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Full text of "Report on progress of the works program in San Francisco; January, 1938"

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REPORT ON 

PROGRESS OF 

THE WORKS 

PROGRAM 



W ORKS PROGRESS 
A D MINI ST RATI ON 

SA N FRANCISCO 

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SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



REFERENCE 
BOOK 

Not to be taken from the Library 






SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 03553 2036 



OCUMENTS DEPARTMENT 



DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT 



PREPARED FOR 

WILLIAM SL LAWSON 

ADMINISTRATOR 

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

JANUARY 193 8 



REPORT ON 




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IN SAN FRANCISCO 




JANUARY 1938 

WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION 

WILLIAM M005ER. JR.. BRANCH MANAGER 



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Report on 


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3 1223 03553 2036 



LIBRARY 



FOREWORD 



According to statistics compiled by the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce, and based on the census of 1930, there were 
gainfully employed in the City of San Francisco in that year, 
335,000 persons. Continuing to utilize the figures compiled by 
the same agency, we find that in 1933* 230,000 persons were 
gainfully employed, while in 1935 - 274,000 persons were working, 
and in 1956 - the last complete figures obtainable -• there were 
295,000 persons gainfully employed. Such statistics as are now 
available for 1937 do not indicate any increase over the 1936 
total. 

Eliminating such factors as normal population growth 
with its concommitant increase of employable persons, and using 
the 1930 figures of 333,000 employed workers, it becomes quite 
evident that there still remain approximately 38,000 persons 
who were working, formerly, in private industry but who are now 
no longer employed. It is interesting to note that in the re- 
port issued by Mr. Bigger s, chairman of the U.S. Unemployment 
Census, there is shown a total of 40,984 persons unemployed in 
the City of San Francisco. 



Obviously, idleness among so- many thousands represents 
not only a waste of potential productivity but also, more import- 
ant, a waste of human resources which results in the demoraliza- 
tion of the collective spirit. The goal, therefore, of the 
Works Progress Administration has been set toward the conserva- 
tion of these human resources in the community, and its efforts 
directed toward building up the spirit and morale of the unem- 
ployed who constitute so large a segment of the community's 
population. 

Previous to the establishment of the Works Progress 
Administration In the latter part of 1935, the relief problem 
was, in a large measure, met through the State Emergency Relief 
Administration. This Agency was set up in California with funds 
appropriated by the State Legislature and with grants for relief 
made by the Federal Government. The program, in the main, was 
devoted to the rendering of direct relief to the unemployed, 
there being only a small part of Its appropriations allocated 
for a Works Relief Program on which the workers were employed 
on a relief budgetary basis. 

The morale of the relief recipients was quite natur- 
ally at a low point, at that time. It must be considered that 
there being no useful work in either private industry or public 
works in which the energies of the unemployed could be directed, 
their principal activities were devoted to finding ways and 
means of clinging to the relief rolls, seeking to increase their 
relief budgets, etc. 

With the principal established in President Roosevelt's 
message to Congress on January 4, 1935 - that unemployed, able 



persons, who wore willing to work, were a Federal responsi- 
bility and with the subsequent establishment of the Forks 
Progress Administration later in that year, a narked change 
ensued in the outlook and morale of the unemployed who pre- 
viously were solely dependent on the relief rolls for their 
maintenance , 

At the time the Works Program was put into effect 
there were maintained on the Unemployed Relief PloIIs in San 
Francisco County (Oct. 1935) 29,051 cases representing 
62,108 persons. By January 1936, 21,454 of these cases were 
removed from the direct relief rolls and placed on W. P. A B 
Projects at security wages. The resultant effect on the 
spirit of these workers can well be imagined; for many of 
these workers, W.P.A. employment represented the fir's t oppor- 
tunity to do useful work after years of enforced idleness. 
That depletion of the will to work and pauperization of the 
spirit had by that time made no substantial inroads was made 
manifest by the alacrity with which work assignments were 
snapped up. There was bouyancy in the workers and hope for 
jobs among those not yet assigned. Similarly now, as was 
then the case, with fifteen thousand working on W.P.A at 
present in San Francisco County and 9,108 on direct relief, 
the anxiety to w.ork is equally intense among both those who 
arc now working and those newly certified workers on direct 
relief, not yet assigned to W.P.A, jobs. 

Nothing further could be added to the fact already 
clearly evident that jobs on useful projects do most to sus- 
tain the morale of the workers. 



The extent of the useful projects which have been 
developed In San Francisco County has made it possible to 
utilize to the utmost benefit of the Community and the work- 
ers themselves the skills and training which they possess. 
Through a system of occupational classifications which takes 
into consideration such factors as; experience, education, 
physical condition, age, and etc., nearly 600 categories of 
workers have been clearly demarked. Each of these occupation- 
al classifications are so arranged as to make it possible for 
work assignments to be given to those best qualified to do the 
job which is required. The benefits to the Community in pro- 
ductivity and in stimulation to the individual worker to re- 
gard themselves as a useful member of society is incalculable. 
What has proved of greatest value to the worker employed on 
projects in his trade or profession is that he is thus enabled 
to maintain his skills sharp and active. This in turn helps 
him to obtain work in private industry when there is demand 
for his particular skill. The numbers who were thus helped 
to get jobs in private industry through keeping their skills 
alive, mount into the thousands. 

In addition to the skilled workers on projects there 
are a considerable number of younger persons and others who 
were placed at work while possessing no skills or previous work 
experience. These workers are now obtaining work exper- 
ience and developing skills which will prove and have already 
proven of immeasurable value to them in getting jobs in pri- 
vate industry. Many have already succeeded in obtaining 



desirable permanent jobs In private employment. 

In 1935 S a n Francisco's revenues from property 
taxes and other resources had not kept pace with the necess- 
ary services which were rendered to its citizens. As a con- 
sequence there was retarded to a considerable extent the ful- 
fillment of many of the construction and improvement plans 
which had been developed by the City's Department of Public 
Works, Park Commission, Recreation Commission, etc. 

The need for street improvements such as widening 
and reconstruction had been keenly felt in the community. 
Since the advent of the ^',?,A. three units embracing over 
100,000 lineal feet of widening and reconstruction have been 
completed. As a direct result of this work the city found 
it possible to extend the development of its street lighting 
program which otherwise would not have been accomplished. It 
is conservatively estimated that due to the participation of 
the W.p.A. in the street improvement work this program was 
advanced by at least three years. 

Similarly with the program of the Recreation Com- 
mission, lack of funds impeded its progress. With the in- 
crease of leisure time due to short hours of work, and un- 
employment, there was voiced in the public press and from 
the rostrum a clearly articulated public demand for a fully 
developed recreational program. 

In this connection the W,p # A,'s contribution can 
be measured by more than the mere improvements to the City's 



recreational facilities, W.P.A.'s contributions are evi- 
denced In the increased number of cultural and educational 
activities In which many thousands more of San ^rancisco's 
citizenry are participating than previously, and In such 
activities as child nurseries, public health clinics, etc. 

The program of the Recreation Commission measured 
by the anticipated and previously hoped for attainments has 
been advanced through W.P.A. participation by a minimum of 
ten years. 

V'.'orks projects which have been set up for the pur- 
pose of the modernization and renovation of the records of 
the various departments of the City and County governmental 
units have effected tremendous improvements in the standard 
of the services which these agencies are rendering. Millions 
of documents, many of them of great value, have been classi- 
fied, indexed, and made available for use by the proper auth- 
orities. Similar value rendered through v'J.p.A. participation 
to the City and County health services have accrued through 
survey projects covering public health and dental programs. 

An evaluation of the permanent benefits which have 
been obtained by the community through Works Program, would 
not be complete by listing the many physical properties 
which have been built and are now in the process of construc- 
tion. The permanent benefits which have already been made 
manifest can best be described in terms of improved health, 
impetus given to the development of the communit5.es cultural 
and educational institutions and improved governmental ser- 
vice to the people. 



INTRODUCTION 



In June of 1935 there was presented the problem of 
setting up a program for work projects in the City and County 
of San Francisco. 

The first step undertaken was a study which was made 
In order to obtain a comprehensive view of the various public 
agencies such as City, County , and State governmental units 
and the extent of the contemplated work that these agencies 
might have in their programs, either for new construction or 
for improvements which their current budget allotments preven- 
ted them from undertaking. 

The results obtained from the study thus made was the 
development of a diversified program of projects Involving 
Parks, Playgrounds, Street and Roads, Building Construction 
and Improvements, and many clerical, service, and professional 
units, as well. 

Due to the relatively small area which San Francisco 
covers and the built-up condition of the city, it became neces- 
sary to concentrate in a greater measure on construction proj- 
ects, rather than on roads and open spaces. • This, as can read- 



ily be understood, involved a larger percentage of expenditures 
on other than labor costs. Such a condition created obvious 
difficulties in providing work for unskilled labor and non- 
manua 1 wo r ke r s . 

However, despite these handicaps, as will be noted on 
the labor load chart included in this report, we have succeeded 
in maintaining on active assignments practically all the wor- 
kers certified to us as employable. Costs, other than labor, 
have been furnished us in increasing amounts by the Sponsors 
and, in many instances, contributions have been made in greater 
amounts than the original pledges in the project proposals. 
This, in itself, evidences the keen interest in the Works Prog- 
ress Administration's Program by the sponsors and the commun- 
ity's acknowledgement of the permanent benefits it derived. 

In selecting outstanding Works Progress Administra- 
tion Projects in San Francisco, it is necessary to keep in mind 
three major factors - the strong civic spirit of San Franciscans; 
the fact that they are proud and conscious of the two bridges, 
the world's greatest engineering feats, which span San Francisco 
Bay; and that, in 1939, San Francisco wili celebrate the com- 
pletion of those bridges by the Golden Gate International Expo- 
sition which will bring countless thousands of guests to this 
area. San Francisco, desirous of living up to its reputation 
of "the city that knows how" is, therefore, planning projects 
and civic improvements with that deadline date constantly in 
mind. It is anxious that the visitors shall recognize why this 
city with its great achievements is beloved of Its peoples and 
has earned, among the cities of the world, the reputation of 



"being a truly colorful metropolis - one, it has been said, of 
"the five romance tinted, story cities" of the United States. 

The several projects chosen for description in the 
following pages reflect the citizens' attitude. 

Streets and sidewalks improvements are, of course, an 
obvious necessity for the re-routing of traffic to openings of 
the bridges and will be more urgently needed to avoid conges- 
tion and confusion when the Exposition brings its visitors. 
Due to the unprecedented growth of population with its conse- 
quent increase in traffic, the city has suffered greatly from 
traffic congestion. The widening and improvement of streets 
has been wholeheartedly endorsed by the San Francisco Board of 
Supervisors. There are, also, in the possession of the City 
Engineer's office, innumerable testimonials from private civic 
spirited citizens endorsing such improvements. 

The Market Street Subway Survey Project has, with em- 
phasis placed on accuracy and speed, completed a survey for a 
subway to improve traffic conditions . 

Aquatic Park has long been a dream of San Francisco - 
and little more than a dream. Now that the Works Progress 
Administration has furnished the man power and money to turn 
the dream into reality, every effort has been expended to bring 
about its completion in order that it may be shown pridefully 
to the Exposition visitors. As knowledge of what the completed 
project will mean has become more commonly appreciated, popular 
approval for this project has gradually mounted to a point of 
fine enthusiasm. That this is an outstanding project achieve- 
ment is evidenced by a complete public support and the fact 



that, heretofore, San Francisco has never had adequate facili- 
ties for the large number who enjoy the sports of boating and 
swimming. 

The enlargement and improvement of Flelshhacker Zoo 
was another dream now being converted into reality through the 
participation of the Works Progress Administration. It Is an- 
ticipated that the Zoo will be enlarged to approximately eight 
times its present size but only that portion of the work has 
been undertaken which can be completed in time for the exhibit 
in 1939, 

The relief maps of California forest areas have been 
needed by the Division of Forestry in their routine work. At 
present, special efforts are being made to map the whole of the ' 
Western States and Pacific Coast region, embracing eleven states, 
for exhibit at the Exposition. Approval has not been secured 
as yet to prepare such an Exposition exhibit. The plan, how- 
ever, has the approval and endorsement of many Interested agen- 
cies and private citizens. 

It is hoped that In the following pages on which Is 
listed and described only a part of the work which has been 
carried out by the Works Progress Administration in San Francis- 
co County, the reader may be enabled to obtain a clearer under- 
standing of how effectively the community has utilized the ser- 
vices being rendered by the Works- Progress Administration. 



COMPARISON OF RELIEF LOAD 

to 
W.P.A. ACTIVE ASSIGNMENTS 



A study of the following graph will show the total 
S.R.A. case load certified to W.P.A., and the active assign- 
ments on the W.P.A. work program. 

It will be noted that the W.P.A. has consistently em- 
ployed most of the load certified; the W.P.A. curve was plotted 
from our own record of active assignments and does not take Into 
account those employed on the Shoals and on projects directly 
operated by Federal agencies. If the information relating to 
the number employed on the Shoals and on Federal projects was 
available, it is certain that the relationship between the cer- 
tified curve and active assignments would be much closer than 
shown . 

A certain portion of the load could not always be 
steadily employed due to the fact that the direct relief agen- 
cies certify all employables according to their own standards 
of eligibility; in addition, the workers certified do not al- 
ways possess all of the occupational skill required. The diffi- 
culty, then, to initiate a work program whereby the projects 
approved call for a specific ratio of occupational skills in 
relation to those which are in the available load, becomes ap- 
parent. For example, a certain type of project may call for 100 
laborers, 8 carpenters, 2 plumbers, 1 steamfitter, 3 electricians, 
4 tile setters, 5 cement finishers, and 10 painters. The avail- 
able load for these classifications at the time of the project's 
opening may be: 120 laborers, 20 carpenters, 4 plumbers, no 
steamfitters, 10 electricians, 1 tile setter, 15 cement finish- 



ers, and 40 painters. The result is that 20 laborers, 12 car- 
penters, 2 plumbers, 7 electricians, 10 cement finishers, and 
30 painters are left on the available certified list, and the 
project can not be properly serviced with steamfitters or tile 
setters. For this reason, a similar project can not be opened 
to take up the remaining workers because certain operations 
within the project can not be completed in time to allow the 
balance of workers to proceed at a normal and economic pace. 

This explanation is given to illustrate the necessity 
for maintaining a project planning department so that many more 
projects of varied character may be planned and in readiness for 
operation. This is one of our most difficult problems, owing 
to the fact that the sponsors have only a limited sum to allo- 
cate and are reluctant to sign projects aggregating more pledge 
than is available in their current budget. 



CHART SHOWING COMPARATIVE 5.R.A RELIEF LOAD, 
CERTIFIED CASES, AND W.P.A. ACTIVE 
ASSIGNMENTS. 




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TABL £ Of CONTENT 



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FOREWORD 

INTRODUCTION 

COMPARISON OF RELIEF LOAD 

CONSTRUCTION AND ENGINEERING 

PAGE 

Aquatic Park 17 

Federal Art Project's Contribution 

to Aquatic Park _ 23 

Streets and Sidewalks. _ 25 

Fleishhacker Playground 33 

Lyon Street Approach to Golden Gate 

Bridge. ... _ _ __ 41 

38th and Fulton Recreation Center 47 

Agriculture Association Building _ 55 

State Teachers' College 58 

Telegraph Hill Park 60 

Glenn Park Recreation Center.. ._ 65 

Golden Gate Park Tennis Courts . 68 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont.) 



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PAGE 

Brief Description of Construction 

Projects 74 

Functions of Safety Department 97 

WOMEN'S, PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL 

Women's, Professional and 

Technical Projects _ 100 

Education _ 102 

Service 108 

Health Control .„, " .'. 108 

Visiting Housekeepers _ 110 

Production 112 

Library and Museum 116 

Recreation . . .. 118 

Cultural ...777. 777 777777 7777777 7777777777777777 122 

Public Administration 123 

Codification of City Ordinances.. 124 

Parole Survey . .. ..126 

S.P. Police Records 127 

Engineering Surveys 129 

Brief Description of Women's, Professional 

and Technical Projects. 153 

FINANCIAL STATISTICS 



Summary of Financial Data 157 

NATIONAL YOUTH ADMINISTRATION 

National Youth Administration 

Projects .; ..161 

■ TESTIMONIAL LETTERS 164 









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TA3L£ Of 
MAfS. CHAJCTS AND OA?H< 






PAGE 



Comparison of Relief Load to W.P.A. 

Active Assignments, 13 



Streets, Roads and Boulevards 32 

Parks, Playgrounds and Buildings. 70 



Physical Accomplishment of 

Construction Units 71 



Expenditures of Construction Units 72 



Comparative Labor, Material and 

Administrative Federal Cost 159 



Analysis of Available Unemployment 

Case Load 160 



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TABLE Of ILUS'/HAfiCWS 



CO NSTRUCTION AND ENGINEERING 

PAGE 

Aquatic Park 21 

6 views 

Streets and Sidewalks 30 

4 views 

Zoological Gardens _ 37 

7 views 



Lyon Street Approach ._ _. 44 

4 6 views 

1 

J 38th and Fulton Recreation Center 53 

* 4 views 

Agriculture Association Building .. _ . 56 

3 views 



State Teachers ' College . 59 



2 views 



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Telegraph Hill Park _ 62 

6 views 

Glenn Park Recreation Center _ _ 66 

4 views 



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Golden Gate Park Tennis Courts 69 

ij{ 2 views 

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TABLE OF ILLUSTRATIONS ( Cont . ) 



Education 103 

2 views 



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$ 



WOMEN'S, PROFESS 10 ML AI--iT TECHNICAL $ 

PAGE 



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C »lCHO • j. 

- Redwoods 105 ^ 

2 views & 



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Dental Survey _ ____ 107 

2 views \ A 

Nursery Schools .. 109 

2 views 

Child Welfare _ 111 

Housekeepers' Aid Ill 

Sewing _ _ 114 jjj 

Pi 

Shoe Repair - ... 115 \ 

Li 

California Academy of Science - 

Library 117 

African Hall ■ 117 

Recreation _ _. 119 

4 views 

U 

Subway Survey _ 130 A 

2 views 



8 



NATIONAL YOUTH ADMINISTRATION 162 A 



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CONSRUC 




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AND 

ENGINEERING PROJECTS 



WORKS PROGRESS ADMINIS TRAT ION 
CALIFORNIA 



AQUA TIC PARK 

Official Project Number: 65-3-2014 

Work Project Numbers 2175 
Project Authorization Advice: 256 

Location Symbol: 03-614-58 

Type of Work Symbol: 1530 

Appropriation Symbol: 065027-1 



OPERATING DIVISION 



CONSTRUCTION UNIT 



AREA NUMBER 7 

NORTHERN DISTRICT 
CALIFORNIA 



17 



AQUATIC PARK 

At the foot of Van Ness Avenue (North) in San 
Francisco, there is a sheltered cove which offers excep- 
tional natural advantages for swimming and boating. There 
is a dilapidated boat house "which is still in use, and in 
spite of the fact that there are nc dressing rooms for either 
swimmers or boaters, rain or shine, one will find from 150 
to 200 faithful sport addicts in or on the water. On pleas- 
ant days from "2000 to 5000 people attend. 

For many years it has been the ambition of San 
Francisco to establish a public playground for water sports, 
and this site was selected as ideal for an Aquatic Park. 
Only with the assistance of the Works Progress Administration 
has this desire begun to take the semblance of reality. 

Following is the official description of the pro- 
ject as included in the project proposal: "The construc- 
tion of 3,250 cubic yards masonry rubble sea wall, 1 bath 
house, 2 boat houses, 2 life saving stations; paving 101,000 
square feet of promenades; excavation and fill of 20,000 cubic 
yards; relocation of 1,400 lineal feet of railroad track; 
the installation of flood light system for night swimming 
and rowing; and approach wharf to school boat house, pile 
cutter berths and landing floats" . 

Day by day, as one watches the work development, 
Aquatic Park becomes a reality. The sea wall, mo.de of dis- 
carded paving blocks and broken pieces of cement from the 
street-widening program, sweeps around the cove. The foun- 
dation of this sea wall is belo" T the water level most of the 

18 



time, so that tide charts had to be studied and construction 
of the wall go forward only at ebb tide;; hence, most of the 
work was done by crews working in the early hours of the 
morning between one and two . 

Working plans have been drawn for a new and modern 
boat house to replace the old wooden structure which will be 
torn down. The new boat house, stream lined and modern to 
the last degree, will have long, glass-enclosed sun purches 
facing the water, and bleachers at either end of the building 
to accommodate sport spectators. 

The Sea- Scout building, a two -story structure of 
unusual design and beauty, will be built upon piles out over 
the water at tne end of a pier connecting it with the beach. 
As an integral part of the Sea-Scout building, will be two 
mooring areas for sea craft. 

Contrary to the somewhat general belief, there will 
be no indoor swimming pools -- Aquatic Park is for out of door 
water sports. 

It is felt that Aquatic Park will provide a long- 
felt need for both children and adults, and has been enthus- 
iastically endorsed by many citizens. The President of the 
Parent Teachers Association of San Francisco, Mrs. Joseph T. 
Morcombe, voiced the opinion of many of the members of her 
organization, when she said: "The people of San Francisco 
should be very grateful that such consideration is being 
given by the Works Progress Administration to the need of a 
place for healthful, out-of-door water sports". 



19 



Mrs. J.M. Todd, President of the ''See and Know 
San Francisco First" group of women's club executives, 
enthusiastically exclaimed, "WonderfxilJ An Aquatic Park is 
a civic improvement of which we, as citizens, can well be 
proud. We are grateful as citizens, too, that our unem- 
ployed can he given work on such a worth-while project". 

782 men is the average number who have been and 
will be employed per month on the project up to, and includ- 
ing June 1938. 

The illustrations serve to express far greater 
than words, the amazing scope of this project and the 
planned beauty of the finished project. 



20 



AQUATIC PARK 



View from circular pier showing enclosed area 01' water 
known as AQUATIC PARK. Construction of Bathing Pevilion 
shown in other photos just starting above white mark. 



View showing portion of rubb] e masonry seawall, a semi- 
circle 2,20C feet long. 




7 -/*-■?* 




7.(75 



AQUATIC PARK 



Viev; looking east shoving Aquatic tyoe of architecture. 



View of bathing Pavilion looking vest 



22 




WORK 

P ROG R A fTl 




AQUATIC PARK 



View showing start of building construction; r '...-creed. 
concrete oiles made by W. p. A. 



View showing building in course of construction. 



22s 



A SHORT RESUME 
of 
A PORTION OF THE WORK BEING PERFORMED 

by the 
FEDERAL ART PROJECT 
for 
AQUATIC PARK 



MAIN LOUNGE - - Ceiling decoration of equi-value harmonics, 

3000 square feet. 12 mural panels II,: feet 
3 inches high as follows? 2 mural panels 
25 feet, 2 irregularly shaped panels 19 in- 
ches, 2 panels 9 feet, 4 panels 3 feet, and 
2 panels 5 feet. 

WOMEN'S LOUNGE - The decoration consists of color wheel on 

the ceiling 1735 square feet. The walls 
show scale of value, white to black. Five 
charts 8 square feet each, and 1735 square 
feet of terrazo floor. Designs for one 
•center light fixture 36 Inches in diameter, 
plus 8 supplementary fixtures . 

RESTAURANT AND - Decorated with rope and Yacht Club flags. 

LOBBY 10 flags 27 x 18 inches and 35 flags 

13 x 19 inches. Terrazo floor and ceil- 
ing design for 1735 square feet, each. 

FACADE - Marquee 4 feet 6 inches and two pediments 

1 foot 6 Inches, to be finished in green 
slate, low relief and one steel grill 100 
square feet. 

BACK PORTICO - Terrazo floor 1500 square feet and glazed 

tile wainscot, 5 x 250 feet. 2 tile mos- 
aics 5x9 feet and two, 20 x 9 feet, plus 
incidental lighting fixture designs. 

There are, In addition, designs to decorate the ban- 
quet hall in repousse metal. The room is 30 x 80 feet and, in 
the event this work is undertaken, will Include a design for a 
terrazo floor. 

All the above work has been designed and is being 
executed by Hilaire Ililer with the help of Richard Ayer, 



23 



Thomas Dowley, Lawrence Holmberg, and Sargent Johnson. Added 
to these, Eeniamino Bufano Is making the following sculptures 
in red granite to be placed in the esplanade of the "building; 

1 crab 2 fish 1 seal 1 bear 1 snail 
1 turtle 1 fly 1 snake 1 frog 

One torso, and one group of mother and children, 
sculptured by Mr'. Bufano, are to be placed v^ithin the build- 
ing. 



24 



WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION 



CALIFORNIA 



STREETS AND SIDEWALKS 

Official Project Number 65-3-1587 
Work Project Number 1891 

Project Authorization 236 
Location Symbol 05-614-38 
Type of Work Symbol 2032 

Appropriation Symbol 065027-1 



OPERATING DIVISION 



CONSTRUCTION UNIT 



AREA NUMBER 7 

NORTHERN DISTRICT 
CALIFORNIA 



25 



STREETS AND SIDEWALKS 



San Francisco's street -widening program, designated 
in every-day usage at the local office of the Works Progress 
Administration as "Streets and Sidewalks", Is officially 
described in the project application as "Moving curb, side- 
walk, and street repair. The narrowing of sidewalks and 
street repair on 25 streets in the City and County of San 
Francisco." It is explained under ''Remarks": -- 
"Revamping and reconditioning of sidewalks and roadways made 
necessary through Increased auto travel and the changes in 
general traffic routes that have been caused by the com- 
pletion of the Golden Gate and San Francisco -Oakland Bay 
Bridges ." 

Briefly, this describes the program designed to 
benefit San Francisco and, at the same time, give employment 
to an average of 2715 men per month for a eeriod of twelve 
months. But It does not in any measure indicate the background 
of need, the significance of the work, or the extent of the 
street-widening program. 

To begin with, the geographical area of San Francisco 
is only 42 square miles with a concentrated population of 
750,000. The street layout rs poor and confusing, due par- 
tially to the shape of the peninsular point upon which the 
city is built and to the fact that the hilly topography 
prevented any orderly arrangement, but further complicated 



26 



by the concentration of the business and financial areas. 

With the growth in population, there has inevitably 
grown a traffic problem of major proportions. This was fur- 
ther increased by the fire- earthquake disaster of 1906 which 
utterly destroyed a large section of the city — that section 
from which sprang, in mushroom- like growth, the highly con- 
centrated business and financial area which Is the "downtown" 
San Francisco of today. Market Street is the main artery of 
all San Francisco traffic; one may say, confidertly, with no 
sense of exaggeration, that "all roads lead to Market Street." 

We have had, therefore, concentration of traffic and 
traffic routes, and these will have to be entirely rearranged 
to adequately handle the new routes of travel and anticipated 
increase, in traffic necessitated by the building of the two 
great bridges spanning the San Francisco Bay at two widely 
separated points. The Works Progress Administration is 
lending the City and County of San Francisco assistance in, 
literally, "paving the way". 

The actual work of widening a street comprises a 
number of steps which, to the layman, is completely astound- 
ing -- 36 operations involved; 

1. Breaking sidewalk. 

2. Setting back sewer traps, including laying 
of new pipe for setback area. 

3. Excavating for new pavement o 

4. Hauling surplus from excavation to c'ump 
grounds or other Works Progress Adminis- 
tration projects. 

5. Hauling broken concrete sidewalks to var- 
ious other Works Progress Administration 
projects where same may be useful 

27 



6. Setting back granite curbs. 

7. Redressing granite curbs. 

8. Cutting granite curb drops for auto run- 
way entrances. 

9. Finish subgrading for concrete pavement. 

10. Setting header boards for concrete pavement, 

11. Excavating for setting back of fuel oil and 
gasoline tanks 4-g feet below surface . 

12. Setting back area walls, 

13. Poiiring concrete pavement, 8 inches thick, 
Class ], E''' concrete. Width varies from 3 
to 7 feet. 

14. Excavating for electric conduit pipe for 
street lighting system. 

15. Setting back street name signs. 

16. Setting back traffic warning signs. 

17. Setting back electric traffic signals. 

18. Setting back fire hydrants, both high 
and low pressure. 

19. Constructing concrete curb forms on 
returns at corners . 

20. Pouring concrete curbs and placing curb 
armo r . 

21. Moving where possible, or wrecking and 
rebuilding brick catch basins. 

22 . Constructing and placing plank runways 
for accommodation of pedestrians and 
automobiles over excavated areas. 

23. Constructing collapsible barricades and 
placing them around open work. 

24. Providing and servicing night flares. 

25. Maintaining a blacksmith shop for ser- 
vicing tools and making various others 
when economical. 



28 



26. Constructing portable office buildings 
for use of timekeepers and material men 
on various units of project. 

27. Installing electric conduit pipe for 
street lights. 

28. Paiiiting barricades and various project 
buildings „ 

29 . Maintaining central supply yard and head- 
quarters for receivxng and disbursing 
materials and equipment. 

30. Repainting street sign posts-, etc., 
damaged In moving. 

31. Excavating for sidewalk. 

32. Constructing artificial stone sidewalk, 
3s inches thick, of Class "E" concrete. 

33 . Chipping out asphalt pavement for conform 
purposes . 

34. Laying asphaltic concrete pavement for 
conform. 

35. Removing and replacing traffic markers 
for crossing lanes where necessary. 

36. Sweeping up streets and sidewalks for 
final acceptance. 



The incidental work required by the various public 
utilities involves the setting back of power and telephone 
poles, electroliers, trolley poles, conduit, pipes, water 
meters, gas valves, wires, and any other work In various 
operations incidental thereto . 

Most of these steps are beyond the comprehension of 
the ordinary motorist, but one feature which he will apprec- 
iate Is the rounding of the corners. 

Officials of the City and County of San Francisco 
heartily endorse this program. 



29 



STREETS & SIDEWALKS 



Laying concrete strios. Showing crew behind mixer, 



Vn ev; showing comnleted unit of work on Golden Gate Avenue 



30 




r4 , 



IS1 1 
iS 3 -/S&7 




STREETS & SIDEWALKS 



Viev; showing work carried on under heavy traffic at Van Nese 
Avenue and Market Streets. 



View taken on off day to show neat manner in which work is 
left. Notice proper barricades and firm substantial run- 
ways for each garage entrance. 



31 




(.5-3-/5%! 
s<-l Z-13 
3-24-37 




uS-3-/ S'tl 

/v - q 7 i 

8-/9- J 7 



STREET, ROAD, AND BOULEVARD ACTIVITIES 



On the opposite page is shown a map of the City and 
County of San Francisco which has been prepared for the purpose 
of showing the locations of the various streets, roads, and 
boixlevards improved, widened, or entirely constructed by the 
Works Progress Administration. 

The locations designated by a solid line indicate 
work already completed; the dotted line is indicative of work 
now under construction. 

This map clearly illustrates the wide scope and varied 
locations of the street, road, and boulevard work undertaken by 
this organization, the necessity of which has proven tremendous 
in view of the heavy traffic increase created, to a great ex- 
tent, by the opening of the Can Francisco and Golden Gate 
Bridges. 



32 



WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION 



CALIFORNIA 



J *. J tJ !. J fi, J fi. ji.W '. .* '. 
t\ <\ ;\ /\ /\ <\ i\ /i 



FLE ISHHACKER PLA YGROUND 

Official Project Number 65-3-2014 
Works Project Number 3048 

Project Authorization Advice 7-108 
Location Symbol 03-614-38 

Type of Work Symbol 2330 

Appropriation Symbol 465800 



OPERATING DIVISION 



CONSTRUCTION UNIT 



AREA NUMBER 7 

NORTHERN DISTRICT 
CALIFORNIA 



33 



FLEISHHACKER PLAYGROUND 



Dr. Heller, director of the Fleishhacker Zoo, 
which is under the San Francisco Park Commission, states: 
"San Francisco has, because of its ideal climatic condi- 
tions, an exceptional opportunity to exhibit animals." 

"If' r , he added, "we can provide adequate exhibit 
space and adequate housing accommodations." 

It was for this purpose that a project proposal 
was submitted by the City and County of San Francisco for 
the sponsorship of a Works Progress Administration project. 
The proposal listed the work Involved as: "The grading of 
9,600 cubic yards for underground pump house and underpass, 
65,000 cubic yards of paths, 10,000 cubic yards of paddocks, 
40,000 cubic yards of lakes & lagoons; the placing of 
6,600 cubic yards of red rock surfacing on paths, 123,000 
square feet of rustic rubble face to slopes of paths, and 
20,000 cubic yards of loam about grounds; the Installation 
of 600 lineal feet 18 inch corrugated metal culverts, 18,400 
lineal feet sanitary and storm sewer system, 13,100 lineal 
feet of Irrigation system, and 4 pumps In pumping plant; the 
construction of an underground reinforced concrete pump house 
of 315 cubic yards, a reinforced concrete underpass of 150 
cubic yards, a reinforced concrete wall, moat slab and coping 
"around animal Island of 485 cubic yards; and landscaping work". 



54 



Translated into language for the layman, the present 
Works Progress Administration project plans to increase the zoo 
acreage of ten to approximately fifty -- five times the present 
size -- and to build accommodations for the animals to approxi- 
mate in appearance their native habitats. The first and fore- 
most step in making plans for the enlarged zoo area was the 
installation of a pumping plant which will circulate running 
water throughout the entire acreage. This running water will 
flow through the moats, lakes and lagoons which will separate 
many of the animal areas from the spectators and will be 
utilized in irrigating the grounds. The pumping plant will 
also be used to carry away sewerage. 

Among the new zoo attractions will be "Monkey Island", 
a round island completely surrounded by a moat. The island, 
itself, will be landscaped with trees, slirubs and rocks, and 
the construction Is such that the present crowded cage quarters 
will be eliminated. 

Bear pits, planned to be fronted by moats, will 
resemble the native haunts of the various species of bear. A 
relief model of one of these pits has been photographed to 
convey a general impression of the finished appearance. 

Lion and tiger yards of the same general type are 
planned. A heavily reinforced wall will prevent escape of 
the animals while they roam as apparently free as in their 
native haunts. Photographs show clearly the strength of 
those protecting walls. 



35 



In addition to the yards, housing quarters are 
planned for inclement weather with runways for spectators, 
making possible the exhibition of animals in any type of 
weather. The accepted plans include a large lion house 
with four separate yards j a pachyderm house surrounded by 
two large elephant yards; one hippopotamus yard, one rhino- 
ceros yard j five bear dens; a paddock, several lakes, and 
a large bird house. In each yard, there will be pools in 
which the animals can wallow. 

Special mention should be made of the "flight 
house", which will be a large room constructed so as to per- 
mit considerable flying space, and to resemble the natural 
surroundings of the birds. Indirect lighting Is to be used 
to illuminate the area which will be seen by the spectators 
through large windows of rose-colored glass. 

The working plans drawn up by the San Francisco 
Park Commission underwent several revisions before the final 
acceptance of those made by Lewis P. Hobart who had studied 
several of the eastern zoos before submitting his drawings. 

An average of 900 men were employed on this pro- 
ject. 

Although no definite figures are available, the 
daily attendance of the zoo is tremendous, and definite need 
has been felt to increase the capacity. This had been done 
to a limited extent as circumstances allowed, but the ambi- 
tious program planned has only been made possible with the 
assistance of the Federal work relief programs. 



35-A 



Already a popular spot. It Is estimated that the 
Golden Gate International Exposition will greatly increase 
the zoo attendance and every effort is being expended to 
complete a large portion of the new area before 1939. 

The present project is near completion, and some 
of the plans mentioned in this report are to be included 
in the continuation of this project. 












36 



ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS 




mmvmm 

WORK 



PROGRRID 



Vie™ shoeing Monkey Island. This is completely surrounded 
by a water moat and animals will run free on artificial 
rocks and sand beach. Within is a room for housing on 
cold nights and inclement weather. A service tunnel 
entering from the opposite side has also been completed. 



37 



ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS 



View showing construction of Five Bear Dea* without bars 
all in natural stone effect. Artificial stream in fore- 
ground. 



View showing a section of Bear Pit just before completion. 
These walls are so constructed that not even a man can 
scale them. Note the pool in center for polar bears. A 
water moat just in front of spectators is brought to your 
attention by the ladder in the lower right corner. 



58 




■■**&&!&hkyvi 






"t-t Liz. 



WORK 

PROGRfl m 




WORK 

PHOORBBl 



ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS 



View showing entrance way. Note the natural rustic stone 
masonry. This material is quarried, transported and 
constructed by W. p. A. Its many natural colors cannot 
of course, be displayed by photogreoh. 



View shov/ing construction of walls surrounding water area 
for Beavers, Otter, etc. Complete underground sewer, 

water, gas, electric and drainage systems are all construc- 
ted. Bear dens on left. Convenience station shown in 
upper right . 



39 





WORK 

PROGRflm 




ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS 



View of Flight Cage and house for both land and aquatic 
birds. All new construction, landscaping and nl anting 
of growing trees now being done.. 



Artificial lake showing landscaping. Rustic masonry walls 
and Flight Cage in uoper right. 



40 




F-3 -XOi if. 

Al- 7*8 

/ 2-/s- J y 



iji^vcr. 



WORK 

PROG R fi m 



ml 



- - 



6>5~3-X Ol if. 
N ~%0 6, 



WORK 

pftooflflfn 



WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION 



CALIFORNIA 






LYON STREET A PPROACH 

to 

GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE 



Official Project Number 
Work Project Number 
Project Authorization 
Location Symbol 
Type of Work Symbol 
Apprcpriation Symbol 



165-3-1047 

5640 

7-108 

03-614-33 

1034 

465800 



465-03-1-122 

8264 

7-108 

03-614-38 

1034 

465011 



OPERATING DIVISION 



CONSTRUCTION UNIT 



AREA NUMBER 7 

NORTHERN DISTRICT 
CALIFORNIA 



41 



LYON STREET APPROACH 

to 

GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE 



The submission of this project to the Works Progress 
Administration for operation was made with a certain amount of 
apprehension by the sponsors , due to the amount of heavy con- 
struction involved and the urgent necessity for the proposed 
work. 

After a period of leus than a month, the Works Prog- 
ress Administration was able to allay these doubts and the proj- 
ect was set up and operated on a basis comparable to any properly 
handled construction project in private industry. 

The work involved in the operation of the project in- 
corporated the following: 

Excavation and backfill 27,256 cu. yds. 

Reinforcing steel 517 tons 

Concrete 9,425 cu. ^ds. 

Lumber - Forms and Falsework 572,000 E.F. 

Piling 56,771 lin. ft. 

Asphaltlc Concrete Pavement 96,000 sq. ft. 
Drainage System - 6 i! to 33 i! 

Pipes 6,500 lin. ft. 

Electric Conduits 6,500 lin. ft. 

These figures, alone, cannot completely indicate the 
amount of work actually required for, due to water's lovol being 
only three feet below the surface in a heavy sand adobe material, 
five 2" pumps had to be kept in constant operation,. Sheet pil- 
ing had to be placed around all footing excavations. A large 
portion of this underground work was done in the rainy season, 
thus increasing the amount of mud and slush In which work had 

to progress* 

The ''Off" ramp and Richardson Avenue approach, a 3ix 
lane highway 800 feet long, and three lane ramp 5Si5 feet long, 

42 



were completed and turned over to traffic in time for the Bridge 
opening on May 27, 1957. 

The superstructure could not he framed or started un- 
til the footings were in and set, for, owing to the unstable 
condition of the terrain, it was necessary for our engineers to 
devise a method for carrying the entire load on the completed 
footings. Modern methods were used throughout the construction. 
The accompanying photographs are clearly descriptive of the or- 
derly manner in which the work was conducted. The engineer can 
readily discern the excellent workmanship through the splendid 
results reflected in the photographs. 

The "On" ramp was turned over to traffic on January 
22, 1938. The opening of this ramp resulted in the diversion 
of all heavy traffic from the Marina Boulevard which extends 
through a highly built up and restricted residential district 
on one side and the Marina Park and Yacht Harbor on the other. 
Heavy produce trucks going to and from, the Bridge in the early 
hours of the morning use this new route, thereby saving the 
residents of the district considerable annoyance. 

Another phase of this project involved the Military 
replacements that had to be effected due to the fact that the 
right-of-way is within the ^residio Military Reservation. This 
work included the moving of the Letterman Club House, tennis 
courts, roads, underground water and sewer lines, etc., as well 
as the construction of a new entrance for the Military road with 
necessary walls and entrance gates, the moving and transplanting 
of trees and numerous other incidental phases. 

The Works Progress Administration may point with pride 
to this achievement and be justified in feeling that it has con- 
tributed to the wealth and convenience of the community. 

43 



LYON STREET APPROACH 






View showing "ON RAMP" looking east. Footings comox'ted. 






View of "ON RAMP" comoleted looking east from n&ar same point. 



44 




S&Vo 
jT-2f-37 




LYON STREET APPROACH 



View shewing oroblem in framing. A skew bent to accomodate 
the military railroad v/as built into the structure on a 
curve and a super-elevation. Note all falsework carried 

on completed footings. 



View looking uo along "ON RAMP" showing type of structure 
and character of work. The finish is concrete as stripped. 



45 



LYON STREET APPROACH 



View of junction of "ON RAMP 1 and "OFF RAMP" orelimlnary 
stages looking east. 



Vievr of "ON and OFF RAMP" completed looking west, 



46 





WORK 

MOOKOB 

MMM 



WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION 



CALIFORNIA 



58TH AND FULTON RECRE ATION CENTE R 

Official Project Number 65-3-1576 

Work Project Number 1701 

Type of Work Symbol 1149 

Appropriation Symbol 365027-1 



OPERATING DIVISION 



CONSTRUCTION UNIT 



47 



AREA M7M.3ER 7 

NORTHERN DISTRICT 
CALIFORNIA 



38TH AND PULTON RECREATION CENTER 



"I wouldn't mind living there.'" 

That has been the invariable comment at the first 
glimpse of the 38th and Pulton Recreation Center built for the 
San Francisco Recreation Commission by the Works Progress 
Administration. 

That was the gasped chorus from forty members of the 
Parent-Teachers Association; it was the unanimous exclamation 
of Golden Gate International Exposition officials who made an 
inspection tour of projects; prefaced by a "Gee. 1 ", it's heard 
frequently from the children who play at this Recreation Center. 

The Recreation building stands In the extreme north- 
eastern corner of the playground, with main entrance facing 
south. The ground floor is level with the 38th Avenue play- 
ground entrance; the playground itself is below the street 
level of the inclined street , at this point . 

The size of this homelike recreation building is 
deceptive. At first glimpse, It appears as diminutive as a 
doll house, yet the floor space is 2,200 square feet. 

In appearance it is a cottage type of residence, 
finished in a rough plaster. The color is a warm gray, con- 
trasting with Dhe darker gray wood trim, and red-- it's a 
light rose-tile red -- composition shingle roof. 



48 



With the softening of line achieved by shrubs and 
flowers which surround the building (in fact, the whole play- 
ground) , the building appears to have achieved unity with the 
soil and to have grown from it. 

The main entrance door opens directly into the recrea- 
tion room which is approximately twenty-one feet by thirty-three 
feet. The walls are of natural knotted pine, the slanted ceiling 
of a composition material lighter than the wooden beams. 

On the southern exposure is an alcove with three out- 
ward-opening steel-framed paned windows, flanked on one side by 
the glass paned door and on the other by a paned window. 

Built in the opposite wall is a capacious gray-blue 
plaster, brick-lined fireplace. At each side, nickel and brass 
wall lights of early American design harmonize with the chandel- 
ier hung by a blue-tinted iron chain from the ceiling ridge. 
Cross beams of rough-hewn wood strengthened by iron supports 
and suspension chains of the same blue tint, emphasize the 
quaint homeliness. 

At the northern end of this room are six built-in 
lockers with generous storage space for playground equipment. 
A door to the left of these lockers leads into a kitchen gleaming 
with buff woodwork, gray and white tile, set off by fittings of 
chromium. A window at both northern and southern ends of the 
kitchen insures excellent lighting and the minimum cf lingering 
cooking odors. Under the northern window, a chromium- plated 
shelf awaits installation of either a gas or electric stove. 

A tiled drainboard with partitioned sink midway, 



49 



extends the full length of the eastern wall and. across the 
southern end, with cupboard space above and below, leaving 
working space of approximately five by fifteen feet . 

Entered from the recreation room (western door) and 
also by a glass door from the southern side of the building, is 
a small office space with built-in cupboards on one wall, and 
two coat closets opposite the outside entrance. Adjoining the 
office is a gray and white-tiled bathroom with a stall shower, 
another closet and a mirror faced medicine cupboard. 

Public dressing rooms for' boys and girls are at either 
end of the building, with entrances from the outside. 

All the public entrances are from the southern -- 
playground -- side of the building. The curved flagstone path 
from the 38th Avenue entrance leads to a locked supply room 
which houses janitorial suppl_es, lawn mower and hoses, gas 
water heater and the miscellaneous equipment necessary to the 
upkeep of a recreation center. 

Steps lead down from the building to the playground 
area. At the 38th Avenue (eastern) end, is a gravelled area 
on which will be placed slides, swings and other playground 
equipment. The balance of the space is paved, marked and 
equipped for one volleyball court, two tennis courts (doubles 
courts) and one basketball court in (from the eastern entrance) 
the order named. 

Next to the western end of the building, and protected 
from the rectangular play area by twelve- foot fencing, is the 
small children's area where the tiny youngsters may play in their 



50 



sand boxes unendangered by chance balls . 

The whole area is fenced on all sides , eight- fuct 
standard chain link fence on the 38th Avenue side, twelve-foot 
fencing on 39th Avenue and the northern boundary line, and 
twenty- four- foot standard chain link backstop behind the various 
courts on the southern boundary. 

The attendance records show an average of one hundred 
and fifty at this playground on Sundays and holidays, forty on 
week days. This speaks far more clearly than mere words, for 
the need of siich a playground and its recognition by the 
community. 

For some six or seven years, the City had planned to 
convert this area, which extends from 38th Avenue to 39th Avenue, 
near the corner of Pulton, Into a playground and recreation 
center . 



52 



3STH AVE. AND FULTON PLAYGROUND 



General view of completed playground. Before W. P. A. 
started, this was a sand-dune on vacant city property. An 
eyesore to the immediate community and a great inconvenience 



due to the drifting sands. 



Front view of Community Center Building newly constructed 
by W. P. A. 



53 








WORK 

p hog r n m 




WORK 

PROGR R m 



3g TH AVE., AND FULTON PLAYGROUND 



Interior of above building showing assembly room where 
indoor games and community plays and classes are held under 
the supervision of the Recreation Commission. 



End elevation of Community Center Building. 



54 



WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION 



CALIFORNIA 



•iHHBH!- ■*■*•;;- 



AGRICULTURE A SSOCIATION BUILDING 

Official Project Number 65-3-5482 

Work Project Number 4556 

Project Authorization 5-4 

Location Symbol 03-614-38 

Type of Work Symbol 1360 

Appropriation Symbol 365027 



OPERATING DIVISION 



CONSTRUCTION UNIT 



AREA NUMBER 7 

NORTHERN DISTRICT 
CALIFORNIA 



55 



AGRICULTURE ASSOCIATION BUILDING- 



FOUNDATIONS 




Picture showing inspection of project by Hon. Frank Merriam, 
Governor of the State of California (in center), Hon. Angelo 
Rossi, Mayor of San Francisco (on left), and Frank Y. McLaugh- 
lin, former California State Administrator, Works Progress 
Administration. 



56 



AGRICULTURE ASSOCIATION BUILDING 
FOUNDATIONS FOR ARENA 



A project was submitted to the Works Progress Adminis- 
tration for the construction of the foundations, beams, and area 
walls for an arena, the size of which was 300 by 400 feet. 

A Public Works Administration project was approved for 
the superstructure and a definite completion date set, for the 
W.P.A. work. 

The foundations, etc., included the following; 

12,000 cubic yards - excavation 

400,000 board feet - lumber 

5,500 cubic yards - concrete 

450 tons - reinforcing steel 

23 tons - structural steel 



This work was started July 10, 1936 and, all but the 2 
ramps and some grading, was completed September 25, 1936. The 
pictures shown on the opposite page indicate the type of work 
performed. 






57 



kr^SSfeite 





WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION 



CALIFORNIA 



STATE T EACH ERS' COLLEGE 

Official Project Number 65-3-43 

Work Project Number 15 

Project Authorization 236 

Location Symbol 03-614-38 

Type of Work Symbol 1134 

Appropriation Symbol 056027-1 



OPERATING DIVISION 



CONSTRUCTION UNIT 



AREA NUMBER 7 

NORTHERN DISTRICT 
CALIFORNIA 



58 



STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



*A new vring to the Science Building of the College 
was built by W. P. A. as one of the first building projects 
begun. 

The State of California cooperated in every way 
both in supplying the materials oledged and in supervisory 
inspection by the State Architect's Office. The breakdown 
of the work in the main shows: 

1. - Excavation 4-CO C.Y. 

2. - Form Work 130,0G0 3oard Feet 

3. - Reinforcing Steel 135,000 Lbs. 
If. - Concrete 1,1^0 C.Y. 

5. - Electric, Dlumbing, plastering, raillwork, 
file work, painting, roofing, etc. 

The photographs shov/n on the opposite oage in- 
dicate the scodc- of the work and character of the finish- 
ed job. 



59 







'Z<1 I 
/V-S73 




WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION 



CALIFORNIA 



TELEGRAPH HILL PARK 

Official Project Number 65-3-2014 

Work Project Number 1689 

Project Authorization 5-4 

Location Symbol 03-614-38 

Type of Work Symbol 2330 

Appropriation Symbol 365027 



OPERATING DIVISION 



CONSTRUCTION UNIT 



AREA NUMBER 7 

NORTHERN DISTRICT 
CALIFORNIA 



60 



TELEGRAPH HILL PARK 



There is, in all probability, no other ancient land- 
mark within the confines of the City and County of San Francis- 
co that is so replete with historical traditions, so interwoven 
with the romance and progress of the district, which yet remains 
so much an integral part of the community in its every day life, 
as TELEGRAPH HILL. It rises to a height of 275 feet and still 
is just adjacent to the water front. The work accomplished on 
this project included:. 

Excavation 7,319 c.y. - rock 

Footpaths 778 lin. ft. 

Concrete Shoulder 100 c.y. 
Rustic Masonry Retaining 

Walls ' 205 c.y. 

Concrete Walls 62 c.y. 

Metal Crib 1,000 sq. ft. 

Water Lines 2,153 lin. ft. 

Landscaping 29 large trees 

Landscaping 10,500 small trees 

and shrubs 

The rustic masonry retaining walls were so constructed 
that soil pockets were left for planting of decorative rock 
plants and vines. How that the many shrubs, vines, and vari- 
colored flowers and berries are growing and blooming, it is a 
most refreshing sight to see them in the natural red rock used 
in the wall construction. 



61 



TELEGRAPH HILL PARK 



View snowing Coit Memorial Tower. 90 percent of the land- 
scaping shown was done by W. P. A. 









View showing completed unit, landscaping, road work, gutters, 



rustic walls, etc. 



62 



The photographs shown on the opposite page present 
the walls in construction. The pedestrian path is on a lower 
level than the road so that it does not interfere with the 
view of the motorists as they drive up the boulevard to the 
top where a magnificent marine view is obtained, fronted by 
the landscaping work. 






63 



i.c: 



riTJc 



TELEGRAPH HILL PARK 



View showing construction of natural red rock ma.sonry retain- 
ing wall. Artistically placed with soil pockets for various 
types of rock and clinging vine plants. 



View showing completed masonry wall immediately after plant- 
ing seedlings. 



64 





/68? 

r*~l 27Z 
3-22-37 



WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION 



CALIFORNIA 



■*##■«•*#■** 



JLENN PARK RECREATION CENTER 



Official Project Number 65-3-1581 
Work Project Number 1703 

Project Authorization Advice 236 
Location Symbol 03-6l4-3g 

Type of Work Symbol 11^5 

Appropriation Symbol 056027 -1 



OPERATING- DIVISION AREA NUMBER 7 

NORTHERN DISTRICT 
CONSTRUCTION UNIT CALIFORN 



65 






:■ . „: 



GLENN PARK RECREATION CENTER 



This project comprised the building of a modern 
recreational center wherein the immediate community could 
be served for: 



1- Indoor recreation such as games, gymnasium 
activities, and other sports. 

2- Little theatre enterprises, participated in 
by the children of the community and carried 
on under the supervision of the Recreation 
Commission. 

3- Moving pictures for the instruction and 
pleasure of the children, during inclement 
weather. 

4- A place for recreation in the evenings. 



The photographs on the opposite page present clearly 
the type of construction effected by the project in order to 
accommodate a congested area. 



66 



GLEN PARK RECREATION CENTER 






Interior view shoving Auditorium. Note moving picture 
accomodations and large fireplace on right. Photo taken 
from stage. 






View showing completed building, landscaping work in progress, 



67 




7fc e ^ 

<+<>5 03-2-/ i ■ 




WORK S PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION 
CALIFORNIA 



*■»****■}«• * 



GOLDEN GATE PARK 
TENNIS COURTS 

Official Project Number 65-3-201^ 
Work Project Number 3712> 

Project Authorization Advice 236 
Location Symbol 03-61^-38' 

Type of V, ork Symbol I3IO 

Appropriation Symbol 065027-I 



OPERATING DIVISION 



CONSTRUCTION UNIT 



AREA NUMBER 7 

NORTHERN DISTRICT 
CALIFORNIA 



68 



#*■-• 












GOLDEN GATE PARK 
TENNIS COURTS 






The battery of nineteen tennis courts in Golden Gate 
Park was constructed a great many years ago and, at one time, 
was the only free tennis court area available for public use. 

From time to time, patch jobs of maintenance were 
done until, eventually, the playing area became considerably 
out of shape. In addition, the roots of trees surrounding the 
courts grew to such a size that the;/ - raised ridges in them. 

An entire new court surface had to be placed and, by 
widening the area and decreasing the space between courts, two 
additional courts were obtained. This made a total of twenty- 
one doubles courts; previously, several of the courts were 
singles, only. 

Photographs of a portion of this battery are shown on 
the opposite page. 



69 




WORK 

PROGRnm 




PARK, PLAYGROUND 
and. 
BUILDING ACTIVITIES 



On the opposite page is shown a map of the City and 
County of San Francisco which presents a pictorial description 
of the locations of the various parks, playgrounds, and build- 
ing projects constructed entirely, or improved, by the Works 
Progress Administration. 

The parks and playgrounds are designated by a solid 
border outline; the building units, by a solid triangular out- 
line. 

By scrutinizing this map, one may readily see the 
diversification of the various locations and that W.P.A. activ- 
ities have been carried on in every area within the confines of 
the City and County of San Francisco - not limited to any few 
locations' or communities. 






70 





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PHYSICAL ACCOMPLISHMENT CHART 
of 
CONSTRUCTION UNITS 



The following set of graphs shows the estimated, quan- 
tities of various items on all construction projects completed 
and now operating. 

It shows the work in two classes: 

New construction (marked "N") 
Rehabilitation (marked "R") 

The heavy line Is drawn to the exact percentage of 
each type of work completed up to December 31, 1937. 

A study of this chart will determine the real accomp- 
lishments of our program in San Francisco and will, undoubtedly, 
be extremely revealing to the citizen interested in informing 
himself. 

The antedated belief that W.P.A. is "manufactured 
work" and "leaf raking" has long since been dispelled In this 
community; San Franciscans have grown to realize that W.P.A. 
is giving outstanding services to the city -- in work and sus- 
tenance for the unemployed and in lasting, necessary improve- 
ments to the community. 



71 



AIOftTHERN DISTRICT-CALIFORNIA 
AREA 7 '- SAN FRANCISCO. 

WORKS PR06RESS 
ADMIN5TRATI0N 

PHYSICAL 
ACCOMPLISHMENT CHART 

BASED ON fTEMS SHOWN ON FEDERAL 

FORM 709 
AS OF JANUARY 1, 1938. 

IOO% RERRESEWT/AfiS ALL CONSTRUCTION WORN DONE OR 
CONTEMPLATED TV BE DONE SINCE BEGINNING OF W.P.A. 



N DENOTES NEW WORK OR ADDITIONS TO EXISTING 

IMPROVEMENTS. 
"R m DENOTES RENOVATION OR REHABILITATION. 









i <*p -i * . 






. M-- &\ • 




m*T\ 


>A& &*&»& 










"^O 


eK 




• ■Ml ** 














■ 




2** 


AO 












PfiYS/CAL ACCOMPLISHMENT CHART 

Percentage PAGE 1 








1 


o a 


3 


4 


5 


o e 


7 


o a 


3 


It 


X) 


3 L anding Fields 




551 

Acr&s 






















R 


















































Runways 


6/>C 
I28,C 


\OLin.Ft. 
OOSq.Yd. 






















R 


















































2 Bridge Approaches 




2,300 
Lin. Ft. 






















R 


















































3 Bridges 




315 

Lin. FH 






















N 


















































A dm in isfra five 


2 


744 
3Q.Ft. 






















N 






















Bui '/dings 


35 


240, 662 
3a. Ft. 






















R 


















































Aud /fori urn 




207,444 
Sq.Ff: 






















R 


















































3fables and 


14- 


1,286,740 
Cu.Ft 






















N 


















Animal Dens 


1 


105,000 
Cu.Ft 






















R 


















































Comrn un ify 


33 


42,374 
Sq. Ft 






















N 




















Buildings 


6 


/2, 702 

Sy.Ft 






















R 


















































Dormifories 


12 


f60,034 
Jq.Ft 






















R 


















































r~ire Houses 


4e 


4,525,240 
Cu.Ft. 






















R 



















































PHYS/CAL ACCOMPU5/iM£A/T CHART 

Percentage Page *2 








/ 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


3 


/ 


00 


Garages 


/6 


23. 60O 

Cu. Ft. 






















A! 






















Garages 


/ 


S3, 240 

cu. rt. 






















R 


















































fiospita/ 


1 


490, OOO 
So. ft 






















R 


















































Jai/s 


2 


162, OOO 
Sq. Ft. 






















R 


















































/nstitul tonal Bldqs 


10 


56-4, OOO 
So. Ft. 






















R 


















































Scrioo/ 


1 


II, SOO 
Sq. Ft. 






















R 


















































L ibrari/ 


1 ' 


2,366 
So. Ft. 






















R 


















































/fecr-eat zonal 


6 


233,600 

Sq. Ft 






















N 


















Bui/ din as 


2 


4-5,ooo 
Sq Ft 






















R 


















































Sfad/ums and 


22 


<?4, 6SO 
Seats 






















IV 


















Gran ds tands 


/ 


4,0 oo 
Seats 






















R 


















































Bulkheads 




/,o&r 

L/n. Ft. 






















N 


















































Levees 




2,5 63 

Cu. Yd. 






















N. 



















































PHYS/CAL ACCOMPUSHMENT CHART 

Percentages Patje 3 








A 


7 2 


3 


4 


3 


6 


01 


3? SO /IV 


War eh o us es 


5 


3//, 00 O 
Co. Ft 






















N 






















a 


1 


65,360 
Co.Ft. 






















R 


















































Railroa d Track 




4,693 
l/o. Ft 






















N 


















































C u 1 i/e rts 


258 


/4,654 
//n.Ff. 






















A/ 
















































Irrigation Pipe 


463 
Acres 


A 925 






















N 


















































Curbs 




73 379 
Z/HFt. 






















N 


















a 




/2,8oo 
LinFt. 






















R 


















































Ditch Drainaae 




1592 
L//t. Ft 






















N 


















































Pipe Drainaae 




74/OZ 
Lin Ft 






















N 


















































Dredqinq 


Depth 

ion 


/8o,ooo 

Co.yt/s. 






















N 


















































Grading 




29.6 
Acres 






















N 


















































Fenc/nq 




75.79/ 
Lin Ft 






















N 






















a 




3./G3 
Lin Ft 






















R 











































PHYSICAL ACCOMPLISHMENT CHART 

Percentage Poqg 4 








1 


2 


3 


O 4 


5 


O 6 


O 7 


o a 


O 9 


1 


OO 


Excavation 




2^57,137 
Co. Yds. 






















N 


















































nn 




920,920 
Cu.Yds. 






















N 


















































Fire Trails 




SjOOO 
Lin. Ft 






















N 


















































Pumping Stations 
2 Cubic Seconds 




IConm} 






















N 


















































Ornamental Pools 




3 






















N 


































> 
















Casting Pools 


4 


40,000 
Sq.F* 






















N 


















































Gas Line Laid 




1,544 
Lin. Ft. 






















N 


















































Outside Lighting 




139 
each 






















N 










































Guard Rails 




27,1 SO 
Lin. F-t 






















N 


















































Guard Walls 




2,300 
Lin. Ft. 






















N 


















































Pa\sed Gutters 




GOj329 
Lin. Ft. 






















N 




















Paved Gu t ters 




2.JB40 
Dn.Ft. 






















R 



















































• 









V 



RN* 






/*/iYS/CAL ACCQMPL/SHMlzMT CHART 

Percentage PA GEL 5 








1 


20 JO 40 SO 60 70 dp dp /oo 


Hard Surface 




33,676 
L/n. Ft 






















N 




















ri/ynway 




/80 3 74a 
Lin. Ft. 






















R 
















































Sec onc/ary 




7O,034 
L/n. Ft. 






















A/ 
























High way 




5^/77 
L/n Ft. 




















. « 




















































Shoulders 




7y7/S 

L/n. Ft 














! 


N 






1 














Shoulders 




27.760 






1^ 












R 


L/n. Ft. 
































I 
















LANDSCAPING 
/.Around Bldas. 


62 


66.7 
Acres, 




^«^_ ^1^^ 














A/ 




:[ 










' » 


2. H icfhways 




/3.2 




^^ 












N i 


- 


^n 


















3. Publ/c Partes 


7 


23/. 5 
Acrs& 
















N 












\ \ 


4-. Public Parks 


30 


A437.4 
Acres, 




















R 










j 












i 
















Paving- other 




93 3 5/& 








^^^ 










N 


S$. Yds. 








1 mm \ 


— 








than Road& 




2,270 






















R 


s%. Yds. 












































• 








Ath.tet/c He id 


22 


















N 




— »_._ 










At/? let/c F/eld 


6 


















R 




i 




















1 














Tennis Courts 


4-0 
















N 






1 i ' 


^l 






Tennis Courts 


31 






1 










R 
































1 







PHYSJCAL ACCOMPUSHMENT CftAfiT. 

Percentage PAGE 6 








1 


o ^ 


5 


4 


5 


6 


7 


o a 


9 


It 


V 


Band Stand 


























N 


















































(jo If Course 




/83 
Acres 






















R 


















































Horseshoe Courts 




27 
Each 






















N 


















































Bowling Oree-ns 




Each 






















N 


















































Play ground s 




Z 
Each 






















N 






















// " 




3 
Each 






















R 


















































Re-rain ing Walls 




20,OSG 
Cu Yds. 






















N 


















































R i p- Rap 




3/0 
Cu. Yds. 






















N 


















































•Slopes $ Berrns 




3/2.440 
3a. Ft 






















N 
















n " 




273,330 
3a. Ft. 






















R 














































Paved Sidewalks 




28,34/ 
Lin. Ft. 






















N 






















a a 




8,240 
Lin. Ft 






















R 


















































Unpaved Sidewalks 




71, 484 
Lin. Ft. 






















N 




















H II 




62,942 

Lin. Ft 






















R 





















PHY5JCAL ACCOMPLISHMENT CHART! 

Percentage PAGE. 7 








h 


1 2 


3 


4 


6 


o e 


7 


6 


30 It 


V 


Trunk -5ewers 




8&, 73 7 
Lin. Ft 






















N 


















































Manholes 4 
Catch Das ins 




S3S 
Bach 






















N 


















































Lateral 5 ewers 




19, 7€9 
Lin. Ft 






















N 






















a a 




3,300 
Lin. Ft 






















R 


















































Undera ro und 
Electric Lines 




/a, 700 

Lin. Ft 






















N 






















it » 




2,9 ZO 
Lin. Ft. 






















R 


















































Telephone Line 




e.ooo 

L in. Ft 






















N 


















































T u n n e J 




I7Q 
Lin. Ft. 






















N 


















































lA/arer Lines 




173,019 
Lin. Ft. 






















N 




















a " 




26, 074- 
Lin. Ft. 






















R 












































Reservoi r 




SO.OOO 
Gallons 






















N 


















































3acking 3plit Wood 




Z,49S 
Cords 






















N 











































































































EXPENDITURE CHART of CONSTRUCTION UNITS 



The following set of graphs will show the percentage 
relations between Federal and Sponsor expenditures on construc- 
tion projects in San Francisco. 

The graph shows : 

1- The percentage of Federal funds 
granted In relation to the esti- 
mated cost of the whole project 

2- The percentage of Federal funds 
expended up to December 31, 1937 

3- The percentage of Sponsor's funds 
pledged in relation to the esti- 
mated cost of the whole project 

4- The percentage of Sponsor's funds 
expended in relation to the a- 
mount pledged up to December 31, 
1937 

5- The amount of Sponsor's funds 
expended in addition to the a- 
mount pledged 

This chart Is posted monthly by the Area Supervisor 
of Operations so he may have a graphic record of the expendi- 
ture of funds and can, so far as is practicable, maintain a bal- 
ance between the Federal and Sponsor expenditures. Many of the 
Sponsor's contributions, such as co-sponsor's funds, materials 
and equipment in kind, and partial time furnished by regular 
employees, are hidden. These are not reported regularly because 
the various departments of the Sponsor must file reports with 
the coordinator of the Sponsor before he can send in a Sponsor's 
certificate. A new procedure has just been put into effect 
whereby the project will report the Sponsor's expenditures as 
soon as materials or services are received on the project. 
This will be of great assistance In maintaining the percentage 

72 



balance. 

The graphs are maintained in groups and reflect the 
projects operated under the supervision of the various depart- 
ments of the City government. Thus, we are able to determine 
the funds expended for Parks, Playgrounds,- Street Improvements. 
Buildings, etc. 

A recapitulation of all construction projects is 
shown, also. 



73 



NORTHERN DISTRICT - CALIFORNIA 
AREA 7 - SAN FRANCISCO 

COSTS BEGlSTEfi 
COASTWCTIOA-PfiOJECTS 




UPPER BOX SHOWING % PLEDGE FULFILLED. 
LOWER BOX SHOWING & /HOMEY PLEDGED AND SPENT IN 
PELAT/ON TO WHOLE PROJECT. 

I ,1 INDiCATJNG W.P.A. FUNDS. 

VZZZZ8& /NO/CAT/NG SPONSOR FUNDS. 
82S2SS8S //VD/CAT//VG OVER EXPENO/TURE. 



M[^R|n«MM3»Mai *t*-^<- *. •■ .'^■■■■■■qpHVHOTMippnBHpaHP 



1Q1LLA3-TDI T ■ 



\A/UivJ/l.f 



A33A 




£1200 



f33U)aqAOITD\«[TeAOD 























• 




. 






- 




I 


wxssxz 




. 


- 


. a 









T\ 



STATE PROJECTS 

as of de:ce:mber 3/, 1937 



PEZRCECMTAGE. 
JO 20 SO -4Q 5Q 6Q 7Q SO QO 



PROJECT 



W.R 
No. 



BY PLEDGED 



EXPEND. 



r******. ******* ******* r****** r ****** ******* ****** 






State 

Teachers 

College 



15 



WA 

5pon. 



IO,4IO 
3,163 



10,138 
3,Q22 



£«K«v.«a»ma9Wvw:«wy!»*wmMiw»ww**>wwwMM;*v»v; 



traseoKaw/wmB 



State 
3u/ld/ng 



WA. 



41 



Spon2S 



3,OII 
70 



7,2/2 
\ 2.567 



m mwrm^m 



mm 



sss s/s V/s/s/,771 



^52 



2ZZZZZZI 



State 

Teachers 

College 



1291 



MA50P20 29,592 
SporJ60,383\56,430 




Yerba 
E>uena 
Island 



2752 



WPAI2J65 



Span 



5.64Q 



11,906 
5 J 59 



EOiOm«»SMI»»W»yXiMm»m«WX//iM^^^^ 



k 



wmmm 



L 



mmimm 



All State 
Projects 
Combined 



WPA 
Span. 



6Q806 68,898 
75,05654, I7S 



SAN FRANCISCO SERVICE PROJECTS 

A5 OF DECEMBER 51. 1937. 


PERCENTAGE 
JO 20 30 40 50 eo TO GO 90 


PROJECT 


WP 
NQ 


BY 


PLEDGED 


EXPEND. 


1 1 | 1 | | [ 






Cabinet 
Shop 


526 


W.PA 
Spon. 


39,932 
9,268 


38.636 
6,677 


\mm 


mm 


■H 












3 
















• 
























5utro Forest 
Fuel5upply 


1649 


W.PA 
Spon. 


22,146 



20,704 
O 






























































5utro Forest 
Fuel Supply 


5621 


WJ>A. 
Ipon. 


51,550 
5,900 


51, 168 
2,036 


>>>>>>* 




))>>)> 


'?Ja 




















































Cabinet 
Shop 


6146 


HPA 
jpon 


56,904 
4,753 


34,770 
2,736 


//////. 


////// 


////// 


'////// 


////// 


sss/\ 


"*i 1 








































All 5.F. 

Service 

Combined 


Spot 


9A. 

rsor 


170,532 
19,921 


145,278 
11,449 


//i'///, 




/S//JS 


'JSJJJ. 


>>S)J>. 


/SSA 









































































































































































































































































































BOARD OF EDUCATION 

/IS OF DECEMBER 3/, I93Z 


PERCENTAGE 
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 


PROJECT 


W.P. 
No. 


BY 


PLEDGED 


EXPEND. 


1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 




1499 


WPA. 
Spon 


27,437 
1825 


27.414 
1824 
























ATHELETIC 
FIELD 


r.rssi 








































GALILEO 

HIGH 
SCHOOL 


6250 


WM 

Spon. 


17,859 
14,306 


17,578 
11,567 




ssss/s. 


/sssss 


■ ssssss 


ssssss. 


■sss/ss 


'/////. 


////// 










////y / 


'S/Si 


























GAL/LEO 

HIGH 
SCHOOL 


7553 


W.PA. 
5pon. 


IO,638 
1605 


6095 
2207 


















■ss/s/s 

1 


y /////\ 


>>}))). 


'//KA^J 




































ALL BOARD 0/ 
ED. COMB/NED 




W.PA 
Spon. 


55,934 
17.8/6 


53,087 
15,598 


™ ■ 










mm 








//////. 


•////// 


A 1 
















































































































































































































• 




































































































- 





PUBUC UT/UTIES 

A5 OF DECEMBER 31, 1937. 


PERCENTAGE 
/O 20 30 40 50 €0 70 80 90 


PPOJECT 


tv.p 

Ato. 


Br 


PLEDGED 


EXPEND. 


I 1 1 1 I ■■■■j—' -J"' ■■ 






Y Cor Line 
extension 


431/ 


W.PA. 
Spon. 


73,295 
25,398 


32,7/5 
23,009 


■■■■■■■■ 






s/ssss. //////,7///// 


•}///?> 




























an 










Municipa/ 
Airport 


6545 


W.PA 
Spon. 


Z3.467 



7,138 





















































Municipo/ 
Airport 


6683 


Spon. 


359,322 
109,843 


353,346 
/O 9,2 32 


im 






















^^^ 






































A// Pub/ic 

Uti/if/es 

comitnec/ 




W.RA. 
Spon. 


446, 104 

135,241 


4/5,399 
/32,24/ 










■■ 






3 




r^^jm 




















































Thu 

dnea 


r proj 

7wM , 


ect Oj 
yppnox 


oerote 


d una 
'/Xo/ 


frr Ar 
//j fu 


so 9 
nets Ui 


trans/ 
tencu 


trreo* 
mSere 


to 


Me/n/cipot 
A/rport 


1727 


W.PA 
Spon. 




1,326,339 
/?4,934 
























• 



























































































































































































































AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION 

AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1937. 


P£/1C£/VTA(5E 
/O ZO 30 40 SO 60 70 80 90 


PPOJ£CT %* 


Br 


PLfDGED 


fXP£/VD. 


I 










Cow 
Palace 


/972 


WPA 
Sport 


325,072 
3,OO0 


323J32 
4,74/ 








mm 






















































4556 


WPA 
Spon 


239,363 
19,419 


238,875 
Z/,/03 




Cow 




















n 


Pa/ace 


))))X& 






































Cow 
Pa/ace. 


7651 


WPA 
Spon 


18,335 
O 


/8.2T5 











































— 




















Cow 
Pa/erce 


8220 


Spon 


199,955 
2<$475 


Z6.524 
O 


"^™ 


I 




































Total 




Spw 


762,725 
54,894 


59^906 
25844- 


//////. 


////// 


/ / s s s s . 


s s s s s s 


f S S S A 











































































































































































































































































































BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

AS OF DECEMBER 3/ t 1937. 

• 


PERCENTAGE 
IO 20 30 40 SO 60 TO BO SO 


PROJECTS 


W.R 

/ve. 


BY 


Pledged 


Expended 






















Lake 
Merced 
Orod/ng 


76 2 


KVPA 
SPON. 


702.599 
12.207 


701 ,735 
2.898 




























n 




















■^™ 




















Ca/ifornia 
Street 


734 


WPA. 
SPON. 


45,907 

12,154 


44.177 
3.946 




MSgSS. 


rjw^w^^^^h 




^H 












'///* 


1^ 




































Lake 
Merced 
Rocking 


1134 


W.PA. 

5P0N. 


206,571 
1 2.207 


207.623 
46,873 








■M 






1H 


sgge^A 






































O'Shauafi- 

nessy 
Bou/eyard 


1202. 


WPA 
5P0N. 


224,866 
12.207 


204,617 
17,534 




















1 


?7rtf* 








































Park 
Stables 


1699 


WPA. 
SPON. 


53.044 
3.049 


49,857 
2.380 










?////// 


7^^ft7 


'•W//V 


////J 






















Z^j 






































F/'re 
Houses 


1702 


WPA. 
SPON. 


75,906 
5./90 


74.745 
2.949 






'////// 


////// 


■////// 


T^^A 






























































5/lver, 
Avenue 


IQ49 


WPA. 
5P0N. 


tepio 

760 


17,435 
337 


'SSSSSS 


//////. 


////// 


/////// 


^1 






























































Brunswick 
Street 


1850 


WPA. 
5P0N. 


6,406 
395 


7,276 
1/3 




)))))) 


')))))\ 




























































Merrie 'Hay 
Esplanade 


I8SI 


WPA. 
SPON. 


6,688 
350 


7,996 









































1 






















Cyshaugh- 
nessy 
Extension 


1852 


W!PA 
SPON. 


66,969 
1,650 


65J3Z 
345 




































































5 1 reefs $> 
Sidewalks 


1891 


tf.PA. 
SPON. 


3.311.740 
2OO.O00 


28/5.543 
328,654 




WAfXArAfxy/y 


■■i 












™^^J 








































St. Joseph 
Avenue 


1922. 


WPA 
SPON. 


/B.827 
840 


11,836 
O 






























































Duncan 
Street- 


1923 


WPA 
SPON 


29.842 
/.040 


23,76/ 
496 


























































Fire, 
Houses 


1932 


WBA. 
5P0N, 


581.669 
6,000 


572.986 
IO.703 


HH 




wffiffiwffim 




unn^jjunmngij 




pr 













BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

AS OF DECEMBER 3/, 1937. 


PERCENTAGE 
/O 20 30 40 SO 60 TO SO 90 


PROJECT 


W.R 
No. 


BY 


PLED6ED 


EXPEND. 






















Police 


1935 


WM. 
Spon. 


16,588 



12,941 







































^/TU/fOf/J 






















Clarendon 
A venue 


2459 


WM 

Spon. 


41,921 
390 


59,965 
1.341 








■■ 




■■ 


















































Hall of 
Justice 


548/ 


WM 
5pon. 


67.544 



81,045 
1.281 


























































Coroner's 
Office 


5550 


W.P.A 
Spon 


51.880 



27,447 





























































3ernol 
Heights 


5673 


WM 
Spon. 


50,571 



44,704 





























































Civic 
Auditorium 


5681 


m. 

Spon. 


94,400 



94,126 
5,155 






























































Orand 
3tands 


5197 


WM. 
Spon. 


159, 7/0 
75,000 


95,120 
50,208 


Y////fi 


////// 


////// 


'/////, 


"SSSS 


CZ4ZZ4. 


« 


^^^95 


////// 


1 


^l 


















^^//s 










Geneva 
Avenue 


6485 


W.P.A 
Spon 


61,300 
50,824 


35,927 
40,405 


^^^^7. 








■////// 


— I 


//////. 


■sssss* 


'//7777 


///s// 


'/////. 


•V/A 


I 
























Street- 
Decorations 


6861 


W>A 
Spon. 


96.674 
41,549 


78,248 
34,762 


wm^mm 


■ 








! 




m 






















AHB.RW. 

Projects 

Combined 


3pot 


isor 


5,989,254 
455,667 


5518,970 
555.660 


'////// 




777777* 




■■ 






warn 




m 


s/s/ma 









































































































































PARK COMMISSION 

A3 OF DECEMBER 3A /9J/T 


PETRCECN TA GET 
IO 2.0 30 -40 SO SO 70 QO 90 


PROJECT 


No. 


BY 


PLEDGED 


EXPEND. 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


McLaren 
Park 


783 


WA 
Spon. 


165.093 
12207 


/64.5/0 
I4J43 


■■ 




























1 








3uena 
l//sta 


1152. 


WPA 
Spon. 


96,654 
6.079 


92307 
4.022 






mmmmwMmA I 




=. 




i 














, •• I,,, 














The 

Z.GO 


1153 


WPA 
Spon. 


581,6/9 
42.737 


558.804 
82.827 


MB 




■■■ 




mmmm 




■■■■i 










































De^bung 
Museum 


1197 


MA 
Spon. 


147,692 
10.579 


141722 
5.367 


mm 


T****wwmM*m* 


mmmm 










=. 




































Horseshoe 
Courts 


1688 


WPA 

Spon. 


15,512 
450 


15.361 
130 




















i 



















| 














Telegraph 
Hill 


1689 


WA. 
Spon. 


40.956 
2000 


39713 

1.315 
20.609 

10708 








■■■ 






































_ _ — _ 












Sharps 
Parrl< 


1690 


WPA 
Spon 


21,975 
9.850 






VJTjZ&srp, 




■***&£ 




_- 


=1 










































Go/den 
Gate 
Park 


1693 


WPA 
Spon. 


5/7.2/7 
876 


317.215 

1.407 










wmm 


■■■ 


■■■ 


■■■ 
































] SSJ 








Kejzar 
Pavilion 


1700 


WPA 
Spon 


33,180 
1.960 


26.198 
1277 


//////; 


• ••••. 


""/■■ 


//////V///// 


's/s/r. 












I™ 






























Inspiration 
Poirrt 


1705 


WA. 

Spon 


17,469 
777 


14.839 
652 






























































Harding 
Park 


1924 


WPA 

Spon. 


3286/ 
896 


32.622 
535 




/////• 


'////// 


^Tj^s^r, 


////// 


'///SSI 
















































1 










Kenar 
Stadium 


1925 


WPA 

Spon. 


(33,486 
2545 


131,907 
2533 






mwm 










■■■ 










































.3ay 
View 
Park 


1926 


mm 

Spon 


151,540 
1.075 


131.462 
1.075 




wmm 




■■i 




mm 






■H 












































Golden 
Gate Park 
Roads 


2106 


WPA 
Spon 


50.805 
895 


43.664 
2227 











































PARK COMMISSION 

AS OF DECEMBER 3/, 1937. 


P£#C5MTAGE 
/O 20 30 40 ZO ffO 70 80 90 


PPOJZCT 


A/o. 


8Y 


Pi£PG£0 


£XPEm 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


A go otic 

Pork 


2175 


WPA 
Spon 


IJ77887 
/7 000 


i,065245 
59081 


■B 


















1 








































G.G.Park 
Drives 


2176 


Wfn 

Spon 


54999/ 
3345 


549520 
28626 




















'///// 


SS^i 








































Moc/nt 
Davidson 


2524 


WPA 
Spon 


77653 
2800 


7/365 
//72 






////// 


//////* 


^s 










— 1 


















































F/Ve 
Parks 


3043 


Spon 


J,7S4/34 



(570372 
54 705 




























































Convenience 
Stations 


3478 


Wfft 
Tpon 


54500 



52660 
467 






























































Lofayette 
Square 


3539 


WPA 
Span 


31675 
622 


30874 
309 


))>)}) 


/ / s/// 


f//s//i 


//{/// 


////// 




















































Hording 
Boa/evord 


3679 


WPA 
Spon 


50500 
74970 


40472 
/5/64 




















\////A 






































G.G.Pork 
7enn is Courts 


37/8 


WPA 
5pon 


Z20I6 



2/44Z 
4078 






















JLWYlOi 


>»<w/y> 






































Marino 
Seo Wo// 


3932 


WPA 
Spon 


/ 19 536 
4 000 


705670 
45/ 




























































Park 
Meadows 


44/5 


WPA 
Tpon 


500284 
75000 


4396// 
/5753 






y ////// 


////// 


'////// 


////// 


<f / '" /i 




/////// 












































Pork&.8&ch 
improvement 


5480 


WPA 
Tpon 


1,218646 
27998 


508340 
13992 








warn 












































Londscop/ng 
Pup/icfbrks 


5839 


WPA 
Tpon 


3656ZO 
35435 


/39396 
22278 
























































fbrk-Presidio 
Bypass 


677/ 


WPA 
Tpon 


118593 
553/2 


48509 
3 769 
















i 




























Chi/drens 
Area 


8248 


wrn 

Tpon 


34302 
8406 


52/5 









™ 





















PARK COMM/SS/ON 

AS OF DECEMBER J/, !937. 


P£P.CCNTA6E 
/O 20 30 40 SO 60 70 SO SO 


PROJECT 


IMP. 
Afo. 


/BY 


Pif06£D 


fxpfm 


mmm 




















Lorn/scaping 

4Construct. 

Bui/cti'ngs 


8514 


W.P.A. 
Span 


86/ 3 423 



6/,972 












































/?// Fbrk 
projects 
Combined 


* 


W.PA 
yton, 


8J52,79$ 
277,8/4 


6,451,596 
548,466 














































































































































































































































































































































































































• 



































RECREATION COMMISSION 

AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1937. 


P£fiCEA/7XGE 
/O 20 JO 40 SO 60 70 60 SO 


PROJECT 


MR 

A/o. 


BY 


PLEDGED 


sxpfA/a 










^^^^// ssssss 












Siymund 
Stern 


I03O 


WPA 
Spon 


102,273 
7,160 


86,0/0 

6,922 




////// 


■////// 


'/////. 




r/////s> 


{////fl 












































Playyrou/kt 
Jurvci/ 


1031 


IWPA 
Spon 


33,35/ 
1,973 


33,089 
7,744 


m 


MEffiO SQMQgg g^ggg 


^m 




■M*M&£± 






^s^n 






















e--T ■ - ■ 


















Crocker 
A ma ion 


1151 


Spon 


195,611 
3,993 


/ 6 2, 073 
9,80/ 


£««««« 




warn 




j««« 








= 


/.'« 






































/ng/es/da 
xJaJ/s/te 


1196 


M 
Spon 


f76,057 
12,7/4 


172,522 
I6J27 










mm 
















































Rossi 
P/oygrotuxt 


1199 


m 

Span 


64,049 
3,214 


63,655 
5,666 


W^M*^ 




1HI 


m 










warn 




[ ////« 






































^■" 


Doug/ass 
Park 


1200 


m 

fyan 


60,336 
6,//6 


60,319 
5,245 


mm 




■■ 










warn 






////w 








































Douglass 
Playground 


120/ 


m 

Span 


361726 
2,/7/ 


30,7/9 
2,/ 64 


/////// 


/////// 


////// 










s/s/ss 


r/fff/s 


'///// 


,)))x 








































38th and 
Fulton 


1701 


WPA 
Spon 


Z2.672 
4/6 


/0,/O4 
5 


















p?" 








































Glen 
Park 


1703 


Spon 


146396 
/2,736 


/22,075 
5,836 


■■1 


■geeege gggeg» 




^MH 


















































30th and 
California 


1/04 


wm 

Spon 


39574 
2,464 


3Z7I/ 
3,209 


H 




TMMMTMM. 


WMTMJM 


■■ 


H 










///&& 




































1 


Balboa 
Park 


1929 


Spon 


36922 
6OO 


34,665 
64 


■////// 


^^ 






















































St Mary's 
P/at/ground 


2370 


km 

Spon 


63,096 
/,6/5 


39,246 
2.293 






'////// 


//////. 


rsssssvi 


//////, 


ffS/f/i 


\////S/ 


'////// 


'/////. 


MSS< 






































tie/en 
Witts 


3479 


WPA 
Spo/i 


32,969 
O 


6,366 
7,859 








■prtAxi 






































G/tman 
Park 


3547 


wm 

Spon 


39,960 



54,484 
233 







































RECREATION COMMISSION 

1 AS OF DECEMBER 31, I9Z7. 


PERCENTAGE PROJECT 
IO 20 30 40 SO 60 70 BO 90 


/Vo. 


BY 


PL£D6£D 


£XP£N/X 






















Berna/ 
Cen ter 


3548 


WM 16,050 
Spa, 


12,980 



























































Ju/ius 
Kahn 


3549 


fVm 12,848 
Spa' 


/ 2,0 50 
1,154 






















E&S9 






































1 


9th 4> 
Ortega 


372C** 

Spy, 


57,249 
500 


51,322 
63 


77^^tt 


^^^ 
















J 






































Crocker 
Amazon 






530,53* 



364,998 
2,8/4 
















XoT 


SB^^ 






















Jpcn 






















Ocean 
V/e*v 


5839 


WfiA 

Spor 


2/$ 667 



157,289 
292 


















I 








































Ptoyyroart 
Areas 


68*9 


WPA 
Span 


2,270 


72,823 





















^^wn 






































G/en 
Par* 


6*8 


Spon 


24,049 
4,90/ 


23,995 
3,578 






-. vwyy 




yx//y# 




#///#A 








777777/ 


^a — 1 




































O/en 
Par* 


7665 


W>4 

SpOTi 


4,63/ 
90 


4,330 
1,0/5 




'///«! 


'SSSSS* 


'/////J 


r S/*SS+ '*S sss* sss*/* 


































1 






,,,„„„,, 










AH 

Projmct* 
Combined 


Jpot 


tjor 


1045&7 
69,93$ 


1674,3* 
7/J7I 






■■ 




■■ 






■■ 


■■1 


///// 


S^^ 











































































































































































"\ ■■: 



*T\ 



t«l. ■ ■:■;■ 









































































































■ 

- 






















. 






1 























BOARD OF HEALTH 

A5 OF DECEMBER 31, 1937. 


PERCENTAGE 
IO ZO SO 40 SO 60 to ao 90 


PROJECT 


W.R 
No. 


BY 


PLEDGED 


EXPEND. 


l 1 1 1 l l l 1 1 — 


Lagans 
Hondo 
Home 


1/95 


Sport 


/57,4/6 
6,28% 


155,370 
9,593 
































































County 
Hospital 


IJ96 


WJIA 
Spon 


189,99$ 
8,505 


/78p57 
7,960 






















*=» 


A^yf J 






































fit/ Board 
ofHes/th 
combined 




W.P.A. 
spon 


347,4/5 
/4,793 


352,027 
17,555 
























































































































































































































































































































































































FEDERAL PROJECTS 

A 5 OF DECEMBER 31, 1937 


PERCENTAGE 
/O 20 30 40 50 GO 70 ao 90 


PROJECT 


W.R 

No. 


3Y 


PL£D6B 


EXPEND. 


| — | 1 














Angel 
Island 


1643 


%P.A 

5pon. 


5,337 
7,353 


5,256 
2,576 


■■ 


mm 


mm 
















<■///// 


' // //s 








i 


















— 1 




Crissey 
Field 


2170 


W.PA 154,090 
Spon. 26,741 


39,2/6 
I3j838 


////// 


fffffft 


• "" '■ 


•""" 


>>>>>■ 


























Marine 
Hospital 


ZI7I 


W.PA. 
Upon 


7,481 
200 


6,887 





















= 


^i 






















Crissey 
Field 


ZI74 


MA. 
5pon. 


8,575 
2,221 


8,072 
4J93 
























































Fort 
Scort 


3462 


WJ>A. 
5pon 


10,692 
6,126 


10,177 
O 








_^r 


























Angel 
Island 


1514 


HPA 
5pon 


2,155 
2,126 


2,067 































































Marine 
Hospiial 


5515 


5pon 


20,968 
O 


19,163 



























































Fort 
Mi ley 


3903 


WJ>A 

Spon 


4,547 
2,135 


4,354 





























^^ 




























Fort 
3cott 


3804 


KPA 
5pm 


27,579 
6,610 


16,639 
4,914 














HB 




'///// t 


//A 


































Lincoln 
boulevard 


3905 


VUPA 


33,004 
11,240 


24,091 
3.170 


rr-'srs. 


///SSf 


'S//A 










— 1 


<///l 




J 
































Fort3cort 
Roads 


3806 


m 

5flon 


209,900 
19038 


ZO9J08O 
13,602 














vxxa m 








'/ / /i i 
































f 






Crissey 
Field 


4500 


VM 
5pon 


47,104 
14,986 


10.453 













1 












■■■■ 




















Lettermon 
Hospital 


5422 


Span. 


44,740 
36,947 


43,634 
15,564 


■MMTAVSAr. 




■■ 
















S///SS 


'////A 






j 






















Angel 
Island 


6692 
7354 


5pon 


8,255 
5,037 


6,548 
O 














3 










— ■ 









FEDERAL PROJECTS 

AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1937. 


PERCENTAGE 
10 20 SO 40 50 60 7 


6 


\0 90 


PROJECT 


MR 
No. 


BY 


PLED6ED 


EXPENDED 






















Fire Control 
Station 


7057 
7560 


W.PA 
5pon 


34,704 
7,255 


52,951 
5,556 


T^^^T^ 


'""■'' 


////// 


t ss ss s 


■ / s / s s 


'' 'sssJ 


/ / /f/, 


//fl 


Z3 
























Officers' 
Quarters 


7/16 
7556 


WJ>A 
5pon. 


12,050 
7,525 


11,668 















3 














1 


























Presidio 
Landscaping 


7117 
7558 


MA 
5pon 


16,618 
2,018 


16.256 
O 
























^^ 






























1 






O 4 H 
Barracks 


7480 


W.PA 
5pon 


6,475 
1,985 


4,183 
O 




















































Fort Scott 
Landscaping 


7485 


W.PA 
tpon. 


26097 
5,561 


24,334 
O 


















- 1 




^^^ 


































Ange/ 
/stand 


7695 


W.PA. 
5pon 


20,554 
5,005 


7,883 













^^ 




































Ange/ 
Island 


7698 


fan 


21,201 
7,974 


9.219 

















■ 




























I 




Presidio 
Landscaping 


7780 


%P.A 
5pon 


27.465 
4,1/4 


11,588 
O 












1 




































fbrf Mason 
PR. Tracks 


8204 


HPA 
5pon. 


2,688 
1,555 


2,591 
O 




























^1 






















1 






fort Mason 
Landscaping 


8205 


9LPA 
5pon 


4,057 
1,1 60 


979 













i 
































A/I Federal 
Projects 
Combined 


5pc 


RA. 

nsoe 


756,764 
/85,I68 


587,279 
64,0/5 








^^Y 










^^^^ 


1 




































\ 




























































>, 













m 1 








• 
























> ■ 


















:. '.- .::• 


























































































































































■ '* 














»■ 


1 














- . 




- 


i 







EXPOSITION PROJECTS 

\ AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1937. 


pcrcen tage: 

JO 20 30 40 50 60 70 SO SO 


PROJECT 


No. 


BY 


PL£D6£D 


EXPEND. 


















Exposition 
Design 


13/5 


Sport 


452,299 
f/3.073 


188,229 
2/6,333 








. — 








































1616 


WfA 
Span 


398889 
Z/4,722 


3S739S 

Z/9.5/8 




Exposition 
Landscaping 


| j 














































3 






Exposition 
Hort/cuifure 


7308 


Span 


968075 
406J02 


246.969 
26.726 






































ZZJ 






/I// Expo. 
Projects 




WM 


'8/9,263 
/■s&r noo 


832:537 

Z£./IK77 


, 






ih 


























<- Or/rO//7&Q 




Spon 


bJbjUyy 


Jt)4p// 

















































































































































































































































































GOLDEN 6ATE BRIDGE PROJECTS 

AS OF DECEMBER 3/,/937. 



PERCENTAGE 
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 



60 &D 



PROJECT 



H/.P 
No. 



BY 



PLEDGED 



EXPEND. 



T 



T 









T 



ntemr 



.G. Bridge 
Approach 



2177 



WMI8IM4- 



179,996 



%m /9 2,577 25 /,80a 



G.G.Bridqe 
Drainage. 



3536 



WPAt 17,4/6 



Spent 51,433/5 I, 



//7,4/& 
',432 



Vr'.'.Y.'/VWf 



GG Bridge 
Drainage 



4416 



WPA 

5por, 



944/0 
10,490 



90,281 
/6,83/ 



m* 



5B5S 



wmwm 



a 



BHfflHHi 



^LifonSt. 
Approach 



56 4C 



WPA554GX35^8I7 



Spor, /09,90s 824,235 






I 



///"/■ '//////$&?&&& susssssa 



GG. Bridge 
Lighting 



5C41 



WPA 



Spor55,//5 



227725224432 



107,382 



//////A xnnftrA //////y /yx/^yzi ^vywxy /////// 




Marina 
Approach 



7O55WPA73,503 
7350SpoA2G,Z/7 



37,85^ 
I5.9Q0 



Lyon St 
Approach 



8264 



WPA\39O20\ 11,21/ 
5pot\ /3,844 6759 









A// Bridge 
Projects 
Combined 



WPA (,087/894 1,0(5,009 
Spy 559,5b% 774,331 



ALL PROJECTS 

AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1937. 



PERCENTAGE 
IO ZO 30 40 30 60 70 ao 90 



PROJECT 



W.R 
No. 



BY 



PLEDGED EXPEND. 



mmm t wrnm 



T^V^A 



State 
Projects 



WPA 



%on. 



30306 



75.Q56 



53.393 



54.173 



wm 



wm 



ZZZZZZ.ZZZZZZt 



V/ // A 



m*. 



SanFnoncisco 
Service 
Pro, j ''ccts 



WPA. 



5/33/7. 



I70.53Z 



/ 9.92 1 



145,2.73 



JL449 



mrnv rm 



zzzzzz ~ 



vrmwm 



wmf. 



*mtz. 



Board 

Of 
Educotbn 



WPA. 



5pon. 



55,934 



17,3/G 



53.037 



1 5.593 






'/////. 



ZZZZZ2 



ZLT 



Public 
Utilities 



wpa. 



Spon. 



446,104 



/ 35. 24 1 



4/5,399 



Z3224/ 



vm 



w. 



AgricultV 
Assodn 



WPA 



5pon 



732.725 



54,394 



596.906 



25344 



WB3. 



■ZZZZ27ZZZZZ 



///// 



•/////. 



•ZZZZZJLZZZZZZt 



////// T>////i 777ZZJ 



Board 
Of Public 
Works 



WPA 



5pon 



5,989254 



455,667 



5,3/3,970 



555,660 



mm 



ZZZZZ/ ////// 



777777 7///// 



* J///}, 777777. T7//S -. /SS;/y r /;,,s. 



P>arK 

Comrrin. 



mm 



8.752,7996,451,596 



5pon 



277.814 



343.466 



m m 






Recreation 
Comrrin 



1.043.8971,674,354 



WA. 



Spon 69.935 



7/,m 



HP 



r*M*rMtxrMrM*ji , *M*M*4 , *w*r**:r**w*w.rjxfW*i-Mr*Mr*.rMrMrj'4'j'**jr*j 



Board 

Of 
Health 



WPA 



Spon 



347,415 



14,793 



332,027 



J7.553 



///// ZZZZZ 



Federal 
Projects 



WPA 



Spon 



756,764 



/8JZ/63 



537,279 



64,0/3 



m 



////// 



//////7/////, 



777771 



ZZZZZZZZZ 



Exposith 
Projects 



WA 



Spon 



1,8/9,263 



636,099 



332,597 



364.577 



TM4WMM0 W^TMMMi VJWMJMd 'MJWM** '*WM*WM rMJWMMA r M**MM*. *M**M*A rfMM*** ****+. 



Go/denGa-te 
B.&ri. 
District 



WPA 



1/087,394 



1, 0/5,009 



774,339 







BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS 
OPERATED IN AREA 7 



The following pages give the works project number, 
together with title and project proposal description, of all 
construction projects operated in Area 7 from October 1, 1935 
to December 31, 1937. 

The description in most cases is the same as the 
Presidential approval and reflects the proposed work to be 
undertaken. However, approved modifications have been made 
from time to time, as the progress of the work warranted. 

The financial statistics relative to any one of 
these units may be found by referring to the works project 
number in column of figures appearing on subsequent pages. 



74 



A BRIEF DESCRIPTION 
of 
ENGINEERING and CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS 

in 
SAN FRANCISCO 



15 STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Construction of an addition to the Science Building, 
State Teachers College, San Francisco, California, 
The work Includes: Excavation for footings, erection 
of sheet piling and cribbing, construction of forms 
for footings, walls, columns, beams, stairs, floor 
slab, etc., placing reinforcing steel and pouring 
concrete up to and including first floor slab. 
Installation of plumbing and electrical work. 

41 STATE BUILDING 

Painting of window frames, exterior iron work, north 
east and west walls; concrete floors; lacquer linol- 
eum floors. Repair and refinish chairs and desks, 
erect store room shelving. Install electrical outlets. 
Repair and refinish Venetian blinds. 

526 CABINET - FURNITURE 

Furniture production and repair - To provide for needy 
handy men, cabinet makers, painters and machinists in 
the production and repair of furniture for relief 
clients o Finished articles to be distributed through 
Surplus Commodities Division and recipients of goods 
to be certified through S.E.R.A., Social Service Divis- 
ion. Also to manufacture kindergarten and playground 
equipment for the Recreation Commission, making various 
articles that otherwise could not be furnished to 
kindergartens and playgrounds. 

782 MERCED GRADING 

Work Involved: The completion of the grading and under- 
ground drainage system for a boulevard 100 to 125 feet 
in width around Lake Merced In the southwest section 
of San Francisco, California, to be known as Lake Merced 
Boulevard. It Involves the movement of 249,664 cubic 
yards of earthwork of a firm sand material cemented with 
clay, replacing of 425 feet of wire mesh fence, con- 
struction of 230 lineal feet of reinforced concrete 
sewer lined with 18' ; V.C.P., construction of a rein- 



75 



forced concrete culvert 6'x7' Inside diameter of 220 
cubic yards concrete , and the repair of 150 lineal 
feet of redwood storm flume, the construction, tools, 
and operating of a blacksmith shop to sharpen and 
repair tools and equipment, and necessary field survey. 

783 ROADS THROUGH McLAREN PARK 

The excavation of 14,350 cubic yards of rock, the 
macadamizing of 400,000 square feet of road and 
125,400 square feet of foot paths and equestrian paths; 
the construction of 12,172 lineal feet of stonegutter 
for roads, 7,481 lineal feet for paths, 17 seepage pits, 
and 56 storm water inlets," the laying of 2,315 lineal 
feet of corrugated iron culverts and V.C. pipe drains; 
landscaping of the park area by creating fire breaks,- 
building fire trails, planting 10,000 trees and snrubs, 
and boxing and transplanting 600 trees. 

784. CALIFORNIA STREET SIDEWALKS 

The narrowing of 12 feet from Fillmore Street to Lyon 
Street; the necessary reconstruction of catch basins, 
and the moving of street signs, fire hydrants, etc; 
also the paving of the additional pavement area with 
concrete and making the necessary conform to existing 
asphaltic concrete pavement. 

1030 SIGMUND STERN PLAYGROUND IMPROVEMENTS 

Improving Si ground Stern Grove, building retaining wall, 
grading and constructing new tennis courts and bowling 
greens, and building comfort station, 

1031 SURVEY OF PLAYGROUNDS 

Making engineering and topographical surveys of play 
areas, equipment and buildings of the eight following 
existing playgrounds? 

Crocker Amazon, Ingleslde, Rossi, China Beach, 
Gillman, Potrero, St. Mary's, Ocean View. 
Planning new playgrounds, making drawings of new play- 
grounds, play areas and buildings. 

1151 CROCKER AMAZON RECREATION CENTER 

The excavation and placing Into embankment of 21,000 
cubic yards of earth and 13,000 cubic yards of rock; 
the hauling from a stock pile and spreading of 21,000 
cubic yards of loam to a depth of 6 inches over the 
area to be graded and that which was graded previously; 
the installation of 23,050 lineal feet of water pipe of 
various sizes together with appropriate fittings, con- 
stituting a sprinkler system. All according to pre- 
liminary plans prepared by the Recreation Department. 



76 



1152 BUENA VISTA PARK 



L 



The rocking of 1,500 lineal feet of paths 8 feet wide, 
the surfacing of 132,960 square feet of paths, the 
resurfacing of 22,300 square feet of drives ; the con- 
struction of 15,455 lineal feet of natural rock gutters, 
6,000 square feet of log retaining walls, 72 natural 
rock steps and coping, 50 lineal feet of rubble masonry 
wall, the placing of 112 lineal feet of 8" era. culvert ; 
the surfacing of 21,600 square feet of tennis courts; 
the erection of 13,590 square feet of standard chain 
link fence; the grading of red rock quarry , 500 cubic 
yards; the installation of 2,800 pipe feet of Irrigation 
system; the grading, etc., of 2 small playgrounds; the 
construction of 18,900 square feet of artificial stone 
sidewalk; and the spreading of 1,000 cubic yards of 
loam and planting of shrubs furnished by the Park Com- 
mission; also the reconditioning of an existing con- 
venience station. 

1153 ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS 

The grading of 9,300 cubic yards for underground pump 
house and underpass, 65,000 cubic yards of paths, 10,000 
cubic yards of paddocks, 40,000 cubic yards of lakes 
and lagoons; the placing of 6,600 cubic yards of red 
rock surfacing on paths, 123,000 square feet of rustic 
rubble face to slopes of paths, and 20,000 cubic yards 
of loam about grounds; the installation of 600 lineal 
feet 18" corrugated metal culverts, 18,400 lineal feet 
sanitary and storm sewer system, 13,100 lineal feet of 
irrigation system, and 4 pumps in pumping plant; the 
construction of an underground reinforced concrete pump 
house of 315 cubic yards, a reinforced concrete under- 
pass of 150 cubic yards, a reinforced concrete wall and 
moat slab and coping around animal Island of 485 cubic 
yards; and landscaping work. 

1154 ROCKING MERCED BLVD. 

This project Involves the subgrading and macadamizing 
of the boulevard graded by Merced project, by placing 
7 Inches of red rock quarried at ' Shaughnessy Boulevard 
in two layers of 5 inches and 2 inches, when compacted. 
Approximately 960,000 square feet; the installation of 
47,200 lineal feet of 2"xl2" redwood curbing, 2,488 
lineal feet of 10" corrugated Iron pipe culvert, and 
37 reinforced concrete catch basins; also the quarrying 
of 13,000 cubic yards additional to material supplied 
by 'Shaughnessy Boulevard. All rock to be hauled 
approximately 6 miles. All work to be done In accord- 
ance with plans and specifications of the Director of 
Public Works of the City and County of San Francisco. 
Prepared by the Bureau of Engineering. 



77 



1195 LAG-UNA HONDA HO ICE 

Rehabilitation and reconditioning of "buildings; - 
construct , repair and improve 

1196 CITY AND COUNTY HOSPITAL 

Repairs to Training Nurses Home, main administration 
building, main group buildings, pathological building, 
emergency and receiving building. 

1197 DeYOUNG MUSEUM 

Rehabilitation and completion of museum building. 

1198 INGLES IDE RECREATION CENTER 

Grading, draining, fencing, and water supply system for 
one football field and one soccer field with parking 
facilities, 10 paved tennis courts, and 2 paved basket- 
ball courts," all according to plans and ipecifications 
as prepared by the Recreation Commission, Cit}^ and 
County of San Francisco. 

1199 ROSSI PLAYGROUND 

Construction of playground, tennis courts, and baseball 
field. 

1200 DOUGLASS PARK 

Excavation and removal from park of 5,700 cubic yards 
of loose rock; the installation of an irrigation system 
of 3,500 pipe feet, and a drainage system of 475 pipe 
feet | the construction of a rubble masonry wall and 
the facing of 12,000 square feet of slope with rubble 
stone masonry; the erection of 1,550 lineal feet of 
standard chain link fence: and the spreading of loam 
manure, the planting of 130,000 ice plants, and the 
sowing of 600 pounds of grass seed. 
The construction of a standard convenience station 
10' x 26' double units. 

1201 24TH AND DOUGLASS PLAYGROUND 

Construction of playground, tennis courts, and conven- 
ience station. 

1202 GRADING AND SURFACING ' SHAUGKNESSY BOULEVARD 

The completion of the grading and underground drainage 
system for a boulevard 60 feet in width arotmd the west 
side of Glen Park Reservoir Site and Glen Park. It 
Involves the movement of 87;, 716 cubic yards of material, 
90% of which is stratified red country rock and 10%, 
top soil and hard earth; also a temporary pavement of 1" 
emulsified asphalt wearing surface over 8" of red rock 

78 



base, 16,000 square feet; and a temporary sidewalk with 
a 5" red rock base, 3,300 square feet; the raising of 
5 brick manholes; the removal of 15 eucalyptus trees; 
and the erection of a masonry rubble wall of 8 cubic 
yards . 

1291 STATE TEACHERS ' COLLEGE 

Construction of an addition to the Science Building, 
State Teachers' College, San Francisco, California. 
Work includes completion of the Science Building from 
first floor. This building started under SERA project; 
submitted under WPA Serial No. 0702-14 for completion 
of footings to and including first floor slab. 

1315 EXPOSITION - DESIGNING 

Architectural and engineering design necessary for the 
creation of a municioally owned airport, with certain 
permanent buildings and accessories for an Exposition 
of the City and County of San Francisco, to provide 
recreational facilities. 

1499 COMMERCE HIGH ATHLETIC FIELD 

This project Is a playing field and an adjunct of the 
High School of Commerce and involves the making of a 
running track, 2 high jumps, one pole vault, one shot 
put, and one broad jump pit and runways; the construc- 
tion of a 10' x 10' athletic equipment house; the 
repair and remodeling of the training quarters under 
grand stand; also the repair and painting of the 2 
existing grand stands; also the surfacing of a practice 
basketball court . 

1616 EXPOSITION LANDSCAPING 

Trees, plants and shrubs for airport and recreational 
area for the City and County of San Francisco . Involves 
the early growth and care, boxing, etc., preparatory to 
placing on the reclaimed area selected for the airport. 

1617 EXPOSITION ROADS AND TRESTLES 

Construction of a roadway and trestle from the San Fran- 
cisco-Oakland Bridge along one side of the island and 
down to the proposed shoals area to be reclaimed under 
another proposal. 

1643 ANGEL ISLAND - BUILDINGS 

Razing water tanks and removal of underground water 
pipes. Landscaping of Immigration Grounds; ditching 
around buildings, construction of cement drain; con- 
struction of Incinerator; leveling of European Recrea- 
tion Grounds; construction of cement bulkhead and 
walks. Tearing oiit shower bath in hospital. 



79 



1649 SUTRO FOREST FUEL SUPPLY 

Sacking and warehousing existing split wood, for the 
purpose of supplying indigent families with stove wood. 
Distribution to he made by the Surplus Commodities 
Division of the S.E.R.A., also cleaning and burning 
certain areas previously logged. 

1688 HORSESHOE COURT 

Excavation for and construction of masonry rubble walls, 
130 cubic yards; 3,000 square feet red rock paths; 600 
lineal feet sewer; the building of a standard convenience 
station, and general rehabilitation of an existing 
horseshoe court. 

1689 TELEGRAPH HILL PARK 

Excavation for and construction of a metal crib wall 
1,600 square feet of face, rubble masonry walls 243 
cubic yards, concrete retaining wall 62 cubic yards, 
red rock coping and slope facing 196 cubic yards, con- 
crete gutter and shoulders 86 cubic yards, concrete 
sidewalk 2,300 square feet; the erection of 250 lineal 
feet of standard chain link fence 5 feet high; grading, 
rocking, and oiling 9,440 square feet of paths; Instal- 
lation of 578 feet of drainage and water system; con- 
struction 578 lineal feet of natural rock gutter; .and 
the spreading of 210 cubic yards of loam and planting 
of shrubs. 

1690 SHARP PARK PIPE LINE 

Installation of pipe line for water purposes on golf 
course. 

1693 GOLDEN GATE PARK IMPROVEMENT 

Spading and re-seeding lawns, planting shrubs, trimming 
trees, and removing of any unsightly snags or stumps 
and weeds over entire park area of two square miles. 

1699 GOLDEN GATE PARK STABLES 

Construction and completion of stable buildings. 

1700 KEZAR PAVILION 

Erection and completion of a one-story reinforced 
concrete addition to present training quarters. 

1701 38TH AND FULTON RECREATION CENTER 

Construction of new field house to be used for district 
recreation headquarters. 



80 



1702 FIRE HOUSES - DISTRICT 4 






Engine No. 4 - 676 Howard Street which includes Water 

Tower #1, Water Tower #2, Searchlight 
Engine #1, and Air Compressor #1'. 

Engine No. 17 - 34 Mint Street, which includes Truck 

Company #1 and Rescue Squad. 

Engine No. 6 - 336 - 7th Street 

Engine No. 19 - 1300 - 4th Street 

Engine No. 29 - 380 Division Street 

Drill Tower - 398 Division Street 



1703 GLEN PARK RECREATION CENTER 






Construction of playground, club hovise, and recreation 
center. 



1704 



30th AND CALIFORNIA STREET RECREATION CENTER 



Grading and construction of new tennis courts 



1705 



INSPIRATION PARK 






1727 
1849 



Excavation of 880 cubic yard 
construction of a rubble mas 
6 sets of reinforced concret 
installation of an irrigatio 
a chain link fence 5 feet hi 
laying of crushed rock walks 
spreading of 635 cubic yards 
excavation for and planting 
for and planting of shrubs o 
feet; the placing of concret 
Park Commission. 

(SEE PROJECT 6545) 

SILVER AVENUE GRADING 



s of soft rock material; 
onry wall 31 cubic yards, 
e steps 27 cubic yards" 
n system of 500 pipe feet, 
gh and 145 feet long; the 
3,150 square feet; the 
of loam and manure; the 
of 100 trees; the excavation 
ver an area of 8,800 square 
e benches supplied by the 



Excavation of 7,700 cubic yards of earth and removal 
to dump. The clearing of 29 trees and reconstruction 
of 650 lineal feet cf board fence. 

1850 PRUNSWICK STREET GRADING 

Excavation and removal of one mile to dump of 3,550 
cubic yards of earth and rock material. 

1851 MERRIE WAY ESPLANADE 

Clearing and grubbing of a half -acre tract -- 1,500 
cubic yards of grading to level same, and 350 cubic 
yards rock surfacing topped with a bitumuls wearing 
surface. 






81 



1852 'SHAUGHNESSY BOULEVARD EXTENSION 

Excavation of 20,550 cubic yards of earth and country 
red rock material and placing same in embankment and 
waste adjacent to project. 

1891 SIDEWALK, CURB, AND STREET REPAIR 

The narrowing of sidewalks and street repair on 25 
streets In the City and County of San Francisco. 
(Detail of work involved appears elsewhere in this 
survey) . 

1922 ST. JOSEPH AVENUE GRADING 

Excavation of 4,600 cubic yards of earth and rock, and 
the removal of 3,000 cubic yards of above, a distance 
of 2 miles to dump. 

1923 ' DUNCAN STREET GRADING 

Excavation of 8,000 cubic yards of earth and country 
red rock and the placing of 1,000 cubic yards of red 
rock material for surfacing. 

1924 HARDING PARK CLUB HOUSE 

Increase space and facilities in club house for the use 
of general public; concrete foundation, concrete floors 
frame construction stucco exterior, plaster Interior, 
plumbing, heating, and electric; tile roof, painting 
inside and outside. 






1925 KEZAR STADIUM 

Reconstruction of old wooden seats to concrete framing. 

1926 BAY VIEW PARK 



Improvement of a natural park by the construction of 
6,500 lineal feet of oiled macadam roadway, said macadam 
to act as base for future pavement as traffic conditions 
warrant; 6', 500 lineal feet of natural rock, gxitter and 
1,250 cubic yards rubble masonry wall. Construct water 
supply system, convenience station, and rustic shelter. 
Two Playf ields . The cultivation of approximately 6,500 
trees and the planting of 2,500 addition, and construc- 
tion of paths and clearing of firebreaks , 



1929 BALBOA PARK 



Construction of gutters, paths, seepage pits, culverts, 
storm water inlets, etc., also the excavation of 
planting areas and the loaming and planting of same. 
Most of the rock for glitters is to be quarried on the 
property . 

82 



1932 



FIRE HOUSES - VARIOUS 



Rehabilitation and modernizing of various fire houses , 
pump station #1, and police stations. 

1933 POLICE STATIONS - SOUTHERN AND MISSION 

Rehabilitation of police stations as hecessary to meet 
the requirements of the Police Department. 

1972 DISTRICT AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION GROUNDS 

Removing and stacking top loam for new finish and doing 
all grading of area shown on accompanying drawing to 
finished grades or elevations as noted. Area to be 
parking space, track and recreational and 
field. Handle approximately 170,000 cubic 



used for 
athletic 
yards of 



earth , 



2106 GOLDEN GATE PARE ROAD 



Re-grading and surfacing with a 3" asphalt pavement of 
140,000 square feet of existing 8" oiled macadam road- 
way; the construction of necessary catch basins and 
seepage pits to adequately handle drainage; the trimming 
of edges of pavement; and the trimming and grading of 
pedestrian paths . 

2170 CRISSY FIELD LANDSCAPING 

Continuation of excavation, filling in low areas, con- 
structing new roads, parking areas, garages and play- 
ground; landscaping areas in vicinity of officers' and 
non-commissioned officers' quarters; landscaping and 
fire prevention work around flying field; construction 
of one double tennis court in rear of quarters and one 
double court off east side of barracks. 

2171 MARINE HOSPITAL TENNIS COURTS 

Grading and construction of double tennis courts, includ- 
ing certain planting of shrubbery around same after 
construction, and in area adjacent to same. This Is for 
the use of the personnel living on the reservation. 

2174 CRISSY FIELD PAINTING 

Steel brushing and painting Crissy Field buildings #20, 
21, 22, 24, 27, 30, and 48. Paint yellow and black 
checkerboard on roofs of buildings #25 and 29. Paint 
obstructions and boundary light at Crissy Field. 

2175 AQUATIC PARK 

Construction of 3,250 cubic yards masonry rubble sea 
wall, 1 bath house, 2 boat houses, 2 life saving sta- 
tions; paving 101,000 square feet of promenades 3 ex- 



cavation and fill of 
1,400 lineal feet of 



20,000 cubic yards; relocation of 
railroad track; installation of 



83 



flood light system for night swimming and rowing" and 
approach wharf to school boat house, pile cutter berths, 
and landing floats. 

2176 DRIVES III GOLDEN GATE PARK 

Regrading and resurfacing with a 2" asphalt pavement of 
13 miles of existing 8" oiled macadam roadway of various 
widths containing 2,550,000 square feet. Said existing 
roadway to be scarified to a depth of not less than 4", 
and brought to line and grade where designated, by the 
addition of 17,000 cubic yards of quarry run rock. 
Also the construction of necessary catch basins and 
seepage pits to adequately handle drainage and the re- 
shaping and oiling of 10 miles of pedestrian paths. All 
within the boundary of the Golden Gate Park and Its pan- 
handl e . 

2177 GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE APPROACH - MARIN 



2370 



This project embraces the location and construction of 
a lateral highway, one and one -half miles in length, 
connecting U.S. Highway 101 at Sausalito with the 
bridge-head of the Golden Gate Bridge, with such struc- 
tures as may be required, and include all necessary ex- 
cavation, grading, drainage, surfacing, fencing, and 
lighting. It is proposed to construct a 30 foot shoul- 
dered roadway with bituminous surfacing. The adequate 
lighting of the project has been taken into considera- 
tion, and under the present request the latest type of 
sodium vapor lamps will be used for this purpose. 

ST. MARY'S PLAYGROUND 



Construction of playground and tennis courts and 
convenience stations. 



2459 



CLARENDON AVENUE EXTENSION 



A base course with a compacted thickness of 8" of quarry 
runrock, topped with a 2" asphalt wearing surface, laid 
on a grade previously constructed by the City, with the 
required curb, sidewalk, guard rail, and drainage 
structures . 



2524 MT. DAVIDSON PARK 






Construction of water bound macadam trails, rubble 
masonry and concrete retaining walls °, installation cf 
a water supply system, construction of park benches 
and landscaping and planting approximately 25 acres. 

2752 YERBA BUENA ISLAND - BRIDGE LANDSCAPING 

Landscaping and planting various cut slopes and excava- 
ted areas which have been opened up during the construc- 
tion of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. 



84 



3048 FIVE PARKS PROJECT 

Landscaping and. grading of tennis courts, buildings, 
walks, and paths for Sharp Pari-:, Zoological Gardens, 
Mt. Lake Park, Sunset Heights Park, Lombard Park 

3462 PORT SCOTT CONSTRUCTION 

Construct a basement in Building No. 13 at Port Scott. 

This consists of cutting holes for 6 windows and one 

door, removing 150 cubic yards of dirt and completely 

finishing the interior. 

Construct a log cabin complete 50' x 24' x 13 T . 

Construct p glass porch 40' x 18 ' to the present 

Officers Club building. 

Construct a circular band stand 28' in diameter. 

Construct two sea going targets for artillery fire 

25' x 12' x 19' . 

Tear down four war time Officers Quarters -- remove nails 

salvage lumber, and beautify locality. 

These Items are now under construction. 

3478 CONVENIENCE STATIONS 

Construction of six convenience stations for the use of 
the general public to be located as follows; 
14th Avenue and Fulton Street) 

19th Avenue and South Drive ) -- C-olden Gate Park 
Ashbury and Oak Streets ) 

Gundlach and Visitacion Streets - McLaren "°ark 
Laguna and Clay Streets - Lafayette Square 
Judson Avenue - Balboa Park 

3479 HELEN WILLS PLAYGROUND 

Regradlng and paving tennis courts, and playground area 
and painting recreation center. 

3481 HALL OF JUSTICE AND COUNTY JAIL 

General rehabilitation of building with additional rooms 
on roof. Completion of unfinished work by S.E.R.A. 

3514 ANGEL ISLAND FIRE TRAILS 

Remove approximately one mile of existing old telephone 
line and replace with new poles and wire. Cut fire 
trails under existing telephone line and transmission 
line from Quarantine Station to a point on the North 
East of the Island. Resurface 2,000 lineal feet of 
road from quarters No. 4 to Military Road. 

3515 MARINE HOSPITAL GROUNDS 

Widen the lawn around Building No. 9 to a 20 foot width, 
with a 2 to 1 slope. Excavate for and construct approx- 
imately 360 lineal feet of reinforced concrete retaining 
wall. Spade, loam, fertilize 60,000 square feet of lawn. 

85 






3538 GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE APPROACH - PRESIDIO 

Construction of wood frame and reinforced concrete 
structures, underground electrical power, light, tele- 
phone, sewers and water lines. The above work Is 
obligatory upon the Golden Gate Bridge and highway 
District on account of demolition, removal and recon- 
struction of similar structures interfering with the 
right-of-way of the Marina (South) Approach. 
The Llarina (South) Approach Is a 60 foot highway connect- 
ing the south bridgehead of the Golden Gate Bridge with 
United States Highway 101 at San Francisco,, thereby 
eliminating the water barrier between the southern and 
northern units of United States Highway 101 

3539 LAFAYETTE SQUARE 

Grading and 4" rock base course of 19,000 square feet of 
paths, the reconstruction of 42,000 square feet of 
existing paths, and asphalt paving of 61000 square feet. 
The demolition of a frame house, water tower brick walls, 
etc., the construction of 91 cubic yards of concrete 
steps and wall, regrading existing playfield, a complete 
water system, and the construction of two tennis courts. 

3547 GILMAN PLAYGROUND 

Construction of playground, including approximately 
9,000 cubic yards, grading 5,000 cubic feet of rip rap- 
ping, planting 5,000 trees and shrubs, constructing 
5,000 lineal feet of 6 ! cyclone fence and placing loam 
and manure . 

3548 BERNAL CENTER RECREATION FIELD 

Field work Involved: Excavation an! grading approxi- 
mately 1,492 cubic yards, 'seeding 20,000 square feet, 
building rubble masonry wall 75' x 4 ! x 18", paving 
16,000 square feet. 

3549 JULIUS KAHN PLAYGROUND 

Surface and finish tennis courts, paint convenience 
station inside and outside, erect 700 lineal feet of 
10' wire fence, plant trees and shrubs and seed approxi- 
mately two acres. 

3550 CORONER'S OFFICE 

Rehabilitation of building in completion of E.R.A. proj- 
ect. Painting, pipe covering, plumbing, electric, etc.; 
rearrangement of laboratory. 



86 






3678 BERNAL HEIGHTS BOULEVARD 

Excavate for and lay 1890 lineal feet of sewer with 
catch basins and manholes, 12,890 lineal feet redwood 
curb, 19,050 square feet of 6" concrete pavement. 
Place 714 tons of 2" wearing surface, reslope all cuts 
and place on road bed, redress all sidewalks. 

3679 HARDING BOULEVARD 

Removing of existing oil surface, and replacing with a 
2" asphalt wearing surface for .8 of a mile on a main 
boulevard to the beach; raise 800 lineal feet of 
settled fill gutter and sidewalks, reslope the cuts and 
landscape hillsides. 

3681 CIVIC AUDITORIUM 

Rehabilitation and repairs to buildings, repairing 
and cleaning tile, replacing broken glass, electric, 
plumbing and heating fixtures, painting and concrete 
work. 



3718 






GOLDEN GATE PARK TENNIS COURTS 

Construction of tennis courts in Golden Gate Park and 
at 38th Avenue and Fulton Street 



3719 JAMES ROLPH PLAYGROUND 

Construction of baseball bleachers, installation of 
night lighting; painting and excavation. 

3720 9th AND ORTEGA TENNIS COURTS 

Construction of tennis courts and Field House 

3721 HAYWOOD BOY'S COMFORT STATION 

Construction of a convenience station for the use of 
the general public . 

3803 FORT MILEY DRILL FIELD 

Clear and level an area of lj acres for the enlisted 
personnel of Fort Miley to use as a drill field and 
baseball diamond. This will involve moving 900 cubic 
yards of dirt. Erect a backstop of pipe and woven 
wire. Erect a spectators' grandstand. 

3804 FORT SCOTT PARADE GROUNDS 

Leveling lower half of Fort Scott Parade Grounds; moving 
30 l , 000 cubic yards; plant field with grass. Lower end 
of field will be a ball diamond with backstop and 
grandstand . 

87 



3805 LINCOLN BOULEVARD 



Widen 6,000 linear feet of a portion of Lincoln 31 vd. 
on Port Scott from 10 feet to 22 feet. Also widen the 
road up to 35 feet on three curves to eliminate sharp 
turns and to provide parking spaces. This involves 
furfacing 7,500 square yards with emulsified asphalt, 

3806 PORT SCOTT ROADS 

Widen 15,600 linear feet of existing roads from 10 feet 
to 30 feet; this will involve paving 34,700 square yards 
with emulsified asphalt. Surface 3,200 linear feet of 
existing roads; this will involve paving 10,600 square 
yards with emulsified asphalt. Construct 14,000 linear 
feet of safety fences to be made of 6"x6" redwood posts 
8' on centers with 2"x6 !l railings. 

3838 CROCKER AMAZON PLAYGROUND 

The construction of bleachers, baseball fields, tennis 
and basketball courts, and landscaping. 

3839 OCEAN VIEW PLAYGROUND 

Grading for playground and gymnasium approximately 
6,600 cubic yards; construction of concrete and rubble 
masonry walls, paths, and gutters, construction of a 
gymnasium, planting, seeding and landscaping approxi- 
mately 9 acres, erection of fence, construction of 
tennis courts and installation of water system. 

3932 MARINA SEA WALL 

Construction of 600 lineal feet of rubble masonry wall 
enclosing a yacht basin; the paving of certain drives 
with natural rock asphalt; and the construction of a 
Harbor-master's station, and an underground convenience 
station; all as designated on attached preliminary plans 

4300 CRISSY FIELD RESURFACING AND LANDSCAPING 

Resurface 400,000 square feet of landing runway, con- 
struct a 6' woven wire fence around east and south 
sides, landscape the area adjacent to the Golden Gate 
Bridge Highway Approach. 

4415 PARK MEADOWS 

Development of 40 acres of unused area, cleaning lakes, 
filling in low places, planting grass and trees over 
the entire area, drain the stadium field, repair the 
stadium seats and convenience stations. Part of Golden 
Gate Park. All work on public property. 

88 



4418 DRAINAGE FACILITIES - MARINA APPROACH TO 

GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE 

Construction of drainage facilities along the Marina 
approach, a 60' highway connecting the south bridge 
head of the Golden Gate Bridge with the U.S. Highway 101 
at San Francisco. 

Work involves a high percentage of hand labor for excav- 
ation of trenches, laying of pipe and of rock filling, 
construction of retaining walls and paved gutters as 
required. 

4556 AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION GROUNDS AND CENTER UNIT #2 

Construction of section of Livestock Building known as 
Unit #2 

The work consists of approximately 36,000 cubic yards 
earth and rock excavation and grading! 5,500 cubic yards 
concrete! 450 tons reinforcing steel! 25 tons structural 
steel! 400 MBM lumber 

4811 "L" CAR LINE EXTENSION 

Extension of "L !l car line from Taraval Street to Wawona 
Street to serve Fleishhacker Playground. 

5197 GRANDSTANDS AND DECORATIONS 

Erection and salvaging of grandstands, decorating of 
Market Street and Civic Center In celebration of the 
San Francisco Bay Bridge. All grandstands are to be 
of frame construction! no unit cost to exceed $40,000. 

5422 LETTERMAN GENERAL HOSPITAL 

Painting the interior of 14 buildings and the exterior 
of 8 buildings. Replacement of 10,350 lineal feet 
heating and hot water pipe including tanks, valves, 
fittings, pipe covering, and hangers In the heating and 
hot water distribution systems. Construct new hardwood 
floors in 12 buildings, and install underground electric 
distributing lines to replace 8,000 lineal feet ol 
overhead lines. Landscape 8 acres. 

5423 FORT SCOTT LANDSCAPING 

Landscaping and removing fire hazards on 403 acre mili- 
tary reserve adjacent to Fort Scott, San Francisco. 
Tree trimming and clearing under brush, constructing 
fire breaks, removing fallen logs and debris, thereby 
removing a serious fire hazard. And planting Ice plant 
to stop wind erosion of sand dunes. 

5480 PARK AND BEACH IMPROVEMENTS 

Golden Gate Park and Ocean Beach. Spading and re-seed- 
ing unsightly areas, planting shrubs, trimming trees, 
removing snags and stumps, repairing and widening paths, 



removing and burning weeds and brush chiefly in West 
Meadows, Golden Gate Park. Also erecting wind breaks , 
planting marsh grass and removing wind blown sand dunes 
on a two mile front near the beach, and the establish- 
ment of a central blacksmith shop for adequately caring 
for tools. 

5640 LYON STREET APPROACH TO GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE 

Construction of ramps, filling and paving same. Excava- 
tion for and construction of superstructure, laying 
sewer. Furnish and drive piles. All necessary carpentry 
electrical work, cement finishing, painting, etc. Recon- 
struct tennis courts. Remove and box trees and shrubs. 
Grade and construct new entrance and roadways to ware- 
houses. Take up and relay railroad siding. Demolition 
of Ward "T" #25, and the rehabilitation of various 
buildings, remove to new locations on account of inter- 
ference with the right of way. 

5641 GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE LIGHTING 

This project embraces the completion of a lateral high- 
way, one and one half miles in length, connecting 
U.S. Highway 101 at Sausalito with the bridge head of 
the Golden Gate Bridge. Building and surfacing of a 
road with asphaltic concrete, oiling of road shoulders, 
lighting both sides of highway with sodium, vapor lamps, 
erecting and painting of guard rail, la3ring drainage 
pipe, and the building of wood and concrete structures. 

5821 SUTRO FOREST FUEL SUPPLY 

Cutting and sacking wood for the purpose of supplying 
indigent families with stove wood. 

5839 LANDSCAPING PUBLIC PARKS* 

Excavation and grading, and laykold paving of playground 
area, for Chinese children on 37th Avenue. Excavating 
grading and planting of vacant lot; on 36th Avenue- 
Install sprinkling system and erect lath fence. 
Unit #4 

Unit #5, Sutro Heights Park 
Unit #6, Merced Manor 

Unit #7, Kezar Stadium Parking Area. Improve, by paving, 
driveway entrances to Kezar Stadium Parking Area - also 
laying of concrete sidewalks to provide pedestrian ways 
around Recreational area in vicinity of kezar Stadium 
Unit #8, Police Station Parking Area. Improve by paving, 
area rear of Police Station; install necessary drainage, 
landscape area, replant trees and shrubs. 
Unit #9, Equitation Field. Cover field area with 6" 
layer of sand. Enclose entire field with redwood fence. 
Paint fence, construct hitching racks and hurdles. 
-x-Beautif ication and landscaping of all public parks in 
San Francisco County for v/hich projects have not been 
specifically approved. All work to be done on public 
property. 

90 






6146 CABINET SHOP 

Furniture production and repair - To provide for needy 
handy men, cabinet makers, painters and machinists in 
the production and repair of furniture for relief 
clients. Finished articles to be distributed through 
Surplus Commodities Division, and recipients for goods 
to be certified through S.E.R.A. Social Service Division. 
Also to manufacture kindergarten and playground equip- 
ment for the Recreation Commission, making various 
articles that otherwise could not be furnished to kinder- 
gartens and playgrounds. 

6250 GALILEO HIGH SCHOOL UNDERPASS 

All necessary work involved In the construction of a 
reinforced concrete tunnel connecting Galileo High 
School with the Athletic Field. Work consists of exca- 
vation, reinforced concrete including forms, asphaltic 
concrete pavement and paving brick, tile, brick work 
and plastering, ornamental iron and electrical instal- 
lation, painting, roofing and necessary drainage and 
plumbing Installation. Also the removal of a portion 
of the present 20" sewer and installation of new 20" 
cast iron sewer. 

6402 BUILDING REPAIR 

Renovating and making minor repairs of county and munic- 
ipally-owned buildings not otherwise approved 

6445 GLEN PARK RECREATION CENTER 

Construction of playground, club house, and recreation 
center. 

6483 GENEVA AVENUE IMPROVEMENT 

Excavation and fill for roadway sub-base, sewer construc- 
tion, (combination storm water and sanitary,) Including 
catch basins, man holes, culverts and appurtenances, 
concrete curb with curb bar, removal of abandoned street 
car traces Including rails, ties, poles and back filling, 
street lighting system including conduits, boxes, stan- 
dards, fixtures, etc; and moving water mains, fire 
hydrants, etc.j and replacing all publicly owned util- 
ities . 

6545 SAN FRANCISCO AIRPORT (Formerly Project 1727) 

Construction of additions and Improvemeiv'- s to San I'ran- 
cisco Airport, including pavement and drainage," lighting; 
water supply | construction of water, gas, electric, 
telephone and sewer services to buildings % completion 
of present main sewer and sewage pumphousej construction 



91 



6683 



of walks, curbs, pavements , st 
utilities around new buildings 
work; construction of drainage 
dredging for construction of s 
construction of earth and rock 
structures thereon including s 
seawalls, etc. ; construction o 
land reclamation for seaplane 
work for seaplane port. 

SAN FRANCISCO AIRPORT 



reet lighting and other 
and other miscellaneous 
control structures; 
eaplane harbor and levees; 

levees and miscellaneous 
eaplane ramp., wharves, 
f earth and rock fills for 
port, and miscellaneous 



6771 



Construction of drainage virorks; grading; roads and ap- 
purtenances; levees and seawalls; filling and land rec- 
lamation; and miscellaneous work; all being a portion 



of the work 
to combined 
Airport. 



required to provide necessary improvements 
land and seaplane ports at San Francisco 



PARK PRESIDIO BY- PASS 



Excavation and fill, construction of sub-base and sur- 
facing roadway. Construct red rock paths and planting 
center strip. Construction of reinforced concrete 
retaining wall and concrete curb. Install irrigation 
system and drainage system. Planting and seeding. 
Installation of lighting system. 

6819 PLAYGROUND IMPROVEMENTS 

To employ persons on relief rolls for the renovation 
and minor improvements of playground equipment and 
buildings, San Francisco County. In addition to proj- 
ects specifically approved. No janitor work done under 
this project. 

6861 GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE FIESTA 

Erection and salvaging of grandstands, lighting, decora- 
ting of Market Street, Van Ness Avenue, Bay Street, 
Cervantes Boulevard and Marina Boulevard, In celebration 
of the completion of the Golden Gate Bridge. 

7350 GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE - ROADS (Formerly Project 7057) 

Construction of three fire control stations at Fort 
MIley and one at Tennessee Point I* Fort Barry) . The 
above work is obligatory upon the Golden Gate Bridge 
and Highway District on account of demolition, removal 
and reconstruction of similar structures interfering 
with the right of way of the Marina (South and Marin) 
North approaches to the Bridge. 

7354 ANGEL ISLAND - BUILDING REPAIRS (Formerly Project 6892) 

Remove present sanitary and water lines and replace with 
new material. Replace plumbing fixtures, install hollow 



92 



tile walls, partitions, tiling, electrical wiring and 
fixtures, ornamental iron, and necessary carpentry, 
concrete, lath, and plaster work. Remove old window 
frames and doors and replace with new. 

7356 OFFICERS' QUARTERS - PRESIDIO (Formerly Project 7116) 

Complete renovation of ten sets of officers 5 quarters; 
Interior and exterior painting, new flooring, plumbing 
and electrical work, and general carpentry repairs. 

7358 PRESIDIO LANDSCAPING (Formerly Project 7117) 

Construct 900 lineal feet rubble masonry wall excavation 
and back fill. Remove surplus trees and underbrush from 
reservoir area. Plant and seed lawns, plant Ice plant 
on slopes. 

7360 30LDEM GATE BRIDGE FIRE CONTROL STATION (Formerly 7055) 



rading and paving roads, construe- 
and retaining walls and street 



Excavation and fill, 
tion of drainage curbs 
lighting incidental thereto; also electrical power, 
light, telephone, sewer, storm drains and water lines. 
Special drainage and landscaping of right of way along 
the Marina (South) Approach and Toll Area. Not a part 
of Federal Aid Highway System; exclusive of any other 
projects approved. The above work is obligatory upon 
the Golden Gate Bridge and Highway District on account 
of demolition, removal and reconstruction of similar 
roads and structures interfering with the right of way 
of the Marina (South) Approach to the bridge. 



7480 



n in 



AND "H" BARRACKS - RENOVATION 



ilTTll 



II", Interior and exterior 



Renovate barracks "G" and 

painting. Electrical and plumbing additions, tiling, 

plaster patching, carpentry and millwork and cleansing 

barracks. 



7483 



FT., SCOTT LANDSCAPING 



Landscaping that portion of military reservation sur- 
rounded by Lincoln Boulevard and Storey Avenue, and 
containing approximately 26.4 acres. Work consists of 
excavation, borrow and fill, covering portions with top 
soil, planting grass, trees and shrubbery, sodding, 
sloping and terracing banks, all without changing the 
natural contour of the area. 

7508 EXPOSITION HORTICULTURE 

Improve the San Francisco Airport and Exposition site in 
the City of San Francisco on property owned by the City 
and County of San Francisco, by landscaping and perform- 
ing horticultural work. Project also Includes the trans- 



II 



93 



planting and hauling of trees and shrubs, donated to or 
purchased by sponsor from public and privately owned 
, property in San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara. 

Santa Cruz, Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Sonoma and 
Napa Counties. Proper permission will be obtained 
before trees and shrubs are procured. In addition to 
projects specifically approved; various locations as 
indicated., 

7553 GALILEO HIGH SCHOOL UNDERPASS 

Complete the construction of a reinforced concrete tun- 
nel connecting Galileo High School with the athletic 
field. 

7651 DISTRICT AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION GROUNDS 

Construct reinforced concrete footings, retaining wall, 
and ramps of Livestock Building as shown previously. 
Excavation and backfill and drainage installation. 

7668 GLEN PARK RECREATION CENTER 

To complete work begun previously (see Project 6445) 

7695 PORT McDOWELL LANDSCAPING 

Build rubble masonry walls, install irrigation system, 
excavation, weeding, seeding, and trimming slopes, 
transplanting seedlings. 

7698 ANGEL ISLAND WATER TANKS 

Construction of two 500,000 gallon square reservoir 
concrete slab bottom and sides with corrugated iron 
roofs, also 1,000 feet of 6" galvanized iron pipe to 
connect with existing water distribution lines. All 
necessary excavation, backfill and drainage installation, 

7780 PRESIDIO LANDSCAPING 

Construct rubble masonry wall, excavate backfill, remove 
surplus trees and underbrush, plant and seed lawns < 
plant shrubs and plants, repair eroded banks and per- 
form appurtenant work for erosion control. Federally 
owned property. 

8036 BUILDING 21 - FORT McDOWELL 



Excavate below first floor of Building #21, underpin 
walls and piers of Building #21, and carry to solid 
bearing. Install complete drying room with lines, fans 
and louvres. Provide adequate room for ten- chair barber 
shop installation. Cut exterior doors, build stairs, 
walks and hand rails to provide access to laundry trays, 
showers and drying rooms from first and second floors 
of Barracks Building #21. 






. 



8204 PORT MASON RAILROAD TRACKS 

Take up and relay approximately 800 lineal feet of rail- 
road track serving Port Mason, including new ties and 
ballast . 



8205 



FORT MASON LANDSCAPING 



Landscaping of 40 acres in Port Mason, San Francisco, 
San Francisco County. Planting trees and shrubs, seed- 
ing lawns. This project is a continuation of work 
begun under Federal Parks Project. 

8220 DISTRICT AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION PARKING AREA 

Excavation and fill for parking area, athletic field, 
and adjacent boulevard at Livestock exposition grounds, 
Spreading loam over entire area, and landscaping. 
Sponsor Is organized under State laws and Is a State 
institution. 



8248 



CHILDREN'S AREA - GOLDEN GATE PARK 



8264 



Install sewerage system including excavation and back- 
fill, sheet piling, pipe laying and manholes. Replace 
paths and roads removed due to trenching. 

APPROACH 



Construct ramps and fill and pave same for the purpose 
of providing a main truck route to connect the city 
with the areas to the north of the Golden Gate. Also 
Includes excavation for superstructure, driving piles, 
necessary carpentry and electrical work, cement finish 
ing, painting and laying of sewers together with other 
incidental work such as reconstructing tennis courts, 
removing and boxing trees, and shrubs, 
constructing entrances and roadways to 
Removing and relaying railroad siding, 
rehabilitating various buildings , etc. 



grading and 
warehouses . 
demolishing and 
All necessitated 



by this road construction, 
Aid Highway System. 



Net any part of the Federal 



8389 FORT SCOTT BARRACKS SUPPLY ROOM 

Excavation for basement under barracks buildings Nos. 
11 and 12, make apertures in concrete walls and install 
doors and windows. Install reinforced concrete floor. 






8399 SAN FRANCISCO WELFARE BUILDING 

Office Building for the Department of Public Welfare of 
the City and County of San Francisco. Construct two- 
story and basement reinforced concrete and frame build- 
ing complete. Build pool concrete walks, and landscape 
Court Area. Construct parking space. Excavation and 
backfill. Wreck present building. 

95 



8456 OFFICERS' QUARTERS - PRESIDIO 

Renovate officers' quarters in the Presidio of San 
Francisco, by painting interior and exterior, reflooring 
repairing and improving plumbing and electrical work, 
making general carpentry repairs, and performing appurt- 
enant work. This project will operate in the City of 
San Francisco, San Francisco County. Federally owned 
property. 

8465 WEST PORTAL LIBRARY 

Construct reinforced concrete library building; 
includes landscaping and work Incidental thereto . 
City and County owned property. 






96 



FUNCTIONS OF 



E SAFETY DEPA 







SAFETY DEPARTMENT 



The function of the Safety and First Aid department 
is to supervise and direct all activities relating to Safety 
or First Aid to that extent which will enable the projects to 
operate with a minimum of hazard. 

Large or extremely dangerous projects are given 
special supervision by qualified Safety Engineers. On other 
projects, the general supervisory force is fully instructed in 
Safety measures and the projects periodically inspected by mem- 
bers of the Area Safety Department. 

Safety manuals are issued, showing in detail the prop- 
er precautions for every type of work, with specific instruction 
to fit every kind of project. These manuals are distributed to 
the supervisors of the various projects, for their guidance. 

Trucks and all mechanical equipment used on projects 
are inspected regularly. Buildings occupied by W.P.A. projects 
are inspected for fire, sanitarian and other safety measures 
before occupancy, and monthly, thereafter. 

Workers are not assigned to specially dangerous jobs 
such as powdermen, electric saw operators* etc., until they have 
passed an examination by the Safety Department and been certi- 
fied as competent. 

The W.P.A. safety work is based or? the simplest rules 
of safety -- on inspection, on education of workers and foremen 

97 



and; above all, on ordinary carefulness. 

The required safety appliances such as goggles, safety 
belts and lines, dust respirators, and safe by helmets are sup- 
plied when needed. 

On all work projects there is assigned one or mere 
persons (depending on size and nature of project) to administer 
First Aid in addition to their regular functions. These persons 
have all been instructed by, and hold First Aid certificates of, 
the American Red Cross. 

All injuries, sustained by workers in the line of duty 
on the projects, are reported to the First Aid attendants who 
give emergency treatment . Major Injuries are referred to the 
Marine Hospital for medical or surgical care. First Aid Kits 
containing suitable supplies are furnished each first aid attend- 
ant . 

Flagmen are stationed on all projects located In the 
vicinity of traffic; warning signs, flags, and flares are dis- 
played to warn approaching vehicles. Everything possible is 
being done to conduct projects in a safe manner for the protec- 
tion of the workers as well as the general public. 

Considering the vast number of workers employed on 
W.P.A. projects, and the large percentage who are doing work 
with which they were wholly unfamiliar, the record of industrial 
accidents on W.P.A. is extremely low. Even in the most danger- 
our kinds of work, the rate is less than half of that predicted 
by industrial accident insurance experts; it Is the operation 
of a well organized Safety program that; has made this record 
possible. 

98 



In the San Francisco Area> approximately 1-J million 
man hours are worked per month. The average number of dis- 
abling or lost time accidents is 25 per month. Our cumulative 
frequency rate since the inception of W.P.A. is 19.4, which is 
comparable with the national rate and with other areas in Calif- 
ornia, Our cumulative "medical only" frequency of 31.1 Is far 
oelow the national rate and approximately one-half the rate of 
the combined areas in California. 






99 




OMEN'S, PRO 

AND 




A 



CHNICAL PROJECTS 



WOMEN'S, PROFESSIONAL and TECHNICAL PROJECTS 

In any discussion of the Works Progress Administration 
Program, one important fact must be noted. The circumstances 
which precipitated the economic conditions leading to wide- 
spread unemployment and consequent suffering also and with a 
kind of ironic justice, provided reasons for developing the 
works Program. For example; unemployment which lowered the 
standard of living, brought in its wake malnutrition and 
disease overtaxing the facilities of hospitals and clinics; 
business establishments, forced to meet unusual conditions of 
competition to prevent bankruptcy, often did so at the expense 
of sanitary and working conditions. The flood of complaints 
reaching the health department could not be handled, thus be- 
coming the basis for a Works Progress Administration Project. 
Unemployment and shortened work weeks for thousands provided 
a new leisure to many in whose hands it might have become an 
instrument for unsocial activities. The need for organized 
recreation facilities Was vital. Privately endowed museums 
whose program depended upon continued contributions found their 
funds cut off and much valuable scientific and research work 
curtailed. It seems evident, therefore, that at a point when 
community facilities needed to be expanded, government and 
private revenues were falling. It was in such a crisis that 
the Works Program was launched. 

The possibilities for projects were made evident on 
every hand, and in a short time, as the Program grew, these 



projects were found to fall Into several general catagorles. 

SERVICE PROJECTS which Include hospital works, clinic 
work> and the housekeeping aide projects. 

PRODUCTION PROJECTS entailing uhe setting up of large 
sewing, and shoe repairing establishments to provide garments 
and repair work for the needy. And under this head may be men- 
tioned the surplus commodity system which was a mechanism set 
up for distributing the products of these projects. 

SURVEY AND INVESTIGATION PROJECTS, employing large 
numbers of needy "white collar" people as investigators, 
stenographers, and typists who undertook all forms of re- 
search surveys whose efforts have gone a long way towards 
assisting in public planning. 

An education program filling a long felt community 
need whose possibilities were in the past hardly realized be- 
cause of lacK of funds by State and City Boards of Education. 

Library and museum projects continuing work already 
begun and undertaking new work long neglected because of lack 
of funds. 

The Recreation project, which will be more fully dis- 
cussed in subsequent pages. 

In no case was the work performed of a type which 
would displace anyone already in private employment or for 
which private funds were available. There have been hundreds 
of projects since October, 1935, the beginning of the Works 
Progress Administration program, for which lack of ppace pre- 
vents an adequate description. All, hov/ever, fit into the 
general classifications above mentioned. Some will be oointed 



■ 



out as examples of representative work which the projects car- 
ried out. 
EDUCATION 

The education program was designed to provide coordin- 
ated and supervised educational activity for under-privileged 
adults and others in the fields of general adult., literary, 
vocational, parental, and workers' education. The present proj- 
ect, employing over 200 people, is filling a community need in 
the vital field of education. 

A typical Progress Report, covering one payroll period, 
shows how the community has taken to the program and the manner 
in which the need is being filled. The report quoted is for 
December 15 to December 30, 1936, when there were 230 people on 
active assignment. At that time, 1000 classes in adult educa- 
tion were held, covered by 3500 teaching hoiirs and 40,000 stud- 
ent hours. 22% of the classes were held in Americanization, 
21% in vocational subjects, 1% in parental and counseling sub- 
jects, and 44% in general adult subjects. The program also 
provides trained counseling advice for the San Francisco Nation- 
al Youth Administration District and includes the compilation 
of case histories and field research on the youths. In this 
period, 276 youths were so counseled. 

When it is considered that this work has been proceed- 
ing at the same rate since the inception of the Works Progress 
Administration Program - over two years - the significance of 
the work accomplished can be clearly realized. 

A less publicized phase of the work, but one which is 
of considerable interest, is the preparation and correction of 



102 



ED T JCA r iIOI- 



Unable to afford commercial or college courses, boys en- 
rolled in the CCC have 3nthusiasticelly responded to the 
Corr? socndence Extension Service Division of the Emer- 
gency Education program. Ten peoole are keot busy with 
the incoming r.n<3 out-going mail which is seen piled on 
the shelves. 



Americanization classes hasten assimilation into the new 
world. This phase of the Adult-Education program is ex- 
tremely well attended. 



103 




WORK 




REDWOODS 



The finished cases containing the exhibits which show the 
life of the redwoods and illustrate the measures for their 
care. The visitor, almost without realizing it becomes a 
oart of the forces of conservation. 



A typical exhibit of the State Parks Redwoods project 
which artistically traces the history of the tree through 
the ages in relation to its ancestors and the cont:nporary 
flora and fauna. 



105 



clear away tables and to perform small duties which help to 
build the basis for future sound habits. 

The program being an innovation in San Francisco, 
the facilities to house it had to be created. School build- 
ings and community centers which are used for other purposes 
during other parts of the day have been converted into nursery 
school centers. Carpenters have prepared tiny lockers from 
old packing cases and orange boxes and have made the other 
necessary equipment scaled down to the needs and sizes of these 
new students. 

Another project which can be considered as a part of 
the educational program, although there are no classes or 
teachers, is the State Parks Redwoods project. This is 
sponsored by the State Division of Parks, and is considered 
an outstanding achievement. Artists and technicians recruited 
from the relief rolls have been trained to do the necessary 
technical work. The purpose of the project is to prepare 
graphic and pictorial materials to interpret the redwoods; it 
is the first attempt of its kind in the administration of a 
public parks system. Its object is public education with a 
view to enlisting every park user in the interest of conser- 
vation. The public response has repaid the effort and ex- 
pense a hundred-fold. 

From February 3, 1936 to October g, 1937, 959 maps, 
25 oil works, 12 color studies, *K)2 artistic redwcod signs 
were made, 118>g photographs were taken, 720 lantern slides 
and 27 display cases were made, all of which were placed on 
public exhibition. 



___ 



DENTAL SURVEY 



An exhibit of the Dental Survey at the W.p.A. 
Exhibition of accomplishment. This graphic display 
attracted a great deal of interest and favorable comment 

on the health program. 



Eighty percent of the sixty- thousand school children ex- 
amined were found to require dental care. The parents of 
these children were informed and steps were taken by the 
Dental Association to work out a plan to interest ioarents 
in treating- their children's teeth. 



107 



SERVICE 

All health projects are of this type and may be sub- 
divided into other classes under this head. 

The health of a community is a fight against disease 
demanding continuous vigilance. It is never won, the enemy 
only subdued and not entirely vanquished. Relaxation of vigi- 
lance may set off an epidemic which might undo in one sweep 
the work built up over years. The Works Progress Administra- 
tion has played an effective part in this fight and its work 
is well recognized. It has helped immeasurably to maintain 
health standards in the community. 
1 . HEALTH CONTROL PROJECTS 

THE SANITARY INSPECTION PROJECT consisting of the 
Bureau of Industrial Hygiene surveyed in five months, 3 5 000 
plants making in the process over 9,000 inspections. They 
uncovered 523 hazards which lead to disease such as rat in- 
fested cellars, inadequate toilet facilities and insect in- 
festation. All of these violators are officially notified 
of the findings and warned to remedy them. 

THE BUREAU OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES has been assisted 
in its study of children to determine the relationship between 
living conditions and Chicken Pox, Mumps and Whooping Cough, 
and Infantile Paralysis. This work, not only of collecting 
the data, but in distributing it widely among the hospitals and 
the profession, is the ground work laid for stopping epidemics. 

THE TUBERCULOSIS SURVEY collects valuable data, and 
is thus instrumental in saving many lives. The data covers per- 
sons v/ho were reported to the San Francisco Department of Public 

108 



NURSERY SCHOOLS 



The management of the Nursery Schools follows the most 
up-to-date oractices. High standard of sanitrtion in 
surrounding's and in the preparation of food is rigidly 
maintained by T ''.p.A. personnel, Pre-school training pro- 
viding the patterns for future sound habits is giver.. 



A cosmopolitan atmosphere prevails in the Nursery Schools 
Children are accepted without restriction from the great 
diversity of races and nationalities which make uo San 
Francisco's population. These four children represent as 
many nationalities; one is Chinese, one is Spanish, one 
Negro end one Italian. 



109 



Health between the years 193^ and 1936 as having tuberculosis. 
Its value arises from the fact that it covers precisely that 
portion of the population for which a tuberculosis control 
project should be mainteined. 

Another health program is that performed by the 
Children's Agency concerned with children who ere the wards 
of the Juvenile Court. There is a complete health program 
for them utilizing the services of dentists, doctors and 
nurses. This Agency investigates the home conditions of 
families who apply for the role of foster parents. In one 
year, k&12. homes were visited and inspected. As part of the 
social service, garments were made for 5$6 boys and 593 girls 
by seamstresses assigned to the project, using 6,2>90 yards of 
material. 

The school health authorities and the dental profes- 
sion have never had any substantially integrated information 
©n the condition of the teeth of school children. The Dental 
Survey project, after probing sixty-thousand mouths found that 
&0% needed care. Satisfying is the fact that the Dental As- 
sociation has sufficient faith in the findings to publish them 
and to utilize this work as a basis for a program of preventive 
dentistry designed to interest parents. 
II. VISITING HOUSEKEEPERS 

The visiting housekeepers have served the people hard- 
est hit by poverty. They have gone into the homes of over 
1,300 families where invalidism and sickness prevail. After a 
period of training in maid service and food preparation, home 
care and hygiene, over 8,500 visits were made. 



110 



CHILD WELFARE 



W.P.A. nurses, taken from the relief rolls, assist the Wel- 
fare Centers, Clinics and Day Nurseries. Mal-nourished 
children, many of whom were carrying contagious diseases, 
were £iven much needed care. 



HOUSEKEEPING AIDE 



An elderly couole, both cripoled, are assisted by a visit- 
ing housekeeper who does the heavy work. These housekeepers 
are fully trained in household management. 



Ill 



In cases where the client requires some special 
nutritive item in the diet for v/hich the relief allowance 
could not be stretched, the recommendation is made that a 
proportionate increase be made to take care of the item. 

The people who enter and work in the homes come in 
contact directly with all the problems of human conduct. 
Workers are therefore trained to meet with understanding such 
problems. An indication of the nature of the training may be 
noted in the following few items of instructions culled from 
a long list: 

1. Remember that at all times you are subject 
to the. families' wishes and instructions. 

2. Try to be cheerful and adapt yourself to the 
surroundings. 

3. Do not discuss your own or the client's affairs. 
U-+ Do not indulge in neighborhood gossip. 

5. Bathe small children. 

6. See that places where food is kept are clean. 

7. Provide your own lunch - the family may have 
only enough for its own needs. 

These instructions serve to show the nature of the 
service rendered. 
III. PRODUCTION 

From the point of view of numbers, the backbone of the 
non-construction projects is the production grouo consisting of 
the sewing project and the shoe repair project. The latter is 
relatively negligible. Out of about 4-,500 people on active as- 
signment, about 3 , 100 are on the sewing project and 30 are on 
the shoe repair project. At least 150 workers who have gained 
proficiency on the sewing machines have found positions in pr? - 

t 

112 



% 












vate industry. This fact alone does not sufficiently indicate 
the skill of the WPA workers since the opportunities for pri- 
vate employment in the garment trades in San Francisco are 
extremely limited. The sewing project is, of course, in no 
sence competing with private industry, for the articles pre- 
pared are for people who are on direct relief and who would 
not otherwise find it possible to buy the clothes that the 
sewing project contributes. 

From October 16, 1935 to January 15, 193&, there was 

produced 1,273,016 garments. A typical list of some of the 

articles made, follows: 

Infants 'booties Boy's snorts 

Diapers Boys' & Men's Underwear 

Men's & Women's pajamas Girls' & Ladies' slips 

Smocks Aprons 

Bloomers Sheets & Pillow Cases 

Ladies' & Girls' dresses Men's work shirts 

Boys' & Men's dress shirts Blankets 

Melton Coats Pants 

Uniforms Bathrobes 

The mechanism for distributing these garments is the 
Surplus Commodity Project which is a clearing house for the 
distribution of food and clothing to WPA and County relief and 
various public non-profit agencies. Some statistics are of 
interest here. In the three months of January, February and 
March, I936, 37,198 people benefited from the following distri- 
bution of food. 

1^3, ^ik Lbs of beef 

8,422 Cans of milk 

26,025 Lbs of beans 

40 1 +,0g9 Lbs of vegetables 

12,179 Lbs of butter. 



113 



SEWING 




A corner of the Sev.'ing Project's display at the W. p. A. 
Exhibit. A few of the different articles such as infant 
bootees, shirts, slips, shorts, towels, and tablecloths 
can be seen on display. 



114 



SHOE REPAIR 




D hoes that one cannot believe repairable are restored for 
San Francisco's needy. The service is on a while-you-v/ait 
basis . 



Ill 



The clothes are not handled on a hand-out system but 
are displayed as far as possible like a commercial store show- 
ing a collection of diversified styles and sizes. Clothing 
needs are ascertained by case workers who issue the orders 
for Surplus Commodities to fill. About 9$ of the workers on 
WPA whose security wage falls below the subsistence wage 
which has been established for a family of their size on re- 
lief are permitted to participate in these commodities. 

The Shoe Repair Project repairs the shoes of relief 
clients and of persons in the °>% on WPA already referred to. 
The project employs experienced shoe workers who have been 
thrown out of their occupation because of the general un- 
employment conditions affecting this business as it did many 
others. Many of them have owned their own small shoos, and 
are fully qualified to perform the work they are doing. 
LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 

The work of projects under this head is an outgrowth 
of activities being performed by public and private institutions 
serving the public whose work was curtailed through lack of 
funds . 

Libraries have been forced to neglect valuable pamph- 
lets and periodicals and articles which have remained unavail- 
able to the public because they were unbound. Damaged volumes 
were not restored to the shelves because they were not being 
rebound. Salvage work was not prosecuted and the volumes 
accumulated. 

This, plus indexing and cataloguing describes sub- 
stantially the work performed by the library projects. 

116 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 



LIBRARY 



These valuable scientific documents and periodicals were 
permitted to accumulate for seven years in the basement 
in this haphazard fashion. A W.P.A. project stepping in, 
soon had these all organized and indexed for quick ref- 
erence . 



AFRICAN KALL 



^his is the largest exhibit of twenty- three in African Hall, 
& olden Gate Park, San Francisco. An exact reproduction of 
an African v/ater hole scene down to infinitesimal details, 
work on this now famous exhibit was stopped because private 
endowments upon which the Museum depends were decreased dur- 
ing these past years. W.p.A. artists were trained for this 
unusual work by the Museum. 



117 



Between March and September, 1937? "the project estab- 
lished for the California Academy of Science Library, bound 
2,191 volumes in addition to large amounts of work on filing 
and index cards. In the San Francisco Public Library from 
October 1936, to September, 1937j 95> 2 95 catalogue cards were 
prepared and 7>730 sheets of music were repaired. 

A representative museum project is the African Hall 
of the California Academy of Sciences. The interest the public 
displays in the museums may be gauged from an available atten- 
dance comparison. In the 193^-35 year, over 1,000,000 people 
passed through its doors, while during the same period, the 
Chicago museum, located at the entrance of the Century of 
Progress in that city, drawing people from all over the world, 
had only 3,000,000 visitors. The project helped the under- 
manned staff to create remarkable realistic exhibitions of 
animals in their native African haunts. This exhibition in a 
short space of time has achieved considerable fame. Addition- 
al work is performed behind the scenes in laboratory and re- 
search assistance in Paleontological work and in bookbinding 
and classifying valuable scientific documents. 
RECREATION 

Changing economic circumstances which threw people 
out of work and curtailed business oroduction, shortening hours, 
provided many people v/ith something new in their lives - namely; 
leisure. Enforced leisure though it was, it still was a 
problem and a challenge to the community. Organized recrea- 
tional facilities maintained by the City and by local community 
centers, found themselves taxed beyond their capacity. 

118 



RECREATION 



A game of night baseball. Darkness does not stop 
the work of the Recreation Project. Supervised recrea- 
tional activity is provided for those vhose leisure time 
occurs only in the evenings. 



Marionettes are om= of the most popular features. Large, 
interested groups of participants work along every phase 
from construction of the puppets to modeling heads 
and costuming them until they finally come to life on 
the stage. 



119 



RECREATION 



Free instruction in boxing is furnished through the city. 
The art cf self-defense is highly popular. 



These boys are just about to participate in the annual 
Kite-flying contest. 



120 






The WPA Recreation program was designed to augment 
existing facilities for recreation in the city. Every phase 
of a recreation program was set up for adults, children and 
adolescents. 

On January 15, 193& > ^ ne Recreation Project supplied 
WPA leadership and assistants to 69 centers employing 27$ 
people on active assignment. A "breakdown of these figures 
gives a more complete picture of the activities of the pro- 
ject: 

Centers Served 



Recreational Centers 


3 


Playgrounds 


3g 


Gymnasiums 


S 


Tennis Courts, etc. 


g 


Sv/imming Pools 


2 


Other Buildings 


10 


Total 


69 



The activities show a wide range running through phys- 
ical recreation, arts, crafts, and hobbies, drama and rhyth- 
mics, social recreation, music, special and seasonal events. 
From "December Jl to January 15, 2,329 classes were held in 
which 35)950 children and 21,8515 adults participated;witness- 
ed by 17,3^^ spectators. 

Aside from the community values derived from this 
program, WPA workers are themselves receiving invaluable train- 
ing in all phases of the work so that they are benefitting on 
an equal basis with other participants. 

Somewhat off the beaten path of this prpJeCVas - a" 
survey, conducted by attorneys charged.o the recreation pro- 
ject, of the City's ordinances relatig to children. This 
survey was made for the RecreatiorCommission with a view to 
the preparation of new ordinances-Jimed toward furthering 

121 



the welfare of children. 
CULTURAL 

The cultural aspects of the program have been over- 
shadowed by the prominence which the Federal projects have 
attained in the fields of art, music, and drama. However, 
the California Art Research, a project locally established in 
the field of art, has performed an outstanding piece of work 
and achieved a widespread fame. This project was written to 
investigate the economic condition under which art and artists 
flourish in San Francisco together with the preparation of 
biographical data about the artists and the development of 
art collections. San Francisco has a rich cultural background 
and the npmes of the artists studied are among the most prom- 
inent in the nation. The project prepared 20 volumes each 
consisting of monographs on from two to four artists. Two 
thousand, one-hundred and twenty-nine (2,129) copies were 
printed and distributed to California Public Libraries and 
private and semi-private institutions interested in California 
Art. The files are full of the correspondence which these 
volumes elicited from these institutions. These in nearly 
every case asked for additional copies. Recommendations to 
institutions all over the country which might Want these vol- 
umes were also made and orders were filled as received. 

Another oroject of an historical nature is one orig- 
inally set up as a Federal project and conducted on a nation- 
al scale. The Historical Building Survey Project, as it is 
now named, is making permanent records of buildings Dossess- 
ing historical interest in California and which may soon dis- 
appear from the American scene due to old age or because 



* 






they imoede the progress of some modern development. 

THE AMERICAN MERCHANT MARINE HISTORICAL SURVEY is 
also of this type. The day of the sailing vessel being oast, 
the romantic old ships art- fast disappearing from America's 
v/aters. The project, by preparing plans and designs and en- 
gaging in research in connection with these old ships will 
preoare a lasting record of their design and history. Care- 
fully worked draftsman's plans in final form will be filed in 
the collection in the Smithsonian Institute, in Washington, 
D. C, thus preserving another oortion of the vanishing and 
colorful background of American life. 
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION PROJECTS 

x he projects which have been devoted to work direct- 
ly within the City's and State's administrative departments 
are many and varied in character. 

The majority of these orojects were of a general 
clerical type, applied to overhaul old files, inventory and 
index old documents, maps, etc., and operated in the record 
rooms of such departments as the Public Utilities Commission, 
County Clerk's office, Real Estate Department and Probation 
Officer. 

While there is no noteworthy example to be cited, 
a general statement may be made that the Works Progress Ad- 
ministration program effected a considerable amount of val- 
uable work within these departments . Very little of this 
work would have been possible for the sponsor to realize 
since budgets are uniformly oaeed to the bare essentials of 
current operation. As a general rule such projects were super- 
vised by the Sponsor who also furnished all materials and 

T23_ 



equipment. 

A project which operated in the County Clerk's office 
is here selected as an illustration of the general nature of 
the work performed. This project was designed to renovate and 
modernize the records of the County Clerk. The work consisted 
chiefly of examining, refiling, renumbering, removing and 
transferring these records. From April 11, 1936 to October 
15, 1937, 414,321 documents were filed, 144,396 labels were 
stenciled, 7,887 labels were hand printed, 4,823 maps were 
colored and 5,944 cards were prepared. 

Fewer in number, but important in achievements and 
public benefit, are the professional and semi-professional 
type projects which have been operated in the interest of 
public administrative departments - principally those of the 
city and county. 

A brief description follows of a few projects that 
will have marked effect in raising the standards of public 
service. 

CODIFICATION OF CITY ORDINANCES : 

An act of the State Legislature in 1856 created the 
City and County of San Francisco as a political entity. The 
first charter went into effect in 1900. From that time until 
1906, when all the permanent records of the municipality were 
destroyed by fire, the laws were passed as "ordinances". 
After that date a new series of ordinances were started, now 
comprising twenty-two volumes of pasted slips,, being the laws 
as published in the official newspaper. 

A new city charter in 1932 provided for setting up 
a Municipal Code and an Administrative Code. By 1935 the 

124 



advance toward a code had been merely the decimal system of 
numbering ordinances as they were passed. 

During 1935 > a start toward codification was made 
by a State Emergency Relief Project. Since then, through 
WPA's continuation of the work, a code is nearing completion. 

The work has involved careful reading and study of 
some twenty- thousand laws, covering a period of eighty years. 

At the start of this work the only published records 
available for the period before 19O6, were the "Orders" of 
18&K and 1896, and the "Ordinances" of 1904. Only a few 
months ago a project worker discovered four additional volumes 
in the storeroom of the Lav: Library, covering they ears 12566, 
1S72, lSSS and 1^9^. 

It must be appreciated that a master list of all 
known laws, - before the fire and since, - grouped, indexed 
and studied for possible amendment, repeal, duplication or 
conflict, has been an essential step involving much time and 
work by competent attorneys. The succeeding steps are no 
less important in finally arriving at a code; i.e., laws seg- 
regated, classified, and indexed, and the Municipal Code 
set up under proper title, division, chapter, article and 
section. 

A valuable feature of public service in connection 
with this code, unlike those of other cities, will be tables 
of court decisions and opinions of the city attorneys since 
1393 • For example, a Traffic Ordinance, enacted in 1927, 
has had 125 amendments which are scattered through six vol- 
umes of clippings. 



125 



The public benefit to the present and future genera- 
tions in dollar value cannot be estimated, since it will save 
so much time wasted by the court, lawyers, supervisors, heads 
of municipal departments, boards, commissions, and others such 
as contractors and builders. 

It may be pointed out that for the first time since 
1906, there will be order instead of chaos In questions of 
existing municipal laws so that now a layman may find all of 
the lav/ in one place, where before no attorney could be cer- 
tain that he had found all of it. 
PAROLE SURVEY 

Another important project of a legal nature operat- 
ing to the advanta.ge of public administration, having great 
potentialities for public benefit, is a comparative survey of: 

(a) The effect of administration of parole laws on 
crime in San Francisco. 

(b) The laws relating to parole of the State of Cali- 
fornia, Illinois, Massachusetts, New York, Washington and of 
the Federal Government. 

This project was sponsored by the City and County of 
San Francisco, and the final report was published by the 
Sponsor in April, 1937* 

The presentation of parole laws was based upon the 
latest published case or statute for each jurisdiction. 
The results of the administration of such laws was based upon 
the published reoorts of parole boards and correspondence with 
each jurisdiction. 

The parole administration in San Francisco was bas- 
ed upon records and reports covering a five year period end- 

126 



ing June 30, 193^> in three courts, the Police Department, the 
Coroner's Office, and the California Boards of Prison Directors 
and Prison Terms and Paroles. 

The published report covered a brief history, and the 
theory and practice of parole, the necessary statistical tables 
and charts to compare laws and their effects in the six juris- 
dictions, a summary and fifteen editorial conclusions. The 
report included as an exhibit the proposed uniform rules and 
regulations of California County Perole Boards. 

The report received considerable favorable newspaper 
publicity and editorial comment. It is difficult to ascer- 
tain the definite extent to which the work has already prov- 
ed of practical value, but since its publication, legislation 
has been enacted in several jurisdictions (including California) 
tending to correct some of the conditions brought out in the 
report. 

^he comparative statements on the existing laws and 
on the effects of the administration of them, are not else- 
where available, and will make the report of continuing value 
to legislators, government officers, and criminologists. 
Requests for copies of the report, from officials and edu- 
cational institutions, haveexceeded the supply. 
SAN FRANCISCO POLICE RECORDS 

Work started in November, 1936 under a project 
sponsored by the City and County. It had long been conceded 
by all concerned that the existing system in the Police De- 
partment must shortly be reorganized, but funds were not 
available. 

The record and filing system was obsolete and un- 

127 



satisfactory. Reports and records in the various precinct 
stations were kept according to the individual ideas of the 
police officers in charge, resulting in incomplete and non- 
uniform reports often inaccessible and not infrequently lost. 

The Police Library contained some valuable material 
but it was practically inaccessible because it was not indexed 
or arranged for use. There was no bibliographical acquisition 
list to build up a library on police and criminal administra- 
tion, nor was such material generally available in San Fran- 
cisco Public Libraries. There was no curriculum for a recruit 
or special detail training school. 

The project made an analytical study of offense re- 
port forms in use in those cities having modernized Police 
Departments, with due regard for statistical reports to the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, and to the local conditions 
peculiar to San Francisco. From this study were drafted 
twenty-one offense report forms that will enable the depart- 
ment to compile accurate daily, weekly, monthly and annual 
reports. 

In connection with the effecting order, the project 
prepared a Record Routing Chart, and a 120-page manual on use 
of forms, which were published and posted In every station. 

The report forms were adopted and an order placed 
them in operation in the department December 1, 1937, with 
the result that, insofar as a record system is concerned, the 
department Is the equal of any municipality In the United 
States. The system is operating satisfactorily and has the 
complete approval of the Chief of Police. 



128 



At present, the records in the precinct stations^ 
for the year starting July 1, 1937? are being either rewrit- 
ten or compiled up to the starting date of the new system so 
that accurate statistical information will be available for 
the reports for the year ending June 30, 193&* 

The Police Library has been catalogued, clipping 
bureau reorganized under uniform crime classification, and a 
modern curriculum for police schools completed. 

In the opinion of those acquainted with the police 
administration there is no doubt of the permanent and prac- 
tical value of this work to the city and to the country at 
large. 

ENGINEERING SURVEYS 

The survey and mapping of underground structures in 
the congested downtown area of San Francisco was another of 
the imoortant contributions made by the Works progress Ad- 
ministration. 

The first of the projects to operate was Works Pro- 
ject No. 3571- ^e work accomplished by it was originally 
intended to be performed by the Public Utilities Commission. 
The City Engineer estimated that the survey would cost the City 
$75,000, a sum which it could not then afford; a WPA project 
was then sponsored by the Commission. 

Under this project, one branch of a proposed subway 
route was surveyed and maooed for sub and surface structures. It 
operated between March and October, 1936, covered 15,300 lin- 
eal feet of route. The combined cost in Federal and sponsor 
funds was 1^6,0^9, or $3-01 per lineal foot. 



129 



SUBWAY SURVEY 



Two views of a base-line party en Market Street in San 
Francisco making a survey of the oroposed route for a sub- 
way system. Thes^ men arc exoert draftsmen and field en- 
gineers whose findings are given official recognition 
through the sponsor, THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION. 



130 



'-'-'his project was so successful that Works Project 
No. 4-S19 was started under the same sponsor, to survey and 
map the other two branches of the proposed subway route, along 
Montgomery, Geary and Mission Streets, '■'■'his project operated 
between October, 193° an & November, 1937 5 surveyed and mapped 
36,700 lineal feet of route at a total cost in Federal and 
sponsor funds of $87,377, or $2.38 per lineal foot. 

As the worth and efficiency of the work performed 
byWPA was demonstrated, a third project (Work Project No. 
8252) was recently started to survey and map the remaining 
congested underground area of down- town San Francisco. Al- 
though the sponsor was the Public Utilities Commission, copies 
of drawings furnished the City Engineer's Office and the De- 
partment of Electricity are highly regarded by them, and they 
at once started using the information. 

Public Utilities Companies cooperatedwith W?A to 
the fullest extent in turning over their data, and in return, 
blue prints of the completed work have been furnished, the 
excellence of the finished work receiving fulsome praise. 

'■4ie field survey discovered many features unknown 
by the present City Engineer's and Public Utilities offices. 

Several large fire cisterns, constructed before the 
fire of 1906, v/ere discovered under Market Street. TheFire 
Deoartment has renovated these and now holds th-^m as standby 
water supply. 

Since all measurements v/ere based on orecisc survey 
lines, many errors v/ere found in files of the city survey de- 
partment. The City had oreviously no record of encroachment 
over city property lines. From the first two orojects the 

131 



city has received a permanent record in the form of inked cloth 
tracings, 500 in number, or over 2,200 square feet of tracings, 
of a complex and congested underground condition of water, 
steam and sewer pipes, cables, conduits, etc. Considerable 
praise of the work performed has been received from a firm of 
New York Subway engineers, Ridgeway & Brahdy. 

Vith the accurate information gathered by the under- 
ground survey, the Public Utilities felt safe in making tests 
of the sub-soil conditions along the route of the proposed 
subway. Accordingly, Works Project No. 7028 was sponsored by 
them, and operating between May and December, 19?7j the pro- 
ject put down 168 test holes to an average of between 50 and 
60 feet in depth, along the route covered by the first survey. 
Eight hundred and ninety (2>90) soil samples were collected 
and labeled, 1 ,fl2 linear feet of borings were made. The 
Federal and Sponsor cost was $10,629 or $1.38 per lineal foot of 
boring. It has been estimated that the cost to the City under 
private contract would have been nearer |3«00 P er lineal foot. 
Under a current project it is expected that the cost will be 
further reduced, due to experience gained. Whether or not the 
information gathered is ever used in subway construction, it 
will remain of permanent value to the city and construction 
engineers in planning future construction. 



132 



BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF WOMEN'S, PROFESS 10 NAL 

and 
TECHNICAL PROJECTS 

OPERATED IN AREA 7 



Contained on the following pages will be found a 
modified descriptions together with works project number 
and title, of all Women's, Professional, and Technical proj- 
ects pursued in Area No. 7 during the period October 1, 1955 
to December 51, 1957. 

The material used has been adapted from the of- 
ficial abbreviated description contained in the Project 
Proposal, WPA Form 501. Even though, from time to time, sup- 
plementary applications have been approved and put Into opera- 
tion, the basic description given has remained constant. 

It is interesting to note that the range of proj- 
ects undertaken provides employment for professional, educa- 
tional, clerical, and technical persons with the proviso, in 
nearly all instances, that the work to be consummated will 
displace no regularly employed Sponsor's personnel. 

The financial statistics of all projects described 
may be ascertained from the pages of figures with correspond- 
ing work project numbers. 



155 



A BRIEF DESCRIPTION 
of 
WOMEN'S and PROFESSIONAL PROJECTS 

in • .- 

SAN FRANCISCO 



46 MURALS - U.C. HOSPITAL 

Completion of six mural panels decorating Cole Hall 
Auditorium and Toland Hall. 

47 CONTROLLER'S RELIEF CASES 

Collection and filing of data on County and SERA 
relief cases. 

48 SANITARY INSPECTION 

Sanitary inspection of factories and industrial plants 

53 CONTROLLER'S RECORDS 

Installing records; indexing payrolls; keeping up 
system in Comptroller's office. 

71 BAND MUSIC SALVAGE 

To salvage and catalogue music accumulated "by the 
Golden Gate Park Public Band. 

358 BUREAU COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 

To supplement the regular Departmental staff In the 
Department of Communicable Diseases. 

359 CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE - PALENTOLOGY 

Department of Paleontology, California, Academy of 
Science - clerical and technical assistance. E.R.A. 
project . 

366 CHILD WELFARE 

To provide graduate nurses for assistance to public 
health doctors. 

370 JUVENILE DETENTION HOME 

Provide supplementary aid; investigating and counsel- 
ing under-privileged children; additional office help 
for Juvenile Court. 



134 






371 STATE LABOR INSPECTION 

Public Works Inspection of State buildings. 
378 DENTAL SURVEY 

Dental survey of San Francisco school children. 

405 CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE - AFRICAN HALL 

California Academy of Science to complete the prepa- 
ration for public exhibit of the African Habitat. 
E.R.A. 

457 SAN FRANCISCO LAW LIBRARY 

Clerical assistance to catalogue books of San Francis- 
co Law Library . 

458 BOARD OF EDUCATION LIBRARY 

To provide clerical assistance in Library. 

476 tT.C. MEDICAL LIBRARY 

Complete a quadruple card catalogue of literature. 

477 STATE DIVISION OF INSURANCE 

State building. Statistical and clerical assistance. 

525 W.P.A. SEWING 

A sewing project to produce finished garments and 
other wearing apparel for the needy of San Francisco. 

527 KNITTED GARMENTS 

To manufacture knitted garments. 

528 CENTRAL FOOD CLINIC 

Central Food Clinic to demonstrate significance and 
preparation of foods. 

529 SHOE REPAIR 

To set up and operate a shoe repair factory. 

530 VISITING HOUSEKEEPERS 

Instruction and supervision in management of homes - 
visiting housekeepers and mother's helpers. 

605 DE YOUNG MUSEUM FRAMING 

Mount, repair, De Young Memorial Museum. City owned. 
Prepare material for storage or exhibit. 

135 



772 CHINESE HEALTH CENTER 

Office Attendant, clerk, janitor in Chinese Health 
Center at 1212 Powell Street. E.R.A. 

773 ADULT PROBATION 

Stenographic assistance and file clerk. 

781 RECREATION 

Expansion of recreation program personnel of play- 
grounds at 7th and Bryant Streets. 

861 CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE - LIBRARY 

At the California Academy of Science Library, catalog 
and hind scientific publications. E.R.A. 

951 STATE FISH AND GAME LIBRARY 

Catalog books, magazines, etc., in the Division of 
Fish and Game. E.R.A. 

954 ALASKA FUR RECORDS 

Copying of Alaska-San Francisco Fur Shipment records 
from 1876 to 1905. 

1055 STATE MINING SURVEY 

An exploratory project to determine range of activi- 
ties, and outline plans for a State-wide mining survey 

1224 NURSERY SCHOOLS 

Handymen, cooks, laundresses, and carpenters to assist 
in the operation of the Nursery School Unit. E.R.A. 

1356 LIGHTHOUSE 

Clerical assistance in weeding out old records. 

1365 CODIFICATION CITY ORDINANCES 

Codify City and County Ordinances. 

1366 U.C. HOSPITAL - GENERAL 

Supplement regular staff to assist in work hospital 
at University of California Medical Center. 

1367 STATE STATISTICAL ART 

Research for preparation of a mineral map of the State 
1475 STATE DIVISION OF MINES 

At San Francisco Ferry Building, clerical assistance 
for compilation, correlation, and indexing publica- 
tions of Division of Mines. Record current geological 

136 



research reports; Index a bibliography of California 
Mines. 

1497 STREET LIGHTING SURVEY 

Survey of existing street lighting equipment of city. 

1498 VETERANS' GRAVES SURVEY 

A survey of the graves of War Veterans from the Civil 
War to date. 






1525 LETTERMAN GENERAL HOSPITAL 

General Hospital - clerical work. 

1646 CITY MAPS AND RECORDS 

Comoilation of maps and records of city-owned real 
property. 

1897 CHILDREN'S AGENCY 

For investigation and clerical service In regard to 
dependent children; trained nurses to render health 
work; seamstresses to help in making clothing for 
wards of the Court. 

1928 TEACHER'S COLLEGE - CLERICAL 

This project is for emergency clerical assistance to 
the Correspondence Extension Service of the State 
Department of Education which resulted from an increased 
scope of this service in covering the C.C.C. camps. 
Work covered in this project will be done for the De- 
partment of Education in the State of California located 
at 124 Buchanan Street. 

1934 SUPERIOR COURT PILE REMOVAL 

Transferral of records of the Superior Court of San 
Francisco covering years 1906 - 1915, in custody of 
County Clerk, from main office to fifth floor storage. 

2034 SURPLUS COMMODITIES 

To provide for receiving, storing, handling, accounting 
for surplus commodities furnished State E.R..A. vj Fed- 
eral, State, and other agencies for distribution to Its 
relief clients, public agencies and institutions. 

2038 EMERGENCY EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 

To provide Emergency Educational Program including 
Literacy Classes, Workers' Education, Vocational Train- 
ings General Adult Education and Far ant Education. 
Maintenance and operation of free nursery schools for 
the needy. Not a part of present educational budget, 
using relief personnel for supervisors and attendants. 



137 



2609 DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 

Provide stenographic and clerical assistance in the 
Divisions of: Accounting, Industrial Welfare, Fire 
and Safety, Immigration and Housing, Industrial Acci- 
dent and the Director's Office. In addition to the 
narmal functions. No current work to be done. 

2683 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATISTICS 



Family expenditure study. Food consumption records 
taken by trained visitors. Completion of S.E.R.A. 
study undertaken by State Division of Labor Statistics 
with cooperation of Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

2779 REHABILITATION PLACEMENT . 

Assist the Vocational Rehabilitation Bureau in finding 
suitahle employment for physically handicapped workers 
In the City and County. Placement Counselors and 
assistants supplied with complete records of the edu- 
cational and experience background of clients for 
which they attempt to secure Individual placement. 
E.R.A. 



2863 BUREAU OF EPIDEMIOLOGY 

State Department Public Health, Inauguration of uni- 
form record system, permanent tuberculosis and non- 
acute reportable diseases file, and disease tabula- 
tions in State Building. 

2865 SAN FRANCISCO COUNTY RELIEF CASES 

Re-filing of material in relief case records to the 
extent of approximately 5,000 cases. Headquarters 
51 Gough Street, 

2868 CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE MANUSCRIPTS 

Assistance in installation of exhibits and copy of 
special manuscript field reports for California Academy 
of Sciences at instance of M.H. DeYoung Museum. Con- 
tinuation of SERA project. 

2871 CENTRAL MEDICAL FILES 

The consolidation of the file rooms and installation 
of master filing system for the Central Medical Bureau. 
Work contemplated is in addition to the normal function 
of the bureau. 

2872 STATE COMMERCIAL ARTISTS 

Technical assistance to the State Department of Health 
Health located in the State Building. Work contempla- 
ted is in addition to the normal function of the Health 
Department . 



138 






r; o i 



2873 STATE PARKS - REDWOODS 

Preparation of graphic, educational, and reference 
material in the form of charts, maps, and pictorial 
exhibits delineating the Redwoods arid associated plants 
and animals for the California State Parks System. No 
provision for this valuable educational exhibit type of 
project . 

2874 CALIFORNIA ART RESEARCH 

Compiling history of the development of art collections 
in San Francisco and to prepare a report on the econom- 
ic factors relating to the development of art In this 
metropolitan region. Also to compile a series of bio- 
graphical sketches relating to artists in California. 
This work had never been undertaken before. No pro- 
vision has ever been made for this unusual work. 

■2877 SAN FRANCISCO HOSPITAL - GENERAL 

To employ personnel to set up an overflow ward In the 
San Francisco County Hospital to aid in the care of 
needy patients inadequately cared for under the normal 
routine. Personnel from relief not to be used in cur- 
rent work. This is a public institution. 

2880 STATE MINING RECORDER 

Preparation of property maps of mining districts by 
township plats from official records of County Recorder, 
Ferry Building. 

2888 STATE FISH AND GAME TRANSLATION 

Translation into English of 2 leading German Scientific 
works dealing with trout and trout culture. Personnel 
from relief not to be used on current work. Funds for 
project not Included in fiscal budget. 

2891 STATE PARKS BOUNDARY 

Copying, on specially printed forms, descriptions of 
boundaries and other legal data concerning each of the 
70 parks in the State System. 

2892 STATE MINES LANTERN SLIDES 

• For technician to copy aerial and other photographs, 
develop and print films and make lantern slides Illus- 
trating geologic phenomena for the California State 
Division of Mines. From personnel on relief ;not to be 
used for current work. No public funds are available 
for this purpose. 

2895 STATE SOCIAL WELFARE 

State Department of Social Welfare. Rendering assis- 
tance to Department of Social Welfare by preparing a 

139 



special biennial report, for the Legislature, and se- 
curing data on the work of clubs, institutions, and 
foster homes throughout the State, Work would not 
otherwise be done due to budgetary limitations. Con- 
tinuation SERA. All personnel to be taken from relief 
rolls. Not a normal function of this institution. 

2896 EXPERIMENTAL PISHING 

Research Investigation to determine the distribution 
from month to month by species and sizes of bottom fish 
in the north coastal waters of California - 450 McAllis- 
ter Street. 



3298 



STATE SEWING 



To employ women as seamstresses, both hand sewers and 
machine operators, cutters, designers, mechanics, and 
technicians. This project will make work shirts and 
pants, jeans and underclothes, bloiises, women's hats, 
men's- caps, women's and girls' dresses and other gar- 
ments and boy's clothes. The garments made on this 



project will be distributed 
Hies through the Commodity 
Also, wherever possible, to 
25 years old, in accordance 
tions of the National Youth 
wide sewing project. 

3329 STATE DIVISION MINES RESOURCES 



to certified relief fam- 
Distribution Division, 
employ youths from 16 to 
with the rules and regula- 
Administratlon. State- 



Assistance in compilation of Handbook of Geology and 
Mineral Resources of California; drafting 400 to 500 
maps and other illustrations; clerical work. Ferry 
Building. Extension of work not provided for In nor- 
mal budget of Sponsors, 

3330 CHINESE ANTHROPOLOGY 

Standardization of Age-Weight-Height scales and an- 
thropometric Indices for Chinese children. 



3409 



STATE PLANNING BOARD 



To provide the funds to continue the planning and coor- 
dinating work of the state planning boards. 

3510 INLAND FISHING WATERS 

Selection, analysis and permanent rsrcordlng of physical 
and biological data pertaining to the inland fishing 
waters of California - 450 McAllister Street. Person- 
nel to be taken from relief rolls. 



3571 



MARKET STREET SUBWAY SURVEY 



Survey to locate and map all building fronts, Includ- 
ing area walls and foundations and all the utilities 

140 



in the street, such as poles, lamp posts, alarm boxes, 
hydrants, conduits, cables, manholes, transformers, 
pipes, sewers. Fremont Street from Polsom to Market 
Street, Market Street from Fremont to Church Street. 
Does not involve house-to-house 
to be taken from relief. 



canvassing. 



Personnel 



3724 TUBERCULOSIS STfRVEI 

Survey of the incidence of tuberculosis, degree of 
medical, nursing, social care and resources available 
to patients in San Francisco Health Center Building. 

3779 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 

At 49 Fourth Street, San p'rancisco. Completion of 
study of Latin and Oriental populations in San Fran- 
cisco and Alameda. Counties started under SERA. 

3802 LETTERMAN HOSPITAL LIBRARY 

For repairing books at the Letterman General Hospital. 
Sponsored by the Letterman General Hospital and the 
County of San Francisco. Federal Property. Permis- 
sion to do the work has been obtained from the proper 
Federal Agency. 

3864 NATIONAL FOREST MODELS 

Building of model relief maps of forest areas in Calif- 
ornia. Will provide aid in planning for transportation, 
fire detection, logging unit, reforestation in forest 
areas. 



3865 



SAN FRANCISCO LIBRARY - PERIODICALS 



3955 



Compilation of "union 11 list of periodicals of libraries 
of the San Francisco Bay Region for the San Francisco 
Public Library. Not a normal function of the sponsor. 

P.P. I.E. RECORD SALVAGE 



Examination, index, and salvage of records of the Pan- 
ama Pacific Exposition of 1915, to make available the 
significant economic and engineering data and historic 
material contained therein for purposes of municipal 
participation in the San Francisco Bay Exposition of 
1938. Not a normal function of this institution. 



4018 TUBERCULIN TESTING 



Assist the San Francisco Department of Public Health 
in the cooperative exchange of data relating to tuber- 
culin testing of dairy herds with the State Department 
of Agriculture and the Administrator of the Jones Con- 
nolly Act. Service not covered by the normal budget. 



141 



4078 



JUNIOR AMD SENIOR HIGH DENTAL SURVEY 



Examine and record 
teeth of the Junio 
ascertain ratio on 
and summarize this 
mat ion | to make re 
District Dental So 
iation, San Franci 
Cisco Board of Edu 
dental conditions 

4215 MUNICIPAL ACTIVITIES 



the condition of the mouths and 
r and Senior High School students to 
dental abnormalities; to tabulate 
information. To publish this infor- 
commendations to the San Francisco 
ciety, California State Dental Assoc- 
sco Board of Health, and the San Fran- 
cation. To acquaint parents with the 
of their children. 



4249 



To employ persons from relief rolls In the supervision 
of municipal recreational and instructional centers to 
provide for instruction in language, home economics, 
hygiene, and allied subjects. To be operated on dona- 
ted, publicly operated centers. No improvements to be 
made to private property. 

LAND USE SURVEY 



4366 



Preparation of maps and data on present uses of land 
in the City and County of San Francisco, with compila- 
tion and quantitative analysis of statistical material 
Not a normal function of this agency and will not dis- 
place any regular employees. 

PRESIDIO COST RECORDS 



Modernization of Initial and maintenance cost records 
of the 500 San Francisco Presidio buildings; this 
project on Federal property with permission of the 
proper Federal Authority. Work is rob a normal func- 
tion of the sponsor. 

4381 MUNICIPAL HOUSING COMPILATION 

Completion and final reports on uncompiled data of com- 
pleted field work of Municipal Housing Survey. 450 
Gough Street. 

4453 PAROLE LAW STUDY 

Comparative study of State parole laws and effect of 
administration of Parole Law on crime in San Francisco. 
403 Civic Auditorium. This is not a normal function 
and It will not displace any of the regular employees. 

4462 SAN FRANCISCO WOOD MODELS 

To build scale wood models of San Francisco and pertin- 
ent adjacent territory in San Francisco and San Mateo 
Counties. To be constructed in removable sections for 
examination and experimental manipulation for planning 
studies relative to the formation of a new Master Plan 
of the city, such as re-zoning, re-building, new high- 



142 






■ - 



way development, etc. Will be housed "by the City as 
a permanent public exhibit at the San Francisco Bay 
Exposition. Work will be done in the City Hall. 

4463- SELF-HELP COOPERATIVE DATA 

Transcribe, index, catalog, box, and tab valuable data 
pertaining to Self-Help Cooperatives for permanent rec- 
ords and prepare a report. Will displace no one now 
employed. No provision for this work in any budget. 

4577 FIELD HEALTH NURSING 

Field Health Nursing Division, San Francisco Department 
of Public Health. Reorganization of Library and Files, 
clerical aid for additional nursing duties, tabulation 
of school children immunity status survey. Entire per- 
sonnel to come from relief rolls. 

4667 COUNTY FINANCIAL DEPARTMENTS 

To provide clerical assistance in county financial de- 
partment for organizing and filing and indexing public 
records. Not now a part of normal budget function 

4729 SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHES 

County -wide; San Francisco County. For the benefit 
of persons from relief rolls - renovating, cleaning, 
re-modeling garments and hats to be distributed free 
to the needy. 

4819 MISS ION- GEARY SUBWAY SURVEY 

530 Bush Street, San Francisco County. To provide em- 
ployment for needy persons j to locate and map all 
water, gas, steam, and sewer lines; street car, 
electric, telephone, telegraph lines; and all building 
foundations. Not a normal function of this institution 
and no one normally employed will be displaced. 

4867 RECREATION, SCHOOLS 

County-wide, San Francisco County. For the benefit of 
persons from relief rolls In the recreational super- 
vision of children in public schools, in games, sports, 
and other activities in the vicinity of public schools. 

5285 PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK REPAIR 

To provide employment for needy persons to bind and 
repair books in the public library In the City of 6 an 
Francisco. This is not a part of the normal work of 
this institution and will displace no personnel nor- 
mally employed. 



143 



5344 

A project to provide employment for needy persons to 
bind and repair books In Presidio at Letterman General 
Hospital. Not a part of normal work of institution 
and will displace no one normally employed. Federal 
owned property. This project is In addition to and 
beyond the original scope of Official Project 265-03- 
7000, 

537 S DE YOUNG MUSEUM FRAMING 

Prepare, mend, and arrange museum pieces at the De 
Young Museum in San Francisco „ 

5418 CODIFICATION CITY ORDINANCES 

To provide employment for needy professional and cler- 
ical persons to reference, edit, classify and index 
city ordinances, also to modernize departmental man- 
uals and compile legislative history of amendments and 
repeals at the City Hall in San Francisco. 

5457 CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE - PALEONTOLOGY 

To assist in indexing, cataloging and bibliography in 
connection with accumulated fossil collections. Also 
prepare and store specimens, and make scientific re- 
ports of same. In the Academy of Sciences in the City 
of San Francisco. 

5473 U.S. DISTRICT COURT FILE REVISION 

To transcribe, catalog, cross- Index, and prepare a new 
file of records in the office of the U.S. District 
Court in San Francisco. There Is no normal budgetary 
appropriation for this work. 

5576 POIICE DEPARTMENT RECORDS 

To provide employment for needy clerical and profes- 
sional persons to reorganize records and Police Library 
and develop a curricula for a police school in the city 
of San Francisco, 

5591 SAN FRANCISCO LIBRARY PERIODICALS 

Compiling a ''union" list of periodicals of the San 
Francisco Bay Region for the Public Library. 

5649 MUSIC SALVAGE 

To salvage, make copies, arrange and catalog various 
musical compositions at the DeYoung Museum, San Fran- 
cisco, 

144 



5650 CONTROLLER'S RECORDS 

To transcribe, catalog, cross-index and prepare a new 
file of records in the public office of the Controller 
in San Francisco. 

5652 HANDBOOK OP ECONOMIC DATA 

To prepare a cross-index and brief description of 
available economic data by subject matter, Indicating 
source in the city of San Francisco. 

5653 CHILDREN'S AGENCY 

To provide employment for needy persons In maintaining 
social service to wards of the Juvenile Court which 
have been committed to the Children's Agency in San 
Francisco . 

5670 U.C MEDICAL LIBRARY 

To classify and catalog reprints and theses and pre- 
pare periodicals for package circulation among rural 
physicians; also classify., catalog and preserve manu- 
script material on file In University of California 
Medical Center Library in San Francisco. 

5671 BOARD OF EDUCATION LIBRARY 

To provide employment for needy persons for simple cat- 
aloging and servicing of new and old books of the Board 
o-f Education Library in the City of San Francisco. This 
project employs mostly women. 

5687 CITY REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT - RECORDS 

To transcribe, catalog, cross- index, and prepare a new 
file of records in the public office of the Real Estate 
Department in theCity Hall, San Francisco County. ..• 

5809 S.F. DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

In San Francisco County. To provide employment for 
needy persons to transcribe, clean, repair, catalogue, 
cross index, and file records In the public office of 
the Department of Public Works. Project employs mostly 
women , 

5822 RECREATION 

To provide employment for needy professional personsfor 
the supervision and coordination of recreation activi- 
ties throughout San Francisco County,' including recrea- 
tional and leisxire time leadership, games, sports, and 
social activities and the training of recreational 
leaders . 

145 



5863 TRAFFIC SURVEY 

City-wide. To provide employment for needy clerical 
and technical persons to conduct a city-wide traffic 
survey throughout the City of San Francisco. 

5865 BUREAU OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 

To provide employment for needy professional educa- 
tional and clerical persons in conducting investiga- 
tions in the origin of diseases in order to safeguard 
public health and to assist the Bureau of Communicable 
Diseases and compilation of data on sources , causes and 
characteristics of such diseases In San Francisco. 

5885 LETTERMAN GENERAL HOSPITAL 

To provide employment for needy clerical persons, in 
the clinical laboratory of Letterman General Hospital, 
San Francisco County, who will do general stenographic 
work in listing, copying and indexing various hospital 
records and reports. This project employs all women . 

5937 STATE RECREATION 

District-wide. To provide employment for needy educa- 
tional, professional and clerical persons for the super- 
vision and coordination of recreational activities, in- 
cluding recreational and leisure time leaders, for games 
sports, social activities, and the training for recrea- 
tional leadership. Project will operate in all coun- 
ties throughout the State of California, exclusive of 
Los Angeles County. Headquarters will be at San Fran- 
cisco. 

5988 HANDICAPPED CHILDREN SURVEY 

District-wide. To provide employment for needy cleri- 
cal and technical persons to transcribe on standar- 
dized forms data from existing records available from 
various sources in each county relating to physically 
handicapped children, in order to provide a complete 
record for further follow-up by State Department of 
Education. This will not involve house-to-house can- 
vassing. 

6149 HOUSEKEEPING AID 

To provide employment for needy persons in furnishing 
free home assistance in housework and care of children 
In homes of the needy where the housewife herself is 
totally or partially incapacitated because of ill health 
or confinement; also provide Instruction and super* 
vision to the needy in problems related to home manage- 
ment, instruction In diet to persons as recommended by 
physicians of the Central Medical Bureau, and in gen- 
eral food preparation in connection with budgetary re- 
quirements. This project employs mostly women. 

146 



6167 DE YOUNG MUSEUM FRAMING 

To provide employment for needy professional, educa- 
tional and clerical persons to mount, mat, prepare, 
mend, and arrange museum pieces at the deYoung Museum 
in San Francisco . 

6168 CITY PROPERTY PLANS 

To provide employment for needy professional, educa- 
tional and clerical persons to sort, classify, index, 
and file architectural plans and specifications devel- 
oped for City properties from 1880 to date at the City 
Hall, San Francisco. 

5421 MUSIC SALVAGE 

To provide employment for needy professional, educa- 
tional, and clerical persons to salvage, make copies, 
arrange and catalog various musical compositions at 
the deYoung Museum, San Francisco. 

6433 CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE LIBRARY 

To hind and catalog scientific publications In the 
public library of the California Academy of Sciences, 
San Francisco; this project employs mostly women. 

6465 ALIEN CARD FILE 

Compilation of card record and index of aliens admit- 
ted at the Port of San Francisco, Angel Island Station, 
San Francisco County. Work contemplates the transcrip- 
tion of information from alien manifests to self-index- 
ing record cards. 

6466 GOLD MINING STUDY 

9 

To study the labor and productivity of Individuals en- 
gaged In small-scale gold mining in California, Nevada 
and Oregon. Work to be prosecuted in San Francisco. 
Project employs all women. 

6543 STATE MINES LANTERN SLIDES 

Provide employment for needy technical persons to copy 
aerial and other photographs, to develop and print 
films, and to make lantern slides illustrating geol- 
ogic phenomena for the California State Division of 
Mines. This project will operate at the California 
Academy of Science in the City of San Francisco. 

6555 STATE SEWING 

Maintenance and operation of sewing rooms in the City 
of San Francisco. Work to include the making of cloth 
toys, rag rugs, and other household articles from scrap 
materials. Products will be used on other W.P.A. proj- 
ects or will be distributed free of charge to chari- 
table institutions, or to the needy. This project em- 
ploys mostly women. 



6576 U.C. HOSPITAL 






To provide employment for needy registered nurses, or- 
derlies, typists, clerks, and supplementary personnel 
in the operation of a medical clinic at University of 
California Hospital Medical Center In San Francisco, 
to provide free medical service to needy patients. 
Medical supplies will be furnished by the Sponsor, The 
persons employed will supplement the regular staff;, 
this project employs mostly women . 



6632 SHOE REPAIR 



Collecting . repairing, and renovating contributed 
shoes for free distribution to the needy. This proj 
ect will operate in the City of San Francisco. 



6671 CHILD WELFARE 



To provide employment for needy registered nurses for 
clinical assistance to public health doctors and for 
nursing supervision at various day nurseries; and to 
provide employment for needy clerical persons for work 
in connection with the nursing activities. This work 
is in addition to work normally carried on by the spon- 
sor and mostly women will be employed. 

6695 LAND USE SURVEY 

To provide employment for needy professional, techni- 
cal and clerical persons in the preparation of maps 
and data on present uses of land In the City and County 
of San Francisco, with compilation and quantitative 
analysis of statistical material. 

6697 FISH AND GAME LIBRARY 

To provide employment for needy clerical, professional, 
and educational persons to reorganize, catalog, file, 
and bind old material for the library of the Division 
of Fish and Game. 

6698 COUNTY CLERK'S RECORDS 

To provide employment for needy professional, educa- 
tional, and clerical persons to renovate and modernize 
old records for the County Clerk's Office. Work will 
consist of examining, refiling, cleaning., repairing, 
renumbering, transferring, etc. 

6753 DIVISION OF MINES RECORDS 

To renovate and reorganize the files and other records 
of the California State Division of Mines, into a uni- 
fied and modernized system. The work IncTu.des repair- 
ing, transcribing, cataloging, cross -indexing, book- 
binding, and map-making. The material will be used to 
compile a geological map which will be made available 
to the general public. Project employs mostly women. 

148 



5784 PRESIDIO BUILDING RECORDS 

To provide employment for needy clerical, professional, 
and educational persons who will assist in modernizing 
the Initial and maintenance cost records of various 
San Francisco Presidio Buildings. 

6859 SELF-HELP COOPERATIVE DATA 

To provide employment for needy professional, educa- 
tional and clerical persons who will assist in bring- 
ing up to date and putting into usable form, complete 
data on various diversified cooperative projects. This 
data, in comprehensible form, will be available and of 
valuable assistance to various governmental agencies 
Interested In future cooperative and production plan 
ning. 

6860 INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENT TABULATION 

To tabulate collected data concerning industrial ac- 
cidents occuring in California for the years 1934, 1935, 
and 1936. The data will be analyzed by types and by 
causes, under industrial divisions. The results will 
be used to plan more equitable compensation and, by 
throwing light on causes, lead to a reduction of acci- 
dents. This project employs mostly women. 

6875 ACADEMY OF SCIENCE RENOVATION 

Renovating and expanding the facilities of the Academy 
of Sciences Museum, an institutional unit of the San 
Francisco Park System, in order to Increase its useful- 
ness to the general public. The work performed will 
include constructing cases, repairing equipment, label- 
ing and cataloging accumulated specimen acquisitions, 
copying field reports for public reference, and taxi- 
dermy renovating. 

7028 SUBWAY TEST BORINGS 

To determine the sub-surface strata and geological for- 
mation along the route of the proposed Market Street 
subway to furnish the factual basis to enable the 
development of the proper design of subway sections by 
the Public Utilities Commission, 

7054 NATIONAL FOREST MODELS 

To prepare model relief maps of forest areas in Calif- 
ornia. These maps are used by the Forest Service for 
fire control and prevention, administrative use, loca- 
tion of roads, trails, lookouts, telephone location 
studies, etc., and by engineers, Irrigation officials, 
and the public for the study of topography. 



149 



7056 BUREAU OF CUSTOMS RECORDS 

To sort, renovate records, and modernize the filing 
system for the Bureau of Customs. Material covers the 
years 1850-1934 and comprises a great mass of accumu- 
lated, unsegregated, and partially obsolete records of 
the Bureau. 

7064 EXPERIMENTAL FISHING 

To conduct a research investigation to determine the 
distribution from month to mouth by species and size 
of bottom fish in the north coastal waters of Califor- 
nia, and test fishing nets to determine the most effec- 
tive sizes for commercial use from the point of view of 
fish conservation. This project will operate In San 
Francisco , and at sea along the California Coast from 
Monterey Bay to the Oregon State line, with supervisory 
headquarters located at San Francisco. 

7082 JUNIOR AND SENIOR HICK DENTAL SURVEY 

To examine and record the condition of the mouths and 
teeth of the Junior and Senior Public High School stu- 
dents in order to ascertain the ratio on dental abnor- 
malities; to tabulate and summarize this information; 
to acquaint parents with the dental conditions of their 
children; and to make recommendations to the San Fran- 
cisco District Dental Society, the California State 
Dental Association, the San Francisco Board of Health, 
and the San Francisco Board of Education. The results 
of this work will be printed and a report issued under 
the authority of t±ie San Francisco Department of Pub- 
lic Health. No Federal funds are to be used in pub- 
lishing these results. 

7096 VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

To develop a complete index system for the State of 
California, Department of Education, Bureau of Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation. 

7127 EDUCATION 

District-wide - District No. 7. To provide, coordin- 
ate, and supervise educational activities for under- 
privileged adults and others in the field of general 
adult, literacy, vocational, parent and worker's edu- 
cation. Project does not cover work normally included 
In the regular educational program of any governmental 
agency. Headquarters at Los Angeles. 

7129 NURSERY SCHOOLS 

District-wide - District No. 7. Maintenance and opera- 
tion of free nursery schools for the needy throughout 
the State of California. Not a part of present educa- 



tional budget. 



150 



::tc 



- .3: 



" f .:. :."i r.00 



7153 BUREAU OP EPIDEMIOLOGY 



To tabulate 
plague data, 
1934 | and c 
data on para 
1933-1934, 
these condit 
by State hea 
of research 
ate in the C 



tuberculosis mortality data, 1933-1934; 

1900-1934; venereal' disease data, 1920- 
linlc data, 1920-1934; and to transcribe 
lytic cases of infantile poliomyelitis, 
Work is designed to determine acuteness of 
ions so that recommendations can be made 
1th authorities looking to the expansion 
and control facilities. Project will oper- 
Ity of San Francisco. 



7346 CALIFORNIA ART RESEARCH 

To compile history of development of art collections 
in San Francisco, preparing a report on the economic 
factors relating to the development of art In this 
metropolitan region, and compiling a series of bio- 
graphical sketches relating to artists of California. 
Project will operate in San Francisco. 

7377 COST OF LIVING INDEX 

Tabulating, computing, and analyzing data on disburse- 
ments of wage earner and clerical families in Califor- 
nia cities by type of expenditure, seasonal variation, 
inter- city difference in regard to consumption of items, 
sex, etc., of the chief wage earner, for the U.S. De- 
partment of Labor,. Bureau of Labor Statistics, and for 
use of the general public. The project will operate 
In the city of San Francisco. 

7419 GOLD MINING STUDY 



7481 



A study of the labor and productivity of individuals 
engaged in small-scale gold mining in California, Nev- 
ada, and Oregon, for the U.S. Department of the Inter- 
ior, Bureau of Mines. This project will operate in 
the city of San Francisco; the resulting data will be 
made available to the general public. This project em- 
' ploys mostly women. 

NATIONAL ARCHIVES 



District-wide - District No. 7. To conduct a survey 
of agencies of the Federal Government in the State of 
California, including the preparation of a detailed 
analysis of the manuscript records contained therein, 
by editing, typing, and abstracting collected reports 
and locating, classifying, rechecking, and conducting 
a research on records. The completed inventory will 
be available to Interested government agenci.es anc ^ li~ 
braries in the State. Project will operate in all 
counties throughout the State of California, exclusive 
of Los Angeles County, with supervisory headquarters 
at San Francisco. 



151 



7506 CUSTOM RECORDS 

To sort, renovate records, and modernize the filing 
system for the Bureau of Customs. Material covers the 
years 1850-1934 and comprises a great mass of accumu- 
lated, unsegregated, and partially obsolete records of 
the Bureau . 

7559 U.C. HOSPITAL PATIENT RECORD 



7560 



To assemble, transcribe, and collate existing data in 
a modern central file for the University of California 
Hospital. Project includes the development of a numer- 
ical identification listing of old "Out Patient Depart- 
ment" cases, covering the years 1912-1932 with cross- 
index to new "unit-case" numbers; to consolidate and 
summarize patient case diagnoses under new "unit- case" 
system; and to modernize old name card file to coor- 
dinate with new "unit-case" system. Project employs 
mostly women , 

PISH AND GAME LIBRARY 



To reorganize, catalog, file, and bind old material 
for the library of the Division of Pish and Game. This 
project will operate In the City of San Francisco. 

7561 HISTORIC BUILDING SURVEY 

To prepare exact measured drawings and photographic 
records of important examples of historic American ar- 
chitecture in Northern California. Copies of documents 
will be deposited in the Lihrary of Congress, Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

7649 STATE PLANNING BOARD 

To assemble existing data and to prepare general plans 
and reports on parks, parkways, and recreational areas 
in California. Data relating to existing and poten- 
tial facilities and means will be classified, indexed, 
mapped, and organized for general reference purposes, 
and reports will bo prepared on the recreational prob- 
lems in the State. 

7754 MT. DIABLO MUSEUM 

To develop an exhibit of graphic educational material 
for the Mt. Diablo State Park Museum and to develop 
other educational and guidance material, such as guide 
books, maps, and signs, for use in promoting the rec- 
reational and conservational values of California State 
Parks. Work will be based upon previously gathered 
data. 

7755 HISTORIC MARINE SURVEY 

To conduct a survey of historic merchant marine ves- 



152 



8030 



sels on San 
drawings of 



Francisco bay 
these vessels 



including the preparation of 
and the construction of mod- 



els for the deYoung Memorial Museum, 
RECREATION 



State-wide. Supervision and coordination of recreation- 
al activities, including recreational and leisure time 
leaders, for games, sports, social activities, and the 
training for recreational leadership. Project will op- 
erate throughout State of California, exclusive of 
District #11, with headquarters, for purposes of super- 
vision, at San Francisco. 

8043 CHILL' WELFARE 

To furnish clinical assistance to public health doctors 
and supervise nursing at various day nurseries; to fur- 
nish clerical assistance at the Central Office; to fur- 
nish dental assistance at Child Hygiene Dental Clinics," 
assist dentists, sterilize instruments, and record 
treatments. Project employs mostly women. 

8191 EDUCATION 



Providing, coordinating, and supervising educational 
activities for under-privileged adults and others in 
the fields of general adult, literacy, vocational, par- 
ent and workers' education. Project does not cover 
work normally/- included in regular educational program 
of -anv governmental agency. Project will operate 
throughout State of California, with headquarters, for 
purposes of supervision, at Los Angeles. 



8213 POLICE RECORDS 

Reorganizing the San Francisco Police Department crime 
record and filing system, covering stations and head- 
quarters, In order to conform with the Federal uniform 
system; reorganizing the police library, and develop- 
ing curricula and material for instruction in the pro- 
posed police school. The present system In both police 
stations and the executive office of the Police Depart- 
ment Is obsolete. Project employs mostly women. 

8238 SELF-HELP COOPERATIVES DATA 

To prepare for publication, chiefly for use In rural 
areas, data on diversified cooperative projects. Data 
will be available to, and of valuable assistance to, 
the United States Department of Agriculture, the Farm 
Security Administration, the Rural Rehabilitation group ; 
the Division of Self-Help Cooperative Service, and to 
any division of governmental service which might be set 
up to plan for any type of cooperative or production 
planning. 



153 



'-■ ■"., 



8251 STATE DIVISION OP MINES 

Renovating and reorganizing files and other records 
dating prior to January 1, 1936, for the California 
State Division of Mines. Work involves repairing, 
transcribing, cataloging, cross-indexing, bookbinding 
and map making. Material will be used to compile a 
geological map which will be available to the general 
public. 

8252 MAPPING OF UNDERGROUND STRUCTURES 

Surveying and mapping underground structures by assem- 
bling field data concerning sewers, pipes, conduits, 
service lines, manholes, and other underground struc- 
tures; preparing complete maps showing horizontal and 
vertical positions with reference to city datum, with 
size, shape, use, materials and other physical charac- 
teristics. Work proposed is a new undertaking, com- 
plete in Itself, not of a continuing nature. 

8253 MISSION-GEARY TEST BORINGS 

To determine the sub-surface strata and geological for- 
mation along the Montgomery-Geary and Mission Street 
routes of proposed San Francisco subway. Data will 
furnish the factual basis upon which plans and speci- 
fications for the construction of subway sections may 
be drafted by the San Francisco Public Utilities Com- 
mission. 

8255 COUNTY CLERK'S RECORDS 

To renovate and modernize old records for the County 
Clerk's Office. Work will consist of examining, re- 
filing, cleaning, repairing, renumbering, transferring, 
etc. No work will be done on records which are dated 
or have to do with matters subsequent to January 1,1936. 

8257 SURVEY OF PRESIDIO 

Surveying and compiling a new map of the Presidio of 
San Francisco showing the location of buildings, roads, 
viaducts, utilities and contours. This project will 
operate in the city of San Francisco. 

8294 CODIFICATION OF CITY ORDINANCES 

Codifying San Francisco ordinances Into a "Municipal 
Code" divided into divisions, chapters, articles, and 
sections, with indices, annotations and tables of crops- 
references, court decisions, opinions of city attorneys., 
and legislative history; preparing an "Administrative 
Code" with index; indexing ordinances not subject to 
code classification; and preparing a legislative his- 
tory of amendments and repeals. Legal advice will be 
furnished by the City Attorney. Sponsor will publish 
final report . 

154 



'.' If* 



'■'. 



8301 CHILDREN'S AGENCY 

To assist the Juvenile Court in giving more complete 
social services to wards of the Court who have been 
committed to the Children's Agency of San Francisco . 
Project employs mostly women. 

8340 PUBLIC UTILITIES RECORDS 

To renovate, reorganize, and prepare an index and cen- 
tral Inventory of records such as legal documents., ac- 
count "books, audits, maps, etc., for the various de- 
partments of the San Francisco Public Utilities Com- 
mission. Completed work will be maintained by the reg- 
ular staff; proposed work Is a new undertaking. 

8386 THEATRE RESEARCH 

To provide employment for needy persons in research 
work concerned with the theatre and its people In San 
Francisco , covering the period dating from 1849. Work 
also includes the preparation of a monograph series on 
actors, directors, Impresarios, operatic stars, and 
significant phases and organizations of the theatre and 
period aforementioned. Data will be collected by re- 
search in the files of newspapers, magazines, and in 
the memoirs, letters, diaries, and scrapbooks contain- 
ing material not generally accessible. Resulting ser- 
ies of monographs will be distributed by the sponsor to 
public agencies, including public and university li- 
braries . 

8387 ACADEMY" OF SCIENCES LIBRARY 

Binding and cataloging scientific publications, pub- 
lished prior to January 1, 1935, for the public Library 
of the California Academy of Sciences. Project employs 
mostly women. 

8388 SHOE REPAIR 

Repairing and renovating contributed shoes for distri- 
bution, free, to the needy. 

8434 LETTERMAN HOSPITAL RECORDS 

To renovate and reorganize records of Letterman General 
Hospital, consisting of: cleaning, mending, copying, 
rearranging, reindexing and, in general, completely 
modernizing the records of this institution. An integ- 
ral part of this work will consist of reorganizing and 
bringing completely up-to-date the indices of the li- 
brary collections of the Hospital and, incidental there- 
to, the mending and binding of books and periodicals 

8463 SEWING 

Maintenance and operation of sewing rooms. Work also 

155 



includes the making of cloth toys, rag rugs, and other 
household articles, except mattresses, using scrap ma- 
terials. Products will be distributed free of charge 
to charitable institutions, or to the needy, and a por- 
tion may be used on other W.P.A. projects. No Federal 
funds will be expended for the cost of distribution of 
finished products. Project will employ mostly women. 



156 



FINANCIAL STATISTICS 



SUMMARY OP FINANCIAL DATA 



The following pages show: 

1- Works project number 

2- Name of official sponsor 

3- Official project number 

4- Total Federal funds expended 

5- Federal funds expended for 
labor only 

6- Federal funds expended for 
other than labor 

7- Percentage of Federal funds 
expended for labor in rela- 
tion to total Federal funds 
expended. 

8- Total Sponsor's funds ex- 
pended 

9- Sponsor's funds expended for 
labor only 

10- Sponsor's funds expended for 
other than labor 



These figures will enable anyone to take off any equa- 
tion desired for statistical purposes. 

A brief titular description may be had by referring to 
the works project number prefixed In brief description on pre- 
ceding pages. 

It may be determined that there have been operated in 
San Francisco, Area No. 7, a total of 282 projects, of which 138 
are construction and 144, women's and professional projects. 

It should be understood, however, that in a number of 
instances more than one work project has been operated for the 
same purpose. This occurs in cases of continuation or super- 
seding projects being approved for the further operation of" the 
same work. 



157 



The grand totals from the charts show expenditures 

from November 1, 1935 to December 31, 1937, as follows: 

WOMEN'S & 
CONSTRUCTION PROFESSION TOTAL 

TOTAL FEDERAL FUNDS $19,346,019 $9,584,110 $28,930,129 

Labor Expend. 15,663,669 9,080,540 24,744,209 

(labor percent) (80.97$) (95$) (85.53$) 

Other Expend. 3,682,350 503,570 4,185,920 



TOTAL SPONSOR FUNDS $ 2,610,274 $ 343,302 $ 2,953,576 

Labor Expend. 506,419 105,349 611,768 

Other Expend. 2,103,855 237,953 2,341,808 

GRAND TOTAL EXPENDITURES $21,956,293 $9,927,412 $31,883,705 



The number of man months employed during this period 
was 380,246 - construction 233,786 - and women's and profession- 
al 146,460, over a period of twenty- six months, thus showing 
that an average of 14,625 persons were employed over this per- 
iod. This figure is exclusive of workers employed on the 
Shoals projects, data for which is unavailable. 

This labor load has fluctuated, and by referring to 
comparative labor load chart the increases and decreases, month 
by month may be seen. 

Of the total funds expended, Federal expenditures rep- 
resent 90.73$ of the total and Sponsor's expenditures, 9.27$ for 
the entire period. However, regulations have been changed and 
the Sponsor now contributes a greater percentage.- The Federal 
cost per man month averages $76.06 and the Sponsor's, $7.77. 



158 









FEDERAL 


FEDERAL 


FEDERAL 


$ OF 
TOTAL 












OFFICIAL 


FUNDS 


FUNDS 


FUNDS 


FED. 


SPONSOR 


EXPENDED 


».P. 




PROJECT 


EXPENDED 


EXPENDED 


EXPENDED 


FOR 








NO. 


SPONSOR 


NUMBER 


TOTAL 


LABOR 


OTHER 


LABOR 


TOTAL 


LABOR 


OTHER 


46 


UNIV. CALIF. 


65-3-17 


* 2,796 


$ 2,796 


$ - 




100 


$ 823 $ 


600 


$ 223 


47 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-18 


4,191 


4,191 


- 




100 


1,791 


1,027 


764 


48 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-20 


1 1,429 


11,429 


- 




100 


632 


488 


144 


53 


CITY-CO. S-F. 


65-3-28 


6,046 


6,046 


- 




100 


1,566 


518 


1,048 


71 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-64 


2,692 


2,692 


- 




100 


586 


508 


7 ? 


358 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-212 


7.130 


7,130 


- 




100 


1,225 


949 


276 


359 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-213 


7,75° 


7,750 


- 




100 


3,730 


2,500 


1,230 


366 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-I365 


24,000 


24,000 


- 




IOC 


1,603 





1,603 


370 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-1373 


15.973 


15,973 


- 




100 


1,486 


306 


1,180 


371 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-1374 


47,472 


47,472 


- 




100 


3,N2 


112 


3,000 


378 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-1382 


8,298 


8,298 


- 




100 


2,999 


2,535 


464 


405 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-921 


9,405 


9,405 


- 




100 


6,748 


— 


6,743 


457 


CITY-CO. S F. 


65-3-379 


1,939 


1,939 


- 




100 


1,023 


1,000 


23 


458 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-38O 


3,921 


3,921 


- 




100 


1,475 


1,340 


135 


476 


UNIV. CALIF. 


65-3-470 


9,538 


9,538 


- 




100 


1,516 


975 


541 


477 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-471 


10,514 


10,514 


- 




100 


2,163 


1,300 


863 


525 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-965 


553,607 


476,928 


76,679 


86 


35,155 


— 


35,155 


528 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-962 


30,090 


30,090 


- 




100 


927 


431 


496 


529 


CITY-CC. S.F. 


65-3-963 


33,878 


33,878 


- 




100 


4,311 


— 


4,311 


530 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-964 


143,197 


143,197 


- 




100 


1,663 


— 


1,663 


605 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-1362 


3,992 


3,592 


- 




100 


1,077 


440 


637 


772 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-1719 


1,684 


1,684 


- 




100 


1,088 


76O 


328 


773 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


C5-3-I72O 


1,062 


1,062 


- 




100 


338 


200 


138 


781 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-959 


527,837 


527,643 




134 


IOC 


10,689 





10,689 


861 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-IO7O 


15,254 


15,254 


- 




100 


3,307 


1,500 


2,307 


951 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-IO5I 


1,101 


1,101 


- 




100 


512 


300 


212 


954 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-IO7I 


31 


81 


- 




100 










1055 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-78 


4,527 8 


4,283 




544 


89 


— 








1224 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65.3-1463 


22,354 


22,354 


- 




100 


— 








1356 


US LTHSE SERV. 


65-3-21 


1,714 


1,714 


- 




100 


20 





20 


1365 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-2101 


22,215 


22,215 


- 




100 


1,736 





1,736 


1366 


UNIV. CALIF. 


65-3-2102- 


101,575 


101,575 


- 




100 


2,109 


817 


1,292 


1367 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-2106 


1,1 16 


I,ll6 


- 




100 


71 




71 


1475 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-2201 


19,586 


19,586 


- 




100 


3,254 


1,283 


1,971 


I4?7 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-1358 


4,41 1 


4,411 


- 




100 


2,211 


2,050 


l6l 


1498 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-1361 


14,671 


14,453 




218 


98 


4,120 


3,400 


720 


1525 


U.S. ARMY 


65-3-38 1 


1,685 


1,635 


- 




100 


550 


425 


125 


1646 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-1360 


14,283 


14,283 


- 




100 


2,650 


1,950 


700 


I897 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-2091 


33,470 


33,470 


- 




100 


3,002 


1,463 


1,539 


1928 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-1721 


8,531 


8,531 


- 




100 


1,144 





1,144 


1934 


CITY-GO. S.F. 


65-3-2722 


684 


684 


- 




100 


213 


213 





2034 


S. R. A. 


65-3-2840 


158,807 


128,569 


30,238 


81 


— 








2038 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-3055 


449,253 


428,250 


21 


,003 


95 


29,896 


12,762 


17,134 


2609 


STATE CALIF. 


65-5-3604 


17,202 


17,202 


- 




100 


1,066 





1,066 


2^83 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-3658 


72,590 


70,546 


2 


,044 


97 


— 








2779 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-3654 


38,869 


38,210 




659 


98 


8,303 


2,670 


5,633 


2863 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-2222 


9,688 


9,688 


- 




100 


2,688 


1,490 


1,198 


2865 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-2982 


2,536 


2,536 


- 




100 


— 







2871 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-3553 


3,898 


3,528 




370 


9! 











2873 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-3631 


43,547 


43,463 




84 


100 


13,009 


4,300 


8,709 


2874 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-3632 


46,436 


44,145 


2 


,291 


95 


— 


— 




2877 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-3651 


247,903 


247,903 


- 




100 


18,350 


6,855 


11,495 


2880 


STATE CALIF. 


65-5-3731 


590 


590 


- 




100 


320 


198 


122 


2888 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-3801 


1,385 


1,385 


— 




100 


275 


240 


35 


2892 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-3492 


543 


543 


- 




100 


223 


135 


88 


2896 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-377? 


1,118 


1,118 


- 




100 


2,600 


2,600 





3298 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-2066 


2,684,434 


2,430,837 


253,597 


91 


47,960 





47,960 


3329 


STATE CALIF. 


*5 -3-4151 


2,053 


2,053 


- 




100 


1,143 


970 


173 


3330 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-4229 


4,693 


4,582 




III 


98 


1,494 


1,050 


444 


3571 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-4425 


44,876 


44,027 




849 


98 


1,394 




1,394 


3724 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-4197 


17,705 


17,705 


- 




100 


351 





35' 


3802 


U.S. ARMY 


65-3-19, 


1,928 


1,928 


- 




100 


541 


25O 


29I 


3864 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-4968 


40,513 


38,654 


1 


,859 


95 


11,747 


5,000 


6,74/ 


3865 


CITY-CO. S.F. • 


65-3-4996 


1,415 


1,415 


- 




100 


284 


200 


84 


3955 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-5013 


3,164 


3,164 


- 




100 


496 


30 


466 


4018 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-U26 


755 


755 


- 




100 


1,052 


775 


277 


4078 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-838 


5,724 


5,522 




202 


96 


731 




73} 


4215 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-77- 


173,047 


173,047 


- 




100 


1,376 


600 


776 


4249 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-5270 


32,303 


30,615 


1 


,688 


95 


2,572 


300 


2,272 


4366 


U.S. ARMY 


65-3-5392 


5,503 


5,503 


- 




100 


1,750 


850 


900 


4381 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-5421 


10,289 


9,95? 




330 


97 


1,412 


— - 


1,412 


4453 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-5441 


3,246 


3,246 


- 




100 


457 


— 


457 


4462 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-5442 


4,675 


3,784 




891 


81 


1,080 


— 


1,080 


4463 


S. R. A. 


65-3-5443 


9,613 


9,613 


- 




100 


3,417 


— 


3,417 









FEDERAL 


FEDERAL 


FEOERAL 


i OF 
TOTAL 








lU n 




OFFICIAL 


FUNDS 

f \J niC tinr r\ 


FUNOS 


FFUNDS 


FED. 


SPONSOR 


•XPENOED 


* .P. 




PROJECT 


EXPENDED 


EXPENDED 


EXPENDED 


FOR 








NO. 


SPONSOR 


NUMBER 


TOTAL 


LABOR 


OTHER 


LABOR 


TOTAL 


LAB OR 


OTHER 


4577 


S. R. A. 


65-3-4493 


$ 6,4IS 


$ 6,415 


$ - 


100 


$ 802 


$ 525 


$ 277 


4667 


S. R. A. 


65-3-655 


10,846 


10,846 


- 


100 


180 




180 


4729 


S. R. A. 


65-3-705 


28,970 


25,683 


3,287 


89 


1,343 


- — 


1,343 


4819 


S. R. A. 


I65-O3 -8001 


86,963 


85,455 


1,508 


98 


2,934 


1,196 


1,738 


48^7 


S. R. A. 


65-3-738 


16,074 


16,074 


- 


100 





— 





5285 


S. R. A. 


I65-O3-7025 


8,842 


8,842 


- 


IOC 


1,974 


1,050 


924 


5344 


U.S. ARMY 


265-O3-7OOO 


3,709 


3,709 


- 


100 


772 


538 


234 


54 18 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


I65-O3-6029 


11,430 


11,430 


- 


100 


1,399 




1,399 


5457 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-6036 


7,261 


7,26l 


- 


100 


3,295 


2,700 


595 


5576 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-6049 


14,709 
1,674 


14,709 


- 


100 


2,400 


1,900 


500 


5591 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-7085 


1,674 




100 


486 


350 


136 


5650 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-7091 


5.754 


5,754 


- 


100 


1,489 


620 


869 


5^52 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-7124 


3,431 


3,431 


. 


100 


3,141 


3,000 


141 


5653 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-7128 


36,963 


36,963 


- 


100 


5,876 


2,520 


3,356 


5670 


UNIV. CALIF. 


I65-O3-7II3 


8,171 


8.171 


- 


100 


1,253 


625 


628 


567I 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


l$5-03-7 181 


3,751 


3,751 


- 


100 


1,431 


1,300 


131 


5809 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


I65-O3-7203 


45,822 


45,822 


- 


100 


2,624 


1,793 


831 


5822 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-6097 


90,456 


90,456 


- 


100 


-.- 




— 


5863 


CITY-CC. S.F. 


I65-O3 -6108 


92,558 


89,747 


2,81 1 


97 


_-. 




— 


5885 


U.S. ARMY 


265-3-7003 


, 1,551 


1,551 


- 


100 


619 


516 


103 


5937 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-6170 


600,942 


595,801 


5,141 


99 


4,912 




4,912 


5988 


STATE CALIF. 


165-03-6123 


2,904 


2,839 


65 


98 


281 


200 


81 


6149 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-O3-726I 


191,671 


191,097 


574 


100 


3,123 


— 


3,129 


6168 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-6189 


5,653 


5,653 




100 


1,395 


1,050 


345 


6421 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


I65-O3 -6186 


16,335 


16,315 


20 


too 


895 


— 


895 


6433 


STATE CALIF. 


165-03-7321 


9,257 


9,257 


- 


100 


1.401 


900 


501 


6465 


U.S. GOVT. 


265-O3-7OO 


18,809 


17,962 


847 


95 


614 


— 


614 


6466 


U.S. GOVT. 


265-03-7009 


3,847 


3,847 


- 


100 


350 


138 


212 


6555 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-7336 


1,894,643 


1,809,207 


85,436 


95 


27,901 


— 


27,901 


6576 


UNIV. CALIF. 


165-03-7329 


17,257 


17,257 


- 


100 


619 


463 


156 


6632 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


I65-O3-8O76 


15,364 


15,364 


- 


ICO 


2,196 


... 


2,196 


6671 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-7375 


11,619 


11,619 


- 


100 


873 


— 


873 


6695 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-6253 


9»«25 


9,022 


103 


99 


739 


200 


539 


6697 


STATE CALIF. 


I65-O3-6259 


5'Z 


517 


- 


100 


142 


125 


17 


6698 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


I65-O3-6267 


18,456 


18,456 


- 


100 


1,158 


937 


221 


6753 


STATE CALIF. 


165-03-7356 


22,518 


22,518 


- 


100 


3,796 


1,63c 


2,166 


6784 


U.S. ARMY 


265-03-6006 


2,072 


2.072 


- 


100 


600 


300 


300 


6859 


S. R. A. 


165-03-6297 


10,C5I 


10,051 


- 


ICO 


3,477 


— 


3,477 


6860 


STATE CALIF. 


I65-O3-7405 


7,333 


7.333 


- 


IOC 


1-575 


1,550 


25 


6875 


STATE CALIF. 


165-C3-8IO7 


5,007 


5,007 


- 


ICO 


2,035 


1,200 


835 


7028 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-6300 


10,527 


10,527 


- 


100 


2,153 


1,280 


873 


7054 


STATE CALJF. 


I65-O3-632O 


22,502 


21,138 


1,364 


94 


5,494 


3,564 


1,930 


7056 


U.S. GOVT. 


265-03-6008 


5,246 


5,246 


- 


100 


578 


450 


128 


7064 


STATE CALIF. 


165-03-6308 


507 


507 


- 


100 


467 


467 


— 


7082 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-6319 


3,823 


3,823 


- 


100 


53 





53 


7096 


STATE CALIF. 


165-03-6313 


6,302 


6,252 


5° 


99 


1,571 


740 


831 


7127 


STATE CALIF. 


165-03-6043 


124,313 


119,477 


4,836 


96 


9.276 


3,133 


6,143 


7129 


STATE CALIF. 


I65 -03 -7 508 


18,956 


16,717 


2,239 


88 


4,012 


933 


3,079 


7153 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-6331 


4,164 


4,164 


- 


100 


— 


— 




7346 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


I65-03-6343 


7,747 


7,365 


382 


95 


.-- 


— 


— 


7377 


U.S. GOVT. 


265-O3-60IO 


12,875 


12,875 


- 


100 


... 


— 


— 


7119 


U.S. GOVT. 


365-03-3-1 


4,178 


4,178 


- 


100 


283 


88 


195 


7481 


U.S. GOVT. 


365-03-3-2 


10,605 


10,605 


- 


100 


— 







7506 


U.S. GOVT. 


365-03-3-3 


9,719 


9,719 


- 


100 


1,042 


525 


517 


7559 


UNIV. CALIF. 


465-03-3-51 


2,394 


2,394 


- 


100 


140 


121 


19 


75^0 


STATE CALIF. 


465-03-3-58 


517 


517 


- 


100 


75 


63 


12 


7561 


STATE CALIf. 


465-03-3-5? 


5,914 


5,911 


3 


100 


500 


500 


— ». 


775* 


STATE CALIF. 


465-03-3-86 


4,926 


4,926 


- 


100 


— 


-_. 


— 


7755 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


465-03-3-89 


3,477 


3,469 


8 


100 


5 





5 


8030 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


■ 465-03-3-UO 


48,382 


48,382 


- 


100 


— 





— 


8043 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


465-03-3-135 


3,667 


3,667 


- 


100 


284 


70 


214 


8I9I 


STATE CALIF. 


465-03-3-112 


34,343 


33,298 


1,045 


97 


1,085 


597 


488 


8213 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


465-03-3-211 


582 


582 


- 


ICO 





— 





8238 


S. R. A. 


465-03-3-225 


1,297 


1,297 


- 


100 





— 





8251 


STATE CALIF. 


465-03-3-I9I 


3,431 


3,431 


- 


100 


144 


ICO 


44 


82 52 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


465-03-3-226 


3,016 


3,016 


- 


100 





— 





8253 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


465-03-3-235 


1,170 


1,170 


- 


100 


29 


_-- 


29 


8255 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


465-03-3-25O 


3,069 


3,069 


- 


100 




— 





8257 


U.S. ARMY 


365-03-3-316 


492 


492 


- 


100 










8301 


CITY-CO. S.F. 
T A L i J 


465-C3-3-259 
P 


939 
$ 9,584,110 


939 

$ 9,080,540 


$ 503,570 


ICO 

95* 





... 





T 


$343,302 


$105,349 


$237,953 



I I 



'•: 



' \ 











FEDERAL 


FEDERAL 


FEDERAL 


i OF 
TOTAL 














OFFICIAL 


FUNDS 


FUNOS 


FUNDS 


FEO. 


SPONSOR 


E 


(PENDED 


.V.P. 






PROJECT 


EXPENDED 


EXPENDED 


EXPENDED 


FOR 


" 






NO. 


SPONSOR 


NUMBER 


TOTAL 


LABOR 


OTHER 


LABOR 


TOTAL 


LABOR 


OTHER 


15 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-43 


$ 10,188 


$ 10,188 


$ 


100 


8,Q22 $ 


818 


$ 7,204 


41 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-10 


7,212 


7,212 





100 


$ 2,567 


960 


1,607 


526 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-96O 


38,636 


38,635 


1 


100 


6,677 


— 


6,677 


782 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-I588 


701,755 


655,584 


46,171 


93 


2,898 


— 


2,898 


783 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1590 


164,510 


148,383 


16,127 


90 


14,448 


408 


14,040 


784 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1591 


44/177 


36,503 


7,674 


83 


8,948 


686 


8,262 


1030 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1571 


86,010 


82,514 


3, ^96 


96 


6,922 


880 


6,042 


1031 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1577 


33,089 


33,071 


18 


100 


1,744 





1,744 


1151 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1578 


182,078 


156,816 


25,262 


86 


9,801 


25O 


9,551 


1(52 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1582 


92,307 


82,758 


9,549 


90 


4,022 





4,022 


1153 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1584 


5faC, 804 


483, 712 


85,092 


85 


82,827 





82,827 


1154 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1539 


207,623 


170,677 


36,946 


82 


46,873 


— 


46,873 


1195 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1567 


153,370 


132,1 17 


21,253 


86 


9,593 


— 


9,593 


1196 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1569 


178,657 


149,408 


29,249 


04 


7,960 





7,960 


1197 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1572 


I4I//22 


104,040 


37,682 


73 


5,367 


— 


5,367 


119s 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1574 


172,522 


166,757 


5,765 


97 


16,927 


547 


16,380 


1199 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1575 


83,655 


6 1,981 


21,674 


74 


5,868 


— 


5,868 


1200 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65 -3-1 580 


80,319 


68,600 


11,71'; 


85 


5,245 


300 


4,945 


1201 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1585 


30,719 


22,308 


7,9H 


74 


2,164 


— 


2,164 


1202 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1592 


204,617 


191,491 


13,126 


94 


17,534 





17,534 


1291 


STATE CA 


LIF. 


65-3-1954 


29,592 


29,532 


— 


100 


38,430 


J, 278 


34,152 


1315 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1789 


188,229 


167,219 


21,010 


89 


218,333 


108,447 


109,886 


I499 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1579 


27,414 


20,531 


6,883 


75 


1,824 





1,824 


l6l6 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1787 


397,399 


361,040 


36,359 


91 


119,518 


14,018 


105,500 


1643 


U.S. ARMY 


65-3-160 


5,256 


5,223 


33 


39 


2,576 


1,650 


926 


I649 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1794 


20,704 


20,364 


320 


98 





— 





|680 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2014 


15.361 


12,818 


2,5*3 


84 


130 





130 


1689 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2014 


39,713 


32,703 


7,010 


82 


1,315 


313 


996 


1690 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2014 


20,609 


15,952 


',657 


78 


lu,708 


— 


10,708 


1693 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2014 


317,215 


311,231 


5,384 


38 


1,407 


1 1 


1,396 


1699 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1570 


49,057 


35,365 


14, -32 


71 


2,380 


— 


2,300 


1 7 OG 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1573 


26,198 


20,649 


5i549 


P 


1,277 


— 


1,277 


1701 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1576 


10,104 


6,814 


3,23u 


67 


5 





5 


1702 


CITY -CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1568 


74,745 


58,243 


16,502 


I 8 


2,949 


150 


2,799 


1703 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-158I 


122,075 


77,484 


44,591 


64 


5,886 


2C0 


5,686 


1704 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1533 


37,711 


27,987 


9,724 


^ 


3,209 





3,209 


1705 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1586 


14,839 


12,777 


2,06^ 


86 


652 


— 


652 


1849 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2013 


17,435 


13,573 


3,862 


78 


337 


— 


337 


I850 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2013 


7,276 


7,017 


259 


97 


113 


— 


113 


1851 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2013 


7,996 


6,484 


1,512 


81 


— 


— 


— 


I852 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2013 


65,782 


58,124 


7,656 


88 


345 


— 


345 


1891 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-1587 


2,815,543 


2, 106,814 


708,729 


75 


328,854 


99,409 


229,445 


1922 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2013 


11,836 


9,293 


2,543 


79 


— 





— 


1923 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2013 


29,781 


29,077 


704 


2? 


438 


— 


498 


1924 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2014 


32,622 


21,368 


11,254 


66 


533 





533 


1925 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2014 


131,907 


93,435 


38,472 


71 


2,533 


— 


2,533 


1926 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-20U 


131,462 


1 14,917 


16,545 


37 


1,075 


— 


1,075 


1929 


C!TY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2014 


34,665 


31,817 


2,848 


92 


64 





64 


1932 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2886 


572,986 


477,200 


95,786 


83 


10,733 


— 


10,783 


1933 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2885 


12,941 


11,727 


1,214 


91 


— 





— 


197? 


OT. AG. ASSN. 


65-3-2942 


323,232 


286,014 


37,2lb 


89 


4,741 


— 


4,741 


2106 


CITY-CO. 


S.F 


65-3-2014 


43,664 


27,246 


|6, 413 


62 


2,327 


— 


2,327 


2170 


U.S. ARMY 


65-3-2923 


99,216 


93,959 


5,257 


95 


13,838 


3,155 


10,683 


2171 


US MAR INE CPS 


65-3-2924 


6,887 


5,671 


I,2l6 


82 


— 


— 


— 


2174 


U.S. ARMY 


65-3-297 


8,072 


7,457 


615 


92 


■-,793 


645 


4,148 


2175 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2014 


1,065,245 


722,886 


342,359 


68 


59,081 


14,300 


44.IPI 


2 1 76 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2014 


549,520 


378,307 


171,213 


69 


28,626 


10,259 


18,367 


2177 


GG BR-HGWY OT . 


65-3-2749 


179,996 


135,798 


44,193 


76 


251,800 


61,261 


190,539 


2370 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2283 


39,248 


30,912 


8,336 


73 


2,293 


155 


2,138 


2459 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2013 


39,965 


23,254 


16,711 


58 


1,341 


— 


1,341 


2524 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2CU 


71,365 


64,048 


7,317 


30 


1,172 


444 


728 


2752 


STATE CALIF. 


65-3-3533 


1 1,906 


11,906 


... 


100 


5,153 


968 


4,151 


3048 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2014 


1,570,372 


1,239,482 


330,030 


79 


54,705 


37,560 


17.145 


3462 


U.S. ARMY 


65-3-4162 


10,177 


8,214 


1,963 


SI 










34 78 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2014 


52,660 


33,298 


13,362 


^3 


467 


341 


126 


3479 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2277 


8,388 


6,310 


2,070 


75 


1,839 


— 


1,839 


3481 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2082 


01,043 


67,885 


13,158 


84 


1,281 


— 


1,281 


3514 


U.S. ARMY 


65-3-161 


2,067 


2,067 


— 


IOC 











3515 


US MARINE CPS 


65-3-4423 


19,163 


I5,H7 


4,046 


79 


— 


— 





3538 


GG 8R-HGWY OT . 


65-3-3233 


117,416 


102,434 


14,982 


87 


151,432 


38,352 


113,080 


3539 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2014 


30,874 


27,806 


3,068 


90 


309 


15 


294 


3547 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2267 


54,484 


45,968 


8,516 


04 


283 




288 


3540 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2271 


12,900 


10,515 


2,465 


81 





— 





3549 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2278 


12,050 


10,533 


1,517 


87 


1,154 


— 


1,154 


3550 


CITY-CO. 


S.F. 


65-3-2883 


27,447 


22,356 


5,091 


81 


... 


— - 


... 









FEDERAL 


FEDERAL 


FEDERAL 


I OF 

TOTAL 










. - " 


OFFICIAL 


FUNDS 


FUNDS 


FUNDS 


FED. 


SPONSOR ■■?<■:' 


*>£. 


•* 


PROJECT 


EXPENOED 


EXPENDEO 


EXPENDED 


FOR 








"NO. 


SPONSOR 


NUMBER 


TCTAL 


LABOR 


OTHER 


LABOR 


TOTAL 


LABOR 


OTHER 


3^78 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-2013 $ 


44,704 


$ 37,854 


$ 6,850 


&5 


$ — 


$ — $ 




3679 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-2013 


40,472 


27,127 


13,345 


67 


15,164 


194 


14,970 


368 1 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-2884 


94,126 


75.959 


18,167 


81 


5,153 


— 


5,153 


37 18 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-201 4 


21,442 


14,672 


6,770 


68 


4,078 


677 


3,401 


3720 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-2275 


51,322 


40,588 


10,734 


79 


63 





63 


3803 


U.S. ARMY 


65-3-4 1 II 


4,354 


3,899 


455 


90 








— 


3804 


U.S. ARMY 


65-3-41 12 


16,639 


15,995 


644 


96 


4,914 


— 


4,914 


3805 


U.S. ARMY 


65-3-4113 


24,091 


19,783 


4,308 


82 


3,170 


567 


2,603 


3806 


U.S. ARMY 


65-3-4109 


209,080 


169,542 


39,538 


81 


13,602 


1,231 


12,371 


3838 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-2266 


364,998 


305,894 


59,104 


84 


2,81' 


— 


2,814 


3839 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-228 1 


157,289 


135,522 


21,767 


s6 


292 


292 





3932 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-4966 


105,670 


87,200 


18,470 


83 


45I 


449 


2 


4300 


U.S. ARMY 


65-3-4676 


10,453 


7,505 


2,948 


72 









4415 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-729 


439,611 


358,788 


80,823 


82 


15,753 


5,133 


10,620 


4418 


GG BR-HGWY DT . 


65-3-886 


90,281 


84,795 


5,486 


94 


16,831 


2,500 


14,331' 


4556 


OT.AGRI.ASSN. 


65-3-5482 


238,875 


147,258 


91,617 


62 


21,103 


1,620 


19,483 


4811 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-4002 


52,715 


41,835 


10,880 


79 


23,009 


1,619 


21,390 


5'97 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-3007 


95,120 


95,120 


— 


100 


50,20', 


— 


50,208 


5422 


U.S. ARMY 


265-03-2005 


43,634 


43,634 





100 


15,564 





15,564 


54 80 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-73I 


508,3*0 


502,225 


6,115 


88 


13,992 


667 


13,325 


5640 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


I65-O3-IO47 


353-8 17 


322,506 


3I,3H 


91 


224,235 


28, 184 


196,051 


5^41 


GG BR-HGWY OT. 


165-03-1054 


224,432 


192,521 


3I,9H 


86 


107,382 


26,114 


81,268 


5821 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


1 65-03-85 1 8 


51,168 


50,281 


887 


98 


2,036 





2,036 


5839 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-64 2 


139,396 


132,226 


7J70 


95 


22,27o 


7,559 


14,719 


6 1 46 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-8048 


34,770 


34,523 


247 


99 


2,736 




2,736 


6250 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


I65-O3-3077 


17,578 


17,534 


44 


100 


11,569 


— 


11,569 


6445 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


I65-O3-3078 


23,995 


23,193 


797 


97 


3,57C 


— 


3,578 


6483 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


I65-03-I105 


33,927 


31,394 


, 2,533 


P, 


40,403 


777 


39,626 


1727 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-2OI5 


1,828,559 


1,214,799 


613,76c 


66 


174,384 


— 


174,984 


6545 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-2015 


7,138 


7,138 


— 


100 





— 


— 


6683 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


165-03-4063 


355,5^ 


335,038 


2c,5oe 


94 


105,232 


10,337 


98,895 


6771 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


I65-03-II34 


48,509 


43,454 


55 


100 


3,763 


b6l 


2,908 


68 19 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


65-3-643 


72,823 


71,500 


1,523 


58 





— 





6861 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


I65-O3-8 1 03 


78,248 


78,212 


36 


100 


3<,762 


... 


34,762 


7350 


GG BR-HGWY OT. 


265-03-1020 


72,274 


68,978 


3,296 


? 5 


15,900 


1,88 1 


14,019 


7354 


U.S. ARMY 


265-03-2019 


7,563 


7,256 


307 


96 





— 


— 


7356 


U.S. ARMY 


265-03-2023 


11,775 


11,178 


597 


95 








— 


7358 


U.S. ARMY 


265-03-5020 


16,220 


15,682 


530 


97 





— 


— 


736o 


GG BR-HGWY OT . 


265-O3-8OII 


33,037 


32,385 


652 


98 


5,556 


1,739 


3,81? 


7480 


U.S. ARMY 


565-03-2-I 


4,183 


4,013 


170 


96 





— 


— 


7483 


U.S. ARMY 


265-03-8012 


24,334 


23,979 


355 


99 





— 


— 


7508 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


465-03-2-23 


246,969 


215,923 


31,041 


87 


26,726 


12,502 


14,224 


7553 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


465-O3-2-9I 


8,095 


8,090 


, 5 


100 


2,207 


— 


2,207 


7651 


DT.AGRI .ASSN. 


465-03-2-107 


18,275 


[6,583 


1,692 


91 





— 





7668 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


465-03-2-116 


4,330 


4,329 


l 


100 


1,015 


— 


1,015 


7695 


U.S. ARMY 


365-03-2-7 


7,883 


7,276 


607 


92 





— 





7698 


U.S. ARMY 


565-03-2-9 


9,219 


8,493 


726 


92 


-- 


— 





7780 


U.S. ARMY 


365-03-2-11 


11,588 


n,347 


24 1 


98 





— 





8204 


U.S. ARMY 


365-03-2-U 


2,591 


2,591 





ICO 





— 





8205 


U.S. ARMY 


365-03-2-I5 


979 


979 


— 


ICC 





— 





8220 


DT.AGRI .ASSN. 


I65-O3-3OI2 


16,524 


14,944 


1,580 


90 





— 





8248 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


465-03-2-212 


5,215 


5,212 


3 


100 





— 





8264 


CITY-CO. S.F. 


465-03-1-122 


1 1,211 


1 1,21 1 





100 


6,759 


— 


6,759 


8314 


CITY-CO. S.F. 65-3-2014 61,972 
TAL CONSTRUCTION $19,346,019 


. 39,140 


22,832 
$3,682,350 


63 

so. 97 $; 


69 

!, 610, 274 


$5o6,4i9$$2 


69 


TO 


$15,663,669 


; 103,855 



NOTE: For the following projects, O.P. No. 65 —3 — 1 7 e 8 , 1733, an d 1790, non-relief costs and other costs include 
both Sponsor's contributions and W.p.A. funds. Constructed under supervision of Army engineers. 



I617 CITY-CO. S.F. 65-3-I788 

I647 CITY-CO. S.F. 65-3-1733 

I69I CITY-CO. S.F. 65-3-1790 



TOTAL 



$ 207 

180,205 

'5,853 

$196,265 



$ 33,744 

673,801 

21,536 

$729,081 



RELIEF LABOR NON-RELIEF LABOR OTHER COSTS TOTAL 



) 91,074 $ 125,025 

2,946,609 3,800,615 

210,837 248,226 



13. 248, 520 $4,173,866 



COMPARATIVE LABOR, MATERIAL 

and 
ADMINISTRATIVE FEDERAL COSTS 



A graph, shown on the opposite page, indicates the 
relation of labor funds, other than labor costs, and adminis- 
trative expense. 

Due to the manner in which appropriations were made 
prior to July 1936, we are unable to show the relations for 
that period. 

It may readily be noted, however, that both the other 
costs and administrative expenses have been decreasing more 
rapidly than labor costs. 

If this were shown by percentages, the result would 
show that in December 1956 , the labor cost was 80,39% 
the other than labor cost was 16.95% 

the administrative cost was 2 . 66% 

and that in Decemb e r 1937 , labor cost was 91.68% 
the other than labor cost was 6.77% 

the administrative cost was 1. 55% 

-The December 1937 figure is proof that those In 
charge displayed not only exceptional Interest and willingness, 
but also, a highly efficient discharge of their duties - for 
only through efficiency can overhead and administrative costs 
be kept at such a low figure. 



159 



Chart Showing Comparative Labor, Material 
and Administrative Costs 


120 
110 

too 

90 

80 

<J 70 

1 

60 

1 

§ so 

40 
30 

20 
10 












































































































u 


sor 


Costs 








































































































































































































































Othl 
La&c 


\R Th 
R Ca 


an 

STS— 

/ 


































/ 












Admi, 


V/JTRy 


\TIVE 


Cost 


7 


































i 


















?4|$S4III4*3-$*4!$4|$$=I4I 

I- /336 H- f337 — 



ANALYSIS OP AVAILABLE UNEMPLOYED CASE LOAD 
CERTIFIED AS ELIGIBLE FOR EMPLOYMENT TO THE 
WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION 



The analysis made covers 1,150 workers for whom 
jobs have as yet not been obtained on W.P.A. 

The breakdown in the following charts reveals, 
statistically, the make-up of the group. 

THE FIRST CHART indicates the ratio of family 
men, women, and unattached men to each other and to the 
total number. 

THE SECOND CHART reveals the breakdown accord- 
ing to age groupings . 

THE THIRD CHART indicates the breakdown accord- 
ing to education. 

THE FOURTH CHART shows the breakdown related to 
recent employment the workers have secured in private in- 
dustry. 



160 



Available Unemployed San Francisco 



Analysis Br Groups (/ISO) 




GROUP m 
33-2.3% 



Family Men P/J] 



Una t ta ched Men 036) 





group m 

4-UZ 



Women (499) 



GROUPJU 
IS -4<*Z 




group m 

I4-2.&X 



Available Unemployed - San Francisco 

Analysis 5y Age f//50) 




•6f+ f£A£S 21-18 7. 
Family Men (J/S) 



UnATTA CHEO M EN fjJSj 



Women (499) 




It- 24 /£AKS 

s- /.s%> 



M 6S+ Y£AM 
/0-3% 



65+ Y£A£S 
4-0.8% 



Available Unemployed San Francisco 



Analysis 3r Education (/ISO) 




Fam/ly Men (3/3) 



Unattached Men (338) 




Available Unemployed San Francisco 



Analysis 3r Recent Employment (1/50) 




IvtMiL y Men {313) 



Unattach ed Me n (336) 





ATONAL YOU 




^ 




!\ 



\l 



THE NATIONAL YOUTH A DMINISTRATION 
STATE OF CALIFORNIA 
AREA ££ 

The National Youth Administration is set up to pro- 
vide training for young men and women between the ages of 12> 
and 25- Youths who are out of school and seeking private em- 
ployment are assigned to projects for which they are fitted 
by training and inclination and are given ko hours of work. 
per month on these projects. In many cases a definite course 
of related training, in addition to the ^0 hours of work, is 
required. 

The work on the projects is designed to bridge the 
gap between shool and job; that is, to give the youth exper- 
ience in the type of work that he hopes to follow in private 
employment, and generally to increase his skill in the pursuit 
for which he is best fitted. A group of between ^00 and 500 
youths are at present receiving this training. 

To accomplish these purposes a variety of projects 
have been set up: nineteen in all. There are several clerical 
projects, as a considerable proportion of the youth are train- 
ed along these lines. One large clerical project operates 
at the United States Forestry Service. Youths work in the* 
various offices of the Service and perform the. same tyoe of 
work as the regularly employed staff. They take dictation, 

r 

type, operate office machines, do statistical work, and gen- 
erally become familiar with all the phases of office routine. 

A project of a different type is the ■ furniture pro- 
ject which trains boys to be skilled caroenters, to operate 

161 



XIW 



~ai i%* ■ 



nit 



■■■:>■ i\i 



NATIONAL YOUTH ADMINISTRATION 




This youth is working as a plasterer's helper 
under skilled supervision. After a definite 
period of training he should be ready for 
orivate employment in that trade. 



162 



the necessary machinery, and construct and repair furniture. 
This project was of great value to the community last Christ- 
mas, when it repaired and reconditioned fifteen thousand toys 
to be distributed to needy families of San Francisco. 

A third type of project is that operating in a num- 
ber of nursery schools, where girls learn the proper care 
and feeding of young children under skilled supervision, with 
the end in view that they may be placed as trained nurse 
maids in private homes. 

A project that is an excellent illustration of the 
purposes of the National Youth Administration is that oper- 
ating at Fleishhacker Zoo, constructing new cages for the 
animals. Boys on this project are trained as plumbers, 
electricians, welders, sheet metal workers, tile setters, and 
mechanics. They are supervised by skilled workmen who in- 
struct them in all phases of a particular trade, and their 
training is of the most practical type. 



164 



MON 






LETTERS 



OFFICE OF THE MAYOR angelo j. rossi 

SAN FRANCISCO Member 

U.S. Conference of Mayors 



February 3, 1938 C 


P 
Y 



Works Progress Administration, 

Area No. 7, 

450 Mission Street, 

San Francisco . 

Gentlement 

With the new year now well on its way, I 
cannot permit too much time to elapse in 1938, without 
expressing to you my sincerest thanks as Mayor of the 
City and County of San Francisco for the splendid work 
your organization has been doing in this area. 

While I am not in a position to compare the 
policies of Area No. 7, with those of other Areas through- 
out the Counties, none the less I can affirm that none 
could have cooperated more fully with any City and County 
Administration than you have. 

The people of San Francisco owe much to W.P.A. 
activities. Without them a burden would have been cast 
upon our citizens which they could not possibly have endured. 
With the W.P.A. projects already carried out and those now 
operating, much relief has been given to upstanding Americans 
who, through circumstances over which they had no control, 
were urgently in need of employment. 

The handling of these cases reflects great credit 
upon your administration and I sincerely trust that the cordial 
relations which have existed between you and the City Adminis- 
tration in the past, may continue In the future. 

Yours sincerely, 

(Sgd.) Angelo J, Rossi 

Mayo r 



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PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION Y 

City and County of San Francisco 



September 25, 1937 



Subject: Extension of "L" Line 



Mr. William Mooser, Jr. 
Manager, Area 7, District 1, 
Works Progress Administration, 
40 First Street, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Dear Mr. Mooser: 

In behalf of the Public Utilities 
Commission may I express our appreciation of your 
work personally, and. that of the Works Progress 
Administration in the construction of the extension 
of the "L" line of the Municipal Railway, which has 
recently been completed. 

The very excellent workmanship dis- 
played by the W.P.A. in the construction of this 
line has given the Municipal Railway a very valuable 
addition to the service which It affords to the people 
of San Francisco. 

I assure you that we are deeply appre- 
ciative of your efforts. 



Very truly yours , 

( signed) 

E.G. Cahill 

Manager of Utilities 

EGC:t 



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THE 
RICHMOND DISTRICT PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 

521 Twenty-Fifth 

Avenue 
BAyview - 3657 



May 2, 1936 



Mr. E. Elmore Hutchison 
Field Engineer 
W.P.A.j 450 Mission Street 
San Francisco, California 

Dear Sir: 

As president of the Richmond District Property Owners 
Association, I address you this letter as a means of con- 
veying to you and the organization under your control an 
expression of gratitude from the property owners of 25th 
Avenue from Fulton Street to Camino Del Mar for the many 
courtesies extended to our people by Mr. Earl Whitney, 
the foreman in charge of this project. 

Words of mine could not convey to you the wonderful 
qualities of this man both in the handling of men, and his 
tact In settling the many complaints of the property owners 
to the complete satisfaction of everyone concerned. As a 
representative of your organization, he is Indeed a credit 
to it. 

I wish to again thank you and your organization for 
the wonderful cooperation extended to our people on 25th 
Avenue, for it has been a pleasure to all of us to have 
your organization In our district. Your men have proven 
to the tax payers of the district that such projects are 
commendable for the welfare of our people as a whole. 



Very truly yours 

RICHMOND DISTRICT PROPERTY 
OWNERS ASSOCIATION 



By (Sgd. ) Michael Duyer 
~ Its President 



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in part) 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
November 12, 1937 



Mr. Wm. Mooser, Jr., Director 
Works Progress Administration 
450 Mission Street 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Dear Mr. Mooser: 



I suppose it is human nature to sometimes over- 
look entirely or delay unnecessarily a cknowl edging a deed 
or job well done. We, of the Golden Gate Tennis Club know 
that apology Is due you and your organization for our be- 
lated expression of both praise and thanks to the men, who 
several weeks ago, completed the installation and resur- 
facing of the tennis courts at Golden Gate Park. 

In writing to express the opinion of the Club's 
officers and the park players, 7 can but repeat what you 
already have undoubtedly been told many times: The courts 
are perfect. I am referring to the quality of surface, Its 
evenness, resiliency, the excellent drainage, etc.. 



Frankly, we were somewhat apprehensive when we 
understood our courts were to be done by the W.P.A. We know 
now that a private contractor could not improve on the job 
done. Having a good knowledge of the problems encountered 
in handling surfacing emulsions, we know you have an extremely 
capable court construction crew 



Yours very truly, 
GOLDEN GATE TENNIS CLUB 



By (signed) 

L.E. Diquez, Secretary 



Note: This is a battery of 21 tennis courts 



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MERCED MANOR PROPERTY OWNERS' ASSOCIATION 

Member 
CENTRAL COUNCIL OF CIVIC CLUBS 



December 21, 1937 



Mr. William Mooser, Jr. 

40 First Street 

San Francisco, Calif ornia 



Dear Sir: 



This is to advise you that the tennis 
courts erected on Sloat Avenue opposite 22nd 
Avenue are a great benefit and asset to the city. 
These courts are used by young -oeople from all 
parts of the city, and on Sundays and holidays 
are used continually. I believe that the value 
to the community is tremendous. 

I believe that it would be of enduring 
value to the city If additional courts such as 
these were placed in fifty other locations in the 
city. That is, in my opinion, the city could 
stand and absorb fifty additional units. This 
statement Is made from an observation of the 
tennis situation in San Francisco covering a 
period of approximately twenty years. 



Yours sincerely. 

( signed) 

P.S. Durie 
President 



FSD : MO 

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San Francisco, California 

P December 14th, 1937 

Y 



Mr. Win. Mooser, Jr. 
c/o Mr. Grey 
40 - 1st Street 
City 

Dear Sir - , 

As the Crocker Amazon Recreation Park is near completion; as the 
Tennis Courts., which are situated, on the North West Corner of 
Moscow and Geneva Ave. has been completed, I wish to express and 
give you, and to Whom it may concern a general idea of the tennis 
courts, there location, climate, beauty, as well as the interest 
that the people of this vicinity have taken along with the Sponsor, 
our City of San Francisco, through the Federal Government assisting. 

There are six sets of Tennis Courts, built the most modern and up to 
date in every way, large enough to hold tournaments, built to accom- 
modate the largest gathering, as well as a place provided for judges 
which is exclusive for Judges to judge all games. The grandstands 
are arranged that one can watch the game and will be able to enjoy 
every move of the players, the court has been built to bring out 
the fastest playing that is in the human being, so constructed that 
plenty of sunshine, best of air conditions, in case of wind, a 
breaker protects the players as well as the sightseers. Everything 
is new the Court, nets, fencing, the convenient House. The surround- 
ings are beautiful, which will add to help the players and sight- 
seers that not a moment will be dull when visiting such a beautiful 
man made out door tennis court, which has taken over three years to 
build . 

The landscape has been carefully laid out, with trees, grass, schrubs, 
Hills and dells. On the East and South no homes, while on the west 
and North homes that are keep up and are a credit to the district. 

This Recreation Play Grounds comprise 55 acres, while the Tennis 
Courts are separate, the Play Grounds will soon be open to the 
Public and there is no question the people will certainly enjoy one 
of the greatest and most beautiful Recreation Parks in United States. 

As President of the Crocker Amazon Improvement Association, which was 
one of the first to Sponsor this Recreation Park, as Chairman of the 
Play Grounds, the people of this vicinity have watched with Interest 
this large Tract, which the homes were purchased and moved off, for 
a reservoir, after the City took over this property, reimbursing 
men whom use same for a vegetable garden for over twenty years, the 
Association desired to have a Play Ground for the people of this 
neighborhood, after untireing efforts, was made we finally succeeded 



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and. thru the Federal Governorment assisting the unemployeed, this 
project is one of the largest in the City and County of San Francisco 

The children as well as the Adults will appreciate this play grounds 

as it is far' 'better for the taxpayer to pay a few more dollars for 

recreation purposes, saving life at the same time enjoying the G-od 

Life that the Creator wants us to have. May I state that we indeed 
are greatful. 

The Recreation Grounds can be reached by street cars, bus, and 
motorists have a wonderful parking place on the grounds. 
It should be of interest of every out door fan to visit this up too 
date Recreation Grounds and all Tennis Fans should consider using 
same . 

Very truly yours 

/s/ W.S. Salisbury 

W.S. Salisbury, President, 
Crocker Amazon Improvement Assn. 
1398 Geneva Ave. 



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