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WHITNEY LIBRARY, 
HARVARD UNIVERSITY, 




THE GIFT OF 
J. D. WHITNEY, 

SturgU Hooper Professor 



MUSEUM OF OOMPAEATIVE ZOOLOGY 



Cl|UJ hi i^Aif. 



APR 26 1924 



SECOND GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF PENNSYLVANIA. 
REPORT OF PROGRESS K^ 

EEPORT OK THE COAL MINES 

OP THE 

MONONGAHELA RIVER REGION, 

FROM THE WEST-VIRGINIA STATE LINE 
TO PITTSBURGH, 

INOLUDINO THB MINB8 ON THE LOWER 

YOTJGHIOGHENY RIVER. 



By J. SUTTON WALL. 



PART I. 

DESCRIPTION OF THE MINES. 



WITH A MAP OP THE IlBGIONf IN TWO SHEETS ; 12 HELIOTYPE ^ /iCk./ , ^( ./ V 
PICTURES 5^7 PAGE PLATE MAPS, AND 19. PAGE PLATE . O^ 



SECTIONS OF THE PITTSBURGH BED. 



HARRISBURG: 

PUBLISHED BY THE BOARD OF GOMMTSSIONERS 

FOR THE SECOND GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

188 4. 



Entered, for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, in the year 1884, according 

to acts of Congress, 

By WILLIAM A. INGHAM, 

Secretary of the Board of Commissioners of Geological Survey , 

In the office of the Librarian of Congress, at 

Washington, D. C. 



Electrotyped and printed by 

LANE S. HART, State Printer, 

Harrisbnrfr, Pa. 



BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS. 



His Excellency, ROBERT E. TATFISON, Governor, 

and ex-offleio President of the Board, Harrisburg. 

Akio Pardee, Hazleton. 

William A. Ingham, Philadelphia. 

Henry S. Eckert, Eeading. 

Henry McCormick, Harrisburg. 

James Macfarlane, - - Towanda. 

Charles A. Miner, Wilkes-Barre. 

Joseph Willcox, Media. 

Hon. Daniel J. Morrell, Johnstown. 

Liouis W. Hall, Harrisburg. 

Samuel Q. Brown, Pleasantville. 



SECRETARY OF THE BOARD. 
William A. Ingham, Philadelphia. 

STATE GEOLOGIST. 
Peter Lesley, Philadelphia. 



ASSISTANTS IN 1883. 



ProfBSSor I. C. Whitb, geologist, in Huntingdon oounty ; address Morgan- 
town, W. V. 

Mr. E. V. D'iNviLLiERS, geologist, in Centre ooanty; 711 Walnut street, 
Philadelphia. 

Mr. A. E. Lehman, geologist, in Cumberland and York oonnties ; 711 Walnut 
street, Philadelphia. 

Dr. H. Martyn Change, geologist, in Clearfield oounty; 2428 Fairmount 
Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Professor E. W. Clatfole, geologist, in Perry and Juniata counties ; address 
in future, Akron, O. 

Mr. J. Sutton Wall, M. E., Monongahela city. Pa. 

Mr. A. S. McCreath, ohemist ; 223 Market street, Harnisburg. 

Mr. Leo Lesquereux, fossil botanist ; Columbus, Ohio. 

Mr. E. B. Harden, topographer, in charge of illustrations for reports, and 
general correspondence at head-quarters; 905 Walnut street, Philadelphia* 

Anthracite ihirvey, 

Mr. Chas. a. Ashburner, geologist, in charge of the Survey of the An- 
thracite coal fields ; headquarters, address 907 Walnut street, Philadelphia. 

Mr. Charles B. Scott, assistant and secretary, Philadelphia office. 

Mr. O. B. Harden, topographer and artist, Philadelphia office* 

Mr. Frank A. Hill, assistant geologist, in the Northern Coal Field; Scrauton, 
Pa. 

Mr. John C. Bbanner, topographer, in the Northern Coal Field ; Scranton, 
Pa. 

Mr. T. J. Williams, assistant, in the Northern Coal Field ; Scranton, Pa. 

Mr. A, D. W. Smith, aid, in the Northern Coal Field ; Scranton Pa. 

Mr. Arthur Winslow, assistant geologist, in the Eastern Middle Coal Field ; 
Philadelphia office. 

Mr. William Griffith, assistant, in the Eastern Middle Coal Field ; Pitts- 
ton, Pa. 

Mr. Bard Wells, assistant geologist, in the Western Middle Coal Field ; 
Pottsville, Pa. 

Mr. H. N. Sims, assistant, in the Western Middle Coal Field ; Pottsville, Pa. 

Mr. Baird Halberstadt, aid, in Western Middle Coal Field ; Pottsville, Pa. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Letters of Transmittal, xiii 

Historical Introduction, xvii 

Chaptek I. 

Mines above Pool No. 6, 1 

Chapter IL 
Mines on Pool No. 6. 

1. Cat's Run mine, 3 

2. Jacobs' Slope mine, , . . 3 

Chapter III. 
Mines on Pool No, 5. 

3. Evans mine, . . • 5 

4. Maple Grlen mine, 6 

5. Black Hawk mine, 6 

Chapter IV. 
Mines on Pool No. i. 

6. Knob mine, 9 

7. Bridgeport Slope mine, . . . c 11 

8. Umpire mine, ......... ^ 12 

9. Climax mine, 15 

10. Garrow mine, 17 

11. Cedar Hill mine, 19 

12. Little Alps mine, 20 

13. Merchant mine, 21 

14. Greenfield mine, 21 



Vi K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

Page. 

15. Reed mine, 21 

16. Globe mine, 22 

17. Dexter mine, 22 

18. Eclipse mine, 22 

19. Caledonia mine 23 

20. Champion mine, 24 

21. Wood's Eun mine, 26 

22. American mine, 27 

23. Peacock mine, 28 

24. Snow Hill mine, 28 

25. Bargedde mine, 30 

Hoaf coal lots, . 30 

26. Stimmel mine, 30 

27. Furlong mine, 31 

28. Troytown mine, 31 

29. Turnbull & Hall mines, 33 

30. Carondelet mine, 34 

31. Little Redstone mine, 36 

32. Connecticut mines, 36 

33. Clipper mine, 36 

34. Ashmaid mine, 37 

35. New Tremont mines, 39 

36. Old Tremont mines, 39 

37. Little Pittsburgh mine, 39 

38. Taggart mine, 41 

39. Glass Works mine. No. 1, 41 

40. Glass Works mine, No. 2, 41 

41. Speer's mine, 41 

42. Rostraver mine, 42. 

Chapter V. 
Mines on Pool No, 3. 

43. Wolf Harbor mine, 46 

44. Whitesville mine, 45 

45. Boyle mine, 46 

46. Myers mine, 46 

47. Jacksonville mine, 46 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. K*. vii 

Page. 

48. Welsh mine, 46 

49. Iron City mine, 47 

60. Thomas mine, 49 

61. Columbia mine, 49 

62. Webster mine, 51 

63. Gilmore mine, 54 

64. Bisselmine, * 56 

55. Heslep mine, 56 

66. Paynetown mine, 56 

67. Bakertown mine, 56 

58. Becketts' Run mine, 57 

59. Stockdale mine, 57 

60. Baird mine, 68 

61. Milesville mine, 59 

62. Harlem mine, 60 

63. Victory mine, 61 

64. Wier mine, 62 

65. Rankin mine, 62 

66. Robinson mine, 63 

67. Black Diamond mine, 64 

68. Fort Pitt mine, 66 

69. Ivile mine, 67 

70. Old Catsburgh mine, 70 

71. New Catsburgh mine, 70 

72. Bakewell mine, . 73 

73. Dry Run mine, 73 

74. New Eagle mine, 74 

75. Mingo mine, ^ 77 

76. Mure mine, 79 

77. Old Eagle mine, 80 

78. Courtney mine, 83 

79. Black Hills mine, 86 

80. Barr mine, 87 

81. Garfield mine, 87 

82. Holmes mine, 89 

83. Buffalo mine, 89 

84. Lysle mine, 92 

85. New Cincinnati mine, 92 



viii K*. REPORT OF PSOaKBSS. J. ;SUTTOK WALL. 

Page. 

86. Britton mine, 93 

87. McKinney mine, 84 

88. Jesse Bentley mine, 94 

89. Old Cincinnati mine, 94 

90. William Finley mine, 94 

91. Port Finley mine, . .v 95 

92. H. H. Finley mine, 95 

93. John Finley mine, 95 

94. Chester mine, - . . 96 

95. Cox mine, 96 

06. Hughes mine, . 96 

97. Craig mine, 97 

98. Jenkins mine, 97 

99. French mine, 97 

100. Hutchinson mine, 98 

101. New Coal Bluff mine, 98 

102. Reed mine, 103 

103. Peterson mine, 103 

104. Coal Bluff mine, No. 3, 108 

106. Coal Bluff mine, No. 2, 103 

106. Coal Bluff mine, No. 1, 104 

107. Cliff mine, 104 

108. Irwin mine, 110 

109. Absalom Bentley mine, 110 

110. Banner mine. No. 1, Ill 

111. Banner mine, No. 2, 112 

112. McKnight mine, 113 

112a. Park mine, 113 

113. Wenona mine, 113 

114. Locust Grove mine, 115 

115. Hilldale mine, 116 



Chapter VL 
Mines on Pool No, ^. 

116. Upper Walton mine, 119 

117. Jones mine, 121 

118. Walker mine, 123 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. K*. iX 

Page. 

119. Harvey O'Neil mine, 128 

ISO. Lower Walton Mine, 123 

121. West Elizabeth mine, 127 

122. Horner & Roberts mine, 127 

1S3. Lovedale mine, 129 

124. Bellevue mine, 132 

126. Robbins & Jenkins mine, 135 

126. Blackburn mine, 186 

127. Pine Run mines, 188 

128. Rock Run mine, . 141 

129. AUequippa mine, 143 

130. Camden mine, 14S 

131. Amity mine, •. 147 

132. Hunter mine, . , 149 

133. Dravosburg mine, . 149 

134. Stone's mine, 150 

135. Blackstock mine, 152 

136. Gallatin mine, 152 

137. John Neel mine, . 153 

138. Dunshee mine, 153 

139. Whighammine, 153 

140. Collins mine, 154 

141. Crawford mine, 154 

142. James Neel mine, 155 

143. McCloskey mine, > 155 

144. Saltworks mine, . 155 

145. Keystone mine, 156 

146. Corry mine^ 156 

147. Shaw mine, 156 

148. Port Perry mine, 156 

149. Miller mine, 167 



Chapter VII. 
Mines on Pool No, 1. 

150. Turtle Creek mine, 159 

151. John Robison mine, 159 

162. Kenny mine, 159 



X K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

Page. 

163. Greensprings mine, 160 

154. Braddock mine, 162 

155. Bellwood mine, 163 

156. Brown mine, 164 

157. Hodgson mine, 165 

158. Bushnell mine, 165 

159. Hays' Street's Run mine, 167 

160. Risher mines, 168 

161. Walton's Pool No. 1 mine, 170 

162. Beck's Run mines, 172 

163. American mine, 174 

164. Ormsby mine, 175 

165. Bausman mine, . . . .• 178 

166. Castle Shannon mine, 179 

Chapter VIII. 
Saw-Mill Run Mines, 

167. Enterprise mine, 183 

168. Venture mine, 186 

169. Coal Ridge mine, 188 

170. Eclipse mine, 188 

171. Chess mine, 189 

172. Fox mine, 189 

Chapter IX. 
Peters* CreeJc Mines. 

173. Venetia mine, 193 

174. Lockhart mine, 194 

175. Legler mine, 195 

176. Peters' Creek mine. No. 1, 196 

177. Peters' Creek mine. No. 2, 196 

Chapter X. 
Toughiogheny River Mines, 

178. Miller mine, 197 

179. Edmundson mine, 197 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. K*. xl 

Page. 

180. Penny mine, 198 

181. James O'Neil mine, 199 

182. Cornell & Werling mine, 200 

183. Osceola mine, 203 

184. Alpsville mine, 203 

185. Eagle Nest mine, 203 

186. McQuiston mine, 204 

187. Rupert mine, 204 

188. Old Alps mine, 204 

189. Coulterville mine, 205 

190. Ciera mine, 205 

191. Scotch Hill mine, 205 

192. Blythe mine, 205 

193. White Ball mine, 206 

194. Shaner mine, 206 

195. Stringtown mine, 206 

196. Charleston mine, 207 

197. Buena Vista mine, 207 

198. Armstrong mine, 208 

199. Brinton mine, 209 



xiiK\ 



Report of Progress, J. Sutton Wall. 



£.B.H. 




LETTERS OF TRAlf SMITTAL. 



To His Excellency Governor R. E. Pattison, Ex-offlcio 
Chairman of the Board of Commissioners of the Second 
Geological Survey of Pennsylvania : 

Sir : I have the honor to lay before the Board a report on 
the collieries of the Monongahela Valley, prepared by Mr. 
Wall, of Monongahela City, illustrated by maps and sec- 
tions, and by a series of photographic views taken at my 
direction by Mr. E. B. Harden, Topographer of the Survey. 

The map of the river valley in a pocket of the bound 
volume was constructed and drawn by Mr. Wall on the 
basis of the river survey made by Col. Milnor Roberts in 
1838, and plotted by Mr. Felix R. Brunot in 1841. The side 
country has been added by Mr. Wall, as well as the loca- 
tions of collieries, towns, villages, &c., from his numerous 
surveys in subsequent and recent years. 

As this, map will be removed from the book by many per- 
sons to hang upon a wall, I have directed Mr. Harden to 
copy it in sections, and insert the parts as page plates in 
the body of the work. The sections of the Pittsburgh coal 
bed, in groups of four to a page, have been drawn by Mr. 
Harden ; to whom also I owe a careful proof reading of the 
whole work and the preparation of its index. In fine he has 
taken entire charge of its publication. 

I hope to have another report from Mr. Wall upon the 
internal structure of the Pittsburgh coal bed, summarizing 
the data scattered through the present report, and describ- 
ing the mining experience of the region. But no advantage 
would accrue from delaying the publication of his observa- 
tions at the diflEerent collieries along the river of facts the 
value of which will be well appreciated by the citizens of 
that part of the State. 

Very respectfully, 

J. P. Ltcsley. 



Xiv K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

MoNONGAHELA CiTY, Pa., Sept 10^ 1881^, 

Professor J. P. Lesley, 

State Geologist^ Philadelphia^ Pa.: 

Dear Sir: I herewith take pleasure in submitting to 
your consideration and approval Part First of my report 
on the Monongahela River Collieries, prepared from obser- 
vations and examinations made in accordance with your 
instructions of June 24, 1881. 

This report contains detailed descriptions of all the coal 
mines now in operation in the Monongahela Valley, together 
with a brief history of many of those that have been in 
operation, but are now suspended. I have also included 
those mines in the Youghiogheny Valley that were in opera- 
tion during the existence of the Slack- Water Improvement 
on that river, and those that are still operating to the river 
trade by means of the slack- water formed in the lower por- 
tion of the river by Pool No. 2 of the Monongahela river ; 
also those of the Saw-Mill Run region and the Peter's Creek 
Valley. To which is added under the heading of an '' His- 
torical Introduction " a brief history of the mining industry 
of the district, from the discovery of the coal to the present 
time, including observations on growth and development at 
various j)eriods of its history, with a table of the annual 
shipments from the Monongahela river since 1844. 

This report is also accompanied with an outline map of 
the Monongahela river, from the West Virginia State Line 
to Pittsburgh, showing the outcrop lines of the Pittsburgh 
Coal Bed, location of coal mines, locks and dams, railroads, 
&c., throughout that distance. In the preparation of this 
map, the Hon. Felix R. Brunot, of Allegheny City, has 
kindly granted me the use of the very excellent map of the 
Monongahela river made by him in 1841, the history of 
which is contained in the accompanying letter from him. 

The chapter on '' Coal Cleavage Planes " will be included 
in Part Second of this report, together with the several 
chapters on ''Methods of Mining," ''Machinery," "Statis- 
tics," &c. 

I feel that an apology is due to yourself, as well as to the 



LETTERS OF TRANSMITTAL. K*. XV 

public, for the protracted delay in completing this report, 
which you have entrusted to my charge, but I sincerely 
hope that what has been lost in time is now fully compen- 
sated for in matter obtained and presented. 

I herewith beg to acknowledge my grateful thanks to the 
numerous friends of the work under my charge, who have 
freely contributed to its success, among whom it gives me 
pleasure to mention William M. Lyon and Joseph S. Mor- 
rison, of Pittsburgh ; Theodore Woods, civil and mining 
engineer, of McKeesport ; R. M. McKinney, civil and min- 
ing engineer, of Elizabeth ; Thomas Hutchinson, of River- 
view; Hon. George V. Lawrence, George A. Linn, M. D., 
and Col. Chill. W. Hazzard, editor of the Monongahela 
Valley Republican^ of this city ; Jolin S. Vanvoorhis, M. 
D., of Bellevernon ; Dr. J. Allen Hubbs, of the U. S. Signal 
Service, at Brownsville ; Major Thomas McGowan, Super- 
intendent of Repairs for the Monongahela Navigation Com- 
pany, of Lock No. 4, and the leading officials of the several 
railroad lines within the district. 

I should also not omit to inform you that I have received 
the kindest attention and assistance from all the Coal Opera- 
tors and Mine Superintendents in the district without ex- 
ception. I am under special obligations to James Louttit, 
Inspector of Mines for the First Bituminous Coal District 
of this State, for his constant companionship and valuable 
assistance rendered during my examinations of the mines ; 
also to R. S. D. Hartrick, E. M., of this city, for assistance 
in the office work, and to Edward B. Harden, C. E., of the 
Geological Survey, at Philadelphia, for the preparation of' 
the maps, illustrations, and copious indices accompanying 
this report. And to yourself especially do I b^g to ac- 
knowledge my most sincere thanks for the wise counsel, 
uniform kindness, and consideration so freely and promptly 
rendered to me at all times throughout the work. 
With very great respect, 

, Your obedient servant, 

J. Sutton Wall. 



xvi k*. report of progress. j. sutton wall. 

Pittsburgh,. Nov. H', 1883^ 
J. Sutton Waj.l, C. E.^ 

Monongahela City^ Pa.: 

Dear Sir : On my return home from work I find yonr 
favor of the 20th, making inquiries about a map of the Mo- 
nongahela river made by me in 1841. 

I was a rodman in the corps making the navigation sur- 
veys, and assisted in the office work afterwards, until the 
maps and drawings were all completed. 

After leaving the employment of the Company, I borrowed 
the note-books and made from them the map to which you 
refer. The Company maps which I also helped to make, 
were on quite a large scale, the separate sheets being bound 
together. They were burned in the fire of 1845, with the 
note-books, except those I have in my possession for the 
•above-named purpose. The original map drawn by me I 
gave to the Monongahela Navigation Company about twenty 
years ago, and subsequently it was lithographed for one of 
the annual reports. The scale was reduced in the litho^ 
graph to about one-half that of the original. My map hangs 
in the office of the Navigation Company, and no doubt 
Gen. Moorhead or Mr. Harlow, the Engineer of the Com- 
pany, will take pleasure in showing it to you. The surveys 
were made under the direction of W. Milnor Roberts, civil 
engineer, in 1838 ; and the principal assistant in charge of 
the parties was Nathaniel McDowell, both now dead. I 
plotted my map with great care from the notes of the sur- 
vey, and I think you may rely upon it as being perfectly 
accurate in all essential particulars. 

Very respectfully, &c., 

Felix R. Brunot. 



HISTORICAL IJfTKODUCTIOK 



The exposure of the Pittsburgh Coal Bed, by erosion, for 
many miles along the Monongahela River and tributary 
streams, rendered it of easy access without material labor 
or expense, and led to its discovery and use by the pioneer 
inhabitants at an early period in the history of the valley. 

The first recorded mention of the discovery and use of this 
coal, that has come under my observation, was by Colonel 
James Burd, who, in 1759, was sent with a detachment of 
two hundred soldiers by Col. Bouquet, then commanding 
at Carlisle, to complete the cutting of Braddock's road 
from a point east of Uniontown to the Monongahela River 
near the present site of Brownsville. He says, in his Jour- 
nal under date of 22d of September, 1759: ''This morn- 
ing I went to the river Monongahela, reconnoitered Red- 
stone, &c., and concluded upon the place for the post, be- 
ing a hill in the fork of the river Monongahela and Nemo- 
calling's creek, (now called Dunlap's creek,) the best situa- 
tion that I could find, and returned in the evening to camp. 
The camp moved two miles to Coal run. This run is entirely 
paved in the bottom with fine stone coal, and the hill on 
the south side of it is a rock of the finest coal I ever saw. 
I burnt about a bushel of it on my fire."* His notes of the 
following day inform us that this was at a point two and one 
half miles from the river. Colonel Burd, being a British 
oflicer, was no doubt well acquainted with the appearance 
and use of English coals, and thereby qualified to express 
a fair opinion of the quality of the coal that he found and 
used, which subsequent developments have fully confirmed. 

* See Sherman Day- 9 Historical Collections of Pennsylvania^ page 836, Ao. 
B (xvii K*.) 



Xviii K\ REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

It also appears that coal was mined from Coal Hill and 
used by the British Army at Fort Pitt, now Pittsburgh, 
while that place was under command of Col. Bouquet, soon 
after its evacuation by the French ; and at least as early as 
1765, according to observations of the Reverend Charles 
Beatty, who visited the Fort in 1766, we find him saying in 
his Journal, under date of Monday, September 8th, of the 
last named year: ''In the afternoon we crossed the Mac- 
conghehela river, accompanied by two gentlemen, and went 
up the hill opposite the fort, by a very difficult ascent, in 
order to take a view of that part of it more particularly from 
which the garrison is supplied with coals, which is not far 
from the top. A fire being made by the workmen not far 
from the place where they dug the coal, and left burning 
when they went away, by the small dust communicated it- 
self to the body of the coals and set it on fire, and has now 
been burning almost a twelve month entirely under ground, 
for the space of twenty yards or more along the face of the 
hill or rock, the way the vein of coal extends, the smoke 
ascending up through the chinks of the rocks. The earth 
in some places is so warm that we could hardly bear to 
stand upon it ; at one place where the smoke came up we 
opened a hole in the earth till it was so hot as to burn paper 
thrown into it ; the steam that came out was so strong of 
sulphur that we could scarcely bear it. We found pieces 
of matter there, some of which appeared to be sulphur, 
others nitre, and some a mixture of both. If these strata 
be large in this mountain, it maj'- become a volcano. The 
smoke arising out of this mountain appears to be much 
greater in rainy weather than at other times. The fire has 
already undermined some parts of the mountain, so that 
great fragments of it, and trees with their roots are fallen 
down its face."* 

It is also quite evident that the Penns had obtained knowl- 
edge of the existence of coal at Pittsburgh as early as 1769,. 

* See History of Pittslyurgh by Neville B, Craig, pages 95 and 96, Ac. The 
burning pits of Coal HiU are also made the subject of a paper read before the 
Historical 8odety of Western Pennsylvania at its meeting in Pittsburgh in 
1879, by James P. Fleming, Esq. 



HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION. K*. xix 

and entertained some idea of its Value, since we find that 
Thomas Penn, in a letter of instructions to his nephew, Lieu- 
tenant Governor John Penn, under date of January 81, of 
that year, says : ''We desire you will order 6,000 acres of 
land to be laid out about Pittsburgh, including the town 
which may now be laid out, and I think from its situation 
will become considerable in time." On the following 12th of 
May he also writes to Mr. Tilghman respecting this survey, 
and says : "I would not engross all the coal hills, but rather 
leave the greater part to others who may work them. ' ' * The 
* difficulties which soon followed between the mother-country 
and her colonies prevented these instructions from being 
obeyed. 

In 1784, however, we find that the Penns, who still re- 
tained their proprietary interests in large tracts of Penn- 
sylvania lands, including the ^^ Manor ^^ of PittsburgJi^ com- 
pleted the survey and plan of the town of Pittsburgh, which 
they had ordered to be done fifteen years before, "and in 
the same year sold the privilege of mining coal in the great 
seam opposite the town at £30 for each mining lot, extend- 
ing back to the center of the hill."t 

Arthur Lee informs us that the inhabitants at Pittsburgh 
were already using the coal at that time. He says in his 
Journal, under date of December 17, 1784: "The banks of 
the Monongahela on the west, or opposite side of Pittsburgh, 
are steep close to the river and about two hundred yards 
high. About one third of the way from the top is a vein 
of coal above one of the rocks. The coal is considered good 
and is burned in the town."t 

James M. Bailey, General Superintendent for the Pitts- 
burgh and Castle Shannon Railroad Company, informs me 
that one of the oldest pits in Coal Hill is located in a small 
ravine about three hundred yards east of the Castle Shan- 
non tunnel, and is known as the Indian Pit. "According 
to old tradition, the coal, when mined from this pit, was 

*See a paper read by William J. Buck before the Historioal Society of Penn. 
sylvania January 4, 1875. 

fSee Pittsburgh and Allegheny in the Centennial Yeavy by Oeorge Thurs- 
ton, page 8 ; also Craig's History of Pittsburgh, pages 185 and 186. 



XX K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

tied up in raw hides and rolled down the face of the hill to 
the river bottom land, where the teams could get at it, after 
which the empty hides were carried back up the hill to the 
pit." 

William Robbins, who is now operating the Rdbhins & 
Jenkins' mine, informs me that his grandfather, Brintnell 
Robbins, who served as a Lieutenant in the Connecticut 
Line of Infantry during the Revolutionary War, settled in 
1796 at a point on the east side of the Youghiogheny river, 
since called Robbins' Mill, and now known as Robbins' 
Station, on the Baltimore and Ohio railroad. He built a 
mill at this place, which was run by water from a dam in 
the river ; and in 1796 he discovered coal of the Pittsburgh 
seam, in the hill facing the river, on his property ; opened 
a mine and commenced to use the coal for smithing and 
domestic purposes. 

Geoige Shiras, sr., informs me that the brewery carried 
on at the Point at Pittsburgh by his father, George Shiras, 
was suj)plied with coal and coke from the Minersville re- 
gion (since called Herron's Hill) by a Mr. Mossman, who 
oi)erated a mine at that place in 1795. Mossman was suc- 
ceeded by Stephen Wiley, who carried on the coal and coke 
business for a number of years, and supplied with coal 
George Evans' Steam-Mill and Mark Stackhouses' foundry 
and machine works, and various other establishments. The 
Bell Brothers, whose residence was near the first toll-gate 
on the Greensburg Pike, also carried on an extensive coal 
business, by wagons, from the Minersville region, owned at 
that time by the Widow Duncan. Mr. Shiras also says that 
thoiirst green window-glass works in this region were erected, 
in 1795, by the late General James O'Harra and Major Isaac 
Craig, at Manchester, now Allegheny City, just below the 
residence of the late John Sampson. These works were 
abandoned in a short time, for the reason that no coal could 
be obtained on that side of the river. General O'Harra then 
erected two similar works, on the south side of the river, in 
1802, which were carried on by him until 1819, and then sold to 
Frederick Lorenz. The works were supplied with coal from 
a pit near the top of Coal Hill facing the works. The coal 



HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION. K*. XXi 

was hauled down the hill on a kind of sled-car, then made 
with two oak saplings framed together so as to form shafts 
for the horse to work in, and a box fastened on to the outer 
end of the shafts that would contain about fifteen bushels. 
The road was made with a rut cut on each side about ten 
inches deep for the ends of the saplings to run in, while the 
sled-car was being hauled up and down the hill, answering 
the purpose of the modern rail. The grade of the road was 
so steep that the main labor of the horse consisted in haul- 
ing the sled-car from the works up the hill to the pit mouth. 
The mud in the ruts answered the purpose of a lubricant in 
hauling the loaded car down the hill. This was a primitive 
arrangement for the transportation of coal, but it is reported 
to have answered the purpose well. The coal-pit caught fire 
and burned for a number of years.* The Chess and Boggs 
families then supplied the works with coal from Saw-Mill 
run. 

The late Jacob Bel tzhoover hauled and ferried large quan- 
tities of coal across the river from Coal Hill to Pittsburgh 
prior to the erection of the Monongahela Bridge.f His pits 
faced the river and also Saw-Mill run. The first ship- 
ment of coal from Pittsburgh appears to have been made in 
1803, by a French Company of Merchants under the firm 
name of John Tarascon Bros, and James Burthoud, who, 
during that year, built the ship Louisiana^ of 350 tons' bur- 
den, and ''sent her out ballasted with stone coal, which was 
sold at Philadelphia for 37^ cents per bushel.":]: 

P. Cumming, in speaking of the appearance of Pittsburgh 
in 1807, says, under date of the 3d of February of that year : 
* 'Another cause of the unprepossessing appearance of Pitts- 
burgh proceeds from the effect of one of the most useful 
conveniences and necessaries of life which it enjoys in a pre- 
eminent degree, namely, fuel, consisting of as fine coal as 
any in the world, in such plenty, so easily wrought and so 

• Major Hiram CaUow informs me that he saw this pit stiU burning in 1842. 

t This bridge was erected in 1818, and was destroyed by the great fire of 
1845. It was then supplied by a wire suspension bridge in 1816, which was 
replaced by the present iron bridge in 1883. 

X See Harria* Directory of Pdtaburgh for 1837, page 277, and for 1841, page 16. 



Xxii K*. IIEPOIIT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

near the town, that it is delivered in wagons, drawn by fonr 
horses, at the doors of the inhabitants at the rate of five 
cents per bushel." 

"A load of forty bushels, which costs only two dollars, 
will keep two fires in a house for a month, and, in conse- 
quence, there are few houses, even amongst the poorest of 
the inhabitants, where at least two fires are not used — one 
for cooking and another for the family to sit at. This great 
consumption of a coal abounding in sulphur, and its smoke 
condensing into a vast quantity of lamp-black, gives the 
outside of the houses a dirty and disagreeable appearance, 
even more so than in the most populous towns of Great 
Britain, where a proportionably great quantity of coal is 
used, which must be caused by a difference in quality which 
appears in the grate to be in favor of the coal of this coun- 
try."* 

The increasing wants of this new country for the manu- 
factured articles of iron, glass, &c., which could then only 
be obtained from the east at great expense for transporta- 
tion, together with the abundance of coal and iron ore within 
easy reach, gave an early impulse to manufacturing enter- 
prises at Pittsburgh and along the Monongahela and 
Youghiogheny river valleys. 

In the absence of more definite knowledge of the growth 
and extent of the coal business at this particular stage of 
its history, we can only learn approximately its develop- 
ment from the uses that were then being made of it. With 
that object in view, a slight digression here may be con- 
sidered pardonable. Steam-power was now beginning to 
form an important factor in the mechanical economy of the 
district. We find that a steam flouring-mill was erected at 
Pittsburgh by Oliver and Owen Evans in ]809,t which was 
supplied with coal from the Minersville region, now in- 
cluded in Pittsburgh. 

The first steamboat that navigated the western rivers was 
the New Orleans^ built at Pittsburgh in 1811. She was sup- 

* See Sketches of a Tour to the Western Country, by F. Gumming, page 62. 
t See Craig's History of Pittsburgh, page $88. 



HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION. K*. XXiii 

plied with Pittsburgh coal, and made her first trip during 
that year/^ 

A rolling-mill was erected at Pittsburgh by Christopher 
Cowan in 1812, which was supplied with coal from the 
Minersville region. 

Cramer's Almanac for 1814t says : " There are three ex- 
tensive establishments for making steam engines in this 
place, 'The Pittsburgh Steam Engine Company' construct 
them on Oliver Evans' plan, 'The Mississippi Steam En- 
gine Company' on Fulton's, and Bolton and Watts' plan, 
improved, are made by Thomas Copeland. The Pitts- 
burgh Steam Engine Company have also erected a very ex- 
tensive air foundry, and in the little town of Birmingham, J 
opposite Pittsburgh, Peter Kimmel has got one in operation. 
There are in addition two very large foundries, one owned 
by Mr. A. Beelen and Mr. J. McClurg." All of these es- 
tablishments used Pittsburgh coal. 

Cramer's Almanac for 1817 informs us, that the number 
of manufacturing establishments using steam-power had in- 
creased to eight in number, viz : Two steam grist-mills, one 
steam nail factory, one steam paper factory, one steam saw- 
mill, one steam woolen factory, and the several steam en- 
gine works. There were also four "air furnaces" in opera- 
tion, "at which they cast all kinds of iron, from butt hinges 
to large sugar boilers, sugar rollers, machinery of every de- 
scription, steam engines, and cannon of all dimensions, to- 
gether with cannon balls." Two green and three white glass 
factories were now in operation. Manufacturing had also 
commenced at various points along the Monongahela valley. 
At Williamsport, now called Monongahela City, the manu- 
facture of glass was in progress. 

At Brownsville an extensive foundry and machine works 
were in operation, and a steam cotton carding and spinn- 
ing factory. Coal of the Pittsburgh bed comprised the 
principal fuel in all these various establishments, and vv:a8 
usually supplied to the works from the neighboring hills. 

*It is said she tools on a fresh supply of ooal at Cannelton, which had been 
mined by Roosevelt for that purpose during the year prior to the voyage, 
t Published at Pittsburgh. 
% Now South Pittsburgh. 



XXiv K\ REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

The transportation of coal from Pittsburgh, in flat boats, 
was commenced by Thomas Jones in 1817.* George Shu-as, 
sr., of Pittsburgh, in a letter to Wm. M. Lyon, under date 
of June 8th, 1884, says : ''The first person that I knew to 
take coal down the Ohio river was ' Pilot Tom ' Jones, son 
of Thomas Jones, who ran and owned the Ferry from the 
foot of Liberty street to his landing on the opposite side of 
the Monongahela river. Their pit was not far up the river 
from O'Harra's burning pit. The coal was brought down 
the hill in a ' sled-car,' driven by Pilot Tom, and placed in 
piles on the bank of the river during the winter, and in the 
spring when the j^a^ hoots arrived from French creek, Jones 
would purchase a pair, hire four or five stout young Irishmen, 
and have his coal wheeled into the boats, lay in a stock of 
provisions, jump aboard the boats with only the steering 
oars at bow and stern, cut loose, and not attempt to land 
until he reached Maysville, Kentucky, where he first com- 
menced to make sales. And from this place he would take 
a fresh start for Cincinnati " 

Daniel Bushnell informs me that Lewis Sweeney was also 
engaged in floating coal from Pittsburgh at an early day, 
he thinks contemporaneous with Thomas Jones. 

Dr. John S. Vanvoorhis informs me, that the first coal 
transported from the vicinity of Monongahela City was in 
1819. The coal was mined from a pit under the present 
cemetery, hauled by road wagons, to a point at the mouth 
of Pigeon creek, and loaded into a boat owned by Edward 
Kearney, after which it was floated to Pittsburgh. The boat 
was built by Isaac and Abraham Vanvoorhis, and measured 
forty feet in length by twelve feet in width, holding about 
seven hundred bushels. 

Coal mining was commenced on a small scale in 1820, at 
points near Coal Centre, formerly called Greenfield. The 
coal was floated in small boats to Pittsburgh and towns on 
the Ohio river. 

In 1830, we find a number of mines operating in a small way 
at Limetown, which are described in succeeding chapters 

♦Information furnished by Ephraim Jones, of Pittsburgh, a brother ot 
Thomas Jones, now deceased. 



HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION. K*. XXV 

of this^report under the head of Barr^ John Finley^ Cox^ 
Jenkins^ French^ Reed, and Absolom Bentley mines. They 
were mostly operated on the "stock-yard" plan. 

The coal was usually mined during the winter season, 
screened or sorted in the mine with iron rakes, and the 
"lump" portion carted or wheeled out in hand-barrows, 
holding from five to seven bushels each, to the "stock- 
yard" on the river bank, where it remained until the river 
commenced to rise. It was then loaded into what was called 
"French-creek" boats by means of hand-barrows run on 
gangway planks extending from the river bank or stock- 
yard to the boats. 

The "slack" coal possessed no market value, and was 
usually left remaining in the working places of the mines. 
Large dogs were often used to assist the miners in hauling 
the coal from the mines. 

The boats were usually from ^ to 79 feet in length, 16 feet 
in width, and from 4 J to 6 feet in depth, and, when loaded, 
would hold from four to six thousand bushels of coal. These 
boats derived their name from French creek, a tributary of 
the Allegheny river, where they were built for the purpose 
of tmnsporting pig-iron and other products of that region 
to Pittsburg. They then only consisted of the bottoms, 
studding, and one row of siding, but after reaching Pitts- 
burgh were sold to the coal men at about forty-five dollars 
each, and conveyed by hand-power to the various coal mines 
along the Monongahela river, where they were sided up 
ready for use at a total cost of one hundred dollars each. 
When loaded, they were provided with a steering oar at the 
stern, a gouger (oar) at the head, and two sweep oars on 
each side, and a crew of five men to each boat, including 
the pilot, who was also the captain. They were "run," or 
rather floated to market singly or in pairs of two boats lashed 
together with ropes, the principal care and labor of the boat- 
men being to keep the boats in the proper channel or cur- 
rent of the river. It required from seven to eight hours to 
reach Pittsburgh from Limetown, on a favorable stage of 
water, the distance being twenty-seven miles ; and about five 
days to reach Cincinnati, a distance of four hundred and 



XXVi K\ REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUITON WALL. 

sixty- seven miles by river. The pilot would receive twenty- 
five dollars for his services per trip, as far as Cincinnati, and 
the rest of the crew from ten to twelve dollars, and they 
often returned home on foot. The boats were sold with the 
coal, on account of the great difficulty and expense attend- 
ing their return. 

The price of coal in the Ohio river markets averaged about 
12i cents per bushel, although fluctuations from five to fifty 
cents per bushel were not uncommon, owing to the supply, 
which depended largely upon a favorable stage of the water 
in the river. 

The shipping season was generally confined to the winter 
and spring rises, which did not often continue for more, than 
a few days at a time. 

A smaller class of jlat boats were also used to convey 
coal to the Pittsburgh market, holding from 1500 to 3000 
bushels They were built at various points along the Mo- 
nongahela river. Coal was also being mined at this time at 
Port Perry and Coal Hill for the river trade. From this 
time forward the advancement in the coal trade was quite 
rapid. 

As an instance of the uncertainty of the price of coal at 
that period, Captain William Ferree informs me that, dur- 
ing the early winter of 1835, he took from Limetown to Cin- 
cinnati a pair of "French -creek" boats loaded with four 
thousand bushels of coal each, and received fifty cents per 
bushel for the coal, and two hundred dollars additional for 
the boats. Messrs. Hunter and Huflf also took down a pair 
of boats each. The other boats that started for market, on 
that rise were sunk or stranded on bars, owing to a sudden 
fall in the water while they were on the way. He made 
sale of his coal on the evening of his arrival at Cincinnati, 
and on the following morning information was received that 
the river at Pittsburgh was again rising, which would enable 
the boats not sunk to get to market, and, on the basis of 
this report, the price fell to nine cents per bushel in a few 
hours. 

In reference to the coal trade of Pittsburgh and vicinity 
in 1837, Isaac Harris gives, in his Directory of the City for 



HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION. K*. XXVU 

that year, the following list of coal mines operating in Coal 
Hill, with the mimberof men employed and the annual out- 
put of each mine : 



No. of] 
men. 



30 
85 
40 
20 
40 
25 
25 
40 
25 
100 



By whom Owned. 



George Ledlie, .... 

Snowden <fe Phil pot, 2^ miles up the river, 

Leonard Semple <fc Co., 

James MoGargiil, 

R. G. Stockton A Co., 

Lonargaus, 

Lyon, Shorb A Co., 

Ormsby's, 

O. A J. H. Shoenberger, 

20 teams hauling, (120 horses,) 



Bosh els, 
yearly. 



480,000 
700,000 
500,000 
200,000 
600,000 
200,000 
260,000 
550,000 
200,000 
1,440,000 



" Which makes the quantity, from these sources alone, 
amount to 5,130,000 bushels, full half of which we believe is 
taken down the river. From Pittsburgh to Brownsville there 
are perhaps 35 to 40 coal railroads reaching into the coal 
region in the hills on each side of the river. At one time 
last fall it was reported that there were fifty large flat boats 
loaded and descending the river. With these facts we 
think the following estimate may be fairly made of the value 
and extent of the coal trade of Pittsburgh and the neigh- 
borhood;"* 

"Mr. Ly ford's estimate for amount consumed by the 

manufaoturies, . . 5,712,000 bushela 

For steam-boat supplies, . . 52,000 <* 

Amount consumed for domestic purposes, .... 3,625,000 *< 
Amount exported from Goal Hill, 2,565,000 <* 

Making a total of 11,954,000 " " 

He estimates the coal to be worth five cents per bushel, 
and considers the above statement as fairly representing the 
magnitude of the coal trade of Pittsburgh at that time, ex- 
clusive of the amount shipped direct to the lower river mark- 
ets, from mines further up the river. 

In speaking of McKeesport, for 1837, in the same volume 
of the Directory, Harris says : ' ' There are considerable ship- 
ments of coal from this point to supply the manufactories 
of Pittsburgh, as well as to all the intermediate points of 

♦See Isaac Harris' Directory of Pittsbu'-gh for 1837, pages 175 and 176, Ac 



XXViii K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

trade from thence to the city of New Orleans. There are 
ten collieries in active employ on the banks of the Monon- 
gahela and Youghiogheny within one mile of the village, 
where about 2,000,000 bushels of the best bituminous coal 
are annually shipped at an expense of four cents per bushel, 
and resold at Pittsburgh at from live to six cents per bushel ; 
at Cincinnati at from ten to twelve cents ; Louisville from 
twelve to sixteen cents, and at the various points from the 
mouth of the Ohio to New Orleans, from twenty to twenty- 
five cents per bushel. From two to three hundred men, 
and as many boats, are steadily employed on these rivers 
in this trade. The coal merchants of McKeesport at this 
time are Major William Caven, J. JeflFers, Bailey & Whig- 
ham, Clark & Co , Stacy & Dunshee, Bell & Co., H. & J. 
Neil, McClusky & Co., Beal & Co., and J. J. Collins." 

Captain Daniel C. Eaton informs me that George Ledlie 
was using mules to haul coal from the Bausman Mine as 
early as 1838, although hand-carts were still used at many 
of the mines then operating. 

We are now approaching an event of great importance to 
the development of the coal interests of this region, namely, 
the building of locks and dams in the Monongahela river. 
In this connection I take the liberty of quoting what Colonel 
W. Milnor Roberts, then chief engineer of the works, says 
in his report to the Monongahela Navigation Company, 
under date of December 24, 1839, in regard to the advant- 
ages to be derived to the coal trade from the completion of 
this improvement : 

"A single fact will show in a striking point of view the 
advantages likely to result to the coal trade upon the com- 
pletion of the works now in progress. During the year 
1837, a large number of flat boats were loaded at various 
points along the Monongahela, but, at that period of the 
season, when the owners wished to carry it to market, there 
was not sufficient depth of water on the ripples to enable 
them to float to the Ohio river. They were consequently 
compelled to remain, under a constant expense for watching 
and bailing, until near the close of the year ; and when they 
at length succeeded in reaching the Ohio, many of them 



HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION. K\ XXiX 

were sunk and destroyed by coming in contact with the 
ice. The loss from this cause during that single year was 
estimated at forty thousand dollars. Had the Monon- 
gahela improvement been completed, they might have gone 
with safety, at a favorable period, and perhaps saved the 
whole of that amount. In October of last year there were 
150 flat boats at the coal landings up the Monongahela 
river, which had then been waiting upwards of tJiree months 
for a rise of water, in order to get to market. A flat boat 
usually carries 5000 bushels of coal, and requires five hands 
to manage it ; but when lying at the coal landings, one or 
two men only are necessary to watch and pump it out. 
There were then 750,000 bushels of coal, with 200 men or 
more, together constituting a sinking fund for one fourth 
of the year. Estimating the coal only at five cents per 
bushel, there was the sum of $37,000 lying as idle capital ; 
and assuming that the men were paid one dollar per day 
for 90 days, there was the sum of $18,000 actually paid out 
as a direct tax upon the coal. A trade which can aflford to 
be thus harassed and taxed and still flourish, will readily 
pay at least a tithe of such expense to insure its safety and 
regularity, and may be considered a sure source of revenue 
to the Company. As the locks and dams are successively 
finished, the coal trade and the agricultural business of the 
flourishing counties of Allegheny, Fayette, Washington, 
and Greene will be gradually extended."* 

Locks Nos. 1 and 2, although not entirely completed, were 
opened for navigation on October 18th, 1841. These locks 
consisted of one single chamber each, 190 feet long and 
60 feet wide. Colonel W. Milnor Roberts, in speaking of 
the items of business done at Lock No. 1 during the eight 
weeks succeeding its opening to the trade, says in his re- 
port to the Navigation Company for 1840: ''The amount 
of coal carried through the lock in this brief period does 
not fall short of 1,260,000 bushels or 41,500 tons.'^f 

* See <* Seoond Annual Report of the President and Managers of the Monon- 
gahela Navigation Company for 1839/' page 30. 

f See Annual Report ( f the Monongahela Navigation Company for 1841, 
page 18, ifco. 



XXX K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

In regard to the consumption of coal along the valley of 
the Ohio at this period, there are some interesting facts 
given in a work entitled "Cincinnati in 1841," which are 
herewith quoted from Col. Roberts' report. The author, in 
speaking of the consumption of coal in that city, says: 

'' The sales from the coal yards during the last year (1840) 
were nine hundred and thirty thousand bushels^ and the 
probability is that the supplies, taken from boats on the 
river, which sell on their own account, would swell this 
amount almost or quite to one million bushels as the an- 
nual consumption for small manufacturing establishments 
and private families in the city. To this must be added 
the quantity required in the large iron works, city water 
works, &c., which I estimate to be as much more ; one es- 
tablishment alone consuming ninety-five thousand bushels 
of this article in a year. For this supply of coal the mar- 
ket depends principally on the regions of the Monongahela 
and Youghiogheny and the neighborhood of Wheeling." 

Colonel Roberts further adds in the same report : 

"Other cities along the great western waters (and especi- 
ally New Orleans) consume a large amount of coal, and the 
demand is gradually increasing. Now, one effect of this 
improvement of the river (Monongahela) is, to reduce the 
cost of coal delivered at its mouth, which necessarily has a 
direct tendency to extend its use. In addition to the 
quantity used in the cities and towns, we have an immense 
and increasing consumption by the numerous steamboats on 
the Ohio." 

Locks and Dams Nos. 3 and 4 were completed and opened 
for navigation on the 3d of November, 1844, which gave a 
continuous line of slack- water communication from Pitts- 
burgh to Brownsville, a distance of 55^ miles, in which 
coal could be loaded and transported to Pittsburgh during 
nearly the whole year, except when the river was obstructed 
with ice. The assurance of a favorable stage of water, at 
least as far as Pittsburgh, throughout a large portion of the 
year gave an additional impulse to the coal industry of the 
valley, and a steady increase in production has been a 
marked feature of the trade from that time forward, except 



HISTORICAL INTIIODUCTION. K*. XXxi 

during periods of war and general financial embarass- 
ment. 

The old method of floating coal to Pittsbnrgh was now 
supplanted by one more convenient and expeditious, that of 
small steam tow-boats, somewhat similar in construction 
to those of the present time. Coal mines were opened up 
in a more systematic manner, substantial tipples were con- 
structed, and a marked change was inaugurated in all the 
operations pertaining to mining generally throughout the 
district. Mule-power was now being employed at nearly 
all the mines. 

A change in the method of conveying coal to points be- 
low Pittsburgh was the next important improvement to fol- 
low, which marked further progress in the industry. 

The transportation of coal to points below Pittsburgh by 
means of steam tow-boats was commenced in 1845. Capt. 
Daniel Bushnell owned a small stern- wheel boat, called the 
*' Walter Forward," and in that year he made a trip to Cin- 
cinnati, taking three coal-flats, loaded with 2000 bushels 
each. Mr. Bushnell informs me that this was done to test 
the practicability of that method of transportation on the 
Ohio river, and to determine the question as to what could 
be done with larger and more powerful boats. He says the 
trip was attended with success, and did much towards dis- 
pelling popular doubts as to the practicability and profit of 
the plan. The coal-barges and boats were then fastened at 
the sides and in the rear of the tow-boat. 

The late Judge Thomas H. Baird built a side- wheel tow- 
boat, called the "Harlem," in 1844. Also, two "model" 
barges, and in the following year commenced the transpor- 
tation of coal with them from his coal mine (called the Baird 
mine) to Hanging-Rock, on the Ohio river, where it was 
used in the iron-works and blast-furnaces of that place. 
The return cargo consisted of pig-iron, which was delivered 
at Pittsburgh. 

Hugh Smith built the steam tow-boat "Lake Erie " in the 
summer of 1849, and commenced to tow coal to the lower 
markets with her during the fall of that year, 
t Daniel Bushnell built the tow-boat "Black Diamond' 



XXXii K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON^ WALL. 

during 1849, and coramenced to transport coal to Cincinnati 
with her in 1850, and subsequently to New Orleans. She 
was also a side- wheel boat. 

Further experience in the matter of towing soon de- 
veloped the fact that the bulk of the coal fleet should be 
placed at the bow of the tow-boat instead of the stern, and 
that the tow-boat should be used to propel and steer the 
fleet, instead of dragging or pulling it along. 

Mr. Bushnell informs me that Capt. Jacob J. Vander- 
grif t, now President of the United Oil Pipe Line, was pilot 
of the tow-boat ^'Black-Diamond" in 1850. This was the 
first trip with a coal fleet placed ahead of the boat. 

The construction of Locks Nos. 1 and 2, on the Youghio- 
ghenjT^ river, by the Youghiogheny Navigation Company, was 
commenced in the spring of 1850, and completed in the early 
part of the following year. Lock and Dam No. 1 was 
located one and a half miles below Alpsville, and Lock and 
Dam No. 2 at Bueua Vista. This was followed by the open- 
ing of numerous coal mines along that river, for a distance 
of thirteen miles above its mouth, which were operated and 
produced large quantities of coal for the river trade, until 
the locks and dams were destroyed by high water and ice 
in 1866. The improvement was then abandoned, and only 
such mines continued to operate as could load coal in the 
back-water produced by Dam No. 2 of the Monongahela 
river. 

All the coal run by water from the Youghiogheny since 
the completion of Dam No. 2, on the Monongahela river, 
has been run into Pool No. 2 of the last-named river, and 
is included in the reported shipments of Pool No. 2, together 
with the quantity actually mined in that pool. 

Additional locks have been added at Dams Nos. 1, 2, 
and 3, of a larger size than the old ones, which greatly in- 
creases the facility for passing coal-boats from one pool 
to the other. Locks and Dams Nos. 6 and 6 were opened 
to navigation in November, 1856, and No. 7 is just com- 
pleted. 

The United States Government completed Lock and Dam 
No. 9, at Hoard's Rock, in West Virginia, one mile and a 



HISTORICAL IjS^TKODUCTION. K*. XXXUi 

quarter south of the Pennsylvania State Line during the 
summer of 1881, and are now proceeding with the con- 
struction of Lock and Dam No. 8, near the mouth of Dun- 
kard's Creek, which will, when completed, connect with the 
Monongahela Navigation Company's Improvement, and 
give a continuous slack- water navigation from Pittsburgh 
to Morgan town, W. Va., a distance of one hundred and two 
miles. 

The Pittsburgh coal-bed preserves a sufficient elevation 
above water-level for convenient mining operations through- 
out the greater part of this distance, and at no point is it 
so much beneath the river that it cannot be easily reached 
by shafting. 

Tow-boats have been increased in size and power until 
there are now a few in the trade having a towing capacity 
of 20,000 tons, and capable of transporting from three to 
seven hundred and fifty thousand bushels of coal at a trip. 
Amongst the larger class we find the "Harry Brown," "J. 
B. Williams," ''W. W. O'Neil," "JohnF. Walton," and 
others. 

The various kinds of coal craft have also been increased 
in size. The following kinds are now used in the trade, 
namely : " Model Barges," holding from eighteen to thirty- 
two thousand bushels of coal; "Barges," holding twelve 
thousand bushels; "Coal-Boats," holding twenty-four 
thousand bushels; "Flats," holding thirty-five hundred 
bushels; "Deck Flats," holding from twenty-eight to 
thirty- four hundred bushels, and "Fuel Flats," holding 
from eight to ten thousand bushels. 

The coal loaded into " Flats" is mostly sold to the Pitts- 
burgh trade, and the larger class of Model Barges, Barges, 
and Coal-Boats, when loaded, are towed from the various 
up-river pools down to Pool No. 1, and sometimes below 
that into the harbor of Pittsburgh, where they are tied up 
and remain until the rivers rise sufficiently to enable them 
to pass safely to market. 

A good boating stage is considered to be from nine to four- 
teen feet of water, as shown by the Pittsburgh gauge. It is 
for the purpose of providing a sufficient stage of water for 
c K\ 



XXXiv K*. KEPOBT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

the harborage of coal-boats and other shipping interests of 
Pittsburgh, during the dry season, that the Davis Island 
Dam is now being built by the United States Government, 
at a point on the Ohio river five miles below that city. The 
dam is now completed and can be used, but the lock con- 
nected with it will not be open for transportation before the 
summer of 1885. This lock is said to be the largest one of 
the kind in existence. The chamber measures 110 feet in 
width and 600 feet in length, and will accommodate the 
passage of ten large coal crafts with fuel-boats and tow-boat 
all connected. The lock will only be used, however, for the 
passage of empty coal craft and boats up stream during low 
stages of water. The dam is formed of movable wooden 
wickets, so arranged that they can be raised and lowered 
at wilL At a high stage of water they will be lowered for 
the passage of boats and coal fleets over them, and when the 
river falls, they will be raised so as to preserve a six-foot 
stage of water in the pool from the dam to Pittsburgh. 

The great bulk of the coal that is transported to the mar- 
kets below Pittsburgh, at this time, is taken from the col- 
lieries of the first four pools of the Monongahela river and 
the slack water of the lower portion of the Youghiogheny 
river. It is, however, in the harbor of the city of Pittsburgh 
where the coal fleets or tows are formed. These tows are 
usually made up of one tow-boat and from ten to fourteen 
loaded coal-boats and barges, together with from one to 
three fuel-boats filled with slack coal for engine fuel during 
the voyage. Of these coal-boats and barges, one is lashed 
to each side of the steamer, and the rest are placed in front, 
all securely tied together with rope cables and ratchet 
chains. Thus, the tow-boat being placed at the rear of the 
coal fleet, propels and steers it along with the current, in- 
stead of pulling or dragging it along, as might be inferred 
from the term towing, the popular expression for this mode 
of transporting coal to market. 

Each of these tows when going as far as Cincinnati and 
Louisville require the services of a captain, (who sometimes 
acts as pilot,) two pilots, two mates, two engineers, six fire- 
men, two cooks, one chamber-maid, and from eight to 



HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION. K*. XXXV 

twelve deck-hands ; and to points below Louisville, the 
number of deck-hands is sometimes increased to fifteen. 

On a good stage of water the time required to run from 
Pittsburgh to Cincinnati is from three to four days, and to 
Louisville it takes about one day more. The return of the 
empty craft requires from five to six days, depending upon 
the stage of the water. After reaching Louisville, the tow- 
boats and fleets pass over the falls intact, if there is suf- 
cient depth of water to prevent the boats from striking the 
rocks, otherwise the boats are uncabled and towed through 
the canal, to a point below the falls, where more coal-boats and 
barges are added, which increases the fleet to from eighteen 
to twenty-eight pieces. Here the pilots are changed, and 
the fleet passes onward to more southern markets. The 
time to reach New Orleans from Louisville is from eight to 
ten days, under favorable weather, and to return with the 
empty craft requires about the same time — the whole dist- 
ance from Pittsburgh being about two thousand miles. 

The cost of transportation from Pittsburgh to Cincinnati, 
over this great water avenue, is about one cent per bushel, 
to Louisville one and a quarter cents, and to New Orleans 
about four cents per bushel, or $1.32 per ton. And while 
this example for cheapness stands without a parallel in the 
history of inland transportation, the trade is still not with- 
out numerous embarrassments throughout its various 
branches. Most prominent amongst which are, protracted 
strikes of the miners, suspension of navigation by ice- 
bound rivers, together with the destruction of coal craft, 
loaded and empty, that often occurs during the breaking-up 
and movements of the ice, periods of low water, breakage 
of dams, and the fluctuations in market prices, produced by 
financial depression, overproduction, and other causes. 
Notwithstanding all these discouraging features, we find 
that the production still increases from year to year, and 
that the trade continues to show flattering signs of pros- 
perity. 

The following table gives the annual shipments from the 
several pools of the Mondngahela river and the slack- water 



XXXVi K\ REPORT OP PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

portion of the Youghiogheny river since 1844 as compiled 
from the reports of the Monongahela Navigation Company : 



Year. 



1845, 
1846, 
1847, 
1848, 
1849, 
1850, 
1851, 
1852, 
1853, 
1864, 
1855, 
1856, 
1857, 
1858, 
1859, 
1860, 
1861, 
1862. 
1863, 
1864, 



Bushels. 



4,605,185 

7,778,911 

9,645,127 

9,819,361 

9,708,607 

12,297,967 

12,521,228 

14,630,841 

15,716,367 

17,331,946 

22,234,009 

8,584,095 

28,973,596 

25,696,669 

28,286,671 

37,947,732 

20,866,722 

18,683,966 

26,444,252 

35,070,917 



Ton& 


Ybab. 


174,997 


1865, . . 




295,698 


1866, . . 




366,514 


1867, . . 




373,136 


1868, . . 




368,923 


1869, . . 




467,322 


1870, . . 




475,806 


1871, . . 




565,972 


1872, . . 




597,222 


1873, . . 




668,614 


1874, . . 




844,892 


1875, . . 




826,196 


1876, . . 




1,100,996 


1877, . . 




976,473 


1878, . . 




1,074,893 


1879, . , 




1,442,014 


1880, . . 




792,797 


1881, . . 




706,190 


1882, . . 




1,004,881 


1883, . . 




1,332,694 







Bushels. 



89,522,792 
42,615,300 
30,072,700 
45,301,000 
52,512,600 
57,596,400 
48,621,300 
54,208,800 
55,113,495 
65,881,700 
61,409,000 
62,395,000 
72,702,800 
69,938,255 
62,016,300 
84,048,360 
86,254,660 
101,434,700 
108,487,800 



Tona 



1,501,866 
1,619,381 
1,142,762 
1,721,438 
1,995,479 
2,188,663 
1,847,609 
2,059,934 
2,094,313 
2,503,604 
2,333,642 
2,371,010 
2,762,706 
2,657,654 
2,356,581 
3,193,837 
3,277,677 
3,854,618 
4,122,636 



This table shows an aggregate of 1,566,875,011 bushels, 
or 59,541,143 tons, thus transported since 1844, to which, if 
500,000,000 bushels be added for the quantity mined at Pitts- 
burgh and in the valley prior to that date, and in Saw-Mill 
Run and Coal Hill since that date, and the quantity mined 
and shipped over the Monongahela Division of the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad since its construction and the aggregate quan- 
tity which has been mined and consumed for local and do- 
mestic purposes, not included in the amounts reported by 
the Navigation Company, we shall have 2,066,875,011 
bushels, or 78,541,250 tons, which I consider to be a fair 
estimate of the quantity mined from the Monongahela and 
the lower portion of the Youghiogheny valleys since the 
commencement of mining operations. This represents the 
exhaustion of an area of over twenty thousand acres, or 
about thirty-two square miles, of the Pittsburgh coal-bed 
up to this time. 

The shipments shown by the -eport of the Navigation 
Company for 1883 are 108,487,800 bushels, to which, if we 
add the quantity mined on Saw -Mill Run and its tributa- 



HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION. K*. XXXVii 

lies, amounting to 8,504,930 bushels; also, the quantity 
mined and transported over the Monongahela Division of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad, amounting to 2,500,000 bushels ; 
and the quantity mined and consumed for local and do- 
mestic purposes, not contained in the reports of the Navi- 
gation Company, amounting to 4,000,000 bushels per year, 
we shall have the aggregate quantity of 123,491,930 bushels, 
or 4,692,693 tons, for the production of the Monongahela 
Valley and its tributaries during that year, exclusive of the 
quantities mined and shipped from the Youghiogheny and 
Peters' Creek valleys by rail. 

The natural gas developments in the Pittsburgh region is 
now attracting considerable attention from manufacturers. 
Its use has been commenced at a number of iron, steel, and 
glass works in Pittsburgh and vicinity with very flattering 
indications of its being a successful fuel. The gas appears, 
so far, to be in great abundance, and according to the re- 
ports from wells that have now been flowing for two years 
or more, it would seem that the supply is likely to continue 
for a number of years at least, but as to the precise length 
of time which they will continue to flow in quantities suffi- 
cient for all the purposes to which it is now being applied, 
is still a question of much speculation. 

The inhabitants of the town of Washington, in this county, 
have already commenced to use the gas for domestic pur- 
poses. It is conveyed to their residences by pipes from a 
well recently drilled near the town. 

It has already affected, to a considerable extent, the local 
coal trade of Pittsburgh and vicinity which has been mainly 
supplied by railroads, but the river trade has little to fear 
in that direction, since the greater bulk of its coal goes to 
markets beyond the present reach of the natural gas supply. 



xxxviiiK*, Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 




REPORT 



MONONGAHELA RIVER COAL MINES. 



Bt J. Sutton Wall. 

Chapter I. 

Mines above Pool No. 6. 

Prom the State line to the mouth of Cat's run, a distance 
of ten and a half miles by river, the Pittsburgh Coal Seara^ 
is found at a sufficient elevation above water-level for suc- 
cessful mining operations. 

Numerous pits have been opened in the seam along the 
river outcrop and tributary streams, and the coal mined out 
on a limited scale to supply a local demand for fuel coal for 
many years. 

The absence of proper transportation facilities, such as 
railroads or slack-water, has very materially retarded the 
development of the coal interests of this entire region. It 
is, however, now confidently expected that this barrier will 
soon be removed by the early completion of Lock and Dam 
No. 8, which is in course of construction by the United 
States Government at a point near the mouth of Dunkard 
creek. 

(1 K*.> 



2 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

Lock No. 9, at Hoard's Rock, three fourths of a mile 
above the State line in West Virginia, was built by the U. 
S. Government in 1879. 

Lock No. 7, one mile and three quarters above the mouth 
of Cat's run, was completed by the Monongahela Navigation 
Company in 1882. 

Dam No. 8, when finished, will completely connect all of 
the slack- water improvements from Pittsburgh to Morgan- 
town in West Virginia, and thereby furnish a safe and 
comparatively cheap means of transportation for coal and 
other commodities from that region during a large portion 
of each year. 

Railroads are also being projected into and through the 
district, and it is highly probable that its extensive coal 
fields will be favored with a large development at an early 
day. 

The coal is of an excellent quality for gas, fuel, and 
steam purposes, and it appears from tests already made 
that the coke compares well with the celebrated Connells- 
ville coke. Its hardness and composition appear to be a 
medium between what is known 'as the Pittsburgh and Con- 
nellsville coals. 

The great thickness of the seam is also a matter of con- 
siderable economic importance in its favor. At Elgy Van- 
voorhis' pit in Greene county, I found the seam to measure 
nine feet^ with an included slate parting of only one half 
inch at six feet from the bottom or under-clay. At a pit 
mouth on Dunkard creek, near Bobtown, and within the 
well-known Dunkard oil region, the same seam measures 
eleven feet, with a thin clay parting eight feet from the 
bottom. On the Payette county side of the river I find the 
main coal member to average eight and a half feet^ the 
over-clay being from two to eight inches, and the roof coal 
from two to four feet. 



ClIAPTETl II. 

Mines on Pool No. 6. 

1. CAT'S RUM MllfE, (8C^ miles flrom Plttoborgh.*) 

The Pittsburgh coal bed descends beneath the river at 
the mouth of Cat's run, and continues beneath water-level 
nearly to the mouth of Ten-mile run. 

A short distance above Cat's run, fronting Pool No. 6, and 
on the Payette county side of the Monongahela river is a 
drift mine opened up in 1877, by Beall, Ewing & Co., who- 
built sixty ovens, and coked the entire product of the mine. 

In December, 1879, C. H. Armstrong & Son leased the- 
works for a term of two j^'ears ; built a crusher and washer,, 
and sold nearly all the coke thus made at Ironton, Ohio. 

Since the expiration of the lease, the works have remained' 
idle, except to supply a small local demand for fuel coal. 
It is claimed that the coke was of good quality. 

One and a half million bushels of coal is reported to have 
been taken from the mine. 

The price of mining is the same here ds in the Connells- 
ville region. 



2. JAOOBS' SliOPE HME, (77} miles from PlUsbargO 

Owned by Captain A. Jacobs, f and located in Payette 
county, at Jacobs' Perry, four and a half miles above Lock 
No. 6. 

* AU these distances are measured along the line of the river. 

t Captain Jacobs informs me that he opened this mine in 1878 and 1879, sim- 
ply for the purpose of determining the depth of the coal below the river bed, 
its thickness and character. 

(8K*.) 



4 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

The slope is 389 feet in length from the surface, readies 
the coal at a perpendicular depth of 155 feet, and 112i feet 
below low water. 

Main entry and air-course (driven 50 feet from base of 
slope) rise at the rate of one inch per foot so far as driven. 

A Sump entry was driven down the river, and dipped at 
the rate of one to ten. 

About 10,000 bushels were mined out, and the mine is 
now filled with water. 

Coal eleven feet thick, * capped with over-clay three inches, 
and over that a massive sand rock. 

* As reported by Captain Jacobs. 



Chapter III. 

Mines on Pool No. 5. 

Prom Ten-Mile run northward to beyond Black Hawk 
mine the Pittsburgh bed is above water level. 

Descending the river from Lock No. 6, the first point 
where we find the coal at a suflicieut elevation above water 
for convenient mining by drifts is at the mouth of Ten- 
MiU creeJc^ which forms the line between the counties of 
Washington and Greene. 

Here two pits have been opened in the seam, the bottom 
of which is five feet above water Ijgvel. The coal passes 
under the creek bed at about one half mile from its mouth. 
A small quantity of coal was shipped from these pits by 
water, in 1865, by Davis and Waddle ; but they are only 
operated at present to supply a local demand. 

8. EViUrS miME, (68^ mUes flroin Piltobnrgh.) 

On the Payette county side of the river opposite to a point 
between Millsborough and Prederick, a pit is opened and 
operated on a small scale by Thomas Evans, who built a 
tipple in 1868, and runs the coal by water to supply a local 
demand at Brownsville and Rice's Landing. 



On property belonging to the estate of Wm. Phillips, at 
the upper end of Prederick- town, there is a pit opened and 

(5K4.) 



6 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

operated on a small scale. The coal here is 66 feet above 
low water. 



Between Frederick town and the mouth of Pishpot run 
are seven pits operated on a limited scale by M. Weaver, 
N. Higdon, N. Burson, John Baker, F. Sinclair, Daniel Mar- 
tin and Tyler Gester. 

The coal is above water level for one fourth of a mile up 
Fish-pot run from its mouth, and rises in that direction. 



At J. H. Vandegrift's distillery, one mile below the mouth 
of Fish-pot run, the coal is opened and used at the mill and 
distillery. 



4. MAPIiE GliEM JHIlfE, (61} miles from Pittoborg.) 

This was opened in 1863, by M. Briggs, and operated for 
several years, and about 10 acres have been mined out. 
The coal was transported by river. Considerable quantities 
of the slack coal was made into coke. 

The mine is not in operation at present, and is owned by 
W. G. S. Keene of Lynn, Massachusetts. 

The bottom of the seam is 40 feet above low water. 



At about four hundred yards below Maple Glen Mine is 
a pit owned by the Hormel estate, and operated under lease 
by Burns & Cartright, only to supply a local demand for 
the present ; and but little coal has been shipped from it by 
river. About one acre has been mined out. 

5. BliACK H4WK IIME, (61} miles from PittobnrKliO 

This mine, owned by Elisha Crouch, and operated under 
lease by W. O'Connell & Co., was commenced in 1853, and 
worked to supply a local trade for a number of years. A 
tipple was built in 1878, and since then the coal has been run 
to the lower river markets. They only load coal Aais^ and 



MINES ON POOL NO. 5. 



K\7 



Black Hawk Mine 
Section'— (IHg, J.) 



the output amounts to 7000 bushels of lump coal per 
month. It is screened into two grades— lump and slack. 

The cleavage planes at this mine are short and variable 
in direction. One observation gave N. 74^ W. 

I made the following section of the bed : 

Sandstone. 

'Carbonaoeous shale, 2' 0" 

Roof ooal, 10 

Over-clay, 10 

Breast ooal, 4 6 

Parting, i 

Bearing-in ooal, 2 

Parting, i 

^Briokand bottom ooal, 2 6 

The bottom of the seam is 16 feet above low- water, 
passes under water-level half a mile farther down the 
river, and continues below water-level to beyond Lock No. 
6, a distance of two and a half miles below the Black Hawk 
mine. 



8K\ 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 



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Chapter IV. 
Mines on Pool No. i. 

6. KNOB lIIliE. (57 mUes from PlUsbargh.) 

Is located one mile above West Brownsville, in Washing- 
ton county. It was opened up for Sloacum and Rodgers 
in 1878, by Eli Leonard (the coal being shipped by water), 
and operated by them until September, 1882, when the 
property was sold to the Knob Coal Company, consisting 
of Christopher Bakewell, John D. Bakewell, John H. 
Bakewell,, S. H. Pearsall, D. H. Pearsall, Ashibald Smith, 
Thomas HoUowood, James Thornton, and James Rollison, 
present owners and operators. 

The coal is reached by a slope shaft 190 feet in length 
and 68 feet in perpendicular depth. 

The bottom of the slope is 300 feet from the river bank. 

The bottom of the coal is 34 feet below water-level. 

The tipple floor is 35 feet above medium water-stage. 
The coal is hauled in the mine to the foot of the slope by 
mules, and drawn up by a stationary engine and rope 
placed at the top of the slope or entrance to the mine. 

The stationary engine at the top of slope is also made to 
do the pumping of water from the boats while under the 
tipple, by means of a rod and lever connection. The boiler 
at top of slope also furnishes the steam to run a pump in 
the mine near the bottom of the air shaft. The water 
flowing into the mine requires the pump to be run six 
hours per day through the summer season, and full time 
during the winter. 

(9K4.) 



10 K*. REPOBT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

The superintendent is of the opinion that some water 
enters the mine from the river ; but since none of the work- 
ings are nearer to the river than 160 feet, that fact has not 
been positively determined. 

The main entry and air-course are driven perpendicular 
to the faces or cleavage of the coal and parallel with each 
other, with 60 feet of solid coal between them. 

The mine is worked on the block system ; room entries 
driven square against the butts and parallel with the cleav- 
age, and 90 yards apart. 

Sub-air-courses are driven parallel with the main entry 
and main air-course at a distance of 90 yards from them, 
and from each other. 

The main entry is driven 600 yards. It dips from foot of 
slope for 200 yards, rises 17 inches in 75 yards, dips 4 feet 
in 160 yards, runs level for 26 yards, and dips rapidly to 
the head. The coal also dips down the river. 

The rooms are driven 24 feet wide ; and the ribs between 
rooms are left 9 feet wide, which leaves 25 per cent of the 
coal in the mine. 

The present production of the mines is 6,000 bushels per 
day, not counting nut and dust coal. 

They only mine out the breast coal, and leave the bear- 
ing-in^ bricJc^ and bottom members undisturbed as a floor 
to the mine. But few clay seams, no horse-backs, and only 
a few binders are found. 

The coal is screened into three grades ; lump, nut, and 
dust, in the proportions of 66 per cent lump, 17 per cent 
nut, and 17 per cent dust. The coal stands handling well, 
and looks well when mined. 

They employ 76 miners, 16 day men, and use six mules. 

The price of mining here is 2J cents per bushel at the 
present time. 

The cleavage is frequent but short ; extends well through 
the members from bottom to top. Two observations on 
the cleavage planes gave : N. 65i W. 3 feet, and N. 70 W. 
4 feet. 

I obtained the following section in the mine : 



ICnob Mine Section, 

(Pig. 2.) 



MINES ON POOL NO. 4. K*. 11 

Sandstone. 

Coal, 2'0'' 

Carbonaceous shale, 17 6 

Coal, 6 

Overplay, 10 

Breast ooal, 5' 9 to 6' 0" 

Parting, (slate,) \ 

Bearing-in ooai, 8 

Parting \ 

BrioJs ooal, 12 

Parting, \ 

Bottom ooal, 19 

Caloareoos day with nodules of limestone. 



7. BRIDGEPORT SliOPE MIME, (56 mUes firom Pittsbarg.) 

Located in the town of Bridgeport, Fayette county, 
and owned and operated by William H. Miller, N. Crawford, 
and H. M. Crawford, this mine was opened in 1870, and only 
run to supply local demand. 

The slope is 100 yards in length, and reaches the bottom 
of the coal at 12 feet above low water, and 33 feet below 
surface at pit mouth. 

The main entry is driven perpendicular to the cleavage, 
and is 500 yards in length. This entry rises moderately 
toward the head. 

The butt entries are driven mainly to the left from the 
main entry, on account of the dip in the opposite direction. 
These entries rise toward their heads. 

The coal is hauled from the mine up the slope by station- 
ary engine and a IJ inch hemp rope 300 feet long. 

The water is drained through a drift cut from the mine to 
the river. 

The present output is 100,000 bushels per year. 

The property contains 50 acres of coal, and about eight 
acres has been mined out ; and the buildings are all new 
and quite extensive for the purpose. 

Price of coal delivered in the town $6 per hundred. 



12 K* REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

Mines located in Brownsville. 

The Oro mine^ at the lower end of the town, owned by 
G. E. Hogg, and operated by Charles L. Snowden, is run to 
supply coal to the glass-works while they are in operation, 
say ten months in the year, requiring 2800 bushels of coal 
per week. 

They also sell custom coal in the town during about nine 
months in each year, at the rate of 3000 bushels per week. 



The Krepps mine^ located on the east side of Dunlap's 
creek, and operated by F. Chalfant, also supplies coal to 
the town in considerable quantities. 



8. ITHPIBE niBI E, (54} miles from PittAbnrg.) 

Situated one fourth of a mile above the mouth of Red- 
stone creek, on the Fayette county side of the river, it was 
opened up in 1863 by Thomas Tiernan, who built a tipple 
and run coal by river, for several years, until his death. 

Zeph Carter then took charge of the mine and operated 
until 1864, when it was sold by the representatives of Tier- 
nan's estate to Thomas Smith and H. H. Finley, who ope- 
rated until 1866. 

Smith then sold his interest to Finley, and W. B. Switzer 
became a partner with Finley in the works. 

In 1873 Switzer sold his interest back to Finley, who con- 
veyed the whole to John S. Cunningham and Lewis Abrams. 

It now belongs to the estate of G. H. Bowman, deceased, 
and G. E. Hogg, and is operated under lease by C. L. Snow- 
den & Co. 

The old main entry is driven against the butts, from the 
river through to the creek, a distance of 1100 yards, and 
rises 15 feet in that distance. 

The new main entry is quite crooked, and driven about 
S. 20° E., and the mine is worked somewhat on the block 



MINES ON POOL NO. 4. K*. 13 

system. Butt entries are driven 180 yards apart, and the 
air-conrses are driven single, 100 yards apart. The face 
entries dip in a southerly direction at the rate of 1^ inches 
per yard, and the coal rises (up creek) at the rate of 6 feet 
in 200 yards. 

They bear in 6 inches above the bottom, and mine out all 
above that to the over clay, amounting to an average of 7i 
feet of coal. The following appears to be an average sec- 
tion : 

Shale passing into sandstone. 

f Over c/ay, from C to 2' 0" 

Breast ooal, 6' 2" 

Parting, (y \" 

Bearing-in ooal, 0' 2'' 

Parting, 0' J" 

Brick coal 1'2" 

Parting, C J" 

^Bottomooal, 1' 8" 

Limestone bottom, nodular. 

The over clay is quite variable in thickness, and in a con- 
siderable portion of the mine it is entirely absent. 

They report the mine as producing 60 per cent of lump, 
20 per cent dust, and 20 per cent nut coal. 

One hundred and forty acres are reported to have been 
mined out up to this time. 

I noticed a few clay seams and spars, but no soot veins. 



Umpire Mine Section, 
(Fig. 8.) 



2£p observation on 
cleavage gave-^ 



N. 70O W. 8 feet. 
N. 70|O w. 2 feet. 
N. 7610 w. 8 feet. 
N. 750 V/. 4 feet. 



The daily out-put is reported at 9000 bushels per day, 
with 85 miners, 8 drivers, 5 day men, and 8 mules. 

Ventilated by a furnace with a stack of 58 feet in height. 

Now using the fourth tipple, which was built in 1869. 

H. H. Finley built four coke-ovens, and G. E. Hogg built 
16 more in 1876 ; and considerable quantities of coke were 
made from the dust coal taken from the mine, until last 
spring, when the coke tipple was carried away by high 
water. 

The coke is reported to have been of good quality, and 



14 K\ Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 



I. 



2. 



3. 



4. 




4,6 



S.O 



u 



2.0 



0.6 



1.0 



6.0 



0, 3 



Ik 



6.2I 



2.5 



/.^ 



/.9 



\0.2- 
1.2 

i 

\/.3 



0.3: 



i.Z 



f.Z 



K4 



MINES ON POOL NO. 4. K*. 15 

was sold at Pittsburgh and Cincinnati at a moderate 
profit. 

An analysis made at the Edgar Thompson Steel Works 
shows the coke to compare very favorably with the coke 
produced in the Connellsville region : 



Analysis of Umpire 
mine coke— 



f Ash, 11.899 

Water, 813 

Sulphur, 798 

Carbon, 86.990 



100.000 



9. CXIHAX MIME, (54 miles flrom Plttsbargh.) 

Located three fourths of a mile below the mouth of Red- 
stone creek, in Fayette county. 

Owned by Jonathan Forsythe, and opened up under 
lease by Lewis Leonard during the present summer. The 
first coal loaded into boats was on July 18th, 1883. 

Entrance to the mine is by means of a slope (the coal 
being drawn up by a stationary engine and wire rope) 160 
feet long, and at an angle of 14 degrees. 

The bottom of the coal is level with lower water at pit 
mouth ; tipple floor 40 feet above low water mark ; depth 
of water under tipple at low water said to be eight feet. 

This mine is worked on the double-entry system. The 
main entry and air course are driven parallel with each 
other, perpendicular to the cleavage or faces, with 60 feet 
of a rib of solid coal between them, and a distance of 150 
yards to their heads at this time. 

These entries are rising from the pit mouth. 

Butt entries are driven double, with 26 feet of solid coal 
between them, to right and left of main entry. 

The coal at pit mouth appears to be near the bottom of 
the synclinal, as the entries driven to the left or down the 
river are running about level, and the entries going to the 
right or up the river are rising at the rate of one foot in 60 
feet. 



Climax Mine Section, 
(Fig. 4.) 



16 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

The air shaft, located near the river end of the air course* 
and 43 feet deep, is cut through rock and shale ; circular 
in form ; 7 feet in diameter, and cost $2 00 per perpendicular 
foot. 

The slope cost $2 25 per lineal foot. 

Ice-breakers and abutment are built 95 yards up the 
river from the tipple. 

All of the entries are driven eight feet wide. 

They only mine out the breast coal member, which is 
here six feet thick. The other portions of the section are 
the same as at the Umpire mine with respect to thickness. 

f Roof ooal, from C to 6" 

Over-clay^ ftom 0' to 1' ()•' 

Breast ooal, 6' 

Parting, \'* 

' Bearing-in ooal, 3" 

Parting, {" 

Brick, 1' 2" 

Parting, \ 

Lower bottom, 1' 8" 

The over-clay is absent in a good portion of the mine. 

Rooms are turned oflf from the butt entries at intervals 
of 32 feet ; room-pillars are left 15 feet thick before they are 
widened out ; and the ribs between each room are left eight 
feet thick. This method of working the coal out gives 
ample support to all parts of the mine, and insures the 
safe working condition of the entries until the rooms are 
all worked out. 

Mr. Lewis Leonard, the superintendent, informs me that 
the mine runs 67 per cent lump coal and 33 per cent nut 
and dust together. They have not, thus far, separated the 
nut from the dust, but expect to do so ere long. 

The present output per day is 3000 bushels by weight of 
lump coal, for which alone the miners receive pay. They 
employ 40 miners and 4 day-men, work one mule and run 
17 wagons. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 4. K*. 17 

10. GABBOir MIME, (51| miles flrom PlUsbnrgh.) 

Located in Payette county opposite to the upper end of 
the town of California and operated by Joseph Garrow is a 
slope mine, the main entry being driven against the butts, 
or parallel with the cleavage, to a distance of 610 yards 
from the pit mouth, the mine being worked on a combi- 
nation of the block and double-entry system. 

Mr. Garrow opened this mine in 1874 on his own property, 
worked out his own coal amounting to about twelve acres, 
and in May 1882, leased an adjoining tract belonging to 
John Dixon out of which he mined 774,311 bushels of lump 
coal. 

The books of the mine show that in running 28,824 
bushels of lump coal the screenings amounted to 10,401 
bushels of nut and dust coal. They run the nut and dust 
coal all together here. 

They mine out all but six inches of the bottom coal 
which is left undisturbed because the under-clay often be- 
comes soft on exposure to the atmosphere and does not 
make a dry working bottom or floor. 

This mine lies on the beginning of the west side of the 
synclinal or trough, the coal dipping to and up the river. 

The bottom of the coal at the pit mouth is 16 feet above 
low water ; and at the furnace (400 yards further up the 
river) 13 feet above low water. 

The coal is hauled up the slope by a stationary engine 
and a f -inch wire rope. 

The boilers supply steam for working a syphon-pump at 
the boats. 

The tipple is of the drop and shute form and 28 feet 
above low water. 

Forty-five miners, 3 drivers and 5 day-men employed. 

The present output of the mine is 6000 bushels per day. 

The cleavage or faces are frequent but not uniform in di- 
rection and appear to have been disturbed by clay-seams 
and rolls in the floor of the mine. In one room I found a 
cleavage plane to bear N. 66i W. 3 feet long, and in 
2 K\ 



WK\ 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 




MINES ON POOL NO. 4. K*. 19 

another room I observed two planes, one bearing N. 67i 
W. 5 feet and the other N. 67i W. 3 feet. 

Carbonaceous shale. 

(Roof coal, 0' 4" 

Over-clay^ (y 10" 

Breast ooal, 5' 0" 

Parting, J" 

^ Bearing-in coal, 2" 



OarrotD Mine Section. 



(Fig. 6.) 



Parting, \' 

Brick ooal, 1' 2" 

Parting, ^" 

Bottom coal, 1' 4'' 

Under-clay. 



11. CEDAB Hllili jniNE, cU^ miles fW»m Plttobarsh.) 

Belonging to the estate of Thomas Lilley, deceased, this 
was opened up under lease by Morgan and Dixon in 1870. 

It is a drift opening and the main entry is driven perpen- 
dicular to the faces of the coal. The distance from butt 
entry No. 13 to head of main entry is 833 feet ; and 75 feet 
more will bring it to the crop coal in the rear fronting on 
the other side of the river hill. 

The main air course is driven parallel with the main 
entry 1000 feet farther up the river. Butt entries are all 
driven single. The air current is carried forward on the 
butt entries by cutting the heads of the rooms through to 
the entry until it reaches the air course. The main entry 
is rising from mouth to head, and the coal dips up the river 
at the rate of two feet in 150 feet. There are 14 butt entries 
with two more yet to drive. They have no furnace, but are | . 
arranging to build one at an early day. The shaft is al- 
ready completed for the furnace and is 60 feet in depth, 
circular in form, and 6 feet in diameter. The air current at 
present is quite vigorous, but reported as not being uniform 
in velocity. 

The present output of lump coal per day is 5000 bushels. 
They run lump, nut and dust coal in the proportions of 67 
per cent lump, 20 per cent nut and 13 per cent dust coal. 

They employ sixty-five miners, three drivers, one roads- 
man, inside boss, two outside men and one greaser. 



20 K\ REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

The tract contained 128 acres, and about one half of it 

has been mined out. 
Bottom of coal at pit mouth 20 feet above low water. 
They mine out all except the roof and six inches of the 

bottom coal. 

Carbonaceous shale. 

Roof ooal, 2" to 6'' 

Over-clay, 10' 

Breast ooal, '. . . . 5' 0" 

Parting, \" 

Bearing in ooal, 3" 

Parting, \" 

Brick ooal, 1' 2" 

Bottom ooal, 1' 8" 

Under-olay. 

Gleai^age planes in entry No. 13 bear N. 68^, W. 3 feet ; 
N. 63i, W. 9 feet ; N. 63|, W. 7 feet. 



Cedar Hill Mine 
Section. 

(Fig. 6.) 



12. lilTTIiE AliPS JMNfi, (51 miles from Plttobargh.) 

Formerly the Budd Mine ; situated in Fayette county 
opposite to the town of California, this mine was opened 
up by James Smith and M. Ward in 1871. The coal was 
owned by L. S. Miller and operated under lease by Smith 
and Ward until 1873. 

Then the mine was leased to Crowthers, Musgrave & Co. 
who changed its name, rebuilt the tipple, and operated 
until 1879, when they sold the lease to Joseph Underwood 
and Joseph Good. 

Main entry and air-course are driven against the faces or 
cleavage (with 30 feet of coal remaining between them) to 
a distance of 1000 yards from the pit mouth, where they 
stop 50 yards short of the outcrop at the north side of the 
property. 

The main breast coal was the only part of the seam mined, 
and the overlying strata being light, the ribs between rooms 
were left quite thin. Sixty acres have been mined out and 
the coal is about exhausted. 

Pit mouth 18 feet above low water; coal rising to the 
north. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 4. K*. 21 

13. JHERCHAMT niNK, (50i miles above Plttebargli.) 

This mine, opened up by William Forsythe about thirty 
years ago, has been operated successively by Meriam 
Chalfant ; Crow & Ward ; Forsythe and Furlong ; Forsythe 
& Bigley ; Crowthers, Musgrave & Co. ; Underwood, Leon- 
ard & Co. ; and recently by Bowdlen & Co. Sixty acres 
have been mined out and the coal is about exhausted. 



14. GREEN FIKI.D JMIVE, (50| miles above Pittobarsh.) 

This mine, originally opened by Young, Moore & Co. 
(who run the coal over a tipple at the river), was operated 
during 1864 by L. W. Morgan, who purchased a half in- 
terest in the property in the spring of 1865 and continued 
to operate until it became the property of Morgan, Craft & 
Lambert ; succeeded by Morgan and Lambert, until Lam- 
bert sold his interest to Morgan ; and Morgan in the spring 
of 1873, sold the whole to Jordon S. Neel, who continues to 
own and operate. 

The coal of the front hill is nearly exhausted, together 
with about 125 acres beyond the North fork of Pike run 
which is distant 1000 yards from the river at that point. 

Coal at pit mouth 42 feet above low water. 

Employ at present 30 miners, and run 3000 bushels of 
lump coal per day. 

Ventilated by furnace and shaft. 



15. REED MINE, (50^ miles Urom Pittsbarsli.) 

When this mine was opened up by Thomas Thomas under 
lease from James Ales about fifty years ago the coal was 
transported from the mine to the boats at the river by hand- 
barrows. 

The mine has been owned and operated successively by 
Shafer, Jesse Reed and (now) by W. W. Patrick. 

Latterly the coal was mined in the usual manner and run 
over a tipple at the river ; but the tipple has been removed 
and no coal run since 1867. About 50 acres of coal have 
been mined out. 



22 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

16. GliOBE niNE, (49| mllM from Plttsbargh.) 

Opened in 1872 by Leadbetter& Co., who operated under 
lease from Robert Gregg until 1879, when the property was 
sold to the present owners, Crowthers, Miisgrave & Co. 
They have not run any coal during the present summer. 

This mine produces 66 per cent of lump, 22 per cent nut, 
and 12 per cent dust coal. 

Seventy-five acres have been mined out. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth 74 feet above low water. 

The mining conducted on the double-entry system ; ven- 
tilated by a furnace and shaft, located 600 yards from the 
river front, 33 feet deep, with a stack 30 feet high. 



17. DJBXTKB JniNE, (49} miles from Pittsbargli.) 

Was opened in 1872 by Furlong & Co., who operated 
under lease from Robert Gregg the owner until 1879, when 
it was purchased by Crowthers, Musgrave & Co., the 
present owners. This mine is operated in connection with 
the Globe mine and the coal transported through the main 
entry and over the tipple of that mine. The tipple of this 
mine is taken away, but they are arranging to build a new 
one at an early day. 

The biUt entries, driven in a north-west direction in 
both mines, rise 36 feet in 650 yards, and the face entries 
driven in a northerly direction also rise. 



18. £CIiIPIiE jniNE, (49} miles above Pittsbargli.) 

Was originally owned and opened by Smith and Lead- 
better, since when it has been successively operated by 
Lewis Smith, Smith & Co., Moore and Moore, and Jordon 
S. Neel the present operator, who leased it from the owner, 
J. H. Eakin, in 1880. The coal of the old mine was ex- 
hausted some years ago. Neel opened up an adjoining tract 
of 126 acres which is now being run out through the main 
entry of the old mine. It is a drift mine and the coal is 
run out level over the railroad from pit mouth, and down a 
short incline, to the tipple at the river. 



SECOND GEOL. SURVEY, PA. 



REPORT K4. PLATE I. 




Q. 
Q. 



O 
Q 






MINES ON FOOL NO. 4. . K*. 23 

Tipple floor 34 feet above low water. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth 52 feet above low water. 

The coal rises slightly up and back from the river. 

The daily output amounts to 10,000 bushels per day of 
lump coal which is shipped by water. The percentage of 
lump coal run is 67 to 33 of nut and dust. 

100 miners, 5 drivers, 4 trappers and 9 outside men. 



19. CAliEDOlflA MINE, (49^ miles IVom PittsburgliO 

Was opened up by Robert Toban and A. Kennedy about 
thirty-five years ago and has been successively operated by 
Jobs, Black & Co., Cyrus Miller, Grubbs and Montgomery, 
Joseph Short & Co., Grey and Mann, and Richard Well- 
ington. 

It is now owned by Samuel Thompson, and operated 
under lease by Thomas J. Woods & Co. since November 
1st, 1881. 

About 40 acres of the coal were mined out up to the time 
when Woods leased the property. Woods built a new tip- 
ple and ice-breakers in 1882. He run 600,000 bushels that 
year. 

The mine is worked on the double-entry system, all butt 
entries are driven to the left of main entry and are rising 
moderately to the head. The rooms are driven 26 feet 
wide, and ribs between rooms are left 10 feet wide. 

The breast and both bottom coal members are mined out, 
amounting to 7i feet in height. Roof Coal is ten inches, 
and the over-clap ten inches in thickness. The roof coal is 
left undisturbed. 

The present output is 9000 bushels per day of lump coal. 

The screenings give 66 per cent lump, 17 per cent nut 
and 17 per cent dust coal. 

Ventilation is produced by a furnace and shaft. The 
shaft is circular in form, seven feet in diameter, 89 feet 
from coal to surface, with 35 feet of a wooden stack added 
on top. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth 55 feet above low water. 



34 K\ REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

They employ 100 miners, 6 drivers, 2 trappers and 7 day- 
men and the coal is shipped by water. 

Woods built a new tipple, ice-breakers and furnace since 
he leased the property and everything about the mines is 
now in good working condition. 

No clay-seams or soot- veins have been noticed. 

Rolls in the floor of the mine are numerous, and some of 
them reach a height of two feet, cutting out the bottom 
coal without otherwise disturbing the seam. 

Cleavage in entry No. 3 bears N. 63^° W. 8 feet. 

.i a u a 4 44 jf ggjo ^ g u 

U 44 44 k( 44 44 J^^ 66i° W. 4 '* 



20. CHAJHPIOM MIlfE, (49 miles fW»m Plttsbarsh.) 

Opened up by Johnson Moore in about 1843; subse- 
quently refitted and put in better working condition by 
Ezeriah Crow ; bought by Samuel Thompson in 1879, who 
built the present tipple and leased it during that year to 
L. W. Morgan and John Dixon the present operators. 

The main entry is driven 500 yards through the first hill 
and as much more into the second hill, it rises to the head. 

Mine worked on the double entry system, and 50 feet of 
a pillar left between the butt entries. About six inches of 
the bottom coal is left undisturbed. 

Rolls in the bottom or floor are frequent but none are 
found in the roof. 

Clay seams are rare and only two have been noticed in 
the mine. One of these only amounts to a spar and bears 
N. 82° E. for a distance of 400 yards. It displaces the over 
clay and roof coal six inches, but only extends downward 
through the coal to the bands or bearing in member. The 
coal is only fractured and colored with a small portion 
of the over clay that has been carried into the opening. I 
made the following section in the main entry : 



MINES ON POOL NO. 4. 



K*. 25 



Champion Mine 
Section. 

(Fig. 7.) 



Shale. 

' Coal, 0' 2" 

Clay parting, 0' 4" 

Coal, 0' 8" 

CarbonaoeouB shale, 2' 2" 

Roof ooal, 0' 9' 

Over-clay, 1' 0'' 

Breast ooal, 4' 9" 

Parting, . . ^" 

Bearing in ooal, 0' 2" 

Parting, 0' |" 

Brick ooal, 1' 4" 

Parting, 0' ^" 

Bottom ooal, 1' 6 ' 

making altogether 7 feet 9 inches of coal under the ove?' 
clay. 

The roof division is variable in this mine for within 50 
yards of the above place. In the same entry I found it thus : 

Shale. 

' Coal, 0' 6" 

Parting. 0' 1" 

Coal 0' 4" 

Parting, 0' 8" 

Coal, 0' 6" 

Carbonaoeoos shale, 2' 0" 

Roof ooal, ... 0' 9" 

Cleavage planes bear N. 64^° W. 4 feet. 
'^ N. 66^ W. 6 feet. 

Ventilation is produced by a furnace with a square stack 
built of stone and brick, 60 feet in height and 6 feet in the 
clear on the inside. 

The rooms are provided with two rows of wooden posts 
set upright eight feet apart while the coal is being mined 
out. 

They employ 75 miners, 5 drivers, 1 trapper, 1 road-man 
and 6 outside men, and the output averages 8000 bushels 
of lump coal per day. 



(Pig. 8.) 



91. WOODS BUJN jniNE, (48} miles fl^m Pf Usbargh.) 

Opened by T. J. Woods and J. B. Williams in coal be- 
longing to Joseph Woods in 1862. This coal was mined 
out, and they bought a tract of coal adjoining the other in 



26 K\ 



Report of Progress, J, Sutton Wall. 



9. 



10. 



M. 




O.fi? 



0.10 




\s.o 



5.3 



\5.9 



\4,9 



'•h 



1.3 



'A 



.^ 



1,3 



'A 



/,4 



\0.2Z 



/J 



^ 



A^ 



\o4 



L4 



jJkjBl anrf. flFTlil 



J6SA 



MINES ON POOL NO. 4. K*. 27 

the rear from Hugh McKee, which they operated until 1880, 
when they sold to Samuel Thompson, the present owner. 
Since May, 1882, it has been operated under lease by W. H. 
Gregg. 

The coal is shipped by water. 

60 acres have been mined out altogether. 

Operated on the double entry, system with air-course run- 
ning parallel to and 60 feet from the main entry, which 
crosses a swamp nine feet at 600 yards distant from the 
second pit mouth. This swamp enters the mine near the 
forks of the run, passes through it in a north-west direction 
and enters the head workings of the Champion mine. I 
find the section here as follows : 

Shale. 

fCoal, 0' 10" . 

Over-clay^ 10 

Breast ooal, 5 

Parting, \ 

Bearing in ooal, 3 

Parting • 

Brick ooal, 1 3 

Parting, | 

^ Bottom coal, 1 4 

They mine out both bottom and breast coal members. 

Cleavage seams bear N. 65° W. 4 feet. 
" K 68i° W. 3 " 
'' " '' N. 66F W. 6 '' 

Ventilated by furnace and stack. Air-current near inlet 
measures 7000 cubic feet and at the furnace 7425 cubic feet 
passing per minute. 

They employ 66 miners, 4 drivers, 2 trappers, pit boss and 
3 outside men on tipple and 2 on the boats. Present output 
averages 6000 bushels of lump coal per day. 



Woods Run Mine 
Section, 



S2. AMKBICAN HIME, (^Sf miles firom Pf ttsbarsh.) 

Opened by Kelsey and Feals in 1855 ; succeeded by Wil- 
liam Latta who sold to F. H. Coursin the present owner and 
operator. 

It is worked on the double entry system. Butt entries 



28 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

are driven N. 72*° W. and the main entry N. 13i E. 900 
yards to the head. 

Ventilated by furnace and shaft. Volume of air-current 
passing out at furnace measures 7500 cubic feet per minute. 

Cleavage seams or faces bear N. 68^° W. 6 feet. 

The coal is shipped by water and the output amounts to 
5500 bushells of lump coal per day. 49 miners, 4 drivers, 1 
trapper and 4 outside men are employed. 



23. PfiA^COCK aUNE, (48 miles fk*om Pittoborgh.*) 

Owned by Jonas Crowthers and opened up by him in 
1882. 

Operated on the double entry system. Main entry and 
air-course are driven square against the cleavage or faces 
160 yards to their head, with 25 feet of solid coal between 
them. The coal rises slightly toward the head of main entry 
and air-course. 

Coal at pit mouth 52 feet above low- water and 22 feet 
above railroad. 

One butt entry has been driven from main entry on the 
left to the line, but no coal has yet been shipped to market. 
He is arranging to ship by both river and rail. 

Property contains 100 acres of coal. 



24. SMOW Hllili afllffi, (47| miles iVom PUtoborsliO 

Owned by the heirs of William Forsythe, deceased. 

It was opened up about 1832 to supply a local domestic 
trade. It was operated as a cart pit and some coal was 
shipped by river. It was leased in 1881 for a term of 
twelve years by the Alps Coal Company composed of 
Joseph Underwood, Joseph S. Elliot, L. S. Miller, J. W. 
Ales and M. E. Lynn, who built the present tipple and 
made other necessary improvements. 

*464 miles by raU. 



SECOND GEOL SURVEY, PA. 



REPORT K4. PLATE II. 




Q. 
Q. 



o 



MINES ON POOL NO. 4. K*. 29 

It is worked partly on the block and partly on the 
doable-entry system. The main entry is driven against 
the fa<5es or cleavage and crosses two swamps. 

The first swamp is 13 feet deep and the bottoni is reached 
at 150 yards from the pit mouth. From the bottom of this 
swamp the entry rises 8 feet in 200 yards, then dips 10 
feet in 200 yards and runs level for 40 yards more to its 
head. That part of the main entry crossing the first swamp 
has been leveled by blasting, the roof down, 
at an expense of $500. 

I obtained the following section here : 

Coal and part'ngs, 1' 0" 

Shale and slate, 10 

[ Roof ooal, 6" 

Over-clayf 9 

Breast ooal, £ 8 

Snow Hill Mine Parting, { 

Section. \ Bearing-in ooal, 2 

(Fig. 10.) Parting, | 

Brick coal, 13 

Parting, J" 

Bottom ooal, . . ... 1 4 
C^ay bottom containing limestone nodules. 

Twenty-five acres have been mined out. 
Coal at pit mouth 37 feet above low water. 
They are arranging to build a furnace. The shaft is com- 
pleted, 63 feet in depth, circular and 8 feet in diameter and 
costs $6 00 per foot for the sinking. 

Cleavage planes in the coal : N. 66f W. 4 feet. 

N. 68i W. 2 " 
N. 66f W. 3 '' 
N. 67 W. 3 *' 
The output amounts to 5600 bushels of lump coal per 
day at present ; 60 miners, 4 drivers, one trapper and 4 out- 
side men employed. 

Reported percentage of product : 75 per cent lump, 9 per 
cent nut and 16 per cent dust coal. 



80 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

25. BABGfiDDfi HIMfi, (47i miles iVom Pittoborsli.) 

Opened up by William Forsythe in 1863 and operated by 
him as a barrow or cart mine for several years ; coal 
wheeled to the river and loaded into boats without a tipple. 

In 1879 James Harris & Co. leased the mine for a term of 
ten years, built a tipple and are the present operators. 

It is worked on the double-entry system and 25 acres 
have been mined out. 

They are now running over 4000 bushels of lump coal 
per day and employ 40 miners, 4 drivers, 1 trapper and 4 
outside men. Ventilation by a furnace. 



THE HOAF COAIi liOTS. 

The coal and surface fronting on the river between the 
Bargedde mine and the mouth of Little Redstone creek 
belonged to David Hoaf, who (about 1840) laid it off into 
ten coal lots of about thirty acres each. Pits were opened 
in each of these lots and operated in a small way. The 
coal was carted out of the mine and stacked or piled on the 
river bank where it remained until the water had acquired 
the proper stage for loading and shipping to market. One 
of these lots is now included in the Stimmel mine ; one in 
the Furlong mine; three in the Troytown mine ; three in 
the Turnbull and Hall mine; and two in the Frazier 
and Frye mirte. 



26. STimiriEIi miNE, (46| miles from Pmsborgh.) 

Opened in 1863 by Henry Stimmel and operated as a 
barrow mine until 1868, when it was leased to Eichard 
Wellington, who built a tipple, made other improvements 
and operated the mine until 1873, when he and Wm. Troy 
leased it for a term of five years more and operated untU 
the tipple was carried away by high water in 1877. Since 
that time no coal has been ran from the mine. 

Total area mined out, twelve acres. 



MINE8 ON POOL NO. 4. K\ 31 

27. FUBIiONG miME, (46^| miles llrom Pittoborgli.) 

Located between the Stimmel and Troytown mines ; this 
Furlong mine was opened up by John Furlong in 1832. It 
was operated for some years as a cart pit by E. C. Furlong 
who subsequently built a tipple and operated until 1871 
when the coal became exhausted and the works were aban- 
doned. 

Area mined out, thirty acres. 



29. TBOTTOWN SIINE, (46} miles llrom Pmsborgli.) 

Opened by Andrew Park in 1844 and operated by him 
nntil 1852 when it was sold to Job Kitts. It was again 
sold to J. F. & W. R. Troy in 1860 and run by them until 
187^ when it was purchased by Adam Jacobs the present 
owner. 

Three of the original Hoaf lots are comprised in this 
property. 

The mine is now operated under lease by Edward Fur- 
long and is producing 3000 bushels of lump coal per day. 

The main entry is driven S. SS"" E. 800 yards to the head 
and crosses a swamp that is also found in the Turnbull and 
Hall mine. 

Ventilation by a furnace and shaft. . . 

25 miners, 2 drivers and two outside men employed. 

Sixty acres have been mined out. 



32 K\ Report of Progress. J . Sutton Wall. 



t 




MINES ON POOL NO. 4. K*. 33 

99. TITBlf BlHLIi A If Alili HIN ES, (46f miles Item Pittsburgh.) 

Opened up by Wm. Jackman and Jonah Wilkens in 1848 
and operated by them until 1870 when it was sold to Jo- 
seph TumbuU and John Hall, the present owners and op- 
erators. 

It includes three of the original ''Hoaf " coal lots in 
connection with other coal lands in the rear and also in- 
cludes what was once known as the Crow pit (a short dis- 
tance below the present tipple) which was purchased by 
the present owners from' Briggs & Co. in 1880. 

The Crow pit tipple was built by James Rutherford ; and 
Tumbull and Hall continued to operate it until last Feb- 
ruary when a rise in the river carried the tipple away. 

The two mines are now consolidated and the coal from 
both run over the upper tipple. 

It is now worked mainly on the double entry system. 
Main entry and air courses are driven against the butts 
and parallel with the cleavage. These entries pass under 
little Redstone Creek at 850 yards from the pit mouth, and 
are driven 350 yards beyond the creek. 

The mine was ventilated for some time by means of a 
furnace and shaft located on the air course at the river 
front ; but since the workings have reached the creek where 
the covering is light they obtain sufficient air current by 
means of a shaft and a slope at the last named place with-rf 
out the use of the furnace.. 

The coal seam rises along the main entry four feet in 
300 yards; dips 9 feet for 300 yards to bottom of first 
swamp \ then rises 3 feet in 200 yards and dips 4 feet in 
the next 200 yards to head and bottom of the second 
swamp. 

I observed one clay seam bearing N. 84° E. ; and one soot 
7)ein crossing the main entry near where it passes under the 
creek. 

The coal is only 18 feet under the creek bed at this place 
and a considerable quantity of water flows into the entry 
through the soot vein^ which crosses the entry on a bearing 
of N. 20° E. 
3K\ 



34 K*, 



REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 



Total area mined out, fifty acres. 

Bottom of seam at pit mouth, 36 feet above low water. 

Cleavage planes: N. 67i° W. 8 feet; N. 65i° W. 6 feet; 
N. 72i W. 8 feet ; N. 67^ W. 4 feet, and N. 67| W. 3 feet. 

Cleavage in the hlock slate bears : N. 48i W. 10 feet ; N. 
46° W. 10 feet ; N. 60J W. 20 feet ; N. 47 W. 30 feet, and 
N. 44° W. 30 feet. 

I observed the following section at this mine : 
Carbonaoeous shale. 

CJoal, 0' 

Slate, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Clay shale, 

Coal, 

Block elate, 8 

Roofooal, 

Over clay, 

Breast coal, 6 

Parting, 

Bearing in ooal, 

Parting, .0 

Brick coal, 1 

Parting, 

Bottom coal, 1 

At another place in the mine I observed a sandsto7i€fro7n 
8 inches to 2^ feet thick between the roof coal and block 
slate. 

The over-clay is quite uniform in thickness and free from 
horsebacks or swells. 

66 miners, 4 drivers and 6 day men are employed. 

Daily output amounts to 6600 bushels of lump coal be- 
side the nut and dust. They obtain 70 per cent, of lump 
to 17 per cent, nut and 13 per cent, of dust coal. 



Turnbull ds Hall 

mine 

Section, 

(Fig. 11.) 



3" 

4 

5 

i 

3 

8 

8 

10 

10 

6 to 6' 

2 

1 

i 

4 



80. CABOMDfiliET miNfi, (46} miles from PittsborgliO 

Opened up by Abraham Hbaf in 1834 and operated as a 
barrow mine for a number of years ; it was also operated 



MINES ON POOL NO. 4. K*. 35 

by George Winters under lease from Hoaf until it was pur- 
chased by John Kennedy and Elliot Frazier. Prye bought 
Kennedy's interest in 1872 and the mine is now operated by 
Frazier and Frye. 

It is worked on the double entry system and only the coal 
between the bands (or bearing-in member) and the over-clay 
is mined out, amounting to an average of 5 feet 9 inches in 
height. 

100 acres have been mined out of the front hill between 
the river and Little Bedstone creek and 60 acres of that 
part lying beyond the creek. 

The mine is ventilated by furnace-power with a shaft 28 
feet in height and a stack additional 56 feet high. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth 46' 8'' above low water. 

Present output 6740 bushels of lump coal per day. 

Screening gives 75 per cent lump and 25 per cent of nut 
and dust coal together. 

82 miners, 5 drivers, one trapper and 6 outside men are 
employed. 



81. liITTliE BEDSTOME miNE, (46 miles rrom PittoborgliO 

Owned and operated by James Rutherford who opened it 
up and built the tipple in 1879. He bought the property 
from Israel Stevens. 

It is worked on, the double entry system and ventilated 
by natural means afforded by its proximity to the outcrop 
along Little Redstone creek. 

Tipple floor 45 feet above low water and the bottom of 
the coal at pit mouth has the same elevation. 

Four butt entries ; three of which are driven to the out- 
crop ; the main entry has reached a distance of 300 yards 
from its mouth. They mine out 74 feet and leave one foot 
of coal in the bottom. 

Daily output 2000 bushels ; 21 miners, 2 drivers and 2 
outside men being employed. 

Area mined out to this time, 18 acres. 



86 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

(82. CON If ECTICVT mill £8, (45| mUes fk*om Pittobnrsli.) 

Opened in 1865 by Sherwood Sterling, member of the 
Connecticut Coal Company, and operated by them for three 
years ; it was sold in 1881 to James Mehaflfey & Co. who are 
the present owners. The mine has not been in operation 
since 1872 and the tipple was carried away by high water 
during the same year. 

The coal was hauled from the pit mouth on a short out- 
side road to the check-house, and from thence it passed 
down an incline tramway to the tipple at the river, where 
it was screened into the boats. 

Main entry rises from the pit mouth for 300 yards where 
it strikes a fault and the coal seam drops about six feet. 
After which the main entry dips to its head at the rate of 
three inches per rod. The entries were all driven single. 

Area mined out, fifteen acres. 



83. ClilPPER MINE, (45| mUes from Pmsbnrgh.) 

Owned and opened up by Capt. Samuel Clark in 1862, 
who operated it until 1876, when it was leased to Clark 
Hughes and George Maxwell, who operated it for three 
years. It was again leased to E. C. Furlong, who operated 
for two years. It was then bought by the Clipper Coal 
Company and operated by them to the present time. 

The old tipple was removed and a new check-house, 
tramway and tipple built at the upper pit mouth and at 
the river. 

Mine worked at present on the double entry system; 
head of the workings 800 yards from the pit mouth. 

Bottom of coal 91 feet above low water at the new pit 
mouth and 96 feet above low water at the old pit mouth ; 
the distance between the two pit mouths being 700 feet. 

Main entry at 600 yards from the front crosses a swamp 
that bears N. 20° W, and is 220 yards wide and eleven feet 
deep in the center. 

I observed a spar in the old main entry that bears N. 
31i E. for a distance of 500 yards. It commences at the 



MINES ON POOL NO. 4. K*. 37 

surface or front of the hill a short distance below the old 
pit mouth, and is cut by the old main entry for a consider- 
able distance until No. 6 butt entry is reached, where it 
connects with a clay seam that bears about S. 40° E. so far 
as it has yet been developed. At the clay vein the roof 
coal is displaced vertically about 6 inches. 

Cleavage plains bear : S. 65 E. 9 feet ; S. 66i E. 9 feet ; 
S. 66i E. 8 feet ; 5 68 E. 12 feet ; S. 64f E. 6 feet ; S. 66i 
E. 6 feet, and S. 65f E. 8 feet. 

The section was found to be as follows : 

Garbonaoeous shale. 

Coal, 0' 6" 

Parting, j^ 

Coal, 4 

Parting, \ 

Coal, \ 2 

Parting, \ 

Coal, 6 

Slate, 10 

Roof coal, 1 

Over-clay, 10 

Breast coal, 4 9 

Parting, \ 

Bearing-in ooal, 2 

Parting, \ 

Brick iooal, ■ 1 1 

Parting, . | 

Bottom ooal, 1 4 

Ventilation is produced by a furnace and stack. The 
furnace is arched and lined with fire-brick. It is 20 feet 
long, 5i feet wide and 5' 8'' high in the clear. The fire bed 
is four feet in length. The stack connects with the rear 
end of the furnace, is 60 feet high, built of stone and brick, 
square in form and six feec in the clear. 

30 miners, 4 drivers and four day men are employed. 

Output amounts to 4500 bushels daily. 

Area mined out, 60 acres. 



Clipper 

mine 

Section, 

{Fig. 1£.) 



34. ASHM^ID MIME. (44| miles from PittobnrsliO 

Opened up at an early day and operated by Johnson 
Dinsmore for some years. 
The coal was run from the pit mouth down to the river on 



98 r. 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 



13. 



/ 
2 

0,Mf 




15. 



16. 




0.6 



A 2 



0.^ 



-^./ 



\^.0 



3.8 



\3.6 



"4 

f.o 
'A 

OJO 



r^T'St^T^"" 1X1 



f.2 



0.3: 



;s 



A J 



r&s i'-**-**^ 



:« 



/.2 



'/i 



/.J 



\0./0 

'A 

f.3 



-K4l 



MINES ON POOL NO. 4. K*. 39 

an incline slide and loadened into hroad-horn boats. These 
boats were made square at both ends, 100 feet long, 25 feet 
wide, and from three to four feet in depth, and would hold 
from 6000 to 8000 bushels. 

The property was bought from Joseph McKee by T. J. 
and Wesley Larmer in 1865. They ran coal during a por- 
tion of that year and Wesley sold his interest to his brother 
T. J. Larmer who is the present owner. No coal has been 
run here since 1865. 



85. MEW TRfimOBTT miBIEfi, (44} auies from Pittsbnrgli.) 

Capt. Samuel Clark & Co. opened this mine and built the 
tipple in 1853. They also built the tow boat Clipper the 
same year and continued to operate th^ mine until Capt. 
Clark died February 14, 1879. 

John A. Woods & Sons bought the property in 1881 and 
are the present operators. 

The coal is screened at the check house into a tram wagon 
and run down a short incline tramway to a sliding tipple at 
the river and dumped into boats. 

An area of forty acres has been exhausted. 



86. OliD TBEmONT aUNES, (44) MUes flrom Pittoborsh.) 

Opened up by W. H. and Samuel Clark in 1847, who op- 
erated the mine on a small scale and only supplied the 
Packet boats with coal until 1849, when they built the tow 
boat Tempest and were the first to transport coal to market 
from this Pool by towing. 

Twenty-five acres were mined out up to 1854 and the mine 
has not been operated since. 

The property now belongs to the estate of George Clark, 
deceased. 



87. lilTTIiE PITTSBURGH miBTE, (44^ Miles iVom Pitts- 
burgh.) 

Belongs to the estate of George Clark and was opened 
up by John A. Bevan for R. E. Schmertz & Co in 1879. 



40 K*. BEPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

Schmertz & Co. operate it under lease and use the lump 
coal in their GHass Factory at Bellevernon. 

They have nine (9) ovens and coke the dust coal produced, 
a portion of which is also used at the same factory. The 
other portion is used at Gibson's Distillery in Gibsonton. 

Daily output 1200 bushels during the time when the fac- 
tory is running. 

They are mining that part of the coal which remains in 
the Old Tremont mine and have taken out about 900,000 
bushels. I find the section to. be 

Sandstone massive. 

Shale, 4' 0" 

Coal, L 

Slate parting, 6 

Coal, 6 

Sandy shale and blook slate, 12 

Roof ooal 2 

Over-olay, 10 

Breast ooal, 4 1 

Parting, ^ 

Bearing-in coal, 2 

Parting, \ 

Briokooal, 1 

Parting, \ 

Bottom ooal, 10 

Clay bottom, containing limestone nodules. 

I find a spar in the roof crossing through the mine on a 
bearing of N. 58^° E. for a distance of 100 yards, which 
also follows (near) the center line of a belt 100 yards in 
width, passing through the workings in which the over -clay 
was found to be entirely absent. Within this belt the roof 
coal rests immediately on the top of the main breast and on 
its margin the over-clay appears with a feather edge and 
gradually assumes its usual thickness in a distance of 20 
yards from the edge of the belt. 

Cleavage planes bear N. 64^ W. 6 feet. 

N. 66i W. 5 " 

Cleavage in the block slate bears N. 46^^ W. 

Bottom of the seaim here is 100 feet above low water. 



Little Pittaburgh 
mine /Section, 

{Fig. IS.) 



MINES ON POOL NO. 4. K*. 41 

88. TAOOABT MINE, (44 miles firom Plttsbnrgli.) 

Is reported to be the oldest pit in this vicinity. It was 
opened up by Abraham Booher to supply a local trade and 
is owned at present by the heirs of Thomas Taggart, de- 
ceased. Four acres of coal have been mined and the pit is 
now abandoned. 



89. OliASS-WOBKS SIINE No. 1, (48| miles firom Pittsbnrgli.) 

Opened by William Everhart in 1850 for the use of the 
Bellevernon glass-works. Fifteen acres have been mined 
out and the pit is abandoned. 



40. OliASS-WOBKS MINE Ho. 2, (48} miles from Pittsbnrsli.) 

Opened by John A. Bevan in 1874 for R. E. Schmertz & 
Co. and the product of the mine used in their glass-works 
at Bellevernon. Six acres have been mined out and the 
works have not been in operation since 1880. 



41. fiPEEB'ld miME, (43i miles firom Pittsbarffh.) 

Situated at the upper end of Bellevernon; this mine was 
put in operation by L. M. and W. F. Speers in 1869, who 
continued to run the mine until 1877. The coal was run 
from the mine on a short outside road and through a 
check-house down an incline tramway to the tipple at the 
river. Thirty acres have been mined out and the property 
now belongs to John Carrothers. No coal has been mined 
since 1877. 



42 K* REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

48. BOSTBATEB HIHE, (40| mllM Urom Pittsbiirgli.) 

Opened up by Bartman & Todd in 1845 who ran the coal 
down an incline road to the river in a manner somewhat 
similar to that employed there at the present time. 

Several new tipples have been built from time to time 
since then, and the present one was built in 1877. The coal 
is run down an incline road, 218 yards in length, from the 
check-house near the pit mouth to the tipple at the river, 
where it is screened into the boats. 

Subsequently the property was purchased by Capt. 
Adam Jacobs and operated by Loomis and Watson, until it 
was sold to Major Thomas McGowan and Robert Connell in 
1862, who operated the mine until it was again sold in 1873 
to John W. Clark the present owner and operator. 

Clark also at the same time purchased an adjoining tract 
of 152 acres of coal from Thomas Reeves and Daniel 
Castner. 

The original tract of 60 acres is all mined out together 
with 20 acres additional out of the Reeves and Castner 
tract. 

It is worked on the double- entry system. The main 
entry is driven nearly perpendicular to the coal faces and 
reaches the rear outcrop at a distance of 860 yards from 
the main entrance to the mine. This entry dips slightly 
from the front. 

The butt entries are driven in pairs with a rib or pillar 
of 30 feet of coal remaining between them. The distance 
between each pair is 160 yards, which makes the rooms 
when driven 80 yards in length including the turn-outs. 

The new main entry is turned off from the old main 
entry at 140 yards from the pit mouth, and is driven on the 
butts to a distance of 1400 yards. This entry rises 11 feet 
in that distance to its head which indicates that the axis of 
the anticlinal is still some distance farther up the river. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth 230 feet above low water. 

Mine ventilated by a furnace and a circular shaft six feet 
in diameter (cut through 70 feet of rock) on top of which is 
placed a wooden stack 12 feet in height. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 4. K*. 43 

The works have not been in operation since last May. 

I found the roof coal very much disturbed by harse-hdcJcs 
or swells in the over -clay ^ and in the intervals between them 
this clay is often entirely absent. These horse- backs take 
the place of a large portion of the roof coal members, and 
sometimes cut out a small portion of the upper part of the 
main breast member. 



44 K*. 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 




Chapter V. 
Coal Mines Located in Pool No. 3. 

48. WOIiF HABBOB HINE, (39^ miles fiwm Plttsbargli.) 

Fronting on the river near the south bank of Wolf Har- 
bor run this mine was opened in 1830 by Wilson and Mc- 
Farland and operated by them for several years in a primi- 
tive manner but has not been in operation for over forty 
years. It is now owned by W. J. Alexander & Co. 



44. WHITBSTIIiliE HINE, (89^ mllM trom Pittobnrgli.) 

Opened up by J. Addison Stockton in 1850 for Townsend, 
Hayes and Stockton who owned the property and operated 
the mine until 1853 when it was sold to Capt. David White. 

It continued to be operated under the management of 
Murray White until 1856 since when no coal in any consid- 
erable quantities has been run from the mine. 

The property was bought by the present owners General 
Richard Coulter and Gustavus Stoy. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth 153 feet above low water. 

Coal, reported to be of excellent quality and yielding a 
coke well adapted to furnace use on account of its great re- -f 
sistance to crushing power. Analyses made by Henry G. 
De Brunner, Professor of Chemistry at the Pittsburgh Col- 
lege of Pharmacy, show the coal and coke to contain : 



CodL 



Moisture, 1. 

Volatile matter, 82.0305 

Fixed carbon, 64.9191 

Sulphur, 7090 

Ash, 1.0206 

(46 K*.) 



Coke* 

Moisture, 0.4675^ 

Fixed carbon, 91.3650 

Sulphur, 5226 

Ash, 8.1776 



46 K\ BEPORT OF PBOGBESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

45. BOTIiE KIBIE^ (88} miles ttom Pittobnrgli.) 

Opened on the Boyle property near the lower line of the 
Whitesville property about 1838 by Benjamin Behanna, 
Henry Behanna and James Jennings, and operated by them 
in a small way as a river mine for one year. The coal was 
run from the pit mouth to the river down an incline shuta 

Bottom of coal here 134 feet above low water. 



46. MTfilUi miBTfi, (88^ mUes fi*om Pittsbnrsli.) 

Located a short distance below the Boyle mine. This mine 
was owned and opened up by Henry, Casper and John 
Myers in 1838, who operated it only for a short time, one 
acre being mined out. The coal was run from the pit 
mouth down an incline shute to the base of the hill, from 
where it was transported in wheelbarrows to the boats at 
the river. 



47. J ACKSONTIIiliE MINfi, (88^ mUes from Pittobnrgli.) 

Located below the Myers mine this mine was opened up 
in 1863 by Samuel Davis. The coal was run out of the 
mine into a coal-yard at the pit mouth, where it was de- 
posited until enough was mined to fill a boat holding about 
3000 bushels ; and then in tram-wagons down an incline 
road to the boats at the river. About one acre has been 
mined out. Not been in operation for over forty years. 
Now owned by the Hon. James K. Moorhead, of Pitts- 
burgh. 



48. WEIiSH miBTC:, (37i miles from Pittobnrffli.) 

Located about 200 yards above the Iron City mine, this 
mine was opened up by Robert Roberts & Co. in 1850. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 47 

They were succeeded by Miller and Williams, who operated 
until 1866, since which time it has remained idle. It was 
operated as a cart mine and the coal was run from the 
check near the pit mouth down an incline tramway to the 
river. Area mined out, 25 acres. 



49. IBOBT CITT HlBrE, (87 miles from Plttobnrgh.) 

William Brown purchased 226 acres of coal and river 
frontage at this place in 1863, opened the mine, built the 
necessary improvements and operated until 1864, when he 
sold to Joseph Keeling & Co. who ran the mine for some 
time and sold to Phillips and Mitenzwyre the present owners 
and operators. 

It is worked on the block system, with the main entry 
and air course driven parallel against the butts, 24 feet 
apart, from the furnace near the front to near the head of 
the workings, a distance of 925 yards. 

Face entries are driven to right and left of the main 
entry, at intervals of 150 yards, from which the working 
butt entries are driven at intervals of 160 yards. 

Main entry dips 60 feet in 1210 yards from inlet to pump- 
ing shaft, 130 feet deep. 

The ventilation is produced by a furnace with a shaft 
through 63 feet of rock and a 16-foot stack on top of the 
shaft. 

The air shaft is circular in form and six feet in diameter. ^ 

The furnace is 31 feet long (and arched), 7 feet in width, 2i m 
feet from floor to grate bars and 5J feet from bars to top of 
arch. This furnace with a moderate fire produces an air 
current of 19,220 cubic feet per minute. 

The coal is hauled from the pit mouth on an outside road 
for a distance of about 100 yards to the check-house, and 
from there the cars run down an incline road to the tipple 
at the river. 

Tipple floor 38 feet above low water. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth 210 feet above low water. 

Horse-hacks or swells in the over- clay are very large and 



48 K*. REPORT OF PBOOBESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 



numerous and disturb the roof coal members to a marked 
degree. They are also usually found occupying the place 
of a small portion of the top of the main breast coal. I 
noticed no rolls in the bottom. The disturbance appears to 
be confined to the roof members and gives that portion of 
the seam a very confused and broken appearance. 

Clay seams are frequent and are found crossing the 
mine and each other in many different directions. They 
all extend downward from the roof, some of them termi- 
nating at the bands, while others pass into the floor of the 
mine. They are usually accompanied with some displace' 
m^nt ot the coal in a vertical direction. 

Along the main entry I observed, in a distance of 650 
yards, seventeen horse-backs measuring from ten to forty 
feet in length and from one to three feet in thickness, the 
intervals between them usually void of over-clay. 

Their general direction is N. 70° E. 

There are two small swamps on the right of the main 
entry both bearing about S. 70° E. 

Cleavage planes run N. 68° W. 7 feet , N. 68i W. 8 feet ; 
N. 68i W. 6 feet ; N. 67i W. 11 feet ; N. 68 W. 10 feet ; 
N. 66 W. 10 feet ; N. 67* W. 6 feet. 

A vertical section of the coal members gives : 

Bock. 

Coal, 0' 30" 

Slate, 3 

Coal, 3 

Clay, 6 

Coal, 4 

Slate, 1 

Coal 4 

Slate, \ 

Coal, 1 2 

Over-clay from to 3 feet in horse-backs. 

Breast coal, 4 

Parting, \ 

Bearing-in coal, 3 

Parting, 1 

Brick coal, 1 2 

Parting, i 

Bottom coal, 1 3 

Calcareous nodules and clay. 



Iron City mine 
Section. 

{^Fig. 14.) 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 49 

60 miners, 5 drivers and 6 outside day men are employed ; 
producing 4000 bushels of lump coal per day. The whole 
output of the mine after screening is reported at 66 per cent 
for lump and 24 per cent for nut and dust coal together. 



50. THOMAS HIHE, (86} miles llrom Pittobargh.) 

Owned and opened up by Benjamin Thomas about 1835. 

James Alexander operated it under lease in 1840, operat- 
ing in a small way. 

Alexander Crumbly bought it from the heirs of Benjamin 
Thomas in 1863, operated until 1866 and sold it to Thomas 
Fox and Joseph Lawson. 

Operated two years and sold to Jones and Watkins. 

An area of four acres was mined out and the property is 
now included in the Columbia Mine. 



51. eOIimiBIA IHINE, (86| miles from Pittsbnrsli.) 

Opened in 1862 by S. Crumby and operated by him until 
it was sold to Fox and Lawson ; who again sold it to Wil- 
liam and Willis Hodgson in 1869 ; who operated it until 
1875, when William Hodgson purchased the interest of his 
brother, Willis Hodgson, deceased. 

Linch and Robinson leased the mine in 1876 and con- 
tinued to operate until sold to Jones and Watkins in 1879. 

Jones and Watkins operated the mine until Nov. 1, 1882, 
when Watkins sold his interest to J. F. Jones, the present 
owner and operator. 

The mine is worked on the block system, and the present 
workings are reached at 900 yards from the pit mouth. 

The main entry is driven against the butts. 

The furnace, located on a face entry, driven from the 
main entry at a point 135 yards from the pit mouth, is built 
with a double arch, having an opening between the arches 
for the air to pass through from front to back. This ar- 
rangement is supposed to utilize the heat that is absorbed 
by the inner arch and thereby increase the power of the f ur- 
4K\ 



60 K\ 



REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 



nace. By the aid of an anemometer I found the volume of 
air passing through and over the furnace, with a moderate 
fire, to be 14,025 cubic feet per minute. 

Mr. Jones informs me that the mine produces 80,000 
bushels of lump coal per acre. He also says that this is 74 
per cent of the whole output . The nut and dust are run 
together and amount to 26 per cent of the whole. 

The roof coal members are greatly disturbed by horse- 
hacks or swells in the over-clay. The intervals between 
the horse-backs are usually void of over-clay. 

Numerous clay veins are also found traversing the mine 
in various directions, ranging from six inches to three feet 
in thickness. 

The following section represents the structure : 

Carbonaoeoas shale. 

Coal, 0' 3" 

Slate, 2 

Coal, 4 

Slate, . . \ 

Coal, 1 

Slate, \ 

Coal, 2 

Slate, I 

Coal, \\ 

Columbia mine Clay, 6 

Section. \ Coal, 8 

iFig.16.) Slate, 1 

Coal, 13 

Over-clay^ 6 

Breast ooal, 3 8 

Parting, \ 

Bearing-in ooal, 3 

Parting, > 

Brick coal, 12 

Parting, | 

Bottom ooal, 13 

The overly shales and rock are quite variable in thickness 
and composition. The carbonaceous shale is quite thin and 
in some parts of the mine its place is occupied by a clay 
shale ten inches in thickness. In one place I found the 
following section : 



Section of Roof. 



\ 

I Clay shale, 

I Top of upper ooal member. 



Micaceous sandstone. 

Block slate, 6" to 1' 6" 

10 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K\ 51 

Cleavage planes run N. 59 W. 3 feet ; N. 63 W. 4 feet ; 
N. 72i W. 10 feet ; N. 66 W. 5 feet ; N. 67 W. 24 feet. 

A swamp 18 feet in depth enters near the pit mouth and 
passes through the mine on a bearing of S. 80° E. It dips 
in that direction at the rate of 15 feet in 700 yards. 

Another swamp is found in the south-east part of the 
present workings whose direction is nearly perpendicular 
to the other one. 

The floor of the mine is so much disturbed with swamps 
and rolls that it is quite difficult to provide for proper 
drainage. The water collecting in the main swamp is car- 
ried away by a syphon pipe 5 inches in diameter through 
an opening at the rear of the workings ; and the water of 
the other swamps is conducted into this one by drains, 
pumping and hauling. 

The coal is hauled from the mine on a short outside road 
to the check house and run down an incline tramway to the 
tipple house at the river. 

They employ 70 miners, 5 drivers and 6 outside men. 

Output, 6000 bushels of lump coal per day. 

Bottom of coal, 200 feet above low water. 



52. WJBBSTER miBTfi. (86^ miles firom Plttsbargh.) 

Located at the south end of Webster and opened by 
James Blackamore in 1858, who operated it until 1872. 

It then remained unoperated for two years and was sold 
to John and William Gufley in 1874, who operated it until 
1880 and then leased it to Sneathon and Wilson for a term 
of five years. 

The works are not running at the present time. 

The coal is hauled from the pit mouth (when the mine is 
in operation) on a short outside road to the check house, 
where it is screened into a tram wagon having two compart- 
ments, one for receiving the lump and the other the dust 
coal. This wagon then runs down an incline tramway to . , 
the dust hopper, where it strikes a Jcnocker that empties the ' 
dust coal, and the wagon then passes on to a sliding tipple 



52 K\ 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 




MINES ON POOL NO. 3. 



K\ 53 



at the river, where the lump coal is dumped into the boats. 
The slack is then let out of the hopper into a wagon under- 
neath it, which passes out on the slack road to another tipple 
where it is dumped into boats for its reception. A loaded 
wagon in passing down the tramway from the check house 
draws an empty wagon back up to the check house again 
by means of a drum and line. 

This mine is worked on the block or single-entry system. 
The main entry is driven through the front hill, a distance 
of 700 yards, to a branch of Webster run, where the road 
crosses over on a trestle, and the entry continues on into the 
second hill, to the head of the present workings, a distance 
of 500 yards more. 

The coal in the front hill is exhausted ; and the total area 
mined out amounts to about eighty acres. 

The percentage of product here when running is reported 
at 70 for lump and 30 for slack coal. 

Horse-hacks and clay veins are rarely found and the 
over-clay is quite thin and in some parts of the mine it is 
absent. 

Bottom of seam 150 feet above low water. 

The following section was obtained : 

Sandstone. 

f Coal, 0' 

Slate, 

Coal, 

Slate, 

Coal, 

Slate, 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 

. Slate, 

Coal, 1 

Over-clay^ 

Breast coal, 3 

Parting, 

Bearlng-in ooal, 

Parting, 

Brick ooal, 1 

Parting, 4 

^ Bottom ooal, * . . . 1 8 



Webster Mine 
Section. 

(Fig. 16.) 



10" 
7 
4 
1 
8 
1 
2 
8 
9 
1 
2 

8 to(y 

6 

i 
2 

i 




64 Kr 



REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTOK WALL. 



58. GIIiMOBE MIBIE, (35} miles ttom Pittsbargli.) 

Located in North Webster, it was opened up by Capt. 
Gilmore in 1871, and is now owned and opemted by him. 

The coal is transported from the mine to the river by ap- 
pliances similar to those used at the Webster mine. 

It is worked on the single entry system. The main entry 
is driven quartering to the right of the faces, and to a dis- 
tance of 882 yards, through the front hill, to the outcrop in 
the rear of the mine. At 100 yards from the pit mouth the 
main entry passes into a swamp or basin 21 feet in depth ; 
follows along the bottom of it for 200 yards ; and then rises 
out of it. This swamp is circular and dish-shaped with 
no drainage outlet. 

A similarly shaped swamp but of less depth is also found 
at some distance to the right of the other one. 

I observed light rolls in the roof and six clo.y veins^ but 
no horse-backs and no rolls in the floor of the mine except 
the swamps before mentioned. 

I found the section to be as follows : 



Sandstone. 



Oilmore Mine 
Section. 

(Fig. 17.) 



Coal, 1' 0" 

Slate, 8 

Coal, 1 

Slate, 2 

Coal, 2 

Slate, 1 

Coal, 1 

Clay, 9 

Coal, 9 

Parting, i 

Coal, 10 

Over-clay^ 9" 

Breast ooal, 3 4 to 3' 6'' 

Parting, I 

Bearing-in ooal, 3 

Parting i 

Brick coal, 10 to 1 

Parting, i 

Bottom ooal, 14 

Cleavage planes bear : N. 65° W. 20 feet ; N. 621 W. 6 
feet ; N. 65i W. 3 feet ; N. 63 W. 4 feet ; N. 65i W. 3 feet, 
and N. 67 W. 6 feet. 



SECOND GEOL SURVEY, PA. 



REPORT K4. PLATE 




CL 
CL 






O 



O 



* t 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 55 

They mine out the breast, bear ing- in andbrick coal mem- 
bers ; which after screening give 66 per cent, lump and 24 
per cent, of slack coal. 

Daily output, 9000 bushels of lump coal. 

Total area mined out, 50 acres. 

110 miners, 8 drivers, and 6 day men are employed. 

The mine is ventilated by a furnace at the front of the 
Avorkings ; 39 feet long ; arched ; rises six inches to the 
rear end ; 7 feet wide ; 7 feet high ; with two square holes 
on each side and one on the top for the purpose of having 
cool air pass through to the stack on the outside of the 
furnace walls. The fire-bed is 7 feet long and 7 feet wide, 
and the front end of the grate-bars are 2 feet inside of the 
furnace front. 

The furnace stack is 7 feet square in the clear, built of 
stone and brick, 42 feet in height, additional to a shaft 
through rock 32 feet in depth. 

By making a direct connection with fresh air from the 
outside the furnace with a moderate fire showed a capacity 
for passing or moving 21,600 cubic feet of air per minute. 
By using the air from the mine it was reduced to 18,000 
cubic feet per minute, which shows a loss of nearly 17 per 
cent of the effective power by friction in passing through 
the several air-courses from the inlet to the furnace. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth 140 feet above low water. 



54. BISSBIi MIllli:, (35^ mUes ftrom Pittsbnrgb.) 

Opened by Calvin C. Bissel in 1853 and operated by him 
on a small scale until it was sold to Plummer and Mc- 
Candles ; who again sold it to Mrs. John Gilmore, the pres- 
ent owner, in 1863 ; from which time it was operated by 
Capt. John Gilmore, until the coal of the property was ex- 
hausted in 1874. 

Whole area mined out, 90 acres. 

The coal was run from the check-house down an incline 
tramway 400 yards in length to the tipple at the river, 
where it was screened into boats. 



[i' 



56 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

55. HESI^EP MIBIi:, (35^ miles from Pittobnrgh.) 

Located a short distance below North Webster, was 
opened up by Samuel Throp for John Heslep in 1864. It 
was operated by Heslep until 1860, when about 15 acres 
were mined out ; and the remaining portion or 29 acres has 
since been run out through the Paynetown works, adjoin- 
ing just below. 

The coal was screened at the check -house near the pit 
mouth on the hill and run down an incline tram-road to a 
sliding tipple at the river. 



56. PATJSr ETOWJSr MIBIE, (35^ miles trom PUtobnrgh.) 

Opened by Captain John Gilmore for William Boner in 
1848 and operated by Gilmore and Hunt until sold to Payne ; 
who operated and sold to Huffman and Seibert ; who oper- 
ated and sold it to Jacob Tomer ; who continued to run it 
until the coal was exhausted in 1881. 

The coal was screened at the check house and run down 
an incline tramway to a slide tipple at the river. 

Area mined out 50 acres. 

Bottom of coal at the pit mouth 125 feet above low water. 



57. BAKEBTOWJSr MIBrE, (34| mUes fl*om Pittobnrgh.) 

Was owned and opened up in 1851 by A. J. Baker, who 
operated until 1862 and sold it to Adam Becker & Co.; who 
operated until 1868 and sold to Koontz and Patterson ; who 
run the mine for one year and leased it to Presley and 
David Gillingham ; who operated until 1872, since when it 
has remained idle. 

The coal was screened at the check house near the pit 
mouth and run in tram wagons down a short incline road 
to a sliding tipple at the river. 

Area mined out reported at 40 acres. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 67 

.08. BECKETT*S BITBI BUBIE, (34imilefi firom Pittobnrsh.) 

Opened up in 1871 by Rogers, Rea & Co. who built a 
tipple and operated until 1879, when the mine was leased 
to H. M. Hodgson and John Crumby, who operated until 
1882. 

The property now belongs to the Bank of Commerce of 
Pittsburgh and the works have remained idle throughout 
the present year. 

Coal at pit mouth 73 feet above low water. 

Tipple floor 50 feet above low water. 

Bottom of coal at mouth of water-course 319 yards farther 
up the river, 79 feet above low water. 

Bottom of coal at old pit mouth at the point of the hill 
165 yards down the river, 50 feet above low water. 

A fault or break in the strata at the last mentioned pit 
mouth has depressed the coal on the west side about 20 feet. 

The same fault is observed at Sutton's pit one mile up 
Beckett's run. 

Bearing of fault about N. 45° E. 

Bottom of coal at the point of the hill on the west side 
of the run, 71 feet above low water. 

Area exhausted at this mine 55 acres. 



59. MTOCKDAI^E miNE, (34| miles flrom Pittsbnrglft.) 

Owned by Henry Fulton and opened up by his son 
Abraham Fulton in 1838 ; the coal being run from the pit 
mouth down a shute to the base of the hill, where it was 
shoveled into a tram-wagon and hauled to the tipple at the 
river by horse-power ; but the operation only lasted for a 
short time and the mine then remained idle. 

It was sold to Richard Stockdale in December, 1857, but 
still remained unoperated until November, 1875, when 
Stockdale leased it to Charles Cocain and John Strope. 

The lessees re-opened the mine, built a check-house, tram- 
road, tipple, ice-breakers and made other improvements and 
operated for about two years. 



68 K\ REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

It was then leased to R. A. Stockdale and William Green- 
arch who operated for about two years. 

It was then operated for a short time by Richard Stock- 
dale the owner who leased it to the Elizabeth Coal Com- 
pany with Mr. Jones as manager in 1879. 

The company operated the mine until 1881 when it was 
sold to Jacob Tomer and Mr. McKinley who have continued 
to operate it to the present time. 

An area of one acre was mined out by Fulton ; and thirty- 
five acres more since it was purchased by Stockdale. 

The mine is worked on the single'eiitrj system, and the 
ventilation is produced by furnace-power. 

A swamp enters the mine on the west side near the head 
of entry No. 7 and passes through on a curved line, cross- 
ing the main entry at 500 yards from the pit mouth ; crosses 
entry No. 6 and entry No. 4 at 300 yards from the main 
entry and leaves the mine at the east side of the workings 
near the front of the property. 

The swamp is about 100 yards in width and appears to 
increase in depth from left to right. At entry No. 4 it is 
21 feet in depth ; where it crosses the main entry it is 25 
feet in depth, counting from the general plane of the coal. 



60. BAIBD MIIfE, (34^ miles from Pittsbnrgli. ) 

Located on the east side of the river ; opened by H. H. 
Finley for Judge T. H. Baird, in 1844 ; operated by Judge 
Baird until 1848 ; and by Shelton, Allen and others until 
1854. 

Since then the balance of the coal contained in the tract 
has been run out through the Harlem mine^ at the west 
side of the property. 

Area mined out, 25 acres. 

The pit cars were run on an incline road, laid on the 
ground surface, from the pit mouth to the tipple at the 
river. They would run a train of several cars together, each 
car being supplied with a brake, and all of the brakes so 
connected with a rope that a man could ride on the hind- 



MITSTES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 59 

most car and control or regulate the speed of the whole 
train as it was moved by force of gravity from the pit ■/ 
mouth to the river. The empty cars were hauled back to , 
the pit mouth by a horse. This arrangement however was 
soon abandoned to a partial extent on account of the uncer- 
tainty of the action of the brakes at all times and the con- 
sequent danger to life and property which might result 
therefrom. 

Instead thereof the road from the pit mouth to the base 
of the hill was furnished with two tracks ; a check-drum 
with a rope was erected near the pit mouth to check the 
full cars down to the foot of the hill ; whence they were 
hauled to the river by a horse. The empty cars were re- 
turned to the base of the incline, and were then lifted to ^ 
the check-house by the weight of the descending full ones. ^ 



61. ]IIIl.ESTIIil.i: miMi:, (33| mUes flrom Pittobnrgh.) 

Opened in 1864 by George Tanner and Charles Tilling- 
hast, who built a tipple, tramroad, 15 blocks of two-story 
double dwelling-houses, a store-room, residence and school- 
house and operated the mine for several years. 

Sold in 1868 to W. N. Robbins, Robert Jenkins, and 
James Lynn. 

Robbins subsequently sold his interest to Jenkins and 
Lynn, who are the present operators. 

It is worked on the single entry system and ventilated by 
a furnace. The old main entry was driven against the 
face, through the eastern half of the tract, and connects 
with the outcrop in the rear by a short butt entry driven to 
the right. 

This part of the property being exhausted a new main 
entry was started in the western half during the early part 
of 1883. The old tipple was removed and a new one built 
connecting with the new workings. 

Bottom of coal at old pit mouth 62 feet above low water. 

Bottom of coal at new pit mouth 56 feet above low water. 

Distance between old and new pit mouths 480 yards. 



60 K*. BEPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 



N. 



65i 
62i 



Floor of new drop tipple 54 feet above low water. 

They employ 100 miners, 6 drivers, one trapper and 7 
day men, and are running 9000 bushels of lump coal daily. 
They report the lump coal at 66 per cent., nut 17 per cent, 
and dust at 17 per cent. ' 

Area mined out, 60 acres. 

The new main entry and butt entry No. 1 cross a clay 
seam five inches in thickness extending from top to bottom 
of the coal. The coal is curled for a distance of fifteen 
feet on each side of this clay seam ; and the cleavage is very 
much broken and disturbed in direction. 

Cleavage planes in other parts of the mine bear : 
W. 10 feet ; N. 62i W. 10 feet; N. 64f W. 6 feet ; 
W. 4 feet ; N. 61i W. 6 feet, and N. 67 W. 3 feet. 

The butt entries bear N. 65i W. 

I found the section here to be as follows : 

CarboDaceous shale. 

Coal, 0' 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Slate parting, 

Coal 

Slate, 

Coal, 1 

Over-clay 1 

Breast ooal, 3 

Parting, 

Bearing-in coal, 

Parting, 

Brick coal, 1 

Parting, 

Bottom ooal, 1 

Calcareous clay with limestone nodules. 



Milesville mine 

/Section. 

{Fig. 18.) 



4" to 12" 
10 
4 

i 
4 
2 


1 

i 
3 

i 

« 



i 
2 



62. HABIiEil MINE, (34 miles trom PlUsbnrghO 

Opened for the late Judge Thomas H. Baird, by Samuel 
Throp, in 1861, who built a tipple and road, and operated 
under lease until 1862. 

It was then leased to Elijah Harrison and Robert Green- 
arch, who operated a few months . 

Greenarch was succeeded by Isaac Black. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 61 

Harrison and Black continued to operate until 1863. 

Then the mine was leased to Thomas H. Baird, Junior, 
who operated until 1868. 

Then it was leased to Robert Giles, who operated it until 
1870. 

Then it was leased to Lewis Staib, who operated it until 
1874. 

Then it was leased to the Harlem Coal Company, who 
operated until 1882. 

An area of 65 acres has been mined out here, together 
with 5 acres purchased from Butler, and 9 acres purchased 
from Beazle. 

The property now belongs to the heirs of Nancy Baird, 
widow of the above mentioned Judge H. Baird, deceased. 



63. TICTOBT MIMK, (33^ mUes firom PittobnrghO 

On the west side of the river. 

Purchased from Cornelius Weygandt by Rea and Rogers 
in 1859. 

The coal was then leased to Samuel Barnum, Ralph Miller 
and Jonas Crowthers who opened the mine, made the neces- 
sary improvements for running to the river trade and con- 
tinued to operate until 1861 ; then Crowthers left the com- 
pany, and Barnum and Miller continued until 1863. 

Lewis Staib then bought a one third interest in the mine 
and operated until 1872. 

The whole property was sold to James Sampson and 
Hiram Rabe in 1874, who sold it back to Lewis Staib in 
1881. 

It has not been in operation for several years. 

Area of coal mined out 60 acres. 

It was worked on the single-entry system. The main 
entry and air-course at 700 yards from the pit mouth crosses 
a swamp, which passes through the mine in an easterly and 
westerly direction. 



62 K\ REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

64. WIEB jHIMK, (88^ miles from Pittoliiirgli.) 

Located at the point of the hill at the lower side of the 
Lower Victory hollow. This mine was owned and opened 
up by William Wier in 1838. It was only operated during 
a part of that year and the total output is said to have been 
only two boat loads or 6000 bushels. The property now 
belongs to Lewis Staib. 



65. BANKIM HIBIE, (33^ mUes IVom PittobarghO 

On the east side of the river. 

Owned by M. W. Rankin, it was opened up in 1880 under 
a fifteen year lease by the Rankin Coal Company, composed 
of H. LaflEerty, William Evans and Henry Rebka. 

In 1883 Lailerty and Evans sold their interest to Rebka, 
who continues to operate the mine. 

It is worked on the single-entry system. The main entry 
is nearly square against the faces, or cleavage, and is 150 
yards in length from the pit mouth. It dips slightly from 
the pit mouth for a distance of 50 yards, and then rises 
quite rapidly to the head. Two butt entries are driven to 
the right and one to the left of the main entry. 

They mine out the breast, hearing-in and hricic coal 
members and leave the bottom coal undisturbed for a floor 
to the mine. 

Area exhausted six acres. 

65 miners, 3 drivers and 3 day men are employed and the 
daily output amounts to 4000 bushels of lump coal. They 
do not separate the nut from the dust coal but run it all 
together as slack. The total output is reported at 70 per 
cent for lump and 30 per cent for slack coal. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth 50 feet above low water. 

Bottom of tipple floor 34 feet above low water. 

No rolls or horse-hacks have been observed in this mine. 
Several soot veins have been cut through ; but only two clay 
seams have been found thus far. One of these clay seams 
bears due north and south. On its western side the coal is 
very much curled, and the main breast portion is reduced 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. 



K*. 63 



eight inches below its usual thickness, as sefti on the oppo- 
site side of the clay seam, while the bottom portion retains 
its horizontal position undisturbed except as to fracture. 

No artificial means have been introduced here yet for ven- 
tilating purposes, and the air current near the outlet showed 
a volume of 4462 cubic feet passing per minute. 

Cleavage planes in the western part of the mine bear : 
N. 67i W. 8 feet, N. 64* W. 3 feet and N. 67* W. 4 feet, 
and in the eastern part of the mine : N. 60* W. 12 feet, N. 
60* W. 8 feet, N. 61 W. 6 feet, N. 64 W. 9 feet and N. 67 
W. 10 feet. 
The following section was obtained in the mine : 

Carbonaceous shale. 



Rankin mine 
Section, 

(Fig. 19.) 



Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Slate, 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Slate, 

Coal, 



Over-clap, 10 



Breast coal, 3 

Parting, 

Bearing-in coal, 

Parting, 

Brick coal, •I 

Parting, 

^ Bottom coal, 1 



66. ROBIMSOM miNi:, (32| mlleii from Pittobnrgh.) 

It was owned and opened up by Robert Robison in 1865 ; 
and operated by him until his decease in 1869. 

It was then leased by Samuel Barnum, and operated by 
Mm until 1870. 

It then remained idle until 1872 ; when it was leased by 
Charles Cocain, and operated by him until 1874. The Rob- 
ison Brothers then leased the mine and operated until 1875. 

It then remained idle until sold to S. B. Hayes, the pres- 



64 K*. BEPOBT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

ent owner anct operator. Thomas Hutchinson is manager 
in charge. 

The main entry is driven nearly due south in direction, 
and its head stands 1,030 yards from its mouth. 

A swamp enters the mine from the west side, at the out- 
let of No. 6 entry, and follows that entry in a south-east- 
erly direction to its intersection with the main entry, 427 
yards from the main pit mouth ; and passes through and 
out at the east side of the workings into the Victory mine. 

The mine is ventilated by a furnace with a brick stack 
eighty feet in height. 

Eighty miners, 4 drivers, and 4 daymen are employed. 

The daily output amounts to 7,000 bushels of lump coal 
per day. 

An area of 85 acres has been mined out. 

The bottom of coal is 58^ feet above pool water. 

Cleavage planes bear : 



N. 


66J° 


W. 


5 feet. 


— N. 


64 " 


W. 


8 feet 


N. 


m" 


w. 


6 




— N. 


63i° 


W. 


6 


( k 


N. 


65 " 


w. 


5 




— N. 


64i° 


w. 


4 


(( 


N. 


63f° 


w. 


3 




— N. 


63 ° 


w. 


6 


(( 


N. 


63i° 


w. 


6 




— N". 


64i° 


w. 


4 


ik 


N. 


64i° 


w. 


6 




-N. 


64i° 


w. 


6 


ii 



67. BliACK DIAMOMD MIBIE, (32| miles firom PittobargliO 

This mine was opened up in 1866 by the Black Diamond 
Coal and Mining Company, organized under a charter 
granted under the general mining laws of the State, with 
a capital stock of $300,000, divided into 30,000 shares of 
$10 per share ; 5,000 shares were to be used for working 
capital, and 2500 shares were to be used for a contingent 
fund. 

The officers of the company were Nicholas Schneider, 
president ; Charles Seibert, treasurer ; Christian Seibert, 
secretary ; T. Boswell Phillips, general business superin- 
tendent and Lorenz Hoflfman, superintendent of mines. 

The directors were Charles Seibert, Christian Seibert, 



SECOND GEOL SURVEY, PA. 



REPORT K4. PLATE IV. 




Q. 
Q. 



O 
O 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 65 

Lorfenz HoflfDtia;nv T. Boswell Phillips, Joseph Reymann, 
Philip Eichenlaub, Nicholas Schneider, Joseph Seibert and* 
Jacob Dressel. 

Their principal office was at No. 89 Water Street, Pitts- 
burgh. 

They built a drop tipple, two blocks ot eight houses, and 
drove some main entry, but run no coal by river. Th« 
tipple was carried away by high water in January, 1868. 

In 1869 the property was sold to Wm. H. Brown, who 
built a slide tipple, and commenced to operate in 1870 ; he 
continued to operate until about the time of his death in 
1875. , , 

It was then operated by his heirs until they leased to 
Lewis Staib, in November, 1878, who operated until July, 

1882. It has not been in operation since that time. It still 
belongs to the heirs of Wm. H. Brown, deceased. 

They built a new road and drop tipple during the fall of 

1883, and are preparing for extensive operations. 

The main entry and air-course are driven perpendicular 
to the faces or cleavage, with 30 feet of solid coal between 
them. The mine is worked on the double-entry system, 
with 30 feet of solid coal remaining unmined between the 
butt entries. It is ventilated by a furnace, a shaft and 
stack 100 feet in height. 

An area of 116 acres has been mined out, and a larger 
amount remains unmined. 

Cleavage 'planes : An average of thirty-six observations 
gave a bearing of N. 64i° W. 

I found No. 10 butt entry to give the same .bearing for 
a distance of 521 feet ; and No. 13 butt entry gives the 
same bearing for a distance of 490 feet. 

The butt entries when properly driven should show the 
average bearing of the cleavage-planes or faces ; that is, 
where the cleavage is not icufled or otherwise disturbed by 
faults or clay veins. 

This mine produced 67 per cent lump, 13 per cent nut, 
and 20 per cent dust coal, as determined from the reported 
yield of each kind for seven year^ of nearly continuous 
working, from September, 1871, to June, 1878. 
5K*. 



66 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTOJST WALL. 



The following section was obtained in entry No. 4, at a 

point where a fall in the roof exposes all of the members to 

view : 

Shaly sandstone. 

Carbonaceous shale, 2' 

Block slate, . 

Carbonaceous shale, 

Calcareous shale with nodules of iron ore, .... 

Carbonaceous shale, 

Coal, 

Slate parting, 

Coal, 

Slate parting, 

Coal, 

Clay parting, 

Coal, 

Slate parting, . 

Coal, 

Slate parting, . . . : 

Coal, 

Clay parliug, 

Coal, 

Slate parting, 

Coal, 

Slate parting, 

Coal 

Over-clay, 

Breast coal, 3 

Slate parting, •. 

Bearing-in coal, 

Slate parting, 

Brick coal, 1 

Slate parting, 

Bottom coal, 1 2 

Clay bottom. 

The bottom of the coal at pit mouth is 46 feet above low 
water. 



Black Diamond mine 
Section, ' 

(Fig. 20.) 



3 



6 
2 
10 



2 

10 

2 

i 

4 

3 



i 



68. FORT PITT inilllE, (32f miles fl*om PiUsbnrgli.) 

The coal and surface frontage of this mine was bought 
from Dr. Robert Ray by W. H. Barr, J. D. Johnson and 
Lewis Moule in 1863. During that year they opened the 
mine, built a tipple, outside road and a block of four houses 
and operated until 1869. Then Barr left the company and 
Johnson and Moule continued to operate for one year, after 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K\ 67 

which Johnson operated alone for two years, and it has 
not been in operation since. 

The property now belongs to Malcolm Hay of Pittsburgh. 

The head of the main entry and air course stands 620 
yards from the pit mouth. They are driven against the 
faces or perpendicular to the cleavage, and parallel with 
each other, with 30 feet of a rib of solid coal left between 
them. 

A swamp enters the mine from the western side adjoin- 
ing the Ivile mine, crosses the main entry and air course 
at 330 yards from the pit mouth and is drained in the mine 
by means of a syphon pipe. 

Thirtv-five acres have been mined out. 



69. ITlIii: JUME. 

Was opened up under lease from Joseph Warne by 
Robert Coulter, Jonas Crowthers and Hiram Warne in 
the spring of 1862. 

G. W. G. Payne became a member of the company in the 
fall of the same year and continued in the company for two 
years. 

William Dil worth purchased a one fourth interest in the 
workings in 1865 and sold his interest back to the company 
in 1867. 

Robert Coulter sold his interest to Crowthers and Warne 
in the latter part of 1868. 

Crowthers and Warne dissolved partnership in 1873 and 
Warne continued to operate until 1881, when the property 
was sold to James Jones, the present owner and operator. 

The old tipple was burned in the fall of 1872 and a new 
one was built in its place soon after. James Jones placed 
a stationary engine near the pit mouth in 1882, which, in 
connection with a drum and wire rope, is used to haul the 
pit cars from a point in the mine to the tipple at the river 
and return them again. 

He also built a railroad tipple at a point below the coal 
road to the river but has run very little coal by rail as yet. 

The following section was obtained at the pit mouth : 



68 K\ 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 




MINES ON POOL NO. 3. 



K*. 



Carbonaoeoos shale. 

Blook slate, 0' 

Carbonaoeoos shale, 0' 

Sandy shale, 

Carbonaceous shale, 

Coal, 

Slate parting, 

Coal, 

Slate parting, 

Coal, 

Slate parting, 

Coal, 

Clay, 1 

Coal, 

Slate parting, 

Coal, 

Slate parting, 

Ivile mine Coal, 

Section, \ Clay, 

i:Fig. 21.) Coal, 

Slate parting, • • 

Coal, . 

Slate parting, 

Coal, 

Over-clay, 

Breast ooal, 8 

Slate parting, 

Bearing-in ooal, 

Slate parting, 

Brick coal, 1 

Slate parting, 

Bottom coal, 1 

Clay bottom. 

A swamp enters the west side of the mine from the J}/'€W 
Catsburgh mine^ crosses the main entry at 370 yards from 
the pit mouth, and passes from the eastern part of the 
workings into the Fort Pitt mine on that side. The swamp 
is 30 feet in depth where the main entry crosses it and the 
poof of the entry has been blasted down at this point. The 
water that collects in the swamp is carried from the mine 
by means of pipes and a steam pnmp. 

The mine is worked on both single and double-entry sys- 
tems ; and the ventilation is produced by furnace power. 

120 miners, 5 inside drivers, 2 trappers, and 6 day men are 
employed ; and the output amounts to 9,000 bushels of lump 
coal per day. 

An area of 125 acres is mined out. 



9" 
8" 
5 
3 

1 

i 

11 

1 

2 

1 

6 

i 



6 



10 

i 

1 

1 
2 
10 
1 

i 

\ 


i 
2 



70 K*. EEPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

Cleavage planes. An average of six observations gives 
a bearing of N. 64^° W. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth 40 feet above low water. 



71. OliD GATSBUBGH JIIINE, (81^ miles firom PIttobargliO 

Is situated on the west side of the river. 

Owned in 1858 by Rev. John Kerr and William McClure 
and opened under lease from them by H. H. Finley, Jonas 
Crowthers and Ralph Miller. They built a tramroad, 
abutment, tipple, and continued to operate until 1859 when 
Crowthers left the company. 

Finley and Miller continued to operate until March, 
1864, when the property was sold to R. J. Anderson and 
John P. Dravo, the present owners. 

They operated until April 17th of that year, when it was 
closed by reason of a fire in the mine. They were using a 
steam pump to pump the water out of the swamp, and the 
coal surrounding the furnace became fired therefrom and 
got such headway in a few hours during the night that it 
could not be extinguished without closing the mine, which 
was done, and it has remained closed ever since. 

The swamp passes through the old workings in such a 
way as to cut the fired region off from the main body of the 
coal and the water which collects in this swamp prevents 
the fire from crossing over it. The fire is thought to be 
burning yet. 

The property is now leased to Lewis Staib and the coal is 
run out through the workings of the New Catsburgh mine. 

The area exhausted amounts to 100 acres. 



71. ATEW GATSBUBGH miME, (31J miles firom PittsbarghO 

Situated on the west side of the river. Opened in 1879 
by Lewis Staib ; it has been owned and operated by him 
ever since. 

It is operated on the single-entry system and the coal is 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K\ 71 

run to the river trade. It is operated in connection with 
the Old Gatshurgh mine and the coal of both mines is run 
out through the workings of the new mine. The coal is 
hauled by mules from the working places to a parting be- 'M 
tween entries No. 8 and 9, at a distance of 770 yards from 
the pit mouth, whence it is transported to the tipple at the 
river by means of a stationary engine (and wire line) located ^ 
at the pit mouth. . 

They haul out 30 cars at a trip in this way. 

A swamp twenty-jive feet in depth enters the workings 
of the Old mine at a point in front near the present ceme- 
tery gate, crosses the old main entry of that mine, also the 
main entry of the Nem mine^ at a point 400 yards from the 
pit mouth, also the center entry, 160 yards to the left of 
the new main entry (at the junction of No. 4 butt entry), and 
follows nearly parallel with that entry until it crosses the 
line air course, and from thence it passes into the Ivile 
"mine. 

Its axis describes nearly a quarter circle through the two 
mines. 

Another swamp^ three feet in depth, passes through the 
advance workings of both mines ; and crosses the main M 
entry of the new mine 500 yards ahead of the large swamp ; 
describing a curve about parallel with the axis of the first 
named swamp. 

A third swamp occurs about 400 yards in advance of the \ 
second. It is fifteen feet in depth ; crossing the extreme " 
head of the present advance workings, in a direction ap- 
proximately parallel with the small (second) swamp. 

The roof of the main entry in the first swamp was blasted 
down in order to raise the hauling road up to grade. 

This mine is ventilated by means of a flre basket^ and a 
shaft, and stack 60 feet high. The fresh air enters the mine 
through entry No. 11, at the extreme head of the workings. 
This entry is driven out to the coal crop near the mouth of 
Scott run on Pigeon creek. 

They employ 170 miners, 8 inside drivers and 6 day men. 
The daily output amounts to 10,000 bushels of lump coal 
per day ; and the total area mined out is 70 acres. 



72 K\ REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 



lanes bear : 






N. 64JW. 


6 feet N. 63f W. 


7. 


N. m w. 


8 " N. 66i W. 


6. 


N. 66 W. 


10 " N. 66i W. 


4. 


N. 66f W. 


6 " N. 64* W. 


5. 


N. m w. 


4 " N. 64i W. 


9. 


N. 62 W. 


5 " N. 64i W. 


8. 


N. 65i W. 


6 " N. 64i W. 


7. 



Slate cleavage observations give : N. 44° W. and 35i° W. 
The following section of coal members was obtained at 
the pit mouth : 



Sandy shale. 

Block slate, 0' 

Carbonaceous shale, 



Slate, 



New Cataburg 

mine 

Section. 

iFHg.gg.) 



Under clay. 





Coal, 

Slate parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Over-clay^ 

Main breast coal, 2 

Parting, 

Bearing-in coal 

Parting, 

Brick coal, 1 

Parting, 

Bottom coal, .1 



7" 

8 

7 

8 

i 
8 

i 

8 
8 

k 
4 
8 
10 

I 
3 
10 
11 

i 
8 

3 

1 

4 

8 



I found the section at the bottom of the main swamp to 
be the same as that obtained at the pit mouth, dip to the 
top of the block slate ; and above that the members were 
concealed. 

The foregoing bearings on slaty cleavage were obtained 
on the center entry at a point where a small indefinite 
swamp crosses that entry and near the front part of the 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 73 

mine. At this point a portion of the roof members have 
been blasted down, which exposes the shale over the block 
slate for a height of three feet in the deepest part of the 
swamp. 

Tlce cleavage here commences at the top of the block 
slate and extends upwards through the overlying shale for 
about five feet. The cleavage planes occur at intervals of 
from one inch to five feet, cleaving the shale into slabs per- 
pendicular to its bedding. Those planes which are only 
a few inches apart are perfectly parallel with each other 
as far as exposed to view across the width of the entry ; 
those that are several feet apart are found to vary slightly 
in direction, as indicated by the foregoing bearings, which 
are taken for the extremes. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth, 49 feet above pool water. 



1%. BAKEWEIili jniNE, (SOf miles from PiUsbargliO 

Situated on the east side of the river. 

Was owned in 1847 by James Manown, Sr., and opened 
under lease by H. H. Pinley ; who operated until 1849 and 
run to the river trade. 

The coal was run from the pit mouth into the boats at 
the river by means of a large and a small chute. A screen 
was placed in the small chute next to the boats. The lump 
coal was the only portion loaded for market, and the slack, 
or the portion that passed through the screen, was cast 
aside as worthless. 

Bottom of coal 82^ feet above low or pool water. 

The property now belongs to the Bakewell heirs. 



78. DRY BUBT JIIlBriS, (80f miles firom PiUsbargiiO 

Located in the west end of Monongahela City. 

Opened in 1862 by Dr. R. F. Biddle and ^, W. Tower, 
who built an inclined tram road and an abutment tipple at 
the river and run coal to the river trade until 1863. 



74 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL 



Tlien operated a few months by Alexander Crumby under 



Sold in 1864 to Joseph Haigh, who operated until 1870. 

Then sold to I. N. Holmes and Sons of Pittsburgh, since 
which time it has only been operated for the local trade of 
the city. 

H. H. Finley is superintendent in charge of the mine and 
property connected therewith. 

Area mined out 60 acres. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth 81 feet above low water. 

The following section was obtained at the pit mouth : 

Carbonaceous shale. 

Coal 0' 2|" 

Slate parting, 

Coal, 

Clay shale, 

Carbonaceous shale containing podules 

of iron ore, 

Clay shale, 

Coal, 

Slate parting, 

Coal, 

Clay shale, 

Coal, 

Slate parting, 

Coal, 

Over-cldy, 

Breast coal, 2 

Slate parting, 

Bearing-in coal, 

Slate parting, 

Brick coal, 1 

Slate parting, 

Bottom coal, 1 

Cleavage planes bear: 

N. 63i W. 10 feet— N. 65 W. 6 feet. 
N. 64 W. 8 " — N. 64i W. 7 " 



Dry Run mine 
Section, 



1 
5 

4 

4 

7 

1 

6 : 

10 

I 
2 

3 
9 
9 



60. NEW EAOIiE iniNE, (29$ miles from Pifttsbargb. ) 

Opened up in 1863 by the owners, Hopkins and Irish, 
who, in 1864, leased it to Jenkins, Nish and Company, who 
built the outside road, 400 yards in length, an abutment 
tipple ; made sundry other improvements, and worked the 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 75 

mine for two years ; after which Hopkins and Irish oper- 
ated for a few months and leased it to Rogers and Wallace ; 
who operated until 1869, and sub-leased it to Lindsay and 
McCuchon ; who operated until the expiration of the orig- 
inal lease. 

Lindsay and McCuchon then leased it from the present 
owner, the Hon. James H. Hopkins of Pittsburgh, and con- 
tinue to operate. 

About 105 acres have been mined out and the coal is run 
to the river trade. 

The coal is transported in pit wagons from the interior of 
the mine to the pit mouth by mule power, and from thence f/^ 
to the tipple by means of a stationary engine and wire rope. 
The engine is located near the pit mouth, and the loaded 
cars run by gravity down to the tipple at the river, carry- 
ing one end of the line with them. The empty cars are re- 
turned to the pit mouth by means of the engine and wire '^ 
line. 

The floor of this mine is quite undulating. Numerous 
light rolls pass in various directions, producing correspond- 
ing swamps or depressions, which render drainage at times 
somewhat difficult. 

A fault or break passes through the eastern side of the 
workings in an (approximately) north and south direction, 
throwing the coal down on that (E.) side from two to six 
feet. 

The head of the present workings is 700 yards from the 
pit mouth. 

They employ 65 miners, 4 inside drivers, and 4 day men, 
and the output averages 5000 bushels of lump coal per 
day. 

Cleavage planes in the coal observed as follows : 
N. 63f W. 4 feet— N. 63i W. 8 feet. 
N. 66f W. 4 *' — K 63i W. 5 " 
N. 64 W. 4 " — N. 63i W. 10 '' 
N. 64 W. 6 " — N. 6oi W. 5 '' 
N. 64t W. 5 '' — N. 63i W. 8 " 
N. 67f W. 3 " — N. 65i W. 8 '' 
Bottom of coal 60| feet above pool water. 



76 K\ 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 




MINE8 ON POOL NO. 3. 



K\ 77 



The following section was obtained on the main entry at 
a point 100 yards from the pit mouth : 

Carbonaoeous shale. 



ISew Eagle mine 
Section, 



( 



Coal, d' V 

Carbonaoeous shale, 1 

Coal, 2 

Slate parting, \ 

Coal, i 

Clay, 10 

Coal, 6 

Slate parting, | 

Coal, 6 

Clay shale, 2 

Coal, 10 

Slate parting, | 

Coal, 3 

Over-clay y 1 

Main breast coal, 2 10^ 

Parting, \ 

Coal, 8^ 

Parting, \ 

Brick coal, 1 1 

Parting, .\ 

Bottom coal, 1 2 



Under-clay. 



75. JUMGO mine, (29| miles Urom PUtsbarKh.) 

Located in the town of Riverview. 

Opened in 1847 by B. F. Bently and John Caldwell ; who 
built a tipple and road and operated until 1849. 

B. F. Bently then leased it to a company, who operated 
until 1851. 

This company sold their lease to Samuel Hamilton, who 
operated until December, 1852. 

Then the remaining portion of the coal, improvements 
and river frontage was sold to Alexander Wilson and Rev. 
John Kerr, who built a new road, tipple and a number of 
dwelling houses ; also the tow-boat ''Alexander Wilson^^^ 
and operated for two years. 

In 1856 the property was sold to Henry Graff ; who leased 
it to Rogers, Rea and Smith ; who operated until 1863. 

Then it was sold to the Mingo Coal Company, composed 
of Dr. Anderson, of Bedford Springs, George Black, John 



78 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 



R. McCune, John Smith and others ; who in 1865 built the 
tow-boat ^^ Reindeer \'' also, about forty coal boats, barged 
and flats ; and operated until 1867. 

Then they sold the property to Henry Lloyd. It then 
remained idle until 1869, when it was leased to Lewis Staib 
and Thomas Hutchinson ; who operated until February 22, 
1874. 

Thomas Hutchinson then leased the mine and operated 
until July, 1877; since when it has remained idle. 

Carbonaceous shale. 

( Coal, 0' 1*^ 

Clay shale, 2 

Coal, 6 

Clay slate, l^ 

Coal, ... 3 

Slate parting, ^ 

Coal, 2 

Slate parting, 1 

Coal, 1 

Slate, 1| 

Coal, 2^ 

Slate, \ 

Coal, \ 

Mingo mine ^^^J^ 1 

Section^ No, I. \ Slate parting { 

{Fig,f5,) Coal, 5 

Slate parting, \ 

Coal, 7 

Clay slate, 2 

Coal, 8 

Slate, \ 

Over-clay, 10 

Breast coal, 3 1| 

Slate parting, \ 

Bearing-in coal, 3 

Slate parting, \ 

Brick coal, 1 3 

Slate parting, \ 

Bottom coal, 1 

Under-clay containing limestone nodulea 

About 100 acres have been mined out and 600 acres re- 
main unmined. 

A swamp enters this mine from the west side ; crosses 
the main entry at 65 yards from the pit mouth, where it is 
four feet deep; and passes tlirough the worMngs in a 
semi-circular manner^ gradually growing deeper, nntil it 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 79 

connects with a circular basin 23 feet in depth and 192 
yards in diameter. 

This happens at a point on the main entry 780 yards 
from the pit month. 

Another swamp enters this basin at its western side^ op- 
posite to where the first one enters. 

A third swamp, seven feet in depth, connects with the 
basin on the south side and continues in a southerly direc- 
tion through the mine, so far as it has been developed. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth, 60 feet above low water. 

The following section was obtained at the pit mouth : 

Another section I got at the back pit mouth, where the 
main entry crosses over Keenan's run, and within the 
before-mentioned basin, as follows : 

Sandstone. 

Plant shale, T 6" 

Sandstone, 15 8 

Carbonaceous shale, 6 

Coal, 6 

Clay parting, 3 

Coal 5 

Clay parting, 2 

Coal, 6 

Mingo mine Over-clay, 10 

Section, No. 8. ^ Breast coal, 3 

{Fig. 26,) Slate parting, \ 

Bearing-in coal, 3 

Slate parting, \ 

Brick coal, 1 

Slate parting, | 

Bottom coal, 1 3 

Clay bottom. 



76. MURE MINE, (29 miles firom Plttobargh.) 

Situated on the east side of the river. 

Opened in 1844 by James Mure and James Robertin ; who 
operated under lease from J. Gardner, in a small way, until 
1846. 

This mine is now an entrance to the eastern main entry 
of the Old Eagle mine. 

The property belongs to the heirs of Wm. H. Brown, 
deceased. 



80 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

77. OEM BAGIiE, (88| mUes from Pittobnrgh.) 

Located on the east side of the river. 

Opened in 1861 by Jenkins, Hill, Nish & Co., underlease 
from Captain William Parkinson. They built an abutment 
tipple and operated until 1863. They then bought the 
property and operated until 1867. 

Sold in 1868 to William H. Brown, who operated until 
his death in 1875, and since then it has been operated by 
his heirs. 

During Mr. Brown's lifetime the mine was greatly en- 
larged by the purchase of other tracts adjoining in the 
rear. The old tipple was removed and a new one built in 
its place during the summer of 1882. 

The mine is worked on the double-entry system and at 
present is divided into three divisions by two main entries. 

The mouth of the one entry is in line with the tipple and 
an air course is driven along parallel with it with a rib of 
about 40 feet of solid coal remaining between them. This 
entry and air course starts from the front at the bottom of 
the main swamp and follow in its course for about 300 
yards, after which they gradually ascend its western slope 
and pass out of it on that side. 

The other main entry starts at a point 450 yards farther 
up the river and is driven perpendicular to the faces or 
cleavage. The coal is hauled over an outside road from 
this entry and the eastern part of the mine to the tipple 
house, a distance of 900 yards, by a compressed air loco- 
motive^ which is also used to haul the cars from the iirst 
named main entry, the distance traveled by it in both cases 
being about the same. 

This locomotive consists of two cylinders, each 22 feet in 
length and 36 inches in diameter, placed on a truck or car- 
riage side by side, which, together with its levers, connec- 
tions, and other necesarry parts, amounts to 27 feet in total 
length. It is charged by the use of a high and a low pres- 
sure air engine run by steam power stationed near the pit 
mouth. The amount of pressure used, as indicated by the 
air gauge, is 400 pounds per square inch. 



SECOND GEOL SURVEY, PA. 



REPORT K 4. PLATE V. 




2 



o 



Q 

_l 
O 



o 

O 
u 

o 



Q. 

O 
o 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 81 

The locomotiveTnakes a round trip in from sev^in to ten 
minutf s, which reduces the pressure to about 260 pouhdis. 

They haul out 30 full cars at a trip and the: superin- 
tendent, Mr. Robert Parry, informs me that they can easily 
haul 50 cars at- a time. He also says that a locomotive with 
cylinders of 15 feet in length and 3 feet in diameter would 
be sufficiently large for this mine. 

A clear entry way eight feet wide and six feet :high is 
necessary for the safe passage of the locomotive where the 
track is straight ; and where the entry is curved a some- 
what larger opening is required. 

Mules are used in the mine to distribute the eiyipty cars 
through the workings, and collect the loaded ones together 
into trains at the parting, from whence they are taken by 
the locomotive. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth of the western or old main 
entry, 38 feet above low wat^r. 

This pit mouth is at bottom of the- main swamp^ which 
passes through the mine a distance of 600 yards (so far as 
it has been developed) on a bearing of N. 53^ E. It is 200 
yards wide and from 20 to 30 feet deep. 

A smaller swamp about six feet in depth is found in the 
western part of the mine, which inters the front at a point 
200 yards west of the main swamp, and passes through the 
workings on a bearing of N. 20° E. to a distance of 600 
yards. 

At about half, way up the eastern slope of the main 
swamp I find a faulty which breaks and throws the coal 
down about five feet on entry No. 5. This fault runs par- 
allel with the axes of the swamp, and extends for a dis- 
tance of 300 yards. 

About 50 yards east of this break and near the eastern 
edge of the swamp, I find another faulty which displaces 
the roof coal and the upper portion of the main breast six 
inches — the doTjm tJifdw in both cases being on the side of 
the svvamp. 

Gla9/ veins were noticed in other parts of the mine ex- 
tending in yarious directions. 

The Cleavage planes in the western part of the mine are 
6K\ 



82 K\ REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 



short and much curled, the openings being frequently 
filled with plates of calcite. The following bearings were 
obtained : 

N. 62i W. 3 feet— N. 61 W, 6 feet. 
N. 65 W. 5 " —N. 64i W. 4 " 
N. 6^ W. 4 '' — N. 62 W. 6 '' 
In the eastern part of the mine bearings were obtained as 
follows : 

N. 64i W. 6 feet— N. 64^ W. 6 feet. 
N. 63i W. 5 '' — N. 644 W. 4 '' 
The best cleavage here appears to occur in the upper 
part of the main breast coal. 

The following section was obtained near the furnace and 
outside of the swamp : 

Sandstone. 

Block slate, 5' 1" 

Carbonaceous shale, 7 

Coal, 4 

Slate parting, | 

Coal, 5 

Clay, 1 

Coal, 4 

Clay, 10 

Coal, 1 

Clay, 2 

Coal, 11 

(IHg.g?,) Over-clayy 10 

Breast coal, 3 

Parting, { 

Coal, 3 

Parting, [ 

Coal, 1 2 

Parting, { 

L Coal, 1 3 

Under clay. 

The ventilation is produced by furnace power. The fur- 
nace is built of brick, arched, 29 feet long, 6^ feet wide, and 
8 feet high from the floor. The fire bed is 13 feet long. 
The furnace stack is built of stone and brick, and 110 feet 
in height. The distance traveled by the air from the inlet 
to the furnace is 3200 yards. With a moderate fire in the 
furnace the air current was found to be moving at the rate 
of 19,337 cubic feet per minute ; and by making a direct 



Old Eagle Mine 
Section. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 83 

connection with the outside air at a point near the furnace 
it was found to pass 28,892 cubic feet per minute. 

Area mined out 101 acres. . 

The coal is run to the river trade. 

98 miners, 5 drivers, 1 trapper and 7 day men ; and the 
output amounts to 7,000 bushels of lump coal per day. 
The total product gives a yield of 66 per cent lump, 17 per 
cent nut and 17 per cent dust coal. 



78. COUBTNEY JIfflNE, (28} miles from Pittsburgh.) 

Owned by John L. George & Co., and opened under lease 
in January, 1879, by Hugh Craig & Co., who built a rail- 
road tipple and shipped the coal by rail ; and operated 
until April, 1880. 

Then the mine was leased to Berry, Cook & Co., who op- 
erated until February, 1882. 

Then the mine was leased to the Courtney Coal Company, 
who operated until 1883. 

At present it is operated by John L. George and J. F. 
Kennedy, who continue to ship by rail. 

The coal is hauled from the working places of the mine 
to the bottom of the swamp on the main entry by mules, 
and from there the cars are hauled out to the tipple house 
by means of a stationary engine and a wire rope placed 
near the pit mouth. 

The main entry is driven on the butts N. 66f W. to the 
bottom of the swamp ; and from there it follows approxi- 
mately in the swamp, which passes through the mine on a 
bearing of S. 61° W. This is the same swamp that is found 
crossing the main entry of the Garfield mine, and appears 
to be the same that passes through the Old Eagle mine on 
the other side of the river. It is 25 feet deep and 200 yards 
wide in this mine. 

The mine is worked on the double- entry system and is 
ventilated by furnace power. 

Area mined out 51 j^^ acres. 

They employ 50 miners, 4 drivers, and 8 day men, and 



84 K\, 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 



29. 



30. 



31. 



32. 




3.9 



■4 



r,3 



t.6 



0.(0 



3.6 



0.3, 



f.2 



^ 



f.6 



rUx^ 



I cla.c 



9 




MINES ON POOL NO. 3. 



K\85 



the output of lump coal is 4000 bushels per day. Since 
its opening the mine has produced 100,000 bushels of 
lump coal per acre. The entire product of the mine after 
screening gives 66 per cent lump, 14 per cent nut, and 20 
per cent dust coal. 
The following section was obtained at the pit mouth • 

Randstone. 

Carbonaceous shale, 1' 3'' 



Courtney mine 
Section No. 1. 

(HHg.gS.) 



f Coal, 1 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Slate parting, 

Coal, 

Main over-clay, . . . , , , 1 

Breast coal, 3 

Parting, 

Bearing-in ooal, 

Parting, 

Brick ooal, 1 

Parting, 

L Bottom ooal 1 

Under-olay. 

A section in the swamp is as follows : 

Sandstone. 

Carbonaceous shale. 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 



Courtney mine 

Section No. S, 

{Fig.SQ.) 



3 



6 



Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, ... 

Coal, 

Main over-clay, 

Breast coal, 3 

Parting, 

Bearing-in coal, 

Parting, 

Brick coal, 1 

Parting, 

^ Bottom ooal, 1 

Under-clay. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth 19^ above railroad grade, and 



2 

10 
9 



3 



6 



86 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

52 feet above pool water. Bottom of swamp 26 feet above 
pool water, where it enters the outcrop 140 yards down the 
river from the main pit mouth. 



79. BliACK HlliliS ]lffIK7E, (2(8} mUes fk*om Plttsbargh.) 

It was opened up in Dec. 1878, by the Dewar Brothers, 
who operated it under lease from Byers, Scott and Miller 
until Dec. 1879. 

It was then leased by Miller & Co., who operated until 
1883, when the remaining coal and property was sold to J. 
F. Kennedy. The coal was transported entirely by rail, 
and sold principally at South Pittsburgh. 

The following statement of annual output has been fur- 
nished to me by I. B. Miller from the books of the Com- 



pany : 










Lump coal. 


Nut coal. 


Dust coal. 


Dec. 1878, 

1879, 

1880 

1831, 

1882 

1883, 


11,222 bushels. 
176,084 
467,754 " 
494,803 " 
893,724 

27,551 


Not reported. 

(( u 

100,998 bushels 
77,390 «» 
Not reported- 


Not reported. 
it (( 

126, 128 bushels. 
83,848 »• 
Not reported. 




1,671,138 bushels 


178,383 bushels 


209,971 bushels 



The area of the workings amounts to 18 acres by actual 
survey, including the ribs and pillars that remain unmined, 
amounting to 31 per cent of the whole area. 

This gives a yield of 87,285 bushels of lump coal per 
acre for the area. 

By excluding the ribs and pillars we get a yield of 126,- 
500 bushels per acre. 

By adding together the reported amounts of lump, nut 
and dust coal for the years of 1881 and '82, we find the 
percentage of lump coal to be 69J, nut coal 14, and the dust 
coal 16^^. 

The main breast, bearing-in, brick and bottom coal mem- 
bers were all mined out here, averaging 4i feet in height. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K\ 87 

SO. BABB MIIVE, (88^ miles trom Plttabargh.) 

Located on the west side of the river, between the Black 
Hills and Oarfield mines. 

Opened in 1825 by R. Barr, who operated in a primitive 
manner for a few years, and then the property passed into 
possession of F. Gardner, who sold it to George Yohe. 

Yohe sold it in 1836 to Robert Bryant, who operated 
until 1846. 

The coal was transported from the mine to river on road- 
wagons and sleds, and loaded into boats at the mouth of 
the small run that passes near the pit mouth. 

Two acres were mined out, and the property now belongs 
to James Craig. 



81. OABFIEIiD MIlfE, (284 miles from PUlsbargh.) 

Located on the west side of the river. 

Opened during the early part of 1879 by John T. Huston 
& Co., in a tract of coal bought by them from James Craig 
containing 8f acres. The surface front belonged to William 
Huston. They built an abutment tipple and tramroad, and 
leased a tract of coal adjoining the other on the west side 
from N. Holmes & Son. They operated in the Craig tract 
and extended a butt entry into the Holmes tract, so as to 
connect with the main entry of the old Holmes mine. 

They operated until August, 1881. 

Then the property of John T. Huston & Co., and William 
Huston was sold to J. B. Finley ; who also sold the same 
to Jordon S. Neel during the same year. 

The coal of the Craig tract is all mined out and J. S. 
Neel is working the Holmes coal under lease. 

This mine is operated on the double-entry system and 
ventilated by furnace power. The main entry and air 
course are being driven parallel to each other, on a bearing 
of S. 13° W., with forty feet of solid coal left unmined 
between them. The butt entries are driven in pairs with 
thirty feet of a rib remaining between them. 

The main entry and air course cross the same swamp 



88 Kr 



KEPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 



Oar field mine 

Section No. 1. 

iIHg. SO.) 



that is found in the Old Eagle and Courtney mines, at a 
distance of 1390 yards from the pit mouth. At this point 
I find the swamp to be fourteen feet deep and two hundred 
and seventy yards across it. This is the head of the present 
workings and they are preparing to blast the roof of the 
entries down in the swamp and raise the track to grade. 

Butt entries No. 21 and 22 are driven from the main entry 
at the bottom of the swamp, and they propose constructing 
arches or bridges at the mouths of these entries, so as to 
preserve an open passage way under the main entry and 
thereby enable them to mine out that part of the coal 
which is inclosed within the swamp with greater ease. 

I find a section of the main coal members in the bottom 
of the swamp to be : 

( Roof coal. 

Over-clay, 0' 

Breast coal, . . .' 3 

Parting, 

* Bearinjc-in ooal, 

Parting, 

Brick ooal, 1 2 

Parting, \ 

. Bottom coal, 1 6 

Under-olay. 

And on the north margin of this swamp it is as follows : 

Roof coal. 

Over-clay, 0' 10" 

Breast ooal, 2 10 

Parting, | 

Bearlng-in ooal, 3 

Parting, { 

Brick ooal, 1 1 

Parting, | 

[ Bottom ooal, 11 

Under-clay. 

The Craig tract has all been mined out, except some ribs 
and pillars, and about forty acres out of the Holmes tract. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth, 34i*(y feet above pool water, 
and 2i feet below railroad grade. 

They employ 125 miners, 8 drivers and 6 day men, and 
the output amounts to 8500 bushels of lump coal per day. 



10' 
6 



i 



Garfield mine 

Section No. 2. 

il\g. SI.) 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 89 

82. HOIiMES miNE, (88^ miles froin Fittsbursrh.) 

Located between the Buffalo and the Garfield mines. 

Owned and opened in 1852 by Dr. Merrett, who operated 
it until 1854, after which it was sold to N. Holmes & Son, 
of Pittsburgh, the present owners. 

It then remained idle until 1879, when the remaining coal 
was leased to John T. Huston & Co., who ran the coal out 
through the Garfield mine and operated until August, 1881. 

Since then it has been operated by Jordon S. Neel, under 
lease. 

The present furnace and stack of the Garfield mine is 
located near the pit mouth of this mine, and the old main 
entry has been driven forward and at present is used as an 
air-course for the Garfield mine. 

An area of four acres was mined out. 



83. BVFFAIiO miNE, (28^ miles fVom Pittabargh.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Opened up in 1846 by Anderson and Lindsay, who ran 
the coal to the river trade and operated until 1863. It was 
then called, the Cleveland mine, 

Chamberland and McDonald operated the mine until 
1857. 

It was then leased to Finley and Miller, who operated 
about two years. 

John Dippold & Co. bought the property in 1860, and 
named it the Tigress mine, and operated until 1863. 

After that it was operated by Adam Apple and John 
Dippold until 1866. 

Adam Apple then leased the mine from John Dippold, 
who had become sole owner, and operated until 1873. 

It was then sold to the Buffalo Coal Company, (at which 
time it was named the Buffalo mine,) who abandoned the 
river trade, built a railroad tipple, and operated by rail 
until 1875. 

It was then leased to Wolf, Walters and Meyers, who 
operated until 1877. 



90 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

William Huston and Hugh Flanegan operated for a few 
months, and then it was leased to J. J. Staitler, who is the 
present owner and operator. He bought the property in 
1881. 

The mine is worked on the double-entry system. The 
main entry and air-course are 1825 yards in length to the 
head. A butt entry is driven from near the head of the 
main entry, from which a face entry is driven to Froman's 
run. 

At the head of the last-named entry a shaft has been 
sunk to a depth of 60 feet and connects with the entry. 
A Champion fan six feet in diameter is placed at the top 
of the shaft and run by steam. It is used as an exhaust 
fan at present, but can be used either to exhaust the air 
from or to force it into the mine. The fresh air enters the 
pit mouth at the river front. At the time of my visit, Jan- 
uary 21, 1884, the fan was being run at the rate of 100 rev- 
olutions per minute which, according to the anemometer, 
gave an exhaustion of 14,850 cubic feet of air per minute. 

The fan was run by steam from a double-flued boiler 20J 
feet in length and 3 feet in diameter. The boiler also sup- 
plied the steam to run a No. 4 Blake steam pump^ located 
at the sump near the foot of the shaft. 

The thermometer indicated four degrees below zero out- 
side of the mine, and I noticed frost on the roof and sides 
of the main entry at a distance of one half mile from the 
pit mouth. 

The coal is hauled from the mine by mule power. 85 
miners, 2 trappers, 6 drivers, and 10 day men are employed. 
Four mules are used to collect the loaded cars into trains 
and distribute the empty cars through the workings, and 
four mules are used to haul the trains out, with two mules 
to a train. 

The daily output amounts to 6500 bushels of lump coal 
per day. During the summer they run by rail to the lake 
trade and during the winter they run on orders for gas coal 
from Cleveland and Toledo. The nut and dust coal are sold 
at present to the Edgar Thompson Steel Works at Brad- 
dock and the Pittsburgh trade. The run of the mine gives 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. 



K\ 91 



66 per cent lump, 17 per cent nut, and 17 per cent dust 
coal. 

At this time the loaded pit cars are hauled from the pit 
mouth up an inclined tramway to the tipple by means of a 
stationary engine and wire rope, but they are ari-anging to 
build a new tipple with a perpendicular lift. 

Floor of present tipple 25 feet above railroad grade. 

Numerous clap veins and spars are found in this mine. 
I noticed one clay vein that displaced the roof coal ten 
inches but did not fracture the main breast coal to a greater 
depth than two feet. They cause no serious inconvenience 
in mining here, however. 

The following section of the coal members was obtained 
near the pit mouth : 

Carbonaceous shale. 

Coal, 0' 4' 

Clay, 2 

Coal, 5 

Clay, 2 

Coal, 4 

Clay, 10 

Coal, . 4 to 0' 5" 

Slate parting, • . . { 

Coal, 9 

Clay, to 0' 4" 

Coal, 7 

Parting, \ 

Coal, 1 

Parting i 

Coal, 2 to 0' 4'- 

Main over-clay, 10 

Breast coal, 2 10 

Parting, a 

Bearing-in coal, 3 

Parting, 4 

Brick coal, 1 3 

Parting, \ 

Bottom coal, 13 

Under-clay. 

Cleavage planes. I obtained the following bearings : 
N. 67i° W. 4 feet at a point 20 feet from a clay vein. N. 
63i W. 6 feet at a point 60 feet on the other side of the same 
clay vein. 

This last cleavage plane was curled or curved to the ex- 
tent of f of an inch from a straight line in its whole length. 



Buffalo mine Section. 



92 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTl'ON WALL. 

The bearings obtained at another point where clay veins 
were not observed are : 

N. 62i° W. 6 feet— N. 64° W. 4 feet. 
N. 71 W. 6 '' — N. 62i W. 6 " 
. All of the clay partings in the roof member appear to be 
subject to sudden variations in thickness, amounting some- 
times to small horse-backs, resulting in depressions in the 
under side of the roof coal, and a consequent variation in 
the thickness of the main breast coal member. Sometimes, 
however, this depression of the roof coal only affects the 
thickness of the main over- clay, making it to vary from six 
to ten inches in thickness. 

Area mined out 180 acres. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth, 35^ feet above pool water, 
and 4 feet below railroad grade. 



84. liYSIiE miNE. 

Located about fifty yards below the Buffalo Mine. 

Opened in 1842 by George Lysle, who operated for about 
two years only. The coal was run to the river trade, and 
the property is now included in the Buffalo mine. His 
sons Addison and George, Jr., are now operating the Cam- 
den Mine, near Camden Station. 



85. K7EW CINCINNATI ilHINE, (28} miles from Plttsbargh.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1854 by Capt. Wm. Ferree, for the Cincin- 
nati Coal Company, who built an abutment tipple and ope- 
rated until 1855 ; and leased it to George Campfield, who 
operated until 1860. 

It was then leased to George Groves, Louis Moule, and 
George Ordner ; after which W. H Barr was added to the 
company, which operated until 1862. 

Then the property was sold to x\rmstrong and Herron, 
who in 1863 sold it to John Dippold, John L. Porter, R. 
G. Herron, and Wm. A. Herron, who operated until 1865, 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K\ 93 

when Dippold bought the interests of his partners and 
leased the mine to William Huston and R. G. Herron. 

They operated until 1868, when Wni. Huston leased the 
mine and oijerated until 1877. 

The property then passed into possession of Robert Ar- 
thurs and Alexander Bradley of Pittsburgh, the present 
owners, who in 1878 leased it to Jordon S. Neel, who built 
a new abutment tipple and some additional houses, and 
made other extensive improvements in the mine. 

During the first three years Mr. Neel operated in the 
northern part of the property. He mined out here an area 
of thirty acres as determined by actual survey, which pro- 
duced 3,000,000 bushels of lump coal, as shown by the 
books at the end of that time. 

He was forced to abandon this part of the mine soon 
after that time by reason of a crush or squeeze in the roof 
and pillars which closed the entries and rendered access 
difficult and dangerous to life. Large quantities of fire- 
damp (carburetted hydrogen) were flowing from the roof 
coal at the head of the workings, which also added to the 
danger of continuing operations at this point. 

He then re-opened the old workings in the southern part 
of the property, which so far has been attended with much 
better results, and this part of the mine now appears to be 
in good working condition. It is operated on the double- 
entry system, and the coal is run to the river trade. Ven- 
tilation is produced by furnace power. 

Area mined out 176 acres. 

Bottom of coal 27^ feet above low water. 125 miners, 8 
drivers and 4 day men are employed. 

Daily output 8500 bushels of lump coal. 



86. BBITTON RUBTE, (88 ,V miles from PiUsbargh.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1839 by Thomas Smith on the line between his 
property and that of Andrew Kirkendail. He operated in 
a small way for a few years and ran the coal to the river 
trade. 



94 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

After remaining idle for many years it came into posses- 
sion of John Britton, who sold it to John Dippold, December 
31, 1866 ; and at present it is included in the New Oincin- 
nati mine 



87. MoKlNfirEY miNE, (28 miles from Pittsbargh.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1846 by Hugh McKinney and operated by him 
until 1849. He sold the property to John Dippold, Feb- 
ruary 9. 1872. One acre was mined out and the property 
is now included in the New Cincinnati mine 



H%. JEMIilS BENTIiY miNE, (27H miles Arom Pittsbargh.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1835 by Jesse Bently and operated by him in 
a small way until 1850. The coal was wheeled out of the 
mine by hand-barrows and carts, stocked on the river bank, 
and loaded into boats, according to the custom of that day. 
The property is now included in the New Cincinnati mine. 



89. OliD €Ifir€lK7K7ATI milVE, (27i miles from Pittsbargh.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1851 by Capt. Wm. Ferree for the Cincinnati 
(]oal Company, who operated here until 1854 and opened 
the New Cincinnati mine. The coal was run to the river 
trade, and the property is now included in the New Cin- 
cinnati mine. 



90. WIIililAJm FIKTIiEY IWINE, (27H miles from Pittsbargh.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 
Opened in 1838 by William Finley and operated by him 
until 1848, in a small way. The coal was run out of the 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 95 

mine by hand-barrows and carts, and loaded into boats, 

under the system of first stocking it on the river bank until 

a rise of water would come. 

The property now belongs to the New Cincinnati mine. 
The bottom of coal at pit mouth 45 jV feet above pool 

water, and 15 feet above railroad grade. 



91. PORT FINE.EY miNE, (27| miles from PiUsbnrgli.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1833 by Levi Finley, who loaded 12 boats of 
coal during that year. The coal was run to Louisville by 
river, and sold in that market. 

The property afterwards passed into possession of Mrs. 
Neel, who leased the mine to various persons that operated 
in a small way. 

It now belongs to Thomas Hutchinson. 

Area mined out nearly an acre. 

Bottom of coal 40 /o feet above pool water, and 11 feet 
above railroad grade. 



93. H. H. FIME.EY MINE, (27} miles Urom Pittsburffli.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1833 by H. H. Finley, under lease from his 
grandfather John Finley, the owner, and was operated by 
H. H. Finley until 1835. The property now belongs to 
John Dewar. 



93. JOHN FINIi£Y miNE, (27^ miles from Pittsburgh.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1830 by John Finley to supply fuel to a steam 
saw and grist mill, which he built at that place during the 
same year. The mine was run in connection with the mill 
successively by Levi Finley, William Cochran, Dr. Joseph 
Curry and H. H. Finley, until 1842, when the mill was de- 
stroyed by fire. 



96 K\ REPOirr of pkogress. j. sutton wall. 

During that year H. H. Finley bailt a coal road to the 
river, and loaded four JPVench creek boats under contract 
with John Leady. Leady furnished the empty boats on 
agreement that he was to have two of them when loaded, 
and Finley was to have the other two. Finley informs me 
that he sent his two boats to market in care of John Donly, 
in the month of May of that year ; one of which was lost 
on the way, and the other passed through safely to Cincin- 
nati. The coal was sold during the month of August at 
five cents per bushel. The boats held about 6000 bushels 
each. He paid 1^ cents per bushel for the coal mined and 
delivered at the pit mouth. 

The property now belongs to James Craig. 



94. CHESTER miNE, (27^ miles from PittoburgliO 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Owned and opened up by Samuel Chester in 1846, and 
operated by him in a small way until 1862. The price paid 
for the coal mined and delivered at the pit mouth was li 
cents per bushel, and day laborers 75 cents per day. 

The property now belongs to Isaac Dawson. 



95. COX SIIBIE, (»7f miles from Pittobnrgli.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Owned and opened up by Enoch Cox in 1830, who oper- 
ated in a small way and ran coal to the river trade until 
1840. 

The property now belongs to Captain James May. 



96. HUGHES HUME, (27^ miles fl*om PiCtobargli.) 

Situated on the east side of the river. 

Opened in 1840 by John Hughes, who ran coal to the 
river trade and operated for a few years. The coal was 
transported from the mine in barrows and hand-carts, and 
stocked on the river bank, ready to be loaded into boats at 
the first favorable stage of the water. 

The property now belongs to Aaron Conlin. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 97 

97. CRAIG MINE, (37} miles flfom Pittobargli.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1874 by James, Robert, and Hugh Craig, who 
built a road and railroad tipple and ran the product of the 
mine by rail to the Pittsburgh market. 

It has not been in operation since 1879. 

Area mined out four acres. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth 39^ feet above low water, and 
16 feet above the railroad. 

A pit was opened near the upper line of this property in 
1831 by P. Rhodes, who operated in a small way for a few 
years only and sold the property to James Craig. 



98. JENKINS miNE, (27} miles flfom PittobnrsliO 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Owned and opened up in 1830 by John Jenkins, who 
operated and run coal to the river trade until 1837. The 
first four boats that he loaded were sunk before they ar- 
rived at market, but the next boat load was sold for 20 
cents per bushel at Cincinnati. 

Area mined out four acres. 

The property now belongs to William M. Lyon & Com- 
pany of Pittsburgh. 



99. FRENCH miNE, (27^ miles from PittsbargliO 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1830 by Samuel French, who operated until, 
in 1840, he was killed on board of a loaded coal boat 
near the foot of Muskingum Island on the Ohio river. 
They were trying to land the boat and had one end of a line 
tied to shore and the other end was being coiled around a 
check-post of the boat. The current was quite rapid and 
he was caught between a coil of the rope and the check- 
post. While in this position the post was pulled, out 
and French was carried into the river. The boat then 
floated down stream and sunk a short distance below. 
7K\ 



98 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

The crew returned and pulled French out of the water and 
found him dead. 

His sons James, Rufus, Westley, and Benjamin French 
operated the mine for several years after that time. 

Area mined out two acres. 



100. HUTCHISON miJUE, (27} miles fl*oiii Pittsburgli.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Opened about 1836 and operated in a small way by various 
persons until 1852, when it passed into possession of Robert 
and William White, who operated until 1861, 

Then it was operated under lease by Milo and George 
Gibson until 1868, and since that time it has remained idle. 

The coal was run to the river trade. 

Area mined out about two acres. 

The property is now owned by Thomas Hutchison. 

On the lot adjoining the north side of the above-men- 
tioned Hutchison property there was a pit opened by a Mr. 
Dewis in 1825. He used the product of the mine in burn- 
ing lime for a number of years. The property now belongs 
to Capt. James May 



101. NEW COAl. BliUFF HINK, (Id7i miles from Pittsbarffli.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1840 by M. Correy and R. Black, who built a 
slide tipple and operated until 1849 and sold it to Absalom 
Bentley, from which time it remained idle until 1862, when 
it was sold to James Verner, who became a member of the 
Coal Bluff Goal Company in 1864 and conveyed this 
property to the company at that time. 

During that year they built a new road and tipple and 
run coal to the river trade until 1872. 

In . 1876 the company dissolved and the entire property 
was sold to George Logan and J. B. Finley, who, in 1877, 
leased the mine to John D. Negley, who sub-leased it to R. 



SECOND GEOL. SURVEY. PA 



REPORT K4. PLATE VI. 




0. 
Q. 



C 

u 

ll. 

2 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K\ 99 

T. Patterson and D. Steen & Son, who operated until May, 
1882, and it remained idle until October, 1882. 

J. B. Finleysold his interest to George Logan in June, 
1878, and in 1882 Logan sold the entire property to J. B. 
Finley, who in turn sold it during October of the same year 
to the Monongahela and Peters OreeJc Goal Company^ con- 
sisting of Allen Kirkpatrick, W. K. Gillespie, Alexander 
Dempster, A. M. Scott and Evan Beedle. 

This company have made large improvements both inside 
and outside of the mine. During the last year they built a 
new road, a railroad, and a river tipple, and are prepared 
to run coal on an extensive scale by both river and rail. 



The mine is worked on the double-entry system, and 
ventilated by furnace power. The furnace is 16 feet in 
length, arched with brick, with a fire lining of fire-brick. 
The fire bed is 8 feet long and 6^ feet wide. The grate bars 
are 2 feet above the furnace floor and 4 feet 8 inches below 
the under side of the ar(3h. 

The shaft and stack are 22 feet from the rear end of the 
furnace, 50 feet in height, and circular in form, 8 feet in 
diameter. The fresh air enters the mine through another 
shaft, 47 feet in depth, and located on No. 2 butt entry. 

The head of the present workings is nearly one mile from 
the pit mouth. The main hauling roads are laid with " T" 
iron rails. The main entry and air course aye driven par- 
allel with each other, api)roximately N. 20° W., with 40 
feet of solid coal remaining between them. They rise about 
66 feet from the pit mouth to the mouth of No. 20 butt 
entry, a distance of 1720 yards, and are still rising so far 
as driven. 

A swamp enters this mine at the north side from the 
Cliff mine^ on a bearing of about S. Q5 W. and passes 
through the head of the old workings, where it curves to 
the north-west and pursues a direction approximately par- 
allel with the main entry. 

It crosses butt entry No. 16 at 620 yards from the main 
entry, and is 25 feet in depth at that point. 

The roof members are much disturbed by small horse- 



100 K\ 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 




MINES ON POOL NO. 3. 



K'. 101 



New Coal Bluff mine 

iSection No, L 

{Fig. SS.) 



hacks in some parts of the mine. This condition gives a 
very rough and uneven roof. 

The over-clay measures from 6 to 10 inches where it is 
not affected by swells or horse-backs. 

Olay veins and spars are quite numerous, but are not so 
large as to cause any serious inconvenience in mining. 

There are a few rolls in the roof member that cut out 
almost all of the over-clay for short distances. 

Near the mouth of butt entry No. 17 I found the lower 
coal members to measure : 

Roof ooaJ. 

' Over-clapy 0' 6'' 

Breast ooal, 3 5 

Parting, { 

Bearing-in ooal, 3 

Parting, I 

BricJc coal, 1 2 

Parting, { 

Bottom ooal, 1 3 

Under clay. 

Near the head of the same entry I found the lower mem- 
bers to measure : 

Roof coal. 

Over clapf 0' 8 " 

Breast coal, 8 8 

Parting, J 

Bearing-in coal, 8 

Parting I 

Brick ooal, ..10 

Parting, | 

V Bottom ooal, 12 

Under-clay. 

At the bottom of the swamp I found the lower members 
to measure : 

^ Roof ooal. 

Over-clay, 0' 10' to 1' 1'' 

Breast ooal, 3 2 to36 

Parting, a 

Bearing-in coal, 8^ 

Parting, a 

Brick coal, 1 1 

Parting, J 

, Bottom ooal, ...1 3 tol4 

Under-clay. 

These members are found to vary in thickness in different 
parts of the swamp, as well as in other parts of the mine. 



New Coal Bluff mine 

Section No, g, 

{Fig. S4.) 



New Coal Bluff mine 

Section No. S. 

{Fig, 35.) 



102 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 



On the Elliott entry, now called butt entry No. 1, 1 found 
the following section of all the coal members to be : 



Garbonaoeous shale. 



New Coal Bluff mine 

{butt entry No. 1) 

Section No. 4. 

{Fig. S6.) 



( Blook slate, 8' 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 8 

CUy, 10 

Coal, 11 

Parting, 

Coal, 5 

Clay, 3 

Coal, 7 

Parting, \ 

Coal, 1 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Over-clay f 10 

Breast ooal, 2 11 



i 



2 



Parting, 

Bearing-in ooal, 

Parting, 

Brick ooal, 1 

Parting, 

Bottom ooal, 1 

Under-clay. 



i 



Cleavage planes were seen to bear: 

N. 64i W. 8 feet— N. 61f W. 



N. 59f W. 


8 


N. 65 W. 


5 


N. 65i W. 


4 


N. 59 W. 


7 



8 feet. 
6 " 



N. 64i W. 12 



— K 64i W. 
— N. 6f)i W. 4 " ' 
— N. 63| W. 6 '' 
--N. 61i W. 6 *' 
— N. 64f W. 3 " 
The coal is transported from the workings to the tipple 
by mule power. They are only driving entries at present. 
This mine includes the coal remaining in the Seed^ Ken- 
nedy and Coal Bluff" No. i, ^ and 3 mines. 

Total area mined out of all of these mines amounts to 
300 acres, and a much larger area remains unmined. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth 51^ feet above pool water, 
and 26 feet above railroad grade. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 103 

lOd. REED MINE, (27} miles flrom PieUibarKli.) 

Located on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1830 by Paul Reed, and operated by him until 
1840. Four acres were mined out, and the coal was run to 
the river trade. The property is now included in the New 
Coal Bluff property. 



103. PETERSON SIINE, (27 mUes from PiUsbnrgli.) 

Located on the west side of the river. 

Owned and opened up in 1836 by Dr. Robert Wray, who 
operated by river, and sold the property in 1847 to Herron, 
Peterson and Kain. 

The mine remained idle until 1850 and was leased to 
Thomas Wilson and Thomas Woods, who operated until 
1862. 

Herron, Peterson and Kain then operated it until 1860. 

In 1862 it was sold to James Verner, who in 1864 became 
a member of the Coal Bluff Coal Company and conveyed 
this property to that company. The property is now in- 
cluded in the New Coal Bluff Mine, The Coal Bluff Station 
is immediately in front of the old pit mouth. 



104. COAIi BliUFF MIME No. 3, (26| miles firom Pittobnrgh.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1858 by James K. Logan and Franklin Dor- 
man, who built a tramroad and slide tipple, and operated 
until 1864. The coal of this mine was run to the river trade, 
and the property is now included in the New Coal Bluff 
miue. 



105. COAIi BliUFF SIIME No. 3, (26J miles from Pietsbargh.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1852 by James K. Logan and Franklin Dor- 
man, who built a tramroad and slide tipple during 1853, 
and operated until 1858. The coal was run to the river 
trade and the property is now included in the New Coal 
Bluff mine. 



104 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

106. COAIa BliUFF JHIJUE Mo. 1, (36^ miles rrom PiCUibnrgli.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1840 by Benjamin and Jesse Bently and oper- 
ated by them until 1843, when it was sold to Samuel and 
Jacob Balsley. 

They operated until the autumn of 1847, and sold it to 
James K. Logan and Franklin Dorman. 

They operated together until Dorman sold his interest to 
Logan in 1857 ; and Logan continued to operate until 1864. 

Then he organized the Coal Bluff Coal Company^ com- 
posed of James K. Logan, James Vemer, Alexander Speer, 
Nathaniel Holmes, John T. Logan, Edward Gregg, James 
Hudson, John Hall and others. 

The coal was run to the river trade, and the property is 
now included in the New Coal Bluff mine. 



107. CE.IFF miNE, (26i miles rrom Pietobursli.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

Opened up in 1838 by John Jenkins, who within the pre- 
vibus year had bought the property, consisting of 84 acres 
of coal and 16 acres of surface frontage connected there- 
with, from William Hindman for $700. 

The coal was wheeled out of the mine in hand-carts and 
barrows and dumped into a chute holding about 800 bushels 
until it was full, then the balance was thrown into a stock- 
yard at the down-river side of the chute. 

The chute was 25 feet wide at the upper end, 9 feet wide 
at the lower end and 50 feet in length. It was set at such 
an inclination that when the door or gate was raised at the 
lower end the coal would run out on to a screen that formed 
a continuation of the chute, and from thence the lump coal 
passed into tram-wagons that conveyed it down an incline 
tram-road to the boats at the river. There were two of 
these wagons connected by a rope that passed over a small 
drum or check- wheel placed under the lower end of the 
chute proper. The force of a full wagon in going down the 
tramway pulled the empty one back up under the screen 
ready for refilling again. When the coal contained in the 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 105 

chute become exhausted, resort was then had to the stock- 
yard for a convenient supply. In which case the coal was 
wheeled in barrows and dumped on to the upper end of 
the screen, from whence it passed into the tram- wagons and 
down the incline to the boats at the river in the same way 
as from the chute. 

This comprised a slight improvement on the stocking sys- 
tem of that period. By the stocking system the coal could 
be mined and stored in a convenient place for loading into 
boats, independent of the stage or condition of the wat^r. 
When the river commenced to rise they would begin to load 
the boats and prepare for a trip down the river to market. 
At many places in this vicinity, however, there were pools 
deep enough to load boats at an ordinary stage of the river, 
by which means some of the operators were able to have a 
number of boats in readiness for a rise of water, without the 
use of the stock-yard. 

This was prior to the slack-water improvement^ and at a 
time when all heavy freitage in large bulk from this region 
was entirely dependent upon the quantity of running water 
in the river. 

John Jenkins operated this mine until 1863 and sold it 
for $13,500 to Shesh Kennedy, who built a new road, an 
abutment tipple, and operated by river until 1870. . 

Then he sold to George T. Miller, Robert Greenarch, and 
Daniel Kane, who operated until 1876 and leased it to 
Samuel Sculley. 

Sculley operated until 1883 when Harvey Hutchinson 
leased the mine and continues as operator. 

It is worked on the double- en try system. The main entry 
and air course are driven nearly due north from the pit 
mouth for a distance of 1867 yards, and from thence they 
bear N. 27 W. 480 yards to the head of the workings. The 
butt entries are driven in pairs from the right and left of 
the main entry. 

A swamp 18 feet in depth and 200 yards wide crosses 
through the mine on a bearing of N. 65° E. It crosses the 
main entry and air course at 867 yards from the pit mouth, 
and is the same that is found in the Banner mine on the 



106 K\ 



Report of Progress. J Sutton Wall. 




MINES OT^ POOL NO. 3. K'. 107 

east, and the New Coal Bluflf mine on the soutn side. The 
roof coal members, where the main entry crosses the swamp, 
have been blasted down, and the floor of the entry brought 
up to grade. This entry has a gradual rise now from the pit 
mouth to the head. This rise amounts to 41 1% feet at the 
distance of 1563 yards from the pit mouth or entry No. 19. 

The coal wagons are collected from the working places to 
a point on the main entry one mile from the pit mouth, 
and from there they are hauled out to the tipple house by 
means of a f inch wire line, operated by a drum and sta- 
tionary engine located near the pit mouth, and worked on L 
the tail-rope system. The rope travels over a metal bull 
wheel in the entry. The empty cars are returned by the 
same means. 

Ventilation is produced by means of a furnace and shaft 
located near the right hand side of the main entry and air 
course, and one mile from the pit mouth. The furnace is 
12^ feet long, 7 feet 8 inches wide, and 6 feet 9 inches high 
under top of arch. The grate bars are placed 2i feet from 
the floor, and the fire bed is 8^ feet in length. The furnace 
rises one foot from front to back. The shaft is even with 
back of furnace. It is circular in form, 7i feet in diame- 
ter, 110 in height through rock and shale, and is surmounted 
by a wooden stack 30 feet high. The air enters the mine 
at the pit mouth and travels around through the workings 
to the furnace, a distance of 4340 yards. I found the quan- 
tity of air passing through the furnace to be 33,250 cubic 
feet per minute, and by using fresh air direct from the main 
entry at a point 1760 yards from the pit mouth, I found 
the quantity then passing through the furnace to be in- 
creased to 43,750 cubic feet per minute. This shows a loss 
of about 25 per cent in the effective power of the furnace 
by the air having to travel the additional distance of 2580 
yards around through the working places of the mine be- 
fore it reaches the furnace. 

The sandstone is found resting immediately on the upper 
member of the roof coal, for a distance of 600 yards along this 
entry. It is light gray in color, micaceous, and very hard. 

The following columnar section was obtained on butt 
entry No. 23 : 



108 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 



Clif mine Section 

No.l. 

{Mg. S7.) 



Light gray mioaoeous aandstone. 

f Coal, 0' 2" 

Clay slate, 1 

Coal, 5 

ClaysUte, 1 

Coal, 4 

Clay, 10 

Coal, 6 

Slate parting, \ 

Coal, 8 

Clay, 1 

Coal, 7 

J Parting, | 

Coal I 

Parting, \ 

Coal, 2 

Over-clay, 6 

Breast ooal, 3 

Parting, | 

Bearing-in ooal, 3 

Parting, i 

Briok ooal, 1 1 

Parting, J 

^ Bottom coal, 1 4 

Sandstone, micaceous. 

Carbonaceous shale, 10' 

Block slate, 

Clay slate, 

( Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Slate parting, 



Cliff mine Section 
No.i. (:FHg.S8.) 



Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Slate parting, 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Parting 

Coal, 

Over-clapt 



0" 
9 
2 
4 

4 

5 

i 

i 
2 
8 
6 

\ 
7 

k 
6 

1 

8 

8 



to 3" 



to 4 



Breast coal, 2 10 

Parting, i 

Bearing-in coal, ....... 4 

Parting, J 

Brick coal, 1 H 

Parting, J 

Bottom coal, 14 

Under-clay. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 109 

• 

At a point where the main entry crosses the swamp all of 
the coal members are well exposed to view, and I obtained 
the foregoing section. 

The following columnar section was obtained at the pit 
mouth : 

Sandstone. 

Block slate, 0' 6" 

( Coal, 2 

Slate, I 

Coal, 2 

Parting, i 

Coal, 2 

Slate, 1 

Coal, 4 

Slate, i 

Coal, 3 

Clay slate, 

Coal, 



Ctiff' mine Section 
No, 8. {Fig, S9.} 



Clay, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Over-clay, 



2 
1 
. 11 
.0 8^ 



Breast coal, 2 11 

Parting, { 

Bearing-in ooal, 4 

Parting, * 

Brick coal, 1 1 

Parting, { 

^ Bottom ooal, 1 2 

Under-clay. 

Both the over-clay and the roof coal clay are found to 
vary from to 10 inches in thickness, and both of them are 
affected, in some parts of the mine, by swells or horse -backs. 

Horse-backs are found in the main over-clay, measuring 
from 2 to 10 feet in length, and from 15 to 30 inches in 
thickness. 

Clay veins and spars are quite rare ; only five are re- 
ported for the whole mine. I find the disturbed condition 
of the roof members repeated here, in a modified form, that 



110 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

• 

exist at the Iron City and Columbia mine near the head of 
this pool, and at the Rostraver mine above Dam No. 4. 

Cleavage planes : 

N. 631 W. feet.— N. 63i W. 4 feet. 
N. 66i W. '' -N. 65 W. 5 '' 

They are prepared to ship coal by both river and rail. 

Floor of river tipple 46 feet above low water. 

Floor of railroad tipple 24 feet above railroad grade. 

Bottom of coal at pit moiith, 73 feet above pool water. 

They employ 125 miners, 5 drivers and 12 day men, and 
the output averages 8000 bushels of lump coal per day. 
The entire product yields 60 per cent, of lump, 20 per cent, 
nut and 20 per cent, dust coal. 

Total area mined out to this time, 240 acres. 



109. IRWIN MIltfE, (26a miles from PUtobarsliO 

Located on the east side of the river. 

Opened in 1845 by Coon and Fanestock, who operated 
until 1849; and it remained idle until 1850, when it was 
sold to Aughenbaugh and Moore. 

They operated until 1856, and leased it to Patrick Manly 
and John McClease, who operated until 1856, when it was 
sold to I. C. Irwin, the present owner, and has not been in 
operation since that time. 

The coal was run to the river trade. 

Area mined out, about 20 acres. 



100. ABS AliOM BENTE.Y MIltfE, (26^ mUes flrom PlUsbnrghO 

Located on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1830 by Absalom Bentley, who built an incline 
tramway and slide tipple, and operated until 1834, when he 
sold the property to William Ferree. 

It was then operated by Wm. Ferree until 1850 ; and the 
mine is now included in the Coal 5Z^(2f property. 

The coal was run to the river trade. 

Area mined out, twenty acres. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. Ill 

The surface land belongs to the heirs of Samuel French, 
deceased. 



110. BANNER MINE No. 1, i^Bi mUes flrom Pittsburgh.) 

Located on the west side of the river. Owned by James 
H. Gamble and John M. Risher, and was opened up by 
them in 1879. They built an abutment tipple and run coal 
at this place by river. 

This mine is operated on the double-entry system, and in 
connection with Banner mine No. 2. The cars are run on 
an incline tramway from the pit mouth to the tipple at the 
river, a distance of 400 yards. The main entry is driven 
single through the front hill to the outcrop, on a small ravine 
a distance of 400 yards from the front pit mouth. The road 
then crosses the ravine, and the coal at the second hill is 
entered by two entries, driven parallel with each other to 
the head of the workings. 

The main entry rises 27 feet in 900 yards from the open- 
ing at the ravine, then dips 27 feet in 50 yards to bottom of 
swamp^ and runs level for about 20 yards in bottom of 
swamp to its head. 

This swamp passes through the head of the present work- 
ings from the north side, and is the same that enters the 
Cliff mine on the south side. 

The mine is ventilated by a furnace located near the left 
side of the left hand main entry, and near the front of the 
second hill. The furnace is 25 feet long, 7 feet wide and 7 
feet high, from the floor to under side of top of arch. The 
grate bars are placed 2 feet above the floor. The shaft is 
even with back end of furnace, circular in form, 8 feet in 
diameter, 85 feet in height through rock and shale, and sur- 
mounted with a wooden stack 8 feet square and 30 feet 
high. I found the quantity of air passing through the fur- 
nace to be 23,861 cubic feet per minute (as indicated by the 
anemometer) after traveling from the inlet and around the 
various air ways, a total distance of 4575 yards ; and by 
making a direct connection with the outside atmosphere, by 



Banner mine No. 
Section No. i. 



112 K*. EEPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

means of a door near the furnace, I found the quantity in- 
creased to 42,386 cubic feet per minute. 

The following section of the lower coal members was ob- 
tained at bottom of the swamp : 

CoaL 

Over-clayy 0' 6" to 8 

Breast ooal, 3 4 

Parting, { 

Bearing-in ooal, 3 

Parting, ^ 

Brick ooal, 11 

Parting, • • • 4 

Bottom ooal, 12 

Under-olay. 

At a point on the margin of the swamp the lower mem- 
bers give the following section : 

Coal. 

( Over-clay, 0-9" 

Breast 00a], 2 10 

Parting, { 

Bearing-in coal, 3 

Parting, | 

Brick ooal, .1 

Parting, J 

Bottom ooal, 1 8 

TTnder-clay. 

Cleavage planes bear : 

N. 61 ° W. 6 feet— N. 63i W. 6 feet. 
3 " — N. 66i W. 10 " 
6 '' — N. 65 W. 8 " 
5 " — N. 64 W. 4 " 
10 '' 
Bottom of coal at pit mouth 90 feet above pool water. 



Banner mine No. 1, 

Section No, S» 

{Fig. 410 



N. 


59* 


W. 


N. 


63* 


W. 


N. 


63 


w. 


N. 


65* 


w. 



111. BANNER mini: NO. 2, (241 miles from Pittobargli.) 

Located about J of a mile north of Banner Mine No. 1. 

Owned by James H. Gamble and John M. Risher, and 
operated by them in connection with Banner Mine No. h 
They built a tram road, elevator, and tipple at this place in 
1879, and run coal by rail. 

The pit cars are run on a level tramroad from the pit 
mouth to the top of the elevator, a height of 84 feet above 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 113 

railroad grade, from whence they are lowered by cages to 
the tipple floor below, where the coal is screened into rail- 
road cars, after which they are returned to the tramroad 
above by the same means. 

They employ at both mines 150 miners, 8 drivers and 8 
day men, and the output amounts to 9000 bushels of lump 
coal per day. 

Total area mined out at both places, sixty acres. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth 102 feet above pool water. 



112. MeKNIGHT MINE, 036^ miles from PittsbarghO 

Located on the east side of the river. 

Owned and opened up in 1852 by Ruf us, Wesley, Benja- 
min, and William French, who built an incline road and an 
abutment tipple, and operated until 1861. 

The property was then sold to George Bentley, who sold 
it to Dean and McKnight in 1863. They changed the old 
tipple to a slide tipple, and operated until 1868. 

It remained idle until 1872, when it was sold to Nicholas 
and William O'Neel, who are the present owners. 

The coal was run to the river trade. 

Area mined out amounts to fifty acres 



(112a. PARK HEINE, 25^ miles from PiUsbnrgliO 

Located on the east side of the river. 

Owned and opened up in 1850 by Judge Park, who built 
an incline road, tipple, and made other improvements, and 
operated only about one year. The coal was run to the 
river trade, and the property now belongs to Judge Park's 
heirs. 



113. WENOBT A MINE, (25.| miles from PiUsbarsli.) 

Situated on the east side of the river. 

Owned and opened up in 1842 by Andrew Leech and 
Thomas Smith, who built a shute, incline tramway, and a 
slide tipple. The coal was transported from the workings 
8 K\ 



114 K\ 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 




MINES ON POOL NO. 3. K*. 115 

to the pit month in hand-carts nntil 1845, when they com- 
menced to use the regular coal wagon of the present style, 
hauled out by mules. 

They run the coal by river to the St. Louis market during 
the year of 1850, in moddle barges holding from 12,000 to 
14,000 bushels each. They owned eight of these barges, and 
about 20 flat boats, holding 1200 bushels each. 

They also owned the tow-boat Active, She was a stern- 
wheel boat, something like the form of such boats at the 
present time. Tow-boats at that day were used for carry- 
ing passengers and freight, as well as for towing coal. 

They also built and owned the tow-boat Dispatch, She 
was also a stem-wheel boat. While this boat was making 
a trip from the mine to Pittsburgh, during the summer of 
1847, one of her boilers burst and killed the pilot, Lewis 
Pearse, and two other men, and damaged the boat to a con- 
siderable extent ; John Nelson was captain. The accident 
occured near the Collins tipple about one mile below the 
mouth of the Youghiogheny river. The boat was after- 
wards repaired and continued to run in the trade. 

They operated until 1864 and sold to H. H. Collins and 
Thomas Smith ; who operated until 1866, and leased it to 
Abraham Nish and Brothers. 

They operated for several years, and the property passed 
into possession of Benjamin Collins and Mr. Wright, the 
present owners, April 26, 1878. 

They leased the mine during that year to James Skillen 
and Brothers, who are the present operators. 

They employ 25 miners, 3 drivers and 4 day men, and 
produce 2000 bushels of lump coal per day. 

Bottom of coal at pit mouth, 138 feet above low water. 

Area mined out, 90 acres. 



114. liOCrST GROYE MINE, (25 miles from PlttobarghO 

Situated on the east side of the river. 
Opened in 1843 by William Alexander, who operated 
until 1846. 



116 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. ' J. SUTTON WALL. 

He then leased it to Archibald McLease and Hugh Killen, 
who operated until 1874. 

It was then operated until 1848 by John and James 
Naulder ; who sold their lease to Black and Lindsay ; who 
operated until 1849 ; since when the mine has remained 
idle. 

Area mined out, 5 acres. 

Coal transported by river. 



115. HILliUAliE MINE, (25} miles from Pittsburgh.) 

Located on the west side of the river. 

Owned by William Hodgson, and was opened in 1871 by 
William Hodgson and James Mort, who built an abutment 
tipple at the river, and an incline tramway from there to 
the pit mouth, a distance of 1B60 yards. 

They operated until 1876, when it was leased to James 
Mort and Robert Blackburn. 

They operated until February, 1881, and it was leased to 
D. H. Linch, Cyrus Robison, Joseph Stone, and George 
Stone. 

They operated until 1883, when Joseph and George Stone 
* sold their interest to Frederick Wilson. Linch, Robison, 
and Wilson continue to operate the mine. 

It is worked on the single-entry system and ventilated 
by furnace power. The air enters the east side of "the mine, 
through a shaft opening, passes around the head of the 
workings until it reaches the furnace at the west side. 

The pit wagons are hauled to the pit mouth by mules, and 
from there they are run down the incline plane in trains, by 
means of a stationary engine, wire line, and force of gravity 
to the tipple at the river, and empty ones are returned by 
means of the same engine and line. The engine is sta- 
tioned near the pit mouth. 

The coal is run to the river trade. 

Area mined out 106 acres, including several acres that are 
reported as lost by reason of fallen roof. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 3. 



K\ 117 



They employ 130 miners, 5 drivers, and 7 day men, and 
the output amounts to 9000 bushels of lump coal per day. 

The following columnar section was obtained at the pit 
mouth : 

Sandstone. 

Garbonaoeoos shalo, 8' 

Shale with nodules of iron ore, 

( Coal, 

Clay, 

Co^l, 1 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Hilldale mine Parting, 

Section. { Coal, 

{Fig, 42,) Over-clay^ . 

Breast ooal, 3 

Parting, 

Bearing-in ooal, 

Parting, 

Brick coal, . 1 

Parting, 

. Bottom ooal, 1 

Under-clay with calcareous nodules. 

Cleavage planes observed : 



0" 

6 

8 

4 
2 
4 

6 
k 

8 
11 

8 




N. 


63 W. 


8 feet- 


-N. 


65 


W. 


9 feet. 


N. 


61i AV. 


6 


(( 


-N". 


63 


W. 


7 


(( 


N. 


61i W. 


4 


• t 


-N. 


63f W. 


6 


(( 


N. 


63 W. 


7 


ii 


-N. 


64 


w. 


5 


(i 


N. 


63* W. 


6 


fc( _ 


-N. 


60 


w. 


4 


(( 



Bottom of coal at pit mouth 150.35 feet abpve pool water 
by accurate leveling, and 124.70 above railroad grade- 
Tipple floor 32^ feet above pool water. 



118 K\ 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 




Chapter VI. 

Mines located in Pool No. 2. 

116. UPPER WALTON JMUltfE, {^4.^ miles from Pittobnrsli.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

It is owned and operated by Hon. Joseph Walton, and 
was opened by him in 1872. This mine is worked on the 
block or single entry system. 

The main entry is driven on a bearing of about N. 20° W. 
out to the crop on Peters' Creek. An air course is driven 
parallel with the main entry with a pillar of forty feet of 
coal remaining between them. Butt entry No. 5 of this 
mine connects with, and forms a continuation of the main 
butt entry or dilly road of the Lower mine. 

The pit cars are hauled by mules from the present work- 
ings in the second hill to, and through the old workings of 
the first or front hill to the check house, a distance of one 
mile, and from that point they pass down a gravity plane 
of about 100 yards to the base of the hill, from where they 
are hauled in trains of 23 cars each by a steam locomotive 
over a graded road one mile in length, laid with T iron rails, 
to the tipple house at the river. 

The mine is ventilated by natural means, which is due to 
the favorable position of the crop line on both sides of the 
mine, enabling nearly all of the entries to reach that line 
before the air becomes too impure for working in it. The 
mine is well drained and in excellent working condition. 

A swamp, sixteen feet in depth and 300 feet in width, 
passes through the eastern part of the mine on a bearing ap- 
proximately N. 60° E. 

(119 K4.) 



120 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 



The following columnar section was obtained : 



Upper Walton mine 
Section, 
{Fig. 4S,) 



Carbonaceous shale, 

Block slate, 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Carbonaceous shale, 

Coal, 

Clay parting, . . . 

Coal, 

Clay parting, . . . 

Coal, 

Parting, 

1 Coal, 

Over-elayf 

Breast coal, .... 

Parting, 

Bearing-in ooal, . . 

Parting, 

Brick coal, 

Parting, 

Bottom coal, .... 



V 


1 




Roof division, 





3 



Main division, 
1 

1 





Clay, 

Calcareous nodules and clay, 3 



' 

6 

9 
10 
1 
8 
1 
7 
i 

4 

3 

9 


«. 

4 



An analysis of coal from^ this mine recently made by Otto 
Wuth, Analytical Chemist of Pittsburgh, shows it to con- 
tain as follows : 

Water, 0. 41 per cent. 

Volatile matter, . , 20.16 " " 

Fixed carbon, 67.06 " " 

Sulphur, 97 " " 

Ash, 2.40 " " 

100.00 

Thomas Rankin, Superintendent of Louisville Gas Co., 
reports this coal to yield 33^ bushels of good coke per ton 
of coal (2000 lbs.), and 5.04 cubic feet of gas per pound of 
coal of 16.34 candle power ; and J. Fullager, Supt. of the 
Cincinnati Gas Co. reports a yield of 36 bushels of coke per 
ton (2000 lbs) of coal, and 5.33 cubic feet of gas per pound 
of coal from the same mines. 
Bearings on cleavage planes were obtained as follows : 
N. 64 ° W. 6 feet— N. 62i W. 10 feet. 
N. 64 W. 4 " — ]S^. 70 W. 4 " 
N. 59i W. 6 '^ — N. 64iW. 5 " 
N. 64i W. 10 '' — N. m W. 8 " 



SECOND GEOL SURVEY. PA. 



REPORT K4. PLATE VII. 




a. 

Q. 



Q. 
Q. 

=5 

(/) 

z 
O 

I- 



MINES ON POOL NO. 2. K\ 121 

N. 65i W. 6 feet— N. 64i W. 3 feet. 
N. 62 W. 12 " — N. 62 W. 4 " 

Clay veins, spars and liorsehacks are quite numerous. 
Some of the clay veins fault the coal members to a consid- 
erable extent. One of which I observed to fault the main 
coal member three feet, along a line bearing N. 40° E. Three 
small soot veins have also been found. 

They emi)loy 240 miners, 17 drivers, 14 day men, 21 mules 
and the output amounts to 17,000 bushels of lump coal per 
day. 



117. JONKS mini:, (23^ inil^^s from Pittsborsh.) 

Located on the west side of the river. 

Owned and opened in 1848 by Robert Cunningham and 
Allen Peel. They built an abutment tipple, a coal road and 
gravity plane to coal level on the face of the hill. 

They operated for some time and Peel sold his interest 
to Cunningham, who continued to operate until the property 
passed into the possession of Charles Leadley in 1853. He 
operated until his decease in 1855, and the mine was sold 
in 1858 to Thomas, George and William Jones, who built 
the present road in 1865. Thomas Jones died in 1872, and 
it became the property of George and William Jones. 

The mine was run by them and in their name until 1879, 
since when it has been operated under the name of George 
Jones and Company. 

It is now owned by Mrs. Rachel Jones, widow of George 
Jones, deceased. 

The coal is hauled from the interior of the mine to the 
pit mouth by mules, over an outside road 300 yards in 
length to check house ; from thence it passes down a gravity 
plane 1170 feet in length to a point near the base of the hill, 
and from there it is hauled to the tipple at the river by 
horses, an additional distance of 500 hundred yards, crossing 
the track of the Pittsburgh, Virginia and Charleston railroad 
at grade. 

They employ 110 miners, 7 drivers, 12 day men, and the 
daily output averages 10,000 bushels of lump coal. 



122 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 



The mine is ventilated by furnace power. 
The columnar section obtained is as follows ; 



6 ' 
U 

i 
5 

4 
1 

8 
1 



1 



Carbonaceous shale, 

Block slate, 0' 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, .0 

Coal, 

Clay, 1 

Coal, 1 

Jones mine Parting, 

Section, I Coal, .0 

iFig. U,) 1 Parting, 

Coal, 

Black clay from to 1' 6", 

Main over -clay y . 1 

Breast coal, (from 2' 10" to 3' 6",) . 3 

Parting, a 

Bearing-ln coal, 3 

Parting, [ 

Brick coal, 1 

Parting, 4 

Bottom coal, »....! 3 

Under-day, 

The upper portion of the main breast coal is quite varia- 
ble in thickness, ranging from 2' 10'' to 3' &\ The lower 
portion of the roof members are much disturbed by what 
the miners call a -'double" clay, which appears to be a 
horseback between the first and second roof coal members. 
In some places we find the three inch or little roof coal to 
be absent and the two clays united. The upper clay how- 
ever is readily distinguished by its hardness and blackish 
color, and appears to be a mixture of clay and carbonaceous 
matter in a comminuted form. 

Cleavage 'planes were obtained as follows : 

N. 60i W. 3 feet— N. 61 W. 3 feet. 
N. 66i W. 5 '' — N. m\ W. 2 " 
N. 62 W. 8 " — N. 60f W. 8 " 
N. 64 W. 3 " — N. 61f W. 4 " 
N. 63 W. 6 '' -N. 64i W. 4 " 



MINES ON POOL NO. 2. K\ 123 

118. WAIiKER MINE, (28^ mUes rrom PtUmhnr^U.) 

Situated on the east side of the river. 

Robert Walker commenced to open this mine in 1860, 
and in 1863 it was leased to Alexander Love, who com- 
pleted the improvements, consisting of a tipple, an incline 
road, check house and a number of dwelling houses. 

He operated until 1864 and sold an interest to Alexander 
Crumby. They continued to operate until 1865 when 
Crumby sold his interest to Edwin W. Tower. Tower and 
Love operated until the spring of 1866, and sub-leased to 
George Thomas & Co , who operated until 1868. After 
which it was operated by Tower and Love until the coal 
was exhausted in 1876. 

The property now belongs to the Hon. James G. Blaine. 



110. HARTEY O'HEIIi MINE, (22^^ miles IVom Ptttobnrgh ) 

Located on the east side of the river. 

Opened in 1883, by James and Harvey O'Neil. They 
built an abutment tipple, gravity plane 700 yards in length 
from the tipple at the river to the pit mouth. 

The loaded cars run to the river by gravity, and the empty 
ones are hauled back by means of a stationary engine and 
wire line, located near the pit mouth. 

The main entry is driven single, about 500 yards to the 
head. One butt has also been driven about 300 yards. 

They employ at present 17 miners, 3 day men and 2 
drivers, and the output averages 1500 bushels of lump coal 
per day. 

The coal here measures 5 feet 8 inches from the under- 
day to the over-clay, including the several partings. 



190* liOWER WAIiTON SEINE, (22j^ miles froin Pittsburgh.) 

Located in West Elizabeth, and is 21 miles from the last 
named place by rail. 
It was opened by O. P. Berry and James O'Neil in 1869, 



124 K*. REPOBT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

.who had previously purchased the property from Christo- 
pher Ihmson and Erastus Perceval. 

They built a chute tipple with a screen, a graded road 
back to Third Street, and from that point a curved or 
dished gravity road to the pit mouth near the top of the 
hill. 

They operated until 1865 and sold to Joseph Walton and 
Peter Haberman. They built a new road and tipple, and 
operated until 1880 when Haberman sold his interest to 
Capt. Samuel S. Brown, who again sold it to Joseph 
Walton, the present owner and operator. 

The loaded pit wagons are hauled by mules from the work- 
ing places of the mine to the parting on the dilly entry, and 
from thence they are hauled out by means of a wire line 
and a stationary engine placed near the pit mouth. From 
this point they are transported by a steam locomotive 
through an entry of the old workings to the pit mouth 
and check house near the top of the front hill, a distance 
of one and a quarter miles, or a total distance from the 
parting in the mine of If miles. 

The locomotive makes four round trips per hour, and 
hauls 24 cars at a trip. 

From the check house the cars pass down a gravity plane, 
f two at a time, a distance of 300 yards, to the base of the hill, 
' and from thence to the tipple at the river. They use two 
check drums, 9 feet in diameter, run on separate shafts con- 
nected by cog gearing. The lines are of wire and f inch in 
diameter. A line of that kind is reported to last about 
four years at this place. They use a f inch wire line for 
hauling out of the mine. 

The main entry is driven S. 25° W., and eight feet in 
width. It is called No. 5, and connects with the upper mine. 
It dips from the pit mouth towards its head at the rate of 
22 inches per 100 feet, which enables the cars to be run 
back into the mine by gravity alone. 

The butt entries are driven 7^ feet wide, and all of them 
run to the outcrop ; which .provides a fair volume of fresh 
air to all parts of the mine, without other artificial means. 
They were found to be quite uniform in width as well as in 



MINES ON POOL NO. 2. 



K*. 125 



height ; a portion of the roof coal having been removed 
which makes them average five and half feet from the floor 
to roof. They are free from standing water except in the 
swamp, and just dry enough not to be dusty. 

A swamp 19 feet in depth and 150 yards in width passes 
through the south, side of this mine and tlie west side of 
the upper mine on a bearing of N. 60° E. 

They employ 255 miners, 12 drivers and 35 day men, and 
the output averages 23,000 bushels of lump coal per day. 

The entire product of the mine yields 70 per cent, of 
lump, 17 per cent, nut and 13 per cent of dust coal. The 
lump coal is shipped to the southern markets, the nut coal 
is sold to steamboats and the Pittsburgh fuel trade, and the 
dust coal portion is sold to the rolling mills and coke- works 
in and near the same city. 

The following columnar section shows the structural fea- 
tures of the coal bed at this mine : 

Massive sandstone. ' 

Sandy shale, 3' 

Carbonaceous shale i 

Block slate, 



' Coal, 

Clay. 

Coal, 

Clay, 1 

Coal, 1 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Lower Walton Parting, 

mine Section, i Coal, 

(JFHg, 45.) Main over-clay, .... from 0' 2 to 

Breast coal, 3 

Parting, 

Bearing-in coal, 

Parting, 

Brick coal, 1 

Parting, 

Bottom coal, 1 

Under-clay, * 

Nodules of impure limestone, 3 

Sandy shale, 

Cleavage bearings were obtained as follows : 
' N. 65i W. 4 feet— N. mj^ W. 4 feet, 
N. 65 W. 3 '' — N. H5f W. 6 " 
N. 68i W. 8 '' — N. 69^ W. 16 '' 



0" 
8 
4 
6 
1 
4 
8 
2 
I 

8 

I 
8 

8 
6 

\ 

i 



i 

4 

4 
4 




126 K\ 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 




MINES ON POOL NO. 2. K*. 127 

181. WEMT KIiIZ4BKTH RHHE, (22 miles from Ptttobnrgli.) 

Located on the west side of the river at the north end of 
West Elizabeth. 

Opened in 1840 by Christopher Ihmson and Erastus Per- 
ceval. Owen J. Owens also became connected with the firm. 

It was a cart pit for several years, and the coal was run 
down a gravity plane to a slide tipple at the river. 

In 1846 they built a new tipple on the abutment plan, 
and operated until 1849. Charles Ihmson operated from 
the last named date until 1852. William Hodgson operated 
from 1857 until 1859, under lease from Ihmson and Per- 
ceval, at which time it was sold to James O'Neil. During 
the same year James O'Neil sold it to J. N. and W. O'Neil, 
who continue to operate it to the present time. 



122. HORHJBR AND ROBERTS MIME, (22 milei» from Pttl»- 

bnrgh.) 

Located at Elizabeth, on the east side of the river. 

The first opening was made in the coal of the Rosenberg 
and Sheriflf farms, located at the junction of Westbays 
and Falling- timber runs, during the year 1859, from whence 
the coal was hauled on an outside road by mules to the 
tipple at the river, a distance of three fourths of a mile. 

The coal at this place, amounting to 100 acres, was ex- 
hausted in 1872, and the road was extended one and a 
quarter miles farther up Falling- timber run, to a point near 
Hay don's Mill, where an opening was made in the coal on 
the Johnson farm, which they had purchased together with 
coals under the Warne, Shrader and Haydon farms. They 
have made extensive improvements at this place. 

The coal is hauled from two main branch entries in the 
mine, a distance of 656 yards, by means of a wire line and 
a pair of stationary engines located near the pit mouth. 
One entry bears S. 25° W. and the other S. 51° W. From 
the pit mouth the coal is hauled over an outside road by a 
steam locomotive to the tipple at the river, a distance of 
two miles. Forty cars are hauled at a trip. 



128 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 



Horner & Roberts 

mine Section, 

{Fig. 46,) 



The road is laid with 40 and 50 fts. steel and iron rails, 
on ties of locust wood. The average grade of the road is 
15 inches to 100 feet, down from the jnt mouth. 

A sioamp has been found to pass through the mine from 
a point at the forks of the two main runs, which bears in a 
general way S. 50° W. and dips in that direction at the rate 
of 61 feet in 550 yards. This swamp is 300 j^ards in width 
and 30 feet in depth ; the continuation of which is sup- 
posed to be the same that has been found to pass through 
the Old Eagle and Courtney mines of Pool No. 3. 

A section of the main coal members in the swamp was 
found to give : 

Roof ooal. 

( Over-clay^ 0' 10 " 

Breast coal, 4 

Parting, \ 

Bearing-in ooal, 6 

I Parting, | 

Brick coal, 1 3 

Parting, \ 

\^ Bottom coal, 1 6 

Under-clay. 

The following was found to be an average of all the mem- 
bers outside of the swamp : 

Carbonaceous shala 

( Coal, 0' 4 " 

Parting, \ 

Coal, 3 

Clay parting, 1 

Coal, 9| 

Parting, \ 

Coal, 3 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal in two members, ••in 2 \^ 

Over-clay, 

Breast coal, 3 

Parting, 

Bearing-in coal, ^ 4 

Parting, * 

Brick coal, 1 1 

Parting, J 

(^ Bottom coal, 1 H 

Under-clay. 



Horner & Moberts 

mine /Section, 

(Fig, 47.) 



i 



10 


\ 



SECOND GEOL SURVEY, PA. 



REPORT K4. PLATE VIII. 




Ql 
Ql 



tr 

UJ 

CD 

O 
oc 

Q 

z 



cr 
O 

X 



MINES ON POOL NO. 2. K*. 129 

; Qleavage^ planes were found to bear as follows : 
N. 63 J W. 4 feet— N. 62i W. 5 feet. 
N. 62i W. 3 " — N. 65i W. 6 *' 
N. 64f W. 8 '^ —^, 62 , W. 3 '' 
N. 62 W. 4 ''. — N. 59f W. 5 '' 
. N.60IW. 4 "-^N. 64iW. 7 '' 
. ■ N. 63.W. 8 ''— N. .61iW. 8 '' 

N. 61i W. 8 '' — N. 64f W. 6 '' 
N. 66 W. 7 "— N. 64iW. 10 '' 
Ventilation is produced by furnace power. The furnace 
is 9i,feet in height,. 7 feet wide and 24 feet in length, with a 
brick and stone stack 100 f^et in height connecting with 
rear end furnace. 

Five steam pumps are used in delivering the water from 
the mine. They force the water up through a shaft opening 
130 feet in deptl^. 

Two hundred and fifty miners, 13 drivers, 3 trappers and 
5 day men are employed, and the output amounts to 14,000 
bushels of lump coal per day. Two hundred acres have 
been mined out at the last named opening. 

The bottom of the coal at the pit mouth is 1 63/^ feet above 
pool water. This mine is worked on the double entry sys- 
tem. 

Matthew McCreavy is superintendent. 



123. liOTEDAIiE MINE, ()31/<; miles from FiUsbursh.) 

Located on the east side of the river. 

Owned and opened in 1870 by Alexander Love. He built 
the road and tipple, and operated until June, 1876, and sold 
to John A. Wood and William §hrader. They operated 
until 1882, and Shrader sold his interest to John A. Wood • 
& Son, who coQtinue to operate the mine. 

The. main entry is driven S. 50° E. 2100 feet, and from 
that point on a bearing of S. 35°. E. 2250 feet to itg head. 
The general dip of the coal bed here is in a south-east di- 
rection, except along the line of the swamp which passes 
through the mine on a bearing of S. 35 E. This swamp is 
reported at 100 feet in depth and 700 yards in width. 
9 K*. 



130 K\ REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL 

The mine is worked under both the double and single en- 
try systems. The rooms are widened out in sets of ten 
each alternately to the right and left. That is, ten are 
widened to the left and ten to the right, and every eleventh 
room is widened out both ways. This plan enables them 
to draw or take out the ribs between rooms whenever a block 
of ten rooms are worked out without endangering the rooms 
of adjoining blocks. 

The coal is hauled from a point on the main entry at 
bottom of the swaujp, a distance of 1,458 yards from the pit 
mouth, by means of a wire rope and stationary enginp lo- 
cated about 50 yards outside of pit mouth. The cars run 
by the acquired momentum from the engine house to the 
check house a distance of 100 yards. 

The bottom of the swamp is 108 feet lower than the coal 
at the pit mouth which enables the empty cars to be re- 
turned by gravity. 

From the check house the loaded cars pass down a gravity 
plane to the base of the hill, from whence they are hauled 
by a steam locomotive, a distance of one mile, to the tipple 
at the river, in trains of 22 cars each. 

Clay veins and spars are quite numerous in the south 
part of the mine, but none were observed in the north part. 

At a point on Entry No. 2, 70 yards east from the bot- 
tom of the swamp, a roll in the under-clay passes through 
a large portion of the mine in a north and south direction. 
This roll is bounded on each side by a fault that uplifts the 
coal on the side of the roll to the height of two feet ; and the 
coal is otherwise much fractured and disturbed between the 
two faults. The coal along the lines of fracture presents 
liighly polished surfaces, resulting no doubt from the frac- 
•tured surfaces being rubbed together. 

The carbonaceous shale overlying the roof coal is un- 
usually thin at all of the exposures observed, and in a large 
portion of the mine is entirely absent, and the gray sand- 
stone rests immediately on the upper member of the roof 
coal. 



Lovedale mine 
Section. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 2. K*. 131 

The following columnar section was obtained in the 
swamp : 

Coarse gray sandstone. 

Carbonaceous shale, inoloedng balls of carbon- 
ate of iron— from to 1' '' 

Coal, 2 

Carbonaceous shale, 2\ 

Coal, ..... 1 

Parting, ^ 

Coal, 7 

Clay parting, 3 

Coal, 1 

Parting, \ 

Coal, 4 

Over-clay, 1 

Breast ooal, 3 9 

Parting, 

Bearing-in ooal, 5| 

Parting, 

Brick coal, 1 

Parting, 

Bottom coal, 1 

Under-clay. 

The following bearings on cleavage planes were obseFved 
in the swamp near the before mentioned roll : 

N. 60i W. 5 feet— N. 58i W. 4 feet— N. 59i W. 8 feet. 

The cleavage planes are broken and disturbed as to direc- 
tion, along the line of the faults, for a distance of from five to 
six yards on each side of them. 

The Cleavage planes in other parts of the mine were 
found to bear : 

N. 65f° W. 6 feet— N. 66i W. 5 feet. 
N. 70 W. 10 '^ — N. 65 W. 4 " 

The mine is ventilated by means of exhaust steam from 
the pumps, which escapes into a shaft at that point. They 
have a furnace and shaft in the north part of the mine 
which is not in use at present. 

Some trouble is being experienced with Jire damp (car- 
buretted hydrogen) at the head of the advanced workings, 
which are being driven up the east side of the swamp. 
The coal here contains that gas in considerable quantities, 
and it collects so rapidly at the heads of the entries, that it 
is necessary to maintain a vigorous air current close up to 



132 K\ REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

the heads of the working places, to enable the men to work 
with naked lights, or the ordinary mining lamp. 

The bottom of the coal at the main pit mouth is 237xV 
feet above pool water. 

They employ 150 miners, 11 drivers, 1 day men and 13 
mules, and the daily output is 10,000 bushels of lump coal, 
100 acres have been mined out of the McGrill farm and 65 
acres out of the Fife farm. 



124. BEIiliETUE MINE, (20| miles from PiUsborsh.) 

Located on the east side of the river. 

Opened in 1845 by James Edgar arid Wm. McCaslin ; after 
which it was operated successively by George Bradshaw, 
Peter Pinkney and Judge Thomas Mellon and sold to John 
Gumbert, Thomas Farrow and Wm. Huey in 1858. 

They ran coal over the old road and tipple for a few 
months, and during the same year built a new slide tipple 
and' gravity plane. The present tipple was built during 
1883. 

The property now belongs to Wm. Huey and the heirs 
of John Gumbert, deceased. The head of the present 
workings is in the second hill two miles from the river. 

The coal is hauled from the workings, a distance of one 
mile, by means of a stationary engine located between the 
two hills, and the empty cars are returned by gravity. The 
full cars then run by gravity to a point in the first hill 500 
yards from the engine, stnd from the last named point they 
are hauled to the front pit mouth, a distance of 800 yards 
more by horses. And from this point they run over a 
gravity plane to a tipple at the river. The cars are hauled 
in trains of 40 cars each, making a round trip in 25 minutes. 

All of the butt entries are driven to the outcrop, which 
provides very fair ventilation to the mines without other 
means. 

They employ 140 miners, 10 drivers, 5 day men at engine 
and in the mine, 5 at the check house, 2 at the smith -shop, 
5 at the river, and 13 mules. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 2. 



K*. 133 



The daily output averages 12,000 bushels of lump coal. 
335 acres have been mined out, and 155 acres remain un- 
mined. 

The columnar section is as follows : 

Carbonaceous shale. 

Coal, 0' 4" 

Parting, * 



Coal, . 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Parting, • 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Bellevue mine Coal, 

Section, < Parting, 

(IHg. 49.) Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Main over-clay, 

Breast ooal, 3 

Parting, 

Bearing-in ooal, . . 

Parting, 

Brick ooal, 1 

Parting, 

^ Bottom ooal, . 1 

Under-clay. 

Cleavage planes were obtained, as follows : 

N. 61i° W. 6 fe6t— N. 58i W. 3 feet. 



N. 59i 


W. 3 " — N. 60 W. 


4 


N. 64 


W. 3 •' — N. 60f W. 


6 


N. 65i 


W. 8 " — N. m w. 


3 


N. 61 


W. 6 " — N. 69i W. 


10 


N. 601 


W. 6 " — N. 62i W. 


6 



10 
4 

! 

8 

2 
1 

8 

I 

8 

2| 



4 
1 

i 

2 
8 
4 

\ 
4i 



134 K 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 




MINES ON POOL NO. 2. 



K*. 135 



185. BOBBIMS AND JKBTKINS IHIBIE, (18^ miles firom 
PiitMburKh.) 

Located on the east side of the river. 

Opened by George Bradshaw. He operated until 1861^ 
and the mine passed into possession of Pollock, Lee and 
Dunseath, who operated until 1857, and were succeeded by 
Thomas Phillips and William Stone. They operated until 
1859, and were succeeded by Wm. Bobbins and Robert 
Jenkins, who operated until 1880, and were succeeded by 
the present operators, Wm. Robbins & Company. 

The following columnar section was obtained : 

Carbonaceous shale 

Block slate, • • > ^' 

Carbonaceous shale, 

( Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Clay parting, 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 1 

Parting, 

Coal, . .0 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, ; 

Coal, 

Main over-clay^ from to 16'. . . .0 

Breast coal, 8 

Parting, 

Bearing-in coal, 

Parting, 

Brick coal, ' 

Parting, 

Bottom ooal, 1 

Under-clay. 

The main over-clay is absent in a large portion of the 
mine, leaving but a mere parting between the main breast 
and roof coal members. In other parts of the mine it is 
found in the form of rolls or horsebacks. 

The mine is worked on the single entry system. The 
butt entries are driven eight feet in width and 150 yards 
apart. 

A stationary engine is located in the mine on the main 
entry 700 yards from the pit mouth, which hauls the cars 



Robbina A Jen/cins 

m%ne. Section. 

(Fig. 60.) 



6 
6 
3 

i 
8 
1 
8 
11 
8 

i 
2 

i 
4 

I 
8J 
9 
1 

\ 
4 

\ 

11 

i 

6 



136 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

to that point from a parting 900 yards farther in the mine ; 
and from this point they are hauled to the pit mouth by 
horses. The empty cars run back from the engine to the 
parting by gravity. 

A shaft 170 feet in depth is sunk at the engine through 
which the smoke and exhaust steam passes from the mine. 

Three of the butt entries are driven out to the crop which 
furnishes ventilation without the use of mechanical means. 

The cars pass from the check house down a gravity plane 
380 yards in length to the tipple at the river. 

They employ 150 miners, 7 drivers inside and 5 drivers 
outside, and the output averages 10,000 bushels of lump 
coal per day. 



126. BliACKBURM HINE, (18 miles flrom PiUaburgh.) 

Located on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1856 by R. M. and Dr. Blackburn. They 
built a tipple and gravity plane, operated to the river trade 
and sold an interest to Whitmore, Wolf and Lain. 

In 1875 the property was sold to the present owners and 
operators, Thomas Foster, Sanford Clark and John A. 
Wood. 

The coal is hauled from a point on the main entry in the 
second hill to the front pit mouth of the first hill, a dis- 
tance of 985 yards by means of a stationary engine and 
wire line, located between the two hills, and from the last 
named pit mouth the cars are hauled to the check house 
by horses, a distance of 300 yards, and thence down a 
gravity plane 1400 feet in length, three cars at a time, to 
the tipple at the river. They use a f -inch wire line on the 
gravity plane, and a drum 12 feet in diameter in the check 
house. 

They use an "Improved Steam Blake^' pump to deliver 
the water from the swamp in the north part of the mine. 
It has an 18-inch stroke, 16-inch steam cylinder, 8-inch 
water cylinder, and requires to be run 15 hours per day. 

The mine is ventilated by the exhaust steam from the 
pump and ^fire basket^ which forces the air up through a 



MINES ON POOL NO. 2. 



K\ 137 



shaft and stack 145 feet in height. The volume of air 
passing through the mine was found to be 13,450 cubic 
feet per minute. 

They employ 200 miners, 9 drivers, one trapper, and 17 
day men, and the output averages 13,000 bushels of lump 
coal per day. 

The total area mined out amounts to 170 acres, and 110 
acres remain unmined. 

The following columnar section was obtained : 



Slaefcburn mine 
Section. 
iIHg. 61.) 



Carbonaceous shale. 

Block slate, 0' 

Carbonaceous shale, 

Coal, 

PartiDg, 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Clay, from 1 ' to 

<3oal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Main over-clay, 1 

Breast coal, 3 

Parting, ... .0 

Bearing-in coal, 

Parting, 

Brick coal, 1 

Parting, 

Bottom coal, 1 

Under-clay. 

Cleavage planes obtained : 

N. 64i W. 5 feet— N. 67i W. 6 feet. 
N. 63i W. 5 *' — N. 67i W. 4 " 
5 *' _]sr. 67 W. 4 '' 

4 '' — N. 68^ W. 3 " 

5 '' _N. 65 W. 3 '' 



N. 65i W. 
N. 66f W. 
N. 62i W. 



5 ' 

6 

2 

1 

4 

2 

1 

4i 
2 
2 
8 
11 

I 
8 

I 
4 
2 
6 

\ 



Thomas Grnv is mine boss. 



138 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

197. PINE-RUN iniNES, (17^ mUes from Pittsburgh.) 

Situated on the west side of the river. 

The first opening was made in the coal of the front hill 
on the west side of Pine run in 1800 by John O'Neil. He 
built a gravity plane and an apron drop tipple at the river. 

The full cars were run by gravity from the pit mouth to 
the tipple and the empty ones were hauled back by a horse. 
The horse would ride from the pit mouth to the river in an 
empty car connected wath each train of loaded cars. 

The coal of the front hill was mined out, amounting to 30 
acres, and the road was extended up on the same side of the 
run and a second opening made and a second incline plane 
built. An area of 75 acres was mined out at this place. 

After which (in 1865) the road was graded and extended 
up to a point three fourths of a mile from the river, and a 
third opening made in the McGowen coal on the same side 
of the run. 

A gravity plane was also built at this place, from the pit 
mouth down to the base of the hill, from which point the 
coal was hauled to the tipple at the river by a locomotive 
engine. One hundred acres of coal were mined out at this 
opening. About the same time a fourth opening was made 
in the Abers coal on the east side of the run, where they are 
still working. Eighty-six acres have been mined out of the 
Abers tract. 

They abandoned the third opening in 1874, and opened the 
fifth mine in the Finney coal, where they are also working 
at present. About 80 acres of the Finney coal have been 
mined out. 

During the last summer they built a new incline, to mine 
out the remaining portion of the Abers coal consisting of 
about 40 acres, but no coal has been run from this place yet. 
The distance from the fifth mine to the river is one and a 
half miles. 

These mines are worked on the double entry system. 

They employ at the fourth or Abers mine, 80 miners, 3 
drivers, 1 trapper and 7 day men ; at the fifth or Finney 
mine, 170 miners, 8 drivers, 6 trappers and 6 day men, and 



MINES ON POOL NO. 2. 



K*. 139 



the combined output of the two mines amounts to 20,000 
bushels of lump coal per day. 

The coal is screened into three grades, lump, nut and dust, 
in the proportions of 70 per cent, lump, 15 per cent, nut, 
and 15 per cent, dust coal. 

The ventilation is produced by furnace power. The fur- 
nace is arched and built of brick on a stone foundation, 24 
feet in length, 8 feet wide inside, 4^ feet above the grate 
bars and 3 feet under them. It rises 2 feet from front to 
rear. The fire-bed is formed of two sets of bars five feet 
each in length, giving a tire surface of 8 by 10 feet. They 
are only using one set of the bars at present. This gives an 
air current, at a point near the mouth of furnace, of 27,500 
cubic feet per minute, after passing around through the 
workings ; and by making a direct connection with the out- 
side air I found the volume increased to 45,100 cubic feet 
per minute. 

The following columnar section was obtained near the 
furnace ; 

Carbonaoeous shale. 

Block slate, 0' 6 

Coal, 6 

Clay, 2 

Coal, 8 

Parting, * 

Coal, . . 1 

Clay, 10 

Coal, 1 

Clay parting, ftt)m | to 2 

Coal, 6 

Pine Run mine Parting, \ 

Section. ^ Coal, 1 

{Fig.5$.) Parting, \ 

Coal, 2 

Main over-clay y .0 8 

Breast ooal, 8 4 

Parting, * 

Bearing-in ooal, 4 

Parting, . . . *. A 

Brick ooal, 11 

Parting, { 

Bottom ooal, 1 2 

Under-clay. 

At another part of the mine I found the breast coal to 



140 K\ 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 




MINEvS ON POOL NO. 2 K*. 141 

measure only 2' 10", without any material variation in the 
other members. The under-clay is very hard, and includes 
numerous nodules of impure limestone. 
I found the cleavage planes to bear as follows: 
N. 61 ° W. 3 feet— N. 59* W. 2 feet. 
N. 65i W. 6 '' — N. 61i W. 4 " 
N. 63 W. 4 " — N. 65 W. 3 " 
N. 61 W. 6 '' -N. 63 W. 4 '' 
N. 62i W. 3 '' — N. 64 W. 6 '' 
A swo.mp 50 feet in depth and 200 yards in width is found 
in the Abers mine. It is reported as being an elliptical ba- 
sin with no drainage outlet. K fault is found along its 
margin that displaces the coal members about three feet ; 
the dow^nthrow being on the side of the basin. Considerable 
difficulty was experienced in obtaining the coal from this 
swamp. 

Numerous horsebacks or swells in the over-clay were ob- 
served from li to 3^ feet in thickness and from 2 to 14 feet 
in length. 



128. BOf^K-RUN MINE, {17^ miles from PiUsburgh.) 

Located on the w^est side of the river. 

Opened in 1853 by William Hodgson and John Watson, 
under a twenty-year lease from James Snodgrass. 

Hodgson operated to the river trade until 1869, and sold 
the remaining portion of the lease to Oliver Gulp and James 
Gamble. 

They operated until 1878, since then it has been operated 
by Wm. J. Snodgrass, son and sole surviving heir of James 
Snodgrass, deceased. 

They abandoned the old workings in 1879, except the 
main tunnel which is driven out at the north side, and con- 
nects with an outside road 600 yards in length, over which 
the coal is being hauled from the present workings in the 
'' eighty acre ' ' tract. This tract lies between the Allequippa 
and Camden mines. 

The coal is hauled from the mine to the check house, on 
the face of the river hill, a distance of 1300 yards, by mules. 



142 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

and from the check house it jjasses down a gravity plane of 
1100 feet in length to the tipple at the river. 

80 miners, 4 inside drivers, 2 outside drivers and 10 day 
men are employed, and the output averages 8000 bushels 
per day. 

Horsebacks and clay veins are numerous. Many of the 
horsebacks are large, and the lower or main coal members 
under them are often much reduced in thickness. The over- 
clay is often quite thin, and occasionally entirely absent 
between the horsebacks. 

The following section was measured under a horseback : 

' Coal, (upper member.) 

Horseback or roU in the over-clay, . . . 3' 0" 

Breast coal, 2 8 

Rock Run mine Parting, \ 

Section Ao. i. -i Bearing-in coal, 3* 

(IHg. 6S.) Parting \ 

Brick coal, 9 

Parting, \ 

Bottom coal, 1 2 

Under- clay. 

Another section was measured at a point 20 feet distant 
from the horseback, and gave as follows : 

( Coal, (upper member.) 

Over-clay^ 0' 6' 

Breast coal, 3 5| 

Rock Run mine Parting, \ 

Section No. S. < Bearing-in coal, 4 

(FHg. 64-) [ Parting, i 

Brick coal, 10 

Parting, \ 

Bottom coal, 1 3 

Under-clay. 

The major axis of the horsebacks are reported to bear 
north east and south- west. In some parts of this mine I 
find the lower portion of the over-clay to be composed of 
quite pure limestone, ranging from a half to two inches in 
thickness. It ayjpears to be a distinct member from the 
over- clay, and often falls away from it when the underlying 
coal is removed. 

A soot vein passes through the mine in approximately an 
east and west direction, and the coal along its course is con- 
siderably fractured for several feet on both sides, rendering 
it of little value except for nut and dust purposes. 



MINEvS ON POOL NO. 2. K*. 143 

Bearings on cleavage planes were obtained as follows; 

N. 63i W. 3 feet— N. 63i W. 4 feet. 
K 61i W. 3 " -N. 59i W. 3 '' 
N. 66i W. 3 *' — N- 631 W. 8 '' 



129. AIiIiK4|UlPPA HINE, {\%^q mloes from Plttsbnrsli.) 

Located on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1856 by James O'Neil. He operated in part- 
nership with Biddle Coursin until 1859, and sold the prop- 
erty to Wm. Whigham, M. Bailey and James Wilson. They 
operated until 1881, when Whigham sold his interest to 
Nicholas O'Neil, Wm. O'Neil, I. N. Large, and S. P. 
Large, who together with Bailey and Wilson comprise 
tlie present operators. 

The present workings are in the Third and Fourth hills, 
and the coal is hauled by mules to a point or parting in the 
Third hill, and from that point the cars run by gravity, in 
trains of 60 cars each, through the Second and First hills 
to the first check house, a distance of 1300 yards. It re- 
quires four mules to return the empty cars to the parting 
again. They make twelve trips per day. 

The loaded cars run down a gravity plane from the first 
to the second check house, and from the second check house 
to the tipple at the river, an additional distance of nearly a 
half mile. 

180 miners, 3 trappers, 9 inside drivers, 2 outside drivers 
and 2 day men are employed, with the usual number of 
checkmen and tipplemen, and the daily output averages 
16,000 bushels of lump coal. 291 acres have been mined out 
and 500 acres remain unmined connected with the works. 

The ventilation is produced by a furnace and stack, not 
withstanding the fact that many of the entries reach the 
outcrop at no very great distance, which would under favor 
able circumstances furnish a large amount of fresh air 
without the use of the furnace. It is, however, well in all 
such cases to have a good furnace or fan at a point where it 
can be used, in case the natural air currents fail to afford the 
necessary volume of air to the head of the working places. 



144 K*. REPOR'r OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 



The following columnar section was obtained.: 

Sandy oarbonaoeous shale. 

Block slate, C 6 " 

Carbouaceous shale, 4 

( Coal, 4 

Parting, J 

Coal, 5 

Parting, * 

Coal, li 

Clay, 1| 

Coal, 4J 

Parting, | 

Coal 5 

Parting, | 

Coal, 1 

Clay, 10 

Coal, 11 

Parting, J 

Coal 4 

Allequippa mine Parting, 

Section. J Coal, 4 

(^g.66.) Parting. 

Coal, 3 

Parting, | 

Coal. 3 

Parting, J 

Coal, 2 

Parting, I 

Coal, 2 

Main over-clay^ 5 

Breast ooal, 3 5\ 

Parting, \ 

Bearing-in ooal, 4 

Parting, a 

Brick coal, 10 

Parting, ' { 

I Bottom ooal, 1 8 

Under-clay, 7 

Impure limestone, 1 6 

Calcareous and sandy shale, 2 

Cleavage plane bearings were obtained as follows : 
N. 63i W. 3 feet— N. 65f W. 4 feet. 



N, /)7f W. 4 
N. 65 W. 6 
N. 61| W. 4 
N. 64f VV 3 
N. 63 W. 5 



— N. 63f W. 4 
— N. 63i W. 5 
— N. 68 W. 3 
— N. m\ W. 5 
— N. 64 W. 6 



MINES ON POOL NO. 2. 



K\ 145 



180. CAMDfiBI MINE, (16^ mUes Irom PUtobargh.) 

Located at Camden on the west side of the river. 

Owned and opened up in 1852 by James O'Neil. 

He built a tipple, gravity plane and check house, and 
operated until 1855 ; at which time he sold the property to 
Isaac Jones and J. D. Miller. They operated and sold the 
mine to George Lysle & Sons, who operated until Lysle's 
decease. 

The property now belongs to the sons, George and Ad- 
dison Lysle, who continue to operate the mine. 

The following columnar section was obtained, which illus- 
trates the structural features of the coal bed at this place : 



Sandstone shale. 
Carbonaceous shale, . 

Block slate, 

Carbonaceous shale, 
Balls of carbonate of 
Carbonaceous shale, 



iron. 



Camden mine 

Hection, 
{Fig, 56.) 



.5' 
. 
.1 

.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 



Little roof 
coal. 



Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 1 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, ........ 

r Coal, 

5 Parting. 

I Coal, 

Main over-clay, .... 

Breast coal, 3 

Parting, 

Bearing-in coal, .... 

Parting, 

Brick coal, 

Parting, 

Bottom coal, 1 



" 

8 



8 

3 

3 

1 

5{ 

H 

3 

i 
1 
8 
2 

1 

4 

2 

4 
4 

k 

u 

6 
1 

4 
1 

lol 

{ 
4 



10 K*. 



Under-clay. 



146 K\ 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 




MINES ON POOL NO. 2. K*. 147 

Cleavage plane bearings were obtained as follows : 
N. 68i W. 3 feet— N. 62 W. 2 feet. 
N, 62i W. 3 '' — N. 64 W. 5 '' 
N. 63f W. 4 '' — N. 65 W. 4 ^^ 

The present workings are in the second hill, the coal of 
the first hill having been exhausted some time since. 

The product of the mine is hauled by mules from the 
workings, through a tunnel in the first hill, to a check house 
near the front pit mouth, a distance of one mile, and from 
thence it passes down a gravity plane 420 yards in length 
to the second check house, and from thence down a con- 
tinuation of the same.plane 420 yards more to the tipple at' 
the river. Three cars are run down this plane at a time. 
The elevation of the tipple floor above pool water is 35 feet. 

They employ 200 miners, 15 drivers, 2 trappers and 18 
day men ; and the output averages 14,600 bushels of lump 
coal per day. 



181. AmiTT miNE, (15^ miles from Plttoburgh.) 

Located at Amity on the west side of the river. 

Opened by the owner John C. Risher in 1851. He built 
a tipple, gravity plane and check house, and leased the mine 
to Daniel Bushnell, who operated and run coal by river until 
1859. Since that time it has been operated by Risher alone. 
He purchased the coal remaining in the Dravo mine, con- 
sisting of 115 acres, in 1867, which has since all been run 
out through the Amity mine, together with 300 acres addi- 
tional of the Amity coal. About 308 acres still remain un- 
mined at this place. 

The workings and improvements are well arranged and in 
good condition. The coal is now hauled from the second 
hill to and through a short tunnel in the point of the first 
hill, and thence on an outside road to the check house by 
mules, a total distance of about 700 yards ; and from the 
check house it passes down a gravity plane, 750 yards in 
length, to the tipple at the river ; four cars b^ing run down 
and up at a time. 

They employ 175 miners, 14 drivers and 15 day men, and 
the output averages 15,000 bushels of lump coal per day. 



148 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 



The following columnar section represents the general 
structural features of the coal bed at this place : 



Carbonaoeous shale. 

( Coal, 0' 

Parting, , 

Coal, 

Parting, G 

Coal, 

Clay parting, 

Coal, 

Clay parting, 

Coal, 

Clay parting, 



i 
5 
1 
4 
7 
7 

I 
6 

^ 

^ 



2i 

11 





10 



Coal, 

Clay parting, 

Amity mine Coal, .0 

Section No. i. J Parting, 

{Fig. 57,) Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, , 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Main over-clay, 

Breast ooal, 8 

Parting, 

Bearing-in ooal, 

Parting, 

Brick ooal, 

Parting, 

t Bottom ooal, 1 

Under-olay. 



A swamp 14 feet in depth and 600 feet in width is found 
passing through this mine in a serpentine manner ; the di- 
rection varying at different points in its course, from north- 
west to west, south-west, south and south-west. 

A section of the main coal members in this swamp was 
found to give : 

Over-clay, V 0" 

Breast coal, 3 8 

Parting, \ 

Bearing-in coal, 5 

Parting, \ 

Brick coal, 1 1 

Parting, \ 



Amity mine 
Section No. 2, 



, Bottom coal, . . . « 1 6 



Under-clay. 



?a> 



SECOND GEOL. SURVEY, PA. 



REPORT K4. PLATE IX. 




a. 

0. 



z 
2 



MINES ON POOL NO. 2. K*. 149 

Cleavage plane bearings were found to be as follows : 
N. 63i W. 4 feet— N. 65i W. 3 feet. 
N. 64i W. 3 '' — N. 69 W. 4 " 
K 66i W. 4 '' — N. 65i W. 4 '' 
N. 62JW. 4 '' -^K 63iW. 5 " 
N. 64f W. 10 '' — N. 64 W. 6 '' 
The mine is ventilated by furnace power. The furnace is 
built of brick, in an arched form, lined inside with fire 
brick, 24 feet in length, 7 feet wide, 4^ feet above the grate 
bars to comb of arch, and 3 feet under the bars to the floor. 
The rear end of furnace is 8 feet from front side of the 
shaft. The shaft is 60 feet in depth, surmounted by a 
wooden stack 30 feet in height. 
Jacob Heasley is superintendent of the mine. 



132. HUNTfiB MINE, (15^ miles firom PittsbnrshO 

Located on the east side of the river, opposite to Amity. 

It was opened in 1836 by Thomas Hunter, who operated 
it as a cart pit until 1840. and no coal has been mined from 
this place since that time. 

The coal was screened at the pit mouth into tram wagons, 
that run on a gravity plane to a side tipple at the river. 



188. DBATOSBUBG MINE, (15^ miles fW»m Pittsburgh.) 

Located at Dravosburg. 

Opened by James O'Neil in 1845. He built a gravity 
plane, an abutment tipple and operated by river until 1851, 
and sold the property to Michael Dravo and sons. They 
changed the old tipple, (that of the slide form,) built six 
coke ovens and manufactured coke from the slack coal. 
The coke was shipped mainly to the Cincinnati and Louis- 
ville markets. 

The property was sold to John C. Risher in 1867, and the 
remaining portion of the coal run out through the Amity 
mine. 

The area mined out here amounts to 227 acres. 

Jonathan Householder & Brother operated near this place 



150 KV REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

in a small way a few years prior to the opening of the above 
mentioned mine. The coal was hauled from the pit mouth 
to the river bank in road wagons, where it was stocked for 
loading into boats at a favorable stage of water. 



1S4. STONE'S mini:, (V^ miles flrom Pittobnrsli.) 

Located on the west side of the river, at the north end of 
Dravosburg. 

Owned and opened by William and John Whigham in 
1830. 

They built a slide tipple and gravity plane and operated 
until the fall of 1839, at which time the road slipped down 
the hill, and could no longer be used for running coal over 
it. In consequence of which they abandoned this place and 
moved about 300 yards up the river to the place where the 
present tipple stands, built a gravity plane and slide tipple, 
and commenced to run coal from the last named place in 
1840. 

They continued to operate until 1856, and sold the prop- 
erty to Wm. Stone and McGrew. Stone purchased 

the interest of his partner and operated until his death; 
since then it has been operated by his sons Joseph A., 
George W., William, Thomas and John Stone. 

The coal is hauled from the interior of the mine to the 
pit mouth by mules, and from there to the check house by 
a steam locomotive, a distance of one and a half miles, where 
it is screened into iron tram wagons, having two compart- 
ments, one for holding the lump coal and the other for 
holding the slack coal. The wagons pass down a gravity 
plane to the foot of the hill where a knocker causes the slack 
to fall into a hopper, located under the road, and the wagon 
passes on with the lump coal to the tipple at the river. The 
slack coal is hauled in wagons from the hopper to the slack 
tipple, located a short distance down the river from the 
other tipple. 

The mine is ventilated by furnace power. The furnace 
is arched,, built of brick, lined inside with fire brick, and 



MINES ON POOL NO. 2. 



K\ 151 



rests on a stone foundation two feet in height. Its length 
is 18 feet, width 6^ feet and height 6 feet. The grate bars 
are in two sets, 5^ feet each in length ; giving a lire bed 11 
feet in length by 6^ feet in width. The shaft and stack 
together amounts to 80 feet in height. The volume of air 
passing through the furnace was found to be 20,300 cubic 
feet per minute. 

150 miners, 8 drivers, 1 trapper and 17 day men are em- 
ployed; and the daily output averages 14,000 bushels of 
lump coal. 

Clay vd/ris and spars are rarely found here. Horsebacks 
or rolls in the main over-clay are numerous, sometimes 
measuring two feet in thickness and 30 feet in width. •The 
coal under them is usually depressed. This depression 
sometimes is found to affect all of the members from the 
over-clay to the under-clay. 

The columnar section is as follows : 

Carbonaceous shale. 

Coal, 



Stances mine 
Section, 
i£Hg. 68.) 



Clay, 
Coal, 
Clay, 
Coal, 
Clay, 
Coal, 
Clay, 
Coal, 
Clay, 
Coal, 



0' 
.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 



Parting, 

Coal, 

Clay 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Main over-ctay, 

Breast ooal, 3 

Parting, 

Breast ooal, 

Parting 

Brick ooal, ' 1 

Parting, 

Bottom coal, 1 

Under-clay. 



6" 
6 
5 
2 
4 
10 
8 
5 
6 
2 
5 

4 

6 
4 

8 

1| 



N. 58f W. 


5 


N. 66i W. 


6 


N. 61f W. 


3 


N. 58* W. 


3 


N. 63f W. 


8 


N. 644 W. 


10 



8 


fee 


3 




6 




3 




6 




6 




10 





162 K\ REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

The Cleavage planes in a large portion of this mine are 
SO variable in direction that diflBiculty is experienced in 
preserving a uniform direction for the butt entries, without 
the aid of sight points given by an engineer. The follow 
ing cleavage bearings were obtained : 

N. 61i W. 4 feet— N. 63J W. 
— N. 55i W. 
— N. 66i W. 
— N. 66i W. 
— N. 64i W. 
— N. 67i W. 
— N. 64 W. 

One cleavage plane, 6 feet in length, was observed to be 
bent or curved 3i inches out of a straight line connecting 
its ends. The bearing from end to end was found to be 
N. 64° W. 

Examples of curved or bent cleavage are quite numerous 
in this mine. 

185. BLACKflTOCK MIIIE, (15 miles from Pittsburgli.) 

Located on the west side of the river. 

Operated in 1840 by Robert Sinclair. He operated and 
was succeeded in 1842 by John Speece and John Painter, 
who operated until 1844 and were succeeded by John 
Loomis. He operated until 1846, and the mine remained 
idle until 1847 ; from which time it was operated by George 
Blackstock & Son until 1851. They sold it to David and 
Andrew Smith, who operated until 1870 and leased it to 
Foster & Clark. They operated until 1875, and the prop- 
erty was sold to William Neel, who worked the remaining 
coal during the following year. 

The total area mined out amounted to 200 acres. 



136. GAIiliikTIM MINE, (14^ miles from PittsbnrshO 

Located on the west side of the river opposite to the 
town of McKeesport. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 2. K*. 153 

Opened in 1837 by Abraham Gallatin. He operated until 
the spring of 1840, when the tipple was carried away by 
high water and ice. 

It was afterwards leased to Samuel Hamilton who in 
1842 built a new incline road and a slide tipple. He ope- 
rated until 1846, and it passed into possession of Abraham 
Gallatin, Jr., who operated until 1847, which terminated 
the operations of this mine. 

An area of thirty acres was mined out and the coal was 
run to the river trade. 



137. JOHN IVEEIi MINE, (14^ miles flrom PUtsburgli.) 

Located on the west side of the river, opposite McKees- 
port. 

Opened in 1844 by John, William and Harvey Neel. They 
operated until 1859, when Harvey died in Vicksbiirg with 
the yellow fever. William Neel continued to operate the 
mine until it was abandoned in 1876. 

An area of 200 acres mined out. 



138. DrMSHEE MIME, (14^ miles flrom PittsbargliO 

Located on the west side of the river, opposite McKees- 
port. 

Opened in 1835 by Thomas Dunshee under lease from 
Colonel John Neel. He built a slide tipple, gravity plane 
and check house, and operated until 1842. He was suc- 
ceeded by William Dunshee who operated until the place 
was abandoned in the spring of 1846. 

About 30 acres have been mined out. 



139. WHIGHAM MINE, (14^ miles from Pittsburgii.) 

Located on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1860 by William and James Whigham and 
Victor McElhaney under lease from Colonel John Neel and 
wife. 



164 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

Mrs. Neel owned one hundred acres of coal extending 
back from the crest of the hill and Colonel Neel owned the 
front between that line and the river. 

Whigham, McElhaney & Co. built a slide tipple, gravity 
plane and check house, operated until the time of Mrs, 
Neel's decease, in 1865, and William Neel bought the prop- 
erty. It was operated by J. S. Neel & Co. until 1873 ; then 
by Wm. Neel and Wm. Oliver until Oliver's death in 1875. 

It remained idle for one year, after which Wm, Neel 
operated it until his decease in 1880. Then Harvey Hutchin- 
son leased the mine and operated until the balance of the 
coal was exhausted in 1883. 

An area of 250 acres has been mined out at this place. 



140. COLIilBIS MINE, (14^ miles Arom Pittsbnrgli.) 

Located on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1835 by David Collins, under lease from Col. 
John Neel. 

He built a slide tipple, gravity plane and check house, 
and operated until 1848, and was succeeded by Altmyer & 
Co., who operated until 1851 ; and they in turn were suc- 
ceeded by Houser & Snyder, who operated until the mine 
was abandoned in 1856. 



141. CBikWFOBD MINK, (14 miles from PUtsbnrsh.) 

Located on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1836 by James Merrington, who operated 
until 1843, and was succeeded by Harmon West. He op- 
erated until 1855, and was succeeded by Mr. J. S. Neel, 
who operated under lease until the coal was exhausted in 
1867. 

About 100 acres mined out at this place. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 2. K*. 165 

142. JAMES MEEIj MIME, (1S| miles iVom Pittsbnrgli.) 

Located on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1838 by James and John Neel, in coal belong- 
ing to their father, Archibald Neel. 

They built a slide tipple, gravity plane and check house, 
mainly out of hickory and white-oak timber hewn on the 
ground. They operated and run coal to the river trade 
until the property was exhausted in 1848, when the mine 
was abandoned. 

An area of about 25 acres was mined out. 



143. ]!IcC1.0tiKT MIBIE, (12^ miles llrom PiUsbnrgh.) 

Located at the upper end of Saltsburg, on the east side 
of the river. 

Opened in 1835 by Patrick McClosky, who built slide 
tipple, gravity plane and check house, and run coal to the 
river trade. 

He was succeeded by his son John McClosky, who op- 
erated until the coal was exhausted in 1846, and sold the 
lease to W. H. Brown. It is reported that the first upright 
check wheel known to be used on the river was erected at 
this place. 



144. 0iikl.TWOBKS MIME, (12^3^ miles Arom Pittsbnrgli.) 

Located at Saltsburg, on the east side of the river. 

Opened by Hiram Neel under lease from Isaac Gill. 

The coal was used in the manufacture of salt for a num- 
ber of years, from which circumstance the town derived 
the name of Saltsburg. 

It was sold to Moses Corry in 1854, who operated and 
sold it to J. B. Corry, David and Correlius Shaw, who also 
operated and sold it to Wm. H. Brown. 

The balance of the coal was run out through the Key- 
stone mine. 



166 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

145* KETSTOMi: BHATfi, (121 miles firom PittobnrslftO 

Located at the lower end of Saltsburg, on the east side 
of the river. 

Opened in 1852 by Moses Corry. He sold it to Thomas 
Jones & Brothers in 1863. They operated to the river trade 
until 1864, and sold it to William H. Brown, who operated 
until his decease in 1875. - 

Since that time it has been operated by his heirs, Capt. 
Samuel S. Brown and brothers. 

The coal is screened at the check house and run down a 
gravity plane in tram-wagons to a slide tipple at the river. 



146. COBBY BIINfi, (12^ miles firom Pittsbnrsli.) 

Located on the east side of the river. 

Opened in 1843 by Moses Corry. He operated until 
1845, when operations ceased by reason of a fall of the 
entry roof. 



147. SHikW ]»IINE. (12 miles flrom PittsbarghO 

Located on the east side of the river. 

Opened by Hiram Neel in 1833 ; after which it was op- 
erated successively by Patrick McClosky, Moses Corry, 
David Shaw and Thomas Jones & Co. The last named 
parties worked out the remaining portion of the coal in 
1852. 



148. POBT-PKBBT JIIINi:, (11} miles from Pittsbnrgli.) 

Located on the east side of the river. 

Opened in 1838 by Col. Wm. L. Miller and Daniel C. 
Eaton. They operated for several years, and sold to 
Herron, Brown & Co. They operated one year and Brown 
sold his interest to W. J. Morrison. Herron and Morrison 
sold to John and James McClosky. They operated and 
sold to McClosky, Cosgrave & Co., in 1858, after which it 



MINES ON POOL NO. 2. K*. 157 

was operated by John McGlosky until sold to William H. 
Brown. 



149. MIIiliEB MIME, (ll^ miles from Pittsbnrgli.) 

Located on the east side of the river, one fourth of a 
mile above Lock No. 2. 

Opened in 1830 by McGraw under lease from Wm. 

L. Miller. He operated to the river trade and was suc- 
ceeded by Patrick McClosky, Noble & McTurk, and James 
O' Neil. O' Neil operated from 1843 to 1845. Then Thomas 
Jones & Co. operated from 1847 to 1853, when the mine 
was worked out. 

The area mined out amounted to 25 acres. 



158 K*. 



ReDortof Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 




Chapter VII. 
Coal Mines in Pool No. 1, 

150. TUBTIiE CBEEK MINE, (11 miles Arom Pittsbargh.) 

Located at the point of the hill at upper side of Turtle 
creek. 

Opened in 1844 by Daniel C. Eaton, John Gilmore and 
Samuel Lewis, under lease from Wm. L. Miller. 

They operated two years and sold their lease to Davidson 
Herron and Wm. H. Brown, who also bought the coal from 
Miller. They leased the mine to D. Herron, John Peterson 
and D. Cain, who operated until the coal was exhausted in 
1853. 

The area mined out amounted to 40 acres. 



151. JOHN BOBnON HIIVE, (lOJ miles south of PitisbnrghO 

Located on the east side of the river, a short distance 
below the mouth of Turtle creek. Was opened in 1846 by 
John Robison. He operated to the river trade until the 
coal was exhausted. 



ISlS. KEMBIT MINE, (9^ miles llrom Pitisbargh.) 

Located on the west side of the river. 
Originally opened in 1835, by Robert McClure under a 
lease from Thomas Kenny. 

(159 K*.) 



160 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESF J. SUTTON WALL. 

McClure operated to the river trade until 1843, and was 
succeeded by the owner, Thomas Kenny, who operated the 
mine until 1845 ; at which time he opened another mine on 
the same property, a short distance up the river from the 
old mine. 

He built a tipple, gravity plane and check house, and run 
the product of the mine to the river trade until the coal 
was exhausted, in 1876. 

The tipple is now being used by the P. V. & C. Railroad 
Company for transporting coke and anthracite coal from 
their cars to boats in the river. 



158. GBEENSPBIlVGti MINK* (9 mUes flrom Pittsbnrgfli.) 

Located on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1840 by Alexander McClure under lease from 
Thomas West. 

McClure built a slide tipple and gravity plane, and oper- 
ated to the river trade for several years. Then Thomas 
West operated the mine until it passed into the possession 
of Matthew Hainan and William Redman, who operated 
until 1866, when Hainan died, and his interest was pur- 
chased by H. B. Hays. 

It continued to be operated by Redman and Hays until 
1875, after this by William Redman and Thomas Fawcett 
until 1877, when Redman sold his interest to Fawcett the 
present owner and operator. The present tipple was built 
during the summer of 1875 by Redman and Fawcett. 

An area of 256 acres has been mined out, and 21 acres re- 
main unmined. The elevation of the coal bed above low 
water is reported to be 390 feet. 

The present workings are in the third hill, a distance of 
2966 yards from the river. 

A stationary engine is located at the front pit mouth on 
the river side of the first hill, which by means of a wire 
rope is used to haul the coal from a point at the bull wheel, 
300 yards inside of the third hill, to, and through tunnels 
in the second and first hills, to the front pit mouth a total 



MINES ON POOL NO. 1. 



K\ 161 



distance of 2700 yards ; and from the last named point it 
passes down a gravity plane, of 266 yards in length, to the 
river. 

The mine is ventilated by the use of the exhaust steam 
from a pump, located near the head of the main entry, which 
is used to pump the water that collects in the swamp, from 
the mine. This swamp is 7^ feet in depth and 200 yards in 
width, and bears S. 20° W. 

The following columnar section was obtained at the pit 
mouth : 

Sandstone. 

Sandy shale, 8' 

Gray sandstone, 5 

Carbonaoeous shale, 8 

Coal, 

Clay 

Coal, 

Parting 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Co^ 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

*a"Clay 

Coal, 

Parting, 

f Coal, 

] Parting, 

^Coal, 

Main overplay, 

Breast ooal, s 

Parting, 

Bearing-in ooal, 

Parting, 

Briokooal, 

Parting, 

Bottom ooal, 1 

Under-day. 

This shows the usual increase in thickness of the coal 
members in the swamps, as has already been noticed in 
many other mines of the district. 

No clay veins were observed, and only one small spar is 
reported in 111 acres of this mine so far as developed. 
11 K\ 



'V 



Oreensprings mine 

Section No. i. 

i^Hg. 59.) 



Little roof ' 
ooal. 



0" 





6 

2 

6 

i 
5 
10 
6 

1 

8 

i 

5 
1 

8 

4| 

2 

7 

4 
I 

I 

2 

10 

2 

k 

9 

i 
4 



162 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

Horsebacks are quite numerous in the roof coal members 
at the point "a" in the section. They measure from one 
to eighteen inches in thickness, and from one to thirty feet in 
width, and the underlying coal members are usually de- 
pressed from one to six inches. 

The main over-clay is quite uniform in thickness through- 
out the mine, and free from horsebacks. 

The bottom coal member is not mined out of the rooms. 

The following section of the main coal members was ob- 
tained in the swamp : 

^ Main over-clay, 0' 10'' 

Breast ooai, 3 5| 

Parting, \ 

Oreensprings mine I Beanng-in ooal, 4 

Section No. 2, | Parting, | 

Brick ooal, 1 

Parting \ 

Bottom ooal, 1 8 

Cleavage plane bearings were obtained, as follows : 

N. 62i W. 6 feet— N. 62° W. 3 feet. 
N. 62 W. 8 " — N. 68i W. 3 " 
N. 67i W. 8 " — N. 63i W. 3 '' 
N. Q^ W. 7 "- — N. 66i W. 4 '' 
N. 67i W. 6 '' — N. 64 W. 5 " 
They are only making two grades of coal at this mine at 

present, lump and slacks in the proportions of 80 per cent. 

of lump to 20 per cent, of slack. 

120 miners, 9 drivers and 14 day men are employed, and 

the output averages 11,000 bushels of lump coal per day. 



154. BBADDOCK IHNE, (8^ miles fl-om PUtsbnrgltO 

Located on the east side of the river, near the town of 
Braddock. 

Opened by James Corry & Co. in 1872. They built a 
gravity plane from the pit mouth to the Pennsylvania rail- 
road, and shipped the entire product of the mine by rail. 
The coal has been exhausted and the mine is not in operation. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 1. K*. 163 

155. BEIiliWOOD iniNE, (8^^ miles from PKtobursliO 

Located on the west side of the river, a short distance 
above Munhall Station on the P. V. and C. Railroad. 

Opened in 1882 by William, Michael and John Munhall, 
the present owners and operators. They built an abutment 
tipple and an outside road, 2i miles in length, up Whiteacre 
run. to the pit mouth, over which the coal is hauled by a 
steam locomotive from the mine to the river. The locomo- 
tive makes a round trip in thirty minutes, and hauls fifty 
cars at a trip. 

The coal is screened at the river into two grades at pres- 
ent, lump and slack. The lump coal after passing over the 
screen runs into the weigh pan, and the weight recorded 
on the weigh sheet, after which the pan is lowered by a 
drum wheel to a barge or boat on the river side of the outer 
abutment. The slack coal is run backwards, through sheet 
iron shutes, to a boat for its reception in the slough between 
the shore and river abutment. 

The weigh sheet shows the cars to contain from 26 to 34 
bushels each, averaging about 30 bushels of lump coal per 
car. They report the run of the mine to yield 75 per cent, 
of lump coal and 25 per cent, of slack. 

140 miners, 7 drivers, 2 day men at the mines, and 13 on 
the road and at the tipple are employed ; and the output 
averages 10,000 bushels of lump coal per day. 

The mine is worked under the single entry system. The 
main entry is driven on a bearing of S. 36^° W. The butt 
entries are driven singly and 165 yards apart. Shallow 
shafts are sunk at the head of each butt entry, which pro- 
vides very good natural ventilation to the workings. 

Horsebacks in the over- clay, clay veins and spars are 
quite numerous. The upper surface of the breast coal was 
observed to be wavy or undulating in a large portion of the 
mine, and usually depressed from three to four inches 
under horsebacks. One horseback was observed that meas- 
ured three feet in thickness and twenty feet in width. They 
usually terminate at the top in a well defined obtuse line 
running parallel with their major axis. The bearing of the 
axis of two of them was found to be S. 40° E. 



164 K\ REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

The following columnar section was obtained at a point 
where the roof had fallen in Entry No. 5 : 

OftrbonaoeouB shale. 

( Coal, 0' 2 " 

Parting, i 

Coal, 2 

Clay parting, 1 

Coal, 2 

Parting, J 

Coal, 1 

Clay parting, 1 2 

Coal, 6 

Parting, | 

Coal, 4 

Parting, { 

Coal, 31 

Clay parting, 2| 

Coal, 6 

Parting, | 

Coal, 1 

Parting, | 

Coal, 2 

Main over-clay, from 4' to 8 

Breast coal, 8 2 

Parting, i 

Bearing-in ooal. 5 

Parting, { 

Brick ooal, 10 

Parting, i 

Bottom ooal, 1 1| 

XJnder-olay. 

The following cleavage hearings were obtained in dif- 
ferent parts of the mine : 

N. 63i W. 4 feet— N. 63 W. 4 feet. 
N. 61J W. 6 " — N. 63 W. 3 '' 
N. 62i W. 6 " — N. 64i W. 6 " 



Bellwood mine 
Section, 
iIHg.60.) 



156. BROWM JHIME, (6^ miles flwm PlttsbnrKlt.) 

Located on the east side of the river near Logtown, now 
called Brown Station. 

Opened by Wm. H. Brown in 1848. He constructjd a 
slide tipple, gravity plane and check house, and run coal 
to the river trade until the mine was exhausted, about the 
time of his death in 1875. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 1. K*. 165 

157. HODGSOM JMIME, (5a miles flwm PlfttsburgliO 

Located at Logtovm now called Brown Station on the east 
side of the river. 

Opened in 1843 by Daniel Bushnell and Wm. Munson. 
It is said that they constructed the improvements, consist- 
ing of a slide tipple, gravity plane and check house, mainly 
out of sugar timber growing in the vicinity of the mine. 

They operated to the river trade, and were succeeded by 
William Hodgson, who operated until 1850, when the prop- 
erty was sold to Wm. H. Brown, 

He built a new road, about 500 yards up the river from 
the old one, and mined out the remainder of the coal con- 
tained in the property. 



158. BUSHNEIili JHIME, (5^ miles flrom PittsburgiiO 

Located on the west side of the river. 

Opened by Daniel Bushnell in 1840. The tipple house 
stood about 100 yards above the mouth of Street's run, 
and the pit mouth was located on the east side of that run 
three fourths of a mile from the river. 

A gravity plane was built from the pit mouth to the run 
bed, and from there a road was constructed, with wooden 
rails surfaced with strap iron, to the tipple at the river. 

The Baltimore and Ohio railroad now occupies a portion 
this old road bed. 

Bushnell run coal at this place to the river trade until 
1861, at which time the property passed back into the hands 
of Daniel Risher, the previous owner, and no coal has been 
taken from this mine since then. 



166 r 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 




MINES ON POOL NO. 1. K*. 167 

150. HAT'S! STBEfi'TS RUM JHIMES* (5* mUes Arom 
PIttsbargliO 

Located on and near Street's run. 

The first of these mines was opened by James Hays in 
1842, in what was known as the David Calhoon coal, at a 
point a short distance above the mouth of the run. 

He built a tipple and gravity plane to the pit mouth on 
the face of the hill fronting the river, and operated until he 
sold it to George Lysle, who operated until the coal was 
exhausted. 

James Hays also opened a mine in the point of the hill 
on the south side of Glass run, which empties into Street's 
run, at a point about one fourth of a *mile from the river. 
He built a check house, gravity plane to the run bed, a road 
and a tipple. The coal was hauled to the river by horses. 
This mine has been abandoned for a number of years. 

He opened the present mine in 1871, on the east side of 
Street's run at a point one and three fourths miles from the 
river, and operated until his decease in 1876 ; after which it 
was operated by his sons Henry B. and John S. Hays until 
their decease, and since February, 1883, it has been operated 
by Harry Bughman as trustee for the Hays estate. 

The coal is hauled from the workings to the check house, 
from where it passes down a gravity plane to the base of 
the hill, and from there it is hauled to the tipple at the 
river, by a steam locomotive. 

220 miners, 14 drivers, 8 day men at the mine, 8 day men 
at the river, and 17 mules are employed, and the output 
amounts to 16,000 bushels per day. 

The coal bed here dips towards the south, and the water 
that collects in the low parts of the mine is drawn out by 
means of a steam pump^ located near the pit mouth, through 
a four inch pipe, 400 yards in length. The pump has a four 
inch suction and a three inch discharge, and is run about 
two hours per day. The fall from pit mouth to inner end 
of pipe is twelve feet. 

*The distance given south from Pittsburgh by water or up the Mononga- 
heia river is computed in each case from the Smithfield Street Bridge, at 
Pittsburgh. 



168 K*. BEPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

The following columnar section was obtained : 

Carbonaceous shale. 

Block slate, 0' 5" 

Coal, 1 

Clay, 1 

Coal, 3 

Farting, | 

Coal, 2 

Clay, 1 

Coal, 3 

Clay, 8 

Coal 4 

Parting, | 

Coal, 5 

Parting, 1 

C^al, 4 

Clay, 2 

Coal, 7 

Parting, | 

Coal, 1 

Parting, | 

Coal, 2 

Main over-clay, .' 8 

Breast coal, 3 

Parting, J 

Bearing-in coal, 5| 

Parting, i 

Brick coal, 9 

Parting, | 

Bottom coal, 1 3 

Under-day. 

Cleavage plane bearings were obtained as follows : 

N. 66i W. 4 feet— N. 63f W. 5 feet. 
N. 63 W. 4 " — N. 62i W. 5 '' 
N. 66 W. 6 '' — N. 65 W. 7 " 



Hays* StreeVa Bun 

mine Section, 

(IHg. 61.) 



160. RISHEB MINES, (4^ miles flH>m PlttsbnrgliO 

Located on the west side of the river. 

The present tipple is located on the site of the old one, 
about 500 yards below the mouth of Street's run. 

The first of these mines was opened in 1869 by Daniel 
Risher, in what was known as the "Black coal," on the 
east side of Street's run, at a point 1^ miles from the river, 

He operated here until January 1st, 1863, when he le^ei 
the coal and road to his son Ithamar D. Risher, and r;>4tired 

i 



MINES ON pOOL NO. 1. 



K*. 169 



from the business. I. D. Risher mined out the remaining 
portion of the "Black" coal, amounting to forty acres, and 
in 1865, he extended the road and opened a mine in the 
*'Mon tooth" coal on the west side of the run, at a point 
two miles from the river. 

He built a check house gravity plane, and hauled the coal 
to the river, by a steam locomotive. About fifty acres were 
mined out at this place. 

In 1868, the road was again extended one eighth of a 
mile farther up the run, to the " Willett " coal, on the same 
side of the run. He mined out 40 acres at this place and 
abandoned it in 1872. During the last-named year he 
opened a mine in "Hamilton" coal, under lease from 
Daniel Risher, located on Irwin's branch of Street's run. 
He also now owns the Miller and Irwin tracts of coal ad- 
joining the Hamilton tract. 

The columnar section is as follows : 

Garboftaoeous shale. 

Block slate, 0' 6' 

Coal, 1 

Clay parting, 1 

Coal, 8 

Clay parting, | 

Coal, 2{ 

Clay parting, 1 

Coal, 2 

Clay parting, 10 

Coal, 6 

Parting, I 

Coal, 5 

Parting, i 

Coal, 

Clay parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, , 

Coal, 

Main over-clay^ 

Breast coal 3 2 

Parting, { 

6earing-in ooal, 4. 

Parting, 4 

Brick ooal, 10 

Parting, { 

Bottom ooal, 1 2 

Under-olay. 



Biaher mine 
Section, 



5 

I 

4 

1 
8 

9 



170 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

Cleavage planes were found to bear as follows : 
N. 61 W. 8 feet— N. 61f W. 4 feet. 
H. 62| W. 3 '' — N. 61 W. 3 '' 
K 56i W. 4 '' — N. 631 W. 4 " 
The coal is hauled from the mine to the check house, on 
the face of the hill, by mules ; from which point it passes 
down a gravity plane to the foot of the hill, and from there 
j'it is run by a stationary engine and wire rope to the loco- 
motive road, at the junction of the two runs. It is then 
hauled to the river by a steam locomotive. 

125 miners, 10 drivers, 1 trapper and 20 day men are 
employed, and the output averages 10,500 bushels of lump 
coal per day. 

The ventilation is produced by furnace power. The stack 
and shaft is 80 feet in height. 



161. WAIiTON'S POOIi Mo. 1 MINE, (4i miles flwm Pitte- 

burgli.) 

Located on the west side of the river. 

Opened in 1825 by Peter Shoenberger. He drove a tunnel 
through the front hill, and used the coal for fuel at his 
rolling mill at Bayardstown, now a part of Pittsburgh. 

It was leased to James Hays in 1828, who operated and 
purchased the property in 1858. He continued to operate 
until 1863, and leased to the present operators, Joseph 
Walton and Peter Haberman. 

The coal is hauled from a point in the second hill to the 
front pit mouth, a distance of 2400 yards, by means of a 
stationary engine and wire line ; the engine being located 
near the front pit mouth. The cars are run in trains of 46 
cars to each train, and make a round trip in 20 minutes. 

The electric telephone is used for communication between 
the engineer and the parting, at the end of the dilly road, in 
the mine. 

The cars are run from the check house at the front pit 
mouth down a gravity plane to the tipple at the river. 

This mine has been operated principally on the single 



MIKES ON POOL NO. 1. 



K\ 171 



entry system. They have however recently commenced to 
drive the butt entries double. These entries are generally 
driven to the outcrop, which gives a fair amount of air 
current without the use of a fan or furnace. 

200 miners, 16 drivers, 14 day men at the mine, and 7 
at the river are employed, and the output averag^l6,500 
bushels of lump coal per day. 

Clay veins and spars are quite numerous. 

The following columnar section was obtained: 



Sandstone shale. 

Carbonaceous shale, 5' 

Blook slate, 

Carbonaceous shale, 

( Goal, 

. . .0 
. . .0 
. . .0 
. . .0 
. . .0 
. . .0 
. . .1 
. . .0 
O'to2 
. . .0 



Walton's Fbol No. 1 
mine Section 
iIHg. 6S.) 



Clay 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal 

Clay, from 1' 

Coal, 



Parting, 

Coal, . . • • 

Parting, 

Coal, - 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Clay 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Main over-clay, 

Breast coal, ....*. 8 

Parting, 

Bearing-in coal, 

Parting, 

Brick coal, 

Parting, 

^ Bottom coal, 1 

Under-clay. 

Cleavage bearings were obtained as follows : 

N. 68° W. 6 feet— N. 67* W. 6 feet. 
N. 60 W. 3 " — N. 66 W. 4 '' 



0" 

6 

6 

4 

2 

5 



2 
8 

61 

4 

4 

i 
4 

i 
6 

1 

i 
2 
10 

1 

4 

4 

4 

8 

4 

4 



172 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 
169. BKt^K'M RUM MIBTES, (S^ miles fl-om PittsburgliO 

Located on the west side of the river. 

James Hays opened a mine on the west side of the run a 
half mile from the river in 1858. He built a tipple and 
gravity plane and operated until 1862 ; and leased the mine 
to N. J^ Bigley. He operated until the coal was exhausted. 

The tipple was located about 200 yards below where the 
present one stands. It was destroyed by high-water and 
ice during the spring of 1867. 

The full cars were run from the foot of the incline plane 
to the river by gravity, and the empty ones were hauled 
back by mules. 

James Hays also opened another mine on the east side of 
the run, one third of a mile from the river, built a gravity 
plane, road and tipple. The tipple was located about 200 
yards up the river from the present one. The coal was 
hauled from the foot of the incline or gravity plane to the 
river by mules. 

He leased the mine to Robert and James Watson, who 
operated until 1869, and nothing has been done at this 
place since that time. The area mined out amounts to 90 
acres. 

The present mine was opened by James Hays in 1869. 
He built a tipple gravity plane, check house, lower and 
upper locomotive roads, and operated until his decease in 
1876 ; after which it was operated by his sons Henry B. 
and John S. Hays until their decease, and since February, 
1883, it has been operated under the direction of Harry 
Bughman, trustee of the Hays estate. 

The coal is now hauled by locomotive power from the 
workings in the second hill, through a tunnel in the first 
hill, to the check house at the top of the gravity plane, a 
distance of one and a quarter miles. It then passes down 
the gravity plane to the base of the hill, from whence it is 
hauled to the river by another locomotive an additional 
distance of one mile. The last named locomotive hauls 
20 cars at a trip. 

The mine is worked on single entry system. The main 
entry is driven on a bearing of S. 25° W. The butt entries 



MINES ON POOL NO. 1. 



K*. 173 



are driven single, 7^ feet wide and 160 yards apart. Butt 
entry No. 3 is driven 1750 yards ; No. 4, 1850 yards and 
No. 5, 1000 yards. 

The air courses are driven across, and perpendicular to 
the butt entries, at intervals of 200 yards. The gauge of 
pit track is 3 feet 5^ inches, and the weight of ''T" iron 
pit rails is from 16 to 20 pounds per yard. They use 40 
pound '*T'' iron on the locomotive road. Five miles of 

UrpjJ JpQj^ p^JIg Jjg^yg j^ggj^ Jg^J^ g^j^jj^ ^j,q Jj^ ^g^ ^^ ^jj^jg mine. 

The following columnar section was obtained at the fur- 
nace: 

Garbonaoeous shale. 
r Coal, 



Beckys Bun mine 
Section, 
{Fig. 64.) 



Clay, 
Coal, 
Clay, 
Coal, 
Clay, 
Coal, 
Clay, 
Coal, 



7" 

5 

9 

\ 
4 

IJ 
10 

\ 
6 

\ 



Parting, 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, . 

Parting, , . . .0 

Coal, 

Main over-clay^ 

Breast ooal, 8 

Parting, 

Bearing-in ooal, 

Parting, 

Brick ooal, 

Parting, 

Bottom coal, 1 

Under-clay. 

Cleavage hearings were obtained as follows : 
N. 69i W. 3 feet— N. 63i W. 3 feet. 
N. 63 W. 4 '* — N. 63| W. 5 '' 
N. 69f W. 5 " — N. m W. 6 '' 
The ventilation is produced by furnace power. The fur- 
nace is located on No. 4 butt entry, 1000 yards from its 
mouth. It is 20 feet in length, 5 feet in width, 6J feet in 
height above the floor, and connected with a shaft and 
stack 105 feet in height. It is built in the arch form, with 



4 
4| 

I 

3 
9 




i 
10 

4 

2 



174 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

two courses of common brick, and lined on the inside with 
one course of fire brick. The fire bed is formed of one set 
of patent shaker grate bars 5 feet in length. Another fur- 
nace is located at a point on the main entry, 435 yards from 
the pit mouth. It is connected with a shaft and stack 83 
feet in height, and is used principally to remove the loco- 
motive smoke from the mine. 

190 miners, 13 drivers, 1 trapper, 1 furnace tender, 14 day 
men and 1 engineeer and fireman on each locomotive ; and 
the daily output is 12,000 bushels of lump coal. 

Peter Troutman is general superintendent, and Julius C. 
Esmiol is mine boss. 



163. AinEBICAM JHIME. 

Located at Ormsby now South Pittsburgh. 
Opened in 1854 by Jones and Laughlin, for the use of the 
American Iron and Steel Works, owned and operated by 
them. 

The head of the present workings is about four miles 
from the river. The coal is hauled from the workings by 
mules, to the entrance of the fourth hill, a distance of 3000 
yards, and from that point it is hauled by a steam locomo- 
tive, through three hills, to the check house at the front pit 
mouth a distance of one and a half miles, from whence it 
passes down a gravity plane 1300 feet in length to the base 
of the hill, and thence to the iron and steel works before 
mentioned. 

90 miners, 12 drivers and 30 day men are employed at 
this mine, and the output averages from eight to nine thou- 
sand bushels of lump coal per day. 
The area mined out is about 330 acres. 
Cleavage hearings were obtained as follows : 
N. 64i'w. 4 feet— N. 66 W. 2 feet. 
N. 60 W. 3 '' — N. 62 W. 4 '' 
N. 60i W. 2 '' — N. 63 W. 5 '' 
N. 66i W. 3 '' — N. 62i W. 4 " 
N. 65| W. 6 " — N. 63 W. 4 " 
K 61 W. 3 '' — N. 67i W. 2 '' 
N. 64f W. 6- '' — N. 62i W. 5 " 
N. 67 W. 3 " — N. 64 W. 4 " 



MINES ON POOL NO. 1. K*. 175 

164. ORMSBT MINE. 

Located at Twenty-first street, Birmingham, now South 
Pittsburgh. 

Opened in 1838 by John H. Page and Captain Phillips. 

They built a tipple, a road along the line of Twenty-first 
street to the base of the hill, a gravity plane and check 
house, and operated to the river trade until 1844. It then 
remained idle until 1846, and passed into possession of 
George Leadley. He operated until 1861, and was suc- 
ceeded by Dr. Oliver Ormsby, who operated in a small way 
until 1861. 

It was then leased by Keeling, Smith & Co., who operated 
until May, 1878, when it was leased by the Birmingham 
Coal Company (Limited) who still continue as operators. 

They exhausted the remaining coal from the front hill 
and extended the main tunnel to the outlet at Spiketown, a 
distance of 3300 yards from the front pit mouth. This is 
also the place where the maip tunnel of the Bausman mine 
comes out to the surface. 

The coal intended for the river trade is hauled from this 
point by a stationary engine located at the front pit mouth. 
Another stationary engine is located at this place, which 
hauls the coal from both mines through tunnels in the 
second and third hills, a distance of 2600 yards, and from 
the head of the present workings, in the fourth hill, an ad- 
ditional distance of 800 yards. 

The coal is screened at the check house, near the front pit 
mouth, into iron tram-wagons having two compartments, 
one for holding the lump coal, and the other for holding 
the slack coal. These cars or wagons run down the gravity 
plane to a point near the foot of the hill, where a knocker 
unloads the dust coal at the coke yard, and the wagon 
passes on a little farther to the first tipple, where the lump 
coal is unloaded into cars holding about fifty bushels each. 
These cars are hauled to the river tipple by a locomotive 
engine. 

The river tipple is so constructed that the cars can be 
lowered perpendicularly to the boats underneath, by means 
of self-acting cages balanced by back-weights. Two of 



n6K\ 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 




MINES ON POOL NO. 1. 



K\ 177 



these cages are used alternately, enabling them to handle a 
large amount of coal, with comparatively great ease, at 
almost any ordinary stage of water. The slack coal is 
made into coke. 

The present workings of the Ormsby and Bausman mines 
are contiguous ; the entries of one connect with the entries 
of the other, and both are worked on the double entry 
system. 

170 miners, 12 drivers, 6 day men, 25 boys and 12 mules 
are employed at this mine, and the output averages about 
13,000 bushels of lump coal per day. 

They have recently put in place a steam fan manufactured 
by Crawford & McCrimmon of Brazil, Indiana, but no in- 
formation has yet been received as to its performance. 

The following columnar section was obtained : 



Sandstone, 

Carbonaceous shale, from 6' 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 



Ormsby mine 
Section, 
{Fig, 65,) 



. .20 
to 12 
, . 
, . 
. . 



Parting, 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, . . ., 

Parting, *0 

Coal, 

Clay, fromO' |" to 

CosO, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Main over-elay, 

Breast ooal, 2 

Parting, 

Bearing-inooal, 

Parting, 

Brick ooal, 

Parting, 

Bottom coal, 1 

Under-olay. 



0" 



6 



10 



The carbonaceous shale averages 12 feet in thickness in 
the Bausman mine. 



12 K*. 



178 K\ REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL 

Cleavage plane bearings were obtained as follows ; 
N. 63i W. 3 feet— N. 66i W. 4 feet. 
N. 61 W. 3 " —N. 60J W. 4 " 
N. 64i W. 8 " — K 64f W. 5 " 



169. BAVSMAH IiniE. 

Located at Twelfth street, Birmingham, now South Pitts- 
burgh. 

Opened by Frederick Bausman in 1844. He operated 
and supplied coal to the city trade until 1849, and leased 
the mine to Joseph Keeling, who operated until 1856; 
after which Bausman operated until 1865, and sold the 
mine to Joseph Keeling. He operated until May, 1878, 
when it became the property of the Birmingham Coal Com- 
pany (Limited) composed of Joseph Keeling, John Spen- 
nenweber and others, who continue as operators. 

The main tunnel has been extended through the first hill 
to the outcrop at Spiketown, the place of connection with 
the Ormsby mine road. Prom this point the coal intended 
for the city trade is hauled through the tunnel to the front 
pit mouth by a steam locomotive, and from this point 
the cars of both mines are run by a stationary engine over 
one and the same road, to the inlet of the workings in the 
fourth hill, a distance of two miles. 56 cars are hauled 
from the mines at a trip. 

The water collects mainly in the west part of the mine, 
and is pumped out through a perpendicular shaft 100 feet 
in depth. 

They have one four-inch and two ten-inch steam pumps 
in place, but are only using the two large ones a portion of 
the time at present. The exhaust steam escapes into the 
bottom of the shaft, and thereby furnishes ventilation to 
the mine. 

The over-clay is quite uniform in thickness throughout 
the mine, averaging about ten inches. 

No horsebacks were observed, although a few small ones 
were reported. One clay vein three feet in thickness was 



MIISTES ON POOL NO.l . K*. 179 

observed near the head of entry No. 10, which was reported 
to have given oflf some carhuretted hydrogen^ and some 
water while being cut through by the miners. 

They employ at this mine 160 miners, 12 drivers, 6 day 
men, 25 boys and 15 mules. 

The output averages about 12,000 bushels of lump coal 
per day. 

The elevation of the coal at the river front, or Coal Hill, 
as reported by S. Diescher, Engineer of Pittsburgh, is 330 
feet above low water, at points in Birmingham below Dam 
No. 1. 



166. CASTJLE-SHAIVIVOIV MINBd. 

Located on Coal Hill (now Mt. Washington) in South 
Pittsburgh. 

Originally opened tin 1825 by Jacob Beltzhoover. The 
old entry is now used for the main tunnel of the Pittsburgh 
and Castle-Shannon railroad. 

Jacob Beltzhoover operated and sold coal to the city trade 
until 1835, and was succeeded successively by John Grriffith 
and John D. Miller. The property was sold to Bailey, 
McKain & Co., in 1856, and in 1859 it passed into the pos- 
session of James M. Bailey who operated and run out the 
remaining portion of the coal in the front hill in 1861, and 
sold to the Pittsburgh Coal Company. 

They extended the road and opened a mine on the south 
side of Saw-mill run. The coal was run from the pit mouth 
down a chute to near the run bed, loaded into cars, that 
were hauled over the run on a trestle, and elevated to coal 
level on the north side by means of a stationary engine; 
and from thence they were hauled through the old tunnel 
by a steam locomotive to the front pit mouth, from where 
they passed down a gravity plane to the coal yard in South 
Pittsburgh. 

They worked this place out in 1864, and opened a mine 
one half mile further up the run, adjoining the one last 
named, where they continued to operate until 1872, and 



180 K\ REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

sold to the Pittsburgh and Castle-Shannon Railroad Com- 
pany. 

This company continued to operate the old mines, and 
open new ones, and commenced hauling passengers and 
coal over the new road in 1874 ; which they had by that 
time extended to Castle-Shannon, the present terminus of 
the road. 

The present mine is located about three miles from the 
river. The coal is hauled from the mine to the check house 
by mules, from where it passes down a gravity plane to the 
tipple at the railroad, on the west side of Saw-mill run. 
Here it is screened into cars, about the size of the mine cars, 
and hauled in trains of 50 cars each, by locomotive power 
to the head of the gravity plane on the face of Coal Hill, 
fronting the river ; from whence they pass down the incline 
or gravity plane to the coal yard at the Castle- Shannon 
railroad depot. 

They employ 140 miners, 10 drivers, 4 inside day men 
and 10 day men outside, and are producing about 8000 
bushels of lump coal per day. 

The mine is worked on the single entry system, and the 
butt entries are driven 160 yards apart. 

The coal bed dips to the west, south and east from a 
point on the main butt entry. 

The following columnar section was obtained: 

Carbonaceous shale. 

Coal, 0' 8' 

Parting, I 

Coal, 8 

Clay parting, 2 

Coal, 5 

Parting, J 

Coal, 1^ 

Castle^hannon Parting, . I 

mine Section, < Coal, 2 

{FHg,66,) Main over-clay, 10 

Breast coal, ' 8 

Parting, \ 

Bearing-in coal, 8 

Parting, \ 

Brick coal, 1 

Parting, . { 

y Bottom coal, , . . 1 2 

Under-clay. 



MINES ON POOL NO. 1. K*. 181 

HorsebdcJcs are not numerous in the main over-clay, but 
are most frequently found in the roof coal partings. A 
few clay veins were observed. 

The following cleavage hearings were obtained : 

N. 67i W. 3 feet— N. 66i W. 8 feet. 
N. 66i W. 1 *^ — N. 65i W. 6 '' 
N. 66 W. 2 " ~N. 65i W. 4 '* 

James M. Bailey is General Superintendent of the rail- 
road and coal mines belonging to the company. 



182 K\ 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 




Chapter VIII. 
Saw-Mill Run Mines, 

167. E1VT£BPBIS£ BIIBifi. 

Located at Banksville, on Little Saw-Mill run, at the 
terminus of the Little Saw-Mill Run Railroad, three miles 
from the Ohio river by rail. 

The mine was owned and opened up by the Little Saw- 
Mill Run Railroad and (joal Company in 1852 and '53. 
They operated until 1863, and leased the mine to Hartley 
and Marshall, who operated, and in 1870 purchased the re- 
maining portion of the coal and improvements from the 
company, as well as other adjoining tracts of coal, which 
they still continue to operate. 

An area of 427 acres has been mined out. 

They employ 200 miners, 10 drivers and 22 day men, and 
the output averages about 1000 tons per day. 

The main entry is driven on a bearing of S. 70° W. 1200 
yards, then curves to the east for 300 yards, from which 
point it bears S. 56f "^ E. 1100 yards, to its head. It dips 60 
feet from the pit mouth to the curve, then rises 24 feet to 
the head. 

The empty cars run in to the inner end of the curve by 
gravity, carrying one end of the wire line with them. The 
line is then hooked on to a train of loaded cars that are 
hauled out by means of a stationary engineloc^ited near the 
pit mouth. The coal was formerly hauled from the head of 
the workings to the inner end of the curve by means of 
another stationary engine located at the last named point. 
This engine has recently been supplied by a Tank-Locomo- 
tive Engine of English manufacture. It runs on three 

(183 K*.) 



184 K\ KBPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

pair of wheels 20 inches in diameter. The cylinders are 6 
inches in diameter ; 12-inch stroke. Boiler to work to 250 
lbs. per square inch steam pressure. Total height of engine 
is 4 feet 9 inches, and weighs about 4i tons. There is no 
special provision for consuming the smoke other than a 
small grate area, which is only IjV feet, which it is claimed 
secures a good combustion. It makes a round trip, of 1300 
yards, in 20 minutes, with a train of from 25 to 30 cars. 

The coal is screened near the pit mouth ; and the portion 
intended for the river trade is run into four-wheeled dump 
cars, holding about five tons each, which are hauled by lo- 
comotive power over the line of the Little Saw-Mill Rail- 
road to the tipple at the river, and loaded into boats ; the 
portion intended for the railroad trade is run into the regu- 
lar flat and gondola cars, and shipped to Youngstown, Ohio, 
and the Lake markets. 

They use a traveling screen, by which they are able to 
make six grades of coal, viz : Lump or 1^-inch coal, f -inch 
coal, run of mine, nut, slack, nut and slack mixed, and 
washed slack or blacksmith coal. They claim a great ad- 
vantage, by being prepared to furnish so many different 
grades of coal to the varying demands of the trade. 

The slack is cleaned from sulphur and slate by a gravity 
washer. 

The coal run to the river was formerly shipped to the 
lower river markets, but for the last three years it has been 
sold to supply the local city trade. About one fourth of 
the product of the mine is disposed of in that way. 

The pit cars used are of the box style ; the bed being 6 
feet 2 inches long, 4 feet wide, with perpendicular sides and 
ends 20 inches high, holding about 26 bushels level full. 
This bed or box is placed on a heavy wooden frame, and the 
wheels are underneath the bed, instead of at the sides. 
The gauge of track is two feet ; the ties are sawed 3i feet 
in length, and 3 by 6 inches square, and the pit rails used 
are of steel weighing 25 lbs. per yard. Chain hitchings two 
feet in length are used. 

The mine is ventilated by means of a fan^ made on the 
Guibal plan, 15 feet in diameter, with blade surfaces 5 by 



SECOND GEOL. SURVEY. PA 



REPORT K 4. PLATE X. 




I 
o 
cr 

CD 
if) 

\- 

CL 

I 
h- 
D 

o 

if) 



Ql 
Ql 



a. 

O 

o 



o 



z 



5 

i 
< 






SAW-MILL RUN MINES. 



K'. 186 



6 feet* The distance traveled by the air current from the 
inlet to the fan is 3tVu miles, and when the fan was moving 
at the irate of 65 revolutions per minute, the volume of air 
traveling at the fan was found by the anemometer to be 
32,176 cubic feet per minute, the area of airway being 33 
square feet. 

They use a steam pump with a 16- inch cylinder to deliver 
the water from the mine. 

A furnace has been erected near the boilers in the mine, 
which is used to keep the air moving through the workings 
during the night time, and to supply the place of the fan' 
in case it could not be run, from any cause. 

The following columnar section was obtained* 

Carbonaceous shale. 

♦ Block slate, 0' 6" 

Carbonaceous shale, 1 

Coal and shale mixed, 2 

f Coal, li 

Clay, from C to 1 

Coal, . on 

Parting,.. i 

Coal, 6 

Parting, J 

Coal, li 

Parting, J 

Coal, 2 

Main over-^lay, ...... from 10'' to 1 6 

Breast coal, 3 8 

Parting, 4 

Bearing-in coal, 4 

Parting, | 

Brick coal, 10^ 

Parting, { 

Bottom coal, 1 4 

Under-olay. 

Cleavage plane bearings were obtained as follows- 
N. 66f ° W. 3 feet— N. 63| W. 2 feet. 
N. 67 W. 3 " — N. 67i W. 3 '' 
V N. 64i W. 6 " —N. 65 W. 4 " 

iritottom of coal bed at pit mouth is reported to be 260 
feel above low water of the river, and in the hill at the 
mouth of Saw-Mill Run it is reported at 350 feet above the 
same stage of water. 



Saw-Mill Bun mines 

Section, 

(^Fig.€7.) 



186 K\ REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

The river tipples are owned by the Little Saw-Mill Bail- 
road Company, and toll is charged for all co^l run over 
them. The first of these tipples was built in 1863, and located 
at a point about 200 yards below the mouth of the run. It 
was arranged for screening the coal as well as loading it 
into boats. 

A new tipple was built in its stead in 1864, which was ar- 
ranged for loading into boats only, the coal being then 
screened at the mines. It is so constructed that the cars 
can be lowered to the boats at any ordinary stage of water ; 
and by means of a movable bottom in the cars, the coal is 
transferred to the boats without the usual breakage. 

Another tipple constructed on the same plan, as that first 
described, was built by the same company in 1854, at a 
point 300 yards below the mouth of the run, and its place 
was supplied in 1868 by the one now being used ; which is 
also arranged for loading into boats only. The elevation of 
tipple floors above low water is about thirty feet. 

An analysis of the coal from the Enterprise Mine, re- 
cently made by O. Wuth, Analytical Chemist of Pitts- 
burgh, shows it to contain as follows : 

Water, 0.41^ 

Volatile matter, 84.10 " 

Fixed carbon, 69.13 " 

Sulphur, 1.12 " 

Ash, 6.20 " 

99.96 

Coke, 63.64 (To 

Ashinooke, 8.12 " 

Sulphur in ooke, 0.92 •< 



168. TKNTIJBi: MIIVE. 

Located at Banks ville, on Little Saw-Mill Run, two and 
three quarter miles by rail south from the Ohio river. 

Owned and opened by the late James Woods in 1854. 
He operated and sold the property to Gray & Bell, the 
present operators, in 1872. 

The workings of this mine are connected with those of 



SAW-MILL RUN MINES. 



K\ 187 



the Cfhess mine, also owned by Gray & Bell ; and both mines 
are ventilated by means of a. fan made on the Gnibal plan. 

They employ 160 miners, 30 day men and 10 drivers, and 
the output is about 10,000 bushels of lump coal per day. 

A small portion of the coal from this mine is run to the 
river trade, over the line of the Little Saw-Mill railroad, 
and the larger portion is transported over the line of the 
same railroad to the mouth of Saw-Mill run, where connec- 
tion is made with the line of the Pittsburgh and Lake Brie 
railroad, which it passes over to the Lake trade and western 
markets. 

The following columnar section was obtained : 

Garbonaoeons shale. 

Goal and ahaie mixed, 1' 

Carbonaceous shale, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Clay parting, 

Coal with slate binders, 

Farting, 

Coal, 

lid over-clay, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Over-clayt -0 

r Coal, 2 

Breast coal, < Carbonaceous shale, , . . 

. CCoal, 

Parting, 

Bearing-in coal, 

Parting, 

Brick coal, 1 

Parting, 

^ Bottom coal, 1 

Under-day. 

The two-inch parting of carbonaceous shale, in the Breast 
coal member, commences at a swamp^ five feet in depth, 
and extends in a belt of 50 yards in width, by 126 yards in 
length. This parting is called a flat spar by the miners. 

A soot vein occurs at this place, in the roof coal members, 
which gives oflf fire damp in considerable quantity, suffi- 
cient to cause a serious explosion, in case it was allowed to 
remain in the working places, for a day or more. 



Venture mine 
Section, 
(Fig.68.) 



2" 

6 

2 

i 

2 
9 

i 
8 
2 

1 

8 

3 
10 

2 

2 
11 



188 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

The Tnain over-clay varies from 10 inches to 6 feet in 
thickness. This condition is found extending throughout 
the mine, in a belt 300 yards in width, on a bearing of 
south 20° east. 

The Second over-claj/'iB found to vary from a mere part- 
ing to one foot in thickness, extending across the mine in 
the same direction as the belts in the main over-clay. 

Cleavage bearings were obtained as follows : 

N. 64i W. 6 feet— N. 67i W. 6 feet. 
N. 61i W. 4 '' —N. 64 W. 3 " 



169. COAIi BIOOE MIME. 

Located on Little Saw-Mill run, 21^1^ miles by rail from 
the Ohio river. 

Owned and opened by A. Kirk Lewis, in 1867, and oper- 
ated by him until 1860 ; when it was leased to Alexander 
Crumby until 1862. It was then sold to Gray & Bell, the 
present owners and operators. 

The coal is shipped principally to the Lake trade, over 
the lines of the Little Saw-Mill Run, and Pittsburgh and 
Lake Erie railroads. 

They employ at present 36 miners, 3 drivers and 6 day 
men, and the daily output is 2000 bushels of lump coal. 



170. ECI^IPSi: MIBifi. 

Situated on the line of the Little Saw- Mill Run railroad, 
two and a half miles south from the Monongahela River. 

Opened in 1879 by John Carlin & Co., who are the present 
owners and operators. 

The coal of this mine is transported over the Little Saw- 
Mill Run railroad, and over the Pittsburgh and Lake Erie 
railroad to Cleveland, and the Lake trade. 

An area of fifty acres has been mined out, and the portion 
remaining is mainly in the form of ribs and pillars, which 
they are now mining, and reported to amount to about 20 
acres. 



SAW-MILL RUN MINES. K'. 189 

They make four grades of coal ; lump, nut, pea and dust. 

The dust is washed and made into coke. They have six- 
teen ovens which are located at the mouth of the run in 
Temperanceville. 

They employ 110 miners, 8 drivers, 1 trapper and 10 day 
men, and the output averages 8000 bushels of lump coal 
per day. 



171. €H£SS miVE. 

Located in South Pittsburgh, on Saw- Mill run, one mile 
south from the Ohio river. 

Opened in 1848 by William Chess, Sr. He operated until 
1866, and sold to Gray and Bell, the present owners and 
operators. 

This mine is contiguous to, and connected with the work- 
ings of the Venture mine, also owned and operated by Gray 
& Bell. 

The coal is taken out at the north end of the field, where 
it passes down a gravity plane to near the run bed, and 
thence through a rock tunnel, 1326 yards in length, to 
Painter's and Singer's Rolling Mills, which are supplied 
largely from this mine. 

Three stationary engines are used to haul the coal from 
the mine to the mills. 

They employ 80 miners, 34 day men, 5 drivers, 7 mules, 
and the daily output is about 5000 bushels of lump coal. 

Cleavage hearings were obtained as follows : 
N. 59 W. 3 feet— N. 64 W. 5 feet. 
K 65i W. 2 '' — N. 60i W. 3 '' 
N. 60i W. 3 '' — N. 63 W. 4 " 



172. FOX ]IIIir£. 

Located in Pittsburgh, South-Side, on a branch of Saw- 
Mill run, one mile south of the Ohio River. 

Originally opened by Charles Leadley in 1852. He ope- 
rated until 1859, and sold it to James Nimick, who leased 



190 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 



it to E. Bowen. He operated until 1862, when it was leased 
to Thomas Fox, who is still operating and running a small 
amount of coal from this place, for the trade of the vicinity. 

In 1879 he opened a mine in the opposite side of the hill, 
which enables him to reach the remaining portion of the 
Nimick coal, and eleven acres of the Kams tract. About 
80 acres have been mined out at both openings. 

He employs 45 miners, 3 drivers and 3 day men, and the 
output averages 2000 bushels per day. 

The coal is hauled to the river in road wagons, and sold 
to the city trade. 

The mine is ventilated by furnace power. 

The following columnar section was obtained : 

Carbonaceous shale. 

Block slate, 0' 4 " 

' Coal, 5 

Clay, 1 

Coal, 7 

Parting, J 

Coal, 5 

Clay, 4 

Coal, 8 

Parting, \ 

Coal, 4| 

Parting, a 

Coal, 4 

Fox mine Parting, 4 

Section, J Coal, 5 

{Fig. 69.) Parting * 

Coal, 2 

Parting. 

Coal, 1 

Main over-clay ^ .... from 0' 9" to 2 6 

Breast coal, 3 6 

Parting, \ 

Bearing-in coal, 4| 

Parting, { 

Brick coal, 9 

Parting, 4 

Bottom coal, 1 2 

Under-clay. 

Where the over-clay is more than nine inches in thick- 
ness, it is usually separated into two members, by a seam 
of coal from one to four inches in thickness, and the lower 
clay member preserves a fairly uniform thickness, of from 



SAW-MILL RUN MINES. K*. 191 

nine to fourteen inches. This lower member is undoubtedly 
the true over-clay, and the upper member, a swell in the 
parting over the little roof coal. 
The following cleavage hearings were obtained : 
N. 66i W. 3 feet— N. 66* W. 4 feet. 
N. 69i W. 5 " — N. 68i W. 4 '' 
N. 69 W. 6 '' — N. 67 W. 6 " 



192 K\ 



Report of Progress. J. Sutton Wall. 




Chapter IX. 



Peters' CreeJc Mines. 

173. TKMfiTIA JUIMK. 

Located at Anderson station,. on the line of the Pitts- 
burgh and Wheeling Division of the Baltimore and Ohio 
railroad, 22| miles south of Pittsburgh by rail. 

Opened up in 1880 by Dr. David M. Anderson. He built 
a road and tipple and continues to operate the mine. 

The following columnar section was obtained : 

Carbonaceous shale. 

Coal, 0' 6' 

Parting, ... | 



Peters^ Creek mine 
Section, 
{Fig. 70.) 



Coal, 

Clay, ..••... 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Clay, 
Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Clay, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Main over-clay , 1 

Breast coal, 3 4| 

Parting, \ 

Bearing-in ooal, 8| 

Parting -0 * 

Brick ooal, 1 1 

Parting, | 

Bottom ooal, 1 4 

Under-olay. 
13 K\ (1»8 K4.) 



2 
6 

1 
3 

10 
6 

1 

3 

4 

1 
i 



194 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

The coal is shipped mainly to the Wheeling market. 

The mine is worked on the double entry system, and 
ventilated by furnace power. By anemometer test the 
volume of air passing through the workings was found to 
be 3675 cubic feet per minute. 

25 miners, 1 driver and 3 day men are employed ; and 
the output is 1500 bushels of lump coal per day. 

The coal comes from the mine in large cubical blocks^ 
has a fine appearance, and bears a good reputation in the 
market for fuel and gas purposes. 

Cleavage hearings were obtained as follows : 

N. 64 W. 6 feet— N. 65* W. 6 feet. 
N. 67i W. 3 " — N. 66 W. 3 " 
N. 62i W. 3 " — N. 62i W. 8 " 
N. 62i W. 4 '' — N. 65i W. 3 '' 



174. liOCKHART llIINlfi. 

Located on the north side of Peters' creek, on the line of 
the Pittsburgh and Wheeling Division of the Baltimore 
and Ohio railroad, 22J miles south of Pittsburgh by rail. 

This mine is just being opened up, and the road and tipple 
are in course of construction. 

The elevation of the bottom of the coal bed at the main 
pit mouth is 37^ feet above present railroad grade. 

It is owned and operated by the Pittsburgh and Peters' 
Creek Gas-Coal and Coke Company, (Limited), composed 
of Jacob Householder, R. B. Tate, Charles Lockhart and 
Thomas McHenry. 

A partial section was obtained at the pit mouth, as follows : 

Coal. 

Main over-clay, 0' 10" 

Breast ooal, . 8 6 

Parting, \ 



{Fig. 71.) 



Lockhart mine Bearing-in coal, o 

Sectvon. ^ p^^ing. i 

Brick coal, 10 

Parting, \ 

[^ Bottom coal 1 3 

Under-clay. 



SECOND GEOL SURVEY. PA. 



REPORT K4. PLATE XI. 




U 



q: 



z 

< 
h 

Z 



peters' creek mines. K*. 195 

The upper portion of the section was not exposed. 
The coal bed rises rapidly towards the north, and is re- 
ported as rising gently to the east, at this place. 



175. liEGIiKR miBifi. 

Located on the line of the Pittsburgh Southern railroad, 
(narrow gauge,) 20 miles south of Pittsburgh by the line of 
the B. & O. railroad, and one mile north of Finley ville. . 

Owned and opened up by Jacob Legler in 1879. He built 
a road and tipple and run coal to the Washington and 
Wheeling markets. 

He leased the mine to Florshini & Young in 1882, who 
operated until December, 1883, when Young retired from 
the company and it continues to be operated by Florshim 
alone, under lease from Legler. 

The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company, during the 
last mentioned year, extended a branch from their road at 
Finleyville out to this mine, and the product of the mine 
is now run over the line of that road, largely to the Chicago 
market. 

The following partial columnar section was obtained : 

Coal. 

f Main over-clay, from to 2' " 

Breast coal, 3 

Parting, { 

Bearing-in ooal, 3 

Parting, 4 

Brick coal, 1 

Parting, { 

Bottom coal, 1 4 

Under-clay. 

The upper portion of the section was concealed. 
Bearings on cleavage planes were obtained as follows : 

N. 66i W. 8 feet— N. 67* W. 4 feet. 

N. 64 W. 5 " — N. 59i W. 3 ". 
30 miners, 2 drivers and 3 day men are employed ; and 
the output averages 1500 bushels of lump coal per day. 



Legler mine 
Section. 
iFHg.7i.) 



196 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 
176. PETERS' CREEK MIME No. 1. 

Located near Gastonville, on the line of the Pittsburgh 
and Wheeling Division of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, 
19i miles south of Pittsburgh by rail. 

Opened in 1883 by the Pittsburgh and Chicago Gas-Coal 
Company. They built a tipple and quite a number of 
dwelling houses. 

40 miners, 2 drivers and 8 day men are emj^loyed ; and the 
output averages 1500 bushels of lump coal per day. 

The product of the mine is divided by screening into 
three grades, lump, nut and dust^ and shipped by rail to 
the Chicago and Western markets. 

Bearings on cleavage planes were obtained as follows : 
N. 62i W. 3 feet— N. 66* W. 4 feet. 



177. PETERS' CREEK JUIBIE No. S. 

Located on the line of the Pittsburgh and Wheeling Di- 
vision of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, 17 miles south 
of Pittsburgh by rail. 

This mine is just being opened up by the Pittsburgh and 
Chicago Gas-Coal Company. The product of the mine will 
be shipped by rail. 



Chapter X. 
Toughiogheny River Goal Mines * 

178. jmLLKB MINfi. 

Located on the west side of the Youghiogheny river, one 
half mile from its mouth. 

Opened in 1839 by Dobbs & Wilkinson, under lease from 
Caleb Edmundson. They operated for the river trade, and 
were succeeded successively by A. N. Miller, William Rob- 
inson, Reuben Miller, Robert Greenhalgh and William 
Greenhalgh. 

The mine has not been operated since 1872. The balance 
of the coal remaining has since been mined out through the 
Edmundson mine. An area of 200 acres has been exhausted 
from both mines together. 



179. EDMVBrDSOM IIIIMK. 

Located three fourths of a mile from the mouth of the 
Youghiogheny river on the west side. 

Opened in 1840 by Michael and John F, Dravo, under a 
lease from Caleb Edmundson. They operated and run coal 
to the river trade until the mine was exhausted in 1851. 

It ranked as one of the most extensive mines in the dis- 
trict, while in operation, having a running capacity of 
10,000 bushels of lumj) coal per day. 

♦Quite a Dumber of these mines have already been described by Mr. 
Charles A. Young, in Franklin Piatt's report of 1875, on the Coke Manufac- 
ture of the Youghiogheny River Valley ; see chapte* on the Youghiogheny 
Gas-Coal Trade, volume L, pages 88 to 97 ,• but it has been thought advisable 
to include in this report re-desoriptions of those comprised within that portion 
of the valley aflTected by the Slack-Water Improvement during its existence. 

(197 K4.) 



198 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SXTTTON WALL. 



180. PEMBIY miBllfi* 

Located on the west side of the river, one mile from its 
mouth. 

Opened in 1848 by John Penny. He built a tipple, gravity 
plane and check house and operated to the river trade until 
1878, and the property was sold to John B. Sneathon, 
Frederick Wilson, David Linch and Cyrus Robison, the 
present operators. 

The mine is worked on the single entry system. The 
butt entries are driven to the outcrop, and entry No. 9 
connects with the Robbins and Jenkins mine on the Monon- 
gahela river. 

* They employ 150 miners, 15 drivers and 12 day men; 
and the output averages 12,000 bushels of lump coal per 
day. 

The following columnar section was obtained : 

Garbonaoeons shale. 

Block slate, 0' 



Penny mine 
Section, 
{FHg. 78.) 



7" 

Coal, 3 

Parting, \ 

Ck>al 5 

Clay, . . . , 2 

Coal, 2| 

Parting, \ 

Coal, 1» 

Clay, 11 

Coal, 7 

Parting, | 

Coal, 3 

Parting, | 

Coal, 4 

i Parting, \ 

Coal, 3* 

Parting, I 

Coal, 6 

Parting, { 

Coal, 3 

Main over-clay ^ 6 

Breast coal, 3 2 

Parting, * 

Bearing-in coal, 4| 

Parting, \ 

Brick coal, 10 

Parting, . . \ 

I Bottom coal, 1 3 

Under-clay. 



YOUGHIOGHENY RIVER COAL MINES. K*. 199 

The block slate rests immediately on the roof coal. 
Cleavage hearings were obtained as follows : 

N. 66i W. 4 feet— N. 62i W. 3 feet. 
N. 6(>i W. 7 '' — N. 64i W. 3 " 



181. JAmifiS O'NEIIi MINIS. 

Located on the west side of the river, 3i miles from its 
mouth. 

Originally opened in 1865 by James O'Neil. He built a 
tipple, a road and gravity plane, to the Major Rankin coaJ, 
one half mile from the river. 

The coal was hauled to the river by a steam locomotive. 

One hundred and forty -eight acres were mined out at this 
place which was abandoned in 1871, and the road extended 
to the upper side of the same property, one half mile further 
up the same run. 

Here he built another gravity plane and mined out the 
balance of the Rankin tract and five acres of the Pierce 
coal. 

He abandoned this place in 1876, and extended the road 
a quarter of a mile farther up the run, and opened the 
present mine in the Henderson coal. 

About 110 acres of this tract have been mined out, and 
the workings are being extended through to the west side 
of Weddle's run, where about forty acres remain unmined. 

The cars are hauled to the parting by mules, and from 
that point they are hauled to the pit mouth by a stationary 
engine and wire line, a distance of 300 yards ; and from 
there they are run to the river by a steam locomotive. 

The old main entry rises from the north end, for a dis- 
tance of 600 yards, and falls from there through to Weddle's 
run, a further distance of 550 yards, so that the water at 
the north part of the mine flows toward the Youghiogheny, 
and from the south part it flows toward the Monongahela 
river. 

They employ 100 miners, 10 drivers and 7 day men, in- 



James 0*Neil mine 
Section. 
• (FHg. 74>) 



200 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. BUTTON WALL. 

eluding the engineer and fireman ; and the output averages 
9000 bushels of lump coal per day. 
The following columnar section was obtained : 

Garbonaoeous shale. 

CkMkl and shale mixed, 0' 6'^ 

Coal, 3 

Clay, 1 

Coal 8 

PartJng, | 

Coal, 4 

Clay, 9 

Carbonaoeous shale, 6 

Coal, 1 8 

Parting, { 

Coal, 3 

Over-clay, from 0" to 4 

Breast ooal, 3 3 

Parting, \ 

Bearing-in ooal, 3^ 

Parting, \ 

Brick ooal, 11 

Parting, | 

Bottom ooal, 1 4 

Under-olay. 

The main over-clay is absent in a large portion of the 

mine, and in other parts it varies from six inches to four 
feet in thickness. 

Cleavage plane bearings were obtained as follows : 

N. 61J W. 6 feet— N. 62 W. 6 feet. 
N. 61f W. 5 " — N. 65 W. 6 " 
N. m W. 7 '' — N. m W. 5 '* 
N. 60f W. 4 " — N. 62i W. 3 " 



18S. CORMELL AND WKRUMG JUIBTK. 

Located at Boston, on the west side of the river, 3f miles 
from its mouth. 

Opened in 1865 by Duncan, Cornell & Werling. They 
built a tipple and gravity plane, and operated to the river 
trade, until the property was purchased by Wm. H. Brown, 
since deceased. It is now owned and operated by W. H. 
Brown's sons. 



SECOND GEOL. SURVEY. PA 



REPORT K4. PLATE XII. 




I 
o 
o 
I 
o 

o 






z 

o 

z 
_j 

Q 

z 
< 



z 

O 
u 



YOXJGHIOGHENT RIVER COAL MINES. K*. 201 

The mine is worked on the single entry system. The 
main entry is driven through to Wild-cat run, a distance of 
1600 yards, and continued 140 yards farther into the second 
hill. 

The butt entries are driven through the field, so that the 
water will flow to the main entry, and thence out, through 
it, to Wild-cat run. The entries are all driven eight feet 
wide. 

The coal is hauled, from the working places, by mules, 
to the parting on the main entry, 1200 yards in the mine, 
and from there the cars are hauled out of the mine by 
means of a stationary engine and wire line, located near the 
pit mouth. The empty cat's are returned by gravity. 

The loaded cars run by gravity from the pit mouth to the 
river, a distance of one mile, and the empty ones are hauled 
back by means of another stationary engine and wire line. 

The coal is screened at the river, into three grades, lump^ 
nut and dust. 

They wash considerable quantities of the dust, and sell 
it for manufacturing eoke. 

The engine that hauls the cars from the mine has a 10- 
inch cylinder and 2-foot stroke, and the engine that is used 
to haul the empty cars from the river, has a 12-inch cylin- 
der and 2-foot stroke. They are now using a battery of 
four boilers each 40 feet in length, and 40 inches in diame- 
ter, to supply the required amount of steam. 

The mine is ventilated. by means of ^furnace and stack. 
The furnace is built with a double arch 6^ feet wide, 6 feet 
from grate bars to underside of first arch, and. 3 feet more 
to underside of second arch. It is 30 feet in length and 
rises from front to rear. The grate bars are placed at an 
elevation of 3 feet above the floor. The flre bed is composed 
of two sets of bars '5i feet each in length. The front of the 
flre bed is placed 8 feet from front of furnace. The stack 
is built of brick 6^ feet square on the inside and 80 feet in 
height. - • 

They employ 200 miners, 10 drivers and 35 day men, and 
the output averages 16,000 bushels of lump coal per day. 



202 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 



The following columnar section was obtained : 

Sandy shale. 

CarbonaoeouB ahale, 2' 

( Coal, 1 



Cornell and Werling 

mine /Section, 

{S\g. 76.) 



6 

10 
8 



Clay, 

Coal, 

Parting, | 

Coal, 4 

Clay, S» 

Coal, 2 

Parting, | 

Coal, 2^ 

Parting, | 

Coal, i 6 

Parting, i 

Coal, 4i 

Main over-clay, 8 

Breast ooal, 8 6 

Parting, { 

Bearing-in ooal, 3^ 

Parting, J 

Briok ooal, 1 

Parting, 4 

Bottom coal, 1 2 

Under-olay. 

Swells or horsebacks are quite frequent between the first 
and second roof members in a large portion of the mine ; 
and where this condition is found, they endeavor to retain 
the over-clay in place by frequent posting, in order to save 
handling the extra quantity of clay. They mine out about 
six inches of the bottom coal member in the entries, and 
traveling roads of the rooms, for the purpose of giving 
more height to the traveling ways. This portion of the 
bottom coal is reported to be quite free from sulphur and 
binders, and is shipped to market with the oth^r coal. 
The following cleavage bearings were obtained : 
N. 62| W. 4 feet— N. 61i W. 3 feet. 
N. 63i W. 4 '' — N. 61i W. 3 " 
N. 64i W. 6 '' — N. 62 W. 5 " 
N. ^6 W. 4 " — N. 65i W. 12 " 
N. 65i W. 5 " — N. Qb W. 4 " 
N. 63i W. 5 " — N. 64 W. 5 '' 
Elevation of bottom of coal at the pit mouth is reported 
to be 266 feet above low water. 
An area of 450 acres has been mined out at this place. 



YOUGHIOGHENY RIVER COAL MINES. K*. 203 

Located on the east side of the river, at Osceola station, 
on the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and is operated by the 
Osceola Coal Company. 

The coal is run from the pit mouth down a gravity plane 
to the tipple at the railroad ; and the product of the mine 
is shipped by rail. 

The mine is worked partly on the single entry, and partly 
on the double entry systems. 

130 miners and 20 day men are employed ; and the out- 
put averages 8000 bushels of lump coal per day. 



184. AiiPSTiiiiiE niBii:. 

Located at Alpsville, on the east side of the river, 6f 
miles from its mouth. 

Opened in 1864 by N. J. Bigley. 

The coal was shipped over the line of the Baltimore and 
Ohio railroad to a point a short distance above McKeesport, 
where it was transferred to barges and boats, and run to the 
lower river markets. 

The slack coal was washed and made into a very beau- 
tiful article of coke. 

Bigley operated until 1880, and was succeeded by Thomas 
Hackett & Co. 

They employ 130 miners, and the product of the mine is 
shipped by rail. 



1»5. EAGIiE-lf EST IHIlfE. 

Located on the west side of the river, 7f miles from its 
mouth. 

Opened in 1850 by David Allen and John Mierhoof, who 
operated to the river trade until 1857. It then remained 
idle until 1876, and was sold to William Duncan and John 
Lamb, who operated by river until 1881, and sold to the 
Greenoak Coal Company, consisting of William Ratcliif, 



204 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

Thomas Painter, Robert Jack, J. H. Dewees and John 
Shields. 

They are the present operators, and run the product of 
the mine by both river and rail. 

An area of about 75 acres has been mined out. 



186. ncCinSTON miME. 

Located on the west side of the river, 8 miles from its 
mouth. 

Opened by Richard McQuiston. He operated to the river 
trade until the slack-water was suspended in 1866, and the 
proi)erty since passed into possession of Duncan & Cornell. 
It remains unoperated. 



187. Ri;P£RT IHIME. 

Located on the west side of the river, 8^ miles from its 
mouth. 

Opened in 1860 by Riley Rupert and Coonrod Smith. 
They operated to the river trade until 1862, and were suc- 
ceeded by Robins & Jenkins, who operated until 1863, and 
the property was sold to Robert Long. 

He operated until the suspension of the slack-water in 
1866, and the mine has remained idle since that time. 



IHH. OliD AliPS MIME. 

Located on the west side of the river, 8f miles from its 
mouth. 

Opened by the Alps Coal Company. They operated to 
the river trade until 1862, and were succeeded by N. J. 
Bigley, who operated until 1863, and the mine has remained 
idle since then. 



YOUGHIOGIIENT RIVER COAL MINES. K*. 205 

189. C)OUIiT£RTILI.K MINE. 

Located opposite to Coulterville on the west side of the 
river, 8| miles from its mouth. 

Opened in 1851 by Robert, John and Henry Duncan, 
Robert Cornell and Andrew Werling. 

They built a slide tipple, gravity plane and check house, 
on the face of the river hill, and operated to the river trade 
until Dam No. 1 was destroyed by ice in 1866, when the 
mine was abandoned. 

An area of 75 acres was mined out at this place. 



190. CIBRA MIBIE. 

Located on the west side of the river, 9i miles from its 
mouth. 

Opened in 1856 by William, Charles and Anthony Dravo. 
They operated to the river trade until 1860, and were suc- 
ceeded by N. J. Bigley and J. V. McDonald, who operated 
uader lease until 1864 ; when McDonald retired from the 
firm and Bigley continued to operate until 1865, and the 
mine has remained idle since then. 



191. 9€OT€H-HII.Ii IHIME. 

Located on the east side of the river, near Robbins' sta- 
tion, on the Baltimore and Ohio railroad. 

Opened by William Robbins and Robert Jenkins in 1855. 
They run coal to the river trade until the Dams were de- 
stroyed and navigation suspended. 



192. BliTTHE IHIME. 

Located on the east side of the river, one third of a mile 
above the Scotch-Hill mine. 

Opened by John Blythe & Co. They built a railroad 
tipple, and run coal by rail. 



206 K*. REPORT OP PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 
198. WHITJfi-BAIili BUNK. 

Located on the east side of the river, at Shaner station, 
on the line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. 

Opened by the Old Alps Coal Company. 

They built a tipple and run coal by rail until 1862, and 
were succeeded by Thomas Moore, who operated until 1878. 
He was succeeded by the Youghiogheny Coal Hollow Coal 
Company. 

Elevation of bottom of coal bed here reported at 50 feet 
above water level. 

The slack coal produced is washed and made into a very 
beautiful article of coke.* 



194. SHANER HIlfE. 

Located a little south of Shaner station, on the line of 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. 

Opened in 1883 by Armstrong & Rafferty. They are 
operating the Hayes coal in connection with the balance of 
the Armstrong tract. 

They employ 137 miners and 17 day men, and the pro- 
duct of the mine is run by rail. 



195. STRIBIGTOWK BlIBIE. 

Located on the west side of the river, near Stringtown 
station, on the Pittsburgh, McKeesport and Youghiogheny 
railroad. 

Opened in 1857 by the Stringtown Coal Company, com- 
posed of Joseph, Thomas, Richard and Watson Muse, 
Cooper Wilson, Edward Davis and John Ingles. 

They operated to the river trade until 1861, and the mine 
remains idle. 

An area of 30 acres is reported to have been mined out. 

* A description of the machinery used in washing the slack coal is given by 
Mr. Charies A. Young, in Volume L, page 91, of the reports of the Second 
Geological Survey of Pennsylvania. 



YOUGHIOGHENY RIVER COAL MINES. K*. 207 

196. CHARIiESTON lUIBIll. 

Located on the west side of the river, one third of a mile 
above the Stringtown mine. 

Opened in 1858 Tdv Charles Dravo, who operated to the 
river trade until 1860, and was succeeded by A. G. McGrew, 
who operated the mine under lease until 1866. and it has 
remained idle since then. 



197. BVEMA VISTA miNE. 

Located at Buena Vista, on the west side of the river, llf 
miles south from its mouth. 

Opened in 1883 by the South- West Coal Company, com- 
posed at present of E. C. Converse, O. D. Delano, B. F. 
Raflerty, J. H, Dewees, John Shields and William Duncan. 

They built a railroad tipple and gravity plane, and run 
the product of the mine to the National Tube Works at 
McKeesport, and to the Lake trade, over the line of the 
Pittsburgh, McKeesport and Youghiogheny railroad. 

The gravity plane is 900 feet in length and has a fall of 
27 feet in that distance. The full cars in passing down the 
plane haul the empty ones back to the pit mouth, by means 
of a hemp line, one and a quarter inches in diameter, and a 
drum wheel stationed at the last-named point. 

The elevation of the tipple floor above railroad grade is 
25 feet, and 50 feet above the surface of the river ; which 
makes the elevation of bottom coal at pit mouth 77 feet 
above the river, and 52 feet above railroad grade. 

This mine is worked on the double entry system, and the 
entries are driven eight feet in width. 

They employ 95 miners, 4 drivers and 6 day men, and 
produce 200 tons of lump and nut coal mixed per day. 

A fault crosses entry No. 2, which dislocates the coal and 
associated strata one foot, and produces a soot vein along 
its entire course. 



20S K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 



The following columnar section was obtained : 

Sandy shale. 

Carbonaceous shale, 2' 

^ Coal, 

Clay parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Clay parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Parting, 

Coal, 

Main over-clay, 

Breast ooal, 8 

Parting, 

Bearing-in ooal, 

Parting, 0- 

Briok ooal, 1 

Parting, 

. Bottom ooal, 1 

(Jnder-clay with limestone nodules. 

Cleavage bearings were obtained as follows : 
N. 61 W. 8 feet— N. 62 W. 4 feet. 



Buena Vi»ta mine 
Section. 
if\ff. 76.) 



N. 64 W. 6 

N. 60f W. 5 
N. 631 W. 3 
N. 65 W. 6 
N. 62i \Y. 5 



— N. 60i W. 7 
-N. 61i W. 10 
— N. 56i W. 4 
-N. 57 W. 5 
— N. 64i W. 6 



■' 

5 

2 
6 
1 



k 

2 

1 

8 

6 

1 
4 



1 

L 

s 

2 
10 
6 

i 

i 

4 
1 



198. ARMSTROBIG IHINE. 

Located on the east side of the river, at Armstrong Sta- 
tion, on the Baltimore and Ohio railroad. 

Opened in 1856 by Bell & McCiine, who operated to the 
river trade until 1858, and were succeeded by the Fulton 



YOUGHIOGHENY RIVER COAL MINES. K*. 209 

Brothers. They also operated and ran the coal to the river 
trade, until the suspension of the slack- water. 

The property was purchased by C. H. Armstrong in 1866, 
who built a railroad tipple, and shipped the coal by rail 
until the beginning of the present year (1884). 

The property now belongs to Charles Armstrong, Jr., 
and B. F. Rafferty, who are running out the remaining 
portion of the coal at the Shauer Mine, owned by the same 
jDarties. 



199. BRINTOK miNE. 

Located a quarter of a mile south of Armstrong's Station, 
on the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, on the east side of the 
river. 

Opened in 1856 by Joel Brinton. He operated to the 
river trade until 1859, and was succeeded by Jones & 
Laughlin. 

They built a railroad tipple, and shipped the product of 
the mine to the Eliza furnace^ which they own and operate 
at Pittsburgh. The mine has not been in operation since 
1866. 

An area of 25 acres has been mined out at this place. 



14 K\ 



INDEX. 



Page. 

Abers*coal; mine; tract, 138; 131,138 

Abrams, Lewis, 12 

Absalom Bently mine, 110 

Ales, James 21 

Ales, J. W., 28 

Alexander, James ; William, 49 ; 116 

Alexander, W. J. & Co., 45 

Allegheny city, , xiv 

Allen, 58 

Allen, David, 203 

AUequippa mine ; section Fig. 66, 129,141,143; 144 

Alps Coal Company, 28,204 

Alpsville; mine, xxxii,203 

Altmyer <fe Company, 154 

American mine, , 27,174 

American Iron and Steel Works, 174 

Amity coal ; mine, 131,147,149 

Amity mine ; section No. 1 ; No. 2, 147 ; 148 

Anderson, Dr. David M., 77,78,193 

Anderson, R. J., 70 

Anderson <fc Lindsay, 89 

Anderson station, 193 

Apple, Adam, 89 

Arthurs, Robert. 93 

Armstrong, Charles, jr., 209 

Armstrong, C. H. & Son, 3,209 

Armstrong & Herron, 92 

Armstrong <fc Raflferty, 206 

Armstrong mine ; station; tract, 198,208; 208,209; 206 

Ashmaid mine, 37 

Aughenbaugh & Moore, 110 

Bailey, James M., xix,179,181 

Bailey, M., 143 

Bailey, MoKain & Co., 179 

Bailey & Whigham, xxviii 

Baird, Judge Thomas H., xxxi, 58,60,61 

Baird, Thomas H., jr., 61 

Baird. Nancy 61 

Baird mine 58 

Baker, A. J.; John, 6,66 

(211 K4.) 



212 K*. KEPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

Page. 

Bakertown mine, . . 56 

Bake well, Christopher ; John I).; John H., 9 

Bakewell mine, 73 

Baltimore and Ohio railroad, xx, 165, 195, 203, 205, 206, 208, 209 

Baltimore and Ohio R. R., (Pittsburgh and Wheeling division,) . 193,194,196 

Balsley, Samuel ; Jacob, 104 

Bank of Commerce, Pittsburgh, 67 

Banner mine No. 1 ; No. 2, 105,111,112 

Banksville, 183,186 

Bargedde mine, ... 30 

Barges, xxxiii 

Barr, R.; W. H.; mine, 87; 66,92; 87 

Barnum, Samuel, . « 61,63 

Bartman & Todd, . . 42 

Bausman, Frederick ; mine, xxviii,178; 175,177,178 

Bayardstown, 170 

Beall, E wing <fc Company, xxviii,3 

Beatty, Rev. Charles, xviii 

Beazle, 61 

Becker, Adam, <fc Company, 66 

Beckett's Run mint?, 57 

Beck's Run mine, (section Fig. 64,) 162,172; 173 

Beedle, Evan, 99 

Behanna, Benjamin; Henry, -. . . 46 

Bell Brothers, xx 

Bell, Gray & xxviii,186 

Bell <k McClure, 208 

Beelen, A., xxiii 

Bell wood mine ; section Fig. 60, 155,163; 164 

Bellevernon, xv 

Beltzlioover, Jacob, xxi,179 

Bellevue mine ; section Fig. 49, 124,132; 133 

Benjamin, French, <fe Wilson, 113 

Bentiey, Absalom; mine, 98,110 

Bentley. Benjamin; B. F.; George, 77,104,113 

Bentiey, Jesse; mine, 94,104 

Berry, Cook & Company, 83 

Berry, O. P., 123 

Bevan, John A., 39,41 

Biddle, Dr. R. F., 73 

Bigley, Forsythe & 21 

Bigley, N. J., 172,203,204,205 

Birmingham, 176,179 

Birmingham Coal Company, (Limited,) 178 

Bissel mine, 55 

Bissel, Calvin C; mine, 65 

Black, Harrison, &, 61 

Black, Jobs, & Company, ' 23 

Black, Isaac; George, 60; 77; 78 

Black <fe Lindsay, 116 

Blackamore, James, 61 



INDEX. K*. 213 

Page. 

Blackburn, Dr.; Robert; R. M., 116; 136 

Blackburn mine ; section Fig. 61, 126,136; 137 

"Black Diamond," (tow boat,) xxxi,xxxii 

Black Diamond mine, 64,66 

Black Hawk mine, 5,6,7 

Black Hills mine, 86,87 

Blackstock & Son, George 152 

Blackstock mine, 135,152 

Blaine, Hon. James G., 123 

Blythe, John, <fc Company, 206 

Blythe mine, 192,205 

Booher, Abraham, ' 41 

Boner, William, 66 

Boston, 200 

Bouquet, Colonel, xyii,xviu 

Bowdlow <fe Co., 21 

Bowen, E., • • 190 

Bowman, G. K., 12 

Boyle mine ; property, 46 

Braddock; mine, .90; 164,162 

Braddock's road xvii 

Bradley, Alexander, 93 

Bradsbaw, George, 132,136 

Brazil, Ind., 177 

Bridgeport ; slope mine, 11 

Briggs, M.; and Company, 6; 33 

Brinton, Joel ; mine, 199 ; 209 

Britton, John ; mine, 93 ; 94 

Brownstown (see Brown's station,) 164,166 

Brown's station, 164,166 

Brown tfe Brothers ; Capt Samuel 8., 124,166 

Brown, Herron, A Co., 166 

Brown, William, 47 

Brown, William H. ;& Sons, 66,79,80,156,156,157,169,164,165; 200 

Brown mine. 164 

Brownsville, xv,xxvii,xxx,xxxiii,6,12 

Brunot, Felix R., xiii,xiv,xvi 

Bryant, Robert, , , 87 

Buck, William J., xix 

Budd mine, 20 

Buena Vista mine ; section Fig. 76, . .' xxxii,207; 208 

Buflfaio mine ; section, 89,92 ; 91 

Buffalo Coal Company, 89 

Bughman, Harry, 172 

Burd, Colonel James, xvii 

Burns & Cartright, 6 

Burson, N., 6 

Burthoud, James, xxi 

Butler, 61 

Bnshnell, Daniel; mine, xxiv,xxxi,147,166; 168 

Byers, Scott <fe Miller, 86 



214 K*. BEPOKT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

Page. 

Cain, D., 169 

Caldwell, John, 77 

Caihoon, David, ooal, 167 

California, 17 

Caledonia mine, 23 

Callow, Major Hiram, xxi 

Camden; mine; section, 92,130,141; 145 

Campfieid, George, 92 

Cannelton, xxiii 

Carlin & Company, 188 

Carlisle, . . , xvii 

Carondeiet mine, 34 

Carrothers, John, 41. 

Carter, Zeph, 12 

Cartright, Burns A 6 

Castle Shannon ; mines; railroad, 180; 166,179; 180 

Castner, Daniel, ^ . . . ... 42 

Cat's run ; mine, 2 ; 3 

Caven, Major William, xxviii 

Cedar Hill mine, 19 

Chalfant, F.; Meriam, 12; 21 

Chamberland <fe McDonald, 89 

Champion mine, 24 

Charleston mine, 196,207 

Chess, William; mine, 171,187,189 

Chester, Samuel ; mine, 96 

Ciera mine, 205 

Cincinnati, xxviii, xxxii,xxxiv 

Cincinnati Coal Company, 92,94 

Cincinnati Gas Company, 120 

Chicago market, . 196 

Clark, George ; Sanford ; Capt. Samuel H., 36 ; 39 ; 136 

Clark, Foster, A 152 

Clark, John W.; W. H., 42; 39 

Cleveland ; mine, 90 ; 89 

Cliff mine; section, 99,104; 108,109,111 

Climax mine, 15 

Clipper mine, .... , 36 

Clipper Coal Company, 37 

Coal Bluff Coal Company mine, . 98 

Coal Bluff mines, Nos. 1, 2, and 3, 103,104 

Coal Bluff property ; station, 110 ; 103 

Coal Centre, xxiv 

Coal Flats, xxxiu 

Coal hill, 179,180 

Coal Ridge mine, 169,188 

Coal run, xvii 

Cocain, Charles, 57,63 

Cochran, William, . . . . 95 

Collins, Benjamin ; David ; H. H., 115 ; 154 ; 116 

Collins, J. J., xxviii 



INDEX. K*. 215 

Page. 

Collins' mine; tipple, 140,164; 116 

Columbia mine ; section, 49,60,110 

Gonlin, Aaron, 96 

Connecticut mines, , 36 

Connell, Robert, 42 

Connellsville region, 8,15 

Converse, E. C, 207 

Cook, Berry, <fc Co., • 83 

Coon & Fanestook, 110 

Copeland, Thomas, ... xxiii 

Cornell, Duncan, & Werling, , . 200 

Cornell, Robert, 205 

Cornell & Werling mine ; section, 182,200; 202 

Corry, James, A Co., 162 

Corry, J. B.; Moses; mine, 155; 156; 146,156 

Coulter, General Richard, 45 

Coulter, Robert, 67 

Coulterville mine, 189,205 

Coursin, Biddle ; F. H., 143 ; 127 

Coursin, F. H., . 27 

Courtney Coal Company; mine; section, 83; 85; 88,128 

Cowan, Christopher, xxiii 

Cox, Knoch ; mine, 96 

Craft, Morgan, <fc Lambert, 21 

Craig, Hugh; James; Robert, 83,97; 87,97 

Craig mine; track, 97; 87,88 

Craig, Major Isaac, xx 

Craig, Neville B., xvlii 

Cramer's Almanac, xxii 

Crawford, H. M.; N.; mine, 11,141,154 

Crawford <fe McCrimmon, 177 

Orowthers, Jonas, 28,61,67,70 

Crowthers <fc Warne, 67 

Crowthers, Musgrave & Company, 20,21,22 

Crow, Ezeriah, 24 

Crow A Ward, 21 

Crow pit, 33 

Crouch, Elisha, 6 

Crumby, Alexander, 49,74,188,123 

Crumby, John ; S., 57 ; 49 

Culp, Oliver, 141 

Cuuiming, F., xx 

Cunningham, John S.; Robert, 12; 121 

Curry, Dr. Joseph, 95 

Dam No. 8, 2 

Davidson, ... 159 

Davis, Edward ; Samuel, 206 ; 46 

Davis Island dam, xxxiv 

Davis A Waddle, 6 

Dawson. Isaac, . 96 

Day, Sherman, xvii 



216 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

Page. 

Dean 4fe MoKQight, 118 

De Brunner, Prof. H. O., 45 

Deck flats, xxziii 

Delano, O. D., 207 

Dempster, Alexander, g{> 

♦* Despatch," (tow-boat,) 116 

Dewar, Brothers; John, 86 ; 95 

Dewees, John H., 204 ; 207 

Dewis, Mr., 98 

Dexter mine, 22 

Diescher, a, 179 

Dilworth, William, 67 

Dinsmore, Johnson, 87 

Dippold, John, A Ca, 89,92,93,94 

Dixon, John, 17,24 

Dixon, Morgan A, 19 

DobbsA Wilkinson, 197 

Dorman, Franklin, 104 

Dressel, Jaoob, 65 

Dravo, Anthony; Charles; John F., 205; 207; 70,197 

Dravo, William; Michael A Sons, 205; 149,197 

Dravo mine, 147 

Dravosburg; mine, 160; 183,149 

Dry run mine ; section, 73 ; 74 

Duncan, Henry ; John; Robert; William, 205; 203,207 

Duncan A Cornell, 204 

Duncan, Cornell A Werling, 200 

Duncan, Widow, xx 

Dunkard creek ; oil region, . xxxli,112;2 

Dunlap's creek, xvii,12 

Dunshee, Stacy A xxviii 

Dunshee, Thomas; William; mine, 153; 138,158 

Eagle-nest mine, 185,208 

Eakin, J. H., 22 

Eaton, Daniel C, Capt, xxviii,156,169 

Eclipse mine, 22,188 

Edgar, James, 132 

Edgar Thompson Steel Works, 16 

Edmundson, Caleb; mine, 197 

Eichenlaub, Philip, 65 

Elliott, Joseph S. E., 28 

Elliott entry, 102 

Elizabeth, xv,127 

Elizabeth Coal Company, 58 

Eliza furnace, 209 

Enterprize mine, 167,183,186 

Esmiol, Julius C, 174 

Everhart, William, 41 

Evans, George, xx 

Evans, Oliver, xxil 

Evans, Owen, xxii 



INDEX. K*. 217 

Page. 

Evans, Thomas; William; mine, 5; 41; 62; 5 

Ewlng, Beall A Co., 3 

Falling Timber run, 127 

Fanestock, Coon A, 110 

Farrow, Thomas, 132 

Fawcett, Thomas, 160 

Fayette county, 2,3 

Feals, Kelsey A, 27 

Ferree, Capt William, xxvi,»2,94,110 

Fife farm, 132 

Finley, H. H., 12,13,58,70,73,74,95,96 

Finley, J. B.; John; Levi, 87,98,99; 95 

Finley, William ; mine, 94 

Finley A Miller, 70,89 

Finleyville, 196 

Finney coal ; mine, 138 

Fish-pot run, 6 

Flanegan, Hugh, 90 

Flats, . xxxiii 

Fleming, James P., xvii 

Florshim A Young, 195 

Forsyth, Jonathan; William, 16; 21,28,30 

Forsythe A Bigley, 21 

Forsythe A Furlong, 21 

Fort Pitt mine 66,69 

Foster, Thomas, 136 

Foster A Clark, 152 

Fox, Thomas, 49,190 

Fox and Lawson, 49 

Fox mine; section, 189; 190 

Frazier A Frye mine, 30 

Frazier, Elliot, ; 35 

French, Benjamin, 98 

French, William, 98,113 

French creek, xxv,96 

French, James ; Rufus, 98 

French, Samuel; Westley, 97,111; 98 

French mine, 97 

Frederick town, 5,6 

Frye, Frazier A ; mine, 30 ; 35 

Fuel flats, xxxiii 

Fulton, Abraham, 67,58 

Fulton Brothers; Henry, 208; 57 

Fullajrer, J., 120 

Furlong, Edward ; E. C; John, 31,36 

Furlong mine, 30,31 

Furlong, Forsythe A, 21,22 

Gallatin, Abraham; mine, 153; 136,152 

Gamble, James H., 111,112,141 

Gardner, J., 79,87 

Gku'ileld mine; sections, 83,87,89 



218 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

Page. 

GhUTOw, Joseph ; mine, 17 

Gastonville 196 

George, John L., 83 

Gester, Tyler . 6 

Gibson's distillery, 40 

Gibson, George ; Milo, 98 

Giles, Robert, 61 

Gillespie, W. K., 99 

Gill. Isaac, . 155 

Gillingham, David ; Presley, 56 

Gilmore, Capt. d^ohn, 54,55,56,159 

Gil more 4fe Hunt, * 56 

Gilmore mine ; section, 54 

Glass run, 167 

Glass factory at Bellevernon, 40 

Glass works mine No. 1, No. 2, . 41 

Globe mine, 22 

Good, Joseph, 20 

Government work, xxxiv 

Graflf, Henry, 77 

Gray, Thomas, 137 

Gray A Bell, 186,187,188,189 

Great Britain, xxii 

Greeuarch, Robert; William, 60,105; 58 

Greenfield mine, xxiv,21 

Greenhalgh, Robert; William, 197 

Greensburg pike, xv 

Greenoak Coal Company, 203 

Green Springs mine : sections, 160; 161,162 

Gregg, Edward ; Robert ; W. H., 104 ; 22 ; 27 

Grey& Mann, 23 

Griffith, John, ' 179 

Groves, George, 92 

Grubbs & Montgomery, 23 

Gumbert, John, 132 

Guflfey, William, 51 

Harrison, Elija, 60 

Haberman, Peter, 124,170 

Hackett, Thomas A Co., 203 

Haigh, Joseph, 74 

Hainan, Matthew, 160 

Hall, John, , 33,104 

Hall, Turnbull <fe ; mine, 30,33,34 

Hamilton coal, 169 

Hamilton, Samuel; tract, 77,153; 169 

Hanging Rock, xxxi 

Harden, Edward R, xiii,xv 

"Harlem," (tow boat,) xxxi 

Harlem Coal Company ; mine, 58,60; 61 

Harlow, Mr., xvl 

Harris, Isaac, xxi,xxvi 



INDEX. K*. 219 

Page. 

Harris, James, <fe Co., 80 

Harrison <fe Black, 61 

"Harry Brown," (tow boat,) xxxiii 

Hartley <fe Marshall, 188 

Harvey O'Neil mine, 123 

Haydon's farm ; mill, 127 

Hay, Malcom, 67 

Hays, Henry B.; James; Johns.; S. B., 68,160,167,170,172 

Hays' coal, . . 206 

Hays' Street's run mine, 167,168,169 

Hayes, Townsend, <fc Stockton, 45 

Hartrick, R. S. D., xv 

Hazzard, Colonel Chill W., xv 

Heasley, Jacob, 149 

Henderson coal, 199 

Herron, Armstrong A, 92 ; 159 

Herron, Brown A Co., 156 

Herron, D.; R G.; William A., 92,93,169 

Herron*s hill, xx 

Herron, Peterson <fe Kain, 103 

Hesiep, John ; mine, 66 

H. H. Finley mine, 95 

Hill, Jenkins, , Nish A Company, 80 

Hilldale mine, 116,117 

Hindman, William, 104 

Historical Society of Pennsylvania, xix 

Hoaf, Abraham ; David, . . 80; 34,85 

Hoaf coal lots, 30,81,83 

Hoard's Rock, xxxii,2 

Hodgson, H. M.; William, 57; 49,116,127,141,166 

Hodgson, Willis: mine, 49; 157,165 

Hoffman, Lorenz, 64 

Hogg, C. E., 12,13 

Hollowood, Thomas, 9 

Holmes, Nathaniel, A Son, 87,89,104 

Holmes, I. N., A Son, 74 

Holmes' coal; mine; tract, 87,88,89 

Hopkins, Hon. James H., 76 

Hopkins A Irish, 74,76 

Hormel, 6 

Horner A Roberts mine ; section, 127 ; 128 

Householder, Jacob, 194 

Householder, Jonathan, A Brother, . 149 

Houser A Snyder, 164 

Hubbs, Dr. J. Allen, xv 

Hudson, James, 104 

Huey. William, 132 

Huff, Hunter A, xxvi 

HuflFman A Seibert, 56 

Hughes, John ; mine, 36 ; 96 

Hunt, Gilmore A , 56 



220 K*. REPOUT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL 

Page. 

Hanter, Thomas ; mine, 132 ; 149 

Huston, John T., <fe Co., 87,89 

Huston William, 87,90,98 

Hutchinson, Harvey ; Thomas, xv,64,78,95,98,105,164 

Hutchinson mine, 98 

Ihmson, Charles; Christopher, 124,127 

Indian pit, xix 

Indiana, 177 

Ingels, John, . 206 

Irish, Hopkins <fe, 74,75 

Iron City mine ; section, 46,47,48,110 

Ironton, Ohio, 3 

Irwin's branch, Street's run, 169 

Irwin, I. C; mine, 110 

Ivile mine ; section, 67 ; 69 

Jack, Robert, 204 

Jackman, William, 33 

Jacksonville mine, 46 

Jacobs, Capt. Adam, 3,4,31,42 

Jacobs' Ferry, 3 

Jacobs' slope mine, 3 

James Neel mine, 155 

James O'Neil mine, 199 

** J. B. Williams,'' xxxiii 

Jeffers, J., xxviii 

Jenkins, John: Robert, 97,104,105; 59,135,205 

Jenkins, Hill, Nish <k Company, 80 

Jenkins, Nish A Company, 74 

Jenkins' mine, 97,198 

Jennings, James, 46 

Jes^e Beutly mine, . 94 

Jobs, Black A Company, 23 

"John F. Walton," (tow-boat,) xxxiii 

Johnson, J. D.; farm, 66 ; 127 

John Finley mine, 95 

John Neel mine, 153 

John Robinson mine, , 159 

Jones, Ephraim, . . xxiv 

Jones, George; Isaac; J. F.; James, 121; 145; 49; 69 

Jones, Mrs. Rachel ; Thomas ; William, 121 ; 50,58 ; 121 

Jones, Thomas & Brothers, xxiv, 156, 157 

Jones <fe Watkins, 49 

Jones <fe Laughlin, 174,209 

Jones mine; section Fig. 44, 117,121; 122 

Kaln, Herron, Peterson <fe 103 

Karns tract, 190 

Kearney, Edward, xxiv 

Keeling, Joseph. & Co., 47,178 

Keeling, Smith <fe Co., 175 

Keenan's run, 79 

Keene, W. G. S., 6 



INDEX. K\ 221 

Page. 

Kelsey & Feals, 27 

Kennedy, A; John; J. F., 23; 35; 83,86 

Kennedy, Shesh. ; Thomas, 106; 169,160 

Kenny mine, 152,169 

Kerr, Rev John, 70,77 

Keystone mine, 146,156,166 

Killen, Hugh, 115 

Kimmel, Peter, xxiii 

Kirkendall, Andrew, 93 

Kirkpatrick, Allen, 99 

Kitts, Job, . 31 

Knob Coal Company ; mine, 9 

Koontz & Patterson, 66 

Krepps mine, 12 

Lafferty, H., 62 

Laflferty <fe Evans, 62 

Lain, Whitmore, Wolf & 136 

<* Lake Erie," (tow-boat,) xxx 

Lambert, Morgan <fe 21 

Lamb, John, 203 

Large, I. N.; S. P., 143 

Larmer, T. J.; Wesley, 39 

Latta, William, 27 

Laughlin, Jones <fe 209 

Lawrence, Hon. George V., xv 

Lawson, Joseph, 49 

Lawson, Fox <fe 49 

Leadbetter <fe Company, 22 

Leadbetter, Smith & 22 

Leadley, Charles; George, xxvii,xxviii,121,189; 175 

Leady, John 96 

Lee Arthur, xix 

Leech, Andrew, . . 113 

Legler, Jacob ; mine ; section, 191 ; 176 ; 195 

Leonard, Eli ; Lewis, 9; 15,16 

Leonard, Underwood, & Co., . 21 

Lewis, A. Kirk; Samuel, 188; 1^9 

Lilley, Thomas, 19 

Limetown, xxiv 

Lindsay Anderson <fe ' 89 

Lindsay, Black <fe 116 

Lindsay A McCuchon, 75 

Linch, David ; D. H., 198; 116 

Linch & Robinson, 49 

Linch, Robinson <fe Wilson, 116,117 

Linn, Dr. George A., xv 

Little Alps mine, 20 

Little Pittsburgh mine ; section, 39 ; 40 

Little Redstone creek ; mine, 30,33; 35 

Little Saw-mill run, 186,188 

Little Saw- mill Run R. R. and Coal Company, 183,184,186,187,188 



222 K\ KEPOHT OF PKOGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

Page. 

Lloyd, Henry, 78 

Lock No. 6 ; 7 ; 8 ; 9, 3,5 ; 2 ; I ; 2 

Lookhart, Charles, 194 

Lookhart mine; section, 174 ; 194 

Locust Grove mine, 115 

Logan, George ; James K ; John T., 98,99 ; 103 ; 104 

Logtown, 165 

Lonargus, xxvii 

Long, Robert, 204 

Loomis, John, 162 

Loomis A Watsoa, 42 

Lorenz, Frederick, xx 

Louisville; Gas Company, xxxiv, 95,149 ; 120 

Louttit, James, . xv 

Love, Alexander, 123,129 

Lovedale mine; section Fig. 48, 123,129; 131 

Lower Victory hollow, 62 

Lower Walton mine, 123 

Lyford, Mr., xxvii 

Lynn, James ; M. E., 59 ; 28 

Lynn, Massachusetts, 6 

Lyon, William M. A Co., xv,xxiv,97 

Lyon, Shorb <fe Co., xxvii 

Lysle, Addison; George, <fe Sons, 92,145; 167 

Lysle, George, Jr., 92 

Lysle mine, . 92 

Manchester, xx 

Manley, Patrick, . . 110 

Manor of Pittsburgh, xix 

Manown, James, 73 

Mann, Grey A, 23 

Maple Glenn mine, 6 

Martin, Daniel, 6 

Maxwell, George, 36 

May, Capt. James, 96,98 

McCandles, Plummer A 55 

McCaslin, William, 132 

McCrimmon, Crawford & 177 

McClease, John, 110 

McUlosky, John ; .James; Patrick, 155 ; 156 ; 157 

McCiosky mine, 143,155 

McOlosky, Crosgrave A Company, 156 

McCIure. Alexander; Robert; William, 70; 159; 160 

McClure, Bell A 208 

McClurg, J., xxiii 

McCiusky, A Co., xxviii 

McCreary, Matthew, 129 

MoCuchon, Lindsay A -^ .... 76 

McCnne. John R., 77,78 

McDonald, J. V.. 205 

McDonald, Chamberland A 89 



INDEX. K*. 223 

Page. 

McDowell, Nathaniel, xvi 

McElhauey, Victor, 168 

McFarland, Wilson A 45 

McGargill, James, xxvii 

McGill farm, 132 

MoGk)wan, Major Thomas, xv,42 

MoGk)wen coal, 138 

McGraw, 157 

McGrew, A. G., 160,207 

McHenry, Thomas, 194 

McKain, Baily, <fe Co., 179 

McKee, Hugh ; Joseph, 27 ; 39 

McKeesport, xv,xxvii, 152, 158,203,207 

McKinley, Mr., 58 

McKinney, Hugh, 94 

McKinney, R. M., xv 

McKinney mine, 94 

McKnight, Dean & 113 

McKnight mine, 113 

McLease, Archibald, 116 

McQuiston, Richard ; mine, . 186 ; 204 

McTurk, Noble A, 157 

Mehaffey, James & Co., 36 

Mellon, Judge Thomas, 182 

Merchant mine, 21 

Merrett, Dr., 89 

Merrington, James, 164 

Myers, Wolf, Walters* 89 

Mierhoof, John, 208 

Miiesville mine, 59 

Miller, A. N.; Cyrus; George T., 197; 23; 105 

Miller, I. B.; J. D.; L. S., 86; 145,179; 20,28 

MUler, Reuben; Ralph; William H., 197; 61,70; 11 

Miller, Colonel William L., 156,157,159 

Miller & Company, 86 

Miller & Williams, 47 

Miller, Byers, Scott A 86 

Miller, Finley A 70,89 

Miller mine, 149,157,178,197 

Miiesville mine ; section, 59 ; 60 

Millsborough, 5 

Mingo mine, section No. 1 ; No. 2, 78,79 

Mines on Pool No. 3 ; No. 4 ; No. 5, 45 ; 9 ; 5 

Mingo Coal Company ; mine, 77 

Mitenzwyre, Phillips A 47 

Model barge, xxxiii 

Monongahela City, xiii,78 

Monongahela Division P. R. R., xxxvi,xxxvii 

Monongahela Navigation Company, xvi,xxviii,2 

Monongahela and Peters' Creek Coal Company, 99 

Monongahela river, xiv,xvii, 188, 198,199 



224 K\ REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

Page. 

MonoDg^faela valley, xiii,xiv 

Moutgomery, Grubbs A 23 

Moutooth coal, 169 

Moore, Aughenbaugh <fe 110 

Moorhead, Hon. James EI., xvl,46 

Moore, Johnson ; Thomas, 24 ; 206 

Moore <fe Moore, 22 

Moore, Young <fc 21 

Morgan, L. W •T 21,24 

Morgan A Dixon, , 19 

Morgan, Craft A Lambert, 21 

Morg- n A Lambert, 21 

Morgantown, 2 

Morrison, W. J.; Joseph S., xv,166 

Mort, James, ] 16 

Mossman, Mr., « xx 

Moule, Louis, 66 ; 92 

Mount Washington, 179 

Munhall, John ; Michael ; William, 163 ; 165 

Munhall station, .... 163 

Mure, John ; mine, 79 

Muse, Joseph ; Richard ; Thomas ; Watson, 206 

Musgrave, Crowthers, <fe Co., . 20,21,22 

Muskingum Island, 97 

Myers, Caspar ; Henry ; John, 46 

Myers' mine, 46 

National Tube Works, 207 

Natural gas, . xxxvi 

Naulder, James; John, 116 

Neel, Archibald ; Harvey; Hiram, 155; 153,156 

Neel, H. <fe J., xxviii 

Neel, Col. John ; mine, 153,155 

Neel, James; mine, 142,145 

Neel, Jordan S., 21,22,87,89,93,154 

Neel, Mrs.; William 95,152,153; 154 

Negley, John D., 98 

Nelson, John, 115 

Nemocalling's creek, xvii 

New Catsburg mine; section, 69,70; 72 

New Cincinnati mine, 92,94,95 

New Coal Bluflf, 107 

New Coal Bluff mine ; sections No. 1, 2, 3, 98,101,103,104 

New Eagle mine ; section, 74 ; 77 

New Tremont mine, 39 

Nimick coal, 190 

Nimick, James, 189 

Nish, Abraham <fe Brothers, 115 

Nish, Jenkins, Hill <fe Co., 80 

Nish, Jenkins. A Co., 74 

Noble & McTurk, 167 

North Webster, 54,56 



INDEX. K*. 225 

Pace. 

Old Alps Coal Company ; mine, 206 ; 188,204 

Old Catsburg mine, 70,71 

Old Cincinnati mine, 94 

O'Harra, General James , xr 

Ohio river, 188,184,186,188,189 

0*Connell A Co., 6 

Oliver, WUliam, 164 

Old Eagle; mine; section, .79,80,82,83,88,128 

Old mine, 71 

Old Tremont mines, 99,40 

O'Neel, Nicholas; WUliam, ' 118 

O'Neil, James; mine, 128,127,148,145,149,167; 181,199 

O'Neil, J. N.; John; Harvey, 127; 138; 119,128 

O'Neil, Nicholas; William, 143; 127 

Ordner, George, 92 

Ormsby, Dr. Oliver, 175 

Ormsby mine ;• section, 164,176,177 

Ormsby mine road, 178 

Osceola Coal Company ; mine, 208 

Osceola station, 208 

Owens, Owen J., 127 

Page, John H., 176 

Painter, John ; Thomas, 162 ; 204 

Painter's Rolling Mill, 189 

Park, Andrew; Judge; mine, 81,118 

Parkinson, Capt William, 80 

Parry, Robert, 81 

Patrick, W. W., 21 

Patterson, R. T., 99 

Patterson, Koontz A 56 

Payne, G. W. G., 56,67 

Paynetown mine ; works, 56 

Peacock mine, 28 

Pearsall, D. H. ; S. H., 9 

Pearse, Lewis, 115 

Peel, Allen, 121 

Penn, John ; Thomas, zix 

Pennsylvania railroad, 162 

Penny, John; mine; section, 180,198 

Percival, Erastus, 124,127 

Peter's creek ; mine No. 1; No. 2, xiv,193,194; 196 

Peterson, John ; mine, 169 ; 108 

Peterson, Ilerron, A Kain, 103 

Phillips, T. Boswell, 64 

Phillips, Capt., 175 

Phillips, Thomas : William, 136 ; 6 

Phillips A Mitenzwyre, 47 

Philpot, Snowden A xxvli 

Pierce ooal, 199 

Pigeon creek, xxiv, 71 

15 K\ 



226 K*. REPORT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

Page. 

Pikenrn, 21 

Pinkney, Peter, 182 

Pine run; mines; section, 127; 138: 139 

Pittsburgh, 2,125,170,179,186,193,194,195,196,209 

Pittsburgh bed, . 1,6 

Pittsburgh Coal Company, 179 

Pittsburgh and Castle Shannon Railroad Company, 180 

Pittsburgh and Chicago Gas Coal Company, 196 

Pittsburgh^nd Lake Erie RaUroad, 187,188 

Pittsburgh, MoKeesport and Youghiogheny Railroad, 206,207 

Pittsburgh and Peter's Creek Gas, Coal and Coke Company, 194 

Pittsburgh Southern Railroad, 195 

Pittsburgh, Virginia and Charleston Railroad, 121,160,163 

Plummer A McCandles, 55 

Pollock, Lee <fc Dunseath ! 135 

Pool No. 6, 1,8 

Port Finley mine, ^ 95 

Porter, John L., 92 

Port Perry mine, xxvi,148,156 

Rabe, Hiram, 61 

RaflFerty, B. F. 207,209 

Rankin, M. W. ; Thomas, 62; 120 

Rankin Coal Company, 62 

Rankin, major coal, 199 

Rankin mine ; section, 62 ; 63 

RatcliflF, William 203 

Ray, Dr. Robert, 66 

Rea <fc Rodgers, 61 

Rebka, Henry 62 

Redstone creek, xvii,12,15 

Redman, William, 160 

Reed, Jesse ; Pftul, 21 ; 103 

Reed mine, 21,103 

Reeves, Thomas,^ 42 

Reeves and Castner tract, 42 

"Reindeer," (tow boat,) 78 

Revolutionary war, xx 

Reymann, Joseph, 65 

Rhodes, F., 97 

Rice's Landing, 5 

Rigdon, N., 6 

Risher, Daniel; John C, 165,168,169; 149 

Risher, John M. ; Ithamar, 111,112; 168,169 

Risher mine; section, 160,168; 169 

Rlverview, xv,77 

Robertin, James, 79 

Roberts, Colonel W. Milnor, xiii,xvi,xxviii 

Roberts, Robert A Co., 46 

Bobbins, Brintnell, xx 

Robbins, William; W. N., 186,205; 69 

Bobbins' mine ; station, 198,205 



INDEX. K\ 227 

Page. 

Bobbins & Jenkins ; mine, xx,204;13^ 

Bobbins' mill ; station, xx. 

Bobbins, William, xx 

Bobinson, Bobert ; William, 63 ; 197 

Bobinson, Linoh <fe, 49 

Bobinson, Linoh A Wilson,' 116,117 

Bobinson mine, 63 

Bobison Brothers, 63 

Bobison, Cyrus, 116,198 

Bobison, John ; mine, 151,159 

Bock run mine; sections, 128,141; 142 

Bodgers, Sloacum <fe 9 

Bogers, Bea<fc Co., 67,61 

Bogers, Bea <fe Smith, 77 

Bogers <fe Wallace, 75 

BoUison, James, 9 

Bosenburg farm, 127 

Bostraver mine, 42,110 

Butherford, James, 33,35 

Bupert, Biley, 204 

Bupert mine, . , 187,204 

Sampson, John, xx 

Saltsburg, 155,156 

Saltworks mine, 144,155 

Sampson, James, 61 

Saw-mill run, xiv,xxxvi,179,180,185,187,189 

Saw-mill run mines, 185 

Schmertz, B. E., & Co., 39,40,41 

Schneider, Nicholas, 64 

Scotch hill mine, 191,205 

Soott, Byers, <fe Miller, 86 

Soott run, 71 

Scully, Samuel, 105 

Seibert, Charles ; Christian ; Joseph, 64 ; 65 

Seibert, Huffman <fe 56 

Semple, Leonard <feCo., xxvii 

Shafer, 21 

Shanermine; station, 194,206,209; 206 

Shaw, Correlius; David, 156,166; 147 

Shaw mine, 156 

Shelton, 68 

Sherritffarm, 127 

Shields, John, 204,207 

Shiras, George, xx,xxiv 

Shoenberger, Peter ; G.; J. H., xxvii; 170 

Shorb, Lyon, A Co., xxvii 

Short, Joseph, <fc Co., 23 

Shrader, William ; farm, 127 ; 129 

Sinclair, F.; Bobert, 6 ; 162 

Singer's rolling-mill, 189 

Skillen, James A Bros., 115 



228 K\ REPORT OF PROGRESF J. SUTTON WALL. 

Page. 

Slack Water Improvement, ziv 

Sloacutn A Rodgers, 9 

Smith, Andrew ; Archibald ; Coonrod 152 ; 9 ; 204 

Smith, David; James; John, 152 ; 20; 77, /8 

Smith, Hugh, xxxi 

Smith, Thomas, 12,93,118,116 

Smith, Lewis, Smith A Company, 22 

Smith A Leadbetter, 22 

Smith A Ward, 20 

Sneathon, John B., 198 

Sneathon A Wilson, 51 

Snow Hill mine, 28 

Snowden, Charles L., A Co., « . . 12 

Snowden and Philpot, xxvii 

Snodgrass, James; William J., 141 

South Pittsburgh 175,189 

Southwest Coal Company, 207 

Speeoe, John, 152 

Speers, L. M.; W. F.; mine 41 

Speer, Alexander, 104 

Spennenweber, John, 178 

Spiketown, 176,178 

Stackhouse, Mark, xx 

Stacy A Dunshee, xxviii 

Stoib, Lewis, 61,66,70,78 

Staitler, J. J., 90 

Steen, D., A Son, 99 

Sterling, Sherwood, 86 

Stevens, Israel, 85 

St Louis, 115 

Stimmel, Henry; mine, 30; 81 

Stockton, R. C, A Co., xxvii 

Stone, George; George W.; John, 116,117; 150 

Stone, Joseph; Joseph A.; Thomas, 116,117; 150 

Stone, William; mine; section, 134,135,150,151 

Stockdale, Richard A.; mine 57,58 

Stockton, J. Addison, 45 

Stockton, Townsend, Hayes A, 45 

Stoy, Gustavus, 45 

Strope, John, 57 

Stringtown Coal Company ; mine, 206; 145,206,207 

Street's run 165,166,168 

Switzer, W. B., , 12 

Taggart mine, 41 

Tanner, George 59 

Tarasoon, John, xxi 

Tate, R. B., 194 

Temperancevilie, 189 

Tempest, (tow-boat,) 89 

Ten Mile run, 8,6 

Thomas, Benjamm ; George ; Thomas, 49 ; 128 ; 21 



INDEX. K\ 229 

Page. 

Thomas, Jones, Bros. A, mine, 156 ; 49 

Thompson, Samael, 23,24,27 

Thorp, Samuel, 66,60 

Thornton, James, 9 

Thurston, George xix 

Tierman, Thomas, 12 

Tigress mine 89 

Tilghman, Mr., xiz 

Tillinghast, Charles, 69 

Toban, Robert, 23 

Toledo, 90 

Tomer, Jacob, . . 66,58 

Tower, Edwin W., 73,123 

Townsend, • • • *6 

Troutman, Peter, 174 

Troy, J.F. William; W. R., 30; 31 

Troy town mine, 30 ; 31 

TurnbuU, Joseph, 33 

Tarn bull d: Hall mine ; section, 30,31,33; 34 

Turtle creek ; mine, 150,159 

Umpire mine, 12,15 

Underwood, Joseph, 20,28 

Underwood, Leonard W. <fc Co., 21 

Upper Walton mine, 119 

Uniontown, xvii 

United Oil Pipe Line, xxxii 

United States Signal service, .... xv 

Vandergrift, Capt. Jacob J., xxxii 

Vandergrift, J. H., distillery, 6 

Vanvoorhis, Abraham ; Elgy ; Isaac, xxiv ; 2 

Vanvoorhis, Dr. JohnS., xv; xxiv 

Venture mine; section, 168,173,186,189,193; 187 

Verner, James, 98,103,104 

Vicksburg, 163 

Victory mine, 61,64 

Waddle Davis A, 5 

Wallace, Rogers <fe, .• 75 

Walker, Robert; mine, 123; 118,123 

«* Walter Forward," xxxi 

Walters, Wolt; A Meyers, 89 

Walton, Hon. Joseph, 119,124,170 

Walton upper mine ; section, 119 ; 120 

Walton lower mine ; section, 123 ; 125 

Walton's Pool No. 1 mine ; section, 161 ; 170 ; 171 

Ward, M., 20 

Ward,- Smith & 20 

Ward, Crow A 21 

Warne, Hiram, 67 

Warne, Joseph, 67 

Warne, CrowthersA 67 

Warne farm, .127 



230 K*. REPOUT OF PROGRESS. J. SUTTON WALL. 

Page. 

Washington market, xxxvii,195 

Watkins, Jones <fe 49 

Watson, James ; John ; Robert, 173 ; 141 ; 172 

Watson, Loomis<fc 42 

Weaver, M., 6 

Webster mine ; section, 51 ; 63 

Webster run, 63 

Weddle's run, 199 

Wellington, Richard, 23,30 

Welsh mine, 46 

Wenona mine, 113 

Werling, Andrew, 205 

Werling, Duncan, Cornell A 200 

Westbay's run, , 127 

West Brownville, 9 

West Elizabeth ; mine, 123 ; 127 

West Harmon ; Thomas, 164 ; 160 

West Virginia State line, xiv 

Wesley, Rufus 113 

W^estern markets, 196 

Weygandt, Cornelius, 61 

Wheeling market, xxz,194,195 

Whigham, Bailey <fe xxviii 

Whlgham, John ; James ; William, 150 ; 163 

Whigham, McElhaney <fe Co., 164 

Whigham, William; mine, 143,163 

White, Capt. David ; Murray, 46 

White, Robert; William, 98 

Whiteacre run, 163 

White Ball mine, 206 

Whitesville mine ; property, 45 ; 46 

Whitmore, Mr., 136 

Wier, William ; mine, 62 

Wild Cat run, 201 

Wiley, Stephen, xv 

Wilkins, Jonah, 33 

Wilkinson, Dobbs A 197 

William Finley mine, 94 

Williams, J. B., 25 

Williams, Miller A 47 

Williams ife Woods, 25 

Williamsport, xxlii 

Willett coal, 169 

Wilson, Alexander, (tow boat,) 77 

Wilson, Cooper ; Frederick, 206; 116,117,198 

Wilson, Thomas ; James, 103 ; 143 

Wilson, Baily & Co 143 

Wilson A McFarland, 45 

Wilson, Sneathon A 51 

Wilson, Linch, Robinson <fe 116,117 

Winters, George, 35 



INDEX. K*. 231 

Page. 

Wolf, Mr., 136 

Wolf, Walters & Meyers, 89 

Wolf Harbor mine ; run, 45 

Woods; John A., 28,24; 129,186 

Woods, James ; Joseph, 186 ; 26 

Woods, Thomas; Thomas J. <fc Co., 103; 23,26 

Woods, Theodore, xv 

Wood's run mine, 25 

Wright, Mr., 116 

Wray, Dr. Robert, 103 

Wuth, Dr. Otto, 120,186 

" W. W. O'Neil," (tow-boat,) xxxiii 

Youghiogheny Coal Hollow Coal Company, 206 

Youghiogheny river, xiv, 116, 197, 199 

Yohe, George, 87 

Young, Moore A Company, 21 

Youngstown, 184 



THE PUBLICATIONS 

OF THB 

Second Geological Survey of Pennsylvania. 



REPORTS FOR 1874, 1875, 1876, 1877, 1878, 1879, 1880, 1881, 1882, AND 1883-1884 

Reports have been issued by the Board of Commissioners, and the prices 
thereof fixed in aooordanoe with the law authorizing their publication, as fol- 
lows: 

ANTHRACITE COAL FIELDS. 

A2. Special Report to the LEaisiiATURE upon the Causes, Kinds, 
AND Amount op Waste in Mining Anthracite. By Franklin Piatt, 
Assistant G^eologist, with a chapter on the Methods of Mining. By Jolm 
Price Wetherill, Mining Engineer. Illustrated by 35 figures of mining opera- 
tions, a Plan of the Hammond Coal Breaker, on the Girard estate, and a 
Specimen Sheet, scale 800 feet to 1 inch, ^o^i^ths ol nature, illustrating the 
Proposed Plan op Mapping the Anthracite Fields. By Chas. A. Ash- 
burner, Assistant Geologist, 1881. 8yo., pp. 134. Price, 11 10; postage, |0 12. 

AC. Report on the Mining Methods and Appliances used in the 
Anthracite Coal Fields. By H. M. Chance : with an atlas of 25 plates ; 54 plates 
and 60 illustrations in the text. Price, $1 40; postage, $0 25. 

AC. Atlas. Coal Mining Plates I to XXV. By H. M. Chance. Price, 
91 40 ; postage, |0 12. 

AA. First Report of Progress in the Anthracite Region, with a 
description of the Geology of the Panther Creek Basin, or Eastern End of the 
Southern Field. By Chas. A. Ashburner, G^eologist in Charge ; with an atlas 
of 13 sheets of maps and sections ; 6 page plates, and 2 folded plates in the 
Report. Appendix A : Determination of the latitude and longitude of Wilkes 
Barre and Pottsville. By Prof. C. L. Doolittle. Appendix B : Theory of 
Stadia Measurements, with tables. By Arthur Wtnslow, assistant. 1883, 8 vo., 
pp. xlvii and 407. Price, $0 58 ; postage, |0 18. 

AA. Atlas Southern Anthracite Field, Volume I,Panther Creek* 
to accompany First Report of Progress AA, 1832. Contains 13 sheets, as fol- 
lows : 3 mine sheets, 3 cross section sheets, 3 columnar section sheets, 1 top- 
ographical sheet, and 1 coal bed area sheet, all relating to the Panther Creek 
Basin in Carbon and Schuylkill Counties; also, 1 miscellaneous 
sheet, "Gteneral Preliminary Map, Anthracite Coal Fields," and 1 miscellane- 
ous sheet containing chart,8howing total annual production of Anthracite since 
1820. Chas. A. Ashburner. Geoloarisfc in Charge, and A. W. Sheafer and Frank 
A. Hill, Assistant Geologists. Price, 91 50 ; postage, 90 12. 

AA. Atlas Western Middle Anthracite Field, Part I, 1884. Con- 
tains 11 sheets, as follows : 4 mine sheets between Delano and Locust Dale, 3 
topographical sheets between Quakake Junction and Mount Carmel, and 4 

Note.— *Single sheets of the Anthracite Survey, with the exception of those 
in the Panther Creek atlas, can be purchased by addressing Chas. A. Ash. 
burner. Geologist in Charge, 907 Walnut street, Philadelphia. 

(1) 



oroflB-motion sheets, all relating to the Mahanoy-Shamokin Basin in Schnyi- 
kill, Columbia, and Northumberland oounties. In preas. Chaa. A. Asli- 
burner, (Geologist in Charge, and A. W. Sheafer and Bard Weils, Assistant 
Geologists. Price, f ; postage, f 

AA. Atuls Northern Field, Part I, 1884. Contains 6 mine sheets be- 
tween Wilkes Barre and Nantiooke, 3 oross-seotion sheets and — columnar 
section sheets, all relating to the Wyoming Basin in Luzerne county. In 
press Chas. A. Ash burner, Geologist in Charge, and Frank A. Hill, Assist- 
ant Geologist. Price, f ; postage, f 

G2. Part II. Loyai^sock Coal Basin, Sullivan County. By Frank* 
lin Piatt (See Reports Central Pennsylvania.) 



BITUMINOUS COAL FIELDS AND SUBBOUNDING ABEAS. 

F. Part II. East Broad Top District, Huntingdon County. By 
Chas. A. Ashbumer. (See Reports Central Pennsylvania.) 

G. Report op Progress in Bradford and Tiooa Counties — 1874-8. 
I. Limits of the Catskill and Chemung Formation. By Andrew 
Sherwood. II. Description of the Barclay, Blossruro, Fall Brook, 
Arnot, Antrim, and Gaines Coal Fields, and at the Forks of Pinb 
Creek in Potter County. By Franklin Piatt. III. On the Coking of 
Bituminous Coal. By John Fulton. Illustrated with 2 colored Geological 
county maps, 3 page plates, and 85 cuts, 8 vo., pp. 271. Price, fl 00 ; post- 
age, $0 12. 

G2. Part II. Coal Basins, Sullivan and Lycoming Counties. By 
Franklin Piatt. (See Reports Central Pennsylvania.) 

G3. Report op Progress in 1876-9. The Geology of Potter County, 
by Andrew Sherwood. Report on the Coal Fields, by Franklin Piatt, with 
a colored geological map of the couuty, two folded plates, and two page plates 
of sections. 8 vo., pp. 120. Price, |0 58; postage, |0 08. 

G*. Report of Progress. Part I. Geology of Clinton County. 
Part II. A special study of the Carroniferous and Devonian Strata 
along the West Branch of Susquehanna River. By H. Martyn Chance. In- 
cluded in this report is a description of the Renovo Coal Basin, by Chas. 
A. Ashbumer, and notes on the Tangascootack Coal Basin in Centre and 
Clinton Counties, by Franldin Piatt Price, fl 05 ; postage, |0 12. 

H. Report of Progress in the Clearfield and Jefferson District 
OF THE Bituminous Coal Fields of Western Pennsylvania— 1874. By 
Franklin Piatt. 8 vo., pp. 296, illustrated by 139 cuts, 8 maps, and 2 sections. 
Price in paper, fl 50 ; postage, $0 13. 

H2, Report of Progress in the Camrria and Somerset District 
OF THE Bituminous Coal Fields of Western Pennsylvania— 1875. By F. 
and W. G. Piatt. Pp. 194, illustrated with 84 wood-cuts, and 4 maps and see^ 
tions. Part I. Cambria. Price, $1 00 ; postage, |0 12. 

H3, Report of Progress in the Cambria and Somerset District 
op the Bituminous Coal Fields of Western Pennsylvaniar— 1876. By F. 
and W. G. Piatt. Pp. 348, illustrated by 110 wood-cuts and 6 maps and sec 
tions. Part II. Somerset. Price, $0 85 ; postage, fO 18. 

H*. Report of Progress in Indiana County— 1877. By W. G. Piatt. 
Pp. 316. With a colored map of the county. Price, |0 80 ; postage, |0 14. 

HB. Report OF Progress in Armstrong County— 1879. By W.G.Piatt. 
Pp. 338. With a colored map of the county. Price, |0 75 ; postage, |0 16. 

(2) 



H«, Report op Pbogbess in Jepperson County— 1880; with colored 
map of county. By W. G. Piatt. Price, $0 60 ; postage, $0 12. 

H.7 A Revision op the Bituminous Goal Measures op Glearpield 
County — 1884 ; with a colored geological ooanty map ; outcrop map of the 
Houtzdale BasiD, and coal bed sections in the text. By H. M. Gbance. Price, 
Z ; postage, I 

I*. Quaker Hill Coal Basin, Warren County. By John F. Carll. 
(Sea Reports Petroleum Fields.) 

K. Report on Greene and Washington Counties — 1875, Bituminous 
Coal Fields. By J. J. Stevenson, 8 vo., pp. 420, illustrated by 3 sections and 2 
county mapSi showing the depth of the Pittsburgh and Waynesburg coal bed 
beneath the surface at numerous points. Price in paper, |0 65 ; postage, ^ 16. 

K2, Report of Progress in the Fayette and Westmoreland Dis- 
trict OF THE Bituminous Coal Fields of Western Pennsylvania— 1876. 
By J. J. Stevenson ; pp. 437, illustrated by 50 wood-cuts and 3 county mapSf 
colored. Part I. Eastern Allegheny County, and Fayette and Westmore- 
land Counties, west from Chestnut Ridge. Price, $1 40 ; postage, |0 20. 

K3. Report of Progress in the Fayette and Westmoreland Dis- 
trict OP THE Bituminous Coal Fields of Western Pennsylvania— 1877. By 
J.J.Stevenson. Pp.331. Part II. The Ligonier Valley. Illustrated with 
107 wood-cuts^ 2 plateSf and 2 county mapsy colored. Price, |1 40 ; postage, 
^ 16. 

M, M2 and M^, Reports of Progress in the Laboratory. By An- 
drew S. McCreath. Contains coal analyses. 

P. Report and Atlas op the Coal Flora. By Leo Lesquereux. 

P2. Report op the Permian and Upper Carboniferous Flora. 
By Wm. M. Fontaine and I. C. White. (See Miscellaneous Reports.) 

Ct« Report of Progress in the Beaver River District of the Bitu- 
minous Coal Fields of Western Pennsylvania. By I. C. White. Pp. 
337, illustrated with 3 Geological maps of parts of Beaver, Butler, and Alle- 
gheny Counties, and 21 plates of vertical sections, 1875. Price, %l 40 ; post- 
age, $0 20. 

Ct2. Report op Progress in 1877. The Geology of Lawrence County, 
to which is appended a Special Report on the Correlation op the Coal 
Measures in Western Pennsylvania and Eastern Ohio. 8 vo., pp. 336, with 
a colored Geological Map of the county, and 134 vertical sections By I. C. 
White. Price, fO 70; postage, |0 15. 

Ct'. Report of Progress in 1878. The Geology of Mercer County, 
by I. C. White, with a colored geological map of county, and 119 vertical sec- 
tions. 8 vo., pp. 233. Price, |0 60 ; postage, $0 11. 

R. Report of Progress. The Geology of McKean County, and its con- 
nection with that of Cameron, Elk, and Forest, with Atlas containing 8 
sheets of maps and sections. By Chas. A. Ashburner. Price, %1 70 ; postage, 
10 22. 

T. Coal Measures, Blair county. By Franklin Piatt. 

Ta« Coal Measures, Bedford and Fulton Counties. By j, J. Ste- 
venson. (See Reports Central Pennsylvania.) 

V. Report of Progress— 1878. Part I. The Northern Townships of But- 
ler county. Part II. A special survey made in 1875, along the Beaver and 
Shenango rivers, in Beaver, Lawrence, and Mercer Counties. 8 vo., 
pp. 248, with 4 maps, 1 profile section and 154 vertical sections. By H. Mar- 
tyn Chance. Price, |0 70 ; postage, |0 15. 

(3) 



V* Report of Pboobbss iv 1879. 8 vc, pp. 282. The Geology of Culb- 
ION Count r, by H. Marty n Gbanoe, with colored geological map of ooanty, 
a map of the Antiolinals and Oil Belt, a contoured map of the Old River 
Channel at Parker, 88 local sections figared in the text, and 4 page plates. 
Price, $0 43 ; postage, $0 12. 

FETBOLEUM FIELDS. 

I. Repobt of Pboobess in the Venango County District— 1874. By 
John F. Carll. With observations on the Geology around Warren, by F. A. 
Randall ; and Notes on the Comparative Geology of North-eastern Ohio and 
North-western Pennsylvania, and Western New York, by J. P. Lesley. S vo., 
pp. 127, with 2 maps, a long section, and 7 cuts in the text. Price in paper, 
$0 60; postage, $0 05. 

f 2. Repobt of Progress, Oil Wells, Records, and Levels— 1876-7. 
By John F. Car 11. Pp. 398. Published in advance of Report of Progress, III. 
Price, $0 60 ; postage, $0 18. 

13. Report op Progress- 1875 to 1879. Geology of the Oil Regions of 
Warren, Venango, Clarion, and Butler Counties, including surveys 
of the Garland and Panama Conglomerates in Warren and Crawford 
counties, and in Chautauqua county. New York, witli des<)riptions of oil well 
rig and tools, and a discussion of the preglacial and postglacial drainage of the 
Lake Erie Country ; with Atlas. With maps and cliarts of Oil Regions. 
By John F. Carll. Price, 92 80 ; postage, |0 30. 

I*. Geological Report of Warren County and neighboring Oil 
Regions, with additional oil well records— 1880-3. By John F. Carll, with 
colored geological map of Warren county, two sheets of oil well sections, and 
a map of the Warren oil region. 439 pages. Price, 91 12 ; postage, 90 20. 

J. Special Report on the Petroleum op Pennsylvania— 1874, its 
Production, Transportation, Manufacture, and Statistics. By Henry E. Wrig- 
ley. To which are added a Map and Profile of a line of levels through Butler, 
Armstrong, and Clarion Counties, by D. Jones Lucas: and also a Map and 
Profile of a line of levels along Slippery "Rock Creek, by J. P. I..esley. 8 vo., 
pp. 122 ; 5 maps and sections, & plate and 5 cuts. Price in paper, 90 75 : post- 
age, 90 06. 

K. DuNKARD Creek Oil District, Greene county. By J. J. Steven- 
son. (See Reports Bituminous Coal Fields. ) 

Ij» Appendix II. A Report on the Use of Natural Gas in Iron 
Manufacture. By John R Pearse. (See Miscellaneous Reports.) 

Ct*. Description of Oil Measures in and adjacent to Lawrence 
COUNTY. By I. C. White. (See Reports Bituminous Coal Fields.) 

Q,** Description op Oil Measures in and adjacent to Eire and 
Crawford Counties. By I. C. White. (See Reports North-western Penn- 
sylvania.) 

R. Description op the Bradford Oil District in McKean county, 
with a reference to the probable position of the Oil Sands in Elk county. By 
Cha& A. Ashburner. (See Reports Bituminous Coal Fields.) 

V2. Description op the Oil Measures in Clarion County. By H. 
M. Chance. (See Reports Bituminous Coal Fields.) 

NORTH-WESTERN FENNSYIiVANIA. 

Ct*« Report of Progress— 1879. The Geology of Erie and Crawford 
Counties, with tables of barometric heights in each township, and notes on 
the place of the Sharon Conqlomerate in the Palaeozoic series. By I. C. 

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White. Also, the discovery of the PBBaiiACiAL Outlet of Lake Erie, 
with two .maps of the Lake Region. By J. W. Spencer, Ph. D. Price, |1 17 ; 
postage, 10 18. 

I» 1'9 '^« I*« 0,^9 V, V? and R. Petroleum Region Reports. By John 
^F. Caill, I. C. White, H. M. Chance, and Chas. A. Ashbumer. 



CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA. 

F. Report op Progress in the Juniata District on Fossil Iron Ore 
Beds of Middle Pennsylvania. By John H. Dewees. With a report of the 
AuGHWiCK Valley and East Broad Top District. By C. A. Ash- 
burner. 1874-8. Illustrated with 7 Oeological maps and 19 sections, 8 vo., 
pp. 305. Price, $2 55 ; postage, |0 20. 

G. Report of Progress in Bradford and Tioga Counties. By 
Andrew Sherwood, (See Reports Bituminous Coal Fields.) 

G2. Report of Progress. Geology op Lycoming and Sullivan 
Counties. I. Field Notes by Andrew Sherwood. II. Coal Basins, by 
Franklin Piatt. With two colored geological county maps and numerous 
illustrations. 8 vo., pp. 268. Price, fl 06 ; postage, $0 14. 

G* Report op Progress in Clinton County. By H. M. Chance. (See 
Reports Bituminous Coal Fields.) 

G7« Report of Progress. The Geology in the Susquehanna 
River Region in the Six Counties op Wyoming, Lackawanna, Lu- 
zerne, Columbia, Montour, and Northumberland. By I. C. White. 
With a colored Geological Map in 2 sheets ; and 31 page plates in text Pp. 
464. Price, |0 85 ; postage, $0 20. 

T. Report of Progress. Geology of Blair County, with 35 illustra- 
trations and an Atlas of 14 sheets of the colored map of Morrison's Cove, 
<fec.; 1 index sheet, and 2 sheets of colored sections. By Franklin Piatt. 
Price of Report and Atlas, $4 55 ; postage, $0 28. 

T^9 Report of Progress — 1882. The geology of Bedford and Fulton 
Counties. By J. J. Stevenson. 8 vo., pp. 882. Illustrated with 2 colored 
geological maps. Price, |0 80 ; postage, $0 20. 



NOBTH-EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA. 

G'« Report of Progress. The Geology of Susquehanna County 
AND Wayne County. By I. C. White. Pp. 243, with Geological map and 
58 sections. Price, $0 70 ; postage, |0 12. 

G«« Report of Progress, 1881. The Geology of Pike and Monroe 
Counties. By I. C. White. 8 vo., pp. 407. Illustrated with colored Geo- 
logical county maps, a map of glacial scratches, and 7 small sections. Also 
special surveys of the Delaware and Lehigh Water Gaps. By H. M. 
Chance, with 2 contoured maps of Water Gaps, and 5 detailed sections. Price, 
91 15 ; postage, $0 15. 

G7. The Geology in the Susquehanna (North Branch) River 
Region in the Six Counties of Wyoming, Lackawanna, Luzerne, 
Columbia, Montour, Northumberland, (exclusiveof Anthracite Re- 
gion.) By I. C. White. (See Reports Central Pennsylvania.) 

G« Report of Progress in Bradford and Tioga Counties. By 
Andrew Sherwood. (See Reports Bituminous Coal Fields.) 

A^f AAy and AC. Anthracite Region Reports. By Franklin Piatt, 
Chaa. A. Ashburner, and H. M. Chance. (See Reports Anthracite Coal Fields.) 

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SOXJTH-EA8TEBN FEinTSYLVANIA. 

€• Report of Progress on York and Adams Counties — 1874. By 
Pereifor Frazer. 8vo., pp. 198, illustrated by 8 maps and sections and other 
illustrations. Price in paper, JO 85 ; postage, $0 10. 

C2, Report op Progress in the Counties of York, Adams, Cumber- 
land, AND Franklin — 1875. Illustrated by maps and cross-sections, show- 
ing the Magnetic and Micaceous Ore Beit near the western edge of the Meso- 
zoic Sandstone and the two Azoic systems constituting the mass of the South 
Mountains, with a preliminary discussion on the Dillsburg Ore Bed and 
catalogue of specimens collected in 1875. By Persifor Frazer. Price, |1 25 ; 
postage, $0 12. 

€*• Report of Progress in 1877. The Geology of Lancaster County, 
with an atlas containing a colored geological map of the county, local map ot 
the Gap Nickel Mine, map and sections of the East Bank of Susquehanna 
River ; other geological sections across the county, and geological colored maps 
of York and Lancaster counties. By Persifor Frazer. 8 vo., pp. 350. Price 
of Report and Atlas, $2 20 ; postage, $0 25. 

C*. Geology of Chester County, after the surveys of Henry D. Rogers, 
Persifor Frazer and Charles E. Hall, edited by J. P. Lesley— with a colored 
geological map of the county, three lithographic plates and maps, and sections 
in the text. Price, $0 75 ; postage, $0 18. 

C6, Report of Progress. Geology of Philadelphia County, and 
OF THE Southern Parts of Montgomery and Bucks. By Charles E. 
Hall. Pp. 145, with Geological map, sheet of colored cross-sections, and 24 
page cuts. Price, $1 65 ; postage, |0 13. 

D. Report of Progress in the Brown Hematite Ore Ranges of Le- 
high County— 1874, with descriptions of mines lying between Emaus, Al- 
burtis, and Fogelsville. By Frederick Prime, Jr. 8vo., pp. 73, with a contour- 
line map and 8 cuts, Ptice in paper, |0 50 ; postage, |0 04. 

D2« The Brown Hematite Deposits op the Siluro-Cambrian Lime- 
stones OF Lehigh County, lying between Shiraersville, Millerstown, 
Schencksville, Ballietsville, and the Lehigh river— 1875-6. By Frederick 
Prime, Jr. 8 vo., pp. 99, with 5 map-sheets and 5 plates. Price, $1 60 ; post- 
age, to 12. 

D3. Vol. L Report of Progress. Geology of Lehigh and North- 
ampton Counties. General introduction, by J. P. Lesley. Slate Belt and 
Quarries, by R. A. Sanders. Water Gaps, by H. M. Chance. Limestone Belt 
and Iron Ore Mines, by F. Prime. South Mountain Rocks, by F. Prime. 
Itinerary Survey, by C. E. Hail. Three lithograph and 3 artotype views of 
quarries, and an atlas. Pp. 283. Price, $0 65 ; postage, |0 13. 

D3« Vol. II. Part I. Report of Progress. Geology of the South 
Mountain Belt of Berks County. By E. V. D'Invilliers. Illustrated 
by 18 page plates in the text, and by the maps in the Atlas. Pp. 441. Price, 
90 55 ; postage, $0 18. 

D3. Volumes I and II, Atlas, containing a colored contour map of Southern 
Northampton on 6 sheets, a contour map of the mountain on 18 sheets, a geo- 
logical index map on 1 sheet, a colored geological map of Northampton 
and Lehigh Counties, and 4 maps of Iron Mines in Berks County. 
Price, $2 80 ; postage, $0 17. 

D5. Maps op Adams, Franklin, and Cumberland Counties. South 
Mountain sheets A^, A^, B^ and B^. By A. E. Lehman. Price, 91 25 ; post- 
age, 90 08. 

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E, Special Rbpobt on the Trap Dykes and Azoic Rocks op South- 
eastern Pennsylvania— 1875. Part I, Historical Introduction. By T. 
Sterry Hunt. 8 vo., pp. 253. Price, |0 48 ; postage, $0 12. 

MISCELLANEOUS BEFOBTS. 

A. Historical Sketch of Geological Explorations in Pennsylvania 
and other States. By J. P. Lesley. With appendix, containing Annual 
Reports for 1874 and 1875 ; pp. 226, 8vo. Price in paper, |0 25 ; postage, ^ 06. 

B« Preliminary Report op the Mineralogy of Pennsylvania — 
1874. By Dr. F. A. Genth. Witli appendix on the hydro-carbon compounds, 
by Samuel P. Sad tier. 8vo., pp. 206, with map of the State for reference to 
counties. Price in paper, $0 50 ; postage, $0 08. Price in cloth, $0 75 ; post- 
s^e, 10 10. 

li. 1875 — Special Report on the Coke Manufacture op the Yough- 
lOGHENY River Valley in Fayette and Westmoreland Counties, 
with Geological Notes of the Coal and Iron Ore Beds, from Survej'^s, by Charles 
A. Young; by Franklin Piatt. To which are appended: I. A Report on 
Methods of Coking, by John Fulton. II. A Report on the use of Natural Gas 
In the Iron Manufacture, by John B. Pearse, Franklin Piatt, and Professor 
Sadtler. Pp. 262. Price, |1 00 ; postage, |0 13. 

in. Report op Progress in the Laboratory op the Survey at 
Harrisburg — 1874-5. By Andrew S. McUreath. 8 vo., pp. 105. Price in 
paper, ^ 50 : postage, fO 05. 

M-. Second Report of Progress in the Laboratory of the Sur- 
vey, at Harrisburg, by Andrew S. McCreath— 1876-8, including I. Classifica- 
tion of Coals, by Persifor Frazer. II. Firebrick Tests, by Franklin Piatt. 
III. Notes on Dolomitio Limestones, by J. P. Lesley. IV. Utilization of An- 
thracite Slack, by Franklin Piatt. V. Determination of Carbon in Iron or 
Steel, by A. S. McCreath. With 3 indexes, plate, and 4 page plates. Pp. 438. 
Price in cloth, $0 66 ; postage, ^ 18. 

M3. Third Report of Progress in the Laboratory of the Survey, 
at Harrisburg. Analyses, <&c., Ac. By Andrew S. McCreath. Pp. 126, with 
2 indexes and map. Price, $0 40 ; postage, $0 10. 

N. Report of Progress— 1875-6-7. Two Hundred Tables of Eleva- 
tion ABOVE Tide-Level of the Railroad Stations, Summits and Tunnels; 
Canal Locks and Dams, River Riffles, <fec., in and around Pennsylvania; with 
map : pp. 279. By Charles Allen. Price, |0 70 ; postage, ^ 15. 

O. Catalogue of the Geological Musuem— 1874-5-6-7. By Charles E. 
Hall. Part I. Collection of Rock Specimens. Nos. 1 to 4,264. Pp. 217. Price, 
to 40; postage, |0 10. 

0'9 Catalogue of the Geological Museum. By Charles E. Hall. Part 
II. 1. Collections of rock specimens, Nos. 4265 to 8974. 2. Palseontological 
specimens. Price, |0 40 ; postage, |0 12. 

P, 1879— Report and Atlas of the Coal Flora of Pennsylvania 

AND OF THE CARBONIFEROUS FORMATION THROUGHOUT THE UNITED 

States. By Leo Lesquereux. Price of Report, tO 80 ; postage, |0 28. Price 
Of Atlas, $3 35; postage, |0 22. 

P2. The Permian or Upper Carboniferous Flora of West Vir- 
ginia and S. W. Pennsylvania, with 38 plates. By Wm. M. Fontaine, 
M. a., and I. C. White, A. M. Price, $2 25 ; postage, $0 17. 



Other Reports of the Survey are in the hands of the State Printer, and 
will soon be published. 

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The sale of the reports is conducted in accordance with the provisions of 
Section 10 of the Act of the 14th day of May, 1874, which directs that copies 
of the Reports, with all maps and supplements, shall be furnished at cost of 
publication to all applicants /or them. 

All the printed volumes and maps in stock have been transferred by the 
Board of Commissioners to the Department of Internal Affairs, where the 
sales thereof will hereafter be conducted. 

Communications relating to the work of the Survey should be addressed to 
J. P. Lesley, State Geologist, No. 1008 Clinton street, Philadelphia, and those 
intended for the Board of Commissioners, to William A. Ingham, Secretary, 
No. 907 Walnut street, Philadelphia. 

All letters and orders concerning the purchase of Reports and remittances 
for the same, should be addressed to, 

J. SIMPSON AFRICA, 
Secretary of Internal Affairs^ 
Harrisburfff Fa. 

April 1, 1884* 



Date Due 



0/5t-— wi^ 



Date Due 



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