(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Reports of the Boards"

This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 
to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 
to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 
are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other marginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 
publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing this resource, we have taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 

We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attribution The Google "watermark" you see on each file is essential for informing people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 



at |http : //books . google . com/ 



■ ■ I 




HJB^All «0rr««poBdeB«« wltk relterea«« to the **HiaatM** aliovld Ito nflilriTtpJ t 
9 Stated Clerk, Md Gilbert ATeane, CindanaU, Ohio. 



©CCicers antr Agencies 

OF THB 



D.D., LL 
Per ma 



Presid 
Corres, 
Tream 
Office-- 



8uBa 



Presid 

Carres 
LIAM IR^ 
JVeash 
Becoro 
Office-- 



Presid 

Corres 

F. Elli 

GiLLESI 

Treast 
Office-- 



Presid 

Corres 
Treasi 
Office^ 




3i=: 






p ::i-ii Xi_ii. '''-v^V-^>''V,Tn 



jm- . > ■ I ii»iri i rrnaimTmn aaxxiXi 



a 



w 



TliK OIKT OF 



:'' 



JPPMrT X PW Cr JiiAimw 



Roberts. 
d, O. 

3US, O. 



dlphia, Pa. 
£8. 

)f 1890. 



Y. 

Eev. WiL- 



York^N.Y. 



Bv. Frank 
Jev, John 



rork,N.Y. 
»a. 
elphia, Pa. 



Preside 

Sccre^ry— Rev. Elijah R. Craven, D.D., LL.D. 
Superintendent of Sahhath-school and Missionary Work — Rev. James A. 
WORDEN, D.D. 
Editorial Superintendent^^QY. James R. Miller, D.D. 
Business Superintendent— ^r, John A. Black. 
IVeosMrer—Rev. C. T. McMullin. 
Becording Clerk— -B^ev. Willard M. Rice, D.D. 
Publication iZbuse— No. 1334 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Digitized by VjrOOQ IC 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



f 

/ 



/ 



i 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



HOME MISSIONS. 



TWENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 

(Th« eightj-eighth from its Organization) 



OF TEE 



BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS 



OF TBB 



PRESBYTEETAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED 
'" STATES OF AMERICA 



. ■•..'( V , '' :i/i..rh 



Presented to the General Assembly, at Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 
May 15<A, 1890. 



No. 6S FIFTH AVENUE, NEW TORE. 
1890. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MEMBBHS 

OF THE 



Soarb of Pome Pisnoitg of Ijft ^rtsirsterian €i^tt\, 



nr THE UJIiTHD 8TATBB OF AllBliaJL. 



The term of service of the following expires in May, 1891. 

MINISTERS. LAYMEN. 

Rbv. JOHN HALL, D.D. aEO. R. LOOKWOOD. 

« HENRT M. BOOTH, D.D. TTTUB B. MMQS. 

«* JOHN B. PAXTON, D.D. 



The term of service of the following expires in May. 1892. 

MINISTERS. LATMEN. 

Rbv. THOS. S. HASTINGS) D.D. JOS. F. JOT. 

Rev. oh as. L. THOMPSON, D.D. JAOOB D. YERMILTE. 

WALTER M. AIKMAN. 



The term of service of the following expires in May. 1893. 

MINISTERS. LAYMEN. 

Rev. THOMAS A. NELSON, D.D. JOHN S. KENNEDY. 

•* JAMES M. LUDLOW, D.D. JOHN TAYLOR JOHNSTON, 

JOHN E. PARSONa 



OFFICERS. 



Rev. JOHN" HAXjLs DOD., President. 
•• HEN-RY K:E3NX>AJL.r., D.3D. 



N-, D.D. y 

J-, D.3D. > 



Seox*etarie8. 
r>. J. :M[oMJ[L.L.i^J^, 

O. D. ICATON", IVeasurer. 

OSC^R S2. SOYX>, Reooxrdins Secretary . 



Presbyterian Honse, 63 Fifth Ayenuei Hew Tork. Box L, Station D. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



HOME MISSIONS. 



THE TWENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 



The Board of Home MiBsions respectfully presents to the General 
Assembly its eighty-eighth annual report — ^its twentieth since re- 
union. 

We record onr humble and earnest thauks to God for His gra- 
cious exemption of the Board from the loss of any member or officer 
by death, and for His manifest guidance and blessing in the enlarge- 
ment and general prosperity of its work during the year. Our 
gratitude is also due for the harmony and zeal which have marked 
the proceedings of the Board, and for the general approbation its 
work has receiyed from the great constituency which it represents 
and serves. The steady general increase of the Board's income 
may be fairly taken as a most gratifying and enoouragiug vote of 
confidence in the Board as the Church's tried and trusted agency 
in the work of home evangelization, and also as an uumistakable 
proof of the unchaDgeable purpose of the intelligent and powerful 
body of American Christians who stand behind it to prosecute this 
sacred enterprise with unremitting energy until the great and glo- 
rious results it contemplates shall be fully achieved. The Presby- 
terian Church in the United States of America, in kindly emulation 
with sister evangelical churches, is bent on doing a generously- 
computed share of the great work of making God's law and gospel 
the pervading and dominant influences which mould and control 
the republic ; and the Board of Home Missions is the strong right 
hand with which it means, under God, to do the work. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 

177556 



ANNUAL BEPOBT OF THE 



[1890. 



The Rev. Wilson Phraner, DJ)., resigned during the year, and 
the Bev. James M. Ludlow, D.D., was appointed to fill the place 
thus made vacant in the Board until the meeting of this General 
Assembly. 

We record with sorrow the removal by death of twelve mission- 
aries during the year. Their names are as follows : 



Rev. WH. I. BRUGH, I). D. . .Kentucky. 
" EDWIN G. BRYANT.... Michigan. 

"" JOHN B. OOMBS KansaB. 

" BEN J. S. CROSBY New York. 

** DON M. DOCKBRY OalifoniU. 

« DAVID GREYCLOUD.. .S. Dakota. 



Rev. SAMUEL G. HAIR Florida. 

" JOHN MoORAE Kansas. 

" EDMUND H. POST Florida. 

'' DANIEL J. ROBERTSON.. Kansas. 

" S. N. ROBINSON New York. 

" 0. 0. WALLACE, D.D. . . Florida. 



A VERY GOOD YEAR. 

The year's work, on the whole, has been attended by marked and 
manifest prosperity. As in most years, it has encountered serious 
obstacles. Floods in Western Oregon, so great as to hinder for 
weeks the transmission of the mails, have made anything like con- 
tinuous church services in many places impossible. Unusually 
heavy snow-falls in the ISTorthwest and about many of the mountain 
regions and passes have embarrassed religious as well as material 
interests. Some five thousand persons are said to have been on the 
verge of actual famine in North Dakota ; and churches and mis- 
sionaries have had their share of the pinch and pressure. Some of 
the older States have suffered additional losses by removals. The 
rush into Oklahoma almost effaced some, and sadly weakened many 
more, of our churches in the southern tier of Kansas. The wide- 
spread failure of the vine in California has reduced whole com- 
munities to comparative poverty. Three churches in one pres- 
bytery, which had reached self-support, were forced back upon the 
aid of the Board, one of them losing sixty members by removal. 
And yet the great work of home evangelization and church exten- 
sion has steadily widened and strengthened and gained ground. 
One hundred and nine more missionaries have been employed than 
in any previous year. In a large part of the country the unusually 
mild and open winter has permitted and facilitated continuous 
maintenance of church services, which has greatly furthered both 
the temporal and the spiritual interests of the congregations. There 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] BOABD OF HOMB 1CIB8ION8. 5 

has been in many places more than usnal evangelistic activity, often 
with large resultant increase. There has been a deepening of the 
impression already long prevalent among the people, that a prop- 
erly-foQnded and wisely-organized Presbyterian church is both a 
beneficent and a permanent institution. The work has not lacked 
the Divine benediction. The gracious Spirit of God has in many 
places turned the wilderness into a fruitful field. The churches 
aided by the Board have received 9,795 on confession of faith, 
and 7,091 by certificate; 16,886 communicants in all. 200 
churches, and 578 Sunday-schools have been organized, and 30 
churches have assumed self-support, often with emphatic and grate- 
f nl acknowledgment of the fostering care which has lifted them to 
independence. 

THE THIRD CORRESPONDING SECRETARY. 

The Board has unanimously elected as its third Secretary the 
Rev. Duncan J. McMillan, D.D., President of the College of Mon- 
tana. To the great satisfaction of the members and officers of the 
Board, he has accepted the post, and already entered on his work. 
Dr. McMillan was the Board's pioneer missionary to the Mormons. 
Under his management the College of Montana has attained a front 
rank among the younger educational institutions of our Church. 
He will bring to the Board's service the prime of his powers and a 
large and special experience. 

OUR MISSIONARIES. 

The missionaries aided by the Board during the year number 
1,701. They have served some 4,000 churches and stations. 
They constitute a noble brigade of soldiers of the cross. A large 
proportion of them are men of marked capabilities and fine equip- 
ment for their sacred calling, and as a body their devotion and 
fidelity are beyond all possible earthly appreciation and reward. 
Their wives, and often their sons and daughters as well, are their 
worthy and wilUng helpers. Their aggressive activity is at least 
equalled by their patient endurance. They would be the last to 
desire that the harder phases of their experience should be over- 



Digitized by VjtOOQIC 



6 ANNUAL BBPOBT OF THE [1890. 

stated in this report ; but it accords with simple fairness and sober 
truth to say that the pinch and stress they not infrequently feel 
when remittances from the drained treaisury of the Board are in- 
evitably withheld for weeks after they are due, should be borne in 
mind, as urgent arguments for increased contribotionB from the 
Church at large. 

But praise of our missionaries goes without saying. The avail- 
able space in this report may be better employed in urging the 
increase of their number. The great need of the hour is more men 
for the work. It is as true to-day as it was when the Master said 
it, that " the laborers are few." Their number, indeed, steadily 
increases, but the work grows far faster. If one-third of the eight 
hundred students or so in our thirteen theological seminaries become 
ministers this spring, the Presbyterian Church will put into the 
work this year one for each three thousand communicants. Some 
in addition to these are obtained from other Christian communions. 
But the entire supply is sadly behind the demand. Calls outnumber 
candidates. The field widens more rapidly than the tilling and 
reaping. 

13ie Board respectfully asks the Church seriously to consider the 
causes of this shortcoming. Who is to blame for it ? The fault 
must be within the Church itself. There are yoang men enough. 
They crowd into every other calling; And the young men them- 
selves are not alone to blame. Pastors do not ply and urge them 
as constantly and earnestly as they might with the claims of this 
sacred service. Parents too often allow or encourage their sons to 
leave the ministry out of the question in their choice of a life- 
work. There are many large, strong, prosperous congregations, 
especially in the great cities, which year after year furnish not a 
single candidate for the pulpit out of their hundreds of bright and 
noble youth. How can the Church consistently deplore the lack of 
ministers and missionaries when it fails to lay holy hands on its own 
children for this high calling ? If, out of the army of strong and 
capable youth who graduate every year into active life from Pres- 
byterian families, even a single thousand should each year be led by 
human persuasion and Divine guidance to enter the ministry, who 
would venture to say that this is in excess of that " living sacri- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] BOABD OF HOMB MISSIONS. 7 

fice *' which the Church is called to lay on her Redeemer's altar ? 
The generons congregations thus devoting their best and brightest 
would be enriched by their own depletion, and thrive afresh spirit- 
ually by the healthful stir of this sacred emigration. The noble 
offering would inspire the whole Church with a new and heavenly 
ambition, and win the enriching benediction of God. 

FINANCES. 

The year opened with a debt of $33,337.89. Home Missions 
proper had a balance in its favor of $4,236.08, while the account of 
Teachers and Chapels, New York Synodical Aid Fund, and Susten- 
tation had deficits respectively of $27,6 19.47, $9,829.02, and $165.48, 
giving net defidt as above. The receipts of the first six months, 
from all sources, showed an increase of $55,000, and those of the 
first ten months an increase of $97,000, over the same months of 
the previous year. But there was a falling off in February of 
$11,000, and in March of $85,000, as compared with the year 
before. Collections from congregations for Home Missions proper 
show a falling off of $19,814 from last year. The total amoimt 
contribnted to the Board from all sources during the year has been 
$831,170.40; for current work, $809,094.61; for N. Y. Synodical 
Aid Fund, $11,672.99 ; for permanent and trust funds, $4,700.00 ; 
for sustentation department, $5,702.80. The Board closes the year 
with a balance agamst it of $80,391.94. Of this, $13,021.27 is on 
account of Teachers and Chapels, $28,551.33 on account of New 
York Synodical Aid Fund, $38,819.34 on account of Home Missions 
proper — that is, aid to churches in the support of ministers. 

The General Assembly of 1887 asked for an income for the Board 
of $800,000, and the Church gave only two per cent. less. The 
Ajssembly of 1888 asked for $850,000. Once more the Board 
received only about two per cent, less, or $832,647.56. The Assem- 
bly of 1889 recommended an income of $875,000, or only five and 
one-quarter per cent, advance on the receipts of the previous year. 
So moderate a proposed advance it seemed reasonable to expect to 
be realized. It is somewhat disappointing that the great Presby- 
terian Church, having stood by the Board's work so staunchly for 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



8 A.NNITAL BEPOBT OF THE [1890. 

some years past, should this year fall so far short of the moderate 
ratio of proposed increase, and the forecast of the General Assembly, 
to say nothing of the fast-growing needs and the clamorous calls 
from all quarters for new work. There has been no undue or hasty 
expansion. The moderate increase in expenditure in the earlier 
months seemed justified by the then increasing receipts. Since 
then the Board has resolutely declined to inci'ease appropriations 
whenever possible. 

The only remedy for this shortcoming is a constant and general 
effort to obtain contributions from all congregations and Sunday- 
schools, and a patient cultivation of the gracious habit of Christian 
giving, especially among the young. There is no more encouraging 
sign for the future than the large amount and the rapid increase 
of gifts to Home Missions from the young people of our con- 
gregations in Sabbath-schools and societies; and this interest 
should be fostered and expanded, as a sure guarantee for the next 
generation. 

The attention of the General Assembly and the Church, especially 
the men of business who are interested in our work, is called to the 
fact, as made plain in the experience of this and previous years, that 
a large increase is desirable in the amount of invested funds which 
the Board is authorized to use as collaterals for loans. During at 
least the summer months of every year the Board's outgo so far 
exceeds its income that large loans are absolutely necessary. The 
full limit of the Board's credit was reached this last season, at a 
time when further loans to a moderate amount and for a brief term 
would have enabled the Treasurer to pay promptly many mission- 
aries who had to wait for weeks. The collaterals now available for 
loans for general work are only about $75,000, and those specially 
available for woman's work not more than $7,000. An increase of 
the funds thus available to doable the present amount would greatly 
facilitate the work. When it is kept in mind that from April to 
November, for several years past, beyond the Board's power to help 
it, its outgo has exceeded its income by $1000 to $1500 every day, 
it will be seen how desirable and vital is this increase of basis for 
necessary loans. 

The Treasurer's report will furnish all necessary financial details. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] BOABD OF HOMB MISSIONS. 9 

NONCONTBIBUTING CHURCHES. 

Of the 6)727 churches reported to the last General Assembly, 
1880, or about twenty-ei^ht per cent., made no contribution to the 
Board of Home Missions. It would be natural enough to conolude 
at first thought that these churches would be found in the list of 
those aided by the Board as unable even to support themselves. It 
should be known and noted, however, that the fact is jast the con- 
trary. There is no one of its rules on which the Board more posi- 
tively insists than the requirement of a Home Mission collection 
from every church aided by its funds. A failure in this is always 
noted, and the delinquent church is required to make the omission 
good. However small the contribution may be in proportion to 
the aid extended, it is none the less insisted on, and with hardly an 
exception it is actually paid. The non-contributing churches, then, 
whether weak or strong, are not the Home Mission churches. This 
puts the case of these non-contributing churches in a new light, and 
not a pleasant or creditable one. It is painfully unsatisfactory that 
so large a number of congregations which can and do bear the 
expense of their own church privileges should ht^^itually give 
nothing to mission work at home, to say nothing of that abroad. 
How to bring these churches to admit and perform their duty is a 
problem which the Board has long sought in vain to solve, and to 
which the Church at large should seriously address itself. The 
remedies for the evil are doubtless to be found in various directions. 
Every pastor and stated supply should make it his business to see 
that this cause, whether popular or not, is annually presented to 
and pressed on his people for their contributions. Elders and 
deacons should fulfill their bounden duty as ordained church officers 
to stand by their pastor and brace him up to the work, instead of 
disheartening and hindering him by apathy or even positive dis- 
couragement, as is no doubt often the case ; and they should be 
especially forward in urging a collection when the pulpit is vacant, 
and in securing prompt remittance of the proceeds, a point not 
infrequently neglected. A stated clerk in a strong country presby- 
tery some years ago, by a little urgent correspondence, prevaQed 
on half-a4ozen negligent churches to fill half or two-thirds of the 
previously vacant columns. An active and resolute elder in the 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



10 AKKTTAL BBPOBT OF THB [1890. 

Presbytery of Bochester a year or two since plied the delinquent 
congregations with appeals antil all had given to this Board, except 
two ; and, not succeeding with these, at the last minute he sent 
contributions for them out of his own pocket, in anticipation of 
their own action, and thus filled the Board's blanks that year. A 
Home Mission committee that means business, or a single deter- 
mined minister, could partially or wholly remedy this faidt in every 
presbytery ; and there is hardly a non-giving congregation in which 
there is not some one elder who might, if he would, secure at least 
some small contribution to the Board, however indifferent or dis- 
affected the people might be. 

RAILROADS. 

These constitute a stock topic in a Home Mission report. Eail- 
roads sustain a relation to the country's development and history 
which is unique and unparalleled. They are the nerves of the 
Nation's life, the standard of its growth, the indices of the march 
and move of its population. They push onward into regions where 
emigration has preceded them ; or they lead the way by making 
channels through which the living tide is sure to pour. Our im- 
mense railway system is the growth of the last sixty years. There 
were twenty-three miles in 1830. In 1861, when the civil war 
broke out, there were 31,000 miles. In 1890 there are nearly 
170,000 miles, or almost half the mileage of the world, and six times 
as much as in Germany, whose railway mileage ranks next. The 
largest annual increase has been 12,872 miles in 1887. The last 
nine years have added at least 68,000 miles. The present season 
promises greater activity in railway construction than has marked 
any previous year. There are some five thousand miles in process 
of construction, seven thousand miles surveyed or under survey, 
and nearly three thousand miles so seriously projected and pushed, 
that they will probably be either completed or fairly begun before 
the close of the year— a total of nearly 15,000 miles. The larger 
part of the construction of the last few years has been in the Cen- 
tral West, Northwest and Southwest. The bulk of the pending 
enterprises is in the South and Southwest, in Pennsylvania and Ohio, 
and in Montana, Oregon and Washington. In the last two States 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] BOABD or HOMB MI88IONS. 11 

three hundred miles were finished between Fehraary Ist and March 
15th, and 1500 more are to be completed within two years. All 
along the vast and rapidly growing extent of these prodigions rail- 
way lines, especially in the newer regions, the natnral increase of 
onr population, the immense multitudes of foreign immigrants, and 
the swarms of restless seekers for better fortunes have been or will 
be speedily distributed. The new settlements are at first generally 
small and weak, and the people mostly poor. The settlers are, as a 
rule, unable to provide and maintain religious privileges for them- 
selves, and very largely also indisposed to make efforts or sacrifices 
to secure them until their worldly circumstances are improved. If 
the Gospel and the Church are to reach them with elevating and 
saving infiuences in their formative period, they must have encour- 
agement and pressure and material aid from without. The relig- 
ious hope and opportunity of the new settlements of the land are 
to be found alone in the steady and tireless pushing of the work of 
Home Missions. 

THE FIELD. 

This report will not admit of anything like a complete sketch of 
the whole vast field, but some large sections of it seem to call for 
special notice and detail. 

THE NOBTHWBBT. 

The Synod of Columbia includes Oregon, Washington, Alaska, 
and one presbytery in Idaho. It covers, without Alaska, 178,000 
square miles. The region is of itself a broad and grand Home 
Mission field, in which there are need and scope for ten-fold the 
men and money as yet devoted to it. Washington is a young but 
mighty State, with 250,000 people, and thousands pouring steadily 
in. Gray's Harbor is one of the best harbors on the Pacific coast, 
and is sure to attract commerce and population. We have already 
an organized church at Aberdeen, near it, and there are other 
important points on its shores. Puget Sound is a noble inland sea, 
on whose shores great cities are growing up, and vast industries 
rapidly developing. Port Townsend, whose great expectations 
have tarried, may soon have the stimulus of a railway terminus. 
Our church there has just entered its new edifice, and is prosper- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



12 ANKUAL BEPOBT OF THE [1890. 

ing welL The land around DnngeneflB, near by, is Baid to raise one 
hundred bnehels of wheat to the acre. Seattle is rising from its 
ashes, and pushing toward the foremost plaoe on the Sound. 
Taooma has had a marvellous growth of values and business, and 
holds its own in the van of progress. It has a population of 30,000, 
having trebled in five years. It has three live Presbyterian 
churches, where there was but one eighteen months ago. The 
Northern Pacific Railroad, already in operation from Tacoma to 
Seattle, will soon be extended further northward to meet the 
Canadian Pacific at Anacortes, on Fidalgo Island — a point already 
occupied by an organized church and a missionary of the Board, 
and whose prospective and not distant importance may be inferred 
from its growth from eight buildings and two hundred people in 
December last, to one hundred and fifty buildings, one hundred 
tents, and more than two thousand population in March. Fidalgo 
City, on a fine bay on the southeast of the island, is rapidly increas- 
ing in population. It is at the head of the strait of San Juan de 
Fuca, and separated from the mainland only by a creek. Yakima 
to the south is the centre of a very fertile tract, which must fill 
up rapidly. The Oneida Community has bought 170,000 acres 
east of it for fifty cents per acre, which, when irrigated, will sell 
up to $25 per acre. The section east of the Columbia is rajridly 
opening up. Large transfers of land indicate a new influx of 
population. Spokane Falls is being rebuilt with new ambition and 
promise. In Pasco the railway authorities have made a liberal 
offer for the founding of an academy, and there are signs of great 
and rapid growth. Great tracts of this region, like the Walla Walla 
valley in the southern part, though almost without rainfall, grow 
the best varieties of wheat (" club " and " blue-stem "), without 
irrigation, up to fifty bushels per acre, and will surely attract a 
large agricultural population. The memories of Whitman and 
Spaulding invite hereabouts the utmost missionary effort. 

Oregon has a population of three hundred thousand, which is 
fast increasing. Portland's suburbs have several struggling con- 
gr^ations which will one day hold large places in the charch sys- 
tem of a great city which will then overspread and include them 
all, as the metropolis of the Northwest. The Presbyterian Alliance 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] BOARD OF HOMX MIBS*ION8. 18 

IB reaching out from the cut's strong and prosperous centre to foster 
these infant enterprises, and should do this still more freely, in co- 
operation with the steady aid of the Board. Southwestern Oregon 
is a wonderful fruit-growing region, equal as such to Northern 
California, and will soon fill up with a large population. The rail- 
roads are pushing through the mountain gaps to several fine harbors 
on the coast, where in the near fature populous cities must stand* 
The Union Pacific Bailway will soon reach tide water at Tilla- 
mook. Coos City and Empire City have harbors with twenty fidet 
of water. Oar Charch has kid extensive foundations, and already 
supports a large number of devoted workmen in that fair region ; 
but the work should be buttressed and broadened at once, and 
prompt and generous outlay for this will surely bring a rich return. 
Umatilla County, in northeastern Or^on, with its reservation for 
the Indian tribe of that name, should soon have a school for this 
and neighboring tribes on the quarter section recently granted by 
government to the Board for that purpose. Union County adjoin- 
ing, with its beautiful lake Walloma, has open fields which should 
be soon and strongly occupied. Baker City, the county seat, should 
be well manned and reinforced as a radiating centre. Prineville, 
in Crook County, in the heart of the State, is an important and 
inviting point. Indeed, the vast counties in all that broad and 
splendid r^ion, many of them as large as some Eastern States, all 
contain strategic points, which, if men and money were forthcom- 
ing, could soon be impressed and controlled by Christian influences. 
Idaho, whose rich resources have hardly yet been touched by tbe 
hand of development, is on the verge of statehood. Post Falls 
should have a Presbyterian church, and other places are within our 
reach. This synod is calling for thirty new men. 

Last year's report chronicled the admission to statehood of the two 
Dakotas. The two cover 151,000 square miles between them, or 
about the same area as Montana, the great Bocky Mountain State 
then also admitted. Our Home Mission work in Dakota has been 
almost entirely accomplished in the last dozen years. North Dakota 
has about 250,000 people. The past year has been a very hard one. 
From crop failures it has been reported that five thousand people 
were at one time on the verge of actual famine. Poverty and re- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



14 AVNUAL BBPOBT OF THE * [1890. 

movalB have forced many changes of ministers. It has been almost 
impossible to raise the people's part of salaries. Missionaries have 
incurred great hardships and anxieties. In January, thirty-tliree 
churches, or one-third of those in the three presbyteries, were 
reported vacant. Some of these have but a nominal existence, but 
many are important. The severe winters render this splendid region 
less attractive than some otherwise far inferior. But these draw- 
backs are but partial or temporary, and the work is going steadily 
onward with promise of enlargement and suceess. 

South Dakota has about 400,000 people. Oar missionaries have 
done much hard and fruitful work. The last meeting of synod 
reported the organization during the year of one presbytery, twenty- 
one churches, and one hundred and twenty Sabbath-schools, the 
addition of eight hundred members by confession of faith, and four 
thousand two hundred children to Sabbath-schools, and the comple- 
tion of nine church edifices and three manses. The Black Hills 
Presbytery covers a fine stock and farming region. Eight churches 
have been organized there during the year, and contributions and 
membership have been more than doubled. A dozen men are 
wanted for vacancies and new work. The recent opening of the 
Sioux reservation will invite a large influx of white population, 
besides giving the right of suffrage to five thqusand Indians. It is 
said that by the next presidential election there will be twenty 
thousand Indian voters in the land ; a strong argument for pressing 
school and mission work among them. 

The vast and rich expanse of the young State of Montana affords 
a noble field fo>r Home Mission work. Good beginnings have been 
made, and many important points strongly occupied ; but laborers 
and stations should be speedily multiplied. There will be a re- 
newed survey of the field this year, and the most vigorous efforts 
possible with the means at the Board's command to expand and 
speed the work. The force there of about a score of ministers 
should be doobled this year. Choteau , Barker, Castle, Neihart, Phil- 
brook and Lewistown are points which demand immediate attention. 

THB SOUTHWBST. 

The Synod of the Pacific includes California and Nevada. The 
latter State is not advancing in population and prospects, and 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] BOABD OF HOME MISaiOKS. 15 

evangeliBtic work, though peraiBtentlj preeaed, finds but limited 
encoaragement and success. We have an unoccupied church and 
manse at Eureka, which should be manned. The State needs four 
or five men. In California the work of Home Missions, grandly 
successful in recent years, is retarded by some special drawbacks. 
The three hundred Presbyterian churches, with an average of little 
more than sixty members each, are mostly poor and dependent, and 
just now largely and specially depressed by financial embarraes- 
ment. The vast wealth of the State is mostly as yet not tributary 
to the Kingdom of Christ. The colossal fortunes which have been 
piled up around the Gh>lden Gate are not yet tithed for Christian 
enterprises. An earnest effort has been made during the past 
winter to widen and complete the now meagre equipment and en- 
dowment of the Presbyterian Theological Seminary in San Fran* 
Cisco— the success of which would greatly tend to the furtherance 
of Home Missions on that coast, by providing what is probably the 
most pressing need of the work in that r^ion to-day, a larger supply 
of trained and able ministers. One gentleman offered a most 
advantageous site in a beautiful suburb of San Francisco, and 
another subscribed $250,000 for additional endowment, on con- 
dition that $50,000 should be raised outside. It is probably safe 
to say that if this aid from abroad could be obtained, the $300,000 
of endowment thus secured to the Seminary, with its new site and 
buildings, would raise it to such dignity and prestige as to inspire 
new appreciation and confidence, and command large benefekctions 
in its own neighborhood, putting it beyond any further need of 
Eastern help. The trained ministers who would then be supplied 
to the churches which now find it next to impossible to get them, 
would lift weak congregations speedily to self-support; and the 
Board of Home Miasions would thus be largely relieved both of 
the care of churches which it has long aided, and of the costly 
necessity of sending ministers across the continent, if they can be 
obtained at all. 

Texas is an empire in itself. It would cover almost six New 
Yorks. Most of its vast area is as fertile as a garden. It could 
sustain the whole population of the Union, and grow cotton enough 
for all the world. Its development of late years has been marvel- 



Digitized by VjtOOQIC 



16 ANKUAL BXPOKT OF THB [1690. 

lou8. Millions of acree of its prairie^ but lately empty and bare, 
are now dotted with thrifty homes and rich with teeming harvests. 
No less remarkable has been its improvement in order and morality 
and religion. Oar own Synod of Texas, which ten years ago was 
so feeble and discouraged that the General Assembly debated the 
expediency of abandoning the field, has since more than doubled 
its membership, and is pushing its difficult work with admirable 
patience and courage. Our strong and zealous synodical mission- 
ary should have his heart cheered by the speedy doubling of the 
thirty home missionaries now in that field. Much has been hoped 
from cooperation with tbe Southern Church, as arranged by the 
two Assemblies. The experiment has hardly been long enough 
tried to show whether or not it will serve the great ends of fra- 
ternity and economy. 

Arizona is ahard and trying field. Population is sparse. Iniquity 
and indifference abound. Living is high, and mission work costly. 
And yet it will be agreed that though obstacles are great and suc- 
cess is slow and small, earnest evangelistic effort should not be 
withheld from a region where, it is said, whole settlements have 
had no gospel ordinances within hundreds of miles for a dozen 
years. Arizona and New Mexico have just been included in the 
new Synod of New Mexico. In the latter Territory the evangelis- 
tic problem is to transform into American Christians the Indians 
and Mexicans who now form the large majority of the people. The 
most effective and promising part of the work done to this end is 
in our Indian and Mexican schools, further noticed under woman's 
work. Some of our missionaries and evangelists, however, both 
American and Mexican, have labored with great zeal and large 
success. Bev. James Frazer, until lately in charge of a wide field 
near Las Yegas, has reported the accession of one hundred and nine 
Mexicans by confession of faith during his last year of labor. 

Last year's report called for ten men for Oklahoma, now just 
one year old, and already almost entirely occupied by a large popu- 
lation. Congress has so recently passed the legislation necessary 
for its organization, that titles, values and business are not yet fully 
settled ; but the Board has six men already appointed and at work 
at Guthrie, Oklahoma City, Edmond, Norman, Kingfisher and 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] BOAKD OF HOMB MI80ION8. 17 

Eeno, and one or two more may be added. Church boildingB 
have been finished and occnpied at Kingfisher and Oklahoma City, 
and others will be erected before long. The '^ Cherokee strip " or 
'^ ontlet," between Indian Territory and Kansas, some sixty miles by 
two or three hundred, will probably soon be opened and populated, 
and form a new and large field for mission work. 

THE MIDDLE WEST. 

Jnst forty years ago the first Presbyterian church was organized 
in Minnesota. To-day, in the twin cities of St. Paul and Minne- 
apolis, with a joint population of over foar hundred thousand, and 
fast growing together into one great metropolis, some forty points, 
churches and stations, are held, and the two Presbyterian Alliances 
are pushing church extension. The work of Home Missions in the 
whole synod is healthful and advancing, notwithstanding the hin- 
drances of severe drought and many removals. A score or more 
of churches have been organized during the year. Here is con- 
centrated a mighty mass of the foreign peoples whose evangelization 
needs and demands the Church's utmost energy of effort. Of the 
State's one and one-half millions of people, one-third — some say 
more — are foreign-bom, and mostly foreign-speaking; and from 
one-quarter to one-third of all the Scandinavians in the land are 
here. Among Swedes and Norwegians and Bohemians work has 
been begun, and will be pressed and extended as fast as men fit to 
carry it on can be found; 

Presbyterian interests in Wisconsin have relatively lost ground 
for three years in comparison with those of some other denomina- 
tions, for want of steady and watchful supervision. The first year's 
work of a new synodical missionary has given them a fresh impulse. 
Like Minnesota, it has a very large foreign element, probably two- 
thirds of its popalation of one million and three-quarters, nearly 
one-half being German. La Crosse, out of 32,000 people, has less 
ftian one-fourth English-speaking. Milwaukee has two-thirds Ger- 
man. It has one Holland church, but as yet no German. Two 
German churches there are now proposed. A Get'man missionary 
at large, and also a Norwegian, are wanted there at once, and when 
found will be at once employed. New fields and calls for work 
have been created by the large and rapid railroad extensions. The 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



18 ANKUAL BBPOBT OF THB [1890. 

Sault Bailroad has built five hundred and seyenty-five miles in 
fifteen months, and our Chureh has as yet occupied none of it. In 
two years the Lake Shore and Western has built three hundred 
and fifty miles, and the Wisconsin Valley one hundred and fifty. 
Oar Oongregationalist brethren have oi^nized twenty-two churches 
in five years. The proper Presbyterian share of the work must be 
pushed with speed and vigor, and will be, if the men and means are 
forthcoming. We have eight Oerman churches in the State, and 
should have many more. Twenty-two men are needed at once, 
including three Bohemians, six Germans, and three Scandinavians. 

Iowa has suffered very much from depletion by removals to 
newer States, but our work there has been admirably managed and 
vigorously pressed. The southwestern part is as fertile a region as 
the Bun shines on. 

Missouri has saffered through its two years' lack of a synodical 
missionary. It has now a new and experienced superintendent, 
who is seeking out the weak places, filling the gaps, and stirring up 
church interests and enterprises in all the presbyteries. There is 
room for more speed and pressure in the staunch and sturdy Pres- 
byterian fellowship of that great State, and more may be looked 
for before long. Thirty more men are urgently needed. There are 
churches which might soon reach self-support if each could have 
the entire attention of a pastor. Many congregations seem too 
content to hold on to outside aid, and need to be aroused and in- 
structed in the direction of self-help. The Board has a right to 
demand vigorous cooperation from those whom it willingly assists. 
Indifference and slackness among the people are among the chief 
causes of stagnation and failure. A sister denomination, it is said, 
has disbanded fifty-three churches in the State in the last five years. 
Similar waste and defeat are not unknown in our own work here as 
elsewhere. Our field is large and inviting. Palmyra Presbjtery 
has a territory larger than New Jersey. In Platte Presbytery two 
hundred and eighty miles of railroad were built last year. The 
synod includes Arkansas, where our work is as yet limited. The 
church at Hot Springs, long weak and discouraged, has had better 
prospects of late under the good work of the Bev. Thomas Marshall, 
and some new fields are proposed. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



180O.] BOABD OF HOMB MIBSIOKB. 19 

In EanBas, our ohoroh work has specially suffered by emigration. 
The popnlation of the State, which was more than a million and a 
half last year, is said this year to have lost 68,000, or three and one- 
half per cent. This report has already referred to the serious, 
sometimes rainons, losses in this way of oar churches along the 
soathem line. There has been also partial failure of crops. And 
yet it is said that the State added last year a million and a half of 
acres to its tilled area, and has reached the first rank in the yield of 
wheat and com. The snre result of this will be to increase both 
the need and the promise of our church work, which during the 
year has been persistently active and steadily saccessfal. 

In Colorado few vacant fields are reported. The Mexican work 
has been going on grandly, and the schools are full. A number of 
elders have aided in a canvass of a part of the field, with a hcdpAil 
and stimnlating effect, and there have been some revivals. Some 
churches have reached self-support. A number of men are wanted. 
Wyoming Is soon to be a State, and will need more laborers. 

The work in the noble State of ]!f ebraska goes quietly and steadily 
on, with constant if not brilliant progress. Our churches there 
have more than doubled in the last nine years. Omaha is a strong 
and well-manned Presbyterian centre. A Bohemian church has 
just been organized there. In Lincoln, the capital, a second and 
third enterprise are under way. Men are needed at a number of 
points. 

THB SOUTH. 

Vast and rapid as is the development of the Northwest, that of 
the South, in many parts at least, has of late been not far, if at 
all, behind it. Northern capital and Northern skilled labor have 
entered many sections together, and these have furnished openings 
and fields, some of which our Church has entered with vigor and 
success. Last year's report told of the beginning of our work in 
northern Alabama. The new Presbytery of Birmingham is gain- 
ing size and strength in spite of hindrances, the chief of which is 
inveterate sectional prejudice. In Anniston and Sheffield and 
New Decatur beautiful church buildings have been finished and 
ooenpied, and solid pn^ress has been made. In Birmingham we 
have a missionary, but no edifice, though the field is the largest 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



20 ANNUAL BBPOBT OF THB [1890. 

and perhaps the best of all. It is intended soon to organize and 
baild at Thomas and at Ensley, snbnrbs of Birmingham. In 
Tennessee the rural churches do not seem to gain much ground. 
Poverty and prejudice and emigration hinder progress. The young 
people have largely gone away. And yet these weak churches are 
said to be furnishing more than theiv proportion of missionaries 
and teachers, both male and female. An English company has 
just bought a large mineral tract in East Tennessee, in which two 
prospective towns have been already located, which will soon 
assume importance, and which our Board has been urged to occupy 
at once. In Kentucky the work is hard and slow, and yet is 
steadily maintained. Florida has hardly recovered from last 
season's terrible visitation of yellow fever, and the work is retarded 
by the poverty of the people, and interrupted by absenteeism in 
summer. The orange crop will probably double next year, and 
improved circumstances will give impulse to church and mission 
enterprise. 

SYNODICAL AID. 

There is not much to add this year to what was said on this topic 
in the reports of last year and the year before. The plan of the 
Synod of New Jersey has resulted in complete success. The synod 
has cared for its own dependent churches, and has given the 
Board more than before for outside work. The Synod of Penn- 
sylvania has not yet been able to shoulder the full burden, and the 
Board has borne a share of it ; but the plan is resolutely pushed, 
and will probably succeed in time. The Synod of New York is 
still further behind. Somewhat less money has been raised for 
Home Missions than last year ; while for the support of th^ feeble 
churcEes in the State, the Board is at this time $28,551.83 in 
advance to the Synodical Aid Fund. The difference between suc- 
cess in New Jersey and partial failure as yet in New York, may 
probably be found partly in the fact, that in the one case the pre^ 
byteries have earnestly set themselves to carry out what the synod 
had resolved on, and in the other some of them have not done so.. 

The Synod of Illinois has lately inaugurated a plan of synodical 
aid, which its authors claim to be preferable to any of. the eastern 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] BOABD OF HOME MISSIONS. 21 

schemes yet tried, and as the result of which the Stated Clerk 
writes, that ^^ already twenty churches have been lifted out of the 
death-throes, and put upon their feet.'' 

The subject of sy nodical aid connects itself closely with the 
difficult but vital question as to the best method of saving and sus- 
taining the feeble and decaying churches in the older States. Indeed, 
it is the condition of these churches that has suggested these syn- 
odical schemes, and the fact that these schemes are adopted or 
proposed is an encouraging indication that the strong synods and 
presbyteries are beginning to awake to the needs of their own weak 
places, and are disposed to provide for them, while not diminishing 
their contributions for frontier work. 

NEW ENGLAND. 

No new churches have been organized during the year. Those 
previously organized hold on their way, with varying degrees of 
saccess, yet on. the whole with an evident growth and gain which 
justifies the work. It is the Board's settled aim and policy in this 
region, not to build up distinctively American churches, or to 
attract members from other denominations to our own, but to put 
Presbyterian church ordinances within reach of new comers, who 
from training and conviction prefer them, and are for the time 
unable to support them unaided. 

OUR FOREIGN POPULATION. 

One in every seven of the population of the United States is 
foreign-born. One in every three is of foreign parentage. One in 
every six is foreign-speaking. Of foreigners, as a whole, a large 
majority are Romanists, including most of the Irish, Bohemians 
and French. Of those of foreign speech, on the contrary, a majority 
are Protestants — the Scandinavians, the Dutch, and three-fifths of 
the Germans. The Germans are very largely agriculturists, in the 
Central West. There are many counties in several States, as Texas, 
exclusively occupied by them. There are 400,000 Germans in New 
York City, and 40,000 Bohemians. There are Bohemian communi- 
ties in Wisconsin, Iowa, Nebraska, Texas and elsewhere. The 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



23 ANNUAL BEPOBT OF THB [1890. 

ScandinavianB, as already noted in this report, form perhaps one- 
third of the people of Minnesota. There are large numbers of them 
in Utah. 

The Presbyterian Ohnrch has not accomplished as mnoh in this 
direction as the Gferman, Methodist, Baptist and Congregational. 
But a new interest in this work has recently been developed 
throughont the Chnrch. The Board hardly needed to be aroused 
on the subject. Indeed, it has repeatedly urged it on the attention 
of the General Assembly. How much foreign work shall be done, 
and how soon, is not for the Board, but for the Ohnrch to deter* 
mine. When the Board closes the year, as now, with a heavy debt, 
it can hardly be said not to have gone far oiongh in any given line 
of work. New Presbyterian churches have been organized this 
year among Scandinavians, Bohemians and Germans. The main 
difficulty is tliat of finding fit missionaries speaking these tongues. 
Our struggling German theological seminaries are doing their 
best, which would be much better if their scanty means were in- 
creased. Several young Bohemians are already employed, and 
others are preparing. It is thought that others still may come from 
Bohemia to engage in the work. A young Spanish missionary of 
training and experience has lately begun work among Spanish- 
speaking people in New York City. Let the Church out of her 
vast resources furnish the means, and the Board will have the 
ability, as it certainly has the inclination, in pursuance of the 
Master's promise, to plan and do ^^ greater things than these." 

CITY EVANGELIZATION. 

There is no need of repeating what was said in the last two 
reports as to the increase of interest and activity and success, of 
late years, in this great department of mission enterprise. Its 
relative size and importance are evident from the fact that already 
one-quarter of our population dwell in cities, and the further fact 
that this concentration is both steady and increasing. The list of 
cities in which church extension is earnestly pressed is larger .this 
year than ever before. The work is both difficult and costly, but 
promising and fruitful, and at the same time more and more 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] BOA&B OF HOMB MI6BIOKS. 28 

neoesBary. The Board stands ready to respond to all its claims and 
calls, to the fall extent of the Ohnroh's will, as shown by the means 
it famishes. 

THE BOARD OP CHURCH ERECTION. 

The Hoard of Home Missions has always found this Board its 
willing and sympathetic helper. We have had repeated proofs this 
past year of its readiness to render to the utmost its indispensable 
and timely aid, in assisting to a church home the congregations 
gathered and organized by the missionaries on the field. 

THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION AND SABBATH 
SCHOOL WORK. 

We make hearty acknowledgment this year, as last year, of the 
invaluable aid rendered to Home Mission work by the kindred 
labors of the scores of missionaries sent out during the summer 
months by this Board. 

WOMAN'S WORK. 

This department of the Board's work is entirely school-work, 
under the care ef the Woman's Ezecative Committee of Home 
Missions, among the Indians, Mormons, Mexicans and Southern 
mountain whites. The schools, with a few exceptions, are all in 
the Indian Territory, New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Alaska, North 
Carolina and Tennessee. There are 118 schools, 368 officers and 
teachers in charge, and 7,478 pupils. The work has cost this year 
$286,371.84. The present grand dimensions of the work have been 
reached in less than twelve years. In 1878 the Woman's Execu- 
tive Committee was organized, and in the first year the income was 
' not more than $5,000. Including gifts for Freedmen, it is now 
$337,841.89. A great enthusiasm has been kindled; the best 
women of the Church have been enlisted; societies have been 
formed in synods, presbyteries, congregations and Sabbath-schools, 
and information has been steadily distributed. The work is hard, 
slow and costly. Great care is taken to select teachers well approved 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



34 akhu:a:l. bxpobt htf thb [1890. 

and accredited in regard to character, piety, experience and aptneas 
to teach. No part of the teachers' salaries can be looked for from 
the field, as in the case of most home missionaries, so that the ex- 
penditure is relatively large. The Indians, Mormons and Mexicans 
are hard to win and Christianize and Americanize. Bigotry, 
ignorance and indifference bar the way. Then the work of build- 
ing chapels and schools on distant fields is very diflScult and very 
expensive. Great labor is expended very successfully on the Com- 
mittee's organ, the Home Mimon Monthly^ which is self-supporting. 
It is not easy in a few sentences to set forth the magnitude and 
multiplicity of the work of" the Woman's Executive Committee. 
The necessary correspondence is very large and difBcult, and per- 
plexing questioBid are constantly arising for settlement. The ability, 
zeal and persistent energy -of those who have given heart and hand 
to this work have won, as they have deserved, the admiration and 
confidence of the whole Church. They have been nobly supported 
by thousands of our worthiest. Christian women, whose zeal and 
ambition have been kindled by contact with their own. The thing 
now most to be desired and aimed at is to attract to a participation 
in this wonderful work other thousands and tens of thousands of 
equally noble women throughout the Presbyterian Church who 
have not as yet been led to take hold of it. 

The past year has not been less marked by progress and success 
in this work than those preceding it. The main drawback has been 
that the work has outrun the means. Large as has been the income, 
it has not met the demands of even the cautious and limited expan- 
sion which has been ventured on. The new work has in large part 
been both suggested and provided for by special gifts for the pur- 
pose — as for instance, the Oakland Institute at Asheville, N. C, 
the purchase money for which was entirely thus furnished. Other 
new work, on the contrary, has involved much added expense. It 
should be noted that this is especially true of the work transferred 
from the Board of Foreign Missions, which has made necessary 
considerable additional appropriations. 

A complete list of the teachers will be found in the appendix. 
The new schools opened during the past year are given below, 
with the names of those having them in charge : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Tnnaftmd 



1890.] BOiPBD OV HOXX/ MIfl8T0V«. SS 

Wtnhbwoob Indian Territory. .Mn. S. M. HotchkinB. 

PuBCiiLL " Mr. H. M. Shields. 

{Mr. & Mrs. W. E. Adams, Miss L. 
Charies, MiM G. Chsries, MfM F: 
Eeyes, Miss E. T. Wells, Mn. G. J. 
Peifyman, Miss M. Atwater. 

Sak Lins Colorado Miss T. A. Gay. 

Chapabito New Mexico Miss B. Allen, 

(Mrs. M. £. Wade, Miss M. 

OxAHA A0BNOT Nebraska ,.<h. Baitaea, Hi^ M. C. Fetter, 

(joelTyndaU. 

Round Lake Wisconsin The Misses Dougherty. 

Sac and Fox Tama, Iowa. . . . '. . Miss- A. Skea.- 

Hablan Coubt HoudB . . . Kentucky .,. ^-;. & v .....,-..•.. . Miss R. Sbepard^ 

Eli^abethton Tennessee. ....... v .,...*..,.. . Miss W. Bassett, 

Jeaboldstowk . . .~. . . " Miss R. A. Rankin. 

AsHETiLLE Day School. . North Carolina. . . . . v . . . . *Miss A/ B. DwigbtV 

. . • f Miss M. Grabm, Miae E. Dooly^ 

ASHEVILLE Oakland) vr^^k n^*^^;^^ J Miss E. V. Emmet, Miss V. T. 

Institute . f ^^^"^ ^^°^»- 1 BooA, Mto F. P. Li)we,MiisM: 

L8-Brainard. . 

Hot Spbinos North Carolina*. Miss A. Bassett. 

Stanlt County North Carolina . . . . [«J^- »• ^«^; ^«" ^^ ^: 

* This work has eDconntered serious obstacles and some disasters 
dtuiDg the past yeiff ; and yet it' may be affirmed of it in general, 
that it has progressed and prospered. For instaace, the boarding- 
sehool at Tahleqnah, the Cherokee capital, on a commanding site 
oTerlooking the town, is a model of neatness and good order. Old 
Dwight Mission, in the heart of the Cherokee forest, with its new 
bnildings, present and prospective, is a centre of elevating inflnence 
among the iiill-bloods. After an addition which will complete the 
main building this year, it is proposed to fit np an old cottage for 
the accommodation of a dozen more girls, and a teacher to saper- 
intend them. The next important step, if the work of this mission 
is to be perfected, should be the addition of a building with adja- 
cent farm for boys at some distance from the present premises, 
and on a higher and better site. The outlay of $10,000 for this 
purpose would give to the men, as well as the women, the Christian 
training necessary to secure well-ordered households in the next 
generation. The girls' boarding-school at Muscogee, with its two 
cottage homes, is doing an invaluable work. At Wealaka the school 
building was last year condemned and vacated, thoroughly rebuilt 
and improved, and the school re-opened in December. It was just 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



96 AVVITAL BXPOBT OF THS [1800. 

getting into full working order when on March 7th it was destroyed 
bj fire. It will rest with the Greek nation, whose property it is, to 
say whether the bnilding shall be restored, and the school resnmed. 
The school at Wewoka, among the Seminoles, after a long and 
nsefnl career, is now in a transition state, a new bnilding being in 
process of erection by the nation in a different locality. The girls' 
boarding-school at Wheelock, and the Spencer Academy for boys, 
in the Choctaw nation, are prosperous and strong. In 'New Mexico, 
the Albnqnerque Indian school has measnrably recovered from its 
two fires, occnpies one new brick bnilding, and is abont to add 
another. The school at Isleta, a large pueblo of L,200 sonls, is 
maintained with patient perseverance, in spite of the great hin* 
drance of the irregular attendance of the children, and the dis- 
couraging indifference of the parents. The school for the Pimas at 
Tucson, Arizona, has lately received the unqualified encomium of 
the Bev. Dr. Dorchester, in9pector of schools in the Indian 
Department at Washington. Gen. Armstrong, of Hampton, not 
long since pronounced our Good Will Mission School among the 
Sisseton Sioux in South Dakota to be a model school. The 
Mexican training school at Santa F6 has recently occnpied its fine 
new brick building, a picture of which may be seen in the March 
number of The GhwroK ait Home tmA Abroad. Up to that time 
teachers and pupils bad had a trying experience in the old dilapi- 
dated and oveivcrowded adobe buildings, which were quite unfit 
for the purpose. The Sitka native training school has added new 
buildings for boys' hospital, boys' reading room, museum, and other 
purposes, and still further improvements and additions in both build- 
ings and industrial training are under way or within sight. The 
Collegiate Institute at Salt Lake City is probably the best school 
in Utah. Its able principal and teachers have done a noble work, 
notwithstanding the great embarrassment of insufficient accommo- 
dations and appliances. Our church at Ogden has within the year 
doubled its membership, and trebled its congregation and Sabbath- 
school. The present church and school sites have been sold at an 
advance, and the buildings for both will be erected without delay 
on the fine central lot which has long been awaiting them. The 
new Academy building at Logan, the chief town in the beautiful 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1880.] BOABI) OF HOME MliSIONB. 9T 

Oaehe Yalley, will soon be finished. Several new school chapels in 
other places have been completed, or soon will be. All school and 
mission work in Utah has received a much needed impulse and 
encouragement from the ^^ Gentile '^ victory a year ago in Ogden, 
which will probably be in time the chief dty of Utah, and from the 
recent similar snccess in Salt Lake City, where there was for the 
first time an American majority. Other important towns in the 
Territory, such as Logan, Hyrum and Spanish Fork, will probably 
follow in the same direction before long. It is the beginning of 
the end. It is the tnm of a tide which can hardly tarn back again. 
It is a grand relief and reward for the devoted missionaries and 
teachers who have held on and held out so long and so well on that 
hard field. Among the mountain whites of the South, the Home 
Industrial School at Asheville, N. C., with one hundred and forty 
girls, is admirably efficient and saccessfnl ; and the Oakland Institute 
close by it, with its splendid site, buildings and equipment, opened 
last autumn with the hope and promise which it needs only time 
and opportunity to fulfill, of fitting young women, by a higher grade 
of training and instruction, not only for general usefulness, but for 
special work as missionary teachers. In the former school (espe- 
cially) there has been a marked religious influence. 

We have given only a few specimens at random from the work 
in this broad field. As to the new work in sight, the grant of land 
in the Umatilla reservation in Oregon for school purposes has been 
already mentioned. An industrial school is in contemplation on 
the quarter section granted some time ago among the Kiowas and 
Comanches, in the Indian Territory, if the means shall be forthcom- 
ing ; and the United States Government Las offered the Board an 
appropriation for a school for the natives at Point Barrow, Alaska, 
the northern-most point on the continent. 

The following is a summary of the school work : 

Schools. Teaohers. Scholars. 

Ainong the Indians 33 

" " Mormons 37 

" " Mexicans 32 

In the South 16 

Total 118 368 7,478 



164 


2,264 


99 


2,374 


67 


1,627 


38 


1,213 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



28 



l.KlfirAl; BVTO'ftT'^Or THS 



[1890. 



NUMBER AND DISTRIBUTION OF MISSIONARIES. 

The number of missionaries who have labored the whole or a 
part of the year in connection with the Board is 1,701, and they 
have been dietribnted as follows : in 



AT^AT^AMA 4 

ALASKA 6 

ARIZONA : ... « 

ARKANSAS S 

CALIFORNIA ..,97 

COLORADO 49 

CONNECTICUT 1 

DELAWARE 5 

FLORIDA... U 

GEORGIA , 

IDAHO 11 

ILLINOIS 80 

INDIANA 48 

INDIAN TERRITORY 46 

IOWA 124 

KANSAS 147 

KENTUCKY 18 

LOUISIANA 

MAINE 3 

MARYLAND 16 

MASSACHUSETTS 17 

MICHIGAN 91 

MINNESOTA 97 

MISSISSIPPI 

MISSOURI 61 



MONTANA 17 

NEBRASKA 109 

NEVADA 2 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 2 

NEW JERSEY 

NEW MEXICO 86 

NEW YORK 149 

NORTH CAROUNA 2 

NORTH DAKOTA 66 

omo 44 

OREGON 45 

PENNSYLVANIA : . 82 

RHODE ISLAND 2 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

SOUTH DAKOTA 71 

TENNESSEE 27 

TEXAS 82 

UTAH 19 

VERMONT 2 

VIRGINIA 3 

WASHINGTON 46 

WEST VIRGINIA 4 

WISCONSIN 64 

WYOMING 1 



The above table shows the truly national character of the work 
of the Board. It has congregations and missionaries in forty-four 
of the forty-nine States and Territories of the Union. It has none 
in South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi and Louisiana. In New 
Jersey the Home Mission churches are supported by synodical aid 
independently of the Board, while contributions are still made as 
before to the Board's general work. It will be noticed that out of 
the 1,701 missionaries enumerated and classified above, no less than 
one hundred and ninety-nine are at work in Southern States. Our 
Church is national, and not sectional, and so is its Home Mission 
work. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] BOAKD OF HOMS MIS0IONB. 29 

GENERAL SUMMARY. 

We oondenae the main features of the year's work into the 

following, viz. : 

Number of MiflBUmaries, 1,701 

" Miflfiioiiftry Teachen, 361 

Additionfl on Profeesion of Faith, 9,796 

" Certificate, 7,091 

Total Membership, 100,778 

•* in OongregatioBB, 151,866 

Adnlt Baptisms, - 8,844 

Ixifinit Baptisms, 5,081 

Simdaj-schools organized, 678 

Number of Sundaj-schools, - - - . - - - - 2,616 

Membership of Sunday-sohools, - 160,111 

Church Edifices (value of same, $4,667,027), .... 1,751 
^ '* built during the year (cost of same, 9897,681), - 151 

" " repaired and enlarged, ( " *« |66,178), - 321 

Church debte cancelled, $161,888 

Ohnzohes self-sustaining this year, ...... 30 

" organized, " *' 200 

Number of Parsonages (value $446,684), 264 



APPOINTMENT OF MEMBERS. 

The term of service of the following members expires with this 
Assembly, namely :. 

Mmisiera — Rev. Thomas A. Nelson, D.D. 
" James M. Ludlow, D.D. 

Laymen — John S. Kennedy. 

John Taylor Johnston. 
John E. Pabsons. 

AU of which is respectfully sabmitted. 

By order of the Board. 

H. KENDALL, \ 

WM. IRVIN, \8ecretome8. 

D. J. McMillan, ) 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AHHUAL BBPOBT OF THB 

TREASURER'S REPORT. 



[1890. 



0. D. EATON, Treasurer, in account %vfth the BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS of the 
Presbyterian Church in the United States of America. . 

1989-Amfllst-ToBidMioetliisdirte. K»S 06 

i99«-]U«oli«l«t-ToCMhrMWlTed to date tor JTohm MimUmt^yiM: 

From Gharohea, fSMCSW 4B 

'* Sabbath dohodla, 84,819 80 

** Women^a Mlialmiary floctetlea, - 98B,eB7 61 

^* Lefcaolea, ...... 187,17806 

** IiidlTldiiala,«tc., .... 41,900 61 

" Intereat on Pennanant and Tniat Funda, . 19,484 16 

___! $609 ON 61 

For P«nnanent Fand,->LaaaoT, 1600 00 

" TruatFund. - - - - 8.600 00 8,000 00 

6819,09161 

NBW TORE 8TNODICAL AID FUND. 
18««-Maroh8l8t-ToCaahreoeiTedtodate, ... 11,67999 

BU8TENTAT10N. 
t g ^ O -March Slat-To Caah reoelTad to date, via. : 

From Charchea, ..-•.■ $8,970 70 

*' Legacy, 9,088 66 

IndiTidaala, etc., - . - - . 48 44 5 ^jg gg 

For Pennanant Fond,— Lagaov, ...-.' 1*700 00 

r,4Q9 80 

OFL. $fflMi»46 

199«— March Slat^By Caah paid to date, rla. : 

Account Borne MUHank, $866,171 60 

** SuttmdaUon. lia. : 
1889-April lat-Bj Balance, Indebtedneeathia date, $166 48 

ilSMI-liarohSlst-ByOaah paid to date, • 4,194 00 

— 4,869 48 

Account New York Synodical Aid Fund, tIz. : 
ISS^^AprU Itt-By Balance, Indebtednesa this date, - $9,890 09 
189«-lKiffoh8l8t--B7 Caah paid to date,- 30,896 80 40,894 89 

$009,756 10 

Sbopended at/ollaiM : 

Miaaionariea, $641,896 69 

Spedal, as deiianated by donors, - 8,660 00 

Teaohers and Chapela— Debt AprU lat, 

1880, ^^ - - 187,619 47 

Paymenta, . . ■ ■ 996.871 84 818,901 81 

Taxes on Real Batata, *98 78 

Interest on borrowed money, 8,147 89 

$867,118 44 

Corresponding Secretaries, .... $io,000 00 

Treasurer, 4,000 00 

Becording Secretary, 8,000 00 

Clei^ 6,486 64 

TraTcUng Expenses, 640 68 

93,986 89 

Presbyterian House— Balance of Taxea, • - $781 06 

Expense of Booms, Janitor, cleaning, fuel, etc., 1,800 87 

8,681 40 

Printing and Binding Annual Report last year, - $1,678 68 

Printing and Stationery, 1,874 64 

The Church at Home and Abroad, • 1,710 90 

4,767 49 

Poatage, $1,049 08 

LegallBxpanBas, ...... 976 00 

1,817 09 

$800,760 60 

To Balance, $74,848 69 

HomeMiaaionsIadAbtedness, $88,819 84 

Teachers and Chapela Indebtedness, .... i«,Q91 97 
New Tork Synodical Aid Fund Indebtedness, 98,661 88 

$80,891 94 
Lass Balance on Bnatentation. $1*848 88 

** Permanent Fund on Sustentatlon, - 1,700 00 

•* Patmaaant and Trust Funds, 8,000 00 6,0tt 89 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] BOABD OF HOME MISBlONa. 31 



PERMANENT FUND8, the ineome only to be nsed. 



Pw V»lQiL Markat VsIm. 

aotted States eoTemment BoDdfl. 198,000 00 $81,720 00 

New T<»k City Bonds, 8,000 00 9,040 00 

Bonds and Mortgagee, 1,000 00 1,000 00 

The John C.€h»en Fond, 100,000 00 108,160 00 

IndlaaapoUs BolHng MIU Stock (|SS,000.00 bequeathed, ralae, nominal). 

Bqoitable Gas Light Co. Bonds, 87,000 00 87,000 00 

Philadelphia City Stock, 600 00 685 00 

I7nlonPaoiflcB.B. Bonds, Kansas Branch (donated), 9,000 00 9,910 00 

Mnnloipal Bond, Memphis, Tenn. (donated), - 800 00 600 00 

Pennsylvania K. B. Bonds (4^ per cent.), .... 97,00000 80,70000 

TownaUp B. B. Bonds (bequeathed), 9,000 00 9,000 00 

Louisa B. Green Memorial Fund, 7,000 00 7,000 00 

1811,000 00 $888,066 00 

TRUST FDKD8, the tanoome from which is to be reoelred by the 
donors during their Urea : 

New York City Bonds, $1,000 00 $1,198 00 

Penn8ylTaniaB.R. Bonds (4>r per cent.), 8,000 00 8,800 00 

■quitable Gas Light Co. Bonds, 8,000 00 6,000 00 

Township B. B. Bonds, 4,000 00 4,000 00 

Lo^ on BealBstate, .... 6,00000 8,00000 

$19,000 00 $19,498 00 

Township B.B. Bonds (bequeathed), $9,000 00 

BXAL BSTTATB— Presbyterian House, one-half interest In the property, comer of Fifth 
Arenue and Twelfth Street, New Tork City. 

O. D. BATON, 7¥'4a$vrer. 



TJU umdmtiffned hatfing tmmintd ilU aeeounU^ with ths woueUn, tf O. D. Baton, 3Was- 
wr^ <jf As Board y ITosm if2Mton«,;ffui iff tarns corrtet, and 1h4 sseurUUi ^ lAs PtrmanmU 
and IHitt Fund$ €U ttaUd. 

WALTER M. AIKMAN, ) . -.^^ 

Nsv Tcaa, Jfoy 6, 1890. TITUS B. MEIGS, ) ^•*«^- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



82 



.AHVUAL BSPOBT OF THB 



[1890. 



1^ 



p 



p 
ft 

§ 



8 9 S 8S SS8SS 



s 
3 



II 



8 



8 



S88B 8 



8 8 
IS 8 



So 

9 



.^8 48 «)888 8888888 888 8 



8 9 

lO o 

"ST~8^"8" 

CO Ot QM Ok 



8 ?8S 8 S 
8 So9g« S S 



83 8 

OOlO to 



8 8SS8 
S 8«S8 






§M 













A 



|8| 888 8^ 

I ri I e«oo o« 



8888S89$ 



8 


8 




5 


ot 




t» 




s 




8 


n 

1^ 






01 




'"' 



'8^ 



i; 






^ :^ :^r 







ill 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD or HOUB UIBSIONB. 



33 



8 ^8 

to* 




8 

00 


8 


S 98 8 

00 00^ ee 


9 
8 


8 


600 
90 00 

1 00 
800 


89 18 
4 75 

7 49 


8 S8 

00 0»»« 




s 

lO 


S 8 $;8S S2 
8 « JSSS ;S 


8 


800 
18 86 

96 00 
787 
800 


S 28^8888 

S «Sfe*'«Sg 


sse 
•a* 


«8 


8 


8889388to88SS 
SSSg||«ffig«38 


1 


8 

8 


19 06 

6100 

807 41 

195 84 
80 00 
12 50 


88 S 8S88 
8*- • 8I5SS 


S8S 


8g 




S88888 8888 

S88*§8 &Q'^^ 


9 
§ 


888898S8888 

^ooojsgoogr-^jg« 










iiiteiiiiiiriiiisiiiii 






iiii 



3 s s 3 a 






i 



jSt|3| _, 



S?S-fe 



8 

00 


8 

00 


60 00 
6 16 
500 
1 00 


18 60 

6 49 
1 00 


8 

00 








8 

S 


s 

00 




s 

2 


80 00 

60 00 
78 99 
500 


105 66 
8189 

T90 


88 

t-ot 


8 


8 
9 












8S8 

SIS 


64 00 

807 00 
500 

10 00 


8 


8 
i 


68 15 

500 

10 00 
51 97 


6 

a 


s 
s 


1 80 
887 
11 01 
88 06 


00 01 
006 
00 01 
009 


8 


8S8S88888?888 

9<»§g8S8e«|S?S^ 


85; 
•^8 


9 

1^ 


8888 88 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



34 



A.NNtTA.1. BEPORT OF THE 



[1890. 



8 8 S 
1 " 9 " 


8 


s 

s 


8 

et 


.& 8 88 


8 

00 


a 




.8888 & SS 


s 

00 


s 




a 

e 




y 8838888 88 888S8 


SS8888 


5 


8 


8 

lO 


S8SS88SSS88 






If 



Ssgf _ 



§ § 



II i^ 






3S4 



11^^ 






SMt. 

19 58 
600 

10 00 

11 90 
800 

20 00 


8 


8 8 8 


. 8S88 8SS 8 8 


8 


S 


8 8 

00 00 


.S888 88S888&«8iS8 
^SSSg Si8{^||?8SS^ 


8 

i 




8 


10 00 
800 

78 87 
17 00 

14 00 
88 00 


■ SS88888 $883S 8 

^.sgsssag S8g- 8 


8 
1 




8 


8^8 8888 88S 
• • - 8S5«« S«* 






£>.4iaS B ^ a & « « S 0^^ 

I 






i 



11 



I 

P4 



I 



n 



iils^li 



riiliii 



iiiij 



ii 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OF HOKB MIBSIONS. 



35 





s 


s 


8 


S 8 


9 


9 


905 
880 

800 

SOT 
500 


s 


a 

8 


S 88 8 

- C* 8 


s 

1H 


875 
10 00 

94 00 
96 00 
56 10 


S S8 8 


8 
S 


888S 8 88 


S88S88 88 


^ 

s 


886888888888888 
gSS«aS2S8— >88S» 



llll 



llilllii 



ii 



3 

II 

I 






|S9 



£p3 si 



llllllllllli ll 



8 


8 

55 


8 
•• 


8 


88 


9 




8 8 


8 


8 8 8 

a - - 


8 

8 


8§ 


8 


8 


888 868 8 8 88 8 8 


9 


8 8 


S 


9 

s 


88 
•8 


8 


888S:S 8 88868 88888888 


6 

s 


8 

9 


88 S88 8 

•S 692 • 


8 


88$ 



1 



14 

Ii 






I 

III! 



ll 



iS^ 



J. 

3a3»3;3o 



ill 



lifiiild 



iti 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



86 



ANHOAL BRPOBT OF THH 



[1890. 



1 

00 


8 






8 8 


S 


8 




00 


8 


8 




g 

s 




1 50 

8 01 
18 67 
10 60 

800 




L.S. 
700 


e 

9 


3 

8 


00 


68 60 
800 

40 00 
860 
970 

14 00 




10 80 

88 90 
4186 
88 88 




^88888 8 


s 


8 

8 




600 

87 00 

10 00 

400 

48 00 


8 

CO 


S8 8S8 28 8 


10 00 

860 

98 81 

1 600 





I 



illaiillOlll^lllllli 



8 8 8 8 88 

1 - - - a 


8 

9 


s 


S.B. 

100 00 
858 

88 00 
886 


a 

8 


e 


L.B. 
868 

606 

888 40 
80 50 

154 79 

84 00 
107 80 








8 


8 




.8S 8 8888888Sdg 8 88 889 


1 


s 


SS 


88 


n 8 

8 * 


8S 



I 

I 







'il'SSas 



lass IS<SS£ 



ilill! 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OF HOMB MIB8IOV8. 



87 



8 


25 


80 00 

960 

800 
8 10 

100 


8 


s 


780 

600 

86 10 

16 60 
8 10 

80 41 
10 00 
10 54 

690 

16 00 
600 


80 60 
80 86 

86 40 
886 


S 


SS88 8 88 8 8 888888 989 1*88 
8ggS g 8« *• § 9«^M» -••a S85I 


88 8 8 8 

^lO « o s 


1 


888 £838888i8 «SS 8^6 8888^ 8 



Sil; 

liaiMflllll 



as 






\Ui 



mm 







8 
3 






750 
119 68 

160 


8 




8 


8 










e 

Oft 


88 


8 




;3 


8 


8 

8 




88 
S8 




s 




8 

8 




i 


e 8 

8 


88 


888 


8888S38 


8 


400 
88 00 
14 00 

885 


983 

eoao 


888 

~a8 


98 00 
860 

TOO 
800 
870 


1 


8SSSS 



oQeS 



i 



iS 



*. e." 



.M|l 




M*Si 



.11, 

(2a 



83 



9 ^o^se 



\Bl 



mi 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AKHVAL BSPOBT OF THB 



[1890. 



^ 88 

1 - 








8 

00 




10 00 
10 00 

188 96 


8 

00 










8 

Co 




00 99 

00 88 
88 Zl 


800 
14 18 

88 88 


.8 






^ 3{ 






40 00 

80 00 
8168 

480 00 

08 00 
140 00 


77 00 

641 

80 00 

10 00 
48 00 
10 00 


H.M. 

60 96 
640 
17 60 


S 


»68 


«88 


8S8898S8888^ 88 


888 8as88888S8 




44s. 






"^11 II 





8 
9 


8 9 


8 8 


8 8 

e» ot 


ad 

OQ 




8 


8 


8 

3 


8 {5 




88 


L. 8. 
78 00 

66 06 
87 00 
960 




S 8 

9 55 


8 

8 


1 


8 88 88 8 

*- as aa a 


S 8 

lO 


8^« 


00 08 
069 
00 06 

HH 


8 8 


800 
8TT0 
87T 

800 
10 40 


8 


00 

i 


8S888St!e»8 

a-s8fca-sa' 


88 89 

10 00 
886 
1 00 


8 8 
8 S 





^-^J^-^-^l 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OF HOHB MISSIONS. 



39 





8 
1 


S 

OT 




8 


8 


8 8 
00 j5 


9 
8 






8 
§ 


8 
8 


38 9 89 


8SSS 
S-98 


88? 88 


&8 8 ;s: 

»• « 8 


i 


8 


S8 
88 


8 

i 


8 S 
8 S 


88 8 896 
S« 8 S«S 


3S88 
»-«98 


8 8888 

00 ggt-o 


888 S 8 
•88 • 8 


8 

§ 




888 

"83 


«• 


82 
5^ 


SS8888 8 

gaǤac s 


SS8 




888 8 8 

•88 -» S 


9 
1 


88 

(.A 



ll 




2li 



.# Ill ill 




J 



^^n!« 



III 



8 8 8 8 

MM r4 «-i 


9 
8 


9 10 

400 
78 00 

7118 

60O 


8 

M 


8 
8 


800 

600 
1179 

476 

8 11 
89 00 


648 

800 
16 00 

400 

1180 
10 00 


i 


64106 

1868 00 
807 80 
760 74 

686 00 
66 68 

94 00 


8S8 & 888 88 8888888 




;3888 8888{:988888S3 9 
888-* i8g||S|8S8;S§« 8 




li 



.„ -Illllll 



1 iSl «^' ssassssasassss 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



40 



ANVVAL BBFOBT OF THB 



[1890. 





S8 

^00 






s 
s 


88 8 




88 8 

y^Cn 00 


8 


8 

00 


8.8. 

61 00 
660 


2 






e 

S 


S88 8 




S S 5S 

CO « m^ 


8888 88 
«*-- 8 *-S 


o 


L. S. 

188 80 
194 82 


8ggS2 


8 


3SS 


1 


S88 


8 

00 


83 8988 
8S «85IS 


SSfeS 888 8 
*8*5 82-* « 


8 

8 


H. M. 

68 48 
144 68 


88258 




S 

s 


i 


888^ 
88«* 


8S 
«S5 


^88^ 88 
S58*-8 8^ 


8889S 8888 


S 







111 






II 






.q 



bui 



k^ 








8 












8 








8 


8 


1 


et 




















M 


00 






e 












S 


888 


8 


^ 


8 


OQ 
OQ 




00 












00 


00^ 


'^ 


8 


o» 


.jS 


g 




8 




fe 


8 


88 


8 


8 


8 S 


8 


8S 


CD o 
Hi ^ 


? 




a 




»- 


S 


•°s 


8 


00 


8 :2 


§ 


SS 


n 


88818 


S 8 


88SS 


8 


88 


8 


88 


g^S 


8Z888 


88 IS 


8S 


s«a'« 


CO lO 


8-»-a 


00 


«ei 


0« 


S2 


^«S 


SSSS8« 


-^^ i 


•8 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD or HOHB MISBIONB. 



41 





s 


8S 


s 




8 










8 


9 


9 

S5 


s 


S 8 8888 

0^ <* OOO^M 


s 


8 




«9 


^8 

»-8 


8 


ss 


888 

«»8 


28 

sa 


5S98Si 




S«S9S88 S8S 8 


8 




8S 


s 

ff 


8IS 
g8 


8 
8 


8S 

coot 


888 
^8lo 


s 




s 


88 88 SSSS88 

4D^ fc-OO ^^g<«<DlO 


OD 


8 


88 
-8 


8S888 




898 


888 
S88 



;$ 









llflll. 



^^nnncQ 










;f 



fiitSi 



l^lllgillllSilllllllllllilU 





8 

CD 






8 




8 

00 




8 

3 


a 

to 


2 

8 


8 


8 

0* 


8 e 




8 


8S 


8 


8 6 

a s 


3 

s 


IS 

a 


SIS ^S 

«S 55S8 


888^898 


8 


188 60 
85 00 

88 15 


8 S 

- S 


888 
•-St 


S 8 8888 


is 

i 


8 

00 


88 8 


14 41 

84 00 
665 
400 
108 88 
488 




88 88 
45 00 
87 50 



h 







S3 



mm 



III; 



ill 






s?i 



L 



illll,ssll 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



42 



ANNUAL BKPOBT OF TBB 



[1890. 



83 



8S 
as8 



8S 



8 8 



"9 8 88888 «8~S 8 8 §8^ 



88 rS8 89 S 8 8;: 8 88 88 8888 

»S "^S 88 8 * 8S ^ ?;« ^;2 «>-8-» 



Hi 










64^1 



k^i 



i 




800 

10 00 

7 15 
896 

840 
746 


8 




ad 

OQ 


8 


S 

8 


S 8 

8 fe 


10 00 

700 
850 

10 80 

85 60 

1 61 
585 


8 

9 




L.S. 
100 


S 

fe 


i 


88 78 

885 00 
8184 

15 00 
189 00 


884 65 
46 80 
900 

718 

980 

100 60 

IT 80 

194 88 
66 41 
686 

4 18 
8100 

88 40 


8 

i 






8 


s 


8 76 

68 00 
16 85 
15 60 
108 00 
890 


S8S88Sg 8 ;S99 8888 888 S8 

s««-**-»s s as* 8j!s* *as '^z 


a 





SU 

M 

3^^^ 




^ m 



B^W^n 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.1 



BOABD OF HOHE MISSIONS. 



43 



8 

CO 


8 

CO 


8 


800 

878 
1 86 

88 86 

485 

866 

7 16 


8 

2 


8 


8 et: 8 89 8 68 SS 88 IS 8 8 

8 »S is «8 S i58 S^ ^S 8 8 8 


S 

3 


600 

708 

88 16 

600 


8 8 

CO ^ 


8 


88 8 8 




►Ifg 

iiiiiiiilhi 



;s 3 3 3 3 3 ; 



II 






iliiliilil 



lei 



8 


s 






100 
1100 
800 
800 


8 


8 8 




S5 
3- 


s 




46 78 

1 60 
600 

600 




88 

38 




SS 
S8 




600 
78 00 

18 00 
185 11 

20O 


8S8S88888 

a;s8^asig^8S 


8 


800 

80 40 

600 

18 88 




s 




8 

SI 


8 

m 


8 


8 



i 



s 



I 



j 



Si 



331 



lllilii 



3> 



Sil 



Is! 



iSlllsli 



i 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



44 



ANHUAL BSPOBT OF THB 



[1890. 



1 


8 


SS 8 


o 




8 




SS 

OtrH 




8 


S S 8 

M «0 


8 


8 

a 


-11 


8^8$ 


8 8SS 8 




S 8 




S8S t; 


88S8 ^ 


H. M. 

8 14 
460 


ssess 
ssas- 






8S 




S S 


S S8 8 888 



lllll 



^li- 1: 



£«8|i?|| 




Suit. 

800 

600 
100 


88 




8 


S 8 

et on 


. 8 828 8S 

OD 


870 

160 
80 00 


8 

00 


S 


10 00 

80 87 
100 


. 8 88S89SS8 S 
2 ■* S8§8$:S8*- 5 


49 46 
488 
7 47 

7116 


14 10 
66 00 

10 48 


s 


8 

8 


^8 ^8 8 


^ 8 388S88 SS 




800 
40 00 

600 


9 


8 


88 88S88 S8 



^Iji 



iism 












llllfclllll Illillll 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABO or BOMS MI8BIOH8. 



46 



8 


8 
8 


8 


8 


8 8 




88 

QDCB 


9 




8 8 
8 


SS 8 


e 

9 


S8838 
8SSS8 






8 


16 00 

74 68 

100 
81 00 

106 76 

8T6 


89 S tS SS 

oita <N CO oflo 


S88SS8 8 


88 88 
800 
16 80 

10 00 


s 


8 

8 


16 00 
868 
600 
8 76 


8 88888$S8 

lo iooog|<D^|g<oao 


S S«888 8 


88 ^88 
38 8S« 



1 



lllllll 






llli 



<-<MA 



Pi c 
III if^^ 






oBvnnni 






I 



nmSMJ»3.2s5alSi 



Sts'S 






8 8 8 


8 

at 








8 

00 


8 


8 

ot 


8 


668 
86 00 


s 

8 


8 

to 


82 




8 8 

00 00 


8 
8 




60 00 
60 00 

870 


40 86 

100 
8616 
18 00 


8 
1 


8 


S88 
•8S 




8 8 
S " 


888 


16 60 
76 

116 16 
64 41 
84 86 

10 OO 
18 00 
18 00 


88888S8 


3 

3 


8 SSS 

to 090000 


88 S 


»88S3SS8S!:8S!SS$S 


8S 

a«ao 


888S88 e88S 



t 






illi 



&i 



1- 



S3 



id 




II 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



4« 



ANNCTAL BSPOBT OF THE 



[1890. 



8S8 

lOlOM 



83 



8888 S8 88 288 238 
S^8fe gS ►• -^S-^ «« 



e 8 



8 8 

CO 00 



8 8 S 8 88 8 



8 



8 88 59 ^ 



8 S3 S? 



8 



88 88S88;!88 8 88 88 



S S8$SSSSS8SS SS9 S St; 



J 



It* 



!W 



|l||;||||s 



iilil 



1 --s 

If 



|f,35 



ill l^itlljtlltN 



1 


8 

10 


s 


8 




ad 

CO 


s 

s 


8 




& 

*• 




QQ 
h4 


3 


28 00 

700 
400 


S8 

9S 


s 


8^ 


g 

■* 


H. M. 

10 00 
18 08 


s 


8 8S 888888 8 8 8^ 


8888 8 


s 


4 10 

88 00 

800 

450 

950 


500 
14 60 
600 
500 


s 



g 



i s 
11 § 



I h jl 11 Jls|lliilsllli|g 






^Jl 



I 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OT HOMB MISSIOSS. 



47 



8 8 






ss 


8 


Si 


600 
600 

600 


S 8 




418 
800 

28 66 

500 

240 


9 






84 48 

802 
600 

686 


S8 
•8 


8 




P 88 8 988 
8 88 « --^-^ 


S 


88 
8S« 


88 
8-^ 


8 8 S 8)^ 8 
S • S ;J8 8 


88888S 


88«S888S 


888S8889 


8 
§ 


16 20 
12 00 
10 60 
28 26 

14 06 

15 00 


88889888S 88 



r:jNI";!l. 



. • . « 



ieS 



iiiliiliill iiliiiig 



fill 



is 



:)ShS 



8 


8 

01 


8 
8 


S 


8 


600 

60 49 
88 18 

20 00 


s 

8 


1 


200 
1166 

80 00 


8 
9 


16 47 
18 80 

4141 
834 41 
96 24 

778 

16 60 

266 81 

200 


8 88 

.-1 «oe» 


460 

640 
26 OO 


12 46 

800 
600 


8 


88 


16 00 
722 

600 

20 00 
25 00 




88 38389 88 88 



il^llilli 



i 

Q 



§ 



iMIIHIIiilsil Ullillll lllli 



It. 



Si 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



48 



▲SirXrAI. BBPOBT OF THX 



[1890. 





8 


S 




8 
















8 






1 


00 


5; 




00 
















*H 








3 






to 


8 










e 




8 


^8 


e 


QQ 


8 






2 


«9 


M 












■<• 


•»-« 


to 




9 S 


ee 


ss 


e s 


8 






8 






8S 


8 


88 


3 


CQ 


-^ g 


8S5 


8* 


fi S 


lO 






S 






»-*« 


S 


S^ 


fc- 


J 8 


8S 


g8S888 


8 88:38 




gs 


888 


8 


9 


88888^ 8 


8^8 


a e« 


vi^ 


• g^i>e. 


- 58»« 




-5: 


ass 


« 




^Sfefc-^S s 


lOt>.00 


» 































s| 



_-5 5 

11 ~ 



£5 



:s5: 





1 


8 

00 


8 

00 






8 


8 8 


OQ 

ad 


s s 


s s 


S 8 

T-l 00 


8 
S 


1! 
2 


8S 
89 


® • 00 

»4 


8 s ss 
s a "s 


sssss 

aa"ss 


S 3 


S3 


8 
i 


9 

S 


^8S8 




88 S8 

00^ «eeo 


8 898«8 8 8 


e 
8 


88 888 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OF HOME MIBBI0N8. 



49 



8 8 S 888 8 

00 <« <0 v^ ^ M 



8 8 

« 22 



S &98 S;!SS 8S 

2 «eo»o» ^oi«H«o «Hio 



8 8 g 
8 



8 



8S 8 

as s 



8 8 8 8 SS 8 

^ a a 5: ss IS 



S3 



88 



9S88 

a"«8 



88 S88 



? ^S88S5:S?aS 8SS8S 13 8 8 8SS8 S 







8^8 S 






88 


r: 

9 


'• 


8 


8 

00 




88S 




8 




9 

§ 


8 

en 


88^ 8 8 

000900 JH lO 


8 

09 


8 


9 ess 


8 


888 


8 S 

00 e« 


S 


8 8 


14 00 

86 85 
65 87 






8 S883S888S8 


8 


600 
600 

1100 
800 

10 00 


1100 
600 
600 
96 00 
80 00 
14 00 


8 


888 

eeotio 


88S;8S888^88 


8 

00 




s ;! 






St 

5 * t 

- i^h 



er 



S<8 



'SS'SS 

QQHH 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



60 



▲nVUAL BBPOBT OF THB 



[1890. 



1 






8 8 

M «4 










8 




8 

CO 


OD 






8 3 










8 
9 




88 

8a 


00* 

h4 






68 88 

3S 88 






it 




8 a 
i; 8 


8 


88 


n 


88 8 


88 

««0 


888S8 888 8 


88 




8888 

e.^8. 


8 


888 


8882 


8S 




1 


8 




88 2 


9 


8 

00 


88 


8 


a 8 


8.8. 
8186 


8 

s 




as 


8 8 

• a 


8 


ft 


8 88 

•9 ^«0 


8 C 

a • 


i4 


8 


8 


988 


8a 

S8 


89 


8 


8 n 

" 9 


S 888 
5 S""* 


Exj 


8 
i 


8 S8 
- "8 


ssasss 


88888 

-"Bas 


98S8 


888888SS8s:888S88 8 



ii 

PS 



d 



bliss 

sill 



!?■ o O » -! O 







lliljllllllll 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OF BOXS HIBBI0B8. 



61 















S 


8 


9 

*4 














09 


8 














^ 




8 


a 




3 




8 




CM 














^ 




*i« 


§ 




OO 




S5 




8 


8 






9 


^ 


8S 


9 


i:8 




8 


8 


8 




83 


8 


« 


9 






X 


S 


2S 


a» 


a- 




s 


a 


S 




S5r 


et 


iiediis 


888 


^ 


d 


sM8feSdS8r:g« 


s 


g 


138888 


8 


88 


8S 


as""*- 


lOMOO 


« 


S 


S^nt^SM*^ 


as 


i 


ff 


»«o«o<ot. 


lO. 


g« 


g« 



ii 



mi 







^Pi 



iiilslii 



Mi^ 



Sf^^' 



HKH RH 



8 

• 


1; 
8 


8 

lO 


8 




« 

a 


a 
3 


17 71 

18 00 

866 

18 00 

860 

. 800 

11 77 

870 

1 18 
180 

464 


8 
8 




s 

s 


6 


«8a888S S 6 8 S 8888 89 So S 


8 
8 


8 




8 

8 




88 888886888881^888828 8^8 §«8§6 88 
1^8 8«>«8««««SS8««aS5!9** •»- — — « S«S 


8 

9 


88S 



IS 



rMiMiilililJ " t i 






at 
2 



I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



52 



▲HNDAL BSPOBf OV THB 



[1890. 





8 


8 




8 


s 


















1 


»< 


^ 




tfl 


Q« 




















8 




9 


♦ 


98 


8 






8 


ts 


9 


8 




01 

ad 


" 




•0 




a- 


m 






01 


8 


8 


M 






8 






S8S 


sa 


9 


8 


8 


8 


89 


8 






HJ 


* 






lOlO^ 


^$4 


'^ 




lO 


M 


8S 


8 








S 888SS8 


8 


sas 


8S 8S 


SSS9S8S 


SS888S 


888 


sssse 


3 


<« lOVDOiioeocfe 


;5 


S"8 


tHiO •"• 


i-i««Met^eo 


""sa-a 


-«s 


8- 


l-l^«0 


fl8 




1 


8 
g 


8 S 

t4 -^li 


8 


8 






8 


QQ 
OQ 


8 




8- 






-! 

A 


8 

oo 


• S 




8 

CO 






8 


n 


8 8 


88&8S 




888 


888 

OV4 00 


8 


888 888^898888 





* _ 

ii!ll 



ii||lililg-| 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OF BOMB KIS8IONB. 



53 



a 










8 






8 










Si 






8 

•0 


8 

le 


3 
1 




s 

8 




8 






9 8 8 

ee « •• 


8888 


8 


8 8 8 

« !-• CO 


8888 888888 


888 

to .4 to 


5: 


8898 88 


8PS 

eowio 



^1 



II I 




^ il^i^iil illliliilill 

a III*' sllllilli I illiil 



8 
















2 




S 8 

CO CD 




s 


S 


90 78 

88 IB 
68 85 

660 






88 

«0«l 






88 


8 

S 


80 98 
17 80 
960 

1110 
660 


48 84 

860 
488 
260 


888 8S88 


§8 


8 

lO 


8^8 


8^ 


88 

•a 






88 





i 







i£(S< 




I 



^fi 



iiiiiij 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



54 



▲HVUAL BIFOBT OF THK 



[1890. 



1- 


S 


8 

01 


8108 
800 

100 
100 

too 


5: 

S3 




8.8. 
188 48 

858 






9 




L.8. 

07 50 
500 

816 

500 




i 8 

8 8 


600 
400 
TTOO 

16 94 


g 


8 

-* 


. fe88Sa88S8 


8 
§ 


07 40 
10 80 
600 
188 80 
600 


90 T5 
60 87 

404 08 
1100 
94 60 

10 00 

18 00 

88 00 
500 

600 

800 


6 

i 





sass^, 



I- 



•dS 



I 



-^^^ 




i'E 



I? 



E i_ a^ p « '- -■ - o Si « afS i3 S iiji 

^ o .^ ^ 21 ^ a S P^.^;[S £ ^tlS s ^-^ 






8 





8 




8 




88 


8 








1 


1-1 




^ 




11 




Ot«H 


00 








s 


























Si 




98 




8 










8 




CQ 
OQ 


CO 




S 




le 










ao 






o 


p 


8 




is 


$ 




8 S 8 




6 


i 


n4 


ss 


lO 


S 




^ 


^ 




•H fe« 40 




S 


«H 




?5 


88S8 


S8 


888SS 


88 


888 


^ 8^8288 


S8 


8 


9 


s 


iOt^v^CO 


Ot-i 


„g„„g 


52SS 


eo«M 


00 Mt^eogjotfe- 


»«o 


8 


00 






illlllltlllllldllllllli 



li 



IllllJlfllllli^lllllllsllllllljSillliilli 




i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OF HOMK MIStlOKB. 



56 



8 8 
" St 


8 
8 


8 

to 


S8 8 88S 9 e S 8 8 

** •» C«S 8 8 • -^ • 


s 


46 64 
T87 


8S888 8188 8 8 8 8 8 8 


8 
i 


196 00 

84 86 
10 00 


880 

14 00 
180 00 
881 18 

86 41 

TOO 

800 

19 88 


ss 

S 


16 60 
16 00 

100 00 
100 
800 

99 00 

600 
100 



mi 



a 






I 



n 



^^liiiii 111 






8 


8 






S 8 




8 


s 


8 
8 


8 






815 

88 


8 


«0 


\ 


a 
3 


600 
460 

10 80 

90 97 






86 86 

78 80 

87 00 

88 10 


« 


18 00 
760 

000 


88 «8 S 

^99 «»f4 «0 


a 
3 


1166 
660 
876 

18 66 


6 

CO 


6 

«0 


400 
166 00 


8Sd 

•a- 


888888 888^88 



lilllii 



Jl 



e^S 



lllllll llliy Sllllllllll^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



56 



AHHUAI. BBPOBT OF THE 



[1890. 



1 


8 


S 8 8 

s a " 




9 

9. 




8 

00 


S3 


OQ 


Ok 


s 


s s ss 


8 


s 

S 




8 8 


8 8. 

00 lO 


»4 


*- 


ss 


S9 stsess 


8 


8 

9 


888 


8 3 9 


888^8 
8«JS8« 


H. M. 

7S0 
500 






S8SSSSS;S 88S 


8 

00 


8 


8 SS 


8 6 8 

• 3 - 


& 88S8 



III 



ft 

if 



ni 



4 






'M^im 'ill! 

'IHllllyl till 






t 



a»l 



Hi I 



Shbm 



la ^'i'iJ 



1 


8 

MS 




s 


SI S S 8 
w 8 • • 


8 


in 


S 

s 




8 


60 00 
85 00 
18197 


S8 8 S 


OQ 


8 

1^ 




98 
IS 


800 
181 00 
159 10 
08 98 


88 8g2S 8138 
538 S§§ 8g- 


^89 88kg%S3 

gas gs^s^-^s 


= 1 

e 


g 


SoS8 

tOO||t- 


8 S889S888 $:S8 


8S 888 8gS8S{:88 
5:3 8:S8 «8S«8S« 



lllll 



I 






£1 



^§ 



,;ii^: 



Ml 



lis' : i^l1«i§ 



illlliji • yi|lii1lllllf il 



■go 



li 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOARD OF BOMB MI6BIONB. 



67 





S3 


^8 8 


s 
s 




88 


88 


8 8 




8 


8 ess 8 Z8 8 8 

Ok ^OOiH «^ «;^« 00 ^ 


8 


3 
8 






9 

at 


ssa 


S 


88Se« S88SSS!S8« X 


8 

8 


98 


8 


SS 8 

38 • 


888t:8S 
88*8"" 


S8 

0101 


8 

a 


SSSSe 88eS 88S 8S8S8 

88»a»- -sax ass •-•-«»«« 


8 


88 


S8 


88 8 

•8 S 


S8 86S 

8» «S* 



111 



1111^11 









Mil 



i 



8 

00 


8 


8 




888 

ioao« 


98 


s 


Ok 


e: 8 

8 ^ 


S88 
»-S8 


8 


8 8 


9800 

17 06 
600 


S 

8 


S 

i 


14 00 
600 

600 


8 


8 8 8888S8888S888888S88888 888 
8 a «o«^.«JJ«a•««•«.«5g»:••5a «»« 




01 



IIap^F^^h? 



I _ 

UlilliiilillllMidlili 






u 



til 



i!|} 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



58 



AHNVAI. BKPOBT OT THB 



[1890. 



1 


8 8 8 


« 


8 
9 




00 

ad 


8 8 e 


9 

a 


8 




ad 


S9 S3 8 sa s 

aa «c fe 9 s 


sen 8 

lOOTiO 22 


8t 
1 




;3 S S 
55 « fc 


a 




98 8S 8 SS S 

88 8S * 8<* 8 


8 8 S8 8 

a - 3| s 


8 


S5 8 SS SS 9 

« tt « QOJ ^ 


89S8 




J 


8 












8.8. 

60 00 
800 




8 

S 




8 

V4 


S 

8 




s 

•0 


8 


si 


a 
§ 


8 

S 


88e 
a-*8 


8 8 

S 


8 
8 


8 8 
8 S 


? 




'- 


3 
1 


8288828 


8888S8 


883 

gotco 


8 

s 


88 S 8 


8 8 8S8S 

•0 •«' »-«as«B 


«»8 



-^ ^lli 



•l"^ 
M^^ 






^§ 



^Hi 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD or HOVB MF8BIOKB. 



59 





*4 










8 




8 8 88 














e 

to 


8 8 


8 8 S 8 


s & 

00 


8 
8 












8 

8 


88S 888888 

S88 S8ass» 


S9 8- 

fliet «o 


8 


■a 


ft 


s 

s 


s 


88 


eg 


882 8 

^*es 8 


88S8882 88 8^8 

JSSgSg-^ «8 8S8 



ll 



Mf 



I 






Sllll |lipllMli|HiMli|lilll 



nili 



i 



8 


9 
8 


88 
"8" 


8 
8 




8 




8 




16 71 
597 


18916 
56 98 


3 


48 60 

7 19 
880 

7 66 


8 


700 

18 79 

800 
868 

88 61 
80 60 


88 88888888 


i 


S88S888 888 888 


S 


15 00 
10 00 

660 
186 



III 



i. 






ilisv 3 ''^'^'lll ills- k.^il!ss^lisl 



: • : 5 : : ' : :^ 



I 



Is 
llllllllllll 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



60 



AVnVAh BBPOBT OF THB 



[1890. 



1 


^ 




e 


8 




8 




'8 




^ 




s 


»- 




1-^ 




•» 










as 








S 


8 




88 




2 




- — 


-.., 


OD 

ad 






ss 








1 


M 




OiO 




S 










8 


88SS 




esss 


«S 


s 


8 


g 


8 




8 




^ 


s 


•4 


to 


••^sa 




8S 8 


c«ao 


1 


S 


s 


« 




«o 




iO 


s 




ss 


8 


8S 


88 


8886 


8 


s 


98S 


88S 


88 


8 


8 


88 


8 


«S 


iO 


96 


M« 


wvooo; 


<D 


8 


•- *5 


««« 


CO^H 


8 


Oi 


co«o 


oo 






a 
m 

4l 



S(2 



81= 



i 






ta (S ij £ 

dq CJO 'ifi J? 









1^1 



88 
1 

to 


S9 8 sa SS 

-« - SS -8 












. 8 
oi 5 


400 

10 00 
80 00 
110 97 

8 11 
86 67 




8 


8 


8 


3 




s 


.88 8 


88 88 8S88d 
S8 S<" S§S«g 




8 
8 


88 8 


5 


S 

1^ 


8 


8 

IO 


^. £i8 8S88S889 888ti8S S:8 
*. 9§ SSS"««8 SSJS-3|S |« 


SI 


3 

S 


800 

90 06 

886 

800 


8045 89 

04 08 
600 


89 

00 0» 


S8SS 



e 



s 



'is -bI 



'■SM, 






iii2iiltP^^-'"---liitP 






|gl)! 

5e§5i 



II 



HI^^O 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD or- HOM» MIBSIOHS. 



63 



900 
10 00 




8 

to 


- 


s 


8 
8 


8 


8 






s 




8 


00 




S 888 

SS -885 


8 




8 




^ 

s 


8 

«0 


8 S 

lO lO 




8889S8888S 


9 


s 


1 


8 

0* 


600 
40 00 
10 00 

600 
10 00 

400 

1 16 


88 8 


8 8 


888 8138 8 

8«a •«- * 


888 



III 



33 



ill 



ilil 



w 



illsi 




8 


8 

s 


»3 


8^ 8 8 

^2 


2 

2 


1 

10 00 

70 66 

180 86 

67 

800 


966 

67 00 
960 

17 19 
400 

81 00 

600 
600 


i 


8 


8 88 82 S 888888 S 8 8 
^ og •*. « •88e|S a « * 


888 eS888 $8 8 88 


9 


8 8 8888 8 8 8 8889 888 



o 
p 







i:i 



fii; 



Mi 






HilllllilSslll 



I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



ANVVAIt BBPOBT OV THB 



[1890. 



1 


8 






8 


8 




8 






8 




8 


S 






ot 


X 




»H 




• 


«» 




lO 




s 


8 


8 


88 


8 










8 






00 
OQ 


a 


« 


■8 


r4iO 


§ 










^ 








R 9i 


S 


8 S 


88 


ts 


8 


8 


88 




8 


s 


8 




1 ^fe 


§ 


S 8 


-s 


i 


lO 


lO 


a- 




«e 


>o 


8 


9 


8S8 


8SS 


88 


S8 


3 


S& 


S 


888 


ss 


s 


8888 


8 


i;"8 


|8* 


S8 


•s [1 


•^oo 


« 


«*-!« 


•OiO 


» 


M.-i©«0 


8 



Hi 



l^h 



h- 



=■0=2 5 

J- °B *^ 



I 



IsillilliliiM'ir 










8 


a 








8 


8 






8 


8 




9 


"""" 


1 




8 


^* 








'^ 


« 






*4 


09 




a 








« 












8 
















OQ 

ad 




S 












>a 




















8 


88 


S88 


- 


8 


fe 




a 




s 






as 


9 


QD 




$5 


3*- 


»"»• 




Ot 


00 




a 




s 






•9 


^ 




8 


S 


8SS88 


8888 


88 


8888888 


8 


8 888 


8S 


88888 


8 


lO 


8 


ofc.«^ee 


■•■•s* , 


^^ 


^^towQoeoae 


« 


-♦ fl*««D 


•eio 


•a-** 


s 



^a 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD or HOHB VISSIOHB. 



68 











^ 






8 




8 

Ok 








8 

m 


8 


8 

OD 




13 












3 

8 


8 

Si 


8 SS 






889 


5:8 

ot«e 


9 


S8S888 

ioot«-i*4M>ce 


S8 


S 




S8& 


18 86 
800 

400 
800 






-3 -SglEdS^ ^1 ii 




s 


a 

8 


8 88 8 

CO lo CO 




8 

lO 


10 00 

900 
160 

184 70 
400 

480 

460 


s 

ft* 


8 

8 


8100 

600 
500 

660 

110 86 

18 18 
100 

475 00 

960 96 

16 00 

60 90 

18 00 




ft 
S 


18 00 

84 00 

18 86 

800 

80 00 

10 00 

100 

18 60 
100 

875 
600 
10 00 

80 00 
800 

88 00 

89 60 
180 01 
700 00 

15 00 
14 60 

81 15 



1^ 



u 



ISllls^ll 






l'isi-9=' 



^. r,. ^. t3 Si 



mm 



ameq t:^ a o Qpq M ^ fo ^AdMi?) 



s5Ǥ 



ii5 



liiiiliiiii' 



iH] 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



64 



▲ KKUA.!. BKPOST OF THX 



[1890. 



1 
















8 8 


00 




9 




8 S 




8 


s 




od 




8 

00 


8 

S 


760 

460 
4T0O 

21 87 


9 




S 


8 8 8 8^ 

« -» 9 «S 




8 


83is8 


SSSSeS 8«S888S8SSS98 




88 


8 


888888888 



a 



iS4 









111^ 







1^ 

11; 






1 




8 




8 




00 
00 


9 


8 




a 


S 8 


L.B. 
20 00 

2 00 


94 06 
20 00 


89 


88 




S88 & S 


H.H. 

260 
600 

260 

8 18 
20 00 


00 91 
92 6 
009 
00 8» 
999 


8899888 S8 


"8 


8 

s 


6 44 
400 
986 
1 96 
68 87 

627 
15 00 


8 88 



III 






I! 







ii\ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD or HOMB XIBBIOHB. 



65 





8 




8 8 

00 •» 


8 






8 




8 


888888 

o*eo0»'«cnio 


90 












8 




• 


8 






sssse 


SS 

OkiO 


& 8 


s 
s 


8 

S5 




8 


9 


8 




& 

s 


6SS$:S 888 


86 




SS888 




88888 28 


1 


888888 

e«<«t>ooeteo 



kill 



sdllljsl, 






«l* 



|i ||1 |p« III. ...,,._,.,. li&^65 1 1 1|||| 



ii 








s 

ao 




8 
8 




8 

lO 




888 

»-0«0» 




8 

lO 




8 

8 




88 

et«o 






8 
9 








88 


91 


S 8 




8 


8 

at 


8 8 

Ok «D 


8 
8 


8 


8 88 
5: SS 




8 

8 




88 


8 8 


8888 


s;s 


8 


8 


888S 


88 


88 


8888 


IS 


S 

S 


8 


8S8 
S8« 


S88gS 


98S88 


8S8 
*S8 


s 


SS8 




■f=i 



S3J 



JIHlliilfll 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



«6 



A.SSUA.% BBPOBT OT THE 



£1890. 



J 
















8 


8 


s 


OQ 


8 

9 






• 










S 
§ 


8 888 8888888 &8 
S S88 SS«8W g| 


'J 


8 So 






« 

"♦ 


8 

8 


8 

S 


8 




6 

i 


S8 {S 88 8 88ISS 8S8 
99 S §^ $3 8S9«K S|g 




888 
8SS 


88 


88 


868 


8 




8 

S 


0» 


1 


8888Si8S 88888SS888 8 
"SeSg-g -S88||«55S2 g 



lit 



t 



I 



illllliiiii illliJl 



i 



Ji^^ 



nt 



millllilllllilillllllli illllllllllillll 



^1 



9m» 



SUBt. 

400 
100 
1 00 

86 00 


1 00 
11 16 






'8 88^8^8 S8 SS ^88 8 9888 

QQ 1-1 ^ ,-, 




90 00 

600 


88 S6$8S 8S;88 SS 888SS8S8 S88S5: 


s 

8 

s; 


60 00 

618 00 
16 70 


H. M. 

600 
1 00 
1 00 


8 
8 


88S588SS 8 ^8 8 988898a88S88S888 

a85;*S9fc g §^ 8 |5^«^ag|S8g«|a;si9 


1 


81 18 

10 00 
896 67 

1100 
16 66 



I- 







SS33SSS^ 



iJlillll fe^<l 9!f 



it 
III 

II 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OF HOME MISSIONS. 



67 



8 


s 


8« 




660 

800 00 
117 60 
66 69 
100 00 


98 SSS88il 8 


9 


9 S 

s s 


a 8 


8 


S88i:S8 


«S8 S88 S 
SS8 9SS 9 


s 


s 8 ssssse 

8 * 'gsiss 


ss 8 S 
8S s 1 


s 


400 

11 00 

80 00 

1160 00 

682 87 

80 49 

1150 00 

600 




g 


SS8S8e8e3S8S88Ssa3S88S82 







nti 



ssssssss: 



8 

o 


8 


• 


8 

8 




87 60 
68 88 

60O 

88 78 


8 8 


100 00 
10 14 

40 00 


8 

s 


46 00 

75 58 

18 00 
880 
86 00 

80 00 

18 15 


10 00 
16 85 
16 00 

68 OO 


S 8 


100 00 
69 90 

500 
TOO 


1 


88 8 8 888 8 8 SS 
88 ^ 8 8-8 a "^ gg 


S 

s 


48 66 
866 00 

86 00 
100 00 

860 

600 

84 68 


8 


zi^ S8 58 
«8 §S as 


p 

1 


88f89e88888 88888 


888 



«..- 



iiSid 



1 







"S P 35 !■ aj * 




i i|j't jy^il :f|, 

6 ISiSiSiSAHnSlI^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



68 



AVNU.iI. BKPOBT OW THS 



[1890. 



1 


8 








8 


88 8 

»-•« CO 


i' 


8 t! 8 

§ a - 




SSS 8 

S-^^ 8 


888 
83$ 


S 
i 




il 


88 8 8 


as 8 


8 8 
• S 


8 8 

8 9 


15 

i 




f' 


88 8 8S 8 


88 8 

8S *• 


900 

10 
94 00 

60 00 
10 00 


8s:s8 

g898 


z 


888 8 

a-8 8 


8 
S 



I 



*SS3 a ^ 



If 



<ii 



li 



I ll'iillilliil llfiiiii^i 



fc'?^ 



i4 



^ a 

o g 

I 

00 






1 


9 

CO 


8 

S 


8 
3 




.8 

"Is 

OQ S 


s 

8 


8 88 88 8 S98S 
fe SS S-* S S8S»- 


669 
49.18 
60 00 
18 80 

96 78 


8 


38 


L.8. 
88 00 

168 00 


S 
1 


^83 888888S; 388 88888888 
839 So8^9S88 83« SaS888a<" 


11 00 
988 00 

27 60 
919 69 
697 81 

90 00 

800 

166 98 




10 96 
187 00 

964 40 


H. M. 

616 98 
87 60 


i 


888 888988388888888888^88888888888 


s 

i 


10 61 

166 00 

800 

110 00 













lllli 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOARD or HOMB MIS8IONB. 



69 



8 8 8 


8 

00 


8 


88 




8 

CO 


16 66 
160 00 

70 00 
176 00 

18 00 

46 00 


s 

00 


s 

00 


14 79 
87 00 


10 00 
600 


8 




88 

etio 


8 


s 


8 

g 


888888 
8|S8SS 


88 8888S88S3 

83 s;:;:'^«>S8« 


8 


8 


10 00 
100 
000 

10 00 


00 08 

09 08 
008 

098 
00 81 


8 


968 76 
49 46 

900 00 
96 00 



n 



M 



^ 

M 



i 



2«- 



1 



I lite lull iimiiriMM 



g 



i 



asslix 



j? 



S 8 

S 


1^ 




19 66 
16 00 

140 00 
11 00 

600 

4107 
40 00 

16 01 

96 00 




16 94 

10 00 
97 00 
60 00 


888 8SSSSS 8 8 g 88 S8 ^S 88 8i 


s 


18 00 
11 OO 

8 10 
400 

100 66 
40 00 


8I!98 ;:89S8 S 88 888S8 88888 8 8S3 
ag5;S feSS|8 S ^'^ agl;853 sa-»|:jj 8 §8 


2 

1 


800 
64 00 

186 00 
88 19 
47 40 




s^ 



^il, 



m 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



70 



AirirtrAL bsport of the 



[1890. 



S S8S S 



8 8S 88888 8 8 SSS888S? 



8 



8S 8S 8888 
Si9 *S 8S5'^ 



r:S8 88S88 8 
S^l SSSggg 8 



. 88 ^S 88 8 898 



SS 



*9 S 



gS « 5 o S a I i2S88«g| 



St 8ea 88888S 8S8S28gS8S88^ 
§§ 85?^ S-S-8- *^2SSS5SSS8«8 



^- 88 9 S88SS88S88888 
^. 855 8 ^S«S588«S«SS»- 



2S 







111 



I 



iAiikmimmmm 









i 5 r 3 S S s : 



. S8S9S8 88 8 



88:$$: 88888 83 8 8 ^Sol^^gl 8 8^8 



8S8 8& 



ad 



8S 



8 



8S^S8 
8&S9<* 



"1" 
8 



. 83S 8 



8888 88 8 



8 8J2888 



88S 8S{ 8888 



8^88888888 



8 88 888S$i$oS;8SS8^8 

» ooce Sao^«^»okoo«oo«<<*o 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD or HOMK MIBBIONB. 



71 



185 00 

10 00 

11 90 

18 88 
860 


3 
1 




8 88S38 C828S 


8 


8 

00 


8 
9 


89 
8* 


600 
80 00 

16 00 

17 00 
10 00 


990 88 
MOO 

195 00 
85 00 

60 00 


g 




98 8 S8S8S 

«S 8 «8«as 


s 

00 


9 




8 
S 


88 




s 

i 






88 






88 


S8S8 
§82^3 


88S5Si88 


g5 

i 


s 


S88888 S88S8888 


8 S 8 
"83 


8^8 
«8« 




8fc; 

8;c 


888S8 



! 



It. 



i 



*iS^ 



r 

n 



iliii 



^slIlliUliHi 






&s 



llJ^ll 



---'--3ilii1ls|l||iilg8S 






!l 



SSS8 8 158 898 8 Ss8 
SS8 S8"'^S» ^ S*- 


9 

i 


8 888 


8T05 
88 89 

600 

10 00 

316 8T 

1 85 

495 
500 


i 


8 

• 


88S 888S88 8 8 8 8 &8 S 


i 


10 00 
106 84 
65 00 

10 00 
808 
500 
600 


8 8^88 8 88 88S;S 8 8 8 8 
2 8|9* 2 g2 «^a« « ^ * 8 


9 


888^88 8S888 8 
9—822 -2882 8 



M 






II" 



llilllll 



si^i 



!J 



Hill 



I 






I, 



<n 



mm 



Sllllillll 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



72 



AHHTJAI. B9POBT OV TBB 



[1890. 



600 
600 


8 

2 


8 9888 


S58 
S8 


8 S 


8 

8 


8 

S 


S88 88 


100 

450 

18 76 

18 00 

81 11 


OQ 

OQ 


5 


98 00 
748 
10 08 

14 80 
400 


8 S 


8 
8 


8 

o 


S 


49 70 
9 17 

98 75 
600 


90 66 
10 00 

898 
48 64 
17 00 


L.8. 

88 00 
72 64 


S 

3 


67 96 

990 48 

66 96 

15 00 
50 09 
98 90 


S 88 


s;S8 


S8 


8 
i 


16 00 

198 91 
15 00 

146 40 
106 74 


96 00 
88 60 

95 00 
100 00 

78 97 


H. M. 

400 
94 00 
64 00 


i 


7180 
176 00 

86 64 

98 00 
68 44 


600 

60 40 
19 00 
660 
10 00 


8SS 

IgMdoo 


88 




6 15 
78 16 

600 

500 

196 61 

9000 00 

7 18 


60 00 
800 

180 00 
196 69 




Suat. 
500 

47 08 


8 
i 


47 66 
19 47 

827 
27 00 

6 40 

829 
10 00 
9100 

378 18 

800 

15 00 

900 

90 00 

860 
98 70 


8 


18 00 

690 
1 60 

400 

100 80 


S.B. 
985 

8 91 


00 

i 


19 89 
480 

500 

800 
8 91 

506 


8 
8 


900 
875 

12 86 
978 

960 


L.8. 

900 
600 

88 08 

14 71 


9 

i 


8S&8{S8 fe S8S883 88S 8 888 




38 88 88888$: 
::s 8* ««88a^ 


H. M. 

990 
500 

66 84 




SSSS$S 8888 iSS8S88?8S5 8 

gfe9S«8 '•••a «gjgg»oo««co s 


1 


8888 8888 S 



I 



ssss^ 



u 



ss 






:ll 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OF HOMS MIBBI0H8. 



78 



58888888 


s 
S 


8S88888S888 8 8 88S888 $:898888 8888 
afe*«»««{Sa8«S 8 -* «88S«« ^•^••Sl:* ^ss^ 


88 8 8 

8S 1 * 


s 

1 


16 00 
600 

100 00 

10 00 
19 14 

60 00 
60 00 


88 SSSSS 

ss ee§ss 


8 
i 


888 8 8dS8 8 888^89888 S8 8 8 
«2S • 88*8 8 •5|SS;:$:'-fe 88 SI; 


S88S888S 


1 


8 89888S89 S8888 8 88S888S S89888S 8888 



III 



ii 

iiii 




88$ 8 IS 

8 



88^888 888 88888 88 

8 



88^2*- a- 



tooot- ao< 



«>S2 



88 



88 88 8 8 



e 8 

-• 8 



8 S 8 
8-^8 



S& 



8S 



28 S S 8 
8« • 8 8 



9 8f^ 
2 88 



€88 
392 



8 



8S88$ ;;8888 8 
fc«8M 8»^82 « 



88 Si8 
2« 28 



8^88 
-88« 



88898 888823 8 8^8 88 



8 8 
.8 5: 



8S88 ^82 882 
^'^^tZ a 2 n §355; 








ill 



if 



I 



1^ 




i 






If 



iiii 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



74 



AHlfUAL BB^OBT OF THB 



[1890. 



Suit. 
500 

8 10 
800 


8 
8 


S 8 


500 
86 14 
6 16 






100 00 
10 00 

9T00 
800 


8.8. 

948 06 
90 00 

917 67 




8 

00 


10 00 
90 00 






60 00 

90 00 
10 00 


L.8. 

085 54 
96 00 

806 60 

900 
1000 00 


8 
S 


150 00 
10 00 

960 00 
768 00 


168 10 

900 00 
86 00 
15 00 

948 00 


8 8 
S S 




18100 

917 85 

1086 00 

98 00 

18 06 

11 00 


^ 8S8S3 8S 
J Sg^Sg Sg 


8 


954 94 

88 80 

596 14 

9088 60 

500 


10 00 
61^00 

880 00 

618 00 

14 00 

184 88 

900 


68 10 

158 58 

101106 

76 00 


8 

9 


7668 94 
94 96 

1940 10 
41 00 

10 00 
18160 

11 19 



I 



M 

^&^- 






i 
I 




iSV--^^^tefcfefc& 



3SS;S3S3::: 



isii^iiiz-i. 



.888 8 
I 8 • « 

CD 



888^8 8 88888888 888888 
S8-»°S 8 •^'g^S^SS S«a«8"* 



S^ ^!S 8 888^ 



8 8 



88 8S8 S8 



S 8 8 «S8 
lO 04 00 «o«^ 



8 888 
8 35^-" 



8B&8S 89 8fSP!8S E^S 8 8 S«SS 
SSS-'fe •a *88^8l ;»« 8 fe 558-» 



il S8888&89 8 
8 3^SS®8*te 2 



^- ^8888 



S8SS&t:8 8SSSS8e8 SSeS8S 



S-SS2 saeas'E" ^'-s-sa 



88S SPSS 9SS 

*S8 "es* ssB 



53 

I 



I-- a 




^il IHl^l ilpl^|ill|||i ijil PI 11 illl 



Sll 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OT HOXB ICIBBIOKB. 



76 



8 

o 


3 
1 


a 888SS 88 8 8 

9 -a"«>s ■•- * »- 


8 


1100 
16 46 

10 00 


8 8 8 8fe 88 

* 8 • ess «S 


SS 


i 


8 8 8 88 S9S8 S 


8 


18 88 

100 00 
16 00 
16 60 


1 00 
8184 

40 00 
10 00 


8 
1 


1 


88S8XS98S88S83 388S 


9 


88888^88 


868 
16 86 

40 00 

819 18 
16168 

108 44 
88 00 


8 

S 


8 

i 


8 888888 S 888 8 

g "«»ass8 a S"8 " 


1 


8SS SSSS 

8S5 s«s;: 


88883898S 88 
•^•888*82: 8* 




S 


9 
8 


S 8 88 8 88 8S8S 88 888 

" "> sa * sa S8''* aa sa- 


i 


160 65 
4 10 
10 00 
50O 

800 00 
600 


9 8 

■• a 


a 
2 


8 88 8 S 88 88 

«B 8 a s- ••• 


9 


868 
80 00 
7 76 

86 08 
80 00 


88S 
"8- 


8 
i 


88 88 88688 S88S9 

88 88 8§39§ saaas 




8 8 S8888 8 
S t: §|88'» S 


88 6P 
8- 8- 


8 
§ 


88888 888 88888 S 8S88& 
Sa-S» 8— E|a88 8 "SS"" 


5 


83888828S8 88 




It 






iilll 



II 



3^333S83S83 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



76 



AHKTJAL BBPOBT OF THB 



[18»0. 



Saat. 

15 00 
766 
7 17 
600 


8 


8 8 8S8S8388 


S 
g 


8 


58 

86 00 
705 

20 00 
700 

19 07 


S8 88 


8.8. 

450 
1 75 
265 




250 

80 00 

200 
19 00 


s 


s 


8 

8 


8 8 

aO OT 


L.8. 

260 
980 




8 S£ 8 S8 ;s:8 

■^ §;:: 9 SSI |S 


9 


S8 


88 92 
106 00 
10 00 
48 85 

68 08 


109 00 

119 40 
400 
51 00 


H. M. 

888 
800 
800 
1100 


88 
§8 


8 ^ 88 S 88S 88 


S 


8 $5 

8 S 


15 79 
160 00 

175 00 

500 

86 00 


10185 
12 00 

12 00 
78 84 



•'I 



a 



it 



liliifillf inmii I 






J 



i|feltilll|isil||l 



. SSS 88 8 

OQ 



88 8 8888 S8S S 888 

ot^ 3 cb«eo«oo «ioio g 8*^S 



8S 



SS 8S8 

oo» ^o«o 

^1 — 



88 



88 



. 8SSSSS 



88 S;^8 8^ 389 8888 8$ 8 



88888S2 

S8as« 



^ 8S^88IS8 



38 8S 8888 8 88^8888 S 
t:*^ Se S8S»° *« ^S8*S9S ^ 



888S5S8 










II li'.^ ml Nit I 



s 



39£S< 






Id : : ! * 

• a a^-S • 
: « o ? ^:i 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OF HOKB UISBIOHS. 



11 



8 




600 
486 

664 
84 00 


800 

76 60 
15 00 
100 


885 

1100 
80 10 


888 
•88 




15 41 
98 00 
8148 
18 00 
18 68 
8100 




8 

to 


S 8 
S 8 


800 
64 00 

800 
448 


8 8 

'^ Ir- 






86 00 

100 00 
80 19 


dr!8 


8 


00 99 
009 

00 99 
988 


66 96 
78 50 

10 00 


is 00 

88 90 
48 00 


888 
S88 


8 
8 


400 
166 86 
188 88 

15 00 
98 86 
10 00 


SS8 


3 
§ 


14 00 
18 90 
8 15 

94 47 


£88^8888 8 


586 

886 

86 71 

74 90 


888 


8 
8 


88 81 
954 98 
94 17 

18 00 
186 00 



mh 




400 

64 68 
856 


88 S 888^:8 8S888888 S 


8 

CO 


8 

3 


87 65 
11 00 

80 00 
400 
16 00 


8 88 88 


S SS8 S 8 889 
8 -ag g ?5 3I5IS 




8 


676 

88 80 
500 


888S58S8888S88 8 88S888S389888 » 


87 00 
14 88 
800 
68 13 


s 


88 00 

870 
01 79 

600 
90 00 


88883S8SBS8SS8S8888g8S898888;S888S8888SS8 
S«'8-*:;X|*SS^S''S8S9«'*'«S|||S|S98eg8a«8««SSS 


9 


14 00 
6O0 

80 00 
800 
906 



*l 



a 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



78 



▲HKVAL BKPOST OF THE 



[1890. 



^.St: 


8 


SSSS 8 888 ^n2 2888 9992 8 8 89888 
*-S«S S Sfe* -^a-^ 5-^-^ «8*« 5 ?S 88»*^ 


S5 
S 


S 


CD 


S 
i 


8;|! 888 88 £ 88 88 828 8 S 3888 
«g ^«8 JS« 8 «8 88 *;:« S £ SSg^ 






. 8 


s 

1 


88 888 8S 8888 8 8S£: |5 82! 8 988 68 88 
§8 '»a| SS 2888 a 888 ^ gg ^ S§^ 88 98 


8 

i 




n 


s 

1 


S8882888888SS 8 8^^82888 888$s8 8S888 
g'^88|8S^S888S | SS^'^SSgfi; ^:58§| SgSgS 


8 


8 

to 



li 




1" 


s 

1 


8 


8 8 
3 8 


8 

s 


8888^88 88 


10 96 
80 60 
1100 
10 00 


88888S8 9 8 S 
8g-g«SS 8 8 g 


ad 


2 




8 8 

8 S 




8 
8 


9 8888 


9 8 
8 S 


89 68888 8 
88 S52:888 S; 


OQ 

4 


9 

§ 


s 

i 




8 

9 


8 
8 


88 


2S68S S 


S*8 


88 8 8 88$ 8 

gS e S 8S8 8 




S 

lO 


S 
1 


s 


$88 


8 
S 


888S8888 8S 

a5;«9S58« 38 


88 

88 


8?:888 8SS88S9 



I 






£S|e| 



i 








S 4 3 3 3 3 9 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OF HOKB MI8SIOK8. 



79 





8 

m 


8 










& 

•« 


9 
S5 


10 60 
14 00 


88 


8 

to 


8 

9 


s 

lO 


8 S;S 888898 888 8888 8 888 


s 

CO 






e . 
I. 









S 


1100 

18 60 

19 84 
85 00 

500 


888 


90 00 
85 00 

600 
11 00 
80 00 

800 


8 


888^881:88 


8 8 9888 

9 g S'^SJS 


88 


1 


10 00 
88 76 


8 

o 


8 




68 19 
800 

90 70 
500 
500 

11 00 


?:8 

8^ 


88 
2S 


1 


80 00 
18 75 
16 00 
999 48 
88 70 


869 
00 01 
066 
00 96 


100 00 

89 88 

460 
81 86 
700 




8 8SS 98 


67 00 
66 00 
26 00 
10 00 
148 00 

65 00 


S 


6 

s 


500 

675 
14 58 

260 

144 89 

18 41 


88 85 
99 00 
19 10 
88 00 


184 00 

75 00 

786 

90 00 

700 
500 
400 


2888S 998 


47 00 

81 48 
96 00 
10 00 
19 00 



II 



i 

1 9 



iJ 



im^ 



I 
Mi 



U 



||pllll|illild?lrflilli|l||l' ^ - ' iilill 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



80 



AUSVAh BSPOST 01* TEB 



[1890. 



1 


s 


s 

fit 




8 


8 
8 






s 

OQ 


8 8 

CO O 


8 






88 

s:2 


38 

00 OD 




L.S. 

58 66 

400 

78 06 

26 66 

860 


700 

8195 

680 

198 68 

90 00 


S 


8 


8 

8 


8^8 
§88 


8 S 88 li 
8 § -8 • 


94 78 

18 75 
86 60 


^.88% 888 
.8«8 «*^ 


88S8&S 


s 

5 


s 


88 


8 


889 69 

10 91 
98 00 


8 18 

60 00 
90 00 

96 00 

107 47 

800 



1 

■g 
il 



A 



lllllllllililisi 




1 

cc 


8 




8 






00 

OQ 


8 


8 








CO 

n4 


8 


8 S 

O lO 




S 9 






8 


8888 8 8 


888888888 &8 88 


e 8 

a « 


S8 8 SS 

«oio oo o-^ 



|8 

.ass 







Digitized by 



Google 



1890.] 



BOARD OT HOMX MIBBIOKS. 



81 





8 
8 




It 


8 9 
8 S 


8 




S 

8 


s 

s 


Is 8888^88 


100 00 
9 10 

18 95 

186 19 

50 00 
80 00 


8 8 

S 8 


88 


86 

as 


8 


8 

S 


18 81 

800 
458 15 
48 57 

19 90 
60 00 

6175 


888 88^88888 
•°8S S«||SS888 


n 8868^ 8 8 
J S88«S • '^ 


8 8 
8 S 


8 

lO 


S 




90 00 
10 00 
800 
56 98 
99149 
19 61 
1100 


888 898 888 
as* 8g8 8-*8 


88 888^ 88 

8^ 8;3»« *s 




9w 



III 




. • • w^illlul'. 



|3 33S33333S«SS3«: 



IS 



I 



Mass 





8 


88 


8 






S 


8 




ss 

OM 


1195 
85 00 

606 
800 


8 


9 
fc 


9 8 


s 


8 

8 


10 00 
80 00 

1 55 


8 88 


888 
^88 


40 00 
96 70 

460 
560 
499 

16 81 




9 


80 99 
71 86 

50 00 
19 69 
750 

6 75 


69S 


8 


S88 
8*- 




88 

S8 


888 8 8 

2:ss *- 8 


88S 


8 


17 00 
116 94 

18 00 
78 17 

900 

600 




>>»»x 



llllllll^l 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



82 



▲HNUAL SBPOBT OF THE 



[1890. 



1 


8 


8 8 e 
^ • « 




8 




88 

as 


8 8 

« 11 


OQ 


8 98 S 
S 8 • 


8 S 88 
8 -^ 88 


88 
8* 


8 

8 




8 t: 


888 8 8 
*"* 8 


»4S 


8S88 1:888 
**S8 85:SS 


88 8 8SS88 
S8 ;5 Sg8« 


88 


S5 
1 


8 


8SS 


8 S8 8888 




8 8 8SS 888888 5888S59 
^ S 8-5 525«-S8 a«8888 


888 
«8g 


1 


S 

10 


88S8 

a8§- 


8^8 888 8 




isl 



S5^ 



ll fill I ill 



1 






8 


8 


3 88 

8 9S 


s s 

1^ »H 


OQ 


88S 


88 


8 


s 

§ 


8888 S8 S ess 

-gis as c """ 


88 


J- 


8 8 
8 ^ 


l:;:8 

G8S 


8^8 
«g8 


8 
1 


88883; SSSSS&SS 


8888 883 


^8B 


8^88 9 

*— 8" CO 


88 8 

-HO ^ 


8 

00 


S 
1 


82s:!S83 ssa 


88 88 « 

«85 as - 



§1 



iriifi 



1^1 

g . w " . . . 






HS 



Digitized by 



Google 



18»0.] 



BOABD OP HOICB mSBIOMS. 



83 





8 
9 


s 






8 


s s 


s 


s 


a ' 

00 




8 




8 






s 
« 




9S 


S 


8S 

Otto 


9 






SSS s 
«S8 ?; 


s 


9S S S 

8*» a • 


2 8 


a 
S 


S 8 SSS 
8 S -S' 




SS SSS 


SS 


S SSS8 

9 ^:5«s 


s 


&SS 
8«S 



III 



1 8 






-I 



^Vii 



lt%h'M 



3i 



i 3 



llllll 





9 

S 


9Sg :? s 

0«r4«0 <« Ot 


S S ^2^ 


8 


8 


88 
«8 


s 

01 


s 


SS 8 9 


S 8S SS 


8 >$ 

- S 


8 
S 


«S8 

SSS 


i 


ssssssss 




88 8 a 


&8SSSS8g 


S8 


s 

i 


SSSSSS£:S 


;s:S:« SS8SSS 


8888 S 


8 888SS8S 
• -8*SS|S 



'I 



m 



£^al 



ill 



if 



i, 



liliir^TiiiiiiliiiiM 



sill 



=1 111 l;^ 






$oop 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1 




8 

•0 


8 

00 


S 

lO 


ad 


s 

8 


8 

•• 


860 
700 

86 00 
10 00 


9 
S 


767 

98 00 
15 00 


L.8. 
1185 


9 


8 8 

«0 «0 


8» 8 9 ;38 58 8 % ^ 

S8 a 8 88 a-* • s a 


8 

8 


s;: 888 
S8 ;ss;s 


n 


9 


696 
18 06 
265 

18 00 
800 


8 88 8 8 8S888 8 8S 8 
" «« S • 8S«;5S 8 ^S2 « 


8 
i 


888 88 



ii 




i 


8 






8 


8 


8 8 




8 

8 


8 


8 


8 


S 
6 




28 
S8 




88 S 

•8 - 


ad 
h4 


8 
8 


8 

o 


8 8 

a 55 


SiS 88 88 8 

«" S* 88 ^ 


8 

8 




S 8 

' 2 


8 






888 


8S 


88 8888S888 86 
8- g8^JSS*S8 8g 


8 


£8 


888 

—8 


86 


888 88 






--^ 




Di^ed by Google 



1890.] 



BOABD or BOMB HIBSIONS. 



86 



S S 8 


s 






818 

4100 

8 11 

70 88 
89 00 


S 

00 






J2 




i 


8 




886 

86 00 
600 


8 


898^5 88 nu 


8 




46 96 
860 

1416 


8 S 

s s 


8 

O 




8 

2 


600 

1 00 

81 00 

61 16 


89888 S 8s:8 S 


S 
1 


8 

0* 


18 60 
40 00 
TOO 
10 00 
10 00 


888 

3"- 


38 


s 


8 

8 


9 


80 76 
14 86 
86 00 
10 00 



2§l 



i 






IllllllllllSllllllllilllls^llllllllg 



1 W "O — i M 






«-<« 



91 

4 ^ $ 9 «9«a 



I 





8 




8 

00 






88 

^00 








8 


8 

S 


S 


ss 


ess 

ft* OC lO 






<ooe 




8 

9 


8 

01 


8 

•0 


888 


9 
§ 


8S8 

SS3 


89 8 


8 




e 8s 

CO oe« 






2 8 
1: 


« 

a 


88S^ 

10000*10 


s 


88 

as 


SS8 83 


00 


8 

«0 


888888 8 

K-eob-ioee<o to 




88 


189 88 
400 
100 
600 
700 






*Si 



m 






it 






1&&& 



]H»Mi 



'Sllllil?! 






Hi I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



86 



ANHXTAL SBPOBT OT THB 



[1800. 



1 


8 

lO 




lO 


s 




8 










CO 
OQ 






ft 


S 88 


8 


8 ;s 


8 




2 


8S 


CD 


8 


sea 


6 


8 




8 ^S SS S 

;s •« «g 8 




o 




•88S 






^S3 


S9« 


8888 




8 28«8 9^8 

^ 5*S8 •?; 


888&9 


88 

00 CD 


88 

S3 




■I 
IP. 









i 






i:a^ 






i. 



1 




8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 

<* 


. 88 


98 








8 




888 


L.8. 
868 

400 




8 

8 






8 S 


88 8 


8 


H. M. 

10 00 
800 

16 00 
800 
400 

48 00 

16 00 


S$::8i)SS8^ 




8888 


SS8 881888 


8888SS888888 

oigOioaognaoAoaoQt 



ii 









;is 



^c» 






raiii 




iii"?ll=s*;*»*^is||L, 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OF HOME MIB8IONB. 



87 





8 

a 


S 8 S 8 8S8 

« w t- » «IOIO 


s 

8 






s 

2 


10 00 
17 BO 
4 10 

UOO 


8 

9 




8 

et 


s 
§ 


SS SS8 8 

as sgR 


8 
1 


8 




8 

s 


88S888 888S8S8888S8JflS888 8S8988S8 8 




10 00 
820 
16 80 
94 40 
18 60 
1 00 



1 

a 




8 


« 
8 


9 

00 






s s 

<D CO 


8 


8 


S 
§ 


S 8 
8 8 






8 S S 88 

^ m ^ <o« 


s 
s 


8SS 


s 


1:88 


841 So 8S9« 88 


8 


8^8 8 8S88$:SSS 
S 2 • 8 -'SSSS'-gl 




8S 


s 

§ 


t;f:$88 


88«8 98 S8 


8 


8 88888888 Is: ^88 


g 
g 



lis 



-T^^TiJS Sis** 




aai 



Is' I 



iniiiiiiiii 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



88 



▲HVUAL BBFOBT OF THE 



[1880. 



1 


S 


8 


8 






8 

S 


8 S 

S 8 






98 85 
865 

15 00 


i 






s 

2 


88S 98 88 

»§« ga g8 






8 8 


i 


8 

s 


a 


8 


8 S8SS888 88 8S 8 

s ss*-«— ag s« |8 s 


^8 

'8 


8 


60 70 

895 
670 
18 08 
8 15 


s 


888 



o 

I 



III 



i 



liil 




Hill 1 1^1 



333133333 



It 



■"li 



s|2| 



mil 



1 


8 


8 

«0 


8 








OQ 
CO 




88 




8 








88 
«8 


8 


8 8 


8 


8 8 

Oft 1-4 


8 


a 


950 
500 

12 00 


S88888S9t:S8S 


19 75 
700 

18 40 
48 77 
460 
10 00 


$88888SSSS888 


17 15 
100 00 

500 
4180 

800 
80 00 




cS3 



{ 






sn^&se. 



iimh m 






J 5 PTS 



^^■-^llli 



Jl 



2 ^'3 isli 



Digitized by 



Google 



1890.] 



BOABD OF HOMJt KIBBIOHfl. 



89 



8 8 


8 




8 S 

8 • 


8 


8 


8 


s 


58 76 
16 00 

85 55 


18165 

TOO 
585 


8 
S 


400 

960 
1100 
90 45 
750 
8 10 


8 8 


8 

S 


148 95 
86 00 
98 80 
10 00 
1T7 00 
886 17 


8888 


8 888888888 


8 
§ 


600 
565 
800 
1100 

14 95 
98 00 
18 50 


18 05 

590 

700 

660 

10 00 


8 


87150 
15 70 
618 
700 
88 46 
788 10 



M 






i.. 

ilosgli 

mm 



liliiiiiliiiiiili iiliiiiiiUliiliii 



s 



s . . -ill 

5 a 



r^ 





8 


8 8 8 


8 S 


8 
8 


150 
17 80 


18 10 

100 

88 60 
60 00 

800 


S 


80 00 
90 00 

500 
99 85 


88S8888888 88888S 


8 
§ 


S888 88 8 8888 8J^ 8888 88 
*^8« S?8 • *««• ^* 8«a*- S« 



ll 



llllllllllllll^l 



I 



5| 

ililllllllillillililllllll 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



90 



▲ KHtTAL BBPOBT OF THB 



[1890. 



1 


.«s s « 

OQ 


3 


S 88 SS "> gSSSi; 


.P8SS 88 8 888 


S 
i 


SSS88eSSSesesS88SaSS«8SS8SS8SS6 
88 S ^^"^t^ *8"8S3 S|9§3 S£:8Sa§ 


^. ^8 88SS8SS88IS8 

H 


i 


SS 888888S S S«? 8S8eS8SSS888 

as "sassf- a g-a S8BS»59«-|sa'*a« 









■» « » g 
0u a« 1^ rj X 



Si 









I 



iiiirii mmiA 



PQPQPQi 



tooota 




JSlllll 



1 


8.8. 

60 00 
90 00 

11190 
860 

500 

18 41 

500 
800 

89 86 


8 

iO 


i 


8 fee 8 s 

8 «8 S -» 


L.8. 

899 29 
98 00 

67 16 
1 65 

500 
119 11 

800 
900 

76 75 
95 95 
91 00 

58 60 
50 00 


19 00 
987 56 
68 49 

99 00 
65 00 




88 98 SS8&8 


^ S 8888S8?88«8 «888889t:88888 

m • 


560 05 

80 90 

900 

11 65 

16 00 


[:888 SSSes 






111 



-5§ 



SS 



% sis 






ifc 




III 



Digitized by 



Google 



1800.] 



BOABD or BOMB MIBSIONg. 



91 





8 6 S8 89 S 8 


8 


8 

s 


8 


s 

8 


84 60 
14 60 


S88S8 ^3 »SS8{!t38S88S 
8a««* SS '-"|8S fe"S«2 


S 

i 




8^8 

£83 


180 75 

600 

66 80 

16 00 

5 00 

59 00 


8 J2 S;: 88 
S5 S ^g 88 


8 8S8 SSSea88 S8 68 

s ass —"o—ga «-a s" 


8 
1 


888 


5Sf29 


46 00 
10 00 
42 00 
600 
600 
19 71 


8888898 8 






a«a??a>-.c 










It 






u 



..1 

mi 



Ui 



a 

3 li 






•e^i 



1^ 












8 8 

CO ^ 



8 8 3 

k» ix 00 



8 
fi; 



8 
SI 



388 



8 8888 8 888 88 88^:: 8S 
8 8S«8 8 £:;S8 8rs S88 Si« 



88 8^1688 S8 

S3 8s;s^8 9;; 



8SS8 88 



8 88SSSS8888S 8S88888S8)S8 
8 S«9888*S-*SS 9g«SS588S*-8te 



8888S88S S^S88 8888881: 

oo«0ej^geo^« goo«oco et ao <o co lo to ^ 



a 



■05, 

5fl 



ll 



,<9 



-Ji 
Me3 



I? la's 05 



S= If '9 lis 1.S 1 5 » k » § 3 • I S£ 5S|£§ 




Digitized by 



Google 



92 



AVN1TAL BBPOBT OF THE 



[1890. 



1 


8.8. 
46 84 

400 


8S! 


600 

986 
766 

T70 

40 00 

18 00 

800 
6 01 


8 

s 


8 

8 


L.8. 
80 00 


80 00 
18 00 
66 88 
89 96 


1^8 68 8 8 8;^898g8 88:3 

«• SS S X 8^8 •§• as8 


8 

1 


838 


^88 88 


607 
16 00 
10 00 
64 00 
40 00 


« 8SS1i88 888888888 8 88 S8 


§ 


96 00 

88 00 

186 76 

884 




A 



j|j2ajiiJ||j^ 



s c g ^^ 

_ tr ^D v ® 








sss 



1 


8.8. 

moo 


3 


86 16 
88 67 

800 


. 99 S 88 8 8 889 88 


s 

i 


8 88 8 8t59 8882: 8 8 8 

;5 88 8 a®"^ 8n8" • ^ 9 


,■ SS i:888 S 888«8$ 

. "8 g'ss 2 assB"" 


8 

1 


IS TtS 88888S8 88 8 8 8S8? S 




'Ij 



I 



iSlil! 






Ui 






8 :a 



4i 



lllsllilL..JIIII 



Digitized by 



Google 



1890.] 



B01.BD OF HOME IIISIIONB. 



98 





S2SS 8 8 
•9888 S 8 


606 

10 46 

900 

75 00 


600 
19 94 

000 
979 


8 

iO 


960 
14 00 

14 00 
90 00 
1100 

500 
10 04 
19 00 


184 19 
860 

106 87 

000 

806 17 


88 8 82 8 8 88 8 


S6 

aa 


2888S8 88888888 


888$3888S 


8888S888 8a8^d8 88$ 


t58 

sa 



lis'-. 



lit 



i^ 



£iee:Q;:5B40 




lu 







8 

8 


100 

800 
97 00 


8 77, 

60 00 

909 
780 


81! 

^8 


19 00 
90 00 


860 

700 
400 

66 00 


a 
S 


S88S 8 88 

-•ga a sa 


88888 S8S8 S 
S8gS| S§"S 8 


i 


8 






490 

9811 

666 

400 
900 

847 
800 


S88 888868889 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



94 



AMNVAL g mUMt X OF THB 



[1890. 



1 


S.B. 

24 48 
82 88 






as s 




^8 

3§ 




.S S 8S S 


as 

S9 










8 K 


H. M. 

800 
54 00 

800 

15 00 

1286 84 

27 00 

800 
18 00 


8S 

*2 


88 


1 77 

26 40 
800 
10 00 


88 


22 00 
810 00 
865 18 

50 00 
28 10 
4196 


8S8 






§11 



il. 



I|I||=S||I 

fill l|i?lifillil||lljir 






3S^ 

I 



■h,^. 



: ^S> 






Ellll 

Ta s> aQ 'JQ oq 



1 


OQ 
CD 


o 




8 




S 

s 




800 

18 60 
97 00 


26 60 
154 70 
21 70 

86 00 
126 


8 
i 


as 


8 8 8 88S 

s 5 8 ss;s 


8 


S8 




800 
700 
600 
14 00 

88 00 


t3oS$s88S888 


9 

1 


48 00 
206 
200 

877 
500 


8 88 8888888 
00 8^ ^?S«8fe^8 


8 
8 


888 
^8S 




Digitized by 



Google 



1890.] 



BOABD or UOUn KI8BIOV8. 



95 





8 88 

2 2- 


e 




46 90 
86 00 


9 

Oft 


470 

95 00 

17B 
600 


88 8 8 S 8 
86 S § 8i • 


8 




48 66 

68 28 
800 


8 8 


10 00 

884 66 

18 60 

96 60 

10 00 

990 60 

18 90 


8 feS:S8 8 8888688 88 


8 

1 


68 

8S 


86 61 

8 47 

60 00 
14 90 


8 » 

8 i 


88 8 88 8 

goo 00 555 CO 



mm 



it 
If 



II 



S3 



III 



lit fi 



Pp^»^^^ 









8 




8 


8 6 


8 


St 8 


868 6 
SttS • 


8 

?5 


96 
71 66 

80 00 

41 6Q 
10 00 


16 00 
800 
87 76 
8180 
78 


2 




8 
8 


6 

99 


:; 88 

S5 Z^ 


888 
*«8 


68868888 


9108 
8100 
10 00 
16 00 


8 

8 


10 00 
90 00 
96 00 
900 
17 00 


88 


8 

lO 



flf^lll 






Illiiliiiiifi 1ili^^^^^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



96 



ANNUAL BSPOBT OF THB 



[1890. 



S88g 8 8 
9::S8 8 8 



8 88S8 8 8 



88 
S58 



98 
S8 



f:8 8 
88 2 



8 8 
S 8 



IS 88 

9 8;:: 



8 8 



888888 
880988*^ 



888 8 8 
§88 § ^ 



8 828;! 888 8 
8 ••SI S^i 5 



8S8 8888SS S8S8S888Sf: S89S888 

as"9|a 8a8s»s8«s8 sg«|*g^ 




illlil 



I 




St^t93SZtiSSS 



1 


8.8. 

500 

4 75 
66 00 
16 70 


600 

80 88 
200 


8 
8 




8 


226 
44 78 
88 82 

10 42 


621 
50 00 
1 10 

252 

180 00 


200 
608 

16 00 
1 10 


.8 S8s;;s 
2 8 asga 


18 50 

200 

2 16 
20 00 


8 
8 




9 


88 00 

285 89 

87 25 
200 
15 77 


197 16 

8179 

500 

59 10 
48 50 


16 00 

870 85 
86 05 
50 00 
26 00 


u 8888 8 

^. ^885: 8 


7 19 
1100 

15 00 
81 81 
27 00 


8 8 


8 


8 


^88888898888888^ 


65 00 
28 81 
102 00 
9 41 
52 65 







p^t 



l|i|||||ll=jlil 



5S& ^^^s 








Digitized by 



Google 



1890.] 



BOABD or HOMK MIBBIOKS. 



97 





j5 
o 


8 


88 

8g 


8 S 
8 • 


1^ 88 8 8 8 8 n^ 
« 9S5 8 « S 8 ^8i 


82 
8S 


8 

S 


8 


§ 


51 W 
10 00 

WIT 


S8 

SS 


8 888888 88 8 888 8 

S S<*9SS9 88 8 S;SS 8 


S8S 


S8888 


8 
1 


S 88 


8 


888898t38S588S88 8 8888988 



L 



!^^ 



t 



•33332' 






111 






66 

160 

800 
88 00 

19 91 

160 00 
60 67 


8 


8^ 


s 

8 


468 81 

18 40 
868 

86 00 


8888 8 8 1^ 88S;88 8 
28--' 53 e . S 8*28J 8 


8 
§ 


88? 
8g9 


8 

9 


86 00 
68 00 
17 00 
88 00 

100 
1 60 


8 8888 8 88 8S88 88S88S8 


8 

§ 


1896 08 

408 86 

100 08 

460 




681 

88167 

86 89 
18 00 
10 00 
16 00 

600 
6 47 



a 



Is. 



I ill! 

lllllllll 




3333333S3S33333S3SSSS 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



98 



▲ NirUAL BBPOBT OV THE 



[1890. 



1 


8.8. 
87 48 

888 

8 11 

978 
16 00 


z 


MOO 
16 41 
18 00 
18 10 

1100 
18 90 

15 60 

78 19 

500 

16 96 
10 75 

775 

60 00 


. ISS 888^S 9 8 ni^ 
2 S8 8WS 8 • 88 




^8 88 88888S 898 8 S 
got go^ S— 288 -88 8 S 


^ 8838 8 888S88 888S 

*. SS8* 8 assays* ->ss$; 


s 
S 


88§ 88gS 8SS888 8888 8 
8fi52 SS*" ^8888^ 982S 8 



« 



hlmhi 



fir" *"** ** 



SlIllilllMli 




If 










1 




5 




S 


48 96 
60 00 
15 96 

10 00 


8 
8 


L.S. 

116 80 
768 


14 61 
68 16 

6100 


8 

to 


! 


88^^ 8 8 88 
&g88 8 8 8:: 


888 8 S89 1^8 8 
^l;8 8 8^2 ^S ^ 


H. M. 

80 86 

900 18 

600 

96 00 

49 00 


500 
6 76 

6188 
880 
100 

68 68 


1 


88 88oS888898fio8 8S889^9888S889S 

«8 S5SSS*SS-«9-*S fe'-8S8Sa8SS«5*-8^S 




23 
I. 



It 



Kto 



III iiiipliiUi 




/ 



ygflgiKd by Ci Ot) Q IC — ^ • 



1890.] 



BOABD or HOXB MIBSIONB. 



99 





IS 


146 
48 19 

90 87 
15 00 

500 


8 
8 


500 

15 00 


S SS 8 8 
8 ga • S 


§ 


8 


S|9 


s s Sin 


8^ 
3'- 


16 50 

15 00 
19 00 


68 00 
4100 
880 48 
168 98 
4100 

600 

41180 
18100 


5 


8 




8 S8888 8 


88 


So888(8988 


8815889888^88 


8 


8888 








\i 



iU 



53S 



lilliiliili 



9 t i :i i t . 



IW 



^^IJ 





141 41 
68 44 
96 99 
8100 

177 66 

60 00 
16 16 

900 
85 00 


i 


800 

184 06 
890 
9 17 


8 8 888888 Tit ^ S 888 88 888S 
« - g?g8S9 fcg g g SSS «3 ?:S2^ 


i 


986 
18180 
1188 
96 00 
47 15 
59 94 

95 60 
89 15 


8«8«SSa888888888SS888S «:?888 


i 


958 
10 00 

900 
41 00 
94 00 

18 00 
900 

78 95 

19 75 
650 

16 60 



mim 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



100 



ANNUAL BBFOBT OF THE 



[1890. 



1 


OQ 

ad 


6 




OQ 

*4 








S 8 

9 


8 
§ 






8 

*- 


s 


8 88S SS8 8S 

■3 «««» lemia iBst 


8 8S 8 




8 888 

00 a«ao-« 





si 



a 



fi 



•S-g. 



•3^ : 

0|^ 



QHB 




I 









1 


8,8. 
496 

604 


88S 8 88 


8 
6 


8S8«SSS Z 8S& 


j5 




SS8 g 98 

cO'*oo Ok toe^ 


S 


S S»8 88S9 8SS SS 386 SS88 8 


to 




88888 83 


3 


S& 3 e38SSSS88S3S SS8SS88SiSS 

as 9 '-as'-s^ssg-'S* •-ss-aajjsa 


8 
i 







lllllllll 




Digitized by 



Google 



1890.] 



BOABD OF HOHB MIB8I0NS. 



101 



8 


8 

M 




s 


8 

•0 






9 
j5 




9 
55 






«9 


10 00 

60 60 
955 

9 14 

18 00 

250 




2 




« seess s 


8 

to 


ss 


8eS8a88S 8889 8 


83 


8 
S 


SS8 


e 

» 



ill 






I 



II 



ll I illll iPi ill ilPulf it I 



||3 

lllii: 








1100 
18 00 

200 
600 




6 

s 




S 8 

" a 


10 00 

10 00 
60 75 

800 

48 00 

40 74 
800 

500 


i 


8 

3 


8 

«D 


S 8 

lO Ok 


8 8 8 S88S8 8 8 8 88 

to lo « lootatotjg ^ « ^ ^«* 


s 


1^ 


8 


8 



iiii 



SJIftillll 




H 



§ 

i 

00 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



102 



ANNUAL BBPOBT OF THB 



[1890. 



8 8 3 



8 3 

^ 8 



8 



8 8 

O «D 



S SSIS8I? 88 S g S 25" 



"5" 

8 



y S85S 



8 3888 88882^8 8888988 88 8 8& 



8 



mi 






i %i4 



^ 



I 



J«J^I l^g"llllli'«il ^ i =11 

111 is 1 1^ k » » k i^Si ilflsli 
1111)3 ll^£iSs;.;gllj£^lilliS|| 



1 




8 8 

M 09 




8 


8 8 
11 « 




8 








6 


8 

ao 


8 






s 

a 




Hi 




8 






8 88 




s 






8 88 88 8 


8 88 


8988888«S8 
S««-os'»-*8* 


8S888888 
8"SS8«"»» 




3 





^ *• S g *p 






:i3 



nJs;lc'^^>S 



■^'.ii 



i 




[111! 






I til 



££si 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD or BOMB MISBIOHS. 



103 



e 


8 8 3 8 


9 


8 

•0 


8 

•0 




8 


8 
S 


8 8 


s 


s 

9 




8 


S88 


9 


888 




8 






88^88 88 888 


6 


Se 8 8 88 

■»- » a »-a 


88 8 888 


a 

8 


8 

00 



g 



9* 

!l 



IMmhUmlml liilHlllllilfliiii II 



it 



8 8 8 88 8 

00 et ^ot ^ 


8 

Ok 


8 

0« 


500 
186 

6160 


s 
9 


8 8 

Ot «l^ 


88 8 8 8 8 fe 8 

-"S JS s •- X » - 


8 

S 


16 00 
80 00 

600 


88 |8 


88 S8 89i!8 8 8 88 8 

MCo 0001 ^ooeoio 00 «o i-ioo <o 


3 


6 8 88888 888 

«o ^ «Da«e»o«Q« cof-i^ 




sis 



Si 



Hi^l 



111 



ill 
III 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



104 



AHNTIAL BBPOBT OF TBB 



[1890. 



1 




8 

00 


^ 

"* 


^ 

»- 




11 88 
400 


8 


8 


8 


CO 
CO 


s 


8 


s 

00 


S 8 
1: - 






88 8 


* 


8 


S88 


00 


s 


9 

8 








s s sss 


8 

S 




88S 


^ 

n 


So 

8 


8 

to 


8 88 


888 8 8 

lOiOtO 00 M 


9 

8 


8 

9 


8SSS8S8S8 


S88 8 


s 


» 88 



i 






^llf^lillll lllllllllllll 




6 

1 

OB 


& 

M 


9 

CO 


8 








« 

■* 


QQ 






8 

00 


8 








8 
8 


12 80 


8 

9 


28 66 
12 60 

1100 




8 




s 

00 


8 
8 


^.8889 88 

' 09000000 000» 


88 


9 

8 


888 888 
«SS 8*3 


800 

9100 

700 

128 06 


88 


8^ 

00 et 


1 76 
80 80 


1 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD or HOMB HIBBIONS. 



106 



8 


8 

Ok 






8 








e 

^ 


8 8 




3 
8 


S 


8 

at 












s 


S8 

a* 


10 00 

96 94 
600 
89 00 

500 




8 

s 


8 


8 


S 

•0 


8 

lO 






500 
900 
800 
18 00 


88 


8 


16 50 

17 07 
6100 
11 18 
90 00 
90 00 

600 


8 

«9 


5 
i 


8888 




ss 






On 



illfilnlsiliiiiiiiii 






si? 

I 



11 



Si 



ES££££mS«S>-»X 






II 



?'3 



s 


8 




8 !S 


500 
88 06 


5 
8 




S 8 

•0 00 




100 
16 88 

86 00 


8 


90 66 

960 

1 00 
17 40 


8 






8 


ft 8 

8 8 




888 88888888 88 


8 

1 


88 
88 


8 8 


8 
8 


1188 
18 60 

990 
10 00 
600 


900 

800 
9100 
16 61 





n 



If 









;5^ 
■J? 



S 



-ilililli ilillii 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



106 



ANNUAL BBPOBT OF TBB 



[1890. 



1 


8 
8 


88 

00 00 


8 




s 
p 




00 


S 


8 


8 S 


8Sg 


9 
8 


8 


ad 


S 8 
8 S 


ses 


8 8 8 

- 81 8 


S8 

lOlO 


fe 
S 


1 




8:^888 
8S*-*8 


8888S5 


$;S8 88Soa 
»-8« S-^-^J 


8888S 

09«O|OiO«D 


1 


• 



ilia q,'-s3 -b 



I 



lii 



sai 



mSSIIoS^^^^^^^ 



1 


s 


8 


S 




OQ 

00 


8SS 




^ 
& 


So 

*- 


00 

*4 


74 00 

76 00 

11 94 
400 


8 ^ 

8 9 


s 


48 00 

600 
800 


txi 


700 

176 19 

18 86 

88 98 

881 10 

84 15 

80 00 

563 

18 05 


88S8S8 


§ 


S 88SSS SS 



I 



^ 



b .11 

In I 



&^ 



III 



g| 



nil 



^1 



9 

o 



|||||gi:5mi 



if 

O rl 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OF HOHB MI8SIONB. 



107 



QQ 
O 

o 

GQ 

H 

O 

o 






sss«s3S9a«£SsaB esssss^sssss 



5* 



|;r4liiilli||||_ 






lllllllllll 









. ISS39S8 









llliiill 









.1 




31 



gaa 



!i3S83:9ssaa35gsseisss!sr:ggEli 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



108 



▲ KNITAL BBPOBT OF THE 



[1890. 



TABULAR STATEMENT OF ACTUAL PAFMBNTS TO THE 

PRESBYTERIES DURING FISCAL YEAR 

ENDING APRIL 1, 1890. 



ATLANTIC. 

But Florida 

Sontli Florida 

BALTIMOBS. 

Baltimore 

NawCMtle 

Washington City 

COLORADO. 

Boulder 

Denyer 

Gunnison 

Poeblo 

COLUMBIA. 

Alaska 

East Oregon 

Idaho 

Oregon 

Puget Sound 

Bonthem Oregon 

ILLINOIS. 

Alton 

Bloomington 

Cairo 

Chicago 

Freeport 

Matkoon 

Ottawa 

Peoria 

BoekBtyer 

Sohayler 

Springfield 

INDIANA. 

OrawfordsyiUe 

FortWayne 

Indianapolis 

Logansport 

Monde 

New Albany 

Yincennes 

Whitewater 

INDIAN TBBEITOBY. 

Cherokee Nation 

Chickasaw 

Choctaw 

Mnseogee 



4,768 81 
43^80 


9,651 81 


8,787 «0 

886 00 

1,000 00 


4,682 60 


8,878 80 
7,881 60 
8,016 67 
10,811 05 


24,037 91 


6,99186 
7,666 18 
7,779 67 
18,911 76 
19,168 68 
4^78 87 


60,176 96 


910 84 

776 00 

8,180 88 

7,9M88 

487 60 

668 60 

866 66 

818 60 

176 00 

470 00 

1,086 00 


17,609 16 


460 00 

99186 
918 60 

1,666 48 
416 66 

1,985 00 


6,86184 


6,870 76 
6,677 60 
8,880 66 
8,814 60 


81,848 80 



IOWA. 

Cedar Bu^ids 

OouMUBInffll 

Des Moines , 

Dnbogne 

Fort Dodge 

Iowa 

Iowa City 

Watarloo 

KANSAS. 

Bmporia 

Hi^land 

Lsmed 

Neosho 

Osborne 

Solomon 

Topeka 

KBNTUCKT. 

Bbenezer 

Looisyille 

Transylyaata 

MICHIGAN. 

Delfott 

Flint 

Grand Bapids 

Kalamazoo .* 

Lansing 

Monroe 

Fetoskey 

Saginaw 

MIHNBSOTA. 

Dalnth 

Mankato 

BedRiyer 

St.Paal 

Winona 

MISSOUBI. 

Kansas City 

Osark 

Palmyra 

Platte 

St.LoaU 

NBBBASKA. 

Hastings 

Kearney 

Nebraska Ciiy 

Niobrara 

Omaha 



1,804 68 
8,668 79 
6,087 66 
8,468 66 
7,826 61 
1,116 00 
1,889 08 
1^88 



88,166 48 



9,870 98 
8,088 88 
8,757 16 
4,486 75 
6,888 60 
4,881 84 
6,197 09 



41,104 89 



1,460 00 
1,187 60 
1,898 75 



4,486 86 



8,679 17 
8,880 00 
1,718 60 

686 00 
1,176 00 

885 00 
8,620 68 
6,011 66 



19368 95 


2,997 67 
3315 85 
8,146 91 
10,815 41 
3,482 06 


88,707 80 


S,891 06 
2,720 00 
8,187 60 
4368 88 
8,446 85 


16,487 26 


7,298 87 
4388 99 
6,188 78 
5,651 85 
8,579 03 


81,145 86 



Digitized by 



Google 



18»0.] 



BOARD OF HOME MIBBIONS. 



109 



HEW JSB8ET.* 

JeiMj Cl^f .*.'..*. ..." 

Moomoatti 

Monis and Onoge 

Hdwtfk 

Nev Brnnswiek 

Newton 

WeitJeney 

NBW MESOO. 

Arliona 

RIoenuide 

SantaM 

NBW TOBK. 

Albany 

Blnghamum 

Boiton 

Brooklyn 

BoJIklo 

Oqnga 

Cbamplstak 

dMmnng 

OohunUa 

Q«iiflwa 

Oeneva 

HndMn 

Longliland 

&:::::::;.::::::::::: 

New York 

Niaffara 

NorttiEiT«r 

OtaMo 

Boimwitar 

St. Lawraaoe.. ...'.!. .'!... 
Steuben 

^^ 

XTOJ 

Utiea. 
~ I 

NOBTH DAKOTA. 

rek 

Farao 

PeiaMna 

OHIO. 

Athens 

BeUefontatne 

ChUUeothe 

GlBoinnatl 

Clereland 

Cdnmbna 

S»yw» 

Huron 

MalwnlMV.V.V.** !."*.*. .' 

MaftnTT. 

MannMw 

PortaaHmtii'.....]!!! 1 

SLCaaimlUe 

SteabenTine 

Wooeter 

Zaneerille 



4,106 48 
7,156 00 
18,448 83 



84.700 75 



8,866 68 

1,0T8 60 

1B^88 

1,610 41 

1,065 55 

875 00 

1,892 50 

1,487 60 

1,085 00 

600 00 

606 85 

1,810 15 

887 60 

768 50 

8,058 88 

8,885 00 

187 60 

706 08 

884 58 

000 00 

718 50 

1,695 88 

1,584 60 

1,786 10 

1,895 84 

700 00 



48,618 18 



8JS47 80 
6,868 08 
8,600 87 



17,590 09 



800 00 
175 00 
475 00 

775 00 
785 00 
100 00 
887 60 
575 00 

100 00 

1,887 50 

875 00 

50 00 

187 50 
468 60 



5,895 00 



PACIFIC. 

LoaAngelea 

Saoramento 

San Franetano 

San Joa6 

Stoekton 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Allegheny 

BlaiMTllle 

Bntler 

Carltale 

Chester 

Clarion 

Erie 

Hnntincdon 

Klttannlng 

Lackawanna 

Lehlffh 

NortEomberland 

PhiladelphU 

Central 

" North 

Plttabaiig^ 

Redstone 

Shenango 

Waahii^[ton 

Wellaboro 

Westminster 

West Virginia 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

Aberdeen 

Black Hills 

Central Dakota 

Dakota 

Soathem Dakota 

TENNESSEE. 

Birmingham 

Holston 

Kingston 

Union 

TEXAS. 

Aostin 

North Texas 

Trinity 

UTAH. 

Montana 

Utah 

WoodBlrer 

WISCONSIN. 

Ohippewa 

La Crosse 

LakeSaperior 

Madison 

Milwaukee 

Winnebago 



5,180 90 
18,860 10 
4,957 96 
4,185 04 
4,848 88 
8,474 68 



85,008 01 



899 65 
498 8T 

88 54 

468 68 

1,488 78 

14 46 
148 76 
978 68 

69 10 

1,888 09 

885 58 

89144 

881 87 

75 97 

688 56 

156 61 

500 

98 96 

60 18 
968 69 

14 00 
1,016 67 



9,887 91 



7,878 90 
6,860 75 
6,689 89 
8,468 88 



80,07185 



8,647 80 
1,670 75 
4,104 50 
8,888 07 



11,706 81 



7,184 86 
5,687 70 
4,654 08 



17,406 06 



7,907 96 
17,088 66 
5,174 99 



80,106 61 



1,966 85 

8,075 49 
8,906 90 
1,854 87 
1,T79 85 
8,489 88 



14,971 69 



•The expense of the Home Mission work in this Synod is prorided for by its Synodical Sustenta- 
tioa Fond. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



no 



ANNCAL BBPOBT OF THB 



[1890. 



QQ 

Q 
O 

GQ 

n 



O 

§ 

H 






CO 



5* 






S8 8S;S8SS$;$:9:39&S888S8 8lg8«^ 



•»:!__ _^ i^ '^ ^ 

$:P8 
If- 






31 



88 



8Si 






S8 



S3SS!SI8S8S§8SS 

Sg§§§IJSS§li§ 



IP 






SSSSSS88S8S;S 



8988 
Siii 

eeofgfacf 

ssfa 



JiJi 



SSS8Si5«9 



8888 

3S§i 



9S98 

ll|l 



33899 









f 



SS8S&SSS 



^^a«f^ 



B8S3$3eS 









:s8;f 



ssss 









§8S8' 



;2:^S8S8SS 

- ^' of 



S8S 

m 

8*8 



^§. 



PI 



8S8 

iS§ 
S;«^8 



8?8 

lii 



ss 



I 






Si 









S8So8 



till 



-IS'- 






I 

I 

s 



I 



I 



9 

s 



I 

ft 
s 



3X»3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OF BOMB MISSIONS. 



HI 



STATISTICAL REPORTS. 



MISSIONARIES. 



ABKL8, Lucas 

ADAIB, Al<KXAlfDS& 

Aaah, Joseph ALSXAimsB, 

Adair, Johv M 

AikAMS, Charlks a 

Adams, John B 

Adams, MosBS N 

An Aim, ROBK&T L 

Adams, Bobbbt N., D.D .... 

Adams, BoLUN L 

Adams, Wm. B 

Ahxbv, Patbiok. 

Albsioht, Bxhbt F 

•Alomh, Gustavxts R 

Alobich, Btrom L 

Albxaxdsb, Frank M 

Albxandmr, Jambs E 

Albzandbr, John E 

Albzandbr, John M 

Allbn, Calmb' M 

Allbn, Datid D 

AtLBN, DaTIDN 

Allbn, Edward A 

Allbn, Fridbrick B 

•Allbn, John F 

Allbn, Marcvb M 

Allbn, Bidnbt 

Allbn. Trbo. H 

Allbb, Absalom T 

Allbt, Frbdbrick , 

Allbtn, Wm. a 

Amblbb, Thos. a 

Ambbosb, David E 

Amlono, Jas. L 

Andbbson, Chas. O 

Andbbson, Jaxxs 

Abdbbson, Samubl B 

Andbbson, Wilxiam 

Andrbws, Jacob B 

Abdbbws, Jos. E , 

Abdbbws, Nath^l 6 

Andbbws, Samubl 

Ahnin, John A 

Abmbntbout, Thos. 8 

Abmbb, William W 

ABMSntONO. Abbl 

Abmbtbono, Chbstbr S. . . . 

ABMSTRONo, Frank E 

Abmbtbono, Hallogk 

Abmbtbono, Bobbrt T . . . 

Abmbtbono, Thomas G 

Abhold, Frank L 

Abbbola, Epipanio 



•ir«R«paffi. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



PlstteyUle and BookTllle. .'. Wis. 

Itoaoow Idaho. 

Blaine, Portland and station Ind. 

Fillmore and Scipio Utah. 

Paokwankee, BoAblo and stations. Wis. 

Lynn Mass. 

Good Will and ataUons 8. Dak. 

Altwny, let Tex. 

BynocUoal Missionanr Minn. 

New SHaron, dfret s Leighton . . Iowa. 

Laoota, Bedlngton, Ong and 4 sta- 
tions Neb. 

Drayton, St. Andrew's, Lincoln and 
4 stations N. Dak. 

Seymour, Throckmorton, Benjamin 
and station Tex. 

Lakeland and Elssimmee Fla. 

Kelso. Castle Bock A Freeport . . Wash. 

Murpnysboro^ and Garteryllle 111. 

RoahsylTania, Bush Creek, Mt. Vic- 
tory and station Ohio 

Oakland and 8 stations Tenn . 

Steele and 2 stations N. Dak. 

Bancroft and Burt, Iowa and South 
Sioux City Neb. 

Rockford, Spangle and station. .Wash. 

Ft. Oibson, Augarieaik 2sta*s.Ind. Ter. 

Decatur Ind. 

Selden, Middle Island A station.. N. T. 

GanadayiUe and 8 stations... Ind. Ter. 

Bessemer. Mich. 

Oranyllle. Union Oroye A station . . .111. 

South Chicago, 1st 111. 

Norton and station Kan. 

Haigler, Champion A 8 stations. . .Neb. 

Picnord and 8 stations, and Juneau 
and Oak Chroye Wis. 

Ely Minn. 

Oswego lU . 

Blue Mound, Pleasant Hill and Ma- 
pleton Kan. 

Currie Minn. 

St. Joe, Adora and station Tex . 

Clearwater. Indianola ft station . . .Kan . 

Crook and 4 stations Col 

Santa Monica and 8 stations Cal. 

Sandusky Ohio. 

Cass City, Brookfleld A 8 sta's. . . Mich . 

Sanborn and rioinity, North Dakota 
and Hot Springs, A 8 sta*8 . . S. Dak. 

Bolla, Cuba and Btt Prairie Mo. 

Felton and Harrington Del. 

Harlan and 8 stations Ky. 

Hill City, Ist. aud stations S. Dak . 

Jackson Mich. 

Washington Mo. 

Wells and Columbia and station Pa. 

Canton and La Grange Mo 

Miles City and station Mont. 

Salt Lake City, Westminster Utah. 

Albuquerque, Spanish and 8 sta- 
tions N. Mex. 



^ 


^ 


A>l>i-J to 


g 


e 


n :•■ 


ChflTi^M. 




"^l 


If 


IS 


i 


1 


4 

00 


RB. 


12 


H 




78 


56 


p. 


1« 


4 


5 


81 


100 


V. 


n 


17 


6 


106 


180 


s ■■--■ ■ 








76 


s - 


^ 


8 


88 


140 


^1 • 


^l^ 


89 


79 


86 


li.Si. 1-4 








140 


P. 


11! 




2 


54 


48 


8.S. 


11 ' m 


6 


115 


98 


B.S. 


im 


9 


4 


88 


160 


S.3. 


m 


B 


8 


T7 


46 


a.K. la 


1« 


8 


86 


20 


S;-. ta 







78 


146 


s.s.i n 


2 


18 


47 


100 


E3, m ' n 


17 


107 


800 


F.B, 7 


12 


10 


170 


100 


s.s. s 






88 


48 


BS. 4 




2 


17 


44 


S.B. 


5 




8 


48 


180 


A/ti. 


11 


i 


8 


84 


80 


S.». 


18 


n 


6 


97 


100 


F. R 


82 


10 


806 


150 


as. n 




1 


18 


17 


S.S.; 132 






80 


40 


fl.a. 


12 


^ 


5 


80 


160 


s.». 


7 


B 





67 


96 


p. 


\ii 


U 


6 


lOS 


116 


S.H. 


n 


a 


1 


65 


70 


s,s.' n 


1 


4 


28 


275 


S,g.' 8Ji 


1 


1 


60 


85 


9.y.: S 










H.S.I 6 


SI 


« 


76 


SO 


S.S.I ft 


^0 


14 


115 


90 


s.s. 


4 






40 


50 


H.H. 


la 


fl 


8 


90 


100 


8. a. 


1^ 


I 


4 


48 


165 


s.t^. 


13 






11 


60 


PE fi 


8 


6 


87 


66 


S.8. r; 






18 




9.8.| IS 


•i 


1 


48 


70 


s.yj la 


9 


8 


40 


160 


PS. la 




2 


188 


106 


R la 


A 




76 


80 


s.a. HH. ^ 


3 


66 


50 


S.S. Ill 






6 


140 


K 1^ 


in 


88 


160 


175 


S.S. ^H 


n 


1 


46 


116 


s.s, 1^ a 


. . .. 


58 


50 


SM. \2 


4 


68 


90 


P.E T2 It 




67 


75 


e.&, V2 m 


16 


86 


150 


EM. 


' la 


a 




84 


86 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



112 



ANNUAL BBPOBT OF THB 



[1890. 



MISSIONABIES. 



ABTUUUi Biohabd 

Abdalb, Wilboh 

ASHLBT, AtHDUVB F 

ASTOV, Albbrt 

Athbbton. Ibaao W 

*ATKIK8, TH08. B. 

Atkinson, Jambs W 

Atkinson, John 8 

AUF DBB HBIDBjFBBD*K H. 

AUQHBT, John H 

Aubqvobb, Obablah C 

Austin, Alonzo B 

AZLINB, ANDBBW 

BAAT, JACOB 

Baoxus, Clabbbob W 

Bahlbr, Louu H 

Bajuet, Fbanxun C 

*Bailbt^ohm W 

Bailvt, Tubnbb S 

*Baii.bt, Wk. L 

BAILOB, JOSBPH 

*BAnf, Jambs. 

Bainton, Hbnbt W 

Baibd, Wm. G 

Baibd, Wm. M 

Bakbb, EnosP 

Baxbb, John P 

Balbbidob, Jambs A 

Baldwin, Jambs H 

Ballaoh, Bobbbt 

*Bantlbt, John C 

Babakat, Mdhanna B 

Babbbb, Samubl 

Babbob,JohnP 

Babolat, Bdwabo B 

Babdill, John A 

Babnbs,Gbo. G 

Babnbs, John B 

Babxbt, Lbwis W 

Babnum, Oribn S 

Babb, Edward 

•Babbbtt, Fbank F 

Babtlb, wm. T 

Babtlbtt, Robt. a 

Babton, Josbph H 

Baskbbtillb, Obo. S 

Baskbbtillb, Hbnbt C. . . . 

Bassbtt, Jambs 

BA88BTT, Wm. B 

*Batohbldbb. Jos. M 

Batbr, Chas. P 

Batbs, Samubl C 

Batbs, Wm. B 

Baxtbb. Gbo. W 

Baynb, Thomas 

Bbalb, Wbisbl 

*3ball, Btbon 

Bball, John N 

Bbabd« John D 

Bbattoe, Thos. C ,. 

•N«B«pwt. 



fiblds of labor. 



White City and WUsie Esn, 

Tipton and 8 stations Mo. 

Bloomlngton, Neb., and Astoria and 
Vermont 111. 

MiUerboro* and WiUowdale Neb, 

Coyelo and station Cal, 

Lower Liberty Ohio 

Milpitae and S stations Cal. 

Hill City, Mt. Salem, Atkins and 
Pleasant Valley Kan. 

St. Louis, 8d, German Jfo. 

Mountain Top A Sugar Notoh, Pa., 
and Edijaond ft 8 stations . . Lid. Ter . 

Northwood and station N. T. 

Sitka, Ist Alaska. 

Arlington Kan . 

Smith Centre, Crystal Plains and 

station Kan. 

isas City, Grand View Park, 
Western, Highland A 8 sta's. . . Kan . 

Maiden... .....TTT: N. Y. 

Kasota and station Minn. 

Lowemont and Meriden Ran. 

Synodioal Missionary Iowa. 

orton Md. 

Minot and 8 stations N. Dak. 

N.Y. 

Snake Birer ft Bear Biyer Country . Col . 

Lostine, Shiloh and 8 stations Oreg. 

Del Norte Col. 

Hebron, Walden and other sta^s. . .Col. 

Laurel and Mariposa Iowa. 

Larlmore and 1 station K. Dak. 

Goose Lake and 8 stations NDak. 

Gravson and stations. Cal. 

Walker, Rowley and 8 stations. . .Iowa. 

Grand River, Hopewell and Dia- 
gonal Iowa. 

Rooky Ford Col. 

Lyndon Kan. 

Ashland. Md. 

Zion, German, Nasareth, German, 
and 8 stations, and Kearney, 
German Neb. 

Humboldt Neb. 

Manchester, MurrayTlUe and Win- 
chester ni. 

Whitestone N.Y. 

San Franoisoo, Bethany Ohapel and 
Peratta St. S. S. Mission Cal. 

Ligonier ^.. Ind. 

San Antonio, Madison Saoare. . . . Tex. 

Prairie Star and Platte Centre. . .Iowa. 

Dayton. 1st Tenn. 

Boise City snd station Idaho. 

Tower City, Bingfaamton and sta- 
tions and Casselton N. Dak. 

Broken Bow Neb . 

New Proyldenoe and Maryyille..Tenn. 

Norden and 2 stations Neb. 

Osborne Kan. 

PlainwelLlst Mich. 

Carlisle, Salem and Ohio Ind. 

Delhi Minn. 

Wellington and Hoopeston HI. 

Pease valley and Ouve S. Dak. 

Louisiana and 8 stations. Mo. 

Firth Neb, 

(Greenfield Ill . 

Santa Maria and 8 stations Gal. 

Las Animas and station Col. 



P.8. 
P. 

8.8. 
S.S. 
P.E 
8.S. 
P. 

8.S. 
S.S. 

S.S, 

8.S. 

P. 

S.S. 

S.S. 

P.E 
P. 

S.S. 
8.8. 

8.8. 
S.S. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
P. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
8.8. 

8.8. 
8.8. 
P. 
8.8. 



8.8. 
P. 

8.8. 
P. 

8.8. 
P.B 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
P. 



19 

19 

Mf 

18 



18 

la 

18 

'? 

19 
18 

19 



19 
4 
4 
7 
8 
18 
6 

9% 
8 
19 
19 
18 


"? 

19 
8 



P. 
P. 

8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 

P. 

P. 
8.8. 

P. 

8.8. 7 
8.8. 4 
8.8. 11^ 
8.8.1 6 
8.8. 4 
8.8.1 18 



6 



19 



88 



18 
100 

78 
00 
180 
185 
80 

75 
140 

100 

60 

116 

86 

76 
49 
196 



IfiO 
60 

40 
66 
00 
40 
66 
00 
40 
60 

185 
66 

180 
90 



900 

60 



148 
75 
80 
70 

164 
80 

880 
80 
60 

190 

188 
80 
t90 
80 
86 

60 
68 
116 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OF Hans MIBBIQVB. 



113 



MI88I01IABISS. 



WtMiM>B OW ULBOR. 



II 



if 



IS 



Bum, Lbovabd JL 

Bran/WiLLiAii G 

Bub, rmw bt 

BbuWi LinnsBS H 

bsll, (^bobok w 

Bill, Jobm Bw N 

Bbltillb. Bam*l K. 

BsmiHr, Aaboji W 

Bnaov, Hombb H 

BBBIOV, SllfOB 

Bms, Hbmbt 

BnsDitt, Rlias 

BBBOBX, GSOBOB 

Bkbbt, Jambs F *.. 

Bbsbbt, Fkabx B 

Bbbt, Jacob. 

•Bbbt, Wiujam 

BBvnoToK, Ctbus L. . . . 

Bbtbb, Bvbbt Q 

BioKBVBACB, Aug. B. . . . 
BunoiBxx, Qbobob B 

BlOLBB, BABTOB B 

BnroBAM, Jom 8 

Bduoacb, Combad B. . 

♦Btwbij, Lbmubl B 

Black, Jambb P. 

BbAOK, William A 

Blaoddbv, William M 

Blaoswbll, Alvin , 

Blaib, Obobcu a 

Blaib, Wm. H 

Blakblt, Zb&ah F 

BLATCHFOBn, HBMBT. . . . 

BLAYBBT, C1LA& P 

BL0BHBVOuL4I^ &, Jb . . . 

Blobm, Fbbd*k W 

Blobui^. P 

BlotSiWm. B . 

Bltib, Datid 

Boabd, Jambs H 

Bqbbacx, Pbxlip 

BoLUiAii, Wm. J 

Bolt, Bicholas 

BooMB, William J 

*BosuiT, Thomas O 

Bnnsiwp, Oumo. 

BonttHTOB, Tmos. B 

BOWBB, JOHH A 

*bowma«, jobx b 

Bowmab. ICasrh 

BOTOB, LBSTBH B 

Bon, Abchibald 

BoTB, Abdbbw O. 

BoffB, Jambs 8 

BoTD, Joseph N 

BOTD, BOBBBT P 

Bon, Thomas 

*Bon. Thomas F 

Bon, Thomas M. 

Bon, Thomas M 

B on, W m. L 

BonBH, JORM A 

BOTBB, JAHBS W 

Bona, William. 

Bbabbb, BobT M. L.... 
•Bbab&bt, Hhhbt C 



.NeE 



Wllllsms and statton lows. 

Bsthdram and BtstioQs Idslu). 

Chttden Gro?e and ttation Iowa. 

Baiatn Mloh. 

Sngle and n Mora Od. 

JtyrUe Grade and stations Oi 

Wahoo and 2 stations. 

Pine City, Bush City A station. 

Barton Wis. 

WUUamsvills, Union and sUtion .... 111. 

GlenTiUe and Kt. Pl«a8ant Neb. 

Ghicago, 1st, German and station. . .111. 
Sammerfleld, Star and Fairriew. . Kan . 
Conway A 6 stations A GxIdley.K. Dak. 

Boms, Orwell and station Pa. 

Broouyn Pa. 

De KfUb and De Kalb Jvnotion.. .N. T. 
De Venuk Milton Oentra A sta'n. . Ohio . 

Coggan, Zion and station Iowa. 

Olendsle and Burt>ank. Gal. 

Coolidse, Kendall, Bdwin A sU'n. . Kan . 

MintoKnoz. K.Bak. 

Baker Gity^lst, and 8 stations. . . .Oreg. 
Bbenessr, Walnitt Hill and Book- 
wood m. 

Colombia. Mioh. 

Loud City, Ist, Neb., and Montne- 

Bethany Iowa. 

Pierra S- Dak. 

Bridgeyille and Federalsborg Del. 

Genoa, 8d, and station N. Y. 

Beading and station Mloh. 

Parkston and Union Centra and 8 

stations B. Dak. 

Odanah. Wis. 

Milan, SuUiran and 8 stations Mo. 

Greenleafton, Bbeneser Minn. 

Boandinayian, Bvansellst Utah. 

Green Bay, Franoh A Little Birer.Wls. 

Ft. DsTls and 4 stations Tex. 

PikeTille Ky. 

Aeern and 8 stations Fla. 

Hynim, Bmanuel and 4 stations . . Utah. 

SpvlnjrviUe Iowa. 

Bethlehem, German, and Angus- 

tinus, German Minn. 

Caldwell and 4 stations Idaho. 

Oilesns Ind. 

Manitowoc 1st. Wis. 

Palmer and S stations S. Dak. 

Caldwell and Sharon Ohio. 

San Angelo Tex . 

Bt. Lawranoe and station 8. Dak. 

Beayer City and 8 stations Neb. 

Fraser ana 8 stations Mioh. 

La Camas, Bt. John's A sU*n . . . Wssh. 
Preston and 8 stations, and La 

Moura N.Dak. 

Lake,8d 111. 

Paris and rioinity Idaho. 

Portland, 4th Oreg. 

Knob Noster and Salem Mo. 

Pendleton Owg. 

Poplar Bluff Mo. 

Baymond, Geresoo and station .... Neb . 
Wilkes Barra, Corenant A station. .Pa. 

LonisTille, Oiiret Ky. 

Hoxie, Selden end 8 stations Kan. 

Tekamahand8 stations Neb. 

Branswiok snd LlnestoBs 111. 



S.8. 
S.8. 

P. 

P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 

P. 
8.S. 

P. 
B.B. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 



18 
18 
18 

18 

"? 

12 
10 
18 
IIH 
18 
18 
4 
lOH 
18 
6 
4 
18 
18 
11 
18 
3X 



8.8. 4H 



P.B 

8J9L 

8.8. 
8.8. 
8.& 
P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

8.8. 

P. 
8.8. 

P. 

8.8^ 
8.8. 
P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 

P. 
P.E 



6 

4 

'? 

18 

'? 

18 

18 

9 
18 
18 
8H 
10 
18 
lOH 
18 
18 
18 

18 
18 
6 
18 
18 
4X 



8.8. 6 



8.8. 

P. 

8.8. 

8.8. 

P. 
P. 

8.8. 



18 

lOX 

18 

18 

[lOX 
8 

18 



8.8.' 18 



8.8 
8.8. 
S.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
P. 
8.8. 
8.S. 
8.8. 



6 
18 
18 
18 
10« 

8 
18 
18 

5 



10 



11 


4 


88 


4 


6 


9 


8' 




5 


.... 


86 





1 




8 




1 


1 


■ 8" 


"6 


60 


8 




9 


*i«' 


"k 


80 


4 


1 


a 


"i' 


V 


6 


5 



100 
80 
180 
186 
180 
00 
90 
186 
80 
100 
18 
186 
800 
116 
75 



186 
66 
188 
100 
160 
60 

160 
81 



84 
80 
168 
66 

80 

100 

100 
64 



80 
45 
85 
60 

150 
60 
65 
876 
180 
100 
65 
85 
100 
90 
80 

900 
400 

200 
101 
86 
66 
100 
60 
197 
160 



70 1128 
68 ' 60 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



114 



AHHUAL BSPOBT OF THB 



[18»0. 



MIBSIONABISS. 



VIBLDS OF LABOR. 



II 



si 



B&AOLBT, William A . . 
Bradmaok, Isaac B. . . 

Bradt, Gba& E 

Bbanoh, Johv 

Brandt, Qubtayus A. 



Bbandt^ohn B 

Brass, Wm. G 

Brat, Georor 

Brrmioxxr, Charlbs.. 

Brbn, Joseph 

Briob, Arobibald 6. . 
BRiosiELS. LnfER F . 
stol, No 



Bristol, Koioe D. . 



Broadt, Wm. C 

Beookinton, Jamms S. . . 
Brouillbttb, Charlbs.. 
Brovillbttb, Te&xsphobs 
Brown, Bbnj. J 



Brown, Clarbnob H. 



Brown, £i>WARO J 

Brown, Bdwih 

*BROWNtHBNRT JAMBS. . 

Brown, HbnrtL 

*fiROWN, Jambs B 

Brown, John 

Brown, John A 

Brown, Wm. B 

Brown, Wm. C 

*Browkb, Oborob 

Brownlbb, Edwin S 

Brownleb, Hervbt H. . 

Bruce, Wallace 

tBRUOH, Wm. L, D.D. . . . 

tBRTANT, Edwin Q 

Buchanan, Duncan M. . 
Buchanan, Thos. N. . . . 

Buchanan, Wm. H 

Buck, Wm. S 

BURRANK, LTBANDER T. . 



Burdick, Charlbs B . 
♦BuRUSON, Jambs H . 
Burnett, Bluah L. . . 
*Burrowes, Thos. B. 
*Busoh, Augustus 



Butt, Daniel M 

Bittt, Jacob S.... 

Bters, Joseph H 

Btllesbt, Faber 

Btram, Albert B 

♦Cadt, Putnam 

Cairns, John 

Caldwell, John C. . . . 
Caldwell, Stuart S. 
Caldwell, Wm. E 



Calkins, Ltman D ... 
Cameron, Alex. G. . . 
Cameron, Daniel W. 
Cameron, John B. . . . 



Campbell, Arch. H. . . 
Campbell, Fred'k. . . . 
Campbell, Henrt M. 
Campbell, James W.. 



fit. Thomss, Elont * Glasston. .N. Dak. 

PRiuuna,lst N.T. 

Llnooln, 8d, and 1 staMoii Neb. 

Union, Verona and t stations Neb. 

Boscoe, Faris, 2Uon, S. Dak., and 
West Dohith, Westminster. ..Mian. 

St. Louis, Coyenant Mo. 

Hannibal N.T. 

Shelton. Neb. 

St. Pani*s, Geiman, Dallas. Tex. 

Bohemians of New Tork City N. T . 

Greenfield and Groreport Ohio . 

Westfleld and stftUon Wis . 

Mt. Pleasant, Beeoe, Hamilton and 
NeaL Kan. 

New ICarket Tenn. 

Speonk, Brookfleld and Manor. . . . N. T . 

Alexandria, Eureka A 8 stations . . Neb . 

Baker City Greg . 

Bhiflton, Bookport and st&tion, and 
Lima, Main Street Ohio. 

Stations in Morgan County, and 
Kismet, Wartburg A sta^s. . . .Tenn. 

Conway Springs, Pe<^one ft 8ta*n.Kan. 

Wolsey and Hitchcock S. Dak. 

Alliance Neb. 

WestMerrfll WU. 

Sloax Clty,8d Iowa. 

FaU Biver, Westminster ft 8 sta's . Mass . 

ArviUa and sUtion N. Dak. 

Wakeeny and 8 stations Kan. 

Baltimore, Knox Md. 

Hamden N.T. 

Minn. 

Grafton, 1st N. Dak. 

BoseTiUe Cal. 

Greenup Ky . 

Bast Jordan and South Arm Mich. 

Christian Hook N.T. 

Oskaloosa. Kan. 

Boeme, Waring and Kerrrille Tex. 

Schoolcraft, Ist Mich. 

Dorp Valley, Garfield, Gandy and 
4stati(ms Neb. 

Omro. Wis. 

LouisrUle, 4th .^j. 

BastMaine N.T. 

HioksTllle Ohio. 

Winona, German, and Frank Bill, 
German Minn. 

Britten and Emmanuel .S. Dak. 

Groton and Knox S. Dak. 

Emporia, Arundel Ayenue . . Kan . 

J«eup Iowa. 

Edgar, Ong and station Neb. 

West Superior Wis. 

Monterey and Sugar Hill t . . N. T. 

La Crescent and Bokah Minn. 

Kelseyyille and station Cal. 

0*Brien Co., Scotch, Liberty Town- 
ship, Gasa, Bethel and Irring^ 
ton Iowa . 

Brooklyn, Trinity N.T. 

Sylranla ft Columbia Cross Boads..Pa. 

West Milton and 8 stations N. T. 

Trinidad, 8d, HuerfRno Cafton and 
8 stations Col. 

Hamburg. Iowa. 

Boxbury Mass. 

Madison and Monett Mo. 

Volga City and station. Iowa. 



p. 

s.s. 

p. 

S.8. 
P. 
8.S. 

8.S. 
S^. 

8.S. 
P. 
P. 

8.8. 
S.S. 



8.S. 
P. 

8.a 

S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 

p. 

S.S. 

p. 
p. 

S.S. 

8.8. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 

P. 

P. 
8.8. 

P. 

S.S. 

P. 

P. 
S.S. 
S.S. 

S.S. 
S.S. 

p. 

8.S. 
P. 
P.8. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 



S.8. 
P. 
P. 
P; 

S.S. 
P. 

S.S 
8.S. 
8.8. 



I 

18 
18 
18 

tm 

18 

101 

18 
18 



18 
18 
18 

io>r 

18 

18 
4 
18 
»H 
11 
18 
18 
18 

8X 
8 

8K 
6 

18 

18 
1 

18 

10 
IS 

111 
18 
18 

?? 

18 
18 
18 
10 

8 
18 
18 

9 



46 
168 
81 

184 



80 



8T 



188 

84 
76 
89 

140 



180 
86 
60 
89 



160 
114 
76 
66 

60 
89 



186 
66 

60 
80 

160 

79 
180 
186 

80 
800 

176 
180 
60 
90 
76 

150 



10 



88 
46 

01 

118 

14 

66 

68 

110 

.800 

4 

110 

64 
88 
46 
89 
86 
101 
76 
95 
64 
60 



189 
164 
100 
100 
110 

146 
181 
800 
66 
180 

90 
176 
TO 
70 
60 
76 
180 
80 
186 
90 



18 



18 



800 

180 
78 
90 

76 
66 
190 
86 
66 



sro 



160 
160 



160 
116 
190 
100 



•NoRiport. fDMMMd. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1S90.] 



BOASD OF HOKB KI8BIOKB. 



115 



MISBIONABIKS. 



CAMPBBUh Jobv R 

Gampbxll, Btoabx M. . . 

OAMFBBLL, WlLUAM. 

Gampsbix, William. • .. 
Gampsbix, William R. . 

Gavfimld, Cmaa. K 

CUMnrr, Albbbt J , 

CAB]>ar, Philip L 

Cabdmmas, Abbam. 

GABMAHAH, DjLTID T 

*OABFBimB, QBOBOB. . . 

Cabb, Wiluam B 

Gabbimotoii, Johh 

CABaOLL,JOBll B 

Gabsom, Hablam P 

Gabotmbbs, Jambs 8 . . . . 
Cabvbb, Abdbbw 8 

GAB, Gbobqb. 

Gabiat, Datid W 

Chamwbbtah, Amobt N. . 

Gmambbbldi, Wm. B 

Cbcapiii, Aodiboh M 

GBAP0, Mmlabcthoii B. 
Cbafpbu*, Gbobob 

Gbabl«ob« Johh T^ 

GHABB, ABiTHDB B. 

Cba«txbtob, Qbbmab H 

Ghatbb, Abolfo , 

Ghbablb, Hbmbt G 

GHBSK,ntA]fOI8J 

GBBBBT, JOSBFH F 

GBXDBBrBB, Samubl W. . 
r yw-iMit Hbmbt 8 

GHB lMHA BaOir, GBA8. G . 

Gbbibtibob, Bobt 

GB0BOBILL, GHAS. H. . . . 

GLABK, BOVABD B 

CIJLBX,JAMB8 H 

Glabx, Bkjbabd a 

Glabx,SbthG 

Glabbb, WM.a 

•Glatwobtht, Wm. H. 

GliBI.ABI>, BoBBBT W. . . . 

, Wm. C. 

R. STbwtob B. . 

, JOSKPR 

Glbtblabdi, Wm. N 

Gltub, Wii^jUM 

•GoBUBOB, Wm 

Gob, Bbwamdi W 

GomuB, Fbabk H 

Gon.B, Albz. J 

GOILB, Bamubl A 

GOIA, WM.DABA 

GouoiAM, Wm 

nSOLUBB, FbAMOU M. . . 

Oolldis^ Gbabubs 

C0I.7BB, ABntOHT W . . . . 

Ooma, Bdoab li. 

Hkmam,JcHa B 

• MeRar"**- ^ 



FIBLD8 OF LABOB. 



Hallook, Northoote And Bidge 

Bdlnbnrgh and :i «tBiion8 N. IMk. 

LIneoln, Golyer and siaitlOB. 8«y- 

moor, SedftliA, BaIb And sta^n.Kaa. 

Delano And Mmie PlalnB Minn. 

MradonAndWeilSTUle Utah. 

SoathBjegate Yt. 

A^ntUe CalTAry. Tiinitv, Lake 

Union, Ballard A 8 8tationa..Wash. 

BedBlufl Cal. 

Santa Croa and station. N. Mas . 

Port Townsend, 1st Wash. 

Wellston and 8 stations. Obio. 

Gilbert Del. 

Ban Frandsoo, Lebanon A sta'n . . .Gal. 

Boion Ohio. 

gjnodioal MisBlonaiT a Dak. 

Hope aad Port Kaa. 

Olen Boae, SlepbenTiUe, Bosque 

and 4 stations Tex. 

Bartoir Fla. 

Woodbine Iowa. 

Glear Creek and other raoant 

ohnrohes Ind. Tar. 

GoBesrviUe and 8 stations Kan. 

8oathBend,9d Ind. 

Benlah, HoveU and 8 stations. . 8. Dak. 
Kylertown, Bradford and Wood- 

lawnandS stations Pa. 

Ida iQiwa . 

HydePaxk Got. 

Pern. ». T. 

Yioinity of Pajarito N.Mex. 

JaokBOu, 1st, and station Minn. 

Paris and stations Ey. 

Portngnese, Missionary^ Cal. 

Mnwankee, Graoe Wis. 

Nortonville Kan . 

Minneapolis, Biyeralde Mission. . Minn. 

DeUB^IdB? 8. Dak. 

Sonth ^ork, Bethany and station. Neb. 

Salinas, Central Arenue Gal. 

Pipestona^asper and 8 stations . Minn . 
Canton, Henrytown and Lanes- 

boro Minn . 

West Plains, Liberal, Hngoton aad 

stations Kan. 

Ghiea«o, Campbell Parte HI. 

Andoyer, Huinon A Plerpont. ..S. Dak. 

MonroTla and Asosa Cal. 

Amity and New Salem Tenn. 

Biedlald and Monroe Missions... Utah. 

MoOune and Osage, 1st Kan. 

Alder Creek and Forestport and 8 

stations N. T. 

Sptinft Yalley, 2Sena and MeCoy . .Qreg. 

Coryallis and Orantsdale Mont. 

GalesbuTg and Brie N. Dak. 

Westford. N.T. 

Mt. Bethel, Timber Bidge and 8 

stations Tenn. 

8he91eid,l8t Ala. 

Gaaeyllle, Hayes and Bonle, and Blk 

and4stotion8 Mloh. 

Osawatomle Kan . 

Grand Jnnotion Col . 

Lawndale Pa. 

ftiehfleld, Syraouae and Hngoton 

and station Kan. 

Qnenemo and 8 stations BEan. 

Poheta and Mt. Pleasant Kan. 



ii 



S.8. 
S.S. 

P.8. 

S.S. 

S.S. 

P. 

S.S. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 
8.8. 

P. 

P. 
8.8. 

8.8. 

8.a 

8.S, 
P. 

8.8 

P. 

8.S. 

8.8. 

8.8. 

P. 

P.B 

8.8. 

8.8. 

P. 
8.8. 

P. 

P. 
8.8. 
P.B 
8.8 
8.8. 

P. 

Si), 

8.8. 
P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.& 

8.8, 
8.8. 

8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

8.8. 

P. 

8.8. 



|J 



18 
6 

18 

18 
18 
18 

18 
18 
18 
18 

8 

1 

^H 
18 
18 
IIX 

18 
8 
18 

18 
13 
6 
18 

6 
18 
18 
18 
18 

5 
18 
IS 
18 
18 
18 
18 

6 
18 
18 



Addsdte 
CkavehM. 



166 
84 



no 



88 



66 



68 
116 



18 



10 



'1 



140 
80 

860 
00 
88 

100 



180 

160 
40 
80 
160 
100 

144 

160 
64 
40 



114 

W 

160 
197 
160 



68 
60 
10 
100 
05 
48 
68 
67 
88 
66 



61 
164 
48 
48 
81 



116 

88 
60 
84 
80 
16 

180 
88 

40 

18 

16 



140 
86 

800 
97 

600 

186 
76 
60 

190 

176 

00 
176 
800 
80 
80 
60 
148 

140 
88 

106 
78 
80 

176 
78 

60 



78 

186 
99 

100 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



116 



▲NNUAL RKPOBT OF THB 



[1890, 



MI8BI0NABIEB. 



GOMPTOH, ANDBSW J. . 

OovPTON, Chablm B. 

GONAIIT, ChAB. a 

Coin, AuousTOS 

OOHDXT, JOHK Q 

CoNOXB, Silas D 

CoNiuB, Jacob B 

COHEBTT, JAOOB 



Cook, Cornbliub O. . . 

Cook, Cha& H 

Cook, Johb J 

Cook, Sbth 

OooKX, Silas. 

COOPBB, Alyin 

OOOPBB, A. WiLLABO.. 



COOPBB, Bdwabd, D.D. 



OOOFBB, HUQH A 

•CoopsBi Jambs H 

COOPEB, JOHM B 

COPLBT, JOHK T 

COBT, AbthubB 

COBTfWM. C 

COULTBB, WM. 

*CO01ITBBMINB, DATID M . 
ComfTBBiailB, JOHX L . . 

COUBT, BOBBBT, D.D 

GOUBTBIOBT, OALTOI W. . . 

COVBBT, WM. C 

Coz, COHMKLL 

COTLB, CAMPBBLL 

Cbaio, Jambs M 

Cbaio, Jobm 8mD.D 

Cbaio, Bobt. Bl 

*Cbaiobbad, David E 

Obavbn, BDwnt 

Cbavbms, Wm. A 



Gbawfobd, Chas. B. . 
Cbawvobd, Jambs M. 



CBAirroBD, John W 

CRAirroBD, Lbti P 

*Cbbath, Jobb 

Gbbswbll, Jobb B. 

Ckinbb, Alyin M 

Cbiswbll, Bobbbt a 

Cbookbb, Jambs N., D.D. . . 

Gbockbtt, Duncan B 

Cboco, Altbbd H 

tCBOSBT, Bbnj. 8. 

Cboss, Hbnbt W 

Cbossbb, John B 

Cbowb, Jas. B 

Cbowl, Thbodobb 

OBUIKflBANX, BSBBBT, D.D 

Cbum, John B 

CuLLBN, Hbnbt 

CUMMINa, Wm 

CUMMINOS, B. WXLMOT 

CCMMINQS, QBO. McLBAN. . 

CUNNINQHAM, ALBZ. M 

CUNNINGHAM, JaMBS Q* 

OUBKIB, NBIL. 



CUBBT, WiLUAM W . . 

CuBTis, Solomon W. . 
Cutlbb,Fbsd. W... 



PIBLD8 OF LABOB. 



TiBTsr Oal. 

Dillon Mont. 

▼ooilieesvlUA N. T. 

Bnslifocd and Btstlon N. T. 

TaUs Book Col. 

Holdredge, Neb , A Toledo, 6th. . .Ohio. 

AmboT and station Minn. 

Wheatland, Oennan, and Belott, 

German Wis. 

North QtLge and South Trenton . . . N. T. 

Saoaton, Ist, Indian Aria. 

Tustin and 8 stations Mloh. 

LohrYlUe,Aabam and station... Iowa. 

Hebron Neb. 

Jefferson, 1st N. Y 

Berthoud and station, CoL, and 

Wapello Iowa 

Marble HilJ, White Water, Bristol, 

Hot Springs, Central and yi- 

olnity Mo. 

ManninKton and stations. W. Ya 

Bethel and Bockwood Tenn 

Lake City Col. 

Blaok Bird wtup i Neb. 

Brents and 8 stations Wash. 

NashYiUe, 1st, and Oak Grore lU 

Waterman, Bl., and Hesperla. . . . Mioh. 

BatoheUerYllle N. Y. 

Fort Howard and station Wis. 

Lowell, 1st Mass. 

Maywood III. 

St.PanL. Park Minn 

Josephand Bnterprise. . . Oreg, 

Central Iowa, 

Holyoke Mass, 

Hopewell and station Ind 

Bennet and station Pa, 

Sheldon and station N. Dak, 

Two Harbors Minn, 

Cameron and stati6n. Breckenridge 

and New Yoric Settlement . . . . Mo . 

GoodWiU S.Dak 

Edna, Lake Creek and 8 stations, 

Somerset and Malmi Itan 

Ellsworth Kan 

LamandaPark. Cal 

Temp6, Mesa City and stations.. .Ariz 

Ludaen and S stations N. Dak. 

Union 8. Dak. 

Colfax, Mackinaw and station 111. 

Superintendent Eastern District. N. Y. 
Oreenwood, CentreTiew and sta*n.Mo. 
Sonora, Columbia and 4 stations. . . Cal. 

Maiden on Hudson N. Y 

Oronooo and Chester Minn. 

PortUnd, Ist Me, 

Pleaeant, Unity and HunnewelL . . Kan, 

SaUda Col 

Montesano, Wynooohee A sta^s. .Wash 
Oiasston, HamUton ft 8 sta's. . N. Dak 

Owatonna and station Minn, 

Waverly Md 

Barre,1st. Vt, 

Yalentine Neb , 

Bugby and stations N. Dak, 

LIbertyriUe lU 

Spring Qrore. Oreenleaf, ColUn*s 

Centre and 3 stations Minn 

jMna Mloh, 

Taos and stations N. Mez, 

Woodharen N,Y 



I 


1^ 


mss. 


1 


.i 


1 


i 


4 


V.S 


10 


8 


18 


81 


40 


9.8. 


9H 




8 


86 


86 


9.8. 


18 


7 




61 


106 


3.8. 


18 


8 


1 


80 


49 


8.8. 


7 


1 


15 


W 


40 


3.8. 


u?? 


10 


17 


TO 


80 


8.8. 


1 


1 


85 


190 


8.8. 


IS 


84 


1 


185 


40 


9.8. 


10 


18 





104 


166 


S.S. 


18 


81 


1 


88 


41 


8.8. 


18 


6 




86 


90 


8.8. 


4 


4 


7 






S.8. 


1 










P. 


18 


8 


8 


es 


66 


S.8. 


18 


8 


8 


US 


185 


8.8. 


7H 


17 


18 


868 


866 


8.8. 


lOff 






80 


75. 


8.8. 


18 






181 


168 


8.8. 


lOJf 




8 


60 


75 


P. 


6 




91 




S.ft. 


10 






18 


100 


8.8. 


4 


4 


8 


118 


168 


P. 


18 




4 


60 


156 


8.8. 


8 










P.B 


4 


17 




66 


88 


P. 


8 


14 


18 


860 


880 


P. 


A 


1 


8 


70 


90 


8.8. 


18 


15 


14 


78 


94 


8J3. 


IS 






16 


66 


P. 


18 


7 


18 


66 


75 


8.8. 


18 


87 


87 


8B0 


184 


s.a 


18 


I 




61 


46 


p. 


18 


6 


6 


86 


806 


8.8. 


4 






30 


46 


P. 


H 




.... 


19 


73 


P. 


llK 


18 


6 


174 


146 


P. 


18 


8 


6 


98 


160 


8.8. 


18 


11 


4 


101 


186 


8.8. 


6 


4 


8 


107 




8.8. 


8 






6 


85 


S.S. 


6K 










S.S. 


4 


1 




18 


40 


8.8. 


4 


4 




88 


60 


8.8. 


11 
18 


8 


8 


90 


66 


P. 8 


18 


a 


10 


190 


75 


8.8. 


19 






88 


60 


8.8. 


u 










8.8. 


6 


4 




56 


70 


P. 


18 


18 


10 


180 


117 


8.8. 


6 


8 


1 


61 


185 


8.6. 


»? 


3 


8 


67 


85 


8.8. 


S 


7 


19 


60 


S.S. 


18 


16 


5 


48 


60 


8.8. 


109( 


1 


1 




60 


P. 


18 


18 


10 


117 


857 


P.E 


10 


18 


88 


100 


140 


8.8. 


4 


1 


1 


14 


80 


8.8. 


^H 






11 


65 


8.8. 


6 


13 


t 


48 


66 


8.8. 


6H 






86 


160. 


8.S. 


9 


6 


4 


80 


180 


S.8. 


18 


4 


S 


56 


60 


P. 


IS 


8 


6 


70 


185 



•NoB«port. t 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.1 



BOA]^D OF HOME MIBBIOV», 



117 



MI88I0NABTK8. 



•GOTLKB, Wm. a. 



Dailkt, Wm. N. p.,.. 
lUsmnA Chaslbs — 

Davks, Lucnxx S 

DASBDOV, ALiBZ. 

DABom, William H. . 
D'ABOBirT, Wm. S. Iah 

Dablbt, Gbo. M 

Datidboh, Wm. W. . .. 

•DavebSi Btab L 

DAYiBa» John M ., D.D 

DtAVlBB, Pbtbb 8 

Da-wia, BDwnr R. 

Datib, Jambs Bcott. . , 

DayiBi TMO0. D 



riELDB or LABOB. 



YbiIoiis points In White Wstter 
Pxesbytery Ind. 

HimtliiBtoii snd Ne|>lii. Utsh. 

Elk B^iids sad Tuba Mioh. 

Mllnor N. Dsk. 

Denmark Mioh. 

Petalnma Osl . 

Burr Oak and 4 stations Mioh. 

Ft. Morgan Col. 

SoathBend,9d Ind. 

Wilmot and stations 8. Dak. 

STnodloal Misslonaxy Tenn. 

Mlssonri ValleT. Iowa. 

Presbyterlal Mlsslonaxy HI. 

Falxfleld, Casej, Greenup and New 
Hope 111. 

Hopewell and 2 statlonsi Neb., and 
Media, Tineland and Willow 
8prlnfl:s Kan. 

Central Paric sad stafeion HI. 

Boris, Mt. Pleasant and stations. . . Ky . 

Uslion N. Dak. 

DAT, JoBB B iGeirais, Aurora, Woodbum and 8 

stations Ores. 

Ametlaan Fork and station. Uti£. 

Elmore and Oenoa Ohio. 

Msndsn N. Dak. 

Ooeor^' Alene Idaho . 



Datib,Wm. S 

DtAWSOM, BOLAXD I 
DAT, Bdoab W . 



DAT, Tbosl F 

DAT, WnuAM H 

*Dattoii, Bdsob C 

Dmpfbiibauoh, Gbo. L. . . . 

Dm OABMO, SAI.ATRIBL B., 



•Db Lqbo, Alfrbd D. . 

DbLomo, Cha& H 

*Db LmiA, Datid 

DMViaoir, Hbbbbbt G. . 

Dbbitbllk, Dahibl 

DMWiira, Cbas. S 

DMWcve, Thomas S 

DlAMBHT, JBBKMIAH N. 



Diaz, Ahtoxio.. 
Dkjxbt, Jobb p. 
•DiCKXT, Jo&S.. 
T,Nl] 



DfCKBOB, Bobbbt, D.D. . 

DiBKBOFF, Wm. 

DiLWORTB, BiOHABO B. . 

Disbhobb, Abdrbw a . . 

Divshobb, Taos. H 

DiXOK, WM.T 

DOBBOB, LBOHIDAS 



tDoGMBBT, Don. M. 
DoDD, Hbnrt M.... 
DOIXD, Bbubl 



DODD, Samubl 

DODDSa JAS. ABNBR 

DoDBOB, Db Costa H . . . . 

DqMBOB, Ck>NRAD 

DooLB, Wiluam I 

DoDOAB, Thomas 

DoveBTT, Jas. Wamvb. 
"DoioahAB, Tbob. E 

DOOOLAS. TOSBANOB B. . 
DOTLB, SHBBMAN H 

Dbbbbbb. Eluot L 

Dbbw, Monbob 

DUNCAB, KbHKBTH J 

DUBLAP, BDW ABD P 

DuBiop, Datid. 



ChrassT Cots, Piney Falls A Bprinc 

CI17 and station Tenn. 

Torktown end Norwloh. Iowa. 

Monument, Palmer Lake te sta*s. . .Col. 
Baton, Spanish snd Ttolnlty . . . . N. Mez. 

Spokane Falls, Centenary Wash. 

ItnozTllle and station Pa. 

Somerrllle. Union Square Mass. 

Barton snd station Md. 

Seminole Churohes in Muskome 

Presbytery Ind. Ter. 

Los Nletos, Spanish snd station.. .Cal. 

Hamden and station Ohio. 

Mexiden and Sohsller Iowa. 

Biookston and Meadow Lake and 

station. Ind. 

Osklaod, Centennial Cal. 

Freeport, 8d German IB . 

Vashon and stations Wssh. 

Alhambra and El Monte Cal. 

Auburn and Waksrosa Kan. 

Paton, Blppey and Sunny Side. . .Iowa. 
Walnut Grore, Anilooh sad Faix^ 

Tlew Ind. Ter. 

Cholame, Starkey and stations Cal. 

Augusta. N. T. 

Paoiflo Beaoh, Point Loma, Defanar 

and station. Cal. 

Stephentown N. T. 

Mlnto, Noz and Forest Blrer ..N. Dak. 
Bethany Chanel and other stat's. . Tex. 

New To]±,8d German N. T. 

Wlohtta, Oak Street Ksn. 

Hillsboro and Kelso and 1 station. Wis. 

Harrison and other stations. Wis. 

Langdon, Elkwood A t stst*s. . .N. Dak. 
Tehama, Klrkwood and station .... Cal. 

Sermour and Promise City Iowa. 

Artesian, ForestburgAlBndeaTor,8.Dsk. 

Ledalre and station .. Iowa. 

Greenfleld and station Iowa. 

Volga and station 8. Dak. 

Whsatlsnd Iowa. 



i 



S.S. 
8JB. 
S.B. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
P. 
S.S. 

p. 

8.8. 
8.8. 

pVb 

P.M 

8.8. 



8.8. 
P. 

as. 
p. 

8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

8.8. 

8.8. 

P. 

P.E 

8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.& 

8.8. 

P. 

P. 

P. 
P.S 
8.8. 
8.8. 

8.8. 
8.8. 
P. 

8.8. 

P. 
S.S. 
8.8. 

P. 

P. 
S.S. 
8.S. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 



i« 



18 
12 
11 

IS 

12 
6 
19 
12 

12 

11 

12 
12 
12 

1 

12 
12 
12 

7 
12 

6 
11 

12 
6 
12 

12 
12 

8^ 

12 

12 

li' 

4 
12 

1? 

4 
49« 



19 



12 9 
10 i 18 
6^ 87 
12 6 



20 



L\A 



V4 



126 164 

14 I 86 
12 i 50 
81 80 



eo 



186 



90 
9S 
190 
214 



187 



890 



800 

101 
100 

180 

100 
78 
80 

60 
182 
100 

80 
61 
160 
180 

96 
10 
80 



170 
190 
76 

100 
80 

106 



166 

70 
99 

40 
816 
196 
120 
120 
106 

40 
100 
100 
2C0 

60 
126 

00 

76 



• N«B«pari. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



118 



▲VFUAL SEPOBT OF THE 



[1890. 



MISSIOKABIEO. 



Drrmt, Alex 

DUKTHHQ^ HOICBK B. . 
I>n3(KIX0, UilLLiJI P., 

DtJTY. Gkorok H,. ,.. 

Dye, ilEKBY B . 

DTE, LUTBIH B 

VruK, jAMxa. ........ 

Ea£i>\ Alkx .,. 

•B0BOL8. Wk. A. 

*Bdoab, Robbbt 

BDWABD8, OBOBOB . . . 

BDWABD8, John 

ADWABD8, WM. H . . . . 

Bbzxb, Dudlbt B . . . 

KhiiBbh, Haws J 

Blfbld, Bdwabd a. . 
Bllbtt, Fbabk G. . . . 
Elliott, Addison 8. . 
Bluott, Fbanois M . 



Bluott, John H 

Bluott, John N 

Bllis,Chas. D 

Blus, Edwin M 

BLUB, John W 

Ellis, Bobbbt 8 

BuoB, OsoabH 

Blwbll, HnuLM. 

Blt, Bobt. W 

Embbsoh, Cbab. H.... 

Bnnib,Bobt . 

Bbnkst, Qbobob 

Bbvin, JohnN 

BBvm, Wm. a 

BscBifXTBB, John H. 

*BTANS^ABTB17B Q. . . 

Evans, Dayid B 



Eyans, Evan B 

Btans, Evan B 

•Eyans, JohnT 

BwART, John 7 

Bwbbs, Albbbt B 

BwiNo, Arthur H 

Etmkr, Lbonard J 

Fagklbr, John O., D.D. . . 

Fait, Silas V 

Fabwbll. Hbnbt 

Fbnn, Ooubtenbt H 

Fbbouson. John 

Fbbbibs, John 

Fiblds, Bbnj. H 

FiFB, Dorset 

♦FiFB, PaSULTA 

FlOOB, LUDWIO 

FiNDLBT, WH. T 

Finnbt, Bbbnbzbb D 

Fish, Edward F 

F18HBB, Elias B 

FisHKR, Edward W 



FiSHBR, Frbnoh W 

Fibhbr,Gbo. M 

*Fishbr Jat B 

Fishbr, Sanford G 

Fishbr, Thomas E 

*Fitzsemons, Jambs H . 

Flaoo, Jambs W 

Flemino, David B 

Flbmino, Samubl B. . . . 



rtSLDS or LABOB. 



"IP 



Atirata uid T«mllJLe«. ...,.,,...... tad 

Flnablntt &Dd £ Btfttloas. M luh 

WbLnut Cr&ek Cftl 

Bolfe, OUmon Cltj and «t«4kHi. . Iowa 

Sterlla^ Mid AdsoQS. . Neb 

AanunptloD. ... Bi 

Hi. Fork sod et&tlODa. . . Ind. Tir 

BoUnu and Fulton Cat . 

Helette sad jBtAtlons B. D&k. 

Stnrgis snd Pleassnt Yslley. . . 8. Dak. 

Davenport, 9d I<>w» 

'White Bt^phnr Springs * stet*n. Mont 

Wheelook Ind* Ter. 

LewinsYllle and Vienna Ya 

St. Ciharlss Iowa. 

SaltBiYerYaUej Ariz. 

Salem, German til. 

Hastings ..Hlcb. 

Adel and Waokee Iowa. 

Dexter and stetiom, Iowa and Botii- 
bon. West Union and Attoona. . End 

Oljrphant Pa 

Anaheim and Follerton Cm\. 

Grace and Immanuel of Saginaw . Mich 
SterensYille, Vietor sad 6 stat*i Mont 

San Franoisoo Tabemaole C&l 

Siayton, Jasper, Kinbrae ft Fulda. Minn, 

Crookston Htnn 

Kllkitat, 1st, Centreville ft statin Whe.h 

Neosho , , Mo 

Bine Lake and Port Kenyon L'&I. 

JaoksonYille, Phoenix ft stet*n.. Or^. 
Burton Memorial and station. . lU. 

Dayton^lst. Ky 

Ohattanooga, Park Plaoe ft stet^ a f t^no. 
Shelbyyille. M Ger 



^ Ind. 

Park Hill. Ehn Spring ft stat*n . Ind. Ter. 
Manannan, Harrison and 7 other 

ohnrohes. Miim. 

Glaremoreand vicinity Itid. Tcr. 

Oanaseraga and 4 stedons N. 7 . 

Kearney and Park Kan 

Woonsooket and Miller B Dnk 

parte and Cold Springs ind. 

Hoa Neb. 

Gross Yillage and Sstetions Mich. 

Los Angeles, Bethany Oal. 

Anadarko and ft stetions Ind. Ter. 

Clinton and 8 stetions Kan. 

Constantia and 8 stetions N. T. 

Denver, Highland Col. 

8t.IgDace Mich. 

Beu^ and 8 stetions 8. Dak. 

Achenajmd stetions Ind. Ter. 

NorthFork Ind. Ter. 

Turner County, 1st Ger 8. Dak. 

Winnebago Indians Neb. 

Failston Md. 

Carpenteria. Cal, 

Bossie and stetion N.Y. 

Sharon, Laoonia, Behobothand Elis- 
abeth Ind. 

Macon, 1st Mo 

Ashley and stations Mont. 

Fort Scott, td, and CHendale Kan. 

Ashland Kan . 

Stookbridge, Indisn and stetion. .Wis. 
Langdon, Elkwood and 8tet*s...N. Dak. 

South Framingfaam, 1st Mass 

Blartinsburf and 8 stations. Iowa. 

Qynodical MissionaKy Kan. 



B.9. 

s.a 
s.g. 

p. 

p. 

S.B. 
H8. 
??,B. 
8.B. 

P. 

S.B. 
S.B. 

P. 

S.S. 

S,B. 

P. 

P. 
PE 

S.& 
SB. 
B.S. 
38. 
S.S. 

P. 
*^,B. 
S,S. 

P. 

P. 
8.8. 

P. 
8.8 

S.8. 
8.8. 
S.S. 
8.8. 
SS. 

F. 
8.8. 
B.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
B.B. 
8.8. 

P. 

P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 
8.8. 
S.B. 

P. 
8.8. 



18 
IS 

18 

la 
12 
11 

IS 

m 

i 

18 
6 
18 
18 
18 

Vf 

18 

Ik 

18 

"? 

18 
18 
18 
11 
4 
18 

n 

18 

18 
18 

t? 

18 
8 

18 
8 
18 
18 
18 
10^ 

18 
8 
18 
18 
8 
7 
18 
4 
18 
18 
18 
9 
18 
9 
18 



3 


.*.. 


7 


8 
7 

1 


8 
8 

1 


8 

8 


■«" 


:::: 



188 



m 

180 
12 
4T 
4S 
14 
88 
57 
87 
74 
85 
14 
15 
80 
68 
84 

888 

7» 
88 

70 



81 



si 



IJ5 

lao 

7b 

18D 
47 
78 
80 
80 
100 
160 
80 
86 
00 
46 
80 

480 
1T5 

8T5 
100 
180 
70 
86 
110 
78 
110 
800 
180 



40 
100 



86 
66 

118 
05 
49 
91 
87 

110 

49 
41 



184 880 



8.8. 1% 

S.a 18 

18 

6 

18 

18 



8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 



66 
88 

60 
805 
68 
19 
00 
9 
48 
87 
188 
77 
88 
46 
80 
78 

80 
84 



85 

80 
76 
109 
7B 
SB 
80 
80 
06 
66 
181 
114 

80 
86 
80 
86 
00 
85 
00 

180 
100 

841 
75 
45 
55 

76 

88 



•No Report. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1890.] 



BOABO OF HOmt KISSIOHS. 



119 





FIKLDS OF LABOB. 


if 




Added to 
CkuekM. 




,j 


MISSIOMABneS. 


it 


4 


FUOKUrOXB, BOBKBT B . . . . 

Fun, Joura F 


FondsSBdSstsJtebs. 

Flora and Odin 


..Iowa. 

lU. 

.&Dak. 

.a Dak. 

OTAff. 


as. 

as. 

as. 

p. 

p. 

8.S. 

aa 
aa 

SJB 

s.a 

P.S 

8.a 
aa 
as. 

S.8. 

p. 

S.S. 

as. 
aa 

as. 
p. 
aa 

8.8. 

aa 

p. 

sa 

P.B 
P.B 

as. 

8.8. 
8.8. 

8.a 

SJ3. 
SJB. 
P.B 
P. 

aa 
aa 
s.a 

s.a 

p. 
p. 

8.8. 


18 

r 

18 
18 

18 
18 

?? 

18 

6 

4 

8 
18 

? 

18 

1 
18 
8 

18 
7 

18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 

I? 

18 
18 
18 
11 
11 
18 
18 

>H 

18 

83€ 

ii 

18 
18 

i? 

18 
18 
18 

6 
18 
18 

4 
IS 
18 
18 
18 
18 

18 
8 


8 5 
16 ft 


80 
66 
40 

a 

96 
18 

49 
TO 
84 
Oft 

48 

80 
76 

141 

60 

98 

48 

86 

74 
107 

60 
66 

85 
84 
82 
160 
85 
17 
187 
848 
44 
26 
64 

94* 
85 
88 

180 
87 
94 
41 
80 
88 
80 
48 

181 
98 

126 

160 
61 
70 

48 

60 
48 
85 
60 

76 
78 


880 
186 


FunuEsos, Bpbriam W 

Vlutb, Johh 8 


Wklto and station 


8 
8 
8 
8 

8 
8 


88 

18 


89 


MoviBtaln Head 


no 


f^aoBB, Wm. 6 


AlMSft. r 


9A0 


Pdbob, Fbsd*k A 


FtfeLakeandSststioBS MloE. 

Lewlston. Idako and Ana4Sones, 

Winohester Ind. 

Bed Cloud. Neb. 

TttusTllle Pis. 

AslitOB and Inwood leivs. 

HitehoookandWeasington..... 8. Dak. 

Mt Flsassat,l8t Mlohl 


60 


FiOWIJO^ JOBH B 


96 
140 


*^Tii AMOff T 




POY, ^OBK .... 


... 1 
8 8 

187 . 4 
.8 1 11 

1 1.... 
6 .... 

80 lA 


195 


Frackxb, asoBei H. 

FftAan,A. H 


•7 

65 


FftABO^ FBinncK B 

VftABBB, Jambs 


115 




195 


Fbaob. Wm. J 


Adsir and Casey, Iowa aad Ca 
wood and JSstoUine 


Btle- 

.^% 

mnn 

...Minn. 
....Va. 
....Gal. 

m. 

Bta- 

..Waab. 
... Mo. 

Un.Col. 
....Wis. 
...Ohio. 
L..Kan. 
.K.M«. 
....Kan. 
N.Mex. 
N.Dak. 
.. N. Y. 
... Wis. 

111. 

....Tex. 

Mo. 

N.Mex. 
sta. 

..Wash. 
Paris 
.8. Dak. 
...Cal. 
....Gal. 
..N. T.. 






198 


VaMMhiJKD^ 1>AM*L N 

«VkUEBIAN, CBAB. V 

Pbsbmah, Jab. B 


Waldo and Hswthaine 

StTpiii,' Aritaitoi^Hmi.'. V. .'. 

CUftoiT! 

TnstlnsndlststlOB. 

Cbioago. Be-Unlon 

Foorth Plain, LaOamaa and 2 

tions. 

JopHn 

UTJncsion Msnor, Booklsnd, 

and S ststloni 

Chlesgo, Bethsny 

NelaonTille,lst... 

Freeport, DsnTiUe and Cxisfleii 
Asteo, FanniBgton and states . 
Deljphos, Glaaoo and 8 stations. 
ClillonTzion, and » stations. . . 

Blanohard and Hnnter 

Bodns Centre and station 

GatosTiUe. 

Ooloonda 

Gainesyille 

Salisbnrr and Olaagow 

Bnens Yisto and S stations. . . 
Klikitst, Ist, CentreTiUe and 4 

Milfordf'peniis.',' aioid' Bosoes,' i 

and Zion . . . . 
San Pablo, 1st, snd ststlon. .. . 

Los Gatos, Ist 

littdlowTille 

SSSS?::;::::.;;:::::::::: 

Middle GranTille. 

Bast Portbnd, 1st 

Lebanon and Orem Oily 

Tvrtle Creek andlCt. Je&ersoi 

Harbor 8prlngs ft Crooked Lai 

Clyde and st^on. 

BottineanandSstsMons. 

Fowler and stotton 

Bnirton and Valley Township 

La Los, Cinioero. La Costilla, 

tonitosndSiAations 

Lexington 


65 


FlUDiOB, ^OMlf L 


8 
18 

10 

8 

6 

9 

85 

18 

4 

18 
4 
18 
17 

"8 
5 

8 

5 

"7 
88 
88 

"e 

1 
1 

88 

ii' 

1 
1 
4 

' 6' 

8 

8 


18 
8 

16 

10 
10 
16 

18 

ii 

10 

io' 
ao' 

is 
9 






180 


Fkdibt, Fbmix H 

^Fbt, Hbbbt B., D.D 

Fbt, Walteb- 


480 

15 
156 




100 
110 


FvL<m]nk ^VAr a , . r - 


110 




175 


FoiAoiii Jambs P 


180 


WvuiiUL Samdsl D 


150 


Fom[[,Jbs.W . 

FURMBAUZ, HU»H J 

FnunsB, Oso 


900 
185 
45 


4A5nCi JOHK I#. . . . T . . . . , r T . . 


60 
260 


Oallabbb, Johh A 

eALULBBB, Thomas, D.D. . . 

flAfJMIfHk Bii^TATf .... 


168 

868 

65 

85 






^AmfFSft^ Jas. a . f 


260 

68 


OABinmn,' Jas. M. L 

RiMrHTR, 8AM*L G 


70 
100 


*€U8S«J6bb B 


...Iowa. 8.8. 

...Iowa.) P. 
...K.T.fl.a. 


140 


Qat, Wiluam 


80 


€Ut, Wm. M 


188 


Qsbioob, Gbobos G 

CtaBLACB, Wm. J 


. .Ohio. 
...Mioh. 

...Oreg. 
L..Ohio. 

...N.Y. 
n..Mftoh. 

...Kan. 
.N.Dak. 

Gal. 

... Tex. 
....Kan. 
....Wis. 

An- 
. ...Ool. 
lad. 


P. 

P. 
8.8. 
P.S 
8.8. 

P. 

as. 

as. 
p. 

8.8. 

b\ 

B.S. 

as. 


70 
160 


•Qbobmlbt, DATm O 

QlBOVBT, Oso. W 


125 
175 


ftnefflr J ak*<* ^ ..,..,, . 




flUMnif, BOBEBT P 


70 


Qibsob! Wm. P .... 


185 


•enaoK. Wm. T 


48 


OiWBB, Gbobob C 

(hmDi,JoBH 

Oubbbt, HbsbxiabM.... 
*glu]bbimf, ai.bza2vdxb. . . 

eiLOBBIBr.FBANOIB M 

•ChLOHBlBT, JABBS 


165 
107 
140 

76 

145 
54 



• HeBafOTt. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



120 



ASTNUAL BBPOST OF THB 



[1»0, 



MISSIONARIES. 



riBLOS or LABOB. 



if 



|J 



▲dteAto 
OhwchM. 



\ Jos. J. . . 

CtaunLLAH, JOBL 8. . 
OiLOaMOH, JOBH C. 



Gnjjji, JiBUHAB 

GnixBpn, 6bob«b 

GtaLLBBPn, fiAlfUBL L.... 

GiLLBSPn, Wm. p. 

GlLMOBS, JOHK. 

GnunoB, Hbxbt M 

GiYSM, Joshua 

GliKISBa. HXMBT O 

OLKHDSinniio, AxoBiir. . 
GuDDSH, Natb*l Dmo. . 
Oxx>vKB, Jomr T 

GODSMAH, CSAS. J 

GoDWABo, Jambs 



Los Anoeles, Bethanj Csl. 

"on County, So 
ope and Millions. 



GorF, HbbhahA 

GOLDIB, Pbtbb O 

Gobzalbs, Pablo Q 

^Gobsalbs, Pabfuu» 

€k>ODBLL, Hbbbt M 

GOODWILLIB, DABIBL H. 

Goboob, Jas. a 

GossABB, Thomas M 

goudib, bobbbt 

Gould, Caltib C 

goulb, j. loomis 

goublat, jobb l 

Gbahah, Chas. P 



Gbaham, William 

GKAKOEB, MARBHAfJ. B. W . 

Gbaybbstbib, Cbbist. H., 

Gbavbs, Obas. F 

*Gbavbs, Zbbulob B 

Gbat. Abdbbw 

Gbat, JbssbA 

Gray, Tbos. J 

Gratbill. J. Waltob 

Obbbm, Edwik 

*Gbbbb, Jambs Pbbbiob. . 

•Gbbbb, Nathabibl C 

Gbbbmb, Albro L 

GBBBNB, El UAH W 

Grbbbb. J/ MBS A 

•Gbebblbb, Tbos. B 

Gbbbbsbiblds, Wm. B 

Grbgo^ Harris H., Jr . ... , 
Grboobt, Dan*l S., D.D. . 

tdiRBTOLOUD, DATID 

Gribdbb. Dabibl 

Gbotes, Jambs A 



GRiFras, Jambs L 

Griffbn, Shbbbod W. . 
Griosbt, Abkold D 



Grimbb, Josbph 8m D.D. 

Gbibwold, Jobb V 

Groh, Miltoh H , 

Obosscup, Dabibl P 

Gbossmab, Fbabe W. . . . 



GUILLB, B. FBAMK.. 

Guliok, Albbbt y. 

OuBN, Sam'lC 

GuNB, Thomas M. . . 

GUTBLIUS, FISHBB. . 



Lb JnntB, Col., and TuloaB points 

InNewMezioo N. Mex 

ithsny 

So. ItailE., and CalU- 

, s Iowa 

Beiltn and ntatlCTiw Ohio. 

Taqvinna Bbt and station Drag 

Box Eider and stations. tJtaE. 

Eagle Pass Tex. 

Minden and 8 stations Neb. 

ICaranette and (Tnit/ Neb. 

Anadai±o and vicinity Ind. Ter. 

CarrersriUe and 2 stations Pa. 

Cheever, Manehester and station. Kan. 

SandBeaoh Mich. 

Aberdeen and Hoqnlam Wash. 

Xalad City and station Idaho. 

BransTille. Ashley and Blbow Lake 

andSsuitlons Minn. 

College Hill and Beems Creek. .. .N. C. 

Harr&yille and 8 stations MIoh. 

Morenoi. Spanish, and 4 stations, AilB. 

Bnena Yista N . Mex . 

Salem Neb. 

Ft. Gratiot, Weetninster Mioh. 

Asuso and MonroTlB. Oal. 

Bed Oak and Deoatnr. Ohio. 

NashTille, Stoneville and stat'n. 8. Dak . 

Oakfleld and BendTlUe Ohio. 

HydahMiasUm Alaska. 

Mooers N. Y.. 

Mayfleld, Slate Valley, Argonia, 811 

ver Creek and Bwell Kan. 

Blmendaro. Madison and 8 Btat's..KaB. 
Pleasant HIU, Fraitland A stat*n. ..Mo. 
A|»lingtOB, PIsgaandBristow... Iowa. 

SkinSon Neb. 

Bast Lake George and Bay Boad..N. T. 

MiUerton N. T. 

Brookllne lU. 

Blunt, Oneida and 8 stations. . .8. Dak. 

Brighton, 1st Col. 

Chippewa Indians Wis. 

BalUmore, Ugfat Street Md. 

Greene Iowa. 

CoUamer N. T. 

LoganBilok Utah, 

Tekonshaw and station Mioh. 

Anthony Kan, 

Hinokley, Ssndstone and station . Minn '. 

OtUwa, 1st in. 

Warrendale Minn. 

Mayaean 8. Dak. 

Bidott, German Ul, 

Coleman, CalkinsTille and 8 states, 

Mioh., and Hardy and Buskin. Neb. 

Long Lake and stations. Mioh. 

CarroUton Mo 

Snnlleld and Sebewa, and Hastings 

and station Mioh. 

EyansYille, 1st Ave Ind 

Colnmbus Neb 

Boeky Foik, CoL, A SUver City. N. Mex 
Austin, Oakland and Woodbury.. Minn, 
DaUas City Missions, Texas, and 

Council Blult, M Iowa. 

Bethany and King^s Point Tenn, 

KUbouxnCity Wis, 

Boston,8ootoh Mass. 

Synodlcal Missionary Wash. 

Pl£cd and Moscow N. T. 



8.S. 
P. 

8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 
P.8 

P. 
8J». 
8.8. 



8.b. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 

P. 

P. 



P.B 

8.8. 
P.8 
S.8. 
P. 
8.8. 



8.8. 
P.S 

sis. 

S.& 
8.8. 

P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 

P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 

8.8. 
8.S. 
8.8. 

8.8. 
P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

8.8. 
8.8. 

18.8. 
I P. 

Is-s. 



18 

4 

9 
11 
11 
18 
18 

1? 

11 
18 
8H 

lis 
10 

IS 

4 
lOH 

4 
18 
6X 
13 

"^ 
5 
61 
18 
18 
18 



8.8., 18 17 
8.8., 6 8 
8.8.1 Sh 
8.8. 9 

18 

18 

18 

!^ 

18 



15 



196 
66 

107 
86 
84 



76 



10 

100 
80 

TO 

or 

40 
16 
9 

66 

66 



9 


16 


6 


19 




4 


"s 


■ 8 


8 


6 



48 
80 
61 
60 
18 
60 
68 
66 

141 
98 

188 
40 
88 
74 
76 
81 
68 
86 

807 
68 

60 
04 
76 
66 
88 
81 
17 
67 
84 

146 
90 
00 

188 

168 

19 
W 

66 
88 
90 



60 

60 
80 
40 
186 
80 

00 
179 
61 

64 

180 
180 
90 
80 

08 
176 
60 
70 
80 
110 
180 
90 

841 
60 

100 
TO 
76 
57 

108 

985 
86 
80 

840 

66 
78 
100 

too 

108 
96 

100 
60 
90 
19 

175 
flO 
76 

ITO 

890 
60 
46 
96 



»R«pori. t l>«eMM4. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD' OF' HOME MISSIONS. 



121 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



^1 



y 



i 


i 


■5 
6 


2 


1 


16 


"2' 




"s 

4 
7 


.... 
81 


io 


» 



Hacbo, JoBir K 

Hahk, Johk a , 

Binras, Altbxd W 

Haihbs, Snaoif S 

tHiiB, Saii*i. O 

Halbbbt, BhosH 

HiLliL, Bdwih 

Ball, Joshua B 

Ball, Tboicab B 

Halii, Wnxiix Tbob 

Hallock, Admst W. 

Hamiutov, BDOAm A 

Hamiltok, Hibam P 

•Hamiltoii. John B 

HAiOLTOif, Samuel L 

•Hamh/ioii, TBoe. A 

HAMiLTOif, William 

Hamxa, Jambs W 

HAimA, Joseph A 

Hahsmanh. Hbkbt 

Hahsoii, Hhskuah 

Habbauoh, Hibam W 

Habbib, John K. 

Habbis, Thbo. W 

•Habbis, Wm. B. B 

Habbop, Bbm 

Habbowsb, Chbibtophkb. 

Habtuet, Bbubbn H. 

Habtmbsb, Jacob Y. N. . . . 

Habtbt, Joseph C 

H4BEBI.I., Bdwin C 

Hasslkb, Anson L 

Haswbll, Jambs 

Hatch, Julian 

Hatii.ani>, Bbnj. F 

Hawkins, John B 

Hawlet, Ransom E 

Hat, JamesA B.... 

Hat. Sam*lC 

Hatenga, Lubkbtus H. . . . 

Hates, Bichabd M 

Hats, Chas. W 

Hazlett,DillwtnM.. .. 

•Hazlbtt, Silas 

Bead, Simeon C 

Healt, Geo. W 

Hedoes, Charles 

Heujoman, Paul 

Heoeb, Alsx. M. 

•Hembbee, Ohas. C 

•H EMnte wAT, Geo . H. . . . 

Hemphill, Joseph 

Hbndbbn, Wm. T 

Hbvbt, Alezandeb V . 

Hknbt, Habbt H 

•Hebald, Ctbus L 

Hbbbbbt, Chas. D 

^Hbbbsbt, Chas. B 

Hbbon, Datto a 

Hbbmgk, Alanson 

Hbbbick, Chas. M.. 

HBBBINe^ Hubbbt 

Hbbbom, Ajidbsw 



Wewoks Ind. Ter. 

WUsonville snd Lebsnon Keb. 

Ladors and Deep tUrer. Iowa. 

MenardTllle and 8 stations Tex . 

Bartow Fla. 

Carlton and Hope Kaa. 

GanoKS and Conewanso N. T. 

Oneida Hi<di. 

Aya and Yergennes. HI. 

Madelia T Minn. 

Let>anon sad 3 stations Pa. 

Springfield, 9d Mo. 

Solpio A Soipioville and Jimins.. .N. T. 

Elmira and stations Mioh. 

Wichita. Lincoln Street Kan. 

Republican Citj, Bloomington and 
stations Neb. 

Blackbird Hills an d station s Neb . 

Clements and X stations Kan. 

DnngenesB and station, and Yashon 
and station .Wash. 

JeftersonTille, German, & sta'B . N. T. 

Oquawka. , , , . in . 

Braidwood ill. 

Scotia and Greeley Centre. ........ Neb. 

Far Rockaway, N. T., and Topeka. 
Westminster Kan. 

MitoheU Ind. 

Point Pleasant, Winfleld and ^tu r^ Kj. 

Caseville and stations . Mloh. 

Riverside Calyar J Cal. 

MarineCity Mioh. 

Raymond and S stations 8. Dak. 

Stromsborg and Broken Bow Neb. 

Tipton and station Ind. 

Blakeman, Ludell, White LUt and 
station, Kansas, and Orleans, 
Stamford and Friendship Neb. 

St. Bdward and 9 stations, and 
WoodRirer Neb 

Oonningham Kan. 

Hdsate and station Ohio 

8t. Paul, 9th Minn 

Ossineke and Caledonia Mich, 

Woodstock and 8 stations Ill 

Union and Rock Creek Iowa 

Packerion, Highland Ind, 

Grand Yiew Kan 

Upper Alton and station HI, 

Harmony and Glasgow Minn, 

North Yakima and station Wash, 

De Pere and station Wis, 

Baltimore, Grace and station Md . 

Moolton and UnionTllle Iowa. 

Lucas and Derby Iowa. 

Norman Ind. Ter. 

Mapleton and Durbin N. Dak. 

Caustoga and Pope Yalley Cal, 

Neillsyme and 6 stations Wis. 

Mt. PisnOi of Roslyn ft station.Wash 

Shicksmnny and station .Pa 

Rural and Badger Wis 

Hebron N. T 

Centreyille, Bic Hollow sad Ash- 
land NY 

Washington and station Tenn 

Steriing, Omer and station, Mich., 
and Otter Lake and stauon. .Minn, 

JamesYille N. Y 

Sioux City, 8d Iowa 

Sanborn and station Iowa 



8,H. 



S.S It 

S.S.; i« 

&,S. 12 

,8.^. 1 

8.S. 11 

S.8. 10 

8.:^. 10 

E.^ t 

P- 19 



e.8. 

S.B. 
P. 

e.s. 
as. 
p.e 

B.S. 
P. 



9 
38 

'}? 

1% 

6 
8 

n 

18 
18 



r.Ei 11 
r. ^ 18 



as, 
as. 

8.8. 



Sa. 
aa 
aa 

p. 

p. 

p. 
as. 
as. 
as. 

p. 
as. 
aa 
aa 

p. 
s.a 
s.a 
s.a 
as. 
aa 

p. 
8.a 

p. 
aa 
s.a 

as. 
p. 

S.S. 

aa 

S.S. 

as. 



7 



18 

10 

7 

9 
18 
18 
18 
12 
6% 

4 

7 

5 
18 

6 
11 

3 
12 

'■? 

18 
8 
7 
12 
12 

^H 
12 

6X 
8 

99t 
12 



65 

4S 

100 
9 

69 
67 
68 

88 
50 
25 
118 
128 
16 
97 



20 

no 

160 
40 

185 
60 
100 
146 
80 
60 
100 
249 

160 

68 

180 

60 
100 

80 
260 

80 

185 
160 
100 
21 
99 
160 

60 
209 



40 
16 
66 

180 
80 
90 
74 



74 
95 

185 
51 
81 



201 
80 

200 

960 
64 

125 
60 

180 
90 

800 
88 
60 

185 

290 

970 

105 
187 
200 

125 
65 
40 



TO 



85 



50 



125 
126 



169 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



ISS 



ANHVAL BBPOBT OF THB 



[1890. 



mSSlONABIES. 



FIELDS OF I.ABOB. 



1 


"3 . 

11 


A4di««e 


^j 


4 


1 


1 


i' 


4 


S.8. 


IS 


6 


8 


78 


909 


8.S. 


6X 


S 




OB 


160 


8.S. 


4 


4 


4 


78 


ISO 


8.& 
8.8. 


1 
1^ 








180 






7T 


lot 


8.8. 


11 


6 


9 


67 


69 


S.8. 


6 










8.8. 


9 






09 


100 


8.8. 


7 


S 


86 


87 


90 


S.S. 


6 


6 


1 


58 


96 


P. 


7 


9 


1 






8.8. 


103C 


9 


18 






8.8. 


'V 


5 


T 


48 


900 


B.S. 


9 






86 




B.8. 


18 


S 


10 


69 


185 


9.8. 


12 


6 


8 


66 


75 


8.8. 


1% 


8 


8 


86 


90 


8.8. 


8 


8 


19 


72 


167 


B.8. 


T 




4 


88 


60' 


B.8. 


11 




8 


68 


70 


8.8. 


10 


U 




76 


76 


8.8. 


18 


9 




86 


60 


P.B 


8 


. .• • 




84 


4S 


P. 


11 




11 


84 


90 


8.8. 


9 






66 


800 


B.8. 


IS 


97 


4 


104 


90 


B.8. 


1 






114 


167 


B.8. 


IS 


6 


6 


48 




8.8. 


10 


1 


4 


68 


6S 


8.8. 


IS 






41 


160 


P. 


IS 


8 




40 




8.8. 


n% 


6 


1 


810 


880 


8.8. 


IS 






19 


90 


8.8. 


IS 


8 


9 


64 


104 


8.8. 


ss 


8 


8 


49 


87 


8.8. 


IS 


7 




86 


865 


8.8. 


4 


8 


8 


108 


160 


8.8. 


6 










8.8. 


6 






110 


80 


8.8. 


111 


6 


a 


96 


100 


8.8. 


IS 


7 


4 


146 


800 


8.8. 


18 




18 


88 


70 


8.8. 


IS 






16 


88 


8.8. 


4 


6 


8 






P.B 


9 


4 


8 


80 


40 


8.8. 


IS 


8 


6 


46 


180 


8.8. 


7 






87 


117 


8.8. 


nn 


16 


1 


166 


276 


P. 


IS 


6 


4 


91 


170 


P. 


18 


8 


1 


74 


194 


8.8. 
P. 


6 
19 








160 


8 


1 


86 


60 


P. 


8 


11 


1 


98 


76 


P. 


18 


1 


4 




14T 


8.8. 


18 


6 


1 


68 


160 


P.E 


18 




8 


16 


86 


8.8. 


6 






75 


60 


P. 


18 


8 


8 


48 


88 


8.8. 


IS 


4 


.... 


n 


60 



Hbuuw, Bobbbt B 

Hbtbiox, AnDaxw J.... 
Hbutbb, OxBnr D 

HxwiTT, John B. B 

HiBBABD, AVQV&rm e. 

HlOK. JOBM N 

•Bioiuvo, Thomas 

•HioxoK, Fbamoir X. . . . 

HfffffT , WIUJAM 

Hill, Albxavdhb 

HjLLtBDOAllP 

Bill, John B 

Hill, John W 

Hill, Bobibt W., D.D. 

Hill.Sam'lN 

Wttj. ^ William J 

HiLLMAN, Thomas If . . . . 

Hotdman, Datis B 

HoBAMT, John B 

HODOB, Samuxl^.D — 

HOITVAN, Wm. H 

HOFFMXIBTBB, CBA8. C. . 
HOLLOWAT, ALPHXUS H. 

Bolt, Jos. W 

HOLTBB, B0BOB8S D. . . . 

Honnbll, Wm. H 

Hood, Fbanz C 

Hood, Jacob A 

HooKB, Bobt. H 

HooYBB, Clinton D 

*HoPKiN8, John T 

HOBTON, BOBBBT H 

HOBTBTLBB, HABYBT. . . . 

HouoH, Wm. a 

HOOBBB, Fbanb 8 

HOWABD, Hbnbt C 

HowABD, John F 

Howb,Chas. X 

*Howx, Fbanblin 8 

HOWBLL, BLLU. 

Howbll, Wm. X 

HowxT. John D 

Horr, HnuM L. 

*m7BBABD, John N 

flUDNUT, WM. H 

HUCIHBS, Datid 

HuoHBB, John I 

*HuOBBSjftOBBBT J 

HVOHBB, WM. J 

HUOHBT, ALBBBT 8 .. .. 

Hull, Bbwin 

HULLHOBST, CHAS. G. A. 

Hunt, Bxnj. H 

Hunt, Chablbb B 

HVNTBB, David M 

HuNTBB, Jambs H. 

HuNTBB, John X 

•HuNTBB, William H. . . 
HuNmroTON, Oilbsbt 
HvBD* Isaac N 



Fredooto, New Albuijaiid 8 8to*s.E«B. 

VilHsoa low*. 

BUudnrater, Ffaakfocd and Oosan 

View Del. 

Fleld*s Landing, Freshwater and 

station CaL. 

Otolden Ool. 

Sapexlor Meb. 

Castlewood, Bsteliae and Braadt- 

tord... a Dak. 

Hansen and West Blae Neb. 

Highlands, Boulerard Ool . 

WarrenalnKK. N. T. 

Cliloago, E^e-Union. HI. 

TopeuK Weshninstifir and Xtsslrtn 

Centre Kaa. 

XHUer, Bodioott and station Neb. 

Baperintendent Ind. Ter. 

Brookway, Fremont 4b station. . ..Xieh. 

Canton and station 8. Dak. 

Albany, Btanberry and station Xo. 

XiHonTale and C^de Kan. 

Bdgely. Xonango, Fullerton and 

station, and Washburn and Coal 

Harbor N. Dak. 

West Union, Bethel Iowa. 

Xnlr and station. Xieh. 

Baileyyille Kan. 

8abin and SooUaad. Xinn. 

Pickford and 8 stations Xioh 

Calvary and station Pa. 

Stafford County Kan. 

NewCasUe Ind. 

Bohnyier Neb. 

Oakes and Hudson and station . N. Dak . 

Wapakoneta. Ohio. 

Denver, South Broadway. Col. 

SaiyersvUle and SstaUons Ky. 

yalL Aroadia and 8 stations, and 

8iouxClty,8d Iowa. 

Payson and station Utah. 

▲nbum Neb. 

Qranbury, Thorpes Springs and 

Lone Cottonwood and ^rrell.Tez. 
Xarathon and Freetown, Havanna 

and Xoreland N. T. 

Dysart Iowa. 

ISunira, Franklin Street N. T. 

Xarvin, Wahiut Fralrie and J ork. . . Ill . 

Boesville and Pleasant Bidce Kan. 

Fairmont, Sawyer and station. . . . Neb. 

Coronado Cal. 

Traoy Cal. 

Nortnampton A BatoheUerville. . .N. Y. 
Los Angelet, Welsh and station. ... Cal. 
New Cambria, Salem and station.. .Xo. 

Guthrie Centre Iowa 

Poland and Olive Hill and station, 

Ind., and Harrisburg lU. 

Auburn, Westminster N. T. 

Arkport N. Y. 

North and South side Xluions of 

Linooln Neb. 

Burr Oak and 8 stations Neb. 

Colfax Iowa. 

Littleton and 8 stations Col . 

Blllngham, Huron and Lanoaster.Kan. 

Tarpon Springs Fla . 

ParkBiver N. Dak. 

Bankin and 8 stations Ool. 

Oonoord '.....» Cal. 



•MoBtfwI. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OF HOITB HlfiBIONB. 



198 



MISBIONABIKS. 



EvTomataoWt Aabon F. . 
Hutchison, A&tbur L. . 

HUTOHUOll, Oso. A 

HUTCBISOll, JOBV K 

Htices, Thos. W 

lomtOA, BUWARDim H. 
ILBLBT, WM . H 

IvGLK, BBAarus T 



iBTim, Albxaudse M. 
iBTOfS, John A ....... 



iBWDf, JOOFHM. 

iRwnr, Wh. F. ... 
Jiox, ANDaxwD.. 



JACXA,BLIA8 C... 

•Jacuon, AxklS.. 



JAOEflON, DAXZEL B 

JAOKBON, MOflBS H 

Jaguon, Richard H 

JAOxaoN, Sbsldom, D.D . 
Jamebson, Phiup M 



^AMIUON, 8aH*L a. . . . 

JAXS8,OSO. M 

jRrrKRBON, Chab. L.... 
jRFFRIXa, WnVFIRLD Y . 
JSLLT, AUEX. M.« D.D. . 



JsNRs, Edwin H 

JBNNIBOa, Wh. H .... 
JlNNUON, Jos. F 

^Jrrrold, Monrob. . . . 

JRSSDP, Linris 

JocuHSRN, Jacob C . . 
Johnson, Charlbs H. 

Johnson, Gbo 

•Johnson, OzLBBRT. . . 
Johnson, Hxnrt B. . . . 
* Johnson, John M. . . . 

^JoHNSONfMARCUS L . 

Johnson, WILL W 

Johnston, Fbbd 

Johnston, John L 

Johnston, Bobbrt. . . . 
Johnston, Thos. P. . . . 
Johnston, Waltbr . . . 



JONBS, Galbb V. 
JoNxs, John J. . . 
Johns, John L.. 
JoNXS, John W. 
JoNBs, Norman. 



Jonx8,Owbh 

JONBS, TBOS. H. 

JONBS, Wk. J 

JONM, WnXIAM W . . . 

JxnnciN, Antbont G . . . 

JUNKIN, BBNJ. O 

JUNKIN, CLARXNOB M. 
JVNOR, DATID 

Kalohn, August 

Kanoubb, Chas. a . . . 



Karnbr, Oho. N. 
*Kat,Alsz. C 



•Kraoh, Bdwih P . 

KBAH,aAMDHLB.. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



il 



MorrlsTlUe Pa. 8.8. 

Lsaslng Iowa. P. 

The DaUM, let Oreg. 8.S. 

SiouzFalls.l8t,and8tallon.. .8. Dak. P. 

Troy and statioas 111. 8.8. 

KUwankee, HoUand Wis. P. 

Kaoon III. P. 

Olaokamas, Ist, 8priiigwater and 

station Oreg . 8.8. 

Mound Cityand Union Ho. 8.8 

Kerrvliie, waring, Grace and sta- 
tions Tex. 8.8. 

Warrendale Minn. 8.8. 

Union, Paoiflo and Moselle Mo. 8.8 

Oowala, Claremore, Mound and 

WardOroye Ind. Ter. 8.8. 

CK>lden(3ate Gal. 8.8. 

Soandinarians and St. Panl, Pine 

Gity, Taylor's Falls A others. Minn. 8.8. 
Minneapolis, Bethany Mission... Minn. 8.8. 

Chicago, Grace Dl. P. 

Deepwater Mo. 8.8. 

Sitka, White A Natiye Churches . Alaska. 8.8. 
Waitsburg, Idaho, and Spokane 

Fall Centenary Wash. 8.8. 

Lnveme Minn. P. 

Andorer and stations N. 7. 8.8. 

West Chester, 9d Pa. 8.8. 

IfaWem Iowa. P. 

New Windsor, Mt. Paran, Granite 

and Bandallstown Md. 8.8. 

Lakeport and station Gal. 8.8. 

Layeme, Bethel and 2 stations. S. Dak. S.P. 

CatonsylUe Md. P. 

N. Mex. S.a 

Hubbea Neb. 8.8. 

Ban Francisco. Danish Mission . . .Gal. 8.8. 

West Duluth. Westminster Minn. 8.8. 

Red Lake Falls and Western Minn. S.a 

Ind. Ter. 8.8. 

Leola, Pembroke and station. . .8. Dak. S.S. 

Casey, Greenup and New Hope 111. 8.8. 

WaynesyiUe.. 111. 8.8. 

Aubumdale and Sherry Wis. S.S. 

Rlsinore and 8 stations Gal. 8.8. 

Aya and Vergennes 111. P. 

Hamilton and 8 stations N. Dak. P. 

BnonYalley Ohio. 8.8. 

Gladstone, Mich., and BeUeytlle and 

Yerona Wis. S.S. 

South Pittsburg and stations. . . .Tenn. P.B 

Byan'sMiUt N. Y. P. 

Guilford and Norwich N. T. 8.8. 

Abbott Memorial and Canton Md . P. 

Mona, FaU Creek, McArthur, Wa- 

yerly, Piketon St Cynthiana.. .Ohio. S.S. 

Manchester, 1st Iowa. 8.8. 

Kuns^ft City, Ist, Welsh Mo. P. 

CniiklixigvUle and station N.T. S.S. 

Petj iler uid 8 stations Neb. 8.8. 

We.st 111 I filter and station Gal. 6.8. 

Antekipt' Yslley and 8 stations Gal. 8.8. 

Euiilirtri! and Liberty Neb. S.8. 

B vH.Mt. Oliyet N. Y. P. 

Ku..h aiiji South Ramsey. Iowa. 8.8. 

Princeton, 1st, Craig Chapel and 2 

stations Ky. P.E 

Manchester, Westminster N. H . P. 

Tawas Mich. 8.8, 

Salem, Laketon and Organ Mo. 8.8. 

• Bois, Bennington 6 sta^s . Ind. Ter . 8.8. 



Ad4«dto 
Charehw. 



61 
18 
18 

9 
18 
18 
18 

18 
18 

"? 

8 

18 
7 

10 

\^ 

18 
18 

18 
18 
Tjr 

12 

18 
18 
18 
12 
6X 

4 

4 

7 
18 
12 

1 

5 

5 
18 
7)4 

6 
18 

18 
18 

1? 

18 

6 
6 

u 

9 
8 
8 
6 
11 

9 
18 
8 
8 
18 



10 



i 



80 
80 
18 
06 
88 
85 
184 

78 
128 

87 
17 
40 

40 
16 



44 

104 
812 

70 
70 
01 
80 
108 

161 
65 
16 



110 
180 

85 
186 

77 
180 
100 

109 
186 

80 
60 
166 

180 

46 



75 
75 
95 
800 

146 
76 

110 
46 

106 

850 
46 



88 



88 

47 

08 
88 
88 
112 
40 
40 

57 
41 
86 
16 
107 

93 
66 
80 
49 
16 
46 
82 
65 
158 



80 



n 



76 
80 
60 
820 
60 
60 

140 
128 
86 
40 



&0 

148 
15 
50 
70 
75. 
40 
20 

600 
68 

60 
100 



1 68 80 



• ir^Hiffcrl. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



124 



ANNUAL B-BPO"ET' OF THB 



[1890. 



MISSIONARIES. 



KxAurs, J. Bdkund 

KUOWIK, HSMBT 

KsntT, William 

KOiLAND, JOHV 

•KKL6BT, BDWARD D 

Kbiipkr, AuousraB S. . . . 

Kkitdbiok, Wm 

KurnsDT, Jab. A 

Kbniixdt^am^l J 

KEBRfJ. HOBNBR 

JSmbr, Mbbbdith H 

KxHBi Sam'l C 

Kbtbb, Wm. 8. H., D.D. . . 
KiDD, David D 

Kxllbf, Jobh T 

giwAi.T. Wm . E 

Xing, Bdfus 

XXNO, Samvxl B 

Knw, YiotorM 

Kore, Wm. T 

KlMOBBT, DAYOD 

EmXPATEIOK, Nblson B. 
KiBKWOOD, JAMBB 

KmKWoOD, Tbos. Cm D.D. 

KUHK, MATBAinXL B 

Klosb, Otto B. W 

Kmiobt, Wm. B. 

Kmott, John W 

KnowLBB, Jambb F 

Kmoz, Bdwabo M 

KNOXfJOBN 

Kobblbb, Mabtif , 

KOLB, F&bd'k F 

KoLB, Jacob 

KOMMIBB, ThOMAB J 

KoPB. Job. C. DbBbutn. . 

Kbombb, Johanvbb 

Laokbt, Albz. H 

I«AFrXBTT, JaMBB 

La Obanob, Sam'l W 

Lajbd, Obo. B , 

IiAMOVT, HUOB 

Lamomt. Thob. J 

*LAiri>, Job. H , 

*LAin>BB, David L , 

liAMDiB, Evan M 

•Lawman, Jobbph , 

•Latimbb, Bobbbt M 

Lauohlin, John C 

Laubib, Jambb a 

Lbabd, Aba 

Lbb, J. BOBB. 

Lbb, Thbodobb , 

Lbb, William B., D.D 

•Lbb, Wm. J., D.D 

Lbbnroubb, Pbtbb J. . . , 

LbFbobb, Obobob 

LaiPBB, Job. MoOabbbll. 
Lbnington, Bob't. 

Lbonabd, Job. T 

•Lbwib. Hbbbkiah B 

Lbwt, Bmil 

•NeS«|MH. 



FIELDS OF LABOB. 



Chenyrale Kbh . 

PreabTterial MiBslonBrj, Soath and, 

EaBtFloxlclA FU. 

Monte Yista and statlonB Col 

OUdwin, l8t and 8d, A 2 BtBttons.Mioh. 

Salem and PlBKah Ohio. 

FosbU Creek and Stoat Col. 

Pnroelland etation Ind. Ter. 

Lake City, Ist, and Bethanj Biyer- 

Bide. :. Mloh. 

Jordan and Belle Plaine Minn. 

Sheldon N. Dak. 

WiohitaFallB Tex. 

Princeton and Biohmond Ban. 

Walnut and Erie... Kan. 

Delmar, Elwood and Btatlon, Iowa, 

and Orange Bend and Centre 

Hill Fla. 

Buffalo and Tower City, A Devil^B 

Lake N. Dak. 

MadiBon and Wameryllle Keb. 

Cairo and atation K. T. 

Pleasant Valley and 2 Btationa Cal. 

Moran and Falryiew Kan. 

Guthrie Ind. Ter. 

Jaoksboro Tex. 

CasBville and station W. Ya. 

Bethel, Jameeon, QaUatin A Bta^n. .Mo. 

Synodlcal MisBionary Col. 

Beddlns, Anderson and 2 stations. Cal. 

Coehec ton N. T . 

Qeorffetown and Empire Col. 

Bowling Green, 1st, sy., and Pome- 

roy and Meriden Iowa. 

BiBing Sun Ind. 

Haynes Memorial Chapel Utah. 

Trenton, Hodge and 2 stations Mo. 

Toledo, Ist German Ohio. 

Look Ridge Pa. 

Beiderland, (German, and station . Minn . 

Ouray. Col . 

Fremont and 2 stations Minn. 

Newark, Salem, German Ohio. 

PuyaUup Wash. 

Plainylew and Shipman HI. 

St. James, let, station and Wells. Minn. 

Independence Ohio. 

Missoula Hont. 

Anaconda Mont. 

Taylor, Post, Oak A vicinity . .Ind. Ter. 

Hueneme and Pleasant Yailey Cal. 

Neodesha Kan. 

BUensburgh . . . Wash. 

Windom Minn. 

Biohland Centre A Fancy Creek.. .Wis. 

White Biver and Kent Wash. 

Omaha, Knox Neb. 

Bookwell City Iowa. 

Springville and station Utah. 

Olympia, Ist, South Union and 8 

B tations Wash . 

St. Louis, MoCausland Avenue Mo. 

Iron Biver, Stambaugfa and station, 

Mich., and Golden Col. 

Ancram Lead Mines N. T. 

Park Hill, Elm Spring A sta^n.Ind. Ter. 
Springfield, 1st, Portuguese and 

Jacksonville, 2d Portuguese... 111. 

WillowB and Arbuckle .Cal. 

Buffalo and Stockton... Mo. 

Lost Creek Pa. 



PM 

P. 

S.8. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
8.S. 

S.8. 
P.B 

S.8. 
S.S. 

as. 
p. 



S.S. 

8.8. 

P. 

P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
S.S. 
8.8. 
8.S. 

P.B 
P. 
P. 

8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.S. 
SJ3. 
8.S. 
8.8. 

P. 
8.8. 
&S. 
8.S. 
8.8. 

P. 
S.S. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
S.S. 
8.8. 
PE. 
8.8. 

P. 
P.B 
S.& 

P. 

s.a 

8.S. 

P. 

S.S. 

S.S. 

8.8. 

8.8. 

P. 



11 



12 

8^ 

12 
8 

TX 
12 

12 

8 
7 

12 
10 
11 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

9 
12 

7 

7 
12 

12 
"I 

12 

1 
10 

6 

5 
12 
12 
12 
11 

8 
12 
12 
12 

9 

I 

4 
12 
12 

12 

8K 
IS 

12 
12 
H 

7 
2 
6 
6 



21 



i 



114 



68 

BB 

80 

80 

59 
S9 
88 
48 

81 
104 



88 

116 
70 
06 
84 

80 
60 
82 
18 
94 

68 

88 
81 

187 
109 

82 
70 
68 

38 



140 



64 
60 
27 
40 
75 

97 
70 
00 
90 
100 
196 



100 
160 
105 
160 
168 

75 

45« 

70 

82 



65 

125 

145 
100 

88 
125 

80 
210 



85 
40 
68 
29 
106 
40 
24 

102 
90 

107 
49 
58 

190 
22 

78 

148 



40 
62 
00 
75 

180 
75 
64 

125 



146 
70 

160 
40 

220 
80 

160 

150 
169 

180 
40 
145 

210 
45 

128 
100 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOASD OF HOICK HIBBIONB. 



125 



MiasioKAsna 



FIILOS OP LABOR. 



^i 


•8 . 


Adda4to 


^1 


i 


OkaidMi. 


i 


1 


1' 


8.a 


12 


« 


6 


44 


8.8. 


18 

7 


10 


2 




P. 


10 


16 


16 


6T 


8.8. 


6 


11 




77 


8.8. 


101 


5 




86 


8.8. 


18 


1 




96 


P.8 


7 


19 


2 


48 


P.E 


18 

IS 




.... 


66 


8.8. 


18 


16 


7 


87 


8.8. 


1 








8.8. 


4 




1 


68 


8.8. 


18 


9 


4 


81 


8.8. 


*? 








8.8. 




. ... 


11 


8.8. 


12 


1 




19 


8.8. 


18 






46 


P.E 


• 

7 


6 


14 


71 


8.8. 


1 








8.8. 


4 


8 


2 


89 


8.8. 


8 




•• 


40 


P.8 


12 


89 


2 


66 


8.8. 


12 


18 


7 


188 


8.8. 


4 






86 


8.8. 


8H 


.... 


1 


80 


8.8. 


18 




4 


14 


8.8. 


12 


18 




81 


8.8. 


18 


5 


1 


80 


P. 


12 


T 


14 


81 


8.8. 


18 


8 


8 


79 


8.8. 


18 




10 


10 


8.8. 


18 


6 


7 


188 


8.8. 


7 
18 


1 


9 




P. 


T 


7 


19 


160 


^• 


18 


88 


14 


180 


8.8. 


10 


I 


1 


66 


8.8. 


9 


8 




114 


S.9. 


18 


8 




80 


8.8. 


sx 


9 


10 


84 


P. 


lOJtf 


8 




46 


P. 


12 


8 


7 


6t 


P. 


7 


18 


24 


Tl 


P.E 


18 


88 


86 


284 


8.8. 


iH 






46 


8.8. 


18 


4 


8 


57 


8.8. 


18 




8 


44 


8.8. 


18 


8 


8 


97 


9.8. 


18 






100 


aa 


18 


46 


16 


81 


a8. 


9 


4 


8 


86 


8.8. 


9H 


1 


6 


16 


P. 


18 


11 


8 


87 


8.8. 


8% 


1 


8 


07 


aa 


8 


8 




106 


a8. 


4 


17 


6 


22 


p.8 


18 


16 


10 


111 


p. 


18 


6 


80 


T8 



ii 



Lm^JAimB 

Ii^DDILX^ XvOBBBX. .••.••... 

UamimLJoaM W 

I dlBlf 1, KlD^UI J 

'f— "■, WM . H 

Uvroii, JoHH C 

I«iPBa, HnmT H 

Idvrm, FsBDBUOK 

lArrni^uTBBB 

Limji, HxirmT 8., D.D.,. . . 

Lbtlb, Joov W 

I^TDraavoir, Cbab. M 

IiLOTD, WM. flUMTLBT 

IflOOKABD, XaBLT 

IrfHTgWABT, GteOBOl 

LooKwooo, Lswn C 

liODea, Obo. M 

LottAV, Jonr Bw 

IrfMAX, Bicnnf on> 

liOttAS, WM.H 

T4MIBA«1>, OEAMLMBU 

Jjona^ Ocnms B 

•Lovtt, Jat Hbhbt 

liOSBDALB, FBAHK 

Loan, JoHH C 

UtmA^WmmmnAV 

Lott^AlbbbtF 

LOUDOX, Clabxb 

laOUOHBAa, JOflBVA 

LOOOBBIDQB. E. M., D.D. . . 

Lows, Jos. A 

LOWMB, Jo«. L 

LOWBIB, UktTMMW B 

LomoB, Nbwbll 8 

LOWBT, W. SOOTT. 

Lucas, Wallaob B 

Ldooook, Gbo. N 

Ltlb,Jas.P 

LTLB, UI.TCSU8 L 

Ltls, William H 

LTVAX, BAB»AH4S 

Ltvd, Bcbsbt T 

Ltxii, Jobs F 

Ltttbil^Wm 

MdAvBB, Gbobob F. 

KoAvsB, Lapslbt A 

Mo AUfOV, JOBM A 

MoAbtbvb, Johb 

XdABTBOB, JOEH A 

XoBbidb, Hobatio B 

♦MoCabb, FBavou S., D.D. 
MoCabab, Jobb M 

XoCaib, Cobbbuus 

MoCalla, Albbbt 

■cCabx, ChablbsB 

MoCabtt, Cbas. O 

MoCabtbt, Ricbabd Q. . . . 
McCasldt, Cbas. H 

XoCaulbt, Albbbt C 

MoCujir, JoaiAB. 



WsstPlslns. Mo. 

Long Islsnd, Logsa, Zkm A sto*n. .Kan. 

BosndlnsTisns and Boheaiisns in Minn. 

SehsUer and Early Iowa. 

Angosi BnoUd and Keystond. . .Minn. 

Miuon, Osnatorook ana station. N. Dak. 

Dresden and station N. T. 

Mulberry Creek and Idana Kan. 

Morrioe Mich. 

Synodioal Missionary Tex. 

T^leBock Ne)). 

Seneoa and Sorrento Fla. 

Galya and Canton Ean. 

Ot'tzIt lyixdL Fortune and Bta*n . .Oal 

Hi r'^rkrNeohaA8tation....N. Dak. 

Hulbr. ukandstotlon N. Y. 

OixLftb&. Ambler Place and West 
Albrl^t and station Neb. 

Oakland City Ind. 

Bacta Monica^ Ist, * Santa Paola. .Cal. 

Pfi^ijbyterlal Missionary Del. 

Mni.tiow Iowa. 

N*.tlO[ialClty ; Oal. 

Ouixle, Mason and station Minn. 

Hopkins. Barnard and MoruinR Star 
and 8 stations Mo 

Northside and Ft. Cbeatam, Mis- 
sion snd Caledonia and New 
Salem and 8 stations Tenn. 

Tabor, Bobemian Minn. 

LinkTilla Oreg. 

Okobolo and 8 stations 8. Dai. 

White lAke. 8. Dak. 

Bed Fork and station Ind. Ter. 

Las Graces, 1st N. Mez. 

Akron, Tama and 8 stations Col. 

Anniston, Noble Street Alaska. 

OTTeill, Jonean and Lambert Neb. 

Boreka Springs Ark. 

Superintendent Western District . N. T . 

Des Moines, Westminster Iowa, 

Taylor Tex 

Doland, Hillsdale and station, and 
Sipe Springs, Pecan Valley and 
8 stations Tex, 

Hebron, Hopewell and station . . . Tenn , 

Frederick. Oneota A 8 stations. a Dak 

Otter Lake and station Mich 

PleasantrUle N. T 

Taymooth, 1st, and 2 stations. . . . Mich, 

St. Paol, Westminster Minn, 

Parkvllle Mo 

Alta and station Iowa, 

Warren and Argyle Minn 

Dayenport, Minnie Falls and 8 sta- 
tions Wash, 

aldsborg and 8 stations Cal, 

Topeka, 8d Ean, 

MeUtte, North Oair, South Qair. 
Bondell and Bast Bondell . .8. Dak. 

€K)odland and 8 stations Ind, 

Porterrille and Piano Cal 

Armoardale. Central Ean, 

Myrtle Creek and 4 stations, Oreg, 
and Cedar Orove and Spring 
Lake Valley and stations. . . wash. 

An Sable Forks and Black Brook. N. T 

Loner Lake, Crystal Bay and Lake 
Minnetonka Minn. 

Bridgewater and Canlstota 8. Dak 

Ogden and station Utah, 



68 

60 

189 
100 
60 
88 

100 

160 



60 
100 
ISO 



180 



660. 
60 

40 

100 
60 
40 
79 

870 
89 

186 



860 
164 



186 
110 
60 
100 
78 
90 
97 
826 
180 
41 



60 
800 

870 
186 
It 

876 



80 

67 

90 
146 
90 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



126 



ANNUAL SBPOBT OF THB 



[189a 



MISSIONARIES. 



HoClbllaiii), David T.. 

MoOLBLLAMD, &iLII*L B. . . 
M oOluhq, Johk 8 

McGoMB, Jambb M 

MoGomiBLL, AuEX. W. . . 
MoCoHmcLL, Jas. H 

•MoCOEKaLLs JOHM B . . . . 
MOCOBMAOK, Jl&AB 8. . . . 
HOCOT, JOHH 

MoCOT, JOHM N 

tMoCBAK^omr 

MoGRflA, WILLIAM B 

MoCrbsbt, Chab. H 

MoCbbebt, Huob H 

McCUISH, JOHN B 

MOCUMB, WiLLLiM C 

MoCU8KKT,Wlf.H. . ... 
MODOHALD, CHA8. H 

McDonald, Donald 

McDonald, Jas. S 

McDonald, John M 

McBlbinnnt, Chan. 8. . . . 

McBlmon, Bktkbidob K. 

McBlbot, Jambb C 

MoBlbot, Wm. B 

MoFabland, Jab 

MoFabland, John W . . . . 

McFabland, Wm. D 

McFbattbbs, Matthbw. 
MoGauohbt, Jornbton . . 

McOaw, Fbanoib a 

MoGbb, Bobbbt G 

*MoOhbb, Bbbnbzbr B. . 
MoOillitbat, Finlat B. 

MoGiNNis, Chab. E 

MoGladb, Jbbomb B. 

MoGowAN, Jab. W 

MoGbboob, Jaspbb W. . . 
MoHABe,WM. N 

McHBNBT, EtaEBBBT 

MclNTTRB, JOBBPH. 

MgInttrb, Lbwib. 

MoKat, Jambb A 

McKat, Kbnnbth 

•MoKat,Nbil 

MoKbnnbt, Gbo. W 

MoEbnzib, Angus 

McKbnzib, Duoald J 

McEiNLAT, Gbo. A 

*MoElNllBT, 8am*l J 

•MoEiNMBT, Wm. H 

MoKlNNON, Anodb 

MoLaurt, Edward A 

McLban, Gbiblbb 

McLban, Enbab 

MoLban, John 

McLban, Robbrt 

MoLbod, Anoub. 

•MolAOD, NOBMAN 

McLbod, Norman 

•MoMabam, Bobbbt T. . . 

•MoBtfwI. t 



FIELDS OF LABOB. 



Gllroy CbI 

Oloqaet, iBt 

Mound YBUeir', AttMioiit And 8 ste- 

tionB Baa. 

OBriln and BUtion NeT. 

AnamoBB, Ist, A Oentte Junolloii, Iowa. 

Madiaonyille and Mt. Tabor Tenn. 

Menoken and Sterilac N. Dak. 

Pott Austin and Grindstone City, Mloh . 
La Foon, Ist, aad statkm, and 

Ellendale N. Dak. 

DoyleBtown, MarBiiaUTiUo and 9 

stations Ohio. 

Ness City and station Kan. 

Kinsley, Greensbnrg ft Wendell. . .Kan. 

Harmony and statiosL Kan. 

Willmar Minn. 

Maple City and 8 stations Kan. 

ATslon and Tiaa Mo. 

FraokriUe, Mt. Hope A stattoo . .Iowa. 

Alexandria and 1 ssation Neb. 

Gatesjille. Stalwart A 2 sta*s Mioh. 

uoal Missionary Gal. 

EwelL Neb. 
nbus Jusotion, Oeatral aad 

station Iowa. 

BelHnRhasa Bay, FalrliaTen, Sedro 

and '4 stations Wash. 

Colony and Neosbo Falls Kan! 

Cbillieothe Mo. 

Central City, 1st, and station, and 

Idaho Springs and station Col . 

Hoonah Mission. Alaska. 

BellSTue and La Platte N«. 

Edfferton and station Kan. 

Baton, 1st and 9d N. Mex. 

Ironwood Mloh. 

North FoA and stationB Ind. Ter . 

Bethany, Centre . N. T. 

Scandia, Sootoh Plains A station. .Kan. 

Pilot Grove , Iowa. 

Lafayette, Fine Biyer, 8d, and sta- 
tion Mioh. 

Chatsworth Ill 

Ian Mich. 

Blue Bapids, 1st . . Kan 

DioUnson and 2 sitatioBs. .!."..! N. Dak. 

Chester. N.T. 

Bushmore and stolon Minn. 

Akron, MartinsTiUe, New Hampton 

and 8 stations. Mo. 

Houlton, 1st, and 8 stations Me. 

Mina and Uniontown. .8. Dak. 

Manchester and 2 stations, 8. Dak., 

and Beaver Creek. Minn 

Union Bidge, Woodland A sta'n. Wash. 
Rutland and MUner and 8sta's. N. Dak. 
Junction, Gobniv and other sta's, Oreg. 

Weyau wega and Fremont Wis . 

Mt. Zion, ApeU and Hatobi. . . Ind. Ter. 

Gladstone, Westminster Mioh. 

Unionyille and station Pa. 

Pembina N. Dak 

Medford and station Orec 

Saguaohe, 1st, and 2 stations Col, 

Grant's Pass, Bethany Oreg, 

Mt. View. West Paift, West Point 

and Glenwood N. Dak 

Minn. House of Faith Minn. 

Beekmantown ..N.T. 

Salem, Preston and Irwin Mo 



£■ 


AM*iw 


ji 


i 


^ 


Cliw^hrt. 


1 


1 


PK 


a 


4 


5 


M 


8.S. 


m 


11 


1« 


28 


8.a 


n 


91 


10 


98 


i*.a. 


6 


4 





10 


B.B. 


12 


T 


4 


89 


n.B. 


It 


6 


7 


80 


S.8. 


6 






18 


8.8. 


4 


.... 




40 


8.8. 


12 


11 


6 


68 


P. 


12 


7 


6 


120 


8.8 


lOH 






88 


8.8. 


12 






26 


8.8. 


6 


2 


4 


87 


P. 


12 


14 


8 


07 


8.8. 


4 






80 


P8 


12 


20 


2 


97 


8.8. 


12 


1 




60 


8J5. 
P. 


'3 


8 


.... 


68 
81 


P.B 


2>r 




1 


88 


P. 


12 


8 


4 


06 


8.8. 


12 


10 


80 


68 


P. 


12 


4 


10 


61 


8.8. 


11. 


18 


27 


106 


P. 


12 


10 


18 


60 


8.8. 
S.S. 


12 
12 








1 


8 


85 


8.8. 


12 


2 


4 


80 


8.8. 


9 


18 


4 


88 


P. 


12 


11 


12 


88 


8.8. 

8.8. 


^ 


8 




80 
44 


8.8. 


12 


8 


2 


60 


8.8. 


4 


12 


1 


60 


8.8. 


2 






82 


8.8. 


8 






66 


8.8. 


12 


4 


8 


40 


8.8. 


12 


7 


8 


08 


8.8. 


12 


1 


1 


15 


8.8. 


4 






24 


P. 


lU 


14 


8 


60 


8.8. 


12 


• 




104 


P. 


12 


6 


6 


75 


8.8. 


8 








8.8. 


12 


8 


7 


77 


P. 


19 


2 




44 


8.8. 


IIH 




8 


12 


8.8. 


H 








8.8. 


9 






44 


8.8. 


4 






88 


8.8. 


•i 


4 


1 


18 


P. 


12 


8 


2 


48 


8.8. 


IH 






24 


P. 


12 


7 


12 


80 


8.8. 


• 






12 


P. 


12 


i4 


29 


78 


8.8. 


7H 


7 


14 


86 


8.8. 


12 






68 


P. 


12 






70 


8.8. 


12 







74 



28 80 

84 
00 
180 
90 
80 
60 



107 
78 
110 
166 
180 
150 

80 
80 
80 

68 

80 

100 
160 
126 

188 
48 
70 

110 

288 



66 
146 
45 

80 
TO 
75 
110 

25 
74 

160 
90 



290 
70 
40 
100 
171 

86 
100 

88 
120 

80 
200 

60 
60 
95 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OF HOHB HIBBIQKB. 



127 



MIBSIONABIBB. 



FIELDS OF ULBOB. 



if 



jj 



4 



MoICabtoi, Pbtbr A. . 
XoIUrxb^HxnbtH.. 

MoMabtbr, Johx 

JCoMnxAX, Ahdbbw. . . 

MOMILLAX, Abthub C. 

XolCiujuc, puu. F 



If OlfXLI.AM, JAS. P 

McMlLLAIf, JOHM W. . 

MoMim, Walkkr A... 

MdfUB&AT, JOHH. ... 



Bad Aze, Blngfaftm and Yeiona. 

Odebolt andfiitotfflaa Iow». 

Akron N. Y. 

Oxford, Union and 8 stationa Iowa. 



MoNaib, Bvandkb. 
McNbal,Ja 



MoNxsa, WiLLiB 8 

•MoNuoE, BoBT. Q., D.D. 

XoKniOB, Thomas 

MoPbadtsn, Hugh. 



MoPHBBBIIf , JOSIAH. . 



HoQuBHii, All 

*MoKabJ[)uvoah a. 
MoBah, Fabquhab O. . 

Maoaulbt, Johh 

Macoahtbt, Ohas. W... 

Maodoxald, Jamks 

Macdohald, Pbtbr M . . 

]fACDOUOA£.L, DOVALD. . 

Macfadddt, T. Ja 



MaoGuirb, Thohas. 

Mack, John 

llAOK,THOMAa 

Maok, WM.B 



Maokat^Au^m 

Maokklykt, Jamks A . . . 
MAOKnntoif, Dak^^. . . 

MAOKIlfTOSH, OBO. 1 

llAOXiaTOHH, Qbo. L. . . . 

Maclabxh, Abgbibald. . 



Macoubkkt, Amthont fi. 

Maks, Akdbkas a 

MAaiLL, Hkxbkiah 

mAJfOBKSTHB, HKBBKKT A 
MAXV, AI.VRKD M 



Blue stem, Sylvan Grove, Vesper, 
Orbitello and steiion Jtan. 

BoricestlUe Kr. 

Inkster and Elkmont N. Dak. 

Obardan Iowa. 

Olaoo, Breokenridge, Clear Fork 
and station Tex. 

Lathrop and 8 stations Mo. 

Baker's Creek, Glorer Hill snd 8 

Bed Lake Palis! '.'.*!.'.'!'. .!.*.*.*.'.. '.'.Minn! 

Salt Lake Cltj, 1st Utah. 

Hltohoock,KUnl>aUand atation, &, Dak. 
Oaseyille, Hayes, Sottletown and 

stations Mioh. 

Bennett and Palmyra .Neb. 

Portagerille N. T. 

▼alona Cal. 

Perry and Minbom Iowa 

MapfoBldgeandtsttttioiis Miefa. 

BlmBiTerandstaMen. ...N.Dak. 

Tenn. 
Boston, St. Andrew's A station, Mass. 

Tannton, 1st, and station Mass. 

Newburyport, 8d, and station.... Mass. 

Taooma,M Wash. 

Somner, Union and Gllead — 111. 

Hempstead W. T. 

Burlington and Big Creek and Ster^ 

ling Kan. 

Fort Wrangeli 



MAm, David 

MAm, Mattrkw O. . 

Mavsox, Autrkd. ... 



Makus, Skatk 

Mavwakbbh, Ohas. H.. . 
Majtt, Danikl J., Jr. . . . 
Mabcbllus, Alokbhon. 

Mabkwam, J. Alkx. 

•Makkb, Jas. J., D.D . . . 

MABqins,JoHir A 

MABaiJi)B,BoujK B. ... 

MABSBrAC 



kvQvwroa 

Mabsbaix, Hugh W 

^^mmmAwi. MATTBAN M. . . 

Mabswam^ Thomas, D.D.. 

M^rT-*". Wm 

MiBf ill., Wk. K., D.D. . 

B, DATIDlf 



Itiv?^ta. ni. 

Kli^TTorth Kan. 

M itcb^U and 1 station : S. Dak 

Wlnumae,Tl|n>eeanoe, Monon, Bed- 

fi>rd and 8 stations Ind. 

Gn.JkiDd, Ollvsi, Yftcrtory and % 

ions Kan, 

teo Fla 

O > ndSststions N. Mex 

PljLotiii Axlsona 

Hastings N. Y, 

Lr>uj^lmrg, Miami, Somerset and 

Pittsburg Kan 

PjncoEuiing Mioh 

Fuyallup, x^iaqnally and Chehalis, 

Indian Wash. 

Neohe, Hyde Pai± and stations, N. 
Dak., and Fort Bragg and 5 sta- 
tions Cal, 

Cateehist at Blm Spring and sta- 
tions Ind. Ter, 

Mont 

Eepennoe N. T 

Oakland. Wilbur and 8 stations. .Oreg 

Sioux City, 8d, and station Iowa 

Cucamonga Cal, 

8«ry, S. Dak., and Ganby Minn 

Osage City, let Kan 

Hesperia and 8 stations Mich, 

New Salem and Grand Summit. . . .Kan, 

Albion and station Ind, 

Hot Springs, Central Ark 

Wray, Laird and 8 stations Col 

WasKom and 8 stations Tex, 

Montpelier and Bagle Creek Ohio 



8.S. 
S.8. 
P. 
P.8 
S.S. 

S.S. 

p. 

8.S. 
S.S. 

S.S. 
S.8. 

S.8. 
8.8. 
S.S. 
S.8. 

8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.S. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

\.i 

P. 

P.B 
8.8. 
S.S. 
8.8. 

P. 

8.8. 

8.8. 

8.8. 

P. 

8.8. 

8.8. 
8.8. 
S.S. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

8.8. 
8.8. 

8.8. 



8.8. 



P. 

8.8. 
S.S. 

as. 

8.8. 
S.8. 
8.8. 
S.S. 
8.8. 
S.S. 
8.8. 

8.a 

P.S 



10 

51 

IS 
18 



4 
18 
IH 
18 

6 

4H 
18 
18 
18 



10 



77 



90 
160 

ST 
180 



140 
78 



180 



70 
105 



87 
86 
161 
68 



18 



17 



18 



88 
88 

11 
60 
80 
47 
88 
100 
108 
41 
85 

00 

166 
60 

11 

46 

188 

80 
80 

46 
78 
18 

08 

88 

861 



80 
884 

86 

60 
170 
60 



71 
70 
160 
70 

06 

100 



870 
176 
60 

100 

190 

100 
81 
40 
90 
46 

176 

46 

180 



14 



116 



60 
80 
48 
15 

86 
148 

86 
87 

8 
45 

9 
08 



860 



88 

70 
175 

80 



100 
106 

86 
176 

96 
185 



•jr«Bif«t. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



128 



AKVOXI.. BBPDST OF THB 



[1890. 




XAsnif, Albbet B 

Karun, Oso. W 

Xabti]i,John 

Mabtin, John F 

*Jl4BTIK, SukllfTBL J 

Mabtiiibz, Juam 1L 

Mabixmbk, Luoas 

MABTm, ASHBBL O... . 

Mabtim, Ch&b. S 

Kasoh, Rdgab C 

KASOir, fiOBBBT W 

Mattbsoii, Ghablbs O. . 

MaTTBB WS, WXLUAH F. . 

Matxbzbsoh, Matvbxab 

Mattiob, Biobabd B. . . 
Mazson, Geo. W., D.D.. . 

Mat, Homtooicbbt. 

Mayo, .Wabbbb 

Matov. J08BFS 

Mats, Albbbt 8 

Mebxbb, Bbnj. C 

MBLBO8B, John C 

Mbnaul, Jambs a 

Mbnaxtl, John 

Mbbbill, Chab. D 

Mbbwin, AXiBX. Moaa. . . . 

MB88BNOBB, BlCBABO. . . 

Mbtbb, Bamubl 8 

MBTBB, WiLIiXAM 

MmBS, Albert B 

Milfoed, Mark L. 

Millard, Bdwabd B. B. 
MiLLSB, Ohablbb H.. . . 
Miller, Glarbkoe Q. . . 

«MiLLEB, Geo. H. 

MiLLBB, Qeo. M 

MiLLBB, Horace O 

Miller, Thob G 

Miller, Willis L 

MxixiOAN, James Y — 
Mills, Benjamin 

Mills, Euoenb B 

Mills, John P 

Milne, Jambs A 

MiTOHBLL, James 

Mitchell, James A 

Mitchell, Stuart, D.D. 
MOFVATT, Wm. J 

MOVVAFT, SaM>L a 

MONDBAOOV. Joti D 

MOMTBITH, TOOB. W 

MoNTooMiBT, Andrew.. 

MONTGOMKRY, JOHV 

MoHTMAN, John F 

MORTOTA, ROMALDO 

MooBB, Gory F 

MooRB, Danibl 

MooBx, Danibl M 

Moobb^EdwoiG 

• KoRtport. 



Gfty,8d Mo. 

Maiiti,BphndmBad8tottoii Utah. 

Wsrtliigton, Coleridge and St. 

James Neb. 

BollTar, Mt. Zion, Grand Prairie and 

stations. Mo . 

SlielbyTllle and Shelbina Mo. 

Blnoonnes and stations N. Mets. 

Bmbudo and 9 stations N. Mex. 

0«rrison and Big Grove Iowa. 

Swan Iiake and Btatlons Minn. 

GreenTille Tenn. 

Balaton and Lyons Minn. 

Boslyn and Glen Wood N.T. 

Oottonwood Falls and stations .... Kan . 
Las Gnioes and Morenoi, Spanish 

andS stations N. Mex. 

Starin FU. 

Biyera and station Gal. 

Cabery Dl. 

Mankato Kan. 

Appleton Gity, Montrose A sta*n. . .Mo. 

Troy. Liberty Street N. Y. 

Bq f ^ira.^ Westminster. Kan. 

Mendenhall Memorial, East Grand 

Forks and station ...Minn. 

Albnqnerque. 1st N. Mex. 

Lagnna and Albuquerque, Siianlsli, 

and 1 station ..^..^T^STkex. 

Ontario Gal. 

Los Angeles and Asnsa, Spanish and 

2stations Gal. 

Little Biver and 9 stoUons Gal. 

GleyelandandKliUtat Wash. 

Bdina and Birdseye Bidge Mo. 

Sipe Springs, Peoan, Bayou and 8 

stati<Mis Tex. 

Tamora and Stapi^urst, Kenesaw 

andHartwea Neb. 

Eastonyltte, Table Book & sto's. . . .Gol. 

Halstead Kan. 

Brainerd and Bloe Lake Minn. 

Brooldyn.Bth German N. T. 

West Bethesda Ohio. 

New York, Dodge Memorial, and 

station N. Y. 

Woonsooket S. Dak. 

Oklahoma City Ind. Ter. 

Portland, St. John*8 Oreg. 

Meade, West Plains, Jasper and 2 

Btations Kan . 

Bedlands Gal. 

Lakefleld and 9 stations Mich. 

Lafayette and Pine Blrer Mioh. 

NewBedford, let Mass. 

Los Alamos, OUvet, Ballard and 8 

stations Gal. 

Mt. Garmel, 1st Pa. 

Pattl*s Yalley, White Bead Hill and 

Wynnewood Ind. Ter 

Appleton Gity, Montrose and sta'n. Mo. 
CapuIiB, Banehet of Taos A 8 sta't . N. Mex . 

Martin, 1st Mich. 

Ironton, Marble Hill and Granite Mo. 

Lonadale B.I. 

MontioeUo and Scoioh Grove la. 

Naebntento N. Mex. 

Dillon Mont. 

Gorert and Kill Creek Kan. 

BlUnwood and 9 fiatloas Kan. 

St. Joieph, North Mo. 



S.8. 
S.S. 

8.8. 

P.S 
8.8. 
1.8. 

P. 

P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
P.8 

P. 

P. 

8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 

P. 

8.8. 
8.8. 

8.8. 



8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 

P. 

8.8. 

8 8. 
8.8. 

P. 

P. 
8.8 
8.8. 

P. 
8.S. 
S.8. 

P. 

8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8 
8.8. 
P. 

P.E 
P. 

8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 

P. 
8.8. 

P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.S. 

P. 



9 
19 

19 

19 
11 
19 
II 
19 

nn 

4 

9 
19 

19 
19 
19 

11 
19 

4 
19 
6 

4 
19 

19 
10 

19 
19 

n% 

19 



19 

IIH 

19 

5 



10 
8X 
19 
19 

19 
19 
19 
9 

19 

19 
19 

19 
9 
19 

19 

tiM 
19 

1 
19 

6 
19 



19 



19 



48 
99 

88 

68 
80 
97 
19 

100 
89 
88 
87 

108 



89 
49 
60 

89 
5T 
89 
69 
60 



100 

100 

75 

10 
IBO 

90 
198 
100 
187 

90 

97 
80 
80. 
90 

66 
99 
100 



97 

98 
68 

48 
29 
48 

185 



ITS 
7& 



59 

100 
60 
180 



6 
9 
8 

91' 

9 
5 



96 
80 
106 
61 
147 
198 

18 
88 
69 

84 

80 
88 
85. 

ioe" 



945 
50. 

195 
75 

000 



85 
60 
150 
900 

900 
00 
90 
40 
65 



10 



68 

60 
196 
95 
TO 
110 
196 
98 
15 

47 
97 
96 



188 

75 
118 
14 
75 
86. 
100 
146 
90 

75 
100 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BO^BD OF HOME 1CI88IONB. 



129 



MISSIONARIES. 



riKLDS OF I^BOR. 



MOOBB, JoaiAB 

MOOKS, Mauoi 

MOOKB, Wm. H 

MOOBHXAD, JOSXFB . . 

MoBBBOH, OAiina.1. 



MOBXISOJI, DOIVALD 

Monisoii, Jammm M 

^Mounov, Wm 

MosBOW. Wm 

MoBxoH, Wm. W 

Mocrw, Dbixs 

MVLLALLT, FPAVOB P. , D.D . 

MvLLsir, HmT A 

MlTLLBB, QbOBOB O 

Mnroy. Ssba F. 

MnnM, I>inffOA]f 

M^BAIBB, Jbam B 

MvBiftATBOTD, Binm B 

MVBPHT, Edwabd N . . 
MUBKAT, ALXX 



MTrBBfEsmr 

Mtbbb, AmtsD £ . 



Mtbbs,SimovP. ....... 

Nau, LLswKiXTir y . . . . 

Hatb, Hbxbt Ja. 

Hblioh. Jomm W 

Nblboii, JoeiPM 

Nbuoh, Stbbajcdt 

NkwblLiW. W.,Jb..... 
Vmbo&as, Wobdbii p. . . . 

NlOBOLLS, Altoh B 

HlOBOLLB, QbO 

HmjD, TBOitAS. 

HiLBi, Wm. Hxixt. . — 

NOBSM, JOWPH B 

HOBTOa.JAMMB C. ...... . 

Hons» HBMAjr A 

KV«BIIT, CBA&1.BS R 

O'BBnar, AiAMXT S . . . . . . 

Odbll, Jbbkmlah ....... 

OouiTBB, Jwaum A. B. . . . 

OllbbbmbiiaWi Samubl., 

OMBLTBirA.WBI 

ObDITaT, dMITM 

ObB, FBAlKLXir 

Obb, Jambs 

Obtboa, Jvab P 

OlBOBBB, CtXDS P 

OmOKP, JOHATHAM 



OrBBMBBBT, QWO. C. . . 
OTBBBXBBSr, BOBT. M.. 

Padbb. Robt. a. 

Padbh, Wm. O 

Paoilla, Pbdbo 

Pasb, Fbbvbbio. — 

Pamb, Jambs A 

Pablbt, Mosbs F 

Palm, Wm. J 

Palmbb, Bdmumv M. . . 
Palmbb, Fkavk N .'. . . 
*Palmbb, Bobm^t B. . 
Palmbb, 8. S 

PaBADB, 1S90MBB 

Pabx,Cha^. H........ 

Pabx, Jonr S 

Pabkbb, Axbbbt Q — 
Pabkbb, AXAX. ^. 



EflWBB«« ..»..,..., lU , 

KmoU Ifliin 

Hopewell ,.,_,-.. .Jnd. 

OorlDEifl ADd 3 lUtloBi. IT, Dak. 

AtbXtnd ftdd B\g Eottow, G«iit«rTm« 

Audi autioti N. Y. 

Etirt Mlcb. 

Bt*M ViUey and 2 iUtions Greg, 

Baat Portlind, MlzpAJi. . Omc^ 

Ohlc«|fo, OOa Street Ill , 

Blue Hill .......K«b. 

aiouxCa, 2d Holluid . ..._„ I* 

ScaUftnd ind ustlaa ...B. Dsk 

BnileT Btid slstloa A|a. 

Lavreoee, G«tixi«ti .Mitt , 

Qraott JiiDCttou ... _ .._ Col, 

PolaL AreiiA uid 6 iUtioni , , . CbI , 

BobSnaon a^d St :^»uT«ur ..Wli 

IlidajpendeDc;^, C*.lva,ry . . . Orea , 

111. Floaatnl KBd 2 autloQa. 0tJi£ 

BsrnucD^ Oraikd Rapldt, Fra1r1«<du- 

Sac, sDd 4 tUttont Mlsn, 

tOCT, lit 



Z 



itineflrille^ Hftilluffa, CoiisbuiaH, 
Whkclftir and OnJda LAlt«. ,..K. T. 
HiUbTHle and Klng'uian... .-,....... Ssn. 

AtLBley and Lltcbdeld _Ueb. 

Mt Slerliiigtltt - Ky. 

111. idaiio and alatloi] Idsbo . 

SciUih CenlrfiTllle H. T . 

PalrvlUe N.T. 

S^a and Land Ke T 

WtlliamBt<)fni Bod BurTlngtoa Ky . 

Mlnneapolli, SlewArt MemorUl. . , .MUm 

Wimpiyllle and Oneld* V*ll«y K. T 

Llvobia and 1 atallon lod . 

Nelaon and Eiuakla , Neb . 

Medkkne L'>iJffe and i atstloiu Kui. 

lit. Pitgrafa and slallotLa W««li. 

BuOklii and liockford .Htnii. 

" The (Jballenge Field " , C«l . 

Eo»cUa and JaDotown Iowa. 

CQtd«D N. Y. 

Caldwell and atallon , . .Kbq. 

South DfiAMoliiC'i.. Idvb. 

Elce Like and ClLfrtak... Wla. 

Pompcy Centre . N. Y . 

Allertua and LiticvUle Iwwi. 

prairie-dn-Jiac Wl*. 

£1 HIto, A^i Nerra, and Mori^.N. Hex. 

Mafxllua ,. N. Y. 

Wbite Kiver, Kent aud itatloDS, aad 

Tacoma, 3d Wa»li . 

Pinrn Creek and Penaa. Eun Ej 

Beav«r and matioD lad. Ter 

Wil»i>n'B Grave aud Dayton Iowa 

MAumng and iMmnilla ... Iowa. 

PonleJ N. Utx 

Parma and Hpringport Mich . 

TliocDaoii add McNaif MetnorlaJ. MlDn. 

MoiriwDTllto and itation Ill . 

Oniaba, Lowe ATenue Nob. 

Mlrabile Mo. 

Alatnr>A& ind 1 aUtlon ,- . , . Col . 

Silv^'f Cliff Add W0at CSllff Col. 

Alwjwindrla B, IJak. 

Mulberry and Wfall« Creek .Kan . 

Drclevillt' K. Y 

WatneifOf l»t San . 

Foireat Glen and B]asobTUl« Md . 

Qraoge ........ . . C*l , 



i 


ij 


Aiidfdto 




e 


'i 


Chim^m. 


%i 


i 


J 


1 


EM. 1% 


10 


4 


110 


114 


P. HM 


1 




5a 


110 


H.H. 


6 


« 


3 


68 


bO 


H.». 


4 






38 


40 


fl.S. 


»M 




1 


»e 


100 


H.H. 


n 


17 


6 


101 


316 


s.a 


IS 




1 


S9 [100 


9,3. 


1 






L 


B.a. 


A 


15 


13 


lOfi^ 


130 


P. 


12 


1« 


8 


64 


120 


p 


IS 


4 




46 


60 


B.9. 


U 


5 


8 


01 


soo 


8.B. 


12 






ao 


76 


P 


« 


5 


1 


108 


194 


8.8, 


7 


1 


7 


ss 


60 


B.B. 


IS 


IM 


S 


IAS 


ISO 


P 


]« 






71 


64 


B.S. 


1 










S.9. 


13 


18 


1 


Bft 


116 


B.8. 


*M 


18 


8 


IS 


m 


R 


H 






sm 


^10 




.11 


]« 


4 


178 


aoo 


8.S. 


14 


a 


100 


140 


S.B. 


« 


18 


10 


47 


100 


P. 


It 


4 




76 


flO 


Sft 


U' 








20 


P.E 


ft 




4A 


80 


P. 


12 






70 


loo 


B.j^. 


1 










S.tt. 


a 






80 


SO 


P. 


19 


10 


sa 


187 


380 


B.a. 


i*H 


14 


I 


40 


140 


S.8. 


12 


4 


% 


04 


110 


H.8. 


18 


1ft 


s 


fl7 


sa 


V, 


g 


7 


4 


00 


000 


H.S.. 


* 


1 




90 


100 


an. 


IS 


S 


4 


100 


aoo 


S ,H 


IS 
4 

a 








40 


H H 








100 


ss. 






ae 


60 


9.8. 


IS 


3 


a 


wv 


1S& 


y.4i. 


IS 


1 


a 


74 


900 


s.a. 


m 


6 


a 


10 


so 


S.N, 


» 


3 




IS 


86 


a.H. 


6 






ao 


00 


p. 


ts 


11 


1 


4» 


03 


W.H. 


IS 


1 




62 




S.f^ 


12 




1 


4S 


28 


s.a. 


nji 


4 


2S 


28 


100 


S.H. 


12 


2fl 


IS 


isa 


06 


S.9. 


fl 






SI 


110 


P. 


IS 


7 


1 


71 


126 


S.S. 


la 


8 


s 


84 


17ft 


P.' 


,1 


H 


m 


68 


a.y. 


12 


26 


10 


7a 


150 


P.E 


5 


2 


s 


ISO 


200 


P. 


IS 


5 


so 


70 


no 


«.S. 


6 






31 




a. 8. 


IS 


U 


17 


67 


111 


9.8, 


i 


; 






8.S. 


1 


4 


T 






P.S. 


12 


a 




SO 


60 


P. 


12 


4 


2 


00 


46 


B.tJ. 


IS 


8 


10 


90 


100 


a.S, 


4 








flS 


P. 


ft 


4 


S 


16S 


140 



^ He Report. 



Digitized by 



Google 



180 



▲HHUAL BXPOBT OF THS 



[1890. 



MIB8I0NABIB8. 



Paskbb, Rob*t H 

Parks, Apoimrs H 

FASLiMAjr, Bxirj. F 

PAS90H8, BbX/ 

PABBom, Jonr C 

Pabsovb, Wzllxam T 

Patohbm, Willis 

Pattbmoill, JiTLnrsS.... . 

Pattbbsok, Adam 

PATTSBSoir, Jambs T. 

Pattersob, Josbph 

PATIIBtOK, WaLTOB 

Pattob, Wm. D 

Pavlit, Abtoh 

Pbabodt, Wakd C 

Pbaihs, Hbbbt B 

pxaxob, isaao a , 

Pbarob, Tbov AS O 

Pbok, Albx.8 

Pblab, Wm 

Pbltob, Ohas 

•Pbblabd, Alibbd M 

Pbroital, Hkbbbbt a 

•PBBBA,J06iT 

PBKBXVCk JOHB 

PXBBY, BaBTOH W 

Pbrby, Hbhby T 

Pbbbt, Samubl M 

Pbrbtmab, Thos. W 

Pbtbb,Wm. 8 

PBTBSaOB,<lAS. B 

Pbtbrsob, Waltbr S 

Pbtrib, Jbrbmiah 

Pbttitt, Altibd C 

Phblts, Jambs H 

PanXTPS. JOHATHAB 8 . . . 
PBIPPS, BOBT. J 

Pbibbiz, Sxbhbt 

PBBAJrBB, StAITLBY B 

PXBBOB,JomiO 

PXBBSOB, GBOBeB , 

PnfifBY, J. 8 

PiBBx, y nOBBT 

Pdxobny, Fraxoib 

POLLOOB, GbO. W , 

POLLOOK, Hbhby O , 

POLLOOB, SAJ^L W 

Pollock, Wiixxam A. 

Pollock, Wm. G 

pombroy, johb b . 

poitd, hobaob n 

POBTBB, OhAB. J. a 

POBTBB, E. H 

PORTBR, WiLUAM MoHlTB, 

tPosT, Edmuhd H 

Poti, Jacob 

^PoTTBR, Jambs H 

Pbatt, AbbamA 

Pbatt, Edward 

Prbbticr, Edwim N 

*PBS8SLT, Robbrt T 

Pbiob, Gyrus A 

Pbxohabd, Btax B 

Pbv«h, Bbnjamib B. p. . . . , 
Pbysb, Jambs M , 

puobb, bxohabd 

PmirMBBT, Wm. H , 



nSLDS or LABOB. 



Kelso, Freoport bmI S ststions, Wadi- 
tagton ind UnloiL Orag. 

SyrBcase sod NeodesliB Ksn. 

Salt Potni, WestMinstor and station . . B. T . 

8«atUe, 9d Wash. 

Fenton Miok. 

looh. Greenwood and 1 station .. N. Dak . 

Hope Onapel and 9 statJonf . S. T)sk. 

OannonsTUle and i stations, , , N Y. 

CIoDtlbret and 1 staUoo, Nc'b. 

BUver Creek , . . N<ib. 

Downs and Bose Yallej . . Kan. 

Iron BlTerBtambaoiA & 2 iLalloni.MLok. 

Florence. Walton, and Cedar Point . . Esn. 

Omaha, Bohemian, and station Nob. 

Games, Byron and station.,, ..Mloh. 

Montrose ,,. Iowa. 

PaoU , .. .,,. Pla. 

Ord^lst .Nob. 

Harmony. ....,., 8^ Bak, 

Wells Minn. 

BlehTiew and Dn Bols, .111. 

Beech ,,.,,,,,«. N« . 

Park BITOT , N . Dtk . 

Pu^arlto N Max. 

OakHUlandlndnstn.......... Kan. 

Norwloh Comers and litchfleld K T. 

MasonTille snd 2 statlon>,ai]d Alton ,17, T. 

Ashland Md. 

Nnyaka Ind. Tor. 

Bethlehem, Centre Betblehera uid 
Pisgah lad. 

Fleetwood, MfUwood ft 4i lUitJcms In<!. Tar. 

Presbyterlal msstonary . . 9. Dak. 

Book Btream * Bbnlra, Frsuklln St., N.Y. 

Maine, Maplewood and H itstloni . Af ion. 

ereyUng A, (Meman ft Caikiniirllle. ,lf luh. 

Bly, Minn., and Perry Iowa. 

Oberiln Kan. 

Le Boy Minn. 

Omaha, WiUiam Street Neb. 

Wilmington and statloos Ohio. 

Henrietta and Bowie Tex. 

Folda and Klnbrae Minn. 

John Hns BohemiBn, and S stations. .N. Y . 

Bohemians in Bmle Co 8. Dak. 

Dnrango Col. 

Union Ind. 

Des Moines, Highland Park. Iowa. 

Began and AJrtell Neb. 

Kansas City, 4th, and station Mo. 

Whitewood and 8 stations 8. Dak. 

Troy Kan. 

Elko and station Ner. 

New Decatur, Westminster Ala. 

Black Hawk Ool. 

St. Andrew's Bay Fla. 

Milwankee, PerMTcrance Wis. 

Enstls Fla. 

Woodbnry Co., Westminster, and S sta- 
tions, and PloTcr and West Bend . Iowa . 

Soldier and 2 stations Idaho. 

Salem Centre Ind. 

Storm Lake Iowa. 

Storm Lake, Proridenoe and station. Iowa. 

Albany Orsg. 

Hebron, Neb., snd Horton Kan . 

North Bend, Mindoro, Lewis Valley 
and 1 station Wis. 

Berler, Glasrton and 1 itatlon. Mo. 

Qamett Kan. 



i 


13 


mAl 


|i 


I 


1 


8.8. 


9X 


81 


4 


48 


P. 


11 


T 


1 


44 


P. 


91 


8 




87 


P. 


IS 


8 


81 


78 


P. 
P. 


^ 


9 

6 


80 

4 


80 
60 


P. 

8.8. 


18 
18 








8 




74 


P. 


18 


5 




48 


8.8. 


i% 






80 


8.8. 


8 


1 




41 


8.8. 


8 




1 


88 


8.8. 


18 


7 


9 


141 


P. 


t 






88 


8.8. 


18 


H 


8 


60 


B.& 


7 




8 


88 


8.8. 


18 






88 


P.B 


UK 


17 


18 


54 


8.8. 


18 


8 


1 


84 


8.8. 


IH 








8.8. 


18 


8 


8 


40 


8.8. 


18 






81 


B.8. 


6 


6 


10 


86 


8.8. 


18 






10 


8.8. 


6 


8 




86 


P. 


lOH 


18 


7 


06 


8.8. 


18 


1 


8 


196 


B.8. 









60 


8.8. 


18 


5 


4 


60 


8.8. 


W 


18 




148 


8.8. 


16 


18 


100 




18 








8.8. 


18 


10 


4 


88 


8.8. 


18 


4 


1 


87 


8.8. 


10 


18 


6 


88 


8.8. 


10 


8 


8 


68 


8.8. 


9 


88 


8 


78 


8.8. 


18 






61 


8.8. 
8.8. 


4 
6¥ 











4 




8.8. 


if 


8 


6 


60 


8.8. 


8 






88 


P. 


18 


80 


8 


170 


8.8. 


4 


8 


6B 


67 


P. 


18 


8 


6 


88 


8.8. 


18 


1 


1 


118 


B.S. 


18 


8 


6 


8 


B.8. 


18 


88 


8 


68 


8.8. 


10 


1 


18 


18 


8.8. 


18 


8 


1 


86 


8.8. 


18 


8 


8 


68 


8.8. 


18 


1 


1 


86 


8.8. 


11 


7 


11 


80 


P. 


18 




6 


80 


8.8. 


8 






81 


8.8. 


18 


18 


4 


160 


8.8. 


18 






68 


8.8. 


18 


8 


T 


70 


8.8. 
8.8. 


18 
4K 








1 




80 


8.8. 
P.8. 


*? 


8 




78 


8.8. 


in 






90 


P.B 


8 


88 


880 


P.B 


u 


4 




66 




u 


6 




W 


P. 


u 


4 


i4 


86 



100 
180 
40 
180 
100 
60 
80 
81 
48 
80 
60 
100 
186 
80 
60 
00 
15 
60 
66 

60 



70 
170 
140 
75 
80 

180 
800 

88 
106 

95 
178 
100 

75 
100 

60 
100 

TOO 
40 
40 
75 
48 
100 
185 
100 
98 
168 
84 
75 
60 



68 96 



100 
62 
40 

80 
100 
880 

100 
80 
70 



• N« lUport. t DMMMd. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1890.] 



BOARD OF HOME MI8BION6. 



181 



1CI88I0NABIE8. 



tewuT.TtMonT H.... 

UDiifV, jAins C 

Eab, William 8 

RaiMW, #OUPB H 

RAnwLpm, Allbh F 

BuoEn, Jon N 

JUmov, MxLTXLiJi M. . . 
•lAjnni, Nxijoir ▲ 

SaBSOX, 0BOBOB 

SiLTiifvn, XmrABS H. . . 
Eatvob. Jas. W 

KbaD, rMILAVDBB 

1ba»jji, Jomi T 

Sbaboiob, Botal F. . . . 

Amoo 

BDrAisI Jomr.'."*..'.'...*. 
"" ,Cabm» 

1 1. 

, Gso. J., D.D 

I Jahh 

fjAJOSS 

*BBn»« Joasm H. 

SBM, WlLUAlf I> 

Bans, Philip P 

Baxm, Tbomas ▲ 

Sbbbbt, Avwjn 

Bbd, Gmmmb Babtlbt. 

Bam, Jobx,Jb 

BBii»,JonG 

Bam, WiLUAif H 

Bbbbkaw, Wx. B 

BnrTILLB,]BAAO 

MaarwiUM, JomM B 

BBTsncAVOX, Jab. S. . . 

RVTVOUMi, Abdbxw M . . 

Brboisb, Gbo 

BsiBoiaB, Waxabb H... 

Sbtboi^db, Wit. B 

•^ .JomrA.^ 

iW 

c8 

. m 8 

BMBtHABxrY 

Bmb^JambsB 

BVKABOB, ChAB. L 

Bmbabsb, Datid Q 

BWABWt, JOVAfBAB B.. 
BKHABMOB, GXABLBB F. 
I^OUIB 

Mbboblabt 8... 

-Mv.wiri; Jaoob B 

^Bimu, Qbobab W 

f IBIKILP, Jo— A 

.JambbW 

>BBBT 

lOWBV J 

.WiluamH.... 

iDabiblJ... 

a, Btabi p.... 

B, Jom 8. . . 
Ai 
Fa 
>Hi 



FIBLDS OF LABOB. 



N.T. 

HeleiiB,8d Moot. 

LaJnnU Ool. 

Woroootor, Itt Mbm. 

Otii Col. 

Bnlnerd, Potwia and stalkm Kan. 

Wartbarg andKiamat Toim. 

Mt. YoraoB, Oxford, Wahiitt YaDoy, 

8taiile7 and Spring Hill .Xan. 

Lafkjeite and Pine Btrer Ukt. 

8t Jamoa Minn. 

Warrwi and LIlUa M«adowi Pa. 

Atklna and Nawhall Central Iowa. 

Centennial, Forrest Hill and itatlons .Tenn . 
Hn»pnar and statlona, Oreg., and 

8nohomldk01|j Wadi. 

Woodbary Co.. weitinlniter BDIot't 

Creek and 8 itatlont Iowa. 

New Amttardam and Sta?«na Point. . Wla. 

Boyne Fills and Boyne Otty Midi. 

Grant City and Knox Mo. 

Ktrkrllle and 1 station Iowa . 

Columbia and 2statlons Ky. 

SaTaanali, Haokberiy, Boeendale and 

2 stations. Mo. 

Chanate andistationa Kan. 

Kings III. 

BoIIa and Falrrlew N. Oak. 

Candler, Soutli Lake Walr A station. . . Fla. 

Woonsooket, 1st B. I. 

Maoston and station Wla. 

Walnut Iowa. 

Great FUls Mont. 

Grcetejr Bad sUtton Col. 

Vatlej Creek, Leonard A 6 stattona.. .Tex. 
rraaklln, Smlthfleld and Bldhmond, 

Vi*k, and Batckellenrnie and 

Northampton N.T. 

Long Hollow 8. Dak. 

A»ceniIon 8. Dak. 

BuulHpSTllle Ind. 

LiOraoda and 8 stations Oreg. 

Grand Baplda, Inunannal Mlofi. 

Blrer Forest Dl. 



Blair Neb. 

West Unkm and Wheat BMge Ohio. 

Ckenoa and t stations Ul. 

Seneeaand Sorrento Fla. 

Port Townsend Bay and 7 stations. . Wssh. 

King City, Union and Union Star Mo. 

Newberry Ml<iili 

Wsatmlnster and statloB Kan . 

St.LonUand2statloos Mloh. 

Day N. Y. 

Boyalton and statton Minn. 

Hflorper and 2 stations Kan. 

Bmpire City and Marshfleld Oreg. 

Sooorro N. Mex. 

Laneaster, Liberty and Harrleane. . . .Wis. 

Cherry Creek, Berg and station Neb. 

BrownsTllle and (mwfbtdsTllie Oreg. 

MaoklaawClty MlcE. 

Pankllng Ohio. 

Thayer and Harrison Kan. 

Pleasant Yalley, Clear Creek and Bine 

Spring Ind.Ter. 

Somenrllle Ohio. 

ttnslaw and 6 statlona Oreg. 

....iowa! 



Templeton and 4 stations. 
Lfane Springs 



h 



8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 
8.8. 

P. 
8.8. 

8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

8.8. 

8.8. 

P. 
8.S. 

P. 

P. 
8.8. 

8.8. 
P. 

8.8. 

8.a 

8.8. 

P. 

P. 
8.8. 
P^ 
8.8. 
S.S. 



8.a 
p. 
p. 

8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 
8.8. 

P. 

P. 

P. 

P. 
P.B 

P. 
8.8 

P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
S.8. 
S.8 
S.8. 
8.8. 
S.S. 

P. 

P. 

8.a 

8.8 
S.8. 
S.8. 

P. 
8.8. 

8.8c 
8.8. 
8.8. 




12 
9 

12 

"? 

12 

6 

12 

12 



|i 



10 



li 



d2 

80 
48 
100 
81 
80 
26 

ire 

61 
20 
67 
80 
66 



18 
61 
8t 
68 
184 
84 

98 
89 
40 
88 
19 
66 
22 
87 
60 
116 
80 



166 
98 

100 
79 

47 
24 
67 
60 

186 

182 
70 
80 

174 
01 
28 
76 
16 
80 
94 
16 
82 
76 

100 
79 
29 
60 
68 

47 
126 
18 
80 
46 



80 
25 
25 

126 
40 

125 
40 

147 

40 
61 

lie 

160 

75 

40 
40 
115 
120 
117 



100 
170 
66 
46 
60 
65 
50 
106 
66 
180 
116 



160 
40 
20 
88 
160 
190 
60 
100 
100 
244 
100 
90 
170 
140 
100 
88 
140 
42 
26 
140 

80 
48 

90 
75 
60 
116 
125 

90 
180 
145 

45 

40 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



182 



ANNUAL &BJ!OKT OF TUM 



[1890. 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIBXDS OF LABOR. 



1^ 



r 



4 



Boaiatov, Jas. R 

RomnoBi Jos. C. ..... , 

tRoBivtoH^Ainm. N ' . 

BOBXSMW, WM. 

RoBDrtoir, Wzluax H. 
RosntoH, WilixulM. 
Bopon, JAJOft G 

i,jAja» 

i, Jas. B 

i, Jacob 

*Bo«ns, Datxd B 

BossBft, Jajos E 

Boone, WX.O 

ROBLAJTD, AlIDBKW W. . 

Romo, YiNonm F. . . 

Root, AuActrnrB 

Root, Jajcbs Svow 

Boboamp, Bob*t Q 

Bmb, Joan H 

RouiiXBABS, DatidW. 
RonOHXT, TBOS. G 

Roe*, OaoBaB 

*R0B8, QaoB«B A ...... . 

Boenxn, jRAsan Z / . . 
RoVH, Jambs F.. . . 
Rowufr, RoMBTU 0. . . 
*BiiiM»LnL Waiabb B. . 
Bunus, Fbabx. ........ 

BvasBLL, Btbob P 

RmiBLL, Dabibl , 

RVlKBBrOBD, Obai 

SaHfu^ WiixtAM At O.D. . 

*BA]f aOBKB, PUBT F 

Sambbbsob, Gbobab'E 

BABDBBflOBjJToS. W., D.D . . . . 

8ah«bbb, wm 

ft&Bioii, Jomr B 

Babbov, THoe. A 

BAimDBBB. RBLtOB 

•BAtTBB, FUMShK. C 

Bawtbix, Bu N 

Satbb, 1&>wabd H.. 

Si.TBB, Hbhbt B 

Satbb, Btltakus 

SOABBOBAVaH, Wm. B 

♦BOHiBBHOBH, AdOLHI. 

SoBABDBL, Jacob 

SOBAIBU. JoBBO..' 

SiiBBLI., J AMB8 P 

SoHBBOK, AbdesobV. C, 0.D. 
SCBUrOK, BUAB S 

SOttBVOK, ISAAO y. W 

S dBBBMBB BOBB, HaBTBT R. . 

SOHUJVITB, SBBBBT. 

SOSOTfAOBra. GUBTAT 

SOBUTLBB, WM. H 

^ScmwabsJPhilip a — 

SOOVXBLD, WM. H...... 

SooTTfJom 

fioorr, JoAhF ^.. 

Boon, JoHB L., D.D. . . 

SOOTffBOBT.D ... 

Scott, Thomas A 

SooTT, Wm. R. 

Soot*, WiBviHLD j 

S4XnT, WomsLD T. . . . . : 

SCOTBL, DWMttt , 

BCBO««s, Ldibbb Sf. . . . , 
•KoBaporl. f 



SoQthport and 2 sutlons. N. T, 

White Bear Lake ....Minn 

Conewango N. T. 

SbaTertown andstatlon N. T, 

Wichita, Perkins ! . .Kan. 

Bast Cedar, Iowa, 

New Haven, 1st Oonn. 

Claremont and Ripley Minn. 

Belmont N. Y. 

Baldwin , Wis. 

Upper ML Bethel Tm. 

Welsh-Union, Bethany and sutlon. .Tenn . 

Wood Lake.' S.DalK. 

Viewfield and Link S. Dik. 

Taos 'and 7 staUons .N. Mez. 

Howard Minn. 

Rochester, Emannel N. T. 

Kokonio..; Ind. 

Independanoa.-....'. Ohio. 

Blackbird, 8e6ttrille& Apple Creek.. Neb. 

Laiirens N.T. 

TnaUtln Plains and 8 stations. . .Orsf . 

OhQckey Vitle, . Ijunar and Mt. 

Lemnon. *...'. r Tenn. 

Kalamuoo, North, and station Mioh . 

Tiela and station 111. 

Brooks, Nodaway ahd 4 stations Iowa. 

01enwood Springs Col. 

Bohemtan, JE^Ter Side Mission and 

Mdhtgomeiy Mission. . .'. Mian. 

Loop City Neb. 

OelweiB, Hasleton and station lowm. 

Bellmore N.Y. 

Oakland Bethany Mission CtA. 

Otego N.T. 

Dadley and 1 station HI. 

BTnodieia Ifisslonary. . . Wis. 

Monango, Bdgeley and station, and 

Sanborn. . .N. Dak. 

DunoansTille and Gibson Memorial . . . ,Pa. 

Argyle and station .N. T. 

West Berkley ..Cal. 



s.a 

P. 
S.S. 
S.S. 

P. 
8.S. 

P. 
PB 
8.B. 

P, 
S.S. 
8.8. 

P. 
S.S. 
8.8. 
B.S. 

P, 

P. 
8.S. 
&S. 
S.S. 
8.8. 

8.8. 
B.S. 

P. 

P. 

8.a 

8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.B 
8.8. 
8.8. 
S.B 



Lawrence. German 

DlUon and Union Kan, 

Appanoose, Pontoosac and station> .... HI . 

Broekport N.T. 

Clatsop PLslns and S stations Oreg. 

Otsego .Ohio. 

Nyaok, German N. T. 

Bnflhlo Grov»^ German: Neb! 

Omaha, 1st German. Neb. 

Bathgate, Tyner Bethel A Backoo. . .N. Dsk . 

Reedsborg Wis. 

North Salem N.T. 

Brooklyn, Grace N. T. 

Ctarden City and Santa F6 Kan. 

Rowley, German Iowa. 

Nyack, German N. T. 

Syerett, Saxton and Tellow Creek Pa. 

MelTUle ..N.T. 

Culbertson'. . . .' ..Neb. 

Walhalla. Buf Centre & 8 staUons, N.. Dak . 

South Bethlehem Pa. 

Presbytarial MiBsionary Mass. 

Chicsgo, Belden ATenue • 111. 

Port HnroQ, .1st Mich . 

Central aiy. : ." Col. 

BIk QroTc and station Cal. 

W^ton and 4 stations . .Oreg. 

Klrkland ',: N. T . 

Marcelineand station. .' .' . .Mo. 



S.8. 
6.S. 

P. 
8.8. 
S.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 
8.8. 

P. 

P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
S.S. 

P. 
8.8. 

P." 
P.S 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.S. 

P. 

P. 
P. 

8.8. 
S.S. 
8.8. 
P. 
8.8. 



IS 
lOK 
IS 
IS 
8 

IS 

7 
11 
12 
18 

8 
IS 
10 
IS^ 

2 



78 

60 

61 
81 
44 

116 
4t> 

U9 
46 

86 
70 



l1«4 
90* 

60. 
40 
46 

18 

97 
40 
67 



186 

1» 



28 

186 



76 

16d 
98 





8 


6 




8 


8 




i 



m 
vi 

76 
46 
40 



lie 

90 
60 



is 
14a 



ISO 

.^. 

60 

6a 
(^ 

;^ 

66a 

76 



«*:.«"» 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



B^iisD' OF itoWiSr rfrssf-o^. 



188 



lilSeiOlTTtEtBB. 



8oin>Dnt, Szbxibl O., DJ), 

SksTnat, Jomr < . . 

8SWABD, Fkkdsxiok D 

BmwMLLjBAMxrT 

8k^Tov, Thomas L., D.D. . 

^Sbtxoob, JOHIf A.. 

SifAKP, Bm/. F 

8KA.KP, Edwaso M. 

Sbaw, Abohibalp M 

SHBLi>oir, FKAjn E 

Sbkpabd, Joe. C. . . ' 

S«ftPiuu>, Chas. M 

*8naLDe, Oaltih B 

8Hmj»«, Jon M 

SioKLoe, WmemfK F 

Simu, Wm. S 

Sbooklbt, HamtT M 

S1DK90THA1I, WiLLIAll 

SiLLABS, AirOUB 

BiMPOOK, Uaao B 

SnmoH, Mabtdt W 

BiHox.An, RoBT. C. H 

SLOAK, IBAAO O 

Sloak, Jomr C 

Blooombb, Saxubl 

Smaix, Ghabbt 

Sm AU.WOOD, Datid 

SMAUiWOOD, JoftBPH S 

Smiok, Wm. a 

Smith, Bkiwamin F 

Smitb, Datid C 

Smitb, Smbbsok, F 

Smith, Gso. G 

Smtth, Gmo. Oabdmbb 

Smith, GMa W 

Smith, Habbt 

Smith, Jambs Irtin., D.D. 

Smith, Jambs M 

Smrm,Johr G 

Smith, Johm M 

Smtth, Lboh Biohmond. . . 
Smith, Miiaom D 

Smtth, TRoe. 6 

♦Smith^Thos. M 

Smith, Wiluam 

Smtth, Wm. A 

S mith, Wm.C 

Smtth, Wm. H 

Smiis, JBtybt 

•Smothk. Chas. K 

8MrTH,JoB3rA 

Svbli^ M. Pobtbb 

8bod»t,Wm. W 

Shook, Ebhbst M 

Sbtdbb, Fbahh L 

SvTDBB. Job. G 

*8o«bstti.i.b. Jambs F — 

^PABXB, KlLLABO F 

S^BHOHB, JlTDSOH 6 

Spbovlb, Gxobob B 

Spboitll, Auex. W , 

SqUIBB, WiLXIAM L. 

Stahitf, Pbthk O 

Btabk, AusbbtC 

StATTj JOBH A ^ 



•ir«B«p«ri. 



FIELDS "OF LABOt?. 



San Antonio, MadiiOB Square. . .' Tex. 

OtisTille and Ml. Hope • .\ . .N. Y. 

Sniodloal HlBstonary. . . .' .Cal. 

wakenbanr and Obtbt and statfon. . .Col. 

Synodioal MlwIoHary Neb. 

Streetsborongfa -.Ohio. 

Benedloi anaGreebam. ...... .Neb. 

Walla walla, Ist , . . Wash. 

Spencartown and AuBterlitz ; N. T. 

SngflsbeT , . .Ind. Ter. 

QoldBn OUT andSbOob .Mo. 

Branston, union Wyo. 

East Portland, Mizpab Oreg. 

Jemea and Nacimienio N. Mez. 

LltehiMdaBd Ansley Neb. 

West Point and S stations Iowa. 

SpearTllle, Bellefont, Cimarron and 

8 stations Kan. 

Norrls Mich. 

Ozlbrd and 8 stations Wis. 

Nokomis Dl. 

Hnmeston, Corydon and S stations. .Iowa. 
West Bar City, WestminBter Cbapel 

and Bay OitT Memorial Mission . . Mich . 

Albert Barnes of Glenooe N. Dak. 

BoshTille, Gordon, CUnton A station . . Neb . 

Caynoos and 4 stations Gal. 

IdaTille and Union Ind. 

Elm GroTe, Barren and Tiofnity . . Ind. Ter. 
Barren Fork and White Water. . .Ind. Ter. 

Bosebnrg Oreg. 

Weir City and SoammoBTille Kan . 

Craig and Fairflix Mo. 

Elmlra Mich. 

Newton and 8 stations Pa. 

Santa F^ 1st, and 1 sUtion N. Mex. 

Albion Iowa. 

Walker, 1st, and station Iowa. 

Tama Iowa. 

Pleasanton ; . . . .Cal. 

North wood, Grant and station N. Y. 

Blocksbnrg, BrldgeTiUe and station. . .Cal. 

Wilson Kan. 

Oentral City, Mineral Point, Sugar 

Valley and station Kan. 

Grand Baplds, Mission Wood Mich. 

BelleTne Idaho. 

Melmore and MoCvtehenTille Ohio . 

Ponca and West Union ! .Neb. 

NasonTllle Wis. 

LeaTenworth, Milltowo, Anderson and 

Grantsbnig*! Ind. 

Emerson and Wakefield Neb. 

Ttndall .8. Dak . 

AlTln and station HI. 

Hermon and ClifVon. Md. 

Woodstoek and Blayton Minn. 

AUarton Iowa. 

Ayr, Holstein and Wellington Neb. 

Belmont N. Y. 

Detroit, Baker Street. : .Mleh. 

daremont and Bipley Minn. 

Craig, Belle Centre and 1 station Neb. 

PlainTllle, Shiloh and station Kan. 

Preebyterial Missionary, Fla., A N. Y. 

Sea and Land N. Y. 

yinita, Pleasant HUl A 8 stations, Ind. Ter. 

Interpreter Wash. 

Hastings, 1st German Neb. 

Delpbos, Glasoo A 4 stations, Kan., A 
. Nooksack, Lyndon A 8 sta's. .... Wash . 



^1 


^ 


CharchM. 


l< 


4 


i 




oa 

9i 


8.8. 


2¥ 




. 


91 




P. 


12 


-2' 


9 


68 


186 




12 


- 








S.S. 


19 
12 






17 


66 


9.S. 


12 










9.S. 


12 


4 




» 


110 


P. 


IS 


5 


6 


04 


50 


8.S. 


12 


11 


' 1 


80 


60 


8.S. 


n 


20 


10 


80 


50 


9.S. 


12 


1 


4 


85 


64 


3.S. 


12 


6 


8 


60 


60 


S.S. 


12 






71 


120. 


S.S. 


12 


11 


9 


89 


55 


8.8. 


4 


8 


9 






P. 


12* 


45 


a 


102 


65 


S.S. 


12 


4 


9 


TO 


175 


3.S. 


8 


8 


1 


21 


45 


S.S. 


12 


5 




79 


100 


8.8. 


8 


1 


8 


80 


70 


P. 


111 


2 


.2 


&9 


85 


S.S. 


4 










S.S. 


12 


5 


1 


28 


50 


B.S. 


12 


88 


11 


180 


150 


8.S. 


12 


8 


2 


25 


75 


8.S. 


9 


9 


2 


42 


50 


P. 


12 






16 


81 


P. 


12 






40 


16 


P. 


12 


9 


2 


89 


100 


3.8. 


6 


1 


8 


57 


186 


9.S. 


12 


4 


5 


64 


100 


B.S. 


2 






18 




9.S. 


12 


6 


1 


68 


100 


P. 


12 


2 


7 


58 


148 


3.8. 


12 


T 


6 


68 


80 


8.S. 


i% 


8 


5 


8 


60 


8.8. 


12 


1 


2 


22 


70 


8.8. 


12 




2 


26 


116 


88 


4 

'1 








87 


S.S. 






18 


40 


8.8. 






76 


lUO 


P.8 


19 


21 


6 


108 


390' 


P.E 


11 


19 


12 


108 


BOS 


3.8. 


9 






80 


150 


P. 


IIH 


16 


8 


168 


m 


P. 


81 


1 4 


14 


90 


75 


8.8. 


6 






10 


80 


S.S. 


7 


1 




1» 


75 


P.E 


Hi 


6 


1 


71 


188 


8.8. 


19 






89 


61 


8.8. 





4 




99 


60 


8.8. 


12 




1 


68 


80 


8.8. 


9K 






24 


90 


3.8. 


IH 










8.8. 


4 


9 




61 


75 


P. 


9 


4 


1 


69 


77 


8.8. 


19 






90 




1:1: 


6 
12 


4 


2 


110 


60 


8.8. 


12 




4 


45 


105 


P. 


9^ 


5 


6 


189 


818 


S.S. 


9 




1 


41 


175 


S.S. 


2 










p. 


19 




11 


50 


50 


8.8. 


11 


21 


96 


68 


50 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



184 



▲VlflrUAL BBFOBT OF THB 



[1890. 



MlSBIONABUe. 



Stibd, Amluc 

Btbu<B| Samubl W . . 



SnuB, WnuAK. 



BeUtviUt. 



.lad. 



♦ Smu, Wm. N 

Smv, Mosw D. A., D.D. 



Ji, JonrA. 

Bsarsflv, Wm. O. 



Bathenrltle, Bmmet 

giran lbIm 

LftOro^Libeny, Boaao A Sitattont. 

BMTtr Creek 

Sidiiej, Homer and Elm Qrove Dl. 

Woodbrtdie, Bethel and Olemento... .Oal 



Bnair, BSBMAji I 

Brravxnoa, Jot. H 

ftnTBBBOV, Boar. M . . . 
BnraiBOir, BoaaarS. . 
Bnyaauv, Sai^l H. . . 
*8nwABT, OmiauB J. 

SmnoL, JAMm. , 

Snxx,JoaAH 

Srautoa, Jaaom B. . . 

6vrfT, JoHV W 

DTRTf wnaoa 

St. Joaa, larnialiA. . 
Bt. Jobh, Stbpsbv N. . 



SsoaKLa, FaaaaaiOK G 

Sroaa, Amvtrtm T 

Srova, BaajAioa F 

0voon,FBiLipD 

BvoraLBT, 8am*& W *" 

8vaAx«B, Faaa^ O 

BraAsavauao, Obd , 

SnarafiauH Svoaaa B. . . . 

SrvAar, Datid M 

Stvabt, Jomr 

SvRs, Fbxd'k 

SwAiH^omrL. 

BwAMyBwau. 

SwAjr, Bairj. M 

fl wAiia , Bnaop C 

SwaBTf Wh. L 

STBaasTBioaaa, HiaAii M. 
Stltaws, Jobm O. t 



BTMOi«rox, Roaaar B . 
Stmicbb. Fbaxoib M . . . 

Tah, wiMoaW 

Talbov, Howabd a. . . 

Talbot, Jobs W 

Tawitbt, Dajobl a. . . . 



Tatlob, Avoubvub 

Tatlob, Cbab. a 

Tatlob, Jomr B 

Tatlob, Joaa O 

Tatlob, Sbbbhab D 

Tatlob, Samubl E 

Tatlob, ViaaT E 

Tatlob, WiLUAK 

Tatlob, William S 

TBmwoaxB, Wm. P 

Tbllb» Obobob W 

TaoMAB, Datxi> 

TaoM 4a, Jomr 

TaOMAl, JOBB 8 

rraoMAt, WM.D 

TaoMAB, Wm. P 

TaoMPsoa, Bownr J^ D.D. . 

TaoMTtov, Fbahoib B 

Taoanoa, Jamm 



FIELDS OF LABOB. 



Co., lit, BDd 



Kaa. 
.Mo. 



.Mian. 
.Ud. 



StPaal, 

Veray 

Lawreaee and WeBtern 

El C^ott and 1 atatton ObI 

MkCaimelandSstattoDB Dl 

ProapeetHUl Cal. 

MadSioB, S. Dak., JkBankaSprtaiti. .Ark. 

Peny Dl. 

PhUadelpblaanditatlODB lad. Ter. 

LohrrOie end Aobom Iowa. 

Troy,»d N.T. 

H6rtelier,lat III. 

BldaeTllle and Oneida Lake N. Y. 

Walloon and 8 Hattoni MIoh. 

PreabyterlBl Mimlonaiy Ind. 

Oneida, Nenekatel, Ozftxrd, Mi. Yer- 

nonasd Borne Kaa. 

Minnl ifa i ft r t f lc arm nn N. H. 

Old Dn Qnoln and NashTiUe Dl. 

Baird, wTndbtm and 1 station Tex. 

Parowan Mtealon Utah. 

Lake City, lit, and 2 lUtlonB Iowa. 

Aahlend and station Orur. 

Oerlton N.T. 

SIlTer Greek and Deeatar Neb. 

Bamell, Medora and JaeksonTlUe. . .Iowa. 
Saa Goiaoalo, Banning and station. . .Oal. 

HenreltMi.... N.T. 

AUegany Pa. 

MeSypolla Dl. 

Bethany Centre N.T 

Bennington and sUtlon Kan 

FalrHBTen N.T. 

Hamilton Mo 

Oandy. Garfield, Dorp Vallay & ste*n. 

Neb.. M Sammerrllle & 4 Bla*B, Oreg. 

Jilaads and station Gal. 

El Paso Kan. 

Northfield Ohio. 

DePeia,lst Wis. 

Caaey Kan. 

Waablngion, Stewarterllle, Hoaston. 

d Fremont Minn. 

Dnnkirk and North Washington. . . .Ohio. 

TImnath Col. 

Bandolph and Imogene Iowa. 

Kansas City, HIUMemocIa] Mo. 

Orwell, New Lyme and 8 fUtlons. . .Ohio. 

Ojwenrlew..... Dl. 

Paxlon Dl. 

.N.T. 

ErleT...' Mich. 

Oal. 

Walnnt Eldge and station Ind . 

Oarboaado and WUkesoa Wash . 

CoQlldge Kan. 

Hafllon and Langford 8. Dak . 

Synodloal Missionary Wis. 

Soath Fork and Bethany Neb. 

CorralUs and Oak BIdM Oreg. 

Cawker City and fflenmdar. . . . ,^. . . .Kaa. 



tah. 



ViiwK.«r \/i*j wuMVi vi«u mum:. ........ a 

KUkltal, Sd, sad Olerelaad, Oreg., 
and Oorinae and station .^1 



P 
P.E 

P. 

8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
P.B 

P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
P.B 
8.8. 

P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
PM 

8.8. 

P. 
8.6. 
8.6. 
8.8. 

P. 

P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
P.B 

8.8. 
8.8. 

P. 

P. 

P. 
8.8. 

8.8. 

P. 

P.8 
P. 

8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
P. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 
S.S. 

8.8. 
P. 
6.8. 



^ 



It 
IS 

•? 

U 
IS 

'? 

IS 
18 

6 

^? 

18 

*? 

IS 

Vf 

19 
12 

8 

f 

18 
18 

1 

4 
18 

8 
11 
18 
18 

8 

".« 

18 

MH 
18 
18 
18 

18 
10 

6 
18 
18 
18 
18 

6 
18 
18 

8 
IS 
18 

I 

4 
11 

4 
18 
18 



S.S. 



Addadto 



'8 


8 


7 


16 




8 


8 




7 


16 


8 


18 


4 


6 


.... 


"6 



811 

146 

194 
117 

m 

100 
90 
TO 
19 
86 
14 

806 
60 
46 
68 



i 



n 

180 

U9 
60 

no 

76 
84 
60 
ISO 

46 

870 

66 

116 
80 
60 



148 

07 
80 



164 
111 
86 
18 
ITO 
86 
66 
88 
66 
66 
68 

184 

100 
88 
79 
68 



110 
60 

n 

64 

90 
78 
44 
87 
67 
46 

7 

86 
44 
16 

7 



ISO 
60 
76 
80 

t!B 

146 

100 
80 

900 
60 
16 
40 

186 
66 

100 

110 



86 
186 

60 
U7 



800 

846 

T6 
100 
860 
180 
100 

66 
160 

70 
180 

60 
184 

60 



100 
140 



6 80 



•MoUfnU 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOARD OF HOME MIBSIOKg. 



136 



MI6810NABIXB. 



*TBOimoB, Jamm W 

IT, JOBVH , 

■• Jon B., B.D 

m^BAXthT 

«, WnjxAM I . . . 

ll,Al»All 

V, AxAn 

Traaoy, Atvibt J. 

Tnmn, Aixs. S. 

TBOUB/CnwmC 

llouT, wnuAx O 

TOBD, CAI.Tni C 

T»dd,DatidB 

TbaisFbah€ibM 

Tmu^JAMm 

IVmD, Jobs A. 

Todd, Mnotnr B 

ToBsn, JvAM L. 

TOUn, OOTATIAHO 

Towuot, Tboilas 

ToWMBfll, J*BV A 

TSATB,M. Moou 

Tbavb, Wm 

TlBHTiW, liABWH L 

TdocNathav F 

TUCKB, Hastwbu A 

TvaKAIAUOITS, SOLOMOir. . . 

TmoD, BowBT 

TrxDAii, HsnT M. 

UrMKB, Haxtubt T 

*YAIL,BOL0illOV N 

▼▲UWfDCB, RlOlfABP 

Vavob, Josktr, D.I> 

Tijn»Bi HooK^OBvH 

YuKMuauoL, amrnxw C 

Yamwm La% Biobabd a. . . . 

Yaisobsh, Jacob D 

yijiI>YCK,BBaan.D. 

Yah Emav, Gaoaai 

Tjui BicAB, Jom W 

*Vak ITwr, Pnn flL B.B. . 
Yai Nm, Bboooh B 

Yas OoRxnKir«»B, Oobvil. 

YnABLs, Joa. 6 

YlBUi,jA0.P 

Y]«i^ Jon J 

YnoBR, Cbbib. B 

Yncnrr, Habit O. G 

Yicrui, Ajn>BBW 

Ya^Ensr 

YoeiuB, Fbxd's B 

VooT, William F 

YoujaE, Philip. 

YoLSi Dabiu. 

YOQB, WiLLLUf B 

Wabb, Fbabob B 

Wadb, Wiluax 

WABBWOBn^OvrW 

Waibwbibbt, Loins C. ..... . 

War, Rajhom 

Waldbokkb, Chab. V 

Walkbb, Albz 



BojMiMiMUiCttar. 
8«Uwood andttation. 



FIKLD6 OF liABOB. 



OfOBt Bend Kan. 

81. Thomaa, Blora, Weal Park and 

8 Btattons N. Dak. 

YaneoBTcr Maaioitel Waah. 

Oryatal Btrar and 4 lUUMia Fla. 

BroadnlbtBandMajfleld N. T. 

F^oatlnii]; and atatton Md. 

Coldwator and atationa, San., and 

Tale<iiiah and ataUon Ind. Tor. 

Knttawa, Marlon and DyoeoalmrB. . . .Ky. 

F^raatCity .8. Dak. 

Waldo and Hawthorn*. Fla. 

Flaadraan, Sd, and station & Dak. 

Hnri^ Wla. 

Natawaka and itatlona, and Avoea, 

*"*' Adrian and atatton Kan. 

, rtnee Wm. Co. lit Jk ata*n . Ya . 

PhflUpa Wb. 

Ma r lpoaa and Laurel Iowa. 

Irona Iowa. 

llAt^aDdSatattona. N.Mez. 

Spudah In Baato F6andTteinttj . . N. Max 

HoU7,lat,andSitatlona. Mich. 

Plaaaant Orora^Oetororadk Marion . . Drag. 

/...... .Vof«f! 

Ind. 

New Proapaet and Siurina Plaee Tenn. 

PraMerliilMiaatanary Ind.Tv. 

Bniralo Lakea 8. Dak. 

Minn. 

IroaMoontaln Mieh. 

Lebanon, lat lU. 

CoUa Iowa. 

KWt Ohio. 

Mlaaton, Sooth Cheater Pa. 

Chleafo, Holland HI. 

Borbank, Harrtaoo, Hawick and 8 



Albion andatatton .Iowa. 

BIfin and atatton Neb. 

CarMale N.Y. 

Yemon and 8 etatlona Tex. 

MUtonrala Ban. 

Qtand Tower lU. 

liTingiton, Beat Beniatadt, Dix Blrer 

aadiUtlon Kt. 

Lrona and atatton Neb. 

HlghlandPark Kan. 

Howard Kan. 

BlUaao N. Mex. 

WimamatowB, Weet Oamden and 2 

stattona N.Y. 

HartUndand Lakln,and Maple City, 

Genda Springa andalattona Kan. 

Bethel,HB||be8RiTerJkBllaabeth..W. Ya. 

Holland^ lat, and aUtton 8. Dak. 

New York Zton, German N.Y. 

Bbanaaer, German and station. . . .8. Dak. 
Brooklyn, Frledensklrohe,G«nnan..N. Y. 

Laorel and S etatlona ind. 

La Oraee and 8 stattona, and WUmot 

and 8 etatlona 8. Dak. 

BlltootlsTille and station, and Fair 

Baren and atatton N. Y. 

Unlontown and Biohlaad 8. Dak. 

MandeohaU Memorial Minn. 

Mlanewankon and stattona N. Dak. 

Beanllew, Blkwood and autions . .N. Dak. 
Bethany, BaalePark and 8 etatlona. .Oref. 
SynodloalMlsaionary Mo. 



i! 




AddMltO 

CfkvKhat. 


h 


•s; 


J 


1 


!' 


*1 


P. 


IS 






76 


174 


8.8. 


4 


88 


19 


66 


4U 


8.8. 


18 


19 


17 


94 


4a 


B.8. 


6 


1 


1 


14 


60 


B^. 


8^ 




8 


96 


70 


P.B 


6 






64 


100 


8.8. 


IS 


14 


6 


98 


175 


P. 


12 


88 


4 


184 




9.8. 


4 






16 


16 


3.8. 


1 










8.8. 


12 


8 


8 


87 


60 


8.8. 


IS 


8 


5 


48 


67 


8.8. 


8 




1 


106 


100 


P. 


IS 




8 


57 


90 


8.8. 


f^H 


6 


6 


18 


45 


8.8. 
P. 


W 


8 


1 


70 


180 


8.8. 


8 


14 




67 


48 


3.8. 


18 




4 






B.B. 


B 


8 


6 


68 


90 


8.8. 


9 


8 


8 


64 


846 


S.8. 
8.8. 


S 






44 

87 


86 




5 


m 


B.8. 


r 






98 


96 


B.8. 


12 






100 


100 


PM 


H 


16 








8.8. 


If 


8 


.... 


61 


76 


B.B. 


si 


7 




7 


40 


P. 


1? 


14 


6 


67 


160 


P. 


10 


11 


7 


70 


118 


8.8. 


6K 










B.& 


4 


.... 




18 


80 


8.8. 


19 








160 


P. 


IS 


11 


6 


100 


100 


8.8. 


4 


88 








8.8. 
8.8. 


^ 




8 

4 


19 


60 


P. 


IS 


8 




68 


180 


8.8. 


IS 


6 


T 


80 


160 


8.8. 


•? 




8 


84 


60 


8.8. 




.... 


60 


800 


B.8. 


18 


8 


7 


61 


109 


P. 


10 


4 


8 


T8 


80 


8.8. 


9 


8 


16 


17 


96 


8.8. 


IS 


4 


4 


68 


186 


8.8. 


11 






6 




pj: 


11 


1 




lOT 


100 


8.8. 


IS 


4 


10 


78 


895 


B.8. 


18 


18 


8 


160 


166 


B.8. 


18 






49 


85 


P. 


81^ 


8 




186 


185 




18 


8 


1 


47 


60 


P. 


7 


70 


6 






P.B 


7 


89 


.... 


89 


86 


8.8. 


IS 





4 


89 


846 


P. 


18 


8 


6 


160 


880 


8.8. 


'? 


.... 


1 


86 


100 


8.8. 




8 


19 


70 


S.8. 


iH 










8.8. 


18 






« 


86 


8.8. 


18 


7 




68 


60 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



186 



AHHUAL KBPOBT' 6F TKB 



[1890. 



MISSIONARIES. 



Walksb, Birsin A 

WiiLKSB, Gborov F 

Walkbb, Nath'i B 

Walksb, William 

*Waix, BLOoianiLD 

tWALLAoi, Okas. 0.,D.D 

Wallaob, Obas. W 

•Wallaoi, David 

Wallace, Johk 

Wallace, J amxs B 

Wallace, R. Howard ... 
Wallace, BoBT. M., D.B 

Wallbt, BAMimL S 

Waller, Blxbb B 

Ward, Josiah J 

Ward, SAjnm. 

•Ward, Wm. A 

Wardlb, Wm. T 

Ware, Wm. H 

Warher, Jobl 

Warrih, Edward 

Warrrk, Johk B 

Warrxr, JoHir M. C 

Warrendrr, Bam'l R 

Watermav, Ibaao N 

WATKim, Hrwry W. H. . . 

Watrdts, Jamrb F 

Watt, Robert 

Watt, Robrbt 

WaVOH, JOBE 

Wratbr, Blub 8 

•Weaver, WiLLiB 

Webb, William H., D.D. 

Webkbb, Tbomab J 

Wbbxb, FRAinc G 

Weexb, Frahk M 

Wrilaitd, Klabs B 

Weller, Outer C 

Wbller, Sam'l H 

Wbllb,BluabB 

Wells, Jooph G 

Wills, Lester D 

WbLLB, WRLLDCnOH W. . 

Wbeit, Wm. J. a 

Wbbt,AlbbbtM 

Webtob,A.B 

Whalieo, Hbmrt H 

Wheatob, Hrhbt 

Wheeler, Bobt. L 

Wberlis, Xiam 

WHEtnL, Chab. M 

•Wkimbtbr, Datid B 

WHBnrAitD, Wm. C 

Whitb,HbertK 

•Wmra, Hbkby R 

White, Isaac 

Wbtte, Matthew T. A. . . 
Wbitb, Wm. Gaeriboh. . . 
WHfTEBEAD, Asa F 

Wrrtield, Wm 

•WHTTiiro, Sam'l P 

Wbttlocx, JOHH M 

WHRtEMOBE, Isaac T — 



FIELDS' OF LAB^. 



Dallas Centre and Grimes Iowa. 

De Salb and De Kalb Jiraotlon. N. Y. 

Croswell andS stations .Mich. 

Sedan, Elk City, Wannete A stations, Kan . 

Howard and winsted Hinp. 

KlBSimmee Fla. 

Reynoldstnirg, Grove City & station . .Ohio. 
SaltYlIle, Mile, Barnard ft Fountain . . Kan. 

GKdley and lone, and 2 stations Gal. 

Ktngwood. . : W. Va. 

HineTiUe N. Y. 

Little Valley and station Pa. 

Rnssell and Falrport Kan. 

Elizabetbton Tenn. 

Kasaon Minn. 

Hamilten, Mt. Pleasant, Keal and 

Reeee .....'. ..Kan. 

Big River and Hartland Wis. 

Newark, 8. Dak., and Sargent and 

StranbvlUe N.Dak. 

Fannington, YermilUon & Empire . . Minn . 

Hooper and Webster ....Neb. 

Kalamazoo, North Mich. 

HoUister and 8 stations. Cal. 

Waterville and 8 other stations Wash. 

South Wales and Glenwood. N. T. 

Uklah, 1st .Oal. 

Bookland, Sd N. T . 

De Soto ..Mo. 

Aurora Neb. 

Alanson, Ist Mich. 

Gohodon N.T. 

Hagerstown Ind. 

Panora Iowa. 

Crescent City Fla. 

San Juan, Lopes and 2 stations Wash . 

North St. Paal, North Minn. 

PapUHon and La Platte.. Neb. 

Hespers and 8 stations Iowa. 

Moreland HI. 

Santa Monica Cal. 

Netawaka and Irving, and Geneseo, 

Harqnetta and station Kan. 

Hteton and station : . . . Wis. 

Marietta Neb. 

Independenoe, Calvary and station . .Oreg. 

Atoka and Lehigh Ind. Ter . 

Spirit Lake Iowa. 

Bureka and 6 stations Ind. Ter. 

El Paso Tex. 

Firmer Ci^, Manslleld and 9 stations, 

and Waterman. ........ III. 

South Omaha, 1st, and 8 stations Neb. 

Mt. PIsgah, Hoshm and station, and 

Preseott and Station Wash. 

Avoca Iowa. 

Hays City Kan. 

Broad Lawn and Pickert N. Dak. 

La Yeta and S stations, and Silver CIUT 

and West ClilT. Col. 

Bellmore N. Y. 

Bnsenada, Ist LOwer Cal. 

RosevUle and station. . : Cal. 

Rockwell CItv Iowa. 

Hnntsvllle, New River, Jamestown and 

t stations, Tenn., and West Bav 

City, Covenant and station MIeh. 

Marietta, 8d, Lamotta, 1st, A station . . Mich . 

Fulton Cal. 

Las Yegas, Spanish and stations . . N. Mex. 
FlorsBee Arit . 



if 


•8 


AMBdto 

Ch«Rh«B. 


|i 


"S 


i 


I 




S.S. 


2 






178 


856 


S.S. 


2 






72 


142 


p. 


18 


8 


5 


71 


115 


S,8. 





5 


10 


151 


80 


9.S. 


7 






90 


8Q 


8.S. 


6 










S.6. 


18 


42 


1 


180 


290 


B.R. 


7 






SO 


254 




lU 






68 


80 


S.S. 


6 






85 


40 


8.8. 


11 


4 


1 


80 


185 


8.8. 


18 


10 


1 


72 


66 


a.s. 


12 




1 


51 


&0 


p. 


12 


17 




40 


100 


s.s. 


12 


1 


i 


88 


80 


8.8. 


6 


8 


1 


58 




s.s. 


11 






69 


80 


8.8. 


4 










8.8. 12 






78 


148 




IS 




8 


18 


90 


P.E 





4 


6 


182 


80O 


8.8. 


12 


3 


1 


46 


80 


8 8. 


12 








70 


8.8. 


6 


1 




116 


150 


8.8. 


12 


5 


9 


66 


110 


8.8. 


11 


1 


1 


88 * 90 


B.S. 


7 


22 


8 


106 


185 


B.S. 


12 


6 


8 


70 


96 


8.S. 


9H 






81 


45 


P. 


7 




1 


60 


80 


9.8. 


^H 


7 


1 


28 


60 


8.8. 


m 






64 100 


8.a 


ir 


6 


4 


68 


60 


8.S. 




1 


24 


65 


8.8. 


12 


2 


2 


82 


60 


P.B 


9K 


9 


2 


48 


4S 


P. 


12 


8 


4 


90 


140 


P.B 


18 


2 


5 


45 


190 


8.8. 


6 


1 


6 


42 


118 


8 8. 


12 


2 




100 


198 


P. 


12 


1 




42 


90 


8.8. 


11 


8 


2 


71 


80 


S.S. 


12 


4 


12 


TO 


60 


8.8. 


12 


24 


8 


108 


880 


S.S. 


12 




3 


00 


80 


B.S. 


Mi 






20 




P.B 


ir 


6 


io 


88 


150 


P.E 


8 





8 


125 


854 


S.S. 


12 


14 


27 


60 


180 


P.B 


IIH 


2 


8 


28 


80 


S.S. 


IX 






17 


60 


8.8. 


111... 




68 


91 


8.8. 


12 26 


4 


77 


79 


8.8. 


9 4 


1 


74 


60 


8.8. 
S.S. 


8 






25 
81 


66 


12 


5 


4 


80 


S.S. 


12 


18 


6 


36 


58 


S.S. 


4 


1 








S.S. 


IIH 


7 


9 


112 


BOO 


P. 


12 


4 


1 


99 


190 


S.S. 
8.8. 


?? 


44 


4 


188 


197 


S.S. 


12 


2 





10 


60 



»NoB«|»ort. fDMMMd. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



18M.] 



BOA^D* OF fl'O'^flf MIBB10N«. 



187 



MISSIONARIES. 



Wkkk, Tb08. a 

WioxB, Emsbsoh G 

WlUfAK, Wm . H 

Wiooim, John M 

Wwnr, Ambbosb 8 

Wrasr, JoesFH K 

WiLBBK, Hbkst P 

WiLST, Bdwabo C 

WiLLAXD, Bir«ENB S 

WiLLBST, JOHH C 

WiLUAMS, DAimo.: 

*WlLUAMi, BaVW F 

WnxiAHS, Qk> 

WUXEAMB, Oko. P 

WouAiia, Mabqh F 

WxLLIAMi, MOBAAll 

WniiiM*. Mosa A 

WlLUAMS, BOBBKT H 

WlLUAMB. WlLUAM B 

WlLUAMSOV, DaM*L E 

WiLUBoir, William A 

WiLLOVOBBY, Jomi W. G. . 

WiLLB, DaTID 

WiLUUv, Datib 

WiLflOw, Obahlib F. 

WiLWH, I>AV11> A., D.D. . . 

*WlL80B, HaBTBT 

WitMir, HuohP 

WiucMi, Jambs 

WnaoB, Jambs M 

WiLBOH, Jambs 8 

Wilson, Jessb O 

Wilson, John 

WiLsoB, John 

WiLBON, JOBBPB M 

WiLBOB, Lbvi B., D.D 

*Wtlson,8amitblT., D.D. 

Wilson, Wiluam 

Wilson, William 8 

WlBCHBBTBB, OLIYBB W. . . 
WlBDBBfJOB. W 

WiNNIB, CBBBBTtAN W 

WnmB, Hmnbt A 

WmmoTOB, Irtino P 

Wim, Fbbdbbiok W 

WiTTB. Philip 

Wrtbnbbb«bb, Josbph . . . . 
wittbbbebobb, matthias. 
WoLOOTT, John M 

WOLP, JOSHVA J 

WoirBBZ, Louis 

Wood, CHABI.BS 

•Wood, Sdwabd P 

Wood, Fbamois M 

Wood, Gbo. F 

WooDHVLL, Obo. S., D.D.. 

Woods, Bbnjaxin J 

Woods, Jamw L 

WOODBTABD, JBTHBO B . . . *. . 

WoKX, AbklM 

WOBBBLL, BbN/. F 

WOKTMANir, HbHBT. 

Woibiho, Fbbdbxiok B. . . . 
Wbmht, Alvhxd W 

WBIOrr, WABHIHOtON O.. 
• No lUpOTl. 



FliBLDS OF LABOR. 



Oreg. 
...Md. 



Boulder Moot. 1 

Ssnd Lske N. Y . 

Oornfofc BDd Vermfllion Esq. 

LlberlTTflto snd ststloo lows. 

Linden, Mnndy, Argentine & station) Mich. I 

Oreen Cotb Springs and station Fla. ' 

Rapid City 8. Dak. 

Orieans N.Y. 

Jnnean, Nslive Alaska. 

Centralis, Ist. and station Wash. 

Estherville, Emmett, 1st, and Sootoli, 

and Banoroft, Bnrt and Pleasant 

Valley Iowa. 

Osoeola Neb. I 

M lobrara and station Neb . 

Coo&eUBlnflb, 2d Iowa. 

Muskogee Ind. Ter. 

MnlTsne Kan. 

Eagle Point and other stations. , 

Annapolis 

Chefaalts, Ist. and station Wash. 

Deerfleld and Half Day 111. I 

Lafayette, Newberg and statloi* Oreg. 

Salem and 4 stations Tenn. 

Letdytown and station Pa. 

Hamilton, Spring Hill and stations. .Mont. 

Marshall, Chrismsn and station HI. 

Laclede, GrantsrlUe, Bethel and 

Sedgwick Mo. 

Oakdale Neb. 

CliAon and the Parallel Kan. 

Ylsalla and 2 stations Cal. 

Omaha, Castellar St., and station. . . .Neb. 

Crandon and station Wis. 

Yates Centre and Toronto Kan. 

Brighton, 1st, Col., A Raton, 1st. .N. Mex 
Oberlin, Colby, Oakley and PhUlips- 

bnrg Kan. 

Greston, Humphrey & Tracey Valley, Neb. 

DelNorte Col. I 

Anbomdale and Winter HaTon Fla. 

Port Hope, Knox and station Mich. 

Cariyle and Lone Sim Kan. 

Oregon, 1st Wis. I 

Ellendaie, N. Dak., and La Crosse, 

North Wis. 

Tyrone and Pine Grore N. Y. 

Madison, St. Paul, Ger. A. MIddleton . . Wis. 

St. Croix Falls Wis. 

Platismooth, German Neb. 

Marion Junction, Immannel German, 

and 8 stations 8. Dak. 

Meridian and Thayer, German Neb. 

Oak Creek, Campbell and station Neb. 

Redfleld N.Y. I 

Essex and station N. Y. I 

Brookjyn, Friedensktrche N. Y . 

New Brighton N. Y. 

Mt. Ayr Iowa 

Synodloal Missionary N. Dsk 

Hornby N. Y. 

Marleth, 1st, and Flrnn Mich. : 

Lenox, Big Lick and 9 stations. . Ind. Ter. 

Oarson City, Not., and Cal. ' 

Mansfield and Corlngton Pa. 

Brookings 8. Dak. 

Homewood and Glenwood 111. I 

Lyon Co., 1st German, A 8 stations. .Iowa. 

Lexington Neb. 

Oherokee and Station Kan. 

Mttesburg, Liek Bun A Hublersbnrg. . .Pa. 



^1 




Added to 
ChorahM. 


-1 


1 


1 


8.8. 


19 


5 


8 


85 


P. 


18 


7 


4 


TO 


8.8. 


18 


10 


9 


106 


P. 


18 


4 


1 


44 


8.8. 


IS 


8 


4 


116 


8.8. 


6 


8 


1 


80 


8.B. 


18 


4 


11 


51 


P. 


8 






88 


S.S. 


18 






48 


8.8. 


111 


4 


24 


28 


8.8. 


18 


8 


8 


65 


8.8. 


7 


.. 




47 


8.8. 


18 


6 


7 


88 


8.8. 


4 




17 


• 


8.8. 


12 


8 


9 


79 


8.8. 


12 


8 


8 


41 


8.8. 


18 






6 


P. 


18 




8 


112 


P. 


18 


5 


9 


49 


8.8. 


11 


3 




9 


8.8. 


18 


86 


1« 


65 


P. 


18 


18 


6 


110 


S.S. 


4 


1 




80 


8.8. 


18 


1 




86 


P.S 


18 


8 


i 


98 


8.8. 
8.8. 


1 
8 






98 
70 






P. 


18 


13 


5 


110 


8.8. 


^ 


8 


15 1 86 


P. 


1? 


89 


18 1116 


8.8. 


18 


8 


8 


88 


8.8. 


6 


8 


8 


88 


S.S. 


10 


8 


18 


189 


S.S. 


18 


8 


18 


188 


8.8. 


18 


8 


1 


80 


8.8. 


4 


8 


8 


84 


S.S. 


18 






88 


S.S. 


tOH 


14 


6 


49 


P.S 


18 


8 


1 


95 


S.S. 


11 




5 


67 


P. 


18 


8 


8 


60 


p. 


18 


8 




78 


P. 1 18 


4 


8 


69 


P. 


18 


4 


8 


85 


S.S. 


18 


18 




80 


S.S. 


18 


6 


8 


88 


P. 


18 


6 




60 


S.S. 


11 






17 


8.8. 


4M 






40 


8.8. 


9M 


9 


4 


99 


P. 


4 


89 




880 


8.8. 


9 


14 


8 


85 


8.8. 


6 
12 






74 


P. 


18 


6 


8 


80 


P.S 


18 


8 


8 


71 


P. 


18 


14 




45 


8.8. 


18 




8 


58 


8.8. 


8 


4 


7 


T6 


P.E 


18 


90 


8 


100 


8.8. 


18 


8 




66 


P. 


18 


8 


4 


84 


P. 


18 


1 


11 


Tl 


P. 


18 


8 


4 


79 


8.8. 


6 


8 




180 



7o: 



78 

65 
50 

87 
45 



180 
75 
47 

121 
90 
90 
150 
100 
180 
180 
194 
ICD 

86: 

125 

196 
40 

148 
86 

87S 
60 
45 

180 



80r 

68 

4ir 

118 
186 
81 

180 
76- 
61 

147 
70 

51 
40 



110 

600 

40 

70 

40 
100 

80 
100 
190 
160 
110 
100 

iia 

65 
40 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



188 



ANNUAL BBPOBT OF THE 



[1890. 



MISSIONARIES. 



Wbmbt, Wiixiam son 8. 

WTOKorv, JOHH H 

Wnixm^AMMM T 

Tonro^ FsniM ou F. . . 

Toms, HnsY P. 

rouir«, 8. Haix 

Toini«, Wm. J 



YIBLD8 OF LABOR. 



Clbolo ftBd PearMll T«z. 

Oraoffe Band and Ceotre HUl Fla. 

PlneOraek, BowleT and Walkar. . . .Iowa. 
61c Haibor, RoMdale, Artondala and 

ttartim Wath . 

OalTeaton, Si. Paiira,' Geraiiui . . . .... Tax ! 

WUmlngtOB and Long B«aeh Cal. 

Dea Moinea, 6th Iowa. 



II 



8.8. 
8.8. 
8.8. 

8.8. 
8.8. 
P. 
8.8. 



II 



)l 



100 

fiO 

80 
IBO 

lis 

150 



MISSIONARY TEAOHERS. 



TEACHERS. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



II 



HowoanCHydah). 



Hoonah. 
Joneau . . 



Prof. W. A Kkllt Sitka. 

Mn. A. B. Austin 

Mioa A B. KxLSET 

MiBB Ida M. BoDOBita 

Kiss Kate A. Rankin 

Mrs. Cha8. E. Ovbrxnd 

JCzs. TiLLis K. Paul 

MlaaO. Dblph 

JCzs. M. C. DbYobs 

Mlsa Mate Bbabt 

B. B. HsNNiKO, M.D 

J. A. Shields 

H. F. Laee ' " 

Mrs.H. F. Lake i *« 

AT. SufSON I " 

WiujE Wells 

Mrs. A. T. SiMBON 

Mrs. A. B MoFarland 

Mrs. B. B. Gould 

MissC. Bakeb 

Mrs. J. W. MoFabland 

Miss D. ▲. Datib 

Mrs. B. S. WiLLARD 

Miss B. L. Matthews 

Miss Jennie M. Dunbar 

BST. B COLTMAK 

Mrs. H. COLTMAN 

L. H. BCHOLLENBBROER 

Mrs. L. H. SOHOLLENBEROER 

MissM. Clements 

F. B. McKlNLBT 

MiSB B. BOWLAND 

MissM. Wood 

Miss L. E. Cassblbbrrt 

MissB. Patterson 

Miss Clara Clat 

F. Wiedbhann 

Miss Kate Soott 

B. M. Fenton 

Miss Ella R. Short 

Miss LiZKiE E. Soott 

Miss F. Shields 

MissM. E.DeSettb 

Miss O.B. Pond 

0. M. y OORHIES 

Mrs. O. M. YooRHiHS 

Miss M. L. Allison Saat* F6 

Miss A J. Decker 



.Alaska. 



H\u\h 



Albuquerque N. Mez.! 



Islets . . . 
Bmbado. 



Isleta... 
Lagona. 
Zani 



Jemes. 



12 


. . . 


148 


148 


12 


1 


19 


1 


12 




12 




1 


12 








12 








12 








6 








8 








6 






7 






6 . 




6 




7 , 









7 1 




12 .....1 80 


80 


12 i < 




6' 1 




12 .190 




120 


12 i 






12 




25 


25 


12 








18 








12 


.... 


08 


(» 


12 








4 








4 








12 








1 








2 








5 








10 


1 




6 






10 


1 




12 


1 




12 


119 




112 


6 








2 








12 








12 


00 




90 


12 


98 


2 


25 


12 








19 


52 




62 


12 


1 




12 


82 ^ TO 


158 


4 


\ 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD OF HOXB KliilOlTi. 



189 



TCAOHXBS. 



JUm L. 8. HoMoHiOAL. . . 

][iMX.A.BirAH]r 

MimM.CBMED 

MlM M. 8. JOHM 

Xlm IL Flbmzmo 

MlM M. i>««»i**« 

MlM J. li. XXBOBBSAIT. . . 

Iftai A. D. MoNaxb 

C. B. WALsn 

Iftai A. W. FncR 

IUmM. Ii.BTBi«Br 

Bar. J. M. Whxtloos. . . . 

BlMA.M.BPBAXlfAV.... 

P. BsHDoir 

Blis M. O. Wtlub 

JUm C. a. Sloav 

Iflfli K. KmravT 

mn. N. MoC. Oabbabp. . 

lOMH.FRiSBE 

1&MI.XLDBB 

JUm C. M OBOAJf 

Blis Dkua M. H ttt. ^ 

lbs. O. R. Wnmsfl 

D.J.MRMAB 

]IImT.A.Gut 

BiM A. Bbshou 

BUS A. M. Rom 

BAjrmEi. Mabbid 

J.J.Vmi. 

BlMA^CnaaxT 

Bis. K. T. horwrr 

Panu Bmxdov 

BiM A. L. Stoops 

Bn. A. M. G&AxeBs 

Btafi M. G. Xa-rbbson. . 
BlM 8. X. ZuvBX 

J.J.TlOL 

BlMB.nL Bix>OM 

O. Bbxdok 

Jacob Xoxdbaoon 

Af^KPt T. MABflBALL 

BIbB L. 8. COLTILUt 

BteA.M.Boe8 

Bias M. 8. Brbtolb 

Bisa.L. BABXX>ir 

Bias A. A. Bx.AU 

J. 8. Cabdei<abio 

Btas J. FamajsN 

Bias A. BL Wilson 

Bias J. Obowat 

Viee A. Htboh 

ItTB. L. A. Boobbs 

Bias B. W. Ckaio 

B.W. Hau. 

Bra. B. W. Hau. 

8. y. Dii<zjrr 

Brs. M. J. DiLXST 

BlasJ.Lmx 

BIsB A. M. DuxBT 

Bn. L. T. HuoHBS 

Bias Btta Ali^h 

lUaa I. L. BooBB 

Bias Bbi<ub Bbobb 

Bias B. C. Vrbdbbioks. . . 
Bias B. F. Cau>wbll. ... 

Biss Bajbt Cbowbll 

Bias Lomx B. Lbohabd 

Bias Katvib Whitb 

BiasF.C. Bakbb 

Bn.W. B. Gamfbbll.... 
Biss&B.DBOBAfV 



Santa F6 .*. N.B« 



Jemas Hot Springs. 
LasVagaa 



Comlas 

Baton 

PajBrito 

San Luis' * Mu'Caiieiitaa.' 
LaCoatillB 



FIKLD8 OF LABOB. 



ElBlto B. 

II 

Aqua da iiobo.'. . . , 
Ago* Nsfva. . . 



Ool. 

» 

ii 
Max. 



LaaOnioas 4k CapfoUen. 



Panaaoo 

Bl Uano 

Bnenal^atB.... 

Oolandzlno 

Laa OordoTaa. 



AntOBito. 



Ool. 



Taoolate N. Mez. 



ElMoro Col. 

San Bafael ** 

Taos (FernaiMles) ....!...!...' .' N.' Max. 
' (BlBanclioa) '* 



" (Pradoda) 

Oanon Bonito * Ooate . 



Mora. 



eioriett* 

Chaperito.... 
Los Anseles. 
MaladCltx.. 



Oal. 



MontpdUar. 

Paria 

Samaria.... 
XendOB 



.Utah. 



IS 



4 



S 



77 



fiO 



88 

07 



42 

70 



M 



80 

60 
4S 
M 
81 
IS 
SO 



11 

88 

40 
66 

78 

80 



87 
40 
84 
180 



188 



87 
80 



60 



18 



88 

100 



86 

106 



48 
70 



88 
18 



46 
64 

81 
18 
80 

M 



11 

88 
40 

66 

78 

80 

68 

101 



84 

180 



188 

87 
81 
88 
88 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



I4d 



4k»%)C«l»r B^«>o«Tr6F .f**i' 



[1890. 



! . ' TEACHERS.^ 'S> ' '" 

* • ■ • I 


:i'^ Fields or labob. ' 




^1 


!1 


«3. 


Miss Carrik Nut«1Ii¥. '! 




.Utah. 

t4 
it 

it 
♦ i 

ii 

tt 
*» 

it 

ii 

ti 

44 

ti 

it 
it 

ii 

u 

it 

ti 

t4 

ti 

it 

t> 
ti 

it 

ii 

14 

ti 

ii 
*l 

it 
i« 
ti 

t4 

14 
it 
ii 
ti 
it 

tt 

it 

ti 

44 

44 

It 
tt. 


IS 
7 
5 
12 
18 
7 
8 
5 
« 
6 
8 
T 
11 
6 
6 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
4 
18 
18 
18 
18 
5 
18 
7 
6 
18 
18 
6 
18 
18 
6 
5 
18 
18 
8 
18 
12 
18 
7 
5 
18 
8 
7 
5 
12 
4 
7 
18 
18 
11 
6 
18 
18 
7 
9 
18 
18 
6 
6 
18 
7 
5 
18 
18 
18 
6 


B0 

76 
47 

8 
40 

81 
61 

«r 

82 

90 
98 

44 

86 
279 

108 

98 

86 
10 
86 
140 

90 

86 

88 


9 

81 
9 

88 

.... 
8 


m 


Miss B. R. HERffMAN 




Mrs. C. M. Parks 




Miss B.M. Knox 


75 


Iflail M, R. ITwoT 




lllas ▲. Clemrns 


HyrutzD 


49 


Miss M. FUBTCHRR 




Miss M. B. CLBKBIfS. 




M f M A NOMT.K 


tt 




Miss A. NOBLB 


WellsvlUe 

.'.-■••* 

PlesssAt Orovs 




Miss M B. Glrmrvs ? 


8 


Miss I. M. CoutTEB 


40 


Miss J. FtRBBAVQH 


M 




Mrs. H. L. Brvsh 




Miss L. B. Work 


44 




Mlw A'-TO* M T^Kr^ 


RnHnar CltV 


8t 


Miss P. J. Hart 


SsysSSue^ ::..::: ::.::::::: 


M 


Mrs. B. M. Knox 






Mrs. B. R. Batlrt 


Box Elder 


47 


Mffit A, T., Rat^.kt 


14 it . 




Miss A. MODOMALD 


Oea»» 

4t 


88 


Miss A M Whitbhead . .. 




BUss A. P. Hardlet 




Miss Clara Pierce , 


Amerioan Fork 


90 


Miss FANRIE TATLdR 


• ; 14 u 




ReT. J. A. L. Smith 


SprinKVille 

M " * *. 


114 


Miss M. H. MCCITLLOUOH 




Miss Helen L. GouaLE 




Mrs. F. C Drrm.AP 


It 




Miss L. B. Work . . 


•« 




Miss B. MURQER 


14 




Mi8sL.B. Perley 

Miss F. Dailkt 


SpaolrihFork 

41 U 

H it 


44 


Miss F. A. Perlet 




Miss F. Gould 


Soipio 




Miss M. B. Orbene 


Tf 

tt 


^ 


Miss A. F. Hamdlbt 




Prof J F. MiLLflPAUOH 


Salt Lake City, Institute 

44 14 44 ' it 
44. it ■ ii t« 
i. tt • U it 
it tt ti ti 
.4 ti • U it 
ti 14 ti ti 
44 tt tt ■ 44 

» " »' Camp Mission.. 

it 4i ti it 

it Ii 4t ii ^' 

tt tt ■ tt ii 

"•R" •■■ 


«8«> 


Miss Q. O. Wbtteman 


Miss A. L. HULBURD 




Miss B. SlMMONR 




Mrs. B. A. Dull 




Miss V. B. Bartlbtt 




Miss M. B. MooRR 




I. N. Smith 




Miss J. LwcoLN. . : 


108 


Miss 8. E. Reed 




Miss M. K. Baxrd 




Miss 1. M. CotTLTER 




Mif|i| F, T «KK 


9B 


Miss A. F. Hulburd 




Miss M. H. Abbott. 


ti 




Mrs. C. B. Sullivan 


Parson 

Toqaerrille and Parowao 


86 


Miss C. B. Sullivan 




Miss F. R. Burke. . , 


10 


Mim J, 0VRTT4 




Mrs. A. B. Blackburn 


6t. George..... 

Mt. Pleasant'." .■.■.'!".■.*.■.■.■.*. '.'.■.*.■*. 


W 


Miss N. O. Blackburn 




Mrs. C. W. LiDDELL 


166 


Miss M. OSMONOE 




Miss B. W. Miller 


ti 




Miss G. M. LarbbiT 


it 






It 




Mrs. B. N. MuRPHT 


It 




Miss F. O. Quillbn. ; 


Mantl 

tt 


90 


Miss M. B. Barrett. ... 




MlsffV Wynnr 


it 




Mfffffi n hta 


Bphralm 

Rtohileld *.;■.! ■.■.■.■.■.■.■■.*.■.'.'.■. '.'.■.!*.'. 
" ...;.: 


88 






Mlse J. A. Olhbtrad'. ... 


:**• 


iaii88L.SNoir 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD: OF, HO^jl: l|;.B,6IQ;lt8. 



HI 



TBACHBB8. 



MiasR. Hau>bum.. 

Mlas A. B. Pauobr 

MloaK. MoPbbbtkbs 

MImM. NEiuoir 

MImM.J.Oobt 

1UMK.COZ 

MImN. OWBVS 

IUm M. B. eRnmB 

Mn.M.M. Qbuk 

MlwA. Qbmkh 

Mlw G. L. AiroiLL 

]UMM.A.PAaB 

Mlw L. S. Trboop ? 

MlwCY. DoBM 

IUmM.B. MoCabthxt 

MlwMAUoir D. Gbkt 

Mn. N. J. H. NoBKAH 

MlM D. B. Lews 

W.K.lC0BBn 

Mn. W. K. MOBUB 

MJm Ada Pattbbsok 

MIm C. D. Bookwell 

Hiss A. B. Gob 

MlM M. F. Btbakokwat 

XlM Jf^H. Brbtikb 

Mn/B. 8MnH .*.'.■.'.■;;.*; 

Mia. L. B. Towx8Bin> 

W. H. Hbxvbt 

L. B. TOWMBBIVD 

B.K1110 

Geo. B. Booe 

Jom Statelet 

J. H. WlLLEON 

BeT. H. BnjjiAK 

lfl»M.J.WmTAKBB 

Min L. W. PoBflOir 

Mlta B. J. BOWLAKD 

Mtos J. If. BBOmiELL 

lllMB.aiBK>H 

MIm G. L. SOHBBIIIBB 

W. J. TBOMnoM 

Mn. W. L. MiLLEB 

MiasA.H.LoBB 

MiML.B. MOBBnOM 

MiMA. B. TBOMEOir 

MImM.G. Atwatbb 

IUM 8. B. aOBBNflBT 

IK F.B. Caleb 

MlM 8. 8. Matsu 

MImF. a. Cauu 

MlMM.MdCXBBBLL 

Mr. BU JoBBflVOM 

W. L. Sqoibb 

Mn. BU JOBNBTOM 

MImO. M. Bebd 

M1MM.B. GOVDT 

MiisM.M.OBB 

MtoaA. O. BomifE...^ 

MImB. M. Chambbbs: 

J. T. LiFPABD 

Mi« B. A. 8TBUi«nBL» 

Mn.Ii.D. LnnwsT 

MImJ. SrsnionsLD 

MiM A. M. SnnemLp 

MlM A. M. BOBBBTBCnr.'... y. 

Mn. A. B. W. BoBunov 

MteB.Coz. 

MlM G. Lw BoBimnoB 

MlMB.A.P«mB , 



GKumisoxi. . 
Parowan.. 



Btohmond... 
BeniBinln. . . . 

MUlTille 

atlTer Beef. 
Slflseton 



FIELDS OF LABOB. 



Blotafleld , UUh . 

Monroe ' 



Fainrlew. 
FillmoTO.. 



8anZ*Tler. 



S. D«k. 



Aris. 



TaUoqnah Ind. Ter. 



Blm Spring. 

ii 44 

Pa^Hili... 



K^drmiOldDwUfbt). 



PleMBQtHUl 

Bed Fork and Wealaka. 

Potaaa 

Tolaa ,,-." 



HuMocM^. 



Ii 


4 


11 


• 


96 




^ 


69 




IS 


ao 




H 


88 




4 






4 






6 






IS 


48 




)S 


46 




1 






IS 






is 


40 




IS 






.!» 


2S 


. . . . 


IS 


86 


. . . . 


6 






b 






IS 


8 


188 


IS 






IS 






u 




-- 


IS 




• 


IS 






IS 






Si 






9 






il 






g 






IB 






6 






12 


.%.. 


79 


9 






7 






•81 




IS 






18 






Id 






1 






13 


6 


SI 


w 






6 






I 






is 


60 


7 


7 , 




10 


9 




9 ISO 


SS 


I 




18 




7 • 




IS , 




}S 3S 




IS ao 




.6 " 
1? : W. 




6-\ 




^\ 




t "• 




IS 




IS 


..... 


86 


7 






-J 






>. 


J. 


; J 



U 



8IL 

86 

80 
88. 



141. 



68. 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



148 



▲HH0AL BBFOBT OT THB 



[1890. 



TKACHBB8. 


nELDB or 


LABOR 


li 


4 


g 


U 


lOiiC. A>cn«ft 


MMOOfM 


iBdtai 
tt 

M 
M 
tt 
tt 
«t 

tt 

It 

tt 

M 
tt 

t« 
ti 
tt 

l» 

tl 
U 

tt 

u 

tt 
tt 
It 
It 

t« 

it 
t» 
tt 

tt 
i* 

u 
a 

14 
tt 
<t 
It 
tt 
t* 
14 
tl 

tt 
II 
It 
It 

41 
tt 
tt 
It 


1 Tanllorf. 
It 

H 

tt 
tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 
tt 

tt 

14 
*4 
tl 

14 
14 

44 

44 
41 
4t 

It 

u 
tt 

•4 
tt 

tl 
It 
tt 

41 

• t 
11 
U 
U 
tt 
M 
ti 
it 
it 
It 

.Neteaaka. 

•t 

a 

Iowa. 

.Wlaooiulii. 
ti 

'!'.'.!'. *• 

u 

' \\[[ [ 44 

tl 


6 
7 
It 
7 
It 
7 
8 
8 
It 
It 
It 
4 
8 
6 
4 
fl 
4 
t 
t 
2 
8 
8 
8 
8 
It 
It 
6 
It 
6 
6 
It 
It 
It 
18 
7 
6 
6 
It 
8 
It 
5 


no 


88 
100 

68 
100 

6 
6 
68 

80 
60 

4 
U8 




Um C. K. FIJWIV9 


»•• 




ItluA. C. WiLLXf 


M 




H.B.Mooaf 


Hipks 

" sadLaUcii.'.. 

u tt- 
tt 




Mn. E. L. Fbutjum 




Mi». A, H. Moow 


88 


JhtAlTK B. Wtt« 

Un F. B. Wklm 

MiM E. BUE<KJT»E 




MkAt E. Q. Pattuwoh 


t« 

tt 




MtaiJ. A. WiLrai 




MIM B. a Taoinoii 


tt 




MlM L B. WisLsa 


" , 




Mr», K. Dajiiia»|i 


tt • 




W E AriAift 


WMteIn 


100 


E. H. CAitmDfatoir 


M 




Mn W. E AdaM^ 


tt 




Mn. R li. tUBKijttww 


M 




MlH r, M KLbt»., 


*t 




Mn. £. F. WCLLB 


•t 




Mill. 0, J, FlUttHAl 


*t 

t» 




MtH M. 0. AtlTiTW 




Mi»i LZXEIK CttAAtCt 




Mlw €t4aA Ckajim 




B. C. BoBv 


WkMlook 


66 


Mn. B. C. Kofts 


tt 


Mti, W, a, Rob*. . 


u 




Mli* L & . Eon 


M 




ItbH J. B. Ttotrt-KWi 


•* 




HlH C. HumritA 


tt 

" M a 
tt it 

M tt 

tt tc 

*» t» 

tt tl 

HoAlMlar 

«t 




A. Hodtma 


100 


Mn. A. DooERiD 




Mlcj U. W eo<RT 




Mill E. LAWUM.nm 

W. H . AitDvsuioii 




S. SUAWBAK 




J, M. MiiwftAU, 




E. H. l>0Ti-ii 


110 


MUi L. E. FRI1HI.LI 




Mln H. WiTiiK»ii 


It 




B. W, Saimm 


14 




Mn. 8. W^. SKAOHftu 


I 




MIm OqEA A. FlAET 


It 
8 
5 
t 
7 

>; 

It 
It 
It 
It 
It 
18 
» 
4 
8 
It 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
• 
18 
It 
18 
19 
8 


104 
47 

et 

14 
66 

80 
t 


104 


MlM A . M. Tflowaojr 


tt 




M in M. Joke*. 


u 




MlM LtlXtli Oa^BLES 


^H?*' 




MImA L Rmko 


68 


MlaiCi-iftA CtUHLXs 


ti 




Mn V. R^ KitiaffT.. 


OaMo 


88 


MtMS. K, KvioiiT 


iT* 


Bi¥. J. R. R^MiAt 


Wawota. 

tt 


68 


Mn. M, L. KAHflAY 




Ml«iM. A. Dturnif. 


M 




MImS Dato 


tt 




Ml*i£. D. Datm 


it 




J,. EtOVUlT BJlHIIIAT 


tt 




W- M4*SSALt 


tt 




BaUTSV M. duIILD* 


Pwodl 

WTnnewood 

u tt 


14 


Mt*, M. S. HoT^rBKtBg 


86 


Mn. M. C. Was*. 


no 


Ml4a M. L. Bamk 




MltiM. Q Fbitia . 




MlM Air«A Sl^EA 


SSffik... ....;: 






MIm 9. A. IknroHi«T 


84 


mit C. A. DriFOHxvrr. 


* tt 






MlM E. SntFAItB 


Harian Oout HooM 

AAfjnUa, Hone Indanrlal.. 

U 4» 
tt »» 
tt 




Uw. L. M Pii«(K 


ito 


MlH ?. StiF^m^soH 




MImB. Uwitf.. 








Mia L. A. O^iTnr 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1890.] 



BOABD or HOXB XIBSIOHS. 



148 



TSAOHKBS. 


FIELDS OF LABOB. 


"5 . 

|1 


4 


11 


u 


MteM. JOHIB 


AibeTlUe, Home lodiutrial 

•Dd 
Oakland Inttiiate. 


..N.C. 

u 

4i 
»« 

*» 
tt 
M 
*t 
»» 
»( 
II 
«l 
t* 

U 
W 

nessee. 
II 

M 
1* 
II 

It 

II 


6 

IS 
IS 
IS 
18 
• 
18 

IS 

IS 

18 

IS 

2 


79 

51 

78 


88 

e8 

90 

188 

88 

47 
89 

48 
180 

81 
85 


40 
88 

■ S* 




MtaiB. D001.T 








IOm 8. V. Stxtkib 


Conooid (Wliita Hall) 


118 


MiM W. F. PSATT 






MIm B. CASFBrriB 


• t M 




M1mM.M. MoKsnov 


(» U 




B«T. A. M. PUULTO 


Penlaod Institate 


51 


Mln BxsTtm M. MoOampbell 


BieeyiUe (Yao^lin Academy). . . 
Oakland Initltate 


78 






MiM M. Gkaham 


41 


Mln F. F. Ix>w» 


U i( 




MiM V. T. Boots, 


• i w 




MImE. V. KMinr 


«« w 






^ a 




Mtot 0. W. OABPiimE 


M a 




MiM A. B. I>wieBT 


AshATille, Day 


88 


MiM A. Bamr 


Hot Springs. ' 

Stanly Coanty, Locust Lerel. . . 

»« 44 to ik 

New Market Ten 


88 


MIm F. E. VwwomD 


98 


IOm C. F. Q-i<OTm 




MlM M. S. KSHIIIDT 


188 


MlM B. A. NbwkjlK 


u tt 






HnntsrUle 


88 


MImB. Bkowv 






Tnsenlnm 

Kismet 


47 


MiM F. M. Mabstov 


88 


MiM M. 0. RowAV 




Mn. B J. Mathm 


Washinffton GoUeire 

Grusy Oojre 

Bllaabethton.* .■.*.*.'.'."..■.■.' ."*.'.' 
Jearoldstown 


48 


Mn. 8. a. DsGabmo 


180 


MiM F. M. Mamtob 




MinW. Bamvr 


81 


Mte B. a. BAncm 


86 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



^ppE:isrDix. 



REPORT OP THE STANDING COMMITTEE ON HOME 
MISSIONS. 



The Standing Committee on Home Miasions presented its report, which was 
aooepted, and after addresses by the Rev. William Irvin, D.D., and the Rev. Henry 
Kendall, D.D., Seoretaries of the Board, was amended and adopted, and is as follows : 

He has lived a generation who has served Home Missions during the past year. 
He has witnessed onanges in populations, in possessions, in facilities for education 
and in the development of (Airistianity, which thirty years could not compass a 
century ago. The nome missionary does business without capital or collaterals ; is 
often poor and poorly supported. His thirst for books is tantalieed by the adver- 
tisement of volumes he can never hope to purchase. He frequently preaches without 
a houee of worship, without Christian and social fellowsfaip, without the aid of 
ohuroh-going habito of older communities ; but with all this God has used him in 
securing phenomenal success, for with only one-eighth of the membership of the 
Presbyterian Church he has received one-fifth of the additions the past year. 

The missionaries of the Board have gathered into the churches 17,886 souls, 
9796 of them on profession. They have organized two Sunday-schools a day for 
the entire year, and every second day a chiuroh. They have a church membership 
of 100,778, and a Sunday-school membership of 160,111, and all this is accom^ished 
at an average cost of f4S0 per minister, including aU the expenses of the Board. 
Was ever such a marvel preceded by such seemingly inadeauate causes? Tou 
cannot explain it unless you say, *' These men have been with Jesus and learned of 
Him.*' xke day is coming when young ministers wiU cease to ask, " Ought I to be 
a home missionary r^ and will say, '* May I be a home missionary P* For they will 
come to ne ^* out of Israel in abundance when they see that the Lord is with us." 

Suooeee has been all the more noteworthy, because it has prevailed in Dakota 
with its 5,000 starving families, California with a fBolure of a chief industry, and 
in Kansaw and Texas where the Oklahoma boom drew hundreds of church members 
away. 

The different sections of our country throng with interest. For instance, the 
revival of Presbyterianism in New England is a striking example. It began about 
seven years aoo. Boston Presbvtery at that time had some fifteen churches. Now 
it has thirty-four. They extend from New Brunswick on the north to Newport at 
flie south. These churches are largely composed of those who came to New Eng- 
land as Pres b yte r ians. They are located mainly in large manufacturing centres, 
and have developed a rapid and surprising strength. Their membership in all but 
two instances exceeds one hundred, and in several instances reaches nearly three 
hundred. The value of church property added to the Presbyterian denommation 
in New England will aggregate somewhere near $140,000. The membership of 
these new dburches will aggregate about three thousand. We question if any part 
of the Home Mission territory has yielded returns more satisfactory than this. As 
an illustration, some six vears aoo, a church was organized at Quincy. On last 
April it reported two hunclred and aeventy members, a Sunday-school of two hun- 
drcd and &ty, a church and a manse worth $12,500. T)ie people raised last year 
$8,100. This is no isolated instance. About three years ago the Scotch Church 
was organised in Boston. It now has an attendance of from six hundred to eight 
hundr^, a membership of nearly three hundred, and owns a house costing $37,000. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



146 APPENDIX. 

The attitade of other ohuroheA, eipeoially the OonmgatioiiBl, II friendly. One 
Congregational Chnioh gare $AfiOQ to bnild a Presbyterian Chnrdh ; others have 
helped hy endorsements and money. Onr Chnrdh does not proselyte bnt simply 
reaches and cares lor its oim* Presbyterians aie oomhig frem Sootlsad, Ireluid 
and the Canadian Provinoes, and will continue to come. We mnst provide chnrohes 
for these people, else leave them to the world, where they will be lost to erery phase 
of Christianity. 

Then, too, the work in the Indian Territory is as interesting as it is nniqne in 
character. The population truly represento the gradations of dyilisation. From 
the sayage and blaxiketod Indian of the Western reserration, through the five civU- 
ized nations to the representetives of our advanced American culture, we have there 
exhibited the successive stages of progress, and are enabled to see at a glance the 
methods of political development. Our missionsries have labored long and suc- 
cessfully there, and the prosperity, education and degree of civilisation enjoyed by 
the Indians are due solely to the efforte of consecrated men and women who have 
devoted their lives to this special work. Although their names may not be known 
as household words anumff the churches, none tridy deserve more honorable mention 
than these servante of the Master, i^o have underteken work in this particular 
field. Evente are moving rapidly in the Indian Territory. Many new lines of 
railroad are projected, which when built will give it more railroads in proportion 
than are now in Kansas. A new judicial system, with a complete code ox laws, has 
lately been provided, and with liberal provision for Indian citiienship and settle- 
ment of the land questions, it is safe to predict a speedy end to tribal autonomy. 
This means the opening of a vast region to settlement, the asteblishment of churches 
and the thorough organisation of every form of Ohristiysn Work. For this we must 
prepare, and there is no time to lose. Our churches and schools must be multiplied, 
and our brethren of the ministry must be fully reinforoed by competent educated 
men trained for Christian work. What the future has in stare for the whole terri- 
tory was illustrated by the marvelous rush into and settlement of Oklahoma during 
the past year. A wonderful transformation has taken plaoe. Where all was un- 
broken prairie one year ago, are now cultivated farms. The tente and dugoute of 
the boomers have given place to well-built homes, substantial blocks of stone and 
brick. The unorganized communities are now all members of a legally constituted 
commonwealth. AH the elemento of great progress and general prosperil^ are there, 
and Oklahoma's future is one of great promise. Here our Church has shown itself 
capable of wrestling with critical social problems, sad stands to-day as the leading 
denomination in enterprise. Every county has ito minister, sad many churches 
have been organized. Others are under way. With more ministers and liberal aid 
for the erection of churches, the Presbyterian Church will do for Oklahoma what it 
has done for Kansas and Dakota. But these axe imperative. When the Cherokee 
strip is opened to settlement there will be as great a rush as was made into Okla- 
homa. On a false report last March 20,000 men crossed into the strip from Kansas, 
to be driven out later by soldiers. What then will happen i^en the country is 
legally opened to settlement ? Our Board must be ready when the time comes, for 
it is almost impossible to recover ground lost in such a critical time. If in Oklahoma 
in the first year we have been able to organize ten vigorous churches, what may we 
not expect when a region three times as large is opened ? Twelve thousand people 
were in Outhrie two days after Oklahoma opened, 7,000 in Oklahoma City, 6,000 in 
Kingfisher. In the Cherokee strip we shsll have a dozen towns of equsl size. We 
must be ready for the emergency with a chosen corps of able ministers to organize 
the churches. 

A similar opportunity is ours in New Mexico. A general feeling of dissatisfac- 
tion pervades ^e Roman Catholics of the territory. They are looking to us for 
religious instruction. Almost every community in the territory is ready to welcome 
a minister or teacher. In the &oe of bitter persecution, many of the Spanish- 
speaking people are turning from the priesto and renouncing allegiance to Home. 
The prog*ressive spirit of American civilization has penetrated the Pueblo^ and 
New Mexico is awakenihg to intellectual, commermal and spiritual activity. 
Nowhere else is opened a wider door, and in no other region will evangelistic work 
produce more far-reaching effecte. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



APPENDIX. 147 



To thoroughly' win New Mexioo is to insore snooess in all Spanish-speaking 
oountries on this oontinent. The oonneotion is so close that efforts there are felt as 
far south as the Isthmns. Here a new departure is producing good results. Native 
teachers and oateohists are sent out who can go where our ministers cannot, and 
from these we are getting a corps of native ministers who will do a great work 
among the people. Through these and our schools we hope to reach in time every 
home in New Mexico. We say, " through our schools." We may justly regard 
them as equally important wil^ the mini^ry. In several towns, had we room and 
facilities in our schools, we- could have five hundred pupils, bri^t young men and 
women eager lor Ohristian education. In Las Veg^ and Santa F6 especially do we 
need larsre aud well-equipped buildings. In both of these places we have been 
compelled to turn away a great number of children for the lack of room. New 
Mexico must be filled with Christian schools equal in capacity with those estabUshed 
by Roman Catholics. At Las Veg^ the Jesuit school has room for three hundred, 
we can care for seventy-five only. They have good buildings, ours are adobe huts. 
So too elsewhere. This work must be pressed, even though it makes large demands 
upon our treasury, for the money thus expended will bring immediate and large 
returns 

Similar opportunities are open to us in the South. It is gratifying to notice the 
advance of the Board's work in this region, comprehending Southern Virginia, 
Western North Carolina, North and South Oarolina, Northern (Georgia, Alabama, 
Texas, Tennessee and Kentucky, popularly known as the New South. The revela- 
tions in recent years of the salubrious climate, and the exhaustless varied natural 
reeouroes for the production of wealth, have attracted millions of capital for invest- 
ment, and wide streams of intelligent, enterprising and progpressive immigration. 
So that the prospect for enlarging the BoarcPs work is imperative in its need, and 
encouraging in the cordial reception extended to its efforts. The mingling of the 
best element from the North and the best element of the South in commercial, 
industrial, civil, social, educational and religious pursuits, tends to produce the 
elimination of sectional prejudices, and the ^ew South is appearing. Accordingly 
the obstructions hitherto impeding the Board's work in the South diminish in 
gravity in the ratio of the Board's ability to produce men and means to meet the 
expanding opportunities. A hopeful evidence of this work is the organization of 
the Presbytery of Birmingham in the State of Alabama, with five churches and as 
many ministers. The organization of such work presses itself upsn the Board from 
every side, as the establishment of new towns and the enlargement of older ones 
is unprecedented in the history of the South. 

A prosperous phase of the Board's work in the South is the hopeful growth of 
the schools of the Woman's Executive Committee. They have been established at 
Asheville, North Carolina, Elisabethton and New Market, in Tennessee, and at 
numerous other points in the destitute mountain regions of the Central South, and 
they are proving a great blessing to these localities, besides laying the foundations 
for future chur^es. Your Ocnnmittee cordially recommends the mountain school 
work of the Board to this Assembly with the liope that enlarged effort may meet 
with still greater results. 

Then* too, the work of city evangelization has interesting features peculiar to 
itsell Just think of it t There are 50,000 Bohemians in Chicago. They are sin- 
gularly accessible. What might not be done, if onlv there were men to go and 
means to sustain them ? There are also 60,000 Polanders without a single Protes- 
tant missionary among them. There are 20,000 Italians. The Pope has lost thefii. 
They will follow anybody who will teach them to read. Many are becoming infidels. 
A little church organized six years ago numbers one hundred and fifty. Their 
building is too small for those that are accessible. The Scandinavians number 
75,000, and in four years four large self-sustaining churches have been built up. 
Three hundred thousand Germans have a half dozen churches. One hundred 
thousand Irish belong to the foreign classes of Chicago. Will their chains of Bui>er- 
stition ever be broken ? A similar state of things exists in all our large cities. 
City evangelization and self-protection are twin sisters, to say nothing of the 
Master's command to evangelize the world. But the cities are not alone threatened. 
Whole oounties are settled up with a foreign population. The best cotton in the 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



148 APPENDIX. 

world 18 raued in Texas, and the best cotton in Texas is raised in a strictly German 
county. In a town in that vicinity the annual public school picnic is held on the 
Sabbath ; and another town boasts that there is not a Bible in it, and that none is 
wanted. The proportion of foreigners in the West is still more marked. What 
urgency then for home missionarr effort ! 

The Northwest, what cannot be said of it ? It has all the elements of wealth. 
Much of it is unequaled as an agricultural region. Montana and Idaho are noted 
for precious metaJs, oopper, iron and great coal fields. Lumber abounds in Wash- 
ing^n and Oregon. There are vast harbors to encourage commerce, and the rail- 
ways bring hundreds of immigrants every day. Whatever is done for them must 
be done now. Seattle grew from ten thousand to twenty thousand in five years. 
Multiplied places are growing even more rapidly. Seventy-five home missionaries 
are needed in the Northwest at once. Helena has a population of twenty thousand, 
and her Protestant churches will not seat more than 1,200. " Who knoweth whether 
thou art come to the kingdom for such a time as this ?" 

Your Committee enters upon a statement of the condition of the home missionary 
treasury with mmgled feelings of astonishment and pain. They are compelled to 
look in the face a debt of 980,819.34. What is to become of the home missionaries ? 
Worse still, what is to become of the cause of Ohrist ? There are 1,880 churches, 
twenty ^ight per cent, of the whole number, that gave nothing last year to Home 
Missions. Many of them are weak, to be sure, but too many of them are strong. 
There ought to be Presbyterial oversight to prevent such n^lect of duty. 

Your Committee is of the opinion that if the churches only knew more about 
Home Missions, they would give more to Home MissiouH, and they therefore recom- 
mend an urgent effort to p ut our Church Magarine, as well as the Home Mission 
Monthly y published by the Woman's Executive Committee, into everj hand. There 
should be wide use of home missionary literature, and, better still, every preacher 
ought to crowd his work full to overflowing with the home missionary spirit. 

The Annual Beport of the Woman's Executive Committee is a marvel of business 
clearness, but the success of their work is of chief interest. In 1889, the churches 
gave 9206,895.20. In the same year the women gave 9^78,940 98, an excess on the 
part of the women of 912,645.78. In 1890, the one gave 9246,580.49, the other 
9286,627 51, an excess on the part of the women of 940,047.02. That is to say, the 
women of the Church raised last year 91^«645.78 more than the combined offiazings 
of all the churqjies, and this year 9^»^7.02 more. To be sure, they received 
950,000 in their school work from the Government, and oonaequentiy that much less 
from regular sources, but then it remains true tiiat they received it. It is &irly 
due to ueir school work that this sum was secured, and even if you throw out this 
950,000, they are then but 910,000 behind the conMbutions of we entire Church. 
But this is not all. These women have 992,000 pledged to support one hundred 
and thirty-nine teachers and six hundred scholars next year. The women get 
tiieir money by the multiplication of small offerings, together with pledged, stated 
amounts. 

Your Committee beUere that the Board^s policy of grouping churches should be 
wisely, firmly and kindlv pushed by the Presbyteries, so as to relieve its treasury 
and give the widest prooUmation to the truth. And that further great care should 
be tfl^en not to crowd into fields already sufficientiy supplied with the GospeL 

We wish to call the attention of the Assemblv to toe good home miasionary 
results growing out of the work of the Sabbath-school missionaries of our Church. 
Thev organize schools, and the schools become churches. All praise to the Board 
of Fublication and Sabbath-schod work. 

The Committee believe that the minutes of this Board are not as full as they 
ought to be. These minutes constitute the only authentic history of the work of 
the Board, but they are littie more than a record of the appropriations made b^ the 
Board, with the names of the parties to whom the money of the Board, is given. 
Thev do not bring to view, or even allude to the efforts of the Board io provide 
funds for carrying on their work. The Treasurer of the Board reports to the Board 
at each monthly meeting. The report is not recorded on the minutes. The simple 
record is *' That the report was received, approved, and ordered to be filed." There 
are no figures in the record that tell the amount of money received and expended. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



APPENPIX. 149 

Out judgment U that in the montl&ly report of the Treaanrer, the amount of money 
reoeiYed and expended should be stated and appear on the minutes, and that at the 
close of the year a statement corresponding to the hrief summary in the Annual 
Report to the Assembly should be spread on the minutes of the Board. The fact 
that all the receipts of the Board come out in the printed Reports prepared for the 
Assembly, should not interfere with a full statement of the Board's financial con- 
dition in its own minutes. 

In conclusion, your Committee would ofiEer the following recommendations : 

1. In view of the financial embarrassments of the Boards of Home Missions and 
Foreign Missions, we recommend that the churches take a special collection, to be 
equaliV diyided between the two Boards, and that where it is possible, this collec- 
tion should be taken in the month of June, but in any event, not later than the 
month of October. 

2. It is recommended that the Sabbath-schools take a collection for this cause 
during the year, as advised by the Assembly of last year, and we suggest the Sab- 
bath preceding Thanksgiving in November, as a fitting time for such offerings. 

3. The Assembly h&a hesffd with thankfulness of the growth of Presbyterianism 
in New England ; and it is recommended that they apitrove heartily of the help 
afforded to our churches there by the Board of Home Missions, and ttuit they favor 
the widest and most rapid development of our New England work that shall seem 
wise to the Board. 

4 Your Committee has examined the minutes of the Board and recommend 
their approval by the Assembly. 

5. The term of service of the following members of the Board of Home Mis- 
mona expires with this Assembly, viz. : Ministera — Thomas A. Nelson, D.D., James 
M. Imdlow, D.D. ; LayTnenr— John S. Kennedy, John Taylor Johnston, John E. 
Parsona. Their reelection is recommended. 

6. This Assembly heartily approves the efficiencv and fidelity of the Board of 
Home Missions in its work during the past year, and in order that the Board may 
effSactively carry on its work, it is hereby recommended to the churches to raise the 
sum of $900,000 for the cause of Home Missions during the present ecoleidastical 
year, and this to be additional to the special collection for the debt of the two Boards. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

H. 8. LITTLE, Ghaimum. 
A true copy. 

Wic. H. RoBSBTB, Stated Clerk, 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE. 



To the Board €f Home Minions : 

Gbntlemek: 

We present the Annual Report of the Woman's Executive Committee 
of Home Missions for the past year with earnest acknowledgment of the guiding 
hand and watchful care of that Divine Providence, responsive to whose call the 
work has been undertaken and sustained. 

A backward glance over the record of the twelve months just completed reveals 
manifold mercies, not unmixed with the trials incident to all work so far-reaching, 
embracing interests so vast and various. 

During the year three of our Vice-Presidents, Mrs. Edward Elv, of Illinois, Mrs. 
Peyton Harrison, of Baltimore, and Miss Laura Sunderland, of Washington, D. C, 
foramoat representative women, each occupying positions of great usefulness and 
prominenoe in their respective synods, have exchanged earthly service for heavenly 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



150 APPXKDIX. 

actiyities. Eminenily endowed as thejr were lor the Maat^r*B service, we rejoice 
that Qod saw fit to honor the work of oar Committee by calling' to its aid these 
women of warm heart, clear judgment and nnswerring Tojulty. Having glorified 
Him in their lives and lahor, He has glorified them by promotion to service in His 
immediate presence. 

We would call attention to the marked prosperity which has attended the year's 
work as a whole. With the dosing months of the previous year we celebrated the 
completion of the first decade of our org^anization, and entered upon a new era. So 
exceptional had been the record of progress that it was predictecl that the limit of 
advance, at least financially, had been reached for some time to come. It is there- 
fore with the greater gratitude that we call attention to the steady onward move- 
ment which is shown in nearly every department of our work. 

In the various fields, in many instances, the Mission schools have been greatly 
blessed by the conversion of pupils. We have constant testimony from those con- 
versant with the facte, that these schools are a necessary and most important factor 
in Americanizing and Christianizing the exceptional populations among whom they 
are located. It is the persistent endeavor of our devoted missionary teachers to 
secure the increased efficiency of the schools under their care. It is a matter of 
profound gratitude that while diphtheria and small-pox have ravaged many com- 
munities in which a number of the schools are located, yet not one of the mission- 
aries has fallen a victim to these dread scourges. During the yeaxs but two of ti^e 
commissioned workers has been removed by death. Hiss Lora Snow, of Utah, and 
Miss Lizzie Morrison, of Tahlequah, Indian Territory, though several faithful and 
efficient teachers have been laid aside by sickness and disease. 

One of the most encouraging features of the Tear has been the increased amount 
received from Sunday-schools. The support of this work of '* the young for the 
young " is eminently calculated to arouse the interest, and prompt the gifts of the 
youth in our Church. Eight hundred and twenty-three Sunday-schoou have con- 
tributed to our funds, and we are assured that money, which in many instances 
would otherwise have been g^ven to oljecte entirely outside the regular Muevolence 
of the Church has thus been secured for ito legitiuLato work. Believing that the 
children of the Presbyterian Church should be trained to an intelligent support of 
the work under ite care, as well as to Christian patriotism, we trust that this evi- 
dence of growing interest in the educational work of the Board of Home Missions 
is but the promise of much greater resulte to be attained in the near future. To 
this end we ask your sanction to the request that the action of the last General 
Assembly be confirmed and renewed, suggesting that each Sunday-school devote at 
least one collection during the year to tms department of work, and recommending 
the Sabbath in November immediately preceding Thanksgiving, as a fitting time 
when such offerings be made. 

Another noteble evidence of increased interest is found in the rapid growth of 
local societies and bands during the past twelve months. Last year the number 
was 3,850. This year we have received reporto from 4,257. Our constant aim is to 
enlist yet other Presbyterian women and children, whom we are assured need but 
to be informed of the work to become ite hearty supporters. 

Our publications (a list of which is herewith presented) now include many valua- 
ble and stimulating leaflete, which have been prejiared to meet the exigencies of our 
work. Many thousand copies have g^ne into circulation, and the demand is con- 
stantly inoreasinff. 

The Home Simon MorUhiy also enjoys continued prosperity. This magazine 
has never absorbed money outside of ite own income in ite publication, but has been 
a helpful agent in bringing increased funds into the treasury. As the organ of our 
work it is an important medium of communication, and has every where met with 
cordial support. 

A still further gratifying fact remains to be recorded in the advance on last 
year's receipte made by our Synodioal Societies. Kotwithstending unsurpassed 
disaster by the Johnstown flood, and though suffering from depression in ite exten- 
sive coal traffic, the noble Synod of Pennsylvania nas yet outetripped ite sister 
synods, making the handsome advance of $5,000. New York and New Jersey have 
each made an advance of (4,000, the latter synod, notwithstanding the fact that it 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



▲PPEKDIZ. 151 

has leM than one-third aa many ohiudhaa within its bounds as are oomprised within 
the larger synod, keeping pace, step by step^ with its stronger sister. Ohio, Michi- 
gan, BaLtimore, Iowa, haye also made notable adyanoe ; nor is this inorease oonfined 
to the synods enumerated, but the entire list of the twenty-six synods which are 
organised for our work, with but three minor exceptions hkye each increased the 
amounts which they paid into our treasury oyer those of the preceding year. Could 
any better token of loyalty and faithfulness be called for ? 

It ffiyes us great pleasure to state that the total amount receiyed for the year 
was •&7,d41.89, exceeding the reoeipte of the preyious year by |17,S01.2d This 
adyanoe, we are assured, is due not only to greater generosity and actiyity, but 
indicates increased derotion and prayer, tnus aflbrding eyen deeper cause for praise 
and gratitude. In this reyiew of the year it must not be forgotten that we entered 
upon its work with a deficit of $97,000 ; a large portion of this amount was at once 
met by self-denial offiBrinffs— eyery coin weighted with a prayer and a promise — and 
the entire sum would undoubtedly haye been realised from this source alone but for 
the Johnstown disaster, which thrilled the whole country with its apalling magni- 
tude, and absorbed botii the sympathy and beneyolenoe of all Christian people by 
its oyerwhelming claims. 

Haying closed the preyious year with a deficit, in entering upon the work of the 
past year, in conference with Hhe oilloers sad members of the Home Board the whole 
field was carefully gone oyer, station by station, and the expense of carrying on the 
work estimated, together with probable reoeiptS) that thus all debt might be ayoided 
if possible. Some months after this careful plan of the work was made, and the 
obligations inyolyed assumed, we were requested to take charge of seyeral mission 
stations among yarious tribes of Indians, which had heretofore been carried on by 
the Foreign Board. In compliance with the policy and sentiment of the Church at 
large, aa yoioed in preyious instructions of the General Assembly, adyising that all 
the work among the Indians should be conyeyed to the Home Board as rapidly as 
possible, we did not feel justified in refusing the work. Aside from this unexpected 
and unplanned for work, we haye not only pud oB the $27,000 deficit of the preyious 
year, but haye met all our obligations, for, thonffh on iiie day when our books closed 
lor the fiscal year there was a balance of $1^031, against the educational work, 
delayed funds pledged for the support of teacher's salaries and scholarships haye 
since reached our treasury, which, with some other sum% reduce the total to about 
the anaonnt incurred in taking this transferred work. We feel tiiat in assuming 
this work in compliance with express adyioe and action of the Home Board, we shall 
be abundantly sustained, and timt the embarrassment of funds occasioned thereby 
will be but temporary, and all obligations be speedUy met. 

In order to secure as much certainty as noasible to our income, we haye obtained 
pledged salaries from societies and indiyiduals of one hundred and thirty-nine of 
our mission teachers, amounting to oyer $61,000. We haye also pledges for the 
support of six hundred scholarships, two hundred and seyentir of these haying been 
•eoured during the past year, the pledged funds from scholarships amountmg to 
oyer $81,000. 

Trusting that the year upon which we aie now entering is as big with blessing 
as it is bright with promise, we assure you of the continued readiness of the 
Woman's Executiye Committee to coOperate with the Board of Home Missions in 
the important work of making this a truly Christian land. 

Onr summary for the year is as follows : 

Schools. Teachers. Pupils. 

Indians 88 164 2264 

Mormons 87 90 2874 

Mexicans 82 67 1627 

South 16 88 1218 

"ll8 868 7478 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Mbb. D. E. finks. Secretary. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



152 



APPENDIX. 



TREASURER'S ANNUAL REPORT. 



Mrs. M. E. BOYD, Tkbabubjbr, in account with the Woman's Ezboctivb 

Committee of Home Mibsions of the Pbesbttbrian Church. 
J>r. Or. 



April l-ToBaUnoe 

Synod of Atlantic . 



$100 68 



•» 


Baltimore . . 


8,888 18 


** 


Catawba. . . 


14 60 


«t 


Colorado.... 


8,054 00 


** 




1468 08 


** 


DUnols 


18,998 59 


'* 


TTt4i*ffla . . . - . 


7,108 08 


*' 


indian Ter . 


1S4 05 


'* 


Iowa 


6,888 6? 


»i 


Kansas 


2,114 78 


•* 


Kentaoky... 


1,47S64 




Miohigan... 


631TT9 


" 


Minneaota 


5,468 60 


'* 


Missouri.... 


4,166 57 


*' 


Nebraska .. 


1,518 56 


»4 


New Jersey.. 


17,441 18 




New Mezioo. 


9840 


•* 


New York . . 


61,880 54 


u 


North Dak.. 


108 98 


ii 


Ohio 


19,608 88 


** 


Paoiilo 


1,881 70 


u 


Pennsyl'a... 
SoQthl>ak.. 


48,460 19 
810 51 


t» 


Tennessee.. 


801 66 


kl 


Texas 


948 68 


»♦ 


Utah. 


814 51 


'* 


Wisconsin... 


1,487 04 




. 196,8W 17 






$887,948 48 


X890. 




April 1— To Balance 


$467 47 



April 1— By Board of Home Mis- 

sions $802,500 00 

Board of Freedmen.. 26,147 87 

Salaries, Printing, 
Mite Boxes. Ac $398 04 

Specials paid to mis- 
sionaries, fto 9,086 10 

Balance 467 47 



/ 



/ 



$881,948 48 



New York, May 14th, 1890. 

I have this day examined the aoooonts and youohera of Mrs. M. E. Boyd, 
Treasurer of the Woman's ExeontiTe Committee of Home Missions, and I find the 
same oorrect. 

ADAM CAMPBELL. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



THE 



FIFTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS 



OF THE 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



IN THE 



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 



PRESENTED TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY, MAY, 1890. 



NEW YORK: 
MISSION HOUSE, 53 FIFTH AVENUE. 

1890. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

1880-1891. R. R. Booth, D.D., C. H. Parkhurst, D.D., Rev. W. R. 

Richards, Edward Wells, Esq. ; Messrs. G. S. Coe and 

D. R. James. 
1889-1892. W. M. Paxton, D.D., J. D. Wells, D.D., Rev, J. Balcom 

Shaw ; Messrs. E. M. Kingsley, Alexander Maitland, 

and John Sloane. 
1890-1893. Charles K. Imbrie, D.D., George W. Alexander, D.D., 

Joseph R. Kerr, D.D. ; Messrs. Henry Ide, Warner Van 

NORDEN, and D. W. McWilliams. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

jOHS D. Wells, D.D., President. 

Mr. William A. Booth, Vice-President. 

John C. Lowrie, D.D., -| 

Frank F. Ellinwood, D.D., I ^ . 

Arthur Mitchell, D.D. , | ^'^^^** 

John Gillespie, D.D., J 

William Dulles, Jr., Esq., Treasurer, 



Letters relating to the Missions, or other operations of the Board, may be 
addressed to any of the Corresponding Secretaries, 53 Fifth Avenue, New 
York. 

Letters relating to the pecuniary affairs of the Board, or containing remit- 
tances of money, should be sent to William Dulles, Jr., Treasurer, same 
address. 

The Church at Home and Abroad contains a large amount of Foreign 
Missionary matter. It is the organ of all the Boards ; price, one dollar a 
year ; published by the Board of Publication and Sabbath-School Work, 1334 
Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Penn. 



Woman's Work for Woman and Our Mission Field, published monthly, 
under direction of the Woman's Foreign Boards and Societies, at 53 Fifth 
Avenue, New York. Price, 60 cents a year. Address orders as above. 



Children's Work for Children, published monthly for the Woman's 
Foreign Boards. Price, 35 cents a year. Address, 1334 Chestnut Street, 
Room 25, Philadelphia, Penn. 



Form of Bequest. — The Board is incorporated by an Act of the Legislature 
of the State of New York. The corporate name to be used is — The Board of 
Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United Slates of America. 



Certificates of Honorary Membership may be had on the payment of 
thirty dollars ; and of Honorary Directorship on the payment of one hundred 
dollars. 

Pr«M of Edward O. Jenkins' Son. 20 North Willianrt St, N«w York. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



ACTION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

AT SARATOGA SPRINGS, NEW YORK, MAY 21, 189O. 



The Report of the Board of Foreign Missions, and the manuscript 
volume of its Minutes for the year ending April 30, 1890, were pre- 
sented to the General Assembly at Saratoga Springs, May, 1890, and 
were referred to the Standing Committee on Foreign Missions. The 
Committee consisted of — Ministers: David J. Burrell, D.D., Josiah 
Kittredge, D.D., Edward H. Curtis, D.D., Henry S. Butler, D.D., 
William S. Marquis, John M. Allis, Wellington J. White, Thomas 
Tracy ; Ruling Elders : Alfred Hand, James D. Thornton, Moses 
W. Dodd, Franklin Dye, Richard E. Bryan, E. R. Paine, M.D., and 
Sydney B. Davis. 

On Wednesday, May 21st, this Committee reported to the Assem- 
bly, and, on its recommendation, the following action was taken : 

1. That the Minutes of the Board, which have been examined and found in 
order, be signed as approved. 

2. That the election of new members in accordance with the action of the 
last General Assembly, authorizing the enlargement of the Board from fifteen 
to twenty-one, be ratified ; the new members being as follows : Joseph R. 
Kerr, D.D., Rev. William R. Richards, Rev. John Balcom Shaw, Edward 
Wells, Esq., Messrs. Alexander Maitland, John Sloane, and D. W. Mc Will- 
iams. 

3. That the retiring class of the Board be re-elected, as follows : Charles K. 
Imbric, D.D., George Alexander D.D., Joseph R. Kerr, D.D.. Rev. William 
R. Richards ; Messrs. Henry Ide, Warner Van Norden, and D. W. Mc Will- 
iams. 

4. That in answer to an overture from the Presbytery of Washington City, 
asking that the simultaneous meetings be held in some other than the first 
week in November, the General Assembly recommend that such meetings be 
held hereafter during the first week in December. 

5. That in response to overtures from forty-seven Presbyteries, asking for 
the appointment of a Field Secretary, the Board be authorized to find a suit- 
able man at the earliest moment, and appoint him for a period not to exceed 
three years, provided a sufficient sum shall be privately secured to meet his 
salary for that time. 

6. That in answer to "an overture from the Presbytery of Lima, protesting 
against the appointment of a Field Secretary, we refer to the foregoing answer 
10 overtures from forty-seven Presbyteries petitioning for such apoointment, 
as a necessary adjunct to our present working force. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



2 ACTION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 

7. That with reference to an overture from the Presbytery of Lima, requesting 
that the North American Indians be taken from under the control of the Board 
of Foreign Missions and placed in charge of the Board of Home Missions, an- 
swer be made that a gradual transfer has been going on for several years ; that 
special reasons exist in cases where such transfer has not been made, and that 
the further adjustment of the matter may safely be left to the two Boards, in 
accordance with the action of former Assemblies. 

8. That we congratulate those godly women of the Church, who, during the 
past year of depression and retrogression, have not suffered their zeal to abate, 
but have opened their hearts and hands more largely than ever to the blessed 
work of evangelizing the earth, and that we invoke the divine blessing upon 
them, praying that they may be able to do yet more and more abundantly for 
the upbuilding of the kingdom of Christ. 

9. That we urge a wider circulation of our magazine— The Church at Home 
and Abroad. The people are derelict for lack of knowledge. It is of the ut- 
most importance that every family in the Church should be informed as to the 
work going on in missionary fields. 

10. That we counsel our Sessions to see that due attention is given in our 
Sabbath-schools to the work of Foreign Missions, and that the children be en- 
couraged to contribute generously, aiming at a sum total of not less than $50,- 
000 for the current year. 

11. That we suggest to our people, that, so far as practicable, their contribu- 
tions for benevolent causes should pass through the regular and appointed 
channels of the Presbyterian Church. Without reflecting, in any wise, on the 
worthiness of other causes, we venture to urge that always, but certainly in 
the present exigency, our prime duty is to furnish an adequate support to our 
own. We should refuse all generous diversions until we shall have redeemed 
our moral pledges to our own Boards. 

12. That the Monthly Concert of Prayer for Foreign Missions, or some 
similar service, should be maintained in all our churches, as affording a suita- 
ble opportunity for a presentation of the claims of the various mission fields, 
to the end that an intelligent and prayerful interest may be taken in the work. 

13. An annual collection uken upon a single Sabbath should not of itself be 
considered a discharge of duty in any church with reference to the support of 
the Foreign Missionary work. If this were its only dependence, the great en- 
terprise must languish. We, therefore, recommend the subscription plan, or 
the systematic pledge plan, to be used in connection with the plate collection, 
in which every member of the Church shall have an opportunity to give. 

14. That, in view of the present emergency, a special collection be taken in 
all the churches on some Sabbath in June, if practicable ; if not, certainly not 
later than October, and that all the undesignated contributions made at such 
time be divided equally between the Home and Foreign Boards. 

The following additional resolution was adopted : 

' Resolved, That this Assembly pledges itself to do all it can to secure $1,000,- 
000 for the Board of Foreign Missions the coming year, and authorizes the 
Board to make its appropriations in view of such an income. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



FIFTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT. 



In presenting its Fifty-third Annual Report to the General 
Assembly, the Board of Foreign Missions would gratefully 
recognize the continued blessings of the Great Head of the 
Church upon its work and the continued interest in its pros- 
ecution which He has inspired in the hearts of His people. 

The Board has suffered an unusual number of losses from its 
force during the past year. On May 22, 1889, Rev. James P. 
Wilson, D.D., who had been a member of the Board since the 
Reunion of the Presbyterian Church, was called to his rest 
after a brief illness, leaving in the Board and throughout the 
Church a deep impression of the sincerity and earnestness of 
his character, and of the depth of his missionary interest As 
pastor of the Park Street church of Newark, which had been 
organized by his effort, and of which he had been the only 
pastor, he had greatly endeared himself to his people as well 
as to the members of his Presbytery and to the whole com- 
munity in which he lived. His interest in the work of the 
Board of Foreign Missions was cherished to the very last. 

On October 26, 1889, Hon. Hooper C. Van Vorst, a Judge 
of the Superior Court of New York, died very suddenly, en- 
tailing a great loss upon the Board, of which he had been for a 
number of years a member and a legal adviser. As an elder in 
the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian church, as an active laborer in 
Christian work, as a man of strong faith and prayer, as a safe 
and wise adviser always interested in every hopeful sign of 
progress, he had rendered himself trusted and beloved by all 
the members of the Board. . 

On December 28, 1889, Robert Carter, a name well known 
throughout the Church and the country, was called to his rest 
at the age of 82. He had been a member of the Board since 
1843. He was one of the supporters of the Board from the 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



4 FIFTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT. 

time of its removal to New York, and its adoption by the Gen- 
eral Assembly of the Presbyterian Church. He had been a 
large contributor to the Board, as well as a safe adviser 
in its counsels. His gifts were also extended to every 
form of missionary and charitable work. Though very quiet 
in his bestowments, it has been a matter of surprise to many, 
even of his friends, to learn the aggregate of his gifts and the 
proportion thereof to his means. Mr. Carter was pre-emi- 
nently a man of prayer, in the closet, in the home, in the Board, 
and in the ecclesiastical meetings of the Church. His faith 
and spirit of supplication were elements of power in the Board 
and in every form of Christian enterprise. 

In accordance with the action of the last General Assembly 
authorizing the enlargement of the Board from fifteen to 
twenty-one members, the following have been chosen, and their 
names are submitted to the General Assembly for its ratifi- 
cation : Joseph R. Kerr, D.D. ; Rev. William R. Richards ; 
Rev. John Balcom Shaw ; Edward Wells, Esq. ; Alexander Mait- 
land ; John Sloane ; D. W. McWilliams. 

Mr. William Dulles, Jr., entered upon his duties as Treas- 
urer of the Board June 4, 1889, and his administration has 
been found eminently satisfactory. 

During the year the Board sent Rev. Arthur Mitchell, D.D., 
on a tour of inspection among the Missions in Japan, Korea, 
China, Siam, and India. He was accompanied by Mrs. Mitchell, 
and visited first our missions on the Pacific coast. Thence 
proceeding to Japan, he made a very thorough survey of the 
missions in the Japanese Empire, then in due course the mis- 
sion at Seoul, Korea, whence he proceeded to North China. 
Though experiencing great discomfort on account of the ad- 
vance of the season and the difficulties attending the close of 
navigation, he was enabled to visit the Pekin Mission and to 
return to Chefoo in time to meet the brethren of the Shantung 
Mission at their annual meeting, at that place, — a meeting 
memorable in the history of the mission. The missions of 
Central and Southern China, and also the Siam Mission (not 
including the Laos), were visited in turn, but owing to great 
prostration Dr. Mitchell proceeded direct from Singapore to 
Aden, being obliged to pass by the India Missions. He arrived 
in Syria on the 29th of March greatly in need of rest and re- 
cuperation. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



FIFTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT. 5 

General health has characterized the year in most of the 
missions under the care of the Board, though there have been 
some sad losses. Rev. William Calderwood, of the India 
Mission, died May 22, 1889, after a long term of service. Rev. 
C. DeHeer, long a faithful and successful missionary in West 
Africa, died October 20, 1889, at Clifton Springs, N. Y. Miss 
Addie C. Ramsay and Professor W. T. Findley, both of whom 
contracted yellow fever on their passage, died in the Republic 
of Colombia, — Miss Ramsay at the home of her sister in Bar- 
ranquilla, and Professor Findley on a river boat upon which 
he had taken passage for his mission field, — Bogota. The un- 
timely death of these two young missionaries just at the thresh- 
old of their field of labor, has impressed not only the Mission 
and the Board, but the whole Church. 

The year has been marked by great events, some of which 
have affected the mission fields occupied by the Board. The 
peaceful revolution in Brazil completes the list of Republics 
in Central and South America, and it has been followed by a 
proclamation of religious liberty to the very fullest extent. 
The auspices under which the mission year opens are brighter 
than those of any previous period in the history of Brazil. 

In Japan a Constitution has been adopted, but at the same 
time there have been some symptoms of reaction against the 
advanced ground which had been taken with respect to foreign 
treaties. Meanwhile an intense intellectual activity is being 
developed, and whatever may be the relations of Japan to for- 
eign countries, the tide of civilization cannot be stayed. The 
missionary labor of all Boards and Societies has continued to 
prosper, and Japan is to-day — as it has been for two decades — 
a mission field of wonderful promise. 

The famine in the Shantung Mission has been followed, as 
was anticipated, by a greatly increased readiness to receive 
the message of the Gospel. The hearts of the people have 
been touched by the manifestation of sympathy shown by the 
missionaries and by the Christian Church in all those coun- 
tries which they represent. At the mission meeting held at 
Chefoo in November, over a thousand inquirers were reported, 
in the different districts of that province. 

The total receipts of the Board during the year have been 
$794,066.44, distributed as follows : From churches, $291,719.86 ; 
from Woman's Boards, $280,285.51 ; from Sabbath-schools, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



6 FIFIY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT. 

$36,062.56; from legacies, $112,877.68; from miscellaneous 
sources, $73,120.83. The Board necessarily feels no little de- 
gree of apprehension in view of the fact that while its work 
must of necessity grow, and that in every direction and in 
every department, its receipts from all sources have fallen behind 
those of last year. Among the obstacles which prevent an in- 
crease are the limitation of resources and ability on the part 
of certain classes of givers, and the disposition of many to turn 
from the regular and systematic lines of work under the care 
of the Board to various objects outside of the Church. 

On the other hand, the work on the field has been for the 
most part encouraging. In Japan, North China, Laos, Persia,* 
Syria, Brazil, and in the Indian tribes large accessions have 
been made, while in some other fields the gain has been small. 
The Board cannot but be impressed with a sense of great re- 
sponsibility in the administration of this widespread and varied 
work, embracing all the forms of Christian effort as they are 
known at home, and it can only trust that the Spirit of God 
may quicken the prayers of the Church and arouse a universal 
feeling that the responsibility of so great an undertaking rests 
upon every one who has named the name of Christ. The 
Board would express the hope that pastors and sessions 
will feel called upon to assume In their measure a part 
of this responsibility, and to teach the churches to feel that 
the work is theirs. It also hopes that Standing Committees of 
Presbyteries will use every exertion to bring the subject before 
the congregations within their respective bounds, to assist 
and stimulate the work of women, and to keep the matter ever 
fresh before the Sabbath-schools, that by so doing the interest 
and the efforts of the young may be kept in close sympathy 
with those lines of mission work which are undertaken by the 
Church as such. 

The Board would renewedly express its thanks for the faith- 
ful co-operation and generous contributions of the Woman's 
Boards of Missions. A large number of Sabbath-schools also, 
whose example is worthy of universal imitation, have gener- 
ously responded to its needs. 

In accordance with a recommendation of the General As- 
sembly the officers of the Board sent out a circular to the 



* As th& Report g:oes to press cheering news comes from Peisia of a great revival and 
nearly 400 conversions. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



FIFIT-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT. 7 

Presbyterial Standing Committees on Foreign Missions, urging 
the importance of more systematic methods of gathering gifts 
for this cause. Many churches and a few Presbyteries have 
adopted the plan of aiming at a fixed amount of contributions, 
and with good results. Several individuals are supporting 
each a missionary on the field. Numerous circulars have been 
issued during the year setting forth the needs of the work. 

XIB8IONABIB8 8BNT OUT IN 1880-1890. 

Missions in Mexico- 

Rev. and Mrs. H. W. Brown, returning. 
Mrs. J. M. Greene, " 

Miss Mabel Elliott, " 

Miss Ella De Baun. 

Mission in Colombia. 

Rev. and Mrs. M. E. Caldwell, and children, returning. 
Prof. W. T. Findley. 
Miss Addie C. Ramsay. 

Mission in Brazil, 

Miss Mary P. Dascomb, returning. 

Rev. and Mrs. G. A. Landes, and children, returning. 

Rev. and Mrs. T. J. Porter, and children, reappointed. 

Rev. and Mrs. Jas. B. Rodgers. 

Rev. W. E. Finley. 

Mission in Syria. 

Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Jas. S. Dennis, returning. 

Rev. O. J. Hardin, returning. 

Miss Eliza D. Everett, " 

Rev. and Mrs. W. Scott Watson. 

Missions in Persia. 

Rev. Dr. and Mrs. J. H. Shedd, returning. 

Dr. and Mrs. J. P. Cochran, and children, returning. 

Mrs. D. P. Cochran, returning. 

Miss G. Y. Holliday, " 

Rev. and Mrs. J. N. Wright, and children, returning. 

Rev. and Mrs. J. L. Potter, and children, " 

Miss M. W. Greene. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



FIFTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT. 



Miss Adeline Hunter. 
Mary J. Smith, M.D. 



Mission in Lass. 



Dr. and Mrs. J. W. McKean, and child. 
Miss Nellie H. McGilvary. 

Mission in Korea. 

Dr. and Mrs. H. N. Alien, reappoinced. 
Rev. S. A. Moffett. 
Miss S. A. Doty. 

Missions in China, 

Rev. J. C. Garritt. 

Miss E. F. Lane. 

Rev. and Mrs. H. V. Noyes, returning. 

Rev. R. M. Mateer, " 

B. C. Atterbury, M D., 

Rev. and Mrs. W. O. Elterich. 

Rev. and Mrs. C A. Killie. 

Rev. and Mrs. W. Lane. 

Rev. and Mrs. J. A. Fitch. 

Rev. and Mrs. E. G. Ritchie. 

Rev. Andrew Beattie. 

Dr. and Mrs. C F. Johnson. 

Dr. and Mrs. E. C Machle. 

Miss Louise Johnston. 

W. R. Faries, M.D. 

Miss Mary Brown, M.D. 

Miss Madge Dickson, M.D. 

Miss E. F. Bough ton. 

Missions in Japan. 

Rev. and Mrs. T. T. Alexander, and children, returning. 

Rev. and Mrs. C. M. Fisher, and child, ** 

Rev. Dr. and Mrs. J. P. Hearst. 

Miss Kate Shaw. 

Miss Helen S. Loveland. 

Miss Ella McGuire. 

Rev. and Mrs. Geo. W. Fulton. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



FIFTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT. 

Dr. and Mrs* J. C. Hepburn, returning. 

Miss Carrie T. Alexander, " 

Miss Sarah Gardner (transferred from Korea). 

Mission in Guatemala* 
Rev. and Mrs. D. Y. Iddings. 

Mission in Africa. 

Rev. and Mrs. B. B. Brier. 
Rev. W. C. Gault, returning. 

Missions in India* 

Rev. Charles B. Newton, D.D., returning. 
Rev. Howard Fisher. 

Prof, and Mrs. I. G. Gilbertson, appointed in India. 
Mrs. H. C. Velte, appointed in India. 
Mrs. J. S. Woodside, appointed in India. 
Miss Anges L. Orbison. 
Miss Caroline C Downs, returning. 
Miss Margaret C Given, ** 
Miss Jessie Dunlap. 
Miss Elma Donaldson. 
Miss Mary E. Bailey. 
Miss Sarah C. Seward, M.D., returning. 
Dr. and Mrs. W, J. Wan less- 
Miss Jennie Sherman. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AFRICA. 

Liberia Mission. 

Monrovia : Rev. Frank B. Perry. 

Brewerville : ) j^^ ^^^^ p noumoy, Prof. Alfred B. Kinff. 

V'LAY'ASHLAlfD ! ) 

Glim A, in the Vey countxy : Mr. Robert D. Kins;. 
Careysburgh : Rev. Robert A. M. Deputie. 
SCHIEFFELIN : Mrs. S. £. Nurse. 
Grassdale : Mr. John H. Deputie. 

Greenville, Sinoe : Rev. David Frazier ; Mrs. J. D. Cranshaw, at outstation of 
Wamey. 
Little Bassa : Mr. James P. Hemdon. 
JOHNSONVILLE : Mr. Joseph W. N. Hilton, licentiate preacher. 

In the list of missionaries few changes have occurred, but one of 
them is greatly lamented — the death of the Rev. Thomas H. Roberts. 
He died of consumption, April 21, 1889, in the twenty-seventh year 
of his age and the fourth year of his ministry. He was of the Vey 
tribe, but was adopted by a Liberian family, spent several years at 
Lincoln University, and then returned to Africa. He labored for a 
year at Brewerville, near Monrovia, and the rest of his short life at 
Glima in the Vey tribe. Here his work was marked by energy, fidel- 
ity, and considerable encouragement. His early removal by death is 
a serious loss, and is deplored by many of the Veys, by his brethren of 
the Presbytery, and by all who knew him. His young widow returned 
to her family in I^iberia, with the sympathy of her friends. 

The usual works of preaching and teaching have been followed 
down to the dates of the station reports, at the end of last December. 
The missionary work in this field is conducted under the supervision, 
not of a Mission, but of the Presbytery ; and from its minutes, Decem- 
ber iith-i4th, the following statistical returns are taken as to the 
membership of the churches : 

Added on Added by Whole 
Examination, Letter, Number. 

Monrovia .. 53 

Clay-AshUnd 3 z 51 

Brewerville . . 18 

Careysburgh i 4 15 

Beadle Memorial, at Grassdale. a8 

Marshall , . 16 

Schieffelin .. 35 

GreenviUe, Sinoe . . 93 

3 5 308 

The brethren mourn over the want of apparent fruit from their 
labors among these churches. Even special services of united churches 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AFRICA — LIBERIA. 1 1 

in Monrovia for a time were followed by no additions to the comniim- 
ion ; but the seed sown may yet spring up and yield even a hundred- 
fold. The churches of Brewerville, Beadle Memorial, and Marshall 
are supplied by the ministers of other churches under the direction of 
the Presbytery, and the communion services are regularly maintained. 

It is encouraging that two new church edifices have been built, one 
at Careysburgh by the labors and sacrifices of the Rev. R. A. M. Dep- 
utie and his congregation ; the other is at Johnsonville, on the Mesu- 
rado River, about twenty miles north of Monrovia. The latter is 
worthy of special record. It was built by a Lit>erian gentleman, Mr. 
H. W. Witherspoon, a resident of Johnsonville, who deeded the church, 
all complete, and four lots of land, to the Presbytery. This |;ood gift 
was gratefully acknowledged by that body. No regular religious ser- 
vices preceded this liberal act, but the donor can see bright prospects 
already of useful results from it, both among Americo-Liberians and 
aborigines. It is expected that a church will soon be organized at 
this place. A school under the charge of Mr. Hilton has been opened. 
He has been lately licensed by the Presbytery as a preacher, and 
while teaching he will continue further studies for the ministry under 
the direction of the Rev. F. B. Perry. The Presbytery committed the 
care of the church in Monrovia and the proposed church at Johnsonville 
to Mr. Perry for the present, with the assistance of Mr. Hilton at the 
latter place. 

The Board would not pass from this brief report of the churches in 
Liberia without again referring to the apparent want of spiritual power 
in so many of them, as shown by the statistical returns. And the hope is 
expressed that both ministers and elders, aided in prayer by all the 
communicants, may be enabled to wait upon God for His blessing in 
(ar greater measure. By His favor, in their earnest use of the ap- 
pointed means of grace, they themselves may rejoice in their progress, 
and their friends in this country will be encouraged in their support, 
as co-laborers for Christ. 

Schools. 

Clay-Ashland 94 

Schieffelin 56 

Grassdale sa 

Mt Tabor— Mrs. II. E. Nurse 10 

Careysbuigh 24 

Greenville— oatstation at Warney, Mrs. J. D. Cranshaw , ao 

Glima 4 

Little Bassa 13 

Johnsonville 19 

26a 

Of these scholars, 71 boys and 49 girls are of Americo-Liberian 
parentage; and of native tribes — ^Vey, Congo, Bassa, andYano — 12 a, 
of whom 22 are girls. 

The usual quarterly reports from these schools have been of varied 
interest The Vey school at Glima was virtually suspended by the 
death of Mr. Roberts, and his assistant is not likely to remain there. 
It must wait for a new laborer adapted to its need. The school at Little 
Bassa, opened last year, do«B not seem to be making progress. The 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



12 AFRICA — LIBERIA. 

Warney school was somewhat interrupted by the illness of the teacher, 
but was resumed with some degree of encouragement. The other schools 
seem to be useful, and the Clay-Ashland Academy, under Prof. King's 
charge, reports a larger attendance of scholars than can be well accom- 
modated. The Grassdale school also seems to be doing well. In general, 
common schools in Liberia can receive but little support from the Gov- 
ernment, owing to its very limited pecuniary resources. Missionary 
Boards may well extend aid to schools of this kind, when it is within 
their ability. Even though the instruction be of the simplest kind — 
that of teaching to read, write, and cipher — ^it is not in vain ; especially 
when it always includes prayer and Scripture lessons by the mis- 
sionary teachers. Seed is Uius sown which will bear good fruit for 
both worlds. 

The growth of our missionary work in Liberia has not fulfilled the_ 
expectations of the Home Church in its earlier years, and yet both the 
churches and schools there established have never been left without 
proof of the divine blessing. But both churches and schools have not 
become strong and self-supporting, after over fifty years since the first 
missionaries were sent to that countiy. Probably this slow progress 
was owing in part to the change of policy, in sending or supporting in 
this field only persons of color. For fifteen years white persons almost 
solely were available. And of sixteen men and women eight died. In 
a number of instances, especially in the first years, this mortality was 
clearly owing to the want of knowledge as to proper climatic care. 
But the experience gained in over forty years after the change of policy 
does not seem to show that the later policy should be followed too 
closely ; out of twenty-three men seventeen died. Several of these 
men, however, were not very young when they became connected with 
the Board. 

It may not be wise to make too much of these statistics ; but on a 
general survey of the field, it would apparently be advisable to send, 
if they could be obtained, a few well-qualified white ministers, and they 
would no doubt be warmly welcomed by our brethren in Liberia. 
Young people there are of fine promise who ought to enjoy the ad- 
vantage in their own country of good education — a Seminary for girls, 
and a Theological Hall for young men who have been in Prof. King's 
Academy at Clay-Ashland. In both cases industrial advantages should 
be available. It is evident that the higher Christian or evangelistic edu- 
cation required cannot now be obtained. The Liberia College, so 
called, does not provide it, as this institution is now located, and under 
its double administration, if not also for other reasons. Experience 
seems to show, further, that it is not expedient to send young persons 
to this country for their education ; most of them go back in some 
respects ill-adapted to the work waiting for the right laborers. This 
is not peculiar to Liberia. Such is the usual result in other mission 
fields. Our ministers and their wives must generally be educated in 
their native country, 

Liberia contains about 20,000 Americo-Liberians, and probably 
several hundred thousand aborigines of the negro race, of different 
tribes and remnants of tribes. Eastward of Liberia a large popula- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



GABOON AND CORISCO. 1 3 

tion, it is believed, is becoming accessible to missionary enterprise. It 
is now evident that the former small number will not be largely in- 
creased, for various causes which need not here be stated. But is it 
not also evident that a great evangelistic work is set before these few 
thousand Christian people ? I^et them become consecrated to it and 
qualified for it. The Board would gladly aid them in further prepara- 
tion for this work for Christ, and then for engaging still more actively 
in its service. And this feeling and purpose, it ^els sure, will meet 
with the approval of the Church in this country toward its mission in 
Liberia. ''Who hath despised the day of small things?" 

Gaboon and Corisco Mission. 

Baraka : on the Gaboon River, near the equator, lo miles from the sea ; occupied as 
a station, 1843; transferred from American Board. 1870; laborers— Rev. and Mrs. W. 
C. Gault ; French teacher, H. E. Presset ; Captain of *' Nassau," Mr. Peter Menlcel ; JRev. 
Nta&a Truman^ and one licentiate. 

/» tkis country: Mis. W. C, Gault, Mr. Peter MenkeL 

Angom : above Nengenenge, on the Gaboon River ; occupied as a station, i88z ; la- 
borers — Rev. and Mrs. Arthur W. Marling, Mrs. T. Spencer Ogden ; French teacher, M. 
Lesage. 

In tMs country : Rev. and Mrs. A. W. Marling. 

Corisco : 55 miles north of the equator, and from 15 to ao miles from the mainland ; 
occupied as a station, 1850 ; laborers— ^^. IHa F. Ikenge and four native assistants. 
Outstation at Mbiko, on the mainland, opposite Corisco. 

Benita : 9a miles north of Gaboon ; occupied as a station, 1864 ; laborers— ^^. 
Frank Myongo; 8 male and 3 female helpers. Six outstations. 

Jn tkis country : Mrs. C. DeHeer and Mrs. Louise Reutlinger. 

Bataroa : 75 miles north of Benita ; occupied as a station, 1875 ; laborers — Rev. and 
Mis. B. B. Brier and five male helpers. Four outstations. 

Kangwe : on the Ogowe River, ijo miles from the sea, or 90 miles direct ; occupied 
as a station, 1876 ; Rev. and Mrs. Adolphus C. Good ; French assistants, M. Carmien 
and M. Gacon ; one licentiate and five male helpers. Four outstations. 

In tkis country : Rev. and Mrs. A. C. Good. ^ 

Talaouga : on the Ogowe River, 80 miles above Kangwe ; occupied as a station, 
z883 ; laborers— Rev. Robert H. Nassau, M.D., Miss Isabella A. Nassau, and one native 
licentiate. 

In this country : Miss Isabella A. Nassau. 

Two names have disappeared from the roll of this mission during 
the year, that of the Rev. Cornelius DeHeer, who died at Clifton 
Springs, N. Y., October 20th, and that of Mr. Joseph Reading, who 
has ceased to be connected with the Board. Mr. DeHeer entered 
upon mission work in Africa in 1855, and with the exception of 
furloughs for health and rest continued in active service until Septem- 
ber, 1888, when he withdrew on account of impaired health, but with 
the earnest hope of being permitted to return to his field. He labored 
first on the Island of Corisco, and afterward at Benita, on the main- 
land. His superior natural gifts, indefatigable industry, patient per- 
severance, remarkable common sense, and, above all, fervent piety 
and love for souls, made him a model missionary, and won for him the 
confidence and affection of his fellow-laborers and of the natives. 
His death has been a sore bereavement to the mission, but his memory 
is firagrant, and the work he accomplished for Christ will continue to 
tell as the years go by. Mrs. DeHeer and Mrs. Reutlinger, who 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SKETTCM' 

Showing the Stettons 

of the 

GABOON 4 C0RI6CO 

MISSION 



Dl8TJUI0e8 
OABOON TO 

CaptKitOTiM 10> 
Oofkeo lilaod «A »* 

•ENITA TO 

Bate Cbarch tSMtlM 
KyvM Chnivh V *• 

OABOON TO 
AagOB ^ tfl 

Mth,ofO Kow»^R.7B 



BaUiiica 170 

Mlh.o(OR(rv«' 
toKmncwt'' UO 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



GABOON AND CORISCO— BARAKA, CORISCO. 1 5 

accompanied Mr. DeHeer to this country, still remain, but with the 
expectation of returning to Africa in the near future. Owing to the 
serious illness of Mr. Good, he and Mrs. Good returned to the United 
States during the summer. Furloughs were also granted to Mr. and 
Mrs. A. W. Marling, and Mr. Peter Menkel, captain of the schooner 
Nassau. Meanwhile Rev. and Mrs. B. B. Brier joined the mission 
in July, 1889, and Mr. Gault, leaving Mrs. Gault in this country, 
returned to Gaboon in October. The Board has recently appointed 
the Rev. John McMillan, M.D., Rev. George Albert Godduhn, Rev. 
W. S. Bannerman, and Rev. Herman Jacot to this mission, who expect 
to sail for Africa in August. 

The Southern Field. 

Baraka Station, 

Of the five stations connected with this part of the field Baraka 
stands first in the order of occupation, work having been begun there 
by the American Board in 1842. Several causes have operated to 
retard the prosecution of effective mission work at this place. Being 
the port of entry, it feels the blighting curse of a debased and debas- 
ing foreign population. As the chief centre of mission business, the 
time of the missionary in charge is necessarily largely occupied with 
secular burdens. A change in the method of managing the business 
affairs of the mission, now under contemplation, however, and the 
probable transfer of part of the business to Batanga, will greatly 
relieve this station and permit more unreserved attention to the 
spiritual aspects of the work. In addition to these difficulties, the 
restrictions of the French Government, which still continue, are neces- 
sarily more keenly felt at the centre than at the other stations. 

The new church building, which has been in process of erection for 
some time, has been dedicated to the worship of God, and regular 
services have been maintained. In the absence of a detailed report 
of the work, which for some reason has failed to reach us in season, 
only a general statement can be made. The school under the care of 
M. Presset, has steadily increased in favor. The French teacher has 
shown himself to be a man of decided ability, and of thoroughly 
evangelical spirit. His success during the past two years strengthens 
the hope that the employment of French teachers may enable the 
mission to maintain its position within French territory, at least for a 
time. In addition to his other duties, M. Presset has rendered valuable 
service as interpreter for the mission with the Government. 

Corisco Station, 

This island station stands next in the order of occupation, and has 
been under the care of the Rev. Ibia J. Ikenge, the first convert 
baptized on the island, and who was ordained to the Gospel ministry 
in 1870. The pastor reports an average attendance of 90 at the 
Sabbath services, with twice that on communion days. Six persons 
were received on confession of faith, and five excommunicated mem- 
bers were restored. Grateful mention is made of the sustaining of 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1 6 GABOON AND CORISCO — ANGOM. 

family worship by persons in connection with the church. Ibia 
has also had the oversight of Ellobey on the mainland, although he 
was prevented by illness from giving as close attention to the work 
there as usual. One of the elders from Corisco made stated visits 
to that place, but encountered difficulty at the hands of the Roman 
Catholic priests. Ibia makes an earnest plea in behalf of the 
tribes lying back of the points visited by him on the mainland. They 
are mainly Fang and Bohaba. These tribes are now reaching down to 
the coast, and are quite accessible. They have possession of the 
Moony River and the Mbiko country, and are gradually acquiring the 
Bolingo on the north of the Moony River. At Italanromga, another 
outstation, a congregation of 44 persons is reported under the charge 
of the native laborer, Mekabeo. There are five inquirers. 

The school on the island had an attendance of eighteen boys and 
two girls. Regret is expressed that it was not possible to maintain a 
school for the girls during the year. Because of this, the two enrolled were 
taught with the boys. The work of the school combines both instruc- 
tion and manual labor — the mornings being devoted to the former, 
and the afternoons to the latter. Serious difficulty has been en- 
countered in getting parents to support their children in the school, as 
the school of the Roman Catholic priests is free to all, and especially 
to the children of Protestant parents. Moreover, in the latter . the 
Spanish language is taught, and this, in the estimation of the islanders, 
gives the Roman Catholic school a great advantage. 

Angom Station. 

This town is situated on the river Como, which unites with the river 
Bakwe at Nengenenge to form the Gaboon. Concerning this as a 
centre of evangelizing influence Mr. Marling writes: "This is a vast 
field for missionary labor. The Fang tribe is the largest and most 
energetic in this part of Africa, and there is no place more advanta- 
geously situated as a base of operations among them than Angora, 
which is central among them, easily reached from Gaboon, and on the 
outskirts of that large mountainous district through which the Fang of 
the interior roam." The withdrawal of Mr. and Mrs. Marling last 
summer left the station in the hands of Mrs. Ogden, who, with the 
French teacher, M. Lesage, has bravely stood at her post looking after 
the interests of the work. During the early part of the year the Sab- 
bath services were held as usual and regularly attended. In the judg- 
ment of Mr. Marling very decided advance has been made since this 
station was occupied in 1881, although as yet no church has been or- 
ganized. When the station was established the people were given to 
piracy and cannibalism, practices which are now rapidly disappearing 
under the influence of the Gospel. Mrs. Ogden has given instruction 
to a class of Fang women, and has also conducted the morning and 
evening prayers during the absence of Mr. Marling. Under the in- 
struction of Mrs. Ogden the children have made progress in the things 
of God, and surprised her on Christmas morning by making out of 
their poverty a gift to the Lord's work, consisting of roasted cassava, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



GABOON AND CORISCO— KANGWE. \J 

beadsy a needle (a great treasure), choice bits of food, small native 
baskets and gourds, while one brought a knife, a great sacrifice on his 
part. Mrs. Ogden makes an earnest plea for a medical missionary, 
adding: "There are sad stories to tell of the neglect of the sick and 
aged by this people. There is much real poverty and sickness. I 
think we must show them that we sympathize with their physical suf- 
ferings before they will believe that we love their souls.'* 

The school-house begun last year has been completed, and the 
French teacher, M. I^esage, has conducted a school in accordance 
with the rules of the French Government, but owing to the withdrawal 
of M. Carmien from Kangwe, Mr. Lesage has been transferred to that 
more important position. In the early part of the year Mr. Marling 
gave religious instruction to the boys, including an exercise in a small 
catechism which had been prepared in the Fang language. The mis- 
sionaries look hopefully for the reaping-time after the patient sowing 
of the past years. 

Kangwe Station, 

By order of Presbytery two churches have been organized in connec- 
tion with this station during the year, one at Wambalia, twenty miles 
below Kangwe, and the other at Igenja, some fifty miles below. The 
former was organized with 76 members from Kangwe church, and the 
latter with 52 names from the same church. In connection with the 
organization 10 persons were received on confession of faith at Wam- 
balia and 4 at Igenja. These churches are the outcome of the precious 
work of grace reported last year, and of the itinerating efforts along 
the river and in the lakes south of and connecting with the Ogowe. 
Both have comfortable bamboo chapels, built by the people themselves 
without aid from the mission. 

During the firsTsix months of the past year 65 persons were re- 
ceived on confession of faith. It is known that others have been bap- 
tized since Mr. Good withdrew, but no report of the number has been 
received. The station has been under the charge of Dr. Nassau, who 
has visited the churches at intervals and looked after the general in- 
terests centering in Kangwe. The work outside the mission station 
has been cared for largely by well-trained native helpers. 

The school under the care of M. Carmien has been well conducted. 
Fifty boys were in attendance, for whom boarding was furnished by the 
mission. The pupils were given work upon the premises, for which 
they received sufficient to purchase their books and clothing, the in- 
tention being to train them to habits of industry as well as in the ordi- 
nary branches of education. Some instruction has been given in the 
vernacular^ with the quiet acquiescence of the French Government, 
the requisition for teaching French having been fully met by M. Car- 
mien, who is a Frenchman. M. Garcon, the French mechanic sent 
out by the Evangelical Society of France, has busied himself with the 
material interests of the station. 

A new outstation has been established at Enyonga, about 80 miles 
below Kangwe, on the Ogowe, among the Nkomi people, a branch of 
the Mpongwe tribe. This work, which is under the charge of a native 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1 8 GABOON AND CORISCO — TALAGUGA. 

licentiate, is regarded as very hopeful, a number of inquirers being 
already enrolled. 

The exploring party sent out by the Evangelical Society of France, 
consisting of Rev. Messrs. Allegret and Tiesseres, very kindly stepped 
into the breach when Mr. Good was compelled by serious illness to 
leave the station, and grateful acknowledgment of their valuable ser- 
vice is hereby made. Under the instructions of the Society these 
brethren, after spending a number of months examining our work, 
both in the southern and northern fields, expected to leave in April 
for a tour into the interior, crossing from the head-waters of the 
Ogowe to Stanley Pool, thence returning to the head-waters of the 
river Quilo, with the purpose of descending that river to the sea, 
about 75 miles north of the mouth of the Congo. After accomplishing 
this tour, it is expected that the explorers will again visit our field en 
route to Paris, where they will make a report of their investigation, 
and upon the basis of that report the Society will determine what shall 
be done in the much-talked-of transfer of our missions within French 
territory. Meanwhile, it is manifestly the duty of the Presbyterian 
Church to stand by the work in the southern field, part of which has 
been so signally blessed by the Holy Spirit. 

Talaguga Station. 

Concerning the work at this station Dr. Nassau writes : " The 
aspect of my work for 1889 is more encouraging than for any previous 
year, whether viewed from the point of good health, outward prosperity, 
good conduct of the station employes freedom from difficulty with 
the natives, or their outward respect lor the Gospel." Dr. Nassau 
also mentions with gratitude that his relation with, the villages along 
the river is cordial, even where the several villages have been alienated 
from each other by local feuds. The people not only listen attentively 
to the Gospel when proclaimed in their own villages, but have also 
attended the Sabbath services at the chapel in Talaguga in larger 
numbers than in former years. Dr. Nassau has been assisted by two 
Bible-readers, who have travelled along the river from village to village 
carrying with them the word of life, rendering also good service at Tala- 
guga in the absence of the Doctor at Kangwe. Miss Nassau has con- 
tinued to give instruction to a few pupils in the Mpongwe and Fang 
languages. Concerning the Fang people, she writes : " They have now 
some knowledge of God, and they welcome and understand better the 
messengers who are privileged to carry it to them. It is pleasant listen- 
ing while they try to sing of Jesus in their own language, also to 
witness their increasing reverence in the service of prayer. Still it is 
a sad disappointment that, except those Fang who have been under 
daily religious influence, there are none who give evidence of true 
conversion, although many are impressed, and several have been 
added to the inquiry class." Miss Nassau has still continued the 
work with her hand-press, including a better edition of the Fang 
primer, the reading lessons of which are taken from a manuscript 
translation of " The Peep of Day," prepared by Mr. Good. A tract 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



GABOON AND CORISCO— BENITA. I9 

has also been printed in Mpongwe entitled, *^ What it is to Believe in 
Christ ! " Altogether four thousand pages have been issued from this 
little hand-press. 

After years of continuous service, Miss Nassau has finally consented 
to take a furlough in the United States, in anticipation of which she 
writes : " As every month and year has deepened my love for and in- 
terest in the work, it is a very heart-sore trial that a failure of strength 
compels me for a time to withdraw from it." 

The Northern Field. 

Benita Station. 

This is the most southern of the northern tier of stations, and is 
situated some forty-five miles above Corisco. A church was established in 
1865, growth along the coast being a necessity, as inter-tribal jealousies 
barred advance toward the interior. Since the withdrawal of Mr. and 
Mrs. DeHeer and Mrs. Reutlinger, this station has been in the hands 
of native laborers, including during the past year Rev. Frank Myongo, 
who, however, has been ill much of the time, so that the work has 
been seriously hindered. It has been visited once or twice during 
the year by members of the mission, but no detailed report of these 
visits has been received. The visiting brethren from Paris exam- 
ined the work here, and expressed their satisfaction. Owing to 
lack of proper supervision the boys' school was closed when the 
foreign missionaries withdrew^ and the work among the women was also 
virtually suspended, there bemg no one left capable of taking charge. 
This dearth of laborers is greatly to be deplored, as Mr. DeHeer 
withdrew in the midst of a deep work of grace, and just after a large 
ingathering. It is earnestly hoped that with reinforcements soon to 
be sent provision may be made for the proper oversight of this im- 
portant station. 

The church at Bata connected with this station was visited dur- 
ing the year by Mr. Good, under the direction of the mission. It is 
some twenty miles north of Benita on the coast. He found a 
church, ministered to by a native licentiate, consisting of ninety 
members, in good standing, with an inquiry class of about fifty. 
After careful examination a number of members were disciplined. 
The chapel, which is built of bamboo and set on posts, with a floor 
consisting of boards hewn from the trees, was packed at the ser- 
vices to its utmost capacity, from two hundred to two hundred 
and hhy 'being present. The building is much too small for the 
purpose. The people were considering the question of building a 
new onejto meet the growing demand. Morning and evening prayers 
at the mission are attended by from thirty to fifty people. The church 
is at Ekuku, three miles south of Bata, but the main part of the 
population is clustered around the factories on Bata point. Here, Mr. 
Good writes : *^ The towns are thick, the beach high and dry. Here 
is the terminus of the principal trade and travel route to the interior, 
which at this point seems to lie closer to the coast than at Batanga. 
The population is large. Counting firom Ekuku, three miles south of 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



20 GABOON AND CORISCO— BATANGA. 

Bata, to Itonde, ten or twelve miles north, there are ten groups of 
towns, and probably a population of from five to eight thousand. 
These people are wonderfully susceptible. When one considers the 
work that has been done, and the wonderful success with which it has 
met, one can't help thinking that if a man, fluent in the language •of 
the people, and full of fire and activity, could travel from town to 
town with the Gospel, thousands might be converted in a single year." 
Unfortunately, the Roman Catholics have recently established them- 
selves here, so that the usual priestly opposition may be expected. 
The French Government has a post at Bata, but little attention seems 
to be paid to it, and the opinion prevails that it will ultimately fall 
either to the Germans or Spaniards. 

Some thirty miles north of Bata is jEvuni, where a church was 
established in 1881, being a colony from Benita. The church has 
been under the care of the ruling elder, Mbai, who is also a Bible- 
reader. Mr. Good says : " Evuni is another field of great promise. 
The population is as large as at Bata and much more compact. From 
ten to fifteen miles north are eight or nine groups of Bwiko towns, 
making as many more, and on the north bank of the Campo are the 
Egara people, said to be very numerous, and among whom we have 
some members and many inquirers." A class of between fifty and 
sixty inquirers was found and two adults were baptized. Subsequently 
Ibia visited Evuni and baptized twelve more. He writes that two 
ministers are needed for that region, one for Evuni and one for the 
Egara people already referred to, as he thinks the latter ought to be 
organized into a church by themselves. Mr. Good found an audience 
of about four hundred on Sabbath morning, and at least three hundred 
in the afternoon, and scarcely fewer in the evening. The chapel is 
built on the ground, the walls being of bark ; it is without windows, 
and has two doors at each end. The people are erecting a new 
building on posts, which is already under roof. They are begging for 
a school ; not a boarding-school under the care of a white teacher, but 
simply a day-school under the care of a competent native. The mis- 
sionary expresses the opinion that a very large Benga school could be 
opened here which would cost nothing but the salary of a teacher. 
The place is teeming with children. 

Batanga Station. 

After correspondence with the Governor of Kamerun, representing 
the German Government, the Board authorized the mission to select a 
site for a permanent station within German territory, it being stipu- 
lated by the Governor that liberty would be granted to teach the 
people in the vernacular. In accordance with these instructions the 
mission by a committee selected Batanga, where some years ago 
a church had been organized, and work had been carried on by native 
helpers. A plain dwelling has been erected, and Rev. and Mrs. B. B. 
Brier have been assigned to the station. Clusters of villages contain- 
ing from 500 to 1,000 people each are found along the beach. No 
such population is to be found anywhere in that region of Africa 
except among the Fang. Moreover, the people are very impress- 



Digitized by VjtOOQIC 



GABOON AND CORISCO— STATISTICS. 21 

ible, and seem to be easily accessible to the Gospel. While at Batanga 
Mr. Good called on the German explorer, Mr. Kundt, who had just 
returned from an expedition to the interior, and was awaiting a steamer 
in which to return to Europe. He spoke very enthusiastically of the 
country and the people of the interior. If his representations are 
correct, it is evident that Batanga is the key to one of the finest mis- 
sion fields in Africa. In giving the statement of the explorer, Mr. 
Good writes : " For eight or ten days there is an almost unbroken 
forest ; then a level or gently undulating plain 2,300 feet above the 
sea level is reached, on which live a people called Yeondo. On this 
plain the forest is gone, except occasional trees and clumps. The 
whole country is under cultivation and teeming with population. Mr. 
Kundt says that along the path it is like one continuous town. You are 
never out of sight of people and houses, and the people are the finest 
he has yet seen in Africa, large, powerfully built, and fine featured. 
In fact, whenever he begins to speak of this tribe, he becomes enthu- 
siastic. The climate, as far as he can judge, is excellent. He never 
had any fever there, and the nights were so cool that he had to sleep 
under one or two blankets. If we were only ready to send some one 
in to look over that country and get the language, a splendid opening 
would probably be found, but the first step must be to occupy and 
strongly man Batanga. By that time a road will probably have been 
cut through the coast forest belt, and access to the interior made 
easier." 

During the visit of the committee five adults were baptized, while 
subsequently under Mr. Brier 33 were received into the church, 
making a total of 38 for the year. Mr. and Mrs. Brier have thrown 
themselves with great enthusiasm into the work assigned them, the 
former conducting four services on the Sabbath, including Sabbath- 
school and two week-day services, ih addition to morning and evening 
prayers; while the latter has organized a sewing-class, conducts a 
meeting for the women, instructs an inquiry class and trains a church 
choir The outlook at this station is certainly most encouraging. 

Statistics, 

Ordained missionaries 5 

Married lady missionaries 4 

Unmarried lady missionaries 4 

Lay^missionaries (male) 5 

Ordained natives 4 

Native licentiates 4 

Native teachers and helpers (male) 2a 

** (female) a 

Number of churches 9 

Communicants X1O90 

Addediduring: the year. 153 

Students, for the ministry 8 

Number of schools 9 

Boys in boarding-school* 82 

Girlsin '• • 11 

Boys in day-schools* 145 

Girlsin " * 79 

Totalnumber of pupils* 317 

Pupils in Sabbath-schools 955 

Pages printed. 4jL^^^ 

Contributions $504 

* Figiuns of last year. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MISSIONS IN BRAZIL. 

Bahia : 735 miles north-northeast of Rio de Janeiro; missionary laborers — Rev. 
A. L. Blackford, D.D.,* and his wife, and Rev. Woodward E. Finlej ; i ordained native 
assistant and a colporteurs, a outstations : i colporteur and Bible-reader. 

Laranoeiras : north of Bahia in the State of Sergipe ; Rev. J. Kolb and his wife ; 
2 teachers. 

Campos : about 150 miles northeast of Rio de Janeiro. Vacant, 

Rio de Janeiro : capital of the empire ; population, 300,000 ; occupied as a mission 
station in i860 ; missionary laborers— Rev. Messrs. John M. Kyle, James B. Rodgers, and 
their wives, and Rev, A, B, Trajano ; i native assistant, 2 colporteurs, and 2 teachers. 

Sao Pauix) : 300 miles west-southwest of Rio de Janeiro ; chief town in the State 
of same name ; population, 60,000 ; occupied as a mission station in 1863 ; mi^onary 
laborers— Rev. Geo. W. Chamberlain and wife; H. M. Lane, M.D. ; Miss EUa Kuhl; 
Rev. E. C. Pereira ; 18 teachers, and i colporteur. 

SOROCABA : 60 miles west of Sao Paulo — Rev, J, Zacharias de Miranda, 

Rio Claro : over i^ miles northwest of Sao Paulo ; occupied as a mission station in 
1873 ; missionary laborers — Rev. J. F. Dagama and wife ; Miss Eva Dagama ; 17 preach- 
ing places ; 6 teachers ; i licentiate and 1 colporteur. 

Jahu : near Brotas ; 170 miles northwest of Sao Paulo ; occupied as a mission station 
in 1868 ; missionary laborers — Rev. J. B. Howell and wife ; 4 teachers. 

Caldas : 170 miles north of Sao Paulo— ^«^. M, G, Torres; i native helper and i 
teacher. 

Campanha : Rev, B, F, de Campos ; 2 native teachers. 

BOTUCATU : 160 miles west by north of Sao Paulo ; missionary laborers— Miss Mary 
P. Dascomb and Rev. J, R, C. Braga ; 2 native teachers. 

CURITYBA : about 500 miles southwest of Rio de Janeiro ; chief town of the State 
of Parana ; missionaiy laborers — Rev. Messrs. G. A. Landes and Thomas J. Porter 
and their wives ; Rev, M, P, B. de Carvalhosa ; 2 colporteurs, and 3 native teachers. 

In this country : Rev. Messrs. J. T. Houston, Geo. W. Chamberlain and their wives, 
and Rev. D. McLaren. 

Very marvellous providences are favoring the extension of our 
work in Brazil and giving added emphasis to the earnest call for 
reinforcements. The abolition of slavery in 1888 making possible 
direct work for 2,000,000 of freedmen, is followed by the downfall 
of the monarchy in 1889, presaging religious liberty for all classes 
and conditions of men. Already at the writing of this report we 
are in possession of the text of a decree of the Provisional Govern- 
ment of the United States of Brazil of January 7, 1890, determining : 

1. That Federal and State authorities alike are prohibited to ex- 
pedite laws, regulations, or administrative acts establishing or pro- 
hibiting any religion, or to create distinctions between inhabitants 
of that country on account of religious and philosophic beliefs or 
opinions. 

2. That all religious denominations have equal right to liberty of 
worship, and to govern themselves in accordance with their respect- 

* Died in this country May 14, 1890. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BRAZIL. 23 

ive creeds without being constrained in the acts, private or public, 
which pertain to the exercise of this right. 

3. The liberty hereby instituted shall embrace not only individ- 
uals in their personal acts, but also churches, associations, and 
institutes in which they may be joined ; to all of which belongs the 
right to organize and maintain their corporate existence in con- 
formity with their creeds and polity without interference of the 
Government. 

4. That patronage with all its institutions and prerogatives is 
hereby abolished. 

5. That the legal capacity of churches and religious denomina- 
tions to acquire and administer property is recognized within the 
limit of the laws concerning mortmain, securing to each the posses- 
sion of their present properties, as well as their houses of worship. 

Thus the cloud which hung on the horizon of the Church's work 
at the organization of the Synod in September of 1888, when a bill 
for Religious Liberty was tabled in the House of Deputies, has 
been swept away by a stroke of the pen as sudden and final as 
that which proclaimed "liberty to the captive" in May of that 
same year. 

The new conditions thus created call upon the Board and the 
Church to lengthen their cords and strengthen their stakes in Bra- 
zil. Three new men were sent out to this promising field in 1889, 
but one missionary has meanwhile returned home in broken health ; 
two others are about returning on leave of absence, one each from 
the States of Bahia and Rio. 

Thus our mission force is weakened just at a time when it should 
be stronger than ever. A new departure is required in order to 
take the tide at its flood. The last General Assembly recommended 
the immediate endowment of a college at S. Paulo, and the Rev. 
G. W. Chamberlain has been laboring during the year to secure 
that end. This object if realized should prove a source of supply 
of laborers for the expanding work. Meanwhile the reports from 
the various fields occupied by our missionaries in that Repub- 
lic make it evident that there is great need of more men. The 
Standing Committee of the Synod on National Missions thus 
appeals : 

** The abundant blessings which it has pleased the Lord to pour 
out upon our Church adds to our difficulties year by year. En- 
couraging reports come to us from all sides ; our pastors, already 
overburdened, report large numbers of conversions ; new centres of 
believers are being formed, and new responsibilities fall upon the 
native church ; meanwhile the laborers increase in an inverse ratio 
— they decrease in numbers. Churches, nay more, hopeful fields 
of evangelization left almost without direction, send vain appeals to 
Presbyteries without means or men to send to them." 

Rev. Dr. Blackford, in transmitting the full statistical report, 
says: 

" In general the work is highly encouraging in the whole field. 
The results in some localities are very animating In the 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



24 BRAZIL — LARANGEIRAS. 

pastoral charge of Rev. J. Z. Miranda, who resides at Sorocaba, 
fifty-seven persons have been added to the churches under his care 
on profession of faith. This indicates a good work and the blessing 
of God. In the district of Botucatu, under the charge of Rev. J. R. C. 
Braga, thirty-five have been received. The school at Botucatu has 
prospered, though at the expense of time properly belonging to the 
legitimate work of evangelizing. He has at length been relieved 
from the care of the school. Mr. Torres, who resides at Caldas, 
has been obliged to ride fifty miles on horseback to reach either of 
his other churches. An invalid for many years, he works with 
indomitable will, and besides caring for his churches, does a great 
deal of evangelistic work. 

" The churches of Rio de Janeiro and S. Paulo have their own 
native pastors supported by themselves. In educational work they 
receive aid from our mission. 

" The number received in the Brazil Mission churches on profes- 
sion, 270, is about eleven per cent, of the membership of the pre- 
vious year. In the matter of contributions the statistics show an 
encouraging increase. The total reported for the year ($12,640.61) 
is an average per member of $4*74. The average of the previous 
year was $4.06. 

** One of the saddest features of the statistics, says the field re- 
port, is the small number of candidates for the ministry. Our 
table of statistics shows but three ; but by combining this with the 
statistics of the Presbyteries, we find six in connection with our 
mission's work, or one for every 444 members." 

The illness and withdrawal of Mr. McLaren interrupted a valu- 
able course of instruction to a class of young men contemplating 
the ministry, but not yet received by the Presbytery of S. Paulo. 

Larangeiras, 

In the State of Sergipe, which lies about 10 degrees south of the 
equator, Rev. J. B. Kolb and wife are laboring at Larangeiras. 
Mr. Kolb writes : " The past year of labor in the Sergipe field was 
one of continued encouragement. The year began with a fierce 
persecution at a distant point, but which has not hindered the work 
of the Lord. Later, in June, at another point the great enemy was 
disposed to shed the blood of those who would preach Christ, but 
was hindered. For these trials we thank the Lord, as they have 
taught us * to look to the hills from whence cometh our help.* " 

At the different points where there are believers, they forsake not 
the assembling of themselves together ; they enjoy and profit by their 
mutual study of the Scriptures. They deny themselves to furnish 
their meeting-places. At Larangeiras, which is the central point, 
the attendance was good throughout the year. Sabbath and day 
schools were continued. Here is an open door for a Christian school, 
for which we should have a thoroughly well trained teacher. The 
prospects for the year on which we have entered are good. With 
the altered condition of the country, we hope to have greater free- 



Digitized by VjtOOQIC 



40 GwCTrtch 3 

r^C E A R a7 /Xtxi'sobte « 




No. 91. Botucatd. 
" SJI. Tatuhv. 
•• «i. Guarfny. 
*' S4. Rio r.'ovo. 
•« S5. Rio I>ardo. 
** St. Itapettnlnsa. 
" 97. Kaxinai 
•< w. Caldaa. 
" t9. Machado. 

m. CampanluL 

81. Borda da Matte. 

S9. Cabo Verde. 

13. Areado. 

U. Cann Verde. 

85. Qutro. 

8«. Coiytlba. 

ST. Campo Larsro. 

18. Ouarapua^a. 

n. Rio Grande. 



Digitized by 



Google 



26 BRAZIL— BAHIA, RIO DE JANEIRO. 

dom and access to the people. Two new men and a lady teacher 
are needed. The State of Sergipe has a population of 250,000. 
Three men could have each a natural division of the State. 

The church in Larangeiras now numbers 70 members, of whom 
II were added during the year. Of Sergipe, Dr. Blackford writes : 
" The little work done there has been signally blessed. It ought to 
be reinforced at once." 

Bahia, 

Immediately south of Sergipe lies the important State of Bahia, 
at whose capital Rev. Dr. Blackford has had the assistance of the 
native minister, Leonidas da Silva, during the year. He was joined 
by the Rev. W. E. Finley Sept. 23, 1889. Two colporteurs have 
labored in Bahia and Cachoeira during the entire year, and a third 
was employed in December to itinerate in the interior of the State. 
The want of a lady missionary or Bible-reader for the city of Bahia 
is strongly urged by Dr. Blackford. He writes : " Through the 
colporteurs and other agencies there were put in circulation during 
the year 41 Bibles, 76 New Testaments and 31 portions, 403 volumes, 
and 22,000 tracts. Various articles were published in the daily 
press." He mentions some cases of conversion through this means, 
and adds : '^ I have reason to believe that there are many others 
scattered about through the great expanse of the State of Bahia, who 
are inquiring for if not walking in the way, into which they have been 
led by a copy of the Divine Word or a tract." The attendance at 
worship in Bahia improved after a better hall and a more suitable 
location had been secured, but the want of a permanent place prop- 
erly equipped for worship is still a serious hindrance to progress. 
'' The immediate outlook has never been so fair, nor the urgency 
for the more active prosecution of the work so manifest as now. In 
the city as well as through the interior, the leaven is permeating the 
mass, and fruits will erelong be gathered in." There is urgent need 
of a school, and an urgent call for laborers in general missionary 
work. Dr. Blackford reports an addition of 5 members during the 
year, and a total of 51 communicants. 

Rio de Janeiro. 

This field contains more than a million of souls. Outside the city 
ours is the only mission at work for the 800,000 people in the State. 
A large unoccupied field lies to the north in Minos and Espiriio 
Santo containing a population of 2,000,000, for which we are not 
able to do anything. It is in the centre of the country and is the 
most densely populated part of Brazil. A strong plea comes from 
Rio, as from the other stations, for more laborers to enter the open 
field. Rev. J. M. Kyle was aided in the work at this station by the 
Rev. F. J. C. Schneider a part of the year. The Rev. James B. 
Rodgers went out in July, 1889, The latter writes : ** Mr. Kyle has 
struggled on alone for four years without any other missionary of 
our Board here. He is secretary and treasurer of the mission, one 
of the editors of the Imprensa Evangelical and pastor of two or 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BRAZIL — RIO DE JANEIRO. 2/ 

three churches. .... I am sorry to say that Mr. Kyle has not been 
well. He needs change, and must have it if he is to work on in the 
future." 

Mr. Kyle, in his report, says : " The church in Rio has continued 
to pay the pastor^s salary and all its expenses, amounting to more 
than two thousand dollars. It is the largest Protestant church in 
the city, is in a central and prominent position, and the services are 
well attended. The pastor's whole time is required by the congre- 
gation and the preaching services. There is need in this great city 
of something like a McCall mission. The conditions which prevail 
in Paris prevail here. It would be a great blessing if preaching 
halls could be opened for nightly services for a class of people that 
cannot be otherwise reached." 

The Imprensa Evangelica was transferred in October, 1889, from 
S. Paulo to Rio, where it yas first issued in November, 1864. It is 
the oldest religious newspaper in Brazil, and has had subscribers 
during the year 1889 ^"^ ^ of the twenty States of the new Republic. 
The Central book depot is at this station, demanding no inconsid- 
erable part of a missionary's time and attention. The need is felt 
for a larger expenditure in providing evangelical literature for Bra- 
zil. A greater variety of religious books should be offered to the 
growing church, and its youth attracted by the excellent character 
of the literature offered to them. Nine persons were added to the 
church in Rio by profession, and two by letter from other churches. 
Losses by death, removal, and suspension equalled the accessions, 
leaving the same number as last year. 

The churches of Ubatuba, Campos, Petropolis, Rezende, and 
Nitheroy are supplied from Rio. 

Ubatuba is 150 miles south on the coast. The church numbers 
about 80 members, and is growing, although it has never had a pas- 
tor. An elder from Rio has served it the past year, while acting as 
Bible-reader. Thirteen members were added to the church in Feb- 
ruary. 

Campos is still without a pastor, and the large field around it still 
uncultivated. 

PetropoiiSy 30 miles north, has enjoyed public services but once a 
month. 

Rezende has also suffered from the in frequency of visits. It is 140 
miles west on the S. Paulo R.R. Its population is 4,000, but it is 
the centre for more than 30,000 souls. 

Nitheroy is across the bay from Rio. Religious services have 
been held there twice a week and are well attended. 

Dr. Blackford says of these churches : " The policy of having but 
one member of the mission at Rio, and he being charged with the 
treasury, book-work, etc., made it almost impossible to give any 
proper attention to these points. Campos is a place of very great 
importance, and centre of a large and growing district. Its church 
is still without a pastor, and must be cared for from Rio. Rio de 
Janeiro, not to speak of the ciiy itself, with 300,000 inhabitants, gives 
easy access to one of the most inviting fields of labor, the Parahyba 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



28 BRAZIL— SAO PAULO. 

valley, full of towns and traversed by railroads, waiting and calling 
to be evangelized." 

Sao PaulO' 

We have no mission report from the church in the city of Sao 
Paulo, for the reason that it has ceased to be a mission church and is 
DO longer dependent on the Board. But we learn from other sources 
that this first year of self-support has been one of prosperity, tem- 
poral and spiritual There were added to the church 41 persons, 
while sixteen were lost through death and dismissal. The manse for 
the pastor was completed and occupied. The salary of the pastor 
did not exhaust the liberality of the congregation, which while 
building a manse has continued to contribute freely to many causes 
outside of congregational, more especially to the fund of National 
Missions^ They report a total contribution of $4,500. Much is 
due to the zeal and wisdom of the capable pastor, who, besides 
preaching the word faithfully to his congregation, has continued to 
edit the monthly Review of National Missions^ which circulates 
widely among all the churches of the Synod of Brazil, stimulating 
all to aim at independence of missionary aid, by systematic offer- 
ings. He has also rendered efficient service to the mission by 
teaching the class of students looking to the ministry, since the 
withdrawal of the beloved McLaren through ill-health. He writes 
to the former pastor, Rev. Mr. Chamberlain : 

*' Pardon the delay in giving you news of this flock, which for 
many reasons should be very dear to you. In the multitude of 
labors I have to neglect many duties, but the Lord will not allow 
this weakness to reach the point of forgetting my brethren before 
the throne of grace. Your prayers for this church have been 
heard, thanks to the goodness of our Father, since He has given 
us many motives for encouragement The general contribu- 
tion to the fund of National Missions^ during this year, so calamit- 
ous for Brazil, was $5,775. The work progresses, thanks be to 
God. The presence of a devoted minister to direct the young men 
is of urgent necessity." 

The Rev. Mr. Waddell has been appointed by the Board to this 
important field. • 

The Schools. 

These have continued to grow under the efficient direction of 
Dr. Lane and his helpers, until 395 pupils were in daily attendance 
at the close of the year : 318 Brazilians ; 21 Americans ; 16 French; 
13 Italians; 12 Portuguese, and 15 other nationalities. The full re- 
port we have of this part of the work says : " The Lord has been 
pleased to bless the work in S. Paulo more abundantly in all of its 
branches than ever before in its whole history. Both of the board- 
ing-schools and the day-schools have been full to overflowing, and 
many pupils have been turned away (from want of room)." .... 
" Fair progress has been made in the matter of preparing text- 
books suited to the improved methods of teaching, chiefly in the 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BRAZIly— RIO CLARO. 29 

primary and intermediate departments This is at once the 

most important and difficult work in the schools." 

A Manual Training-shop has been in operation for the boys of 
the boarding-school, who devoted twelve hours a week to this ser- 
vice. " The result has been even better than was anticipated. The 
boys show a far better comprehension ot their studies, and take 
higher stand in their classes than do boys of the same age and rank 
who have no work." ....** Manual labor as a branch of legiti- 
mate school work, besides imparting the skill to turn the hand to 
useful labor, aids powerfully in giving habits of attentiveness, exact- 
ness, accuracy in observation, and self-reliance. It sharpens the 
perceptions and develops the senses A sense of responsibil- 
ity is developed ; method and system are soon seen in all of the 
boy's life." This justifies the moderate investment that has been 
made, and would warrant extension. 



Rio Claro. 

The work at this station and the outstations of Araraquara, Piras- 
sununga, and Pinhal has been under the direction of Rev. J. F. 
Dagama, who reports : 

** The outlook is very encouraging all over the field, but it is too 
large to do justice to the cause. I have in the Rio Claro church 
5 preaching places ; in S. Carlo de Pinhal, distant 40 miles, 3 
preaching places ; Araraquara, distant 70 miles, has 9 preaching 
places ; Pirassununga, distant 40 miles, has 9 preaching places. The 
additions to these 4 churches during the year were 24 ; total number 
of communicants, 209; pupils in 7 schools in this field, 112." 



BrotaSy Jahu^ Dous Corregos. 

Rev. J. B. Howell, with residence at Jahu, reports 11 outstations, 
a total church membership of 317, of whom 20 were added during 
the year. There are 3 schools, with 56 pupils. Mr. Howell says : 

** I have continued monthly trips to the six most important points 

in my field, visiting the remaining five quarterly During the 

year I have instructed the two candidates for the ministry under 

my care Both are exceptionally good preachers, and as 

elders have shown themselves well qualified for pastoral work. . . . 
The farm-school closed with an attendance of ten boarders. The 
boys have shown themselves diligent and ready to work, and have 
made good progress in their studies." 

This school is suspended at present for lack of a proper head, as 
Mr. Howell is preparing to return to the United States. The mis- 
sion at its meeting in August, requested the Board to send out a 
man to take charge of the educational work in connection with the 
farm-school. It is hoped that a proper man will soon be appointed 
to the field. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



30 BRAZIL— RIO GRANDE DO SUL. 

Curityha^ Parana^ 

The absence from this station of our only missionaiy in the Prov- 
ince of Parana has deprived us of any formal report of the progress 
of the work there, which has continued under the care of the native 
pastor, Rev. M. P. B. de Carvalhosa. Dr. Blackford says of this 
field : 

^' Curityba, Castro, Guarapuava, and Caropo Largo were last year 
wholly under the care of Mr. Carvalhosa. He seems to have been 
diligent and abundant in labors, which were signally blessed of the 
Lord, as fortyrfour were added to those churches on profession of 
faith. A school was also begun in Curityba. This field has hap- 
pily been reinforced by the arrival of Mr. Porter and the return of 
Mr. Landes. The work there involves long and weary journeys on 
horseback. Would that all our other fields could be as liberally 
reinforced in proportion to their relative importance as Parana has 
been, although there is urgent need for more even there." 

Rio Grande do SuL 

Mr. Menezes has charge of the church of Rio Grande, and is our 
only representative in the important state of Rio Grande do Sul. 
At least two more men ought to be sent to that field without dela^. 
Mr. Menezes is not strong, and it is not well to leave him alone m 
so large and important a field. He feels keenly the loneliness of 
his position, and longs for some one to aid him in the work. 

The large cities of Porto Alegre, with 50,000 inhabitants ; Pe- 
lotas, with 25,000 inhabitants ; Jaguarao, Bage, and others would 
welcome earnest preachers of the Gospel, as was verified in the visit 
of Mr. Chamberlain to those cities in 1887. 

The State of St. Catherina, which is yet to be occupied, 
showed the same disposition on occasion of his visit in 1888. The 
field is white and the laborers few. 

This report should not be closed without calling attention to a 
fact which must deeply impress every careful reader, viz., that the 
chief accessions have been made to the churches which are under 
the charge of native pastors. The lesson of the report is in this 
respect most striking. 

There could not be a stronger illustration of the importance of 
training up a ministry on the ground. Other things being equal, a 
foreign missionary can never reach the masses of the people like 
one who is of their own blood, of their own habits of thought, and 
especially of their own mother tongue. 

In Mexico and other Spanish-speaking States, as well as in Bra- 
zil, the most effective preaching is done by native preachers. 

As a measure of success therefore, as well as of economy, the 
work of higher education should receive constant and assiduous 
attention. The college or training-school at S. Paulo, under the 
care of Dr. Lane, should be put in complete working order, and 
should be an object of earnest prayer on the part of the churches. 



.Digitized by VjOOQIC 



%!^%;s;!;:bs'si'::*8£ &^ Mi^& s s s« s^:: ^c^zis s s ?o «^ o.o.^o> » n 



No. and date of orga- 
nization. 




;«;5 2 252^5 o^aiSi^y^'sS § 5r!{i5 g^'&'&sis'a s,8ii3l»3S 



• sa Mw o O.CB* -^ t 



I M OB^ CO 



I In la • • Ol ^ l> O Cn Oin U* W 0» • **U» OO 






8 :!'S'3'&5'5'S5«.3"85»$± ff^a'&'g S«.^ ^ 'S ^ 5^ t: ^"S &%^'S'2 S'S'Sv^ 



Received from begin- 
ning. 



Received on profes- 
sion, 1889. 



Received by letter, X889 



No. in full communion, 
X889. 



(A 

H 

> 

H 
1—1 
en 



n 

CO 

o 
w 

> 



C/) 

l-H 

o 



00 

vO 



X* MW o <*«• ^ 



I W M ft» M • • I 

I M M M e»i^ 00* • K 4 



t>^ M • OOCd U b 



m • • w 00 



Adults baptized, 1889. 



tt'aoi m«mu>w • M^ M e»^ M-«k o\ 



I To*.* • l>«4l}4kS^* 



M OOinVt • l/i OOt 



Minors baptized, 1889. 



Candidates for the 
ministry. 



: : 9: : 5^: .5: 8: : : ?: : : : : o.: : : :^t: g: t: : : S^ 



Pupils in Sunday-schMs. 



No. of schools. 



W> • • •>• MV'MH* 



Teachers in ditto. 



•.^. . .OB- k»M< tt u« • ••• 



T . . , yj Q^^ ^ 



Pupils in ditto. 



8i"S 



I M ^ I «4 M * O 

: SSI'S i 8*5: 8. 



8c?8- 8 



;i58^8^3S^3:55t.* 






35 S'&S'S 8^:5 8 8. * 8^8 



Congregalional.l 



•SoS*<o* o«''S'^8« S' 
S8«2?: a: 82 'S«'&: S* .* 



: !^;:';:'8'8;8 8 88 8<S: 8<S8 



Missions. 



8:^: : g: :^: :u«%*JSo: * •• 8- 
%': 8i : 8- :K: i 85il8: i-grstl: :^ 



"S: 8: 



'SS: • 88 



Miscellaneous. 



8S8JS:a2'SS8 8tt5»:'g8«?8 8 85'- 3 Bird's 'SS 8,2 8 'Si! : 8'S8 



Ul« wu> 






Total. 



Average per 
men^r. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MISSION IN CHILL 

Valparaiso, the chief seaport of Chili : Population, 120,000 ; laborers— Rev. Messrs. 
W. E. Dodge, J. F. Garvin, and their wives. Rev. Mases Bercoritx, Seven outstations, 
including Constitudon, where there is an organized church. 

Santiago, the capital of Chili, lao miles southeast of Valparaiso, with which it has 
railroad connection: Population, 200,000; laborers— Rev. Messrs. S. J. Christen, J. 
M. Allis, W. H. Lester, Jr., and their wives. One licentiate. Six outstations, including 
Linares, where there is an organized church. 

In this country: Rev. and Mrs. J. M. Allis. 

CONCEPCION, near the coast, about 300 miles south of Valparaiso, connected with 
Santiago by railroad : Population, 20,000 ; laboiers — Rev. and Mrs. W. B» Boomer, 
Rev. Francisco Jorquera, Eight outstations. 

CopiAPO, about 400 miles north of Valparaiso : Population, 15,000 ; laborers — Rev. and 
Mrs. W. H. Robinson. Six outstations. 

Two or three steps have been taken by this mission during the year 
indicating substantial advance, and promising permanent benefit. In 
accordance with the policy of the Board, as set forth in its manual for 
missionaries, an effort has been made to magnify the Presbytery (of 
which the foreign missionaries are members) by committing to it the 
work of publication hitherto managed exclusively by the mission. 
The Chilian members of the Presbytery appreciate this mark of con- 
fidence, and have made a number of suggestions looking toward 
economy and enlargement. Should this experiment prove successful, 
it is intended to entrust other parts of the work to the Presbytery. 
The year has also been signalized by the installation of the first 
Chilian pastor, the Rev. Francisco Jorquera, who was called by the 
church at Concepcion, one-third of his support being pledged by the 
church. By authority of the Board an effort has been inaugurated for 
the securing of a permanent home for the Instituto Internacional, a 
lot having been purchased for that purpose, and steps taken to secure 
the necessary funds for the building. This has been done under the 
profound conviction that Christian education is of the first importance 
in the evangelization of Chili, and that the need of a permanent home 
for the Instituto is imperative. 

Valparaiso Station, 

This city with its five outstations, under the care of the Rev. J. F. 
Garvin, deals mainly with the artisan class. The report divides the 
population into four classes : the common peon, or day laborer, who, 
as a rule, can neither read nor write ; the artisan, who is usually able 
to do both ; the clerks and shopkeepers, and the higher class of pro- 
fessional men, owners of haciendas, mines, and commercial houses. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHILI. 33 

Our mission reaches some of the third class, but rarely if ever touches 
the fourth. In the estimation of the mission this is not a serious 
drawback, as it is believed that the hope of Chili lies in the middle 
class. 

The church in Valparaiso has suffered by the withdrawal of Mr. 
Vidaurre from connection with our mission, and his establishing of an 
independent church, which drew for a time from the regularly organ- 
ized church. A thorough overhauling of the roll has reduced the 
number of communicants to 99. Five were received during the year 
on confession of their faith. The Sabbath-school is regarded by Mr. 
Garvin as the most encouraging department of the work. The corps 
of teachers, drawn from the English community and our own Spanish- 
speaking church, is spoken of as faithful and efficient. The attend- 
ance on the school has been excellent, and the contributions, con- 
sidering the poverty of the scholars, have been large. The Union 
Church (English-speaking) continues to render valuable service to the 
mission, while its pastor, Rev. W. E. Dodge, as heretofore, gives much 
of his time and strength to the work. 

Of the outstation Melon the report says : " The work at this hacienda 
is encouraging. Pedro Moysan, an aged miner, came to a knowledge 
of Christ about four years ago ; and, aldiough dependent on his children 
for support, has dedicated himself to the preaching of the Gospel. 
He gathers the children of the hacienda in his room, and with the aid 
of his invalid wife teaches them a little reading, arithmetic, and writing, 
but above all insists on the study of the Bible and catechism. The 
school has from 12 to 18 scholars. He also holds a Sabbath and 
week-day meeting which many of the neighbors and parents of the 
children attend. At these services there are from 12 to 30 in attend- 
ance. Several names from this district have been proposed for mem- 
bership, and the work is growing and extending in spite of the petty 
persecutions of the parish priest." 

At San Felipe services have been suspended for the present,' owing 
to the removal of several of the strongest supporters, and the Elder 
who had charge of the work. 

The Quillotta Churchy with 19 communicants, has been in charge of 
Mr. Cortes, an elder of the Valparaiso church, a man of earnest 
spirit, but without sufficient training to do effective work. Mr. 
Cortes reports a number convinced of the errors of Rome, but not 
willing to throw off the yoke. He notes a decided falling off in the 
attendance on Roman Catholic processions, and a waning of the power 
of the priests. 

At idira regular services were maintained by Mr. Garvin with an 
average attendance of a score or more. It is known that several are 
interested, and it is expected that some will confess Christ in the near 
future. 

The work in Consiitucion^ where there is a regularly organized 
church, has languished, although supplied during the year by an 
ordained minister. Rev. Mr. Bercovitz. A serious mistake seems to 
have been made in re]X)rting the membership of this church hereto- 
fore, as it is stated that there are but six members in full communion. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



34 CHILI— SANTIAGO. 

The most effective work done by the preacher has been in a school 
which was conducted with the approval of the mission, numbering 
forty pupils, 32 boys and 8 girls. 

The Escuela Popular^ a day-school for girls and boys, supported 
largely by tuition fees, reports a successful year^ with a roll of 222 
children. A marked gain has been made durmg the year in the 
punctuality of the pupils, owing perhaps to a rebate of twenty-6ve 
cents per month in tuition to those who attend promptly. The report 
says : ^* The school is organized as a distinctively Protestant institu- 
tion. The opening exercises each morning are religious. Bible-classes 
are held twice a week, and the whole atmosphere is Christian." At 
the closing exercises a number of prominent Government officials 
were present, and expressed their gratification at what they saw and 
heard. The Valparaiso papers in reporting the exercises commended 
the school for its instiuction and discipline. The mission sets such a 
high estimate upon the character of the work done here, that it is very 
anxious to have a new primary department opened in another part of 
the city, conducted on the same general plan. 

The Sheltering Home, which throws the arms of Christian love 
around indigent children, has had an uneventful year. Nineteen 
children have been cared for. This institution is under the general 
direction of our mission, although it is supported mainly by subscrip- 
tions in Valparaiso, and the receipts for board and lodging where there 
is ability to pay. 

Santiago Station, 

The Santiago Union Church, composed mainly of English-speaking 
foreigners, by an arrangement with the mission has been supplied by 
Mr. Allis during the year, the church being responsible, as formerly, 
for part of the salary. This arrangement is continued by the Board 
under the belief that it is advantageous to the general work of the 
mission. 

The year opened full of promise for the Spanish-speaking church in 
this capital city of the .Republic, six services being held weekly, in- 
cluding a Sabbath-school in the chapel. The work, however, was 
suddenly arrested by the destruction of the building by fire on April 
26th. After an unsuccessful effort to rent a room near the centre of 
the city, it was determined to occupy the chapel. This being located 
in the outskirts, the attendance was greatly reduced, but through the 
generosity of English and Spanish friends in Santiago (especially those 
connected with the Union Church, who contributed $5,600 gold), the 
amount of insurance realized, and a gift by the Board, a new church 
is well advanced, the lower room of which will probably be occupied 
by the time this report reaches the Assembly. Notwithstanding the 
peculiar difficulties under which the church has labored six persons 
publicly confessed Christ, and four were received into the church by 
letter. 

• The outstations, Talca and Linares, were both visited by Mr. Lester 
three times during the year. In the former it has been found impos- 
sible to gain a foothold during these flying visits. Nothing short of a 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHILI— CONCEPCION. 3 5 

resident missionary, or a well-equipped native laborer, is likely to 
accomplish anything in this large and influential town. The church at 
Linares has been under the care of a licentiate, who has recently 
withdrawn and returned to Germany on account of ill-health. But 
little growth is manifested here, owing, it is believed, to the inefficiency 
of the person in charge. 

EducaiionaL — The Instiiuto Iniernacional x^^ort^ a roll of i6i boys, 
of whom 50 were boarders, with an average attendance of 98 day pupils 
and 45 boarders. The instruction given in this school is of a good grade, 
and is most thorough. That the Government sets a high estimate upon 
the institution is evident from the fact that it has recently granted the 
privilege of a special examining committee who came to the school, and 
there examined the pupils who wished to enter the University, a privilege 
granted to but seven of the twenty-eight private schools in Santiago. 
It is thoroughly Protestant, and is the only Protestant school of this 
grade in the country. The atmosphere of the school is religious, and 
is becoming more and more so every year. In addition to morning 
and evening religious exercises, preaching services are held on Sabbath 
mornings, and a Bible-class in the afternoons. At these services the 
boarders are required to be present. The parents have now and then 
objected to their children being compelled to attend religious services, 
but when informed that this was an essential part of the curriculum, 
they have permitted their sons to remain rather than deprive them of 
the superior advantages of the school. Reference is made elsewhere 
in this report to the effort now being put forth to secure a permanent 
home for this deserving institution. 

Two students completed their course in the Theological Seminary 
under Mr. Allis, and were licensed to preach by the Presbytery, one 
being assigned to work in Valparaiso, and the other in Copiapo. The 
course of study pursued by these young men is excellent, and by the 
Divine blessing calculated to equip them well for their work. Another 
student, while pursuing the higher branches taught in the Instituto, 
recited also in the seminary. Several young men have applied to be 
received into the seminary during the coming year. 

Concepcion Station. 

The field covered by this station embraces fifteen cities and towns 
with large populations, and easily accessible from Concepcion by rail 
or steamer. Up to this time, however, the work has been confined 
chiefly to the main station, where there is a regularly organized church 
under the care of the Rev. Francisco Jorquera, who has been installed 
pastor during the year. Mr. Boomer, the foreign missionary in charge 
at this station, entered upon his work a year ago, but has devoted most 
of his time to the study of the language, having visited but four of the 
outstations. It is his purpose soon, however, to organize a system for 
visiting the neighboring towns, assisted by a student, and as far as pos- 
sible to establish regular monthly services. The church at Concepcion 
is reported as united and aggressive. Twelve persons were received 
during the year on confession of faith, and four by letter, making a 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



36 CHILI — COPIAPO. 

substantial addition to the working and spiritual force of the church. 
In addition to regular Sabbath services a Friday evening service has 
been held, and also a weekly sewing society. The pastor has held 
special meetings for inquirers and all interested in religious questions. 
This church stiil worships in a rented building, and the need of a per- 
manent home becomes more and more imperative every day. It is in 
advance of all others in Chili in the matter of contributions, having 
given for different objects about $500 in gold during the year. 

An earnest plea is made for the establishing of a small school on the 
plan of the Kscuela Popular in Valparaiso. It is believed that the 
time for opening such a school is favorable, and that it would be an 
effective means of reaching the artisan class. 

Copiapo Station. 

The work at this station during part of the year has been in charge 
of Mr. Robinson, who with his wife removed to the city last May. 
He has held regular services in English, with a preaching service in 
Spanish once a month. Within the last few months the work has 
become more encouraging, so that the Presbytery has felt justified in 
organizing a church, which was done since the report was written. In 
addition to the work at this station Mr. Robinson has visited Caldera, 
the port of entry, seventy-five miles distant, once a month, where ser- 
vices in both English and Spanish were held, the people paying the 
rent of the chapel and other necessary expenses, also the travelling 
expenses of the missionary. Here, as in the case of Constitucion and 
Concepcion, an earnest request is presented for the establishing of a 
school. Mr. Robinson writes : " If it were practicable, I would recom- 
mend the immediate establishment of a school on the plan of the 
Escuela Popular of Valparaiso. I believe that such a school, charging 
such moderate tuition as is charged in Valparaiso, would very soon, if 
not immediately, be well patronized, and properly conducted would 
prove a power for good." 

The report concludes : " The missionary in charge feels that there 
are many discouraging things, indifference, ignorance, and great spirit- 
ual deadness, yet there is hope that the near future will show better 
and more definite results than we can report at present. There seems 
to be some movement among the dry bones which we earnestly hope 
may prove to be the working of the Holy Spirit." 

Literature. 

The El Heraldo has been issued semi-monthly as formerly, and 
has had a circulation of 3,200 copies. The mission continues to 
regard this little messenger as a most important agency in evangelizing 
Chili, although very far from being an ideal missionary periodical. 
The committing of this work to the Presbytery, it is hoped, will increase 
the interest of the churches in it, and add to the efficiency of the 
paper. The printed page is still regarded as an important factor in 
disseminating the truth in this aggressive republic* During the year 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



' CHILI — STATISTICS. 37 

1,216,000 pages, including El Heraldo, were issued and distributed, 
besides the sale of such books as *' £1 Devocionario" and '* Hints on 
Bible Study." 

* Staiisiics. 

Ordained missionaries (one in Engb'sh) 7 

Married lad/ missionaries 7 

Ordained natives 3 

Licentiate i 

Native helpers, male 3 

•• •• female S 

Number of churches o 

Communicants. 326 

Added during: the year ^ 

Boys in boarding-school 63 

•* day-school 338 

Girls in boarding-school 7 

" dav-school loa 

Total number of schools 3 

Number of pupils 409 

Pupils in Sabbath-schools 379 

Contributions $962 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MISSIONS IN CHINA. 
Canton Mission. 

Canton : Rev. Messrs. A. P. Happer, D.D., B. C. Heniv, D.D., H. V. Noyes and 
O. F. Wisner and their wives, and Rev. Andrew Beattie ; John G. Kerr, M.D., J. M. 
Swan, M.D., and E. C. Machle, M.D., and their wives; Miss £. M. Butler, Miss M. W. 
Niles, M.D., Miss Hattie Noyes, Miss Hattie Lewis, Miss M. H. Fulton, M.D., and Miss 
Louise Johnston ; lay assistant, Mr. C. A. Colman. J^ev. Quon Loy^ Rev. E, Sikkau^ 
tnd Rev. Lai Po Tsun ; z6 unordained evangelists, 15 narive assistants, 40 teachers, 
and 13 Bible-women. 

Hainan : Rev. F. P. Gilman and wife, H. M. McCandliss, M.D., and wife, and Mr 
C. C. Jerimiassen. 

Macao : Rev. J. C. Thonoson, M.D., and wife. 

In this country: Revs. A, A. Fulton and W. J. White and their wives. 

Pelcin iNission. 

Pekin: the capital of the country ; occupied as a mission station, 18^; missionary 
laborers — Rev. J. L. Whitine and Rev. Messrs. Daniel McCoy and John Wherry, and 
their wives ; Rev. Messrs. J. Walter Lowrie and W. U. Langdon, B. C. Atterbury, 
M.D., and G. Y. Taylor, M.D., Mrs. Reuben Lowrie, Miss Mary A. Lowrie, Miss Grace 
Newton, Miss Marion £. Sinclair, M.D., and Miss Jennie McKiUican ; Rev, Hsu Cking^ 
Rev, Chia Lan Fangy Rev, Teng Ying ; native helpers, 32. 

In this country : Mrs. J. L. Whiting. 

Sliantung iNission.* 

TuNGCHOW : on the coast, 55 miles from Chefoo ; occupied as a mission station, 1861; 
raissionaiy laborers— Rev. Messrs. C. W. Mateer, D.D., Charles R. Mills, D.D., W. O. 
Elterich, J. A. Fitch, C. A. Killie and E. G. Ritchie, and their wives ; Rev. W. M. 
Hayes ; Robert Coltman, Jr., M.D., and wife ; Miss Fanny Wight ; Rev, Yue Kik Yin; 
6 licentiates, 9 teachers. 

Chefoo : the chief foreign port of Shantung ; occupied as a mission station, 1862 ; 
missionary laborers— Rev. Messrs. J. L. Nevius, D.D., Hunter Corbett, D.D., Geo. S. 
Hays, and William Lane, and their wives ; 3 licentiates, 33 helpers, 4 Bible-women. 

Chinanfoo : capital of the Shantung province, 300 miles south of Pekin ; occupied 
as a mission station, 1873 ; missionary laborers — Rev. Messrs. John Murray, Paul D. 
Bergen and W. P. Chalfant, and their wives ; Rev. Messrs. Gilbert Reid and W. B. 
Hamilton ; J. B. Neal, M.D., and C. F. Johnson, M.D., and their wives ; 3 helpers. 

Wei Hein: 150 miles southwest from Tungchow; occupied as a station in 1883; 
missionary laborers— Rev. Messrs. J. A. Leyenberger and R. M. Mateer ; Rev. Messrs. 
J. H. Laughlin, S. A. Hunter, M.D., and F. H. Chalfant, and their wives; W. R. 
Faries, M.D. ; Miss Emma Anderson, Miss Emma F. Boughton, Miss Mary Brown, 
M.D., and Miss Madge Dickson, M.D. ; 5 licentiates, 23 teachers, x Bible-woman. 

In this country : Mrs. J. A. Leyenberger and Mrs. W. M. Hayes. 

Central iNission. 

NiNGPO : on the Ningpo River, 12 miles from the sea ; occupied as a mission station, 
1845 ; laborers— Rev. Messrs. W. J. McKee and V. F. Partch and their wives, Mrs. John 
Butler and Miss* Sara O. Warner ; Rev, Messrs. Bao-kwong-hyi^ Voh-Cong^eng^ Zi- 
KyuO'jingy Lu-Cing-vengy Yiang-Ung-tsiao^ Ye Yin-cohy Leo Ping-fong and Loh- 
dong-no ; 7 licentiates, 14 native teachers and 7 Bible-women. 

In this country : Mrs. John Butler and Miss Sara O. Warner. 



* Some new members of the Mission, whose names are included in the list, are only 
temporarily assigned — ^the Board not having decided in reg^ird to new stations. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHINA — CANTON. 39 

Shakghai : on the Woosung River, 14 miles from the sea ; occupied as a mission sta- 
tion, 1850; laborers— Rev. J. M. W. Famham, D.D., Rev. J. N. B. Smith, Rev. Geo. 
F. Fitch and their wives, Rev. John A. Silsbv, Miss Mary Posey, Rev, Messrs, Tsu-Tsk- 
SOMj Wong Vung-ioH^ Bau Tsik-dzae and Tang^Toh'tsong ; i licentiate, i Bible-reader, 
zz male and zo female teachers. 

Hanochow : the provincial capital of Chehkiang province, Z56 miles northwest of 
Ningpo ; occupied as a mission station, 1859 : laborers— Rev. Messrs. J. H. Judson and 
F. V. Mills and their wives ; Rev. J. C. Garritt, Rev, Messrs, Tsiang-Nying Kwe and 
Yi Zong-foh ; a Bible-women and 4 male teachers. 

Jn this country: Rev. and Mrs. F. V. Mills. 

SoocHOW : 70 miles from Shanghai ; occupied as a mission station, Z87Z ; laborers — 
Rev. Messrs. J. N. Hayes and D. N. Lyon and their wives ; i Bible-woman ; 7 helpers. 

In this country : Mrs. D. N. Lyon. 

Nanking : on the Yang^-tse Kiangf, 90 miles from its mouth ; occupied as a mission 
itatioo, 1876; laborers — R^v. Messrs. Charles Leaman and R. £. Abbey and their 
wives ; Miss Maiy Lattimore and Miss Emma F. Lane ; Rev, Zia; native helpers, 8. 

The Canton Mission. 

In tlie Canton Mission there have been few changes during the year. 
Miss Sophie Preston was married to Rev. O. F. Wisner and remains 
in the mission. Rev. H. V. Noyes and family returned to the field 
during the year, and Rev. A. A. Fulton and Rev. W. J. White, with 
their families, have received permission to return to this country. 
The health of the mission has been good, except in the case of a child 
of Rev. Mr. and Mrs. Gilman, who died in the summer. A severe 
epidemic was suffered in the island of Hainan, but fortunately the 
health of the missionaries was preserved. 

During the year the mission has received accessions in the appoint- 
ment and arrival on the field of Dr. and Mrs. E. C. Machle, Miss 
lA)uise Johnston, and Rev. Andrew Beattie, the latter of whom has 
gone to join Dr. Thomson in the new station of Yeung Kong. 

The different lines of work have been carried forward without much 
change, and with a fair degree of spiritual growth and prosperity. 

The First church of Canton, under the care of Rev. U. Sik Kan, has 
received eight members during the year. The present number of 
communicants is 109. The number of pupils in Sabbath-school is 
t%. The students from the men's training and boys' boarding-school 
have attended the church services. The amount of contributions has 
been %ii. 

In the Second church, under the pastorate of Rev. Kwan Loi, 29 
persons have been received, making the present number of communi- 
cants 170. The pupils in the Sabbath-school are reported at 210. 
The contributions have amounted to $154. 

The San Ui church, under the care of Rev. W. J. White, has re- 
ceived I. Present number of communicants, 26 ; contributions, $20. 

The Third church in Canton, under the care of Rev. Dr. Henry, is 
situated in the centre of the city, on the boundary between the Can- 
tonese and Tartar quarters. It reports a membership of 64, two hav- 
ing been received during the year. Forty-five children are reported 
in the Sabbath- school. Contributions, $52. 

The Chik Hom church reports 47 members. Nine persons have 
been received. Nineteen members are reported. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



40 CHINA— CANTON. 

The Shek Lung church reports 44 roemberSi Received during the 
year, 3. 

The Lin Po church, under the care of Dr. Henry, holds services in 
the different centres. It reports 66 communicants^ 14 having been 
received during the year. 

The Lien Chow church has enjoyed a year of great prosperity and 
growth. Fifteen persons have been received, making the present 
membership 53. This has been constituted a new station, and the 
large per cent, of increase in its membership during the year, as well 
as the contribution of $25, indicates vigorous life for a recent organ- 
ization. Only two stations ao-e as yet m full operation. Canton and 
Hainan, though the occupation as stations of Lien Chow and Yeung 
Kong has already been decided upon. 

Chapels. 

There are in Canton four chapels in which daily preaching is main- 
tained. Dr. Henry, with a Chinese assistant, has had charge of the 
Treasury Street chapel. The attendance has been good, and much 
interest has been shown by the people. An evening service for prayer 
and the study of the Bible has also been held. This chapel is a land- 
mark in Canton, and is well known to officials and people, not only 
in the city, but far and wide through the Canton Province. 

The Sz Pai Lau chapel is also under Dr. Henry's care. This is the 
home and centre of influence of the Third Presbyterian church. 

The chapel in connection with the First church has been under the 
care of Rev. A. A. Fulton. The attendance has been good, though 
no immediate fruits have been gathered. Another chapel connected 
with the hospital has been under the direction of Dr. Henry and Rev. 
Kwan Loi. 

Training' School for Men and Boys* 

Two boarding-schools and 34 day-schools have been maintained, 
with a total number of 916 pupils. The training-school for men and 
boys has been under the care of Rev. Messrs. Noyes and Wisner. 
The property formerly occupied by this training-school has been sold, 
and the means used in the erection of suitable buildings on new 
grounds purchased two years ago. The foundations of the new school 
building are already completed, and it is hoped that in a few months 
all will be in readiness for permanent use, temporary quarters having 
been found for the school during the year. The patrons of this school 
are mostly members of the church, whose sons are here educated as 
far as possible for active Christian work. Efforts are being made to 
give greater breadth to the curriculum, and for this purpose a scientific 
department has been thought indispensable. Ample room is now fur- 
nished in the new building for whatever department it shall be thought 
wise to establish in this institution. Mr. Wisner has given some in- 
struction during the year in astronomy, illustrating his lectures from 
charts and diagrams on the blackboard. Those who were examined 
at the close of the term showed themselves to have made marked pro- 



Digitized by VjtOOQIC 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



42 CHINA— CANTON. 

ficiency in this to them new science. Instruction in instrumental 
music has been given to a limited number of the pupils. 

In the men's training department* Bible history, exegesis, and other 
branches pertaining to preparation for the ministry have been taught. 
Out of eighteen attendants, fifteen are Christians, and one of the re- 
maining three is an applicant for baptism. 

In the boys' boarding-school most of the time has been devoted to 
committing to memory the books of the New Testament Beginners 
must commit to memory the Three and Four Character readers, while 
the advanced class has studied a Commentary on Romans. Their 
work in Chinese literature consists in study of the characters, letter- 
writing, and reciting the classics. The whole number in attendance 
was 43. The pupils in both departments meet together for prayers 
morning and evening. In addition to the regular church services, a 
special meeting is held every Sabbath afternoon for more detailed 
religious instruction. 

TAe Girl/ Boarding- School. 

There are two departments connected with this institution — first, 
the training-school for women, and second, the girls' boarding-school. 
The latter is divided into three grades — advanced, intermediate, and 
primary. The work has been in charge of the Misses Noyes and 
Butler, assisted by Miss Lewis and Mrs. Wisner. Six native teachers 
are employed, and with a single exception all have been educated and 
trained in the school. They are all earnest Christians, and are con- 
scientious workers. They manifest a deep interest in the spiritual 
welfare of the children. There have been during the year in all these 
departments 117 pupils, some of them, however, for only a limited 
period. Twenty-two from the school have been received into the 
church — nine women and thirteen girls. One of these women has 
been employed in the school for ten years, and for years her mind has 
wavered between the old belief and the new. She has at last become 
a decided Christian. The larger girls, with scarcely an exception, are 
Christians. A missionary society in connection with the school, or- 
ganized in 1888 by Miss Butler, now numbers 45 members, and sup- 
ports two Bible-readers in the country, besides making other contribu- 
tions. There is also a Dorcas Society, in which sewing and other work 
is done for the poor and needy. 

jDay-Schools, 

Of these, there are 17 schools for boys, with an aggregate of 381 
pupils. Seven have been under the care of Dr. Henry, one in Macao, 
under the care of Mrs. White, six under the care of Mr. White, and 
three under the care of Mr. Fulton, who has returned to this country 
on leave of absence. 

Seventeen day-schools for girls have also been maintained, with an 
enrollment of 343 pupils. These schools have been under the care of 
Mrs. Kerr, Mrs. Fearon, Mrs. Wisner, Miss Butler, Miss Noyes, and 
Mrs. White. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHINA— CANTON. 43 



Medical Work. 



The hospital in Canton, under the care of Dr. Kerr, assisted in the 
men's department by Dr. Swan, and in the women's ward by Dr. Mary 
W. Niles, has had a prosperous year. Many thousands of patients 
have been under treatment ; the wards have been well filled, and there 
have been good opportunities for evangelistic work. The morning 
prayers have been kept up for the in-patients, while out-patients have 
been reached by preaching in the adjacent chapel. Special Sabbath 
instruction has been given during the year, and many it is hoped, 
have received a saving knowledge of Christ. Those patients who are 
able attend the services of the Second Presbyterian church. Visitation 
to some extent has been done by Rev. A. A. Fulton among the pa- 
tients in the hospital. Mrs. Swan and Mrs. Wisner have also worked 
as opportunity afforded among the women in the wards. 

The hospital school for women has been conducted by Mrs. Kerr 
throughout the year, with gratifying results. A new school building, 
recently erected, without expense either to the hospital or the mission, 
furnishes pleasant accommodations for this school. By means of it 
profitable occupation is given to those patients who otherwise would 
be left in idleness and without improvement. An excellent plan has 
been adopted of keeping a registry of all patients, and reporting them 
to the helper in charge of the country station or chapel near which 
they reside, that the good work may be followed up on their return 
home. 

Dr. Swan, in addition to his work in the wards of the hospital, has 
taken very efficient care of the finances of the mission in the capacity 
of Mission Treasurer. A marked improvement is recognized in this 
business department of the work. 

The work of Dr. Niles in the hospital and dispensary has been in- 
defatigable and useful. There have been in attendance in her depart- 
ment 4,286 patients, and 393 in-patients have been under her care. 
She has performed 683 surgical operations, and 164 patients have 
been visited in their homes, 275 calls having been made. She has 
thus reached many firesides of the poor, and also of the wealthy and 
influential, always carrying the Gospel message. " Usually/' says the 
report, '^ a large roomful of female relatives await her coming. Doubt- 
less many secluded women of the upper class have heard the truth, 
who otherwise would not have had an opportunity." Frequently one 
of the medical students has accompanied Dr. Niles in these visits, and 
rendered material assistance in giving religious instruction. As fees 
from these patients she has received $182. Owing to poverty, in 
some cases, the usual fee of one dollar has not been paid, and in ex- 
ceptional cases, more has been received. Four young women are in 
the medical class, and of these, the two most advanced have acted as 
assistants. All are Christians. In the Sabbath-school, as well as in 
many other ways, they have assisted in the religious work of the hos- 
pital. The medical class has been continued this year under the care 
of Drs. Kerr, Swan, and Niles. Twelve students have been in attend- 
ance. Four of the number are women. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



44 CHINA — CANTON. 

Three dispensaries have been in charge of Dr. Mary H. Fulton. 
In one of these, in the centre of the city, 7,000 patients — all women 
and children — have been in attendance. During part of the year Mrs. 
Wisner visited the dispensary weekly, and since then Miss Hattie 
Noyes or one of the Bible-readers has been present on each dispens- 
ing day, all for the purpose of reh'gious instruction. By this work 
much prejudice has been removed, trust in idols has been weakened, 
if not crippled, and in many cases sincere belief in Christ has been ex- 
pressed. In another dispensary, under Dr. Fulton's care, 2,000 pa- 
tients have been enrolled. At Ng Chau a third dispensary has been 
opened for both men and women ; a medical assistant has been sta- 
tioned at this place, and nearly 2,000 patients have received treatment. 
In November, Dr. Fulton, in response to an urgent request from a 
Chinese official in Canton, made a voyage to Swatow, and from thence 
several days' journey into the interior, to prescribe for his mother, an 
old lady of eighty-two years of age. This official is one of high rank 
and of great influence in South China, and has always been intensely 
opposed to Christianity. An escort was sent with her from Canton, 
and she received every attention on the way and after reaching the 
home of her patient, whom she found to be a lady of unusual intelli- 
gence. After the recovery of her patient, Dr. Fulton received appre- 
ciative testimonials to her skill, and grateful recognition of the value 
of her services. The visit enabled her to carry the Gospel to that 
distant town under the most favorable circumstances, and it is hoped 
that lasting impressions for good have been made. 

During the early part of the year Dr. Kerr was called to attend the 
Tartar General, who is the military commandant in Canton. After 
his recovery, this official came with a large retinue to express his 
thankful appreciation. The pomp and circumstance of his visit 
spread abroad a knowledge of what had been done most widely and 
impressively among the people. Dr. Niles has visited by invitation 
'' the families of nearly all the high officials residing in Canton, and, in 
such ways," says the report, *' medical skill serves to open doors which 
are otherwise barred to the introduction of Christianity." 

The hospital work at Yeung Kong has accomplished much good 
during the year. Dr. Thomson and his assistants have treated 15,814 
patients and 75 in-patients. The number of surgical operations per- 
formed was 510. 

Outstations. 

Of these, there are twenty-eight connected with the Canton Mission. 
They are superintended by missionaries residing in Canton and 
Macao. Four have been under the charge of Dr. Henry. Much 
good work has been done in connection with the Lien Chow station, 
though the force at hand is wholly inadequate to meet the openings 
for usefulness which are presented on every side. Dr. Henry made 
three visits to IJen Chow during the year, being accompanied on the 
last journey by Dr. and Mrs. Machle and Miss Johnston. A shop 
has been rented temporarily for a chapel, and regular services are 
held. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHINA — HAINAN. 45 

The limits of our space forbid a specific notice of the various out- 
stations in order, but in them all the work has been judiciously and 
profitably carried on through the regular labors of native preachers 
and assistants, with occasional visits from missionaries. At a station 
145 miles southwest of Canton, five men were received during the 
year upon letters of recommendation from churches in California, and 
these have identified themselves with the Christian work. This inci- 
dent is given as an illustration of the good accomplished by missionary 
labor among the Chinese in California, and it is to be hoped that by 
mutual correspondence between laborers in this country and in the 
Canton Province, all Christian men who return may be looked after 
and kept in sympathy with the one work of our divine Master. Mr. 
Fulton had the satisfaction of baptizing his first convert in the distant 
Province of Kwong Sai, where a few years ago he was mobbed and 
his work was broken up. He has made repeated visits to Kwong Sai 
Province, but up to the time of his return home on leave of absence, 
he had not been able to secure a firm footing. It is hoped that Lien 
Chow, which has t)ecome a treaty port, may be found available for the 
establishment of a missionary station. 

At Yeung Kong, which is situated 250 miles southwest of Canton, 
progress has been made. In October last. Dr. Thomson had the pleas- 
ure of receiving five converts into the church by baptism. Fifteen 
more candidates for baptism are reported. In the autumn Rev. 
Messrs. White, of Macao, and Oilman, of Hainan, visited Yeung 
Kong and received a strong impression of the prospects of the good 
work which has opened up in that station and in the surrounding coun- 
try. Mr. Beattie's accession to the mission with the purpose of labor- 
ing in Yeung Kong, has given much satisfaction. An interesting work 
has been done during the year by Mr. Col man, who has visited some 
scores of towns in the region of Yeung Kong, preaching and selling 
books. 

Hainan. 

The Hainan station was established in 1885, though work was com- 
menced in the island in 1881 by Mr. Jerimiassen. The missionary 
force consists of Mr. and Mrs. Oilman, Dr. and Mrs. McCandliss, and 
Mr. Jerimiassen. Notwithstanding the prevailing sickness during the 
year, the work has gone on with a good degree of prosperity. The 
medical work has made most favorable impressions in the midst of the 
epidemic. The superiority of Western science appears in nothing 
more clearly than in its improved treatment of disease, and the fact of 
substantial help being given in times of distress does much to over- 
come prejudice. 

Nodoa, 90 miles in the interior, is the only outstation, the mission 
having its headquarters at Kiung Chow, three miles from the port of 
Hoi How. Mr. Jerimiassen has spent several months at Nodoa 
during the year, accompanied by a native preacher. At Nam Fung 
some work has been done, and a good degree of interest is manifested. 
There are five communicants in the place. Mr. Jerimiassen has, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



46 [china— MEDICAL WORK. 

with the consent of the Board, made some substantial improvements 
in the building at Nodoa. 

I'he medical work at Kiung Chow, under the care of Dr. Mc- 
Candliss, has furnished a good opportunity for Mr. Gilman to preach 
the Gospel regularly to those who are in waiting for their turn of 
treatment There have been 4,774 out-patients and 118 in-patients. 
One hundred and forty have been visited at their homes. At Nodoa, 
Mr. Jerimiassen has dispensed medicine to over 5,000 patients. Nine 
have been received as in-patients in his small hospital. Nearly 2,000 
more persons have been treated by Mr. Jerimiassen on his itinerating 
tours. 

The Canton College. 

The Canton College, under the care of Dr..Happer, though laboring 
under great disadvantage for want of proper buildings, has made a 
good beginning. Sixty-six pupils have been in attendance, and the 
only limit to this good work is found in the want of suitable accommo- 
dations. By the authority of the trustees of the college, this institu- 
tion is now placed under the direct control of the Board in so far that 
it has power to fill all vacancies in the trusteeship. It is believed that 
when suitable buildings are secured for the accommodation of all who 
come, the institution will enter upon a career of great prosperity and 
widespread usefulness. 

Statistics of the Canton Mission. 

Ordained missionaries, of whom one is a physician .... 9 

Physicians, of whom two are females 6 

^ Lay helpers a 

Married female missionaries ra 

Unmarried female missionaries 6 

Native^tors x 

Unordained evangelists 16 

Colporteurs 15 

Teachers 40 

Bible-readers 13 

Churches 8 

Total membership 625 

Number added on profession of faith 100 

Contributions $341 

Boarding-schools 3 

Men and boys in boarding-schools 6x 

Girls in boarding-schools 117 

Boys' day-schools 17 

GirW " «* 17 

Boys in day-schools 381 

Girls in day-schools 343 

Total attendance in schools 903 

Pupils in Sabbath-schools 380 

Summary of Medical Work. 

CANTON HOSPTFAL. 

Out-patients (attendances) I9i557 

In-patients it^7 

Surgical operaUons 3,036 

Visits at homes 1375 

8Z PAI LAU DISPENSARY. 

Out-patients (attendances) 7i«H 

Surreal operations ,256 

Visits at homes ^7 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



.CHINA— PEKIN. 47 

TUNC TAK TAI KAI DISPENSARY. ^ 

Out-^tients (attendances) 1,963 

Surgical operations 66 

VO CHAU DISPENSARY. 

Out-patients (attendances) 3t<3cx> 

YEUNG KOKG HOSPITAL. 

Out-patients (attendances) X5f8i4 

Surgical operations 5x0 

In-patients treated at homes 75 

KIUNO CHOW HOSPITAL (HAINAN). 

Out-patients (attendances) 4*774 

In-patients 108 

Viats at homes 140 

NODOA HOSPITAL (HAINAN). 

Out-patients (attendances) 7iOoo 

In-patients 9 

TOTAU 

Out-patients (attendances) 59^3^1 

In-patients '»459 

Sui]g:ical operations 2,868 

Visits at homes 647 

Pekin Mission. 

The health of this mission has been good in the main. Mrs. Whit- 
ing was obliged to seek leave of absence for a necessary recruit. Dr. 
Aiterbury returned during the year from a leave of absence. No ad- 
ditions have been made to the mission. 

There are in the Pekin Mission two organized churches, both in the 
city. Very little has been accomplished as yet by this Mission in out- 
stations, with the exception of some summer work at a point about 
fifteen miles away. A movement is now in progress, however, for 
establishing an additional station in the interior. 

The total number of communicants reported by the Mission is 183. 
During the year 27 were added to the church, and the net gain is 
25. The number of adherents is given as 360. The children in the 
Sabbath - school number 180. In the two boarding-schools and 
the nine day-schools 158 pupils are enrolled. The amount of con- 
tributions during the year was $338.30. The Mission reports one 
pastor and two ordained evangelists. The pastors' salaries are only 
about $80 a year. Two theological students, eight licentiates, four 
medical students, eighteen teachers, and four Bible-women are re- 
ported 

The medical report given by Dr. G.Yardley Taylor, embracing the pe- 
riod from August 1, 1888, to August i, 1889, reports 18,640 out-pa- 
tients, 155 in-patients, and 90 surgical operations. Owing to the ab- 
sence of Dr. Atterbury during the year thus reported, the outside dis- 
pensary work has been almost entirely in the hands of the first assist- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



48 CHINA — PEKIN. 

ant, Wang Yu-lin. Two medical assistants have honorable mention 
for the work accomplished by them. The native pastor of the 
hospital church has been faithful in preaching to the dispensary 
patients and in visiting those confined in the wards. Mr. I^ang- 
don, a recent accession to the mission, is spoken of as having made 
many visits to the in-patients, whom he has interested in the teach- 
ings of the Bible. Hsu Pin, a theological student at Tungchow, 
has spent his summer vacation to good advantage in preaching and 
healing the sick in a district about forty miles northeast of Pekin. 
Attracted partly by his medical skill, a score or more of the villagers 
gathered about him, coming quite regularly to his inn for instruction. 
Mr. Lowrie visited the place in midsummer, and was greatly pleased 
with the spirit of earnestness which these inquirers displayed. The 
head men of the village, alarmed by the spread of the foreign doctrine, 
be^an a system of terrorizing which soon subdued the weaker in- 
quirers. Inn-keepers were forbidden to harbor any one who preached 
the doctrine, and employment was refused to all not willing to swear 
allegiance to the religion of their ancestors, and threats of violence 
were freely uttered and posted throughout the neighborhood. The 
door thus opened has been partly closed, but it is hoped that it will 
soon be opened wider than ever. 

This instance shows the efficacy of medical missions, when con- 
ducted in an earnest, evangelical spirit, in opening the way for the 
truth. Dr. Taylor and his first assistant visited the region north of the 
place above mentioned with a view to establishing two dispensaries. 
This is the kind of introduction that has most promise for the future. 

Miss Marion Sinclair, M.D., and Miss Jennie McKillican, the latter 
acting as trained nurse, are highly spoken of in the report in connec- 
tion with the medical work, though the task of acquiring the language 
has largely absorbed their attention during this their first year. 

The report refers to some general changes which have occurred in 
the country, conspicuous among which is the completion of the rail- 
road from the Kai-ping coal mines in the region of Pekin, to Tientsin. 
This achievement, together with the fact that other lines are contem- 
plated, indicates an awakening of the Chinese Government to the 
necessity of these material forms of development. 

Near the close of the year Rev. J. L. Whiting and Dr. B. C. Atter- 
bury visited the region westward from Pekin with a view to establish- 
ing a new station. 

Mr. Wherry, with the approval of the mission, has been largely en- 
gaged in literary work. Mr. Whiting, also, in addition to preaching 
three times a week in the street chapel, has been preparing a Chinese 
work on Moral Philosophy. Mr. Lowrie has had the boys' school in 
charge, and has addressed the people as occasion offered. During the 
hot season he gathered large numbers at an old temple in the coun- 
try, to whom he preached the Word of Life. Dr. Sinclair and Miss 
McKillican, in addition to hospital work, have been engaged in evan- 
gelical effort among the women. 

Miss Mary Lowrie, as well as Mrs. Lowrie, has done a good work 
among the women. She has maintained regularly a woman's class. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC* 



CHINA— PEKIN. 49 

At the Hills, in the hot season, she gathered an interesting girls* school, 
which she was reluctant to give up on returning to the city. Miss 
Grace Newton has sustained the responsible work of the girls' school 
and with increasing interest. 

Mr. Langdon has been diligent in his first year with the language. 

The mission have deplored the necessity which compelled Mrs. 
Whiting to leave her useful work among the women on account of ill- 
health. Mr. Whiting remains at his post. 

The following incident, given in a letter from Dr. Atterbury, is so 
faithfully illustrative of the boasted benevolence of Buddhism that we 
quote it entire : 

'' Dr. Taylor was called out the other day to see a little fellow about 
fifteen years old who was found lying in a field with his throat badly 
cut and many other wounds in different parts of his body. The case 
strikingly illustrates the difference between Christianity and Buddhism ; 
between active sym])athy for suffering and mere falk about compassion. 
It seems some rascal hired the boy, who was a donkey driver, to take 
him to a place a little distance from the city. Arriving at a lonely 
spot the man attacked the boy, and leaving him wounded and bleed- 
ing, ran off with his donkey. By chance a man came along some time 
afterward, who carried him to a large, open space' in front of one of 
the largest temples in the vicinity. Here a crowd quickly collectmg 
stood gazing at the little fellow as he lay on the ground, but no one 
offered to do anything for him. In this land, which is lightened by the 
* Light of Asia,' men follow the example of the priest and the Levite, 
and, after looking at any case demanding assistance, ' pass by on the 
other side.' This took place about noon. The next morning 
some one suggested asking the foreign doctor to see the boy, as 
there was no other chance of saving his life. So Dr. Taylor went 
out, and was almost disposed not to attempt to do anything, loss 
of blood and long exposure having made the case a desperate one 
to treat. Still he thought he would try to see what could be done, and 
he asked if some one in the crowd of two hundred or more people, who 
were standing around, would not tell him where he could find a room 
to which the boy might be carried while his wounds were being 
dressed. In the gateway of the large temple directly behind were a 
dozen priests — devout followers of Buddha — but they would never 
think of allowing the wounded boy to be put into one of their vacant 
rooms ; he might die, and then the expense of burying him would be 
great, or at any rate they would have to look after him for some days, 
and this would be a sore trouble. At last a man, living at some little 
distance, gave permission to have the boy carried to his house. There 
Dr. Taylor dressed the wounds, and finally the boy was brought to 
our hospital, where he now lies in one of the wards. His neck was 
so badly injured that at first everything he ate came out of the wound. 
Now, however, he is much better, and there is some chance that he 
may pull through all his troubles. The trachea being cut through just 
at the larynx, he cannot talk, and several times has nearly suffocated 
from the swelling under the lining membrane of the windpipe obstruct- 
ing the passage of air. He is a patient little fellow and lies quietly on 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



50 CHfNA— SHANTUNG. 

the kang with a tube in his throat which gives him great relief. He 
appreciates everything we do for him, and, unable to speak, thanks us 
by shaking his clasped hands in Chinese fashion. 

" Let those at a distance sing the praises of the * Sage of India ' and 
applaud his teachings. A tree is known by its fruits. If asked, this 
wounded boy would say that there was a something in Christianity in- 
fluencing its followers to love their neighbors as themselves which the 
religion of his own country did not possess. Many of the Chinese, 
knowing about this case, have contrasted the action of the priests in 
not allowing the boy to be taken into their temple with that of the for- 
eigners who did all they could for him." 

Statistics of Pekin Mission, 

Ordained missionaries 5 

Missionary physicians, of whom one is a female 3 

Married female missionaries 3 

Unmarried female missionaries 5 

Ordained natives 3 

Native helpers aa 

Churches 3 

Communicants 183 

Added during the year 37 

Pupils in boys' day-schools (7). 60 

" rirls' " {2) 34 

*' boarding-schools (2) 64 

Total number of pupils 158 

Sabbath-school pupUs x8o 

Contributions $338 

Shantung Mission. 

The annual meeting of the Shantung Mission was held at Chefoo in 
November last. All the accounts represent it as the most interesting 
meeting ever held by the mission. One element of great encourage- 
ment and joy was the arrival of sixteen new missionaries — men and 
women, who arrived on the field just before the meeting was held. 
They received the most hearty welcome, and as to their character and 
promise, the very best impression appears to have been made upon 
all. 

Another circumstance of great encouragement was the fact that as a 
result of the faithful work done in famine distribution, a thousand in> 
quirers were reported as looking toward the truth and the acceptance 
of the offer of salvation. It is generally believed that during the pres- 
ent year a still larger number will be found, and that the work in the 
immediate future will be attended with greater fruits than at any for- 
mer period. It was also reported that a large number of backsliders 
had returned to their^duty, and that the zeal of many of the native 
churches had been quickened. 

A matter of still further congratulation was the fact that Dr. and 
Mrs. Mitchell arrived in time to attend some of the closing exercises 
of the meeting. Dr. MitchelFs letters, as well as those of the mis- 
sionaries, speak of the occasion as one of remarkable interest and 
encouragement. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHINA— TUNGCHOW. 5 1 

In addition to the large number of missionaries appointed by the 
Board, a valuable accession was made to the mission in the marriage 
of Miss H. R. Sutherland, of the Canadian Mission, to Rev. Dr. 
Corbclt 

Measures were taken at the meeting toward ocaipying two new 
stations — Che-ning-chow and I-Cbow-fu — and assignments were made 
of the new missionaries, together with some of those who had had 
experience and a knowledge of the language. The Board has thus far 
sanctioned the occupation of the former of the stations named. Rev. 
S. A, Hunter, M.D., and wife, though they had received many months 
before leave of absence from the Board that they might visit their 
fatherland, after many years of faithful labor, cheerfully consented to 
remain two years longer, in order to establish the new missionaries at 
this interesting station, which is situated on the Grand Canal. 

There have been several cases of serious illness, which will be par- 
ticularly noticed in connection with the various stations. With the 
exception of these, the health of the mission has been mercifully pre- 
served and none have been called away by death. 

Tungchow, 

The Tungchow station reports 234 communicants, with an addition 
of 27 during the year. The pupils in Sabbath-school number 207. 
The Tungchow college reports 115 students, and the girls' boarding- 
school 26. The total number in all schools is 158. One native 
pastor. Rev. Yuen Keh Yin, is reported. There are connected with 
this station six licentiates and nine teachers of both sexes. For the 
benefit of missionary societies and Sabbath-schools, desiring to sup- 
port particular pupils, it is stated that the support of a student in the 
Tungchow college is $40; in the girls' high-school 925, and in the 
medical school $13. 

The report of the Tungchow college may be briefly summarized as 
follows : The last year has been the twenty-fifth of the history of the 
institution, and has been the most prosperous year in its whole career. 
The average number of students has been over 100. In view of the 
increased number of applicants the standard requirement for admission 
has been raised, and the admissions have been restricted to those of 
roaturer age than in former years. The boarding-schools at the other 
stations are beginning to furnish students for the college, and these are 
found as a rule to be the most satisfactory in the end. The demand 
for the graduates of the college among all the various Protestant Mis- 
sionary Societies in China has been greater than ever. It would seem 
to be a matter of regret that the Presbyterian Missions in the Empire 
should not be sufficiently sustained by funds to enable them to utUize 
all the graduates of this vigorous and efficient institution, both in the 
department of the ministry and in that also of school instniction. 
Seven of the students have applied for admission to the church, of 
whom four have been received. In the absence of Dr. and Mrs. 
Mateer for most of the year, Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Hayes bore the 
chief responsibility, until it became necessary for Mrs. Hayes to obtain 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



52 CHINA—CHINANFOO. 

leave of absence and return home on account of ill-health. Mr. 
Hayes accompanied her only as far as Japan, and thence returned to 
his post. Mrs. G. S» Hays, temporarily engaged at Tungchow, has ren- 
dered more or less assistance during the year, devoting some time also 
to the country work among the women of the villages. Her husband, 
in the meantime, has been too much occupied with evangelistic work to 
be able to render much assistance in the school, except for a part of 
two sessions. The institution has continued to be one of the foremost 
centres of higher education in China. It is a thoroughly missionary 
institution, keeping the great spiritual ends of mission work ever in 
view, at the same time that it has pursued a course of broad and effect- 
ive instruction in practical science, and in whatever should be deemed 
necessary to fit young men to meet the changing conditions which 
are rapidly passing over the Empire. 

Dr. Neal's medical report shows during the year 4,227 out-patients 
and 58 in-patients ; of the latter, 4 1 are reported as cured. He has 
also had a class of 5 medical students. The course occupies four 
years, of seven months' study in each. Toward the close of the year. 
Dr. Neal,whose work is greatly approved by the mission, was removed 
to Chinanfoo, and Dr. Coltman assumed his duties at Tungchow. 

Dr. Mills, in addition to chapel preaching and itineration, has la- 
bored among the patients assembled from day to day at the hospital. 

The girls' school at Tungchow has been assigned to Miss Wight, 
who has been transferred from Chefoo. 

Mrs. Mills has made a good beginning in the instruction of three or 
four deaf-mutes, — a kind of Christian effort hitherto unknown in North 
China. This work is not connected directly with the Board, but has 
been sustained by gifts from deaf-mutes in this country, who have been 
anxious to do something for their fellow- sufferers in China. An utter 
incredulity seems to have possessed the people until they saw demon- 
strations of the possibility of teaching this unfortunate class to com- 
municate with others and even to read the Word of God. 

Chinanfoo. 

Dr. Coltman, who has had charge of the medical work, reports an 
increase of 1,200 patients during the year — making the whole number 
8,495. ^^^^ hundred and eighty-five surgical operations have been 
performed. A number of calls have been received by him from offi- 
cials, and many new friends of the work have been made. . With the 
consent of the mission, Dr. Coltman has exchanged places with Dr. 
Neal, of Tungchow. 

Mr. Reid has carried on an extended work among the outstations, 
making eleven tours, and meeting with not a few discouragements in 
various forms. 

Much work was done in the early part of the year by the mission- 
aries of the station in famine relief distribution. Mr. Bergen also de- 
voted a part of his time in giving instruction to the theological class at 
Chinanfoo. The country work has fallen mainly to Messrs. Murray, 
Bergen, Reid, and Chalfant« 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHINA— CHEFOO. 53 

Serious illness during the year has affected neariy every member of 
the station, and has rendered the necessity of procuring property for 
residence outside of the city too plain to be disregarded. The char- 
acter of the diseases suffered is such as to show clearly the effect of 
malarial poison. The city lies on a level plain, with little opportunity 
for drainage, and has almost no sanitary care. Gradually, and espe- 
cially through the medical work, the mission seems to be growing in 
the favor, or at least in the toleration, of the people. All the local 
work is within the city, except that of the school, which is located in 
the east suburb. 

The total membership reported in the Chinanfoo church is 113, of 
whom 6 have been baptized during the year. 

Chefoo. 

Rev. Hunter Corbett, D.D.. reports a very prosperous year in the 
outstation work. Two itinerating journeys, extending over ninety-four 
days, were made. He finds new life in some important stations in 
which for some years there had been little advance. Two new schools 
have been established, one for boys and one for girls. Four persons 
have been received on profession of faith, and some lapsed members 
have been restored. At a large interior town 19 persons were ad- 
mitted to the church, two of whom were widows, aged 74 and 77 
respectively. All these accessions attributed their first interest in 
the truth to the attendance of their children or grandchildren upon 
Christian schools. The suggestiveness of this fact will be hailed with 
satisfaction by all who, in Sabbath-schools or women's auxiliary 
societies, are contributing of their funds to the maintenance of these 
interior day-schools. When one is able scy clearly to trace the 
influence of these little germs to the establishment of permanent 
churches to which goodly numbers of the middle-aged and even the 
aged are received on profession of their faith, there is reason certainly 
to thank God and take courage. This influence may be traced still 
further back to those steps which led to the establishment of the 
schools themselves. For several years a widow woman has resided 
as the sole believer in this place. It was at her earnest request that 
a school was opened less than two years ago. Intense persecution 
followed for a time, but at length subsided. A great change came 
over the people, and there are now three schools and the flourishing 
church above named. The influence of this movement is not con- 
fined to one village. Many persons in the surrounding villages have 
given their names as inquirers, and they are now studying the truth. 
Two Bible-women who are employed in this region report many 
homes in which they have found women and children learning to 
pray. 

In another village, twenty miles distant from the above, there is a 
sort of family church corresponding somewhat nearly to those of New 
Testament times. In one influential family there are more than thirty 
persons, all communicants. Others besides the family have been added, 
and the church has, with great self-denial, provided itself with a 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



54 CHINA— CHEFOO. 

simple but attractive church building and school-house. The structure 
was dedicated during Dr. Corbett's ^visit. An elder and a deacon 
were ordained, and nine persons were baptized. In this village also 
there are three day-schools. 

In the Chi Meh district, where years ago Dr. Corbett shared the 
persecution to which the people were subjected, ne spent this year 
several days in visiting the various schools and preaching stations among 
the villages. Fourteen years ago the people of this region built for 
themselves a church and school building. The place is now too small 
for the requirements of the community, and steps have been taken to 
erect a new edifice, to be known as the Mary Nixon Corbett Memorial 
Church. Toward the erection of this building the people have sub- 
scribed largely in labor. Since the harvest of the autumn crops the 
work of erection has gone forward. At still another village a build- 
ing for worship and for a school has been presented by one of the 
native Christians, a deacon in the church, a man of little means, but 
rich in faith and good works. Still another congregation, sixteen 
miles distant, have recently repaired and enlarged their church and 
school building by their own effort. Fourteen new members were 
added to their number. 

During this trip. Dr. and Mrs. Corbett visited five organized 
churches, eight stations, examined seventeen schools, and received 52 
persons on profession of their faith. Thirty children were also bap- 
tized. In another place Dr. Corbett organized a church with thirty- 
two members. There are now ten district churches under his care, 
with a membership of 634. They are almost entirely self-supporting. 
They contributed during the year, in spite of their great poverty, 
$533. The total number added during the year on examination was 
1 10. The excellent plan of Drs. Corbett and Nevius of gathering 
young preachers and helpers for three months of training during the 
winter months, has been continued. Twenty have been thus instructed 
during the year. 

Chef 00 and Outsiaiions, — The report says : " Faithful work has been 
done in -the boys' boarding school at Chefoo. Forty pupils attended. 
A ^bright lad of seventeen died of fever after only a few days' illness. 
His parents and grandparents were Christians. He had been ad- 
mitted to the communion l short time previous to his death. Five 
young men entered the College at Tungchow at the end of the year. 
One of the teachers, Ten Sheo Shen, came to us wheH quite a small 
boy. After several years spent in school here, he went to the Tung- 
chow College and graduated with honor. After taking half of the 
theological course, he found his strength not equal to the trying work 
of itinerating, which is required as a part of the training for our theo- 
logical students. He is a first-class teacher. His wife has for several 
years taught in her own home a little school for girls in a village near 
us. She has now twelve bright little girls attending and daily memo- 
rizing Scripture and other books. Most of the girls are from heathen 
homes. The parents have learned to value education for their girls as 
well as for the boys. It has required many years of patient work to 
gain this point. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHINA— WEI HEIN. §5 

'^The removal of Miss Wight to Tungchow has necessitated the 
temporary suspension of the girls' boarding-school at this place. I 
tmst the time will soon come when we shall be able to have a flour- 
ishing school permanently established here. 

^ A number of new schools have been established at different points 
in the interior. We have now a total number of 29 schools, with an 
aggregate attendance of 500 ; of these, 100 are girls. 

*' In one village where we have three members, after much effort we 
succeeded in getting a little school started. To-day a letter came 
from the teacher, saying he has opened with 30 pupils, some of them 
coming daily from surrounding villages. The same messenger brought 
a request to have another school opened in a village seven miles dis- 
tant 1 should think fully one-half of the number who united with the 
church the past year attributed their interest in the truth to what they 
saw and learned in connection with the Christian schools. These 
schools are proving an effective means of expelling darkness and 
overcoming prejudice and hostility. So important has this work become 
that we have felt constrained to enter upon a long-cherished desire 
and open a normal school at Chefoo for the special training of teach- 
ers and lay-preachers. Only young men of from 18 to 30, as a rule, 
are admitted, and only those who have already attended native schools 
from eight to twelve or more years. A special course of three years' 
training is given. We have two Christian teachers, exceptionally well 
qualified for this work, now in charge. We have ten men at present 
and many more applicants. Among the men is a native graduate of 
fine scholarship and address. We do not guarantee certain employ- 
ment to the students who take this course, but sincerely hope we may 
from this school be able to supply a great want of more efficient la- 
borers. This will in no way interfere with the College or regular theo- 
logical classes. Each student is pledged to aid, so far as possible, 
needy and worthy youth in acquiring an education after they leave 
our school." 

Dr. Nevius has devoted his time principally to the preparation of 
books and to the training of the native ministers. Mrs. Nevius has 
suffered very serious illness, but with the blessing of God appears to 
have measurably recovered her health. 



mi Hein. 

The report from Wei Hein is full of interest. Mr. Leycnberger spent 
some two months or more in famine relief in the early part of the year, 
distributing ^6,000 among 20,000 persons. He devoted forty-three 
days of the autumn to outstation work, and was cheered by the revival 
of interest on every hand. One hundred and fifteen inquirers presented 
themselves for examination, while backslidden members returned and 
engaged with zeal in the performance of Christian duty. Among the 
29 outstations under Mr. Laughlin's care are about 100 pupils in schools. 
Much interest is shown by the people in the education of their chil- 
dren, and desires are expressed for the establishment of boarding- 



Digitized by VjtOOQIC 



56 CHINA— WEI HEIN. 

schools for girls. Mr. Laughlin has been permitted to receive into 
the church during the year 26 adults, and has baptized 4 children. 

Dr. Hunter's work has been carried on in usual variety — embracing 
pastoral, medical, and literary work. His time, also, has been largely 
drawn upon in the building operations of the station. His dispensary 
was opened to patients every day except Sunday. Dr. Hunter super- 
intended the erection of a dispensary and hospital at Wei Hein — a 
memorial of the late Mrs. Robert Mateer. Some time, also, was de- 
voted to famine-relief work. 

Mr. Mateer returned in the late fall from a leave of absence and en- 
gaged at once vigorously in his work. 

Mr. and Mrs. Laughlin were employed for five months in famine re- 
lief, distributing $30,000 to 35,000 people — some being aided during 
the entire five months, and others a shorter time. Abundant oppor- 
tunities for preaching the Gospel were improved as time and strength 
permitted, and with great promise of good results. A considerable 
number of persons are reported as studying Christian books, observing 
the Sabbath, etc. Over 400 persons in the outstations visited by Mr. 
I^aughlin have avowed themselves inquirers and have been examined. 
Only a small proportion were received, for want of sufficient knowl- 
edge, but it is believed that the new year will witness a large ingather- 
ing. The inquirers are mostly of a good class of people, not likely to 
be influenced by the " loaves and fishes." " The heathen," says Mr. 
Laujghlin's report, "are more favorably disposed than ever before, 
while the Christians are apparently quickened in faith, and are build- 
ing better houses of worship, opening schools, making larger contribu- 
tions, etc Meanwhile, many old backsliders are returning." 

The boys' boarding-school at Wei Hein has been prosperous. Spe- 
cial work for women has been carried on by Mrs. Laughlin, both in 
itineration and in instructing visitors at her home. Miss Anderson, 
notwithstanding a long and severe attack of typhoid fever in the hottest 
season, has done a good work for a part of the year among the women. 
Two village boarding-schools for girls are under her c^e, as well as a 
general work among women in the country and at home. She also 
spent a month in the famine region, assisting in the work of relief. 

Miss Anderson and Mr. Chalfant are both highly commended by the 
£xan)ining Committee for the progress which they have made in the 
language during the past two years. The latter has already begun to 
preach in the Chinese. He has also had a part in the work of relief 
distribution, extending aid to nearly 5,000 persons, who were thus sup- 
ported during an average of fifty-four days each. A part of the year 
has been occupied in superintending the building of a house. The 
field assigned to Mr. Chalfant embraces eight stations, in which there 
are one hundred Christians. Mrs. Chalfant has worked among the 
women as her time and strength would permit. 

Four new members — Dr. W. R. Faries, Miss Mary Brown, M.D., 
Miss Madge Dickson, M.D., and Miss Emma F. Boughton — have 
been added to the station during the year. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CENTRAL CHINA — NINGPO. 5/ 

Statistics of Shantung Mission. 

Ordained missionaries, of whom one is a physician ax 

Missionary physicians, of whom two are women 6 

Married feinale missionaries 21 

Unmarried female missionaries. 5 

Ordained native j 

Licentiates 14 

Native teachers and helpers 71 

Churches 19 

Communicants Si^Qa 

Added durin? the year 337 

Boys in boarding-schools (6) 182 

Girls" •• •• (4) 91 

Pupils in day-schools (:^) 600 

Total number of schools 45 

** ** of pupils 873 

Sabbath-school scholars ZtC>93 

Contributions $816 

Central China Mission. 

The magnitude of the field occupied by this mission is set forth in a 
recent appeal for reinforcements as follows : 

" Our live stations occupy a commanding position with reference to 
the richest and most populous part of China, — what may be called the 
temperate zone of the Chinese world. The parallels which include 
the provinces of Chehkiang and Kiangsu, within which our five sta- 
tions are located, form the central belt through which flows the great 
river of China, — the Yiang-tse-kiang. Our position commands the 
whole broad valley of this * Son of the Ocean/ with all his tributaries. 
Under the Governor-General, whose palace is at Nanking, are grouped 
three provinces — Kiangsu, Kiangsi, and Nganhui, with an aggregate 
population of 95,058,559 in an area of 165,137 square miles. Add to 
these the province of Chehkiang, with a population of 26,256,784, in 
an area of 39,150 square miles, and we have as the field within easy 
reach of our station over 121,000,000 of people in an area of 204,- 
287 square miles. In other words, in a territory only one-fourth as 
large as the United States east of the Mississippi, we have a popula- 
tion about doable that of the United States." 

Ningpo Nation, 

The year at this station has been one rich with tokens of Divine 
grace, although peculiar difficulties have been encountered. The mis- 
sionary force, all too small at best, was depleted by the necessary 
withdrawal, on account of health, first of Miss Warner, and later of 
Mrs. Butler. Mr. and Mrs. Partch, however, although necessarily 
occupied largely with the study of the language, have done much to 
relieve the burdens of Mr. and Mrs. McKee. On the 23d and 24th 
of August a typhoon passed over the region occupied by this station. 
The rain fell in torrents; the streams were swollen to a degree un- 
known in forty-five years ; bridges and houses were swept away, some 
villages being almost totally destroyed, and crops greatly injured. The 
loss fell heavily upon some of our native Christians. The chapel in 
Ta-bing was wrecked — ^the native preacher and his family, who occu- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



5? CENTRAL CHINA— NINGPO. 

pied a part of it, barely escaping with their lives. The Roman Cath- 
olics have not been slow to take advantage of this condition of things, 
one of their preachers busying himself among the suffering members 
of our church in the Saen-poh district, offering them food and clothing 
if they would come to Ningpo and join the Roman Catholic Church. 
Notwithstanding the strong temptation to people on the verge of 
starvation, only three or four yielded. When in addition to this it is 
learned that persecutions, especially in the line of depriving Chris- 
tians of their rights and privileges as to ancestral estates, still con- 
tinue, it will be seen that the difficulties encountered are neither few 
nor small. 

In spite of these drawbacks, several of the churches connected with 
the station have enjoyed a time of refreshing. Ten members were 
added to the Ningpo church on confession of faith, two of them wood- 
carvers by trade, men of intelligence and influence. One was the 
son of heathen parents in well-to-do circumstances. Before he was 
received into the church, the parents were consulted, and frankly 
stated that they had no objection to having their son confess Christ — 
a very marked contrast to the persecution which usually awaits those 
making a public confession of their faith. Special mention is made of 
marked growth in spirituality on the part of two of the members of 
the church, manifested amon^ other things by a spirit of Christian 
beneficence — one of them givmg one-tenth of his income to the Lord, 
and the other still more. The church at Fu-saie, in the Saen-poh 
district, so signally blessed last year, has received eighteen persons on 
confession of faith this year, while still others are inquiring. It is 
worthy of record that this work of grace had its origin in the faithful 
efforts of a humble, earnest member of the church among his heathen 
neighbors. The church at Tsiu-ong has just completed a neat church 
building at a cost of $450, United States gold, of which less than one- 
half was furnished by the Board. 

There are seven Bible-readers connected with the station, five of 
them laboring in Ningpo, and the others within the bounds of churches 
at the outstations. Those serving in the city engage also in itinerary 
work at certain times. 

Referring to evangelistic work the report says : " On account of 
the unusual readiness of so many to listen to the truth, our native 
preachers feel the importance of being doubly diligent at this time, 
and we are sending out preachers, two and two, into the regions be- 
yond." While on a recent visit to Tong-Yiang, two hundred miles 
from Ningpo, Mr. McKee was hospitably entertained by two gentle- 
men of influence. They professed to be believers in Christianity, 
having learned of Christ at the Hankow Hospital of the London Mis- 
sionary Society, where they had been successfully treated. They gen- 
erously offered their assistance in securing a suitable house for a chapel 
if a native preacher could be sent. Two native laborers have been 
sent to occupy the field for the time. During the early part of the 
year a combined effort was made by the four missions occupying 
Ningpo to conduct street preaching in different parts of the city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CENTRAL CHINA— SHANGHAI. 59 

The- experiment, which continued for three months, was regarded by 
all as a success. 

Schools. — TYicPresbyierial Academy^ under the care of the Presbytdry 
of Ningpo, had thirty-four pupils last year, twenty-nine of them being 
boarders. Of these, twenty-five are sons of Christians, eight of them 
being communicants. The religious interest in the school has been 
well sustained. Seven of the pupils applied for admission to the seal- 
ing ordinances of the church, four of whom were received, including 
the son of heathen parents, to whom reference has already been made. 
The Presbytery maintains a faithful watch over this institution, re- 
quiring at its annual meeting reports from the directors, the examining 
committee, and the soliciting committee, besides carefully auditing the 
accounts of the school. 

The Girl^ Boarding-School^ which^ under the efficient management 
of Mrs. Butler, has come to be an important missionary agency, has 
for the past year been under the direction of Mr. McKee, Mrs. Mc- 
Kee rendering such assistance as her strength would allow. Mrs. Li, 
the raatron-teacher, and the other native helpers who have been con- 
nected with the school for some time, also rendered excellent service 
in the absence of the Principal The pupil-teacher, Ah-loh, died after 
a short illness, rejoicing in her Saviour, and exhorting her heathen 
relatives to accept Christ Thirty-four pupils were enrolled, most of 
them the daughters of Christians. Eight are communicants, and five 
others are inquiring. 

There are three day-schools for boys connected with the station — 
one in Ningpo with eight pupils, one at Bao-ko-toh with ten, and one 
at Yu Yaio with sixteen. These schools are under the care of the 
pastors at the respective places, who are held responsible for their 
management. The Board grants $25 per annum toward the support 
of the teacher, the church being responsible for the remainder. This 
plan is found to work well, as it not only stimulates to self-support, 
but makes the teacher responsible to the pastor, and in a' measure to 
the parents of the pupils. These teachers are graduates of the board- 
ing-schooL 

There are two day-schools for girls^ one of them taught by Mrs. Zi, 
the wife of the pastor of the Ningpo church, who, in addition to the 
usual studies, gives the pupils lessons in sewing, embroidering, etc. 
The children are mostly from heathen homes. The other is taught 
by O-kwe, a young married woman, a graduate of the girls' boarding- 
school. It originated in her gathering together, of her own accord, 
a few of the daughters of her heathen neighbors, to teach them to 
read and sing. These schools have been superintended by Mrs. 
Partch, who has also the oversight of the Bible-readers and the indus- 
trial class. 

Shanghai Station. 

Our mission occupies three localities in this commercial metropolis 
of Central China. The oldest sub-station is within the English con- 
cession and centres around the Mission Press. This Press, first estab- 
lished in Macao in 1844, removed to Ningpo in 1845, and finally 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



6o CENTRAL CHINA— SHANGHAI. 

transferred to Shanghai in i860, continues to be one of the most 
efficient parts of our equipment at this station. The plant has been 
increased during the year by the addition of a new Bremner printing 
machine, together with two new fonts of type. The Press continues 
to do a large amount of work for the British and Foreign Bible Society, 
the American Bible Society, the Chinese Religious Tract Society, and 
the North China Tract Society. During the year 11,753,950 pages of 
Scriptures were printed; 7,158,870 of religious books and tracts; 
3,09 ^.,2 13 pages of miscellaneous matter, besides the regular issues of 
the Illustrated News^ the Child* s Paper ^ and Chinese Recorder ^ mak- 
ing a total of 23,820,363 pages for the year. About one-half of the 
eighty persons employed in the Press are professing Christians. All 
are expected to be present at morning prayers, and the attendance on 
the Sabbath services, which is voluntary, is reported as excellent. Bor 
the past two years the church connected with the Press has been sup- 
plied by Mr. Sz, a Chinese minister. A few months ago he was 
formally called, and has since been installed pastor of the church, the 
congregation providing for his entire support In addition to this 
they have also furnished funds for the maintenance of a day-school. 

About three miles south of the Press, outside the South Gate of the 
city, is the second centre of work established. To the east and south- 
east of this there is a populous suburb, extending over a mile from 
north to south, within which no other mission is operating^ Mr. 
Smith writes : " Including the portion of the interior of the native dty 
next to us unoccupied by other missions, we have a region of about 
one mile and a half long by one mile wide, densely packed with 
houses, and containing a population of about 150,000. Our nearest 
missionary neighbors are. a mile west of us, and the nearest point of 
the foreign settlement is a mile to the north." The church at the 
South Gate reports 129 members, of whom four were received on con- 
fession of faith during the past year. The average attendance on the 
Sabbath morning service was about 160. Two Sunday-schools are 
held in connection with this church, — one in the morning for the 
boarding-school scholars, the other in the afternoon, which is attended 
not only by the pupils in the boarding and day schools, but also by a 
number of heathen. The highest number present during any one 
session was 285, the average attendance, including teachers and pupils, 
being 230. 

Concerning the two boarding-schools at the South Gate the report 
says that '* they have continued about as usual, excepting that we have 
had more sickness than commonly falls to our lot, and were obliged 
to close both schools for a month on account of measles. The usual 
studies have been pursued, special efforts being made to secure thorough 
religious instruction." 

In the boy^ school (orXy-ihree have been enrolled, the average attend- 
ance being thirty-seven. The religious condition of the school is 
encouraging. Six of the boys are professing Christians, four having 
been received into the church during the year, one of them uniting 
with the Southern Baptist Church with which his family is connected. 
Still others are inquiring. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CENTRAL CHINA— SOOCHOW. 6 1 

In reporting the girl^ boarding-school^ Mrs. Smith states that the 
arrival of Miss Posey had been quite a relief, the burdens being too 
great for one to carry. The school is conducted on the Mt. Holyoke 
plan. The report says : " We divided our thirty girls into ten divisions 
last spring, giving one of the older girls two younger ones to care for 
and help. Each division has work to do each day, and every Monday 
morning the task is changed ; for instance : the kitchen division be- 
comes the dining-room division during the second week, and that has 
charge of the dormitories, and so on." One death occurred during 
the year, and although the girl was not a professing Christian the hope 
is expressed that she had given herself to the Saviour. Fourteen of 
the girls are members of the church and sustain a weekly prayer- 
meeting. 

Seven day-schools have been conducted during the year in con- 
nection with the South Gate, the pupils being examined monthly in 
the church building. The total average attendance on these schools 
was about one hundred. In addition to his teaching and preaching 
work, Mr. Smith prepared and issued a Sunday-school paper, one-half 
of which is devoted to the International Lessons and is used in 
Shanghai and Soochow in our own and some other missions. 

About four and a half miles northeast of the Press, within the Amer- 
ican concession, in the district called Hongkew, is the third location 
occupied by our mission under the superintendency of Dr. Farnham. 
The site was selected during the past year after consultation with the 
Presbytery, and in view of its spiritual destitution. It was found that 
a number of members of Presbyterian churches of the city were living 
in that locality, and steps have now been taken for organizing them 
into a church. On Sabbath, February 3, 1889, a room was opened 
and publicly consecrated to the service of God as a chapel. The 
average attendance at the preaching services has been about 60, with 
an attendance at Sunday-school of 47. Eight persons have expressed 
a wish to be received into the communion of the church. 

Three day-schools for boys and girls have been established in the 
neighborhood, two of them being taught by Christian women, who 
were trained in our girls' boarding-schools at Shanghai and Ningpo. 
All the schools are superintended by Mrs. Farnham. 

Dr. Farnham in addition to other work has continued to have 
the editorial oversight of the Child* s Paper and Chinese Illustrated 
News ; also, to act as secretary of the Chinese Religious Tract Society. 

The supervision of the five outstations connected with this station 
has fallen to Mr. Silsby, who spent seven weeks in itinerating, exam- 
ining the schools, and conducting services in connection with one of 
the Chinese preachers. 

Soochow Station, 

Soochow, a city of 500,000 inhabitants, is the centre of an immense 
population. It is estimated that from the top of the large pagoda in 
the city may be seen an area with a population of five millions, while 
five millions more are contained in a still wider circle, which must be 
reached from this «6tation if at all. The outlying regions between 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



62 CENTRAL CHINA— HANGCHOW. 

Soochow, Hangchow, and Shanghai include a lai^e number of walled 
cities with their teeming multitudes. The city has been occupied by 
our mission for the past eighteen years, but for* the most part it has 
been very inadequately manned. The church numbers 25 members, 
7 of them having been received during the year. The interna- 
tional lesson is studied on Sabbath morning, and preaching services 
are held in the afternoon, especially for Christians. There is also a 
Thursday afternoon prayer-meeting and a weekly prayer-meeting for 
women. Two women have been brought into the church largely 
through the influence of the Bible-woman. Mrs. Hayes feels deeply 
the need of reinforcement in this direction, and it is earnestly hoped 
that two single ladies, for whom provision was made in the estimates 
last year, may be found to enter upon this work during the coming 
year. Services have been maintained in the two chapels as usual. 
One inquirer is reported from that at Tsang Mung, a man who had 
been addicted to opium-smoking. In this connection Mr. Hayes 
writes : ** We have a terrible foe to contend with in opium. There is 
an opium den on each side of one of our chapels, close to the build- 
ing, and the fumes from the smokers are often quite annoying." At 
Mt. Lion, a rocky peak several hundred feet high, rising abruptly from 
the plain, some five or six miles west of the city, a chapel has been 
rented and a school opened. At the foot of this peak five of the 
Soochow church members reside, four of them having been baptized 
during the year. It is expected that this will prove the nucleus of a 
strong and vigorous church. Of the five members only one, a woman, is 
unable to read. They are well-to-do farmers, and live in the midst of 
a population above the average in intelligence. The report makes 
touching reference to the death of one of the elders, Mr. Loo, who 
was for many years a chapel preacher at Kwung-san, but for the past 
three years had been identified with work at Soochow. He witnessed 
a good confession, and died in the triumph of faith. 

Five day-schools have been in operation with a total enrollment of 
72. In these schools about one-half the time is devoted to the study 
of Christian books. Two young men from this station have recently 
entered the theological class in Tungchow. 

The brethren at this station make an earnest plea for at least two 
men adapted to itinerating work, who after mastering the language 
may be able to undertake the work of preaching the Gospel in the 
vast re&rion already referred to. 

Hangchow Station, 

The return of Mr. and Mrs. Mills to the United States last spring, 
because of impaired health, left the whole burden of this station upon 
Mr. and Mrs. Judson until toward the close of the year, when they 
were joined by the Rev. J. C. Garritt, the only addition to the or- 
dained force of the entire mission for the year. 

The membership of the church in Hangchow numbers 68, the same 
as last year. Five had been added on confession of faith, but one 
had died and four had been dismissed to other churches. *' The con- 



Digitized by VjtOOQIC 



CENTRAL CHINA— HANGCHOW. 63 

tributions have been larger than usual. In addition to the support of 
their own pastor, and caring for the sick and poor among themselves, 
they raised some thirteen dollars toward the relief of the famine* 
stricken ones in Northern China, and they have also employed a 
Bible-woman during the greater part of the year." The church at 
Sin-z, the other church connected with this station, has had a very 
different experience. But one has been added to the roll, while six 
names have been taken off, three by death and three by dismission to 
other churches, leaving a total membership of 38. The pastor, Mr. 
Yu, who has been settled over the church about a year, has passed 
through a sore affliction in the death of his wife, leaving him with five 
motherless children. Owing to the lack of force, but little chapel 
work was done in the city of Hangchow. Mr. Tsiang Nying-kwe, 
pastor cf the city church, preached in two chapels as his other duties 
would permit In the Beh-ma-miao chapel, service has been kept up 
throughout the year, a student who had been pursuing his studies in 
the Tungchow Training-School being in charge. In addition to the 
Bible-woman employed by the church, the mission has employed an- 
other. These visit the homes during the year, and testimony is borne 
that nearly all the families, whether rich or poor, receive them gladly, 
and listen attentively to the truth. During the year over one thou- 
sand families have been visited in this way. 

The Bayi Boarding-School opened with an attendance of 50. Two 
were subsequently dismissed, leaving 48 on the roll, an increase of 
8 over last year. Of the 48, seven are professing Christians, one 
of whom was received during the year. About half of them are the 
children of Christian parents, and have been baptized. At a recent 
communion, twelve others applied for admission to the church, four 
of whom were received. Mr. Judson reports a marked religious feel- 
ing among the students throughout the year. Two young men were 
graduated last year — one, a member of the Hangchow church, is now 
teaching a day-school in the city, and the other, of the Southern Pres- 
byterian Church in Hangchow, is employed by them as a teacher. 
At the last meeting of the Presbytery, three of the graduates from this 
school were licensed to preach, while still another is studying theology 
at Tungchow. 

The Industrial Department has been continued as during last year, 
a native carpenter being employed to give instruction. The outcome, 
however, is far from satisfactory, and the request is again made that a 
man thoroughly trained in industrial lines in this country be sent out 
to take charge of this department. 

Five day-schools are conducted by this station, three in Hangchow 
and one at Sin-z, the fifth having been opened at the outstation 
Zang-peh. The case of a sad fall and probable apostasy through 
opium is recorded in connection with one of the schools, the teacher 
having been dismissed because of the opium habit, after having been 
dealt with kindly, but without effect. He has been disciplined by the 
church, but thus far has given no indication of deep penitence. 

On the return of Mr. and Mrs. Mills to the field after furlough, it is 
expected that more attention will be given to evangelistic work. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



64 CENTRAL CHINA — NANKING. 

Nanking Station. 

The completion of the house erected for the two single ladies con- 
nected with the girls* school — Miss Lattimore having been joined by 
Miss Lane last autumn — together with the building of a neat and 
commodious chapel, has quite add^d to the material equipment of the 
station. The chapel, which was rendered necessary by the growth q€ 
the girls' school, was built in part by gifts from private sources, and 
was dedicated to the service of God last June. Though ten conver- 
sions are reported for the year in connection with this station, no 
church has been organized, presumably because of the lack of material 
for ruling elders. Mr. Leaman reports that regular Sabbath services 
have been conducted at three points in the city, with a manifest in- 
crease of interest on the part of the people. He has also paid some 
attention to the distribution of Bibles, tracts, and calendars, and feels 
assured that the year has passed with a good measure of God's bless- 
ing and no little success. 

Mrs. Leaman reports for the Girl^ Boarding-School a year of 
patient effort and of " quiet waiting for the dqws which are to bring 
on the longea-for harvest"; adding, "each little advance in the way 
of truth, each little turning to ways of righteousness, fills our souls 
with joy and gratitude." This joy was experienced at the close of the 
last term, when a number of the girls expressed a desire to be num- 
bered with the people of God. As this was the first shower of bless- 
ing upon the school, it is noted with profound gratitude. 

The experimental stage in the school may be regarded as past. 
No difficulty is now found in getting the parents to sign papers agree- 
ing to place their children in the school for a given number of years. 
Progress has also been made in the direction of unbinding the feet^ 
about one-half of the girls in the schools having their feet unbound. 
Twenty-four girls and four women have been enrolled as boarders 
during the year, and twelve girls as day pupils, making forty in all. 
The report says : " Among the little girls who are turning their faces 
Zionward is one who was intended by her mother for a Buddhist nun. 
She was brought to me with her head shaven, her feet unbound, and 
her ears without rings, as those intended for nuns must not bind their 
feet or pierce their ears. I prevailed on the mother to let the child's 
hair grow, and of course I was only too glad that the feet were free as 
God made them. The mother has told me since that she will give 
the little girl over to our church. She seems to look upon it just as 
giving it over to another religious order." Mrs. Leaman meets a class 
of women twice a week for reading, some of them being servants in 
the mission families, others mothers of the girls, and still others outside 
heathen women. Fourteen have been in attendance during the year, 
and it is hoped that ten or twelve of them will soon be able to read 
the Word of God. One of these women has applied for baptism. 

The Boys' Boarding-School conducted by Mr. Abbey reports a roll 
of eleven pupils. The school is intended to keep in view the training 
of Christian helpers and teachers. The religious instruction includes 
daily recitation in the Bible, Old Testament history, Dr. Corbett's 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CENTRAL CHINA— NANKING. 65 

Catechism, the Westminster Catechism, etc. In connection with 
morning worship, some time is devoted each day to the expounding of 
the Scriptures. There has been a decided religious interest among the 
scholars. At the spring communion four of them were baptized, pub- 
licly confessing Christ. One of them before taking the step was told 
by his mother that he might be required to pass through some severe 
trials. His reply was, no matter what happened he desired to confess 
Christ, adding, " If they kill my body they could not kill my soul." 

Nanking continues to be regarded by our missionaries as an import- 
ant centre for educational work. In this they are evidently sustained 
by other missionary Boards working in this former capital of China. 
In this great literary centre the Methodist Episcopal Church of the 
United States is about to establish a University with a foundation of 
$200,000, and the Disciples are also securing a site on which to erect 
a college building. Compared with these magnificent enterprises our 
educational plant is certainly insignificant. It is claimed that the 
Mandarin spoken in Nanking is the most useful in China, being readily 
understood by one hundred millions of people. The work done here 
in Christian education, therefore, cannot be regarded as having a mere 
local interest. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



o 



< 
U 

H 

o 

CO 

U 
[^ 

I— I 

H 
< 
H 

CO 







§ 


& 


J? 


1 


» 




M 


rS^^ 












M- 


Urn 














•/floyjs- 


1 


-R 


^ 


3- 


8 


r. 


y/»^^5' «« s/'/V 










►T 


'm4^j/o'ojqmox 


'i 




& 


e. 


s; 


1 




>^ 


moL 


n 


s 


$ 




.8 


»o 


'^MD 


15 


r* 


: 




s 


? 


1 


Q 


'sKoff 




^ 


? 




s> 


s 

^ 


§ 




/o 'OX 


«n 


»o 


^ 


m 


« 


a 


<^ 




'^^fD 


^ 


H 


: 




* 


s 




















SKOQ 


s 


9 


% 


" 


H 






'Ctfsium 


, 


C*> 


H 


c« 




A0/stu9pnts: 


" 








' 






•SJDOOMU^ 


8> 




to 


v% 


o 


^ 


1 


PUO ^$V9a 


. 










' » 


MOOUWQ 
.iV9£ 














u 


«o 


^ 


O 


t* 


o 


9. 


^ 


JSutJHp p9ppy 


«n 


** 










"tunmmoj 


i 


{5 

M 


1 


s* 


s 


« 




'Sfqojiniij 





« 


« 


H 


. 


I? 




/o'o/^ 
















'SJ911DV9X 


c*> 


o 


, 


« 


n 


t>. 


j u (2 


9JVm9J 


H 








«o 


""ft" 


1 h" 


00 


•* 


f) 


;^.^ 


'U9 
'SjU 


t^Ai 9WS 


t>. 


H 


« 


H 


; 


H 
H 


1 "^ffi 


^4j»H ^^N 


: 


*0 




« 


H 


o 


M 


'mox 




-^ 


M 


H 


•^ 


? 


s 


'pfijiuvmuQ 


fO 


« 


« 


" 


s 


< 


c« 


M 


; 




« 


«o 




'S9tVtt 


t>i 


H 


H 




. 


o 




-U99t'T 9AtfV/,l 

•s9attVj\f 












M* 


3 


Ch 


«<^ 


<« 




. 


' H 


p9UU>pJ0 
'S9tADUOtf 












«0 


5 


n 


^ 


C*> 


« 


« 




r p9UWpJ0 














f9q uctfvfs: 


1 

H 


M 


1 


H 


t 




(0* 




: 


• 




J 




1 




•g 


% 


i 


Itf 




1 


.s 


t 


g 
« 


1 




1 






, 


55 


« 


s 


(K 


2 


H 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MISSIONS TO THE CHINESE AND JAPANESE IN 
THIS COUNTRY. 

San Francisco : mission begun 1852 ; mission axy laborers— Rev. Messrs. Augustus 
W. Loomis, D.D., and A. J. Kerr and their wives ; Miss Maggie Culbertson, Miss £. R. 
Cable, and Miss M. M. Baddn ; three teachers in English ; three native helpers. 

Among the Japanese : one native s::perintendent and two native helpers. 

Oakland : mission begun 1877 ; two teachers ; one native helper. 

Los Angeles : Rev. I. M. Condit and wife ; two native helpers ; four teachers in 
Eni^lish. 
Portland, Oregon : Rev. W. S. Holt and wife. 
New York : one native superintendent. 

San Francisco, 

The work among the Chinese in California still labors under the 
great discouragements which affect the social and political status of 
these people. A change of administration in the Government 
had excited the hopes of the Chinese that the Exclusion Law would 
be modified, and that people, even though laborers — formerly resi- 
dent here, but now in China — would be permitted to come back, 
and that all who are now in this country might go and come at pleas- 
ure. These hopes, however, have been disappointed ; the Exclusion 
Law is still carried out ; and, from the indications of the public press, 
the anti-Chinese feeling is spreading through other cities as well as 
San Francisco, especially against the laundrymen. The Chinese 
population is stead'ly decreasing. Every steamer carries back from 
two to five hundred. 

The morning and evening services in the Chinese church are well 
attended, though not quite as largely as in previous years. The Sab- 
bath-school is still well sustained, and the evening mission school for 
boys and young men has also given much encouragement. One young 
roan, Ng Poon Chew, who has been studying in the mission school for 
some time in preparation for the ministry, is so far advanced that last 
September he was able to enter the Presbyterian Theological Seminary 
in San Francisco, where he has proved himself a bright and promising 
student. He still keeps up his Chinese study, and looks forward with 
the confident hope of becoming a missionary to his native land. 

The missionaries in San Francisco have been called upon as in for- 
mer years to act as agents for missionaries in China, Japan, and Siam, 
— ^forwarding various bills of goods, at the same time that they have 
bad no easy task in rendering assistance to those missionaries who 
were going and coming through the Golden Gate. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



68 CHINESE AND JAFaNESE IN U. S.— SAN FRANCISCO. 

During the summer. Dr. and Mrs. Loomis spent some time in Santa 
Cruz and San Jose, and Mr. Kerr has visited Sacramento, Santa Rosa, 
Stockton, Placerville, etc. In many places he preached on the street 
to goodly numbers, and embraced every opportunity to reach the 
Chinamen. 

A promising Sabbath-school was organized in the Presbyterian 
church at Stockton during the year, and at Placerville arrangements 
have been made for a day-school for Chinese children born in that . 
town. 

Six adults have been received into the church in San Francisco and 
four children have been baptized. The present membership is 78. 
The contributions during the year have amounted to $502.30. 

The Chinese Woman* s Home. — The Home for Chinese girls con- 
ducted by the Occidental Woman's Board, has been in existence fifteen 
years, and has rescued and sheltered 260 persons, — a noble record 
surely. There were 35 inmates at the beginning of the year 1889 ; 
28 more were received during the twelve months following, making a 
total of 65 for the year. Eleven have been removed from the Home 
by marriage, and two have died. Most of those rescued and brought 
to this retreat were slaves, and represented a money value of from $500 
to $2,000 each. The report of Miss Culbertson says : " In nearly 
every case we have hard legal battles to fight in the courts to retain 
these girls, for the Chinese slave-dealer does not relinquish his chattel 
without the fiercest struggle." An illustration is given in the case of 
a little seven-year-old girl, Kum Yoke. The report sayS : 

** In the latter part of September she was rescued from what is 
known in Chinatown as the * Beehive house,' by the officer for pre- 
vention of cruelty to children. Her scant and filthy garments were 
infested with vermin, and her little body was bruised and blackened 
by the frequent beatings she received. Kum Yoke's 'alleged mother' 
was a gambler, and her paramour an opium-smoker, and any ill luck 
that attended them they attributed to the child, and her young life was 
made miserable by their cruelty ; the excuse for their brutality was, 
that she had a bad habit of biting her finger-nails, which according to 
Chinese notion was as bad as taking poison. 

" We obtained immediate letters of guardianship, which the * alleged 
parents * set to work to have revoked, carrying the case from one court 
to another, and now after a period of four months the case has re- 
cently been decided in our favor. The closing words of the judge's 
decision published in the San Francisco Law Journal are these : * To 
take the child from the Mission Home would be very much on a par, 
as to reasoning, with withdrawal ng a lad from the high-school to fritter 
away his life in the purlieus of filth, vice, and crime. The motion to 
revoke letters of guardianship must be denied.' Kum Yoke is an in- 
teresting child, and takes kindly to her new surroundings." 

There are at present seven Christian girls in the Home, who assist as 
interpreters in religious instruction, and who give lessons in the day- 
school. 

Among other results of this good work there are thirty-five homes 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHINESE AND JAPANESE IN U. S.— SAN FRANCISCO. 69 

on the Pacific coast, which have been created by the marriage of these 
rescued girls. 

The report urges the great need of enlarged accommodations, not 
only for the regular inmates, but for special occasions. As an illus- 
tration of this need, the U. S. Court recently sent ten Chinese women 
to the Home, as guests, pending certain legal investigations as to their 
rights. 

Work in Chinese Families, — Miss Emma R. Cable's work of 
house-to-house visitation has been carried forward as usual, 133 
families having been visited and instructed. Miss Cable's methods 
cover all that pertains to the personal, domestic, social, and religious 
life of the households which she is permitted to enter. A systematic 
course is pursued, so that the instruction may be followed up to 
hopeful results. In her parish are 36 women with small feet. In 
the case of girls, the influence of Miss Cable has frequently been 
etfectual in the abolition of the practice. There are 18 girls at pres- 
ent still subject to this cruelty, instead of 30 as at a former time. 
They are beginning to *' like big feet, all same as Shing Shang 
(teacher), so I can go street." One hundred and fifty-six girls have 
been taught and visited, ranging from three to twelve years of age ; 
58 of these have been under instruction, and with good results. 
Only seven adult women have been brought under systematic instruc- 
tion, though often the mothers learn from their children. " Fortunately," 
says Miss Cable, '^ the number of slave children is decreasing from 
year to year, and I observe a more humane treatment of them, as the 
owners are conscious that we have a vigilant eye over them, and the 
Home acts as a corrective. It is and has been a satisfaction that we 
have been enabled to gather some of these children into the Home. 
We frequently encounter children in the alleys and dens of vice, who 
are there in defiance of our laws ; and could we induce the proper 
authorities to take hold of these children, we would not be compelled 
to see the class of little girls whom we taught in Bartlett Alley already 
in the possession of procuresses and in dens of iniquity at the age of 
thirteen and fourteen. This is the branch of our work which demands 
the most earnest attention. To-day I have in my home a young girl 
that Miss MacFarland and myself rescued from one of the lowest dens 
in Cum Cook Alley, a girl eighteen years of age. She is attractive 
in appearance, of superior mind, marked individuality, and of a refine- 
ment of manner which it is difikult to tell how she acquired. Bought 
in China for $300, and landed in defiance of our laws, she was sold in 
Chinatown for $2,500, and placed in one of the many shameless and 
nameless dens that infest that locality. She was at the time but four- 
teen years of age. Of the bargain and sale there can be no possible 
doubt, for in addition to living witnesses of her enslavement I hold the 
bill of sale covering the details of the iniquitous transaction. In the 
house from which she was taken there were five other girls held as 
chattels, toward whom my heart yearned, and I would gladly have 
rescued them if I could. Of such houses there are probably not less 
than one hundred scattered through Chinatown, and recent indications 
point to a rapid increase. I respectfully but very earnestly submit 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



70 JAPANESE— SAN FRANCISCO.' 

that the time has arrived when the Church should take hold of 
this crying evil and break it up. What is wanted is a propelling 
power behind the officers of the law that shall force them to action. 
This the Christian people should supply. The laws are all right ; the 
non-enforcement of them is all wrong. Human slavery is abolished, 
but it is maintained as a living, hideous, death^ealing, soul-destroying 
fact all the same. 

"In this connection I would call attention to a decision just rendered 
by Judge Gibson, of Alameda County, by which one of the slave- 
holders has been sentenced to pay a fine of $300, and su£fer twelve 
months' imprisonment. In speaking of the state of things in San 
Francisco the learned judge used brave and noble language, every 
word of which my ten years' experience in Chinatown enables me to 
endorse and approve. He said : * This conviction may be a bene- 
ficial lesson in restraining such unlawful acts in Alameda County. 
The Chinese woman, I believe, was held in slavery, and the defend- 
ant is known to have deprived her of her liberty. We do not want 
to see the practices that hold sway in San Francisco indulged in 
Alameda County. My view is that the majority of officers in San 
Francisco's Chinatown ought to be behind the bars of the State prison. 
They are working in with the vilest criminals unhung. There are 
bribery and corruption there, and a worse form of slavery than that 
which existed in the South before the war. Chinatown is a disgrace to 
civilization, a menace to all decency, and it ought to be cleansed. 
We must use the law here to protect Alameda County from the crying 
shame that spoils the fame of San Francisco. I think that Lem Share 
is guilty, and I deny the motion.' The defendant was then sentenced 
to one year's imprisonment in the county jail, and to pay a fine of 
$300." 

The Occidental boys'-school has had during the year an enrollment 
of from 35 to 40. The illness of Miss Baskin during a part of the year 
somewhat interfered with the full and regular attendance. During the 
absence of Miss Baskin on account of illness. Miss Jennie Wisner, 
late of the Canton Mission, was temporarily employed. 

One of the older pupils, Ah Chew, was dismissed in October to 
become a student in the Theological Seminary, where his progress is 
reported as most satisfactory. His object is to carry the Gospel to his 
countrymen in China. In addition to school-work, Miss Bsiskin has 
been able to do something in the line of house-to-house visitation. 

The Japanese Mission In San Francisoo. 

The work of the Presbyterian Board among the Japanese in Cali- 
fornia is full of interest and promise. All the indications show that 
the time has come when more vigorous measures should be adopted 
and a more generous support accorded. There are said to be not less 
than 2,000 Japanese on the coast. Most of these are found in the 
city of San Francisco and in the suburban towns. More than half of 
the entire number are those who have been baptized by missionaries 
in Japan, and a large per cent, of these have been connected with the 
congregations of the Union Presbyterian church in their native land. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



JAPANESE— SAN FRANCISCO. 7 1 

The resignation of Dr. and Mrs. E. A. Sturge was severely felt by 
the Japanese Mission. For nearly three years they had devoted them- 
selves most earnestly to the evangelization of these young men, who 
are coming in increasing numbers. They were so highly esteemed 
and beloved by the young men that it seemed impossible for a time to 
fill their place. Mr. A. Hatori, a licentiate of the United Church of 
Christ, was sent early in the year to take charge of the work. 

The Japanese Presbyterian church in San Francisco numbers 57 
members. Connected with it is a Young Men's Christian Association 
of about 75 members. The building in which Sabbath services 
are held is rented by the Young Men's Christian Associatioa, and 
the only expenses to the Board during the past year have been 
$600, paid as salary to Mr. Hatori, an undergraduate of Princeton 
Theological Seminary, who has been employed for the year, and an al- 
lowance of $25 per month toward the employment of assistant teach- 
ers. Of this sum $12.50 per month has been paid to a young Japan- 
ese teacher; the other $12.50, supplemented by gifts of the Japanese 
church, has been devoted to the employment of an English teacher. 
Mr- Hatori has preached twice on the Sabbath with great acceptance, 
and the only limit to his congregations has been that of the narrow 
and insufficient accommodations furnished for the purpose. The care- 
ful preparation of his sermons and the conduct of religious meetings 
during the week, together with the labor of conducting a night-school 
on every evening of the week except Saturday, has been so great that 
he has been unable to devote the time and labor which seemed to be 
necessary to looking up the large accessions to the Japanese popula- 
tion which are made from month to month by every arriving steamer. 
It seems all-important that in addition to the utmost labor that Mr. 
Hatori can periform, there should be employed an American mis- 
sionary who shall take the general conduct of the mission, look after 
all finances, assume the management of the school, and devote him- 
self as far as possible to the work of gathering in the scores of young 
men, sons of the churches in Japan, and bringing them under the in- 
fluence of the mission. The Methodist Mission has purchased am- 
ple quarters for its Japanese work and made abundant provision 
not only for the church services, but also for the wants of the Young 
People's Association, or as they call it, the Gospel Society. Partly as 
a result of this better accommodation and more thoroughly equipped 
mission force, the Methodist Japanese church numbers over 100 mem- 
bers. 

As an example of our urgent need of enlarged accommodations, 
a recent steamer brought 22 young men from Japan, of whom 11 had 
letters to the Presbyterian Mission. "They came," says a letter, 
^ expecting to find accommodations and to be taken under the care 
of the mission, but not one of them could be accommodated. Cheap 
lodgings which could be rented to these men for a time at least would 
be a very great help to the work. The young men themselves have 
been raising a subscription, which now amounts to about $800, for 
the erection of a church of their own, but unaided as they are by the 
ChiistiaD churches about them, they have little prospect of success." 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



J2 JAPANESE — SAN FRANCISCO. 

A better outlay could scarcely be made by any Christian man of 
means, than in assisting these young men to provide in San Francisco 
a church home for their countrymen, in the present and in the time to 
come. 

These young Japanese represent the most vigorous element in the 
churches of Japan. Except through the influence of the San Fran- 
cisco Missions they will be likely to receive but little fellowship 
and encouragement from Christian sources. The complaint fre- 
quently made by them is that their first experience in Christian 
America is a surprise and a shock, and there is great danger that in 
too many instances this may be followed by apathy and doubt, and 
final apostasy ; while, on the other hand, if they are received with 
cordial fellowship, and the opportunity so peculiar and so favorable 
for effort among them is properly embraced, they may be sent back 
to their country as virtual missionaries in whatever pursuit they may 
be engaged. It seems almost invidious to compare one department 
of missionary work with another when there is so much demanded by 
all, but when one considers that this Japanese population consists 
wholly of vigorous and spirited young men, more than half of whom 
have received Christian baptism, who come to our shores to learn and 
who must in the very necessities of the case learn either good or evil 
and receive impressions which shall be edifying or paralyzing, it would 
seem that no form of missionary work in any mission or any coun- 
tr)' could make a stronger appeal to the attention and support of the 
Church than this. As an example of the influence which these men, 
properly cared for, may be expected to receive and carry back with 
them, the following instance is thus given by Mr. Kerr : 

" A recent steamer carried back to Japan one of our elders, Dr. 
Masayasu Kawakami. He was in some respects a very noteworthy 
man. In 1876, when only 17 years of age, he took part in the 
Maebara rebellion against the Japanese Government. He was arrested 
and imprisoned, but on the overthrow of the revolt was released. 

" The purpose of the rebellion, as he himself declares, was to exclude 
foreigners, Western civilization, and, in particular, the Christian religion 
from Japan. When he sau' that the new order of things was bound to 
prevail, like a wise man he went about to prepare for it. He studied 
foreign medicine in Tokyo, and was admitted to practise in 1882. 

"In the spring of 1885 he came to San Francisco for the double pur- 
pose of learning English and pursuing an advanced course in medicine. 
He was invited to our mission soon after his arrival in the city, and 
he*there found several young men similarly situated to himself. Mrs. 
Sturge taught him every evening, and Dr. Sturge gave him special in- 
structions during the day. He was converted and united with the 
church by baptism and confession of faith in the fall of that year. He 
subsequently entered the medical department of the State University, 
where he studied for two years. 

" He opened an office for practice on one of the principal streets 
and had certain hours in every week when he gave free medical at- 
tendance to poor Japanese. " About a year ago, by an almost 
unanimous vote, he was elected ruling elder in the church, and until 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



OAKLAND, CAL.— SACRAMENTO, CAL. 73 

his departure continued to serve the church faithfully. He at 
length yielded to his family's repeated entreaties that he should go 
home, and he sailed a few months ago. Before going he got a letter 
of dismissal, that he might unite with the Presbyterian church in 
Tokyo, but he particularly requested that I should give him a letter 
to one of the small churches where there would be plenty to do. 
The large churches, he said, have many workers." 

Seven young men were received into the Japanese church. Thirty- 
four united with the Christian Association. Ninety-four have been re- 
ceived into the Japanese church since its beginning in 1885. The 
present membership is sixty-five ; of these, twelve are absent in Japan 
or in other parts of this country. The contributions for all purposes 
have amounted to $1,174. 

The evening mission school for Japanese in Alameda is taught by 
Miss Garrette, daughter of the pastor of the church. The young men 
respond to their teacher's zeal and enthusiasm in a delightful manner. 
The weekly prayer-meeting is well attended. The contributions 
amounted to $45. 

There is a large and increasing number of Japanese in Oakland, for 
whom special work should be undertaken at once. It is desirable to 
rent a house sufficiently large, and also to engage a teacher for the 
evening school. It is believed that after the second or third month 
the Japanese would be ready to assume the entire rent and other ex- 
pense, leaving only the salary of the teacher to be paid by the Board. 

Oakland. 

The Chinese church has suffered even more seriously than that of 
San Francisco from removals. The present number of church members 
is 44. Fifteen of these, however, are absent ; seven in China and the 
others in different parts of this country. The remaining twenty-nine 
have been faithful, and, considering that they are house-servants, their 
contributions, which amounted to $257, have been generous. During 
the year two were received on profession of faith and one by letter. 
Eight were dismissed to churches in Canton. 

Sacramento, 

At Sacramento the work has been carried on under some difficulty. 
Charges of unchristian conduct were preferred against two of the 
prominent members. It was found impossible to secure definite 
proofs either to acquit or convict, and this unsettled condition of af- 
fairs has operated against the work. 

The evening and Sabbath schools have been prosperous. Excite- 
ment and differences of opinion are subsiding. A day-school has been 
opened for Chinese children, of whom there are fifteen of school age. 
The school is taught by Miss Lulu Earl, daughter of a Chinese mer- 
chanty who has been for a long time in business at Sacramento. She 
was graduated last spring from the city High-School, and is a devoted 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



74 CALIFORNIA. 

Christian. Her home is still heathen, but her influence in it and upon 
other Chinese women is excellent. The school is under the super- 
vision of Mrs. J. E. Wheeler, wife of the pastor of Westminster Pres- 
byterian church. Mrs. Wheeler provides for all necessary expenses, 
and is untiring in her efforts on behalf of the Chinese. The young 
men last summer refitted their mission-rooms at considerable expense. 
They have also been liberal during the year to various benevolences, 
the amount of contributions being $220. Two promising young men 
recently went to San Francisco and were baptized, 

San Josk. \ 

The reopening of the mission, which was contemplated in May last, 
has been postponed on account of heavy reductions in the appropria- 
tions. There are some faithful Chinese members in the place who 
very much desire the mission to be reopened. The estimates will 
provide for this, and it is hoped that the appropriation will be made. 



Santa Rosa. 

Good work has been accomplished during the year at Santa Rosa. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. Smythe, Miss Chase, Mrs. Pit- 
blado, and others have been faithful friends to the young men. The 
Chinese themselves meet all expenses, and have in addition given lib- 
erally to other benevolences. The night and Sabbath schools have 
been carried on during the year with a small but steady attendance. 
Two young men were baptized, and eight united with the Christian 
Association, of whom five or six are reported as about ready for bap- 
tism. The contributions have amounted to $109 50. 

Napa, 

The school has suffered from removals, and particularly 'from the re- 
turn to China of Lu Ling, to whose Christian influence all were in- 
debted. He was the leader of the Chinese Christians and was beloved 
by Americans and Chinese. The school has been maintained two 
nights in the week. The little church belonging to the Board at Napa 
is in great need of a roof. The cost is estimated at $175. 

San Rafael. 

Miss Walker has continued her earnest work in the night-school. 
Six of her scholars united with the Christian Association in prepara- 
tion for an open profession of their faith. The Sabbath-school and 
prayer-meeting have been encouraging. Elder C. H. Fish and Rev. 
Arthur Crosby have done much by their teaching and kind words. 
The scholars meet a part of the expense of the school. The contribu- 
tions for all purposes were $191. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CALIFORNIA— ALAMEDA, LOS ANGELES. 75 



Alameda. 

The progress made under Mrs. Fraser's continued labors has been 
marked. The town is considered a desirable place for family resi- 
dences, and the number of Chinese servants has accordingly increased. 
A larger place for services has long been desired. An eligible lot, 50 
by 150 feet, close to Mrs. Fraser*s house, was purchased by Dr. 
I^toomis last winter, — one-half of the cost being a contribution from 
Mrs. l^omis, the other half being given by the Board. This generous 
gift of Mrs. Loomis really effected the good result. 

Los Angeles, 

From the Los Angeles field Mr. Condit reports a total church 
membership of 65. Fourteen have been added during the year. The 
whole number received at that station from the beginning is 81. The 
Sabbath-school pupils number 66, and the pupils in day and night 
schools 218. The contributions during the year amounted to $771.78. 
Mr. and Mrs. Condit are the only missionaries of the Board in this 
Southern field. Five helpers are reported, and among those who have 
given instruction in the night-schools there are reported the names of 
Mrs. S. J. £. Noble, Miss Ida L. Boone, Mrs. H. £. Harrison, Miss 
C. C. Twitchell, Miss G. Harrison, Mrs. M. A. McKenzie, Mrs. 
Johnson, and Mrs. !-». P. Bidgood. The total expense of this force 
of teachers has been only $117 per month, less than double the 
amount of contributions from the churches at Los Angeles and the 
other stations. 

The financial reaction which has occurred in Los Angeles has, by its 
interference with business employments, seriously affected the work 
among the Chinese — diminishing the numbers there residing. 

The Morrison Band^ established by Mrs. Condit, has been doing 
good work. It has thirty members, and has generously contributed 
for the support of a native helper in China. A kindergarten in China- 
town, taught by Mrs. Harrison, numbers 25 children. 

Mrs. Condit reports at Los Angeles 23 women and children in- 
structed in 16 families. Ten of the women read and study the Bible 
in English and Chinese. Seven had been at one time or another in 
one of the Homes in San Francisco. On February 21st a meeting for 
women only was established. Twelve persons have been present at 
each meeting, and three or four have led in prayer. 

A kindergarten was opened in October for boys and girls. Nine 
children are regular pupils. 

Ten of the women read the English-Chinese Bible. 

Rev. Dr. Noble, of San Diego, says that the work there ** has cer- 
tainly vindicated its right to exist." Ninety-eight names are on the 
school-roll, and there have been nine baptisms. The average attend- 
ance at night-school is twenty-five. The same number is reported 
in the Sabbath-school. Twenty-three Chinamen are now members of 
the First Presbyterian church. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



^6 PORTLAND, OR.— NEW YORK. 

Santa Barbara. 

At this place the Chinese have their church-home in a neat chapel 
belonging to the Board. There have been fifty pupils in attendance 
at the evening school. Ten Christian Chinamen are connected with 
the mission, of whom three were baptized during the year. The Ad- 
ams Mission Band devotes the last Sunday evening of each month to a 
missionary concert, in which the work done in various lands is consid- 
ered. Miss Twitchell continues her work as teacher of the evening 
school and the Sunday Bible-class. The contributions have amounted 
to $260 ; of this, $74 was given for foreign missions, the remainder 
for congregational uses. Two persons who have recently been bap- 
tized are undergoing great trial in the opposition of their friends at 
home. They have received a letter with 4,000 characters, in which 
their kindred characterize their Christian profession as *' much foolish," 
and strive to turn them backward. 

Portland, 

The work of Rev. Mr. Holt has been fairly prosperous. 

Two new schools and centres of influence have been opened in the 
Chinese work during the year — one at Ashland and another at Salem, 
Oregon. A Home has been established in Portland for Chinese 
women and girls. This is under the care of the North Pacific Wom- 
an's Board, which has made a most vigorous and laudable beginning. 
Seven inmates have been received. 

Nine teachers are employed in the night-schools, in which there are 
135 pupils. The number of native Christians is 19; added during the 
year, 3. Amount of contributions, $140. 

Ntw York, 

The work among the Chinese in New York under the care of Mr. 
K. Huie, has been continued with good results. The average attend- 
ance in the Sabbath- school has been 35. The Sabbath evening ser- 
vice, at which Mr. Huie has preached in the Cantonese, has averaged 
20. The number has been reduced by the removal of some of the 
most efficient men. Two of these are in China, where they are doing 
good service among their countrymen. One of them, as reix>rted last 
year, had given a lot in his native community for the erection of a 
chapel. Recent letters from China show that a sufficient amount of 
money has been pledged for the erection of this structure. 

Among the contributions made by the Chinese school in this city, 
$50 was appropriated toward this building. A native preacher is 
already at work in the community, and when the building shall be 
completed there is every reason to expect a more efficient and ex- 
tended work. 

Two men from the New York school are now employed as mission- 
aries, one by a Baptist and the other by an Episcopalian Society. 
Three are engaged as assistant superintendents in different schools in 
New York and Brooklyn. Mr. Huie has been called upon to do a 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHINESE AND JAPANESE IN U. S.— STATISTICS. ^^ 

good deal of general work in the interest of Chinamen in this city. 
Thirteen persons have been assisted in time of sickness, and frequent 
instances occur in which interposition is necessary on the part,of those 
viio are imposed upon by Americans. One man has united with the 
church during the year, and there are several more who are hoping to 
do so soon. During the year $256.07 have been contributed, namely, 
$60 for the Johnstown sufferers, $50 for the church in San Ui, China, 
and $19 toward the erection of a chapel in Alameda. One hundred 
and twenty-seven dollars have been contributed by the Sabbath- 
school 

Statistics of Chinese and Japanese in this Country , 

Ordained missionaries 4 

Married female missionaries. 4 

Unmarried female missionaries 3 

Native helpers 10 

Churches. 4 

Communicants * 344 

Added during^ the fear 39 

Girls in boarding-school 45 

Daf and night schools 27 

Pupils in daf and night schools. 1*070 

Tobd number of pupils. i|ii5 

Pupils in Sabbath-schools 717 

Sttidents for ministry 5 

CoDtributions I3i7ii 

•The loss as compared with last year is owing to the 'fact 
tiiat laiige numbers of Chinamen are constantly returning to China. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MISSION IN GUA TEMALA. 

Organised in i88a : station, Guatemala City, about 60 miles from the seaport of San 
Jose ; laborers— Rev. Messrs. £. U. Haymaker and D. Y. Iddings and their wives ; Miss 
M. L. Hammond and Miss Imogene Stimeis. 

The year in this mission has been marked by aggressiveness and 
substantial gain. The arrival of Mr. and Mrs. Iddings in August 
relieved Mr. Haymaker of part of the heavy burden resting upon him, 
and which at one time seriously threatened his health. The work in 
the capital has steadily advanced both materially and spiritually. The 
church which has been in process of erection, though not yet com- 
pleted, is almost ready for inside finishing, an advance in the price of 
material requiring an additional appropriation to make it ready for 
occupancy. Services in English have been continued every Sabbath 
morning, conducted mainly by Mr. Iddings since his arrival on the 
field, while Spanish services have been held on Sabbath and Wednes- 
day evenings. The attendance at the latter has more than doubled 
during the past six months. With a view to attracting the attention 
both of the English and Spanish.speaking people the mission has 
adopted a plan which includes the scanning of the arrivals at hotels, 
systematic visitation, the establishing of a normal Bible-class, stated 
visits to hospitals, and the holding of special services now and then 
during the year. The Sabbath-school numbers fifty members, includ- 
ing both English-speaking and Spanish-speaking people. Owing to 
the peculiar difficulties in the early history of the church, the organ- 
ization has been allowed to lie dormant for the past year or two, but 
now in the judgment of the mission the time has come when it ought 
to be revived, the undesirable members having dropped out, and those 
remaining giving evidence of a quickened spiritual life. 

Considering the smallness of the available force, a good deal of 
attention has been given to evangelistic work. During the year two 
trips were made through the Eastern or Chiquimula circuit, the 
extreme points reached being two days from the capital. An itiner 
ating tour was made by one of the students to Quezaltenango, the 
second city of the republic, some four days from Guatemala City. It 
is reported to be a good centre for work among the Indian tribes, and 
therefore it is very desirable that it should be occupied at an early day. 
Many villages were visited during the itinerating tours, and large num- 
bers of copies of the Scriptures sold and subscriptions received for the 
little religious paper published by the mission. Some opposition was 
encountered, one priest having burned Bibles in the village of San 
Arate, and Uie fanaticism of the people, led by two priests, having 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



80 GUATEMALA. 

made it impossible to attempt work in the village of Villa Naeva. 
The most systematic effort at persecution was made in the village of 
San Rosita, some two leagues from Guatemala City. As members of 
the town council and the government secretary favored the attempt to 
establish Protestant worship, an effort was made to remove them, but 
failed. At first meetings were held in the schooUhouse, but as this 
was likely to involve the local authorities, meetings were discontinued, 
and the work was carried on privately. A lot has since been pur- 
chased and a small building is being erected on it by those interested 
in the work. When it is completed, it is expected that public worship 
will be resumed. 

The Girls' School {CoUgio Americano^ has had forty names enrolled 
during the year, including two small boys. Of these, ten were free 
pupils and the others paid tuition. The experiment authorized at the 
beginning of the year to open a boarding department on a small scale 
can scarcely be said to have succeeded, as only one pupil has thus far 
been received. In the school rich and poor meet together, the daugh- 
ter of the President of the Republic, " a bright though unassuming 
little girl," sitting side by side with the barefooted girls in the class. 
Miss Stimers, in addition to her other duties in the school, has con- 
ducted with growing interest a kindergarten department for the smaller 
children. A permanent home for the school, which would cost from 
$5,000 to $7,000 in addition to the price of a lot, is greatly needed. 
Miss Hammond in reporting the work of the school laments the lack 
of provision for the education of boys. She writes : ** One of our 
little boys has been put in a Roman Catholic school in Switzerland. I 
felt doubly pained at this because the father said before sending him 
away, * If you could continue to care for boys we would keep our boy 
at home. We were perfectly satisfied as long as he could be with 
you, but there is no other school in the city where we care to trust 
him.' " Although it is understood that boys are not taken, as a rule, 
some twelve or fifteen applications had been made by parents to have 
such received. Since the beginning of the new year the mission has 
recommended the opening of a school for boys. 

The El Mensajero, a little monthly paper published by the mission, 
has been issued throughout the year, but is discontinued for the pres- 
ent until the mission is in better shape to publish. In this connection 
Mr. Haymaker writes : " Fifteen hundred copies of a ten-page tract, 
giving a compend of our belief, were printed, many of which have 
already been distributed ; also, 2,500 copies of the ten commandments 
on small slips for general distribution." 

The field occupied by this mission is not only large and easily ac- 
cessible, but our missionaries are the only organized force at work in 
the interest of Protestant Christianity. In addition to the white Span- 
ish-speaking people there are multitudes of the Ladino, or mixed race, 
who are Roman Catholics by profession, and yet many of whom have 
no religion at all. It is from this mixed race that the controlling power 
of the liberal party in the government comes. In addition to these, 
away from the chief centres of population, and the main lines of travel, 
are to be found the Indian aborigines, who have never yielded to the 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



GUATEMALA. 8 1 

power of Rome. They practice their mysterious rites, incantations, 
and turkey sacrifices on the mountain-tops, as they did before Spain 
and Rome united in the conquest of Guatemala. The occupation of 
this Republic for Christ means the extending of evangelistic efforts to 
the Indian aborigines, as well as to the Ladinos or mixed race. 

Statistics for Guatemala. 

Ordained missionaries 3 

Married lady missionaries 2 

Single lady missionaries 3 

Native teacher i 

Church I 

Communicants. 4 

School for girls i 

Pupils (including one l>oarder) j8 

Students for the ministry a 

Pupils in Sabbath-school 50 

Pages printed i7i596 

Contributions $i5*45 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MISSIONS IN INDIA. 
Lodiana and Furrakhabad. 

[These missions occupy provinces in the northwest of India, with stations extending 
from Allahabad to Rawal Pindi, 900 miles apart, on or near the line of the chief rail- 
roads. The same lang:uages are mostly in use, and the same forms of reli^ous belief — 
heathen and Mohammedan^<:hiefly prevail. The methods of the missions m thdr work 
are also the same in both missions, and so their stations and reports are here presented in 
regular sequence. Their division into two missions is mainly for general and local ad- 
ministration.] 

STATIONS AND MISSIONARIES. 

Rawal Pindi : 170 miles northwest of Lahore ; mission station commenced, 1855 ; 
missionary laborers— Rev. J. F. Ullmann, Rev. Robert Morrison and his wife, and Rev. 
Howard Fisher ; Miss Margaret A. Craig ; native Christian assistants, eight ; superin- 
tendents of girls* schools, one. Ouf station : Murree. In England : Mrs. J. F. Ullmaun. 

Lahore : the political capital of the Punjab, 1,225 miles northwest of Calcutta; mis- 
sion station commenced, 1849; missionary laborers— Rev. John Newton, D.D., Rev. 
Charles W. Forman, D.D., Rev. J. C. Rhea Ewing, D.D., Rev. J. Harris Orbison, 
M.D. ; Rev. Henry C. Velte and Prof. J. G. Gilbertson and their wives ; Jfev. Isa Char- 
ran ; Miss Agnes L. Orbison ; native Christian assistants — nineteen. Employed by the 
mission— three Christian fenuile teachers. 

Ferozepore: 50 miles southwest of Lodiana; occupied as a station, 1882; Rev. 
U. S. Grant Jones, Rev. P. C. Uppal ; native Christian assistants, four. 

HOSHYARPORE *. 45 miles north of Lodiana, mission station commenced, 1867 ; Rev, 
K. C, Chatter jee and Rev, H, Abdullah ; native Christian assistants, fifteen. 

Jalandhar : 120 miles east of Lahore, 30 miles west of Lodiana ; mission station 
commenced, 1846; missionary laborers — Charles W. Forman, Jr., M.D., and his wife; 
Rev. Golok Nath; Miss Caroline C. Downs, Miss Margaret C. Given, and Miss Jessie 
Dunlap ; native Christian assistants, four. 

Lodiana: near the river Sutlej, 1,100 miles northwest of Calcutta; mission station 
commenced, 1834 ; missionary laborers — Rev. Edward P. Newton and his wife ; Rev, 
John B. Dales, Rev, Dharm Das ; native Christian assistants, sixteen. Outstations 
at Jagraon, Rev. Ahmad Shah and one native teacher ; at Morinda, one native Chris- 
tian teacher and two native Christian assistants ; at Khanna, Rev. Jaimal Singh ; 
three native Christian assistants. 

Am BALA : 55 miles southeast of Lodiana ; mission station commenced, 1848 ; mission- 
ary lat>orers— Rev. Benjamin D. Wyckoff and his wife ; Rev. Charles B. Newton, D.D„ 
Rev. William J. P. Morrison ; Miss J. R. Carleton, M.D.; one Christian female assistant ; 
Rev. W. Basten, Rev. Sandar Lai; native Christian assistants— twelve. At stations in 
the plains, in the cold season, and at Ani, in the hills, in the hot season. Rev. Marcus 
M. Carleton and his wife, and Marcus B. Carleton, M.D., post-office, Ambala Canton- 
ments. Outstation at Jagadri ; native licentiate, George H. Stuart and one helper. 
Outstation at Rupar ; Rev. Matthias and Rev. Henry Goloknath. 

Sabathu : in the lower Himalaya Mountains, no miles east of Lodiana ; mission 
station commenced, 1836; missionary laborers— ^^. T. IV. J, Wylie; one native 
teacher. 

Dehra : 47 miles east of Saharanpur ; mission station commenced, 1853 \ missionary 
laborers— Rev. Reese Thackwell and his wife; Mrs. Wm. Calderwood, after her hus- 
band's death ; Miss Sarah M. Wherry, Miss Annie S. Geisinger, Miss Harriet A. Sav- 
age, and Miss Elma Donaldson. Employed by the girls' school, one Christian female 
teacher; Rev. Frabhu Das; native Christian assistants — five male and eight female 
teachers ; Bible-women and zenana teachers — five. 

Woodstock: in Landour, 15 miles eastward from Dehra; school begun, 1874; 
missionary laborers— Mrs. James L. Scott, Miss Clara G. Williamson, Miss Emily G. 
Foote, Miss Clara C. Giddings, and Miss Mary E. BaUey. 

Saharanpur : 130 miles southeast of Lodiana ; mission station commenced, 1836 ; 
missionary laborers— Rev. Alexander P. Kelso and his wife ; Rev. Kanwar Sain ; na- 
tive Christian assistants — two licentiate preachers, three male and five female teachen. 

Mazaffarnagur : a few miles soutn of Saharanpur, on the railroad ; station sus- 
pended. 

In this country : Rev. E. M. Wherry, D.D., Rev. G. S. Bergen, Rev. F. J. Newton, 
M.D., returning; Rev. J. M. McComb, and their families; Miss Mary Fullerton, Miss 
Mary E. Pratt. Miss Irene Griffith, and Miss A. S. Geisinger, on her return. In Ger- 
many : Miss Clara Thiede. 

FURRUKHABAD : on the Ganges, 733 miles northwest of Calcutta ; mission station 
commenced, 1844; missionary laborers — Rev. Mohan Lai; one Christian assistant; 
two native Christian assistants. Outstation : Chabramow. 

FUTTEHCURH : mission station commenced, 1838 ; missionary laborers— Rev. C. A. 
Rodney Janvier and his wife ; Rev. John N. Forman and Miss Mary P. Forman ; na- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INDIA — FURRUKHABAD. 83 

tive minister, one ; native Cbristian assistants, five. At Saharanpur, Rev. Henry For- 
man and his wife. Employed by the mission— two Christian female teachers. 

Mtnpurie : 40 miles west of Futtehgurh ; mission station commenced, 1843 ; mission- 
ary laborers — Rev. T. Edward Inglis and his wife ; native Christian assistants, seven ; 
and at OutsteUioHy four. 

Etah : not distant from Mynpurie ; station begim, 1873 ; missionary laborers— two 
native Christian helpers. 

ETA.WAH : on the Jumna, 50 miles southwest of Mynpurie ; mission station com- 
menced, x9b^ ; missionary laborers — Rev. Thomas Tracy ; Rev. John S. Wood&ide and 
his wife ; two native licentiates ; five native Christian assistants. Miss Christine Belx, 
teacher and zenana visitor. Two substations. 

GWALIOR : capital of the district of the same name ; mission station commenced, 
1874 ; Mrs. Joseph Warren ; Jiev. Suk/i Pal; native Christian assistant, one. 

J H ANSI : 65 miles south of Gwahor ; occupied as a missionary station in 188&; Rev. 
James F. Holcomb and his wife ; two female assistants ; Rev, Nabi Baksh, 

FuTTEHPORE : 70 miles northwest of Allahabad ; station begun, 1853 ; missionary 
laborers, three native assistants. 

Allahabad : at the junction of the Ganges and the Jumna, 506 miles northwest of 
Calcutta ; mission station commenced, 1836 ; missionary laborers—Rev. James M. Alex- 
ander and his wife; Rev. James J. Lucas, D.D., and his wife, Miss Sarah C. Seward, 
M.D., Mrs. John Newton, Jr., Miss Susan A. Hutchison, Miss Mary L. Symes, and 
Miss Bessie Babbitt ; Rev. John S. Calebs Rev, Isaac Fieldbrave ; three native licen- 
tiates ; native Christian assistants, ten. 

In this country: Rev. William F. Johnson, D.D., Rev. George W. Pollock and 
his wife, Rev. Cjeorge A. Seeley and his wife, Mrs. Thomas Tracy, and Miss £. J. 
Seeley. 

Kolhapur Mission. 

KoLHAPUR : 390 miles southeast of Bombay (by available route) ; 35,000 inhabitants ; 
mission station commenced, 1853 ; taken under care of the Board, 1870 ; laborers — Rev. 
Messrs. Galen W. Seller and Jas. M. Goheen and their wives, Mrs. J. J. Hull, Mrs. R. 
G. Wilder, Miss Grace E. Wilder, Miss Margaret L. Ewalt, and'Miss Jennie Sherman ; 
13 native teachers and helpers and i outstation. 

Panhala : 14 miles north of Kolhapur ; mission station commenced, 1877 ; laborers — 
Rev. and Mrs. George H. Ferris, Miss Esther Patton ; 6 native assistants ; 3 outstations. 

In this country : Rev. and Mrs. George H. Ferris and Miss Esther Patton. 

Saivgli : JO miles east of Kolhapur; work be^n 1884 ; laborers — Rev. Messrs. J. P. 
Graham and L. B. Tedford and W. J. Wanless, M.D., and their wives ; 3 native helpers. 

In this country : Rev. and Mrs. J. P. Graham and Mrs. L. B. Tedford. 

Lodiana and Furrttlcliabad Rlissions. 

Changes in the List of Laborers. — The Rev. William Calderwood de- 
parted this life May 22, 1889. He was in the 65th year of his age and the 
34th of his ministry. Mrs. Calderwood expects to continue her efficient 
missionary work, removing to Dehra as her station. The Rev. C. B. 
Newton, D.D., and his family arrived in this country in May, and 
with improved health he returned to India in October, leaving his wife 
and children in this country for the education of the children. Dr. 
Seward regained her usual health, and also returned to her work 
at Allahabad Mr. and Mrs. McComb returned to this country for 
health, and gained strength from the voyage. They were led to en- 
gage in home missionary work in Nevada. This work is entered 
upon provisionally. The climate may be of service to them. The 
question of returning to India is in abeyance for the present. The 
Rev. Howard Fisher went to India in October and was stationed at 
Rawal Pindi by the Lodiana Mission. The Rev. Henry C. Velte en- 
tered on married life at Lahore. Miss Jessie Dunlap and Miss Elma 
Donaldson, new missionaries ; Miss M. M. Given and Miss C. C. 
Downs, returning; and later, Miss A. L. Orbison and Miss M. £. 
Bailey, new missionaries, were sent to India, — the last to Woodstock, 
Landour ; Miss Donaldson to Dehra, Miss Orbison to Lahore, Misses 
Given, Downs, and Dunlap to Jalandhar. In several cases these su- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



84 



INDIA— STATISTICS. 



tions have been assigned for a year, while the new laborers are learn- 
ing the language. The list of new appointments includes the names 
of Prof. J. G. Gilbertson and his wife. Mr. Gilbertson, M.A., a gradu- 
ate of Edinburgh University, has occupied a professorship in the Chris- 
tian College of Lahore, and he is also an elder in the newly organ- 
ized Presbyterian church in that city. 

Two sets of annual reports are, as a rule, received by the Board 
from the missionaries in the field, — one from each station endorsed by 
the mission, the other personal and usually brief. In the following 
pages, the statistical information, furnished in the station reports and 
here summarized, will give a general idea of the character of much of 
the work and show its importance. Added to this statistical informa- 
tion, so far as received, notices from the reports generally will convey a 
further impression of the evangelizing work which God is giving to his 
servants to fulfil in behalf of the Church in one of the greatest mission- 
ary fields. 

STATISTICS OF BOTH MISSIONS, 

Statistics of Churches. 



Rawal Pindi 

Lahore , 

F'erozepore 

Hoshyarpore 

Jalandhar 

Lodiana 

Sabathu , 

Ambala. , 

Dehra. Native church , 

Saharanpore 

Mozatfamagar , 

Itinerant, P. O. Ambala Cantonments. 



Totals. 



Furrukhabad 

Futtehgurh 

Mynpune 

Etah 

EUwah 

Morar, Gwalior 

Jhansi 

Futtefapore 

AUahabad—Kutra. . 
*' — Jumna. . 



Totals.. 



§ 
U 



I 
1 



6 

3 

3 
4 
»5 

I 

5 

7 

17 



X o 

W - 

a 

1.2 
M a 

3 



£•! 



613 



I 



I 



35 
97 
31 
57 
27 

16 
81 
61 
66 

»7 



564 

53t 
ii7t 
3at 
7t 
2St 
lit 



13 
81 



427 



t Report 1889. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INDIA— STATISTICS. 
Statistics of Schools, 



BOARDING AND ORPHAN 
SCHOOLS. 


1 


1 




Hoshyarpur.... ..••. 




108 

lit 
58 


Lodiana • 


80 
38 


SaharanpoTR 


Woodstock 


Dchia 




Futtehgurh 








Totals ........... 




118 


335 





t Rqx>rt 1889. 



DAY-SCHOOLS. 



Rawal Pindi . . 

Lahore 

Hoshyarpore. , 
Jalandhar . . . . 

Lodiana , 

Sabathu 

Ambala 

Dchra 

SaharaQpore. . 



Lodiana Mission : Totals . 



Fumikhabad 

Futtehgurh 

Mynpurie 

Etah 

Etawah 

Morar 

Jhansi 

Futtehpore 

Allahabad— Kutra. . . 
** — Jumna. . 



Fumikhabad Mission : Totals 
General Total 



834 

1,056 



441 
671 



780 
360 
200 



S89t 
52t 

I33t 
17+ 
40 



3ot 
190 
254 



1,305 
5,765 



-a 
3 



118 
395 
56 
131 

86 



16 
174 



976 

22 st 

i8t 

I27t 

44 



14 



428 
1,739 



85 



t Report 1889. 

Number of pupils under instruction in zenanas not generally re- 
ported. Number of Sabbath-school scholars : in Lodiana Mission, 
x,SSo ; in Fumikhabad Mission, last year, 1,402. Contribution, as far 
as reported, bnr native churches in Lodiana Mission, $733-00. Further 
Statistics will be found in the General Summary, pages 218-19, in/ra. 

In the three Leper Asylums, which for years have been fostered 
by the missionaries, a sympathetic, discouraging, but not hopeless 
work is still conducted. The Leper Asylum at Sabathu has, from 
the beginning many years ago, been chiefly supported by the Board, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



86 INDIA— RAWAL PINDI. 

and our brethren, foreign and native, have been its religious teachers 
and care-takers. The same remark is applicable to the I^per Asylum 
at Ambala, supported partly by the. Board ; and also, in good meas- 
ure, to the I>eper Asylum at Allahabad,^-which, however, is pecuni- 
arily supported by local funds. About loo adult lepers are usually 
in these three asylums, with their wives and children. They have 
long enjoyed the Gospel ministries of our brethren, and in many in- 
stances they have been led to Christ as their Saviour, while their poor 
children have enjoyed suitable education. 

NOTICES OF STATIONS. 

Rawal Pindu 

The senior missionary at this station, Mr. Ullmann, now over forty 
years in this service, was seriously ill during the past year, and was 
twice brought so (low that his recovery was hardly expected, but he 
was spared for continued labors. As acting pastor of the church, he 
was relieved in March by Mr. Rala Ram, a graduate of the Theologi- 
cal Seminary at Saharanpore, who, as a licentiate preacher, was for a 
year in charge of the work in the Hoshyarpore district under the care 
of Mr. Chatterjee. The Rawal Pindi church was led to give him a 
united call, and to provide his salary and all expenses of the church 
and burial-ground. The missionaries had previously felt justi6ed in 
having the charge of this congregation, though ill able to fulfil all its 
duties in connection with their other and more general work ; but they 
are grateful for the good promise of the church in its now settled min- 
istry. Mr. Ullmann will aid the young pastor in some parts of his work 
for the present, but he continues in other lines his varied labors. Both 
he and Mr. R. Morrison give attention to the schools, the latter spend- 
ing four or five hours daily in their instruction. During some months 
in the hot season Mr. Morrison for the first time was at Murree, a 
sanitarium in the Hills, some twenty miles from Rawal Pindi, where he 
was occupied with useful work. Both these brethren speak of labors 
abundant. Mr. Fisher was warmly welcomed on his arrival at the end 
of the year. 

Lahore, 

In this large city, the capital of the Punjab, the work of missions 
has continued to advance in its extent, success, and promise of still 
further influence. "The nine schools for boys enroll 686 Hindus, 
300 Mohammedans, 82 Sikhs, and 4 Christians," " Until recently 
there were but two High-Schools in the city ; now there are five. 
Nevertheless, our mission school has steadily maintained its position 
and popularity, while its influence as an evangelistic agency is probably 
greater than ever before." As an important educational centre, La- 
hore has now the Government Anglo-Indian, the Mohammedan, the 
Hindu, and the Aryan Colleges, which contain a large number of stu- 
dents. These will all be co-laborers, in greater or less degree, with 
our Christian College, it may be hoped, or, at any rate, be greatly in- 
fluenced by it. It is now well established and well manned It is con- 



Digitized by VjtOOQIC 




LffjrsinrM isf ^ast rrn^ \mi wABHfftGrm. U7' 



±J 



Digitized by 



Google 



88 INDIA— LAHORE. 

ducted on a moderate scale of expense, which it is hoped will be con- 
tinued, but It will need some additional funds. It reports 137 stu- 
dents at the end of the year. "Religious instruction has been imparted 
to all the classes. In some cases the Bible alone has been the text- 
book during the period devoted to Christian teaching"; "in others 
this has been supplemented b^ a study of Butler's Analogy, and in 
others by the discussion of topics drawn from the Holy Scriptures." 
In October two of the new buildings for the College were formally 
0|)ened by the President before a large assemblage. The service 
was honored by the presence and gratifying address of the Viceroy of 
India, and the presence also of the Governor of the Punjab. With a 
faculty of thoroughly missionary professors, and a good degree of pub- 
lic interest among the people, the Church may expect blessed results 
from this College, if God still favors it. Toward the expenses of the 
schools and the College tuition fees were received amounting to over 
^3«ooo last year. The report of the Lahore station refers also to eight- 
een schools for girls attended by 394 scholars ; and a school for Chris- 
tian girls of nearly 80 scholars " under the auspices of the Indian Fe- 
male Normal School and Instruction Society has been carried on in 
connection with our mission " with very encouraging success, as stated 
by Miss Keay, the lady superintendent. 

The preaching services to non-Christians by the native preachers in 
the villages near the city and by the missionaries and Christian laymen 
in public places in the city have been kept up with interest. Numer- 
ous public lectures were delivered to English-speaking, non-Christian 
audiences by missionaries and other gentlemen, which were always 
well attended. In the mission dispensaries over 39,000 applications 
were made for treatment and over 1,100 minor operations were per- 
formed ; of these, nearly 1 7,000 applications were by females, and 
nearly 400 minor operations. The medical services are always pre- 
ceded by evangelizing instruction. The female dispensary is under 
the charge of Mrs. Isa Das, M.D., whose husband is the doctor in 
charge of the general dispensary, where he often preaches the Gospel 
to the poor assembled to receive alms. 

The native congregation is indebted foe two Sabbath services and 
one on Wednesday evenings to the Rev. Drs. Newton (acting pastor) 
and Forman, aided by others, — Dr. Ewing, Mr.- Velte, Dr. Isa Char- 
ran, and some of the elders. The Union church, with services in 
English, at the request of its members, was organized as a Presbyte- 
rian church. The services are well attended. Lectures are reported 
by Dr. Orbison, and the Indian Christian Association, of which he is 
President, has now thirty members. The outstation at Vaga, twelve 
miles from the city, has still enjoyed the self-denying labors of Miss 
Thiede, but at the end of the year the failure of her health made a 
visit to her home in Germany expedient. Mr. Velte was in charge 
of the church in Vaga, often preaching there and administering the 
sacraments, but regretting to find cases of unworthy conduct, which 
required the exercise of discipline. 

Brief as is this summary statement of the work at Lahore, it must be 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INDIA— HOSHYARPORE. 89 

regarded as showing progress and great promise, with the continued 
blessing of God 

Hoshyarpore. 

The usual work of Mr. Chatteijee and his co-laborers, all of whom 
are Christian Hindus, has been effectively continued. In the city, 
preaching services in the streets and bazars daily and in the chapel 
three times a week have been maintained. And in the District — 97 
miles by 30 — with its 2,100 villages and its population of 500,000, 
preachers and teachers were in each of its four administrative circles. 
Respectful and friendly attention was given to the Gospel message in 
most cases, excepting by members of the Arya Somaj, referred to on 
a later page. 

The church in Hoshyarpore received three adult members by bap- 
tism. The members of this church are trained in the duty of self-sup- 
port, according to their ability. The girls' orphan asylum, under 
Mr. Chatterjee's charge, had fourteen inmates, and gave good 
encouragement. The day-schools for girls — one for Mohamme- 
dans and one for Hindus — reported 56 scholars. The orphanage 
and boarding-school still occupied a rented building, delay having 
occurred in securing a site for the Home ; but a very eligible 
site has been obtained, architectural plans were ready, and the build- 
ing will be completed at the earliest practicable date, to the great sat- 
isfaction of the missionaries and of the ladies in this country, who pro- 
vided the liberal gift of funds required for its erection. A reading- 
room, a religious book depository, and a Bible-class, are all reported 
as of good service, each in its sphere. Mr. Chatterjee has been called 
on to give much time.to correspondence, to examination of books and 
manuscripts for publication — most of them belonging to the Religious 
Book Society, and to the supervision of its colporteurs ; and other en- 
gagements were fulfilled. At this station for the year, its laborers and 
their work and its prospects all encourage the hope of large success 
in the near future. 

The disposition of many of the Hindus toward the Christian religion 
is well indicated by the Rev. K. C. Chatterjee in the Station Report 
of Hoshyarpore as to the people of that city. " The attitude of the 
city people toward our work may be generally described as friendly. 
They have repeatedly heard the Gospel, and many of them have a very 
fair apprehension of Christianity. They regard Christ as one of the 
greatest religious teachers in the world, and some of them have adopted 
His teaching for the ruling principle of their lives. The distinctive 
doctrine of Christianity, ' Justification by Faith,' they do not accept. 
What is wanting in the case of this people is a true conviction of sin, 
a rousing of the conscience, and a feeling of their own helplessness. 
Until this takes place, we shall in vain look forward for a general 
awakening or movement to the sinner's Friend. This is the work of 
God's Spirit, and He chooses His own time and place and manner of 
working. We can neither force nor hasten it. We can work in obe- 
dience to the Master's command, and daily wait and pray for the gift 
of His Holy Spirit. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



90 INDIA— JALANDHAR. 

" The only section of the community that offers us active opposition 
is the Aryi Somij. This is a conservative Theistic movement, started 
by a Gujrdti Brahman, named Daya Nand Saraswati Swam^. He was 
a strong opponent of idolatry, as well as of both Pantheism and Poly- 
theism, and contended that the four Vedas alone were a true revela- 
tion, and that the hymns to Agni, Indra, and Surya, mentioned in the 
Vedas, were really hymns to one God, and that adoration, prayer, and 
devotion were to be offered to one God only, abstracted from all idea 
of shape, and without any second, as set forth in the Vedas. This 
form of Monotheistic teaching, including, as it does, the doctrine of 
Metempsychosis, is repudiated by the various Brahmo-Sanyasis, but is 
popular among the half-educated men, who are dissatisfied with Hin- 
duism and not prepared to accept Christianity. It has about forty 
adherents in the city of Hoshyarpore, who seem to make it the princi- 
pal part of their work to speak against Christianity. But as most of 
what they say is based on entire falsehood, it exposes itself and falib 
to the ground. We have not as yet found much inconvenience from 
their opposition." 

Jalandhar, 

No report has been received of the work of the Rev. Golok Nath, of 
this station. It is understood that his health is infirm. £arly in the 
year Miss Pratt returned on a visit to this country. In December 
Miss Given and Miss Downs, on their return, were transferred by the 
mission to this station from Lodiana, and Miss Dunlap, for a year, 
while learning the language. Dr. and Mrs. C. W. Forman, Jr., and 
two licentiate native preachers were in active charge of the varied 
work of this place. 

A considerable part of this work was that of itinerant preaching in 
the cold season. A large number of villages are within easy reach of 
Jalandhar ; of these 107 were visited and some time spent at each. 
Generally a friendly reception was given to the missionaries on their 
visits. 

Cases of special interest have occurred, but no baptism of converts 
is reported. One would have been but for his early death. Seven 
schools, mostly for girls, have been under Mrs. Forman's charge after 
Miss Pratt's return, but the number of scholars is not reported, ex- 
cept in a lately opened school in one of the villages, of 45 boys and 
30 girls. The prevalence of cholera, which was severe, interfered with 
the attendance of these schools. 

During nine months of the year Dr. Forman kept the Dispensary . 
open, and over 16,000 visits were received, upwards of 5,000 of which 
were new cases. Rs. 250, or about $85, were received in fees — " ap- 
plied to the medical work, the expense of which has been greater than 
m any previous year." " Each day at the Dispensary is always be- 
gun with reading and explaining a portion of Scripture to the 
waiting patients, who listen attentively. Many are thus pointed to 
the Great Physician." 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INDIA — FEROZEPORE. 9I 

Ferozepore* 
The Rev. Francis J. Newton, M.D., for many years, and the Rev. 
U. S. G. Jones for the last year, as a new missionary, have occupied 
this station. Mr. Jones has made good progress in learning the lan- 
guage, and can already engage in some parts of the work. Dr. New- 
ton is expected soon to arrive in this country with his family, for urgent 
reasons of health, and also for the education of their children. Before 
leaving the station, a good report was made of its work and prospects. 
From this report the following extracts are taken : 

Preaching in the City has been carried on almost daily. A house is rented 
in the principal chauk (crossing of two streets) of the city, in front of which 
large audiences are addressed. Hymns are also sung with the accompaniment 
of the baby organ. This is found to be a means of drawing together a great 
many hearers, and of disarming any opposition that may casually appear. It 
must be said, however, that there ib little inclination to oppose the preaching 
of the Gospel on the part of the Ferozeporites and of those villagers from the 
surrounding district, who are personally known to the members of the Chris- 
tian community ; but, occasionally, a Maulvi from distant parts, appears upon 
the scene. The typical disputatious Maulvi^ or Mulla^ is a well known char- 
acter. He is seen, and heard too^in most of Indian bazars. 

There are many in Ferozepore who do not hear any preaching. Those that 
do are a mere handful. The masses care nothing about religion, one way or 
the other, and are not to be stirred by a preacher of any school or sect or relig- 
ion. How to reach them is the question. Conversation with individuals in 
their hours of leisure from business, at their own houses or elsewhere, is a 
means much resorted to, but even this reaches a very small number 

Preaching in the Distfict is done only in the cold season. We go out in 
twos or threes, and walk from village to village, putting up in dhamisalas. 
That is a sort of village inn. It is the name given them in the villages, in this 
district occupied chiefly by Sikhs. There are often three or four in a village, 
and travellers and wayfarers, of all classes, provided they are Hindoos, are 
allowed to occupy them. Muhammadans are rather objected to. The latter 
have inns of their own called takyas^ which, however, are generally not nearly 
so well kept, nor so clean. No objection is ever made to our Christian preach- 
ers finding shelter in the dharnisalas^ and in our itinerant tours through the 
district they are a great boon, for they afford us a most convenient resting 
place in the very midst of the people. The dhamisala is the place of rendezvous^ 
and here, when the day is done, the men gather for an evening's gossip. That 
is our opportunity. From seven or eight p.m., till midnight we may have a 
throng of curious, if not eager, hearers. 

By turns we address them, frequently engaging one or more of them in a 
brisk discussion on some religious topic. In this the villagers take the keenest 
interest, and will come night after night and sit for hours, not only to hear 
what these *' setters-forth of strange gods " have to say, but to witness the dia- 
lectic skill of the contestants. All preserve the utmost good humour and seem 
to care little whether their own man or the stranger is the victor. This good 
humour is immensely promoted by the singing of hymns with the *' baby organ ** 
accompaniment. This instrument, easily carried on the head of a coolie, has 
become a most important factor in all our preaching, whether in the city or the 
villages 

The district we have to traverse is an immense one. There are hundreds of 
villages that ought to be visited, and yet it is but a mere fraction of these we 
arc able to reach. It has been our plan not to go into new regions each year, 
but, as far as possible, to visit the same ones as frequently as possible. The 
theory is to get as intimately acquainted with the people as possible, and to 
make as many personal friends as practicable. To this end we get to know 
many of them by name, going to see them and inquiring after their welfare 
year after year, . • • • 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



92 INDIA— FEROZEPORE. 

Medical work has for years been a prominent feature of the work in Feroze- 
porc. The hospital has been largely patronized by the people of the city as 
well as those of the district. Patients come in from distances of many miles. 
A large number of operations have been performed during the yeari both major 
and minor, and the total number of new names entered in the Hospital Register 
is 5r433, while the number of visits has been io,ooa Many of Uiese, coming 
from considerable distances, have a supply of medicine given them sufficient 
to last for a week or ten days. Hence visits are not repeated as often as they 
would otherwise be. 

A Municipal Hospital flourishes in the town, not far from our own. It is 
sometimes asked, wherein the necessity consists of having a second hospital 
where one already exists. 

With all due respect to the Surgeons in charge of Government institutions, 
we hold that those institutions do not supply the want provided for by a Mis- 
sion Hospital. The aim and object of the latter is different. It is distinctively 
Christian, in its workings, and understood to be so, and recognized as such, by 
the whole population. It forms an immense lever for the wielding of Christian 
influence in the city. The work opens each day with the reading of the Gospel 
and prayer, and all know that what is done is done in the name, and for the 
sake of Christ. The very existence of such an institution has overcome many 
a prejudice, and disarmed the opposition of many who once were hostile. 
There is no mistaking the public sentiment. The people here are as capable 
as any on earth of recognizing an act done with kindness ; and kindness of 
treatment and gentleness of manner, count for very nearly as much with the 
sick as the administration of a pill or a draught. This mode of treatment (not 
the pill, but the kindness,) we have reason to fear is sadly deficient in some 
quarters. Not that it is absent. The power of the rupee, even there, is well 
known to conjure it to the surface 

Ne7o Church. — During the year we have built a new Church. The congre- 
gation is not a very large one. Including children, it does not exceed sixty- 
five souls. So the building has been made^to seat not more than two hundred, 
at a pinch. Yet we have sought to make fit as handsome for our money as 
possible. The design was very kindly furnished by S. Athim, Esq., of Amrit- 
sar, an engineer in employ of Government. The Church has a spire nearly 
ninety feet in height, which is visible at a distance of some miles. The situa^ 
tion is an excellent one, being close to the main thoroughfare between the city 
and cantonment, and not far from the chief gate. 

Here it stands, guardian over the city, overlooking its walls and its tallest 
houses and far away into the surrounding country, a prominent witness to the 
presence of Christianity as a power that has come to stay. 

The money for the building was raised entirely in this country, no part of 
the funds being furnished by the Board in America. English friends have 
contributed largely, while the members of the cong^regation, most of them not 
wealthy, have given liberally of their means. Some of them, besides monthly 
contributions, gave each a month's salary. To Rai Maya Das, elder in the 
Church, is due more than to any other, the erection of the building. Not only 
did he beg all the money that was begged, — and that was a large proportion of 
the whole — but he contributed more largely than any one else. Our brethren 
of the C. M. S. Mission came to our aid and helped us materially with their 
contributions. The Chaplain of the station also sent a substantial offertory 
from the English Church, ** an offering of sympathy," as he very kindly put 
it, ** on the part of the European Christians here with their native brethren." 
For all this help and the many kind expressions of sympathy, coming too, in 
most instances from those of another communion, we here express our most 
cordial thanks. Nothing can more surely break down the outward barriers 
which divide us, nor promote more certainly the true interests of a spiritual 
unity. 

On Sunday, the 29th December, the new church was dedicated. It had just 
been finished and the Lodiana Mission being at the time assembled at Feroze- 
pore for its Annual Meeting, the occasion seemed an appropriate one. The 
service took place at 11 a. m. when the building was crowded to its utmost 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INDIA— LODIANA. 93 

c&padty. Besides all the members of the Mission who were present, including 
ladies, a number of Native Christians from Lahore, Jalandhar, Hoshyarpore 
and Amritsar, and in addition to these, many of the non-Christian residents of 
Ferozepore, attended the service. This was conducted by the Rev. P. C; 
Uppal, pastor of the Church, and Rev. J. Newton, of Lahore, the oldest mem- 
ber of the Mission, who preached the sermon. Addresses were made also by 
Rai Maya Das and Rev. H. U. Weitbrecht of Batala, and Dr. H. Marty n 
Clark of Amritsar, both of the C. M. S. Mission. These latter brethren had 
come at our invitation and brought us the greetings of their Church and Mis- 
sion, speaking words of cheer and sympathy. 

All seems bright and hopeful for the future. We begin our new year aus- 
piciously. Our work moves on, unfolding and enlarging, our workmen are 
active, our circle of influence widens. With all this we have learned not to be 
too sanguine of those results which Christian people at home so eagerly expect. 
We have long since found out the strength of the enemy, and know too well 
how securely he is ensconced behind his works to believe that a few years of 
siege or assault can possibly effect his downfall. In the meantime it is no 
small matter that we have secured the position we have done, and are slowly 
and surely advancing. All will be triumph some day. It will not be in our 
time. Some of us go, to be replaced by others. None of us are essential to 
the success of the work. 

The house at Muktsar, spoken of in last year's Report, is not yet finished. 
It soon will be, and then we shall have another and still more advanced base 
of operations. 

Lodiana. 

This senior station of the Board's work in India was subject to an 
unusual number of changes in the staff of laborers during the last 
year. These can be mostly learned from the list of stations and mis- 
sionaries on page 82 above, as compared with the report of the year 
before. At the end of the mission year, the Rev. E. P. Newton was 
the only American laborer here, but he would be efficiently aided for 
the ensuing year in the boys' boarding-school, with the approval of the 
Board, by %he Rev. A. G. Norman, an English clergyman of the best 
standing. For further information, the annual report of this station is 
here reprinted : 

The Christian Community consists of two hundred and sixty-nine members, 
including the boys in the Boarding-School. The Sunday-School, which is 
held in place of the ordinary morning service, is intended to comprise all 
the members of the congregation, though there are some who, we regret to 
say, habitually absent themselves from it, and others who are irregular in iheir 
attendance. Mr. Dales resigned the pastorate of the Church in the early part 
of the year, and Babu Dharm Das, a student in the graduating class in the 
Theological Seminary at Saharanpur, was elected by the congregation in his 
stead. At a meeting of Presbytery held at Lodiana in August, the call was 
presented and accepted by him, and on the 4th of the same month he was or- 
dained and installed Pastor of the Church, by a Committee appointed for the 
purpose by the Presbytery. We are glad to be able to announce that the 
Church undertakes the entire support of their Pastor. The contributions dur- 
ing the past year have been, for the Pastor's salary, Rs. 347 ; for Evangelistic 
work, Rs. 85 ; for the poor, Rs. 56 ; for Presbyteriai expenses, Rs. 32 ; and 
for the general expenses of the Church, R$. 108. The total amount given is 
Rs. 628, or about $210, of which about Rs. 400 may be credited to the native con- 
gregation. The Wednesday evening service has been devoted to a study, in reg- 
ular course, of the Epistles of Paul, except on the last Wednesday of each month, 
when a paper is read, or an address delivered, on one of the great Mission fields 
of the world, — the work in China, Japan, Siam, etc., being each presented in 
turn. The women's Bible reading is held on Friday evenings. A Bible read- 



Digitized by VjtOOQIC 



94 INDIA— LODIANA. 

jng and Prayer meeting is held on Saturday evenings by the Native Christians, 
in their own houses, in turn ; and the Women's Home Missionary Society, 
which was organized three years ago, continues to work for the evangelization 
of the women of Lodiana. Since the beginning of the year, the monthly sub- 
scriptions have been increased ; and sufficient is now given, with the help of 
the ladies of the Mission, for the support of a Bible-woman. During the 
year, six adults have been baptized, and the number of communicants is now 
ninety-two. The two pupils of our school in Khanna, who were reported as 
having been baptized last year, have left us, one having joined the Arya Samaj, 
and the other relapsed into Sikhism. 

Of all religious systems, it would be difficult to conceive of one that could 
have less claim to the respect of serious-minded men than of the Ar3''a Samaj. 
Its founder was a man named Daya Nand Saraswati, lately departed this life, 
who claimed to be a Brahman, though of this doubts have been expressed, and 
little is really known of his origin ; nothing in fact beyond what he himself has 
revealed. His followers, who repudiate the name of Hindu, and call them- 
selves Aryas, have established societies in various parts of the country, chiefly 
in the Punjab and North-West Provinces. The word Samaj means Society or 
a Chapter, and is applied both to the community as a whole and to the sepa- 
rate local organizations. They accept the Vedas as the only Divine revela- 
tion, which they say is eternal, and reject all the later Hindu Scriptures. 
They proclaim the unity and personality of God, advocate the remarriage of 
widows, and denounce, in violent language, infant marriages, caste, idolatry, 
and the Brahmans. This sounds encouraging, and might lead one, unac- 
quainted with the facts, to form a high opinion of their intelligence and pro- 
gressiveness. But unhappily, their doctrines on these subjects are for the 
most part held as a theory only. In actual life, they are as great sticklers for 
their caste distinctions as any one. When their domestic tranquillity seems to 
require it, they do not hesitate to conform to the idolatrous practices*of their 
countrymen ; their little girls are married at a tender age, and when the child's 
husband dies, she is condemned to perpetual widowhood, quite like the daugh- 
ters of the Orthodox Hindus. Those who are best acquainted with this sect, 
are agreed that little is to be hoped for from them, at least for some time to 
come, in the direction of real social and moral progress. 

Our day schools for boys contain 68 1 pupils, this being the average number 
on the rolls throughout the year. 

Owing to the absence of Mr. C. B. Newton in America, and the death of 
Mr. Calderwood, which made it necessary for Mr. E. P. Newton to take the 
management of the Press and the Nur-Afshan newspaper, there has been 
little itinerating, beyond what the native brethren have been able to do. The 
Press has been busy, especially in the lithographic department, the work done 
being chiefly for the Pan jab Bible and Religious Book Societies. We have printed 
during the year 9,623,295 pages. Of this total, dlbout 9,116,000 are religious 
publications, and of these again, 7,091,500, Vernacular Scriptures. The Nur- 
Afshan^ a secular and religious weekly paper in the Urdu language, has been 
enlarged from eight to twelve pages. For the paper used in printing it we are 
indebted to the London Tract Society, which has very kindly made us a free 
grant of all that was required for the purpose. 

The number of pupils in the Boys' Boarding School has averaged eighty 
throughout the year, exclusive of twenty who attended as day scholars. Of 
these iifty-nine are, in addition to their scholastic studies, employed in the In- 
dustrial Department. Twelve are in the carpenter's shop ; sixteen in the shoe- 
shop, fifteen are learning the art of tailoring, and sixteen that of weaving Per- 
sian carpets. One pupil passed the middle school, four the upper, and four 

the lower, primary examinations The health of the school has been good, 

though we regret to have to report the death, from consumption, of one young 
lad. Two of the elder pupils have been sent to study in the Theologicsd 
School at Saharanpur. The work in zenanas and girls' schools has been car- 
ried on as usual. Another school has been opened, and the opportunities for 
doing good among the women have been greater than the present staff of 
workers was able to take advantage of. We are surrounded by open doors, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INDIA— AMBALA. 95 

and though some become alanned and close their houses to the Christian vis- 
itor, there are always others where we can find a welcome. A nd thus the 
truth is spreading among the women, but very slowly, and very little has been 
done in the surrounding villages, fDr the old reason. May the time be not far 
distant when we shall have ladies stationed out in the district, and regular 
evangelistic work going on in hundreds of places where yet nothing has been 
attempted. 

In Jagraon, the Rev. Ahmad Shah has continued his work of preaching, and 
administering medicines, on the native system, both in the city and in the vil- 
lages. He writes encouragingly of the reception he meets everywhere. There 
is no opposition worth speaking of. The people are his friends. The Aryas, 
those most inveterate enemies of the Gospel, who for a time threatened to 
give trouble, have disappeared from the scene, and, as he says, using an ori- 
ental idiom, ** Neither their name nor their mark is left in the place." Many 
confess the truth of the Gospel. O'hers have expressed a desire to receive 
baptism, but no way has yet been found for them to surmount the difficulties 
in which this step would involve them, and consequently they hesitate. 

Since the baptism of two boys in Khanna last year, the work in that town 
has been less encouraging. At first active hostility was aroused, resulting in 
a large diminution in the number of our pupils. Latterly the school has in a 
measure recovered, but the average number in attendance does not exceed 
fifty, and it begins to be doubtful whether it is worth while to continue it. 
The hostility of the people has subsided, and been replaced by an apathy and 
indiflference to the Gospel, which is more difficult to meet. The Rev. Jaimal 
Singh, often accompanied by Munshi Sangat Masih and others, has preached 
in fifty villages situated around Khanna, many of them having been visited 
frequently, and this work he has found more hopeful. There have been sev- 
eral applicants for baptism, but all have been so circumstanced, that to profess 
openly their faith in Christ would have entailed the severance of all their 
worldly ties, and without the assurance of support, they have lacked courage 
to come forward. 

Ambala, 

At this double station — the city and the cantonments —the usual 
lines of work were conducted by Mr. WyckofF and native laborers. 
Mr. Morrison's health was so feeble, and often he was so ill, that only 
a part of the year could be spent at his station in the usual labors. 
But while in the Hills for six months he .was enabled to supply a Un- 
ion English church there in a measure and to its benefit. Miss Carle- 
ton, M.D., was still at Ambala as a medical missionary, but no report 
of her work has been received. 

Preaching services in the city and district and at the cantonments ; 
schools for boys and girls ; zenana work ; Leper Asylum of 30 in- 
mates, of whom 25 are Christians — the Asylum being supported by 
local gifts, but ministered to by the missionaries^ have all received 
their attention. For statistics, see tables on page 84. Of the native 
church in Ambala, the report says : " The services, though interesting 
and instructive, as conducted by the Rev. H. Goloknath, have not 
been well attended. There is a manifest indifference among many of 
our church members." For mission work at this station, gifts from 
local donors were received amounting to $132, of which $80 was for 
the Leper Asylum. 

Dr. C. B. Newton, on his return to India in December, was ap- 
pointed to Ambala by the mission. He expected to be occupied in 
itinerant work, especially among the numerous villages. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



96 INDIA — DEHRA. 

The work of the Rev. M. M. Carleton and his wife, and of his son, 
M. B. Carleton, M.D., was conducted last year, as before, ^t the 
two stations referred to above. No report has been received from 
Mr. Carleton, except as written by his wife. Mrs. Carleton gives a 
good account of her husband* s work, and says that his '* way of mis- 
sionating is by social conversation rather than by formal preaching 
services"; and she refers to the selling of quinine to fever patients as 
a considerable part of his occupation. It is sold nearly at cost, and 
from such sales last year $360, as compared with $668 in the preced- 
ing year, were received, the last year having been more healthy than 
the previous one. Mrs. Carleton says : *' The rite of baptism was 
during the season administered to two adults and two infants ; and at 
the fall communion fourteen native Christians partook of the Lord's 
Supper." She describes : *' The usual routine of work, viz., Sabbath 
service, daily noonday service, Sabbath-school, women's prayer-meet- 
ing, and day-school, was carried on in Ani during our stay there." In 
some or most of these meetings her own devotedness was no doubt 
well represented. 

Dr. M. B. Carleton' s report of his medical missionary work is valu- 
able and interesting. His faithful labors as a physician were tributary 
to his main object, that of trying to lead the poor people to Christ as 
their Saviour. 

Sabathu, 

The Rev. T. W. J. Wylie, the native evangelist, is still at this sta- 
tion, which is connected with Ambala for supervision. His work is 
largely among the lepers, of whom 16 are members of the church, in the 
asylum. One of these pitiable inmates was lately baptized. The 
religious services seem to be regarded by them with interest, especially 
in the singing of hymns of praise to Christ. 

Dehra. 

The reported work at this fine station is one of encouragement. 
Both the £nglish church, under Mr. Thack well's charge, and the native 
church, of which Mr. Prabhu Das was pastor, received new communi- 
cants — six by the former and seven by the latter — of whom five were 
by examination. The total number of communicants in the church of 
natives is 70, of whom but 42 were resident ; 2 had died ; i was under 
church censure ; i had apostatized ; 23 were absent without taking 
their letters. Few of them are employed by the mission ; the greater 
number are in Government offices and domestic service, and liable to 
frequent transfers and changes. 

Of the schools and the zenana work, an encouraging report is 
given. The pupils in the Christian girls' boarding-school, supported 
in part by their parents, numbered 95 on the roll during the year, and 
85 at its close. Miss Wherry, the superintendent, aided by Miss 
Savage, speaks favorably of the deportment and progress of the 
scholars. " Six left the school before the end of the year, of whom i 
has become a zenana worker ; 3 have been married, two of them to 
Uiculogical students; and the third, we think, is well married, and is 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INDIA — WOODSTOCK. 97 

seeking to do good in her home by teaching some who are willing to 
learn. The long-cherished plan of having a Training-class for Chris- 
tian workers established in this school has at length been realized. 
Four young ladies, born in the country, and conseqiiently accustomed 
to the climate and the habits of the people, have been secured." 

Of work in zenanas Miss Geisinger writes : "The record of our 
work from year to year varies little. Earnest, faithful work has been 
quietly done by the assistants, and there has been a spirit of industry 
and inquiry on the part of some of our pupils. We close the year 
with 64 houses and 79 pupils. During the year we have taught in 73 
houses, with 97 pupils. A number of these pupils removed from the 
station, and the instruction of some others we were obliged to discon- 
tinue. I have corresponded with some of those who went away, and 
they assure me that they continue their reading, and pray every day in 
the name of Jesus. Other pupils have borne very clear testimony to 
their faith in Christ ; and when they went to their homes in villages, 
they took the Gospel message with them, and brought back a request 
for books and teachers. Thus they testified by works, if not by bap- 
tism." 

Woodstock: Landour. 

This excellent seminary for girls can report another year of success, 
both in its training and in its religious influence. The number 
of scholars continues to be as large as the building can receive. 
Among them are the daughters of missionaries, but the much larger 
number are from English-speaking families, mostly such as find homes 
for themselves and their children in India. There the Christian edu- 
cation received in this seminary may widely extend a missionary in- 
fluence by precept and example, leading many of the Hindus to the 
knowledge of Christ as their Saviour. 

The school is supported largely by tuition fees, and it would have been 
self-supporting before this but for defraying the expense of enlarging 
and improving the school building and its premises. These are now 
convenient and attractive. The Government still makes a moderate 
grant in aid from its educational funds, and its Inspector's approval, 
after examination, is quite satisfactory. Its general regulations, how- 
ever, are necessarily somewhat inconvenient. After referring to the 
good work done in the school, and the good health of the girls, Mrs. 
Scott could say further, at the end of the year : " In the spiritual state 
of the school we had much to cheer, as well as much to cause sorrow 
and anxiety. Seven of our girls came with us to the Lord's table for 
the first time ; and others, who were not ready to do this, gave us good 
reason to hope that they would before long seek this privilege too." 

Saharanpore, 

•Preaching services in Hindustani have been conducted by the mis- 
sionaries and teachers in the Theological Seminary, and in English for 
Europeans. The latter service is partly for families connected with 
the railway, and their children ; this little congregation contributed 
$150 for this object. Evangelistic meetings have been kept up regu- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



98 INDIA— FUTTEHGURH. 

larly in the city. The church increased from 57 communicants to 66^ 
after the removal of 9 — 3 by death, 3 to join other churches, and as 
many absent without taking letters of dismission. In the chief school 
of 200 boys, the orphanage of 39 boys as boarders, of whom 5 united 
with the church during the year; girls' schools and zenanas, under the 
charge of Mrs. Kelso, with 150 scholars in the former and 115 women 
in the latter ; and the women's normal school, for the wives and chil- 
dren of the theological seminary students, under Mrs. Kelso's care 
also, aided by Mrs. Henry Forman ; in all these good work has been 
done. Good seed sown will bear good fruit. The Theological Semi- 
nary has been well sustained, with the attendance of 28 students. 
Some of its graduates are now ordained as pastors of churches, and 
others have been licensed as preachers, who give promise of useful 
labors. 

The station at Mazaffarnagur is suspended for the present. 

Futtehgurh — Furrukhahad. 

These stations are virtually one, being about three miles apart 
Much of the work for the latter is connected with the former, as the 
place of residence of most of the foreign laborers. Their duties are 
fulfilled in the usual lines ; but Mr. J. N. Forman spent much of his 
time in itinerating work. The preaching services, orphanage, and 
evangelistic schools and visits to zenanas, with the supervision and 
encouragement of native laborers, call for earnest labor. One of the 
prominent native ministers had to be suspended by the Presbytery, 
and his name is omitted from the list given above. The usual station 
and personal reports from this double station, and also from Mynpurie, 
Etawah (excepting that of Miss Belz), Morar, and Jhansi, have not 
been received as this report goes to the printer. Perhaps they may 
arrive before it goes to press, and their statistics may be inserted; 
otherwise, those of last year may be reprinted. 

Mynpurie^ 

and the outstation at Etah, as just stated, cannot be fully reported. 
The same kinds of work — preaching, teaching, itinerating — are under- 
stood to have been conducted as heretofore, and with no less encour- 
agement. 

Etawah, 

The usual reports from this station for the last year have not been 
received, excepting that of Miss Belz. From letters it is learned that 
the Rev. Thomas Tracy, after continuing in his usual work during 
nearly all the year, would leave India on a visit to his family in this 
country, with the consent of the Board. His arrival may be expected 
at an early day — perhaps before this Report is published. The Rev. 
John S. Woodside spent part of the year at this station and a part of 
it at Landour with a married daughter's family, but he was still 
occupied with work for the Saviour. After his return to Etawah, he 
was married to Mrs. Edward Leavitt, a missionary of the Board in 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INDIA — ETAWAH. 99 

1856-57. In the absence of reports of the work at Etawah, reference 
must be made to the last Annual Report of the Board. 

The interesting work of Miss Belz can be best described by quoting 
her own report. It will be read with interest, as showing what a Chris- 
tian woman, who is well acquainted with the language and ways of the 
people, can do in making the Gospel known to them : 

With gratitude to the Lord, I can state that my visits in towns and villages 
are always very welcome to the people. In nearly every place to which I go 
I am received as a friend, and I see clearly that everywhere among the 
women the desire to listen to the Gospel message and to hear more about the 
Saviour Jesus Christ is increasing with every year. There are a number of 
women who, from having heard the truth so often brought before them, have 
become convinced that there is no salvation in their Hindu religion, and that 
in fact their religion is altogether false. They will listen to me for hours and 
put many important questions to me about the way of salvation, which shows 
me the state of their hearts. At many places, when speaking to them, they 
say to each other before me: ''All that this lady tells us is perfectly true, 
and it is clear from what she states that the Christian religion is the 
true religion of God." Many a time the great attention of my audience 
appeared to me as if I had a Christian congregation before me, so earnestly did 
they hear, and the questions which they put about their souls' salvation showed 
that they felt the power of the truth. Some of them would say to me, *' Do let 
me go with you," meaning that she wanted to become a Christian. But then 
by doing so that woman would lose her caste, and could not remain with her 
own relatives. Her husband and her children would turn her out of her own 
home. In such a case I told the woman to remain in her own house and to 
take care of her household as before, but to give her heart to Jesus, and to put 
her hope of salvation in him and in him alone. 

People will very often tell me also of their bodily sickness, and ask me 
whether I did not know of some remedy to help them. As far as I am able, I 
give them my advice what to do, but most of all I try to make them know that 
sickness and every kind of pain and death had come into this world through 
sin, and that they therefore and every one should repent of their sins and turn 
10 the right Physician, the Lord Jesus Christ, for help. When in the village 
Pupar§ I was addressing a number of Brahmini women, a very sickly-looking 
Brahmin who was lying there on a charpoy listened also to me. When I was 
about to go away this man complained, telling me that for the last three 
months he had been confined to his bed, and that he was racked with pain in 
all his bones. The man seemed to sufifer of paralysis, and was much depressed 
in his mind about his illness. He inquired whether I did not know of any 
medicine which could cure him. I replied : " Medicine to cure you I do not 
know, but the Lord Jesus can make you well." I then related to him some of 
the miracles performed by our Lord on sick people, and advised him to repent 
of his sins and to pray to the Lord Jesus for help. He cheerfully said that he 
would try. The next time when I came again to this place many Brahmins 
were present, who received me very kindly and gave me a charpoy to sit on. 
An aged woman came out of a house to be with me, and a strong, hale-looking 
man who was cutting straw, left his work and came also, and put some ques- 
tions to me, as if he would find out whether I remembered something about 
him. When he saw that he appeared quite a stranger to me, he said : " The 
man who was lying here on a cot, sick and miserable when you were here the 
last time, that man am I. I have prayed twice every day to the Lord Jesus 
Christ, and he has made me well." 

I have been in a number of zenanas of high caste Hindus where the inmates 
listened well to the Gospel message, and mostly everywhere in these houses, 
when I was about to go away, some women would beg of me to come again to 
them. The other day, in the village Manikpore, where many high caste people 
are living a Brahmini woman, in whose house I was, said to me : ** 1 have 
seen you at the Mela at Sonai, and other women here have told me about you, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



lOO INDIA— ETAWAH. 

but I said to them that lady does not come to our house." This woman begged 
me in a most touching way to come again, and said : "All that you tell us is 
so very true and important, but we being parda-women [parda^ a screen, to 
keep them from being seen] are not allowed to go out and hear you at places 
where you speak to women, who gather about you in the street." In a 
Brahmini-zenana, in the village Bataura, I found a girl of about eighteen years 
suffering of consumption. Her mother told me that this, her daughter, had, 
when very young, become a widow, and was much afraid to die. I of course 
spoke to them about Jesus as the Saviour of sinners, and exhorted the girl to 
believe and to trust m him. and if ever fear would come to pray to him for 
help. The girl seemed to feel comforted. Both mother and daughter wept, 
and it seemed as if every word which I told them went to their hearts. When 
about to leave them some other women and the girl's mother followed me to 
the door of the house, and with tears the mother begged me to come soon 
again, so that her poor, dying daughter might hear more of the "good word." 
In several other Brahmini>zenanas the women would make me promise them 
that I would come again. 

I have also been called into several Mohammedan-zenanas, where generally 
a great number of women gathered about me. They would listen quietly to all 
I told them till I came to the point that there was no other way to paradise but 
by Jesus Christ, then they would generally show that they did not agree with 
what I was saying. At one place, where from several houses about twenty- 
five Mohammedan women had gathered about me, all listened with attention 
till I came to speak about the Lord Jesus as the only Saviour of sinners. 
Upon this one or two men who seemed to have heard what I had said from a 
hidden place in the house, came forward to oppose me, when most of the 
women left me and ran into the adjoining houses. After I had said a few 
words to my opponents, and had put a few questions about religion to them, 
they dropped the matter and left me also. But now a strong-minded woman 
came forward and said to me : " Go away from here ; we do not like to hear 
you speak of Jesus Christ. We believe in our own prophet, Mahomet." I 
did not feel like going away, but after having told them first a few words more 
about the Saviour, remaining sitting on the charpoy, I said to them : "You 
have called me here to preach to you. I shall therefore go after I have done 
so." And having done so. I left them. 

My zenana schools number at present 144 pupils, who are of high caste and 
taught by four female teachers. The books read in these schools are the First 
Hindi Book, the Catechism, Guru Gian, and Prashan Utter ; the tract Dharm- 
tula ; Barth's Bible History, or instead of it some portions of the Old Testa- 
ment—Genesis and Exodus, the Psalms, and the Proverbs — and after that the 
New Testament. In this year again a number of girls left school after they 
had learned to read well. Others again who had not yet finished their study 
had to leave, because we were going away from Etawah. One woman who 
had only read the Catechism and the tract Dharmtula told me when I exam- 
ined her the last time that she was going away from Etawah. She seemed on 
this occasion to be very thoughtful about the Christian religion. In the pres- 
ence of several of her friends she asked me to tell her the difference between 
their god R&m and the Lord Jesus Christ. She put also many other important 
questions about Jesus Christ as the Saviour, which I answered, and then 
bought a book containing Christian bhajans or hymns from me, and at her 
advice her sister bought the tract Dharmtula. This tract is generally read by 
my pupils with attention and interest. However, one Brahmini woman made 
an exception. She declared to the teacher that if I would give her a book 
again which was so opposed to her Hindu religion as Dharmtula she would 
give up reading altogether, and in the same way she and her mother spoke to 
me when I came to examine her. The teacher had told them already that 
according to the rules in my schools no other books than those mentioned 
above are used, and that whoever would not read them could not be taught at 
all by my teachers. This woman is now reading in the Old Testament, and 
seems to be reconciled again and willing to continue her reading. 

In conclusion, I wish to state that during the last year I have paid 342 visits 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INDI A— A LLA H AB AD. I O I 

to villages, have been in 145 zenanas in towns and villages, have attended 
10 melas, and on 119 days I have worked in the city of Etawah. 
May the Lord bless his own Word to the salvation of many souls ! 

Morar. 

At this station Mrs. Warren continues in the charge of its work. 
She is aided by a native minister, and cherishes the hope that their 
labors are not in vain in the Lord. The report of the station not 
yet received. 

Jhansi, 

The missionary outlook at this station is still of marked interest and 
encouragement. As a military and railway post, surrounded by a large 
population, it is considered a good place for missionary work. A 
chapel and reading-room is about completed, and in a few months it is 
hoped that a church, in a different part of the city, will be ready for ser- 
vices. Mr. and Mrs. Holcomb have their hearts and hands full of 
gooii work, and they should have the assistance of another missionary 
family at the earliest practicable time. They have now the aid of a 
lady from Australia, formerly of India, whose salary is defrayed by 
Australian friends, and who is useful in the school and in visits to 
native women and children. A native minister is also stationed at 
Jhansi. 

Futtehpore. 

This city is still but an outstation of Allahabad. It is under the 
special supervision of the Rev. J. M. Alexander, and is occupied by 
native helpers. Reference is made to it in Mr. Alexander's report 
below. As a central post in a district of nearly 700,000 people, it 
needs the regular services of an able and earnest minister and his 
wife. 

Allahabad. 

At this influential city the work of the missionaries is in good con- 
dition. Mr. Alexander devotes his time largely to evangelistic and 
educational labors, and he rightly understands the former as including 
the latter. His report speaks of interesting missionary tours, accom- 
panied by Mrs. Alexander and three of the native Christian assistants, 
especially in the district of Futtehpore. In this district of 680,000 
people only visits by the brethren seem as yet to be practicable ; but 
a small church has been formed at the chief town, and native helpers 
are connected with it, who are visited and aided from Allahabad. Mr. 
Alexander is led to fear that a disproportionate attention is given by 
missionaries to the large cities, while the almost innumerable villages 
are too much neglected. In Allahabad his labors are largely in the 
part of the city called the Kutra, where he preaches in the bazars and 
the streets, besides visiting almost daily in the forenoons certain suburban 
towns for the same purpose. He aids the native pastor, Mr. Calebs 
exercises supervision over schools, having over 200 scholars, gives 
attention to keeping the accounts of the treasury for the stations of 
the mission, and so devotes himself to abundant labors in the cause 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



102 INDIA— ALLAHABAD. 

of Christ It IS noteworthy that during one of the missionary tours 
T40 separate villages were visited and preached in, and many interest- 
ing conversations were held with individuals. Mrs. Alexander also 
finds invaluable opportunities of doing good, both on the missionary 
journeys, and fh visits among native women and children ; 86 zenana 
pupils are reported in connection with the Kutra station. To the 
church there 8 communicants were added, making in all 81. The 
Futtehpore church, under Mr. Alexander's charge, reports 13 com- 
municants. The schools at Kutra include 190 boys and 14 girls. 

The various labors of Dr. Lucas have been steadily and efficiently 
continued during the last year in abundant preaching services ; the 
superintendence of the High School for boys, of 254 pupils; the editing 
of the monthly magazine, the MakUzan-i-Masihe ; visits to the Blind 
Asylum of 69 inmates, and the I-feper Asylum of 35 inmates. The 
services in the new church on the Sabbath and several times during 
the week attested the great advantage of its site, its size, and its well- 
known purpose as a temple for the worship of the true God. Some 
attempts were made to disturb the meetings held in it ; stones were 
thrown into it in times of worship, windows were broken ; but these 
annoyances have mostly ceased — partly no doubt under the protec- 
tion of the police, and the audiences are now usually undisturbed and 
attentive. At the Jumna church %2^ communicants are reported. Five 
were added to the church, two Hindus, one Mohammedan, and two 
by letters from other churches. Another Hindu was baptized, but 
was intensely persecuted by his friends, and at length yielded to their 
influence, and is not a communicant. Several inquirers are referred 
to, some of whom have disappointed hopes indulged, and others who 
may yet confess Christ as their Saviour. The members of the church 
have begun to collect funds among themselves to support a pastor, 
showing liberality in their limited means. An effort is contemplated 
to form a new church, under another pastor. 

In January and February the usual evangelizing efforts at the annual 
mela were made, but unusual opposition was met with. This led the 
brethren to modify their plans, and concentrate their labors at certain 
places among the vast crowds, thus securing better attention. An 
outstation was occupied at Kurma across the Sutlej, twelve miles 
from Allahabad. One of the native brethren and his wife were placed 
in charge, and the first three months gave encouragement. A number 
of inquirers were known. Dr. Lucas also refers to the blind inmates 
of the Asylum, sixteen of whom are able to read, and a strong desire 
was expressed by them to have the whole Bible printed in their letters. 

It is difficult to give a full account of the work in progress at this 
station, as it is also at other stations ; but it is evident that God is 
blessing the labors of His servants here, as elsewhere in India. The 
boarding-school for native Christian giris at Allahabad is under the 
efficient charge of Mrs. John Newton, Jr. It is doing a good work 
for an interesting company of young people, 58 in number. Their 
parents are expected to pay for the expense of their schooling, accord- 
ing to their ability, which in most cases is very small. Mrs. Newton 
has been aided in her labors provisionally by Miss Hutchison and 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INDIA — ALLAHABAD. I03 

Miss Babbitt, but these young ladies expect to be occupied chiefly 
in other lines of duty — visits among native women in zenanas and in 
villages, and as opportunities offer. An efficient teacher of some ex- 
perience in teaching is much needed in aid of Mrs. Newton. Her 
work as superintendent has been altogether excessive, and must be 
lessened. 

The medical missionary work at this city is still in the charge of 
Miss Seward, M.D., and is marked by its efficiency and success. Her 
impaired health required a visit to this country for a few months, but 
she was glad to return to her work with renewed strength, arriving at 
Allahabad in Deceniber. In her absence the work was in the care of 
Miss Symes, of special medical training, aided by the faithful Bible- 
reader who has been with Miss Seward for some years, and the work 
was well conducted. Miss Symes reported the attendance of patients, 
from April to November inclusive, as 6,785, of whom 2,301 were new 
patients. Most of the patients are very poor, but Rs. 327 — over 
$ioo^were received from fees. The reading of the Scriptures or 
religious books was kept up daily, preceding the medical work ; and 
visits were made to some of the women at their homes, besides 
keeping up a Sabbath-school class of from 30 to 40 boys and girls at 
the dispensary. In these duties the faithful Bible-reader continued to 
assist Miss Symes, and both were happy in their good labors. Visits 
were paid by the Bible-reader to 32 zenanas, in which 49 pupils were 
taught. 

Miss Seward, while at home, renewed the request for a new dispensary 
or hospital. This application was sanctioned by the mission. The 
building heretofore rented was never suitable, and it had become almost 
uninhabitable, besides being refused for rent longer. The new building 
had received the approval of the Board in the preceding year ; but to 
obtain a good site was very difficult, and the funds available only 
secured the ground, and so the case rested, after a very eligible site 
had been obtained, near the new church building, in the best part of 
the city. With the aid of liberal gilts from friends here, the Board 
was encouraged to complete the funds required for the new building. 
The outlay for the land and the dibpensary will be about $4,000. The 
architect's plans were generously without charge, and the new build- 
ing by its attractive but modest style, its well-appointed interior 
arrangements and its admirable site, with its efficient administration, 
will greatly increase the influence for good of this dispensary. It will 
still have the faithful Christian services of the Bible-woman long con- 
nected with it, as well as those of Miss Symes, while Miss Seward will 
be more than ever thankful for the blessing of God upon her work. 

One of the signs of progress in India was the decision of the 
Supreme Court at Allahabad, the highest in the northwestern prov- 
inces, that a convert of minor age may be baptized as a Christian if 
his act is intelligent and free. At the discretion of the court he may 
be released from the control of his relatives who would compel him 
to remain a heathen, and be subject to cruel and degrading treatment, 
extending as in some cases that have occurred to the destruction of 
reason and of life itself, to prevent his becoming a Christian. The 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



I04 INDIA — KOLHAPUR. 

case adjudicated was that of a young man at Allahabad, a member of 
one of our schools, whose relatives prosecuted our missionaries, Dr. 
Lucas and Mr. H. Forman, before the court for baptizing him. The 
case attracted wide attention, and the decision was a great departure 
from the ruling of the high courts heretofore. Its immediate effect 
relates to the people in the northwest provinces, but it already estab- 
lishes the right law for a hundred millions of the Hindus, and it will 
probably be a decision, owing to the principles and the circumstances 
involved, to be followed in all parts of the country. The judgment of 
the Court was long deferred for mature consideration. The mission- 
aries regard it as reached in answer to prayer, and are very grateful to 
God for it. 

It is needful to remember that the staff of ministers from this 
country in these missions in Upper India is becoming seriously weaker. 
Some have returned, hoping to go back, but not for some time, most 
of them meanwhile not drawing their support from the Board. One 
has died ; several are becoming aged and infirm. Only one new 
minister was sent out last year ; another was to have gone, but serious 
illness prevented. Two new ministers are now under appointment. 
But more are needed if the work is kept in requisite force. There is 
urgent need of prayer for more laborers in so great a field. 

There is still more need of prayer for the power of the Holy Spirit 
to give life to the multitudes who are " dead in trespasses and in sins." 
In the older missions, prayer is needed for special grace to bring 
into life seed widely sown, and make it spring up and bear fruit many 
fold. With the blessing of God the friends of missions in our part of 
India may soon see thousands and tens of thousands of the Hindus 
turning unto the Lord, as in South India in recent years. The Lord 
hasten the day ! 

Kolhapur Mission. 

The field occupied by this mission comprises the CoUectorates of 
Ralnagiri, parts of the CoUectorates of Satara and Belgaum, the States 
of Kolhapur, Sangli, Miraj and Kurundwar, and other of the Southern 
Marathi States. It contains 4,000 villages, besides the densely popu- 
lated cities and towns, making the total number of souls within the 
territory of our mission about 4,000,000. The inhabitants are mostly 
Hindus, although there are a goodly number of Mohammedans, Jains, 
and others. The missionary force has been temporarily depleted by 
the return of Mr. and Mrs. Ferris and Miss Patton to the United 
States on furlough, while it has been substantially increased by the ar- 
rival of Dr. and Mrs. Wan less, Miss Margaret L. Ewalt, and Miss Jen- 
nie Sherman, who joined the mission during the year, the two former 
being assigned to Sangli, and the latter two to Kolhapur. An earnest 
appeal has been forwarded by the mission for sixteen new missionaries 
to strengthen the posts already established, reoccupy Ratnagiri and 
extend the work to other strategic centres. 

Kolhapur Station, 
Preaching has been conducted at this station by Mr. Goheen and 
Mr. Seiler and three native laborers in church and chapel, and on the 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INDIA — KOLHAPUR. 105 

public highway. Six persons were received into the church on con- 
fession of faith, and four by letter, making the total enrollment sixty, 
while still others are inquiring. A day of fasting and prayer was 
observed by the church in June to the refreshment and edification 
both of the missionaries and the native Christians. The report men- 
tions with gratitude the manifest growth of brotherly love and earnest 
prayer among believers. 

Four Sunday-schools have been in operation in the city, that held in 
the city chapel having sixteen classes, with an average of twenty 
pupils each. It is especially to be noted that about one hundred of 
those who attend this school are not connected with any of the mission 
day-schools, showing that attention is being challenged outside the 
usual circle of direct mission influence. 

The evangelistic work in the outlying districts has been prosecuted 
to some extent by Mr. Goheen, with thft help of native preachers, 
twenty-five towns and villages having been visited. In addition to 
preaching in the city, Mr. Seiler spoke to groups in some thirty differ- 
ent places in Kolhapur and in twenty villages, paying special atten- 
tion to private conversation. In connection with these evangelistic 
efforts Mr. Goheen writes : " I feel more and more convinced that if 
the mission is to reach the multitudes of India, missionaries must go 
into the highways and hedges with the Gospel." 

Work among the women has been prosecuted with diligence by Mrs. 
and Miss Wilder, and also by Mrs. Hull. In addition to house-to- 
house visitation, in which 140 homes were visited, Mrs. Wilder and 
daughter opened a school in the village of Bowada, conducted as a 
Sunday-school, although held on Thursdays. The ladies encountered 
some opposition during the year, but on the whole have found the 
homes of the people open and ready access to the women and chil- 
dren. In addition to the work in and around Kolhapur, Mrs. and 
Miss Wilder made an itinerary tour to Sangli, visiting villages on the 
way. Mrs. Hull, in connection with her school work, has had six 
zenana pupils during the year in four different homes. Part of this 
work consists in imparting religious instruction. She notes with 
gratitude that her most advanced pupil, a young Mohammedan woman, 
finished committing " The Summary of Scripture Doctrine " during the 
year. This achievement is all the greater because it was done after 
the family had retired, that she might not be charged with neglecting 
her ordinary duties in order to study Christian truth. 

Educational, — The English High-School, under the care of Mr. 
Seiler, reports a prosperous year, with 120 pupils enrolled. The relig- 
ious instruction of the school is thus referred to : " Fifteen minutes are 
devoted to daily prayers, which 1 conduct in Marathi for the benefit of 
those studying the lower standards. Two classes have each two 
hours in * Pilgrim's Progress' every week ; the sixth and seventh classes 
have gone through the Gospel of Mark twice." In addition to this Mr. 
Seiler reaches the boys in Sunday-school and by private conversation. 
Miss Sherman, who has been assisting in the school, speaks enthusias- 
tically of it as a means of reaching the youth with the Gospel, being in 
this respect in sharp contrast to (rovernment schools, where religious 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



I06 INDIA— KOLHAPUR. 

instruction is forbidden. She mentions the case of an advanced 
student in one of these schools who told her that he knew nothing of 
Christ, save that he had heard his name mentioned, and on her talking 
with him of Peter's walking on the water, he wished to know whether 
it was " Peter the Hermit," or " Peter the Great" 

The Chrisiian GirU School established a year ago has quite met the 
expectation of the mission. Being exclusively for the girls of Christian 
parents, its growth can only be in proportion to that of the churches 
within the mission. There was an average attendance for the year of 
about 25, 1 1 of them being in the boarding department and the others 
living on the mission compound or in the city. Six of them are 
orphans. The health of the pupils has been excellent, something 
which Mrs. Goheen ascribes to the comfortable home now provided 
for them, furnished, however, in native style. Concerning the com- 
forts of this home, Miss Ewalt writes: **It probably would not seem 
very comfortable to us ; sitting on the floor at meal-time and all other 
times, eating rice and curry without knife, fork, or spoon, and at night 
spreading our beds, consisting of a few quilts, on the floor." 

Three day-schools for boys, with an average attendance of 1 1 2, have 
been conducted by native teachers under the direction of Mr. Seiler. 
The attendance at the school for Hindu and Mohammedan girls in the 
Bazaar, under the care of Mrs. Hull, has fallen off. Six of the girls 
withdrew to attend a Hindu school for girls which the Government 
had opened during the year, and where instruction is given in the 
Arabic tongue. Mrs. Hull adds : "Marriages, feast days, and indiffer- 
ence of parents have all contributed to make the attendance irregular. 
On the other hand, the scholarship and general status of the school 
has, I think, advanced. Two girls passed the examination for the 
sixth class and one for the seventh, being, I believe, the first Hindu 
girl in any school of our mission who has been allowed to remain in 
school long enough to pass so far. The children's hearts are easily 
touched, and they are influenced by the truth which they are taught 
One refuses to worship idols or wear the caste mark ; some two or 
three meet together to sing the hymns they have learned ; one reads 
the New Testament to a neighbor, another tells her father the good 
news learned at school, that they both have a Father in heaven, while 
girls who have attended the school will visit it again, or speak with 
pride of their former connection with it." 

Panhala Station, 

In the absence of Mr. Ferris, the oversight of this station has been 
in the hands of Mr. Seiler, wiiile the outstations connected with it have 
been under the charge of Mr. Goheen. Preaching has been maintained 
in the town chapel by Bhiwaji, a native preacher, on Sabbath after- 
noons, and the Sabbath-school in the compound, though greatly re- 
duced in numbers, was maintained. The absence of Miss Patton, and 
the inability of the mission to put any one in her place, rendered it 
necessary to close the day-school which had been an important feeder 
to the Sabbath-school. None were received into the church on con- 



Digitized by VjtOOQIC 



INDIA— KOLHAPUR. I07 

fession of faith, while one was suspended for unchristian conduct. 
Since the close of the year, however, a man and his wife have been 
baptized and enrolled as members of the church. 

The dispensary work has been carried on by Somaji, a native 
Christian, who has been trained to this work. He prescribed for 
7,620 patients during the year, and made good use of opportunities for 
preaching the Gospel to those who came to the dispensary. 

Mr. Goheen reports that he spent two days at Nerlehy an outstation 
some thirty miles from Kolhapur. where hundreds came to hear the 
Gospel, .^t Kerduli^ where the missionary spent four days and held 
communion, a large number of Hindus were present. Several persons 
were found who seemed to be almost persuaded to take their stand 
for Christ. One of the Christians there had been sorely tried by his 
Hindu neighbors, they having threatened to starve him out if he re- 
fused to work on the Lord's day. By his consistent walk and God's 
providential care, however, he gained the victory and has now no diffi- 
culty in finding employment. 

The church at Itiwadi, some three miles from Kerduli, has been in 
charge of Surtoba, a native preacher. The communicants number 
but 13, and no additions are reported for the year. The preacher in 
charge, besides conducting services there, preached in thirty different 
towns and villages. 

Sangli Station, 

The church building in the city, which was reported well advanced 
last year, is still unfinished, owing to vexatious delays, and yet Mr. 
Graham, who has charge of the work, has been congratulated by native 
gentlemen on the rapidity with which the edifice has been erected, 
building in India being proverbially slow. The church occupies one 
of the most conspicuous sites in Sangli, and for this reason has stirred 
up the priestly and other high castes. The opposition, however, has 
not led to any serious interference with the progress of the work. 
Public worship has been conducted as formerly in the central room 
of the boarding-school. This room, which accommodates about 
125 persons, has been well filled, and frequently closely packed, 
mostly, however, with the native Christians and children, together 
with the workmen employed on the mission buildings. The Sunday- 
school has been well attended, the room being filled to its utmost 
capacity. The international Sunday-school lessons have been the 
subject of study in the school, as well as the theme for the Thursday 
afternoon church meetings. Deep regret is expressed at the fall of a 
young man who had given promise of great usefulness, and was in 
course of preparation for the ministry. But one addition was made to 
the church on confession of faith during the year. 

The Boy^ Boarding-school^ under the care of Mr. Graham, had an 
attendance of 26 during the year, 16 of the number being boarders. 
One of the day scholars died of hydrophobia in circumstances which 
made a deep impression upon all. Although he had never made a 
public confession of his faith, he had been taught the way of salvation 
through Christ, and in his delirium before his death he called on Christ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



loS INDIA— STATISTICS. 

to save him, and in such a way as to bring tears to the eyes of all who 
heard him. A pri/e of a Bible dictionary in the Marathi was offered 
to the boy in the three highest classes who passed the best examina- 
tion in the books of the Bible which are studied in the school. Mr. 
Graham reports that during a six hours' examination four boys did not 
miss a question, and it became necessary to give them all prizes. 

Since our occupation of Sangli a number of the better class of the 
people have expressed a desire that the mission should open a high- 
school for their benefit, and although the way does not seem clear for 
this step at present, it indicates confidence on the part of the people 
in our missionaries and their methods of instruction. 

The itinerating work of this station has been in the hands of Mr. 
Tedford, who, with a native preacher, made two journeys through the 
villages and towns in the Sangli region, also visiting Chinchli, where 
the great annual exhibition of domestic animals is held, and where 
frequently 100,000 people gather in the month of February, multitudes 
of whom bathe in the sacred Krishna, and then prostrate themselves 
at the shrine of the idol god. During a visit to Tasgaum, a large 
place, containing one of the most magnificent temples in Western In- 
dia, striking testimony was borne to the value of the Bible by an edu- 
cated Brahmin. He said : " I have read most of the Bible, and also 
studied it carefully, and I can truly say that the ancient history, cere- 
monies, and morals of the Old Testament are most interesting, and the 
teachings of Jesus Christ most excellent. If men would act according 
to them, this world would become a heaven." A good deal of opposi- 
tion was encountered here and there during the itinerary tours, and 
yet on the whole respectful attention was given to the proclamation of 
the truth. Mr. Tedford also during part of the year held regular ser- 
vices in the railroad station at Miraj, a city of 25,000 inhabitants, 
some twelve miles from Sangli on the railroad. It is one of the points 
which the mission is exceedingly anxious to occupy, not only because 
of its large population, untouched by the Gospel, but because of its 
strategic importance. 

Statistics of Kolhapur Mission, 

Ordained missionaries 5 

Medical missionary z 

Sing^le )ady missionaries 6 

Married lady missionaries 6 

Licentiates 3 

Native teachers and helpers 22 

Number of churches 4 

Communicants loa 

Added during: the year 13 

Number of schools 14 

Total number of pupils 512 

Pupils in Sabbath-school 668 

Contributions $82 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MISSIONS AMONG THE INDIANS. 
Dakota Mission. 

^'Yankton Agency, South Dakota : on the Missouri River, 69 miles above Yankton; 
station occupied, 1869 ; Rev. John P. Williamson and his wife ; Rev, Henry T. Seltvyn, 
Outstatiofis^ 3 ; native helpers, 3. 

Pine Ridge : occupied 1886 ; Rev. C. G. Sterling and his wife ; Miss Jennie B. Dick- 
son and Miss Charlotte C. McCreight; Rev. Louis Mazanakinyanna ; four native 
helpers. 

Flandreau, South Dakota : on Big Sioux River, 40 miles above Sioux Falls ; station 
occupied, 1869 ; ^^- John Eastman. 

Lower Brule Agency (White River), South Dakota : on the Missouri River, 80 
miles above Yankton Agency ; station occupied in 1885 ; Rev, Joseph Rogers, 

Poplar Creek, Montana : on the Missouri River, 70 miles west of Fort Buford ; sta- 
tion occupied, 1880 ; one native helper. 

Wolf Point, Montana : on the Missouri River, 84 miles west of Poplar Creek ; sta- 
tion occupied, 1885 ; one native helper. 

Tlie Nez Perce Mission. 

Lapwai, Idaho Ter. : work begun, 1838 ; Miss Kate McBeth. 

Kamiah : occupied 1885 ; Miss Sue McBetb temporarily at \fount Idaho. 

Native ministers : Kamiah, Rev. R. Williams ; Umatilla, Rev. J, Hayes ; North 
Fork, Rev. W, Wheeler; Lapwai, Rev. Peter Lindsley ; Spokane Falls, Rev. A. B. 
Lawyer ; Wellpinit, Rev. Silas Whitman; Meadow Creek, Rev. Enoch Pond. General 
evangelist. Rev. James Hines. 

Seneca Mission. 

Alleghany : Alleghany Reservation, Western New York : Rev. M. F. Trippe and 
wife, and Rev. William Hall ; eleven native assistants. 

Substations : on Tonawanda, Tuscarora, and Complanter Reservalions. 

Upper Cattaraugus : Cattaraugus Reservation, Western New York ; mission be- 
gun, 181 1 ; transferred to the Board, 1870 ; Rev. George Runciman and wife. 

During the year the Chippewa, Omaha, and Sac and Fox Missions have been trans- 
ferred to the Board of Home Missions. 

Tlie Dalcotas. 

From the report of Rev. John P. Williamson, we glean the follow- 
ing points of interest : The Yankton Agency church observed the 
Week of Prayer with good results, the meetings being fully attended ; 
nearly all the men in the church, of whom there are sixty, took part 
in some of the services. The Sabbath-school is full, and the Wom- 
an's Society and the Young Men's Christian Association are active. 
Mr. Williamson gives what attention he can, with his other work, to 
the Government boarding-school, in which he seems to be welcomed. 
The Yankton Agency day-school has been under the care of Miss 
Miller since the ist of January, Miss Hunter having resigned the work 
in which she had made a faithful record. Good accounts of Miss Mil- 
ler's work, as well as that of Miss Wheeler, are given. The former 
has had previous experience in the Indian work, and understands 
enough of the Dakota language to communicate with the children 
through that medium, and also to teach them to read their vernacular 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



no 



INDIANS — DAKOTAS. 



Bible. She also has a Dakota class in the Sabbath-school, and 
takes an active part in the woman's meetings, and in visiting the sick 
and inquirers. There are two day-schools among the Yaftktons taught 
by Indians, namely, the Hill school, conducted by Charles Ironheart, 
and the Ree school, taught by J'ierre La Pointe. Both have done sat- 
isfactory work, and have exerted a positive influence in bringing the 
youth to an understanding of Bible truth, and to a practical knowledge 
of Christ. 

The two outstation churches among the Yank tons have been main- 
tained. Some of the native assistants have suffered temporarily from 
influenza, but at other times they have been faithfully at work. Mr. 
Williamson speaks highly of our " active and strong elders in each of 
the churches, who keep up the meetings and church visitation and in- 
struction." He himself has conducted an elders' meeting or theo- 
logical class (it partakes of the nature of both) on Tuesday after- 
noons. These sessions have been largely attended, and have proved 
interesting and profitable. 

The people at Flandreau are a good deal agitated over the question 
of a sale of a portion of the great Sioux reservation, and the prob- 
ability that it will lead to a change of their location. Two persons 
have been received into the Flandreau church. 

At Lower Brule Agency two preaching stations have been main- 
tained. The attendance is good, but the Indians are much excited 
over their future removal. 

The following general presentation of the claims of the Dakota 
Mission, prepared by Rev. John P. Williamson, is so instructive that 
we present it entire : 

"The Dakota Indians, numbering over 30,000, are the most numer- 
ous of any tribe in the United States at present. P'or the last twenty 
years the Sioux or Dakotas have received much attention, and the 
number of missions among them has rapidly increased. 

"The following table will show where these Indians are located and 
the denominations at work among them : 



Name of Agency. 


No. of Indians. 

7,404 
5,052 
4,335 
2,925 

■ 1,891 

i»837 
1,487 
1,145 
1,099 

979 

830 
221 


Denominations at Work. 


Rosebud 

Pine Ridge 

Standing Rock 

Cheyenne River 

Ft P«^rV i Poplar Creek 
^^•^^''^l&Wolf Point 

Yankton 

Sisseton 

Lower Brule 


Congregational, Episcopal, Catholic. 
Presbyterian F. M., Episcopal, Catholic. 
Congregational, Episcopal, Catholic. 
Congregational, E|>iscopal. 

Presbyterian F, M. 

Presbyterian F. M., Episcopal. 
Presbyterian H. M., Episcoiml. 
Presbyterian F. M., Episcopal. 
Presbyterian N. M. S., Episcopal, Catholic. 
Presbyterian N. M. S., CathoUc. 
Congregational, EpiscopaL 
Catholic. 
Presbyterian F. M., EpiscopaL 


Crow Creek 


Devil's Lake 

Santee 

Ft. Belknap 

Flandreau 




Thirteen Agencies 


30,112 


Presbyterian, 8 ; Congregational, 4 ; Episcopal, 
10; Catholic, 6. (The number of Agendes 
occupied shows little as to amount of work. ) 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INDIANS— YANKTON. 



Ill 



" We give below another table designed to show the amount of 
work done by the several denominations, and the total school work 
done by both church and government. The figures are not entirely 
accurate, some being for 1888, some for 1889, and a few estimated, 
but will give, we think, a fair comparative view. 



Church and School Work among 


the Dakotas 






By whom Supported. 


og 


IS 


8 . 


3 

a 




M 


''I 
It 


1 

it 


Presbyterian Church 

Congregational Church.. 

Episcopal Church 

Catholic Church 

Government (Rfcservation 

Schools) 

Eastern Schools 


4 
4 

1 


12 

4 

7 


1,100 

1,800 

* 


$3,100 

1,000 

2,5<"o 

* 


I 
2 
4 

5 
II 


no 
205 
175 
379 

1,196 
300 


6 

14 

39 


375 
4CO 

1.451 








25 


23 


3,250 


$6,600 


23 


3,265 


59 


2,136 



" In regard to church work, it will be seen from the above table 
that there is an ordained minister of some denomination, Protestant or 
Catholic, to every 600 Dakotas, and that, not including Catholics, 
one-tenth of the entire population are communicants. It will also be 
seen that the communicants contribute on an average $2 per member. 

" As to school work, the table will show that of a school population 
(as returned by the agents) of 8,000 there are 4,391 who have attended 
some kind of a school during the year. 

"This is a wonderful record for the Sioux Nation, which twenty 
years ago was one of the wildest and most uncivilized (as a body) of 
any tribe in the United States." 

Yankton. 

Of the general improvement at Yankton Mr. Williamson writes as 
follows : " Quietly, but deeply and effectively, the Spirit of God is 
moving upon this people. The chains of idolatry are dropping off these 
long-imprisoned souls, and the weak eyes are becoming accustomed 
to the glorious light of the Sun of Righteousness. Among the 1,800 
Yankton Indians we have three organized churches and four preach- 
ing stations. The Episcopalians are doing about the same amount of 
work. There are also, however, this winter about the same number 
of dance-houses. The dancers seem to know that their time is short, 
and in their zeal have reclaimed some of our converts, much to our 
sorrow. On the other hand, a larger number have been won to the 
truth than in any previous year. Twenty-nine have been added on 
profession at Yankton Agency, 29 also at the Hill church, and 4 at 
the Cedar church, making 62 among the Yanktons. The total num- 

* These items could not be^obtained. , . 

8 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1 1 2 INDIANS — YANKTON. 

ber is 298." Mr. Williamson has preached generally three times a 
week. Pastor Selwyn has also been busy. 

Notwithstanding the fact that large numbers of children have been 
gathered into the Government boarding-schools, the three day-schools 
have been as full as ever, " showing," as Mr. Williamson says, "that 
the time has not yet come to give up this work." Many of the bright- 
est scholars are sent to the Santee Training-school, under the American 
Missionary Association. Twenty-seven from the Yankton churches 
are now there. Forty children from these day-schools are in the 
Agency Government boarding-school. They are permitted to attend 
the church and Sabbath-school of the mission. The relations between 
the Government school and the church have been pleasant and satis- 
factory. A number of children from these churches are also in schools 
at the East. Mr. Williamson speaks highly of the influence of institu- 
tions like Hampton and Carlisle as bearing upon the work among the 
Dakotas. 

The church among the Lower Brule Indians, known as the White 
River church, has been under the care of Rev. Joseph Rogers, who 
has labored faithfully amid many distractions and trials. As this is on 
the great Sioux Reservation the people are much excited over the 
question of land distribution and settlement, and there is much dissat- 
isfaction over the location assigned them. Notwithstanding these dis- 
couragements fifteen have joined the church on profession, making the 
present number of communicants forty-nine. Mr. Rogers has main- 
tained a day-school. A number of young men have learned to read 
the Bible in their own language. 

At Flandreau station there are only 221 Indians, of whom 114, or 
more than half, are communicants in the Presbyterian church. There 
is also a small Episcopal church among them. The native pastor. 
Rev. John Eastman, reports that there is no one to be converted, but 
a good many to be established. Five baptized children of the church 
have been admitted on profession. There is a probability that the 
people will be removed from Flandreau under the new land allot- 
ments. 

The Montana Mission established at Poplar Creek has been without 
the oversight of any resident missionary since the withdrawal of Rev. 
(Jeo. W. Wood. Native helpers, however, have been employed dur- 
ir\g the year, and steps are now being taken for the permanent settle- 
ment of a missionary. There is no ordained minister within sixty 
miles. 

The native Missionary Society at Yankton has long been a centre 
and source of spiritual power. Mr. Williamson reports advancement 
in its efficiency and interest He says : " They now support four na- 
tive missionaries and their wives, — Rev. Samuel Hopkins and wife at 
Devil's Lake, Rev. D. Renville and wife at Crow Creek Agency, 
Elder James Brown and wife at Cheyenne River Agency, and Elder 
James Redwing and wife at Standing Rock Agency. James Brown," 
he adds, *'has been sorely tried in the loss of three children in three 
months^ but * casts his burden on the Lord.* Samuel Hopkins is in 
the famme-stricken district, but his people have been favored in finding 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INDIANS— PINE RIDGE. II3 

great quantities of fish, and those who had been scattered are coming 
together again. He has therefore been able to reopen the day-school 
which he had closed, and his religious meetings are full. Mr. D. Renville 
at Crow Creek has received several accessions to the church. James 
Redwing is working hard against Roman Catholic opposition, but his 
Indians thus far remain faithful." 

Pine Ridge, 

Rev. C. G. Sterling, located at Pine Ridge Agency, sends an inter- 
esting report, varied with light and shade. Four points are being held 
in connection with this station, — the Agency itself. Porcupine Creek, 
White Clay, and the Cheyenne settlement on White River. These 
speak a different language, yet they have not been left wholly uncared 
for. A school has been established under the management of an In- 
dian boy who had been educated in the Indian Territory. 

Porcupine Creek is occupied by Miss Dickson and Miss McCreight, 
and White Clay by Rev. Louis Mazawaka-Kinyanna, formerly pastor 
at Sisseton Agency. At each of these stations regular services are 
held, and efficient work has been done, and each point is sufficiently 
central to favor the attendance of a large number of Dakotas from the 
region round about. 

The report notes changes which are constantly occurring under the 
gradual adjustment of land settlement. The Indians are moving off 
in groups to settle upon the land which has been assigned to them, or 
which they expect to receive ; but notwithstanding these changes the 
Pine Ridge Agency is so central as to be of permanent importance, 
and it should be strengthened. 

Mr. Sterling finds a specially interesting branch of his work in the 
pastoral care of thirty Government boarding-school children, with 
whom he holds two services on the Sabbath, besides drilling them at 
other times in a knowledge of the Word of God. The field is divided 
between the Presbyterian Mission and that of the Episcopal Church. 
Both are doing their work faithfully and well, and they are in perfect 
harmony. One of the young helpers employed at this Agency, James 
Lynn, has entered Pierre University. He has been received under 
the care of the Dakota Presbytery as a candidate for the ministry. 
John Chaske, another young man educated in Massachusetts, is now 
filling his place, and is highly spoken of in respect to Christian char- 
acter and marked ability as a ready and clear speaker. 

Mr. Sterling speaks with delight of the pleasant parsonage secured 
to his family a year ago. It is certainly a very modest one, as even 
carping critics would admit could they look upon a recent photographic 
sketch. 

Porcupine Creek, 

There are indications of vigor and success at this station. Miss 
Dickson and Miss McCreight have secured a strong hold upon those 
who at first came only out of curiosity rather than to receive instruc- 
tion. These self-denying ladies are worthy of all confidence, and of 
the earnest prayer and support of the Church. They have lately been 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



114 Ix\DIAw:5— PORCUPINE CREEK. 

called to pass through a sad experience in the removal of a lai^e num- 
ber of children from their care to a Government boarding-school, 
which is under the care of Roman Catholics. It is exceedingly desir- 
able that when such changes are made, as oftentimes they must be, 
that the children who have been under Protestant training should, if 
possible, be placed in some institution where they will receive the 
same evangelical instruction. 

The Indian preacher at White Clay, though employed but a short 
time, has already given indications of a successful work. 

Mr. Sterling's report of the Cheyenne community, in which there 
are 500 people, is especially interesting. In the services which he 
has held among these people settled on White River, there has often 
been evidence of deep feeling. These poor waifs express their joy 
at the message of forgiveness, and call upon God in prayer. Among 
them was one who had been a disturber in the meetings conducted by 
the Cheyenne boy, Elkanah Jan sen, who was at that time acting as 
interpreter. 

One of the most touching incidents in the report is that relating to 
the subsequent suicide of this earnest and amiable Indian lad. He 
had been educated at Carlisle, and had won the heart of Nfr. Sterling 
to a very unusual degree. As he describes him, he was gentle, 
affectionate, and thoughtful, and always revealed an excellent Christian 
spirit. Mr. Sterling says : " I had looked upon him as a rare jewel 
in the midst of this degraded and prejudiced people, a lovable man 
among men. He had been at Carlisle ^ve years, where he had become 
connected with the Presbyterian Church, and on his return to his 
people he was ready to assist in Christian work in every way. He 
had learned to play upon the organ, and also to speak earnest words 
for his Master in religious services. But he was laboring under sore 
trials. He was subjected to the most heartless and wicked treatment 
of a stepfather, his own father having died. His sensitive nature was 
also wounded repeatedly by the scorn of unbelieving companions, 
who mocked at his profession and at his testimony for Christ. The 
contrast to which he was subjected in returning from Carlisle to the 
desolateness of an Indian home and community seemed almost too 
nuich for him. At length, after a night of heavy sobbing, as those in 
the next room afterward related, he went out while the darkness of 
the early morning still lingered, and hung himself as a release from 
his despair." This sad incident illustrates what' doubtless is often ex- 
perienced by those who, after a period in a boarding-school, are sub- 
jected to a heavy strain of despondency and temptation when they 
return to their former homes. 

There is at this Cheyenne station a log structure which was pur- 
chased during the year, and in which is now a thriving school, under 
the care of Eugene Standing Elk. He has received some education 
in the Indian territory. The report states that this school is but a 
meagre provision, and that some more permanent arrangement should 
be made. The Government has as yet no school among these Chey- 
ennes, and no other church than the Presbyterian has entered the field. 

In regard to the future, Mr. Sterling's report says : " I believe these 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INDIANS — STATISTICS DAKOTA MISSION. II5 

outposts have been wisely placed ; and that they may be able to do 
the work at their doors, it is necessary, first, that everything in the 
sunroundings of the missionary home may be made as agreeable and 
inspiring as possible." Could the readers of this report know how 
desolate is the aspect of most Indian reservations, this would be con- 
sidered a very modest suggestion. The men and women who are 
engaged in this work have welcomed great self-denial Their comfort 
and whatever can cheer them in this labor should be carefully studied 
by thoughtful Christians throughout the Church. 

It is not too late to do something yet for the Indians — for the adults 
as well as the children — and since the effort of the Government is 
directed wholly to those who are of school age, the duly must rest 
upon the Church to care also for those others who must otherwise re- 
main in neglect. Especially should every effort be made to extend 
sympathy and co-operaiion to young men and women who have re- 
turned from school at Hampton or Carlisle, and who unless properly 
backed and sustained are under an almost irresistible temptation to 
again cast in their lot with their people, even though it involve a vir- 
tual relapse to the old heathen customs. Better structures should be 
reared for mission homes and schools. " The Episcopal Church no 
longer erects log buildings," says the report, ** either at the agencies or 
on the camps. The Government buildings also are of a much higher 
order," and if the Presbyterian Church would keep pace with that im- 
provement which is proposed for the Indians as a means of raising 
them to civilization, it must devise more liberal things. There is pos- 
sibly a feeling that whatever is done for the Indians is only temporary, 
and that generous outlays are not wise, but it must be remembered 
that for a whole generation yet, more or less work must be done for 
tribes like the Sioux in their vernacular tongue, and that while out of 
the entire Indian population of the United States only about 15,000 
are found in schools. Government and Mission together, there are 
tens of thousands of adults who are only to be reached by men who 
will learn the language and cast in their lot for a life-work among these 
people. 

One word of encouragement closes Mr. Sterling's report. It is 

significant, and should stir the hopes of the most desponding. He 

says : " Our Church is already spoken of by the Indians quite generally 

as the Church which has come for the purpose of * teaching them the 

Bible/ " 

Statisiics of Dakota Mission, 

Ordained missionaries a 

Ordained natives 4 

Wives of missionaries 3 

Unmarried female missionaries 2 

Native teachers and helpers 9 

Churches o 

Communicants 478 

Added during the year 87 

Boys in boardmg-school 29 

Girls in •* 27 

Day-schools 7 

Boys in day-schools 140 

Girls in " 124 

Total number of pupils 320 

Pupils in Sunday-scnools 320 

Contributions $1,148.13 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Il6 INDIANS— NEZ PERCES. 

The Nez Perces. 

The report which has been forwarded to the Board by Rev. G. L. 
Deffenbaugh, \n regard to the work among the Nez Perces, shows the 
number of communicants to be 858. The number jreceived during 
the year was 64. 

The work among the Nez Perces still remaining under the care ot 
the Board of Foreign Missions, consists in the support and direction 
of eight native ministers, seven of whom are pastors of churches, and 
two licentiates, and in the educational work of Miss S. L. McBeth at 
Mt. Idaho, assisted by a native helper, and that of Miss Kate McBeth 
at Lapwai. Miss S. L. McBeth has labored, as for many years past, 
in the education of young men for the ministry. Most of the native 
pastors connected with the mission have been under her instruction. 
During the year she has had nine regular pupils, besides others who 
have received more or less instruction. Miss Kate McBeth has con- 
tinued to devote her attention to the women and children at Lapwai. 
Her knowledge of the language has rendered her a useful sympathizer 
and helper in the Indian families. 

An interesting report speaks of the sad havoc of the prevailing sick- 
ness, which in many cases took the form of fatal pneumonia. The 
church attendance at Lapwai has accordingly been diminished. Miss 
McBeth notes the fact that, owing to the great scarcity of money, 
many of the Indian families have suffered from want of food. There 
is likely to be, also, a great lack of seed for planting the spring crops. 
Miss McBeth expresses her satisfaction at the present management of 
the Agency. The general outlook of the work among the women at 
Lapwai is encouraging. 

The numbers received into the churches show a good degree of 
prosperity on the whole, though the past year has been one of sore 
trial on account of the disease which so seriously affected all parts of 
the land. There have been many deaths, owing to the great poverty 
and exposure of the people. It has been a season, also, of more or 
less suffering for lack of food, as the Indians were poorly prepared for 
the winter. 

Mr. Deffenbaugh, in speaking of the general outlook of the Indian 
work, calls attention to the fact that the winter has been one of unex- 
ampled difficulty and discouragement, owing not merely to the prevail- 
ing sickness, but also to the great depth of snow — forming for much 
of the time an effectual blockade. And yet, with conscientious effort 
on the part of the Indian preachers, the work has progressed. Mr. 
Deffenbaugh says : " Considering the fact that we are testing their 
ability to carry on church work when thrown upon their own re- 
sources, it would have been cause for gratitude had they merely held 
their ground for another year, but they have done more than that. 
The net increase of membership over last year is twenty-nine — this in 
spite of the deaths. The number would have been considerably larger 
had there not been an unusual mortality prevailing among the adult 
church members." 

Mr. Deffenbaugh expresses regret that the Board is not in a position 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INDIANS— SENEGAS. 1 1 / 

to extend this work to at least one or two other needy tribes, especially 
the Crows of Montana. 

Mr. Deffenbaugh speaks highly of the present management of the 
Lapwai Government school under the care of Mr. and Mrs. Eaves. 

Miss S. L. McBeth, in a recent letter, gives the following interesting 
facts: 

** At the communion of the Lord's Supper the Sabbath after Christ- 
maSy twenty-one were received into the Kamiah church on profession 
of faith in Christ. Three of those were from among the heathen of 
Joseph's band. On the following Sabbath another was received and 
baptized. The Kamiah church now numbers 298 members. Two 
from Meadows Creek, who also professed conversion at the meetings, 
will probably unite with the church in the community to which they 
belong." 

Siatisiics of the Nez Perce Mission, 

Femak missioiiaiy teachers a 

Ordained natives 8 

Licentiates a 

Native teacher i 

Churches 7 

Communicants. 858 

Added durine^ the year 64 

Pupils in Sabbath-school 15^ 

Contributions $638 

The Senecas. 

Alleghany^ Tuscarora^ and Tonawanda. 

The work among the Senecas has been carried on by Revs. William 
Hall and M. F. Trippe on the Alleghany Reservation, and Rev. 
George Runciman in charge of the work at Cattaraugus. The Alle- 
ghany, Tuscarora, and Tonawanda tribes have been under the care of 
Mr. Trippe, the stations under his charge being Tuscarora, Tona- 
wanda, Jemisentown, Oldtown, and Cornplanter. There are six out- 
stations besides the above-named points. 

At Tuscarora the work is in a prosperous condition. Some recent 
accounts which have appeared in the New York Herald^ over the 
signature of Mr. John Habberton, have been calculated to assure the 
public of the hopefulness of the work among the Tuscarora Indians. 
It is believed that the proportion of church members among them is 
quite as large as in similar communities of white people. The ques- 
tion has been opened of transferring the work among the New York 
Indians to the care of the Presbytery of Buffalo, but the sentiment of 
the Presbytery seems to be decidedly in favor of the present relations 
of this work to the Board of Foreign Missions. A few special services 
have been held among the Tuscaroras. Six have been added to the 
church* At Tonawanda, Rev. John McMaster, pastor of the Presbyteri- 
an church at Akron, has preached twice a month to the India.) congre- 
gation. He has been unable to do more than this. As compared with 
the condition of things a few years ago, there has been a healthy ad- 
vance not only in the church but in the sentiment of the Tonawanda 
community. The noost prominent men of the tribe attend the little 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1 1 8 INDIANS— CATTARAUGUS. 

mission church. The people through their own effort have renovated 
the church property. 

The Jemisentown community extends over an area of fifteen to 
twenty square miles, and has three outstations. Three services have 
been maintained on the Sabbath. There is a temperance society, a 
woman's sewing- society, prayer-meeting, etc. The Sabbath-school 
has been superintended by one of the Indians without any aid. A 
bell costing $150 has been purchased, and one-half paid for by the 
people. The Temperance Society at Jemisentown numbers 180 
adult Indians. Rev. William Hall, who has been for over fifty years 
in the service, has continued to maintain one service on the Sabbath, 
missing only three Sabbaths in the year. He is eighty years of age, 
and carries with him the character and influence which a half century 
of faithful labor has accumulated. 

The church at Oldtown was recently organized. It represents an 
area of twelve square miles, and has two outstations. There has 
been some little difficulty arising from the land agitation. The people 
have raised over $150, on a pledge of $300, for a church building. 

The Cornplanter Reservation suffered greatly during the winter 
from the prevailing sickness. The people have maintained their own 
Sabbath-school without help. 

An interesting religious centre on the Tuscarora Reservation is 
Miss Peck's school-house, known as the old boarding-school. This 
good woman has lived here for over forty years as missionary teacher. 
She has done a good work and is greatly revered by the Indians, who 
love her for her self-denying and lifelong labor in their behalf. Her 
house is a place for holding religious services. Altogether, eighteen 
religious services have been held, thirteen of these maintained by the 
Indians themselves. "They preach and teach," says Mr. Trippe's 
report, ** superintend Sabbath- schools, conduct their temperance meet- 
ings and sewing societies, plan their Christian work, attend to the 
temporalities of the church," etc., and he adds, " this is certainly an 
evidence of Christian progress and a matter of sincere congratulation." 

Cattaraugus, 

Mr. Runciman on the Cattaraugus Reservation has been blessed in 
his labors during the year with a revival of the church, and particularly 
the neighborhood of Pine Woods in the eastern portion of the Reser- 
vation. Some thirty members have been added to the church. Twelve 
others are desiring to do so, but are hindered by various complica- 
tions with pagan usage. The present number of communicants in the 
Cattaraugus church is 86 ; added during the year, 30, a gain of 26 
over losses by death and otherwise. The whole number who have 
been added at this station from the beginning is 699. Letters re- 
ceived from Mr. Runciman during the year show that there has been 
a return to a more faithful observance of religious services on the part 
of some who had been more or less indifferent. The work seems 
more prosperous on the whole than for some time past. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INDIANS— STATISTICS SENECA MISSION. 1 19 



Statistics of Seneca Mission, 

Otdained missionaries 3 

Married female mtssionaries a 

Native helpers 11 

Churches 7 

Communicants 294 

Added during; the year 47 

Pupils in Sabbath-school aa? 

Contributions $1*300 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MISSIONS IN JAPAN. 
East Japan Mission. 

Yokohama : on the bay, a few miles below Tokyo ; mission begun, 1859 * laborers— 
Dr. and Mrs. James C. Hepburn and Miss Etta W. Case. 

Tokyo : the capital of Japan ; station occupied, 1869 ; laborers— Rev. Messrs. David 
Thompson, D.D.,* William Imbrie, D.D., George Wm. Knox, D.D., James M. McCau- 
ley, H. M. Landis, and their wives ; Dr. and Mrs. D. B. McCartee, Rev. Theodore M. 
MacNair, Rev. George P. Pierson, Prof, and Mrs. J. C. Ballagh, Mrs. Maria T. True, 
Miss Isabella A. Leete, Miss Kate C. Youngman, Miss Carrie T. Alexander, Miss 
Annie R. West, Miss Annie P. Ballagh, Miss Bessie P. MiUiicen, Miss C. H. Rose, 
Miss Gertrude C. Bigelow, Miss Emma Hayes, Miss Lily Murray, and Miss Sarah 
Gardner. 

In this country : Miss Anna K. Davis and Miss Sarah C. Smith. 

West Japan Mission. 

Kanazawa : on the west coast of the main island, about 180 miles northwest of 
Tokvo ; station occupied, 1879 ; Rev. Messrs. Thomas C. Winn, Marshall C. Hayes, 
J. M. Leonard, A. G. Taylor, G. W. Fulton, and their wives ; Miss Mary K. Hesser, 
Miss F. E. Porter, Mrs. L. M. Nay lor, Miss M. E. McGuire, Miss Kate Shaw. 

Osaka : a seaport on the main island, about ao miles from Hiogo ; station occupied, 
1881 ; Rev. Messrs. Tho.nas T. Alexander, J. B. Porter, Charles M. Fisher, John P. 
Hearst, Ph.D., B. C. Haworlh, George E. WoodhuU, and their wives; Miss Ann Eliza 
Garvin, Miss Alice R. Haworth, Miss Cora B. Lafferty, and Miss H. S. Loveland. 

Hiroshima: on the' Inland Sea; station occupied, 1887; Rev. Messrs. Arthur V. 
Bryan, F. S. Curtis, J. B. Ayres, and their wives; Miss M. Nellie Cuthbert. 

Resigned: Miss C. B. Lafferty. In this country: Rev. and Mrs. A. V. Bryan. 

East Japan Mission. 

The report of this mission for the past year necessarily reflects in 
some measure the momentous crisis through which Japan is passing, 
both politically and religiously. The establishment of a constitutional 
government, which provides for a restricted representation of the 
people and guarantees religious liberty, has produced intense excite- 
ment. Coupled with the revision of the treaties with foreign powers 
which has stirred the patriotism of the young men of the empire and 
roused their indignation and ambition, a disturbing influence lias been 
produced which has operated against the best results of mission work. 
Buddhism also has taken the alarm and has organized a national union, 
hoping thereby to secure the support of the government, and to con- 
solidate its forces for the more successful resisting of Christianity. 

In carrying out this purpose it has adopted Western methods, found- 
ing an expensive university, establishing a theological seminary, 
organizing a foreign missionary board, and disseminating information 
through magazines and lectures. Unitarianism and Rationalism are 
also making themselves felt, attempting through educational and lit- 
erary agencies to influence the leaders of national and religious 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



EAST JAPAN— TOKYO. 121 

thought. The mission report, from the pen of Rev. George P. Pier- 
son, says : " At least four noteworthy causes during the past year have 
seemed to operate against more rapid and extensive progress — the in- 
definite postponement of treaty revision ; the abandonment, at least for 
the present, of church union ; the general poverty succeeding typhoons 
and l3oods ; and the unique political situation of which the novelty and 
the afforded opportunity for patriotic expression and effort have dis- 
tracted especially the student class. The first and second causes 
have affected our evangelistic work, and the third and fourth our edu- 
cational work." The " church union " referred to is the union be- 
tween the Congregational churches of Japan and the United Church of 
Christ, which a year ago seemed almost assured, but which after pro- 
longed consideration has been indefinitely postponed. 

Dr. and Mrs, Hepburn, the veterans of the mission, after a brief 
sojourn in the home-land, where they met with a royal welcome and 
did much to deepen the interest in the evangelization of Japan, have 
rejoined the mission, as has Miss Alexander, after the usual furlough 
in the United States ; while Miss Davis, Miss Leete, and Miss Smith 
have returned for a well-earned rest. Miss Sarah Gardner has been 
added to the teaching force of Graham Seminary. Notwithstanding 
the peculiar difficulties encountered, the work in the several depart- 
ments has been crowned with such success as to call for devout 
thanksgiving to God. So far as figures can express it, this success 
appears in the appended table of statistics. In presenting these sta- 
tistics, it is proper to state that they are only approximately accurate. 
Our missions in Japan are an integral part of the United Church of 
Christ, which now comprises seven missions, the Cumberland Presby- 
terian having been added during the year. As the work under these 
several missions is virtually one, it is difficult to determine with ])re- 
cision to what credit each is entitled. 

'*Two features of the evangelistic work are worthy of note : i. The 
establishment of a school for the training of male teachers. The full 
course of study in the theological school is imperatively needed by our 
ministers, but the graduates are not numer9us enough to meet the in- 
creasing demand for workers. There is a class of men somewhat ad- 
vanced in years who are unable to give many years to study, and who 
yet give promise of usefulness. After some consultation the Japanese 
pastors in Tokyo resolved upon the establishment of such a school, 
and asked the missions of the Reformed and Presbyterian churches 
for aid. The school was opened in September, 1889. In January, 
1890, thirty students were present. Some of these men give promise 
of much usefulness. The school is an experiment that can be fully 
tested only by some years of trial. 2. Besides this, the successful ex- 
periment has been made of employing an evangelistic superintendent, 
who works under the Home Mission Board of the United Church of 
Christ. Rev. Ishiwara Yasataro began his work in this capacity last 
July, and reports 87 days spent in travelling ; places visited, 42 ; 
sermons or addresses delivered, 66 ; people baptized, 37. It is be- 
coming more and more evident that the future work of the foreign 
missionary in Japan is chiefly to be either that of teacher or evangel- 



Digitized by VjtOOQIC 



122 EAST JAPAN — TOKYO. 

istic superintendent. The need of well-trained native evangelists 
cannot be too strongly emphasized. 

** The principal literary work of the year has been the continuance of 
work on a Bible dictionary undertaken by Dr. Hepburn before his 
visit to America." 

Educational, 

Meiji Gakuin, — The faculty of this institution has been increased 
by the addition of D. B. McCartee, M.D,, for a number of years con- 
nected with our Central China Mission. The Preparatory Depart- 
ment has been removed to Yurakucho, some three or four miles from 
the College proper, a more central location, and therefore easier of 
access to day students. The Theological Department, hitherto con- 
ducted in Tsukiji, the Foreign Concession, has been transferred to the 
Meiji Gakuin grounds and temporarily occupies Harris Hall for dor- 
mitory and recitation purposes, awaiting the completion of the new 
Theological Hall, which is being erected on the premises with funds 
furnished mainly by the Synod of Japan and friends in the United 
States. 

Four students were graduated from the theological department 
and 14 from the academic last year. The young ministers have all 
been placed over churches glad to welcome them, while of the aca- 
demic graduates (all Christians but one) five have entered u|)on the 
study of theology in the institution, four have become teachers, two 
are pursuing special studies, one is studying law at Yale, and two 
have embarked in business. The entire number of students enrolled 
was 213, of whom 129 were Christians, 40 of them having confessed 
Christ during the year, the result in part of the divine blessing upon 
the special services conducted by Mr. Luther D. Wishard, one of the 
secretaries of the International Y. M. C. A. 

Graham Seminary. — In accordance with the plan recommended by 
the mission and sanctioned by the Board, this seminary and the Saku- 
rai school for young women (Bancho) are to be consolidated. The 
plan provides for the sale of the properties now occupied by these 
schools and the erection of suitable buildings on a lot not far from 
Bancho already secured for the purpose. Partial provision having 
been made during the sununer for the Bancho school on the new 
premises, the classes were opened there last autumn, and the senior 
class of Graham Seminary was transferred and united with that of 
Bancho. As soon as the buildings in process of erection are com- 
pleted, the entire consolidation will be effected, the names of both 
schools being perpetuated by being applied to each of the two main 
buildings. 

Graham Seminary, like all girls' schools, has felt the influence of 
the national agitation and the somewhat changed attitude of the Jap- 
anese toward foreigners. Nevertheless, of the 85 on the roll when 
the report was written 77 were pupils who had been in attendance the 
previous year, showing marked confidence in the school on the part 
of parents, notwithstanding the present prejudice against Christian 
schools. The progress of the pupils in their studies is reported as on 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



EAST JAPAN— TOKYO. 1 23 

the whole thorough and satisfactory. Twenty-seven of those enrolled 
are professing Christians, thirteen of them having confessed Christ 
during the year. Others have expressed a desire to be baptized, and 
are only awaiting the consent of their parents. Five were graduated 
last year, of whom one has been married, one is pursuing higher 
studies, and three are teaching. The teachers and pupils of this Semi- 
nary take part in three Sabbath-schools, and the branch of the King's 
Daughters established here is sustained with unabated interest. 

Sakurai School (Bancho) — As intimated above, in pursuance of the 
plan for consolidation this school has already been transferred 10 the 
new premises. Eighteen new pupils were admitted last year, and the 
first class in the collegiate department, consisting of nine, was gradu- 
ated last June, all but one being professing Christians. Most of these 
are now teaching in various parts of the empire. On this point the 
report says : " It had been a matter of anxiety as to whether young 
women who had of necessity become accustomed to a somewhat dif- 
ferent manner of living from what could be expected in country homes 
and schools would be willing to go to such self-denying work as would 
be wailing for them. Now we record with gratitude that when, after 
class-day exercises were over, the call for teachers in six country 
schools was presented every member of the class, except two who 
were married before they entered the collegiate school, expressed a 
willingness to go. They have worked most satisfactorily thus far." 

A steady and healthy religious interest was maintained in this school 
throughout the year. Twelve of the pupils united with the church, 
and the benevolent societies ^nd Christian associations manifested a 
commendable activity, the latter furnishing laborers for seven Sunday- 
schools. One death occurred in this school during the year, the first 
in the history of the institution, the girl being the first child baptized 
in Tokyo. 

Of Takata^ a distant outstation where work has been carried on 
under the supervision of the Bancho teachers, the report says: "Ta- 
kata has been greatly blessed. Miss Milliken, who has been working 
there for six months, reports the dedication of a new church and the 
conversion of ten girls in the Christian school. This school carries on 
three Sabbath-schools, two at Takata and one at Naoetsu, a neighbor- 
ing town." Two conversions are reported in the school at Utsunomiya^ 
a school under Japanese management, but where assistance is rendered 
by teachers and pupils from Bancho. 

The Sumiyoshi cho day-school in Yokohama, under the superintend- 
ence of the ladies of the Dai Machi school, had a regular attendance 
of 280 children. In the Sabbath-school connected with it two bap- 
tisms are reported. The school work in this city has increased so 
much in volume and importance that the mission has transferred Miss 
Case from Dai Machi to Yokohama, and she is henceforth to devote 
her entire time to this work. Four Bible- women have been laboring 
in Yokohama under the direction of the mission. 

Of the school at Dai Machi^ owned by Mr. Okami, a Japanese 
Christian, but depending on Misses West, Alexander, and Case for re- 
ligious instruction, the report says : '^ Notwithstanding the somewhat 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



124 EAST JAPAN— TOKYO. 

reactionary changes in the girls* school the average attendance in the 
Shoyei School for young ladies has been 45, and the work done has 
been most satisfactory. The attendance upon the Sabbath-school and 
church is good, and there were two baptisms during the past year. 
The Shoyei Preparatory School, also supported by Mr. Ok ami, num- 
bers 190 pupils. The Sabbath-school in connection with it is car- 
. ried on with the assistance of the young women from the Shoyei 
School, who are thus being trained in Sabbath-school work. These 
schools are near the *Dai Machi* church, Tokyo, and work in con- 
nection with it. We have one more school under our care, namely, 
the children's school in Shinagawa. This has grown until the build- 
ing erected last year is full. The pupils number 65." 

The girls* school at Saporo^ on the Island of Yezzo, during the ab- 
sence of Miss Smith on furlough, has been in the hands of Miss Ka^the- 
rine Light, who, in addition to her usual school duties, teaches a class 
of ladies in the afternoons. The report fails to give details. 

"The Kemo No. 2, or Shiba Primary School, under the care of 
Mrs. McCauley, has had on the roll during the year 130 pupils, with 
an average attendance of 110. The school has labored under disad- 
vantage during the year, not being able to find a suitable place for a 
building sufficiently near the present site to retain the children. So, 
contrary to the government regulations, the children sat on the floor, 
the old building not being sufficiently strong to allow the additional 
weight of desks and chairs. However, ground has at last been leased 
about ten minutes* walk from the old place, and building will soon 
begin. There have been three children's meetings held weekly dur- 
ing the year, besides a Sunday-school and a parents* Sunday evening 
meeting. The families of the pui)ils have been visited legularly, partly 
by the teachers of the school and partly by the women of Miss Young- 
man's Bible Institute. Since the transfer of the Bible Institute to the 
ladies at Dai Machi, the entire work is done by the teachers in the 
school and Mrs. McCauley. One of the teachers, being a graduate 
of the Bible Institute, has the religious instruction in the school entirely 
in her charge. She is also superintendent of the Sunday-school, is 
always present at the children's and parents' meetings, and is alto- 
gether a most efficient woman. The older children of the school 
attend the Shiba church." 

The Tokyo Bible Institute^ hitherto under the care of Miss Young- 
man, but now transferred to Miss Alexander and Miss West, held its 
fifth anniversary during the year. Miss Youngman writes: "The 
work of the women at the country stations has been greatly blessed 
and their labors appreciated by the churches. The call for such 
workers has been greater than we could fill. In one or two instances 
remuneration in part has been given for their services. This is a step 
in advance worthy of note. It is no small encouragement to the work 
to know that while the women were sent during the five years ten dif- 
ferent times to the country, not in one instance was a complaint made, 
or a censure heard, from the section of country to which they 
went. Increased earnestness and faithfulness of the women have been 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



WEST JAPAN— OSAKA. 1 25 

manifested in various ways — in seeking new places for meetings, in 
tract distribution, in visiting the sick, or speaking a word for Jesus." 

The students of the Institute have taken care of three prayer-meet- 
ings and assisted in Christian work in many ways. The number in 
attendance has varied during the year, the present enrollment being 
22. Fifteen are wives or widows, their ages varying from 17 to 48. 
Only eight receive support, and that but partial. A summer Bible- 
school was held at Kogawa Mura (God-mountain village), from the 
5th to the 30th of August. In Tokyo two primary schools are re- 
ported, one under the care of Mr. Yoshida, with 50 pupils, and the 
other already referred to in Mrs. McCauley's report. The need of an 
industrial scnool to help students from these preparatory schools to the 
Meiji Gakuin is much felt. 

Mrs. Thompson last year opened a school in Kanda (Divine field), 
which has since become a preaching station, and at which two persons 
have recently applied for baptism. 

The report of the mission closes with these thoughtful yet hopeful 
words : " Generally speaking, a definite, aggressive national campaign 
cannot yet be undertaken. We feel accordingly content to do well 
the duty evidently pressing, and to wait patiently the revealing of 
God's plan. Yet, so far from being disheartened, we have much for 
which to thank God and to take courage, committing ourselves to Him 
whose we are and whom we serve." 



West Japan Mission. 

The work of the Osaka'Mission is so intimately connected with that 
of the United Church of Christ in Japan, that any changes in that 
church are very important to this mission. During the year the Cum- 
berland Presbyterian Mission, whose work is in the city of Osaka and 
vicinity, connected itself with the United Church, so that the cause of 
union in Japan is still making progress, even though it has not been as 
rapid as was hoped at one time. 

Dr. Mitchell's visit was regarded by all the members of the mission 
as a pleasure not soon to be forgotten ; and the letters from the field 
urge upon the Board the importance of such intimate contact with the 
missionaries and their work as an important means of gaining definite 
knowledge of their operations. 

During the year Rev. Messrs. T. T. Alexander and C. M. Fisher 
and their wives have returned after a furlough in this country, and it 
is hoped that Dr. and Mrs. Hearst have by this time also reached their 
field. The mission has been increased during the year by the arrival 
of the Rev. and Mrs. G. W. Fulton, Miss McGuire, Miss Shaw, and 
Miss Loveland. Rev. J. B. Porter has been sent tentatively to Kyoto. 
This was done with the concurrence and co-operation of the mis- 
sionaries of the American Board, who have hitherto been the only 
missionaries in this large city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



126 WEST JAPAN— EVANGELISTIC. 



Evangelistic Work, 

The churches in connection with this mission have shown their 
usual activity. There has been a gain all along the line, not in num- 
bers merely, but in Christian life also. Many of these humble Chris- 
tians seem to be truly taught of the Holy Spirit. One of the older 
n)issionaries, in speaking of a Session meeting, writes : " The questions 
asked and the instruction given to the- candidates filled me with thank- 
fulness to God. One of the elders is one of the prominent men of this 
province as a business man. The courage and yet humility, together 
with the spiritual wisdom which he showed last evening, led me to say 
to myself: *Can this be the man who four years ago was constantly 
running to me with his doubts and misunderstandings concerning the 
Bible ? ' Surely one such man saved is reward enough for all the labors 
and prayers of these years ! " 

The First Church of Kanazawa has not made as rapid progress as 
some others, but is now under the care of a good pastor, and every- 
thing is in excellent working order. The Tonotnachi church ^in 
Kanazawa), though a new organization, has made vigorous financial 
efforts from the start, and while yet dependent, to a small extent, 
on the mission, it has this year completed a new building, and its 
prospects are now bright. Self-supj)ort of churches on the foreign 
mission field is a subject which occupies the time, heart, and thought 
of our missionaries, who are engaged in the evangelistic work, to 
a much larger extent than is generally supposed, and in this mission 
with encouraging results. In many cases the native Christians con- 
tribute out of their poverty amounts which, when the rates of wa^es 
in the two countries are compared, would put many of our Christian 
people in the United States to shame. 

The North Church, in Osaka, is well organized, and reports a gain 
of over I GO members. The pastor of this church was called to Tokyo, 
but the Presbytery refused to dissolve the pastoral relation, a con- 
stitutional action satisfactory to both pastor and people. The South 
Church, in Osaka, made a gain during the year of 50. It attempted, 
for a while, to be self supporting, but owing to removals and deaths of 
important members it has been obliged to again seek assistance from 
the mission. It is sorely in need of a house of worship, and is making 
strenuous efforts to secure the necessary amount to build. The 
people can no longer invite their friends to hear the Gospel, because 
there is not even standing room for the church members. They are 
not able, with their utmost effort, to accommodate themselves and still 
leave room for others to hear the truth. 

The church at Hiroshima is making good progress. During the 
year, while many of its members have removed, it has made a net 
gain of about 20, bringing the membership up to 100. Hiroshima is a 
bigoted place. When our missionaries first went there to live, they 
were met with rude remarks and insults of various kinds from the chil- 
dren in the streets. But this has been lived down, and they are now 
everywhere treated with politeness. This result has been attained 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MAP 

JAPAN 




rUkJiliuMlLlf.T. 



9 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



128 WEST JAPAN — EDUCATIONAL. 

largely by three Sabbath-schools carried on among the young children 
by Mrs. Bryan and Miss Cuthbert. These schools have encountered 
all kinds of obstacles, from opposition Sunday-schools conducted by 
Buddhist priests to violence, in order to prevent the children entering 
the building where the school was held, but all without the desired 
effect The following note from Miss Cuthbert's report will illustrate 
this fact: ''Some time ago an old man who lives next door to the 
Sunday-school building became very strongly «nipressed with the idea 
that if all the children of the neighborhood came so regularly to my 
Christian school they would all become Christians, and so undertook 
to prevent their coming. Failing in several instances, he finally paid 
money to two boys to get them to come to school and disturb the 
order by whistling. I detected them in this and suppressed them. 
But the old man was not yet willing to give in, and the next Sabbath 
undertook to keepjthe children out by main force, taking position in 
front of the door and driving them off with a long bamboo pole. 
Finally, when I came and he saw / was not disposed to run as the chil- 
dren did, he turned and ran himself before 1 got within speaking dis- 
tance ; the children followed me into the house and we had school as 
usual, and I was delighted to learn not long since that his own chil- 
dren now come to the school, and not only he, but his whole family, 
are very much interested in Christianity.'' It is not in the larger and 
stronger churches where the strength of the missionaries is exerted, for 
after a church is well organized it is expected to move on with veiy 
little oversight from those who established it. 

Of these smaller churches and preaching places some have been but 
recently undertaken, while others are of some years' growth. Besides 
the churches enumerated above, there are under the care of the mis- 
sion i8 preaching stations: at Kanazawa, 4; at Osaka, 7; and at 
Hiroshima, 7. Most of the last named, once worked from Osaka, have 
•been turned over to the Hiroshima station. Some of these, as Hagi 
or Tsuruga, are the centres of populous regions. Of these places only 
one, Bingomachi, has been abandoned, not because of lack of interest, 
but because of internal discord, while work has been undertaken in 
two new-places, Sakye and Tsuruga. The strength of this niiwion has 
been put mainly into evangelistic work, and there is no doubt but that 
the '^ foolishness of preaching" is jwst as effective in Japan as else- 
where. 

Educational Work» 

The Boy^ School in Kanazawa has moved into new quarters, 
being compelled by the Government to give up its old place ; the price 
paid for it, together with a grant from the Board, enabled the school 
to not only secure a much more desirable location, but also to put up 
some much-needed buildings. The study of the Scriptures has been 
pursued with evident interest. There have been about 5o pupils 
in attendance. Of these about one-third are professing Christianas. 
Four pupils have been baptized. These men have formed them- 
selves into a Young Men's Christian Association, and with assistance 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



f WEST JAPAN— KANAZAWA. 1 29 

from the Girls' School sustain a Sabbath-school and a preaching-place 
in the city where good work has been done. 

The Girl^ School in Kanazawa, — The work in this school has 
enjoyed its usual prosperity. The Bible is tiaily taught as a text-book 
The number of pupils this year is 50, more than half of them being 
professing Christians, of whom 16 have been hopefully converted 
during the year; the Christian life of the girls is promoted by a wise 
use of their zeal in the Sabbath- schools and Bible-work. 

The Itchijo Gakko— Girls* School, Osaka, — This school has suffered 
seriously from the anti-foreign reaction, which has so blocked the 
wheels of treaty revision. It is probably only a temporary stay of 
proceedings, however, but in the meantime it has seriously affected 
some of our schools. How this has been done is, perhaps, best told 
in the words of Miss Garvin in her report : '^ Christian schools all over 
the country, but especially girls' and women's schools, are feeling the 
effects of this undercurrent of opposition. It has worked for the most 
part silently, almost stealthily, and is therefore the more difficult to 
deal with. The experience of this school is a fair sample of what 
others are undergoing. Unfounded slanders appeared in the city 
papers, whose editors are glad to publish anything that will tell against 
Christianity. These printed slanders, together with purposely cir- 
culated rumors and other malicious influences outside the school, have 
resulted in nearly one-half of our pupils leaving us. Some returned to 
their homes ; some entered schools under the control of the Japanese. 
The number of pupils now in attendance is 25." Meanwhile ro girls 
have received baptism, and a Sabbath-school of 120 pupils is con- 
ducted in the school chapel, both for the i)urpose of overcoming the 
prejudice of their neighbors and to instruct the girls how to teach and 
superintend Sabbath-schools, so that they may be prepared to enter 
upon Christian work at their homes when they leave school. 

77ie Children's School, Kanazawa, — This school also rejoices in 
larger, more healthful, and more commodious quarters, secured through 
the assistance of the governor of the province, whose children attend 
the school. Of course there is no effort to count results in the way of 
conversions or baptisms in such an institution, but if the child-faith of 
some of these little people could be communicated to older people it 
would be a great gain, as the following extract from Miss McGuire's 
report shows: ** Every Friday afternoon a * Children's Prayer Meet- 
ing' is held in one of the school-rooms. The faith shown by these 
little people in a prayer-answering Father might well put many older 
Christians to shame. A large number of the children recite Bible 
verses, and some of them always request prayer on special subjects. 
One dear little boy, each time for several weeks, asked us to pray that 
a sick classmate might be restored to us. At last the child was better 
and returned to school. I was pleased to notice at the next prayer- 
meeting that the boy who had been praying for his friend's recovery, 
did not forget to thank God for the answer to his prayers. 

" A little girl for more than a year regularly asked for prayer that 
her mother might give up her idols and learn to love the true God. 
The child pleaded with her heathen mother for a long time, until at 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



130 WEST JAPAN — ADVANCEMENT. 

length her faith has been rewarded. The mother has ceased to bow 
down to graven images. She attends church and prayer-meetings 
regularly, and has recently asked for baptism and admission into the 
church with her littie daughter." 

There have been 62 pupils connected with this school this year, both 
boys and girls, ranging in age from three to fourteen years. A native 
pastor's estimate of Miss Porter's work is as follows : " I am learning 
more and more to realize the importance of work among children. 
The Japanese who become Christian after their hearts are polluted 
with sin are unsatisfactory as Christians, just like trees that we may 
try to straighten after they have arrived at mature age. This work for 
children begins at the beginning and keeps them straight." 

Miss Cuthbert began a small day-school for girls in Hiroshima with 
the twofold purpose of getting a passport to live in the interior and of 
training the girls. This school has only an attendance of 12 pupils, 
but, under the circumstances, that is as many as were wanted. These 
girls study the Bible and are very regular in their attendance upon 
church, though that is not required of them. One was a Christian 
when she came, and one more has been converted since her connection 
with the school. 

Advancement, 

The mission is very desirous of continued advance along these 
three lines : 

I. Evangelistic, — The mission at its annual meeting passed the fol- 
lowing resolution : " That we respectfully ask the Board to send out as 
soon as possible, at least Jive new men to aid in the work of the mis- 
sion, in view of the very pressing need in the region south and west of 
Osaka.'^ This was accompanied by a very comprehensive letter, 
signed by every member of the mission and all the native pastors who 
could be conveniently reached with the document. The reasons for 
the request are : 

1. To occupy territory which can only be worked at a great dis- 
advantage at present. 

2. This region is left by other missions to our occupancy. 

3. It is one of the most populous and prosperous regions of the 
empire. 

4. To co-operate with the Dutch mission on the island of Kyushu^ 
the third in extent and second in population in the empire, and as yet 
practically untouched. 

5. All who are acquainted with Japan, her history, her present con- 
dition, and the work of the " United Church," agree that n07o is the 
time to push matters there. 

II. Educational, — Since the Cumberland Mission has become iden- 
tified with the " United Church," the question of enlarged educational 
work, in union with them and the Southern Presbyterian Mission, is 
being agitated. As yet no detailed plans have been determined upon. 

III. Literary Work, — ^This mission has expended almost its whole 
force in evangelistic work, and therefore has had little or no oppor- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



JAPAN — STATISTICS. 1 3 1 

tiinity for literary work. The need of this kind of labor has been 
keenly felt, and it is hoped that since the older missionaries have re- 
turned to the field, something may be done in this line. 

Statistics of Japan Missions, 

Ordained missionaries 21 

Medical missionaries 2 

Lay missionary i 

Married lady missionaries 22 

Unmarried lady missionaries 25 

Statistics of the United Church of Christ in Japan, 

Outstations 94 

Churches 68 

Communicants 8,954 

Added during year 1,348 

Japanese ministers 40 

" licentiates 47 

Schools 31 

Theolog:ical students 34 

Young men and boys in schools 438 

Young women and girls in schools 2,080 

Total in schools 2,552 

Total of Christians in sdiools 704 

Contributions $i3»5oo 

Of the above summary about one-half may be fairly credited to the 
Presbyterian Church (North), as it furnishes about half the missionaries 
and half the funds provided by the foreign missionary societies co-op- 
erating with the United Church. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MISSION IN KOREA. 

Mission begun in 1884 \ station, Seoul, the capital, near the western coast, on the Han 
River, and twenty-five miles overland from the commercial port, Chemulpho ; laborers — 
Rev. H. G. Underwood and wife, and Rev. Messrs. D. L. Gifford and S. A.Moflfett ; J. 
W. Heron, M.D., and wife, Miss M. E. Hayden, and Miss S. A. Doty. 

At Chemulpho (temporarily) : H. N. Allen, M.D., and wife. 

The Board has sent during the year two new missionaries to 
Korea, Rev. S. A. Moffett and Miss S. A. Doty, the latter to engage 
in school-work. During the year, also, Dr. Power, an assistant 
medical missionary, was recalled, and Dr. H. N, Allen, who had 
been engaged as secretary and director of the Korean embassy in 
Washington, which position he had assumed at the earnest request 
of the King, was reappointed by the Board with a view to opening 
a missionary station at the port of Fusan, on the southeast coast, if 
upon visiting the place such a step should be found feasible. This 
is one of the open ports, and is situated at the mouth of a small 
river or roadstead, the port being largely a Japanese community, 
while the native Korean city lies farther inland. It was found impos- 
sible for the present to purchase or even to rent suitable property, 
whereupon, with the consent of the Board, Dr. Allen removed to 
Chemulpho, the port of Seoul, lying on the west coast. He is there 
located tentatively, with permission to practive his medical profes- 
sion among foreigners, and meanwhile to study the ground, and re- 
port upon the feasibility of making it a station. 

The Korea Mission has also considered the question of commenc- 
ing work at some other port on the northeast coast. No conclu- 
sions have as yet been reached by the Board, but meanwhile tokens 
of encouragement are multiplied, and proofs are furnished that 
Korea as a mission field is full of promise. The following sketch 
of the first stages of missionary effort in this so-called Hermit Nation, 
even before it had been opened to foreign intercourse, will reveal 
the circumstances which scattered the germs of the truth very 
widely in the northern portions of the country at least fifteen years 
ago. It throws much light upon the Korean mission field. 

One of the most vigorous missions in the Chinese Empire is that 
of the Scotch United Presbyterian Church in Manchuria. This 
work was commenced by Rev. John Ross, who, as a result of many 
years of labor, is enabled now to look upon a thoroughly established 
and ever-expanding Gospel work among all classes, high and low, 
in that far-off region. To him really the beginnings of evangelical 
work in Korea as well as in Manchuria are due. The most eastern 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



KOREA. 133 

port of Manchuria is known as the Korean gate, and it has for along 
time been the only place where Korean merchants could exchange 
the products of their country for Chinese merchandise. Mr. Ross 
visited the place in 1873, ^^^ ^^^ numerous interviews with Koreans, 
who were extremely anxious to get information from him^ but whose 
lips were sealed whenever he sought to gain knowledge of their 
country. He was entirely foiled in his efforts to accomplish any- 
thing, but next year he paid another visit to the Korean gate, and 
with much better results. Fortunately, a Korean merchant, who 
had invested all his capital in a commercial venture, had lost his 
goods by the upsetting of a boat on one of the Korean rivers, and 
had reached Manchuria penniless. In his sorry plight he was em- 
boldened to run some risk for the sake of gaining a livelihood. He 
therefore escaped at midnight from his companions, and started for 
Moukden, not allowing even his own brother to know his plans lest 
the whole family of relatives should be put to death in consequence 
of his desertion. This man became the teacher of Mr. Ross, and 
assisted him in translating portions of the Gospel of Luke into 
Korean. Rev. Mr. Mclntyre, another missionary of the Scotch 
Presbyterian Church, assisted Mr. Ross in this good work. Some- 
what later, another Korean, a peddler of quack medicines, had come 
to want, and was glad to be employed as a compositor. He seemed 
a most clumsy and inapt pupil, sluggish in mind and inactive in 
body, but to the surprise of his employers, he not only became skil- 
ful through plodding industry, but also gladly accepted the Gospel 
which he had been employed to print. Still later, a younger man 
attached to the annual Korean embassy to China, joined the circle, 
and proved a most expert compositor. The quack peddler, who 
had now gained considerable knowledge of the Christian faith, and 
had developed an earnest Christian character, was employed as tract 
distributor, and was sent with portions of the Scriptures to his native 
valley in the northern interior of Korea. After six months he re- 
turned, giving a good report of the work, and calling upon the mis- 
sionary to go to the valley and baptize a number of people who had 
become believers. He returned for another tour, of which he sub- 
sequently gave still more encouraging accounts. Meanwhile, a rev- 
olution had occurred in the Korean capital, and a large number of 
men, including many of the progressive party, were killed, while 
multitudes of others were scattered as refugees into Manchuria. 
Still others found their way back to their native valleys in Korea, 
where they saw the tracts which the native helper had distributed. 
They were just in the frame of mind to accept the truth, and they 
lent their influence to its dissemination. In the next autumn Mr. 
Ross and Mr. Webster, another colleague of the missionary, resolved 
at whatever hazard to visit these valleys, waiting until the rivers 
should be frozen over as the only means of crossing. In or^er to 
reach them high passes covered with snow were to be traversed. 
Much of the way they were unable to ride, and were often subjected 
>o great exposure. Finally, however, they reached the borders of 
the first valley, where they took refuge in a small Chinese inn for 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



134 KOREA. 

quiet and rest They had occupied their quarters, however, less 
than an hour when a body of a dozen Koreans, gentlemanly in ap- 
pearance, garments, manner, and speech, came to welcome them. 
These were refugees from Seoul. The missionaries were conducted 
to the home of the principal farmer of the neighborhood, in whose 
guest-room they found a crowd of men. Every one of these refugees 
became a convert and was baptized. The oldest was a hereditary 
official, and possessed the highest Korean literary degree. The 
next day thirty of the neighboring families appeared, and wished to 
be examined for baptism. It had not been thought proper that their 
wives should accompany them, as they were to meet men, but the 
wives, also, and some of the children were reported as believers. 
The next day, crossing a ridge in the deep snow, a second valley 
was visited, and with the same results. Nearly a hundred men, 
varying from i6 to 72 years of age, presented themselves for baptism. 
In three valleys 85 men were baptized, and far more were postponed 
for further instruction. As the winter was approaching, it was neces- 
sary for the missionaries to return. They were informed that in no 
less than twenty-eight valleys in Northern Korea were companies of 
believers waiting to be received into the church by baptism. The 
next summer Mr. Ross revisited the valleys, but persecution of so 
bitter a nature had sprung up that he thought it wise to desist from 
extending the work. The landlords, who were Chinese, and who 
rented their land to the Korean farmers, looked upon this work as a 
plot formed against their interest. One of the refugees from Seoul, 
thinking it now safe to return to the capital, received special instruc- 
tion that he might become a native colporteur at the capital. A year 
later he wrote to Mr. Ross, requesting him to visit Seoul, as thirteen 
of his friends desired to be formed into a congregation. The next 
year after that the missionary was again urged to visit the capital, as 
there were reported to be 79 believers in and around Seoul. " But, 
meanwhile,'* says Mr. Ross, "our American Presbyterian brethren, 
forward in all mission work, sent to Korea one and then other mis- 
sionaries." Mr. Ross at length visited Seoul, and became the guest 
of Rev. Mr. Underwood, and was present with him when he organ- 
ized his small company of believers into a Presbyterian church- It 
turned out that two members of this church were cousins of the man 
whom Mr. Ross had trained for the work in Moukden. They had 
been believers for six years. It also appeared that thirteen of the 
fourteen baptized members forming the church were converts either 
of that man or of another who had left Moukden earlier. "But," 
adds Mr. Ross, " what was most interesting to me was the assurance 
that there were over three hundred men of that class in the city who 
were believers, but who for various reasons were not prepared pub- 
licly to join the church." 

The health of the Korea Mission ha» been good, though both 
Mrs. Underwood and Mrs. Heron suffered seriously for a time. 
With the blessing of God, both are now fully restored. The mission 
is now stronger in numbers, in knowledge of the field and of the 
language, and in all the requisites for effective work, than it has 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 




Digitized by, 



Google 



136 KOREA. 

ever been before. Dr. Heron has had charge of the hospital, and 
has also been employed professionally at the royal palate, and has 
engaged to some extent in practice among foreigners, reporting all 
receipts for this work to the treasury of the mission. Mr. and Mrs. 
Underwood, in the early part of the year, made an extended tour in 
the interior of Korea, where they found the way open for missionary 
effort so far as large numbers of the people were concerned, but 
they also met with abundant proofs that the Korean officials were 
not prepared to admit the preaching of the Go^el. Mr. Under- 
wood did not feel free, owing to this fact, to engage in direct and 
open mission work, but Mrs. Underwood, as a practical physician, 
found abundant opportunity to heal the sick, and thus in a general 
way allay suspicion, and win the confidence of the people. Mr. 
Underwood has, in the latter part of the year, been busily engaged 
in carrying a dictionary and other Korean books through the press 
in Japan. Mr. Gifford's first year has been devoted largely to the 
study of the language. He has also acted as treasurer of the mission, 
and has given instruction in the orphanage. Miss Hay den, who 
has had the care of the girls' school, has rendered faithful and effi- 
cient service. Mrs. Heron was engaged in active Christian work 
until the condition of her health compelled her to lay it aside, it is 
necessary to proceed with great caution as yet in Korea, for, although 
the people are generally believed to be favorable to progress in edu- 
cation, and are even disposed to be tolerant of missionary effort, 
yet, inasmuch as there is a conservative faction which is ready to 
take advantage of anything that looks like progress, it is a part of 
prudence to proceed slowly and cautiously. There is, however, an 
almost unanimous belief on the part of those who carefully study 
the field, that the country is being prepared for an early presenta- 
tion of the Gospel, and for the development of all lines of true ad- 
vancement. 

During the year Korea was visited by one of the Secretaries of 
the Board, Dr. Mitchell, who, after looking over the field carefully, 
and weighing its difficulties as well as its promise, writes : ** I want 
you to tell the Board that, notwithstanding all the perplexities which 
have attended the work in Korea, if they could see this group of 
young, intelligent, and ardent men and women, the seed and certain 
prophecy of the true Church of Christ in Korea, if they could see 
their work and hear their prayers, they would stand up and sing a 
hymn of praise to God." 

One of the most interesting incidents in connection with the work 
in Korea, is the fact that already preliminary steps have been taken 
by the mission to carry out the recommendation of the General 
Assembly looking to the formation of union churches pn the mission 
fields. Two missionaries from the Victoria General Assembly ia 
Australia, arrived on the field during the year, Mr. and Miss Davis. 
These representatives of our Church in that country, which a half 
century ago was itself a mission field, have been gladly welcomed 
by our missionaries, and they were also welcomed heartily by Dr. 
Mitchell, who had the pleasure of meeting them, and whose account 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



KOREA— STATISTICS. 1 37 

of them to the Board is most gratifying. No action has as yet been 
taken by the Board in connection with the Presbyterian Church of 
Victoria, but the natural drift of events, as well as the sympathies 
and fellowship of the missionaries, is all in the direction of union. 
There seems to be good prospect that at an early day Korea will 
follow the example of Japan in demonstrating the feasibility of a 
United Missionary Presbyterian Church in heathen lands. 

Statistics of Korea Mission. 

Ordained missionaries 3 

Physicians 3 

Married female missionaries 3 

Unmarried female missionaries 2 

Added during the year 39 

Present number of communicants 104 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LAOS MISSJOJ\r.' 

Cheuno-Mai : on the Maah-Ping River, 500 miles north of Bangkok ; occupied as a 
mission station, 1876 ; missionary laborers— Rev. Messrs. Daniel McGilvary, D.D., D. G. 
CollinSf W. C. Dodd, and their wives ; Dr. and Mrs. James W. McKean ; Misses Isa- 
bella Griffin, Eliza P. Westervelt, and Nellie H. McGilvary ; Jiev. Nan-Ttth; 10 helpers ; 
12 outstations. 

Lakawn : on the Maah-Wung River, southeast from Cheung:-Mai 75 miles ; occu- 
pied as a mission station, 1885 ; missionary laborers — Rev. S. C. Peoples, M.D., and his 
wife. Rev. Jonathan Wilson, Miss Kate W. Fleeson, and Rev. Hugh Taylor and his 
wife ; I native helper. 

In this country: Rev. S. C. Peoples, H.D., and his wife. 

It gives us pleasure to see that the usual cheering report from 
this far-off mission has not this year changed its tenor. The church 
in the Laos field has been of remarkably steady and rapid growth. 
There have been adult accessions to the membership at each month- 
ly communion for the last twenty-two consecutive months, and in 
fifty-five out of the last sixty-one months, or since October, 1884. 
Large annua] accessions have been made for the last seven years, 
and this increase has grown steadily larger each year- 
There has been little interruption in the work of the mission, 
aside from the temporary absence of Mr. Dodd and Miss Eakin in 
Bangkok, to have their marriage ceremony performed in the pres- 
ence of our United States Minister ; there was but one removal 
from the country, in the case of Dr. and Mrs. Peoples, who left in 
August, on a furlough, for America. Some departments of the 
work, especially itinerating, were harassed by a troublesome case of 
civil process against one of our native helpers, Noi-Saliy which con- 
tinued through eight months of the year. With these interruptions 
the work, in all its departments, was carried forward with as much 
vigor as the small force of the mission would permit. 

Cheung-Mai, 

The medical department was not neglected/ though the station is 
without a missionary physician. Dr. McGilvary gave this work all 
the time that the other cares of his missionary' work would allow 
him to bestow. Having the services of Dr. M. A. Cheek to perform 
important surgical operations, and a native assistant whom Dr. Gary 
trained to take charge of the dispensary and oversee the services in 
the hospital, he has been able to make this department of great 
benefit to the place and to the mission. It has been productive of 
some tangible results in Ghristian work. One important family, in 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LAOS — CHEUNG-MAI. 1 39 

a new district, has been brought into the church through its agency, 
and many others have gained a good degree of knowledge of Chris- 
tian truth, some of these from a distant province. 

At the dispensary medicines were sold to the amount of 2,212 
rupees. 

A cheap temporary hospital building has been doing good service 
in the place of the fine new hospital that the mission had hoped to 
have completed before this time. If it had not been for the misfor- 
tune of the early failure of Dr. Gary's health, we doubtless would 
already have had a fitting monument to the loving charity of our 
American Sabbath-school children in the completed building. But 
the good work is still going forward, and the closing days of the 
year have brought news of the coming of the new physician, Dr. 
McKean, with his family ; and the missionaries have now confident 
hope that the temporary hospital building will soon give place to 
one that will meet the wants of the public and fulfill tKe expecta- 
tions of those who so generously contributed to its erection. 

Special mention is made of the kind services of Dr. Cheek in per- 
forming a number of important surgical operations and of his care for 
some of the missionaries during the year. The doctor's large business 
interests oftentimes place him in a position in which he can render 
important service to the missionaries in their work, and he seems to 
take a pleasure in doing these kind favors. 

The Educational work of Cheung-Mai consists in the Girls* School, 
a School for Boys, and the Theological Training Class. The Girls' 
School is under the management of Misses Griffin and Westervelt, 
assisted in the early part of the year by Miss Belle Eakin, who 
joined the mission the year previous. Three native teachers sup- 
port the ladies in the work of teaching. The school enrolled 91 
pupils during the year, 71 of whom were boarders. Nineteen of 
the girls became members of the church. The teachers in the 
school labor under the serious difficulty of not having text-books in 
the native Laos language. All the books they have are in the 
Siamese tongue. 

The Boys' School has had a history of but two years. In its sec- 
ond year it enrolled 94 pupils, with an average attendance of 65, of 
whom 40 were boarders. That is the full capacity of the school's 
accommodation for boarders. There were many other applicants, 
but they could not be received. Another year Mr. Collins will 
need additional class rooms and a new dormitory. 

Eleven of the pupils were received into the church. School 
was in session for eight months of the year. Very commendable 
progress was made by the pupils. The closing examinations were 
attended by all the missionaries and by H. R. H. Prince Sonapan- 
dit The Prince was so highly pleased with the result of the year's 
work that he promised a donation of Siamese text-books to the 
school. One of the brethren writing about the schools says : " We 
attended the closing examinations of the schools for both boys and 
girls, and were more than pleased. The Girls' School has had a 
record for some years past. The Boys' School had a record to 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



140 LAOS — LAKAWN. 

make. Brother Collins may be highly gratified, and we may all be 
thankful for the progress made." This school has enjoyed during 
the last seven months the privilege of a circulating library, a gift of 
Dr. John M. Watt, of Ohio. Three hundred books have been drawn 
by the boys. 

The Theological Training Class is the department which is looked 
to with most interest in all the educational work of the mission, be- 
cause it stands in closest relation to the most pressing need of that 
field. This year was its first experiment. Fourteen of the best 
men formed this class. The course of study was somewhat limited. 
The students were engaged in active Christian work a portion of 
each week during the term, and since its close ten of them have 
been employed as evangelists. Mr. Dodd says : " We feel grateful 
to God for the evident blessing bestowed upon the infant undertak- 
ing, and hope for more solid and uninterrupted work during the 
coming year." 

Lakawn. 

The medical and school work in Lakawn, as well as all the other 
departments of missionary interests, are yet in their infancy. 

The Medical work has been under the care of. Dr. Peoples until 
last August, when he and his wife returned temporarily to this 
country. This work has so far gained the favor of the rulers, that 
the First Governor gave a fine location for a hospital, and the Sec- 
ond Governor gave a large lot for Mr. Taylor's residence. On the 
hospital lot a convenient dispensary has been built, and a small 
chapel is in process of erection. There is as yet no hospital build- 
ing. Small bamboo shanties or huts, covered with grass, have thus 
far been made to serve the place of hospital wards. 

A beginning has been made for a boys* school. It originated in 
an evening class of small boys taught by Mrs. Peoples. After her 
departure Mrs. Taylor and Miss Fleeson took charge of it. They 
have some twenty pupils. The missionaries hope that, in the near 
future, this beginning will grow into an industrial school for boys. 

Evangelistic Work. — Direct evangelistic work in this mission is 
of two classes : First, ministration to the five organized churches 
by some one of the ordained missionaries under appointment of 
Presbytery ; and second, touring. 

Thus each ordained missionary takes some responsibility in direct 
evangelistic work, whatever his special mission work may be, whether 
teacher, translator, or evangelist. 

The First Church of Cheung-Mai is the most important of these 
churches, because it is the chief mission centre, the oldest organ- 
ization, and to its roll are added all the names of the new Christians 
who are in the immediate vicinity of either of the other organized 
churches. This church received last year 136 adults and 82 chil- 
dren. It has now an adult membership of 524, with all the organ- 
ized forms of church work. The Sabbath-school enrolls 350 
scholars. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LAOS— LAKAWN. I4I 

The other churches in this district are : at Maa Dawk Dang, 10 
miles northeast of Cheung-Mai ; Bethlehem, 10 miles southeast 
from Cheung-Mai ; and First Church of Cheung-Saan, 150 miles 
north of Cheung-Mai. These three churches have not had so 
marked an increase as the Cheung-Mai church, yet Bethlehem has 
had a delightful refreshing after a number of years of inactivity. 
It more than doubled its membership, adding thirty-one new names 
to its roll. The fifth church is the first church of Lakawn at the 
new mission station. 

Touring. — There was only one long missionary tour taken this year. 
It was made by Mr. Dodd, to Pa-Row, Cheung-Hai, and Cheung- 
Saan. These are the names of provinces lying to the north of Cheung- 
Mai ; the last named is on the Cambodia River, well up on its course 
toward China. On this long journey Mr. Dodd visited a number 
of towns and villages where there are already little clusters of Chris- 
tians, as well as many other places. He baptized twelve adults and 
eight children. A number of shorter tours were made by all the 
different members of the mission, including the ladies. The hearts 
of the brethren were oftentimes delighted with the warm reception 
they would receive from the natives and their desire to learn. At 
one place, one of the missionaries and his helper taught interested 
hearers through the night till it was time to put on the morning 
rice-pot. More than thirty distant villages and towns were reached 
by this means. 

Translating. — Mrs. McGilvary, with the assistance of Mr. Dodd 
and native teachers, has translated " The Acts," a first transla- 
tion, and has revised other portions of the Scriptures previously 
translated. 

Printing. — No printing has as yet been done in the Laos lan- 
guage. The need for a correct font of type is so strongly felt by 
both the mission and the Board, that the Board has made a grant 
of $1,000 for the undertaking, and the work is now going forward 
under the supervision of Dr. Peoples. 

The new Church Building. — The foundations of the first fine 
church building among the Laos are now complete. It is expected 
that the church will be finished this summer. Having no chapel 
large enough to hold the congregations, they have been cpmpelled 
to worship in the Girls' School building, much to the inconvenience 
of the teachers and of the school. 

Dr. McGilvary closes his report by saying : " We esteem it a 
great privilege to be tke voice of the Church through whom, 
and in Christ's name, to offer the Gospel to the Laos. We 
adore His grace in blessing our humble labors. We thank the 
Church for reinforcements. Some of us have labored till our 
whitening locks remind us that our privilege will erelong have 
to be resigned to others. We sometimes wonder if our great Pres- 
byterian constituency remember that the privilege of actually send- 
ing the Gospel to every creature will soon be resigned to another 
generatioB, and whether they regard it as great a privilege to give 
of their means as their missionaries do to act as their messenger. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



142 



LAOS— STATISTICS. 



May God bless the cheerful giver. What gift is comparable to the 
unspeakable gift of the Gospel of eternal life to a lost world ? " 

Since this report was written cheering news is received from Mr. 
Dodd. He had made an extended tour for a month to the north, 
while an ordained helper had journeyed south. During their 
month's work they had baptized nearly loo persons, of whom 
about 60 were adults, and who were added to the rolls of the 
church. Ours is the only mission to the Laos. A glorious work 
unusually free from hindrances is before our Church, and one re- 
markably rich in promise of an abundant harvest of souls. 

Statistical Report for the eleven months from January i to Novem- 
ber 30, 1889. 





1 

u 




s 


i 

1 

4 

3 
6 


c 

i 

s 

CC 

;= 
k 

z 
I 


.2 
IS 

i 

B 

t 

i 
3 

I 
4 


t 

> 
> 
c 

1 

*H 



s 

I 
I 


1 

Lr 

c 

1 

1 

10 

z 
11 


1 

la 

Z3 


8 

5 

z 
z 
z 
z 
z 

5 


S 

2 

u 
bfl 

c 

1 

zo 

z 

3 

a 
z 

>7 


i 

Q 

4 
z 
3 

~ 
8 


3 

1 

3 
•0 

■0 

1 

s 

i 

"5 

Z36 
3» 
9 

z 

3 

.80 


.1 

•3 

< 

Z36 
39 

9 

z 

3 

z68 


.1 

c 
9 

E 

1 

3 
< 

a 

3 


f 

3 
•a 

<; 

10 

3 

3 

15 


1 

•0 

— 

5 
3 

z 


A 

*3 

•s 

1 

— 

524 
55 

zoz 
30 

Z3 
722 


j 
1 

3 

B 
S 

8 

§ 

83 

.8 
«3 

4 

"7 


1 

M 

e 

1 
6 
B 


1 

H 

330 

44 
80 

14 
468 


X 

* 


Jd 

c 

1 

.5 
94 


i 

1 

.s 

.5 
91 

9* 


I 

c 

•i 

H 

c 

"i 

M 
M 


i 

1 

B 

"a 
199 

30 
339 


1 

1 

1 

350 
30 
86 

as 
30 

Sa« 


1 

.s 

II 

B 


Cheung-Mii Sta'n 

Church Cheung- 
Mai 

Church Beth- 
lehem 

Ch. Maa Dawk 
Dang 

Church Cheung- 
Saan 


3 
3 

*3 
6 


IZ35 

8 


I^kawn Station. . . 
Ch. Lakawn. ... 

Totals 


39 
zija 



* One of whom is a physician. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



THE MEXICAN MISSION. 
Southern Mexico. 

Begun in 1873 in the City of Mexico ; missionaries— Rev. J. Milton Greene, D.D., and 
Rev. Hubert W. Brown and their wives, Miss A. M. Bartlett and Miss Ella De Baun, 
in Mexico City ; Rev. Henry C. Thomson and wife, Tlalpam. Native ministers : Mexico 
City, Rev, Arcadia Morales^ Rev, Manuel ZavaUia; Toluca, Rev Luis Arias; Jalapa 
(Tabasco), Rev, Evaristo Hurtado ; Ozumba, Rev, Jose P. Navarez; Zimapan, Rev. 
Miguel Arias ; Jacala, Rev, Vicente Gomez; Huetamo, Rev. Enrique Bianchi; Zita- 
coaro, Revs. Daniel Rodriguez and Felipe Pastrana; Tuxpan (Mich.), Revs. Maxi- 
mitmo Palomino and Pedro Ballastra; Jung:apeo, Rev. Leofoldo Diaz; Vera Cruz, 
Rev, Hipclito Quesada; Paraiso, Rev. Salomon R. Diaz; San Juan Bautista, Rev. 
Procopio C. Diaz; Comalcalco, Rev. Eligio N. Granados; Merida, Rev. Abraham Franco; 
Chilpancingo, Rev. Plutarco Arellano ; Tixtla, Rev. Prisciliano Zavaleta; Mohonera, 
Rev, Felix Gomez; licentiates, 6; native teachers and helpers, 34. 

Northern Mexico. 

Zacatecas : occupied 1873 ; laborers— Rev. Thomas F. Wallace ; Rev, Jesus Marti- 
meZf Rev. Brigidio Sepulveda^ and Rev, LuisAmayo ; licentiates, 9 ; native helpers, 4. 

San Luis Potosi : occupied 1873 ; Rev. Hesiquio Forcada ; licentiates, 3 ; teach- 
ers, 6. 

Saltillo : occupied 1884 ; Miss Jennie Wheeler and Miss Mabel Elliott ; licentiates, 
7 ; teachers, 8. 

San Miguel del Mezquital : occupied 1876; laborers— Rev. David J.Stewart and 
wife; I teacher. 

In this country : Rev. Messrs. Isaac Boyce and M. E. Beall and their wives, and Mns. 
T. F. Wallace. 

The labor of our missionaries in Mexico, North and South, is largely 
in the department of field work. 

Early in the year, Rev. Dr. Greene reported a most interesting 
work in Mizanila, a town of 5,000 inhabitants lying ninety miles north 
of Jalapa. A few Indians from this place had strayed into the 
church at Jalapa, where they heard a sermon and received a few 
tracts, which they read on their way homeward. They reported what 
they had heard and read to their neighbors, and as a result, 30 people, 
fathers and mothers with their children, set out from Mizantla with the 
purpose of attending religious services ninety miles away, in order to 
see for themselves what they were like and to obtain books. Upon 
examination fifteen of the number were baptized, and $25.00 worth of 
Bibles and religious books were sold. Whatever may be the per- 
manent results of this movement, it well illustrates the darkness and 
torpor which have lain upon these outlying communities for so long a 
time under the influence of Romanism. These people may be said to 
have awakened out of a profound sleep. The truth was almost as 
strange as if it had come as a special revelation direct from heaven. 

Dr. Greene in the latter part of the year made an interesting tour 



10 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



144 MEXICO, SOUTH. 

into the State of Guerrero. This is the historic ground of that violent 
and blood J persecution which broke out at Acapulco fifteen years ago. 
The year 1887 was signalized by still another outbreak, and one as- 
sassination has occurred even during the last year, namely, that of Don 
Tomas'^Espernosa, a worthy elder of Tetela del Rio. He was mur- 
dered by a drunken man who had conceived a grudge against the min- 
ister of the church who sought to reclaim him from his evil ways. This 
sad blow, together with the death of the remaining elder and two of 
his sons during the year, has reduced our congregation at Tetela del 
Rio very seriously. The remaining members are administered to by 
Sr. Zepeda, who lives forty-five miles away. 

In making this tour Dr. Greene left Mexico City on the railroad 
leading to Tlaltizapan, passing near the volcanoes of Iztaccihuatl and 
Popocatapetl, and through the sugar-growing districts of Cuantla and 
Yantepec in the State of Morelos. This road will find at length its 
southern terminus at Acapulco, on the Pacific coast, and will open up 
some of the richest cattle-raising and mineral districts in the Republic. 
From Tlaltizapan Dr. Greene's method of travel was by the saddle. 
A ride of many hours brought him to Los Arnates, where a cordial 
welcome awaited him in a Christian family and in a little centre of be- 
lievers. A ride of three hours further brought him to Tonalapa, where 
an evening service was held in a private house. The experience of 
the next two days is given in the following words : 

"In the morning at five we are off for a long, tiresome climlxup 
and over the mountains, through rugged fastnesses and along narrow 
paths of slippery rock, in the intense heat of this now tropical clime, 
until at twelve we reach Zapuapa, a picturesque hamlet of some 200 
souls, where that evening and the next, congregations of 60 to 70 
earnest worshippers assembled. Here is a school of 34 bright pupils 
taught by one of the young men from our seminary at Tlalpam. We 
examine these scholars in their various studies and are highly pleased 
with their proficiency, especially in the Shorter Catechism and the 
Catechism for Children. These brethren, out of their poverty, are 
building a very solid and tasteful church edifice, 40 by 18 feet, which 
they promise to have ready for dedication on my next visit. One of 
them also sets apart his house, the best in the place, for the school 
Leaving here Rev. Felix Gomez (who joined us at Los Arnates) to 
hold services on the Sabbath, we start at 6 a.m. for a ride of ten 
leagues, over the worst road we shall encounter, stop at Tcmascalapa 
for a baptismal service and breakfast at 8, and at 4 p.m. arrived weary 
and sore, at Ahuacuatitlan, on the summit of the Sierra Madre. Here, 
in the very house where our good elder, Miguel Ciprian©, was murdered 
for his faith, we hold a service at night, attended by the faithful few 
who have passed through great tribulation, and our theme is ' the con- 
ditions of acceptable prayer.* 

" Here, also the mission has purchased, as a building site, a spot 
baptized with bloody and on it the brethren, with our aid, will soon 
complete a commodious church edifice at a total cost of about $250. 
Against the outer wall will be erected a monument inscribed with the 
names of our three martyred brethren. Funds for this purpose are 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 




Digitized by 



Google 



146 MEXICO, SOUTH. 

now being contributed by our various churches and will probably 
reach the sum of jjioo. From here we pass on in the morning to 
Teloloapam, distant one league. This has always been regarded as a 
very fanatical place and practically closed against all evangelical work. 
But our good minister, Felipe Reyes, a man of middle age, by his un- 
doubted piety, prudence, and tact, has succeeded in winning the con- 
fidence of not a few devoted Romanists, and in undeceiving them as 
to the real spirit and tendency of our work. As a result a very eligible 
house has been rented for our worship and notice has been given to tlie 
authorities that to-morrow (24th) our first public service will be held. 
We improve the interval in conversation with various persons who are 
anxious to know the truth as viewed and preached by us. I send a 
telegram to Governor Arce, to make sure that all necessary precau- 
tions are taken to preserve peace, and at 1 1 a.m. on the following day 
the doors of our provisional chapel are opened and more than sixty 
persons enter, all of whom are quiet, respectful, and attentive while 
they listen for the first time to our hymns, prayers^ and the reading 
and preaching of God's word. My theme is * Search the Scriptures.' " 

As an instance of the spirit of self-help which is being developed in 
at least a part of the Mexican outstations, the following is of interest : 

" As both horses and riders are somewhat in need of recuperation, 
we rest here until Monday, holding nightly services and also a dedi- 
catory service on Sabbath morning, at which the neat church building 
erected wholly by the people themselves is solemnly set apart for 
divine worship, my theme being Solomon's prayer at the dedication of 
the temple. A great and good work is being done here by Brother 
Gomez, who out of his scanty salary gave $60 toward the church 
building, just one-half its entire cost. He is doing a most effective 
preparatory work, aided by El Faro^ in the two adjacent villages of 
Cocula and Coacoyula, whence various brethren come to join m our 
services and where regular worship will soon be established." 

Dr. Greene speaks of another congregation which under the care of 
Lauro Adamo has doubled since his last visit. The services were 
formerly held on the outskirts of the village, but the brethren them- 
selves have recently bought a house in the centre of the town at a 
cost of about $80, and here on the last evening of the year Dr. 
Greene preached for the first time to an audience of 70 within doors 
and about 25 without. At the last of the three services held at this 
place the Lord's Supper was administered. 

At Chilpancingo, the capital of Guerrero, the missionary was received 
very cordially by Sr. Arce, the Governor of the Slate. He gave as- 
surance that he is doing all in his power to secure the arrest and pun- 
ishment of the murderer at Tetela, and he also stated that the principals 
in the Ahuacuatitlan massacre some months ago are in prison, and 
that they will either be shot or sent into exile. It is a matter of en- 
couragement that at Chilpancingo, once a most fanatical place, Prot- 
estants are being sought for by the Government to fill posts of special 
honor and responsibility. The congregation has more than doubled 
under the faithful care of Prisciliano Zavaleta. There is not room for 
the people who would gladly attend services. Sr. Zavaleta has secured 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MEXICO, SOUTH. I47 

the confidence even of the priest, who cannot deny the excellence of 
his character and influence. 

At Tuxpan Dr. Greene found the work in an encouraging condition. 
The services during his stay were held under a booth formed of freshly- 
cut branches of trees. 

He was impressed as never before with the poverty of the peo- 
ple, and with the lack of ordinary comforts under which the masses 
suffer. Great numbers were suffering from chills and fever, some of 
them being fatally ill, and no physicians were found except in a few 
principal cities. Even quinine was a thing not to be found, though so 
essential and efficacious. These poor Christians are struggling with 
great difficulties, and are greatly in need of the sympathy and prayers 
of God's people everywhere. 

Rev. Hubert W. Brown returned to his home February 24th, after 
a tour of twenty-six days in the State of Michoacan. Most of the time 
was spent on horseback, and altogether the distance which he had 
thus ridden was about 500 miles. Twenty- three diflferent outstations 
were visited. In such tours the missionary is accompanied by an at- 
tendant who acts partially as a guard. One of the most interesting classes 
of people with whom we meet in Mexico are the natives of the mountain 
State of Michoacan, mostly Indians pure or slightly mixed. Their 
response to the truth of the Gospel is generally direct and cordial, 
and a great and good work has been done among them by our native 
preachers. There have been no great ingatherings of converts during 
the year, but the growth throughout this field has been steady, and 
Mr. Brown notes a positive advance as compared with last year. One 
disturbing influence which the churches in this region have encoun- 
tered is the fanatical lawlessness and irresponsibility which have been 
engendered by the Plymouth Brethren, particularly by the late Mr. 
Pasco, of England. The extravagant ideas of "freedom" in religi- 
ous life which these men have taught to the half-educated natives, 
have resulted in license and in the breaking down of that institutional 
order which is observed in our Missions, and which certainly has the 
warrant of the New Testament A young Mexican who some years 
ago attempted to assassinate Rev. Daniel Rodriquez, but who after- 
ward was converted by his conciliatory methods, has been swept away 
by these delusions, and has accomplished much harm among the un- 
stable and the wayward. 

In several places the membership of the churches had been seri- 
ously diminished by removals, but it was found that those who had 
thus removed had carried with them the Gospel, and that it had be- 
come a leaven in places which might not otherwise have been reached. 
Though the report of communicants may be reduced, they are not 
lost, but are extending the truth. 

The following sketches are given in the words of Mr. Brown's report : 

'' In Aguacate, I was accorded the same cordial welcome as of yore 
by the brothers Antonio and Guadalupe Vaca, who own the ranch. 
They have been for a year or more building a much larger house, and 
the best and largest room has been set apart for church services and 
will soon be ready for dedication. It is their desire to secure all the 
cooperation they can to tastefully furnish the hall." 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



148 MEXICO, SOUTH. 

** We reached Patanibaro on February 5th, the Mexican Constitution 
day. The young men of the family of Don Jose Maria Lopez, with 
whom we stopped, determined to celebrate the occasion in a suitable 
manner. A hilltop overlooking the ranch was selected, a tribune of 
stones and moss was raised, and the trees were tastefully hung with 
festoons, flags, and lanterns, and over all floated the national banner. 
The music was supplied by a society, called * Benito Juarez,* which 
Mr. Palomino had organized for musical and literary improvement. 
It was a hard climb to the summit, but once there the view of valleys 
and mountains was superb. Messrs. Sanchez, Palomino, and Bianchi 
made speeches and then I was called upon. I used the opportunity to 
assure my audience that all true Americans were the friends of Mexi- 
co. About two hundred were present. The feasting that followed 
was of an orderly character, with no drinking or gaming, a notable 
contrast to feasts under Romish auspices. The gathering showed the 
growing interest of the country folk in the. constitution and republican 
institutions, and was a plain and emphatic refutation of the oft-repeated 
charge that our Protestant converts are traitors and devoid of patriot- 
ism. In the evening many gathered for service and the Lord's Supper." 
The poverty and simplicity of life which prevail among these moun- 
taineers, as well as the lack of ambition and thrift, are well set forth 
in the following brief passage : 

" I never visit these two points without being struck with the cheer- 
less, comfortless appearance of the houses, dark, dismal, with many 
cracks through which the wind whistles, and the only furniture a rude, 
hard bed, a rickety table and an equally unsteady bench. The ranch- 
ero might have a nice home, if he only cared to. It is a great prob- 
lem how to awaken in this people a desire for the comforts and civil- 
izing influences of life." 

Jungapeo has for a long time been under the care of Rev. Daniel 
Rodriquez, one of our most faithful native ministers. He has suflered 
for years with great diflSculty in his eyes, and once came to New York 
for the purpose of securing relief by surgical operation, in which, how- 
ever, he was disappointed. Mr. Brown speaks of the field as follows : 
" The next centre visited was Jungapeo, where I held four services 
and on the Sabbath administered the Lord's Supper. The tasteful 
chapel erected there in the time of Don Rafael Rodriguez is still in 
good repair, and the congregation is evidently proud and careful of 
what they know to be one of the prettiest Protestant churches in all 
Mexico. The congregation appeared to be in a prosperous condition, 
and Sunday afternoon in were present at the communion service. 
Don Alvino Rodriguez, who, at the time his father died, was a student 
in the Seminary and obliged to leave to take charge of his affairs, has 
at last decided to devote himself entirely to the work, and during the 
year has studied and preached under the direction of his pastor, Rev. 
Leopoldo Diaz." 

Over against these encouraging facts, however, are some dark shad- 
ows. The little congregations at Sauces, Colmena, and Guacimas 
have become well-nigh extinct through bitter persecution, together 
with the death of some of the leading men and the removal of others 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MEXICO, SOUTH. I49 

to other ranches. The life of a church on a ranch, even though hun- 
dreds of peasants may be employed, is always precarious, as the labor- 
ers are removed from one ranch to another. This dark picture is re- 
lieved by the fact that many of those who were formerly enrolled at 
these stations are now found in another not far away, so that the few 
who remain can attend services at the new station. Mr. Brown says 
of a visit to the latter : " The cordiality of our welcome in Tepehuajes 
is shown by the fact that the family sent all the way to Jungapeo to 
buy chocolate, bread, meat, and all that they thought we would like to 
have, and then borrowed dishes, one here and one there, from their 
neighbors. The man in whose house the service is held was converted 
through the reading of our tracts, and formerly when services were 
held only in Tetengeo, several leagues away over a steep mountain 
trail, he and all his family, men, women, and children, were accus- 
tomed to attend." 

Mention is made of another ranch, Salitre, formerly owned by Don 
Luis Arroya, who before his death some years ago offered ground for 
a church if the Mission could erect one. His widow and his son are 
still warm friends of the mission cause, and extend a most cordial wel- 
come when either a missionary or a native preacher pays a visit to their 
community. 

Superstition is not dead, nor the mendacity of the priesthood ex- 
tinct. The house of one of our zealous converts caught fire a short 
lime ago and nearly all the furniture was burned, whereupon the local 
priest declared that it was a signal punishment from heaven for their 
having had in the house that " viperous sheet El Faro" Yet not- 
withstanding this experience the people of that region have asked for 
a school and have promised from 25 to 50 pupils. 

Mr. Brown's report ends with a tribute to Rev. Mr. Rodriguez, who 
in spite of a severe illness from which he has only partially recovered, 
and hi^ almost total blindness, has succeeded in converting a part of 
the mission property in Zitacuaro into a very neat audience-room, 
capable of seating 150 persons. At the same time, Mr. Rodriquez 
has so revived the people spiritually that the hall is already too small. 
Mr. Brown says : " With a further outlay of $200 or $300, the room 
could be enlarged to nearly twice its present capacity." The results 
of his tour, which was a laborious and fatiguing one, were on the whole 
encouraging. 

Statistics of Southern Mexico. 

^ Ordained missionaries 3 

Married female missionaries 3 

Unmarried " ** 9 

Ordained natives 21 

Native licentiates 6 

Native teachers and helpers 34 

Churches (organixed, 52 ; preaching places, 14) 66 

Communicants 3*323 

Added during year (1889) 196 

Students for the ministry 15 

Girls in the boarding-school 63 

Day-schools (26), attendance 931 

Total number of pupils 994 

Sabbath-schools (number, 27), attendance 665 

Contributions $892.75 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1 50 MEXICO. 

Thf Annua/ Afission Conference. — The Sixth Annual Conference of 
the Mexico Mission met at Saltillo, January 2 2d, and there was a 
good attendance of the missionaries. Some important items of busi- 
ness were transacted which well show the progress of the work. A 
report was given of a Union hymn-book which was in progress of 
preparation by a committee chosen from the various Protestant mis- 
sions. About 170 hymns were reported as having been adopted, 
most of them accompanied with tunes. This movement may be 
hailed with satisfaction as showing, first, the unity of spirit among the 
missions, and second, the disposition to economize the force and ex- 
penditures. One of the evils of division between the different de- 
nominations in conducting mission work, has been the heavy expense 
which each society must undertake in conducting similar lines of work. 
If hymn-books and certain classes of publications, institutions of learn- 
ing, etc., can be placed upon a union basis, it is hoped that they will 
prove bonds of unity, and will enable the societies to accomplish a far 
greater aggregate of missionary work. 

The report refers to a similar movement which has often been dis- 
cussed, but which has made but little progress, toward the establish- 
ment of a Union College. This is a more formidable and difficult un- 
dertaking, but with an earnest and united spirit on the part of the mis- 
sionaries, it may be found practicable. If so, it is certainly desirable. 

Our missionaries are calling loudly for the opening of such a col- 
lege, to be placed upon a union basis, all the associated missions 
contributing to its support. This subject has been before the Mexican 
Evangelical Alliance for the last two or three years, and although little 
progress has been made except in the development of general inter- 
est, the feeling is constantly increasing that such a department of mis- 
sion work is well-nigh indispensable. 

The Press, — A report was given of the work of the press of the 
Presbyterian Mission, which was on the whole satisfactory. Over 
13,000,000 pages had been printed during the year, including tracts, 
hymns, and the bi-weekly religious paper El Faro, It is desirable 
to greatly increase, if possible, the self-support of these various 
branches of publication. The influence of the press thus far has 
proved most eflfective in conducting mission work, and all the differ- 
ent societies except one are publishing religious papers for general 
circulation. New accommodations for the press have been secured. 

Help on the Field, — A special note is made of the fact that in re- 
pairing and enlarging the property purchased a year ago for the girls* 
boarding-school at Saltillo, the foreign residents in the place have 
mainly contributed to the building of a chapel within the mission 
premises. Two hundred dollars were contributed by Rodger Hayne, 
Esq., a gentleman of St. Louis, Mo., and a member of the Episcopal 
Church. 

Dr. Greene reported upon the increased effort of churches in the 
southern part of Mexico to build their own churches, or to contribute 
a large part of the funds therefor. 

The Theological Seminary, — Rev. H. C. Thomson, of the Theological 
Seminary at Tlalpam, reports an average attendance of fifteen students 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MEXICO. 151 

during the year. The young men are of fair capacity, and have been 
studious and diligent. The spiritual atmosphere of the institution 
has been better than for some years past Services have been held 
by the students at five different places during the year. The new 
plan of alternate study and work has been inaugurated for the older 
and more advanced students, with the belief that it will combine a 
very useful practical element with the technical and general education 
which they are receiving. The class who have this year been engaged 
in field work will go back to the Seminary next year, and it will soon 
be possible to estimate the practical results of this experiment. An 
earnest hope, coupled with more or less fear, is expressed that the 
funds granted for the institution will not be so curtailed as to necessi- 
tate the turning away of any promising young men who apply for 
admission to the Seminary. 

The labors of Mr. Thomson have been in part devoted to the 
production of a new Spanish version of the Bible in connection with 
Rev. H. B. Pratt, Agent of the Bible Society, and with representatives 
of other Mission Societies. It is hoped that by the end of this year 
one-half of the Old Testament will have been revised 

T?u Girl^ Boarding-Schools, — One of the causes of mutual con- 
gratulation at the Mission meeting was the fact that the two boarding- 
schools, one at Mexico City and the other at Saltillo, had both been 
enlarged and put in working order during the year. In the City of 
Mexico a large addition, costing something over $7,000, had been 
made, and the school had been reopened on the first Monday in 
August, at which time 40 boarders and 30 day pupils were received. 
The average attendance has been 37 boarders and 25 day pupils. 
Great progress has been manifested. Three of the girls are about to 
graduate. Good habits are reported on the part of the girls in doing 
all their own work and dispensing entirely with servants. They keep 
their rooms clean and do their own sewing, washing, and ironing, and all 
other work. Only one younger child has been assisted in this respect, 
and in this case the service was paid for by her parents. Over 200 
blanks were prepared and issued calling on parents to contribute 
toward the expense of the institution, and nearly all responded. 
Scarcely any expense has been incurred in paying the travelling ex- 
penses of pupils to and from the school. 

The mission is in receipt of constant applications for admission to 
the girls' school in Mexico City, and the missionaries find in their trips 
that the reputation of the school is very high among converts and those 
who are merely friendly to the cause. A number of girls educated in 
the Normal School have been sent out as teachers, and with the most 
satisfactory results. In many cases comparisons have been made be- 
tween their instruction and that imparted in the Government schools, 
and to their advantage. Under the wise management of Miss Bart- 
lett, ably seconded by Miss De Baun, the standard of the school has 
been steadily raised. 

Miss Wheeler, of Saltillo, reported that the building for the Normal 
School in Saltillo was nearly completed. The removal from Monte- 
rey was effected May 20, 1889. IThe school desks were moved, but 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



152 MEXICO — ZACATECAS. | 

the remainder of the furniture had to be sold. Miss Wheeler ren- 
dered assistance in the Mexico City school from August to December. 
The building at Saitillo should accommodate forty-five pupils. Miss 
Mabel Elliott, after an absence on account of ill-health, has resunied 
her work. There is every prospect of opening with the full number, 
half of whom will be day pupils from Saitillo and the remainder board- 
ers from abroad. 

Day-schools. — There are, in all, 26 day-schools in the Southern field, 
four of which are in Mexico City, with a total enrollment of 931 pu- 
pils of both sexes. These schools are doing a good work among the 
poor children of the capital, while in the smaller towns and country 
districts they often afford the only chance for an education. The mis- 
sionaries on their trips notice at once the beneficent influence of these 
schools, and are often told by parents, " We cannot raad ; we never 
had such advantages ; but our children are learning and can read us 
the Bible and your hymns and tracts." 

Zacatecas. 

Rev. T. F. Wallace has continued his work in the city and in the 
surrounding country stations. Only partial reports have been re- 
ceived. Dr. G. W. Prevost and family, always intensely interested in 
the mission from the beginning, have continued to aid the work in 
many ways. 

Mr. Wallace reports some interesting incidents in his work among 
the outstations of the Zacatecas field. Speaking of a visit to the Ha- 
cienda El Carro, Mr. Wallace says : 

" Our good friend Francisco Ezparza, though not a member of the 
church at this place, has been for a year raising little by little the 
tumbled-down walls of an old house of his so as to make a hall and 
give it to our people as a place of worship. It was lacking a roof 
when I was there, but this has since been supplied. The owners of 
a hacienda or ranch have it in their power to prevent the repairs of 
an old building or the erection of a new one if they desire, but as 
Senor Ezparza is an old resident and has a good doal of influence he 
was allowed to transform the old building, which he would not have 
been allowed to do had the owners of the site any idea that he 
intended it for Protestant worship. This same man has given our 
preacher a house to live in for more than two years free of rent. Thfe 
little church grows slowly, which is encouraging considering the. 
obstacles placed in its way." 

The same report gives an interesting account of services held in 
very small adobe huts, where the floor has to be utilized wilhout 
chairs for seating the people, and where a bed is used as a seat by the 
women, while the children and babies are huddled on the same bed 
behind their mothers. There are many discouragements, and in some 
of the older fields, like Jerez and Ville de Cos, the work is not so 
encouraging as it has been in years past 

The report of the Zacatecas field is on the whole encouraging. 
Besides the church in the city there are 17 outstations. The total 
number of communicants reported is 1,090, and 100 have been added 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MEXICO— SAN LUIS POTOSI. 1 53 

during the year. There is a clear gain over all loss by death or other- 
wise of 59. The number of pupils reported in Sabbath- schools is 
597, and in day-schools 61. The total amount of contributions is 
given at $1,975. Two native pastors are reported, nine licentiates, 
four teachers, and one Bible-woman. 

San Luis Potosu 

The work of Rev. Mr. Beall and his helpers has been prospered, 
as the statistics show. 

The degree of favor with which the Gospel is received from year 
to year in Mexico depends very largely upon the spirit and temper of 
the local authorities. Mr. Beall, in describing a short tour which he 
made with Rev. H. Forcada into the mountainous region lying south 
of San Luis Potosi, mentions a place in which one year ago Mr. 
Forcada was repulsed, only two hours being given him, weary as he 
. was, in which to leave the town. '* We were at first in some doubt," 
he says, *' as to the reception that awaited us, but were soon assured 
of a hearty welcome. The chief in authority was a subscriber to El 
FarOy and we lodged three days in his house. Instead of being told 
to leave the town the public school building was placed at our disposal. 
Newly found friends furnished lamps and candles, and a congregation 
of 185 persons listened to three sermons or talks, and each person 
carried away a supply of tracts. Such a visit and such a work cannot 
be figured in statistical reports, and it may be that the Church at large 
will never know the results of such meetings, though they are not 
uncommon in missionary experience. But the Great Head of the 
Church keeps a record, and He knows what harvests such seeds will 
produce, and after all it is for Christ we are working." 

The grace which seems to be given to these simple people in their 
trials as well as in their prosperity seems to be all-sufficient. Mr. 
Beall mentions a poor man who after a lingering illness had died of a 
very painful disease, but his resignation was marked and his faith tri- 
umphant. At each communion during the year members have been 
received ; " the last one," says the report, " was of peculiar interest 
and impressiveness. Four children who had been baptized in infancy 
were received into full communion together with several others on 
profession and baptism." During the year 35 have been added to the 
San Luis church. 

Toward the close of the year Mr. and Mrs. Beall were compelled 
to seek leave of absence for six months on account of the severe ill- 
ness of their child. 

The following are the statistics of the work embraced in the San 
I^uis Potosi field : 

Ordained native, i ; licentiates, 3 ; native teachers, 6 ; churches, 6 ; 
communicants, 172 ; added during the year, 54 ; day-schools, 3 ; boys 
in day-schools, 55 ; girls in day-schools, 54 ; pupils in Sabbath-schools, 
170; contributions, $115. 

SaltilU. 

Rev. Mr. Boyce sends a report of the Saltillo field in which light 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1 54 MEXICO — SALTILLO. 

and shade are blended in about equal proportions. First of all, it is 
Ycry apparent that Roman Catholic induence is steadily recovering 
the ground lost by the political revolution which occurred twenty-five 
years ago, and which dealt such heavy blows at the Jesuitical Order, 
the hoarded church property, and the flaunted presence and prestige 
of the hierarchy. The priesthood is making itself felt more and more 
in certain portions of the Republic in political ways, and in the Sal- 
tillo field some flagrant outrages have recently emphasized this fact ; 
among other things, a most exorbitant tax* has been levied by the local 
authorities upon all missionaries and native preachers, in the latter 
case amounting almost, if not quite, to the full amount of the salary 
received. This has been done with the avowed purpose of " driving 
them out." The Papacy never tires; year after year, generation after 
generation, it works on and forces its way like the tides of the sea. 
It is unscrupulous beyond expression, bitter and cruel, resorting to 
persecution, and even to bloodshed when necessary, as has been shown 
in so many instances in Mexico within the last twenty years. Over 
against this, however, it is believed that the sentiment of the most 
respectable citizens, not bound hand and foot by the priesthood, is 
more and more favorable to the work of Protestant missions. Observ- 
ing men cannot fail to see the improvement made in the moral char- 
acter of the people, — ^their greater truthfulness and moral purity, and 
they hail with satisfaction the general elevation of the people who are 
brought under Protestant influence. Even if no converts are gained 
to the Protestant churches, the leaven which is infused into the gen- 
eral fabric of society is worth all the outlay that has been made. It 
is impossible for the Mexican priesthood to sink into the shameless 
corruptions of thirty years ago so long as they are under the surveil- 
lance and the direct and condemnatory influence of Protestant mis- 
sions, nor is it possible for them to so hoodwink and blind the minds 
of the people. In some cases, doubtless, political managers and truck- 
ling officials will be influenced by their schemes, and persecutions may 
be expected from time to time as in the past, but the work goes on. 
Mexico rises up out of the- darkness and corruption which for three 
centuries has lain like a pall of death upon her institutions and upon 
all society, and her regeneration, though gradual, is sure. 

Mr. Boyce says : " All over the Republic the priests are making the 
authorities, from the highest to the lowest, feel and acknowledge their 
power and influence. Abuses are to-day tolerated which a few years 
ago would have been promptly corrected. Overt acts on the part of 
the priesthood are passed by unnoticed which in better days would 
have been followed with swift punishment. Assured of this immunity, 
the priests have been enabled to press an aggressive work against us 
as well as to hold themselves ever on the defensive against our work. 
The hollow display and pomp of their worship, aided by all the wiles 
of Jesuitic subtlety, have been able to catch the eye and infatuate 
anew the superstitious and ignorant hearts of multitudes who had for 
long years almost cut loose fi-om Rome. This prevailing and powerful 

• This has recently been greaUj reduced, as the result of higher appeal. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MEXICO — SAN MIGUEL 155 

influence of the priesthood is felt more deeply in the country districts 
than in the large cities." 

The growth of the churches in the State of Coahuila, in which Sal- 
tillo is situated, has been slow, the increase not having quite equalled 
that of former years ; still, there has been an advance. 

During a part of the year Mr. Boyce has suffered severely from ill- 
health, at the same time that he has been heavily burdened with the 
repairs of a building purchased for the use of the girls* boarding-school 
formerly at Monterey. Much responsibility has also devolved upon 
him in the sale of the Monterey property. The school is now fully 
re-established in its new quarters. The property at Sal tillo is well 
adapted to the purpose, and Miss Jennie Wheeler and Miss Mabel 
Elliott have just reopened the school. There has been a long cessa- 
tion of direct labor in this institution, though the teachers have been 
engaged, so far as health would permit, in the study of the language, 
at the same time rendering assistance in various ways. Miss Wheeler 
was for several months in Mexico City assisting Miss Bartlett until 
Miss Ella DeBaun, newly appointed, should reach her field. Miss 
Elliott was compelled during the year to spend some months on leave 
of absence on account of ill-health. She has now returned in re- 
newed health and in strong hope of being able to endure the labors of 
her position. Just as the year closes Mr. Boyce, who has suffered 
severely from chills and fever, has been compelled to seek a leave of 
absence in order to recover from the depressing effects of his disease. 
It is a matter of hope and prayer that he may in due time be re- 
stored to his manifold work. The field work in certain portions of 
Mexico involves considerable exposure to malarial influence, and it is 
only by using precaution and care that the mbsionary can avoid seri- 
ous depression of health. 

Mr. Boyce reports, including ten outstations, a total membership of 
580. Thirty-eight have been added during the year, being a net gain 
of 34. The number of pupils in Sabbath-schools is 363, and in day- 
schools, of which there are nine, 194. During the year $645 have been 
contributed. Seven licentiates and eight native teachers are reported. 

San Miguel del MezquUal. 

Rev. D. J. Stewart reports his work at this place as having pro- 
gressed slowly. He is surrounded with discouragements. The people 
are fanatical and extremely ignorant, and the priesthood, to say the 
least, are corrupt. Speaking of a visit to a town called Reyes, for- 
merly a centre of banditti, he reports that he found an entrance mainly 
because the priests so seldom visit the place — they never do so unless 
assured that it will pay financially. " Recently," says Mr. Stewart, 
" the people were suffering great loss by the death of their oxen, which 
were dying of an epizootic disease. The people asked the priest to 
disinfect the community, which he did for a consideration of $3.00, 
the service being rendered by the recitation of certain Latin incan- 
tations. Word having gone out to other mountain villages that the 
priest was attempting to drive away the evil spirit of disease, many 
others sought to secure a participation in this hoped-for relief, but the 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



156 MEXICO, NORTH. 

priest refused to do anything for them until $4 should be raised, and as 
they were too poor to make up this sum, he passed on. As his im- 
posture in Reyes amounted to nothing, the people lost £a.ith in the 
priest and in his incantations. Such are the pictures of the Papacy in 
Mexico to-day." Mr. Stewart reports great poverty among the peaple, 
and expresses a strong desire for the small amount of $70 or $80, 
with which, added to the gifts of the people, to provide a place of 
worship. 

During the year six persons have been added to the San Miguel 
church on profession of faith, and one person has been reinstated. 
One of the baptized is a young man from a hacienda 54 miles away. 
He is zealous in the cause and gives good promise of being useful. 

Statistics of Northern Mexico. 

Ordained missionaries 4 

Married feniale missionaries 4 

Unmarried female missionaries 2 

Ordained natives . 3 

Licentiates 19 

Native teachers and helpers 19 

Churches 17 

Communicants i>843 

Added during year 192 

Students for ministry 9 

Girls in boarding-school 25 

Boys and girls in day-schools (14) 364 

Total nuniber of pupils 389 

Pupils in Sabbath-schools. i>i30 

Contributions $2,735 

General Progress, 

The influence of the Protestant mission work in Mexico is more 
and more felt by the people at large. El Tempo^ one of the most im- 
portant daily papers published in Mexico City, said some time since, 
" The Yankees are exerting a notable influence on our language, our 
commerce, and our religion." A Mexican in a published comment 
upon this admission says : 

" Thank God that the North Americans who are Christ's servants 
have brought us the holy and blessed religion of Jesus Christ, the only 
one which can make truly happy our beloved country, Mexico, which 
for so many centuries has been the victim of the rapacity and iniqui- 
tous intrigues of the Catholic Jesuits. So at last the papistical writers 
sing their recantation since now they declare the contrary of what they 
have preached and written : * That Protestantism was a corpse.' Now 
they admit that the Protestant religion possesses life and makes its in- 
fluence felt in the Mexican Republic to such a degree that thousands 
are leaving the idolatrous church of the popes." 

The following minute adopted by the members of the Mexican 
churches in the City of Mexico during the Week of Prayer, shows the 
gratitude which is felt by pastors and people for the encouragement 
and assistance which have been rendered to them by Christian people 
in the United States : 

"When the work of missions was presented during the Week of 
Prayer, we agreed unanimously to send a vote of thanks to the various 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MEXICO, NORTH. 157 

missionary societies by whom we are employed, for the money so gen- 
erously expended for the evangelization of Mexico, and for the co- 
operation of our beloved brethren, the missionaries. Yes, dear breth- 
ren, we have always felt the deepest and liveliest gratitude for what 
you have done in Mexico, building churches, sustaining schools and 
seminaries, establishing presses, and all with the sole purpose of bring- 
ing us the joy and peace which you experience through faith and love 
toward Christ our only Saviour. We are glad to make this public ac- 
knowledgment before the whole world ; and yet at the same time we 
feel that as yet we have hardly begun this great work, and we there- 
fore appeal to you to continue your efforts until all the beautiful land 
of Mexico belongs to Christ, the King of glory." 

There continues to be a cordial spirit of harmony and co-operation 
among the various Protestant missions. 

The Protestant missions in the Mexican Republic, those working 
together since the first Evangelical Missionary Assembly, which was 
held in 1888, are the Quakers; Methodists, North and South; Bap- 
tists, North and South ; Presbyterians, North and South ; Associate 
Refomi, and Cumberland and the Congregationalists. Each of these 
missions has its own paper, published bi-monthly, with the exception of 
the Southern Methodist, which is issued weekly, and all but one are 
illustrated. The Presbyterian paper, El Faro, has carried on an inter- 
esting discussion during the past year with La VozdeMexico, the organ 
of the Archbishop. 

At the missionary assembly of 1888, the women of the several mis- 
sions organized a temperance society, and began at once to bring the 
subject before the community, and especially before the Protestant 
churches. To the majority of our converts the question was new and 
stranf e, but good results are already visible in many of our churches. 
Pulque ib produced in certain districts in much greater quantities than 
in others, and the railroads by their freight facilities open a much 
wider market for its consumption ; indeed, many of the passenger 
trains have a pulque car attached, in which the huge hogsheads of this 
intoxicant are carried to all the principal towns and cities. This has 
notably increased drunkenness and petty crimes in many districts, and 
added to the inebriety caused by the use of strong distilled liquors, 
presents a sad picture. During the past year the secular papers hare 
done good service in calling attention to the evil, and to a great de- 
gree advocating temperance measures. 

Most of the missions publish Sabbath-school lesson-papers similar 
to those used at home. The Presbyterian Question-book is published 
in Spanish in monthly portions by missionaries of the Board, and these 
are used by the Presbyterian and Congregational missions. Rev. Mr. 
Morales uses in his church of Divino Salvador, illustrated lesson- 
charts with much effect, and during the week he employs them also in 
the different day-schools. 

Mr. Brown reports having attended the examinations in some of the 
day.schools, and as having found that a very satisfactory work was be- 
ing carried on. In the States of Tobasco, Michoacan, Hidalgo, and 
Guerrero (he people are beginning to take an interest and pride in the 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



158 MEXICO, NORTH. 

schools and to show an increasing desire for a better education. At 
an examination in one town in Hidalgo, nearly the whole population, 
not a large one, was present In many places the people pay a part 
of the teacher's salary. 

Encoura^ng progress is reported in the matter of self-help, contri- 
butions bemg made toward the day-schools and the support of the 
churches, also for the furnishing of seats, lights, etc. In many places 
societies of young people have been organized to raise funds to help 
on the work. Mr. Morales has in his congregation a society of chil- 
dren known as Christ's Jewels, whose membership has increased to 
eighty. These children contributed during the year J22, a large sum 
considering the great poverty of the people. 

At the last meeting of the Presbytery of Mexico, the question of 
organizing a Mexican Home Mission Board was agitated, and though 
conclusions have not been reached, the leaven of such an idea is work- 
ing in the minds and hearts of the people, and surely no better and 
more auspicious step could be taken. The very life of the Mexican 
Church involves the necessity of an aggressive and self- propagating 
element. 

Statistics of Mexico Mission. 

Ordained missioDaries 7 

Female missionary teachers 4 

Ordained natives 25 

Licentiates 35 

Native teachers and helpers 53 

Churches 90 

Communicants* 5*165 

Added during: year 388 

Girls in boarding-schools (2) 88 

Boys and girls in day-schools (40) I1270 

Total number of pupils i,3S8 

Students for ministry 15 

Pupils in Sabbath-schools 1,795 

Contributions $3*627 

* The fact that the net gain over last year is only 132, while 388 
.lave been added, is owing to the removal of the people from one 
ranch to another. The loss, therefore, is not a real one. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PAPAL EUROPE. 
The Waldenses 

A very responsible work is laid upon the Waldensian Church, the aim 
of which is to grasp from the hands of Rome the fair land of Italy with 
its 30,000,000 of souls, and give to them a pure gospel. Great results 
have already been achieved. There is a college and theological 
school, and an advanced school for girls, while scattered over the king- 
dom are a number of primary schools. There are 44 churches with 
38 pastors, 8 evangelists, 67 evangelical teachers, besides colporteurs 
and Bible-readers. But far transcending all visible results is the leaven 
of its influence in the promulgation of freedom of thought, and in the 
emancipation of the people from sacerdotal tyranny and superstition. 

The i6lh of August last was celebrated by the Waldensian Church 
of Italy as the two hundredth anniversary of the return of the exiled 
Vaudois to their homes in the Alpine valleys of Piedmont, from which 
they had been driven by the persecution of Rome. In the dead of 
night, August 16, 1689, the exiles, whose number had been reduced 
to less than a thousand, under the leadership of their pastor, Henri 
Arnaud, embarked in small boats at Nions, with the purpose of land- 
ing on the hostile French shore, and thence forcing their way through 
the wild passes of Savoy and over the Cottian Alps. After untold 
hardship they reached at last the mountains overlooking the valleys 
of their birth, only to find their path obstructed by an Italian army of 
2,000 men, sent out by the Duke of Turin. Though badly armed, 
the heroic band, some of whom had never handled a musket before, 
attacked and defeated the Italian army, leaving 600 of the latter 
dead upon the field. Filled with chagrin by this signal defeat, the 
Romanists sent out another army of 20,000 men under the Marquis 
de Catinat. It is impossible to describe the terrible sufferings to 
which the patriots were exposed on those bleak Alpine mountains 
during the dreary months of the following winter and spring. On 
May 1, 1690, occurred the heroic storming of the Balsi by the Vaudois, 
ending in a second complete defeat of their enemies ; but on the 14th 
of the same month, in a second attack upon the same fortress, the 
patriots were disastrously defeated and scattered over the mountains. 
For months the unequal struggle continued, until at length it seemed 
as though the cause of Protestantism in Italy was forever lost. At 
this crisis, however, help came from an unexpected source. DifBcul- 
lies arose between the courts of Versailles and Turin, knd war was 
declared by the latter. The Duke of Turin, seeing it was useless 
to waste his energies upon a band of mountaineers who had baffled 

II 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



l6o PAPAL EUROPE— FRANCE. 

and in several cases defeated the best soldiery of France and Italy, 
forgave the Waldenses and established them in their homes, in return 
for which numbers of them enlisted in his service. * It was in this un- 
looked-for way that peace came to the valleys of Piedmont, and that 
the cause of Protestant Christianity, the fate of which had so long 
trembled in the balance, became firmly established. 

The following statistical table will enable our readers to take in at a 
glance the state of the Waldensian churches : 

Churches 44 

Stations 44 

Places visited 180 

Pastors 38 

Evangelists 8 

Schoolmaster evangelists .' 10 

Schoolmasters and mistresses 57 

Colporteurs and colporteur evangelists 9 

Bible-readers 6 

Regular hearers 6,2x8 

Occasional hearers 49«795 

Communicants 4|074 

Catechumens 469 

The Evangelical Churches of France, 

The annual report of the Evangelical Society of France for the 
year closing December, 1889, records a large number of very encourag- 
ing incidents which have occurred in the experience of the agents of 
the Society in the various parts of France. While there is on the 
other side much apathy and discouragement, while no large movements 
are reported in the direction of a more evangelical faith and life, here 
and there throughout the different provinces there are tokens of an 
earnest spirit of inquiry, and a leaven of discontent with the deadness 
and formality of the Roman Catholic faith and teaching. Again and 
again these men, when permitted to address meetings attended by 
Romanists, have heard with satisfaction their expressions of surprise 
that this Gospel preaching should be so different from anything that 
they had ever heard from other sources, though the two religions were 
professedly the same. Hundreds are thus reached who do not hesitate 
to make known the fact that they really had never heard the Gospel 
in its legitimate presentation before. The difficulty which appears on 
the other hand is the lack of co-operation and organization — here and 
there is an individual or a family, here and there a little group holding 
up the torch of the truth in the midst of surrounding darkness. 
**This religion," said one, "is much better than ours, and I would go 
over to Protestantism were I not so old." "I am sure I will be 
excommunicated," said an inn-keeper, *' but that does not matter, I 
have heard such good things." *' Come and see us again," says many 
a hearer. One woman is reported as having walked twenty miles to 
receive the Lord's Supper, but such believers are too widely scattered 
and are surrounded by thousands of Romanists, and even in Protestant 
churches there is often great apathy, induced probably by more or less 
rationalistic influence. While Christians in Atnerica contribute of 
their means to keep alive these sparks from off the true altar, there is 
need thait their prayers ascend to God for the influence of the Holy 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PAPAL EUROPE— BELGIUM. l6l 

Spirit, who is omnipotent and who can make dry bones even rise up 
into life. 

Rev. L. J. Bertrand, of Paris, has been engaged during a part of 
the year in representing in this country the Central Society of the Re- 
formed Church of France, the Evangelization Society of the Free 
Church, and the Society for Training Evangelists, and the Board has 
consented to receive and transmit funds which the churches have con- 
tributed for these Societies. There are embraced within this union of mis- 
sionary operations between six and seven hundred churches * and Sun- 
day-schools, with many Young Men's Christian Associations. They have 
two preparatory training-schools and two theological seminaries, in one 
of which there are seventy-eight students. They support a Bible and 
Tract Society, and, although their total number of communicants is 
only about three-quarters of a million, the benevolences of their 
churches, independent of current expenses, amount to not less than 
a million of francs. This is a fact which ought to remove all the 
doubts of those who may have the impression that the poor churches 
of France are willing to live upon the charity of their brethren in other 
lands. All France is now open to evangelistic effort, and these churches 
are struggling to withstand the power of Rome and to present the 
truth of God in its purity. They are worthy of help. 

Belgium. — A Missionary Church. 

Rev. Kennedy Anet, of Brussels, has sent us the following instruct- 
ive facts : 

" At the time of the Reformation, that part of the Netherlands now 
called Belgium was one of the countries of Europe where the light ot 
the Gospel shone with the greatest brightness. If this glorious period 
of Belgian history is almost forgotten, it is because the Protestants 
were swept away by the Spanish Inquisition ; thousands were execu- 
ted, burned alive, or put to the sword by Philip the Second's soldiers, 
whilst others had to seek a refuge in foreign lands. 

** During more than two hundred years darkness reigned supreme in 
this land. At the beginning of the century there were only a few Prot- 
estants scattered here and there, but within the last fifty years the 
country which had been steeped in the blood of martyrs, has been 
yielding a rich harvest, and its whitening fields are of still greater 
promise for the future. 

" This work has been principally accomplished by the Evangelical 
Society founded in 1837. In 1848 it took the title of 'The Christian 
Missionary Church of Belgium.' At first it encountered many difficul- 
ties. In some places violent opposition, ill-treatment, and persecution 
in different forms impeded the work, while in others the pastors found 
it impossible to meet the demands for preaching and teaching, so 
gladly was the Gospel received. 

'' It is said that in Belgium there are 30,000 men toiling day and 
night in the coal mines. This represents a large population employed 



* Only about 400 cbiuches are stricUy evangelical. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



l62 PAPAL EUROPE — BELGIUM. 

either in the pits or in the factories that have sprung up near these 
rich supplies of fuel. It is among this people, for the most part 
wretchedly poor and either grossly superstitious or openly atheistic — 
often sunk to the lowest of immorality — that our Church is at work. 
The glorious promises of the Gos]>el message and the untold joy it 
imparts find ready access to the hearts of these poor toilers, in whom 
long hours of labor (generally from 12 to 16), bad pay, and rough 
treatment produce a great yearning for something better to hope for. 
It is in the dark galleries of the pit, in the workshops, and in the fac- 
tories that the best spiritual work is being done. It is there that our 
converts have abundant opportunities of showing their colors. For- 
merly they were known for cock-fighting, drinking, and swearing; now 
their employers recognize that they have become sober and gentle. 
They wonder at the change ; and the light that has been made to 
shine before men is reflected in the hearts of others. 

" Genval, near the field of Waterloo, was the first station where the 
new Society sent an agent. It has now 27 organized churches and 59 
preaching stations. It works in about 80 other localities, where the 
Gospel is preached occasionally. Two hundred other localities are 
visited by its colporteurs. It has 38 pastors, evangelists or coli>or- 
teurs, and Bible-readers and more than 7,000 church members (ip- 
cluding children), of whom, only 400 are Protestants by origin." 

In addition to receiving and forwarding special contributions to tht 
work in Papal Europe, the Board has distributed amounts in aid to the 
various Continental Churches as follows : 

Evangelical Society of Brussels $500.00 

Evangelical Society of Geneva 500.00 

The Waldenses 1,000.00 

The interest on permanent Waldensian fund 1,326.00 

Funds collected through Mr. Bertraiid 3,092.50 

Total $6,418.50 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MISSIONS IN PERSIA. 
Western Persia Mission. 

Oroomiah : 600 miles N. of W. from Teheran, the capital ; station begun under the 
American Bosurdf 1835 ; transferred to this Board in 1871 ; laborers— Rev. J. H. Shedd, 
D.D., Rev B. Labaree, D.D., J. P. Cochran, M.D., Rev. F. G. Coan, Rev. E. W. St. 
Pierre, and their wives; Mr. R. M. Labaree, Mrs. D. P. Cochran; Misses N. J. Dean, 
M. K. Van Duzee, Maria Morgan, Anna Melton, and Mrs. E. W. McDowell, it being 
impracticable for her to accompany her husb&nd at present in his new work in the 
Koordish mountains ; 34 ordained and 29 licentiate native pastors, and 126 native helpers. 

Ti.\RY : new mountain Sfai ion— opened in 1889 ; 150 miles west of Oroomiah, in 
Turkey; laborers— Rev. E. W. McDowell and J. G. VVishard, M.D.; 3 ordained and 
5 licentiate native pastors, and 13 native helpers. 

Tabriz : nearly 500 miles N. of W. from Teheran ; station begun, 1873 ; laborers — 
Rev. Messrs. J. M. Oldfather and S. G. Wilson and their wives ; Dr. and Mrs. G. W. 
Holmes, Miss Mary Jewett, Mrs. L. C. Van Hook, Misses G. Y. HoUiday and M. E. 
Bradford, M.D.; 2 ordained and 5 licentiate native ministers, and 15 native helpers. 

Salmas : Haftdevoan village ; station begun in 1884 ; laborers— Rev. J. N, Wright, 
Rev. J. C. Mechlin, and their wives ; Misses C. O. Van Duzee, A. G. Dale, and Emma 
Roberts ; z ordained and 5 licentiate native ministers, and 6 native helpers. 

In this country : Dr. and Mrs. Geo. W. Holmes, Mrs. B. Labaree, Miss Emma Rob- 
erts, and Miss Maria Morgan. 

Eastern Persia INission. 

Teheran (capital of Persia, population 200,000) : work begun in 1872 ; laborers- 
Rev. Messrs. J. L. Potter, S. Lawrence Ward, and Lewis F. Esselstyn, W. W. Tor- 
rence, M.D., and their wives; Miss Anna Schenck, Miss Cora Bartlett, Miss M. W. 
Greene, and Mary J. Smith, M.D. 

Hamadan (200 miles southwest of Teheran, population 40,0 x>) : occupied 1880 ; labor* 
ers— Rev. Messrs. James W. Hawkes and W. G. Watson, E. W. Alexander, M.D., and 
their wives ; Miss Annie Montgomery, Miss Charlotte Montgomery, and Miss Adeline 
Hunter ; /fev. Pastor Shimon ; 2 licentiates, 6 male and 5 female native teachers. 

Western Persia Mission. 

In general it may be said of Persia that an awakening has begun. 
The third visit of the Shah to Europe has taken place, and now he is 
showing himself the foremost man in Persia in desiring reforms and 
progress. Concessions and proclamations announce the dawn of a 
new era. Banks have been opened in the capital at Tabriz. The 
Kamn River is being made a highway of commerce from the south 
into the heart of the country. Railways are projected, mines and 
manufactories are opened, and highways are built. There are more 
signs of progress in the two years past than in a thousand years be- 
fore. These signs of the times render certain the incoming of English 
and American capital and enterprise. They also render our mission 
stations strategic points for the great campaign of evangelization on 
the broad field of Western Asia. Nearly twenty degrees of longitude 
must be crossed before our missions in Persia can clasp hands with 
the China missions. We must ever have an eye on this great field 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



164 WESTERN PERSIA— OROOMIAH. 

and estimate the work of the year, not only as so much done, but as 
far more a preparation for the great work yet to do. The day of 
opportunity is at hand. 

The region to be evangelized by this mission covers a large part of 
ancient Assyria or Media, twice the area of the State of Ohio, and 
indirectly a much larger region in the Caucasus and beyond under 
Russian dominion. The key of the position is found in the nominal 
Christians, Nestorians, or Old Syrians, and Armenians. These old 
churches have been preserved as the buried seed that is to spring up 
under the power of the pure Gospel, and thus to form the base for 
the wider work for Jews and Moslems. Among the Syriac-speaking 
Christians there are two stations, Oroomiah and Tiary, and among 
the Armenians Tabriz and Salmas. 

The year past has seen the return of several missionaries who were 
on furlough, Rev. and Mrs. J. N.Wright, and Dr. and Mrs. J. P. Cochran. 
Mrs. D. P. Cochran and Miss HoUiday returned in the autumn after a 
furlough in the United States, and Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Shedd in the 
spring. Of those in the field a year ago Dr. and Mrs. Holmes, of 
Tabriz, greatly to the regret of his Royal Highness the heir-apparent 
of Persia and of the mission, have been obliged to leave because of 
the serious illness of the latter. For the same reason Miss Roberts, 
of Salmas, has come to America. Miss Morgan is unable yet to re- 
turn. Miss Dale has been transferred from Tabriz to Teheran. It is 
expected that the mission will be reinforced by a missionary for Tabriz 
and two single ladies for Oroomiah as soon as they can be sent. A 
lay missionary for the industrial work at Oroomiah it is hoped will soon 
be appointed. 

Oroomiah Station, 

There are several departments here to be reported. In general the 
year has been filled with anxieties as well as encouragements. At 
the opening of the year there were within the church divisions that 
happily have been healed. Without was the active and aggressive 
opposition to our mission by the English Ritualists. These causes 
have operated against spiritual results, and the number of additions to 
the churches is the smallest reported for many years. • 

It is a singular and painful fact that notwithstanding this gain there 
is actual loss in the total number of genuine Christians. A new and 
more rigid rule has been enforced in the church. The rolls have 
been purged. Many have been led astray by the Ritualistic party, 
and the loose morals taught by their new teachers in regard to Sabbath 
observance, wine-drinking, and other things. 

In the opening of the year, however, many of the erring had been 
reclaimed, and a new and better era had dawned on the church. A 
genuine revival was in progress, resulting in more than a hundred con- 
verts. Prayer is earnestly offered that still greater blessings may follow 
this happy beginning. 

Another critical condition in our work is the restlessness of our 
young people arising from a desire to better their temporal prospects 
by money-making or going abroad. In some respects this is not 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 







Digitized by 



Google 



1 66 WESTERN PERSIA — OROOMIAH. 

blameworthy. We all rejoice to sec these long-oppressed Christians 
rising to a higher plane of life and prosperity, and the missionaries are 
trying to help them in this. But this condition of mind is not favor- 
able to spiritual things. There are, however, some earnest Christian 
workers, and the year 1889 closes with a brighter outlook than it 
began. 

The Spirit and Growth of Christian Character^ as reported at the 
gathering last summer for Bible study and prayer, was a great encour- 
agement. The same spirit and earnest prayer and hard work and 
faithful searching of heart weie manifest at the fall meeting of the 
Synod. The week of prayer followed and was observed with solem- 
nity and hopefulness and with special interest in a few places. The 
hopes of succeeding weeks were frustrated by the widespread influ- 
enza, which for a time paralyzed congregations and schools. This 
world-wide illness has caused much suffering and many deaths, and 
the apprehension of cholera to follow throws a cloud over the future 
which ought to render men thoughtful. Four ordained native minis- 
ters have been removed by death. One of them, Rev. Mr. Hormezd, 
was a prominent Christian man and moderator of the Synod. 

The Generous Giving to the Missionary Funds is mentioned. More 
has been raised for the native missionary fund than ever before, and 
the activity of the native Board is very encouraging in visiting the 
congregations and in spreading the glad tidings. They are prepared 
to pay one-lhfrd the cost of several churches through their Church 
Erection Board. The Home Mission Board has raised $250. The 
Evangelical Board of the Synod expects to collect and distribute ^360 
this year. 

The Work for Moslems has been marked by no wonderful results, 
but several inquirers are spoken of — some of them men of standing. 
One of the converts was violently attacked by a Moslem in a public 
place, and it was surprising that he escaped with his life. Another 
witness for Christ has closed his life triumphantly. '* It is touching to 
think of the love to Christ which sustained this poor soul to the last in 
trust upon the Saviour against the entreaties and jeers of his friends. 
Surely it cost something for him to believe and hold fast his profession 
firmly to the end." The work for Moslem Women and Girls bears fruit. 
Miss Van Duzee's report of work is full of interest. The evidence of 
the Holy Spirit's presence among the daughters of Islam we accept as 
a proof that the Lord is willing to answer prayer and to bless the hum- 
ble means for poor Christless souls. It is a question that presses upon 
the missionary how to make larger efforts, and they lay it upon the 
hearts of all Christians as a subject to be constantly brought to the 
Lord in prayer. 

The Work for Women all over this field is pressing, and the mission 
appeal urgently for a single lady to devote herself to village work. 
Such work in many places is more productive than similar efforts for 
men, as the women are always at home and can be reached more sys- 
tematically. The work of the native evangelist or Bible-reader, Laya, 
has been reported in ** Woman's Work for Woman." 

The Village Schools- — The report for the winter of 1888-9 says : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



WESTERN PERSIA — OROOMIAH. 167 

'* The school fund was short, and,/(7r the sake of economy^ the station 
reduced the number of schools from 85 to 73. In Gawar the Turkish 
Government expelled three teachers and closed three schools. They 
seemed determined to stop our school work in this region if possible. 
In Nochea, just south of Gawar, the Metropolitan is very friendly. A 
theological student, much beloved, spent several winters successfully 
in this district, but last spring he was attacked by Koords, who aimed 
to kill him. After being badly beaten he was jammed into an oven in 
the ground and left for dead He recovered consciousness and mer- 
cifully escaped to the plains. The report of his death had preceded 
him. There was consequently great joy among his weeping friends 
when he appeared as one risen from the dead. Notwithstanding this 
treatment he is ready to return again to his field of labor. While there 
was a falling off in numbers the quality of schools was never better. 
The competition in some villages was very sharp with the free schools 
offered by the Ritualists, and it is a sign of the stability of our work 
that this competition has caused so little real injury. All our prayers 
and efforts are to the end that our young men who are acting as teach- 
ers may feel the responsibility of their position, and may have power 
from on high for their work. With a consecrated corps of teachers 
we may look for blessed results." Of the past winter Mr. R. M. 
Labaree, who has charge?, says : ** This winter our schools start out 
with flattering prospects, and we think last winter's work will be ex- 
celled. The superior abilities and greater faithfulness of our teachers 
have been very manifest and are bearing fruit." 

In Higher Education for Girls the year is signalized as the first in 
the new building of the " Fidelia Fiske Seminary," and nearly 100 
girls in attendance. Miss Dean's failing health has thrown heavy bur- 
dens upon the young shoulders of Miss Melton, and the call for help 
is very urgent. It is needed at once, that the interests of the school 
may not seriously suffer. We have not at hand the full report of this 
school. 

Oroomiah College has had a prosperous year, with 100 students in 
attendance. Mr. St. Pierre, the superintendent, reports : Theological 
students, 12; college course, 56; preparatory or special, 32 — total, 
100. " The two terms were full of intellectual activity. There was 
good order throughout. The religious life was very encouraging. 
The revivals seemed only the natural fruit of the deep religious feeling 
pervading the entire year. They were revivals, too, in the true sense 
of awakening Christians. In the last term eight students were so 
thoroughly awakened that it seemed a conversion to them. They 
were church members before, but profoundly asleep, and their new 
confessions were evidently induced by the Spirit. God was working 
mightily among them. If it be asked, were sinners converted ? the 
answer is, that all our students are professing Christians and church 
members." 

The teaching force was very much weakened by the absence of Dr. 
Shedd. Sixteen were graduated last July from the college course. 
They are now engaged as teachers and are very faithful and success- 
ful A new class of 18 was admitted in September. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



l68 WESTERN PERSIA— OROOMIAH. 

Expenses — The pupils bear the expense of their own boaxd^ books, 
clothes, and incidentals. The college furnishes the teaching and 
rooms. In a rootn, say i6 by 20, six or seven boys lodge. As they 
study, sit, and spread their beds at night upon the floor, very little fur- 
niture is required. They form clubs and board at an expense of only 
one dollar a month. Their food is very simple, consisting mainly of 
coarse bread and meat soup. They dress simply and certainly live 
very cheaply. 

Equipment — ^The college has grounds and buildings and library and 
apparatus worth twelve or fifteen thousand dollars. There are two 
main buildings, built of sun-dried brick, with red brick trimmings. 
They appear well and are roomy. One of these buildings was erected 
the last summer to enlarge the dormitory accommodations. A fund 
of 1(3,000 was raised last year for this new dormitory and to open an 
industrial department. This new department has been undertaken 
by the Board, under the conviction that education of the hand as well 
as of the head is important in this field. The native workers need 
self-reliance and ability to help themselves, and the Christian society 
must meet the question : How are our people to live honestly and 
thriftily as becomes the Gospel ? To save the young men from de- 
moralization, this industrial department is begun. ''The college aims 
to be the centre of influence and enlightenment for a vast region. 
With this in view the mission have urged the collecting of funds for 
the permanent support of the institution, and that the effort be perse- 
vered in until the requisite amount be secured." There is an invested 
fund of $5,000, and the steady annual gift for current expenses from 
a gentleman in Philadelphia, of $2,000, which is the basis for the per- 
manent support. Let a sufficient sum be put into this work and we 
shall see what God will do through such a native agency as shall be 
raised up. 

The Medical Work, in the absence of Dr. Cochran, was conducted 
in part by Dr. Oshana Badal, the native medical assistant. The 
hospital was reopened on Dr. Cochran's return in the early winter, and 
the work of mercy has been going on since. The outlook of the 
medical work is always encouraging, and there is a class of several 
students under instruction. 

The Press at Oroomiah has accomplished about the same in amount 
and quality of work as in previous years. Rev. Dr. Labaree in charge 
says : '* Considering our isolation from skilled book manufactories, and 
the fact that our printers and binders are all trained on the ground and 
have but limited appliances for finished work, we have reason to con- 
gratulate ourselves on the comparative excellence of our press produc- 
tions. Our type, for which the punches and matrices were made here, 
under the skilled direction of our first printing superintendent, Mr. 
Breath, are acknowledged as the most beautiful Syriac type in exist- 
ence, and are adopted by some of the first Oriental publishing houses in 
Germany and England. It may be classed as one among the many 
aids contributed by foreign missions to the advancement of learning 
and scholarship in the world. 

" The whole number of pages printed during the year was 688,720. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



WESTERN PERSIA — OROOMIAH. 1 69 

The most important work was a translation of Mr. Spurgeon's * Morn- 
ing by Morning/ It takes the place of a former work called * Green 
Pastures/ which has long been a household volume among the lovers 
of devotional reading. The new volume promises to become even 
more a favorite than the earlier one." 

The monthly newspaper and the Sabbath -school quarterly lesson 
papers are more widely taken than in any previous year. The Turkish 
authorities have forbidden the circulation of the books and papers in 
Turkey, which is much to be regretted, and deprives the Syrian Chris- 
tians of Koordistan of their literature. The book circulation ending 
with June, 1889, was 2,272 volumes. 

In the same connection should be mentioned the Revision of the 
Syriac Old Testament^ which Dr. Labaree and a committee of native 
scholars have undertaken and have brought near completion. It has 
proved a work of more magnitude and perplexity than was at first sup- 
posed, and has required much deliberation and careful scholarship. It 
is really a revision in the same language in which parts of the Scripture 
were written — the Aramaic — the tongue spoken by our Saviour and 
His apostles. It should be done with prayer, pains, and patience to 
secure the best results. 

Mr. Coan, whose report of evangelistic work was received after this 
report was prepared, gives many interesting facts, of which the follow- 
ing are a fair sample. 

Mr. Coan says : •* Our evening service was held in the largest and 
oldest house in the village of Murbeshoo. In a large room, 70 by 40 
feet, dark with the smoke of nearly 200 years, lives a family of 72 
souls. Here under one roof they eat, sleep, and live with four large 
ovens iu the ground to furnish the cooking. From one of the walls, 
which is solid rock and toward the mountain side, gushes a beautiful 
spring right into the rooin. As this is the head family of the village, it 
is an inn for travellers as well, so that one is here always sure of a good 
congregation. I shall never forget the service that evening. In this 
dark room, lighted by a few flickering lamps, grouped in circles about 
their hearths, sat nearly 100 souls, from the aged great-grandfather to 
the little infants asleep in their cradles. A variety of creeds was 
represented in this one family. Right in front of me in one group sat 
two priests of the old church, one a venerable, fine-looking man, the 
other a Catholic priest who has no following ; another a disciple of the 
Ritualists, and one a graduate from theology in our school in the class 
of 1888, with his mother, who is a Christian. All listened attentively 
to the simple Gospel stor}'." 

An hour from this place Mr. Coan was invited to preach in the old 
church, and there was no objection from priest or people. But they 
unitedly begged for a preacher and teacher to reside among them. 
Their request was granted and a school of more than 40 is in success- 
ful operation there. 

A band of six young men, deeply impressed with the necessity of a 
purer Christianity and more closely following Christ, met regularly 
together for prayer and conference. They then were the means of 
arousing the pastor, resulting in a conference with the missionaries. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



170 WESTERN PERSIA— MOUNTAINS. 

and not long after the revival referred to in another part of ihis report 
began, and the greatest success seems to have been in places where 
there was the greatest coldness and unconcern. 

In Ardeshai, where the church was unusually dead and the pastor 
greatly prejudiced, a remarkable revival has occurred, in which the 
church is greatly quickened, the pastor entirely won over, and 22 have 
confessed Christ and are determined to follow Him. One hundred 
and ten dollars were also subscribed as one-third toward a new church. 
The last report brought by Mr. St. Pierre from Golpashan, where he 
and Deacon Ismaiel worked three days, is grand. In this church that 
had the courage to drop 24 leading members, who did not show signs 
of repentance, all but four have again been received back, and 71 pro- 
fess Christ for the first time. It is hoped that we have but seen the 
beginning, and that many churches from which earnest prayers have 
ascended may receive similar blessings. 

The Mountain Department. 

Last year's report mentioned the difficulty of locating the mountain 
station in Tiary, owing to a feud between the Tiary people and the 
surrounding Koords. This difficulty in a large measure continues, and 
the missionaries have had their headquarters in the field. The reports 
of the work are full of interest and encouragement. Mr. McDowell 
gives a vivid picture of missionary experience among nominal Chris- 
tians, Yezidees, and Moslems. The most powerful Koordish sheikh is 
Sheikh Mohammed, of Bawmermee in Berwer. ** My visit was made 
for the purpose of disarming the suspicions of the Koords of that 
region, who regard us as political agents of some kind hostile to them. 
The Mullahs and the sons of the sheikh received me very coolly, 
but the sheikh himself, who is a very old man and quite venerable in 
appearance, treated us with great courtesy. He expressed gratification 
at the explanations of our work, and gave us a cordial invitation 
to come again, especially after the arrival of Dr. Wishard. He volun- 
tarily gave us, and especially the doctor, freedom to come and go 
through his territory at pleasure. Thus friendship was established at 
Koordish headquarters at the doorway of Tiary. Passing into Tiary, 
the leading Malek or chief manifested his usual friendliness, but inti- 
mated that the trouble with the Koords was in part because of the 
missionaries, and they should exert themselves to protect these Chris- 
tians. This spirit is very strong among the Tiary people, that the 
business of missionaries and the Christian power^ is to put the Koords 
under the feet of the Christians. It leads the mountain people, as 
their danger and difficulty increase, to offer their adherence to Rus- 
sians, French, English, or Americans — to any one that promises civil 
protection. This condition renders the independent tribes of Tiary 
and Tkhoma a very difficult field at present." After spending a part 
of the winter in Tiary, Mr. McDowell returned through Berwer to 
Dihi, where there is a flourishing congregation, and then spent some 
weeks in Bohtan, a district further west. **Dr. Wishard arrived in the 
latter part of March, and very soon demonstrated the value of a 
physician in a new field. About the ist of May he was called to visit 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



WESTERN PERSIA— MOUNTAINS. 171 

a prominent man at Dihi, who was lying sick. He saved the man's 
life, but himself fell sick, and for a time his life was almost despaired 
of. It had been his intention to Remain in the mountains during the 
summer, but in view of his physical condition and the lack of all con- 
veniences, it was deemed best by us both that we go to Oroomiah." 
On the way in May occurred the robbery, fully detailed in the Church 
at Home and Abroad for March, 1890. After spending some weeks at 
Orooraiah and attending annual meeting, the two missionaries returned 
to their field in the fall. On entering Turkey they were met by 
quarantine, but the Turks learning that one of the missionaries was a 
physician, with the Sultan's commission in his hands, they were earn- 
estly pressed into service at Mosul. Dr. Wishard at once was recog- 
nized as the medical authority in the cholera-stricken city, and soon 
acquired great influence with all classes. The winter just closing has 
thus been spent, partly in Mosul and partly in different districts. The 
latest intelligence, January 17, 1890, says of them at Dihi : '* Dr. 
Wishard called upon the sheikh mentioned above, whose residence is 
but a short distance from Dihi. The sheikh. readily gave his consent 
to our building a house in Dihi." So far as the station has a home it 
is found at this place. " Here will always be a centre of work, and a 
house in which to work is simply indispensable. I have planned the 
house, made all the estimates, and I trust we shall soon have a fair 
house at a moderate sum. It is to answer the purposes of church, 
school, pastor's residence, and also a residence for missionaries, and 
last, but not least, for a dispensary and hospital." 

Turning from the oudine of missionary movements to the work, Mr. 
McDowell gives a sketch of the field and its peoples, and the open- 
ings and departments of work, which must be condensed. 

In the rugged mountains are the semi-independent tribes of Tiary 
and Tkhoma and the smaller districts of Tal and Rakan. Tal and 
Rakan have but few Christian villages. The latter gathers an audi* 
ence every day, and on Sabbath it numbers about forty. Six persons 
are candidates for membership. Tkhoma is populous, forming an 
almost continuous village for miles. Muzrai, one of the largest cen- 
tres, is also the centre of missionary operations. Good work was 
done by the young man stationed there, with large congregations and 
many who professed a desire to live a new life. There were two 
schools in Tkhoma. 

Tiary lies along the Zab River, which divides it into two parts, each 
of these being again divided, making four divisions with four Maleks, 
or chiefs, and some 50 or 60 villages. Lizan and Zarnee are the only 
points where we have congregations. In the first there are but few 
members. One of these is the son of the Malek. He is a sober- 
minded man, and gives evidence of a regenerate heart. 

Zarnee lies at the extreme lower end of Tiary. It is the point 
selected for the station. Our church numbers about 15 members, and 
the meetings held last winter were the means of much good. We had 
fwe schools in Tiary, but feeble ones. 

Passing toward the plains of Assyria the next district is Berwer^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



172 WESTERN PERSIA— MOUNTAINS. 

with some 30 Syriac \ illages. The people are completely subject to 
the Koords, and these Koords are at war with the Tiary people. There 
are a few church members, and but a poor opportunity for quiet labor 
because of the threatening attitude of the Koords. Beyond a low range 
of hills lies the Supna district, with a large population, Koordish and 
Christian. The latter are largely Roman Catholics. We have one 
church at Dihi, where a mission-house is being built. Mr. McDowell 
says : ** Our work in Dihi has been a source of joy to me. The church 
is exceptionally pure and zealous and full of good works. We have 
had daily meetings, and besides have held morning prayers in many 
houses of the village, and in the evening have visited from house to 
house with an experience the most blessed of my missionary life. 
There are a number who seem to have a change of heart, and it is not 
too much to expect that erelong the entire village will become Prot- 
estant, and the great majority of them true Christians." 

From this point a three days' journey westward brings us to Bohian^ 
a very large district, part of it a fertile plain along the Tigris and part 
the mountains which lie. toward Van. The church in Hassan is the 
oldest and largest, but successive years of famine and the oppressions 
of the Koords have crushed the life out of the people, still they 
give liberally out of their deep poverty to the supix)rt of their pastor. 
Monsoria is a large village on the Tigris River, with a strong and 
promising church, marked by brotherly love and zeal. They are 
always at work for specific persons, and there are always inquirers in 
the church. There is great opposition, but the progress is constant 
toward leavening the whole population with the Gospel truth. Above 
and below this point are large districts. Two of the villages visited 
are very interesting, and open to the Gospel and begging for a teacher. 
In two other directions the influence of the year must be noted. One 
of these is a tentative effort among the strange people called the Yezi- 
deeSf or Worshippers of Satan, in the plain of Assyria. Two of our 
evangelists visited them, not as Christian teachers, but as artisans. 
The substance of their report, so far as it afTects practical work, is 
that they were received in 9 very friendly manner ; the people are 
open to religious conversation, show little consciousness of sin, but 
much openness to the Gospel. They are very ignorant, all education 
being confined to two families. Mission work would meet with little 
opposition from the lower classes, but the rulers, who are very sus- , 
picious, would fight it to the death. Open work would at present be 
impossible. Personal work done by Christian ma&ons would be pro- 
ductive of much good. It is this method that is to be followed up 
for the present. The other direction was among the Roman Catholic 
Syrians of El Kosk, the reputed burial-place of Nahum, the prophet, 
and the seat of the Chaldean Patriarch. While our evangelist for the 
Yezidees was tarrying at El Kosk a large party of the people awoke to 
his instructions and threw off the Papal yoke, and asked him to be 
their teacher. The ecclesiastics soon raised a mob on a Sabbath 
evening, dragged the evangelist out of the village, beat him, maltreated 
him, destroyed his books, and took possession of his property. This 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



WESTERN PERSIA— TABRIZ. 1 73 

case of persecution did not stop the movement. There is good hope 
of winning a permanent footing in this important centre. 

In the entire field there are six churches with about 150 members. 
Twelve preachers were employed during the winter, seven of them 
being evangelists for part of the time. There were twelve schools. 
The number of accessions to the churches was not definitely reported. 
Three of these churches contributed to their own support. 

77ie medical work of Dr. Wishard began on the day of his arrival 
last year, in March. He at once treated many patients, thus winning 
the favor of the Government and of the important Koordish leaders. 
At every place he visits he is overwhelmed with patients, and he has 
pressing invitations from chiefs whom he hopes to visit. On every 
hand his influence is felt, while in the city of Mosul there is an urgent 
demand for his constant presence. 

The experience of the past year shows that the seal of divine ap- 
proval rests upon earnest, self-denying labors all over the Syriac-speak- 
ing field, both in Persia and Turkey, notwithstanding serious difficul- 
ties. There is the living church of 2,000 members, and radiating in- 
fluences upon the great Moslem population in many directions, which 
render the reformation and mission work going forward among the 
Nestorians an important factor in the evangelization of the East. 

Tabriz. 

The mission force at this important centre has suffered depletion 
since last report. Dr, Holmes and his wife were obliged to leave on 
account of ill-health. For a year before he left Dr. H. was physi- 
cian-in-chief to his Royal Highness the Vali Ahd, or heir-apparent 
of Persia, but he was at this post in the full spirit of a missionary. 
Rev. W. L. Whipple, the agent of the A. B. Society, with head- 
quarters at Tabriz, who co-operates earnestly with our brethren, is 
also absent on furlough, and Rev. Mr. Oldfather is on his way to 
America. Mr. Wilson is the only clerical missionary left, and greatly 
needs the promised reinforcements. 

The work has gone forward as in the previous year. Two preach 
ing services have been regularly supplied. The church has received 
seven additions, mostly from the schools. 

Outstations, — ^The field work from Tabriz comprises about three- 
fourths of the province of Azcrbijan, one of the most populous and 
fertile of the provinces of Persia. There are several cities of im- 
portance. In two of these — Maragha and Soujbullak — there are per- 
manent preachers and congregations. Their work has prospered the 
past year, both among Moslems and other races. In two smaller 
places — Mianduab and Ilkachee — schools and services have been kept 
up. In these outstations there are 16 communicants. 

Itinerant labors by four evangelists have been going on most of 
the year. The report says: "The Moslems have a listening ear for 
the truth. There is certainly a spirit of inquiry and unrest among 
them, and while for the present Babism (whose head is a captive at 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



174 WESTERN PERSIA— TABRIZ. 

Acre, in Syria) is flourishing greatly, our hope is that when the ex- 
pectations inspired by this new religion fail, its devotees may turn to 
Christ the true * Bab * or * Door' This preaching of the Word in con- 
nection with Bible distribution has been going on in the cities and 
villages for several years. It is looked upon with unconcern by the 
Government as harmless. Its results are preparatory in most cases, 
removing prejudice and giving to many correct ideas of Christianity, 
as well as the Word of God to read. One of our evangelists writes of 
work in the camp of the Shah when he was on the road to Europe. 
* Half a mile distant from Zenjan I took some books with me to the 
camp. I met many educated men and sold them some Bibles. After 
that I went to the tent of the Shah, and told the chief of the eunuchs 
that I had brought for his Majesty the Shah the Word of God. He 
did not let me go in, but took the books from me and carried them 
to the Shah, who returned me the value of the Bibles. I talked much 
with the chief of the eunuchs about Jesus, that we can by Him be 
saved from the servitude of Satan. Then 1 went to the prince, uncle 
of the Shah, and talked to him of the love of God who sent His Son 
to die on the cross. He was very glad to hear and bought two 
Bibles.' " 

Other encouraging tours were made among the Jews to the south 
and among the Armenians of Karadagh. This kind of effort, how- 
ever, has been largely prevented by other work. Books have been 
circulated in several languages ; in all 2,196 volumes sold. "There 
is a good demand for religious books in Armenian and for the 'Pilgrim's 
Progress' in Persian." 

Educational work in Tabriz and in the outstations has gone on 
more quietly than in any previous year. 

The boys' school in Tabriz is well organized with primary, intermedi- 
ate, high-school, and theological class ; in all 20 boarding and 47 day 
pupils. The upper class of the high- school has seven promising young 
men. The class in theology was just beginning, and students were 
expected from the Caucasus as well as from Persia. The seven 
graduates of last summer are doing good work in the schools. Three 
are teaching in Tabriz field, two in Salinas, and two in Orooniiah. The 
graduation of this class was the first annual commencement of the 
high-school. They represented five districts or cities of Persia and 
one of the Caucasus. They are all believers, and have made such 
progress, mentally and spiritually, as to render these first-fruits very pre- 
cious. Their graduation was honored by the presence of consuls, and 
generals, and others — Persian and European — of high official rank. 
There are plans for the enlargement of this school which promise 
much good. 

Tlie pressing need is a suitable building, as the term of rent of the 
present poorly-adapted buildings is soon to expire. Under the circum- 
stances the mission urgently requested the Beard to allow an effort to 
be made to raise special funds, not to inteifere wiin the regular in- 
come of the Board. After careful examination the Board approved. 
An ai)peal appeared in the March number of the Church at Home 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



WESTERN PERSIA— TABRIZ. 1 75 

and Abroad. God's answer was most remarkable through a gener- 
ous friend, who at once pledged the J 10,000 needed to open this 
Christian training-school in the commercial capital of Persia. The 
building will be a memorial, as is also the new church edifice in 
Tabriz. They both, we trust, will stand till the light of the blessed 
Gospel shall shine over all Persia. 

The GirU School in Tabriz has had a prosperous year, having 30 
day pupils in the lower department and 25 pupils in the boarding de- 
partment. The report says : " The studies of the year have been 
pursued without interruption — with no sickness. Nine of the girls 
testified a desire to live a new life by faith in Christ Jesus. Examina- 
tions were held in January, April, and June. Those in June continued 
three days. A class of four girls — all Christians — ^graduated. It was 
a pretty sight — those four white-robed girls, their faces bright with 
anticipations of future happy usefulness, as they stood listening to Mrs. 
Van Hook's parting words of loving counsel. One was married and 
has gone with her husband to Mianduab as helper and teacher. An- 
other has gone to Salmas to aid Miss Van Duzee. Two remain as 
teachers in this institution." The ladies of the school have been able 
to make between three and four hundred calls in addition to school 
duties. Mrs. Van Hook gratefully contrasts the beginnings ten years 
ago, when with difficulty three girls were induced to enter the mission- 
ary's house, and only ten pupils were enrolled for the year, and the 
present, with a handsome, commodious building filled with boarding 
and day pupils, four competent native teachers, and an excellent ma- 
tron, and lessons in higher studies and music, along with the constant 
study of the Bible and Catechism. The progress shows what God has 
wrought. 

Medical Work. — Miss M. E. Bradford. M.D., arrived in Tabriz in 
the fall of 1888. She devoted herself to the study of the language at 
first, and refused medical work as far as possible. After a few months 
she opened the dispensary once a week in self-defence, so many came 
to her house at all hours. A month later a second day was added, 
and before long every day there were patients seen for three hours. 
From August, 1889, she was able to converse with these patients with- 
out an interpreter. Previous to that time Mrs. Wilson devoted a great 
deal of time to helping at the dispensary and in visits at houses. 

Dr. Holmes' faithful service for many years did much toward secur- 
ing for Miss Bradford the hearty reception she received. For three 
months also she had the benefit of his advice and experience. 

The summary of work embraces 565 visits to houses, 450 new pa- 
tients, 450 office visits, and 1,204 prescriptions. Dr. Bradford says : 
'* The social grade of the people to whom we have gone ranges from 
the highest to the lowest. The rich have received us gladly, and not 
less have we gone to the poor and miserable who were suffering in 
some damp cellar or hovel. One of the chief wives of His Majesty 
the Shah, during a short stay in Tabriz^ sent for us several times. She 
si>oke of the great need of lady physicians in this land and expressed 
the wish to have one at the capital. When informed that Dr. Smith 



12 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



176 WESTERN PERSIA— SALM AS. 

was coming to that city, she wrote expressing great joy. There have 
been frequent visits to the household of His Royal Highness the Vali 
Ahd and also at the home of the Chief Councillor. 

'* By means of this medical work many have heard the Bible and 
been told of Christ as their Saviour. At the dispensary there is a 
short service before treating the patients. A Bible-woman always 
stays in the waiting-room, and often she has been invited to visit the 
houses." 

There is continual pressure to enlarge the medical work into a 
hospital, and Miss Bradford makes an appeal for such an enlargement 
in Tabriz, but the way does not seem yet fully prepared. 

Salmas. 

Mr. Wright returned to this station in the fall of 1889, the burden 
of the work previously falling upon Mr. Mechlin, who was still imi>er- 
fectly acquainted with the language. Miss Roberts being compelled 
to leave, Miss Dale was persuaded to take her place for the year, but 
she returns again to Teheran. This mission force is now divided : 
Mr. and Mrs. Mechlin and two single ladies, living in Haftdewan, an 
Armenian town, and headquarters for Armenian work ; Mr. and Mrs. 
Wright, living in Oola, the headquarters for the work among Nesto- 
rians, Roman Catholics, and Moslems. 

In Haftdewan there is as yet no church. The congregation on 
Sunday varies from thirty to ninety. There is a great change in the 
friendliness of the people, but the cry is for God*s Spirit to breathe 
upon them the breath of life. The larger part of the audience is com- 
posed of women, to whom the missionary ladies give a special talk 
after the sermon. Occasionally some of the young men and a few of 
the older men come in. Miss Van Duzee spends much of her time 
visiting in Haftdewan and in the surrounding villages, and meets with 
a kind reception. In Education the effort for the Armenians is cer- 
tainly encouraging. There were 60 boys in school from February to 
July. As fast as the poor boys dropped out in the spring to care for 
kids and calves or work on the farm, the sons of the richer class came 
in. Several cases were noted, where the parents opposed, but the boys 
said they would not go to school unless it was the mission school, and 
a night class for the larger boys succeeded for a time, but the influenza 
broke up the class. Daily lessons are given in the school, and it is 
hoped that a boarding department may be added soon. The Girli 
School has had 10 boarders, and the roll has 72 day pupils. Some of 
the latter are very irregular, but the average has been about 50. Miss 
Dale had a busy winter. The most remarkable thing is that the Ar- 
menian priests do not forbid the girls attending the school. 

The outstations for Armenian work are at Old City or Old Salmas 
and Khoy, with not very encouraging progress. 

The work in Oola is in good condition, with audiences of 50 and 
60, and interesting meetings for the women, and not the least inter- 
esting have been those for the Moslem women. There has been but 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



WESTERN PERSIA— SALMAS. \^^ 

one addition to the church, which numbers 28 members. The Girls 
School is conducted by Khorraa, who was for several years a worker 
in the Chinese Home in San Francisco. In Gulezaiu an adjoining 
village, is an interesting school, chiefly of Moslem boys. In these 
villages the Romanists are the great opposers, by all the means they 
know so well how to use. In Khosrowa, their stronghold, our colpor- 
teur has his rented house and many of the people are friendly, but not 
ready to confess the truth against the persecution. The Colporteur 
Work has been large in the sale of Bibles and school-books ; in the 
Armenian villages especially there is constant demand. 

A new interest has started among the Jews of Old Salmas. A 
young man from the Oroomiah Theological Class has succeeded be- 
yond expectations. He rented a room and his widowed aunt keeps 
house for him, and has gathered a school of 30 boys and, young men, 
and a large attendance at the service for prayer and expounding the 
Word. The Jews are much divided among themselves, the liberal 
portion welcoming the Christian teacher as often as he will attend 
their synagogue. It is another indication of the gathering in of the 
chosen people in the lands of their long captivity. 

The report speaks of the friendliness of the people. " I count 
among my best friends some of the chief Moslems of this district," 
says Mr. Mechlin. But there is the lack of deep spiritual power and 
the ingathering of souls which must come if the faithful laborers faint 
nor. 

Other missions in the field are the French Lazarists of the Romish 
Church and the Anglican Ritualists among the Syriac-speaking people. 
In the Tabriz field Swedish missionaries — evangelical and earnest — are 
at work. They found restrictions in the Russian dominions so great 
that they have come over into the more tolerant kingdom of the Shah, 
and il is hoped that they will join in fellowship and comity with our 
missionaries. 

The first report of the mission in Persia under this Board was for 
the year 187 1, nineteen years ago. The station then was only one, at 
Oroomiah ; the communicants were 700 ; pupils in schools, 960. 
Compare with this the present work of six stations, and in the Western 
Mission over 2,000 communicants and 2,374 pupils in the schools, and 
we can see that the work is progressing rapidly, giving us good ground 
for expecting a great blessing in the near future. 

Note.— After this report was in type refreshinf^ news has come from Oroomiah. The 
revival which began in Ardeshai had extended its influence imtil about /our hundrea 
persons have been converted, and the blessed work continues. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



178 



EASTERN PERSIA— TEHERAN. 



^afistijs of Western Persia Mission. 



Ordained missionaries 

Medical '* 

Lay *• 

Female missionary physicians 

Wives of missionaries 

Single female missionaries 

Ordained natives 

Licentiate '* 

Native teachers, female . . . . 

»• male 

Bible-women 

Ori^anized churches 

Other cong;regations with communicants . 

Present communicants 

Added to the churches during the year . . . 

Number of schools 

Pupils in boys' boarding-schools 

Pupils in girls* '* 

Boys in day-schools 

Girls in day-schools 

Total number of pupils 

Students for the ministry 

Pupils in Sabbath-schools 

Contributions so far as reported 



c^ 



•5 



^ i t^ 



6 

5 
34 

25 

21 

IC4 
I 

20 
28 

1,941 

103 

114 

100 

76 

1,432 

413 

2,021, 

12' 

4,086 

$1,389 



4 
100 

15 
12 



1 
2 

3 

2 

5 
4 
9 

2 

X 

2 

58 

7 

9 

20 

25 



X70 


83 


30 


44 


210 


172 


.... 


4 


$150 


$^^5 



2 
3 
I 
5 
I 
4 
1 
I 
2 
28 
I 
6 

10 
112 

90 
212 

I 

200 
$72 



I 

I 

10 

II 

40 

26 
129 

4 

24 

36 

2,1*7 

126 

14X 

120 

III 

1,797 

577 

2,615 

»7 

4,824 

$1,796 



Eastern Persia Mission. 

The year in this mission was rendered somewhat eventful by the 
presence of cholera in Hamadan and its threatened invasion of 
Teheran. The visitation, however, was confined to the former sta- 
tion, and there our missionaries were mercifully preserved, although 
the scourge entered our Faith Hubbard School, claiming one of the 
girls as its victim, and necessitating the closing of the school for a 
time. The presence of the disease within the bounds of the mission 
seemed to render it prudent to omit the usual annual meeting. It also 
temporarily interfered with the distribution of the new missionaries 
who had accompanied Mr. and Mrs. Potter on their return to Teheran, 
viz., Miss Mary W. Greene, Miss Adeline Hunter, and Mary J. Smith, 
M.D. Miss Hunter, though under appointment to Hamadan, spent 
the winter in the capital studying the language and assisting in the 
boys* school. 

Teheran Station, 

The spiritual condition of the two churches connected with this 
station is not as encouraging as in former years. That at Resht — 
some 200 miles from the capital — is at best but a feeble flock, and 
labors under the disadvantage of being far removed from the imme- 
diate supervision of a foreign missionary, although having the minis- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



EASTERN PERSIA— TEHERAN. 1 79 

trations of a native pastor. It numbers only aine members, none 
having been added during the year. A letter from Teheran laments 
the spiritual lethargy ot the church in that city, a number of the mem- 
bers giving little evidence of a deep spirituality, and not a few of them 
being addicted to the wine-drinking habit of the country, to the mani- 
fest detriment of their spiritual life. One was dropped from the roll, 
and four were suspended during the year. It is hoped that the meas- 
ures now taken may result in the purifying of the church and the 
deepening of individual piety. It is gratifying to report on the other 
hand that four persons were received into the church on confession of 
faith, and that the attendance on the Sabbath services averaged 136. 
Preaching was sustained in the Persian language on Sunday morning 
and Friday afternoon, while services were held in Armenian on Sun- 
day afternoons in the West Side chapel, where Baron Mahran has 
recently been placed in charge. The envelope system of giving to 
the Lord's work, introduced a year ago, has worked well, the total 
gifts for the year, including the Christmas offering, amounting to about 

$193. 

The work at Kasvin^ an outstation under the charge of Mirza 
Ohannes, is reported as flourishing. The native evangelist is an 
enthusiastic laborer, busying himself with selling the Scriptures, hold- 
ing services in Armenian and Persian on the Lord's day, and em- 
bracing every opportunity for private conversation on religious 
subjects. Mr. Esselstyn visited the point during June, spending two 
days there and administering the Lord's Supper to a few of the mem- 
bers of Teheran church located there temporarily or permanently. 
The success of the evangelist has to some extent excited the fanaticism 
of the Moslems, so that he finds great difBculty in securing a house to 
rent, but few of the Armenians owning property at that place. Some 
have asked for the organization of a church and the establishment of a 
school. During the year Mr. Esselstyn visited twenty-six villages, 
mostly Mohammedan, repeating the visits several times in a number 
of instances, and preaching the Gospel as he had opportunity without 
marked opposition. 

Educational. — The Girl^ Boarding-School is henceforth to be known 
as " Iran Bethel " — the Persian Bethel. May it ever prove to be a house 
of God ! Eighty-one girls were enrolled during the year, representing 
five nationalities, and speaking six languages. Of these 1 2 are pro- 
fessing Christians, and 5 others have expressed a desire to confess 
Christ. The spiritual atmosphere of the school seems to be healthful. 
The report from the pen of Miss Schenck says : " The girls all have 
part in family worship morning and evening, repeating Scripture singly 
and in concert. Morning prayers are followed by a silent devotional 
time before breakfast. The weekly school prayer-meeting is con- 
ducted by the Christian girls. Very precious and helpful times we 
have together. Several are efficient Bible-teachers, both daily in the 
school and in the church Sunday-school ; their faithfulness, interest, 
and spirituality adding not a little to the effeciiveness of the teachers' 
meeting held weekly at the house of Mr. Esselstyn. A few of the 
girls have earned their clothing by giving help in teaching, while all 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



l8o EASTERN PERSIA— TEHERAN. 

have taken part in the domestic work of the school. The school is 
advancing steadily toward self-support." 

''The summer was occupied as usual with the Industrial SchooL 
It is all its name indicates as to industry for all concerned — a steadily 
unintermitted day-by-day occupation — planning, cutting, fixing, direct- 
ing, calculating, following up, correcting, and instructing a lot of 
children eager and interested beyond their years, deserving credit for 
good, faithful work, yet after all the most childish of children. A 
number are very helpful in using the machines. This is an alUitnport- 
ant part of our school work, not only as necessary to a girl's education, 
but essential for sanitar}' and prudential reasons, to have the clothing 
and household articles ready for use. Indeed, without the result of 
the Industrial School, we should be quite unprepared to have a school 
at all. This summer the two months given up to this work produced 
more than 900 articles of clothing and household outfit, including 
some 2,500 buttonholes." 

Miss Greene has been added to the teaching force of this institution, 
and with the consent of the West Persia Mission, the Board has trans- 
ferred Miss Dale to her former place in the school, expecting, how- 
ever, that a good portion of her time will be devoted to work among 
the women. These additions are most timely, as the burden upon 
Miss Schenck and Miss Basset t has been very heavy. 

The Boys' School ^ under the care of Mr. Ward, made decided 
progress during the year in numbers, efficiency, and self-support. 
Eighty were enrolled, 46 being in the boardmg department, and 34 
being day scholars. Of the entire number 14 are Mohammedans, 4 fire 
worshippers, 2 Americans, i English, and the rest Armenians. Twenty- 
seven of the boarders paid in whole or in part ; 26 of the day pupils 
took breakfast in the school and paid for it. Last year but 14 of the 
pupils contributed anything toward their own support. The receipts 
from tuition this year amounted to $225. Some difficulty has been expe- 
rienced in securing satisfactory teachers, but it is believed that this has 
now been overcome. The spiritual condition of the school has not been 
what could be desired, but Mr. Ward writes : " During the present 
term 1 have seen decided signs of more earnest purpose on the part of 
the professors of religion, and more respectful attention at the relig- 
ious exercises on the part of all.'' As the school has been established 
with the ultimate purpose of training Christian teachers and ministers, 
it is earnestly hoped that the superintendent's desire may be realized 
in seeing a deeper interest in spiritual things on the part of the 
pupils. 

This station was honored during the year by a visit from the Emin- 
ed-Dowleh, Minister of Posts and President of the Shah's Cabinet. 
After a careful inspection of the schools, he expressed himself as highly 
gratified at seeing such a work going forward for the uplifting of Persia. 
He has since expressed a desire to have a school for Moslem boys 
begun under supervision of the Americans. 

Medical. — Several years ago, on the basis of the generous gift of Mrs. 
M. W. Ferry, of Lake Forest, the Board authorized the establishing of a 
hospital, it being understood in advance that a site for the purpose 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



EASTERN PERSIA— RAMADAN. Hi 

was to be given by the Prime Minister of Persia. This hope, however, 
was never realized, and it was finally determined to abandon the idea 
of securing a gift and to purchase a site for the hospital over which 
the Board might have control. Through the kindness of some of the 
officials this was secured at a comparatively low price, about one mile 
from the present mission premises, the Shah having suggested that 
it would not be well to plant it too near the government hospital. 
The lot comprises twenty-four thousand square yards. Upon this is 
being erected at present a pavilion for the accommodation of 20 
patients and also a house for the resident physician. Ground was 
broken on May 18, 1889, ^"^ ^^^ corner-stone laid on August 6th, 
the Hon. £. Spencer Pratt, American Minister to the Shah, presiding 
on the occasion and making a brief address. It is to be noted with 
gratitude that the work is progressing without interference on the part 
of the local authorities, and that a gift of 20,000 bricks has been made 
by the brother of the Prime Minister. Meanwhile work has been 
prosecuted at the dispensary as usual, 4,237 prescriptions having been 
issued during the year. It is to be regretted that the religious work 
connected with this department has not been prominent, as it has not 
been thought best to provoke Mussulman prejudice by systematic 
religious instruction. It is expected that the opening of the hospital 
will make a new departure in this direction, as provision will be made 
not only for stated religious services, but for such other Christian 
effort as is possible with indoor patients. In this work, both medical 
and spiritual, Mary J. Smith, M.D., a recent graduate of one of the 
Chicago Medical Colleges, is henceforth to be associated with Dr. 
Torrence. 

Hamadan Station, 

The distracting elements which had disturbed the church at this station 
for some time have happily disappeared, and two very delightful com- 
munion seasons were held during the yean That observed in July 
was preceded by a week of special services which proved to be refresh- 
ing and helpful both to the missionaries and the church. Nine were 
received on confession of faith during the year, 3 of them being from 
the Faith Hubbard Girls' School, and one from the Boys' High-School. 
This church, like that at Teheran, has felt the blighting curse of the 
wine trade. After years of patient and prayerful effort, the session 
was constrained to dismiss four of the members during the year because 
of their connection with this trade. Three of these still continue to 
attend divine services, and it is hoped that the discipline they are 
undergoing may work to their eternal welfare. Only one Mussulman 
appears as yet on the roll of the church, but there are several who 
give good evidence of a change of heart, and who will probably confess 
Christ in the near future. The Sabbath-school numbers 150, with an 
average attendance of 121, including many of the members of the 
church. During the absence of the Shah in Europe many of the 
soldiers were off duty and attended worship during the summer in large 
numbers. The report mentions with gratitude that entire freedom has 
been enjoyed in proclaiming the Gospel both in public and pri- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1^2 EASTERN PERSIA— HAMADAN. . 

i^ate, and that Moslems have attended these services without interfer- 
ence. 

Mr. Hawkes has preached statedly in the Jewish quarter on Satur- 
day evening, the Jewish Sabbath, and has also given brief expository 
lectures on the lesson at the close of the Sunday-school service which 
is held Sunday morning. 

Educational, — ^The want of uniformity in language is a serious hin- 
drance to this branch of the work, as it also is to the direct proclamation 
of the Gospel. At the close of the Boyi High-School on July i6th, ex- 
ercises were held in Arabic, Persian, Chaldee, Armenian, and English. 
Eighty-four pupils have been enrolled, with an average attendance of 
60, 8 being in the boarding department. Eleven of these were re- 
ceived from the Faith Hubbard School, having become too large to be 
associated with the girls. Of the number enrolled, 21 are Armenians, 
7 Mussulmans, and the rest Jews. It is worthy of note, as indicating 
growing favor on the part of the authorities, that the grandson of the 
present Governor, who has been a private pupil of the mission since 
April, 1889, has taken his place as a scholar in the school. The 
Governor is one of the fifty sons of Fet Ali Shah, and has been a warm 
friend of the mission during his term of office. It is in this school 
that Mr. Hawkes holds the preaching service in the Jewish quarter, 
already referred to, and where a Sabbath-school of 30 is conducted 
under the superintendency of Dr. Alexander. 

The Faith Hubbard School opened with 83 names enrolled, of 
whom '^i were boarders. The system of early marriages and of with- 
drawing girls from school for other reasons, has made it necessary to 
insist that all girls received into the school shall remain until they are 
at least sixteen years of age. The report from the pen of Miss C. G. 
Montgomery says : " Our family now numbers 48 (including teachers 
and servants). We say family^ for this cannot be simply a boarding- 
school as the name is generally understood. We try to give them the 
home training so sadly lacking in this land, and to take on ourselves 
the responsibilities their parents do not assume, indeed do not even 
realize. Receiving them all as given us by God to be trained for' Him, 
knowing that for each one we must give account, the burden of so 
many souls is not a light one." As intimated elsewhere, the cholera 
found its way into the school, claiming one of the pupils as its victim. 
This led to the closing of the school for a number of weeks, but on 
reopening it was found that most of the pupils returned. 

The boys' Saturday morning prayer-meeting has been continued with 
great success, and has widened its circle of influence, including now 
not only the boarders in the house, but a number of the day scholars, 
who attend the high-school, making 30 who came to the services 
regularly. Grateful mention is made of the only Moslem girl in the 
school, who when she entered was a sincere follower of the false 
prophet, with all the characteristic hatred, of the Mohammedan toward 
the name of Christian ; now she has expressed a wish to be baptized 
and to be enrolled as a follower of Christ, and her life gives good 
evidence of the change which she professes. In addition to the three 
mentioned elsewhere as having confessed Christ during the year, 12 of 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



.feASTERN PERSIA — HAMAD AN. 1 83 

the girls of this school have united with the church since the report 
was prepared. 

The school in the Jewish quarter for girls, begun by Mrs. Alexander 
six years ago, has continued with varying success, the illness of teach- 
ers or the outbursts of fanaticism on the part of the people operating 
against it In addition to instruction in Persian and Hebrew the chil- 
dren'have been taught to sew and knit, substantial accomplishments ot 
which the Jewish women know but little. At the Christmas exam- 
ination of the Faith Hubbard School a class of Jewish girls was taken 
to the Armenian quarter to be examined and receive the usual gifts. 
This gave great offense to the Jews, and the girls were at once taken 
from the school, so that it became necessary to close it for several 
weeks. Just before the appearance of the cholera in November the 
school had been reopened with a roll of 25. 

The woik among the women has been prosecuted with encourage- 
ment during the year. The women's prayer-meeting, which has been 
sustained for seven years, had an attendance of about 50 girls and 
women, the number of Armenian women being much larger than last 
year, with a good attendance of Moslem women. Mrs. Hawkes and 
Mrs. Alexander conducted a prayer- meeting for women in the Jewish 
quarter some two months until the women were forbidden to attend by 
their husbands, through the interference of an impostor. These two 
ladies have also done much house-to-house visiting in company with 
their husbands, and all the ladies of the mission have followed the 
custom of calling at certain seasons of the year, and in this way have 
done something toward the breaking down of prejudice and the opening 
of the way for the Gospel. 

Daily services were held for the girls and women during the second 
week of November, the time designated by the General Assembly for 
Simultaneous Meetings. Miss Montgomery has continued her class of 
young men and boys, which has afforded her many precious oppor- 
tunities for speaking a word for Christ. 

Medical, — Dr. Alexander reports a total of 6,000 patients treated dur- 
ing the year, fully one-half of them being from the villages around Hama- 
dan, varying in distance from two hours to three or four days. The doc- 
tor says : " I find our best work is among those who come from without 
the city. They take the medicine with less trouble and listen better 
to the Gospel." 

The most pressing need is felt for larger accommodations. The 
present waiting-room, where most of the patients are seen, is not large 
enough for holding religious services while the physician is busy with 
his work. For lack of better accommodation during the summer sev- 
eral patients turned the doctor's yard into a hospital, the weather being 
warm and dry. The report says : ** They did very well — indeed better 
than most patients who have respectable homes, for here we could 
give them the medicines as they required, and keep their friends from 
spoiling our work, and it was very much easier to tell them about the 
Saviour than those who came during the rush of the mornings." Med- 
ical work has been extended to the village of Sheverine, near the city, 
the physician spending two afternoons a week in a branch dispensary. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1 84 EASTERN PERSIA — STATISTICS. 

Dr. Alexander also made frequent visits to Bahare, a town some six or 
eight miles from Hamadan, with a population of about 6,000. During 
the summer he and Mrs. Alexander made several visits to Kurzara, a 
village 28 miles east of the city. A medical tour was also made to 
Sultanabad, a place of 20,000 inhabitants, and, by special invita- 
tion of the Amir, to Kinnanshah to consult with the physician of that 
official. The doctor remained there nine days, and although his 
patient died, he has found in the son, who has succeeded his father, a 
warm friend. Mirza Said and Mirza Yakob, medical assistants, made 
an extended tour among the villages during the year. They took with 
them two boxes, one filled with Bibles and the other with medicines. 
As the tour was made in the winter season when there was deep snow, 
it was found difficult to go from village to village. The need of a 
hospital grows more imperative as the months go by. The amount 
asked for this purpose by Dr. Alexander is modest, amounting to about 
$2,000, It is earnestly hoped that the Board may be able to nijeet 
this demand, or that some friend of medical missions will count it a 
privilege to furnish the means for the equipment so essential to effective 
service for Christ. 

Statistics for Eastern Persia, 

Ordained missionaries 5 

Medical missionaries (^one lady) 3 

Sing^le lady missionanes 6 

Married lady missionaries 7 

Ordained natives 3 

Licentiates 3 

Native teachers, male 13 

" " female 8 

Churches 3 

Communicants 143 

Added during the year 15 

Bo>'s in boarding-sdiool 54 

Girls ** »» 118 

Boys in day-school 174 

Girls " 118 

Student for ministry i 

■"' Total number of pupils 46^ 

Number of schools 

Pupils in Sabbath-school 386 

Patients treated 10,337 

Contributions $404 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MISSION IN SIAM. 

Pangkok : on the River Meinam, 35 miles from its moath ; occupied as a mission 
station, 1840 to 1844, suid from 1847 ^o ^^ present time; missionairy laborers — Rev. 
Messrs. E. Wachter, C. A. Bergfer, T. Heyward Hayes, M.D., J. A. Eakin, J. P Dun- 
lap, and their wives ; Miss Edna Cole ; one native licentiate preacher ; seven native 
Christian teachers. 

Fetch ABU REE : on the western side of the Gulf of Siam, eighty-five miles southwest 
of Bangkok ; occupied as a mission station in 1861 ; missionary laborers— Rev. Messrs. 
E. P. Dunlap, W. G. McClure, and their wives ; Benjamin B. Paddock, M.D., Misses 
Mary L. Cort and Miss Jennie M. Small ; one Bible-woman ; three licentiates ; fourteen 
native teachers. 

Ouistatums: Bangkaboon, Paktalay, Tharua Banphai, Ban Laam, and other places. 

Ratburee : occupied as a mission station in 1889 ; missionary laborers — ^James B. 
Thompson, M.D., and wife, and Rev. Charles E. Eckels ; one licentiate. 

In this country : Rev. Messrs. E. P. Dunlap and E. Wachter and their wives, and 
Mrs. T. H. Hayes. On furlough: Rev. C. A. Berger and wife. Resigned: B. P. 
Paddock, M.D. 

The working force of the mission has been greatly weakened by the 
removal of a number of workers, and their places only partially filled 
by new recruits with limited experience in mission work ; still there is 
much of interest to report. 

Again, at the opening of the new year, the staff of missionary workers 
has been sadly decreased. Rev. and Mrs. Berger, owing to continued 
fever almost from their arrival on the field, have been compelled to 
withdraw. Mrs. Wachter and Mrs. Hays, through trying sickness, 
have had to take leaves of absence. Dr. Paddock has also withdrawn 
from the work. This weakening of the staff of missionaries makes an 
irresistible appeal to others to join this very needy and attractive field. 
The present small force will be unable to endure that enervating 
climate and accomplish the great amount of work that is laid upon 
them. 

Ratburee Station, 

We are glad to report that the third mission station of Siam was 
founded during the year at the city of Ratburee. Dr. and Mrs. Thomp- 
son and Rev. Chas. Eckels, accompanied by the native preacher, Lien 
Soo, on August 2d took possession of the property granted by the 
Siamese Government. Through the Providence of God this new 
station was started, and a comfortable brick dwelling occupied, at a 
cost to the mission of less than $500. 

Rev. Charles Eckels writes that " the first attempt at holding a pub- 
lic religious service was on Sabbath, August nth. Dr. Thompson 
and a native preacher have held services every Sabbath since in the 
room used as a dispensary. The native helper has also been sent to 
preach several times at Bang Pa, at the home of Mee Same, Bible- 



Digitized by VjtOOQIC 



1 86 SIAM— BANGKOK. 

reader, in whose house Jive have a small school. A number of people 
have come inquiring about * the new doctrine.' To these, as well as 
to those coming for medical treatment, Dr. Thompson has proclaimed 
the true God and Jesus Christ whom He hath sent. 

"There seems to be a great desire on the part of the people 
of the place to have a school established for their children. On 
every hand we are met with the question : * When will it begin ? * 
This, with the conditions under which the use of the place is granted, 
has determined us to make an effort in this line as soon as possible 
after the first of the year. Ratburee is now in postal and telegraphic 
communication with Bangkok and Petchaburee. The station is a grand 
centre for evangelistic work. We beg that God's people may continu- 
ally make mention of it in their prayers. According to your faith be 
it unto you." 

Churches, 

Bangkok, — Regular services have been kept up in the First and Sec- 
ond churches of Bangkok. To the First church only four were added 
during the year. There was no revival, but a painful indifference on 
the part of many members was manifested by absenting themselves 
from church services. Other departments of the work have pressed 
so heavily upon the pastor that he has been unable to visit his people. 
Their residences have been changed and so they could not be properly 
cared for. For many years the pastor of the First church has thus 
been unable to look after his widely-scattered flock. Owing to the 
small number of missionaries, it has been almost a rule that the church, 
printing-office, school, and all the secular work, falls to the care of one 
man. The Sabbath-school of this church, although not large, is very 
interesting, a number of the members serving as good, efficient teach, 
ers. The women of the church, through the leadership of Mrs. Wach- 
ter, were formed into a prayer and mission sewing-circle, working for 
the missionary cause at large. The removal of the Christian training- 
school to Sumray will no doubt enlarge the influence of this church. 
While the past year has been one of many discouragements, yet when 
we remember that this church has furnished the mission some of the 
ablest and most consistent native preachers, colporteurs, and devoted 
Christian school-teachers, we are encouraged, and believe that through 
the blessing of God and the consecrated labors of His servants it will 
yet become a much greater power for good. 

In the Second church, Bangkok, Sabbath services, Sunday-school, 
and daily morning services have been conducted throughout the year. 
The services have for the greater part been conducted by Nai Nan, 
a consecrated native preacher, who for more than 15 years has labored 
zealously and wisely for the Master. He has given to the press some 
of our best literature for general evangelistic work. At times we have 
depended upon him to hold different stations, and he has not failed us. 
For years he has labored for one-fifth the salary he could have com- 
manded from European business houses. This year he requested the 
mission to reduce his salary $1.20 per month. The mission replied 
that while cognizant of the reasons which moved him to make this re- 



Digitized by VjtOOQIC 




£.C.BEil[3»tM» 4<t»UMji«r^««veii>t «A? PlJeUSHlFt, 






1 88 SIAM— FETCH ABU REE. 

quest, and his self-denial in doing so, they deemed it unwise for him 
to make any greater sacrifice. Surely there is encouragement from 
this case to put forth more earnest effort to raise up a native ministry, 
and also labor that the power of the Gospel may be thus made mani. 
fest in the lives of others. 

Petchaburee, — There are five churches located in Petchaburee and 
its Province. All the ordinary services have been sustained at the 
Petchaburee church, as well as at the outposts. The preaching has 
been done by Rev. W. G. McClure and three native licentiates. One 
of the latter was not engaged during the last five months. " The conduct 
of the native helpers has in some instances not been all that could be de- 
sired, yet they did much good work. The attendance at Petchaburee has 
been fairly good ; at the other churches, painfully small, partly because 
we have not been able to look after them properly. Discipline has 
been administered in several cases, and it has become necessary to 
seriously consider suitable modes of dealing wisely and justly with 
evils natural to the Siamese, but which, if not counteracted, must work 
great harm to the churches." There have been but two accessions 
during the year ; others applying were placed on probation. Contri- 
butions from the churches were $82.55 ; ^^ox\\ Sabbath- school, $22.50 ; 
Women's Missionary Society, $22.05; Christmas offering, $32.86. 
Of the missionary society connected with this church Miss Cort 
writes : ** The Women's Home and Foreign Missionary Society held 
a number of popular meetings for the benefit of China, India, Africa, 
Japan, Corea, Persia, and Syria. Next year we hope to reorganize 
and include the whole church, men, women, and children, in our home 
and foreign work." This church has suffered a great loss in the death 
of " Pan Ang," who had been a consistent member for more than 22 
years. Through the perusal of Christian books, he became a believer 
before coming in contact with the missionaries. He was a man of in- 
fluence in his village, and had the joy of seeing a son and daughter, 
grandchildren, and other relatives embrace Christianity. He was a 
man importunate in prayer. At times, when the villagers were given 
up to noisy heathen ceremonies and drunken feasts, after protesting 
against these evils, he would walk five miles to the mission compound 
and request a quiet place in which to enjoy praying unto God. His 
home was always open for religious service, and he earnestly urged 
the villagers to come and hear the Gospel. He was a Bible student, 
and in his declining years could repeat many precious stories of Bible 
saints, and especially of the Saviour, which he had memorized before 
the infirmities of age came upon him. His faith was unwavering to 
the last, and he died rejoicing in the Saviour. 

The Press. 

This department of work has been under the superintendence of 
Rev. E. Wachter. A new hand-cutting machine has been purchased. 
Owing to the fact that the type are very old and worn there was a 
decrease in the number of pages printed last year by 74,000. Should 
the American Bible Society continue printing the Bible at our press, 
the purchase of a new font will be necessary. The books have been 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SIAM— ITINERATING. 1 89 

made more attractive by improvement in covers, and this in part 
accounts for the steady increase in sales, which will be seen from the 
following : 

Pages Tracts Scriptures Total 

printed, distributed, distributed. distributed, 

1887 977.000 3,148 3,566 6,714 

1888 I1I33.400 6,898 2,846 9,744 

1889 1,040,190 8,540 4,347 12,887 

Before the year 1887 all books were given away ; but the American 
Bible Society and the Siam Mission joined in inaugurating a new sys- 
tem, viz., the selling of books at a nominal price. This plan has in- 
creased the efficiency of our colporteurs, and has not decreased materi- 
ally the distribution of books. It has secured a greater number of inter- 
ested readers, and better care of the books disposed of. The receipts 
from sales have been sufficient to pay expenses of colporteur work 
and leave a small balance for printing. The mission are rejoiced at 
the arrival of Rev. John Carrington and family, agent of the American 
Bible Society, among them. They will, no doubt, do true missionary 
work, although not members of our mission. Mr. Carrington will 
take charge of the Bible work in Siam. A permanent committee to 
examine MSS. and suggest matter new and old for publication has 
been appointed. The mission repeats its urgent request " that the 
Board seriously consider the matter of sending out a layman to man- 
age the business of the press and kindred work — a consecrated Chris- 
tian, with good business qualifications and knowledge of printing.'' An 
additional press is urgently asked for and greatly needed. Mission- 
aries were the pioneer printers in Siam. Now, presses, native and for- 
eign,, are multiplying, publishing reading matter of all kinds, save 
religious^ and much that is positively injurious, being vile to the ex- 
treme, whilst ours is the only press exclusively a fountain of evangel, 
ical truth. Its efficiency should be so increased as to make it a mighty 
power in publishing a knowledge of the Saviour and in guiding aright 
the seeker after the pure truth. 

Itinerating, — ^The lack of men and inexperience of those in the field 
have, in a measure, compelled neglect of this very important part of the 
work. There are large districts of Siam as yet unreached by the preach- 
er of the Word. There are multitudes who do not know even the name 
of our Redeemer. We should have men who, able to deny themselves 
the comforts of home, would devote their energies wholly to this work. 
Bangkok is a grand centre for the itinerant missionary. One man 
could be kept busy on each of the four large rivers. The east and the 
west coast each needs a missionary. *' Natives of the west coast 
have sought missionaries at Petchaburee and urged them to go and 
teach on that coast, but their hands were too full at the station.'' 
There is great need at Petchaburee of an ordained missionary to take up 
this branch of the work. Rev, A. Willard Cooper has been reappointed 
for this station, to return there this autumn. Other appointments are 
under consideration. Miss Cort writes that she '* has made fourteen 
tours during the year to the villages in the Petchaburee District, hold- 
ing services everywhere, sometimes spending two or three days teach- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1 90 SIAM— EDUCATIONAL. 

ing, conducting women's meetings and bun day-schools, etc. I find 
this hard but pleasant work, and again ask for a helper to go out with 
me." The mission joins in this request that two young ladies be sent 
to Petchaburee ; then Miss Cort can give herself more fully to work 
among the women, a work for which she longs. Miss Cooper is 
already under appointment to go out with her brother. The mission- 
aries at Ratburee have taken one tour along the Meekling River, reach- 
ing one large town and several villages, doing medical and colporteur 
work, and were accompanied by a native preacher. They disposed 
of many books, and report that '* the people seemed kindly disposed 
and ready to buy both medicines and books." A greater part of the 
itinerating has been carried on by the native colaborers. A faithful 
colporteur has been engaged all the year in and about Bangkok. The 
report says : " He has done excellent work ; was conscientious in the 
use of his time and opportunities. He taught much, and sold several 
thousand copies of books in the country." Another layman, who has 
written several able and popular tracts (contributing the same to the 
cause), has also made good use of opportunities for teaching, especially 
the higher class of Siamese. In his business he travels extensively. 
His literary work and teaching are given freely. Two earnest colpor- 
teurs from Petchaburee have also gone far and near. During one tour 
they taught and disposed of books, in sixty villages. Another, a stu- 
dent for the ministry, has labored along the west coast of Siam, 
chiefly in his native province, 500 miles southwest of Petchaburee, a 
province of 230,000 male adults. Only by reinforcing the mission can 
this great work of itinerating be effectually carried on. 

Educational Work. 

Bangkok, — ^This branch of the work is believed now to be on a better 
basis than at any time in the history of the mission. This is partly ow- 
ing to the increased number devoted to educational work, and partly to 
the establishment of the Christian Training-school, the purpose of 
which is best expressed in Rev. J. A. Eakin's report of the Christian 
High-School : ** We plan to make the school not only the nursery of 
the church, but also the place of training for workers in the church. 
It is expected hereafter to have all the schools under the care of the 
mission parts of one system, mutually helping each other, the schools 
at the outstations sending students to the High-School and the High- 
School sending out teachers and candidates for the ministry, to be 
trained under the immediate care and oversight of the missionaries in 
the practical work at the outstations. By this means, with the divine 
blessing, we hope to be able to train up in time an aggressive and 
reliable native ministry." By action of the mission the boarding de- 
partnient of the boys' school at Sumray was transferred to the Chris- 
tian High-School. This change brought twenty boys to the school. 
There was an encouraging religious interest among the pupils during 
the year. The students have been diligent in committing Scripture 
verses and catechism. The Christian High-School will be removed to 
Sumray. ** By this move a close and more vital connection will be 
established between the church and school." 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SIAM— EDUCATIONAL. I9I 

The transferring of the boarding department of the boys' school to 
the High-School and making Sumray a day-school did not diminish 
the attendance, fifty- five boys being enrolled as day pupils. " The 
native teacher was faithful' to his duties and did good work in the 
school. Being an earnest Christian he conducted prayers at the 
opening of the school daily, and used his influence to induce the boys 
to attend Sunday-school and church services. He deserves high 
praise, and the successful working of the school is chiefly due to his 
efforts. We have endeavored to work up the school toward the point 
of self-support by requiring a small tuition fee. By this means the 
expense of each pupil, in excess of tuition fees received, has been 
$1.80 for the year. This includes teacher's salary and all incidentals. 
The pupils bought their own books and school materials." 

.Girls* Boarding' School at Bangkok. — This school has been doing 
good work in all departments. Miss Edna Cole gives the following 
interesting statement in her annual report : 

*' In July a little princess, daughter of the king's brother, was added 
to our family for a term of three years. Then followed several other 
children from noble families. The school now numbers forty-eight, 
and for the past three months has averaged forty-four. 

" A kitchen and dining-room have been erected, with very little ex- 
pense to the Board. The money was principally furnished by the 
sewing department, and special contributions from a few friends. The 
sewing department has been unusually industrious and successful. 
Without the money obtained by it we must have closed the year in 
debt. The proceeds of the bazar held at the Royal Garden, December 
4th, were nearly $200, while the income from school work durif^g the 
year was more than $300. Only those who have superintended such 
a department can fully appreciate the labor involved in planning and 
carr>ing it all out to a successful issue. 

" One fact deserves note. The Board's appropriation for this school 
is $525. The food alone costs $495. This leaves but $30 for salaries 
of Siamese instructors, servants' wages, and all incidental expenses ! 
And yet the kitchen and dining-room were built, and no debt incurred, 
for which profound gratitude is felt." • • 

The Sunday-school ip this institution sends ^^15 as a Christmas offer- 
ing to the Board. 

The mission desires to make this a first-class seminary. This end 
will involve sending two or three young ladies to be associated with 
Miss Cole. A committee was appointed to consider the propriety of 
making Wang-Lang exclusively a station for work for women and girls. 

Educational Work at Petchaburee, — Miss Cort has had charge of 
twelve day-schools, with an enrollment of 232 pupils. Three of these 
schools were organized during the year, one at Paktalay, where there 
is a church. The purpose is to try to open a school for each church. 
These twelve' schools are located in the city of Petchaburee, and in the 
villages of the province. The day-schools have been visited regularly, 
and religious services held in them, the audiences varying from ten to 
eighty. Mr. McCIure writes: "These schools are undoubtedly doing 
a good work, though but little compared with the great need." 

13 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



192 SIAM — MEr)ICAL. 

The Boys' Boarding-School and the Howard Industrial School for 
Girls have been under Miss Small's care. Twenty-eight boys were 
enrolled in the boys' school. Three were sons of the Governor of 
Petchaburee. Three promising boys have* been sent to the Christian 
High-School, Bangkok. The oldest pupil has entered the hospital at 
Petchaburee to study medicine. He with one of the other boys declared 
their faith in Jesus, applied for church membership, and were placed 
on probation. This school has been placed under Prof. £akin*s care, 
and will be a feeder to the Christian High-School, Bangkok. 

The Howard Jtidustrial School. — Thirty-seven girls were enrolled ; 
twenty-six of them were boarders. A new dming-hall and kitchen were 
built, and new furniture, maps, globe, and sewing-machine were placed 
in the school-room. Two of the girls applied for church membership, 
and were placed on probation. The girls have been studious, and ha\e 
improved in their manners. A Band of King's Daughters was organized 
in the school. Some of the Band — ^bright young Christians— joined M iss 
Small in going from house to house teaching the precious things con- 
cerning Jesus. Frequent visits were made to the Governor's home in 
order to read and explain the Word to his daughters, who were once in 
the school. Miss Small writes as follows : '* Miss Cort and 1 have room 
in our hearts and home for more workers, and we hope to see them 
soon. Siam needs many more earnest workers." 

Training Department for Teachers and Bible-workers. — Miss Cort 
spent five months of the year doing all the teaching in this depart- 
ment. Twelve married women were enrolled. The studies were in 
the Bible. " Evidences of Christianity," Shorter Catechism, names of 
our Lord, a poetic Life of Christ, ** Pilgrim's Progress," and practice in 
telling Bible-stories. One aim of this department is, as Miss Cort 
says, *'To give teaching a more honorable and desirable position in 
church work. As these women all earn their own living, I had to grant 
them a small allowance for their time. The entire expense of the 
training department has been $34.62. When one poor woman re- 
ceived her portion she returned one-third of it, saying : * I will con- 
secrate it to God.' The pupils in all the schools joined in celebrat- 
ing Christmas ; each one brought an offering — some brought money, 
others fruit, eggs, and rice. We need hardly assure you that all our 
schools are thoroughly evangelistic, the Bible being the chief book in 
use." 

Medical Work, 

Bangkok, — The Bangkok Hospital and the Mission Dispensary have 
been under the care of Dr. Hays, ably assisted by Mrs. Hays and a native 
Christian physician. The Hospital has been largely supported by the 
King of Siam, and, owing to the liberal aid of a Siamese general, the 
Dispensary has had no rent to pay. The latter has been a feeder to 
the Hospital, and a means of furnishing funds for carrying on the 
medical work. The report shows that the medicines sold were three 
times the value of those sold in 1888. While there has been some 
decrease in the number of patients treated at the Dispensary, this has 
been more than compensated by an increase of 60 per cent, in the 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SIAM— MEDICAL. I93 

9umber of patients treated at the Bangkok Hospital. The whole 
number of patients treated during the year is 8,603. The Hospital 
has grown in favor with both the European and native community. 
"The wards furnish a grand field for Christian effort. The poor 
people are sick and sad and lonely, and welcome, oh ! so heartily, 
every visitor, and are ready, to listen and ponder over everything told 
them. As one poor fellow said to the missionary : * Every day you 
come to see nie my heart grows so big (spreading out his hand) ; but 
when there is a day you do not come my heart is as little as that ' 
(putting the tips of his fingers together)." The evangelistic work car- 
ried on in the wards has been done by Dr. and Mrs. Hays alone. 
Daily morning service has been held in the Hospital, and preaching 
services every Sabbath, which the missionaries, with Dr. McFarland 
and Mrs. Ed. McFarland and the native preachers, have conducted. 
Dr. Hays writes : **We again entreat that this grand field may not be 
left in the hands of myself and wife another y6ar, but that we may have 
help, so that every opportunity for preaching Christ may be embraced." 
The number of patients treated at the mission Dispensary is 2,830 ; 
and at Bangkok Hospital, 5,773. 

It will be well at this point to mentionlwo things : (i). Through Dr. 
Hays' influence the Siamese Government is sending six chos&n youth 
to the United States to be educated in our medical science, and return 
to practice and teach the same in Siam. Dr. Hays will make a flying 
visit to the United States for the purpose of bringing the boys, the 
entire expense to be borne by the Government. They will be placed 
for the present under the care of Rev. Eugene P. Dunlap, who, on 
account of his ill-health, is still detained in this country. While the 
Siamese Government has educated a number ot youth in Europe, this 
will be their first effort in this direction in this country. Great good 
may result from this move. 

(2). The Government of Siam has built two hospitals and a dispen- 
sary in Bangkok ; one of these (the largest) is located just back of the 
Wang Lang Station, the other in the heart of the city, not far from the 
palace. These hospitals, together with other work in the same line, 
have been offered by the Siamese Government to the care of our 
medical missionary, Dr. Hays, all the expense of the work to be borne 
by the Government, and no restrictions placed on teaching Christianity 
in the hospitals. This, we believe, opens a wide door for evangelistic 
work. And the mission, regarding the offer, resolved as follows: 
"That the mission sanction Dr. Hays' proposal to enter the service 
of the Siamese Government, he remaining in nominal connection with 
the Siam mission and the Board." Although the Government is to 
pay Dr. Hays a liberal salary, it is his own proposition to pay the same 
over to the mission, retaining the ordinary salary of a medical mission- 
ary. The Government also authorizes Dr. Hays to secure a medical 
missionary to join him in the work. It would be well to have an or- 
dained missionary free to work right along with the medical mission- 
aries in this great city. 

Petchaburee. — The medical work has continued as usual ; 4,327 pa- 
tients were treated. Of these 659 were vaccinated. All classes h:n e 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1 94 SI AM— CONCLUSION. 

been treated from far and near. Among the patients was the ex^ 
Minister of Foreign Affairs and several of his family, the Governor 
of Petchaburee and members of his family. The Governor has shown 
much interest in the medical work, and has requested -that the doctor 
take one of his sons a^ a medical student. The native student assist- 
ant has done good work, not only in direct medical, but in spiritual 
work as well. One new student was also taken under instruction. He 
is very promising, and is also deeply interested in the Christian religion. 
He applied for church membership. Regular evening services have 
been held in the Hospital daily, conducted either by a native preacher 
or the first assistant in the Hospital, and the patients have always been 
requested to attend all services in the chapel. One indoor patient 
united with the church. The indebtedness of the Hospital has been 
discharged, and a small balance left in the treasury. Owing to Dt, 
Paddock's return to this country, there is imperative need of a medical 
missionary at the station: > 

Mr. McClure writes : " The interest of our work requires the con- 
stant presence of a medical missionary, especially since we have a 
hospital and dispensary well established ; and then it is never safe for 
a company of missionaries t<f remain without a- physician. Twenty- 
four to forty-eight hours would be required to get a physician from one 
of the other stations, even under the most favorable circumstances." 

Ratburee. — It is a pleasure to present the first report from this new 
station. Dr. Thompson says : " We began Our regular medical work 
here August 17th ; 116 cases have been treated at the station, and a 
good number of patients treated in their homes. A tour was also 
taken along the Meekling River, during which 109 cases were treated." 
While waiting to enter the house at Ratburee Dr. I'hompson labored 
in Bangkok, treating 233 new cases and making 167 outvisits ; whole 
number of new cases is 458 and of old cases is 471. The beginning 
of medical work at Ratburee is promising. " We have aimed to give 
at least a word of Gospel truth to each patient, and a small tract 
which has been prepared for the purpose. Our building was put in 
good sanitary condition ; one of the lower rooms has been fitted for a 
dispensary s^nd another for in-patients." Dr. Thompson further adds : 
" When we have become fully settled we hope that the evangelistic 
will be the most prominent feature of our work. The people at Rat- 
buree are easily accessible, and for the most part welcome our coming. 
Our closing word is that we have been permitted to spend some most 
delightful hours in telling the old, old story. May the Holy Ghost 
water the seed sown ! " 

, Conclusion, 

There is scarcely a field in which our Church i^ hboring where 
the missionary has greater liberty. It is fully open to aggressive 
work for the Master; missionaries are excluded from no part of 
the land. One of them writes that when about to take a tour in 
provinces before unreached, the Prime Minister of Siam voluntarily 
gave him a letter, bearing the Government seal, to the Governors of 
the several provinces through which he expected to travel. The letter 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SIAM — STATISTICS. 



195 



was about as follows : " The bearer of this letter is an American mis- 
sionary going down through your several provinces for the purpose of 
teaching the Christian religion, disposing of Christian literature, and 
healing the sick. Place no obstacle in his way. If the people wish 
to adopt his teachings or receive his books, forbid them not. Permit 
him to pass easily through your provinces, and, in so far as you can, 
minister to the comfort of his family journeying with him." 

Rev. Mr. McClure writes as follows : " The doors here, and indeed 
in all parts of Siam, are wide open. Who will enter in and occupy ? ' 

Statistics, 

Ordained missionaries. 7 

Mecical missionaries 3 

Wives of missionaries 8 

Unmarried lady missionaries 3 

Native licentiates 5 

Student for the ministry i 

Native helpers ,. 22 

Churches 7 

tf embership 392 

Added during the year 6 

Number of schools 17 

Boys and girls in day-schools 310 

Boys and girls in boarding-schools 102 

Contributions $269 







^ 


IS* 

> 


i 


^. 


•^' 


4* 


•-I 






§ 


^ 




J- 


.^ 


;§ 


«0^ 


...^ATISTICS OF THE CHURCHES IN THE 




«> s 





i| 


^ 


1 

«0 




■'^1 


Presbytery of Siam. 




^•§ 


Ss 


•§ 


■S| 


^•§ 




1 


1 


1 





1 


1 


1 


p 




^ 


^ 


^ 


K, 


^ 


^ 







I 




2 


«6 




2 


50 


?56 

54 

159 


2d •' " 


I 




T 


39 
153 


I 




Jl 


Petchaburee 


2 






1 


5 


Bangkaboon 


I 






43 




I 






Ban^Laam 


1 






17 


I 




. , 




Paktalay 


I 






31 








.. 


Thiirua Banphai 




.. 




33 


•• 


2 


•• 










Totals 


7 


3 


3 


393 


3 


TO 


155 


$269 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MISSION IN SOUTH AMERICA. 
Mission in the Republic of Colombia. 

Bogota : the capital of the country ; situated on an elevated plain ; 4* north latitude ; 
climate, temperate ; population about 90,000 ; elevation about 900 feet ; occupied as a 
mission station in 18^6 ; missionary laborers — Rev. and Mrs. M. E. Caldwell, Miss Maria 
B. Franks ; four native teachers ; one native helper. 

Barranquilla (Bar-ran-keel-ya) : near the northern seacoast at the mouth of the 
Magdalena River ; 12* N. ; occupied as a station in May, x883 ; missionaries— Rev. and 
Mrs. T. H. Candor ; population, 30,000. 

Medellin : population, 50,000 ; occupied October, 1889 ; situated on tableland at 
an elevation of 5,000 feet, between the two great rivers Magdalena and Canda, ten days 
north of Bogota ; missionaries. Rev. and Mrs. J. G. Touzeau ; i native helper. , 

The Republic of Colombia contains about 2,500,000 population. It 
lies between the equator and 1 2 degrees north latitude, and is the point 
of contact with North America, joined to it by the Isthmus of Panama. 
The waters of the Pacific wash its western shores and its great rivers 
empty into the Caribbean Sea on the north. Its three stations are 
(i) Bogota, the Mountain Capital; (2) Barranquilla (Bar-ran-keel-ya), 
the northern seaport ; (3) Medellin^ on the tableland between the 
other two stations. The language is Spanish. The religion of the 
people is Roman Catholic, which is held in rather light esteem by 
some, while by the large majority it is held in its most corrupt form — 
sometimes scarcely bearing any semblance of Christian faith. The 
more intelligent are driven by the corrupt teachings of their religious 
leaders into infidelity. The missionaries find the people generally 
ready to listen to the truth, and confident hope is expressed that the 
present beginnings of work will speedily grow into grand and symmet- 
rical proportions. 

Bogota. 

The work in this station has been subject to changes and sore dis- 
appointment. Rev. and Mrs. J. G. Touzeau occupied it for seven 
months of the year, until the arrival in August of Rev. and Mrs. Cald- 
well. Miss M. B. Franks continued her labors in the school for girls 
through the year. The cloud of sorrow that came upon Bogota came 
in like manner on Barranquilla. When Mr. Caldwell and family re- 
turned from the United States of America in August, 1889, they were 
accompanied by greatly needed reinforcements for Bogota and Bar- 
ranquilla — Prof. W. W. Findley and Miss Addie C. Ramsay. On 
their way both the new missionaries, Prof. Findley and Miss Ramsay, 
were exposed to the contagion of yellow fever. They arrived in Bar- 
ranquilla August 13th. The dreaded disease attacked Miss Ramsay 
in the home of her sister, Mrs. Candor, August 14th, and she died on 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 




from Oreenwlch. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



198 . COLOMBIA— BOGOTA. 

the 19th. On the 15th Prof. Findley was prostrated by the same dis- 
ease the day he had started with Mr. Caldwell and family on their 
journey up the Magdalena River on their way to Bogota. On the 
2xst, just two days after Miss Ramsay's death, Mr. Caldwell laid the 
fever.stricken body to rest on the banks of the stream, at the Port of 
Sogamoso.. before he had reached the end of his journey. It was a 
sad day for the missionary who had waited nine years for this associate 
in his work. Prof. Findley was specially fitted for the work to which 
he had consecrated himself. It is a mysterious providence that this 
young man's life should have ended just as he was about to enter upon 
his labors. The loud call for some one to take his place has not been 
unheeded, and it is expected that another missionary will go dunng 
this summer to take charge of the .work that has so long waited for 
him. Mr. Caldwell continued his sad journey up the river and over 
the mountains to a disappointed people in Bogota. Soon after that 
Mr. and Mrs. Touzeau set out for Medellin, their new station, leaving 
Mr. Caldwell alone to care for both school and church work. 

School Work. — Miss Franks was engaged during the greater part of 
the year in her school for girls with her usual degree of success. By 
previous arrangement she was to remove to Barranquilla as soon as 
her successor could be secured. It is greatly to be regretted that her 
health was such that she was obliged to hasten her departure early in 
the new year. This made it necessary for Mr. Caldwell to close the 
boarding department until another lady can be sent out. It is urged 
with good reason that two ladies should go to this important centre, 
not only to aid one another, but that in the trying climate at this high 
elevation a change when required may be obtafned without interrupt- 
ing the work of the school. It is believed that this will be the more 
economical plan. Mr. Caldwell, in speaking of the girls* school, says 
that " good music is highly appreciated. Many people are attracted 
by the service of song. Bogota is sometimes called the city of pianos." 
These Heavy instruments must be carried on men's shoulders sixty 
miles over rough mountain roads ! Their own songs are weird and 
doleful, and yet they are glad to hear our bright tunes in hymns of 
praise. The pupils who go out from the school carry their religious 
instruction home with them. When Mr. Caldwell was in Honda on a 
tour, he found a pupil who in the institution had not come out on the 
Lord's side. But there in her home she had her Bible and gathered 
all the family to attend prayers with the missionary, herself joining in 
them. New openings for the Gospel are sometimes made in this 
way. 

Church Work. — The congregations are large and encouraging, more 
of the artisan class are coming to the services, and there is an especial 
increase in the attendance of women. '^Some are always asking 
admission to the membership of the church." 

"Alejandro Gonzalez has been a constant and very -^'aluable helper 
during the past year. Oftentimes he has conducted the services of the 
church. He has sold many Bibles and other good books, and shows 
great zeal, patience, and perseverance as well as economy in trying to 
prepare himself for the ministry. He now expects, besides other 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COLOMBIA— BARRANQUILLA. I99 

mission work, to lielp in the Boys' School, and at the same time to 
study with Mr. Caldwell." 

**The Boys' School has opened with more than 60 pupils, and with 
liberal help would soon become, we think, a grand success. All the 
pupils enter the Bible-classes, and the Gospel is preached to them 
daily. There are about 50 little boys in one Bible-class, and we are 
sure that if the Christian people could see these bright faces, at times 
almost spellbound, with their eyes fixed on the minister, as he tells 
them Bible stories and talks to them about the Word of Life, a deeper 
interest would be taken in this school." 

While there is nominal freedom of conscience, the Government is in 
the hands of the Jesuits. The presence of evangelical missionaries is 
simply tolerated because of treaties. There is neither freedom of 
speech nor liberty of the press, and marriage is not legal unless per- 
formed before a priest. A Protestant minister has no legal right to 
marry his own people I 

The sum of $295 has been contributed by the church. 

Barranquilla, 

The first mention of this station was in last year's report. There 
has been no change in the number of missionaries stationed there. 
The laborers are Rev. and Mrs. T. H. Capdor. The helpers employed 
are Mr. Adam H. Erwin, Miss A. M. Duncan, and Miss Eugenia Des- 
moineaux. 

Schools, — Mr. A. H. Erwin, a gentleman of advancing years and 
extended experience in the country, conducts an excellent boys' school 
of 25 pupils. He receives $120 assistance from the mission. His 
school-house has been used as a chapel. It is desirable to continue the 
arrangement with Mr. Erwin and also hire an assistant teacher for 
$120, and thus be able to receive a larger number of pupils, and by so 
much increase the influence of the school. 

The Girls' School has been under the care of Mrs. Candor. Thirty 
pupils are on the rolls. Early in the year epidemic measles seri- 
ously interfered with work among children. Few houses escaped the 
disease in its deadly form. The school was obliged to close its doors 
for a short time in May. 

The last annual report speaks of the appointment of Miss Addie C. 
Ramsay, as promised, to aid Mrs. Candor in the Girls' School. This 
report records with great sorrow her early death so soon after her 
arrival at her sister's home. The disease from which she died, yellow 
fever, rendered it necessary to close the school again. Profound 
gratitude is felt because no one took the dreaded fever. Mr. Candor, 
in speaking of her death, says : " It seems a very strange providence, 
but faith does not ask an all- wise Father the reason why." Her death 
produced a profound impression in Barranquilla. The influence of it ^ 
in our country is still felt. It was expected that a suitable building 
would be selected for the Girls' School, in which she was to teach. 
Now, however, it is proposed to build a memorial school called by her 
name. The Woman's Board of Philadelphia has appropriated $1,000 
for this purpose^ and our Board has appropriated $2,000 toward it, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



200 COLOMBIA — MEDELLIN. 

guaranteeing $2,000 more in the new year to complete the required 
sum of $5,000 for this purpose. It is confidently expected that the 
pledged $2,000 will be given by tho^e whose hearts were so touched by 
the sad termination of Miss Ramsay's life. The need of another lady 
to take her place is strongly felt, and it is regarded as imperative that 
some one be sent as soon as possible. 

The school was resumed in October, and successfully carried on 
through the term. . The fees collected more than paid for the current 
expenses. Miss Duncan, the assistant teacher, a member of the 
church, was born in Barranquilla. She will continue her services. A 
larger attendance is promised another year. 

The Charity School has been under the care of an efficient native, 
Miss Eugenia Desmoineaux. The very poor have free instruction 
here, and are taught the Gospel of Jesus Christ. There is good ground 
for expecting that a great blessing will follow the work of these two 
schools, and that they will be nurseries for the church. 

Church Work, — The Barranquilla church was organized January 5, 
1889. Sixteen members were received during the year out of twenty- 
eight applicants. Three elders were ordained and three deacons set 
apart for their duties. 

Regular services were held at Mr. Candor's house and Mr. Erwin's 
school-room during the whole year, with an attendance varying from 
20 to 100. Two Sunday-schools were also maintained, with about 
40 pupils. The utter disregard of the people for the Lord's day makes 
it difficult as yet to secure very regular attendance. It is pleasant, 
however, to know that there is a growing interest which is full of 
encouragement. Mr. Candor says : " In the earnestness of the people 
as well as in their friendly actions, we see a higher hand than ours that 
can insure success." 

Evangelistic Work. — Mr. Candor was greatly hindered in his pur- 
pose to itinerate outside the city. The deadly epidemic, the sad 
affliction of the mission, and the failure to gain reinforcements, have 
kept him closely confined to work in the city. People who have come 
from the country to the services are very earnest in their desire to have 
churches organized in their towns. One of the elders is a promising 
candidate for a native helper, and will be taught and tried in evan- 
gelistic work. The surrounding towns and villages are an attractive 
field for the station to cultivate, and promises good returns. 

Meddlin, 

This new station is an important mterior city, wmcn was occupied 
for the first time in October, 1889, by Rev. and Mrs. J. G. Touzeau. 
It is the second city of Colombia in importance and in population. 
It contains a government mint. It is the centre of a large mining 
region. The people are called the Yankees of their country, and 
though they were reported to be unusually bigoted, yet no opposition 
was offered to the missionary. He secured a house and has held reg- 
ular services in it. The people have shown much interest in the new 
teaching, and have purchased many of his books and tracts. As the 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COLOMBIA— STATISTICS. 201 

prejudice of the people is broken down, the way for the Gospel will be 
opened, and blessed results may be expected. 

Mr. Touzeau reports his sales of Gospel literature : Total number of 
books and tracts sold, 1,355 ; given away, 1,350. 

Statistics of Colombia Mission, 

Stations 3 

Ordained missionaries 3 

Wives of missionaries 3 

Unmarried lady missionaiy i 

Native helpers, male 3 

** •' female 7 

Churches 2 

Communicants 104 

Added during the year 25 

Whole numl^r from the beginning 139 

Schools 4 

Girls in boarding-school 17 

Girls in day-school 74 

Boys in day-school , 45 

Total pupils 136 

Sabbath-schools 2 

Pupils in Sabbath-schools 116 

Student for the ministry 3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MISSION IN SYRIA, 

Beirut: Rev. Messrs. C. V. A. Van Dyck, D.D., M.D., H. H. Jessup, D.D., Wm. 
W. Eddy, D.D., James S. Dennis, D.D., Samuel Jessup, and their wives ; Mrs. GenUd 
F. Dale, Miss E. D. Everett, Miss Emilia Thomson, and Miss Alice S. Baxfaer. 

Abeih : Rev. Messrs. Wm. Bird, Theo. S. Pond, O. J. Hardin, and their wives ; Miss 
Emily G. Bird. 

SiDON : Rev. Wm. K. Eddy and wife. Rev. Geo. A. Ford, Miss Rebecca M. and Miss 
Charlotte H. Brown. 

Tripou : Rev. Messrs. F. W. March and Wm. S. Nelson, and Ira Harris, M.D., 
and their wives ; Miss Harriet La Grange, Miss M. C. Holmes, and Miss Mary T. Max- 
well Ford. 

Zahleh : Rev. Messrs. Frank E. Hoskins and W. Scott Watson, and their wives. 

In this country : Rev. Wm. M. Thomson, D.D., Rev. and Mrs. Samuel Jessup, Rev. 
and Mrs. T. S. Pond, Mrs. O. J. Hardin, Mrs. M. P. Ford, and Mrs. E. P. Calhoun. 

Faculty and Instructors of the Syrian Protestant CoUege : Rev. D. Bliss, D.D., 
President; Rev. G. E. Post, M.A., M.D., D.D.S., Rev. John Wortabet, M.D., Rev. 
Hanrey Porter, B.A., Samuel P. Glover, M.A., M.D., Robert H. West, M.A., Franklin 
C. Wells, M.D., Harris Graham, B.A., M.D., George L. Robinson, B.A., Frederick S. 
Hyde, B.A., Jabr M. Dhumit, B.A., Dean A. Walker, B.A., B.D., Louis S. Baddur, 
B.A.. Alfred E. Day, B.A., Najib M. Sahbi, B.A., Ayyub M. Kimeid, Amin F. Ma'luf, 
B.A., Francis Sufair. 

The importance of the work done by the Syria Mission is not to be 
measured by the comparatively small geographical area of the country 
nor by the number of its population. Its influence extends far beyond 
its borders, and, in some respects, can only be limited by the wide 
extent of the Arabic language. The staff of missionaries has been 
subject to several changes. Rev. J. S. Dennis, D.D., and Mrs. Den- 
nis, and Miss Eliza D. Everett returned to their work in Beirut. Rev. 
O. J. Hardin was reappointed (after spending a few weeks in this 
country), and returned in October to take up work in the Abeih Sta- 
tion, including the charge of the Boys' Board ing-School at Suk-el- 
Ghurb. He left Mrs. Hardin in this country to join him later. Mr. 
and Mrs. W. Scott Watson are new recruits who joined the mission in 
October and are associated with Mr. and Mrs. Hoskins. thus relieving 
Mr. Ford from work in that station, to aid again Mr. W. K. Eddy, his 
associate, who was bearing far too heavy burdens in the Sidon Station. 
Dr. and Mrs. Harris returned early in the year to their work in Tripoli 
Station and received a most cordial welcome. Rev. and Mrs. S. 
Jessup returned to this country in July last, after an absence of sixteen 
years. Rev. T. S. Pond and family returned also in July, after an ab- 
sence of twenty-one years, the first five years of this period being 
spent under the A. B. C. F. M. at Mardin. 

The year's work has been much like that of the previous year in its 
obstacles, its trials, its successes, and its joys. No great sorrow has 
come upon the mission, but there have been many occasions for pro- 
found gratitude. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYRIA — BEIRUT. 203 

The repressive measures of the Government have by no means 
been prohibitory. The Lord's work continues to grow in influence 
and pawer. There has been an advance all along the line, as will be 
seen by the station reports and the statistical tables. While a few 
schools are still closed bv the Government, the number of pupils re- 
mains about the same. The additions lo thet church h^ve been 98. 
The total membership has doubled in the past ten years. At the 
opening of the new yeari about forty new candidates are asking admis- 
sion to the church. There are many cheering indications that the 
Gospel leaven is permeating the minds of the people of every sect, 
including the Moslems. 

The religion of the people is usually called by the Government 
Moslem and non- Moslem. The first includes Orthodox and Persian 
Mohammedans (Moslems and. Metawalies), Druzes, Nusaireeyehs and 
Ismaileyehs, and all Bedaweie Arabs. Non-Moslems are Jews, nom- 
inal Christians (Orthodox Greek, Papal Greek, Maronite [Papal], 
Jacobite, Syrian, Armenian, and Latin Papists), and Evangelical 
Christians. The principal accessions to the church have been from 
the non-Moslem sects. Work among these is important. It aims to 
give them a pure Gospel and to remove all ground for the well-merited 
contempt in which nominal Christians are held by Moslems. This 
has been so far successful that, first, the religion of Evangelical Chris- 
tians is looked upon as a new religion and 16 respected by the non- 
Christian sects ; second, the old sects are beginning decided reforms 
in their churches ; and, third, the leaven of the Gospel is working 
in a most interesting and marked manner among the Moslems, giving 
the confident hope that the day is not far distant when a large number 
of them may be brought to Christ. Earnest prayer is asked that free- 
dom of conscience may be fully granted to all. 

Beirut. 

This is the central station of the mission. When our missionaries 
first arrived, it was a small, closely packed city of about 6,000 inhabit- 
ants. It has now grown to be nearly 100,000, and is the literary as 
well as commercial centre of Syria. 

Rev. Wm. M. Thomson, D.D., though spending the remainder of his 
days in this country, is remembered with affectionate regard by large 
numbers of Syrians, and is greatly missed in the councils of the mis- 
sion. 

Dr. Van Dyck has just celebrated his jubilee of missionary work. 
On April 2, 1840, he reached Syria. The Turkish Government has 
bestowed upon him a ** decoration " (the third order of the Majeedy), 
for literary and scientific work, and humane services rendered to sub- 
jects of the Sultan. The Syrians of all sects have united in presenting 
him as a testimonial of their high appreciation of his services to their 
country, the sum of $2,160. The amount was raised by voluntary 
contributions. At the annual mission meeting in January, he pre- 
sented a most interesting- and instructive paper on '* Early Remi- 
niscences of the Mission." 

The crowning joy of his fifty years is in the wonderful circulation of 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



204 SYRIA— BEIRUT. 

the Word of God, to ihe translation of which he gave so many years 
of his Ufe. It is a joy that will increase as the years go on. The 
report of his station says : "It is our earnest prayer that he way be 
spared to afford to the mission the benefit of his great experience and 
paternal counsel. May his last days be indeed his best days, and 
may what- he now witnesses in the wide distribution of the Arabic 
Scriptures, be to him a continual source of gratitude and comfort ! " 

The Church, — ^The pastoral work of the Beirut church has been 
carried on during the year by Rev. Yusef Bedr, acting as assistant to 
the missionary in charge. Nineteen members have been added. One 
of those baptized and received to the communion is a Bedawee Arab 
of one of the great tribes. He spent the summer with his tribe in 
their wanderings, reading to them the Scriptures in their black tents, 
and telling them of the salvation through Christ. He was everywhere 
welcomed, and his tribe found him so superior to them and so useful 
from his knowledge of reading and writing, that they were unwilling to 
have him leave them to resume his studies. He has, however, entered 
one of our boarding-schools for further training. -He states that his 
people were especially interested in the Psalms of David and the His- 
torical Narratives of the Old and New Testaments. 

The contributions of the native church during the year were about 
$570, of which $160 was for the native pastor. 

The five congregations which hear the Gospel regularly in Beirut 
number in the aggregate about 820, and the Sunday-schools in con- 
nection with our mission have 520 pupils. There are about 350 in 
other Sunday-schools. 

Wometi s Meetings, — The number of women's meetings has increased 
considerably and the weekly attendance is about 300. From Mrs. 
Dale's statement we learn that "the Ras Beirut Girls' and Boys* 
Schools are in a prosperous condition. They were established ten 
years ago/' On Sunday both boys and girls are in our Sunday-school. 
Miss Van Dyck conducts the Women's Bible Class. There are five 
native teachers besides Mrs. Dennis, Mrs. Dale, Mrs. Porter, Miss 
Van Dyck, and Miss Post. The average weekly attendance is 1 14. 
The week-day women's meetings average 84 in attendance, nearly 
two-thirds of whom are Druzes. Other such meetings are held in dif- 
ferent parts of the city, one of which is conducted most successfully in 
the Eastern chapel by Mrs. Dale. As a result of interesting accounts 
of the Aintab revival given by Dr. and Mrs. Graham, six neighborhood 
meetings have been started in different parts of the city, conducted by 
native Protestant women, and it is expected that this plan of work may 
be still further extended. 

The Theological Seminary. — The seminary was opened October 
2 1 St with a class of seven students. It has now been located in Beirut 
since 1873. ^^' Dennis says : " It was removed here from Abeih in 
order to be in proximity to the college, and secure the advantages of 
contact with the best and highest educational facilities which Beirut as 
the literary centre of Syria affords. It was also thought that the exist- 
ence of the seminary within the radius of college life and within the 
view of college students would be itself a presentation of the claims 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



200 SYRIA— BEIRUT. 

and opportunities of the ministry to the minds of the young men oi 
Syria. The seminary building at one end of the college campus has 
been useful in calling the attention of young men to the fact that the 
medical exit at the other end is not the only door of usefulness which 
opens to the college graduates. It is, no doubt, true that the Christian 
young men who are receiving their education at Ras Beirut are led to 
consider the call to the ministry as a possible fact by the visible re- 
minder of a duty to the church and to the needy world which they 
have in a theological seminary placed in such conspicuous and honored 
relations to the college as a centre of intellectual activity and ad- 
vanced culture. Medicine was hterally carrying the day with our edu- 
cated young men until theology stepped upon the college campus, and 
the fact that the last theological class were all college men gives at 
least substantial encouragement that a certain proportion of our can- 
didates for the minislry shall be from those trained in the college. 
The present class has been selected with great care, and there is 
reason to think that it represents the cream of the total list of appli- 
cants. Since the location of the seminary in Beirut 52 students have 
been in connection with it, some only for a short time. Of these, 39 
students have gone forth for the work of the ministry. Of this num- 
ber 22 are in the employ of our own mission, 13 are employed by 
neighboring missions, three have left the ministry, and one has died." 

" The second volume of the text-book in Systematic Theology 
has been issued. A second edition of the first volume is now going 
through the press. Dr. Eddy has also published the second part of 
his Commentary on the New Testament. It is hoped that these 
two volumes will prove an invaluable help to the Arabic-speaking 
races in understandmg the Word of God in lands where this word has 
so long be6n kept from the people, or presented to them overlaid and 
commingled with a mass of superstitions, traditions, and fanciful and 
erroneous interpretations." 

. " Instruction is given at ppsent by Dr. Van Dyck in Natural The- 
ology ; Dr. Eddy in New Testament Introduction and Exposition and 
Mental Philosophy ; Dr. H. H. Jessup in Church History and Horai- 
letics ; Dr. Dennis in Evidences, Theology, and Old Testament Expo- 
sition ; Mr. Hourany in Harmony of the Gos|)els and Rhetoric." 

Female Seminary, — The report of this institution is, in the words of 
Miss Thomson, ** a record cf mercies ; of prayers answered ; of lives 
preserved ; of the yoke made easy and the burden made light." 
Grateful acknowledgment is made of the welqome. return of Miss 
Everett, of the providential preservation from death of two teachers 
who were on a roof when^it fell with them. There were 120 pupils in 
the institution-, representing eight sects : Moslem, Dnize, Jew, Greek 
Orthodox, Greek Papal, Maronite, Armenian, Protestant — " all folded 
under the loving care of the Good Shepherd, all equally dear to Him, 
all bought with the same great price, all taught with the story of His 
redeeming love." Fifty-five of the pupils were boarders. The weekly 
prayer-meetings and the noon hour of prayer were very well attended 
and greatly enjoyed. The three graduates of the year are teaching in 
the service of the mission. '^ The infirmities of age are appearing in 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYRIA— BEIRUT. 20/ 

parts of the building, and it will require an expenditure of $800 to put 
it in suitable repair." 

The Press. — Substantial work has been done by the press during 
the year. Mr. S. Jessup, on leaving Syria June 1 2tb, was succeeded 
as mans^er by his brother. Dr. H. H. Jessup. About twenty volumes 
of our Arabic publications were locked up in Damascus for two years 
and the legal sanction for their sale withheld. Through the efficient 
services of Consul E. Bissinger these were finally sent to Constantino- 
ple, where, through the kindly proflFered aid of Rev. H. O. Dwight, of 
the A. B. C. F. M., all were returned stamped with the Government 
pernnt. Among them were some of our most important Arabic works, 
such as Calhoun's Bible Hand-Book, Dr. Dennis' Systematic Theology, 
his Evidences of Christianity, and his Biblical Interpretation, and Dr. 
Eddy's Commentary on the New Testament. A new Board of Public 
Instruction has been organized in Beirut, which has thus far done its 
duty well in facilitating the examination and sanction of new books. 
Several publications, which were once rejected by another council, 
have been examined again and sanctioned. The Life of Livingstone, 
however, is prohibited still on the ground of its giving an account of 
missionary work in Africa, and it is claimed that Africa is a Moham- 
medan country, and consequently it is prejudicial to the " public 
peace " to publish an account of conversions to Christianity in Africa. 
But there is reason for special gratitude because the Turkish Govern- 
ment has sanctioned not only more than 25 different editions of the 
Holy Scriptures, but more than 300 of our religious, educational, and 
miscellaneous publications. Early in the year the Government noti- 
fied all printing presses that they must obtain the Imperial permit or 
close their doors. Accordingly the American press applied for the 
legal permit, and on the 29th of May the manager obtained it on giv- 
ing the usual guarantees of obedience to Ottoman law in all matters 
pertaining to the publications of the press. The usual fee for a legal 
permit was not required, on the ground that the existence of the 
American press since 1834 constituted a permission on the part of the 
Government. In July a number of English books belonging to various 
members of the mission were confiscated by the Censor in the Custom 
House. Only six were burned, and owing to strong representations 
made by the manager of the press to the Government, thirty-two were 
saved from the flames and exiled to the United States. 

The record of the press during the year shows a large amount of 
work done, though less than in 1888. 

The whole number of pages printed was 24,569,167 as compared 
with 28,722,968 in the previous year. The American Bible Society 
published 12,638,918; London Religious Tract Society, 1,876,000; 
Miscellaneous, 9,054,249; American Tract Society, 1,514,000. 

The number of volumes printed is 52,203 ; publications of all kinds 
issued in 1889 is 321,854. 

The number of new books printed is 10 ; tracts, 14. Books re- 
printed, II ; tracts reprinted, 21. Different editions of the Scriptures, 
5 ; new additions to our catalogue — tracts, 14 ; books, 10 ; total, 24, 
making the whole number of publications on the catalogue 404. 

14 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



208 SYRIA — BEIRUT. 

The stock of books, Scriptures, and tracts on hand December 31, 
1889, 's as follows : Scriptures, 95,594, worth $20,676 ; Religious 
Tract Society, 128,209, worth $7,000 ; American Tract Society and 
Miscellaneous, 17,140, worth $44,178; total copies, 404,069, worth 
$71,854. The total number of pages issued from the beginning is 
418,407,354. 

It is worthy of notice that the departments of work carried on by 
the press are unusual in their variety. They are : making punches 
and matrices, casting type, making electrotypes, stereotypes, and lith- 
ographs ; map-making, composing, editing, printing, binding, jobwork, 
selling. About fifty employees obtain good remunerative work in this 
one establishment. They are not reckoned among the nearly 200 na- 
tive helpers in the list of mission employees. There is no department 
of this mission work that is more warmly supported by the missionaries 
in every clime. Its publications are found in every continent. Many 
special blessings have accompanied the pages that have been distrib- 
uted, and great encouragement is found in following out the remarka- 
ble influence exerted by these many millions of light-bearing and life- 
giving messages. 

The College^ — ^The Syrian Protestant College is a child of the Syrian 
Mission. It was born of a strong desire to give a high Christian edu- 
cation to the best minds and hearts in the East. Its president and 
first instructors were chosen from members of the mission. Its board 
of managers is made up principally of missionaries. There is thus a 
constant and close bond of union between it and the mission. It is 
looked upon as an indispensable part of our mission work and is 
heartily commended to the earnest prayers of our whole Church. Sev- 
eral changes have taken place in its corps of instructors. Dr. Dight 
and Dr. Fisher, greatly to the regret of the college, felt compelled to 
resign their posts and return to this country. Their places have been 
supplied by the arrival of Dr. Harris Graham from the A. B. C. F. M. 
in Turkey, and by the re-engagement of Rev. Dr. Wortabet. The 
corps of instructors was further reinforced by the arrival of Rev. Dean 
A. Walker and Mr. Alfred E. Day. Mr. R. H. Beattie completed a 
four years' term of sifrvice and returned to this country to pursue his 
theological studies. 

The prosperity of the college is shown by its steadily increasing 
number of pupils, notwithstanding strenuous efforts made by its oppo- 
nents of other faiths to detract from its influence. There were in the 
medical department 45 students; collegiate, 56; preparatory, 121. 
This is a larger number than has ever before been on the college rolls. 
The steadily growing influence of this institution on the country 
through the graduates that go out from it is a source of great gratifi- 
cation. 

The Hospital of the Prussian Knights of St. John is still served by 
the medical staff of the college. The indoor patients treated were 
446 ; outdoor, 9,470. Its work of mercy is as highly appreciated as 
ever, and its influence on the side of the Gospel of Christ is invalu- 
able. 

Dr. Jessup, in his station report, says : '' It gives us pleasure to re- 



Digitized by VjtOOQIC 



SYRIA— SIDON. 209 

port that our excellent Consul, Mr. E. Bissinger, has been retained in 
office by the Department of State, and that he has continued to promote 
American interests with his usual wisdom and energy. At the close 
of the year the Legation in Constantinople was urging anew the right 
to reopen the school in Hamalh." 

Sidon. 

" Gratitude to God for an unbroken circle of workers, for health 
continued and new mercies given, for dreaded dangers averted and 
unseen perils escaped, is not a duty merely, but the outflow of hearts 
full of thanksgiving." With these words Mr. Eddy begins his annual 
report. 

Rev, G. A. Ford, during the latter part of the year, shared again 
with Rev. W. K. Eddy the burdens and the joys of the work at this sta- 
tion. Misses R. M. and C. H. Brown have kept on faithfully and 
successfully in their work in Sidon Seminary. 

The Government has interfered directly with the work in only two 
places, Mejdel and Ain Kunyeh. There the churches are still closed 
and all instruction forbidden. Hopes are entertained that in the 
providence of God these interdicts may be removed. Indirectly the 
known hostile attitude of the Government has stimulated the zeal of 
the enemies of the Gospel to many new efforts to impede its progress. 
Attempts have been made to deprive Protestants of their legal status 
before the law and refuse them the representatives in the courts hereto- 
fore allowed them in common with other non-Moslem sects. The Mos- 
lem authorities have kept such rigid watch over our schools and their 
people, that they have diminished the number of Moslem pupils under 
our care. It is believed that a reaction in our favor will erelong be 
felt. The opposition of Romanists is increasingly active. In Saleheyeh 
they engaged as their teacher a student from our college who had 
been dismissed by the missionaries. The priest told the people that 
as they had always leaned to Protestant morals and training he had 
secured a teacher from our school and they would have no further ex- 
cuse for using Protestant schools. 

An incident of the work is thus related by Mr. Eddy : 

" In Berta the drawing power of Gospel preaching may have been 
frequently seen during the past year in the crowds collected about the 
hired room. That few were inside, that the choir outside praised with 
tin pans, that the collection thrown in was not taken up except to clear 
the room, that it would enrich a geological cabinet rather than the 
Lord's treasury, that the responses savored of the language of Ashdod, 
that the iron gong at the door was stolen, and that the poor widow 
woman who united with the church was beaten, — these are all little 
incidents of the work there. To deter others from confessing their 
faith in Christ a Protestant family there was made an example of. A 
plot of land suitable for a house was seized by a priest, who proceeded 
by main force to erect a building thereon. The owner is too poor to 
engage in an expensive lawsuit, and so this parcel of land may keep 
company with Naboth's vineyard." 

A church member of Abara, falsely accused of murder, has been 1 7 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



210 SVRIA — SIDON. 

months in prison withoot trial. It is well known to all the court that 
he is innocent. But being poor he cannot obtain his freedom. 

Female Seminary. — ^The report ispeaks at length of the first visit of 
Mrs. Hoskins to the school where she as Miss Eddy taught so many 
years, and of the happy reception accorded to her by pupils and friends. 

During the summer vacation the girls were busy raising money for 
their foreign mission band. They sent the proceeds to the City of 
Mexico and were rejoicing in the quick return of notes of gratitude 
from that field, and to know that it was the means of leading the Mex- 
ican converts to " go and do likewise." 

Six girls received their diplomas and after graduation took a special 
course in normal instruction. All are engaged in evangelical work. 
The primary object of the school was to train Protestant girls. A 
Druze girl has, however, been enrolled among the boarders, and a 
Moslem father asked admission for his daughter and is willing to pay 
for her training. The day-school is made up of girls from all the sects^, 
including Jew, Moslem, and Metawaly. A little benevolent society of 
girls sent a few bushels of Sidon oranges to the Prussian Orphanage in 
Beirut. Miss R. M. Brown adds to her report that " at the close of 
the year a meeting for Moslem women was started, and between thirty 
and forty have been enrolled. They gave good attention to Bible 
stories, and so far have been most zealous in committing to memory 
the Lord's prayer. This annex to the seminary we trust will change 
the homes of many of the day pupils and thus be a real help and bless- 
ing in the work. The teachers and pupils in the seminary have many 
causes for thanksgiving, and not the least of them is the grant of 
if 1, 500 by the Board for building the house in Judeideh for the ladies 
$f Sidon station. As Judeideh, the village in which the house is to be 
orected, is in easy nding distance from many villages where there are 
eormer and present pupils and teachers of the seminary, the work will 
continue during vacation, and with God*s blessing be to His glory. 
* The Lord hath done great things for us, whereof we are glad.' " 

Mr. Eddy says : " Equal encouragement comes from the Sidon 
Academy^ with its 140 boys. Thirteen of the boarding pupils come 
from Zahleh station and fourteen from Tripoli. A class of five gradu- 
ated last summer, four of whom now have charge of schools. Of the 
55 graduates 31 are engaged in teaching. Fifty pupils have been pre- 
pared and sent to the college in Beirut. The pupils are from various 
sects : 53 were Protestants, 55 Orthodox Greeks, 30 Papal Greeks, 14 
Maronites, 8 Moslems, 8 Druzes. Three have entered the Theolog- 
cal Seminary after having been tested by several years of faithful 
teaching." 

Lack of sufficient accommodations has compelled them to refuse 
full boarding privileges to all new pupils. A reading-room and library 
have been provided by renting a long vault, which, being well lighted 
and fitted up, is a most useful place. Large donations of valuable 
books were received from the Women's Society of Englewood and 
from the late Dr. Hunt's library. 

The church services have been very well attended and full of inter- 
est More than 200 pupils attended the Sunday-school. Ten persons 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYRIA— ZAHLEH. 2 1 1 

were received into the church on profession of faith in Christ. There 
is reason *' to hope for blessed results from the weekly gathering for 
Christian women and the two large classes of Moslem women under 
instruction." In Jezzeen the attendance of over loo pupils upon our 
schools and the changed attitude of the people show how the noted 
Maronite bigotry of that place may yet wholly disappear. In Meij 
Aiyoon the death of the faithful helper, Ibrahim Yusef, is deeply felt. 
It is hoped that his sons, now completing their education, may wear 
the mantle so long worn by their father. In Judeideh the work con- 
tinues uninterrupted, with 330 pupils. In Alma seven have united 
with the church. In nearly all the outstations the record of the year 
has been that of quiet fruitful work. Twenty-six have been added to 
the eleven churches of the station. There are 1,600 Protestants ; 
1,440 pupils in the schools, of whom 500 are girls. 

Zahleh. 

Rev. G. A. Ford, of Sidon, has spent about six months in the Zahleh 
field, taking the lead in all the work. Early in October Rev, and Mrs. 
F. E. Hoskins were reinforced by the arrival of Rev. and Mrs. W. 
Scott Watson, who have given themselves chiefly to the study of the 
difficult Arabic language. Welcome visits were received from Drs. 
Bliss and Eddy, and Mr. W. K. Eddy, who rendered aid in a most ac- 
ceptable manner. 

A little daughter was added to the family of Mr. and Mrs. Hoskins. 

Special mention is made in this as in other reports of the untiring 
efforts and timely counsel and encouragement of Consul Erhardt Bis- 
singer. The unmistakable attitude of hostility on the part of Govern- 
ment is dwelt on at length. It is, however, clear that much of this 
hostility is kept alive by the zealous bishops, who lose no opportunity 
to obstruct Gospel work. The school in Ain Burday (a suburb of 
Baalbec) was reopened, but was so boycotted by the police that for a 
considerable time the teacher had no pupils. Late in the year eight- 
een had forced the blockade and were in regular attendance. At 
Shuleefa the people were frightened into giving a bond in $250, to be 
forfeited if they allowed the Americans to open a school there. Later 
on a teacher was welcomed by the people and their bond bought back 
for one dollar and eighty cents. All the schools were visited by sol- 
diers, who asked questions, took notes, and reported to their superiors. 

At Kob Elias the native helper was erecting a school-house and 
chapel. When the walls were up and ready for the roof the Govern- 
ment prohibited finishing it and arrested the native helper. He was not 
released until he gave pledge that he would do no more work on the 
building. The winter rains have seriously injured the roofless walls. 
At Mushghara the people purchased a large bell to replace the little 
old cracked one. They were adding stonies on the roof for a belfry 
when work was stopped by threats to imprison the teacher. 

In general the present determination of the Crovemment is that our 
work shall not expand, and that we must light to hold our own, espe- 
cially where there are Moslem and kindred sects. On the other hand, 
the people in all directions are friendly except the papists, who seek 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



2 1 2 SYRIA— ZAHLEH. 

opportunities to insult or injure our missionaries and their native 
helpers. All others welcome their visits and listen to their instruction. 

The School Work has prospered notwithstanding the obstructive and 
repressive measures of Government. The average attendance is bet- 
ter than before, though the actual number of pupils on the rolls is less 
than the previous year. Petitions for new schools were received from 
five towns. 

The one solitary pupil at Sughbeen has now i8 companions and ex- 
pects many more. In Mushghara and Jadeetha^ where five years ago 
the work stopped for lack of interest, we have now our best success. 

Church Work, — There has been real growth in the church work 
and life. Special week-day meetings are largely attended. Such was 
the case in Zahleh. The regular services are attended usually by less 
than one hundred, while about 300 attended the special meetings. 
Five members were added to the church. Although the number is 
small, the frequent changes in the management of the station and the 
impossibility of working up the interests of the church must account 
for it. Better things are expected another year. The Foreign Mis- 
sion Band in Zahleh devotes its j^ii2 to work in India. The benevo- 
lent contributions of the church average one dollar per member. In 
Tullya the people have expended $174 in providing a suitable place 
for the school. They also offer another house for a girls' school. 
Special mention is made of the marked influence of the mission press 
in all the station and its work. 

In a glance backward Mr. Hoskins' report says : " It is not many 
years since missionaries were driven out of Zahleh. All that has 
changed. It is not many years since nothing worthy to be called 
a school existed; and a man who could read was reverenced as 
something above an ordinary mortal. How greatly has all this 
changed. None but the poorest are denied the advantages of some 
schooling. Schools have been multiplied among all sects until it is 
a disgrace to a man not to know how to read and to write. The de- 
mand for books and newspapers is constantly growing, and one is 
continually reminded that the people as a whole have waked up to 
the value and imperative need of education. Best of all the Bible 
is owned and read, and that priest or bishop is rash who would 
attempt to hinder people in these days from owning and reading 
the best of all books. The entrance of God's Word giveth light. 
It is very pleasant to have this truth exemplified as clearly as it has 
been in Shuleefa this year. Several young men began to study 
there ; they soon put the ignorant priest to confusion, and we re- 
joiced to take two of them into the church." 

The Greek school in Zahleh is manned by teachers from our 
schools, and furnished with books from our Press. The whole 
order and spirit of it is said to be Protestant. In Wady Yahfufeh 
are several Metawaly villages in which only one man could be found 
able to read. A school has been opened among them. Moslems 
have attended services in Badlbcc and in Muallaka^ and Bibles are 
welcomed in Moslem homes. The teachers of the Governor's 
girls' school in Baalbec were educated in American mission 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYRIA — ABElH. 21 3 

schools. A Moslem Mufti has a son in one of our boarding-schools, 
and on being galled to account for it by the authorities in Damas- 
cus, claimed the right to educate his son where he pleased. Moslems 
are seeing clearly the difference between evangelical Christianity 
and that of the nominal Christians of the land. One of the Turkish 
Governors recently spent an hour and a half talking with non- 
Moslem members of his court while the missionary was calling, and 
claimed that they ought all to join the evangelical party and to be 
like them in faith and practice. 

Abeih, 

Rev. and Mrs. Wm. Bird have been connected with this station 
during their entire missionary life. Their daughter, Miss £. G. 
Bird, lives in their family and conducts the work for women in a 
most acceptable manner. Rev. and Mrs. T. S. Pond and family 
left for this country in June. Rev. O. J. Hardin took Mr. Pond's 
place in November, and has taken direct charge of the training- 
school. The Abeih report speaks in common with all others of the 
visitation of the ** Abu Rikab*' fever which very few escaped. In 
many villages every inhabitant was "in bed" with it. In some 
places schools were suspended for several months on account of 
small-pox and diphtheria. The Ain Zehalteh church, besides con- 
tributing the usual amount toward their pastor's salary, raised $100 
for a new roof to their church. Baakleen is a remarkable Druze 
centre, and the home of the famous Druze warrior, Ali Beg Hamady, 
who before his death requested the prayers of missionary ladies re- 
siding there. Here there are 160 children in the schools, and all 
taught the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Three English ladies. Misses 
Smith, Ward, and Prout, have made this town their residence. 
They spend their time in work for the women and are very highly 
respected. They also contribute time, money, and their earnest 
prayers in aid of the schools. 

Shweifai^ one of the largest towns of Lebanon, continues to be a 
most interesting point of work. There are about 150 pupils in our 
schools. An Irish lady* Miss Proctor, has established here a board- 
ing-school in which are 25 girls and 12 little boys and 31 day pupils. 
The Sabbath services are well attended. The most influential men 
of the place often listen to the Gospel preaching. The people are 
Greek and Druze. It is well worth while to make diligent use of 
our opportunities in this the winter capital of a very large district 
in Lebanon. Mr. Bird in speaking of Aramoon says : ** It is at 
present highly favored in having an ignorant and obstinate priest 
who has succeeded in alienating a large part of his flock. Some of 
them have declared themselves Protestants, while others are about 
ready to do so." A hundred pupils attend the schools. Suk el Ghurb 
and Abeih were supplied with preaching by the Beirut brethren who 
were spending the hot season on the mountains. The training- 
school at Suk el Ghurb was opened a month later than usual await- 
ing Mr. Hardin's arrival, and more fees were collected, consequently 
;he number of pupils has diminished slightly. The influence of 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



it4 SYRIA— TRIPOLI. 

this school is felt all through the mountain for good. At Abeih 
both church services and schools are up to the usual mark of inter- 
est. Seven members were added to the church. The Women's 
Sewing Circle for benevolent objects is a new ferture. Earning 
money expressly for benevolence was a new idea and is working 
beautifully. Mr. Bird says, " it dawned upon them like a revela- 
tion/' and they found a new joy both in working and in bringing 
the proceeds to their treasury. They were surprised that they 
could give so much. One poor woman made little clay models of 
Syrian household articles, and was astounded to find that she had 
more than two dollars to give to the treasury. '^ The giving of so 
much money at once had not entered into her wildest dreams." 
Druze women and others have joined in the same work and help it 
on. While there are special obstacles in the southern part of the 
station, owing to the almost unrestrained influence and antagonism 
of the Maronite bishop, yet on the whole there is a bright outlook 
and signs of great good to come. 

Tripoli. 

The area and population of the district occupied by this station 
are equal to about half that of the whole mission. It contains four 
important cities, Tripoli^ El Meena^ Hamath, and Hums^ now con- 
nected by a carriage-road. The material prosperity of the people 
is about equal to that of other Syrians. The wealth is in the 
hands of a few, while the vast majority are poor. One of the prin- 
cipal features of the work at this station is its touring. The suc- 
cessful working of it requires the absence of one of its members 
nearly all the time. The burden of this important part of the work 
has rested during the year mainly on the Rev. F. W. March, senior 
member of the station. Dr. Ira Harris, who returned with his 
family in July with restored health, was most cordially welcomed by 
his associates as well as by the Syrians of all sects, and especially by 
the Moslems, among whom by means of his surgical skill he had 
made many warm friends. Rev. and Mrs. W. S. Nelson are making 
excellent progress with the language, Mr. Nelson having already 
begun the use of it in public services. 

Teachers* Convention. — Mr. Nelson says in the abstract of the 
station report that " In the summer a convention of all its native 
helpers was called at Tripoli, Some of the teachers travelled four 
days to reach it. It was a pleasant and helpful occasion, and all re- 
turned to their various posts with renewed spirit and devotion." 

Persecution, — This station, whose work has been made so memo- 
rable in years past by the long-continued and bitter persecutions 
against its converts, has experienced a year of rest and quiet. Mr. 
Nelson says : " It has been a pleasure to see an increase of brotherly 
love and Christian zeal. In more than one place a p eriod of lethargy 
has been followed by a time of earnest work and morediligent study of 
the Scriptures. The largest accession to the church was at Minyara^ 
where eleven were welcomed to the communion-table." In Hums 
one of the native brethren, an elder in the church and for many 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYRIA — TRIPOLI. 2 1 5 

years teacher, was called to fill the absent pastor*s place, which he 
has done with great acceptance. A home missionary band has un- 
dertaken work in the surrounding towns with considerable suc- 
cess. One whole village with its priest offered to become Protest- 
ants. The result will doubtless be the beginning of a church there 
after persecution has sifted the people. 

Under the leadership of one or two of the women, vigorous work was 
also undertaken for the women of that city. A new place of worship, 
outside the city walls, is greatly needed to meet the wants of those who 
have not before been reached. The school at Hatnath^ which has 
been reopened more than once in accordance with orders from Con- 
stantinople, has been as often closed by the local Turkish Government. 
The meetings, however, both here and at Mahardeh^ are so well at- 
tended that new and larger accommodations are an imperative neces- 
sity. The accessions to the church membership during the year have 
been forty-one. 

Schools, — " Several schools have been added to the list of last year, 
and many other villages are urgently calling for more. The chief 
increase in the roll has been in the line of girls' schools. One has 
been reopened at Safita^ one at Bishmizeen, and a new one at Meshia, 
This last is attended by boys as well as girls, though the teacher is a 
young woman." 

The work at Tripoli is thus described in the report : 

** Several departments of work centre in Tripoli itself. The book- 
store is always a useful agency where much religious work is done in 
the salesroom, and the colporteurs, supported by the American Bible 
Society, have made successful trips in the North, selling many copies 
of the Scriptures and conversing much with the people, awakening a 
new interest in the truth. The dispensary, which has been reopened 
since Dr. Harris* return, calls together a large company at every 
clinic. Many of these are Moslems, and they hear the Bible read and 
explained before receiving medical attention. Three regular preaching 
services are maintained. One is at the city proper, one at the Meena, 
or port, and the third on the hill where the poorest people of the city 
reside. This last quarter is the most interesting part of our work in 
Tripoli. The' men gather every evening for Bible study, and meet- 
ings are frequently held for the women." 

The Girl^ Boarding-School has been crowded with pupils this year. 
There have been 33 boarders and 100 day pupils* The Italians have 
opened a free-school, supported by their Government, for the sake of 
introducing their language, and thus opening a channel for their com- 
merce. Many years ago the principal foreign language in Syria was 
Italian, and trade was carried on through Italian merchants. The 
French gradually took its place, and Italian influence with its trade dis- 
appeared. We now notice a revival of Italy's interests in its introduc- 
tion of new schools in the important centres with no religious purpose, 
but simply and avowedly that of Government interest. The Italian 
ladies, who are teaching their girls' school, showed a friendly interest 
in our school. Their institution, though free and quite a success, has 
not as yet detracted at all from our own. The ladies in charge 
have been able, by the well-earned reputation of its teachers, to col- 



Digitized by VjtOOQIC 



2l6 



SYRIA— STATISTICS. 



lect the regular fees from the pupils. The report says : " The direct 
study of the Bible is a conspicuous element in the life of the school. 
During the year one of the native teachers was taken away by death. 
She was a graduate, and had taught for a few years in the school. 
While there was no marked religious awakening during the year 
among the girls, several of their number have made public confession 
of their faith in Christ, thus subjecting themselves to trying persecu- 
tion from relatives and friends/* 

Mr. Nelson, in closing his report, adds : 

" In all respects the members of the Tripoli station look over the 
past year with gratitude to God for His hand leading them, and with 
new courage for the future. The whole missionary band is on the 
ground and in good health, ready for active work ; the native brethren 
are in earnest and ready for aggressive movements, and hopeful indi- 
cations cheer the workers in many directions/' 

Statistics of the Syria Mission. 
I. EVANGELISTIC AND GENERAL MISSIONARY WORK. 



Native 

Sy. IAN 

Laborers. 



American jMen 

Missionaries, j' Women 

Ordained Pastors. 

Licen. Pre.^ch'rs.. 

School Teachers.. 
[Other Helpers ... 

Stations 

Outstations 

Churches., 

Church Buildinj^s. 

Added on prof, during year.... 

Male Church-members. 

Female Church-members 

Regular preaching places 

Average Congregalions 

Sabbath-schouls 

Sabbath scholars 

Syrian Prot. Community (with- 
in the field of Am. Pres. Mis.) 
Contributions of Native Ch'r'si 



1876 


1885 


:n'« 


Jlhs 


3 


3 




8 


35 


■189 


5 
6o 


5 
90 


lO 


19 


24 


30 


75 


130 


6i 
2,642 


87 
3,891 


40 
«,54^ 


3^^ 


2,982 
$1,252 


*i:?I? 





1886 



JJf" 



32 
X31 



5 

86 



1887 



»3 . 

3Z 

4 

29 

"5 

»3J 

5 

91 

X9 

31 

104 



19 
31 
153 

675i'*^° 695 

92 ! 8s 

4,29? 4,289 

68 66 

3.746 3,733 



798 t 



1888 



X3 

23 

4l 
37 
>53 

7J 

5 
89 
20 

I3 



M93 



4,165 
$6,980 



, 4,245 
$8,114 



M534 



94 
4,5 M 

81 
4,6ao 

^4059 

$7»355 



1889 



X5 

84 

4 

»S5 
7 

4 

•o 

4,966 

$7,767 



II. EDUCATIONAL 'WORK. 



College (Syrian Protestant)... 

Medical School 

Pupils in College (including 

Medical Department) 

Theological Seminary 

Pupils in •' 

Boys' Boarding-schools 

Pupils in " 

Female Seminaries 

Pupils in ** 

High-Schools 

Pupils in *' 

Common Schools 

Boys in ** 

Girls in " 

Total Schools 

Total Pupils 

Women in Bible-Classes 



1876 



106 



4a 
3 

89 

2 

209 

7X 



1885 



i6s 



72 

3 
zio 



443 

I 108 



80 
3,509 



4871 



136 

5,665 

^34 



1886 



i6s 

7 
3 
151 
3 
X19 
15 
379 
97, 
3,178 , 
1,327) ' 

121 

5,344 

230 



1887 



6 

3 

za9 

3 

143 

19 

477 

91 

3,016 J 

1,185 ) 

125 

5,391 
240 



4901 



1888 



xzo 

.4 

39 

483 

X4« 

6,299 

330 



1889 



Z16 

3 

X43 

X9 

46s 

X43 

6,173 

390 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYRIA — STATISTICS. 



217 



III. PRESS WORK: PRINTING AND DISTRIBUTION OF 
BIBLES, TRACTS, Etc. 



1876 



Bible House and Press Estab.: | 
Steaai Presses 



Hand Presses. 

Hydraulic Press ' 

Lithographic Press 

TvBe Foundry — Casting 

Machines 

Electrotype Apparatus.. . . I 
Scereotjrpe Apparatus . 
Embossing Pre»ses.. .. 
Hoc Rolling Press . . .. 

Press Employ^ 

Pablicat^ns on Press Catalogue! 
Volumes printed during year. . 
Pa^ " *• " .. 

Olwhich pages of Scriptures .. 
Tracts ..... 
Total pgiges from the beginning 
*ScTiptures distributed during 

the year J 

^Other Books and Tracts sold 

and distributed 

Coi>ies of publications of all 
kinds issued during year . . 



44 

ao7 

38,450 

13,786,980 

4ia77»S«> 

332,000 

159,810,300 

5164X 

9S,7^t I 



1885 I 1886 I 1887 



•x! 



I 



37,981,600 
17,378,600 

i,045,5co 
311,743,044 

33.576 

36.75a 



336 

73,050 

33,384,675 

X9.33»i7.SO 

1,703,500 

345,036,716 

X5,57X 

63,311 

I 
373,7x0 I 



45 
346 



J 7,000 
5,500 
11^x17,000 
i,67x,xoo 
365,1x3,3x9 

3X,484 

333,649 

a84i45o 



1888 



1889 



48 

106,900 
38,732,968 
> 8,045 «ooo 



3931835,187 418,404,354 

36,848 34,310 

76,198 299,090 

333^550 33^^854 



52,ao3 
24,569,167 
13,638,018 



IV. MEDICAL WORK AT ST. JOHN'S HOSPITAL, 

The Physicians of the Medical Department of the Syrian Protestant College have been aopointed by 
the Order of St. John in Berlin as the Medical Attendants of the ** Johanniter-Hospital in Beirut. 
This most interesting Charity^ supported by the above-mentioned Order, and served also by the Deacon- 
esses of Kaiserswerth, has received during the past years : 





1876 


1885 • 


1886 


1887 


1888 


1889 


Indoor Patienu 

Patients treaued in Polydinique 
Total of days of treatment . . . 


9,163 
«7i500 


6,009 
16,348 


7,136 
X3.M6 


11,842 


8.390 

"»953 


446 
9,470 
14,168 



* These figures represent the copies of Scriptures sold and sent out froin our Mission Press to private 
purchasers, and to our own and other Missions, and to Bible Societv Agencies, for further distribution. 

t The distribution has been by the various Missions among Arabic-speaklng peoples, and the Amer- 
ican and British Bible and Tract Societies. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



o 

€9 



& 

^ 

^ 



O 






»« 

f^ 



§ 

a 

§ 



g 



Xqsiniyi '91 <inapn)S 



*S|001(3S 

-qi«qq«S ui flidnj 



•< 
O 



nviox 



••WO 



S ' & 



•sXog 



•«H!0 



•sXoa, 



% 



II 



t §.§ 



m >ooo 
« n 



r^^ 



: S Jl 



s. ' 



I f : 



f {ooqog JO jaqmn^ 



*saopnqu)ao3 



8 8 8 
§ It S 



I 



8 



88 



•p»PP»»q«nN 



I 8 



J? a? 



m 15 « 



*sia«3tnninioo3 



? ? 



J ?! 



^ I ^ 



aqamqo 



^ 



• * !r **- 



*9An«^ 



•s 

a 






•aimi.afi 



p.unipjio 



■aTBOuamy 



■* *ri Oi 



'onSag aotssiiY 



00 00 



1 1 



CO 

O 
H 



2 :- 

nil 

CO «• 

Sis 

«• V S 



: I 

i 



1 1 



2^5 5.2 9.2 



^ 



II 
II 

M 
M 



a 

s ^ 
s •«• 



•o 



I 

I 



t3 H 



r«W_fa 






CO 

O 

Eg 



q9 



CO Q 



S 

^ 



o 



•J 

H 

§ 



u 

*' h. 

-a 



V4 c w 

Is- 



• K 

:5 



id by 



3=1 



O 

s 






d 






I K ^ 



I 8 



* "8 



^0 »n »n 6 M 



1 8X S'5> 



* Sf §s 



§• %l 1^ 






S«o ct eo m 
M M 



•« «^ M 



8 8 



8 88 81 



» M i: ^ 



r^ m c« 



8S^ 



S" 5 



« 



C*mS 



§ % 

in ♦ 



il 






;^ * 



;^8 



i S 



s t 



J J? 



8 

s = 



8 8 



88 

n 



^ 



i ^ i I % ? H 



MM ^ 



^ 



f 



8 S 



00>O «00 



o> m M m 



: : SS 



rs, »» in m 



?8 



n « » w 



«i 



!» s? 



06 00 06 00 00 d 



i 



9: : 



CO 



i 


: 3 • 

: o : 


•1 


i si 


s 


1 ii 


•o 


S Tl 


s 


1 S i 


e 


q « • 


■s 


o *S • 




"3 ««| 


X • 


U3 « 


H 


H 



s i 1 

o 8 s 



S 2 

o o 

CO o 

o ^ 



5fl 



.1 



•a 

OTg 



.2 o *• c 
6ug O 



^ 21 



b, O 



io -I 



Si 



il 



3 

O 



< 



J 




s 



< 

O 
Ui 



a ^ 



5^ * 



8 8 



? « 



1 



5 



. e 

c .2 

8.S 



If 



n 



i 



I 



I. 
a I 

II 

.S a 
S5H 



gfS^ Digigedby 



(Google 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



The Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A. 
May I, 1889, to May i, 1890. 

Appropriations for 

MiBflionfl. Missions, 1880-90. Total. 

Africa. 

Gaboon and Corisco $23,875 02 

Liberia 7,28000 $31,15502 

China. 

Canton 45.796 00 

Peking 15.699 00 

Shanghai 85,89400 147,38900 

Chinese IN U. S 21,86700 21,86700 

Guatemala 12,35600 12,35600 

India. 

Fumikhabad 34,089 00 

Kolhapur. 18,52100 

Lodiana 88,91200 141,52200 

Japan. 

Osaka 38,698 00 

Tokyo 47,28900 85,98700 

Korea 15,20000 15,20000 

Mexico 79,958 00 79,958 00 

Papal Europe 2,69000 2,69000 

Persia. 

Eastern Persia 29,784 05 

Western Persia 47,088 84 76,872 89 

SiAM AND Laos 40,201 26 40,201 26 

South America. 

Brazil 62,623 00 

Chili 37,460 88 

Colombia 17,09700 117,18088 

Syria 60,73364 60,73364 

U. S. Indians. 

Dakota 9,025 00 

Nez Perces 3.770 00 

Omaha 799 00 

Sac and Fox i53 84 

Seneca 6,255 00 

Winnebago 1,13200 21,13484 

Sundry Special Appropriations 1,724 47 1,721 47 

$855,972 00 

Appropriations for Home Department 52,000 00 



$907,972 00 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 221 

EXPENSES FOR HOME DEPARTMENT. 



Salaries of Secretaries $i8,ocx) oo 

** '* " Clerks 2,591 25 

" " Special Secretary, in absence 
of Dr. Mitchell 

Salary of Treasurer 3,966 67 

" '* Treasury Clerks 7192475 

Shipping Department Clerks 

Salary Secretary for Special Objects 
(one-half) 

Expense Account— Janitor, Coal, Cleaning, etc 

Postage 

Stationery 

Traveling , 

Candidates 

Printing, (including Annual Report) 

Library 

Book and Map Account , 

A. Mitchell, D.D.. Travelling Account visiting Missions.. 



Total. 


$20,591 25 


1,068 55 


11,891 42 


2,334 00 


499 99 


2,770 03 


921 92 


507 27 


630 90 


119 50 


2,895 26 


169 45 


153 34 


1,202 61 



$45,755 49 
" Church at Home and Abroad," pro rata assessment 2,507 39 



$48,262 28 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



a: 

H 

O 
Ui 

o 



CO 

U 

H 

Q 

X 

< 

H 

CL. 

u 
p^ 

o 

H 
Z 

s 

H 

< 

C/5 



o 

00 



H 


<J 


.4 


2 


Pi 


O 


^ 


Z 


D 


1— 1 


c> 


u 




;z; 


U 


w 




< 




M 
>* 



M 

DC 
H 

O 
b 

cfl 
Z 

o 

C/3 

C/3 



o 
a 

o 

b 

o 

Q 

o 

pa 




8 


ffg 


•s 


1 




1 
% 










^1 



I 



8 


5 


00 

H 


S 


1 


J 


i 


« 


% 

s. 



I 



I 



o 
H 



II 
il 

o (3 
h 



4 4 

M?5 H^ 



5< 



SI 

>.« 
h 

i| 

.5 8 

M e 



•a V •• 

5 ^ a 



- e 



9. in 



"I 

O 

Q 



M hi V 00 rC _ 

6 .2 H 



6 

u 

'Ja 

C 



n 



SI 



c 5 






2e 



2 






|8 

§s 
ss 

'is 



•ssl 

lis 

O " i> 

• *- • • 

m« 6eo t^. 

•i a-^JJ 



SS S 






•s 



§§l§8 



■a- a«- -a-S'S 

lll-iiNlli 



.5 " SLS- ^ § S2 2 ' 






^-a 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



?o 2 



g I 



<x 




mil 



> 

► 3. 




r 

r 



» 



r 
r 

> 

d 

r 

r 
w 

C/J 






H 

a 
w 

w 
o 

> 

O 
O 

? 

M 
S 

as 






o 

s 

a 

o 

s 

H 

a 
PI 

en 



G 
> 

o 

o 

z 

> 

r 

> 
r 
> 

n 

(/) 

a 

H 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



ASSETS. 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH IN THE U. S. A. 

Bonds and Mortgages on Real Estate $162,197 5' 

Philadelphia and Reading R.R $1,000 00 

Richmond & Danville R.R 6,000 00 

Houston & Texas Centra] R.R 5,ooo 00 

Union Pacific R.R. Co 2,o«> 00 

St. Louis & Terre Haute R.R 1,00000 

Cairo, Arkansas & Texas R.R 5,ooo 00 

Georgia Pacific R.R i.«» «> 

Pittsburgh, Cincinnati & St. Louis R.R 10,000 00 

Chicago & Northwestern R.R. Co 4,«» «> 

Central R.R. of New Jersey R.R. Co 3.<»o 00 

Delaware & Hudson Canal & R.R. Co 7.o<» «> 

Utica& Black River R.R. Stock 400 00 

45,400 00 

City of Elizabeth Adjustment 4s 9, 500 00 

Orange & Newark Horse Car R.R. Co. Bonds 5,ooo 00 

City of Newark Sewer Bonds 30,ooo 00 

Bank of America (N. Y.) Stock 1,50000 

Ouassaic National Bdnk, Newburgh 1,20000 

Note, Berea Property '>^^ ^ 

$256,464 19 

New York, May i, 1890. 

Above securities examined and found in the possession of the Board and at the 
Merchants' National Bank, as stated, and correct 

FREDERICK A, BOOTH, > ^^.^^^ 
WALTER CARTER, f '^'^ 

New York, May 9, 1890. 

PERMANENT FUNDS APRIL 30, 1890. 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH IN THE U. S. A. 

Waldensian Fund— Interest used $22,100 00 

Annuity Funds 53,875 00 

Gifts of Property — not available in cash 29,731 16 

Memorial Fund 12,410 00 

Marine Insurance 22,214 70 

Children's Fund 13,200 00 

Oroomiah^College Fund 5,ooo 00 

Monterey Seminary Fund 5,000 00 

Mrs. Stokes' Fund 5,031 40 

Board's Real Estate $100,000 00 

Board's' Permanent Fund 70,645 76 

170,645 76 

Nkw York, May'i, 1890. k|339»2o8_o2 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



ANNUAL REPORT OF RECEIPTS 

BY THE 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS 

DUBING THE YEAB ENDING MAY 1, 1890. 



^F* Items here stated as receipts from the IVomani's Boards are those reported by them. 
The amounts received by this Beard during tht /iscai year of 1889— 1890 from the Woman's 
Boards^ ate given on ^ge 281. The contributions under the heading 0/ *^ Sabbath - 
schools " are not includtd in the first column^ which represent the donations 0/ chutchet. 



SAB. S. W. B*DS. 



SYNOD OP AT1.AMnC. 

Pby of Atlantic, 

Aimwell 

Berean 

Bethel 

Beaufort, Salem 

Calvary 

Charleston, Olivet 

WalUngford 
Edisto 
Grace 
Hebron 
Hopewell 

iaoies Island z 00 

It. Pleasant 
River Chapel 
Salem 

St. Andrew*s 
St. Michael 
St. Paul 
Summerville 
Wallingford 
ZioD 



Pby 0/ Bast Florida, 
Buflalo Bluff 
Candler 

Crescent City zo 00 

Gainesville (colored) 
Green Cove Springs zo 00 
Hawthorne 

Jacksonville, zst zo 00 
'' 3d (Laura st.) 

Mary Esther 
MiU Cove 
Palmer 

Sao Mates so a6 

Satsuma 

South Lake Weir 
Starke 

St. Andrew*s Bay 
St. Augustine 43 00 

Waldo^ 

93 a6 



SAB. S. W. B'DS 



Pby of Fairfield. 

Brainerd Institute 
Bethlehem, zst 
** ad 

Beulah 
Blue Branch 
Calvary 
Carmel 
Cheraw 
Congruity 
Dutchman's Creek 
Ebenezer z 

Friendship 

Good Will 4 

Harmony Chapel 
Hebron 
HermoB 
Hopewell 
Howell, Salem 
Ladson 
Lebanon 
Little River 
Macedonia 
Magnolia 
McCoy Chapel 
Milina 
Mt. Carmel 

" Lisbon 

'* Sinai 
Nazareth 
New Haven 
Olivet z 

Pleasant Grove 
Shiloh, zst 
" ad 
St. Matthew 
Sumter, ad 

Tabor z 

Trinity 
YorkviUe 



5 00 



673 



7 SO 



az 48 



Pby 0/ Knox, 



Columbus, 2d 
Ebenezer 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



226 



SYNOD OF BALTIMORE. 



SAB. S. W. B'DS. 



SAB. S. W. B D6. 



Ebenezer, ad 












Bait., Knox 








Ezra 












" Lafayette sq. 


33 2» 


XX a8 


ia8 sx 

X7 80 


Grace Mem'l 












" Light St. 


9 75 




Madison 












** Madison st 








Med way 












" Ridgcley St. 
Chapel 








Mt. Sinai 












362 






New Hope 












" Welsh 








Oglethorpe Chapel 












** Westminster 


40 06 


9 03 


59 50 


Pleaisant Grove 












Barton 


1^ 






Riceboro 












Bel Air 




55 «> 


St. Paul 












Bethel 


5 00 




78 00 


Washington av. 












Chestnut Grove 






44 50 


Williams Chapel 












Churchville 


iJ^ 




47 00 






X 


00 






Deer Creek, Harm'y 15 25 


9 00 
8 00 


8425 


Pby 0/ McClelland. 










ElHcott City 


7 73 


aaS 97 


Abbeville, ad 
Belle Way 
Bethel 
Bo wen 








6 


00 


Emmittsburgh 

Fallston 

Franklinville 


50 00 

a 00 
5 90 


4x 04 


47 00 












Frederick City 


a6 as 




30 00 


Calvary Chapel 
Fair Forest 












Frostburg 
Govanestown 


38 00 


xo 00 


^^ 00 


Immanuel 
Lites 












Granite 
Hagerstown 


3 30 
9 SO 




60 00 


Mattoon 
Mt. Pi^gah 
" Zion 


I oo 






3 

X 


00 
50 


Hampden 
Havre de Grace 
Lonacoming 


5 00 
XX 00 


ao 00 
xo 00 
39 00 


X5 00 
140 as 


Pitts 

Pleasant View 
Salem 
Sloane's Chapel 










50 


Mt. Paran 
New Windsor 
Paradise 
Piney Creek 
Relay 
Taneytown 
The Grove 
Waverley 


S 00 
x8 26 




27 SO 


Walker's Chapel 






■"" 


"""" 


~~" 


35 00 
15 00 




54 00 












xs 00 




X oo 


- 




XI 


00 






48 00 


Pby of 6outh Florida, 










Williamsport 
Zion 


X 00 




xo 00 


Acorn 
Altoona 
Auburn dale 
Bartow 












Miscellaneous 






747 50 


800 










3,92a 25 


456 67 


5*904 27 


Centrehill 












Pby o/New Castle. 






Crystal River 
Eustis 


64 00 


xo 


00 






Blackwater 








Higley 












Bridgeville 








Homeland 












Buckingham 






5 6t 


Kismet 












Chesapeake City 


15 00 




35 00 


Kis-simee 












Christiana 








Lakeland 












Cool Spring 
Delaware City 






xo 65 


Orange Bend 












xo 00 






Paoli, Alex. Mem'l 


5 °^ 










Dove<i 


60 00 




xoi 6x 


Piitman 












Drawyers 


6 00 






Seneca 












Eden 








Sorento 












Elkcon 


50 00 




93 ao 


Tarpon Springs 
Titusville 


7 43 










Federalsburgh 
Feltou 


x6 <x> 


a 10 


6 50 


Winterhaven 










Forest 


20 00 


X836 


80 30 














Georgetown 










8443 


10 


00 






Grace 
Green Hill 




6 00 




SYNOD OP BALTIMORE. 










Harrington 

Head of Christiana 


8 00 
10 00 




20 00 


Pby of BaltifHore, 










Lewes 






17 00 


Annapolis 




at 


ti 






Lower Brandywine 


60 x6 






Ashland 








16 


00 


Manokin 


XX 00 




41 00 


Bait , ist I 


500 00 


25 


00 


1,320 


OJ 


Milford 


4X 00 






" ad 


225 00 


50 


00 


305 


29 


Newark 


38 00 




6s 00 


" lath 


25 00 


5 


00 


X89 


49 


New Castle 


x6i 66 


aa 49 




" Abbott Mem'l a oo 










Pencader 


22 00 




42 70 


" Aisquith st 


29 3X 






100 


03 


Perryville 








'* Boundary av. 


aoo 50 


109 


21 


295 


48 


Pitts Creek 


90 xo 


800 


30 00 


** Broadway 
'* Brown Me. x 


xo 00 


25 


00 


27 


50 


Port Deposit 


1844 


ao oo 


88 00 


432 55 


18 


00 


905 


36 


Port Penn 


xo 50 




28 7a 


" Central 


41 91 






751 


25 


Red Clay Creek 


X5 00 






•' ( 'ri-p Mem'l 
*• F.-iith 












Rehoboth, Del. 








5 00 


46 


00 


119 


12 


M'd 






16 20 


•* Fulton ave. 


5 00 






IS 


00 


Rock 


20 00 




7 40 


'' Grace 












Smyrna 


27 75 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYNOD OF CATAWBA. 



227 



SAB. S. \V. B D3. 



Snow Hill 
Stanton 
St. George*s 
Westminster 
West Nottingham 
White Clay Creek 
Wicomico 
Wilmington, zst 
** Cen- 



306 
31 za 
36 96 
4850 
z8 25 



a59 44 



Worton 
Zion 



tral 

Hano- 
ver St 

Olivet 

Rodney 
St 98 37 

West 81 00 

38 00 



P6y o/Rto de yaneiro. 



Phy 0/ Washington City, 

Alexandria 

Big Oak 

Boyds 10 00 

Clifton 

Dames town 

Falls Church 

Georgetown,W. st 

Gurley 



9 00 
52 00 
15 oo 

153 9» 
14 10 
9 00 

39 33 
10 oj 



Hermon 

Hyattsville 

Lewinsville 

Manassas 12 00 

Mt. Hermon 

Mt. Zion 

NeeUville 25 00 

Oak Grove 

Prince William, ist a 00 

Vienna 12 40 

Washington 

City, ist 198 25 

;; 4tH 134 73 

** 6th 88 00 

" xsth st 25 00 

As- 
sembly 63 00 
" Cove- 

nant 837 za 
" Eastern 

" Metro- 

ave z,o33 39 

" North 9 08 

** Unity zo 03 

** West nz3Q 21 

West- 

m'tcr X35 00 

Miscellaneous 



3.0Z9 94 

SYNOD OP CATAWBA. 

Phy 0/ Ca^ Fear. 
Allen*s Chapel 
Bethany 
Blandonian 
Chadboum 
£benezer 
Fayetteville 
Freedom, East 



43 69 



22 50 

69 25 
X3 as 

8Z 00 
22 50 



xo 84 285 00 

8705 

zo 00 



27 57 
x88 00 



40 13 
J,475 14 



xo 00 

X 90 

50 00 



8 00 



80 00 
74 59 



55 00 



26 zx 

27 00 
1x2 00 

71 Z7 

6 25 

X35 94 

Z5 00 

Z2 50 



zo 00 

57 SO 
2^ 90 
Z05 00 
zo 00 

78 03 

527 33 

2Z Z2 

242 20 

627 87 
40 00 

33 79 
97 50 

Z02 75 
6 50 



298 49 2,394 76 



Friendship 80 

Hookerton 

Mt. Cahrary 

Mt. Olive 30 

Mt. Pleasant 

Panthersford 

\ ilcrim Cha[>el 

Pollocksville 

Raleigh , Davy st 

Shiloh 

Simpson Mis. 

St. Paul 

Trenton 

T. D. Darling Mis. 

Westminster 

White Hall 

William's Chapel 

Wilmington, Ches. st a 00 

3 xo 

Phy 0/ Catawba, 

Fen Salem 

Bethel 

Bethlehem 

Beihphage 

Biddlevine 

Black's Memorial 

Caldwell 

Chariotte 

Cleveland Mills 

Concord 5 00 

Davidson College 

Ebenezer 

Emmanuel 

Good Hope 

Hamilton 

Hendersonville 

Huntersville a 50 

Lawrence Chapel 

Leepcr's Chapel 

l.incolnton 

Lloyds 

Love's Chapel 

Matthew's Chapel 

McClintock 

Mills River 

Miranda 

^it. Olive 

Mt. Zion 

Murk land 

New Hope 

Philadelphia 

Poplar Tent 

Salem Hill 

Shelby 

Shiloh 

Siloam 

St. Paul 

Wadesboro 

Woodland 



7 50 



Pby 0/ Southern Virginia, 

Allen Mission 

Albright 

Big Oak 

Central 

Christ 

Ebenezer 

Holbrook st 

Mt. Hermon 

Mt. Zion 

Oak Grove 

Russell Grove 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



228 



SYNOD OF COLORADO. — SYNOD OF COLUMBIA. 



SAB. S. W. B*06. 



Pby of Yadkin. 

Aberdeen 

Allen Temple 

Booneville 

Bower*! Chapel 

Cameron 

Chajpel Hill 

Christian Hope 

Cool Spring 

Danville, Holbrook st 

Durham, ad 

Freedom a 

" East 
Gold Hill 
Manners 
Hillsboro 
John Hall Chapel 
Lexington 

Logan X 

Mebane 
Mocksville, ad 
Mooresville, ad 
Mt. Airy 

Mt. Tabor a 

Mt. Vernon 
Mt. Zion 
Nazareth 

New Centre x 

Oakland 
Pittsburgh 
Rockingham 
Salisbunr 
Statesvifle, ad 
St. James 
Thomaaville 
Wilson 
Winston 



6 oo 



SYNOD OF COLORADO. 

Pby 0/ Boulder. 
Berthoud 
Boulder 

" Valley a 56 

Brush, Rankin 9 54 

Cheyenne 
Crook 
Douglass, 
Fort Collins 16 00 

Moigan 
Fossil Creek and 

Stout 
Greeley 



25 50 
3 70 



amie 
Longmont 15 00 

Rawlins 

Timnath xa 00 

Valmont 8 40 

63 50 

Pby 0/ Denver, 
Abbott 
Akron 
Black Hawk 
Brighton 
Central City 
Cb. of Redeemer 
Denver, i-\A ave 

" Central ^__ ^. 

** Westmin*r 30 00 
, ** Boulevard 



4 00 
380 

zo 00 

5 00 

51 09 
500 5a 



36 00 
5 35 

70 55 

3 50 

5 00 

3 20 



8 50 



S8o 
35 00 



8 00 



73 36 
30 00 



zs 00 
6s so 

34 00 



a66 66 
6 00 



X39 00 
56X 95 
t75 86 

45 OS 

4a 9% 

6 00 



SAB. S. W. B*DS. 



Georgetown 
Golden 
Hvde Park 
Idaho Springs 
Littleton 
Otis 

Wray, zst 
Yuma 
Mucellaneous 



13 70 xo 25 
5 00 

13 as 
1 30 

X 65 a 15 

673 96 32 60 



Pby of Gunnison. 
Aspen 
Delta 
Fair Play 
Grand Junction 
Glenwood Springs 
Irwin 
Lake City 
Leadville 
Ouray 
Pitkin 

Poncha Springs 
Salida 
Tabernacle 



6 < 



Pby 0/ Pueblo, 

Alamosa^ 

Canon City 

Cinicero 

Colorado Springs 

Costilla 

Del Norte 

Durango 

Elmoro 

Engle 

Huerfano Cafion 

La Junu 

** Liiz 

" Vcta 

^^ Animas 

'* Mesa 
Monte Vuta 
Monument 
Pueblo 
Rocky Ford 
Saguache 
Silver CliflF 
Table Rock 
Trinidad, zst 
" ad 
Valley View 
Walsenburg 
WestCUflF 
Westminster 



30 00 
785 00 

600 4Z 



2 00 
a 00 



3 00 

3 00 

z^ 00 

226 00 

34 00 

9 88 
8a 66 

82s 



2 00 
ao 00 



3500 


vj 8s 


2 50 


zo 00 


«/>St 43 



•6S 



64 65 ao 6s 



\ 



SYNOD OF COLUMBIA. 

Pby 0/ East Oregon. 
Arlinglon 
Baker City 
Centreville 
Cleveland 
Enterprise 
Grass Valley 
Heppner 

ioseph 
Llikitat, zst 
" ad 
La Grande 
Lostine 
Pendleton a 60 



3 00 
3 00 



9 so 
a 00 
zo 30 



59 00 
809 75 



zo 70 
Z4 00 



5073 

40 00 

a 70 

Z58 70 



x,83Z ao 33 so z,Z4S I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



229 



SAB. S. W. B^DS. 



Shiloh 

Summemlle 

The Dalles 

Umatilla 

Union 

Weston 



Brents 

Coeur-d*-Alena 

Davenport 

Kamian 

Lapvai 

Leviston 

Meadow Creek 

Minnie Falls 

Moscow 

North Fork 

Prescott 

Rathdram 

Rockibrd 

Spangle 

Spokane Falls 

" Centenary 

" River 
Waitsbunr 
Walla Walla 
Wellpinit 



6 00 



a 00 
8 00 

7 00 
7 56 
5 00 



500 



1 so 

3 00 

5 00 

9a 77 

9 00 



X40 83 



75 00 



5 00 

xt 00 



*.v Ph 0/ Oregon. 

Albany 

Albina 7 00 

Astoria 40 60 

Aurora 5 00 

Bethany^ German xo 00 

Brownsviile 5 00 

Chinese Mission 17 61 

Clackamas 

Clatsop Plains zo 00 

CorvaUis 

Crawfordsville 6 35 

Eagle Park, Ger. 

East Portland, xst za k-^ 

*• Mixpah 
Eugene City z6 00 

Gervais 
Independence, Cal- 

Knappa 
La&yette 
Lebanon 
McCoy 
Marion 
Medford 
North Yamhill 
Oak Ridge 
Octorara 
Oregon City 
Pleasant Grove 
Portland, xst 

Calvary 
" St. John's 
Salem 
Sellwood 
Sjpring Yalle^ 
Tualitin Plains 
Yaquinna Bay 

63s 36 

Pby of Pug<i Sound. 

Aberdeen 
Ainslie 



8 00 

7 00 

8 00 
a63 37 

37 23 

XII ao 

9 00 
xB 00 

XX 60 
3 00 
S «> 



a 50 



X7 47 
5 00 



3 10 



x8 35 
X76 83 

4 40 



SAB. S. W. D*DS. 



Bellingham Bay 




Calvary 




Carbonado 




Cedar Creek 




Centralia 


3 00 


Chehalis 


6 00 


** Indian 




Casmopolis 




Cowlitz Co., xst 




Dungeness 




Ellensburgh 


13 90 


Fourth Plain 


X 00 


Freeport 
Gig Harbor 




Hoquiam 

La Camas, St. Jno. 




4 00 


Lincoln Creek 




Lopez Island 




McCormick 


3 70 


Montesano 




Mt. Pisgah 
Misqually, Indian 
Nooksack 






North Yakima 


4 35 


Olymoia 

Port Townscnd 


xo 6s 


645 


Bay 




Puyallup 




" Indian 


9 00 


Renton 




Rosedale 




San Juan 


3 50 


Seattle, xst 


56 00 


»* 3d 


8 00 


" 3d 




Snohombh 


4 '5 


South Union 




Sumner 


7 90 


Tacoma, xst 


99 70 


** ad 




" 3d 


4 00 


Toledo 




Trinity 




Union Ridge 


7 00 


Vancouver 




Vashon 




White River 




Wilkeson 




Woodland 




Wynooche 






249 60 


Pbyof So' th Oregon 




Ashland 


XX 00 


Eagle Pomt 




Grant's Pass 




Jacksonville 
tinkviUe 


4 3o 


3 00 


Medford 


II 00 


Myrtle Creek 


3 00 


Oakland 




Phttnix 


XI 00 


Roseburg 


4 00 


Wilbur 





.:J1 



8 50 



40 4X 



45 ao 

SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 

Pby of Alton. 

Alton 60 00 

Baldwin 

Belleview 

Belleville 3 xs 

Bethel 

Blair 



85 95 



95 00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



230 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



SAD. S. W. B DS. 



Brighton 
Butler 


4 oo 












Carlinville 






4705 


Carlyle 






14 »S 


Carrollton 




12 74 


79 00 


Chester 


4 oo 


5 00 




CollinsviUe 


60 00 






East Si. Louis 








Ebenezer 








Edwards ville 








Elm Point 








Greenfield 


7 70 






Greenville 


4 50 


22 43 




Hardin 








HilUboro 


32 00 


28 99 


9905 


IerseyviUe 
Lebanon 


38 00 
4 00 




20 60 
xo 00 


Litchfield 








Moro 








Nokomis 


S 00 






Old Ripley 
Plain View 


4 50 




4 05 


Plea<uint Ridge 








Plum Creek 








Raymond 








Rockwood 








Salem, German 


10 00 






Shipman 


3 00 






Sparta 






65 39 


Spring Cove 








Staunton 


3 85 






Steelvillc 








Sug.'\r Creek 








Trenton 
Troy 
Upper Alton 






25 00 


xo 00 






Virden 






426 50 


Walnut Grove 






20 00 


Wavcland 








Whitehall 








Woodbum, Ger. 


5 00 






Yankeecown 








Zion, German 


10 00 
267 70 


73 »6 






921 74 


Pby of Bloom 


ngton. 






Alvin 
Bement 


30 00 




93 77 


Bloomington, ist 


76 00 


X4 00 


136 70 


2d 


276 06 




867 65 


Buckley 


4 50 




10 00 


Cayuga 








Cerro Gordo 








Champaign 


X20 75 


26 00 


25903 


Chatsworth 


15 10 






Chenoa 


14 »5 




SO 00 


Clarence 


8 50 




X2 00 


Clinton 


27 64 


xo 00 


133 00 


Colfax 


xa Q5 






Cooksvillc 


17 15 




17 XO 


Covell 


4!^^ 






Danville 




xio 97 


D wight 








Elm (irove 








El Paso 


43 00 


12 44 


26 25 


Fairbury 


5 00 




22 00 


Farmer City 






5 50 


Gibson 


40 00 




42 25 


Gilman 


19 17 


10 00 


55 00 


Heyworth 


39 00 




26 05 


Homer 




3 00 


3 35 


Hoopeston 






20 cx> 


Jersey 

Lexington 
Long View 
Mackinaw 


13 50 




75 SO 




a 27 




7 55 







SAB. S. W. e*DS. 



Mahomet 

Mansfield 

Minonk 

Monticello 

Normal 

Onar^ga 

Paxton 

Philo 

Piper City 

Pontiac 

Prairie View 

Rankin 

Reading 

Ro^sville 

Selma 

Seymour 

Sheldon 

Sidney 

Tolono 

Towanda 

Union 

Urbana 

Watseka 

Waynesville 

Wellington 

Wenona 

Miscellaneous 



x8 28 

72 2S 

50 00 
6 60 
30 00 



7 00 
3 00 



50 04 

8 IS 

9 00 

10 00 
4 00 

IS 00 



ao6 

xo 00 
s so 



4a 59 
x8 00 
36 00 
134 00 

46 00 
149 IX 
50 00 

9 35 

a 00 
34 85 



4558 
30 00 

x6 00 



30 00 
4x3 8a 



1,094 64 92 VI 3,013 la 



Pby 0/ Cairo. 

Allendale 

Alto Pass 

America 

Anna y, 

Ava 

Bridgeport 

Cairo 

Carbon dale 

Carmi 

Carterville 

Centralia 

Cobden 

Du Bois 

Du Quoin 

Eagle Creek 

Enfield 



Fairfield 
Flora 

Friendsville 
G:)lum 
Gilead 
Golconda 
Grand Tower 
Harrisburg 
Hermon 
Kmmundy 
McLeansboro 
Metropolis 
Mt. Carmel 
** Vernon 
Murphysboro 
Na&h ville 
Oak Grove 
Odin 

Old Du Quoin 
Olney 

Pasturefield 
Pisgah 

Potter Memorial 
Richland 
Rich view 
Salem 

Saline Mines 
Sharon 
Shawneetown 



»7 75 



XX 70 
17 00 
x8 15 

33 85 



867 



90 81 



58s 



3 00 
xo 00 



88 
35 
50 


00 
50 
00 
00 


34 as 
33 50 


109 


86 


5 


90 



13 45 


13 


85 


10 


00 


I 


47 


6 


00 


6 


00 



« 73 
X 08 



394 
IS ao 



7 30 



xs 00 



5 4X 



«7 J 

8 I 



56s 
15 00 
" 45 



5 SO 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



231 



SAB. S. W. B DS. 



Sumner 

Tamaroa 

Union 

Versennes 

Wabash 

Walnut Hills 



Pby 0/ Chicago. 

Austin 3a 85 

Arlington Heights 

hloom 33 85 

BrauJwood 

Brookline x 75 

Calvary a 00 

Chicago, xst 1,483 85 

** ist, Gcr. 6 00 

** ad x,5ao 00 

3d Viti 63 

" 6ih 431 93 

8th 52 80 

" 4xst St 5X 89 

" Beldenave X3 06 

** Bethany 3 00 

Campbell 

Park 

** Central 

Park a 

Christ 
Chapel 
** Covenant 343 41 

** FuUerton ave 117 46 
" Grace x oj 

" Holland 5 00 

** Immanuel 
^* Tefferson Park X43 ox 

" Lake View 

'* Railroad Chapel 

" Re-Union 

" River Park x 00 

'* Scotch X7 00 

** Westminster 
Deerfield 
Dun ton 
Dtt Page 
Elwood 
. linglewood 

** 60th St 6 00 
Evanston 477 69 

Gardner a 40 

Glenwrood 5 00 

Half Day 

Herscher 5 00 

Highland Park 15 00 

Hinsdale 8 43 

Homewood a 00 

Hyde Park 49X 00 

luska a 00 

Joliet 

** xst 

" Central 139 49 

Kankakee x6 88 

Lake, xst 13 00 

Lake Forest 770 19 

Lake View xax 00 

libertyville 

Manteno 43 00 

Maywood a6 00 

Mission Chapel 
Moreland 
New Hope 
Normal Park 
Oak Park . xo 00 



6 70 



383 8a aa 48 s8a 04 



54 38 
74 ^<i 



635 



a 33 


1,8x3 'is 




a,x88 74 


71 67 


a,co9 75 




a,9" 35 
ia4 06 

60746 
85 xo 




xxo 35 




30 00 



65 00 



aa9 98 
2x8 50 



148 57 
13 35 
184 68 

x6 53 



35 00 

6r 00 
ao IX 
609 42 



45 00 





463 95 




8581 

501 00 

t6 50 


35 00 


1,338 83 




33 45 

xo 00 


35 00 


9 50 
X78 94 


♦ 





SAri. s. w. b'd 



Peotone 146 54 

Pullman xo co 

River Forest 

Riverside 

South Chicago 

South Evanston 

Waukegan 

Wheeling, German 

Will 

Wilmington ao 50 

Woodlawn Park X24 73 

Aliscel Ian eons 



5 10 35 
4X X4 

70 00 



Pby 0/ Freepof t. 
Apple River 
Belvidere 
Cedarville 
Durand 
Elizabeth 
Foreston Grove 
Freeport, xst 

" 3d 

" 3d, Ger. 
Galena, ist 

" Ger. 

" South 
Hanover 
Harvard 
Ind. Pres. Church 
Lawrence 
Lena 

Linn and Hebron 
Marengo 
Middle Creek 
Monticello 
OakviUe 
Oiegon 

Polo, Independent 
Prairie Dell, Gcr. 
Ridgefield 
Ridott, Ger. 
Rockford, ist 



35 


00 


4 35 


S6 


8x 


19 


60 


4 


00 


ax 


35 


as 


00 


80 


'*S 


13 


OQ 



10 00 

41 48 

57 50 



x8 17 



10 00 

x8 89 

5 73 

XXI 91 



Westminster 31 38 



Rock Run 
Scales Mound, Ger. 
Shannon 
Warren 
Willow Creek 
Winnebago 
Winslow 
Woodstock and 
Queen Anne 
Zion, Ger. 



4 00 

6 00 
96 00 
53 00 



6 50 
35 CO 

753 83 



Pby o/MattooH, 
Anderson 

Areola 5 00 

Ashmore xo 00 

Assumption ^ 5 00 

Beckwith Prairie 
Bethany x 95 

Bethel 8 00 

Casey 

Charleston 34 00 

Chrisman 
Dalton 

Dudlev 3 75 

Efhngnam 
Grand View 
Greenup 
H umbo It 

Kansas x8 00 

Marshall x xo 



4 70 
X8 36 

5 00 



33 38 



XX3 38 

36 CO 

5 00 

77 50 
30 00 
6897 
X3b 78 
as 44 

U 35 
50 51 

x,997 00 



XX, 3 19 19 344 79 16,838 06 



38 35 
36 00 



38 44 X9X 35 

X37 00 

xo 00 

33 43 53 00 



X3 44 



x8 17 
30 76 



27 50 
ao 00 



XI 35 

44 78 
193 93 



20 19 
49 5a 

31 00 

xoo 00 

XI3 00 

7 00 



8 50 
53 87 173 00 

X33 15 

x6 40 



193 15 x,39x I 



53 35 
4 00 8 00 



5 «> 54 53 
5 55 



x8 00 33 6x 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



232 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



SAB. S. W. B*DS. 



X» S3 

500 



14 r> 



Marvin 

Mattoon 7 

Milton 

MorrisonvtUa 

Moweaqua 

Mt. Oiivet 

Neogm 

New Hope 

New Providence 

Newton 

Oakland 

Palestine 

Pana 60 09 

Paris 90 00 

Pleasant Prairie az 05 

Prairie Bird 4 50 

Robinson 

Shelbyville 19 00 

Shobonier 

Taylorville ts xz 

Tower Hill 6 zz 

Tuscola 30 00 

Vandalia 35 00 

Walnut Prairie 

Watson 

West Okaw 4 64 

Yoric ^ 

Miscellaneous 



33« »3 



Pfy 0/ Ottawa. 

Au Sable Grove zs 00 

Aurora 3Z 56 

Brookfield 

Compton 

Earlville 4 00 

Grand Ridge 

Granville 

Kings 

Mendota xas 00 

Meriden 

Morris 7 00 

Oswego 

Ottawa, 

** South 
Paw Paw 

Plato c CO 

Rochejle 

Sandwich 7 co 

Streator Park 
Troy Grove 3 45 

Union Grove 
Vienna 
Waltham 
Waterman 37 00 



•35 5« 



Phy 0/ Ptoria, 
Aha 

Altona 4 00 

Astoria 

Brim field 6 50 

Brunswick 

Canton Z4 55 

Crow Meadow 
Deer Creek 
Delavan 
Elba 

Elmira za zo 

Elm wood 

Eureka ao 83 

Farmington 6 00 

French Grove 4 00 

Galesbutg 74 48 



33 50 



4 40 



8 58 



zz 70 



o 00 



za4 a6 
Z39 97 



so 00 
44 90 



49 55 

95 50 



ao 00 
ao 00 



68 aa 74a 57 



3» 75 
8z as 



Z4 30 

Z3a 8a 

35 54 
a4 as 



30 00 
as 00 
8s 60 
za7 40 
46 a6 



3 ao 7a 30 



Z3 ao 706 47 



a as 
zs 00 

7 90 
»94 «5 

96 as 

84 08 
39 48 
5» 39 
63 55 
Z9 00 
z6z Z3 



5 00 
3 55 



SAB. S. W. B'I>S. 



Green Valley 

Henry 

Ipava 

John Knox 

Knoxville 

Lacon 

Lewistown 

Limestone 

Low Point 

Oneida 

Peoria, zst 
" ad 
'' Bethel 
*' Calvary 
/* Grace 

Princeville 

Prospect 

Salem 

Sparland 

Vermont 

Washburn 

Washington 

Yates City 



SO a4 

45 «> 
5 00 
•7 00 
8 00 
3650 
134 90 



zs 37 

tz as 
o 30 
13 50 



7 00 
zo 86 



Pby 0/ Rifck Rivtr, 

Albany s 00 

Aledo Z09 7Z 

Alexis az 50 

Arlington 6 00 

Ashton Z7 00 

Beulah 4 ^5 

Buffalo Prairie 
Calvary 

Centre 34 ao 

Coal Valley s 50 

Dixon 5a 86 

Edgington 37 zs 

Franklin Grove 6 00 

Fulton 33 05 

Garden Plain zas 00 

Geneseo 37 00 

Hamlet 4 00 

Kaithsburg 

Kewanee 4 00 

Milan o 80 

Millersburg 8 00 

Morrison 66 65 

Munson 
Newton 

Norwood 68 00 

Peniel zz 00 

Perryton a 00 

Pleasant Ridge a 00 

Pre-Emption 

Princeton 105 90 

Rock Island, 
Broadway 
Rock Island, Cen'l 
" Ger. 

Sharon 

Spring Valley a S9 

Sterling 
Viola 

Woodhull Z3 04 

Miscellaneous 



644 4S 

Phy of Schuyltr. 

Appanoose z6 00 

Augusta ao 00 

Bardolph 

Brooklyn ^ zi 7s 

Burton Memorial Z7 00 

Bushnell xo 00. 



3660 
58 50 

«3« 43 

;69 xa Z90 34 

5 00 

z6 40 

30 54 

zs 87 38Z 85 

aa6 97 



33 36 



SX as 

88 az 

75 00 

97 75 

4»» 

ZZ 90 



36 as 
8 00 6s 04 



604 38 Z34 90 3,348 44 



5 00 

93 88 zoo 00 

S 00 6z zo 



zs 00 



5 00 

ax 64 



7 »S 
zs 00 



45 43 
35 00 
5 00 
aa 00 
3a 01 
4Z ao 

5 00 

zo 00 
za 00 

z6« 37 

6 35 
6a 3Z 
X5 8s • 

5 00 



39 85 «59 00 
Z63 66 



86 6z 

5 "o 

6 3Z 34 80 
8 36 

303 33 x,za9 6a 



za 00 
3 00 



17 00 



^x 00 
zs 00 
7 00 
a 00 
z6 00 
3 35 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYNOD OF INDIANA. 



233 



Camp Creek 
" Poim 
Catthace 
Chili 
Clayton 
Doddsville 
Ebenezer 

ElUngton Memorial 
ElTascon 
Fainnount 
Fountain Green 
Coed Hope 
Hamilton 
Hersman 
Huntsville 
Kirkwood 
Lee 

liberty 
Macomb 
Monmouth 
Montebello 
Mt. Sterling 
NauToo, German 
New Salem 
Olive 
Oquawka 
Perry 
Pittsfield 
Plymouth 
Pontoosic 
Prairie City 
Quincy, ist 
KttshTille 
Salem. German 
Walnut Grove 
Wanmw 
Wjrthe 
Miscellaneous 



34 00 
95 00 
34 33 

3 25 
7 00 

4 SO 



Ph 0/ Springfield, 
Bates 

Brush Creek 3 67 

Qiatham 
Decatu 



Farmington 
Green view 
Irish Grove 
Jacksonville, 2d, 

Portuguese 
Jacksonville, Cent*! 

" Sutest 

** United Por- 
tuguese 

" Westminster 
Lincoln 
Macon 
Manchester 
Maroa 
Mason City 
M array vilte 
Naples 

North San^mon 
Pennsylvania 
Petetsburgh 
Pisgah 

Pleasant Plains 
Providence 
Springfield, xst 
" ad 
" 3d 

" xst Portu'se 
" 3d 
Sweet Water 
Unity 
Virginia 



6600 
5 00 

39 00 



117 58 



73 40 
3 00 
580 

S 00 

35 3X 



15 00 

as «S 

S6 44 
5 6a 

138 to 
34898 
S8 3a 



33 xo 



9 00 
3 00 



841 

ao 00 
5 00 

xo 00 



«9 as 






a6 95 


4 «> 


7 


00 


x8 00 


45 00 






576 
32 48 


XX 00 






31 00 


«5 ~ 
80 00 

XS3 00 






55 35 
X83 35 


43 4S 


70 


00 


60 00 


X 00 








XX 3X 
4 ^l 






3a 00 


3 y> 






3 50 


x6 00 

38 31 

xo 00 


3 

63 


00 
95 


54 14 
63 SO 
h^ 35 


33 80 






3875 
30 00 



639 40 X87 95 833 89 



ili^ 



xo 80 



X7 64 



66 60 



6 
68 


00 
20 


45 ^S 
3 25 
35 00 


15 


00 


375 33 


39 «> 
9 ^l 


X5 X3 

38 84 


9« 


00 


Sa 

30 
so 


58 
xo 
95 



460 65 
276 24 
50 00 



tt 



•AB. S. W. B*DS. 



WiIHamsvil1e,Unton xa 85 

Winchester 

Miscellaneous 



SYNOD OP INDIANA. 



Pby 0/ Cf aw/or dsville. 
Alamo 
Attica 
Benton 
Bethany 
Bethel 
Bethlehem 
Beulah 
Clinton 
Colfax 

Covington, xst 
" 3d 

Crawfordsville, xst 
" Centre 
Darlington 



5 00 



73 06 
a 63 

6 00 



Dayton 

Delphi 

Dover 

Elizaville 

Eugene 

Fowler 

Frankfort 

Hopewell 

iuoson 
Lirklin 
Ladoga 
Lafayette, 1st 
*' 3d 

Lebanon ■ 
Lexington 
Marshfield 
Montexuma 
New Bethel 
New Port 
Newtown 
North Union 
Oxford 
Parkersburg 
Pleasant Hill 
Prairie Centre 
Rock Creek 
Rockfield 
Rockville • 
Romney 
Rossville 
Russell ville 
Spring Grove 
StateLine 
Sugar Creek 
Terhune 
Thomtown 
Toronto 
Union 

Veedersburg 
Waveland 
West Lebanon 

" Point 
WilHamsport 
Miscellaneous 



4^60 



X 30 

7 00 

3 00 

383 00 

3 00 
5 00 

X3 3X 

xo x6 
9386 
7 00 
13 00 



x6 00 



a8 75 
x6 S3 

300 



26 00 



765 27 
Phy 0/ Fort Waynt. 

Albion 

Auburn 8 00 

Bluffton XX 00 

Bristol 

Columbia City xo 40 

Decatur 



5 00 



918 47 97 6a 1,869 S« 



xo 58 
7 57 



30s 



56 60 

X32 xo 
ao 00 

36 00 
x6 70 



5 00 

333 35 

X50 00 
340 83 

9 00 



X9S 38 
X9 06 
43 00 

3383 
90 00 
X05 00 
33 50 
33 00 



XO 


00 


X4 05 


X30 


00 


45 


00 


X7 1:7 


5 


00 


5 


00 


48 


30 


3X 


20 



60 00 

XX 76 
9 50 



3X ao 1,809 43 

38 45 
7 00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



234 



SYNOD OF INDIANA. 





t 00 


SAB. s. 


w. b'ds. 


Crown Point 


x6 xo 


SAB. S. 


W. B DS. 


Elhanon 






10 40 


22 50 


Elkhart 


438 00 


89 00 
76 00 


283 00 
37885 


Francisville 








Fort Wayne, ist 


134 46 


Goodland 


2 00 




xo 20 


ad 




23 05 


50 00 


Granger 








3d 


70 00 




X24 62 


Hebron 








Goshen 


115 00 


60 00 


231 47 


IdaviUe 








Highland 








Kentland ^ 




5 00 


XX 00 


Hopewell 


6 00 






Lake Prairie 


X7 00 




25 70 


Huntingdon 
Kendalfville 






75 36 


La Porte 


127 40 


75 00 


173 37 


ti 56 




50 Of 


Logansport, xst 


48 CO 




9« 00 


Kingsland 
La Grange 








*• Broadway 10 00 


«7 50 


86 7X 


10 00 




44 14 


Meadow Lake 






II as 


LarwiU 








Michigan City 


36 00 


IX 40 


95 70 


Ligonier 


8 56 






Mishawaka 


X 00 




12 74 


Lima 


16 00 




75 'o 


Monticello 


x8 00 




37 53 


Millersburg 








M t. Zion 








(>rland 








Pisgah 


6 00 




13 19 


Ossian 




18 10 


19 00 


Plymouth 


»o 95 




50 10 


Pierceton 


7 75 




xo 00 


Remineton 
Rensselaer 






9 24 


Pleasant Grove 












10 47 


Salem Centre 








Rochester 


5 5a 




»4 75 


Troy 


653 






RoUinePrairie 
South Bend, xst 








Warsaw 


z6i» 




50 00 


X27 00 




X41 «5 


Waterloo 


7 00 






ad 
Sumptions Prairie 
Tassinong 






30 00 




87726 


266 15 


1,427 00 


6 00 














Tippecanoe 








Pby of Indianapolis, 






Union 


9 99 




58 20 


Acton 
Bainbridge 
Bethany 
Bloomington, 


2 00 
17 40 

31 55 


39 x6 


X4 00 
36 40 


Valparaiso 
Walkerton 
West Union 
Winamac 


30 00 




72 46 
xo 43 


Walnut St 






Boggstown 










474 9<5 


119 30 


997 86 


Brownsburg 
Carpentersville 


3 00 


4 00 




Fby o/Muncie. 






Clermont 








Anderson 


5 00 




36 50 


Columbus 






60 70 


Blaine 








Danville 








Centre Grove 








Edinburgh 






xo 00 


Elwood 


2 OJ 






Franklin 


6845 




17s 00 


Hartford City 


5 50 


5 50 




Georgetown 








Hopewell 


»9 75 


2 as 




Greencastle 


16 23 




so 90 


Tonesboro 
Kokomo 


5 00 




5 00 


Greenfield 








5 00 




15 00 


Greenwood 


«9 SO 




30 00 


\a Gro 








Hopewell 
Indianapolis, tst 


65 00 


TJ 


87 50 


Liberty 


4 25 






170 50 


510 00 
x,85o 00 


Marion 


13 «> 




47 00 


sd 


249 19 




Muncie 


47 70 




X27 42 


^^\ 


Z9 80 


7 33 


X47 45 


New Cumberland 








5th 






12 31 


New Hope 
Noblesville 


4 00 




9 50 


6th 


4 «> 




ao 00 






29 00 


7th 






115 00 










;♦ 9th 








Peru 


SO 00 


598 


74 77 


** xath 


16 ao 






Portland 


7 60 




24 00 


»» East Wash- 






Shiloh 


2 00 






ington St lO oo 






Tipton 


5 00 




15 00 


" Memorial 


23 IX 


23 xo 


ZZ2 45 


Union City 


2 00 




as 00 


" Olive st 








Wabash 


99 00 




185 IX 
6 00 


" Tabernacle 36 22 


39 00 


49X 70 


Winchester 


5 00 




Nashville 


5 «> 






Xenia 






4 05 


New Pisg^h 






















Putnam ville 










38x 80 


13 73 


603 35 


Southport 


5 ao 




55 «8 
8 50 










White Lick 


Z5 28 




Pby 0/ New Albany, 






Zionsville 








Anderson 
















Bedford 


xo 00 




'6 53 




777 63 


Z36 xo 


3,787 09 


Beech Grove 






5 90 


Pby of Loganspori, 






Bethel 
Bethlehem 








Akron 








Bridgeport 








Bedford 








B^ownstown 


6 00 






Bethel 


4 00 






Charlestown 






84 85 


Bethlehem 






S 00 


Corydon 






ao 00 


Burton 








Crothcrsville 






1656 


Brookston 








Elizabeth 








Centre 








Graham 








Concord 






X4 17 


Grantsburg 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYNOD OF INDIAN TERRITORY. 



235 



SAB. S. W. B*DS. 1 



SA.B. S. W. B DS. 



Greenville 
Hanover 
Jackson Co. 
JcfTerson 
Jeffcrsonville 
Kossuth 
Laconia 
Leavenworth 
Lexington 
Livonia 
Madison, 1st 
ad 
Manckport 
Milltown 
Mitchell 
Monroe 
Mt. Lebanon 
Mu Vernon 
New Albany, 1st 
ad 
** "id 

Churches 
New Philadelphia 
" Washington 
North Vernon 
Oak Grove 
Orleans 
Otisco 

Owen Creek 
Paoli 

Pleasant Hill 
Pleasant Township 
Rehoboth 
Salem 
Seymour 
Sharon 

" Hill 
Smyrna 
St. John's 
Utica 

Valley City 
Vernon 
Vevay 

Walnut Ridge 
Miscellaneous 



ax 41 


4 


76 


76 00 




X 


00 




71 07 






70 00 
X as 

5 00 


10 00 








7 00 






xo 00 


60 47 


89 


53 


"S 00 


17 00 






4a 50 



8 50 



« 45 


93 00 


19 00 


xao 70 


ax 00 


174 25 




736 65 


3 33 




850 


15 00 




X4 00 




XX 00 




13 64 


I 53 


5 SO 




6 50 


'3 as 


ao 10 


4 99 


as 60 



8 78 



7X 89 
7 «3 

6 35 



335 77 95 "9 1.736 " 



P^ 0/ Vincennes. 
Bethany 

Brazil 14 00 

Bruceville 

Carlisle x 50 

Claiborne 
Evansville, ist ave. 

" Grace 4a 95 

** Walnut St. 74 00 
Graysville 
Howes ville 
Indiana 

Koleen x 00 

Mt. Vernon 
Oak Grove 
Oakland City 
Ohio 

Olive Hill 
Petersbuig 
Poland 

Princeton 33 00 

Rockport 
Royal Oak 
Salem 
Smyrna 

Spencer 3 00 

Sullivan 

Terre Haute, Cen'l 35 50 
Moffint st 3 00 



39 84 



S 76 
30 00 

a X3 
34 38 

5 00 
106 00 
X75 as 



16 77 

60 00 
33 00 



73 00 
67 00 



Upper Indiana 
Vincennes 
Washington 
West Salem 
Worth ington 
Miscellaneous 



7 35 



5 00 



584 
ao 00 



X05 a6 
35 00 



»So 



aax 30 69 68 8ai 4s 



Pby 0/ White Water, 
Arlington 

Aurora 5 00 

Bath 

Brookville 
Cambridge City 
Clarksburg 

Mem'l 
Cold Spring 
College Corner 
Concord 
Connersville, xst xo 00 

Ger. 
Dunlapsville 8 00 

Ebenezer 4 00 

Greensburgh 83 83 

Hagerstown 3 00 

Harmony 
Homer 
Hopewell 

Kingston ao 00 

Knightstown 

I^wrenceburg 8 00 

Lewisville 3 00 

Liberty 5 00 

Metamora 

Mt. Carmei 6 00 

New Castle 7 00 

Palmetto 
Providence 

Richmond 84 00 

Rising Sun xo so 

Rushville 

Sardinia " "' 

Shelbyville 38 87 

** German 

Sj>arta 

lower's Chapel 
Union 6 75 

Versailles s 00 



307 95 



as 00 

71 00 

380 

xo 00 

400 x8 

xs 00 

xxo 37 
34 50 
X3 9» 

xo 00 
7 00 



906 36 

a 50 

95 00 

a so 

X64 54 



x,ao3 06 



SYNOD OF INDIAN TERRITORY. 

Pby 0/ the Cherokee Nation, 
Antioch 
Aw-ga-ley 
Barren Fork 
Blockard's Chapel 
Blue Springs 
Canadaville 
Claramore 
Dwight 
Elm Springs 
Eureka 
Fleetwood 
Fort Gibson 
Millwood 
Oowala 
Park Hill 
Pleasant Hill 
Pleasant Valley 
Tahlequah 
Viniia 

Wa'nut Grove 
While Water 

«3 « 



5 00 



500 
3 00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



236 



SYNOD OF IOWA. 



SAB. & W. B*DS. 



SAB. S. W. B OS. 



Pby 0/ Chickatnvf. 






Richland Centre 






Atoka 
Caddo 
Durant 


6 00 


9 


50 


Scotch Grove 

Shellsbiifg 

Springvilfe 

Vinton 

Watkins 

Wheatland 

Wyoming 


9 00 
5 CO 


91 00 

5 so 


Johnsonville 
Lehigh 
Paul's Valley 
Punell 


4 « 






49 00 
9640 


X99 49 

7 75 

35 »o 


White Bead Hill 


3 00 












Wynnewood 


300 
x6 00 






450 5x 

Pby 0/ Council Bluff*. 


»57 X7 x»377 9« 




9 


50 




Pby 0/ Choctaw. 






Adair 
Afton 


658 


xo 90 


Apeli 








Atlantic 






Beaver Dam 








Audubon 


55 n 




Bennington 
Big Uck 


s 00 






Avoca 


XI 50 


4S 








Bedford 


xoo 45 


Forest 








Brooks 


X 00 




Hebron 








Carson 


5 00 


95 00 


Lenox 








Casey 
Clarinda 


75 




McAleater 








56 35 


6x X5 


Mt. Gilead 








Conway 


4 70 




** Zion 


00 
8 00 






Coming 
Council Blulb 


X5 00 


8898 


Mountain Fork 








79 35 


New Hope 
Oak Uiif 








Creston 


90 50 


7 35 








Emerson 


48 00 


99 55 


Philadelphia 


tx 70 






Essex 


9 50 


x8 90 


Sans Bois 


9 50 






Goshen 


X 00 




St. Paul 








(Greenfield 


9 99 


95 79 


Wheelock 


3650 






Griswold 
Guthrie Centre 
Hamburg 


39 00 


5 00 




60 70 






x6 00 


SCO 


Pby 0/ Muscogte. 






Imogene 
Knox 


546 
9 00 




Achena 








Lenox 


15 xo 


t^' ■• 


Econtachka 


zo 00 






Malvern 


19 00 


3a 3a 


Muscoeee 
North Fork 


47 ^*^ 






XX 40 


95 94 








Marne 






Nuyaka 
Red Fork 


15 00 






Menlo 


99 95 


39 fc 


xo 00 






Missouri Valley 


9 50 




Tulsa 








Mornine Star 
Mount Ayr 


Z7 30 




Wealaka 










9 00 


Wcwoka 


ao 55 






Neola 

Nodaway 

Norwich 


4 00 
17 50 






X02 55 
















Pilot Grove 






SYNOD OF IOWA. 






Platte Centre 


8 00 




Pby of Ctdar Rapids. 






Prairie Star 
Randolph 


x6 ^ 




Anamosa 




z8 


00 


Redding 
Red Oak 






Andrew 


673 






35 50 


9964 


Atkins 


5 00 


X 


00 


Sharon 


zz 00 




Bellevue 




800 




Shelby 


95 00 




Bethel 


676 






Shenandoah 


97 75 


93 56 36 88 


Big Grove 








Sidney 


50 00 


8 88 


Blairstown 


90 00 


ZQ 


li 


VilHsca 


1843 




Cedar Rapids, ist 


a 00 


489 


Walnut 


9 09 


634 


ad 


131 93 


50 00 zoa 


36 


Westminster 


13 00 




^ \* 3<^ 


9 93 


99 Z5 




Woodbine 


ZO 50 


1565 


Central 








Yorktown 


94 50 




Centre Junction 


X2 00 


13 00 7 70 












Clarence 


984 


7 94 34 
30 00 z8o 

a 


to 




76Z zz 


93 56 609 69 


Clinton 
Delmar 


X05 03 


80 
00 


Pby 0/ Dot Moines. 




Elwood 








Adel 


18 00 


95 00 


Fulton 








Albia 




"7 57 


Garrison 




14 11 


Allerton 






Hickory Grove 








Centreville 






Linn Grove 


XI 00 


53 


00 


Chariton 


99 60 


6 44 17 35 


Lyons 
ftfanon 


ZO 03 


a 


00 


Colfiut , 


364 


xo 00 


ZO 58 


« 33 79 


60 


Columbia 






Mechanicsville 


slo 


35 


00 


Corydon 
Dallas Centre 






Monticello 


X 70 






XI 00 


6 00 x8 53 


Mt. Vernon 


a3 75 


9 00 50 


00 


Derby 






Onslow 


6 90 


97 


00 


Des Moines, 6th 




895 


Pleasant Hill 








»' Bethany 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYNOD OF IOWA. 



237 



Des Moines 

** Cent'l 145 48 

** Highland Pk. 

** Wesun'r 20 00 

Dexter 
£arlham 
East Des Moines 
English, xst 
Garden Grove 
Grand River 
Grimes 
Hartford 
Hopeville 
Humcstott 
Indianola 
Jacksonville 
Knozville 
Laurel 
Ldghton 
Leon 
LeRov 
Lineville 
Lucas 
Mariposa 

Medora 4 87 

Minbum 
Moolton 
New Sharon 
Newton 
Olivet 
Osceola 
Oskaloosa 
Panora 
Pella 
Perry 
Plymouth 
Promise City 
Ridgedale 
Russell 
St. Charles 
Seymour 

South Des Moines 
Union ville 
Waukee 
White Oak 
Winterset 
Miscellaneous 



Beihel 

C«ntretown, Ger. a 00 

Dayton 

DuDuque, xst 



30 00 

zoo 00 

35 00 

a 00 



Ger. 
Dircrsville, Ger. 
Fairbanks 
Farley 
Fiankville 
Hazleton 
Hopkinton 

Independence, ist xao go 
'* Ger. lo 00 

Jessup 
Lansing, ist 

Ger. 
Littleton 
Lime Springs 
McGregor. Ger. 
Manchester 
Maynard 
Mt. Hope 

Oelwcin 5 00 

Pine Creek 7 00 ■ 

Pleasant Grove 3 00 



3 00 
3 00 
7 14 



4 16 
850 
300 



400 



X96 95 

5984 
4841 



3X 03 




133 91 


la 90 






17 56 




606 


I 00 






17 00 




1484 


z 00 




XT 53 


90 00 


13 00 


58 95 


6 00 






15 00 




30 00 

i6s 


4 00 




3 40 


13 00 


300 


33 31 



z 00 


xo 00 


XX 97 


33 00 


7 34 


31 97 


3 00 




4 33 

14 37 


300 




25 00 


3 00 




3 54 


33 00 






9 00 






x6 00 






X3 73 




1738 


93 84 




6756 


5 00 




zo 00 








564 95 


6578 


886 88 



46 so 
90 00 



985 



X9694 



54 27 
134 31 
30 00 
a 44 
35 00 

776 



I 18 

Z3 X5 

8 35 
39 00 



SAB. S. W. B*D9. 



Prairie 

Ross ville 

Rowley 

Sherrill's Mound,Ger 5 00 

Sumner 



65 00 



Volga City 

Waukon, German 

West Union 

Wilson's Grove 9 00 

Zion 9 xo 



PBy o/Fori Dodge, 

Alta 3 

Arcadia 

Ashton 

Auburn 

Bancroft 9 

Battle Creek xz 

Bethel 

Boone 

Burt X 

Calliope 8 

Carroll 9 

Cherokee 

Churdan a 

Coon Rapids 

Dana 

Dedham 3 

Dentson 

Earley 9 

East Cedar 15 

Emmanuel, German 13 

Emmitt Co., tst 

** Scotch 

Estherville 

Fonda 5 

Fort Dodge 68 

Gilmore City 
Glidden 4 

Grand Junction 34 

Hospers 3 

Ida Grove 7 

Inwood 
Irenton 
Jefferson 
Lake City 
Le Mars 
Larrabee 

Liberty a 

Lohrville 7 

Lvon Co., German 3 
Manilla 
Manning 
Mapleton 
Marcus 
Meriden 
Moingona 
O'Brien Co., Scotch 
Odebolt 
Paton 
PauUina 
Pleasant Valley 
Plover 

Plymouth Co. 
Pomeroy 
Providence 
Ramsey, Ger. 



36 00 



x6 



58 



36 



[3 50 
7 as 
6 00 



Rippey 
Rockwell City 
Rolfe, 2d 
Sac City 
Sanborn 
Schaller 
Sioux City, 1st 
" ad 



3 \ 
36, 
«3 < 



5 00 



IS 71 



X 00 
37 17 



a 43 

8 00 
467 

8 33 



4x6 90 86 33 518 83 



97 

3 00 9 08 

S8 

8 75 14 8s 

x6 09 
23 57 
60 30 

X7 76 



87 OS 
3 10 



35 00 
38 6x 

36 33 

55 57 
56X 

«5 95 



7 92 



40 00 
X 80 



34 36 
660a 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



238 



SYNOD OF KANSAS. 



SAB. S. W. t^DS, 



Sioux City Co., ad 
Spirit Lake 3 34 

Storm Lake x 15 

Sunny Side 
VaU 

West Bend 
Westminster & Wood- 
bury Co., 
Wheatland, Ger. 40 00 



Pby 0/ Iowa, 

Bentonsport 
Birminzham 
Bloomneld 
Bonaparte 
Burlington, xst 
Chequest 
Croton 

Ebenezer, German 
Fairfield 
Ft. Madison 
Grandview ^ 
Home Prairie 
Keokuk, Westmin- 
ster 
Kirkville 
Kossuth 
Lebanon 
Libertyville 
MartiuKburg 
Mediapolis 
Middletown 
Montrose 
Morning Sun 
Ml. Pleasant, ist 
Ger. 
" Zion 

New London 
Oakland 
Ottumwa, ist 
Pleasant Plain 
Primrose 
Salina 
Sharon 
Shiloh 
Shunam 
Spring Creek 
St. Peter's Evangel 
Troy 
Union 
Wapello 
West Grove 
West Point 
Winficld 



95 84 



39 53 
7 00 



23X 38 

XX 5« 

XX 93 

3 00 

X3 00 

39 59 
X5 65 

5 00 
42 70 
63 50 

485 



46 3X 
3 90 



Pby o/Iowa City, 



Atalissa 
Bethel 
Blue Grass 
Brooklyn 
Cedar Valley 
Columbus Cfentral 
Crawfordsville 
Davenport, xst 
" ad 

Uccp River 
Eldridge 
Elm Grove 
Fairvievr 
Hermon 
Iowa City 
Keota 
Ladora 



3 00 



x6 57 



84 00 
348 



54 75 
8 31 



9 36 
3 00 



3 00 



X7 00 
» 57 



498 07 96 43 523 07 



6 09 

3 SO 
3x4 64 



53 00 165 so 
54 00 



67 45 

25 00 

9 80 

305 X5 

55 07 

3> 40 

30 00 
X05 00 



13 00 



3 15 






5 00 






4 50 




«3 75 


8 00 






4 50 




xo 00 


47 25 






17 62 






850 


655 




5 57 




23 51 


25 19 


395 45 


i»»63 77 



46 45 



1 


58 


307 


2 


50 


29 


3 59 


»5 50 


X53 75 




i8s 


00 


4 


00 




6 


00 


IX 


60 


675 






45 


XI 


X 25 


77 44 


2a 


30 




x6 


50 


zo 00 









La Fayette 
La Claire 
Malcolm 
Marengo 
Montezumik 
Mt. Union 
Muscatine, ist 

** German 

Nolo 
Oxford 
Princeton 
Red Oak Grove 
Scott 
Sigoumey 
Sugar Creek 
Summit 
Tipton 
Onion 
Unity 

Washington 
West Branch 
" Liberty 
What Cheer 
Williamsburg 
Wilton 
Miscellaneous 



xo 00 




800 

326 

25 05 


X4 00 
700 
xo 00 


35 00 
5 00 


105 03 



6 00 



835 
xo 00 

3884 
5 50 



36 00 
a 00 
XX oo 

10 00 



13 x6 



Pby 0/ Waterloo. 
Ackley 
Albion 
Aplington 
Cedar Falls 

*» Valley 
Clarksville 
Conrad 
Dows 
Dysart 

East Friesland 
Eldora 
Greene 

Grundy Centre 
Holland, Ger. 
Janesville 
Kamrar 
La Porte Ciiy 
Marshall town 
Morrison 
Nevada 
Pisgah 

Point Pleasant 
Rock Creek, Ger. 
Salem 

State Centre 
Steamboat Rock 
Tama 
Toledo 
Tranquillity 
Union, Ger. 
Waterloo 
Waverlj^ 

West Friesland, Ger. 
William!. 



9 00 

X4 00 
a 00 
12 00 

3 00 
5 00 

32 60 

4 00 

8 54 

52 SO 
4 00 
25 00 

33 50 
8 00 



X4 03 

2 00 

1 05 
824 

X9 00 

2 00 



15 00 



273 68 

SYNOD OP KANSAS. 

Pby 0/ Emporia, 
Agricola 

Argonia ^ 5 00 

Arkansas City 5 00 

Augusta 
Belle Plaine 
Big Creek 
Brainerd 



x6 46 



3X 00 

X7 50 



S 00 



a X5 

8454 

4048 
3 50 
9 y> 

4088 
7 3X 



500 63 36 X5 778 56 



53 9^ 
xa 00 

|x5 00 



X16 ax 
X2 00 
10 75 

15 00 

41 35 
26 69 

2X 87 



34 20 
xo 00 



9 53 
8704 

X2 X4 

4 00 



54 96 5«4 74 



5 00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYNOD OF KANSAS. 



239 



SAB. S. W. B'DS. 



Burlingame 


a4 00 


Burlinzton 
Caldwell 


xo 00 


8 00 


Calvary 
Cedar Point 




Clear Water 


3 00 


Clemeote 


2 00 


Conway Sprines 
Cottonwood Falls 


S 00 


Council Grove 


13 00 


Dexter 




Eaton 




El Dorado 


ao 00 


El Paso 


3 00 


Elmendaro 




Emporia, xst 


96 S7 
5 00 


" Arundel av. 




Eureka 




Florence 




Grand Summit 




Harmony 
HartfordJ 






Howard 


5 00 


Hunnewell 


as 00 


Indianola 


X 00 


LcRoy 




Lyndon 
Madison 


5 56 




Maple City 




Marion 


4X 25 


Maxon 




Mavfield 
Melvem 


9 00 




Morris 




Mt. Pleasant 


X 00 


Mt. Vernon 




Mulvane 


xo 00 


Neal 


a 50 


New Salem 




Newton 


xo oo 


Osage City 


18 00 


Oxford 




Peabody 


x6 00 


Peotonr 




Perkins 




Pleasant Unity 




Potwin 




Quenereo 
Reece 


538 


X ao 


Salem Township 




" Welsh 




Sedan 




Silver Creek 


4 00 


Slate Valley 


500 


Union, ist 


a 33 


" ad 




Walnut Valley 




Walton 




WauneU 




Waverly 


aa so 


Wellington 


3a 75 


Westminster 




White City 


6 00 


Wichita, ist 


48 00 


Dodge av« 


:. 


** Lincoln st 




" Oak St. 


XO 00 


" Perkins 




" West Side 




Welcome 




WiUey 


5 SO 


Winfield 


a3 00 




5" 69 


Pby 0/ Highland, 


Atchison 


3a 00 


16 



xo 00 

I 00 

33 08 



35 xa 

45 48 
10 89 



16 43 



xo 80 



X 80 

4 00 

a? as 

5 7» 



xoi 87 
xo 50 

36 79 



X ao 
xo 79 



X 50 



69 73 



14 58 
30 00 

14 75 
48 oa 

X3 x8 
SO 

S 50 



as 00 

S06 OX 

5 00 



Avoca 

Axtell 

Baileyyille 

Blue Rapids 

Clifton 

Corning 

Deer Creek 

Effingham 

Fairview 

Frankfort 

Hiawatha 

Highland 

Holton, ist 

" German 
Horton 
Huron 
Irving 
Lancaster 
Leghorn 
MarA'sville 

^' North 
Netawaka 
Neuchatel 
Norton ville 
Onaga 
Oneida 
Troy 

Vermillion 
Washington 
Willis 



SAB. S. W. B DS. 



6 00 



XO 00 
10 cx> 
3 00 



30 00 
65 00 
xo 50 



4 30 
653 



3 00 
7 00 



4 9» 
3 00 



9 00 



X9 68 
16 58 



6 50 



ao7 ^i 



SI a6 



Pby of Larntd. 

Anthony 

Arlington 

Ashland t 

Attica 

Banner 

Bazine 

Beaver 

Bellcfonte 

Bethel 

Burrton 

Cairo 

Canton 

Chase 

Cimarron 

Claflin 

Cold Water 

Coolidze 

Crisfiela 

Danville 

Dodge City 

Edwin 

Ellinwood 

Frecport 

Galva 

Garden City 

Geneieo 

Great Bend 

Greensburg 

Halstead 

Harper 

Hartland 

Hugoton 

Hutchinson 

luka 

Kendall 

Kingman 

Kinsley 

Lakin 

Lamed 

Lecsburg 

Liberal 

Lydia 

Lyons 



5898 



X5 00 



»33 *^ 



5 73 



9 56 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



240 



SYNOD OF KANSAS. 



SAB. 8. W. B^DS. 



SAB. 8. W. B*DS. 



Marauette 
Mcpherson 








Osage, xst 


a840 




aa 50 




58 10 


Oswego 


S^ 


ao 00 


Meade Centre 








Ottawa 


34 «> 


Medicine Lodge 








Paola 


xo 00 


775 4 80 


Mt. Nabo 








Parsons 




Nashville 








Pittoburgh 






Ness City 








Pleasant Hill 


a 00 




Ninnescah 








Pleasanton 






Parks 








Princeton 


xo as 




Pratt 








Richmond 


7 50 




Richfield 








Scammon 






Roxbury 
Sanuri 








Somerset 












Springdale 






SpearviUe 


za 66 






Sugar Valley 


a 40 




Sterling .-.^ 


13 00 






Thayer 






St. John 








Toronto 






Sylvia 








Union town 






Valley Township 
Wendell 
West Plains 








Walnut 
Weir City 
Yates Centre 


I 75 










Miscellaneous 




xo 00 














Woodsdale 










a97 XX 


34 55 334 I7 


Zion 














Miscellaneous 






758 
aTo 69 


Phy of Osbemt, 

Achillea 
Atkin 






X44 7a 


a9o 




\Phyo/Ntotko 








Beaver Valley 
Bethel 






Alumont "" 








Blakeman 






Baxter Springs 








Bow Creek 






Bethel 








Colby 






Blue Mound 


X 99 






Covert 






Caney 








Cresson 






^^^\ «. 


365 




31 13 








Central City 


\% 






Downs 






Chanute 


a 93 


9 66 


Fairport 
Goodland 


5 00 




Cherokee 










» 75 


Cherry vale 


6 10 


XX 87 


t% 


Gove 






Chetopa 






Graham 






Coffey ville 


a 6s 


a 6s 




Grainfield 






Colony 
Columbus 


IX 00 


485 


3 73 


Hays City 
Hill City 


6 00 




Edna 








Hoxie 


a 00 




Elk City 








Kill Creek 






Erie 


\Z 






Logan 






Fairview 






Long Island 






Fort Scott, ist 


19 8a 




40 00 


Ludell 






ad 








Mt. Salem 






Fredonia 


xo 00 






New York 






Galena 








Norton 


X4 00 


xa 00 


Gamett 


9Z 00 




5 85 


Oakley 






Geneva 


X 00 






Oberim 






Girard 


X7 70 




ao ax 


Olivet 






Glendale 






3 00 


Osborne 


5 00 




Harrison 








Phillipsbnig 


5 00 




Humboldt 


as (A 




60 as 


Plainville 






Ipdependence 






9 as 


Pleasant Valley 






lola 


If 00 




x6 Z9 


Prairie View 






Lake Creek 








Rose Valley 






LaCygne 








Russell 






Le Loup 








Selden 


3 00 




Liberty 
Lone Elm 


S SO 






Sharon Springs 










z 40 


Shiloh 






LiOuisbuig 






xo 00 


Smith Centre 


3 00 




McCune 


a so 


4 SO 




Wa Keeney 




5 35 xo 75 


Mapleton 


X 00 






Wallace 






Miami, 4th 








White Lily 






Mineral Point 


X 00 






White Rock 






MUHken Memorial 


S 00 






Zion 






Monmouth 








Miscellaneous 




5 00 


Montana 
Moran 














a 40 




6 6s 




43 00 


5 35 30 50 


Mound Valley 
Neodesha 


a 00 




>3 45 


Pby 0/ SohtMn. 




Neosho Falls 






3 03 


Abilene 




'5 44 


New Albany 








Bashan 




44 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYNOD OF KENTUCKY. 



241 



SAB. S. W. B*D6. 



Banitfd Tftbemacle 

BeUerOle 

Belotc 

Bcnniagton 

Blue Stem 

Bridgeport 

Carlton 

Cairker City 

Cheever 

Clyde 

Concord 

Concordia 

CulTcr 

Delphos 

Dillon 

EUsirorth 

Fort Haiker 

Fountain 

Glasco 

Glen Elder 

Harmony 

HerrinctOB 

Hope 

Industry 

Kanopolii 

Lincoln 

Manchester 

Mankato 

Ifillonvalc 

Minneapolis 

Mt. Pleasant 

Mulberry, Fr'ch 

Orbitello 

Plum Creek 

Poheta 

ProTidence 

Salina 

SalcYiUe 

Scandia 

Scotch Plains 

Solomon 

Svlran Grove 

Union 

*• Grove 
Vesper 
White Rock 
White Creek 
Wilson 
Woodbine 
MiaceUaneous 



3 00 



S 00 

8 00 

38 xa 

3 73 
»7 77 
7 00 



«83 
a 00 



9 00 
367 



x6 oa 

Soo 

47 95 



a 00 

8 00 

65 



75 



Adrian 

Annourdale 

Auburn 

Bala 

Baldwin 

Bethel 

Blackjack 

Clay Centre 

Clinton 

DeSoto 

Ed^erton 

Fairmount 

Gardner 

Hebron 

High Prairie 

Iduia 

Industry 

Junction City 

Kansas City 

•* Western 

Highland 
Lawrence 57 97 



16 Z3 



300 

700 
506 

300 



3a6 

Z5 00 
aoo 00 



z 88 



83 00 
95 00 



19 38 



zz 80 



6 8s 



40 00 



I as 

400 

9 33 
369 



d4 9X 



13 80 

5 00 

«5 77 aofi 97 



6 00 
9 47 

3*49 

S 8s as 69 

94 89 



1530 



3r 7S 
76 00 



s 05 ^58 < 



SAB. S. W. B*DS. 



Leavenworth 
Leonard ville 
Lowemont 
Manhattan 
Meriden 
Mission Centre 
Mulberry Creek, 

German 
OakHiU 
OUthe 
Oskaloosa 
Perry 

Pleasant Ridge 
Riley Centre, Ger. 
Ross ville 
SedaUa 
Seymour 
Sharon 
Spring Hill 
Stanley 
Topeka, zst 
" ad 

" 3d 

*' Highland Pk. 

** Westminster 
Vineland 
Wakarusa 
Wamego 
Willow Springs 
Miscellaneous 



309 00 



z6 ( 



9 40 



639 00 



9 X5 

X9 35 
5 00 



SYNOD OP KBNTVOCr. 



Ashland 

Augusta 

Burlington 

Covington, zst 

Dayton 

Ebenezer 

Falmouth 

Flemingsburg 

Frankfort, xst 

Greenup 

Lexington, ad 

Ludlow 

Maysville 

Moorefield 

Mt. Sterling 

Murphys ville 

New Concord 

New Hope 

Newport, xst 

Paru, xst 

Pikeville 

Salyersville 

Sharpsburg 

Valley 

Williamstown 



■5 vj 

xo so 

930 00 
6 so 



98 zo 
5887 

633 7X 



4 00 
99 00 



soo 



x,o74 90 

Pby o/L&uiniUt, 

Bradensbuig 

Caney Fork 

Cloverport 

Craig Chapel 

Elizabeth town 

Hodgensville 

Hopkinsville 3 00 

Kuttawa 

Louisville, 4th xo 00 

** Central x8s 00 
" College st 44 55 
** Jefferson st 



xx8 40 
99 so 



6 00 



360 



9S 00 



556 

5 3X 



13898 



49 SO 



5 00 



7 50 

836 00 
.•4 75 



8x5 

X9 9S 



38 99 



x,3xs 8a XXX 84 847 69 



X55 40 

700 



33 X5 

85 00 
xo 00 
999 50 
6 13 
" 55 

X4 7Z 



500 

53 00 



X93 48 683 44 



5 00 

aj «5 
x8 00 
4x 00 
X75 00 
15a 8s 
00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



242 



SYNuD OF MICHIGAN. 



SAB. U W. B DS. 



SAB. S. W. B^DS. 



Louisville, 






Detroit, Thompson 


3« xa 






•' Knox 






Trumbull 








♦' Olivet 






ave 


x^S 63 




85 00 


Chapel 


ao 00 


zz 23 


'' West- 








" Walnut St 


zz 36 


47 50 


minster 


356 30 


135 9x 


40700 


" Warren 






East Nankin 


5 00 






Memorial 


L4 00 


sBo 00 


Krin 


8oo 






Marion 






Holly 






ao 35 


New Castle 






Howell 


jaS 89 




X0663 


Olivet 






Independence 








Owensboro, ist 




25 00 


Marine City 


7 00 


X7 00 


5 00 


Pennu. Run 


a 00 




Milan 








Pewee Valley 


5 00 


9Z 00 


Milford 


zoa 23 


40 00 


359 63 


Pisgah 






Mt. Clemens 


3* 00 




53 50 


Plum Creek 






Norris 


a 00 




7 75 


Princeton, ist 


I* 00 


30 2X 


Northville, zst 


34 48 


4 05 


40 40 


2d 






Plainfield 


8 00 






Salem 






Plymouth, ad 


3 36 


6 60 




Shelbyville, ist 


8 57 


5486 


Pontiac 


73 ax 


855 


X58 08 


South CarroUton 






Port Huron 














Saline 
South field 


464 


Xt 3X 






3X5 48 


890 79 




Piy of Trantylvania, 




South Lyons 
Springfield 


9806 




a8 7S 


Barbourvville 






Stony Creek 
Unadilla 


za 4X 




4X XO 


Bethel Union 






5 «> 






Boyle 






White Lake 








Burkesville 






Wing •* 








Columbia 


X5 00 


5 00 


Wyandotte 






3> 


Concord 






Ypsilanti 
Miscellaneous 


73 SO 


8 95 


5x5 80 


Danville, ad 


xoo 00 


35 00 zs8 02 






36 10 


Dicks River 
East Berastadt 
















xo 00 


4 


,262 '5a 


303 87 


4,6c>z 48 


Ebenezer 














Edmonton 






Pby 0/ Flint. 








Greensbu^ 
Hanging Fork 
Harlan 






Argentine 
lirockway 


7 00 
a 00 


5 xo 




Harmony 
Harrodsbuig 
Knox 
Lancaster 






Bruce 








3« 00 


44 34 


Bingham 
Had Axe 


3 00 

4 00 




X486 


5 00 




Brookfield 








Lebanon, zst 

LiviUKston 

Manchester 




40 00 
Z4 00 


Bethel 

Caseville 

Caro 


x6 00 


xo 00 


34 50 


Meaux Chapel 






Cass City 
Columbia 








Paint Lick 

Richland 

Richmond 


16 50 




Corunna 
Croswell 
Denmark 


1578 


873 




Sunford 


167 50 




Elk 
Flint 
Flushing 
Fenton 


3840 
iz 00 




35 55 




35 CO 273 36 










Flynn 








SYNOD OP MICHIGAN. 




Frascr 








Pby 0/ Detroit. 




Fort Gratiot 
Fremont 


xa 75 

a 00 






Alpena 






Ga'nes 


a 00 






Ann Arbor 


40 20 


229 71 


Grindstone City 








Birmingham 


zo 00 


38 50 


Knox 








Brii^hton 


3 00 


19 00 


Linden 


4 03 






Canton 






Lapeer 


40 85 




X8S 03 


Dearborn 






Lamotte 


a <xj 






Detroit, xst 


X89 22 


686 88 


Mundy 


9 00 






" 2d ave 




153 00 


Marlette, xst 


xo 00 




4 00 


" 3d ave 


131 13 


56 78 


■' 2d 


3 00 






" Baker City 




Morrice 


zz 00 




x8 30 


" Calvary 
" Central 




140 82 


Otter Lake 








39 93 


25 00 


Port Austin 








" Cove- 






" Hope 








nant X 


,023 50 


36 60 30 00 


»' Huron 








" Fort st 


994 96 


990 00 


Sand Beach 


7 36 


5 00 




'* Ham- 






Soulc 








tramck 


15 00 


35 00 


Vassar 


8 55 




32 00 


" Jefferson 
ave 


728 00 




Verona 


2 00 
















** Memorial 


49 75 


35 00 Z7X 51 




3Z0 69 


28 83 


aS4 X3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYNOD OF MICHIGAN. 



243 



Phy of Grand Rapids. 
Bis Rapids, West- 
minster 6 37 
Evart 8 00 
Fcnysburg 

Grand Haven 46 64 

^ Rapids, ist 41 50 
** ** Imman. 5 00 
" ** Mis'n 

Wood 10 so 
" " West- 
minster 74 oa 



95 25 
48 33 



Hesperia 


5 00 




3 50 


Ionia 




xoo 00 


43 00 


Ludingtott 


14 so 




5 00 


Montague 


x8 00 


X9 00 


xo 56 


Muir 


5 00 


4 00 




Pewamo 








Sebewa 








Spring Lake 


a 00 








236 53 


135 35 


997 64 


Pby 0/ Kalamazoo. 






Buchanan 


«7 57 


5 00 


28 oo 
xo 78 


Burr Oak 


4 07 




3 00 




Boo 


800 


30 00 


Consiantine 






xs xs 


Decatur 


" 45 




8o3 


£dwardsburg 








Hamilton 








Kalamazoo, xst 144 75 
" Holland xo 00 




3i423 49 


North 


8 00 


9 00 


xo CO 


Kendall 


5 «> 






Martin 






2 65 


Niles 


88 96 


2840 


xio 58 


Paw Paw 






95 00 


Plainwell 


7 00 


S 00 


xs 00 


Richland 


26 17 




56 57 


Schoolcraft 


800 




xo 00 


Storgis 


xo 00 


50 


X9 00 


Three Rivers 


93 68 




40 44 


White Pigeon 


5 30 




14 7x 




387 95 


58 90 


3,822 30 


Pby 0/ Lansing. 






Albion 


40 00 
67 00 


3 00 


84 70 


Battle Creek 




go 40 


Brooklyn 


9 00 


9 70 


37 00 


Concord 


ao 79 




10 90 


l>elhi 


264 




4 00 


Eckibrd 




2 60 




Hastings 






7 35 


Homer 


31 00 


• 


33 47 
38 ga 
84 35 


Jackson 
Lansing, x^t 


"7 57 


10 42 


47 03 




'' Franklin St. 11 00 






Marshall 


37 12 




X02 77 


Mason 


50 00 




23 88 


North Lansing 






59 c,o 


Oneida 


IX 00 




94 85 


Parma 


5 55 




10 00 


Springport 








Slock bridge 


4 00 






Sunaeld 








Tekonsha 


7 05 




4 98 


Windsor 


00 
3667a 








x8 72 


61587 


Pby 0/ Monroe, 






Adrian 


220 50 




163 00 


Blti^field 


8^ 






Califorma 






5 00 



Clayton 

Coldwaier 

Deerfield 

Dover 

Erie 

Hillsdale 

Hudson 

Junesville 

La Salle 

Manchester 

Monroe 

Palmyra 

Petersburg 

Quincy 

Raisin ' 

Reading 

Tecumseh 



30 OS 



X13 00 
XO 00 



6x 00 
5 » 

99 00 

7 00 

67 00 



SAB. S. W. B DS. 



68 32 

39 65 
78 SI 

7 60 

X04 00 

2 50 
56 00 
X4 09 

7 00 
X64 36 



xo OQ 
9 60 



543 55 
Pby o/Petoskey. 
Alanson 
Boyne City 
•' Falls 
Cadillac 
Crooked Lake 
Cross Village 
East Jordan 
Elk Rapids 
Elmira 
Fife Lake 
Harbor Springs 
Lake City 
Mackinaw City 
Omena 
Peloskey 

Riverside, Bethany 
Walloon 
Miscellaneous 



xa 60 7x0 03 



X 00 
2 00 
30 00 ao 00 



460 



34 00 

Pby 0/ Saginaw. 
Alcona 

AUis 2 30 

Alma 

Au Sable and Oscoda 
Bay City 363 36 

Calkinsvtlle 2 90 

Coleman^ 
East Saginaw, xst 

** Wash'nar 
Emerson 
Gladwin, ist 

9d r^y 
Grayling 
Harris viUe 
Ithaca 

Lafayette, 9d 
Lone Lake 
Maple Rid^e 
Midland City 
Mt. Pleasant 
North Bumes 
Omer 

Pinconning 
Pine River 
Saginaw 

'* City, xst 

'* Grace 

" Immanuel 
Sterling 
St. Louis 
Tawas 
Taymouth 
Westminster 

963 63 



1 

38 00 



4 " 



3068 
4 75 
8 00 



•x8 66 


450 00 
5 00 
5 00 


a so 
9907 



58 95 
356 



14 97 
5 00 
90 39 



80 



24 60 113 67 



183 57 



x8 75 



7 50 



«9 50 



87 95 

1,069 52 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



244 



SYNOD OF MINNESOTA. 



SYNOD OP MINNESOTA. 



Pbypf DuluiK 


, 


Rrainerd 




Cloquet 


^^ 


Duluth, tst 


" ad 


15 00 


•• Westm'r 


7 <»o 


Ely 




McNaU^emorial 


3 00 


Pine City 


1 00 


RiceUke 




St. Jamef 


3 00 


Sandstone 




Thomson 




Two Harbon 




West Duluth 





99 50 



"S.t 



14 18 
170 so 



Phy <^f Mankato, 






Amboy 


5 00 






Balaton 








Beaver Creek 




5 00 




Blue Earth City 






59 59 


Canby 








Currie 








Delhi 


X987 


7 00 


a 66 


Fulda 








Grand View 








Home 








Jackson, xst 
KasoU 


7 00 




369s 


Lake Crystal 








Le Sueur 


x6oo 


5 00 


la 44 


Luveme 


18 00 




18 S 


Lyons 
Bfladelia 


00 
78 09 






Mankato 


X907 


187 7a 


Morgan 








Pipestone 


X 00 






Porter 








Redwood FalU 


ao 00 




9969 


Rushmore 


a 03 






Slayton 








St. James 

St. Peter's Union 








3380 


9 30 


49 07 


Swan Lake 








Tracy 






xa so 


Wells, xst 


X4 50 




5 00 


Windom, xst 








Winnebago Qty 


800 




•9 63 


Woodstock 








Worthington, 
Westminster 








t,ox9 9a 


aa48 


360s 




i.asa ax 


6785 


479 55 


Pby o/Rtd Ritftr, 






Angus 








Argyla 




- 





Bethel 

Crookstown 

Davb 

Elbow Lake 

Euclid 

Evansville 

Fergus FalU 

Goodale 

Hallock 

Hope 

Keystone 

Knox 

Lawrence 

Maina 



Z7 z8 



8 00 x8 x8 

Z4 83 78 38 
xs 30 

9 00 



SAB. S. W. B'DS. 



Maplewood 

Mendenhall Mem'l 

Moorehead 7 as 

Northcote 

Red Lake FalU 5 00 

Vermillion 

White Bear 

WiUmar 

Winstead 

Warren 

Western xo 00 



41 43 



Phy of Si. Paul, 

Belle Plains 

Brown *s Valley 

BuAJo x8 44 

Crystal Bay 

Delano 10 00 

Dundas 

Eden Prairie 

Empire 

Farmingtott 

Forest 

Goodhue 

Greenleaf 

Harrison 

Hastings 

Howard 4 00 

Jordan 

Litchfield 33 98 

Long Lake 

Macalester 34 6s 

Maple Plain s 00 

Merriam Park 9 00 

MinneapolU, xst xos 36 
5th xs 00 

Andrew 303 57 

Bethlehem 
Bloomington are 
Franklin ave 14 53 

Highland Park 19 03 
House of Faith 
Olivet 

Riverside Chapel 
Shiloh 66 04 

Stewart Mem*l 78 83 
Westminster 478 8a 

Murdock 

North St. Paul 

Oak Grove 15 00 

Red Wing 49 as 

Rockford 4 00 

Royalton a 00 

Rush City 6 00 

Shakopee 

Spring Gmve 

St. Cloud 61 03 

St. Croix Falls 6 47 

St. Paul, xst 
9th 

Arlington Hills 
Bethlehem, Ger. 35 00 
Central xz,03x S4 

Dayton ave. X77 93 

East 

Goodrich ave. ix 00 
House of Hope 734 37 
Park 8 00 

Summit ave 
Westminster 9 as 

Stillwater xx 97 

Taylor's FalU 

Vermillion 

White Bear x8 5> 

Wilmar 4 00 



a 57 



45 63 




58 X3 



500 


ao 00 




47 M 


6 00 
Soo 


38 00 
ax7 63 

as "5 
144 «3 
133 35 


8 95 


8« 55 
700 

33 45 


806 
IX as 

86.3 


8368 

54 50 

1,934 36 



4 34 



700 





xoo 00 


84 06 


37 50 




37 9« 


46" 




10 00 






•'SiS 




3900 


ao 00 


40 00 


too 8Z 


737 95 




SOO 


800 




996 


8998 



«83 



xs 80 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYNOD OF MISSOURI. 



245 



Winstead 
Warrensdala 



13,360 5a 
Phyof Winona, 

3786 



I 50 
307 5X 



Albert Lea 

Austin 

Bethel 

Caledonia 

Chatfield 

Chester 

CummingsTilIa 

Claremont 

Coulton 

Ebenexer 

Frank HUl, Ger. 

Fremont 

Gla«goir 

Harmony 

Henrytown 

Hok^ 

Houston 

Kasson 

La Crescent 

Lanesboro 

LeRoy 

Oakland 

Oronoco 

Owatonna 

Preston 

Ripley 

Rochester 

StewarUville 

Washington 

Winona, xst 

** German 
Woodbury 



8 00 



5 00 



la S3 

4 50 



3 3a 



a 00 
35 30 

a 08 
aa 00 



SYNOD OP MI880USI. 

Ph o/AlUn. 
Allen Chapel 
Cotton Plant 
Harris Chapel 
Hope 
Hopewell 
Little Rock 
Monticello 



Phy 0/ Kansas City, 
Appleton City xa 34 

Bethel 
Brown ington 
Butler 
Centre View 
Qinton 
Creighton 
Deepwater 
El Dorado 
Greenwood 
High Point 
Holden 
Independence 
Jefferson City 
Kansas City, xst 
ad 



7 75 



4 

«th 
Hill Me. 
WeUh 
ELnob Noster 



9 


00 


S 


50 


7 


ao 


43 

xoo 


xo 
00 


657 
5 


74 
00 



46 90 



aSs 



154 69 a 85 



689 



w. b'ds. 


5*60403 


i6i X9 


48 $1 


5 00 


so 00 


xa S2 

850 


88 3X 


500 
vj so 


370 X3 


400 


47 40 


36 60 
7 59 


657 


XX 50 

a 05 


899 aa 
XX OS 


84 95 
70 


700 



Lone Oak 

Malta Bend 

Montrose 

Nevada 

Osceola 

Pleasant HiU 

Raymore 

Rich Hill 

RockTille 

Salem 

Salt Springs 

Schell City 

Sedalia, Broadway 

Sharon ^ 

Sunnyside 

Tipton 

Warrensburg 

Warsaw 

Westfield 



95 00 
55 00 



7 SO 



4 00 
x6 00 



700 



S\B. S. W. B'DS. 



8 00 

10 50 75 63 

14 00 



xoo 00 3x0 00 
ax 00 



Pby 0/ Onark, 

Ash Grove 
Belleview 
Bolivar 
Buffalo 

Carthage 33 

Conway 
Ebenexer 
Eureka Sptings 
Golden City 
Grace 
Granby 
Grand Praine 
Home 
Irwin 
Toplin 
Lenigh 
Lockwood 
Madison 
Mountain Grove 
Monett 
Mt. Vernon 
" Zion 
Neosho 
North Prairie 
Otark 

" Prairie 
Preston 
Salem 
Shiloh 
Springfield, ad 

" Calvary 
Stockton 
Trinity 
Waldensian 
Webb aty 
Westminster 
West Plains 
White Oak 

" Rock 
Mucellaneoils 



800 
x6 00 



6 00 



5 00 



X9X 73 

Phy 0/ Palmyra, 
Bethel 
Bevier 

Birdseye Ridge 
Brookfield 

Canton 5 00 

Clarence 

Edina xo 00 

Glasgow 
Glasstown 



5 00 
855 

aa 40 



X1043 33 35X 39 x,8oa 49 



a 50 



X4 55 



99 50 
3a 50 



a 50 
7 SO 35 00 



xa 50 



xa 90 


5 00 


4 47 


80 00 


77 75 


40 00 135 00 




\ 



a6 S9 
SO 00 43S X4 



aa 00 
X4 00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



246 



SYNOD OF NEBRASKA. 



SAB. S. W. B DS. 



SAB. S. W. B DS. 



Glen wood 








Union Star 








Grantsville 








Westboro 








Hannibal 


XS5 00 




50 00 


Weston 








Kirksville 


16 61 




33 «6 


Wheeling 
Willow Frock 








Knox City 


a CO 












Laclede 








Miscellaneous 






3 03 


La Grange 


5 00 




XI 30 














Louisiana 


4 15 








999 47 


35 X3 


197 99 


Macon 
Marceline 
Milan 
Millard 


4 00 
•3 SO 




a 75 


Pfyc/ St, Louis, 
Bethel, Ger. 93 ao 
Bethlehem 


xo CO 


zo 00 


Moberly 
Newark 




94 61 


13 55 


Bristol 
Burbois 








New Cambria 


9 00 






Cornwall 








*' Providence 


a as 






Cuba 


X9 00 






Pleasant Prairie 


X 00 






Desoto 






500 


Salem 








Elk Prairie 


9 00 






Salisbury 

Sedgwick 

ShelbyviUe 

Sullivan 

Unionville 






4 40 


Emmanuel, Ger. 


50 00 


8co 


xo 00 








Ferguson 
Frederickstown 








3 as 






Hot Springs, Central xo co 
Iron Hill 






Wilson 








Iron ton j 








Miscellaneous 






4 56 


Kirkwood 


t X9 


zoo CO 


49 96 










Laketon 


x 00 








aaa 76 


34 61 


15566 


Marble HUl 
Moselle 








Pbyc/PUU*. 
Akron 3 00 


3 10 




Nazareth, Ger. 

Organ 

Ozark 


90 35 

z 00 


3 CO 




Albany 


^u 




X3 00 


Pacific 








Avalon 
Barnard 
Bethel 
Breckenridge 

Cameron 
CarroUton 
Chillicothe 
Craig 


xo 00 


7 00 


Pleasant Hill 


5 00 






700 




8 00 
5 00 
7 90 


Poplar Bluff 
Ridge Station 
Rock Hill 
Rolla 
Salem, xst 

" Ger. 
Smith ville 


xo 00 
300 
97 00 


400 


97 90 


Dawn 

Easton 

Fairfax 

Gallatin 

Graham 

Grant City 


4 00 
a 00 




xo 00 


St. Charles 
St. Louis, ist 

" 9d 

»♦ 1st, Ger. 

" 9d, " 

^* Carondelet 


36 00 

X29 93 
90 00 

xs 00 

90 00 




36 SO 
69 00 

509 9S 

X5 00 


Hackberry 


I 00 






'* Cote Brilliante 


13 00 






Hamilton 
Hodee 
Hopkins 
Jameson 
King City 


4 00 
la 00 
x6 30 


6 90 


8 79 


" Glasgow ave 
'' Lafayette Pk. 
" McCaualand 


9904 
xso CO 


7500 
90 CO 


&rr 


I 70 




20 63 


ave 
" Memorial 








Kingston 

Knox 

Lathrop 


X3 00 






Tabemade 
" North 
** Shiloh 


«50 
3500 




xifo 


Lincoln 

Martinsville 

Maryville 

Mirabile 

Mizpah 

Mound City 

Mt. Zion 

New Hampton 

New Point 

N. Y. Settlement 

Oak Grove 

Oregon 

Parkville 

Rockport 

Rosendale 

Savannah 

Stanberry 


X 00 

X 27 
« »5 


308 


10 40 


" South 
" Washington A 
Compton ave 
»* West 
**" Westminster 


400 00 

x8 00 

S 00 




4760 

660 8s 
4000 


9 55 






Sturgeon Market 








9 00 

6 za 

7 70 




6 63 


Ger. Mission 
Sullivan 
Union 
Washington 
Webster Grove 
White Water 


4 30 

X9 80 
X83 67 


5 00 


9X 25 


ai 34 

4 00 
2 00 
X as 




68 00 


Windsor Harbor 
Zion, Ger. 
Zoar 
Miscellaneous 

I 


6 00 

90 CO 


S CO 


xo 00 
x8o 50 


St. Joseph, North 
** West- 


t974 9» 


300 00 


9,089 4a 


minster 50 00 


3 as 


99 09 


SYMOD OP NBBRASKA. 






Tarkio 

Tina 


12 00 


8 80 


750 


Pby 0/ Hastings. 






Union 








Aurora 




a ^ 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYNOD OF NEBRASKA. 



247 



Axtel 
Ayr 
Bttiver City 


7 00 


4 00 


Benkleman 




Bloomington 
Blue Hill 


6 00 


Catherton 




Campbell* Ger. 


A CO 


Champion 




CulbertsoD 




Driftwood 




Ed jar 


xo 00 


Elkton 




Elwood 




Fairview 




Friendship 




Glenville 


X 00 


»' Ger. 




Haigler 




Hanover, Ger. 




Hansen 


a8 00 


Hardy 




Hartwell 




Harvard 




Hastings, xst 


xo 00 


" Ger. 


3 00 


Holdrege 


xao8 


Holstine 




Imperial 




Inland 




Kenesaw 




Marquette 




Millington 




Minden 


5 49 


Mt. Pleasant, Ger. 


X 00 


Nelson 


x6 X9 


Oak Creek, Ger. 




Orieans 


X 00 


Osco 




Oxford 




Ragan 




Red Cloud 




RepuLlican City 




Ruskin 




Spring Ranch 
Stamford 


X 00 


Sui>erior 


4 15 


Union 




Unity 




Verona 




Wallace 




West Blue 


a 60 


Williamsburg 


X 00 


Wikonville 






12X 44 


Phy ofKearnty. 


Ansley 
Armada 




Betlel 


56 


Box Elder 




Broken Bow 




Buffalo Grove, Ger. 


13 JS 


Burr Oak 


3 00 


Central City 




Cherry Creek 
Clontibret 


X 36 


3 00 


Dorp Valley 




FuUerton 


6 00 


Gandy 




Garfield 




Gibbon 




Gothenburg 




Grand Island 




Greeley Centre 




Hope 





a 58 



w 33 



W. B*DS. 


Kearney 


4388 


SAB. s. 


w. b'ds. 




30 14 


8^ 36 




Lacota 


a 35 








Lexington 


xo 00 








Lillian 








x8 00 


Litchfield 








500 


Tx}up City 
Minden 






9^ 00 




North Loup 


300 


X46 


7 40 




*' Platte 


94 50 








Ord 


7 00 








St. Edwards 


800 




3 75 


9 00 


*' Paul 
Salem, Ger. 
Scotia 
Shelton 
Turkey Creek 
Wilson Memorial 
Wood River 


5 00 

500 
xo 53 




x6 x8 


S58 




146 X3 


3X 60 


•31 69 


Pby 0/ Nebraska City. 








Adams 


3 00 




a 50 




Alexandria 






2 00 




Auburn 


8 84 




x6 a8 


aa 30 


Barneston 










Beatrice 


aa 34 




3807 


xo xo 


Belvidere 








Bennett 


X5 00 




5 oa 




Bethel 








800 


Blue Springs 

Bower 

Brownsville 

Burchard 

Carleton 

Diller 

Endicott 

Eureka 


xo 00 

4 00 
X OS 


7 oa 






Fairbury 


22 70 


XX so 


9 00 




Fairmount 


J6 7S 


8 ai 






Falls City 


a 

8 00 








Firth 
Goshen 




405 






Gresham 










Hebron 


ao 00 


59 


IX 85 




Helena 










Hickman, Ger. 


6 00 




5 00 




Hopewell 
Hubbell 


















Humboldt 


6 00 




2x 75 




Liberty 


7 OS 






Lincoln, zst 


^45 55 




947 79 




ad 


45 xo 




37 36 




Little Salt 










Meriden, Ger. 








■ 


Monroe 








7098 


Nebraska City 
Ohiowa 




20 00 


»7 75 




Palmyra 


5 00 




as 00 




Panama 










Pawnee 


6a 53 


3 00 


9 20 




Plattsmouth 

Ger. 


57 80 
3 00 




39 83 




Prairie Centre 








xo 00 


Raymond 


4 00 








Salem 


7 68 


a 09 




a6 00 


Seward 
Simeon 
Staplehurst 


9 70 
2 00 


7 57 


7 as 


39 00 


Sterling 
Table Rock 


7 00 
9 15 




\Z 




Tamora 
Tccumseh 


44 00 


7 00 


A^ 




Thayer, Ger. 
Tobias 








90 00 


York 






zx 28 



653 X4 7x xo S89 08 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



248 



SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY. 



.8. W. B DS. 



Phy o/Nioirara, 






Alliance 








Atkinson 






4 50 


Bethany 
BUcIc Biid 














Cleveland 








Coleridge 
Dailey Branch 


a 00 






S??«y 








Elpn 


X 50 






Emenon 


673 




765 


Gordon 








Green VaUcy 








Haines vtUe 








Hartington 


6 00 




500 


Inman 








Lambert 








Madison 






xa 50 


MiUerboro 


I 40 


360 




Niobrara 


xo 00 






Norden 








Oakdale 


3 50 




3 00 


O'Neil 








Pender 


5 «> 




9 00 


Ponca 


xa 00 




35 00 


RushvUle 








St. James 


a 00 






Scottville 








South Fork 








" Sioux aty 








Stuart 








Valentine 








Wakefield 


10 35 






Wamerville 








Wayne 






" 43 


West Union 








WlUowdale 


6048 








360 


8x xo 


Pbyo/ Omaha, 






Bancroft 






3 56 


Belle Centre 








Bellevue 


•665 


X538 


3 40 


Black Bird Hills 


10 00 






Blair . 


567 


I 58 


X9 00 


Ceresco 








Columbus 


800 




5 «> 


Ciaig 


as 90 




9 40 


Creston 








Decatur 








Douglas 








Florence 








Fremont 


7644 


3 70 


7898 


Garrison 








Grandview 








Hooper 








Humphrey 
La Platte 








687 






Lost Creek 








Lyons 
MarietU 


4 50 


90 as 


AZ 


Omahsu ist 


8561 




985 97 


iz 00 




45 60 


'' Ambler Place 


3 as 


3 "5 


5 75 


" Castellarst 






9 53 


" German 


10 00 




5 o© 


" Knox 


7 76 




XX 80 


" Southwest 




6 86 




" Walnut Hill 


z8 40 




xs 00 


" WestAlbrighl 


t 






" Westminster 


1046 




59 50 


Osceola 








Papillion 
Schuyler 


184s 




x6 30 


Shelby 








Silver Creek 









SAB. S. W. B*1>S. 



South Omaha 


9 00 




Stromsburg 






Tekamah 


xo 00 




Tracy VaUey 






Wahoo 


6 00 




Waterloo 




144a 


Webster 


3 50 












349 76 $x 09 


596 ae 


SYNOD OP.NBW JBR8BY. 




Ph'^/O 


friteo. 




Bau 


X 00 




Baunga 


9 00 




Benita 


X 00 




Corisco 


4 00 




Evune 


X 00 




Gaboon 


xs 00 




Ogove, ist 


9 00 




" ad 


x 00 




" 3d 


X 00 





40 00 XS3 00 

49 90 



98 00 

Pby 0/ Elinahetk, 

Basking Ridge 179 00 
Bayonne City 50 00 

Bethlehem 94 00 

Clarksville 5 00 

Clinton X33 46 

Connecticut Farms oa 50 
Cranford 34 59 

Dunellen 5 3^ 

Eliaabeth, xst 977 98 

*' xst, Ger. 6 00 

** 9d 959 95 

" 3d 55 «> 

" U churches) 
** Madison ave x8 60 
'* Marahall st 44 58 
'' Siloam 
'* Westmin- 
ster 970 05 
Lamington x6x 39 

Liberty Comer xo 00 

Lower Valley %i 00 

Metuchen 44 09 

Perth Amboy 83 95 

Plainfield, xst 6s 00 

** Crescent av. x,5X7 00 
" (9 churches) 
Pluckamin sx 00 

Rahway, xst at 95 

** xst, Ger. 3 00 

" 9d 

Roselle X74 73 

Springfield 57 53 

Westfield 49 5x 

Woodbridge X7 00 



4,33" 03 «»n4 •! 4*4a5 07 
Pby 0/ j€ruy City, 



90 00 


6538 


96 so 

XZX 64 


3«75 


9S 00 




9S03 


950 50 


994 so 


15039 


X08 00 


3857 


^u 




.3S 


700 




179 »6 


490 00 


9700 


«a3 «4 


5 00 


'^i 


•073 




330 «> 




X46 X3 




50994 


34 95 


;3?? 


149 ^6 
X4X 68 


XX3 00 


X9X 94 


3163 


Z99 00 




XO3 00 




80 00 



Arlington 90 X9 30 00 

Avonaale 

Bethesda 

Calvary 

Caristadt, German az 00 zs 00 

Dundee 

Englewood 1,493 x8 

Hackensack X9 00 8 00 

Garfield 

Hoboken, xst 



55 < 



147 00 
8800 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY. 



249 



SAB. S. W. B DS. 



71 83 
39 83 



Jeriey City, 

** Bers^en, xit ^i 40 

** Claremont aa 00 

*» Scotch 

" Wcst'«t«r 
KinnlAnd 
Lvnaehunt 
Madison av. 
Newfoundland 
Norwood 
Panaic 

*' Gennan 
PatersoQ, xst 
** x»t Get. 
ad 

ad 

" B*way.Ger.4 57 
** East Side 36 50 
" Rede'm'r xoo 00 
Wett'ster 43 86 
aia 83 



*5o 00 
69 07 
ZX3 88 



Ratherford 
Tenafly 
Weehawken 
West Hoboken 
West Milford 
Miscellaneous 



51 00 

za 91 



PSy 0/ Montmoutk. 



Allen town 
Asbury Park 
BaniMat 
Beverly 
Bordentown 
Burlington 
Calvary 
Columbus 
Cranbury, ist 
" ad 
Cream Ridge 
Delanco 
English town 
Farminffdale 
Forked River 
Freehold, ist 
Hightfttown 
Holmanville 
Hope 

Jacksonville 
Jamesbuig 
Keyport 
Lakewood 
Long Branch 
Manalapan 
Manaaquan 
Manchester 
Matawan 
Moorestown 
Mount Holly 
New Gretna 
Ocean Beach 
Oceanic 
Perrineville 
Platuburgh 
Plumstead 
Point Pleasant 
Providence 
Red Bank 
Sayerville, Ger. 
Shrewsburv 
South AmSoy 
Tennent 
Tom's River 
Tuckerton 
Wcttmiastcr 



50 00 
17 63 

3 00 
55 07 

6 75 
85 03 
10 50 
XX 00 
94 40 

5 00 



817 50 

9 00 

aa7 04 

X3X 00 

16 ao 

75 00 

7 00 

a4o 78 

986 
6395 
X5 00 

9X 99 

ao 00 

as 00 

a 00 

7 50 
ax 00 

8 00 
5 00 

xo 00 

9 zo 
X5 00 

5 50 

zoo 00 
a 00 
766 

439 



836 46 
Z5 00 

70 00 
7 30 30 00 



35 40 



as 00 
ao7 70 
Z37 56 
zas 00 

z6o 00 

330 00 

Z08 17 

Z16 00 
75 <» 
a,os5 00 

a,8o9 08 389 63 4,589 89 



aa 67 

40 00 
5 00 



Z50 67 
35 59 



50 00 



z 80 



7 00 

38 45 
za 00 
Sa 7a 



3 50 

890 

4 SO 

zo 56 



zoz 00 
69 zs 

zo 00 
318 a6 

50 00 
"3 30 

as 00 

87 az 

34Z 00 

850 

4 00 

33 5a 



35« 79 
85 00 



Z70 00 
68 83 
36 so 

aa8 75 

Z08 56 

Z08 00 

9 60 
33 4a 



Z06 00 
«7 75 



SAB. 8. W. b'DS. 



Whiting and 

Shamong 

Miscellaneous 



5 00 



a,a9z so 456 64 3,640 07 



V^ 



Pby 0/ Morris and Orangw, 

Berkshire Valley 

Boonton 

Chatham 

Chester 

Dover 

" Welsh 
East Orange, zst 
Elmwood Chapel 
Fairmount 
Flanders 
Gennan Valley 
Hanover 
HiUside 
Madison 
Mendham, zst 
ad 
Mine Hill 
Morris Plains 
Morristown, zst 

"^ South St 
Mt. Freedom 
Mt. Olive 
Myersville 
New Providence 
New Vernon 
Orange, zst 

" ad 

'' Central 

" East, BethU 38 39 

** German 

580a 

50 09 

6in 
tA 

Z63 s8 
4z 00 



3 00 

00 

00 

zoo 00 

8687 

zo 00 

8x7 74 

5 00 
40 00 
9a 75 
40 00 
4z8 93 
545 78 
84 90 

3a CO 

za 00 

ao 00 

657 05 

z,4z8 7a 

59 5» 

a 00 
33 00 
«57 50 

3,000 00 

«99 59 

Z,OZ8 00 



Pleasant Grove 

" Valley 
Rockaway 
Schooley^s Mount 
South Orange 
St. Cloud 

Sterling \ii^t 39 04 

Succasunna 30 53 

Summit 

'* Central 893 67 
Whippany 3Z 74 

Wyommg 9 89 



60 00 



7a 73 
zo 00 
SO 00 



zs 00 
zz 54 



zoo 00 
z83 8a 



34a ao 



z 00 

Z4 70 
zoo 00 
a6 39 
93 00 
35 00 
5 35 



7 00 

5 00 
3« 33 

35 00 



94 49 
70 00 



3« 50 
79Z so 



8 00 
Z50 CO 
X54 zs 

376 35 
63 87 



t 



Z33 00 

48Z zs 

7887a 

679 7z 

X9 31 

38 00 



48 3S 

50 00 
3Z3 z8 



aS7 75 
Z7 00 
zo,3a6 44 z,336 96 5,754 83 



Piy of Newark, 

Bloomfield, zst 437 58 

Ger. 6 00 

" West'ster 36008 

Caldwell 533 05 

E. Newark, Knox 33 00 

Lyons Farms 47 53 

Montclair, zit z,3oo 95 

" Trinity 339 88 

Newark, zst B63 57 

ad 383 sz 

934 xa 

ao CO 

a 00 

63 40 

ao6 04 

4Z3 89 
3a 50 
47 00 
5a 00 

33 36 



35 00 5Z0 00 



3ZO 00 
Z77 40 



l?h 



kh 
Bethany 
Calvary 
Central 
High St 
zst, German 
8d 
3d " 

Jth ave 
ay St. Chapel 30 00 
f emoxial 50 00 



Z9a 4a 
36z 6a 



47 SO 



Soo 



45 3a 
68z 69 
«9S 41 
3z6 50 

505 86 
30 00 



io°; 



65 00 

3x5 CO 

a8a ao 



ZZ9 00 



Digitized by VjzOOQIC 



250 



SYNOD OF NEW MEXICO. 



SAB. S. W. b'DS. 



Newark, 

" Park 

" Plane St 

** Roseville 

'' South Park 

" Wickliffc 

" Woodside 



646 oz 
51 9X 



SO 00 



290 00 

461 69 

36 00 



6,468 87 


S8x 54 


4,6a6o7 


Pby of Ntw Brunswick, 






Alexandria, ut a 00 




as 00 


Amwell, z&t 8 00 
3d 10 as 


5 00 


55 35 
26 75 


" United, xst 5 84 




93 50 


Bound Brook 50 44 


aa 00 


ao 00 


Chapel Hill 




48 50 


Dayton zaS 56 


xo 51 


36 49 


Dutch Neck 157 49 


37 S» 




Ewinj; 37 60 




80 00 


Flemington 197 30 


30 00 


408 00 


Frenchtown 35 31 


77 


56 00 


Hamilton Square 9 57 




1498 


Holland 




X5 00 


Hopewell 5 00 




45 00 


Kingston 




6 00 


Kingwood 3 00 






Ktrkpatrick MemU 17 00 
Lambertville 394 00 




xa 50 




407 35 


Lawrence 76 00 




»34 00 


Little Yoric 




X3 00 


Milford 34 00 


za 00 


60 00 


New Brunswick, xst 335 34 




X87 00 


** ad 60 00 


ao 50 


as 00 


Pennington 80 08 




x6o 00 


Princeton, ist 164 05 


xox 80 


aai 97 


ad 78 84 




15 00 


" Withcrspoon st i 00 




7 5a 


Stockton 8 00 




a4 00 


Titusville 


xo 00 


17 50 


Trenton, xst a,a65 la 




470 00 


"ad 54 08 


xa 46 


50 00 


" 3d ax2 77 
" 4th 944 87 


30 50 


340 00 


5x 80 


449 34 


5th 
" Bethany s «> 


X3 30 


20 00 
35 00 


" Prospect St 79X ox 


ao 00 


35097 


Miscellaneous 




»3 35 



5,44X 4a 378 X5 3,673 07 



Pby of Niwton, 



Andover 8 50 

Asbury 230 «> 

Beattystown 3 00 

Belvidere, xst xao 15 

** ad 71 37 

Blairstown 38a 5X 

Bloomsbury xz 06 

Branch ville 37 00 
Danville 

Deckertown 46 95 

Delaware xo 00 

Greenwich 50 '8 

Hackettstown 3x8 39 

Harmony f^t^ 43 °o 
Hope 

Knowlton 6 00 

La Fayette a 00 

Mansfield, ad 4 <» 
Marksboro 
Montana 

MusconetcongVairy xo 00 6 00 

Newton 355 <» 
New Village 
North Haidiston 

Oxford, zat 30 00 



6 03 X7 95 

zo 00 a6 00 

399 5a 

xao 00 

6a 00 X97 39 

30 00 

6 00 

ao 36 
w 19 44 «4 

875 
33 as 68 60 

xa 00 5a 35 

zo 00 
56s 



379 31 

6 00 



SAB. S. W. B DS. 



Oxford, 3d 


Z9 24 


6 83 


73 47 


Papacating 








Phillipsbuig, xst 


34 00 




7436 


West'iar Z3 00 


5 «> 


59 00 


SparU 


3 00 






Stanhope 


5 00 






Stewarts ville 


8s 00 


X5 ox 


8500 


Stillwater 


Z7 00 




39 59 


Swartswood 








Wantage, xst 


5 00 




3 as 


3d 


zs 00 






Washinsrton 
Yellow Frame 


85 00 


as 00 


xoo 00 


3308 


309 






a,03a 53 


3xa 40 


1*653 49 


Pby of W€st Jtrsey. 






Absecon 






8 00 


Atco 








Atlantic City 


55 00 




30 00 


Oct. 








Berlin 








Billingsport 


4 00 






Blackwoodtown 


70 00 




47 *S 


Brain erd 


5 94 


406 




Bridgeton, zst 


•g» 


57 74 


X76 73 


3d 


I3t 9a 


zz6 24 
33366 


West 


xxo 00 


50 00 


Bunker Hill 








Camden, xst 


x8x 00 




336 45 


" 7d 


X9 00 






" 3d 








Cape Island 
Cedarville, xst 


59 <5 


33 xa 


23 05 


xa 83. 




90 40 


3d 


4 00 






(two ch 


s) 




46 54 


Clayton 


34 «> 


z6 00 


Cold Spring 
Deerfield 




5 00 




45 «> 


zo 73 


75 00 


hlmer 


380 






Fairfield 


X3 00 






Glassboro 


4 00 




4 50 


Gloucester City 


xo 00 


zo 00 




Green Creek 








Greenwich 


z6oo 




X44 00 


Haddonfield 


zao 00 






Hammonton 


X9 00 




ax ao 


. Janvier 


4 00 






, ericho 








. .eeds Point 








Liberty Park 


a 00 






May's Landing 


X 00 


600 


«9 8s 


Merchants ville 


41 sx 




7 03 


MiUville 


850 




40 00 


Pittsgrove 


38 00 




84 95 


Pleasantville 


5 00 






Salem 
Swedesboro 


75 00 
6 00 


95 00 


"5 45 


Tuckahoe 








Vineland 


46 34 




4t 00 


Waierford 








Weiionah 


X75 00 


ao 00 


xa8 00 


Williamstown 


3X 00 


Z5 00 




Woodbury 


7689 




36 00 


Woodatown 


50 00 




2800 




x,707 8a 


443 57 


x,777 05 



SYNOD OP NBW MKXICO. 

Pby of Arizona. 
Florence s 00 

Phoenix 
Pima, xst 

Sacaton 5 00 

Tombstone 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYNOD OF NEW YORK. 



251 



SAB. S. W. B*DS. 



Pby of Rio Grande. 



Albuquerque, ist 


18 


85 


** Spanish 




Jemes 
Lag^una 


4 
5 


00 
00 


Las Cruces, ist 






" 3d 






Pajarito 
Silver City 


a 


00 






Socorro 


6 


00 




35 


"si 


Pbj of Santa Fe. 




Agua Negra 






Aztec 


a 


00 


Ruena Vista 






Capulin 
£1 Rito 










Embuda 






Farmington 


I 


00 




13 


00 


" Spanish 






Mora 






Ocate 


5 


76 


Raton. Tst 






." »<1 






Rincunes 






Santa Fe 






Taos 







SYNOD OF NBW YORK. 
Pby of Albany^ 



Albany, xst 
" ad 



3^ 94 
3<\ 43 90 

4th 800 00 

6th as 00 

MadiM>n av 
State St 999 71 
West End 49 84 

175 00 



Amsterdam, ad 
Ballston Centre 

*• Spa 
Batch ellerville 
Bethlehepa 
Broadalbin 
Carlisle 
Charlton 
Conklingville 
Corinth 
Day 

East Nassau 
Emmanuel 
Esperance 
Galway 
GloversNille 
Green bush 
Hamilton Union 
Jefferson 

Jermain Memorial 
Johnstown 
Kin^boro 
Manaville 
Mayfield 
New Scotland 
Northampton 
North ville 
Pine Grove 
Princetown 
Rensselaerville 
Rockwell Falls 
Sand Lake 



\^ 00 
3 as 



ao 00 
41 so 



3 00 



5 16 

31 64 

xo 00 
zz 68 



5 00 



^S 00 
300 00 



X7 57 



a88 50 
300 00 
Z64 88 
S70 03 

75 CO 
133 00 
669 50 

32 58 
383 xo 

93 39 

z8o CO 

7 35 

9 00 
38 99 



xo 00 


Z3 00 


5 00 

54 00 


5986 




66 93 
3 oz 


xs 00 






34 00 


6 00 


15 as 


533 85 




40 00 


xoo 00 


zoo CO 


SO 00 


33 S6 




3S 00 


5 00 




37 00 



az z8 

3 00 



37 49 
30 00 



SAB. S. W. B DS. 



Saratoga Sp*gs, zst 
ad 


8z7a 
49 5t 


4a 90 


a33 83 
81 00 


Schenectady, xst 
" East avc 


x8s ax 


ZO3 31 


77 60 


67 14 




Stephen town 
Tribes Hill 


14 71 




lo 00 


xo 00 




>9 40 


Voorhees ville 


7 00 






West Galway 


718 




Z7 00 


West Milton 


Z CO 






West Troy, zst 


365 

,803 ox 




37 '6 


3 


63699 


4,933 63 


Pby of Binghamton. 






Afton 


7 00 






Apalachin 








Bain bridge 


30 X3 


3855 


zz 70 


Binghamton, zst 


596 4* 




484 40 


*' North 


45 ^ 




70 00 


" Ross 








Memorial 3 00 






" West 






67 00 


Cannonsville 


zo 00 






Conklin 






zoa xz 


Cortland 


367 93 


ZOO 00 


zxo 00 
z8 00 


Coventry, ad 


36 7a 




Deposit 








East Maine 








Freetown 








Marathon 






8 00 


Mason ville 


XX 00 




7 00 


McGrawviUe 


3785 




36 CO 


Nichols 


a so 






Nineveh 


60 90 
73 66 




83 SO 


Owcgo 
Preble 




"5 >S 


Smithville Flats 


5 00 




33 00 


Trujfton 








Union 
Virgil 
Waveriy 


ao 00 


5 00 


30 00 


Z04 a6 




54 30 


Whitney's Point 






30 00 


Willet 








Windsor 


7 50 


7 50 


43 50 


z 


»4o8 49 


zsx OS 


z,3sz 66 



:i 



44 



Pby of Boston.^ 

Antrim 33 35 

Barre 

Bedford 39 6a 

Boston, zst 130 00 

^^ Columbus 

ave 
" Scotch zo 00 

** St. Andrew's s 00 

East Boston zo 00 

Fall River 

Holyoke 

Houlton 

Lawrence 

Litchfield 

Londonderry 

Lonsdale 

Lowell 

Manchester, zst Ger. 

** Westminster 3 00 

New Bedford 
'* Boston zo 00 

Newburyport, zst 8c 00 
^* 3d 100 00 

Newport 

Portland $ 00 

Providence 36 00 

Suincy 6 00 

oxbury Z3 50 

Somerville 



4 a5 

5 00 



x86 98 
zs 00 

6s 00 



z6 00 
z 93 
S 00 

3S 00 
7 00 



35 X5 
3 50 63 60 

13 x8 3S 00 

34 30 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



252 



SYNOD OF NEW YORK. 



SAB. 8. W. b'dS. 



SAB. S. W. B*OS. 



South Boston 37 00 




7X 07 


Colden 








" PnuDinrliam \ 50 




1759 
8 00 


Conewago 


90 00 






** Ryegate xo 00 




Dunkiric 




•500 


Taunton 3 00 
Windham 38 70 




8 75 


East Aurora 


*» 30 


14 00 


xs CO 




X9 so 


East Hamburg 








Woonsocket %$ 00 






Ellicottville 








Worcester 






Franklinrdle 


x6 so 




xo 70 








Fredonia 
Gowanda 


60 37 
5 00 


5669 


4X CO 
8 00 


6x7 a6 


x6 68 


66486 








Jamestown 


x8a 00 


as 00 


10798 


Ph 9/ Brooklyn, 






^ amison 


3 00 






Brooklyn, ist x,6o3 00 
ad oai 69 
•* xsl, Ger. 8 00 
" 5th '» 

^* Ainslie st 45 57 
** Bethany 43 67 
" GtyPaik 


Si: 


489 50 
3a6 si 


Lakest 
l^ncaster 
Olean 
Oidtown 


7 00 
so 00 


aa 00 


35 «> 


a8 00 


X9 4.? 


Orchard Park 

Panama 

Portvillc 


xoo 00 




X as 

83 CO 


" Classon ave 850 00 
'* Cumber- 


3a 10 


3xa 76 


Ripley 
Sherman 


875 




Soo 
6x 75 


land st xo 00 


as 00 




Silver Creek 


83 00 


300 


800 


" Duryea XX4 00 
" E.W*msb'g, 

Ger. xo 00 


95 03 


South Wales 

Springville 

Towanda 


xo 00 
5 00 
X 00 


a 00 
3« 50 


as 00 

xo 00 


'' Franklin ave 
** Friedens— 




33 69 


'' Mission 
United Mission 


xo 00 






kirche xs 00 
" Grace 8 00 






Westfield 


73 83 




xoo 00 






Miscellaneous 






43 «6 




48 60 


83 45 








8,361 X3 


** Greenpoint ax ao 
" HopkSsst, 

Ger. ao 00 




5 84 


3,703 »7 
Pby of Cayuga, 


"9 »9 


•• Lafayette 






Auburn, xst 


77X 50 




x6o 00 


" Ger. Evan. 

Miss. 
" Memorial 94< X9 


35000 


778 ax 
38830 


'* ad 48 sa 
»• Calvary xx xa 
'' Central 85 85 
" Westminster 3 X4 


60 00 


88897 
as CO 
xxs 00 

43 '6 


** Mt. Olivet 9 00 

*• Noblest 




73^ 


Aurora 
Cato 


8903 




150 00 


" Peace, Ger. 
" Prospect 
Heighu 




,«o5 77 


Cayuga 
Dryden 
Fair Haven 


9*5 
19 50 




4fl03 
XX 55 


" Ross st xio 00 
'' Siloam a 00 


ao 00^ 


B 83 99 


Genoa, xst 
" ad 


47 00 




X4 00 

5 50 


" South 3d st 436 33 

" Tabernacle 

" Throop ave 299 00 


a8x 56 


3a8 x6 
408 34 


" 3<1 
Ithaca 


a 00 
x,394 s> 


3 9« 


x6 OS 
683 » 


xoo 00 


39903 
X36 44 


Ludlowville 








" Trinity 55 00 
" Westmin- 


X7 00 


Meridian 
Owasco 


36 80 
5 00 




40 00 
83 00 


ster 563 93 
Edgewater, ist xxo 09 




x6x 05 
X1666 


Port Byron 

Scipto 

Scipioville 


X3 00 


as 00 


43 n 


New Brighton 
Faith 

West New Brigh- 
ton, Calvary X7 05 

Miscellaneous 










xo 00 


75 00 


45 00 
ax 77 


Sennett 

Sprinjgport 

Weedsport 


9 50 
7684 




as 00 

xs 00 
9765 

1,748 a8 










3,533 OS 


"9 5* 


8,345 59 


x,ixo 80 


4.31S oa 










Pby of Buffalo, 






Pby of Champiain, 






Akron 






Ausable Forks and 






Alden 






Black Brook 


6 67 




84 as 


Allegheny and 






Beekmantown 


5 00 




6ao 


Complanter 7 85 






Belmont 


X9 00 




13 00 


BuflEalo, X5t x,ooo 00 
'* Bethany 18a 80 




300 CO 


Burke 


X3 oa 








X91 58 


Champlain 






33 00 


" Calvary aoo co 
" Central aas 00 


50 00 


xs6 ax 


Chateaugay 










895 00 


Cha«y 


99 54 






** Covenant 9 00 
" East 800 




4 00 


Constable 


3 00 




a 00 




33 00 


Essex 








" Lafiiyette st 37 a6 
** North 575 X3 




X50 x6 
38569 


Fort Covington 


50 40 








Keeseville 


34 X4 




3089 


" Wells st 700 




37 03 


Malone 


87 7» 




97 00 


" West ave ao 00 




7 6a 


Mineville 








" West Side 




a6 00 


Mooen 






a 85 


" Westminster 786 xo 


as 00 


X8600 


Peru 


X 7a 






Clarence 7 00 




8 80 


Plattsburg 


X7a S3 


xsoo 


aos so 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SYNOD OF NEW YORK. 



253 



8AB. S. W. b'dS. 



Port Henry 


6a 4a 






5000 


WeatviUe 












474 13 


»5 


00 


45a 09 


Pby 0/Chtmung, 








Big Flats 


ig ao 


aa 


80 


6a 50 


Breesport 










Burdett 


Vi 






XX 00 


Dundee 






60 so 


Elminuxst 

" FrankUnst 


•i:: 






X97 69 


'* Lake St 








X7a 75 


Havana 


9 35 






9 00 


Hector 








X3 00 


Horse Heads 








93 00 


Mecklenburgh 


600 






a4 50 


Monterey 

Moreland 








xo 00 








650 


Newiield 








875 


Pine Grove 


a 00 








Rock Stream 


6 00 






7 38 


Southport 






CO 


Spencer 


ax 37 






93 ax 

6 00 


Sugar Hill 
SuTlivanvUle 








Tyrone 
Watkins 


X38 5x 

570 10 


»5 


80 


xo 00 
xa8 00 




"38 


eo 


84978 


Pby cf Chili, 








Conception 
Constitucton 










Linares 










Quillou 
Santiago 










Valparaiso 











Pby of Columbia, 

Ancrmm Lead Mines 

Ashland 

Austerlitx 

Cairo 

Canaan Centre 

Caukill X49 69 

Centerville 7 59 

Durham, xst X4 00 

••ad 
East Windham 
Greenville xa as 

Hillsdale 

Hudson X55 00 

Hunter 90 00 

{eweti 95 36 

«Danon Centre 
Livingstonville 
Spencertowa 5 00 

Yalatie 33 00 

Windham 50 00 



Pby 0/ Genosoe. 

Alexander 

Attica X75 08 

Batavia 915 aa 

Bergen 96 08 

Bethany Centre 

Byron xo 00 

Castile 60 68 

Corfu 

East Bethanv 

East Pembrolce 6 91 

Elba 



13 04 



98 65 


7 


ao 


xa 


50 


36 


00 


aoo 


00 


xo 


33 


X9 


xa 


46 


00 


6 


00 


a9i 55 


89 


00 


"9 


00 


M 


CO 


5 


CO 


:i 


00 


50 



54X 8a 39 04 794 85 





4^§ 


xo 99 


49 95 


X3 40 






46 CO 




S« 94 




fx4 70 



SAB. & W. B*Z>S. 



Leroy 


50 50 




X33 15 


*' and Bergen 






SO 00 


North Bergen 


xo 50 


400 




Oakfield 


7 00 




t6 CO 


Orangeville 








Perry 


130 00 


30 00 


57 00 


Pike 






X3 00 


Portageville 


5 00 






Stone Church 






4800 


Tonawanda Valley 


58jif 




10 00 


Warsaw 


99 77 


941 3« 


Wyoming 


748 




a9 35 


X 


.993 9x 


X5809 


1,348 36 


Pby 0/ Gtntva, 






Bellona 


x8 00 




34 00 


Branchport 


9 90 






Canandaigua 


6409 


4000 


X06 00 


Canoga 




a «7 




Clifton Springs 






5 00 


Dresden 


5 as 






Geneva, xst 

'* North 1 


axx 87 

>4X9 38 


74 83 
40 00 


395 6x 


Gorham 


X3 00 




x6 00 


Hopewell 








Manchester 


33 <* 




xs 00 


Naples 
Oaks Comers 


73 fe 


xo 56 




9 00 


xa 00 


30 94 


Orleans 


I 00 






Ovid 


68 49 


4§ 


3000 


Penn Van 


86x9 


I90 00 


Phelps 


«39 87 




88 95 


Romulus 


59 4a 


95 00 


46