85:^ 

7,529 

6,042 

10,405 

8,905 

45.282 

56,571, 

4,046 

2,158 

7,647 

4,449 

4,464 

6,205 

6,765 

2,965 

6,226 



202,444 



307 
353 
185 
39 
1,024 
915 
134 
477 
244 
237 
266 
317 
206 
428 
413 
1,682 
1,590 
166 
62 
356 
189 
140 
226 
339 
125 
208 



8,073 



275 
380 
188 
48 
1,002 
890 
153 
573 
236 
267 
227 
319 
199 
413 
390 
1,670 
1,W9 
144 
56 
295 
168 
142 
215 
307 
110 
219 



1,336 

1,473 

965 

369 

3,923 

5,585 

561 

1,996 

1,022 

993 

1,023 

1,162 

908 

1,642 

1,490 

7,486 

5,69U 

633 

414 

1.320 

655 

718 

820 

1,212 

626 

883 



7,995 33,5:)0 



1.215 

1,445 

9?2 

843 

4.471 

5,951, 

496 

2,122 

924 

988 

l,i:i5 

1.265 

915 

1.585 

1,4'2:} 

7.721 

6,209 

642 

270 

1,294 

621 

670 

856 

1,143 

608 

915 



343 
258 
205 
78 
708 

'& 

367 

208 

189 

202 

172 

163 

367 

281 

1,429 

1,051 

134 

77 

216 

162 

186 

205 

212 

95 

178 



:«,939 6,528 



258 

304 

251 

67 

1,019 

9U 

99 

440 

205 

225 

214 

316 

178 

374 

292 

1.839 

l,i95 

167 

66 

274 

152 

102 

176 

212 

89 

218 



7.527 



1.710 

1.785 

898 

894 

4,101 

5,582 

444 

2,121 

1.008 

981 

1.165{ 

1.134 

9191 

1,854 

1.489 

8.014 

6,m 

682 

451 

1.279 

860 

905 

866 

1.171 

636 

943 



35,690 



i.2:w 

1,555 

864 

814 

4,600 

A, 151 

484 

2,006 

898 

914 

905 

1,377 

788 

1,7« 

1.232 

8.6f>7 

7,209 

631 

297 

1.138 

713 

667 

797 

984 

436 

892 



:fi,969 



877 

981 

352 

206 

1.988 

1,718 

378 

1,-254 

661 

690 

446 

788 

469 

1,161 

1,258 

3.844 

2,667 

487 

8401 

984 

630 

628 

561 

718 

295 

410 



19,905 



661 
646 
801 
136 
2,025 
1,825 
327 
839 
406 
616 
280 
679 
297 
849 
637 
3,590 
5,128 
360 
136 
491 
309 
306 
483 
517 
245 
360 



15.288 



PROVINCE OF PINAR DEL RIO. 



Artemisa 

Bahla Honda 

Cabanas 

Candelaria 

Consolaclon del Norte 
Consolacion del Sur . . 



9,317 


298 


280 


1,732 


1,561 


405 


395 


1,933 


1,574 


645 


2,117 


82 


86 


887 


391 


49 


96 


328 


384 


157 


8,853 


102 


97 


616 


672 


166 


123 


8:m 


633 


426 


4,866 


156 


141 


964 


882 


208 


183 


992 


823 


300 


7,399 


362 


•xsn 


1.549 


1.496 


»26 


323 


1.3'29 


1,072 


879 


16,665 


755 


7«/) 


3,278 


3.242 


673 


726 


2,805 


2.626 


1,044 



494 
157 
285 
215 
221 
757 



204 



BEPOET ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, J899. 



Table VIII. — Age and »ex — Continued. 

PROVINCE OF PINAR DEL RIO— Continued. 
[Figures in italic are include<l in those for the province or district.] 



Provincefl. 



Guanajay 

Guane 

Guayabal 

Julian Piaz... 
Ijos Pala€:io8 . . 

Mantua 

Mariel 

Pinar del Rio. 



City of Pinar del Kio . 

San CriMtobal 

San Di^ro de loa Bafio8. 

ean Diego de Nufiez 

San Juan y Martinez 

San Luis 

Vinales 



Total 
popula- 
tion. 



Age and sex. 



Under 5 
years. 



.Male. 



8,796 

14,760 
2,710 
1,871 
2,456 
8.366 
3,631 

38,343 
8,880 
4,263 
2,419 
1,137 

14,787 
7,608 

17,700 



The province I 173,064 



370 

549 

91 

60 

77 

880 

130 

2,252 

U)6 

122 

74 

39 

736 

425 

1,073 



8,133 



Fe- 
male. 



354 

499 

90 

64 

74 

344 

145 

2,127 

WO 

101 

89 

47 

630 

405 

1,005 



7,681 



6 to 17 


vcars. 


18 to 20 






ycmrs. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 
257 


Fe- 
male. 

399 


1,520 


1,552 


2,798 


2,585 


713 


637 


521 


493 


138 


122 


400 


380 


75 


82 


498 


466 


101 


131 


1,631 


1,629 


376 


370 


619 


614 


122 


138 


7,022 


6,999 


1,428 


1,539 


l,Sli 


1,66S 


t88 


iS7 


836 


827 


2O0 


205 


490 


421 


105 


93 


202 


185 


33 


35 


2,873 


2,689 


699 


575 


1,457 


1,431 


285 


295 


3,349 


3,500 


706 


695 


32,741 


31,915 


7,064 


7,162 



21 to 44 
years. 



Male. 



Fe- 
male. 



1,455 

3,569 

487 

345 

603 

1,741 

635 

6,774 

1,661 

885 

608 

169 

2,942 

1,331 

8,160 



32,725 



1,675 

2,165 

421 

2»4 

401 

1,207 

662 

5,936 

1,76U 

714 

399 

174 

2,141 

1,179 

2,474 



26,944 



45 years and 
over. 



Male. 



Fe- 
male. 



603 
771 
202 
103 
124 
410 
296 

2,606 
699 
233 
125 
129 
920 
490 

1,062 



11,025 



611 
474 
145 
7» 
81 
279 
270 
1.660 
i70 
140 
115 
124 
582 
310 
676 



7,674 



PROVINCE OF PUERTO PRINCIPE. 



Cicgode Avila 

Moron 

Nue vitas 

Puerto Principe 

City qf Puerto Prin 

cipe 

Santa Cfruz del Sur 

The province 



9,801 

9,630 

10.355 

53,140 


573 

538 

526 

3,049 


501 

487 

471 

2,987 


2,178 
2,165 
1,792 
9,970 


2,180 
2,068 
1,763 
9,877 


262 

276 

355 

1,410 


311 

314 

306 

1,629 


1,334 
1,311 

2,188 
7,376 


1,294 
1.300 
1,332 
7,928 


£6, lot 
5,308 


1,181 
368 


1,171 
842 


S,909 
1,092 


A, 608 
1,032 


610 
164 


918 3,316 
167| 822 


U,676 
595 


88,234 


5,054 


4,788 


17,197 


16,940 


2,407 


2,727 


13,031 


12.449 



PROVINCE OF SANTA CLARA. 



Abreus 

Caibarien 

Calabazar 

Camajuani 

Cartegena 

Cejado Pablo 

Cienfucgos 

City of Cienfuegog. . . 

CifuenteH 

Cruces 

Esperanza 

Palmira 

Placetas 

Queroado de Guines — 

Rancho Veloz 

Ranchuelo 

Roda.H 

Sagua la Grande 

City qf Sagua ta 

Orantle 

San Antonio de las 

Vueltas 

Sancti Spiritus 

Cityo/Sancti Spiritus 

San Diego del Vallo 

San Fernando 

San Juan dc las Yeras.. 
San Juan de los Reme- 

dioa 

Santa Clara 

City qf Santa Clara. . 
Santa Isabel de las Lajas 

Santo Domingo 

Tinidad 

dtp of Trinidatl 

Yaguajay 

The province 



8.995 


158 


180 


679 


762 


116 


140 


775 


534 


8,650 


439 


406 


1,507 


1,577 


263 


299 


1,629 


1.339 


13,419 


475 


458 


2,311 


2,200 


471 


498 


2,897 


2,020 


14,495 


547 


576 


2,470 


2,366 


634 


427 


3,623 


2,091 


6,244 


192 


215 


1,107 


1,087 


225 


222 


1,514 


894 


6.951 


391 


375 


1,292 


l,S34 


177 


231 


958 


1,022 


59,128 


2.254 


2,214 


9,978 


9,775 


2,084 


2.063 


12,827 


9.357 


30,038 


1,21^ 


1,30U 


ii,64f 


6,1U 


960 


1,177 


5,677 


6,5i,3\ 


3,825 


156 


143 


716 


703 


84 


161 


' 676 


6?2 


7.953 


262 


270 


1,306 


1,422 


240 


291 


1,590 


1,290 


7,811 


237 


215 


1,524 


1,450 


306 


315 


1,594 


1,307 


6,527 


270 


251 


1,125 


1,149 


213 


236 


1,308 


889 


11,961 


418 


416 


2, 157 


2,173 


402 


372 


2,49(i 


1,901 


8.890 


390 


316 


1.589 


1,598 


304 


306 


1,664 


1,414 


7,532 


317 


337 


1,:M3 


1,3,38 


196 


270 


1.291 


1,047 


5.059 


IHl 


185 


933 


1.020 


145 


194 


915 


861 


9,502 


:w 


413 


1,735 


1,693 


347 


325 


2.0<i6 


1,295 


21.342 


822 


892 


3,513 


3,746 


660 


790 


3,997 


3, 621 


12,7t8 


i95 


6S1 


2,071, 


S,3li 


355 


601 


2,129 


2,315 


12,832 


478 


491 


2,492 


2,345 


519 


427 


2.765 


1,906 


25,709 


793 


877 


5.0t.8 


5,205 


709 


881 


3.613 


4,308 


12,696 


570 


1,66 


2,20i 


2,S72 


2S3 


616 


i,ias 


2,639 


5,369 


171 


131 


1,00(5 
1,275 


9(i0 


186 


218 


1.167 


903 


6,445 


207 


20(i 


1,180 


253 


197 


1,616 


831 


5.600 


213 


194 


1,124 


1,110 


205 


212 


i.aM 


891 


14,833 


533 


576 


2,469 


2.665 


493 


614 


2,SiG 


2,376 


28.437 


M3 


782 


6, 145 


5.164 


1,062 


1,095 


6.694 


5,010 


13,763 


Ui 


^50 


2,217 


2,528 


477 


693 


2,S7S 


2,813 


9,603 


248 


264 


1,679 


j 1.448 


'Ml 


2,309 


i,4:« 


10.372 


345 


29-2 


1,849 


' 1,920 


3:» 


381 


2, 125 


1,715 


24,271 


925 


9a4 


4,527 


1 4,502 


746 


1,010 


8,7:« 


4,199 


11, ISO 


1,78 


605 


1,8U 


2,1U 


256 


530 


1,3^)2 


2,296 


9,718 


436 


431 


1.720 


1 1,570 


395 


300 


2,:ttW 


],'294 


856,536 


13.058 


13,043 


63,6:n 


rh{,452 


12,249 


12, 7«'. 

1 


70.937 


56,420 



632 

632 

1,027 

4,420 



536 

519 

595 

4,491 



1,896 2,918 



439 



287 



7,150 0,431 



384 
66K 
1,398 
1,133 
516 
668 

5, aw 

2,072\ 
8071 
773| 

485 

65:^ 

1,008 
815 
877 
347 
862 

1.915 



I 



867 
].86:i 
747t 
3<i6, 
491 1 
345 

1.274' 

1.838 

780, 

mv 
8:^1 

1.757. 
606^ 
H05, 



267 
523 
091 
62S 
273 
506 
3.546 
2,23t 
218 
510 
879 
433 
618 
494 
516 
278 
4U9 

1,:)86 



1, 110, 916 



542 
2,392 
l,68i 
258 
289 
256 

1,107 

1.801 

1,157 

611 

568 

1,938 

1,132 

459 



29,176l 21,S58 



AOE AND 8EX. 

Tablk V[II.— .I^.i7irf*-j-.— (V 

PROVINCE OF BANTIAOO. 

[PIkiirw ill Italic sre Inrladi-it In Ihixi: for Ihu r 






CuapechueU .. 
Csney 

CrtaUtV/-" '-'-'-'- - 



12,770 me', tS2, £.837 



Uftfarf 

Niqaero 

Puiiift Sorlum 

Puerto Padre 

Saciui de Tanamn . . 

BonttftgodeCubii... 
CUg qf Santiago 

The prorlnce. 



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BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



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216 



REPORT ON THfi OENSOS OP CUBA, 1899. 



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AGB, BAOE, NATIVITY, AND SEX. 



217 



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KEPOM OK THE 0EM8Ua OS' CUBA, 1899. 



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ii.m 


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128, aw 


a.m 


88 








471 
































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2,146 


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/v 



BIRTHPLACE. 



219 



Table X. — Biirthplace — Continued. 
[Figures in italic are included in thoee for the province or district.] 



District 

Hftximo Gomez 

Mendes Capole 

Palmillas 

Perico 

Roque 

Sabanilla 

San Jose de los Ramos 

Santa Ana 

XJnion de Eeyos 

The prorince 



Total popu- 
lation. 



4,046 
2,166 
7.647 
4,449 
4,464 
6,205 
6,766 
2,965 
6,226 



202,444 



Cuba. 



8,667 
1,981 
6,616 
8,754 
8,847 
4.510 
5,836 
2,689 
4,685 



178,524 



Spain. 



182 
124 
406 
244 
228 
891 
506 
248 
887 



14,127 



Other 
countries. 



PBOVINCE OF PINAR DEL RIO. 



257 
lOS 
625 
451 
894 
804 
834 
78 
154 



9,793 



Unknown. 



Artemisa 

Bahia Honda 

Cabanas 

Candelaria 

Consolacion del Norte. . 

Consolacion del Sur 

Guanajay 

Guane 

Guayabal 

Julian Dla2 

Los Palaclos 

Mantua 

Mariel 

PlnardelRio 

CUy qf Pinar da Bio 

San Crurtobal 

San Diego de los Balioe 

San Diego dc Nufiez 

Sun Juan y Martinez... 

San Luis 

Vinales 

The province 



9,817 
2,117 
8.853 
4,866 
7.899 

16,665 
8,796 

14.760 
2,710 
1,871 
2,456 
8,866 

s,esi 

88,843 
8,880 
4,268 
2,419 
1,137 

14,787 
7,608 

17,700 



178,064 



8,744 
2,012 
8,448 
4,628 
7,019 

15,806 
8,008 

18,584 
2,488 
1,809 
2,880 
7,887 
8,870 

85,148 
r.75f 
4,098 
2,827 
1,062 

18,888 
7,078 

10,414 



160,450 



450 

60 

148 

217 

880 

617 

602 

1,161 

286 

46 

85 

463 

188 

2,515 

8£9 

141 

74 

45 

1,286 

468 

1,177 



10,254 



PROVINCE OF PUERTO PRINCIPE. 



128 

45 

257 

26 

60 

245 

186 

65 

86 

16 

41 

16 

128 

680 

919 

29 

18 

60 

168 

67 

109 



2.860 



CiegodeAvIla 

Moron 

Nuevitaa 

Puerto Principe 

CUyqf Puerto Principe 
Santa Cruz del Sur 

The province 



9.801 

9,630 

10,856 

53,140 

t6,lM 

5,808 



88»284 



9,462 

9,422 

8,925 

60,202 

4,971 



82,982 



271 
187 
902 
1,953 
J,J57 
282 



3,595 



68 

21 

528 

965 

itU 

55 



1,657 



PROVINCE OF SANTA OLARA. 



Abreus 

Gaibarlen 

Calabazar 

Camajuanl 

Cartagena , 

Ccjade Piablo 

CienfuegoB 

City qf Cier^fuegot 

Cifuentes 

Cmces 

Eroeianza 

Palmira 

Plaoetas 

Quemado de Guinea 

Rancbo Veioz 

Ranchuelo 

Rodaa 

Sagua la Grande 

City €/ Sagua la Orande , 
San Antonio de las Vueltas 
Sancti Spiritus 

City qf Sandi Spirilus, . . 
San Dl^O del Valle 



8,995 


8,381 


882 


232 


8.660 


7,411 


1,017 


222 


18,419 


11,817 


990 


612 


14,495 


10,822 


8,167 


906 


6,244 


5,631 


802 


111 


6.954 


6,465 


208 


286 


59,128 


51,119 


5,914 


2,095 


50, OSS 


t6,oe8 


S,156 


855 


8,825 


8,585 


162 


78 


7,958 


6.802 


686 


465 


7,811 


7,470 


249 


92 


6,527 


5,707 


543 


277 


11,961 


10,280 


1,861 


820 


8,890 


8,011 


492 


887 


7,532 


6,733 


453 


846 


5,059 


4,710 


230 


119 


9,562 


8,404 


792 


366 


21,842 


18,496 


1.941 


903 


lg,7t8 


11,186 


1.068 


U76 


12,832 


10,775 


1,853 


2(M 


25,709 


24,625 


GU3 


481 


It, 696 


It, 170 


Si,9 


177 


5,869 


5,067 


209 


93 



>' OF ax.: 



BIRTHPLACE, SEX, AND RACE. 



221 



SptiB. 



Tablk XI. — Birthplace f seXy and race — Continued. 
PROVINCE OP HABANA. 



Countries of 
birth. 



S(6 

1,762 

419'; 

480, 
fiK! 
l.-JSil 



!>;afr- 



^1 



~!aba 

■OrtoRioo 

Vest Indies 

iouth America... 

Central America . 

tfexico 

Jnited States 

Canada 

'$pain 

Eaifland 

tlreiand 

^Scotland 

.Germany 

France 

-Italv 

Portugal 

Scan<unavia 

Other Europe 

■ Africa 

Australia 

China , 

Japan 

Other counties. . 

Unknown 

The province, 



Both classes. 



Total. 



849,122 

616 

283 

457 

83 

846 

4,178 

24 

61,487 

272 

18 

24 

190 

642 

834 

45 

85 

243 

1,799 

6 

3,848 

2 

213 

88 



424,804 



Male. 



162,664 

242 

121 

228 

19 

297 

2,762 

18 

49,701 

169 

8 

18 

158 

365 

243 

38 

22 

168 

769 

6 

8,810 

1 

169 

42 



221,990 



Female. 



186,458 

873 

162 

229 

14 

549 

1,426 

11 

11,783 

108 

10 

6 

87 

287 

91 

7 

13 

85 

1,080 

1 

38 

1 

64 

46 



202,814 



White. 



Total. 



243,664 

459 

217 

434 

80 

768 

3,638 

20 

61,426 

216 

18 

24 

190 

638 

383 

88 

82 

241 

15 

6 

62 

1 

176 

56 



812,590 



Male. 



116,810 

195 

84 

217 

17 

268 

2,887 

10 

49,671 

128 

8 

18 

163 

852 

243 

32 

22 

157 

11 

4 

62 



138 
28 



Female. 



126.754 

264 

183 

217 

13 

600 

1,261 

10 

11,756 

88 

10 

6 

87 

286 

90 

6 

10 

84 

4 

1 



1 

43 
27 



171,000 



141,690 



Colored. 



Total. 



106,568 

166 

66 

23 

3 

78 

540 

4 

61 

66 



4 

1 

7 
8 
2 
1,784 
1 
8.796 
1 

87 
83 



112,214 



Male. 



Female. 



45,854 
47 
87 
11 

2 

29 

365 

3 
88 
41 



8 



6 



1 

768 

1 

3,788 

1 

26 

14 



60,990 



39,704 

100 

29 

12 

1 

49 

176 

1 

28 
15 



1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1.026 



38 



11 
19 



61,224 



*■' * 
S2 . 
IJ - 

•y 

10 . - 

no . ■ 
m ... 



PROVINCE OF MATANZA8. 



Cuba 


178,624 

71 

22 

60 

6 

70 

589 

14 

14,127 

87 

4 

3 

17 

188 

84 

18 


85,121 
83 

7 
40 

1 

20 

896 

8 

11,070 

23 

4 

2 
11 
96 
29 
10 


98,403 

88 

15 

20 

4 

60 

144 

6 

3,067 

14 


102,682 

48 

20 

67 

4 

69 

606 

11 

14,116 

86 

4 

8 

17 

133 

84 

8 


60,824 

26 

6 

37 


62,868 

23 

14 

20 

4 

43 

184 

5 

3,061 

18 


76,842 

28 

2 

8 

1 

11 

88 

8 

11 

1 

* * « 


84,797 
8 
1 
8 
1 
4 
23 
2 
5 
..••1 .... 


41,015 
16 

1 


Porto Rico 

West Indies 

South America . . . 
Central America . 


Mexico 


16 
372 

6 

11,065 

23 

4 

2 
U 
96 
29 

7 


7 


United States 

Canada 


10 
1 


Spain 


6 


England 


1 


Ireland 




Scotland 


1 
6 
38 
6 
8 


1 

6 

88 

5 

1 








Germany 








France 








Italy 








Foringai 


6 


8 


2 


Scanmnavia 




Other Europe 

Africa 


56 
4.893 


89 
2,611 


17 
1,882 


55 
8 


89 
2 


16 

1 


1 
4,890 


***2,*569* 


1 
1,881 


Australia 




China 


4,249 

8 

70 


4,246 

8 

58 


8 


64 

8 

64 


64 

8 

44 




4,185 


4,182 


8 


Japan 






Otner countries . . 
Unknown r T r T - - - 


12 


10 


16 


14 


2 






















The province. 


202,444 


103,726 


98,718 


117,917 


62,174 


66,743 


84,627 


41,662 


42,976 



PROVINCE OF PINAR DEL RIO. 



Cuba .• 


160,460 

26 

9 

20 

1 

28 

118 

8 

10,264 

6 

6 


80,727 
17 

6 
15 

1 
11 
91 

2 
9,098 

4 

8 


79,723 
8 
4 
6 


114,907 

21 

6 

20 

1 

24 

112 

2 

10,247 

6 

6 


58,578 

14 

2 

16 

1 

7 

86 

1 

9,092 

8 


66,834 
7 
8 
6 


45,643 
4 


22,154 
8 
3 


23,889 

1 


Porto Rico 

West Indies 

South America . . . 


Central America . 








Mexico 


17 

27 

1 

1,166 

2 


17 
26 

1 
1,156 

2 


4 

6 

1 
7 


4 
5 

1 
6 




United States 

Canada ........... 


1 


^>ain 


1 


England 




Ireland 








Scotland 








Germany 


8 
81 
29 

2 


3 
72 
26 

2 




3 
80 
29 

2 


8 

71 

26 

2 










France 


9 
8 


9 
8 


1 


1 




Italy 




Poctugal 









222 



REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Tablb XI. — BirihpUice, seXy and race — Continued. 
PROVINCE OF PINAB DEL BlO^-Contlnued. 



Countriee of 


1 

Both classes. 


White. 


Colored. 


birth. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. Female. 


ScandinAvia 


2 

120 

1,819 


2 

81 

945 




2 

120 

17 


2 
81 
17 










Other Europe 

Africa...... 


39 
374 


89 








1,802 


928 


874 


Australia 






China 


576 


573 


8 


12 


'12 




564 


561 


3 


Japan 






Other countries... 
Unknown . . . ^ . ^ . . 


14 


10 


4 


11 


8 


8 


8 


2 


1 






















The pzovince. 


173,064 


91,688 


81,876 


125,625 


68,020 


57,605 


47,439 


28,668 


23,771 



PROVINCE OF PUERTO PRINCTPE. 



Cuba 

Porto Rico 

West Indies 

South America... 
Central America. . 


82,982 

24 

117 

28 

7 

17 

248 

2 

8,695 

25 

2 

80 


40,870 

16 

75 

14 

8 

9 

204 

'**8,*i76* 
16 
2 
4 
5 
24 
4 
2 


42,612 
8 

42 
9 
4 
8 

44 

2 

419 

9 


66,349 

20 

65 

21 

7 

16 

237 

2 

3,692 

17 

2 

4 

7 

29 

4 

1 


82,575 

12 

85 

12 

8 

9 

194 

"*'8,*i73* 
10 
2 
4 
5 
23 
4 
1 


88,774 
8 

30 
9 
4 
7 

43 

2 

419 

7 


16,683 

4 

52 

2 


7,795 

4 

40 

2 


8,838 
12 


Mexico 


1 
11 




1 


United States 


10 


1 


Spain 


3 

8 


3 
6 




S&iffland 


2 


Ireland 




Scotland 












Gftrtnuny .,...,.,, 


2 
6 


2 
6 






• 


France 


1 


1 




Italy 






2 




8 


1 


2 


ScandinaYla 






Other Europe 

Africa 


674 


7 
511 




6 

1 


6 
1 




1 
673 


1 
510 




168 




163 


Australia 






China 


451 
10 


449 
1 

7 


2 








451 

1 
8 


449 

1 
2 


2 


Japan 










Otner countries. . . 
Unknown 


8 


7 


5 


2 


1 






















The province. 


88,234 


44,899 


48,885 


70,887 


86,074 


84,818 


17,847 


8,825 


9,022 



PROVINCE OF SANTA CLARA. 



Cuba 

Porto Rico 

West Indies 

South America... 
Central America. . 

Mexico 

United States 

Canada 

Spain 

I&ffland 

Ireland 

Scotland 

Germany 

France 

Italy 

Portunil 

Rcanainavia 

Other Europe 

Africa 

Australia 

China 

Japan 

OtnOT countries .. 
Unlmown 



The proylnce. 



856,536 



317,248 


155,876 


107 


60 


58 


84 


65 


89 


4 


8 


96 


58 


529 


880 


9 


6 


28,898 


^•^ 


52 


86 


3 


1 


5 


8 


25 


19 


148 


U7 


58 


60 


25 


21 


9 


8 


172 


103 


4,178 


2,607 


8 


2 


5,263 


5,288 


1 


1 


88 


76 



189,057 



161,867 

47 

19 

26 

1 

45 

149 

3 

4,099 

16 

2 

2 

6 

81 

8 

4 

1 

69 

1,571 



12 



167,479 



214,945 

82 

26 

58 

4 

88 

512 

5 

28,866 

48 

8 

5 

25 

148 

58 

20 

8 

170 

19 

1 

111 



71 



244,768 



106,771 

49 

15 

86 

8 

46 

871 

8 

24,275 

82 

1 

8 

19 

117 

60 

19 

8 

102 

14 

1 

111 



61 



182,107 



108,174 

88 

11 

22 

1 

37 

141 

2 

4,091 

16 

2 

2 

6 

81 

8 

1 



68 
5 



10 



112,661 



102,296 
25 
27 

7 



15 
17 

4 
82 

4 



5 
1 
2 

4,169 
2 

6,162 

1 

17 



111,768 



49,105 

11 

19 

3 



7 
9 
3 
24 
4 



1 
2,596 

1 
5,152 

1 
16 



56,960 



63,193 

14 

8 

4 



8 
8 
1 

8 



8 
1 
1 

1,666 
1 



54,818 



BIBTHPI«AOB, SEZ, AND BAOE. 



223 



Tabls XI. — Birthplace, aex, and race — Continued. 
PEOVINCK OF SANTUGa 



Ooimtries of 


Both claaaes. 


White. 


Colored. 


birth. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


CQbft .....•• 


811,941 

266 

1,228 

127 

58 

49 

882 

4 

11,879 

197 

5 

6 

42 

245 

42 

26 

18 

52 

590 


150,766 

151 

684 

78 

29 

27 

682 

4 

10,071 

141 

5 

5 

88 

190 

88 

17 

14 

88 

815 


161,186 

116 

544 

54 

29 

22 

160 


• 

167,797 

159 

886 

104 

49 

42 

640 

2 

11,858 

102 

5 

6 

42 

228 

41 

21 

18 

46 

1 


82,292 
96 

160 
68 
24 
28 

526 

10,068 

82 

5 

5 

88 

182 

87 

15 

11 

84 


85,505 
68 

176 
ti 
25 
19 

115 


144,144 

107 

892 

28 

9 

7 

192 

2 

26 

96 


68,464 

66 

624 

10 

6 

4 

157 

2 

18 

59 


75,680 

62 

368 

18 

4 

8 

86 


Porto Rioo 

West Indies 

Soutii America... 
Central America. . 

Mexico 

United States 

Oanft/la...,,. , ,. . . 


Spain 


1,806 
56 


1,300 
20 


8 


|frifr1||TMl^.,.. 


86 


Ireland 




Scotland 












<^rniaTiy ...-.,.. 


4 

65 

4 

8 

4 

14 

276 


4 

46 
4 

6 

2 

11 

1 








France 


17 
1 
4 
5 
7 
689 


8 
1 

i 

4 

• 815 


9 


Italv 




Pornigal 


2 


ScanSnavia 

Other Europe .... 
Africa 


2 

8 

274 


AuBtralia 






China 


476 

1 

188 


478 

1 

98 


8 


10 


10 




466 

1 
18 


468 

1 

12 


s 


Japan 






Otner countries .. 
Unknown 


40 


115 


81 


84 


6 






















The proTlnce. 


827,716 


168,846 


168,870 


181,110 


93,788 


87,872 


146,605 


70,107 


76,496 



CITY OF CIENFUEG08. 



Cuba 


26,028 

28 

88 

18 

2 

19 

120 

1 

3,166 

13 

1 

2 

8 

89 

12 

6 

4 

41 

148 


11,274 
10 
19 
10 

1 

8 
76 

1 
2,696 

9 


14,764 

18 

14 

8 

11 
44 


15,736 

17 

17 

16 

2 

17 

116 

1 

3,158 

10 

1 

2 

8 

89 

12 

5 

4 

40 
4 


7,046 

9 

10 

10 

1 

8 

75 

1 

2,696 

6 


8,690 
8 
7 
5 

.1 
9 

40 


10,293 

6 

16 

8 


4,229 
9 


6,064 


Porto Rico 

West Indies 

South America . . . 


6 
7 
8 


Central America. . 






Mexico 


2 
5 




2 


United States 

Canada r , t 


1 


4 


Spain r . - r , - - 


460 

8 

21 

2 

1 


468 
4 

1 
1 
8 
21 
2 


2 
8 




2 


l^irlnnd . , . , r , - t , - 


3 




Ireland 




Scotland 


1 
6 

18 

10 

5 

4 

19 
62 


1 

5 

18 

10 

5 

4 

19 

3 








Qennany 








Franco - - 








Italy 








PorfoKal; 


1 




1 


Scandinayia 








Other Europe — 
Africa 


22 
86 


21 

1 


1 
144 




1 


59 


85 


Australia • 




PhlnA - 


842 


842 




1 


1 




341 


SU 




Japan ............ 




• 




Other oountdea.. 
Unknown ,r ,..,,, , 


28 


20 


8 


22 


19 


8 


1 


1 
























Thedty 


80,088 


14,689 


15,449 


19,220 


9,946 


9,276 


10,818 


4,644 


6,174 



CITY OF HABANA. 



Cuba 

Porto Rico 

West Indies 

South America.. 
Central America. 

Mexico 

United States 

Canada 

Spain 

rland 

land 

Scotland 

Germany 

Fiance 

Italy 

Portugal 

9cftnamftyla .... 




178,670 


78,646 


609 


198 


266 


109 


866 


174 


18 


U 


707 


242 


8,868 


2»i5 


2D 


18 


46,866 


87,668 


238 


140 


16 


6 


21 


16 


166 


187 


669 


806 


278 


200 


29 


24 


81 


19 



100,024 

816 

146 

192 

7 

466 

1,176 

7 

9,187 

96 

10 

5 

29 

268 

78 

6 

12 



115,632 

866 

202 

860 

16 

640 

2,929 

17 

46,810 

194 

16 

21 

166 

665 

277 

26 

28 



62,910 

152 

80 

169 

9 

220 

1,900 

10 

87,646 

114 

6 

16 

187 

808 

200 

22 

19 



62,592 

218 

122 

181 

6 

420 

1,029 

7 

9,166 

80 

10 

6 

29 

262 

77 

4 

9 



68,188 

144 

63 

16 

3 

67 

489 

3 

46 

89 



4 
1 
8 
3 



25,706 

41 

29 

6 

2 

22 

298 

8 

28 

26 



3 

2 



37,432 

103 

24 

11 

1 

46 
146 



22 
18 



1 
1 
1 
8 



224 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XI. — Birthplace^ sex, and race — Continued. 
CITY OF HABANA— Continued. 



Countries .of 


Both classes. 


White. 


Colored. 


birth. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Other Europe 

Africa 


142 
843 

4 
2,761 

2 
129 


91 

269 

8 

2,720 

88 


61 
664 

1 
81 

1 
41 


140 

7 

3 

17 

1 

113 


90 
4 
2 

17 


60 
8 

1 

• 


2 

836 

1 

2.734 

1 
16 


1 

255 

1 

2,708 

12 


1 
5H1 


Australia 




China 


31 


Japan 


1 
87 




Otner countries . . 
Unknown 


76 


4 






















The city 


285,981 


123,258 


112,723 


168,433 


94,180 


74,808 


67,548 


29,128 


38,420 



CITY OF MATANZA8. 



Cuba 


82,107 

26 

16 

7 

2 

82 

418 

8 

3,061 

21 

1 

3 

9 

89 

11 

2 


13,768 

11 

4 

8 


18,839 

16 

11 

4 

2 

27 

109 

2 

758 

7 


20,981 

19 

15 

7 

2 

29 

395 

8 

3,068 

21 

1 

3 

9 

89 

11 

1 


9,219 
9 
4 
3 


11,712 

10 

11 

4 

2 

24 

100 

2 

766 

7 


11,176 
7 


4,549 
2 


6,627 
5 


Porto Rico 

West Indies....... 


South America . . . 








Central America. . 








Mexico 


5 

309 

1 

2,803 

14 
1 
2 
5 

23 
7 
1 


6 

295 

1 

2,803 

14 
1 
2 
5 

28 
7 
1 


3 
23 




3 


United States? 

Canada 


14 


9 


Spain 


3 




8 


fimrland 






Ireland 


• 






Scotland 


1 
4 

16 
4 

1 


1 

4 

16 

4 









Germany 








France 








Italy 








Portwral 


1 




1 


Scandinavia. ..... 








Other Europe 

Africa 


17 
244 


13 
105 


4 

139 


17 


IS 


4 








244 


106 


139 


Australia 










China, r T T 


842 
8 

11 


342 
8 
6 










342 


342 




Japan 




3 

11 


3 
6 






Otner countries . . 


5 


5 








Unkiiown _ - - 
























' 


The city 


86,874 


16,926 


19,448 


24,675 


11,914 


12,661 

m 


11,799 


5,012 


6,787 



CITY OF PUERTO PRINCIPE. 



Cuba 


23,641 
12 
44 
9 
5 
10 
51 


9,686 

10 

21 

6 

3 

6 

SO 


18,905 
2 

28 
4 
2 
5 

21 


16,605 
10 
88 
9 
5 
10 
60 


6,764 
8 

20 
5 
3 
6 

80 


9,741 
2 

18 
4 
2 
6 

20 


7,086 
2 

6 


2,872 
2 

1 


4,164 
5 


Porto Rico 

West Indies 

South America . . . 


Central America . . 








Mexico 








United States 


1 




1 


Canada 







Spain.. Tr«.,.T 


1,137 
18 


997 
6 


140 
7 


1,115 
12 


995 
6 


140 
6 


2 

1 


2 




fj^hiriand , . . r . - - , 


1 


IreTand r . , . , 






Scotland 




















Oermanv 


8 
6 
2 
2 


8 
5 
2 
2 




8 
5 
2 

1 


8 
4 

2 
1 










France 


1 


1 


1 


1 




Italy 




Poriuiral r , , r 






1 


1 




ScanninRTiA 








Other Europe 




















Africa 


190 


112 


78 


1 


1 




189 


111 


78 


Austealia 






China rr r 


75 


74 


1 








76 


74 


1 


Janan •- 










Otner countries . -. 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 








Unknown - 




























The city 


25,102 


10,912 


14,190 


17,788 


7,848 


9,940 


7,814 


8,064 


4,260 



OITIZ£KSHIP. 



225 



Tablk XI. — Birthplace J sex, and race — Continued. 

CITY OF SANTIAGO. 



Countries of 


Both classes. 


White. 


Colored. 


birth. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Cuba 


38,607 

125 

806 

65 

38 

28 

366 

1 

2,554 

118 

3 

3 

23 

52 

12 

7 

8 

24 

71 


16,502 

67 

400 

27 

18 

16 

308 

1 

2,225 

74 

3 

3 

21 

31 

9 

2 

4 

22 
23 


22,105 
58 
396 
28 
20 
13 
58 


15,258 

74 

204 

40 

35 

27 

276 

1 

2,549 

48 

3 

3 

23 

42 

12 

4 

4 

20 
1 


6,702 

89 

92 

21 

17 

14 

226 

1 

2,220 

33 

3 

3 

21 

28 

9 

1 

2 

19 


8,556 
35 
112 
19 
18 
13 
50 


23,349 

51 

601 

15 

3 

1 

90 


9,800 

28 

317 

6 

1 

1 

82 


18,549 

23 

284 

9 

2 


Porto Rico 

West Indies 

South America... 
Central America. . 
Mexico 


United States 

Canada 


8 


Spain 


329 
44 


829 
15 


5 
70 


5-1 


KngUind , 



41 


29 


Ireland 


Scotland 












Germany 


2 
21 
3 
5 
4 
2 
48 


2 
14 
3 
3 
2 
1 
1 








France 


10 


3 


7 


Italy 


Portugal 


3 

4 

4 

70 


1 

2 

8 

23 


2 
2 

1 
47 


Scan^navla 

Other Europe 

Africa 


Australia 




China 


106 


106 










106 


106 




Japan 












Otner countries. . . 
Unknown 


84 


52 


32 


74 


46 


28 


10 


6 


4 






















The city.... 


43,090 


19,922 


23.168 


18.698 


9,497 


9,201 


24,392 


10,425 


13,967 



Table Xlh—CilizenBhip. 
[Figures in italic are included in those for the province or district.] 



Province. 



Total. 



Habana 

City qf Habana 

Matanzas 

Pinardel Rio 

Puerto Principe... 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Cuba 



424,804 
t35,981 
202,444 
173,064 
88,234 
856,586 
327,716 



1,572,797 



Cuban. 



309,533 
161,563 
162,901 
147,974 
77,078 
298,581 
800,305 



1,296,367 



Spanish. 



8,987 
7,713 
2,483 
1,683 
1,543 
3,464 
2,368 



20,478 



In sus- 
pense. 



89,255 
eUtlte 
13,282 
20,308 
7,355 
26,920 
18,691 



175,811 



Other 
citizen- 
ship. 



16,906 

lg,6i5 

23,464 

8,072 

2,225 

27,541 

6,315 



79,525 



Un- 
known. 



171 
U 

814 
27 
88 
80 
86 



616 



PROVINCE OF HABANA. 



District. 



Afoacate 

Alquizar 

Bainoa 

Batabano 

Bauta 

Bejucal 

Cano 

Caaiguas....^ 

Catalina 

Ceibadel Agua 

Gnanabacoa 

City qf €hianabaeoa 

Gnara 

GMnes 

Guira de Melena 

Habana 

City of Habana 

Islade PmoB 

Jaruco 

Madruga 

Managua 

Iffa ffaiifl^ 

24662 15 



Total. 


Cuban. 


8,168 


2,710 


8,746 


7,489 


1,725 


1,654 


6,628 


« 4,930 


5,142 


4,266 


6,756 


4,913 


4,210 


8,482 


1,004 


951 


2,718 


2,409 


2,197 


1,872 


20,060 


17,064 


13,966 


11,797 


1,835 


1,666 


11,894 


9,697 


11,548 


9,566 


242,055 


166,102 


tS6,981 


161,653 


8,199 


2,818 


4,076 


8,688 


8,744 


8,204 


2,887 


2,624 


8,598 


6,454 



Spanish. 


In sus- 
pense. 


32 


856 


13 


1,136 




149 
1,324 


114 


9 


780 


159 


611 


1 


670 


8 


36 


30 


260 




302 
2,371 


46 


36 


1,598 


16 


147 


98 


1,364 


120 


1,674 


7,819 


65,389 


7,713 


6A,lt6 


32 


834 


4 


460 


80 


448 


6 


247 


36 


1,409 



Other 
citizen- 
ship. 



64 

107 

22 

154 

87 

70 

57 

9 

19 

22 

695 

530 

14 

289 

186 

12,696 

It, 61,5 

16 

29 

62 

10 

&93 



Un- 
known. 



1 
1 



1 
1 
8 



1 
4 

U 
2 
1 
3 
60 
U 



226 



EEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OK CUBA, 1899. 



Table XII. — Cituenship—ContiDued. 

[FJigureB in italic are Included in thoee for the province or district] 

PROVINCE OP HABANA— Continued. 



District. 



Helena del Bur 

Nueva Fas 

Fipian 

Quiyican 

R€«la 

Salud 

San Antonio de las Vegas . 
San Antonio de los Banos. 

San Felipe 

San Jose de las Lajas 

San Nicolas 

Santa Cruz del Norte 

Santa Maria del Rosaiio. . 

Santiago de las Vegas 

Tapaste 

VeiedaNueva 



The province 424.804 



Total. 



8,207 
7,761 
1,101 
2.428 

11,863 
8,298 
1,855 

12,681 
1,915 
4,154 
4,568 
2.965 
2,780 

10,276 
1,551 
2,416 



Cuban. 



2,885 
6,018 
1,020 
2,117 
8,065 
2,896 
1,666 
10,568 
1,591 
8,670 
4,069 
2,669 
2,450 
7,992 
1,406 
2,211 



809,588 



Spanish. 



25 
68 



14 

67 

8 

8 

96 



26 
19 



8 

56 

4 



8,937 



Insus- 
peose. 



216 

598 

75 

274 

2,645 
890 
171 

1,778 
280 
885 
864 
216 
190 

1,945 
120 
196 



89,255 



Other 

oitiien- 

ship. 



80 

190 

6 

18 

595 

4 

15 
187 

44 
128 
116 

80 

82 
192 

19 
9 



16.908 



Un- 
known. 



1 
7 



1 
2 



91 



171 



PROVINCE OF MATANZA8. 



Alacianes 

Bolondron 

Cabesaa 

Oanasl 

Cardenas 

CUyqf OardenoB. . . 

Carlos Itojas 

Colon 

Cuevitas 

Quamacaro 

JagQey Grande 

Jovellanos 

Macagua 

Macunges 

MarU 

Matanzas 

CUyqfMatamxtu,., 

Maximo Gomez 

Mendez Capote 

Falmillas 

Perico 

Boque 

Sabanilla 

San Jose de los Ramos 

Santa Ana 

Union de Reyes 

The province ... 



8,110 


6,847 


48 


417 


9,179 


7,272 


67 


454 


6,184 


4.408 


12 


166 


1,993 


1,718 


1 


48 


24,861 


19.212 


789 


2,457 


fl,9JiO 


10,700 


7St 


g,m 


8,174 


2,580 


25 


166 


12,195 


9,893 


195 


792 


5,807 


4,728 


41 


286 


6,000 


4,817 


21 


828 


5,858 


4,899 


47 


807 


7,529 


6,819 


168 


877 


5,042 


4.804 


26 


842 


10,405 


8.540 


88 


627 


8,905 


7,880 


22 


441 


45,282 


85,046 


497 


4,155 


S6,S7U 


t8,tOU 


190 


3,8S0 


4,046 


8,495 


29 


161 


2,158 


1,809 


11 


54 


7,647 


6,205 


88 


487 


4,449 


8,584 


9 


274 


4,464 


8,708 


11 


185 


5,205 


4,041 


12 


206 


6,765 


5,460 


410 


821 


2,965 


2,841 


2 


124 


5,226 


4,805 


29 


822 


202,444 


162,901 


2,483 


18,282 



808 

1,886 

608 

281 

2,451 

t,090 

418 

1,815 

762 

888 

600 

670 

869 

1,804 

1,061 

5.277 

S,6U 

861 

284 

967 

582 

615 

946 

578 

498 

670 



28,464 



2 
1 



1 

1 

1 

807 

306 



314 



PROVINCE OF PINAR DEL RIO. 



Artemisa 

Bahia Honda 

Cabanas 

Candelaria 

Consolacion del Norte .. 

Conaolacion del Bur 

Guanajay 

Gnane 

Guayabal 

Julian Diaz 

LosPalacios 

Mantua 

Marlel 

PlnardelRio 

OUtt of Pinar dd Rio 

San Crutobal 

San Diego de los Bafioe . 
San Diego de Nufiez .... 

San Juan y Martinez 

San Luis 

Vinales 

The province 



9,817 
2,117 
8,853 
4,866 
7,399 

16,665 
8,796 

14,760 
2,710 
1,871 
2,456 
8,866 
8,631 

88,343 
8,880 
4,263 
2,419 
1,137 

14,787 
7,60K 

17,700 



178,064 



8,846 
1,958 
8,893 
4,392 
6,860 

14,704 
7,268 

12,478 
2,221 
1.758 
2,261 
7,826 
8,211 

81,807 

6,8U 

8,947 

2,282 

998 

12,065 
6,349 

14,885 



17 



4 

87 
191 
86 
97 
43 
2 



18 

81 

70 

541 

lit 

57 

20 

8 

173 

129 

214 



147,974 I 1,683 



805 

110 

196 

407 

756 

1,489 

1,195 

2,148 

453 

98 

180 

992 

206 

5,084 

224 

189 

76 

2,882 

1,038 

2,485 



20,806 



147 

47 

260 

80 

89 

485 

234 

91 

84 

20 

47 

17 

148 

956 

U8 

85 

27 

60 

192 

92 

116 



3.072 I 

L 



2 

7 



8 

1 
2 



1 
5 
5 



1 
5 



27 



OITIZENBHrP. 



227 



Tabl£ XII. — OUizenahip—Con^nued. 

[Figures in italic are Included In those for the province or dijrtrict] 
PEOVINCE OP PXJEBTO PEINCIPK. 



District 



Giegode ATila 

Moron 

Nuevitas 

Puerto Principe 

CUyqf Puerto Principe 
Santa Gnu del Sur 

The province 



Total. 



9,801 

9,6a0 

10,866 

53,140 

U,109 

5,308 



88,234 



Cuban. 



8,720 

8,963 

7,971 

46,766 

4,668 



77,078 



Spanish. 



93 
277 
295 
799 
its 

79 



1,543 



In sus- 
pense. 



885 

856 

1,480 

4,121 

504 



7,855 



Other 
citizen- 
ship. 



PEOVINCE OF SANTA CLARA. 



Abreus 

Gaiharien 

Calabasar 

Gamajuani 

Cartagena 

CeJ a de Pablo 

Cienfuegos 

(Htv qf OienfuegoB 

Cifuentes 

Cruces 

Esperansa 

Palmiia 

Placetas 

Quemado de Guines 

RanchoVeloK 

Ran chuelo 

Rodas 

Sagua la Grande 

City qfSaguala Orande 
San Antonio de las Vueltas 

Sancti Spiritus 

' CUyo/8a7icti8piriiua.. 

San Diego del Valie 

San Fernando 

San Juan de las Yeras 

San Juan de los Remedlos . 
Santa Clara 

cup qf Santa (Xara 

Santa IsaDel de las Lajas . . 

Santo Domingo 

Trinidad 

Oftu qf Trinidad 

Yaguajay 

The province 



8,995 

8,660 

13,419 

14,495 

6,244 

6,954 

59,128 

50,058 

8,825 

7,953 

7,811 

6,527 

11,961 

8,890 

7,532 

5,059 

9,562 

21,842 

It, 7X8 

12,832 

25,709 

1£,696 

5,369 

6,445 

5,600 

14,833 

28,437 

1S,76S 

9,603 

10,372 

24,271 

ll,ltO 

9,718 



856,586 



8,282 

6,460 

11,827 

8,820 

5,523 

6,255 

47,241 

f5,50A 

8,428 

6,598 

7,149 

5,491 

9,126 

7,724 

6,889 

4.585 

7,981 

17,161 

10,517 

9,544 

24,085 

n,6Al 

4,887 

5,501 

5,177 

12,000 

24,884 

11,960 

8,659 

9,339 

22,732 

10,U13 

7,388 



208,581 



8,464 



92 


849 


81 


1,517 


121 


912 


139 


1,107 


16 


522 


54 


278 


928 


6,616 


89S 


5,058 


72 


174 


17 


610 


158 


268 


87 


564 


162 


887 


42 


406 


81 


480 


16 


859 


22 


1,027 


427 


2,072 


5» 


i,m 


26 


668 


162 


1,256 


liO 


79g 


18 


187 


28 


435 


89 


218 


17 


1,240 


831 


1,482 


301 


1,000 


15 


449 


195 


390 


86 


1,006 


89 


i68 


82 


1,491 



26,920 



100 
88 

600 
1,481 

686 
61 



2,225 



Un- 
known. 



822 

642 

1,058 

4,429 

188 

867 

4,826 

1,896 

155 

728 

285 

885 

1,786 

718 

682 

99 

632 

1,681 

86U 

2,693 

249 

J77 

277 

481 

166 

1,576 

1,740 

60g 

480 

448 

446 

169 

767 



27,541 



8 
1 



88 
1 
1 



88 



17 

17 

1 



1 
f 

1 
7 
6 



1 
1 



80 



PROVINCE OF SANTIAGO. 



Alto Bongo 

Baracoa 

Bayamo 

Campechnela 

Caney 

Cobre 

Crlsto 

Gibam 

Guantanamo 

Holguin 

Jlguani 

Mancanlllo 

City qf Manxanido 

Mayari. 

Nlquero 

Faima Soriano 

Puerto Padre 

Sagua de Tanamo 

San Luis 

Santiago de Cuba 

City qf Santiago de Cuba 

Tbeprovlnoe 



12,770 


12,282 


14 


832 


171 


21,944 


20,643 


38 


1,070 


192 


21,198 


20,652 


12 


474 


55 


7,369 


6,901 


8 


394 


71 


9,126 


6,9T2 


204 


1,573 


875 


10,707 


10,195 


27 


262 


228 


1,194 


1,013 




141 


40 


81,594 


27,818 


"242* 


3,104 


417 


28,068 


24,642 


431 


1,954 


1,061 


84,506 


82,309 


114 


1,882 


201 


10,495 


10,383 


17 


82 


18 


82,288 


29,742 


96 


2,006 


441 


lU^tiSU 


It, WO 


75 


1,636 


363 


8,604 


8,218 


88 


156 


41 


2,718 


2,582 




182 


4 


12,805 


12,049 


81 


166 


57 


19,964 


19,11B 


179 


651 


185 


5,796 


5,499 


8 


280 


9 


11,681 


10,728 


80 


768 


154 


45,478 


88,609 


882 


8,844 


2,685 


h5,090 


56,t66 


8St 


5,555 


t,66t 


921,71b 


800,805 


2,868 


18,691 


6,816 



1 

1 



18 
6 



1 

i 



2 
1 



1 
8 
8 



228 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XIII. — Males 21 years of age and over, by cUieenshipf literacy , and educaiioti. 

CUBA. 



Total voting age 



Caban citizens. 



Can neither read nor write. 
Can read but can not write 

Canreadand write 

With superior education .. . 



Spanish citizens. 



Can neither read nor write. 
Can read but can not write 

Can read and write 

With superior education . . . 



Citizens in suspense. 



Can neither read nor write 
Can read but can not write. 

Can read and write 

With superior education . . . 



Foreign and unknown citizens. 

Can neither read nor write 
Can read but can not write 

Can read and write 

With superior education . . . 



All 
clasBes. 



417,998 



290,905 



172,627 
4,132 

105,285 
8,861 



9,600 



1,149 
106 

7,929 
814 



76,669 



16,945 

858 

66,704 

2,162 



40,919 



26,641 

298 

11,914 

2,071 



Whites 

bom in 

Cuba. 



187,818 



184,471 



94,801 
2,069 

79,46S£ 
8,629 



144 



18 

2 

105 

19 



1,296 



812 

18 

861 

105 



1,902 



191 

8 

1,162 

561 



Whites 
bom in 
Spain. 



96,068 



142 



84 



99 
9 



9,841 



1,126 
106 

7,816 
293 



75,249 



16,590 

887 

65,771 

2,051 



11,866 



7,434 

153 

8,682 

87 



Whites 
bom in 
other 
coun- 
tries. 



PROVINCE OF HABANA. 



CITY OF HABANA. 



6,794 



78 



IS 
1 

89 
25 



6 



8 
2 



87 



7 
1 

24 
5 



6,673 



872 

84 

4,877 

1,890 



Colored. 



127,296 



106,214 



78,279 

2,042 

25,695 

198 



9 



4 
'6 



87 



86 
2 

48 
1 



20,988 



18,144 

98 

2,706 

43 



Total voting age 


127,047 


62,621 


43,278 


8,499 


27,654 




Cuban citizens 


78,989 


51,158 


86 


45 


22,705 




Can neither read nor write 


80,845 
1,628 

87,669 
4,897 


16,896 

688 

29,255 

4,812 


4 


2 

1 
28 
14 


13,441 
839 


Can read but can not write 


fiwi r^^ and write . , 


80 
2 


8,866 
69 


With superior education 






fl^ninh citizens . . 


4.718 


49 


4,661 


6 


8 






Can neither read nor write 


880 

52 

4,1^ 

149 


4 


874 

62 

4,095 

140 


1 


1 


Can read but can not write 




Can read and write 


37 

8 


8 

1 


2 


With superior education 








Citizens in suspense 


89,207 


678 


88,471 


21 


87 






Can neither read nor write 


6,442 

491 

81,174 

1,100 


129 

9 

469 

71 


6,800 

479 

30,669 

1,028 


2 
1 

18 
5 


11 


Can read but can not write 


2 


Can read and write 


t3 


With suDorior education 


1 






PVimign and nnkirown cf tilWPilr 


9,188 


741 


105 


8,428 


4,909 




Can neither read nor write 


4,188 

57 

4,120 

818 


11 

1 

607 

222 


8 


248 

15 

2,588 

677 


8,921 
41 


Can read but can not write 


Can read and write 


88 
9 


987 


With superior education 


10 







Total voting ago. 
Cuban citizens... 



Can neither read nor write. 
Can read but can not write. 

Can read and write 

With superior education 



75,805 



85,460 



8,804 

975 

22,790 

8,891 



28,790 



22,729 



2,665 

845 

16,507 

8,312 



82,779 



23 



20 
2 



2,787 



87 



28 
12 



=1= 



15,949 



12,671 



6,736 

630 

6.240 

65 



omzENsmp. 



229 



Table XIII. — Malm SI years of age and over, by cUkenskip, literacy^ etc, — Continued. 

CITY OF HABANA— Continued. 



Spanish citicens. 



Can neither read nor write. 
Can read but can not write. 

Can read and write 

With superior education 



Citiasena in suapenfle 



Can neither read nor write. 
Can read but can not write. 

Can read and write 

With superior education. . . . 



Foreign and unluiown dticens. 

Chin neither read nor write. 
Can read but can not write. 

Can read and write 

With superior education 



All 
classes. 



4,186 



327 

62 

8,623 

184 



29,079 



8,216 



24,681 
894 



6,680 



2,023 

48 

8,268 

706 



Whites 

bom in 

Cuba. 



39 



80 
8 



460 



87 

6 

847 

61 



672 



8 

1 

386 

177 



Whites 

bom in 

Spain. 



4,069 



824 

62 

8,688 

126 



28,689 



3,170 

381 

24,211 

827 



78 



6 



64 
8 



Whites 
bom In 
other 
coun- 
tries. 



8 
1 



16 



1 

1 
8 
6 



2,730 



139 

U 

2,067 

618 



Colored. 



8 



1 
'2 



26 



7 

2 

16 

1 



8,260 



2,470 

86 

736 

8 



MATANZAS. 



Total voting age 


66,696 


21,320 


10,217 


666 


28,396 






C^ihan dtlepT^n, . ,,-r. , , , . - ^ t - 


37,644 


20,843 


17 


11 


16,673 






Can neither read nor write 


28,968 

648 

11,933 

1,086 


10,062 

281 

9,482 

1,068 


2 


4 


18,916 


Can read but can not write 


282 


Can read and write 


10 
6 


4 
3 


2,487 


With Bunerior education 


9 






RpRTiiah citizens 


1,083 


16 


1,016 




1 








Can neither read nor wT*t<» .... .... 


112 
16 

866 
40 




112 
16 

863 
36 






Can read but can not write 


1 

11 

4 






Can read and write 




1 


With suDerior education 












Cftis^ena ij\ fampense . . 


6,798 


91 


6,706 


1 


1 






Can neither tmiA pa^ w^te. - , , . t r , 


749 

62 

4,732 

266 


6 

2 

77 

6 


741 

60 

4,666 

249 


1 


1 


Can twmI but can not write 




Can read and write r . . . ., r . r .... 






With superior education 












Forelim and unknown citizen^. . , -, r r ,.,,.. , 


11,220 


370 


8,479 


653 


6,718 






Can neither read nor write 


8,677 

77 

2,196 

271 


88 

2 

201 

79 


2,279 
66 

1,106 
36 


132 

1 

365 

166 


6,178 


Can rpad but can not writp 


18 


Can read and write 


621 


With superior education r . , . , . . 


1 







PINAR DEL RIO. 



Total voting age. 
Cuban citizens . . 



Can neither read nor write. 
Can read but can not write 

Can read and write 

With superior education . . . 



Spanish citizens 



Can neither read nor write. 
Can read but can not write 

Can read and write 

With superior education . . . 



43,760 



88,479 



26,424 

284 

7,416 

406 



662 



64 

6 

698 

10 



24,324 



24,104 



17,118 

163 

6,422 

401 



16 



3 



18 



8,242 



6 



1 
"6 



646 



61 

5 

680 

10 



806 



10,876 


9,369 


8,806 

71 

968 

6 



230 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Tablb XIII. — Males 91 yean of age and over^ by citizenship, literacy, etc. — Contiiiued. 

FINAR DEL RlO-^Conttxined. 



CltizenB in stuipense 



Can neither read nor write. 
Can read but can not write 

Can read and vrrlte 

With superior education 



Foreign and unknown ciUxena. 

Can neither read nor write 
Can read but can not write. 

Can read and write 

With superior education . . . 



All 
clajHses. 



7,765 



8,140 

56 

4,439 

120 



1,854 



1,561 

2 

260 

81 



Whites 

bom in 

Cuba. 



171 



91 
1 

76 
8 



83 



22 
7 



Whites 
bom in 
Spain. 



7,677 



8,048 

65 

4,867 

117 



13 



U 
1 



Whites 
bom in 
other 
coun- 
tries. 



807 



Colored. 



118 

1 

170 

28 



1,601 



1,443 

1 

57 



PUERTO PRINCIPE. 



Total voti»iflr wre , , ... 


20,181 


12,518 


2,962 


261 


4,420 






CnhfLTi nltic^nn. , 


15,759 


12,861 


4 


2 


8.392 






Can neither read nor write 


7,810 
818 

6,972 
660 


6,087 
214 

5,475 
685 


1 




1,772 


Can read but can not wrlt^ 




104 


Can read and write 


2 
1 


1 

1 


1,494 


With superior education 


22 






Bpanisb cUizenH , , . , . , 


446 


25 


420 




1 








Can neither read nor wHte 


224 
10 

189 
23 


9 


214 
10 

176 
20 




1 


Can read but can not write 






Can read and write 


13 
8 






With superior education 












CHt1«enii In ifliifpenfle 


2,605 


56 


2,547 




2 








Can neither read nor vrrite 


783 

43 

1,607 

172 


10 


778 

43 

1,565 

166 






Can read but can not write 






Can read and write 


40 
6 




2 


With suDerior education 












FoT^tfrn Rnij iinkifown cltlzen«» 


1,871 


76 


11 


269 


1,025 






Can neither read nor write 


904 
12 

281 
174 


5 
1 

24 
46 


8 


14 

1 

119 

125 


877 


Can read but can not write 


10 


Can read and write 


1 
2 


187 


With superior education 


1 







SANTA CLARA. 



Total voting age 


100.118 


45,584 


21,968 


899 


81,727 






Cuban citliens r , r ^ , 


71,462 


44,976 


66 


U 


26,409 






Can neither read nor write 


46,064 

915 

28,475 

968 


25,118 
520 

18,374 
964 


22 


6 


20,938 
896 


Can read but can not write 


Can read and write 


48 

1 


4 

1 


5,054 


With superior education 


22 






flpi^Tiiah cltisens , . . r . . . - . . 


1,481 


82 


1.447 


1 


1 






Can neither read nor write 


88 

17 

1,880 

46 


2 

1 

25 

4 


86 

16 

1,804 

41 






Can read but can not w^te. , , r , . , 






Can read and write 




1 


With superior education • 


1 








Cltiipenn f p ffliffpense 


12,947 


182 


12.744 


2 


19 






Can neitiier read nor write 


8,043 
117 

9,556 
281 


41 

4 

125 

12 


2,992 
113 

9.420 
219 






10 


Can read but can not write 






Can read and write 


2 


9 


With superior education 













OmZENSHIP. 



231 



Table XTII. — Males i^l years of age and over; by citizenship f litera/^, etc, — C'Ontinued. 



SANTA CLARA— Continaed. 



Foreign and unknown citizens. 

Can neither read nor write. 
Can read but can not write. 

Can read and write 

With superior education . . . 



All 
classes. 



14,223 



10,304 

123 

3,667 

289 



Whites 

bom in 

Cuba. 



344 



78 

8 

210 

58 



Whites 
bom in 
Spain. 



7,696 



6,113 
95 

2,466 
33 



Whites 
bom in 
other 
coun- 
tries. 



885 



262 

6 

472 

145 



Colored. 



5,296 



4,866 

19 

420 

8 



SANTIAGO. 



Total vot4ng age , . , 


71,307 


81,496 


9,421 


1.162 


29,228 






OiiN\n cH*?wtn«» 


58,722 


31,084 


13 


9 


27,666 






Can neither read nor write 


38,981 

694 

17,821 

1,326 


19,068 

228 

10,494 

1,249 


4 


1 


19,906 


Can read but can not write 


871 


^n riflad i^nd write, t 


9 


2 
6 


7.316 


With superior education 


71 










1,160 


6 


1,151 




3 








Cati pefthnr tvaA nor write. .,,,--,„ ^ , - - ., . 


291 

8 

816 

46 




289 

8 

806 

46 




2 


Cati re^d hnt <?»" "Ot write ,.,,.,....--,, 








Can read and write 


6 




1 


With superior education 














CltiH^Pff II mimennfl 


8,357 


118 


8,205 


12 


22 






Can neither read nor write 


2,788 

89 

5,196 

2S4 


36 
2 

74 
7 


2,736 

87 

6,106 

277 


4 


13 


Can read but can not write 




Can read and write 


8 


9 


With superior education 










FoTelflm and unknown citizens 


3,068 


338 


52 


1,141 


1,687 






Can neither read nor write 


1,015 

14 

1,301 

688 


10 

1 

188 

139 


25 
2 

19 
6 


HI 

2 

663 

865 


809 


Can read but can not write 


9 


Can read and write 


681 


With superior education 


28 







232 



ItEPORT ON THt: 0EK8US Ot OtTBA, 18d0. 



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CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



299 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, 
[FlgurcM iu italic are included in thofie for the province or dlfitilct.] 



Piovlnoe. 



BLabana 

City of Hcbania 

Matanzas 

PinardelBio 

Paerto Principe. . . 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Cuba 



Total. 



424,804 
iS5,981 
202,444 
173,064 
88,284 
356,636 
327,715 



1,572,797 



Single. 



289,770 
160,780 
143,988 
124,482 
62,869 
252,767 
285,343 



1,108,709 



Married. 



77,646 
US, 071 
27,087 
27,100 
17,210 
66,925 
40,483 



246,851 



Living 
together 
as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutual 
consent 



28,780 
18,g6S 
20,942 
12,886 
8,606 
26,607 
89,662 



181,732 



Wid- 
owed. 



28,612 
1U,799 
10,069 
8,964 
5,129 
20,110 
12,263 



85,167 



Un- 
known. 



146 

78 

838 

182 
21 

187 
64 



888 



PROVINCE OF UABANA. 



District. 



Aguacate 

Alqulzar 

Bainoa 

Bataban6 

Bauta 

Bejucal 

Cano 

Castoias 

Catalina 

Ceibadel Agua 

Ouanabaooa 

CUy qf Otianabacoa 

Guara , 

Otdnes 

Qutra do Helena 

Habana 

CUyofHabana 

Ifllade Finos 

Jaruco 

Madmga 

Managua 

Marianao 

Helena del Sur 

NuevaPaz 

Pipian 

QnlvlcAn 

Eegla 

Salud 

San Antonio de las Vms 
San Antonio de los Banos 

San Felipe 

San Jose de las Lajas .... 

SanNiooUs 

Santa Cruz del Norte 

Santa Maria d^ Rosario . 

Santiago de las Vegas 

Tapaste :. 

VeredaNueva 

The province 



Total. 



8,168 
8,746 
1,725 
6,528 
5,142 
5,756 
4,210 
1.004 
2,718 
2,197 

20,080 

13,965 
1,835 

11,894 

11,548 
242,055 
t35,981 
3,199 
4,076 
8,744 
2,887 
8,693 
8,207 
7,761 
1,101 
2,428 

11,368 
8,293 
1,855 

12,631 
1,915 
4,154 
4,668 
2,965 
2,780 

10,276 
1,661 
2,416 



424,804 



Single. 



2,269 
5,989 
1,197 
4,898 
8,469 
8,789 
2,885 
713 
1,889 
1,519 
13,796 
9,700 
1,312 
7,885 
7,958 
164,897 
160,780 
2,184 
2,761 
2,648 
1,996 
5.944 
2,266 
6,480 
767 
1,683 
7,487 
2,210 
1,291 
8,487 
l,3f0 
2,771 
3,206 
2,009 
1,918 
7,022 
1,011 
1.588 



Married. 



892 

1,789 

286 

1,892 

1,009 

1,240 

913 

162 

495 

410 

3,322 

t,069 

312 

1,750 

2,103 

43,349 

US, 071 

riA 

684 
676 
564 

1,551 
479 

1,224 
285 
428 

2,885 
779 
842 

2,827 
292 
741 
688 
484 
449 

2,104 
822 
607 



Living 
together 
ashus- 
bctnd and 
wife by 
mutual 
consent. 



289,770 



77,546 



856 
501 

88 
322 
327 
210 
132 

78 
115 

92 
1,864 
1,111 

66 

867 

781 

18,492 

18,t55 

66 
286 
186 
100 
668 
286 
603 

20 
186 
715 

22 

92 
850 
134 
218 
886 
271 
137 
840 

82 

82 



Wid- 
owed. 



155 
516 
165 
415 
847 
612 
278 
61 
218 
176 
1,605 
1,099 
Ibi 
889 
708 
15,231 
1U,799 
184 
343 
885 
226 
640 
176 
448 
89 
176 
823 
282 
130 
1,017 
128 
423 
285 
201 
226 
791 
136 
189 



28,730 



28,612 



Un- 
known. 



1 
1 



6 
2 



4 

5 
1 
3 
3 

86 

78 

1 

2 



6 



8 
8 



1 
1 
1 



19 



146 



300 



BEPOET ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Tablb XV. — Ckmjugcd condition — (Continued. 

PROVINCE OF MATANZAS. 
[FifiTures in italic are included in those for the province or diBtrlct] 



District 



Alacranes 

Bolondr6n 

Cabezas 

Canasi 

G&rdenas 

Oiivof Cdrdencui. . . 

Carlos Rojaa 

Col6n 

Cuevitas 

Ouamacaro 

Ja^ey Grande 

Jovellanos 

Maca^ua 

Macurlges 

MarU 

Matanzas 

City qf MatamoB. . . 

M&ximo-G6me2 

M^ndez Capote 

Palmillas 

Perlco 

Roque 

Sabanilla 

8an 3oa& de los Ramos 

Santa Ana 

Uni6n de Reyes 

The province ... 



Total. 



8,110 

9,179 

6,184 

1,998 

24,861 

tl,9iO 

8,174 

12,195 

5,807 

6,000 

5,853 

7,629 

6,042 

10,405 

8,905 

45.282 

S6,S7U 

4,046 

2,158 

7,647 

4,449 

4,464 

5,205 

6,766 

2,965 

5,226 



202,444 



Single. 



5,691 
6,816 
8,840 
1,885 
17,421 
15,StO 
2,493 
8,941 
4,083 
4,283 
4,104 
5,469 
8,606 
7,447 
6,852 
81,380 
t6,M0 
8,006 
1,556 
6,378 
8,221 
8,893 
8,718 
4,916 
2,172 
3,818 



Married. 



996 

1,015 

920 

248 

4,066 

5,055 

292 

1,527 

756 

660 

900 

716 

582 

1,041 

1,071 

7,263 

5,607 

424 

820 

864 

466 

492 

707 

840 

395 

697 



148,988 27,087 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

¥rifeby 

mutual 
consent 



1,094 

1,493 

95 

248 

1,818 

1,606 

267 

1,2U 

712 

801 

523 

1,048 

642 

1,688 

1,192 

8,307 

t,817 

434 

206 

1,160 

606 

421 

518 

776 

256 

694 



20,942 



Wid- 
owed. 



388 
356 

829 

112 

1,654 

1,S80 

122 

616 

266 

264 

825 

299 

212 

870 

290 

8,080 

t,W9 

182 

75 

261 

165 

158 

262 

226 

142 

216 



Un- 
known. 



10,089 



2 

S 



2 

1 
2 



14 



302 
SI 



1 
4 



8 

i 



338 



PROVINCE OF PINAR DEL RIO. 



Artemisa 

Bahia Honda 

Cabafias 

Candelaria 

Cons61aci6n del Norte . . 

Cons61aci6n del Sur 

Guanajay 

Guane 

Guayabal 

Julian Diaz 

LosPalacios 

MAntua. 

Marlel 

PinardelRio 

CUy qf Pinar del Mio 

San Cristobal 

San Diego de los Baiios . 

San Diego de Nufiez 

San Juan y Martinez. . . . 

San Luis 

Viflales 

The province 



9,817 
2,117 
3,863 
4,866 
7,399 

16,665 
8,796 

14,760 
2,710 
1,871 
2,466 
8,366 
8,631 

38,343 
8,890 
4,263 
2,419 
1,137 

14,787 
7,608 

17,700 



178,064 



6,656 


1,486 


1,588 


206 


2,914 


324 


8,872 


695 


5,801 


1,300 


12,881 


2,474 


6,091 


1,635 


10,450 


2,249 


1,883 


620 


1,455 


218 


1,728 


287 


5,892 


1,274 


2,678 


554 


27,766 


5,969 


6,i07 


l,9tU 


2,967 


706 


1,742 


872 


781 


92 


10,834 


2,868 


5,425 


1,868 


12,788 


8,103 


124,482 


27,100 



576 


689 


213 


UO 


435 


180 


450 


849 


863 


481 


1,048 


815 


449 


721 


1,285 


775 


122 


184 


108 


95 


282 


168 


827 


872 


269 


240 


2,992 


1,672 


696 


i69 


298 


292 


184 


170 


222 


42 


869 


716 


482 


333 


1,082 


821 


12,886 


8,964 



10 



4 
2 



1 
1 



1 
1 



84 



11 

GO 
6 



182 



PROVINCE OF PUERTO PRINCIPE. 



CiegodeAvila 

Mor6n 

Nuevitas 

Puerto Principe 

OUyqf Puerto Principe 

Santa Cruz del Sur 

The province 



9,801 


7,018 


9,680 


7,162 


10,855 


7,414 


53,140 


86,788 


£5,i0f 


17,165 


5,306 


4,002 


88,234 


62,869 



2,007 


253 


623 


1.884 


148 


501 


1,974 


459 


507 


10,609 


2,828 


3,401 


U,966 


796 


t.tou 


786 


822 


197 


17,210 


8,605 


6,129 



1 

19 
f 

1 



21 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



801 



Tablb XV. — Conjugal oondilion — Continued. 

PROVINCE OP SANTA CLARA. 
[Figures in italic are included in those for the province or district.] 



District. 



Abreus 

Caibarlen 

Calabasar 

(^unajuanl 

Cartagena 

Cejade Pablo 

Cienfuegos 

CUy qf denfuegoi 

Cifuentes 

Cmces 

Eroeranxa 

Palmira 

Plaoetas 

Qucmado de OCllnes 

RanchoVelos 

Ranchuelo 

Rodas 

Sagua la Q rande 

Ciiy qf Sagua la Orande 
San Antonio de las Vueltas 
Bancti-Spirltns 

CUy qf SaneH^SpiHttu . . 

Ban Diego del Valle 

Ban Fernando 

Ban Juan de las Yeras 

Ban Juan de los Remedios . 
Santa Clara 

Ci^ of Santa Clara 

Santa IsaDel de las La jan . . 

Banto Domingo 

Trinidad 

CiiyqfTrtnidad 

Yaguajay 

The province 



Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutuaJ 
consent. 


Wid- 
owed. 


3,996 

8,660 

18,419 

14,496 

6,244 

6,964 

69,128 

50,058 

8,826 

7,963 

7,811 

6,627 

11,961 

8,890 

7,682 

6,069 

9,662 

21,342 

lt,7e8 

12,832 

26,709 

U,696 

6,369 

6,446 

6,600 

14,833 

28,437 

9,60B 
10,372 
24,271 
11,190 

9,718 


8.014 
6,121 
9,3U0 

10,164 
4,622 
6,041 

41,996 

t0,S75 
2,680 
6,666 
6,298 
6,102 
8,480 
6,391 
6,369 
3,618 
7,042 

16,304 
9,168 
8,922 

18,124 

9,m 

8,693 

4,646 

3,786 

10,668 

19,791 

9,8gJ^ 

7,060 

7,046 

17,168 

8,065 

7,092 


661 
1,617 
1.982 
2,626 

917 

964 
9,210 
U,798 

667 
1,112 
1,414 

778 
1, wv9 
1,292 

949 

716 
1,462 
2,941 
1,716 
2,669 
4,637 
1,969 
1,016 
1,138 
1,064 
2,406 
4,784 
h9i7 
1,330 
1,782 
3,814 
1,695 
1,664 


267 

663 

1,412 

1.168 

327 

634 

4,924 

t,65U 

286 

714 

607 

361 

773 

786 

918 

499 

621 

2,023 

l,li6 

601 

1,098 

U75 

372 

424 

406 

1,044 

1,975 

9Ui 

781 

815 

1,866 

687 

613 


163 

467 

702 

646 

377 

324 

2,973 

1,7H 

262 

461 

696 

286 

708 

420 

803 

826 

446 

1,067 

706 

840 

1,917 

l,llfS 

388 

340 

844 

818 

1,915 

1,0U7 

441 

729 

1,436 

68A 

448 


866,686 


262,757 


66,926 


26,607 


20,110 



Un- 
known. 



2 
23 
2 
1 
1 
25 
9 



1 
1 



1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
7 
U 



38 
6 
1 
2 
1 
2 

22 



3 
1 

1 



187 



PROVINCE OF SANTIAGO. 



Alto Bongo 

Baracoa 

Bayamo 

Gampechuela 

Caney 

Cobre 

Cilsto 

Oibara 

Guantanamo 

Holguin 

Jlgnani 

ManxaniUo 

CUjf (4 UanxaniUo 

Mayari. 

Niquero 

Pauna Soriano 

Puerto Padre 

Sagua de T&namo 

Ban Luis 

Santiago de Cuba 

Cilhn^ Santiago de Cvba 

The province 



12,770 

21,944 

21,198 

7,869 

9,126 

10,707 

1,194 

31,694 

28,063 

84,606 

10,496 

32,288 

8,504 
2,718 
12,806 
19,984 
6,796 
11,681 
46,478 
ia,090 



827,716 



9,763 

16,746 

15,846 

5,481 

6.879 

7.927 

8»1 

21,961 

20.002 

23.464 

7,741 

28,668 

10,610 

6,047 

1,961 

8,624 

14.119 

4,182 

8,386 

32,718 

50,998 



236,343 



40,483 



976 


1,788 


2,777 


2,580 


1,235 


8,618 


494 


1,247 


984 


1.028 


720 


1,853 


138 


119 


6,108 


1,984 


2,497 


4,766 


6,953 


2.237 


873 


1.642 


2,T29 


4,896 


1,688 


1,IU»6 


1,242 


890 


200 


491 


1.301 


2.028 


2,834 


2,163 


750 


646 


1,109 


1,879 


6,664 


3,757 


6,596 


5,599 



39,562 



244 
889 
488 
147 
235 
205 
43 

1,618 
790 

1,866 
238 
994 
661 
328 
66 
850 
868 
217 
857 

2,435 

5,588 



12,263 



3 
6 



2 



23 
8 
6 
1 
1 



2 
2 

i 



9 
64 



302 



BEPOBT ON THB CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XVI. — Omjugal condiiion by sex, race, and nativity, 

CUBA. 





Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 
wife by 

mutual 
consent. 


Wid- 
owed. 


Un- 
known. 


All classes 


1,572,797 


1,108,709 


246,851 


181,732 


85,167 


888 






Males 


815,205 
757,592 


600,790 
507,919 


125,067 
121,284 


65.798 
65.989 


28.069 
62,106 


496 


Females 


842 






Native white 


910,299 


687,999 


169,854 


41.052 


61,869 


635 






Males 


447,878 
462,926 


896,252 
901.147 


75,454 
99,900 


20.095 
20,957 


15,207 
46.662 


865 


Females 


270 






Foreiirn white 


142,093 


76,826 


45,189 


8,975 


11,046 


62 






Males 


115,740 
26,858 


68,671 
8,155 


84.806 
10,889 


7,516 
1.459 


5,199 
5,847 


48 


Females 


14 






Colored 


520,400 


894,484 


81,808 


81,705 


12.262 


141 






Males 


252,092 
268,908 


195,867 
198,617 


15,907 
16,501 


88,182 
48,628 


2,658 
9,609 


68 


Female 


66 







PROVINCE OF HABANA. 



All classes 


424,804 


289,770 


77,546 


28,790 


28,612 


146 






Males 


221,990 
202,814 


159,758 
190,012 


40,089 
87,469 


14,322 
14,406 


7,743 
20,869 


84 


Fftmalw T--TT--, - 


62 






Native white 


243,619 


'166,162 


49,679 


7,880 


19,803 


96 






Males 


116,698 
126,781 


86,851 
79,811 


21,549 
28,190 


3,999 
3.881 


4,892 
14,911 


47 


Females 


48 






Foreism white 


68,971 


88,623 


21,068 


8,746 


5,601 


S3 






Males 


54,162 
14,809 


83,754 
4,869 


15,919 
5,749 


2,824 
922 


2,240 
8,261 


25 


Females 


8 






Colored 


112,214 


84,986 

• 


6,799 


17,104 


8,808 


18 






Males 


60,990 
61,224 


89,653 
45,832 


9,215 
8,584 


7,499 
9,605 


611 
2,097 


12 


Female* ...... ,.,r-^ 


6 







PROVINCE OF MATANZAS. 



All claflROR. 


202,444 


143,988 


27,087 


20,942 


10,069 


838 






Males 


103,726 

98,718 


76,709 
67,279 


13,602 
13,485 


10,456 
10,486 


2,760 
7,829 


199 


Females 


139 






Native white 


102, GK2 


?2,497 


19,5&1 


2,773 


7,562 


296 






Males I 


50,324 

52,358 


38,181 
84,316 


8,611 
10,949 


1,453 
1,320 


1,904 
5,658 


175 


Females 


121 






Forelim white 


15, 2:^ 


7,124 


5,953 


989 


1,764 


5 






Males 


11,850 
9,385 


6,297 
827 


8,923 
1,430 


898 
91 


729 
1,035 


8 


Females 


2 






Colored 


84,527 


64,867 


2,180 


17,180 


768 


37 






Males 


41,552 
42,975 


32,231 
82,186 


1,068 
1,112 


8,106 
9,075 


127 
696 


21 


Females ........ .^.r-n-.r-rr T- 


16 







CONJUGAL 00in>ITI0N. 



808 



Tablb XVI. — Conjugal condition by sex, nux, and natmiy — Continued. 

PROVINCB OF PINAB DEL RIO. 



• 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 
mntoal 
consent 


Wid- 
owed. 


Un- 
known. 


All clasMB 


178,064 


124,482 


27,100 


12,886 


8,964 


182 






Males 


91,688 
81,376 


68,878 
66,609 


18,788 
18,817 


6,189 
6.197 


2.772 
6,192 


71 


Females 


61 






Native white 


114,907 


82,827 


20,091 


6,647 


6,848 


90 






Hales 


68,678 
66,834 


45,102 
87,226 


8,900 
11,191 


2,000 
2,988 


1,910 
4,988 


62 


Females 


47 






Foielgn white 


10,718 


6,068 


4,040 


716 


867 


7 






Hales 


9,447 
1,271 


4,806 
280 


8,406 
682 


664 
62 


660 
807 


7 


Femalefi 








Colored 


47,489 


87,067 


2,969 


6,128 


1,264 


26 






Ma)4MI 


28.668 
28,771 


18,968 
18,104 


1,476 
1,494 


2,916 
8,207 


802 
962 


12 


Female* - 


14 







PROVINCE OF PUERTO PRINCIPE. 



All classes 


88,284 


62,869 


17,210 


8,606 


6,129 


21 






Males 


44,899 
48,335 


88.888 
28,986 


8,542 
8,668 


1,764 
1,751 


1,208 
8.926 


17 


Females. r.-,. 


4 






Native white 


66,849 


46,778 


18,649 


1,966 


8,948 


8 






Males 


82,576 
88,774 


24,568 
22,210 


6,809 
7,840 


898 
1,068 


794 
8,154 


6 


Females. . . . t . t , . . r r r r - - - r - . . ^ 


2 






Foreisn white 


4,038 


2,071 


1,408 


254 


806 








Males 


8,499 
689 


1,878 
198 


1,212 
196 


281 
28 


188 
122 




Females. ........,..,.., ^ ^ t ., - r .. ^ - .. , 








Colored 


17,847 


18,620 


2,168 


1,286 


876 


18 






Males 


8,826 
9,022 


6,942 
6,578 


1,021 
1,182 


626 
660 


226 
660 


11 




2 







PROVINCE OF SANTA CLARA. 



All «»lassos. ..,T,,r-- - 


866,686 


262,767 


66,926 


26,607 


20,110 


187 






Males 


189,067 
167,479 


141,189 
111,668 


28,681 
28,244 


18,816 
18,292 


5,791 
14,819 


81 


Females 


66 






Native white 


214,946 


151,180 


40,401 


7,661 


15,660 


94 






Males 


106,771 
108.174 


80,946 
70,184 


18,084 
22,817 


8,698 
4,063 


4,086 
11,573 


&7 


Females , . . , , , r 


87 






Foreisn white 


29,828 


16,894 


9,203 


1,846 


1,866 


14 






Males 


25,886 
4,487 


16,696 
1,296 


7,071 
2,182 


1,604 
242 


1,062 
814 


11 


Females 


8 






Colored 


111,768 


84,788 


7,821 


17,100 


2,586 


29 






Males 


. 66,960 
64,818 


44,646 
40,088 


8,626 
8,795 


8,118 
8,987 


668 
1,982 


18 


Females 


16 







304 BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 

Tablb XVI. — Oonjugcd conditions by sex, rcux, and ntUwity — Goiilinaed. 

PROVINCE OF SANTIAGO. 





Total. 


Single. 


MArried. 


Living 
together 
as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutual 
consent 


Wid- 
owed. 


Un- 
known. 


All n1 AJMAR 


827,715 


285,848 


40,488 


89.562 


12,268 


M 






Males 


168,845 
168,870 


120,878 
114,465 


20,376 
20,107 


19,757 
19,805 


2,790 
9,473 


44 


Females 


20 






Native white 


167,797 


118,505 


25,980 


15,225 


8,044 


43 






Males 


82,292 
85,505 


61,104 
57,401 


12,001 
13,979 


7,588 
7,687 


1,621 
6,423 


28 


Females 


15 






JY>relini white ........ r . ^ r 


18,318 


7,026 


4,117 


1,424 


743 


8 






Males 


U,446 
1,867 


6,341 
685 


8,878 
744 


1,296 
129 


435 
806 


2 


Female<f r . , - 


1 






Colored 


146,605 


109,812 


10,386 


22,913 


3,476 


18 






Males 


70,107 
76,498 


58,433 
56,879 


5,002 
5,384 


10,924 
11,969 


734 
2,742 


14 


Females 


4 







CITY OF CIKNFUEQ08. 



All classes 


30,088 


20,973 


4,796 


2,684 


1.724 


9 






Males 


14,589 
15,449 


10,627 
10,346 


2,375 
2,428 


1,268 
1,266 


814 
1.410 


5 


Females 


4 






Native white 


15,735 


10,992 


2,772 


800 


1.1G9 


2 






Males 


7,046 
8,690 


5,410 
5,582 


1,094 
1,678 


876 
424 


163 
1,006 


2 


Females 








Foreim white 


3,485 


1,830 


1,129 


313 


212 


1 






Males 


2,900 
585 


1,647 
188 


871 
258 


274 
39 


107 
105 


1 


Females 








Colored 


10,818 


8,151 


897 


1,421 


813 


6 






Males 


4,644 
6,174 


3,570 
4,581 


410 
487 


618 
803 


44 

299 


2 


Females 


4 







CITY OF HABANA. 



All classes 


235,981 


160,780 


42,071 


18,268 


14,799 


78 






Males 


123,258 
112,723 


88,737 
72,043 


22,003 
20,068 


9,105 
9,148 


8,872 
11,427 


41 


Femalpfl ........ t. 


87 






Native white 


115,532 


79,221 


22,719 


4,727 


8,816 


49 






Males 


52,940 
62,592 


39,692 
89,529 


9,191 
13,528 


2,468 
2,264 


1,674 
7,242 


20 


Females 


29 






Foreiflm white 


52,901 


80,251 


15,528 


8,060 


4,024 


18 






Males 


41,190 
11,711 


26,894 
3,857 


11,084 
4,494 


2,271 
809 


1.478 
2.546 


18 


FemaleH 


6 






Colored 


67,548 


51,308 


8,824 


10,446 


1,960 


11 






Males 


29,128 
88,420 


22,651 
28.657 


1,778 
2,046 


4,871 
6,075 


820 
1,689 


8 


Females 


8 







CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



305 



Table XVI. — Conjugal condUUni by »ex^ rucey and naiimty. — Continued. 

CITY OP MATANZAS. 





Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together 
as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutual 
consent. 


Wid- 
owed. 


Un- 
known. 


A.1I claaaes 


36,374 


25,520 


5,607 


2,817 


2,409 


21 






Males 


16,926 
19,448 


12,300 
13,220 


2,743 
2,864 


1,406 
1,411 


470 
1,939 


7 


Females r , 


14 






I^ative white 


20,931 


14,629 


3,857 


709 


1,718 


18 






Males 


9,219 
11,712 


6,996 
7,633 


1.574 
2.283 


366 


276 
1.442 


7 


Females 


11 








Foreljni white 


8,644 


1,681 


1,247 1 220 


496 








Males 


2,695 
949 


1,408 
273 


930 
317 


192 
28 


165 
331 




Females 








Colored 


11,799 


9,210 


503 


1,888 


195 


3 






Males 


5,012 

6,787 


3.896 
5,314 


239 
264 


848 
1,040 


29 
166 




Females 


3 







CITY OF PUERTO PRINCIPE. 



All claww?. ...T,,, ■, 


25,102 


17, 155 


4,956 


785 


2,204 


2 






Males 


10,912 
14,190 


7,919 
9,236 


2,249 
2,707 


393 
392 


351 
1,853 




Females 


2 






Native white 


16,505 


11,101 


3,505 


830 


1,565 


1 






Males 


6,764 
9,741 


5,022 
6.082 


1.413 
2,092 


145 

185 


184 
1,381 




Females 


1 






^ireiKn white 


1,283 


602 


482 


88 


111 








Males 


1,084 
199 


520 

82 


421 

61 


80 
8 


63 

48 




Females 








Colored 


7,314 


5,449 


969 


367 


528 


1 






Males * 


3,064 
4,250 


2,377 
3.0?2 


415 
554 


168 
199 


104 
424 




Females 


1 







CITY OF SANTIAGO. 



All classes. 



Males . . . 
Females. 



Native white. 



Males . . . 
Females. 



Foreign white 



Males . . . 
Females. 



Colored 



Males . . . 
Females. 



24662- 



-20 



43,090 



19,922 
Zi, 168 



16,258 



6,702 
8,556 



3,440 



2,795 
645 



24, 392 



10,425 
13,967 



30,998 



14,661 
16,337 



10,691 



5,069 
5,622 



2,015 



1,712 
303 



18,292 



7,880 
10,412 



6,396 



3,154 
3,242 



2.716 



1,158 
1,558 



969 



744 
225 



2,711 



1,252 
1,459 



8,299 



1,635 
1,664 



619 



294 
325 



258 



•230 

28 



2,422 



1,111 
1.311 



2,388 



465 
1,923 



1,228 



963 



178 
785 



9 



7 
2 



179 
1,019 


2 
2 


197 


1 


108 
89 


1 







306 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Taule XVII. — Conjugal conditiun by (ige, sex, race^ and nalivUy. 

CUBA. 
TtJTAi. Population. 



Under 15 years . . . 

1510 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 yeans 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 yean< 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

Cuba , 



Total. 



577,036 

106,770 

71,265 

40.310 

112,649 

137, 40) 

118,812 

185,056 

117,628 

68,182 

37,699 

85 



Single. 



576,361 
103,581 
63,644 
32,678 
79,684 
72,029 
45,385 
57,221 
37,293 
24,821 
15,957 
55 



1,572,797 1,108,709 



Married. 



67 

1,632 

4,121 

3,953 

19,542 

39,538 

44.060 

72,687 

88.788 

16,381 

5,624 

8 



246,351 



Living 
together 
as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutual 
consent. 



61 

1,426 

3,218 

3,311 

11.268 

20,077 

21,256 

35,324 

20.762 

]0,&52 

4,673 

4 



131,732 



Wid- 
owed. 



22 

69 

256 

357 

2.123 

5,782 

8,088 

19.821 

26,655 

16,611 

11,431 

2 



86,167 



Un- 
known. 



525 
G2 
26 
11 
32 
29 
23 
53 
30 
17 
14 
16 



838 



Total Males. 



Under 15 years 
15 to 17 years. . 
18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 



293,089 
49.696 
34,660 
19,777 
59,231 

25 to 29 years i 73,206 

30 to 34 years 64,023 

35 to 44 years 101,305 

45 to 54 years I 64,096 

55 to 04 years ! 37,099 

65 years and over i 18, 976 

Unknown 57 



Cuba. 



815.205 



292,759 
49,536 
34,182 
18,836 
51.194 
48,493 
29,374 
33,567 
20,599 
14,081 
8,136 
34 



600,790 



17 

36 

133 

339 

4.014 

14.612 

21,948 

42,629 

26,247 

11,708 

4,378 

6 



125,067 



11 

57 

291 

569 

3,777 

8,895 

10,401 

19,069 

12,631 

6.845 

3,225 

2 



65,793 



17 

18 

27 

29 

223 

1,190 

2,284 

5,986 

5,600 

4,455 

3,230 



28,059 



285 
49 
17 

4 
23 
16 
16 
34 
19 
10 

8 
15 



496 



Total Fkmalks. 



Under 15 years 283,947 

15 to 17 years 57,074 

18and 19year8 36,615 

20 years 20,533 

21 to24years 53,418 

25 to 29 years 64,199 

30 to 84 years 54.789 

85 to 44 years i 88,751 

45 to 64 years I 58,432 

31,083 

18,723 

28 



55 to 64 years. 
66 years and over 
Unknown 



Cuba. 



757,692 



■283,602 
54.045 
29,462 
13.842 
28.490 
23.536 
16,011 
23,654 
16,694 
10.740 
7,822 
21 

607,919 



50 

1,696 

8,988 

3,614 

15,528 

24,926 

22,112 

30,006 

13,641 

4,673 

1,246 

2 

121,284 



• 50 

1.369 

2,927 

2,742 

7,491 

11,182 

10,855 

16,235 

8,131 

8,507 

1.448 

2 

65,939 



5 

51 

229 

828 

1,900 

4,642 

5,804 

18,835 

15,055 

12,156 

8,201 

2 

62,108 



240 

18 

9 

7 

9 

13 

7 

19 

11 

7 

6 

1 

842 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



307 



Tab AS XVII. — Conjugtil conifitioji by agi\ gej\ rc/cf, and ruUivily — Continued. 

CUBA— Continued. 
Total Nativk Whitk. 



Under 15 yeiirH . . . 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yeani. . . 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 84 yeani 

85 to 44 yeare 

45 to 54 yean) 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

Cnbft 









Living 












together 






Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


HS hug- 
band and 
wife by 
mutual 


Wid- 
owed, 


Un- 
known: 


















consent. 






383,482 


382.891 


55 


28 


16 


447 


69.651 


67,672 


1,316 


656 


66 


54 


44.438 


39.473 


3,365 


1.390 


199 


21 


23,731 


18,957 


8.108 


1.871 


290 


5 


64,772 


48.609 


15,071 


4.360 


1,722 


20 


74, 111 


33. 151 


29.134 


7,122 


4,687 


17 


63,006 


17,807 


31.428 


7,351 


6,410 


12 


96,001 


19.241 


49,043 


11,480 


15.258 


29 


52,838 


8.620 


24,174 


5,168 


14,869 


17 


26,690 


4.063 


9.614 


1,767 


11,238 


8 


12.589 


1,989 


3,063 


424 


7,122 


1 


35 


26 


3 




2 


4 






^10.299 


637,399 


169,354 


41, a*^ 


61,859 


635 



Native White Males. 



Under 15 years. . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
UnKnown 

Cuba 



195,718 
82,075 
20,743 
10,996 
31.096 
35.588 
31.054 
47,7a5 
25,192 
11,996 
5,187 
24 



447,373 



195,445 

31,964 

20,606 

10,638 

26,790 

21,690 

11,422 

11.201 

4.191 

1,761 

787 

18 



12 

80 

99 

239 

2,772 

9.697 

14.112 

25,801 

14.072 

6.337 

2.281 

2 



2 

24 

109 

195 

1,411 

3.236 

8,785 

6,409 

3,302 

1,274 

348 



336,252 75,454 20,095 



13 

14 

17 

23 

169 

956 

1,728 

4,280 

3,616 

2,621 

1,770 



15,207 



246 

43 

13 

1 

13 
9 
7 
14 
11 
8 
1 
4 



365 



Native White Females. 



Under 15 yean... 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean... 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

SO to 34 yean 

85 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

66 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 
UnKnown 

Cuba 



187,714 
37,579 
23,695 
12,735 
33,677 
38,523 
31,954 
47,296 
27,646 
14,694 
7,402 
11 



462,926 



187.446 

35,608 

18.968 

8,419 

16,879 

11,461 

6,385 

8,040 

4,429 

2,302 

1,202 

8 



801.147 



48 

1,286 

3,266 

2,869 

12,299 

19,437 

17,316 

23,242 

10.102 

8,277 

772 

1 




3 

42 

182 

267 

1,553 

3,731 

4,682 

10,978 

11,243 

8,617 

5,352 

2 



201 
11 
8 
4 
7 
8 
5 
15 
6 
5 



93,900 



20,957 I 46,652 



270 



308 



REPOKT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XVII. — Conjugcd condition by age, 9ex, race, and naimty — Continaed. 

CUBA-Oontinued. 
Total Fobeion White. 



Under 15 years. . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

SO to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

Cuba 



Total. 



5.682 

8,477 

4.830 

8.646 

16,549 

23,030 

19,675 

31,512 

19,814 

9,820 

4,546 

17 



142,098 



Single. 



6,670 

3,392 

4.584 

8,330 

14,129 

16.308 

10.395 

11,421 

4.843 

1,974 

775 

5 



76,826 



Married. 



68 

183 

245 

1,766 

6,043 

7,014 

14,930 

9.893 

4.496 

1,547 

4 



45,189 



Living 
together 
as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutual 
consent 



2 

15 

49 

58 

537 

1,306 

1.588 

2,993 

1,670 

596 

161 



8,975 



Wid- 
owed. 



1 

1 

11 

11 

114 

367 

672 

2,156 

2,900 

2,752 

2,061 



11,046 



Un- 
known. 



9 
1 
8 
2 
8 
6 
6 
12 
8 
2 
2 
8 



62 



Foreign White Males. 



Under 15 years. . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

Cuba 



3,134 

2,640 

4,068 

8,044 

14,241 

19.647 

16,646 

26,449 

15,515 

7,327 

8,013 

16 



116,740 



3,128 

2,637 

4,040 

2,977 

13,178 

15,401 

9,844 

10,687 

4,442 

1,721 

611 

5 



68,671 



1 

12 

85 

658 

8.059 

5,164 

12,014 

8.211 

8,805 

1,344 

8 



34,806 



1 

10 

29 

876 

1,046 

1,295 

2,581 

1,503 

530 

145 



7,516 



8 
1 

27 

187 

838 

1,156 

1,354 

1,270 

912 



5,199 



6 

1 
8 
2 
2 
4 
5 
11 
5 
1 
1 
8 



48 



Foreign White Females. 



Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

Cuba 



2,548 

837 

762 

602 

2,308 

8.383 

8,029 

5.063 

8,799 

2,493 

1,533 

1 



26,358 



2,542 
755 
544 
853 
951 
907 
551 
734 
401 
253 
164 



8,155 



67 

171 

210 

1,108 

1,984 

1,850 

2,916 

1,682 

691 

208 

1 



10,883 



2 

14 

39 

29 

161 

260 

293 

412 

167 

66 

16 



1 

8 

10 

87 

230 

834 

1,000 

1,546 

1,482 

1,149 



1,459 I 5,847 



14 



CONJUGAL CONDrnON. 



809 



Table XVII. — ConjiLgal condition by age^ sex^ rojce, and naiivity — Continued. 

CUBA— Continued. 
Total Colobjed. 



Under 15 yean . . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

90 to 84 years 

86 to 44 years 

46 to 54 years 

66 to 64 years 

66 years and over 
UnJuiown 

Cuba 









Living 












together 






Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutuu 


Wid- 
owed. 


Un- 
known. 








consent. 






187.922 


187,800 


12 


36 


6 


09 


83,639 


32,617 


248 


755 


12 


7 


21,997 


19,587 


583 


1.779 


46 


2 


12,933 


10.391 


600 


1,882 


66 


4 


31,328 


21,946 


2,706 


6,881 


287 


9 


40.264 


22,570 


6,361 


11,649 


678 


6 


86,129 


17,183 


6.618 
8.664 


12.817 


1.006 


6 


58.543 


26,559 


20,901 


2,407 


12 


45.376 


28.830 


4,721 


13,924 


2,896 


6 


31,6?2 


18,784 


2,271 


7,989 


2,621 


7 


20,564 


13,198 


1.024 


4.068 


2.248 


11 


83 


24 


1 


4 




4 








520.400 


394,484 


31,808 


81,705 


12,262 


141 



C/OLORED Males. 



Under 15 years. . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

SO to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

46 to 64 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

Cuba 



94.237 

14,981 

9,839 

6,737 

13.895 

17,971 

16,323 

27,151 

23,389 

17.776 

10.776 

17 



I 



252,092 



94,186 
14,935 

9,637 

6,321 
11,286 
11,402 

8,108 
11.679 
11,966 
10.599 

6,737 
11 



195,867 




Colored Females. 



Under 16 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

26 to 29 yean 

30 to 34 yean 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 64 yean 

66 to 64 yean 

66 yean and over 
UnKnown 

Cuba 



93,685 
18,658 
12,158 

7,196 
17,433 
22,293 
19,806 
31.392 
21.987 
13,896 

9,788 
16 



268,308 



93,614 

17.682 

9,950 

6,070 

10,660 

11,168 

9,075 

14,880 

11,864 

8,185 

6,456 

13 



196,617 



7 

243 

661 

536 

2,121 

8,506 

2,946 

8,850 

1,757 

705 

271 



16,601 



27 

728 

1,607 

1,537 

4,891 

7,036 

6,996 

10,802 

6,098 

2,948 

1,356 

2 



43,623 



2 

8 

39 

61 

260 

581 

788 

1,857 

2,266 

2,057 

1,700 



9,609 



86 
2 
1 
8 
1 
8 
1 
3 
2 
1 
6 
1 



68 



310 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



TABiiB XYll,"— Conjugal amdition Ity age, sex, race, and nativUif — Continued. 

PROVINCE OF HABANA. 
Total Population. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 ycani r 

18 and 19 years 

20 yea re 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years , 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Unknown 

The province 



Total. 



190,465 
28,121 
20,400 
11,181 
88,070 
45,029 
86,463 
53,519 
82,883 
18,829 
9,814 
80 



424,804 



Single. 



180,361 

27,828 

18,875 

9,809 

27,584 

24,666 

14,931 

17,297 

10.032 

6,174 

3,696 

17 



Married. 



289,770 



24 

455 

1,216 

1.106 

6,666 

13,223 

18,906 

22,816 

11,876 

6,144 

1,624 

2 



77,546 



lAviag 
together 
ashuft- 
bandand 
wife by 
mutual 
consent. 



16 

299 

725 

669 

8,111 

5,190 

4,961 

7,893 

8,894 

1,810 

661 

1 



28,730 



Wid- 
owed. 



13 

27 

75 

94 

714 

1,941 

2,655 

6,491 

7,074 

6,696 

3,832 



28,612 



Un- 
known. 



51 

12 

9 

4 

6 

9 

10 

22 

7 

5 

1 

10 



146 



Total Males. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

86 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 yeare 

65 yeare and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



65,436 

13,438 

10,833 

5,786 

20,558 

24,981 

20,857 

29,682 

17,478 

9,564 

4,401 

26 



221,990 



65,885 

13,406 

10,176 

5,460 

17,807 

16,834 

10,044 

10,420 

5,425 

3,199 

1,590 

13 



159,758 



6 

7 

53 

113 

1,532 

6,276 

7,096 

13,837 

7,761 

8,618 

1,283 

2 



40,083 



2 

8 

92 

161 

1,128 

2,418 

2,480 

4,026 

2,378 

1,181 

462 

1 



14,822 



10 

11 

9 

12 

87 

448 

781 

1,889 

1,916 

1,564 

1,066 



7,743 



33 
6 
4 



4 
6 
6 
10 
3 
2 



10 



84 



Total Fkmalbs. 



Under 16 yean 

15 to 17 yeare 

18 and 19 yeare 

20 yeare 

21 to 24 yeare 

25 to 29 yeare , 

80 to 84 yeare 

35 to 44 yeare 

45 to 54 yeare 

55 to 64 yeare 

66 yeare and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



66,029 

14.683 

10,067 

5,445 

17,512 

20,048 

16,106 

23,837 

15,405 

9,266 

5,413 

4 



202,814 



64,976 
13,922 
8,200 
3,819 
9,777 
7,832 
4,887 
6,877 
4,607 
2,976 
2.106 
4 



130,012 



18 

448 

1,163 

992 

6,123 

7,948 

6,810 

8,979 

4,115 

1,526 

341 



87,463 



14 

291 

633 

618 

1,983 

2,772 

2.481 

8,367 

1,621 

629 

199 



14,406 



3 

16 

66 

82 

627 

1,493 

1,924 

4,602 

5,158 

4,132 

2,766 



20,869 



18 
6 
5 
4 
2 
3 
4 

12 
4 
8 
1 



62 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



311 



Tablr XVII. — Conjugal condxti(m by age, sex, rare, and nativity — Continued. 

PROVINCE OF HABANA— Continued. 
Total Nativr Whitk. 



Under 15 years 

IS to 17 ycafM , 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years , 

90 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years , 

45 to 64 years 

56 to 64 years , 

66 years and over . 
Unknown 

The province 









Living 












together 






Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutual 
consent. 


Wid- 
owed. 


Un- 
known. 


93,026 


92,949 


21 


8 


9 


39 


18,772 


18.230 


878 


133 


22 


9 


12.622 


11,227 


1,086 


292 


59 


8 


6,413 


5,180 


883 


274 


73 


3 


21,102 


14.282 


5.106 


1,127 


584 


3 


23,075 


10.398 


9,40K 


1.683 


1.580 


6 


17,827 


5,101 


9,212 


1,435 


2.071 


5 


25,289 


5,159 


13,498 


1,861 


4.758 


13 


14,211 


2.074 


6,629 


758 


4,746 


4 


7,595 


1,008 


2,700 


'255 


8,628 


4 


8,680 


546 


807 


54 


2,273 




7 


5 


1 






I 










243.619 


166, 162 


49,679 


7.880 


19,803 


95 



Nativr White Males. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 yean* 

20 yeare 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . , 
Unsnown 

The province 



46.910 
8,579 
5,824 
2,876 
9.822 

10,963 
8,650 

12,286 

6,408 

3,146 

1,373 

6 



116,838 



46.873 

8,560 

5,734 

2.718 

8,273 

6,388 

3.229 

2,906 

1,006 

416 

185 

4 



o 

4 

42 

92 

1,054 

8,843 

4,067 

6,923 

3.749 

1,671 

598 

1 



86,351 



21,549 



1 

3 

39 

57 

428 

869 

812 

1,111 

466 

173 

40 



8, 999 



7 

9 

6 

9 

CG 

359 

540 

1,282 

1.180 

884 

550 



4,892 



24 
4 
8 



1 
4 
2 
4 
2 
2 



1 

47 



Native White Females. 



Under 15 yean 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 84 yean 

86 to 44 yean 

46 to 51 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



46,116 

10,198 

6,798 

8,537 

11,280 

12,112 

9,177 

13,008 

7.808 

4.449 

2,307 

1 



126,781 



46.076 

9,671 

5,493 

2,462 

6,009 

4.010 

1,875 

2,198 

1.068 

592 

361 

1 



79,811 



16 

374 

994 

791 

4,052 

6,065 

5, 145 

6,575 

2,880 

1.029 

209 



28,130 



7 
130 
253 
217 
699 
814 
623 
7o0 
292 
82 
14 



3,881 



2 

13 

53 

64 

518 

1,221 

1,531 

3,476 

8,566 

2,744 

1,723 



14,911 



16 
5 
5 
3 
2 
2 
3 
9 
2 



48 



312 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XVII. — Conjugal condition by age^ aex, race^ andnoUivUy — Continued. 

PROVINCE OF HABANA-Oontinued. 
Total Forbiqn Whitk. 



Under 15 years. , . , 

1ft to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years , 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 
Unknown 

The province 



Total. 



8,240 
2,041 
2,744 
1.945 
8.452 

11,224 
9.660 

14.517 

8.641 

4,676 

2,120 

11 



68,971 



Single. 



3,232 

2,003 

2,643 

1.815 

7.216 

7.895 

6,037 

5.217 

2,196 

984 

882 

3 



38,623 



Married. 



83 

73 

103 

901 

2.559 

3,489 

7,043 

4,288 

1,933 

645 

1 



21,068 



Liying 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
oonsent. 



2 
4 

24 

25 

275 

594 

719 

1,182 

604 

248 

69 



3,746 



Wid- 
owed. 



3 
2 

58 
173 
311 
1,069 
1,451 
1,410 
1,023 



5,501 



Un- 
known. 



5 

1 

I 



2 
3 

4 
6 
2 
I 
1 
7 



33 



Foreign White Males. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 vears 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



1,752 
1,637 
2,382 
1.647 
7,155 
9,800 
7,794 
11,652 
6,417 
3.197 
1,318 
11 



1,748 

1,635 

2,367 

1,624 

6,634 

7,324 

4,664 

4,738 

1,921 

816 

280 

8 



54,162 33,754 



1 

8 

10 

826 

1,480 

2,467 

5,433 

3,435 

1,608 

660 

1 



15,319 



5 
13 
179 
434 
532 
907 
493 
203 
68 



2,824 



1 

'i' 



14 
GO 
138 
469 
567 
570 
420 



2,240 



3 
1 
1 



2 
3 
5 
1 



7 
25 



Foreign White Females. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 

The province 



1,488 

404 

362 

298 

1,297 

1,924 

1,766 

2,965 

2,124 

1,879 

802 



14,809 



1,484 
868 
276 
191 
682 
671 
873 
479 
275 
168 
102 



4,869 



82 

65 

93 

675 

1,079 

1,032 

1,610 

853 

826 

86 



5,749 



2 
4 

19 

12 

96 

160 

187 

275 

111 

45 

11 



922 



2 

2 

44 

113 

178 

600 

840 
603 



8,261 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



313 



Tablb XVII. — Conjugal condition by age^ sex, race, and naHvily — Continued. 

PROVINCB OF HABANA— Continued. 
Total Golorsd. 



Under 16 yean 

15 to 17 yeaxB 

18 and 19 years 

20 years , 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 34 yean 

85 to 44 yean 

45to54 yean , 

55 to 64 yean , 

65 yean and over . 
Unknowm 

The province 



Total. 



84, 199 
7,S06 
5,084 
2,828 
8,516 

10,780 
9,076 

13,718 

10,131 

6,658 

4,014 

12 



112,214 



Blngle. 



84,180 
7,095 
4,605 
2,814 
6,086 
6,878 
4,790 
6,921 
5,762 
4,182 
2,768 
9 



84,965 



Married. 



3 

44 

107 

119 

648 

1,266 

1,205 

1,775 

969 

611 

172 



6,799 



Living 
together 
as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutual 
consent. 



6 

162 

409 

870 

1,709 

2,913 

2,807 

4,860 

2,632 

1,807 

638 

1 



17,104 



Wld- 
owed. 



3 

5 

13 

19 

72 

188 

278 

664 

877 

668 

536 



8,806 



Un- 
known. 



7 
2 



1 
1 



1 

8 
1 



18 



OOLOBBD MALI8. 



Under 15 yean 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

26 to 29 yean , 

80 to 34 yean , 

85 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

65 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



16,774 
8,222 
2,127 
1,213 
8,681 
4,718 
8,913 
5,844 
4,668 
8,221 
1,710 
9 



60,990 



16,764 
3,212 
2,074 
1,118 
2,900 
3,122 
2,161 
2,716 
2,498 
1,967 
1,126 
6 



39,653 



1 

2 

3 

11 

162 

452 

572 

961 

577 

839 

125 



3,215 



1 

6 

48 

81 

821 

1,116 

1,186 

2,006 

1,414 

806 

864 

1 



7,499 



2 

2 

2 

3 

7 

29 

63 

138 

169 

110 

96 



611 



6 
1 



1 
1 



2 
12 



COLOBBD FEMALU. 



Under 16 yean 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 84 yean 

85 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean , 

65 to 64 yean 

66 yean and over . 
Unknown 

The province 



17,425 
4,086 
2,907 
1,610 
4,935 
6,012 
5,163 
7,869 
5,473 
3,437 
2,304 
3 



61,224 



17,416 
8,888 
2,431 
1,196 
8,186 
8,251 
2,689 
4,206 
3,264 
2,216 
1,643 
3 



45,332 



2 
42 
104 
106 
496 
804 
633 
794 
382 
172 
47 



8,684 



5 

157 

861 

289 

1.188 

1,796 

1,671 

2,842 

1,118 

602 

174 



9,605 



1 

3 

11 

16 

65 

169 

220 

526 

708 

548 

440 



2,697 



1 
1 



2 
1 



6 



314 



TtEPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Tablb XVII. — Conjugal condition by age, gex, race, and naHvily — Continaed. 

PROVINCE OP MATANZAS. 
Total Population. 



Under 15 yean 

16 to 17 years 

18 and 19 yean 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

56 to 6t yean 

66 yean and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



Total. 


Single. 


70,441 


70,139 


13,096 


12,714 


9,047 


8,191 


5,008 


4,152 


14,490 


10.380 


17,788 


9,515 


14,418 


6,751 


22,963 


7,801 


16,969 


6,473 


11,404 


5.285 


6,799 


3,572 


21 


15 


202,444 


143,968 





Living 






together 




Married. 


as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutual 


Wid- 
owed. 








consent. 




7 


11 
224 




119 


4 


836 


492 


26 


835 


482 


39 


2,054 


1,778 


276 


4,559 


2,957 


756 


4,741 


2,913 


1,012 


7,851 


4,873 


2,433 


4,464 


3,626 


2,405 


1,922 


2,818 


1,877 


096 


1.266 


1,259 


1 


2 


2 


27,067 


20,942 


10,069 



Un- 
known. 



284 

35 

2 



2 

1 
1 
5 

1 
2 
4 
1 



338 



Total Malj». 



Under 15 yean 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

30 to 34 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over . . 
UnJmown 

The province 



35,580 


35,427 


6.023 


5,978 


4,160 


4,093 


2.868 


2,230 


7,098 


6,082 


8,852 


5,792 


7,463 


3,462 


12,287 


4,420 


9,466 


3,860 


6,759 


3,399 


3,668 


1,972 


12 


9 


103,726 


76,709 



13,602 



2 


2 
12 
55 




4 




9 


2 


22 


112 


4 


871 


025 


18 


1,559 


1,353 


147 


2,277 


1,420 


2»l 


4,572 


2,552 


738 


2,862 


2,076 


677 


1,387 


1,439 


533 


586 


809 


847 


1 


1 





10,456 



2,760 



149 
84 

1 



2 
1 



5 
1 
1 

4 
1 



199 



Total Frxales. 



Under 15 yean 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 34 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

56 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



84,861 
7,073 
4,887 
2,640 
7,392 
8,936 
6,965 

10,676 

7,506 

4,645 

8,181 

9 



98,718 



34,712 
6,741 
4,098 
1,922 
4,298 
3,7i3 
2,289 
3,381 
2,623 
1,886 
1,600 
6 



67,279 



5 

115 

827 

313 

1.683 

8,000 

2,464 

8,279 

1,602 

535 

162 



18,485 



9 

212 

487 

870 

1,153 

1,604 

1.493 

2,321 

1.550 

879 

457 

1 



10,486 



4 

24 

85 

258 

609 

718 

1,695 

1.T28 

1.344 

912 

2 



7,329 



185 
1 
1 



139 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



315 



Tablk XVIL — CanJMgal condition by <i^, «er, race, and naiwUif — Ckmtiniied. 

PROVINCE OF MATANZAS-ConUnued. 
.Total Nativr Whitb. 



Under 15 yean . . . . . 

16 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

90 to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

66 to 64 ytars 

65 years and over . . 
Unluiown 

The province 



Totol. 



42,119 
8,141 
5,424 
2,766 
8,152 
9,243 
7,034 

10,267 

6,660 

2,662 

1,202 

12 



102.682 



Single. 



41,857 

7,943 

5,000 

2,362 

5,850 

4,877 

1,976 

1,882 

762 

829 

160 

9 



72,497 



Married. 



6 

102 

274 

269 

1,677 

8,637 

8,685 

5.698 

2,857 

1,038 

816 



19,554 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
consent. 



1 

61 
127 
104 
899 
582 
511 
649 
258 
69 
17 



2,773 



Wid- 
owed. 



2 

21 

81 

225 

646 

862 

2.086 

1,787 

1,231 

719 

2 



7,662 



Un- 
known. 



255 

83 

2 



2 

1 



296 



Native Whitk Males. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



21,440 


21,302 


3,762 


8.725 


2,500 


2,479 


1,302 


1,269 


8,842 


8,378 


4.328 


2,789 


3,472 


1,306 


5,220 


1,218 


2,730 


450 


1,224 


181 


496 


77 


8 


7 


60.324 


88,181 



2 

3 

6 

15 

285 

1,112 

1,620 

8,001 

1,659 

677 

231 



8,611 



2 

13 

15 

163 

297 

304 

413 

174 

57 

15 



1,453 



1 
3 
15 
129 
242 
586 
446 
809 
178 



1,904 



136 

82 

1 



1 
1 



2 
1 



175 



Native White Females. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years.:... 

20 yean 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 
Unknown 

The provini»e 



20,679 
4,879 
2,924 
1.464 
4.310 
4,915 
8,562 
5.047 
2,990 
1,438 
706 
4 



.^2.358 



20,555 

4,218 

2,521 

1,093 

2,472 

1,588 

670 

664 

312 

148 

73 

2 



4 

268 

254 

1,392 

2,525 

2,065 

2,697 

1,198 

256 

85 



34,316 I 10,943 



1 

59 

114 

89 

236 

285 

207 

236 

79 

12 

2 



1,320 



2 

20 

'28 

210 

517 

620 

1,4^0 

1,341 

922 

546 

2 



5,658 



119 
1 
1 



121 



816 



BEPOBT ON THS OSNSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XVII. — Conjugal oondUion by ctge, sex^ race^ and natimty — Oontiniied. 

PBOVUICE OF MATANZA8-<k>xitinued. 
Total Fokbign White. 



Under 16 yean 

16 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

26 to 29 yean 

80 to 34 yean 

86 to 44 yean 

46 to 64 yean 

56 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over . . 
Unknown 

The provinee 



TotaL 



484 

290 

885 

278 

1,558 

2,082 

1,900 

3,394 

2,462 

1.692 

809 

1 



15,286 



Single. 



480 

285 

866 

247 

1,806 

1,870 

976 

1,154 

542 

800 

111 



7,124 



Married. 



6 

22 

20 

198 

634 

676 

1,613 

1,272 

716 

802 

1 



6,868 



living 
together 
as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutoal 
consent. 



6 

8 

40 

129 

167 

869 

184 

76 

21 



969 



Wid- 
owed. 



2 

8 

20 

49 

82 

267 

464 

602 

876 



1,764 



Un- 
known. 






FOSXIGN Whitx Malxs. 



Under 16 yean 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 84 yean 

85 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

66 yean and over . . 
UnKnown 

The province 



278 

190 

284 

221 

1,287 

1,720 

1,576 

2,809 

1,870 

1,112 

507 

1 



11,850 



271 

190 

282 

218 

1,205 

1,287 

911 

1,068 

502 

264 

89 



6,297 



1 

2 

46 

804 

478 

1,258 

995 

588 

250 

1 



8,928 



1 

5 

84 

117 

158 

883 

169 

67 

19 



896 



1 

2 

12 

34 

134 

204 

193 

149 



729 



FoBEioN Whitx Females. 



Under 16 yean 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean , 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 84 yean 

85 to 44 yean 

46 to 64 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 

The province 



211 
100 
101 
57 
271 
862 
824 
585 
592 
480 
302 



3,885 



209 
96 
78 
84 

100 
83 
64 
71 
40 
86 
22 



827 



5 

21 

18 

147 

230 

198 

855 

2T7 

127 

62 



1,480 



6 

8 

6 

12 

14 

26 

16 

8 

2 



91 



2 

2 

18 

37 

48 

133 

260 

809 

226 



1,036 



OOKJUQAL OOKDITIOK. 



817 



Table XVII. — Oofnjugal condition by age, sex, race, and natwify — Ck)ntinaed. 

PBOVINCE OF MATANZAS-Gontiniied. 
Total Oolokkd. 



Under 16 yeaiB 

16tol7yean 

18 and 19 yean 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

26 to 29 yean 

90 to 84 yean 

86 to 44 yean 

46 to 64 yean 

56 to 64 yean 

66 yean and over .. 
Unknown 

The province 



Total. 



27,888 
4,666 
8,288 
1,964 
4,780 
6,468 
6,484 
9,802 
8,847 
7,150 
4,788 
8 



84,627 



Single. 



27,802 
4,486 
2,886 
1,648 
8,226 
8,768 
2,800 
4,766 
6,169 
4,656 
8,811 
6 



64,867 



Married. 



1 

12 

40 

46 

184 



880 
540 
886 
174 
80 



2,180 



Living 
together 
as hua- 
band and 
wife by 
mutnai 
consent. 



10 

168 

859 

870 

1,889 

2,246 

2,236 

8,866 

8,189 

2,174 

1,228 

2 



17,180 



Wid- 
owed. 



768 



Un- 
known. 





25 


2 
8 


2 


6 




81 
61 


1 


68 
180 
164 


1 
2 


144 
166 


2 
4 



87 



Colored Malsb. 



Under 16 yean 

16 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 84 yean 

85 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



18,867 
2,071 
1,876 
845 
1,969 
2,804 
2,406 
4,258 
4,866 
4,423 
2,666 
8 



41,552 



18,854 
2,068 
1,882 
748 
1,499 
1,716 
1,245 
2,119 
2,898 
2,964 
1,806 
2 



82,281 



1 

2 

5 

40 

148 

179 

818 

208 

122 

66 



1,068 



2 

10 

41 

92 

428 

989 

968 

1,806 

1,788 

1,815 

775 

1 



8,106 



1 
6 
18 
18 
27 
81 
25 



127 



11 
2 



1 
4 



21 



COLOBKD FKMALX8. 



Under 15 yean 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 84 yean 

85 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

65 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



18,971 
2,604 
1,862 
1.119 
2,811 
8,659 
8,079 
6,044 
8,981 
2,727 
2,123 
6 



42,975 



18,948 
2,428 
1,604 
796 
1,726 
2,062 
1,565 
2,646 
2,271 
1,702 
1,506 
4 



82,186 



1 

11 

88 

41 

144 

245 

201 

227 

127 

62 

25 



1,112 



8 

168 

818 

278 

911 

1,807 

1,272 

2,069 

1,456 

869 

458 

1 



9,075 



2 

2 

6 

80 

66 

60 

112 

127 

118 

140 



686 



14 



1 

i 



16 



318 



BEPOST ON TH£ OENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XVII. — Conjugal condition by age, sex, race, and naiivUy — Continaed, 

PROVINCE OP PINAR DEL RIO. 
Total Population. 



Under 15 yean 

16 to 17 years , 

18 and 19 yean 

20 yean. 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

30 to 84 yean 

36 to 44 yean 

45 to 64 yean 

66 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



Total. 



68,210 

12,260 

8,467 

6,769 

13,636 

16,978 

12,311 

16,744 

10,176 

6,602 

3,016 

6 



173,064 



Single. 



68,101 
11,871 
7,512 
4,660 
9,433 
8,618 
4,361 
4,626 
2,625 
1,707 
1,276 
3 



124,482 



Married. 



6 

222 

642 

633 

2,610 

4,968 

4,819 

7,166 

3,963 

1,699 

563 



27,100 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
consent. 



2 

167 

374 

613 

1,408 

2,667 

2,154 

2,726 

1,453 

617 

816 



12,386 



Wid- 
owed. 



8 

7 

34 

69 

278 

801 

977 

2,823 

2,132 

1,479 

871 



8,904 



Un- 
known. 



S 
6 

4 

7 
4 

*4 
S 

"i 

2 



132 



Under 16 yean 

16 to 17 yean.. 

18 and 19 yean 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

30 to 84 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

46 to 64 yean 

66 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



Total Males. 










34,966 34.902 


4 

3 

16 

62 

661 

1,902 

2,697 

4,30f 

2,636 

1,279 

439 




3 

3 

4 

2 

27 

162 

289 

789 

662 

616 

316 


47 


6,918 
4,256 
2.808 
7,163 
9.132 
6,871 
9,669 
6,902 
8,339 
1,781 
3 


6,901 
4,216 
2,682 
6,154 
6,880 
2,818 
2,822 
1,616 
1,086 
798 
1 


9 

18 

69 

416 

1,186 

1,167 

1,660 

987 

469 

229 


2 
3 
3 
6 
3 


4 
2 




2 










91,688 


68,878 


13,783 


6.189 


2,772 


71 



Total Femalbb. 



Under 16 yean.;.:. 

16 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 84 yean 

36 to 44 yean 

45 to 64 yean 

66 to 64 yean 

66 yean and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



33,264 
6,342 
4,211 
2,951 
6,483 
7,846 
6,440 
7,175 
4,274 
2,163 
1,286 
2 


83,199 

8,297 

1,868 

8,279 

2,638 

1,643 

1,703 

1,010 

622 

478 

2 


1 

219 

626 

681 

1,969 

3,086 

2,222 

2,862 

1,827 

420 

114 


2 
148 
866 
444 

992 
1,482 

987 
1,076 

466 

158 
86 




62 


4 

30 

67 

251 

639 

688 

1,634 

1,470 

963 

666 


1 
2 
1 
2 

1 




1 


1 










81,876 


65,609 


18,317 


6,197 


6,192 


61 



OONJUOAL CONDITION. 



319 



Tablb XVII. — Conjugal condiUon by age^ sex, race, and nalivily — Continued. 

PKOVINCE OP PINAR DEL RIO-Continued. 
Total Native Whitk. 



Under 15 yean 

16 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean 

20 vean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

30 to 34 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to G4 yean 

65 yean and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



Total. 



48,925 
8,772 
6,000 
8,889 
9,969 

11,200 
7,739 

10,071 

5,422 

2,4»1 

1,024 

2 



114,907 



Single. 



48,840 

8,471 

5,283 

8,085 

6,240 

5,066 

2,256 

1,866 

772 

323 

153 

2 



82,327 



Married. 



2 

197 

473 

515 

2,091 

4,027 

8,666 

5,226 

2,580 

1,006 

309 



20,091 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
consent. 



95 

213 

288 

792 

1,406 

1,030 

1,130 

445 

119 

29 



5,547 



Native White Males. 



6,843 



Wld- 


Un- 


owed. 


known. 


■ 
3 


80 


7 


2 


27 


4 


50 


1 


240 


6 


679 


2 


788 




1,847 


2 


1,623 


2 


1,046 
533 







99 



Under 15 yean 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

30 to 84 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over . . 

The province 



25,205 
4,239 
2,966 
1,849 
4,698 
5,714 
4,060 
5,286 
2,783 
1,276 
507 



58,573 



25. 161 

4,225 

2,933 

1,778 

4.087 

3,543 

1,482 

1,188 

476 

188 

91 



45,102 



1 

3 

12 

36 

416 

1,396 

1,782 

2,802 

1,585 

687 

230 



8,900 



7 
6 

32 
217 
634 
568 
719 
317 
86 
23 



2,609 



8 

3 

3 

2 

24 

140 

228 

575 

454 

315 

163 



1,910 



40 
1 
2 
1 
4 
1 



2 
1 



52 



Native White Females. 



Under 15 yean 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean..... 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

30 to 34 yean 

85 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



23,720 
4,583 
8,044 
2,040 
4,671 
5,486 
8,679 
4,785 
2,639 
1,218 
517 
2 



56,334 



23,679 

4,246 

2,350 

1,257 

2,203 

1,543 

774 

678 

296 

135 

62 

2 



37,225 



1 

194 

461 

479 

1,676 

2,631 

1,883 

2,424 

1,045 

819 

79 



11,191 



88 
207 
256 
575 
772 
462 
411 
128 

S3 
6 



2,938 



4 

24 

48 

216 

539 

560 

1,272 

1,169 

731 

870 



4,933 



40 
1 
2 



2 
1 



47 



320 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XVII. — Conjugal condition by age^ sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

PROVINCE OP PINAB DEL RIO-Contlnued. 
Total Fobkign White. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 34 yean 

36 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together 
as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutual 
consent. 


1 

Wid- 
owed. 


Un- 
known. 


197 


197 

199 

828 

289 

916 

1,116 

674 

760 

879 

159 

70 

1 






1 

1 


204 


3 

13 

27 

123 

898 

632 

1,249 

951 

492 

152 


2 
4 

4 

35 

97 

120 

217 

173 

48 

16 


1 


846 

323 

1,079 

1,633 

1,471 

2,432 

1,716 

908 

407 


1 

1 

5 

21 

45 

201 

212 

209 

169 




2 


1 


2 

1 


2 


1 












10,718 


5,088 


4,040 


716 


867 


7 



FoKXiGN Whitx Males. 



Under 15 yean 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

30 to 84 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



127 

176 

311 

283 

980 

1,471 

1,319 

2.184 

1,494 

782 

318 

2 



9,447 



127 

175 

809 

269 

881 

1,080 

646 

732 

870 

160 

68 

1 



4,808 



1 

8 

67 

291 

582 

1,104 

828 

444 

133 



3,408 



1 
1 
4 

80 

88 

112 

198 

168 

46 

16 



664 



2 
11 
29 
148 
127 
142 
101 



560 



2 

1 

2 

1 



Foreign White Females. 



Under 15 yean. 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 84 yean 

85 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over.. 

The province 



70 

28 

85 

40 

99 

162 

152 

248 

222 

126 

89 



1,271 



70 

24 

19 

20 

85 

86 

28 

28 

9 

9 

2 



280 



8 

12 

19 

56 

107 

100 

145 

123 

48 

19 



682 



1 
8 



5 
9 

8 

19 

5 

2 



52 



1 
1 
8 
10 
16 
56 
85 
67 
68 



307 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



321 



Tablb XVII. — Conjugal condUion by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

PROVINCE OP PINAR DEL RIO— Continued. 
Total Colobbo. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years , 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

2 > to 29 years 

3J to 34 years 

So to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to G4 years 

65 years and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



Total. 



19,068 
3,284 
2,121 
1,547 
8,188 
4,145 
8,101 
4,241 
8,038 
2,100 
1,585 
1 



47,439 



Single. 



19,064 
3,201 
1,901 
1,226 
2,277 
2,316 
1,431 
1,899 
1,474 
1,225 
1,058 



37,067 



Married. 



3 

22 

56 

91 

2% 

563 

522 

691 

432 

201 

92 



2,969 



Living 
together 

aa hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
consent. 



2 

60 

157 

221 

581 

1,164 

1,004 

1,379 

835 

450 

270 



6,123 



Wid- 
owed. 



Un- 
known. 



6 

8 
33 
101 
144 
272 I 
297 I. 
224 
169 



1,254 



19 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



1 
1 



26 



Colored Males. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18andl9 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

CO to 34 years 

25 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

56 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



9,624 

1,503 

989 

676 

1,475 

1,947 

1,492 

2,099 

1,625 

1,281 

956 

1 



23,668 



9,614 

1,501 

973 

635 

1,236 

1,257 

690 

902 

769 

747 

639 



18,963 



3 

8 

68 

215 

283 

398 

273 

148 

76 



1,475 



1 
11 
33 
169 
463 
487 
733 
502 
327 
190 



2,916 



1 
11 
32 
66 
81 
59 
51 



302 



7 
1 
1 



1 
1 



12 



CoLOBED Females. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years , 

SO to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

56 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 

The province 



9,464 

1,781 

1 132 

871 

1,713 

2,198 

1,609 

2,142 

1,413 

819 

629 



23,771 



9,450 

1,700 

928 

591 

1,041 

1,059 

741 

997 

705 

478 

414 



18, IW 



22 

53 

83 

228 

348 

239 

293 

159 

53 

16 



2 
59 
146 
188 
412 
701 
517 
646 
333 
123 
80 



1,494 



3,207 



o 

8 

32 

90 

112 

206 

216 

165 

118 



952 



12 

"'i 



1 
14 



24662 21 



322 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Tablk XVII. — Conjugal condiiUm by cuje, sex, nux, and ruUivitif — Continuixl. 

PROVINCE OF PUERTO PRINCIPE. 
Total Population. 



Under 15 years 

15tol7yearH 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 yearsi, 

30to34yean4 

35 to 44 years 

46 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



Total. 



87,768 
6,211 
8,439 
1,755 
4,493 
5,100 
5.944 
9,943 
6,791 
4,200 
2,587 
S 



Single. 



37,757 
6,011 
2,996 
1,419 
8,072 
2,593 
2, 115 
2,758 
1,731 
1,124 
791 
2 



88,234 I 62,869 



Married. 



6 

148 

316 

271 

1,127 

1,947 

2,929 

5,223 

3,128 

1,536 

579 



17,210 



Living 
together 

ashoa- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
consent. 



2 
49 

111 
53 
232 
417 
588 
985 
638 
289 
141 



3,506 



Wid- 
owed. 



1 

3 

16 

12 

62 

140 

308 

972 

1,292 

1,249 

1,074 



5,129 



Un- 
known. 



3 
4 
5 
2 
2 
2 
1 



21 



Total Males. 



Underl6 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

85 to 41 years 

45 to 64 years 

55 to 6-1 years 

66 years and over 
Unknown 



The province 



19,394 
2,857 
1,624 
843 
2,278 
2,582 
2,963 
5,208 
8,533 
2,238 
1,378 
1 



19,390 

2,851 

1,600 

814 

1,969 

1,699 

1,805 

1,589 

974 

686 

605 

1 



44,899 , 33,383 



12 

18 

223 

674 

1,815 

2,890 

1,896 

1,068 

442 



8.542 



1,764 



1 


1 


8 




11 


1 


9 


2 


78 


8 


185 


21 


276 


63 


511 


214 


883 


278 


197 


285 


100 


330 



1,203 



3 
4 
4 

2 
2 
1 



17 



Total Fkmalbb. 



Under 15 years i 18, 374 

- '- 3,354 

1,815 
912 
2,216 
2,618 
2,981 
4,735 
8,258 
1,962 
1,209 
2 



15 to 17 years. 
18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

66 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
UnknoAvn 



Theprovince 43,335 



18,367 

3,160 

1,896 

605 

1,103 

894 

810 

1,169 

757 

438 

286 

1 



28,986 



5 

146 

304 

253 

904 

1,273 

1,614 

2,338 

1,232 

468 

137 



8,668 



1 

46 

100 

44 

164 

232 

312 

474 

256 

92 

41 



1,751 



3 

15 

10 

M 

119 

245 

768 

1,014 

964 

744 



3,926 



1 

1 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



323 



Table XVII. — Conjugal condition by age^ sex, race^ and nativUij — Continued. 

PROVINCE OF PUERTO PRINCIPE— Contlnuwl. 
Total Nativk Whitk. 



Under 15 years 

IStolTyeare 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 21 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to S4 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 
Unknovm 

The province 



Total. 



31,017 
4,930 
2,654 
1,294 
3,176 
3,325 
4,351 
7,165 
4,471 
2,606 
1,358 
2 



66,349 



Single. 



31,008 

4,768 

2,287 

1,009 

2,034 

1.415 

1,245 

1,513 

812 

45-1 

201 

2 



46,778 



Married. 



5 

124 

274 

244 

943 

1,548 

2,464 

4,231 

2,354 

1.089 

373 



13,649 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
couBent. 



1 

35 

79 

31 

146 

240 

376 

591 

315 

116 

86 



1,966 



Wid- 
owed. 



1 

3 

14 

10 

53 

120 

2&1 

798 

990 

947 

748 



3,948 



Un- 
known. 



2 
2 
2 



8 



Native White Males. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

SO to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 yean and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



15,919 
2,281 
1,245 

612 
1,608 
1,499 
2,053 
3,563 
2.065 
1,216 

618 
1 



32,575 



15,916 

2,278 

1,228 

592 

1,291 

908 

767 

870 

391 

232 

96 

1 



24,568 



1 

2 

9 

14 

163 

487 

1,051 

2,236 

1,826 

732 

288 



6,309 



1 

7 

5 

48 

90 

182 

294 

170 

73 

28 



898 



1 

1 

6 

17 

51 

162 

175 

179 

201 



7W 



2 
2 
1 



Native White Females. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 



15,098 
2,649 
1,409 

682 
1,668 
1,826 
2,298 
8,602 
2,406 
1,390 

746 
1 



Theprovinoe I 33,774 



15,092 

2,490 

1,059 

417 

743 

512 

478 

673 

418 

222 

105 

1 



4 

122 

265 

280 

78a 

1,061 

1,413 

1,995 

1,028 

357 

85 



22,210 



7,340 



1 

81 

72 

26 

98 

150 

194 

297 

145 

43 

8 



3 

13 

9 

47 

108 

213 

636 

815 

768 

547 



1,068 I 3,154 



324 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XVII. — Conjugal condition by age^ sex, race^ and iialiritij — Continued. 

PROVINCE OF PUERTO PRINCIPE-Continued. 
Total Foreiqn White. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

SO to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 j'ears 

65 years and over . , 

The province 



Total. 



176 

76 

77 

71 

391 

675 

459 

874 

680 

370 

189 



4.038 



Single. 



176 

74 

74 

64 

834 

510 

275 

821 

150 

57 

36 



2.071 



Mnrried. 



1 

2 

5 

43 

120 

143 

437 

384 

206 

67 



1.408 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
consent. 



1 
1 
2 
14 
40 
31 
78 
62 
18 



254 



Wid- 
owed. 



Un- 
kiiowii. 



5 
10 

:W 
84 

79 



3C."> 



FoKEiGK White Males. 



Under 15 years. . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



95 

47 

61 

53 

350 

6:^6 

424 

795 

604 

292 

142 



The province 



3,499 



95 

47 

61 

51 

316 

495 

270 

308 

147 

49 

34 



1,873 



1 
24 
101 
118 
386 
346 
178 
58 



1,212 



1 

10 
38 
30 
72 
59 
15 

6 



231 



2 
6 
29 
52 
50 
44 



lf=3 






Foreign White Females. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

Oo years and over . . 

Tlio province 



81 
29 
16 
18 
41 
39 
35 
79 
76 
7S 
47 



539 



81 
27 
13 
13 
18 
15 

6 
13 

3 

8 
o 



l'.»8 



1 
2 
4 

19 
19 
25 
51 
38 
28 
9 



196 



1 
1 
1 
4 
2 
1 
6 
3 
3 
1 



23 



3 

4 

9 

32 

39 

35 



122 



CONJUGAL CONDITION.. 



325 



Tahlk XVII.— 



Omjiu/al condition hij age, sex, race, and nnfloUi/ — C-ontimuHl. 

PROVINCE OF PUERTO PRINCIPE— CtonUnuwl. 
ToTAi, Colored. 



Under 15 years 

l."> to 17 yeiirs 

K^ and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 5-4 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 
UnKnoT^Ti 

The province 




Married. 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutaal 
consent. 



Wid- 
owe<l. 



1 

23 
40 
22 
141 
279 
322 
555 
390 
241 
139 



2,153 



1 

13 

31 

20 

72 

137 I 
181 ' 
316 
261 
155 

98 



1,285 



2 

2 

9 

15 

31 

136 

218 

213 

247 



876 



Un- 
known, 



1 
2 
8 
2 
2 
2 
1 



13 



Coi/)RED Males. 



Tl'nder 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 vears 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 5^4 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 

The province 



3,380 
529 
318 
178 
420 
447 
486 
850 
8&4 
730 
623 



8,825 



3,879 
526 
811 
171 
362 
301 
268 
411 
433 
405 
876 



6,942 



1 

3 

3 

36 

86 

146 

268 

224 

158 

96 



1,021 



1 

2 

4 

3 

20 

57 

64 

145 

IM 

109 

66 



625 



1 

2 

2 

6 

23 

51 

56 

85 



226 



1 
2 
8 
2 
2 
1 



11 



Colored Females. 



Under 15 years 


3,195 
676 
390 
212 
606 
653 
648 

l.OM 

776 

494 

417 

1 


3,194 
643 
324 
175 
342 
367 
827 
483 
336 
208 
179 


1 

22 

37 

19 

105 

193 

176 

287 

166 

83 

43 






15 to 17 vears 


11 

27 

17 

52 

80 

117 

171 

107 

46 

32 






18 and 19 vears 


2 
1 
7 

13 
28 
113 
167 
157 
1G2 




20 years 




21 to 2 1 years 




25 to 20 years 




30 to 34 years 





3.5 to 4 1 years 




45 to 54 vears 




55 to 64 years 




65 years and over 


1 


Unlcnown 


1 














The province 


9,022 


0,578 


1,132 


G60 


650 


•) 







326 



REPOKT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XVII. — Conjugal condition by age, Bex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

PROVINCE OF SANTA CLARA. 
Total Population. 



Under 15 years 
15 to 17 years. . 
18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 



128,550 

24,640 

16,076 

8,879 

25.330 

25 to 29 years ! 31,530 



Total. 



30 to 34 years. 
35 to 44 years. 
45 to 54 years. 
55 to 61 years. 
65 years and over 
Unknown 



27,339 
43, 152 
27, 271 
15,618 
8,140 
5 



Theprovlnce 356,536 



Single. 



128,461 

23,966 

14,439 

7,270 

18.180 

16,841 

10.667 

13,529 

9,288 

6,316 

8.796 

5 



252,757 



Married. 



18 

376 

911 

892 

4,377 

9,251 

10.492 

17,618 

8,707 

3,277 

1,006 



LiTing 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
consent. 



56,925 



12 

272 

643 

605 

2,194 

3.904 

4,058 

6.921 

4.366 

2.407 

1,225 



Wid- 
owed. 



3 

18 

74 

110 

567 

1,529 

2,117 

5,0?2 

4,899 

3.612 

2,109 



Un- 
known. 



26,607 20,110 



56 

8 

9 

2 

12 

11 

6 

12 

11 

6 

5 



137 



Total Males. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19.year8 

20 years .' 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years ■ 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over i 

Un known 

The province 



65,303 

11,392 

7,839 

4,410 

18,735 

17,264 

15,324 

24,614 

16, 674 

9,038 

4,460 

4 



189,057 



65,264 

11,365 

7,737 

4,258 

12,186 

12,029 

7,412 

8.726 

5,834 

4,146 

2.228 

4 



141,189 



2 

12 

27 

66 

756 

3,194 

5,228 

10,465 

5.776 

2,365 

790 



28,681 



13,815 



5 


1 


8 


3 


57 


10 


81 


5 


728 


57 


1,?24 


314 


2,017 


663 


3,728 


1,686 


2,636 


1,421 


1,606 


1,016 


825 


615 



5,791 



31 

4 
8 



8 
3 

4 
9 
7 
5 
2 



81 



Total Females. 



Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

05 years and over 
Unknown 



The province 



63,247 


03,197 


16 


p. 


2 


13.248 


12,601 


364 


264 


15 


8,237 


6,702 


884 


586 


64 


4.469 


8.012 


826 


624 


105 


11,595 


5,994 


3,621 


1,466 


510 


14,272 


4,812 


6.057 


2,180 


1,215 


12,015 


8,255 


5.264 


2,041 


1,454 


18,538 


4,803 


7.153 


8,193 


8,386 


11,597 


3.451 


2,931 


1,730 


8,478 


6,580 


2,170 


912 


901 


2,596 


8,680 
1 


1,567 
1 


216 


400 


1,494 










167,479 


111.568 


28.244 


13,292 


14,319 



25 
4 
1 
2 
4 
8 
1 
3 
4 
1 
3 



56 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



327 



Table XVII. — Conjugal condition by age, sex, race^ and nativity — Continued. 

PROVINCE OP SANTA CLARA— Continued. 
Total Native Whitb. 



Under 15 yean. . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 yearn.. 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 yeans 

35 to 44 years 

45toM years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 



The province 









Living 












together 






Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutual 
consent. 


Wid- 
owed. 


Un- 
known. 


90,896 


90,825 


16 


4 


2 


49 


16,929 


16,461 


309 


136 


16 


7 


10,492 


9,382 


743 


308 


58 


6 


5,417 


4,365 


700 


257 


94 


1 


11,880 


10,156 


3,396 


851 


470 


7 


17,710 


8,140 


6,919 


1,376 


1,270 


5 


15,221 


4,461 


7,679 


1,364 


1,714 


8 


23,314 


4,705 


12,361 


2,118 


4,123 


7 


12,335 


1,965 


5,638 


940 


3,786 


6 


5,824 


818 


2,057 


259 


2,688 


2 


2,423 
4 


348 
4 


583 


53 


1.438 


1 












214,945 


151,130 


40,401 


7,661 


15,659 


94 



Native White Males. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

S5to44 years 

45to5'l years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



46,084 
7,789 
4,897 
2,517 
7,338 
8,709 
7,861 

12,077 

5,957 

2.576 

1,013 

3 



106,771 



46,001 

7,767 

4,843 

2,440 

6,534 

5,723 

3,125 

2,973 

1,029 

362 

146 

3 



80,916 



2 

12 

18 

42 

503 

2, 146 

3,509 

6,668 

3,368 

1,382 

434 



18,084 



1 

5 

24 

30 

251 

589 

721 

1,161 

582 

188 

46 



3,598 



1 

2 

6 

5 

45 

250 

504 

1,270 

974 

643 

386 



4,086 



29 
3 
6 



5 
1 
2 
5 
4 
1 
1 



57 



Native White Females. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to2l years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 5*1 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . , 
Unknown 

The province 



44,862 
9,140 
6,595 
2,900 
7,542 
9,001 
7,360 

11,237 

6,378 

3,248 

1,410 

1 



108,174 



44,824 

8,694 

4,539 

1,925 

3,622 

2,417 

1,336 

1,732 

936 

456 

202 

1 



70,184 



14 

297 

?25 

658 

2,893 

4,773 

4,170 

5,693 

2,270 

675 

149 



22,317 



T 



3 

131 
279 
227 
600 
787 
643 
957 

a>8 

71 
7 



1 

14 

52 

89 

425 

1,020 

1,210 

2,853 

2,812 

2,045 

1,052 



4,063 



11,573 



20 
4 



1 
2 
4 
1 
2 
2 
1 



37 



328 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XVII. — Conjugal condition by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

PROVINCE OF SANTA CLARA-Contlnued. 
Total Fobbign White. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

56 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 









Living 












togetber 






Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


aa hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutual 


Wid- 
owed. 


Un- 
known. 


















consent 






996 


996 
620 
881 










643 


16 
44 


6 
11 


1 
4 




942 


2 


809 


729 
8,307 


64 
365 


12 
118 


4 

21 




3,812 


1 


6,227 


3,825 


1,044 


270 


86 


2 


4,325 


2,356 


1,479 


818 


171 


2 


6,810 


2,654 


3,139 


617 


396 


2 


3,940 


1,074 


2,016 


847 


600 


3 


1,621 


339 


780 


120 


381 


1 


697 


113 


256 


27 


300 


1 


1 


1 
















1 


29,823 


16,894 


9,203 


1,846 


1,866 


14 



FoRBioN Whitb Males. 



l^lnder 15 years 

16 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 yeais 

65 years and over .. 
Unknown 

The province 



683 

448 

776 

678 

8,372 

4,572 

8,784 

5,949 

3,368 

1,318 

488 

1 



25,836 



683 

448 

766 

662 

8,141 

3,692 

2,296 

2,568 

1,027 

319 

93 

1 



15,698 



2 

12 

139 

619 

1,109 

2,674 

1,726 

662 

228 



3 
4 

86 
224 
267 
556 
325 
114 

26 



7,071 



1,604 



6 
36 
108 
249 
288 
222 
141 



1,062 



2 



I 

2 
2 
2 
1 
1 



11 



Foreign Whits Females. 



Under 15 vears 


413 
196 
167 
131 
440 
665 
541 
861 
572 
303 
209 


413 

172 

116 

67 

166 

133 

67 

86 

47 

20 

20 










15 to 17 years 


16 

42 

62 

226 

426 

370 

666 

290 

118 

28 


6 

8 

8 

82 

46 

61 

61 

22 

6 

2 


1 

2 

4 

15 

60 

G3 

149 

212 

159 

159 




18 and 19 years 




20 years 




21 to 24 yearn 


i 


25 to 29 years 


1 


30 to 34 years 




36 to 44 vears 




45 to 64 years 


I 


65 to 64 vears .- 




65 vears and over 








The orovince 


4,487 


1,296 


2,182 


242 


814 


3 







CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



329 



Tablk XVII. — <\mjngal coiiditian hy age, wu*, racej and ntUlmly — Continued. 

PROVINCE OF SANTA CLARA— Continued. 
Total Colored. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

90 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

The province 



Total. 



Single. 



37,158 
7,068 
4,642 
2,653 
6,638 
8,599 
7,793 
13,028 
10,996 
8,173 
5,020 



111,768 



37,140 
6,885 
4,176 
2,176 
4,717 
4,876 
3,851 
6,170 
6,249 
5,159 
3,834 



84,733 



Married. 



2 

51 

124 

128 

616 

1,288 

1,334 

2,118 

1,053 

440 

167 



7,821 



Living 
together 
as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutual 
consent. 



Wid- 
owed. 



17,100 



Un- 
known. 




Colored Males. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



18,686 
3,155 
2,167 
1,215 
3,025 
8.983 
3,679 
6,588 
6,349 
5,144 
2,959 



Theprovince , 56,950 



18,680 
3,150 
2,128 
1,156 
2,511 
2,614 
1,989 
3,185 
3,778 
3,465 
1,989 



7 
12 
114 
429 
610 
1,223 
682 
321 
128 



4 

3 

30 

47 

391 

911 

1,029 

2,011 

1,729 

1,204 

754 



44,645 



3,626 8,113 



•> 



G 

28 

51 

167 

159 

151 

88 



653 



2 
1 



3 
1 



2 
1 
3 



13 



Colored Females. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 

The province 



18,472 
3,913 
2,475 
1,488 
3,613 
4,616 
4,114 
6,440 
4,647 
3,029 
2,061 



54,818 



18,460 
3,735 
2,048 
1,020 
2,206 
2,262 
1,862 
2.965 
2,471 
1,694 
1,345 



40,088 



2 
51 
117 
116 
502 
859 
724 
895 
371 
119 
39 



3,796 



4 

127 

299 

289 

834 

1,347 

1.347 

2, 175 

1,350 

824 

391 




8,987 



10 
12 
70 
115 
IHl 
:m 
151 
r.-V2 



1,932 



1 
1 
1 
8 



1 
1 



3 

16 



830 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XVII. — Cfmjugal coTidUion htj age, fter, race, and nativUy — Continued. 

PROVINCE OP SANTIAGO. 
Total Population. 



Total. 



Under 15 years 141.602 

15 to 17 years 22,442 

18 and 19 years I 13, 836 



20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

85to44>'ears 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 >*oars 

66 years and over 
Unknown 



7,728 
16,630 
20,974 
22,337 
38,735 
23,438 
12,629 

7,343 
21 



Single. 



141,542 

21,691 

12.131 

5.978 

11,035 

9,896 

7,560 

11,311 

7.144 

4.215 

2.827 

13 



Married. 



7 

312 

800 

717 

2,819 

5.570 

7,173 

12,463 

6,650 

2,803 

1,164 

ft 



Thcprovince ! 327,715 235, :m i 40,483 



Living 
together 

ashUR- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
eonsent. 



18 

425 

873 

989 

2,545 

4.942 

6,582 

12.426 

6.785 

2,911 

1,065 

1 



39,562 



Wid- 
owed. 



2 

10 

31 

43 

226 

565 

1,019 

2,530 

2.853 

2,698 

2,286 



Un- 
known. 



12,263 



33 
4 
1 
1 
5 
1 
3 
5 
6 
2 
1 
2 



64 



Total Malbr. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to ai years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to&t years 

55 to 64 years 

66 years and over . 
Unknown , 

The pnn'ineo 



72,420 

10,068 

6,438 

8.612 

8,409 

10,395 

ll,a>5 

19,945 

12,043 

R. 161 

3,288 

11 



l<«,84: 



72,391 
10,040 
6,362 
3,392 
6,996 
6.259 

5,590 
2,901 
1,566 
1,012 
6 



120,878 



7 

16 

68 

581 

2,008 

3,435 

7,061 

4.316 

1.991 

888 

3 



20.376 



1 

17 

58 

147 

802 

2.030 

3,041 

6,622 

4,176 

2.063 

800 



19,757 



2 
1 
1 
4 

26 
96 
244 
670 
646 
541 
557 



2,790 



24 
3 
1 
I 
4 



2 
2 
4 



1 

2 



44 



Total Fbmalks. 



Under 15 years 

16 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45to&t years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



69,182 

12.374 

7,398 

4,116 

8,221 

10,579 

11,282 

18,790 

11,395 

6,468 

4,055 

10 



163,870 



69, 151 
11,651 
5. 769 
2,586 
4,039 
3,637 
3,227 
6,721 
4.243 
2, 6-19 
1,785 
7 



114,465 



5 

305 

784 

&19 

2,238 

3, 562 

3,738 

5,402 

2,334 

812 

276 

2 



20, 107 



17 
408 

815 

8i2 

1,743 

2,912 

3.541 

5,804 

2,609 

84H 

265 

1 



19,805 



9 

30 

39 

200 

467 

775 

1,860 

2,207 

2,157 

1,729 



9,473 



9 
1 



1 

1 

1 

3 

2 
•» 



20 



CONJUGAL COKDITION. 



331 



Tablr XVII. — Conjugal condition hy nge^ sex, race, and nniivU-g — Continued. 

PROVINCE OP SANTIAGO— Continued. 
Total Native White. 



Under 15 yean 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 
UnKDown , 

The province 



Total. 



77,949 

12,110 

7,246 

3,952 

8.098 

9,558 

10,836 

18,895 

10,739 

5,509 

2,902 

8 



167,797 



Single. 



77,912 

11,699 

6,294 

3,006 

5.047 

3,735 

2,765 

4,086 

2,235 

1,131 

591 

4 



118,505 



Married. 



5 
206 
555 

497 
1.858 
3,596 
4,723 
8,029 
4,116 
1,729 

665 
2 



25,980 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
consent. 



9 

196 

376 

417 

1,035 

1,835 

2.635 

5,081 

2,457 

949 

235 



15,225 



Wid- 
owed. 



1 

6 

20 

32 

150 

392 

711 

1.696 

1,927 

1,698 

1,411 



8,044 



Un- 
known. 



22 
3 
1 



3 
1 
2 
S 
4 
2 



43 



Native WnrrK Males. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

66 to 64 years 

66 years and over . . 
Unlcnown 

The province 



40,210 
5,425 
3,321 
1,840 
3,887 
4,375 
4,958 
9,273 
5,2M 
2,558 
1,185 
6 



82,292 



40,192 

5,410 

3,288 

1,741 

3,217 

2,344 

1,513 

1,986 

836 

382 

192 

3 



61,104 



1 

6 

12 

40 

351 

1,213 

2,083 

4,171 

2,4a'> 

1,188 

500 

1 



12,001 



6 

20 

56 

304 

757 

1,198 

2,711 

1,593 

697 

196 



7,538 



3 
13 
61 
163 
405 
887 
291 
297 



1,621 



16 
3 
1 



2 

i 

3 



2 
28 



Native White Females. 



Under 15 yean 

16 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

30 to 34 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



37,739 
6,685 
3,925 
2,112 
4,206 
5,183 
5,878 
9,622 
5,485 
2,951 
1,717 
2 



85,505 



37,720 

6,289 

3,006 

1.265 

1,830 

1,391 

1,252 

2,100 

1,399 

749 

399 

1 



57,401 



4 

200 

543 

467 

1,507 

2,382 

2,640 

3,858 

1,681 

541 

165 

1 



13,979 



9 

190 

356 

361 

731 

1,078 

1.437 

2,370 

864 

252 

39 



7,687 



6 

20 

29 

137 

331 

518 

1,291 

1,540 

1,407 

1,114 



6,423 



6 



1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 



15 



332 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Tajjlk XVII. — Conjugal co7idUi(/n by age, nea:, race, and natiritij — (VmtimuHl. 

PROVINCE OF SANTIAGO— ContlnutxI. 
Total Foreign White. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 yeiirs 

18 and 1*9 years 

ao years 

21 to 24 vearw 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 31 years 

36 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years , 

55 to (>4 yearH , 

65 years and over . . 
Unknown 

The province 



Total. 



689 

223 

33(> 

220 

1,257 

2, 189 

1,960 

3,4^5 

1,975 

753 

324 

2 



Single. 



Marrie<l, 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
consent. 




I 



Wid- 
owe<l. 



Un- 
known. 



Foreign White Males. 



Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and Vd yearH. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 5-1 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unltnown 



3(H 

142 

255 

162 

1,097 

1,9'18 

1,749 

3,160 

1,762 

626 

240 

1 



Theprovince 11,446 



304 

142 

255 

158 

1,001 

1,523 

1,055 

1,258 

475 

123 

47 



6,341 



56 
2&1 
470 
1,259 
881 
325 
115 
1 



3,373 



37 
145 

201 

515 

289 

86 

21 



1,295 



3 
16 
23 
127 
116 
93 
67 



4a'> 



1 
1 



•» 



Foreign White Females. 



Under 15 years . . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 31 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

66 years and over 
Unknown 



The province 



285 
81 


285 
69 




10 


81 


48 


29 


58 


28 


24 


160 


50 


85 


241 


69 


124 


211 


24 


125 


825 


57 


190 


213 


27 


101 


127 


12 


45 


84 


16 


10 


1 




1 








1,867 


685 


744 



3 

5 
18 
31 
32 
25 
11 

2 



129 



1 
1 
/ 
17 
30 
53 
73 
68 
58 



308 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



333 



Table XVII. — Conjugal condition by age^ «^.r, ract\ and ndtivHy — Coutiiuiecl. 

PROVINCE OF SANTIAGO— ConUnued. 
Total Colored. 



riuler lo years.. - 

15 to 17 yearB 

IHftnd 19 years... 

liO years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

J«)to34y«ir8 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 j'cars 

(V5 years and over 
rn'known 



Total. 



63,064 

10,109 

6,254 

3,556 

7,280 

9,227 

9,541 

16,355 

10,724 

6,:}67 

4,117 

11 



The province I 146, 605 



Single. 



63.041 
9,781 
5,534 
2,786 
4,937 
4,569 
3,716 
5,910 
4,407 
2,949 
2, 173 
9 



Married. 



2 

96 

216 

194 

820 

1,587 

1,855 

2, 98,5 

1,552 

704 

374 

1 



109,812 I 10,386 



Living 
together 

ti8 hus- 
band and 

wife by 

muttial 
consent. 



9 
227 
494 

565 
1,455 
2,931 
3,714 
6, 805 
4,028 
1 , 875 

809 
1 



22,913 



Wid- 
owed. 



1 
4 

10 
10 

m 

140 
255 
(i51 
737 
839 
760 



Un- 
known. 



3,476 



11 
1 



1 
2 



1 
1 



28 



Colored Males. 



t'nder 15 years. , . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. .. 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 voars 

3U to 34 years 

:-'5 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

<V5 to 64 years 

cV) years and over 
Unknown 



31,906 
4,501 
2,862 
1,610 
3,425 
4,072 
4,348 
7,512 
5,027 
2,977 
1,863 
4 



The im)vince | 70,107 



31,895 
4,488 
2,819 
1,493 
2,778 
2,392 
1,765 
2,346 
1,590 
1,061 
803 
3 



53,433 



1 

1 

4 

26 

174 

531 

882 

1,631 

1,000 

478 

273 

1 



1 

11 

38 

89 

461 

1,128 

1,642 

3,396 

2,294 

1,281 

583 



5,002 i 10,924 



1 

1 

1 

1 

10 

21 

58 

13S 

143 

157 

203 



734 



8 



1 
2 



1 
1 



1 

14 



Colored Females. 



« 

Ui ider 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

IS and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

3C) to 34 years 

X> to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

»V> to 64 years 

G5 years and over 

I ' nknown 

The province 



31,158 


31,146 


1 


8 


5,f)08 


5,293 


95 


216 


3,392 


2,715 


212 


456 


1,946 


1,293 


168 


476 


3,855 


2,159 


646 


994 


5,155 


2,177 


1,056 


l,80:i 


5. 193 


1.951 


973 


2,072 


8,843 


3,564 


1,3.'>4 


3,409 


5,697 


2,817 


552 


1,731 


3,390 


1,888 


226 


h^{ 


2,264 


1,370 


101 


226 


7 


6 




1 






76,498 


56,379 


5,38-1 


11,989 





3 


3 

9 
9 

56 
119 
197 
516 
51U 

5.17 


I 


.......... 
















2, 742 



834 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



TabltE XVII. — Conjugal roiulUion hy age., sex, race, and italiv'dg — Contluaed. 

CITY OF CIENFUEGOS. 
Total Population. 



Under 15 yean. - . 

16tol7year8 

18 and 19 yean... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 yean 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

54 to &1 years 

65 years and over 

The city 



Total. 



10.430 
1,908 
1,387 

740 
2,316 
2,684 
2,373 
3,847 
2,360 
l,2a5 

708 



30,038 



Single. 



10,428 

1,851 

1,230 

606 

1,633 

1,445 

978 

1,292 

775 

451 

282 



Married. 



20,973 



1 

33 

87 

70 

394 

724 

836 

1,437 

784 

326 

106 



4,798 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

matual 
consent 



22 

64 

49 

251 

425 

415 

707 

379 

157 

65 



2,5M 



Wid- 
owed. 



1 

5 

13 

36 

88 

144 

411 

421 

351 

254 



1,724 



Un- 
known. 



1 
1 
1 



2 
2 



1 

i 



9 



Total Males. 



Under 15 years. . . 

16 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

The city 



5,081 

809 

606 

344 

1,168 

1,342 

1,214 

1,963 

1,173 

603 

296 



6,081 
808 
593 
325 
986 
885 
586 
676 
374 
209 
105 



14,589 I 10,627 



4 


7 


6 


13 


80 


87 


249 


193 


400 


202 


816 


391 


504 


224 


231 


103 


86 


48 



2,375 



1,268 



4 

14 
26 
82 
70 
60 
57 



314 



1 

1 



1 

1 



Total Femalbb. 



Under 15 years. . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

The city 



5,349 

1,099 

781 

396 

1,168 

1,342 

1,169 

1,884 

1,187 

682 

412 



15,449 



5,847 
1,M3 
637 
283 
647 
560 
392 
617 
401 
242 
177 



10,346 



1 

33 

83 

64 

314 

475 

436 

622 

280 

95 

20 



2,423 



22 

57 

86 

164 

232 

213 

316 

155 

54 

17 



1,266 



1 

4 

13 

32 

74 

118 

329 

351 

291 

197 



1,410 



1 
1 



1 

4 



CONJUGAL CONDtnON. 



335 



Table XVII. — Conjiigal a/iidilum by age, aex^ race, and nativity — Continued. 

CITY OF CIENFUEGOS— Continued. 
Total Native White. 



Under 15 years . . . 

16tol7yean« 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

90 to 3-1 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

The city . . . 



Total. 



6,547 

1,145 

775 

404 

1,189 

1,227 

1,044 

1,712 

928 

502 

262 



15,735 



Single. 



6,546 

1,110 

676 

817 

790 

575 

340 

888 

146 

61 

43 



10,992 



Married. 



1 

23 

65 

53 

268 

4&( 

477 

81 i 

393 

169 

55 



2,772 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
consent. 



11 

29 

24 

102 

130 

137 

220 

110 

29 

8 



800 



Wid- 
owed; 



1 
4 

10 

28 

68 

90 

290 

279 

243 

156 



1,169 



Un- 
known. 



1 

i 



Native White Males. 



Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20vear8 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

The city ... 



3,170 
'474 
818 
162 
540 
549 
472 
717 
371 
177 
95 



7,045 



3,170 

474 

311 

163 

451 

342 

203 

200 

68 

23 

15 



5,410 



1 
4 

53 
136 
192 
364 
202 
101 
41 



1,094 



5 

5 

31 

61 

64 

112 

66 

22 

7 



376 



4 
7 
13 
41 
35 
31 
32 



163 



1 

"i 



Native Whits Females. 



Under 15 years . . . 

15 to 17 years 

18and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

90 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

The city . . . 



3,377 
671 
467 
242 

678 
572 
995 
557 
325 
167 



8,690 



3,876 

636 

365 

164 

339 

233 

137 

188 

78 

38 

28 



5,582 



1 

23 

61 

49 

215 

318 

285 

450 

191 

68 

14 



1,678 



11 

24 

19 

71 

66 

73 

108 

44 

7 

1 



424 



1 
4 

10 

24 

61 

77 

249 

241 

212 

124 



1,006 



336 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XVII. — Conjugid condition by ctge^ seXy race, and nativiiij — Continued. 

CITY OF CIENPUEGOS— Continued. 
Total Foreiqx White. 



Under 15 years. . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

66 years and over 

The city . . . 



Total. 



129 
68 
101 
82 
377 
615 
502 
850 
540 
217 
104 



3,485 



Single. 



129 

65 

96 

75 

326 

370 

265 

306 

139 

47 

18 



1,880 



Married. 



1 

5 

6 

37 

90 

177 

390 

277 

108 

89 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
consent. 



Wid- 
owed. 



Un- 
known. 



1,129 



2 



1 

18 
47 
44 
107 
66 
24 

9 



813 



I 



1 
1 
1 
7 

16 
47 
58 
38 
43 



212 



Foreign White Males. 



Under 15 vears 


76 

52 

87 

69 

321 

445 

429 

716 

455 

176 

74 


76 

52 

85 

67 

301 

351 

265 

282 

127 

42 

9 






1 


15 to 17 years 








18 and 19 years 


1 

1 

11 

61 

127 

813 

288 

93 

86 




'i V.V. 




20 years 


1 
9 
38 
39 
97 
61 
21 
8 




21 to 24 years 




25 to 29 years 


4 1 

8 '.... 
24 


1 


30 to 34 years 




35 to 44 years 




45 to 54 years 


29 1.... 

20 .... 

21 i.... 




55 to 64 years 




65 years and over 










The city •. 


2,900 


1,647 


871 


274 


107 


1 







Fobeign White Females. 



Under 15 years. .. 

15 tol7year8 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 61 years 

65 years and over 

The city ... 





53 
16 
14 
13 
66 
70 
73 
134 
85 
41 
30 


53 

13 

10 

8 

25 

19 

10 

24 

12 

5 

4 






« 






1 

4 

4 

26 

39 

50 

77 

89 

15 

3 


2 
















1 
1 

8 
23 
29 
18 
22 






4 
9 
6 
10 
5 
3 
1 


































685 


183 


268 


39 


105 









■^ 



OOKJUGAL CONDITION. 



337 



Tablr XVII. — Conjugal condition by age, sex, race, and ixativUy — Continued. 

CITY OF CIENFUEGOS-Continued. 
Total Colored. 



Under 15 yean... 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean. . . 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

90 to 34 yean 

85 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 

The city 



Total. 



3,754 
695 
511 
254 
760 
942 
827 

1,285 
892 
566 
842 



Single. 



3,753 
676 
450 
216 
517 
600 
373 
598 
490 
343 
226 



10,818 



8,151 



ICarrled. 



Colored Males. 



Under 15 yean . . . 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean... 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 84 yean 

85 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 

The city 



1,885 
283 
201 
113 
297 
348 
813 
530 
347 
260 
127 



4,644 



1,835 
282 
197 
105 
234 
192 
128 
193 
179 
144 
81 



3,570 



9 

17 

12 

89 

180 

182 

233 

114 

49 

12 



897 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
consent. 



9 

35 

24 

136 

248 

234 

880 

203 

104 

48 



1,421 



2 
1 

16 
62 
81 
188 
64 
37 
9 



410 



Wid- 
owed. 



2 
7 
47 
91 
99 
182 
97 
60 
S3 



618 



2 
7 
13 
88 
74 
84 
70 
55 



343 



Un- 
known. 



3 
5 
17 
6 
9 
4 



44 



1 
I 



1 

"i 



6 



Colored Females. 



Under 15 yean... 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean... 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 34 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 64 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 

The city 



24662^ 



-22 



1,919 
412 
310 
141 
453 
594 
514 
755 
545 
816 
215 



6,174 



1,918 
894 
262 
111 
283 
808 
245 
405 
811 
199 
145 



4,581 



9 

15 

11 

78 

118 

101 

95 

60 

12 

3 



487 



9 

83 

17 

89 

157 

135 

196 

106 

44 

15 



808 



2 
7 
10 
83 
57 
78 
61 
51 



299 



1 
1 



1 
4 



838 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XVII. — Conjugal condition f/y age, ^er, ract'f and luitivilg — ContinuccL 

CITY OF UABANA. 
Total Population. 



Under 16 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 lo 24 yean« 

25 lo 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

36 lo44 years 

46 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 



Total, i Single. I Married. 



66,107 


66,040 


14.617 


14,098 


10,802 


9,777 


6.888 


4,949 


21,711 


16.073 


26,867 


16.490 


21.982 


9.983 


82.864 


11.656 


19.414 


6,658 


11.066 


8.946 


6,772 


2,203 


11 


7 



The city ! 235,981 



160,780 



Total Males. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Unknown , .*. 

The city 



82.426 

6.889 

6,561 

3 077 

12,087 

16.025 

12.418 

17.852 

10,224 

6,384 

2.306 

9 



123.258 



32,398 

6,872 

6,467 

2.932 

10,500 

10.630 

6.736 

6,992 

8 458 

1,945 

807 

6 



88,737 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
consent. 



Wld- 
owed. 



10 

231 

677 

626 

8.336 

6,676 

7,492 

12,634 

6,773 

2,878 

937 

1 



42,071 



8 

6 

31 

66 

780 

2,669 

3,763 

7,486 

4,469 

2.034 

737 

1 



22,003 



12 

169 

418 

869 

2,034 

8,473 

3,372 

4,873 

2,318 

939 

276 



10 

11 

28 

42 

265 

716 

1,131 

8,179 

8,760 

3.802 

2.8» 



18.253 14,799 



2 


7 


4 


6 


69 


8 


84 


6 


766 


89 


1,618 


122 


1,686 


241 


2,645 


724 


1,426 


879 


626 


779 


194 


668 



9,106 



8,872 



Un- 
known. 



35 
8 
2 
2 
8 
2 
4 

12 
5 
1 
1 
S 



78 



21 
3 
1 



2 
1 
2 
6 
2 



8 
41 



Total Females. 



Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years. ... 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

The city.... 



33,681 


83,647 


7.628 


7.226 


6,241 


4.310 


2,811 


2,017 


9.624 


6,673 


11.332 


4.860 


9.664 


8,247 


14,502 


4,664 


9,190 


8,100 


5.682 


2,001 


8,466 


1,396 


2 


2 



7 

226 

646 

470 

2,656 

4,017 

8,739 

6,149 

2,314 

844 

200 



10 

165 

359 

285 

1,268 

1,860 

1,686 

2,228 

892 

313 

82 



8 

6 

25 

87 

226 

694 

890 

2,455 

2,881 

2,523 

1,787 



14 
5 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
6 
8 
1 
1 



112,723 I 72,043 20,068 , 9,148 i 11,427 



87 



OONJUaAL CONDITION. 



339 



Table XVII. — Conjugcd coTidition by age, sex, race, and naiiviiy — Continued. 

CITY OF HABANA-Oontinued. 
Total Native White. 



Under 15 yean 

15 to 17 years 

18 ftnd 19 years , 

20 years 

21 to 2 1 yean 

25 to 29 years 

30 1 > 34 years 

36 to 44 years 

45 to 5-1 S'ears 

55 1 ) C4 years 

65 years and over 

Unknown 

The city 



Total. 



44,069 
8,523 
5,647 
2,742 
9,762 

10,684 
8,678 

12,483 

6,938 

3.919 

2,094 

3 



115,532 



Wngle. 



44,023 

8.249 

5,011 

2,211 

6,615 

5,127 

2,837 

2,934 

1,210 

633 

369 

2 



79,221 



Married. 



8 

188 

479 

879 

2,299 

4,047 

4,163 

6.368 

3,124 

1,254 

410 



22,719 



Living 
together 
as hus- 
band and 
wife b; 
mutua 
consent. 



S 



5 

71 

138 

121 

650 

1,021 

928 

1,151 

447 

160 

85 



Wid- 
owed. 



Un- 
known. 



4,727 



7 

9 

17 

29 

187 

489 

748 

2,024 

2,154 

1,872 

1,280 



8,816 



26 
6 
2 
2 
1 



2 
6 
3 



1 
49 



Native White Males. 



Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 t^ 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to G4 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

The city 



21,712 
3.760 
2,506 
1,170 
4,361 
4.900 
4,046 
5,545 
2,868 
1,407 
661 
2 



21,690 

3,749 

2,454 

1,098 

3,595 

2,952 

1,722 

1,565 

530 

229 

107 

1 



52,940 j 89,692 



2 
4 

27 

43 

469 

1,336 

1.652 

2.969 

1,673 

785 

291 



9,191 



26 
26 
270 
540 
511 
668 
263 
103 
25 



2,463 



5 
5 



8 
27 
72 
131 
352 
401 
340 
238 



1,574 



14 
2 
1 



1 
1 



1 
20 



Native White Females. 



Under 16 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

SO to 34 years 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

65 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 
Unknown 

The city 




22,338 

4,500 

2,557 

1.113 

8,020 

2,175 

1.115 

1,369 

680 

404 

262 

1 



6 

184 

452 

336 

1,830 

2.711 

2,511 

3,409 

1,451 

519 

119 



39,529 13,528 



4 

71 
112 

95 
380 
481 
887 
483 
184 

57 

10 



2,264 



2 

4 

17 

26 

160 

417 

617 

1,672 

1,753 

1,532 

1,042 



7,242 



12 
4 
1 
2 
1 



2 
5 
2 



29 



340 



BEPOBT OK THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XVII. — Conjugal condition by age, sex, racCf and noHvUy — Contiiiued. 

CITY OF HABANA— Continued. 
Total Fobbion White. 



Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
UzLknown 

The city . . . 



Total. 



2,3S2 
1,594 
2,095 
1,463 
6,588 
8,770 
7,463 
11,264 
6,454 
8,823 
1,552 
8 



52,901 



Single. 



Married. 



2,827 

1,570 

2,021 

1,872 

5,635 

6,260 

8,997 

4,225 

1,790 

767 

295 

2 



30,251 



20 

62 

70 

679 

1,910 

2.664 

5,250 

8,110 

1,886 

436 

1 



15,628 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
consent. 



2 

8 

19 

20 

233 

487 

685 

1,007 

479 

192 

53 



8,060 



Wid- 
owed. 



3 
1 

40 
121 
215 
777 
1.073 
1,027 
767 



Un- 
known. 



4,024 



3 
1 



1 
2 
2 
5 
2 
1 
1 



18 



FoBKioN Whitb Males. 



Under 15 years. . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

66 to 64 years 

66 years and over 
Unknown 

The city ... 



41,190 



1,269 


1,267 


1,802 


1,301 


1,816 


1,809 


1,237 


1,221 


6,554 


6,164 


7,192 


6,761 


6,972 


8,672 


8.854 


8,802 


4,788 


1,560 


2,285 


687 


918 


206 


3 


2 



2 

7 

284 

1,047 

*1,799 

8,978 

2,471 

1,118 

382 

1 



26,894 



11,084 



4 
9 

147 
846 
416 
766 
886 
154 
43 



2,271 



8 
87 
83 
808 
880 
381 
286 



1,478 



2 
1 



1 
1 
2 
6 
1 



IS 



FoBxioir White Females. 



Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years , 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

36 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 



The city 



1,063 

292 

279 

226 

1,034 

1,578 

1,491 

2.410 

1,666 

1,038 

684 



11,711 



1,060 
269 
212 
151 
471 
489 
825 
423 
240 
130 
87 



8,867 



20 

60 

63 

445 

863 

865 

1,272 

689 

228 

54 



4,494 



2 

3 

16 

11 

86 

141 

169 

241 

93 

38 

10 



809 



2 
1 

32 
84 
132 
474 
693 
646 
482 



2,646 



1 
1 
1 



oohjuoal condition. 



341 



Table XVII. — Conjugal condition by age, sex, race, and natwUy — Continued. 

CITY OF HABANA— Gontlnued. 
Total Colobkd. 



Under 15 years . . . 

15tol7yean> 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

56 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

The city.... 



Total. 



19,706 
4.400 
8,060 
1,683 
5,371 
6,908 
5,841 
8,607 
6.022 
3,824 
2,126 
5 



67,548 



Single. 



19,690 
4,279 
2,745 
1.866 
8,823 
4,118 
3,149 
4,497 
8,558 
2,646 
1,589 
8 



51,808 



Married. 



2 

23 

46 

77 

858 

719 

666 

1,016 

539 

288 

91 



Livingr 
together 
ashos- 
hand and 
wife by 
mutual 
consent. 



5 

95 

261 

228 

1,151 

1,965 

1,859 

2,715 

1,392 

587 

188 



3,824 I 10,446 



Wid- 
owed. 



8 

2 

8 

12 

38 

106 

168 

378 

533 

403 

308 



1,959 



Un- 
known. 



6 
1 



1 

i 



11 



CoLORKO Males. 



Under 16 years . . . 

15 to 17 years 

13 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

The city 



9,445 
1,827 
1,237 

670 
2,172 
2.933 
2,400 
3,458 
2,568 
1,692 

727 
4 



9,486 
1,822 
1,204 

613 
1,741 
1,917 
1,342 
1,626 
1,378 
1,079 

492 
2 



29,128 



22,651 



1 

1 

2 

6 

77 

276 

302 

518 

315 

186 

64 



1,778 



1 
4 

29 
49 
349 
727 
729 
1,211 
777 
869 
126 



4,371 



2 
2 
4 
13 
27 
69 
98 
58 
45 



320 



2 
8 



Colored Fbmalbb. 



Under 15 years . . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 yean... 

20 years 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

90 to 84 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 
Unknown 

The city.... 



10,261 
2,573 
1.828 
1,013 
3,109 
8,970 
8,441 
5,154 
8,454 
2,132 
1,399 


10,254 
2,467 
1,641 
768 
2,082 
2,196 
1,807 
2,872 
2,180 
1,467 
1,047 
1 


1 

22 

44 

71 

281 

443 

863 

468 

224 

102 

27 


4 

91 

232 

179 

802 

1,238 

1,130 

1,504 

615 

218 

62 


1 

2 

6 

10 

34 

93 

141 

309 

435 

345 

263 


1 
1 










1 
















88,420 

1 


28,667 


2,046 


6,075 


1,639 


8 



342 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XVII. — Conjugal condition hj age, sex^ race^ and nativitij — Continued. 

(^TY OF MATANZAS. 
Total Population. 



Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

35 to 41 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

The city . . . 



Total. 



12.204 
2.498 
1,689 
866 
2,896 
3,374 
2,679 
4,384 
2,906 
1,759 
1,122 
6 



36,374 



Single. I Married. 



12,185 

2,447 

1,645 

735 

2,119 

1,894 

1,131 

1,485 

939 

593 

444 

3 



25,520 



1 

23 

78 

57 

418 

852 

901 

1.637 

1,000 

463 

177 



5,607 



Living 
together 
as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutual 
consent. 



27 

63 

56 

307 

480 

459 

714 

402 

195 

112 

2 



Wid- 
owed. 



2.817 



1 

3 

7 

51 

148 

187 

M7 

567 

508 

889 

1 



Un- 
known. 



I. 



2,409 



18 



1 
1 



21 



Total Males. 



Under 16 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

The city . . . 



16,926 



6,986 


6.980 


1,099 


1,099 


688 


681 


363 


344 


1,308 


1,114 


1,470 


946 


1,243 


681 


2,103 


7W 


1,332 


378 


867 


274 


466 


168 


2 


1 



2 
6 
90 
294 
398 
882 
607 
334 
190 



12,300 



2,743 



5 
12 
100 
214 
288 
388 
231 
187 
80 

1 



1,406 



1 

3 

16 

26 

98 

116 

122 

88 



470 



1 

i 



Total Females. 



Under 16 years... 

16 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

SO to 84 years 

86 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

The city . . . 



6,219 
1,399 


6.206 

1,348 

864 

391 

1,005 

948 

560 

751 

561 

319 

276 

2 


1 

23 

76 

61 

328 

568 

503 

756 

398 

129 

47 






13 


27 

58 

44 

207 

266 

221 

826 

171 

58 

82 

1 


1 

3 

6 

48 

132 

161 

449 

451 

886 

801 

1 




1,001 




492 




1,688 




1,904 




1,436 
2,281 


1 


1.576 




892 




656 




4 










19,448 


13,220 


2,864 


1,411 


1,939 


14 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



343 



Table XVII. — Cmijugal covdition by age^ sea-^ race, and vaiivittf — Continued. 

CITY OF MATANZAS-ConUnued. 
Total Native White. 



Under 15 years. . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 1) 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 1 ) 54 yean 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 



Total. 



Single. 



8,102 

1,647 

1.091 

602 

1,740 

1,869 

1,399 

2,240 

1.306 

667 

866 

2 



8,085 
1,614 

431 

1,287 

966 

466 

495 

202 

95 

54 

1 



Native White Males. 



Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

The city . . . 




6,996 



Married. 

1 

20 

67 

45 

839 

627 

659 

1,144 

629 

248 

78 

.......... 


Living 
together 

ashus- 
t>and and 

wife by 

mutual 
consent. 


1 

Wid- Un- 
owed. known. 


ifi 


12 

28 

19 

119 

164 

128 

161 

67 

15 

6 




Jl:::::::::: 

7 

44 1 

123 

166 

439 1 

408 

309 

228 

1 



Thecity j 20,9811 14,629 1 3,857 



1,574 



709 



1,718 



366 



276 



18 



4,000 






1 


5 


702 






!!!!!!i. .. 




419 


1 
6 


2 
2 


1 


189 


i';:::: 




600 


73 


45 


8l 


1 


460 


186 


74 


13 .... 




234 


267 


83 


21 .... 




269 


622 


99 


69 1 


1 


83 


328 


40 


67 .... 




86 


163 


15 


67 .... 




14 


48 


6 


45 .... 




1 







****"*!**'* 





Native White Females. 



Under 15 yean. . . 

15 to 17 yean 

i8andl9yean... 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 1> Si yean 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 
UnKnown 

The city . . . 



4,097 
945 
669 
304 

1,018 

1,146 
804 

1,280 

788 

407 

253 

1 



4,085 
912 
576 
242 
637 
515 
222 
226 
119 
60 
40 



1 

20 

66 

89 

266 

441 

402 

622 

301 

95 

30 



11,712 I 7,633 



2,283 



12 
26 
17 
74 
80 
45 
62 
27 



343 



11 

1 

2 

6 

41 

110 

136, 

370 ' 

841 

252 

183 

1 



1.442 



11 



844 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XVII. — Conjugal oondilion by o^c, «&r, rcux, and natwUif — Ck>iitinued. 

CITY OF MATANZAS-Continued. 
Total Fobxion Whitx. 



lV>tal. 



Single. 



Married. 



Living 
together 
as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
matual 
consent 



Wid- 
owed. 



Un- 
known. 



Under 15 years . . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

'21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

The city.... 



139 
68 
88 
66 

867 



411 
7G9 
687 
4S5 
245 



1S9 

67 

83 

68 

817 

808 

219 

274 

126 

65 

25 



1 

4 

2 

41 

125 

189 

852 

801 

190 

92 



8,644 



1,681 



1,247 



1 
1 
8 
28 
84 
75 
42 
20 
11 



220 



1 

13 

19 

68 

118 

160 

117 



496 



FoRBiaN White Malis. 



Under 15 years . . . 

16 to 17 years 

18 and 19 yean. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

The city 



76 

48 

68 

64 

296 

875 

820 

618 

419 

284 

188 



2,695 



75 

48 

68 

53 

280 

276 

193 

245 

105 

49 

16 



1,408 



9 

71 

94 

288 

235 

161 

77 



980 



1 
7 
26 
80 
65 
87 
17 
9 



192 



2 
8 
25 
42 
57 
86 



165 



FoBXiGN WHrrx Fkmalxb. 



Un^er 15 years... 

16 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

46 to 64 years 

66 to 64 years 

66 years and over 

The city.... 



64 

20 

20 

12 

71 

94 

91 

151 

168 

151 

107 



949 



64 
19 
16 
10 
87 
27 
26 
29 
21 
16 
9 



273 



1 
4 
2 
82 
64 
45 
69 
66 
29 
15 



817 



1 
2 
4 
10 
5 
8 
2 



28 



1 

11 
16 
43 
76 
103 
81 



831 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



845 



Xarlb XVII. — Conjugal condUUni by age, 9ex, race, and natwUy — Continued. 

CITY OF MATANZAS-ConUnued. 
Total Colobxdi. 



Under 15 yeazB. . . 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean. . . 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

30 to 84 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 
Unknown 

The city 



Total. 



8,963 
783 
510 
287 
789 

1,036 
869 

1,375 

1,015 

657 

511 

4 



11,799 



Single. 



3,961 
766 
468 
241 
565 
626 
456 
716 
611 
433 
865 
2 



Married. 



I 



9,210 



2 

7 

10 

88 

100 

103 

141 

70 

25 

7 



503 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
consent. 



15 

34 

36 

180 

298 

297 

478 

293 

160 

95 

2 



1,888 



Wid- 
owed. 



Un- 
known. 



6 
12 
12 
40 
41 
89 
44 



195 



3 



COLOBXD MaLIS. 



Under 15 yean. . . 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean. . . 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

30 to 34 yean 

35 to 41 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 
Uxiknown 

The city 



1,905 
349 
198 
111 
290 
372 
328 
525 
395 
823 
215 
1 



5,012 



1,905 
349 
191 
102 
234 
220 
154 
220 
190 
190 
138 



3,896 



8 
87 
47 
77 
44 
20 

5 



239 



3 

9 

48 

114 

125 

224 

154 

105 

65 

1 



848 



1 
2 
4 

7 
8 
7 



29 



GoLOBKD Females. 



Under 15 yean 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean ^. 

90 to 84 yean. 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 61 yean. 

65 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 

Unknown 

The city 



2,058 
434 
312 
176 
499 
664 
541 
860 
620 
834 
296 
8 



6,787 



2,056 
417 
274 
139 
331 
406 
802 
496 
421 
243 
227 
2 



5,314 



2 

6 

10 

30 

63 

56 

64 

26 

5 

2 



264 



15 

31 

27 

132 

184 

172 

254 

139 

55 

30 

1 



1,040 



6 
11 
10 
36 
84 
81 
87 



166 



3 



346 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XVII. — Conjugal condition by age.^ sejr., race, and nativity — Continued. 

CITY OF PUERTO PRINCIPE. 
Total Population. 



Under 16 yean . . , 

16 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years ..„ . . 

21 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

SO to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

The city-... 



Total. 



9,091 
1,678 
970 
668 
1,447 
1,626 
1,839 
3,079 
2,263 
1,630 
1,021 



26,102 



Single. 



9,089 
1.636 

478 
1,026 
868 
788 
977 
668 
434 
822 



17,166 



Married. 



1 

36 

82 

67 

346 

698 

8U2 

1,468 

911 

469 

202 



4,966 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
consent. 



1 

7 

18 

11 

66 

101 

132 

226 

134 

71 

86 



785 



Wid. 
owed. 



6 

2 

20 

69 

117 

423 

660 

666 

461 



2,204 



Un- 
known. 



Total Males. 



Under 15 years . . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 yean and over 

The city . . . 



4,448 
642 
396 
214 
633 
667 
740 

1,276 
902 
691 
403 



10,912 



4,447 
642 
892 
207 
633 
421 
346 
377 
246 
175 
134 



7,919 



2 
6 
80 
192 
309 
737 
499 
280 
144 



2,249 



1 
1 

19 
48 
66 
106 
81 
47 
24 



393 



1 
G 
21 
66 
76 
89 
101 



I. 



361 



Total Femalks. 



Under 15 years... 

16 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

46 to 54 years 

66 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

The city. . . . 



4,643 

1,036 

674 

344 

814 

969 

1,099 

1,803 

1,861 

989 

618 



14,190 



4,642 


1 


994 


36 


477 


80 


271 


61 


498 


266 


447 


406 


443 


498 


600 


716 


422 


412 


269 


179 


188 


58 


9,236 


2,707 



7 

12 
10 
86 
63 
67 
119 
53 
24 
11 



892 



5 

2 

19 

53 

96 

867 

474 

477 

860 



1.8G3 



1 

i 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



347 



Tablb XVII. — Conjugal condition by age, seXj race, and nativity — Continued. 

CITY OP PUERTO PRINCIPK-Continued. 
Total Native Whitk. 



Under 16 years . . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

The city 



Total. 



6,625 

1,182 

658 

347 

886 

931 

1,178 

1>974 

1,837 

890 

497 



16,605 



Single. 



6,624 
1.148 
674 
283 
679 
436 
899 
479 
803 
180 
99 



11,104 



Married. 



1 

81 

69 

69 

266 

412 

628 

1,065 

604 

291 

94 



8,606 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

matual 
consent. 



Native White Males. 



Under 15 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years , 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 

The city 



3,199 
450 
263 
121 
343 
838 
432 
764 
434 
272 
148 



6,764 



3,199 

450 

260 

118 

282 

201 

165 

176 

90 

54 

27 



6,022 



2 

3 

55 

119 

219 

501 

283 

161 

70 



1,413 



3 

9 

3 

25 

86 

66 

110 

51 

22 

7 



830 



Wid- 
owed. 



6 
14 
83 
49 
26 
12 

5 



145 



6 

2 

16 

48 

91 

329 

379 

397 

297 



1.66& 



Un- 
known. 



4 
15 
88 
35 
45 
46 



184 



Native White Females. 



Under 15 years . . . 

16 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

The city 



3.426 
732 
396 
226 
543 
593 
746 

1,210 
903 
618 
349 



9,741 



3,425 
606 
314 
165 
297 
235 
234 
303 
213 
126 
72 



6,062 



1 

31 

67 

56 

211 

298 

404 

564 

821 

180 

24 



2,092 



3 

9 

3 

19 

21 

32 

61 

26 

10 

2 



186 



6 

2 

16 

44 

76 

291 

844 

852 

251 



1,881 



348 



BEPOBT ON THE CEK8U8 OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XVIL — Ckn^ugal condition by age^ aeXy ract, and naixmJty — Continued. 

CITY OF PUERTO PRINCIP£--Gontinued. 
Total Fobbion Whitb. 



Under 15 yeaxB... 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to S4 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 

The city 



Total. 



70 

82 

29 

28 

129 

174 

132 

266 

217 

130 

76 



1,283 



Single. 



70 
82 
28 
25 
104 
116 
76 
83 
84 
21 
13 



602 



Married. 



1 

2 

19 

42 

48 

152 

127 

67 

29 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual, 
consent 



482 



1 

6 

14 

10 

22 

25 

6 

4 



Wid- 
dowed. 



Un- 
known. 



88 



2 

3 

9 

31 

36 

30 



111 



FORBION WUITB MALBB. 



Under 15 yean. . . 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean. . . 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 84 yean 

85 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 

The city ... 



89 

24 

22 

18 

110 

158 

122 

237 

196 

100 

58 



1.064 



89 
24 
22 
17 
94 
112 
73 
77 
84 
16 
12 



520 



1 

12 
82 
86 
188 
121 
61 
25 



421 



4 
14 
10 
21 
28 
4 
4 



80 



3 

6 

18 

19 

17 



68 



FoRBiGN Whitb Fbmalbs. 



Under 15 yean... 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean. . . 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 34 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

46 to 54 yean 

55to64yearar.... 
65 yean and over 

The city . . . 



31 
8 
7 

10 
19 
16 
10 
29 
21 
30 
18 



199 



81 
8 
6 
8 

10 
4 
8 
6 



5 
1 



82 



1 
1 
7 

10 
7 

19 
6 
6 
4 



61 



1 
2 



1 
2 
2 



8 



8 

13 
17 
13 



48 



CONJUGAL CWNDITION. 



849 



Tajslx XVU. — CanjugdL oo/nd^Hon by age, gex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

CITY OF PUBRTO PRINCIFE-Continued. 
Total Golosed. 



Under 15 years . . . 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean. . . 

20 yean 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

ao to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

The city 



Total. 



2,896 
464 
283 
183 
432 
621 
629 
839 
709 
610 
448 



7,814 



81ii8:le. 



2,896 
456 
267 
170 
343 
316 
313 
416 
831 
233 
210 



6,449 



Married. 



4 

12 
6 

61 
144 
136 
246 
180 
101 

79 



Living 
together 
as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutual 
consent 



1 

4 

4 

7 

24 

52 

67 

93 

58 

43 

24 



867 



Wid- 
owed. 



4 

9 

23 

85 

140 

133 

134 



628 



Un- 
known. 



CoLosBD Males. 



Under 16 years . . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

90 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 yean 

66 to 64 years 

65 yean and orer 

The city 



1,210 
168 
HI 
76 
180 
171 
186 
276 
272 
219 
197 



3,064 



1,209 
168 
110 

72 
167 
106 
107 
124 
122 
106 

96 



2,877 



2 
13 
41 
64 
108 
96 
58 
49 



416 



1 
1 
9 
20 
22 
36 
32 
81 
16 



168 



1 
2 
8 
12 
23 
25 
88 



104 



CoLOBED Females. 



Under 16 years . . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

66 years and over 

Thedty.... 



1,186 
296 
172 
106 
262 
860 
843 
564 
437 
291 
261 



4,260 



1,186 
288 
157 
98 
186 
206 
206 
291 
209 
128 
116 



8,072 



4 

12 

4 

48 

108 
82 

143 
86 
43 
30 



664 



4 

8 

6 

15 

32 

36 

67 

26 

12 

9 



199 



8 

7 

20 

78 

117 

108 

96 



424 



850 



REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Tablk XVII. — Conjugal cfmdttion by age^ sex^ race^ and naiimty — Continued. 

CITY or SANTIAGO. 
Total Population. 



Under 15 years. . . 

15 tol7 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

SO to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

The city.... 



Total. 



14,640 
8,048 
2,023 
1,026 
2,789 
8,604 
8,707 
5,862 
8,590 
1,832 
966 
3 



43,090 



Single. 



14,687 

2,952 

1,803 

852 

1,990 

2,000 

1,627 

2,338 

1,498 

825 

475 

1 



30,998 



Married. 



51 

133 

97 

486 

981 

1,224 

1,982 

1,003 

335 

102 

2 



6,396 



Living 
together 

as hus- 
band and 

wife by 

mutual 
consent. 



2 

42 

83 

68 

270 

501 

631 

966 

496 

194 

43 



Wid- 
owed. 



8,299 



2 

4 

8 

40 

122 

221 

574 

593 

478 

846 



Un- 
known. 



2,388 



1 
1 



1 
3 



1 
2 



Total Males. 



Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25to29years 

80 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

The city . . . 



7.135 

1,319 

891 

449 

1,311 

1,727 

1,778 

2,743 

1,569 

683 

315 

2 



19,922 



7,133 

1,316 

877 

416 

1,107 

1,114 

822 

1,002 

608 

225 

140 

1 



14,661 



1 

5 

15 

108 

369 

G05 

1,104 

646 

233 

77 

1 



1 

1 

9 

16 

90 

235 

311 

601 

301 

138 

29 



8,164 



1,635 



1 

4 

19 

39 

132 

114 

87 

69 



466 



1 
1 



1 

2 



1 
1 



Total Females. 



Under 16 years. . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

56 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

The city ... 



7,505 
1,729 
1,132 

677 
1,478 
1,877 
1,929 
3,119 
2,021 
1,149 

651 
1 



23,168 



7,604 
1,636 
926 
436 
883 
886 
805 
1,836 
990 
600 
835 



16,337 



60 
128 

82 
378 
622 
619 
878 
857 
102 

25 
1 



3,242 



1 

41 

74 

62 

180 

266 

823 

462 

195 

66 

14 



1,664 



2 
4 

7 
86 
103 
182 
442 
479 
391 
277 



1.928 



1 

i 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



351 



Tablb XVII. — Conjugal condition by age^ sex, race, and naiivity — Continued. 

CITY OF SANTIAGO— Continued. 
Total Nativk White. 



Under 15 years. . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 yean. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 yean 

cO to 84 yean 

85 to 44 yean 

45 to M yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 
Unknown 

The city.... 



ToUl. 



5,987 

1,160 

737 

358 

966 

1,095 

1,145 

1,869 

1,128 

567 

805 

1 



Single. 



Married. 



Living 
together 
as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutual 
consent. 



5,937 

1,118 

653 

293 

663 

528 

408 

578 

804 

148 

80 

1 



15,258 



10,691 




2,716 



23 


12 


1 


55 


26 


8 


46 


18 


1 


216 


66 


19 


410 


96 


61 


520 


111 


111 


888 


183 


279 


412 


76 


836 


158 


26 


240 


43 


5 


177 



Nativb White Males. 



Under 15 yean... 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean. . . 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 84 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 
Unknown 

The city 



2,967 
511 
297 
160 
410 
443 
461 
783 
400 
184 
85 
1 



6,702 



2,967 

508 

292 

152 

847 

248 

175 

287 

91 

84 

17 

1 



1 

2 

8 

43 

138 

218 

406 

216 

9S 

88 



5,069 



1,158 



619 



1 

8 

5 

17 

49 

58 

96 

48 

17 

5 



294 



1,228 



2 
8 
15 
44 
45 
85 
80 



179 



1 
2 

i 



1 

i 



Native White Females. 



Under 15 yean... 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean. . . 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 84 yean 

85 to 44 yean 

45 to 51 yean 

65 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 
Unsnown 



The city 



2,970 
639 
440 
198 
556 
652 
684 

1,086 
?28 
883 
220 



8,556 



2,970 
605 
361 
141 
816 
280 
228 
886 
213 
109 
63 



5,622 



22 

53 

43 

173 

272 

802 

427 

196 

60 

10 



1,558 



11 


1 


23 


8 


13 


1 


49 


17 


47 


53 


58 


96 


87 


235 


28 


291 


9 


205 




147 



325 



1,049 



1 

i 



352 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XVII. — Conjugal condition by age, »eXf rac«, and nottvt^^ Continued. 

CITY OF SANTIAGO-^Continued. 
Total Fobbion White. 



Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

The city . . . 



T6tal. 



251 

7S 

148 

78 

890 

572 

494 

821 

461 

151 

60 

2 



8,440 



Single. 



251 

67 

181 

62 

269 

894 

270 

840 

158 

60 

28 



2,015 



Married. 



4 

12 

9 

60 

129 

162 

842 

199 

62 

18 

2 



969 



lAying 
together 
ashuo- 
band and 
wife by 
mutual 
consent. 



1 

11 
40 
49 
82 
55 
16 

2 



268 



Wid- 
owed. 



9 
23 
66 
54 
83 
21 



Un- 
known. 



197 



FOBBGK WHITX MAUEB. 



Under 15 years * 


127 

48 

110 

49 

276 

479 

428 

705 

408 

125 

49 

1 


127 

48 

110 

46 

260 

868 

257 

810 

144 

42 

20 










15 to 17 years 










18 and 19 years 










20 years 


2 

19 

77 

119 

282 

177 

60 

17 

1 


1 
7 
85 
41 
76 
68 
15 
2 






21 to 24 years 






25 to 29 years 


4 
6 
86 
84 
18 
10 




80 to 84 years 




85 to 44 years 


1 


45 to 54 years 




55 to 64 years 




65 years and over 




Unknown 














The city 


2,795 


1,712 


744 


280 


108 


1 







FoBDON White Females. 



Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 
Unknown 

The city ... 



124 
80 
88 
24 
54 
93 
71 

116 

53 

26 

20 

1 



645 



124 

24 

21 

16 

19 

81 

13 

80 

9 

8 

8 



808 



4 

12 

7 

81 

62 

88 

60 

22 

2 

1 

1 



226 



4 

5 
8 
6 
2 
1 



28 



5 

17 
20 
20 
15 
U 



89 



OOKJUQAL 0Oin>ITIOn. 



858 



Tablb XVII. — (hnJugcU e(mditi4m by age^ mlt, tcux, and nativUy — Ck>ntinued. 

CITT OF 8ANTIAQO— Ck>iitlnudd. 
Total Goloebd. 



Under 15 yean 

16tol7ye«ra 

18 and 19 years 

20 vean 

21 to 24 yean j 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 34 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 

The city 



Total. 



8,462 
1,825 
1,148 

595 
1,498 
1,987 
2,068 
3,172 
2,001 
1,114 

592 



24,892 



Single. 



8,449 
1,772 
1,019 

497 
1.058 
1,078 

954 
1,425 
1.041 

682 

867 



Married. 



Living 
together 
as hus- 
band and 
wife by 
mutual 
consent 



24 

66 

42 

220 

442 

552 

807 

892 

125 

41 



18,292 I 2,711 



2 

28 

57 

49 

193 

365 

474 

701 

365 

152 

86 



2,422 



Wid- 
owed. 



1 

1 

6 

21 

52 

87 

289 

203 

205 

148 



963 



Un- 
known. 



1 
1 



GoLOBXD Males. 



Under 15 yean... 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean. . . 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 84 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 

The city . . . 



4,041 
765 
484 
240 
625 
805 
894 

1,255 
761 
374 
181 



10,425 



4,089 
765 
475 
218 
510 
603 
890 
455 
278 
149 
108 



7,880 



8 

10 

46 

144 

268 

416 

258 

85 

27 



1,262 



6 

10 
66 
151 
217 
832 
200 
106 
22 



1,111 



1 
2 
7 
18 
62 
35 
34 
29 



178 



1 
1 



OOLOBKD FKM ALB. 



Under 15 yean. . . 

15 to 17 yean 

18 and 19 yean... 

20 yean 

21 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

80 to 84 yean 

85 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

65 to 64 yean 

66 yean and over 

The city . . . 



4,411 

1,060 

659 

865 

868 

1,182 

1,174 

1,917 

1,240 

740 

411 



13,967 



4,410 
1,007 
544 
279 
548 
675 
564 
970 
768 
488 
264 



10,412 



24 

68 

82 

174 

298 

284 

891 

189 

40 

14 



1,469 



1 

28 

51 

89 

127 

214 

257 

369 

165 

46 

14 



1,811 



1 

1 

5 

19 

45 

69 

187 

168 

171 

119 



785 



24662 



-28 



354 



BEPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table Xyill.-'lUeffiHmaU childrm, 

CUBA. 



All claaseB 



Males. . . 
Females 



Native white 



Males... 
Females 



Foreign white. 



Males 

Females 



Colored. 



Males 

Females 



TotaL 


Under 6 
years. 


6to9 
years. 


10 to 14 
yean. 


15 to 19 
years. 


20 to 24 

yean. 


25Teaz9 

and over. 


185,080 


87.060 


66,660 


47,161 


26,883 


10,061 


7,265 


92,126 
92,904 


18,567 
18,503 


28,768 
27,882 


24,121 
23.040 


12.411 
14,422 


6,071 
4,990 


8.198 
4,067 


58,686 


12.140 


19,098 


15,664 


8.051 


2,577 


1,271 


80,185 
28,601 


6,171 
5,969 


10,011 
9,082 


7,960 
7,694 


8,898 
4.158 


1,468 
1.109 


682 
589 


254 


28 


48 


52 


go 


87 


39 


143 
111 


18 
15 


25 
23 


28 
24 


29 
21 


22 

15 


26 
13 


126,090 


24,892 


87,509 


31,555 


18,732 


7.447 


5,955 


61.798 
64,292 


12,878 
12,619 


18,782 
18,777 


16,183 
16,422 


8.489 
10,243 


3,561 
3,866 


2,490 
3,465 



PROVINCE OF HABANA. 



All classes 


28,303 


5,897 


7.863 


6,521 


4,237 


2.016 


1,769 






Males 


13,665 
14,638 


2,W)5 
8,042 


8.890 
8,973 


8,275 
8,246 


1,955 
2,282 


923 
1.093 


767 


Females 


1,002 


Native white 


6,737 


1,834 


2,090 


1,492 


789 


321 


211 






Males 


8,345 
3,392 


884 
950 


1,074 
1,016 


717 
775 


393 
896 


174 
147 


103 


FftlPaJW ..,...., r r .. . 


108 






Foreign white 


185 


13 


80 


26 


25 


19 


22 






Males 


70 
65 


7 
6 


14 
16 


12 
.14 


13 
12 


10 
9 


14 


Females 


8 






Colored 


21,431 


4,060 


5,743 


5,003 


3,423 


1,676 


1.536 




Males 


10,260 
11,181 


1.964 
2,086 


2,802 
2,941 


2,546 
2,467 


1,549 
1,874 


789 
987 


650 


Females 


886 







PROVINCE OF MATANZAS. 



All classes 


24.363 


5,338 


7,831 


6,088 


3,227 


1,247 


1,132 






Males 


11,969 
12.394 


2,662 
2,676 


3,629 
3,702 


8.192 
2,896 


1,466 
1,771 


583 
664 


447 


Females 


685 






Native while 


2,678 


580 


813 


735 


341 


120 


89 






Males 


1,332 
1,846 


286 
294 


395 
418 


386 
349 


162 
179 


67 
63 


36 


Females 


S8 






Foreign white 


17 




2 


3 


4 


4 


4 








Males 


11 
6 






2 

1 


3 

1 


2 
2 


4 


Females 




2 










Colorcil 


21,668 


4,758 


6,616 


6,360 


2,882 


1,123 


1.039 






Males 


10,626 
11,042 


2,376 
2,382 


3,234 
3,282 


2,804 
2,546 


1,291 
1,591 


514 
609 


407 


Females 


632 







ILLEOmHATE CHILDREN. 



355 



Tablb XVIII. — lUeffiUmcUe children — (Continued. 

PROVINCE OF PINAR DEL RIO. 



• 


Total. 


Under 5 
yean. 


6 to 9 
yean. 


10 to 14 
yeara. 


15 to 19 
yean. 


20 to 24 
yean. 


25yean 
and over. 


All olaraes 


17,976 


4,817 


6,963 


4.299 


2,126 


756 


515 






Males 


8,820 
9,156 


2,167 
2,160 


3,011 
2,962 


2,094 
2,205 


942 
1,184 


861 
395 


255 


Females 


2G0 






Native white 


7,048 


1,830 


2,455 


1.608 


721 


276 


153 






Males 


8,672 
8,471 


935 

895 


1,284 
1,171 


774 
834 


848 
873 


148 
128 


83 


Females 


70 






Forebni white 


11 


1 


2 


3 


1 




4 








Males 


7 
4 




1 
1 


3 


1 




2 


Females 


1 


2 












Colored 


10,922 


2,486 


8,506 


2,688 


1,401 


480 


358 


Males 

Females 


5,241 
6,681 


1,222 
1,264 


1,726 
1,780 


1,317 
1,371 


593 
811 


213 
267 


170 
188 



PROVINCE OF PUERTO PRINCIPE. 



All classes 


8,483 


1,923 


2,602 


2.170 


1,206 


859 


228 






Males 

Females 


4,354 
4,129 


984 
939 


.1,867 
1,235 


1,187 
1,083 


577 
629 


186 
173 


108 
120 


Native white 


5,004 


1,164 


1,654 


1,318 


663 


155 


60 






Males 

Females 


2,621 
2,383 


589 
575 


875 
779 


699 
619 


827 
326 


91 
64 


40 
20 


Foreign white 


5 


1 


2 


1 


1 












Males 


3 

2 


1 




1 


1 






Females 


2 


















Colored 


8,474 


758 


946 


851 


552 


204 


163 


Males 


1.730 
1,744 


894 
364 


492 
454 


437 
414 


249 
308 


95 
109 


63 


Females 


100 







PROVINCE OF SANTA CLARA. 



All classes 


81,576 


5,674 


9,474 


8,395 


4,887 


1,813 


1.333 






Males 


15,337 
16,239 


2,867 
2,807 


4,735 
4,739 


4,239 
4,156 


2,130 
2,757 


834 
979 


532 


Females 


801 






Native white 


8,996 


1,507 


2,807 


2,641 


1,327 


454 


200 






Males 


4,544 
4,392 


764 
743 


1,445 
1,362 


1,346 
1.295 


625 
702 


254 

200 


110 


Females 


90 






Foreisn white 


49 


3 


8 


10 


9 


13 


6 






Males 


82 

17 


1 
2 


6 
2 


7 
3 


4 

5 


10 
3 


4 


Females 


2 






Colored 


22,591 


4,164 


6,659 


5.744 


3.561 


1,346 


1,127 






Males 


10,761 
11,830 


2,102 
2,062 


3,284 
8,875 


2,886 
2,858 


1,601 
2,050 


570 
776 


418 


Females 


709 







356 



BEPOBT ON THE CEN»SU8 OF CUBA, 1899. 
Tablb XVIII. — lUegiiimate children — Gontinued. 

PROVINCE OF SANTIAGO. 



J 





ToUl. 


Under 5 
years. 


5 to9 
years. 


10 to 14 
years. 


15 to 19 
years. 


20 to 24 
yean. 


25yean 
and oyer. 


All classes 


74.829 


18,911 


28,417 


19,688 


11,160 


8.870 


2.298 






Males 


87,981 
86,348 


7.032 
6.879 


12.136 
11,281 


10,181 
9,504 


5,351 
6,799 


2.184 
1.686 


1,094 


Females 


1,199 






Native white 


28,288 


6,225 


9,274 


7,760 


4.220 


1,251 


558 






Males 


14,771 
18,517 


2,718 
2,512 


4.938 
4.836 


4,038 
8,722 


2.038 
2.182 


734 
517 


310 


Females 


248 






ForeiRti white 


87 


10 


4 


9 


10 


1 


3 






Males 


20 
17 


4 
6 


4 


8 
6 


7 
8 




2 


Females 


1 


1 








Colored 


46.004 


8,676 


14.189 


11,919 


6,920 


2,618 


1.732 




Males 


28,190 
22,814 


4,815 
4,861 


7.194 
6,945 


6,148 
6,T76 


8,806 
8,614 


1,450 
1.168 


782 


Females 


950 







CITY OF CIENFUEGOS. 



All classes 


2,862 


644 


787 


739 


476 


187 


129 






Males 


1,871 
1,491 


276 
' 269 


870 
417 


868 
871 


215 
261 


93 
91 


60 


Females 


79 






Native white 


800 


181 


244 


210 


107 


45 


13 






Males 


403 
397 


90 
91 


124 
120 


98 
112 


52 
55 


29 
16 


10 


Females 


3 






Foreijni white 


1 


1 
























Males 


1 


1 












Females 




























Colored 


2,061 


862 


543 


529 


869 


142 


116 






Males 


967 
1,004 


184 
178 


246 
297 


270 
259 


163 
206 


64 
78 


40 


Females 


76 







CITY OF HABANA. 



All classes 


17,760 


3,966 


4,873 


8,759 


2,679 


1,819 


1,194 






Males 


8,491 
9,269 


1,892 
2.044 


2,400 
2.473 


1.887 
1.872 


1,225 
1,464 


588 
786 


504 


Female** - t . r . . 


690 






NaUve white 


4,624 


1,360 


1.426 


964 


520 


205 


149 


Males 


2,268 
2,356 


655 
705 


718 
706 


464 

600 


245 
276 


106 
97 


78 


Females 


71 






Foreisn white 


100 


9 


23 


14 


19 


14 


21 






Males 


60 
60 


6 

4 


10 
18 


6 
9 


11 
8 


6 

8 


IS 


Females 


8 






Colored 


18,036 


2,567 


8,424 


2.781 


2,140 


1,100 


1,024 






Males 


6,173 
6,863 


1,232 
1,885 


1,672 
1,752 


1,418 
1,868 


969 
1,171 


469 
681 


413 


Females 


611 




• 



ILLSamMATS OHILDBEK. 



357 



Tablb XVIII. — lUegilimate children — Continued. 

CITY OF HATAKZAS. 





Total. 


Under 5 
years. 


5to9 
years. 


10 to 14 
years. 


15 to 19 
years. 


20 to 24 
years. 


25years 
and over. 


A.11 classes. 


8,661 


689 


960 


859 


589 


278 


236 






Males 


1,766 
1,796 


846 
844 


485 
475 


463 
896 


249 
290 


131 
147 


92 


Peniftlw .,,.,,.-r 


144 






Native white 


629 


151 


194 


166 


76 


82 


20 






Males 


829 
800 


80 
71 


99 
96 


86 
70 


87 
89 


18 
14 


9 


Females r 


11 






Foreisrn white 


1 








1 


















Hales 


1 








1 






Females . , , . r t - - 
















: V 










Colored 


2,931 


588 


766 


703 


462 


246 


216 






Males 


1,486 
1,496 


265 
273 


886 
880 


377 
826 


211 
251 


118 
188 


83 


Females ,,-^--^--^,^^ 


188 


* 





CITY OF PUERTO PRINCIPE. 



All classes 


1,946 


883 


616 


466 


824 


148 


119 






Males 


974 
972 


193 
190 


269 
247 


242 

214 


147 
177 


74 
74 


49 


Females , . , . , 


70 






Native white 


706 


188 


219 


183 


113 


40 


15 






Males 


860 
848 


72 
66 


111 
106 


96 
88 


66 
67 


18 
22 


8 


Females 


7 






Foreifim white 
































Males 
















Females 
































Colored 


1,238 


246 


297 


278 


211 


108 


104 






Males 


614 
624 


121 
124 


158 
189 


147 
126 


91 
120 


66 
62 


41 


Females 


63 







CITY OF SANTIAGO. 



All classes 


5,824 


788 


1,664 


1,684 


1,076 


462 


466 






Males 


2,853 
2,971 


865 

868 


780 
784 


777 
767 


611 
564 


230 
232 


190 


Females 


266 






Native white 


1,193 


168 


872 


822 


220 


66 


46 






Males 


622 
671 


91 

77 


200 
172 


171 
151 


IM 
116 


87 
28 


19 


Femalw - - r , 


27 






Foreiim white 


15 


8 


8 


1 


2 




1 








Males : 


8 
7 


4 
4 


8 




1 
1 






Females .'.... 


1 




1 










Colored 


4,616 


667 


1,189 


1,211 


853 


897 


409 






Males 


2,223 
2,893 


270 
287 


677 
612 


606 
606 


406 
447 


193 
204 


171 


Females 


288 







REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 
Table XlX.—Sdtoulaltetulanoe, literacy, andwaperior rduealivn. 

[Plsni'es In Italics are Inelnded Id tboae tur tbe pruriDoear district.) 





Total 

OS;. 


Under 10 
yean of age. 


Tan jfear* of acs and otot. 


Soperloredn- 
ealton. 


ProTlncM. 


■< 


gl 


Il 

< 


1 


Si 


1. 

? 


1 
1 


Yea. No, 

1 




irj,i»4 

3S7.71S 








a 

s.ais 

!:S2 




i 

13 


».ob;| (IS. tot 


ntgofHaltana .. 


1 
( 




1:S i! 

t;70t| 1M 


i 


a 

1 

«8 


ill 
Oil 


Sauta Clara 


■III 








1,S72.T9J 


W,Ua| 3I8.(W 




8S,7TB 




l,*27 



















PROVINCE or HABANA. 





-s- 


end 


erlO 
otKce. 


Tenrewi 


o,«. 


aud over. 1 ^'^S,*^" 


Dlrtrlct. 


1 


4| 
11 


-< 


1 


1 


1 

1| 

r 


:^ ! 


Nth 


AnaaM 


IS 

li 

!:S 

J.ltU 

a),(Mi 

II M 

'.<! iw 

fi 

ii/itr 

il 

i S3 
I.SM 
1£,B31 

i 


'i 

Bia 

J 
1 

an 

188 
8M 

! 

vx. 
iZbS" 


1 

MO 

i 

ii 
J 

560 

'i 

ssa 
e.i!i7 

i 

,,S! 

MS 


US 

'S 

HIT 

1 

ST 
3» 

,.,!!J 
'"'2 

1 

i 

i 

IB-ffll 


B.JSJ 
1,G» 

<;kii 

. [»» 
»;| 

:| 

,s 

3. OSS 

i 

!:ig 
\-!& 


K 

m 

Si 
808 

"?! 

8.000 

' 4S 
70 
U 
H 
186 

1 

80 
67 

1 


:l 
1 

,.i 

cm 

1W.18C 

'"■S 
■|! 

•■1 

8» 

:;s 

876 
3.020 

S» 

m 


1 
i 

i 

....... 

101 

1 

4£7 


i 

00 

■! 

2MI 
fSS 

8t 
7,8(18 

,,„ 

i 

w 

tot 

88 

T7 
5 














f-S 






'S 










Celbad^_ABua 


■jffi 


gg|^ 


■'ii 
■its 

"IS 

Ii 


QalrmdeMeleoa 

Habana 

Wa^XS"""""- 










»:'i1'^"."::::::: 




.fS 




San Autimlo de laa 


'is 


San Antimio de loa 


12. us 




San Nicolas 

Saa ta Cruz del Norte. 


i^ 


S»-'"'"»- 


IO.IJI 


VorediNuoya 


xlm 




(3t,MH 


ii.iuu 


l<B.fflil 


« 


s.uur 


ill. TO 



LITERACY. 



359 



Table XIX. — School attendance, literacy, and superior education. — Continued. 

PROVINCE OF MATANZA8. 
[Figures in italics are indnded in thoee for the province or district] 



District. 



Alacranes 

Bolondr6n 

Cabezas 

Canasi 

Clffdenas 

Cityof Cardenas. 

Carlos BoJas 

Col6n 

Cnevitos 

Gnaxnacaro 

Jagtiey Grande 

Jovellanos 

MacagnA 

Macnriges 

Marti 

Matanzas 

City of MatanzoA . 

M4xiino-06mez 

Mendes Capote 

Palmillas 

Perico ^ 

Roque 

Sabanilla 

Han Jos6 de los Ramos 

Santa Ana 

Union de Reyes 



Total 
popula- 
tion. 



Under 10 
years of age. 






1 



••8 
55 



8.110 

9.179 

6.184 

1,993 

24.861 

gU9U0 

8.174 

12,196 

6.807 

6.U00 

6,863 

7,629 

5.042 

10,405 

8,905 

46.282 

56,574 

4,046 

2.168 

7,647 

4,449 

4,464 

6.205 

6.765 

2,965 

5,226 



The province... I 202,444 



236 

185 

93 

52 

1,225 

i,«W 

139 

341 

IGO 

171 

131 

^6 

67 

S64 

205 

2,251 

i,158 

80 

5 

158 

100 

72 

135 

225 

7 

191 



6,698 



1,335 

1.7T9 

990 

282 

4.116 

SMU 

698 

2,466 

1.169 

1.176 

1.198 

1,437 

1,143 

1,888 

1,824 

6,764 

5,170 

773 

405 

1,643 

764 

779 

960 

1.404 

626 

973 



Ten years of age and over. 



•d 

9 

"SI 
21 



36.440 



280 
200 
101 

87 

1.668 

l,6g0 

124 

346 

96 
192 
114 
275 

93 

265 

162 

2.858 

f.7f7 

98 

18 
178 
168 

68 
191 
282 

69 
218 






7,995 



4.610 
6.060 
8.225 
1,810 
8.034 
6,31,7 
1.797 
6.467 
8.230 
8,474 
3,227 
8.609 
2.966 
6.064 
6.119 
16,070 
9,699 
2,280 
1.385 
4.315 
2.378 
2,744 
2.909 
3,702 
1,827 
2.4i8 



is 

o8 



96,007 



130 

163 

42 

5 

806 

772 

88 

317 

123 

66 

72 

142 

64 

140 

112 

1,547 

1,289 

84 

40 

71 

95 

81 

88 

115 

16 

152 



S 



f 



4,567 



1.498 

1,780 

760 

254 

9,080 

8,580 

424 

3,258 

1,084 

910 

1,100 

1,880 

706 

1,757 

1,478 

16.716 

15.f75 

ni 

347 

1,276 

942 

716 

919 

1.047 

429 

1.241 



I 
I 

o 



Superior edu- 
cation. 



50,376 



17 

3 

3 

3 

43 

35 

4 

12 

6 

12 

11 

21 

3 

37 

6 

68 

58 

1 

13 
6 
3 
4 
4 
10 
1 
3 



292 



Yes. 



14 

91 

13 

16 

300 

5S7 

3 

90 

18 

62 

27 

156 

46 

60 

49 

1,289 

1,2^) 

26 

4 

34 
23 
16 
51 
27 
8 
41 



2,613 



PROVINCE OF PINAR DEL RIO. 



No. 



8,083 
9,088 
6.171 

i.on 

24.462 

21,553 

3,171 

1:3.105 

5,789 

6.938 

6,820 

7,374 

4,097 

10,355 

8.a')a 

43.903 

35, W, 

4,020 

2.154 

7,613 

4.426 

4.449 

6.154 

6,738 

2.957 

6,186 



199,831 



Artemisa 

Bahia Honda 

Cahaflftfl - 

Candelaria 

Cons61aci6n del 

Norte 

Cona61aci6n del Sur 

Guanajay • 

Guane 

Guayabal 

.Julian Diss 

LosPalacios 

M4ntua 

Mariel 

PinardelRlo 

Cityof Pinar del 

Rio 

San Cristobal 

San Diego de los 

Bafios 

San Diego de Nufiez 
San Juan y Martinez 

San Luis 

Vlfiales 

The province. . 



9,317 


57 


2,117 




3,863 


5 


4,866 


83 


7,399 


68 


16,666 


105 


8.796 


2» 


14,760 


9 


2,710 


49 


1,871 


1 


2.456 


2 


8,366 


29 


8,681 


117 


88,348 


463 


8,880 


363 


4.263 


26 



2,419 
1,137 

17,700 



173,064 



14 



74 

52 

182 



1.656 



1,098 


T8 


6,442 


76 


1,900 


12 


45 


476 




1,253 


19 


868 


1 


8 


684 


19 


2,603 


8 


494 




11 


880 


111 


2,028 


.« 


879 


3 


88 


1,994 


43 


4,460 


50 


792 


2 


17 


4,130 


205 


9. 399 


239 


2,484 


13 


74 


1.684 


238 


8.988 


147 


2,560 


1 


74 


3,086 


18 


9.560 


60 


2,084 


9 


20 


496 


60 


1.467 


86 


600 


3 


21 


419 




1,293 


a • * V V • • 


167 


1 


2 


Si3 


3 


1,466 


84 


424 


4 


14 


2,057 


31 


6,262 


44 


946 


8 


11 


646 


104 


1,957 


58 


751 


3 


22 


10,092 


470 


20,862 


406 


6.002 


28 


206 


1,59U 


57f 


3,170 


213 


3,153 


15 


169 


826 


39 


2,637 


26 


806 


1 


» 


610 


10 


1,4»4 


7 


381 


8 


14 


201 


^ 


714 


14 


148 




1 


3.627 


90 


9.040 


106 


1,828 


20 


33 


2,109 


87 


4.310 


58 


977 


16 


24 


6,004 


162 


10,478 


76 


1.794 


6 


42 


41,102 


1,757 


100,513 


1,490 


26.416 


132 


746 



9.272 
2,100 
3.842 

4,778 

7.382 

16,601 

8.72:2 

14.740 

2.689 

1.860 

2.442 

8,^5 

8,609 

88.137 

8,711 
4.244 

2.405 

1.186 

14,764 

7,684 
17,658 



172,818 



PROVINCE OP PUERTO PRINCIPE. 



CiegodeAvila 

Mor6n ......__.. 


9,801 

9,680 

10,866 

63,140 

25,102 
5,306 


128 

162 

804 

1,523 

1,319 
85 

2,196 


2.767 

2,686 

2.164 

13.150 

U,553 
1.636 


123 

211 

813 

1.466 

1,21,2 
89 


4.507 

4,830 

8,685 

17.288 

5,026 
2,000 


222 
225 
216 

1,700 

l,ltU 
167 


1,966 

1,568 

8,718 

17.879 

11,820 
1.843 


4 

13 

16 

117 

28 
8 


88 

66 

137 

1.139 

92U 
63 


9.713 
9.665 


Nnevitas 

Puerto Principe 

City of Puerto 

Principe 

Santa Cruz del Sur . . 


10,218 
62,001 

24, 178 
6,256 


The province .. 


88,234 


22.262 


2.202 


82,440 


2,628 


26,466 


16H 


1.482 


86,752 



360 REPORT ON THE OENSUB OF CUBA, 1899. 

Table XIX. — School atUndanee, Hteraey, and aupertor edueation—ContdtmoA. 

PBOVINCE OF SANTA CI.ABA. 
[FiBnraa In Itsllo »re Indodcd Id thoea for the province or dlatricl-] 





Total 


Under 10 
rearaoIaKe. 


Tmyean 


of.*. 


and OTer. 


'"^^- 


District 


11 

■< 


51 

2l 


1 


1=^ 




1 

1 
3 


1 


Y«». 


Ntt 




i 

w;is8 

i 

:.:S 

1", ,■» 

L'l . .«£ 
lt,7tg 

u.«a3 

!8,tST 
S,«03 

S:iit 


ISO 

z 

90 
I,9M 

'« 

1 
1 

710 

uo 

m 

1 

W 

£13 

m 


i 

l!8t£ 
ID.SSE 

i 

i 

f,0« 

s.8ei 
Blai 

'•Ui 

4,(ni 

i,s«e 

1,8£S 


tee 

107 
£,GU 

''i 

us 

,.i 

8M 

1B7 

•s 

86 

flIO 

i 


8.868 
i8,H0 

!:^ 

1 
3 

■iS 

5. 778 

:s 


'i 

i 
1 
1 

,.!S 

'■'» 

S! 

137 
«1 


a, MO 

iS 

1,188 
1,188 
18,788 

'■m 

!l8> 

loso 

*,«! 

'■S 

1,07S 
8,708 

ii 


« 

r 

i' 

9 

1 


i 

a) 

810 

8a 

iS 
i 

IMJ 

u 

116 

10 

i 

108 
18 


3. Ml 


















0" 


fi8.fll8 


















ffinchoVetoi 


J-Sf! 






B>KaalBOnnde 




eu Antonio de ka 




SuFemmndo V. 


i;56i 




II; ns 


%^^^ *"""* 


Santa laabel de Ua 






M.l» 


^S^?!'ii'i^; 








aM,(ia6 


8,897 


•8.8U! 


"•«" 


m,«B 


.,«. 


88, «0 


UO 


1,977 


aM,8EB 



PEOVINCB OP SANTIAQO. 



Oampechnela .. 

Crlito""M!I" 
Olbaim 

Holffaln '.'.'. 

Jteoiui] 

ICiiiuilUo 

Cltpo/MatumHUo 

Hlgtiera 

Punui Soriano 

PnerloPadra 

emgam da T^wuno... 

San Lola 

SMtiaco da CniM .,.. 

nwpNTllMB... 



e.H8 
0,1188 
5. BEE 



30,060 

K,3U 



I.ITEBAOT. 



361 



Tabub XX. — Population 10 years of age and ovevy by ctge^ sex, race, and nativity, 

and oy literacy. 



CUBA. 



Total 

10 to 14 yean 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Total males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years. 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

56 to64years..«... 
65 years and over . 

Total females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years...... 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and oyer . 

Total natiye white — 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

86 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years, j 

66 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Native white males... 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20to24yeas8 

26 to 20 years 

80 to 84 years 

86 to 44 years 

46 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

66 years and over . 

Native white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

66 to 64 years 

66 years and over . 



Total. 


Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 


Can read 

but can not 

write. 


Can read 
and write. 




1,215,810 


690,665 


32,772 


492,473 
70.178 




280,019 


140,727 


9,144 




178,086 


96,261 


6,146 


75.629 




162,960 


75,964 


8.601 


78.604 




137,406 


69.242 


8,106 


64.965 




118, 8J2 


62,648 


2,612 


63.652 




185,066 


101,553 


8,937 


79,666 




117. 62B 


71,698 


2,275 


43,560 




68,182 


46,429 


1,288 


21.465 




87,784 


27,158 


672 


9.954 




684,515 


851,601 


11,905 


270,919 


112,899 


75,148 


3,892 


83,368 


84,346 


47,978 


2,208 


84.075 


« 


79,006 


38,141 


1,261 


89,606 




78,206 


34,598 


1,098 


87.510 




64,023 


30,850 


804 


32,279 




101,806 


60,712 


1,202 


49,301 




64.006 


86,812 


686 


27,008 




87.099 


24,197 


331 


12, sn 




19,083 


13,754 


158 


5,121 




681,295 


338,874 


20,867 


221,654 




107.660 


65,578 


5,262 


86.820 




08,689 


48,288 


3,862 


41,554 




73,951 


37,818 


2,240 


83.896 




64,199 


84,644 


2,100 


27,455 




64,789 


81,696 


1,718 


21,3r3 




88,751 


50,841 


2,645 


80,265 




68,432 


85,381 


1,680 


16,462 




81,068 


21,232 


957 


8,894 




18,751 


13,404 


514 


4,833 




673,796 


880,586 


16,004 


297,600 


146,928 


91,362 


5.006 


49,870 


114,002 


60,349 


8,289 


60,454 




88.603 


44,148 


1,634 


42,721 




74, Ul 


37,162 


1,375 


85,574 




63,008 


31,644 


1,127 


30,337 




95,001 


47,911 


1,743 


45,347 




62,888 


27,437 


927 


24,474 




2P,680 


13,522 


549 


12,619 




12,624 


6,160 


264 


6.210 




326,826 


179,902 


6,015 


140,906 




76,170 


48,848 


2,471 


23.851 




62,818 


29,768 


1,268 


21,787 




42,091 


21,628 


601 


19,877 




85.688 


18,066 


428 


17,105 




31,064 


15,626 


8GU 


16,079 




47,705 


24.148 


624 


23,038 




26,192 


12,966 


242 


11,984 




11,996 


6.196 


98 


5,702 




5,211 


2,688 


43 


2,486 




846,970 


179,663 


10,689 


150,696 


71,758 


S«^^* 


8,225 


26,019 


61,274 


80,586 


2,021 


28,667 




46,412 


22,626 


1,043 


23.844 




38,623 


19,107 


947 


18,469 




31.964 


15,919 


777 


15,258 




47,296 


28,768 


1,219 


22.308 




27,646 


14.471 


685 


12,400 




14,604 


7, aw 


451 


5»JiI 




7,418 


3,467 


221 


8,726 





362 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XX. — Population JO years of age arid over, by age, sex, race, and fiativUy^ 

and by literacy — Contiiined. 



CUBA— Continued. 



Total foreign white 

10 toU years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

a0to34years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

56 to 64 years 

66 years and over . . 

Forei^ white males. . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

90 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

66 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 

Foreiern white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Total colored 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

% to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

56 to 64 years. 

66 years and over . 

Colored males 

10 to 14 years 

L5 tol9years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 20 years , 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

66 years and over . . 

Colored females 

10 to 14 years 

16 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

36 to 44 years 

46 to 64 years 

56 to 64 years 

66 years and over ., 



Total. 



139,180 



2,764 

8,807 

20.195 

28,080 

19.675 

81,512 

19,814 

'9,820 

4.668 



114,254 



1,648 

6.706 

17,285 

19.647 

16,646 

26,449 

15,515 

7,827 

3,029 



24,926 



1.116 
1,509 
2,910 
3,883 
3,029 
5,063 
3.790 
2,483 
1.534 



402,836 



70,367 
66,636 
44,261 
40.264 
36.129 
58,543 
45,376 
31,672 
20,507 



108,436 



35,681 
24,820 
19,632 
17,971 
16,328 
27,151 
23,880 
17,776 
10.798 



200.300 



84.776 
80.816 
24.629 
22,208 
19,806 
81.392 
21,987 
18,890 
9,804 



Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 



40.745 



1.084 
2.074 
5.620 
6,282 
6,406 
8,799 
6,956 
3,625 
1,947 



Can read 

bntcannot 

write. 



2,300 



108 
186 
277 
363 
810 
527 
327 
174 
83 



29.060 



1.284 



605 
1,621 
4,870 
4.996 
4,122 
6.446 
8,880 
2,120 
1,011 



11.686 



430 
568 

1,160 
1,290 
1,876 
2,354 
2,076 
1.506 
906 



S80.235 



48.381 
33,838 
26.286 
26,788 
26.500 
44,843 
38,300 
28.282 
19.061 



60 

77 

179 

234 

178 

290 

164 

84 

38 



1.016 



58 

60 

98 

139 

182 

237 

163 

90 

45 



L%868 



3,345 
2,720 
1,500 
1,460 
1,175 
1,667 
1,021 
665 
385 



142.729 



25,706 
16,604 
12,148 
11,647 
11,108 
20,124 
19,466 
15,881 
10,060 



147.606 



22,026 
17.144 
14,138 
14,241 
14,403 
24.719 
18,834 
12,401 
9,001 



4,606 



1,371 
948 
491 
446 
866 
478 
280 
149 
77 



9,2SS 



1,974 

1,772 

1.009 

1,014 

8(« 

1,189 

741 

416 

248 



Can read 
and 'write. 



96.135 



1.027 

6,007 

14,308 

16,375 

13,867 

28,188 

18.031 

6,<S1 

2,533 



83,910 



1,003 

5,110 

1:2.736 

14,437 

12.348 

19,714 

11.471 

5,123 

1,980 



12, 



624 

087 
1,662 
1.948 
1.521 
2,472 
1,560 
886 
553 



96.738 



18.681 

19.078 

16,886 

13,016 

0.448 

12,033 

6.066 

2,805 

1,211 



46,101 



8,504 
7,178 
6,998 
6,978 
4.854 
6.549 
8.643 
1.746 
656 



62,681 



10,177 
11.900 
9.892 
7,088 
4.604 
6.484 
2.412 
1,079 
666 



LITERACY. 



363 



Table XX. — Population 10 years of age and over^ by ar/e, uex, race, and natitnty, 

and by literacy — Continued. 



PROVINCE OF HABANA. 



Total 

10 to U years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

£( to 29 years 

ao to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to54 years 

55 to 04 years 

05 years and over . 

Total males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

36 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 04 years 

05 years and over . 

Total females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 10 years 

20 to :M years , 

25 to 29 years 

:» to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 04 years 

05 years and over . 

Total native white 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to20 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

05 years and over . 

Native white males... 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 04 years 

05 years and over . 

Native white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 10 years 

20 to 24 years 

23 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

36 to 44 years 

46 to 54 years 

66 to 04 years 

05 years and over . 



Total. 


Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 


Can read 

but can not 

write. 


Can read 
and write. 


345,070 


133,607 


11,030 


199,879 


50,737 


23,160 


2,824 


24,703 


48,621 


17,507 


1,008 


29,010 


49.261 


10,120 


i,m 


31,797 


45,029 


14.958 


1,257 


28,814 


30,408 


12. n4 


1,055 


22,034 


68.519 


19,682 


1,609 


32,338 


32.883 


14.529 


903 


17,451 


18.829 


9,497 


607 


8,825 


0,8U 


6,354 


249 


4,241 


182,212 


64,604 


4,219 


113,399 


25,068 


12.382 


1,209 


13,007 


23, ni 


8.800 


760 


14,221 


20,294 


7,818 


610 


17,060 


24.081 


7,376 


434 


17,171 


20,357 


0,009 


866 


13,993 


29.682 


0,025 


613 


20,144 


17,478 


0,519 


200 


10,009 


9,504 


4.383 


133 


5,048 


4.427 


2,252 


65 


2,120 


162,804 


08.9ra 


7,411 


86,480 


25.079 


10.708 


1,015 


12,090 


24.750 


8.797 


1,168 


14,705 


22,957 


8,308 


818 


13,831 


20,048 


7.682 


823 


11,043 


16,100 


0,705 


700 


8,041 


23.837 


10.557 


1,U80 


12,194 


15.405 


7.960 


043 


0.782 


9.265 


5.114 


374 


8.n7 


5.417 


3.102 


194 


2,121 


186,323 


06,805 


5,060 
1.030 


115,378 


85.730 


15,097 


18,408 


31.394 


11.481 


040 


18.973 


27,615 


9,407 


540 


17.478 


23,075 


7,701 


476 


14.888 


17,827 


5,571 


878 


11.878 


25.280 


7,079 


549 


17,001 


14,211 


4,050 


271 


0,284 


7.505 


2.517 


186 


4,882 


3.087 


1.090 


80 


2,511 


88.002 


:i2,422 


1.847 


68,733 


18,074 


8,490 


no 


8,865 


14.408 


5,078 


377 


8.348 


12.008 


4.509 


209 


7.980 


10.963 


3.754 


153 


7.066 


8.050 


2,740 


115 


6,789 


12.280 


3,705 


170 


8,351 


0,403 


1,983 


00 


4,354 


8,140 


1,067 


29 


2,000 


1,379 


440 


9 


930 


98,321 


33,473 


3.208 


01,645 


17.050 


7,207 


911 


9.538 


10.991 


5,803 


503 


10,035 


14.817 


4.988 


831 


0,498 


12.112 


3,947 


823 


7,842 


9.177 


2.825 


20J 


6.080 


13.003 


3,914 


879 


8,710 


7,8(18 


2,073 


206 


4.930 


4,449 


1,400 


157 


2,832 


2,308 


060 


71 


1.661 



362 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XX. — Population JO years of age and over^ by age, sex, race, and nativity, 

and by literacy — Continned. 



CUBA—Continued. 



Total foreign white 

10 toU years 

15 to 10 years 

ao to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30to84yearB 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 04 years 

65 years and over . . 

Foreign white males. . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years . 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 

Foreign white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Total colored 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

56 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 

Colored females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years , 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

36 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



Total. 


Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 


Can read 

bntcannot 

write. 


Can read 
and -write. 


139,180 


40,745 


2,800 


96.135 


2,764 


1,084 


108 


1,CS27 


8,807 


2,074 


186 


6,007 


20,195 


5,620 


277 


u.aoB 


28.080 


6,202 


363 


16,875 


19.675 


5,408 


810 


13,867 


81.512 


8.799 


627 


2S,186 


19,314 


5,966 


327 


18,(01 


'9,820 


3,625 


174 


6.021 


4.663 


1,947 


83 


2,633 


114,254 


29,060 


1.284 


' 83.910 


1,648 


605 


60 


1.0G8 


6,708 


1,521 


77 


6.110 


17,285 


4,870 


170 


12,736 


19,647 


4,996 


284 


14.427 


IB. 646 


4.122 


178 


13,340 


26.449 


6,446 


200 


19,714 


16, 515 


8,880 


164 


11.471 


7,827 


2,120 


84 


6.1^ 


3.029 


1.011 


38 


1.9S0 


24,926 


11,685 


1,016 


12,225 


1,116 


489 


63 


624 


1,509 


568 


60 


987 


2.910 


1,150 


08 


1.602 


8,883 


1,290 


130 


1,948 


3,029 


l,8r6 


182 


1.53» 


5,068 


2,854 


287 


2.472 


8,799 


2,076 


188 


1.560 


2,493 


1,606 


00 


896 


1,634 


986 


45 


553 


402,886 


280.235 


13,868 


08,788 


70,357 


48.381 


3,345 


18,681 


65.63B 


33.838 


2,720 


10.078 


44,261 


26,286 


1,500 


10,385 


40,264 


25,788 


1,460 


13.016 


36,129 


25,606 


1,175 


0,448 


68,543 


44,843 


1,667 


12,033 


45,876 


38,800 


•1,021 


0,066 


31,672 


28,282 


666 


2,825 


20,507 


19,061 


826 


1,211 


198,436 


142,729 


4,006 


40,101 


35.681 


25,706 


1.371 


8,504 


24,820 


16,804 


048 


7,178 


19,632 


12,148 


481 


0,008 


17.971 


11.547 


440 


5,078 


16,323 


11,108 


806 


4.854 


27,151 


20.124 


478 


6,549 


23,889 


10,466 


280 


8,043 


17,776 


16,881 


148 


1.740 


10.798 


10,060 


77 


0S6 


209,809 


147,606 


0,262 


6S.681 


34,776 


22,025 


1,974 


10,177 


80,816 


17,144 


1,772 


11,900 


24,629 


14,138 


1.000 


9.802 


22,208 


14,241 


1.014 


7,088 


19,806 


14,408 


800 


4.604 


81,302 


24.710 


1,180 


5,484 


21,987 


18,834 


741 


2,412 


13,806 


12,401 


416 


1,070 


9,804 


0,001 


248 


665 



LITERACY. 



363 



Table XX. — Population JO pears of age and over^ by age, ttex, race, and nativity, 

and by literacy — Continned. 

PROVINCE OF HABANA. 



Total 

10 to 14 yean 

15 to 19 yean 

20 to 24 yean 

85 to 29 yean — . 

ao to 34 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

45to54yean 

55 to 04 yean 

65 yean and over . 

Total males 

10 to 14 yean 

15 to 19 yean 

20 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

30 to 34 yean 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

05 years and over . 

Total females 

10 to 14 yean 

15 to 19 yean 

20 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 years 

:» to 34 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

55 to 64 yean 

65 years and over . 

Total native white 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 yean 

25to29yean 

30 to 34 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

65 to 64 years 

65 yean and over . 

Native white males. . . 

10 to 14 yean 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 yean 

25 to 29 yean 

ao to 84 yean 

85 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 yean 

i& yean and over . 

Native white females 

10 to 14 yean 

15 to 19 yean 

20 to 24 yean 

25 to 20 yean 

80 to 34 yean 

35 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

66 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over . 



Total. 



345,076 



60,737 
48,621 
48.251 
45,029 
86,463 
68,519 
32,883 
18.829 

V, o4v 



182,212 



25,658 
23.771 
28,294 
24,981 
20,357 
29,682 
17,478 
9,564 
4.427 



182,864 



25,079 
24,760 
22,957 
20.048 
16.106 
23,837 
15,405 
9.265 
5,417 



186,323 



35.730 
31.304 
27.515 
23.075 
17,827 
25,280 
14,211 
7,605 
3,687 



88,002 



18.074 

14,408 

12.606 

10,963 

8,650 

12.286 

6.403 

8.146 

1,379 



96,321 



17,656 

16,991 

14,817 

12,112 

9,177 

13,003 

7,808 

4,449 

2,308 



Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 



133,567 



23,160 
17,597 
16.120 
14,968 
12. n4 
19,582 
14,529 
9,497 
5,354 



64,504 



12.382 
8.800 
7.818 
7,376 
6,000 
0.025 
6.549 
4,383 
2.252 



68,973 



10,708 
8,797 
8,3U8 
7,582 
6,765 

10,557 
7,980 
5.114 
3,102 



65,805 



15,007 
11.481 
9,497 
7,701 
5,571 
7,679 
4,666 
2,517 
1.096 



32.422 



8,490 
5,678 
4.609 
3,754 
2,746 
3,765 
1.983 
1,057 
440 



33,473 



7.207 
5,808 
4,98^ 
3.947 
2,825 
3,914 
2.673 
1,460 
066 



Can read 

bat can not 

write. 



11,630 



2,824 

1,908 

1,328 

1,257 

1,065 

1,609 

908 

607 

249 



4.219 



1,2(0 
760 
510 
434 
855 
513 
200 
133 
55 



7,411 



1,015 
1,158 
818 
823 
700 
1,086 
643 
374 
194 



5,060 



1,630 
040 
540 
476 
878 
549 
271 
186 
80 



1,847 



719 

377 

209 

153 

115 

170 

06 

29 

9 



3,208 



911 
663 
831 
32!) 
20J 
379 
205 
157 
71 



Can read 
and write. 



199,879 



24.763 
29,016 
31,797 
28,814 
22,034 
82,338 
17,451 
8,835 
4,241 



113, 



12,067 
14,221 
17,906 
17, Kl 
13,993 
20,144 
10,609 
5,048 
2,120 



86,480 



12.606 

14,795 

13,831 

11,643 

8,641 

12,194 

6,782 

3,n7 

2,121 



115,378 



18.408 

18,9r3 

17.478 

14.898 

11.878 

17.061 

9,284 

4,802 

2,511 



58,733 



8.865 
8,348 
7,980 
7.056 
6,789 
8.351 
4.354 
2,000 
990 



01.645 



9.538 
10.635 
0.498 
7,842 
6.089 
8.710 
4.990 
2,832 
1,581 



364 



BEPORT ON THE CENSUS OP CUBA, 1899. 



Table XX.—PoptUation 10 years of age and over^ by age, sex, race, and nativity^ 

and by h^erocif— Continned. 



PBOVINGE OF HABANA— Continued. 



Total foreign white. . . 

lOtoU years 

15 to 19 yearn 

aOtoS{4 years 

25 to 29 years 

aoto84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and oyer . 

Foreign white males. . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

;Wto84 years 

36 to 44 years. 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Foreign white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years , 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 51 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



Total colored .. 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 y^ars and over 

Colored males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 20 years 

80 to 84 years 

36 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

66 years and over 

Colored females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Total 


Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 


Can read 
bntcannot 
write. 


Can read 
and write. 


67,174 


18.227 


1.288 


5aS.e» 


1,448 


826 


00 


1,067 


4.785 


674 


68 


4.048 


10,897 


1.604 


168 


^•^ 


11,224 


1.868 


201 


9.170 


9,660 


1.763 


168 


7,62B 


14,517 


2,866 


800 


11.368 


8,541 


2,006 


186 


6,900 


4,576 


1,848 


06 


8.ias 


2.181 


706 


47 


1,37» 


68,290 


7,869 


637 


44,784 


880 


181 


28 


071 


4.019 


601 


44 


8.474 


8,802 


1.109 


08 


7.606 


9.300 


1,273 


104 


7.803 


7,794 


1,075 


81 


6.68S 


11,662 


1,681 


143 


9.728 


6.417 


1,106 


76 


6.233 


8,197 


639 


41 


2,517 


1,329 


802 


22 


1,006 


18,884 


5,868 


661 


7.875 


668 


145 


82 


806 


766 


178 


24 


660 


1,605 


405 


66 


1.035 


1,924 


580 


07 


1,247 


1,766 


688 


87 


991 


«•?? 


1,174 


167 


1.634 


2.iS* 


088 


100 


l.OBT 


1,379 


700 


65 


615 


802 


406 


26 


ga 


91.579 


54,445 


5.2B8 


31.842 


18,664 


7,137 


1,134 


6.308 


12,342 


6,442 


900 


6,000 


11,389 


5,025 


726 


6,689 


10,780 


5,404 


680 


4,746 


9,076 


5,440 


600 


8,127 


18,713 


0,048 


750 


8.015 


10,181 


7,777 


447 


i.9or 


6.668 


5,682 


125 


801 


4,006 


8,560 


122 


854 


40.020 


24,808 


1.736 


14,888 


6,704 


8,ni 


462 


2.681 


5.849 

4.m 


2,621 


829 


£.899 


2.200 


208 


8.391 


4.n8 


2,849 


177 


8.108 


8.918 


2.188 


159 


1.666 


5,844 


8,579 


200 


8.065 


4.668 


8.458 


118 


1.0S2 


8,221 


2,687 


63 


471 


1.719 


1,610 


24 


185 


60.660 


80.142 


3.667 


16.900 


6,860 


8.416 


672 


8,778 


6.903 


2,821 


671 


8,601 


6.545 


2,826 


422 


8.296 


6.012 


8.066 


403 


8.554 


6,163 


8.252 


860 


1.561 


^•^ 


6,460 


660 


1.860 


6.473 


4,319 


329 


885 


3,437 


2.945 


162 


880 


2.307 


2.040 


98 


160 



LITEBACT. 



365 



Table XX. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity^ 

and by literacy — ^Continned. 



PROVINCE OF MATANZAS. 



Total 

lOtoU years 

15 to 19 years 

30 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

a) to d4 years 

35 to 44 years 

45to54 years 

55 to 04 years 

65 years and over . 

Total males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

85 to 44 yearn 

45to54 years 

55 to 04 years 

65 years and over . 

Total females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years. 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

56 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Total native white ... 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 10 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

86 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Native white males . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

86 to 44 years 

46 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Native white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years. 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



TotaL 


Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 


Can read 

but can not 

write. 


Can read 
and write. 


159.297 


96.067 


4.507 


58,663 


27.294 


15.944 


1.316 


10,034 


22,143 


11.908 


1.015 


9.220 


19.496 


10.242 


5a5 


8,721 


17.788 


9,778 


480 


7,530 


14,418 


8,241 


334 


6,843 


22.963 


13, 7n 


425 


8,701 


16,969 


11.740 


247 


4.962 


11.404 


8,814 


141 


2.449 


6,820 


5,623 


74 


1.123 


82,047 


40.688 


1,066 


30,699 


13.901 


8,785 


553 


4.503 


10,183 


5,929 


368 


8,880 


9,466 


6.042 


177 


4,247 


8,&^ 


4,779 


164 


8.909 


7,453 


4,017 


110 


8.330 


12,287 


6.752 


139 


5.396 


9. 466 


6,208 


89 


8,171 


6,750 


6.131 


45 


1,583 


3.680 


3.044 


21 


015 


77,260 


46,385 


2.901 


• 27.964 


18,883 


7.150 


768 


6.471 


11.960 


5.970 


647 


6.334 


10,083 


5.200 


358 


4,474 


8.986 


4.989 


316 


8.621 


6,965 


4,224 


224 


2.5n 


10,676 


7.025 


286 


8.365 


7,603 


6,537 


158 


1.808 


4,645 


8.683 


96 


866 


3.140 


2,579 


53 


508 


n,428 


38,007 


2,204 


87.037 


16,865 


9.479 


768 


6,618 


13,565 


6.818 


512 


6.235 


10,918 


5.263 


243 


5.412 


9,243 


4,420 


206 


4.617 


7,084 


3.214 


152 


8,668 


10,267 


4,528 


207 


5,533 


5.660 


2.677 


119 


2.964 


2.662 


1,208 


58 


1,336 


1.214 


530 


29 


655 


87.482 


19,522 


843 


17.117 


8.506 


6.205 


335 


3.058 


6,262 


8,394 


199 


2.669 


6.144 


2.609 


83 


2.382 


4.328 


2,218 


62 


2.(K8 


3.472 


1.678 


52 


1.742 


6.220 


2,326 


63 


2.831 


2,730 


1,208 


34 


1,493 


1.224 


579 


9 


030 


504 


250 


6 


248 


39,946 


18.575 


1,451 


19.920 


8.267 


4.274 


433 


8.500 


7.803 


3.424 


313 


3,500 


6.n4 


2.594 


160 


8,(0) 


4,915 


2,202 


144 


2.509 


3,662 


1.536 


100 


1.920 


6.047 


2.202 


144 


2.701 


2,930 


1,374 


85 


1,471 


1.438 


689 


49 


700 


710 


280 


23 


407 

: :- 



366 



REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XX. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age^ aex, race, and naturity^ 

and by litercusy — ^Continned. 

PROVINCE OF MATANZAS— Continned. 



Total foreign white. 



10 to U years 

15 to 19 years 

^ to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

ao to 34 years 

86 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

05 years and oyer 



Foreign white males. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to C4 years 

65 years and over 



Foreign white females 



10 to U years 

16 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

66 years and over 



Total. 



Total colored 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 10 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 20 years 

80 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Colored males. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



15,016 



266 
675 
1,886 
2,062 
1,900 
8,894 
2,462 
1,602 
810 



11,729 



162 
474 
1,606 
1,720 
1,676 
2,809 
1,870 
1,112 
608 



8,287 



113 
201 
328 
862 
824 
585 
602 
480 
802 



66,868 



10,164 
7,908 
6,744 
6.468 
5,484 
9,802 
8,847 
7.160 
4,796 



32,886 



5,151 
3,447 
2,814 
2,804 
2,405 
4,268 
4,866 
4,423 
2,668 



Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 



5,496 



160 
263 
641 
706 
686 
1.066 



735 
426 



Colored females. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



34,017 



5,013 
4.466 
3,980 
3,659 
3,079 
6,044 
3.961 
2.727 
2,128 



3. 608 



1,885 



64 
99 
160 
168 
160 
289 
879 
860 
216 



62,477 



6,315 
4,827 
4,338 
4,652 
4,434 
8.196 
8,240 
6,8U 
4,667 



26,662 



3.494 
2,371 
1,892 
2,023 
1.906 
3,650 
4,466 
4,167 
2.584 



25,925 



2.821 
2,466 
2,446 
2,629 
2,628 
4,634 
8,784 
2,644 
2,063 



Can read 

but can not 

write. 



and write. 



7 
18 
33 
82 
34 
65 
47 
37 
19 



147 



86 


5 


164 


7 


481 


20 


688 


22 


433 


21 


767 


80 


544 


20 


885 


16 


210 


6 



145 



2 
11 
18 
10 
13 
86 
27 
21 
13 



1,981 



641 

485 

258 

242 

148 

163 

81 

46 

26 



676 




1,306 



328 

323 

185 

162 

111 

107 

46 

26 

17 



9»231 



aM 

1,162 
1.344 
1,273 
2,273 
1. 



7.974 



61" 
903 

1.007 
l.lflO 
1.122 
2.012 
1.306 
711 



1,257 



47 

91 

155 
184 
151 
261 
186 
109 
78 



12,896 



8,806 

2,501 

2,147 

1.660 

002 

966 

526 

206 

106 



5.606 



1,444 
914 
848 
701 
462 
663 
875 
236 
75 



6,7W 



1.864 

1,677 

1,290 

808 

440 

406 

151 

57 

28 



LITKBACY. 



367 



Table XX. — Population JO years of age and over, by age, aex, racc^ and nativity y 

and by literacy — Continxied. 



PROVINCE OF PINAH DEL RIO. 



Total 



10 toU years 

15 to 10 yean 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

ao to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

46 to 54 years 

55 to 54 years 

65 years and over 



Total males 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 10 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

S5 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Total females 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

86 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Total native white. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 10 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 yearn 

80 to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Native white males 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 10 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

36 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Native white females. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 10 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

85 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 yean 

65 to 64 yean 

65 yean and over 



Total. 



180,807 



25.453 
20,727 
10,895 
16,978 
12,811 
16,744 
10,176 
5,502 
3.021 



13,048 
10,174 
0,061 
0,132 
6.871 
0.660 
5,002 
3.339 
1,784 



60.582 



12,410 
10,553 
0.434 
7,846 
5,440 
7,176 
4,274 
2,163 
1,237 



84,345 



18,363 

14,772 

13,258 

11.200 

7,730 

10,071 

5,422 

2.494 

1.026 



42,706 



0,428 
7,195 
6,547 
5,714 
4,000 
5,286 
2,783 
1,276 
507 



41,540 



8,085 
7,577 
6,711 
5,486 
8,679 
4,785 
2,638 
1.218 
510 



Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 



100,518 



60,775 



21.661 

16,328 

14,685 

12,617 

0.067 

11,987 

7,440 

4.245 

2,546 



51,545 



11.128 
8,002 
7,238 
6,880 
4,717 
6,268 
3,022 
2,442 
1.458 



48,068 



10,441 
8.326 
7,447 
6,237 
4,370 
5,720 
3,527 
1,808 
1.068 



64,840 



15,223 

11,454 

10,004 

8,300 

5,735 

7.183 

3.018 

1,704 

758 



32,184 



7.877 
5,602 
4.878 
4,106 
2,023 
3,683 
1,006 
894 
305 



32,185 



7,846 
5,852 
5.126 
4,194 
2,812 
8,560 
2,012 
000 
303 



Can read 

bat can not 

write. 



Can read 
'and write. 



1,400 



28,804 



404 


3,480 


843 


4.066 


206 


4,502 


164 


4,197 


06 


3,128 


169 


4,696 


60 


2.661 


32 


1,225 


18 


467 



639 



177 
187 
86 
67 
89 
82 
82 
13 
6 



851 



227 
206 
122 
97 
57 
77 
84 
19 
12 



17.601 



1,738 
2.085 
2,637 
2,686 
2,116 
8,229 
1,948 
884 
3B» 



10.713 



086 



813 
222 

130 
111 
50 
82 
87 
21 
11 



413 

m 

04 
57 
45 
24 
33 
16 
7 
3 



1.742 

2.021 

1.866 

1,512 

1,018 

1,360 

718 

341 

137 



18,000 



2,827 
8.006 
8,124 
2,780 
1.045 
2.806 
1.467 
670 
257 



578 

178 
128 
73 
66 
a*) 
40 
22 
U 
8 



10,100 



1,416 

1.400 

1.612 

1.563 

1,113 

1,620 

862 

875 

180 



8.791 



1.411 

l,9B7 

1.512 

1,226 

882 

1,186 

6U5 

801 

118 



368 



REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XX. — Population 10 years of age and over^ by age^ «ea?, raoe^ and nativity^ 

and by litemcy — Continued. 

PROVmCE OF PIKAB DEL BIO— Cantlnned. 



Total foreign white . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 yean 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

a0to34 years 

36 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Foreign white males. . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

ao to 34 years 

35 to 44 years. 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

66 years and over . 

Foreign white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years. 

45 to 54 years. 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Total colored 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 20 years 

30 to 34 years , 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and oyer . 

Colored males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

86 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

66 years and oyer . 



Total. 



10,686 



115 

660 

1,402 

1,688 

1,471 

2.432 

1,716 

906 

400 



9,400 



80 

487 

1,268 

1,471 

1,819 

2,184 

1,494 

782 

820 



1,286 



86 
63 
189 
162 
152 
248 
222 
126 
89 



86,886 



6,975 
6,406 
4,785 
4.145 
8.101 
4.241 
8,098 
2,100 
1.686 



17,679 



8,686 
2,482 
2,151 
1,947 
1,492 
2,099 
1,625 
1,281 
957 



17,747 



8.440 
2.918 
2,684 
2,198 
1,600 
2,142 
1,413 
819 
629 



Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 



4,410 



64 
284 
619 
676 
676 
907 
686 
422 
228 



8,694 



41 
201 
621 
688 
482 
751 
688 
821 
151 



816 



28 
88 

96 



156 
152 

101 

77 



81,784 



6,282 
4,640 
4,002 
8,641 
2.777 
8.897 
2,846 
2,029 
1,660 



15,767 



8.210 
2.199 
1,839 
1.691 
1,802 
1.874 
1,488 
1,227 
942 



16,967 



8.072 
2,441 
2.228 
1.960 
1,475 
2.028 
1,868 
808 
618 



Can read 

bat can not 

write. 



Can read 
and write. 



106 



4 

10 
15 
11 
14 
33 
11 
4 
4 



76 



4 
6 

18 
8 
8 

24 
8 
3 
2 



30 



4 

2 
8 
6 
9 
3 
1 
2 



898 



87 

HI 

68 

42 

28 

44 

18 

7 

8 



150 



88 

87 

16 

14 

7 

26 

9 

8 

I 



248 



48 

74 

47 

28 

16 

19 

9 

4 

2 



0,120 



47 
309 

n» 

M6 

cfiC 

1,4913 

1,031) 

482 

177 



5.730 



35 



810 
1,41» 



466 
107 



12 



39 
66 
63 
83 
67 
24 
10 



3,194 



606 
654 

610 
468 
801 
800 
174 
64 
28 



1, 



287 
266 
296 

!g 

200 

188 

51 

14 



I, 



819 



814 

S80 

118 

100 

41 

18 

9 



LITEBAOY. 



869 



Table XX.— 



Population 10 years of age and over, by age, seat, race, and nativity, 
and by literacy — ^Continned. 



PROVINCE OP PUERTO PRINCIPE. 



Total 

10 to U years , 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

aOtoMyears 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years wad over 

Total males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to ^ years 

ao to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years . 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total native white 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20to24yuars 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45to54years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years wad over 

Native white males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20to24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Native white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 10 years , 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

24662 24 



Total. 


Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 


Can read 

but can not 

write. 


Can read 
and write. 


63,786 


82,440 


2,528 


28,818 


13,820 


8,571 


797 


8,962 


9,660 


4,711 


421 


4,518 


6,248 


2,478 


165 


8,606 


6.100 


2,068 


168 


2.879 


5,9U 


2,640 


191 


8.113 


9,948 


4,764 


830 


4,840 


6.791 


8.428 


210 


8,158 


4,200 


2.188 


166 


1.856 


2,580 


1,607 


96 


897 


82.808 


17,409 


907 


U.063 


6,868 


4,780 


848 


1,784 


4,481 


2,634 


162 


1.7&5 


8.121 


1,806 


60 


1,758 


2,582 


1,060 


65 


1,447 


2,968 


1,865 


68 


1,550 


U.206 


2,547 


109 


2,668 


3,533 


1,765 


68 


1.715 


2,238 


1,213 


38 


987 


1,879 


882 


23 


474 


81,418 


15,081 


1,(B1 


14,766 


6,457 


8,481 


448 


2,168 


5.169 


2,177 


260 


2,788 


8,127 


1.175 


106 


1.847 


2,518 


988 


98 


1,438 


?'S1 


1,285 


138 


1.563 


J»2^ 


2.217 


230 


8,288 


8,268 


1.658 


157 


1.443 


1,962 


975 


118 


860 


1,211 


716 


78 


423 


46,221 


28,894 


1,709 


21,118 


10,889 


6,997 


630 


8.262 


7,584 


8,714 


317 


8.558 


4,470 


1,856 


105 


2,509 


3,325 


1,440 


75 


1.810 


4,851 


1.949 


122 


2.280 


7,165 


8,432 


206 


8,527 


4,471 


2,166 


123 


2.180 


2,806 


1,209 


80 


1,317 


1,860 


629 


51 


680 


22,268 


12,266 


636 


9,366 


5,612 


3,875 


284 


1,453 


3,526 


1.906 


127 


^•*!a 


2,120 


974 


88 


1.106 


1,499 


712 


26 


761 


2,058 


989 


82 


1.082 


3,563 


1,802 


67 


1,094 


2,065 


1,042 


84 


989 


1.216 


593 


20 


6U6 


614 


281 


8 


82.) 


23,968 


11,128 


1,078 


11,752 


5,277 


3,122 


346 


1,809 


4,068 


1,716 


190 


2.153 


2,360 


882 


67 


1,401 


1.826 


728 


49 


1.049 


2,298 


960 


90 


1.248 


8,602 


1,630 


130 


1.833 


2,406 


1,126 


89 


1.191 


1,800 


616 


60 


714 


746 


348 


43 


355 



370 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XX. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, raoe^ and nativUy, 

and by literacy — Continned. 

PROVINCE OP PUERTO PRINCIPE-Oontinaed. 



Total foreign white. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 10 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Foreign white males 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 3Fears 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Total. 



3,966 



108 
158 
462 
675 
469 
874 
680 
870 
IRO 



3,450 



Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 



Foreign white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 20 years 

80 to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over .. 



55 

106 
408 
686 
424 
705 
004 
292 
142 



506 



48 



89 
85 
79 
76 

78 
47 



Total colored . 



13.600 



10 to 14 years , 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Colored males. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

36 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Colored females. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

66 years and over 



2,828 
1,913 
1,316 
1,100 
1.134 
1,904 
1,640 
1.224 
1.041 



6,641 



1,196 
847 
608 
447 
486 
850 
864 
730 
623 



6,960 



1,132 
1,066 
718 
653 
648 
1,054 
776 
404 
418 



1,261 



86 
28 
90 
196 
148 
806 
221 
151 
106 



1,067 



19 

20 

81 

188 

139 

272 

176 

100 

67 



224 



17 

6 

9 

13 

9 

33 

45 

51 

39 



7,765 



1.538 
960 
532 
432 
543 
1,027 
1,034 
828 
862 



4.086 



886 

516 
246 
185 
227 
473 
547 
520 
534 



3,679 



702 
453 
284 
247 
316 
654 
4B7 
308 
328 



Can read 
bat can not 

write. 



and write. 



76 



3 

3 

4 

16 

11 

10 

13 

6 

1 



10 



1 
2 
3 



(43 



164 
101 
56 
62 
58 
114 
74 
70 
44 



314 



63 
34 
21 
18 
16 
28 
11 
14 
14 



620 



2.608 



64 

123 



463 

aoo 

5S0 

446 

213 

82 



"I" 



57 



2,345 



2 I 
1 I 

iJl 

10 
14 

8 

4 

1 



34 

asi 

437 
275 

fioe 

420 

188 

74 



1 
5 
5 
2 



30 
35 
47 
26 
25 
41 
26 
25 
8 



5,002 



686 
848 
728 
006 
633 
763 
532 
326 
135 



2.341 



207 
207 
320 
240 
243 
840 
806 
106 
75 






101 
67 
85 
40 
42 
86 
68 
56 
30 



2,751 



820 
646 



857 
SOO 
414 



180 
60 



LITEBACY. 



371 



Tablk XX. — Population JO years of age and over, by a^e, sex, race, and nativity, 

and by hteraey^Continxied. 



PROVINCE OP SANTA CLABA. 



Total 

IQtoUyears 

15 to 19 years 

:» to 21 years 

26 to 29 years 

ao to 34 years 

36 to 44 years 

, 46 to54 years 

65 to 64 years 

66 years and over . 

Total males 

10 to 14 years 

16 to 19 years 

80 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

36 to 44 years 

46 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

66 years and over 

Total females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

56 to 64 years 

66 years and over 

Total native white — 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 20 years 

30 to 84 years 

36 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

66 to 64 years 

66 years and over 

Native white males... 

10 to 14 years 

16 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 20 years 

30 to 84 years 

86 to 44 years 

46 to 64 years 

66 to 64 years 

66 years and over . 

Native white females 

10 to 14 years 

16 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

86 to 44 years 

46 to 64 years 

56 to 64 years 

66 years-aod over . 



TotaL 


Otn 

neither 

read nor 

vrrite. 


Can read 

but can not 

vrrite. 


Can read 
and write. 


279,887 


171,305 


8.006 


100,014 


51,341 


88,170 


2,883 


15.788 


40,716 


28.522 


1,604 


15,690 


84,200 


18,922 


862 


14.425 


81,536 


17,762 


799 


12,975 


27.389 


16,153 


564 


10,622 


48,162 


26,925 


880 


16.347 


27,271 


18,162 


604 


8,6U5 


16,618 


11,360 


. 278 


3.980 


8.145 


6.829 


184 


1.682 


160,137 


91,987 


2,789 


66.411 


26,383 


17.822 


982 


7,579 


19.281 


11.874 


658 


6.799 


18.146 


10.119 


282 


7,744 


17.264 


9.373 


260 


7,831 
6^601 


15.824 


8.624 


199 


24,614 


13,928 


m 


10.420 


16.674 


9.989 


153 


5.532 


9,088 


6.648 


54 


2,336 


4,464 


8.565 


30 


869 


129,190 


79,868 


5.219 


44.608 


84,968 


16.348 


1,401 


8,209 


21,485 


11.648 


1.046 


8,791 


16,064 


8.808 


580 


6,681 


14,272 


8,889 


589 


5.344 


12.015 


7.529 


865 


4,121 


18.638 


12.002 


609 


5,927 


11,697 


8,173 


851 


8.073 


6,580 


4,712 


224 


1,644 


8,681 


2,764 


104 


813 


160,988 


8B»282 


4,608 


68,196 


36,484 


23,519 


1,584 


11.331 


27,421 


15.619 


904 


10,804 


20.297 


11,074 


464 


8,769 


17.710 


9,860 


874 


7,476 


15.221 


8,625 


288 


6,308 


23,314 


18,040 


470 


9,804 


12,335 


7,122 


287 


4.976 


5,824 


8,174 


134 


2,516 


2,427 


1,249 


58 


1.120 


79.512 


47,011 


1.544 


80.057 


18.775 


12,57C 


660 


6,530 


12,686 


7,668 


317 


4,706 


9,855 


6,496 


162 


4.207 


8,709 


4,820 


102 


8,787 


7,861 


4,471 


06 


3.205 


12.077 


6,709 


. 131 


5.237 


5.967 


3,363 


60 


2,mi 


2.576 


1,382 


17 


1.177 


1.016 


531 


10 


475 


81.471 


46,271 


2.960 


82,241 


17,660 


10.943 


924 


6,792 


14,735 


7,956 


587 


6.192 


10,442 


6.578 


302 


4,562 


9,001 


5.040 


272 


8.689 


7.800 


4,154 


193 


8.013 


11,287 


6.331 


889 


4.667 


6.878 


3,769 


m 


2.442 


8,248 


1,792 


117 


1.380 


1.411 


718 


48 


645 



372 



BEPORT ON THE CEN8U8 OF .CUBA, 18W. 



Table XX^—Popuiation 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativUp, 

and by literacy — Continiied. 

PROVINCE OF SANTA GLARA-Continaed. 



Total foreign white 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 384 years 

26 to 389 years 

90 to SI years 

35 to 44 years 

46 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

66 years and oyer * 

Foreign white males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80to34 years 

35 to44 years 

46 to 54 years 

56 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Foreign white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45to64 vears 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total colored 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years.. 

45 to 54 years 

55to64 years 

65 years and oyer 

Colored males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

30to34 years 

36 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

66 years and over 

Colored females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

a0to34 years 

35to44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65to64 years 

65 years and oyer 



Total. 


Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 


Can read 

but can not 

write. 


Cwiread 
and writeu 


29,894 


12.142 


888 


10,869 


667 


844 


21 


aoe 


1,585 


728 


27 


880 


4,621 


2.189 


46 


2,437 


5,227 


2,152 


82 


S'?S 


4,826 


1,778 


68 


8.45J 


6.810 


2.566 


7f 


4. 187 


8,940 


1,420 


63 


«,487 


1,621 


691 


19 


9H 


686 


824 


U 


888 


25,088 


9,662 


268 


16,288 


886 


206 


8 


121 


1,228 


640 


12 


871 


4,060 


1.841 


86 


2,173 


4,572 


1,800 


55 


2.714 


8,784 


1,449 


89 


2,20S 


5.949 


2,016 


s 


8.882 


8,aR8 


1,049 


37 


^?S 


1,818 


480 


11 


837 


489 


181 


6 


802 


4.806 


2.680 


186 


1,681 


282 


188 


18 


81 


888 


188 


15 


160 


671 


288 


9 


284 


665 


862 


24 


279 


541 


828 


19 


108 


861 


660 


26 


286 


572 


871 


16 


186 


808 


211 


8 


84 


209 


148 


5 


81 


88,960 


65,881 


8»112 


19,967 


14.840 


9,807 


778 


4,266 


11.710 


7,176 


678 


8,882 


9.291 


6,709 


868 


3,219 


8.699 


5.760 


848 


2,606 


7.798 


5,760 


218 


1,826 


18,028 


10.319 


833 


2.876 


10,996 


9,620 


214 


1.188 


8,173 


7.486 


126 


663 


5,000 


4.766 


65 


199 


45.687 


86,864 


967 


9,186 


7.2T8 


5,040 


814 


1,919 


5,822 


8'2S 


229 


1,4S 


4,240 


2,782 


94 


1.864 


8,963 


2,768 


100 


1,180 


8,679 


2,704 


65 


910 


6,588 


5.196 


89 


1,801 


6,349 


5,5n 


56 


716 


6,144 


4,786 


26 


832 


2,969 


2,868 


14 


92 


43,413 


80.617 


2.126 


10.771 


7,067 


4,267 


464 


2,886 


6,888 


8,604 


444 


2,440 


6,051 


2,927 


289 


1.866 


4,616 


2,997 


248 


1.876 


4,114 


8.046 


158 


916 


6.440 


5,121 


244 


1.076 


4,647 


4,048 


168 


446 


8,029 


2.709 


99 


821 


2.061 


1,908 


51 


107 



LITERACY. 



873 



Table XX. — Population JO years of a>ge and over, by age, «e.r, race, and nativity, 

and by literacy— Continued, 

PEOVINCE OP aA^NTIAGO. 



Total 



10 to U yean *. 

15 to 10 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

ao to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



Total males 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45to54year9 

65 to 64 years 

66 years and over 



Total females 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

86 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

66 years and over 



Total natiye white. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 04 years 

66 years and over 



Native white males. 



10 to 14 years 

16 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

46 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Native white females. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 20 years 

80 to 84 years 

86 to 44 years 

45 to54 years. ... 

65 to 64 yean 

66 yean and over 



Total. 



288,017 



51,904 
86,278 
24,866 
20,074 
22.337 
88,735 
23.488 
12,6)» 
7,854 



117,976 



26,551 
16,606 
12,021 
10,886 
11,065 
19,946 
12,048 
6,161 
8,299 



120,041 



26.868 
19.772 
12,837 
10,579 
11,282 
18,790 
11,805 
6,466 
4.065 



118,495 



Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 



28,647 

19,866 

12,045 

0,658 

10,886 

18,805 

10,780 

5,609 

2,010 



66,766 



14,688 
8,746 
5,727 
4,375 
4,858 
0.278 
5.254 
2.568 
1.101 



61,780 



18,964 
10,610 
6.318 
6.188 
5,878 
0,622 
5,485 
2,061 
1,710 



166,678 



88,328 
22,105 
13.601 
12.050 
18,653 
25,518 
16,800 
0,325 
6,700 



76,524 



20,302 
10,889 
6,621 
5,610 
6,128 
12,207 
7,884 
4.880 
2.558 



80,140 



18,021 
11,366 
6,880 
6,448 
7,525 
18.811 
8,606 
4,045 
8.166 



74,548 



20,447 
11,283 
6,464 
5,441 
6,450 
12,040 
6,006 
8,660 
1,888 



86,407 



10,825 
5.428 
8,007 
2,446 
2,818 
5,006 
8,460 
1,601 
816 



88,051 



0,622 
5.886 
8,867 
2,006 
8,632 
6.141 
8,527 
1,860 
1,072 



Can read . .„„ ,^„„ 

butcannoti '"*i*'2^ 
write »nd write. 



Can read 



4.540 



1.420 
854 
408 
845 
872 
685 
345 
174 
101 



1,685 



622 

818 

146 

118 

133 

178 

00 

48 

28 



2,864 



708 
536 
257 
227 
280 
367 
246 
126 
78 



2,082 



771 
804 
162 
133 
128 
229 
140 
70 
36 



782 



838 

154 
52 
40 
32 
00 
33 
16 
7 



1,830 



438 
240 
110 
03 
06 
160 

lor 

54 

28 



76,705 



12.161 

18,220 

10,454 

8,570 

8.812 

12,682 

6,7(13 

8,130 

1,554 



80,767 

5,627 
5.349 
5.254 
4,667 
4,704 
7.660 
4,060 
1,733 
723 



87,028 



6,634 
7,880 
5.200 
3,908 
8,518 
5.122 
2.643 
1,397 
831 



41.885 



7.420 
7.H00 
5,420 
8.984 
4,258 
6,617 
3,608 
1,879 
987 



19,536 



8.620 
8,164 
2,578 
1.890 
2,108 
B,90o 
1,752 
851 
868 



22.849 



8,909 
4,535 
2,851 
2,094 
2,160 
8,812 
1,851 
1,028 
619 



374 



REPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1809. 



Table XX,— -Population 10 years of age and over^ hy age, sex, ra4X, and nativity^ 

and by literacy — ContiiiaeNd. 



PBOVINCB OP SANTIAGK>— Continued. 



Total foreign white. 



10 to U years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Foreign white males. 



10 to 14 years 

L5 to 10 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Foreign white females 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Total colored. 



10 to 14 years* 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

% to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Colored males. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Colored females 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25to29year8.. .. 

30 to 84 years 

86 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

66 to 64 years 

66 years and over 



Total. 


Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 


Can read 

but can not 

write. 


Can read 
and ^write. 


12.995 


4,193 


145 


8.068 


271 


114 


8 


149 


559 


147 


10 


402 


1,477 


427 


17 


1.083 


2.189 


709 


21 


1.45B 


1.960 


641 


25 


1,2»4 


8,485 


1,110 


33 


2.340 


1.975 


611 


18 


1.346 


753 


278 


12 


483 


326 


155 


1 


170 


11,288 


3,870 


109 


7,808 


146 


62 


3 


81 


897 


96 


7 


296 


1,259 


337 


11 


911 


1,948 


619 


16 


i.aid 


1,749 


684 


19 


1,106 


8,160 


968 


88 


2,174 


l,78i; 


470 


15 


1.277 


626 


195 


9 


423 


241 


100 


1 


140 


1,707 


biU 


36 


848 


125 


62 


5 


08 


162 


52 


3 


107 


218 


90 


6 


128 


241 


90 


5 


146 


211 


107 


6 


96 


325 


152 


6 


168 


218 


141 


3 


09 


127 


83 


3 


41 


85 


56 




30 






106,627 


77,988 


2,842 


28.862 


22.986 


17,762 


641 


4,683 


16.363 


10,785 


460 


5,128 


10.836 


6,680 


224 


3,902 


9.227 


5,909 


191 


3,127 


9,541 


6,562 


219 


2,700 


16.355 


12,860 


273 


8,723 


10,724 


8,788 


187 


1,754 


6,367 


6,487 


92 


7B8 


4.128 


8,666 


66 


897 


49,923 


86,667 


844 


12,428 


1 11.722 


9.416 


281 


2,086 


1 7,363 


5,316 


157 


1,890 


5,035 


8,187 


88 


1,705 


4,072 


2,546 


68 


1,464 


4,348 


2,n6 


82 


1,490 


7,512 


5.841 


90 


2.061 


5,027 


8,945 


51 


1,081 


2,9n 


2,494 


28 


460 


1.867 


1,637 


16 


215 


56,604 


41,276 


1,486 


13,880 


11.264 


8,847 


860 


2,567 


9.000 


6.469 


298 


8,238 


6.801 


8'iH 


141 


2,227 


6.156 


8,868 


128 


1,063 


6.108 


3,786 


187 


1,270 


8.848 


7,018 


188 


1.042 


6.697 


4,888 


186 


728 


3,390 


2,908 


09 


8» 


2,861 


2,009 


60 


182 



LITEBAOY. 



875 



Table XX. — Population 10 yearn of a^ge and otw. by age^ nexy race^ and nativity. 

and by Zifcracy— Continucfd. 

CITY OF CIENFUEOOS. 



Total 



TotiO. 



28,600 



lOtoU years 

15 to 19 years 

20to24 years 

25 to 20 years 

30todi years 

85 to44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and oyer . 



Total males 



3,892 
8,296 
8,066 
2.684 
2.878 
8,847 
2,860 
1.285 
708 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

86 to 44 years 

45to54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Total females 



10 to 14 
15 to 19 
20 to 24 
25 to 29 
30 to 84 
35 to 44 
45 to 54 
55 to 64 
65 years and over 



years, 
years, 
years, 
years, 
years, 
years, 
years, 
years. 



Total native white 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

86 to 44 yean 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

66 years and over 



Native white males. 



11,891 



1.883 
1.415 
1,602 
1,342 
1,214 
1,963 
1.173 
608 
286 



12,109 



2,000 
1,880 
1,554 
1,842 
1,160 
1,884 
1,187 
682 
4DS 



11,578 



2,380 

1.920 

1,59B 

1,227 

1,044 

1,712 

928 

602 

262 



5,084 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80to84 years 

36 to 44 years 

46to54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 yean and over 



Native white females 



10 to 14 yean 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 yean 

26 to 29 yean 

80to84 yean 

85to44 yean 

46to54 yean 

66 to 04 yean 

65 yean and over 



1,159 
792 
702 
649 
472 
717 
871 
177 
95 



6.544 



1,231 
1.128 
891 
678 
572 
996 
667 
8B% 
167 



Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 



7,097 



962 
742 
657 
656 
717 
1,826 
1,022 
620 
876 



2.969 



618 
328 
282 
271 
270 
605 
400 
252 
138 



4,188 



409 
414 
375 
884 
447 
821 
622 
368 
288 



2,480 



519 
358 
289 
217 
236 
406 
261 
132 
68 



987 



260 

141 

112 

85 

79 

130 

78 

34 

18 



1,543 



259 
212 
177 
182 
156 
276 
188 
96 
60 



Can read 

bntcannot 

write. 



034 



262 

160 

113 

101 

81 

113 

59 

85 

20 



342 

~m 

69 
34 
34 
29 
36 
10 
9 
3 



592 



134 
91 
79 
67 
62 
77 
49 
26 
17 



379 



135 
74 
41 
83 
28 
34 
18 
9 
7 



129 



64 

28 
12 

7 
8 

i 
1 
1 
1 



260 



71 
40 
20 
26 
20 
27 
17 
8 
6 



Can read 
and write. 



15,469 



2,668 
2,308 
2.286 
1.928 
1.575 
2,408 
1,279 
680 
812 



8.090 

1,262 

1.018 

1.186 

1.037 

915 

1.42SS 

763 

342 

165 



7,879 



1,406 
1.375 
1.100 
801 
660 
966 
516 
S88 
157 



8,719 



1,736 

1.493 

1,263 

977 

781 

1,272 

649 

361 

187 



8,968 



835 

623 
678 
457 
385 
580 
292 
142 
76 



4,751 



901 
870 



600 
896 



857 
219 
Hi 



876 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XX. — Population 10 years of age and over, hy age, xesc, rcM», cittd fiativiipn 

and by literacy^ ikmiinned. 

CITY OP CIENFUEQ08— Continued. 



Total foreign white. 




10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years . ... 
65 years and over 



Foreign white males 



Total. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 20 years 

ao to <» years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Foreign white females. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

15 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Total colored 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Colored males. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 20 years 

80 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Colored females 



10 to 14 years 

16 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to :h years 

86 to 44 years 

46 to 54 years 

66 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



70 
160 
459 
515 
502 
850 
540 
217 
104 



2.865 



41 
189 
890 
445 
429 
716 
465 
176 

74 



561 



29 
80 
69 
70 
78 
184 
85 
41 
80 



8,496 



1,482 

1,206 

1,004 

942 

827 

1,285 

802 

566 

842 



8,482 



484 
410 
848 
318 
680 
847 
2S0 
127 



5,004 



740 
722 
694 
694 
514 
765 
545 
816 
215 



Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 



106 



2 
6 
19 
21 
88 
65 
81 
19 
13 



4,027 



451 
874 
312 
874 
880 
754 
655 
442 
285 



1,680 



248 
177 
188 
148 
122 
264 
247 
191 
110 



2,807 



206 
197 
179 
231 
258 
490 
406 
251 
176 



Can read 

but can not 

write. 



Can read 
and write. 



802 



.1. 



10 
10 
87 
43 
69 
111 
75 
27 
10' 



I 



61 



4 
2 

6 

13 

11 

13 

7 

5 



1 
1 
4 
8 
8 
10 
8 
4 



8 
1 
2 
5 
3 
8 
4 
1 



494 



118 
84 
66 
55 
42 
66 
84 
21 
18 



174 



68 

40 

18 

19 

13 

19 

6 

4 

2 



8390 



60 
44 

48 
86 
29 
47 
28 
17 
11 



2,T75 



54 



»7 
43S 



671 
437 

166 
81 



2,434 



30 
128 
349 
394 
3SS 
505 
377 
145 

64 



341 



24 
24 

48 
44 
87 
76 
50 
21 
17 



8.075 



868 
748 
636 
613 
405 
465 
208 
108 
44 



1,688 



887 

267 

258 

186 

178 

247 

04 

65 

15 



2.287 



481 
481 
807 
827 
227 
218 
100 
48 



LITERACY. 



377 



Table XX.— 



Population JO years of age and ot^er, by age, sex, race, and fiativity, 
and by hteraey — Continued. 



CITY OF HABANA. 



Total 



10 to U years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

80 to 84 yearn 

36 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

56 to 64 years 

66 years and over 



Total males 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

36 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

66 to 64 years 

66 years and oyer 



Total females 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

90 to 84 years 

36 to 44 years 

45to54yearB 

56 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Total native white 



10 to 14 years 

16 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 20 years 

80 to 34 years 

86 to 44 years 

46 to 54 years 

66 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Native white males 



10 to 14 years 

16 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Native white females 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

86 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

65 to 64 years 

66 years and over 



Total. 


Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 


Can read 

but can not 

write. 


Can read 
and write. 




198,870 


48,122 


7,822 


137,926 




23,996 


6,428 


1,767 


15,816 




23,819 


4,661 


1,199 


19,559 




27,699 


4.808 


859 


21,932 




26,867 


6,269 


883 


20,205 




21,982 


6,217 


733 


16,082 




83,354 


8,408 


1,189 


22,807 




19,414 


6,680 


683 


12,201 




11,086 


4,396 


874 


6,297 




6,783 


2,511 


195 


8,077 




102,682 


20,264 


2,742 


79,526 




11,700 


8.218 


744 


7,738 




12,460 


2,068 


457 


9,906 




15,164 


2,066 


880 


12.768 




15,025 


2,867 


800 


i2,avt 




12.418 


2,089 


260 


10,079 




17,862 


8,242 


838 


14.2?^ 




10.224 


2,677 


189 


7,458 




5.384 


1,794 


96 


8,405 




2,316 


823 


89 


1,468 




91,888 


27,866 


6,080 


58,400 




12,296 


3,206 


1,018 


8,078 




12,860 


2,478 


742 


9.654 




12,436 


2,742 


629 


9,164 




11,382 


2,902 


588 


7,847 




9,564 


3,128 


483 


5,953 




14,502 


6,166 


601 


8,535 




9,190 


8,963 


494 


4,743 




6,682 


2,601 


279 


2.802 




8.468 


1,688 


156 


1,624 




86,799 


12,680 


2,679 


71,681 
11.319 




16,386 


8,163 


854 




14.170 


1,899 


476 


11,796 




12,494 


1,648 


268 


10,683 




10,684 


1,342 


260 


9,082 




8,678 


1,089 


202 


7,387 




12,488 


1,604 


803 


10,676 




6,938 


985 


156 


6,797 


• 


3,919 


602 


113 


3,214 




2,007 


317 


62 


1,728 




88,680 


6,238 


927 


82.466 




7,402 


1,600 


868 


6.480 


1 


6,268 


868 


190 


6,220 




6,681 


618 


110 


4,80") 




4,900 


678 


76 


4,251 




4,046 


487 


64 


8,545 




6.546 


672 


79 


4,894 




2,868 


292 


81 


2.545 




1,407 


189 


11 


1,207 




663 


90 


8 


570 




48,160 


7,801 


1,762 


89,116 




7,984 


1,564 


491 


6,880 




7,902 


1,041 


286 


6,575 




6.963 


980 


158 


6,880 




6,784 


709 


184 


4,831 




4,632 


652 


138 


8,842 




6.938 


1,032 


224 


6,682 




4.070 


693 


126 


8,252 




2,612 


408 


102 


2,007 




1,434 


2OT 


49 


1,168 





378 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Tablb XX. — Population 10 years of age and aver, by age, sex, race^ and nativity^ 

and by literacy — Continned. 



CITY OF HABANA-Continued. 



Total foreign white — 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years. 

ao to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

46 to 54 years 

66 to 64 years 

66 years and oyer . . 

Foreign white males. . . 

10 to 14 years 

16 to 19 years 

aO to 24 years 

25 to 20 years 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

46 to 54 years 

56 to 64 years 

66 years and over .. 

Foreign white females 

10 to 14 years 

16 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

36 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

66 to 64 years 

66 years and over . . 

Total colored 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years.. 

80 to 84 years 

86 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

66 to 64 years 

66 years and over .. 

Colored males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

aoto84 years 

85 to 44 years 

45to64 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over .. 

Colored females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

a0to34 years 

a6to44 years 

46 to 64 years 

66 to 64 years 

66 yetfs and oyer .. 



Total. 


Can 

neither 

read nor 

writer 


Can read 

bat can not 

write. 


Can read 
and write. 


51,62:) 


7,817 


1,073 


42.7Si 


l,06i 


154 


46 


854 


8.689 


267 


56 


8,377 


8,061 


834 


138 


7.CI79 


8,770 


1.006 


170 


7.5QS 


7,463 


1,125 


142 


6,196 


11.264 


1.819 


254 


9,191 


6.454 


1,813 


151 


4.900 


8,323 


781 


77 


2.4&5 


1,555 


486 


40 




i.oni 


40,677 


4.003 


517 


36.057 


656 


81 


22 


558 


3,118 


171 


35 


2.912 


6,791 


506 


81 


6.20e 


7,192 


662 


90 


6,440 


5,972 


580 


62 


5.330 


8,854 


990 


120 


7.804 


4,788 


604 


57 


4,127 


2,2a5 


316 


81 


1.938 


921 


151 


19 


751 


ll,0i6 


3,814 


666 

24 


6,676 


886 


78 


aoi 


671 


86 


20 


465 


1,260 


326 


67 


877 


1,578 


486 


80 


1,062 


1,481 


645 


80 


806 


2,410 


880 


134 


1,387 


1,666 


709 


94 


863 


1,088 


465 


46 


627 


634 


285 


21 


828 


56,448 


27,766 


4.070 


23.612 


7,606 


3.106 


857 


8.648 


7,460 


2.405 


668 


4.387 


7.054 


2.426 


468 


4,170 


6,908 


2.829 


458 


8.6S1 


6,841 


8.003 


889 


2.448 


8,607 


4,965 


562 


8,040 


6,022 


4,232 


876 


1,414 


8,824 


8,022 


184 


618 


2,131 


1,758 


108 


270 


23,825 


11,023 


1,298 


11.004 


8,642 


1,528 


360 


1,756 


8,064 


1.060 


282 


1,778 


2,842 


940 


189 


1.763 


2.988 


1,132 


134 


1,667 


2,400 


1,072 


124 


1,204 


8,458 


1,740 


189 


1,574 


2,668 


1,681 


101 


786 


1,692 


1,289 


68 


360 


731 


582 


17 


132 


82.128 


16,748 


2,772 


12,608 


8.964 


1,678 


498 


1,888 


4,896 


1,846 


486 


2,614 


4.212 


1,486 


819 


2,407 


8,970 


1.697 


319 


1.964 


8,441 


1.981 


265 


1,246 


6,154 


8,245 


448 


1,466 


8,464 


2.651 


276 


688 


2,132 


1.733 


181 


288 


1.400 


1.176 


86 


188 



LITERACY. 



379 



TABL.B XX. — P&pvlation JO years of age and atjer, by age, sex, race, and nativity, 

and by literacy — Continned. 

CITY OP MATANZA8. 



Total. 



Total 

10 to 14 

15 to 19 years 

]» to 24 yean 

26 to 28 years 

ao to 84 years 

36 to 44 years 

46 to 64 years 

56 to 64 years..... 
06 years and over 

Total males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

85 to44 years 

45 to 64 years 

66 to 64 years 

66 years and over 

Total females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

86 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

66 years and over 

Total natiTe white. . . 

10 to 14 years 

16 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

85 to 44 yearn 

45 to 54 years' 

66 to 64 years 

66 years and over 

Native white males.. 

10 to 14 years 

16 to 19 years 

90 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

85 to 44 years 

46 to 54 years 

56 to 64 years 

66 years and over 

Native white females 

10 to 14 years 

16 to 10 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

86 to 44 years 

46 to 64 years 

66 to 64 years 

66 years and over 



29,046 



4,876 
4,187 
8,751 
3,374 
2,679 
4,384 
2,906 
1.760 
1,128 



13,284 



2,:M3 
1,787 
l.ttH 
1,470 
1,243 
2,103 
1,382 
867 
468 



15,762 



2,533 
2,400 
2,080 
1,904 
1,436 
2,281 
1,576 
892 
060 



16,106 



3,279 
2,738 
2.242 
1.809 
1,399 
2,240 
1,306 
667 
368 



6,781 



1,567 
1.124 
920 
723 
505 
060 
618 
260 
114 



9,827 



1,712 

1,614 

1,822 

1,146 

804 

1.280 

788 

407 

264 



Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 



9,699 



1,873 
1,136 

Wo 

(MA 

877 
1.691 
1,291 

641 



4,004 



734 
492 
395 
370 
349 
598 
470 
847 
249 



639 
644 
604 
596 
528 
996 
821 
475 
892 



3.900 



817 
666 
529 
457 
8S0 
568 
338 
131 
74 



1,664 



440 
272 
211 
182 
151 
223 
113 
47 
25 



2,226 



Can read 

but can not 

write. 



5,696 



1,289 



468 



146 
1U2 
56 
44 
25 
41 
24 
14 
6 



881 



170 
151 
100 
99 
77 
99 
75 
39 
21 



600 



181 
118 
76 
57 
36 
60 
49 
23 
9 



219 



87 
51 
27 
18 
11 
19 
8 
3 



Can read 
and write. 



18.068 



816 


3,187 


268 


2,798 


156 


2.596 


143 


2,265 


102 


1,7U0 


140 


2.«50 


99 


1.518 


5;{ 


884 


27 


460 



890 



94 
67 
49 
44 
25 
41 
41 
20 
9 



8.822 



1,463 

1.193 

1,220 

1,066 

869 

1,464 

838 

506 

213 



9,236 



1,724 
1.605 
1.376 
1,209 

mi 

1.186 
680 
878 
247 



11.569 



2.281 

1.954 

l.ftJ7 

l,a55 

1.013 

1,612 

919 

613 

285 



4,898 



l.OiU 
801 
682 
528 
43;^ 
718 
397 
210 
89 



6,671 



1,241 
1,153 
955 
827 
580 
894 
522 
808 
196 



380 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XX,— Population JO years of age and over, by age^ seXy rcux^ and natitnty^ 

and by h'terac^— Con tinned. 

CITY OP MATANZAS— Continued. 



Total foreign white. 



lOtoU years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years , 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Foreign white males 

10 to 14 years... . 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Foreign white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 



Total colored . 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Colored males. 



10 to 14 years 

16 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

20 to 34 years 

36 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Colored females. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

66 years and over 



Total. 


Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 


Can read 

bntcannot 

write. 

1 


Can read 
and write. 


3,562 


683 


77 


2,792 


47 


10 




3; 


156 


15 


2 


130 


488 


88 


5 


389 


469 


50 


4 


408 


411 


45 


6 


90O 


769 


114 


21 


634 


587 


146 


17 


424 


485 


148 


15 


272 


245 


107 


7 


131 


2.644 


304 


31 


2,809 


24 

116 
860 


5 
6 

20 




19 




110 


4 


326 


875 


40 




333 


320 


26 


3 


291 


618 


56 


8 


554 


419 


63 


7 


349 


284 


50 


4 


230 


138 


38 


3 


97 


906 


879 


46 


483 


28 
40 


5 
9 




18 


2 


28 


88 


19 


1 


63 


94 


19 


2 


73 


91 


19 


8 


09 


151 


58 


18 


80 


168 


83 


10 


75 


151 


98 


11 


42 


107 


69 


4 


84 


9.386 


5,066 


603 


8,097 


1.550 


546 


135 


869 


1,293 


455 


138 


706 


1,OT6 


431 


75 


570 


1,086 


450 


82 


504 


869 


482 


60 


327 


1,375 


912 


50 


404 


1,015 


807 


38 


176 


667 


543 


15 


99 


515 


460 


11 


44 


8,858 


2,086 


206 


1,615 


762 


289 


59| 


404 


547 


214 


51 


282 


401 


164 


25 


212 


372 


148 


2» 


195 


828 


172 


11 


145 


525 


319 


14 1 


192 


395 


294 


9 , 


9St 


323 


250 


1 


66 


216 


186 


3 1 


27 


6,627 


3,060 


896 


2,082 


796 


267 


76 


465 


746 


241 


82 


423 


675 


267 


60 


868 


664 


802 


68 


809 


5il 


810 


49 


182 


860 


683 


45 1 


SUB 


620 


518 


84 1 


83 


334 


298 


8 


33 


299 


274 


8 


17 



LITEBAOY. 



381 



Table XX.— 



Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, 
and by literacy — Continued. 



CITY OF PUERTO 



) PRINCIPE. 






Total. 


Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 


Can read 

bat can not 

write. 


Can read 
and write. 


19,230 


5,026 


1.114 


13,090 


8,219 


1.040 


302 


i.sn 


2,648 


528 


141 


1,979 


2,005 


3or) 


09 


1,686 


1,626 


304 


67 


1,255 


1,839 


395 


84 


1,360 


8,079 


792 


172 


2.115 


2,263 


707 


117 


1,439 


1,59) 


486 


108 


941 


1,021 


474 


50 


488 


7,979 


2,061 


844 


5.554 


1,515 


544 


138 


833 


1,088 


245 


52 


741 


847 


126 


25 


096 


667 


124 


17 


526 


740 


136 


22 


582 


1,276 


291 


42 


943 


902 


242 


23 


637 


591 


187 


16 


388 


403 


186 


9 


208 


11.251 


2,945 


770 
164 


7,536 


1,704 


496 


1.044 


1,610 


283 


89 


1,238 


1,158 


174 


44 


940 


969 


180 


50 


?29 


1.099 


269 


62 


778 


1,803 


601 


130 


I,ir2 


1,361 


465 


94 


8U2 


989 


299 


87 


553 


618 


288 


50 


280 


12,224 


2.600 


607 


9,017 


2,344 


666 


211 


1.447 


1.840 


334 


87 


1,419 


1.233 


172 


27 


1.034 


931 


158 


23 


750 


1,178 


218 


40 


02U 


1.974 


408 


87 


1.479 


1.337 


322 


54 


9dl 


89U 


180 


48 


653 


497 


113 


30 


%4 


4.645 


1,032 


200 


8.413 


1.060 


361 


95 


624 


713 


158 


33 


52S 


464 


73 


13 


379 


338 


64" 


5 


209 


432 


71 


8 


353 


764 


147 


23 


59^ 


434 


90 


13 


3:31 


272 


46 


9 


217 


148 


22 


3 

407 
116 


123 


7.579 


1.568 


5,604 


1.264 


325 


833 


1.127 


176 


55 


896 


760 


99 


15 


65.5 


593 


94 


18 


481 


746 


147 


32 


'^7 


1,210 


261 


64 


885 


903 


232 


41 


OIK) 


618 


143 


39 


4^ki 


849 


91 


27 


ZM 



Total 



10 to Uyearb 

15tol9year8 

20 to 24 years. ... 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

46 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

66 years and over 



Total males 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years , 



80 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Total females 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

46 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Total native white. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30to84 years .... 
35 to 44 years... . 

46 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Native white males. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45to&4 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Native white females 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

30 to 81 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 51 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



382 



REPORT OW THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XX. — Population 10 years of age and ot^r, by age^ sex, race, and nativity ^ 

and by literacy — Continiied. 

CITY OP PUERTO PRINCIPE— CSontlnned. 



Total foreisrn white. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

:iO to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years . — 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and oyer 



Foreign white males. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Total. 



1.244 



31 
61 
157 
174 
132 
266 
217 
130 
76 



Foreign white females. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to a4 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Total colored 



10 to 14 years. .. 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years. ... 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Colored males. 



lOtoU years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years — 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Colored females 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years — 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



1,061 



16 
46 
128 
158 
122 
237 
196 
100 
58 



183 



15 
15 
29 
16 
10 
29 
21 
30 
18 



5.762 



844 
747 
615 
521 
529 
839 
709 
510 
448 



2,273 



419 
279 
255 
171 
186 
275 
272 
219 
197 



8,480 



425 
468 
360 
360 
843 
564 
487 
291 
261 



Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 



230 



2 



14 
26 
24 
51 
60 
32 
31 



183 



11 
25 
24 
44 

41 
20 
17 



47 



Can read 

bntcannot 

write. 



34 



Can read 
and write. 



4 

6 
5 
8 
7 
3 
1 



22 



1 
6 
4 

6 
3 
1 
1 



12 



3 
1 



7 

9 

12 

14 



3 



1 
2 
4 

4 



2,196 



352 
194 
114 
120 
153 
333 

265 
331) 



473 

"oT 

54 
38 
38 
89 
n 

52 

28 



866 



122 



182 

87 

42 

35 

41 

100 

111 

121 

147 



1,330 



170 
107 
TJi 
85 
112 
233 
224 
144 
183 



43 

20 

12 

6 

10 

13 

7 

6 

5 



351 



48 
84 
96 
32 
29 
64 
49 
46 
23 



900 



61 

139 
14S 
103 
307 
lOO 
95 
44 



856 



15 

46 

116 

127 

94 

187 

152 

79 

40 



124 



14 
15 
23 
15 

9 
20 

8 
16 

4 



3,096 



401 
489 
468 
863 
387 
429 
318 
193 
90 



1,285 



194 
178 
201 
130 
186 
162 
154 
92 
45 



1.808 



207 
827 
268 
288 
202 
267 
164 
101 
46 



LITERACY. 



383 



Table XX. — Population 10 years of age and over^ by age, aeXy race, and nativity, 

and by literacy — Continiud. 



CITY OF SANTIAGO. 



Total 

10 to 14 years 

15 to Itt years 

20 to 21 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years..... 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

30 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over , 

Total native white 

• 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

66 years and over 

Native white males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 84 yean 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years ^ 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Native white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

80 to 84 years 

86 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

66 to 64 years 

66 years and over 



Total. 


Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 


Can read 

bat can not 

write. 


Can read 
and write. 


84.478 


10.687 


1,109 


22,848 


6,028 


2,082 


872 


8.624 


6,071 


1,068 


m 


8.826 


8,815 


767 


76 


2,982 


8,604 


851 


89 


2,664 


8,707 


1.062 


105 


2,550 


6,862 


1.033 


141 


8.788 


8,590 


1,442 


89 


2,050 


1,832 


mi 


39 


908 


969 


507 


21 


441 


16,666 


4.266 


429 


10,981 


2,879 


1,078 


169 


1.632 


2.210 


568 


75 


1.567 


1,780 


823 


28 


1.409 


1,727 


874 


33 


1.320 


1,778 


386 


40 


1.352 


2,748 


667 


46 


2.030 


1.669 


463 


24 


i,ote 


683 


248 


- 10 


425 


317 


149 


4 


164 


18,812 


6,271 


680 


11,861 


8.148 


954 


206 


1.992 


2.861 


600 


102 


2.259 


2.055 


434 


48 


1.573 


1,877 


4n 


66 


i.;m 


1,929 


666 


65 


1.198 


8,119 


1.266 


96 


1.7.'58 


2.021 


979 


65 


977 


1,149 


637 


29 


483 


652 


358 


17 


277 


11,602 


1.586 


236 


9.840 


2,281 


462 


120 


1.698 


1.887 


178 


88 


l.b71 


1,324 


106 


9 


1,209 


1.095 


102 


10 


983 


1,145 


134 


11 


1,000 


1.869 


275 


27 


1.567 


1,128 


166 


16 


956 


567 


70 


5 


492 


806 


48 




263 








4,884 


684 


100 


4,100 


1,099 


260 


58 


791 


808 


95 


21 


692 


570 


53 


6 


511 


443 


40 


2 


401 


461 


87 


8 


421 


783 


93 


7 


68:) 


400 


43 


2 


av 


184 


11 


1 


172 


86 


12 




74 








6,768 


888 


186 


6,740 


1,182 


212 


62 


906 


1,079 


88 


17 


979 


754 


58 


3 


698 


662 


62 


8 


582 


684 


97 


8 


579 


1,086 


182 


20 


884 


728 


118 


14 


601 


883 


60 


4 


320 


220 


81 




189 









384 



BBPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XX. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativiiy 

and by literacy — Continned. 

CITY OP SANTIAGO-Continned. 



Total foreign white. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

ao to 84 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Foreign white males. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

90 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



TotaL 



Foreign white females. 



10tol4y€tors 

15 to 19 years . 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 61 years 

65 years and over 



Total colored. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years . . . . 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



Colored males. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years.../. 

%to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



Colored females. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

86 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years . . . . . 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



3,277 



88 
216 
408 
572 
494 
821 
461 
151 

71 



2,711 



43 
153 
325 
479 
423 
705 
408 
125 

60 



OdO 



45 
63 

78 
96 
71 
116 
53 
26 
21 



19.509 



8,121 



1,737 
1,249 
866 
805 
894 
1,255 
761 
374 
181 



Can 

neither ' 

read nor 

write. 



3,659 
2,968 
2,088 
1.937 
2,068 
3,1?2 
2,001 
1,114 
502 



11,478 



1,922 

i,n9 

1,223 
1,132 
1.174 
1.017 
1,240 
740 
411 



614 



22 

17 
67 

lor 

106 

161 

90 

29 

15 



Can read 

but can not 

write. 



462 



6 
10 
43 
86 
81 
126 
69 
22 
9 



162 



16 

7 

24 

21 

25 

36 

21 

7 

6 



8,887 



1,548 
873 
584 
612 
812 
1,497 
1,196 
786 
449 



3,170 



53 



4 
3 
6 
8 
10 
12 
6 
3 
1 



33 



1 
1 
4 

7 
5 
9 
4 
1 
1 



20 



3 
2 
2 
1 
5 
3 
2 
2 



820 



248 
136 
61 
71 
84 
102 
67 
31 
20 



296 



Can read 
and write. 



822 
463 
227 
248 
268 
448 
351 
215 
128 



6,217 



726 
410 
357 
304 
544 
1,049 
845 
571 
821 



110 
53 
18 
24 
32 
30 
18 
8 
3 



524 



138 
83 
43 
47 
58 
72 
40 
28 
17 



2«C10 



fS2 
196 
330 
457 
378 
648 
365 
119 

55 



2, 



36 
142 
278 
386 

337 
570 



IQB 
40 



384 



26 
54 

53 
71 
41 
78 
3t) 
17 
15 



10,382 



1,863 

1,969 

1,443 

1,224 

1,172 

1,573 

788 

297 

123 



4,665 



805 

733 
620 
533 

594 
777 
302 
151 
50 



6,787 



1.068 
1,226 



681 
678 
786 
846 
146 
73 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCK. 



385 



Tablk XXI. — School attendance by months, vrith «ca?, age, and race. 

CUBA. 



Total. 



Total 



Under 6 years 

5to9 years 

10 to 14 yc»r8 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total males 



87,986 



Under 6 years 

6 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total females 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 yearn 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



688 

39,876 

43.826 

8,488 

613 



4i,503 



803 

20,115 

21,466 

3,116 

508 



43,432 



380 

19,761 

21,860 

1,322 

100 



Total native white , 62,083 



Under 5 years 

5to9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



Under 5 years 

5to9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over . 

Native white females. 



Under 5 years 

5to9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total foreign white. . 

Under 5 years 

5to9 years 

10 to 14 years , 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Foreign white males . 



Under 5 years 

5 to9 years 

10 to 14 yearH 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



Foreign white females. 

Under 5 years 

5to9years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over . . 



Total colored. 



Under 6 years 

5to9«year8 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



Native white males 32,132 



501 

28,1^ 

30,285 

2,654 

516 



217 

14,430 

15,366 

1,701 

428 



29,951 



284 
13,697 
14,929 

953 
88 



1.134 



19 
440 

41 



617 



8 

240 

277 

58 

89 



517 



11 
200 
281 

23 
2 



1 month 
or less. 



24,718 



163 
11,309 
12,483 

708 
55 



6,708 



97 

8,655 

2,767 

156 

28 



3,309 



41 

1,820 

1,340 

89 

19 



3,394 



56 
1,886 
1,427 

67 
9 



4,151 



2,234 

1,717 

111 

20 



2,055 



25 

1,130 

828 

60 

12 



2.096 



44 

1,104 

889 

51 

8 



56 



3 

27 

21 

3 

2 



2 

21 
8 
2 
2 



21 



1 

6 

13 

1 



2,496 



26 
1,394 
1,029 

42 
6 



2 to 3 
months. 



15,702 



4to5 
months. 



16,743 



196 
8,260 
6,741 

450 
66 



141 
7.396 
7,552 

590 
64 



8,083 



7,999 



84 

4,203 

3,405 

298 

43 



57 

3,742 

8,827 

824 

49 



6to7 
months. 



7,669 



111 
4,047 
8,386 

152 
23 



7,743 



84 

8,653 

3,725 

366 

15 



9.781 



la^ 

5.229 

4,062 

807 

48 



95 

4,971 

4,965 

428 

6U 



5,140 5,504 



58 

2,727 

2,114 

210 

31 



39 

2,558 

2,625 

344 

38 



4,641 



5,005 



77 

2,502 

1,948 

97 

17 



56 

2,413 

2,340 

184 

12 



162 



201 



8 

75 

68 

5 

6 



5 
95 
82 
16 

4 



84 



1 

35 

38 

5 

5 



113 



3 
60 
45 
10 

4 



78 



80 



7 

40 
30 



5,759 



52 

2,946 

2,611 

138 

12 



2 
46 
87 

5 



5,032 



41 

2,329 

2,605 

147 

10 



21,711 



118 

9,358 

11,175 

021 

139 



10,864 



57 

4,n8 

5,899 
578 
117 



8 months 
or more. 



10,84; 



61 

4,040 

5,776 

348 

22 



10,509 I 15,689 



93 

6,849 

7,912 

714 

131 



8,006 



43 

8,607 

3,884 

467 

104 



7,684 



60 
8,842 

4,028 

247 

17 



276 



2 

96 

146 

21 

11 



28,077 



133 

11,318 

15,091 

1,821 

315 



14,296 



149 



1 
54 

69 
14 
11 



137 



1 
43 

77 
7 



5,746 



28 

2,418 

8,117 

186 

7 



64 

6,632 

7,495 

832 

375 



13,779 



68 

5,686 

7,596 

489 

40 



21.053 



100 

8,844 

11,629 

1,094 

377 



11,428 



52 

4,506 

5,905 

720 

348 



10,526 



57 

4,386 

5,724 

874 

34 



430 



1 

147 

241 

32 

18 



237 



1 

80 

117 

22 

17 



202 



67 

134 

10 

1 



5,685 



22 

2,227 

8,221 

106 

20 



24662- 



-25 



386 



BEPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XXI. — School attendance by months, with sex, age, and race— Continued. 

C UB A— Con tinned. 



Colored males 

Under 5 years 

6 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Colored females 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

lOtoU years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



Total. 



11,754 



78 

5,445 

5,833 

882 

36 



12,964 



86 

5,864 

6,660 

846 

19 



1 month 
or less. 



1,219 



14 
660 
604 

27 
5 



1,277 



11 
725 
525 

15 
1 



2to8 
months. 



2,800 



25 
1,441 
1,253 

83 
7 



2.950 



27 
1,606 
1,868 

55 
5 



4 to 5 
months. 



2,883 



15 
1,134 
1,167 

70 
7 



2,640 



26 
1,195 
1,348 

77 
3 



6to7 
months. 



PROVINCE OP HABANA. 



2,710 



13 
1.157 
1,446 

02 
2 



3,096 



10 
1,266 
1,671 

94 
5 



Smooths 
or TDoro. 



t,ts3a 



11 

1,C44 

1,473 

9» 

15 



3^062 



11 

1,183 

1,748 

106 

6 



Total 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



30,878 



376 

14,276 

14,462 

1,402 

357 



Total males 



Under 5 years 

6to9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total females 



Under 5 years 

5to0 years 

10tol4 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



16,178 



172 

7,271 

7,484 

940 

311 



14,005 



204 
7,005 
6,978 

462 
46 



Total native white I 28,502 



Under 5 years 

5to9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Native white males. . 



Under 5 years 

5to9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over . 

Native white females. 

Under 5 years. 

5to9years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over . 



301 

10,928 

10,909 

1,163 

306 



12,527 



127 

5,629 

5,712 

792 

268 



11,065 



164 
5,206 

5,197 

371 

38 



Total foreign white. 



733 



Under 6 years — 

5to9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years , 

18 years and over 



16 

308 

830 

51 

24 



1,715 



51 

958 

663 

29 

14 



867 



23 
482 

384 

21 



7 



848 



28 
476 
329 

8 



1,201 



30 

692 

439 

21 

10 



606 



14 
844 
220 

14 
4 



606 



25 

348 

219 

7 

6 



20 



2 

16 

10 

1 

1 



4,488 



90 

2,407 

1,824 

141 

20 



2,404 



87 

1,2S8 

1,002 

110 

18 



2,064 



53 

1,179 

822 

22 

8 



3,078 



67 

1,683 

1,207 

94 

17 



1,669 



29 

874 

677 

78 

11 



1,400 



88 
819 
530 

16 
6 



97 



7 

47 

37 

8 

3 



4,923 



80 

2,418 

2,166 

239 

85 



7,060 



65 

3,153 

3,426 

385 

71 



2,571 



34 

1.243 

1,136 

180 

29 



2,852 



46 

1,170 

1,021 

109 

6 



3,668 



58 

1,768 

1,549 

191 

27 



8,668 



84 

1,602 

1,734 

238 

60 



3,412 



31 

1,561 

1,092 

127 

11 



JS,419 



51 

2,423 

2,667 

311 

67 



1,897 2,839 



23 

915 
881 
106 

22 



26 

1,248 

1.306 

206 

67 



1,696 



85 
863 
718 

85 
5 



138 



5 

68 

60 

12 

3 






2,580 



25 

1,180 

1.262 

108 

10 



165 



1 

62 
86 
13 

8 



12,667 



90 
5,845 
6,383 

ess 

211 



44 

2.n6 

3,279 
432 
197 



5,099 



46 

2.629 

3,114 

196 

14 



10,301 



76 

4.347 

5.147 

546 

186 



5,626 



35 

2.252 

2,679 

386 

174 

4,775 



41 

2,095 

2,468 

190 

11 

304 



1 

111 

166 

22 

14 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 



387 



Table XXI. — School attendance by monthSy toith sex, age, and race — Continued. 

PBOVTNCB OP HABANA-Contlnned. 



Foreign white males. . 

Under 5 years 

5to0 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer . 

Foreign white females 

Under 6 years 

5to9 years 

10 to 14 years 

16 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer . 

Total colored 

Under 5 years 

6 to9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years.. .. 
18 years and oyer . 

Colored males 

Under 6 years 

6 to9years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer . 

Colored females 

Under 5 years 

5to9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer . 



TotaL 



ao9 



8 

150 

172 

38 

22 



334 



8 

144 

107 

13 

2 



1 month 
or less. 



10 



2 
13 
8 
1 
1 



10 



3 

7 



6.548 



69 
8,060 
8,214 

188 
27 



3,252 



37 

1,484 

1,600 

110 

21 



3,296 



32 
1.666 
1,614 

78 
6 



485 



10 

251 

214 

7 

8 






7 

126 

111 

6 

2 



233 



3 

125 

108 

1 

1 



2 to 3. 
months. 



48 



1 

22 

20 

3 

2 



49 



6 
25 

17 



1.313 



16 
667 
580 

44 
6 



687 



4 to 5 
months. 



73 



3 

32 

27 

8 

8 



65 



2 
38 
23 

4 



1,192 



17 
577 
567 

36 
5 



601 



7 

832 

305 

38 

5 



626 



9 
336 

275 
6 
1 



8 

296 

277 

16 

4 



591 



9 

281 

280 

20 

1 



0to7 
months. 



88 



1 

31 
43 
10 

8 



77 



81 

43 

8 



1,496 



18 
668 
773 

41 
1 



741 



8 months 
jrmore. 



7 
328 

386 
20 



r56 



6 

340 

387 

21 

1 



PROVINCE OF MATAXZAS. 



Total 



14,093 



Under 5 years — 

5to9year8 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer 



53 

6,645 

7,298 

649 

53 



Total males 



7,117 



Under 5 years 

6to9year8 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer 

Total females 



18 

8,306 

3,416 

340 

38 



Under 6 years 

5 toOyears 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer 



Total natiye white. 



Under 5 years 

6to9years 

10 tol4 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer 



7,676 



36 
3,330 

8,878 

809 

16 



9,495 



29 

4,198 

4,736 

484 

48 



1,606 



12 

824 

617 

47 

3 



718 



5 

405 

282 

23 

3 



786 



7 

419 

335 

24 



792 



2,743 



16 

1,454 

1,178 

91 

10 



1,318 



1 

698 

558 

54 

7 



1,425 



14 
766 
616 

37 
3 



1,611 



11 
790 
641 

61 

8 



2,527 



8 

1,188 

1,229 

96 

4 



3,882 



9 

1,508 

2,051 

206 

18 



1,260 



4 

625 

576 

62 

4 



1,868 



4 

705 

939 

116 

16 



1,267 



4 

563 

664 

46 



1,506 



3 

721 

704 

77 

3 



2,014 



6 

808 

1,112 

91 

3 



2,712 



6 

1,115 

1,421 

158 

18 



171 



1 

62 
79 
16 
13 



133 



49 

77 

« 6 

1 



2,062 



13 

887 

1,090 

60 

12 



971 



8 
402 
521 

ao 

10 



1,091 



6 

485 

569 

30 

2 



4,088 



9 

1.681 

2,223 

207 

18 



1,953 



4 

783 

1,061 

96 

9 



2.066 



6 

798 

1,162 

111 

9 



2.972 



5 

1.164 

1.624 

162 

17 



388 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XXh^ScIwol attendance by months, with near, age, and race — Gontiiiued. 

PROVINCE OF MATANZAS-Contlnned. 



• 


Total. 


1 month 
or less. 


2to3 
months. 


4to5 
month's. 


6to7 
moaths. 


8 months 
or mors. 


Nwtiv© whit© malfls.- -, -. . .- 


4.728 

10 

2.137 

2,276 

272 

83 


382 


730 


794 


1.352 

2 

564 

678 

98 

15 


1,470 






Under 5 veArs 


3 

201 

160 

16 

2 


1 

385 

301 

38 

5 


2 

389 

345 

45 

3 


2 


5 to 9 years ._ 


688 


lOto 14 years 


7» 


15 to 17 years - 


80 


18 years and over 


8 






Nfttive white fniii|Ll<w| , . , 


4.767 


410 


781 


714 


1.360 


1,506 






Under 5 years 


19 

2,061 

2,400 

312 

15 


2 

207 

186 

15 


10 
406 
340 

23 
3 


1 

322 

3se 

32 


3 

551 

743 

60 

8 


3 


5 to 9 years 


57V 


10 to 14 years - 


838 


15 to 17 years 


83 


18 years and over 


9 








Total foreign white 


89 


8 


18 


16 


32 


20 






Under 5 years 


3 

30 

46 

8 

2 


1 
5 
1 
1 


1 
3 
8 




I 
11 
16 

4 




5 to 9 years 


6 
9 

1 


5 


10 to 14 years 


12 


15 to 17 years -...._ 


2 


18 years and over 


1 


1 












Foreign white males... 


41 


4 


8 


7 


14 


8 






Under 5 years...: 














5 to 9 years 


21 
17 

1 
2 


4 


2 
6 


4 
3 


8 
6 
1 


8 


10 to 14 years 


4 


15 to 17 years - 




18 years and over. - 




1 




1 












Foreign white females 


48 


4 


5 


9 


18 


12 






Under 5 years 


3 

9 

29 

7 


1 
1 

1 
1 


1 
1 
3 




1 

8 

11 

8 




5 to 9 years 


2 
6 

1 


. 


10 to 14 years 


8 


15 to 17 years 


2 


18 years and over 


















Total colored 


5,109 


708 


1,219 


1,008 


1,138 


1.046 




Under5years 


21 

2,417 

2,511 

157 

3 


6 

411 

270 

15 

1 


3 

661 

524 

80 

1 


5 

461 

516 

20 

1 


8 

472 

614 

49 


4 


5 to 9 years 


412 


10 to 14 years 


567 


15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 


43 








Colored males 


2.348 


332 


580 


450 


502 


476 






Under 5 years 


8 

1.148 

1,122 

67 

3 


2 

200 
122 

7 

1 




2 

222 

227 

7 

1 

544 


2 

228 

256 

21 


2 


5 to 9 years 


311 

262 

16 

1 


192 


10 to 14 years 


265 


15 to 17 years 


16 


18 years and over 











Colored females 


2.761 


371 


639 


636 


571 






Under5year8. 


13 
1,269 
1,389 

90 


4 

211 

148 

8 


8 

'XV) 

272 

14 


a 

239 

289 

18 


1 
249 

866 
28 


2 


5 to 9 years 


280 


10 to 14 years 


8S2 


15 to 17 years 


27 


18 years and over [ 








... ...... 









PROVINCE OF PINAR DEL RIO. 



I 



Total 

Under 5 years . . 

5 to 9 years 

10 to U years .. . 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



3.412 



12 

1,643 

1.652 

92 

13 



268 



157 

106 

3 



.583 



5 

848 

220 

10 



455 



3 
229 

206 
17 



»» 



4 

426 

309 

20 

4 



1. 



488 

n9 

42 
9 



SOHOOIi ATTENDANCE. 



889 



Tablb XXL — School attendance by months, unth sex, age, and race— Continned. 

PROVINCE OF PINAR DEL RIO-Con tinned. 





Total. 


1 month 
or less. 


2 to 8 
months. 


4to5 
months. 


6 to 7 
months. 


'8 months 
or more. 


Total maleii 


1,790 


196 


806 


252 


439 


ft55 






Under Syean 


6 

853 

855 

66 

10 




2 

185 

113 

8 


3 
130 
111 

8 


1 

214 

206 

13 

8 


1 , .. 


5to9yean 


85 

48 

3 


239 


10 to 14 years 


875 


15 to 17 years 


34 


18 years and oyer 


7 










Total females ,,,-, 


1,622 


132 


275 


203 


414 


608 






Under 5 years r . . 


6 

790 

797 

26 

8 




8 

163 

107 

2 




3 

212 
191 

7 
1 




5 1« years 


72 
60 


99 

96 

9 


244 


10 to 14 years 


344 


15 to 17 years 


8 


18 years and over 




2 












Total natiye white 


2«638 


207 


419 


835 


660 


1,017 




Under 6 years . . 


9 

1,261 

1,278 

80 

10 




4 
253 
155 

7 


1 

166 

154 

15 


4 

329 

307 

16 

4 




6 to 9 years 


119 

86 

8 


386 


10 to l4 years 


577 


15 to 17 years - - 


80 


18 years and over ......... 


6 




! 






Native white males 


1,482 


112 


233 


190 


360 


547 






Under 5 years 


3 

670 

690 

61 

8 




1 

139 

86 

7 


1 
94 
88 

7 


1 

173 

163 

10 

8 




5 to 9 years 


68 

41 

8 


196 


10 to 14 years 


812 


15 to 17 years - 


84 


18 years and over 


6 












Native white females 


1,206 


96 


186 


145 


810 


470 


Under 5 years ..- .- 


6 
501 

588 

19 

2 




3 

114 

69 




8 

166 

144 

6 

1 




5 to 9 years 


51 


71 

66 

8 


199 


10 to 14 years 


265 


15 to 17 years -. 


5 


18 years and over 






1 












Total foreifirn white 


26 


2 


5 


2 


» 


8 


Under 6 years 














5 to4> years 


15 
11 




4 

1 


2 


6 
3 


8 


10 to 14 years 


2 


6 


15 to 17 years 






18 years and over 






















1 "" 




Foreiim whit« males 


16 




1 


2 


8 


6 








Under 5 years.. 














6 to 9 years 


11 
5 




1 


2 


6 
2 


2 


10 to 14 years _..'... 




3 


15 to 17 years.. 










18 years and over 




















4 








Foreim white females 


10 


2 




1 


3 








Under 5 years . . . .... 






1 






5 to 9 years 


4 
6 




a 






1 


lOto 14 years 

15 to 17 years *. 


2 




1 


2 






18 years and over 






• 












...... — .|. ......... 






Total colored 


748 


60 


159 


118 


184 


228 






Under 6 years...... 


8 

867 

868 

12 

8 




1 
91 
64 

8 


2 
62 
62 

2 




5 to 9 years 


88 
21 


91 
89 
4 



85 


10 to 14 years 


137 


15 to 17 years. 


8 


1** years and ov«iiT 




3 














Colored males ... 


842 


24 


74 


60 


81 


108 






Under 5 years ». 


3 

172 

160 

5 

2 




1 

45 
27 

1 


2 
34 
23 

1 


1 


6 to 9 years 


17 
7 


35 

43 

3 


41 


10 to 14 years ■. 


60 


15 to 17 years 




18 years and over 




2 














390 



KEPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 18f)9. 



Tablk XXI. — School attendance by months, with sex, age, and r<we — Continaed. 

PBOVINCE OP PINAR DEL RIO— Oontiiined. 





Total 


1 month 
orlesa 


2to3 
monthii. 


4to6 
months. 

68 


6to7 
months. 


8 months 
or more. 


CV>lor<*d f mnal<Mi 


406 


86 


86 


108 


126 






Under 6 vears - 














6 to 9 yean 


196 
306 

7 
1 


21 
14 


46 

87 

2 


28 

29 

1 


66 
46 

1 


44 


10 to 14 years - 


77 


15 to 17 years 


8 


18 Team and over . 




1 















PBOVINCE OP PUERTO PRINCIPE. 



Total 



Under 5 years — 

6 to years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total males 



Under 5 years 

5 toOyears 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



Total females 



Under 6 years 

5 toOyears 

10 to 14 years 

15 tol7 years 

18 years and over 

Total native white . . . 



Under 6 years 

StoOyears 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Native white males.. 



Under 6 years 

6 too years 

10 to 14 years 

15tol7years 

18 years and over . 

Native white females. 



Under 5 years 

5to0years , 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



Total foreign white. 



Under 5 years 

6to0years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Foreign white males. 



Under 5 years 

5to0years 

10 to 14 years 

16 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



4,808 



. 15 

2,181 

2,116 

78 

18 



2,225 



6 

1,108 

1,060 

47 

11 



2,178 



10 
1,078 
1,U67 



8,601 



14 
1,779 
1,788 

61 
9 



1,808 



4 

802 

30 
9 



1,798 



10 



887 

874 

22 



42 



7 

81 

8 

1 



27 



5 

18 

8 

1 



806 



8 

151 

147 

8 

1 



171 



2 

87 

79 

2 

1 



184 



1 
64 
68 

1 



240 



2 
121 
116 

2 



188 



1 

72 
60 

1 



107 



40 

66 

1 



2 
2 
1 



1 
2 
1 



767 



2 

441 

817 

6 

1 



215 


195 


162 


186 


5 


9 


1 


2 



884 



2 
226 

155 
1 



680 



2 

281 
8 
1 



170 

119 

3 

1 



287 



2 



178 
112 



1 
7 
1 



1 
6 
1 



792 



4 

416 

858 

16 

8 



802 



400 



4 

221 
167 

7 
1 



622 



4 

880 

272 

14 

2 



805 



140 

145 

9 

2 



817 



181 

127 

6 



1 
2 



2 



1 

1 



1.872 



8 



678 

24 

6 



674 



1 

840 

818 

16 

4 



2 



866 

8 
1 



1.140 



8 

660 

669 

24 

8 



660 



1.162 



8 

5U 

021 

24 

8 



606 



819 

16 

8 



557 



1 
246 

auB 





1,010 



8 

435 

661 

18 

8 



617 



1 


2 


281 


220 


250 


282 


16 


10 


8 


8 



589 



488 



2 



810 

8 



215 
90 
8 



12 



18 



1 
10 



1 '. 



2 

10 

1 



4 

"i* 



2 
6 
1 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 



391 



Table XXI. — School attendance by nwnths, witk «eaj, (ige, and race— Continued. 

PROVINCE OP PUERTO PRINCIPE— Contlnned. 



Foreign white females 



Under 6 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total colored 



Under 6 years 

5 to9years 

10 to U years 

16 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Colored males 



Under 5 years 

6 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



Colored females. 



Under 6 years 

5 to9years 

10 to 14 years 

16 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



Total. 



15 



2 
18 



755 



1 

385 

347 

9 

8 



300 



1 
206 

in 

5 
1 



365 



189 

170 

4 

2 



1 month 
or lens. 



60 



1 
28 
30 



2to3 
months. 



178 



1 



34 



1 

14 
18 



1 



26 



14 
12 



87 

79 

2 



83 



44 

38 
1 



95 



53 

41 

1 



4to5 
months. 



6 to 7 8 months 
months, or more. 



167 



85 

79 

2 

1 



85 



45 
40 



40 

39 

2 

1 



1 
6 



211 



I 



111 
99 



109 



59 
50 



102 



52 
49 



139 



74 

60 

5 



79 



44 

31 

4 



60 



30 

29 

1 



PROVINCE OP SANTA CLARA. 



Total 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

lOtoU years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total males 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years » 

18 years and over 

Total females , 

Under 5 years 

5to9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total native white 

Under 5 years 

6 to 9 years. 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Native white males 

Under 5 years 

5to9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



20,301 



134 

8,763 

10.578 

724 

102 



10,215 



63 

4,425 

5,206 

439 

85 



10.086 



71 

4,338 

5,375 

285 

17 



14,014 



84 

5,993 

7,302 

546 

89 



7,241" 



41 

3,062 

3.706 

3S6 

76 



2,039 



23 

1,078 

876 

55 

7 



1.006 



8 

528 

437 

29 

6 



1.031 



15 
650 
430 

26 
1 



1.239 



16 
636 
540 

41 
6 



616 



5 

816 

270 

20 

5 



4,124 



49 

2,057 

1,887 

119 

12 



2,154 



31 

1.090 

958 

66 

9 



1,970 



18 
967 
929 

53 
3 



2,567 



30 

1,297 

1,137 

93 

10 



3,549 



1,899 



18 
709 
606 

66 

8 



27 

1,680 

1,837 

101 

4 



1,818 



7 

792 

961 

54 

4 



1,731 


20 

788 
876 

47 


^ 


2.429 



12 
1.058 
1,292 

63 
4 



1,292 



5 

532 

715 

86 

4 



4,404 



17 

1,821 

2,302 

151 

23 



2.160 



9 

918 

1,107 

106 

21 



2.244 



8 

903 

1,285 

46 

2 



3,119 



12 

1,305 

1,670 

114 

18 



1,553 



6 

650 

785 

86 

17 



6.185 



18 

2.227 

3,586 

298 

66 



3,075 



8 

1,097 

1.740 

185 

45 



3.110 



10 

1,130 

1,846 

113 

11 



4.660 



14 

1,697 

2.663 

235 

51 



2,381 



7 

846 

1,328 

158 

42 



892 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899, 



Table y^T, — School attendance by months, with sex, age, and race —ContiiiQed. 

PROVINCE OF 8ANTA CliABA-Gontinued. 





Total. 


1 month 
or less. 


2 to 3 
months. 


4to5 
months. 


6to7 
months. 


8 months 
or more. 


Nfttivfl whltB f eTurie* . , .r - r-- -- 


6,773 


628 


1,168 


1,187 


1,666 


2,279 






Under 6 vears..... .................. 


43 

2,981 

3,506 

190 

13 


11 
320 
270 

21 

1 


12 
588 
529 

37 
2 


7 

626 

577 

27 


6 
646 
885 

28 

1 


7 


6 to 9 years - 


851 


10 to 1' years 


1,835 


lRfn17vAA.m 


77 


18 years and over 


9 








Total foreiflm white 


136 


9 


23 


19 


82 


63 






TTnflnr K VAAiHi . .__ 














5 to years 


45 

76 
9 
6 


4 
4 


12 
10 


7 

10 
2 


io 

17 
8 
2 


12 


lOto 14 years 

15 to 17 years 


2& 

4 


18 years and oyer ........... 


1 


1 


2 








Foreifrn white males. ...... 


74 


5 


14 


15 


17 


23 






Under 5 years...... - 














5 to 9 years 


26 

36 

6 

6 


3 

1 


7 
6 


5 

8 
2 


5 
8 
2 
2 


6 


lOto 14 years 

15 to 17 years - 


13 
2 


18 years and oyer 


1 


1 


2 








For^ig^ white females 


62 


4 





4 


15 


ao 






Under 6 years.. 












. 


6 to 9 years 


19 

40 

8 


i 

8 


5 

4 


2 
2 


5 
9 

1 


6 


10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 


22 
2 


18 years and oyer 
























Total colored 


6,151 


791 


1.534 


1,101 


1,263 


1,4W 






Under 5 years - 


60 

2,725 

3,200 

169 

7 


7 

438 

332 

14 


19 
748 
740 

26 
1 


15 
515 
536 

86 


5 

506 

705 

34 

8 


4 


6 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 


618 
888 


15 to 17 years 


80 


18 years and oyer 


3 










Colored males 


2,900 


387 


741 


511 


600 


671 






Under 6 years 


22 

1.837 

1.461 

Ti 

3 


3 
200 
166 

9 


18 
374 
344 

10 


2 

255 

238 

16 


3 

254 

314 

17 

2 

663 


1 


6 to9 years 


246 


lOtol years 


890 


15 to 17 years 


25 


18 yean* and oyer 


1 












Colored females ^ 


3.251 

1 28 
1 1,388 
1 1,739 
92 
1 4 


404 


798 


SOO 


801 


Under5years 

6to9 years 


4- 

229 

166 

6 


87? 

396 

16 

1 


13 
260 
297 

20 


2 
252 
301 

17 

1 


3 
273 


lOto 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer 


480 

84 

2 









PROVINCE OF SANTIAGO. 



Total 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer 



Total males 



Under 5 years 

5to9year8 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer. 



14.258 



98 

6,368 

7,225 

498 

74 



6.978 



39 

3.157 

3,450 

284 

48 



873 


2,997 


3.496 


8 


34 


10 


487 


1,543 


1.509 


356 


1,320 


i,ni 


19 


83 


119 


3 


17 


18 



409 



3 
23:3 

160 
11 



2 , 



1.466 

1? 
787 
612 

46 

8 



1.706 



9 i 
757 
850 > 

71 . 
10 ' 



4.120 



20 

1.698 

2,229 

155 

18 

2.055 I 



8 I 

840 

1,098 

86 

14 



2,772 



12 
1.071 
1,549 

18 



1.812 



6 

531 

721 

70 

14 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 



393 



Table XXI. — School attendance by months, with »ex, agcj and race~Ck)ntirned. 

PROVINCE OP SANTIAGO-Continned. 





Total. 


1 month 
or less. 


2 to3 
months. 


4 to5 
months. 


6to7 
months. 


8 months 
or more. 


Total f emalen . 


7,280 


464 


1,531 


1.7C0 


2,066 


1,430 






Under 5 yean.................. 


54 

3,211 

8,776 

214 

26 


5 
254 

196 
8 

1 


21 
756 
706 

37 



10 

812 

012 

48 

8 


12 

849 

1.131 

60 

4 


6 


5 to years 


640 


10 to 14 years 


828 


15 to 17 years 


62 


18 years and over 


4 






Total native white... 


8,743 


472 


1,626 


2.022 


2,630 


2,003 






Under 5 yf ars 


74 

3,973 

4,322 

320 

54 


7 

258 

102 

13 
o 


21 

853 

601 

40 

12 


17 

020 

094 

68 

14 


18 

1,127 

1,378 

06 

11 


11 


6 toO yeaxj 


HOtt 


10tol4ye^rs 


1.067 


15 to 17 years 


94 


18 years and over. ........ 


15 






Native white maleff 


4,306 


216 


816 


1,026 


1,351 


087 






Under 6 years .. .. .... 


32 

2,041 

2.108 

181 

34 


2 

120 

78 

6 

1 




460 

323 

28 

6 


8 
469 

501 
41 

< 


7 

587 

. 694 

54 




6 


5 toO years ... 


406 


10 to 14 years 


612 


15 to 17 years. 


52 


18 years and over -, . . * . , , 


11 






Native white females 


4,347 


256 


810 


006 


1.270 


1,006 






Under 6 years 


42 
1,032 

2.214 

130 

20 


5 

120 
114 

7 
1 


12 
409 
368 

21 
6 



460 
493 

27 
7 


11 
540 
684 

42 
2 


5 


5 to years 


400 


10 to 14 years 


555 


15 to 17 years 

IH years and over ....... .... 


42 
4 






Total foreign white 


106 


3 


15 


23 


26 


41 






Under 5 years. 






1 






5 to years 


40 

55 

6 

8 


1 
2 


8 
5 

1 
1 


11 
11 


6 

14 

1 

5 


14 


10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years......... . 


23 
3 


18 years and over 




1 


1 








Foreign white males 


60 


3 


6 


13 


17 


21 






Under 5 years............. .. .. 






1 






5 to years 


18 

20 

5 

8 


1 
2 


2 
2 

1 
1 


6 
6 


4 
7 
1 
5 


5 


10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 


12 
8 


18 years and over 




1 


1 








Foreign white females , . 


48 







10 


9 


20 








Under 5 years 












5 to years 


*" 22 

26 




6 
3 


5 
5 


2 

7 





10 to 14 years 




11 


15 to 17 years. 






18 venm and over 






















, . - 


Total colored 


5,407 


398 


13 
662 
624 

33 
4 


1,451 


1,464 


738 






Under 5years 


10 

2,355 

2,848 

173 

12 


1 

228 

162 

6 

1 


2 

629 

766 

51 

3 


2 

565 

837 

58 

2 


1 


5 to years 

10 to 14 years 


251 
450 


16 to 17 years 


25 


18 years and over 


2 







Colored males 


2,522 


. 100 


644 


667 


G87 


:S4 






Under 5 years 


1.008 

1,313 

08 

6 


1 

108 

80 

5 

1 


4 
335 

287 

17 

1 


1 

282 

352 

30 

2 


1 

258 

397 

31 




5 toO years 


120 


10 to 14 years 


107 


15 to 17 years 


15 


18 years and over 


2 








2,885 


208 


712 


784 


777 


404 






Under 5 years 


13 
1,257 
1,535 

75 
6 






347 

337 

16 

3 


1 

347 

414 

21 

1 


1 

307 

440 

27 

2 


1 


5 to y«ars 


125 
82 
1 
. . _ . . ..... 


131 


10 to 14 years 


262 


15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 


10 







394 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XXI. — School attendance by months, with sex, age, and raee-^Contdnned. 

CITY OP CIENFUEGOS. 





Total. 


1 month 
or lees. 


2 to3 

months. 


4 to6 
months. 


6 to7 
months. 


8 months 
or more. 


Total 


3,832 


258 


622 


686 


776 


1,484 






Under 6 ve&rs 


26 

1,652 

1,092 

160 

13 


1 
127 

m 

9 


6 
821 

2n 

17 
1 


5 

887 

320 

22 


6 

383 

411 

22 

8 


7 


5 to 9 Tears 


634 


10 to 14 vears . . 


851 


16 to 17 years ....... 


80 


18 years and over 


9 










Total males .,,.,,,^, 


1,869 


108 


331 


286 


872 


773J 






Under 6 years. ........,, .^.-r.-r-r..--- 


13 
805 

951 
92 

8 


1 

62 
61 

4 


4 

179 

137 

10 

1 




4 

168 

191 

12 

2 


4 


6 to 9 years - - 


161 

124 

11 


a» 


10 to 14 years 


448 


16 to 17 years 

1ft vAiLrfl ».r\A nvAi* . _ _ . . 


65 
5 












1.963 


160 


201 


4OT 


408 


712 






Under 6 years 


12 

847 

1,041 

68 

6 




2 
142 
140 

7 

• 


6 

186 

205 

11 


2 

170 

220 

10 

1 


8 


6 to 9 years 


76 

70 

6 


274 




406 


16 to 17 years 


25 


18 veRra and over ......... 


4 












Total native white 


2,482 


161 


867 


419 


610 


1,QS6 






Under 6 years .. 


18 
1,081 

i,2n 

108 
9 




4 

108 

167 

12 

1 


3 

204 

198 

14 


6 

286 

254 

13 

1 


5 


6 to 9 years 


88 

72 

6 


865 


10 to 14 years 


680 


16 to 17 years 


66 


18 VA&rfl And civar ......... 


7 










YTftfivA ivIilfA mAlmi . 


1,246 


66 


205 


160 


2i8 


667 






TTnder 6 veiLm ..^^-r..,. 


9 

627 

629 

73 

7 




2 

112 
80 
10 

1 




4 

116 

118 

9 

1 


3 


5 to 9 years.... ...... 


84 

31 

1 


84 

68 

7 


181 


10 to 14 years 


332 


16 to 17 years 


4S 


1ft vAAi« And nvAF _ 


6 










Native white females 


1.237 


96 


162 


260 


262 


468 






Under 6 years. .,.^.--,r..-r, - --^r 


9 
554 

642 

80 

2 




2 
81 

77 
2 


3 
120 
130 

7 


2 
120 
136 

4 


2 


6 to 9 years 


49 

41 

6 


184 


10 to 14 years...... 


258 


16 to 17 years ..-, t,,- 


12 


18 ve&rs and over 


2 














Total foreijrn white 


42 


2 


7 


6 


6 


21 






Under 6 years.. ..n...... 














6 toO years 


14 

26 

2 




3 

4 


2 

3 
1 


1 
6 


8 


10 to 14 years 


2 


12 


IS to 17 yefl.rs ... 


1 


18 ve&ra Rnd over 
























Foreiflm white males 


20 




3 


3 


4 


10 








TTnder 6 vears. .. .............. 














6 to 9 vears . .......... 


7 

11 

2 




1 
2 


1 
1 

1 


1 
3 


4 


10 to 14 vears 




6 


16 to 17 vears 




1 


1ft vAAfHi anH ovAr . _ _ 
























Foreign white females 


22 


2 


4 


3 


2 


11 






TTnder S vears 














6 to vesuv 


1 

16 




2 
2 


1 
2 




4 


10 to 14 years. 


2 


2 


7 


16 to 17 vears . .. ._ . . . 




18 years and over 














Total colored 


1,308 


96 


248 


268 


260 


438 






Under 6 years 


7 

657 

605 

46 

4 


1 
44 

47 
3 


2 
125 
116 

5 




2 
131 
128 

7 




2 


6 to 9 years 


96 

162 

9 

2 


161 


10 to 14 years 


262 


16 to 17 years 


21 


18 years and over 


2 



SCHOOL attendan(;k. 



395 



Tabus XXI. — School attendance by months, tvith sex, age, and race — Continued. 

CITY OP GIENFUEGOS-Contlnu©d. 



Colored malee 

Under 5 years 

5to9yearB 

10 to U years 

16 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Colored females 

Under 5 years 

5to9years 

10 to U years 

16 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



Total. 



604 



i 

271 
311 
17 
1' 



704 



3 

266 

28 
3 



1 month 
or less. 



42 



1 

18 
20 

8 



63 



26 

27 



2to3 
months. 



123 



2 
66 
55 



4to6 
months. 



125 



60 

61 

6 



124 



66 

65 

3 



144 



2 
66 
73 

4 



6to7 
months. 



120 



46 

70 

3 

1 



130 



60 

82 

6 

1 



8 months 
or more. 



106 



1 
75 

111 
8 



243 



1 

86 

141 

13 

2 



CITY OP HABANA. 



Total 

Under 5 years 

6to9years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total males 

Under 6 years 

6 to years 

10 to 14 years 

16 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total females 

Under 5 y tors — 

6 toByears 

10 to 14 years , 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer 

Total native white ... 

Under 6 years 

6to0years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Native white males.. 

Under 6 years 

6to0years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer 

Native white females 

Under 6 years 

6to0years 

10 to 14 years 

16 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total foreign white . 

Under 6 years — 

5to9yearR 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 yearn and over 



20,678 



821 
0,660 
9,371 
1.119 

302 



10,829 



146 

4,857 

4,832 

724 

270 



v , 04v 



175 
4,708 
4,580 

305 
32 



15,574 



251 

7,188 

6,062 

921 

262 



8.263 



110 

8,096 

3,021 

601 

235 



7,311 



141 
3,492 
3,331 

9SS0 
27 



602 



12 
247 
273 

49 

21 



671 



38 
401 
216 

10 
7 



352 

lo" 

217 
107 

6 

3 



310 



19 

184 

106 

4 

4 



460 



28 

2B1 

139 

6 

6 



233 



12 
154 

64 
2 
1 



226 



16 

127 

76 

4 

4 



21 



2 

12 
6 
1 



2,688 



80 

1,396 

973 

116 

23 



1,414 



33 
716 

548 

101 

17 



1,174 



47 
681 
425 

15 
6 



1,605 



61 
963 

588 
77 
16 



931 



27 

491 

338 

64 

11 



164 



34 
463 

250 

13 

5 



73 



5 

33 

29 

3 

3 



3,087 



68 

1,536 

1.255 

201 

27 



1,611 



29 
792 
664 
103 

23 



1.476 



89 
744 
601 

98 
4 



2,169 



61 

1,074 

865 

150 

20 



1,147 



21 

661 

466 

82 

17 



1,022 



30 
513 
399 

77 
3 



114 



3 

58 

38 

U 

3 



4.726 



67 

2,096 

2,215 

296 

62 



2.434 



31 

1,040 

1,123 

185 

56 



2.292 



26 

1,066 

1,092 

HI 

7 



3,566 



45 

1.569 

1,630 

254 

68 



1,861 



23 

783 

838 

165 

52 



1.605 



22 
786 
792 

89 
6 



132 



1 

48 
67 
13 

3 



9,601 



78 

4,131 

4,713 

49tt 

183 



5,018 



34 

2,093 

2.390 

829 

l?i 



4,583 



44 

2,038 

2,323 

167 

11 



7,605 



66 

8,311 

3, 730 

425 

16^J 



4,001 



27 

1,707 

1,915 

288 

154 



3,604 

39 

1,604 

1,815 

137 

9 



282 



1 

96 

133 

20 

12 



398 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 18»9. 



Table JTXI. — School attendance by months, with seXy age, and race — Continned. 

CITY OP PUERTO PRINCIPE-Contiiiued. 





TotaL 


1 month 
orlesa 


2 to 3 
months. 


4to5 
months. 


6to7 
months. 


8 months 
or more. 


Tnffi.1 mulAn .... 


1,881 


141 


229 


242 


8b7 


888 






TTndei* 5 voArfl ..- .--. 


8 

668 

622 

81 

7 


2 
71 
66 

2 








1 


5 to 9 years.. 


128 

96 

8 


132 

106 

4 


169 

154 

10 

4 


168 


10 to 14 irears - 


196 


15 to 17 7earB --.. 


12 


18 vears and over _ .. 


8 












Totiil female* ^ 


1.230 


114 


219 


223 


345 


329 






TTndftr ft vflftrfl ...... ........t-^*-- 


8 

640 

567 

14 

1 


1 
54 

88 

1 


2 
180 

86 

1 


2 

1 


1 
168 
171 

5 




5 to 9 vearB .. .....^t. 


158 


10 to 14 Tears...... 


171 


15 to 17 years 

18 VARi*fi And over . . 


5 












Total native white - 


1.995 


198 


307 


342 


636 


612 






Under ft vears. ........ ....^.^^-r- ^-- 


10 

1,016 

928 

35 

6 


2 
99 
95 

2 


2 
185 
119 

1 


4 

202 

131 

5 


1 

262 

255 

15 

3 


1 


5 to 9 vears 


268 


10 to 14 years 


a» 


15 to 17 years 


12 


18 years and oyer 


8 










Natiye whit© males 


1.024 


107 


155 


176 


260 


386 






TTiidAf fi VAa.m ..^.-.^....... ....... 


2 

514 

478 

24 

6 


1 

58 
47 

1 








1 


5 to 9 years.- 


91 
68 

1 


97 
76 

i 


129 

118 

10 

3 


139 


10 to 14 years 


175 


15 to 17 years - --- 


8 


18 years and oyer 


;i 


Native white females. 


971 


91 


152 


166 


276 


2m 






TTndni* X VAAFS ._ 


8 

602 

450 

11 


1 

41 
48 

I 


2 

94 
56 


i 

105 

66 

. 1 


1 
133 
187 

5 




5 to 9 years -r 


U» 


10 to 1' years 


158 


15 to 17 VBftFfl .......... 


4 


18 years and oyer v... 






Totjtl foreiim wh Ite -.....-r 


27 


5 


5 


1 


9 


7 






TTndnr fi \rAn.i*n ..___ 














6 to 9 years . . 


5 

18 
3 

1 


2 
2 

1 


1 
8 
1 


1 


I 
7 




10 to 14 years 


6 


15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer 




1 




1 




Foreiflm white males 


18 


4 


5 


1 


4 


4 






TTnder fi years .- . 














fi tiO iTMLrn .... 


8 

11 

3 

1 


1 
2 

1 


1 
8 

1 


1 






10 to 1' VBftFA - - .... 


3 


3 


1 A to 17 VAAra ^ - . 




1 


18 years and oyer 




1 




VorAiim white fpfnaleA 


9 


1 






5 


3 










TTndfti* ft VAKra 














ft t.n vMLn* 


2 

7 


i 






1 
4 




10 txk 1< ' VAa.i*8 






8 


1ft 4^ 17 vAA.m - 










18 years and oyer 














Total <»lored - 


539 


53 


136 


122 


187 


93 






TTndAf* t% VAAPs 


1 

287 
243 

7 

1 


1 

24 
27 










5to9 years 


72 

62 

2 


64 
56 

1 
1 


74 
63 


53 


10 to 1 years 


85 


15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer 


4 








Colored males 


289 


80 


69 


65 


78 


52 






TTntf^Al" R VAATA 


1 
151 
138 

4 


1 

12 
17 










5to9 years 


36 
32 

1 


34 
81 


40 
83 


29 


10 to 14 years 


20 


1A to 17 VAAm 


8 


18 years and oyer 












T . . — 













SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 



399 



Tablk XXI. — School attendance by numtha^ toith sex, age, and race — Gontinaed. 

CITY OP PUEBTO PRINCIPB-Contlnued. 



• 


Total. 


1 month 
or less. 


2to3 
months. 


4to5 
months. 


6 to 7 
months. 


8 months 
or more. 


Colored fenuJefl _ 


2S0 


» 


67 


57 


64 


40 






Under 6 years 














6to9 years 


136 

no 

3 

1 


12 
10 


36 
90 

1 


30 
26 

1 
1 


34 
30 


24 


10 to 14 years _ 


15 


15 to 17 years - 


1 


18 years and over 



















CITY OP SANTIAGO. 



Total 



Under 5 years 

5to9years 

lOtoHyears 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer 

Total males 



Under 5 years 

5 toOyears 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer 

Total females 



Under 5 years — 

5to9years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer 

Total natiye white... 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer 

Natiye white males. . 



Under 5 years — 

5to9years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer. 



Natiye white females. 



Under 6 years — 

5 toOyears 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total foreign white. . 



Under 5 years — 

5 toOyears 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer 

Poreign white males. 



Under 5 years 

5to0years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and oyer 



4,451 



87 

1,033 

2,317 

147 

17 



2,157 



13 

940 

1,107 

84 

13 



2,204 



24 

993 

1,210 

63 

4 



2,272 



24 

1,022 

1,121 

92 

13 



1,153 



11 

510 

557 

55 

11 



156 



4 

85 

63 

3 

1 



78 



1 

60 

25 

1 

1 



78 



8 
35 
38 

2 



68 



8 
36 
28 

2 

1 



35 



25 

9 

.... 



1.119 



33 



13 
508 
564 

37 
2 



47 



20 

26 

1 



24 



10 

13 

1 



3 
11 
17 

2 



879 



12 

481 

375 

9 

2 



422 



2 
242 

173 
4 
1 



457 



10 

239 

202 

5 

1 



317 



3 

195 

114 

4 

1 



162 



1 

104 

54 

2 

1 



155 



2 



1 
1 



2 
91 
60 

2 



8 



3 
4 

1 



1 
1 



1.053 



7 
461 
556 

28 
1 



519 



4 

223 

270 

22 



534 



3 

238 

286 

6 

1 



516 



6 

238 

266 

16 

1 



1.438 



267 



4 

118 

131 

14 



249 



120 

124 

2 

1 



13 



7 
6 



8 



4 
4 



9 

566 

795 

63 

5 



679 



2 

250 

391 

33 

3 



760 



7 

316 

404 

30 

2 



790 



8 

827 

414 

37 

4 



384 



2 

153 

206 

21 

3 



406 



6 

174 

209 

16 

1 



2 
8 



1 
1 



925 



5 

840 

528 

44 

8 



459 



4 

175 

248 

24 

8 



466 



1 

165 

280 

20 



581 



4 
226 

812 

33 

6 



305 



4 

119 
158 

18 
6 



276 



107 

154 

15 



19 



7 
12 



10 



4 
6 



400 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XXl,^ School attendance by months, with sex, age, and race — ContdnnedL 

CITY OF SAKTIAGO-Continaed. 



Foreigrn white females 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total colored 



Under 5 years 

5 to9 years 

lOtoUYears 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Colored males 



Under 5 years — 

5 to 9 years 

lOtoU years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Colored females 



Under 5 years 

6 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



Total. 



23 



10 
13 



2.132 



13 

891 

1,170 

54 

4 



980 



2 

411 

537 

28 

2 



1,152 



11 
480 
633 

26 
2 



1 month 
or less. 



86 



1 

48 
36 

1 



41 



1 
24 

15 
1 



45 



24 

21 



2to3 
months. 



6 



8 
3 



664 



9 
288 
257 

4 

1 



4to6. 
months. 



258 



1 

138 

118 

1 



296 



3 
2 



624 



1 

216 

295 

12 



244 



101 
135 

8 



280 



8 




1 


145 


115 


139 


160 


8 


4 


1 









6to7 
months. 



8 months 
or more. 



3 



1 
2 



643 



1 

237 

378 

26 

1 



283 



96 

185 

12 



360 



1 

141 

193 

14 

1 



3 




1 

107 

204 

11 

2 



144 



58 

84 
6 
2 



181 



1 

65 
120 

5 



Table XXII. — Superior education by age, sex, race, and nativity. 

CUBA. 



Under 18 years. . . 
18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

!» to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 61 years 

65 years and over 

Cuba 



All classes. 



5 
o 



'3 



9 

-3 

&4 



1,363 

916 

499 

2.300 

2,837 

2.626 

4,289 

2,565 

1.212 

551 



951 

630 

339 

1.752 

2,228 

2,155 

3.623 

2,173 

1,010 

467 



19,158 ,15.328 



412 
286 
160 
548 
609 
471 

AAA 
ODD 

392 
84 



Native white. 



I 



I 



1.210 

807 

406 

1,792 

2,001 

1,932 

8,0?a 

1,715 

791 

339 



857 

551 

273 

1,352 

1,545 

1,558 

2,550 

1,391 

631 

271 



.1 



£ 



353 
256 
133 
440 
456 
374 
.522 
324 
160 
65 



3,830 14,065 |10,98;: !3,0h3 



Foreign white. 



o 



a 



78 


52 


65 


54 


59 


45 


438 


363 


746 


032 


641 


560 


1,128 


1.007 


817 


753 


405 


366 


201 


184 


4,578 


4,016 



1 



26 
11 
14 
75 

114 
81 

121 
64 
39 
17 



662 



Colored. 






75 
44 
34 
70 
90 
58 
89 
33 
16 
11 



515 



42 
25 

21 
37 
61 
37 
66 
29 
13 
9 



-a 

a 

« 



88 
19 
13 
88 

SO 
16 
23 

4 
8 
2 



330 I 186 



PROVINCE OF HABANA. 



Under 18 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

The province 



607 


539 


433 


338 


227 


173 


1.108 


886 


1,420 


1,154 


1,243 


1.066 


1.960 


1,660 


1,182 


1,015 


542 


453 


285 


230 


9,097 


7,514 



158 


625 


1 490 


135 


44 


81 


13 


28 


18 


95 


388 


308 


85 


32 


28 


4 


13 


7 


54 


188 


143 


45 


28 


23 


5 


11 


7 


222 


906 


729 


177 


178 


145 


33 


24 


12 


266 


1,026 


825 


201 


858 


306 


62 


36 


28 


m 


916 


785 


131 


312 


209 


43 


16 


12 


300 


1,426 


1,202 


224 


610 


440 


70 


24 


18 


167 


802 


674 


128 


869 


331 


38 


11 


10 


89 


324 


2a5 


59 


214 


186 


28 


4 


2 


55 


170 


130 


40 


112 


97 


15 


8 


8 


1.583 


6,771 


5,546 


1,225 


2,157 


1,856 


301 


169 


112 



10 
6 
4 
12 
13 
3 
6 
1 
2 



67 



8UPEBI0B EDUOATIOW. 



401 



Tablb XXII. — Superior education by age, aex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

PBOVINCE OP MATANZAa 



Under 18 years 

lb and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to a* years 

85 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

56 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

The province 



All classes. 



3 



202 

145 
67 
318 
362 
332 
583 
848 
183 
72 



2,613 






121 

84 

32 

220 

230 

238 

467 

276 

149 

62 



1,888 



£ 



81 
62 
36 
96 

123 
04 

116 
72 
34 
10 



725 



Native white. 



1 



100 
133 

57 
246 
271 
250 
436 
240 
124 

45 



2.000 






113 

75 

27 

164 

174 

179 

335 

176 

94 

35 



1,372 



fa 



n 

57 
80 
82 
97 
80 
101 
64 
30 
10 



628 



Foreign white. 



& 



7 
8 
7 

66 
83 
60 
142 
107 
57 
27 



573 



6 
7 
4 

55 
63 
58 
128 
09 
53 
27 



501 



fa 



1 

1 

3 

11 

20 

11 

13 

8 

4 



72 



Colored. 



3 

o 
H 



5 
6 

a 

6 
8 
4 
5 
I 
2 



40 



I 



2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
1 
2 



15 



I 



8 
i 
2 
6 
6 
8 
2 



26 



PROVINCE OP PINAR DEL BIO. 



Under 18 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 


46 

24 

20 

fiS 

118 

110 

157 

121 

42 

16 


34 

12 

19 

72 

100 

04 

134 

112 

39 

16 


12 

12 

1 

20 
18 
16 
23 
9 
3 


42 

21 
19 
84 
94 
84 
122 
68 
20 
5 


30 
10 
18 
65 
80 
72 
101 
62 
26 
5 


12 

11 

1 

19 
14 

21 
•6 
3 


2 
2 


2 

1 


...... 


2 

1 
I 

1 
2 


2 
1 
1 
1 
2 




21 to 24 years 


7 

22 
26 
34 
62 
13 
11 


6 
18 
22 
32 
49 
13 
11 


1 
4 
4 
2 
3 




25 to 20 years 




80 to 34 years 




35 to 44 years 


1 
1 


1 
1 




45 to 54 years... 




55 to 64 years 




66 years and over 


















The province... 


746 


682 


114 


668 


469 


99 


160 


154 


15 


9 


9 





PROVINCE OP PUERTO PRINCIPE. 



Under 18 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 


89 

63 

38 

187 

184 

198 

840 

205 

132 

46 


61 

88 

25 

141 

144 

148 

278 

169 

105 

43 


38 
25 
13 
46 
40 
50 
62 
36 
27 
8 


81 

60 

29 

130 

118 

146 

260 

139 

100 

84 


48 

35 

19 

92 

87 

108 

196 

105 

76 

31 


33 
25 
10 
88 
81 
43 
54 
34 
24 
8 


6 
3 
7 

52 
59 
45 
86 
60 
32 
10 


2 
3 
4 

44 
51 
38 
79 
64 
29 
10 


4 


2 


1 


1 


3 
8 
8 
7 
7 
2 
3 


2 
5 
7 
7 
4 


2 

5 
6 
7 
3 




21to24 years 




25 to 29 years 


1 


d0to84 years 




Si to 44 years 


1 


46to54 years 




66 to 64 years 








66 years and over — 


2 


2 




The province... 


1,482 


1,142 


840 


1,087 


792 


295 


366 


924 


42 


29 


26 


3 



PBOVINCE OP SANTA CLARA. 



Under 18 years 

18 and 10 years 

20 years --- 


99 

74 

51 

245 

3U2 

290 

486 

260 

114 

56 


69 

57 

80 

181 

250 

250 

441 

227 

108 

52 


30 
17 
21 
64 
52 
40 
45 
33 
11 
4 


89 

60 

38 

184 

216 

214 

337 

160 

77 

37 


66 

55 

21 

131 

182 

181 

806 

138 

67 

88 


24 
14 
17 
53 
34 
83 
31 
22 
10 
4 


2 
2 

8 
58 
74 
69 
138 
95 
34 
19 


1 
6 
47 
63 
65 
128 
66 
33 
19 


2 

1 

2 

11 

11 

4 

10 

9 

1 


8 
3 
5 
3 

12 
7 

11 
5 
3 


4 

1 
3 
3 
5 
4 
7 
3 
3 


4 

2 
2 


21 to 24 years 




25 to 29 years 


7 


3Uto34 years 


3 


35 to 44 years 


4 


45 to 54 years 


2 


55 to 64 years 




65 years and over 












The province. . 


1.077 


1,660 


817 


1,421 


1,179 


242 


499 


448 


51 


57 


33 


24 



24662- 



-26 



402 



BEPOET ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XXII. — Superior education by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

PBOVINCE OP SANTIAGO. 





All classes. 


Native white. 


Foreign white. 


Colored. 




• 

1 

Eh 


• 


1 


1 


• 


1 


• 

I 




• 

-a 

1 


ft 

1 


i 


4 
£ 


Under 18 yean 

ISandlOyeani 

20 years ...'. 


230 
176 

96 
850 
451 
453 
763 
440 
100 

76 


137 
101 

60 
252 
341 
359 
643 
374 
161 

64 


03 
75 
86 
08 

110 
04 

120 
75 
38 
12 


183 
137 

75 
242 
276 
313 
501 
306 
137 

48 


111 

73 

45 

171 

107 

238 

410 

236 

103 

40 


72 
64 
30 
71 
TO 
75 
01 
70 
34 
8 


17 

18 



77 

150 

120 

218 

128 

55 

22 


11 

14 

8 

66 

131 

108 

190 

124 

52 

20 


6 
4 

1 

11 

10 

12 

10 

4 

3 

2 


30 
21 
12 
31 
25 
20 
44 
15 
7 
6 


15 

14 

7 

15 

18 

13 

34 

14 

6 

4 


15 
7 
5 


21 lo 24 years 


16 


25 to 20 years 


12 


80 to 34 years 


7 


85 to 44 years 


10 


45 to 64 years . 


1 


66 to 64 years 


1 


65 years and oyer — 


2 


TheproTince... 


3,243- 


2,402 


751 


2,218 


1,624 


584 


814 


733 


^ 


211 


135 


76 



CITY OP HABANA 



Under 18 years 

18 and 10 years 

20 years ^ ^ 


585 
364 
185 
806 

1,138 
093 

1,525 
020 
436 
245 


464 

286 
137 
722 
932 
841 
1,277 
792 
366 
105 


131 

78 

48 

174 

201 

152 

. 248 

128 

70 

50 


525 
327 
151 
725 

708 
715 
1,077 
604 
242 
145 


413 
257 
111 
500 
652 
604 
806 
508 
200 
108 


112 

70 

40 

136 

146 

111 

181 

06 

42 

37 


80 

27 

26 

150 

303 

264 

425 

306 

100 

07 


27 

23 

22 

121 

250 

226 

364 

276 

164 

84 


12 
4 
4 
20 
44 
88 
61 
81 
26 
18 


21 

10 

8 

21 

32 

14 

23 

10 

4 

3 


14 

6 

4 

11 

21 

11 

17 



2 

8 


7 

4 

4 


21 to 24 years 


10 


25 to 20 years 


11 


80 to 84 years 


s 


85 to 44 years 

46 to 54 years..... .... 


6 

1 


66 to 64 years 


2 


65 years and over 


« * • »« m 


The city 


7,282 


6,002 


1,280 


5,300 


4,830 


070 

m 


1,827 


1,565 


262 


146 


98 


48 



CITY OP MATANZAS. 



Under 18 years 

18 and 10 years 

20 years 


a 

106 

70 

82 

166 

160 

140 

253 

157 

106 

32 


63 
44 

11 
108 
107 

08 
106 
114 

82 

20 


48 
86 
21 
58 
62 
42 
57 
43 
24 
3 


102 

74 

20 

121 

111 

06 

188 

117 

77 

17 


61 
30 
10 
75 
64 
66 
130 
70 
56 
14 

603 


41 
85 
10 
46 
47 
80 
48 
88 
21 
8 


8 
5 
3 
42 
55 
41 
62 
40 
28 
16 


2 
5 
1 
33 
42 
81 
65 
36 
25 
15 


1 

""2 

13 
10 
7 
5 
8 


1 


• • «»• • 


1 


21 to 24 years 


3 
3 
3 
3 


...... 

1 


3 


26 to 20 years 


2 


80 to 34 years 


2 


86 to 44t years 


1 


46 to 64 years 




65 to 64 years 


1 


1 




65 years and oyer 


...... 








5 




The city 


1,240 


862 


888 


932 


328 


294 


244 


50 


14 


9 



CITY OP PUERTO PRINCIPE. 



Under 18 years 

18 and 10 years 

20 years 


77 

44 

24 

100 

00 

118 

206 

125 

93 

29 


43 
25 

16 
81 
66 
81 
158 
94 
70 
28 


34 
19 

8 
28 
33 
87 
48 
31 
23 

1 


70 
42 

18 
86 
81 
101 
167 
97 
73 
20 


40 
23 
12 
63 
54 
64 
122 
66 
62 
10 


30 
10 

6 

23 
27 
37 
45 
31 
21 

1 


5 
2 
4 

20 
13 
12 
87 
28 
20 
7 


2 

2 

2 

15 

8 

12 

84 

28 

18 

7 


3 


o 

• 


1 


1 


2 
5 
5 
...... 


2 
3 
5 
6 
2 


2 
8 
4 
6 
2 




21 to24 years 

25 to 20 years 


i 


80 to 84 years 




86 to 44 years 




46 to 64 years 




66 to 64 years 


2 








66 years and oyer 


2 


2 




The city 


924 


662 


262 


756 


515 


240 


148 


128 


20 


21 


10 


2 



OCCUPATIONS. 



403 



Table XXII. — Superior education by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued^ 

CXTY OP CIENPUBQOS. 





Allclaasea 


Katiye white. 


Foreign white. 


Colored. 




• 


• 


i 

1 


• 




• 

o 
1 


1 


• 

,2 


• 


i 


1 


• 


Under 18 years 


24 
9 
11 
57 
67 
58 
85 
53 
16 
14 


21 
8 
9 
41 
52 
48 
72 
42 
16 
14 


a 

1 

2 
16 
15 
10 
13 
11 


24 

9 
8 

42 
46 
83 
58 
29 
8 
8 


21 
8 
7 

30 
38 
81 
51 
23 
8 
8 


3 
1 
1 

12 
8 
7 
7 
6 










18 and 19 years 














20 years 


2 

15 
17 
16 
25 
22 
6 
6 


1 
11 
14 
15 
20 
18 
6 
6 


1 

4 

3 
1 
5 
4 


1 


1 




21 to 24 years 




26 to 29 years 


4 
4 
2 
2 
2 


....„ 

1 
1 
2 


4 


80to84 years 


2 


86 to 44 years 


1 


45 to 64 years . .-_. 


1 


55 to 64 years... 




06 years and over 














The city 


394 


323 


71 


270 

1 


22S 


45 


10» 


91 


18 


15 


7 


8 



CITY OF SANTIAGO. 



Under 18 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

80 to 34 years 

36 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over.. 

Thecity 



142 


92 


50 


117 


77 


40 


8 


5 


3 


17 


10 


99 


53 


46 


77 


36 


41 


9 


9 




13 


8 


50 


82 


18 


38 


23 


15 


5 


4 


i 


7 


5 


187 


124 


63 


132 


84 


48 


41 


34 


7 


14 


6 


234 


166 


68 


141 


93 


48 


80 


66 


14 


13 


7 


224 


173 


51 


154 


111 


43 


59 


54 


5 


11 


8 


396 


325 


71 


273 


221 


52 


98 


85 


13 


25 


19 


249 


-302 


47 


181 


136 


45 


61 


60 


1 


t 


6 


116 


87 


29 


87 


62 


25 


23 


20 


3 


6 


5 


46 


87 


9 


28 


28 


5 


12 


10 


2 


6 

• 


4 


1,743 


1,291 


452 


1,228 


866 


363 


306 


347 


49 


119 


78 



7 
5 
2 
8 
6 
8 
6 
I 
1 
2 



41 



Table XXTU. — Grand groups of occupations, 

CUBA. 

TOTAL POPULATION. 

[Fignres in italic are included in those for the province or district.] 



Provinces. 



Habana...' 

Citvo/Habana 

Hatanzas 

PinardelBio 

Pnerto Principe . . . 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Cuba 



Total. 



424,804 
995,981 
202,444 
173.064 
88,234 
356,536 
827,715 



1.672,797 



Agricul- 
ture, 
fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



31,988 
715 
50,804 
48,697 
17,068 
81.951 
08,699 



299,197 



Trade 
and 
trans- 
porta- 
tion. 



39,715 
S1,S51 
9.407 
4,433 
3.004 
13.509 
9,270 



79,427 



Manu- 
factur- 
ing and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 



42.991 
51,913 
10,992 
8,685 
3,704 
16.817 
14.895 



93.084 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



4,553 

988 

390 

350 

1,400 

1,028 



8,736 



Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
service. 



64, n4 
l,0,3€6 
13,105 
10,699 
7,697 
30,836 
14,885 



141,936 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



240,843 
tt7,9Hl 
117.148 
105,202 
56.412 
211,924 
218,938 



950,467 



TOTAL MALES. 



Habana 

City of Habana 

Matanzas 

Pinardel Rio 

Puerto Principe - . . 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Cuba 



221,990 
lS3,Sr>8 
103,726 
91,688 
44,h99 
189.067 
163.845 



815,205 



31.944 
7tM 
46,496 
48.552 
17,(60 
80,866 
67.443 



2962,831 



89,440 
31, 135 
9,339 
4.390 
2,954 
13,503 
9,140 



I 



78,766 



38.083 

S8, 187 

9,532 

8,313 

2,963 

15,160 

12,991 



82,012 



3,820 
3,f}91 
767 
a59 
292 
1.069 
780 



7,096 



46,877 

g6, 79U 

5,587 

7,3o0 

4,093 

22,190 

10,162 



06,760 



62,376 
SS,3!*a 
32,005 
27.714 
17,547 
56.260 
63. S» 



250,231 



EEPORT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899, 
Tabla XXUL — Orand groupn of occupations — Continoed. 

CUBA— Cod tiuaed. 

TOTAL FEMALES. 

[TIffnTea in Italic are included In those for tbe prorlncs or diBtrict.] 



ProTlnoM. 


^^ 


Agricul- 
Usberles 


^■s- 

s 


ing and 


s 


W 


tlon. 




2M.8U 

11 

I«a!87D 


t.308 

1.086 

1.2SS 


™ 


4.968 
],9M 


733 
40 
£30 


IB, 837 

1 






1 






























Tsr.sre 


6.8«a 


•» 


ll.OK 


1.S40 


4B.1B7 











Plnardel EUo 

— 2oSS:?!;:: 



aHUfCtan 



TOTAL NATIVE WECITE. 



NATIVE WHITE MALES. 



NATIVE WHITE FEMALE!^. 



TOTAL FOREIGN WHITE. 



1,334 

BS8 



W% 





II 


31. M7 
as: 434 


,1 


■■ro 


1 .600 
( ,136 

1 

4:oa3 


3.086 

'oas 

IS 

«87 


1 

10, £88 


187. £84 




1 


1 

S9lt 




























910, 2W 


188.990 




S«,681 


8,980 


47. EM 















HIT 


m 


a>.08O 
38; 340 


11,484 

f:i 

ilaaa 


17,100 


£.544 

1 

887 


in 


ni" 


,^ 






1 
'i 


3S4 

873 

292 


i 
1 


sat 

4S! 


31 
































188.in7 


2»,K1« 


36,087 


4,880 























1S8.781 

,gi!l 

86.808 




108 
£9 


1,800 


361 

1 


!,1M 

;;a 

1,«H8 
'«88 


laiao 






w 










■sss 






Cnh« 


4«B.BB8 


883 


218 


4.817 


'■" 


8.096 


„,« 



w I st.snt is.iuif 14.703 a,zis si.;e<t k.h 



OCCUPATIONS. 



405 



Table XXIII. — Orand groups of occupations — Continued. 

CUBA — Continaed. 

FOREIGN WHITE MALES. 

pngures in italics are included in thoee for the province or district.] 



ProVinces. 



Habana ............ 

City of Habana 

Matanzas 

PinardelRio 

Puerto Principe . . . 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Cuba 



Total. 



64,162 
Uhl90 
11,850 
9,447 
8,409 
25.836 
11,446 



115,740 



Agricul* 
tnre, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



4,074 
t7S 
4,684 
5,802 
1,453 
11.322 
4,379 



31,214 



Trade 
and 
trans- 
porta- 
tion. 



25,398 
il,30U 
4,069 
2,204 
937 
6.207 
8,296 



42,123 



Manu- 
factur- 
iog and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 



8,674 

7,290 

1,418 

586 

819 

2,861 

995 



14,847 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



1,042 
891 
215 
92 
78 
805 
207 



1,987 



Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
service. 



12,566 

9,6t9 

957 

954 

672 

4,812 

2,184 



21,484 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



FOBEiaN WHITE FEMALES. 



2,419 
1,80U 
498 
810 
152 
829 
433 



4,635 



Habana 

City of Habana 

Hatansuis 

PinardelRio 

I^uerto Principe . . . 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Cuba 



14,809 
11,711 
3.385 
1,271 
539 
4,487 
1,867 



26,358 



2 

16 

4 

2 

19 

18 



56 



138 

108 

15 

*? 

41 
20 



245 



258 

25 

7 

8 

27 

81 



856 



208 

18S 

27 

7 

9 

87 

12 



295 



1,282 

i,ies 

149 
84 
68 

134 
76 



1,758 



12,916 
10,083 
8.153 
1,188 
451 
4,229 
1,716 



23,668 



TOTAL COLORED. 



Habana 

City of Habana. 

Matan»» 

PinardelRio 

Puerto Principe 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Cuba 



112,214 
67,51*8 
84,527 
47,489 
17,847 
111,768 
146,605 



520.400 



6,788 

lk7 

26,892 

11.534 

3,107 
24.763 
28,883 



100,967 



2,589 
9,008 
1,479 

4;i 

215 
1,675 
1.856 



7,625 



14,568 
11,966 
4,489 
1,326 
1,623 
6,864 
9,836 



38,647 



COLORED MALES. 



Habana 

City of Habana 

Matanzas 

PinardelRio 

Puerto Principe . . . 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 

Cuba 



268 

tl5 
63 
16 
29 

100 
94 



664 



29,771 
90,609 
8,940 
6,282 
2,917 
16,102 
8,466 



71,478 



60,900 


6,766 


2,558 


11,669 


284 


14,880 


99,198 


189 


1,986 


8,899 


199 


9,SSS 


41,552 


21,732 


1,441 


3.665 


64 


2,481 


23,668 


11,476 


408 


1,186 


14 


8,043 


8.825 


3.104 


195 


1,895 


26 


1.069 


56,960 


28,938 


1,549 


6,117 


77 


9,234 


70,107 


27,824 


1,274 


8,576 


74 


4.505 


262,002 


94,840 


7,425 


32,598 


479 


35,162 



66,264 
S3,S10 
48,714 
28,871 
9,956 
62,864 
97,970 



801,129 



14,898 

8,579 

12.229 

T.541 

8,036 

16.035 

27,864 



81,668 



COLORED FEMALES. 



Habana 

City of Habana. 

Matanzas 

PinardelRio 

Puerto Principe 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 



Cuba 



61,224 
S8,l,S0 
42,075 
23,771 
9,022 
64.818 
76,498 

268,308 




81 


2.900 


19 


14.891 


48,861 


91B 


^'2£7 


16 


11,969 


9h,7S8 


38 


774 


9 


6.509 


81,485 


8 


140 


1 


2.239 


21,330 


20 


238 


8 


1.848 


6,930 


26 


747 


28 


6.868 


46, 3:29 


82 


1,260 


20 


8,961 


70.118 



2UU 



6,049 



75 I 36,816 I 219,641 



406 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XXIV. 



Province op Habana. • 

TOTAL POPULATION. 
[Fignres in italic are included in those for the province or district.] 



Districts. 



Aernacate 

Alquizar 

Bafnoa 

Batabano 

Banta 

Bejncal 

Cano 

Casiffuas 

Catalina 

Ceibadel Agoa 

Quanabacoa 

City of Guanabac€>a.. 

Gnara 

Qnines 

Qnira de Melena 

Habana 

Cityof Habana 

IsladePinos 

Jamco 

Madruga 

Managua 

Maranao 

Melena del Sur 

NuevaPaz 

Pipian 

Suivican 
egla 

Ralud 

San Antonio de las Vegas 
San Antonio de loe Bancs 

San Felipe 

San Jose de las Lajas 

San Nicolas 

Santa Cruz del Norte 

Santa Maria del Rosario. 

Santiago de las Vegas 

Tapaste 

VeredaNueva... 

The province 



Total. 



3,163 
8,746 
1.725 
6,523 
5,142 
6,756 
4,210 
' 1.004 
2,718 
2,197 

20,080 

IS, 965 
1,835 

11,304 

11,548 
242.055 
SSf^,981 
8,109 
4,076 
3,744 
2,887 
8,593 
3,207 
7.761 
1,101 
2,423 

11,363 
3,298 
1,^55 

12,631 
1.915 
4,154 
4,5C8 
2,965 
2,7:» 

10,276 
1,551 
2,416 



424,804 



Agrricul- 


Trade 


ture, 


and 


fisheries. 


trans- 


and min- 


porta- 


ing. 


tion. 


461 


128 


2.300 


241 


545 


36 


1,105 


770 


1.647 


164 


501 


280 


1,296 


105 


168 


19 


597 


58 


608 


76 


1,770 


1,117 


19 


9S6 


871 


32 


2,101 


468 


2,848 


890 


1.441 


31,600 


715 


31,351 


• 408 


140 


913 


137 


608 


107 


707 


56 


723 


705 


684 


03 


1,181 


217 


243 


5 


415 


62 


11 


,1,085 


930 


70 


468 


29 


2,200 


506 


176 


67 


456 


151 


850 


127 


761 


54 


650 


109 


917 


473 


245 


27 


591 


43 


31,968 


88,715 



Mann- 
factur- 
ing and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 



113 

345 

79 

258 

92 

670 

118 

9 

58 

72 

1,709 

1,603 

57 

517 

460 

32,251 

51,913 

84 

152 

107 

86 

674 

116 

200 

4 

85 

1,226 

n 

45 

1,223 

57 

161 

142 

40 

55 

1.580 

21 

43 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



12 
16 

8 
27 



25 
16 

8 
11 

8 
245 

in 
8 

58 

80 

3.706 

S,65S 



24 
7 
7 

77 
6 

21 



Domes' 

tic and 

personal 

service. 



6 

60 

7 

5 

47 

14 

16 

10 

6 

9 

50 

8 

3 



42,991 I 4,668 



619 
830 
207 
680 
206 
651 
247 
238 
338 
107 

2.816 

9,501 
158 

1,356 

1,152 
41.689 
U),S66 
647 
450 
421 
285 

1,598 
350 

1.251 
243 
263 

1.973 
248 
111 

1.424 
893 
710 
874 
388 
227 

1,216 
349 
800 






64.714 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



1,990 
6.014 

8.788 
8.006 
8,720 
2,428 
606 
1,666 
1.381 
12.428 
8,68U 
1.214 
6,804 
6,661 
131.850 
127,981 
1,016 
2,400 
2,404 
1.746 
4.821 
1.948 
4,801 
606 
1,503 
7,058 
1,965 
1,187 
7,231 
1,208 
2,660 
2,666 
1.721 
1.671 
6.010 
906 
1.436 



240,848 



TOTAL MALES. 



Aguacate 

Ai9uizar 

Bainoa 

Bataban6 

Bauta 

Bejucal 

Cano 

Casiguas 

Catalina i 

Ceibadel Agua 

Quanabacoa 

City of Quanabacoa 

Guara 

Gttines 

Guira de Melena 

Habana 

Cityof Habana 

Islade JPinos 

Jaruco 

Madruga 

Managua 

Marianao 

Melena del Sur 

NuevaPaz 

Pipian 

QoiTic&Q 



1.640 


461 




4,814 


2,298 




058 


544 




8,600 


1,105 




2,837 


1,647 




2.788 


501 




2,340 


1,296 




561 


168 




1,353 


589 




1,174 


607 




9,W15 


1,770 




6,529 


19 




925 


8n 




•5,725 


2,098 




6,486 


2,846 




128.775 


1,428 




US, 2r>s 


7(ki 




1,782 


408 




2. 152 


912 




1,807 


696 




1,549 


707 




4,582 


718 




1,650 


08^3 




8,834 


1,181 




582 


243 




1.286 


415 





128 

237 

36 

767 

164 

288 

105 

19 

58 

74 

1,110 

931 

32 

465 

889 

31,392 

31, 135 

138 

ia5 

107 
56 

708 
91 

214 

5 

62 



112 


10 


477 


452 


305 


14 


576 


1,884 


30 


2 


86 


261 


254 


20 


488 


006 


01 


7 


160 


768 


655 


22 


450 


822 


116 


13 


206 


eos 


9 


2 


198 


166 


48 


8 


814 


836 


67 


2 


75 


](40 


1,886 


211 


1,093 


8.836 


1,S88 


191 


1,750 


t,S50 


57 


2 


151 


812 


479 


52 


1.078 


1,668 


456 


25 


902 


1,868 


28.521 


3,128 


28,024 


84,282 


28, 187 


3,091 


te, 79U 


SS,3U8 


84 


7 


614 


636 


121 


20 


317 


644 


107 


7 


873 


616 


82 


6 


240 


458 


504 


55 


1,158 


1,866 


96 


5 


288 


487 


187 


14 


1,021 


1,217 


4 




242 
286 


88 


81 


3 


480 



OCCUPATIONS. 



407 



Table XXIV— Continued. 
Province op Habana— Ck)ntinned. 

TOTAL MALES— Continued. 
[Figures in italics are included in those for the province or district.] 



Districts. 



Begla 

S^d 

San Antonio de las Vegas 

San Antonio de los Bancs 

San Felipe 

San Jose de las LiSjas 

SanKicol&s 

Santa Cruz del Norte 

Santa Maria del Roeario 

Santiago de las Vegas 

Tapaste 

VeredaNueva 

The province 



Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 
fisheries, 
and min- 
ing. 


Trade 
and 
trans- 
porta- 
tion. 


Manu- 
factur- 
ing and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
service. 


Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 


5,766 


11 


1,080 


1,107 


48 


1,675 


1,894 


1,787 


930 


70 


73 


3 


286 


475 


951 


467 


29 


44 


4 


95 


818 


6.631 


2,194 


i93 


1,061 


43 


961 


1,880 


9:19 


176 


66 


50 


9 


807 


882 


2,040 


456 


151 


160 


13 


676 


686 


2,543 


860 


127 


124 


7 


686 


740 


1.608 


761 


54 


36 


4 


312 


486 


1,410 


659 


106 


52 


7 


314 


870 


6,270 


916 


468 


1,318 


43 


906 


1,617 


849 


245 


27 


20 


8 


824 


280 


1,297 


501 


43 


43 


2 


286 


8ae 


221,990 


31.944 


39,440 


38,083 


8.820 


46,877 


62,876 



TOTAL FEMALES. 



Aguacate 

A&uizar 

Bainoa 

Bataban6 

Bauta 

Bejucal 

Cano 

Casiguas 

Catalina 

Ceibadel Agua 

Quanabacoa 

City of Quanabacoa 

Quara 

Gttines 

Quira de Melena 

Habana 

Cityof Habana 

Islade Finos 

Jaruco 

Madruga 

Managua 

Marianao 

Melena del Snr 

NuevaPaz 

Piplan 

Quivic&n 

aS&d infill.'.**'.*""':.'.',".'" 

San Antonio de las Vegas . . 
San Antonio de los Banos.. 

San Felipe 

San Jose de las Lajas 

SanNicolto 

Santa Cruz del Norte 

Santa Maria del Rosarlo . . . 

Santiago de las Vegas 

Tapaste 

VeredaNueva 

The province 



1.523 
3,932 

767 
2,923 
2,305 
8,018 
1,870 

443 

1,865 

1,023 

10,276 

7,455 

910 
6,660 
6,062 
115,280 
llf, Its 
1,417 
1.924 
1,937 
1.838 
4,011 
1.557 
3,927 

519 
1,187 
6.598 
1,506 

904 
6,000 

976 
2.114 
2,026 
1,362 
1.320 
5,006 

702 
1,119 






1 

40 
49 

4 

1 
15 

2 


2 
2 
1 
7 
2 
3 
3 
1 
8 
1 

84 

SI 

1 

6 

6 

678 

66U 

2 

4 


42 

254 

118 
92 
45 

101 
39 
41 
24 
82 

823 

751 
7 

278 

260 

13,665 

IS, 679 

33 

133 
48 
45 

435 
71 

230 

1 

27 

298 
12 
16 

448 
86 
85 

188 
71 
18 

808 
25 
14 


--...> .... 
2 
1 


4 


3 






1 








8 
1 




10 

5 

323 

S15 


8 

7 
5 




3 


3 
1 
217 
tl6 
2 
2 


88 

13 

8,730 

S,7t6 


13 
li 


1 


2S 






4 

80 
20 
13 


1 

22 

1 

7 


6 

1 


3 
2 
3 








4 

119 


2 

18 
4 
1 
6 
5 
8 
8 
2 
2 
7 




5 


1 
6 

1 




1 

162 

7 

1 

18 

4 

3 

262 

1 


13 

1 












1 
5 


1 






1 








202,814 


44 


276 


4,958 


733 


18,837 



TOTAL NATIVE WHITE, 



Aguacate 
Alquizar . 
Bafnoa... 
Bataban6 
Bauta.... 
Bejucal .. 
Cano...., 



1,667 
5,472 
1,271 
4.131 
8,625 
4,4<t2 
3,328 



291 
1,432 
368 
686 
1,054 
339 
9d5 



56 

97 

22 

269 

n 

126 
57 



59 
185 

61 
137 

43 
454 

80 



8 
15 

8 
20 

8 
19 
14 



196 
184 
148 
803 
131 
456 
U4 



1,478 
8.630 

604 
8,817 
8,867 
8.80B 
1,826 

401 
1,380 



0,068 

.e,ssu 

908 
5,341 
4,793 
07,077 
94,653 
1.880 
1,766 
1,880 
1,288 
8,466 
1,468 
8,674 

618 
1,164 
5,164 
1,490 

885 
5,871 

876 
8,075 
1,816 
1,885 
1,801 
4.423 

676 
1,104 



178,467 



1,068 
3,560 



8,716 
8,318 
8,068 
^188 



408 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1809. 



Table XXIV— Continued. 
Provincb of. Habana— Gontinued. 

TOTAL NATIVE WHITE-Contlnued. 
[Figures in itallos are included in those for the prorince or disMct] 



Districts. 



CasiffUM 

Cataiina 

CeibadelAgna 

Quanabacoa 

Ctty of QuatiaJbacoa . . 

Ouara 

Gttines 

OuiradeMelena 

Ha^'f^T^a -• 

Citypf Habana 

Isla de jPinos 

Jaruco 

Madruga 

Managua 

Marianao 

MelenadelSnr 

Nneva Paz 

Pipian 

Quivic&n 

Regla 

Salnd 

Ban Antonio de las Vegas 
San Antonio de loe Banos 

San Felipe.... 

San Jose de las Lajas — 

San KicoUs 

Santa Cruz del Norte — 
8anta Maria del Rosario . 

Santiago de las Vegas 

Tapaste 

VeredaNueya 

The province 



Total. 



007 

2.040 

1,748 

13,160 

8,999 

i.aas 

7,002 
7,372 
119,816 
116,689 
2,480 
8,044 
2,423 
2.268 
4,758 
1,847 
4,390 
962 
1,772 
7,498 
2,874 
1,465 

9,8n 

1,209 
2,965 
2,797 
1,706 
2,002 
7,160 
1,260 
2,142 



248,619 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries. 

and min- 
ing. 



106 
898 
448 

1«281 

IS 

265 

1,384 

1,791 
754 
t9h 
255 
651 
435 
403 
464 
436 
765 
163 
803 
8 
746 
846 

1,449 
142 
287 
532 
479 
467 
660 
153 
518 



21,124 



Trade 

and 

trans- 

I>orta- 

tion. 



10 

29 

43 

666 

h68 
11 

191 

150 
8,027 
7, Mi 
78 
79 
41 
31 

286 
40 
89 



27 

426 

41 

12 

252 

27 

93 

60 

27 

62 

161 

12 

27 



11,690 



Manu- 
factur- 
ing and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 



5 
47 
45 

763 

695 
87 

277 

250 
13,812 
19,155 
57 
09 
54 
47 

306 
71 

HI 

4 

56 

721 
60 
84 

906 
85 
94 
64 
21 
29 

960 
13 
89 



19,600 



Profes- 
sional 
seryioe. 



2 

8 

1 

179 

169 

2 

44 

20 

2.396 

9,S66 

6 

22 

5 

5 

63 

6 

19 



5 

48 

6 

4 

41 

10 

16 

8 

6 

6 

86 

2 

3 



3,065 



Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
seryice. 



142 
252 
74 
1,321 
/,0U 
155 
638 
385 
9,668 
8,979 
168 
280 
219 
255 
411 
102 
415 
235 
138 
988 
243 
56 
786 
164 
450 
3S8 
141 
197 
665 
809 
281 



21.006 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



402 
1,806 
1,187 
9.041 
5,860 

035 
4.706 
4.776 
85.670 
89,85U 
1.616 
1,943 
1,669 
1,437 
8,226 
1.192 
2,991 

660 
1,243 
6,358 
1,778 
1.013 
5,941 

831 
2,016 
1,815 
1,081 
1,251 
4,768 

761 
1,828 



167.254 



NATIVE WHITE MALES. 



Aguacate 

Al^uizar , 

Bainoa 

Bataband 

Bauta.* 

Bejucal 

Cano 

Casiguas 

Cataiina 

CeitMi del Agua 

Guanatiacoa 

City of Quanabacoa . . 

Guara 

Gttiues 

Guira de Melena 

Habana 

Cityof Habana 

IsladeTinos 

Jaruco 

Madruga 

Managua 

Marianao 

Melena del Sur 

NuevaPaz 

Pipian 

Ouiyic&n 

Begla 

Sahid 

San Antonio de las Vegas 
San Antonio de lus Bancs 

San Felipe 

San Jose de las Lajas 

SanNiooUus 



826 


291 


66 


68 


6 


175 


2,837 


1.431 


95 


168 


13 


ISO 


690 


868 


22 


17 


2 


90 


2,003 


686 


260 


134 


14 


283 


1.932 


1,054 


n 


43 


7 


118 


2,049 


339 


125 


446 


17 


430 


1,735 


935 


57 


80 


11 


109 


871 


106 


10 


5 


1 


131 


966 


893 


29 


88 


5 


249 


897 


448 


43 


41 


1 


64 


6,807 


1,281 


563 


649 


146 


1,197 


8,767 


IS 


457 


686 


189 


951, 


602 


255 


11 


87 


2 


151 


. 8,879 


1,332 


189 


251 


39 


478 


8,907 


1,791 


149 


246 


16 


340 


65,198 


751 


7,941 


12,173 


2,019 


8,502 


69, 9W 


999 


7'% 


H,998 


9,001 


7,889 


1,809 


255 


77 


57 


5 


464 


1,574 


651 


77 


51 


19 


257 


1.100 


435 


41 


54 


5 


198 


1,206 


493 


81 


45 


4 


240 


2,307 


463 


284 


275 


43 


817 


041 


435 


89 


60 


5 


88 


2,109 


765 


89 


109 


13 


890 


485 
872 


163 
808 




4 

53 




235 

184 


27 


3 


8,512 


8 


423 


680 


86 


872 


1,524 


746 


41 


60 


2 


236 


717 


345 


12 


S3 


3 


51 


4,701 


1,444 


248 


789 


37 


670 


588 


141 


27 


29 


7 


148 


1,887 


287 


93 


94 


13 


448 


1,487 


532 


50 


57 


6 


802 



240 
080 
191 

TOT 



683 

543 

118 

272 

800 

2,471 

1,616 

236 

1.080 

1,365 

23,807 

99,979 

451 

519 

867 

893 

025 

314 

743 

83 

352 

1.486 

439 

273 

1,513 

286 

432 

540 



OCCUPATIONS. 



409 



Table XXIV— Continued. 
Peovince of Habana— Ck)ntinned. 

NATIVE WHITE MALES—Contlnued. 
[Figures in italics are included in those for the province or district.] 



Districts. 


Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 
fisheries, 
and min- 
ing. 


Trade 

and 

trans 

I>orta- 

tlon. 


Manu- 
factur- 
ing and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
service. 


Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 


Santa Cruz del Norte 

Santa Maria del Boeario 

Santiago de las Vegas 

Tapaste 


^884 

1,QB9 

8,406 

667 

1,U9 


479 
457 
680 
168 
618 


27 
62 
161 
12 
27 


20 
27 
766 
13 
80 


4 
6 
80 
2 
2 


118 
191 
681 
296 
231 


276 

286 

1,289 

192 


Vereda Nueva. -. 


807 






The province — 


U6,888 


21,104 


11,484 


17,700 


2,544 


18,942 


45,064 



NATIVE WHITE FEMALES. 



Aguacate 

Alquizar 

Bamoa 

Bataban6 

Bauta 

Bejucal 

Cano 

Caaiffuas 

CataUna 

Ceibadel Agua 

GnanabacoA 

City of Chianctbacfia . . 

Guara 

Giiines 

Guira de Melena 

Habana 

CitypfJBabana 

Isla doTinos 

Jaruco 

Madruga 

Managua 

Marianao 

Melena del Sur 

Nueva Paz 

Pipian 

Qulvic&n 

Begla 

Salud 

Ban Antonio de las Vegas 
San Antonio de loe Banos 

San Felipe 

San Jo66 de las Lajas 

SanKicol&s 

Santa Cruz del Norte 

Santa Maria del Roeario . 
Santiago de las Vegas — 

Tapaflte 

Vereda Nueva 

The province 



841 
2.635 

581 
2,088 
1,693 
2,413 
1,593 

296 
1,054 

851 
6,848 
U,U7S 

703 
8,718 
8,466 
64,628 
69,699 
1,171 
1,470 
1,823 
1.062 
2,461 

906 
2,281 

477 

900 
8,961 
1,860 

748 
4,676 

621 
1,608 
1,810 

781 

973 
8,754 

683 
1.023 



126,781 



2 



3 
B 



1 
1 



1 
5 
1 



20 



2 

1 



2 

1 

80 

86 
1 
2 



2 

1 



2 

i" 



106 



1 
17 
44 

3 



8 



9 
4 

114 

109 



28 
4 

1,139 
i,M7 



18 



2 
83 
11 

2 



8 

41 



1 

119 

6 



7 

1 

2 

186 



1,800 



2 
2 
1 
6 
1 
2 
3 
1 
3 



38 

SO 



5 
4 

376 

565 

1 

3 



1 

20 

1 

6 



2 
12 
4 
I 
4 
8 
8 
2 
2 



6 



611 



20 

84 

68 

20 

18 

17 

5 

11 

8 

10 

124 

90 

4 

60 

46 

1,166 

IfUO 

28 

21 
16 
94 
14 
25 



4 

66 

7 

5 

116 

16 

11 

26 

23 

6 

84 

14 



2,154 



818 
2,679 

478 

in 

£,885 
1,685 

284 
1,034 

837 
6,570 

h,eu6 

699 
8,618 
8,411 
01,863 
69,869 
1,166 
1,424 
1,802 
1.044 
2,801 

878 
2,248 

477 

891 
8,800 
1,389 

740 
4,428 

605 
1,584 
1,275 

756 

965 
8,479 

669 
1.022 



122,190 



TOTAL FOREIGN WHITE, 



Aguacate 

Alquizar 

Bainoa 

Bataliano 

Bauta 

Bejucal 

Cano 

Casignas 

Catalina 

Ceiba del Agua 

Guanabacoa 

City of Chuanabacoa 

Guara 

GtUnes 



205 


62 


55 


21 


3 


17 


833 


298 


111 


29 


1 


271 


74 
878 


41 
175 


12 
466 


8 
68 




1 
63 


7 


440 


218 


80 


12 


1 


43 


416 


62 


149 


60 


4 


17 


896 


173 


47 


10 


2 


100 


28 
162 


9 

58 


9 
27 




1 
2 


2 

20 


4 


170 


76 


29 


8 


2 


11 


1,484 


218 


496 


128 


60 


170 


1,091 


6 


m 


lis 


U 


166 


89 


33 


20 


5 


1 




888 


294 


218 


40 


9 


78 



47 
128 

17 
110 

86 
125 

64 
2 

41 

44 
428 
8S8 

au 

194 



410 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XXIV— Continued. 



PBOvmcE OF Habana— Ooiitinned« 

TOTAL FOBEIGN WHITE— Confcinuod. 
[Pigrares in italics are Included in those for the province or district.] 



Districts. 



Gnira de Helena 

Habana 

Cityof Habana 

Islade Finos 

Jaruco 

Madruflra 

Managua 

Marianao 

Helena del Sur 

NueyaPaz 

Pi plan 

Quivican 

ftogla 

SaUid 

Ban Antonio de las Veeas 
San Antonio de los Bancs 

San Felipe 

San Jose de las Lajas 

San Nicolas 

Santa Cruz del Norte 

Santa Haria del Rosario. 

Santiago de las Vegas 

Tapaste 

VeredaNueva 

The province 





Agricul- 


Trade 




ture, 


and 


Total. 


fisheries. 


trans- 




and min- 


porta- 




ing. 


tion. 


1,221 


373 


205 


53. sn 


378 


21,567 


6i,yoi 


vu 


tl,hl2 


196 


62 


49 


206 


92 


42 


280 


92 


54 


110 


51 


21 


1,159 


96 


844 


126 


46 


36 


377 


152 


93 


33 


22 


6 


148 


58 


82 


1,666 


6 


575 


193 


110 


29 


65 


29 


17 


1,220 


337 


234 


125 


15 


34 


189 


69 


53 


230 


107 


58 


186 


62 


22 


108 


41 


42 


1,202 


120 


290 


68 


84 


13 


101 


88 


13 


68,971 


4,076 


25,5315 



Hanu- 
factur- 
ing and 

mechan< 
ical in- 

dustriea 



50 

7.604 

7,51S 

12 

19 

18 

14 

163 

15 

20 



8 
206 
5 
8 
83 
7 

28 

33 

• 7 

7 

246 

2 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



9 

1,095 

1,07U 

3 

2 

2 

1 

11 



8,992 



11 
1 
1 
6 
4 



8 
9 
1 



1,245 



Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
service. 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



397 

11,220 

10,79t 

61 

2 

12 

1 

318 



46 



16 
869 



1 

263 

24 

14 

1 

2 

1 

288 

7 

26 



13,84; 



187 
12,013 
11,8S7 
21 
48 
58 
2S 

232 

29 

65 

6 

34 

500 

48 

4 

297 
41 
40 
29 
43 
14 

249 

a 

24 



15,336 



FOREIGN WHITE MALES. 



Affuacate 


171 
727 

57 
764 
358 
306 
335 

19 

113 

125 

1,113 

SOU 

62 

664 

1.059 

42.UU8 

Ul,190 

185 

160 

182 

88 
932 

97 
318 

28 

120 

1,229 

151 

50 
974 

87 
155 
204 

97 

92 
997 

58 

77 


62 

293 

41 

175 

218 

62 

173 

9 

58 

76 

218 

6 

83 

294 

873 

876 

t7t 

52 

92 

92 

61 

96 

46 

152 

22 

58 

5 

110 

29 

837 

15 

59 

107 

62 

41 

130 

34 

38 


55 
109 

12 
453 

80 
149 

47 
9 

27 

27 
493 

lau 

20 

218 

205 

21,459 

tl.SOh 

48 

42 

*64 

21 

343 

86 

92 

5 

82 

672 

29 

17 

225 

83 

53 

58 

22 

41 

i:j 
13 


21 
29 
2 
68 
12 
50 
10 


3 
1 


17 

268 


13 


Ainuizar ...... 


27 


Balnoa 


2 


Batabano 


6 


42 
42 

11 
99 


20 


Bauta 


6 


Bejucal 

Cano - - 


4 
2 

1 

2 

1 

50 


21 

4 


Casif^uas .' 




Catalina 


4 

8 

128 

108 

5 

40 

50 

7,382 

7,990 

12 

19 

18 

14 

150 

14 

20 


18 

11 

146 

m 


4 


Ceiba del Agna 


2 


Guanabacoa - 


88 


City of Ovanabacoa 

Guara 


77 
4 


Gilines 


8 
8 
909 
891 
2 
1 
2 
1 
9 


77 

380 

10,053 

9,6f9 

60 


27 


Guira de Helena 


84 


Habana .-.. 


1.829 


City of Habana 


1,80L 


Islade Pinos 


11 


Jaruco. 


6 


Madruflra 


10 


6 


Managua 


1 


Harianao .- 


296 


38 


Helena del Sur.... 


1 


Nu«va Paz . . .... 




40 


14 


piptffTi 




1 


Q^fi vican r 


8 
198 
5 
3 
81 
7 

23 

33 

6 

7 

341 

2 




15 
360 


7 


fiegla 


11 
1 
1 
5 
2 


83 


Salud 


6 


San Antonio de las Vegas 

San Antonio de los Bancs — 
San Felipe 






254 
24 

14 


72 
6 


San Joa6 de las Lajas 

San Nicolas 


6 


1 


6 


Santa Cruz del Norte 




7 


Santa Maria del Rosario ..... 


1 
9 

1 




2 


Santiago de las Vegas 

Tapaste 


277 

6 

26 


64 
2 


Vereda Nneva............ 












The nrovinoe.. ......... 


54,162 


4,074 


25,398 


8,674 


1,042 


12,555 


2,419 







k 



OCCUPATIONS. 



411 



Table XXIV— Continued. 
Province of Habana— Continued. 

FOREIGN WHITE FEMALES. 
[Figurc»8 in italics are included in those for the province or district.] 



Districts. 


Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 
fisheries, 
and min- 
ing. 


Trade 
and 
trans- 
porta- 
tion. 


Manu- 
factur- 
ing and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
service. 


Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 


Affuacate ....... 


34 

106 
17 

lU 
82 

110 

61 

4 

99 

45 

371 

987 
27 

169 

162 
11,860 
11,711 
13 
46 
48 
22 

227 

29 

68 

5 

28 

437 

42 

6 

246 
38 
34 
26 
39 
16 

205 
10 
24 












84 


AjqniTAr , . r ■ ^ 




2 






3 
1 
11 
1 
6 
I 
2 
2 


101 


Bainoa 




1 


i' 

1 


IS 


Batabano ,- 




3 


99 


Bauta 






80 


BeJucal 








104 


Cano ......... 










60 


Casisruas....... 










s 


Catalina 










87 


Ceiba del Airua 




2 
2 

g 




1 


42 


Onanabacoa 




5 

5 


- St 

39 


840 


City of Guanabacoa 


- --- 




get 


Qxiara . - -^ ^ ■ , 


i 
1 
1 

186 

18$ 

1 

1 


86 


OUines 








i 

8 
1,167 
1,163 

2 
2 

1 
17 


167 


Qnira de Melena . . . 








153 


Habana --.-.- 


2 


lie 

108 

1 


222 


10,184 

to, 083 

10 


atu of Hahana 


Isla de JPinos 


Jaruco .... ... 






43 


MadmgB- 








46 


Manairua r 










21 


Marianao 




1 


13 

1 


2 


194 


MelenadelSur 




28 


Nueva Paz 




1 


1 


6 


51 


Pinian ............ 




6 


Ouiyican 










1 
9 


27 


Regla 




3 


8 




417 


Salud 


42 


San Antonio de las Vegas 

Ban Antonio de los Banos 










1 
9 


4 




9 
1 


2 


1 
2 


226 


BanFeUpo 




85 


San Joe>ede las Lajas 

San Nicolas ... 






84 








1 


1 
2 

1 

11 
1 


24 


Santa Cruz del Norte 






1 


86 


Santa Maria del Rosarlo 




1 

4 


3 


12 


SantiaflTode las Vegas 




5 


185 


Tapaste 






9 


Vereda Nueva 










24 
















The province 


14,809 


' 2 


138 


258 


208 


1,292 


12,916 







TOTAL COLORED. 



Aguscate 

A^uizar 

Bafnoa 

Batabano 

Bauta 

Beju-'al 

Cano 

Casiguas 

Catalina 

Ceiba del Agua 

Onanabacoa 

City of Ouantibacoa 

Guara 

GtUnes 

Ouira do Melena 

Habana 

City of Hahana 

IsladePinos 

Jaruco 

Madruga 

Managua 

Marianao 

MelenadelSur 

Nueva Paz 

Pipian 

Qttivlcan 



1.291 


108 


17 


3,441 


575 


33 


380 


136 


2 


1.514 


244 


45 


1,077 


375 




878 


100 


14 


486 


188 




314 
526 


53 
141 






279 


84 




5,446 


276 


57 


U,6LS 


I 


59 


351 


83 


1 


8,460 


473 


59 


2,955 


682 


35 


68,362 


309 


2,015 


67,5!48 


!47 


S,008 


521 


96 


13 


826 


170 


16 


1,091 


171 


12 


509 


163 


4 


2,676 


163 


75 


1,234 


202 


17 


2,994 


264 


35 


106 
603 


58 
54 




3 



33 

131 

15 

53 

37 

157 

28 

4 

7 

19 

818 

795 

15 

2U0 

169 

11,336 

11,966 

15 

64 

36 

25 

208 

30 

69 



21 



2 



16 
16 



5 

1 

216 

915 



1 
3 



807 

375 

68 

224 

31 

78 

33 

95 

66 

22 

1,325 

1,999 

8 

740 

370 

20,811 

90,609 

118 

168 

190 

29 

860 

267 

790 

8 

lUO 



826 
1,327 
169 
948 
B27 
627 
£86 
160 
809 
150 
2,954 

s,m 

249 

1,992 

1,696 

83,676 

55.510 

279 

406 

683 

287 

1,363 

728 

1,836 

40 

316 



412 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XXIV— Continiied. 
Province op Habana — Ck>ntinned. 

TOTAL COLORED.— Continned. 
[Figures in italics are included in those for the proyinoe or district.] 



Districts. 



Begla 

Salud 

Ban Antonio de las Vegas. 
San Antonio de los Banoe . 

San Felipe 

Ban Jo86 de las Lajas 

Ban Nicolas 

Santa Cruz del Norte 

Santa Maria del Rosario. . . 

Santiago d« laa.Vegas 

Tapaste...^. 

VeredaNueva 

The province 



Total. 



2,204 

228 

835 

2,034 

581 

1,000 

1,541 

1,124 

620 

1,914 

233 

173 



113,214 



Agricul- 
ture, 
fisheries, 
and min- 
ing. 



Trade 

and 
trans- 
porta- 
tion. 



3 

74 

93 

414 

19 

110 

211 

220 

161 

217 

58 

40 






6,788 



36 



20 

61 

5 
19 

6 

5 
22 

2 

3 



2,589 



Manu- 
factur- 
ing and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domes- 
tic and 
I>ersonal 
service. 


299 

8 

8 

232 

15 

44 

45 

12 

19 

384 

6 

4 


1 


666 
5 

54 
375 
205 
287 
545 
240 

29 
263 

33 

43 
















5 




253 


14,559 


29,771 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



1,200 
180 
180 



888 
604 

m 

647 

406 

1.023 

134 

83 



68,264 



COLORED MALES. 



Aguacate 

Alquizar 

Bainoa 

Batahano 

Bauta 

Bejucal 

C^no 

Casiguas 

Cataiina 

Ceibadel Agua 

Guanabacoa 

City of Guanabacoa . . . 

Ouara 

Gliines 

Ouira de Melena 

Habana 

Cityof Habana 

Islade Finos 

Jaruco 

Madruga 

Managua 

Marianao 

Melena del Bur 

KuevaPaz 

Pil)ian 

guivican 
egla 

Salud 

San Antonio de las Vegas . 
^an Antonio de los Banos. 

Ban Felipe 

Ban Joe6 de las Lajas 

San Nicolas 

Santa Cruz del Norte 

Banta Maria del Rosario. . 

Santiago de las Vegas 

Tapaste 

VeredaNueva 

The province 



643 

1,260 

211 

743 

547 

383 

•270 

171 

254 

152 

2,385 

1,908 

171 

1,683 

1,520 

29,574 

f9, 1S8 

288 

418 

525 

255 

1,343 

612 

1,407 

69 

244 

1,024 

112 

184 

a56 

264 

518 

853 

583 

289 

867 

124 

101 


108 
574 
135 
244 
875 
100 
188 

53 
138 

83 

276 

1 

83 
4?i 
682 
301 
1S9 

96 
169 
171 
163 
159 
203 
264 

58 

54 
3 

74 

93 
413 

19 
110 
211 
220 
161 
216 

68 

40 


17 

33 

2 

45 

7 
14 

1 


33 

108 

11 

52 

36 

150 

26 

4 

6 

18 

614 

591* 

15 

188 

160 

8,966 

8,899 

15 

54 

86 

23 

169 

22 

58 


1 


285 

158 

5 

163 








1 








67 
47 


2 
4 

54 

50 

1 

58 

35 

1,992 

1,986 

13 

. 16 

13 

4 

76 
16 
33 


1 


16 
15 


650 
650 


5 

I 

200 

199 


583 

178 

9,469 

9,SSS 

90 

60 

106 




1 
3 


645 

200 

591 

7 

87 
443 


1 


3 
35 


20 

220 

8 

8 

191 

14 

43 

34 

10 

18 

312 

5 

4 


i' 






' 44 

57 

135 

213 

884 

194 

23 

60 

23 

29 


'26 
6 
5 

19 
6 
5 

21 
2 
3 










""" 


4 






60,990 


6,766 


2,558 


11, (VW 


234 


14,880 



199 

377 

68 

239 

129 

118 

55 

47 

00 

47 

776 

668 

72 

486 

408 

8,646 

8,679 

74 

119 

142 

64 

383 

172 

460 

4 

80 

818 

80 

89 

275 

90 

147 

204 

153 

82 

264 

36 

26 



14,898 



COLORED FEMALES. 



Aguacate 
Alquizar . 
Bafnoa... 
Batabano 
Bauta.... 
Bejucal.. 



648 
1,191 
169 
771 
530 
495 



1 
1 



I 



23 
4 

1 
1 

7 



22 

217 

58 

61 

31 
78 



950 
HI 
700 
498 
408 



OCCUPATIONS. 



413 



Table XXIV— Continued. 



Province of Habana — Continned. 

COLORED FEMALES— Continued. 
[Figures in italics are included in those for the province or district,] 



Districts. 



Caoo 

Casifiruas 

Catallna 

Ceibadel Agua 

Quanabacoa 

aty of Quanabacoa. . 

Ouara 

Gtiines 

Guira de Helena 

Habana 

Cityof Habana 

Ida de Finos 

Jaruoo 

Madruga 

BCanagua ........... . 

Marianao 

Helena del Sur 

NuevaPaz 

Pipian 

Quivican 

Regla 

Saind 

Bau Antonio de las Vegas 
San Antonio de los Banos 

San Felipe 

San Jose de las Lajas 

San Nicolas 

Santa Cruz del Norte,... 
Santa Maria del Rosarlo. 

Santiago de las Vegas 

Tapaste 

VeredaNueva 

TheproYince 



Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 
fisheries, 
and min- 
ing. 


Trade 
and 
trans- 
porta- 
tion. 


Manu- 
factur- 
ing and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 


Profes- 

sionai 

service. 


Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
service. 


216 
143 
272 
127 

8,061 

9, 67 k 
180 

1,787 

1,435 
88.788 
S8,US0 
233 
408 
566 
254 

1,833 
622 

1,587 

37 

259 

1,180 
114 
151 

1,078 
817 
482 
689 
542 
831 

1,047 

> 109 
72 






2 




83 

28 

19 

22 

675 

6lt2 

8 

217 

197 

11,342 

lUtea 

28 
108 

26 

29 
324 

57 

199 

1 

22 

2»» 

5 

10 
818 

70 

24 
161 

46 

6 

213 

10 

14 








8 

1 




1 

1 

204 

toi 








3 
9 


1 
1 




1 


1 


12 

9 

2,369 

t,S67 






8 
8 


23 

22 


16 
16 


1 




10 












2 
34 

8 
11 




4 






1 
2 




- - •- 










1 
70 
























1 




41 
1 
1 

11 
2 
1 

72 
1 
































1 


1 


1 
















61,224 


22 


31 


2,900 


19 


14,891 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



181 

U6 

S48 

108 

2,178 

1,898 

177 

1.566 

1,229 

26,080 

9hJS8 

205 

288 

641 

»71 
556 
1,376 
86 
286 
887 

loe 

141 

718 
246 
457 
617 
494 
824 
750 
96 
56 

43,361 



Peovince of Matanzas. 



TOTAL POPULATION. 



Alacranos 

Bolondron 

Cabezas 

Canasi 

Cardenas 

Cityof Cardenas 

Carlos Kojas 

Colon 

Cuevitas , 

Quamacaro 

JagUey Grande 

Jovellanos 

Hacagua 

Hacuriges 

Harti 

Matanzas 

Cityof Matanzas . . 

Hazimo Gomez 

Hendez Capote 

Palmillas 

Perico , 

Boque 

Sabanilla 

San Jos6 de los Bamos . 

Santa Ana 

Union de Reyes 

The province 



8,110 


2,808 


203 


808 


86 


482 


9,179 


8,270 


306 


311 


28 


457 


5,184 


1,786 


108 


66 


10 


66 


1,998 


749 


68 


49 


6 


106 


24,861 


2,526 


1,968 


2,259 


160 


2,893 


21,9W 


1,683 


1,888 


S,217 


162 


2,793! 


8,174 


1,261 


52 


77 


12 


93 


12,195 


2,741 


600 


576 


61 


984 


5,807 


2,068 


112 


247 


14 


272 


6,000 


2,241 


155 


161 


12 


185 


6,853 


1,870 


175 


126 


7 


179 


7,529 


1,817 


277 


421 


27 


384 


5.042 


1,431 


95 


105 


14 


124 


10,405 


3,705 


292 


340 


22 


219 


8,905 


3,066 


301 


475 


24 


188 


45,282 


4,752 


3,472 


4,242 


447 


5,102 


S6,S7U 


1,8S3 


S,SS8 


U,U5 


1*26 


h,608 


4,046 


1,364 


109 


124 


11 


119 


2,158 


1,086 


23 


21 


3 


99 


7,647 


2.602 


248 


214 


22 


320 


4,449 


1,577 


157 


207 


•12 


157 


4,464 


2,013 


66 


63 


8 


145 


5,205 


1,651 


116 


117 


12 


165 


6,765 


2,168 


180 


176 


16 


96 


2,965 


1,031 


56 


41 


7 


48 


5,226 


1,256 


274 


271 


13 


275 


202,444 


60,804 


9,407 


10.992 


988 


13,105 



4,883 

4.812 
8,153 
1,013 
15, OM 
15,199 
1,679 
7,233 
8.074 
8,246 
8,406 
4,608 
8,273 
6,827 
4,856 
27,267 
22, 05k 
2,319 
976 
4.241 
2,339 
2,169 
8,145 
4,129 
1,782 
8,137 



117,148 



414 



BEPOBT ON THE CEKSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XXIV— Continued. 
Pbovincb of Matanzas— Continued. 

TOTAL HALES. 
[Fiinures in Italics are included in those for the province or district.] 



Districts. 



Alacranes 

Bolondron 

Cabezas 

Canasi 

Cardenas 

Cityof Cctrdenas . . 

Carlos tfojas 

Colon 

Cuevitasi 

Quamacaro 

JagUey Grande 

Jovellanos 

Macagua 

Macuriges 

Marti 

Matanzas 

City of Matanzas . . 

Maximo Gomez 

Mendez Capote 

PalmiUas 

Perico 

Roque 

Babanilla 

San Jos6 de los Ramos 

Santa Ana 

Union de Beyes 

The province 



Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries. 

and min- 
ing. 


Trade 
and 
trans- 
porta- 
tion. 


Manu- 
factur- 
ing and 
mechan 
ical in- 
dustries. 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
service. 


4.573 


2,481 


198 


279 


30 


182 


4,850 


2,866 


303 


294 


19 


136 


2,606 


1,701 


103 


66 


8 


49 


1,065 


728 


67 


37- 


6 


87 


11.744 


2,898 


1.963 


1,948 


188 


934 


10,206 


1,6S9 


1,88S 


1,907 


ISS 


873 


1,615 


992 


52 


66 


6 


24 


6,215 


2.676 


602 


529 


48 


423 


8,138 


1,897 


111 


232 


11 


88 


8.090 


1.866 


155 


167 


8 


64 


3,002 


1,857 


174 


126 


4 


78 


3.673 


1,432 


276 


414 


20 


194 


2,666 


1.427 


05 


105 


11 


98 


6,452 


8,125 


287 


335 


16 


138 


4,931 


2,602 


801 


470 


20 


120 


21,905 


4,718 


8,438 


. 8,333 


348 


2.432 


16,926 


1,805 


s.sou 


S,217 


SS3 


2,005 


2.102 


1,171 


109 


130 


7 


61 


1.344 


918 


23 


21 


3 


22 


4,155 


2,367 


246 


174 


15 


100 


2,486 


1,415 


157 


204 


10 


86 


2.577 


1,865 


66 


62 


4 


69 


2,678 


1,639 


116 


HI 


6 


70 


8,652 


2. 061 


180 


173 


13 


58 


1,677 


1.081 


56 


41 


6 


88 


2,622 


1,163 


272 


235 


11 


82 


106,726 


46.406 


9,339 


9,632 


767 


6.687 



WitLont 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



1.40B 

1,28S 

678 

2U 

4.863 

5,771 

475 

1.M7 

804 

850 

868 

1.237 



1,661 

1.3S8 

7.636 

6,26k 

634 

857 

1,244 

614 

611 

737 

1,147 

405 

859 



32.005 



TOTAL FEMALES. 



Alacranes 

Bolondron 

Cabezas 

.Canasi 

Cardenas 

Cityof Cardenaa . . 

Carlos Kojas 

Colon 

Cuevitas 

Gnamacaro 

Jagiley Grande 

Jovellanos 

Macagua 

Macuriges 

Marti 

Matanzas 

City of Matanzas . . 

Maximo Gomez 

Mendez Capote 

PalmiUas ^ 

Perico 

Roque 

Sabanilla .• 

San Jo66 de los Ramos 

Santa Ana 

Union de Reyes 

The province 



3,537 

4,329 

2,579 

906 

13,117 

11, 754 

1,559 

5.980 

2,669 

2.910 

2,761 

3,056 

2,377 

4,963 

3.974 

23,377 

19,U48 

1.944 

814 

3,492 

1,963 

1.887 

2.627 

3,113 

l,;js8 

2,6(M 



98,718 



322 

404 

85 

21 

128 

kS 

269 

65 

191 

385 

13 

385 

4 

580 

374 

34 

18 

193 

118 

235 

162 

148 

12 

87 



93 



4,308 



5 
3 



1 
5 

5 



2 



1 
1 



34 

5A 



68 



24 

17 



12 

311 

SIO 

11 

47 

15 

4 



6 
5 

909 

908 

4 



40 
3 
1 
6 
8 



36 



1,460 



6 

4 

2 

1 

31 

*9 

6 

13 

3 

4 

8 

7 

3 

6 

4 

99 

98 

4 



7 
2 
4. 
6 
8 
1 
2 



221 



250 

821 

17 

71 

1,950 

1,919 

60 

561 

189 

121 

101 

190 

26 

81 

63 

2,670 

2,605 

58 

77 

211 

71 

76 

05 

38 

10 

193 



7.618 



2.930 
3.680 
2.475 
802 
10,683 
9,Ui8 
1.204 
6.2B6 
2.270 
2,896 
2.643 
8,866 
2.344 
4,276 
3,528 
10,631 
15, 790 
1,685 
619 
2,997 
1.725 
1.658 
2.406 
2.982 
1.377 
2,278 



85,148 



TOTAL NATIVE WHITE. 



Alacranes. 
Balondron 
Cabezas... 
Canasi.... 



8,676 


808 


8,819 


1,055 


3,687 


1,197 


1,038 


400 



71 

114 

46 

37 



117 
111 

21 



26 


100 


2,464 


20 


88 


2,481 


7 


29 


2.870 


3 


83 


644 



OCOXJPATIOirS. 



415 



Table XXIV— Continued. 
Pbovincb op Matanzas— Continued. 



TOTAL NATIVE WHITE-Cantinaed. 
[Fl^rnres in Italics are Indnded in those for the provinoe or district] 



Districts. 



Cardenas 

Cityof Carderuu... 

Carlos Rojas 

Colon 

Cuevitas 

Quamacaro 

Jagttey Qrande 

Jovellanos •... 

Macagna 

Macnxiges 

Marti 

Mfttangiafl 

City of Matanzas .. 

Maximo Gomez 

Mendez Capote 

Palmillas 

Perlco 

Roqne 

Sabanilla 

Ban Jo86 de los Ramos 

Santa Ann 

Union de Reyes 

The proyince 



Total. 



14.085 
11,968 
1,179 
6,706 
8.087 
2,605 
3,674 
2,835 
2,524 
4,008 
4,126 
27,571 
t0,931 
1,788 
1,142 
8,337 
1,662 
2,066 
2,630 
2,673 
1,503 
2,237 



102,682 



Affricnl- 

ture, 
fisheries, 
and min- 
ing. 



1,150 

6US 

845 

1,051 

928 

700 

1,047 

860 

636 

1,054 

1,106 

2,906 

857 

486 

405 

844 

886 

800 

797 

728 

515 

417 



20,212 



Trade 

and 
trans- 
porta- 
tion. 



850 
818 
11 
207 
30 
55 
68 
96 
26 
86 
85 
1,633 
l,56t 
40 
10 
87 
49 
22 
37 
42 
22 



3,824 



Mana- 
factnr- 
ing and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 



1,220 

1,199 

30 

245 

80 

67 

72 

104 

41 

188 

214 

2,051 

1,979 

46 

12 

80 

83 

84 

33 

52 

15 

108 



6,115 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



107 

lOf 

7 

44 

12 

9 

5 

21 

11 

13 

19 

304 

t91 

7 

2 

16 

8 

7 

10 

11 

7 

7 



683 



Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
service. 



637 

/498 
15 
168 
40 
46 
49 
74 
18 
60 
46 
1,520 
l,tOO 
24 
11 
58 
29 
28 
31 
15 
10 
40 



3,060 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



10,212 
8,701 
762 
8,901 
1,047 
1,728 
2,433 
£,080 
1,702 
£,667 
£,656 
19,156 
15,0US 
1,185 
702 
2,243 
1,107 
1.165 
1,722 
1,825 
1,024 
1,576 



69,789 



NATIVE WHITE MALES. 



Alacriines 

Balondron 

Cabezas 

CanaMi 

Cardenas 

Cityof Cardenas . . . 

Carlos RoJas 

Colon 

Cnevitas 

Quamacaro 

JagUey Orande 

Jovellanoe 

Macagua 

Macnriges 

Marti • 

Matanzas 

City of Matanzas . . 

Maximo Gomez 

Mendez Capote 

Palmillas 

Perico 

Roque 

Sabanilla 

Ran Josd de los Ramos 

Santa Ana 

Union de Reyes 

The province 



1,972 


897 


71 


1,947 


1,046 


113 


1,823 


1,176 


46 


579 


307 


86 


6,381 


1,138 


867 


6,S08 


636 


818 


592 


343 


11 


2.766 


1,047 


206 


1.583 


922 


30 


1,299 


682 


66 


1,835^ 


1,046 


68 


1,273 


366 


96 


1,258 


633 


26 


2,043 


1,046 


86 


2,163' 


1,096 


86 


12,887 


2,900 


1,624 


9,ei9 


867 


1,668 


911 


484 


40 


676 


405 


10 


1,728 


843 


87 


850 


884 


49 


1,147 


796 


22 


1.364 


794 


87 


1,396 


717 


42 


819 


515 


22 


1,093 


417 


88 


50,324 


20,080 


3,809 



118 

105 

88 

14 

1.054 

1,038 

32 

237 

76 

66 

72 

190 

41 

132 

211 

1,628 

1,866 

46 

12 

70 

88 

34 

33 

62 

15 

100 



4.401 



21 


76 


17 


30 


6 


27 


2 


19 


82 


302 


79 


f77 


2 


6 


32 


121 





28 


6 


28 


2 


35 


14 


56 


8 


16 


11 


44 


15 


44 


224 


1,160 


tie 


876 


4 


23 


2 


10 


10 


33 


6 


25 


3 


26 


4 


26 


8 


12 


6 


• 10 


1 5 


25 


0)6 


2.190 



794 
687 
681 
111 
2,948 

196 
1,122 
618 
462 
613 
660 
634 
725 
710 
6,292 
U,16t 
814 
837 
686 
808 
£66 
460 
666 
251 
468 



19,284 



NATIVE WHITE FEMALES. 



Alacranes 

Bolondron 

Cabezas 

Canasi 

Cardenas 

Cityof Cardenas 

Carlos Hojas 

Colon 



1.704 
1.872 
1,864 

458 
7,704 
6,6.% 

587 
2,941 


1 

9 

21 

3 

. 12 
8 
2 
4 




4 

6 


6 
8 

f 

25 

su 

5 
12 


24 

49 

2 

14 

235 

«i 

9 

47 


1 


1 
2 
2 


7 
166 

166 
7 
8 


i 



1,670 
l,8tH 
1.839 

433 
7,264 
6, 933 

564 
2,860 



416 



KEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF OITBA, 1809. 



Table XXIV— Continued. 



Province of Matanzas — Continned. 



NATIVE WHITE FEMALES— Continued. 
[FlflrnreB in Italics are Included in thoae for the province or diatrlet.] 



DiatrictB. 



Cuevitas 

Quamacaro 

Jaguey Orande 

Jovellanoa 

Macagua 

Hacuriees 

Marti 

Matanzas 

City of Matanzas . . 

Maximo Gk>mez 

Mendez Capote 

Palmillas 

Perico 

Roque 

SabaniUa..: 

San Jose de Ice Ramos 

Santa Ana 

Union de Reyes , 

The province 



TotaL 



1.454 

1,806 

1.689 

1.662 

1,286 

1,960 

1,962 

14,784 

11,71S 

877 

466 

1,609 

812 

90V 

1,276 

1,277 

774 

1,144 



62,858 



A(Kricul- 

ture, 
fisheries, 
and min- 
ing. 



6 
18 
2 
8 
8 
9 
8 
8 



1 
2 
4 

8 
11 



182 



Trade 
and 
trans- 
porta- 
tion. 



9 

9 



15 



Manu- 
factur- 
ing and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



4 

1 



1 

3 

428 

^23 



19 



8 



661 



3 
8 
8 
7 
8 
2 
4 
80 
75 
8 



6 

2 
4 
6 
3 
1 
2 



185 



Don&ea- 

ticand 

personal 

service. 



12 

18 
14 
19 

2 

6 

2 

351 

StS 

1 

1 

25 

4 

2 

5 

3 



15 



800 



gsBkinfizJ 



i 




50,506 



TOTAL FOREIGN WHITB. 



Alacranes...... ............ 


496 
789 
287 
81 
2,814 
f,081 
174 
824 
398 
359 
480 
411 
191 
699 
427 
4.512 
5,5U 
138 
126 
427 
267 
227 
401 
612 
251 
404 


245 
418 
184 

81 
208 
183 

89 
801 
184 
179 
241 
117 

82 
880 
118 
642 
ff6 

50 

92 
192 
110 
159 
181 
282 
129 
180 


92 

180 
38 
20 

929 

893 
82 

229 
69 
68 
86 

106 
51 

187 

141 

1,475 

IMS 

42 

11 

101 
49 
21 
46 
81 
30 

130 


88 
68 

14 

5 
811 
300 

8 
82 
60 
23 
12 
65 
27 
44 
83 
401 
377 
20 

4 
40 
37 

3 
19 
50 

7 
27 


8 

8 

8 

8 

42 

39 

5 

13 

2 

2 

2 

5 

8 

6 

5 

118 

110 

8 

• 1 

4 

3 

1 

2 

4 


85 
19 

6 

6 
194 
173 

8 
55 
14 
10 
15 
46 
14 
21 
12 
556 
lt83 

3 

1 

19 
14 

9 
21 
15 

3 
15 


83 


Bolondron 


161 


Cab«7Aff 


as 


Canasl _ 


16 


Cardenas 


669 


City of Cardenas 


iiSS 


Carlos no jas........ 


87 


Colon 


144 


Cuevitas 


08 


Gnamacaro 


87 


Jaguey Orande.. 


74 


Jovellanos .. 

Macagua 

Macuriges 


14 
161 


Marti 


68 


MatanzAj^... .,. r. 


1,390 


City of Matanzas 


1,0S7 


Maximo Oomez -....,. 


20 


Mendez Cai>ote 


17 


Palmillas 


71 


Perico 


44 


Roque .- . 


34 


Saraniila 


13S 


San Jose de loe Ramos 

SantA Atir -„. r - 


180 
82 


Union de Reves ...... .... 


4 


96 






The province........... 


15.285 


4,700 


4,104 


1,438 


242 


1,106 


3,645 







FOREIGN WHITE MALES. 



Alacranen, 


426 

628 

198 

64 

1,792 

l,6tU 

143 

692 

831 

269 

858 


244 

412 
184 

80 
268 
183 

89 
801 
184 
174 
241 


90 

129 

88 

20 

927 

89 1 

32 

228 

. 69 

58 

86 


38 

62 

14 

5 

302 

f9l 

8 

81 

60 

28 

12 


8 

2 

8 

8 

87 

36 

4 

12 

2 

2 

2 


28 

12 

6 

6 

157 

138 

8 

42 

13 

10 

15 


22 


Bolondron 


U 


Cnbezas 


8 


Canasi .............. ^ 




Cardenas 


100 


City of Cardenas.... ...... 


86 


Carlos KoJas - 


7 


Colon . 


28 


Cuevitaff .^..-r 


8 




2 


Jaguey Grande 


8 



rBi, lion 




ro/Fs- ^•' 



» 



} 

r 

» I 

i' 



OCCUPATIONS. 

Table XXIV.— Continued. 
Province op Matanzas — Continued. 

FOREIQN WHITB MALES-Contlnued. 
[Fifrnres in italics are inclnded in those for the provinoe or diBtrict] 



Districts. 



Jovellanos 

Macagna 

Macnrifires 

Marti 

Hatanzas 

City of MatanzoB 

Maximo Gomez x... 

Mend ez Capote. J 

Palmillas 

Perico 

Roqne 

Sabanilla 

San Jose de loe Ramos 

Santa Ana 

Union de Reyes 

TheproTlnoe 



TotaL 



180 
651 
870 
3.200 
9,696 
116 
112 
861 
213 
196 
271 
446 
174 
817 



11,860 



Ajrricul- 

•tnre, 
fisheries, 
and min- 
ing. 



116 
82 
829 
116 
641 
ff5 
49 
92 
192 
110 
159 
180 
281 
129 
130 



4,684 



Trade 
and' 
trans- 
porta- 
tion. 



106 

61 

137 

141 

1,468 

l,kl5 

42 

11 

99 

49 

21 

46 

81 

30 

lao 



4,089 



Mann- 
factnr- 
ingand 
mcKshan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 



66 
27 
44 
83 
889 
S66 
20 

4 
40 
35 

3 
19 
50 

7 
27 



1,413 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



5 
3 
5 
5 
101 
94 
2 
1 
4 
8 
1 
2 
4 



215 



Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
service. 



45 
14 
21 
12 
484 
kl9 

3 

1 

16 
14 


17 
15 

3 
11 



957 



417 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



16 

8 

15 

13 

207 

18U 



8 

10 

8 

3 

7 

15 

6 

15 



492 



FOREIGN WHITE FEMALES. 



*-. 



Alacranes. - . 


71 

161 

89 

17 

522 

A57 

31 

132 

67 

90 

71 

50 

11 

148 

57 

1,222 

9U9 

22 

14 

66 

44 

31 

130 

166 

77 

87 


1 
1 


2 

1 






7 

7 


61 


Bolondron _ 


1 


1 


150 


Ca*>ezaH 


89 


Canasi 


1 










16 


Onrd^na^i . . . , 


2 


9 

9 


5 

U 
1 
1 


87 

55 


469 


City of Cardenaa 




407 


Carlos KojiMf ., . 




30 


Colon 




1 


1 


13 
1 


116 


Cuftvitas . 




66 


Guamacaro 


6 








86 


Jaguey Grande 










71 


Jovellanoe. 


1 








1 


67 


MaCAgUA --,.-, --r-r 








11 


Macurlges 


1 
2 
1 






1 




146 


Marti 








56 


Matanzas x..^.r . . 


7 
7 


12 
If 


17 
16 

1 


72 

71 


1.113 


City ofMatanxaa 

MaximoGomez 


8ltS 


1 


21) 


Mendez Capote. 








14 


Pi^lnii1i<w ,. 




2 






8 


61 


Perico 




2 




43 


Roque 










31 


Sabanilla 


1 
1 








4 


125 


San Jose delos Ramos 








165 


Santa Ana . 










77 


Union de Reyes 










4 


83 














The province ........... 


3,3% 


16 


15 


26 


27 


149 


3,153 







TOTAL COLORED. 



Alacranes ., 

Bolondron ., 

Cabezas 

Canasi . 

Cardenas 

Cityof Carderuis 

Carlos Rojas 

Colon 

Cuevitas 

Guamacaro 

Jagtiey Grande 

Jovellanos 

Macagua 

Macariges 

24662 27 



3.938 
4,671 
1,210 
874 
8,462 
7,897 
1,821 
5,665 
2,372 
3,0% 
1,749 
4,283 
2,327 
5,708 



1.660 
1,802 

455 

818 
1,107 

8S6 

827 
1,389 

976 
1,362 

582 
1,341 

713 
2,321 



40 

62 

19 

U 

180 

177 

9 

164 

13 

42 

21 

78 

18 



153 

137 

14 

23 

728 

719 

30 

249 

107 

71 

42 

162 

37 

163 



20 

to 



4 



1 

8 



297 

850 

31 

69 

2.162 

75 
761 
218 
1139 
115 
264 

92 
MS 



1,786 

2.220 

691 

4o3 

4.286 

U,005 

880 

aou8 

1.098 
1.431 
9»9 
2,442 
1.467 
2,990 



418 



BEPOBT OK THE CEK8U8 OF CUBA, 1899. 



i 



Table XXIV— Continued. 
Provincb of Matanzas— Continued. 

TOTAL COLOBED-Contiiiaed. 
pngnres in italioe are indnded in those for the province or district.] 



Difltricts. 



Marti 

Matanzaa 

City of Matanzcu .. 

Maximo GomeB 

Mendez Capote 

Palmillaa 

Perioo 

Boqne 

Sabanilla 

Ban Jo8e de los Bamon 

Santa Ana 

Union de Reyes 

The province 



TotaL 



4.368 

13,100 

11,799 

2.120 

890 

8.883 

2.530 

2,181 

2,174 

8,480 

1,121 

2,685 



84.527 



Asericol- 

tnre, 
fisheries, 
and min* 
Ing. 



1,842 

1.202 

7U1 

828 

630 

1,566 

1.081 

1,054 

678 

1.158 

387 

700 



Trade 
and 
trans- 
porta- 
tion. 



76 
364 

27 
2 
60 
60 
23 
82 
57 
4 
56 



25,802 



1.479 



Mann- 
factur- 
ingand 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 



178 

1,790 

1,760 

68 

6 

85 

87 

26 

65 

74 

■ 19 

136 



4,430 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



25 

f5 
1 



2 
1 



1 
'2 



63 



Domes- 
tie and 
personal 
service. 



125 

8,006 

9,995 

02 

87 

248 

114 

106 

lis 

66 
86 

220 



8,040 



Withoat 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



2,138 
6.7W 
6,96S 
1,U4 



1.027 

1,188 

970 

1.201 

2,1M 

678 

1.463 



43,714 



COLORED MALES. 



Alacranes 

Bolondron 

Cabesas 

Canasi 

Cardenas 

Citypf Cardetuu . . . 

Carlos Bojas 

Colon 

Cnevitas 

Qnamacaro 

Jaffuey Qrande 

Jovellanos 

Macafrua 

Macuriges 

Marti 

Matanzas 

City of Matanziis . . 

Maximo Gomez 

Mendez Capote 

PalmillaR 

Perioo 

Roque 

Sabanilla 

San Jose de los RamoA 

Santa Ana 

Union de Reyes 

The province 



2,176 
2,276 

684 

442 
3,671 
S,S7U 

880 
2,768 
1,224 
1,622' 

898 
1.948 
1,227 
2,868 
2,398 
5,778 
5,0tS 
1,075 

566 
2,066 
1,423 
1,284 
1,063 
1,810 

684 
1,212 


1.340 

1,406 

891 

301 

991 

8tl 

560 

1,328 

791 

1,000 

571 

960 

712 

1,761 

1.478 

1,177 

7SS 

638 

421 

1.332 

921 

910 

665 

1.U83 

387 

616 


87 

61 

19 

11 

179 

176 

9 

158 

12 

42 

20 

72 

18 

64 

75 

346 

.t36 

27 

2 

60 

60 

23 

32 

57 

4 

64 


133 

127 

14 

18 

602 

583 

26 

211 

96 

68 

42 

160 

37 

160 

176 

1,316 

1,996 

54 

5 

04 

86 

25 

60 

71 

19 

108 


1 


78 
86 
16 
12 
476 
h58 
15 
280 
42 
26 
28 
04 
68 
73 
64 
779 
716 
35 
11 
60 
47 
34 
27 
31 
25 
46 






19 
19 


4 






1 






23 

93 

1 


1 

1 




1 


2 


41,562 


21,732 


1,441 


3,665 


64 


2.431 



667 
604 
144 
100 
1.315 
1,917 
270 
797 
283 
886 
237 
662 
302 
811 
006 
2,137 
1,918 
820 
117 
649 
800 
242 
27n 
667 
140 
386 



12,220 



COLORED females. 



Alacranes t,. 

Bolondron 

Cabezas 

Canasi ..• 

Cardenas 

Citypf Oardenaa 

CarlosBojas 

Colon . 

Cuevitaa 

Onamacaro 

Jaguey Qrande 

Jovellanos 

Maftftgna 

Macuriges 

Marti 

Matanzas 

City of Matanza* 

Maidmo Gomez 



1,762 
2,296 

626 

432 
4,891 
U,693 

941 
2,907 
1,148 
1.514 

851 
2,336 
1.100 
2,845 
1.055 
7,421 
6,787 
1.046 



820 
394 

64 

17 
116 

SS 
267 

61 
185 
382 

11 

381 

1 

570 

364 

26 

18 
100 



3 
1 



1 
i 



6 
1 



1 
1 



18 
18 



20 
10 



6 

136 

155 

4 

38 

11 

3 



4 

2 

474 

U7S 

4 



1 
1 



3 



2 



219 

2900 

15 

67 

1,687 

1,663 

60 

601 

176 

108 

87 

170 

24 

75 

61 

2,247 

2,909 

67 



1,100 
1,626 

547 

353 
2.060 
9,788 

610 
2,301 

776 
1,015 

762 
1,780 
1,075 
2,188 
1,628 
4,666 
U,067 

794 



OCCUPATIONS. 



419 



Table XXIV— Continued. 
Pbovincb of Matanzas— Gontiiiaed. 

COLOBBD FEMALBS-Continaed. 
[Fiffures in italioB are Indnded in those for the province or district.] 



Districts. 



Mendez Capote 

Palmlllas 

Perico 

Boque 

SabaniUa 

San Joe6 de los Bamos 

Santa Ana 

Union de Beyes 

The province . . . . 



TotaL 



Affriovl 

rare, 

fisheries, 

and min- 

inff. 



884 
1,817 
1,107 

047 
1,121 
1,670 

637 
1.873 



42.975 



118 
284 
160 
144 
8 
75 



98 



4.160 



Trade 

and 

trans- 

I>orta- 

tion. 



88 



Manu- 
facture 
ingand 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 



21 
1 
1 
6 
8 



28 



774 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



9 



Domes- 
- tic and 
personal 
service. 



76 
188 
67 
74 
86 
85 
10 
174 



6,600 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



140 

1,878 

670 

72B 

1,021 

1,077 



81,486 



Pbovincb of Pinab del Rio. 



TOTAL POPULATION. 



Artemisa 

Bahia Honda 

CabaiKas 

Candelaria 

Consolacion del Norte . . 

Consolacion del Bur 

Quanajay 

Guane 

Ouayabal 

Julian Diaz 

LosPalacios 

Mantua 

Mariel 

Pinar del Bio 

City of Pinar del Lio 

San Cristobal 

San Diego de los Bafioe . 
Ban Diego de Nufiez *. . . . 
San Juan y Martinez . . . 

Ban Luis 

Viflales 

The province 



0,317 


2,574 


241 


263 


17 


786 


.',117 


425 


65 


47 


2 


211 


8,868 


078 


71 


178 


6 


460 


4.866 


1,466 


07 


04 


16 


292 


.7,809 


1,808 


86 


77 


12 


677 


10,665 


4,000 


328 


310 


86 


1,007 


8,706 


971 


473 


665 


43 


1,146 


14,760 


5,884 


876 


210 


26 


265 


2,710 


767 


87 


20 


8 


246 


1,871 


758 


23 





1 


16 


2,466 


608 


91 


62 


6 


265 


8,366 


2.756 


219 


04 





851 


8,681 


814 


151 


122 


6 


886 


38,348 


0,696 


1,214 


092 


110 


2,721 


8,890 


IS 


968 


85U 


98 


t,053 


4,263 


1,085 


189 


76 


21 


374 


2,410 


886 


38 


42 


8 


70 


1,137 


200 


11 


16 




154 


14.787 


5,401 


257 


143 


21 


637 


7,608 


2,840 


172 


106 


25 


147 


17,700 


5,067 


35:3 


105 


1« 


540 
10,690 


17:}. 064 


48,697 


4,432 


3,635 


399 



5,486 
1,877 
2,171 
2,001 
4,654 

10,787 
6,608 
8,000 
1,028 
1,060 
1,444 
4,037 
2,183 

23,001 

kr89k 

2,618 
1,875 
666 
8,426 
4,807 
11,527 



105,202 



TOTAL MALES. 



Artemisa '. 


5.013 
1,008 
2.143 
2,620 
3,045 
8.565 
4.206 
8,400 
1,430 

083 
1.8(» 
4,637 
1.802 
20,082 
U,t66 
2,276 
1,802 

572 
8,170 
3,968 
9,350 


2,660 

416 

073 

1,466 

1.885 

4,090 

071 

6,865 

767 

752 

696 

2,755 

814 

0,683 

IS 

1.085 

860 

288 

5,380 

2,331 

6,047 


241 

55 

71 

07 

86 

327 

460 

376 

87 

28 

01 

218 

140 

1,188 

9SH 

130 

88 

11 

257 

160 

868 


268 

42 

172 

85 

62 

318 

602 

215 

28 



45 

86 

116 

816 

681 

60 

40 

13 

130 

107 

101 


16 

2 

5 

14 

10 

2r 

88 

25 

6 

1 

5 



5 

112 

91 

10 

7 


640 
161 
441 
222 
534 
984 
860 
103 
193 

15 
296 
218 
219 
1,563 
l,ifO 
281 

34 
124 
153 

74 
315 


1,280 


BahiA Honda 


387 


Cabailas 


481 


Candelaria ... 


736 


Consolacion del Norte 

Consolacion del Bur 


1,368 
2,800 


Quanalnv 


1,305 


Quane -_---. 


1,816 


Guayabal 

Jxilian l>iaz 


. 408 
183 


TjOS Palacion 


840 




1.261 


Mariel 


480 


Pinar del Bio -. 


6,726 


City of Pinar del Rio 

San Cristobal 


1,407 
733 


San Diego de los Bafioe 

San Diego de Nufiez 


823 
186 


Ban Juan y Martinez 

San Luis 


21 
22 

15 


2,220 
1,286 


Vifiales 


3,420 






The province _. 


91,688 


48,662 


4.800 


3,318 


350 


7,300 


27,714 







420 



BEPOKT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XXIV— Continued. 
Peovincb op Pinar del Bio— -Continued. 

TOTAL FEMALES. 
[Fignres in italics are Included in those for the province or district.] 



Districts. 



Artemisa 

Bahla Honda 

Cabafias 

Candelaria 

Ck>nsolacion del Norte . . 

Consolacion del Snr 

Onanajay 

Onane '. 

Qnayabal 

Julian Diaz 

LosPalacioB — 

Mantua 

Mariel 

Pinar del Bio 

aty of Pinar del Rio 

Ban Cristobal 

Ban Diego de los Bafios . 

San Diego de Nufiez 

Ban Juan y Martinez ...' 

San Luis 

Vtfiales 

The province 



Total. 



•i 
t 

8. 

f: 

1, 
8, 
1, 
18, 
A, 
1, 
1. 

6. 
3, 
8, 



804 
114 
710 
246 
454 
110 
591 
300 
271 
888 
163 
829 
829 
261 
6fSU 
987 
117 
665 
617 
620 
350 



81,876 



i(!j^cul- 

ture, 
fisheries, 
and min- 
ing. 



5 
9 



19 



1 
2 
1 



13 



26 
2 
21 
18 
20 



146 



Trade 
and 
trans- 
porta- 
tion. 



1 
4 



1 

2 

81 

SO 



3 



42 



Manu- 
factur- 
ing and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 



5 
5 
1 
9 

15 
1 

63 
4 
1 



7 
8 
6 
176 
167 
7 
2 
3 
4 
1 
4 



.322 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



1 
2 
2 
8 
6 
1 
2 



1 

7 
7 
2 
1 



3 
8 



40 



Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
service. 



146 

60 

18 

70 

148 

118 

286 

162 

63 

1 

39 

183 

186 

1,168 

9SS 

93 

86 

80 

884 

78 

225 



8,889 



Without 

gainful 

occupa- 

tion. 



4447 
1,060 
1,000 
2,166 
8,286 
7,987 
4,233 
6,184 
1,215 



1,104 
8,686 
1,684 
16,876 
S,L87 
1.885 
1,062 
680 
6,208 
8,628 
8,008 



77,488 



TOTAL NATIVE WHITE. 



Artemisa 

Bahia Honda 

Cabafias 

Candelaria 

Consolacion del Norte . . . 

Consolacion del Bur 

Guanajay 

Guane 

Guayabal..*. 

Julian Diaz 

LosPalacios 

Mantua 

Mariel 

Pinar del Rio 

City of Pinar del Bio 

San Cristobal 

San Diego de los Bafios. . 

San Diego de Nufiez 

San Juan y Martinez 

San Luis 

ViSiales 

The province 



6,757 
808 
1,313 
2,939 
6,233 
9.842 
5,646 

11,023 
1,882 
1,060 
1,473 
6,471 
2,161 

26,023 

1^,908 

2.822 

1,760 

458 

10,202 
5,164 

12,885 



114,907 



1,696 


96- 


141 


14 


808 


235 


24 


16 


2 


8 


472 


40 


82 


4 


( 7 


939 


44 


43 


12 


92 


1,190 


30 


38 


7 


626 


2,597 


118 


141 


29 


821 


605 


223 


299 


82 


590 


4,226 


148 


93 


18 


114 


487 


21 


18 


6 


135 


444 

411 


9 
32 


8 

27 




7 
114 


8 


2,012 


106 


51 


6 


268 


524 


101 


73 


3 


66 


6,323 


401 


487 


86 


1,136 


8 


SOU 


571 


. 7S 


7» 


669 


79 


45 


16 


209 


610 


24 


14 


6 


42 


183 
8,318 


6 

76 


8 
56 




6 

801 


14 


1,534 


72 


41 


17 


68 


3,482 


134 


96 


10 


130 


31,857 


1,787 


1,717 


286 


4.420 



3.600 

518 

708 

1,800 

3,442 

6,686 

8,807 

6.424 

1,216 

607 

886 

4,086 

1,385 

17,640 

5,570 

1,804 

1,064 



6.438 
8,447 
9,024 



74,882 



NATIVE WHITE MALES. 



Artemisa 

Bahia Honda 

Cabafias 

Candelaria 

Consolacion del Norte 
Consolacion del Sur.. 

Guanajay 

Guane 

Guayabal , 

Julian Diaz 

Los Paiaciofl 

Mantua 

Mariel 



2,978 

401 

754 

1,549 

2,720 

4,047 

2.593 

5,987 

949 

551 

770 

3,372 

1,088 



1,594 
2&5 
472 
939 

1,187 

2,697 
605 

4,211 
487 
443 
409 

2,011 
624 



96 


140 


13 


277 


866 


24 


12 

82 
41 


2 

3 

11 




128 


40 




157 


44 


79 


435 


30 


28 


6 


468 


1.002 


117 


141 


21 


801 


1,770 


223 


262 


29 


625 


948 


148 


91 


18 


87 


1,482 


21 


17 


4 


118 


802 


9 


3 
22 




7 
106 


89 


82 


2 


100 


107 


44 


6 


179 


1,026 


100 


60 


2 


64 


889 



I 



OCCUPATIONS. 



421 



Table XXIV— Continued. 
Pbovincb of Pinar DRii Rio — Cantinned. 

NATIVE WHITE MALES--Caiitinaed. 
[Figures in Italics are incladed in those for the province or district.] 



Districts. 



PinardelBio 

Citu of Finar del Rio 

SanCrlstobfl 

San Diego de los Baiios . 
San Diego de Kufiez — 

San Jnan y Martinez 

San Lois 

Vifiales.: 

The province 



TofcaL 



12,940 
t,175 
1,468 
917 
248 
6,273 
2,601 
6.467 



58.673 



Agricnl- 

tnre, 
fisheries, 
and min- 
ing. 



6,317 

8 

609 

600 

181 

8,306 

1.520 

3.470 



81,774 



Trade 
and 
trans- 
porta- 
tion. 



396 

t99 

79 

24 

6 

76 

71 

134 



1,778 



Mann- 
factnr- 
ingand 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 



847 

tss 

41 
12 
2 
68 
41 
94 



1,542 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



81 

68 

14 

6 



14 

14 

9 



263 



Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
service. 



800 

665 
176 
84 
6 
96 
25 
66 



8,863 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



4,900 

969 

489 

Zi2 

66 

1,720 
930 

2.606 



19,888 



NATIVE WHITE FEMALES. 



Artemisa 

Bahia Honda 

Cahafias 

Candelaria 

Consolacion del Norte . 

Gonsoladon del Sur 

Quanajay 

Ouane 

Ouayabal 

Julian Diaz 

LosPalacios 

Mantua 

Mariel 

PinardelRlo 

City of Pinar del Bio . 

San Cristobal 

San Diego de los Bafios 
San Diego de Nufiez . . . 
San Juan y Martinez .. 

-San Luis 

Vifiales 

The province 



2,779 

402 

659 

1,390 

2,513 

4,895 

3.053 

6,086 

033 

609 

708 

3,099 

1,063 

13,083 

g, 755 

1,354 

843 

210 

4,929 

2.563 

6.418 


2 




1 

4 


1 


81 
8 
7 
13 
67 
20 
66 

n 

17 








1 
1 
2 
8 
8 






2 

11 


8 




1 




87 
2 
1 


15 

• 






2 


1 
2 
1 






5 

7 
4 
90 
88 
4 
2 
1 
2 


1 


8 

79 

11 

827 

ftt? 

88 

8 


1 

1 
5 
5 


1 
6 

6 
2 

1 


6 




10 
2 
15 
14 
12 










208 

28 

74 


1 


3 
1 


2 




56.334 


83 


9 


176 


82 


1.066 



2,744 

800 

661 

1,374 

2.440 

4,866 

S,948 

4,942 

018 

606 

687 

8,011 

1,046 

12,66) 

t,b08 

1,815 

823 

207 

4,700 

2,517 

6,320 



64,060 



TOTAL FOREIGN WHITE. 



Artemisa ^ 


470 

62 

153 

221 

331 

664 

667 

1,177 

240 

46 

87 

408 

142 

2,750 

1,0S5 

152 

75 

45 

1,300 

477 

1,182 


221 

28 

76 

118 

172 

857 

90 

708 

72 

22 

27 

271 

66 

1,126 

U 

n 

86 

30 

975 

281 

554 


123 

21 

27 

40 

51 

174 

199 

200 

13 

14 

43 

108 

86 

681 

61S 

61 

13 

6 

162 

85 

193 


28 

3 

21 

14 

12 

44 

50 

92 

6 

1 

4 

82 

6 

166 

Its 

6 

6 

4 

40 

28 

44 


1 


86 


66 


Bahia Honda r . 


10 


Cabafias 


2 
4 
4 
6 
10 
7 
2 
1 
3 
1 
3 
20 
tl 
6 
2 




27 


Candelaria.. ,,.,r., 


1 
44 


44 


Consolaci6n del Norte 

CVniflAl4i|i?i^n dpi Rnr - - _. 


48 
88 


Guanaiav - 


139 

67 

78 

2 


170 


Guane .....^.-r.T 


108 


Guavabal ...--- 


09 


jnliATi Diaz 


6 


Los Palados 


10 


M&ntua 


39 

2 

336 


22 


Mariel -.. 


20 


PInar del R<o ...... 


432 


City of PifMr del Rio 

San Onstob*^! 


187 
18 


San Diego de los Bancs 

San Dieiro de Nunez 




19 




6 


San Juan y Martinez 

8i»-n T/uiii ....... T . . ^ - - - - 


7 
4 

8 


18 

2 

226 


96 

77 


VlfiaW 


168 






The province 


10.718 


5,306 


2,284 


602 


09 


988 


1,400 







422 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XXIV— Continued. 



Province of Pinar del Rio— Contiiiued. 

FOREIGN WHITE MALES. 
[Figures in italics are included in those for the proTince or district.] 



Districts. 


Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 
fisheries, 
and min- 
ing. 


Trade 

and 

trans- 

porta* 

tion. 


Manu- 
factur- 
ing and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 


Profes- 
sional 
seryioe. 


Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
aeryice. 


Without 

gainful 

occnpa^ 

tion. 


Artdmisa 


421 

62 

127 

188 

291 

589 

601 

1,085 

184 

42 

82 

447 

114 

2,436 

86U 

144 

61 

38 

1,212 

407 

1,026 


1 

221 

28 

76 

118 

172 

357 

90 

707 

72 

22 

27 

271 

66 

1,125 

U 

77 

85 

80 

975 

281 

552 


123 

21 

27 

40 

51 

174 

196 

200 

13 

14 

48 

108 

86 

657 

6S9 

61 

13 

5 

162 

83 

193 


22 

3 

21 

14 

12 

44 

50 

92 

6 

1 

4 

82 

6 

152 

m 

6 
6 
4 

39 
28 
43 


1 

Y 

3 
4 

6 
8 
7 
2 
1 
3 
1 
3 
27 
19 
5 
2 


33 
fc. 


21 


Bahia Honda 




Oabafiss 


1 


Candelaria 




13 


Consolacidn del Norte 

Gon861aci6n del Sur.. 


44 

136" 

66 

75 

2 


8 
8 




22 


Quane'--' ....... ...... 


13 


Ouayabal 

Julian IMaz 


16 
2 


Los Palacios .- 


5 


HffA-ntua.. .....r.. . , 


39 


i 


Mariel 


8 


Pinar del Bio 


826 
1S7 


148 


City of Pinar del Rio 

Ban Cristobal 


63 
5 


San Diego de los Banoe 




5 


San Diego de Nun^s 






6an Juan y Martinez 

San Luis 


7 

4 
6 


12 


17 
11 


Viflales 


221 


U 


The province 


9,447 


5,302 


2,204 


585 


92 


964 


810 



FOREIGN WHITE FEMALES. 



Ai*tAml"a . 


40 
10 
26 
83 
40 
75 

166 
92 
66 
4 
5 
21 
28 

824 

161 

8 

14 

6 

88 

70 

156 






1 




3 


45 


Fahla Honda 








10 


Oabafias . . 












26 


Candelaria 








1 


1 


81 


Conso]aci6n del Norte 








40 


Con861aci6n del Bur. 












75 


GuanaJay 




4 




2 


3 
1 
3 


157 


Guane .— — 


1 




90 


Guayabal 








63 












4 


Los Palacios 












6 


M&ntua 












SI 


Mariel 


m Mw****.^ 








2 
9 

7 


S6 


PJnar d^^l Rio 


1 


24 


4 
U 


2 
8 


284 


City of Pinar del Rio 

SanOrwiohftl , 


UU 




8 


San Diego de los Banos 












14 


San Diego de Nunez 












6 


San Juan y Martinez 






1 




6 
2 
4 


81 


San Lnls.r ........... . 


2* 


2 




66 


Viflal4w :.., 


1 


2 


147 








The proYlnce 


1,271 


4 


30 


7 


7 


34 


1,180 







TOTAL COLORED. 



Artemisa 

Bahia Honda 

CabaSias 

Candelaria 

Consolacidn del Norte . . 

Con861aci6n del Sur 

GuanaJay ^ 

Guane 

Guayabal 

Julian Diaz 

Los Palacios 

MAntua 

Mariel 

Pinar del Rio 

City of Pinar del Rio 



3,090 
1,252 
2.387 
1,706 
1,835 
6,150 
2,483 
2,560 
588 
765 
896 
1,427 
1,338 
9,561 
t,9U7 


767 
162 
425 
409 
531 

1,145 
276 
960 
208 
287 
100 
473 
224 

2,247 
1 


20 
10 

4 
13 

5 
36 
51 
28 

3 


99 

28 

71) 

37 

26 

134 

216 

84 

5 

5 

21 

11 

48 

OvV 

S60 


2 


442 

208 
452 
199 

108 

776 

417 

74 

33 

7 

151 

54 

288 

1,250 

1,1*7 






1 


i 
1 




16 
8 

14 
132 
118 




2 


4 
U 



1,770 
849 
1,486 
1.018 
1,164 
4,068 
1,622 
1,473 
839 



548 

879 

709 

5,629 

1,7»7 



OCCUPATIONS. 



423 



Table XXIV— Continued. 
Province of Pinab dbl. Rio^ContinnecL 

TOTAb GOLOBBD— Oontisaed. 
[Flfirnres in ItiUics are included in those for the provinoe or district.] 



Districts. 



San Cristobal 

8an Diego de los Banoe 
Ban Diego de Nnnez . . 
San Juan y Martinez. . 

San Luis 

ViSales 

TheproTlnoe 



Total. 



1,280 
684 
634 
8,285 
1,967 
8,633 



47,430 



Agrlcnl 
tore. 

fisheries. 

and min 
ing. 



289 

241 

77 

1,106 
634 

1.081 



11,634 



Trade 
and 
trans- 
porta- 
tion. 



9 

1 

1 

19 

J5 

26 



411 



Mann- 
factor- 
ing and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 



25 
22 

9 
48 
30 
55 



Profee> 

sional 

service. 



1,326 



15 



Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
service. 



165 
28 

140 

218 
92 

176 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



5,282 



801 



808 
1,802 
1,283 
2,345 



28,871 



COLORED MALE& 



Artemisa ..................... 


1.614 

560 

1.262 

888 

034 

8,019 

1,111 

1,328 

806 

890 

451 

n8 

600 

4,707 

l,il7 

664 

824 

285 

1,685 

980 

1,857 


754 
153 
425 
400 
626 

1.146 
276 
947 
206 
287 
160 
478 
224 

2.241 

i 

289 

225 

77 

1.102 
530 

1.025 


20 
10 

4 
18 

6 
86 
61 
28 

8 


96 

27 

69 

30 

22 

188 

190 

32 

6 

5 

19 

xo 

41 
817 
285 

22 

22 

7 
47 
88 
64 


2 


380 
161 
441 
148 
22 
683 
199 


412 


Bahla Honda. - 


190 


Oabaflafi 




823 


Oandelaria 




288 


Consolaci6n del Norte 

CVm^l^^riAn del Snr 


1 


858 

1,022 

894 




1 


Ouane. 


321 


(i^uavabal .................... 






90 






6 
120 


92 


Los Palaciofl 


16 

8 

13 

130 

117 

9 

1 

1 

19 
16 
26 




136 


M&ntua ^,- - 


2 


225 


Mariel 


165 

428 

tas 

106 


157 


Pinar del Rio 


4 

U 


1,587 


City of Pinar del Bio 

San Cristobal 


S8t 
230 


San Diego de los Banoe 

San Diecrode Nnnez.......... 




76 




119 
43 


81 


San Juan T Martinez 


• 474 


San Luis 


... . 


4S 


844 


Vi^Almi 




29 


723 






The province 


23,668 


11.476 


4(:8 


1,186 


14 3.043 


7,641 











COLORED FEMALES. 



Artemisa ^ 

Bahia Honda 

CabaSias 

Candelaria 

Consolaci6n del Norte . . 

Cons61aci6n del Bur 

Ouanajay 

Ouane 

Quayabal 

Julian Diaz 

Los Palacios 

Mikntua 

Mariel 

Pinar del Bio 

City of Pinar del Bio 

San Cristobal 

San Diego de los Banoe. 
San Diego de Nunez. . . . 
San Juan y Martinez. .. 

San Luis 

Vlfiales 

The province 



1,476 

702 

1,125 

828 

901 

3,140 

1,872 

1,232 

282 

875 

445 

709 

788 

4.854 

1,7S0 

626 

260 

840 

1,600 

987 

1,776 


3 





3 

26 
2 




112 
42 
11 
66 
86 
93 

218 
74 
33 
1 
31 
54 

123 

822 

699 
60 
28 
30 

175 
43 

147 














5 














i 


3 


















2 

1 

2 

82 

75 

3 

2 

1 
1 












1 
2 
1 




6 


■ - 


16 







6 
4 

6 










, 


1 








23,771 


68 


8 


140 


1 


2,239 



1,868 
650 

1,113 
760 
806 

8,046 

1,128 

1,152 
248 
874 
412 
654 
612 

8,942 
96S 
662 
216 
317 

1,418 
930 

1,622 



21.830 



424 



BEPOKT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XXIV— Continued. 



Province op Puerto Precipe. 

TOTAL population. 
[FlgnreB in Italics are indaded In those for the province or district.] 



Districts. 



Ciego de Avila 

Mor6n 

Nuevitas 

Puerto Principe 

City of Puerto Principe 
Santa Crusdel Snr 

The province 



TotaL 



9,801 

9,630 

10,355 

63,140 

t5,10t 

5,306 



88,S34 



Agricul- 
ture, 
fisheries, 
and min- 
ing. 



2,286 
2.296 
2.592 

8,547 

689 

1.838 



17,058 



Trade 

and 
trans- 
porta- 
tion. 



219 

237 

512 

1.867 

179 



8,004 



Manu- 
factur- 
ing and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 



282 
172 
457 

2.615 

198 



8,704 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



24 

15 

40 

271 

iss 

9 



360 



Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
service. 



538 

469 

1,023 

5,296 

8,879 



7,607 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



6,«73 

6,441 

5,731 

84.554 

16, ae^ 

8,213 



56.412 



TOTAL MALES. 



Ciegode Avila 

Mor6n 

Nuevitas 

Puerto Princii>e 

City of Puerto Principe 
Santa Crus del Sur 

The province 



4,979 


2,282 


218 


210 


21 


228 


4,922 


2.293 


235 


109 


14 


888 


6,888 


2.590 


510 


425 


82 


445 


26,225 


8,533 


1.813 


2,119 


221 


2,906 


10,912 


683 


1,571 


1,871* 


189 


t,sn 


2.885 


1,332 


178 


120 


4 


182 


44,899 


17,080 


2,954 


2,983 


282 


4,003 



2,025 
1,888 
1,886 

10,634 
U,U78 
1,U9 



17,547 



TOTAL FEMALES. 



Ciego de Avila 

Mor6n 

Nuevitas 

Puerto Principe 

City of Puerto Principe 
Santa Cruz del Sur 

The province 



4,822 


8 


1 


62 


3 


316 


4,708 


8 


2 


68 


1 


81 


4,467 


2 


2 


82 


8 


678 


26,916 


14 


44 


496 


60 


2,381 


1U,190 


6 


U 


Sl^ 


hk 


l,66t 


2,428 


6 


1 


•78 


6 


Zl» 


43,335 


28 


60 


721 


67 


8,604 



4.448 
4,656 
8,846 
23,920 
If, 186 
2,094 



38.865 



TOTAL NATIVE WHITE. 



Ciegode Avila 

Moron 

Nuevitas 

Puerto Principe 

City of Puerto Principe 
Santa Cruz del Sur 

The province 



8,034 
8,436 
7.121 
89,196 
16,605 
3.662 



66,849 



1,820 
1,981 
1,854 

6,486 
U63 
905 



12.496 



123 
169 
298 
1,149 
889 
122 



1,861 



150 
128 
206 
1,181. 
969 
88 



1.754 



12 

9 

26 

102 

167 

6 



245 



374 
442 
534 
2,638 
1,8SS 
162 



4,140 



6,666 
6,767 
4,708 
27,550 
IB, 186 
2,288 



45,853 



NATIVE WHITE MALES. 



Ciegode Avila 

Moron 

Nuevitas 

Puerto Principe 

City of Puerto Principe 
Santa Cruz del Sur 

The province 



8,989 
4,269 
3,615 
18,808 
6,761, 
1.884 

32,575 



1,818 
1,929 
1,353 
6,474 
US8 
899 



12.473 



123 

167 

298 

1,122 

86f 
122 



1,832 



114 
66 

186 
865 

769 
38 



1,269 



9 

8 

20 
150 
ISl 

3 



190 



202 



206 

1.630 

1,301 

26 



2,462 



1,733 
1,711 
1,562 

8,567 

5,945 

7M 



14,860 



OCCUPATIONS. 



425 



Table XXIV— Continued. 



Provinok of Puebto Principb— ContinnecL 

NATIVB WHITS. FEMALES. 
[FignreB in italics are included in those for the province or district.] 



Districts. 



Ciegode Avlla 

Moron 

Nnevitas 

Puerto Principe 

City of Puerto Principe 
Santa Cruz del Sor 

The province 



Total. 



4,085 
4,167 
8,606 
20.888 
9,7U1 
1,678 



88,774 



Agrioul- 

tnre, 
fisheries, 
and min- 
ing. 



2 
2 
1 

12 
6 
6 



23 



Trade 

and 

trans- 

porta> 

tion. 



2 



27 

«7 



29 



Manu- 
factur- 
ing and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 



86 

62 

20 

816 

too 

51 



486 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



8 
1 
6 
42 
S6 
8 



65 



Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
service. 



172 
64 
328 
1,006 
6S1 
126 



1,688 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



8,822 
4,046 
8,151 
18,868 
8,9ia 
1,482 



31,494 



TOTAL FOBBIQN WHITB. 



Oieirode Avila..... »»,.-,,, 


813 
197 
970 
2,259 
l,t8S 
299 

4,088 


136 
92 

446 

060 
7t 

121 


84 

64 

169 

ffTO 

lae 

41 


38 
9 

91 
166 
116 

28 


12 

6 

18 

62 

iO 


8 

8 

142 

462 

S76 
40 


40 


Moron 


88 


Nuevitas 


109 


Puerto PrincijM 


869 


City of Puerto Principe . . 
Santa Cruz del Sur .......... 


9.5A 
72 






The province 


1,465 


928 


827 


85 


640 


608 







FOREIGN WHITE MALES. 



Cleffo de A Vila ».x,»-- 


288 
175 

869 
1,948 
1,08U 

234 


136 
92 

445 

669 
75 

121 


84 

64 

169 

669 

tas 

41 


38 
8 

91 
161 
119 
*21 


12 

6 

11 

46 

54 

1 




18 


Moron ......^-^r-- 


126 

409 

37 


6 


Nuevitas 

Puerto Principe 


17 

104 


City of Puerto Principe . . 
Santa Omz d^l Sur 


89 
13 






The province 


8,499 


1,463 


987 


319 


76 


6Ti 


152 







FOREIGN WHITE FEMALES. 



Giesode Avlla........... 


80 

22 

111 

811 

199 

65 








, 


8 

8 

16 

48 

■iU 
8 


27 


Moron ^w.^»- 






1 




18 


Nupvitas 


1 
1 




2 
6 

6 

1 


92 


Puerto Princine 


1 
i 


5 
5 
2 


266 


City of Puerto Principe . . 
SantnCrus del Sur .....^ 


166 




69 










The nrovlnce .. 


589 


2 


1 


8 


9 


68 


451 







TOTAL COLORED. 



Cieffo de Avila.... ............ 


1,454 
997 
2.264 
11.685 
7,S1U 
1,447 


829 
273 
792 
1,401 
16U 
812 


12 
4 

46 
138 
100 

16 


74 

85 

160 

1,268 

1,1S8 
86 




161 
24 

847 
2,206 
1,671 

179 


878 


Moron ....,.., ,-.-,,^,,,rw,n-^- 




661 


Nnevitas 


1 
27 

t6 
1 


919 


Puerto Principe 


6,645 


atji of Puerto Principe . . 
Santa C"izdel Bur 


853 






The province ....... 


17,847 


8.107 


215 


1,623 


29 


2,917 


9,056 







426 



BEPOBT ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899, 



Table XXIV— Contiiiued. 
Pbovxncs of Puerto Prinoipe — Ckmtinued. 

COLORED MALE& 
[Flguree in Italics are included in those for the province or district.! 



Districts. 



Ciego de Avila 

Moron 

Nnevltas 

Puerto Principe 

City of Puerto Principe 
Santa Cruz del Sur 

The province 



Total. 



607 

478 

1.414 

6,460 

S,06U 

767 



8,826 



Aflricul- 

ture, 
fisheries, 
and miU' 
ing. 



828 
272 
792 
1,400 
15S 
S12 



3,104 



Trade 

and 

trans- 

portar 

tlon. 



11 

4 

43 

122 
8U 
15 



196 



Manu- 
factur- 
ing and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 



68 

86 

148 

1,008 

993 

61 



1,386 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



1 
26 



26 



Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
service. 



21 
113 



66U 
60 



1,060 



Without 

gainful 

oooup** 

tion. 



279 
167 
817 
1,963 
UlUS 
810 



8,086 



COLORED FEMALES. 



Ciegode Avila 


767 

619 

860 

6.216 

UytSO 

680 


1 
1 


1 


16 




140 
24 

234 
1,340 
1,00/7 

110 


690 


Moron -. 




404 


Nn©vita<i..... . -^ . 


2 
16 

16 
1 


12 
176 

m 

26 




O02 


Puerto Principe.. 


1 

J 


2 

S 
1 


4,682 


City of Puerto Principe . . 
8#pt-ft Cruz del Sur.^....... .. 


3,079 
548 








The province .. .... 


9,022 


3 


2J 


2S8 


3 


1,848 


6,020 







Province of Santa Clara. 



TOTAL POPULATION. 



Abreus 

Calbarieu 

Calahazar 

Camajuani 

Cartagena 

Cejade Pablo 

denfuegoe 

City of Cienfuegoa 

Cifnentes.'. 

Cruces 

Esperanza 

Palmira 

Pbtcetas 

Quemado de GflineB 

BanchoVeloK 

Ranchuelo 

Bodas 

Sagua la Grande 

City of Scufua la Chrande 
San Antonio de las Vueltas. 
Sancti Spiritus 

aty of Sancti Spiritua . . 

San Diego del Valle 

San Fernando 

San Juan de las Teras 

San Juan de los Bemedios . . 
Santa Clara....... .. 

City of Santa Clara 

Santa Isabel de las Lajas... 

Santo Domingo 

Trinidad...: 

City of THnidad 

Yaguajay 

The province 



8,906 

8,660 

13,410 

14,486 

6,244 

6,964 

60.128 

90,038 

3,826 

7,068 

7.811 

6,627 

11,961 

8,800 

7,682 

6,060 

9,662 

21,342 

if,7«8 

12,882 

25,700 

It, 696 

5,869 

6,446 

6,600 

14,833 

28,437 

13,763 

9,608 

10,872 

24,271 

n,ito 

9,718 



866,636 



81,951 



1,012 


149 


968 


966 


4,468 


361 


4,210 


685 


2,141 


104 


1,641 


180 


12,004 


3,828 


901 


3,065 


966 


102 


980 


412 


2,280 


134 


1,124 


236 


3,463 


296 


2.668 


206 


2,068 


161 


834 


171 


1,907 


296 


2,040 


1,284 


Ut 


9St 


4,161 


191 


6,077 


727 


75U 


5U3 


2,004 


77 


1.988 


67 


1,419 


87 


3,066 


416 


6,774 


1,073 


526 


972 


2,146 


288 


8,885 


279 


4,440 


602 


367 


39U 


2,744 


292 



18,609 



165 

657 

606 

662 

180 

208 

3,942 

S,ttl 

162 

620 

165 

241 

622 

292 

288 

168 

288 

1,774 

1,316 

206 

1,810 

l,llt 

40 

100 

101 

798 

1,366 

l,t57 

368 

248 

1,109 

915 

384 



16,817 



16 

37 

39 

36 

14 

12 

369 

S9U 

17 

45 

15 

22 

24 

12 

17 

14 

35 

136 

107 

15 

108 

H 

11 

7 

8 

56 

191 

178 

31 

26 

86 

67 

27 



1,409 



266 
622 
543 
804 
340 
218 
5,294 

UyOOU 

200 

1,641 

438 

908 

428 

205 

750 

646 

1,288 

3,880 

t,7t3 

582 

1,738 

1,375 

94 

687 

465 

1,719 

2.444 

t,t89 

1,623 

687 

2,129 

1,S0U 

608 



30,886 



2,307 
5,510 
7,437 
8,100 
3,515 
4,750 

33,700 

18,653 
2,858 
4,446 
4,770 
4,002 
7,128 
6,518 
4,S98 
8,326 
5,778 

12,200 
7,Uf9 
7,680 

16,780 
8,8S8 
8,143 
8,606 
3,520 
8,789 

10,600 
8,51,1 
5,157 
5,846 

15,855 
8,173 
5,668 



211,094 



OCCUPATIONS. 



427 



Table XXIV— Continued. 
Pbovinck of Santa Clara— -Gontiiiiiedi 

TOTAL MALES. 



[Fignres in italics are included in thoae for the province or district] 



Districts. 



Abreus 

Caibarien 

CalAbazar 

Camajnani 

Cartagena 

Cejade Pablo 

Cienfuegos 

Gityof Cienfuego9 

Cifnentee 

Cmcee..^ 

Esperanza..- 

Palmira 

Flaoetas 

Qnemado de QAines 

RanchoVeloB 

Ranchnelo 

Rodas 

Sagua la Grande 

Sity of Sagua la Orande 
Ban Antonio uw V ueltas — 
Sancti Bpiritus 

City of Sancti Spirittu . . 

Ban Diego del Valle 

Ban Fernando 

Ban Juan de las Yeras 

San Juan de los Remedios . . 
Santa Clara 

Citv of Santa Clara 

Santa Isabel de las Lajas . .. 

Banto Domingo 

Trinidad 

aty of Trinidad 

Yaguajay 

The province 



Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries. 

and min- 
ing. 


Trade 
and 
trans- 
porta- 
tion. 


Manu- 
factur- 
ing and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
service. 


Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 


2,112 


980 


148 


148 


12 


216 


000 


4,d(J6 


952 


964 


640 


29 


389 


1.588 


7.562 


4.308 


350 


575 


33 


270 


2,021 


8,407 


4,196 


679 


533 


31 


686 


2,288 


8,568 


2.112 


108 


129 


11 


806 


802 


8,486 


1.564 


129 


208 


10 


191 


1.389 


32,173 


11,729 


3.798 


3.562 


272 


3.492 


9.320 


1U,689 


89t 


S,H98 


By 869 


tto 


S,S10 


6,061 


1.938 


986 


102 


146 


11 


74 


009 


4.170 


964 


406 


894 


33 


1.166 


1.205 


4.145 


2.284 


134* 


102 


9 


844 


1,218 


3.6W 


1.124 


233 


241 


17 


778 


1,176 


6,481 


3.449 


295 


603 


21 


321 


1.802 


4,762 


2.579 


208 


290 


8 


115 


1.667 


4.024 


2,046 


• 161 


197 


12 


397 


1,212 


2.521 


831 


170 


104 


9 


460 


878 


5, 86i 


1,902 


296 


263 


25 


1,182 


1.700 


10.907 


2,004 


1,277 


1.587 


92 


2.634 


8.313 


6,163 


ISO 


9t6 


1,161 


78 


1,71,9 


9,099 


7.121 


4,137 


191 


201 


10 


610 


2,072 


12,046 


6,010 


718 


1,028 


91 


854 


4.846 


6,0S0 


7t^ 


SU) 


868 


7A 


6S9 


t,17l 


2,806 


1,908 


77 


40 


8 


66 


718 


8.742 


1.988 


67 


100 


5 


669 


1,028 


2,988 


1,402 


87 


100 


3 


447 


899 


7,606 


3,044 


413 


665 


45 


1,258 


2.106 


14.582 


6,767 


1,063 


1,140 


136 


1,S00 


8,986 


6, teg 


621 


962 


1,01,1 


ISO 


1.584 


t.ftU 


5.606 


2,146 


287 


366 


29 


1,614 


1.274 


6,496 


8.327 


274 


210 


21 


248 


1.412 


11.688 


4,867 


586 


1,118 


65 


1,088 


8,860 


U,B16 


S6U 


599 


86U 


SI 


t ^ 


1,965 


5,664 


2,741 


291 


381 


21 


• 519 


1,711 


189,067 


80,866 


13,603 


16,160 


1.000 


28,190 


56,209 



TOTAL FEMALES. 



Abreus 

Oaibarien 

Calabazar ........ 

Camajuanl 

Oartagena 

Cejade Pablo 

Clenfuegos .......a...... — 

aty of Cienfuegot 

Cifuentes 

Cruces 

Esperansa 

Palmira 

Placetas 

Qnemado de GHUnes 

KanchoVeloz 

Ranchnelo 

Rodas 

Sagua la Gruide 

City of SaatM la Orande 
San Antonio de las Vueltas. 
Sancti-Spiritus 

City of Sancti'Spiritua . . 

San Diego del Valle 

San Fernando 

San Juan de las Yeras 

San Juan de los Remedios.. 
Santa Clara 

City of Santa Clara 

Santa iBabel de las Ltfjas 

Santo Domingo 



1.888 
4,144 
5,867 
6,068 
2.891 
8.468 

26,955 

15, U9 
1,887 
8.783 
8.666 
2,968 
6,480 
4,128 
3.508 
2.638 
4,195 

10,435 
6,565 
5,J11 

18.663 
7,666 
2,473 
2.703 
2.062 
7,228 

18,865 
7,601 
8.997 
4,876 




58 



1 
2 
1 
6 
1 
1 
31 



2 

1 
2 



1 
1 

7 
6 



9 
5 



3 

10 

10 

1 

6 



• 

7 


4 


51 


17 


8 


138 


21 


6 


273 


29 


4 


209 


1 


3 


84 




2 

87 


27 
1.802 


380 


S5t 


74 


l,k9h 


16 


6 


126 


135 


12 


375 


3 


6 


94 




5 
3 


125 
107 


29 


2 


4 


90 


91 


5 


363 


4 


5 


77 




10 
44 


101 
1,265 


187 


15k 


99 


»7A 


2 


5 


72 


282 


12 


879 


fU 


10 


745 




8 
2 


29 
28 




1 


5 


18 


143 


10 


466 


216 


56 


944 


916 


ta 


906 


2 


2 


109 


30 


5 


344 



1,788 
8,978 
6,418 
6.886 
2,823 
8,861 

84,880 

lS,h99 
1,689 
8,241 
8,668 
2.806 
6,826 
8,961 
8,046 
2,448 
4,078 
8,887 
B,UJO 
5.618 

12,414 
6,657 
2,430 
2.678 
2.021 
8.504 

12,618 
fl.517 
8.888 
4,484 



428 



BEPORT' ON THE CENSUS OF CUBA, 1899. 



Table XXIV— Continued. 
Pbovincb of Santa Clara— Gontinned. 

TOTAL F3MALB8— Continued. 
[Figures in italics are included in those for the province or districtl 



Districts. 


Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 
fisheries, 
and min- 
ing. 


Trade 
and 
trans- 
porta- 
tion. 


Manu- 
factur- 
ing and 
mechan- 
ical in- 
dustries. 


Profes- 
sional 
servioe. 


Domes- 
tic and 
personal 
service. 


Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
- tion. 


• 

Trinidad 


12,683 

6,60U 
4,064 


73 
S 
3 


6 

2 

1 


56 

51 

8 


21 

16 

6 


431 
S4 


11,906 


City of Trinidad 


6.908 


Yamiajay 


8,957 






The province 


ie7,479 


1,085 


96 


1,657 


340 


8,646 


155,666 







TOTAL NATIVE WHITE. 



AbreuB 

Caibarien 

Calabazar 

Camajuani 

Cartagena 

Cejade Pablo 

Cienfuegos 

City of Cienfuegoa 

Cifuentes 

Cruces 

Eeperanza 

Palmira 

Plaoetas 

guemado de QAines . 
ancho Velos 

Banchuelo 

■Rodas 

Sagna laQrande 

Cityof Saaua la Orande 
San Antonio ae las Vueltas 
Sancti-Spiritus 

City of Sancii-Spiritu* . 

San Diego del valle 

San Fernando 

Ban Juan delasTeras 

San Juan de los Remedies . 
Santa Clara 

Citv of Santa Clara 

Santa Isabel de las Lajas .. 

Santo Domingo 

Trinidad 

City of Trinidad 

Yagnajay 

The province 



2,227" 

5,620 

7,600 

7,933 

8,862 

4.190 

32,209 

15, 7S5 
2,450 
4,084 
5,002 
8.238 
7,214 
5,737 
8,823 
8,067 
5,427 

11,709 
7,01*5 
9,368 

18,738 
8,170 
4,096 
4,176 
4.105 
9,094 

18,3U0 
8,t76 
4,872 
7,000 

13,746 
6,1,73 
5,471 



214,945 



454 

537 
2.222 
1,863 
1.1)6 

960 
5,437 

ssu 

658 

439 
1,494 

661 
1,795 
1,540 

937 

483 
1,000 
1.078 
68 
2,600 
3,896 

509 
1.506 
1.112 

856 
1,799 
4,242 

S16 
1,099 
2,251 
2,606 

tl8 
1