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r 



THE CLASS OF 1863. 



THE CLASS OF 1863. 



Let us so live and die, 

That our lessening band may cry 
Hurrah, " Sixty-three ! " 

Hurrah for our own " Sixty-three ! " 

— Brooks. Ode in 1869, 






-'•■^Ji 



■ '\X 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 



OF 



THE CLASS OF 1863 



OF 



HARVARD COLLEGE, 

June, 1893, to June, 1903. 




PRINTED FOR THE USE OF THE CLASS. 



CAMBRIDGE: 
JOHN WILSON AND SON. 

1903. 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

341374 

A8T0R, LENOX AND 

TILOEN FOl'vOATIONS. 

1906 



Clagg Committee* 



•ARTHUR LINCOLN, Class Secretary. 
CLIFFORD CROWNINSHIELD WATERS. 
EDWARD BANGS DREW. 
HENRY FITCH JENKS. 



TO THE CLASS OF 1863. 



'T^HE last Class Eeport was issued in June, 1893, on the 

-■" Thirtieth Anniversary of our graduation. The present Ee- 
port covers the years from June, 1893, to June, 1903, our For- 
tieth Anniversary. 

This is the period of our maturity. In these ten years we 
have done, for weal or for woe, the chief work of our lives. The 
influence that the Class has exerted upon the world's history and 
progress must be looked for in these pages. The record may not 
be remarkable for achievement, but is one of which we have no 
need to be ashamed. 

At the time of the last Eeport, out of one hundred and twenty 
graduates, ninety-six were living. At the present time, seventy- 
six are living. We have lost in ten years twenty classmates, — 
an average of two a year, — among whom are included many who 
have shed lustre on the Class, who have contributed to the re- 
nown it has gained, and who have been deeply enshrined in our 
hearts. 

First and foremost, is Lincoln, our Class Secretary, faithful 
and true, ever devoted to the interests of the Class, whose pres- 
ence and kindly greeting added an attraction to all our meetings, 
and from whom it is hard indeed to realize that we have parted, 
of whom, however, we may well say 

" To live in hearts we leave behind 
Is not to die." 

Beside him have died Clarke, Dabney, Fiske, French, both 
Frothinghams, Greenhalge, Greenough, Haseltine, Hassam, 
Hayes, Howland, G. S. Jones, Kilbreth, Knapp, Stackpole, 



4 THE CLASS OF 1868. 

Wales, Weld, and Winthbop, and of those who were of the 
Class for a part of the course, Barnakd, Dinsmoor, Eustis, and 
Fearing, making a total of twenty-four out of the one hundred 
and fifty-one who were at any time members of the Class, and 
leaving us with eighty-eight still living. 

Lincoln had begun this Report, and in spite of his illness had 
prepared all the matter concerning those who had died before him 
since the last Report, so that there was nothing to be done except 
to send it to the printer, and he had procured the likenesses of all 
of them but one. When he died, Waters was in California and 
Drew in China, so as the remaining member of the Class Com- 
mittee I took his material and have completed the work. I have 
retained on the titlepage the term Secretary's Report, because the 
work was so largely his that the volume may be treasured as a 
memorial of his painstaking assiduity and of his all-absorbing 
interest in the Class. His familiar features make the frontis- 
piece to which we shall first turn. The portrait of Fiske is a 
photogravure from the volumes of his essays published after his 
death, for the use of which we are indebted to the permission 
of Mrs. Fiske, and the courtesy of the Macmillan Company; 
that of Greenhalge is from his life, published by our classmate 
J. M. Brown, to whom we are indebted for the use of the plate ; 
that of Hassam we owe to the kindness of his widow and brother ; 
and those of Knapp and Winthrop have been supplied to us by 
their brothers. 

The remaining pictures are half-tones made ffom the best 
photographs that could be procured. One or two of these were 
so small and indistinct that the results may be considered as 
really wonderful. The picture of Haseltine's garden, which sup- 
plements the account of him in the text, is a heliotype reduced 
from a photograph furnished by his sister. 

The death of Barnard was so recent that it has proved impossi- 
ble to secure a likeness of him. 

Some response has been received from every member of the 
Class now living, and from all but two of those who were 



PREFACE. O 

members for a part of the course. This Eeport, therefore, may 
serve to answer the questions we should naturally ask one an- 
other if we were to meet, and will tell us that which we should 
most like to know. Its preparation has been a pleasure ; may its 
perusal prove the same. 

The words which Morse wrote for our Twenty-fifth Anniver- 
sary appeal to our hearts now, and we find in them a new signifi- 
cance, as we recall our hopes, and compare them with our achieve- 
ments, and associate the memories of the past with the realities 
of the present. 

Still let us sing as boyhood sang. 

When merry Time was young, 
Ere yet his shining sickle rang — 

And leave our tears unsung ; 

Ay, leave the later loss and pain, 

That wrung your hearts and mine, 

Deep in the soul ; but sing the strain 
We sang in auld lang syne. 

The old sweet echoes in the heart 

That time alone can give, 
We need no master minstrePs art, 

Save Love's to bid them live. 

In every breast that music thrills 

And bursts in song divine ; 
We speed across a thousand hills. 

To sing of auld lang syne. 

* For the Class Committee. 

HENRY F. JENKS. 
June 24, 1903. 



CONTENTS 



PAOB 

Members of the Class 11 

Biographies of Members 13 

Biographies of Members during a Part of the Course 

only 125 

Summary : 

Occupations, etc 133 

Marriages 134 

Births 137 

Grandchildren 145 

Deaths 146 

Sons in College 148 

Daughters in College 150 

Class Meetings 150 

The Class Fund 172 

Addresses 173 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Portrait op 


Arthur Lincoln, Class Secretary 


. Frontispiece 






Haswell C. Clarke 


Facing page 21 






George S. Dabney 




* 24 






John Fiske 




29 






John D. W. French 




35 






Benjamin T. Frothingham . . . 




38 






William Frothingham .... 




43 






Frederic T. Greenhalge . . . 




46 






W1LLLA.M Greenough 




' 55 






Albert C. Haseltine 




' 61 


View op Haseltine's Garden 




63 


Portrait op 


John T. Hassam 




67 






Alexander L. Hayes 




69 






William M. Rowland .... 




72 






George S. Jones 




76 






James T. Kilbreth 




78 






Arthur M. Knapp 




80 






William Stackpole 




' 113 






Benjamin Read Wales .... 




117 






Stuart Faucheraud Weld . . . 




' 120 






John Winthrop 




' 122 






George Reid Dinsmoor .... 




' 126 






Cartwright Eustis 




' 128 






Charles Frederic Fearing . . . 




130 



MEMBERS OF THE CLASS. 



Amory, Charles Walter 
Amory, Robert 
Appleton, Kathan 
Ayres, Marshall 
Bagley, Charles Hazlett 
Bailey, Andrew Jackson, 1869 
Baxter, George Lewis 
Bishop, Thomas Wetmore 
Blair, Albert 
Boit, Edward Darley 
Bowditch, Charles Pickering 
*Boynton, Winthrop Perkins, 

1864 •1864 

♦Brooks, Frederick •i874 

Brown, John Murray 

Brown, Melvin 
♦Clarke, Has well Cordis, 1867 •1901 

Cobb, Frederick 

Comte, Auguste 
♦Crane, William D wight, 1864 •isei 

Cromwell, Frederic 

Cross, Thaddeus Marshall Brooks 

Curtin, Jeremiah 
*Dabney, George Stackpole •1900 

DanieU, Moses Grant 
*Davis, Samuel Craft •1374 

Denny, Clarence Holbrook 

Drew, Edward Bangs 

Edwards, Henderson Josiah 

Emerson, Charles, 1867 
*Etheridge, Locke •ises 

♦Evans, Samuel Edwards •issi 

Fairchild, Charles Stebbins 

Field, William Gibson 
*Fiske, John •1901 

Foster, Charles Marsh 

Freeman, John Williams 
*French, John Davis Williams •1900 



*Frothingham, Benjamin Thomp- 
son •1902 
*Frothingham, William •1895 
*Fullerton, Payson Perrin •I877 

Fumess, Charles Eliot 

Gillet, Joseph Anthony 

Goodwin, Frank 

Green, Adolphus Williamson 

Green, John Ome 
♦Greenhalge, Frederic Thomas, 

1870 -1896 

*Greenough, William •1902 

Grew, Edward Sturgis 

Hall, John Dean 

Hammond, Walter Whitney, 1864 

Harris, Thomas Robinson, 1867 
♦Haseltiiie, Albert Chevalier '1898 
*Hassam, John Tyler *i9^i 

*Hayes, Alexander Ladd •1899 

*Heaton, Charles William •1869 

^Higginson, Francis Lee, 1868 
""Higginson, Samuel Storrow 

Horton, John Marvin 
♦Howland, William Monefeldt •1894 
♦Hubbard, William Guptill •I866 
♦Hun, Edward Reynolds •I88O 

Hutchins, Edgar Adelbert 

Jackson, Charles Cabot 

Jenks, Henry Fitch 
*Jenks, William Fumess •I88I 

* Jones, George Seneca, 1864 •ms 

Kidder, Edward Hartwell 
*Kilbreth, James Truesdell •I897 
*Knapp, Arthur Mason •1898 

*Langdon, Francis Eustis •1890 

Lathrop, William Henry 

Lawrence, Arthur 
♦Lincoln, Arthur •im2 



12 



THE CLASS OF 1863. 



*Linder, William •I872 

Lombard, Josiah 

*Loring, Fmncis Caleb •isss 

*Lunt, Henry •issr 

*Marden, Francis Alexander •I893 

Marsh, Francis 

Marston, Elias Hutchins, 1881 
♦Marvine, Edward Charles *mB 

Mason, Amos Lawrence 

Mixter, George 
*Moriarty, Joseph Mosely •I888 

Morison, George Shattuck 

Morse, James Herbert 

Nichols, William 

Owen, Roscoe Palmer 

Palmer, William Henry 

Pearce, James Lewis 

Peck, Thomas Bellows, 1864 

Perry, James Leonard 

Pillsbury, William Low 

Pingree, David 
♦Post, Albert Kintzing, 1868 •I872 

Pratt, Herbert James 

Putnam, William Harrington 



Rand, John Howard 

Shattuck, George Brune 

Sheldon, Henry Newton 

Shreve, Octavius Barrell 

Smith, Clement Lawrence 
*Stackpole, William •1901 

Stetson, Edward Gray 
*Stevens, Edward Lewis, 1864 'isw 
*Taber, Henry Arnold •I868 

Tomlinson, George Samuel 
*Townsend, Henry Elmer •i89i 

Tuck, Henry 

Verplanck, Robert Newlin 
♦Wales, Benjamin Read, 1864 •1901 

Warren, Horace Winslow 

Warren, John Collins 

Waters, Clifford Crowninsbield 
*Webb, Michael Shepard •I872 

*Weld, Charles Stuart Faucheraud 

•1901 

Wheeler, Edmund Souder 
* Wheeler, Moses Dillon, 1867 •i889 

White, William Augustus 
*Winthrop, John •I895 

♦44+76=120 



MEMBEEIS OF THE CLASS DURING A PART OF THE COURSE ONLY. 



Allen, Frederick Baylies 

Allyn, John 

Almy, John Page 
♦Barker, Augustus 
♦Barnard, John Clark 

Bellows, Josiah Grahme 
*Blake, Marshall William 
*Boyd, Charles Malcolm 
♦Brown, Henry French 
*Dinsmoor, George Reid 
*Dunn, Horace Sargent 
*Eustis, Cartwright 
*Fearing, Charles Frederic 

Going, Henry Barrett 
♦Gould, Arthur Frederic 
*Gould, Samuel Shelton 



•1863 
•1903 

•1872 
•1864 
•1863 
•1901 
•1862 
•1900 
•1901 



•1862 



Whole number 



*Haslett, Sullivan ♦issi 

Howe, Franklin Theodore 
*Huidekoper, Herman John •I868 
Jones, W^illiam Frederic 
Leve, Adolphus Maximilian 
Lombard, Josiah Stickney 
Richardson, William Priestley 
*Ryan, William Aurelius ^1886 

♦Sewall, Moses Bartlett ^1860 

*Stevens, Gorman Phillips '1862 

Strong, John Lorimer Graham 
*Turner, George Henry •I86I 

*Van Bokkelen, John Frink Smith 

•1863 

Ward, Edmund Augustus 
*Washburn, Thomas Jefferson I866 
♦19+12=31 

151 



* Deceased. 



HARVARD COLLEGE. 

CLASS OF 1863. 



CHAELES WALTER AMOEY continues to reside in Boston, 
at 278 Beacon Street. He was elected Treasurer of the Amos- 
keag Manufacturing Company in 1898. His office is in the Ames 
l^uilding, Washington and Court Streets. 

His son William graduated at Harvard in 1891, and his son 
George Gardner in 1896. His daughter Dorothy was married 
Jan. 20, 1903, to Frederick Winthrop (Harvard, 1891) of New 
York. 

He has grandchildren, T. Jefferson Coolidge, 3d, born Sept. 17, 
1893 ; Amory Coolidge, born March 23, 1895, and William Apple- 
ton Coolidge, bom Oct. 22, 1901. 

EOBEET AMOEY resides in Boston at 279 Beacon Street in 
the winter, and in the summer at his cottage The Eyrie at Bar 
Harbor, Maine. He retired, in September, 1888, from the Presi- 
dency and management of the Brookline Gas Company, and has 
not been in active business since, but has been engaged in 
literary work in medicine and appeared, as an expert witness, be- 
fore commissions appointed by the Superior Court to appraise 
the values of Gas and Electric Companies' property where cities, 
under the Statute, have taken over existing lighting plants. 
At the present time he is revising the fifth edition of the second 
volume (Poisons) of Wharton and Still^'s Medical Jurisprudence, 



14 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

of which he edited the last two previous revisions. As president 
of the Kebo Valley Club and treasurer of the Mount Desert 
Eeading Eoom, both social organizations in Bar Harbor, Maine, 
he takes an active interest in the management during summer 
seasons of these two social clubs. 

He went to Europe in the spring of 1902. 

He is still a Justice of the Peace, his commission having been 
renewed in December, 1902. 

He has another daughter, Margery Sullivan, born Oct. 23, 1897. 
His son Eobert was prepared for college at Volkmann's School in 
Boston, and entered Harvard College in the summer of 1902 in 
the Class of 1906. 

He has grandchildren, Mary Thorndike, born Oct. 17, 1893 ; 
Alice Thorndike, born March 6, 1895 ; Augustus Thorndike, born 
March 13, 1896 ; Charles Thorndike, born March 13, 1898 ; Eobert 
Amory Thorndike, born Dec. 19, 1900. 

NATHAN APPLETON is now residing at 66 Madison 
Avenue, New York. Tn June, and again in the autumn of 1893, 
he was in Chicago for the Columbian Exhibition. In November, 
1893, he was the Eepublican candidate, from the Fourth District, 
for the Governor's Council in Massachusetts. 

In February, 1894, he went as the guest of Hon. T. Jefferson 
Coolidge to Kingston, capital of Jamaica, and other parts of the 
island, then to Colon and Panama, where he visited the canal 
works, in temporary suspension, and on to Cartagena, where Mr. 
C. was interested in the railroad to the Magdalena Eiver. He 
returned by Port Limon, passed a night at St. Jos^, the capital 
of Costa Eica, and then, touching at Kingston, to New York, 
having been abroad exactly seven weeks. 

In September, 1894, he went to France, and on October 19, at 
the Picpus Cemetery, Paris, gave in behalf of the Massachusetts 
Society, Sons of the American Eevolution, of which he was a 
Vice-President and delegate, the bronze marker of the Society to 
Gaston de Sahune Lafayette, to place at the grave of his distin- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 15 

guished ancestor. This was done, with speeches, in the presence 
of several of the descendants of Lafayette, and French and Ameri- 
can guests, and was an interesting occasion. There was a print of 
it in " Harper's Weekly," of which Lincoln had a copy. 

In March, 1895, he made a short visit to Bermuda, the guest 
of Mr. S. H. Marston, and went several times to Washington, 
being especially interested in the Panama Canal question. He 
left New York the end of October, 1899, for Naples, and then by 
Brindisi to Port Said, to attend, at the especial invitation of 
Countess de Lesseps, widow of the builder of the canal, the inau- 
guration of the statue of Ferdinand de Lesseps, to take place on 
November 17, the thirtieth anniversary of the opening of the Suez 
Canal, at which he had been as delegate of the Boston Board of 
Trade, travelling with Gen. N. P. Banks. With his travelling 
companion, Jacob Sleeper, and other friends, he went to Cairo, up 
the Nile to Luxor, Karnac, Assouan, Philae, etc., and then, later, 
took a steamer at Ismailia for Ceylon, where he passed the month 
of January, 1900. He returned to Egypt, from Alexandria to 
Athens (where he saw our classmate Frothingham of Brooklyn, 
since dead), Smyrna, Constantinople, Belgrade, Budapest, Vienna, 
and Paris, where he saw the great Exposition in all its splendor. 

On 28 March, 1896, he was one of the incorporators of the 
Society of Mayflower Descendants in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, and was Deputy Governor until the election of 
1899, when he resigned. On 20 August, 1900, he became a life 
member of the Society in France, Sons of the American Kevolu- 
tion. On 13 Feb., 1902, he joined the Army and Navy Club of 
the City of New York. On 30 Jan., 1903, he became a member 
of the Cape Cod Pilgrim Memorial Association. 

MARSHALL AYRES still lives in New York City, and is 
in business at 12 Broadway. Since December, 1898, he has been 
engaged in the export business with Cuba, as Vice-President of 
the Elwell Mercantile Co., and in charge of the New York office. 

His oldest daughter, Mary Louise, entered an Episcopal Sister- 



16 THE CLASS OF 1868. 

hood at Peekskill, New York, in 1895. His second daughter, 
Winifred, fitted for college at Miss Brackett's School in New York 
City, entered Smith College in 1888, was graduated in 1892, and 
received degree of M.A. from Smith in 1895. His third daughter, 
Marjorie, was prepared for college at the New York Collegiate 
Institute, entered Smith College in 1891, and was graduated in 
1895. 

His daughter inifred married, on June 3, 1897, Theodore 
Sherwood Hope, of New York City, son of Charles Edwin and 
Ida Dusenbury Hope, and resides in New York. 

His daughter Marjorie married, on April 18, 1896, Albert Starr 
Best, of New York, son of Albert and Estelle Starr Best, They 
now reside in Evanston, Illinois. 

His daughter Mildred married, on April 12, 1898, James Albert 
Hawkins, of New York, son of James Eockwell Vail and Adelaide 
Amelia Terhune Hawkins. Tliey reside in New York. 

He has grandcliildren, Marshall Ayres Best, born Nov. 27, 
1901, and Winifred Louise Hope, born June 13, 1902. 

CHAELES HAZLETT BAGLEY is still practising dentistry 
in Denver, Colorado, at room 9 Evans Block, 1132 Fifteenth 
Street, and is interested in mining operations in Mexico. 

ANDEEW JACKSON BAILEY resides in Boston, and is still 
at the head of the Law Department of the City Government, with 
his office at 731 Tremont Building. 

Ho was appointed Corporation Counsel of Boston, Jan. 7, 1895, 
and in November, 1895, was appointed associate Counsel for the 
Massachusetts Metropolitan Water Board. 

GEOEGE LEWIS BAXTEE still resides at 27 Warren Avenue 
Somerville, Massachusetts, and is Head Master of the Latin High 
School, which position he has held for thirty-six years. 

In 1901 he was honored by having his name given to one of 
the schools of Somerville. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 17 

He is one of the corporators of the Somerville Savings Bank, 
and has held the ofl&ce of Trustee since its incorporation. 

His only son, Gregory Paul Baxter, received his A.B. degree at 
Harvard in 1896, his A.M. degree in 1897, and his Ph.D. degree 
in 1899. He is instructor in Analytical Chemistry in Harvard 
University. 

THOMAS WETMOEE BISHOP Hves at Auburndale (Newton), 
Massachusetts. 

In 1896, after a pastorate of five years at Auburndale, he spent 
eight months in Europe, passing a delightful winter in Berlin, 
with classmate Drew, returning in the spring of 1897. He then 
supplied the Methodist Episcopal church at Kevere for one year, 
after which he became pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church 
at Newton Highlands for five years, his third parish in Newton. 
Where he may be called upon next to pitch his tent is a secret 
which will be revealed by a greater bishop than himself. In 1901, 
with his sister, he spent three months in England and Scotland. 

He still insists that Saint Paul could not have had him in 
mind, and denies that 1st Timothy iii. 2, has any application to 
himself. 

ALBERT BLAIR continues to practise law in St. Louis, at 
815 Missouri Trust Building. In 1900, he made a second journey 
to Europe, spending about four months in travel ; and in 1901 
he spent about the same length of time in New York, in efforts to 
bring about a consolidation of the several Brake Beam Companies. 

He has held no political offices, but in 1898 was a candidate, 
on the Republican ticket, for State Senator, but, running in a 
Democratic district, was not elected ; he had, however, the satis- 
faction of cutting down the normal Democratic majority of 2000 
to 1200. 

He is of a " philosophic mood, and cheerful temper, has enjoyed 
good health and moderate prosperity, and cherishes a cordial and 
unabated regard for the men of sixty-three^ 



18 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

EDWAED DAELEY BOIT has been at Newport, Ehode Island, 
this spring, but returned to Europe hi March ; his address is care 
of Eobert A. Boit, 40 Kilby Street, Boston. He has given up his 
Paris residence, and is thinking of retuniing to live in the neigh- 
borhood of Boston during the winter months. From May to 
November he expects to reside at a place he bought in the moun- 
tains near Florence, Italy, a few years ago. Its name is Cernitoio 
(per Pelago Provin-cia di Firenze Italia), and it w^as originally a 
convent dependent on the great convent of Vallombrosa. 

His w^fe, Mary Louisa Cusliing, died Sept. 29, 1894 He 
married, Jan. 6, 1897, Florence McCarty Little, daughter of 
Capt. William McCarty Little, IT. S. N., and Anita Chartrand. 
The wedding was celebrated in tlie English Protestant church at 
Biarritz, where his wife's parents were tlien living, but their per- 
manent place of residence is Newport, Ehode Island. He has 
had two cliildren by tliis marriage, Julian McCarty, born Jan. 
21, 1900, and PMward, born April 12, 1902, both at 28 Eue 
Galilee, Paris, where his wife died April 28, 1902. 

CHAELES PICKEEING BOWDITCH still lives in Boston, 
and does business at 28 State Street. 

There has been no change in his occupation since 1893. 

He travelled in North Africa, Sicily, Italy, and England from 
February to October, 1898, and also made a journey to North 
Africa, Italy, Spain, and P^ngland from November, 1901, to July, 
1902. 

He is a Justice of the Peace. Commission dated March 11, 
1903, in continuation of similar appointments during the last 
twenty-eight years. 

He is a Director of the following corporations : Massachusetts 
Cotton Mills, Massachusetts Mills in Georgia, Pepperell Manu- 
facturing Co., Salmon Falls Manufacturing Co., Massachusetts 
Hospital Life Insurance Co., Boston & Providence Eailroad Cor- 
poration, American Telephone and Telegraph Co., American Bell 
Telephone Co. ; Trustee of the Boston Athenaeum ; a member of 



BIOGRAPHIES. 19 

the Faculty of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology 
and Ethnology ; a member of the following societies besides those 
in the Report of 1893 : New England Historic-Genealogical So- 
ciety, Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, 
Old South Corporation, The Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 
American Association for the Advancement of Science (Member, 
1894, Fellow, 1897), Essex Institute, Soci^t^ des Am^ricanistes de 
Paris, Bunker Hill Monument Association, Massachusetts His- 
torical Society, American Ethnological Society, American Greo- 
graphical Society, Department of Archaeology University of 
Pennsylvania, American Forestry Association, Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society, Vice-President of Archaeological Institute 
of America, International Society of Americanists, American 
Anthropological Association, Vice-President of Boston Society 
of Natural History. He is a member of the Unitarian Club, 
Harvard Club of New York, Union Club, University Club, Eliot 
Club, Country Club, Harvard Union, and other clubs. 
He has published the following pamphlets since 1893 : 

" Sketch of the Life of Epes S. Dixwell," in Volume XXXV., " Pro- 
ceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences '' ; 

** The Lords of the Night and the Tonalamatl of the Codex Borboni- 
cus," in the "American Anthropologist," 1900 ; 

" Memoranda on the Maya Calendars used in the Books of Chilan 
Balam," in the "American Anthropologist," 1901; 

" On the Age of the Maya Ruins," in the " American Anthropologist," 
1901 ; 

" A Method which may have been used by the Mayas in calculating 
Time," privately printed, 1901 ; 

'* Was the Beginning Day of the Maya month numbered Zero (or 
Twenty) or Onel" privately printed, 1901; 

" Notes on the Report of Teobert Maler," in the " Memoirs of the 
Peabody Museum," Volume II. No. 1, privately printed, 1901. 

His son Ingersoll Bowditch prepared for college at the Rox- 
bury Latin School, and at the school of Mr. William Nichols, 
travelled in Europe for one year before entering college, under the 
care of William Vaughn Moody, entered Harvard College in 1893, 



20 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

and graduated in 1897 with the degree of A.B ; entered Institute 
of Technology in 1897, and graduated in 1900 with degree of B.S. 
His profession is that of Civil Engineer, and he is at present in his 
father's office, 28 State Street. 

His daughter Lucy Eockwell Bowditch married, Nov. 7, 1894, 
Franklin Greene Balch, son of Joseph and Agnes Love (Greene) 
Balch. She resides at 279 Clarendon Street, Boston. Her chil- 
dren are Franklin Greene Balch, Jr., and Charles Bowditch Balch, 
born May 3, 1896 ; Lucy Bowditch Balch, born Jan. 12, 1898 ; 
Henry Gordon Balch, born August 8, 1901. 

His daughter Katharine Putnam Bowditch married, Nov. 16, 
1899, Ernest Amory Codman, son of William C. and Elizabeth 
(Hurd) Codman. She resides at 104 !Mt. Vernon Street, Boston. 

♦ WINTHEOP'PEEKIXS BOYNTON was bom in Boston, 
August 29, 1841. He died in Grahamsville, South Carolina, 
Nov. 30, 1864. 

♦FEEDEEICK BEOOKS was born in Boston, August 5, 
1842. He died in Boston, Sept. 15, 1874. 

JOHN" MUEEAY BEOWN continues in business in Boston as 
a publisher and bookseller, being the senior member of the firm 
of Little, Brown, & Co., 254 Washington Street. He resides in 
Belmont. 

From March, 1883, to March, 1903, he was a Trustee of the 
Belmont Public Library, being Secretary and Chairman during the 
whole time. 

In the spring of 1898 he made a journey in Europe. 

His son Philip Lamson Brown graduated at Harvard in 1899, 
and in October of that year became a clerk with his firm, by 
which his son Murray is also employed. 

MELVIN BEOWN still has an office at 166 Montague Street, 
Brooklyn, and is working his very best " to prevent the real 
estate market getting dull." 



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BIOGRAPHIES. 21 

His son Frederick M. (Harvard, 1889) is practising law in 
New York City. His daughter Evelyn, married, June 18, 1898, 
Edwin Clarence Lane, of Brooklyn. He has a grandson, Melvin 
E. Lane, born Sept. 25, 1902. 

* HASWELL COEDIS CLAEKE was born in Eoxbury, Massa- 
chusetts, Sept. 28, 1842. He died in Kankakee, Illinois, Jan. 16, 
1901. 

He continued to reside in Kankakee until his death, and was 
elected Mayor of that city, April 18, 1899, for the term of two 
years. He was a very prominent and respected citizen of Kan- 
kakee, active in public affairs and in Masonic circles, and his 
death, while Mayor, caused universal sorrow. 

At the annual meeting of the Class on Commencement Day, 
June 26, 1901, the Class Secretary announced the death of Clarke, 
and Bailey was requested to prepare a resolution to be entered 
upon the Class records and sent to the family. 

The following resolution was prepared by Bailey : 

Resolvedy That in the death of our classmate, Haswell Cordis Clarke, 
at the time of his decease Mayor of Kankakee in the State of Illinois, the 
Class loses another of its loved and honored members, the promise of 
whose early years has been abundantly carried out in his manhood. 
Full of energy and application, steadfast in his college course and sei^ 
vice for his country in tlie army, he settled at the close of his service in 
Kankakee, and from that time until his death, while attending closely to 
business, he gave the best of his ability to the service of the public and 
to charitable and religious works. We recognize in his steady upward 
progress the benefits conferred by his college education and associations, 
and the noble instincts developed by them, and while we mourn his loss, 
we view with the pride and satisfaction of brothers the kind, eager dis- 
position of our dear classmate as it developed into the earnest and strong 
character of the man, making him the patriotic soldier, the steady man 
of business, the loving and devoted husband, the doer of good public and 
charitable works, and the loyal and upright Christian gentleman ; and 
we rejoice that those with whom he was associated, and for whom he gave 
so much of his life and work, so fully appreciated and honored him in his 
life. 



22 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

FEEDEEICK COBB continues the practice of law in Brook- 
lyn, New York, at 213 Montague Street, Eoom 3. 

AUGUSTE COMTE still resides in San Francisco, and is prac- 
tising law at 534J California Street. Prior to 1897 he was a 
member of the Board of Education. In 1897 he was one of the 
Freeholders elected to frame a charter for San Francisco, which is 
the one now operative. In 1899 he was elected a Supervisor of 
the City and County of San Francisco, under this charter, and 
in 1901 was re-elected. These positions are non-partisan. 

His wife died August 21, 1893, and he married, Jan. 15, 1898, 
Ella La Faille, daughter of the late Daniel and Julie Frances 
La Faille, of San Francisco. He has two daughters by this mar- 
riage, Helen La Faille, born Sept. 15, 1900, and Marie La Faille, 
born Feb. 19, 1902. 

♦WILLIAM DWIGHT CEANE was born in Boston, Nov. 29, 
1840. He died in Grahamsville, South Carolina, Nov. 30, 1864. 

FEEDEEIC CEOMWELL is still Treasurer of the Mutual 
Life Insurance Company of New York. He resides in New 
York, at 5 West 56th Street, in the winter, and in the summer 
near Bemardsville, New Jersey, where he has "a farm of fair 
dimensions, and delights in planting, stock-raising, etc." His 
business address is 32 Nassau Street, New York City. 

His close occupation in business makes it necessary for him 
to find relaxation in frequent journeys in this country and in 
Europe. He expects to sail for Cherbourg in June, and to 
remain in Europe during the summer. 

His eldest daughter is now in Italy, and the two younger are 
attending the Brearley School in New York. 

His son Seymour L. graduated from Harvard in 1892, and is 
now a member of the firm of Strong, Sturgis & Co., bankers. He 
married, Nov. 29, 1899, Miss Agnes Whitney, daughter of the late 
Stephen Suydam Whitney, and they have two children, Frederic, 
born Sept. 10, 1900, and Seymour, born Nov. 20, 1902. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 23 

THADDEUS MAESHALL BEOOKS CEOSS continues to 
live in New York, practising medicine at 352 West 28th Street. 
During the last ten years he has attended closely to his profes- 
sion, and nothing worthy of record has occurred. He has had 
good health, and has come to the conclusion that mankind's 
greatest blessing is work. 

He is still unmarried. 

JEEEMIAH CUETIN lives at Bristol, Vermont, in the sum- 
mer, but his headquarters are at Washington, District of Columbia, 
when not in the field, that is making journeys of investigation. 

In 1897, he made a trip through Mexico and Guatemala ; later 
he visited Greece, Egypt, Palestine, and Turkey. In 1900, he 
made a journey around the world by way of Siberia, Amoor Eiver, 
Japan, China, and Sandwich Islands. In 1902, he travelled 
through the Canadian Dominions, from Quebec to Victoria, British 
Columbia, thence to Washington, District of Columbia, by a route 
which led to the Grand Canyon of the Colorado. 

In the " Boston Transcript " of Nov. 10, 1902, appeared the fol- 
lowing notice: 

Jeremiah Curtin is something of a globe trotter. Having had the 
satisfaction of seeing his translation of " The Pharaoh and the Priest " 
— from the Polish of Alexander Glovatski — obtain a good hold of the 
intelligent reading public, Mr. Curtin is again " on the wing," his latest 
temporary address being Winnipeg, Manitoba. It was only about a yeiir 
ago that this indefatigable traveller returned from a journey around the 
world, vid Eussia, Siberia, Amoor Eiver, China, and Japan. He spent 
three months among the Buriats, the only tribe of Mongols, with its 
great horse sacrifice and splendid creation myths, and he is now at work 
on a book of Mongol religion and history, and also a book giving an 
account of his travels. It was late in the summer when he completed 
the final work on his latest Polish discovery, Alexander Glovatski, for 
Mr. Curtin is one who makes innumerable changes in his proofs, in order 
that his translation may be entirely satisfactory, to himself at least. 
His fame, of course, rests chiefly as the authorized translator of the 
works of Henry Sienkiewicz, of which "Quo Vadis'* alone sold to the 



22 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

FEEDEEICK COBB continues the practice of law in Brook- 
lyn, New York, at 213 Montague Street, Eoom 3. 

AUGUSTE COMTE still resides in San Francisco, and is prac- 
tising law at 534J California Street. Prior to 1897 he was a 
member of the Board of Education. In 1897 he was one of the 
Freeholders elected to frame a charter for San Francisco, which is 
the one now operative. In 1899 he was elected a Supervisor of 
the City and County of San Francisco, under this charter, and 
in 1901 was re-elected. These positions are non-partisan. 

His wife died August 21, 1893, and he married, Jan. 15, 1898, 
Ella La Faille, daughter of the late Daniel and Julie Frances 
La Faille, of San Francisco. He has two daughters by this mar- 
riage, Helen La Faille, born Sept. 15, 1900, and Marie La Faille, 
born Feb. 19, 1902. 

♦WILLIAM DWIGHT CEANE was bom in Boston, Nov. 29, 
1840. He died in Grahamsville, South Carolina, Nov. 30, 1864. 

FEEDEEIC CEOMWELL is still Treasurer of the Mutual 
Life Insurance Company of New York. He resides in New 
York, at 5 West 56th Street, in the winter, and in the summer 
near Bernardsville, New Jersey, where he has "a farm of fair 
dimensions, and delights in planting, stock-raising, etc." His 
business address is 32 Nassau Street, New York City. 

His close occupation in business makes it necessary for him 
to find relaxation in frequent journeys in this country and in 
Europe. He expects to sail for Cherbourg in June, and to 
remain in Europe during the summer. 

His eldest daughter is now in Italy, and the two younger are 
attending the Brearley School in New York. 

His son Seymour L. graduated from Harvard in 1892, and is 
now a member of the firm of Strong, Sturgis & Co., bankers. He 
married, Nov. 29, 1899, Miss Agnes Whitney, daughter of the late 
Stephen Suydam Whitney, and they have two children, Frederic, 
born Sept. 10, 1900, and Seymour, born Nov. 20, 1902. 




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24 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

extent of one million copies. Mr. Curtin has done creative work, such 
as bis books on myth and folk tales of Ireland, of Kussia, and of the 
western Slavs and Magyars. He has no difficulty in making himself 
understood when visiting strange people, inasmuch as he is a famous 
linguist, knowing, it is said, over sixty languages. Mr. Curtin is nomi- 
nally a resident of Bristol, Vermont, although seldom at home. 

Since 1893 he has published : 

" Creation Myths of Primitive America/* 

and the following translations from Henryk Sienkiewicz : 

** Yanko, the Musician, and other stories '' ; 

" Lillian Morris, and other stories " ; 

** Pan MichaeV a sequel to " With Fire and Sword " ; 

" Quo Vadis, a Narrative of the Time of Nero *' ; 

**Childrenof theSoil"; 

** Without Dogma"; 

" Hania, and other stories " ; 

" Sielanka, and other stories " ; 

« In Vain " ; 

" The Knights of the Cross " ; 

and in addition : 

" The Argonauts," from the Polish of Orzeszho ; 

" The Pharaoh and the Priest," from the Polish of Glovatski ; 

and is at present engaged on a work to be entitled " The Mongols," 

about one-half of which is written. 

* GEOEGE STACKPOLE DABNEY was born in the island 
of Fayal, Nov. 25, 1842. He died in Boston, Sept. 3, 1900. 

He continued to reside in Boston until his death, but was 
obliged to give up active business on account of ill health. 

At the funeral services held in King's Chapel, Boston, Sept. 6, 
1900, C. W. Amory, J. M. Brown, F. L. Higginson, Jackson, Lincoln, 
Mason, Mixter, and J. C. Warren acted with others as pall-bearers. 

At the annual meeting of the Class on Commencement Day, 
June 26, 1901, the following memorial was adopted: 

George Stackpole Dabney died in Boston, Sept. 3, 1900, at the 
age of fifty-eight years, and was buried from King's Chapel, a number 
of his classmates and old friends acting as pall-bearers. 



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BIOGRAPHIES. 25 

Six months after graduating, in December, 1863, he entered business, 
and shortly went to China. The voyage out was somewhat noteworthy 
in that his ship narrowly escaped capture by the *' Alabama." He spent 
several years in China, and then returned to Boston, where the rest of his 
business life was passed, he being at one time in partnership with his 
brother, Walter Dabuey, as a cotton broker. 

Dabney was a very constant attendant at the Class reunions on Com- 
mencement Day, and his presence will be much missed, though after a 
period of thirty-eight years classmates must be prepared to face such 
depletion of their numbers with constantly increasing frequency. 

His was a loyal, affectionate, unsuspicious nature ; his temperament was 
naturally cheerful, buoyant, and courageous. He was social, was fond 
of and excelled in games and sports. He was ready to take, and to give 
punishment. Though somewhat below the average stature, he was sturdy, 
muscular, and vigorous. He was known in college as '* Little Dab." 

Some of his classmates will remember an episode which was in many 
ways characteristic of him. On " Bloody Monday " when the Class of 
1863 were Freshmen, and the Delta a stricken foot-ball field, the tide of 
battle having surged over and past him and left him unscathed, Dabney 
was seen expostulating with his hard fate and lamenting that no one 
would hit him. 

He was not fitted above others, to endure the tedium of physical in- 
firmities, and probably would be the last to regret that old age with its 
increasing disabilities was denied him. 

It was thereupon 

Votedj that the memorial be entered upon the Class records, and a copy 
be sent to the family. 

MOSES GEANT DANIELL stiU resides in Boston at 9 
Schuyler Street, Eoxbury. 

In July, 1895, he made a trip to Denver, Salt Lake City, and 
the Yellowstone Park. 

In June, 1896, he withdrew from the management of Chauncy- 
Hall School, and accepted a position in the Editorial Depart- 
ment of Ginn and Company, Publishers, Boston, where he still is. 

He has been Treasurer of the Handel and Haydn Society 
(except in 1897 and 1898) since 1881 ; Secretary of the Episco- 
pal City Mission from May 22, 1901 ; and was appointed by 



26 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

Bishop Lawrence a member of the Sunday School Commission of 
the Diocese of Massachusetts, September, 1902. 
He is author of 

"New Latin Composition," 1897; 

" Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Ronoe, with Introduction and Notes," 1899. 

Joint author (with Wm. C. Collar) of 

"Exercises in Greek Composition," 1893; 
"First Latin Book," 1894; 
" First Year Latin," 1901; 

Joint editor (with Prof. J. B. Greenough and Prof. B. L. D'Ooge)of 

"The New Cfeaar,'' 1898, and 
"Second Year Latin," 1899. 

Joint editor (with Prof. Greenough) of 

" Sallusfs Catihne," 1891. 

His daughter Emily Anna entered Eadcliflfe College (then 
" Harvard Annex " ) in 1891, graduated in 1895, and is now teacher 
in Milton High School. His daughter Lucy Catherine married, 
June 12, 1902, Stanley Marshall Bolster, son of Judge Solomon 
Alonzo and Sarah Jenny Bolster of Koxbury. His daughter Eliz- 
abeth Porter entered Radcliffe College in 1902. 

* SAMUEL CKAFT DAVIS was born in St. Louis, Missouri, 
March 10, 1842. He died in Boston, Oct. 10, 1874. 

CLAKENCE HOLBKOOK DENNY still resides in Boston, 
and is not engaged in active business. 

EDWARD BANGS DREW is still in the Chinese Customs 
service, and is now at Foochow, China. 

In the spring of 1895 he returned home on furlough, and during 
the visit of Li-Hung Chang to this country in September, 1896, 
was his Secretary of Embassy, accompanying him through the 
country. In Boston, Oct. 17, 1896, he read a paper before the 
Commercial Club on the " Chinese Empire of To-day." Soon after 
he returned to China vid Europe, spending the spring of 1897 in 



BIOGRAPHIES. 



27 



Berlin. From his return to China in 1897 until the spring of 
1899 he was Commissioner of Customs at Canton, and then, until 
January, 1901, at Tientsin. While he was here the Boxer upris- 
ing occurred, in the spring of 1900, and with his wife he was in 
Tientsin during the siege, and at one time under the fire of the 
Chinese cannon. Before the siege he sent his children to Shang- 
hai for safety. Immediately after the siege, Mrs. Drew joined 
their children, and returned with them to the United States, but 
he remained at Tientsin. General Chaffee and staff were for a 
time quartered in his house. In December, 1900, he went to 
Peking to see Sir Eobert Hart, and in January, 1901, started for 
America on a special leave of absence for a year, for a needed 
rest and change after so much responsibility and anxiety. He was 
present at Commencement in this year, and presided at the Class 
Supper. While in this country, he gave several addresses, and 
lectures. In February, 1902, he returned to China, and resumed 
his duties as Commissioner of Customs at Foochow. 

His son Charles D. Drew graduated at Harvard in 1897, and 
took the degree of S.B. at the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology in 1899. He is now a civil engineer in government 
employ in the Philippine Islands. His daughter Dora May 
Drew graduated at Eadcliffe in 1899, and married, June 12, 1900, 
Irving Babbitt (Harvard, 1889), Assistant Professor of French in 
Harvard University, son of Edwin Dwight and Augusta (Darling) 
Babbitt. 

He has one grandchild, Esther Babbitt, born Oct. 2, 1901. 

HENDEKSON JOSIAH EDWARDS continues to reside in 
Boston, and to practise law at 47 Court Street. 
His wife died July 2, 1902. 

CHAELES EMEESON still lives at Concord, Massachusetts. 

♦ LOCKE ETHEEIDGE was bom in Warren, New York, Dec. 
11, 1837. He died in New York City, Nov. 5, 1865. 



28 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

♦SAMUEL EDWARDS EVANS was bom in Fitchburg, 
Massachusetts, May 17, 1841. He died iu Chelsea, Massachu- 
setts, Nov. 16, 1891. 

CHARLES STEBBINS FAIRCHILD continues to reside in 
New York City, and is President of the New York Security and 
Trust Company at 44-46 Wall Street. 

He is Treasurer of the New York State Charities Aid Associa- 
tion. In December, 1895, he was Chairman of the Committee of 
Sound Money of the New York Reform Club, and a member of the 
Committee of Fifty organized to purify the government of New 
York City. He is Vice-President of tlie (New York) Chamber of 
Commerce, and a member of various Commercial Clubs. In 1897 
he was on the Monetary Commission of the Indianapolis Conven- 
tion of Boards of Trade. The same year he was candidate, on the 
Citizens' Union ticket, for Comptroller of Greater New York. In 
1901 he was elected President of the Harvard Club of New York, 
and at Commencement, June 26, 1901, he was elected a member 
of the Board of Overseers of Harvard College. 

WILLIAM GIBSON FIELD resides at Enfield, Hartford 
County, Connecticut. He is a counsellor at law, and an occasional 
writer for the press. 

He owns and occupies an original colonial mansion on Enfield 
Street famed " far and wide " for its beauty, on account of its 
width and its being lined on either side with giant elm-trees. 
The house was built one hundred and thirty-two years ago by his 
wife's great-great-grandfather, Captain Ephraim Pease, a prosper- 
ous merchant, contractor, and large land-owner in Enfield during 
the French and Indian war. He entertained Washington, when, 
as Commander-in-chief of the Continental Army he passed through 
Enfield to take command of the army in Cambridge. In the 
house next north of Field House were quartered British soldiers 
of the Revolution, probably a part of Burgoyne's army, surren- 
dered October, 1777. 

His wife is eighth in direct descent from Governor William 



■-■■! ':''^f:. 





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BIOGRAPHIES. 29 

Bradford, the well-known governor of the Plymouth Colony who 
inaugurated the popular feature of Thanksgiving Day. Her great- 
grandfather, Eev. Elam Potter, a former minister of the Congrega- 
tional church in Enfield, was very active in his opposition to slavery, 
that in his time prevailed in Connecticut ; he even went lecturing 
against it in the Southern States ; and it is supposed that the 
memorial to the General Assembly of Connecticut, praying that 
the negroes in this State be released from slavery, was perhaps, 
in part, a result of his influence. 

Enfield Street is, to some extent, a resort in summer. It is on 
the line of the New York, New Haven, and Hartford Kailroad, 
and on the trunk trolley line between Boston and New York. 
Facilities are therefore the best for reaching Hartford and Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, for business. 

He is a member of the Connecticut Valley Harvard Club, meet- 
ing annually in Springfield, Massachusetts. 

♦ JOHN FISKE was born in Hartford, Connecticut, March 30, 
1842. He died in Gloucester, Massachusetts, July 4, 1901. 

He continued to live in Cambridge until his death, engaged in 
lecturing, authorship, and other literary work. 

He had published since Commencement, 1893, the following 
books : 

"Old Virginia and her Neighbors," 1897. 

"Through Nature to God," 1899. 

"Dutch and Quaker Colonies," 1899. 

"A Century of Science," 1899. 

"The Mississippi Valley in the Civil War," 1900. 

and had in press at the time of his death : 

"Life Everlasting," published 1901; 

The above works were published by Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
Since his death have been published : 

"New France and New England," 1902 (Houghton, Mifflin & Co.); 
"Essays Historical and Literary" (Macniillan Co., 2 vols.), 1902; 

Three vols, of the History of all Nations Series (Lea Bro's & Co., 

Philadelphia, 1902.) 



30 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

The lists of Fiske's publications which have appeared in former 
Class reports were most carefully prepared by Fiske himself, and 
the proof from the printer thoroughly revised by himself at his 
own request. The new publications since 1893 enumerated herein 
have been furnished by Mrs. Fiske, so we may know that we 
have in these lists an accurate and complete record of his literary 
work. 

Among other books which Tennyson read or had read to him, 
in his last sickness, was Fiske's " Destiny of Man." 

He delivered the Phi Beta Kappa oration at Cambridge, June 
27, 1895, a course of lectures on " The Dutch and Quaker Col- 
onies," before the Lowell Institute in Boston, beginning Feb. 7, 
1898, and another course of lectures on " New France and New 
England," before the Lowell Institute, beginning Feb. 18, 1901. 
He was under engagement at the time of his death to deliver an 
oration at the exercises commemorating the millennial anniversary 
of the death of King Alfred at Winchester, England, and was to 
have sailed for Europe for that purpose in August, 1901. 

The degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred upon him by Har- 
vard University, in 1894 and the degree of Litt. D. by the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania in the same year. 

He was from Nov. 7, 1894, to April 1, 1899, President of the 
Immigration Eestriction League. He was re-elected a member 
of the Board of Overseers of Harvard College in 1899. 

Several years ago Fiske wrote the following characteristic letter 
to an inquirer regarding his methods of work : 

Petersham, Mass., July 19, 1884. 
Dr. H. Erichsen : 

Dear Sir, — I am forty-two years old, six feet in height, girth of 
chest forty-six inches, waist forty-four inches, head twenty-four inches, 
neck eighteen inches, arm sixteen inches, weight two hundred and 
forty pounds, complexion florid, hair auburn, beard red. Am alert 
and active, appetite voracious, digestion perfect, sleep sound. I work 
by day or night indifferently. My method, like General Grant's, is to 
" keep hammering." I sometimes make an outline first. Scarcely 
ever change a word once written. Very seldom taste coffee or wine. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 31 

or smoke a cigar. But I drink beer freely (two or three quarts daily 
for the past twenty-four years), and smoke tobacco in a meerschaum 
pipe nearly all the time when at work. Have been in the habit of work- 
ing from twelve to fifteen hours daily since I was twelve years old. 
Never have a headache, or physical discomfort of any sort. I prefer 
to work in a cold room, 55° to 60° F. Always sit in a draft when I can 
find one. Wear the thinnest clothes I can find, both in winter and 
summer. Catch cold once in three or four years, but not severely. 
Never experienced the feeling of disinclination for work, and therefore 
have never had to force myself. If I feel at all dull when at work, 
I restore myself by a half-hour at the piano. You may make any use 
you like of these facts. 

Very truly yours, John Fiskb. 

Please let me know when and where your book is to appear. 
P. O. address, 22 Berkeley St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Herbert Huxley Fiske prepared at St. Mark's School, South- 
borough, Massachusetts, and entered Harvard College in the Class 
of 1896. He was married, Jan. 24, 1903, to Elizabeth, youngest 
daughter of the late Dr. George Franklin French and Clara H. 
Buckley, of Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Clarence S. Fiske, married June 1, 1895, at New York, New 
York, Margaret Gracie Higginson, daughter of James Jackson 
Higginson and Margaret Bethune Gracie, of New York. They 
have children : Margaret Gracie, born March 9, 1896 ; Barbara, 
born Sept. 7, 1897 ; John, bom Sept. 17, 1900 ; Dorothy Brooks, 
born Sept. 19, 1902. 

Maud Fiske was married Dec. 12, 1896, at Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, to Grover Flint, son of General Cuvier Grover, U. S. A., 
and Susan Willard Flint, New York. They have children : Cuvier 
Grover Flint, born April 5, 1900; Susan Willard Flint, born 
May 25, 1902. 

Ealph Browning Fiske died June 15, 1898. 

At the annual meeting of the Class on Commencement Day, 
June 25, 1902, Smith offered the following memorial: 

Since our last reunion the Class and the whole country have suffered a 
grievous loss in the death of John Fiske, which occurred at the Haw- 



32 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

thorne Inn, East Gloucester, Massachusetts, early in the morning of July 
4, 1901. His last illness was a very brief one. Until within a few days 
of the end he had been in the enjoyment of his usual good health, his 
intellectual powers were still in their full vigor, and he had apparently 
many years of happy and fruitful work before him, when he suddenly 
succumbed to the effects of physical exhaustion, due to the oppressive 
summer heat. He was fifty-nine years old. 

It was already apparent to us in our college days that Fiske would 
make his mark as a writer. But he did not at once venture to trust to 
his pen for a livelihood. He entered the Harvard Law School, and after 
completing the three terms that were then required for the degree, and 
gaining admission to the bar, he began actual practice in Boston. But 
like more than one of our eminent men of letters, he soon abandoned the 
law for authorship, and by the autumn of 1865 he had closed his ofl&ce 
and definitely committed himself and his family — for he was already 
married — to the precarious chances of a literary career. How success- 
ful he made this career is known to all. The long lists of his writings 
given in our Class Secretary's reports in 1888 and 1893 attest his extraor- 
dinary productiveness and his prodigious industry. In the same 
reports are recorded the engagements and appointments and honors that 
grew out of his literary activities. The most remarkable of these is the 
record of his lectures, which in the ten years ending in 1893 av'feraged 
considerably more, than a hundred a year, and took him to places as 
remote from one another as Loudon and Tacoma. A few of these lectures 
were on philosophical, a smaller number on musical subjects ; a few took 
the form of sermons from Unitarian pulpits ; the great majority were on 
American history, a field which, for the purposes of the Lyceum lecture, 
Fiske has been truly said to have discovered and made completely his 
own. He had no rival in it while he lived, and he has left no successor. 
His lectures were very popular. Without any of the graces of the orator, 
by his simple skill in telling the story, he had the gift of making a serious 
subject entertaining, and drew large audiences wherever he was announced 
to speak. In the remarkable awakening of interest in American history 
which has taken place within the last twenty years there has been no 
more potent factor than his voice and pen. 

Fiske was a precocious child, and in his case the promise of childhood 
was not disappointed. The quick understanding and retentive memory, 
which had made the boy familiar with much literature and sevei*al 
languages, grew in strength witli his years. His interest and his reading 
covered a very wide range, and his writing followed close in their wake. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 33 

Ho came to be one of the most learned men of his time, — a scholar of 
the older type, who made all knowledge his province ; a type that has 
become rare in this age of specialization. That his acquaintance with 
many of the numerous topics which appear in the titles of his essays was 
not profound, goes without saying. Yet he was never superficial. His 
study was thorough and searching ; and even in the hackwork of his pro- 
fession, of which he had his share, he spoke with knowledge, if not always 
with authority. In three fields of inquiry he produced works which 
commanded the respectful attention of exports. In philosophy he won 
credit, not only for the lucid exposition in which he was unsurpassed, 
but also for some substantial contributions of his own, which proved him 
an original as well as an independent thinker. In the religious problems 
which grew out of the doctrine of evolution he took a deep interest. In 
the heat of the controversy that raged over this subject in the Seventies 
he incurred the reproach of agnosticism for the stand he took in behalf 
of untrammelled scientific inquiry ; but he lived to win the praises of his 
critics and to bring comfort to many perplexed spirits by his later essays, 
in which he championed the faith of the believer and sought to show that 
the fundamental doctrines of religion remain, as matters of faith, un- 
scathed by the discoveries and conclusions of modern science. 

Finally, Fiske came to be, in the last dozen years of his life, " the 
most widely read and one of the most influential of American historians." 
As early as 1878 he projected a History of the American People on the 
model of his friend J. R. Green's well-known History of the English 
People, It was to be a work of six or eight volumes. Five years later 
he was still engaged on this project, and in fact the rest of his life was 
mainly devoted to American history. But the plan as originally con- 
ceived was never carried out. Fiske*s well established habits of work 
were apparently too strong for him to break away from, and instead of a 
comprehensive history, he produced a series of historical monographs, in 
which he treated one period or topic after another, not in chronological 
order, but following his own choice or convenience. Proceeding in this 
way, he published, beginning in 1888, a series of nine volumes, in which 
he gradually covered the whole period of our history down to the year 
1789, together with a volume on Civil Government in the United States, 
a school history of the United States, and a smaller history of the Revo- 
lution. To this list he added, in 1900, a volume on the western campaigns 
of the Civil War, which may be accepted as evidence of his purpose to 
cover the whole period of our history as far at least as the end of that 
war, and of the full measure of our loss in his untimely death. In his 

3 



34 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

last years he added still another work in the same field, — a general his- 
tory of the United States in three volumes, which is to form part of a 
Universal History, not yet published. This makes a total of sixteen 
volumes on American history, besides some on other subjects, in thirteen 
years, — surely a remarkable achievement. Nor was this rapid produc- 
tion accomplished at the cost of any sacrifice of quality. By natural 
endowment and long training, Fiske had acquired a truly marvellous facil- 
ity of expression which enabled him to write page after page with scarcely 
a correction or erasure. In history he was not primarily an investigator. 
He was a critic of sources rather than a searcher for them. In this part 
of the historian's function he entered into the labors of other men. But 
he followed no man's lead. He went directly to the material they had 
gathered, and sifted it for himself; and out of it, with sure discernment 
of what was characteristic and interesting, he constructed his delightful 
pictures of the past. 

From 1867 to the end of his life Fiske made his home in Cambridge. 
He often appeared at our Class meetings on Commencement Day, but 
during the rest of the year even those of us who lived near by saw little 
of him. He was away lecturing much of the time, and at home he was 
constantly engrossed in his work. Yet he never lost his interest in his 
Class, and had ever a cordial greeting for a classmate. He was a cheerful 
spirit, to whom intellectual toil in the field he had chosen was the most 
absorbing pleasure ; a genial nature, kindly, simple, and unaffected ; and 
in his great learning there was no trace of pedantry or assumption. 

To the record of service which the Class of Sixty-three has thus far 
achieved, Jolm Fiske has made the largest and most conspicuous contri- 
bution. We gladly enter on our minutes this testimonial, bearing witness 
to our high sense of his worth, and to the warm regard with which we 
cherish his memory. 

It was thereupon ^ 

Voted, that the memorial be entered upon the Class records and a copy 
sent to the family. 

CHAELES MAESH FOSTEE returned from Ithaca, New 
York, where he was at the time of the last report, to Topeka, 
Kansas, in May, 1894, and has since resided in Topeka, practising 
law. 

In August, 1902, he made a visit to various places in southern 




36 ' THE CLASS OF 1863. 

him during his college days as a youth full of life, energy, and humor, 
unpretending in manner, loyal in friendship, clear in thought, witty in 
speech. He did well his part in all that pertained to undergraduate life, 
though his exuberant spirits sometimes brought him into conflict with 
the Faculty's regulations and (like many another classmate) he passed a 
season in rural retirement before his course ended, returning in time to 
graduate with his Class. 

Toward the close of his college course he began to take a deeper view 
of the privileges and duties of life, and while losing nothing of his sense 
of humor and appreciation of the bright and joyous side of things, he 
deepened steadily in his sense of duty. He was confirmed, before gradu- 
ating, in the Episcopal church, and remained its loyal and devoted 
member to the end. 

In February, 1864, ho entered the United States Christian Commis- 
sion, and in its service spent many months of faithful and unpaid duty in 
Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, and Virginia. At the close of the Civil War 
he marched across country from Richmond to Alexandria, took part in 
the Great Review at Washington, and then returned to Boston, which, for 
the rest of his life, he made his home in the winter, spending his summera 
at North Andover, Massachusetts, where, in October, 1867, he bought an 
estate which he named Cochichewick Farm. This was his real home. 
Here he devoted himself to agriculture and the study of kindred subjects. 
He bred cattle and edited herd books. He wrote on forestry, and re- 
ceived from the Massachusetts Society for the Promotion of Agriculture 
a prize of $1000 for the splendid larch plantation of his own planting. 
He entertained freely, and travelled widely in this country and abroad. 
He entered public life, and served for four years on the Common Council 
of the City of Boston. He took an interest in everything that concerned 
the public good, and gave himself unsparingly to the service of his fellow- 
men, in Church and State. Inheriting an independent fortune, he might 
have spent a life of elegant and selfish leisure among his books and 
herds; but instead of that he labored unweariedly for and among all 
sorts and conditions of men. Patience, thoroughness, and good judg- 
ment were distinctive marks of his work. He shirked no duty, and 
never shrank from taking a responsibility. He had the gift of loyal 
friendship. His love for his classmates especially was unfading, and in 
making his will he performed the gracious and characteristic act of leav- 
ing, to seven of his most intimate among them, legacies, in token of his 
life-long affection. 

He never married ; but those to whom he ministered as son or brother 



BIOGRAPHIES. 35 

New Hampshire and Vermont, visiting also friends in Masi=;achu- 
setts, New York City, and Washington, District Columbia, among 
whom were several classmates, and returned to Topeka, March 5, 
1903. 

JOHN WILLIAMS FREEMAN is still out of health, and 
resides in Canandaigua, New York. 

♦JOHN DAVIS WILLIAMS FRENCH was born in Boston, 
Jan. 29, 1841. He died in Atlantic City, New Jersey, May 2, 1900. 

He continued to reside in Boston, and upon his farm in North 
Andover, Massachusetts, until his death, devoting much of his 
time to work in religious and charitable societies, and to agricul- 
ture, horticulture, and forestry. 

The funeral service, conducted by Bishop Lawrence at the 
Church of the Good Shepherd, Boston, May 7, 1900, was largely 
attended by members of the Class, J. M. Brown, Grew, Lawrence, 
and Lincoln, acting with others, not classmates, as pall-bearers. 

A memorial window was placed in Emmanuel Church, Boston, 
Dec. 8, 1901. A memoir for the New England Historic-Gen- 
ealogical Society, prepared by Hassam, and printed in the New- 
England Historical and Genealogical Register (LV., Ixvii), says : 

" He was a good citizen, public-spirited to an unusual degree, always 
ready and willing to give his time and his money to all worthy and de- 
serving objects. His death is a distinct loss to the community. It will 
be difficult to fill the place thus left vacant." 

At the annual meeting of the Class on Commencement Day, 
June 27, 1900, the Class Secretary offered the following tribute 
on behalf of Lawrence, who was absent : 

John Davis Williams French, our classmate, the son of Jonathan 
and Hannah (Weld) French, was born in Boston, Jan. 29, 1841. His 
father, who is still living, at a very great age, was a well-known man of 
business. 

French fitted for college at the private Latin School of the late Epes 
S. Dixwell, and entered with the rest of us in 1859. We remember 



■> 



38 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

The foUowiog letter was subsequently received from a 

sister : 

280 Marlborough Street, July 19, 1000. 
Dear Mr. Lincoln, — On coining to Boston to-day, after a two weeks' 
absence, I found your kind note and tlie tribute paid to my brother on 
Commencement Day. Please accept my sincere thanks. 

Very truly yours, 

Cornelia Anne French. 

♦BENJAMIN THOMPSON FROTHINGHAM was bom in 
Charlestown, Massachusetts, Feb. 2, 1843. He died at Chestnut 
Hill, Philadelphia, April 30, 1902. 

He had given up active business at the time of his death, and 
had devoted much time to travel in this country and in Europe. 

The following letter was received from Cromwell, in reply to 
inquiries made by the Class Secretary : 

32 Nassau St., New York, May 20, 1902. 

Dear Lincoln,. — Henry Tuck has forwarded to me a letter from you, 
inquiring as to the death of our classmate Benjamin T. Frothingham, 
and asks me to reply : I have intended to write informing you of the 
sad event, and am now wishing that I had done so earlier. 

Frothingham died on the 30th of last month, from heart disease, — 
very suddenly at the close, but after a failure in health which lasted 
through three or more years, and which gave warning of the gradually 
approaching and inevitable end. 

His loss of physical strength had led him recently to relinquish all 
active pursuits : in fact, he had of late given up most of his time 
to foreign travel, and in that he indulged the scholarly tastes with 
which he was gifted, and daily added to the store of knowledge which 
made him a man of exceptional culture. While his near friends knew 
well the suffering and restriction which came with his illness, no one 
ever saw a shadow cast by them upon his life. He never lost the happy 
faculty of rising above difficulties and disappointments of that kind into 
an atmosphere of brightness and hope. 

In Brooklyn, where he had his home, he, during the active years of 
his life, did much for the good of those around him. While not en- 
gaged in public life, he was interested in the city's charities and in many 
organizations formed for the general welfare ; he was for many years 



•^ 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



A8TCR, LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS. 




BIOGRAPHIES. 39 

the Secretary of the Brooklyn Philharmonic Society and its most active 
Director, and was also interested in the Institute of Arts and Sciences, 
and there and elsewhere became a valued adviser in educational work. 
A graduate of tlie Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, he was one of 
the officers of its Board of Tnistees, and until his death continued his 
interest in its wide field of instruction. 

I had a long visit from Ben only two days before his death. He came 
here to my office, and for nearly two hours we indulged in memories 
of the past, going back to the days at Cambridge, and in anticipa- 
tion of the happy times to come, — for we then vowed that we would 
without fail join the Class at the forty-year reunion next year. 

Imagine the shock when, upon the second day after that, a telegram 
came, telling me that he had died. 

Mrs. Frothingham, as you may remember, is a sister of our classmate, 

W. Augustus White ; she has remaining with her two children, — the 

one a daughter, the other a son (John Wliipple Frothingham) who 

graduated with high rank at Harvard. 

With warm regards, believe me, sincerely yours, 

Frederic Cromwell. 
Arthur Lincoln, Esq., 63 State St., Boston. 

At the annual meeting of the Class on Commencement Day, 
June 25, 1902, the Class Secretary offered the following memorial 
on behalf of White, who was absent : 

Benjamin Thompson Frothingham was born in Charlestown, Massa- 
chusetts, Feb. 2, 1843. He would sometimes refer, half jokingly, to the 
fact that he was born under the shadow of Bunker Hill Monument ; and 
it almost seemed as if his warm sympathy with every movement making 
for liberty of thought and of man was, if possible, heightened by some 
feeling of obligation imposed by the associations of his birthplace. His 
ancestry for two centuries was of New England origin, and his maternal 
grandfather, Benjamin Thompson, after whom he was named, repre- 
sented the Charlestown district in Congress for two terms. In 1852 
his parents changed their residence to Brooklyn, N. Y. In 1855 he 
entered the Brooklyn Collegiate and Polytechnic Institute at its open- 
ing. This was a large new preparatory school of which Dr. Jolm H, 
Raymond was President, and inaugurated by him on liberal lines that 
placed it in advance of most of the boys' schools of the period. Disci- 
pline was maintained by appealing to the pupils* sense of honor rather 
than by restrictive regulations and punishments. The morale of the 



40 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

school was excellent and congenial to Frothingham, who always looked 
back with pleasure to the four years spent there. 

His gift of oratory and elocution seemed innate, perhaps a natural ex- 
pression of the combination in his character of clearness of thought, with 
a warm and sympatlietic appreciation of the feelings and thoughts of 
others. At those rather dreary school functions where boy after boy 
recites mechanically some " piece " learned by rote, his recitations were 
always an enlivening and redeeming feature that aroused the audience 
to close attention and appreciative applause. 

He learned much at school, but more outside. He was always an 
eager reader, and early in his life took an interest in subjects that usually 
attract only those of maturer years. He sympathized strongly with the 
movement toward a more liberal religious belief in the Unittirian denom- 
ination. He attended the church of which Rev. Samuel Longfellow 
(brother of the poet) was pastor, — a man of congenial sweetness of 
disposition that resulted in a warm and lasting friendship between the 
two, and had considerable influence in shaping Frothingham's opinions 
and character. 

The anti-slavery movement enlisted his warmest sympathies. As a 
boy of thirteen, he was not too young to take an enthusiastic interest 
in Fremont*s campaign for the Presidency, and his interest in national 
politics deepened and grew more intense as public sentiment at the 
North rapidly ripened during tiie few years immediately preceding the 
Civil War. 

Frothingham entered college at the age of sixteen, probably more 
mature in development than most of his classmates. He attained a fair 
standing in his classes without much effort, but for more than that he 
did not care to strive, as the routine of recitations was irksome to him, 
and he preferred to throw his real work and interest into studies some- 
what outside of the regular college work. From early boyhood he was 
a lover of music, and enjoyed greatly both classical music and the Italian 
Opera of that date. On the short visits of opera companies to Boston, 
he was nearly always in attendance, sometimes taking a text-book with 
him to prepare between the acts for next morning's recitation. 

His genial nature and bright mind made him a popular and prominent 
member of the Class, and resulted in his receiving perhaps the highest 
honor within its gift, that of being chosen orator for Class Day. His 
address on that occasion was largely concerned with the stirring ques- 
tions of the day, and was an inspiring appeal to patriotism and the sup- 
port of the national cause. So good a judge as Edward Everett, who 



BIOGRAPHIES. 41 

was present, said that it was the best Class Day oration he had ever 
listened to. 

Frothingham's nature was, as has been said, an unusually affectionate 
and kindly one; his tastes and inclinations were all toward a quiet 
life ; he had nevei\ taken any interest in athletics or outdoor sport ; it 
was, therefore, only a strong sense of duty that led him, a few months 
after graduating, to enter the army as a volunteer aide with the 
rank of captain on the staff of General Gillmore. A diary kept by him 
during his term of service makes frequent mention of meeting class- 
mates. In November, 1863, he was at Port Royal, South Carolina, and 
in that vicinity, where he met Crane and Boynton several times. In 
January, 1864, he was in Florida, and mentions Stetson as spending 
a night with him, meeting Morison several times, and obtaining a pass 
for him, and also meeting Brooks and Wales. From April to June, 1864, 
he saw hard service in the Peninsular Campaign, and met Verplanck, 
Clark, and others. Such was his aversion to any appearance of ostenta- 
tiousness, that in after life he seldom referred to his military service, or 
if it was spoken of, passed it over lightly as a matter of little serious- 
ness ; yet it appears from his diary that he was often under fire, that 
men and horses were shot alongside of him, and once beyond the picket 
lines he was shot at from behind at short range, and narrowly escaped 
capture. 

After leaving the army he made a trip to Europe, and spent nine 
months abroad, much of the time in company with Cromwell and White, 
and enjoying and appreciating greatly the Old World that is so new to 
an American on his first visit. 

In 1866, he married Katharine Tredway White. In all four children 
were bom to them, a daughter and three sons. The loss of two of his 
sons at the age of six and seven, respectively, was deeply felt by him. 

For about twenty-five years he was engaged in mercantile business in 
New York, but he was never greatly interested in money-making. 

He gave much of his time and thought to institutions with which he 
was connected. He was a trustee in the Brooklyn Collegiate and Poly- 
technic Institute for thirty-five years, for the most of that time its 
Secretary and for a few years its Treasurer. He was for thirty years a 
Trustee of the Brooklyn Philharmonic Society, for most of that time its 
Secretary, and always the most active member of its Board. In 1898, 
he l^ecame a Trustee of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, 
was a member of its Executive Committee, and Chairman of its Music 
Committee. He was a director in the Nassau National Bank of Brook- 



42 THE CLASS OF 1803. 

lyn. He served for a time as Trustee of the First IlDitarian Society of 
Brooklyn. He took an active and intelligent interest in all movements 
for better politics, and his advice and co-operation were sought and wel- 
comed in many ways. 

During the latter years of his life, his activity was a good deal limited 
by his knowledge that a serious weakness of the heart might bring 
death at any moment ; yet his manner never showed any consciousness 
of it, but he was always as bright and cheerful as though he had every 
prospect of many years more of life. Considerable time was spent in 
Europe, where it was always a pleasure to him to meet classmate Pratt 
and talk over college days. He always kept up a close intimacy with 
Cromwell, whom he called to see and had a long talk with only two 
days before his death. The end came very suddenly on April 30, 1902. 

It would be superfluous to enumerate his fine qualities to his class- 
mates who knew him so well. His most effective work was the example 
he set of a nature always kindly and loving, bringing cheer to all with 
whom he came in contact, absolutely unselfish, and full of thoughtful 
consideration for others ; and this fundamental amiability of character 
was illumined by a brightness of mind and alertness of fancy that made 
him the best of companions, as well as the dearest of friends. 

The f olowing letter was subsequently received : 

September Q, 1902. 
My dear Mr. Lincoln, — I thank you exceedingly for your kind letter 
enclosing the Memorial of my husband. This appears to me a very 
fitting tribute, for which I shall- express personally my gratitude to my 
brother. It is a genuine satisfaction to me to know that the Class of 
Sixty-three, of which he was so fond, records his memory with such 
sympathy and appreciation. 

Believe me, very sincerely yours, 

Katharine White Frothingham. 
Chestnut Hill, and 68 Broad St., N. Y. 

* WILLIAM FROTHINGHAM was born in Boston, Nov. 8, 
1841. He died ia Boston, Feb. 27, 1895. 

He continued in business in Boston until his death. 

At the annual meeting of the Class on Commencement Day 
June 26, 1895, H. F. Jenks offered the following memorial: 

"We are one in the joy and sorrow." 



r% 




r/rr:Z 




r 



BIOGRAPHIES. 43 

• 
Well have we proved the truth of this first line of our dear old Class 

song. Few classes in our Alma Mater, if any, have more strongly re- 
garded the ties of brotherhood. In these days of large classes it is im- 
possible to maintain the same intimacy and to conserve the same friendly 
interest which was possible in classes whose number was small enough to 
allow acquaintance and some degree of familiarity between all their 
members. Though our Class was the largest that had graduated up to 
its time, it was small enough for the establishment and maintenance of 
those personal relations, between all who composed it, which promote 
mutual interest and sympathy, and we have always retained a kindly 
regard for one another, have rejoiced in one another's triumphs, and 
mourned in one another's misfortunes and sorrows. Wo have been 
singularly fortunate, in comparison with other classes, in the limited 
number of breaks which have occurred in our circle. In the quin- 
quennial catalogue issued to-day ninety-four names of living members 
appear. Of the one hundred and five who graduated thirty-two years 
ago, twenty-two only have died ; of the one hundred and twenty who 
have received degrees as members of our Class, only twenty-six ; and of all 
the one hundred and fifty-one who were at any time connected with the 
Class, only forty-one, — a record such as probably no other class can show, 
particularly when we consider that from our Class were sent many into 
the ranks of the army in the Civil War. 

Still, in spite of this immunity, we are reminded as the years pass on 
that we must 

** Draw the ranks of our brotherhood nearer," 

for from time to time they ** narrow," and as we come here to-day we are 
called to notice a break in them since we last met together. 

William Frothingham, son of Samuel and Louisa Frothingham, who 
was born in Boston, 8th Nov., 1841, died in that city February 27, of 
the current year. 

We remember Frothingham as a man with a ready capacity for acquir- 
ing knowledge, but never a hard student ; he could with little effort have 
attained a high standing, and he had natural abilities of no mean order. 
In his life after graduation, he had many trials to encounter and mis- 
fortunes to overcome, and the prospects of his early manhood failed of 
fulfilment. 

With some of us, he retained his early intimacies, and felt the support 
of their sympathy, and, as from time to time he met with us in our 
gq,tUerings, there was a ready cordiality in his manner, and an underlying 



44 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

cheerfulness that no disaster or reverse could entirely overcome. His 
death in the prime of manhood reminds us that the time of our gradu- 
ation from earthly scenes draws on apace. 

We mourn the loss of one of our brotherhood, and tender to his family 
and friends our respectful sympathy. 

" What though life'sbattle has not been 
A victory to all ! 
What though in running life's hard race 
We may have chanced to fall. 

** Each brother's life with its single strife 
Is a part of each other's story." 



It was thereupon 

Voted^ that the memorial be entered upon the Class records, and a copy 
be sent to the family. 

*PAYSON PEEEIN FULLEETON was born in Boston, 
July 15, 1841. He died in New York City, Nov. 13, 1877. 
His son, Walter Morse, died Feb. 23, 1881. 

CHAELES ELIOT FUENESS is still in impaired health, and 
not engaged in any business. 

JOSEPH ANTHONY GILLET is still Professor of Mathe- 
matics and Physics in the Normal College of the City of New 
York, a position which he has held for over thirty-three years. 
He leads a very quiet life, is in excellent health, enjoys his work, 
draws his salary regularly, and strives to earn it by good honest 
work. 

FEANK GOODWIN still resides in Boston, and is a Professor 
in the Law School of Boston University. 

His son, Eobert Eliot, was fitted for college at the High School, 
Concord, Massachusetts, and graduated at Harvard College, with 
a cum laude, in 1901, and is now a student in the Law School of 
Boston University. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 45 

ADOLPHUS WILLIAMSON GEEEN still resides in Chicago, 
but spends much of his time in New York, and has a summer 
home at Belle Haven, Greenwich, Connecticut. 

From 1893 to 1898 he was a lawyer, with a constantly increas- 
ing practice, and after twenty-five years of hard work had reached 
the position to which he had been looking forward, the head of a 
large law firm with the privilege of selecting just the kind of busi- 
ness he wanted. 

At the beginning of 1898 he was largely instrumental in form- 
ing the National Biscuit Company, and became the general counsel 
for that Company, also one of its Directors and a member of its 
Executive Committee. As the Company developed, he became 
drawn more and more into the business management, so that in 
the fall of 1898 he was forced to take the position of Chairman 
of the Board of Directors, and became practically the chief execu- 
tive oflBcer. This necessitated his gradually giving up the prac- 
tice of law. 

He has made four trips to Europe since 1893. 

JOHN OENE GEEEN continues the practice of his profes- 
sion in Boston, at 182 Marlborough Street. 

He still holds his professorship in the Harvard Medical 
School, and is Aural Surgeon of the Massachusetts Charitable 
Eye and Ear Infirmary. He has resigned from the Massa- 
chusetts Gieneral Hospital and as Aural Surgeon of the Boston 
City Hospital, but has been appointed Advisory Surgeon of the 
latter. 

His writings, entirely professional, have been confined to medi- 
cal periodicals and society transactions, except sections in the 
following works : 

** Reference Handbook of the Medical Sciences." 
"American Textbook of Diseases of the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat." 
" International Textbook of Surgery." 

"A System of Genito-Urinary Diseases, Syphilology and Derma- 
tology." 



46 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

♦FREDEEIC THOMAS GREENHALGE was born in Clith- 
eroe, England, July 19, 1842. He died in Lowell, Massachusetts, 
March 5, 1896. 

He continued to reside in Lowell until his death. 

He was elected Governor of Massachusetts, Nov. 7, 1893, and 
inaugurated Jan. 4, 1894. He was re-elected in November, 1894 
and 1895, and died in oflBce. 

Funeral services were held in the First Congregational Church, 
Lowell, March 9, 1896. Sheldon was one of the pall-bearers, and 
classmates present were Appleton, Bishop, Daniell, Denny, Drew, 
Edwards, Goodwin, Grew, F. L. Higginson, Lincoln, Mason, Owen, 
Smith, Wales, and H. W. Warren. 

The following letters explain themselves : 

Boston, March 6, 1896. 

Dear Mrs. Greenhalge, — Among the many assurances of respect 
and esteem for your husband, I hope that a word from his college class- 
mates will be of some comfort to you and your children. I therefore 
venture to send you this message to remind you of the great interest 
we have always had in him. 

In the early college days we soon learned to appreciate his talent and 
to value his friendship, and later years have constantly strengthened our 
regard and attachment for him. There is a peculiar charm about college 
friendships which is most enduring, and I am sure we have always 
cherished this feeling for him, as he did for us. He has been a constant 
attendant at our social gatherings, and no one has contributed more than 
he to the pleasure and profit of such occasions. 

Our burden will be heavier, now he is gone, but his memory will help 
us to bear it more bravely. 

Very sincerely yours, Arthur Lincoln, 

Class Secretary, 
Mb. Arthur Lincoln, 
Boston. 
Dear Sir, — My mother desires me to thank you in her name for the 
very kind and sympathetic letter which you sent to her. 

Very truly yours, F. B. Greenhalge. 

Memorial exercises were held by the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts in Mechanics Building, Boston, April 18, 1896. 



46 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

♦FREDEEIC THOMAS GREENHALGE was born in Clith- 
eroe, England, July 19, 1842. He died in Lowell, Massachusetts, 
March 5, 1896. 

He continued to reside in Lowell until his death. 

He was elected Governor of Massachusetts, Nov. 7, 1893, and 
inaugurated Jan. 4, 1894. He was re-elected in November, 1894 
and 1895, and died in ofl&ce. 

Funeral services were held in the First Congregational Church, 
Lowell, March 9, 1896. Sheldon was one of the pall-bearers, and 
classmates present were Appleton, Bishop, Daniell, Denny, Drew, 
Edwards, Goodwin, Grew, F. L. Higginson, Lincoln, Mason, Owen, 
Smith, Wales, and H. W. Warren. 

The following letters explain themselves : 

Boston, March 6, 1896. 
Dear Mrs. Greenhalge, — Among the many assurances of respect 
and esteem for your husband, I hope that a word from his college class- 
mates will be of some comfort to you and your children. I therefore 
venture to send you this message to remind you of the great interest 
we have always had in him. 

In the early college days we soon learned to appreciate his talent and 
to value his friendship, and later years have constantly strengthened our 
regard and attachment for him. There is a peculiar charm about college 
friendships which is most enduring, and I am sure we have always 
cherished this feeling for him, as he did for us. He has been a constant 
attendant at our social gatherings, and no one has contributed more than 
he to the pleasure and profit of such occasions. 

Our burden will be heavier, now he is gone, but his memory will help 
us to bear it more bravely. 

Very sincerely yours, Arthur Lincoln, 

Class Secretary. 
Mr. Arthur Lincoln, 
Boston. 
Dear Sir, — My mother desires me to thank you in her name for the 
very kind and sympathetic letter which you sent to her. 

Very truly yours, F. B. Greenhalge. 

Memorial exercises were held by the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts in Mechanics Building, Boston, April 18, 1896. 




r 



BIOGRAPHIES. 47 

At the annual meeting of the Class on Commencement Day, 
June 24, 1896, Sheldon offered the following tribute: 

Our late classmate, Frederic Thomas Greenhalge, the son of William 
and Mary (Slater) Greenhalge, was born in Clitheroe, England, on the 
19th day of July, 1842. He spent his boyhood and laid the foundation 
of his education in rural England, with the ordinary advantages of Eng- 
lish middle-class life, somewhat heightened by the fact that his father 
possessed much natural ability, and had gained for himself a thoroughly 
practical education. In the spring of 1855, William Greenhalge, with his 
family, emigrated to this country, and established himself in Lowell, in 
an important and fairly well-paid position, in charge of the engraving 
department of the Merrimack Print Works. His son Frederic inherited 
from the sturdy English stock from which he sprang the vigorous race- 
qualities which were afterwards prominent in his career; and, as has 
been so often seen in other cases, those qualities lost none of their native 
power, but acquired a more brilliant polish and a keener edge in the 
stimulating air of Massachusetts. He was fitted for college in the High 
School at Lowell, where, though completing the four years' course in 
three years, he took high rank in his studies, being the first winner of 
the Carney medal, and became a leader in his class. He founded and 
largely maintained the " High School Union," a paper edited and written 
by the scholars. In the fall of 1859, he was admitted to college, and 
became a member of our Class. He did not remain long with us, being 
compelled by the death of his father to leave college during his junior 
year ; but he was with us long enough to win distinction, to gain the 
good-will of his classmates, and to make us all glad, not only in his own 
pleasure, but for the sake of the Class, which was thus enabled to claim 
him as her own, when, in 1870, the college gave to him the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, as a member of the Class of '63. 

Though always a good student, especially in those subjects which he 
most affected, and which he saw to be of chief importance to his own 
needs, it was as a writer and debater that he acquired his highest dis- 
tinction. His discussions with our other deceased classmate, who but 
for his early death would doubtless have continued to be his tit rival, 
Gorham Phillips Stevens, are fresh in the memory of many of us. At 
the close of our Sophomore year, he was appointed orator of the Institute 
of 1770; and he also became one of the editors of the old "Harvard 
Magazine." We knew him then in embryo, as we have known him since 
his graduation, not only as the powerful orator, not only as the sagacious 



48 - THE CLASS OF 1863. 

raan of affairs, not only as one who both in public and private life owed 
his success to his good qualities, and not to his failings, but as the man 
of letters whose tongue and whose wit were alike always ready, whose 
genial nature was made all the more lovable because when he was at 
ease among his classmates he liked to cover it with a mask of sarcasm, 
whose capacity was always equal to every exigency that came to him. 
Accordingly, in after life as well as in college, we were as quick to resort 
to his tongue and pen as he was ready to use them in our behalf. He 
enlivened our meetings by the brilliancy of his speech and the kindliness 
of his bearing. lie wrote the ode for our fifth triennial dinner in 1878 ; 
he was well characterized by our Secretary in 1888 as " Joculator ornatis- 
simus;" he presided at our latest dinner in 1893 with a plenitude of 
wit and eloquence which demanded and received from every one his best 
in return. 

Obliged by the death of his father in 1862 to leave college, and to 
provide for his own support and care for his mother and sisters, he met 
these responsibilities fully and efficiently, while he devoted his spare time 
to the study of the law. In the winter of 1862-63 he taught a district 
school at Chelmsford ; in September, 1863, he was employed for a short 
time at the American Boiler Works at Lowell. But his personal needs 
could not make him deaf to the call of patriotism. He volunteered to 
enlist in the Union army ; and when, by reason of an enfeebling injury, 
he failed to pass the medical examination, he was still resolved to put 
himself in the way of active service, and so betook himself to Newbern, 
North Carolina, hoping to receive a commission. Here he was for a time 
placed in charge of the commissary department; but w^hen the city 
was attacked in February, 1864, he took command of a body of colored 
troops, and so continued until he was seized with malarial fever, and 
after some weeks was sent home sick, and discharged. He then resumed 
the study of the law, and in May, 1865, was admitted to the Middlesex 
bar. 

It has been my privilege elsewhere, in another connection, to speak of 
Greenhalge's career at the bar, and I may perhaps be allowed to use the 
same words here. As a lawyer, it was well said of him by one of our 
ablest judges, that he never found it necessary to give up candor or 
manners in order to fight hard and prevail. So another eminent judge, 
now deceased, after presiding at the trial of a case prosecuted by Green- 
halge, and stubbornly defended by one of our most skilful lawyers, spoke 
of the pleasure he had felt in hearing a case fought hard and closely by 
men who were both lawyers and gentlemen. Ho never failed to bring 



BIOGRAPHIES. 49 

out the full strength of his client's position ; and he was never afraid to 
meet the hardest onset or the most persistent defence that could he made 
by his opponent. His powers of oratory were unfailing; but he did not 
attempt by those powers to conceal any unfairness of argument or any 
distortion of truth and justice. Utterly loyal to his client, he did not 
fall short in his loyalty to the court. He was eager to secure victory, 
and he could toil terribly to this end ; but he could not fight his forensic 
battles otherwise tlian fairly and honestly. He loved the truth ; and his 
bearing, his demeanor, the tones of his voice, the very features of his 
countenance, his heart and mind manifesting themselves in all that he 
said and did, showed this love of truth so plainly that few could fail to 
see and appreciate it. He was a sincere man ; he could not deceive him- 
self, and he would not deceive others. He was a lover of justice ; and he 
realized the fact, so often overlooked by mere theorists, that, under our 
system of administering the law, a just result can best be practically 
attained when the opposing interests are each earnestly and even zeal- 
ously supported and vindicated by the highest skill of professional advo- 
cacy, with a competent and impartial tribunal finally to decide between 
them. So he, sincerely and with an earnest strenuousness, but fairly 
and courteously, supported the claims of his client, and expected and 
welcomed the same conduct from his adversaries. If he were disap- 
pointed in this reasonable expectation, if any unfair devices were used 
against hira, he was able to trample them underfoot and bring them 
to destruction. 

Accordingly, he was successful as a lawyer. Early in his professional 
life, he said that he had a fair practice, which was increasing daily. It 
cannot be doubted that, had he continued in active practice, he would 
have attained both a sufficient competence and that measure of fame 
which is within the reach of the practising lawyer. He turned into 
political life, and his renown is the greater. But he was the same man 
as a lawyer that he was in other walks of life. His practice was a 
varied one, and he did all his work well. It was ever his habit to rise, 
at least, to the level of each occasion, and to discharge successfully 
whatever duty came to his hand. I have said that he would doubtless 
have acquired a competence had he not diverted his attention from law 
to politics. But he never practised law in the commercial spirit ; he 
was not inclined to magnify the pecuniary value of his services, or to 
consider his own emolument so much the object of his exertions as the 
welfare of his client. He desired professional success ; he was ambitious 
to gain it ; the contests of the bar suited his eager nature. His argu- 

4 



50 THE CLASS OF 1868. 

ments to juries were strong and effective, just as in political life his 
speeches were influential and persuasive. He knew what to say and 
how to say it ; and, while his wit and sarcasm made his arguments and 
speeches attractive and fascinating, the unflinching integrity and manli- 
ness of his nature slione forth in all that he said, and gave the weight 
and strength that carried conviction to the minds of those that heard 
him. 

I have purposely left myself but little space in which to speak of his 
public life. It was as a man rather than as a statesman or a politician 
that we, his classmates, knew and loved him. And yet, we cannot 
forget that the honors he received from his fellow-citizens were acquired, 
not by any chance, not by any devices of a demagogue, not by any 
pandering to popular prejudices or any truckling to the passions of the 
hour, but by the same combination of warm-hearted geniality, stern 
and unbending integrity, firm and determined devotion to the right, 
with the same capacity of vehement outburst against the wrong, and 
the same fertility of resource, all fused together into the same trenchant 
eloquence, that won and retained our affection. And we feel that the 
honors he gained are, in a certain sense, to be counted among the laurels 
of his Class ; that it is also his " glory that cannot be shaken " that is to 
help inspire us for the combats that remain. He was naturally a leader 
of mankind ; and we may well go over the title-roll of his dignities, not 
in any vain pride, but with rejoicing that in him worth was recognized, 
and that his high qualities were afforded the field which was necessary 
for their proper manifestation. 

He served in the Common Council of Lowell in 1868 and 1869. He 
was for three years, beginning in 1871, a member of the School Board. 
In 1880, he was elected Mayor of Lowell, and discharged with honor 
the duties of that office; and in 1888 he was made City Solicitor. In 
1874, he was appointed Special Justice of the Police Court of Lowell. 
In 1885, he was elected a Representative from Lowell to the General 
Court of the Commonwealth; and, in 1889, he became a member of the 
51st National Congress from the 8th Massachusetts District. In 1884, 
he was sent as a delegate to the National Republican Convention ; and, 
in 1889, he presided over the Republican State Convention of Massa- 
chusetts. In 1893, he was elected, and was re-elected in 1894 and 1895, 
to be Governor of Massachusetts, each time by majorities which had 
been long unknown in our State elections. In all these positions he 
gained for himself the love and admiration of those who agreed with 
him, the esteem and admiration of those who differed from him. He 



BIOGRAPHIES. 51 

made each difficulty the stepping-stone to a new success. In his Con- 
gressional service, though lasting but for a single term, it is not too much 
to say that he gained for himself a national distinction, at once winning 
the attention and respect of the House, and securing a position in the 
front rank of Congressional orators. But it was in the discharge of his 
functions as Governor of Massachusetts that he most clearly manifested 
to the public gaze his courage in administration, his independence in 
thought and action, his absolute integrity, his ardent and unswerving 
patriotism, his steadfast faith in the people, his quick and sound judg- 
ment, his persistent adherence to the right regardless of any question as 
to his own political interest, or even as to any merely partisan concerns. 
While he was yet newly seated in the gubernatorial chair, anarchy with 
misguided labor in its train, crawled before him, and snarled out such 
threats and demands as time-serving politicians had been wont to quail 
before ; but he met the sufferings of labor with so ready a sympathy, 
and the ravings of anarchy with so stern and utter a denial, that all 
danger disappeared as if by magic; and again were exemplified those 
great words of Lowell : 

** The brave makes danger opportunity ; 

The waverer, paltering with the chance sublime, 
Dwarfs it to peril. " 

But it is not for me on this occasion to speak in detail of his public 
services. This matter has now passed into the domain of history, and 
we who loved the man could not treat this subject with the self-restraint 
and in the calm and measured language that would be fitting. Instead 
of attempting to do so, let me hand to our Secretary the resolutions, 
already indeed familiar to us all, in which the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts has made official acknowledgment of his services and recorded 
its grief for his loss. 

Greenhalge was married Oct. 1, 1872, to Isabel Nesmith, daughter 
of the Honorable John Nesmith, formerly Lieutenant-Governor of this 
Commonwealth. His children were Nesmith Greenhalge, born August 
28, 1873, and died July 25, 1874; Frederick Brandlesome Greenhalge, 
born July 21, 1875 ; Harriet Nesmith Greenhalge, born Dec. 10, 1878 ; 
Richard Spalding Greenhalge, born July 31, 1883. 

His health had suffered from the demands made upon him in his 
official positions ; and early in February, 1896, he was prostrated by the 
progressive encroachments of a disease which had long been sapping his 
strength, though he had hitherto resisted its open attacks. But now it 



52 THE CLASS OF 1868. 

advanced rapidly to its inevitable termination ; and he died on the 5th 
day of March, 1896, during his third term of office as Governor, lamented 
by all the people of the Commonwealth. Never has there been a more 
general expression of grief in this State than came from this loss. I 
have already quoted the resolutions of the Executive Department of the 
Commonwealth. On Saturday, April 18, 1896, the Commonwealth paid 
him its last formal tribute by observances, in his honor, at Mechanics 
Hall, in Boston, terminating with an eloquent eulogy upon the late 
Governor, by the Honorable Henry Cabot Lodge. Let me quote a 
few winged words from this noble speech : 

" He was sinple in his life, devoted and tender to his wife and chil- 
dren, a lover of home, the altar and shrine of the race who read the 
Bible in the language of Shakespeare. He was brave and loyal, loyal 
with that chivalrous loyalty which is not too common, but which leads 
a man like him to come unasked to the aid of a friend, and to give and 
take blows in a friend's behalf, as the Black Knight came to the side 
of Ivanhoe when he was sore beset. He was honest in word and deed, 
and untouched by the unwholesome passion for mere money which is 
one of the darkest perils of these modern times. He loved literature 
and books with a real love and reverence, and held scholarship in honor. 
. . . With memory sharpened by sorrow, we all recall his ability in 
administration, his capacity for business, his unfailing charm of manner, 
his simple but strong religious faith, and his large and generous toler- 
ance. These qualities were known and honored of all men ; and they 
had their reward, not in the high offices that came to him, but in the 
confidence and affection which he inspired. This was a life worth 
living. He made it so, both for himself and for others. He did 
a man's work ; he fouglit a man's fight ; he made his mark upon his 
time." 

Greenhalge died a poor man. Under the press of public duties that 
weighed upon the last years of his life, he had disregarded his personal 
interests so completely that his pecuniary resources had practically dis- 
appeared. And he would rather have had it so than have gained wealth 
while engaged in the discharge of public trusts. But he has left to his 
children a legacy better than any mere wealth, — a name which is loved 
and honored as few otliers have been by the people of this State, a fra- 
grant memory which will not soon pass away, an inheritance of glory 
in which they can never cease to feel an honest pride. And to us, his 
classmates, he has left an example which we cannot fail to find quickening 
and ennobling. Because we have known him, because- we have been con- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 53 

versant with him, and enjoyed the blessiug of his friendship, we can repeat 
with deeper truth, with a stronger realization of the force of our words :* 

"Our place has already been taken 

By the lives whose glad labor is done ; 
By their glory which cannot be shaken 
We are pledged to the combat till won." 

It was thereupon 

Voted, that the tribute be entered upon the Class records and a copy 
be sent to the family. 

The resolutions adopted by the Executive Council of Mas- 
sachusetts and referred to in the foregoing memorial are as 
follows : 

" The Lieutenant-Governor and the Executive Council of Massachusetts 
for the year 1896, in common with all the people of this Commonwealth, 
feel a deep sense of loss to the State and nation in the premature death 
of our beloved Governor, Frederic Thomas Greenhalge. 

" He has left us in the maturity of his early manhood and in the full 
play of his splendid abilities to plan and execute, and all the people may 
well give expression to their grief at the untimely departure of a chief 
magistrate so entirely devoted to their service. This council will miss 
his genial presence, his wise leadership, and his personal friendship. 

" Coming to this country in childhood and in humble circumstances, 
he, like many others who acquired leadership and fame, had to work out 
his destiny by the force of his indomitable will. His growth and success 
were phenomenal. Heroes are bom, not made. Frederic T. Greenhalge 
was both born great and grew great. 

" He readily imbibed the spirit of American institutions, and his 
early life and the training of his intellectual powers in the schools was 
a fine illustration of American opportunity, American civilization, and 
Massachusetts education. He was of and for the people. He believed 
in them and trusted them. They believed in him and loved him. And 
when the power of speech and the fire of eloquence were called forth 
to stir men to enthusiasm and action, they were sure to be found in 
Frederic T. Greenhalge. He captivated men not so much by his elo- 
quence as by his earnestness and his sincerity. A lawyer by profession, he 
spent much of his life in the public service. In the councils and as Mayor 
of his own city, in the Legislature of this State, he took position at the 



54 THE CLASS OF 1868. 

front and did good service. A brilliant career in the national House of 
Representatives, and finally as Governor of this Commonwealth completed 
his public service. Every position he filled he adorned. He was a man 
of fixed opinions, and when conclusions were reached and believed by 
him to be founded on principles of justice and truth, it was useless to 
try and change his course. He was conscientious and untiring in his 
discharge of public duty, and though sometimes criticised by those who 
watched for his halting, his praises now fall from their lips. 

" Taken prematurely in the middle of a career which, had he lived, 
might have been greatly extended, he drops by the wayside, leaving a 
reputation of honorable service to the Commonwealth and without a 
stain. History will assign him an honorable place in the long line of 
illustrious chief magistrates of this Commonwealth, and his memory 
will live in the hearts of the people for ages yet to come. 

" Without rudely invading the sanctity of private grief, we tender our 
heartfelt sympathy to the sorrowing family." 

The following letter was subsequently received : 

My dear Mr. Lincoln, — Please accept my sincere thanks for the 
copy of Judge Sheldon's tribute to my husband. It is a beautiful testi- 
monial, just, truthful, and appreciative* I shall prize it as a memorial 
dear to me and my children from the classmates whom he loved. 
Very sincerely yours, 

Isabel Nesmith Greenhalge. 
CoNWAT Cbntre, July 22, 1896. 

A marble bust of Governor Greenhalge, by Kitson, was pre- 
sented to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, by the people of 
Lowell, Feb. 28, 1896, and is now placed in the State Hguse. 
A volume on " The Life and Work of Frederic T. Greenhalge," 
has been published by James Ernest Nesmith. 

His son, Frederick Brandlesome, has graduated in the Harvard 
Class of 1898. 

* WILLIAM 6EEEN0UGH was born in Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts, June 29, 1843. He died at Lake Placid, New York, July 8, 
1902. 

He was for three years, 1897-1899, a Commissioner of Education 





/^TCcCco-'^ ,/kyCu<.y^ f^ - 




/ f -• *■ •''. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 55 

in New York City by appointment of Mayor Strong. His wife 
died Nov. 29, 1897. 

His son, William, graduated at Harvard in 1896; his son, 
Carroll, is a member of the Class of 1904. 

He has a second grandson, Greenough Townsend, born March 
4, 1895. 

At Commencement Fairchild will ofifer the following memo- 
rial: 

William Greenough, sou of William Whitwell (Harvard, 1837) and 
Catherine Scollay (Curtis) Greenough, was born in Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, June 29, 1843. He. fitted for college at the Boston Public 
Latin School. 

The first year after graduation he spent at Salisbury and Amesbury, 
Massachusetts, occupied in studying the character and condition of wool. 
The second year he passed in Boston, with Tyler, Mclnnes, and Co., 
wool dealers. From August 1, 1865, to April 1, 1866, he was in business 
as a wool-broker, at 122 Congress Street. He was afterwards with Hallo- 
well and Coburn, wool commission merchants. He became a member 
of this firm April 1, 1867, and left it, Jan. 1, 1872, and began business 
under his own name at 51 Federal Street. His warehouse, with all its 
merchandise, was consumed in the great fire of November, 1872. He 
removed to New York City early in 1879, and engaged in the manu- 
facture of woollen goods at Waterloo, New York, and their sale in New 
York City, in partnership with his wife's brother, under the name of 
Patterson and Greenough, at 65 Leonard Street. In the early part of 
1888 he moved to 41 Worth Street, and later to 345 Broadway, where 
he continued in the same business until the time of his death. 

He was interested in the foundation of the New York Free Circulat- 
ing Library, — a free library for the poor of the City of New York, — 
and was one of the trustees, and at one time Secretary of the Society. 
He was connected with the management of the Dewitt Dispensary, New 
York Lying-Tn Hospital, City Reform Club, and New York Charity 
Organization Society, of which he was one of the founders. He was, 
during the last years of his life, a trustee of the Institution for the 
Savings of Merchants' Clerks, and of the New York Institution of the 
Deaf and Dumb. 

In 1897 he was appointed a Commissioner of Education in the City of 



56 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

New York, by William L. Strong, at that time Mayor of the City, and 
served in that capacity for three years. 

He was a member of the New York Historical Society, Waterloo His- 
torical Society, University Club, Merchants' Club, Harvard Club, and of 
several others. 

He was marrfed, April 26, 1871, to Alice Mary Patterson, daughter 
of Joseph Wymau Patterson of New York City, who died on the 27th 
day of November, 1897. 

He had five children, all of whom survive him, — Alice, born March 
24, 1872, the wife of Edward Mitchell Townsend, Jr. ; William, born 
July 15, 1874 (Harvard, 1896); Marion Mansfield, born Oct. 17, 1877; 
Edith, born Sept. 12, 1881 ; and Carroll, born Jan. 30, 1883. 

He died at Lake Placid, New York, on the 8th of July, 1902. 

No better description can be given of Greenough's public service and 
faithful character than by quoting the following article from a New York 
newspaper in reference to his work as a Commissioner of Education and 
also the minute of the Charity Organization Society of New York upon 
his death. 

"A SAFE STEP TOWARD NON-PARTISANSHIP. 

** Many persons who believe most strongly in the wisdom of non-partisan 
government in municipal affairs are convinced that it is a mistake to attempt 
to force that conception upon a community in which all political ideas are 
wrapped up with the division into parties. Even victory, if premature, is 
often a calamity, and a crushing defeat on the issues of non-partisanship would 
set back the cause indefinitely. To be able to make use of a victory the 
people must be ready for it. It is better to wait too long than to offer open 
battle when defeat is probable and victory would weaken the forces that won 
it. There is but one safe road to new forms of government and that road is 
public education. Let us show the people the advantages of disinterested con- 
duct in public positions before we ask them to vote on the abstract principle. 
Colonel Waring has done more to make the idea of independence in municipal 
politics a reality than a dozen crusades. When there have been enough officials 
like him the reform will have been accomplished gradually ; a permanent vic- 
tory will haye been won ; solid education by example will have made our city 
ready for another principle in elections. 

" An illustration of this kind of progress was given at yesterday's meeting 
of the Board of Education, in a report based on months of faithful and intel- 
ligent work. The Board of Education was practically committed months 
ago to a reconstruction of teachers* salaries, based on an abolition of the old 
grades and a substitution of grades by which the newest teachers and those 
with the lowest salaries teach children in the middle of the school course and 



BIOGRAPHIES. 



57 



are promoted down to the younger children as well as up to the older ones. 
The rearrangement of salaries fell to one commissioner, a new acquisition of 
the board. He found it necessary to work out this principle in detail to apply 
to all the two thousand teachers in the city. Not only that, but old by-laws 
of the Board of Education, many of them foolish and arbitrary, about priority 
in promotion, not only according to Ifength of service, but according to the 
school where the vacancy occurred, made the task infinitely more complicated. 
No member of the Board of Education of a year ago would have thought of un- 
dertaking such a task. If it had been done it would have been done by the paid 
superintendents. This merchant, however, knew how important it was that 
the whole work be accomplished by a man with no wires to pull and an under- 
standing of the spirit of the change in standards of promotion. He has done 
it in his own office after months of work, with the clerical help of his own 
personal force of employees, and there have been no speeches about it and no 
invitation for applause. Yet all the citizens who understand the effort which 
one of their number has made for the good of all, without pay and without 
notoriety, have a lesson in the value of giving offices to men whose only desire 
is to be of use to the community. 

" Nobody knows whether Commissioner Greenough is a Republican, a Demo- 
crat, or a Mugwump, and nobody cares to know. He has performed the kind 
of service that leads to non-partisan standards along a road where there are 
no dangers." 

" At a Regular Monthly Meeting of the Central Council of the Charity 
Organization Society, held on Oct. 8, 1902, the President announced the death 
of William Greenough, and the following minute was unanimously ordered 
to be spread upon the record. 

** William Greenough, one of the original founders and organizers of the 
Charity Organization Society of the City of New York, died July 8, 1902, be- 
fore his time. It was in 1882 when a group of those interested in systematic, 
intelligent improvement in charitable methods met at Mr. Greenough's resi- 
dence, to form a Charity Organization Society for this city. By education and 
moral equipment he was well fitted to be one of the leaders in the modem 
movement. 

" He combined gentleness with firmness, earnestness and persistency with 
consideration for the views of others, a wide range of information, and a natu- 
ral ability for the practical application of his researches and observations. 

** He was a member and chairman of the local committee of the district in 
which he lived for several years, and a member of this Council and its Execu- 
tive Committee, Finance Committee, and other active committees from 1885 to 
1899, when many other duties, and a gradual impairment of health, compelled 
him to retire from the Council. He then became one of the Vice-Presidents of 
this society. He was an ardent supporter of the Teachers* College through 
all its early struggles, and for several years a most valuable member of the 
Board of Education of this city. 



58 



THE CLASS OF 1863. 



^ 



" Others come and go ; their work succeeds ; the society prospers and time 
heals all things, but we cannot forget our beginnings and our foundation- 
stones. It fell to the lot of pioneers and builders to bear the heaviest burden 
of moulding public sentiment and of meeting the adverse criticism of preju- 
dice, inexperience, and ignorance, and of creating respect for the society. In 
this troublesome period of its history, Mr. Green ough was indefatigable and 
untiring. 

" There was nothing superficial in his chai*acter. He took home with him 
the educational and social problems, and thought them out until he was 
sure of his position. Then he contended for it. Vanity and self-interest 
were not in him. He worked for the cause which interested him. He was 
absolutely true, sincere, and genuine. Is there any better type ? But the 
higher the 'type, and the greater the man's usefulness, the keener the loss." 

I may add that I saw him often during the last years of his life, and 
that to the end he was the same kind, genial, lovable fellow and strong, 
faithful friend that he had always been. 

EDWARD STURGIS GREW continues to reside in Boston at 
185 Marlborough Street. He is not engaged in active business. 
He has been for thirty-one years a manager and for twelve years 
Secretary of the Boaton Dispensary. 

In 1898 and again in 1903 he visited Europe. 

His son Randolph Clark graduated from Harvard in 1895; 
his son Henry Sturgis in 1896; and his son Joseph Clark in 
1902. 

His §on Henry Sturgis Grew married, Nov. 17, 1897, Ethel 
Hooper, daughter of James C. Hooper. 

JOHN DEAN HALL is Assistant Surgeon-General in the 
United States Army, with the rank of Colonel. 

He was stationed at Fort Wadsworth, New York, July 31, 1898. 
Later he was stationed at San Francisco, and at the present time 
is on duty at Manila, Philippine Islands. 

WALTER WHITNEY HAMMOND closed his pastorate of 
the Chestnut Hill Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia, March 
31, 1895, and on account of his removal from Philadelphia re- 
signed his position in the Executive Council of the Presbyterian 
Historical Society of the United States of America. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 59 

After an interval marked by occasional supply of pulpits, and 
evangelistic labor, he took charge, in October, 1897, of the Pres- 
byterian Church at Remsenburg, Long Island, and closed his 
service there upon accepting, April 1, 1902, his present charge, 
the Morris Plains, New Jersey, Presbyterian Church. 

He is a member, from April 1, 1902, of the Morris Ministerial 
Association, a body organized for theological and literary culture. 

On July 4, 1902, at Morris Plains, he delivered the address in 
connection with a flag-raising in the square. Has given several 
addresses at union meetings and inter-denominational gatherings 
on behalf of the work of the Young Men*s Christian Association, 
United Society of Christian Endeavor, Sunday School, Temper- 
ance, and Missions. 

THOMAS ROBINSON HARRIS, in 1895, having completed 
twenty-five years as Rector of St. Paul's Church, New York City, 
resigned, and accepted the Rectorship of St. Mary's, Beechwood, 
a small rural parish at Scarborough-on-the-Hudson. He made 
this change principally for the sake of the health of himself and 
his family, intending to remain there only for two or three years. 
Finding, however, that the smaller parish gave much more time 
for outside work, he has remained there for eight years. 

His public duties have been greatly increased. For sixteen 
years he has been Secretary of the Convention of the Diocese. In 
1895 he was elected a member of the Standing Committee of the 
Diocese, and has_^served' as Secretary of that Committee for eight 
years, — having been re-elected by ballot by the Diocesan Con- 
vention every year. In 1897 he was elected Chairman and 
Treasurer of the Committee on Trust Funds of the Corporation 
of Widows and Orphans of the Clergy, to fill the place occupied 
by Dean Hoffman, and he continued to hold the position for two 
years, until he found it conflicting with other duties. In 1897 
he was elected by the Diocesan Convention a Trustee of the Gen- 
eral Theological Seminary, and a few weeks later was elected a 
member of the Standing Committee of that institution. In the 



60 



THE CLASS OF 1863. 



following May he was elected Secretary of the Board of Trus- 
tees. All which positions he continues to hold. He has been a 
member of the Annual Committee on the Examinations at the 
Seminary nearly every year since 1893, and Examining Chaplain 
of the Diocese of New York since 1895, until last November, 
when he resigned. In 1894 he was elected President of the New 
York Clericus, — a club composed of clergy of New York and 
vicinity, — and in 1897 he was elected President of the New York 
Churchman's Association. He is also a member of the clerical 
association known as "The Club." During his residence at Scar- 
borough he has been three times elected a School Trustee, and 
has served in that capacity for over five years. In 1899 he was 
, elected General Secretary of the Church Congress of the Protes- 
tant-Episcopal Church, and continues to hold the office. 

His publications have been confined principally to his official 
work as Secretary of the various bodies with which he is con- 
nected, and whose annual reports he prepares for publication. 
He has contributed, however, a number of articles to the religious 
press, besides a somewhat lengthy one to the Encyclopaedia 
Britannica. Among the published articles are the following: 

" The Higher Criticism and the Devotional Use of the Holy Scrip- 
tures." A paper read before the New York Churchman's Associa- 
tion, and published in "The Churchman," Sept. 30, 1893. 

"Church Growth in New York." "The Churchman," Dec. 16, 1893. 
Largely copied in the Press. 

'* The Religious Corporations Law." " The Churchman," 1897. This 
paper resulted in the appointment of a Committee to revise the Relig- 
ious Corporations Law of the State of New York, of which he was a 
member, and which succeeded in securing a radical revision of the 
law adopted by the Legislature in 1895. 

His oldest son, Robert Van Kleeck, married, in 1894, Anna Van 
Doren, of New York, and has two children : Robert Van Kleeck, 
2d, born July 6, 1895 ; Laurence Van Doren, born Dec. 7, 1898. 
He is now Rector of Christ Church, Red Hook, New York. 

His oldest daughter, Margaret, was married in 1899 to William 



THE NEW YORK 

FURLIC LIBRARY. 



A^T'I'R. LENOX AND 

Ti'.DFs F ■■i;:.:5-;tion9. 



60 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

following May he was elected Secretary of the Board of Trus- 
tees. All which positions he continues to hold. He has been a 
member of the Annual Committee on the Examinations at the 
Seminary nearly every year since 1893, and Examining Chaplain 
of the Diocese of New York since 1895, until last November, 
when he resigned. In 1894 he was elected President of the New 
York Clericus, — a club composed of clergy of New York and 
vicinity, — and in 1897 he was elected President of the New York 
Churchman's Association. He is also a member of the clerical 
association known as "The Club." During his residence at Scar- 
borough he has been three times elected a School Trustee, and 
has served in that capacity for over five years. In 1899 he was 
, elected General Secretary of the Church Congress of the Protes- 
tant-Episcopal Church, and continues to hold the office. 

His publications have been confined principally to his official 
work as Secretary of the various bodies with which he is con- 
nected, and whose annual reports he prepares for publication. 
He has contributed, however, a number of articles to the religious 
press, besides a somewhat lengthy one to the Encyclopaedia 
Britannica. Among the published articles are the following: 

" The Higher Criticism and the Devotionftl Use of the Holy Scrip- 
tures." A paper read before the New York Churchman's Associa- 
tion, and published in " The Cliurchman," Sept. 30, 1893. 

"Church Growth in New York." "The Churchman," Dec. 16, 1893. 
Largely copied in the Press. 

'*The Religious Corporations Law." « The Churchman," 1897. This 
paper resulted in the appointment of a Committee to revise the Relig- 
ious Corporations Law of the State of New York, of which he was a 
member, and which succeeded in securing a radical revision of the 
law adopted by the Legislature in 1895. 

His oldest son, Robert Van Kleeck, married, in 1894, Anna Van 
Doren, of New York, and has two children : Robert Van Kleeck, 
2d, born July 6, 1895 ; Laurence Van Doren, born Dec. 7, 1898. 
He is now Rector of Christ Church, Red Hook, New York. 

His oldest daughter, Margaret, was married in 1899 to William 



THE NEW YORK 

FUBLIC LIBRARY, 



AST"«. ^E^OX AND 

Tii ':iFN ^'■■l I -.OPTIONS. 




^x^^^^^t^^^^^^ 




BIOGRAPHIES. 61 

Lamson Griffin, of New York, and has one son, William Lamson 
Griffin, 2d, born Nov. 10, 1902. 

His youngest daughter, Ellen Van Kleeck, died in December, 
1894. His third daughter. May Eobinson, was admitted to the 
Normal College in New York in 1896. His youngest son, 
Thomas Eobinson, is attending the Holbrook Military Academy, 
where he is making a good record for scholarship. 

* ALBERT CHEVALIER HASELTINE was born in Phila- 
delphia, Jan. 16, 1843. He died at Pierres-Maintenon, near 
Paris, France, July 14, 1898, and was buried in the Bagneux 
Cemetery, in Paris. 

He continued to live in Paris and its vicinity until his death, 
devoting much time to fruit-raising and horticulture upon his 
estate at Pierres-Maintenon. 

At the annual meeting of the class on Commencement Day, 
June 28, 1899, Jenks offered the following memorial : 

Albert Chevalier Haseltine died July 14, 1898, soon after Com- 
mencement, near Paris, France. 

A man of refinement and courtesy, but reserved in manner, he was, in 
college life, known intimately by few of us, but by those he was 
esteemed and counted an agreeable companion. 

Soon after graduation he took up his residence in France, and for a 
few years devoted himself to literature and the study and practice 
of art, and subsequently to horticulture. He was consequently unable 
to maintain much intercourse with the class, and was present at Com- 
mencement only three times. 

Hia death, coming as it does this year Avith two others, reminds us that 
we must look forward to our own occupation of the place which 

.... ** has already been tAken 

By those whose glad labors are done." 

As one and another departs let us 

" draw the ranks of our brotherhood nearer. " 

and cherishing the little nameless, unreraembered acts of kindness and 
of love, which, the poet says, are the best portions of a man's life, be 
stimulated to practise them ourselves. 

We tender our respectful sympathy to the surviving relatives of our 
classmate. 



62 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

It was thereupon 

Vot^y That the Memorial be entered upon the Class records, and a 
copy be sent to the family. 

The following letters were received in reply to inquiries by the 
Class Secretary: 
BoiT writes : 

Vallombro8A,JItalt, July 13, 1899. 

My dear Lincoln, — Here in the Apennines about twenty miles 
from Florence, and nearly three thousand feet above it, I recall my promise 
to tell you something of our classmate Albert Haseltine during the last 
years of his life. 

Our intercourse was always of the most irregular and broken kind. 
We would meet two or three times during a few weeks or months, and 
then lose sight of one another for several years. 

It must have been ten years ago or thereabouts that Haseltine was 
called on to represent the interests of one of his brothers in the settle- 
ments of the affairs of George Petit — the well-known Paris picture dealer 
— and at that time, to be near Petit, he had hired a diminutive apart- 
ment in the Rue Godot de Mauroy which he occupied only when called 
to the capital by the exigencies of his brother's affairs. 

It was a curious little place, and there I remember finding him, having 
no doubt, gone to see him in the company of some mutual friend passing 
through Paris. He showed us his apartment, and he could do this 
almost without taking a step, and yet it comprised a short staircase, an 
antechamber, a kitchen, a parlour, and a bedroom. I recall his saying we 
were lucky to find him there, because most of his time was spent at 
Chartres, where he had a house and, above all, a garden in which he 
loved to work, digging, planting, weeding, pruning, and raising many 
kinds of fruit, not for sale but to supply his personal wants. 

I never visited him during his stay at Chartres (which must have 
extended over several years), but later on, about five years ago, I carried 
out an often-deferred project of spending a day in his company and see- 
ing his newly acquired cottage and garden in the little village of Pierres 
near Maintenon, about a dozen miles from Chartres on the railway 
towards Brittany. 

An early train from Paris brought me at about ten a.m. to the Station 
of Maintenon, where Haseltine was waiting for me. It was a beautiful 
day in June, and the walk of two or more miles through the pretty 




■■'■.■■!» 



BIOGRAPHIES. 63 

country surrounding the Chateau of Maintenou was delightful. Further 
on than the walls of the park the landscape became flatter and barer 
than it had been, and in this more uninteresting scenery we came upon 
the village of Pierres and Haseltine's modest dwelling. A gray plaster 
building of one story, with dormer windows in the roof, square and 
small, it stood directly on the road, with a narrow garden behind it run- 
ning down to a bit of woodland. This was all, and here Haseltine passed 
the last years of his life. Here he died. 

Inside the house were two small rooms on the street, and a kitchen and 
shed at the back, and in the roof a large rambling room with some im- 
provised easy-chairs and a fine collection of books that remained to him 
from the period of his college days. All day long he would work in his 
garden, and in the evening would read for hours in the attic parlour I 
have spoken of. At rare intervals there came a visit to Paris, where, in 
the Rue do Bourgogne, he always retained a modest lodging, and it was 
during these visits that we occasionally met, for I never went to Pierres 
except on the June day of which I have been speaking. 

On that day (to go back to it) he showed me about his garden with 
the natural pride of a creator, — for it was all the result of his own 
labors, and I listened not unwillingly to the story of its growth, visited its 
strawberry and raspberry beds, and felt of the green pears and peaches 
slowly ripening against its walls. Then came the hour for lunch, and 
after sipping our coffee, we climbed the narrow stairs leading to the upper 
room, and there spent a pleasant hour talking of old days and old friends, 
until our talk was interrupted by the arrival of a rustic carriage pre- 
viously ordered to carry us over to Chartres, Avhere we proposed to visit 
the cathedral, see the town, and dine at the inn — returning together by 
the evening express to Paris. I have a most vivid recollection of this 
drive of a dozen miles or more through a beautiful country, in the most 
beautiful month of the year, and, in my enjoyment and admiration, I 
found in Haseltine a sympathetic and congenial companion, one who was 
keenly alive to the beautiful side of things. 

After this memorable day we did not meet for two years, and when we 
did meet it was in the most unexpected manner. Again in the month 
of June (this time in the year 1897) I had arranged with William 
Haseltine, — the artist, so long resident in Rome, — to go with him to the 
Salon of the Champs de Mars. We had reached our destination at an 
early hour of the morning, — say ten o'clock, — and were almost alone 
in the vast building, when we suddenly ran up against Albert Haseltine. 
The brothers had not yet met, and after the first surprise Avas over, we 



64 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

agreed to join forces, and when our visit to the Salon was over, both the 
Haseltines accepted my invitation to lunch with me. In this way we 
passed the better part of another long June day together, and this meet- 
ing of the two brothers is not devoid of a certain melancholy interest in 
view of the fact that only one year later this same brother William 
was sent for in Albert's last illness, and was with him when he died. 
" The last time I saw Haseltine (it must have been only a few months 
before his death) he was coming to call on me when he met me in the 
street, and we walked on together. I had been to see the American 
Ambassador to France and urge Hasel tine's fitness for the post of 
Commissioner at the coming French Exposition, and gave him, on that 
occasion, an account of my interview. 

Although he had many influential friends working in his favor, 
Haseltine did not secure this position, and no doubt felt the disappoint- 
ment keenly. He ha<l felt, as he had a right to feel, that his intimate 
knowledge of the French language and long familiarity with artistic 
matters eminently qualified him for the place he sought, but these 
places all depended upon political influence. 

We can only wonder how long his life might have been prolonged by 
the success of his application for this position. The lonely life he had 
led had, no doubt, somewhat undermined his health, and a persistent 
hoarseness had long indicated a growing weakness of the throat and 
lungs j but whether or no a new interest would have given him new 
courage, and have prolonged his life, there was undoubtedly a pathetic 
side to his last days and death. Under other circumstances, his noble 
tastes and wide cultivation might have made a mark in this puzzling 
world of ours. 

I cannot think, my dear Lincoln, that these ragged recollections of 
mine can be of service to you, but I have noted them down for what 
they were worth. 

Always yours most truly, 

Edward D. Boit. 

Appleton writes : 

21 July, 1899. 

Haseltine was the founder of the Harvard Club in Philadelphia, and 
then of the one in New York. I remember my first visit to the latter 
was during the winter of 1865-66, or perhaps 1867-68, when the meet- 
ings were held way up in the building of Clark's restaurant, Broadway. 

It was in 1869-70 that our classmate appeared in Paris with the plan 
of selecting and buying paintings to be sent to his brother, who was an 
art dealer in Philadelphia at the time. He had also a brother who was 



BIOGRAPHIES. 65 

a painter iu Rome, Italy, and another, a sculptor in the same city, and 
I believe they were to help in the work. 

The Franco-Prussian War broke out before they were more than started, 
and this really prevented the business from being undertaken later, though 
A. C Haseltine was always more or less in touch with French artists, and 
for many years lived in Paris, and was associated with the house of 
Mons. George Petit. 

The winter of 1875-76, 1 saw him frequently in London and Paris, 
when he was especially interested in a plan of a cable from Portugal vid 
the Azores to some place in the United States, to co-operate with the 
telegraph system of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The leading spirit 
in the enterprise was Mr. Van Choate of Boston, and I was associated 
with them, and we worked at it together for some time, but did not bring 
it to a successful result. 

Shortly after this, he took up the idea of erecting a business building 
on American prmciples, i. e., heat, elevators, many different offices, etc. 
etc., of which there was nothing of the kind in Paris. This was to be 
near the Bourse, in the financial centre of Paris, and I knew, perhaps better 
than any one, the thought, time, care, and diligent work he gave to it. 
Properties had to be examined, leases looked over, many of them running 
for years, and all the details of future ownership arranged. But this did 
not succeed, and so, from the two disappointments, I doubt if he attempted 
any more active work of the kind. 

I saw him often at Paris, the summer of 1878, the year of the Exposi- 
tion, and also in 1879, at the time of the Canal Congress called together 
by Ferdinand de Lesseps, and did what little I could in his behalf. As 
late as two years ago, he sought a place in the American Commission for 
the great Exposition to be held in 1900, and I, with others of his class, 
signed a petition recommending his services. 

I cannot say just what year it was he went to live at Chartres, where 
he had a very comfortable house, with grounds and garden, and he took 
great delight in looking after the vegetables, fruits, and flowers. He lived 
almost the life of a hermit, cooking his meals and taking long walks 
across the country. I visited him two or three times at this place. 
I^ter he removed to Pierres-Maintenon, between Paris and Chartres, 
where he had a cosy house, garden, and everything to his taste, which a 
legacy from an old friend enabled him to possess without annoyance, as 
his finances were not very high. I went there during my last visit to 
France, the autumn of 1894, and passed a night, and the next day we 
drove to a neighboring village to lunch. 

6 



66 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

That was the last time I remember seeing him, as it was only a few 
days before I left Paris, where he had in the Rue de Bourgogne over the 
river, a comfortable little pied d terre whenever he came to the city. 

Brought up in luxury and extravagance, but compelled to live in most 
modest circumstances, he was generally in a cheerful^ and pleasant frame, 
and seemed to enjoy recalling the days of his past, before he had been 
subjected to so many disappointments. 

Mason writes : 

In September, 1896, my wife and I passed a day or two with Hasel- 
tine at his house in PieiTes, where he took great pleasure in seeing his old 
friends and in showing them his garden and the attractions of the neigh- 
borhood. It was a privilege to visit with him the magnificent cathedral 
at Chartres, and indeed his knowledge of French history, literature, and 
art was very wide. 

Probably few men could have so adapted themselves to the mode of 
life in which his lot was cast, but he did it with philosophy and with 
dignity. He was of French Huguenot extraction, in appearance a 
Frenchman, with perfect command of the language, for which he had a 
fondness in his early days. He was a great reader of books, in several 
languages. Very fastidious in his tastes, he took a great interest in the 
French cuisine and became personally proficient in this art, as well an ex- 
pert in judging of French wines. His knowledge of " fruits and flowera" 
led the American Commissioner to the Exposition of 1878 to enlist his 
services in that department, and they were subsequently acknowledged 
in the United States Government Report. 

Though seldom with us, Haseltnie was a loyal son of Harvard and 
took pride in having been the organizer and the first Secretary of the 
Harvard Clubs in Philadelphia and in New York. He had a strong 
desire to return and live again in his own laud among his old friends, 
and a few months before his death a business position that would have 
enabled him to do this was offered to him, but failing health obliged 
him to decline it. 

♦JOHN TYLER HASSAM was born in Boston, Sept. 20, 
1841, and died in Boston, April 22, 1903. 

In addition to the societies mentioned in former reports, he was 
elected a member of the Bar Association of Boston, June 6, 1885, 
of the Virginia Historical Society, May 9, 1896, corresponding 



r> 




^^Jlu^ J, A/ac 



f ^/v»^ 



.■■».•'.*"■■■•.': 




BIOGRAPHIES. 67 

member of the Somerville Historical Society, Feb. 6, 1900, corre- 
sponding member of the Maine Historical Society, June 27, 
1900. 

He has been a frequent contributor to the " New England His- 
torical Genealogical Register," and to the "Proceedings of the 
Massachusetts Historical Society," and, since the list printed in 
the Class Report of 1888, has published the following pamphlets 
reprinted from the "New England Historical Genealogical 
Register : " 

*'The Hassam Family. Additional Notes.'' 1889 ; 

" Ensign WiUiam Hilton of York, Me." 1896 ; 

"Ezekiel Cheever. The Cheevcr M8S. and Letters." 1903 ; 

and the following from the " Proceedings of the Massachusetts 
Historical Society:" 

''The Confiscated Estates of Boston Loyalists. Victrix causa deis 

placuit, sed victa Catotii" Cambridge: 1895; 
"Diuister Papers." Cambridge: 1895; 
"Hilton Letters." 1895; 
*' Early Recorders and Registers of Deeds for the County of Siiflfolk, 

Massachusetts. 1639-1735." 1898. Reprinted also, with additional 

foot-notes, as part of the Introduction to " Lib. x. Suffolk Deeds." 

1899; 
" The Bahama Islands. Notes on an Early Attempt at Colonization." 

1899; 
"Registers of Deeds for the County of Suffolk, Massachusetts. 1735- 

1900.^' 1900. Reprinted also, with additional foot-notes, as part of 

the Introduction to "Lib. xi. Suffolk Deeds." 1900 ; 
"Registers of Probate for the County of Suffolk, Massachusetts. 1639- 

1799." 1902; 

as well as the following : 

" Land Transfer Reform. A Practical Point of View." 1893. A re- 
ply to an article by F. V. Balch in the "Harvard Law Review" 
for March, 1893. Printed for the Laud Transfer Reform League of 
Boston; 

"No. 47 Court Street, Boston." 1903. Reprinted (with additions) from 
Notes and Queries of the " Boston Transcript " of October 25, 1 903. 



68 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

and these privately printed volumes : 

" The Hassam Family." 1896 ; 
" The Hilton Family." 1896 ; 
** The Cheever Family." 1 896 ; 

"The Hassam Family." 1902. This is a reprint, \vith some addi- 
tions, of *• The Hassam Family." 1896. 

At Commencement the following memorial will be offered by 
Owen: 

John Tyler Hassam was bom Sept. 20, 1841, and died April 22, 
1903. From his birth to his death he resided in Boston. After a ser- 
vice of eight or nine months in the army as First Lieutenant in a regi- 
ment of colored troops, he studied law and was admitted to the bar 
Dec. 13, 1867. His practice as a lawyer was confined principally, if 
not entirely, to conveyancing, and his ability, industry, and accuracy 
soon gave him a place among the leaders of that branch of his profession 
in Suffolk County. Studious by nature and enthusiastic in the pursuit 
of all sources of information relating to the subjects of his investigation, 
he devoted all the time which could be spared from his increasing 
business to the study of the early history of his native city, and, long 
before his death, was recognized as an authority upon the antiquities of 
Boston. As an ofl&cer and member of historical and genealogical so- 
cieties he made many valuable contributions to their records, many of 
which have been published in pamphlet form for distribution among his 
friends. Absorbed as he seemed to be in the study of the musty records 
of the past, his mind was still alert in devising and putting into effect 
new plans for preserving and arranging these records and making more 
easy and convenient the use of them by the public. The sketch of his 
life printed in the Class report presented by the Secretary on the twenty- 
fifth anniversary of our graduation gives some idea of the extent of his 
activities and the variety of his achievements. Among them may be 
mentioned the originating and forwarding of the plan of the exhaustive 
researches in England undertaken by the New England Historic-Genea- 
logical Society, which resulted in the discovery of the parentage and an- 
cestry of John Harvard ; the printing of the early volumes of Suffolk 
Deeds ; the great improvement of the indexes in the Registry of Deeds 
under his direction as an Index Commissioner, which has resulted in 
vastly diminishing the labor and expense of examining titles ; the rescu- 
ing from destruction of a large part of the original court files of Suffolk 
County, and obtaining the large appropriations necessary for their pres- 



f 



BIOGRAPHIES. 69 

ervation and proper arrangement; and the effective service which he 
rendered towards the procuring of the passage by the Massachusetts Leg- 
islature of the act authorizing the addition of accommodations for the 
Eegistries of Deeds and Probate in the new court house. He was also 
one of the earliest and most effective advocates of the introduction of 
the Torrens system of laud registration, which, with some modifications, 
has been enacted into law in this Commonwealth. 

Although in no sense an orator, he was an easy and persuasive speaker, 
and his zeal was untiring when he had once entered upon the work of 
obtaining what he believed to be for the benefit of the public. Finn 
and persistent in the pursuit of his purpose, he cherished no resentment 
towards those who opposed him. Of sunny disposition and kindly tem- 
per, he had always a smile and a friendly greeting for all with whom he 
came in contact. Burdened during the past two years with the weight 
of an incurable disease, he still maintained his cheerful demeanor, and 
although his wasting form and haggard face gave evidence to his friends 
that he was walking in the shadow of death, he made no sign and 
uttered no complaint. His last work was the revision of the proof of 
the sketch contained in the Class report for this year. Two days after 
he had returned it, he passed away. He lived a useful and an honor- 
able life, and he will be long remembered in the community whose 
interests he served so well. 

•ALEXANDER LADD HAYES wa3 born in Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, Sept. 20, 1841, He died in Cambridge, April 
14, 1899. 

He continued to reside in Cambridge until his death, but was 
obliged to give up somewhat the practice of his profession as 
solicitor of patgnts on account of ill health. 

At the annual meeting of the Class on Commencement Day, 
June 28, 1899, the following sketch, prepared by Goodwin, was 
read by the Class Secretary : — 

Our classmate, Alexander Ladd Hayes, was bom in Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, Sept. 20, 1841. The writer of this sketch was born in 
the same year, and in the same town, and had an intimate personal 
acquaintance with him from early boyhood. We are informed that 
much of the moulding of the mind of our classmate is to be referred 
to the influence of Mr. Morrison, whose school he attended when a boy 
in Washington, and by whom he was fitted for college; and we can 



70 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

readily conceive that the attraction which the delicate aroma of classical 
literature always possessed for our classmate, drawing him toward it as 
a fragrant plant causes the body to lean toward its branches, may have 
been increased by the early surroundings of his preparatory school. The 
hard syntax, and the mechanical metre of literature never bound him 
with their chains; but the delicate sentiment and the fine feeling ever 
wooed and won him. • 

His mind had a scientific^ a philosophical, and a poetic turn. But it 
was the fine idea in science, not the material embodiment of it which 
interested him. The marvellous matching of ideas, their correlation, 
and the symmetry resulting in their combination, fascinated him ; and 
these he saw in his imagination, so that he did not need the visible 
object, the crystallization into material form, to satisfy his mental re- 
quirements. It was in these respects that his scientific, his philosophical, 
and his poetical qualities met. An electrical machine, displaying its 
new-bom wonders, represented to him the thought of the universe, 
drawn from manifold quarters, operating in entire harmony, without 
clash or confusion, and upon lines of beauty, yet all of it based upon 
principles of eternal and universal verity. With a mind so constituted, 
it was very natural that he should give his attention, as he did for a 
large part of his mature life, to the subject of inventions ; and we are 
informed by those competent to judge of the matter, that his work in 
drawing descriptions of novel and patentable ideas was excellent, entirely 
accurate, and expressed in language of great clearness, with the fine dis- 
tinctions between things very neatly put. 

But beyond all these intellectual aptitudes, he was thoroughly amiable, 
very sympathetic, and without a streak of meanness in his nature. The 
vice of envy, which alone of all the vices assaults merit in another, was 
entirely absent from his soul. He rejoiced with those that rejoiced, and 
sympathized with those to whom his kindly words and looks were 
grateful. Then, too, he was genial. The hard facts of a competitive 
and exacting age beget a selfishness in many men who are worthy of a 
better development of their characters ; but the ugly nature of the 
struggle for success never seemed to affect him in the least. He was 
always serene, always interested in his friends, and although without 
zeal in the affairs of the mass of humanity, yet with a deep interest in 
the welfare of those within the limits of his environment. Had he been 
educated to the ministry, he would have had a larger care for the mem- 
bers of his flock, than for the uplifting of all mankind, and would never 
have groaned or sighed under the load of the white man's burden. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 71 

It was thereupon 

Voted, that the memorial be entered upon the Class records, and a copy 
sent to the family. 

The following letter was subsequently received : 

No. 605 Sbars Building, Boston, August 8, 1899. 
My DEAR Lincoln, — For my sisters and myself I thank you very 
much for the copy of the resolutions passed by my brother's Class on the 
occasion of his death, which you so kindly sent me. 

It is pleasant for us to know that this tribute to my brother was 
written by one who had known him all his life, and could appreciate those 
traits of character which endeared him to us as a brother, and to his 
classmates as a friend. Please convey to the members of his Class our 
grateful appreciation of this thoughtful and kindly act. 
Very sincerely yours, 

William A. Hayes, 2d. 
To Arthur Lincoln, Esq., 

63 State St., Boston, Mass. 

♦ CHAELES WILLIAM HEATON was born in Alton, lUi- 
nois, Dec. 11, 1840. He died in Boston, Sept. 9, 1869. 

FEANCIS LEE HIGGINSON continues to live in Boston at 
274 Beacon Street. While not in active business, he is a " fairly 
busy man." 

Since about 1886 he has been one of the managing Trustees of 
the Suffolk Savings Bank for Seamen and others, and its Presi- 
dent for the past two years. He is a Director of the Merchants' 
National Bank, the City Trust Co., the Massachusetts Hospital 
Life Insurance Co., and of several other corporations. He is a 
Trustee of the Massachusetts General Hospital, of the Massachu- 
setts Eye and Ear Infirmary, of the Museum of Fine Arts, the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Massachusetts 
Humane Society. He is an Overseer of Harvard College, having 
been elected in 1897 for the term expiring at Commencement, 
1903. 

He was in Europe from May 4, 1898, to about May 10, 1899. 

He was mamed, April 11, 1898, to Corina Anna, daughter of 



72 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

George B. and Amalia Shattuck of Boston, and has two children, 
Corina S., born Sept. 19, 1899, and Eleanor Lee, born Nov. 22, 1901. 

His son Francis Lee, Jr., fitted for college at the Groton School, 
Groton, Massachusetts, and entered Harvard College in 1896, and 
graduated in 1900. He is now a clerk in the office of Lee, Hig- 
ginson, & Co. His daughter Mary Cabot married, Feb. 2, 1898, 
Philip S. Sears (Harvard, 1889), of Boston. 

He has grandchildren : Philip Mason Sears, born Dec. 29, 1899, 
and David, born Dec. 23, 1901. 

SAMUEL STORROW HIGGINSON is at the Soldiers' Home, 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

JOHN MARVIN HORTON is living in New York City at 
211 West 101st Street. 

* WILLIAM MONEFELDT ROWLAND was born in Charles- 
ton, South Carolina, Feb. 19, 1841. He died in Bloomfield, New 
Jersey, April 1, 1894. 

At the annual meeting of the Class on Commencement Day, 
June 27, 1894, the Class Secretary announced the death of How- 
land, and Cobb was requested to prepare a sketch to be entered 
upon the records and sent to the family. The following sketch 
was subsequently prepared by Cobb : — 

William Monefeldt Rowland, Class of 1863, a native of Charleston, 
South Carolina, after a lingering illness, died of paresis at Bloomfield, 
New Jersey, at the age of fifty-four, on the first day of April, 1894. His 
obsequies were conducted by the Rev. Robert Colly er of the Church 
of the Messiah, 'New York City, who, after the religious exercises and 
reading with much feeling Sir Edwin Arnold's familiar poem ** He who 
died at Azan," paid a tribute to the memory of the deceased that may 
be condensed to this purport, — 

'* He was a ripe scholar and a polished gentleman. His books were 
his constant companions, we might almost add, his best loved friends, 
and it is much to be deplored that his physical strength was but in poor 
accordance with his mental power. Naturally of a meditative disposi- 
tion, he disliked ostentation, and took but little interest in the lighter 




;^.^/^..^^:^ 



'\ .^uJ-ti 



BIOGRAPHIES. 73 

moods and movements of social life : but, on the other hand, he possessed 
that broad human sympathy rarely found, save in the contemplative 
recluse and philosopher; this, combined with lofty instincts, clear in- 
tuitions, and unwavering sincerity, won for him the affection and esteem 
of all to whom he was truly known." 

He was buried in the family plot in Greenwood Cemetery. 

♦WILLIAM GUPTILL HUBBAED was born in Acton 
Maine, March 18, 1841. He died in Somerville, Massachusetts 
May 23, 1865. 

♦ EDWARD EEYNOLDS HUN was born in Albany, New 
York, April 17, 1842. He died in Stanford, Connecticut, March 
14, 1880. 

EDGAE ADELBEET HUTCHINS has removed to Boston, 
and is in business as a mining expert at 120 Tremont Street. 

His daughter Amy was married, Dec. 26, 1900, to Le Baron E. 
Barker (Harvard, 1898). They have one child, Anne Ware 
Barker, born Dec. 6, 1901. 

CHAELES CABOT JACKSON still lives in Boston at 301 
Marlborough Street, and is the senior member of the firm of 
Jackson and Curtis, Stockbrokers, 15 Congress Street. He went 
to Europe in February, 1903. 

He is Vice-President of the Boston Stock Exchange, and a 
member of the Executive Committee of the Indianapolis Mone- 
tary Convention. 

He published, in 1894, a pamphlet, "Has Gold Appreciated?" 

His son Charles graduated from Harvard College in 1898, and 
his son Eobert Appleton in 1899, and from the Law School in 
1902. His son George S. is a member of the Harvard Class of 
1905. 

HENEY FITCH JENKS is still pastor of the First Congre- 
gational Parish of Canton, Massachusetts (Unitarian). 

In 1895 he spent a part of the fall in Denver, Colorado, and 
went again as far as Salt Lake City. In 1897 he went to Eng- 



74 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

land, with members of the American Library Association, to 
attend the International Library Convention in London, July 13, 
and returned the last of August. Unusual facilities were given to 
the party for seeing places of interest generally closed to visitors. 
The Corporations of Newcastle, Bath, Salisbury, and many other 
cities and towns extended special civilities, and in London the 
Lord Mayor invited the members to an evening reception ; at Lin- 
coln and Salisbury, the Dean and Sub-Dean, respectively, con- 
ducted them through the Cathedrals ; at Oxford, the authorities of 
the Bodleian Library invited them to a Conversazione ; at Cam- 
bridge, the Mayor, a son of the naturalist Darwin, gave a garden 
party ; in London, Apsley House, the home of the Duke of Wel- 
lington, Grosvenor House, the home of the Duke of Westminster, 
Sutherland House, and Brooke House, the home of Lord Tweed- 
mouth, were thrown open; in Edinburgh, the Corporation was 
assiduous in attentions and hospitality, and the royal apartments 
in Holyrood Palace were shown, by the special direction of her 
Majesty, the Queen. Besides there were many opportunities for 
making personal acquaintances, and visiting the homes of the 
people. Before returning he made a short trip to Paris. In 1900 
he attended a meeting of the American Library Association at 
Montreal, and after it made a second visit to the Eiver Saguenay. 

In 1902 he went abroad again, intending to make a short trip 
on the continent, and be absent about three months, but was 
obliged to return in half that time, and without having been out 
of England. He saw, however, several Cathedral cities which he 
had not seen before, and received benefit from the voyage. 

In December, 1894, he was elected a member of the Massachu- 
setts Society of Colonial Wars ; in 1894, Dec. 21, a member of the 
Massachusetts Society of Sons of the American Eevolution; in 
1895, Eecording Secretary of the Prince Society ; in 1898, Cabinet 
Keeper of the Massachusetts Historical Society ; in 1891, Vice- 
President of the Massachusetts Infant Asylum ; in 1893, a mem- 
ber of the Virginia Historical Society ; in 1900, Vice-President of 
the Boston Latin School Association ; in April, 1901, a member of 



BIOGRAPHIES. 75 

the American Antiquarian Society ; May, 1 899, Moderator of the 
Boston Association of Congregational Ministers, which ofl&ce he 
held to May, 1901 ; in December, 1902, a member of the Twen- 
tieth Century Club in Boston ; in March, 1903, he was for the 
fifth time re-elected a Trustee of the Canton Public Library for 
three years, which, when completed, will make seventeen years 
of continuous service. He is a member of the Harvard Union. 
He was a delegate to the National Conference of Unitarian 
Churches at Saratoga in 1894, 1897, and 1901, and at Washing- 
ton in 1895 and 1899. 

In 1902 he resigned his membership in the American Academy 
of Political and Social Science, the Virginia Historical Society, 
and the American Folk Lore Society. In the same year his 
commission as Justice of the Peace expired, and he did not apply 
to have it renewed. 

He published an article on " Old School Street, Boston," in the 
" New England Magazine " for November, 1895. In 1898, May 26, 
he preached the annual sermon before the Massachusetts Con- 
vention of Congregational- Ministers. His subject was " Some 
Problems of the Country Parish," and the sermon was printed by 
vote of the Convention. In 1902 the " Eecords of the Church in 
Brattle Square, Boston," of which he had been for some years one 
of the editors, was published. He was a member of a Committee 
of the Massachusetts Historical Society to publish a second 
volume of Belcher Papers, volume seven of the sixth series of the 
Collections of the Society, and two additional volumes of Trum- 
bull papers, volumes two and three of the seventh series of the 
Collections. 

His son Charles F. is in the Class of 1906 in Bowdoin College. 
His son Frederic A. has passed his preliminary examinations, and 
hopes to enter Harvard this year. 

♦ WILLIAM FURNESS JENKS was born in Louisiana, Mis- 
souri, May 21, 1842. He died near Philadelphia, Oct. 31, 1881. 
His son Eobert Darrah graduated at Harvard in 1897. 



76 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

* GEORGE SENECA JONES was born in Foxboro', Massa- 
chusetts, June 13, 1840. He died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
March 14, 1903. 

He gave up the manufacture of typewriters some time ago, 
and has since been writing the astronomical articles for the 
" Press," " Record," and " Inquirer " in Philadelphia, for papers in 
Chicago, New Orleans, New York, Pittsburg, and Washington, 
and for newspapers and magazines all over the country. 

For several months he managed the scientific department of 
the " Self-Culture," published in Chicago. In 1898 he wrote a 
volume entitled "Foreign Statesmen," in a set of books called 
"Six Thousand Years of History." 

He leaves a wife and three children. 

At Commencement the following memorial will be offered by 
Jenks : 

We have reached a point in life when we cannot expect that the 
exemption from the ordinary lot of mortahty which has been such 
a marked feature of our Class history can be our experience much 
longer. More and more rapidly must we be numbered with the 
starry host. Since our last Class report twenty-three, more than one- 
fifth of the Class, have ceased from earthly labors, and of these whom 
we are called upon to commemorate to-day, four since the last Com- 
mencement. 

George Seneca Jones died March 14, 1903, after a long illness, at 
his home in Philadelphia. A native of Massachusetts, bom in Foxboro', 
June 13, 1840, most of his active life was passed in Pennsylvania, 
where for many years he was in the Department of Public Instruction 
at the Capital, and later in business life, or engaged as an author. 
This is the simple story of his life. 

Coming to us in the Sophomore year, and leaving, to enter the army, 
before oiir graduation, he was not widely known ; and as his after life 
was passed in another State, and he was able to attend Commencement 
but once, he had little or no opportunity to renew or strengthen such 
intimacies as he may have formed with his classmates, so that while 
he always retained an interest in them, and in the memories of college 
life, he was to most of us little more than a name. 





<(T' 




BIOGRAPHIES. 77 

But though we did not know him well, we felt he was of us, and were 
glad to hear of his usefulness ; his work is a part of our Class achievement, 
and helps to round out its record of service. In his later years, in de- 
scribing the stars in their courses so as to increase the popular interest 
in astronomical science, he has helped to reveal the Creator to his crea- 
tures by pointing out the work of an Almighty hand^ In his departure 
we feel that the ties of our brotherhood are again broken and the circle 
of our fellowship narrowed. 

He leaves a widow and three children, and to them we offer our sym- 
pathy in their bereavement. 

EDWAED HAETWELL KIDDEE lives in New York at 37 
East 77th Street. He is the Secretary of the Barrett Manufac- 
turing Co. and the American Coal Products Co., but passes six 
months of each year at his country place at Marlborough, New 
Hampshire. 

He travelled in Europe for several months in the summers of 
1895 and 1896. In 1899 he went to Egypt, coming home through 
Europe, travelling some seven or eight months, and again, 1901, 
was abroad for four months. 

His daughter Grace was married, Sept. 18, 1900, to Paul Leicester 
Ford, son of Gordon L. and Emily Elswood (Fowler) Ford. Paul 
L. Ford died May 8, 1902. 

He has a grandchild, Lesta Ford, born June 3, 1902. 

* JAMES TEUESDELL KILBEETH was born in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, March 12, 1841. He died in Southampton, Long Island, 
June 27, 1897. 

He continued to reside in New York City until his death. He 
was appointed by President Cleveland Collector of Customs of 
the Port of New York, July 28, 1893, and assumed office August 
3, 1893. The Senate was not in session at the time of his appoint- 
ment, so that his confirmation by that body did not occur until 
Oct 30, 1893. By act of Congress he was appointed one of a 
committee of three to superintend the construction of a new 
Custom House in New York City. He was Collector at the time 



78 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

of his death, and a most efficient, just, and able officer. He died 
of pneumonia after an illness of about two weeks. 

At the annual meeting of the Class on Commencement Day, 
June 30, 1897, Lincoln ofifered the following memorial : 

The Class of 1863, in annual meeting assembled at Cambridge on 
Commencement Day, miss for the first time the gracious presence and 
cordial greeting of their classmate, James Truesdbll Kilbreth, and 
desire to extend upon the record their appreciation of his great worth 
and their regard for his memory. 

In College he was our attached friend. He early won our love and 
respect, which deepened and strengthened as the years went on. He 
had a kind and generous word for all, and unkind and ungenerous 
thought for none. His sturdy character, combined with his social and 
musical nature, made him an attractive personality, and gave him at 
once a conspicuous place in the Class, which he always maintained. 

In the Professional Schools he attained distinction by faithful and 
diligent work, which commended him in high degree to teachers and 
associates. 

In his professional career, as lawyer and judge, he became a trusted 
and wise counsellor to the clients who sought his advice, and by his fair 
and just decisions upon the bench, he was a safeguard for the morals 
and happiness of the great city whose interests he served. 

In political life, as administrator of the great office which he has 
recently filled, he was so impartial, so high-minded, and so unswerving 
in the discharge of his duties, that he commanded the respect of all 
parties and of the nation. 

He was always a loyal son of Harvard, a devoted and enthusiastic 
member of our college Class. He has fallen like an oak in the forest 
with heart sound to the core. In this, our own circle of classmates, 
his place can never be filled, but his memory will remain a benediction 
and an inspiration to us all. 

It was thereupon 

Voted, that the memorial be entered upon the Class records, and a copy 
be sent to the family. 

The following letter was subsequently received by the Class 
Secretary from Kilbreth's son : 



-^ 




^:^ 




~~' . t 



MJK:^ 




BIOGRAPHIES. 79 

Southampton, July 6, 1897. 
Dear Mr. Lincoln, — Both the copy of the minutes and your own 
personal letter have reached us, and on behalf of my mother and myself 
I want to express to you our deep appreciation. It was very thoughtful 
of you to have the minutes prepared and I can assure you that they 
were a source of gratification and sorrowful pleasure to us. Your 
own kind sympathy we cherish deeply too, and thank you from the 
heart. . . . 

Sincerely yours, 

James T. Kilbreth, Jr. 

*AETHUE MASON KNAPP was bom in St. Johnsbury, 
Vermont, August 8, 1839. He died in Boston, Dec. 27, 1898. 

He continued to reside in Boston and to' be Custodian of Bates 
Hall, in the Boston Public Library, until his death. In the 
discharge of his multifarious duties he had to meet, and try to 
help and satisfy, " all sorts and conditions of men," — and women, 
from cranks to philosophers, rich and poor, learned and ignorant, 
men who had an idea of what they wanted, and club-women 
who had " to get up a paper " on a subject regarding which they 
had not a shadow of an idea, and it is gratifying to know from 
many sources that he was able to render assistance to a great 
many people, and to perform the duties of his trying, though 
congenial, position to the acceptance of all. 

Funeral services, conducted by Eev. William E. Barton, pastor, 
were held at the Shawmut Church, Boston, Dec. 30, 1898. 
Among others, Rev. James De Normandie, D.D., one of the 
trustees of the Boston Public Library, made the following 
address : 

The work of a great public library can be appreciated only by those 
who know something of it. 

You see a large and beautiful building sheltering seven or eight 
hundred thousand volumes ; you see the ceaseless procession of patrons ; 
you see the attendants delivering to them the books, and you think 
that is all, and that it is plain and easy. 

Of what is done before the public can be served ; of the vast and 
hidden details ; of the choice and cataloguing and arrangement of books ; 



80 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

of the years of careful preparation ; of the co-operation, industry, studied 
and unhroken attention; of the promptness and forbearance; of the 
patience and knowledge and alertness required to meet the daily demand 
of thousands of inquiring minds, — of all this nothing is known. 

The public is most exacting of its servants, and feels that all their 
time and strength and acquisitions belong to it without a moment's 
delay, without any manifestation of impatience or weariness. To haye 
been for nearly a quarter of a century in such a service is itself a great 
testimony to one's worth, and to have been for twenty years the trusted 
head of one of the leading departments of the Public Library is a proof 
of merit to which words can add very little. 

The accumulated and well-arranged learning of our friend, as if it 
were all in a multitude of familiar drawers, was freely given to any 
inquirer. Many came every day to ask not only for books, but to know 
what books or what essays had been written upon every subject recent 
or ancient, plain or abstruse, that the fertile mind of man has ever 
thought of, — and here was one who seemed to remember all, whose 
good taste and good judgment were ever ready to suggest not only books, 
which is a very little matter, but the best books, which is a very 
important matter touching the higher questions of life, — so that his 
daily work was to give to hundreds better ideals of human actions and 
human character, making his mission one with all those who in every 
form of teaching, in journalism, in schools, and in the church, are help- 
ing this to be a better world. 

What knowledge, what graciousness, what a ready and unfailing 
sympathy, what a sense of humor which so lightens the annoyances of 
public station, what a spirit of self-denying, what faithfulness marked his 
daily life. 

When Saint Paul would express the highest merit of a steward, he says, 
" It is required that a man be found faithful," and when Jesus Christ 
would set the seal of divine favor and divine joy upon a man's work, he 
told the beautiful story of one who was faithful to his talents, his gifts. 

Servants and stewards of the Most High, all of us, our best reward is 
that we be found faithful. Only faithful ! In the midst of so much 
that is unfaithful, in the midst of so many noisy activities which count 
for nothing and end in nothing, God grant that when our work like his 
is done, there may be written upon it the promise of Jesus, " Thou hast 
been faithful over a few things, I will make thee ruler over many things, 
enter thou into the joy of thy Lord." 

We know it cannot be otherwise, and we would not have it otherwise, 



i^rv-'s-'*-^. 






80 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

of the years of careful preparation ; of the co-operation, industry, studied 
and unhroken attention; of the promptness and forbearance; of the 
patience and knowledge and alertness required to meet the daily demand 
of thousands of inquiring minds, — of all this nothing is known. 

The public is most exacting of its servants, and feels that all their 
time and strength and acquisitions belong to it without a moment's 
delay, without any manifestation of impatience or weariness. To have 
been for nearly a quarter of a century in such a service is itself a great 
testimony to one*s worth, and to have been for twenty years the trusted 
head of one of the leading departments of the Public Library is a proof 
of merit to which words can add very little. 

The accumulated and well-arranged learning of our friend, as if it 
were all in a multitude of familiar drawers, was freely given to any 
inquirer. Many came every day to ask not only for books, hut to know 
what books or what essays had been written upon every subject recent 
or ancient, plain or abstruse, that the fertile mind of man has ever 
thought of, — and here was one who seemed to remember all, whose 
good taste and good judgment were ever ready to suggest not only books, 
which is a very little matter, but the best books, which is a very 
important matter touching the higher questions of life, — so that his 
daily work was to give to hundreds better ideals of human actions and 
human character, making his mission one with all those who in every 
form of teaching, in journalism, in schools, and in the church, are help- 
ing this to be a better world. 

What knowledge, what graciousness, what a ready and unfailing 
sympathy, what a sense of humor which so lightens the annoyances of 
public station, what a spirit of self-denying, what faithfulness marked his 
daily life. 

When Saint Paul would express the highest merit of a steward, he says, 
" It is required that a man be found faithful," and when Jesus Christ 
would set the seal of divine favor and divine joy upon a man's work, he 
told the beautiful story of one who was faithful to his talents, his gifts. 

Servants and stewards of the Most High, all of us, our best reward is 
that we be found faithful. Only faithful ! In the midst of so much 
tliat is unfaithful, in the midst of so many noisy activities which count 
lor nothing and end in nothing, God grant that when our work like his 
it done, there may be written upon it the promise of Jesus, " Thou hast 
been faithful over a few things, I will make thee ruler over many things, 
«ttter thou into the joy of thy Lord." 

We know it cannot be otherwise, and we would not have it otherwise, 





^-^4^^^^^ ^^4A, 



Cud^Vy^ 




BIOGRAPHIES. 81 

but the heart has its own way of looking at the things which belong 
to the heart. The separation is always hard, and we miss the familiar 
voice and the loved form, and the lonely paths are sad and hard to enter. 
The heart knows its own bitterness and loves to dwell upon it. We see 
those on whom our hopes are centred, whom we have most fondly loved, 
drop away, and we ask, '' Are the infinite purposes defeated, or are we 
listening only to an unfinished tale to be told out elsewhere ? " It is in 
the presence of death that we first and most surely believe there is no 
death. 

What this loss is to this inner circle privileged to be at one with him, 
we may not now venture to say, but they will be grateful as long as they 
live for this life, and they know that he will be with them still in 
innnmerable sweet and precious memories of gentle companionship, of 
daily duty and sacrifice, of unfaltering devotion, of unbroken love, in 
influences which belong to the things which are unseen, but eternal. 

It is ever the story of old ; a cloud has received him out of our sight. 
The veil of the future is never lifted, but because it is not, we believe it 
has fallen around us from the same Eternal Goodness which makes 
this life so dear and grateful. 

'* What to us is shadow to him is day 
And the way he knoweth^ 
And not on a blind and aimless way « 

The spirit goeth, — " 

but a way which duty, faith, and love make straight and shining to 
the Eternal Home. 

The following Bulletin was posted in the Library : 

Arthur Mason Knapp. 
1839-1898. 

On Tuesday, Dec. 27, 1898, died Arthur Mason Knapp, Custodian of 
Bates Hall in the Boston Public Library. 

He was bom at St. Johnsbury, Vermont, August 3, 1839, the son of 
Hiram Knapp and Sophronia Brown. During his boyhood the family 
removed to Boston, where he fitted for college at the Boston Latin 
School. He was graduated as the first scholar in his Class, and entered 
Harvaixi College as a member of the Class of 1863. He held from Har- 
vard the degree of A.M. as well as that of A.B. 

After teaching for some years in Phillips Academy, Andover, in the 
Boston Latin School, and in the Brookline High School, he entered the 

6 



82 THE CLASS OF 1868. 

service of the Library, Jan. 23, 1875. His first appointment was to 
the charge of the special collections of the Library ; from 1878 until 
bis death he held the position of Custodian of Bates Hall. 

His knowledge of Shakespeariana and of Elizabethan literature was of 
great valhe in the preparation of the catalogue of the Barton collection. 
In his position in charge of the main reference department of the Li- 
brary, his special knowledge of the subject of genealogy and local 
history, as well as a thorough general knowledge of the resources of 
the Library on all subjects, was of the greatest service to an immense 
constituency of readers. To the value of this service, rendered with 
exact conscientiousness and singleness of purpose in its relation to his 
colleagues, and with assiduity and personal interest towards the readers 
and students who came to him for assistance, the warm appreciation of 
all those with whom he came in contact bears witness. 

At the annual meeting of the Class on Commencement Day, 
June 28, 1899, the Class Secretary offered the following memorial 
on behalf of Peck, who was absent : 

Arthur Mason Knape died at his home in Boston, Dec. 27, 1898, 
after a brief but painful illness, of paralysis. He had been engaged in 
his usual employments in the Boston Public Library up to the time of 
his illness, and, although somewhat delicate in physique, is believed to 
have been usually in possession of good health. From his boyhood 
onward he had been remarkable for his love of literature. At the 
Boston Latin School, where he was prepared for college, he stood easily 
at the head of a class which contained a large number of good scholars. 
A few years older, and therefore more mature in mind than most of his 
classmates, he was enabled by his industry, his clearness of mind, and 
his remarkable memory, to hold his leadership, and did so with such 
unassuming modesty as never to excite a feeling of jealousy among his 
classmates. He held a high rank for scholarship during his college 
course, in which he showed the same capacity and devotion to study as 
in his school days. His intellect was sound rather than brilliant. 
While he won the respect of the Class by his sterling traits of character, 
his retiring disposition, and the fact that he made his home with his 
parents in Boston, and spent the working hours of the week only in 
Cambridge, prevented him from becoming as well known in the Class 
socially as would otherwise have been the case. 

To an unusual degree, Knapp's life was spent in a congenial atmos- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 83 

phere of books and study. After graduation, he adopted the profession 
of teaching, and taught in the Phillips Academy in Andover and in the 
Brookline High School, until in January, 1875, he entered the service 
of the Boston Public Library. After serving for about three years as 
curator of pamphlets and periodicals and keeper of the Prince and 
Barton Libraries, and during this time preparing, in connection with 
Mr. J. M. Hubbard, a Shakespearian catalogue which was highly com- 
mended, he was appointed librarian of Bates Hall, and held this respon- 
sible position until his last illness, — a period of more than twenty years. 
Here he found his life-work, and in this employment his life was spent 
happily and, in the highest sense of the word, successfully. His life must 
have been happy, because his modest ambitions were satisfied, his tasks 
were such as were best suited to his tastes and talents, and he must have 
enjoyed the consciousness that he had won the esteem and friendship of 
those with whom he was brought into pleasant relations in the perform- 
ance of his daily duties. His life was truly successful, because it was 
spent in a constant succession of acts of service to others, and, in render- 
ing these services, his own stores of knowledge were increased, his mind 
was expanded and strengthened, and his character became riper and 
sweeter. Although he lived among books, he was in no sense a recluse. 
It was his duty, as librarian of Bates Hall, to place his knowledge of the 
treasures of the Library at the disposal of every applicant needing his 
help or guidance, and it was said that " almost no other individual in 
the city was in personal contact with so many people as was Mr. Knapp." 
In this trying position his patience and courtesy never failed, and so re- 
tentive was his memory, so thorough his acquaintance with the contents 
of the Library, and so general and exact his knowledge upon a vast 
variety of subjects, that he rarely failed to supply the needed informa- 
tion. The many tributes which appeared in the press after his death 
uniformly testified to the admirable manner in which his duties were 
performed, and to the spirit of Christian courtesy which he displayed 
to persons of all characters, often under circumstances which must have 
been very trying to his equanimity. These tributes also show how 
widely he was known as a scholar and as an accomplished librarian, and 
how universally he was esteemed and admired by the many frequenters 
of the Library. His faithfulness to his duties was unswerving, while 
the most hasty visitor could not fail to note that the Library in which 
he was so important a factor, was his pride and delight. His record is 
one of a life well spent in useful and honorable work, of fidelity to 
principle, and of native talents, developed and strengthened by cultiva- 



84 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

tion and worthy use. We, his classmates, shall miss him on our visits 
to the Puhlic Lihrary, at Commencements, which he frequently attended, 
and in the social gatherings of the Class, while to his associates in his 
work, and to the many students who looked to him for advice and assist- 
ance, the loss is almost irreparable. 

It was thereupon 

Voted, that the memorial be entered upon the Class records, and a 
copy be sent to the family. 

* FEANCIS EUSTIS LANGDON was bom in Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, Nov. 10, 1842. He died in Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, Feb. 4y 1890. 

WILLIAM HENEY LATHEOP continues to live and prac- 
tise medicine in Lowell, Massachusetts, at 21 First Street. 

He remained a member of the School Board through 1894 ; in 
all, four years. In 1901 he was President of the Middlesex North 
District Medical Society. 

AETHUE LAWEENCE is still Eector of St. Paul's Episcopal 
Church at Stockbridge, Massachusetts, and Archdeacon of Spring- 
field. He completed his twenty-fifth year of service at Stock- 
bridge in 1897, and on June 2d of that year there was a service 
in St. Paul's Church commemorating it. 

He has been since June, 1900, Archdeacon of Springfield. In 
October, 1895, he was a member of the General Convention of the 
Episcopal Church at Minneapolis, Minnesota, and in October, 1901, 
of the same body at San Francisco. 

He is a member of the Standing Committee of the Diocese of 
Western Massachusetts ; of the Commission on Church Unity of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church ; and Honorary Secretary of the 
Egypt Exploration Fund. In 1899 he was elected Professor of 
Church History in the Berkeley Divinity School, but declined 
the post. Oct. 10, 1903, he received the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity from Williams College. 

He is a member of the Massachusetts Military Historical So- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 85 

ciety, of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, a Fellow of the 
American Greographical Society of New York, has been Chaplain 
of the Massachusetts Chapter of the Sons of the Eevolution, is a 
member of the Boston Episcopal Charitable Society, of the Cen- 
tury Association of New York City, the Harvard Club of New 
York, the Union Club of Boston, and a life member of the Har- 
vard Union of Cambridge. In 1900 he became Vice-President of 
the Berkshire Industrial Farm, a Eeform School for boys at 
Canaan Four Corners, Columbia County, New York. 

From August, 1897, to April, 1898, he was in Italy, Germany, 
France, Algiers, and England, and a part of the time in Algiers 
and Italy with classmate Pratt. For two Sundays in 1897 he 
took charge of St. John's Church in Dresden. In 1902 he was 
again abroad from July to October, visiting Germany, Holland, 
England, and Scotland. 

He is the author of an article on " Bryant and the Berkshire 
Hills " in the " Century Magazine *' for July, 1895. 

His son William Eichards graduated at Harvard in 1901, was 
a master at the Groton School in 1901-2, and is now studying in 
Germany. 

* AETHUE LINCOLN was born at Hingham, Massachusetts, 
Feb. 16, 1842. He died at Boston, Dec. 11, 1902. He continued 
to practise law in Boston, in the Exchange Building, 53 State 
Street, up to the time of his death. 

He was the Trustee of many estates, and Treasurer of several 
charitable societies. 

He was appointed, July 30, 1896, by the Governor, a member 
of the Ballot Law Commission of Massachusetts, to hold office for 
one year from Aug. 1, 1896, and re-appointed to hold for three 
years from Aug. 1, 1897. In October, 1897, he was elected Chair- 
man of the Commission, and Sept. 5, 1900, was again re-appointed 
a Commissioner for three years from Aug. 1, 1900. He was 
elected a member of the corporation of the Home for Aged Men, 
Boston, Jan. 9, 1899, a Director of the Bunker Hill Monument 



86 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

Association, June 17, 1900, a member of the Oakley Club, October, 
1900, a member of the Society for the Relief of Aged and Desti- 
tute Clergymen in 1901. At Commencement, 1900, he failed of 
election as Overseer of Harvard College by a tie vote, but the fol- 
lowing year (June 26) was elected. 

He maintained his record of attendance at Commencement 
until the end, and was present at every annual meeting of the 
Class through 1902, being the only member of the Class who has 
not missed one since graduation. 

His health began to fail a year and a half or more before his 
death; but with unflagging fidelity he attended to every duty 
until within three days of his death, which occurred on Dec. 11, 
1902, among other things, preparing during the last summer the 
copy for the printer of much of this report, including all relating 
to the men who had deceased. 

His funeral, which took place from Arlington Street Church on 
one of the stormiest days of the winter, was attended by a large 
congregation, which filled the edifice, testifying to the high regard 
in which he was held by the community, and the sense of general 
loss which was felt at his departure. R Amory, Bowditch, J. M. 
Brown, Denny, Grew, Jackson, Jenks, and J. C. Warren, with two 
others not of the Class, acted as pall-bearers, and Allen, Baxter, 
Bishop, Daniell, Edwards, J. 0. Green, W. F. Jones, Lathrop, 
Lawrence, Mason, Peck, Shattuck, Shreve, Tomlinson, H. W. 
Warren were present. 

The " Boston Transcript " said : 

** Noticeable among those present were many men who had attained 
far more than Mr. Lincoln's age of sixty years. While they were 
gathering at the church, the organist, Everett E. Truette, played appro- 
priate selections, including Chopin's * Funeral March.' The high pulpit 
desk was completely hidden by beautiful wreaths and clusters of flowers, 
and all about the pulpit steps and chancel were still more of these 
tributes to Mr. Lincoln's memory. The service was conducted by Rev. 
Paul Revere Frothingham, minister of this church, who read from the 
scriptures, including passages from the Psalms, and offered prayers. 
The quartette of the church sang the hymn, * Still, Still with Thee,' 



BIOGRAPHIES. 87 

to the music of Mendelssohn's * Song without Words/ ' Consolation ' ; 
the quartette, 'Cast Thy Burden on the Lord/ from Mendelssohn's 
oratorio, ' Elijah,' and for a closing number the familiar hymn, ' Lead, 
Kindly Light.' After the minister's benediction, Mr. Truette played 
the *Marche Fun^bre,' of Guilmant, for a postlude. Following the 
services at the church, the body was taken to Hinghara, the birthplace 
of Mr. Lincoln, for burial in the family lot in the cemetery there." 

In the " Transcript " of Monday, December 15, was printed the 
following tribute : 

ARTHUE LINCOLN. 

A noble life has ended, but its memory will never fade from the hearts 
of those who enjoyed its blessed friendship. Few in our community 
have been able to draw around them so many closely intimate friends as 
Arthur Lincoln, and fewer still have won without effort the implicit con- 
fidence and esteem of those who knew them only in a social or business 
way. From early boyhood he possessed a happy winsome disposition, 
a manner singularly attractive and gentle, and an openness and frankness 
of countenance which made him a delightful associate and companion, 
and in his ripe maturity, a devoted husband and father. 

He was the soul of integrity, sound in judgment, with clear percep- 
tions of truth and right, and in his business relations displayed marked 
ability and skill. That such a man should have been the trusted con- 
fidant and agent of people in all spheres of life and in widely varied 
business connections was to have been expected, and it was natural that 
his services should have been sought and availed of where good faith, 
honesty, and careful administration were the highest needs. His innate 
modesty never allowed him to seek public or business honors, and 
numerous as those conferred upon him were, they came as the unsought 
reward of a straightforward, upright, and unselfish life. 

The perplexities and annoyances of a business career he met with 
such gentle firmness and discretion that, to outward appearance, they 
left little trace of anxiety and care, and his threescore years sat lightly 
upon a heart that was ever young. He was one of the best examples 
of a sturdy New England character mellowed by the Christian graces 
of kindliness, and an equable temperament which enabled him to bring 
his cheerful and happy nature to the aid and support of his fellowmen. 

His Unitarian faith was broad and comprehensive, held with firm and 
clear conviction, and illustmted by his life and work ; but he took little 



88 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

interest in its controversial side, and was so broadly catholic in thought 
that he welcomed all who by honest belief and uprightness of life were 
doing the Master's work. 

In his loss the city is the poorer ; but it is richer in the fact that such 
a man dwelt within its gates, and here showed those virtues which en- 
nobled his daily walk and honored his chosen profession, bringing happi- 
ness and love to the vast circle of friends to whom the record of his life 
will now be a precious and enduring gift. If outwardly he has passed 
from among us, he yet lives in our hearts and in the happy remembrance 
of all that his pure and Christian character has been to us. 

W. W. 

From various testimonials from various societies with which he 
was connected may be selected those from the Trustees of Derby 
Academy and of the Public Library of Hingham. 

The Trustees of Derby Academy place on record their sense of the 
loss which they, in common with the rest of the community, have 
sustained in the death of their associate, Mr. Ai-thur Lincoln. 

A member of this Board for thirty-one years, for thirty of which he 
was its Secretary, he was punctual in his attendance upon its meetings, 
and gave patient, diligent, and cordial consideration to the affairs of 
the institution committed to its charge. 

With the same fidelity and untiring industry he performed the 
duties of every position which he assumed, and he was called to many, 
responding to each new call as if it alone demanded his time and 
thoughts. 

** No duty could overtask him, 
No need his will outrun, 
Or ever our lips could ask him, 
His hands the work had done ; " 

and so fully as to win commendation and increase the confidence felt 
in him. 

" Walking his round of duty 
Serenely day by day 

All that wakes to noble action 
In his noon of calmness lay." 

A deep affection for his birthplace, which came to him by inheritance, 
made him ever loyal to its interests and zealous for its prosperity, and 



■^ 



BIOGRAPHIES. 89 

the town reciprocated the feeling, and availed itself of his service, and 
gladly conferred upon him its honors. 

Of a sunny disposition and genial temper, with a great capacity for 
friendship, he was a general favorite, and his presence was sought in 
social gatherings ; by his kindliness he won the hearts of his associates, 
and by his high sense of honor secured their respect. 

The community honored him, his acquaintances esteemed him, his 
friends loved him, and those who knew him best held him in highest 
regard. 

He was a good citizen, and his life exemplified how much may be 
done in private station for the common weal, if only the will exist. 

It is hard to realize that we are to see his face no more at our 
gatherings, and that his place in the community is vacant, but in him 
we see that 

"Honorable age is not that which standeth in length of time, nor 
that is measured by number of years, but wisdom is the gray hair unto 
men, and an unspotted life is old age. 

" He being made perfect in a short time fulfilled a long time. 

" Thus the righteous that is dead shall condemn the ungodly which 
are living." 

To his family in their affliction we tender our heartfelt sympathy, and 
assure them of our participation in their sorrow, commending them to 
the source of all comfort for help in their time of need. 

At a regular meeting of the Trustees of the Hingham Public 
Library, the following was presented by Hon. J. D. Long : 

The Trustees of the Hingham Public Library place on their records this 
expression of their sorrow and sense of loss in the death, on the 11th 
instant, of their esteemed and beloved associate, Mr. Arthur Lincoln. 
He was a native of this town and descended from one of its first 
settlers. He was of a family distinguished in its annals, and his identi- 
fication with its life and its interests was never broken. Here began 
his education. From here he went to Harvard College, graduating in 
the Class of 1863. Here he retained till his death the ownership of 
the house in which he was born. Although he engaged in the practice 
of law in Boston, and after his marriage lived there continuously, he 
retained his voting privilege here, and rarely failed here to cast his vote 
on election days. He represented Hingham in the Massachusetts House 
of Representatives in the years 1879 and 1880. He was one of the 



90 THE CLASS OF 1863. 



^ Trustees of Derby Academy and many years the efl&cient Secretary of 

the Board, always present at its meetings and always devoted to the 

f welfare of the Academy. Indeed he was always loyal to all the interests 

{ of the town, ready to serve in any capacity whenever good service was 

* needed in connection with its schools or other institutions, or the 
i Centennial, or other observance of the landmarks of its history. It is 
1 of especial interest that he was a Trustee of this Public Library. In 

• this connection he rendered valuable service in selecting books for 
J purchase, his admirable good taste and judgment and his familiarity 
'. with good literature peculiarly fitting him for that duty. 

• He was a man of rare qualities. His natnre was so amiable, his 
' bearing so affable, and his instincts so high and true, that it is not too 

much to say that no man was more beloved. He commanded absolute 
confidence ; his life was unsullied ; his manner was unpretentious. He 
was an honor to the town and an example to its youth — a model 
gentleman, man of business, and citizen. 

; In the "Harvard Graduates' Magazine" for March, 1903, 

'^ appeared the following notice : 

* Arthur Lincoln, Class Secretary, died in Boston, Dec. 11, 1902. He 
'. was born at Hingham, Feb. 16, 1842, the son of the Hon. Solomon 
' (Brown University, 1822) and Mehitable (Lincoln) Lincoln. He fitted 
; for college at Hingham. While in college he was a member of the 

Harvard Glee and Hasty Pudding Clubs, and <l>. K. B. After leaving college 
he studied at the Harvard Law School from March, 1864, to July, 1865, 
acting as a college proctor at the same time. He was admitted to the 
bar June 16, 1865. He entered the office of Lothrop and Bishop, 

; Boston, Jan. 1, 1866, and except for a short time in 1867, was con- 

nected with that firm, part of the time as a member, until its dissolution 
in 1879. Since then he has been in practice for himself in Boston, 

^ and of late years chiefly occupied as a Trustee of various estates. He 

was Judge Advocate, with the rank of Captain, on the staff of Brigadier- 
General Sutton of the 2d Brigade, Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, from 

; July 30, 1877, to March 3, 1882. In the years 1879 and 1880 he was 

Representative to the General Court from the first Plymouth District, 
serving during the former year as Chairman of the Committee on Bills 
in the third reading, and during the latter on the judiciary. In 1897 
he was appointed by Governor Wolcott a member of the Ballot Law .Com- 
mission, and at the time of his death was Chairman of the Board. He 

; was the Memorial Day orator at Hingham in 1876. He was a Manager, 




BIOGRAPHIES. 



91 



Secretary and Treasurer of the Boston Dispensary ; Treasurer of the 
Industrial School for Girls at Dorchester ; a member of the Boston Lying- 
in Hospital ; member of the Society for the Promotion of Theological 
E<lucation, of the Society for Encouraging Religious Education, of the 
Society for the Relief of Aged and Destitute Clergymen ; for some time 
Treasurer of the American Unitarian Association ; Treasurer of the Massa- 
chusetts Congregational Charitable Society ; Treasurer of the Society for 
Propagating the Gospel among the Indians and others of North America ; 
a member of the " Trustees of the Charity of Edward Hopkins," of the 
Sufifolk Savings Bank, Boston; Director in the Hingham Mutual Fire 
Insurance Co. ; member of the Boston and Hingham Civil Service Re- 
form Associations ; the Boston Bar Association ; Clerk and Treasurer of 
the Proprietors of the Social Law Library in Boston ; Trustee of the 
State Library ; President of the Hingham Public Library Corporation ; 
Trustee and for many years Secretary of the Derby Academy, Hingham ; 
member of the Apollo Club, the Harvard Musical Association, the 
Bunker Hill Monument Association, the Bostonian Society ; Trustee of 
the Pilgrim Society of Plymouth ; member of the Unitarian, St. Botolph, 
Union Clubs, and the Oakley Country Club. He has been one of the 
Directors of the Alumni Association of Harvard College since 1872, 
except the years 1882 and 1883, when he was Secretary of the Associa- 
tion ; and was one of the Executive Committee on the Commemoration 
of the Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the Founding of the 
College. In 1900 he was defeated as a candidate for Overseer of 
Harvard College by a tie vote, but elected the following year to fill 
the vacancy. He has not missed attendance at a single Commence- 
ment since graduation. He married, Dec. 17, 1883, Serafina Loring of 
Boston, who, with a daughter, their only child, survives him. 

At CommenceBcient the following memorial will be offered by 
Lawrence : 

We meet to-day with feelings of peculiar sadness. For the first time 
in forty years the Class comes together at Commencement without the 
familiar and beloved presence of Arthur Lincoln. As our Secretary 
he had held the unique record of having never once missed the annual 
meeting of his Class. 

Such a record is an evidence of his high sense of duty and of his sur- 
passing attachment to his classmates. He loved them and they loved 
him; and on this day — the first Commencement that he has failed to 
greet them — it is their privilege to express and put on record their 



S 92 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

t admiration for bis character and their personal affection for him as a 

\ man. 

{ Arthur Lincoln (the son of Solomon and Mehitable) was bom in 

\' Hingham, Massachusetts, Feb. 16, 1842. He was descended from one 

i of the earliest settlers of the town, and of a family distinguished in its 

annals for public service and high character. There he fitted for col- 
( lege, entering Harvard in 1859, and graduating in 1863, with an honor- 

able record for scholarship and character. His subsequent life was 
r. mostly passed in Boston, but he never lost his interest in and his identi- 

fication with his native place. There he retained through life the 
\ ownership of the house in which much of his early life was passed ; there 

\ he never failed to vote on election day, and for two years was the town's 

representative in the Legislature of Massachusetts. He was devoted to 
all its interests, serving with painstaking fidelity its various institu- 
;. tions, — such as its Public Library and schools, taking an active part in 

its historical and other celebrations, and identifying himself in every 
i way with its public and private life. But to most of us he was best 

known in connection with his professional and social life in Boston, and 
; especially with his duties, performed with such singular enthusiasm, 

\ devotion, and fidelity, as Secretary of his Class. 

Choosing the law as his profession, he was admitted to the bar in 
; 1865, having studied two years at the Harvard Law School; and for 

•' the rest of his life devoted himself assiduously to his vocation. As 

might have been expected by us who had so long known his spotless 
} integrity, his good business judgment, his painstaking industry, and his 

/ kindness of heart, his work led him more and more into fiduciary posi- 

■ tions, the management of trust property, the care of estates, and into 

becoming the friend and adviser of the widow, the orphan, and the 
• unprotected. But his life had many other interests. He travelled 

'. abroad, served in the militia, played golf, cultivated music, kept his 

4 friendships in repair, served in all sorts of charitable and literary and 

social organizations, — a list of which would unduly prolong this brief 
/■ paper. They may be found in the Class reports. He was at the 

\ time of his death an Overseer of Harvard College. He was a faithful 

:• member of the Unitarian Church, — firm in his own faith, sympa- 

thetic and generous toward the faith of other men. His was a 
:. well-rounded, joyous, useful life, filled with love and service to his 

fellowmen. 
\ He had great personal charm. There were in his face and bearing 

: a gentleness and sweetness that to a stranger might have been mislead- 



^ 



BIOGRAPHIES. 93 

ing ; but underneath it lay a strength of purpose and a force of will that 
went to make him the man that he was. He was strong. He stood 
four-square to all the winds that blew. No temptation, no persuasion 
could swerve him a hair's breadth from y^hat he believed to be the path 
of truth and honesty and right. The implicit trust that men learned 
to place in him was never disappointed. Pure in heart and word and 
deed, he leaves behind the record of a blameless life. 

No allusion to that life would be complete which did not touch upon 
that in it which meant most of all to him, and that was his home. 

He married somewhat late, but his family life brought to him his 
highest happiness. There all that was best and tenderest in him found 
expression. Whether he there gave most or received most, we may not 
know or say ; but we recall Sir Walter's words — 

" Some feelings are to mortals given 
With less of e^arth in them than Heaven. 
And if there be a human tear, 
From passion's dross refined and clear, 
'T is such as pious fathers shed 
Upon a duteous daughter's head." 

He leaves a wife and only daughter. 

Last of all, we remember what may be called his enthusiastic passion 
for his Class. He was its ideal Secretary. No classmate ever got 
beyond the range of his affection and remembrance. The smallest 
detail connected with any one of them was of interest to him. He 
rejoiced over our successes ; he sympathized with our sorrows. Of 
his careful editing of the Class Reports, you need no reminder. He left 
large scrap-books filled with newspaper cuttings, gathered from every- 
where, relating to the Class from its graduation to the time of his 
own death. 

He delighted in the meetings. You remember his careful preparation 
for them and for the suppers, the kindly and genial smile with which 
he greeted us; the self-forgetful courtesy of his manner, the modest 
dignity of his bearing. A year ago, though his strength was unequal 
to the task, he insisted on being driven to Cambridge for the last time, 
to make preparation, with his usual fidelity and care, for the Class 
meeting on Commencement Day ; and toward the close of his life, when 
too feeble to attend to other business, almost his last labor and latest 
pleasure, was the completion of the books already referred to, in which 
he had gathered, and arranged in permanent form, the record of his 
clasBmates' lives. 



94 THE CLASS OE 1863. 

No Class was ever more loyally and lovingly served. May we see to 
it that DO classmate's name shall be more gratefully and tenderly 
remembered than that of 

Arthur Lincoln. » 

The following will be offered by Peck : 

Death has made many inroads of recent years in the ranks of our Class, 
and has taken away some who had achieved success in public life, or 
had won fame in literature, or had been leaders in business or philan- 
thropic work, but probably no one among them was more highly 
esteemed and beloved, or will be more lamented or more greatly missed 
than Arthur Lincoln. 

The same qualities that led to his selection as Class Secretary, his 
simplicity of character, his faithfuhiess to duty, his warmth of heart, 
his genuine interest in every member of the Class, and his readiness to 
help in time of need, as well as his unfailing patience and affability, 
made every classmate his friend, and won the esteem and affection of all 
who were brought into close relations with him. 

In thinking of the traits of character which he displayed from the 
time of entering college to the close of his life, one who knew him inti- 
mately and in many relations is impressed with the fact that although 
he grew in strength of character, in wisdom, and in judgment, there 
was a uniform growth, but no radical change in character nor even in 
manner. He was essentially the same through life as in his college 
days, always modest and unassuming, trustful of others, although not 
easily deceived, thinking no evil, forming his opinions cautiously, and 
expressing them with moderation, and therefore an excellent adviser, 
not only in business matters, but in all important concerns of life. One 
could always go to him and be sure of sympathy and appreciation and 
of wise counsel. He had wit and humor, and appreciated humor in 
others ; but the substance of his character was serious, and his concern 
was with the essentials of life. He valued others and chose his friends, 
not for their brilliant qualities nor their social position, but for their 
essential worth of character. Having chosen a friend, he was true to 
him under all conditions. Few men cared as little as he for the glamour 
of fashion or the brilliance of worldly success. At the same time he 
valued the privileges and advantages which success in life brought to 
him, — books, home comforts, social position, travel at home and abroad, 
and whatever makes modern life desirable. But he held all these things 



y 



BIOGRAPHIES. 95 

at their true value, and could have been happy if fortune had placed 
him in dififereut circumstances, as long as he had the essentials of life 
and useful work to do. 

The traits of character that impressed his friends most strongly were 
his perfect integrity, his modesty, his patience, his charity for others, 
his industry, his fidelity to duty, his soundness of judgment, and the 
steady warmth of his friendships. 

The same qualities, which were so evident to his classmates and to 
his associates in business, shone even more brightly in his home life. 
The warmth which he put into his friendships, there developed into the 
still warmer and deeper feeling of home love. One felt that his home, 
and what it contained, were the things that were the most precious to 
him in life. His strength was so concealed by his modesty that it was 
not at once evident how the home rested upon his sound judgment and 
his steady affection. He had the qualities most needed to make a happy 
home, self-control, infinite patience, feelings deep and strong, but not 
effusive, and wisdom in meeting the difficulties that come to all. 

The void which his unexpected death has left in the hearts and lives 
of his classmates and friends, is an indication of the far greater void in 
the home of which he was the strong support, and in the hearts of the 
wife and daughter to whose happiness his unfailing afifection and devo- 
tion were indispensable. 

The following will be ofifered by Bishop : 

The traits of character of Arthur Lincoln that have left the deepest 
imprint are great conscientiousness, fidelity to duty, a gentleness and 
evenness of disposition which made every one his friend. 

In a long and intimate friendship with him of more than forty years, 
I cannot recall a single instance in which these noble qualities are now 
tarnished by a regrettable recollection. 

On the street, in his office, at Commencement, in his home, wherever 
you met him, he was always Arthur Lincoln, which meant so much to 
his classmates and others who knew him. One was always made the 
happier for meeting him, for he was a man, to use Emerson's phrasing, 
whose " friendship bathes the soul in an element of love like a fine 
ether." 

His devotion to his Class and his loyalty to Harvard were almost a 
passion with him ; and it surely is not too high praise to say, that no 
class ever had a more ideal Secretary. 

A year ago, when his look was a sad prophecy of what has since 



96 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

come, he began, during his enforced rest at the seashore, with the help 
of his devoted wife, the preparation of the present Class report. He was 
then too ill for such a task ; but no persuasion could make him leave 
to other hands this last service for the Class he loved so well and whom 
he had so faithfully served. 

Few, if any, outside his family, knew the effort it cost him to serve 
his Class at the last Commencement, and the joy it gave him, on his 
return home, that his strength had been equal to the task. 

In the silence of his chamber, after the end had come, I stood for a 
few moments. His face wore the same pleasant look as in life, and my 
thoughts were such as any man might covet for his friend whom he had 
left. Our Class gatherings will be a different thing from this time on, 
because this guileless soul was so essential a factor in all of them. 

The Jews have a custom, when one of the family dies, of burning a 
taper in memory of the dead. It used to be kept burning for a year. 
The light is tended with great care, thus to keep alive the memory of 
the loved one. Arthur Lincoln needs no burning taper with those 
who knew him ; for while a friend or a member of the Class of *63 sur- 
vives, his memory will be cherished. 

The following will be offered by Denny : 

He was my friend, but he was the friend of everybody. The ideal 
friend, not the hail-fellow-well-met kind, but the friend you go to when 
beset by the troubles and perplexities of life. He would freely share 
with you his strength. His advice would always be for a simple, 
straightforward course of action. It would be given in the most modest 
way, but would be persisted in until his plan became your plan. 

He saw the good points in people, and gave them due credit, and this, 
with his unfailing courtesy, and cheerful way of meeting and greeting 
all with whom he came in contact, conveyed an impression of friendli- 
ness, and caused all to reciprocate the feeling, and this in a measure 
accounted for his popularity with all sorts and conditions of men. 

His industry must have been remarkable, judged by the variety and 
amount of detail of the work which his own tastes and the calls of his 
profession and official and public duties laid upon him, yet he never 
seemed to be in a hurry, and would greet a new arrival in his office as 
serenely as if that man's interests were the one thing that concerned 
him that day. 

But those of us who have known him for forty years, and known him 
intimately, perhaps hark back to his extreme simplicity of life and 



^ 



BIOGRAPHIES. 97 

thought, to his clean-heartedness and wholesome views of things, as his 
strong points, the hooks of steel by which he grappled us to his soul. 
Such attributes, manifested as they were in him without asceticism, and 
with appreciation of the good things of this life and of the social amen- 
ities, go to make a strong man and a lovable one, and such a man was 
Arthur Lincoln. 

Morse will offer the following : 

TO ARTHUR LINCOLN. 

As the Ipng coast in tidal ways 

To the incessant flow of sea — 

So all there is of you and me 
Is subject to the stream of days. 

Yet sing I one who lived and wrought ; 

His praise upon the shore I sing. 

What matter if the song I bring 
Shall pass away and be as naught 1 

The choice of all our hearts — the one 

Who wrote our names upon the sand — 
He, too, at last hath stayed his hand — 

Is gone — his gentle work is done. 

Believing much, he held the pen 

That traced our momentary fame 
As if no wave should reach the same. 

No billow wash it out again. 

The ill we sometimes wrought, he saw, 
Yet set it, where the seas ran high, 
So near that, ere the seas ran by, 

It felt the planetary law. 

From youth to years he held in fee 

The love we never could withhold — 
The love that never shall grow cold. 

Till Time shall call us to the sea. 

We are within the hand-reach, all, 

Of Him who lifted up the shore. 

When we can love and sing no more, 
He sounds the trumpet of recall. 

The twilight of an afternoon 

Fades slowly, but the evening star 
Leads up the shining hosts that are 

In hiding with the courtly moon. 
7 



98 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

Till eve we know not where they hide, 
And who can guess the larger suns 
Beneath whose beams our hidden ones — 

Our dearest and our best abide 1 

♦ WILLIAM LINDEE was bom in Brooklyn, Sept. 23, 1842. 
He died in Newton, Massachusetts, Jan. 18, 1872. 

JOSIAH LOMBARD is still at 12 Broadway, a Director of the 
Tide Water Oil Company. 

His daughter Ethel A. was married, Oct. 25, 1900, to Ralph W. 
Best, son of the late Albert and Estelle Best. He died at Colo- 
rado Springs, Sept. 8, 1902. They have one child, Alice L., bom 
March 28, 1902. 

♦FRANCIS CALEB LORING was born in Boston, Nov. 13, 
1841. He died Oct. 30, 1888. 

* HENRY LUNT was born in Quincy, Massachusetts, March 
28, 1842. He died in Quincy, Massachusetts, April 7, 1887. 

♦FRANCIS ALEXANDER MARDEN was born in West 
Windham, New Hampshire, June 19, 1840. He died in New 
York City, Jan. 31, 1893. 

The memorial adopted by the Class on Commencement Day, 
June 28, 1893, was duly sent to the family, and subsequently the 
following letter was received by the Class Secretary from Mrs. 
Marden : 

Conway Centre, N. H. 
Dear Mr. Lincoln, — With deep feeling I thank you for your kind- 
ness. And through you, will thank the Class of '63, for myself and my 
children, for their kindness and sympathy. 

Yours very sincerely, 

LiLLiE Marden. 

His daughter Lillie Butman was married to James Sheafe 
Satterthwaite, April 7, 1896. 

FRANCIS MARSH is Manager for Eastern Massachusetts of 
the John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company, at Boston, 



% 



BIOGRAPHIES. 99 

with his office in the John Hancock Building, 178 Devonshire 
Street. He lives at Dedham. 

In the summer of 1897 he made a trip through England, 
Scotland, Ireland, France, Switzerland, and Germany. 

His son Edward married, Oct. 9, 1901, Adele M. Fisher, 
daughter of Albert F. and Anna W. Fisher, of Dedham, and 
has a son, Francis, 2d, born Jan. 16, 1903. 

ELIAS HUTCHIN'S MAESTON" is still Principal of the 
Phillips Grammar School in Boston, residing in Somerville, at 
27 Maple Avenue. ^ 

*EDWAED CHAELES MAEVINE was born in Auburn, 
New York, Aug. 5, 1840. He died in Buffalo, New York, Nov. 
26, 1878. 

AMOS LAWEENCE MASON still lives and practises medi- 
cine at 265 Clarendon Street, Boston, and in the summer at York 
Harbor, Maine. 

He continued to be Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine in 
the Harvard Medical School until 1899, when he resigned that 
position, after twenty years of teaching for the University, chiefly 
in the wards of the Boston City Hospital, as Instructor, Assistant 
Professor, and Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. He re- 
mained as Visiting Physician to the Hospital until January, 1903, 
when, after twenty-five years of active service, he withdrew from 
that position, and was appointed " Senior Physician " to the 
Hospital, by the Trustees. He is now Senior Physician to the 
Boston City Hospital, a Councillor of the Massachusetts Medical 
Society, and an Honorary Member of the Association of American 
Physicians. 

In 1895 he was President of the Suffolk District Medical 
Society, and in 1896 President of the Boston Society for Medical 
Improvement. In 1899 he withdrew from the Board of Man- 
agers of the Boston Dispensary, of which he was a member for 
twenty years. 



341374 



100 THE CLASS OF 1868. 

He went to Europe in the summer of 1896, visiting England, 
Holland, Germany, and France. 

He has written various articles relating to the practice of 
medicine. 

He is a member of the Society of Colonial Wars. 

His daughter Marion Steedman was married, March 11, 1902, 
to Eichard Thornton Wilson, Jr., of New York. 

GEORGE MIXTEE still lives in Boston, at 219 Beacon Street, 
and is in business at 28 State Street, as banker and dealer in 
mercantile paper. 

He has bucolic tastes, which he gratifies by farming his ances- 
tral acres in Hardwick, Massachusetts, where he has one of the 
finest farms in Worcester County. 

He is a member of the Somerset Club, Union Club, Algonquin 
Club, Exchange Club, Harvard Union, Boston Athletic Associa- 
tion, Tennis and Eacquet Club, Boston Art Club, New Eiding 
Club, Papyrus Club, Eural Club, Country Club, Eastern Yacht 
Club, Massachusetts Automobile Club, Megantic Fish and Game 
Corporation, Point Mouillee Shooting Club, Massachusetts Horti- 
cultural Society, Mycological Club, Worcester West Agricultural 
Society, of which latter society he was for two years President. 

In October, 1902, he was nominated by the Democrats in the 
Third Worcester District for Eepresentative to the General Court, 
but failed of success at the polls, in spite of the following notice 
which appeared in the " Boston Herald " during the campaign : 

" We observe that the Democrats of the Third Worcester District have 
nominated Mr. George Mixter of Hardwick for the Great and General 
Court. The Democrats are in a large and elegant minority up in that 
vicinity, and the chances are that Mr. Mixter will not be elected. It 
deserves to be mentioned, however, that the Democratic nominee, who 
belongs to the Somerset Club and resides here in Boston during the 
fallow season of the year, is a gentleman, a scholar, a mighty hunter and 
fisherman, a farmer, a financier, and an all-round Yankee, whose equip- 
ment would add to any legislative body. If the voters of the Third 
Worcester District desire a first-class representative, who could be 




BIOGRAPHIES. 101 

depended upon to look out for their best interests, as his father, the late 
Hon. William Mixter, did when he was one of the leaders in our Legis- 
lature, they will forget politics and elect Mr. Mixter." 

The following notice appeared after the election : 

In the multitude of returns the fact should not be lost sight of that 
Mr. George Mixter of Hardwick and of Boston, and President of the 
Worcester West Agricultural Society, swept his own Republican town, 
notwithstanding the fact that he is a Democrat, and, therefore, not 
elected. 

♦JOSEPH MOSELY MORIARTY was born in Boston, Aug. 
16, 1842. He died in Chicago, March 6, 1888. 

GEORGE SHATTUCK MORISON has an office at 49 Wall 

Street, New York. 

He continued to live in Chicago until the spring of 1898, re- 

tainiqg also his old New York office. He closed his Chicago 
office in 1898, and his legal residence has since been in New 
York. In the spring of 1901 he removed his office from 35 Wall 
Street (Mills Building) to 49 Wall Street (Atlantic Building). 
Having built a substantial new house in Peterborough, New Hamp- 
shire, the original town of the Morisons, he moved the greater part 
of his books and furniture to this house when he left Chicago, and 
it is now really his home, although business and other conditions 
prevent his occupying it as much as he would wish to. 

During the last ten years his work has been of a less active 
character than before, becoming more of a consulting practice, 
with less direct charge of work, but it has taken him to various 
parts of the United States. As a member of the Isthmian Canal 
Commission, he went to Paris and to the Isthmus, spending some 
time both at Nicaragua and at Panama, besides visiting the 
Caribbean coast east of the Panama Route. He has also made 
visits to Mexico, Cuba, and some other places. 

In 1894 he was appointed by President Cleveland a member of 
the Board of Engineers to determine the Greatest Practicable 
Length of Span for a Bridge across the North River at New 



102 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

York. In 1896 he was appointed by President Cleveland a mem- 
ber of the Board of Engineers to Locate a Deep Water Harbor in 
Southern California. From 1895 to 1897 he served as a member 
of a Board of Consulting Engineers to the Dock Department of 
New York City. 

In 1899 he was appointed by President McKinley a member of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission, which position he still holds, 
although the Commission is furloughed. 

During the year 1895 he was President of the American Society 
of Civil Engineers. 

He was elected a Trustee of the Phillips Exeter Academy in 
June, 1888, and since June, 1898, has been President of the Board 
of Trustees. 

He is a member or a fellow of the following professional and 
technical societies : American Society of Civil Engineers, elected, 
1875 ; American Institute of Mining Engineers, elected, 1879 ; 
Western Society of Engineers, elected, 1879; American Society 
of Mechanical Engineers, elected, 1890 ; Institution of Civil En- 
gineers (London), elected, 1891 ; Mexican Society of Engineers 
and Architects (about 1896) ; American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, elected, 1901 ; American Academy of 
Arts and Sciences. 

The following is a list of the principal pamphlets or articles 
which he has published during the last ten years : 

"The New Epoch and the Civil Engineer." President's Address de- 
livered at the Annual Convention of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers, June, 1895. 

** The New Epoch and the University." Phi Beta Kappa Oration 
delivered at Cambridge, June, 1 896. 

** Suspension Bridges, A Study." *^ Transactions American Society of 
Civil Engineers," December, 1896. 

"The New Epoch and the Currency." "North American Review/' 
February, 1897. 

"The Civil Engineer and the University." Address delivered at the 
Annual Commencement of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 
Troy, N. Y., June, 1897. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 103 

"Masonry." "Journal of Western Society of Engineers," December, 

1898. 
" The Responsibilities of the Educated Engineer." Address delivered 

at the Annual Commencement of Purdue University, Lafayette, 

Indiana, June, 1901. 
"The Isthmian Canal." Address delivered before the Commercial 

Club of Chicago, January, 1902. 
''The Isthmian Canal." Address delivered before the Massachusetts 

Eeform Club in Boston, April, 1902. 
"The Isthmian Canal." Lecture delivered before the Contemporary 

Club of Bridgeport, Connecticut, May, 1902. 
"The Bohio Dam." "Transactions American Society of Civil Engi- 
neers," 1902. 
" Lake Bohio the Summit Level of the Panama Canal." " Engineering 

Magazine," January, 1903. 
"The Panama Canal." "Transactions American Society of Civil 

Engineers," 1903. 
"The Panama Canal." "Bulletin of the American Geographical 

Society," 1903. 

He is the author, jointly with his brother and sister, of a life 
of his father, entitled, 

"John Hopkins Morison, A Memoir," 1897. 

He is a member of the following social clubs: Union Club, 
Boston, elected, 1878 ; University Club, New York, elected, 1880 ; 
Down Town Association, New York, elected, 1887 ; Chicago Club, 
Chicago, elected, 1888 ; Engineers' Club, New York, elected, 1889 ; 
Union Club, New York, elected, 1900. 

JAMES HEEBERT MORSE continues to reside in New 
York, engaged in teaching, and spends the summers at Cotuit on 
Cape Cod. 

He writes from Siena, Italy, under date of March 19, 1903 : 

Since 1901, my former assistant, I. Lothrop Rogers (Harvard, 1881), 
and my son James Herbert Morse, Jr., have been associated with me 
in the school as partners. In May, 1902, we removed to 1 West 46th 
Street, and, sailing for Europe on October 18th, I began my first Sab- 
batical year since the school was established in 1868. At the present 



104 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

writing, I am with my wife in Italy, where we have passed the winter 
chiefly in Capri, Ravello, Castellamare, Naples, Rome, and Siena. Be- 
fore returning home in July, I expect to visit Florence and Venice in 
Italy, Switzerland, England, and Scotland. Much shall I miss not 
being with the " boys " at the Dinner this year, but if we are, as we 
hope to be, at that time in the land of Burns, I shall, all by my lone- 
some, if necessary, sing Auld Lang Syne with the full Scotch emphasis. 

The old bad habit clings to me, which Time does not in any way cor- 
rect, of writing verses, when I have nothing worse to do, and, since 1892, 
various poems of mine have appeared in the " Critic," " Independent," 
" Boston Transcript," " Atlantic Monthly," " Scribner's," « Harper's," 
and ** Century " Magazines. A series of my papers — eight in number 
— on the ** Training of Boys," appeared last year in " Harper's Bazar." 
Otlier contributions in prose and verse have been printed in various 
journals and magazines ; but that great epic which, when in college, I 
intended to produce, remains unwritten, although the other day, when, 
on the shoulders of a swarthy Charon, I crossed the Styx at Avemous 
and entered Hell, I received some encouragement from both Virgil and 
Dante. 

Uncle Sam has " trusted, honored, and profited " me by leaving me 
free from the duties of public office. I have never even served on the 
jury — an uneventful life, every one will say. 

The following letter was written to Lincoln, before he had 

heard of his decease : 

Rome, Italy, Dec. 27, 1902. 

My dear Lincoln, — I am sending you to-day a corrected edition 
of tlie Class poem of 1901, but I confess it a most unsatisfactory mess 
as I see it cold. I have tried to give it better shape, but it needs to be 
re-written and then burnt. 

I am abroad, as you see, and do not expect to be at home again until 
well on in July, so that I shall miss the Dinner in June ; but, as the old 

song says : 

** My heart will be with you. 
Wherever you may go." 

We have been in Italy two months, slowly coming north from Capri, 
where we rummaged among the villas of the Csesars, and had three joyous 
weeks, — Sorrento, Amalfi, Ravello, Castellamare, Pompeii, Naples, 
and then Rome. Here we stay about three months, and then Florence, 
Venice, Siena, and perhaps Switzerland. I am going to look in at the 



BIOGRAPHIES. 105 

banker's to-morrow to see if Smith or any other classmate is in Rome. 

It is good for sore eyes to see the old boys, and I shall miss no chance 

to look them up. Rome is a cold town in winter. The feet get cold, 

and the hands numb, but the heart is warm. I wish you would come 

here and bring a cord or two of my oak woods for back-logs, — a few 

poplar branches, linden, and old apple-tree trunks. 

Sincerely yours, 

J. H. Morse. 

His son James Herbert, Jr., graduated from Harvard in 1896, 
and his son William Gibbons, in 1899. His daughter Rosa took 
the Harvard examinations in 1899, and received four honors. 

His son William Gibbons married, Oct. 12, 1902, Marjorie 
Dewey, daughter of Daniel and Mary Dewey of Newton, Massa- 
chusetts, and is in the employment of the American Bridge Com- 
pany at Wissahickon, Pennsylvania, living in Germantown. 

WILLIAM NICHOLS stills lives in Buffalo, New York, at 83 
Ashland Avenue, and conducts the Nichols School at 35 Norwood 
Avenue. He is also Head Master of the Franklin School, of 
which the pupils are mostly girls. 

His son Clifford graduated at Harvard in 1894, and is a lawyer 
in the service of the Erie Railroad ; his son Philip graduated from 
Harvard in 1895, and is also a lawyer, and Assistant City Solicitor 
of Boston. 

ROSCOE PALMER OWEN still holds the office of City 
Conveyancer in the Law Department of the City of Boston. He 
has removed his office to 731 Tremont Building, Boston. 

He is a member of the University Club of Boston and of the 
Abstract Club. 

WILLIAM HENRY PALMER continues to reside in New 
York, and is a Fire Insurance Broker, at 55 Liberty Street. 

From 1894 to 1899, he was Cashier of the Schermerhoni Bank 
of Brooklyn ; then he established himself in his present business. 

His daughter Elizabeth Cummings was married, August 10, 
1897, to Samuel Hubbard, son of Edwin and Emma (Riedel) 



106 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

Quackenbush of Troy, New York, and has a daughter Emma 
Lasell, born Oct. 18, 1898. 

His son William Henry, Jr., married April 18, 1900, Violet, 
daughter of Joseph Biddle and Lydia (Duval) Wilkinson of 
New York City, and has a daughter Violet Wilkinson, bom 
August 20, 1902. 

JAMES LEWIS PEAECE lives in Kansas City, Missouri, and 
is in business in connection with the Simpson-Groves Insurance 
Agency Co., 101 Massachusetts Building. 

About 1892 he purchased a suburban home of thirty acres and 
has since that time been devoting himself to improving and 
beautifying it. In a letter written not long after he says : 

" While rural life was quite a change and somewhat of an experiment, 
it was the achievement of a purpose and wish which both my wife and I 
had entertained for years, and which I regret we did not accomplish 
long before, for it really seems to be the ideal life, and after an expe- 
rience of two years we are increasingly fond of it. 

" The thirty acres are about evenly divided up into lawn, meadow, 
woodland, and orchard, and it is within thirty miles* ride of Kansas 
City, by frequent trains day and night. I do not attempt to run it as 
a farm, nor does my income depend upon its proceeds, as my other 
resources, I am glad to say, are sufficient without it, but it aflforiis me 
ample and varied occupation, besides being a good investment. I have 
not exactly retired from active business, but rather withdrawn from it, 
anyhow for the present, and until the general commercial maelstrom 
adopts a somewhat less decided centrifugal motion. 

" Without indorsing too ardently the familiar adage that * God made 
the country and man made the town,' I have a growing conviction that 
it is more than half true, although my whole past career as a dweller in 
cities until now has been at variance with this sentiment. 

" The foregoing references as to my present life are sufficient to renew 
me to you up to date. The intervening years since we separated as 
friends and classmates have brought to me my proportion of disappoint- 
ment and defeat in some directions, with sufficient compensations in 
others to render the record so far a pretty fair average. . . . 

" To us distant veterans of brigade '63, away off here in the wild and 
woolly West, occasional chronicles from Orient Headquarters are re- 



^ 



BIOGRAPHIES. 



107 



ceived with a degree of satisfaction which you more favored fellows 
dwelling near the shrine of Alma Mater can scarcely appreciate. If it 
were not for our faithful Class Secretary's intervening biographies, which 
come to us now and then with the optative of indefinite frequency, we 
frontier pilgrims would have, long since, mentally starved to death on 
morbid reminiscences." 

His son McCloud married, March 31, 1897, Miss Cora Osborne. 
His daughter Eliza S. married, Feb. 22, 1898, Christen Jensen 
Kasmussen. His daughter Catherine married, Nov. 8, 1899, John 
H. Slavens of Kansas City, Missouri. His daughter Sallie 
McCloud married, Nov. 20, 1900, Pascal Parker. He has a 
grandson, John H. Slavens, Jr., born Sept. 27, 1900. 

THOMAS BELLOWS PECK continues to make his home in 
Walpole, New Hampshire. He has not engaged in any regular 
business since returning to Walpole in 1887, but has been inter- 
ested in gardening and out-door life, and has taken some part in 
town affairs. He has been Secretary of the Town Library Com- 
mittee since 1891 ; Secretary of Walpole Old Home Week Associ- 
ation since its organization in 1899 ; Vice-President of the Unitarian 
Club two years ; Trustee of Savings Bank of Walpole for many 
years ; one of three Commissioners of the Village District ; High- 
way Surveyor two years ; member of Cemetery Committee ; and 
Secretary of the Homestead Golf Club, although not a golf-player. 

He has devoted considerable time and labor to local history 
and genealogy, and has prepared and published the following 
books and pamphlets : 

" Tlie Bellows Genealogy ; or John Bellows the Boy Emigrant of 
1635 and his Descendants," comprising a full history of Col. 
Benjamin Bellows, the founder of Walpole, N. H., and his descend- 
ants, and a partial account of the families of Isaac, John, and 
Eleazer Bellows of Marlborough, Mass., and of Nathaniel Bellows 
of Groton, Ct. Illustrated. Keene, N. H. Sentinel Printing 
Company, 1898. 8**, pp. xvi, 657. 

** Records of the First Church of Rockingham, Vermont," from its 
organization, October 27, 1773, to September 25, 1839. Copied 
by Thomas Bellows Peck, with an Historical Introduction. Reprinted 



108 ^ THE CLASS OF 1863. 

from the " New England Historical and Genealogical Register." 
Boston : Press of David Clapp & Son, 1902. 8°, pp. xi, 60, cloth. 

" Ezra Bellows of Lunenburg, Mass., and Springfield, Vt., and his De- 
scendants," supplementary to the Sketch on page 609 of the " Bel- 
lows Gene-alogy," 1898. Reprinted from the " Genealogical Quarterly 
Magazine," Burlington, Vermont, 1901. 8*^, pp. 14, pamphlet. 

" Parentage of Ezra Bellows of Lunenburg, Mass., and Springfield, Vt., 
with an Account of the Bellows Family of Westboro, Mass." 
Supplementary to the Sketch on page 609 of the " Bellows 
Genealogy," 1898. Reprinted from "Genealogical Quarterly Maga- 
zine," Burlington, Vermont, 1902. 8*^, pp. 9, pamphlet. 

JAMES LEONARD PERRY lives and practises medicine at 
138 West 116th Street, New York City. 

He married, Nov. 10, 1891, Adrienne Marie Duysters of 
New York City, who died March 28, 1893. He has a son 
James Agassiz Perry, born Nov. 16, 1892. 

WILLIAM LOW PILLSBURY lives in Urbana, IlUnois. In 
1893 the office of Registrar of the University of Illinois was 
created, and he was appointed to it. He has been continued as 
Secretary of the University, but has been out of the Agricultural 
Experiment Station since 1897, except for some editorial work. 
During the fifteen years that he has been with the University 
of Illinois, the number of students has grown from 377 to 3288. 

In the Report for 1883 it is incorrectly stated that he taught 
school first at Bloomington, Illinois, and later went to Normal, 
when really he went to Normal, and began teaching there imme- 
diately after graduating from college. 

His daughter Bertha Marion, having received the degree of 
A.B. from the University of Illinois in 1895, entered the graduate 
department of Radcliffe College in 1896, and received there the 
degree of A.M. in 1898. 

DAVID PINGREE still lives in Salem, Massachusetts, and is 
occupied in looking after the business affairs of his family. 

He is also interested to some extent in the care and manage- 
ment of several local institutions. 



^ 



BIOGRAPHIES. 109 

* ALBERT KINTZING POST was born in the City of New 
York, Jan. 5, 1843. He died in West Hampton, Long Island, 
New York, July 5, 1872. 

HEEBERT JAMES PRATT still continues his wanderings in 
Europe and the East. 

He writes from Blidah, Algeria, under date of March 30, 1903 : 
" I do not know that I have anything to communicate about 
myself. I am still a traveller and reader, but the years are 
getting on, and I am beginning to think it 's time to go home to 
America and settle down for old age. The highway is free for 
all, but belongs rather to the next generation, a fact every day 
more evident." 

WILLIAM HARRINGTON PUTNAM is still teaching in 
Washington, District of Columbia, at 1339 Corcoran Street 

He writes : " The routine of a schoolmaster and private tutor 
gives little opportunity for picturesque description at the end of 
each period. I have helped some young men to enter upon 
college courses, and others to prepare themselves for business 
pursuits each year, and so have been brought into contact with 
many whose characters and talents have been an interesting 
study, and some who may hereafter be among the leaders in 
their respective spheres of useful labor. I have had little strength 
for work outside my daily routine, though I have written one or 
two historical and biographical papers for our local historical 
society." 

JOHN HOWARD RAND was in 1893 Manager of the Lake 
Hopatcong Club at Mount Arlington, New Jersey. Since then 
he has been and is Manager of the Country Club of West Chester 
County, New York. 

GEORGE BRUNE SHATTUCK continues to practise medi- 
cine at 183' Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts. He has made 
four or five trips to Europe and Africa. 



110 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

He was re-elected Overseer of Harvard College, and served for 
twelve years, until Commencement, 1902. He is still Editor of 
the " Boston Medical and Surgical Journal," and has served on 
that staff for twenty-four years ; Senior Visiting Physician of the 
Boston City Hospital, and has served on that stafif far twenty-five 
years; President of the Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear 
Infirmary ; a Trustee of the Boston Lying-in Hospital ; a member 
of the Corporation of the Massachusetts School for Idiotic and 
Feeble Minded Youth; of the Consulting Board of Physicians 
of the Dan vers Insane Hospital ; of the Association of American 
Physicians ; of the Massachusetts Medical Society, and of other 
Medical Societies ; Chairman of the Harvard Overseers' Commit- 
tee on Italian, Spanish, and Eomance Philology and Literature ; 
a member of the Committee on the Medical and Dental Schools ; 
a Trustee and a Vice-President of the Humane Society of the 
State of Massachusetts ; a Trustee of the Boston Athenaeum ; 
President of the Tarratine Club, Dark Harbor, Maine. 

He has contributed numerous articles, signed and unsigned, 
to medical and other periodicals, dictionaries, reviews, and 
transactions. 

His daughter Eleanor Shattuck was married to Hugh Whitney, 
Oct. 20, 1897. Hugh Whitney is the son of Henry Austin 
Whitney (Harvard, 1846) and Fanny Lawrence Whitney. They 
have one child, Eleanor Whitney, born Sept. 2, 1899. 

His daughter Corina A. Shattuck was married to classmate 
Francis L. Higginson, April 11, 1898. They have two children : 
Corina Shattuck Higginson, born Sept. 19, 1899 ; Eleanor Lee 
Higginson, born Nov. 22, 1901. 

HENEY NEWTON SHELDON continues to live in Boston 
at 538 Massachusetts Avenue. He was appointed, Feb. 1, 1894, 
by classmate Greenhalge, then Governor of the Commonwealth, 
one of the Justices of the Superior Court of Massachusetts, and 
has been continuously engaged since that time in the performance 
of the duties of the position. In 1897 he was appointed on a 



o 



BIOGRAPHIES. Ill 

commission " to investigate and report upon a plan for the simpli- 
fication of pleadings to be used in criminal proceedings" in 
Massachusetts. 

His son Wilmon Henry was graduated at Harvard in 1895. 
He continued his studies in the Graduate School, and took the 
degree of A.M. in 1896, and of Ph.D. in 1899. He has since 
taught philosophy as an Assistant in the University of Wisconsin, 
and at Harvard, and is now a tutor in Columbia University, New 
York. 

OCTAVIUS BAERELL SHEEVE retired from the active 
practice of medicine about a year ago. He still lives in Salem, 
Massachusetts, and is engaged in the care of several estates, and 
the study of art. 

He went to Europe August 4, 1897, and returned Nov. 4, 1897 ; 
again April 10, 1901, and returned July 26, 1901, and again June 
4, 1902, and returned Sept. 4, 1902. 

His daughter Genevieve was married, June 11, 1898, to Dr. 
Edward Lawrence Peirson [Harvard, 1884] of Salem. They have 
a son Edward Shreve Peirson, born June 11, 1899. 

His son Benjamin Daland Shreve entered Harvard College in 
the Class of 1895, but did not graduate. He passed two years in 
Europe, mostly in Paris, where he received a business education, 
and on his return became Assistant Treasurer of the Shreve, 
Crump & Low Company of Boston. 

CLEMENT LAWRENCE SMITH continues to reside in Cam- 
bridge, and to teach Latin at Harvard. He spent the academic 
year, 1897-98 in Rome, as Director of the American School of 
Classical Studies in that city. During his residence in Rome, his 
personal studies were directed to an examination of the manu- 
scripts of Suetonius in the Vatican Library, and, in the course of 
his journey during the following summer from Italy to England, 
he studied the manuscripts of the same author in Florence, 
Venice, Munich, Leyden, and the British Museum. The results 



112 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

of this investigation were published in the paper mentioned 
below. On his return in the fall of 1898 he was elected Dean of 
the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and held this position, in addi- 
tion to his professorship, until 1902, when he resigned it, owing to 
impaired health. In 1899 he was President of the American 
Philological Association. His presidential address, given at New 
York University in July, was published in the " Atlantic Monthly." 
In 1901 he was elected Pope Professor of Latin, succeeding in this 
position Professor Lane. He has been granted leave of absence for 
the year 1902-03, and expected to spend it chiefly in Rome. 

He continues to be joint Editor-in-chief of the College Series of 
Latin Authors, which now numbers twelve volumes. His own con- 
tribution to the series, an edition of Horace's Odes and Epodes, was 
published in 1894. A second edition of the work is now in press. 
He has published, besides official reports, the following papers : 

" Cicero's Journey into Exile." Harvard Studies in Classical Philology, 

VIL (1896), pp. 65-84. 
" The American College in the Twentieth Century." " Atlantic Monthly," 

February, 1900, pp. 219-231. 
" A Preliminary Study of certain manuscripts of Suetonius' Lives of the 

Caesars." Harvard Studies, XII. (1901), pp. 19-58. 

His daughter Eosalba Peale was married, Oct. 28, 1895, to 
Arthur Cleveland Bent (Harvard, 1889), of Taunton, Massachu- 
setts. His sons, George Lawrence and C. Lawrence, Jr., were 
graduated from Harvard College in 1895 and 1897, respectively, 
and his youngest son, Edgar Lawrence, is at present a student in 
the Class of 1905. 

* WILLIAM STACKPOLE was born in Boston, April 27, 
1842. He died in York Cliffs, Maine, August 10, 1901. 

He continued to reside in Boston, not engaged in active busi- 
ness, until his death. 

At the annual meeting of the Class on Commencement Day, 
June 25, 1902, the Class Secretary announced the death of Stack- 
pole, and read the following sketch, which had been prepared by 
Mason : 





^^Cca(|.;€ 



r 



:•■%• 



-^■■'.xr- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 113 

William Stackpole died on August 10, 1901, at York Clififs, Maine, 
in his sixtieth year. 

He was the second son of Joseph Lewis (Harvard, 1824) and Susan 
Margaret (Benjamin) Stackpole, and was born in Boston, April 27, 1842. 
He fitted for college at the Boston Public Latin School, and during his 
college course, and for some years afterward, lived with his mother in 
Cambridge, entering actively into the dry goods commission business soon 
after his graduation. Later he became a cotton broker in partnership 
with Walter Dabney (Harvard, 1865), and, having good financial and 
business ability, he soon acquired a moderate fortune and permanently re- 
tired from active business life. 

He made several trips to Europe, but had no great liking for foreign 
travel, as he was very fond of his home associations, living quietly with 
his aged mother the greater part of the year. His tastes were social and 
his chief interest was in out-door sports, shooting, fishing, and yachting, 
which for many years took him to the South in winter, and often at 
other seasons to the Monument Club on Buzzard's Bay, of which he was 
one of the founders some thirty-five years ago. 

In early years he was an adept at the game of billiards, and, with 
William Frothingham, at the end of our first college year, he beat at 
this game the two representatives of the Yale Freshman Class, the con- 
test taking place at Worcester, where, in that year (1860), Harvard won 
against Yale the three boat races on Lake Quinsigamond, as well as the 
two billiard matches and the gam«s of chess. 

Stackpole was a very good shot, and a skilful and patient angler for 
salmon, bass, and trout. He took great pleasure in sending to his friends 
the trophies of his gun and rod. 

Long before his death, however, his health began to fail, several visits 
to foreign spas brought little improvement, and during the last two 
years of his life he was th« victim of a hopeless malady, with which he 
bravely contended until the end. 

It was thereupon 

Votedf that the memorial be entered upon the records, and a copy 
be sent to the family. 

The Class Secretary subsequently received the following letter : 

Mattafoibbtt, July 6, 1902. 

Dear Mr. Lincoln, — I am greatly obliged to you for sending me 

the proceedings of the Class of 1863 in regard to my brother William. 

8 



114 THE CLASS OP 1863. 

It is a kind and appreciative memorial of his life and character, for which 
all his family will feel grateful and for which you have my cordial 
thanks. Sincerely yours, 

J. L. Stackpolb. 
Arthur Lincoln, Esq., Class Secretary, Class of 1863. 

EDWAED GEAY STETSON still practises law at 508 Call- 
fornia Street, San Francisco, residing at Toyon, Marin County. 

He has held no ofl&ce except Trustee of a Country School Dis- 
trict, which he says " is not one of profit, nor honor, and as my 
co-trustees do not appear to approve of me, I should hardly call 
it an office of trust." 

He sends the following letter : 

San Francisco, March 11, 1903. 
Rkv. Henry F. Jenks, Canton Corner, Mass. 

My dear Jenks, — Yours of the 24 ultimo — asking information for 
the Class Report — has reached me, and gives me the first news of Lin- 
coln's death. I shall miss Lincoln. Since I left the Law School in 
1868, 1 have seen very few of my classmates, and have heard little about 
the others, except what I read in the Class reports ; but Lincoln I have 
seen sometimes, and have corresponded with him, and his image remains 
clear in my meuory. 

I enclose a memorandum of answers to your questions seriatim. But 
when you ask for more facts, I hardly know what to say. My life since 
1893 has not been eventful. lu 1890, for reasons of health, I went to 
live in the country at a place I call Toyon, in the Santa Margarita 
Valley, a little north of San Francisco, and there I have lived ever 
since, keeping my ofiice in the city, and swinging daily, like a pendulum, 
from town to country, — most days in the city occupied with books and 
papers, and sometimes in the country watching the grass grow, and the 
fruit ripen, and trapping the coons and foxes and coyotes, or, like Mr. 
Gladstone, swinging an axe. We are not burdened with social forms 
over there, — in fact, rather out of the world, some people might say. 
Still, now and then a stray classmate or old college friend turns up 
and visits us. Curtin and his wife came, postponing for a day his 
expedition to the Kombo Indians (or whatever tribe it was), whose 
myths he wanted to dig up before the six survivors of the race should 
depart for their eternal hunting grounds. Hall, we would see from time 
to time, while he was here, before his translation to Manila a few months 




BIOGRAPHIES. 115 

ago. Blair was the fast one to come, — last year some time, — and it 
was amusing to find a St. Louis lawyer posing as an authority on apple 
orchards. Morison and Fiske came here more than once, but could 
never spare time for a visit to me at home. Drew turns up now and 
then, on his way between Boston and China, and has not forgotten how 
to talk English. Nathan Appleton came here with M. de Lesseps, when 
the Panama Canal was booming, and Denny, Piugree, and Waters made 
visits to California. Possibly two or three others made flying trips 
hither. Their visits have been as the visits of angels, and I have been 
sadly isolated from my classmates. 

My two boys are growing up, but are not yet old enough to think 
about Harvard. I find one of them studying a Latin Grammar written 
by one Daniell ; it can't be our Daniell, for this man pronounces Latin 
in a very diflFerent fashion from that used by Moses Grant in 1863, and 
I note other heresies in the book.r 

I shall rejoice in your Report when it comes, and meanwhile, remain, 
with best wishes. 

Yours as ever, 

Edward Gray Stetson. 

I. 

♦EDWARD LEWIS STEVENS was born in Boston, Sept. 30, 
1842. He died near Camden, South Carolina, April 18, 1865. 

* HENRY ARNOLD TABER was born in New Bedford, 
Massachusetts, Sept. 23, 1841. He died in New Bedford, Oct. 5, 
1868. 

GEORGE SAMUEL TOMLINSON still lives in Boston, at 283 
Heath Street, Roxbury, occupied with the charge of several estates 
as Trustee. 

His three daughters all graduated at the Girls' Boston Latin 
School. His daughter Anna then studied six years at the School 
of Drawing and Painting at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, 
and is now an artist. His daughter Edith graduated at Smith 
College in 1899, and married, June 6, 1900, Richard Gorham 
Badger, son of James Gorham and Emma Bartlett (Holmes) 
Badger. They have one son, Richard Gorham Badger, Jr., born 
June 25, 1901. His daughter Adelia studied six years at the 
New England Conservatory of Music. His son James Ellis 



116 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

prepared at the Eoxbury Latin School, and is a member of the 
Harvard Class of 1903. 

*HENEY ELMEE TOWNSEND was born in Boston, Dec. 29, 
1841. He died in Boston, July 14, 1891. 
His son Frederic Edward died May 15, 1899. 

HENEY TUCK continues Vice-President of the New York 
Life Insurance Company, 346 Broadway, New York City. 

In 1894 he made a trip round the world, and has since made 
several trips to Europe. 

His wife died Nov. 9, 1898, and in 1902, Sept. 23, he married 
Elenore Boyd Hammond, of Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. 

His son Shirley E. married, April 30, 1901, Ellen Miller ; his son 
Henry W. married, April 26, 1898, Olga M. Dininny ; they have a 
son Carlton Webster, born April 2, 1899. His daughter Eosamond 
married, April 10, 1901, James Harper Skillin of New York. 

EOBEET NEWLIN VEEPLANCK has abandoned agriculture, 
having found that farming for thirty years was not profitable to 
mind or purse, and is now living at Orange, New Jersey, having his 
family, who are employed in New York and its vicinity, with him. 

He narrates an instance of fortune's pranks, to show how nar- 
rowly he escaped the " potentialities of wealth beyond the dreams 
of avarice.'' When he sold his oil refinery in 1872, his partner 
took cash, and he took one hundred shares in Standard Oil stock, 
which his father, badly advised, induced him to sell soon after. 
That stock in 1882 became twenty-four hundred shares, and is 
worth to-day $1,680,000, and has paid $700,000 in dividends. 

His son Gulian is employed under classmate Cromwell, and his 
son William is beginning with the same company ; while his son 
Eobert is in a marine engine-shop. 

* BENJAMIN BEAD WALES was bom in Dorchester, Massa- 
chusetts, Feb. 4, 1842. He died in Boston (Dorchester), August 
31, 1901. 



■* 



BIOGRAPHIES. 117 

He continued to reside in Dorchester, and was in the Appraiser's 
Department of the Boston Custom House at the time of his death. 

He was a very prominent comrade of the Grand Army of the 
Republic, much interested in the schools of his neighborhood, 
and a highly esteemed and respected citizen of his native town. 

In reply to a communication from the Class Secretary, the fol- 
lowing letter was received from Mrs. Wales : 

Mr. Arthur Lincoln : 

My dbar Sir, — I thank you for your kind and tender sympathy, 
and for the tribute of respect to the memory of my dear husband and 
your classmate expressed in your note to me. 

All that was dear to me has gone out of my life. The sweet and 
blessed memories of the happy past are all that remains, and it is a ray 
of sunshine through the gloom, to know that my loved one's pure life 
and character lives in the hearts of his friends. 

There will be one more vacant chair at your next reunion, but I know 
that you will remember the cheery smile and the pleasant word with 
which he always greeted the " Class of '63." 

Sincerely yours, 

Augusta A. Walks. 
October 11, 1901. 

At the annual meeting of the Class on Commencement Day, 
June 26, 1902, H. W. Warren offered the following tribute : 

Bbnjamin Read Wales died at his home on Columbia Road, Dorchester, 
on Saturday, August 31, 1901, after an illness qf only a few hours. 

The printed reports of our secretary give so completely the story of 
our classmate's life that few additional particulars are needed in this 
brief memorial. He was an earnest and valued member of Benj. Stone, 
Jr., Post 68, G. A. R., — of which he was Past Commander, — also a 
member of Massachusetts Commandery of the Loyal Legion, of the 
Dorchester Council of the Royal Arcanum, of the Roxbury Military 
and Historical Society, of the Boston Chapter of the Sons of the Amer- 
iean Revolution, of the American Art Society, and of the Old Boston 
Schoolboys' Association. 

For nearly twenty-nine years he was connected with the Boston Cus- 
tom House, and for seventeen years of that time was in the Appraisers' 



118 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

Department. He was a consistent and beloved member of the Second 
Parish Church in Dorchester (Congregational Trinitarian) for forty-three 
years. All his life he was closely identified with that church. There 
be was baptized ; there received as a church member ; there married ; 
and there the last services in memory of him were held. At those 
services the pastor, Rev. Dr. Arthur Little (himself a comrade of the 
same Grand Army Post), delivered an eloquent and sympathetic eulogy 
on the life and character of our classmate. The most prominent officers 
of the church, and representatives from the societies of which he was a 
member, were honorary pall-bearers, and the Guard of Honor was six Past 
Commanders of his Grand Army Post. Almost the entire east end of 
the church was a mass of flowers, and the pulpit ftnd casket were hidden 
in them. The house was full to the doors, with those who came to pay 
the last tribute of respect and esteem, and the presence of many children 
testified to their affection for him. 

Dr. Little said, " I have seen many large gatherings in this house 
during the last ten or twelve years on occasions similar to this ; but I 
do not remember ever to have seen ]so large a one. You have come 
because you loved this man, because you knew him, because he was 
kind to you and true to you, and 'because you feel that in bis depar- 
ture you have lost a personal friend." 

His interest in children and his earnest patriotism were frequently 
shown by his addresses in the public schools, especially at the exercises 
connected with Memorial Day. 

Captain Read Wales, as his neighbors and friends called him, was a 
descendant of one of the best known and most respected of the Old 
Dorchester families. He loved his home, his church, his town. No one 
who knew him ever doubted our classmate's intense patriotism, his con- 
scientious devotion to duty, his genial kind-heartedness and well-deserved 
popularity. 

It was thereupon 

Votedf that the memorial be entered upon the Class records, and a 
copy be sent to the family. 

HORACE WINSLOW WARREN lives at 77 Rockview Street, 
Jamaica Plain, and is Master of the Henry L. Pierce School in 
Dorchester. 

In 1898 he made a trip of about seven weeks to England and 



"% 



BIOGRAPHIES. 119 

Scotland, and in July and August, 1900, a brief vacation trip to 
Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. 

He is a member of numerous professional clubs and societies, 
such as Schoolmasters' Clubs and Educational Associations, of 
the Sons of the American Revolution, of the Appalachian Moun- 
tain Club, of the Cyclists* Touring Club of England, and Asso- 
ciate Member G. A. R. 

His daughter Helen F. is in the class which graduates this 
year from the Girls' Latin School in Boston, and last year passed 
with credit the preliminary examinations for Radcliflfe College, 
receiving an " honor " in Greek. 

JOHN COLLINS WARREN is still engaged in the practice of 
his profession in Boston, at 58 Beacon Street. He was made 
Professor of Surgery in Harvard University in 1893. 

In 1895 Jefferson College gave him the degree of LL.D. Be- 
side the societies mentioned in the last report, he is Hon. F. R. C. 
S. Eng. (elected in 1900), a member of the American Academy of 
Arts and Sciences, and of the College of the Physicians and Sur- 
geons of Philadelphia. 

He is the author of 

" Surgical Pathology and Therapeutics," 1895 ; 

"Healing of Arteries after Ligature in Man and Animals," 1896, 

and, Editor and author of 

" Warren and Gould's International Text Book of Surgery," 1900. 

The splendid endowment of the Medical School of the Univer- 
sity, through which it is to possess the finest and best equipped 
buildings in the country, is largely due to his indefatigable perse- 
verance and enthusiasm. 

His son John graduated at Harvard in 1896, and at the Medi- 
cal School in 1900, and is now Demonstrator of Anatomy in 
Harvard University. His son Joseph graduated at Harvard in 
1897, and at the Law School in 1900, and is now Attorney of the 
Police Commission of Boston. 



I 




S /Zi^i^,^ X/^ii.«Sc^. 



.V YORK; 






BIOGRAPHIES. 121 

as our classmate, John Fiske^ De LaGuse, the historian, and Andrew D. 
White. Mr. Gladstone and the Empress Eugenie also wrote to Weld in 
regard to it. 

He was married August 16, 1880, in Hyde Park, to Lydia Anna Har- 
vell, of Hyde Park, daughter of Arterius and Caroline HarvelL A son, 
Louis D wight Harvell, was born April 18, 1882, and named Louis after 
the Prince Imperial of France, who was killed in Zululand. 

He died at Hyde Park, Nov. 8, 1901, leaving his wife and son surviv- 
ing him. 

In his death tlie community has lost an enthusiastic and painstaking 
student and an indefatigable worker in certain fields of historical and 
political research. We have lost a respected classmate and valued friend, 
and are reminded that the ranks of our brotherhood are drawing closer 
and closer. 

It was thereupon 

Resolved, that the memorial be entered upon the Class records, and a 
copy sent to the family with the assurance of our deepest sympathy. 

His son, Louis Dwight Harvell, is a member of the Class of 
1905, in Bowdoin College. 

EDMUND SOUDER WHEELER lives in Buffalo, New York, 
and his address is 857 Delaware Avenue. 

From June, 1893, to June, 1899, he was one of the Directors 
of the Niagara Falls Power Company (at Niagara Falls), and 
from June, 1894, to June, 1899, Treasurer of that company. 

For the last eleven years he has been Superintendent of the 
Niagara Junction Railway Company, and Agent of the Niagara 
Development Company, with offices at Niagara Falls, New York. 

His journeys have been confined to those made for business, 
with an occasional trip to the neighborhood of Boston and New 
York. 

His wife died at Atlantic City, New Jersey, Nov. 11, 1897. 

His son Reginald Tremaine entered the Lawrence Scientific 
School in 1901, in the Class of 1905. His daughter Elisabeth 
Townsend was married, Oct. 15, 1902, to Dr. Jacob S. Otto, of 
Bufifalo, New York. 



120 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

CLIFFORD CROWNINSHIELD WATERS is stUl residing in 
California, at present at Los Angeles. He is not engaged in any 
active business. 

* MICHAEL SHEPARD WEBB was born in Windsor, Ver- 
mont, Feb. 22, 1842. He died in San Francisco, April 15, 1872. 

♦CHARLES STUART FAUCHERAUD' WELD was bom 
in Fort Lee, New Jersey, Dec. 14, 1839. He died in Hyde Park* 
Massachusetts, Nov. 8, 1901. 

At the annual meeting of the Class on Commencement Day, 
June 25, 1902, Lincoln ofifered the following memorial: 

Charles Stuart Faucheraud Weld, or, as he called himself in later 
years, Stuart F. Weld, son of Theodore D wight Weld and Angeline Emilia 
(Grimk^) Weld, was born in Fort Lee, New Jersey, Dec. 14, 1839. He 
fitted for college at his father's school in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. He 
entered the class at the beginning of the Freshman year and completed 
the full course of four years. 

In college he was a diligent and faithful student and received a Detur 
in his Sophomore year. He had no ambition to see his name high on 
the rank list, but chose rather to devote himself to those studies which 
were congenial to him and which seemed to him more advantageous in 
after life. He occupied, however, a respectable and honorM position as 
a scholar in the Class. 

He took his college life seriously, without indulging much in its frivol- 
ities, and with his natural dignity and reserve did not encourage much 
the formation of close intimacies, but cordially welcomed those who 
sought his friendship. 

After graduation he lived in Boston, and for the most part in Hyde 
Park, Massachusetts. He devoted his time principally to literary work, 
reading, studying, and teaching either private pupils or in schools. He 
contributed numerous articles to the "Atlantic Montlily," the "Radical," 
and similar magazines. He was especially interested in the life of Napo- 
leon III. and his government, and in the Isthmian Canals, preferring 
the Panama • route. 

In recent years he published a pamphlet on Koumania, and the part 
Louis Napoleon took in her affairs. Rev. Dr. Edward E. Hale wrote 
an introduction to this work. It was favorably received by such men 



"^ 



120 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

CLIFFORD CROWNINSHIELD WATERS is still residing in 
California, at present at Los Angeles. He is not engaged in any 
active business. 

* MICHAEL SHEPARD WEBB was bom in Windsor, Ver- 
mont, Feb. 22, 1842. He died in San Francisco, April 15, 1872. 

♦CHARLES STUART FAUCHERAUD* WELD was bom 
in Fort Lee, New Jersey, Dec. 14, 1839. He died in Hyde Park> 
Massachusetts, Nov. 8, 1901. 

At the annual meeting of the Class on Commencement Day, 
June 25, 1902, Lincoln oflfered the following memorial: 

Charles Stuart Faucheraud Weld, or, as he called himself in later 
years, Stuart F. Weld, son of Theodore D wight Weld and Angeline Emilia 
(Grimk^) Weld, was born in Fort Lee, New Jersey, Dec. 14, 1839. He 
fitted for college at his father's school in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. He 
entered the class at the beginning of the Freshman year and completed 
the full course of four years. 

In college he was a diligent and faithful student and received a Detur 
in his Sophomore year. He had no ambition to see his name high on 
the rank list, but chose rather to devote himself to those studies which 
were congenial to him and which seemed to him more advantageous in 
after life. He occupied, however, a respectable and honorM position as 
a scholar in the Class. 

He took his college life seriously, without indulging much in its frivol- 
ities, and with his natural dignity and reserve did not encourage much 
the formation of close intimacies, but cordially welcomed those who 
sought his friendship. 

After graduation he lived in Boston, and for the most part in Hyde 
Park, Massachusetts. He devoted his time principally to literary work, 
reading, studying, and teaching either private pupils or in schools. He 
contributed numerous articles to the "Atlantic Monthly," the "Radical," 
and similar magazines. He was especially interested in the life of Napo- 
leon III. and his government, and in the Isthmian Canals, preferring 
the Panama ' route. 

In recent years he published a pamphlet on Roumania, and the part 
Louis Napoleon took in her affairs. Rev. Dr. Edward E. Hale wrote 
an introduction to this work. It was favorably received by such men 




S /t-^^ci^^^ ^' /^<u^^^^. 



7. .7 YORK\ 

; LIBRARY • 



ASTOR, LENOA ^N.- 
TILDEN FOUNDATION 



o 



BIOGRAPHIES. 121 

as our classmate, John Fiske, De LaGuse, the liistorian, and Andrew D. 
White. Mr. Gladstone and the Empress Eugenie also wrote to Weld in 
regard to it. 

He was married August 16, 1880, in Hyde Park, to Lydia Anna Har- 
vell, of Hyde Park, daughter of Arterius and Caroline Harvell. A son, 
Louis D wight Harvell, was born April 18, 1882, and named Louis after 
the Prince Imperial of France, who was killed in Zululand. 

He died at Hyde Park, Nov. 8, 1901, leaving his wife and son surviv- 
ing him. 

In his death the community has lost an enthusfastic and painstaking 
student and an indefatigable worker in certain fields of historical and 
political research. We have lost a respected classmate and valued friend, 
and are reminded that the ranks of our brotherhood are drawing closer 
and closer. 

It was thereupon 

Resolved^ that the memorial be entered upon the Class records, and a 
copy sent to the family with the assurance of our deepest sympathy. 

His son, Louis Dwight Harvell, is a member of the Class of 
1905, in Bowdoin College. 

EDMUND SOUDER WHEELER lives in Bufifalo, New York, 
and his address is 857 Delaware Avenue. 

From June, 1893, to June, 1899, he was one of the Directors 
of the Niagara Falls Power Company (at Niagara Falls), and 
from June, 1894, to June, 1899, Treasurer of that company. 

For the last eleven years he has been Superintendent of the 
Niagara Junction Railway Company, and Agent of the Niagara 
Development Company, with offices at Niagara Falls, New York. 

His journeys have been confined to those made for business, 
with an occasional trip to the neighborhood of Boston and New 
York. 

His wife died at Atlantic City, New Jersey, Nov. 11, 1897. 

His son Reginald Tremaine entered the Lawrence Scientific 
School in 1901, in the Class of 1905. His daughter Elisabeth 
Townsend was married, Oct. 15, 1902, to Dr. Jacob S. Otto, of 
Buffalo, New York. 



122 THE CLASS OF 1868. 

* MOSES DILLON WHEELEE was born in Zanesville, Ohio, 
March 16, 1840. He died near Arrochar, Staten Island, New 
York, Nov. 1, 1889. 

WILLIAM AUGUSTUS WHITE Uves in Brooklyn, New 
York, at 158 Columbia Heights. 

He retired from mercantile business in 1897. 

His son Harold Tredway graduated at Harvard in 1897. Both 
his sons are stockbrokers. 

His son Alexander Moss, Jr. (Harvard, 1892), married, 2 Nov. 
1898, Elsie Ogden. 

He has grandchildren : Alexander White Moffat, born 26 June, 
1891 ; Donald Moflfat, born 18 July, 1894; George Barclay Mof- 
fat, Jr , born 16 May, 1897 ; Frances White Moflfat, born 21 Nov., 
1899. 

♦JOHN WINTHEOP was born in Boston, Massachusetts, 
June 20, 1841. He died in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, Sept. 
18, 1895. 

He continued to reside in Stockbridge, devoting a large portion 
of his time to farming, until his death. 

At the annual meeting of the Class on Commencement Day, 
June 24, 1896, the Class Secretary announced the death of 
Winthrop, and presented the following memorial on behalf of 
Shattuck, who was absent: 

John Winthrop, soil of Robert Charles (Harvard, 1828) and Eliza 
Cabot (Blanchard) Winthrop, was born in Boston, June 20, 1841. He 
fitted for college with Mr. Thomas G. Bradford, in Boston, and entered 
the class at the beginning of the junior year. 

After graduation the greater part of his life, interrupted by annual 
visits to Boston, and occasional visits to New York, was passed at Stock- 
bridge, Massachusetts, where he owned an estate and spent his time as 
a gentleman farmer, — a person whom he himself described as " one 
who has a farm, does not labor, and loses money at it steadily." He 
was married in March, 1864, to Isabella Cowpland Weyman, daughter of 
John Weyman of New York. 



■> 



122 THE CLASS OF 1868. 

* MOSES DILLON WHEELEE was born in Zanesville, Ohio, 
March 16, 1840. He died near Arrochar, Staten Island, New 
York, Nov. 1, 1889. 

WILLIAM AUGUSTUS WHITE Uves in Brooklyn, New 
York, at 158 Columbia Heights. 

He retired from mercantile business in 1897. 

His son Harold Tredway graduated at Harvard in 1897. Both 
his sons are stockbrokers. 

His son Alexander Moss, Jr. (Harvard, 1892), married, 2 Nov. 
1898, Elsie Ogden. 

He has grandchildren : Alexander White Moffat, born 26 June, 
1891; Donald Moflfat, born 18 July, 1894; George Barclay Mof- 
fat, Jr, born 16 May, 1897 ; Frances White Mofifat,born 21 Nov., 
1899. 

♦JOHN WINTHEOP was born in Boston, Massachusetts, 
June 20, 1841. He died in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, Sept. 
18, 1895. 

He continued to reside in Stockbridge, devoting a large portion 
of his time to farming, until his death. 

At the annual meeting of the Class on Commencement Day, 
June 24, 1896, the Class Secretary announced the death of 
Winthrop, and presented the following memorial on behalf of 
Shattuck, who was absent: 

John Winthrop, soil of Robert Charles (Harvard, 1828) and Eliza 
Cabot (Blanchard) Winthrop, was born in Boston, June 20, 1841. He 
fitted for college with Mr. Thomas G. Bradford, in Boston, and entered 
the class at the beginning of the junior year. 

After graduation the greater part of his life, interrupted by annual 
visits to Boston, and occasional visits to New York, was passed at Stock- 
bridge, Massachusetts, where he owned an estate and spent his time as 
a gentleman farmer, — a person whom he himself described as " one 
who has a farm, does not labor, and loses money at it steadily." He 
was married in March, 1864, to Isabella Cowpland Weyman, daughter of 
John Weyman of New York. 





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_ jz L13R,.'.. 


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BIOGRAPHIES 



123 



Wiutbrop's name recalls some of the most distinguished leaders and 
some of the most important chapters in the early Colonial history of 
New England; his father's life is still fresh in our minds. 

It would not have been strange had he inherited a taste for elegant 
scholarship and a love of letters* But in fact he was never fond of books. 
He was fond of nature and animals, and understood them. He was 
bluff, honest, outspoken, straightforward in hi* mannei*s and conversa- 
tion — " without any nonsense." His distinguishing characteristic was 
plain common-sense and good judgment. He had many of those elements 
which go to make popularity. 

He was at one time Representative to the General Court from the 
Fifth Berkshire District. He was for a number of years, and at the time 
of his death, President of the Lenox Club ; he was also warden of the 
Episcopal Church at Stockbridge, of which his classmate Arthur Lawrence 
was rector. 

Among his neighbors of all cLisses in Berkshire County, whether the 
fashionable summer residents who come to Lenox from New York, or the 
poorer native farmers and laborers of the soil, Winthrop was immensely 
popular, and without striving to be so. This was largely due to his 
genuineness, his bonhomie. 

Although robust in appearance, he was not always in good health, and 
he died suddenly at Stockbridge, after returning from a fishing trip 
to the lakes of Maine, Sept. 18, 1895. His funeral was attended by a' 
great concourse of people of all classes from the countryside. His wife 
survives him ; but he left no children. 

It was thereupon 

Voted, that the memorial be extended upon the Class records, and a 
copy be sent to the family. 

The following letter was subsequently received by the Class 
Secretary from Mrs. Winthrop: 

My dbar Mr. Lincoln, — I am very much pleased with the class 
tribute to my husband which you so kindly sent me. It is very simple, 
direct, and to the point. When you see Dr. Shattuck, would you kindly 
convey my appreciation of it. Thanking you very much for sending it 
to me, Believe me, very sincerely yours, 

Isabella C. Winthrop. 
Stockbridge, June 29, 1896. 



124 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

The following sketch was prepared for the "Harvard Grad- 
uates' Magazine," by Robert C. Winthrop, Jr., Esq., a brother of 
Winthrop : 

John Winthrop (born in Boston, June 20, 1841, died in Stockbridge, 
Sept. 18, 1895), second son of the late Hon. Robert C. Winthrop by his 
first wife, Eliza Cabot Blanchard, was fitted for college at private schools, 
took bis bachelor's degree at Harvard in 1863, and not long afterward 
established himself on a farm of some two hundred acres near the vil- 
lage of Stockbridge, Massachusetts, in one of the most beautiful situations 
in the county of Berkshire. His health, originally delicate, was greatly 
benefited by an open-air life, which enabled him to indulge to the full 
his pronounced taste for horses and live-stock, and he continued to make 
Stockbridge his home for the remainder of his life, though he habitually 
passed a couple of months of each winter in Boston, and made occasional 
visits t) other places. With much native intelligence, he had no love 
of literature or disposition to mix in general society. A single trip to 
Europe satiated him with art, and a single term of ofl&ce as representa- 
tive of the Fifth Berkshire District in the Massachusetts Legislature tired 
him of politics. He liked best the quiet life of a gentleman farmer, 
varied by the conviviality of the well-known Lenox Club, of which he 
was always one of the most active members, and of late years the presi- 
dent. It was his lot, .however, to attain a degree of widespread per- 
sonal popularity not often enjoyed by more ambitious men. His genial 
manners, his obliging disposition, his keen sense of humor, handsome 
figure, and engaging address, all combined to make him a universal 
favorite, and his death, after a short illness, in his fifty-tifbh year, has 
given rise to exceptional manifestations of sorrow wherever he is known. 
He married, March 30, 1864, Isabella Cowpland, daughter of the late 
John Weyman of New York, by whom, who survives him, he leaves 
no issue. 



-> 



MEMBERS OF THE CLASS 

DURINO A 

PART OF THE COURSE ONLY. 



Frederick Baylies Allen lives in Boston at 132 Marlborough Street. 
He is still in charge of the Episcopal City Mission, with an office at 
the Diocesan House, 1 Joy Street. He is Secretary of the Massachu- 
setts Bible Society. 

He has two more grandchilden : Allen Williams Clark, bom Feb. 18, 
1896, and Francis Richmond Clark, bom Nov. 27, 1899. 

John Alltn is senior member of the firm of Allyn and Bacon, book- 
publishers, at 172 Tremont Street, Boston, and lives in Cambridge. 

He married, June 19, 1872, Anna Winter Page, of Watertown, Massa- 
chusetts, and has children: Alice Page, born March. 27, 1873; Rufus 
Bradford, born June 27, 1874; Philip Morton, born August 24, 1878, 
married, June, 1902, Elfrida MacDonald ; Dorothea, bora June 2, 1880; 
Samuel Bradford, born Sept. 20, 1884. 

John Page Almy lives in Boston at 26 Newbury Street, and is in no 
active business. 

♦Augustus Barker. * 1863. 

*JoHN Clark Barnard died at Worcester, Massachusetts, April 1, 
1903. 

JosiAH Grahmb Bellows lives in Walpole, New Hampshire. He is 
a lawyer, but is now invalided from a shock of paralysis, in 1900, from 
which he never expects fully to recover. 

In the late autumn of 1900 he went to England for his health. 

January 1, 1894, he was appointed one of the Railroad Commission- 
ers for New Hampshire, and resigned the office of Judge of Probate for 



126 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

Cheshire County, which he had held for over sixteen years. He con- 
tinued, by two reappointments, as Railroad Commissioner until June 
1, 1901, when he resigned on account of health. For the same reason, 
October 1st of that year, he resigned the Treasurership of the Savings 
Bank of Walpole. In the fall of 1893 he was appointed on the Com- 
mission to ascertain and establish the true jurisdictional line between 
Massachusetts and New Hampshire, and to the same Commission was 
given, later, the task of fixing the southeast comer of New Hamp- 
shire and the southwest corner of Vermont. New Hampshire and 
Massachusetts had been in dispute over this matter twice about 1690, 
and though various commissions and legislatures had tried to patcli it 
up, it was never done until finally, in 1894, his Commission and the 
Massachusetts Commission agreed, and after six or seven years of legis- 
lation, and the various impediments that we wise people always put in 
the way of good deeds, the matter was finally closed by the New Hamp- 
shire Commission in 1901. Although the contention between the States 
was not based on tangible values, he believes it to be about the longest 
fought-out State quarrel on record. In 1894 he was chosen clerk of the 
Railroad Commission, and continued in that ofl&ce until his resignation. 
His daughter Mary Howland Bellows was entered at Smith's College in 
1897, and graduated with the Class of 1901, receiving the degree of B. L. 

♦Marshall William Blake. * 1873. 

♦Charles Malcolm Boyd. * 1864. 

♦Henry French Brown. '' * 1863. 

* George Reid Dinsmoor was bom in Keene, New Hampshire, May 
28, 1841. He died in Keene, April 29, 1901. 

He continued to reside in Keene until his death. He had been out 
of health for some time, and although thus debarred from active work, 
he was well known and much beloved and respected in his native town 
and elsewhere. The Class Secretary received the following letter from 
Mrs. Dinsmoor : 

Keene, N. H., March 31, 1902. 

My dear Mr. Lincoln, — I have your letter of March 14th, and 
regret that circumstances have prevented my acknowledging it before 
now ; and, too, I wish to assure you that I am not so unmindful as I 
seem of your kind note of many, many months ago. I am glad to 
have, and am most grateful for your expressions of appreciation of my 
husband's character, and for the nice remembrances you have of him. 



% 




rt . . ■ ^ ^■'■.^*- c-"»*r. •■■■ ■'■ «t:'*"-^ • •-'■V- 



■> 





J ^^^^^=-N«i-.*.W- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 127 

The heroism with which he met the suffering of so many years is beyond 
words, and his interest in the world and the life about him was ever 
keen and sympathetic. Every item of news which reached him of his 
classmates and their respective welfares interested him deeply. I appre- 
ciate very much your earnest desire to have a photograph of Dr. Dins- 
moor for the Class records. I have hesitated which of two pictures to 
send you, — whether one taken twenty years or so ago, or one taken 
within the last seven years ; but as you ask for the latest one, I conclude 
to send you this last, although it is, as you will see, distinctly the picture 
of an invalid. Yours very truly, 

Helen J. Dinsmoor. 

" The Keene Evening Sentinel," April 29, 1901, in announcing Dins- 
moor's death, says : 

Dr. George R. Dinsmoor, of this city, died this morning at his resi- 
dence, 45 Washington Street, at the age of nearly sixty years. 

For the past twenty-three years, Mr. Dinsmoor has been shut out 
from the activities and many of the pleasures of life on account of a 
severe attack of paralysis, which deprived him of the use of all his limbs. 
Through this long period of invalidism, he had kept in touch with the 
outer world as well as he could, and by frequent drives he enjoyed the 
beauties of Keene and its immediate surroundings. Through the de- 
lightful hospitalities of his home, in which his devoted and loving wife 
and affectionate sister made his happiness their foremost thought and 
aim, he kept in touch with many old friends and found new ones. 
His infirmities and sufferings were borne with the greatest patience 
and fortitude, and into a life doubtless trying and burdensome in the 
extreme, was brought much of happiness to himself and others. 

* Horace Sargent Dunn. * 1862. 

* Cartwright Eustis was born in Natchez, Mississippi, Nov. 4, 
1842. He died in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Dec. 2, 1900. 

He continued to reside in New Orleans, and engaged in business 
as Treasurer of A. Baldwin and Company, Limited, corporation, 
dealers in hardware, until his death. He was a much beloved and 
respected citizen of that city. A sketch of his life appears in the 
Secretary's Report of Class of 1888. 

The following letter was received byF. L. Higginson from Richardson : 

Nbw Orleans, Louisiana, Dec. 7, 1900. 
Dear Frank, — Cartwright Eustis died in Milwaukee last Saturday, 
and was buried here Wednesday. The poor fellow was a great sufferer. 



128 THE CLASS OF 1868. 

and about three months ago had an operation performed, and went to 
Milwaukee for the 'purpose. The operation was considered a perfectly 
successful one, and his friends expected to have him return this month, 
but a cold contracted while taking an airing on Thanksgiving Day 
culminated in acute pneumonia, a shock his already wasted system 
could not withstand. 

One more of our old set called home.* He left a wife and nine chil- 
dren, only one of whom, the oldest daughter, being married, Mrs. 
Russell of Milwaukee. Cartwright bore his suifering with great forti- 
tude and unflinching courage. Peace to his ashes. 

Sincerely, W. P. Richardson. 

The Class Secretary received the following letter from one of Eustis's 

sons : 

Fbb. 21, 1901. 
Arthur Lincoln, Esq., Boston, Mass. 

Dear Sir, — I beg to acknowledge receipt of your favor of the 14th 
inst. to my mother, and in her behalf I wish to thank you for your 
kind words of sympathy. 

Under separate covers I send you a photograph of my father as per 
your request, and also a copy of the " New Orleans Times Democrat," 
with a short account of the circumstances surrounding his death. 

Any friend of my father is a friend of mine, and I trust, should you 
ever come to New Orleans, you will do me the honor of calling on me. 

Yours truly, Allan C. Eustis. 

The "New Orleans Daily Picayune" of Dec. 3, 1900, announcing the 
death of Eustis, says : 

Cartwright Eustis, one of the most widely known and influential 
business men of this city, a distinguished soldier and a cultured gentle- 
man, died in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, yesterday. Mr. Eustis has been a 
prominent figure in the business life of New Orleans for many years, 
and at the same time his influence has been felt in all the varied circles 
with which his life has come in contact. He was a leader. In educa- 
tional, religious, social, and business afla-irs, municipal as well as private, 
he occupied positions of prominence and power. A member of the 
Board of Administrators of the Tulane University, he became chairman 
of the real estate committee ; in the congregation of Trinity Church he 
occupied the position of junior warden ; he was Treasurer of A. Baldwin 
& Co., Limited, one of the largest business corporations of this city ; 
he was Vice-President of the Round Table Club, one of the most influ- 
ential social and intellectual organizations of the city, and Mayor Flower 




128 THE CLASS OF 1868. 

and about three months ago had an operation performed, and went to 
Milwaukee for the 'purpose. The operation was considered a perfectly 
successful one, and his friends expected to have him return this month, 
but a cold contracted while taking an airing on Thanksgiving Day 
culminated in acute pneumonia, a shock his already wasted system 
could not withstand. 

One more of our old set called home/ He left a wife and nine chil- 
dren, only one of whom, the oldest daughter, being married, Mrs. 
Kusscll of Milwaukee. Cartwright bore his suifering with great forti- 
tude and unflinching courage. Peace to his ashes. 

Sincerely, W. P. Richardson. 

The Class Secretary received the following letter from one of Eustis's 

sons : 

Feb. 21, 1901. 
Arthur Lincoln, Esq., Boston, Mass. 

Dear Sir, — I beg to acknowledge receipt of your favor of the 14th 
inst. to my mother, and in her behalf I wish to thank you for your 
kind words of sympathy. 

Under separate covers I send you a photograph of my father as per 
your request, and also a copy of the " New Orleans Times Democrat," 
with a short account of the circumstances surrounding his death. 

Any friend of my Either is a friend of mine, and I trust, should you 
ever come to New Orleans, you will do me the honor of calling on me. 

Yours truly, Allan C. Eustis. 

The "New Orleans Daily Picayune" of Dec. 3, 1900, announcing the 
death of Eustis, says : 

Cartwright Eustis, one of the most widely known and influential 
business men of this city, a distinguished soldier and a cultured gentle- 
man, died in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, yesterday. Mr. Eustis has been a 
prominent figure in the business life of New Orleans for many years, 
and at the same time his influence has been felt in all the varied circles 
with which his life has come in contact. He was a leader. In educa- 
tional, religious, social, and business affkirs, municipal as well as private, 
he occupied positions of prominence and power. A member of the 
Board of Administrators of the Tulane University, he became chairman 
of the real estate committee ; in the congregation of Trinity Church he 
occupied the position of junior warden ; he was Treasurer of A. Baldwin 
& Co., Limited, one of the largest business corporations of this city ; 
he was Vice-President of the Round Table Club, one of the most influ- 
ential social and intellectual organizations of the city, and Mayor Flower 




C^^t^ui/t^^^CAj^^^^^^ 



■<^ 






^^, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 129 

recognized his qualities by appointing him a member of the Water and 

Sewerage Board, although he saw fit to decline the trust. It would be 

difficult to point to any movement of great public interest in which his 

influence has not been felt. 

• ••• ••••• 

During his long and honorable business career he held many posi- 
tions of great responsibility and trust, but the position in the duties of 
which he found probably the greatest pleasure was as a member of the 
board of administrators of Tulane University. The welfare of that 
great institution was near his heart, and he devoted himself to its inter- 
ests with the greatest zeal and energy. He was a member of that 
board from the time of its formation. His position as chairman of the 
real estate committee gave him a large hand in the management of the 
trust, and his great ability was a potent factor in the prosperity that 
has attended the administration. 

* Charles Frbderio Fearing was bom in New York City, July 31, 
1840. He died in New York City, April 5, 1901. 

He continued to reside in New York until his death, and was very 
prominent in social life. During his periods of invalidism he was con- 
stantly surrounded by relatives and old friends. His sense of humor 
remained with him until the last, and many good stories are told of him 
by his friends of the Union Club, which he called his home. One of 
these stories is recounted as follows : 

" Mr. Fearing once met with a severe accident. His leg was crushed, 
blood-poisoning set in, and the doctors decided that he must choose 
between amputation and death. He chose death. The patient rapidly 
grew worse, word was sent to his relatives and friends that he was dying, 
and we all thought the end had come. The next morning one of our 
leading daily papers printed an obituary notice on the supposed deceased. 
The proprietor of the paper, then and always a friend of Mr. Fearing, 
subsequently asked him how be felt when reading the announcement of 
his own death. *0h,' Mr. Fearing replied, *I never believe anything 
in your paper, and I didn't believe that.* " 

A contemporary New York paper, April 19, 1901, thus speaks of 
him : 

" Charles F. Fearing's funeral was solemnized yesterday at the Pres- 
byterian Church in University Place, and he was buried at Woodlawn 
Cemetery; and so passes away from our every-day vision a man well 
known in a world of genial, polite, and pleasant people, — the only world 



130 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

he cared much for, — and little known or not at all in that world of great 
and energetic activities which is regarded as making up the life of the 
time. 

" He was not a very old man, and yet so rapid have heen the changes 
of life in the city that he seems almost to helong to a former time. 
Fearing's youth fell in that ancient age when young gentlemen out of 
college finished their education by making the grand tour of Europe; 
and his grand tour coincided with the date when Commodore Vanderbilt 
was just doing his first fighting as a railroad man, and when Jay Gould 
was pushing a wheelbarrow along the roads in Delaware County. His 
social qualities, his wit, his good nature, his genial spirit, his immense 
success as a raconteur, made him a welcome guest wherever he was 
known; and to tell of the brilliant circles in which he was at home 
would be to write the history of society in the city for thirty years." 

" Native Philistines will perhaps agree with foreign critics in regard- 
ing as a quite unusual American one who never invented anything, nor 
built a railroad, nor organized a trust, but the man who sets the example 
of making the most of the pleasant side of life has his value. The man 
who cultivates the art of enjoying life, of endeavoring to be happy and 
to make others happy about him, has distinguished himself in a way 
that our people will appreciate . more and more as time goes on." 

The following sketch has been prepared by Mason : 

Charles Frederic Fearing died in New York, April 5, 1901, in 
his sixty-first year. He was the eldest son of Charles Nye and Mary 
(Swan) Fearing, and the great-great-grandson of General Israel Fearing 
of Wareham, Massachusetts, a soldier of the Revolution. 

For twenty years he was a stockbroker in Wall Street, but about 1885 
retired from active business. He had many tastes that fitted him for a 
life of leisure, among them a fondness for books which led him to collect 
a good library of standard works. 

For fifteen years he was a constant traveller, and, with social tastes 
and ready wit, he made many friends in England and France, China and 
Japan, Manila and Australia, India, Cape Colony, and Auckland, and at 
many other points where he stopped during his frequent voyages. 
He went round the world three times, and was equally at home in San 
Francisco and London, Hong Kong and Cairo. He met many notable 
people, among them Cecil Rhodes, whom he visited in South Africa. 

He was fond of angling, and, in pursuit of his favorite sport, had 
camped on many streams in both continents. He was the originator of 



130 THF CLASS OF 1863. 

he cared much for, — and little known or not at all in that world of great 
and energetic activities which is regarded as making up the life of the 
time. 

" He was not a very old man, and yet so rapid have been the changes 
of life in the city that he seems almost to belong to a former time. 
Fearing's youth fell in that ancient age when young gentlemen out of 
college finished their education by making the grand tour of Europe ; 
and his grand tour coincided with the date when Commodore Vanderbilt 
was just doing his first fighting as a railroad man, and when Jay Gould 
was pushing a wheelbarrow along the roads in Delaware County. His 
social qualities, his wit, his good nature, his genial spirit, his immense 
success as a raconteur, made him a welcome guest wherever he was 
known ; and to tell of the brilliant circles in which he was at home 
would be to write the history of society in the city for thirty years." 

"Native Philistines will perhaps agree with foreign critics in regard- 
ing as a quite unusual American one who never invented anything, nor 
built a railroad, nor organized a trust, but the man who sets the example 
of making the most of the pleasant side of life has his value. The man 
who cultivates the art of enjoying life, of endeavoring to be happy and 
to make others happy about him, has distinguished himself in a way 
that our people will appreciate . more and more as time goes on." 

The following sketch has been prepared by Mason : 

Charles Frederic Fearing died in New York, April 5, 1901, in 
his sixty-first year. He was the eldest son of Charles Nye and Mary 
(Swan) Fearing, and the great-great-grandson of General Israel Fearing 
of Wareham, Massachusetts, a soldier of the Revolution. 

For twenty years he was a stockbroker in Wall Street, but about 1885 
retired from active business. He had many tastes that fitted him for. a 
life of leisure, among them a fondness for books which led him to collect 
a good library of standard works. 

For fifteen years he was a constant traveller, and, with social tastes 
and ready wit, he made many friends in England and France, China and 
Japan, Manila and Australia, India, Cape Colony, and Auckland, and at 
many other points where he stopped during his frequent voyages. 
He went round the world three times, and was equally at home in San 
Francisco and London, Hong Kong and Cairo. He met many notable 
people, among them Cecil Rhodes, whom he visited in South Africa. 

He was fond of angling, and, in pursuit of his favorite sport, had 
camped on many streams in both continents. He was the originator of 




£ff. 







ACTC:>, LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS. 




BIOGRAPmES. 131 

the Kestigouche Salmon Club, on the Canadian river of that name, and 
his fishing tours took him also to Scotland and to Norway. 

In his last years he made two visits to the baths of Nauheim, in Ger- 
many, for the cardiac malady which ultimately proved fatal, but most 
of his summers were passed with his relatives and his old friends on the 
seashore of New England or in the vicinity of New York. He was a 
strong Harvard man and found great satisfaction through life in his 
early association with the University. 

Henry Barrett Going lives in Brookline at 15 Fairbanks Street. 

♦Arthur Frederic Gould. * 1890. 

* Samuel Shblton Gould. * 1862. 

* Sullivan Haslbtt. * 1887. 

Franklin Theodore Howe still resides in Washington, District of 
Columbia, and is news editor of the "Washington Evening Star." 
He has been a member of the Washington Harvard Club since its 
formation, and one year its Vice-President. He is a member of Bum- 
side Post, No. 8, G. A. R. ; and Hancock Regiment, No. 1, W. V. U., 
and of the Union Soldiers' Alliance, an organization peculiar to Wash- 
ington, and one of its past Presidents. 

His four daughters made a tour of Europe in 1900, and, as a result, 
one of them, Sarah Willard Howe, has just published "Oberammergau 
in 1900," a description of the Passion Play. 

His son George Alpha married Miss Bella Jost of Montgomery, 
Alabama, and has two children, Elise Francis, and Theodore Christian ; 
and his son Franklin Theodore, Jr., married Miss Nellie Bennett of 
Washington, and has a son, Franklin Theodore, 3d. 

♦Herman John Huidekoper. * 1868. 

William Frederick Jones lives in Orchard Street, Jamaica Plain. 

He was commissioned Deputy Collector of Customs for the port of 
Boston, March 27, 1894, and still holds that office. Since 1901 he has 
been Treasurer of the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati. 



• JoslAH Stioknbt Lombard, M..D., died at London, England, 
May 18, 1903. 



132 THE CLASS OF 1808. 

William Priestley Richardson still lives in New Orleans, at 1438 
Louisiana Avenue. 

* WiLUAM AuRELius Rtan. * 1886. 

* Moses Bartlbtt Sewall. * 1860. 

* GoRHAM Phillips Stevens. * 1862. 

John Lorrimer Graham Strong is in a law ofiGice at 130 Fulton 
Street, New York City. 

His wife died Dec. 30, 1900. 

His son married, Feb. 18, 1896, Grace Huntington, daughter of Fred- 
eric S. and Josephine Perry Wells. 

He has one grandson, Chester Bradford Strong, bom March 20, 1900. 

* Gboroe Henry Turner. * 1 861. 

* John Frink Smith Van Bokkelen. - * 1863. 

Edmund Augustus Ward still spends much of his time on his farm at 
Richfield Springs, New York. His address in New York City is the 
University Club. 

♦Thomas Jefferson Washburn. * 1866. 



SUMMARY. 



The occupations of the Class may be presented as follows : 

Business. — C. W. Amory, R. Amory, Appleton, Ayres, J. M. Brown, 
Cromwell, Denny, Emerson, Grew, F. L. Higginson, S. S. Higginson, 
Horton, Jackson, Kidder, J. Lombard, Marsh, Mixter, Palmer, Pearce, 
Peck, Pingree, Rand, Tomlinson, Verplanck, Waters, E. S. Wheeler, 
White, — 27. Allpiy Almyy Going, Howe, W. F, Jones, Live^ Richard^ 
son, Strong, — 8. 

Law. — Bailey, Blair, M. Brown, Cobb, Comte, Edwards, Fairchild, 
Field, Foster, Goodwin, A. W. Green, Hutchins, Owen, Sheldon, Stet- 
son, — 15. Bellows, Ward, — 2. 

Medicine. — Bagley, Cross, Freeman, J. 0. Green, Hall, Lathrop, 
Mason, Perry, Pratt, Shattuck, Shreve, Tuck, J. C. Warren, — 13. 
J. S, Lombard, — 1. 

Teaching. — Baxter, Daniell, Gillet, Marston, Morse, Nichols, Put- 
nam, Smith, H. W. Warren, — 9. 

Theology. — Bishop, Hammond, Harris, H. F. Jenks, Lawrence, — 5. 
Allen, — 1 . 

Civil Engineering. — Morison, — 1. 

Miscellaneous. — Pillsbury, public instruction ; Boit, painting ; Bow- 
ditch, trusts ; Drew, Chinese customs* service ; Curtin, authorship, — 6. 

Residences. — As situated at present, of those members of the Class 
who have received the degree of A.B., thirty-four are in Massachusetts ; 
twenty in New York; three in Illinois; two in Europe; two in New 
Jersey ; three in California ; two in Missouri ; and one each in China, 



134 THE CLASS OF 1868. 

Colorado, Connecticut, Kansas, Manila, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, 
Vermont, Washington, D. C, and Wisconsin. 

Of those who were members of the class during a part of the course 
only, seven are in Massachusetts; two in New York, and one each in 
New Hampshire, and Louisiana, Washington, D. d and Europe. 



MARRIAGES. 

Nichols Nov. 26, 1863 

♦WiNTHROP Mar. 30, 1864 

GiLLBT May 4, 1864 

' (Sept. 4, 1884 

BoiT (June 16, 1864 

(Jan. 5, 1897 

Daniell (July 26, 1864 

(July 24, 1872 

Shrbvb July 28, 1864 

♦FiSKB Sept. 6, 1864 

ToMLiNsoN Sept. 10, 1864 

KiDDBR Oct. 11, 1865 

*Frothingham, W Oct. 26, 1865 

♦Post Jan. 25, 1866 

♦FuLLBRTON April 18, 1866 

Rand April 19, 1866 

Marston (April 30, 1866 

(Aug. 14, 1873 

♦Taber May 10, 1866 

BowDiTCH June 7, 1866 

♦Davis June 19, 1866 

♦Mardbn June 26, 1866 

Goodwin Sept. 27, 1866 

Brown, M. Oct. 8, 1866 

Whbbler, E. S Oct. 24, 1866 

♦Frothingham, B. T Oct. 31, 1866 

Edwards Nov. 29, 1866 

♦Jones, G. S Dec. 24, 1866 

PiLLSBURY Dec. 26, 1866 

*TowNSEND April 11, 1867 

Harris June 20, 1867 




MARRIAGES. 



135 



Amory, C. W Oct. 23, 1867 

HoRTON Nov. 12, 1867 

♦Evans Nov. 20, 1867 

Grew Nov. 26, 1867 

Cromwell Jan. 8, 1868 

White April 29, 1868 

Pearob June 3, 1868 

(June 11, 1868 

^^^"^ I Oct. 30, 1889 

Sheldon Dec. 31, 1868 

Bailey Jan. 19, 1868 

HuTCHiNS Jan. 19 1869 

•Langdon Mar. 9, 1869 

♦Clarke May 5, 1869 

TT a o (Oct- 6, 1869 

HlGGINSON, S. S. }^^^^ g^ j3gg 

♦LiNDBR Dec- 2, 1869 

PAiiMER Jan. 17, 1870 

Morse May 12, 1870 

*Webb May 12, 1870 

Smith Aug. 25, 1870 

Warren H W '.' i Aug. 25, 1870 
Warren, H.W |g^^^ 2, 1884 

Marsh April 13, 1871 

♦Greenough April 26, 1871 

Fairohild June 1, 1871 

Lathrop Sept. 6, 1871 

Emerson Sept. 18, 1871 

*Kilbreth Nov. 21, 1871 

Shattuok June 6, 1872 

CuRTiN July 17, 1872 

Baxter July 18, 1872 

CoMTE (Aug. 15, 1872 

^''''^'' (Jan. 15, 1898 

♦Grbenhalgb Oct. 1, 1872 

Warren, J. C May 27, 1873 

*Knapp July 2, 1873 

Brown, J. M Oct. 30, 1873 

( Nov. 26, 1873 
( Sept. 23, 1902 



136 



THE CLASS OF 1863. 



*HuN April 29, 1874 

*Jenk8, W. F. . . . June 15, 1874 

I>RBW Aug. 24, 1874 

Mason Sept. 30, 1874 

*Walbs Oct. 14, 1874 

FuRNESs Mar. 29, 1875 

HiGOINSON, F. L / ^®^- ^^» ^^^^ 

' ' I April 11, 1898 

Vkrplanck Feb. 24, 1876 

Jackson June 7, 1876 

Hall .... i^^^® ®> 1^76 

( Sept 21, 1882 

Lombard, J June 7, 1877 

Lawrenob June 12, 1877 

♦Hassam Feb. 14, 1878 

Green, A. W July 3, 1879 

*Weld Aug. 16, 1880 

Jenks, H. F Mar. 1, 1881 

Cobb jan. 18, 1883 

♦Lincoln Dec. 17, 1883 

♦HowLAND April 30, 1885 

Stetson Sept. 3, 1887 

FiBLD Oct. 25, 1887 

^PLBTON Nov. 16, 1887 

Hammond . Sept. 24, 1890 

P»»RY Nov. 10, 1891 

87 

Lombard, J. S. AprU 20, 1864 

^owe Aug. 6, 1864 

^^^ Nov. 19, 1864 

Bdlowa ... [ J^°® 26, 1866 

1 Nov. 21, 1877 
^Fearing July 9, I866 

Allen (April 24, 1867 

(June 4, 1884 

^o**»^ Oct. 28, 1867 

*-^^«^ Nov. 24, 1867 

Eichardton Nov. 28, 1867 

'^^^^^^ Feb. 25, 1868 

*^y«» • Feb. 23, 1869 



^ 



BIRTHS. 



137 



Ward . 
*Eu$tis . 
*Dinsmoor 



Total. 



Oct. 16, 1869 
, May 3, 1870 

Sept. 9, 1874 
14 



101 



Amory, C. W. 



Amory, R. 



Ayres 



Baxter . 
BoiT . . 



BOWDITCH . 



Brown, J. M. 



BIRTHS. 

William Sept. 19, 1869 

Clara Gardner Jan. 3, 1872 

George Gardner June 22, 1874 

Dorothy July 17, 1878 

Alice May 8, 1865 

Robert Oct 23, 1885 

Mary Copley July 3, 1888 

Katharine Leighton .... Oct. 21, 1891 

Margery Sullivan Oct. 23, 1897 

Mary Louise July 5, 1869 

Winifred July 21, 187i 

♦Charles Marshall Oct. 7, 1872 

Marjorie Aug. 18, 1874 

*Loraine Aug. 13, 1876 

MUdred ........ May 12, 1879 

*George Lewis May 16, 1873 

Gregory Paul Mar. 3, 1876 

♦Edward Darley ' . May 13, 1865 

♦John Gushing Oct. 1, 1866 

Florence Dumaresq .... May 6, 1868 

Jane Hubbard Jan. 17, 1870 

Mary Louisa June 5, 1874 

Julia Overing Nov. 15, 1877 

Julian McCarty Jan. 21, 1900 

Edward April 12, 1902 

Cornelia June 12, 1867 

Lucy Rockwell Aug. 24, 1868 

Katharine Putnam .... April 13, 1870 

•Edith April 29, 1872 

IngersoU May 31, 1875 

. Murray Oct. 11, 1876 

Philip Lamson Jan. 31, 1878 



138 



Brown, M. 



Cobb . 

COMTB 



Cromwell 



Daxiell 



Drew 



♦Evans 



♦FiSKE 



THE CLASS OF 1863. 

Alice Munroe May 11, 1879 

Robert CorneU Juue 7, 1880 

Arthur Perry Oct. 11, 1883 

Margaret Deo. 15, 1887 

Susan KUaubeth July 19, 1867 

Frederick Melvin Nov. 21, 1868 

Evelyn Brockway Dec. 7, 1870 

♦Adelaide Bradford Oct. 20, 1873 

Percy Low May 23, 1885 

Mary Ethel Aug. 29, 1887 

Pauline Julia May 31, 1873 

George Augustus Feb. 8, 1877 

Lawrence Henry Aug. 17, 1879 

♦Marie Christine Dec. 22, 1880 

♦Louis Joseph May 12, 1883 

Edmund Jules Capel .... Sept. 18, 1885 

Helen La Faille Sept. 15, 1900 

Marie La FaiUe Feb. 19, 1902 

Mary Rebecca Oct. 14, 1868 

Seymour Legrand April 24, 1871 

*Ellis Bowman Sept. 8, 1875 

Gladys Louise Husted ) ^.^ ^o iqq/* 

T. .1 Tr 1 ' TT i. J f • Nov. 28, 1886 
Dorothea Katharine Husted ) 

♦Moses Grant April 19, 1865 

Emily Anna Nov. 16, 1873 

Lucy Catherine Dec. 1.8, 1875 

♦Robert Jan. 13, 1877 

Elizabeth Porter April 20, 1884 

Charles Davis Sept. 13, 1875 

Dora May Aug. 22, 1877 

Elsa Caroline Mar. 11, 1881 

Luoy Bartlett Mar. 22, 1884 . 

Kathleen June 24, 1886 

Lionel Edward Jan. 27, 1890 

Maude May Aug. 9, 1868 

Grace Ermina April 19, 1870 

Kenneth Edward Jan. 28, 1875 

Maud July 21, 1865 

Harold Brooks May 13, 1867 

Clarence Stoughton .... May 10, 1869 



^ 



BIRTHS. 



139 



♦Frothingham, B. 

♦Frothingham, W. 
♦fullerton . . 

FURNBSS . . . 
GiLLBT . . . 

Goodwin . . 
Green, A. W. . 



*Grebnhalge 



*Grbenough . . 



Grew 



♦Ralph Browning . ^. . . . Nov. 16, 1870 

Ethel July 22, 1872 

Herbert Huxley Aug. 20, 1877 

T. Elizabeth White Feb. 21, 1869 

♦Thompson Goddard .... Oct. 17, 1871 

John Whipple June 8, 1878 

♦Philip Hart Feb. 22, 1881 

♦Maria Louisa Dec. 10, 1866 

Samuel Aug. 7, 1868 

. ♦Arthur Warren Sept. 8, 1868 

♦Walter Morse May 18, 1871 

. Anna Earle May 17, 1876 

Alexander Ramsey Oct. 18, 1877 

♦Charles Eliot Oct. 21, 1879 

Laura Mar. 31, 1882 

. ♦Mary Ann Sept 9, 1867 

Fannie Nov. 5, 1871 

• Louis Bliss - Dec. 23, 1880 

. *Mary Feb. 18, 1868 

Sarah Storer Aug. 1, 1870 

Eleanor Greenwood .... June 24, 1877 

Robert Elliot Oct. 27, 1878 

. Jane May 3, 1880 

Mary July 9, 1881 

♦Arthur Williamson .... Dec. 6, 1882 

Esther Margaret April 16, 1885 

♦Charles Francis Dec. 12, 1886 

Elizabeth Lawrence .... May 6, 1888 

John Russell June 10, 1890 

Josephine Aug. 5, 1892 

. *Nesmith Aug. 28, 1873 

Frederick Brandlesome . . . July 21, 1876 

Harriet Nesmith Dec. 10, 1878 

Richard Spalding July 31, 1883 

. Alice Mar. 24, 1872 

William July 15, 1874 

Marion Mansfield Oct. 17, 1877 

Edith Sept. 12, 1881 

Carroll Jan. 30, 1883 

. ♦Robert Sturgis Sept. 1, 1871 



140 



THE CLASS OF 1863. 



Hall 



Hammond 
Harris 



♦Hassam . . . 

HlGGINSON, F. L. 



HiGGINSON, S. S. 
HORTON . . . 

*H0WLAND . . 
HUTCHINS . . 



Jackson 



Jenks, H. F. 



Eandolph Clark Sept. 21, 1873 

Henry Sturgis Nov. 1, 1875 

Joseph Clark May 27, 1880 

Eleanor Jackson Sept U, 1882 

John De Camp Sept. 10, 1877 

Dean Dec. 14, 1883 

Walter Edward July 4, 1892 

Robert Van Kleeck .... June 23, 1868 

Margaret Oct. 23, 1870 

•William Thaddeus Dec. 25, 1872 

Emma . Mar. 8, 1876 

•Edith Holbrook July 7, 1878 

May Robinson May 3, 1880 

Thomas Robinson 1 « iqoa 

*Ellen Van Kleeck} ' ' ' ' ^^^^^ ^' ^^^^ 

Eleanor Mar. 20, 1879 

Francis Lee Nov. 29, 1878 

Mary Cabot •. . Dec. 3, 1879 

Juliet Mar. 6, 1881 

Barbara Mar. 28, 1884 

Corina Shattuck Sept. 19, 1899 

Eleanor Lee Nov. 22, 1901 

♦Gordon Storrow June 16, 1889 

♦David Stone Aug. 16, 1868 

Marion Nov. 26, 1869 

Frances Bickford Oct. 22, 1887 

, *Willie Fuller Dec. 6, 1869 

Alexander Jan. 4, 1871 

Lucy CamiUa June 16, 1873 

♦Hiram Aug. 26, 1875 

Amy Dec. 11, 1876 

De Witt Aug. 28, 1880 

Charles Mar. 10, 1877 

Robert Appleton Nov. 24, 1878 

Susan July 17, 1881 

George Schiinemann .... Mar. 10, 1884 

Frances Appleton May 31, 1887 

Henry Angier Nov. 17, 1882 

Charles Fitch Feb. 12, 1884 

Frederic Angier Dec. 3, 1886 



•n 



BIRTHS. 



141 



•Jbnks, W. F. 

*JONBS, G. S. 

Kidder 



♦KiLBRBTH 

*Langdon . 
Lawrence 
♦Lincoln 

*LlNDER 

Lombard, J. 



♦Mardbn 

Marsh • 

Marston 

Mason • 
Morse . 

Nichols 
Palmer . 



Robert Darrali Mar. 1, 1875 

Horace Howard June 6, 1878 

Emma Clarence Sept. 23, 1867 

•Francis Gilmore Dec. 9, 1869 

♦George Emmerson Dec. 16, 1872 

EUa May May 16, 1878 

Chester Nye May 6, 1881 

♦Edward Hartwell July 17, 1867 

James Hathaway Sept. 25, 1869 

Mary Grace Jan. 2, 1878 

James Truesdell June 23, 1873 

Helen Haven Nov. 5, 1870 

Francis Eustis Aug. 3, 1872 

William Richards July 3, 1878 

♦Susan Dana Aug. 20, 1879 

Serafina Sept. 2, 1884 

WiUiam Sept. 18, 1870 

Emily Rathbun July 21, 1878 

Ethel Ayres Mar. 2, 1880 

♦Jessica Sept. 12, 1881 

Edith April 18, 1884 

Louise Ayres Oct. 15, 1886 

♦Harold Feb. 15, 1891 

Francis Skiddy June 12, 1867 

Marian Isabel Aug. 11, 1870 

Lillie Butman AprU 18, 1872 

Eleanor Gay Mar. 9, 1876 

♦Frank Walter Nov. 7, 1873 

Edward Feb. 9, 1877 

♦Charles Edwin Dec. 17, 1866 

Mabel Louise Oct. 1, 1874 

Marion Steedman July 17, 1875 

Rose July 4, 1871 

James Herbert July 8, 1875 

William Gibbons Dec. 14, 1877 

♦William Dec. 6, 1864 

♦George Tolman Jan. 10, 1867 

Clifford Oct. 21, 1873 

Philip July 25, 1875 

Elizabeth Cummings .... Nov. 7, 1870 



I 



142 



'i 
1 

{ 

if 

5 



i- 

•1 

:4 



J 



4. 



Peargb 



Perry . 

PiLLSBURY 



♦Post . . 

Shattuck . 
Sheldon 
Shrevb . , 

Smith . . 

Stetson 
♦Taber . 

TOMLINSON 



THE CLASS OF 1863. 

Anna Mather Dec. 26, 1872 

William Henry Aug. 20, 1876 

Bertha Nov. 21, 1879 

*Greorge Kennedy April 1, 1883 

Daniel Appleton Deo. 27, 1884 

Marjorie ) 

Alice > July 11, 1887 

McCloud June 25, 1869 

Eliza Stockwell Sept. 29, 1870 

♦James Lewis Dec. 17, 1871 

Catherine July 7, 1874 

Sallie Oct. 4, 1875 

James Agassiz Nov. 16, 1892 

William Forrest Dec. 17, 1867 

ArthurwLow Nov. 30, 1869 

♦George Stephen Feb. 18, 1871 

Bertha Marion June 18, 1875 

Charles Stephen Feb. 3, 1887 

Lina Beatrice Nov. 11,1866 

Waldron Kintzing July 7, 1868 

Regis Henri Jan. 28, 1870 

Corina Anna Mar. 18, 1873 

Eleanor Cecilia Amalia . . . Nov. 19, 1875 

♦Alice Sept. 17, 1869 

Wilmon Henry April 4, 1875 

Genevieve Aug. 31, 1868 

Benjamin Daland Mar. 10, 1871 

Mary Daland Sept. 27, 1873 

Rosalba Peale June 14, 1871 

George Lawrence Dec. 2, 1873 

Clement Lawrence April 14, 1875 

Edgar Lawrence May 6, 1882 

Meriam Nov. 16, 1888 

Philip Gushing Sept. 22, 1890 

♦Henry June 20, 1867 

Gertrude Swift July 4, 1868 

Anna Clementine June 13, 1872 

Edith Eliza Jan. 7, 1875 

Adelia Grover May 6, 1877 

James Ellis ....... July 15, 1880 



>.S 



r> 



BIRTHS. 



143 



*T0WNSEND . 



TUOK 



Verplanck 



Warren, H. W. 

Warren, J. C. 

♦Weld . . . 
Wheeler, E. S. 



White 



Allen 



Allyn 



Bellows 



Kobert Elmer Feb. 7, 1868 

♦Frederic Edward Aug. 15, 1869 

Lilian Henrietta June 17, 1873 

Shirley Richardson Aug. 5, 1874 

Henry Webster May 5, 1877 

Rosamond Feb. 27, 1879 

Gulian Crommelin Dec. 9, 1876 

Judith Crommelin April 14, 1878 

Mary Brinckerhoff Sept. 28, 1881 

William Samuel Mar. 20, 1884 

Robert Sinclair Aug. 15, 1885 

Mary Winslow July 25, 1875 

Helen Farrar ...... Aug. 21, 1886 

John Sept. 6, 1874 

Joseph Mar. 16, 1876 

Louis Dwight Harvell . . . April 18, 1882 

*Townsend Sept. 24, 1867 

Elisabeth Townsend .... July 27, 1873 

Frank Storer Dec. 24, 1876 

Marion June 8, 1880 

Reginald Tremaine .... June 28, 1883 

Frances Hillard Aug. 10, 1869 

Alexander Moss Oct. 30, 1870 

Harold Tredway Oct. 10, 1875 

*Alfred Hillard Oct. 3, 1876 

Margaret Low Mar. 2, 1883 

258 

Josephine Francis Feb. 1, 1868 

Rebecca Gorham Oct. 12, 1869 

Louisa Ripley Nov. 21, 1871 

Hildegarde July 1, 1885 

Frederick. Lewis July 5, 1890 

Alice Page Mar. 27, 1873 

Rufus Bradford June 27, 1874 

Philip Morton Aug. 24, 1878 

Dorothea June 2, 1880 

Samuel Bradford Sept. 20, 1884 

*Mary Grahme ) ^ ^q 10^7 

*Annie Morrill ) " ' 



144 



THE CLASS OF 1863. 



•make . 
*Din8moor 

*Euitis . 



Going 



Howe 



Live . . 
jRichardson 



Strong 
Ward 



Mary Rowland Sept. 18, 1878 

*a daughter 1868 

William PaiTy Nov. 29, 1875 

♦Julia Fiske Nov. 20, 1878 

Ellen Aug. 5, 1871 

Laura May 30, 1873 

Cartwright Mar. 9, 1875 

Allan Chotard Dec. 23, 1876 

Catherine Jan. 2, 1879 

Herbert Lee Nov. 24, 1880 

Richard Sept. 8, 1882 

Laurance Aug. 28^ 1884 

Maud ......... Aug. 26, 1887 

Mabel Dec. 21, 1868 

Gertrude Jan. 2, 1870 

John Kendall Oct. 29, 1871 

Mary Helen Aug. 15, 1865 

George Alpha Aug. 6, 1867 

Katerine Lay Oct. 10, 1868 

♦Frances Sylvia July 8, 1871 

Franklin Theodore July 17, 1873 

Sarah Willard Sept. 30, 1874 

♦Caleb William Aug. 12, 1876 

♦John Cowdin Aug. 14, 1879 

Marie Agnes Oct. 2, 1880 

♦Eobert Cowdin Mar. 17, 1882 

Alvah Maximilian Nov. 2, 1866 

Maurice Ambrose Sept. 13, 1874 

♦Catherine Caroline .... Nov. 29, 1868 

James Scudday ...... Jan. 10, 1871 

Mary June 13, 1872 

Marguerite Aubert Dec. 3, 1873 

Henry Leverich Mar. 21, 1875 

Jane Priestley Nov. 23, 1877 

RosinaBein Jan. 2, 1880 

Catherine Caroline Jan. 2, 1882 

Julia Hayden Nov. 19, 1884 

Louise Rightor May 27, 1886 

Frederick Jan. 16, 1869 

♦Edmund Oct. 20, 1870 



^ 



BIRTHS. 



145 



Henrietta Ward April 23, 1872 

Anne Williston Dec. 26, 1874 

Susan Elliot April 10, 1877 

Frances King Nov. 16, 1880 

56 
Total 314 



Amory, C. W. 
Amort, E. 

Atres . . • 
bowditch . . 



Brown, M. 
Cromwell . 

Drew . . 

FlSEE . . 



Grbenough . . 
Harris . . . 

HiGGINSON, F. L. 



GEANDCHILDREN. 

T. Jefferson Coolidge, 3d . . . Sept. 

Amory Coolidge Mar. 

Wm. Appleton Coolidge . . . Oct. 

Mary Thomdike Oct. 

Alice Thomdike Mar. 

Augustus Thomdike Mar. 

Charles Thomdike Mar. 

Robert Amory Thomdike . . . Dec. 

Marshall Ayres Best Nov. 

Winifred Louise Hope . . . 
Franklin Greene Balch, Jr. "^ 

Charles Bowditch Balch | * " ^^^ 

Lucy Bowditch Balch .... Jan. 

Henry Gordon Balch .... Aug. 

Melvin E. Lane Sept. 

Frederic Cromwell Sept. 

Seymour Cromwell Nov. 

Esther Babbitt Oct. 

Margaret Gracie Fiske .... Mar. 

Barbara Fiske Sept. 

Cuvier Grover Flint April 

John Fiske . Sept. 

Susan Willard Flint May 



17, 
2a 
22, 
17: 
6 
13 
13, 
19, 
27. 



Dorothy Brooks Fiske . . . 
Edward Mitchell Townsend, 3d 
Greenough Townsend . . . 
Eobert Van Kleeck Harris, 2d 
Laurence Van Doven Harris . 
William Lamson Griffin, 2d. . 

Philip Mason Sears Dec. 

David Sears Dec. 



June 13. 
3, 

12; 

8, 

25, 

10, 

20, 

% 

9, 

7, 

17, 
25 

19: 

13, 

4, 

7; 

10, 
29 
23, 



Sept. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

July 

Dec. 

Nov. 



1893 
1895 
1901 
1893 
1895 
1896 
1898 
1900 
1901 
1902 

1896 

1898 
1891 
1902 
1900 
1902 
1901 
1896 
1897 
1900 
1900 
1902 
1902 
1893 
1895 
1895 
1898 
1902 
1898 
1901 



10 



146 



THE CLASS OF 1803. 



HUTOHINB 
ElDDBB • 

Lombard 
Mabsh . 
Palmbb 

Pbabce 
Shattuok 



Shrevb 
tomlinson 

TUOK . . 

White . . 



AlUn 



Howe 



Strong . . . 



Anne Ware Barker . • . 

Lesta Ford 

Alice L. Best .... 

Francis Marsh, 2d . . . 

Emma Lasell Quackenbush 

Violet Wilkinson Palmer 

John H. Slavens, Jr. . . 
Eleanor Whitney • . . 
Corina Shattuck Higginson 
Eleanor Lee Higginson 
Edward Shreve Peirson . 
Richard Gorham Badger, Jr. 
Carlton Webster Tuck . 
Alexander White Mofiat . 
Donald Moffat .... 
George Barclay Moffat, Jr. 
Frances White Moffat . . 



Katharine Clark . . . . , 
Benjamin Preston Clark, Jr. 
Allen Williams Clark . . . 
Francis Eichmond Clark . . 
Elise Francis Howe . . . 
Theodore Christian Howe 
Franklin Theodore Howe, 3d 
Chester Bradford Strong . , 



48 



Dec. 


6, 


1901 


June 3, 


1902 


Mar. 


28, 


1902 


Jan. 


16, 


1903 


Oct. 


18, 


1898 


Aug. 


20, 


1902 


Sept. 


27, 


1900 


Sept. 


2, 


1899 


Sept 


19, 


1899 


Nov. 


22, 


1901 


June 11, 


1899 


June 26, 


1901 


April 


2, 


1899 


June 26, 


1891 


July 


18, 


1894 


May 


16, 


1897 


Nov. 
$ 


21, 


1899 


Feb. 


10, 


1891 


Feb. 


28, 


1893 


Feb. 


18, 


1896 


Nov. 


27, 


1899 


Mar. 


20, 


1900 



56 



DEATHS. 

BoYNTON Nov. 30, 1864 

Crank Nov. 30, 1864 

Stevens, E. L. April 18, 1865 

Hubbard May 23, 1865 

Ethbridob Nov. 5, 1865 

Tabbb Oct. 5, 1868 

Hbaton Sept 9, 1869 

LiNDBR Jan. 18, 1872 

Webb April 15, 1872 



^ 



DEATHS. 147 

Post July 5, 1872 

Brooks Sept. 15, 1874 

I>Avi8 Oct. 10, 1874 

FuLLERTON Nov. 13, 1877 

Marvinb Nov. 26, 1878 

Hun Mar. 14, 1880 

Jbnks, W. F Oct. 31, 1881 

I-UNT April 7, 1887 

MoRiARTT Mar. 6, 1888 

LowNa Oct. 30, 1888 

Whbblbr, M. D Nov. 1, 1889 

Langdon Feb. 4, 1890 

TOWNSEND July 14, 1891 

Evans Nov. 16, 1891 

Mardbn Jan. 31, 1893 

Rowland AprU 1, 1894 

Frothingham, W. Feb. 27, 1895 

WiNTHROP Sept. 18, 1895 

Grbenhalob Mar. 5, 1896 

KiLBRBTH June 23, 1897 

Hasbltinb July 14, 1898 

Knapp : Dec. 27, 1898 

Hates April 14, 1899 

French May 2, 1900 

Dabnby Sept. 3, 1900 

Clarke Jan. 16, 1901 

FlSKE July 4, 1901 

Stackpolb Aug. 10, 1901 

Wales Aug. 31, 1901 

Weld Nov. 8, 1901 

Frothingham, B. T April 30, 1902 

Grbbnough July 8, 1902 

Lincoln Dec. 11, 1902 

Jones, G. S Mar. 14, 1903 

Hassam Apr. 22, 1903 

44 

bewail Sept. 13, 1860 

Turner 1861 

J^nn May 22, 1862 



148 



THE CLASS OF 1863. 



Stevens, G. P. Aug. 12, 1862 

Gould, S.S. Sept. 17, 1862 

Brawn, K F. Mar. 3, 1863 

Van Bohkelen June 22, 1863 

Barker Sept. 18, 1863 

Boyd June 30, 1864 

Woihhum Oct. 22, 1866 

Huidekoper Oct. 21, 1868 

BkJce Nov. 15, 1872 

Ryan July 15, 1886 

Hasleti Jan. 4, 1887 

GaM,A.F. Oct. 6, 1890 

EutUe Dec. 2, 1900 

Fearing April 4, 1901 

JHnsmoor April 29, 1901 

Barnard April 1, 1903 

19 



Total 



63 



Amort, C. W. 
Baxter . . 
bowditch . 
Brown, J. M. 
Brown, M. . 
Cromwell . 
Drew . . 

♦FlSKB . . . 

Frothinqham, 
Goodwin . . 
Grbenhalob 
♦Grehnough . 



B. T, 



Grew 



Harris . . . 
Higginson, F. L. 
hutohins . . 



SONS IN COLLEGE. 

William Harvard, 1891 

Gregory Paul " 1896 

IngersoU " 1897 

Philip Lamson " 1899 

Frederick Melvin .... " 1889 

Seymour Legrand .... " 1892 

Charles Dana Davis ... " 1897 

Herbert Huxley " 1896 

John Whipple " 1899 

Robert Eliot " 1901 

Frederick Brandlesome . . " 1898 

William " 1896 

Carroll " 1904 

Randolph Clark " 1895 

Henry Sturgis " 1896 

Joseph Clark " 1902 

Robert Van Kleeck . . . Columbia, 1889 

Francis Lee Harvard, 1900 

Alexander " 1894 




SONS IN COLLEGE. 



149 



Jackson . . 

Jbnes, H. F. 
*Jbnks, W. F. 

KiDDEB . . 
♦KiLBRBTH . 

Lawrence . 
*Mardbn 
Morse . . 

Nichols . . 

PiLLSBURY . 

♦Post . . . 



Sheldon 
Smith 



TOMLINSON . 
*T0WNSBND . 

Warren, J. C. 



Weld . . . 
Wheeler, E. 
White . . 



Charles Harvard, 

Robert Appleton .... " 

George S " 

Charles Fitch Bowdoin, 

Robert Darrah Harvard, 

James Hathaway .... " 

James Truesdell " 

William Richards .... " 

Francis Skiddy " 

James Herbert " 

William Gibbous " 

Clifford 

Philip 

William Forrest " 

Arthur Low . . 

Waldron Kintziug 

Regis Henri . . 

Wilmon Henry . 

George Lawrence 

Clement Lawrence 

Edgar Lawrence . 

James Ellis . . 

Robert Elmer 

John .... 

Joseph .... 

Louis Dwight Harvell . . . Bowdoin, 



1898 

1899 

1905 

1906 

1897 

. . . " 1892 

. . . " 1894 

. . . " 1901 

. . " 1888 

. . . " 1896 

. . . " 1899 

. . . " 1894 

. . . " 1895 

. . . " 1889 

Lawrence Scientific, 1892 

. . Harvard, 1890 

1891 

1895 

1895 

1897 

1905 

1903 

1889 

1896 

1897 

1905 



Reginald Tremaine . Lawrence Scientific, 1905 

Alexander Moss Harvard, 1892 

Harold Tredway " 1897 

48 



*Eustis , 

Uve , 



Allan Chotard 
Alvah Maximilian 
Maurice Ambrose 



Tulane, 1896 
Williams, 1891 
1897 
3 



51 



150 



THE CLASS OF 1868. 



Aybbs . . 

Daniell 

Drew 

PiLLSBUBT 
TOMLINSON 

Bettowi 



DAUGHTERS IN COLLEGE. 

Winifred Smith, 1892, A.M. 1895 

Marjorie Smith, 1895 

, Emily Anna Radcliflfe, 1895 

Elizabeth Porter Radcliffe, 1906 

. Dora May Radcliflfe, 1899 

'University of 
lUinois, 1895 
Radcliflfe, 1896, 
A.M. 1898 

Edith E Smith, 1899 

7 
Mary Howland Smith, 1901 

_1^ 

8 



Bertha Marion 



CLASS MEETINGS. 

A room in Holworthy Hall has always been open to the Class for 
business and social meetings on Commencement, Alumni, and Commem- 
oration Days. 

Members present at 



the anniversary in 1864 






. 42 


1865 . 






, 47 


1866 . 






. 63 


1867 






. 29 


1868 






. 30 


1869 . 






. 38 


1870 






. 30 


1871 . 






. 34 


1872 






. 36 


1873 . 






. 29 


1874 






. 36 


1875 






. . 34 


1876 






. . 38 


1877 






. . 43 


1878 






. . 31 


1879 






. . 32 


1880 






. . 30 


1881 






. . 29 



\ 



CLASS MEETINGS. 



151 



Members present at the anuiversary ia 1882 

1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 



29 
53 
22 
28 
27 
16 
57 
21 



22 
27 
28 
24 
25 
25 
25 
26 
21 
22 
21 



The tables od pages 168-171 give the attendance at each Commence- 
ment. 



The Eleventh Dinner, on the Thirtieth Anniversary of the 
graduation of the Class, took place at the Parker House, Boston, 
June 27, 1893. Greenhalge presided ; Bishop, chaplain; Morse, 
odist ; Lincoln, chorister. Forty-three members were present. 

The Ode on page 159, by Morse, was sung to the air of " John 
Brown": 



The following was read by Lincoln : 

The Class of Sixty-three, may its tribe increase ! 
Awoke one night from thirty years of peace, 
And saw, beneath the gaslight in the room, 
At Parker's tavern, in his best saloon, 
The Secretary writing in a Book of Gold. 
Exceeding grace had made the Chaplain bold. 



152 THE CLASS OF 1868. 

And to his classmate said the reverend sage, 

** What writest thou ? " The writer turned the page 

And with a look of sweet content 

That all who saw knew quickly what it meant, 

To the Bishop thus ; — 

" In this red-lettered book I have the data 

Of those who 've wisest served their Alma Mater." 

" And is our Class there P " quoth Thomas, 

The Secretary thought, — " now for another boon 

I '11 blow their trumpet till the crack of doom." 

Then with an air of great delight 

To all his classmates on this festive night, 

He showed the names of those who loved their college best, 

And lo ! 't was Sixty-three led all the rest. 

The Bill of Fare was as follows : 



^ 



Q. B.F.F. Q. S 

ALVMNOS CONLEGI HARVARDIANI ORNATISSVMOS 

IN8PEGTOBE8 H0N0BAND08 ATQYB BEYEBENDOS 

CVM AMPLISSIMO IVRIS MEDICINAE SCIENTIAE DOCTORVM ORDINE 

PROFESSORIBVS-QVE 

VIROS INLVSTRISSVMOS 

RERVMPVB • FOED • AERARII PRAEFECTVMi 

IN CONG • RERVMPVB • FOED • REPRAESENTATOREM 

CIVITATIS-QVE LOWELLENSIS SVMMVM MAGISTRATVMa 

APVD AVLAM SINESIAM LEGATVM« 

CIVITATIS NOV-EBOR • IVDICEM* 

CIVITATIS BOSTONIAE ADVOCATOS 

CHRISTOPH • COLVMBI HISTORIC VM 6 

JOHANN • HARVARDIANI EXPLORATOREM « 

POPVLI AMERICANI PONTIFICEM MAXIMVM7 

VENEEANDOS ECCLESIARVM PASTOKES 

FAVTORES CLASSIS PECVNIAE MVNIFICOS 

OMNES SOD ALES FESTIVOS ATQVE REIVVENES 




AD SOLLEMNIA CENATICA 



A • D • V • KAL • QVINCT • A • CIO • 10 ■ CCC ■ v!/XXXXIII 

APVD PARKEEIS CAVPONAM 

CONCELEBRANDA 

IFaIBOHILD. * GBUNHALaB. > GUBTIN. « KiLBBKTH. S FZSKI. • HaSSAK. ^ MOBI8OH. 

The above references are appended now (1903) to aid those who have forgotten their Latin. 



BA QVA PAB EST OBSEBVANTIA 
INVITANT 

mi' VIRI DISCIPVLORVM HARVARDIANORVM 



ANNI CIO*IO-CCC-a/XIII 



> Olau OoimiTTa. 



^ 



TRICES -FEST- ANNIVER 



CLASS SONG. 

We are one in the joy and the sorrow ; 

We are one in the loss and the gain, — 
Not alone in the hope of to-morrow, 

But in memories glad that remain. 

Chorus : Again old joys are o'er us, — 
Old voices fill our chorus ; 
And ever through the years 
We shall hear our parting cheers : 

Hurrah, Sixty-three 1 
Hurrah for our own Sixty-three ! 

'T is the parting of brother from brother. 
Yet to-day shall but strengthen the bond ; 

It shall stretch from one year and another, — 
Only lost in the union beyond ! 

Make the voice of our gladness the clearer ! 

It must speak in our trouble and toil ; 
Draw the ranks of our brotherhood nearer I 

They may narrow, but must not recoil. 

For our place has already been taken 

By the lives whose glad labor is done ; 
By their glory, which cannot be shaken, 

We are pledged to their contest till won. 

Fredebick Brooks. 



'^ 



ODE. 

Praise the passion of the trumpet ; praise the wonder of renown ; 
Sing the fiery-hearted beautiful whose brows we ran to crown, 
When our battle-vexed immortals laid their shining weapons down, 
As we were marching on. 

Chorus : Glory, glory, hallelujah 1 
Glory, glory, hallelujah ! 
Glory, glory, hallelujah ! 
As we were marching on. 

For the ashes on the altars flows the fragrance of the wine ; 
Yet there 's gladness in the vineyard, for the noon is on the vine. 
And the harvesters are singing where the purple clusters shine, 
As we go marching on. 

Sing the sorrow time has ended ; sing the flow that will not cease, 
From the golden horn of plenty spilling out its rich increase ; 
Sing the merry boys and maidens blooming in our paths of peace, 
As we go marching on. 

Still, as brothers by the memories of all we dared to be, — 
Ay, as brothers by the pain of loss, and joy of victory. 
We are toiling down the terraced mountains, singing, to the sea. 
As we go marching on. 

— Morse. 



But first of right to thee, Past, helong 
The homage of our hearts, the tribute of our song ! 
At memory's call, — to meet our farewell gaze, — 
Return, je scenes of bygone College days ! 



CLASS POEM. 



■> 



/ 



ESCVLENTA HOC ORDINE APPONENTVR 
Little Neck Clams. 

SOUPS. 
Clear Green Tartle. Cream of Lettuce. 

FISH. 
Boiled Penobscot Salmon. Egg Sauce. 

Fried Soft-Shell Crabs. Tartor. 

Cucumbers. Tomatoes. 

REMOVES. 
Spring Lamb. Mint Sauce. 
Fillet of Beef, Larded, d la Bemaise, 
Roast Chicken. Giblet Sauce. 

entr]6es. 

Supreme of Roast Larded Sweetbreads. 

Boucher of Shrimp, d la Heine. 

Strawberry Fritters. Sauce Benedictine. 

Roman Punch. 

GAME. 
Golden Plover. English Snipe. 

Lettuce Salad. Julianne Potatoes. 

SWEETS. 
Parisienne Souffle. Chantilly Cream. 

Charlotte Russe. Boubie Denis Glass. 

Boquefort'and Brie Cheese. 
Toasted Crackers. Salted Almonds, Olives. 

DESSERT. 
Strawberries. Bananas. Oranges. 

Nuts and Raisins. 

Ice Cream. Sherbet. 

COFTEB. 



160 THE CLASS OF 1868. 

The Twelfth Dinner, on the Thirty-fifth Anniversary 
of the graduation of the Class, took place at the Parker House, 
Boston, June 28, 1898. Sheldon presided; Bishop, chaplain; 
Morse, odist; Lincoln, chorister. Thirty-two members were 
present 

The following Ode, by Morse, was sung to the air of " Tramp, 
Jiramp, tramp " : 

In the winding vale of Time 

With the golden thread of song 
Shall we ever cease to tread the flowery ways 

Where the endless echoes roll 

To the measures sweet and long, 
Which we lifted in the old and happy days f 

Chorus : Near, far, rolling on undying, 

Hear, brothers, hear the merry strain. 

And the echoes in reply 

That shall never wholly die, 
Where our heroes with the cannon trod the plain. 

Comrade from the hills of gold, 

Comrade from the land of pine, 
Comrade singing in the Silences beyond. 

Here 's the welcome of the wine, 

Here 's the hand that joined with thine 
In the old, unfailing pledge to keep the bond. 

Chorus : Near, far, rolling on undying, 

Hear, comrades, hear the merry strain, 

And the echoes in reply 

That shall never wholly die, 
Of a nation bringing blossoms for the slain. 

Honor to the leal and lost ! 

Honor to the brave and true ! 
Honor to the sons who catch the undersong — 

They who lift the starry light, 

They who bear the stainless blue. 
Beating down in thunder battlemented wrong 1 

Chorus : Near, far, rolling on undying. 

Hear, brothers, hear the merry strain, 

And the echoes in reply 

That shall never wholly die. 
From our heroes on the rounding of the main. 




CLASS BiEETINGS. 161 ^ 



\ 



The following communication from Tuck was read : ' 

June 27, 1898. 
Dear Lincoln, — As I cannot be with you to-morrow night, — per- 
haps the enclosed may be acceptable — 
Yours sincerely, 

Hbnbt Tuok. 

TO THE CLASS OF 1863 — 36th CLASS SUPPER. 

*• Time flies." — *• Things change and we change with them," 

But our loye for Harvard and our Class ne*er dies ; 

As we grow older, love for those increase. 

With failing vigor, eyes and ears less sharp. 

Affection for old friends grows in the heart 

Stronger and q^onger. So, come we here to-day. 

Old fires to kindle and old bonds renew. 

Fall five and thirty years ago, we stood upon the brink, 

Eager to launch our boats upon the voyage of life, 

And now, that voyage for some of us is o'er, 

The score is finished and the record made. 

Some we commend — not one let us condemn. 

'T is not for all to conquer in the wage of life. 

The few are victors, but the most must fail, 

Fate and environment largely shape our end, 

With these propitious, even fools may win. 

With fate adverse, pure hearts, high aims 

Are not enough to gain the laurel wreath 

On earth, — perhaps sufficient for a heavenly crown — 

Let us hope this, and still press bravely on. 

Cheering our friends, helping our fellowmen. 

That like Ben Adhem, we "lead all the rest." 

H.T. 

Two large salmon (twenty-one pounds and twenty-two pounds), 
which had been killed by those expert fishermen, C. W. Amory 
and J. C. Warren, were sent to the Dinner from the Eestigouche 
Salmon Club, Matapedia, Quebec. 



The Thirteenth Dinner took place at the Parker House, 
Boston, June 25, 1901. Drew presided; Lawrence, chaplain; 
Morse, odist; Daniell, chorister. Twenty-nine members were 
present. 



162 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

The following Ode was read by Morse : 

When the feasting had ended, and merriment ceased, 
Then the bard took his cue from the king of the feast. 
He sang of the wine-press, of Lyde, and glory, 
The men of old Rome and the old Roman story. 

So, brothers, to-night, with my cue from the king — 
Rex bibendi — I take the old harp and I sing. 
If the sweet bells be jangled, you '11 think the tune fine. 
Because of the love in your hearts and in mine. 

Call up the old boys. Let them all, as they come, 
Keep step to the stir of the fife and the drum. 
The little blue soldier caps — think how they shone ! 
Forty years to a day since we first put them on. 

Forty years to a day since our sweetest by far 

Swept over the hills in the red storm of war. 

Half ashamed, we who stayed watched the gleam of the gun 

In that summer of battles — Gkxl's own Sixty-one. 

Half the world, had we known then the counsels of Qod, 
Was in camp for the mom when the scourge and the rod 
Should be flung on the stream and swept over the bars 
At the word of the Builder who builds for the stars. 

Call them back — those eight brothers who fell at the portal. 
Whose faces we see not, whose names are immortal, — 
Their date is in marble, their deed so sublime 
We name them Qod's architects working in Time ! 

Call them back. Fill the cup. Let them stand as of old 
With youth's purple aglow in the eye, with the gold 
Agleam on their brows, and the gladness within ! 
Though apart as the stars, how it made us all kin — 

Made us kin, as we shot the old ball down the green; 
Made us kin, while the moon wove her mantle serene 
With the boughs of the elms in the yard 'twixt the halls, 
As we danced on the green and she danced on the walls. 

O the splendors of Youth ! O the days, when each stole, 
With the girl of his fancy, to try the Dutch roll. 
On the ice in the gleam of the moon, when Fresh Pond 
Was as sweet with bright eyes as the Starry Beyond. 

Call them back ; and the masks which we wear in the mart 
At the threshold of trade — tear them all from the heart : — 
The stem features of Law, the far light in the eye 
Divinity draws from long watching the sky. 



■^ 



CLASS MEETINGS. 163 

The doctor's sad smile as he sits by the bed. 
While the pulse to his touch beats the March to the Dead — 
Toss them all to the winds, those false features we dou, 
As we drop the last tear at the gate and are gone ! 

We have hearts ; we have rights. As a morning in May, 
Which rises in might and flings winter away, 
Uncovers the blossoms and bids the birds sing — 
As a morning in May, we will call back the spring. 

Yet chastened in soul, we have seen the young go 
To be angels above, who were angels below. 
We have measured the way many times to the tomb 
And laid our sweet hopes in that low-vaulted room; 

Many times have come back to the clamor and strife — 

To the onset, recoil, of the battle of life. 

If we lay the mask by to be boys once again, 

It is not to forget we have learned to be men. 

Shall I read the Mock Parts of our old Sixty-three, 
Taking up one by one the old masks which you see ? 
Some are white. — How they shine in the azure of love. 
As they go forth to star with the angels above ! 

We remember them all, in the mask or the crown, 
Both the boys who went up and the boys who stayed down. 
All are young. *T is the mask we designate " old.** 
There is Lincoln, the Skipper, whose heart is true gold ; 

He has long held the tiller and kept the ship trim. 
For he loves the old crew, and the old crew love him. 
Every year, as our captain, he makes up the log, — 
That is, Lincoln the mask, not this handsome young dog. 

There is Knapp with the same ubiquitous look 

With which he brushed off his very last book. 

There are Bailey and Owen, officially wise, — 

Brown, Green, Dunn — all hues that have dropt from the skies. 

Heaven knows how they wind through the cold and the dark. 
Incandescent for long, till they flash in a spark. 
There is White — that grand fellow — seven colors in one, 
Who does his fine work like a wave from the sun. 

Ben Frothingham — elegans rhetorum dux ; 
Post, Linder, and Crane, Van Bokkelen, Brooks, 
Gould, Stevens — dear Gorham ! — the sweetest of seven — 
Who put on the white crown to star it in heaven. 



164 THE CLASS OF 1868. 

There is Bishop — no bishop who takes so much trouble, 
With so single a heart, to make other hearts doable. 
He wears the mask lightly — black cloth and white choker — 
Too serious, maybe, for jack-pot and poker. 

But a heart that breeds beauty and gladness and joy — 

The face of a man, but the soul of a boy. 

We are all on our knees to the possible girl 

Who shall make up his crown with her heart for the pearl. 

There is Sheldon, who masks in the law as a judge; 
Of course, as the autocrat says — " It 's all fudge." 
He 's a little dark fellow, with that in his soul 
Makes a logical thought take the track of a mole. 

He can spar with a phrase to the limit of law, 

Till he gets his fist fixed for a whack at the jaw. 

A multum in parvo, you see him compact 

As the bolt which Jove handles when sinners are whacked. 

Then our Smith — you would think from his gravity, Smith 
Had peeled off the green and got down to pith. 
Just get him behind a golf ball with a brassy. 
The pith of the man in the Dean becomes *' sassy." 

He is levity's self, a kind of young Jocus, 

In the deft way he lifts the light ball through its locus; 

But I, who as bard sing his praises in rhyme, 

Must confess that he can't do the joke every time. 

There 's our famous flood-spanner, bridge-builder, world-strider. 

Who takes a broad stream like a long-legged spider, — 

A vast anaconda, who swinges his flail. 

And the river gods roar as they slide from the tail. 

He threatens the Dutch in their pot-bellied town. 
And the whole river rumbles from Dunderberg down. 
Had he lived in the times of the goose and the gander — 
Of Hero the goose, and the other, Leander, 

Long since had the Hellespont sung of a wonder 
Leander's to which had been small sparks to thimder. 
He 'd have laid a bridge straight to the girl at her orisons, 
And made her his bride — just imagine it — Morison's ! 

Then Bowditch, last fruit of the decimate system ! 
Because we had lost some good fellows, and missed 'em — 
The Faculty, somehow, I think it was, smote 'em — 
'T was thought the whole class ought to wear the same totem. 



CLASS MEETINGS. 165 

Like the team of the Sun when the boy took the wagon, 
We meant to go straight, but we struck the old dragon. 
" No team like that team should be run on the cobbles." 
And the Faculty went for the class collywobbles. 

Thus I take the masks up, giving each a sly touch. 
With a hint to the boys that we might have been such. 
But are not. We are only the fellows you see, 
Just starting, but wiser than old Sixty-three. 

There are some little changes that make us feel glum; 

In nigh forty years there ought to be some. 

The arsenal there, with the guns all new rammed 

For the Old Cambridge Antis, has long since been damned. 

We buried the football, whose death seemed a big skin. 
But the ball, resurrected, became the new pig-skin, — 
Only shined up a bit — 't was the Higginsons shined it ; 
They are half in the family, so we don't mind it. 

We know that the earth is our oyster to-day, 
From Cuba to Guam, from Cebu to Cathay ; 
It was we who discovered the thing on the sands, — 
Ask the Mandarin there from the chin-chinny lands. 

It was he who led Chang when he came with the queue ; 
The conundrums he asked were all answered by Drew. 
If Chang has his way with the heathen Chinee, 
'T will be holiday soon for our own Sixty-three. 

Say, Mandarin, fresh from the Orient old, 

Will they give us the queue when they give us the gold ? 

Rise, Curtin, arise ! Let the Manchu declare — 

Is he under the paw of the Great Northern Bear ? 

You uncovered the Pole, brought Pan Michael to light, 
Ran Sienkievitch down through the vast polar night; 
Then, skirting the coast to the isles of the Celt, 
You caught the sweet ballads that make the heart melt. 

For this linking of worlds, Nat Appleton tried, 

But the Gulf was too deep, or the Isthmus too wide. 

Then the note Brother Pratt caught — he does n't know which: 

Art, music, the lingo of Ivanovitch, 

The lilt of a song missed — he can't tell you why. 
But it 's something we *ll know in the Sweet By-and-By ! 
Fiske knows — if he doesn't, who does ? — He has been as 
Alert in the world as original sin has. 



166 THE CLASS OF 1803. 

On the coast of all knowledge what gems he has found I 

But the marvel to man is, how he gets round. 

Get round he does, in a way makes you smile, 

But you can't fence him in while he keeps up that style. 

Such beauty as pearls have in ti-esses of girls, 
Such beauty do words make when Fiske strings the pearls — 
Clear, lucent, and flashing, through sunless he found them. 
And still as the shell which the sea built aroimd them. 

Some Fiske of the future shall search by the sea — 
A scion perhaps of our own Sixty-three, 
When the Antis are dead, and the game up, perhaps, 
With the Muscovite in on the last of his laps. 

Some logical fellow, with erudite leaning — 

Who shall take up the shell and thus muse on the meaning : 

— " Those boys on the shore, with the knife and the shell. 
And marks upon both of what Sherman called Hell — 

'*Did they well, did they ill, in that Spanish trepan ? 
Was it death to the oyster, or life to the man ? 
Did they ill, did they well, when they went down the shoals 
And packed off to Paradise thousands of souls 7 

** Were our daddies all wrong, excepting the Antis ? 
Were the Antis all ticketed — Tenth Bulge of Dante's ? 
Who can tell ] The earth greens; the lovely hills bourgeon; 
Was the Spanish trepan not the work of the surgeon 

** Who saved from the burning, pre- Adamite embers 
Our very imperfect and infantile members — 
Gave body and shape and proportion and mind. 
While he lopt off the simian pendant behind — 

** That pendant an old tail, grasping, prehensile. 

Long marked on God's page with the Author's blue pencil ? 

— We walk on in blindness ; we seem in the van. 

But there 's something behind us that shoves on the man. 

** Small honor to us. Honor such as there is — 
We write it as ours, but God knows it is His." 

— Thus the Fiske of the future, whose words are like bells, 
Shall walk on the shore and discourse of the shells. 

But we of to-day, and the ** we " that are gone. 
Whose dear faces we see with the glory put on — 
Here we lay down all masks, get our hearts all in tune 
For the music we marched by that sweet day in June. 




CLASS MEETINGS. 167 

Two large specimens of the " Salmo giganteus Restigouche, ex 
dono C. W. Amory and F. L. Higginson, piscatores," were sent 
from Canada. 

Members of the Class present at the Class Dinner in 



1866 . 


. 59 


1869 . 


. 33 


1872 . 


. 38 


1875 . 


. 40 


1878 . 


. 35 


1881 . 


. 30 


1883 . 


. 60 


1886 . 


. 27 


1888 . 


. 69 


1890 . 


. 26 


1893 . 


. 43 


1898 . 


. 32 


1901 . 


. 29 



168 



THE CLASS OF 186a 



MEMBERS OF THE CLASS 



Amorj, R» , , * 
A}rplet0ii * ^ . , 
Ayrfls * ... * 
&i«loy . . , , , 

BtTley 

Buter ..... 
Biibop . , . . . 

BlAlr 

Bolt 

Bovi'4ltcli .... 
Boyntori .... 

BrookA 

ft ronHf' Jh. M. > w . 
BrowUf M. . , , 

Clarke 

Cobb ..... 
Gomta ..... 
CrikDQ . . , . . 
Cri>mw«B . ^ . . 
Oroav ..... 
Giirtin ..... 
I>«lniey . , . * , 
DbdIdU ..... 
Bavit ..... 

Deimy . . , , . 
Drew ..... 

K*)waf<<!e ^ . , . 

EmeraoEi .... 

KtliK^rldge . . . . 

Evanj ..... 

Falrthlld .... 

Fi^id . . . . . 

FLske . . . , . 

Fo«t«T . , . . ^ 

Free^mjui . . . . 

French . . * < , 

FTutliiLigbanif B. T. 

Frothingliam, W. . 

FullKjrtoji . . . . 

FiitTieaa . . . , 

GUktt . . . . . 

Goodwin . . . . 

C*r«*Hj A. W. . . . 

areen, J. O. . . . 

GreeabalK« . . . 

GreaiiQugh . . . 

Grew . . . . - 

Hall ..... . 

Qammnnd . . . . 

Harris 



Hftyoa . , , . 
Ilaaton .... 
HL^fiDBon> F, L. 
HiF^iBFLDeoii, B. E, . 
Morton .... 
Howland . . , 
Hubbnrd . . . 
Hun , . . . . 
Hutcbiiu . , . 
Jaek9<m . . . 
JsnlCB, H. F. . . 
Jenka, W. F. . . 
Jonflx, O. S. . . 
Sldder .... 
Kilbnth . . . 
Ktupp .... 
IjAUfdon . . . 
Lathmp . . . 
LawTf!'nc« . . . 
Llaeoln , • . ^ 
Lliider . . . , 
LoinbKrd^ J. r n 



'66!'«9 



'6a 



'69 '70f7i -73 

E 



Va 



74 



*75 



*7* 



*77 



^78 



■fll 



^ 



BIOGRAPHIES. 



169 



PRESENT ON COMMENCEMENT DAYS. 



'84 *85 *» '87 '88 



'89 



'9a 



93 



94 



95 



'97* 



'99' 



Total 



Amory, 0. W. 
Amory, R. 
Appleton 
Ayres . . 
-^ [ley . 



Baxter . 
Biahop . 
Blftir . . 
Boit . . 
Bowditoh 
Boynton . 
Brooks . 
Brown, J. M. 
Brown. M. 
Clarke . 
Cobb . . 
Oomte . 
Crane. . 
Cromwell 
CroM . . 
Cnrtin . 
Dabney . 
Danieil . 
DaTlB. . 
Denny . . 
Drew . . 
Edwarda 
Emerson 
Etheridge 
Erans 
Fairchild 
Field . . 
make . . 
Foster 
Freeman 
French . 
Frothingham, B. T. 
Frothingham, W, 
FuUerton . 
Fumess . . 
OiUet. . . 
Ooodwin. . 
Green, A. W. 
Green, J. O. 
Greenhalge . 
Greenough . 
Grew . . . 
Hall . . . 
Hammond . 
Harris . . 
Haseltine . 



Hayes 
Heaton 
Higginson, F. L. 
Higginson, S. S. 
Horton . . 
Howland 
Hubbard 
Hun . . . 
Hutchins . 
Jackson . . 
Jenks, H. F. 
Jeuks, W. F. 
Jones, G. S. 
Kidder . . 
KUbreth. . 
Knapp . . 
Langden . . 
Lathrop . . 
Lawrence 
Lincoln . . 
Under . . 
Lombard, J. 
Loring . . 



6 
10 
16 

8 

13 
19 
32 



3 
17 
2 



4 

2 
26 
87 

6 
14 



1 
6 
9 
3 
27 
2 

30 
8 
3 

2 
4 

15 
2 

14 

23 
8 
9 
3 

11 
4 
3 

34 

22 
2 

11 

3 

I 



6 

16 

37 

2 

1 

7 

10 

12 

2 

8 

11 

39 

6 

12 

1 



170 



THE CLASS OF 1863. 



MEMBERS OF THE CLASS 



^ 



Lunt . , 
MftTdad 

If OTHh - 

Uaadq ^ 
Mtiter . 

Morjie * 
If Ichob . 

OVHU ^ 
BiiiEatr , 
Fftuco . 
Feck. . 
Perry 
FiUsbaiy 
F^n^rH , 
FcMt . . 
Tntt . 
Futnun 
Rjuid . 
Sh&ttuck 
Blieldoa 
Gbrevg . 
fimJth . 
Bt4ckpo]ft 
itetsau * 
StflveuSf B, 
T&bcr . 
TomUnacm 
TowEiBeDd 
Tnck . 
Vnri>Umck 
Wales H 
Wttrrent H^ 
WojTeu, J 
W«t*ri * 
Webb . 
Weld . 
WhPf!(leT, K 
Wbeoier, M, 
WliJt* . 
Wlntbrop 

AHm . 
Ail^ . 
X/ww . 
Barker , 

^CJfffi . 

Broji-Tij IT, 

Dunn H, 
Eu^Ux . 

6ow]^ . 
€hul}t,A.F. 
Q^idd, 8. S. 
ffeafelt . , 
Nffw , » 
Ifuidekaptr 
Jonfg, W. /I 

X^TT. . . 

Lnmhiifd^ J. 

Rffmi . , 
Semdl . . 

Sirong . , 
Turnf^ . . 
Van B&kkel0n 
Ward , . 
W&thbiirti 

TariA . 



'ca^ 



'62* 



42 



4T 



*w ^6? 'ea 



€3 



2fi 



30 



38 



30 



'71: '7a 



rf ] 



34 



n 74 



29 



36 



73 



34 38 



'77 



43 



'78 '75 



33 



So 'Si 



% 



■83 



63 



BIOGRAPHIES. 



171 



PRESENT ON COMMENCEMENT DAYS. 



tCarden « 

MutOi , 

Marston . 

Marviue ^ 
Maaoh 

MIxtfii- . 
Mortarty 

Hdriaou . 
Morae 

KlchoU . 

Owen » . 

IHUdbt , 

Ftiftrce . 

Peck . . 

Peny , » 

Plngree , 

B*»tt , ♦ 

Putnun , 
Band . , 
BhKttuck 
Bbeldoa , 

Bmlth 
Btockpolo 
BtetsoD 
BtflvenflT E. 
Taber . . 

TowQwud 
Tuck . . 
YerpUuck 
WmleB 
WRrren, H. W, 
Wftrreo^ J, C. 
Wjiters . 
Webb . . 
Weld . . 
Wheeler, £. 
Wheeler, K, 
White . 
Winthrop 

Allm . . 
AUpti. . 
Atmu , . 
Barker , 
Barnard 



Boyd 
Browut H. K 

fhtnn . . 

Fearinp , 
Going 
Gould ^ A, F. 
fhuitf, S. S. 
MaaUn . 
Hewi . . 
Huidtkotier 
Joma, IV. F, 

Lombard, J, 
Jtirhfird^n 



S. 



Strong 

TuTHtr 

Van B&kkilm 

Ward . 

WaiAlfurn 

Tot At 



►62* 



m* 



^^ 



'8S '86 'B7 



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aa 'Eg *go 



It 



'm 'gfi 



'97 /ga^ 



57] 21 



2C 



^ 



TqUI 

22 

16 
3 



1 

t 
1* 

2S 
2? 
13 

I 
14 

3 



17 
24 
13 
31 



1 

38 

lA 
3 
2tt 
£4 
11 
2 
2 
1 

I 

« 

3 
4 



23 



22 



£1 



172 THE CLASS OF 1863. 



THE CLASS FUND. 

The Class Fund at Lincolu's death was invested as follows : 
$1,000, Oregon Eailway and Navigation Co. 4s ; $1,000, Xansas 
City, Fort Scott, and Memphis Railroad 6s ; $1,000, Rio Grande 
Western Railway ; $500, Union Pacific Railroad 4s, and there was a 
balance of $415.67 in cash. 

This was transferred by the Executrix of his estate to the Class 
Committee, on the 30th of April, 1903. 

The expenses of the Class Dinners and of Commencement Days 
are paid from the Fund, and there are no assessments. - 

The Dinner this year, and the expenses of the Class Report, 
will be paid from the Fund. This will more than exhaust the 
cash balance, and will render an encroachment on the securities 
necessary, but will leave about $3,000 at par value. 



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ADDRESSES. 



Notice of any change in address should he sent at once to the Class Secretary, especially 
as the College authorities rely upon the Class Secretaries for the addresses of the Alumni 



Amort, C. W., Ames Building, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Amort, Dr. Robert, 279 Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Appleton, Nathan, 66 Madison Avenue, New York, New York. 

Atres, Marshall, 12 Broadway, New York, New York. 

Baqlbt, Dr. C. H., 1132 15th Street, Denver, Colorado. 

Bailbt, a. J., 730 Tremont Building, Tremont Street, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Baxter, George L., 27 Warren Avenue, Somerville, Massachusetts. 

Bishop, Rev. T. W., Auhumdale, Massachusetts. 

Blair, Albert, 615 Missouri Trust Building, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Borr, E. D., Jr., care Hottinguer et Cie, Paris, France, or care R. A. Boit, 
40 Kilby Street, Boston. 

BowDiTOH, C. P., 20 State Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Brown, John M., 254 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Brown, Mblvin, 166 Montague Street, or 215 Greene Avenue, Brooklyn, 
New York. 

Cobb, Frederick, 213 Montagtie Street, Brooklyn, New York. 

CoMTB, AuGUSTE, 534^ California Street, San Francisco, California. 

Cromwell, Frederic, 32 Nassau Street, New York, New York. 

Cross, Dr. T. M. B., 352 West 28th Street, New York, New York. 

CuRTiN, Jeremiah, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, District of 
Columhia. 

Daniell, M. G., 11 Schuyler Street, Roxhury, Massachusetts. 

Dennt, Clarence H., 23 Central Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Drew, Edward B., Commissioner of Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs 
Service, Foochow, China. 

Edwards, H. J., 47 Court Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Emerson, Charles, Concord, Massachusetts. 



174 THE CLASS OF 1863. 

Fairohild, Charles S., 10 West 8th Street, New York, New York. 

Field, W. Gibson, Enfield, Hartford County, Connecticut, P. 0. Box 16. 

Foster, Charles M., Topeka, Kansas. 

Freeman, John W., care Mrs. Walter Tillman, Troy, New York, 

FuRNEss, Charles Eliot, care Dawes E. Furness, 42 Chauncy Street, 
Boston. 

GiLLET, J. A., 242 East 76th Street, New York, New York. 

Goodwin, Frank, 28 State Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Green, A. W., Home Insurance Building, Chicago, Illinois. 

Green, Dr. J. Ornb, 182 Marlborough Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Grew, Edward S., 185 Marlborough Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Hall, Col. J. D., Asst. Surgeon Gen. U. S. A., Manila, Philippine 
Islands. 

Hammond, Rev. W. W., Morris Plains, New Jersey. 

Harris, Rev. Thomas R., Scarborough, New York. 

HiooiNSON, F. L., 274 Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Higginson, S. S., Soldiers' Home, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

HoRTON, J. M., 211 West lOlst Street, New York, New York. 

HuTGHiNS, E. A., 120 Tremont Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Jackson, C. C, 15 Congress Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Jenks, Rev. Henry F., Canton, Massachusetts. (P. 0. Canton Comer.) 

Kidder, E. H., 37 East 77th Street, New York, New York. 

Lathrop, Dr. William H., Lowell, Massachusetts. 

Lawrence, Rev. Arthur, Stockbridgo, Massachusetts. 

Lombard, Josiah, 12 Broadway, New York, New York. 

Marsh, Francis, 178 Devonshire Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Marston, Elias H., Phillips School, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Mason, Dr. A. L., 265 Clarendon Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

MixTER, George, 28 State Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

MoRisoN, George S., 49 Wall Street, New York, New York. 

Morse, J. H., 1 West 46th Street, New York, New York. 

Nichols, William, 35 Norwood Avenue, Buffalo, New York. 

Owen, Rosooe P., 731 Tremont Building, Tremont Street, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Palmer, William H., 55 Liberty Street, New York, New York. 

PBA.RCE, James L., 14 East 32d Street, Kansas City, Missouri. 

Peck, Thomas B., Walpole, New Hampshire. 

Perry, Dr. James L., 138 West 116th Street, New York, New York. 

Pillsbury, W. L., Urbana, Illinois. 

PiNGREB, David, Salem, Massachusetts. 



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ADDRESSES. 175 

Pratt, Herbbbt J., care Baring Bros, and Co., Lim., London, England. 
Putnam, William H., Lunenburg, Massachusetts, or 1339 Corcoran, 

Washington, District of Columbia. 
Hand, John H., Country Club, West Chester, New York, New York. 
Shattuce, Dr. Gborgb B., 183 Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 
Sheldon, Henbt M., 538 Massachusetts Avenue, or Court House, Court 

Square, Boston, Massachusetts. 
Shreyb, Dr. 0. B., Salem, Massachusetts. 
Smith, Clement L., Cambridge, Massachusetts. 
Stetson, E. G., 508 California Street, San Francisco, California. 
ToMLiNSON, George S., 283 Heath Street, Roxbury, Massachusetts. 
Tuck, Dr. Henry, 39 East 53d or 346 Broadway, New York, New York. 
Verplanok, R. N., 160 William Street, Orange, New Jersey. 
Warren, H. W., 77 Rockview Street, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts. 
Warren, Dr. J. Collins, 58 Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 
Waters, Clifford C, Los Angeles, California. 
Wheeler, Edmund S., 857 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, New York. 
White, William Aug., 130 Water Street, New York, New York. 

Alien, Rev, Frederick B,y 132 Marlborough Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

AUt/Hj John, 172 Tremont Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Almtfy John P., 26 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Bellows, J, G., Walpole, New Hampshire. 

Goingy H. B., 15 Fairbanks Street, Brookline, Massachusetts. 

Bowe, Franklin 7'., care Evening Star, Washington, District of 

Columbia. 
Jones^ William F,, Orchard Street, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts. 
Leve, A. M., West Townsend, Massachusetts. 
Lombard, Dr. J, S., care Baring Bros, and Co., Lim., London, 

England. 
Bichardso7iy W. P., 1438 Louisiana Avenue, New Orleans, Louisiana. 
Strong, J. L. G., 130 Fulton Street, New York, New York. 
Ward Edmund A,, University Club, 1 West 54th Street, New York, . 

New York. 



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