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Full text of "Report on Civil Rights Congress as a communist front organization. Investigation of un-American activities in the United States, Committee on Un-American Activities, House of Representatives, Eightieth Congress, first session. Public law 601 (section 121, subsection Q (2))"

X 



80th Congress, 1st Session 



Union Calendar No. 575 

House Report No. 1115 



REPORT ON 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS AS A 
COMMUNIST FRONT ORGANIZATION 



INVESTIGATION OF 

UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES IN THE 

UNITED STATES 



COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES ^ 

EIGHTIETH CONGRESS 

FIRST SESSION 

Public Law 601 

(Section 121, Subsection Q (2)) 
Printed for the use of the Committee on Un-American Activities 



SEPTEMBER 2, 1947 



'VU 




November 17, 1947. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House 
on the State of the Union and ordered to be printed 



UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1947 



^4-,JH 






COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

J. PARNELL THOMAS, New Jersey, Chairman 
KARL E. MUNDT, South Dakota JOHN S. WOOD, Georgia 

JOHN Mcdowell, Pennsylvania JOHN E. RANKIN, Mississippi 

RICHARD M. NIXON, California J. HARDIN PETERSON, Florida 

RICHARD B. VAIL, Illinois HERBERT C. BONNER, North Carolina 

Robert E. Stripling, Chief Inrestigator 

Benjamin MAi^Dt^L. Director of Research 



Union Calendar No. 575 



SOth Conokess ) HOUSE OF KEriiEfcJENTATIVES j Report 



1st Session f 1 No. 1115 



I 



REPORT ON CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS AS A COMMUNIST 

FRONT ORGANIZATION 



November 17, 1917. — Committed to the Committee on the Whole House on the 
State of the Union and ordered to be printed 



Mr. Thomas of New Jersey, from the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, submitted the following 

REPORT 

REPORT ON CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

205 EAST FORTY-SECOND STREET, NEW YORK 17, N. T. 

Murray Hill 4-6640 
February 15. 1947 

HoNOR.\RY Co-chairmen 
Dr. Benjamin E. Mays Dr. Harry F. Ward 

Chairman of the board: Executive director: 
George Marshall Milton Kaufman 

Trea-surcr: Field director: 

Raymond C. Ingersoll Milton N. Kcmnitz 

Vice Chairmen 

George F. Addes Ira Latimer 

Marv McLcod I^othune Stanley Nowak 

Rev. Charles A. Hill Lawrence Rivkin 

Vincent Sheean 

REPORT ON CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

Having adopted a line of militant skullduggery against the United 
States with the close of World War II, the Communist Tarty has set 
up the Civil Rights Congress for the purpose of protecting those of 
its members who run afoul of the law. This new project was founded 

1 



2, CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

at a conference held in Detroit on April 27-28, 1946, effectuating the 
merger of the International Labor Defense and the National Federa- 
tion for Constitutional Liberties. The latter organizations had been 
so badly discredited by repeated exposure as to injure their usefulness 
in the newly envisaged campaign of Communist lawlessness. It will 
be found, however, that the sponsors of the Civil Rights Congress in 
many instances arc the same as those of its predecessor organizations. 
It has been a time-honored Communist tactic to set up a hife and 
cry for civil liberties precisely at a moment when boldest attacks upon 
democracy are intended. Invariably this appeal finds a response 
among Communist sympathizers, and ingenuous professional bleeding 
hearts, who would rather sacrifice the interests of their country than 
dp violence to the Communist conception of civil liberties as applied 
to the United States. For some curious reason these standards are 
never applied to any territory under the Communist dictatorship. 

INTERNATIONAL LABOR DEFENSE 

The International Labor Defense was the American section of the 
International Red Aid, formed by the Communist International in 
1922. It was part of an international network of organizations for the 
defense of Communist lawbreakers. In France it was loiown as 
Secours Rouge Internationale, in Austria as Osterreiche Rote Hilfe, 
in Germany as Internationale Rote Hilfe, in Holland as Internationale 
Roode Hulp, and in Spain as El Socorro Rojo Internacional, all oper- 
ating under the direction of MOPR with headquarters in Moscow. 
The international head of the organization was Helen Stassova, 
member of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the 
Soviet Union. Attorney General Francis A. Biddle has properly 
designated the International Labor Defense as "the legal arm of the 
Communist Party." 

Speaking at the foundation meeting of the Civil Rights Congress, 
Hon. Vito Marcantonio, president of the International Labor Defense 
for about 10 years, pledged to carry on within the new organization, 
in harmony with the history and traditions of the International 
Labor Defense. 

The International Labor Defense has been under investigation by 
the Committee on Un-American Activities since 1938 when our com- 
mittee was first established. On October 17, 1939, Benjamin Gitlow, 
one of the original foimders of the International Labor Defense in 1925, 
and one of its leading officials, testified as follows regarding the 
character of this organization, which has not changed under its new 
label: 

International Labor Defense is not a national organization, but an international 
organization * * *. In the second place, the International Labor Defense is 
not a defense organization in the pure sense of that term; nor is it a civil liberties 
defense organization. It is the legal defense organization of the Communist 
Party and the Communist International in this covmtry, and serves, also, as a 
highly political and propagandist Communist organization. * 

BACKGROUND 

The ink was scarcely dry on the Stalin-Hitler pact presaging the 
disastrous Communist-led strikes in North American Aviation and 

1 Hearings of the Special Committee on Un-American Activities, vol. 10, p. 5982. 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 3 

Allis-Chnlmcrs, the peace strikes in universities, and the fulminations 
aj2:ainst President Koosevelt as an "imperialist warmonger," v>lieu 
Earl Browiler, then general secretary of the Communist Party of the 
United States and passport forger, sounded the usual warnings about 
the imminent menace to our civil liberties. Speaking at the National 
Conference for Civil Liberties in New York City on October 14, 1939, 
he declared: 

The forces which are moving against American civil liberties are the same forces 
which want this war to go on as long as possible for the sake of the profits they 
expect to make out of it, and which are preparing to take this country into the 
war at an opportune moment * * * the forces involving America in the 
senseless destruction and slaughter of the imperialist war strike first of all against 
the Communist Party because they sec in it the leader and the symbol of all the 
deepest antiwar and peace sentiments of the masses, which they wish to silence 
and to crush.' 

Thereafter, a maze of organizations \vas spawned for the alleged 
purpose of defending civil liberties in general but actually intended 
to protect Communist subversion from any penalties under the law. 
Among these organizations were the Committee for Citizenship Rights, 
the Committee for Civil Rights for Communists, Detroit Bill of Rights 
Defense Committee, Greater New York Emergency Conference on 
Inalienable Rights, Michigan Civil Rights Federation, Minneapolis 
Civil Rights Committee, National Committee for People's Rights, 
the National Federation for Constitutional Liberties, and numerous 
other special committees under various guises. Former Attorney 
General Francis A. Biddle characterized the National Federation for 
Constitutional Liberties, the chief national organization on this list, 
as follows: 

The program of the federation parallels closely the Communist Party line of 
1940 * * * One of the tactics which they use to attack the (national defense) 
program was the emphasis on the threat to civil liberties and the rights of labor 
and of minority groups * * * The defenses of Communist leaders such as 
Sam Darcy and Robert Wood, party secretaries for Pennsylvania and Oklahoma, 
have been major efforts of the federation.^ 

ANTAGONISM TOWARD THE UNITED STATES 

Early in 1945, after the close of World War II, the attitude of the 
Soviet Government changed from one of reserved cooperation with 
the United States to one of vituperative criticism. This attitude 
served to cover its own aggressively expansionist designs. The 
Communist parties throughout the world echoed this sentiment and 
translated it into positive activities with the United States as the 
chief target. The Communist Party, U. S. A. (then known as the 
Communist Political Association) was quick to join this procession. 
In a resolution of its national board adopted in convention, July 
26-28, 1945, dealing mainly with the adoption of the new, belligerent 
line, it declared: 

American capital supported the war against Nazi Germany, not because of 
hatred of fascism or a desire to liberate suffering Europe from the heel of Nazi 
despotism, but because it recognized in Hitler Germany a dangerous imperialist 
rival * * * They are trying to organize a new cordon sanitaire against the 
Soviet Union * * * « 



' The Second Imperialist War by Earl Browder (International Publishers, 1940, p. 139). 
* Memorandum of Attorney General Francis A. Biddle prepared for use in administration of the mandate 
of Public Law 135. 
« PoUtical Aflairs, July, 1945. pp. 579, 5«X 



4 CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

This significant change in approach was expressed in an accentua- 
tion of every possible form of civil strife and disruptive interference 
with the social, economic, and civic affairs of the Nation, carefully 
disguised in the form of a legitimate effort for the rights of labor and 
world peace. Eugene Dennis, general secretary of the Communist 
Party, U. S. A., recently convicted for contempt of Congress, has 
outlined these tasks in specific form in his pamphlet, What Ai^erica 
Faces, embodying his speech before the plenary meeting of the National 
Committee of the Communist Party held in New York on February 
12-15, 1946. He calls for "strike-wage struggles," "growing class con- 
sciousness," "a crucial battle against the giant trusts," "fighting spirit 
* * * of the workers," "united actions of the Negro and white 
workers, as well as of labor and the veterans * * * into a coordi- 
nated drive," and insists that "Communists play a key role in helping 
shape vital strike strategy arid tactics." He reminds his followers that 
any wage settlements made "can result only in a temporary stalemate 
or armed truce." He holds out the fear of "considerable unemploy- 
ment and inflation," and "a great crisis" leading "to a new world war 
as the way out." He declares that the "American working people will 
resist" and "fight" these measures. He looks forward to a "definite 
upsurge" in mass activities and calls upon the Communists "to prepare 
in time to organize and lead these movements." He calls for a "mass 
movement which can curb the monopolists" and "the imperialist 
war makers." He applauds "state-wide demonstrations of labor, the 
veterans * * * j^ Albany, Harrisburg, Sacramento, Lansing, 
and Cleveland" and "the powerful demonstrations of the GI's." 
From the general tone of these declarations it should be clear that we 
are faced with another Stalin-Hitler pact period in which Communist 
hostility to the United States finds expression in a new and more 
intensified form. Perhaps we had better call this the period of the 
STALIN-Dimitroff-Tito-Rakosi-Pauker-Fischer-Togliatti-Thorez- 
Dennis axis with Russia as its chief pole, the period of a strongly 
reactivated Communist International, in which the Communists are 
clearly out to raise all the trouble they can. It is a period in which 
the Communists have drawn upon themselves the following well- 
deserved characterization of J. Edgar Hoover, Chief of the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation: 

The Communist Party of the United States is a fifth column if there ever was 
one. It is far better organized than were the Nazis in occupied countries prior 
to their capitulation. They are seeking to weaken America just as they did in 
their era of obstruction when they were aUned with the Nazis. Their goal is 
the overthrow of our Government.^ 

Clearly expressed is the underlying outlook of hostility toward the 
American Government by Civil Rights Congress spokesmen. Joseph 
Nahem, a Communist veteran who took a leading part in the GI 
demonstrations in the Pacific area, who was arrested on March 15, 
1946, for picketing the New York City Hall on the occasion of the 
visit of the Honorable Winston Churchill, and who was duly defended 
by the Civil Rights Congress, has formulated this approach as follows: 

The state is an instrument of direct and indirect oppression of one class by 
another; that the paraphernalia of the state, such as the army, the police and 
the courts are utilized today by the bourgeoisie for curbing, restricting, and openly 
suppressing the working class and its parties: These are the cornerstone principles 

• Statement of J. Edgar Hoover before the Committee on Un-American Activities, March 26, 1947. 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 5 

of ^^a^xism-Leninism. ♦ ♦ * We urge (liat full support be given to the 
Civil Rights Congress, which has taken over the aijpeal." 

Gerliart Eisler put the matter a little more bluntly. Speaking: of 
the GovcrnmcMit which is finally l)rin.<rin<j: him to justice for passport 
frauds ami contempt of Conirress, which constitute a meager portion 
of his crimes, he declared: "I always had only contempt for my 
jailers." ' 

PROTECTIVE COMMUNIST MEASURES 

Manifestly this incendiary program reciuires the establishment of a 
protective buH'er as a safcguartl against legal prosecution. It was 
necessary to exploit America's traditional regard for civil hberties in 
order to allow free play for outright subversion. William Z. Foster, 
chairman of the Communist Party, United States of America, has 
clearly described this strategy for protecting Communist leaders and 
organizers as follows: 

In every strike the question of defending the civil rights * * * of the 
* * * union leaders constitutes an im])ortant problem * * *. Defense 
activities are not only a matter of court action, but especially of mass pres- 
sure * * * against the government and the employers * * * Attacks 
on the civil rights of the strikers * * * must be militantly resisted * * * 
through the holding of mass meetings, sending of delegations to the state legisla- 
tures and Congress. Wlien injunctions are issued * * * the strikers should 
follow the traditional American (sic) trade-union policy of ignoring such court 
orders * * *_ Against * * * violators of civil rights * * * the 
strikers should make active use of all available political institutions (pp. 240, 241). 
It's about time, therefore, that rod-baiting be knocked on the head in the 
American labor movement. This Hitlerism slander campaign should be recog- 
nized for what it is, the spreading of employer-inspired, imperialist warmonger 
propaganda in the ranks of the workers (p. 358).* 

Although Milton Kaufman, executive secretary of the Civil Rights 
Congress, has issued the usual denial that "the Civil Rights Congress 
is inspired by or acts as a front for any political party, including the 
Communist Party," the Congress has mirrored the Communist 
approach to the letter. In fact, Mr. Kaufman admitted that his 
organization would not shrink "from the most vigorous defense of 
Communists" and that it would disdain to join in "the new national 
sport of Red-hunting." ^ 

TECHNIQUE OF DISTORTION 

Applying the recognized military strategy of taking the offensive 
against the "enemy" (as the Communists now refer to the American 
Government), the Civil Rights Congress does not limit itself to a 
simple defense of those under charges. In fact, its pronouncements 
indicate that such a defense is by no means its primary purpose. 
Instead, this organization concentrates mainly upon attacking the 
American Government in the most virulent manner with no regard 
for the truth. Sponsors who have lent their names to the organization 
in the interests of civil liberties find themselves listed as endorsing the 
most distorted assaults upon the United States — assaults characteristic 
of the slanderous attacks emanating from the Soviet Union and its 

• Daily Worker, May 20, 1946. 

' Pamphlet, Gerhart Eisler, My Side of the Story, published by the Civil Rights Congress, March 1947, 
p. A-2. 
8 American Trade Unionism, by William Z. Foster (International Publishers, 1947J 
' New York Times, March 13, 1947. p 20. 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

agents throughout the world. The "Urgent Summons to a Congress 
on Civil Rights" held in Detroit on April 27 and 28, 1946, furnishes 
some glaring examples of this approach: 

Today's drive to subvert our democratic liberties is well-organized, well- 
heeled, insidious. * * * -p^ig great war against fascism is won, but the 
victory is far from secure. * * * Reactionary forces, based on war-rich 
monopolies, the die-hard union breakers, Red-bajters, and race haters, command 
the largest surviving fifth column in the world. They are turning the "weapons 
and methods of fascism against the American people. They are prepared to 
destroy our democracy', even to the establishment of outright fascism. 

Outlining its aims and program, the Civil Rights Congress declares 
that — 

All aspects of our political life today are affected by the growing offensive of 
those who seek to destroy the United Nations unity and who would plunge the 
world into a new war. These enemies of the peace in our country cannot achieve 
their sinister purpose unless they split and demoralize the democratic forces. 
Therefore, they grow more arrogant in their attacks on labor, on the Negro 
people, and other racial and religious minorities; the Hitlerite tactic of Red- 
baiting is reaching new heights.'" 

In its call to a conference on April 13, 1946, the New York Initiat- 
ing Committee preparing for the Civil Rights Congress on April 
27-28, announced blandly that — 

We are getting a taste of the divide-and-conquer technique which in Germany 
led to fascism, to the human slaughterhouses at Dachau and JNIaideneck — and 
to World War II. 

The same pamphlet calls attention to an alleged "Fascist offensive 
* * * on our lives and liberties * * * qj-^ ^j^g minds of our 
children" to a "Hitler's white supremacy technique * * * of 
gun, whip, and rope." 

In its May 29, 1946, issue of Action Now, official organ of the Civil 
Rights Congress, referrmg to the Presidential message on the threat- 
ened I'ailroad strike, we find the headline "Truman bill means fascism 
in America." 

In his speech before the Civil Rights Congress in Detroit on April 
27, 1946, George Marshall, former chairman of the National Feder- 
ation for Constitutional Liberties, now under indictment after being 
cited for contempt of Congress, sounded the followmg dire note: 

What has happened since VJ-day is truly ominous. We hear the tread of 
approaching storm troopers and as of today so close that we must close our ranks 
to fight — right now. 

Referring to the South, where both the AFL and CIO have sub- 
stantial local unions, the resolutions committee of the Civil Rights 
Congress at its Detroit convention in 1946 declared: 

The Bill of Rights has been treated as a scrap of paper in most of the Southern 
States insofar as the common people, black and white, are concerned. The 
right to vote, to join a union, to speak, to write, to move about freely, to a fair 
trial, are only hollow phrases to a majority of the people in the South. 

Other examples of the type of vicious propaganda ladled out by the 
Civil Rights Congress and reiterated by Communist Parties through- 
out the world are the following: 

LYNCH TERROR STALKS AMERICA * * * Will You Be Next? " 

'« Worker, May 12, 1946, p. 7m. 

" Civil Kiglits Congress leaflet advertising a meeting on August 28, 1946, cosponsored by the Communist 
Party of the West Side in New York City. 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 7 

Advcrtisins: a mootini: in Ix-hnlf of (rcilinrt Eislcr. intornntioiinl 
Coiniuunist agent, one of Moscow's "brain trustors" in its subversive 
activities in the United States and charged by his own sister with 
being a "terrorist type" responsible for tlie death of a numl)er of 
opponents of the Stabn regime, the Civil Rights Congress declares 
in the Daily Worker of March G, 1947 (p. 8): 

Gorhart Eislcr was denied every civil riRht by the FBI, the Department of 
Justice, a Congressional Committee. That means YOUR democratic liberties are 
endangered. 

Again on February 15, 1047, the Civil Rights Congress in its circular 
letter to Congressmen describes Eisler's appearance before the House 
Committee on Un-American Activities as follows: 

The Chairman then refused to permit him to read, before being sworn, a one- 
page statement of protest of his arrest. 

It is worth recounting the true facts in order to appreciate fully- 
the Communist technique of distortion. Authoritative testimony be- 
fore this committee supported by documentary evitlence shows that 
Eisler, under the various aliases of Edwards, Brown, Hans Berger, and 
Samuel Liptzen, using forged passports, carried on his nefarious activi- 
ties without molestation in 1933 and then from 1941 to 1947. Re- 
fusing to be sworn in until he had read his "three minute" statement, 
Eisler promptly distributed to the press a prepared statement of 23 
pages, now reprinted as a pamphlet and widelv circulated under the 
title "Gerhart Eisler— My Side of the Story'." On December 27, 
1946, he was granted the privilege of the air over the WOR network 
affording him an opportunity to voice his views before a Nation-wide 
radio audience. Since his citation for contempt by Congress, he has 
been addressing meetings in various parts of the country exploiting 
to the full the unique opportunity we have aflorded him as the only 
agent of the Communist International to be allowed to address public 
meetings in the United States without resort to subterfuge — all this 
under a government which is charged with "turning the weapons and 
methods of fascism against the American people." Convicted by a 
Federal court and under $20,000 bail, he continues his activities, writ- 
ing articles for the Communist press, addresshig meetings, and acting 
as adviser in chief of the Communist Party of the United States, 
Commenting upon American indulgence toward him, Eisler declared 
derisively at one of his meetings, "Whoever heard of releasing an atom- 
bomb spy, foreign agent, an overthrower of government, and a dan- 
gerous enemy alien, all in one, for $20,000?" '^ On another occasion 
he admitted that he had been well treated and well-fed at the Federal 
House of Detention.'^ Certainly his Soviet fatherland would not have 
been guilty of sudi overweening lenity. 

The coddling policy shown toward Gerhart Eisler is a glaring demon- 
stration of the ineptitude of our law enforcement agencies toward 
Communist law violators. 

In July 1940 the New York l)ranch of the Civil Rights Congress 
entered upon a campaign of vilification against the police department 
of that city under the slogan of "Halt Anti-Negro Terror," and 
"End New^ York Police Brutality." It charged "a deliberate prov- 

a Dailv Worker, April 24. 1947, p. 12. 
« New York Times, April 17, liM7. 

H. Kept. 1115, 80-1 2 



8 CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

ocation by members of the department to incite riots." '* This was 
condemned by Police Commissioner Arthur W. Wallander as a 
"campaign of calumny." In a letter dated August 9, 1946, former 
Congressman Joseph Clark Baldwin refused an invitation to a civil 
rights meeting on the ground that this committee's attack on the 
police commission was "completely unwarranted," and that its 
attitude was "one of complete irresponsibility and a fundapiental 
lack of judgment as to the true relation of facts." The New York 
World Telegram in its issue of August 9, 1946 (p. 14) called this 
campaign of the Communists "a new low in civic irresponsibility 
and deceit." 

STATUS OF CIVIL LIBERTIES IN AMERICA 

It is high time that certain phases of our way of life, which we have 
too long taken for granted, be restated so that we may not become 
oblivious of their merits in the face of Communist distortion. What 
about the warmongering charge? We are leaning over backward 
in our efforts to arrive at peaceful relations with the Soviet Union, 
some claiming that we are still guilty of appeasement. We have 
disarmed almost to the point of dangerous impotence. We have no 
designs for expansion or accession of territorial claims as a result of 
our recent victory. 

What are the sober facts? Contrary to the practice now being 
enforced at the point of the bayonet in Soviet-controlled areas we are 
not suppressing political parties — even the Communist Party, despite 
extreme provocation, has not been outlawed. We have not interfered 
with free elections. Communists and their stooges are running for 
office and are even elected in some localities. Contrary to the practice 
in Soviet-controlled territory, our trade-unions are free and inde- 
pendent organizations constituting an influential section of our body 
politic. We have no concentration camps or slave labor. Our 
press is uncensored and we are still devotedly enforcing the right to 
freedom of speech, press, assembly, travel, and worship, the right to 
trial by jury, habeas corpus, the right to accept or relinquish a job, 
to own property, freedom, from police surveillance, and the countless 
other blessings of a democratic society which are absent under a 
Communist dictatorship. 

The New York Times has said the following in regard to the Ameri- 
can attitude toward the Negro, which is a favorite topic of Communist 
vilification: 

Around the turn of the century the Negro lynchmgs in this country were close 
to 100 annually, and about the same time the Russian czars were sending to 
Siberia perhaps 10,000 political exiles annually. In the last dozen years our 
Negro lynchings have been perhaps five a year, and the inlnates of the Soviet 
concentration camps have .been estimated at 10,000,000 or higher.'* 

There can be no doubt that the standard of living of the average 
Negro in the United States is far higher than that of the average 
Soviet worker, under the Communist dictatorship. 

The incendiary character of the Civil Rights Congress propaganda 
is forcefully demonstrated by contrast with the latest estimate made 
by the American Civil Liberties Union for the period ending July 

i< Daily Worker, August 8, 1946. 

» New York Times, June 19, 1947, p. 20. 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 9 

1946. It must be rcinpniboroil, in tins coniioction, tliat the ACLU 
has gone so far in its preoccupation with civil hherties as to defend 
both Communists and Fascists, sometimes witli an ahnost complete 
disregard for consiilerations of national security involved. We quote 
from this extremely liberal source: 

Wholly unlike the period foIiowinK World War I, the conversion from war to 
peace in 1945 brought no marked chanu;es in tiie exercise of American hherties 
affecting citlicr the majority or minorities. The voluntary wartime censorshijis 
of press and ratlio were at once removed; * * * restrictions were gradually 
removed on enemy aliens * * *_ The reason for this striking dilferonce 
between the aftermaths of the First and Second World Wars is to be found in 
the comparatively slight reconl of repressive measures in World War II. Only 
a few score jicrsons had been prosecuted for speech or publication. Public debate 
and discussion had remained unrestricted * * *. No wartime hysteria had 
marked the country. Organized labor had become too strongly entrenched to 
permit wholesale attacks upon the trade-union movement * * * Indeed, 
the gains in civil liberties which had surprisingly marked the war j'cars continued." 

ORIGIN, EXTENT, AND PURPOSE 

According to its own pronouncements, the Civil Rights Congress 
appears to be dedicated to a most meritorious cause, which is described 
as follows: 

The CRC is a national membership organization formed by hundreds of national 
and community groups from all parts of the country to provide a well-organized, 
unified program of action to defend and extend the democratic rights of every 
American. 

It should be noted in this connection that the Civil Rights Congress 
is not recorded as defemling any but Communist or Communist front 
cases and that the phrase "extend the democratic rights of every 
American" is time-honored Communist double talk for the idea of 
utilizing the opportunities afforded by our democracy for the further- 
ance of Communist propaganda and the ultimate establishment of a 
Communist dictatorship. 

The Detroit conference of April 27-28 was preceded by a conference 
held on April 13, 1946 (Thomas Jefferson Day) at the Fraternal Club- 
house, at 110 West Forty-eighth Street, New York City. This Iniild- 
ing is owned by the International Workers Ozxler, cited by former 
Attorney General Biddle as "one of the strongest Communist organ- 
izations." The conference was called by an "Initiating Committee," 
whose origin has never been disclosed. The call assured all and sundry 
that "An enemy offensive is now being waged against the common 
people of the United States — labor, Negroes, Jewish people, the 
foreign-born, progressives, and all their organizations — in a relentless 
drive to establish fascism in our own country." The New York 
meeting proceeded to elect an organizing committee. Following the 
Detroit conference, Meyer E. Stern, director of District 6 of the 
United Packinghouse Workers (CIO), announced through the Daily 
Worker of May 9, 1946, page 4, the formation of the Civil Rights 
Congress of New^ York, formerly loiown as the New York Conference 
on Civil Rights. A meeting had previously been held for this purpose 
at the Hotel Capitol on April 25. 

As to the character of the "national and community groups" which 
constitute the Civil Rights Congress, the pronouncement goes on to 
state that: 

<• From War to TcAce, .\merlcan Liberties, I9i&-Vi, published bj the American Civil Liberties Uaioa, 
170 5tb Ave., New York 10, N. Y., July 1M6, pp. 5. 6. 



10 CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

Into the CRC have been merged the National Federation for Constitutional 
Liberties and the International Labor Defense. The Civil Rights Federation in 
Detroit and the Chicago Civil Liberties Committee immediately affiliated with 
the CRC. * * * Local organizations which have merged into the New York 
CRC include Veterans Against Discrimination and the Metropolitan Inter-faith 
and Interracial Coordinating Council. 

Officially endorsed by the Civil Eights Congress is the newly formed 
Eisler defense committee, defending Gerhart Eisler, American repre- 
sentative of the allegedly "dissolved" but extremely active Communist 
International. The congress also voted to reconstitute an Abolish 
Peonage Committee, claiming in its customary restrained fashion that 
"The crime of peonage or debt slavery is still rampant in our land." 

Also represented at the CKC were the Nassau County (N. Y.) Con- 
ference for Human Rights, the St. Louis Committee for a Fair Em- 
ployment Practice Ordinance, the United Citizens for Democracy of 
Houston, Tex., the Mass Movement League of Toledo, Ohio, the 
Wisconsin Committee for a Permanent FEPC, the New York Com- 
mittee for Justice in Freeport, the Southern Negro Youth Congress, 
and the National Negro Congress. Other typical regional organiza- 
tions are the Texas Civil Rights Congress, West Bronx Civil Rights 
Congress, Albany Civil Rights Congress, Upper West Side Civil 
Rights Congress, Illinois Civil Liberties Committee, Eisler Defense 
Committee, Greenwich Village Civil Rights Congress, etc. 

Of the above organizations the following have been cited as 
Communist front organizations by former Attorney General Francis 
A. Biddle: International Labor Defense, the "legal arm of the 
Communist Party"; the National Federation for Constitutional 
Liberties; Michigan Civil Rights Federation; National Negro Con- 
gress. The following have been previously cited as such by the 
Committee on Un-American Activities on one or more occasions: 
International Labor Defense, National Federation for Constitutional 
Liberties, National Negro Congress, Michigan Civil Rights Federa- 
tion, Southern Negro Youth Congress. The Chicago Civil Liberties 
Committee should not be confused with the American Civil Liberties 
Union, from which it seceded in repudiation of the policies of the latter 
organization. All merged into the new organization pledged by the 
former head of the International Labor Defense to carry on the history 
of the latter, notorious. Communist front. 

The Detroit conference claimed 415 delegates with 38 observers from 
23 States and the District of Columbia. Of this number, 258 came from 
the Midwest, 35 from the East, 70 from the West, and several from the 
South. It should be noted, however, that the ringleaders lilce Alilton 
Kaufman, George Marshall, Louis Colman, and others came from 
New York where Communist Party headquarters are located. 
Conference figures show 119 labor delegates, 2 from fraternal organiza- 
tions, '26 Negroes, 21 from civic and political organizations, 9 from 
rehgious organizations, 20 women organizations, 24 foreign-born, 5 
youth, 3 veterans, 3 educators, and 5 lawyers. The decision to form 
the Civil Rights Congress was adopted unanimously and a continua- 
tions committee (a term typical of Communist front organization 
procedure) was authorized to pick an executive committee. ^^ 

Dues are set at $1 per year for general membership, $3 for asso- 
ciates, $5 for subscribers, $10 for sustaining members, and $25 for 
supporters. 

" Daily Worker, May 12, 1947, p. 7m. 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 11 

Subsequently the Civil Rights Congress pledged itself "to act 
against the Schwellenbach proposal to outlaw the Communist 
Party," '* denounced "punitive measures directed against the Com- 
munist Party," opposed proposed loyalty investigations of Federal 
employees as "the most dangerous and undemocratic proceeding that 
could be conceived," ^^ urged President Truman "to effect immediate 
release of Gerhart Eisler," ^^ and announced that it would "undertake 
full responsibility for the defense, in and out of court, of Eugene 
Dennis, general secretary of the Comminiist Party, and Leon 
Josephson," -^ a leading party member identified with espionage 
activities and passport frauds. 

Among its activities is also the defense of Howard Fast's Tom Paine^ 
with a demand that it be restored for use in the public high schools.^^ 
This book is a fictionahzed, sugar-coated, but thinly disguised, exposi- 
tion of Communist theory and practice including the advocacy of 
overthrow of government by fofce and violence. Its clear implication 
is that we must carry over the revolutionary tactics used against the 
British Government m colonial times as described by Mr. Fast, to the 
present against our own Government. The following passages are 
typical: 

Quoting Benjamin Rush: "We had no precedent, but only a theory, and that 
theory is that stren"!'.! Ues in the hands of the armed masses. * * * B^it 
there was never in this world, a technique for revolution. * * * The strength 
of many is revolution" (p. 116). 

Quoting Tom Paine: "Revolution is a method of force by a party not in power 
as we understand it, by the party of the people, which has never been in power 
in tlio history of this earth" (p. 197). 

Then, with startling suddenness, it came to an end. All the carefully organized 
revolutionary cells, miners in Wales, cutlers in Sheffield, the dock workers at 
Liverpool and Tync, the potters and the wheelwrights — all those who had looked 
for Paine's leadershiiD — were cracked wide open by the government * * * be- 
fore the thin threads of revolution were even in shape to be drawn together (p.. 
247). 

The Civil Rights Congress has been active in behalf of Paul Robeson, 
who was denied the right to speak in Albany and Peoria. The 
Albany branch was headed by Mrs. Vivian Schatz, with headquarters 
at 63 South Pearl Street. Paul Robeson will be remembered as one 
who has been outspoken in his defense of the Communist Party on 
numerous occasions as cited in the following issues of the Daily 
Worker: Julv 23, 1940, page 1 ; March 5, 1941, page 2; March 18, 1945, 
page 3; April 22, 1947, page 5; April 30, 1947, page 11. He has 
defended Gerhart Eisler and Leon Josephson, active international 
Communist agents.^^ \^Tiile refusing to afhrm or deny membership 
in the Communist Party, he has participated in official Communist 
gatherings on March 17, 1941, March 17, 1947, and on May 8, 1947. 
He has long been an ardent apologist for the Soviet Union, where his 
son resided and was educated. 

In Los Angeles, the Civil Rights Division of the Mobilization for 
Democracy affihated with the Civil Rights Congress, cooperated 
with the Progressive Citizens of America in seeking to reverse the 
decision of the directors of the Hollywood Bowl barring Henry A.. 
Wallace from speaking.^* 

<» Dailv Worker, March 15, 1917, p. IZ 

i» Daily Worker, May 19, 1947, p. 3. 

*> PM, March 3, 1947, p. 20in. 

>' Daily Worker, May 23, 1947, p. 3. 

« Daily Worker, March 20, 1947; Civil Rights Congress release, March 11, 1947. 

» Dailv Worker, April 2^, 1947, p. 4. 

" DaUy Worker, AprU 28, 1947, p. 4. 



12 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



INTERLOCKING RELATIONSHIPS 

The fact that the Civil Eights Congress is not based primarily upon 
a desire to defend civil rights is brought out sharply by the number of 
its sponsors and officers who have been associated in one way or 
another with the American Peace Mobilization, formed at the time 
of the Stalin-Hitler pact in order to sabotage our national defense 
program and culminating in a mass picket line around the White 
House lasting until a few days before Adolf Hitler attacked Russia. 
A Mst of those 43 individuals to be found in both organizations follows: 

INDIVIDUALS CONNECTED WITH BOTH THE CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS AND THE 

AMERICAN PEACE MOBILIZATION 



Henderson, Donald 
Hughes, Langston 
Jurich, J. F. 
Lee, Canada 
Leicester, Robert 
Marshall, George 
McMichael, Jack 
McWilliams, Carey 
Merrill, Lewis 
Oakes, Grant W. 
Powell, Hazel Scott 
Quill, Michael J. 
Rathborne, Mervyn 
Rautenstrauch, Walter 



Adelman, Meyer 
Bay, Howard 
Berne, Lewis Alan 
Billings, Warren K. 
Burt, Sam 
Connelly, Philip M. 
Connolly, Eugene P. 
Curran, Joseph 
Dehn, Adolph 
DeLacv, Hugh 
Dodd, Bella V. 
Dutto, Frank 
Emspak, Julius 
Gainer, Morris 
Eammett, Dashiel 

It will be remembered that during the days of the infamous Soviet- 
Nazi pact, the Communists built protective organizations known as 
the National Emergency Conference, the National Emergency for 
Democratic Rights, which culminated in the National Federation for 
Constitutional Liberties. It cannot be accidental that the following 
83 individuals supporting one or more of these organizations have 
also aided the Civil Rights Congress: 



Refregier, Anton 
Reich, Harry 
Robeson, Paul 
Robinson, Earl 
Robinson, Reid 
Selly, Joseph P. 
Shore, Jerome 
Soyer, Raphael 
Stewart, Donald Ogden 
Ward, Courtnev D. 
Ward, Harry F. 
Weinstock, Louis 
Wilkerson, Doxey 
Yergan, Max 



Ackley, Charles B. 
Adamic, Louis 
Allen, James Egert 
Anderson, William A. 
Arndt, Elmer J. F. 
Balokovic, Zlatko 
Bay, Howard 
Beil, Thomas 
Benet, William Rose 
Benson, Elmer A. 
Berne, Lewis Alan 
Bethune, Mary McLeod 
Bowie, W. Russel 
Bradley, Lyman R. 
Brewer, James L. 
Brodsky, Joseph R. 
Brown, Charlotte H. 
Burnham, Louis E. 
Colman, Louis 
Connolly, Eugene 
Corwin, Norman 
Curran, Joseph 
DeLacy, Hugh 
Dickerson, Earl B. 
Dodd, Bella V. 
Dunn, Robert W. 
Fairchild, Henry P. 
Feuchtwanger, Lion 



Field, R. D. 
Flynn, Elizabeth G. 
Fritchman, Stephen H. 
Gallagher, Leo 
Gimbel, Elinor S. 
Gregg, J. A. 
Hammett, Dashiel 
Harvey, Arthur J. 
Henderson, Donald 
Hill, Charles A. 
Hughes, Langston 
Jack, Hulan E. 
Jurich, J. F. 
Kahn, Albert E. 
Kemnitz, Milton 
Kent, Rockwell 
King, Carol 
Marshall, George 
Mather, Kirtlcy F. 
Matthieson, F. O. 
McConnell, Francis J. 
McMichael, Jack 
McWilliams, Carey 
Merrill, Lewis 
Nordstrand, Josephine 
Oakes, Grant W. 
Parsons, Edward L. 
Pettus, Terry 



Poteat, Edwin McNeill 
Pressman, Lee 
Quill, Michael J. 
Rathborne, Mervyn 
Rautenstrauch, Walter 
Refregier, Anton 
Robeson, Paul 
Robinson, Edward G. 
Robinson, Reid 
Schieffelin, William J. 
Schlesinger, A. M. 
Schneirla, T. C. 
Selly, Joseph P. 
Sorrell, Herbert K. 
Spofford, William B. 
Stefansson, Vilhjalmur 
Stern, Bernhard J. 
Stevens, Hope R. 
Stevei:ison, A. E. 
Stewart, Donald Ogden 
Struik, Dirk J. 
Talbott, Glenn J. 
Ward, Harry F. 
Weber, Max 
Wliite, Wayne 
Wilkerson, Doxey 
Yergan, Max 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



13 



Gallagher, Leo 
Guinicr, Ewart 
Hammctt, Dashiel 
Henderson, Donald 
Jack, Hulan E. 
Jurich, J. F. 
Kent, Rockwell 
LeSeiier, Arthur 
McWilliams, Carey 
Merrill, Lewis 
Oakes, Grant W, 
Quill, Michael J. 
Rathborne, Mervyn 
Rautenstrauch, Walter 



Reich, Harry 
Robeson, Paul 
Robinson, Reid 
Shore, Jerome 
Smith, Ferdinand 
Spofford, William B. 
Stefansson, Vilh.jalmur 
Stevens, Hope R. 
Ward, Courtney D. 
Ward, Harry F. 
Weber, Max 
Yergan, Max 



Eooxploiting: a llinitcd circle of pro-Communist sponsors, the Civil 
Rights Congress counts for support upon the following 40 individuals 
also found on statements or committees supporting the release of 
Earl Browder, former general secretary of the Communist Party, 
U. S. A.: 

Adelman, Meyer 
Alexander, Raymond Pace 
Bay. Howard 
Chodorov, Edward 
Collins, Cliarles 
Connelly, Philip M. 
Connolly, Eugene P. 
Curran, Joseph 
DeLacy, Hugh 
Dickerson, Earl B. 
Dunn, Robert W. 
Flynn, Elizabeth G. 
Fritchman, Stephen H. 
Gainer, Morris 

The Civil Rights Congress has received the support of numerous 
Communist front organizations and has cooperated with such organ- 
izations on frequent occasions, of which the following are typical: 

On August 28, 1946, the Upper West Side Civil Rights Congress of 
New York City held a meeting at the Pythian Temple, 135 West 
Seventieth Street, which was cosponsored by the Communist Party, 
West Side; American Labor Party; American Youth for Democracy; 
United Negro and Allied Veterans of America; and the International 
Workers Order, Lodge 572. 

Tickets for the Civil Rights Congress meeting on March 20, 1947, 
in behalf of Gerhart Eisler were on sale at Club 65 Bookshop, 13 
Astor Place; International Workers Order, 80 Fifth Avenue; Jefferson 
Bookshop, 575 Sixth Avenue; Forty-fourth Street Book Fair, 133 
West Forty-fourth Street; Worker's Bookshop, 50 East Thirteenth 
Street; American Youth for Democracy, 150 Nassau Street; the 
German-American, 305 Broadway — all well-knowm Communist 
centers.^ 

Participating organizations in the Eisler defense committee, an 
offshoot of the Civil Rights Congress, are the following Communist- 
dominated fronts: American Committee for Protection of Foreign 
Born; Friends of the German- American ; German- American Labor 
Council. ^^ 

Subscribers to the pro-Communist gossip and scandal sheet, In 
Fact, have been placed on the mailing list of the Civil Rights Con- 
gress.^ 

On August 1, 1946, the Daily Worker announced a Madison Square 
Park demonstration in which the Civil Rights Congress, the Com- 
munist Party, and the American Labor Party participated. John 
Williamson, member of the top secretariat of the Communist Party, 
U. S. A., was a speaker. 

People's Songs, a group which has been identified by its appearance 
on the programs of Communist organizations, furnished the talent 
for a Civil Rights Congress affair on September 15, 1946. 

« Daily Worker. March fi, 19J7, p. 8. 

« Pamphlcr, Fi?ler riii= Back, published by the German-American, 1947, p. 18. 

n New York World Telegram, December 11, 1946. 



14 CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

KEY INDIVIDUALS 

The character of the Civil Rights Congress is amply demonstrated 
by the Communist affiliations of its leading officers and supporters: 

Joseph R. Brodsky, member of initiating committee and New York 
board of directors of Civil Rights Congress; cited by Benjamin 
Gitlow as "a member of the Communist Party hokling a position of 
the highest confidence * * * the party's main legal ad- 
viser * * * yri^Q handled confidential matters and money 
matters";-^ listed as pay-off man for Moscow by the British Gov- 
ernment;-^ attorney for the International Labor Defense, the' Inter- 
national Workers Order; attornev for the Communist Party in 193G, 
1940, 1942, 1946, and 1947. After his death on July 28, \947, the 
Communist Party announced that he had been a charter member of 
the organization. In September. 1939 Brodsky had denied party 
membership under oath. 

Louis Colman, member, initiating committee; executive secretary, 
New York branch; member of national staff of Civil Rights Congress; 
assistant national secretary, International Labor Defense, the "legal 
arm of the Communist Party"; supporter of Communist candidate 
for President in 1932. 

Thelma Dale, member, initiating committee of Civil Rights Con- 
gress ; member, New York State committee of the Communist Party, 
U. S. A.,-in 1 945 ; speakerf or the International Labor Defense, Japanese- 
American Committee for Democracy, Congress of American Women. 

Hugh De Lacy, convention speaker, sponsor of Civil Rights Con- 
gress; cited as one w^ho is "beloved, long beloved, and deeply cherished 
by the Communist Party" ;^'' signer of protest against barring Com- 
munist Party from ballot in 1940; defends Communists Sam Darcy, 
Harry Bridges, William Schneiderman, Morris U. Schappes, Earl 
Browder, Ernest Fox, Oklahoma Communist Party leaders; closely 
associated during a plenary meeting of the executive committee of the 
Communist Party, U. S. A., in January 1944 with Carl Reeve and 
Henry Huff, chairman and secretary of the Communist Party of the 
State of Washington, respectively. 

Julius Emspak, member, initiating committee of Civil Rights Con- 
gress; cited by Louis F.Budenz as "Comrade Juniper," a secret member 
of the Communist Party, U. S. A., in 1947; sponsor of the American 
Peace Mobilization and its successor, the Win-the-Peace Conference. 

Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, sponsor, Civil Rights Congress; mem- 
ber, national committee. Communist Party, U. S. A.; and head of a 
number of committees set up to defend Communists. 

Stephen H. Fritchman, sponsor of Civil Rights Congress; ousted 
as editor of the Christian Register because of charges of Communist 
sympathies; supporter of the following Communist fronts: Congress 
of Youth, Committee To Defend America by Keeping out of War, 
North American Spanish-Aid Committee, New Alasscs, Joint Anti- 
Fascist Refugee Committee, Win-the-Pcace Conference, American 
Committee for Protection of Foreign Born; "sponsored no less than 
22 pro-Soviet organizations"; ^^ signer, Communist Party election 
petition, August 22, 1940. 

2' HoarinRS of the Spocial CommittPe on TTn-Amorfnan Activitios, vol. 7, p. 4554. 

w Doc'iinipnts Il'ustratinc the Hostilp Activitios of thn Soviet (iovnrnn'ont anri th^^ Third Intornational 
Against Orcat Britain. Presented to Parliament by Command of His Majesty. Command Paper No. 
2874. 1927. 

3o,Concrewional Record, December 7, 1945, p. 11876. 

" Congressional Record, May 28, 1947, p. A2680. 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 15 

Leo Gallagher, sponsor of Civil Rights Congress; Communist 
candidate in Los Angeles in 1933, 1934, 1938; attorney for the Com- 
munist Party, 1934, 1940; attorney for the International Labor 
Defense, 1930, 1934, 1936, 1937; subject of disbarment proceedings in 
193G. 

Donald Henderson, sponsor of Civil Rights Congress; Communist 
Party oflicial and writer for the Communist press; expelled from 
faculty for Communist activities in Cohmibia University in 1933; 
signer of statement in behalf of Communists Earl Browder, Gerhart 
Eisler, Sam Darcy, Eugene Dennis, Luis Carlos Prestes, George 
Dimitrov; member of numerous front organizations. 

Langston Hughes, sponsor of Civil Rights Congi-ess; member, 
Communist Party, U. S. A.; signer of statement in behalf of Com- 
munists George Dimitrov, William Z. Foster, Don West, Benjamin J. 
Davis, Jr.; contributor to the Communist press. 

J. F, JuRicH, sponsor of Civil Rights Congress; signer of statement 
in behalf of Communists Earl Browder, Sam Darcy, Harry Bridges, 
and Communists in the Army. 

Albert E. Kahn, member, initiating committee. Civil Rights 
Congress; New York State Communist Party leader; signer of state- 
ment in behalf of Communists Gerhart Eisler, George Dimitrov; 
editorially associated with the following Communist publications: 
The Hour, New Currents, Jewish Life, New Masses. 

Milton Kaufman, executive secretary. Civil Rights Congress; 
leader of left-wing in the American Newspaper Guild; signer of 
statement defending the Conununist Party, April 16,1947; sponsor of 
the following Conununist fronts: American League for Peace and 
Democracy, Joint Committee for Trade-Union Rights, Greater New 
York Emergency Conference on Inalienable Rights. 

Jack McMichael, member, mitiating committee, Civil Rights 
Congress; defended the Communist Party on October 28, 1940, 
December 19, 1940, March 5, 1941, March 18, 1945, April 29, 1947, 
May 20, 1947; signer of statement in behalf of Communists Earl 
Browder, Gerhart Eisler, Morris U. Schappes, Sam Darcy; supporter 
of the following Communist fronts: American Peace Mobilization, 
American Youth Congress. 

Herbert March, sponsor. Civil Rights Congress; member, na- 
tional committee. Communist Party; former organizer, Young 
Commmiist League. 

George ^Iarshall, chairman of the board of the Civil Rights Con- 
gress; signer of statement in behalf of Communists — ^Alrs. Raissa 
Browder, Luis Carlos Prestes, Gerhart Eisler; signer of statement 
defendinfi: the Communist Party on August 8, 1940, March 5, 1941, 
March 18, 1945, April 16, 1947; cited for contempt of Congress. 

Saul Mills, sponsor. Civil Rights Congress; signer of statement in 
behalf of Communists Earl Browder, Morris U. Schappes, and Com- 
munists in the armed forces; opposes President Truman's loyalty 
program; supporter of the following Communist fronts: American 
Peace M^obilization, Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Committee, Wash- 
ington Committee for Democratic Action, Stage for Action. 

Samuel A. Neuburger, member, initiating committee, and New 
York director, Civil Rights Congress; attorney for Communist de- 
fendants, October 1940, May 1947; attorney for International Labor 
Defense. 



H. Kept. 1115, 80-1- 



16 CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

Grant W. Oakes, sponsor, Civil Rights Congress; signer of state- 
ment in behalf of Communists Earl Browder, Jack Johnstone ; signer 
of statement in defense of Communist Party, March 18, 1945, May- 
25, 1947; supporter of Communist publications Daily Worker, Chicago 
Star; sponsor, American Peace Mobilization and Chicago May Day 
Committee. 

Irving Potash, sponsor, New York Civil Rights Congress ; member, 
political committee and national board, Communist Party. 

Michael J. Quill, sponsor. Civil Rights Congress; cited by former 
members of the Com.munist Party as a fellow member; signer of state- 
ment in behalf of Communists Earl Browder, Simon Gerson, Morris 
U. Schappes, George Dimitrov; supporter of following Communist 
fronts: American Peace Mobilization, Jewish People's Committee, 
Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Committee, American League for Peace 
and Democracy, International Labor Defense, Washington Committee 
for Democratic Action, Am_erican Committee for Protection of Foreign 
Born, National Negro Congress. 

Walter Rautenstrauch, member, mitiating committee. Civil 
Rights Congress; signer of statement in behalf of Communists Luis 
Carlos Prestes, Harry Bridges, George Dimitrov, Earl Browder; sup- 
porter of the following Communist fronts: American Peace Mobiliza- 
tion, American League for Peace and Democracy, American Committee 
for Protection of Foreign Born, American Com.mittee for Democracy 
and Intellectual Freedom, American Youth Congress, Council for 
Pan-American Democracy, Committee for Citizenship Rights, Inde- 
pendent Citizens Committee of the Arts, Sciences and Professions, 
Jefferson School of Social Science, League of American Writers, New 
Masses, School for Democracy, Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Comm.ittee. 

Earl Robinson, also known as Robert Earl, sponsor. Civil Rights 
Congress; furnished music for Com.munist Party according to Daily 
Worker of January 20, 1938, February 9, 1938, January 30, 1939, 
December 20, 1942, January 20, 1947; acted in behalf of Communists 
Ella Reeve Bloor, Harry Bridges, Morris U. Schappes; supported the 
following Communist fronts: Abraham Lincoln Brigade, American 
Artists School, American Friends of the Chinese People, American 
Peace Mobilization, China Aid Council, International Labor Defense, 
International Workers Order, League of American Writers, National 
Council of American-Soviet Friendship, New Masses, School for 
Democracy, Soviet Russia Today, United American Artists, American 
Committee for Protection of Foreign Born, People's Songs, Jefferson 
School of Social Science, and the Young Communist League. 

Reid Robinson, sponsor. Civil Rights Congress; signer of statement 
in behalf of Communists Earl Browder, Harry Bridges; signer of 
statement defending the Communist Party, September 24, 1940, and 
March 18, 1945; held incom.municado by the Canadian Government 
in 1941; supporter of the following Communist fronts: All-California 
Conference for Defense of Civil Rights, Am.erican Committee for 
Protection of Foreign Born, American Council on Soviet Relations, 
American League for Peace and Democracy, American Peace Mobih- 
zation, American Youth Congress, Committee To Defend America 
by Keeping out of War, First Congress of the Mexican and Spanish- 
American Peoples of the United States, Galena Defense Committee, 
International Labor Defense, Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Committee, 
National Council of American-Soviet Friendship, Second Northwest 
Congress Against War and Fascism, New Masses, Council for Pan- 
American Democracy. 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 17 

Joseph P. Selly, member, initiating committee, Civil Rights 
Congress; acted in behalf of Communists Morris U. Schappes, Harry 
Bridges, Francisco Perez Leiros, Murray Winocur; supporter of follow- 
ing Communist front organizations: Council for Pan-American De- 
mocracy, International Labor Defense, American Council on Soviet 
Relations, American Peace Mobilization, American Committee for 
Protection of Foreign Born, Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Committee. 

Ferdinand C. Smith, member, initiating committee, Civil Rights 
Congress; Communist Party member; acted in behalf of Communists 
Earl Browder, Morris U. Schappes, Benjamin J. Davis, Jr., Israel 
Amtcr, George Dimitrov; supporter of the following Communist 
fronts: Council on African AfTairs, Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Com- 
mittee, National Negro Congress, New Masses, United May Day 
Committee, Stage for Action, George Washington Carver School. 

Hope R. Stevens, member, initiating committee, Civil Rights 
Congress; acted in behalf of Communists, Earl Browder, Benjamin J. 
Davis, Jr., Luis Carlos Prestes, Sam Darcy, Harry Bridges, George 
Dimitrov; signer of statement in defense of the Communist Party, 
September 16, 1940, March 5, 1941; supporter of the following Com- 
munist fronts: Lawyers Committee to Keep the U. S. out of War, 
American Committee for Protection of Foreign Born, National Negro 
Congress, Council for Pan-American Democracy, West Indies Na- 
tional Emergency Committee, Jewish People's Committee. 

Donald Ogden Stewart, member, initiating committee. Civil 
Rights Congi-ess; supporter of the following organizations defending 
individual Communists or the Communist Party: American Committee 
for Democracy and Intellectual Freedom, American Committee for 
Protection of Foreign Born, International Labor Defense, National 
Committee for People's Rights, National Federation for Constitutional 
Liberties, National Emergency Conference for Democratic Rights; 
signer of statement in behalf of Communists Sam Darcy, George 
Dimitrov, Harry Bridges; supporter of the following Communist 
fronts: American League for Peace and Democracy, League of Ameri- 
can Writers, Committee for a Democratic Far-Eastern Policy, Con- 
sumers L'nion, Friends of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, Motion 
Picture Democratic Committee, National Council of American-Soviet 
Friendship, New Alasses, Soviet Russia Today, Theatre Arts Com- 
mittee, American Council for a Democratic Greece. 

Dirk J. Struik, sponsor, Civil Rights Congress; signer of statement 
in behalf of Communists Earl Browder, Hariy Bridges, Morris U. 
Schappes, George Dimitrov; supporter of the following Communist 
fronts: Jefferson School of Social Science, American Committee for 
Protection of Foreign Born, Science and Society (magazine), New 
Masses (magazine), Committee To Defend America by Keeping out 
of War, Conference on Pan-American Democracy, American Com- 
mittee for Democracy and Intellectual Freedom, National Federation 
for Constitutional Liberties, Alassachusetts Council of American- 
Soviet Friendship, Committee for Citizenship Rights. 

Courtney D. Ward, sponsor, Civil Rights Congress; signer of state- 
ment defending the Communist Party, March 13, 1947, May 25, 1947; 
endorser of Daily Worker; supporter of the following Communist 
fronts: American Peace ^Mobilization, National Federation for Con- 
stitutional Liberties, Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Committee; partic- 
ipant in banquet for Ella Reeve Bloor, leading Communist, June 1947. 



18 CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

Ha.rry F. Ward, chairman, Civil Rights Congress; signer of state- 
ment in hehalf of Communists Harold Pritchett, Simon Gerson, Sam 
Darcy, Ella Reeve Bloor, Luis Carlos Prestes, Harry Bridges, Morris 
U. Schappes, Gerhart Eisler, Earl Browder; signer of statement in 
defense of the Communist Party, March 5, 1941, April 19, 1947; 
supporter of the following Communist publications: New Masses, 
Soviet Russia Today, Daily Worker, Midwest Daily Record; endorser 
of statement in defense of the Soviet Union, October 4, 1933, June 20, 
1936, September 1939, August 1941, March 18, 1946, June 15, 1947; 
supporter of the following Communist fronts: American jLeague 
Against War and Fascism, American League for Peace and Democracy, 
American Peace Mobilization, American Committee for Protection of 
Foreign Born, American Friends of the Chinese People, American 
Friends of Spanish Democracy, American Youth Congress, League of 
American Writers, National Federation for Constitutional Liberties, 
National Negro Congress, American Student Union, International 
Labor Defense, American Youth for Democracy, League of Women 
Shoppers, Council for Pan-American Democracy, Joint Anti-Fascist 
Refugee Committee. 

Max Weber, sponsor. New York Civil Rights Congress; signer of 
statement in behalf of Communists Earl Browder, James Ford, Sam 
Darcy, Harry Bridges, George Dimitrov, Israel Amter, Gerhart 
Eisler, Benjamin J. Davis, Jr.; signer of statement in defense of the 
Communist Party, Alarch 18, 1945, April 16, 1947, May 20, 1947; 
signer of statement in defense of the Soviet Union, Alarch 1937, 
November 1937, April 28, 1938, Septcmbor 1939, March 18, 1946; sup- 
porter of the following Communist fronts: American Artists Congress, 
Independent Citizens Committee of the Arts, Sciences and Professions, 
National Federation for Constitutional Liberties, New Masses, Soviet 
Russia Today, United American Artists, International Workers Order, 
American Committee for Protection of Foreign Born, Joint Anti- 
Fascist Refugee Committee, National Council of American-Soviet 
Friendship. 

Louis Weinstock, member, initiating committee. Civil Rights 
Congress; member, national committee. Communist Party; signer of 
statement in behalf of Communists Earl Browder, Ella Reeve Bloor, 
Abraham MarkolF, George Dimitrov, Stanley Nowak, Benjamin J. 
Davis, Jr., Robert Thompson; numerous other front connections. 

Gene Weltfish, member, initiating committee, Civil Rights Con- 
gress; signer of statement in behalf of Communists Gerhart Eisler, Ella 
Reeve Bloor; condemns "Red-baiting," September 25, 1946; supporter 
of the following Communist fronts: American Committee for a 
Democratic Greece, Committee for a Democratic Far Eastern Policy, 
Congress of American Women, Jefferson School of Social Science, 
American Youth for Democracy, Council on African Affairs. 

Max Yergan, m.ember, initiating committee, Civil Rights Congress; 
signer of statement in behalf of Communists Earl Browder, Benjamin 
J. Davis, Jr., George Dimitrov, Harry Bridges, Ella Reeve Bloor; 
signer of statement in defense of the Communist Party, September 
16, 1940, April 26, 1947; supporter of following Communist fronts: 
National Council of American-Soviet Friendship, American League 
for Peace and Democracy, American Peace Mobilization, Win-the- 
Peace Conference, American Committee for Protection of Foreign- 
Born, Committee for a Democratic Far-Eastern Policy, National 
Negro Congress, American Student Union, American Youth Con- 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 19 

gress, China Aid Council, Committee for Citizenship Rights, Com- 
mittee To Defend America by Keeping out of War, National 
Federation for Constitutional Liberties, Council on African Affairs, 
Council for Pan-American Democracy, International Committee on 
African AlTaii-s, International Labor Defense, International Workers 
Order, New Masses, School for Democracy, George Washington 
Carver School, Jefferson School of Social Science, People's Radio 
Foundation. 

Of the above 34 key individuals guiding the policies of the Civil 
Rights Congress, 12 are outright leading members of the Communist 
Party, 25 have aided one or more leading Communists on occasion, 
and 14 have signed statements in support or defense of the Communist 
Party. Due allowance should be made for the fact that important 
party members are known to keep their membership secret. It is 
therefore safe to assume from the pattern of loyalty to the party-line 
that there are more party members among these 34 key individuals. 

It is worthy of note that subsequent to the formation of the Civil 
Rights Congress in Detroit on April 27-28, 1946, and the enUstment 
of additional sponsors, the names of a number of members of the 
initiating committee, having served their decoy purposes, disappeared 
from the organization's letterhead, among them being Zlatko Balo- 
kovic, Elmer A. Benson, Dr. Charlotte Hawkins Brown, Edward 
Chodorov, Norman Corwin, Julius Emspak, Jess Fletcher, Clark 
Foreman, Carey McWilliams, Kirtley F. Mather, Bishop Edward L. 
Parsons, James G. Patton, Dr. Edwin McNeill Poteat, Paul Robeson, 
Edward G. Robinson, Wesley E. Sharer, Prof. John F. Shepard, 
Johannes Steel, and Donald Ogden Stewart. This seems to be a 
favorite device of Communist front organizations. 

CONCLUSION 

From the facts cited above it should be clear that the Civil Rights 
Congress is an organization dedicated not to the broader issues of 
civil liberties, but specifically to the defense of individual Communists 
and the Communist Party, that the organization is controlled by 
individuals who are either members of the Communist Party or 
openly loyal to it, and that in carrying out its defense aims, the 
organization has at the same time engaged in a campaign of vihfication 
against the American Government. 



Beginning on page 40 is a list of contributions and expenditures of 
the Civil Rights Congress and its New York bi'anch, as submitted 
to the Clerk of the House of Representatives in accordance with the 
Lobbying Act. These figures show the enormous financial income 
which this organization defending the Communist Party and its 
officials, whose activities are clearly directed against the interests of 
the United States, has been able to accumulate. In some cases this 
income has been drawn from sources franldy in sympathy with the 
Communist Party such as the International Fur and Leather Workers 
Union (CIO), the United Electrical, Radio, and Machine Workers of 
America (CIO), the Communist Party of the United States, George 
Marshall, Dashiell Hammett, Louise Bransten, Lement Harris, Paul 
Crosbie, and others. In some cases they have been secured on the 
basis of a spurious appeal in behalf of civil liberty. The report will 
further show the maintenance of a huge legal and administrative staff 
including persons with known Communist records. 



APPENDIX 

You Are Called Into Action To Safeguard Civil, Labor, and Minobitt 

Rights in New York i , 

A conference will be held on Thomas Jefferson Day Saturdaj^ April 13, 1946, 
at 1 p. m., at Fraternal Clubhouse, 110 West Forty-eighth Street, New York City. 

Tlie war against fascism is not ended. An enemy offensive is now being waged 
against the common people of the United States — ^labor, Negroes, Jewish people, 
the foreign-born, progressives and all their organizations — in a relentless drive 
to establish fascism in our own country. 

initiating committee 

James Egert AJlen, president, New York State Conference of NAACP Branches 

Zlatko Balokovic, president, American Slav Congress of Greater New York 

Joseph Brodsky 

Charles Collins, vice president. Local 6, Hotel and Club Employees, A. F. of L. 

Louis Colman, secretary, International Labor Defense 

Joseph Curran, president, National Maritime Union 

Miss Thelma Dale, field secretary, National Negro Congress 

Miss Katherine Earnshaw, coordinator of activities, Greater New York CIO 
Council 

Rabbi Max Felshin 

David Freedman 

Leonard Golditch, secretary. National Committee To Combat Anti-Semitism 

Abner Green, executive secretary, American Committee for the Protection of 
Foreign Born 

David Greene, executive secretary. International Workers Order, New York 

Rev. Walter Houck, editor. Pilgrim Interfaith Forum 

Assemblyman Hulan E. Jack 

Mrs. Ada B. Jackson, Brooklyn Interracial Assembly 

Albert E. Kahn 

Milton Kemnitz, executive secretary, National Federation for Constitutional 
Liberties 

Judge Anna M. Kross 

Canada Lee 

Representative Vito Marcantonio, president, International Labor Defense 

Lewis Merrill, president. United Office and Professional Workers of America 

Rev. Jack R. McMichael, executive secretary, National Federation for Social 
Service 

Saul Mills, president. Greater New York CIO Council 

Samuel Neuberger 

Representative Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. 

Mrs. Hazel Scott Powell 

Leon Quat, executive secretary. Metropolitan Interfaith and Interracial Coordi- 
nating Council 

Prof. Walter Rautenstrauch, Columbia University 

Bernard Reswick, president, Brooklyn Council for Social Planning 

Lawrence Rivkin, chairman. Veterans Against Discrimination 

Miss Rose Russell, legislative secretary. Teachers Union 

William Jay SchiefTelin 

Joseph P. Selly, president, American Communications Association, CIO 

Miss Lisa Sergio 

Johannes Steel 

Hope R. Stevens 

Ferdinand Smith, vice president. National Maritime Union 

Palmer Weber, research director, CIO Political Action Committee 

> Program, Civil Rights Congress, April 13, 1946. 
20 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 21 

Dr. Gene Weltfish, department of anthropology, Columbia University 

Louis Weinstock, secretary-treasurer, district council No. 9, Brotherhood of 

Painters, Decorators, and Paperhansers of America, A. F. of L. 
Rev. Wayne White, president, Bronx Clergy Association 
Max Yergan, president, National Negro Congress 

(Organizations listed for identification only.) 



Initiating Committee for a Congress on Civil Rights, 205 East Fortt- 
SECOND Street, New York 17, N. Y.^ 

Elmer A. Benson, Chairman, Executive Council, National Citizens PAG. 

Dr. Charlotte Hawkins Brown, president, Palmer Institute. 

Col. Evans Carlson, Escondido, Calif. 

Edward Chodorov, New York City. 

Norman Corwin, New York City. 

Julius Emspak, secretary-treasurer. United Electrical, Radio, and Machine 

Workers, CIO. 
Jess Fletcher, vice president, Building Service Employees International Union, 

AFL. 
Carey McWilliams, Los Angeles, Calif. 

George Marshall, chairman. National Federation for Constitutional Liberties. 
Dr. Kirtley F. Mather, Cambridge, Mass. 
Dr. Benjamin E. Ma3's, president, Morehouse College. 
Bishop Edward L. Parsons, San Francisco, Calif. 

Dr. Edwin McNeill Poteat, president, Colgate-Rochester Divinity College. 
Paul Robeson, New York City. 
Edward G. Robinson, Hollywood, Calif. 

Wesley E. Sharer, co-chairman, Chicago Civil Liberties Committee. 
Prof. John F. Shepard, president, Michigan Civil Rights Federation. 
Johannes Steel, New York City. 
Donald Ogden Stewart, Cambridge, Mass. 
Milton Kaufrnan, executive secretary. 

(Organizations listed for Identification only.) 



Urgent Summons to a Congress on Civil Rights 

In Detroit, April 27 and 28, 1946, to organize an offensive against the rising 
Fascist aggression in the United States. 

Today's drive to subvert our democratic liberties is well-organized, well-heeled, 
insidious. It presents an emergency that emergency measures alone can meet. 

The great war against fascism is won, but the victory is far from secure. Only 
a coalition of all the forces of the people, through united action, can prevent its 
destruction. 

initiating committee 

Zlatko Balokovic, vice president, American Slav Congress 

Elmer A. Benson, chairman, executive council, National Citizens PAC 

Mary McLeod Bethune 

Dr. Charlotte Hawkins Brown, president. Palmer Institute 

Col. Evans Carlson 

Edward Chodorov 

Norman Corwin 

Julius Emspak, secretary-treasurer, United Electrical, Radio, and Machine 

Workers, CIO 
Jess Fletcher, vice president, Building Service Employees, International Union, 

AFL 
Clark Foreman, president, Southern Conference for Human Welfare 
Carey McWilliams 

Rep. Vito ]Marcantonio, president. International Labor Defense 
George Marshall, chairman, National Federation for Constitutional Liberties 
Dr. Kirtley F. Mather 
Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, president, Morehouse College 

' Letterhead, March 9, 1946. 



22 CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

Bishop Edward L. Parsons 

James G. Patton, president, National Farmers Union 

Dr. Edwin McNeill Poteat, president, Colgate-Rochester Divinity School 

Paul Robeson 

Edward G. Robinson 

Wesley E. Sharer, co-chairman, Chicago Civil Liberties Committee 

Prof. John F. Shepard, president, Michigan Civil Rights Federation 

Johannes Steel 

Donald Ogden Stewart 

Milton Kaufman, executive secretary 

SPONSORS ' 

(Partial list) 

Joseph Curran, president, National Maritime Union 

Councilman Benjamin J. Davis, Jr., New York City 

Adolph Dehn 

Representative Hugh DeLacy, Washin,a;ton 

Hon. Earl B. Dickerson, president. National Bar Association. 

Catherine Dunham 

Roscoe Dunjee 

N. H. Eagle, Director of Organization, United Rubber Workers 

Prof. R. D. Feild, Tulane University 

Lion Feuchtwanger 

Elizabeth Gurley Flynn 

Eleanor Fowler, secretary. Congress of Women's Auxiliaries 

Stephen H. Fritchman, editor, Chirstian Register 

Leo Gallagher, Los Angeles 

John Garfield 

Sander Genis, manager, Twin City Joint Board, Amalgamated Clothing Workers 

Elinor S. Gimbel, New York City 

Leonard Golditch, secretary. National Committee to Combat Anti-Semitism 

Rabbi Solomon Goldman, Chicago 

L. A. Gossett, secretary, Georgia State CIO Council. 

Bishop J. A. Gregg, Kansas City, Kans. 

Abner Green, secretary, American Committee for Protection of Foreign Born 

Mel J.' Heinritz, secretary, Wisconsin State CIO Council 

Donald Henderson, president. Food, Tobacco, Agricultural and AlUed Workers 

Rev. Charles A. Hill, president, Detroit NAACP. 

James M. Hinton, president. State Conference of NAACP for S. C. 

Langston Hughes 

Rev. Kenneth deP. Hughes, president, Boston NAACP 

Hosea Hudson, local president. United Steel Workers, Birmingham 

Rabbi Ferdinand M. Isserman, chairman. Justice and Peace Commission, Central 

Conference of American Rabbis 
Dr. D. V. Jemison, president. National Baptist Convention 
Dr. Rufus M. Jones, Haverford, Pa. 

J. F. Jurich, president, International Fishermen and Allied Workers 
Louis Adamic 

Meyer Adelman, district director. United Steelworkers, Milwaukee 
Raymond Pace Alexander 

James Egert Allen, president, New York State Conference, NAACP branches 
Representative Charles W. Anderson, Kentucky State Legislature 
Judge William A. Anderson, Minneapohs 

Susan B. Anthony II, secretary. Congress of American Women 
Elmer J. F. Arndt, chairman, Committee for Christian Social Action, Evangelical 

and Reformed Church 
Bishop James C. Baker, Los Angeles 

C. B. Baldwin, executive vice president. National Citizens PAC 
Howard Bay, president. United Scenic Artists, Local 829 
W. A. Bell, president. Miles College 
Lewis Alan Berne, president. Federation of Architects, Engineers, Chemists and 

Technicians 
Warren K. Billings 

Rev. Shelton Hale Bishop, New York City 
Judge Jane M. Bolin, New York City 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 23 

H. D. Bollinger, secretary, Department of Student Work, Board of Education, 
Methodist Church 

Rev. W. Kusscl Bowie 

Louis E. Burnham, organizing secretary, Southern Negro Youth Congress 

D. A. Cameron, editor. Little, Brown & Co. 

Councilman Charles N. Carr, Cleveland 

Del Castle, Ship Scalers Union, Local 589 

Rose Mae Catchings, president, Southern Negro Youth Congress 

Prof. Emmanuel Chapman, chairman, Committee of Catholics for Human Rights 

Dr. Rufus E. Clement, president, Atlanta University 

Dean Nick Comfort, Oklahoma School of Religion 

Philip M. Connelly, secretary, Los Angeles CIO Council 

Councilman Eugene P. Connolly, New York City 

A. A. Couch, president, Iowa Federation of Labor 

Julius Crane, vice president, United Shoe Workers 

George W. Crockett, Jr., executive director. Fair Practices Committee, UAW, 
CIO 

Millard Lampell 

Ring W. Lardner, Jr. 

Kenneth Leslie, editor, the Protestant 

A. A. Liveright, executive director, American Council on Race Relations 

Arthur Le Sueur, Duluth, Minn. 

Bishop Francis J. McConnell 

Prof. Edward W. McFarland, president Metropolitan Council FEP, Detroit 

O. E. McKaine, secretary, Progressive Democratic Party, South Carolina 

Rev. Jack R. McMichaei, secretary, Methodist Federation for Social Service 

Herbert March, district director. United Packinghouse Workers, Chicago 

Prof. F. O. Matthieson, Harvard University 

Samuel D. Menin, Denver, Colo. 

Lewis Merrill, president. United Office and Professional Workers 

Saul Mills, secretary, New York CIO Council 

Dr. George S. Mitchell, director. Veterans Service, Southern Regional Council ^ 

J. P. Mooney, organizer. Textile Workers Union, Bessemer, Ala. 

Morris Muster, president. United Furniture Workers 

Tom Neill, executive secretary, Servicemen's and Veterans' Welfare Committee, 
UERWMA 

Josephine Nordstrand, secretary, Wisconsin State Conference on Social Legisla- 
tion 

Grant W. Oakes, president, United Farm Equipment and Metal Workers 

Representative Ellis E. Patterson, California 

Boyd E. Payton, president, Virginia State CIO Council 

Dr. Charles A. Petioni, chairman, West Indies National Council 

Terry Pettus, president, Washington State CIO-PAC 

Irving Potash, manager. Furriers Joint Council, New York 

Representative Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., New Y''ork City 

Lee Pressman, general counsel, CIO 

Councilman Michael J. Quill, president. Transport Workers Union 

Thomas C. Rabbitt, Washington State senatoi 

Mervyn Rathborne, Secretary, California State CIO Council 

Prof. Walter Rautenstrauch, Columbia University 

Earl Robinson 

Reid Robinson, President, International Union, Mine, Mill and Smelter WorkoFS 

Dorothy K. Roosevelt, Executive Secretary, Michigan Citizens Committee 

Representative William A. Rowan, Illinois 

Representative Charles R. Savage, Washington 

William Jay Schieffelin 

Prof. A. M. Schlesinger, Harvard University 

Artur Schnabel 

Prof. Frederick L. Schuman, Williams College 

Joseph P. Selly, President, American Communications Association 

Henry R. Silberman, Executive Director, New England Division, Amepiean Jew- 
ish Congress 

Charles N. Smolikoff, Director, Florida State CIO Council 

Herbert K. Sorrell, President, Conference of Studio Unions, APL • 

Christina Stead 

Max Sein, Secretary, Cincinnati CIO Council 

A. E. Stevenson. Secretary. Cleveland CIO Council 

H. Kept. 1115, 80-1 i 



24 CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

Prof. Dirk J. Struik, Massachusetts Institute of Technology - 

Glenn J. Talbott, President, North Dakota Farmers Union 

Senator Glen H. Taylor, Idaho 

Representative Donald C. Teigland, Illinois State Legislature 

W. E. Tucker, President, Local 157, International Uni-on of Brewery Workers, 

Dallas, Tex. 
Prof. Ralph E. Wager, Emory University 
Dr. Harry F. Wartr ■ - ■ . 

Courtney D. Ward, Secretary. Painters District GoiinciT. Cleveland 
Max Weber . , ' - 

Lulu B. White, Secretary, Houston, Tex., NAAGP - 

Rev. Glaude C. Williams-. Director, People's Institute of Applied Religion 
James H. Wolfe, justice, State Supreme Court, Utah ' 

Bishop Pk,. R. Wright, Jr., Secretary, Fraternal Council of Negro Churches ' 

Dr. Max Yergan, President, National Negro Congress 
Jaok-Zellerj Etlucatiotial DirectOT, UAW-Cia - -•-- ■' '"f-:^'-':'- - " -'?'.-.'»^' 

Conference headquarters: 009 Hammond Building. Fort and Woodward 
Avenues, Detroit. Telephone: Cadillac 0278. - _' ': 

Registration: At First Congregational Church from 11 a. m. to 2, p. rn. on 
Saturday. After 2 p^m., at Maccabees Auditorium. Registration fee:, $2 for 
each orgamzation, delegate, or individual. ^ V'- V- - '-^■ 

Representation: Two representatives from each organization;' %iteresle^ 
individual?^ .. ^ ' - ' J ' '; :J' ' "^■" - ^- ' .'^ r 

Conference lmiche<>n: Saturday noon, at First Congregatibn'al Chu'rcE.' Reser- 
vations may be mad6^ at $1.50 per plate. Please riiake reservatiojis in advance^ 
Lunpheon speakers to be announced. - '• . ■, r ' -- 

Accommodation!?:' Heservations for hotel accomrtiodatidhs must. be riia'de in 
advance because of housing difficulties."" Address" all requests for reservations to 
New York headquarters of Congress on Civil Rights. For fuftlier .details, 
additional copies" of' this call and 'general' inquiry, send all cohimumcatlpfls to: 
Congress on CiviL Rights, 1^05 East .Fortv-se.cofld Street,- New -York 17, N/ Y!. 
.MUrrayi[lll-4^e40;--- "-- ^::""-^ ?.-£rvr^ -r.::,?-^! ;-:.-;}>r ^-y-i^wj:^ 

,.s»&?.-*-:rr:s.cO er^Se" JFEcftfl-the'wisBiiigton P6st;Taratoy,May20; K)47r .r:-.''??^? ...li^''i £r:-1 
^^0_B jPoMiatujiisflr-s pF- Thbib Rights?— r-TpENrrYou^&Gp-. Oxjtj'thb -WrNpow, -'Epp 

Mr. Cp.ngre^man ^ ^We. ar.e,>vriting ^j'OU. te convey our opp.osition to the enact- 
ment 01 any excdption^ sLnd^pumtiyel pleasures, directed against tlieComjpjaanist 
Party. ■,. „. . -, ,-■ -'-"■".:;;■.;■ , , .''-.-, v^ -''-'^- ":..-J. -"-,-, ~t/^ ^' ----,^ 

We consider the Rankiii"bj|t,alid aS "^simnafTegislationla 
liberties of the entire American people, almost without parallel Jnl our history. 
It is a flagrant violation, of-the ri^Jhts guaranteed all citizens "under the Constitution 
and the Bill of Rightstand especially reserved to all minority, parties and groups. 

These guarantees are precious to us for the same sound. reasons that rn^de 
them the foundation of American deinoeracy. Once our Geveriurient is permitted 
the means of suppressing one' minority party, even if that party is opposed by 
most Americans, the door is ©pen to the suppression. of aiiy, and all otlier minority 
parties. Moreover, the enactfneAt of such legislation woidd. inevitably dead, to 
the censorship of all publications, the policing of all drganizia'tion .programs, anJd 
jgubjeet^ing fiveryojie's mail to search and scrutiny. - - .. .„...- ']','. .1- . ."'~ 
" ■ ' Legislatioa sVich as tliait proposed by. Congressmen'Rankin, Sheppard, ITartley, 
Parnell " Thorhas, aiid McDdnough follows -the Hitler pattern Outlawing the 
Communist Party is the first fatal ixiile down the road t-o fascism; it Xs tlie inevi- 
table prelude to the destruction of a free labor movement, academic freedom in 
the Nation's schools and colleges, freedom of political and religious belief, and 
of all progressive organizations and movements. " ' ' . . _ ,' 

No true American can ignore tlie lessons- learaed from Fascist rule in- Hitler 
Germany, and.paid for by. Uie- American pedple.in blood and suffering. 
. --.'^hjej.Coiiini VI mst Party fs^a.^^ We see nothing in 

its program, record, orlictivities; eitlier in war or peace, to justify tlie enactment 
of the repressive legislation now-bein^iir§.ed.upon,the. Congeess in an atniQsphere 
of an organizedJ>j'steria..''.--' . ,' :..^'iS ;_,, -,l..l\~ .. - ' '.',\" J -^^.,r ' .■ ^^^'r,: " -' -lV..r.~-£- 

We therefore urge yotTto defend oiirdehibcfatic'Airiefican way- bf.Tlfebv "re- 
jecting the Rankin bill and all legislation which- curtails- the deii^QcratiQ- rights 

i :-:>i :_.- ,. :.e-,.^ -h 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 25- 

of Colnniunists, or wliich violates or limits the CGrstitutiona} right of tho Coni- 
munist Party to function as a legalpolitical party as it lias in the past. 

' Respectfully, • 

:i.: ;t-- Franklin P. Adams; Prof. Thomas Addis, Stanford University; Stella' 
Adlor, actress; James E. Alien, president. New York State Con- 
ference NAACP; Bishop C. C. Alle^me, Philadelphia, Pa.; Zlatko 
Balokovic, vice president, American Slav Congress; Samuel 
L. M. Parlow, New York City; Bishop W. Y. Belli Cordele, Ga.; 
Hon. Elmer A. Benson, Vice chairman, Progressive Citizens of 
America; Waltei' Bernstein, writer; Prof. Lyman R. Bradlej', 
New York University; Prof. S. P. Breckinridge, University of. 
Chicago; Prof. Edwin Berry Burgum, New York University;' 
Charles H. Colvin, New York City; Nibk Comfort, former dean,' 
Oklahoma School of Religion; Prof. Archibald Cox, Harvard' 
University; Prof. H. W. L. Dana, Harvard University; Frank M^ 
Davis, executive editor. Associated Negro Press; Adolph Dehn,- 
•- artist; Prof. J. Frank Dobie, University of Texas;- William E. 

Dodd, San Francisco, Calif.; Arnaud D'Usseau, playwright; 
- :■-- ■•■ Prof. Henry Pratt Fairchild, New York University; Howard 
-,r.'_ ;zi Fast; Harry Gottlieb, Artist; John C. Cranberry, editor, The' 
Emancipator; AVilliam Cropper; Prof. Ralph H. Gundlach, Uni- 
^■-- nrversity of Washington; Robert Gwathmey, artist; J. W. Hay- 
wood, Gammon Theologicar Seminary ; Rev. Duncan M. Hobarl, 
St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Meridian, Miss.; Rev. Kennetti 
de P. Hughes, Cambridge, Mass. ; Prof. Ellsworth Huntington, 
-CTi:-:.^ ''.1 Yale Universit}'; Carol Janeway, artist; Francis Fisher Kane, 
>o.-D?-.r 5,~.-f<: Philadelphia, Pa.; Rabbi Jacob H. Kaplan, Temple Israel, Mianfif 
"' Reach, Fla. ; Frank Kleinholz, artist; John Howard Lawsbnf 

~' Ray Lev, pianist; Pluhp Loeb, actor; Rev. Charles F. Mac- 

lennan, Cleveland, Ohio; W. H. Man waring, professor emeritus; 
j: ."f: .'s.: : -Stanford University; Prof. F. O. INIatthiessen, Harvard Unir 
.n;>5aii.-?: ^^-'versity; Rev. Jack R. McMichael, executive secretary, Methodist 
— her-. ; rev '; ?^" Federiation for ^Social Service; Rev. William Howard Melishf 
:>'?•; f '^^' .-^Brooklvn, N. Y.; Arthur Miller, playwright; Judge-Stanley 
.Z 9i:?j:..i ii&:--Moffat't, Huntington Park', Calif .; Rev.- Skillmain E. -Myers,' 
'i?Tbf. R3.:.y. ^'Piairtfield, Vt.; Bishop R. C. Ransom, AMEChureh, Wilbet- 
.larrjifixfO -c —? force,- Ohio; Elbert Russell, dean emeritus. Divinity School^ 
_ Duke University; William Jay Schieffelin, New "York City; Arthur 

x^y/. .B?.ii je>~gchnabel; Prof. "Frederick L. Schuman,' Williams College;,Vida^D^ 
sz.&LIl'f' .•:«-' --Scudder, professor emeritus, Wellesley Cdllegie; Prof. MafColm 
.sailvC A Btii::iSha'rp, law school, ■University of Chicago; -Vincent Sheeanj 
?rfT .,7r.rir>£ r: :]VIargaret Sanger Slee;- Tucson, Ariz.; Rev. F. Hastin_gs Smythy 
-RCi :"•:.--. ttnrTfSup'eTioF S.-C. C.,- Cambridge, Mass.; Raphael Soyer, artist; 
_ Dr. Harry F. Ward, professor emerit.us, Union Theological Settil- 
.^r•i*.T^• .?^'.:P n^ry; - Prof. Leroy Waterman; University ' of Michigan; Max 
- - ■ • - :-:f-.-, r Weber, artist; Dr. ' Henry -N. Wieman; University* or _Ghicagoj 
- ""'William Zorach^- - * _ ■ ' .i.-,; :. - t •; ^( e__ . ; ;;i 

'(TRlcs,aHd;ihstitutions^or identificafidn'oxiIy),"partiailist'.rr^/- *^^^ i* '. . -•"• . -^..•■- '.!,]. ." ^.t; '"'t t 
CiviL Rights Gqngbess, 205 East Forty-second Street;,. New York' L7; ij. -Y.- 

I ericlosemy contribution of $=:,_'_«'/'lp/help. reproduce this/9;d in newspapers 
thropgbout the Nation. --■-_'' '■''•'- ■-- _ • 

■••.■r° . - - ^-.i ■■^_ -•."^i r.-,-'fir!?7_i_ •„ -: .r-'XC'' r.-j;; 7?"5.x.-'r.i,z.: -.".:» t; sz.s:.''. ..-,£.>, 

Address -:_ iiJ!^:^-:rJiij. Ji:«'.i :__'!: ^siiii- 1 _ .: co,i Ji. _ .J^~_0-_ i"-JL !."_ -■j.l.L _.je;;>.j_L Jf^:iiL.'i^ii'^ 

(This adverti.^erment is sponsored and paid for "by the Civil Rfghts Congress), ' 



(From the Daily Wor'.ier, October 7, 1946, p. 3] _ 

Sixty Labor. ^Civic Le^aders: Defend •GP_BAtfcOT-- Rights 

'^-GnFthee've of thereopening.of thecourt-euit-tobarthoe Communist Party from 
the New York State ballot, 601abor andiiberaltcaders yesterday condemned the 
drive conducted by reactionary Democratic leaders against minority., party relejCr 
toralriglttsaa "assault on the American principle of free elections.-^^ rs.:,r Vi'.f;.-r,i# 



26 CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

Court action against the Communist petitions gets under way this afternoon 
for a second time in the Albany Supreme Court. 

Earlier proceedings before Justice William H. Murray in Troy were canceled, 
after two days of testimon3', by an appellate court ruling that Justice Murray had 
snatched the case "in excess of his jurisdiction." 

The same justice, however, is regularly scheduled to sit in the Albany Supreme 
Court, starting toda3^ 

Attorneys for the Communist Party, Joseph R. Brodsky and Paul J. Kern, said 
yesterday they would ask him to disqualify himself in view of the appellate court 
decision. They may appeal to the higher court again if he should fail to do so. 

In their previous plea to the appellate court, they charged that attorneys for 
Spencer Young, Democratic candidate for Comptroller in whose name the fight 
against the Communist petition is being conducted, had "shopped aro\md" for 
Justice Murray because of a previous ruling barring the party from the ballot. 

Communist campaign headquarters announced that Councilman Benjamin J. 
Davis, candidate for Attorney General on the Communist ticket, will become part 
of the legal defense at today's hearing. Councilman Davis is a member of both 
the State and Federal bars in Georgia. 

Nathan Witt, former secretary of the National Labor Relations Board, will 
enter the case as a "friend of the court" in behalf of both the State and City CIO 
organizations. 

In their statement yesterday, the 60 labor and liberal leaders called upon the 
"responsible officials of the major parties to repudiate these attacks and actively 
defend the basic political rights of all American citizens by formal and public 
opposition to the action taken against the minority groups." 

"In New York, a general attack is being made on the right of any minority 
party to participate in the elections, with the most intensive fire being directed 
at removing the Communist Party from the ballot. Defending its own electoral 
rights in the courts now, the Communist Party as the first and immediate object 
of attack is thereby defending the American principle of free elections." 

Among the signers of the declaration, issued by Dashiel Hammett, president of 
Civil Rights Congress of New York, were ministers, labor leaders, professors, 
writers, artists, and actors from various parts of the state. They included — 

Rev. Dr. Charles B. Ackley, of St. Mary's Episcopal Church, New York; 
James Egert Allen, State president, NAACP; ALP City Councilman Eugene P. 
Connolly; Thomas Bell, novelist; William Rose Benet, poet; Stanley Moss, adver- 
tising. New York; Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan, Astoria; Rev. Ruthven S. Chalmer, 
Boonville, N. Y.; Armaud d'Usseau, dramatist. 

Also: Prof. Henry Pratt Fairchild; Rabbi Max Felshin; Garner Rea, Max 
Weber, Raphael Soyer, William Zorach, Helen V/est Heller, artists; Col. William 
Jay Schieffelin; Vilhjalmar Stefansson, writer and explorer; James A. Moss, 
Methodist Federation for Social Service; Rev. V, illiam B. Spofford, editor, The 
Witness, Episcopal publication; Katherine Dunham, dancer; Jerome Robbras, 
producer. 

Also: Rev. Kenneth E. Hoover, Hobart, N. Y.; Rev. Lee A. Howe, Oneida, 
N. Y.; Bishop James K. Humphrey, New York; Rev. Howard McGrath, Pough- 
keepsie; Rev. Mebane Ramsey, Staten Island; Rev. Richard Henry, Brooklyn. 

Also: Harry Beckman, president, Local 3, and Frank Dutto, president Local 1, 
AFL Bakers Union; Theodore Jackson, president, Local 370, Dining Car Employ- 
ees; Martin Cody, secretary-treasurer, Local 6, Hotel and Club Employees, AFL; 
Joseph Cohn, manager, Local 623, Meat Cutters Union, AFL; Harry Reich, 
president, Chefs and Cooks Union, Local 89, AFL. 

Also: Sam Burt, manager, joint board. Fur Dressers and Dyers, CIO; Nick 
Carnes, president Local 1250, Department Store Workers; Mickey Finn, secretary- 
treasurer Local 259 UAW-CIO; Rocco Franceschini, secretary-treasurer. Shoe 
Joint Council, CIO; Morris Gainer, president, Local 905, Brotherhood of Painters, 
AFL; David Livingston, director of organization, -Local 65, URWEDSEA, CIO; 
Anthony J. Salcse,' president, Local 430, UERMWA, CIO; Aaron D. Schneider, 
regional director, UOPWA. 

(From the New York Times, October 7, 1946, p. 19] 

Keep Elections Free in New York Statb 

A new attack on the freedom of elections is under way in New York State. 
Various reactionaries are now attempting to drive four minority parties off the 
ballot for the coming elections. Charges have been made by the parties under 
attack that intimidation of nominating petition signers is the majci weapon 
being used against them. 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



27 



Whether One agrees with the platforms and programs of any of these parties 
is not the issue. 

The sole question is the right of all parties — and those they represent — to a 
place on the ballot. This is a right guaranteed by our election laws. 

An attack on the right of citizens to vote for candidates of their choice is an 
attack upon all democracy-loving citizens. If the minority parties can be driven 
off the ballot, either by terror or subterfuge, the ballot rights of no group in 
American political life are safe. The present attack, a move to freeze all political 
activity within the limits of a two-party system, jeopardizes freedom of political 
action for all. 

Fascism began its attack on democracy in every nation under the banner of 
"anti-Communism." It quickly moved on to the destruction of all political 
groups, trade unions, civic and religious organizations, that stood in its way. 

In New York, a general attack is being made on the right of any minority party 
to participate in the elections, with the most intensive fire being directed at re- 
moving the Communist Party from the ballot. Defending its own electoral rights 
in the courts now, the Communist Party, as the first and immediate object of 
attack, is thereby defending the American principle of free elections. 

Fascism must not happen here. 

We cannot permit freedom to be strangled, either by open terror or by legalistic 
trickery. 

We, the undersigned, representing citizens of various political opinions, hereby 
record our strenuous objections to any undemocratic attempt to deprive any 
minority party of the right to the ballot. We brand such attacks as an assault 
on the American principle of free elections. We call upon the responsible officials 
of the major parties to repudiate these attacks and actively defend the basic 
electoral rights of all American citizens by formal and public opposition to the 
actions taken against the minority groups. 

By word and by deed we pledge ourselves to work for the maintenance of the 
system of free elections for all. 

(Partial list of signers. Names of organizations or institutions used for purposes 
of identification only.) 



Rev. Dr. Charles B. Ackley,. St. Mary's 

Episcopal Church, New York. 
James Egert Allen, president, New 

York State Conference, NAACP. 
Henry Beckman, president, local 3, 

Bakers' Union, AFL, New York. 
Thomas Bell, writer, New York. 
William Rose Benet, poet, New York. 
Prof. Lyman R. Bradley, New York 

University. 
James L. Brewer, Esq., Rochester, N. Y. 
Sam Burt, manager, Joint Board of 

Furriers and Djers, CIO, New York. 
Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan, Beth-el of 

Astoria, Long Island. 
Nick Carnes, president, Local 1250, 

Dept. Store Workers, CIO, New York. 
Pk^v. Ruthven S. Chalmers, Boonville, 

N. Y. 
Martin Cody, secretary-treasurer. Local 

6, Hotel and Club Emploj^ees, AFL, 

New York. 
Joseph Cohen, manager, Local 625, 

Meat Cutters L'nion, AFL, New York. 
Councilman Eugene P. Connolly, New 

York, xV. Y. 
Rev. Alfred H. Coons, Margaretville, 

N. Y. 
Katherine Dunham, dancer. New York. 
Arnaud d'Usseau, dramatist. New York. 
Frank Dutto, president. Local 1, Bakers' 

Union, AFL, New York. 
Prof. Henry Pratt Fairchild, New York 

University. 



Howard Fast, writer. New York. 

Rabbi Max Felshin, Radio City Syna- 
gogue, Kew York. 

Mickey Finn, secretarv-treasurer. Local 
259, UAW-CIO, N4w York. 

Rocco Franceschini, secretary-treasurer, 
Shoe Joint Council. CIO, New York. 

Morris Gainer, president. Local 905, 
Brotherhood of Pain;crs, AFL, New 
York. 

Robert Gwathmey, artist, New York. 

Li^ta Hagen, actress, New York. 

Arthur J. Harvey, Esq., Albany, N. Y. 

Helen West Heller, artist, New York. 

Lyndon Henry, business agent. Local 
80, Joint Board of Furriers, Dressers, 
and Dyers, CIO, New York. 

Rev. Richard Henry, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rev. Kenneth E. Hoover, Hobart, N. Y. 

Rev. Lee A. Howe, Oneida, N. Y. 

Bishop James K. Humphrey, New York. 

Theodore Jackson, president. Local 370, 
Dining Car Employees, New York. 

Sidney Kaufman, agent. National Union 
of Marine Cooks and Stewards, CIO. 

Joseph F. Kehoe, secretary-treasurer, 
American Communications Associ- 
ation, CIO. 

Carol King, lawyer. New York. 

David Livingston, director of organiza- 
tion. Local 65, URW and DSEA, 
CIO. New York. 

Rev. Howard D. McGrath, Pough- 
keepsie, N. Y. 



28 CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

George Marshall, chairman of national Col. William Jay SchieflFelin, New York. 

board, Civil Rights Congress, Kew Aaron D. Schneider, Nev/ York, regional 

York. director, UOPWA. 

James A. Moss, Methodist Federation Prof. T. C. Schneirla, New York Uni- 

for Social Service, New York. versity. 

Stanley Moss, advertising, New York. Joseph P. Selly, president, American 

Samuel, A. Neuburger, Esq., New Communications Association. 

York. Raphael Soyer, artist. New York. 

Irving Potash, manager. Furriers Joint Rev. WiUiam B. Spofford, editor, The 

Council, CIO, New York. Witness (Episcopal). 

Rev. Mebane Ramsey, Calvary Presby- Vilhjalmur Stefansson, writer, New 

terian, Staten Island. York. 

Rea Gardner, artist, Brookhaven, N. Y. Prof. Bernhard J. Stern, Columbia Uni- 

Harry Reich, president, Chefs and versity. 

Cooks Union, Local 89, ALF, New Max Weber, artist, Great Neck, Long 

York. Island, N. Y. 

Jerome Robbins, producer, New York. William Zorach, sculptor, New York. 
Anthony J. Salese, president, Local 430, 

UERMWA, New York. 

Civil Rights Congress of New York 

112 East Nineteenth Street, New York 3, N. Y. 

Dashiell Hammett, President Meyer E. Stern, Kenneth Spencer, Cochairmen 

of the Board 



Organizations Participating in Eisler's Defense * 

American Committee for Protection of Foreign Born. 
Civil Rights Congress. 
Friends of the German- American. 
German-American Labor Council. 

BISLER DEFENSE COMMITTEE 

(Committee in formation) 

Max Bedacht Ida Guggenheimer 

Dr. FeUx Bocnheim Abraham J. Isserman 

Charles Collms Carol King 

Eugene P. Connolly Albert Maltz 

Gustav Faber Walter Mueller 

Send your contribution to the German-American, Inc., to help spread the 
truth about the Eisler case. 

The German-American, Inc., 
S06 Broadway, Room 207, New York 7, N. Y. 



[From PM, March 3, 1947, p. m20] 

Read What Outstanding Americans Say About the Un-American Activities 

Committee 

As American citizens concerned with the future of democracy in our land, 
we condemn the undemocratic practices of the Thomas-Rankin House Committee 
on Un-American Activities, most recently exemplified by the shameful persecution 
of the anti-Fascist refugee, Gerhart Eisler. The hysterical atmosphere contrived 
around this case, involving a German Communist, kept here against his will, 
indicates that it is intended as the initir.l phase of a sweeping attack upon the 
labor and progressive movement in the United States. Were such tactics to 
remain unchecked in our Nation, as in Germany in the early 1930's, we Americans 
would have ourselves to blame for consequences possibly as disastrous as those 
which overtook the German people. 

' Pamphlet, Eisler Hits Back, issued by the German-American, Inc., December 11, 1946, p. 16. 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 29 

Today, the Un-American Activities Committoc openly plans to intensify its 
antidemocratic activities. The Kisler case sets tlic stau;e for the passage of anti- 
labor legislation, for an all-out attack on organized lal)or and the educational 
system, and for the suppression of all liberal thought in the radio and movie 
industries. The inevitable consequence of this program would be the ultimate 
suppression of all traditional American liberties. 

We therefore call upon Congress to abolish this most un-American committee, 
urge President Truman to effect immediate release of Gerhart Eisler, permitting 
him to return to his homeland. 

We urge our fellow Americans to join us in this efifort. 
Hon. Elmer Benson 

D. W. Chapman, president, Montana Farmers Union 
Dr. Nick Comfort, dean, Oklahoma School of Religion 
Frank Marshall Davis, executive editor, Associated Negro Press 
Earl B. Dickerson, president, National Bar Association 
Dr. W. E. B. DuBois 

Prof. Balph H. Gundlack, University of Washington 
Dashiell Hammett 

Dr. Luther P. Jackson, Virginia State University 
Dr. D. V. Jemison, president, National Baptist Convention of USA 
Dr. David D. Jones, president, Berlnett College 
Albert E. Kahn 
Francis Fisher Kane 
Garson Kanin 
Rockwell Kent 
Rev. C. Franklin Koch, executive secretary, board of social missions of the 

United Lutheran Church 
Prof. Walter Landauer, University of Connecticut 
Katherine Locke 
John Howard Lawson 
Louis F. McCabe 
Rev. Jack MacMichael, executive secretary, Methodist Federation for Social 

Service 
Carey McWilliams 
Thomas Mann 
Prof. W. H. Man waring 

George Marshall, chairman of board. Civil Rights Congress 
Prof. Kirtley F. Mather, Harvard University 
Arthur Miller 

Bishop Arthur W. Moulton, Protestant Episcopal Church 
Dorothy Parker 

Prof. John P. Peters, Yale Medical School 
Dr. Harry W. Roberts, Virginia State College 

Dr. Elbert Russell, dean emeritus, Divinity School, Duke University 
Wm. Jay Schieffelin 
Mrs. Christine S. Smith, national president. National Association of Colored 

Women 
Dr. Harry F. Ward 

Prof. LeRoy Waterman, University of Michigan 
Max Weber 
William Zarach 

Partial list (titles and institutions for identification only). 



[From the Daily Worker, April 27, 1947, p. 25] 

Texans Assail Witch Hunt Bill 

Houston, Tex. — Prominent Texans have petitioned the Texas Legislature and 
the Congress against the passage of legislation which they charge would consti- 
tute a "suppression of ideas and political principles," it is announced by the 
Texas Civil Rights Congress. The petition declares: 

"A number of bills have been introduced into the Legislature of the State of 
Texas and the Congress of the United States purporting to be aimed at the sup- 
pression of the Communist Party * * *. We are neither members of the 
Communist Party nor adherents of its political principles. These laws, however, 



30 CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

do not direct themselves to any acts of subversives, but.rather to a suppression of 
ideas and political principles. 

"This trend in our legislatures parallels a vast increase in wanton and baseless 
accusations of communism in our political life. The only outcome of this dual 
drive of political invective and political suppression will be to destroy the basic 
tool of democracy ; free discussion." 

Included among the more than 100 signers from all parts of Texas are — 

Educators. — Prof. Clarence E. Avers, Dr. Wendell C. Gordon, Mrs. J. H. 
Clauser, Dr. Clarence A. Wiley, Prof. Ernest A. Patterson, Dr. Harry E. Moore, 
Prof. E. E. Hale, Prof. N. Peach, Prof. J. H. Morton, Prof. Howard D. Asbury. 

Ministers. — Rev. Blake Smith, Rev. Fred E. Cole, Rev. L. N. Hawke, Rev. 
W. H. Holland, Rev. William C. Crawford. 

Labor leaders. — Ray Davidson, M. M. McKnight, Carl Garcia, Garland Butler, 
Arthur Leibson, R. J. Owen, Ed. Dawley, C. A. Sanders, Ceferino Anchiando, 
Juan R. Benevidez. , 

Business, professional and civic leaders. — W. M. McMillan, Kenneth Lampkin, 
Regina Boyd, Mrs. U. V. Christian, Joe B. Dibrell, A. Maceo Smith, Jack Sum- 
merfield, Clare Ruggles, J. J. Jones, R. D. Dickson, Arthur Ruskin, A. A. Ormsby, 
C. D. Leake, Chester Frazier, Arthur De Witty, Mrs. J. E. Craft, R. H. Duncan, 
Mrs. L. M. Mitchell. 

Student and veteran leaders. — Melvin Webber, Stuart Chamberlin, Richard 
Sterba, Mr. and Mrs. Curry Gilmore, Mac E. Wallace, Louis Watel, Monroe 
Cohen, Nicholas Seidita. 



. [From the Worker, Sunday, May 25, 1947, p. 9] 

Five Hundred and Fifty Union Officials Assail "Red-Hunt" 

Five hundred and fifty CIO and AFL union officials warned last week that the 
House Un-Americans are spearheading the drive of big business against labor 
"in the name of hunting Communists." The warning was contained in a state- 
ment released by the Civil Rights Congress. 

Names of signers are listed below: 

AMERICAN communications ASSOCIATION 

Joseph p. Selly, international president, New York 

Lawrence F. Kelly, international vice president 

Dominick Panza, international vice president. New York 

Jack Winocur, international vice president. New York 

A. T. Brown, northern California, chairman, San Francisco 

Edward Barlow, international representative, Oakland 

H. L. Rust, secretary, local 9, San Francisco 

Murray Winocur, president, local 2, New York 

Carl Lundquist, secretary-treasurer, local 2, San Francisco 

N. B. Steinberg, district delegate, local 2, New York 

F. W. Grumman, secretary-treasurer, local 10, New York 

F. A. Lenahan, secretary-treasurer, local 11, New York 

David Sokol, chairman, local 15, New York 

John J. Wieners, chairman, local 40, New York 

Louis Siebenberg, vice chairman, local 40, New York 

Al Doumer, secretary-treasurer, local 40, New York 

Lester Osbard, shop steward, Globe Wireless, Woodcliflfe Lake, N. 

L. Monahan, chairman, local 101, Seattle 

UNITED AUTOMOBILE WORKERS 

Saul Waehlth, delegate, Berkeley 

Joseph Mattson, international board member, Chicago 

James Tate, president, local 162, Chicago 

Hilliard Ellis, president, local 453, Amalgamated, Chicago 

James Hamby, president. Ford local 551, Chicago 

Edward Herning, trustee, local 719, electromotive, Chicagc 

Percy Llewellyn, international board member, Detroit 

Harold Johnson, international organizer, Detroit 

Dan Radakovic, international organizer, Dearborn 

Wise W. Stone, international organizer, Detroit 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 31 

Carl J. Stollato, international organizer, Detroit 

William 11. Johnson, recording secretary. Ford local 600, Detroit 

J. G. Couser, finance secretary. Ford local 600, Detroit 

Arthur McPhaul. PAC cliairman, local 600, Detroit 

Alex Winton, B Building chairman, Ford local 000, Dearborn 

John R. Duncan, member plant committee, Ford local 600, Detroit 

Leo Fenster, secretary, Cleveland district Auto Coimcil, Cleveland 

Charles K. Beckman," president, Local 45, also president, Cleveland Auto Council, 

Cleveland 
Joe Chaka, executive board, local 45, Cleveland 
C. V. Stephenson, president, local 207, Cleveland 
Robert Buse, president, local 248, Greendale, Wis. 
Harold ChristofFel, honorary president, local 248, West Allis, Wis. 
Joseph W. Dombek, vice president, local 248, Milwaukee 
Linus Lindberg. treasurer, local 248, Greendale, Wis. 
Alfred Lading, financial secretary, local 248, Milwaukee 
Hodges E. Mason, president, local 208, Detroit 
Fred Williams, business agent, local 208, Detroit 

CLEANERS AND DYERS UNION 

Solomon Weissman, president, local 364, AOW, New Haven 

UNITED ELECTRICAL, RADIO, AND MACHINE WORKERS OF AMERICA 

William Sentner, international vice president, also president, district 8 UE, 

St. Louis 
John Bittman, international representative, Oakland 
H. M. Martinson, field organizer. El Cenito, Calif. 
Vincent J. Romeo, field organizer. New Haven 
Ernest DeMaio, international vice president, Chicago 
Alice Smith, vice president, local 11, Chicago 
Bernard J. McDonough, president, local 1119, Chicago 
Adam Smith, vice president, local 1119, Chicago 
Alex Kampf, secretary-treasurer, local 1119, Chicago 
Walter Mandra, recording secretary, local 1119, Chicago 
Sam Kushner, business manager, local 1119, Chicago 
V.illiam J. Brady, president, local 1149, Chicago 
Pat Amato, president, local 1150, Chicago 
Irving Crane, business manager, local 1150, Chicago 
John's. Kelliher, president, local 1154, Chicago 
Leonard Baker, vice president, local 1154, Chicago 
Stanley Grabbe, financial secretary, local 1154, Chicago 
Dorothy A. Lees, recording secretary, local 1154, Chicago 
Robert Kirkwood, international representative, district 9, Indianapolis 
Jack Myers, international representative, district 9, Baltimore 
Jack Zucker, international representative, district 9, Baltimore 
Hugh L. Joyce, president, local 201, Lynn, Mass. 
John Bandarra, president, local 277, Boston 
Joseph O'Brien, executive board, local 277, New Bedford, Mass. 
Roy Rogerson, executive board, local 277, New Bedford, Mass. 
Frank Parker, president, Worthington Pump,' Holyoke, Mass. 
Leon Massa, business agent, Worthington Pump, Holyoke, Mass. 
William Mauseth, representative, Minneapolis 
Leo J. Gianannini, steward, local 1117, Minneapolis 
Rudy Olson, secretary, local 1146, Minneapolis 
Clarence A. Hathaway, business agent, St. Paul 
C. Bingamon. president, local 810, St. Louis 
Jam.es McLeish, international vice president, New Jersey 
Ruth Young, secretary, district council 4, New Jersey 
William Janowicz, executive board, district council 4, New Jersey 
W. Hamilton, executive board, district council 4, New Jersey 
Erwin A. Guttko, executive board, district council 4, New Jersey 
Charles Fav, vice president, district council 4, New Jersey 
Lelia Rottkamp, executive board, district council 4, New Jersey 
George H. Rooney, executive board, district council 4, New Jersey 
Al Stearn. executive board, district council 4, Newark 
R. A. Shattuck, executive board, district council 4, Newark 



32 CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

Arthur O'Hare, executive board, district council 4, Newark 

Wesley Mitchell, Jr., executive board, district council 4, Newark 

George H. Lawrence, executive board, district council 4, Newark 

Peter Berch, international representative. New Jersey 

Joseph Alfona, field organizer, New Jersey 

Louis I. Sorti, field organizer, Newark , 

William Santors, international field organizer, Newark 

John Paradine, international field organizer. New Jersey 

Tom Neill, field organizer, Newark 

William A. Frazier, field organizer, Camden 

Ethel Carpenter, international field organizer, New Jersey, Camden 

Stanley Krzyswonos, president, Mercer Hunterdon UE conference board, New 

Jersey 
Joseph H. Watkins, president, local 134, Camden 
Samuel Goldberg, business representative, local 134, Camden 
Tony Lizzano, president, local 409, New Jersey ' 

Emil Ashur, business agent, local 423, Newark 
Marie Muriello, secretary, local 437, Newark 
A. A. Burdick, business representative, local 437, Newark 
Ernest Pollock, business representative, local 437, Newark 
Maurice K. Slater, business manager, local 451, Phillipsburg, N. J. 
Henry Fiering, international representative, Winston-Salem 
Fred Keller, international representative, district 7, Cleveland 
Herbert Hirschberg, international representative, Cleveland 
James Divine, chief steward, Airtemp Unit, local 8, Dayton 
Fred Hoag, business agent, local 707, Cleveland 
Ivan Brumbaugh, local 709, North Canton . 
Harry J. Bradley, local 709, Canton 
Ralph D. Marcus, business agent, local 709, Canton 
Joseph Kres, district vice president, Cleveland 
Paul Shepard, business agent, local 735, Cleveland 
Marie Pieed, business agent, local 735, Cleveland 
Dave Davis, business agent, local 155, Philadelphia 
Thomas Hockenberry, president, local 601, Pittsburgh 
Nathan Daniel, vice president, local 1227, Long Island 
James Garry, business manager, local 1227, Long Island 
Vincent Perillo, vice president, local 1227, Long Island 
Edward N. Washington, president, local 1227, Long Island 
William Harper, assistant chief steward, local 601, Pittsburgh 
Charles Marcum, president, local 754, Dayton 
David Tincher, president, local 768, Dayton 
Ernest C. Ketzel, recording secretary, local 768, Dayton 
Bebe Ober, educational director, local 768, Dayton 
Andrew T. Gad, representative, local 768, Dayton 
K. M. Kirkendall, business agent, local 768, Dayton 
Arthur L. Garfield, international representative, Dayton 
L. B. Slagle, field organizer, Cleveland 
John Mitchell, field organizer, Dayton 
Louis L. Kaplan, field organizer, Dayton 
Robert A. Harrison, field organizer, Dayton 
Helen Pope, secretary joint wage commission, Dayton 
Philip H. Van Gelder, field organfzer, Dayton 
James Price, international vice president, Philadelphia 
Thomas F. Delaney, secretary, district council 1, Philadelphia 
Thomas J. Fitzpatrick, international vice president, Pittsburgh 
Stephen Dochmal, shop chairman, local 155, Philadelphia 
Fred W. Eoettger, executive board member, local 155; also sergeant at arms, 

Philadelphia 
Marcus Gaylburd, shop chairman, local 155; also secretary veterans committee, 

Philadelphia 
Charles Kenneck, building trustee, local 155, Philadelphia 
Thomas Mandarine, president, local 451, Easton, Pa. 
Philip H. Smith, international representative, Milwaukee 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 33 

UNITED FARM EQUIPMENT AND METAL WORKERS UNION 

Grant Oakcs, international president, Chicago 

Gerald Fickle, international seeretary-treasnrcr, Chicago 

Pope HufF, international board n\eniber at large, Chicago 

Charles E. I.awton, president, district 1, Chicago 

John ShafTer, international vice president, Chicago 

Milt liiirns, international organization, director, Chicago 

James De \Vitt, Wisconsin field director, Milwaukee 

FOOD, TOBACCO, AGRICULTURAL AND ALLIED WORKERS OF AMERICA 

Donald Henderson, general president. Pl;iladeli:)hia 

Rufns Bell, president. Salt River Valley division, local 78, Phoenix, Ariz. 

Charles J. Feller, International organizer. Phoenix, Ariz. 

James Patton, executive board, local 78, Phoenix, Ariz. 

Robert Latham, international vice president, Winston-Salem 

Christina Gardner, international organizer, Winston-Salem 

Frank Green, international organizer, W'inston-Salem 

Velma Hopkins, international organizer, Winston-Salem 

A. M. Alejandro, international representative, Berkeley 

Pablo S. Valdez, business agent, local 7, San Francisco 

Angelina Goulaite, secretary-treasurer, local 50, Oakland 

Fred Less, international organizer, Tampa 

Edwin C. Waller, international representative, Miami 

Jessica Rhine, regional director, Indianapolis 

James Barnett, international organizer, Indianapolis 

Emil Dean, international organizer, Indianapolis 

Albert A. O'Brien, international representative. New Orleans 

Frank Bruno, general organizer, Louisiana Shrimp \Yorkers Council, New Orleans 

Robert W. Lee, international representative, Baltimore 

Lewis C. Bentzley, regional director, Camden 

Lucy Aiello, president, local 56, New Jersey 

Florence Mercantina, vice president, local 56, New .Jersey 

Herbert Kling, president, local 80, Camden 

Anthony Valentino, business agent, local 80, Camden 

Ed McCrea, international board member, W^inston-Salem 

John C. Hunt, business agent, local 26, Wlnston-Salem 

Moranda Smith, international board member, V/inston-Salem 

Frank V. Patterson, international organizer, Portland, Oreg. 

Benjamin Butler, chief steward, local 80, Philadelphia 

L. E. McGurty, chief steward, local 80, Charleston 

Sidney Fishman, chief steward, local 80, Charleston 

Karl korstad, local organizer, Memphis 

Jaqueline Nelson, international representative, Houston 

Jack Frye, business agent, local 75 Jacinto City, Tex. 

Louis Kalb, international organizer, Richmond 

Evetta J. Hamp, secretary-treasurer, local 45, Richmond 

Harry ^'irgil, regional director, Milwaukee 

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF FISHERMEN AND ALLIED WORKERS OF AMERICA 

J. F. Jurich, international president, Seattle 
Anton Susanj, secretary-treasurer, district 3, Seattle 
John Tadich, business "agent. District 3, Tacoma 1, W^ash. 
Oscar Anderson agent for Seattle, Alaska Fishermen, Seattle 
E. M. Berg, business agent, Alaska fishermen, Seattle 
Hans A. Hansen, Seattle agent, Alaska 

INTERNATIONAL FUR & LEATHER WORKERS UNION 

Pietro Lucchi, international secretary-treasurer, New York , 

Ben Gold, international president 

Harold L. Shapiro, regional director, Detroit 

Clarence H. Carr, local 202, Gloversville, N. Y. 

Ruth Siegel, educational director, joint bonrd, Essex, N. J. 

George Marlow, business agent, local 48, Easton, Pa, 



34 CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

Irving Potash, international vice president, New York 

Abe Feinglass, international vice president, Chicago 

Lou Goldstein, midwest manager, Chicago 

Hardy Scott, district representative, Asheville, N. C. 

Anthony Baratta, organizer. Fur Dressers and Dyers, local 80, Fairhaven, N. J. 

Phil Klurman, business agent, local 85, Essex County, N. J. 

Santo Beracqua, president, local 140, Essex 

George O. Pershing, district director, Williamsport, Pa. 

Joseph C. EUie, president, local 47, Milwaukee 

UNITED FURNITURE WORKERS OF AMERICA 

Morris Pizer, international president, New York 

Max Perlow, international secretary-treasurer. New York 

Michael Tyson, organizer, — New Haven 

George L. Beaumont, business manager, local 105, Deep River, Conn. • 

David Peterson, executive board member, local 105, Deep River, Conn. 

Sam Fox, organizer, Baltimore 

Max Weinstock, Baltimore 

C. J. Bettini, secretary, local 137, Springfield, Mass. 

Peter DiGiacomo, business manager, Boston, Pa. 

Ernest Marsh, international vice president, Los Angeles 

Nick Blattner, international vice president, Chicago 

UNITED GAS, COKE & CHEMICAL WORKERS OF AMERICA 

Fred Hamilton, international executive board, district 3, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Frank Novick, president, local 121, Brooklyn 

Jasper Grassa, financial secretary, local 121, Brooklyn 

Alcott Tyler, business manager, local 121, Brooklyn 

David Elliott, international board member, Newark 

Paul Zazrivy, president. Greater Cleveland district council, Cleveland 

FEDERATION OF GLASS, CERAMIC &. SILICA SAND WORKERS OF AMERICA 

Marco Massola, vice chairman, local 12, Pittsburgh 
Joseph Sodecky, Jr., financial secretary, local 12, Pittsburgh 
Anthony Gabrish, vice chairman, local 17, Pittsburgh 

INTERNATIONAL LONGSHOREMEN'S WORKERS UNION 

Harry Bridges, international president, San Francisco 

Joseph Lynch, vice president, local 6, San Francisco 

Paul Heide, local 6, vice president, Oakland 

Richard Lynden, secretary-treasurer, local 6, San Francisco 

Robert A. Moore, local 6, business agent, Oakland 

Charles Duarte, business agent, local 6, San Francisco 

Ray Heide, business agent, local 6, Oakland 

Joseph Nuzio, business agent, local 6, San Francisco 

C. J Meske, international representative. New Orleans 

Andrew Nelson, president, local 207, New Orleans 

August Harris, business agent, local 207, New Orleans 

Joseph Henderson, international representative, Baltimore 

Leroy Faegler, international representative. Warehouse and Distributor Workers 

of America, Cleveland 
Tom J. V/arren, business agent, Dallas 
Charles W. Otto, dispatcher, local 1-7, Seattle. 
A. Lawrence, dispatcher, local 1-9, Seattle 

J. Stevens, dispatcher, local 1-9, Seattle ~ » 

I. E. Stevens, secretary, local 32, Seattle 
Bernard Lucas, Midwest division, Chicago 

* 

NATIONAL MARITIME COOKS AND STEWARDS ASSOCIATION 

Hugh Bryson, president, San Francisco 
Harry Nehrebecki, dispatcher, San Francisco 
Irv Dvorin, port agent, Baltimore 
Sidney Kaufman, port agent. New York 
C. E. Johanson, patrolman. New York 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 36 

Alfred Jcwett, patrolman, New York 
William F. O. Gorman, dispatcher, New York 
E. M. Tangcn, assistant business agent, Seattle 

NATIONAL MARINE ENGINEERS BENEFICIAL ASSOCIATION 

Arthur Coco, editor, New York 

James RomanotT, assistant business manager. New York 

R. E. Goforth, assistant business manager, Norfolk 

INDUSTRIAL UNION MARINE AND SHIPBUILDING WORKERS OF AMERICA 

Milton Self, chairman, local 24, Baltimore. 

NATIONAL MARITIME UNION 

Jack Lawrenson, vice president. New York 

Howard McKcnzie, vice president, New York 

Chester Younfr, temporary vice president, New York 

Ferdinand C. Smith, secretary, New York 

M. H. Stone, treasurer, New York. 

Pete Smith, national organizctionrJ director, New York 

Bill McCarthy, national director, New York 

Louis Diaz, national director, New York. 

Lowell Chamberlin, editor. The Pilot, New York 

Francis Garth, assistant editor, The Pilot, New York 

William Chondor, patrolman. New Orleans 

Charles J. McCarthy, af^ent, Boston 

Clyde Drake, agent, Detroit 

John Ecker, agent, Duluth 

M. Davis, agent, St. Louis 

Morton Davis, agent, St. Louis 

John Rogan, chairman, port commissioner, New York 

Sol Renzi, chief dispatchet. New York 

Charles Obermeier, educator, New York 

George Schwartz, as.=ista.nt agent, New York 

Paul Palazzi, agent. New York 

Fred G. Wynters, dispatcher, New York 

A. Diaz, dispatcher, New York 

Herbert AL Sofield, dispatcher, New York 

R. Nesbitt, dispatcher. New York 

Joe Keller, patrolman, New York 

J. Higgins, patrolman, New York 

Benito Hernandez, patrolman, New York 

George Green, patrolman, New York 

Joseph Fuchs, patrolman, New York 

Victor Durham, patrolman. New York 

James M. Corbett, ps/crolman. New York 

Anne L. Conroy, patrolman. New York 

Lawrence Burke, patrolman. New York 

John Anderson, patrolman. New York 

Manuel Querol, patrolman, New York 

A. Summers, patrolman. New York 

Al Mooney, patrolman. New York 

Frank Leason, patrolman. New York 

D. Jimi Gavin, tanker patrolman. New York 

Philip Miller, port commissioner, New York 

Charles Miller, port commissioner, New York 

Edward Gordon, port commissioner, New York 

J. Alejandro, port commissioner, New York 

Josh Lawrence, director of organization, Great Lakes area, Cleveland 

Mike Vareco, organizer. Great Lakes area, Cleveland 

Samuel Waitzman, publicity director. Great Lakes area, Cleveland 

Philip N. Smith, patrolman, Portland 

Robert W. New, Jr., acting agent, Charleston, S. C. 

William E. Davis, agent, Memphis 

James P. Boyle, agent, Houston 

Jack Smith, agent, Seattle 



36 CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

Vernon Bown, patrolman, Seattle 
Robert H. Kinney, patrolman, Seattle 
L. J. Piloman, agent, Milwaukee 
Jack A. Kramer, patrolman, Milwaukee 
Constance Lamb, New York 

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF MINE, MILL AND SMELTER WORKERS 

Maurice E. Travis, international president, Chicago 

John Clark, international secretary-treasurer, Chicago 

Ken Echert, international executive board; also chairman, die-casting division, 

Chicago 
C. J. Powers, international board member, San Francisco 
Albert Pezzati, international representative, Waterbury, Conn, ' 

William Gately, international representative, Connecticut 

A. C. Skinner, international representative, Chicago 
Paul Brodnansky, business agent, local 735-A 

Ray Dennis, business agent, local 735-A, Cleveland 
Edward Radden, president, local 755, Cleveland 
Silverio Alva, president, local 509, El Paso, Tex. 

AMERICAN NEWSPAPER GUILD 

John Ryan, executive vice president. New York Guild 

Julius Klyman, executive board member, St. Louis Guild ^ 

George Londa, executive board member, St. Louis Guild 

UNITED OFFICE AND PROFESSIONAL WORKERS OF AMERICA 

John J. Stanley, international secretary-treasurer. New York City 
Joseph H. Levy, international vice president, New York City 
Bernard Young, regional representative, Berkeley, Calif. 
Louis Fowlks, business agent, local 225, Oakland, Calif, 
Morris YanofT, Midwest regional director, Chicago 
George Hansen, assistant regional director, Chicago 

B. FonorofT, organizer, Chicago 

Laura Epstein, district representative, local 39, Chicago 

Frank Manago, president, local 78, Chicago 

Lillian Finn, president, local 12, Baltimore 

Robert Goodman, regional director, New England, Boston 

Eileen Bettercourt, business agent, local 68, Boston 

Jerome Shore, regional director, Detroit 

Christine Walker, president, local 26, Detroit 

James I^. Whitehouse, regional representative, Boston 

Frank Engelberg, regional director, Newark 

William Rosenthal, regional representative, Newark 

Ernest De Fronzo, regional representative, Newark 

Frieda A. Frith, regional representative, Newark 

Perry Zimmerman, organizer, Newark 

Fred M. Baker, president, local 241, Camden, N. J. 

Anne Berenholz, regional director, Cleveland 

Mrs. M. June Kaplan, treasurer, local 6, Dayton, Ohio 

Harriette E. Dennett, president, local 35, Seattle, Wash, 

Ethel Isaacs, recording secretary, local 43, Milwaukee 

UNITED PACKINGHOUSE WORKERS OF AMERICA 

Herbert March, international board member, Chiciigo 

Sam Parks, president, Wilson local 25, and secretary district council 1, Chicago 

Joseph Besenhoffer, president, Armour local 

John Mitchel, regional director. New England, Boston 

James Carr. representative, St. Louis, Mo. 

Meyer E. Stern, international board member, New York City 

UNITED PAPERWORKERS OF AMERICA 

Gustave Caporale, president, local 70, Pittsburgh 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 37 

UNITED RETAIL, WHOLESALE DEPARTMENT STORE EMPLOYEES OF AMERICA 

Arthur Osmar, international vice president, New York 

Sam Kovenctsky, president, local 1-S, New York City 

Marcella Loring, first vice president, local 1-S, New York City 

Victor Lopos, second vice president, local 1-S, New York City 

William Michelson, president, local 2, New York City 

Samuel Lewis, local 3, New York City 

Stanley LaValle, local 3, New York City 

John I.arsen, local 3, New York City 

Jack Greenbera;, local 830, New York City 

Louis Basis, local 830, New York Citv 

Alfred Recen, local 830, New York C"itv 

Albert R. Turbane, local 830, New York City 

Nathan Solomon, local 830, New York Citv 

Nathan Nattman, local 830, New York Citv 

Philip Lesten, local 830, New York City 

W. E. Wilson, president, local 495, Dallas, Tex. 

Ben T. Berman, manager, local 144, New York 

UNITED RUBBER WORKERS 

Joseph W. Smith, president, local 217, Garfield, N. J. 
George Milliron, president, local 2, Akron, Ohio 
David R. McCann, vice president, local 2, Akron, Ohio 
W. L. Vaught, international board member, Akron, Ohio 
George R. Bass, president, local 5, Goodrich, Akron, Ohio 
Joe Childs, president, local 9, Akron, Ohio 

UNITED SHOE WORKERS OP AMERICA 

T. Rosenberg, international vice president, New York 
Julius Crane, international vice president, Chicago 
Sam Appel, international representative, Massachusetts 
Joseph Shaffer, international representative, Philadelphia 
R. Hogan, international board member, St. Louis 
Milton Filker, regional director, Endicott, N. Y. 
Arthur Kostove, international representative, Endicott, N. Y. 
John Agnese, organizer, local 54, New York City 
Sol Reinstein, business agent, local 54, New York City 
Murray Gold, business agent, local 54, New York City- 
Leon Rabinowitz, business agent, local 54, New York City 
Ted Tudesco, business agent, local 54, New York City 
Anthony Scimeca, coordinator, local 54, New York City 
Cecil Nash, international representative, Lynchburg, Va. 
James C. Crist. Lynchburg, Va. 
John A. Wilmer, president, local 90, Lynchburg, Va. 

UNITED STEEL WORKERS OF AMERICA 

Charles Wells, business agent, local 1789, Oakland, Calif. 

Frank E. Opal, chairman of steward body, local 2047, Chicago 

Walenty Wojik, trustee, local 2047, Chicago 

Amos B. Murphy, president, local 1159, Akron, Ohio 

Mike Pchiro, president, local 1331, Youngstown, Ohio 

Chester Crosby, treasurer, local 1331, Youngstown, Ohio 

J. R. Moore, recording secretary, local 1331, Youngstown, Ohio 

E. J. Reinthaler, chairman, veterans committee, local 1331, Youngstown, Ohio 

Lewis T. Jones, financial secretary, local 1375, Southington, Ohio 

Frank Wiln, trustee, local 1375, Warren, Ohio 

Victor Brooks, president, local 1519, Cleveland, Ohio 

Thomas Pycraft, secretary, local 1104, Lorain, Ohio 

George Edwards, editor, Lorain Labor, leader and trustee, local 1104, Lorain, 

Ohio. 
Jo.seph Robinson, executive board, local 1276, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Theodore Dennis, trustee, local 2596, Bethlehem, Pa. 
Herman Thomas, trustee, local 2600, Bethlehem 



38 CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

Clinton Carlton, president, Mullens Manufacturing local, Warren, Ohio 
Tom Kelly, board member, local 1G5, Chicago 
Joe Cook, president, local 1029, Chicago 

STONE AND ALLIED QUARRY WORKERS 

Alec Wright, international representative, Pittsburgh 

TEXTILE WORKERS UNION OF AMERICA 

Sonia Baltrum, international representative, San Francisco 

Mary Figurcido, vice president, local 19, New Bedford, Mass. 

Manuel Coito, vice president, local 595, New Bedford, Mass. 

Ben Maurey, business agent Passaic joint board, Passaic, N. J. 

Hymnn Gurinsky, president, local 75, Paterson, N. J. 

Gus Hughes, secretary-treasurer, local 75, Paterson, N. J. 

George Eardley, executive board member, local 75, Paterson, N. J. 

Frank Pagano, executive board, local 1733, Paterson, N. J. 

Charles Lazzio, president, local 1733, Paterson, N. J. , 

John Lydig, business agent, Totov.a Borough, N. J. 

John Soolzitti, president, Dololiin Tate local, Paterson. N. J. 

Boyd E. Payton, director, Lynchburg, Va. 

TRANSPORT WORKERS UNION 

Michael J. Quill, international president. New York City 

Douglas L. MacMahon, International secretary -treasurer 

William Grogan, international representative, San Francisco 

Henry S. Foley, president, San Francisco 

M. L. Edwards, president, local 500, Miami 

David O. Frazier, treasurer, local 500, IMiami 

P. H. Schefisky, chairman, local 500, Miami 

Pete Piket, executive board, local 500, Miami 

James M. Powell, executive board, local 500, Miami 

Richard L. Avery, board chairman, local 500, IMiami 

Raymond R. Tillman, international executive board. New Orleans 

Ernest Scott, president, local 206, New Orleans 

Herman C. Gray, secretary -treasurer, local 2C6, New Orleans 

Alvin Green, international representative, Texas 

UTILITY WORKERS UNION OF AMERICA 

Charles Bloomer, Jr., director, joint council, northern California, Oakland 

Angela Ward, international representative, San Francisco 

Dan Stofie, publicity director, Oakland 

Harry L. Harris, secretary, joint council, northern California, Oakland 

Lou Hames, Oakland 

James A. Cuthill, business representative, local 133, San Francisco 

Alvin C. Rowe, president, local 133, San Francisco 

INTERNATIONAL WOODWORKERS OF AMERICA 

Tlmar Koivunen, international executive board, Duluth 

Martin Kuusisto, secretary-treasurer, local 29, Duluth 

Karly Larsen, first vice president, Seattle 

Walter Brlka, secretary, northern Washington district council, Seattle 

William Wallace, president, district 2, Seattle 

Frank J. Gerber, secretary-treasurer, local 2-46, Seattle 

Karl Atterberry, secretary, local 2-54, Seattle 

Giles C. Evans, business agent, local 2-75, Seattle 

Herman Hartzell, president, local 2-101, Seattle 

Fred Gary, business agent, local 330, Billingham, Wash; 

John Cchuberger, vice president, local 6349, Billingham, Wash. 

COUNCILS 

Mervyn Rathborne, secretary, State CIO council, San Francisco 

Ole Fagerbaugh, secretary-treasurer, Alameda County CIO Council, Oakland 

Olive Chase, secretary, CIO Council, New Haven 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 39 

John G. Lackner, president, Florida State Council, Tampa 
Chailes N. SniolkoIT, director, Florida State Council, Miami 
Tracy M. Doll, director, Wayne County PAC, Detroit 
Samuel Sage, secretary, Wayne Countj^ CIO Council, Detroit 
Norton Bloom, executive secretary. Greater Newark CIO Council, Newark 
Walter Barry, president, Greater Newark CIO Council, Newark 
John renello, chairman, PAC Passaic County CIO Council, Passaic 
Manuel Kurzberg, executive secretary, Passaic County, CIO Council, Passaic 
Charles Sonain, president, Passaic County CIO Council, Passaic 
Charles E. Sims, president, Montgomery County lUC, Dayton, Ohio 
Ernest ISIoyer, president, ClO Council of Northampton County, AUcntown, Pa. 
Clinton Carlton, president, Trumbull Countv lUC CIO, Warren, Ohio 
Carl C. Garcia, president. El Paso County lUC CIO, El Paso, Tex. 
Gertrude H. Ranson, secretary. Blue Ridge lUC, Lynchburg, Va. 
A. A. Fisher, secretary-treasurer, Washington State lUC, Pinehurst, Wash; 
Hilda Hanson, executive secretary, Seattle CIO Council, Seattle 1, Wash. 
James A. Fox, legislative representative, Pennsylvania Brotherhood of Loco- 
motive Firemen and Enginemen, Harrisburg 
Jos. R. Chase, legislative representative. Lodge 507, Brotherhood of Railroad 

Trainmen, Boston 
Jose Gonzalez, president, Bakfery and Confectionery Workers Local 361, Tempe 
Joseph Cappadona, business representative, Ba,kery and Confectionery Workers 

Local 3, Brooklyn 
Jack Curylo, business representative, Bakery and Confectionery Workers Local 3, 

Brooklyn 
Max Rothstein, secretary, Barbers Union Local 502, Philadelphia 
Willis W. Simmons, executive board, Brewer}- and Soft Drink Workers Union, 

Easton 
Charles Witmer, Building and Construction Trades Council, AUentown 
Mervin L. Cole, secretary. Building Service L'nion Local 6, Seattle 
George S. Brees, president, Carpenters and Joiners Local 2637, Seattle 
John Zelipsky, treasurer, Chemical Workers Local 14, Cliffside, N. J. 
Frank Diez, fifth vice president, Cigar Makers International Union, also: 

president joint advisory board, Tampa, Fla. 
Mauricio Torre, sixth vice president. Cigar Makers International Union, Tampa 
Mario Azpeitia, seventh vice president, Cigar Makers International Union, Tampa 
Louis Ornitz, international organizer, Cigar JNIakers International Union, Tampa 
John Terleski. secretarj^ Cleaners and Dyers Local 12, Cleveland 
Francisco Rodriguez, secretary, Cooks and Waiters International Union Local 

104, Tampa 
Sol Sniderman, business agent. Firemen and Oilers Local 32, Detroit 
I. J. Murray, vice president. International Hod Carriers, Dallas 
Jose Estrada, executive board. International Hod Carriers, Dallas 
Jose J. Cabello, trustee. International Hod Carriers, Dallas 
Raymond Wright, business agent. Hotel and Restaurant Workers Local 665, 

]\Iinneapolis 
Nellie Stone, board member, Hotel and Restaurant Workers Local 665, Minneapolis 
John Steuben, secretary-treasurer, Hotel Front Service Union Local 144, Nevy 

York 
Nick Lazari, business agent. Hotel and Restaurant Workers Local 287, Pittsburgh 
George Nichols, emploj'ment manager, Hotel and Restaurant Workers Local 237, 

Pittsburgh 
Esther Schweitzer, member joint board. International Ladies' Garment Workers 

Union, Cleveland 
Lillian Franyin, member joint board, International Ladies' Garment Workers 

Union, Cleveland 
Maurice G. Harman, president. International Ladies' Garment Workers Union, 
Local 212, Harrisburg, Pa. 
James B. Nimmo, national representative, Laundry Workers Union Local 222, 

Miami 
W. G. Stone, president, International Longshoremen's Association Local 1400, 

St. Louis 
William Westbrook, president. International Longshoremen's Association Local 

1401, St. Louis 
M. Abramowitz, executive board, Luggage Workers Local 61, Philadelphia 
Joseph Dimow, treasurer, Elm Lodge 420, International Association of Machinists, 

New Haven 



40 CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

F. B. Gerhart, president, National Match Workers Council, Barberton, Ohio 

A. Eleff, steward, Meat Cutters and Butchers, Cleveland 

Shriley Johnson, vice president. Meat Cutters and Butchers, Richmond^ 

W. Carter, chaplain, Meat Cutters and Butchers, Richmond 

Andrew J. Monroe, president. Meat Cutters and Butchers, Local 432, Richmond 

Fannie Boiling, recording secretary. Meat Cutters and Butchers Local 432, 

Richmond 
Leroy Whaley, sergeant at arms, Meat Cutters and Butchers Local 432, Richmond 
Edward Choka, member District Conference Board International Moulders 

Union, Cleveland 
Carl Mitch, committeeman. International Moulders Union, Cleveland 
Clyde Higgins, secretary -treasurer, International Moulders Union (Iron Molders), 

Dallas 
Frank Casey, executive board member, Moving Picture Operators Local 143, St. 

Louis 
Ben Scher, business representative. Moving Picture Operators Local 306, Brook- 
lyn 
L. Fabian, business agent. Painters Local 37, Detroit , 

Courtney Ward, secretary. Painters District Council 8, Cleveland 
R. Rymus, secretarj', Painters Local 867, Cleveland 
H. W. Lindlow, secretary. Painters Local 592, Seattle 
S. T. Wagner, business agent, Pile Drivers Local 34, San Francisco 
Dave Williams, business agent, Pile Drivers Local 34, San Francisco 
Herman B. Hughes, chairman, Typographical Union, Houston 
James Dimakes, president. Miscellaneous Restaurant, Local 110, San Francisco 
Joseph Ruccio, secretary. United Slate, Tile, and Composition Roofers, Local 46, 

Allentown, Pa. 
Frank Dutto, president. Bakers Local 1, New York 
Ben Tiedeman, secretary, Bakers Local 1, New York 
Oscar Schindler, manager, Bakers Local 579, New York 
Julius Meyerowitz, business agent, Bakers Local 579, New York 
Louis Altman, business agent. Bakers Local 164, New York 
Ruby Marcus, manager, Paper Workers Local 107, New York 
Louie Weinstock, secretary, Painters District Council 19, New York 
John McAvinney, recording secretary. Central Labor Union, New York 
A. J. Reed, assistant business agent. International Association of Machinists, Local 

79, Seattle 
Harold Johnson, assistant business agent, International Association of Machinists, 

Local 79, Seattle 
John Goodman, international vice president. Building Service International 

Union, New York 
Andrew Leredu, president, Jewelry Local 1, New York 
Isadore Kahn, secretary-treasurer. Jewelry Local 1, New York 
Saul Kreas, business representative. Painters Local 186, New Haven 
Jules C. Abercaugh, business agent. Jewelry Workers Local 5, Philadelphia 
Herman Goffer, business agent, Pocketbook Workers Union, Bronx 
John R. Gerlach, organizer, Restaurant Workers CIO, Detroit 
Paul Demeny, organizer, Hotel and Restaurant Workers CIO, Detroit 
J. L. Mahady, State director Louisiana SFTW, New Orleans 
(All organizations and titles listed for purpose of identification only.) 

Civil Rights Congress 
205 East Forty-second Street, New York 17, N. Y. 

Statements filed with the Clerk of the House of Representatives under the 
Lobbying Act, January 10, 1947. 

contributions of $500 OR MORE 

Leo S. Bing, 119 West Fortieth Street, New York City, 
George Marshall, 38 East Fifty-seventh Street, New York City. 
Robert Marshall Foundation, 38 East Fifty-seventh Street, New York City. 
Raymond C. Ingersoll, 350 Cabrini Boulevard, New York City. 
Frasier McCann, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York City. 
Dashiell Hammett, Hardscrabble Farm, Pleasantville, N. Y. 

International Fur and Leather Workers Union, 251 Fourth Avenue, New York 
City. 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



41 



Julius Rubin, 4510 Beach Fortv-fifth Street, Sea Gate, N. Y. 

UERMWA, 11 East Fifty-first Street, New York City. 

Civil Rights Congress of New York, 112 East Nineteenth Street, New York City. 

Total sum of contributions made to Civil Rights Congress during 
the calendar vear and not stated under paragraph (1) (October 1, 
1946, to date) . $21,249. 12 

Total sum of all contributions made to Civil Rights Congress during 
the calendar year (October 1, 1946, to date) 36, 546. 65 

Items from detailed statement of expenditures 



Name 



Emanuel Bloch 

Frank Blumenfeld 

Lawrence Brown 

Ray Elson 

Laurent Frantz 

Percy Greene 

Dorothy Faulkner 

Esther Gellman 

Benjamin Goldring 

Milton Kaufman 

Milton N. Kemnitz 

Ethel Livingston 

Victoria Martin... 

Amy Miyagawa 



New York Civil Rights 
Congress. 
Do 



Dixon Pylcs 

Ralph Powe 

Prisoners' relief. 



Kathryn Pankey.. 

Gladys Pollin 

Jack Rollins 

Esther Romanofl.. 

Recia Sobelson 

Harold Swiss 

Beatrice Schneller. 
UERMW.... 



Total expendi- 
tures. 



Address 



270 Broadway, New York 

Citv. 
3S32 Poplar Ave., Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
ISfi West 135th St., New 

York Citv. 
101 West IGth St., New 

York City. 
101 Bowlirig Ave., Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 
Jackson Advocate, Jackson, 

Miss. 
360 West 117th St., New 

York Citv. 
235 IV-ount Hope PI., Bronx, 

N. Y. 
121 Howard Ave., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 
183 Columbia Heights, 

Brooklvii, N. Y. 
78-09 135th St., Flushing, 

Lono; Islnnd. N. Y. 
208 East 28th St., New York 

City. 
284 Quincy St., Brookljm, 

N. Y. 
160 Claremont Ave., New 

York Citv. 
112 East 19th St., New York 

Citv. 
do-- - 



423 J.« East Capitol St., Jack- 
son, Miss. 

700 Mason St., BrookljTi, 
N. Y. 



270 St. Nicholas Ave., New 

York City.. 
310 West 97th St., New 

York City. 
49 Macdougal St., New 

York Citv. 
203 West 74th St., New 

York Citv. 
508 West 114th St., New 

York City. 
1215 50th St., Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
152 West 72d St., New York 

Citv. 
1029 Vermont Ave. NW., 

Washington, D. C. 



Amount 



$825.00 
242. GO 

50.00 
641.42 
982.50 
410.00 
213. 90 
632.82 
368.20 
1,257.08 
989. 80 

14.85 
583.64 

39.81 
2, 650. 00 

10.00 
500.00 
380. 00 
315.28 

218. 85 
104. 17 
188. 55 
780. 50 
132.20 
195. 30 
118. 34 
45.00 



28, 352. 42 



Date 



Nov. 25-Dec. 20. 

Oct. 4- 

Oct. 17 

Oct. 4-Jan. 3 

..-.do 

Oct. 15-17.. 

Nov, 22-Jan. 3.. 

Oct. 4-Jan. 3 

do- 

Nov. 8 

Oct. 4-Jan. 3 

Oct. 16... 

Oct. 4-Jan. 3 

Sept. 27-Oot. 4.. 
Oct. 22-Dec. 2... 

Oct. 29 

Oct. U-Nov. 22- 

Oct. 4-Jan. 3 

Oct.30-Dec. 27.. 

Oct. 4-18 

Oct. 11-18 

Oct. 4-18 

Oct. 11-Jan. 3--. 

Oct. 4-18 

Oct. 4-Nov. 8... 
Dec. 20-Jan. 3... 
Dec. 13 



Item 



Leeal services and 

expenses. 
Salary. 

Accompanist »t 

public dinner. 
Salary. 

Salary and expen- 
ses. 
Travel expenses. 

Salary. 

Do. 

Do. 

Salary and travel 
expenses. 

Salary. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Proceeds from pub- 
lic dinner. 

Refund on mem- 
bership. 

Legal services and 
expenses. 
Do. 

Aid given to 35 
prisoners and 
their families. 

Salary. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Office rental. 



Civil Rights Congress 
205 East Forty-second Street, New York 17, N. Y. 

Statement filed with the Clerk of the House of Representatives under the- 
Lobbying Act, April 2, 1947. 



42 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



CONTRIBUTIONS OF $500 OR MORE 

Louise Bransten, 505 Fifth Avenue, Room 707, New Yorli City. 

Dashiell Hammett, Hardscrabble Farm, Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Elinor Ingersoll, 350 Cabrini Boulevard, New York City. 

Rajanond C. Ingersoll, 350 Cabrini Boulevard, New York City. 

Los Angeles Civil Rights Congress, 206 South Spring Street, Los Angeles, Calif. 

George Marshall, 38 East Fifty-seventh Street, New York City. 

Robert Marshall Foundation, 38 East Fifty-seventh Street, New York City. 

New York Civil Rights Congress, 112 East Nineteenth Street, New York City. 

Contributions made and not stated above $6, 123. 53 

Total sum of all contributions 19, 517. 85 

Items from detailed statement of expenditures 



Name 



Hilda Eisler (Mrs. 
Gerhart Eisler). 

R. O. Everett- 

Ray Eslon.- 

Dorothy Faulkner 



Federated Press. 
Esther Gellman. 



Benjamin Goldring 

Percy Greene 

Raymond C. Ingersoll.. 

Milton Kaufman 

Do. 

Milton N. Kemnitz 

Do.. 

Carol King 

Levine & Schlesinger... 

George Marshall 

Victoria Martin ._ 



New York Civil 
Eights Congress. 
Do 



Samuel Neubui'ger. 

Ralph Powe 

Do... 

Dixon L. Pyles 

Prisoners Relief 



Esther Romanoff- 



Beatrice Schneller. 



Address 



48-46 47th St., Woodside, 
Long Island, N. Y. 

Durham, N. C. 



Transport Workers 

Union Local 206. 
UERMW 



Total sum of ex- 
penditures. 



161 West 16th St., New York 

Citv. 
119 East 102d St., New York 

City. 
25 Astor PI., New York City. 
235 Mount Hope PI., Bronx, 

N. Y. 
121 Howard Ave., Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 

Jackson, Miss 

351 Cabrini Blvd., New 

York City. 
18.3 Columbia Heights, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
do 



78-9 135th St., Flushing, 

Long Island, N. Y. 
do 



220 Broadway, New York 
City. 

National Press Bldg., Wash- 
ington, 4, D. C. 

38 East 57th St., New York 
City. 

284 Quincy St., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

112 East 19th St., New York 
City. 

do 



61 Broadway, New York 

City. 
735 Macon St., Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
do 



423!-^ East Capitol St., 
Jackson, Miss. 



203 West 74th St., New 

York City. 
152 V/est 72d St., New York 

City. 
420 Gravier St., New 

Orleans, La. 
1029 Vermont Ave., NW., 

Washington, D. C. 



Amount 



$506. 05 

564. 30 

544. 39 

197. 48 

49.25 
507.% 

315. 00 

45. 00 
150. 00 

937. 20 

340. 14 

848. 40 

392. 87 

3, 127. 74 

25.00 

150. 00 

467. 82 

1, 600. 00 
642.80 
219.92 
326. 70 
360.00 

1,250.00 
475. 91 

817.05 
14.84 

214.80 
90.00 



Date 



Item 



Mar. 8-21. 



25, 786. 65 



Jan. 10.. 

Jan. 10-Mar. 28. 

do 

Jan. 16-Mar. 7_. 
Jan. 10-Mar. 28. 

do 



Jan. 31. 
Mar. 2. 



Jan. 10-Mar. 28. 
Jan. 10-Mar. 31. 
Jan. 10-Mar. 28. 
Jan. 10-Mar. 31. 

Mar. 5-10 

Mar. 20 

Mar. 2_ 

Jan. 10-28 

Mar. 17 

Jan 10-Mar. 31.. 

Jan. 22 

Jan. 10-Mar. 28. 
Jan. 10-Mar. 31. 

Jan. 16-31 

Jan. 10-Mar. 31. 

Jan. 10-Mar. 28. 

do 

Jan. 16... 

do 



Advance expense 
on national 
speaking lour. 

Legal fee and ex- 
penses. 

Net salary. 

Do. 

Mats. 
Net salary. 

Do. 

Telephone expense. 
Loan payable. 

Net salary. 

Fares, field trips, 

etc. 
Net salary. 

Fares, field trips, 

etc. 
Legal services and 

expoiises. 
Legal services. 

Loan payable. 

Net salary. 

Loan receivable. 

Refund; share of 
contributions. 

Fare and field ex- 
penses. 

Net salary. 

Field trips, fare 

and expenses. 
Legal fees. 

MA given to 34 
prisoners and 
their families. 

Net salary. 

Do. 

Field expense. 

Rental of Wash- 
ington office. 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



43 



Civil Rights Congress 

205 East Forty-second Street, New York 17, N. Y. 

Statement filed wiih the Clerk of the House of Representatives under the Lobby- 
ing Act, July 7, 1947. 

contributions 
Contributions of $500 or more: 

Bernard Ades, 505 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

Lionel Berman, 66 Barrow Street, New York City. 

Louise Branstcn, 66 Barrow Street, New York City. 

Communist Party, 35 East Twelfth Street. New York City. 

Katharine L. Harris, Chappaqua, N. Y. 

Lenient Harris, Chapj^aqua, N. Y. 

Elinor Ingersoll, 350 Cabrini Boulevard, New York City. 

Los Angeles Civil Rights Congress, 206 Soutli Spring Street, Los- Angeles, 

Calif. 
Frasier McCann, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York City. 
George Marshall, 38 East Fifty-seventh Street, New York City. 
Civil Rights Congress of New York, 112 East Nineteenth Street, New York 

City. 
Milton Paulson, 295 Madison Avenue, New York City. 

Contributions not listed above. $13, 961. 72 

Total sum of all contributions 47, 555. 03 

Items from detailed statement of expenditures 



Name 



Bernard Ades 

Amalgamated Bank 

Do 

Do 

Amalgamated Travel 

Bureau. 
William Bidner 



Gerhart Eisler_ 
Hilda Eisler.... 



Ray Elson 

Lawrence Emery 

R. d. Everett,. 

Dorothy Faulkner 

Federated Press. 

Stephen Fritchman 

Esther Gellman 

Benjamin Goldring 

Raymond C. Ingersoll.. 

A. J. Isserman 

Albert Kahn... 

Milton Kaufman 

Do 

Milton N. Kemnitz 

Do 

Carol King 

Levine and Schlesinger. 



Address 



505 5th Ave., New York 

City. 
11 Union Square, New York 

City. 

do._ 

do._.. 

do 



206 South Spring St., Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
48-4G47th St., Woodside, 

N. Y. 
do 



161 West 16th 
York City. 

434 Lafayette 
York City. 

Durham, N. C. 



St., New 
St., New 



119 East 102d St., New York 

City. 
133 West 44th St., New York 

City. 
6 Greenough Ave., Jamaica 

Plain, N. Y. 
235 Mount Hope PI., Bronx, 

N. Y. 
121 Howard Ave., Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
351 Cabrini Blvd., New 

York Citv. 
133 West 44th St., New York 

City. 
White Hill Rd., Yorktown 

Heights, N. Y. 
183 Columbia Heights, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
do. 



78-09 135th St., 

N. Y. 
do. 



Flushing 



220 Broadway, New York 
City. 

National Press Bldg., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



Amount 



$125. 00 

1, 092. 20 

1, 500. 00 
901.32 
112.82 

300. 00 

461. 00 

681.05 

1, 122. 89 

50.00 

617. 30 

357. 16 

49.25 

24.00 

1, 058. 25 

394.50 

150. 00 

2,000.00 

12.50 

1, 987. 60 

688.18 

1, 767. 50 

607.02 

5, 877. 74 

50.00 



Date 



May 9-June 13.. 

Jan. 10-June 27.. 

Jan. 15-June 13.. 

Mar. 12 

May 2 



June 24. 

Apr. 16- June 26. 
Mar. 8-May 23. 

Jan. 10-June 27.. 

June 19 

Jan. 10-May23-. 
Jan. 10-May 9... 
Jan. 16-Mar. 7.. 

June 9 

Jan. 10-June 27.. 
Jan. lO-Apr. 18.. 

Mar. 2 

May 29-June 13. 

Apr. 21 

Jan. 10-June 27.. 
Jan. 10-June 26.. 
Jan. 10-June 27.. 
Jan. 10-May 16.. 
Mar. 6-June 13. . 
Mar. 20-May23. 



Item 



Accounting serv- 
ices. 
Withholding tax. 

Loan payable. 
Transportation. 
Do. 

Loan receivable. 

Travel re trials; 
living expenses. 

Expenses, nalicnal 
speaking tour, 
and mainte- 

nance. 

Net salary. 

Research and writ- 
ing. 

Legal fee and ex- 
penses. 

Net salary. 

Mats. 

Travel expense. 

Net salary. 

Do. 

Loan payable. 

Legal fee and dis- 
bursements. 
Travel expenses. 

Net salary. 

Fares, field trips, 

etc. 
Net salary. 

Fares, field trips, 

etc. 
Legal service an 

disbursements. 
Legal services. 



44 CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

Items from detailed statement of expenditures — Continued 



Name 



Address 



Amount 



Date 



Item 



Louis McCabe. 



George E. McNeil. 
George Marshall... 



Victoria Martin. 



Civil Rights Congress 
of New York. 
Do 



938 Commercial Trust Bldg., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Washington, D. C 

38 East 57th St., New York 

City. 
284 Quincy St., Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
112 East 19th St., New York 

City. 
.... do 



Samuel Neuberger. 

Ralph Powe.- 

Do 



61 Broadway, New York 

City. 
753 Macon St., Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
do 



Prisoners Relief. 



Dixon L. Pyles 

David Rein 

Lawrence Rivkin 

Esther Romanofi 

Hyman Schneider 

Beatrice Schneller 

Alfred L. Tan^ 

Violet J. Tarcai. 

Barent Ten Eyck 

Trade Union Agency... 



Transport Workers 

Union Local 206. 
UREMW... 



Harry F. Ward 

Rev. L. W. Wertz. 
Mortimer B. Wolf. 



423).« East Capitol St., 
Jackson, Miss. 

1105 K St. NW., Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

112 East 19th St., New York 
City. 

203 West 74th St., New 
York City. 

130-04 226th St., Laurelton, 
N. Y. 

152 AVest 72d St., New York 
City. 

350 Fifth Ave., New York 
Citv. 

8407 AVoodland Ave., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

40 Wall St., New York 
City. 

17 East 49th St.. New York 
City. 

420 Gravier St., New Or- 
leans. La. 

1029 Vermont Ave., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

IIIG Arcadian Way, Pali- 
sade, N. J. 

P. O. Box 909, Hamlet, 
N. C. 

1501 Broadway 



$1, 000. 00 

2, 500. 00 
150.00 

991. 35 

1, 650. 00 

742. 80 

219. 92 
683. 10 
471. 32 

836. 55 

2, 750. 00 
300.00 

50.00 
817. 05 

62.85 

14.84 
100. 00 

13.92 
1, 500. 00 

77.51 

214. 80 
90.00 
95.12 
60.00 
50.00 



June 20. 

May 26- 
Mar2... 



Jan. 10-Jime27.. 
Mar. 17-June 12. 
Jan. 10-Junel6.. 

Jan. 22 

Jan. 10-June27.. 
Jan. 10-May23.. 

Jan. 10-June 19.. 

Jan. IG-June 19.. 

June 19 

Apr. 16 

Jan. 10-Mar. 28 _ 

June 27 

Jan. 10-Mar. 28. 

June 20-- 

May 15 

May 22.- 

Jan. 23-May 23.. 

Jan 16 

do--- 

May 2-29-- 

May 23-- - 

May 23- June 13. 



Total sum of ex- 
penditures. 



53. 101. 92 



Legal services. 

Do. 
Loan payable. 

Net salary. 

Loan receivable. 

Refund, share o( 
contributions, 
advance. 

Fare and field ex- 
penses. 

Net salary. 

Field trips, fares, 
expense and serv- 
ice. 

Aid given to ^4 
prisoners and 
their families. 

Legal fee. 

Do. 

Field expenses and 

fare. 
Net salary. 

Do. 

Do. 

Legal disburse- 
ments. 

Refund on fleld 
trip fare. 

Legal fee. 

Workmen's com- 
pensation, insur- 
ances, etc. 

Field expenses. 

Rental, DC oflBce. 
Field trip fares. 
Field expenses 
Legal fee. 



Civil Rights Congress of New York 

112 East Nineteenth Street, New York, N. Y. 

Statement filed with the Clerk of the House of Representatives under the Lobby- 
ing Act, January 10, 1947. 

contributions 

Contributions of $500 or more: 

Dashiell Hammett, 15 East Sixty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. 

Civil Rights Congress, 205 East Sixty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. 

Paul Crosbie, 17 East Forty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. 

Contributions not listed above $18, 785. 00 

Total' contributions. _ 23, 035. 00 

expenditures 

Expenditures of $10 or more (see list attached).. $21, 515. 89 

Expenditures not listed 216. 08 

Total expenditures 21 ''31, 97 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 
Items froin detailed statement of expenditures 



45 



Name 


Address 


Amount 


Date 


Item 


American Cru-sade 
Against Lynching. 

Louis Colman 


23 West 26th St.. New York. 

39 Charlton St., New York.. 

342 West 19th St., New York. 

1152 Rogers Ave.. Brooklyn . 

278 East 45th St., Brooklyn.. 

208 East 28th St.. New York. 

3720 Ave. L. Brooklyn 

Address unknown ._ 


$430.00 

/ 1,761.23 
\ 118.84 

/ 1,175.73 
\ 52. 90 

/ 1,161.84 
\ 40. 70 

f 1,115.21 
\ 186. 55 

/ 635. 65 
\ 1.25 

/ 533. 52 
1 2.20 

290. 40 

80.58 

/ 234. 98 

\ 10.85 

350. 42 

67. 93 
1, 492. 50 
50.00 
97.71 
41.20 

25.40 

49.00 
11.65 

40.00 
56.00 
75.00 

41.00 

80.00 

100. 00 

75.00 

40.50 

126. 00 

51.30 

4, 585. 59 
40.66 

18.84 
52.04 
11.00 


Oct. 1 


Exchange for rail- 


}0ct. 3-Jan. 9.... 
|....do 


way ticket. 
(Net wages. 
< M iscellaneous fares 


Robert Freeman 

Lawrence Rivkin 

Jacques Sartisky 

Ethel Livingston 

ICToll^ Diinn 


I and expenses. 
Net wages. 
< M iscellaneous fares 


}....do 

jOct. 3-Jan. 2 

}Oct. 3-Jan. 9.... 
|....do 


[ and exiicnses. 
iNct wages. 
i M iscell aneous fares 
I and expenses. 
(Net wages, 
•j M iscell aneous fares 
I and expenses. 
fXet wages. 
\ Fares. 
Net wages. 
■^Miscellaneous ex- 


Alice Q. Harris . . 


J 
Oct. 3-Nov. 15.. 
Nov. 15-22- 

}nov. 21-Jan. 2.. 
Nov. 21-Dec. 26. 

Dec. 19-Jan..2... 
Oct. 4-Dec. 4.... 
Oct. 7- 


l penscs. 
Net wages. 


Rosalind Lazar ... 


200 Bennett Ave., NeiS York. 

1971 Grand Ave., Bron.'c 

320 Eastern Parkway, 
Brooklyn. 

7 Morton PI.. New York 

7 East 44th St., New York.. 
299 Broadway, New York... 
41 East 14th St., New York.. 
303 West 4th St., New York. 

305 Riverside Dr., New 

York. 
261 Broadway, New York... 
65 Ashland Ave., Buffalo, 

N. Y. 

208 East 28th St., New York_ 
278 East 45th St., Brooklyn.. 
Care of Weinstein, 1245 East 

Parkway, Brooklyn. 
1152 Rogers Ave., Brooklyn.. 

23-31 29th St., Astoria 

28 Greenwich Ave., New 

York. 

817 Avenue N, Brooklyn 

100 5th Ave., New York 

50 East 13th St., New York. 
112 Park Ave., New York... 

205 E. 42d St., New York... 
2100 Beekman PI., Brook- 
lyn. 

650 Crown St., Brooklyn 

41 East 14th St., New York.. 
Address unknown 


Do. 


Herbert Shore 


fNet wages. 
I Faros. 
Net wages. 


Sara Fields 


Sony Lipton 


Do. 


Moss & Arnold Co 


Advertising. 
Legal expenses. 


Gensup Stationery 

Dorothy Kley 


Nov. 22 


Stationery. 


Nov. 4-Dec. 23.. 

Nov. 26-Dec. 23- 
Dec. 3 


Organizing activ- 


Hpnry .Tftpnhy 


ity, CRC chap- 
ter. 
Do. 


Hprtrim Tin.lcprman 


Legal expenses. 


JaD6 Brant 


Dec. 18 


Organizing activ- 




Dec. 20 


ity, CRC chap- 
ter. 
Loan payable. 


Jacques Sartisky 

Herbert Goldenberg 


do. 


Do. 


do 


Do. 


do. 


Do. 


Bernard Moss 


do- 


Do. 


Eugene P. Connolly 

Seymour Rosenberg 

Louis Fleischer 


Dec. 23 


Dinner tickets. 


.do 


Auditing. 


Dec. 24 


Legal. 


Daily Worker 


Dec. 30. 


Advertising. 




do 


Purchase of collec- 


for Human Welfare. 
Civil Rights Congress.. 
Sadie Freedman 

Dorothy Lipson 

Gensup Stationery 

Olin Montgomery 


Oct. 7-Dec. 27... 
Nov. 4-Dec. 23.. 

Nov. 26-Jan. 6.. 
Oct.24-Dec.9.-. 
Dec. 5-19 


tion boxes. 
Contributions. 
Organizing actlv 
ity, CRC chap- 
ter. 
Do. 
Stationery. 
Personal assist- 
ance. 


Total expendi- 


21,515.89 


- 


tures. 







Civil Rights Congress of New York 

112 East Nineteenth Street, New York, N. Y. 

Statement filed with the Clerk of the House of Representatives under the Lobby- 
ing Act, April 2, 1947. 

CONTRIBUTIONS 

Contributions of $500 or more: 

Civil Rights Congress, 205 East Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y. 

Dashiell Hammett, 15 East Sixty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. 

Contributions not listed above $11. 662. 07 

Total contributions. 14, 939. 37 



46 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



EXPENDITURES 

Expenditures of $10 or more (see list attached) $14, 784. 31 

Expenditures not listed 42. 30 

Total expenditures 14, 826. 61 

Items from detailed statement of expenditures 



Name 



Address 



Amount 



Dorothy Kley.. 

Sadie Freedman 

Evelyn Fischer 

William S. Gailmore^__ 
United Office and Pro- 
fessional Workers 
Union. 

Ray Shapiro 

Molly Dunn 

Lawrence Rlvkin 

Robert Freeman 

Ethel Livingston 

Goldie Davidofif_ 

Clifford C. Davis 

Seymour Rosenberg,.. 
Gensup Stationery 

Civil Rights Congress. 

Louis Colman 

Moss & Arnold Co 

Albert E. Kahn_. 

Total expend! 
tures. 



300 West 4th St., New York, 

2100 Beekman PL, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

173-34 Effington Ave., 

Flnshin?, N. Y. 
55 West 55th St., New York. 
30 East 29th St., New York. 



338 East 20th St., New York. 



3720 Ave. L, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

1152 Rogers Ave., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

342 West 19th St., New York. 

20S East 28th St., New York. 
56 Cannon St., New York... 

503 West 148th St., New 
York. 

817 Ave. N, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
41 East 14th St, New York.. 

205 East 42d St., New York. 



39 Charlton St., New York.. 

7 East 44th St., New York.. 
245 West 2oth St., New 
York City. 



$14.41 
15.60 

16.36 

18.00 

150. 00 
28.50 



385.50 
.40 

404. 25 

.45 

691.35 
2.00 

334. 75 
.50 

514. 25 
40.45 

634.95 
4.60 

75.00 

50.48 

477. 00 

1, 600. 00 

8.75 

973. 50 
173. 25 

633. 00 
70.00 



Date 



}jan. 14-22. 

Jan. 14 

Jan. 16- 

Jan. 28 

Feb. 13-Mar. 26 

}jan. 30-Mar. 17. 

}jan. 16-Mar. 27. 
}....do.... 

}jan. 16-Mar. 13. 

Jan. 16-Mar. 27. 
Jan. 16 

}jan. 30-Mar. 27 

Mar. 26 

Mar. 3-25 

>Jan. 15-Mar. 21 

jjan. 20.. 

Mar. 25-.. 

Mar. 28 



^ 



Item 



[Organizing activity, 
CKC chapter. 

[ Exchanges.- 

Organizing activ- 
ity, CRC chap- 
ter. 

Delegate fees. 

Lectures. 
Exchanges. 



Net wages. 
Miscellaneous 
, fares. 
Net wages. 
Miscellaneous 
. fares. 
fXet wages. 
\Taxi fares. 
'Net wages. 
ISIiscellaneous 

fares. 
Net wages. 
Do. 

{Xet wages. 
Miscellaneous 
fares. 
Auditing. 
Stationery. 
(Contributions. 
•J Returned loan. 
Exchanges. 
Net wages. 
Miscellaneous 
fares and ex- 
penses. 
Advertising. 
Lectui'es. 



14, 784. 31 



Civil Rights Congress of New York 
112 East Nineteenth Street, New York, N. Y. 

Statement filed with the Clerk of the House of Representatives under the 
Lobbying Act, July 9, 1947. 

CONTRIBUTIONS 

Contributions of $500 or more: Dashiell Hammett, 15 East 66th 
Street, New York, N. Y. 

Contributions not listed above $5, 916. 75 

Total contributions 7, 916. 75 

EXPENDITURES 

Expenditures of $10.00 or more (see list attached) $9, 055. 57 

Expenditures not listed 48. 05 

Total expenditures. 9, 103. 62 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 
Ilcms from detailed statement oj expenditures 



47 



Name 



Ilorbcrt Shore 

Stage for Action 

Qensup Stationery Co.. 

Moss & Arnold 

Civil Rights Conprcss.. 

United Office and Pro- 
fessional Workers of 
America. 

Louis Colman 

Clifford C. Davis 

Albert E. Kahn 

Rev. Ben Richardson.. 

Richard Yaflee 

Betty Sanders 

Phil Irving _ 

Molly Dunn _ 

Louis Colman 

Cliflord C. Davis 

Ethel Livingston 

Ray Shapiro 

Frances Skoy 

Lawrence Rivkin 

Moses C. Weinman 

Emanuel H. Bloch 

Total expenditures. 



Address 



1971 Grand Ave., Bronx, 

.\. Y. 
130 We-^t 42d St., New York 

City. 
41 East 14th St., New York 

City. 
7 East 44th St., New York 

City. 
205 East 42d St., New York 

City. 

[so East 29th St., New York 
[ City. 

39 Charlton St., New York 

City. 
503 West M8th St., New 

York City. 
245 West 25th St., New York 

Citv. 
7th Ave. and 125th St., New 

York City. 
467 Central Park West, New 

York City. 
2212 Ditmas Ave., Brooklyn. 

N. Y. 
215 West 11th St., New York 

City. 
3720 Ave. L, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

39 Charlton St., New York 
City. 

503 West 148th St., New 
York City. 

20S East 28th St., New York 

City. 
338 East 20th St., New York 

Citv. 
58 East 3d St., New York 

City. 

1152 Rogers Ave., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

207 4th Ave., New York City. 
299 Broadway, New York 

City. 



Amount 



$30. 00 
35.00 
44. 01 

205.90 

125.00 
539. 79 

30.00 

156. 67 

60.00 

50.00 

25.00 

30. 00 

17.50 

25.00 

183. 75 

1, 150. 50 
75.10 

917. 15 
G3. 70 

607. 75 

501. 15 
1.20 

364. 05 
4.35 

817.05 
265. 00 

25.00 
35.00 



9, 055. 57 



Date 



Apr. 2 

Apr. 23 

Mar. 26-Junc CO 
June 17 

jjune 18-23 

Apr. 21-May 9. 

May 13-Jime 5. 

June 5 

May 9 

do 

May 20 

June 14 

do 

Apr. 3-24 

} Apr. 3-June 26. 

}....do 

do... 

}....do 

}...-do 

}..-.do 

Apr. 2. 

Apr. 30 



Item 



Fares, etc. 

Performance. 

Stationery. 

Advertising. 

fExchanccs. 
[Contributions. 

fExchanirc 
[Union clues. 

Exchange. 

Do. 
Lectures. 
Lecture. 

Do. 

Artist-Perform- 
ance. 
Singer at meeting. 

Net wages. 

Do. 
Miscellaneous fares 

and expenses. 
Net wa'jes. 
Miscpllancous fares 

and expenses. 
Net wages. 

fNet wages. 
\ Fares. 
|Nct wages. 
\ Fares. 
(Net wages. 
< Miscellaneous fares 
t and expenses. 
Legal expenses. 
Do. 



o 



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