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Full text of "Reports of the missionary and benevolent boards and committees to the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America"

BX 8951 .A3 

Presbyterian Church in the 

U.S.A. General Assembly. 
Minutes of the General 



flt flit Shwlojrral * 

W^ PRINCETON, N. J. & 

Presented b^ReA?. VAf. <L>A .T?oV?er-VS 7C33. 

Division \^."._J. ^ , s^ 
Section W-.-l I'j^J 




GDn? ifunftrrin anfc iEbwntfj 
Annual Steport 



OF THE 



Board of Home Missions 



OF THE 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED 
STATES OF AMERICA 



Presented to the General Assembly, at Atlanta, Georgia, 
May 15th, 1913 



Prrahgtman VtrtUtittg: 

No. 156 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 
1913 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 



The term of service of the following expires in May, 1914: 

Ministers. Laymen. 



Rev. ALLAN DOUGLAS CARLISLE. D.D.* 
" WILTON MERLE SMITH, D.D.i 
" GEORGE LOUIS CURTIS, D.D.4 
" JOHN LYON CAUGHEY, D.D.i 



JOHN E. PARSONS.i 

J. C. COBB. 6 

GEORGE W. PERKINS.! 

FRANCIS O. PHRANER.5 

HERBERT K. TWITCHELL.2 



The term of service of the following expires in May, 1915: 

Ministers. Laymen. 



I* 



Rev. D. STUART DODGE, D.D. 1 
" LYMAN WHITNEY ALLEN, D.D. < 
" HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, D.D. 1 
" W. FRANCIS IRWIN, D. D. 3 



FRANK L. BABBOTT. 2 
THEODORE W. MORRIS. 
WM. S. BENNET, LL.D.i 
JOHN H. FINLEY, LL.D. ' 



The term of service of the following expires in May, 1916: 

Ministers. Laymen. 



Rev. JOSEPH DUNN BURRELL, D.D. 2 
" ALBERT EDWIN KEIGWIN, D.D.i 
" EDGAR WHITAKER WORK, D.D.i 
" WILLIAM ADAMS BROWN.D.D.' 
" EDGAR P. HILL, D. D. 7 



WALTER M. AIKMAN.2 
ROBERT C. OGDEN.i 
HENRY W. JESSUP.i 
FLEMING H. REVELL.i 



1 Of the Presbytery of New York. 

2 " Brooklyn. 

3 " Louisville. 

4 " Newark. 



5 Of the Presbytery of Morris and Orange 

6 " Kansas City. 

7 " Chicago. 



OFFICERS: 



D. STUART DODGE, D.D President 

CHARLES L. THOMPSON, D. D Secretary 

JOHN DIXON, D. D Associate Secretary 

JOSEPH ERNEST McAFEE Associate Secretary 

HARVEY C. OLIN . . Treasurer 

MARSHALL C. ALLABEN Supt. of Schools 



PRESBYTERIAN BUILDING, 156 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 



HOME MISSIONS. 



THE ONE HUNDRED ELEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT. 



The Board of Home Missions respectfully presents to the 
General Assembly this its one hundred eleventh Annual Report. 
An unusual number of our faithful missionaries have been 
called from their labors to their reward. The honor roll is as 
follows : 



Rev. Herbert N. Bevier 

Rev. Robert M. L. Braden, D. D., 

Rev. Oliver C. Cude 

Rev. A. B. C. Dinwiddie, 

Rev. R. Y. Gray 

Rev. F. H. Gwynne, D. D. 

Rev. John G. Lange 

Rev. D. M. Lewis 

Rev. Duncan McMillan 

Rev. Duncan MacEachern 

Rev. S. W. Porter 

Rev. William A. Robinson 

Rev. James M. Stultz 

Rev. Thomas T. Vincent 

Rev. J. J. Williams, 

Rev. Henry Wortmann 



Centerville, California. 
Bellevue, Nebraska. 
McKenzie, Tennessee. 
Baird, Texas. 

South West City, Missouri. 
Stevensville, Montana. 
Estelline, Texas. 
Lathrop, Missouri. 
Vesta, Minnesota. 
Munich, North Dakota. 
Okarche, Oklahoma. 
Halfway, Oregon. 
Union, Missouri. 
Woodburn, Oregon. 
Mineral Wells, Texas. 
George, Iowa. 



Mr. William H. Corbin, for seventeen years a member of this 
Board and valued in its council, especially in legal matters, 
ceased from his earthly labors on September twenty-fourth. 
The Board records its earnest appreciation of his services, 
often professional and freely rendered. 

At the very beginning of the new year, on April fourth, the 
oldest member of this Board was called Home, the Rev. Wilson 
Phraner, D. D. He was for a generation actively engaged in 
the service of the Home Board, chairman of its Application 
Committee for many years, and a frequent representative 
of the Board before presbyteries and synods. Dr. Phraner 
in his ninetieth year spoke with almost his usual force and 
eloquence before the last General Assembly. Soon after that 
his powers suddenly failed and after lingering for nine months 
his release came. Few men have served their generation so 
long and so well, and the Board of Home Missions mourns the 
loss of one of its most faithful and efficient members. 



4 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

The report of the Treasurer gives full and exact account 
of the large financial outgo of the year. The largest expendi- 
ture, as usual, is in the evangelistic department, in the opening 
of new work and the nurturing of the old. On this we have 
spent more than in any previous year in the history of the Board. 

The year has been one of marked progress along the many 
lines of the Board's activity. Perhaps the most notable move- 
ment has been in the line of synodical organization. The 
development of a synodical consciousness and responsibility 
has been pronounced in a large number of states and has tended 
toward more compact and comprehensive forms of missionary 
service. While the rights of presbytery have been jealously 
guarded, the synod has conceived itself in terms of definite 
supervision of and care for all the home mission interests within 
its bounds. 

Until recently synodical organization has been reserved for 
synods able to attain self-support. The present movement 
is the organization of aid-receiving synods for the sake of 
greater efficiency and to hasten self-support. All of the synods 
except those in the Rocky Mountain region are now thus 
organized, or are in process of organization.' 

Many of the advantages are apparent without explanation. 
By uniting or articulating their interests the constituent pres- 
byteries of a given synod serve more effectively each its own 
and all the others' interests.' Field work is conducted more 
economically and efficiently. The relations to the Board 
become at once simpler and less liable to friction. The reports 
of the field secretaries will give some details of this synodical 
advance. 

The Synod of New England has been constituted during the 
year, and steps were taken at once to organize the home mission 
work on a synodical basis. Thus the synod will take its place 
among the self-supporting synods in respect of normal sustenta- 
tion work. Extensions in the peculiarly difficult and largely 
needed ministry to immigrant communities in New England 
will require the direct cooperation of the Board, but such 
extensions will be made only after careful deliberation and 
planning. 

FEDERATION OF SELF-ADMINISTERING SYNODS. 

The Assembly of 1912 approved and recommended to the 
Board and the synods concerned a plan with two main features, 
— the federation in groups of the self-administering synods and 
the establishment of intimate relations between them and 
the Board through corresponding members. 

Three groups were authorized: the eastern, the central and 
the western. The last two have been approved by the con- 
stituent synods and the representatives have met in their 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 5 

respective Federation Councils. These Councils consist of 
two representatives of each constituent synod with representa- 
tives of the Board sitting as corresponding members. 

The Western Group, including the Synods of Iowa, Kansas, 
Nebraska, Missouri and Minnesota, held its Council meeting 
in Omaha, February twenty-first. An entire day was devoted 
to the discussion, and action of great importance was recom- 
mended to the constituent bodies. 

The Central Group, including the Synods of Indiana, Illinois, 
Ohio, Michigan and Wisconsin, held its Council meeting in 
Cleveland, January twenty-eighth and twenty-ninth, in con- 
junction with other conferences in which the members were 
concerned. Organization of the group was effected, and rec- 
ommendations made to the constituent bodies which should 
have wholesome effect and which will enable the Council to 
render larger service in the future. 

The Eastern Group has not been organized. One synod 
voted in disapproval of the plan. Two others did not designate 
representatives. The New England Synod was formed since 
the meeting of the Assembly. Naturally this synod will be 
included in the group, and, when the Council is fully organized 
it will include the Synods of New York, New Jersey, Penn- 
sylvania, Baltimore, West Virginia and New England. 

The other feature of the plan approved by the 1912 Assembly 
was the designation of corresponding members, one from each 
of the self-supporting synods federated, to meet with the Board, 
at the Board's expense, at one of its meetings during each year. 
These members have also the right to attend other meetings as 
they may be able to attend. The corresponding members were 
asked to be present at the March meeting in pursuance of this 
plan. A preliminary conference was arranged during the 
morning of that day. The conference continued also after the 
official meeting of the Board had adjourned. The discussion 
was most fruitful, and the plan commended itself to the corre- 
sponding members so fully that they asked for the designation 
of two days next year, when fuller discussion of common inter- 
ests might be conducted and a wider range of topics considered. 

The most important action taken by the meeting in March 
was the recommendation to the Assembly of an overture pro- 
viding for the concerted effort of churches and church agencies 
during the autumn of 1913 to give eminence to the home 
mission work among the eastern and middle western synods. 
Almost a million of the Presbyterian members are included in 
this region. It was felt that a million dollars annually from the 
churches and church organizations for regular home mission 
work in this region is the least which the exigencies of the times 
will justify. The need of additional and more fully trained 
leadership was also recognized. The Church was asked to 



6 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

rally with money and men to meet the complicated problems of 
immigrant, industrial and rural communities which must 
engage the Church with new vigor and insight. 

THE HOME MISSIONS COUNCIL. 

The Home Missions Council, in the development of which 
our Board has taken a leading part, is becoming an enlarging 
factor in the home mission interests of our common Protes- 
tantism. It includes within its membership thirty-three mis- 
sionary societies from twenty-two denominations. With only 
one exception all the principal denominations are enlisted in it, 
and every year adds to the roll from among the smaller denom- 
inations. It has two great aims; first, to ascertain facts in 
every part of the country on which a comprehensive program 
for the evangelization of America may be based; and, second, 
to try to realize that program in loyalty to denominational 
principles on the one hand, and to the wider interests of the 
Kingdom of Christ on the other. The vigor and beneficence 
of this agency continues to increase. 

The annual meeting held in our Assembly room in January 
disclosed a unity of feeling and a fraternity of effort suggestive 
of great progress in home missions. The Council received the 
report of the Indian Committee with the usual deep interest, 
and plans were approved for continuing the policy now estab- 
lished of maintaining a representative in Washington. The 
Honorable H. B. F. Macfarland has been retained as before to 
serve the interests of united Protestantism, and, through the 
committee of the Council, the federal Government is harkening 
with a deepened interest to the voice of united Protestantism 
thus expressed, where united Romanism has for long years 
made its influence felt, and sometimes unwholesomely. 

Further report was made upon the general survey of con- 
ditions throughout western fields. Bulletin Number One was 
presented by the committee and its publication approved. 
Copies may be had upon application to the constituent Boards. 
The committee was authorized to publish further Bulletins 
of this series as soon as the returns from the Survey Committees 
shall justify. 

The Home Missions Council survey work in several states 
has already resulted in establishing permanent committees 
for the discussion of common problems and the adjustment of 
differences between the denominations in the conduct of home 
mission work. The outstanding illustration of this movement 
is that in Colorado, where a state Home Missions Council 
has been organized, auxiliary to the national Home Missions 
Council, one of the Presbyterian leaders having been chosen 
secretary and the Presbyterian force generally cooperating 
heartily. 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 7 

The Council received with enthusiasm the report upon 
Home Mission Week, celebrated in the fall of 1912. The 
members had come up to the meeting already convinced of the 
great value of this movement, and committed in their own 
minds to the continuation of the plan. The observance of 
Home Mission Week in the fall of 1913 was enthusiastically 
authorized, and a strong committee appointed to take plans in 
hand. The topic designated is that of "Immigration." The 
offices of the Missionary Education Movement — the inter- 
denominational agency already well-known in missionary 
circles — were enlisted in the conduct of the campaign. Much 
of the needed literature and material for publicity has already 
been produced, and other is in process. There is prospect 
that the future observance of the fall season for home missions 
among the churches will be even more effective than that of the 
fall of 1912. 

In connection with the annual meeting the Council met with 
the Conference of Foreign Mission Boards and declared in the 
presence of a great company that home and foreign missions 
stand for one common duty and must manifest a united front. 
This doctrine of the unity of missions is being emphasized on 
a grander scale in the recent organization of all the mission 
boards of evangelical denominations into one body to carry on a 
united missionary campaign, the aim of which shall be to secure 
from every follower of Christ a sense of definite responsibility 
for mission service. It is too early to prophesy the outcome 
of this alignment of all Christian forces, but the vision of it is 
inspiring. We are on the way to the answer of Christ's last 
prayer. 



PRESBYTERIAN DEPARTMENT OF MISSIONARY EDUCATION 

The Presbyterian Department of Missionary Education was 
created by act of General Assembly, May, 1912, uniting the 
educational work of the Home Board, the Foreign Board, and 
the Board for Freedmen. The year has been one of organi- 
zation. The representative of the Home Board is the Rev. 
Jay S. Stowell. The cooperation between the three Boards 
mentioned and also the Missionary Department of the Board 
of Publication has amply justified itself. 

There have been enrolled in the department, including all 
groups studying home and foreign missions, 2975 classes. Of 
these 899 used home mission text-books and 1759 foreign. 
Portions of this report will be duplicated in the Reports of the 
other constituent Boards, as well as in the reports of the women's 
societies, all of whose mission study classes have been reported 
through the department. 



8 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913] 

There have been a few junior classes and a very few men's 
classes but a relatively large number of young people's and 
women's classes. 

Home Mission Week in the fall furnished a strong impetus 
for home mission study and the department was able to pro- 
vide a large amount of missionary literature for use in the 
various departments of the Church and to attend to many 
special requests for imformation and help in churches where 
a more systematic study of home mission problems was not 
practicable at the time. 

Cooperation with the Missionary Education Movement in 
its summer conferences and with the Young People's Depart- 
ment of the Board of Publication in its conferences for Presby- 
terian young people formed an important part of the depart- 
ment's summer activity. Representatives of the department, 
as teachers and leaders, have attended practically all of these 
training conferences. Many local missionary leaders were 
thereby discovered and helped. 

The department has also cooperated in the follow-up cam- 
paign of "The World in Cincinnati", "The World in Baltimore", 
and in the preparation for "The World in Chicago". 

Normal mission study classes for the purpose of training 
leaders have been conducted by the secretaries of the depart- 
ment under various other auspices. 

"The Church of the Open Country" by our own Rev. Warren 
H. Wilson, Ph.D., has been the home mission text-book for 
the year and has been widely used, as has also Dr. Bruce 
Kinney's "Mormonism, the Islam of America", which has 
proved popular in many organizations other than the women's, 
for whom it was primarily prepared. A good many of the 
older books have also been used by various societies. 

In addition to this emphasis on the mission study class and 
the training of leaders to take such classes, special attention 
has been given to the introduction of the missionary spirit 
and methods of missionary education into the Sunday school. 
The correspondence along this line and the interest shown by 
the local workers has been gratifying. A large quantity of 
missionary literature for use in Sunday schools has been pre- 
pared and distributed. 

The work reported through the department in this first year 
of its existence is considerably larger than the total work 
previously reported in any one year by its constituent Boards. 
The mission study idea is evidently extending and intelligence 
and enthusiasm along mission study lines is growing. 

SPECIAL SPEAKERS. 

The Rev. Moses Breeze, D.D., during the entire year has done 
even more conspicuous and effective service along the line of his 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 9 

special endeavor than heretofore. He has been humorously 
styled "The Doctor of Sick Churches". This is in a measure 
unjust both to him and the churches he serves. He has remark- 
able qualities of inspiration, and out of long, practical exper- 
ience has developed methods which enable churches effectively 
to reorganize their financial schemes. He pushes the budget 
plan in the local church and assists church officers otherwise 
effectively to organize their local work. He has been the means 
of reducing home mission grants and bringing dependent con- 
gregations to self-support in a large number of cases, and the 
Board has been much gratified with the many letters testifying 
to the remarkable effects of his ministry. 

After many years of heroic service in Alaska the Rev. S. Hall 
Young, D.D., has transferred his activities to the states. As 
the Board's special representative for Alaska he has spent the 
past winter in presenting to churches our work in that great 
land, and in securing by special appeals supplies and equipment 
needed for various Alaskan churches and stations. He con- 
tinues in this form of service, whose beginnings already indicate 
in many localities a quickened interest in a field full of perils 
and difficulties and needs. 



LOGGING CAMPS. 

The year just closed has been one of encouragement in mis- 
sionary work among the lumber-jacks. Seventeen men and 
one woman have given all or part of their time to this ministry. 
Eight of these have been laboring in Minnesota, two in Washing- 
ton, two in Oregon, two in California, one in West Virginia and 
one in northern New York. In Minnesota alone over fifteen 
thousand men have been reached by regular gospel services. 

The one great obstacle we have to contend with, east and 
west, is the saloon. It is a continual fight all over the field. 
But public opinion among the men against the liquor interest 
has been increasing. The men while in camp away from its 
influences are continually discussing this vice, taking a strong 
stand against it, and wherever they have a chance to vote, as 
in West Virginia, we see the encouraging results of this agitation. 

Everywhere the companies have been willing that we should 
work among their men, and now a few of them are beginning to 
help us financially. We have reason to believe this interest 
and helpfulness will increase. 

While the first and greatest purpose is to preach the gospel 
to these men in the woods, at the same time the missionaries 
do what they can to show them their obligation to their 
employers, and the need of being men clean in person as well as 
character. 



10 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

Besides Mr. Higgins' service on the field he has raised over 
six thousand dollars for the work as well as money for home 
missions in general. He has also raised money for the work in 
the Adirortdacks under supervision of the synodical committee 
of the Synod of New York. 



SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS. 

Attention should be called to the fact that with the tendency 
towards cities and the increase of the problems of city life the 
Board is increasingly called on to give service in one form and 
another to our great centers, both east and west. 

The work of the various new departments has been exten- 
sive and encouraging. Thus the demands from presbytery 
and synod for the service of our Social Service, Immigration, 
and Church and Country Life Departments have been far in 
excess of our ability to meet them. This is to be expected as 
a logical part of the irresistible problem of our incoming 
foreigners, of the revival of interest in country life, and of the 
new sense of social claims and rights. We are only at the 
beginning of these new interests and duties. We must gird 
ourselves for much larger advance along these lines in the near 
future. 

Among our American Indians, the erection of two hospitals, 
the growth of the Training School at Tuscon, and especially 
the assumption by the Board of a large work among the Navajos 
— transferred to us by the Independent Mission to the Navajos 
and Other Tribes — are the outstanding features of the year in 
this department, of which fuller report is given on pages 22. 

A peculiar and swiftly developing phase of our immigration 
problem is in the great influx of Mexicans into the Southwest. 
It is estimated there are four hundred thousand in Texas alone. 
They are the advance guard of other thousands which the 
troubles in Mexico will force into our borders. Four years ago 
the General Assembly authorized the Board "to formulate 
and put into effect a plan for the independent management 
of the Mexican work" — not confined to one presbytery or 
synod, and yet presenting one common problem, requiring 
special consideration by men specially trained and qualified. 
Not until this year has the Board been able to see its way clear 
to meet the expectation of the Assembly in this regard. Last 
December it appointed the Rev. Robert McLean, D. D., of 
Grants Pass, Oregon, to this responsible position. A mis- 
sionary among Spanish-speaking people many years — first in 
South America and later in Porto Rico — he is peculiarly fitted 
for this extensive and increasing field. In this, as in missionary 
service to foreigners generally, the first difficulty is in finding 
men fitted for the work. It is hoped soon to open a Bible 




Typical conditions re- 
vealed in surveys made 
by the Bureau of Social 
Service 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 11 

training school to fit young Mexicans to become evangelists to 
their people. A native ministry at last is the hope of foreign 
missions whether abroad or in our own country. 

BUREAU OF SOCIAL SERVICE. 

Each year during the past three or four years the Bureau of 
Social Service has been called upon to direct an important 
interdenominational movement, because it is generally acknowl- 
edged that the Board of Home Missions is well equipped 
to handle such campaigns. In each case the major part of the 
expense of these campaigns has been borne by the cooperating 
agencies, the Board merely paying its own allotment. 

The most recent of these movements was the publicity cam- 
paign conducted under the direction of the Rev. Charles Stelzle, 
superintendent of the bureau, for the Home Missions Council 
and the Council of Women for Home Missions. This campaign 
occupied the attention of the bureau for a period of six months, 
culminating in Home Mission Week, November seventeenth 
to twenty-fourth, 1912. One of the unique features of this 
movement was the fact that it touched the remotest church in 
the open country as well as the biggest church in the town. The 
bureau corresponded with representatives in the nearly twenty- 
five hundred cities having a population of twenty-five hundred 
and over, for the purpose of organizing local committees which 
should have charge of the arrangements for Home Mission 
Week. Such campaigns were actually organized in fully one 
thousand cities. Twenty-two out of twenty-eight larger 
cities in the country had meetings of some kind during the 
period. 

Previous to Home Mission Week itself a preliminary campaign 
of three months was conducted. Articles were written for 
various syndicates of newspapers and millions of readers 
stumbled upon missionary truths in the course of their daily read- 
ing. Six hundred thousand posters 22" x 28", dealing with 
modern home mission problems, were sent to the Protestant 
ministers of America, to all colleges and universities, all Protes- 
tant theological seminaries, and all of the Young Men's and 
Young Women's Christian Associations in this country. A 
quarter of a million home mission postcards were used during 
the Home Mission Week campaign, and an equal number of 
home mission stickers. A million leaflets of various kinds 
were issued. Mission study classes were organized in many 
of the churches. One of the important results of the campaign 
was the interest in home missions aroused among an entirely 
new group of people who previously had shown extreme in- 
difference to this branch of religious work. It was the breadth 
and scope of the campaign which appealed to these "outsiders. " 



12 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913 

In the survey department of the bureau, "Church and City 
Week" for the Presbytery of Cleveland was an important 
feature of the year's work. Under the supervision of Mr. G. 
B. St. John, who was assisted by the Rev. Arthur R. Burnet, 
careful statistical information regarding Presbyterianism in 
Cleveland was obtained from the churches in that city and 
graphically reproduced on about three hundred charts, which 
were displayed for several days in the Chamber of Commerce 
in Cleveland. This exhibit was said by the social workers in 
that city to have been one of the best ever shown there. Meet- 
ings were held for special groups of Presbyterians, which were 
addressed by representatives of the Board. The primary 
object of the "Week" was the securing of twenty thousand 
dollars to carry on the work in Cleveland under the auspices 
of the Church Extension Committee of presbytery. A survey 
of the field of the Fourth Presbyterian Church of Chicago was 
also made by the bureau, at the request of the Rev. John 
Timothy Stone, D. D., and the session of the church. This 
study attracted wide attention not only in the daily press but 
in the Bulletin of the City Club of Chicago and the Survey 
Magazine of New York, besides a number of religious papers. 
Constructive plans for this field will be worked out during the 
next year, the bureau cooperating with the pastor and session 
of the church. The old Railroad Mission field in Chicago and 
the field of the Bethlehem Church in that city were studied by 
Mr. St. John for the Church Extension Committee of the 
presbytery, also another large territory in which the committee 
is considering establishing a new enterprise. The survey of 
Redstone Presbytery was completed and an exhibit was prepared 
for the immigration conference at Uniontown, Pennsylvania. 

In the field of original research the bureau has been studying 
the economic aspects of the liquor problem in order to meet 
the argument presented by the brewers that if the saloon and 
the brewery were closed it would create a labor panic, because 
it is alleged that a million men would be thrown upon the 
streets. The bureau studied the question not only in this 
country but secured material from many foreign countries, 
and is now prepared to meet the arguments of the liquor dealers. 
This has already been done in part through a series of poster 
cards. The study of the question will culminate in an educa- 
tional campaign among workingmen, continuing the work 
already established by the bureau in the matter of temperance 
reform among industrial workers. 

During the past year an unusually fine equipment for statis- 
tical work has been established for the Board under the immedi- 
ate supervision of Mr. Burnet. This equipment greatly facili- 
tates the work of interpreting the material which comes to the 
office from ministers and other church workers throughout the 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 13 

country who have made local surveys with the use of the blanks 
prepared by the bureau. One of the most important aspects 
of the bureau's work has been the increasing number of inquiries 
that have come from individual ministers desiring to know 
about definite plans of work for their churches in the matter of 
social service. All the features of the bureau's work since its 
formation have been continued during the past year. These 
have been mentioned in previous Annual Reports. 

April first, 1913, marked the tenth anniversary of the begin- 
ning of the Home Board's work in behalf of workingmen. At 
that time Mr. Stelzle was called from the pastorate of the 
Markham Memorial Church in St. Louis to become a "general 
missionary" among the workingmen of the United States. 
Soon the Department of Church and Labor was organized 
which, later, was merged into the Bureau of Social Service. 
Following are some of the outstanding accomplishments of 
the ten years' work: — 

The changes in sentiment between Church and labor have 
practically undergone a revolution in the past decade. There 
is no longer the hopelessness on the part of the Church nor the 
superficial attitude on the part of labor. Social service workers 
have come to realize that the Church is adequate to meet 
the modern social and religious conditions, especially in our 
great cities. "Labor Sunday", now observed by practically 
every Protestant denomination throughout the United States, 
was established, as was also the plan of sending ministers to 
central labor unions as fraternal delegates. These ministers 
are in many cases serving as chaplains to organized labor and 
are having a most wholesome influence on workingmen. Almost 
from the beginning of the Board's work in this connection 
special articles have been syndicated to every labor paper in 
the United States and Canada, there being something like 
three hundred fifty of these. This has proven to be one 
of the most effective methods inaugurated. It has resulted 
in a complete change in the attitude of the labor press and of 
the labor leaders toward the Church. In the great working- 
men's mass meetings conducted on Sunday afternoons during 
the winter season fully five hundred thousand workingmen 
have been addressed. Important shop campaigns have been 
conducted which were attended by two hundred fifty thousand 
men and women. The bureau undoubtedly holds the record 
for men's meetings. 

The workingmen's temperance movement inaugurated by the 
bureau has become so influential that it has practically become 
impossible to-day for the liquor interests to dominate the 
organized labor movement in this country. 

The survey work conducted in cities, presbyteries and synods 
as well as in local fields has given the churches in the com- 



14 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

munities investigated a larger conception of their tasks. City 
problems have been scientifically studied and definite plans of 
work have been successfully inaugurated in some of the most 
difficult fields in America. The Labor Temple, established 
by the bureau in lower New York, is a conspicuous illustration 
of what has been accomplished in this field of labor, and has 
served as an incentive to the workers in other cities, both in the 
Presbyterian Church and in other denominations. Municipal 
problems and how to meet them have been discussed in scores 
of cities with city officials and others responsible for meeting 
the social situation. 

The bureau has furnished staff service for some of the most 
important movements conducted during the past ten years, 
in many cases having entire charge of the work. Among these 
movements were the World's Fair Evangelistic Campaign in 
St. Louis in 1904; the Social Service Department of the Men 
and Religion Forward Movement; the Home Mission Week 
campaign for the Home Missions Council and the Council of 
Women for Home Missions; the Commission on the Church 
and Social Service of the Federal Council of Churches; and the 
Commission on Industrial Education of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor. A correspondence course in applied Christianity 
for ministers and Christian workers has been conducted, over 
two hundred ministers having taken the course. Important 
industrial disputes have been arbitrated. Social service con- 
ferences and courses of lectures have been given in colleges 
and theological seminaries. Sixty educational and inspira- 
tional leaflets have been published and given wide distribution, 
one leaflet alone having had a circulation of a quarter of a 
million copies. Original research work of an important 
character has been conducted and modern efficiency methods 
for churches have been worked out. 

It will be seen that the work of the Bureau of Social Service 
is almost entirely field work, assisting ministers and laymen to 
meet the problems in their own parishes. Every dollar spent 
has gone into the actual doing of the work or else into the task 
of increasing the efficiency of those who are doing it. 

The Presbyterian Church has the distinction of being the 
first denomination in this country which organically established 
a department with a secretary in charge to study the social 
problem. Other denominations in the United States and 
Canada, Europe and Australia, seeing the success of the methods 
introduced by the bureau, have inaugurated movements 
similar to our own; so that there are to-day probably a dozen 
such bureaus with secretaries in charge or with special com- 
mittees appointed to supervise their work. 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 15 

DEPARTMENT OF CHURCH AND COUNTRY LIFE. 

The Department of Church and Country Life, the Rev. 
Warren H. Wilson, Ph.D., superintendent, has become a prac- 
tical efficiency bureau. The work has grown, as it was initiat- 
ed, out of requests by presbyteries and synods for special ser- 
vice on behalf of country churches. 

SALT RIVER PRESBYTERY. 

At the beginning of the year the department undertook the 
temporary responsibility requested by the presbytery on behalf 
of its home mission churches. This duty has been discharged 
in a survey of the presbytery, in a three months' season evangel- 
istic meetings, as requested by churches of the presbytery, and 
in assisting the churches to secure pastors. The presbytery 
adopted at its fall meeting, by unanimous vote, the survey 
made in the bounds of the presbytery by the Rev. Anton T. 
Boisen, investigator. The presbytery has suffered from a 
disproportion between the number of ministers and the number 
of churches. This department's main business is to bring in 
to the vservice of the presbytery a number of efficient pastors 
as the churches shall take them. At the beginning of our 
work forty-two churches were enrolled in the presbytery and 
the number of ministers in service was eight. The survey 
adopted includes the retirement of six churches and the group- 
ing of the churches according to their neighborly relations; 
the securing of pastors for rural churches and the extension of 
a plan of federation such as now subsists between the Northern 
and Southern Presbyterian Churches. It includes also a 
campaign for benevolence in the presbytery. 

In the fall, growing out of this survey, evangelistic meetings 
were conducted by the Rev. Clair S. Adams, during three 
months in six rural churches with a total of sixty-nine con- 
versions and fifty-six additions to the churches. This work 
will be continued in its season. We are now cooperating with 
individual churches in the securing of pastors, especially for 
those in the open country. The great need of this region is 
rural pastors for the strong well established rural churches and 
the grouping of near-by churches together into broad parishes 
within which the minister shall live with his people. Such a 
pastorate is largely lacking in the territory of the middle West. 

SUMMER SCHOOLS. 

The department secured for one hundred fifty-five country 
ministers the privilege of post graduate study in the problem 
of the country church during the past summer, at Auburn 
Theological Seminary, at the University of Wisconsin, at the 



16 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

University of Missouri and at Estes Park, Colorado. It is our 
hope that the theological seminaries will take up this work on 
behalf of the ministers of the country. Meantime, Christian 
men, eminent and scholarly, are teaching the ministers at these 
central points the scientific and practical knowledge necessary. 
These courses are two or three weeks in length. The work is 
in the class room, each subject having the same teacher from 
the beginning to the end of the course. The result in the 
appreciation of the ministers themselves is extraordinary. 
We have never seen in any class of students such eagerness for 
the service of the teacher of Christian learning, nor such im- 
mediate desire to put into practice what they have learned. 

COUNTRY LIFE INSTITUTES. 

The institutes have been one or two day meetings, devoted 
to the country church, and held either in a rural church, or at a 
central point. The demand for this evangelism of efficiency 
increases both from presbyteries and congregations. The 
service of the Rev. Matthew Brown McNutt has been wholly 
given through the year to meeting such demands, as they are 
urged upon the Board by presbyteries, especially in the middle 
West and Northwest. Mr. McNutt has traveled incessantly, 
at one time being absent from his family four months. To 
meet requests in certain eastern synods the Board has twice 
secured a month of the time of the Rev. Silas E. Persons, D. D., 
the honored pastor of the Cazenovia Church, New York. In 
response to requests of congregations, Dr. Persons has spoken 
on itineraries arranged in the Synods of New York, Penn- 
sylvania, and Ohio. Such itineraries have been made under 
the direction of Buffalo Presbytery, the Synods of Ohio, Michi- 
gan, Tennessee and Kansas and the Presbyteries of Nebraska 
City, Denver, Mankato, Oakes and Fargo. 

SERIES OF INSTITUTES. 

A new feature of the institute work this year has been the 
arrangement of series of institutes covering a given territory. 
This has been an economy of time and has greatly increased 
interest and secured more effective work, the same group of 
men going from place to place. In this work the superin- 
tendent and field assistants of the department have been en- 
gaged. Such series of institutes have been held in the Synods 
of Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, Wisconsin, Tennessee and Ohio. 

These institutes, we believe, are of the greatest value, school- 
ing the people and the ministers in the small community in a 
gospel of efficient church work. The main principle is imita- 
tion of work that is successful in the country bv those who are 



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1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 17 

discouraged or disheartened under conditions of transition and 
arrested growth. 

SOCIAL SURVEYS. 

The surveys made by the department are becoming almost 
exclusively practical. The time of mere investigation is past. 
The audiences, as not in previous years, are attentive rather 
to the teaching of "what to do", than to the description of 
conditions. We had at first to state the conditions which 
church people had refused to recognize. We are now called 
on for recommendations for efficient service. Presbyteries as 
a rule are the source of these requests. The department 
does not make surveys in the local communities, in which the 
pastor must make his own survey. Surveys of this sort, 
requested by presbyteries with endorsement of their synods, 
are now contemplated by the department in the bounds of the 
Presbyteries of Buffalo, Ozark, Arkansas, Baltimore and 
Boulder, and in the Synods of Iowa, Michigan and Texas. 
The Board has been unable to undertake responsibility urged 
upon it in certain presbyteries for individual congregations, 
except in the manner described above. The work desired 
by presbyteries is already too much for the resources of the 
department. 

WHAT THE DEPARTMENT ADVOCATES. 

The incessant traveling of the workers in the department 
furnishes them with their message. They are constantly 
observing the efficient work of men in the country and advising 
others of the principles and the methods involved in this work. 
They are teaching everywhere only that which churches are 
doing somewhere in the country. The effective evangelistic, 
educational or social work of any country pastor is by the 
department published to other pastors and churches as an 
example and stimulus. What is not done in the churches is 
not taught in the department. By the demand for practical 
guidance we have been forced to reduce our proposals to 
the barest essentials, namely: the survey of the field, either 
by a presbytery or a community, as a preliminary to Christian 
ministry there; evangelistic work, where it may be followed 
up with the work of the pastor; institutes for the training of 
the people in the churches in the conception of an efficient 
church; the establishment of rural pastors who will live with 
country people and serve them at first hand. The Board be- 
lieves that it is useless to hope for the maintenance of Christian 
life and character or for the survival of the country church, 
without the resident and devoted pastor living in the country. 



18 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

DEPARTMENT OF IMMIGRATION. 

The work of the Board of Home Missions among the recent 
immigrant populations is carried on through its Department 
of Immigration, the Rev. William Payne Shriver, superin- 
tendent. All the studies and missionary work of this depart- 
ment are effected directly on the field and only upon the request 
of presbyteries and synods. 

In the past year the Board cooperated with twenty-two 
presbyteries from coast to coast in carrying on work in sixty- 
seven different centers in as many immigrant communities. 
Over eighty missionary pastors, visitors and lay workers have 
been commissioned and over seventy-five thousand dollars 
granted directly to the field. Eight languages are regularly 
employed: Italian, Magyar, Ruthenian, Bohemian, Syrian, 
Scandinavian, Armenian and Polish. 

FIELD WORK IN DETAIL. 

Much of the work is of large importance in strategic centers. 
By way of illustration, reference may be made to the following 
projects which have been initiated or advanced during this 
past year. 

At Gary, Indiana, the Gary Chapel and Neighborhood House 
was completed by the synod at a cost, including lots, of fifteen 
thousand dollars and dedicated November seventeenth. The 
Rev. V. P. Backora was transferred from New York and made 
superintendent. A foreign-speaking visitor was added to the 
staff. This work is developing to the great encouragement of 
synod's committee. 

At Indianapolis, the Cosmopolitan Chapel and Foreigners' 
Help Office has completed the renovation of its building accord- 
ing to plans suggested by the department at a cost of two 
thousand dollars. A day nursery has been opened in the neigh- 
borhood and a foreign-speaking deaconess added to the staff. 
This center is especially effective in the educational and pro- 
tective work. 

In Baltimore, the cooperation of the department has been 
especially extended to the development of St. Paul's Polish 
congregation in a community of thirty thousand Poles. A 
neighborhood house will be opened. The Rev. Joel B. Hayden, 
Immigration Fellow, now in Austrian Poland, upon his return 
in October, will be associated with the Rev. Paul Fox. Also, in 
Baltimore, a recreation center is being developed in connection 
with the historic Second Church, the Rev. Edward Niles, 
pastor, with special reference to the Jewish neighbors. 

In St. Louis, cooperation is extended to the important work 
at Boyle Memorial Center, the Rev. W. Clyde Smith, superin- 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 19 

tendent. A Hungarian work is also aided. The department 
is sustaining a cordial relation to the home mission committee 
in the study of the East Side of St. Louis, looking to the develop- 
ment of some parish plan similar to that so successfully em- 
ployed on the upper East Side of New York. 

In Kansas City, Fellowship Houses, Numbers 1 and 2, are 
maintained with relation to the large Croatian and polyglot 
community. Inadequate equipment is provided for this work. 
Mr. Ralph Cummins, honor graduate of McCormick Seminary 
and under appointment as an Immigration Fellow, will make a 
study of this great community adjacent to the packing works, 
and upon his return from abroad will probably engage in this 
work. 

In Newark, New Jersey, cooperation has been continued 
with the church extension committee in the First Ruthenian 
Church, which now has a membership of one hundred forty- 
seven. The social work at this church was given an impetus 
by student cooperation in the summer and a daily vacation 
Bible school. 

In San Francisco, following a visit by representatives of the 
Board in the winter of 1912, the Home Board and the presby- 
tery, in cooperation with the Green Street Congregational Church 
and the Congregational Conference of North California, set up 
a union work in the heart of an Italian community of thirty 
thousand. The Rev. Robert Walker, formerly superintendent of 
Italian work for the Baptist City Mission in New York, and one 
of the best equipped men in the country for work among 
Italians, was called to the pastorate. A new and modern 
institutional church building valued at forty thousand dollars 
has been placed at the disposal of this work. 

New York City, with its foreign-born population of two 
million has been a field for the special efforts of the Home Board 
since the inception of this department. The work is effected 
through, and upon the requests of, the Presbyteries of New 
York and Brooklyn. The Board is cooperating in fifteen 
centers with work among Italians, Hungarians, Bohemians, 
Ruthenians, Syrians and Jews, and has commissioned nine 
pastors, visitors and student workers. The problems in 
both these presbyteries increase in their intensity and 
challenge the resources and leadership of the Church to the 
utmost. The foreign people are colonizing in great areas of 
the city. There are over three hundred fifty thousand foreign- 
born Italians alone, a fourth of the entire population in the 
country, with colonies exceeding ninety thousand. The 
Church of the Ascension, Italian, has just been completed, at 
a cost for lots and buildings of seventy thousand dollars, 
which was paid by the church extension committee of the 
Presbytery of New York. This is one of the^most important 



20 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

and successful works among the Italians in this country. 
It has a membership of 329 with one hundred catechumens. 
The congregation is one of the elements in the American Parish 
on the upper East Side under the chairmanship of the Rev. 
Norman M. Thomas, pastor of one of the churches. This 
larger method of attack upon a wide city area, developed by the 
department in connection with the home mission committee, 
promises to be of significance to other cities. Superintendence 
for the committee of presbytery is furnished by the department. 
This effects a great saving and economy. The interchange of 
experience thus made possible is of value to the presbytery and 
to the Board's work in other parts of the country. Men 
trained in active work in New York are available for new work 
in fields outside the presbytery. 

The Home Board cooperates with the two new Bohemian 
presbyteries of the Central West and Southwest which include 
twenty-three organized churches and ten or more stations, with 
a force of twenty Bohemian pastors. The Presbytery of the 
Southwest was directly the outgrowth of the cooperation of the 
Home Board with the Synod of Texas. Following a visit in the 
autumn, the Bohemian Church in South Omaha has been given 
a new outlook. The Rev. E. J. Kallina, a young American of 
Bohemian parents, graduate of Auburn Seminary, has been 
commissioned for this strategic center. 

Following the action of the Synod of New York in October, 
1912, the Home Board arranged with synod to cooperate in 
all work among immigrant communities in the synod, the 
applications of the presbyteries being made in the first place 
by synod's committee. Superintendence will be maintained 
jointly. 

SPECIAL SURVEYS AND CONFERENCES. 

With the completion of the survey of the coke region made 
upon the request of the Presbytery of Redstone, the Old 
Redstone Conference was held at Uniontown, Pennsylvania, 
in October. The sessions of this conference were attended by 
over thirty churches of the presbytery, including all the impor- 
tant ones. The findings of the survey were presented together 
with an exhibit of more than one hundred charts and photo- 
graphs and a specially prepared stereopticon lecture. Recom- 
mendations were submitted for a vigorous attack upon the 
crucial situation in the coke region. In connection with this 
conference a Slavic conference was held which brought together 
thirty representative Slavic Presbyterian pastors and workers. 

In Cleveland, in January, a Magyar conference was held 
with an attendance of fifty Magyar pastors and representatives 
of various home mission committees carrying on work among 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 21 

this people This conference was highly significant in bringing 
out the facts with regard to the present status of our Presby- 
terian work among the Magyars and in pointing out the 
necessity of some further coordination. 

Upon the request of the Trustees of the Union for Church 
Extension in Brooklyn and the Presbytery of Brooklyn, a 
church efficiency service has been set up for that presbytery. 
This is a temporary service to make a comprehensive study of 
the Presbytery of Brooklyn and its churches and the needs 
of the communities within the bounds of that presbytery. 
In view of the large foreign population in this presbytery, 
notably Italian, and the experience of the department in 
similar work in the Presbytery of New York, this efficiency 
service is being effected by the department. 



DAILY VACATION BIBLE SCHOOLS. 

The child life of our city and immigrant communities makes 
an irresistible appeal. Twenty-six of these schools were set up 
under the general auspices of the Board's Immigration Depart- 
ment in New York, Brooklyn, Newark, Baltimore, St. Louis 
and Cleveland in 1912. They enrolled over five thousand 
children. 



LEADERSHIP. 

While fully recognizing the place which young men of foreign 
birth or origin may be expected to take in the Church's work 
among our recent immigration, the Home Board's increasing 
experience leads it strongly to the conviction that conditions 
in our great cities and at the tense centers of industrial life 
create a field for the same type of young American that is 
volunteering for work in foreign lands. To emphasize the 
urgent need of this type of American leadership and to facilitate 
its training, the Home Board therefore announced its series of 
Immigration Fellowships, open to recent graduates of theologi- 
cal seminaries, duly licensed or ordained by a presbytery. 
Three appointments were made to these Fellowships last year. 
With the close of the year four additional appointments were 
made to become effective in the new fiscal year. Of the seven 
thus chosen, four received the highest honors of their respective 
seminaries. Fields are already waiting the return of these men. 

The chief publication of the department in the year has been 
a forty-four page pamphlet, "The Presbyterian Church and 
the Immigrant." This is the first inclusive statement of the 
entire work of the Presbyterian Church for our immigrant 
populations. 

In the large city and industrial centers where immigration 



22 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

work is to be set up or carried on, the Board makes it a policy 
to require proper equipment as a basis for cooperation in 
maintenance. In the past two years this policy has facilitated 
the investment by local presbyteries and synods of $135,000. 
for new buildings for immigration work, to which may be 
added $40,000. the value of the new building of the Green 
Street Church in San Francisco, — a total of $175,000. 

LABOR TEMPLE. 

Cooperating with the church extension committee of New 
York Presbytery, the Board is sharing in the work at the 
Labor Temple, for which the presbytery provides the building. 

A study of the Labor Temple weekly program shows that 
the spiritual welfare of New York's polyglot population in the 
midst of which the old Presbyterian church is located, is the 
first consideration of those who are in charge of that field — 
the Rev. Jonathan C. Day, D. D., and his helpers. 

The pulpit is the pivotal point and the Bible school is of 
prime importance. While there are clubs, classes, lectures 
and moving picture entertainments, they are always used as 
a means to the great end of bringing the people to Christ. 
Sabbath morning is given to a Hungarian service under a 
Hungarian pastor, — the center of a large ministry which is the 
only work for the Hungarian population of New York City 
below Fifty-ninth Street. Sabbath afternoon is given to the 
Bible school, and the preaching service is held in the evening 
with a large attendance, as, for instance, during the month of 
January when each Sabbath evening showed an average con- 
gregation of four hundred. The church is open with some- 
thing worth attending every day in the week, dealing with 
religious problems no less than with civic, educational and 
social matters. The various plans include many phases of 
need in that congested section, from special care for the little 
children on Saturday afternoon to the Religious Forum for 
the grown-ups on Friday night. 

DEPARTMENT OF INDIAN MISSIONS. 

There is much of encouragement in the report of the Depart- 
ment of Indian Missions and its advance in the last year. The 
advance may be summarized as follows: churches, 116; mission 
stations, 118; ordained ministers and helpers, 84; with 78 
assistants; total number of communicants, 7,777; and estimated 
adherents, 18,608; not including 1500 native Alaskan Presby- 
terians. 

The superintendent, the Rev. Thomas Clinton Moffett, 
D. D., spent five months of the year in visiting the missions 
on the various reservations, which are widely scattered through- 




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1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 23 

out many of the western states, thus keeping the Board closely 
in touch with the missionaries, their difficulties and needs. 

On the part of the Government, reservation life and tribal 
restraints are rapidly being broken up. The old political 
agency system and corrupt administration have largely dis- 
appeared. In the main the government Indian Service is on a 
much higher level, and greater advances are being made in 
administrative and educational development. In the govern- 
ment boarding schools, in which some thirty thousand pupils 
are enrolled, the churches have been given large opportunity 
for religious instruction, and the Presbyterian Church has 
about one thousand pupils directly under pastoral care and 
instruction. 

The fourteen national Boards represented in the Home 
Missions Council which are engaged in work for the Indians 
have cooperated and have exemplified comity and the unity 
of effort in relation to Indian missions to a marked degree. 
Most of the correspondence and the efforts for a united advance 
in this interdenominational work have been carried forward 
through the department of our Board, and one of the largest 
gains in efficiency and influence since the erection of this depart- 
ment has been along the line of mutual service with our sister 
Churches. The Indian Committee has vigorously prosecuted 
efforts in New York by interdenominational conferences, and 
in Washington by hearings before the Secretary of the Interior 
and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, to secure just recogni- 
tion by the Government of the large work, and influential 
cooperation of the mission forces laboring for the uplift of 
the Indians of the whole country. In interdenominational 
relations our Church has been blessed in a special place of 
privilege and leadership, and statistics show the greatest 
advance of any year in membership and new stations occupied. 

MEDICAL AND EDUCATIONAL. 

Specially noteworthy in the advance of recent months is the 
establishing of a Bible Training School at Tucson, Arizona, 
where a small class has been maintained for Pima and Papago 
workers, and the erecting of two hospitals for the Indians. 
One of the new hospitals— at Walthill, Nebraska — which was 
opened in January, 1913, is now filled. 

The need of larger medical service under Christian auspices 
is being more strongly impressed upon the friends of the Indians 
as the dire conditions existing on the reservations are revealed. 
Of forty-two thousand Indians examined last year for eye 
disease sixteen per cent, had trachoma of a contagious character 
and, of forty thousand examined, sixty-eight hundred had 
tuberculosis. Even on the desert of Arizona, on the Colorado 



24 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

River Reservation, twenty per cent, had tuberculosis; and 
of seven thousand Dakota Indians on the Pine Ridge Reserva- 
tion, twenty-five per cent, had tuberculosis. 

The increasing evil of the peyote or mescal, a drug habit 
which has also a religious cult, calls for strenuous efforts on the 
part of the Government and missionary workers. 

District conventions and institutes have now become an 
important feature of the work, Conferences are held annually 
by workers in Oklahoma, the Dakotas, and the Southwest. 
Presbyterians unite in the annual Zayante Conference held at 
Mount Hermon, California, by the Northern California Asso- 
ciation. Yearly reports are also received from the Umatilla 
Conference in Oregon, the Nez Perce encampment in Idaho, 
and the Pima camp-meeting in Arizona. 

EVANGELISTIC SERVICE. 

The Rev. John N. Steele, our Presbyterian evangelist-at- 
large for Indian work under the Board, has spent a large portion 
of the year in traveling from reservation to reservation, co- 
operating with the regular pastors and missionaries in pro- 
claiming the good news of the gospel to the red men. He also 
takes part in camp-meetings and Bible institutes, where the 
Word is prayerfully studied and native workers are fitted for 
more effective leadership. 

INDIAN EXHIBITS. 

In the "World in Baltimore" the Board has shared for the 
third time in a missionary exposition, under the direction of 
the Missionary Education Movement, by providing the Ameri- 
can Indian Exhibit, which as in previous expositions occupied 
the largest section on the home mission floor. The attendance 
and interest were good. 

Presbyterians have reason to take courage in their efforts to 
reach the long neglected pagan tribes, and to nurture our 
Presbyterian Indians in the Christian faith. Our present 
purpose is to encourage the Indians everywhere in America 
to adjust themselves to the new conditions and strange rela- 
tions into which they have been forced, and to help them under 
God to work out their own salvation and destiny in American 
life. 

THE DISTRICT OF THE SOUTH AND SOUTHWEST. 

For this section, — comprising the Synods of Alabama (includ- 
ing Florida), Arkansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, 
Oklahoma, Tennessee (including our work in Georgia and 
North Carolina), and Texas (including our work in Louisiana), 




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1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 25 

— the field secretary, the Rev. B. P. Fullerton, D. D., LL.D., 
presents the following statement: — 

Material conditions in the District of the South and South- 
west have not greatly changed from what they were a year ago. 

The prospective opening of the Panama Canal has led far- 
sighted statesmen and church leaders to believe that the 
South will become the rendezvous of immigrants from southern 
Asia as well as southern Europe. The Government is pre- 
paring for this by the erection of a commodious and imposing 
immigration building at Galveston. 

The disturbed condition in Mexico has resulted in a large 
immigration into Texas. Many Mexicans will become perma- 
nent residents and there is an insistent demand in their behalf 
for work, both educational and evangelistic. 

During the summer, conferences on home mission methods 
and work were held in connection with the Bible school at 
Lebanon, Tennessee, and the Presbyterian Assembly of the 
Southwest at Hollister, Missouri. At the latter place the 
Rev. Moses Breeze, D. D., special representative of the Board, 
held conferences and delivered addresses that have been pro- 
ductive of good. 

An arrangement was made between the representative of the 
Foreign Board in the district and the representative of the 
Home Board to carry out a program at the meetings of the 
synods in the interest of benevolences, with special reference 
to home and foreign missions and the budget. The synods 
very graciously gave a day and evening to this program. 

All of the synods adopted a plan for the reorganization of the 
field force, providing for a superintendent of home missions 
for the synod, with a sufficient number of assistants to cover 
the field adequately, all of whom should be appointed and 
commissioned by the Board with the consent of the synod and 
the advice of the synod's home mission committee. It is 
understood that the superintendent and his assistants will 
work under the direction of synod's committee and in closest 
fellowship with the field secretary, and all shall work in such 
harmony with the authorities of presbyteries as in no way to 
interfere with the largest possible rights thereof. The framers 
of the plan kept in mind continuously the rights of both pres- 
byteries and synods. 

Home Mission Week, together with the weeks and months 
leading up to it, was quite generally observed throughout the 
district. In many cases a union of Presbyterian forces within 
a specific district, and in others a union of Protestant forces, 
was secured in making the services more helpful and impressive. 

In December, with the approval of the Board, the synodical 
superintendents of Alabama, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky, 
Mississippi and Tennessee met the field secretary in Memphis, 






26 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

Tennessee, for a two days' conference upon the situation in 
the whole field, the needs thereof and how best to supply them. 
It is the judgment of the state men that such conferences 
should be held at least once a year, in order that there may be a 
general policy wrought out for the development of our home 
mission interests within the district. 

January was given to Florida. Practically every home 
mission station within the state was visited. The two years 
between this visit and the last one show a record of growth 
and promise unexpected and at the same time reassuring. 
The pulpits are almost all filled with men who see the oppor- 
tunity in the state and have come to embrace it for the Kingdom 
of Christ. At a meeting of the presbyterial home mission 
committee early in February, a good many groups were re- 
arranged in the hope of saving both men and money and at 
the same time increasing efficiency. The Rev. R. W. Edwards, 
pastor-evangelist for Florida, is not only assisting the home 
mission committee to find ministers but is very wisely investi- 
gating the fields where the door may be opened to our Church. 
Some years ago an agreement between the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States and our Church was reached by which 
where one Presbyterian Church was sufficient and either was 
already at work, the other would not intrude, and that agree- 
ment has been so thoroughly observed that there is not a place 
in Florida where the two Churches are at work. The time 
may come in the growth of the cities of Florida when it will be 
quite wise and quite in harmony with comity for both Churches 
to be in the larger cities. 

In February a series of conferences upon church life and 
work were conducted in Alabama by the field representatives 
of the Boards of Home and Foreign Missions in the district 
and, while not largely attended, the testimony of those who 
attended was that they would be productive of great good. 

The work in each synod in detail is as follows: — 

ALABAMA. 

At the meeting of this synod last fall the name of the office 
that has been occupied by the Rev. W. B. Witherspoon, D. D., 
was changed from pastor-evangelist to synodical superintendent. 
Dr. Witherspoon has continued during the year in this position. 

There has been large development in and about Birmingham 
and the new work established a year ago has been prosecuted 
with vigor. The churches in this synod are very largely rural 
and it has been difficult so to group them as to secure the 
largest service with the greatest economy of money. There 
has been a decided improvement during the year in this respect. 
The churches have employed better methods of work and are 
gradually increasing their offerings to local support. 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 27 

ARKANSAS. 

The Rev. T. E. McSpadden has been employed as assistant 
to the Rev. C. E. Hayes, D. D., the superintendent. Mr. 
McSpadden has been very successful in evangelistic work and 
since entering upon the duties of his office, October first, has 
been continuously at work either in conducting evangelistic 
services or under the direction of the superintendent. The 
superintendent of the synod reports that the fields are well 
manned and great hopes are entertained for larger development 
in the state. 

KENTUCKY. 

The Rev. F. J. Cheek, D. D., superintendent, and the Rev. 
J. F. Price, synodical evangelist, with the approval of the 
synod's committee have continued the work, and with the 
same earnestness and efficiency that have characterized them 
in the past. In September the synod's executive commission 
elected the Rev. C. C. Brown of Lancaster, Kentucky, to take 
the place vacated by the Rev. F. E. Moore. Mr. Brown is a 
man with large evangelistic gifts and inspirational power and 
has proved himself an efficient evangelist and has won his way 
into the lives of the people of that synod. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

The Rev. R. L. Phelps, synodical superintendent, reports 
last year by far the best during his incumbency in the office. 
A number of new church buildings have been erected, new 
fields have been opened and fields already occupied have been 
stimulated and strengthened. More people have united with 
the Church upon examination than during any single year 
since the union. 

MISSOURI. 

In Missouri there have been changes in the field force. After 
a service of nine years, the Rev. J. B. Hill, D. D., resigned as 
synodical superintendent. Of his service the synod says, 
"His labors have been varied and arduous. He has always 
been ready to assist wherever there was a need. He has rendered 
the synod an enduring service and it is with sincere regret 
that we state he is no longer to serve us as our representative." 
The Rev. J. W. Mitchell, pastor-evangelist for the Presbytery 
of Sedalia, and the Rev. Redmon Whitehead who had been 
giving half-time to the Presbytery of Kirksville as pastor- 
evangelist, also completed their term of office last October: 
since then the synod has been without field men. 



28 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

At the March meeting of the synod's home mission com- 
mittee, acting under the authority given it by the synod, the 
Rev. J. H. Speer, D. D., pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, 
Webb City, Missouri, was unanimously commended to the 
Board of Home Missions for appointment as synodical superin- 
tendent. Dr. Speer brings to the position the strength of 
cultured manhood and enthusiasm for the work. 

The committee decided that if the provision for the reorgani- 
zation of the field force was to be effective and the field adequate- 
ly manned, it would be necessary to select at least two assistants 
to the superintendent, but the selection of these was deferred 
until the fall meeting of the committee. 

The committee also urged upon the presbyterial home mission 
committees the importance of organizing and conducting 
evangelistic meetings, especially in home mission churches, by 
securing from self-supporting churches the contribution of 
their ministers for a ten days' or two weeks' meeting in these 
churches, as well as approved evangelists for such work. 

OKLAHOMA. 

In Oklahoma the Rev. E. B. Teis and the Rev. George P. 
Howard, pastor-evangelists respectively for the Presbyteries 
of Cimarron, El Reno and Hobart, resigned and no successors 
have been selected. At the meeting of the synod's committee 
in March, it was decided to recommend the continuance in office 
for the present of the Rev. Duncan McRuer for the Presbyteries 
of Ardmore and McAlester, the Rev. J. A. McDonald for the 
Presbytery of Muskogee and the Rev. Ralph J. Lamb for the 
Presbyteries of Oklahoma and Tulsa, with the provision that 
these pastor-evangelists are available for work in any part of 
the synod under the direction of the executive committee 
of the home mission committee. 

The reorganization of the field force passed upon by the 
synod has been handed down to the presbyteries for their 
approval and when such approval has been communicated to 
the Executive Commission, it is understood that synod's home 
mission committee is "authorized to secure the man for the 
position of synodical superintendent for that state. 

Oklahoma is passing through a severe financial depression. 
In sections of the state severe droughts have prevailed for three 
years. It may be necessary for the Board for a time to render 
this field larger aid than heretofore because of the resulting 
financial condition in the state. If men are provided for this 
field, with the high cost of living as it is, it will require some- 
what larger salaries than have been paid and a larger part of 
these must for the time being come from the Board even though 
readjustments of groups have been made for the purpose of 
saving men and money. 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 29 

TENNESSEE. 

The Rev. Calvin A. Duncan, D. D., who was for twenty 
years synodical superintendent of Tennessee, retired from this 
position last October. Dr. Duncan resigned with the profound 
respect and confidence of the entire synod and strong resolutions 
commendatory of his faithfulness and uniform Christian 
courtesy were passed by the synod. 

The synod adopted the policy of having two associate 
superintendents whose fields of labor should be specified but 
who should be available for work anywhere. The Rev. J. H. 
Miller, D. D., three years pastor-evangelist for the presby- 
teries in west Tennessee, and the Rev. W. T. Bartlett, pastor 
of the Westminster Presbyterian Church, New Decatur, 
Alabama, were elected to the positions. Mr. Bartlett entered 
upon the work December first. They are making careful surveys 
of the religious conditions and needs of the various localities in 
which our churches are situated and are doing statesmenlike 
work in the entire synod. 

At the spring meeting of the synod's home mission committee, 
it adopted what it was pleased to call "The Working Policy 
of the Committee on Home Missions of the Synod of Tennessee" 
part of which follows: " Believing the time has come when the 
Presbyterian churches of the Synod of Tennessee should give 
a more careful and intelligent study to the needs and conditions 
of our field, a more earnest and aggressive use of the forces at 
our command; and realizing with all loyalty to the plans of the 
General Assembly, that the cultivation of our particular terri- 
tory depends upon a definite line of action by ourselves rather 
than upon the organized agencies of the Church at large; and 
considering that, for our guidance in meeting the new problems, 
we should set before us a policy clear and comprehensive, 
standards toward which all can move: therefore, the Committee 
on Home Missions of the Synod of Tennessee at its spring 
session adopts the following working policy for the synod." 
This indicates the purpose of the committee. The policy 
embraces every form of Christian service which is demanded 
of our churches in Tennessee. 

The Presbytery of Union proposes to provide for its own 
home mission churches by sending to the Board for evangeli- 
zation all the money it asks for that purpose, and has not only 
taken on new work but has regrouped the home mission churches 
and provided salaries that will call for double the amount 
granted last year. The presbytery will ask the Board to 
administer these funds, just as they have been administered 
heretofore, and has set as its minimum contribution to home 
missions the sum of two thousand dollars. 



30 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

TEXAS. 

The Synod of Texas, at its meeting in October, adopted a 
policy for the reorganization of the field force which provides 
for the selection of a superintendent and a sufficient number of 
assistants to cover the field adequately. Up to the end of the 
year no one had been found for these positions. 

The Bohemian work, within the bounds of the Southwest 
Bohemian Presbytery, has been prosperous and if men and 
means can be secured a great work may be done for the Bo- 
hemians of Texas and Oklahoma. 

There is a growing cordiality between the two branches of 
the Presbyterian Church in Texas. Exchange of weak churches 
have been made and causes for offense have been reduced in 
number. 

For the present there is no change in the pastor-evangelist 
force in that state because a superintendent has not yet been 
selected. 

Certain parts of the state, especially the west and northwest, 
have been severely tried by four successive droughts and men 
who have been hitherto prosperous are now borrowing money 
on which to live. A good many have been forced to abandon 
their pulpits in these sections and the membership of the 
churches has been so depleted that the life of a good many 
churches has been threatened. Because of the assistance 
given by the Board of Home Missions, our ministers in these 
drought stricken regions have been able to remain at their 
posts and minister to a discouraged people. No one has lost 
faith in the final development of this section of Texas and the 
present emergency is not the time to leave the people without 
the ministry of the Word. Other sections of Texas have been 
prosperous and the state, as a whole, has had a good- year. 

The best spring meeting of the synod's home mission com- 
mittee was that held in March and, while the demands on the 
Home Board have been somewhat increased, this is due in part 
to three things: (1) the excessive drought in certain sections; 
(2) the rearrangement of groups, connecting strong fields with 
weak ones and thus taking care of weak fields; and (3) the 
disposition on the part of those churches that have had only 
one-fourth time of the service of the minister to have one-half 
time, and the purpose of those that have had one-half time 
to have full time. This is a healthful sign and while such 
churches have largely increased their gifts to local support, 
they have not yet been able to support the minister independ- 
ent of the gifts of the Home Board. 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 31 

DISTRICT OF THE NORTHWEST. 

For the year's work in the District of the Northwest, which 
comprises the States of Minnesota, Nebraska, and North and 
South Dakota, the field secretary, the Rev. William H. Kearns, 
D. D., presents the following statement: — 

This district has an area of nearly three hundred seven 
thousand square miles, and a population of almost four and 
one-half millions of people. About one million are classed 
as foreigners. There are twenty-seven presbyteries, including 
Dakota (Indian), with eight hundred seventy churches, having 
a membership of nearly sixty-two thousand. About fifty 
per cent, of these churches are more or less dependent upon 
home mission aid in the supporting of their ministers. 

In material things the district has been fairly prosperous. 
In Minnesota, North Dakota and eastern South Dakota and 
Nebraska the crops were abundant, but low prices and 
the mortgaged indebtedness consequent upon the failure of 
crops for the two years previous have made it difficult to make 
much advance in contributions for local support or for the 
Home Mission Board. 

In the matter of local supervision of the mission work, there 
has been considerable progress. The presbyterial and synodi- 
cal committees have been more compactly organized with the 
view of more thoroughly supervising the work in their territory. 
Each synod of the district now provides for synodical review 
and recommendation to the Board of the budget of aid needed 
by the presbyteries. The results of this method of procedure 
are apparent in the increased interest manifested by the com- 
mittees, and in setting apart more time at the meetings of 
presbyteries and synods for the discussion of the problems and 
work of home missions. The committees are also more fully 
recognizing the responsibilities of the work laid upon them 
by their respective bodies, and it is now not an unusual thing 
to find a synod's committee meeting from two to four times a 
year and continuing in session two days at a time. 

One of the most difficult problems which the committees 
constantly face is the securing of efficient ministers for the 
mission fields. The insufficient supply, inadequate salaries, 
and the strenuous character of the work required on many 
fields, indicate some of the obstacles to be overcome. While 
the work suffers on this account, yet much has been done on 
these vacant mission fields by the pastor-evangelists, a large 
part of whose work is ministering to these little congregations. 
During the year twenty pastor-evangelists, six of whom were 
commissioned jointly by the Home Mission and Sabbath- 
School Boards, have been at work in the district. Most of 
them have rendered very efficient service. They are the 



32 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

executive officers of the committees and do any work needing 
to be done in the districts they serve. It would be impossible 
to indicate all that has been accomplished through these field 
men. They have assisted in raising thousands of dollars for 
church buildings and manses, and the salaries of the missionar- 
ies. They have introduced, and helped put in operation, 
business methods of church finance. They have preached 
the gospel, visited the homes, administered the sacraments, 
organized churches and Sabbath schools, and in many ways 
ministered to the people in the neglected communities. Sum- 
marizing a few of the items reported, we find that they have 
preached 2,358 sermons, made 8,110 pastoral visits, held 77 
series of evangelistic meetings, resulting in 522 professed 
conversions. They received into church membership 818 
persons, of whom 558 were on confession of faith. They collect- 
ed and sent to the Board offerings to the amount of nearly four 
thousand dollars. 

The relations of the ecclesiastical bodies to each other are 
more cordial than formerly. Comity sentiment has increased 
with the year. In each state there is either a regularly organized 
federation council, or a comity committee representing several 
denominations. Work along this line is probably the best 
organized in Nebraska, where an executive secretary and an 
assistant devote their entire time to the work; the salaries 
and expenses being met by apportionments made upon the 
denominations identified with the movement. In South 
Dakota the state federation meeting was the most enthusiastic 
and successful thus far held. As one result of this growing 
sentiment there has been an exchange of fields by denominations 
in a number of instances, and in a few small towns two or more 
churches have been federated under one minister. As our 
mission fields are more carefully studied, it is apparent that 
there is not a great deal of overlapping. In many places ours 
is the only English Protestant church. At the meeting of one 
synod's committee it was brought out that in one presbytery, 
out of twenty-one churches asking aid, only three were in 
towns having other English Protestant services. 

In some parts of the district there is spiritual destitution. 
This is mostly in the sparsely settled parts of western North 
and South Dakota, and in northern Minnesota. How are we 
to serve these people? Two or three presbyteries are trying 
the plan of placing ministers at strategic centers from which 
they shall reach five or six churches and out-stations. This 
kind of work requires real missionaries and the expenditure 
of much home mission money, as little can be raised on such 
fields. Comparatively little is being done for the strictly 
foreign population by our Church, as most nationalities in the 
district are ministered to by other denominations which use 
the foreign language. 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 33 

Considering the work as a whole there has been substantial 
progress throughout the district. Interest in the work of home 
missions has increased. New churches have been organized. 
Better financial plans have been put in operation. A number 
of churches have become self-supporting, and the committees 
have exercised closer supervision. While some presbyteries 
are asking more money from the Board an account of the 
demand for better salaries and the need of more ministers, 
yet others are asking less. In one presbytery the amount 
asked for next year is about twelve hundred dollars less than 
the amount actually received this year. 

MINNESOTA. 

In this synod the home mission and Sabbath-school work is 
under the general supervision of a single committee, the Rev. 
George E. Davies, chairman. The plan has proved very 
satisfactory and it is hoped that considerable progress has been 
made toward self-support, although the increased demands 
of the northern and western parts of the state indicate that it 
will be several years before the goal is reached. There has been 
no change in pastor-evangelists except in Adams Presbytery 
where the Rev. R. S. Sidebotham was commissioned to succeed 
the Rev. D. K. Laurie who removed from the state. In the 
Presbyteries of Minneapolis, St. Paul and Duluth, church 
extension committees have been organized to include all the 
home mission, Sabbath-school and church erection matters. 
These committees are necessary in view of the growth of the 
cities from which the presbyteries take their names. Splendid 
results are expected from this method of administering the 
work. In the northeastern part of the state increased effort 
has been made to reach the large number of miners and lumber 
camp men. This part of the state is developing rapidly, and 
the material resources are largely undeveloped. In the north- 
western part of the state, with splendid agricultural possibili- 
ties, there are large tracts of country which have not yet been 
explored by the Church. 

Work ' in the lumber camps has been actively prosecuted 
during the year. The Rev. Frank E. Higgins, who has general 
supervision of this work, reports that eight men and one 
woman have been engaged in missionary work in the logging 
camps. Five of these have been employed throughout the 
year, and four for six months. One of these missionaries 
spent six months along the Mississippi River, having a territory 
of about fifty miles, and being the only missionary of any 
denomination. He was provided with a canoe, tent and other 
things needful for his journeys up and down the river. In 
the fall he removed to another point, from which he reached 



34 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

twenty logging camps with about fifteen hundred men. An- 
other of these missionaries, laboring in the Big Fork country, 
has completed a church organization of thirty-one members. 
During the winter he ministers to about one thousand men in 
twelve camps. Mrs. McCall, the wife of one of our mission- 
aries to the lumber jacks, has done splendid work in visiting 
the hospitals located at Cloquet, Virginia, Superior and Duluth, 
being the only Christian woman many of these fellows have 
had to minister to their physical and spiritual needs. During 
the year about seven tons of reading matter have been distribut- 
ed in the camps and among the homesteaders, besides several 
boxes and barrels of second-hand clothing, and large quantities 
of fruit and comfort bags among the men in the hospitals. 

The primary object of this work is to reach these men with 
the gospel of Christ. The missionaries have been received 
with kindness, both by the lumber jacks and by the companies. 
Over ten thousand men, or about one-half of the number 
employed in the camps, have thus been reached. Wherever 
possible, little churches are organized, and the lumber camp 
work tied up in them. 

NEBRASKA. 

This synod has the unique distinction of being the only self- 
supporting synod which sustains the same relation to the 
Board as the dependent synods. The plan has proved very 
satisfactory in that there is complete freedom in the way of 
local administration without in any way decreasing the interest 
in the nation-wide work. The union of the home mission and 
Sabbath-school work under joint committees of presbyteries 
and synod, has proved exceedingly satisfactory. At the 
last meeting of synod some advanced steps were taken in the 
administration of the field work. Synod's committee was 
authorized to divide the state into districts and appoint a 
district superintendent over each; these men being available 
for work in any part of the synod under the direction of the 
committee. The field secretary continues to act as synodical 
superintendent, and with four district men, directs the field 
work of both the Home Mission and Sabbath-School Boards. 
During the year the Rev. W. H. Cooper, pastor-evangelist of 
Hastings and Nebraska City Presbyteries, resigned to accept the 
call of the church at Fullerton, where he was formerly pastor. 
The Rev. R. M. L. Braden, D. D., pastor-evangelist of Omaha 
Presbytery for many years, was called from his earthly to 
his heavenly service. The northern district is served by the 
Rev. Samuel Light, the southern district by the Rev. Julius 
F. Schwarz, the central district by the Rev. N. C. Johnson, 
and the western district by the Rev. D. W. Montgomery. 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 35 

The two latter are commissioned by both the Home Mission 
and Sabbath-School Boards. 

The Omaha Indian Reservation is located in the eastern 
part of this synod, and for many years our Church has carried 
on mission work among these people. During the year a 
hospital has been built and equipped for the Indians at Walthill, 
the cost exceeding ten thousand dollars. 

Exclusive of appropriations made by the Board for the 
Indian work, for the year closing March thirty-first, 1912, the 
synod expended $13,236. and contributed to the Board $14,791. 
The offerings this year may not be so large in view of the extreme 
drought conditions which prevailed in the southern part of 
the state, and the disease which caused the death of hundreds 
of horses. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

This state had abundant crops during the past year, and 
land values have steadily increased, but the drought conditions 
during the previous two years compelled the farmers to place 
heavy mortgages on their property, so that the contributions 
for the work of the Church have been little more than formerly. 
This state is capable of supporting ten times its present popula- 
tion, and it is expected that there will be thousands of new 
settlers next year. A large part of the present population is 
Scandinavian. Our churches, outside of a few of the larger 
towns, are mostly small, and in many instances they are the 
only churches in the community ministering to the people in 
the English language. In Bismarck Presbytery, which includes 
more than one-fourth of the entire state, there are large stretches 
of country without an organized church. It has been exceed- 
ingly difficult to get ministers who will endure the hardships 
necessary to minister to these large communities. 

Some changes have been made in the pastor-evangelists 
during the year. The Rev. C. W. Fye succeeded the Rev. 
M. S. Riddle in Oakes Presbytery, and in Minot Presbytery 
the Rev. T. U. Richmond was selected to take the place of the 
Rev. H. S. Waaler, Ph.D. Under favorable conditions our 
Church should make rapid progress in the future. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

For a number of years our Church has made little progress 
in this state. The drought of the past few years, especially 
in the part of the state west of the Missouri River, has seriously 
interfered with the permanency of the work. There has not 
been the best distribution of field workers, as it was found 
impossible for the presbyteries to successfully carry on the 



36 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

work in the sparsely settled regions, it being necessary for the 
pastor-evangelists to travel hundreds of miles to reach parts 
of their territory. It is hoped that the changes recently made 
will prove more successful. At the last meeting of the synod 
the field work was placed under the supervision of its home 
mission committee, and the synod was divided into four 
districts which can be more readily served by the pastor- 
evangelists. The northern district includes parts of Aberdeen, 
Reserve and Black Hills Presbyteries, and the territory is mostly 
reached by railroads. The Rev. C. C. Todd has been placed 
in charge. The central district, composed of parts of Aberdeen 
and Central Dakota Presbyteries, will be under the super- 
vision of the Rev. Henry Cullen, D. D. The southeast district, 
which includes Sioux Falls and parts of Central Dakota and 
Reserve Presbyteries, has the Rev. William Wallace, D. D., 
as its pastor-evangelist, and the Rev. J. S. Surbeck ministers 
to the Black Hills district, made up of parts of Black Hills and 
Reserve Presbyteries. These men are selected by the synod's 
committee and are under its general supervision. It is hoped 
that the new plan will prove much more efficient. The sy nodi- 
cal committee is taking a great interest in the work and reviews 
the presbyterial schedules and makes the recommendations 
to the Board. 

Connected with this synod is the Dakota (Indian) Presbytery 
with twenty-three ministers, thirty-four churches, and over 
nineteen hundred members. The Rev. J. P. Williamson, D. D., 
has for many years been the missionary to these people. The 
work has been very encouraging during the past year. 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN DISTRICT. 

For this section, which includes Montana, southern Idaho, 
Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona, the 
field secretary, the Rev. Robert M. Donaldson, D. D., presents 
the following statements: — 

This district comprises six synods and twenty-four presby- 
teries. Initial steps have been taken to organize Wyoming 
into a separate synod, which will make one synod for each 
state in the district. Two new presbyteries have been organ- 
ized: the Presbytery of Laramie, set aside from Cheyenne; 
and the Presbytery of Northern Arizona from Phoenix. The 
latter organization made possible the erection of the synod 
of Arizona, heretofore united with New Mexico. 

This district is served by field men, four of whom are com- 
missioned as synodical superintendents, serving the Synods 
of Arizona, New Mexico, Idaho and Utah. There are eleven 
pastor-evangelists, each serving one or more presbyteries in 
Colorado, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. One of these holds 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 37 

a joint commission from the Home Board and the Sabbath- 
School Board. Each gives all his time to the field for which 
he is commissioned. 

At no time during the year has each church been served by a 
minister living on its field. Not enough men are available. 
The cost of reaching the field, the cost of living while on the 
field, the lack of manse or available house for residence and, 
in some cases, the inadequate salary offered, turned away 
many men who sought work. This scarcity of men, which 
in several cases was distressing, would have resulted in total 
disorganization of our forces, but for the timely and faithful 
service of our pastor-evangelists. They were tireless in the 
experienced service which they rendered to these shepherdless 
flocks. In many places where a pastor was finally secured, he 
found a people united and vigorous because of such shepherd- 
ing. It is difficult to conceive of any other practical plan by 
which these remote fields can be held intact, and led forward 
along aggressive lines through their period of vacancy. Under 
the ministry of the pastor-evangelists, some of these churches 
have made marked progress, financially and spiritually. Most 
of our home mission committees would be in despair, but for 
the efficient cooperation of these field men who sacrifice home 
comforts and pastoral fellowship for the sake of the larger 
interests of the Kingdom of their Master. 

Several events of more than passing interest mark the closing 
year. The needs and opportunities of country life were 
emphasized in a summer conference of two weeks, held in Estes 
Park and attended by thirty-five ministers. Planned as an 
interdenominational conference, it was attended only by 
Presbyterians. They represented our rural work in the States 
of Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Kansas 
and Nebraska. So helpful was this conference that similar 
annual conferences were unanimously agreed upon till this 
phase of our work shall be fully developed. Local conferences 
have been held in churches and communities, growing out of the 
suggestions received in the above institute. The fact that 
about one-third of all churches in the Rocky Mountain District 
are of this type, and that nearly all our new organizations are in 
rural regions, make this study imperative. 

In June the initial conference concerning work among Spanish- 
American people in the United States was held at Albuquerque. 
This was interdenominational, including secretaries and field 
workers from all denominations enlisted in this enterprise. 
The results were so far-reaching that a permanent Council has 
been established. This includes all evangelical work in the 
five States of California, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado 
and Texas. It is generally conceded that this work will long 
continue of a purely missionary type, and that self-support 



38 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

or self-direction cannot be expected in the near future. Even 
creditable advance will be impossible till more leaders are 
trained for pastoral service among their own people. This 
makes imperative the training school for evangelists which 
is contemplated in connection with Menaul School at Albuquer- 
que. All the denominations recognize the value of cooperation 
if this work is to be brought to large success. 

Home Mission Week was observed with enthusiasm and 
profit in many of the churches. Wherever observed it is 
believed that this was one of the wisest and most comprehen- 
sive plans yet devised to promote the evangelization of our land ; 
and that it should have a permanent place in the calendar of 
our religious activities. 

In some sections the principles of federation are being worked 
out with carefulness and hope. Indeed it is one of the most 
hopeful signs of progress. It has been frankly discussed in 
each state of the district, and interdenominational comity is 
insisted upon to a larger degree than ever before. 

ARIZONA. 

This is not only a new state, but a new synod. It has recently 
become an ecclesiastical as well as a civil unit. Its forces 
are weak in numbers, but strong in faith and hope. Its fields 
are widely scattered but its laborers are knit together for 
united effort. This infant synod is proposing to coordinate 
its work from the first, in the interests of closer direction and 
more comprehensive effort. While this is difficult yet they 
deem it essential. 

Their constituency is widely diverse, including the foreigners 
of the camp, the several Indian tribes of the desert, the large 
element of Spanish-American people, together with the city 
and country populations of English-speaking people. It is 
estimated that one-fifth of the population of the state belong 
to the non-English-speaking class. To each of these we are 
presenting the scriptural standards of life and faith. In the 
federation of Protestant forces on the field, Arizona easily leads 
the district. While not the first to insist upon the recognition 
of these principles, it is the first to organize for their enforce- 
ment in a sane and practical way. Their federation includes 
all evangelical denominations now at work in the state. It 
counsels against undue multiplication of organizations. It has 
secured temporary transfer of fields, from the weaker to the 
stronger. It undertakes to demonstrate to the constituency 
of each that the highest interests of God and man may thus be 
served. The field worker is the Rev. Frank C. Reid, of Phoenix, 
Arizona, who labors in closest sympathy with the committee 
of each presbytery. 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 39 

The training school for Indian evangelists, located at Tucson, 
properly bears the name of the Rev. Charles H. Cook, D. D., 
who has given forty-two years of continuous and consecrated 
service to the desert tribes who, until his coming, were without 
God and without hope. We are looking to it to provide 
trained leaders for our work in Arizona and adjoining states. 

COLORADO. 

The Protestant forces of Colorado are facing the problem of 
federated action, and are facing it with serious purpose. Nor 
have they moved prematurely in this direction. If a recent 
agreement is carried out upon the field, it will eliminate many 
conflicts, while it strengthens the influence and increases the 
efficiency of each denomination in its legitimate work. It will 
demonstrate the permanent character of our work, and will 
remove one of the most forceful reasons for short pastorates. 
It may require several years of wise administration to secure 
universal approval of the policy. It is worth waiting and 
working for. 

The non-English-speaking population of Colorado has not 
received due consideration from the Protestant Church. Plans 
are now maturing for a summer survey and evangelistic tour 
among these people in Pueblo Presbytery. A conference of 
Colorado field workers agreed that a test should be made in 
the mining regions of southern Colorado. Work in other parts 
of the synod will hinge upon the success of this effort which 
has the cordial support of the Board of Home Missions and of 
Pueblo Presbytery. The field includes one hundred thousand 
who speak an alien language. Pueblo thus becomes one of 
twenty-two presbyteries in which such surveys are being made 
in the interest of the nation as well as of the Kingdom of God. 
Some of the Colorado presbyteries are concentrating their 
energies on church extension, and are merging their committees 
to secure intelligent and harmonious action. 

Looking toward securing increased study of God's Word in 
the state institutions, with the approval of the State Teacher's 
Associations a Colorado pastor is preparing a course wherein 
students in these schools may pursue Bible study under the 
auspices of local churches, and can obtain credits in the institu- 
tion for the work done. 

The following pastor-evangelists are at work in Colorado: 
the Rev. C. K. Powell, in Boulder and Denver Presbyteries; 
the Rev. J. R. Lamb, in Gunnison; and the Rev. M. H. MacLeod 
D. D., in Pueblo. 



40 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

IDAHO. 

Idaho is taking initial steps toward becoming an organized 
synod. It hopes, through this means, both to unify and 
intensify its home mission work. Conditions incident to a new 
country, with its unoccupied areas, the long distances to be 
traversed, and the scarcity of men make this a more serious 
task than in the larger populations. 

In the death of the Rev. John Gourley, D. D., the home 
mission forces of the synod lost an aggressive and helpful leader. 
Few men have been permitted in so brief a period to witness 
such rapid expansion in the local church which he served and 
in the new synod for whose erection he labored so zealously. 

Except in the strictly Mormon towns, few communities in 
Idaho are destitute of religious privileges. In the new towns 
that are springing up so rapidly provision is made for religious 
occupancy from the first. 

The present field force includes the Rev. J. H. Barton, D. D., 
synodical superintendent, and the Rev. J. K. MacGillivray, 
pastor-evangelist for Twin Falls Presbytery. Efficiency con- 
ferences have been held in most of the fields,- in which pastor 
and people are stimulated toward united study of local needs, 
and to plan for larger service. 

The year has brought encouragement through increased 
activity in some fields long inactive; the organization of five 
new churches; the erection of four new houses of worship and 
of three manses. 

The sentiment for federation has not developed as rapidly as 
in some other states, but its advocates insist upon being heard. 

MONTANA. 

The presbyteries in Montana have experienced unusual 
difficulty in securing men who are willing to serve mission 
fields. For this reason the number of vacant churches during 
all or part of the year is greater than in some other years. 
This condition has demonstrated the imperative need for men 
whose commission permits them to care for these churches till 
permanent men can be secured. This field force is as follows: 
the Rev. J. H. Mcjunkin in Butte Presbytery, the Rev. A. B. 
Minamyer in Great Falls, the Rev. W. N. Sloan, Ph.D., in 
Helena, the Rev. Alexander Pringle in Kalispell and the Rev. 
T. M. Patterson in Yellowstone. 

Emphasis is being placed upon two phases of religious 
enterprise. A Bible conference is to be held early in July, 
in which it is expected that ministers and laymen will participate. 
It is projected by one of the country churches whose officers 
have assumed large obligations to launch this spiritual enter- 
prise. 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 41 

The development of country life is also receiving marked 
attention. Foremost in this line of service are men charged 
by the state and nation with the development of the material 
and educational interests of the people. They not only co- 
operate heartily with religious bodies, as they have opportunity, 
but their own conferences and institutes among rural com- 
munities emphasize the value of definite religious training 
and of fraternal cooperation in each community, as potent 
forces in all that pertains to religious and social progress. 

In spiritual attainment, so far as it is shown by addition to 
the churches, Montana for many years, has had a net increase 
of ten per cent, or more. Perhaps no other synod has the 
unvarying record which characterizes this, — of adding more 
members on confession of their faith than by letter. This is 
evidence of substantial inroads upon the unchurched populations 
of the state. Incidentally it pays a tribute to the efficiency and 
devotion of our ministers and their supporters. 

NEW MEXICO. 

This synod has divided its area, by the erection of the Synod 
of Arizona. But it has not, to any perceptible degree, lessened 
its problems or responsibilities thereby. In its diversity of 
interests the field is exacting enough to call for consecrated 
energy, fraternal cooperation, and aggressive leadership. In 
its record of accessions to the churches it generally receives 
more members by profession than by letter. 

It occupies a strategic position. Its territory lies in the 
heart of the great Spanish-American population of the South- 
west. Naturally the success of our work among these people 
will contribute largely to the success in adjoining states. The 
unrest in Mexico incident to the present revolution means 
that we will have larger populations of Spanish-speaking people. 
What we do with these will go far toward determining what 
our moral influence will be upon the neighbors who remain 
in Mexico. If peace is to reign on our borders, faith in God 
must lay the foundations of that peace. Our schools and 
missions must have an ever-increasing influence, if this program 
for better citizenship and for a more spiritual kingdom is to be 
realized. 

Several ministers, through the helpful ministry of the Presby- 
terian Sanatorium at Albuquerque, are rejoicing in restored 
health and strength, and are able to return to their fields of 
labor in this and other lands. The restoration to full service 
of experienced and capable men surely puts such an institution 
on a par with those institutions whose prime service is to 
prepare men for the gospel ministry. Its signal service to the 
Church commends it to the attention of those whose powers 



42 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913 

are depleted by disease, and to the generous support of those 
to whom God has entrusted a large portion of his treasure. 
The synodical superintendent is the Rev. John R. Gass, D. D. 

UTAH. 

The Protestant forces in Utah are coming together and are 
planning for such occupancy of the fields as will remove every 
basis for the charge of interdenominational competition. 
When this is said it should be remembered that instances are 
scarce compared with like conflicts in the eastern states. This 
is largely true of all western states; but the nature of the work 
in Utah has almost prohibited duplication of organizations 
which is characteristic of other regions. Adjustments are 
contemplated which will eliminate some of these hindrances. 
It is an opportune time to establish this principle beyond con- 
troversy and to adjust denominational plans and agencies to it. 
Any other line of action in these meager fields would be a crime 
against God and man. 

An item of general interest is worth noting. A vast majority 
of Mormon recruits are from abroad. The unrest in the 
membership of state churches furnishes a most fruitful field 
for Mormon appeal. Many of these people are intelligent, 
trained in the schools as well as the churches, accustomed to 
think for themselves. They discover, sooner or later, that 
they are the victims of a pious fraud. Should a leader arise 
within their own Church, like the leaders of the reformation, 
he would find many of these ready to rally about his standard. 
To meet these and other emergencies, our churches must be 
manned with leaders of the largest possible endowment of 
intelligence and human sympathy, crowned with the graces 
of a Christly life. More and more we must study leadership; 
for we will find ere long that increasing numbers are becoming 
susceptible to leadership of a sane and safe type. Who should 
furnish it, if not the Church? All the investments of conse- 
crated men and means will fail of fruitful issue, should we fail 
at this point. 

The Rev. Josiah McClain is synodical missionary. 

WYOMING, 

The total membership of the evangelical churches in Wyoming 
is estimated at about ten thousand. About one-sixth of these 
are in the Presbyterian churches, few of which are self-support- 
ing, and several are without houses of worship. With only 
six or seven per cent, of the population of the state responding 
to the appeals of the gospel, it seems clear that no over-emphasis 
is laid upon religious life. There is abundant area for all real 



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1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 43 

workers, and a proper distribution of church workers will 
accomplish infinitely more for the state and for the churches 
themselves than will a partisan attempt to cover the same 
ground. Much of the discouragement incident to Wyoming 
work lies at this point. Within three years the Presbytery 
of Cheyenne has more than doubled its members and ministers. 
This made possible the organization of Laramie Presbytery 
within the year, and furnishes a constitutional basis for the 
erection of the Synod of Wyoming, when the time is ripe. If 
suitable men can be obtained, Wyoming furnishes one of the 
most fruitful and strategic fields in which to expend our energies. 
The pastor-evangelists are the Rev. L. Harold Forde, for 
Cheyenne and Laramie, and the Rev. J. W. Winder, for Sheridan 
Presbyteries. 

A glance at the Rocky Mountain District, covering the 
records of the last five years, contains suggestion, inspiration, 
and cause for thankfulness to God. In the entire district more 
than thirty-one per cent, of the entire number received on 
profession of their faith united with the aid-receiving churches. 
In this period the net gain of membership within the district 
is an advance of more than one-third. 

Much more might be accomplished if we had adequate 
equipment for service. One frontier presbytery has not a 
single manse within its borders. One synod has sixteen church 
organizations that are without a house of worship; in many 
cases they do not even own ground upon which to build. One- 
third of these were organized within the last year. Three new 
churches have just been completed and other buildings are 
projected. It is a manifestation of the grace of God when 
such churches win members and gather offerings for the work 
of the Church in other places, some of which are favored far 
beyond them in material and spiritual advantage. Conditions 
there are duplicated in each of the synods in the district. 
The district is at work upon problems that are far-reaching. 
Some of these are being solved, not for individuals, nor for 
states, but for nations and races. For example: if the conquest 
of arid America establishes processes by which desert and 
famine stricken lands shall be crowned with harvests and 
orchards and gardens, we have wrought for humanity. 

PACIFIC COAST DISTRICT. 

For this section the field secretary, the Rev. William Sylvester 
Holt, D. D., presents the following statement: — 

This district covers Washington and northern Idaho, Oregon, 
California, and Nevada, — having three synods and twenty -five 
presbyteries. 



44 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

One of the main topics of discussion during the year through- 
out the entire Pacific Coast District, has been that of organi- 
zation. Special plans for organization have been introduced 
into the three synods, at their meetings last fall, and have fared, 
practically, in the same way. California has adopted organi- 
zation on a basis submitted to the presbyteries before, and 
in this basis are the following salient points worthy of record : — 

First, the home mission committee is to be made up of a 
member from each presbytery, nominated by that presbytery, 
and to serve for three years. The committee to elect from its 
own number an executive commission to act in the interim 
in its behalf, and to elect its own officers. 

Second, the commission is charged with the responsibility 
of the direction and oversight of the home mission work of the 
synod, and clothed with authority adequate to the discharge 
of this responsibility, provided always that the constitutional 
rights of presbyteries, churches and individuals be recognized 
and respected. It is to seek to unify the home mission work of 
the synod, to promote unity and cooperation among the several 
presbyteries, to enlist the strong presbyteries in aid of the 
weak, and all in the effort to attain self-support. Through 
its officers and field agents it is to endeavor to cover the entire 
field with inspirational and helpful influence. 

Third, it shall hold stated meetings, twice a year, in October 
and in the early spring, for the consideration of all matters 
connected with the work. At the spring meeting, the estimates 
of all the presbyteries — or their committees — of the sum needed 
for the work of the ensuing fiscal year within their bounds, and 
the budgets apportioning the amounts to be raised by their 
churches for home missions, shall be presented in detailf or the 
consideration and advice of the committee, and any modifica- 
tion thereof, suggested by the committee, shall be given respect- 
ful consideration by the presbyteries or their committees in 
making up the final estimate and budget. 

As concerns field workers, it was determined by the synod 
that pastor-evangelists shall be elected by such presbyteries as 
desire their services, and in the judgment of the sy nodical 
committee are in need of them. The maximum number 
of pastor-evangelists to be employed in the synod, and the 
presbyteries entitled to elect them, shall be determined by the 
synodical committee after careful consideration of the needs 
of the whole field, and presbyteries which are without pastor- 
evangelists of their own, shall be entitled to the assistance of 
those of other presbyteries as occasion may demand, and as 
may be agreed upon by the home mission committees of pres- 
byteries interested. It is provided also that the plan of organi- 
zation shall leave unchanged the relations now existing between 
the presbyteries, or their committees, and the missionaries and 
the mission churches under their care. 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 45 

In accordance with their plan the home mission committee 
of the Synod of California held their first meeting in San 
Francisco in February and studied in detail their entire home 
mission budget for the ensuing year, returning recommendations 
to the various presbyteries for their consideration. Delightful 
and harmonious, the meeting showed the great value of synodi- 
cal organization and most favorably impressed all who attended 
it. Since in California alone such a plan is in operation, 
Washington and Oregon will watch with interest the working 
of synodical organization in their neighboring synod. 

The Synod of Oregon brought up a plan for organization at 
its last meeting, but, as the meeting was held in a remote 
portion of the state, and only a small number were present, 
it did not seem wise to take final action. Therefore the plan 
was referred once more to the presbyteries for their full and 
careful consideration, and it will come up next fall for final 
action, undoubtedly, with a strong sentiment in the synod 
in favor of organization. And at the same time there^ is 
considerable opposition to it. It will have careful discussion 
and will be decided on its merits, at the next meeting, in 
Portland, where a large attendance is expected. 

In the Synod of Washington organization received definite 
action to this extent. After a careful consideration of the plan 
proposed, in which it was determined to separate Sunday- 
school work from home mission work entirely, and to erect a 
new committee to look after Sunday-school work, the plan 
was referred to the presbyteries, and a decision was reached 
by the synod that, after a majority of the presbyteries have 
approved the plan, it shall immediately become operative. 

GENERAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE HOME MISSION WORK. 

The largest development at present in this district is in the 
famous San Joaquin Valley. Large tracts of land heretofore 
used for farming, cut up into smaller tracts, are being sold out 
to settlers. New towns are developing along the Southern 
Pacific and the Santa Fe Railroads ; and new irrigation projects 
are bringing land under more intensive cultivation. This 
has largely increased the population, and the demand for home 
mission work. All of these new places need the gospel, and 
we are trying to do our share in giving it to them, therefore 
it will be found that the calls from the San Joaquin Presbytery 
will be larger for next year than from almost any other part 
of the entire district, altogether owing to the new development 
and the increasing population. 

In all three synods the most marked growth is in the great 
cities. The following facts, from the Statistical Department 



46 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

of the Census Bureau for the year ending December thirty-first, 
1912, are most significant: — 



Tacoma in 1910, 82,972 



Spokane 

Portland 

Los Angeles.... 

Seattle 

San Francisco 



104,402 
207,214 
319,198 
237,194 
416,912 



in 1912, 96,404. 

124,657. 
240,597. 
399,240. 
286,322. 
437,241. 



City home mission work manifestly needs immediate and careful 
attention if we would meet the situation. The presbyteries 
are alive to it. This means that the demands for home mission 
work in the cities are growing faster than the demands of the 
country about them. Our cities are destined to be great 
cities, and the home mission work needs immediate and pressing 
attention, in order that we may meet the situation. The 
presbyteries are alive to this situation, and are doing their 
utmost to meet it. For example, Los Angeles Presbytery 
has changed its home mission committee into a committee of 
church extension, and has entirely reorganized it. 

The Presbytery of Portland is considering the very same 
thing, in order to meet the growing needs in that city, and 
throughout all the cities of the Coast there is a continued 
demand, which requires our utmost efforts to meet. It is 
getting to be true on this Coast, as it is in other parts of the 
United States, that the cities are the great home mission 
centers, and require the most careful and exacting attention 
from the churches in order to keep pace with the growing 
population. At the same time, new railroads and new irrigation 
projects are adding to the country population, and adding 
equally to the home mission need. How people who go on 
to raw land and prepare it for cultivation are able to make a 
living while they are waiting for it to come to production is 
a problem. That they are not able to meet all the demands 
made upon them for churches and schools is not to be at all 
wondered at. The governments of the states with their large 
school funds are able to help support the schools; the Church, 
also from its resources in other parts of the country, must 
help th,e churches until they can come to the time of self- 
support. Nevertheless, the Honor Roll will show progress 
toward self-support among individual churches. 

THE LOGGING CAMPS. 

Our Church is still the only one at work for the loggers 
throughout the entire Pacific Coast District, but is only begin- 
ning to meet the needs. In these camps are thousands of men 
who never have the opportunity to hear the gospel. Mr. 
Fred W. Davis and the Rev. T. H. Simpson, in Oregon and 
Washington, respectively, have been kept busy whenever the 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 47 

camps have been open, and have done excellent work among 
them, and we are having good help from men who are con- 
tiguous to the camps in the State of California. Their reports 
show the progress that is making. They are not only consider- 
ing the spiritual welfare of the men but are doing all that is 
possible to improve their physical conditions. Under their 
stimulus a number of the camps have provided better accommo- 
dations for the men, and the competition that will ensue from 
finding good conditions in one camp and poor in another will 
certainly have its effect. In Washington, Mr. Simpson has 
led the city of Aberdeen to undertake a forward movement 
in establishing a home for the loggers where they may avoid 
the many temptations they meet in the town. This has not 
yet materialized in full, but good progress has been made and 
it is hoped that it will be accomplished during the coming year. 

Nor must we forget the faithful efforts of men who live near 
the camps. The Rev. William Baesler, in the northern part 
of California, and the Rev. Riley C. Grace on the western coast 
of California have done all in their power to reach the men who 
are near them. They distribute literature and preach the gos- 
pel when it is possible. Mr. Baesler especially has spent consider- 
able time in the camps themselves, trying to help the men 
to the knowledge of the truth as it is in Jesus Christ. 

We have had the aid of students in the northern part of 
California, who have done good service. One from New York 
City has been led by his experience on the Coast to give himself 
entirely to this work after completing his studies. 

Praise is due the Rev. John W. Beard, pastor of the church 
at Hoquiam, who has not only induced his people to pay forty 
dollars a month towards the support of a missionary in the 
camps, but who has himself given a portion of his time to those 
camps contiguous to his town. All these things have helped 
and we are interested in the development of the logging camp 
work. At the same time we should do something to interest 
all the denominations in this work, rather than lay the burden 
of it upon one, for it is not a work out of which come churches, 
and it should be maintained on an interdenominational basis. 
It would seem wise to call this to the attention of the Home 
Missions Council, and see if it cannot be taken up in a general 
way by all the Churches, rather than by one Church. 

ITALIAN WORK. 

Large numbers of Italians are found in the several city 
centers. Regarding the work of our Church among them in 
San Francisco report is made under the Department of Immi- 
gration. Little is done among the Italians in any other part 
of the district at present, although there are more than ten 



48 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 1913.] 

thousand in the city of Portland, and there are many in the 
city of Seattle, also. 

THE SURVEY. 

While the results of the survey, which was arranged by the 
representatives of the Home Missions Council a year ago, have 
not all been secured, yet enough has been discovered from that 
survey to show where more work needs to be done. It is hoped 
that one result of this will be some arrangement whereby 
Churches shall cease to crowd upon each other, will undertake 
to care for the unoccupied territory, and so extend the Kingdom 
in a definite, practical, Christian way. This is one of the 
things hoped for in the continuation of the work of the survey 
throughout the states of the Pacific Coast. 



COMITY AND FEDERATION. 

Decided progress has been made during the past year, to 
which it is worth while to call attention. 

In Freewater, Oregon, three churches combined under a fed- 
erated system. By federation, of course, we do not mean 
union. Neither Church gives up its own special organiza- 
tion, but they combine for an aggressive work in the community 
in which they are situated. Upon the formation of the federa- 
tion, the churches became self-supporting, paid a living salary to 
the new pastor, and the work seems to be progressing in a satis- 
factory way. 

Enterprise, the county seat of Wallowa County, in northeast- 
ern Oregon, has taken up the same movement. There Method- 
ists, Presbyterians and Disciples have combined in one federa- 
tion, have elected a pastor, and immediately are paying a salary 
of fifteen hundred dollars. Each church has its own building, 
and they are all used for the work of the federated church. The 
Sunday schools, arranged in classes, meet in the different build- 
ings so that they do not trespass upon each other, and do not 
disturb each other by their noise. The meetings are held in the 
largest building. The progress is showing that they have made 
a wise move in undertaking the federation. 

In the Presbytery of Portland are two fields, in which there 
are two churches, and neither field is able to support one. They 
are both occupied by Presbyterians and Methodists. An ar- 
rangement has been made whereby the Presbyterians withdraw 
from one, and the Methodists from the other, with the distinct 
agreement not to interfere further; each will carry on the work 
in the field assigned to it, and all Christians will work together 
for one end. 



1913.1 BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 49 

These things show that the spirit of comity is abroad and what 
can be done when it can be brought to a definite point. We be- 
lieve that finer results will follow hereafter. The Presbyterian 
Church is interested in the movement and believes in its exten- 
sion. 

FINANCIAL CONDITIONS. 

Special financial conditions largely peculiar to the fruit dis- 
tricts should have special mention. For example, eastern Wash- 
ington, in the irrigated districts, has given a great deal of its ter- 
ritory to raising fruit. Wonderful apples grow in that region, 
and beautiful peaches and luscious grapes and all kinds of fruits 
that can be raised in a temperate zone. Last year the crop was 
one of the largest that has ever been known throughout the en- 
tire district. But, unfortunately for the people on the Coast, 
there was a large crop throughout the United States. This 
closed the eastern markets to the Coast people, and much of this 
crop of apples was put into cold-storage waiting for a market. 
Other fruits that will not keep, like peaches, in many instances 
had to be sacrificed ; some men realized only half a cent a box on 
their peaches, others received nothing whatever from the com- 
mission men to whom they shipped, but even had a bill to pay 
after the crop had been sold. One shipper of three carloads of 
apples received from the men who sold them for him a check of 
twenty-seven cents. 

In southern California the most severe frost in years de- 
stroyed not only the citrus fruit, but in some cases the orchards 
as well. One man in southern California, who valued his land 
at one thousand dollars an acre because he had a growing or- 
chard, is ready to take less than a third of that because the 
trees have been destroyed, must be cut up and burned or 
thrown away, and the land must be reset. 

It can readily be seen how this situation in the home mission 
district will cut into the support of the churches. These things 
need to be borne in mind, for they come to us occasionally as 
they have come the past year, and the Church will be called 
upon to meet them in enlarged grants in some places, because 
of this unusual situation. 

OUTLOOK. 

There is nothing to be said concerning the outlook except that 
which is full of hope. We are optimistic on the Pacific Coast. 
We see a great future for the entire country. There seems to be 
nowhere else for people to go, except to come here. With ad- 
mirable climate, with remarkable resources still largely undevel- 
oped, with vast areas in which there is no one yet living, with 
the coming railroads, with increasing irrigation projects, and 



50 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

with the operting of the Panama Canal, it does not seem possible 
that we shall not add great numbers to our population in the 
next few years. This calls for the most alert attention on the 
part of the Church. We must be ready for the coming thou- 
sands or millions. We are able to take care of more people than 
we ever dreamed of. It is possible for the entire population of 
the United States to live in the State of Oregon, and every man, 
woman and child have more than half an acre of ground. What 
can this mean for our future? When the transportation facili- 
ties are greater, when the development of the resources is more 
extensive, when the ease of getting here is simplified, will it not 
be true that our vacant territory will be fully occupied, and the 
demand upon the Church be enormous? 

We are trying to rise to this situation. We are planning for 
the days to come. We are trying to be wise in the planting of 
our churches to occupy points that will be strategic in the ad- 
vance of the Kingdom of God, and we are hoping for and receiv- 
ing from the richer portions of our Church that encouragement 
and help which it seems now imperative that we shall have. 

PASTOR-EVANGELISM. , 

There have been fourteen pastor-evangelists at work in this 
district during the year ending March 31, 1913, covering seven- 
teen presbyteries, and the following results have been accom- 
plished, as reported: — 

Presbyteries covered 17 

Churches visited 410 

Sermons preached 1,388 

Pastoral visits 5,305 

Evangelistic meetings 275 

Conversions 415 

Added to churches 43 1 

Churches organized 21 

Raised for church buildings $2,690.50 

Raised for salaries $3,440.00 

Home mission offerings $1,742.04 

ALASKA. 

YUKON PRESBYTERY. 

The work in interior and northern Alaska differs this year 
somewhat in its personnel. From Barrow, as was noted last 
year, Dr. and Mrs. Marsh and their family returned from the 
rigors and loneliness of that distant station among the Eskimos 
on the Arctic Coast. 

Finding no ordained missionary physician to succeed them, 
the Board availed itself of the presence at Barrow of the Rev. 
Delbert W. Cram, a minister of the Congregational Church. 
For some time under the employ of the Government's Bureau 
of Education, he and Mrs. Cram were familiar with the people 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 51 

and the needs of the field. By the courtesy of the Bureau of 
Education Mr. Cram was transferred temporarily to the work 
of this Board. The thoroughness of his missionary work dur- 
ing the preceding years as well as his efficiency in his new ser- 
vice is illustrated in the following extracts from his first report: — 

"Speaking from personal experience, one of the things that 
impresses the stranger upon his first attendence of a church 
service at Barrow, is the evident earnestness with which these 
people take their religion. Practically the whole village turns 
out to the services, and the shut-ins that are not able to attend 
church on account of sickness are given the benefit of the ser- 
mon by the young people that go to them, sometimes immediately 
after the service, and tell the message that was given in the 
church. Not only do the people show their interest in the 
church and its work by their attendance; there is an earnest- 
ness with which they take part in the services that is very 
commendable. Another thing that the stranger notices is that 
the babies are not left at home. Those upward of a month old 
are there with the mother and father. The younger babes are 
carried in the mother's 'ateega'— their large blouse-like gar- 
ments — while those old enough to walk toddle along beside the 
mother, or in the winter time are pulled on a dog sled or play 
along the way with the other children. 

"Such a large juvenile congregation with unusually well de- 
veloped lungs resulting from this most healthful climate might 
be a little hard on the average preacher. But then there is 
this consolation; I have listened — and doubtless others have 
also — to many a supposedly learned sermon which held for me 
less inspiration than I could get from half a hundred crying 
babies, and so remembering the Master's words to the disciples 
we 'forbid them not'. 

"On account of the devotion of the people to their church 
there is no necessity for the pastor to spend a greater part of 
his time drumming up an attendance. This leaves his work in 
such shape that he can put in his time directly training the 
young people in Bible study and along other lines where the 
effort is most needed. 

"Just now there is a group of boys and girls coming on that 
in five years from now will be counted as leaders of the com- 
munity. They must be trained also to take their places as the 
leaders of the Church. These boys and girls are reading the 
English Bible. They are intensely interested in the lives of 
such Bible characters as David and Daniel and Joseph. How- 
ever, most of all, the life of the boy Jesus holds them with a 
fascination such as no other story can. The greater part of 
them are found in our intermediate society of Christian En- 
deavor, and to neglect their teaching now would be little short 
of criminal. 



52 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913.] 

"The Church here must rise to its opportunity and lay the 
foundations for these lives broad and deep. It must teach 
them the meaning of the power of God in their hearts; the power 
and value of a clean life. It must also show them the necessity 
for a life lived in close contact with the Master and given back 
to Him in loving service for others. Personally I feel that noth- 
ing less than the burden for the evangelization of their own 
people should be laid upon their hearts. I do not believe it is 
too much to expect that if the Church does her part in this 
school of preparation they will, when the time comes, do theirs. 

"With this end in view all of the agencies of the church are 
being utilized. Aside from the regular Sabbath services and 
the weekly prayer meeting of the church are the Sunday school 
and young people's societies of Christian Endeavor — junior, in- 
termediate and senior. In all of these thus far throughout the 
year a splendid interest has been manifested. Particularly is 
this true of the Sunday school — the training school of the Church 
for young and old. One night in the week all of the teachers 
meet with the pastor and go over the lesson. Most of the teach- 
ers understand English. The story of the lesson for the suc- 
ceeding Sunday is told in English and interpreted into the Es- 
kimo language. Then the teachers divide into groups of three 
or four each, and study the English text from their Bibles, call- 
ing on the pastor for any help that they need. Usually, the 
next day after the teachers' meeting two or more of the teachers 
will get together and go over the lesson again. All of the classes 
are then taught in the Eskimo language, except the one that 
the pastor teaches. That is composed of the most advanced 
pupils of the school who can read their Bibles. In this way the 
Old Book is getting a grip on the lives of the workers." 

The foregoing contains suggestions that might well be fol- 
lowed in training for Bible study and Sabbath-school work in 
the states. It is right that the Church should have Mr. Cram's 
plea for these people of the North: — 

"And now let me bespeak for this little flock at the farthest 
north a continued interest in your prayers. They need them 
as they reach out after a more practical knowledge of the 
Fatherhood of God. They need them as they struggle to better 
their miserable social conditions." 

At the last Assembly an earnest message was brought from 
the Presbytery of Yukon in behalf of the field in and about 
Cooks Inlet with increasing population and utter lack of church 
influence. In response to this plea the Board, the latter part 
of the summer, secured the Rev, Thomas P. Howard who had 
proved his right to greater privilege of service through years 
of home mission work in the Northwest. Leaving his family 
behind, that his children might not be deprived of necessary 



Inmost Alaska 

From far down the Yukon Valley 







Ruby, one year old when this photograph was taken. Already laying 

claim as the "Metropolis of the Yukon." Dr. Young, the 

Pioneer Parson, succeeded by Dr. Bradshaw 




Sure to draw the crowd. At least $100,000 of gold in each dump 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 53 

educational opportunities, Mr, Howard started in July for the 
new and needy field. 

Our Church will want to become acquainted with the names 
of some of the stations in his far-reaching frontier itinerary: — 
Knik, Willow Creek, Susitna, Beluga, Tyonic, Turnagain Arm. 

The importance of this Cooks Inlet region is found in the 
facts that it is the logical outlet for the Matanuska coal fields 
as well as that the whole region is recently claiming a good deal 
of attention because of mining developments. It is also of im- 
portance agriculturally, having conditions favorable for farm- 
ing and stock raising on an extensive scale. A number of home- 
steads are occupied and other settlers are continually being 
added. Climatic conditions are much more favorable than on 
the exposed coast, while market facilities are better than fur- 
ther inland. 

Mr. Howard, after careful study of conditions, selected Knik 
as the best place for headquarters. He preached his first ser- 
mon in the dining room of the Pioneer House and organized a 
Sabbath school in the cabin of the lady who was elected as su- 
perintendent. 

A valuable lot on Main Street in the heart of the town was 
donated for a house of worship and the gathering of material 
for its building was early undertaken. Not only to the white 
settlers but also to the natives, hungry for help, Mr. Howard 
has extended his ministry. 

On New Year's day Mr. Howard wrote as follows of the de- 
velopment at Knik, even though he is much of the time ab- 
sent at the other parts of the field: — 

"Knik is all and more than I had hoped for in the way of 
progress. The Sunday school is holding its interest for the 
children without the aid of supplies. (No second class mail 
matter comes in here during the closed season without you 
pay a dollar a pound to the carrier for bringing it from Sew- 
ard). The school has sent ten dollars to the Board. The or- 
ganized congregation is working well, and reports better at- 
tendance in my absence than when I am present, and I am not 
a bit jealous. The committee in charge of the services in my ab- 
sence prepares a program of records of the best music, hymns, 
and select readings, and makes an effort to invite the indiffer- 
ent and the T-don't-believe-in-Church' man. The result is 
gratifying. The congregation sent twenty dollars to the Board. 

But the most gratifying results are seen in the work among 
the natives. 'Already', said one to me, 'there is a difference in 
their personal appearance, their homes are cleaner, and the 
very windows of their cabins look brighter.'" 

Some of the physical handicaps with which Mr. Howard con- 
tends are hinted in the following humorously expressed sen- 
tence : — 



54 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

"Yes, I have met with some discouraging things, and not the 
least of these the fact that I am obliged to do whatever clerical 
work falls to me in a barnlike room with the mercury on the 
outside ranging anywhere from ten to twenty — and sometimes 
as low as forty — below zero, and sometimes I have half a 
notion to go outdoors to get warm." 

The third of the Board's new appointees to Yukon Presby- 
tery is the Rev. Ernest N. Bradshaw.D.D., who from his pas- 
torate at Leon, Iowa, is on his way to the new section centering 
at Ruby, beyond Fairbanks. Appealing calls for a man who 
should be the only minister in that region were of no avail, 
although the search was begun before our last Report was 
written. A special appeal through the church papers this win- 
ter met Dr. Bradshaw's eye and he has been appointed to Ruby. 

The measure of the need may be guessed from the following 
letter from Dr. Condit, our pastor at Fairbanks: — 

" Recent reports from Ruby indicate that there will be a good 
number of people there next summer. There will also be quite 
a large winter population and so far as I know there will be no 
religious service of any kind and certainly no resident mission- 
ary. It distresses me that the camp must be destitute of gos- 
pel privileges. This was also the case in the early history of 
the Iditarod. A gentleman from the Iditarod in appealing for 
a missionary for that place said that he hoped it would never 
be his lot to put in another season in a camp without a church 
service. He was not a Christian man either. I presume that 
there will be from eight hundred to ten hundred people there 
this winter." 

Dr. Bradshaw started early in March and the last letters 
from him gave promise that early in April he would have 
reached Fairbanks on his way to Ruby. 

The church at Fairbanks continues to grow under the care 
of the Rev. James H. Condit, D.D. He writes: — 

"We held our congregational meeting this week. All obli- 
gations financial have been met in full and we have a balance 
in the church treasury. The enrollment in the Sabbath school 
was ninety-six and the average attendance was sixty. The young 
people have twenty-seven members in their society. The 
Ladies' Aid Society has thirty-nine active members. We gave 
one hundred thirteen dollars to missions including offer- 
ings to Bible Society and Temperance. The church is well or- 
ganized for aggressive work and I feel confident that with new 
e aders and methods there is a bright future for this church. 

"In this connection I wish to say that the congregation voted 
to assume another one hundred fifty dollars per year of 
the pastor's support, making the amount asked from the Board 
from April first fourteen hundred dollars instead of fifteen hun- 
dred fifty dollars as at present. The matter of local support 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 55 

was discussed at length and it is the purpose of the congrega- 
tion to reduce the amount asked from the Board each year. 
We had an insurance bill of one hundred fifty dollars to pay 
this year for the coming three years or the amount would have 
been still farther reduced." 

Our remaining field in Yukon Presbytery lies far to the south 
of Fairbanks and on the coast — Cordova. Here the Rev. M. 
Egbert Koonce, Ph.D., has continued his careful earnest ser- 
vice. The tides of fortune which mean so much for or against 
the interests of our Church have somewhat ebbed during the 
recent years at Cordova. The financial depression of the pre- 
vious year has continued. Nevertheless the little congregation 
has fulfilled its pledges of three hundred dollars toward Dr. 
Koonce's salary. Notwithstanding the difncultits of the past 
months, Dr. Koonce writes that the prospects for the region as 
well as for the whole territory are more encouraging than at 
any time for three or four years. 

"The report of the Alaska Railroad Commission which has 
recently been made to Congress is generally considered to be 
the beginning of prosperous times for this community, inasmuch 
as they have recommended the Cordova route as the most 
feasible one for the proposed government railroad to the in- 
terior. Our most reliable news from Washington is to the effect 
that at the special session of Congress in March this matter 
will be before Congress with the prospect of immediate author- 
ization for the building of the road. The population of this 
town will be doubled within two weeks of the passage of such 
legislation, and it will continue to grow in proportion to the 
development of the undertaking. 

"We have also encouraging reports regarding the opening of 
the coal fields, which will parallel the action with reference to 
the railroads, no doubt. This means great business activity in 
this particular region and throughout the territory generally." 

Removals have depleted the number of Dr. Koonce's force 
of co-workers to an unusual extent as well as the number of his 
congregation. Last summer twenty-three Sunday-school schol- 
ars and four teachers were among those who left. However, 
the pastor bravely writes, " Most of these people will come back 
again when conditions improve." 

Another hindrance to active church work is found in the 
weather conditions which were bad in summer as well as in 
winter. During the three months ending with September there 
were but three days without rain and only one of these was a 
Sabbath. 

Let us hope that the Government's plans for developing 
Alaska may at last bring due reward to this brave little flock 
and their pastor who so long have been waiting for the fulfill- 
ment of promised development. 



56 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

ALASKA PRESBYTERY. 

The year in southeastern Alaska has had several character- 
istic features. For the first time the home mission committee 
of the presbytery has made a systematic visitation of all the 
fields, studying them with a view to greater efficiency of service 
and economy of effort. In connection with this visitation the 
Rev. David Waggoner of Klawock, a member of the committee, 
with his missionary boat acted as host throughout the entire 
period. Various resulting recommendations were deferred for 
action for fuller information by the Board. Other recommen- 
dations were immediately acceded to and the outcome should 
prove the value of the personal canvass of this peculiarly isolat- 
ed field with its solitary centers of service. There has been fur- 
ther equipment of our Alaskan missionaries with boats, — with- 
out which they are unable to do proper pastoral work or reach 
their out-stations. There has been encouraging development 
in connection with the work reported to the Assembly last year 
as received from the Friends. 

On the old mission stations there are various features com- 
mon to most. The Christmas season furnishes a fine oppor- 
tunity for special services and as a special point of interest 
throughout the somewhat monotonous routine of the winter's 
work. Always the Christmas tree is available and is well used. 
Frequently the "band" boys form an orchestra which is greatly 
appreciated, especially when — as in some instances — the mis- 
sionary forms a member of the band. The training of the chil- 
dren with appropriate Scripture recitations and other allied 
"pieces" is an added tie between the missionary and his flock. 
The gifts, while simple as to kind and inexpensive as to com- 
mercial value, find their worth in the fundamental value of 
every offering of love. For special items regarding the fields the 
following details may be noted: — 

At Haines the time of the Rev. A. F. McLean has been di- 
vided between the regular duties of the field worker, building 
a mission boat with much outlay of energy for the sake of econ- 
omizing in money, and lending assistance as needed in connec- 
tion with the hospital under the Woman's Board. Relieved of 
the latter, and the boat completed, the coming year will find 
Mr. McLean much more ready to push effort along evangel- 
istic and pastoral lines. In the summer when the village is 
practically deserted because the men are off on fishing trips, 
Mr. McLean follows them, holding services wherever they may 
happen to be, with a folding organ and a portable building, — 
the latter loaned by the Government's Department of Educa- 
tion. A hint of how much the services mean to this people is 
found in the following from one of Mr. McLean's reports: — 

' ' Skookum Jim, an old man of seventy years of age, lives about 
a mile from Haines at what was once the Chilkat village. He and 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 57 

his old wife have been very faithful at all the services. It is a 
long walk for an old man who is almost blind and his faithful 
old wife has been leading him back and forth all the years that 
I have been at Haines. One evening a few weeks ago he came 
rather late to prayer meeting. When the time came for prayer 
and testimony the old man said, 'I had a hard time to get to 
church to-night. First the devil tempted me to stay at home, 
telling me that I was an old man and ought not to go out in 
the dark, that the prayer meeting would get along very well 
without me, and that soon I w^ould be dead anyway and it 
would have to get along without me. But I prayed and God 
•gave me strength to come. I left home and had not gone far 
when I stepped on a stick which broke in the middle and one 
piece flew up and hit me on the nose. I said a bad word, and 
then I was very sorry and I knelt down on the road and asked 
God to forgive me, and the bad spirit went away and I came 
on to church. I am very happy to-night for I know God for- 
gives." 

"The prayer meeting you see is somewhat of a confessional, 
not to a priest but to God in the presence of his people, and it 
seems to do them good. They feel happier when they have 
lifted the burden that is on their hearts in this manner and 
some way I feel that the Heavenly Father comes near and I 
can hear him say as he said to his people in ages past, 'Thy 
sins and thine iniquities will I remember no more." 

Klukwan. This field, twenty-five miles from Haines, remains 
practically our only purely native work in southeastern Alaska. 
With the help of their leader, the Rev. Fred R. Falconer, the 
people have been taught more than the rudiments of intelligent 
gardening, thus getting their first definite knowledge toward 
self-support in home and church. Under the same leadership 
a side-walk has been built during the past year through their 
village, making it possible not only to guard against exposure 
from unprotected muddy paths, but also to attend the evening 
services as was not possible hitherto. 

Another new project of the more recent months has been the 
establishing — still under the watchful direction of the mission- 
ary — of the Klukwan Mercantile Company to enable the peo- 
ple to secure at the lowest reasonable rate the necessities of 
life, instead of having to pay much larger prices, the profits 
going into the hands of those who are either unscrupulous or 
regardless of the welfare of the Alaskan native. Such forms of 
activity are not always classed among the items of missionary 
service, but in this case they are thoroughly imbued with the 
missionary spirit. Mr. Falconer's attention to the agricultural 
work, the building of the side-walk, and the mercantile com- 
pany serve as a background for the more spiritual side of the 
work. Witness his three hundred twenty pastoral calls during 



58 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

the year, and his own words: "It all has its part to play in 
the general uplift of the race." "If the spiritual and material 
uplift keep pace we can hope for something lasting." "We 
seek ever to keep uppermost the spiritual side of the work." 

Hoonah. With a record of two hundred pastoral calls and 
an addition of nineteen members, the field seems to have ad- 
vanced under the leadership of its pastor, the Rev. George E. 
Good, even though he was absent as a commissioner to the 
last General Assembly and enjoyed a furlough during the sum- 
mer months. He says: "Some of our older people are holding 
tenaciously to their old customs and are trying hard to hold the 
people back." "While we have had trials we have cause for 
rejoicing. It does one good to see the people make progress in 
the knowledge of Christ." 

Among the peculiar hindrances Mr. Good enumerates the na- 
tive beer-making — an occupation which we do not often asso- 
ciate with Alaska — and the Japanese, Norwegians and Scan- 
dinavians who have settled among the natives and made the 
latter their prey. 

At Sitka the special home mission feature is the large school un- 
der the direction of the Woman's Board with its equipment of 
new buildings. With the tide of white population setting 
steadily away from Sitka the work is limited more and more 
to the natives. 

The Rev. E. E. Bromley has remained on the field throughout 
the year. 

Juneau, to which Sitka has yielded her preeminence since the 
transfer of the territorial capital, is suffering from the boom 
which comes with vague but well assured reports of mineral 
wealth. With a gain of a thousand in her population during 
the past year, with the placing of enormous amounts of capital 
in developments looking toward large returns from mining in- 
terests, and with the unrest which accompanies such movements 
Juneau is now proving a promising but a peculiarly difficult 
field. 

The work among the natives continues as heretofore under 
the direction of the Rev. L. F. Jones, who has oversight as well 
of the Douglas work, where a lay helper is assistant. One of 
the oldest native missionary centers, Juneau this year has wit- 
nessed the baptism of the children of parents whom the pastor 
baptized when they were children; and he has received into 
church membership applicants whom he baptized in their child- 
hood. Naturally more and more the members of this church 
are becoming dependable and steadfast. 

In the Northern Light Church of which the Rev. John B. 
Stevens is pastor the year has been one of improving the church 
property. The manse has been raised and a new foundation 



Boys and Girls in Sitka 



.** ' 



m 




The Sheldon Jackson School in Alaska 




The pupils are of several tribes and come from all sections of 
Southeastern Alaska 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 59 

placed under it, and the repair bills have been taken care of by 
the people, as well as five hundred dollars toward the ministers' 
salary. 

The first Territorial Legislature convened at Juneau in March. 
Four judicial districts were to be represented with two senators 
and four representatives from each. While the function of this 
Legislature is largely advisory, yet it will be a very decided in- 
fluence in shaping Alaska's affairs at present and also in mold- 
ing her future. This is the most important step yet taken in 
Alaskan progress. The Senate of the Legislature has chosen 
Mr. Stevens as its chaplain. So in matters of Church and 
State he has opportunity for leadership beyond that of any of 
our other workers in southeastern Alaska. 

Wrangell. The Rev. James S. Clark has continued in charge 
of the white and native churches here. From May to October, 
when he was relieved of the work at Petersburg which until then 
had been under his care, a native helper was actively in charge of 
Petersburg. A special feature worthy of mention at Wrangell has 
been the unusual interest shown in Bible study. There has been 
much increase in the Sabbath-school attendance, and a special 
class has been organized for Bible study which meets on Thurs- 
day evenings. The government teacher has borne witness to 
the order and interest, which she says she has not seen matched 
in any Sabbath school. With the handicap of serious illness 
in his home, Mr. Clark has nevertheless been active in his pas- 
toral work, making about three hundred calls upon the various 
homes in his congregation. 

To Petersburg, forty miles from Wrangell, where under 
the self-sacrificing and earnest effort of Mr. Clark 
of Wrangell a church building and a manse were 
erected, after long search the Board succeeded in sending a 
missionary, the Rev. Robert J. Diven, a pastor of one of the 
churches of Portland, Oregon, and previously an earnest and 
successful missionary on pioneer fields in the states. Peters- 
burg is at present the only town on the Pacific Coast with al- 
most a strictly foreign population — only about twenty being 
native-born Americans. There is a strong Norwegian element 
and conditions at present are very unsettled owing to prospec- 
tive changes along business lines. Mr. Diven's energy in the 
service is suggested by the fact that in the first quarter he 
made one hundred fifty pastoral calls. His impressions of the 
field may be taken at par value. We cull from his letters as 
follows: "Conditions measure up to what I expected to find: 
very few who have a dependable interest in religious work, and 
immorality rampant — heaven for scenery and hell for morals 
is the shortest and fairest description I can give." "Two hun- 
dred people attended our Christmas exercises, more than one 
hundred of them being men who would have been down in the 



60 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

saloons but for our effort and invitation through the lips of 
everybody who would agree to bring somebody." "We have 
a good Sunday school, our church attendance is growing steadily 
and chiefly from the ranks of those who never went to church be- 
fore. A nice Sunday-school library will soon be opened in the 
manse for the use of anybody who will come for a book. We 
are sure we can loan many more books by making the library 
accessible all the time rather than only on Sundays. I will thus 
have a chance to direct the reading of any who care for any 
help or suggestions." 

And so in season and out, by old tried methods and new ones, 
Mr. Diven is getting hold of the people who are sorely in need. 

The work centering at Klawock is still under the direction of 
the Rev. David Waggoner. The Indian names of Klawock, 
Hydaburg, Howkan, Kake and Shakan have added to them a 
group suggestive of the encroachments of the whites on this 
formerly native field, — namely, Fish Egg, Hunter Bay, Camp 
Lorenzo and Rose Inlet. 

Sharing the labor on this too extensive field Mr. Waggoner's 
helpers have been William Benson, George E. Haldane, John 
S. Brown and John Demmert. The experiment of transferring 
the people of one village undesirably located to another under 
better conditions, which resulted a year ago in the establish- 
ment of Hydaburg, has led this year to a movement toward 
Klawock from Shakan. From the first of November to Feb- 
ruary Shakan has no sun. Naturally it cannot be a healthy 
village. For business reasons it has seemed well to the people 
to unite in the larger and sunnier town. A cooperative company 
has been organized by the people to conduct a store in Klawock 
in order that the natives may maintain successful business op- 
erations, protecting themselves from the White Fishermen's 
Union. The encroachments of the latter have resulted in the 
discomfort and often suffering of the unsuspecting natives. 
Thus it is the part of the Christian leader here so to direct affairs 
that the people may not be robbed by those who care only for 
selfish gain. 

The neighboring village of Kake has for its pastor the Rev. 
George J. Beck, whose efforts have been largely expended in re- 
pairing the property transferred to us from the Friends a little 
more than a year ago. Caring for the sick, getting acquainted 
with the people — four hundred fifty pastoral calls made during 
the first quarter — and stimulating the moral and spiritual ener- 
gies, the months have been well spent and we may look for 
larger outcome as their fruitage later. 

At Saxman the Rev. Edward Marsden continues his work 
among the people whom he reaches from Saxman by means of 
his missionary boat. One of the serious problems of the year 
here, as in other Alaskan fields, is the illegal sale of liquor on 



Laying Foundations in Porto Rico 

Polytechnic Institute Missionary J. B. Harris, President 




A Group of Students who are Building Better than they Know 




Overlooking the Site on which is Rising (and will rise) an Institution 
Builded by Porto Rican Christian Students for Porto Ricans 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 61 

the part of white men. Although nominally prohibited by the 
Government, permits are secured and our Indians suffer. Mr. 
Marsden, as other of our missionaries, urges the need of build- 
ings for social centers, where when not at religious meetings, 
the people can gather for legitimate recreation and helpful ac- 
quaintance. 

PORTO RICO. 

The past year in Porto Rico has been a logical outworking of 
the various mission plans in the centers and out-stations al- 
ready well known — by name at least — to the readers of this 
Board's Annual Report. The only change in the personnel of 
the Board's force has been the addition of the Rev. Thomas R. 
S. Butler, who went to Anasco upon his graduation from Au- 
burn Theological Seminary last May. Other sorely needed 
additions, for a force already overborne by a task at once ex- 
acting and unreasonably heavy for the shoulders upon which 
it has been carried, have not been secured. The imperative 
need continues for young American pastors and their wives, 
able to speak or to learn Spanish, to share in the privileges and 
the problems of the Porto Rican service. Than this field none 
other is more encouraging; in none other is there greater need 
of reinforcements. 

The year has witnessed three or four most significant ad- 
vances in connection with the work of our Board: — 

First may be named the exchange of school work in San Juan 
for community work, in charge of two experienced, capable and 
consecrated young American ladies — Miss Anna C. Stover and 
Miss Edith D. Surbey. They are gaining an entree increas- 
ingly into the homes of the San Juan people, and through the 
ministry of the kindergarten, domestic science classes, and clubs 
are ministering to the young people of the city as the mission 
school work could not do. The development of public school 
facilities in the capital city led to this change of policy. It 
foreshadows similar change in the form of service in Porto 
Rican centers that shall develop as San Juan has along lines of 
general school work. The following quotations indicate at once 
the fascination and the importance of the new community 
mission service: — 

"We arrived in San Juan September first, 1912, to begin the 
establishment of a gospel settlement work in connection with 
the Presbyterian mission in the Hugh O'Neill Memorial building 
of San Juan. September and October we devoted exclusively 
to the study of Spanish. In November we began adjusting 
our quarters for our work and began the organization of two 
self-government clubs, one for school girls over thirteen years 
of age, and one for business young women who wanted to learn 



62 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

English. Both of these clubs have been conducted in English 
except the Bible lessons which we have given in Spanish. 

"In December we reorganized the Sunday school primary and 
intermediate departments and added to our regular work a 
woman's club and two clubs for younger girls. These three 
clubs are conducted exclusively in Spanish. 

"February seventeenth we opened a Spanish kindergarten. 
All of these clubs and the kindergarten have definite Bible study 
then a short business session in each club, a special educational 
or industrial program, and close with a game or social time. 

"Our rooms — consisting of a library and reading-room, a club 
and kindergarten, a corridor which we use for classes, a kitchen, 
dining-room and two patios — are quite nicely furnished and 
equipped for our work, thanks to the generosity of the Home 
Board. 

"The present enrollment of all our activities is as follows: — 

Club Amistad (Friendship Club — for women) 33 

Club Fidelidad (Fidelity Club — for young women) 27 

Club Princessa (Princess Club — for girls over thirteen) 27 

Club Lealdad (Loyalites Club— for girls from ten to thirteen) 30 

Club Joya (Jewels Club — for girls from five to ten) 25 

Kindergarten 29 

Total enrollment 171 

"The total attendance during December, January and Feb- 
ruary has been 1347. The pennies contributed by these mem- 
bers have amounted to $10.95. Considering our limited knowl- 
edge of the language and the people, we felt the response, and 
the regularity of attendance has been unusual. 

"We have had little time for visiting and have not soliciled at- 
tendance in any particular way. At least one-third have never 
attended any of the church services or organizations before. 
We have not worked for numbers because we have felt we had 
as many present as we could well help at one time. We believed 
before we came that a settlement work, which includes gospel 
social effort as well as a gospel educational effort, would be es- 
pecially valuable on a mission field, and our beginning here in 
San Juan has strengthened this belief, both as to the need and 
the practical working out of this method of work. 

"We are trusting that as we ourselves learn to speak the lan- 
guage with more fluency we may be able to continue and strength- 
en that which we have begun in the name of Him whose name 
we bear. The name chosen for our work here is 'The Christa- 
more Settlement' of the Hugh O'Neill Memorial building of 
San Juan, Porto Rico". 

Second. The enlargement of the medical work in Mayaguez. 
Until the early part of 1912 the force of the Rye Hospital includ- 
ed only one medical missionary and one nurse and a Porto 
Rican pharmacist. The large demands compelled these work- 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 63 

ers frequently to continue in day and night service with almost 
no opportunity for rest. An interne and a second nurse have 
been supplied, practically doubling- the hospital force and mak- 
ing it more than ever a missionary as well as a medical factor in 
Mayaguez. An important item to be noted in connection with 
the Rye Hospital is the fact that out of an annual current 
expense of $2848 the hospital has returned to the treasury of 
the Board $2470, almost the whole amount. 

Third. The establishment on a firmer footing of the project 
looking toward the Polytechnic Institute in San German. The 
reason for the Polytechnic Institute of Porto Rico is based on 
the fact that in all Latin countries— Porto Rico included — work is 
generally considered as below the dignity of an educated in- 
dividual. Only those of the peon class can work without hurt- 
ing their feelings. Therefore, to the uplift of the Porto Ricans, 
it may be conceded that industrial training is essential. To 
teach its students to feel the dignity of work and how work can 
be efficiently and economically performed, both by men and 
women, is therefore the no mean purpose of this Institute. It 
is under the direction of a Board of Trustees of which ten are 
Presbyterians, one Congregational, one Baptist, one Methodist, 
one United Brethren, one Episcopalian and one Roman Cath- 
olic. The President of the Board is a Porto Rican, Mr. Juan 
Cancio Ortiz, mayor of one of the towns in the western end of 
the Island, whose gift of land to establish a school led to the 
developing of the plans for the Polytechnic Institute. The 
President of the Institute is the Rev. John William Harris, our 
missionary at San German, Porto Rico. 

It is stipulated in the deed that "not less than eighty per cent, 
of the trustees of the institution shall be members in full com- 
munion of Churches holding to the evangelical faith, and who 
together with the president of the institution shall accept and 
approve the Holy Scriptures as the only infallible rule of faith 
and practice." 

After much earnest effort on the part of Mr. Harris sufficient 
funds were on hand and in sight to secure the property and guar- 
antee the beginning of the work. The first term of class-room 
work began last September with an enrollment of thirty students, 
ten of whom were young ladies. The ages range from fifteen to 
twenty-three. All the students share in the homely duties 
necessary to the carrying on of such an institution. Those who 
have no money work four and a half hours a day ; those who pay 
four dollars a month work three hours a day; those who pay 
eight dollars, two hours a day ; those who pay ten dollars, one and 
a half hours a day ; those who pay twelve dollars, one hour a day. 

With a graduate of Park College as principal and a graduate 
of the Normal and Collegiate Institute of Asheville, North 



64 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

Carolina, as an instructor, thoroughness of work and orthodoxy 
of teaching are assured. 

The school is therefore able to render a distinctly Christian 
training in an unsectarian spirit and lends itself admirably to 
the missionary work of all the Boards operating in Porto Rico. 
It is the earnest hope of those who have been actively engaged 
in it thus far that it will be a center of practical and Christian 
assistance to the young men and women of Porto Rico who are 
beginning to learn the dignity of labor and who seek efficiency 
in the care of the home and its proper support. 

Fourth. More definitely in the line of missionary cooperation 
between the various denominations pledging themselves to 
work together on a comity basis when the door opened widely 
in Porto Rico to missionary work at the time of the Spanish- 
American War, is the agreement of the past year upon which 
our Training School at Mayaguez has become a Union Training 
School shared by the United Brethren and our own body. It is 
hoped that in time other denominations at work in Porto Rico 
may realize the advisability of cooperation in the training of 
young men for evangelistic ministry among their countrymen 
in so small a territory as the Island of Porto Rico. 

The following are the essential statements in the plan agreed 
upon by the representatives of the Presbyterian and United 
Brethren missions: — 

The purpose is to found a Christian Training School which 
will be devoted exclusively to training for Christian work. 
Owing to peculiar conditions which now prevail provision for 
studies of a preliminary character must be made for some time, 
but it is expected that later on these may be pursued in the high 
schools or other institutions of Porto Rico. 

The Training School will be located at Mayaguez. 

It is proposed that a suitable building be erected at a cost not 
to exceed $12,000., including grounds and furnishings. In view 
of the size of the Presbyterian mission work, and further in view 
of the use that the Presbyterians in Cuba may make of the 
school, it is suggested that the amount necessary be apportioned 
as may be agreed upon. This property will be of joint owner- 
ship, and will be under the control of a board composed of rep- 
resentatives from each denomination. 

The school will be under the direction of a Board of Directors 
composed of members of the missions concerned, meeting an- 
nually for the transaction of business. 

The expenses incident to the maintenance of the school will 
be apportioned as may be mutually agreed. 

In order to preserve the greatest harmony among the mis- 
sions concerned, and also in order to maintain an effective dis- 
cipline, it is mutually agreed that: — 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 65 

"1. There shall be no attempt to influence students in the 
least to change denominational beliefs or practices. 

"2. No person in attendance at the Seminary, nor one who 
has attended same, will be employed under any circumstances 
by one of the denominations other than the one to which he be- 
longs, except by mutual consent of the denominations con- 
cerned." 

A further instance of cooperation is in the publication of 
"Puerto Rico Evangelico", into which this year has been 
merged "El Testigo Evangelico", the hitherto official organ of 
the United Brethren, and "La Voz Evangelica" of our own 
Church. These two denominations and the Congregationalists 
are sharing, on terms agreed upon, both the cost of the plant 
and the maintenance of the paper. Each denomination was 
expected to secure a thousand subscribers and to pledge to the 
treasury of the paper the five hundred dollars thus obtained. 

The Committee of Publication is composed of representatives 
from each denomination and meets regularly once a year or 
oftener if occasion requires. A committee shall have control of 
the printing plant and appoint the manager and editors of the 
paper, who in turn are responsible to the Committee of Publi- 
cation. In addition to the manager and editor-in-chief, any 
other denomination not represented by the editor-in-chief is 
entitled to one associate editor. 

Both our own Church and the United Brethren owned print- 
ing plants, but neither was sufficiently large for the publishing 
of the proposed paper. The two plants therefore were carefully 
appraised and given to the Committee of Publication who were 
to retain what was needed and sell the remainder, the three 
Churches having equal share in the joint printing plant. 

The contents of the paper are not to include articles of a con- 
troversial or purely personal character. There are of course 
news items regarding the various mission stations of the denom- 
inations interested, each of which appoints a representative 
responsible for the news concerning its fields. . 

The year of experiment has abundantly justified the plan, 
into which as the work goes on it is hoped the other denom- 
inations may enter. 

Because of the foregoing instances of practical loyalty to one 
cause and the realization that in His work we are ever brethren, 
Protestant missions in Porto Rico are on a firmer footing in the 
presence of the united front of Roman Catholicism. 

CUBA. 

The Rev. J. Milton Greene, D.D. superintendent of our work 
in Cuba, presents the following statement regarding the work 
in that field: — 



66 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

As I sit down to report on the work of our mission it is the 
morning following a service in the First Church, Havana, in 
which seven young people each presented one of the sayings of 
our Lord on the cross. The large church was filled with a deep- 
ly attentive audience and the service was pronounced the most 
solemn and impressive of all that we have ever celebrated. 
Such knowledge of the Scriptures, such facility of expression and 
such fervor of personal experience left a profound impression on 
the many who had attended from curiosity. The special fea- 
ture of interest for the many youth in attendance was the cul- 
ture and character exhibited by our young people as the result 
of our weekly Biblical studies and devotional services. All saw, 
and many so expressed themselves, that only under similar in- 
fluences can Cuban youth be saved from such temptations to 
sensuality, worldliness and vice as perhaps exist in no other 
country. 

Governmental sanction, social conditions and ecclesiastical 
laxity are just so many dynamics which impel the young men of 
Cuba along the downward road to physical degeneration, men- 
tal atrophy and practical godlessness. Little known to the pub- 
lic and unappreciated even by those who most ardently seek the 
moral reformation of Cuba, work is being faithfully carried on 
in all our thirty-eight centers whose practical results were ex- 
emplified last evening. In the young people of our evangelical 
missions is found the chief hope for the Cuba of the future. 

A letter just received from one of our young men who is study- 
ing in Dubuque Seminary, whose evangelical faith has caused 
him to be practically disinherited by his parents in Spain, 
will serve to show the type of character which results from our 
missionary efforts. He says, "What I feel in my inmost heart 
is that God calls me to the ministry of his holy Word. For me 
this is infinitely important. I desire to hear only the voice of 
God and to resist all the allurements of the world. Who can 
hinder my progress if I follow the path in which God leads me? 
And what could I hope for blessing if I should yield to my own 
caprice? I see great opportunities in this country for a young 
man situated as I am and I feel the power of these attractions, 
but I can truly say that none of these things move me for I hear 
the voice of God calling me to his service. " 

At the end of these eleven years it is given to us to see scores 
of young people whose consecration is sublime, and among the 
younger children in our day and Sabbath schools tender hearts 
filled with the love of Christ are working marvelous changes in 
the homes from which they come. 

The average adult mind among this people is so stagnated 
and their religious ceremonialism is hedged about with such ter- 
rible sanctions that few comparatively possess the moral initia- 
itve and courage necessary to know the truth and be set free 




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1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 67 

thereby. But in the case of a large majority of the fathers such 
is their religious indifference that while clinging nominally to the 
faith of their ancestors they are more than willing that their 
children shall be educated under the very best influences both 
intellectually and morally. And here we have such an advan- 
tage that, wherever a school is planted by the mission, its suc- 
cess is assured. 

During the year just closing regular weekly services have been 
maintained in thirty-eight chapels by nineteen ministers who 
have also conducted thirty-six Sabbath schools with a total at- 
tendance of more than sixteen hundred. Cooperating with 
these agencies we have had thirteen day-schools with an attend- 
ance of over six hundred children. 

A large number of candidates for church membership await 
reception but we have preferred to prolong the period of prep- 
aration in order to make sure as far as possible that they shall 
prove sincere and steadfast. This seems to us especially neces- 
sary among a people so impressionable as are the Latin races. 
In these Roman Catholic countries the actual increase in church 
membership indicates only a very small part of the influence 
exerted by our evangelical missions. Our native brethren often 
remind me of this and instance the growth of religious toleration, 
the removal of fanatical prejudices, the correction of false be- 
liefs concerning Protestantism, the exemplification of purity in 
heart and life, the sanctification of the home and of the Sabbath, 
and the identification of the ministry with the people in all 
whereby they may be serviceable to them. 

A wondrous change in public opinion has been wrought and 
the way is being thus prepared for the Evangelical Church to 
come to its own, justified and recommended by its fruits. Be- 
hind a nominal Romanism as a social badge entitling one to 
recognition in favored circles and to patronage in business rela- 
tions, we often find the frank avowal of hearty sympathy with 
our work and the declaration of a firm belief in it as in accord 
with divine revelation. Many a kindly word and helpful act 
come to us in secret from those who have not the moral courage 
as yet to declare openly their religious faith. 

The year just closing, like the three preceding, has been made 
more difficult for us by conditions created and fostered by the 
administration of President Gomez. A general relaxing of 
moral beliefs and practices has eaten like a cancer into the life of 
the masses and has cost dearly in the impoverishment of the 
people, in the corruption of the youth and in a wide spread forget- 
fulness of God. So marked are these results that Dr. Dixon, 
after a sojourn of two weeks among us and visits to our various 
congregations said to me repeatedly: "For pure and undefiled 
godlessness, recommend me to Cuba." Add to these features 
of our environment the bitter and sleepless opposition of the 



68 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

Romish priesthood and their votaries and it will be understood 
that every advance recorded here must be the fruit of earnest 
effort and of the divine blessing. And such advances are not 
lacking. There is not one of our thirty-eight chapels in which 
some progress is not noticeable. One hungry soul here and an- 
other there; whole families in not a few cases, and in very many 
instances open-hearted children, have been brought under the 
power of the truth as it is in Jesus and are rejoicing in it as over 
a new found treasure. For instances I may mention Pozo 
Redondo where a hundred souls are waiting to confess Christ 
and be organized into a church ; also the congregations of Sancti 
Spiritus, Pinar del Rio, Vedado, Salud and Bejucal, in all of 
which the year has been one of unexampled growth in the num- 
ber of souls who have voluntarily and gladly placed themselves 
under gospel influences. 

Then too our schools have enjoyed a year of great prosperity 
as is seen in Sancti Spiritus with a hundred twenty pupils; 
Cienfuegos, with eighty; Cabaiguan, with fifty; Guines, with 
eighty; Vedado, with sixty; and Soledad with a hundred twenty. 
What all this means as indicating the presence and operation 
of a divinely regenerating force at work to prepare a new 
future for Cuba, can hardly be set forth in its true proportions. 
Morally speaking the Cuban situation is chaotic. Interminable 
confusion exists in the minds of the masses as to God's character, 
as to worship, sin, repentance and salvation. Such a thing as a 
morality based on inflexible law with its corresponding penalty 
in the matter of veracity, honesty, chastity and reverence can- 
not be found among the masses of the people and it is hard to 
find even among those most cultured. 

Prevarication, infidelity to promises, profanation of marriage, 
irreverence in the use of sacred names and places, all these things 
are looked upon as conventionalisms, matters of expediency to 
be determined by one's own idea of what will best serve his 
personal interest. 

Common life in Cuba is pervaded by Jesuitism in solution. 
The end justifies the means. The end one has in view is not 
tested by any moral standard but by individual caprice, and 
whatever methods may be necessary in order to attain it are 
eagerly seized upon. Wide spread evils are palliated or excused 
by an appeal to race peculiarities or ancestral custom or the 
sanction of civil or ecclesiastical authority. A series of fiestas 
this spring were celebrated in the various towns of Pinar del Rio 
whose devastation in a moral sense may justly be symbolized by 
the tornados and floods which have wrought such havoc recent- 
ly in the home land. Under the sanction of the Romish Church 
and with the consent of the civil authorities, an image of the 
patron saint is paraded through the streets daily, masses are cel- 
ebrated, cock fights are held, all sorts of gambling devices flour- 



1913. J BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 69 

ish, the evenings are given up to balls and daughters of shame 
are imported from Havana. A wail of protest comes up to me 
from our faithful brethren who are laboring at these points and 
fiery temptations assail our little flocks of believers. And let it 
not be forgotten that these demoralizing exhibitions are organ- 
ized and perpetuated year by year by the parish priests for the 
pecuniary benefits which accrue to them. To stem this flood of 
iniquity and counteract all these demoralizing influences the 
only agency which exists is found in the work of our missions. 
And to those of us who are familiar with these conditions the 
wonder is that any progress can be made in the moral regener- 
ation of these people. 

No class of persons are more wofully mistaken than those who 
recently declared themselves as disposed to discourage the for- 
mation of evangelical churches in these countries and who would 
rather confine our efforts chiefly to the inculcation of higher 
ideals into the Romish Church. All such efforts would be like 
the vain attempts of the prophets to stem the tide of idolatry 
and corruption in ancient Israel. In spite of all heavenly mes- 
sages the captivity came. The only message suited to Cuban 
conditions and the only one which God has blessed, is "Come 
out from among them and be ye separate and touch not the un- 
clean thing". Only thus can we form for the Cuba of the future 
a public conscience the lack of which accounts for all her ills. 
And this is what we are doing. 

WOMAN'S BOARD. 

The following report of the year's work of the Woman's Board 
is presented by its secretary, Miss Julia Fraser:— 

With heartfelt thankfulness to the great Head of the Church 
for His loving kindness shown in many marvelous ways during 
the past year, the Woman's Board herewith presents to the 
Board of Home Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the Unit- 
ed States of America its thirty-fourth annual report. 

The Board mourns the loss by death of three of its members: 
Mrs. H. C. Campbell, Mrs. S. F. Hallock and Miss Mary J. Peck. 
Mrs. Campbell and Mrs. Hallock were in the prime of life — 
loyal, loving members, devoted to the cause of missions, and 
we had fondly believed both would be our fellow associates for 
many years to come. Miss Mary J. Peck had been on the 
Board since 1887. As a member of its finance committee, she 
was most intimately associated with all the details of Board 
management, and her wise counsel and loving sympathy endeared 
her to all; her thoughtful ministrations to the missionaries, 
especially those on the isolated fields, will make her missed in 
many scattered homes. 

One missionary, Miss Antoinette Brengle, so closely identified 
with Mexican plaza missions, and later with the Allison School 



70 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

at Santa Fe, has answered the summons to higher service. We 
cannot let pass the opportunity to make grateful mention of 
Mrs. A. R. McFarland, in her early life a missionary among the 
Mexicans and Indians, and yet forever associated in thought 
with Alaska, as there she was the poineer missionary, and during 
her first winter the sole representative of the Christian Church 
in that far off country. We thank God for the inspiring lives of 
these our friends and lovingly cherish their memories. 

Finances. The total receipts of the year, including Freed- 
men, Emergency Fund, and so forth, were $598,244.24, 
but of this only $460,304.20 was available for current work. 
For complete statistical information consult the annual report 
of Miss Fish, treasurer of the Woman's Board, pages 162-168. 
The year opened with a depressing debt, accumulated during 
three years and largely caused by deficits on many building op- 
erations. This, of course, made any new work impossible. 
With thankful hearts we report that the debt is entirely paid, 
and record grateful appreciation of the action of the Board of 
Home Missions in cancelling the balance due on the Sitka build- 
ings, ($14,466.) included in the debt statement of $56,805.94 
reported March 31, 1912. 

During the past four years the Woman's Board has been 
obliged to erect many buildings. Every field has shared in these 
sadly needed improvements, but the most extensive operations 
have been in Alaskan and Mormon territory. As the final pay- 
ments on many of these buildings were included in the debt 
statement of $56,805.94, provision for meeting which was made 
during the year just closed, we record here the complete list of 
new buildings, enlargements and purchases: Haines Hospital; 
six buildings Sheldon Jackson School, Sitka; Point Barrow, 
Alaska; Ganado, Arizona; North Fork, California; Jewett, New 
Mexico; Embudo, New Mexico; Albuquerque, New Mexico; 
Mt. Vernon, Kentucky; Lawson, West Virginia; Hot Springs, 
North Carolina; Mt. Pleasant, Utah; Panguitch, Utah; Guines, 
Cuba; Pueblo Nuevo, Porto Rico; Mayaguez Marina, Porto 
Rico. 

The total cost, including equipment, aggregates nearly 
$300,000. The titles of this property, as of all other secured by 
the Woman's Board, are held by the Board of Home Missions. 

Years ago the Woman's Board accepted from the Board of 
Home Missions the support of certain ministers supplying 
churches organized as a direct result of its work. The past year 
at the request of the Woman's Board the Board of Home Mis- 
sions has resumed the salaries of these ministers as well as the 
support of Point Barrow and other picturesque fields. 
But, as in some cases "donors have not been willing to 
transfer the salaries of these ministers to the support of teach- 
ers or hospital workers commissioned by the Woman's Board, 
there has not been complete financial relief. 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 71 

The work of the Woman's Board is so complex, varied, mag- 
nificent, in its grasp of opportunity, and yet necessarily so mi- 
nute and personal in much of its detail, that it is impossible to 
present more than a mere outline of its activities, leaving each 
reader to supply from other sources the personal touch which 
alone vivifies annual reports. 

The Woman's Board not only maintains the Church's second- 
ary schools, boarding, training, industrial and day-schools, and 
a number of hospitals, but it erects the necessary buildings and 
provides equipment. This vast missionary work is done 
through the loyal support of the constituency, coextensive with 
the Presbyterian Church in America; the Woman's Board is the 
point of contact between the field where missionary activities 
are centered and the force which makes possible all this effort. 

THE FIELD 

The outstanding feature of the past year on the field was one 
of adjustment, the attempt to make those members of our large 
and widely scattered family who had new buildings feel at home 
in strange surroundings. The experience has been trying for 
our missionaries and for Mr. Allaben, our superintendent of 
schools, upon whom as chairman of the building committee 
came first the pressure of necessary changes in plans for build- 
ings, delays in delivery, and the other annoyances consequent 
upon building operations. But these trials are all happily sur- 
mounted and many of our missionaries now have the material 
requisites for a stronger and more aggressive work than ever 
before. 

Alaska. This adjustment to new surroundings was especially 
difficult at the Sheldon Jackson School, Sitka, but it is now on a 
strong, satisfactory basis. The natives of Sitka realize that 
this is not an institution for their sole benefit, but the one great 
training school for all Alaska, where strong and willing native 
boys and girls can have Christian training to prepare them for 
leadership among, their own people. 

At Haines there is no new building, but the old one has been 
remodeled so that the hospital now is in better condition than 
ever to continue its ministry of helpfulness. Mr. and Mrs. 
McLean have been devoting themselves with their usual un- 
selfishness to the best interests of this medical station. 

Indians. Tucson Training School, the largest and best* 
equipped of our Indian stations, is crowded to its utmost ca- 
pacity and the urgent appeals for additional buildings are pa- 
thetic in the extreme. In Oklahoma, the Dwight Mission 
School has had a good year in spite of sadly cramped quarters. 

Mexicans. Through the generosity of a friend the girls' dor- 
mitory of the Allison School has been entirely renovated ; ad- 



72 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

ditional room is made available in the attic, by cutting new win- 
dows, while fresh paint and papering have made the building 
most attractive. An adjoining lot has been purchased, thus 
giving control over property necessary for the development of 
the school. 

Los Angeles Spanish School is eagerly anticipating the new 
building and enlarged opportunities which the California wom- 
en are providing. An interesting community work was begun 
some years ago in connection with this school, by which the mis- 
sionary, Miss Boone, keeps in touch with former students; 
many of these are married and have their own homes, others 
are working; but wherever they are Miss Boone lovingly follows 
them. Such work is needed in all our boarding schools. 

On the Mexican field the plaza schools are holding strategic 
positions and accomplishing marvelous results. The need for 
more of them is imperative since the revolution in Mexico has 
caused the influx of Mexicans into our border states. The 
plaza teachers are encouraged by the Woman's Board to send 
their older and more promising pupils to our boarding schools, 
which in turn are gradually dropping the lower grades. Em- 
phasis is now placed on a picked registration with the purpose 
of thus providing leadership for the people. 

One plaza sent six of its pupils away last year; from another 
three boys go to Menaul and five girls to Allison. One of our 
plaza schools is fifty miles from the nearest store — how far our 
teacher is from another English-speaking person we do not know 
— but this year she is to have an assistant. At another plaza 
there is no physician within forty miles and the teacher there 
says "nearly all Mexicans have chronic tonsilitis" — Mexican 
sore throat, the doctors call it; this with stomach trouble is 
causing a more serious health problem. The new work must be 
commissioning district nurses and establishing a few small hos- 
pitals. 

Mormons. Mormonism was the subject of the study book 
for the current year. The book has proved most popular, its 
sales exceeding any of past years, and much new interest has 
been aroused. 

During the past year there has been progress in working out a 
plan outlined several years ago, to strengthen the academy work 
in Utah. In 1906 an agreement was made by which the Salt 
^Lake Collegiate Institute should become the preparatory de- 
partment of Westminster College, and the Woman's Board 
agreed to transfer to said college the proceeds of the sale of cer- 
tain property amounting to $40,000. This has been done. 
In the northern part of the state at Logan is the New Jersey 
Academy for girls. It has just closed its most successful year. 
Fifty miles south of Salt Lake City was the Hungerford Acad- 
emy at Springville, and approximately fifty miles south of that, 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 73 

Wasatch Academy at Mt. Pleasant. Each of these academies 
had about thirty-seven boarding pupils and because of the many 
grades, required seven or eight workers. Unquestionably in 
the interest of efficiency and economy a consolidation of these 
two schools must be effected. Mt. Pleasant had the strategic 
location and although there was much regret at leaving Spring- 
ville, Hungerford Academy was consolidated with Wasatch, due 
precaution being taken to preserve memorial names. The fol- 
lowing recent word from Wasatch shows already the wisdom of 
the consolidation: — 

"Our school report for December showed a total attendance 
of one hundred fifty-three pupils in all departments. I find 
that seventy-nine of these are from families the principals of 
which are either leaders in the Mormon Church, or are strongly 
Mormon in influence." 

Mountaineers. Here the important facts of the year is the 
appointment of Mr. Edward P. Childs as field superintendent 
for the work of the Woman's Board in the mountain section of 
the South. 

In West Virginia, strike conditions have at times seriously 
interfered with the work; in Tennessee, at Mossop Memorial, 
the entire force of commissioned workers are graduates of our 
Normal and Collegiate Institute; everywhere the call to prep- 
aration for leadership has been clear and strong; perhaps this is 
most strikingly illustrated at Ozone where out of an organized 
Bible class of ten young men two of them have definitely decided 
to study for the ministry. " It will take years of work, but with 
strong brains, earnest hearts and brave souls they are entering 
upon the task to win. The one is hoping to carry the gospel to 
China, while the other feels called to labor for the salvation of 
souls in this mountain region." The Asheville Schools main- 
tain their usual high standard. 

Foreigners. The Woman's Board has had under consider- 
ation a policy for work among the immigrant populations, which 
would be comprehensive, definite, sufficiently flexible to meet 
existing plans that are satisfactory, and yet making possible a 
work for foreigners supported and controlled by the Woman's 
Board. At Louisville an outline plan, which had previously 
been presented at a regular Board meeting, was discussed in the 
executive session and received hearty commendation. A con- 
densation and rearrangement of the material was made and the 
policy adopted by the Woman's Board. In framing this policy 
the Woman's Board gratefully acknowledges the help of the 
joint conference (composed of officers of the Board of Home 
Missions and of the Woman's Board of Home Missions) and 
especially of the Department of Immigration of the Board of 
Home Missions. By this plan all of the present work among 
immigrant populations, excepting that at Ellis Island alone, 



74 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

will be directly under the supervision of the local women's com- 
mittees; money for its support will be received by the Treasurer 
of the Woman 's Board and returned in bulk for disbursement. 
Funds are to be in advance of usual contributions for the nation- 
al work. The Woman 's Board furthermore definitely agrees to 
inaugurate advance work for immigrant populations as soon as 
its funds warrant such enlargement. For account of work 
among foreigners see page 

Cubans and Porto Ricans. The signal event of the year in 
Cuba was the dedication of the beautiful new building at 
Guines, the "Kate Plumer Bryan Memorial Building," and the 
successful inauguration of the work in the new locality. In the 
other station, Sancti Spiritus and Nueva Paz, the record is en- 
couraging. 

At San Juan, Porto Rico, the day-school has been closed and 
in its stead a community work organized under the Home Board. 
The result is most promising. The public schools in the larger 
centers of Porto Rico are increasing in number and efficiency 
every year and the effort now should be to develop a strong 
boarding school and provide more industrial and vocational 
training. The hospital at San Juan has had a prosperous year. 

Freedmen. The Woman's Board receives from its constit- 
uency funds for the work among Negroes, and transmits the 
same to the Freedmen's Board in Pittsburgh. Last year the 
sum of $85,236.09 was so received, receipted and forward- 
ed. No statistics of missions among Negroes so maintained are 
reported, as they are all included in the summary of the Annual 
Report of the Board for Freedmen. One issue of the official 
publication of the Woman's Board, The Home Mission Monthly, 
is devoted to the attractive presentation of this great theme, and 
the Woman's Board does not suggest any topic for consideration 
by the constituency in April, thus leaving the opportunity for a 
full setting forth of the work of the Freedmen's Board. 

THE FORCE. 

Making'possible all this widely located and diversified mis- 
sionary^effort, most of it for the distinctively pagan peoples of 
America, is the constituency. This year two new synodical so- 
cieties have been organized, making a sisterhood of thirty-four, 
for Washington, Idaho and Oregon are grouped under the North 
Pacific Board and unite home missionary and foreign mission- 
ary work through the organization of a territorial Board. 

When General Assembly constituted the new Synods of Ari- 
zona and New England, a new division of presbyterial territory 
was made, and this has naturally caused some uncertainty re- 
garding boundaries of the women's presbyterial organizations. 
But these questions have now been adjusted and the recently 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 75 

elected synodical and presbyterial officers are energetically 
handling their varying problems. The Synod of Arizona was 
formerly a part of New Mexico, but as rriost of the synodical of- 
ficers lived in Arizona and have graciously consented to contin- 
ue in office, the New Mexico Synodical Society, whose officers 
are unfamiliar with our methods, is really in all except name the 
new organization. 

New England Synodical Society was organized in Boston at a 
meeting held when the new synod met. 

The new apportionment plan has been successfully inaugura- 
ted. By this plan synodical societies receive in January finan- 
cial statements from headquarters, together with the minimum 
amounts requested from their constituency for the fiscal year be- 
ginning April first following. Synodical societies agreed to hold 
executive meetings in January to pass on these apportionments 
and forward the presbyterial apportionment to each presby- 
terial society in time for consideration in executive committee 
before the spring meeting. 

We believe this plan will immeasurably strengthen the finan- 
cial side of our work, and the enthusiastic manner in which it 
has been received is most cheering. 

The story of the year's force, as told in figures, is necessarily 
inaccurate because of belated returns, but the statistics are as 
follows : — 

Synodical societies 34 

Presbyterial societies 261 

Local societies 5,536 

Members 166,460 

This vast force is officered by women who are becoming 
experts in developing missionary interest and directing 
missionary enthusiasm, doing more than the Church begins 
to realize in conserving Presbyterian ideals. Our missionary 
officers are picked women — and our hearts thrill as we recall 
their devoted service — given gratuitously, lovingly, joyfully for 
the Master who did so much for women and who included them 
in His last tender message "Go, tell!" 

THE CAMPAIGN FOR DOUBLE MEMBERSHIP. 

The campaign for double membership is closed, but not until 
the Master comes again will the need for seeking new members 
cease. This responsibility to seek out and interest the un- 
interested women rests heavily upon our constituency. Among 
the most inspiring letters that come to the secretary's desk are 
those which outline intelligent, tactful plans for prosecuting this 
work. 



76 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

The plan for vitalizing our societies, adopted at the last an- 
nual meeting, was directly designed to cultivate the feeling of 
dependence upon prayer — by forming prayer circles, empha- 
sizing prayer in the missionary programs and inviting members, 
if they so desired, to use cards which could be signed to suit the 
individual and returned to headquarters or not, just as she 
wished. The securing of statistics on matters so intimate as 
this would in many cases defeat the purpose desired, so in all 
printed information and correspondence the office purposely 
guarded every statement and letter. But the response has been 
gratifying beyond expression. The fundamental note was 
sounded — now the volume of prayer and praise will grow, as of- 
ficers and leaders remain faithful to the trust. 

SPEAKERS. 

In all the details of extending the organization, stimulating 
the constituency, encouraging the officers, developing interest 
in the uninterested, a most efficient force has been our field sec- 
retaries: Miss Elizabeth Cameron in the East, Miss Abbie H.J. 
Upham, in the central section, and Mrs. J. W. Aldrich in the 
West tirelessly met many engagements. Presbyterial and syn- 
odical meetings were followed by varied and often difficult itin- 
eraries. Study classes for home missions, and organization of 
new societies were among the results that can be counted. Mrs. 
Gildersleeve, our associate secretary, gives the following facts 
for this year: — 

In addition to the constant activities of the field secretaries, 
special speakers have met the many demands made by societies 
for outside inspiration. Mrs. Guy S. Davis has visited local 
churches in Oklahoma and Texas, and as a result twenty organ- 
izations have been effected. Mrs. D. E. Wiber, Washington, 
D. C, who has proved so valuable as a mission study leader, has 
also shown marked ability in presenting the subject of home 
missions in general. Mrs. D. E. Waid, Mrs. A. S. Crane, Miss 
S. F. Lincoln, Mrs. D. J. Fraser, Miss Lydia Hays, Mrs. D. F. 
Diefenderfer, and others have rendered invaluable service. 

Last year at their annual meetings twenty-four synodical and 
one hundred twenty-two presbyterial societies were supplied 
with speakers who proved most acceptable. 

SECRETARY FOR STUDENT WORK. 

In January, 1912, the Presbyterian Church started work 
among women students through the cooperation of the Wom- 
an's Board of Home Missions with the Woman's Board of For- 
eign Missions of New York in a Joint Committee on Student 
work. Mrs. Dwight E. Potter was appointed secretary and in 
that capacity has visited twenty-three colleges and schools and 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 77 

six conferences during the past year. The work is still in its ex- 
perimental stages, is developing rapidly and gives large promise 
of permanency and usefulness. An effort is being made to sup- 
plement by intensive work, such as the leading of mission study 
classes, the more extensive work carried on by other organiza- 
tions in the student field. It is the desire of the joint committee 
to come in contact through its secretary with Presbyterian girls 
during the formative years of college life, to interest them in the 
work of the Church at home and abroad, and cultivate in them 
a cordiality of relationship that will lead them to identify them- 
selves with the work of their church in whatever station of life 
they find themselves when the college training is over. 

In January, 1913, on the invitation of the National Board of 
the Young Women's Christian Associations in the United States 
of America, a two days' conference of Association secretaries 
and representatives of women's mission Boards discussed the 
general question of student work and missions. Representa- 
tives of twenty-three Boards were present from all parts of the 
country and a thorough discussion of this subject is rich in possi- 
bilities for the future. 

THE HOME MISSION MONTHLY. 

During the past year, under the wise guidance of its editor, 
Miss Finks, The Home Mission Monthly has sustained its well- 
earned reputation as an up-to-date missionary periodical of the 
highest standard. Its effectiveness as a means of information 
has been proved by the speedy answers to special calls from the 
treasury which have appeared on its pages, and by the many 
words of appreciation of its aid in the conduct of local societies. 
As the official means of communication between officers at head- 
quarters and the members of the constituency, it is a recognized 
and strong power in the work at large. Furnishing as it does the 
latest news from the field, educational and inspirational materi- 
al, aids for conduct of study classes, suggestive programs and 
helps for local societies, and much other valuable material, it has 
been found that societies which have a good list of Home Mission 
Monthly subscriptions, availing themselves of its assistance and 
stimulus, are the best working societies. Inversely, societies 
with small lists in proportion to their membership are neither 
up-to-date nor efficient in results. Therefore we urge the widest 
circulation of the magazine, not for its own sake nor for the 
reader's sake alone, but for the promotion of the great work of 
home missions, and we rely upon the secretaries of literature to 
make even larger efforts than ever before. The magazine con- 
tinues its record of the years in being not only self-supporting 
but able after paying all expenses to turn a surplus into the 
treasury of the Board ; this amount is to be applied this year to 
the memorial building to be erected at Mount Pleasant, Utah, 
in honor of the late editor of the magazine, Mrs, Delos E. Finks. 



78 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

OVER SEA AND LAND. 

In addition to keeping the three thousand subscriptions se- 
cured last year, Over Sea and Land has gained 2159 new subscrib- 
ers. While from a comparative point of view this record of 
our children's magazine is good as a whole, it shows a lack of en- 
thusiasm somewhere, for it means an average gain over last year 
of less than one-half a subscription each for our army of secre- 
taries of literature. Half of these subscriptions were obtained 
by children, not directly by the secretaries, which reduces the 
percentage still further. Miss Birdsall, the editor, is providing 
a charming magazine for boys and girls and it is earnestly to be 
desired that in the coming year every woman of the Church will 
bestir herself to see that every child under thirteen is supplied 
with Over Sea and Land, either by direct subscription or as a 
present from the Sunday school. Many laudatory letters have 
been received from mothers, teachers and children, which show 
that the magazine is filling a vacant place. There is no other 
up-to-date method of keeping our children informed as to the 
great work done by the Presbyterian Church in missionary 
fields; there is no other Presbyterian missionary magazine for 
young people. 

BOXES. 

For Missionaries. More than two years ago announcement 
was made by the Board of Home Missions that as a method of 
partial support of home missionaries home mission boxes should 
be eliminated, and that it would be the Board's policy so to in- 
crease the salaries that box aid would not be needed. 

In hearty sympathy with this action the Woman's Board con- 
tinues to receive requests from ministers desiring boxes, and has 
forwarded necessary information to societies wishing to extend 
such aid. 

This year two hundred forty boxes have been sent to 
missionary homes, in connection with which sums aggregating 
$3,697. were given; and cash to the amount of $1897. was sent 
in lieu of boxes. Eleven fur coats have been purchased for mis- 
sionaries in the Northwest. 

The year has been a particularly trying one on account of con- 
tinuous crop failures in certain sections, illness and other misfor- 
tunes that have prevailed in many homes, together with the 
high cost of living, while the boxes on the other hand have dim- 
inished in number. 

Gifts of partial communion outfits, pulpit Bibles and hymn 
books have encouraged struggling mission churches. 

Books, magazines and religious papers have given hours of 
enjoyment in homes, mining and lumber camps and in some of 
our mission schools. 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 79 

For Mission Schools. During the year 1912-13 societies have 
been very much interested in providing the necessary articles to 
make both teachers and pupils comfortable, so that about three 
hundred fifty boxes and packages containing material, clothing, 
bedding, table linen, and so forth have been sent to schools and 
hospitals. Two hundred seventy-five yards of rag carpet and 
one hundred forty-eight rugs have helped to make rooms com- 
fortable and homelike. Seventy uniform outfits for the girls in 
one of our Indian schools were prepared by societies. 

Two hundred or more boxes and packages filled with Christ- 
mas cheer have been sent to schools — twenty-three societies 
providing money for Christmas treats without the gifts. Four- 
teen of our teachers were gladdened and inspired by presents of 
wonder bags. 

All letters received from teachers regarding Christmas gifts 
for pupils show appreciation and much satisfaction. 

LITERATURE DEPARTMENT. 

The text-book, Mormonism, the Islam of America, prepared 
especially for women's societies this year, has had a larger sale 
than any previously issued in the series for home mission study. 
Orders filled in our department have required 9,500 copies. 
More than a thousand copies of "The Conservation of National 
Ideals", the text-book used last year, have been sent out, and 
500 copies of "Some Immigrant Neighbors", the book provided 
for juniors; also 1520 copies of other junior text-books. 

Thirty-eight new titles have been added to our list and thirty- 
one leaflets have been reprinted to meet demands. These have 
been bound into 357,133 copies containing 3,360,000 pages. 
328,465 collection envelopes and 25,000 mite boxes have also 
been required by our societies. Joint publications such as the 
Prayer Calendar and programs prepared by the Young People's 
Department, numbering 46,050, including 2,342,400 pages, have 
been printed. Repeated appeals from many auxiliaries led to 
the publication of a fine new cloth map of North America on 
which are located all missions under the care of the Woman's 
Board. 

To the secretaries of literature, many of whom are magnifying 
their office and to whose effort this encouraging growth may be 
in large measure attributed, we acknowledge grateful appreci- 
ation. 

It is the aim of our Literature Department to win the confi- 
dence of our constituency, to provide only printed matter of a 
high standard, and to give the best service that can be rendered 
under economical and human planning. We bespeak the co- 
operation of every officer and interested worker to aid in placing 
the literature already available in the hands of every Presby- 
terian woman. 



80 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

COUNCIL OF WOMEN FOR HOME MISSIONS. 

The fourth Annual Meeting, in Chicago, December third, 
1912, was the first one to be held outside of New York. It is a 
wise provision that in the future alternate Annual Meetings may 
be held in other cities than New York, thus broadening the 
scope and influence of the Council's work. 

In conjunction with the Home Missions Council, this body 
successfully conducted the campaign for home missions, chiefly 
by means of literature and publicity work, culminating in the 
general observance of Home Mission Week, when nation-wide 
consideration of home missionary interests stirred our entire 
constituency. The plan was conceived by the president of the 
Woman's Board of Home Missions and was most cordially ac- 
cepted by both Councils of Home Missions. The result of 
this united and far-reaching effort to inform all the people in 
every place in our country of the stupendous task facing the 
Church can never be estimated. The Woman's Board has is- 
sued a leaflet, "Follow Up Campaign," which aims to impress 
in a concrete form some of the lessons learned in this nation-wide 
effort to make "Our Country God's Country .-" 

THE WOMAN'S BOARD. 

Twelve regular or called meetings of the Board have been 
held and sixteen Executive Committee meetings. Ten popular 
"Third Tuesdays" have been unusually well attended, and 
there have been three "Fifth Tuesdays"for prayer and praise. 

The Hospitality Committee introduced an innovation by 
serving at four meetings of the Board a simple luncheon which 
proved a convenience in the saving of time and also afforded 
opportunity for social intercourse. 

The close of the year was saddened by the resignation of the 
president, Mrs. F. S. Bennett, owing to ill health. She had been 
urged to consider an extended leave of absence, but felt con- 
strained rather to insist that her resignation be accepted. It 
was with exceeding regret that the Board yielded to her wish. 
Mrs. Bennett's long official connection with the Woman's Board, 
covering over twenty years of continuous service, made her en- 
tirely familiar with its varied and extensive activities. Her ac- 
quaintance with the field work and the constituency, the support 
and confidence which all Board members accorded her lovingly, 
her brilliancy, her sane judgment, her thoughtful consideration 
of others and her keen sense of justice, all emphasize our loss. 

But with the faith and loyalty which is the heritage of the 
Woman 's Board, it looks forward with confidence into the future. 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 81 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S DEPARTMENT. 

The twentieth report of the Young People's Department is 
herewith presented by the secretary, MissM. Josephine Petrie: — 

Beginning with 1888 the Board's Reports show an "annual 
anniversary collection from Sunday schools and Christian En- 
deavor societies" for home missions. In 1893 the first itemized 
statement of these gifts was printed, and the fund reached over 
eight thousand dollars. By this time the young people demand- 
ed periodical information of the work toward which they were 
giving, and the officers of the Board could not give the attention 
required for such details. The Young People's Department was 
the result. 

It is with a pleasure not unmingled with wonder that we com- 
pare the financial records of the past fifteen years. In the first 
report of your present secretary (for the year 1898-1899) the 
statement shows $36,391. from Sunday schools and $26,868. 
from the Christian Endeavor societies. In 1902-1903 the fig- 
ures were, in round numbers — Sunday schools, $38,000.; 
Christian Endeavor and juniors, $28,000. ; other young people, 
$23,000. In 1912-1913 the records stand:— 

Sunday Schools $49,871.22 

Young People's Societies 27.486.82 

The steady increase in the figures for each of the intervening 
years is significant in the face of changing conditions among the 
young people and in spite of the slight decrease of the past two 
years the slight fluctuation in their gifts is a silent testimony to 
the value of this department of our Board. The secret of even 
"holding our own" is the attention to details and the loyal co- 
operation of the young people's secretaries. 

THE YOUNG PEOPLE'S SECRETARIES. 

While the dominant note of this report is one of progress, there 
have been all the usual problems during the past year and some 
unusual ones. Not the least of these is that of the changes in the 
secretarial force, for in this respect it has been the most trying 
year in our history. There are about three hundred fifty sec- 
retaries for young people's work in the presbyteries and synods. 
Last fall sixteen of the thirty-five synodical secretaries were 
changed, and during the year nearly eighty new presbyterial 
secretaries have been appointed. In three synods every secre- 
tary for young people's work is new to her office and readjust- 
ments have been necessary in the new synods. 

The importance of this office cannot be underestimated, and 
though ofttimes discouraged because of apparent indifference 
many of these young people's secretaries have " in due season" 
reaped the harvest of their own seed-sowing. We can again re- 



82 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

port the promotion of a number of our force to the senior offices 
in the presbyterial and synodical societies. Two have offered 
themselves for service on the home field, and three are in train- 
ing schools for local church and community work. Who can 
question the returns for the investment of time in this service 
for the young people? 

THE YOUNG PEOPLE. 

We have a roll of 10,030 churches in our General Assembly 
Minutes, and many of these churches have two or more organ- 
izations of young people. In reports received from one hun- 
dred twenty of the young people's secretaries we count twenty- 
two hundred young people's societies and eight hundred fifty 
juniors with a membership of 60,500. But while large synods 
still report twenty-five per cent, of their churches without young 
people's organizations of any kind ; while more than half of the 
remaining percentage make no report of study or giving for mis- 
sions among the young people; and while several thousand Pres- 
byterian Sunday schools make no response to the home mission 
call, there is a definite need for this department and all its co- 
workers. 

A volunteer card was prepared by your secretary before the 
summer conferences and this has been helpful to leaders in se- 
curing recruits. It has been most favorably commented on by 
officers of interdenominational organizations, and is in circula- 
tion at present as a model for other Boards. The special merits 
of this card seem to be the amount of information given in con- 
densed form. A few choice workers have been found through 
this method. 

THE SUNDAY SCHOOL. 

In the Sunday schools will be found the members of the other 
organizations of young people, and these are giving through the 
church treasury, the treasury of the Sunday school and that of 
their own society, but the "power of the littles" is shown in the 
totals noted elsewhere. These amounts represent contributions 
from about twenty-five hundred of the 9566 Sunday schools list- 
ed in the General Assembly Minutes — too small a proportion if 
the figures indicate a neglect to present national home missions 
to the Sunday schools. The monthly statements of the treasur- 
ers have indicated a steady decrease during the year in gifts 
from this source, and we have been anxious lest the gifts from 
Sunday schools would seriously affect our budget for the year. 

We are to-day enjoying the activities, and reaping the results 
of the generations before us in our church life, as well as in our 
business. Missionary committees are now a necessary part of 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 83 

the machinery of the Sunday school, and these committees are 
increasing rapidly. Cooperating with the Presbyterian Depart- 
ment of Missionary Education, we are endeavoring to reach the 
Sunday schools through these committees with home mission 
supplies, or suggestions for study and giving. The definite, 
frequent presentation of missions must result in more intelligent 
and larger giving of time and talents for the greatest work in the 
world — missions. 

As in former years programs have been provided for the spe- 
cial Sunday school occasions. The Thanksgiving service (for 
the Woman's Board Sunday-school offering) was prepared by 
Miss Crowell, and the one for Washington's Birthday (the of- 
fering for the Board of Home Missions) by Mr. Stowell. Eighty 
thousand copies of the Thanksgiving programs were furnished as 
requested, and one hundred thousand of the programs for the 
"Washington's Birthday" service, with a corresponding supply 
of offering receptacles. Constant vigilance is required over the 
treasuries of the Sunday schools as over those of the young 
people's organizations, for here also the gifts are often voted 
away with more zeal than knowledge. 

THE MISSION BAND. 

Mission Bands are cared for by the Associate Secretary of the 
Woman's Board, although the young people's secretary is usual- 
ly the responsible correspondent in presbyterial societies. Gifts 
from Bands are included in the amounts reported from young 
ladies' societies and the Westminster Guild, the total amount 
being $29,435.88. 

THE WESTMINSTER GUILD. 

By mutual agreement the correspondence with Westminster 
Guild Chapters and Circles returned to the desk of your young 
people's secretary on January first, at the time of Mrs. Potter's 
appointment as student secretary. 

There are enrolled four hundred eighty-one Chapters and one 
hundred seventeen Circles. Eighteen synodical Westminster 
Guild secretaries have been appointed, and a number have been 
elected in presbyterials for this specific service. The home mis- 
sion course of study was assigned for the first quarter of 1913, 
when the girls followed Mormonism the Islam of America as their 
text-book, using a special program prepared expressly for the 
girls by our Westminster Guild Committee. The members of 
this committee of our Woman's Board have given unsparingly 
of their time and talents for the advancement of this arm of our 
constituency, and the outlook for the future is most promising. 
The Circles have used for their study "Some Immigrant Neigh- 
bors", also "The Winning of the Oregon Country". We are 



84 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

indebted to Miss Ruth Louise Parker for the beautiful programs 
for Bible study — "St. Paul as an Example ". The Westminster 
Guild is auxiliary only to the Woman's Board and the gifts from 
Chapters and Circles have, with few exceptions, been applied 
toward the maintenance of the hospital for natives at Haines, 
Alaska. To broaden their vision three stations are now present- 
ed for the gifts of the girls. One-half of their contributions will 
still be used for the work at Haines and the other half divided 
between Porto Rico and the Mountain field with specific work 
for the girls in each of the stations assigned. 

The triennial Westminster Guild Council meeting was held 
in New York in January, and a few changes made in the admin- 
istration policies. Contributions from this source during the 

year were : — 

For Haines Hospital, $5,484.10 
For other "objects", 440.00 

THE PRINTED PAGE. 

Only the simplest publications have been issued during the 
year, but these are ever popular. To meet the demands it 
has been necessary to increase each year our supplies of field 
letters. The following table shows the number of copies of 
the four-page printed letters furnished during the year, and 
also indicates the equitable distribution of the different fields 
among our contributors. 

Alaskan 5400 copies Mormon 5400 copies 

Cuban 4600 " Mountain 5400 " 

Indian 5200 " Porto Rican 5400 " 

New Mexican 5600 " 

We have also prepared and furnished ninety-five hundred 
printed junior letters, and forty-six hundred for intermediate 
societies. In addition to these printed sheets, we have provided 
sixty-four hundred separate letters from missionaries, many of 
them two or three pages in length. Our thanks are due the mis- 
sionaries of the Board and the Woman's Board who have so 
promptly and cheerfully complied with the requests for mater- 
ial for these letters. When one realizes the fact that most of 
our letters are sent to local addresses, some of the detail work of 
the department may be appreciated. 

A page of " Notes" is furnished each month for The Assembly 
Herald and The Home Mission Monthly, the object being to dis- 
tribute among leaders the most recent methods culled from our 
correspondence, also programs for meetings or missionary socials 
and any original suggestions, announcements of our publica- 
tions, and so forth. Illustrations on home mission subjects are 
furnished the Westminster lesson helps through Mr. Trull. 

Programs 'have been provided for the home mission Christ- 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 85 

ian Endeavor meetings, the following topics receiving special 
attention: "The Home Missions of -my Denomination — A 
Bird's Eye View", "Missionary Progress in North America", 
"Missionary Achievements" and "Missionary Endurance". 
Seven thousand copies of each program were issued. " Mission- 
ary Endurance" was specially prepared for Home Mission 
Week. Many young people's societies followed the topics of 
that week, and in a number of churches the young people had 
charge of one service for which we furnished much by way of 
suggestions and printed matter. 

In cooperation with a representative of the Women's Foreign 
Boards your secretary has prepared a series of twelve programs, 
under one cover, on the home and foreign Christian Endeavor 
missionary topics for 1913. These pamphlets are sold at five 
cents each, and sales have been encouraging. Formerly our 
programs have been furnished free, or for the cost of postage. 
All the missionary letters are provided without cost to the so- 
cieties. A six-page folder, "Home Mission Hints for 1913", is 
another useful leaflet. 

A set of four junior programs on Alaska was also a popular 
production of the year. The flattering notices in The Christian 
Endeavor World brought us requests from young people of most 
of the other denominations. As the regular "object" for the 
contributions of the junior Christian Endeavorers all over the 
country is the support of the children's department of cur Pres- 
byterian Hospital, San Juan, Porto Rico, a special call was 
made in these junior programs (at the solicitation of their lead- 
ers) for an "object" in Alaska for which the special gifts of the 
children could be applied. A water wheel at Sitka, Alaska, was 
suggested. This "extra" has amounted to $92.91 of the 
$350. asked. 

Supplies of all our publications are sent to conferences, insti- 
tutes, state Christian Endeavor conventions, and so forth, and 
the mailing list of those desiring samples (exclusive of the list of 
Sunday-school superintendents) has about five thousand ad- 
dresses. Many requests for these supplies are from leaders of 
district or state work in other denominations than our own. 

THE "SPECIALS". 

The "special object" is a much abused and misunderstood 
term as it relates to this department. We have used the expres- 
sion in assigning salaries, scholarships, and so forth — any work 
which is exclusive of the general fund. Only twice in the his- 
tory of the department have appeals for large "specials" been 
asked from the young people. The first was in 1896-1897 when 
Christian Endeavor societies responded with $12,617. as a 
"thank-offering fund for the payment of the debt of the Board 



86 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

of Home Missions". The second call was made in 1901 for 
special gifts toward the first of our Presbyterian hospital build- 
ings in Porto Rico. As a result one building is named for the 
Christian Endeavor societies. 

Several new plans have operated this year toward the appor- 
tioning of more stations to groups of societies or Sunday schools. 
In this way six "general objects" have been assigned, while the 
full salaries of thirteen pastors under the Home Board, thirteen 
teachers of the Woman's Board have been presented to the 
young people and Sunday schools, in addition to the two hun- 
dred ten scholarships and one hundred twenty-five scholarship 
shares which they have assumed. 

THE BEST THINGS. 

The following "best things" of the year are culled from re- 
ports given at the last synodical meetings. First, we welcome 
the synodical and presbyterial secretaries of the new Synods of 
Arizona, New England and New Mexico, and expect the coming 
year will show an increase in our totals because of their work. 

Some of the encouragements noted are as follows: Better let- 
ters to societies from their presbyterial secretaries. An evident 
increase of interest in the young people on the part of presby- 
terial officers. More intelligent questions the rule in letters to 
headquarters. An advance made in several synods toward 
quarterly payments. Progress in definite or intensive study. 
A " Cabinet" recommended for the local churches composed of a 
member from the women's societies, the Sunday schools, and all 
organizations of young people, each to know what the other is 
doing, what to count on in gifts, to exchange helpful suggestions, 
letters, and so forth. One young people's society "prayed into 
life by four interested women". The prayer chain, or prayer 
circle, formed of the secretaries in several synods. The "Round- 
robin" letters which keep the secretaries in touch with one an- 
other and inspire action. "Missionary policies" adopted. 
Better programs and a fuller "Hour" for the young people at 
presbyterial and synodical meetings. "Loyalty to the estab- 
lished work, and larger gifts to meet our answered prayers". 
"Joy over more splendid young women giving of their time and 
talents for this work". More missionary institutes and confer- 
ences. Better attendance of young people at these gatherings. 
More frequent communication between the young people's sec- 
retary and presbyterial treasurers. 

A few discouragements: Decreased funds because of more 
local work — the old pledges forgotten. "The money given by 
one society in our presbytery for local philanthropies would to- 
tal five times the amount given to the mission Boards of our 
Church". "The young people lack attention from the well in- 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 87 

formed adults in the Church, hence the spirit of disloyalty to 
our denominational work". A synod where 534 churches have 
no organizations for children and 397 churehes no young people's 
society. The lack of leaders. This wail comes from every 
point of the compass. Why are these leaders for the young 
people so hard to find? A financier gave testimony to the life 
of the late J. Pierpont Morgan in these words: "Among the 
greatest of debts of appreciation that the financial world owes to 
his memory is that he trained eminently capable successors". 
The brief story of another year in the Young People's Depart- 
ment is closed. Your secretary has endeavored to reach the 
young people through every possible avenue of approach, but 
there have been many limitations and the work of the year can- 
not be measured by the dollars we report. The future of our 
Presbyterian Church is not assured because of strong men and 
women who may be the leaders of to-day, and if we are to reach 
our ideals for her we must do our full share in developing "em- 
inently capable successors" in the next generation. Such lead- 
ership is found in the Sunday schools, senior, intermediate and 
junior Endeavor societies, and all the other organizations of 
young people in the Church. It is a God-given privilege to 
share in the finding and training of these successors in the home 
churches, and to know that through them we are helping to 
"hasten the time when the whole earth shall be filled with the 
knowledge of the Lord". To this end we work and pray. 

LITERATURE DEPARTMENT. 

We report with sincere gratitude the largest distribution of 
home mission literature ever recorded. This result in our work 
has been attained by a careful and continuous campaign of ed- 
ucation. 

Receipts from sales of publications, including those of the 
Woman's Board, reached the splendid total of $11,123.65. Of 
this $2,683.63 was deposited with the treasurer of the Board, 
and $8,440.02 with the Woman's Board. This total includes 
receipts from sales of leaflet and pamphlet aids on the topics 
recommended for study each month; the income for Prayer Cal- 
endars, of which with the exception of gift copies to our commis- 
sioned workers, an edition of 16,000 has been sold; text-books 
for study classes ; and rentals of stereopticon slides that practi- 
cally meet the expense of maintaining our lecture department. 

The demand for the monthly issues of the "Home Mission 
Paragraphs" has steadily increased. Because of frequent 
changes in the addresses of pastors, we have found it wise to ask 
them to renew their orders for the "Paragraphs" semi-annually, 
so as to keep our lists correct and also to avoid waste in distri- 
bution. While this method seems to serve our purpose it is an 



88 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

interesting fact that the circulation of this leaflet has steadily 
increased in many churches until now 45,000 copies are required 
each month to fill the orders on file. We have distributed 
60,500 more copies this year than last. 

The circulation of the Prayer Calendar is considerably in ad- 
vance of last year, and receipts from sales show an increase of 
$120.43. 

When the Presbyterian Department of Missionary Education 
was established in June to direct and forward the work of mis- 
sion study, all home mission text-books which formerly had 
been sent out by our department were transferred, and the re- 
ceipts from sales of books that we report this year merely 
represent the cost price of the stock transferred. 

Though no new sets of stereopticon slides were added to our 
lecture equipment until very near the end of the fiscal year our 
office has filled one hundred four more engagements than last 
year for their exhibition, and our field secretaries report an in- 
crease of thirty-two exhibitions. Receipts from rentals show a 
decrease of $60.81 because the rental price was reduced from one 
dollar and a half to one dollar. Two fine new lectures, " Church 
and Coke" and "The White Man's Alaska", have recently been 
prepared and we hope to develop plans for others later. 

Great impetus was given to the distribution of literature by 
the celebration of Home Mission Week, November 17-24, 1912, 
and the increased demand for information has continued 
throughout the year. Never in the history of the work has 
there been such thoughtful inquiry for definite facts on definite 
topics. To satisfy this demand we have put into circulation 
some excellent leaflet literature prepared by experts in the work, 
such as The Current Program of Home Missions by Hubert C. 
Herring, D. D.; Cooperation in Home Missions by Lemuel Call 
Barnes, D. D.; The Country Community by Prof. Harold W. 
Foght; The Italians in America by Frederick H. Wright; The 
Negro in the United Statesby H. Paul Douglass, D. D.; The New 
Frontier by the Rev. C. A. Wooddy, ; The Poles in America by the 
Rev. Paul Fox, and The Task of the Church in the City by the 
Rev. Herman F. Swartz. Five new issues of "The Stories of the 
States" have also been added to our list; West Virginia by the 
Rev. George W. Pollock, Utah by the Rev. Josiah McClain, 
Kentucky by Edward L. Warren, D. D.; New England by 
Herbert A. Manchester, D. D; and Michigan by the Rev. 
George B. Crawford. These leaflets which cover conditions, 
secular and religious, in the various states are being used in in- 
creasing numbers. 

The year's output, exclusive of the Annual Report, numbers 
836,825 copies bound into leaflets and pamphlets containing 
9,345,600 pages; 103,635 collection envelopes, and 24,680 mite 
boxes. Joint publications such as the Prayer Calendar and pro- 



1913.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 89 

grams prepared by the Young People's Department, numbering 
46,050 copies including 2,342,400 pages have been printed. 

The library in connection with this department has grown 
increasingly useful not only to those living in the vicinity of our 
headquarters, but also to students of missions located at a dis- 
tance, to whom volumes have been sent by mail or express. 
Only the cost of transportation is required from borrowers. 

The increase in this record is proof that Presbyterians, in- 
dividually and in organizations, are becoming more aroused to 
the value of securing facts regarding the actual conditions of the 
work and needs of home missions. It is for this evidence of a 
new interest that we are profoundly grateful. We work and 
pray for its continuance and ask all who are interested to help 
us. 

CONCLUSION. 

Thus we have given you the work of the year. It tells its 
own story. It comprehends a wide and steadily widening 
range of our activities. These activities have not been sought. 
They have knocked insistently at our door. To have been deaf 
to any one of them in our judgment would have been unfaith- 
fulness to manifest duty. 

The developing West has called for more money than ever 
before expended there. We have heard and acted and given 
more for evangelization than ever in the history of the Board. 
The cry of the American Indians has come in thrilling tones 
over the deserts and we have greatly advanced our work among 
them. 

We have heard the ground swell of social discontent, and sure 
that the gospel is the only permanent counteractant we have 
measured it against that discontent in cities and mines and fac- 
tories and have found it mighty in changing the attitude of 
workingmen toward the Church of Christ. 

We have heard the roll of the immigration waves through all 
our ports far up into cities and towns, and sure that the Voice 
that spoke on Galilee alone is sufficient to still them and to con- 
vert those waters into fountains of national blessing we have 
stimulated, organized and guided a nation-wide enterprise in 
twenty-two presbyteries and sixty-seven different centers to 
welcome and comfort and save our new citizens. 

The call of the countryside has come to us from many presby- 
teries and synods in minor tones of discouragement and surren- 
der, and we have done what we could to inspire country churches 
to realize again the old ideals which generations ago made the 
country the very garden of the Church. 

We have listened to the pleadings of the islands for a freer re- 
ligious life and to the fastnesses of Alaska for relief for imperilled 
bodies and souls. 



90 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

We have begun to face the problem of Spanish-American life 
in the Southwest, — a problem which revolutions in the sister 
Republic have made grave and urgent. 

The Woman's Board has been responsive to the cry of the 
children in a dozen states and in various languages but in the 
one common appeal for a better chance to be fit for American 
citizenship. 

We have tried to make efficient this nation-wide program. 
Success in any great enterprise in these days waits on efficiency 
of supervision and direction. In our minds the line of our 
advance is beyond question. The program for the salvation 
of our country must be as comprehensive and adapted as are 
the multiform foes that threaten it. To this program in essential 
outlines, repeatedly approved by the General Assembly, we 
pledge ourselves as an accepted policy and call on our great 
Church to match the occasion to which we have come, with 
their sustained support and their unfailing prayers. 

We have rejoiced in the partnership of service with our more 
than two thousand missionaries and teachers, and now submit 
this record to the considerate judgment of the General Assem- 
bly and the Church. 

The term of service of the following members expires with 
this meeting of the Assembly: — 

Ministers. Laymen. 

Rev. Samuel J. Niccolls, D. D., LL.D. Walter M. Aikman. 
Rev. Joseph Dunn Burrell, D. D. Robert C. Ogden. 

Rev. Albert Edwin Keigwin, D. D. Henry W. Jessup. 
Rev. Edgar Whitaker Work, D. D. Fleming H. Revell. 
Rev. William Adams Brown, D. D. 

Respectfully submitted by order of the Board, 

Charles L. Thompson, 
Secretary. 



1913.] SELF-SUPPORTING SYNODS. 91 

SELF-SUPPORTING SYNODS. 



SYNOD OF BALTIMORE. 

Owing to the peculiar geographical conditions no synodical 
• organization for home missions is maintained, each presbytery 
being a self-supporting unit and conducting its home mission work 
independently. 

PRESBYTERY OF BALTIMORE. 

During the past year there has been a growing sense of the importance 
of the home mission work of the presbytery, and a disposition to meet the 
new opportunities in an adequate way. Much of the interest now mani- 
fested is due to the hearty cooperation of the Board of Home Missions. 
Through its secretaries and the superintendent of the Department of Immi- 
gration it has stood ready to give to the committee of presbytery the benefit 
of its experience in the development of the work, and to furnish such prac- 
tical assistance as was necessary to carry out a far-sighted and aggressive 
policy. 

A change in the organization of the committee was made in October, 
providing for a closer supervision of the work. The home mission and church 
extension committee is comprised of fifteen members, sub-divided into three 
sub-committees of four each, two ministers and two laymen. These are 
known as the committees on down town and foreign work, city and suburban 
work and town and country work. The chairman of the committee, the 
secretary and the superintendent are ex-officio members of each sub-com- 
mittee. The close of the fiscal year was changed from September thirtieth 
to March thirty-first in order to conform to the fiscal year of the Church. 

A conference committee was also appointed representing the presbytery 
and the various Presbyterian agencies concerned in the home mission enter- 
prise. This committee met early in March to prepare a budget for the com- 
ing year and plans were laid to secure concerted action in the work of the 
committee. 

Preparations have been made for an efficiency survey of the entire 
presbytery during the coming summer to culminate in a Church and City 
week in the fall. This survey will be made in co-operation with the Depart- 
ment of Immigration and the Department of Church and Country Life of 
the Home Board. It is proposed to make this survey the basis for a 
thoroughgoing educational and financial campaign during the coming winter. 
The down town and foreign work in the city of Baltimore has received much 
attention during the past year. There are at present five foreign centers: 
the Bohemian and Moravian Church, the St. Paul's Polish Church, the Reid 
Memorial Guild House in which the Italian work centers, the Austrian Im- 
migrant Home and the Neighborhood House of the Second Church, which 
ministers mainly to a Jewish population. A varied service is rendered in 
these centers adapted to the needs of the immediate neighborhood. The 
workers, now numbering eighteen, meet monthly for conference and a spirit 
of hopefulness is manifest with reference to the entire field. 

Six daily vacation Bible schools were held last summer in down town 
and foreign sections of the city in cooperation with the Board of Home 
Missions. These schools were not only successful in ministering to the one 
thousand children who attended, but proved of immense value in opening 
doors of approach by the Church. A fresh air farm, belonging to the presby- 
tery, also proved a fruitful source of help to many of the foreign people. 
Both these agencies will be greatly extended in their scope during the coming 
summer. 

During the year two suburban fields were opened. At Severna Park 
a church building was erected and a congregation organized. 

The Presbyterian Training School has been cooperating with the Home 



92 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

Board in furnishing trained workers. It is hoped that with the assistance 
of the Board of Education this service may be greatly extended. 

John Stuart Conning, 

Presbyterial Superintendent. 

PRESBYTERY OF NEW CASTLE. 

The New Castle Presbytery has within its bounds nearly all the problems 
that are met with in home mission work. It has the city where the down 
town church is face to face with the difficulties of battling with the inroads 
of the business district. It also has the suburban question with its growing 
residence sections, as well as the adjacent centers of new life out along the 
trolley lines. It has also the immigration phase of the question, arising out 
of the rapidly growing foreign populations. 

It has the rural question from every angle. It has the country district 
with its prosperous church, where the boys stay on the farm, where progress- 
ive farming and progressive church work go hand in hand. It has the 
country district where the boys leave the farm and where renters have sup- 
planted the owners, and as a consequence the church declines. It has also 
the districts where improved methods of farming are bringing in a better 
class of farmers. The home mission committee is striving to lend its aid 
to all these phases of need and to give encouraging help to the new communi- 
ties seeking to establish church services and to the old communities seeking 
to sustain services against a changing population and a declining membership. 

Foreign work is carried on in Wilmington among the Italians, who have 
been making commendable progress in their- new church building, situated 
as it is in the district where the better class of Italians are securing homes for 
themselves. At present the home mission committee is considering the 
inauguration of a work among the Polish population with every prospect of 
a successful mission among that people. So many and varied are the dif- 
ficulties encountered in properly and successfully conducting services among 
immigrant populations, that the committee called into a conference on the 
subject the members of the home mission committees of the Presbyteries of 
Baltimore, of Philadelphia North, and the church extension committee of 
Newark, New Jersey, with the Rev. W. P. Shriver of the Home Board, and 
others interested in foreign work with special reference to the work among 
the Polish populations. To this conference were invited several Polish 
priests of the Independent Catholic movement who were present and gave 
encouraging addresses on the attitude of their people and of their readiness 
to meet properly directed efforts on their behalf. 

This conference resulted in recommendations being adopted looking to 
an advance step in dealing with foreign elements. These recommendations 
are to be presented to the presbyteries interested for consideration. 

Joel S. Gilfillan, 
Chairman of Home Mission Committee. 

PRESBYTERY OF WASHINGTON CITY. 

The Presbytery of Washington City consists mainly of the District of 
Columbia and four small churches in Virginia and six or seven in Maryland. 
The home mission work of the presbytery consists mostly of sustaining the 
work in the weaker churches and of planting new churches as the City of 
Washington develops. While no new churches have been organized in the 
past year, yet there are fields where churches will doubtless shortly be 
established, and there are twelve churches organized in the past which still 
require substantial encouragement, and drew upon the sustentation fund 
of the presbytery to the amount of about twenty-seven hundred dollars 
last year. This is raised altogether within the presbytery and besides there 
is liberal response to the needs of the Home Board. We have a Presbyterian 
Alliance which helps financially to bear some of the burdens and works in 
conjunction with the church extension committee of the presbytery in look- 
ing out for new sites for planting churches. 



1913.] SELF-SUPPORTING SYNODS. 93 

A great movement which is truly home mission is the successful effort 
which has been made under the leadership of the Rev. Charles Wood, D.D., 
to relieve of debt the churches too heavily incumbered to lift themselves out 
of their indebtedness in the near future. By this plan such churches were 
encouraged to subscribe splendidly to their own debts by the presbyterial 
committee appointed for that purpose being able to raise subscriptions to 
pay the balance of the debts, differing of course in amount according to the 
respective abilities of the indebted churches. Thus debts to the amount of 
ninety thousand dollars or more have been provided for by the combined 
subscriptions, to the great joy of the many and the brighter outlook for the 
burdened churches. When thus relieved they will be better able and 
doubtless willing to respond even more generously to the beneficences of the 
Church. 

Henry E. Brundage, 

Chairman of Home Missions Committee. 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



Formerly the home mission problem in Illinois was to provide churches 
and church services for those who wanted them. To some small extent this 
phase of the problem still exists. Here and there a new church is needed, 
and when needed, is organized. But this is no longer the burden of our 
work. 

The problem to-day is to provide people for the churches which want 
them. Not that we are losing in population. Almost everywhere we have as 
many people as ever, and in many places vastly more. And everywhere we 
have some of the finest and most earnest Christians. 

But three floods are rolling simultaneously over our Commonwealth. 
First, the flood transients who rent, and work, and farm, here one year and 
there the next and who never expect to settle down in a permanent abode 
anywhere. Second, the flood of immigrants from countries at best only 
formally Christians and who come to us almost, if not quite, hostile to any 
church or church organization. Third, the flood of forgetfulness of God, 
due to absorption in amusements, in the use of luxuries, and in fads and 
foibles of innumerable descriptions. 

Only intelligent and heroic work of the deepest kind can meet the situa- 
tion. Only in league with God can it be done at all. And some effective 
work has been done. During the past year our churches have contributed 
more liberally than ever before. The intelligence of the people concerning 
the situation and its demands are steadily growing. The average strength, 
quality, and efficiency of the men in the home mission fields is notably 
increasing. Better salaries are being provided for the right men, in the home 
mission pastorates. 

At present we are exceptionally fortunate in our workers among the 
foreign-speaking peoples. 

Notwithstanding serious and superficial statements to the contrary the 
country church work in Illinois is in a hopeful condition, and taken all in 
all is in as good a condition as ever before. And in many localities it is in a 
very much better condition than formerly. Some churches have been dis- 
banded, or united with others, or moved to towns near by to the great gain 
of the cause. Throughout the state the Presbyterian Church is better and 
more strongly represented than ever before. But our present plants and 
facilities are capable of doing, and need to do, far more than is at present 
accomplished. 

Among the foreign-speaking peoples in our synod we are building missions 
and churches, establishing social centers, doing work among the children, 
maintaining reading rooms and places for innocent games and gatherings, 
doing night-school and vacation-school work, preaching, lecturing, entertain- 
ing, giving daily assistance in the way of counsel and material advancement, 
visiting among the people, making their acquaintance, trying to put ourselves 



94 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 



in their places so as to understand them and their needs, and to learn what 
best to do in every separate case to win and hold these people for Christ and 
America, and to make them well worthy of both. And our results already 
show that this can be done. 

Our tasks are great; our progress is encouraging; our hope is in Him 
Whose we are and Whom we serve. 

W. V. Jeffries. 

Synodical Superintendent. 



SYNOD OF INDIANA. 



The steady increase of the gifts of the churches of the Synod of Indiana 
to home missions, which has been reported for the past six years, has con- 
tinued to the present. The churches gave in 1907 the sum of $11,497.60; 
in 1908, $13,184.35; in 1909, $15,127.61; in 1910, $16,153.66; in 1912, 
$18,146.13; and in the year now ended $20,662.48. An interval of five 
months when the fiscal year was changed, from October, 1910, to the spring 
of 1911, is omitted necessarily in this statement. In that period the churches 
gave $5,719.65. The average gifts a year ago amounted to just over thirty- 
six cents a member; this year they amount to nearly forty-one cents. 

Each presbytery sustains its own home mission work, except the two 
southern presbyteries. They receive grants from the synodical committee, 
this year amounting to $2,400. The synod also cares for the foreign-speak- 
ing work in Logansport Presbytery, and has this year assumed charge of the 
Clinton mission, though the Crawfordsville Presbytery has borne the most 
of its current expense. The Home Board also contributes largely to the Neigh- 
borhood House at Gary. 

According to the Indiana Plan, the churches send their home mission 
offerings directly to the presbyterial home mission treasurer, who retains 
seventy-five per cent, for presbyterial work. Of the remainder, fifteen per 
cent, goes to the synodical committee for the state work, and ten per cent, 
goes to the Board in New York. 

The synod also receives the income from the Yandes Funds, this year 
amounting to $3,279.93. The income from the Yandes Sunday-school 
Fund has been administered, since the last meeting of the synod, by the 
Sunday-school committee. Daniel Yandes and his sons, Simon and George 
B. Yandes, were residents of Indianapolis who gave largely to benevolent 
causes, especially to those of our Church. The two former while living had 
contributed various sums to this synod for its mission and Sunday-school 
work, so establishing the Yandes Funds. At the death of George B. Yandes 
last February, the fund was splendidly increased by the provision of his will 
which bequeathed to the synod the residue of his estate for home mission 
and Sunday-school purposes. The income of two-thirds of the bequest is 
to be spent in home mission work, and of the other third in Sunday-school 
work, under the direction of the home mission committee. The precise 
amount of the bequest is not yet known but it opens a new era in the 
administration of home mission affairs in this synod. 

The figures found in the General Summary of Synodical Home Missions, 
on another page of the Board 's Report, present the statistical side of the 
year's work, so that it need not be repeated here. 

The mission work in Gary, Clinton and Indianapolis has prospered during 
the year, — the Rev. V. P. Backora being resident superintendent at Gary, the 
Rev. C. B. Papa at Clinton, and Mr. Joseph Horkey in Indianapolis. The 
notable and outstanding event of the year in respect of our foreign-speaking 
work, has been the erection of the Neighborhood House at Gary. The 
building and furnishings cost about $13,700., besides the lots which were 
purchased for $1,900. by Miss Katherine R. Williams and Miss Jane P. 
Williams of Lima, and presented by them to the committee. Toward the 
erection of the building the Board of Church Erection granted $2,000., the 



1913.] SELF-SUPPORTING SYNODS. 95 

women of the synod raised $3,000., and the churches, by offerings and per- 
sonal gifts, secured the remainder. 

The building was dedicated with simple but impressive services, on the 
fifteenth of November, and is already the center of social, religious and edu- 
cational work which reaches a neighborhood of working people speaking 
various tongues, and constantly in need of guidance, sympathy and light. 

This building has received an especial consecration from the fact that it 
was the last piece of special work in which our devoted and beloved super- 
intendent, the Rev. George Knox, D.D., was engaged. The last ripe 
twelve years of his life he gave to our synod, working with splendid devo- 
tion, and falling at last overtaxed and weary but busy to the very last day 
in his service of the synod. He died December nineteenth. A tablet is to 
be erected by the synod to his memory in the large room of the Neighbor- 
hood House. 

By the direction of the synod, the home mission committee has become 
incorporate, and now holds the Gary mission property in trust for the synod. 

John P. Hale, 
Chairman of Home Missions Committee. 



SYNOD OF IOWA. 



The work of home missions in this synod is administered by the Board 
of Iowa Presbyterian Home Missions, the synod having assumed self-support 
in 1904, and the synodical committee having been changed to a chartered 
Board a few years later. This Board is composed of the presbyterial chair- 
men of home missions, with two laymen added as members of the Board and 
its executive committee, the latter being composed of these laymen and the 
president, secretary and treasurer of the Board. Meetings of the Board 
are held semi-annually. At the spring meeting grants are made to presby- 
teries to meet their needs of the year beginning April first. 

An assessment is laid on all churches of the synod of " Half as many dollars 
as members " from congregational offerings. The contributions from 
organizations within the churches— Sunday schools, Women's Societies, and 
so forth — are not asked for the Iowa Board's work. They go through 
national Boards for the wider work. 

Of the congregational offerings to and through the Iowa Board, one-tenth 
is sent to the national Board, nine-tenths being devoted to missions in Iowa. 

Any presbytery which fails to meet the common apportionment of "Half 
as many dollars as members " will have its grant for work reduced in the 
proportion of its deficiency. 

The salaried force consists of the superintendent, the Rev. C. H. Purmort, 
D.D., and the assistant superintendent, the Rev. Scott W. Smith, who do 
the field work, dividing the synod between them for effectiveness. 

The establishing of a Collegiate Church, for special ministry to the college 
and student body at the State Agricultural College at Ames, has now been 
turned over to the collegiate department of the Board of Education, in so 
far as concerns the securing of further funds for an adequate building. The 
Iowa Board continues its grant to the salary of the pastor, and its general 
policy of assistance in any way possible to this important enterprise. 

As a result of the action of the synod looking toward a federation of Iowa 
churches, and the appointment of the Board's president as chairman of a 
committee to secure cooperation along this line, a meeting was held in April, 
1912, at which a constitution was adopted for submission to the state re- 
presentative bodies of the Churches participating in the initial meeting — 
Baptist, Congregational, Disciples, Methodist Episcopal, Protestant Epis- 
copal, Presbyterian and United Presbyterian. The chairman of the Iowa 
Board was made the chairman of the federation. The tentative constitu- 
tion has now been approved by all the Churches represented in the con- 



96 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 1 1913 

ference, and a meeting for permanent organization and the adoption of 
methods will be held April seventeenth, 1913. 

It is hoped that this will be the beginning of a better relation between the 
home mission agencies of these various Churches, and the conservation of 
Christian effectiveness in the smaller and rural communities of the state. 

Some proposals are now pending for exchange and consolidation of work 
in several fields between our own Church and the United Presbyterian, 
which will probably be effected very soon. 

The total contributions for home missions (including the amount for 
"Freedmen" by Women's Societies) have been as follows for two years past: 

1910-11 1911-12 
Through Iowa Board (including interest) for Iowa 

work $16,287 18 $18,627 94 

Through Iowa Board for National work 1,752 31 2,005 43 

Through Women's Synodical Society 13,375 89 13,541 56 

Totals $31,415 38 $34,174 93 

Deducting "Freedmen" portion 3,367 37 3,414 40 

Net total $28,048 01 $30,760 53 

Net gain $ 2,712 52 

This does not correspond with the totals in last year's report, which 
included the contributions of the four foreign-speaking presbyteries, three 
of which have been organized into a separate synod, and the fourth operates 
through the national Board as to offerings, and assistance in work. 

The gross total of Iowa contributions for home missions, as shown by 
the Assembly Minutes, which may include all local home mission contribu- 
tions, boxes, and so forth, was for 1910-11, $41,077.00, and 1911-12, 
$41,938.00, an increase of $861.00. 

A feature of the work of the year has been the holding of some " Rural 
Church Farmers' Institutes" under the arrangement of the superintendent, 
who also presented at the State Fair a very attractive exhibit of the work of 
the Presbyterian Church in its relation to the rural church and country life 
problems. 

It is hoped that in the near future survey work may be taken up in three 
or more typical counties of Iowa, with the leadership and assistance of the 
national Board. 

E. B. Newcomb, 

President of Board Iowa Presbyterian Home Missions. 



SYNOD OF KANSAS 



The Board of Home Missions became more than a benefactor to the Synod 
of Kansas when in April of 1908 it made it possible for us to enter the group 
of self-supporting synods by granting the moneys collected by the synod 
during the second six months of the previous year to be used as an initial 
banking fund and by supporting all our pastor-evangelists for an additional 
two months. Kansas had been contributing to the Board between $6,000 
and $7,000 for the work of home mission evangelism. The first wholesome 
reaction of the new plan was in a $10,000 increase to the contribution of 
former years, which increase has been maintained to the present time. 

Synod's work was originally administered by a home mission committee 
composed of the chairmen of the presbyterial committees and later its power 
was enlarged by giving to the same personnel the functions of a Commission. 
The field force operated under the direction of the presbyterial committees 
and consisted of five evangelists whose work was virtually that of pastor-at- 
large. The latest feature in the development of our synodical administration 



1913.] SELF-SUPPORTING SYNODS 97 

for home missions has grown out of the conviction that the synodical unit 
furnishes the basis of greatest efficiency. Therefore last October the synod 
authorized the appointment of ministers to serve the larger interests of the 
Church as synodical superintendent and assistant superintendents. The 
superintendent is to be selected by synod's Home Mission Commission and 
the Board of Home Missions and commissioned by the synod. His salary 
is to be met equally from the treasuries of synod's home mission fund and of 
the Home Mission Board. He is to serve the Church as the home mission 
executive under the direction of the synodical Home Mission Commission. 
His specified duties are as follows: 

1. To have general care of vacancy and supply of the whole synod. 

2. To secure the raising of the home mission apportionment made by the 
synod upon the presbyteries. 

3. To look after new fields where presbyteries may begin work. 

4. To co-operate with home mission committees of presbyteries in the 
vigorous prosecution of their work and in their effort to bring churches 
receiving aid to self-support as rapidly as possible. 

5. To conserve the interests of the Home Board as may be agreed upon 
between the Board and the synod. 

The Rev. W. M. Irwin, D.D., who has proven the efficient secretary of 
Synod's Commission since its organization and who has labored untiringly 
for the success of this work has been prevailed upon to accept the superin- 
tendency and began his work April first. Dr. Irwin is pre-eminently fitted 
for the duties which he has assumed both by natural endowment and by his 
detailed knowledge of the field. We reasonably anticipate a larger and more 
effective service in behalf of Presbyterianism in Kansas. 

The receipts for Kansas home missions for the past year were $16,021.14; 
the expenditures were $17,441.65; the balance April 1, 1913, was $5,376.19. 

William Westwood, 
President of Home Mission Commission. 



SYNOD OF MICHIGAN 



In a state having so much territory which is distinctively home missionary, 
the work of self-support is always strenuous if not bordering on the heroic. 
A line beginning at Port Huron and then drawn across the state from east 
to west will divide the state into two distinct sections as regards home mis- 
sion work. 

The lower half of the state is thickly settled and well provided with 
churches. The northern half which included the upper peninsula is new 
territory and not so thickly settled. The great pine forests have been cut 
down, and now the hardy settler is going in over the blazed trail and making 
for himself and family a home out of the ruins, swamps and underbrush. 
Many formerly prosperous churches have gone back and only exist in name 
and a church building. Many not conversant with the situation have been 
appalled at the vacant and decadent churches. There is always a going 
back when community life changes, at least when there is a marked change 
in the industrial life and habit of a community. The lumber-jack and the 
lumberman have gone and now comes the farmer, ranchman and miner, a 
more settled people. 

The upper half of the state is now in a formative stage, new settlers are 
coming in from the older states, and the rich farm lands are being rapidly 
claimed. Iron, copper and coal bring in another great company of workers, 
who will rapidly occupy this rich and once neglected territory and again open 
and use the empty churches. 

But during this transition home missions has had a difficult task in simply 
holding the territory, let alone making progress or entering on new work. 
Ten years will reveal a great change among the home mission churches of 
this region. Self-support has been largely dependent on the southern part 



98 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [1913. 

of the state. Yet the great work of the state has not been hindered but has 
gone forward. 

To do this new work more effectively the synod in 1910 divided the state 
into three districts, and appointed three district missionaries, who in their 
work carry out the duties of a superintendent. They report the result of their 
work to the chairman every month, and are under the direction of the com- 
mittee during the year. Their work has been very efficient; they made over 
sixteen hundred personal calls, organized Sunday schools, churches, and 
gathered together the scattered communities. Each missionary is well 
acquainted with his territory, having visited every field and many of them 
several times during the year. During the year they received on confession 
of faith 52, preached 320 sermons, organized 9 Sunday schools, settled 19 
pastors and supplies, held 173 official meetings, made 23 financial canvasses 
of congregations, and this is but a small part of their work over the synod. 
They are not office fixtures but efficient field men, dealing with problems at 
first hand. 

The financial statement for the year shows that the year's work was 
begun with a budget of $15,000, and with a balance of $56. A strenuous 
campaign was conducted among the churches during the year. As a result 
of that effort five presbyteries made a gain over last year of $1,028. — Detroit, 
Flint, Lake Superior, Lansing, Saginaw. Four had a loss of $712. — Grand 
Rapids, Kalamazoo, Monroe, Petoskey — or a net gain of $315. for the year. 
Lake Superior gave 44 cents per member, Flint 42, Saginaw 40, Lansing 38, 
Grand Rapids 37, Detroit 35, Kalamazoo 21, Monroe 20, Petoskey 35. 
The total amount expended during the year was $14,3,32. The Presbytery 
of Detroit is doing a large work among the people of foreign speech, expend- 
ing on this work alone $2,362. The work done is principally among the 
Italians, as is also the work of synod at Calumet, while the new work at 
Saginaw is principally among the Bohemians. The Presbytery of Detroit 
paid into synod's treasury $3,983., besides taking care of their own home 
mission work. The presbytery is also carrying forward a very pretentious 
work in church extension, calling for an expenditure of about $20,000, last 
year. 

The problem of the country church and country life is receiving a large 
attention by both a special committee of synod as well as the home mission 
committee. Urgent calls have gone to the Home Board for assistance in 
this work and unless the Board can come to the help of synod, the work must 
languish for lack of funds. 

Throughout the synod members of the committee are conducting meetings 
in shops and factories, and are trying to get into the thought and life of the 
great company of workingmen throughout the state. 

The object of the synod for the coming year is a dollar per member for 
home missions. A new budget for home missions is now being formulated 
by synod's committee, which will be sent down to the presbyteries for their 
approval; if the same is approved a new day for home missions in Michigan 
will have dawned. The work was never better in hand and more effectively 
done than at the present time. The great need of the synod next to funds 
is efficient men to carry forward the work. Can the laymen of our great 
Church tell us how to make the ministry more attractive to able young men? 
The churches have been too critical is the experience of the writer who has 
been trying to place men in fields on the firing line. There is no heroism 
like the heroism of our home missionaries. 

J. Ambrose Dunkel, 
Chairman of Home Mission and Sabbath-School Work. 



SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY 



New Jersey has completed twenty-six years of synodical administration 
of its home mission work with a record of continued enlargement in gifts 
secured for its support and in work accomplished thereby. It has success- 



1913.] SELF-SUPPORTING SYNODS. 99 

fully met from its own resources an ever increasing burden of obligation for 
support of new fields and in the carrying forward of missionary effort among 
the foreign people who are locating within its borders in such numbers. Its 
report rendered at the last meeting of the synod showed that a total of 
$35,074. had been raised for mission effort within its own bounds, of which 
sum $13,104. had been secured and expended within the Presbytery of Newark 
through its church extension committee. This total represents three times 
the amount expended in the first year of synodical effort, and has not inter- 
fered with an increase of offerings made to the Home Board during the whole 
period. 

The past year has brought interruption to the work in the death of the 
synodical superintendent, the Rev. Samuel McLanahan, who was suddenly 
stricken early in the year. His intimate knowledge of the work and his 
untiring zeal in its behalf have been greatly missed and it will be difficult 
to find his successor. None has yet been secured to undertake the work, 
but the position will be filled as soon as possible, as the necessity of a super- 
intendent is well recognized by the synod. In the meantime the work is 
being carried forward by the committee as a whole as was done previous to 
the appointment of a superintendent. 

The results of the year just ended have been similar to the last previous 
years. Work has been carried on at one hundred twenty-two different 
centers which is an increase of sixteen over the previous year and presents 
a development of the field throughout the eight presbyteries of the synod. 
Two churches have assumed self-support, both of them being in the Presby- 
tery of West Jersey; eight churches will receive decreased assistance from 
the fund, but this is offset by the fact that increase has been found necessary 
at five points. One new church has been organized and new missions have 
been started at five other places. About eight hundred have been added to 
the membership of the mission churches, of whom nearly five hundred have 
been upon confession of faith; these additions representing about a fifteen 
per cent, increase of the total membership. 

The increasing demands of the work in the synod are laying a heavy 
burden for funds on the churches and a larger revenue is imperative. At the 
last meeting of the synod this was recognized and the committee in charge 
of the work was directed to secure a more adequate amount for the progress- 
ive policy which was believed to be necessary in the face of the constantly 
growing needs of the state, and definite effort is being made to accomplish this 
end. 

The fourfold nature of the work in this state offers a peculiarly varied 
problem for solution. There is (1) the work in the rural communities, (2) 
that in the growing suburbs, (3) that of city missions, and (4) that among the 
foreigners who are fairly swarming into the state. 

Among the rural churches efforts are being made toward economy of ex- 
penditure by "grouping" those which might be combined under one pastor 
without decreasing the efficiency of the work, and at the same time securing 
a more nearly adequate support for the pastor in charge of the united fields. 
The changing character of the residents of these communities from owners 
to tenant farmers makes the management of the matter especially difficult 
and is bringing some churches to the need of support which were formerly 
well able to carry on their own work. But with the decrease of the support 
comes the increase of the necessity of the Church in the changed community 
conditions. 

Situated between the two great cities of New York and Philadelphia, 
New Jersey enjoys the growth incident to the growth of those cities and as a 
result many suburban towns are being developed. These must be provided 
with churches, and while the people are straining every effort to secure a 
church building (as must be done), the support of the minister must be 
supplemented from mission funds. Money thus expended by the fund will 
be returned many times over into the treasury of the Church in later years, 
but that fact does not alter or relieve the pressure of the demand at the 
present, a demand which it would be folly to ignore or neglect. 



100 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [191 3. 

New Jersey is a state of towns: it has ninety of twenty-five hundred or 
more; more than one-half of its people live in cities of twenty-five thousand 
or more; almost one-third in cities of over a hundred thousand, of which it 
has three. No cities in the country present a more complex situation and 
the local church resources are inadequate for the maintenance of the work 
of the size and character demanded. Aid must be given from mission funds; 
in this work the Presbytery of Newark, through its church extension com- 
mittee, is easily the leader, and has easily the most difficult situation. 

The work among foreigners is purely a mission work; very little can be 
gathered from them for their own work naturally; they can not appreciate 
the necessity of the work as we see it and it must accordingly be carried on 
almost entirely by the missionary agencies of the churches. In and around 
the great cities, these aliens are congested in colonies utterly unAmerican 
in every particular and can be touched only by the school and the Church; 
the state will provide the one; we must provide the other and are trying to 
do so though we can not claim to have kept pace with the opportunities 
which are given to us. 

In each of these four departments of activity something has been accom- 
plished already; what has been done furnishes a basis from which much 
more will be done in the successive years, for neither the limit of opportunity 
nor the limit of ability of work is yet in sight for the Synod of New Jersey 
after its first quarter century and more of effort and achievement. 

R. H. Gage, 
Chairman of the Permanent Committee on Synodical Home Missions. 



SYNOD OF NEW YORK. 



The work of synodical home missions in the State of New York during 
the past year has been exceedingly strenuous, but nevertheless of a satis- 
factory character. With upwards of one hundred twenty-five churches 
assisted through the Permanent Committee on Synodical Home Missions in 
addition to a considerable number assisted by some of the presbyteries 
direct, the work has been well maintained. While, therefore, there is no 
slackening of our efforts in the maintenance of these features of the state 
work, which in years gone by have absorbed the attention of this committee, 
there is also being gradually developed several collateral lines of work which 
must be well maintained in order to conserve the religious life of both the coun- 
try church and the urban church in view of the constantly changing racial 
characteristics of the many communities within the bounds of the State of 
New York. 

These responsibilities are met through the agency of general secretary 
and our associate secretaries, the time of one being devoted almost exclus- 
ively to fostering a larger interest in work among people of foreign speech, 
the time of another being engaged constantly in assisting official boards 
of churches throughout the entire synod in the line of church finance and 
evangelism. In addition to these secretaries we have had the advantage 
this year of two months' services of the Rev. Francis E. Higgins, who was 
engaged in work among the lumbermen of the Adirondacks. 

We close this year in a spirit of thankfulness, both for blessings received 
and for the larger opportunities for consecrated service constantly opening 
before us. 

G. P. CONARD, 

Chairman Permanent Committee on Home Missions. 



SYNOD OF OHIO 



The work in our synod during the past year has furnished cause for re- 
joicing and gratitude. The results attained have in many respects been the 



1913.] SELF-SUPPORTING SYNODS. 101 

best yet realized under our Synodical Plan. In some of our presbyteries 
an unusually large number of the larger churches changed pastors, yet in the 
interim contributions suffered little or no decline owing no doubt to the 
present quiet general use of the duplex envelope system. 

Persistent and effective efforts have been made to supply so far as possible 
all of our home mission churches with settled pastors. It is not always an 
easy task to find suitable men for the smaller fields, or to retain such for any 
considerable period of time. 

We have recognized the growing demand for more systematic and ef- 
ficient effort among our foreign-speaking peoples. Our greatest difficulty 
has been to secure competent and reliable workers. Some progress has been 
made during the year, and larger plans outlined for the future. Cleveland 
Presbytery has definitely organized for more aggressive work among her 
large foreign population, and under the direction of the new city superin- 
tendent of missions a most excellent beginning has been made. 

One of the interesting and important enterprises undertaken during the 
past year has been the Ohio rural survey. With the cooperation of the rep- 
resentatives of the Board of Home Missions this movement was organized 
early in the year and prosecuted throughout the summer season. In all a 
total of twenty-two counties were surveyed. The results will shortly be 
available in printed form. It is intended to continue this work in other 
counties during the coming summer. 

The last synod provided for two important changes to take place in our 
plan of operation. First the home mission apportionment is increased to 
fifty cents per member. It is not expected that the stronger churches will 
limit themselves to this amount but a uniform effort will be made to bring 
all of the churches up to this standard as a minimum. The second import- 
ant change provided for relates to the synodical year. Heretofore our 
synodical year closed September thirtieth. It is now proposed that the 
synodical year shall be made to coincide with the regular ecclesiastical year 
opening April first and closing March thirty-first. Both of these changes 
become effective April first, 1913. 

J. A. DONAHEY, 

Chairman Synodical Home Missions. 



SYNOD OF PENNSYLVANIA 

The Permanent Committee on Synodical Home Missions in Pennsylvania 
held its annual meeting in October, 1912, when the Rev. Calvin C. Hays, 
D.D., pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, 
was the unanimous choice of the committee for chairman to succeed the 
Rev. George S. Chambers, D.D., deceased. Dr. Hays has represented the 
Presbytery of Blairsville for ten years, and is thoroughly familiar with the 
work of the synod. 

Growth of the Weak Churches. 

The salaries of 134 ministers were supplemented from the home mission 
funds of the synod last year. These ministers served 171 churches and 26 
missions, having under their care a communicant membership of 12,444, an 
average of 72 members to each organized church. To these churches were 
added 1,129 members on confession of faith, an average of seven to each 
church, being a gain of about ten per cent. The average membership of the 
1,777 churches in the synod is 235; the average gain in members on confes- 
sion of faith last year was 12, being a gain of about five per cent. Hence 
it appears that the average gain in membership of the churches aided from 
synod's fund was double the average for the whole synod. 

Benevolent Gifts of the Weak Churches. 

The Synod of Pennsylvania makes it a positive condition of giving aid 
that the church must contribute to all the Boards and to its own mission 



102 ANNUAL REPORT OF [1913. 

fund annually. In its quarterly reports to the secretary, the session must 
state to what Boards offerings have been made within the quarter; and at 
the end of the year the amount contributed to each object must be reported. 
From 1891 to 1910, the total of these offerings of the aided churches equalled 
fifty-four per cent, of the aid given during those years from synod's fund; 
in 1911 they equalled seventy-two per cent, and in 1912, eighty-one percent, 
of the amount of aid appropriated. The wisdom of making such a condi- 
tion cannot be questioned. 

Pastoral Support of the Weak Churches. 

The synodical committee called the special attention of the synod in 1909 
to the utterly inadequate salaries paid to many home mission pastors in 
the synod, some being as low as six hundred dollars. The synod directed 
its Permanent Committee to apportion to its presbyteries a sum sufficient 
to enable it to assure to every pastor under its care not less than eight hun- 
dred dollars and a manse or its equivalent. The policy of the committee 
has been to so use its funds as to stimulate the weak churches to a more 
liberal support of their pastors. In three years the committee has succeeded 
in raising the average of salaries paid pastors of weak churches from nine 
hundred two dollars to ten hundred dollars, two-thirds of this increase com- 
ing from the aided churches themselves. This growth in membership, in 
benevolence and in pastoral support, proves beyond question that the home 
mission churches in our synod are not dying churches. Beside such evidence 
of vitality within themselves, these churches are furnishing students for our 
colleges, candidates for the ministry, teachers for our schools and good men 
and women for every walk in life. 

Immigrant Evangelization. 

This phase of home missions, new and untried a few years ago, is now 
carried on successfully, along well-established lines, by fifteen of our twenty 
home presbyteries. This synod insists: (1) that foreign-speaking people 
shall be carefully instructed in the Scriptures, and in the duties and obliga- 
tions of the Christian life before admission to church membership; (2) that 
attention be given to training ministers and lay-workers for this form of 
mission activity, American trained workers being found' most satisfactory; 
(3) that presbyteries exercise care in organizing churches among people of 
foreign speech, and whenever possible, to put such organization under the 
care of a nearby American session. It is found advisable in many cases to 
conduct the work as missions of American churches. This latter fact makes 
the gathering of statistics quite difficult, the members of these missions 
being enrolled with those of the church under whose care they are placed. 
Exclusive of Germans, there were in this synod last year 36 ordained foreign- 
speaking ministers; 58 lay- workers, 23 organized churches with 2,500 com- 
municants; 30 Sabbath schools with a membership of 3,000; the sum ex- 
pended within the synod for work among foreigners $77,598. The total 
outlay for home missions within this synod is about $175,000. annually, 
which is about fifty per cent, of the total sum raised for home missions by 
this synod. 

Calvin C. Hays, Chairman, 

J. M. McJunkin, Secretary, 

Synodical Home Missions in Pennsylvania. 



SYNOD OF WEST VIRGINIA 



This synod closed the year with the financial situation well in hand. 
Two churches arrived at self-support, and one new church was organized. 
Of the many problems at the present time, two stand out prominently — that 
of the foreigner and that of the lumberman. Thus far not much work has 
been attempted among these classes for the reason that funds have not been 



1913.] SELF-SUPPORTING SYNODS. 103 

available. Our first effort has been to strengthen the work already in hand. 
The salaries of a number of our missionaries have been raised to a point 
where a living can be had without great hardship. 

Work in a small way has been started among the foreigners, and this will 
be enlarged as rapidly as circumstances will warrant. Most of the people 
of foreign speech are employed in our mines, mills and glassworks, The 
population of foreign birth in West Virginia has increased one hundred 
fifty-five per cent, in the last decade, and the foreign born outnumber those 
of foreign parentage. Those ranking highest in number are Italians, 
Hungarians, Poles and Austrians. 

At present work among the foreigners is confined practically to Wheeling 
and Follansbee. The work at the latter place is almost wholly supported 
by the Follansbee brothers of Pittsburgh. 

Most of the lumber camps in the state are in the territory of the Southern 
Presbyterian Church. Their home mission committee and ours are working 
together in the interest of these people, of whom there are about sixteen 
thousand. The Rev. Francis E. Higgins, "The Sky Pilot of the Lumber- 
jacks, " spent some time in the state investigating the situation. Already, 
as a result of his visit, an evangelist is at work, who is generously supported 
by a Philadelphia elder. 

Our work along all lines will be much easier and more successful with the 
advent of state-wide prohibition, which goes into effect July first, 1914. 
Our splendid victory in November, 1912, with over ninety-two thousand 
majority for constitutional prohibition, together with the rigid laws for its 
enforcement, enacted by our legislature, will make West Virginia the model 
prohibition state in the Union. The Presbyterian Church was no insignifi- 
cant factor in securing the great victory. 

George W. Pollock, 

Secretary of Synodical ' Committee on Home Missions. 



SYNOD OF WISCONSIN 



The tenth year of Wisconsin self-support marks larger advance. De- 
pendence, independence, cooperation denote the stages of progress in rela- 
tion to Wisconsin and the Home Board. The past year has shown a very 
definite advance over the years past due to a larger cooperation with the 
Home Board. A gracious enlargement of interest in religion was wrought 
amongst the Indian peoples of this state by the Rev. John N. Steele of the 
Indian Department. After a very helpful summer school at Madison for 
country pastors, a series of profitable church and country life conferences 
were conducted across -the northern part of the state under Dr. W. H. 
Wilson's department of the Board. Then by survey and special investiga- 
tion the Immigration Department of the Board gave valuable advice with 
regard to work for foreigners in the city of Milwaukee and the synod and 
Board have already developed plans for the opening of at least five vacation 
Bible schools in Milwaukee this summer. 

The home mission committee has been fortunate in retaining the services 
of its three district superintendents who have secured a high average ef- 
ficiency in the home mission churches. The Rev. C. J. McConnell of Chip- 
pewa, whose support and $1400. for pastors of this district comes from the 
Women's Synodical Missionary Society, has been successful in caring for 
new churches and organizing new stations along the railroads. The Rev. 
C. A. Adams has kept the Winnebago district well supplied with pastors and 
has initiated special evangelistic work in many places. The Rev. R. A. 
Carnahan of the southern district (La Crosse, Madison and Milwaukee 
Presbyteries) in addition to excellent supervision of difficult problems has 
been very happy in the introduction of the systematic plan of church finance. 
In the last eighteen or twenty months this has been introduced into twenty- 
nine churches, with a net increase of funds for Wisconsin church work of 



104 SELF-SUPPORTING SYNODS. [1913. 

sixty-five hundred dollars. The Rev. H. A. Talbot of the home mission 
committee has by his able and voluntary editorship of the Wisconsin Presby- 
terian ministered monthly to a state-wide parish with large efficiency for 
our work. 

The contributions from the churches during the past year showed an in- 
crease over the year before but the expenses had a curious way of doing the 
same thing and doing it a little better. There was no income from bequests 
this year. In honor of him who for fourteen years was the synodical superin- 
tendent a Lowell C. Smith Fund was established. The Rev. Lowell C. 
Smith, D.D., after a number of months of ill health passed away at his home 
in Waukesha the latter part of December, 1912. The purpose of this 
special appeal was to provide a much needed reserve fund to obviate the 
necessity of borrowing during the dull season, and eventually to provide 
through interest or through vote of committee for new work or for emergency 
cases. While waiting for some of our wealthy Indiana friends to migrate 
hither we are training a little interest of our own and through some twenty 
small gifts, many of them from missionary pastors, over six hundred fifty 
dollars has come into this fund during the past four months. It is planned 
to carry out the budget system and seek the acceptance of a definite amount 
on the part of each church early in the new year. 

R. S. Donaldson, 

Chairman of Synod's Home Mission Committee. 



1913.1 



ROLL OF HOHOR. 

ROLL OF HONOR 



105 



The Fifty-two Churches Which Have Become Self-Supporting During 
the Fiscal Year Ending March 31, 1913. 



Synod of Alabama. 

Presbytery. Church. 

Huntsville Bethlehem 

" New Market 

Synod of Arkansas. 

Arkansas Gravette 

Synod of California. 

San Joaquin Exeter 1st 

Lemon Cove 

Kaweah 

Synod of Colorado. 

Pueblo Pueblo-Park Ave. 

Synod of Kentucky. 

Logan Trinity 

" Goshen 

Princeton Marion 

Transylvania Lebanon 

Synod of Minnesota. 

Adams Warroad 

• " Stephen 

Minneapolis Eden Prairie 

Red River Sabin 

St. Cloud Kerkhoven 

St. Paul South St. Paul 1st 

Farmington 

Winona Kasson 

Synod of Missouri. 

Carthage Seneca 

Kirksville Shiloh 

Bear Creek 

McGee Sharon 

" Pleasant Grove 

Ozark Brookline 

St. Louis St. Louis-Oak Hill 

" Salem 

Steelville 



Synod of Montana. 

Presbytery. Church. 

Yellowstone Forsyth 

Synod of Nebraska. 

Niobrara Emerson 

" Osmond 

Synod of North Dakota. 

Fargo Hannaford 

Synod of Oklahoma. 

Ardmore Tishomingo 1st 

Synod of South Dakota. 

Black Hills Lemon 1st 

Central Dakota Wessington 

Sioux Falls White Lake 

" Mitchell 

Synod of Tennessee. 

Columbia Mooresville 

Lewisburg 

" Farmington 

Howell 

Obion-Memphis Dyer 

Synod of Texas. 

Austin Wrightsboro-Barnett 

" Dilley 

Dallas Rockwall 

" Fate 

Synod of Washington. 

Seattle Manette 

" Green Lake 

" Vashon 

" Georgetown 

Wenatchee Omak 

Synod of West German. 
Galena Hope 



106 GENERAL SUMMARY. [1913. 

GENERAL SUMMARY. 
Number and Distribution of Missionaries. 

Alabama 33 Nebraska 55 

Alaska 28 Nevada 5 

Arizona 50 New Hampshire 2 

Arkansas 44 9 New Jersey 5 

California 112 10 New Mexico 46 

Colorado 60 "New York 60 

2 Cuba 24 North Carolina 8 

Delaware 1 North Dakota 84 

Florida 25 12 Ohio 8 

Georgia 1 Oklahoma 100 

Idaho 49 Oregon 66 

Illinois 2 "Pennsylvania 10 

Indiana 5 "Porto Rico 59 

5 Iowa 7 Rhode Island 1 

6 Kansas 5 South Dakota 96 

Kentucky 41 Tennessee 59 

Maine 1 Texas 123 

8 Maryland 6 Utah 24 

Massachusetts 7 Washington 113 

Minnesota 119 15 Wisconsin 6 

Mississippi 14. Wyoming : 32 

Missouri 89 Specials 7 

Montana 58 Total 1750 

1 Including eight Indian helpers. . 2 Including eight native helpers. 
3-5.i5\Vork among Germans and Indians. 4-6Work among Indians and Foreigners. 
^Pastor Evangelists and work among Foreigners. 
9-l3\Vork among Foreigners and Negroes specially provided for by the Phineas M. Barber Fund . 
i°Including twelve Mexican helpers. 

HThese missionaries are working among Foreigners in Brooklyn, Nassau, New York, North- 
River, St. Lawrence and Westchester Presbyteries, among Indians and Foreigners in Buffalo Pres- 
bytery, and Negroes as provided for by the Barber Fund. 

i2Work among Foreigners, n Including forty native helpers. 



Results of the Work. 

Number of churches aided by the Board 1,847 

Number of missionaries, including 68 Cuban, Porto Rican, Mexi- 
can and Indian Helpers 1,750 

Number of missionary teachers 404 

Additions on confession of faith 5,567 

Additions by certificate 4,876 

Total membership 66,757 

Total in congregations 63,436 

Adult baptisms 3,309 

Infant baptisms 2,565 

Sunday schools organized 273 

Number of Sunday schools 1,381 

Membership of Sunday schools 91,105 

Church edifices (value of same, $3,545,791.) 1,225 

Church edifices built (cost of same, $249,683.) 53 

Church edifices repaired and enlarged (cost of same, $52,724.). . . 220 

Church debts cancelled $107,401 

Churches having reached self-support 52 

Churches organized 113 

Number of Manses (value of same $663,617.) 404 



1913.] GENERAL SUMMARY. 107 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCHES AND MISSIONS 
IN THE U. S. A. 

Using a Language Other Than English. 

October, 1912. 
Compiled by The Department of Immigration. 





u 

(LI 

E 

3 


c 

u 
o 
a 


Accessions. 


Total 
Members. 


Sunday 
School. 


Beneficence. 




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O 

PQ 


bio 

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Ih 

bfl 

C 

o 
U 


Bohemian 

Other Slavic. . . . 

Magyar (Hungar- 
ian) 


41 
20 

34 
74 
6 
1 
3 
4 
5 
9 
9 
4 
1 


39 
17 

24 
49 
5 
1 
3 
3 
4 
6 
4 
4 
1 


177 

57 

437 

840 

29 

9 

6 


20 
4 

132 

85 

6 

20 


1,910 
702 

2,546 

3,821 

714 

93 

158 

94 

327 

240 

393 

560 


2,625 
993 

788 
4,668 

661 
40 
60 
10 

415 

234 
79 


$1,800 
334 

1,089 

663 

633 

12 

45 

388 
2,127 

281 



$18,394 
4,334 

13,883 


Italian 

French 

Scandinavian 

Welsh 

Syrian 

Chinese 


12,941 
9,594 

448 
2,570 

385 


34 
19 
26 


13 

7 
12 


4,074 
1,442 


Japanese 


2,096 
1,446 




10 


2 


75 


1 


307 








Total 


211 

44 


160 

44 


1,644 
132 


301 

37 


11,558 
1,507 


10,648 
973 


$7,119 
503 


$71,914 


Spanish (Mexican) 


5,108 


Total 


255|204 


1,776 


338 


13,065 


11,621 


$7,622 


$77,022 



Spanish-speaking churches in Cuba and Porto Rico, Presbyterian churches 
among the Indians, and native members of churches in Alaska are not included. 



108 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 



1913. 



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110 treasurer's report. 1913.1 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

The Board respectfully submits herewith, its financial 
statements for the year ending March 31st, 1913. 

The "Comparison of Receipts for Current Work" seem- 
ingly shows a backward swing of the pendulum which last year 
marked the highest point in the history of the Board — not 
considering the receipt of the bulk of the Kennedy legacy, 
which came in during the year ending March 31st, 1911. 

The shortages appear to be in receipts from churches, in- 
come on real estate, legacies and woman's board. 

Churches would doubtless have reached last year's totals 
at least, had it not been for the floods in the central west, 
which, occurring just at the close of the fiscal year, no doubt 
delayed many remittances which should have been counted 
in this year — indeed, such remittances coming during the first 
week in April more than make up for the shortage. 

Income from rentals (Presbyterian Building) shows a 
slight decrease, owing, first, to an abnormally large amount of 
uncollectable rents, and second, to some unfortunate changes 
in surrounding conditions which it is hoped may be only tem- 
porary. The necessity, also, for the use of more and more 
office room by the Boards of Home and Foreign Missions, 
further affects the rent roll to some degree. 

Legacies are only apparently less than last year, a consid- 
erable part of two large legacies having been received in se- 
curities which are acknowledged this year in Schedule No. 7 
and which amount to over $175,000. 

In both the Evangelization and Mission School depart- 
ments, expenditures show an excess as compared with receipts, 
but, owing to the balance brought forward from last year 
($45,525.88) the Board is enabled to show a slight balance in 
hand at the close of the present fiscal year. The Evangeliza- 
tion department alone, owing to the balance in hand April 
1st, 1912, as indicated above, shows a balance of $25,058.93, 
while the Mission School department (Woman's Board) 
shows a shortage of $24,500.07. 

It is difficult to make a careful analysis of the increases and 
decreases showing in the "Comparison of Congregational Of- 
ferings" on page 116, so many causes are operating, 
under changing conditions, to affect such offerings. 



1913.] treasurer's report. Ill 

The comparison shows how the Synods stand in the matter 
of congregational offerings. Large decreases in some Synods 
are, as will be noticed, offset by large increases in others. A 
few of the Presbyteries have entered into an arrangement 
with the Board whereby offerings from the churches for 
Presbyterial, Synodical and Home Mission work, aregather- 
ed into the Presbyterial treasuries and pro rated, upon an 
agreed percentage, to the three lines of work. 

The Board endeavors to co-operate in every way, through 
speakers, literature, and otherwise, to assist in the gathering 
of the largest possible amount for these joint budgets. In 
most cases this arrangement has been entered into through a 
realization, by the Presbyterial authorities, of the immensity 
of the local work, owing to the influx of the immigrant pop- 
ulations. 

The "Comparison of Congregational and Sabbath School 
Offerings by Synods for Evangelization During the Past Five 
Years " as shown on pages 118-19 constitutes an interesting 
study, showing that while, during the past four years, the of- 
ferings in bulk have indicated slight variation, the individual 
Synods do not, by any means, run so evenly. Both self-sup- 
porting Synods and Home Mission Synods have contributed 
loyally to the nation-wide work. Emphasis should be laid 
upon the fact, however, that while large legacy receipts, dur- 
ing the last few years, have enabled the Board largely to in- 
crease its work, such income cannot be depended upon to con- 
tinue at the same rate during the years to come. The Board 
must look to congregational and society offerings as its great 
dependence, and it is hoped that, with the development of the 
Budget System, very greatly increased contributions will be 
forth-coming from all sources. 

Referring to the statement of " Legacy Receipts by Synods 
for the Past Five Years", page 120, it will be noted that 
during this period receipts from this source have been abnor- 
mally and unusually large, emphasizing, it would seem, the 
fact that our people, in growing numbers, are coming to rec- 
ognize the importance of providing, in their wills, larger and 
larger amounts for the evangelization of our country. 

The Board calls attention to its literature upon the subject 
of Wills and Annuities, and gladly furnishes such literature 
upon request. 

The list of the twenty-five churches contributing the 
largest amounts to the evangelization work of the Board 
during the year, on page 117 is of interest, the per capita contri- 
bution, in each case, seeming to tell the story of individual 
consecration to this cause in the congregations under review. 
There is no doubt, however, but that this study, carried fur- 



112 treasurer's report. [1913. 

ther, would indicate among the smaller and probably among 
the Home Mission Churches, far larger per capita contribu- 
tions than are shown in the table under consideration. 

Particular attention is called to the table on page 121 cover- 
ing " Receipts, Indebtedness and Balances for the Last Fifteen 
Years". It will be seen therefrom that only one year, that 
ended March 31st, 1908, shows an indebtedness at the close 
of the books, that indebtedness being in the panic year. 

The Balance Sheet, Schedule No. 1, reveals a gratifying 
financial condition, giving assurance to the church and the 
public that the Board of Home Missions is upon a sound fi- 
nancial basis. 

Schedule 2, on pages 124-25 shows, in general terms, re- 
ceipts and expenditures covering all departments of the 
Board's work, while a statement of expenditures more in de- 
tail, is shown on pages 127-129. 

The items of expenditure connected with the general offices, 
and with some of the departments, are unusually large this 
year, owing to the fact that long delayed and necessary equip- 
ment has been purchased and some additional facilities pro- 
vided, in the line of printing machinery, through the owner- 
ship of which it has been possible to save considerable 
amounts in money in the matter of printing. 

The Permanent and Annuity Funds of the Board, and 
the securities in which these funds are invested, are shown 
in Schedules 5 and 6, pages 130-135. 

On page 137 the expenditures will be found re-arranged 
by departments and by classes of work done, and on page 138 
appears a statement of Receipts and Disbursements made 
up in conformity to a resolution of the General Assembly of 
1907, by which all boards report upon a common form. 

WOMAN'S BOARD. A careful analysis and explanation 
of the Mission School department finances will be found in 
the report of the Treasurer of the Woman's Board, on pages 
162-168. 

There have been received for the Permanent Funds of 
the Board and the Woman's Board, and as Annuity Gifts, 
the following: 

Permanent Funds, Board of Home Missions. . . $11,488 52 
" Woman's Board 6,404 10 

Total, $17,892 62 

Annuity Gifts, Board of Home Missions 28,728 52 

" Woman's Board 1,000 00 

Total, $29,728 52 



1913.] treasurer's report. 113 

It is due the Church to know somewhat of the men 
who constitute the Finance Committee of the Board, and 
under whose direction and careful supervision its finances 
are managed. 

The Committee consists of the following named: 

Rev. D. Stuart Dodge, D.D., President of the Board, 
Ex-Officio, 

Mr Walter M. Aikman, President of the Central Stamp- 
ing Company, Chairman, 

Mr. Fleming H. Revell, President of the Fleming H. 
Revell Company, 

Mr. Herbert K. Twitchell, Vice President of the Chemical 
National Bank, 

Mr. Geo. W. Perkins, Capitalist. 

These gentlemen devote time and thought, without 
stint, in the supervision of the financial affairs of the Board 
as advisers to the Treasurer, under whose immediate care 
the work of the department is carried on. A glance at the 
list above will indicate that the finances of the Board are 
under the direction of a committee which it would be diffi- 
cult to surpass in business standing, and in large grasp of 
financial affairs. 

For thirty years past, the counsel of this Board has been 
John E. Parsons, Esq., who has, during all these years, 
rendered most valuable service to the Board and always 
without compensation. Since Mr. Parsons' retirement from 
active practice, the legal affairs of the Board, under his 
general supervision, have been carefully looked after by 
Wm. E. Carnochan, Esq., junior partner of the firm of which 
Mr. Parsons was so long the head. Mr. Carnochan has, 
during the last two years, conducted most satisfactorily, 
the defense in will cases involving large amounts and with 
great satisfaction and advantage to the Board. 

At this point a word as to the treasury department will 
be in order. 

The duties of the depaitment may be grouped under heads 
as follows: 

1st. Receipt and Disbursement of Offerings from Congre- 
gations, Societies, Individuals, etc. 

This branch of the work involves very much of detail 
and constant watchfulness, to see that funds received are 
properly applied, and that the records are so kept that ready 
reference may be had at all times. The Treasurer of the 
Board has, for over a quarter of a century been the 
designated officer for the distribution of undivided funds 
from Churches and Societies, where sent to his office 
for division, either upon a basis designated by the contribu- 
tors, or upon the General Assembly's pro rata. In the office 



114 treasurer's report. [1913. 

of the Home Board contributions were received and handled, 
during the last fiscal year, to the amount of $22,549.00. 

The office receives monthly, from each missionary and 
missionary teacher on the field, a voucher calling for salary, 
thus involving the issue, booking and signing of over 
22,600 checks for salaries alone. 

2nd. The Treasurer, under the By-Laws, is the Pur- 
chasing Agent of the Board, having to do not only 
with purchases for the conduct of the offices in New York, 
but of all school supplies, furniture, etc., for the schools 
under the Woman's Board throughout the mission field. 

In this connection it should be said that all these purchases 
are made without the addition of a single dollar to the pay 
roll for a purchasing agent or his equipment, or the increase, 
in any wise, of the number of people employed. 

In the case of large items, carefully prepared specifications 
are made up and bids asked from several firms. The firm 
making the lowest bid, consistent with "grade of goods, is 
always accepted. 

3rd. Legacies. The Treasurer is charged with the re- 
sponsibility of looking after all the legacies which are made 
in favor of the Board. This involves correspondence with 
attorneys and executors; consultation with our own 
counsel in New York, and frequently extended litigation, 
as for instance in one estate which has just been closed, and 
from which the Board has received, in total, nearly half a 
million of dollars. This estate has been in course of settle- 
ment for five years, and has involved litigation and nego- 
tiations not only in this country, but in England. 

Again, another estate, that of the late John S. Kennedy, 
which, for the immediate present, has been closed, has in- 
volved in handling, nearly $2,700,000. 

The Treasurer has upon his files at the present time lega- 
cies pending to the number of, approximately, two hundred 
and fifty, involving in amount from $50.00 to $150,000. 

4th. Presbyterian Building and other properties. The 
Treasurers of the Boards of Home and Foreign Misssions are 
a sub-committee of the Joint House Committee, involving 
the conduct of this great property, valued at more than two 
millions of dollars. 

Other properties which have come to the Board through 
legacies, purchase, or gift, are constantly under negotiation 
either in the line of the disposal of such properties, or of the 
conservation and proper handling of the same. These 
properties are scattered throughout the home mission fields 



1913.] treasurer's report. 115 

in continental United States, Alaska, Porto Rico and Cuba, 
and involve many legal and business problems. 

Percentage of Expenditures to gross receipts for the past 
year is as follows: 

Expense of administration 3.88% 

Disbursements, not administrative 0.44% 

Cost of communicating information, including dis- 
bursements directed by the General Assembly for 
Annual Report, Assembly Herald and the Depart- 
ment of Missionary Education 2.52% 

Note. — The cost of operating the Woman's department, $34,240.21, 
has been deducted from the gross receipts of the Woman 's Board before 
figuring these percentages, thereby placing this Board on the same basis 
with other Boards receiving money from Womans' Boards. 

A COMPARISON OF RECEIPTS FOR CURRENT WORK. 

1911-12 1912-13 Increase Decrease 

Churches $298,276 64 $289,305 69 $8,970 95 

Women's Societies. . 1,466 15 1,295 76 170 39 

Sabbath Schools 24,706 29 24,935 61 $229 32 

Y. P. Societies 14,658 80 13,743 41 915 39 

Individuals 42,104 66 60,777 48 18,672 82 

Total Living Givers $381,212 54 $390,057 95 $8,845 41 

Interest on Invested 

Funds 29,315 23 31,360 59 2,045 36 

Interest on Kennedy 

Fund 99,435 98 118,675 02 19,239 04 

Income Real Estate. 20,456 62 16,063 94 4,392 68 

Legacies 464,066 72 403,43136 60,635 36 

$994,487 09 $959,588 86 $34,898 23 

Woman's Board 496,695 76 460,304 20 36,39156 

$1,491,182 85 $1,419,893 06 $71,289 79 

Comparative Statement of Contributions from the Living for the 
Past Five Years. 

Home Board 

1908-09 1909-10 1910-11 1911-12 1912-13 

Churches $282,128 88 $298,836 01 $300,650 56 $298,276 64 $289,305 69 

Sabbath Schools 23,922 65 25,237 80 24,482 13 24,706 29 24,935 61 

Y. P. Soc's 16,328 69 15,698 19 15,477 98 14,658 80 13,743 41 

W. M. Soc's 777 21 1,518 90 929 85 1,466 15 1,295 76 

Individuals 56,457 08 42,912 66 42,195 86 42,104 66 60,777 48 

$379,614 51 $384,203 56 $383,736 38 $381,212 54 $390,057 95 

Woman's Board. 

Churches $3,513 83 $2,779 51 $3,880 94 $4,492 09 $2,676 45 

Sabbath Schools 23,922 65 25,237 81 24,482 14 24.706 29 24,935 61 

Y. P. Soc's 42,239 95 43,266 52 43,234 01 44,374 91 43,179 29 

W. M. Soc's 248,097 67 257,108 58 265,679 05 281,626 24 277,338 89 

Individuals 27,409 60 27,86131 31,909 36 24,436 46 25,614 89 



$345,183 70 $356,253 73 $369,185 50 $379,635 99 $373,745 13 



116 treasurer's report. [1913. 
A Comparison of Congregational Offerings Only. 

Synod. 1911-12. 1912-13. Increase Decrease. 

Alabama $1,959 42 $1,825 65 $133 77 

Arizona 662 65 $662 65 

Arkansas 1,494 98 1,59189 96 91 

Atlantic 36 55 53 91 17 36 

Baltimore 6,110 40 5,102 25 1,008 15 

California 9,112 50 8,366 26 746 24 

Canadian 17 00 33 75 16 75 

Catawba 99 50 108 00 8 50 

Colorado 5,507 72 4,91198 595 74 

East Tennessee.... 27 50 32 94 5 44 

Idaho 960 76 1,118 42 157 66 

Illinois 7,608 81 7,939 01 330 20 

Indiana 1,972 74 798 00 1,174 74 

Iowa 4,170 26 2,388 45 1,78181 

Kansas 5 00 65 00 60 00 

Kentucky 5,610 70 6,378 19 767 49 

Michigan 894 75 25 21 869 54 

Minnesota 10,222 26 12,014 77 1,792 51 

Mississippi 1,117 79 910 35 207 44 

Missouri 14,685 64 13,548 06 1,137 58 

Montana 1,788 57 1,465 11 323 46 

Nebraska 14,062 43 13,342 18 720 25 

New England 2,998 35 2,998 35 

New Jersey 34,685 40 39,264 71 4,579 31 

New Mexico 1,532 35 548 07 984J28 

New York 87,482 44 76,900 35 10,582 09 

North Dakota 2,348 97 2,796 13 447 16 

Ohio 4,133 56 2,832 50 1,30106 

Oklahoma 3,323 54 3,240 81 82 73 

Oregon 2,134 00 2,591 52 457 52 

Pennsylvania 57,92148 53,395 54 4,525 94 

Philippines 5 00 5 00 

South Dakota 2,053 82 2,094 21 40 39 

Tennessee 3,150 76 3,476 94 326 18 

Texas 6,138 06 6,77192 633 86 

Utah 440 55 220 54 220 01 

Washington 4,978 33 6,520 32 1,54199 

West German 2,433 15 2,433 15 

West Virginia 62 00 62 00 

Wisconsin 488 10 481 60 6 50 



$298,276 64 $289,305 69 



$8,970 95 



1913.] treasurer's report. 117 

Receipts by Months and Quarters. 

April $39,919 25 October $36,578 09 

May 17,842 43 November 80,922 93 

June 58,091 74 December 306,943 40 

$115,853 42 $424,444 42 



July $32,779 92 January $106,012 23 

August 10,526 67 February 63,964 93 

September 46,609 48 March 159,397 79 

$89,916 07 $329,374 95 



The twenty-five churches contributing the largest amount 
to the evangelization work of the Board, during the year, are 
as follows: 

Per 

Church. Amount * Membership (<„*.:,„ 

New York, Fifth Avenue $ 6,865 30 2,401 2 85 

New York, Madison Avenue 5,575 87 1,023 5 45 

New York, Brick 4,384 10 1,018 4.30 

East Orange, First 4,285 99 1,201 3.56 

Englewood 3,156 15 546 5.78 

Buffalo, First 3,000 00 594 5.05 

Plainfield, Crescent Avenue 3,000 00 1,124 2.66 

Philadelphia, Princeton 2,594 00 705 3.69 

Minneapolis, Westminster 1,893 28 2,218 .85 

New York, Riverdale 1,869 55 144 12.98 

St. Paul, House of Hope 1,760 00 990 1.77 

NeW York, Madison Square 1,701 55 690 2.46 

Rochester, Central 1,700 00 2,211 .76 

New York, University Place 1,544 48 1,163 1.32 

New York, Central 1,490 25 1,218 1.22 

Pittsburgh, East Liberty 1,460 74 1,634 .83 

Rochester, Brick 1,425 00 2,555 .55 

Washington, Ch. of the Covenant 1,425 00 1,270 1.12 

Brooklyn, First 1,421 87 1,493 .95 

Newark, 1st 1,292 09 798 1.61 

Princeton, First 1,282 94 582 2.20 

Beatrice, First 1,200 00 511 2.34 

Philadelphia, Germantown, First 1,156 47 1,362 .84 

Haddonfield 1,100 00 462 2.38 

New York, West End 1,080 00 2,025 .53 

A special gift of $5,000.00 was received and by request credited to the 
Second Church of Chicago. 



*As reported in 1912 minutes of the General Assembly. 



118 treasurer's report. [1913 

A Comparison of Congregational Offerings for "Evangelization" by 
Synods During the Past Five Years. 

Synods. 1908-09 1909-10 1910-11 1911-12 1912-13 

Alabama $1,463.29 $901.02 $1,450.42 $1,959.42 $1,825.65 

Arizona 662.65 

Arkansas 939.91 976.03 1,084.66 1,494.98 1,591.89 

Atlantic 24.50 54.75 63.55 36.55 53.91 

Baltimore 4,932.22 7,929.25 8,238.60 6,110.40 5,102.25 

California 7,014.53 7,965.66 8,891.61 9,112.50 8,366.26 

Canadian 16.00 22.00 17.00 17.00 33.75 

Catawba 72.00 119.91 112.13 99.50 108.00 

Colorado 4,085.23 5,505.69 5,560.18 5,507.72 4,911.98 

East Tennessee 21.50 24.00 26.35 27.50 32.94 

Idaho 731.96 885.91 960.76 1,118.42 

Illinois 4,570.07 10,448.27 9,038.50 7,608.81 7,939.01 

Indiana 1,286.31 1,266.01 2,290.77 1,972.74 798.00 

Iowa 2,744.55 4,494.56 4,179.49 4,170.26 2,388.45. 

Kansas 179.37 35.50 88.82 5.00 65.00 

Kentucky 2,098.34 3,142.34 4,537.86 5,610.70 6,378.19 

Michigan 1,594.45 1,025.99 1,480.55, 894.75 25.21 

Minnesota 12,410.71 12,099.67 11,684.54 10,222.26 12,014.77 

Mississippi 1,008.15 948.61 1,094.86 1,117.79 910.35 

Missouri 15,182.40 12,441.13 15,271.38 14,685.64 13,548.06 

Montana 1,282.71 1,249.16 1,532.57 1,788.57 1,465.11 

Nebraska 7,863.26 9,781.00 13,154.22 14,062.43 13,342.18 

New England 2,998.35 

New Jersey... 33,853.89 36,321.05 35,804.24 34,685.40 39,264.71 

New Mexico... 1,685.05 1,804.45 1,825.12 1,532.35 548.07 

New York 79,615.19 79,124.60 80,094.70 87,482.44 76,900.35 

North Dakota. 3,172.28 2,717.81 2,590.85 2,348.97 2,796.13 

Ohio 5,097.92 5,009.77 4,981.75 4,133.56 2,832.50 

Oklahoma 3,676.51 4,539.61 3,654.10 3,323.54 3,240.81 

Oregon 1,540.07 2,090.73 2,123.64 2,134.00 2,591.52 

Pennsylvania.. 62,390.76 62,864.39 58,871.42 57,921.48 53,395.54 

Philippines 18.63 15.20 5.00 

South Dakota. 2,531.02 2,692.52 2,819.13 2,053.82 2,094.21 

Tennessee 3,769.55 3,063.45 2,915.87 3,150.76 3,476.94 

Texas 8,389.61 8,088.09 7,468.03 6,138.06 6,771.92 

Utah 919.83 401.20 255.72 440.55 220.54 

Washington... 4,329.14 5,961.67 5,733.92 4,978.33 6,520.32 

West German 2,433.15 

West Virginia.. 1,900.93 2,376.86 62.00 

Wisconsin 450.00 610.10 828.10 488.10 481.60 



$282,128.88 $298,836.01 $300,650.56 $298,276.64 $289,305.69 



1913.] treasurer's report. 119 

A Comparison of Sabbath-school Offerings, by Synods, for 
Evangelization. 





1908-09 


1909-10 


1910-11 


1911-12 


1912-13 




$17.10 


$33.00 


$86.72 


$84.38 


$106.64 




25.38 








11.65 


Arkansas 


11.15 


20.60 


22.05 


21.56 


Atlantic 


9.40 


4.50 


3.00 


8.35 . 




Baltimore 


442.12 


480.74 


441.08 


433.89 


585.65 


California 


695.79 


809.23 


781.63 


965.26 


822.34 




1.00 






1.15 


5.00 


Catawba 


6.00 


3.40 


8.95 


4.00 


12.25 


Colorado 


254.12 


112.07 


155.50 


155.07 


212.30 








14.00 

78.37 

358.98 




11.05 


Idaho 




74.69 
296.83 


123.62 
238.70 


83.05 


Illinois 


273.31 


365.74 




160.47 


68.31 


145.17 


138.13 


195.36 


Iowa 


309.65 


279.41 


311.25 


244.83 


260.39 


Kansas 


174.77 


10.49 


26.76 




21.00 


Kentucky 


98.13 


124.55 


88.44 


107.95 


266.42 


Michigan 


150.76 


19.43 


33.72 


8.00 


11.00 


Minnesota .... 


197.65 


299.10 


206.28 


339.86 


380.94 


Mississippi. . . . 


16.30 


5.00 


35.85 


3.15 


15.65 




785.65 


589.25 


507.29 


425.96 


367.57 


Montana 


71.53 


75.15 


54.50 


67.39 


83.18 




344.03 


402.11 


285.37 


263.46 


275.90 


New England . . 










308.93 


New Jersey. . . 


3,287.93 


3,100.73 


2,858.34 


3,174.70 


2,720.82 


New Mexico.. . 


81.56 


55.49 


146.19 


52.50 


30.37 


New York. . . . 


3,481.43 


3,431.53 


3,529.64 


3,734.49 


3,225.06 


North Dakota. 


127.87 


87.01 


93.93 


90.83 


138.24 


Ohio 


672.03 


723.48 


634.12 


433.17 


719.36 


Oklahoma 


144.18 


158.27 


240.76 


92.29 


149.03 




81.67 


116.79 


195.94 


119.69 


190.88 


Pennsylvania. . 


5,953.57 


6,309.17 


5,321.09 


4,629.80 


4,299.23 


South Dakota. 


125.80 


78.92 


82.05 


46.65 


111.24 


Tennessee 


207.05 


141.58 


275.87 


132.37 


214.28 


Texas 


191.66 


138.84 


139.94 


68.20 


122.60 


Utah 


73.94 


36.36 


32.65 


31.59 


81.77 


Washington. . . 


264.87 


259.77 


448.27 


254.47 


396.32 


West German 










139.06 


West Virginia.. 


78.01 


63.11 






22.60 


1.80 


9.83 


6.20 


8.52 


8.20 



$18,807.53 $18,409.29 $17,648.45 $16,504.56 $17,014.23 

A Comparison of Congregational and Sabbath-School Offerings, 
by Totals for Past Five Years. 

1908-09 1909-10 1910-11 1911-12 1912-13 

Churches $282,128.88 $298,836.01 $300,650.56 $298,276.64 $289,305.68 

Sabbath-schools 18,807.53 18,409.29 17,648.45 16,504.56 17,014.23 



120 treasurer's report. [1913. 

Legacy Receipts, by Synods, for the Past Five Years. 





1908-09 
$706.84 
2,500.00 


1909-10 
$6.00 


1910-11 
$2,863.90 


1911-12 

$10.00 
1,796.84 


1912-13 

10.00 

105.00 






50.00 








7,791.42 

10,906.42 

99.85 

1,881.45 

595.41 

776.16 

5,955.00 

988.19 




Indiana 


10,429.21 
17,017.76 


3,334.12 

1,614.35 

400.00 

250.00 


14,333.87 

1,299.25 

2,475.00 

112.33 


3,997.15 

4,415.84 

537.50 


Kansas 




179.00 


Kentucky 

Michigan 

Minnesota. . . . 




666.67 


1,155.11 
1,479.00 


418.00 
1,702.85 
2,500.00 


157.87 
5,850.00 
1,300.00 

761.20 
18,386.06 


5,095.25 
3,750.00 


Montana 






Nebraska 








25.00 


New Jersey. . . 
New Mexico.. . 


13,761.24 


20,139.11 


1,545.77 


7,888.70 


New York. . . . 


115,263.98 


171,935.19 2,180,522.75 


602,395.57 


195,093.50 


North Dakota. 


100.00 
27,086.91 


575.72 
9,193.55 








Ohio 

Oklahoma 


24,076.26 


15,247.53 


8,668.54 


Oregon 

Pennsylvania. . 
South Dakota . 








133,210.53 




42,348.77 


25,938.19 
354.03 


28,201.67 


299,356.35 


















Utah 










Washington. . . 
West Virginia. . 
Wisconsin 


















225.00 










501.96 


Miscellaneous. . 


1,095.00 





















$232,943.82 $238,361.11 $2,280,390.16 $783,425.14 $530,290.46 
Less legal ex- 
penses incurred in 
collection of above $2,570.27 $7,025.38 $1,288.28 $4,358.42 1,859.10 



$230,373.55 $231, 335.73 $2,279,101.88 $779,066.72 $528,431.36 
Less amount carried to 

Reserve Fund 60,000.00 1,966,638.87 315,000.00 125,000.00 



$171,335.73 $312,463.01 $464,066.72 $403,431.36 



1913.1 



TREASURER S REPORT. 



121 



RECEIPTS, INDEBTEDNESS AND BALANCES FOR THE LAST 
FIFTEEN YEARS 
Year. Receipts. Debt. Balance. 



1898-1899 
1899-1900 
1900-1901 


$856,906 59 

729,511 09 

745,904 67 

803,662 96 

816,351 94 

820,606 20 

867,016 70 

911,793 72 

963,326 81 

989,285 24 

1,073,971 76 

1,108,343 65 

1,192,859 59 

1,491,182 85 

1,419,893 06 

d for by transfer 
transferred to R 

Respe< 




nd. 

ed, 
C 


$3,613,33 

2,576 09 

207 62 


1901-1902 




4,586 82 


1902-1903 




8,270 71 


1903-1904 




3,180 26 


1904-1905 




4,007 40 


1905-1906 




2,411 06 


1906-1907 




1,945 38 


1907-1908 
1908-1909 
1909-1910 
1910-1911 
1911-1912 
1912-1913 


$47,717 73 
*66,611 18 

from Reserve Fu 
eserve Fund. 

:tfully submits 
Harvey 


f65,343 51 

45,525 88 
653 86 


*Provide 
t$60,000 


. Olin, 

Treasurer 



John H. Allen, 

Public Auditor. 
Cable Address, 
"Hullallen," New York. 



10 Wall Street 
Astor Building 

New York. 
April 22, 1913. 



Walter M. Airman, Esq., 

Chairman of Finance Committee, 

Board of Home Missions, New York. 
Dear Sir: — I have examined the accounts, with he 
vouchers, of the Treasurer of your Board for the twelve 
months which ended March 31st, 1913, have verified both the 
cash and the securities and find the same in full accord with 
the records as herein set forth. 

I have also verified the balance sheet shown herewith with 
the books and accounts, and it correctly presents the financial 
status of the Board. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John H. Allen, 

Public Auditor. 



122 



treasurer's report. 



[1913. 



THE BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS OF THE 

Schedule 

BALANCE 

March 



CURRENT ASSETS. 

Cash $44,489 79 

Kennedy Funds awaiting investment 2,322 87 

Special Funds in Trust Co., awaiting demand 75,777 70 

Rents Receivable, Presbyterian Building 3,299 54 

Due from Sundry Organizations 29.500 07 

Advanced on Sundry Accounts 14,923 90 

$170,313 87 

INVESTED ASSETS. 

Investment Securities, as per Schedule No. 6 $2,889,582 49 

Permanent Real Estate Investments — Schedule 6: — 
Presbyterian Building (one-half Interest)$905,175 54 
Property 5 W. Twentieth St. (half Interest) 45,578 09 

950,753 63 

Unsold Securities and Real Estate, unacknowledged as 
Donations until converted into Cash as per Sched- 
ule No. 7 (per contra) 220,966 02 

$4,061,302 14 

ADVANCES AND UNADJUSTED BALANCES. 

Advance for Sundry Missions and Buildings $20,545 15 

Unexpired Insurance Premiums 1,292 18 

Advanced for Settlement of Estate 9,000 00 

Premiums and Discounts Kennedy Estate 215,380 00 

$246,217 33 

Grand total $4,477,833 34 



1913.] treasurer's report. 123 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE U. S. A. 

No. 1. 

SHEET 

31st, 1913. 



CURRENT LIABILITIES. 

Special Funds 

Due to Organizations and Individuals 

Rents Paid in Advance, Presbyterian Building. . 
Accrued Taxes, Water Rents, etc. " 
Accrued Interest on Special Gifts, " 



OTHER LIABILITIES. 



$75,777 70 


17,154 90 


89 


5S 


4,023 


02 


161 


04 



$97,206 24 



Permanent Funds as per Schedule No. 5 671,596 45 

Annuity Gifts as per Schedule No. 5 164,678 03 

The John S. Kennedy Special Fund— Schedule 5 2,273,302 87 

Funds invested in Presbyterian Building and 

Twentieth St. Properties — Schedule 5: — 

Funds bearing no interest $786,178 14 

Funds bearing interest 164,575 49 

950,753 63 

Income Account 55,282 09 

Loan from General Permanent Fund 25,000 00 

Premiums and Discounts 19,048 01 

Unacknowledged Receipts (per contra) 220,966 02 



$4,380,627 10 



Grand total $4,477,833 34 



124 treasurer's report. [1913 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

FOR CURRENT WORK. 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1913 

Schedule No. 2. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand April 1, 1912 $45,525 88 

For EVANGELIZATION 

Churches 289,305 69 

Woman's Missionary Societies 1,295 76 

Sabbath Schools [See Note on 1 . . . 24,935 61 

Young People's Societies (next page... J ... 13,743 41 

Individuals and Miscellaneous 60,777 48 

Interest on John S. Kennedy Fund 118,675 02 

Interest on Permanent Invested Funds 25,863 29 

Interest through Trustees General Assembly. . 5,497 30 
One-half Profits Operating 

Presbyterian Building 18,701 54 

Less Interest on Annuity Gifts. . 2,939 88 



One-half Profits Operating 20th St. 

Property 2,125 40 

Less Interest on Annuity Funds. 1,823 12 

Legacies, General 199,267 15 

John S. Kennedy Estate 46,664 21 

Martha E. Kortright Estate 282,500 00 

528,431 36 
Less amount carried to Special 

Reserve 125,000 00 



15,761 66 



302 28 



403,431 36 959,588 86 



For MISSION SCHOOL WORK. 



Churches 2,676 45 

Woman's Missionary Societies 277,338 89 

Sabbath Schools ......... ( See Note on 1 24,935 61 

Young People's Societies [ next page. . J 13,743 41 

Young Ladies' Societies and Bands 29,435 88 

Individuals and Miscellaneous 25,614 89 

Interest on Permanent Funds 6,788 87 

Legacies 10,307 88 

Tuition and Receipts from Fields 63,780 33 

Rents and Sales 5,681 99 



460,304 20 



Total for current work. $1,465,418 94 

Special gifts received for specific work not a part of 

the Board's Budget 11,088 73 

$1,476,507 67 



1913 treasurer's report. 125 

EXPENDITURES. 

For EVANGELIZATION. 

Missionaries, Field Work, etc 901,399 56 

Cost of Communicating Informa- 
tion 22,138 06 

General Assembly's Executive 

Comission-Budget Committee 2,333 33 

Exchanges 344 97 

Expenses of Administration 53,839 89 

980,055 81 

For MISSION SCHOOL WORK. 

Mission Schools, Field Work, In- 
surance and Buildings 434,485 46 

Cost of Communicating Informa- 
tion 10,484 10 

Woman's Board — exclusive of 

Mission School Work. . . 34,240 21 
Interest on Money Borrowed .... 5,421 83 
Exchanges 172 67 

484,804 27 

Total for current work 1,464,860 08 

Special gifts paid out for specific work not a part of 

the Board 's Budget 10,993 73 

Balance on hand April 1, 1913 653 86 

1,476,507 67 



Note. 

Sabbath School Offerings for Evangelization 17,014 23 

Transfer from Woman's Board — Adjustment 7,921 38 



TOTAL— one-half of S. S. Offerings 24,935 61 

Young People's Societies' offerings for Evangelization .... 7,840 64 

Transfer from Woman's Board — Adjustment. 5,902 77 



TOTAL— one-half of Y. P. S. Offerings 13,743 41 



126 



TREASURER S REPORT. 



[1913. 



PERMANENT AND ANNUITY FUNDS. 

INVESTMENT ACCOUNT. 

For The Year Ended March 31, 1913. 

Schedule No. 3. 



RECEIPTS. 
HOME BOARD. 

For Permanent Fund. 

Catherine Roseboom 

Legacy $2,000 00 

Sarah A. Crawford 

Legacy 2,500 00 

W. B. K. Johnson Leg- 
acy 6,888 50 

Edith D. Canby Mem'l. 

Fund 100 00 

For Special Fund. 

Estate of Martha E. 

Kortright 125,000 00 

Annuity Gifts. 

MissErvillaG.Tuttle 1,000 00 
Miss Mary A. Eaman 20,000 00 
Estate Eliza J. Grier 1,128 52 
Rev. Wm. E. Honey- 
man 6,000 00 

Miss Dorliska E. Shel- 
don 500 00 

J. E. Jarrett 100 00 

WOMAN'S BOARD 

For Permanent Fund. 

Roseboom Legacy. . . 3,000 00 

Mary Gow Estate.-. . . 404 12 
Phebe P. Potter Es- 

state 500 00 

Ada Lester Jones 

Scholarship Fund 2,500 00 

Annuity Gifts. 

Miss Ervilla G. Tuttle 1,000 00 

$172,621 14 

Emergency Fund for 

Disabled Teachers. $2,419 88 



EXPENDITURES. 

Bonds and Mortgages 

and Railway Bonds $170,121 14 
Securities received as 

Gifts 2,500 00 



$172,621 14 

Cash Temporarily De- 
posited in Trust Co. 
bearing interest $2,419 88 



1913.] treasurer's report. 127 

ITEMIZED EXPENDITURES. 

For The Year Ended March 31st, 1913. 
Schedule No. 4. 

Mission-School. 

Synods. Missionaries. Work, Etc. Total. 

Alabama $21,123 60 $21,123 60 

Arizona 41,289 58 26,057 19 67,346 77 

Arkansas 13,347 17 13,347 17 

Baltimore (Foreigners only) 4,720 33 4,720 33 

California, (Includes Nevada.) 54,99102 5,822 28 60,813 30 

Colorado (Includes Wyoming) 35,859 11 1,702 48 37,561 59 

Idaho 16,819 55 1,063 27 17,882 82 

Indiana (Foreigners only) 2,963 35 2,963 35 

Iowa (Foreigners only) 2,116 69 2,116 69 

Kansas (Foreigners & Indians) 2,790 00 300 00 3,090 00 

Kentucky 14,184 28 13,537 81 27,722 09 

Minnesota 33,764 87 33,764 87 

Mississippi 4,962 45 4,962 45 

Missouri 24,096 40 1,317 98 25,414 38 

Montana 21,829 93 3,411 23 25,241 16 

Nebraska 15,643 03 41 65 15,684 68 

New England 1,740 75 1,740 75 

New Jersey (Foreigners only) 2,150 00 2,150 00 

New Mexico 24,509 60 46,002 42 70,512 02 

New York (Foreigners & Indians) . . 45,401 26 45,401 26 

North Dakota 25,344 74 25,344 74 

Ohio (Foreigners only) 1,880 56 1,880 56 

Oklahoma 41,449 27 9,719 43 51,168 70 

Oregon 27,562 57 27,562 57 

Pennsylvania, (Foreigners only) .... 2,200 00 2,200 00 

South Dakota 32,744 04 3,514 91 36,258 95 

Tennessee (includes No Car.) 22,936 51 111,596 98 134,533 49 

Texas 43,518 20 43,518 20 

Utah 17,886 80 31,027 47 48,914 27 

Washington (includes Alaska) 81,946 23 30,467 78 112,414 01 

West German 7,373 89 7,373 89 

West Virginia . 8,197 32 8,197 32 

Wisconsin (Among Indians only) . . . 3,660 00 3,660 00 

Gen'l Evangelist & helper among 

Indians 2,603 16 2,603 16 

Dept. Immigration— Specials 4,157 89 4,157 89 

Mexican Work— Specials 2,258 15 2,258 15 

Cuba Missions 35,259 26 8,323 60 43,582 86 

Porto Rico Missions 46,270 03 39,049 18 85,319 21 

Americans in Europe 366 65 366 65 

Special Barber Fund 4,615 00 4,615 00 

Field Work 6,268 46 6,710 11 12,978 57 

Field Secretaries 21,085 58 21,085 58 

Field Superintendent — Woman's. . 

Board 2,692 96 2,692 96 

Collections received last year refund- 
ed 55 00 73 75 128 75 

New School Buildings 54,668 85 54,668 85 

Insurance Church & School Buildings , 6,173 04 6,173 04 

Foreigners in U.S.— Woman's B'd 23,013 77 23,013' 77 

Labor Temple, New York City 17,457 85 17,457 85 

Totals carried to next page $833,202 81 $434,485 46 $1,267,688 27 



128 treasurer's report. [1913. 

Total brought forward from previous page. . . $833,202 81 $434,485 46 $1,267,688 27 
Bureau of Social Service: 

Salary, Superintendent $3,500 00 

Traveling " 1,035 45 

Clerks Salaries 10,115 75 

Office Expenses 2,574 86 

Postage, etc 761 73 



Printing and Stationery 2,167 63 

Survey Work 561 23 



Department of Immigration: 

Missionaries .": . . 74,257 50 

Salary, Superintendent 3,000 00 

Clerk's Salaries 1,050 50 

Office Expenses 678 16 

Postage 115 40 

Printing and Stationery 777 00 

Traveling Expenses 789 17 

Field Survey Work 1,281 89 

81,949 62 
Less transfer to Synods 74,257 50 



Department of Indian Missions: 

Missionaries 87,908 99 

Salary, Superintendent 3,000 00 

Clerks' Salaries 1,854 00 

Office Expenses 240 48 

Postage 136 55 

Printing and Stationery 578 59 

Traveling Expenses 957 65 

94,676 26 
Less transfer to Synods 87,908 99 



Department of Church and Country Life: 

Salary, Superintendent 4,000 00 

Clerks' Salaries 4,187 10 

Office Expenses 751 41 

Postage 601 11 

Printing and Stationery 3,038 95 

Traveling Expenses 1,731 22 

Field Survey Work 18,710 92 



20,716 65 20,716 65 



7.692 12 7,692 12 



6,767 27 6,767 27 



33,020 71 33,020 71 



$901,399 56 $434,485 46 $1,335,885 02 



Cost of Communicating Information: 

Literature Department. 

Home Board $12,759 68 

Less Receipts from Sales 2,332 60 $10,427 08 



Woman's Board 18,374 22 

Less Receipts from Sales 8,440 12 9,934 10 $20,361 18 



Home Missions Council: 

Home Board 1,800 00 

Woman's Board 550 00 2,350 00 



Totals carried forward to next page $22,711 18 $1,335,885 02 



1913.] treasurer's report. 129 

Totals brought forward from previous page 22,711 18 $1,335,885 02 

Disbursements directed by the General Assembly: 
Annual Report: 

Printing .binding and distributing 10,100 copies last year. 2,435 29 

Assembly Herald: 

Articles, Illustrations and extra pages. 3,240 17 

General Assembly's Executive Commission: 

Joint Committee of the Boards . 2,333 33 

Department of Missionary Education: 

Salary Rev. Jay S. Stowell 8 mos 

Traveling " 

Stenographer 7 " 

Office furniture and supplies " 

Postage " 

Printing and Stationery " 

One-half net cost of operating 

joint department of Home 

and Foreign Boards " 



1,333 35 






444 44 






490 00 






225 47 






48 92 






32 75 






1,466 99 


4,041 92 


34,761 89 






$5,421 83 



344 

172 


7 
67 


5,900 
10,604 


00 

02 



Interest on Money Borrowed: 

To pay salaries of Teachers, etc . 

Exchanges on Out-of-town Checks: 

Home Board 

Woman's Board 

Woman's Board: 

Salary Account. 

Executive Officers 

Clerks 

School Department. 

Salaries — Superintendent and clerks, 

— printing, postage and office 8,571 72 

Expense Account. 

Printing and Stationery 

Office 

Postage 

Legal Expenses 

Young People's Dept.-one-half 2,147 28 34,240 21 

Expense of Administration: 

Salary A ccount. 

Executive Officers 

Clerks 

Auditor 



1,806 


12 


2,827 


18 


1,814 


70 


569 


10 


2,147 


23 


23,125 


00 


21,623 


60 


500 


00 


1,391 


41 


970 46 


2,840 50 


1,435 


16 


2,147 


27 



Expense Account. 

Printing and Stationery 

Postage, etc 

Office 

Traveling 

Young People's Dept.-one-half 2,147 27 54,033 49 



Total for Current Work 1,464,860 08 

Specials , , 10,993 73 

$1,475,853 81 



130 treasurer's report. [1913. 

PERMANENT, ANNUITY AND OTHER FUNDS 

HELD BY THE BOARD FALL UNDER SEVEN CLASSES. 
Schedule No. 5. 



FIRST. — Money or securities received by the Board as gifts or legacies to be invested or 
held by the Board, the income alone to be used, either for the general work of the Board 
or for some specific portion of that work. These permanent funds are as follows: 

General Permanent Fund '. . . $134,494 46 

John C. Green Fund $100,000 00 

Carson W. Adams Fund 7,116 26 

Baldwin Memorial Fund 4,250 00 

David W. Baxter Fund 5,000 00 

Romney E. Blanton Fund 1,000 00 

A. I. Bulkley Fund 1,000 00 

Julia F. Gould Fund 1,000 00 

Charles W. Henry Fund 5,000 00 

C. C. Larimore Fund 400 00 

George Long Fund 15,000 00 

"M. T. Fund " ' 48,000 00 

Susan Mansley Legacy Fund 500 00 

George G. Negley Memorial Fund 200 00 

Charles R. Otis Missionary Fund 5,000 00 

Stephen C. Pinkerton Fund 952 50 

Cornelia B. Strong Fund 10,000 00 

"A Thank Offering from a Friend of the Work" Fund 18,000 00 

"A Thank Offering from a Friend of Home Missions" Fund 18,000 00 

"Memorial to a Christian Mother " Fund 1,000 00 

Edith D. Canby Memorial Fund 1,100 00 

Orison Dean Fund 9,906 25 

Coates Fund 540 00 

Margeret L. Hogg Fund 5,000 00 

Robertson Darling Memorial Fund 10,000 00 

Anna Findley Memorial Fund 11,091 47 

Jas. W. and Eliza Smith Fund 10,000 00 

Sara A. Palmer Memorial Fund 5,000 00 

M. F. and W. A. S. Hyland Permanent Fund 1,000 00 

James Walker Fund 1,000 00 

J. C. Blair Fund 150 00 

Total carried forward to next page .$ 430,700 94 



1913.] treasurer's report. 131 

Total brought over from previous page $430, 700. 94 

Schedule No. 5. — (.Continued.) 

SECOND. — Money or securities received by the Woman's Board, either 
as gifts or legacies, the interest alone to be used for the mission school 
work of the Board. These permanent funds are as follows: 

Juliet L. Axtell Fund $1,000 00 

A. I. Bulkley Schoolrship Fund 5,000 00 

A. I. Bulkley Fund 1.000 00 

Wm. Allen Butler Memorial Fund 1,000 00 

Gallup Memorial Fund 3,232 01 

Wm. T. Garratt Scholarship Fund 2,000 00 

Helen Day Gould Fund 2,500 00 

Louisa B. Green Fund 6,681 72 

Francis Henry Fund 5,000 00 

Anna Kip Miller Fund 2,500 00 

Emeline G. Pierson Memorial Fund 2,000 00 

Twenty-fifth Anniversary Fund 40,000 00 

Sara B. Withers Scholarship Fund 5,865 25 

Woman's Board — Permanent Fund 36,049 23 

Matilda M. Burrowes Fund 946 20 

Susan Ann Livingston Guy Memorial Fund 250 00 

Frances E. Curtiss Fund (one-half) 17,575 55 

Mary W. Robinson Memorial Fund 1,000 00 

Mrs. Robert Lambie Memorial Fund 1,000 00 

Mary Elizabeth Trout Scholarship Fund 2,000 00 

Caroline A. Walsh Scholarship Fund 2,000 00 

"Friend of Home Missions" Scholarship Fund 1,000 00 

Julia M. Potter Fund 500 00 

Frances A. Robinson Scholarship Fund 2,000 00 

Robbins Memorial Fund 4,000 00 

Sara A. Palmer Memorial Fund 5,000 00 

Margeret J. Peebles Fund 960 00 

Henry St.Clair Scholarship Fund 1,000 00 

Mary H. McCune Mem'l Fund 1,000 00 

Ada Lester Jones Scholarship Fund 2,500 00 $ 156, 559 96 



THIRD. — Trust Funds, the interest to be used for work not a part of 
the Board's Budget, or for some special work: 

A. K. and Martha J. VanMeter Legacy 4,050 00 

Cooper Memorial Fund 1,710 00 

Sarah P. McNair Mem'l Fund 1,000 00 

Frances E. Curtiss Fund (one-half) 17,575 55 $ 24,335 55 



FOURTH.— Reserve Fund $93,000 00 

Less amount invested in the 

Presbyterian Building 33,000 00 $ 60, 000 00 

Total carried forward to next page $ 671,596 45 



132 treasurer's report. [1913. 

Totai brought over from previous page $671,596.45 

Schedule No. 5. — {Concluded.) 

FIFTH. — Money or securities received from individuals as absolute gifts 
to the Board upon the principal sum of which a certain rate of in- 
terest is to be paid to the donor or designated person during the 
life of the beneficiary. These annuity gifts amount in the aggregate 
as follows: 

Home Board $233,878 52 

Woman's Board 20,500 00 



$254,378 52 
Less amount invested in Presbyterian 

Building and 20th St. Properties. 89,700 49 $ 164,678 03 



SIXTH.— The John S. Kennedy Special Fund $2,273,302 87 

SEVENTH. — Gifts specially designated by the donors to be used in pay- 
ment of the cost of the Presbyterian Building and also Special and 
Reserve Funds received with no conditions attached, used by the 
Board in completing payment due on said Building and in purchase 
of the adjoining property, No. 5, West Twentieth St.: — 

Funds Bearing No Interest. 

Stuart Legacy $230,500 00 

Special Funds 181,321 99 

Special Gifts 374,356 15 $786,178 14 



Funds Bearing Interest. 

Rev. Alfred S. Badger, D.D 12,500 00 

Rev. John C. Bliss, D.D 500 00 

John H. Converse 3,125 00 

Miss Jane L. Hardy 2,000 00 

Mrs. Mary E. Officer 2,000 00 

Rev. Wilson Phraner, D.D 2,500 00 

Rev. Joseph Piatt 500 00 

Miss Elizabeth J. Reamer 750 00 

Rev. Wm. M. Taylor 500 00 

Miss Emily M. Wheeler 5,000 00 

David B. and Mary H. Gamble Fund 12,500 00 

Reserve Fund 33,000 00 

Special Funds 89,700 49 $164,575 49 $ 950, 753 63 



Grand Total $4,060,330 98 



1913. 



TREASURER S REPORT. 



133 



THE SECURITIES 

IN WHICH THE PERMANENT, ANNUITY, TRUST AND 
RESERVE FUNDS OF THE BOARD ARE INVESTED. 



Schedule No. 6. 

Book 
{Par) 
Value. 

Bank of Pittsburgh National Association, 

Fifty shares capital stock — Bequeathed 2,500 00 

Birmingham, Ala., Ry. Light and Power Co. 
General Mortgage Refunding 4J^% 
Gold Bonds. Due 1954— Donated . . 5,000 00 

Brooklyn Union Gas Co. First Consolidated 

Mortgage 5% Gold Bonds. Due 1945 5,000 00 

Central Branch Ry .Co. First Mortgage 4% 

Gold Bonds. Due 1919— Donated . . 2.000 00 

Central Syndicate Building Co. — 39 shares 

Capital Stock— Bequeathed 3,900 00 

Chesapeake and Ohio Ry. Co. General Mort- 
gage 4^% Gold Bonds. Due 1992. . . 12,000 00 

Chesapeake and Ohio Ry. Co. First Consoli- 
dated Mortgage 5% Gold Bonds 

Due 1939— Donated 2,000 00 

Chicago and Alton Ry. Co. 3% Refunding 

Gold Bonds. Due 1949 20,000 00 

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy R. R. Co. 

5% Bonds. Due 1913— Donated 4,000 00 

Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Ry. Co. 
First Refunding Mortgage Gold Bond. 
4% Due 1934. Registered.— Donated 1,000 00 

Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Ry. Co. 4% 
First and Refunding Mortgage Gold 
Bonds. Due 1934 36,000 00 

Chicago and Northwestern Ry Co. 3 H% Gen- 
eral Mortgage Gold Bond. Due 1987 

—Donated 5,000 00 

Citizens National Bank of Chattanooga, Tenn. 

20 shares capital stock — Bequeathed. 2,000 00 

Colorado Midland Ry. 1st Mtge. 4% Bonds 

1947— Donated 3,000 00 

Columbus, Connecting and Terminal Ry. Co. 
5% First Mortgage Gold Bonds. Due 
1922 5,000 00 

Detroit, Grand Rapids and Western R. R. Co. 
First Mortgage Consolidated 4 % Bonds 
Due 1946 50,000 00 

Erie R. R.— Penn. Coll.— 4% Gold Bonds. 

Due 1951 23,000 00 

Flint and Pere Marquette R. R. Co. Consoli- 
dated First Mortgage Gold Bonds 5% 
Due 1939— Donated 1,000 00 

Flint and Pere Marquette R. R. Co. Toledo 
Division First Mortgage 5%, 40 year 
Gold Bonds. Due 1937 4,000 00 

Ganby Consolidated Mining, Smelting and 
Power Co., Ltd. 102 shares Capital 
Stock— Bequeathed 10,200 00 



Market 

Value as of 

Aprill,'13. 

3,125 00 



4,925 


00 


5,287 


51) 


1,800 


00 


2,910 


00 


11,895 


00 


2,180 


00 


13,200 


00 


4,005 


00 


842 


50 


30,330 


00 


4,125 


00 


3,000 


00 


900 


00 



5,300 00 



39,500 


00 


20,527 


50 


970 


00 


3,720 00 


6,273 


00 



134 treasurer's report. [1913. 

Glens Falls Portland Cement Co. 20 shares 

preferred stock -Bequeathed 2,000 00 2,200 00 

Great Northern Ry. Co. 4500 shares preferred 

capital stock-Bequeathed. . 450,000 00 582,187 50 

Great Northern Iron Ore Properties, 3000 
shares(30 Trustee's certificates of bene- 
ficial interest, 100 shares each) — Be- 

queathed. 300,000 00 105,375 00 

Keokuk and Des Moines Ry. Co. First Mort- 

gage 5% Bonds. Due 1923 20,000 00 19,950 00 

Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Ry. Co. 
ZV>% Gold Bonds. Due 1997— Reg- 
istered- Donated 6.000 00 5,197 50 

Louisville, Henderson and St. Louis Ry. Co. 
First Mortgage 5% Gold Bond. Due 

1946 _ Don ated 500 00 540 00 

Minneapolis, Lyndale and Minnetonka Ry. 
Co. First Consolidated Mortgage Bond 
and of the Minneapolis Street Ry. Co. 

5% Due 1919. .- • • 9,000 00 9,090 00 

Missouri, Kansas and Texas Ry. Co. First 
Mortgage 4% Bonds. Due 1990 

-Donated" • ..". . 2,500 00 2,284 25 

Missouri, Kansas and Texas Ry. Co. First 
Mortgage 5% Bonds. Due 1942 — 

Donated .... 2,000 00 1,940 00 

New York Central and Hudson River R. R. 
Co 4% Gold Debenture Bond. 1990. 

-Donated 1,000 00 905 00 

New York Telephone Co. First and General 
Mortgage 4^% Gold Sinking Fund 

Bonds. Due 1939 10,000 00 9,662 50 

New York, Westchester and Boston R. R. Co. 
First Mortgage Gold 4H% Bonds. 

Due 1946. . . • • 50,000 00 47,500 00 

Northern Pacific Ry. Co. 7500 shares capital 

stock-Bequeathed 750,000 00 880,312 50 

Northern Pacific Ry. Co., St. Paul-Duluth 

Division 4% Gold Bond. Due 1996 3,000 00 2,610 00 

Northern Pacific— Great Northern Rys. 4% 
Joint Bond C. B. and Q. Collateral. 

Due 1921 ■ 20,000 00 18,901 25 

Pennsylvania R. R. Co. 400 shares capital 

y Stoc£ 20 '000 00 23 > 750 00 

Philadelphia Company Consolidated Mort- 
gage and Collateral Trust 5% Gold 

Bonds. Due 1952— Bequeathed 2,000 00 1,805 00 

Rio Grande Western Ry. Co. First Trust 

Mortgage 4% Gold Bonds. Due 1939 16,000 00 13,200 00 
Sanitary District of Chicago Municipal 4% 

Bond. Due 1916 2,000 00 1,955 00 

Sherman Shreveport and Southern Ry. Co. 

First Mortgage 5% Bonds. Due 1943 15,000 00 15,300 00 
St Louis, Memphis and Southeastern R. R. 
Co. First Mortgage 4% Gold Bonds. 

Due 1952 19,000 00 16,720 00 

St. Louis Southwestern Ry. Co. 4% First 
Mortgage Gold Bonds. Due 1989 — 
Donated 2,000 00 1,747 50 



1913.] treasurer's report. 135 

St. Paul City Ry. Co. 5% Cable Consolidated 

Mortgage Gold Bonds 31,000 00 32,240 00 

Southern Ry. Co. First Consolidated Mort- 
gage 5% Gold Bonds. Due 1994 

($2,000 Donated) 3,000 00 3,131 25 

Southern Ry. Co. — St. Louis Dividion First 

Mortgage 4% Gold Bonds. Due 1951 5,000 00 4,225 00 

Spokane International Ry. Co. First Mort- 
gage 5% Gold Bonds 40,000 00 41,200 00 

Struthers-Wells Company First Mortgage 

5% Bonds. Due 1922— Donated 5,000 00 4,650 00 

Texas and Oklahoma R. R. Co. First Mort- 
gage 5% Gold Bonds. Due 1943— 

($10,000 Donated) 28,000 00 28,420 00 

Texas and Pacific Ry, Co. First Mortgage 5% 

Bonds. Due 2000— Donated 1,000 00 1,042 50 

Toledo and Ohio Central Ry. Co. 4% First 
Mortgage St. Mary's Division Gold 
Bonds. Due 1951 12,000 00 10,500 00 

United Electric Company of New Jersey First 
Mortgage 4% Gold Bond. Due 1949. 
—Donated 1,000 00 815 00 

United States Steel Corporation 5% Sinking 
Fund Gold Coupon Bonds. Due 1963 
—Donated 2,000 00 2,015 00 

Wabash R. R. Co. First Mortgage 5% Bonds. 

Due 1939 2,000 00 2,075 00 

Western Union Telegraph Co. 4J^% Refund- 
ing and Real Estate Mortgage Gold 
Bond. Due 1950— Donated 1,000 00 915 00 

Western Union Telegraph Co. 15 shares cap- 
ital stock— Donated . . 1,500 00 1,053 75 

Wilkesbarre and Eastern R. R. Co. First 
Mortgage 5% Gold Coupon Bonds. 
Due 1942 25,000 00 24,425 00 

Wisconsin Central Ry. Co. First General 
Mortgage 4% Gold Bond. Due 1949. 
—Donated 1,000 00 903 75 

Wisconsin Central Ry. Co. — Marshfield and 
Southeastern Division — Purchase 
Money First Mortgage 4% Gold Bonds. 
Due 1951 24,000 00 21,600 00 

Loan against Real Estate 25,000 00 25,000 00 

Notes of David B. Gamble 3,750 00 3,750 00 

Certificate of Deposit Bank of Marshall Mo. 

5%— Donated 1,000 00 1,000 00 

Notes of Frank H. Reid 1,000 00 1,000 00 

Bonds & Mortgages 777,732 49 777,732 49 

$2,889,582 49 $2,915,642 24 
Presbyterian Building (one-half interest).. . . 905,175 54 905,175 54 
Property, 5 West 20th Street, N. Y. (one- 
half interest) 45,578 09 45,578 09 

$3,840,336 12 $3,866,395 87 



136 



TREASURER S REPORT. 



[1913. 



SECURITIES AND REAL ESTATE. 

Received as Donations or Legacies to be Acknowledged When 
Converted Into Cash. 



Schedule No. 7. 

Book Value. 

Land in Washington Co., Colo $200 00 

Lehigh and New York R. R. — Capital Stock 3,900 00 

Mortgage on property in Montclair, N. J 1,000 00 

Enterprise Mining & Reduction Improvement Co. of Ari- 
zona — Capital Stock 10 00 

Rampart City Gold Mining Co., Alaska, — Capital Stock 10 00 

J. H. Durfee — Paid-up Insurance Policy 100 00 

Property in Watertown, S. D 150 00 

Monongahela Water Co. — Stock 273 00 

Property in Lincoln, Pierce and Whatcom Counties, Wash. 100 00 

City of Anniston, Ala., Bonds 200 00 

Escee Co.— Pittsburgh, Pa.— Bonds 22,000 00 

McGlasson Mortgage Notes 150 00 

Octavia Hill Association — Capital Stock 225 00 

Arrowhead Reservoir and Power Co. — Preferred Stock. . . 100 00 

Charles E. Hilton— Note 327 60 

Property in Monrovia., Calif 100 00 

Martindale Water Co. — Pa. — Bonds , 2,500 00 

The Hermitage Co. Capital Stock 3,000 00 

Alex Mc Nabb Note 166 67 

Prospect Park Land Co. Kansas City, Mo. Stock 5 00 

Property, Monterey, Cali 100 00 

Colorado Southern Ry. Bonds 2,000 00 

Indianapolis, Decatur & Western R. R. 5% Bonds 6,000 00 

Kanawha & Michigan R. R. 4% Bonds 2,000 00 

Lehigh Valley R. R. Coll. Trust 4% Bonds 12,000 00 

Coal Co. 4% Bonds 6,000 00 

Louisville & Nashville M. & M. Divn. 4^% Bonds 6,000 00 

Nor. Pac— Gt. Nor.— C. B. & Q. Ry's. Joint 4% Bond ... 1,000 00 

Philadelphia City Loan Ctfe 1,000 00 

Phila. & Chester Valley R. ,R 4% Pfd. Loan 500 00 

Phila. Co. Con. Mtge. 5% Bonds 4,000 00 

Phila. Germantown & Chestnut Hill Ry. 4^% Bond 1,000 00 

Pittsburgh Bridge Loan 4% 3,000 00 

Port Reading Ry. 5% Bonds 5,000 00 

St. Louis Merchants Bridge & Term. Ry. 5% Bonds 5,000 00 

St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Ry. 4% Bonds 6,000 00 

Wilmington & Northern Ry. 5% Bonds 3,000 00 

New York & Rockaway Ry. 5% Bonds 5,000 00 

New York Brooklyn & Manhattan Beach Ry. 5% Bonds 5,000 00 

Wisconsin Central R. R. -S. & D. Divn. 4% Bonds 5,000 00 

Kansas City, Fort Scott & Memphis R. R. 6% Bonds . . . 5,000 00 

Central New England R. R. 4% Bonds 5,000 00 

Baltimore & Ohio R. R.-P. L. E. & W. Va. System 4% 

Bonds 5,000 00 

C. W. Dennis, Note 1,300 00 

Bonds & Mortgages against Real Estate 88,350 00 

$217,767 2 7 
Chesapeake & Ohio R. R. Bonds-temporary invest- 
ment for a special donation 3,198 75 



$220,966 02 



1913.] treasurer's report. 137 

THE FOLLOWING STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES. 

For Year Ended March 31st, 1913, Classified by Departments, is a 
Re-arrangement of Pages 127 to 129 and is here 

PRINTED FOR INFORMATION ONLY. 

Mission School 

Missionaries. Work, Etc. Total. 

American Mission Churches... 361,569 02 168,370 52 529,939 54 
Synodical Missionaries and 

Evangelists 23,064 77 23,064 77 

Pastor Evangelists 86,852 46 86,852 46 

Barber Fund 4,615 00 4,'615 00 

Lumber Camps 11,095 36 11,095 36 

Churches and Missions where 
the language used is other 
than English — 

1. Germans 7,373 89 7,373 89 

2. Other Europeans 81,949 62 23,013 77 104,963 39 

3. Indians 94,676 26 54,86131 149,537 57 

4. Mexicans 19,415 50 43,360 83 62,776 33 

5- Cuba 35,259 26 8,323 60 43,582 86 

6. Porto Rico 46,270 03 39,049 18 85,319 21 

Alaska (both English and Native) 30,654 14 29,880 50 60,534 64 

Labor Temple, N. Y 17,457 85 17,457 85 

Bureau of Social Service 20,716 65 20,716 65 

Department of Church and 

Country Life 33,020 71 33,020 71 

Field Work, including Field 

Secretaries, etc 27,409 04 6,710 11 34,119 15 

New School Buildings, In- 
surance, etc 60,915 64 60,915 64 



$901,399 56 $434,485 46 $1,335,885 02 



138 treasurer's report. [1913. 

The following statement of RECEIPTS and DISBURSEMENTS, includ- 
ing not only current work, but funds for investment, is made up in conformity 
to a resolution of the General Assembly of 1907 — by which all the Boards are 
to report upon a common form. 

The ground covered is the same as that on pages 124 to 126 and the 
grand totals will be found to correspond therewith. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand April 1st, 1912 $45,525 88 

Churches $289,305 69 

Sabbath Schools 24,935 61 

Woman's Societies 1,295 76 

Woman's Board 348,130 24 

Young People's Societies 13,743 41 677,410 71 

Individuals— Current Work $86,392 37 

Individuals— For Permanent and Annuity Funds.. 31,200 00 117,592 37 

Interest 156,824 48 

Legacies — Restricted 141,421 14 

Legacies — Unrestricted 413,739 24 

Net income from Real Estate 16,063 94 

All other sources 80,551 05 808,599 85 



$1,649,128 81 

DISBURSEMENTS - = 

Appropriations: 

Missionaries, Field Work & Specials $901,399 56 

Mission Schools, Field Work & Buildings.. 434,485 46 

$1,335, S85 02 

Investments 172,621 14 

Interest 5,421 83 

Literature 20,361 18 

Home Mission Week 2,350 00 

Department of Missionary Education 4,041 92 

Assembly Herald 3,240 17 

Annual Report 2,435 29 

Administrative Expenses: 

Salaries Executive Officers $23,125 00 

Clerical Force 21,623 69 

Auditor 500 00 

Incidental Expenses: 

Printing and Stationery 1,391 41 

Postage, Telegrams, P. O. and Safe 

Deposit Box Rent 970 46 

Office Supplies and Repairs 2,840 50 

Young People's Dept. one-half 2,147 27 

Traveling Expenses 1,435 16 54,033 49 

All other disbursements: 

General Assembly's Executive Commis- 
sion 2,333 33 

Woman's Board: Salaries, Office Exp. 

and one-hatf Y. P. Dept 34,240 21 

Exchange on checks 517 64 

Sundry Specials 10,993 73 48,084 91 

$1,648,474 95 
Balance on hand carried to next year.... 653 86 



$1,649,128 81 



1913.] CONTRIBUTIONS FROM INDIVIDUALS, ETC. 139 

CONTRIBUTIONS FROM INDIVIDUALS, ETC. 
FOR CURRENT WORK OF "EVANGELIZATION" 
DURING THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1913. 



Abell, W. A $10 00 

Ackerly, Ida P 5 00 

Alcott. Wm. P 5 00 

Altoona Lutheran 1st Ch 5 00 

Auburn Seminary, Y. M. C. A 382 66 

Baird, H. T 5 00 

Barnard, Miss H. M 20 00 

Bauer, H. E 5 00 

Baxter ,Mr. and Mrs. DeWitt 20 00 

Bill, Mrs. Fred A 50 00 

Blake, Luther 5 00 

Boies, Miss L. M 25 00 

Borden, Mary W 300 00 

Boundary Mission Chapel 60 

Breyer, Laura J 6 00 

Brokaw, C. L. through 15 44 

Brooks, Dr. E. D 1 00 

Brooten, Dorcas Ladies Aid 5 00 

Bruen, Miss Katherine A 50 00 

Bulkley, F. A 5 00 

Bullion, Elizabeth 25 00 

Burks, W. H 10 00 

Butler, Rev. Henry S 20 00 

Buzzell, Charles F 10 00 

Callan, P. A . ... 10 00 

Camp, Norman H 10 00 

Carey, Arthur A 35 00 

Carle, Mrs. Wm. M 2 00 

Carlisle Indian School, Y. W. C. A . . 5 00 

Carlisle Mass Meeting 93 22 

Carlson, Miss Augusta 1 00 

"Cash" 135 00 

Casselberry, Miss Willie 5 00 

Cathcart Home for Incurables 5 00 

Christian Endeavor Temple 3 40 

Christian Herald, through 16 66 

Clark, Mrs. Mary 5 00 

Conaughty, Wallace L 100 00 

Cooper, Miss Hattie S 266 41 

"H. C." 150 00 

Cowan, Mrs. A. H 473 75 

Crabtree. Mrs. J. W 2 28 

Crafts, Mrs. P. A 5 00 

Craighead, Mrs. Lydia L 25 00 

Cranford, N. J. Boys Club 30 10 

Cratty, Mary B 5 00 

Cross, Miss A. D 3 00 

DeGraff, Mrs. Carrie M $100 00 

Dickinson, Miss H. A 5 00 

Dickson, Miss A. M 5 00 

Driver, Frederick B 4 00 

Dunlap, Dr. Robert W 25 00 

East Bloomfield Cong. S. S 30 02 

Edwards, Henry A 100 00 

Elliott, Sue F 400 00 

Enos, H. G '. 100 00 

" E. O. E. " 750 00 

Esgate, John I 5 00 

Evans, Daniel H 20 00 

Fisher, Horace 5 00 

Fisk. Mr. and Mrs. C. R 5 00 

Fiske, Rev. Asa S 105 00 

Foberg, Miss Selma 5 00 

Francis, J. F 20 00 

"An Anonymous Friend " 10,000 00 

"Friend" 100 00 

"Friend" 5 00 

"A Friend" 30 00 



"A Friend " 


$ 5 00 




10 00 




25 00 




5 00 




3 00 




2,000 00 
1 50 






200 00 




65 00 




19 00 




55 00 




27 00 


"Friends " 


4 00 




100 00 


"Friend," Wash 

"A Friend in Wilmington, Del. "... 
"A Friend of the Cause" 


10 00 

500 00 

1 00 

500 00 


"A Friend of the Work" 


1 00 


Frith, Wm. B 


5 00 




20 00 


Fuller, Annie 


10 00 


Fullerton Union Ch. No. Dakota. . . . 

Gardner, C. B. Trustee 

Gayman, Virginia E 

Gibbs, Mr. and Mrs. E. W 

Gillespie, Mary B 


5 80 

112 00 

20 00 

5 00 
100 00 

5 00 


Gould, Miss lone 

Green, James W 


10 00 
1 00 

75 00 


Groff , Theodore L 


25 00 
7.500 00 


"H 042437" 


1,048 90 


Hackensack True Reformed Ch. 

N.J 

Hall, Miss M. E 

Halsey, Miss Cornelia U 


25 44 

75 00 

100 00 


Harden, Fred G 


2 50 

1,000 00 

7 00 


Harkness, Edward S 


5,000 00 


Hartzell. Rev. W. H 

Haskell, Mrs. N. M 

Hervey, H. M 

Holt, Rev. W. S. through 


10 00 

2 61 

1 00 

700 00 

4 00 

525 00 

25 00 


Hope, Effie E 


7 00 


Hubert, Miss E. M 

Hubert, Mr. and Mrs. J. H 

" In Memory of a Christian Mother" . 
"InMemory of Mrs.Eliza Buchanan 
" In Memory of Rev. John Gillespie" 
" InMemory of Mary J. Maitland ". . 
Isely, C. H 


10 00 

2 50 

5 00 

25 00 

10 00 

10 00 

250 00 

10 00 

2,000 00 

5 00 

50 

1 00 


Johnston, Rev. J. E 

"K." 


5 00 

5 00 

5 00 

400 00 




50 00 
5 00 



140 



CONTRIBUTIONS FROM INDIVIDUALS, ETC. 



[1913. 



Kellogg, Rev. and Mrs. H. H 10 00 

Lake Minnewaska Meeting 91 00 

Lamont, Hugh W 2 50 

Landon, Warren H 20 00 

Lawshe, Mrs. C. H 5 00 

Lay, Rev. Dirk through 250 00 

Leibelsperger, Miss E. A 5 00 

Lice, A. C. Y 2 50 

Lowrie, Dr. S. T 15 00 

Loy, Miss Florence and Mother. ... 4 00 

McCall, Rev. Jack through 103 00 

MacCalla. W. A 31 60 

McCallach, Mrs. A. A 5 00 

McClinton, Margaret 2 50 

McCoy, Sarah H 300 00 

McCracken, J. C $1 00 

McCreery, Rev. Charles H 2 00 

McCutcheon, A. C 50 00 

McLanen, Donald 200 00 

McLeod, A. G 10 00 

McNeill, Jesse 10 00 

McRuer, Rev. Duncan 5 00 

Maltby, Mary C 5 00 

Martin, John L 5 00 

Mathews, Robert A 5 00 

Mathis, Miss Arminta 1 00 

Maxwell, A. A 6 00 

Mayaguez Medical Mission 2,470 33 

Meadow Creek Indian Farm 302 50 

"A Member of the Synod of New 

Jersey 200 00 

"In Memory of James R. Hills" .. . 100 00 

Mead, Mrs. M. Louise 1,200 00 

Meyer, Rev. and Mrs. W 5 00 

"M. H. A." 1,000 00 

"A Miller" 73 37 

Miller, I. R 5 00 

Mills, Helen D 100 00 

Mills, O. S 50 00 

Mission Center C. E. Soc'y- Topeka 

Kas 16 00 

Mitchell, Rev. F. G. through 10 00 

Mogk, Miss 1 00 

Moody Bible Institute, Chicago 50 

Morse, A. A 5 00 

Mulford, W.J 5 00 

Mundy, Rev. Ezra F 1 00 

Munger, Mrs. Gertrude B 12 50 

Nairn, Mrs. G. H 1 00 

New York Indian Association 5 00 

New York Olivet Mem'l Ch. (Inter- 
denominational) 10 00 

Niagara Falls 1st Baptist S. Sch 20 00 

Niess, Mrs. Sarah B 1 00 

Niles, Harriet S 17 50 

Norton, William 1 00 

"Obed" 20 00 

Oliver, John 32 80 

Otis, Charles R 500 00 

Owen, Louise G 350 00 

Palmer, Frances C 5 00 

Palmer, Miss N. C 4 00 

Parmly, Rev. John E 25 00 

Parry.Rev. Samuel 20 00 

Parsons, William H 50 00 

Patterson, Martha 10 00 

Perry, Mrs. Lizzie E 5 00 

Pierson, Chas. E. and Jno. S 10,000 00 

Pomeroy, A. B 5 00 

"A Presbyterian " 1 00 

"A Presbyterian" 50 00 

Presbyterian Relief Assn. of Nebr. . . 12 00 



Primm, Sarah E 100 00 

Rate, John G 1 00 

Rayburn, Rev. James 15 00 

Reaugh, G. A 14 00 

Reeves, Frances B 5 00 

Renich, E. A 09 

Renwick, Helen G 10 00 

Riegel, Miss Jennie 6 25 

Rogers, Eli E 5 00 

Rule, Wallace B 5 00 

Russell, Rev. F. W 7 50 

Sale Seneca Hymn Books 6 25 

Sample, Rev. J. Logan 500 00 

Sanders, Miss Josie 2 00 

San Francisco Theological Seminary 25 00 

Schulte. W. H 10 00 

Scotia Sem. Miss. Soc'y Concord 

N. C 10 00 

"Seneca Family" 5 00 

Sheller Katharine 4 65 

Shoup, J. L 3 00 

Smith, C. A. Lumber Co 75 00 

Smith, Rev. Geo. L 3 00 

Smith, S. L 20 00 

Snyder, John D 5 00 

Sornberger, Rev. J. W. through .... 114 50 

Spencer, Miss M. P 5 00 

St. Louis, Thomas MorrisonS. Sch. 9 18 

Stage, G. S 30 00 

Stokes, Miss O. E. P 50 00 

Strong, Horace 10 00 

Taylor, Mrs Anna J 60 00 

Taylor, Mrs. Esther 1 00 

Telford, Mrs. Emma Paddock 1 00 

Tombstone Congregational Church.. 5 25 

Topeka, Central Cong. S. Sch 21 60 

"Traill" 12 00 

"Two Friends" 150 00 

Twyeffort, L. V 12 50 

Unused of 191 1-1912 appropriation. 1,053 55 

Union Meeting 17 00 

Vanderpoel, A. E 50 00 

Van Wagoner, Rev. C. Davis 20 00 

Voorhees, Mrs. Elizabeth R 1,000 00 

Voorhees, George E 10 00 

Wallace, Mrs. Ellen L 500 00 

Walthill Indian Hospital 385 93 

Ward, Samuel 20 00 

Warne.Mrs. W. W 5 00 

Warrick, S. K 7 50 

Waterhouse, Mrs. Wm 7 00 

White. Mrs. Edwin C 1 00 

Whitehead, Rev. Redmon 15 00 

Whitehead, Mrs. P 1 00 

Wick, John C 2000 00 

Willet, Mrs. E.S 50 00 

Williams, Charlotte E 200 00 

Williams, Mrs. Mary A 200 00 

Williamsport, Pennsylvania Synod- 

ical Meeting 10 00 

Williamson, T. C 15 34 

Wilson, D. A 2 00 

Witherspoon, Mrs. M. M 2 50 

Woods, Mrs. Wm 5 00 

M. W. and J. T. W 5 00 

Yocum, Miss Ella 5 00 

Young, Rev. S. Hall through 7 00 

Zimmerman, B. Estelle .' 5 00 

"8862" 50 00 

Total $60,777 48 



1913. 



SUNDRY SPECIALS 

SUNDRY SPECIALS. 



141 



THE BOARD RECEIVED THE FOLLOWING SPECIAL CONTRIBUTIONS 
FOR WORK NOT A PART OF THE BOARD'S BUDGET. 



Borden, Mrs Mary M $200 00 

Bullions, Miss Elizabeth 5 00 

Conencticut Indian Association 75 00 

Denny, Miss 10 00 

Dodge, Rev. D. Stuart 1,200 00 

Drury, Mr. & Mrs. John H 20 00 

Dusenbury, Mrs. E. G 100 00 

"AFriend" 25 00 

"A Friend" 1,600 00 

Fluth, Tjark 20 00 

Golden, Miss Dora 100 00 

Gould, Miss Helen M 100 00 

Harkness, Edward S 1 ,000 00 

" M. C. D. " 10 00 

Nisbet, Mrs. Elizabeth S 30 00 



Seymour, Miss 25 00 

Smith, Miss E. Dean 75 00 

Spotswood, Miss Anna R 30 00 

Spotswood, Miss Susan B 30 00 

St. Paul Union, Longwood, Ills 

(Independent Church) 75 00 

Steel, Miss Mary C 10 00 

Wick, Miss Eva J 15 00 

Wheeler. Mrs. W. E 30 00 

Young, Rev. S. Hall, Through • 2 00 



$4,787 00 



142 LEGACIES. [1913. 

LEGACIES 

RECEIVED DURING THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1913, FOR 

CURRENT WORK OF "EVANGELIZATION." 

ARRANGED BY SYNODS. 



BALTIMORE 
Ellen Matthews, late of Baltimore, 



$10 00 



CALIFORNIA. 

Martha Leeper, late of Fowler 105 00 

ILLINOIS. 

Amelia S. Perrin, late of Carrollton . . 216 15 
Emeret C. Farwell, late of Chicago 2,000 00 
M. Louise Frackelton, late of Men- 
ard County 100 00 

David Liggett, late of Camp Point. . . 29 53 

A. C. Moore, late of Granville 50 00 

Jacob H. Strathman, late of El Paso 1,500 00 
Daniel Worthley, late of Livingstone 

County 101 47 

$3,997 15 

INDIANA. 

J. H. Crouse $600 00 

H. L. VanNuys, late of Goshen 3,815 84 



$4,415 84 



IOWA. 



Marshall Hays, late of Kossuth Co. $400 00 

John P. McEwen, late of Shelby 137 50 



KANSAS. 
Cecelia Berkey, late of Beloit . 



KENTUCKY. 

Caroline H. Richardson, late of 
Louisville 

MICHIGAN. 

Mrs. A. C. Leonard, late of Ypsilanti 
Helen H. Newberry, late of Detroit 



MINNESOTA. 

Anson Blake, late of St. Paul 

Chas. E. Vanderburgh, late of Minne- 
apolis 



NEBRASKA. 
James D. Hamilton, late of Omaha . 



$537 50 
$179 00 

666 67 

95 25 

5,000 00 

$5,095 25 

$1,250 00 

2,500 00 

$3,750 00 

$25 00 



NEW JERSEY. 

Eliza J. Davidson, late of Cranbury. . 100 00 

Emma L. Disborough, late of Tren- 
ton 500 00 

Frank C. Haines, late of Newark 73 70 

Giles S. Orcutt, late a member of 

Passaic 1st Ch 1,000 00 

Nathaniel Tooker, late of East 

Orange 4,762 50 

Austin C. Trowbridge, late of East 

Orange 952 50 

Oscar Woodworth, late of Trenton 500 00 



$7,888 70 



NEW YORK. 

Rev. W. W. Atterbury, late of N. Y. 

City $27,075 00 

Sarah Wright Baker, late of Dunkirk 5,000 00 

Mary G. Barnes, late of Amagansett 237 50 

Charles B. Beck, late of N. Y. City . . 20,282 07 

Maria S. Blossom, late of Rochester 500 00 

Matilda R. L. Bradford, late of 

Seneca Co 500 00 

Jennie Bush, late of Waterford 1 ,000 00 

Sarah Corwith, late of Bridgehamp- 

ton 500 00 

D. Matilda Douw, late of Albany 6,000 00 

Mr. Dyer, late a member of Ogden 

Ch 300 00 

S. Mills Ely, late of Binghamton 8,000 00 

Nancy B. Greenough, late of Man- 
chester, N. H 200 00 

Samuel Hall, late of N. Y. City 10,000 00 

Christina B. Isham, late of N. Y. 

City 284 85 

Samuel Macauley Jackson, late of 

N. Y. City $1,000 00 

Martha L. Johnson, late of Nunda 460 00 

Mary F. Johnson, late of Benton. . . 46,731 65 

John Stewart Kennedy, late of N. 

Y. City 46,664 21 

John S. Kenyon, late of N. Y. City 631 29 

Mary McLaury, late of Stanley 236 64 

Margaret P. Myrick, late of Dobbs 

Ferry 46 01 

Rebecca C. Northway, late of Pom- 

pey 148 72 

Mrs. Laura E. Olmsted, late a mem- 
ber of Geneseo Ch 2,250 00 

Phebe R. Reilly, late of Bridgehamp- 

ton: 471 50 

Horace B. Silliman, late of Cohoes 3,422 41 

Mary J. Spence, late of Montour 

Falls 1,000 00 

Marian Summerville, late of Troy. 199 75 

Eliza T. Vanderoef, late of Mont- 
gomery 11,951 90 



$195,093 50 



1913. 



LEGACIES. 



143 



OHIO. 

D. H. Baldwin, late of Cincinnati . 
Elizabeth Boyd, late of Mechanics 

town 

Isabella Brown, late of Cincinnati . 

Jane M. Calhoun 

Mary B. Estabrook, late of Warren 
Sarah Ferson, late of Delaware Co. 

O. L. Hunter 

George Lyman, late of Cleveland 
Rev. Samuel R. McClurkin, late of 

Watertown 

Cornelia Renz, late of Westerville . . 
Henry Robertson, late of Toledo . . . 
Lyman J. Talbot 



PENNSYLVANIA. 



2 39 



500 00 


4,307 


01 


65 


00 


l 200 


00 


150 


00 


50 


00 


[ 4 


33 


550 


00 


382 


57 


2,357 


24 


100 


00 







3,668 54 



Elizabeth Anderson, late of Phila- 
delphia 59 51 

Mrs. Louisa M. Baugh, late of Phila- 
delphia 1,000 00 

Caroline Beggs, late a member of 

Hopewell Ch 100 00 

John B. Craighead $1,320 00 

Mrs. Elizabeth Wandell David, late 

of Philadelphia 1,000 00 

Eliza Thaw Edwards, late of Pitts- 
burgh 500 00 

Anna S. Eells, late of Allegheny City 4,860 48 

Caroline Hallowell, late of Philadel- 
phia 1 13 

Anna Heid, late of Port Royal 262 40 

Blanche Wilson Hill, late of Wilkins- 

burg 248 89 

Harriet J. Baird Huey, late of Phila- 
delphia 13 50 

Charles Koonce, late of Clark 104 79 

Martha E. Kortright, late of Phila- 
delphia 285,724 29 



Mary W. Laird, late of Lewisburg . . . 200 00 

William H. Lester, late of West 

Alexander 50 00 

Chas. Little, late of Philadelphia 826 25 

Anna Coleman Morrison, late of 

Pittsburgh 475 00 

John Parry, late of Stoneboro 190 00 

Henry H. Reed, late of Philadelphia 249 76 

Margaret R. Smith, late of Phila- 
delphia 31 93 

Susan Stevenson, late of Philadelphia 7 67 

Orlando L. Swoope, late of Philadel- 
phia 100 00 

William M. Taylor, late of New 

Castle 200 00 

Tillie J. Wilson, late of West Kisha- 

coquillis Ch 38 63 

Clara E. Wray, late of Edenburg 1 ,783 87 

Charles Wright, late of Canton 8 25 



$299,356 35 

WISCONSIN. 

Geo. H. Hull, late of Buffalo 501 96 

Gross Total $530,290 46 

Less Legal expenses incurred in col- 
lection of above 1,859 10 



Less amount carried to Temporary 
Reserve 



$528,431 36 
125,000 00 



Net Total $403,431 36 



144 RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS BY PRESBYTERIES. [1913. 

STATEMENT, BY PRESBYTERIES, OF RECEIPTS FOR 

EVANGELIZATION AND MISSION SCHOOL WORK 

AND PAYMENTS FOR EVANGELIZATION. 

During the Year Ended March 31st, 1913. 





RECEIPTS. 


PAYMENTS. 




For Evangel- 
ization. 


For Mission 
School Work. 


Total 


For Evangel- 
ization. 


ALABAMA 


$382 45 

1,015 53 

152 41 

486 15 


$135 14 

131 90 

11 40 

243 00 


$517 59 

1,147 43 

163 81 

729 15 


$5,020 67 




5,438 53 




3,707 57 




6,956 83 








$2,036 54 


$521 44 


$2,557 98 


$21,123 60 


ARIZONA 

1 








$1,871 40 




$33 30 
421 90 
224 10 


$2 00 

307 86 

3 50 


$35 30 
729 76 
227 60 


$93 75 




866 70 




2,077 80 




34,219 93 










2,160 00 














$679 30 


$313 36 


$992 66 


$41,289 58 


ARKANSAS 








$3,365 25 




$529 20 
600 49 
162 68 
321 08 


$178 94 

339 17 

10 98 

63 44 


$708 14 
939 66 
173 66 
384 52 


3,532 83 


Fort Smith 


1,758 96 




1,720 85 


Little Rock 


2,969 28 








$1,613 45 


$592 53 


$2,205 98 


$13,347 17 


ATLANTIC 


$7 00 

25 91 

3 00 

6 00 

13 00 




$7 00 

25 91 

5 50 

8 00 

34 45 




Fairfield 








$2 50 

2 00 

21 45 








McClelland 










$54 91 


$25 95 


$80 86 








BALTIMORE 


$1,977 11 

514 92 

I 3,606 48 


$4,739 55 
3,145 96 
7,249 15 


$6,716 66 
3,660 88 
10,855 63 


$600 00 


New Castle 


1,446 33 








2,674 00 














$6,098 51 


$15,134 66 


$21,233 17 


$4,720 33 


CALIFORNIA 








$1,156 45 


Benicia 


$1,123 95 
363 83 
269 55 

2,522 89 
776 54 
652 96 
734 51 

1,605 01 
180 35 

1,331 31 


$725 61 

15,558 89 

70 92 

2,528 69 
876 54 
722 72 

1,621 08 

1,147 10 
851 97 
680 00 


$1,849 56 
15,922 72 
340 471 
5,051 58 
1,653 08| 
1,375 68 
2,355 59 
2,752 11 
1,032 32 
2,011 31 


$4,975 68 








4,738 25 




5,226 87 




987 45 




6,280 45 
1 9,112 94 






1 8,981 75 








1,190 00 




3,749 00 



1913.1 



RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS BY PRESBYTERIES. 



145 





RECEIPTS. 


PAYMENTS. 




For Evangel- 
ization. 


For Mission 
School Work. 


Total. 


For Evangel- 
ization. 










5,994 48 










537 70 










2,060 00 














$9,560 90 


$24,783 52 


$34,344 42 


$54,991 02 


CANADIAN. 


$31 75 




$31 75 
2 85 
7 00 




Rendall 


$2 85 




White River 


7 00 












$38 75 


$2 85 


$41 60 




CATAWBA. 


$45 25 
24 50 
24 00 
32 50 


$3 00 

14 50 

42 00 

7 00 


$48 25 
39 00 
66 00 
39 50 






















$126 25 


$66 50 


$192 75 








COLORADO. 


$1,244 79 

157 97 

1,444 08 

507 60 

78 36 

1,551 63 

157 85 


$1,167 30 

214 00 

2,359 98 

197 00 


$2,412 09 

371 97 

3,804 06 

704 60 

78 36 

3,396 51 

195 10 


$3,177 74 




5,364 74 




5,087 42 




2,138 78 




2,124 96 




1,844 88 
37 25 


7,385 64 




6,448 87 




399 66 










3,731 30 














$5,142 28 


$5,820 41 


$10,962 69 


$35,859 11 


EAST TENNESSEE. 


$27 64 
9 00 
7 35 




$27 64 

10 00 

7 35 






1 00 
















$43 99 


$1 00 


$44 99 








IDAHO. 








$1,819 35 


Boise 


$852 69 
107 60 
241 18 


$370 40 
36 50 
23 00 


$1,223 09 
144 10 
264 18 


4,778 35 


Kendall 


2,391 35 


Twin Falls 


6,365 50 




1,465 00 








| 




i 


$1,201 47 


$429 90 


$1,631 37 1' 


$16,819 55 


ILLINOIS. 


$877 59 

38 76 

792 05 

34 81 
6,239 62 

18 93 
20 21 
41 18 
171 67 
25 74 
6 71 

35 00 
79 51 




$877 59 

1,293 70 

4,129 19|1 

431 24| 

11,094 04| 

753 68 

990 21 

1,218 80 

1,147 12 

1,937 74 

1,308 71 

1,371 04 

1,287 05 




Alton 


$1,254 94 
3,337 14 

396 43 
4,854 42 

734 75 

970 00 
1,177 62 

975 45 
1,912 00 
1,302 00 
1,336 04 
1,207 54 





























Ottawa 


























| $8,381 78 


$19,458 33 


$27,840 11 



















146 



RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS BY PRESBYTERIES. 



[1913. 







RECEIPTS. 


1 


PAYMENTS. 




For Evangel- 
ization. 


For Mission 
School Work. 


Total. 


For Evangel- 
ization. 


INDIANA. 


$741 00 
68 58 
45 88 
3 64 
45 30 
20 34 
35 00 
32 62 
3 00 




$741 00 

1.452 71 

1,214 40 

1,312 29 

2,627 03 

1,033 55 

393 72 

600 18 

610 68 






$1,384 13 

1,168 52 

1,308 65 

2,581 73 

1,013 21 

358 72 

567 56 

607 68 




























White Water 






2,963 35 














$995 36 


$8,990 20 


$9,985 56 


$2,963 35 


IOWA. 


$297 12 
193 00 
161 33 
169 88 
306 35 
217 04 
276 73 
381 62 
332 53 
492 91 
258 18 


$1,460 31 

12 25 

789 69 

557 35 

1,170 68 

561 55 

676 00 

1,225 39 

1,052 75 

1,670 06 

1,128 04 


$1,757 43 
205 25 

951 02 
727 23 

. 1.477 03 
778 59 

952 73 
1.607 01 

1.385 28 
2,162 97 

1.386 22 




Central West 










































$2,116 69 














$3,086 69 


$10,304 07 


$13,390 76 


$2,116 69 


KANSAS. 


$2 00 
5 00 


$490 10 

1,296 91 

732 46 

1,290 48 

368 10 

890 34 

1,570 60 

1,141 10 


$492 10 

1,301 91 

732 46 

1.311 48 

376 10 

890 34 

1,615 60 

1,146 10 














21 00 
8 00 














45 00 
5 00 




Wichita 






$1,165 00 










1.625 00 














$86 00 


$7,780 09 


$7,866 09 


$2,790 00 


KENTUCKY. 










$5,320 02 




$1,701 56 

5 00 

526 35 

1,654 23 

426 34 

2,352 63 


$692 69 


$2,394 25 

5 00 

914 65 

2,607 03 

669 59 

2,827 38 


1.790 45 








388 30 
952 80 
243 25 
474 75 


845 90 




1,230 44 




1,574 97 




3,422 50 








$6,666 11 


$2,751 79 


$9,417 90 


$14,184 28 


MICHIGAN. 
Detroit 


$5 00 
10 16 


$6,349 18 
583 50 
832 84 
485 09 
646 51 
482 00 
545 67 
371 45 
621 98 


$6,354 18 
593 66 
832 84 
503 09 
646 51 
485 05 
550 67 
371 45 
621 98 




Flint 










18 00 










3 05 
5 00 


























$41 21 


$10,918 22 


$10,959 43 









1913. 



RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS BY PRESBYTERIES. 



147 





RECEIPTS. 


1 

! PAYMENTS. 




For Evangel- 
ization. 


For Mission 
School Work. 


Total. 


For Evangel- 
ization. 


MINNESOTA. 


1 

$248 71 

2,063 39 

2,403 05 

3,201 14 

263 89 

484 89 

2,933 81 

805 47 


1 

$158 91 
1,014 82 

810 78 
4,048 62 

148 50 

347 98 
1,664 47 

572 56 


$407 62 
3,078 21 
3,213 83 
7,249 76 
412 39 
832 87 
4,598 28 
1,378 03 


$2 593 13 


Duluth 


4,453 74 




4 646 13 




2,372 80 




2,655 94 


St. Cloud 


6,651 73 


St. Paul 


2 593 59 




1,178 00 




75 00 










6,542 81 














$12,404 35 


$8,766 64 


$21,170 99 


$33,764 87 


MISSISSIPPI. 




$38 00 
56 40 
97 30 

117 80 


$38 00 
302 17 
351 75 
543 58 




Bell 


$245 77 
254 45 
425 78 


$1,139 75 




2,309 75 


Oxford 


1 512 95 








$926 00 


$309 50 


$1,235 50 


$4,962 45 


MISSOURI. 




$32 28 
990 42 
180 32 

2,453 35 
313 76 
641 09 
450 46 
985 94 

4,390 35 
260 05 
720 00 


$32 28 
1,703 47 

510 37 
4,989 90 
1,454 76 
1,295 61 
1,818 13 
2,248 19 
8,927 69 

740 00 
1,829 60 


$2 091 91 




$713 05 
330 05 

2.536 55 
1,141 00 

654 52 
1,367 67 
1,262 25 

4.537 34 
479 95 

1,109 60 


1,178 75 




3,811 66 




3,268 77 




1,101 76 




793 40 




2,086 70 




1,995 70 




3,392 75 


Salt River 






875 00 




3,500 00 














$14,131 98 


$11,418 02 


$25,550 00 


$24,096 40 


MONTANA. 
Butte 


$350 32 

217 81 

544 21 

52 55 

388 40 


$478 10 

106 16 

151 54 

68 26 

134 50 


$828 42 
323 97 
695 75 
120 81 
522 90 


$3,636 42 




4,815 50 




4,148 60 




4,576 00 




4,253 41 




400 00 














$1,553 29 


$938 56 


$2,491 85 


$21,829 93 


NEBRASKA. 








$139 47 


Box Butte 


$606 83 
1,922 67 
2,375 40 
4,389 69 
1,485 00 
3,233 04 


$113 50 
309 66 
642 00 

1,465 50 
301 10 

1,594 16 


$720 33 
2,232 33 
3,017 40 
5,855 19 
1,786 10 
4,827 20 


2,575 94 




1,168 44 




1,989 85 




562 88 




2,414 33 




3,007 36 




3,784 76 














$14,012 63 


$4,425 92 


$18,438 55 


$15,643 03 


NEW ENGLAND. 


$1,061 41 

1,683 52 

382 60 

313 75 


$748 40 
795 97 
117 00 
192 00 


$1,809 81 

2,479 49 

499 60 

505 75 


$554 15 




150 00 




486 60 




550 00 








$3,441 28 


$1,853 37 


$5,294 65 


$1,740 75 



148 



RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS BY PRESBYTERIES. 



[1913. 







RECEIPTS. 




PAYMENTS. 




For Evangel- 
ization. 


For Mission 
School Work. 


Total. 


For Evangel- 
ization. 


NEW JERSEY. 


$7,453 65 

1 00 

4,915 59 

1,320 52 

13,359 86 
8,017 08 
3,930 26 
1,278 26 
3,060 95 


$6,233 77 
50 
3,219 16 
1,938 12 
6,878 69 
5,006 92 
2,284 32 
1,018 84 
2,212 20 


$13,687 42 

1 50 

8,134 75 

3,258 64 

20,238 55 

13,024 00 

6,214 58 

2,297 10 

5,273 15 






































2,150 00 














$43,337 17 


$28,792 52 


$72,129 69 


$2,150 00 


NEW MEXICO. 






i 


$2,086 30 




$79 20 
211 06 
302 68 


$115 45 

130 23 

93 69 


$194 65 
341 29 
396 37 


1,932 50 




3,046 10 




2,387 55 




$5,851 10 








, 


9,206 05 














$592 94 


$339 37 


$932 31 


$24,509 60 


NEW YORK. 




$141 00 

4,195 65 

1,963 80 

5,114 63 

5,451 83 

1,463 25 

899 56 

523 44 

786 00 

1,050 57 

1,259 99 

1,313 04 

1,251 38 

775 69 

1,195 00 

18,124 96 

1,253 96 

1,067 61 

546 55 


$141 00 
8,161 80 
3,232 00 
13,115 01 
11,902 43 
3,708 22 
1,673 43 
1,081 15 
1,346 67 
1,976 63 
2,883 47 
3,568 00 
2,474 62 
1,270 93 
2,223 31 
48,653 68 
2,140 89 
2,419 46 
1,148 86 
152 24 
7,725 72 
2,692 21 
1,834 33 
3,799 72 
5,437 13 
5,432 89 
7,928 42 






$3,966 15 

1,268 20 

8.000 38 

6,450 60 

2,244 97 

773 87 

557 71 

560 67 

926 06 

1,623 48 

2,254 96 

1,223 24 

495 24 

1,028 31 

30,528 72 

886 93 

1,351 85 

602 31 

152 24 

5,192 87 

1,114 66 

846 82 

1,030 37 

3,463 13 

1,998 97 

4,421 04 












Buffalo 




















































North River 














2,532 85 
1,577 55 
987 51 
2,769 35 
1,974 00 
3,433 92 
3,507 38 
















Troy 




Utica 










$42,466 76 










2,934 50 














$82,963 75 


$65,160 47 


$148,124 22 


$45,401 26 


NORTH DAKOTA. 


$235 58 
739 70 
265 18 
198 19 
138 66 
299 60 

1,068 89 


$156 50 
248 86 
105 48 
5 00 
73 26 
199 88 
647 58 


$392 08 
988 56 
370 66 
203 19 
211 92 
499 48 

1,716 47 


$6,601 55 




2,174 13 




3,005 18 




5,582 68 




3,279 98 




2,850 11 




1,851 11 








$2,945 80 


$1,436 56 


$4,382 36 


$25,344 74 



1913.] 



RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS BY PRESBYTERIES. 



149 





RECEIPTS. 


PAYMENTS. 




For Evangel- 
ization. 


For Mission 
School Work. 


Total. 


For Evangel- 
ization. 


OHIO. 


$20 98 

45 84 

1,347 88 

407 92 

143 00 

575 82 

49 58 
127 14 
258 98 
104 06 

47 65 
$52 30 
286 56 
174 37 

75 19 
188 77 


$517 24 

951 00 

5.071 75 

5,410 65 

1,184 89 

3,324 47 

560 85 

1,265 25 

1,631 34 

1,408 57 

989 46 

$812 51 

1,839 08 

1,825 31 

951 53 

995 49 


$538 22 
996 84 
6,419 63 
5,818 57 
1,327 89 
3,900 29 
610 43 
1,392 39 
1,890 32 
1,512 63 
1,037 11 
S864 81 
2,125 64 
1,999 68 
1,026 72 
1,184 26 




Chillicothe 












































St. Clairsville 


















$1,880 56 













$3,906 04 


$28,739 39 


$32,645 43 1 


$1,880 56 


OKLAHOMA. 
Synod 




$54 10 
120 75 


$54 10 

380 22 

54 04 

613 93 

292 85 

264 96 

683 16 

733 93 

1,347 04 

1.005 66 






$259 47 
54 04 
438 98 
173 35 
167 66 
550 15 
466 88 
731 17 
721 05 


$3,296 45 


Choctaw 






174 95 
119 50 
97 30 
133 01 
267 05 
615 87 
284 61 


4,783 89 


El Reno 


2,643 50 


Hobart 


3,769 20 




3,544 25 




4,263 21 




6,503 61 


Tulsa 


4,106 26 




$8,538 90 














$3,562 75 


$1,867 14 


$5,429 89 


$41,449 27 


OREGON. 
Grande Ronde 


$547 19 
262 74 
152 46 
809 82 

1,018 84 


$114 30 
25 35 

1,378 47 
173 50 
498 23 


$661 49 

288 09 

1,530 93 

983 32 

1,517 07 


$4,951 00 


Pendleton 


5,761 63 


Portland 




Southern Oregon 


8,001 69 


Willamette 


6,193 63 


Work among Indians 


1,48> 50 










1,167 12 














$2,791 05 


$2,189 85 


$4,980 90 


$27,562 57 


PENNSYLVANIA. 
Beaver 


$992 47 
2,181 02 
1,499 98 
4,164 66 
2,649 67 
2,684 38 
1,564 48 

536 16 
1,133 94 
3,211 86 
2,746 48 
2,384 01 
12,044 00 
8,383 99 
7,973 15 

834 58 

156 41 
1,669 85 

147 74 


$843 20 
1,571 13 
2,257 35 
5,089 02 
4,561 49 
2,399 07 
7,842 12 
1,933 63 
1,580 49 
2,621 07 
2,986 99 
2,782 50 

10,145 34 
8,199 34 

12,439 98 

1,941 06 

2,029 30 

2,725 30 

214 75 


$1,835 67 

3,752 15l 

3,757 33| 

9,253 68l 

7,211 161 

5,083 45| 

9,406 60| 

2,469 79| 

2,714 43 1 

5,832 93 

5,733 47 

5,166 51 

22,189 34 

16,583 33 

20,413 13 

2,775 64 

2,185 71 

4,395 15 

362 49 | 




Blairsville 




Butler 




Carlisle 




Chester 




Clarion 




Erie 




Huntingdon 




Kittanning 




Lackawanna 




Lehigh 




Northumberland . . . 




Philadelphia 




Philadelphia, North 




Pittsburgh 




Redstone 




Shenango 




Washington 




Wellsboro 





150 



RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS BY PRESBYTERIES. 



[1913. 





RECEIPTS. 


PAYMENTS. 




For Evangel- 
ization. 


For Mission 
School Work. 


Total. 


For Evangel- 
ization. 




2,520 98 


2,024 63 


4,545 61 






2,200 00 












$59,479 81 


$76,187 76 


$135,667 57 


$2,200 00 


PHILIPPINES. 


$5 00 




$5 00 












$5 00 




$5 00 










SOUTH DAKOTA. 




$78 97 

938 35 

81 00 

494 25 


$78 97 
2,004 89 
222 76 
974 42 
30 00 
137 65 
854 83 


$53 44 


Aberdeen 

Black Hills 


$1,066 54 
141 76 
480 17 
30 00 
132 65 
533 83 


5,153 38 
6,049 36 




1,416 88 








5 00| 
321 00 


6,943 23 




2,257 13 




10,870 62 














$2,384 95 


$1,918 57 


$4,303 52 


$32,744 04 


TENNESSEE. 


$14 70 
537 79 
243 85 
84 29 
205 08 
280 26 
294 70 
338 66 
658 34 
253 95 
782 00 




$14 70 

1,079 69 

480 88 

109 29 

654 87 

646 57 

480 60 

476 06 

1,160 39 

474 93 

1,613 61 


$2,239 14 




$541 90 
237 03 
25 00 
449 79 
366 31 
185 90 
137 40 
502 05 
220 98 
831 61 


3,323 35 




1,043 21 




1,084 52 




3,833 20 




2,788 00 




2,021 56 




1,949 61 




2,384 06 




1.483 21 




786 65 








$3,693 62 


$3,497 97 


$7,191 59 


$22,936 51 


TEXAS. 


1 






$1,571 95 




$480 73 

731 07 

695 70 

198 75 

1,014 80 

39 25 

930 43 

495 49 

335 38 

861 80 

35 00 

1,192 85 

| 


$321 02 
392 10 
228 45 
198 30 
664 64 

57 00 
734 45 
188 38 

92 47 
493 45 


$801 75 

1,123 17 
924 15 
397 05 

1,679 44 
96 25 

1,664 88 
683 87 
427 85 

1,355 25 
35 00 

2,129 45 


6,895 90 


Amarillo 


3,362 20 
5,443 64 




2.188 30 


Dallas 


2,501 75 




2,413 90 


Fort Worth 


5,209 06 


Jefferson 

Paris 


4,665 90 

' 1,538 00 

1,202 10 




936 60 


1,366 25 
5,159 25 














$7,011 25 


$4,306 8« 


$11,318 11 


$43,518 20 


UTAH. 








$2,277 58 




$87 1C 

121 13 

94 0J 


$66 0C 

503 5C 

90 48 


$153 10 
624 63 
184 56 


4,138 75 


Salt Lake 


4,860 79 




5,605 30 




1,004 38 














$302 31 


$659 9? 


$962 29 


$17,886 80 


WASHINGTON. 


$138 6! 


$32 2i 


$170 90 


$21,498 29 



1913. 



RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS BY PRESBYTERIES. 



151 





RECEIPTS. 


PAYMENTS. 




For Evangel- 
ization. 


For Mission 
School Work. 


Total. 


For Evangel- 
ization. 




488 88 

319 20 

479 12 

1.013 72 

1,603 65 

1,621 59 

867 89 

285 94 

108 00 


137 00 

438 00 
121 50 
374 50 
644 01 
457 50 
238 60 
102 45 


625 88 

757 20 

600 62 

1.388 22 

2,247 66 

2,079 09 

1,106 49 

388 39 

108 00 


4,394 27 




4,535 04 




4,248 70 




4,655 15 


Seattle 


8,472 04 




9,335 52 


Walla Walla 


6,302 63 




3.431 01 




9,155 85 






3,470 00 










2,447 73 














$6,926 64 


$2,545 81 


$9,472 45 


$81,946 23 


WEST GERMAN. 








$1,557 37 




$631 50 

1,078 06 

939 25 




$631 50 

1,078 06 

939 25 


1,030 60 






3,909 60 






876 32 










$2,648 81 




$2,648 81 


$7,373 89 








WEST VIRGINIA. 


$74 00 
8 60 
2 00 


$901 34 
1,104 76 
1,441 41 


$975 34 
1,113 36 
1,443 41 


















$84 60 


$3,447 51 


$3,532 11 








WISCONSIN. 




$1,748 18 

517 77 

105 75 

599 93 

1,230 26 

1,055 91 


$1,748 18 

533 97 

109 75 

599 93 

1,681 46 

1,081 31 






$16 20 
4 00 














451 20 
25 40 










$3,660 00 














$496 80 


$5,257 80 


$5,754 60 


$3,660 00 



152 



RECEIPTS, BY SYNODS, FOR "EVANGELIZATION. 



[1913. 



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154 



TOTAL RECEIPTS, BY SYNODS. 



[1913. 



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1913. 



TOTAL PAYMENTS, BY SYNODS. 



157 



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158 



SELF-SUPPORTING SYNODS 



[1913. 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

FOR LOCAL HOME MISSION WORK WITHIN THE BOUNDS OF THE 
SELF-SUPPORTING SYNODS. 

Note — These figures furnished by the respective Synods, represent the amounts re- 
ceived and expended by their own Treasurers, and cover the period April 1, 
1912, to March 31, 1913, unless otherwise stated. The receipts are also in- 
cluded in the "Combined Statement" immediately following this table. 



iRec'd 
* 
$4,519.47 
* 

CALIFORNIA. 

Los Angeles I $13,619.01 



ILLINOIS. 

Alton 

Bloomington 

Cairo 

Chicago 

Ewing 

Freeport 

Mattoon 

Ottawa 

Peoria 

Rock River 

Rushville 

Springfield 

Expense of Adm'n. . . 



149.86 
929.38 
141.69 
736.03 
,394.22 
,861.42 
,095.88 
201.44 
,471.89 
,143.22 
128.46 
767.07 



Exp'd. 

* 

$4,321.18 

* 

$14,001.01 



$1,503.07 
2,142.33 
1,705.14 

30,512.31 
689.59 
1,467.05 
1,125.30 
927.41 
1,063.33 
2,906.31 
1,956.85 
2,306.63 



$56,020.56 $48,305.32 



INDIANA. 

Crawfordsville $3,303.14 

Fort Wayne I 2,770.81 

2,405.26 
3,359.29 
2,119.66 
1,390.35 
1803.83 
1,443.86 
3,279.93 



Indiana . 

Indianapolis 

Logansport 

Muncie 

New Albany 

White Water 

Yandes Funds 

Expense of Adm'n. . 
Synod's Committee . 



21.876.13 



IOWA. 

Cedar Rapids. . . 

Corning 

Council Bluffs . . . 

Des Moines 

Dubuque 

Ft. Dodge 

Iowa 

Iowa City 

Sioux City 

Waterloo 



KANSAS. 

Emporia.- 

Highland 

Larned 

Neosho 

Osborne 

Solomon 

Topeka 

Wichita 

Synodical 

Miscellaneous 

Expense of Adm'n 



690.49 
369.69 
282.94 
,856.88 
250.25 
,801.78 
,205.11 
,321.93 
403.40 
,611.23 



$2,062.90 
1,762.33 
2,601.49 
3,424.12 
1,971.96 

905.50 
1,851.83 

680.22 

746.24 
4,854.83 



20.861.42 



1889.11 



967.50 
561.66 



17,793.70 



$1,512.89 
1,321.80 
1,068.36 
2,175.35 
986.16 
2,061.01 
4,220.23 
2,577.19 



98.35 



$1,339.99 
825.03 
1,738.60 
1,512.50 
1,476.70 
854.67 
2,775.00 
1,158.90 
5,177.52 



582.94 



16,021.34 I 17,441.85 



MICHIGAN. 

Detroit 

Flint 

Grand Rapids 

Kalamazoo 

Lake Superior . « 

Lansing 

Monroe 

Petoskey 

Saginaw 

Individuals and Mel. . 

Synodical 

Expense of Adm'n 



NEW JERSEY. 

Oct. 1,1911, to Oct. 1,1912... 

Elizabeth 

Jersey City 

Monmouth 

Morris and Orange 

Newark 

New Brunswick 

Newton 

West Jersey 

Miscellaneous 

Administration I. . 



NEW YORK 

Albany 

Binghamton 

Brooklyn 

Buffalo 

Cayuga 

Champlain 

Chemung 

Columbia 

Genesee 

Geneva 

Hudson 

Long Island 

Lyons 

Nassau 

New York 

Niagara 

North River 

Otsego 

Rochester 

St. Lawrence 

Steuben 

Syracuse 

Troy 

Utica 

Westchester 

Interest and Mel 

Salaries 

Expense of Adm'n. . 



Rec'd. 

$3,811.55 

1,299.86 

971.13 

834.69 

1,027.79 

1,154.02 

615.95 

668.95 

1,231.59 

80.02 



Exp'd. 



11,695.55 



4,785.69 
3,221.27 
2,948.56 
3,877.33 
10,452.32 
3,200.00 
1,102.75 
2,551.39 
582.08 



32,721.39 



333,40 
425.01 
450.00 

2,645.80 
250.00 
547.52 
774.20 

1,941.65 



6,314.48 
715.96 



14,398.02 



$2,420.79 
5,214.65 
3,935.58 
2,212.00 

13,124.62 
2,025.20 
1,585.89 
4,068.93 
1,106.25 
304.96 



35,998.87 



2,836.89 

1,420.78 

3,058.54 

6,315.00 

1,129.08 

405.85 

350.32 

272.92 

395.13 

645.98 

495.14 

557.23 

499.16 

418.65 

2,193.08 

442.08 

586.52 

389.60 

4,170.36 

1,414.86 

713.40 

2,287.53 

1837.98 

1,519.05 

2,056.76 

1,394.55 



37,806.44 



1,655.51 
1,665.42 
2,698.00 
6,200.00 
896.35 
* 

4 00.00 

337.50 

233.33 

475.00 

450.00 

450.00 

583.33 

500.00 

799.92 

858.75 

343.75 

587.48 

4,128.36 

1,442.24 

279.17 

1,753.00 

1,679.00 

1,074.00 

1,721.05 

' 4*654.31 

805.43 



36,670.90 



"Figures asked for but not furnished. 



1913. 



SELF-SUPPORTING SYNODS. 



159 



Athens 

Chillicothe 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Dayton 

Huron 

Lima 

Mahoning 

Marion 

Maumee 

Portsmouth . . . 
St. Clairsville . 
Steubenville . . 

Wooster 

Zanesville 



Portland . 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

Beaver 

Blairsville 

Butler 

Carlisle 

Chester 

Clarion 

Erie.. 

Huntingdon 

Kittanning 

Lackawanna 

Lehigh 



Rec'd. 

634.41 
1,116.04 
3,833.15 
15,168.60 
5,857.71 
3,240.59 
1.015.00 
1,443.60 
3,275.00 
3,274.33 
2.092.89 
1,401.92 
2,808.35 
2,580.62 
3,243.60 
1,344.20 



$7,251.77 



$1,678.48 
7,937.66 
3,010.00 
4,805.98 
5,346.06 
1,527.76 
4,997.72 
4,724.93 
2,559.40 

18,282.00 
5,769.30 



Exp'd. 

650.00 
1,026.48 
3,742.68 
14,263.05 
2,031.45 
2,668.67 

835.00 
1,442.79 
2,987.00 
2,808.35 
1,223.93 
1,257.14 
3,274.33 
2,494.66 
1,057.13 
1,269.17 



52,330.01 39,757.50 



$6,014.12 



$2,569.73 
7,643.60 
3,025.00 
3,780.42 
5,520.44 
1,817.87 
5,433.30 
4,724.93 
2,523.25 

22,193.99 
6,442.77 



Northumberland . . . 

Philadelphia 

Philadelphia North . 

Pittsburgh 

Redstone 

Shenango 

Washington 

Wellsboro 

Westminster 

Miscellaneous 

Expense of Adm'n. . 



Rec'd. 

2,188.78 

*53,452.15 

6,476.01 

67,027.11 

4,574.56 

2,082.54 

2,924.64 

327.99 

698.61 



Exp'd. 
3,427.75 

47,068.38 
6,287.83 

62,422.77 

5,944.34 

2,082.54 

2,524.64 

495.00 

150.00 



3,690.77 



1200,411.88 199.779.32 



♦Includes $9,800.00 expended] 

in City Missions under| 

Presbyterian Union .... 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

Grafton 

Parkersburg 

Wheeling 

Miscellaneous 



WISCONSIN. 

Chippewa 

LaCrosse 

Madison 

Milwaukee 

Winnebago 

Miscellaneous 



1,487.70 
990.76 

3,653.01 
103.33 



$6,234.80 



1,135.00 

2,114.19 

1,880.00 

124.80 



$5,253.99 



240.36 
761.86 
506.04 
,502.87 
636.79 
143.50 



$4,583.69 

654.16 

581.66 

2,321.50 

3,904.39 

5,928.91 



15,791.42 1 17,974.31 



*Figures asked for but not furnished. 



RECAPITULATION. 



Synod of Baltimore (New Castle Pby. only) . 

" California (Los Angeles Pby. only) . 

" Illinois 

" Indiana 

" Iowa 

" Kansas , 

" Michigan , 

" New Jersey 

" New York 

Ohio 

" Oregon (Portland Presbytery only) . 

" Pennsylvania 

" West Virginia 

" Wisconsin 



*See preceding page. 



Receipts 
*$4,519.47 
13,619.01 
56,020.56 
21,876.13 
17,793.70 
16,021.34 
11,695.55 
32,721.39 
37,806.44 
52,330.01 

7,251.77 
200,411.88 

6,234.80 
15,791.42 

$494,093.47 



Expenditures 
$4,321.18 
14,001.01 
48,305.32 
20,861.42 
* 

17,441.85 
14,398.02 
35,998.87 
36,670.90 
39.757.50 

6,014.12 
199,779.32 

5,253.99 
17,974.31 

$460,777.81 



160 



COMBINED STATEMENT. 



[1913. 

A COMBINED 



SHOWING THE RECEIPTS OF THE BOARD OF HOME 

AND OF 
SELF-SUPPORTING SYNODS FOR 



SYNODS. 


1901-02 


1902-03 


1903-04 


1904-05 


ALABAMA 






1 


ARIZONA 






1 


ARKANSAS 






i ....."-: 


ATLANTIC 

♦BALTIMORE 

CALIFORNIA 


$643 86 
23,015 07 
14,550 04 


$484 94 
27,014 75 
15,945 80 


$582 96 
25,137 88 
15,164 91 


$749 24 
23,647 57 
16,769 47 


CANADIAN 


CATAWBA 


83 90 
5,525 21 


90 98 
5,721 58 


129 92 
5,969 14 


169 58 


COLORADO 


4,998 97 


EAST TENNESSEE 




IDAHO 










♦ILLINIOS 


52,971 52 
19,822 07 
15,561 68 
7,225 94 
6,149 91 
8,022 66 
8,331 94 


54,319 70 
30,223 49 
20,140 95 
7,543 96 
6.042 97 
16,824 77 
10,052 79 


53,854 64 
39,095 64 
23,108 51 
6,707 84 
5,893 14 
20,023 71 
10,477 77 


62,942 39 


♦INDIANA 


27,399 88 


*IOWA 


23,649 34 


♦KANSAS 


9,279 18 


KENTUCKY 


6,035 45 


♦MICHIGAN 


19,223 15 


MINNESOTA 


12,09S 05 


MISSISSIPPI 




MISSOURI 


11,012 15 
1,211 82 
5,374 22 


12,847 30 
1,063 81 
5,356 82 


"11,628 20 
1,141 44 
5,399 75 


12,145 29 


MONTANA 

NEBRASKA 


1,047 91 
6,091 18 


NEW ENGLAND 




♦NEW JERSEY 


71,817 90 

1,026 35 

154,723 SI 

1,017 07 

52,633 28 

1,469 78 

4,883 08 

150,998 52 


78,227 19 
1,381 36 

161,825 34 

1,371 13 

52,706 13 

2,071 84 

6,215 86 

156,917 85 


... 

75,757 59 

1,522 69 

164,698 20 

1,456 44 

53,731 13 

1,870 47 

6,181 78 

151,859 97 


79,377 97 


NEW MEXICO 

♦NEW YORK 


1,338 99 
171,062 45 


NORTH DAKOTA 


1,277 92 


♦OHIO 


52,322 58 


OKLAHOMA 


2,180 90 


OREGON 

♦PENNSYLVANIA 

PHILIPPINES 


5,817 98 
182,723 99 


SOUTH DAKOTA 


2,008 11 
2,178 10 
1,306 74 
874 89 
2,668 71 
| 


2,066 53 
2,224 86 
1,217 38 
880 65 
3,180 75 


2,046 26 
2,254 79 
1,231 52 
904 63 
3,958 22 


2,121 65 


TENNESSEE 


3,239 92 


TEXAS 

UTAH 


1,201 36 
1,507 19 


WASHINGTON 


3,787 13 


WEST GERMAN 




♦WEST VIRGINIA 






3,715 93 


♦WISCONSIN 


5,038 90 


8,523 12 


11,894 10 


12,907 49 








$623,147 23 

133,557 96 

72,041 41 

103,432 91 


$692,484 60 

120,223 66 

83,181 84 

104,643 30 


$703,683 24 
164,158 14 
67,218 27 
96,564 54 


$750,830 10 
168,270 25 




66,413 46 


Woman's Board, viz.r Individuals, Legacies, 


109,823 30 




$941,179 51 1 


$1,000,533 40 


$1,031,624 19 


$1,095,337 11 



NOTE. — The Synod totals show the aggregate amount contributed by Churches, Sabbath-Schools, 
Women's Societies and Young People's Societies only 
♦Self-supporting Synods caring for Home Mission work within their own bounds. 



1913.] 

STATEMENT 



COMBINED STATEMENT. 



161 



MISSIONS FOR GENERAL WORK UNDER ITS CARE 

THE 

THEIR LOCAL HOME MISSION WORK. 



1905-06 



$514 14 
27,871 47 
19,603 12 



153 19 
6,013 69 



62,934 67 
30,307 75 
25,263 44 
11,082 22 
6,199 21 
23,686 57 
12,869 28 



1906-07 



S696 44 
24,250 68 
19,593 44 



112 24 
6,969 00 



62,952 67 
25,572 70 
26,136 80 
10,740 06 
6,950 73 
26,504 55 
14,823 15 



13,212 36 
1,375 891 
6,808 101 



1907-08 



$1,717 84 



1908-09 



1909-10 



1910-11 



$2,028 531 $2,944 71 1 $2,204 47 



1,347 04 

74 23 

24,929 05 

25,320 47 

28 04 

135 85 

8,769 85 

39 50 



13,929 23 
1,398 35 1 
7,115 81 



80,912 17 

1,610 08 

177,571 00 

1,724 11 

58,566 95 

2,873 69 

4,825 06 

205,803 81 



2,757 17 
2,938 60 
1,438 14 
1,477 13 
3,941 03 



82,565 24 

1,412 88 

173,440 83 

1,981 05 

64,180 03 

3,132 27 

5,867 15 

234,810 00 



68,675 8. 
23,267 68 
28,526 10 
14,112 16 

8,8S7 87 

22,366 56 

19,317 69 

670 33 

22,824 47 

1,640 47 
10,633 88 



1,560 66 

72 35 

24,344 73 

22,568 32 

24 00 

171 64 

9,632 88 

22 50 



75,814 41 
26,309 02 
29,111 85 
18,242 78 

7,815 95 
25,892 99 
22,015 77 

1,339 34 
26,580 27 

2,046 22 
12,792 14 



2,526 04 
3,091 29 
1,388 34 
1,526 63 

4,678 85 



215,074 6S 

89,170 21 

120,433 86 



6,0S6 28 
14,945 38 



$849,378 11 
175,001 25 
111,927 43( 
108,263 73| 



82,115 24 

2,219 16 

176,374 74 

4,169 72 

57,888 38 

3,706 63 

7,278 60 

243,641 82 



3,732 59 
6,199 62 
7,844 15 
1,478 64 
7,000 09 



89,725 32 

2,078 13 

176,641 02 

4,473 45 

78,813 57 

5,429 85 

4,411 58 

280,778 58 

18 63 

4,542 34 

7,559 82 

11,821 48 

1,744 94 

6,996 31 1 



1,792 99 

91 75 

26,105 10 

38,757 27 

23 00 

181 85 

12,271 49 

27 00 

1,060 80 
99,845 79 
25,631 78 
29,988 19 
19,133 84 

9,221 00 
28,297 36 
20,962 96 

1,352 32 
24,318 24 

2,131 31 
14,945 43 



96,615 15 

2,406 07 

183,786 36 

4,262 35 

52,780 09 

6,987 75 

19,274 04 

272,479 98 

15 20 

4,867 15 

6,828 96 

11,818 77 

871 76 

15,825 96 



1,627 09 

107 50 

39,376 52 

39,416 89 

21 00 

183 33 

11,732 32 

56 35 

1,316 86 
80,888 06 
29,299 37 
31,395 29 
23,370 87 

8,940 62 
23,817 65 
20.59S 64 

1,440 31 
26,874 88 

2,489 65 
18,079 33 



5,664 23 
19,889 75 



$912,472 39 
141,652 48 
101,424 11 
115,110 58] 



5,266 65 
20,527 45 



$1,009,215 47 

230,373 55 

93,403 79 

109,262 



7,731 82! 
18.09S 82| 



98,910 16 

2,464 55 

178,158 20 

4,156 52 

78,117 39 

5,707 37 

10,812 29 

313,579 74 



5,059 38 
6,655 61 
11,546 57 
854 53 
8,947 80|' 



1911-12 



$2,670 38 



2,120 64 

70 90 

ff-36,099 64 

42,251 24 

22 65 

165 05 

11,233 44 

39 50 

1,436 06 

93.951 09 

32,973 95 

32,109 06 

25,774 73 

8,193 76 

24,825 74 

19,770 751 

1,537 62| 

26,684 841 

2,805 06 

19,364 28 



1912-13 



103,887 03 

2,186 77 

190,615 33 

3,778 89 

**66,546 26 

5,149 94 

12,099 661 

318,672 44 



4,093 95 
6,860 35 
9,823 35 
865 18| 
8,037 51 



8,462 58 
22,222 401 



1,063,707 41 

231,335 73 

76,532 50 

130,792 10| 



8,267 20 
26,520 00 



Sl,173,050 101 $1,244,570 52 



$1,118,892 09 

312,463 01 

88,992 071 

112,587 85 | 



$1,152,314 24 



$2,557 98 

992 66 

2,205 98 

80 86 

f25,752 64 

47,963 43 

41 60 

192 75 

10,962 69 

44 99 

1,631 37 

83.860 67 

31.861 69 
31,184 46 
23,887 43 

9,417 90 

22,654 93 

21,170 99 

1,235 50 

25,550 00 

2,491 85 

18,438 55 

5,294 65 

104,851 08 

932 31 

185,930 66 

4.382 36 

84,975 44 

5,429 89 

12,232 67 

336,079 45 

5 00 

4,303 52 

7,191 59 

11,318 11 

962 29 

9,472 45 

2,648 81 

9,766 91 

21,546 02 



1,171,504 18 



464,066 72 403,431 36 

203,76158| 226,877 03 

141,496 23 1 112,173 96 



1,270,659 56 I $1,442,255 70] $1,502,367 74] $1,632,935 021 $1,961,638 77] $1,913,986 53 



JExclusiye of Baltimore and Washington City Presbyteries,— no report furnished. 
**£ XC i - ve °! Washington City Presbytery,— no report furnished. 
Exclusive of Cleveland and Wooster Presbyteries,— no report furnished. 



162 FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S BOARD. [1913. 

THE THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT OF 
THE WOMAN'S BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 

As the busy months of another fiscal year have been added 
to the past records of the Woman's Board of Home Missions 
they have carried with them untold stories of love for the 
"other sheep" in lonely neglected places of our homeland, and 
of self sacrifice in bringing to the Master offerings of "gold, 
frankincense and myrrh," in order that His Kingdom may be 
established on this earth. The loyalty of "the women who 
publish the tidings" to the great work committed to their care, 
which loyalty continues to manifest itself not only in "tithes 
and offerings," but in extra "love gifts," is the foundation 
upon which the work of the Womans Board rests, and because 
of this foundation the service of another year has been suc- 
cessfully brought to a close. While it is with regret that we 
must report a failure to meet the entire expenditures for the 
fiscal year, we do not face the outcome with discouragement. 
The exceedingly large budget and the deficit of 1911-1912 prov- 
ed to be more than could be financed in one year, but notwith- 
standing the situation we are ready to "press forward toward 
the mark" with renewed endeavor. 

The following statement presents the financial report of the 
treasurer for the year ended March 31st, 1913: 

RECEIPTS. 

Women's Missionary Societies $277,338 89 

Y. L. Societies and Bands 29,435 88 

Y. P. Societies and C.E'S 19,646 18 

Sabbath Schools 32,856 99 

Churches 2,676 45 

Individuals and Misc 25,614 89 

$387,569 28 

Legacies 10,307 88 

Interest on Permanent Funds 6,788 87 

$404,666 03 

Tuition and receipts from the field 63,780 33 

Rents and sales 5,681 99 



$474,128 35 
Less Y. P. and S. S. transfers to the Board of Home Missions 13,824 15 



Total income for the current work of the Woman's Board for 

the year ended March 31st, 1913 $460,304 20 

In addition to the foregoing receipts for current work, the 
following amounts were received in the treasury of the Woman's 
Board : 

Emergency Fund $2,419 88 

Liturature Sales 8,440 12 

Home Mission Monthly Subscriptions 17,851 40 

Receipts for Freedmen's Work 85,236 09 

Receipts from organizations for deficit of 1911-12 28,019 80 



1913.] FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S BOARD. 163 

These amounts were entered on the records of the Woman's 
Board and retained, transferred or deposited according to the 
Fund. Although these funds have no direct bearing upon the 
receipts for regular current work under the care of the Woman's 
Board, the same amount of book-keeping is required to handle 
them as the amounts received for the budget of the Woman's 
Board. 

DISBURSEMENTS. 
Mission School Work — 

Alaskans $30,185 50 

Indians 57,462 31 

Mexicans 55,006 69 

Mormons 48,059 65 

Mountaineers 140,288 10 

Porto Ricans 44,524 66 

Cubans 9,822, 48 

Immigrant Populations 23,013 77 

General Building Fund 13,165 40 

Insurance on mission property. . . 6,173 04 

$427,701 60 

Field Work and Traveling: Organ- 
izers of Women's Societies and 

speakers 6,710 11 

Collections refunded 73 75 

$434,485 46 

School Department: Salaries officers and clerks, 

printing, postage, and office expenses 8,571 72 

Interest on borrowed money 5,421 83 

Exchange on checks 172 67 

Legal expenses 569 10 

Salaries Officers 5,900 00 

Salaries Clerks. . 10,604 02 

Printing and stationery 1,806 12 

Postage 1,814 79 

Office expenses 2,827 18 

Young People's Department 2,147 28 

Publication of Literature 9,631 10 

Over Sea and Land . 303 00 

Expenses Home Mission Week 550 00 

$484,804 27 

Total income for current work 460,304 20 



Deficit for current year $24,500 07 

The following analysis of the total income for current work 
will show the designation of contributions as received by the 
treasurer : 

SPECIAL CONTRIBUTIONS 1912-13. 

General Fund $85,631 97 

Salaries 110,477 80 

Scholarships 71,400 69 

Current Expenses 62,909 37 

Summer Offering (Medical Work) 4,063 90 

Tuition and Receipts from Field 63,780 33 

Rents and Sales 1,501 49 



164 FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S BOARD. [1913. 

Work among Immigrants 22,356 38 

Building Funds 52,006 42 

Total $474,128 35 

Less Y. P. and C. E. Transfer $5,902 77 

Less S.S. Transfer 7,921 38 

$13,824 15 

Work among Immigrants returned 12,874 13 

Specials remitted 2,028 17 

Building Funds deposited 52,006 42 

80,732 87 



Available for Current Work under Budget $393,395 48 

New buildings, receipts for "Work among Immigrants" re- 
turned in bulk, and special contributions transmitted direct 
to the field, are never included in the budget, consequently the 
sum of $393,395.48 only was available to meet the amount of 
the budget, hence the deficit of $24,500.07 must be reported. 

'DEFICIT FOR 1911-1912. 

The report of the treasurer for the year ended March 31st, 

1912, showed liabilities to the extent of $56,805.94. During 
the fiscal year just ended this amount was disposed of as follows: 

From Honorary Memberships $ 8,500 00 

From Societies and Misc. Gifts 19,519 80 

From Transferred Funds 14,320 14 

From Board of Home Missions account 

of balance on Sitka Buildings 14,466 00 

Total $56,805 94 

The Woman's Board acknowledges with thanks the gift of 
$14,466.00 from the Board of Home Missions representing the 
balance due on the Sheldon Jackson School Buildings, Sitka, 
Alaska. This gift was an encouragement in the effort to secure 
the full amount of the deficit above referred to. 

The amount contributed by women's organizations for the 
1911-1912 deficit amounted to $20,095.64. This sum added 
to the total of $277,338.89 from women's societies for this year 
gives a grand total of $297,434.53, representing an actual in- 
crease over last year's contributions of $15,808.29. 

EMERGENCY FUND. 

The Emergency Fund continues to be a source of assistance 
to sick and disabled workers, a number being granted leave of 
absence during the past year for various periods of time. The 
total amount on hand to the credit of this Fund March 31st, 

1913, was $5,708.73. 



1913.] FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S BOARD. 165 

SALES OF LITERATURE. 

Sales of Literature amounting to $8,440.12 were applied 
toward the cost of the printing and distribution of books and leaf- 
lets for information concerning the work of the Board. This 
shows an increase of $2,238.80 over last year, due largely to 
Home Mission Week; the increase in the cost of this Depart- 
ment, — said cost amounting to $18,071.22, — likewise being due 
to the Week mentioned. 

PERMANENT FUND. 

The Permanent Fund was increased by the amount of $6,- 
404.12,— making a total of $174,135.51. The sum of $6,404.12 
represents the following legacies and gifts: — - 

Legacy — Mrs. Mary Gow — for Dorland In- 
stitute $404 12 

Legacy— Phoebe P. Potter— for General Work 500 00 

Legacy — Catherine Roseboom — for General Work 3,000 00 

"Ada Lester Jones" Scholarship Fund — for Dor- 
land Institute 2,500 00 



$6,404 12 

The Permanent Fund represents gifts or legacies, the prin- 
cipal of which is to be kept invested, and only the interest 
thereon used for current work. 

ANNUITY GIFTS. 

This year one Annuity Gift of $1,000 was received. This 
gift was not available for current work as the principal was at 
once invested in order to meet the interest to be paid to the 
donor during her life time. 

Annuity gifts are kept invested until all obligations in con- 
nection therewith have been met, when the principal is available 
for such use as may be determined by the Woman's Board. 

FREEDMEN. 

The amount of $85,236.09 transferred to the Freedmen's 
Board in Pittsburgh shows an increase of $1,672.10 for the year. 

FIELD WORK AND TRAVELING. 

The amount expended for Field Work and Traveling this 
year shows a total of $7,758.51. This sum was reduced by 
$1,048.40 received from organizations for the expenses of speak- 
ers provided for meetings. As receipts for the purpose named 
are used to replenish the Field Work and Traveling Expense 
Fund, no credit for the same is given in contributions for regular 
current work. The salaries and expenses of Field Secretaries 
are paid from this Fund. 



166 FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S BOARD. [1913. 

MONTHLY RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS FOR CURRENT WORK. 

Receipts Payments 

April $8,373 19 $29,288 10 

May 12,839 33 41,787 02 

June 39,16103 38,827 44 

July 27,703 73 41,218 11 

August 12,575 96 36,807 99 

September 31,709 60 43,704 15 

October 34,163 76 40,020 09 

November 25,851 64 34,276 20 

December 54,242 03 46,454 32 

January 42,103 56 34,519 94 

February 30,946 50 32,783 45 

March 154,458 02 65,116 46 

$474,128 35 $484,804 27 

A careful study of this statement will help to explain the 
item of "Interest" under Disbursements. 

B UILDINGS 

The Building projects before the Woman's Board for the 
year have been the completion of the Kate Plumer Bryan 
Memorial School, at Guines, Cuba, at a cost of $20,510.33 and 
the Marina, Porto Rico, mission building at a cost of $2,430. 

The records show a total outlay of $263,999.23 for the erec- 
tion of new buildings during the past three years. 

The call for funds for the erection of a girls' dormitory in 
connection with Wasatch Academy, Mt. Pleasant, Utah, to be 
known as "Finks Memorial Hall" in memory of Mrs. Delos E. 
Finks, for twenty-five years the beloved editor of the "Home 
Mission Monthly," resulted in the sum of $25,470.77,— $4,000 
of the amount being the gift of the "Home Mission Monthly" 
for the purpose named. The total amount is now deposited 
in the Trust Company awaiting the erection of the dormitory 
during the coming year. 

The following items outside of the budget were also provided 
during the year: 

$2,000 00 — Heating plant, Bell Institute, Walnut, N. C. 
2,900 90 — Repairs and equipment Wasatch Academy, Mt. Pleasant, 

Utah. 
1,042 33 — Equipment Kate Plumer Bryan Memorial School, Guines, 

Cuba. 
4,000 00 — Repairs and equipment and purchase of lot, Allison School, 
Santa Fe, N. M. 



$9,943 23 Total 
HONORARY MEMBERS 

It has been an encouragement to receive contributions fo r 



[1913. FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S BOARD. 167 

eighty-five Honorary Memberships during the year from the 
following Synodical Societies: 

Pennsylvania 23 

New York 19 

New Jersey 12 

Baltimore 7 

Ohio 5 

Minnesota 4 

Indiana 3 

Nebraska 3 

Illinois 2 

Michigan 2 

Kansas 2 

New England 1 

Oklahoma 1 

South Dakota 1 

85 

The sum received was applied toward the deficit for 1911- 
1912. Hereafter all sums for Honorary Memberships will be 
applied forward the General Fund according to rule. The 
SI 00 required to constitute such a membership should be over 
and above regular contributions and paid in to the treasury of 
the Woman's Board at one time. 

LIFE MEMBERS 

The year has increased the enrollment of Life Members by 
110 names. Pennsylvania leads with 21 and Illinois follows 
with 15. This means of honoring faithful workers continues to 
be popularwith societies and is a great help to the General Fund. 

POLICY FOR WORK AMONG IMMIGRANT POPULA- 
TIONS. 

The change in the policy for work among immigrants calls 
for all funds for this work other than national immigrant work, 
to be received, entered for credit, and then returned in bulk to ap- 
pointed authorities for disbursements. Workers will no longer 
be commissioned by the Woman's Board, but their names will 
be listed in the School Directory if so desired. At the present 
time the work at Ellis Island, New York, is the only work in- 
cluded in the budget for 1913-1914, and for which national 
contributions may be received. As soon as funds will permit 
additional national work for immigrants will be assumed. 

PRESBYTERIAL TREASURER'S 

The treasury work of the year has been lightened to a large 
degree by the cordial co-operation of the splendid body of 



168 FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S BOARD. [1913. 

women holding offices of presbyterial treasurers. Their clear, 
business-like assistance in transmitting funds, and their loyalty 
to the Woman's Board and the Treasurer of the Woman's Board 
expressed in their sympathy and willingness to carry out new 
methods of work, have made associations in the work of the 
treasury most pleasant and profitable during the year. 

CALL FOR THE NEW YEAR 

"When He saw the multitudes, He was moved with com- 
passion on them, because they fainted and were scattered abroad 
as sheep having no shepherd. 

Then saith He unto His disciples, The harvest truly is plente- 
ous, but the laborers are few, 

Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest that He will send 
forth laborers into His harvest." 

The call comes for new work among Mexicans in Texas who 
are coming into that state in increasing numbers, and for the 
opening up of new fields in Cuba. Loyalty to the established 
work must still be our plea, but these new fields "white into 
the harvest" must also be taken for the Master. "Lovest 
thou Me? Yea, Lord, Thou knowest that" we love Thee. 
Feed my lambs." 

Respectfully submitted, 
Miss Dora M. Fish, 

Treasurer. 



1913.] FORMS OF BEQUEST. 169 



For the convenience of those intending to make gifts of 
money or propery to the Board, by will, the following forms 
are given: 

BEQUESTS. 

The Board is incorporated by an Act of the Legislature of the State 
of New York. The corporate name to be used is the "Board of Home 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America." 

FORM OF BEQUESTS. 

I give, devise and bequeath unto the "Board of Home Missions of 
the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, " incorpor- 
ated April 19, 1872, by Act of the Legislature of the State of New York 
the sum of Dollars, to be expended for the appro- 
priate objects of said corporation. 

FORM OF RESIDUARY CLAUSE. 

All the rest, residue and remainder of my real and personal estate I 
devise and bequeath unto the "Board of Home Missions of the Pres- 
byterian Church in the United States of America," incorporated April 
19, 1872, by Act of the Legislature of the State of New York. 

FORM OF DEVISE. 

(Real Estate.) 

I give and devise unto the "Board of Home Missions of the Pres- 
byterian Church in the United States of America, " incorporated April 
19, 1872, by Act of the Legislature of the State of New York, all that 
certain (here insert description if convenient) with the appurtenances 
in fee simple, for the use, benefit and behoof of said Board forever. 

note — If it be desired to bequeath a sum "to be added to the Gen- 
eral Permanent Fund of the Board, the income only to be used for the 
appropriate objects of said corporation, " or if it be desired to designate 

a sum "to be separately invested and to be known as the 

Fund, the income only to be used, " etc., it can be so stated. 

TO THE WOMAN'S BOARD. 

FORM OF BEQUEST. 

I give, devise, and bequeath unto the "Board of Home Missions of 
the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, " incorporated 
April 19, 1872, by Act of the Legislature of the State of New York, the 

sum of dollars, the same to be applied to the work 

of the Woman's Board." 



170 



MISSIONARIES. 

MISSIONARIES 

DURING YEAR 1912-1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



o a. 



% rt 



WT3 
l-J « 

•si 



§* 
s 



Additions to 
Churches. 



Abbott, James W Willow Okla 

Acosta, Primitivo Mayaguez (Helper) ; Anasco (Helper) ; Lajas 

Palmarejo and Stations P. R. 

Adair, Robert F [Christiana, Lascassas and Auburn. . . .Tenn 

Adams, A. Jack MoroandMonkland; Eugene-Fairmount . Ore 

Adams, Crafton Craig Minneapolis — Vanderburgh Memorial Minn 

♦Adams, Frank H |Coquille, First Ore 



Ahrens, Edward A 
Albert, J. H . . . . 
Albert, Michael. 
Albertson, G. V. 



Alexander, John H . . . . 
Alexander, John M . . . . 
Alexander, John McK . 
♦Alexander, Robert . . . 
Alexander, W. A., D.D. 
Alexandrakis, Miss P . . 
Alford, Charles M., D.D. 



Rushmore Minn. 

Punta Gorda, First Fla 

Fish Lake, First and Knox, First N. D. 

Candler, First Weirsdale, First, and Station 

Fla 

Acme and Deming Wash 

Irondale Argo, Liberty and Branchville . . Ala. 

Centennial Tenn 

Almont — Bethany and Stations N. D. 

Brooklyn — Siloam N. Y 

New York City— Labor Temple (Visitor) N. Y 
Glenwood, First and Titusville Fla. 



Allen, Columbus J JSpringfield Avenue and Belleview Mo 

Allen, David D 



Allen, Louis C. 



Alyea, Abram 

Anderson, Edwin L 

Anderson, Joseph M., D.D. 
Anderson, John T 



Anderson, Louis M., Ph.D. 

♦Anderson, Matthew, D.D.. 

♦Anderson, Wallace J 

Anderson, William, Jr 

Andrews, C. H 



Andrews, Harold Edward 
Andre, Joseph Newton. . . 

Angus, Harry B , 

Anthony, Charles W 

Archilla, Alfredo 

Archilla, Angel 



Archilla, Miss Providencia 

Armstrong, Hugh 

Armstrong, James A 

♦Armstrong, Reuben H. . . 

Arnett, James C 

Arthur, Chester 

Arthur, Mark K 

Asdale, Wilson 

Astles, W. W 



Ashburn, Joe Ore . . 
Astwood, Joseph B 



Payallup, First, Nesqually and Stations 

(Indian) Wash. 

Wray, First, Colo.; Cheapside and Sutherland 
Springs; Chillicothe and Tolbert. . . .Tex. 

Spring Brook and Epping N. D. 

Cody, First and Station; Gillette, First . . Wyo. 

Jerome, First Ida. 

Belfield, First and Station, N. D.; Round 

Lake, First Minn. 

Merrill, First and Mt. Laki; Pastor Evangel- 
ist. Ore. 

Philadelphia — Berean Pa. 

New Prague and Montgomery Minn 

Rugby .First N. D 

Cartersville, Calabar and Paragon Missions 

Mont. 

Wolsey, First S. D. 

Walnut — Barnard and Stations N. C. 

Cody, First and Station Wyo. 

Dos Palos, First Calif. 

San Juan, Second (Helper) P. R! 

Mayaguez (Helper); Maricao (Helper); Isa-I 

bella (Helper) P. R. 

Naranjito (Bible Reader) P. R.| 

Wells Minn. | 

Alamogordo, First N. M.| 

Germantown — People's Mission Pa.| 

Sturgis and Harmony Miss.i 

Minishda (Indian) Mont.j 

Lapwai, First and Stations (Indian) . . . .Ida. 

Tipton, First Mo. 

Blue Springs, Robinson's Chapel, Cherry) 

Creek and Johnson's Chapel Tenn.l 

Mt. Pleasant No. 1 and Concord Ala.| 

Big Falls, First, Mizpah, First and Station 

Minn. 

Atencio, Tomas |Las Vegas and vicinity N. M. 

Atkinson, Alfred 

Atkinson, Thomas H . 
Atkisson, William L . 

Augur, Walter B 

Ayres, James A. 



Ketchikan (Helper) Alas. 

Entiat, First and Stations Wash 

Adairville Ky. 

Jasper Minn 

Nemo and Galena N. D 

Azary, John |New York City — Fourteenth Street Hungarian 

| (Assistant) N. Y. 

♦No report 



S S 



P 

S S 



S S 
S S 



S S 
S s 
S s 



s s 



s s 
s s 



s s 
s s 



s s 



12 

12 

12 

ny 2 

12 

12 

4 

5 
12 

9 

7 

12 
12 

5 
12 
12 

2 
11 



9U 

5 

1 



6 I 



3 

12 
12 

6 
2 

12 
12 



S S 8 
I 6 
12 

12 



4 
12 

5 
12 

12 
7 
4 

4 



12 



9 
2 

23 



12 



15 



1913.1 



MISSIONARIES. 



171 



MISSIONARIES 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



o o. 

OC/3 



Additions to 
Churches 



c.2 
'" c 

o 9 

u 



Baber, W. C .... 
Backora, Vaclav P . 



L. F 

Badillo, Baldomero 

Baesler, William 

Bailey, Elizur K., M. D.. . 

Bailey, Franklin C 

♦Baillie, J. K 

Bain, David 

Baker, Bonham Houghton 



*Baker, Tyre W 

Baker, William Henry . . . 
*Baker, William Morgan . 

Baldwin, Harold H 

Baldwin, Wm. Ph.D 

Baligrodski, B. M 

Ballagh, Robert 

Bandy, Paul S 

Bandy, J. Van Neice 

Bantly, John Calvin 

Barackman, Franklin J . 

Barkle, T. J 

♦Barkwell, James H . . . . 

*Barnett, J. H 

Barnum, Orien S 

Baros, Juan 

Barr, Ailanthus L . ... 

Barr, Thomas 

Barrier, Thomas F 

Barrios, Carlos 

Bartlett, William T 

Barton, Joseph H. D.D. 

Barton, Vernon R 

Bass, Calvin S 



Bates, C. D , M.A 

Bates, Charles P 

Bates, John Milne . . . 

Bates, William E 

Baughman, C. S 

Baumann, Emil 

Bayless, Ralph W 

Beattie, Andrew 

Beatty, Frank Ernest . 
*Beauchamp, J. M.. . . 
Beaumont, William L., 



Beavis, Horatio S., D. D. . 

Bechtel, Leslie A 

Beck, George J 

Becker, D. Julian 

Beith, Miss Bessie 



Beith, George Arthur. 

Bell, L Carmen 

Bell, Marcus T 

Bell, Thomas 

Bell, W. S 

Benson, Enoch 

Benson, William 

Benthin, Walter O . . . 



Berardelli, Humbert . 



Bergen, George E . 
;: Bergen, Hansen. 



Grand Prairie, First; El Paso- Altura. . .Tex. 
New York City — Bohemian Brethren. ,N. Y. 
Garey Chapel and Neighborhood House 
Ind. 

Pastor Evangelist Minn. 

Aguadilla (Helper) ; Cabo Royo (Helper) P. R. 

Blue Lake and Stations Calif. 

Oxford, First Neb. 

Kasota, First Minn. 

Phoenix, First Ore. 

Rock Island, Garwood and Sheridan Tex. 

Florence, First and Station, Ore.; Lamoille. 
Star and Wells; Camp Meeker — Mizpah, Calif. 

Mt. Hope Mo. 

Quanah, First Tex. 

Hereford, First and Stations Tex. 

Brooks, First Minn. 

Wildrose, First N. D. 

Gary Mission Ind. 

Glennville Calif. 

Jacksonville, First and Station Ore. 

South Framingham, First Mass. 

Kasson, First. Minn 

Pastor Evangelist Minn. 

Tremont — Westminster Calif. 

Miami and Stations Ariz. 

Mineral Wells— Oak Street Tex' 

Ilwaco, First and Long Beach Wash. 

Mexican Helper N. M 

Benton, First Ark 

Spain, First and Newark, First S. D 

Springdale Okla 

San German District P. R.l 

Associate Synodical Superintendent. . . .Tenn. 

Synodical Superintendent Ida.| 

Verdel and Niobrara Neb. 

Batesville, Independence, Black Jack and] 

Courtland Miss. 

Prague Okla. 

Rush City, First Minn. 

Gary, First S. D. 

Montesano, First Wash. 

Henryetta, First Okla. 

Mt. Carmel Ky. 

Tullahoma Tenn. 

Berkeley — Calvary Calif . 

Spokane — Lidgerwood Wask. 

Fisk, First, Pope's Chapel and Station. . .Mo. 

Cully Memorial — Rice, Pleasant Vallev and 
Station Wash.| 

Arvada, First Colo.| 

Butte— Immanuel Mont. 

ake Alas. 

Castle Rock, First and Toledo, First. . .Wash.l 

Omaha Agency — Blackbird Hills (Helper) | 

Neb. 

Omaha Agency — Blackbird Hills Neb.| 

Fedora — Endeavor and Station S. D. 

Laton, First and Camden, First Calif. 

Woodstock and Holland Minn. 

Hope Missions Wash. 

Moss Beach, Salada Beach and Granada Calif. 

Klawack (Helper) Alas. 

Parkston, First, S. D.; Dorena, First and Sta- 
tion; Crawfordsville, First and Walker- 
Union Ore. 

White Plains and Mt. Vernon Italian Mis- 
sions N.Y. 

Central City and Georgetown Colo. 

IGlenham S.D. 



S S 

s s 

s s 
p 
p 

s s 

s s 

p 

s s 
s s 
p 



p 

s s 
s s 



s s 
s s 
p 

s s 
s s 
s s 



p 

s s 



s s 
s s 
s s 



p. 



12 



12 
12 
4 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

uy 2 

12 

12 
12 

3 

S 

2 
12 

mi 

12 
2 

12 

6 
12 

8 

12 

12 
12 

12 
12 
4 
12 

14 

112 
12 
12 
12 
12 

7 

1 

\oy 2 
i 

12 
12 

5 
36 

4 

! 7 
12 I 

10H 
12 
1 

12 

|12 

i 

12 



16 



10 



20 
23 



20 
1 



4 
5 
6 

25 



15 



30 



3 

1 47 
I 15 



GO 



77 
75 
175 

40 



65 

40 
20 
100 



75 



85 
77 



180 
60 

160 
76 
55 
60 

87 

283 



63 63 



21| 82 
48 90 



2 

60| 110 
60 



46 
132 



*No Report. 



172 



MISSIONARIES. 



[1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



° 9- 



•a B 



Additions to 
Churches 



Berger, H. Ray . . 
*Beving, Fred J . . 
Berry, A. Lincoln 
Beseda, Henry E. 



tBevier, Herbert N. . . . 
Bierkemper, Charles H. 

Bierschwale, William . . 



*Bigbee, John C. . . . 
Billingsley, John A. 

Binyon, W. A 

Birtchet, Grover C. 



*Bixler, Simon P 

Black, Alexander 

*Blackbourn, C. G 

Blackshield, F. H 

Blair, Miss Elizabeth G. 

Blair, George A 

Blair, J. Edward 



Blair, Mrs. W. E. 



Blakemore, Loren E. 



Blanton, Wade H. . 
Blasi, Domenico 
Bloom, Lansing B. . 
Blyth, David, D. D. 

Boatman, J. S 

*Boatright, John G. 

Boaz, John Luther. . 

Boix, Mrs. Trinidad . 

Bond, Rismond 

Bond, William 



Bone, H. F. D.D. 
Bone, John H 



Bone, W. L 

Bonilla, Miguel . 



Boone, John D 

Booth, Randall K. . 
*Boppell, Charles J. 
Bostick, James J. . . 



Botts, Charles E 

Bowman, Miss Margaret. . , 

Boyd, A. G 

*Boyden, Clair E 

*Boyett, Faunie B 

Boyles, Isaiah M 

tBraden, R. M. L., D.D. .. 

Bradford, Charles C 

♦Bradford, Herbert A 

Bradley, W. F 

Bradshaw, Ernest N., D.D . 

Braly, John Douglass 

Braswell, B. S 

Bready, Stuart 

Brechbill, Miss Effie 

Breckenridge, Walter L. . . . 



Elk Mountain and Milo Missions Wyo. 

Doran — German Minn .| 

Sunrise Wyo. | 

Schillersville, Port Lavacca (Missions) and| 
Stations (Bohemian) Tex. 

Centerville and Alvarado Calif. 

Navajo Mission No. 1 (Indian) Ariz.; North- 
port and Station Wash. 

Harper — Barnett Springs, Junction and Sta- 
tion Tex. 

Afton, First and Grove, First Okla. 

Twin Bridges, First Mont. 

Krum and Sanger Tex. 

Dorena and Stations; San Francisco — Memor- 
ial and Russian Work Calif. 

Mulhall and Yates. Okla. 

Ft. Defiance (Indian) Ariz. 

Bovill , First and Station Ida. 

Makaichu, First (Helper) Mont. 

Italian Field Calif. 

Pastor Evangelist Calif. 

Turlock Park, Calif.; Cloyd's Creek, Clover 
Hill and Tabor Tenn. 

San Francisco — Hungarian and Russian Mis 
sions Calif 

Tokalon Valley, Rockhill, Amistad and Station! 

N. M. 

Wallace and Wise Tex 

New Rochelle — Italian Mission N. Y 

Jemez Springs and Station (Indian) . . . . N. M 

Seattle— Woodland Park Wash 

Forest Hill and Pine Grove Tenn 

Hindsville, Alabam, Kingston and Stations 

Ark. 

Patterson 's Chapel, Baggett's Chapel, Waver- 
ly and Station Tenn. 

Anasco (Bible Reader) P. R. 

Zion, Salem and Dixon Chapel (Indian) .Okla. 

San Bois, Pine Ridge, Wadeville and Post Oak 
(Indian) Okla 

Hunters School House Tex. 

Lockney, Kress, Running Water, Hale Center 
and Abernathy Tex. 

Berkeley — Calvary Calif. 

Mayaguez (Helper) ; Naranjito and Stations 

P. R. 

Cooney, Alma, Pleasanton and Mogollon Mis- 
sions N. M. 

Parker — Mohave Indian Mission Ariz. 

Spokane — Monroe Park Wash. 

Strathmore — St. Andrews and Terra Bella, 

First Calif. 

Algona, Jovita and Station; Zillah First and 
Liberty Wash. 

Baltimore — Second (Jewish Work) Md. 

Kapowsin, First and Fife, First Wash 

Thief River Falls — Twentieth Century Minn. 

Hollis, First and Station Okla. 

Monument, First and Stations Ore. 

Pastor Evangelist Neb. 

Kerkhoven and Murdoch Minn. 

Kinbrae and Brewster Minn. 

Lock Spring Mo. 

Ruby Mission and vicinity Alas. 

Kiowa, Stringtown and Calvin Okla. 

Harmony and Shiloh Miss. 

Frankfort on Main Germany. 

Mayaguez — Rye Hospital (Nurse) P. R. 

Yuma, First and Stations Colo. 



S S 

s s 



s s 

s s 



s s 



s s 



s s 



s s 



s s 



s s 
s s 



s s 



s s 
s s 



4 
12 

7 

112 

I 
12 

12 
12 
3 I 

12 I 

10H 

10 

10 

'.)'., 

(i 
3 
3 



12 
12 J 



33 



1 


1 


I | 


s s 


12 


8 


s s 


12 

9 
5 


2 




11 


14 



4 


591 


95 


3 


1351 


92 


9 


9401 
6 


1 50 
79 


34 


109| 


1S5 



*No report. 



tDeceased. 



1913.1 



MISSIONARIES. 



173 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 













o 

JO 
r! ■ 


Additions to 










O Q. 


"- 1 D 




c.2 


1* 3 


O (- 




-3 g 
















o 


a 


■a 


o e 




v. 
W 


CJ 





Breeze, Moses . . . 
Brevard, Charles . 



Bridger, A. C. E. 
Bridges, James S. . . . 
Brodhead, Claude R. 

Bromley, E. E 

Brooks, Fred E 

Brooks, John M 

Brown, Allan H 

Brown, C. Connor. . 

Bro.vn, Carl V 

Brown, David 

Brown, David S . . . . 

Brown, Duncan 

Bro.vn, E. L 

Brown, George W. . . 
Brown, Henry A. . . . 

Brown, John S 

Brown, Kenneth 
Brown, Richard H . . 



Brown, Robert L. . . . 
Brown, Thaddeus S. 



Browne, George Francis. . 

♦Browne, John R 

♦Browne, R. A. McLaren 

♦Browning, C. P 

Broyles, E. Hubert 

Brubaker, Lauren E 

Bruce, Walter J 

Bruins, Fennerikus W . . . 



Bryant, Joseph T 

Bryant, M. M 

♦Bryant, S. A 

♦Buchanan, J. D 

Buckbee, Mrs. Margaret . 

Budd, Robert B 

Buell, Warren C 

Buenahora, Victor M . . . , 



Bullock, Miss Florence. 
Bullock, Hubert E. . .. 



Burd, D. Clarence... 
Burdge, James M . . . 

♦Burgess, W. M 

Burhans, H. W 

Burian, Miss Bozena 

Burian, Ludvik 



Burke, J. B 

Burkholder, Abram H 
♦Burrow, John Milton. 
Butler, Henry S., D.D. 

Butler, John 

Butler, Thomas R. S. . . 

♦Byers, James 

Byington, Alonzo D . . . 



Byrd, T. F. 



Cachora, Joshua C . 
Caldwell, A. O 



Special Representative for the South-west 
Pleasant Hill, Old Union, Goshenand Trinity 

Ky 

Loma, First; Ouray, First Colo. 

Marvel Ala. 

Laguna and Stations (Indian) N. M. 

Sitka (White and Native) Alas. 

Edina and Station Mo. 

Kosse Tex 

Fedora — Endeavor S. D 

Harmony; Synodical Evangelist Ky 

Pleasant Valley, First and Stations Ida. I 

Omak, First and Stations Wash. 

Interior, First and Stations S. D. 

Crane, Hollister and Stations Mo. 

Joplin and Concord Missions Mont. 

Folk, First and Station Ida 

Emerson, First Neb 

Klinquan — Hydah and Stations Alas 

East El Paso Tex. 

Huntland, Normandy, First and Unionville 

Tenn 

Barbourville and North Jellico Ky. 

Bowers Mill, Dudman Springs, Madison, | 
Stotts City and Bethel Mo.J 

Edmonton and Station Ky. 

Hominy, First; Newkirk, First Okla.j 

Hamilton, First Calif. | 

Gravette, First Ark 

Seattle— Mt. Baker Park Wask. 

Sheffield, First Ala. 

Montgomery — Second Ala, 

Big Bend, Silver City, Pactola and Pierre 

Lodge S. D. 

Groom, First Tex. 

Stratford, First Calif. 

Snyder — Bethany and Mt. Zion Okla. 

Hartford, First and Huntington Ark. 

Tolchaco Indian Mission (Girls' Matron) Ariz. 

Verdel and Niobrara, First Neb. 

Elephant Butte N. M. 

Anasco (Helper) ; San German District — Sab 
ana Grande (Helper); Naranjito andl 
Stations (Helper) P.R 

Cleveland — Vacation Bible Schools (Super- 
visor) Ohio 

Duck Creek, Garland, and Pleasant Valleyl 
Tex.J 

New York City — Ascension (Assistant) .N. Y. 

Irwin .First Mo. 

Mercury and Winchell Tex. 

Burns Church Missions Ore. 

New York City — John Hus Bohemian (Vis- 
itor) _....N. Y. 

New York City — John Hus Bohemian (Help- 
er) N. Y. 

Dalton Neb. 

Mabton, First and Station Wash. 

Lohn, Waldrip, Fife and Salt Gap Tex. 

Huntsville and Helenwood Tenn. 

Tuba — Navajo Indian Mission No. 3 . . . . Ariz. 

Anasco P.R. 

Reno, First Nev. 

Hochatown, Oka Achukma, Mountain Fork| 
and Station Okla.| 

New York City — Labor Temple (Social Secre- 
tary) N. Y. 

Indian Oasis (Helper) Ariz. 

New York City — University Settlement 
(Helper) N.Y. 

♦No Report. 



P 

S S 



S s 



p 

s s 
s s 



s s 



s s 

s s 



s s 



s s 
p 
s s 



s s 
p 



s s 



ss 
s s 



s s 



112 

I 

112 
112 
(12 

112 
12 
I 4 
112 

3 l A 

|12 
I S l A 
112 

12 

12 
4 
3^ 

12 

12 

12 

12 
12 

12 

4 
12 
|12 

6 

6 
12 
12 

3M 
12 

5 
12 

3 

VA 

7 
12 



VA 
I 

6 

6 
12 
10 

4K 

12 

3 
1 

7 
12 
12 
12 

9 
12 



5 

12 

1 



30 
7 
3 



29 



30 



54 



50 

83 

257 



25 



170 
100 
1S5 



110 



| 25 
3 

2 


1 
85 
96 
84 


3 

2 


11 
28 


10 


34 
11 




148 




34 


10 


89 




60 




70 


2 

1 


3 



50 
166| 200 



SO 



35 

47 



65 
75 



130 
150 
210 



174 



MISSIONARIES. 



[1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 









Additions to 
Churches. 



.c.2 



Caldwell, S. A. . . 
Calhoun, John S. 



D.D. 



Callan, James A. 
Cameron, James D. 



*Camp George Washington 
Campbell, Charles B. 



Campbell, Charles L . 
♦Campbell, G. W. . . . 
Campbell, John 



Chattanooga — Park Place Tenn. S S 

Stilwell and Westville (American) and Elm I 

Springs and Park Hill (Indian). .Okla. | S S 

Maysville Ewing and Station Ala.| S S 

ILonsdale, First R. I.| P 

♦Cameron, Robert A [Victor, First Mont.[ 

St. Paul — Zion Minn 

Florida, Pine River — Calvary and Stations 

Colo 

Oakland — St. James Calif . 

Lost Springs and Stations Wyo. 

Hot Springs — Dorland Memorial and Stations 

N. CI 

Denver— Immanuel Colo. 

Hayfield and Ashland Minn.l P & S S 

Clarendon Ark. I 

Weed— Mt. Shasta Calif. 

Allanstand, First and Stations N. C. 

Ravia, First, Mill Creek, First and East Ard- 
more Okla.[ 

La Jara, First and Antonito, First; Monu- 
ment, First and Table Rock. . . .Colo. 

Nyssa, First Ore.| 

Midland, First S. D. 

Melrose, First, Taiban, First, Ft. Sumner — 
Martha Taylor Memorial, Estancia and 
Mcintosh N. M. 

Aberdeen — Colwell Memorial, Springfield, and 
Pingree Ida. 

San German District — Ensanada (Helper) 

P. R.| 

Neche, First N. D.I 

Isabela, Quebradillas and Stations (Helper) 

P. R. 

Vedado, San Francisco, and Cerro Missions 

Cuba.) 

Springfield, First Mass 

Lake Crystal and Watonwan Minn. 

Lumber Camp Work Minn 

Ft. Defiance (Indian) Ariz 



Campbell, William M . . 
Carey, Edgerton S . . . . 

*Cargill, Ebzar C 

Carle, William M 

Carmichael, Donald S . 
Carnahan, Reynolds G. 

Carnine, John Newton . 



Carrick, Alexander R 

Carson, H. P., D.D 

Carver, John Randolph Jr. 



Carter, George W . 
Casablanca, Pedro 



*CasseU, W. H... 
Castillo, Emelio.. 

Castro, Francisco 



Chadsey, Horace T 
Chaffee, Arthur R . 
Channer, Elwyn . . 
Chapin, Dwight C 



S S 



S S 



S S 



P&SS 

p 

S S 



S s 



12 
10 
12 
5 
7 

12 
12 
3 

12 

7 
12 
12 
12 

1 

12 

12 



12 
5V 2 



Chapman, H. W I Sterling City and Stations Calif. 



♦Chase, John W 

Cheek, Francis J., D.D 

Chessington, Miss Aura M 

*Choate, William W 

Christoff , A. T 



Cigliano, Vincent 

Circle, James A 

Clack, Isaac N 

Clair, Horace G 

Clardy, Edward M . . 

Clark, Eldred J 

Clark, George T . . . . 
Clark, Howard A . . . 

Clark, James S 

Clarke, John A 

*Clarkson, R. J 

Cleland, T. H, D.D. 
Clemens, William C . 
♦Cleveland, James L . 

*Clift, Wallace 

Coates, Jordan T. L. 

♦Coats, L. J 

♦Cochran, W. F 

Coen, Marcus E . . . . 

Cohee, O. J 

Cohee, Mrs. O. J... 

Coker, J. N 

Colbert, John T 



S S 
P 



S S 

Culbertson, First Mont 

Synodical Superintendent Ky 

Mayaguez — Training School P. R 

Kelseyville, Calif. 

Kansas City Fellowship House No.l and No. 2 

Kans 
Port Chester and vicinity (Italian) . . . . N. Y 

Calvary and Hiddenwood N. D. P 

Lampasas and Espyville Tex. S S 

Saratoga, First Wyo 

Smithville, First Tex. S S 

Paynesville, First and Havick, First. . .Minn. P&SS 
Talihina, Heavener, Wister and Stations Okla. P E 

Tuba — Indian School Ariz 

Wrangell (White and Native) Alas. S S 

Cleveland, First Okla 

Miniska and Stations (Indian) S. D 

Minneapolis — Rosedale Minn. P E 

Elizabethton Tenn. S S 

Celina, First Tex 

Marion Ky 

Rolette First and Station N. D 

Sharon Mo 

Cle Elum and South Cle Elum, First. . Wash] 
San Francisco— University Mound.... Calif. | S S 
New York City— Hope Chapel (Asst.), N. Y.| 
New York City, Hope Chapel (Asst.), N. Y.| 

Ebenezer and Mt. Carmel Ky.i 

Chambersburg — Hope Pa. I P 

♦No Report. 



12 
6 

3H 
3 

7 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

12 
12 
12 
12 
4 
12 
10 
12 

12 

12 
2 

12 
12 
12 

8 
12 

2 
[12 
12 
12 
I 1 
Il2 



10 



13 



40 

30 

11 

16 

4 



6 

20 

9 
8 
14 

3 



1913.: 



MISSIONARIES. 



175 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 






d^ 



Additions to 
Churches 



c.2 



*Cole,J. P 

Collazo, Evaristo P. 

Collier, L. C 

Collins, Charles M. . 
*CoUins, S. P 



Colvin, R. L 

Colyn, Leonard 

Comer, Samuel Allen . 



Condit, James H 

Condy, Archie 

Conner, Franklin T 

Conning, John S 

Conrad, W.J 

Conte, Nicola , 

Cook, Charles H, D.D. . 

♦Cook, Clinton E 

*Cook, S. B 

Cooke, John G 

Cooper, W. H 

Cooter, James T., D.D . . . 

*Copeland, Berry 

Copeland, E. L 

Copeland, William E . . . . 

Cordova, Charles 

Cordova, Eliseo C 

Cordry, Robert T 

Cornelius, Maxwell 

Cornejo, Salvador 

Cornelison, James M . . . . 

Cornell, H. L 

Cornwell, Charles E 

*Cort, Arthur Buchanan . 

Corwin, Charles L 

*Cory, Harlan Page 

Cory, Lowrie D 

Cotton, Jarvis, P 

Couden, Walter A 

Court, Medford G 

Cowan, David C 



Cowden, Morella F . . . 

Coxe, P. J. A 

Crabb, Cecil V 

Cram, Delbert W 

♦Cramer, August 

Crane, Albert O 

Crane, George A 

♦Crawford, A. J 

Crawford, Dennis W . . 
Crawford, George A . . . 
Crawford, G. D. ( D.D . 
Crawford, J. Russell . . . 



♦Crawford, N. D 

Cremeans, Walter R 

Creswell, Willis W., M.D . 



Crooks, Ira L 

♦Crothers, William H . 
Crow, Mandville M . . 

Crozier, J. K. P 

Cruz, Jose 

Csuchta, Miss 

tCude, Oliver C 

Cullen, Henry, D.D. . 

♦Cumpsten, H.J 

Cunningham, J. N . . . 
Cunningham, L. W . . . 



Veblen, First and Stations S. D. 

Guira and La Salud Cuba. 

Pastor Evangelist Tex. 

Jackson — Royal Street Term. 

Goree, First, Jayton, First, Norton, First, 

Blackwell, First and Station Tex. 

Adrian and Stations N.D. 

Alpha, First Minn. 

Frankston, Mt. Selma, Pleasant Grove, 

Henry's Chapel and Stations Tex. 

Fairbanks Alas. 

Elbert County Missions Colo. 

Seattle — Brighton Wash. 

Superintendent of Home Missions Md. 

Du Pont Wash. 

Watertown — Italian Mission N. Y 

Pima, First and Stations (Indian) Ariz 

Anderson — Howard Street Memorial . . . Calif . 

Wolsey, First S. D. 

Baldwin, First and Station N. D. 

Pastor Evangelist Neb. 

Arlington and Stations Colo 

Elkmont, Nebo and Beulah Ala 

McVille N. D 

Rockdale, Sharp and Stations Tex 

Petaca and Stations N. M 

Trementina and Stations N. M 

Streeter a nd Gackle N. D. 

Missionary Work in Cleveland Ohio 

Cienf uegos School Cuba 

Tutuilla — Umatilla and Station (Indian) Ore. 

Granger Mo. 

Buckley, First Wash 

Burnham, Pomana and Station Mo 

Peoria, Wickenburg and Station Ariz 

Globe, First Ariz. 

Burnsville and Stations N. C 

New Decatur — Willoughby Ala. 

Kent, First and Station Wash 

Royalton and Stations Minn 

Paxton, Red Water and Cow Creek Missions 

Mont. 

Oklahoma City, Second Okla 

Westchester — Second Pa. 

Green Valley Minn. 

Point Barrow Alas. 

Avon S. D. 

Belfry, Washoe and Station Mont. 

Cross Plains, First, Sabanno and Liberty, Tex. 

Louisville, First and Mashulaville Miss 

Sherman Heights, First Tenn. 

Pony and Station Mont. 

Tucumcari, First N. M. 

Edmonton; Winchester — Washington Street 

Ky 

Savannah, First Tenn, 

Berryville ...... -Ark. 

Mayasuez and Stations (Medical Missionary) 

P. R. 

Pleasant Valley and Thorn Creek Wash. 

Logan — Brick and Station Utah 

Corinth, Enon and Mountain View Ala 

Crozier, Vineyard and Stations Ark. 

Mexican Helper N. M 

Cleveland— North Slovak Work Ohio 

McKenzie, First and Sharon, First Tenn. 

Pastor Evangelist S. D 

Dexter, First and Hagerman, First. . . .N. M 

Granbury Tex 

Thomas, First Okla 

♦No Report. tDeceased. 



S S 
P 

S S 

p 

s s 

s s 

s s 

s s 
p 



s s 

s s 

s s 

p 

s s 

s s 

s s 
p 
p 



s s 
s s 



s s 



p 

s s 



p 

s s 



3 
12 
12 

4 

9 

7 
12 

12 
12 

12 
12 

8 
10 
12 

7 
12 

2 
12 
12 

2 
12 

12 
3K 
3M 

12 

12 

sy 2 

4 

2 
12 
12 

9M 
10 
12 
12 

7 
12 
12 

4 

8 

5 

12 

12 
7 

iy 2 
i 

im 

2 
3H 

12 
6 
12 
12 
12 



uy 2 

12 

12 
12 
12 



3 

2 

10 



3 
7 

IS 
4 



28 
5 



20 



1 
2 

14 



10 



12 
67 

30 
95 

410 

48 
26 

94 
67 

92 
35 



163 
129 
65 

27 



18 
104 



132 
26 

16 

138 
61 



176 



MISSIONARIES. 



[1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 




Additions to 
Churches. 



J 

Union Hill, Silverton, Milo and Station . . .Tex. 

Newark, First Calif. 

Porter, Adair and Stations Okla. 

Lumber Camp Evangelist Minn. 

Holy Trinity (Italian) N. Y. 

Danly , Arthur Everett lOwyhee Mission (Indian) Nev. 

Darby, E. F. S Stroud, First Okla. 

Darley, Fred E.. ._. . „ .„ . . . (Newark — First Ruthenian N. J 



♦Cunningham, W. F. 
*Curry, James, D. D 

Dalton, John J 

Daly, Matthew 

D'Anchise, Gustavo J 



S S 



Darley, George M. 
Dauerty, James S. 



D. D.... 



Davenport, C. E 

Davenport. Isaac S 

David, William O 

♦Davidson, R. B 

Davidson, T. W 

Davis, Claude K 

Davis, Daniel S 

Davis, Fred W 

*Davis, John P., A. M., B.D. 

Davis, McLain W 

*Davis, Robert E 

Davis, William H 

Davison, John Oscar 

Day, Alanson R 

*Day, Clarence B 

Day, John E 

Day, Jonathan C 

Day, Raymond P 



De Coteau, Louis 

Delgado, Sandalio 

Del Manzo, M. C 

Del Rio, Juan 

*Denby, William A . . . . 
Denison, Herbert G. . .. 

Denton, John D 

De Rogatis, Joseph . . . . 
*Devin, Oliver Peyton . 



De Witt, O. E. 
Diaz, Jose. 



. Utah 



S S 



P E 



Springville — First 

Skykomish, Barring and Lyer Missions 

Wash. 

Red Bank and Tehama Calif. 

Pearsall and Station .Tex. 

Lyndora Pa. 

Oakdale, First Calif. 

Santa Anna, First and Stations Tex. 

Nephi, First Utah 

San Francisco — Grace Calif. 

Lumber Camp Work Ore. 

Rawlins — France Memorial Wyo. 

Boise — Westminster Ida. 

Wellsburg — Union and Station S. D. 

Pueblo — Park Avenue Colo. 

The Institute Tenn. 

San Mateo, First Fla. 

Granada, Moss Beach and Salada Calif. 

Butte Falls, First and Stations Ore. 

New York City — Labor Temple N. Y. 

Zenith, Taft, Prairie Union and Lone Tree 

Missions N. D. 

Crow Creek and Conkicakse (Indian).. .S. D. 
Mayaguez Medical Mission (Assistant) . P. R. 

Fallon. First and Mildred Mont. 

Toa Alto P. R. 

Rondo and Oak Grove Mo.J 

Fargo, First and Auburndale, First Fla.f P & S S 

Labor Temple (Social Secretary) N. Y.| 

Cleveland — West Side Italian Mission. .Ohio.)) 
De Soto, First and Stations, Mo.; HanfordJ 

First and Stations Wash. I 

Eufaula, First Okla. I 

Marianao and Arroyo Apolo Cuba 



P 
P 

S S 

s s 



Di Benedetto, John IBaltimore — Reid Memorial Mission Md.i 



*Dickey, Charles Lee . 

Dickey, D. A 

Dickie, Paul R 

Dickman, Henry .... 

Dickson, Frank 

Dickson, James G. . . 

*DiUin, J. C. F 

tDinwiddie, A. B. C. 

Disch, J. E 

Diven, Robert J 

Dobias, Jaroslav W. . 



*Dodds, James A., Ph.D. 
Dokus. Gabriel 



Dolph, Charles Arthur. 
Donehoo, George M . . . 
Dooley, Curtis C 



Doolittle, C. H 

Dorrance, John W. . 
Dougherty, M. R. . . 
Douglas, Clifford A . 



Dowell, Robert W . 

Dressier, A. J 

Drumm, John 



Bethany, Forney and Station Tex 

Teague, First and Station Tex. 

Virginia City, First Nev. 

Burch Mission S. D. 

San Francisco — Glenside Calif. 

Tutuilla Indian Reservation Ore. 

Hyrum. Smithfield and Stations Utahl 

Baird, First Tex.| 

Cuibertson Heights and Lincoln Park. . .Okla. I 

Petersburg Alas. I 

Houston Heights, Galveston and Crosby (Bo-| 
hemian) Tex. I 

Tacoma — Sprague Memorial Wash.| 

New York City — Fourteenth Street (Magar)l 

N.Y.| 

Stanwood, First and Birmingham, First Wash.l 

Pastor Evangelist Minn. 

Goldthwaite, First, Star, First, and Station! 

Tex,| 

Sharon -. N. D. 

Lemon Cove, First and Kaweah Calif. 

Marceline, First Mo. 

Enterprise, Lamorine, Mud Springs and Wil- 
low Springs Wash. 

Sageeyah, Oolagah and Station Okla. 

Gooding Ida. 

Florence, First and Station Ore. 

*No Report. tDeceased. 



S S 
S S 



S S 
S S 



S S 



S S 



S S 

p 

S s 
p 



s s 
s s 
s s 



7 

12 
12 
112 
12 
12 

3 

12 

4 
11 
12 
12 
12 
11 
12 

12 
12 

12 
12 
12 
12 

5 

6 
12 
12 

3 
12 

* l A 
12 

12 I 

fi' 

I 4 

I 

12 

2H 
11 

6 

7 
11 
12 

4 
10 
12 

3 
'! 8 
112 

6 

112 

I S 

4 

12 
12 

6 
11 
12 
11 

4 
12 
110 



35 
6 

12 



40 
3 



20 



5 


53 


2 


72 


3 


65 


9 


71 


4 


70 




54 


3 


43 




68 



1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



177 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



"Sg 



Additions to 
Churches 



'31 
£1 



Oj o 
-W3 



*X/i 



Duarte, Pedro . 



Puerta de la Guira and Canas; San Cristobal 

and Candelaria Cuba 

Kingsport, Reedy Creek, Glen Alpine and Sta- 
tions Tenn 

Synodical Missionary Tenn 

Seattle — South Park, Wash.; San Francisco — 

Grace and St. James Calif 

Bethesda, NewmansvUle, Pilot Knob and Sta- 
tions Tenn 

Heyburn and Stations Ida 

Ritchey, First and Seneca Mo 

Guernsey, First and Station Wyo 

lone, First Calif 

Petersburg Mission Alas 

Dushaw, Amos Isaac, D.D.. . |South St. Paul, First Minn.| 

Dyke, Simon, M.D INavajo — Medical Missionary Ariz.' 



Dugger, Cornelius A . . . . 

Duncan, Calvin A., D.D 
Duncan, Charles L 



Duncan, Columbus W. 



Dunham, Dwight. 
♦Dunham, J. J. . . 
Dunn, Wallace B. 
Durrie, Archibald 
Duryea, George T 



Eagle, Wallace R. 
Eagle-Hawk, Joseph . . 
Eames, Lucius Calvin. 

♦Easley, H. E 

Eastman, John 

Eaton, George 

Eby, William J 



Eddins, Abram F , 

Eddleblute Luther H. . 

Edgar, Alfred C 

Edgar, E. H 

Edmondson, William W 
Edmundson, George R., D.D 



Makizita (Helper) S. D. 

Tasunkekokepapi (Helper) S. D. 

Burlington, First N. D. 

Spicer, New London and Station Minn. 

Goodwill (Indian) S. D. 

Kasaan (Helper) Alas. 

Wilsonville, First and Lebanon; Lisco, First, 

Broadwater and Centerview Neb. 

Grey Noret and Middleton Okla. 

Byers and Stations Colo. 

Needles — Mohave (Indian) Calif. 

Pastor Evangelist Ore. 

Renton, First Wash. 

Littleton, First Colo. 



Edwards, George I Great Falls— Grace and Stations. . . . Mont. 

Edwards, Rees W 

♦Eihusen, Henry H . . . . 

Elder, E 

Elder, Mansel P 



Elliott, Paul C 

Ellis, Clarence H., M.D 



♦Ellis, John Alfred 
♦Ellis, Roland Lee 
*EUis, W. S., M.D 
Elsing, Warren. . . . 
*Engler, George L. 
Ennis, J. E 



Pastor Evangelist Fla 

Ferron Utah. 

Ukiah, Albee and Station. Ore 

Cheapside, Sutherland Springs and Hochheim 

Tex 

Elges, William Henry Cuyuna, Crosby and Station Minn 

Elliott, Miss Anna M Walthill — Omaha Hospital (Nurse) Neb, 

Elliott, Elbert W Bethlehem, Hebron, Penn. Run and Hodgen- 

viUe Ky 

Port Orford, Langlois and Stations Ore 

Pima, Fifth and Maricopa, Second (Indian) 

Ariz 

Hopewell, Prospect and Caledonia Miss. 

Kossuth, Pleasant Ridge and Station. . .Miss 

Bono, Macey and Monett Ark. 

El Paso — Altura Tex 

Easton Mo. 

Candler, First Weirsdale, First and Station 

Fla. 

*Ernst, Karl J St. Paul— Bethlehem (German) Minn 

Erskine, Carroll D Sturgis, First S. D 

Erskine, J. S. E Pas— a— Grille Fla 

*Ervin, William A Socorro, First N._M. 

Ervine, James Maple Falls, Glacier and Clearbrook Missions; 

Hoquiam — Calvary Wash, 

Oklahoma City— Putman Heights Okla, 

Poplar, First and Stations (Indian) Mont 

Evans, James Frazer |Fair Oaks and Orangevale Calif. 

Evans, John Rhys ISouth Berkeley, Grace Calif. 

Evans, Lester Clitherall — Liggett Memorial and Almora 

First Minn. 

Evans, W. Berin Scotia (Lumber Camp Work) Calif. 

Everett, Charles H Hunters, First and Stations, Wash.; Post Falls 

I First Ida. 

Bonham — Union Tex. 

Colorado Springs Second Colo. 

Los Angeles — Mexican Missionary Work 

Calif. 
Falconer. Fred R Kluckwan— Thlinget Alas. 



Evans, A. Grant, D.D 
*Evans, David Edward 



Everheart, Joe N 

Ewart, John Y., D.D. 
Falcon, Jose 



S S 

S S 
S s 

p 

s s 

s s 
p 



s s 
p 

s s 



p 

s s 



s s 



s s 



s s 
p 



s s 



s s 
s s 



s s 
p 
p 



12 

12 
6 

12 

12 
12 

6 

5 
12 

4 
12 

2H 
12 
12 
12 
11 
12 
12 

12 

9 
12 
12 
11 
12 
12 

5 
12 

3 

3M 

G 
7 
2H 

12 
4 

12 
12 
12 
12 
4 
12 

3 
12 
12 

2 
12 

12 
4 
12 

112 I 
12 

3% 

12 
12 
12 

5 

12 



13 



11 

5 



12 



58 



58 



190 
54 



25 



S4 



300 
125 



65 
100 



27 65 
3l 81 



26 

100 

42 

11 

85 
125 



94 



129 



I I 



80 
2 

50 

95 
160 
100 



125 



35 



451 45 
93 121 



25 



150 



110 
95 



61 
100 
139 



60 



100 
90 
140 



*No Report. 



178 



MISSIONARIES. 



[1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



►J -a 
■a £ 



Additions to 
Churches. 



C3.2 



*Farmer, John E., D.D 

*Farrand, Fountain R 

Faucett, James E 

Faucette, William Clar.ke . . 

Faust, Allan E 

Feather, Nathan 

Ferguson, David Kennedy. . . 

Fergusonjohn B 

Ferguson, J. Elmer 



Fernandez, Juan . 
Fernie, John.. . . 
*Ferry, David W 
Fife, Dorsey .... 
Figge, John 



Figueroa, Manuel 

Filipi, Bohden A 

Findley, Thomas M., D. D 

*Fink, W. P 

Finlayson, John D 

Finlayson, Roderic A 

Finley, Woodard E., D.D. 



Fischer, J. W., Jr 
Fischer, Peter W. 
*Fisher, G. R. G. 
Fisher, James 
Fisher, J. Emory 



Valentine, First Neb 

Willows, First Calif. 

Stanfield — Hope, First Ore 

Burns, First; Sunrise Wyo. 

Krebs, North McAlester and Station. . .Okla 

Mora, First Minn 

Terrell, First Tex 

Chelan Falls and Stations Wash, 

Cumby, Palestine, Miller Grove, Oakland and 

Station Tex. 

Mayaguez (Helper); Lares and Stations. P. R 

Belvidere, Stamford and Okaton S.D.| 

Spokane — Emmanuel Wash. 

Maud — Achena (Indian) Okla. 

Sutter — Salem German, 111.; Independence, 

First la. 

Aguadilla (Helper) P. R. 

Omaha — Bohemian Brethern Neb. 

Pastor Evangelist Minn. 

Alfred, First and Station N. D. 

New York City— Labor Temple N. Y. 

Post Falls, First Ida.l 

Marshall — -Couper Memorial and Stations| 

|N. C 

Glenburn, First and Stations N. D. 

St. Louis — Boyle Memorial (Assistant) Mo. 

St. Paul — Westminster Minn. 

Mina, Uniontown, Warner and Stratford S. D. 
United Mission, Pine Woods and Station (In- 
dian) . N. Y. 

Forada, First, Sedan and Station; Kingston, 

Watkins and Brooten Minn.] 

Fisher, Wm. G., A.M., B.D.. [Marion, First, Pleasant Grove and Turner—)! 

Octorara Ore. 

San Francisco — Seventh Avenue Calif. 

Roosevelt and Stations Ariz 

Ho Wash 

Antioch, Calhoun and Livermore Ky 

Carriso — Navajo Mission (Indian). . . .N. M 
Clifton, First; Cowan, First and Station Tenn 

Fleming, Charles H |Fairview Neb. 

*Flemming, John E [New York City — Hope Chapel N. Y, 

*Flute, John |Pajutazee Minn 

Folke, Erik T [Westminster and Ideal S. D 

Fonken, Adelbert A (Fraser, First and Station Colo 



Fisher, Oscar W. ( D.D. 



Fisher, William J., D.D. 
Fiske, Charles Russell. . . 

Fiske, Nathan Milo 

Fitzgerald, J. R 

Flack, Charles E 

Flaniken, Fred P. 



Forbes, W. O., D.D. 
*Ford, Pinkney M. . . 
Forde, L. Harold.. . . 
Foreman, William S.. 
Forsyth, William 



Fortuny, Jose. . 
Foster, H. M . . 
Foster, John A . 



D.D. 



Fotheringhame, T. F., D.D . 

Fox, Paul 

Francis, Charles Paris 

Francis, James Allen 

Frank, Adam G 

Frank, Howard Moody .... 

Franklin, J. T 

Frarey, J. Harvey 

Fraser, Frank L 



Frausto, C. A . 



Frazier, Samuel G . . . 
Freeman, Charles S . 



[Pastor Evangelist Wash. 

Bickleton, First; Kittias and Stations. .Wash. 

Pastor Evangelist Wyo. 

St. Louis— McCausland Avenue Mo. 

Vardy — Andrew's Memorial, Sneedville and 

Sycamore Tenn., 

Guanajay and San Antonio de los Banos Cuba| 
Missionary among theQuniaielt Indians Wash. 
New Decatur — Willoughby; Oak Grove, 

Rocky Ridge and Rosedale Ala. 

Orland — Trinity and Station Calif. 

Baltimore — St. Paul Polish Mission Md. 

West Park Mission Okla. 

West Point — West Broad Street Miss 

Brigham, First Utah. 

Vale and Stations S. D. 

Burleson, Crowley and Union Hill Tex 

Blackduck, First and Station Minn 

Kennewick, First and Hover, First, Wash.; 

Creswell, First .Ore 

San Bernardino and Redlands (Mexican)) 

Calif. 
Retro, Sale Creek — Welsh Union, Brown's 

Chapel and Soddy, Second Tenn. 

Jersey City — Lafayette N. J.| 

*No Report. 



S S 
S S 
S S 

P 

P 

s s 
s s 



s s 



s s 

s s 

p 
s s 

p 



s s 



P. E. 



p 

s s 



s s 

p 

p 
s s 

p 

s s 

s s 

P& s 



s s 



s s 
p 



9 

12 
12 

12 

12 I 
12 

12 
7 

12 
12 
7 
12 
12 

12 
1 

12 
12 

5 

1 



12 

I 3 

12 
12 

12 



12 
12 
12 
11 

12 

10 

12 
12 

3^ 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

12 
12 
12 

12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

12 
12 
10 



10 



IT 

4 

17 

4 

10 
41 

3 

5 



2 
2 
6 

10 

5 

3 
45 



03 



60 
156 



1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



179 



MISSIONARIES. 



French, Herbert A . 



Freyschlag, E. M 

Friedrich, Robert A . . . . 

Fruhling, Arthur F 

Fry, William Engelbert . 
Fryar, Samuel Pierce . . . 



Fulsom, Sim . 



Fulton, James A . 
Fuson, Mrs. A. L . 



*Fye, B. A 

Fye, Charles W 

Gabard, Milton E., D.D. 

Gabbard, Elmer E 

Gall, Miss Irene 



Gait, William A 

Gammons, Albert H. 
Gammon, George U . 

Gane, Homer H 

Garcia, Federico. . . . 

♦Gardner, H. M 

♦Garrett, Willis Otis . 
Garth, John G 



Garver, James C . 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



*Gasque, G. Wallace . 
Gass, John R., D.D. 
Gaston, Joseph 



Gauss, Oscar W..D.D . . . 
Gebby, George H 



George, Jesse C 

Gerdes, Henry N 

Gertsch, Albert 

Getty s, Richard T 

Ghormley, David O., D.D. 

Gibbons, Wilber R 

♦Gilbert, H. M 

Gilfillan, J. S., D.D 

Gillis, Walter N 

Gilman, Samuel Clarke. . . 

Gilmore, Walter Lee 

Glenn, Henry E 



Glick, Joseph M . . 
Goehring, J. S . . . 
Gomez, Adolph F . 

Gomez, Luis 

Gonzales, Moise.. 



Good, David N . . 
Good, George E . 
Goodbird, Jacob . 
Gorby, Isaac J. .. 
Gordon, Robert . 



Gordon, S. R., D.D 

♦Grace, Riley C 

Grafton, Louis D 

Grafton, W. M 

Graham, Everett W 

Grant, Thomas P 

Gravenstein, Christian H. 
Graves, C. H 



o a 

Hi! 



1-4 <u 



apL, 



Cle Elum, First and South Cle Elum; Algona, 

Jovita and Station Wash. 

Prairie Grove and Walnut Grove Ark. 

Beloit — German Wis 

Menlo Park, First and Station Calif 

Denver — Valverde; Denver — Immanuel Colo 
Leonard's Chapel Mt. Cumberland and Union 

Hall Tenn.'l 

Hochatown, Oka Achukma, Mt. Fork and | 

Station Okla. 

Sacaton, First (Indian) Helper Ariz. 

Tolchaco Indian Mission (Instructor and 

Seamstress) Ariz. 

Valley, First Neb. 

Pastor Evangelist N. D. 

Nesbitt and Bethel Miss. 

Crockettsville Mission Ky.l 

New York City — Fourteenth Street Hun-I 

garian (Helper) N. Y. 

St. Louis — Lee Avenue Mo. 

Bolinas — Calvary Calif. 

Lumber Camp Work near Albion Calif. 

Cleveland; Blue Springs, First Neb.| 

Maricao, Las Marias and Stations P. R. 

Desloge, First and Stations Mo. 

Bovey, First and Coleraine Minn. 

Encampment, Dovvnington and Bennett, 

Wyo.; Coachella Calif. 

Rigby, First, Rexburg, First; Montpelier- — 

Calvary Ida. 

Huntsville — Biernes Avenue Ala. 

Synodical Missionary N. M. 

Hobson, First and Station, Mont.; Milnor, 

First N. D. 

Nunn, First, Carrand Stations Colo. 

McDowell Mission and Stations (Indian) 

Ariz. 

Asotin — Grace Wash. 

General German Missionary for the West . 

Owensville Mo. 

Flag Pond Tenn 

Pastor Evangelist Wash 

Hoopa (Indian) Calif 

St. John — Home Heights and Wellston . .Mo 

Pastor Evangelist Del. 

Alexandria, First Neb 

Calistoga Calif 

Huffman — Five Mile . Ala 

Barnum, First and Willow River, First; 

Wahkon and Onamia Minn 

Salem and Cook Station Mo. 

Sarles, First and Station N. D 

Ignacio — Immanuel (Mexican) Colo 

Sancti Spiritus and Stations (Helper) .... Cuba! 
Neuva Paz, San Nicolas and Palos (Helper) | 

Cuba 

Sherman Heights, First Tenn. 

Hoonah — Thlinget Alas 

Raven Hill and Wood Lake (Indian) . .N. D. 

Bend, First Ore. 

Knowles, First, Raymond, First and Stations 

Calif. 

Sand Springs, First Okla. 

Fort Bragg, First Calif. 

Hubbard Tex. 

Concrete — Mt. Baker and Stations. . . .Wash. 

Dell Rapids, First S. D. 

Brady Tex. 

Grundy Center (German) la. 

Berg — Lone Star and/Stations N. D. 



S S 

S S 

P 

s s 
p 

s s 



s s 
p 



s s 
s s 



s s 
s s 



s s 



Additions to 
Churches 



S S 
S S 
S S 



S S 

S s 
s s 

p 
p 

s s 
p 
p 



12 
12 
12 

12 
12 

6 

12 
11 
12 
10 
12 

10 
12 
12 

12 
12 

9 
12 
12 

3} 2 
12 

12 
3 

12 

1 

12 

11 

12 
12 
12 
9 
112 
12 I 
12 
3HI 



10 



12 



30 



1 

18 

12 
2 
1 
1 
4 



Hi 



44 
100 
55U 50 
201 
41 105 



37 1 SO 



50 93 

112| 300 

30 25 
37 

5S 103 



36 



30 



55 120 



60 



125 



35 

S6 



105 
200 



47 
60 



85 



75| 120 
32 90 



50 



93 

140 



100 

50 

56 1 55 

79| 95 

I 651 40 



♦No Report. 



180 



MISSIONARIES. 



[1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 









Additions to 
Churches. 



Gray, Joseph Cross 

Gray, L. B 

tGray, R. Y 

Gray, William Lee 

Green, Charles Chester. . . . 
Green, Lawson 

Green, W. E 

Greene, J. Milton, D.D... . 

Greenslade, James 

Greig, George Brown 

Gregory, Carey Ellis 

Griffith, Thomas W 

Griffith, William Uriah. . . 

♦Griggs, Archie Roy 

Grigsby, Sherwood L 

Grimes, Mills S 

Grose, N. P 

♦Gross, O. C 

Grosscup, D. P 

Gruver, J. Harlin 

Gunn, W. Chalmers 

Gurley, Albert Kaiser. . . . 

Guth, E. L 

Guzman, Eugenia 

tGwynne.F. H., D.D 

Hackett, W. L.. . 

Hagen, J. Francis 

Hageman, Theodore A. . . 

Hagler, Melford H 

Haines, Alfred H 

Haldane, George 

Hall, J. H. B 

Hall, John Knox 

Hall, William Thomas. . . 
Halley, Hosea D 

Halsell, J.P 

♦Haman, John W., Ph.D 

Hamilton, Charles H 

Hamilton, Earl C 

♦Hamilton, George L 

Hamilton, James Reid . . . 
Hammond, Edward F. . . . 

Hammond, Sidney L 

Handyside, John S 

Haney, Theodore H 

Hanks, Ebenezer J 

♦Hanks, Nathan D 

Hanna, Thomas 

Hanson, Henry G 

Harding, Albert E 

Harold, William S 

Harper, Arthur E 

Harper, B. F 

Harrell, Charles H 

Harris, A. G 

♦Harris, J. Will 

Harris, Samuel 

Harrison, W. E 

Harsanyi, Ladislaus 

Hart, Fred J 

Hart, Orlando E..D.D 

Harvey, Frederick , 

♦Harvey, John Leslie 

Hassold, Fred A 



Maria and Sanderson Tex.| S S 

Albany — Newcomb Tex.| S S 

South West City and Maysville, First Mo. 

Hope, First Ark. P 

Willow Springs, First Mo. P 

Hickman, First and La Grange, First; Turlock 

Park Calif. S S 

Pastor Evangelist ... Tex. | 

Havana, First and General Missionary. .Cuba S S 

Troutlake and Glenwood Wash. 

Pastor Evangelist Calif. 

Jupiter and Brittian's Cove N. C. 

Myrtle Point First Ore. 

Friendship and Mustang — Westminster. Okla. S S 

iQuincy, Ephrata and Soap Lake Wash. 

Pastor Evangelist Ore. 

Bristol — McFarland Memorial Wash. S S 

Glenburn— Hope N. D. P 

Atlanta Mo. 

Odessa, First Wash. S S 

Reem's Creek and Stations N. C. P 

Manitou and Oakland Wash. S S - 

Preston and Jasper Mo. S S 

Mt. Carmel and Cottageville — Ebenezer. Ky. 

San Juan (Bible Reader) P. R. 

Stevensville Mont. 

St. Cloud, First Fla. P 

Leola, First S. D. 

_ Springs, First and Dalton, First Neb. S S 

New Holland — Welsh Mountain Mission . . Pa. S S 

Connell and Station Wash. S S 

Hydahburg Alas. 

Six Mile, Brent and Pleasant Hill Ala. S S 

Aurora Colo. S S 

League City and La Porte _ Tex. S S 

Work among the Creek and Seminole Indians 
I p Okla. 

Fairview, First Okla. S S 

Seattle— Woodland Park .Wash. 

Salina — Crosby Memorial and Station . . Utah S S 
Casey's Fork, Marrowbone and Burkesvillel 

Ky.| S S 

Loraine, Merkel and Station Tex. 

White Earth, First and Station N. D. S S 

Norfolk, First Neb. P 

Steele, First . . . . .N. D. S S 

Osakis, First, Leslie, First and Station. .Minn. S S 
Stanford, First and Windham, First .... Mont. S S 

Richfield and Station _ Utah. S S 

Lincoln, Cincinnati and Station Ark. 

Taft, First and Fellows — Westminster. .Calif. S S 

Conrad, First Mont. 

Latonia — Huntington and Avenue and Station 

Ky. S S 

Jupiter and Brittian's Cove N. C. S S 

Dunnebecke, Coton, Sulphur and Ball. .S. D. 

Pastor Evangelist Ore. 

High Point Mo. S S 

Cheyenne Junction Mission S. D. 

San German District P. R. 

Sonora, Stent, Columbia, Big Oak Flat and 

Stations Calif. S S 

Abilene — Central Tex. P 

New York City — First Magyar N. Y. S S 

Okanogan, First and Stations Wash. S S 

Pastor Evangelist Calif. 

Redmond, First and Stations Ore. S S 

New Prague; Quiring — Beacon and Station 

Minn. | 
Morristown and Stations S. D.| S S 

♦No Report. fDeceased. 



uy 2 

12 


1 


12 


12 


1 


7 


12 


8 




12 






12 


20 


1 


12 


2 




12 






2 






2V 2 
12 


3 




11 






6 


24 




12 






2H 
6 


10 




12 






12 


3 


6 


■sy 2 

12 






by 2 
ny 2 

4 


1 


19 


6 




5 


12 


3 




12 


6 


3 


9 






5 


4 


4 


12 


3 


6 


12 


1 




10 






12 


6 




2 






12 






12 




1 


12 






12 


8 




12 


18 


11 


12 


6 


5 


12 


1 


1 


ny 2 

12 


1 


5 


12 






12 


7 


3 


5H 






12 


9 


13 1 


4 




1 


sy 2 

12 






12 






4 






12 






12 






12 


8 


6 


12 


3 


73 


11 




6 


12 






8 


1 


3 


M ' 






12 I 


3 1 


6 1 



12 



65 



1913.] 



MISSIONARIES. 



181 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



o a 



Additions to 
Churches. 






Hatfield, Clarence E 

Havranek, Anton 

Hawkins, Lemuel J 

Hawley, George W 

Hayden, Frank L..D.D.. 

*Haydon, Ambrose P 

Hayenga, Calvin 

Hayes, C. E., D.D 

Hayes, James 

Haynes, Arthur B 

Head, George J 

Healy. George W 

♦Hearst, John P., Ph. D. 

Heatly, Frank T 

♦Hedges, James A 

Hedges, T. J 

Heemstra, Jacob 

Hellyer, Henry L 

Hemenway, Charles C. . . 
Henderlite, Peter Baxter . 
Henderson, Giles A 



Hennrikus, Albert W . 
Henry, Alexander. . . , 
♦Henry, John D 



Herbert, Joseph . 



Hernandez, Antonio . 
Hernandez, Jesus G . 



♦Herndon, Frazier, S 

Herrick, Edward, P., D.D . 

Herriott, Calvin C 

Herriott, Clarance D 



Hess, John Leonard 

Hess, William Whitehill. . 

Hester, James D 

♦Hickman, S. C. C 

Hickok, Miss Ida M 



♦Hicks, Joseph P. . . 

Hicks, W. C 

Higgins, Charles W. 



Higgins, Francis E. 

Hill, James R 

Hill, John B., D.D. 

Hill, John G 

Hill, John W 

Hillery, Horace E... 
♦Hines, Charles C 

♦Hinkle, A. G 

Hitchings, Brooks . . 
Hockstotter, John . . 
♦Hodge, Robert B.. 
Hodge, Thomas 



Hodges, H. A 

Hodges, John G. . . 
Hodges, John J. . . . 

Hodgson, John 

Hodgin, A. J 

Hoffmeister, C. C. 
Hogg, Alfred A. J., 



Hoberg and Zion Mo. 

Dutchkills and Astoria (Bohemian) . . . .N. Y. 

Cut Bank and Stations Mont. 

Ardmore, First and Stations S. D. 

Auburn — White River Wash. 

Bridgeport, First Neb. 

Reading Mission Minn. 

Synodical Superintendent Ark. 

Kamiah, First and Station (Indian) .. . .Ida. 

Canyon, First Tex. 

Lake Traverse (Indian) Minn. 

Kettle Falls and Garden Valley Wash. 

Central Point, First and Woodville-Hope Ore. 

Chelsea, First Okla. 

Sunnyside Wash, 

Sumpter, First and Stations Ore. 

Fairview — Lower Yellowstone Mont 

General Jewish Missionary 

Glasgow and Salisbury Mo. 

Tucumcari, First ; N. M 

Florence and Station, Ariz.; McGregor — 
Central Tex 

Ganado Mission (Indian) Ariz 

Wounded Knee (Indian) S. D. 

Fort Collins — Fossil Creek Colo.; Came, 
Tunis, Luxon and Mimbres Valley Mis- 
sions N. M. 

Lawen, Harney, Harriman, Narrows, Sun- 
set, Waverly, Valley View and Voltage. 
Missions .Ore 

Puerto Esperango and Consolacion Missions 

Cuba 

San Cristobal and Candelaria; Puerto de 
Golpe ; Cuba 

Tuscon — Papago and Station (Indian — .Ariz. 

Mantanzas — The Redeemer Cuba 

Oakland — High Street Calif. 

Corte Madera and Larkspur; Centerville 
and Alvarado Calif. 

Waltham, First Mass. 

Republic, First Wash. 

Stigler, First and Keota; Checotah, First Okla. 

Oakland, First and Sutherlin, First Ore. 

New York City — Hope Chapel, Visitor (Ru- 
thenian) N. Y 

Hemphill Tex. 

Bolivar, Willard and Walnut Grove. . . . .Mo 

Southern Curry County, First Mission and 
Stations; Ukiah — Camas Prairie and 
Stations Ore. 

Superintendent of Lumber Camp Work Minn 

Holyoke, First Colo. 

Synodical Missionary Mo. 

Indian Oasis Mission (Helper) Ariz, 

Buda, and Union; Kenesaw Neb 

Krupp and Stations Wash 

Sparta, First and Hickory Valley Tenn 

Inez — Eden Ky. 

Fairfax, First and Stations Okla 

Parkston S. D 

Scottsboro, Stevenson and Station Ala. 

Springerville and Stations, Ariz.; Sunnyside 
and Stations Utah. 

Wynnewood, First, Okla.; Magdalena. .N. M. 

Point Arena, First Calif. 

Westhoff and Station Tex 

Ambrose, First N. D 

East Ely, First Nev 

Atlanta Tex. 

Seattle — Green Lake Wash 

♦No Report. 



P&SS 

S S 

s s 
s s 

P ! 



P 

s s 



s s 



s s 
p 



s s 



12 

10K 

12 

12 

12 

9 

4 
12 
112 

2 
12 
12 
12 
12 

6 
12 

12 
10H 

12 

4H 
12 





3 












12 












12 












12 










s s 


12 


4 


4 


96 


100 


p 


12 


8 


8 1 


70 


175 


s s 


12 
7 






29 


80 


p 


7 


8 


27 


35 


87 


s s 


ny 2 

12 

12 
10 


1 


4 


48 


45 


s s 


12 


10 


5 


100 


80 


s s 


12 
12 


3 


1 


23 


70 


p 


ny 2 

7 
6 


2 




35 


50 


s s 


12 
4 

12 
3 




1 


48 


70 


s s 


12 
1 
6 


6 


1 


38 


70 


p 


12 






44 


48 


s s 


12 


4 


2 


59 


50 




12 


1 


2 


25 




s s 


12 
4 






14 


90 


s s 


12 


5 




35 


50 


P E 


9 


25 


35 


150 


130 



153 



160 
70 



100 



771 138 



35 



90 
110 



125 
56 



30 
135 



60 



182 



MISSIONARIES. 



[1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



Holesovsky, Miss Jane . 
Hertford, David, B.D... 

Hollister, Moses K 

Hollyman, Jonathan C. 
Holman, Robert W. . . . 

*Holt, B. P 

Holt, Harvey E 

Holub, Joseph 

Holzinger, 6. A 

Hood, Alexander 



Hood, John W. . . 
Hoole, William H. 
*Hooper, J. L. . . . 
*Hopkins, John T. 
Hopkins, Samuel. 
Horak, Henry V. . 
Horky, Joseph. . . 
Hornbeak, J. A. . . 
Hornicek, Francis 
Horton, Eugene S 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



^V> 



Additions to 
Churches. 



Immanuel Church— Greiner (Visitor). . .Ohio 

Chester, First Mont 

Watertown and Bellwood Tenn. 

Ethel, Glasston and Union Chapel Mo. 

Berkeley Mission Calif. 

Randall and Lincoln Minn. 

Centennial and Station Wyo. 

Cleburne — Bohemian Kans. 

Hinckley, First Minn. 

North Fork Mission and vicinity (Indian) 

Calif. 

Winchester, First Ida. 

Ravensdale, First Wash. 

Hernando Miss. 

Turlock, First Calif. 

Ascension (Indian) S. D. 

Tabor— Bohemian Minn. 

Slavic Cosmopolitan Mission Ind. 

Pastor Evangelist Tex. 

Rovvena — Bohemian and Station Tex. 

. . Hurley — Harmony S.D. 

Hough, William A | Berkeley— Faith Calif. 

Pastor Evangelist; Gramdfield, First. . .Okla 

Vista Mo. 

Missions in the vicinity of Cook's Inlet . . Alas. 

Snyder, First Tex 

Elm Springs S. D 

Wessington, First S. D 

Dalhart, First; Tex., Pawnee, First Olka 

Barton and Harris N. D 

Terry— Union Mont 

Southern Curry County Missions and Stations 

Ore. 
Tolchaco Mission and Station (Interpreter) 

Ariz. 
Tolchaco Mission and Station (Teacher) . Ariz. 
Superintendent Omaha Indian Hospital . . Neb 

Gadsen— Central Ala 

Sharpsburg and Moorefield Ky 

Westhope — St. Paul, Zion and Eckman .First 
| N. D 



Howard, George P. 

Howard, Henry A 

Howard, T. P 

Howard, Ulysses Clement . 

Howe, E. C 

*Howe, J. L 

Howell, W. M 

Humphreys, Oliver P 

Hunter, William C 

Hoyt, John W 



Hubbard, David . 



Hubert, Miss Sophia. 
Hubert, Miss E. M. . 
*Hudson, Fred L. . . . 
Hudson, Harry S. . . . 
*Huey, J. Way 



S S 
P 
S S 



p 

S S 



S S 
S s 



s s 



St. Louis— Harney Heights Mo. 

Purcell — Welcome and Stations N. D. 

St. Joseph —Hope Mo. 

IBarton and Harris; Brinsmade, First. . .N. D, 

Denver — Valverde Colo 

Akron, First Mo 

John Hus — Bohemian (Assistant) N. Y. 

Falk, First and Station Ida 

Lower Boise and Bethel Ida 

Terry — Union and Station Mont 

Pastor Evangelist N. D 

Hurd, Charles T |Newport, First Ore 

Huston, J. Newton ILehigh, Centrahoma, Moller and Station Okla. 

Hutchison, Roy C Ranger, Eolian and Avoca Tex 

Hutchison, William M Helena, First Okla 



Hughey, Albert S 

Humphreys, J. M 

♦Humphreys, Oliver M. . . 
Humphreys, Oliver Perry. 
Hunt, Charles R., Ph.D.. 

Hunt, Erva Clay 

Hunter, Stanley A 

Hunter, Stuart McK 

Hunter, Thomas K., D.D 

Hunter, W. C 

Hunter, W. H 



P&SS 



P 

S S 

s s 
s s 
p 

s s 
s s 



s s 

s s 

p 



in 

12 

11 

4 
5 
12 
4 

sy 

103 

12 
12 

12 
3 
12 
12 

V 
12 
12 
10 
11 

6 
12 
10 

m 

12 
V, 

12 
12 
3J 

7 



7 
7 

V-A 
12 

12 



12 
12 
12 
10 

7H 

7 

6 

4 

6 

12 

7 

12 

12 

12 

7 

12 



Hyatt, William H. 



Hyink, Martin 

*Ibanez, Jose M 

Ibarra, Alexander D. 
Icadusmani, Titus . . . 

Iorns, Benjamin 

Irvine, John A 



*Irvine, Melville B. 
Irwin, Andrew J. . . 



Estes Park; Antonito, First and La Jara, First! I 

Colo. | P & S b|J 

Lemmon, First S. D. S S 

San Diego (Mexican) Calif. 

Bisbee and Stations (Mexican) Ariz. 

Buffalo Lakes S. D. P 

Pierpont, First S. D. S S 

Acton, Sabathany, Prairie Hill, Cresson and 

Station Tex. S b 

Minneapolis — House of Faith and Minneapolis 

—Calvary Minn. 

Myrtle Point, First, Ore.; Langlois, First and 

Station, Ore.; Florence, First and Sta- I 

tion Ariz. S S |11 

*No report. 



It 



*P 



12 I 
3 ! 



27 
63 



45 60 



12 

46 

I 

1 00 



3 35 

13 I 
10 



125 
49 
60 



52 
135 



55 
100 

35 



134 SO 



93 300 

20 60 

I 

11 50 

52| 75 

37 1 35 

29 25 

45 60 



107| 

105 

90 

52 



200 
100 
70 



981 205 
401 95 



1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



183 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



^£ 



Additions to 
Churches 



Ivanyshyn, A. P 

Jackson, Alexander, Ph.D.. 
Jacob, Capt. R. T 



Janes, J. Marshall. 
*Jansen, Jueren. . . 
Jaramillo, Refugio. 

*Jardine, Robert . . 
Jason, Howard T. . 
Jenangan, Melkon.. 
Jewell, Stanley D., 

*Johns, W. D 

♦Johnson, Alfred B. 
Johnson, Almus B. . 
Johnson, Andrew F 

Johnson, Elam J... . 



Johnson, Eugene A. . . . 
Johnson, George Lewis. 
Johnson, Martin 



Irwin, Chester M Browning, First Mont 

Irwin, J. H Cuymon, First Okla 

Irwin, Percy C Fargo and Homedale Missions; Soda Springs 

and Station Ida 

New York City — Hope Chapel (Ruthenian) 

N. Y. 

| Portland— Park Street Me 

| Fair Park Mission School and Englewoodf 

I Okla. | 

Jacobs, Hyman [Page, First and Station Neb. I 

Jacobson, Carl M |Brewster and Kimbrae; Forada, Sedan andi 

Brooten Minn. 

Barker, Oakland and Letitia Tex. 

Twin Brooks — Zion S. D. 

Walsenburg, Second and Huerfano's Canon 
(Mexican) Colo. 

Unionville, First Mo. 

Corozal and Naranjito P. R. 

Yetten — Armenian, First Calif. 

D.D Fredericktown, First and Stations Mo. 

Grand Saline and Wills Point Tex. 

Dewey, First Okla. 

District Missionary (Indian) Okla. 

Missionary among the Dakota Indians — Pine 
Ridge Agency S. D. 

Nanih Chito, Kulli — Tuklo Big Lick, Spring 
Hill and Buffalo Okla. 

Seattle — Grace Wash. 

Huntington, First and Shiloh Tenn. 

Big Fork, First and Lumber Camp Work[ 

Minn. 

Johnson, M. Craig Nacogdoches — Main Street lex. 

Johnson, N. C Pastor Evangelist Neb. 

Johnson, Samuel W Oxford, Second Pa. 

Johnson, W.J Cottonwood, Morgan Mill, Exray, First, 

Bosque, and Station Tex. 

Willow City, First and Station N. D. 

Antler, First N. D. 

Callao, Mt, Zion and New Harmony Mo. 

Indian Wells Ariz. 

Dodd City, Lannuis, Windom and Spring Hill 

. Tex. 

Haileyville .First and Station Okla 

Fate and Rockwall Tex 

Geronimo and Stations Okla 

Grandview, Henderson, Mt, Hope and New 
Harmony Tex 

Kaufman, First Tex 

Glengarry, First Mont. 

Springfield — Evans and Strafford — New Prov- 
idence Mo 

Juneau — Thlinget, Douglas — Thlinget and 

Station Alas. . . 

Jones, Richard Pony, First and Station Mont 

Jones, Robert L Lanesboro, First Minn. 

Jones, Samuel H Pastor Evangelist Calif. 

Jones, Stephen H Clovis, First N. M. 

Jones, William Midland, First S. D. 

Jones, William H Tenino — Christ's Wash. 

Joslin, Morten Gillette, First; Cody, First and Station . Wyo. 

Junek, Frank Wagner — Bohemian S. D. 

*Junker, Valentine Emery — German S. D. 

Junkin, Clarence M Wendell, First and Stations Ida. 

Kallina, Emanuel J South Omaha Bohemian and Moravian Breth- 
ren Neb. 

Kamm, John Manchester — First German N. H. 

Kane, Hugh Waverly Minn. 

Kapteyn, P. J Novata Calif. 

Kardoss, Joseph St. Louis — Hungarian Mission Mo. 

Karges. Frank E Nisbet— Oliver N. D.| 



Johnston, C. Garman 
Johnston, Thomas . . . 

Johnston, W. H 

Johnston, William R. 
Joiner, John Willis . . 



*Jolly, Ibzan V. 
*Jones, B. W. . . 
Jones, David I. . 
Jones, G. W 



Jones, Ilion T 

Jones, John E 

* Jones, J. Russell. 



Jones, Livingston F. 



S S 



s s 
P 



s s 
s s 



s s 
s s 



s s 
p 
p 



s s 
p 
s s 

s s 



s s 



s s 
s s 



s s 
p 
s s 



12 

5 
12 
12 

2 

3 
12 

9 
12 

5 

7 
12 
12 

2y 2 

12 

4 I 



9 ! 

3 

11 



30 



1 


1 


3 


2 




2 






2 


7 


3 


4 


2 


G 



*No Report. 



184 



MISSIONARIES. 



[1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



ts S 



Additions to 
Churches. 



1* 

Hi 



Eastanek, Rudolph . 



♦Kearns, Carl E 

♦Keeling, George P . . . 
Keener, Andrew Ivory . 

Kegel, Arnold H 

Kelley, Dwight S 

Kelley, John H 



Kelsey, Spaflford 

Kennedy, James D., M.D . 



♦Kennedy, R. H. . 

Kennon, S. E 

Kerby, William F . 



*Kerr, T. C 

Kersten, George C. . . . 

Kessler, J. G 

Ketchum, H. A., D.D. 

Keusseff, Theodore M . 
Kilbourn, Chalmers . . 

Killian, W. L 

Kilpatrick, Charles M . 



Kilpatrick, W. W 

King, Robert L 

Kinninook, David 

Kirk, Lucian P 

Kirkpatrick, W. A 

*Klass, CarlN 

Klemme, Hermann G.. 

Kline, Nelson B 

Klinger, Albert 

Knott, John W 

Koffend, Robert J 

Koonce, M. E., Ph. D . 

*Koper, W. H 

Krebs, Adolph 



Krolfifer, Julius F. 



Kruse, Miss E. Louise. . 
Kuntz, Eugene B., D.D . 

Kunze, W. Charles 

Kusiw, Basil 



Lafonso, Elmer 

LaFuerza, Narciso. . . 
LaGrange, Sam'l W.. . 
*Lake, Leo Clarence. . 

Lamb, Clarence 

Lamb, Jasper R , 

Lamb, Ralph J 

Landes, Philip S 

Landis, Evan Mohr . . 

Lang, William G 

fLange, John G 

*Langton, Joseph F.. . 
Lanktree, William H. 
*LaPointe, Pierre . . . 
Latchaw, Eli Louis . . 
Latimer, Jeremiah B. 
Latta, J. L 



Laurie, David K. 



S S 



P 
P 

S s 
S s 



s s 



s s 
p 



s s 



s s 
s s 



s s 



Astoria and Dutchkills Bohemian Missions; 
New York City — Bohemian Brethren 

N. Y. 

Watertown, First S. D. 

Rolla Mo 

University Place — Westminster Neb 

Lansing (German) la. 

Schell City Mo 

Fayetteville — Carl Walker Memorial, Mt 
Comfort, Reiff 's Chapel and Station Ark 

Dayton Mont, 

Ganada Medical Missionary to the Navajo 

Indians Ariz 

Yergensville, Fairfieldand Aurora Ore.| 

Stephenville, First Tex. 

Brownfield, Lou and Stations; Lewisville, 

First and Flower Mound Tex. 

New Concord and Falmouth Ky .| 

Blue Hill, First and Bloomington Neb. 

Sutter— Salem 111. 

Mt. Pleasant, Oak Park, Oak Ridge and 

Station Ore. 

Panguitch Mission and Station Utah 

Bushland, Estelline, Newlin and Vega . . . .Tex. 

Toppenish, First and Station Wash. 

Red Springs — John Sergeant Memorial and 

Station (Indian) Wis. 

Jerome, First and Station Ida. 

Bonanza, First Ark. 

Ketchikan (Interpreter) Alas. 

Prestonsburg Ky. 

Randolph Tex. 

Seattle— West Side Wash. 

Harlowton, First Mont. 

Fort Collins, Second Colo. 

Foreman and Stations Ark. S S 

Yoncalla, First Ore. S S 

Wendell, First and Stations Ida. 

Cordova Alas. 

Bremerton, First and Station Wash 

Hermann — Nazareth, Hermann — Zion and 
Station Mo 

New York City— Labor Temple (Helper) 

N. Y. 

New York City— Holy Trinity (Visitor) N. Y. 

Loma, First Colo. S S 

Shiro, Cobbs Creek and Concord Tex. 

Newark — First Ruthenian St. Peter and Paul 
N. J. 

Assistant to Evangelist-at-large 

Limones and Rodas Missions Cuba 

Spring Park and Crystal Bay Missions. Minn. S. S. 

Allison, First and Tiffany-Union Colo.| 

Crosby, First and Stations N. D.I 

Pastor Evangelist Colo. 

Pastor Evangelist Okla.l 

Sartell, First and Little Falls-Westminster | 

Minn. | S. S. 

Hover, First Wash.| S. S. 

Paducah-Kentucky Avenue Ky. S. S. 

Dundee, Newlin, Estelline and Bushland Tex. 

Fall River, First Mass. 

McLeod and Station N. D. S. S. 

Hill-Indian S. D. 

Sabin, First Minn. S. S. 

Ringwood Okla. S. S. 

Fontaine, St. Paul, Emmett, Melrose and 

Artesia Ark. S. S. 

Pastor Evangelist, Minn.; Pastor Evang. Ore. 



12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
9 

12 
4 

12 

|12 
5 

12 
7 
4 
9 

12 
12 
3 

12 

12 

1 

9 
12 

2 
12 
12 
10 
12 

9 
12 

3 
12 
12 

12 

12 
12 

5 

7 

12 
2 
6 

12 
5 

iy 

7 
12 

7H 

5 
12 

3 

9 

3 
12 
12 
12 

\Wi 
12 



26 



IS 



10 



22 



14 



57 



140 
45 



30 

210 



42 
07 



33 



52 
38 



27 



24 

70 
79 
32 
32 

24 



49 



32 
90 



155 



17 

11 

125 



110 
50 
63 



27 
60 



100 

45 
75 



♦No Report. fDeceased. 



1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



185 



MISSIONARIES. 



Lay, Dirk 

Layman, Lafayette 

Leavitt, Nathaniel 

Lee, E. Franklin 

Lee, Ellen P 

Lee, John William 

Leeper, Charles B 

Lehmann, A. E 

Lehr, Edith, Miss 

Lepeltak, Cornelius 

fLewis, D. M 

Lewis, Lorenzo Dow 

Lewis, Richard C 

Lewis, Richard W 

Lewis, Robert Lee 

Lewis, T. Henry 

Lewis, Thomas 

*Lheureux, Eli S 

Light, Samuel 

Liles, Edwin Hart 

Lilly, George A. M 

Lindner, George, J., Ph.D 

Lindsay, Marcus E 

Lindsay, Wilfred 

♦Lindsay, Edward Austin , 

Lindsey, E. J 

*Lindsley, Peter 

*Lininger, Joel C 

Linn, Alexander 

Linn, Otis L 

Litherland, Alexander . . . 

Liva, Arcangelo, M. D. . . 
Livingston, William L.. . . 

Lloyd, Starr H. 

Locker, A. K 

Lockton, Grace, Miss. . . . 

Loew, Edward 

Logie, George 

*Long, M. DeWitt, D. D. 
Longbottom, James A.. . . 

Longbrake, Carl R 

Longstaff , George 

Lonsdale, Frank 

Lopez, Jose 

Loveless, James V 

Lowrie, W. J 

Lowry, William Scott. . . . 

Lucero, A. V 

Lugo, Cristobal 

Lugo, Evaristo, Prof 

Lugo, Maria P 

Lugo, Ramon Ortiz 

*Lyle, David Miller 

Lyle, J. M 

Lyle, James P 

*Lynd, Samuel E., Ph.D . 

McAdams, J. L 

McAllister, James A 

McAmis, Sam'l Lowry. . . , 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



Pima, Third, Fourth and Stations-Indian 

Ariz. 

McFall and Chula Mo. 

Forada and Lowry Minn. 

Birmingham-West End Ala. 

Labor Temple (Nurse and teacher) . . . . N. Y. 

Waterloo, Sego and Sherrods Ala. 

Beaver, First Okla. 

Omaha-Parkvale Neb. 

John Hus-Bohemian (Assistant) N. Y. 

Clear Lake — First Holland S. D. 

Green Valley Mo. 

Fairview, Salem and Station Ala. 

Tucson — Papago Indian Mission (Helper) 

Ariz. 

Pans, First Tenn. 

Corvallis and Grantsdale Mont. 

Seattle — Georgetown Wash. 

Pima, Third (Helper) Ariz. 

San Sebastian P. R. 

Pastor Evangelist Neb. 

Colorado Springs — Boulder Street Colo. 

Redmond, First; Tygh Valley and Stations 

Ore. 
The Northern Liberties, First of Philadelphia 

Pa. 

Boise — Bethany and Station Ida. 

New Market and Bethel Union Ky. 

Louisville, Fourth Ky. 

District Missionary S. D. 

Meadow Creek — Indian Ida. 

Los Molinos and Station Calif. 

Tarpon Springs, First; Pinellas Park and 

Station Fla. 

Roseville, First Calif . 

Stites, First, Kooshia, Mt. Zion and Station 

Ida. 

Staten Island Italian Mission N. Y. 

Birmingham — First Avenue Woodlawn. . . Ala 

Lucan and New Avon Missions Minn 

McDowell and Stations; Tolchaco Indian 

Mission Ariz 

Clinton — Italian Ind. 

Shakopee, Minn.; Salem, First S. D. 

Tucson Training School Ariz 

Sheridan, First Wyo 

Elbe, First and Mineral, First Wash 

Charleston, First Wash 

Lynch, First and Apple Creek Neb 

Pacific, Moselle and Station Mo 

Paso Real; Pinar del Rio Cuba 

Lake Arthur, Dayton and Cumberland. N. M. 
(Daggett Brook, Suttons School-house and 

Gibbs School-house Missions; Lumber 

Camp Work Minn. 

Pastor Evangelist, Calif.; Pastor Evang. Ida. 

Embudo — -Mexican N. M. 

San Sebastian (Helper) P. R. 

Mayaguez Training School P. R. 

San German (Bible Reader) P. R. 

Lajas, Palmarejo and Stations, Mayaguez 

P. R. 

Goldfield, First Colo. 

Mound and Badlands Mission N. D. 

Mason, Menard and Pecan Grove Tex. 

Dixon, First Calif. 

Booneville Ark. 

Mayaguez Training School and Stations 

P. R. 
Thermopolis, First Wyo. 

*No Report. tDeceased. 



o a 



S. S. 
S. S. 

p 

s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 

p 

s. s. 



s. s. 

s. s. 

p 



■s. s. 
s. s. 



s. s. 
p 



s. s. 

s. s. 



P E 



s s 
s s 
s s 



s s 



s s 

P E 



■aB 



12 

9 

6 

9 

6 
12 

VA 
11 

12 
10 
12 

12 
3 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 



12 
12 

6 
12 
12 
11 

6 

10 
12 

12 
12 
12 
3H 

12 

12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

7 

3H 
12 
12 



5 
12 

9 
12 
12 

12 
12 

3H 
12 
12 

5 



Additions to 
Churches. 



S S 12 
P |12 



69 



25 



7 
11 

20 
2 
10 



o.2 
"* c 

"I 
O 



430 

36 
50 

83 
53 
49 

38 

55 



112 
69 
125 



56 

20 

160 
4S 
30 



22 
I 50 
I 

72 

53 

• ! 

i 

li 61 



450 

65 
86 

100 
75 
135 

30 

50 



100 

70 

231 



80 

52 

414 

85 
90 



34 
220 



125 
65 



75 



161 
45 



65 



50 
43 



644 
70 



420 
60 



186 



MISSIONARIES. 



[1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



McCaffity, Sam 'IF.... 
McCahon, George. . . . 

McCain, George L 

McCaleb, H. Y 

McCall, John 

McCall, John, Mrs 

McCampbell, Chas T. . 
McCaslin, D. S., D.D. 
*McChesney, H. Field. 



McClain, Albert M 

McClain, Josiah 

McClelland, A. C 

McClelland, Alva R 

♦McClelland, Melzar D. 

McCluney, John T 

*McCluney, Smith G. . . 

McClung, Arthur J 

McClure, William H. . . . 
*McCombs, Harry W. . . 
*McConnell, Chas. C . . . 

McConnell, James 

*McConnell, W. G 

McCorkle, David S 

McCornack, Jirah S. . . 
McCracken, Sam'l D. . 



McCracken, W. Henry. 
McCreary, Fred M. . . . 
McCroskey, John A. . . 
*McCutcheon, H. S.. . . 



McDaniel, J. Walton . . 
McDonald, Edwin A.. . 

McDonald, J. A., D.D. 
McDonald, James F. . . 



*McDonald, J. S 

McDougall, George F. . 
♦McDowell, William A. 
McElhinney, James M. 
*McEwan, Henry 



McGaw, J. A. P., D.D. 
McGee, Will Vannoy . . 



McGlothlan, A. W 

McHenry, Herbert 

Mclnnis, James 

Mcintosh, D. M 

Mclver, Andrew C 

Mclvor, Sam 

McJunkin,:John H. . . . 
*McKean, Frank L. . . . 
McKee, John C, Ph.D. 
McKinnon, Andrew . . . 
McKnight, Julius M. . . 
McLarty, M. I., Miss. . 

McLaughlin, D. B 

McLean, Allen F 

McLean, Robert, D.D.. 

McLennan, J. D 



McLennan, John W. 
McMican, B. F 



fMcMillan, Duncan . 
McNeel, Albert W. . 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



o a 

u 3 

gt/j 



Additions to 
Churches 



S S 



P 

S S 



S s 



s s 
s s 



s s 



p 

s s 



Wellington, First and Station Tex. 

Arnegard Precinct-Bethel N. D. 

Mattapan — St. Paul's Mass 

Alva, Big Creek and New Ebenezer .... Miss 

Lumber Camp Evangelist Minn 

Visiting Hospitals among Lumbermen. Minn. 

Moorcroft and Stations Wyo. 

Pastor Evangelist Minn 

Ignacio; Trinidad, Second and Las Animas, 

Second (Mexican) Colo 

Spokane — Bethany and Station Wash 

Synodical Missionary Utah 

Xederland and Stations Colo. 

Oak Forest and Stations Mo. 

Pikeville, First Ky 

Beaver Creek, Mt. Nebo and Station. Ala 

East Lake — Reed Ala 

Benson, First Neb 

James Hayes — Indian Utah 

Fort Pierce, First and Station Fla 

Tishomingo, First Okla 

Lansford and Central School House N. D 

Gunnison — Tabernacle Colo 

Labor Temple (Student Worker) N. Y 

Great Falls — Grace and Station Mont 

Pollock, First, S. D.; Surrey and Logan. 

N. D.|P 

Hitchcock, First S. D. 

Okanogan, First, Oroville and Station. Wash. 

Kaw City Okla. 

Weldon, Goodrich, Orchard, First and 
Station; LaPorte Colo. 

St. Paul, First and Dickson Tenn. 

Isabela, Quebradillas, Jobos and Stations 

P. R. 

Pastor Evangelist Okla. 

Philadelphia, Deemer, Line Prairie and 
Neshoba Miss. 

Corte Madera and Larkspur Calif. 

Orleans, First Neb. 

San Antonio— West End Tex. 

San Francisco — Holly Park Calif. 

Roseau, First; Stephen, First and Station 

Minn. 

Chemawa Indian School Ore. 

Creswell, First; Lake Creek — Blachly and 
Stations Ore. 

Cumberland Ridge Mo. 

Atwater, First Minn. 

Cokeville, First Wyo. 

Pastor Evangelist N. D. 

Naches Heights Wash. 

Westhope, First N. D. 

Pastor Evangelist Mont. 

Pine City, First Minn. 

Coachella Calif. 

Tillar, McArthur and Station Ark. 

Lake Andes S. D. 

Mayaguez — Rye Hospital (Nurse) P. R 

Pastor Evangelist Wash 

Haines — Chilcat Alas 

Superintendent of Mexican Work in the 
Southwest 



S S 
S S 



S S 



s s 



Hannaford, First, N. D.; Mt. Vernon, First 
and Dayville Ore 

Hickman, First and LaGrange, First. Calif. 

Liberty, Mt. Moriah, Oak Grove and Port- 
land Ky. 

Vesta, Ashford and Underwood Minn. 

Eastonville, First and Elbert, First Colo. 

*No Report. fDeceased. 



S S 
S S 
S S 



S S 
P 



S S 



12 

4 

3 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

12 
12 
12 

6 
12 
12 
12 
12 

4}/ 
12 
12 

8 

3H 
10 

5^ 

7 

12 

12 
12 

12 
12 

12 

12 

12 
3 
6 

12 
12 

7 
12 

10 
12 
12 

4 
12 
12 
11 

9 
12 

5 

12 
12 
12 

12 



-10 



S S 



10} 2 

12 



1 

10 

1 
1 

12 






I* 



54 



4r. 



140 
27 



39 150 



130 



64 



101 
45 
41 
25 



250 



150 
94 



144 
75 



134 
50 
60 
SO 



55 
176 



105 
59 



50 

00 

90 

75 



60| 140 



110 



23 



30 
120 



30 
100 



117 



35 



60 108 



1913.1 



MISSIONARIES. 



187 



MISSIONARIES. 



♦McNiece, Robt. G., D.D.. 
McPhail, Samuel M 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



p^j2 



McRuer, Duncan. . . . 
McShan, James E. . . . 
McSpadden, Thos. E. 

McVicker, Elmer E.. , 
McWilliams, John . . . 



Brigham, First Utah 

Detroit, Stone's Chapel, Shamrock and 

Bagwell Tex.l 

McPherson, S. A [Miama, Mendota, Glazier and Gem City. | 

Tex. | 

Pastor Evangelist Okla.l 

Fairfield Miss.j 

Booneville, Assistant Synodical Superin- I 

tendent Ark. 

Gervais and Yergensville Ore. 

Creedmore, Davilla, Granger and Station 

Tex. 

Woodville — Hope and Stations Ore. 

Fort Lapwai, First Ida. 

Omemee N. D. 

Crosby, First and Stations N. D. 

Munich, First N. D. 

Burns, First and Station Wyo. 

Pastor Evangelist Ida. 

Langford, First S. D. 

Marfa Tex. 

Wellpinit, Spokane River and Spokane. . 

Valley Wash. 

Mattapan — St. Paul's Mass. 

Souris and Dewey N. D. 

Pastor Evangelist Colo. 

Macmillan, John M iKintyre, First and Braddock, First N. D, 

MacMinn, William A |Kimmswick — Windsor Harbor and Sulphur 

Springs Mo 



MacAllister, John, D. D.. . . 

*MacDonald, A. N 

MacDonald, Fred A 

*MacDonald, Rosmond M.. 

IMacEachern, Duncan 

MacFadyen, Robertson .... 

MacGillivray, John K 

MacGowan, James W 

Macintosh, James 

Mackey, Wm. A., D.D 



MacKinnon, A. D. 
MacLean, John R. 
MacLeod, M. H., D.D. 



Macmurray, Thomas J 

Macon, William S 

Madero, Manuel M 

*Madsen, Axel, D. D 

Maes, Amadeo 

Magill, Frank H 

Maier, Frederick 

*Makey, Moses 

Malone, Orrin K 

Man, Grant H. W 

♦Manifold, William J 

*Manly, Alexander H 

Mann, Joseph William 

*Mansveld, Karel R 

*Mapson, Joseph C 

Mark, John Henry 

Markley, Stanley K 

Marris, William H 

Marrs, Samuel E 

Marsden, Edward 

Marsh, Horatio R., M. D.. . 

Marsh, Wallace H 

Marshman, David M 

Martin, Daniel S 

Martin, George W 

Martin, G. W., D. D 

Martin, James M 

Martin, J. W 

Martinez, Jose 



Martinez, Jose A. . . . 
Martinez, Lucas 
Martinez, Miguel E.. 

Martinez, Rafael Q. . 

Martyn, A. G 

Mason, Albert S 

Mathes, E. E 

Matheson, Angus . . . 



St. Paul— Ninth Minn 

Sanger, First Calif 

Morenci and Metcalf — Mexican Ariz 

St. Paul — Golgotha (Dano-Norwegian) Minn 
La Luz, Los Pinos, Redeemer, San Rafael 

and Stations Colo. 

St. Louis— Oak Hill Mo. 

Hillsboro and Stations Mo. 

Mountain Head — Indian S. D. 

Strool, Cash and Grandview S. D. 

Bear Creek — Indian Mission (Helper) . .S. D. 

Seattle — Interbay Wash. 

New Decatur — West Side Ala. 

Culdesac Ida. 

Golden Rod and Mayflower S. D. 

Tenstrike, Kelliher and Station Minn. 

Evansville, Ashby, Carlos and Garfield. . 

Minn. | 

Hillsdale, Areola and Station . Wyo.f 

Ravenden Springs and Smithville Ark. 

Lowell Ark. 

Saxman and Stations Alas. 

Point Barrow Alas. 

Fullerton and Station N. D. 

Tehama and Station Calif. 

Kansas City — East Side Mo. 

Houston — Woodland Heights Tex. 

Manti and Ephraim Utah 

Meeker, First Okla. 

Reserve, First, and Station — Indian. ... . . Wis. 

Ensenada, Parguera and Salinas Missions 

P. R.'| 

LaPlata and Stations (Helper) P. R.| 

Mexican Helper N. M. 

Monte Grande and Porto Real Missions 

(Helper) P. R. 

Douglas (Mexican) Ariz. 

Roscoe, First S. D. 

Patterson, First Calif. 

Mesilla Park N. M. 

Elk Grove, First; Tracy, First Calif. 

*No Report. tDeceased. 



ttfl 



S S 

S s 
s s 

s s 
s s 



s s 
s s 

s s 

p 

p 

s s 
p 

s s 
s s 



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p 



s s 



s s 
s s 
p 

s s 
p 



s s 
p 
p 
p&ss 
p 



p 

s s 
s s 

s s 



Additions to 
Churches 



m 

12 

112 1 

112 

112 

12 
6 



11 
2)i 

51, 

4 
10 

7 

1 
12 
12 

7 

12 
7 
12 
12 
12 

12 
12 

12 
12 
6 

12 

12 
4 
12 

12 

12 
12 
12 

6 

(i 

12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
6 

sy 2 

1 

12 
12 
12 
12 

6 

4 
12 



12 
12 
12 

sy 2 



12 



37 
4 
2 

14 
7 



28 



188 



MISSIONARIES. 



[1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



Maxwell, Sam'l H. 

*May, Mark A 

*Mayne, Samuel . . 



Mayo, H. B 

Mays, Albert Sellers. 
*Mays, J. Weston. . . 
Mazzorana, Antonia. 

*Mead, M. H 

Means, James T 

Medford, Frank J. . . 
Meeker, Benjamin C 

Meeker, John 

Meier, Rudolph 

Meinders, Hans J. . . 
Mendez, Manuel. . . . 

*Merriam, C. L 

Merritt, C. Z 

Mershon, Isaac S.. . . 

Meyer, Dirk J 

*Meyer, H. Lewis . . . 

Meyer, William 

Michel, Carl T 

Middlemass, Wm. S. 
Miedema, William B 
Miksovsky, Joseph . . 
Miles, James T. J. . . 
♦Millar, James 



Matheson, Duncan IMesilla Park, First N. M 

Mathews, Robert T |Louisville — Calvary Ky 

Matteson, Edward E |Coal Harbor — Morning Watch, Alexander 

and Darling N. D. 

Twin Bridges, First Mont. 

Logan Memorial Tenn. 

Malheur, Ironside — Locey Memorial and 
Station Ore. 

DeBeque, First Colo. 

Carlisle, Third Pa. 

Thayer, First, and Mammoth Springs . . .Ark. 

Regla, Guanabacoa and Station Cuba 

Sunny Slope, First and Station Ida. 

[Sayre, First Okla. 

Basin, First Wyo. 

Rincon and Station N. M. 

Mt. Pleasant and Station. Utah 

Iowa and Kickapoo Indian Missions. . .Kans. 

Lismore, First and Hardwick Minn. 

Espinal and Rincon P. R. 

Reserve, First and Stations — Indian .... Wis. 

San Francisco — Green Street Calif. 

Melrose and Stations Mont. 

Drake — Immanuel and Zoar Mo 

New Salem, First N. D. 

Superintendent of Indian Work Okla 

Harlan, First Ky. 

Minneapolis — Homewood Minn 

Elsimore Calif 

Rosenberg and Stations — Bohemian Tex. 

Vamore — Toquah Tenn. 

Milliken, First Colo 

Miller, Abbie L., Miss |Yankton Indian Agency (Field Matron) 

S. D 

College Place, First Wash. 

Associate Synodical Superintendent. Tenn. . . 

Kansas City — Prospect Avenue Mo 

Dixon, Mt. Bethel and Webster Miss 

Arapahoe, First, and Stations Colo 

Pastor Evangelist Mont. 

Racine — Bohemian Brethren and Station ) 
Wis 

Aztec and Flora Vista N. M. 

Cleveland — Italian West Side Mission. . .Ohio 

Elizabeth and Kiowa Colo. 

Tolchaco Indian Mission Ariz. 

St. Joseph — Calvary; Dodson and Marl- 
borough Mo. 

Ironton, Patterson and Piedmont Mo. 

Pastor Evangelist Mo. 

Buhl, First Ida 

Ozark and Stations Mo. 

Albany — Grace Ore 

Nueva Paz, Palos and San Nicolas Cuba 

Colorado Springs — Emmanuel Colo. 

Pinellas Park, Center Hill and Station. Fla. 

Kamiah, Second — Indian Ida. 

Parker, First Wash. 

Pastor Evangelist Neb. 

Synodical Evangelist Ky. 

Buckhorn, Waverly, Livermore and Vir- 
ginia D ale Colo 

Atlanta — Harris Street Ga, 

Taos and Stations; Clovis, First N. M 

Blanchard, Rosedale and Station Okla. 

San Antonio — Denver Boulevard and Har- 

landale Tex. 

Morgan, E. C Meadow and Stations S. D. 

Morgan, O. L Nisbet— Oliver N. D. 



Miller, Harvey V 

Miller, J. H., D. D 

Miller, John Henderson . 

♦Milling, Daniel N 

Mills, William J., D. D.. 
Minamyer, Albert B.. . . 
Mineberger, Vaclav 



Minton, W. B., D. D. 

Minutilla, Alfio 

Mitchell, Bert F 

Mitchell, Fred G. . . . 
Mitchell, George A. . . 



Mitchell, Joel T 

Mitchell, James W 

Mitchell, William J 

Mitchtlmore, Chas H. . . 

Mochel, Levi S 

Monasterio, Jose 

Monfort, David G 

Monks, Walter A 

Monteith, Moses 

Montgomery, D. M 

Montgomery, David W. 

Moore, Frank E 

Moore, Franklin 



Moore, Jere A 

Moore, Jeremiah, D. D. 

Moore, William E 

Morey, Lewis Hall 



S S 
P 



P 
P 

S S 

s s 
p 



s s 
p 



s s 
p 

s s 
s s 
s s 



p 

s s 



u 

•a £ 



Additions to 
Churches 



5 
12 

12 

5 

6 

12 

12 
12 
12 

6 
12 
12 
10 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
11 
12 
12 
12 

6 

12 

12 

12 
12 
12 
12 



S S 



P 

S S 



31 



2 

41 



IS 



13 



P&SS 


', 2 


, 


s s 


12 
2 




p 


12 

7 


16 


s s 


12 




s s 


12 

7 


14 


s s 


4 




s s 


12 


2 



12 


8 


12 




12 


6 


7 




12 


2 


12 


11 


12 




5 





30 



o£ 



s s 


1 

12 


5 


1 


s s 


12 


7 


15 


P&SS 


11^ 


4 


6 


s s 


12 




3 


s s 


12 


5 


16 



3^1 



*No Report. 



1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



189 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



■sg 

o 
o 



Additions to 
Churches. 



Morgan, Oscar T., Ph.D. 

Morgan, William T 

Morley, George R 

Morris, Nelson J 

Morris, William Jesse. . . . 

*Morrison, C. E 

Morrison, H. S 

Morrison William M 

Morrow, A. B 

Morrow, Winfield S 

Moseley, R. K 

Motter, Wm. Arthur. . . . 

Mowry, T. G 

Moxedano, Louis 

Mueller, John F 

Mulder, Teis 

Munford, James T 

Murphy, Charles B 

Murphy, Edward N 

Murphy, Wildman 

Murray, Hazen T 

Murray, James 

Mutschler, Albert H 

Myers, Robert H 

Nagle, W. O 

Napp, James E 

Nash, William A 

Nation ,Henry C 

*Neal, George W 

Needels, George T 

Neel, Edward Thomas. . . 

Nefi , C. A 

Nelson, John E 

Nethery, Thomas G 

Newland, Lorenzo D 

♦Newport, M. F 

♦Newsom, C. S 

Newton, Francis H 

♦Nicholson, A. H 

Nicholson, Jeseph B 

Nicholson, Wm. Thomas. 

♦Nicholson, Wm. Thomas 

♦Nickell, W. Nelson 

Niebruegge, Robert 

Noble, Wm. B.,D. D.... 

Noehren. Arthur G 

♦Norris, D. D 

Noyes, Heman A 

Nugent, Charles R 

Nuin, Gonzalo 

Nunn, Nathaniel G 

Nutting, Ansel E 

Oakes, R. Welton 

♦O'Connor, Thomas J.. . . 

Odell, Edward A 

O "Dell, Herbert W 

♦Olander, E. F 

Oldenburg, Ernst A , 

Olmstead, Horatio F 



Lakeview, First; Merrill, First and Mt. Laki 

Ore 

Punta Gorda Fla 

Penrose — Kirkwood Memorial Colo. 

District Missionary's Assistant Okla. 

Crafton, CundifF, Newport and Vashti. . .Tex 

Salem, First S. D 

Pastor Evangelist N. D 

Covelo — Round Valley Calif. 

Irma, Martin, Ishawooa and Valley Missions 

Wyo 

Burley, First and Marshfield; Augur Falls, 

Arcadia and Orchard Valley Ida. 

Moro, First and Monkland; Pine Valley, 

Carson and Stations Ore 

Skykomish and Baring Missions Wash, 

St. John — St. Andrews N. D, 

White Plains and Mt. Vernon-Italian . .N. Y. 

Omaha — First German Neb. 

Eureka and Elm Grove Okla 

Vancouver Heights and Minnehaha.. . .Wash 

Wayne — Bethel and Rush-Calvary Colo 

oise — Pierce Park and Station Ida 

American Fork and Stations Utah 

Clinton First and Stations Wash. 

Nezperce, Ida.; Othello and Ralston. . .Wash. 
Duluth — Highland Park and House of Hope 

Minn. 

Pastor Evangelist N. D. 

Dawson Springs Ky. 

Pennock, Willrnar and Stations Minn. 

Jefferson, First Okla. 

San Francisco — Parkside . . Calif. 

Greenwood, Liberty and Weir's Chapel Ark. 

Liberty Missions N. M. 

Kemp, Kaufman, Lone Oak and Jiba.. . .Tex. 

Labor Temple (Student Worker) N. Y. 

Friday Harbor, First and Emmanuel . . Wash 

Green River, First Utah 

Lewiston and Utica Minn. 

Pine Bluffs — First Union and Stations; 

Saratoga, First Wyo. 

Omemee, First N. D. 

Wilbur, First; Creston and Sherman.. .Wash 

Altus — Denning Ark 

Bokoshe, McCurtain, Quinton and Stations 

Okla 

Bellefonte, Baines, Pleasant Hill and Station 

Ark 

Blanket and Zephyr Tex, 

Lowry City and Coal Mo. 

Worthing Mission S. D. 

Synodical Missionary Calif 

Wahkon and Onamia Minn.| 

Fairview — Lower Yellowstone Mont.J 

Valley and Fruitvale Ore.f 

Texas City Tex.l 

LaPica, Sabana Grande and Stations; 

Isabela and Quebradillas (Helper).. P. R.| 
Vasco, Lake Creek, Cooper and Ben Frank- 
lin Tex 

Wapato, First Wash 

Davis, First Okla 

Brisbane and Raleigh . . . N. D 

San Juan, Second and Stations P._ R 

Willow River, Bruno and Station Minn. 

Euclid, First and Stations; ♦Roosevelt, 

First Minn 

St. Paul— East Minn, 

Pastor Evangelist Tex, 

♦No report. 



S S 
P 

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s s 
s s 



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190 



MISSIONARIES. 



[1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 









O 




JD 








1-J-g 


t, 3 


•« F 














^3 

C/3 





Additions to 
Churches 




♦Oltmans, Oltman B 
Orman, David G. . . 

Orr, E. L 

Orr, James Calvin. . 



Orr, Wm. David 

Orr, W. M 

Orr, Zachariah Taylor 

Osborn, Wm. M 

Osborn. W. S 

Osborne, J. C 



Sibley — First German Iowa 

Harmony, Valley Grove and Calera Ala. 

Lewisburg and Farmington Tenn. 

Cowan and Winchester, Tenn.; Wilbur, First 

Wash. 

Cabot, Mt. Carmel and Ward Ark. 

Idaho Springs, First and Stations Colo. 

Versailles — Westminster Mo. 

Millarton and Sydney Missions N. D. 

Douglas Mission (Lay Worker) Alas 

IVictor. First Mont.l 

I *No Report. 

Potomac and Lumber Camps Mont 

Waurika and Ryan Okla 

Fairy Tex 

Blossburg and Station Ala 

Ordway, First and Station S. D 

San German District (Student) Cuba 

Blunt, First S. D. 

Wishek — Grace and King N. D 

Ranger, First, Eolian and Avoca Tex 

Lindsay, Paoli and Maysville Okla 

Emmett, First Ida 

Portal, First N. D. 

Bonner's Ferry Ida 

Cuba — Bohemian Kans. 

Three Forks, First Mont 

Paris Ark 

Patterson, Samuel S IBishop, First and Station Calif. | 

Patterson, Thos. M., Jr |Pastor Evangelist Mont. 

Patton, W. Erwin Payson and Benjamin Utah 

Payne, George M Stirum, First, and Crete N. D. 

*Pearman, Wm. T Dodson and Station Mo. 

Pearson, Herschel Surrey, First and Logan N. D. 

Pearson, M. A Missionary to Cherokee Indians (Tahlequah 

District) Okla. 

Peck, E. G Wetonka, First, and Station S. D. 

Peebles, Henry M Baird, First Tex. 

*Peirce, John D Selma Ala. 

Percy, Albert W Gillette, First Wyo. 

Perea, C. H Richmond, Second, and Station Ky. 

♦Perkins, Hal M Poteau Okla. 

Perkins, Otis G Selmer, Mt. Sharon, Antioch and Adams- 

ville Tenn. 

Perkins, Silas Mt. Vernon and Dayville Missions Ore. 

Perpetuo, A. H Long Prairie, First Minn. 

Perrin, P. Percival Wittan and Stations S. D. 

Perry, William F Belton, Mo.; Westminster Tex. 

*Peter, Harvey Holden and Station Okla. 

Peters, O. B Merricourt, First and Station N. D. 

Peters, William Maricopa, First, and Pima, Second (Helper) 

I Ariz 

Petersen, August [Renville — Ebenezer Minn. 

*Peyton, W. G | Sentinel, First and Granite, First Okla 





1 

12 


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12 


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12 


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Osborne, J. L 

*Ott, E. F 

Overcash, Hinton R. . . . 

*Overton, W. A 

*Owen, Hugh H 

Pagan, A 

♦Palmer, Fred A 

Palmer, James M 

Parker, J. Wood 

Parker, Lyman B 

Parker, Stanton A 

Parkes, John Richard. . . 

*Parks, D. W 

Paroulek, Frederick. . . . 

♦Patterson, John C 

Patterson, Robert Mead 



1 


1 

6 




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6 




7 




7 




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S s 


11 




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Phelps, FredC. 
Phelps, Rufus L. . . . 
Phend, Clarence D. 

Phillips, Simeon K. 



Phipps, Robt. J., D. D.. 

Pickens, John C 

Pickens, Rome 

Picotte, S. LaF., M. D.. 

Pierce, Albert W 

Piercy, William 



Pillsbury, Ira Harris. 
Pinkston, Hartford . . 



IWhitefish Mont 

Pastor Evangelist Miss. 

New Providence, Millard and Mt. Moriah 

Mo 
Double Springs, Post Oak and Stations 

Tenn 

Watonga, First Okla 

Titusville Fla 

Moulton, Pilgrim's Rest and Station Ala 

Omaha — Indian Mission Neb 

Green Cove Springs, First and Station Fla 
Minden, Pleasant Springs, Tennessee, New 

Prospect and Willow Springs Tex 

Forsyth, First Mont 

Brookline and Verona Mo 

*No report. 



S S 



S S 



S S 



S S 



S S 



12 | 

2 
I VA 
12 
12 
|l2 

VA 

5 

3K 

12 

4 

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3 


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12 



78 
ISO 



50 



30 



48| 100 



60 



50 

278 
125 
110 



1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



191 



MISSIONARIES 



Pinney, Jerome S 

Pinol, Francis, M. D 

Pirazzini, Francesco 

♦Pitts, Charles E 

*Ploetz, A. F 

Porter, George C 

Porter, Narcisse 

tPorter, S. W 

Porter, William M 

Potochnak, Elizabeth, Miss. 

Pottsmith, William F 

Powell, Crayton K 

♦Prater, Marcellus A 

Pratt, A. A 



Pressnell, Samuel C. 



Pressnell, S. C 

Preston, William B. . . . 

Price, Andrew K 

Price, James F 

Price, John T 

Price, William N 

Prichard, Addison B. . . 

Prichard, Evan R 

Primrose, William J. . . 
Pringle, Alexander. . . . 

♦Proett, A. F 

Prudden, Roy A 

Pryse, W. S., D. D. . . . 

Purdy, R. L 

Quick, Louis B 

Quickenden, Henry. . . . 
Quinones, Francisco . . . 

Quintana, Juan G 

Quist, Eli N 

Ralston, D. B 

Ramsay, F. P 

Ramsay, Mebane 

Rankin, John C 

Rasmussen, Axel 

Ratsch, Paul Edmund . 

Ratz, Jacob 

Raupp, Robert P 

Ray W Byrd 



Rayburn, James. . . 

♦Reagor, L. A 

Reaugh, Wm. D. . . 
♦Reddoor, Basil M. 
Red Shirt, Frank . . 
♦Reed, John C. . . . 
Reed, Richard .... 



Reed, Samuel B 

Reed, William Albert . 

♦Reed, W. P 

Reemstma, Henry. . . . 
Rees, W. Gwilym 



Reeve, John C. ..... . 

♦Reeves, Nathaniel S. 
Reeves, R. E 



Reid, Frank C 

♦Reid, John, Jr 

Reiter, Uriah David . 
♦Rend on, Gabino . . . 



FIELDS OF LABOR 



St. Paul — Warrendale Minn. 

Limones and Rodas Missions Cuba 

New York City — Ascension (Italian) . . .N. Y. 

Carterville, First Mo. 

Daviston, First, and Cash — Bethany. . .S. D. 

Strasburger — Union and Stations Neb. 

Sacaton — Indian (Chapel Helper) Ariz. 

Salem, Calvary and Station Okla. 

Spanish Fork Utah 

Cosmopolitan Mission of Indianapolis. Ind.. 

Ellsworth and Fisher Wash. 

Pastor Evangelist Colo. 

Prineville, First Ore. 

Lumber Camp Work near Ft. Bragg; San 
Francisco — Memorial and Russian 

Work Calif 

Mt. Moriah, Oak Grove, Liberty and Port- 
land . : Ky. 

Byars Chapel and Hebbardsville Ky 

San Marcos and Fentress Tex 

Walter, First Okla 

Synodical Evangelist Ky 

Pastor Evangelist, Tenn,; Childress Tex 

Bishop and Stations Calif 

Cordova and West Union Tenn 

Seattle — North Broadway and Station. Wash 

Spalding and Stations Neb 

Pastor Evangelist Mont 

Willow Lake — First German S. D 

Lumber Camp Work Ore. 

Lakeview, First Ore 

Buda and Union Neb 

Hoquiam — Calvary Wash. 

Boise, Second Ida 

Santurce (Helper) P. R 

Mexican Helper N. M. 

Quilcene, First and Station Wash. 

Chelsea, First Okla 

Benson, First Neb 

Riverside and Bloomfield Missions. . . .N. M 

Gandy Neb. 

Enderlin, First N. D 

White Sulphur Springs Mont. 

Galena — German 111. 

Crook, First, and Station Colo. 

Morgantown, Ebenezer and Caney Fork) 

Ky. 

Bell Buckle Tenn. 

Ensley — Grace, Ala.; Winchester Tenn. 

Minatare and McGrew . . Neb. 

Makaicu, Kangipaha — Indian S. D. 

Medicine Root — Indian (Helper) S. D. 

College Place, First Wash. 

Rieffs Chapel, Carl Walker Memorial, Mt. 

Comfort and Station Ark. 

Skylight Ark. 

Libby, First and Station Mont. 

Ethel, Glasston and Union Chapel Mo, 

Menno Mission S. D, 

Wisdom and Stations; Stevensville, First 

Mont 

Elkins and Huntsville Ark. 

Palisades, First Colo. 

Cottageville — Ebenezer, Ky.; Lavergne and 

Tusculum Tenn 

Synodical Missionary Ariz 

Everson, First Wash 

Rock Hill Mo 

Santa Fe, Embudo, Rincones, Quemado, Las 
Truchas and Chimayo N. M 

♦No report. tDeceased. 



o a 



S S 

S s 

s s 

s s 
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s s 

s s 
s s 

s s 

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s s 
s s 

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p 

s s 



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P. E 






Additions to 
Churches 



1 
s s 


1 

9 


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9 




12 


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4 




12 




12 




9 




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31 



40 



29 
384 



272 

89 

85 

100 

122 

80 



140 
350 

40 

40 
128 



170 

110 

125 

65 
140 
100 



38| 125 
61 100 



75 
70 



16 



110 
90 



130 
150 



87 
128 
33 



40 



75 



133 
125 



192 



MISSIONARIES. 



[1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



I o a 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 






Additions to 
Churches. 



Renick, James Madison. 

Renville, Isaac 

Replogle, William A. . . . 



Rexford, Geo W 

Reyes, Marcolina .... 

Reynolds, A. M 

Rhoads, Wm. Hunter. 



*Rice, Clayton S. . . . . . 

♦Richards, Frederick V., 
Richards, Samuel W. . . 

Richardson, A. L 

♦Richardson, David V.. 

Richardson, Frank M. . 
Richardson, James J. . . 



Richardson, L. K 

♦Richardson, W. J 

Richmond, T. U 

Riddle, Merchant S 

♦Rimmer, H. C 

Ringland, E. B 

Ringold, John A 

Ripoll, Jose 

Ritter, Walter L 

Rivera, Sinesio 

Roach, George H 

Roberts, Edward 

Roberts, Moses H 

Roberts, Owen J., Ph.D. 

Roberts, Richard 

Roberts, Stanley Hall. . . 

Roberts, William D 

Robertson, Albion L. . . . 
♦Robertson, S. L 



Robinson, J. B., Ph.D. 

Robinson, R. H 

tRobinson, William A.. 
Robison, George D. . . . 
♦Robison, James M... . 
Robison, Martin W.. . . 
Robles, Ramon Olivo . 
Rocafort, Am para. 
Rocker, John 



Rodman, Charles R 

Rodriguez, Andres 

Rodriquez, Antonio 

Rodriguez, Antonio J 

Rodriguez, Carolina, Mrs. 

Rodriguez, J. C 

Rodriguez, Tomasa, Mrs. 

Rogers, Robert H 

Romankaw, George 

♦Romero, C. A 

Romero, Vicente F 

Roque, Jacinto 

Rosenau, John W 

Ross, Robert 

Ross, Wm. Crosby 

♦Rouillard, Samuel 

Row, Charles A 

Ruland, Charles M 



Russel, James G. 
Russel, Joseph S. 



Hornsby, Ebenezer and Station Tex. S S 

Long Hollow — Indian S. D. P 

Daisy, Cully Memorial, Pleasant Valley and 

Station Wash. S S 

Fort Myers Fla. S S 

San Sebastian (Bible Reader) P. R. 

St. Joseph — Green Valley Mo. S S 

Ross First; Pleasant Valley and Stations; 

Rolette, First N. D. S S 

Myton and Roosevelt . Utah 

Pima, Second and Maricopa, First Ariz 

Roslyn, First Wash 

Lumber Camp Work Minn 

Osnabrock, First and Soper, N. D.; Red Lake 

Falls, First Minn. 

Kimball and St. John Chapel Neb 

Henrietta, First, and Sunset, First, Tex.; 

Paris and Station Ark. • S S 

Seattle— Woodland Park Wash 

Mcintosh, First and Watauga, First. . .S. D 

Pastor Evangelist N. D.l 

Pastor Evangelist, N. D.; Redding Calif. I S S 

Gore, McKey and Vian, First Okla. 

Putnam Heights and Station Okla. S S 

Arcadia — First German Iowa S S 

Nueva Paz, San Nicolas and Station . . . Cuba 

Mansfield S. D. S S 

Isabela and Quebradillas (Helper) P. R 

Kendrick, First and Juliaetta, First Ida. P & SS 

Whitewood, First S. D. 

Lismore, First Minn. 

Salmon, First Ida. P E 

Cokeville Wyo. S S 

Eden Prairie Minn. P 

Kendall, First and Stations Mont. S S 

Park Hill— Indian Okla. 

Madison Cross Road, Bethel and Taylor 

Ala 

Burley, First Ida. 

Umatilla Mission Ore. 

Pine Valley and Carson, First Ore. 

Bethel and Stations Tenn. S S 

Mooresville Tenn 

(Collinsville Okla. S S 

Naranjito and Stations (Helper) P. R. 

Mayaguez (Bible Reader) P. R. 

Sacaton — Pima First and Stations (Helper) 

Ariz 

Rolling Bay, First and Station Wash. P 

Puentes Grandes and Bejucal Cuba 

Isabela and Quebradillas (Helper) P. R. 

San Pablo and Costilla — Mexican N. M. P 

Corozal (Bible Reader) P. R 

Mexican Helper N. M 

Santurce (Bible Reader) P. R. 

Pastor Evangelist Tex. 

Newark — First Ruthenian (Assistant) . .N. J. 

Ignacio — Immanuel Colo. 

Mexican Helper N. M. 

Moca and Stations P. R 

Hastings — First German Neb. P 

Paulina, Fife and Supplee Missions Ore. 

Hysham and Rancher Mont. S S 

Makasan — Indian S. D, 

Stigler, First and Keota Okla. S S 

Spring Grove, First and Greenleaf; Crosby. 

Deerwood and Station Minn. S S 

Ong, First Neb. P 

Vaughn, Cuervo, Montoya, Roy and Colfax 

Missions N. M. S S 

♦No report. fDeceased. 



12 
12 

6 

12 
12 
3 
I 

12 
12 

12 
3 

11 
4 

12 
6 

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7 
12 
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12 
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11 
112 
112 

4 

2 

4 
12 
12 

8 
12 

6 

12 
12 
11 
4 

12 

12 



18 



18 

6 

10 



1913.1 



MISSIONARIES. 



193 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 





h 


Additions to 








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110 



Russell, J. Rodney . 
Russell, Lawrence. . 
♦Russell, Ouray O. . 
Russell, William T.. 

Rutt, Raymond J. . 
Ryland, Saumel C. 
Sade, William I. . . . 



Salazar, Rubel 

Salguero, Arturo, Prof.. 



Salmon, William T. . . . 

♦Samson, David , 

Sanchez, Luis , 

Sanchez, Manuel D. J.. 



Sanders, Flemon 

Sanders, Leslie Lee .... 
♦Sandidge, Wm. H. C. 

Sandoval, Abel 

Sandoval, B 

Sandoval, Manuel 

Sands, Taylor 

Sanford, Arthur N. . . 

Sanna, Joseph 

Santuccio, Agatino S. 
Sarrameda, Armando . . 
Saunders, Albert H. 

Saunders, H. L 

Saure, Ernst B 

Sawyers, Henry A. 

Schabka, F., Miss 

Schell, James P 

Schell, Ulysses G. 
♦Schermerhorn, L. S. 

Schiller, John 

*Schillerstrom, Glen . . . 

Schmidt, A. R 

Schmitt, Henry A. 
♦Schodle, Adam G. . . 
Schurter, M. A., M. D. 

Schwab, John W 

Schwarz, Julius F. 



Scofield, William H. 
Scott, Winfield 



Scott, Winfield T. . . 
Seabright, Ernest C. 

Seals, Monroe 

Secrest, Edwin S. 
Segar, Grace, Mrs. . , 

Self, George W. C. 



Self, Isaac B 

Senn, Jacob G 

Senti, Antonio 

*Sesulka, Joseph 

Sharp, Fanny S., Miss. . . 
Sharpless, S. F., D. D.... 
Shaver, Minnie M., Miss. 
Shaw, Glenn H 



Shea, George H 

Sheets, Anna May, Miss. 

Shell, Garland 

Shelton, William J 

Sheppard, Albert 



Cooks Field and Station Wash. 

Broken Arrow, First Okla. 

Morrill, Hope Chapel amd Fairview. . . .Neb. 
Daisy, Cully Memorial and Stations; 

Gifford — Riverview and Stations. .Wash. 

Delta Mission Utah 

St. Joseph — Faith Mo. 

Melbourne, Mt. Olive and Pleasant Union 

Ark. 

Mexican Helper N. M. 

Mayaguez Training School and Mayaguez 

District P. R. 

Childress Tex. 

Bowbells, Westminster and Station... .N. D. 

Maleza Alta and Stations P. R. 

Alamosa, Second, Saguache — Messiah's and 

Stations (Mexican) Colo. 

Atkins Ark. 

Leola, First S. D. 

Gresham — Ebenezer Ky. 

Mexican Helper N. M 

Mexican Helper N. M 

Mexican Helper N. M. 

Davis — Indian Okla. 

Greybull, First Wyo. 

Cleveland — West Side Italian Mission . . . Ohio 

Poughkeepsie — Italian Mission N. Y. 

Ensenada P. R. 

Artesian, First S. D. 

ISt. Joseph — Brookdale Mo. 

Hershey, First and Keystone, First Neb. 

Savannah, First Mo. 

Labor Temple N. Y. 

Lakeview, First Ore. 

Cedar Gap, Fordland and New Hope . . .Mo. 

Savage Mont. 

Kovar, Sealy and Station — Bohemian . . Tex. 

LeBeau, First and Station S. D. 

Belfry and Stations Mont. 

Ellsworth — Zion Minn. 

Lackawanna City — Magyar N. Y. 

Mayaguez — Rye Hospital P. R. 

Bois d'Arc and Stations ._ .Tex. 

Omaha — First German; Pastor Evangelist 

Neb.' 

Barneston, First Neb. 

Sacation — Pima First and Stations (Helper) | 

Ariz. 

|Spring Valley, Whiteson and Station Ore. 

New Hampton and Martinsville Mo. 

Hartford, First and Huntington Ark. 

Bellingham — Knox ? Wash. 

Tolchaco Indian Mission (Girls' Matron) 

Ariz. 
Mt. Enterprise, Rock Springs, Cross Roads, 

Friendship and Station Tex. 

Lostine Ore. 

Gardiner, Glasston and Stations Mont. 

Cabaiguan Cuba 

Penelope, Rowena and Stations Tex. 

Tolchaco Indian Mission (Boys' Matron. Ariz. 

Pastor Evangelist Minn. 

Parker — Mohave Mission Ariz. 

Dallas. First and Winner, First; Belvidere, 

First and Kadoka, First S. D. 

Gwyther — Fort Rice and Station N. D. 

Ganado Hospital (Housekeeper) Ariz. 

Jewett and Buffalo .Tex. 

Dyer and Kenton Tenn. 

Artesian, First S. D. 

♦No Report. 



194 



MISSIONARIES. 



[1913. 




Barnum and Atkinson Minn 

St. Joseph— Oak Grove Mo 

Pastor Evangelist Wash 

Muskogee — Bethany Okla 

San Francisco — St. James Calif 

Pastor Evangelist S. D 

Grandview and Stations Minn 

New York City— Spring Street (Italian)N. Y.| 

Warroad, First; Pastor Evangelist Minn. 

Labor Temple N. Y. 

Lumber Camp Work Wash. 

Ahpeatone and Randlett Okla. 

Fresno — Belmont Avenue Calif 

Powell— Union Wyo 

Hawthorne, First Fla 

Pastor Evangelist Mont. I 

Minneapolis, Fifth Minn. 

Pleasant Prairie, First and Stations. . . .S. D. 

Hagie, Springer and Fairview Wyo 

Searles Memorial and Stations Ky 

Aguadilla District P. R 

Vashon, First and Colvas Wash. 

Middletown; Upper Lake Calif. 

College Mound and Pleasant Hope Mo.| 

Philipsburg, First Mont.' 

Granville, Alpine, Union Grove and Stations. 

Tenn 

Smith Fred Kelly IWabasso— Knox; Tamarack, First and Sta- 
tion Minn 



Sherwin , William K 

Shetler, D. Augustus. . . 

Shields, J. H., D. D 

Shiffler, Harry C 

Shimian, Frederick S. . . . 

Shirey, W. E 

Shotwell, De F. N 

Sibilio, Paolo 

Sidebotham, Robt. S . . . 
Simpson, Olive, Miss. . 
Simpson, Thos. H. S 

Skinner, J. O 

Skinner, John R 

Slack, James A 

*Slaney, Joseph H 

Sloan, Wm. N., Ph. D . 
Sloane, Wm. E., Ph. D. 

Smiley, William 

♦Smith, Addison M . . . . 

Smith, Albert E 

Smith, Arnold 

Smith, Atherton N 

Smith, B.T 

Smith, Charles W 

*Smith, E. Claude 

♦Smith, Fount 



130 
S3 



Smith, George B 

Smith, G. W. H., D. D 

*Smith, Hal F 

Smith, Hubert G 



Smith, Jackson . 
Smith, James W 
Smith, Lewis F . 



♦Smith, L. Richmond 
♦Smith, Richard J... 
Smith, Robert Asa . . 



Foley and St. George Minn 

South Bend, First Wash 

Tyler— Central Tex 

Sancti Spiritus, Cuba; Palisades and De 

Beque Colo. 

Brankton— Reems Creek and Station . .Tenn. 

Manchester— Westminster .N. H. 

Corryton — Washington and Morristown— 

St. Paul Tenn 

Foster and Ravensdale Wash 

Alvarado ; - •••••• T ' T '^- ex i 

Seattle— Pleasant Valley and Lake Union I 

Wash. I 

Smith Robert B I Beaver Creek, First • ■ • ■ ■ .Minn.l 

Smith; Robert P I Big Sandy, Pleasant Ridge and Mt. Pleasant' 



*Smith, W. Alex. . 
Smith, W. Bryson 
Smith, W. Clyde. 
Smith, Willis 



Tenn. | 

Johnson and Almonta — Bethany Wash. 

St. Louis— Immanuel Mo. 

St. Louis— St. John's Mo. 

Crider— Bethlehem .Ky. 

Smith! Winfield S |Waldport, First Ore. 

Smits Evert (Elgin, First /. f 

Snoddy, Wayne S I Boulder First and Stations Colo. 

Snodgrass, Geo. W (Eureka Springs, First . . 

Snowden, Robt J 

Snyder, Gerritt, D.D.. . 



Lamoine and Stations W as h 

Kansas City— County Club Mission Mo. 

Mitchell, First S. D 

Kissimmee, First • • *}*■ 

Riverside — Mexican La lit. 

Cienfuegos and Stations xV- 

Lumber Camp Work Minn. 

Gotha, First •*}*• 

QnanVw fteorse P Skiatook ■ Okla. 

Spann George^...' Johnson's Chapel, Clairemont, Jayton and 

Stations xt tS 

Shea School House Mission N. D 

Nopal, Pilgrim Lake and Slayden lex 

Woodville— Hope and Station Ore 

Baltimore, Second (Visitor) . .Md 

Orient Kelly Hill and Sherwood Missions 
i Wash 



*Snyder, Henry 
Snyder, Sylvanus S. 
Solomon, Samuel . . . 
Someillan, Henry B 
Sornberger, John . . 
Spahr, George W 



Spare, B. Y 

*Speegle, William Miles 

Spencer, J. Manly 

Sperry, Mabel Miss . . . 
Spicer, Elton F 



*No Report. 



1913.1 



MISSIONARIES. 



195 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 






Additions to 
Churches. 



g.2 



Sproat, William 

Spurlock, W. Randall. 

Squires, Walter A 

Stabler, George 

Standifer, Sam'l R. . . . 

Standt, Calvin K 

Stanfield, Robt. W.... 



Steele, John N 

Steenson, James 

Steiner, J. F 

Steinheiser, C. E 

Stevens, John B 

Stevenson, Arthur M... 
Stewart, George D. B. 

Stewart, James K 

Stewart, Joseph Y. . . . 
Stockburger, Jacob W. 



Stone, Sidney, D.D. . . . 
Stonecipher, Martin C. 
Stophlet, S. W..D.D... 
Stout, Otelia D. Mrs.,. 



Belmont and Seltice Wash. 

Corcoran, First Calif. 

Stockton — East Side Calif. 

Blackbird Hills — Indian (Helper) Neb. 

Elgin, First Tex. 

Tacoma — Calvary Wash. 

Hearn, Harmony, Palestine and Laneburgl 
| _ _ Ark. 

Stapleton, John S [Springfield — Reunion Mo. 

Staub, Wm. L West Duluth — Westminster Minn. 

♦Stauss, John D [Stacyville — Union German, Iowa; Boscobel — 

Marion German Wis. 

Evangelist at large for Indian Work 

Minneapolis — Elim Minn. 

Louriston and Stations Minn. 

Tamarack and Station Minn. 

Juneau — Northern Light Alas. 

Conrad, First Mont. 

Exeter, First Calif. 

Clover Hill and Cloyd's Creek Tenn. 

Woodland, First Wash. 

St. Paul, Sulphur City, Crosses and Station 
| Ark. 

Maplewood Minn. 

Divide Center Neb. 

Lead Belt, First Mo. 

New York City — Harlem (Church Visitor) 
I N. Y.| 

. San Juan Community Work P. R. 

. Purcell, First Okla. 

. Morgan — Union and Evan, First Minn. 

. Mukilteo and Station Wash. 

. Milner and Stations Ida. 

. Munford Tenn. 

. Kansas City — Covenant Mo. 

. City Missionary for Tulsa Okla. 

. Pastor Evangelist Calif. 

. Rogersville, New Salem and Station Ala. J 

. St. Louis — Jennings Mo.f 

. Thurston — John Huss Neb. 

. Labor Temple (Musical Director) N. Y. 

. Centennial and Station Wyo. 

. Lake Mary Fla. 

. Pastor Evangelist S. D. 

Surbey, Edith D., Miss [San Juan Community Work P. R. 

♦Sutherland, L. O ISorrento, First Fla. I 

♦Sutherland, Walter M |Sausalito, First Calif. | 

*Swaim, Angus A Minden, New Prospect, Pleasant Springs, Wil- 1 

low Springs and Tennessee;* Henrietta 

First and Sunset, First Tex. 

*Swaim, William T Fayetteville — Grace Tenn. 

*Swander, J. M Las Vegas, First and Rhyolite, First. . . .Nev 

Swart, Charles E Springfield and Pingree Ida 

Swede, Berend J Rock Rapids — Zion German Iowa 

Sweetland, Leslie F Jackson, South Park and Cheney Missions 

Wyo. 

Szeghy, John D Fourteenth Street — Hungarian (Ass't) . .N. Y. 

Szilagyi, Andrew Yonkers — Hungarian N. Y. 

*Taber, George Sumner, Burr Oak and Mt. Zion Neb. 

Talbot, William O Luverne Mission N. D. 

Taliaferro, Paul Eve St. Joe and Batavia Ark. 

Tallent, Isaac C Brent, Pleasant Hill and Six Mile Ala. 

Talley, John Calvin Anniston and Stations Ala. 

Tallman, Dwight D |Hot Springs, First S. D. 

Tamaree, Thomas I Wrangell (Lay Worker) Alas. 



Stover, Anna C, Miss . . 

*Stowe, Frank J 

Strand, John C 

Strange, F. D..D.D.. . . 
Strange, William Loran . 

Street, Lemuel A 

Stringfield, Eugene E. . . 

Stroh, Grant 

Strong, Edward K 

Strong, William B 

Stuart, Benj. L 

Stulc, Jaroslav 

Sturgeon, F. W 

Sundby, Nels G 

Sundell, John F 

Surbeck, James S. 



Tanner, Curtis S.. 
Tanyan, Waxie 
Tate, James Henry . 
Taylor, Benj. Giles. 
Taylor, George W. . 



San Francisco — Richmond Calif 

Tallahasse and Station — Indian. ..... .Okla 

Ira, First, Fluvanna, First and Stations. .Tex 
Carnegie, Pleasant Valley and Merritt. .Okla. 
Walterville, First and Dorena Ore. 

*No report. 



S S 
S S 
P 

S S 
S s 

s s 

s s 

p 



s s 
p 
p 



s s 
s s 
s s 
s s 



s s 
p 

s s 
s s 
p 



p 

s s 



s s 



12 
12 
12 
1 
12 

12 

7 I 
12 

12 
12 
12 

V/2 

3} 2 
12 

6 
12 

3 
12 

12 
12 
12 
12 

12 

7 

I W2 

12 
12 
6 
12 

12 
12 
12 

[12 
112 

12 
3 

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12 

7 
12 
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12 








6 








3 






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5 


p 


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3H 
4 


5 




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12 
12 
12 


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6 


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12 


3 


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p 


12 
12 
12 


6 


6 


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12 




2 


s s 


12 


11 


9 


s s 


12 


1 


4 


s s 


12 


32 


5 



30 
42 
124 

60 
90 

115 

73 
133 



79 
63 

250 

50 
140 

65 
13S 
140 



232 



60 
130 
162 

140 

70 
35 
50 

400 



125 
60 
70 

110 



72 
79 



15 



161 



(53 



25 
102 



15 
110 

50 
137 



50 

70 



47 



66 

50 

200 



196 



MISSIONARIES. 



[1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



o a. 



J 3 



5 PM 



Additions to 
Churches 



oB 



Taylor, H. L.... 
Taylor, Park W. 



Taylor, R. P 

Taylor, Russell 

Taylor, Samuel E 

Tealdo, Emanuel 

Teis, Edward B 

Temple, Edward K. . . 
*Templeton, David H. 
Tenney, Henry M. . . . 
Tepper, Anna, Miss. . 
Test, Elmer E 



Testa, Stefano L 

Thomas, A. W 

Thomas, Felix X 

Thomas, George W. . . . 
Thomas, Jas. S., M.D.. 
Thomas, John Arma . . . 
Thomas, Norman M. . . 
Thompson, A. Roy. . . . 
Thompson, David R. . . 
Thompson, Harry E. . . 

Thompson, Lewis C 

Thompson, William H.. 



Thompson, William W. . . 

Thomson, Albert J 

Thomson, Henry C, D.D. 

♦Thomson, James 

Thomson, Sears 

Thornell, Jacob 

Thornton, Wyley 

Thos-Hazel, Jos. A 

Thuran, August H 

Tingle, George W 

Toben, Dora, Miss 



Todd, Calvin C 

Todd, John W 

Toensmeier, J. A. . . . 

Tonge, Frederick 

Torres, Julian B 

*Totten, Leo Lucian . 



Towne, Rafael S 

*Travis, J. Montgomery . . 

*Treiber, Daniel J 

Trevizo, Miguel 

Trippe, Morton F., D. D. 



Tron, Giovanni 

Troutman, Homer A. 
Tucker, Enoch S . . . . 



Turnbull, John S . . 
*Turner, George S . 
Tweed, Robert .... 
*Tyler, Flavius J . . 
Tyma, Anna Mrs . 
Ulrich, Frederick . . 



Valdejully, Juan 

Valdez, Victoriano 

*Vance. Edgar J 

Vanderbeck, Henry C 

Vanderlas, J. C 

Van der Maaten, Clyde E . 



Chaffee N. D. 

Grassy Cove, Jewett, Crab Orchard and Sta- 
tion Tenn 

Leeds and Mt. Calvary Ala 

Sheep Creek Settlement — Grace Wyo 

Denver — Berkeley Colo 

Brooklyn— Elton Street (Italian) N. Y. 

Pastor Evangelist Okla. 

Brinkley , First Ark. 

Bethel, Fairview, Bogota and Rugby. . . .Tex 

Belfield, First N. D 

Baltimore — St. Paul's Polish (Assistant) .Md 

Mizpah, Big Falls and Lumber Camp Work 

Minn 

Brooklyn — Franklin Avenue (Italian) . .N. Y 

Saxman (Helper) Alas. 

Middletown, First Calif. 

Toston and Station Mont 

Pastor Evangelist Calif 

Java, First; Parkston S. D 

New York City —East Harlem N. Y 

Lares and Stations; Mayaguez District. .P. R. 

Lisco, Broadwater and Centerview Neb. 

Glenwood Fla. 

Terry — Union and Fallon Mont. 

Kaysville — Haines Memorial and Clinton 

Utah. 

Trenton and Mt. Pleasant No. 2 Ala. 

Kuttawa and Chapel Hill. Ky. 

Mayaguez — Central and Stations P. R. 

Wilson Creek, Moses Lake and Krupp.Wash. 

Stanley, First N. D. 

Ross, First N. D. 

D wight Indian Mission Okla. 

Denver — People's Colo. 

Bethel and Ostfriesland — German Minn. 

Bethel and Waldensian Mo. 

New York City— Hope Chapel (Church Vis- 
istor) N. Y. 

Pastor Evangelist S. D. 

Cozard, First Neb. 

Denver — First German Colo. 

Odessa, First Wash. 

Mexican Helper N. M. 

Spokane — Manito and Northwest Section 

Wash. 

Sisters, First Ore. 

Westminster — University Colo. 

Hollister, First Ida. 

I Globe and Station — Mexican Ariz. 

Tuscarora, Tonawanda, Jamison Cold Spring . 
Tunesassa, ' Onoville, Cornplanter and 
Station N. Y. 

New York City— East Harlem (Italian) N. Y. 

New Prague Minn 

Tye, Compeer, Tuscola, Buffalo Gap and 
Stations Tex. 

Hazeldell, Bethel and Poplar Minn. 

Gilbert, First Minn. 

St. Maries, First Ida. 

Erwin and Station Tenn 

Cleveland — North Slovak Work Ohio 

New York City — East Harlem (Assistant) 
N. Y. 

Mayaguez (Helper) P. R- 

EIRancho, Petaco and Stations N. M. 

Caledonia, Blaine and Mt. Horeb Tenn. 

Labor Temple N. Y. 

Phoenix Indian Mission Ariz 

Pocatello, First Ida 

*No report. 



S S 

s s 
s s 

s s 

P E 

s s 



s s 



s s 
p 



12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

12 

12 

6 

12 
12 

9 

9M 
12 
12 
12 
12 

4 



S S | 


2 


S S 


2 


s s 


12 


s s 


12 


p 


12 




4^ 




12 


p 


9i/o 


s s 


7M> 




12 


p 


12 


p 


12 


s s 


11 




12 




12 


s s 


4 


P E 


11 




9 




12 


s s 


9 




12 




4 


I s s 


12 



I I 



s s 


12 




12 




3H 


p 


12 


p 


12 





12 


S S 


10 




7 




W2 




12 




2 


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12 




3 




6 




12 


1 s s 


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4 

1 

16 

7 

12 



1 

CO 

2 

12 

1 
51 

5 



4 
6 

32 
3 

22 



1 

20 



25 

24 



13 



4 

39 



9 66 137 



1913.1 



MISSIONARIES. 



197 



MISSIONARIES. 



Van Ruschen, Edward, 

Van Wagner, S. S 

Varner, J. Howard 

Vasquez, Henrique 

Vaughn. H. P 

Vega, Canon 

Velez, Jose (Oretz) 

Velez, Jose (Segarra) . . . 

Venable, Joseph G 

Ventosa, Cesar S 

Venturing Rino 

♦Verterees, Joe H 

Vicker, Hedley A 

Villafane, Petra, Miss . . . 
Villelli, Joseph A 



fVincent, Thomas T. 
von Stilli, A. E. . . . 



von Thurn, Robert. 

Voris, Paul C 

*Voss, W. E 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



s s 


112 1 




3H 




6 




7V?. 


p 


12 




9 




1 


s s 


3 


p 


11 


s s 


12 




5 


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12 




6 


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12 | 


s s 


HHI 



Waaler, Hans S., Ph. D. 

Waggoner, David 

*Wagner, H. N 

Waite, J. Raymond . . . . 

♦Wakeman, John 

Waldrop, Samuel D . . . . 

Walker, Eugene A 

Walker, N. R 



Walker, Sydney A 

Walker, William W 

♦Walkup, Samuel J 

Wallace, William, D. D. 
Wallace, William D.... 



Walter, Christ 

Ward, Beverly M . 
Warne, William W . 



Warren, Minnie R., Miss. 
Watson, George S 



Watson, William C 

Watt, James 

Watt, James Craig 

Weaver, Bert N 

Weaver, E. E..Ph. D. 
Webb, Frederic Lee 

Webb, Robert Lee 

Weibel, Robert W 

Welch, Albert B 

Welch, Albert F 

♦Welch, JohnR 

Wellholter, Arthur 

Wellington, Joseph 



Werner, Roy J. 
West, James G . 



White Lake, First S, D. 

Mexican Helper N. M. 

Savage, First Mont. 

Los Angeles — Mexican Calif. 

Labor Temple (Religious Director) N. Y. 

Guines and Station Cuba 

Lares (Helper) P. R. 

San German District P. R. 

Lake Mary Fla. 

Sancti Spiritus Cuba 

Mt. Kisco — Italian N. Y. 

Calumet and Geary Okla. 

Clarkston — Vineland Wash. 

Anasco (Bible Reader) P. R. 

New York City — Sea and Land Italian Mis- 
sion N. Y. 

Woodburn, First and Donald Ore.| 

Edenburg, First and Koople, First; Ken- 
mare, First N. D.|P & S S[ 

ICaputa and Elk Creek Missions S. D. 

Northomeand Stations Minn. 

Seiling, First and Station; Jet and Jefferson 

Okla. 

Pastor Evangelist, N. D.; Browning. . .Mont. 

Klawock and Stations Alas. 

Ft. Hall— Indian Ida. 

Benson, Ariz,; Novato Calif. 

Porcupine — Indian S. D. 

Seymour Tex. 

Reardan Wash. 

Woodward, Supply, May, Laverne, Gate and 
Sharon Missions Okla. 

Hazelton, First N. D. 

Paterson — St. Augustine N. J. 

Deepwater Mo. 

Pastor Evangelist S. D. 

IHollister and Stations; Pleasant Valley andj 
Station Ida. 

Menno, Mission S. D 

York— Faith .Pa 

Lake Washington, Warwick and Stations 
N. D. 

Mt. Vernon— Italian Mission (Visitor) .N. Y 

Mt. Vernon — McFarland Memorial and 
Livingston Ky. 

Wells Minn. 

Wolf ord— Juniata and Island Lake N. D, 

Duncan and Station Ariz 

Lone Pine and Shady Grove Ark 

Waltham, First Mass. 

Flag Pond and Stations Tenn. 

San Francisco — St. Paul's Calif 

Stewartsdale — Westminster and Stations N.D 

Dawson Tex. 

Hartford and Bonanza Ark. 

Hemet, First Calif. 

Deisem, First and Station N. D. 

Pima, Fifth and Maricopa, Second (Helper) 
Ariz. 

Ideal, Westminster and Stations S. D. 

Belton Mo. 





4 




sy 2 




9 




9 




12 




12 


S S 


im 




12 


p 


12 


S S 


12 




12 


S S 


9H 


p 


12 




12 




4 



S S 



s s 



s s 



* Weston, Samuel K . . 
Wharton, Robert K . . 
Wheeler, William L . . 
White, George Clyde . 

White, George W 

White, Guy Arnott . . 
White, James D 



Flandreau, First — Indian S. D. 

Minneapolis, Fifth Minn. 

Nashville — Cleveland Street Tenn 

Lake City Colo. 

Poison, First and Station Mont. 

Richmond, First Calif 

Morrilton — Central, Ark.; Jackson Royal 
Street Tenn. 

*No Report. tDeceased . 



S S 
P 

S S 
S S 



s s 



s s 
p 

s s 
p 
p 

s s 



12 
2 
12 

11 

12 

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12 

12 

4 

2 
12 
12 

3 

3 
12 

3K 

4H 

1H 

"HI 

12 

7 
12 

3 
12 
12 



Additions to 
Churches 



22 
4 



10 



10 



7 
10 



2 

12 

8 
2 

15 



3 
11 
6 
7 
10 



.1 1 



17 



10 

12 
1 



B.S 



u 



o2 



I 
45 1 70 



SO 



25 

226 

27 

125 



350 
150 



7.". 



20 


15 


30 


30 


85 
35 


124 
99 


11 

GS 


102 
75 


17 


« 


58 


75 


20 


100 



69 



77 



105 



60 
40 
118 

59 

56 

60 

110 



70 
150 



120 
120 



GO 



198 



MISSIONARIES. 



[1913. 



MISSIONARIES. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 



o a 

^ 3 



h3"S 

O i- 

o 
— Si 

o 



Additions to 
Churches. 



— c 

— 3 

5 E 

o £ 

Ho 
U 



.0.0 
Bcfl 



Z^i 



White, John B.... 
White, Neil Oliver 
White, Richard. . . 



White, Samuel S 

♦White, Wilbur George 
♦White, William M.... 
Whitehead, Redmon . . , 
♦Whitlock, John M 



Whitsitt, C. G 

Whittlesey, Chas. T 
Wichers, J. W 



Sheridan Lake, Union and Stations Colo 

Minto — Knox N. D. 

Camp Meeker — Mizpah; Westminster and 

Faith Calif. 

Planada, First and Winton, First Calif. 

Akron, First and Burdett Colo. 

Lisman — Shiloh and Dixon Ky. 

Pastor Evangelist Mo. 

Lumberton and Tierra Amarilla — Mexican 

N. M 

Chance — Sheldon Jackson and Stations Mont 

Cove Orchard Ore 

Alexandria and Stations Minn 

Wieman, Henry, N | St. Joseph — Brookdale, Mo.; Tremont — 

Westminster Calif. 

Roosevelt, First; Euclid and Belguim Minn. 

Gustine, First Calif. 

Keller, Bethel No. 1 , Justine and Garza Tex 

Midland Valley Mission Okla. 

Woodbridge — Bethel and Clements Calif 

Winneview and Station Okla 

Pima, Fourth and Station (Helper) Ariz 

tWilliams, John J (Mineral Wells— Oak Street Tex 

Williams, Thomas N [Louisville, Immanuel Ky.j 

Williams, William D.. . . 

Williams, W. Edward . . . 

♦Williams, W. S., M. D 

Williamson, J. P., D. D 

Willis, Anderson P . . . . 



Wilcox, Charles L. . . . 
Wilkins, George H.. . . 
Wilkins, Robert F.... 
Willbanks, JohnS.... 

Willhoit, John B 

*Willhoit, Thomas M . 
Williams, Horace . 



P 

S S 



p 

S S 



S s 
s s 



Willis, Arthur R 

*Willis, William James 
Wilshire, James M . . . 



Wilson, Carlo A. 



Wilson, George F . 
♦Wilson, James W 



Wilson, L. L 

Wilson, Oscar S 

Wilson, Thomas M . . 
Wilson, William H . . 
Wilson, W. Macafee. 
Wimmell, Richard M 



Malad Id 

Minneapolos — Rosedale; Kasson Minn. 

Gridley, First, Calif.; Myrtle Point Ore. 

Missionary among the Dakota Indians S. D. 
Tessie, Warwick, Crescent Valley and Langtry| 

Missions Tex.| 

San Francisco — Bethany Calif. 

Garvin, First and Stations Okla. 

Elmer, Hollister and Tipton, Okla; Wise and 

Wallace Tex. 

Luksokla, Mt. Zion, Kulli Chito and Kulli 

Kosoma— Indian Okla 

Indian Oasis Ariz. 

Shady Grove, Hickory Grove, Amity and 

Glendale Ark 

San Francisco — Memorial and Stations Calif 

Ferrell, St. Joe and Avery Missions Ida 

Wapato, First; Raymond, First Wash 

Homing, First Okla. I 

Crescent City, First Calif.] 

Hamlin, First, Rochester and Rotan, First, 

Tex,; Huntington and Mansfield Ark. 

Pastor Evangelist Wyo. 

Mt. Bethel, First Mo.i 

Pastor Evangelist Ala. 

Merricourt, First and Station N. D. 

Lingle and Station W T yo. 

O^-den— Central Park Utah. 

Mc Cullough and Wewoka — Indian Okla. 

Tarpon Springs and Center Hill Fla. 

Othello and Ralston, Wash.; Nezperce. . .Ida. 

Wray, First .' Colo.! 

Lamesa, First, Six Mile No. 2 and Stations 

Tex 

Forbes, First N. D 

Bethel Neb 

Okemah, First Okla. 

Longfellow, Donnelly and Eldorado Minn 

Crowell and Benjamin Tex 

Cohutta, Howardsville, Apison and Ocoll 
| Tenn 

Work, Char\eslj [Ft. Lauderdale, First Fla 

fWortmann, Henry |Matlock — German Iowa 

♦Wright, A. W |Forest Lake Minn. 

Wright, C. G Midlothian, First Tex. 

Wright, Edward ]St. Louis — Baden Mo. 

♦No report. tDeceased. 



Winder, J. W..... 

♦Witherspoon, Finis P . . . . 
Witherspoon, W. B., D. D 

Witt, E. T 

Witteman, Cline H 

Wittenberger, Arthur F . . 

Wolf, Jackson 

Wolf, Joshua J 

Wolfe, Aaron B..D.D... 

Wolff, Albert N 

Wood, Leonard M 



Wood, Natha 3 

Woodard, George 

Woodard, John H 

Woodcock, Isaac 

Woods, Samuel Orville. 
Wooten, John M 



P 

S S 
S s 



s s 



12 
12 

12 

3 
12 

6 

7 

12 

12 
4 

10 
12 
11 

12 

11 
12 
12 
12 
1 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 



112 

P 112 

6 

S S 110 



P 

s s 
s s 
s s 
s s 
p 



112 

12 

4} 

12 

|12 

\wy 2 

ii 
i 

112 
|12 
12 
112 
I VA 

112 

12 

12 
5 

12 
4 



10 

21 



.1 s s 


|10 


p 


5'/ ? 


s s 


12 


s s 


12 


s s 


12 


s s 


10 


s s 


12 I 


s s 


hV 7 \ 




2'4| 




« 


s s 


12 J 


p 


12 I 



21 
4 
4 



28 
10 
1 



2 
3 

7 
16 

9 

24 



43 

40 



50 



250 
50 



10 10 

1S| 45 
161 58 
1151 100 
29 1 90 
29| 65 



60 
108 



39 
75 
32 

60 



51 
51 
67 
46 
21 
104 

53| 
20 
31 
43 
81 
49 



1913.1 



MISSIONARIES. 



199 









o 


Additions to 










is o. 
o a 




Churches 


a 
.S-2 


"o 2 




FIELDS OF LABOR. 


gc/3 


■ag 

en ° 
-at: 

g£ 




3| 

Hi 




MISSIONARIES. 


6 


S3 








in 


§ 


M 


u 












W 


U 




c/5 



Wright, Wiley K.... 
Wright, William P.. 

Wylie, F, M 

Wylie, John M 

Wylie, W. H 

Yankoff, Peter 

Yenovkian, D S 

Yerkin, Howard B . . . 
Yokley, Isaac N. . . . 

♦Youel, John E 

♦Young, John C . . . . 
*Young, J. Ernest . . . 
♦Young, J. Morton. . 
Young, S. Hall, B. D 
♦Youree, J. Millon . . 

Zaidan, Joseph 

♦Zimmerman, Frank. 



I 

Holly Colo 

Rincon and Stations N. M 

Hot Springs — Orange Street Ark. S S 

Elk Grove Calif. S S 

San Francisco — St. James Calif. 

Kansas City — Fellowship House (Student) 

Kans. 

Delta Mission Utah. 

New York City— Holy Trinity (Ass't.) N. Y. 

Lawrenceburg and Lasting Hope Tenn. S S 

Wallowa, First Ore. 

Seattle — South Park Wash. 

Leith — Valley View and Carson — Union N. D. 

|Elk Mountain, First and Station Wyo.l 

General Missionary Alas. I 

Sweetwater — Central Tex. I 

Brooklyn, Syrian N. Y. S S 

St. Paul — Lexington Parkway Minn.| 

*No report. 



12 


9 


1 
3 


1 
67 


■MA 


3 


3 


9 


12 


13 


3 


66 


6 






32 


I 








3 








2H 








3 








12 


2 


10 


85 


6 








9 








7 








12 








1?! 








12 


1 


7 


80 


12 









107 
47 
55 

72 



74 



200 MISSIONARY TEACHERS. [1913* 

MISSIONARY TEACHERS AND OTHER WORKERS 

DURING YEAR 1912-1913. 



TEACHERS. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 




Sitka 



Mrs. J. W. Reed Gambell 

Dr. F. J. Shadd IHaines 

Mrs. B. H. Gaisford |. 

Miss Marie Anderson 

Supt. E. G. Bridgham 

Mr. George J. Beck 

Miss Grace Crockett 

Miss Aletta de Boer 

Miss Jeanette C. Dingraan 

Miss Sallie Dinsmore 

Miss Henrietta Drost 

Mr. Herbert B. Fenn 

Miss Edna Findley 

Mr. Raynor Garey 

Miss Esther Gibson 

Miss Sarah Haines 

Miss Mary E. Holt 

Mrs. Lulu R. Lancaster 

Miss Edna McGraw 

Miss Mabelle McDill 

Miss Laura D. Midgley 

Miss Gladys Nelson 

Mr. Peter Simpson 

Miss Anna M. Sheets 

Miss Florence Stevens 

Miss Bertha Winnard 

Miss Cora L. Moore 

Miss Sarah E. Cochrane 

Miss S. Louise Conklin 

Miss Olive Forsyth 

Miss Anna M. Sheets 

Mrs. Josephine R. Enis 

Dr. James F. Record 

Miss Ethel Byerly 

Miss Sarah H. Chapin 

Miss Audrey Cooper 

Miss Florence E. Dilley 

Mr. Louis P. Guigou 

Mrs. Louis P. Guigou . . 

Miss Ellen G. Howard 

Miss Emma E. Laird 

Miss Bertha LeSaar 

Mr. J. J. Lynn 

Miss Alice Nicely 

Miss Minnie M. Parker 

Miss Alice H. Record 

Mr. John M. Robe 

Miss Lona VanNess 

Mr. Geo. F. Wilson 

Mrs. Geo. F. Wilson 

Miss Elizabeth T. Wolfe 

Mrs. Lucy Gay 

Miss Katherine F. Watters 

Miss Dorothy Damkroger. 

Miss Frances Marston 

Miss Kate C. McBeth 

Miss Mazie Crawford 

Mrs. Ella S. White 

Mrs. C. D. King 

Miss Lillian M. Evans 

Miss Olive F. Forsyth 

Mrs. H. T. Smith 

Mr. H. T. Smith 

Miss Edith G. Worthy 

Mrs. Anna P. Bloom 



. Alaska 



Ganado Arizona 



San Miguel 
Tucson 



Pitt River California 

North Fork 



Lapwai 



. Idaho 



Kickapoo Reservation Kansas 

Wolf Point Montana 



Jemez N. M.| 



12 
12 
12 

12 

5 

7 

3 

12 

12 

3 

12 

7 

7 

12 

5 

7 

12 

12 

12 

12 

7 

1 

5 

7 

12 

9 

7 

5 

2 

7 

1 

10 

7 

12 

5 

12 

12 

12 

4 

12 

7 

12 

7 

12 

7 

3 

5 



12 
12 
12 

7 
12 
12 
12 

6 
12 

7 

7 
12 
12 

3 
12 



38 



1913.1 



MISSIONARY TEACHERS. 



201 




Miss Pearl Boutwell 

Miss Jessie E. Rogers 

Mr. George Bratschi . 
Miss Mary McKenzie .... 
Miss Ruth J. Urquhart. . . 

M r. John M. Robe 

Miss Edna E. Arnold 

Miss Mattie Day 

Mr. C. C. Elrod 

Mr. J ; H. Harnish 

Mr. W. B. Hunter 

Mr. Rankin S. Johnston . . 

Miss S. Nellie Long 

Miss Clover P. Mahan. . . . 

Miss Rada Mathes 

Mr. Harris Moore 

Miss Hester Parker 

Miss Elizabeth Pyeatt .... 

Miss Helen M. Rice 

Mr. Sam Ussery 

Miss Bertha Wilson 

Miss Jennie Templeton . . . 

Miss Janet Buchanan 

Miss Florence A. Campbell 

Miss Marietta Hunt 

Miss Kate Hawkins 

Miss Jennie Meigs 

Mr. W. E. Stevenson 

Miss Lena Johnson 

Miss Lillian North 

Miss Jennie C. Gabus .... 
Miss Annie E. McMullen. . 

Mr. Amos One Road 

Mrs. Edith D. Waddle 

Miss Helen W. Clark 

Miss Ida L. Boone 

Mrs. E. R. Gilschrist 

Miss M. S. Gilchrist 

Mrs. Hamilton 

Miss Mollie Clements 

Miss Charlotte Richardson 

Miss Ada G. Wagner 

Mr. J. C. Ross 

Mr. C. M. Allabach 

Miss Mary E. Babb 

Miss Ola Booze 

Mrs. M. L. Carpenter. . . . 

Mr. Delfido Cordova 

Mr. Thomas M. English . . 
Mrs. Thomas M. English. 

Miss Ora Gates 

Miss Faith H. Haines 

Miss Maud Hart 

Miss Louise Murray 

Mrs. J. C. Ross 

Mrs. M. F. Schuknecht. . . 
Mr. Vincent T. Shipley . . . 

Miss Mary D. Smith 

Miss S. B. Sutherland 

Mrs. Voss 

Miss Mary P. Webster. . . 

Miss Annetta Bell , 

Mr. Cosme Garcia 

Miss E. Josephine Orton . , 

Miss Pearl English 

Miss Abbie Sawyer 

Miss Frances M. Davis. . . 
Miss S. Frances Hawley . . 

Rev. F. L. Schaub 

Miss Nannie Beers 



Dwight Oklahoma | 



Elm Spring . 



Good Will S. D 



Neah Bay Washington 

Los Angeles California 

(School) 



San Juan Colorado 

San Pablo 



Albuquerque N. M. 



Agua Negra . 
Chamisal . . . 
Chimayo . . . 



El Rito . 
Embudo . 



Santa Fe 



12 


37 


12 




12 




12 




6 




9 


72 


7 




lHi 




4 




5 




6 




12 




12 




12 




1% 




12 




I 




7 1 




12 




12 




12 


51 


12 




7 




5 




VA 




7 




12 


86 


4 




5 




3 




3 




m 




b 




12 




12 




12 


30 


2 




10 




12 


45 


3H 


35 


12 




12 


156 


12 




12 




7 




4 




5 




7 




6 




12 




5 




12 




12 




12 




12 




6 




12 




12 




4 




12 




12 


42 


8 


54 


12 


74 


6V 7 




12 


53 


12 


125 



96 



202 



MISSIONARY TEACHERS. 



[1913. 



TEACHERS. 



FIELDS OF LABOR. 




ss Alice Blackford 

ss Emma Brown 

ss Mabelle Davis 

Rankin S. Johnston . . . 
ss Amelia M. McFie .... 
ss Olinda A. Meeker. . . . 

s. Mary Morehead 

ss Alice I. Reid 

s. Susan P. Richey 

ss Frances M . Robe 

■s. A. M. Robinson 

ss Harriet B. Runnion . . . 

ss Ruby Ruybalid 

ss Florence Sawhill 

ss Eleanor L. Weir 

ss Melicent I. Woods .... 

Desiderio Naranjo 

. Miguel Rodriguez 

ss Mary E. Clagett 

ss Charlotte Richardson . 

ss Ina F. Scott 

ss Edna M. Tait 

ss Elizabeth W. Craig . . . 

ss Lucy Craig 

ss Alice Hyson 

ss Faith Haines 

ss Alice A. Blake 

r. Telesfor Jamarillo 

ss Emilie L. Gillespie .... 

ss Eleanor Potter 

ss Winifred Fitzhugh .... 

ss Blanche Manley 

ss Mildred Nelson 

ss Josie Curtis 

ss Edna A. Bright 

ss Ola Booze 

ss Blanche R. Manley . . . 
ss Mary C. Matthews. . . 

ss Belle Miller 

ss Ethel C. Montgomery . 
ss M. Elizabeth Sechrist. 
ss Winifred I. Smith .... 

ss Anna Stanley 

ss Lottie E. Stevenson . . . 
ss Rosilla M. Lowry .... 

ss Mary I. Lowry 

\ C. L. Johns 

ss Estella Allen 

ss Winifred Jensen 

. Knowles Wyatt 

ss Madge McDowell .... 

ss Jane F. Martin 

ss Pattie Metzgar 

ss Edith Montgomery . . . 

:. C. O. Nickell 

ss Fannie B. Potts 

ss Elizabeth Smith 

ss Lida M. Smith 

ss Helen Whittelsey 

H. Guy Wood 

ss Clara B. Wright 

ss Luella E. Rolofson .... 
ss Emma Pearl Kelley . . . 

ss Sarah J. Reed 

ss Harriet Elliott 



iSanta Fe N. M 



Taos 



El Prado de Taos 
Los Ranchos de Taos 
Trementina 



|Truchas . . 
Fairview . 



Rev. A. H. Burkholder. 



A. H. Burkholder.. 

ss Jean D. Gesner 

'. James F. Machwart . 
ss Mary H. Martin . . . 
ss Frieda K. Williams . 



Utah I 



Gunnison . 
Logan 



Monroe 

Mount Pleasant 



Mount Pleasant 



Panguitch 



Salina 

Springville 



1913. 



MISSIONARY TEACHERS. 



203 




Miss S. Louise Conklin [St. George Utah 

Miss Jessie McNeill |Cortland Ky. 

Miss Mary Johns [Harlan 

Miss Sarah E. Cochrane 



Hindman 
Manchester 



Mt. Vemon 



Pikeville 



Flat River Mo. 

IFredericktown 



Miss Gertrude Lewis 

Miss M. Tirzah Magill 

Miss Cora L. Moore 

Miss Mina L. Rernley 

Miss Matilda M. Walker 

Miss Adeline A. Reid 

Miss Elizabeth P. Hemphill 

Miss Rose McCord 

Miss Eila Carson 

Miss Mary Clarkson 

Miss Frances Forbes 

Miss Marceline M. Kefauver 

Miss Martha J. Lewis 

Miss Marion D. Oskamp 

Miss Maude A. Rowlee 

Miss Lena L. Waddell 

Miss Mary E. Wanzer 

Miss Rebecca Watson 

Rev. J. P. Whitehead 

Miss Ethel Fanson 

Miss Alice R. Payne 

Miss Louise Bebb 

Miss Jessie A. Fobister 

Miss Nellie D. Covert 

Miss Edwarda M. Clingan iGladstone 

Miss Mary E. Clingan " 

Mr. E. P. Childs, Supt. of Mountain 
Field | 

Dr. J. P. Roger IFarm School N. C. 

Mr. B. F. Caldwell | " * " t "J 

Mr. Horace L. Custer I " " " JJ I 

Miss Ida A. Custer I " " " "J 

Miss Hester E. Field 

Miss Sarah Jane Gamble 

Mr. David Griffith 

Mr. Fred J. Hay 

Mr. E. A. Joslyn 

Miss Jennie F. Linn 

Miss Eleanor C. Mcjunkin 

Miss May Parker 

Miss Florence Redway 

Mr. Harry P. Standerwick 

Miss Jessie L. Turner 

Miss Elizabeth Williams 

Mr. Nelson Williams 

Miss Florence Stephenson 

Miss S. Isabel Allison 

Miss Josie Bundy 

Miss Helen Dean Fish 

Miss Elizabeth McKinstry 

Miss Bessie M. Martin 

Miss Grace Maxwell 

Miss Anne B. Orbison 

Miss Aletta C. Rankin 

Miss Elizabeth M. Rich 

Miss May Wilhelm . 

Miss Edith C. Thorpe 

Mrs. W. P. Benedict 

Miss Mary F. Hickok 

Miss Susan Albright 

Miss Clara B. Anderson 

Miss Ella Bickerstaffe 

Mr. Ernest N. Billard 

Miss Imogen H. Bush 

Rev. T. A. Cosgrove 

Miss Mary Faulkner 

Miss Gabrielle Sorenson 



Asheville (Home Industrial School) .... " 



Pease House 



Asheville (Normal & Collegiate Inst.) . . 



3 
12 
10 

5 

7 

3 

8 
11 
12 
12 
12 
10 
12 

7 
12 

2 

5 
12 

S 

7 

8 
12 

9 

7 

4 

5 

2 
12 

12 

12 
12 
12 
8 

12 

12 

12 

4 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

4 

8 

12 

12 

12 

12 

5 

12 

7 

7 

12 

12 

5 

5 

7 

12 

12 

7 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

7 

12 

5 



.V. 



62 



167 



204 



MISSIONARY TEACHERS. 



[1913 




Miss Mary E. Hagenbach . . . 
Miss Grace H. Hamilton 
Miss Josephine L. Huston . . . 

Miss Lois McKinney 

Miss Mary McNeil 

Miss Edith Morris 

Miss Ernestine A. Potter 

Miss Alice H. Record 

Miss Agnes B. Sayre 

Miss Mary G. Sheak 

Miss Edna M. White 

Miss Laura B. Wiley 

Mrs. Laura D. Williams 

Miss Anna E. Gill 

Miss Margaret E. Griffith . . . 

Miss Martha P. Darby 

Miss Ada M. Dinkleman 
Miss Frances J. Gibson .... 

Miss Sarah J. Reed 

Miss Mary E. Wilson 

Miss Lulu G. Darby 

Miss Martha P. Darby , 

Miss Verdie M. Fraser 

Miss Ida A. Olsen 

Miss Florence M. Ricketts . . 

Miss Mary Hull Morse 

Miss Mary E. Logan 

Miss Melissa Montgomery . . 

Miss Kate Abernethy 

Miss Alice M. Bryan 

Miss Margaret L. Hutchison 

Miss Lucie M. Keener 

Miss Florence A. Redway . . 

Miss Carrie A. Rigg 

Miss Grace M. Sample 

Miss Anna Belle Stewart . . . 

Miss Julia E. Phillips 

Mrs. Margaret M. Evans . . . 

Miss Clara Ferguson 

Miss Elizabeth Ferguson . . . 

Miss Glen Gotschall 

Miss Gertrude Y. Hornbeck 

Miss Nora Horton 

Miss Edith Houghton 

Miss G. Genevieve Kelley . . 

Miss Laura Kirby 

Miss Mary McClelland 

Mr. Harris B. Parks 

Miss Carrie B. Pond 

Miss Lucy M. Shafer 

Miss Emma Shields 

Miss Emily B. Sidebotham . 

Miss Bertha J. Smiley 

Miss M. Ida Tipton 

Miss Mary J. Denlinger .... 

Miss Maye A. Dennis 

Miss Jessie P. Tipton 

Miss Frances L. Goodrich . . 

Miss Tenny Bishop 

Miss Bertha Carver 

Miss Gertrude Conover .... 

Miss Edith B. Fish 

Miss Ruth E. Griffith 

Miss Nellie Grove 

Miss Ollie Henricks 

Miss Eleanor Jaynes 

Mkss Margaret S. Lee 

Miss Mary E. Leiper 

Miss S. S. Mathes 

Miss Anne B. Orbison 

Miss Bertha Lee Patton 



Asheville (Normal & Collegiate Inst.). .N. C. 



Banks Creek 

Walnut (Bell Inst.) 



Big Pine 



I," .'.' •••• 
Brittains Cove 

| Concord 



Hot Springs 



Jacks Creek 
Laurel Field 



1913. 



MISSIONARY TEACHERS. 



205 




Mrs. B. F. Patton. 
Miss Mary M. Russel . 

Miss Emma Sledge 

Miss Clara B. Wherry. . . . 
Miss Florence M. Ricketts. 

Miss Jessie P. Tipton 

Miss M. Ida Tipton 

Miss Fannie G. Gudger . . . 
Miss Elizabeth Penrose . . . 
Miss Florence M. Perry . . . 

Miss Nannie Runnion 

Mr. Wm. O. Griffith 

M: 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 



ss Mary E. Logan 

ss Lucile E. Johnston 

ss Agnes C. Patton 

ss Zidany Sexton 

ss Ida A. Olsen 

ss Bessie Donovan 

ss Bessie Donovan 

ss M. Laura Fredericks . . 

ss Cora Graves 

ss Sarah M. Halbert. . . . 

ss Bertha Hunnicutt .... 

ss Naomi Ogle 

ss Bessie Willoughby 

ss E. Louise Hotchkiss . . 

s. Mary A. Hotchkiss . . . 

ss Mary J. Donnelly 

ss Cairo M. Parker 

ss Elizabeth Smith 

ss Blanche Winters 

ss C. Edna Lewis 

ss Elizabeth G. Brown . . . 

ss Jennie Moore 

ss Anna M. Faulkner. . . 

ss Olive Forsyth 

ss Viola Held 

ss Florence M. Perry. . . . 

ss Sarah E. MacBride . . . 

ss Mary J. Rankin 

ss Sallie Gass 

ss Eliza N. Robinson .... 

ss Clara E. Heminger . . . 

ss Laura W. Pierson 

ss Grace Twining 

George A. Reaugh 

ss Emma A. Jackson 

ss Minnie B. Newcomb . . 

ss Evelyn M. Henderson . 

ss Margaret Doolittle . . . 

ss Flora S. Dunton 

ss Elizabeth M. Elliott . . 

ss Lura M. Llndley 

ss Louise H. Strang 

Mrs. W. A. Allen 

Miss Clara Austin 

Miss Ruby Badger 

Miss Ethel Bogar 

Mrs. Marion J. Brooks 

Mrs. S. M. Burton 

Miss Mary B. Cappelli 

Miss Adeline S. Crane 

Miss Susie Dunmore 

Miss Teresa Fransee 

Mrs. Ida Harsanyi 

Miss M. Myrtle Haskin .... 

Miss E. Agnes Hornicek 

Miss Hermina Janek 

Miss Laura A. Kennedy. . . . 
Mrs. Theresa Keresztes 



Little Pine 
Marshall 



Pensacola 
Walnut Run 



Walnut Spring. 
White Rock . 
Huntsville . . . 



Jewett 
Juniper 



.Tenn 



Ozone 

Rock Creek. 
Rocky Fork 



Sycamore 
Vardy 

Brittontown . 
Brush Creek . 



.W. Va 



Clear Creek . . . 
Dorothy 
Dry Creek 
Jarrolds Valley . 



Lawson 



Kansas City 
Green Bay 

Erie 

Beaver Falls 
Middleton 

Gary 

Bristol 

Detroit 

Jersey City 
Ellis Island 
New Brunswick 

Easton 

St. Louis 

Rowena 

Siegfried 

Magyar Mission 



, .Kans. 
. . .Wis. 
. Penna 



.W. Va 
Ind. 

. Penna. 

. .Mich. 

...N. J. 

. .N. Y. 

.N 



. Penna. 
...Mo. 
. . Texas 
. Penna. 
.N. Y. 



4 




7 




12 




m 




12 




4 


60 


SH 




11 


74 


12 




1 




2 


34 


2 




10 


31 


7 




5 




12 




7H 




2 




?. 




12 I 


53 


12 




8H 


120 


12 




2 




12 




12 


49 


12 




12 


98 


2 




4 




m 




i 




12 




12 




12 




12 




12 




12 




12 




12 




12 




12 




12 


72, 


2H 




12 




2 




5 




2 




12 


65 


12 




10 


108 


12 




12 




12 


I 


12 


91 


12 


80 


12 




12 




12 




12 


84 


12 




12 




12 




12 


56 



206 



MISSIONARY TEACHERS. 



[1913. 















o 






y 


J3 . 
1-1 u 


a 






■gg 


g 


TEACHERS. 


FIELDS OF LABOR. 




"o 














§^ 


w 






a 





Miss Helen M. King Cincinnati 

Miss Rosa Kiss New Castle 

Mrs. F. P. Patrona Calumet ...... 

Miss Frances Psencik Houston Heights . 

Miss Anita Rau Brooklyn 

Miss Carlotta Schiapelli Italian Mission 

Miss Lena Stewart ICalumet 

Miss Mary M. Weir I " 

Miss Margaret Jane Wright IChester 



Miss Beulah L. Wilson. 

Miss Mercedes Castellanos 

Miss Lucila Diaz 

Miss Helen M. King 

Miss Amparo Lavin 

Miss Victoria MacArthur 

Miss Mary M. Coy 

Miss Ofelia Viamonte Cuervo . . . 

Mr. Moses A. Gonzales 

Mr. Jose Monasterio 

Miss Rosalia V. Oropesa 

Mr. Jose Ripoll 

Miss Mabel Jane Rogers 

Miss Angelina Gomez 

Mr. Manuel Janer , 

Miss Sixta Perurena 

Miss Ida A. Pyland 

Miss Emelina Zayas 

Miss Edith A. Sloan 

Miss Jean H. Alexander 

Miss Hortensia Carrion 

Miss Maggibel Course 

Miss Hazel Howland 

Miss Minnie Kopf 

Miss Lora Lundy 

Miss Grace E. McKinney 

Miss Dolores Montoyo 

Miss Margarita Ponce de Leon. 

Miss Margaret E. Baker 

Miss Minnie Kopf 

Miss Jeanne Sloan 

Miss Petra Villefane 

Miss Annie A. Rowe 

Miss America L. Archilla 

Miss Callie Barnes 

Miss Charlotte E. Brown 

Miss Mary E. Hagenbach 

Miss Clara E. Hazen 

Miss Myra D. Stevenson 

Miss Guillermina Nazario 

Miss Angelina Pagen 

Miss Georgiana Villanueva . . . . 

Miss Laura Jacob 



Guines 



Neuva Paz 



. ..Ohio 
. Penna.| 
. .Mich.| 
. .Texas. 
. .N. Y. 
. .N. Y.I 
. .Mich.l 
• • " I 

.Penna. 

. .Cuba 



Sancti Spiritus 



Aguadilla Porto Rico 



Anasco 



Mayaguez (Colegio Americano) . 



San German (Polytechnic Inst.) 



Miss Eva Espada 

Miss Mamie H. Smith 

Miss Maggibel Course 

Miss Alfredo Archilla 

Miss Dolores Montoyo 

Miss Eugenia Quinoes 

Dr. E. Raymond Hildreth. . . 

Miss Jennie Ordway 

Miss Mary Louise Beaty 
Mrs. Margaret E. Craighead . 
Miss Ruth Margaret Eddy . . 

Miss Rosa Gonzales 

Miss Lyllis Halsey 

Miss Francisca Jimenez 

Miss Josefa Martwell 

Miss Anna Monefeldt 



Mayaguez (Marina) 



Pueblo Nuevo 
Aguadilla 
San German 
San Juan 



Hospital . 



6 

12 
6 
12 
12 
12 
6 

6 I 

12 

12 

12 

7 

5 

2 

12 

2 

7 

12 

2 

9 

1 

12 

6 

9 

12 

12 

12 

12 

5 

m 

7 

5 

5 

7 
12 

1 
12 
12 

7 
12 
12 
12 
12 

8 
12 

5 
12 

7 
10 

1 

7 

12 
12 

5 

5 

1 

2 

1 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

1 

1 
12 



46 
71 



108 



121 



142 



213 



134 



150 



36 
63 



1913.] APPENDIX. 207 

APPENDIX. 



FROM REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMISSION 

Regarding the Board of Home Missions at the General Assembly 

at Atlanta, 1913. 

The Executive Commission desires to state that it regrets exceed- 
ingly that publicity was given to the Paper referred to in the Blue Book, 
and that its publication was unfair and unjust to the Board, and pro- 
duced wrong and erroneous impressions. 

The Executive Commission desires also to state that it finds no 
misappropriation of funds nor has any such misappropriation been 
charged, intimated, or suspected; nor any form of Malfeasance; nor 
is there any question as to the honesty or efficiency of the management, 
or of the integrity of the members of the Board or of its officers, nor 
any usurpation of Presbyterial authority. 

The questions raised, prompting the inquiry by the Commission, 
were questions of methods of work adopted by the Board, expenditures 
made under these methods, and differences of opinion as to what pro- 
portion of the expenditures should properly be charged to Administration 
and what to Missionary Work. 

A better understanding of these questions will appear by setting 
forth the methods of work in general and the character of the work now 
conducted by the Board. 

It is but fair to the Board, to say that the present methods of work 
have had the recognition and approval of the General Assembly. 
After considering in full detail the policies and methods 

of the Board of Home Missions, the report of the Executive 

Commission continues as follows: 

In closing, the Executive Commission desires to say that, in making 
its inquiry, in meeting in conference with the Board, in listening to the 
Board's answers to our questions, in studying its literature, it has been 
deeply impressed with the magnitude of the Home Mission problem, 
the perplexing difficulties with which the Board is frequently confronted, 
the wise and statesman-like policies it has generally adopted in meeting 
existing and changing conditions, and the assurance that the Board is 
ever ready and willing to receive counsel as to supervision and methods 
of administration. 

The Executive Commission desires also to place upon record its 
commendation of the Board, its Secretaries and other officers, for their 
faithfulness to duty, and successful achievements, and expresses the 
hope that the benign favor of God may continue to rest upon the great 
cause of Home Missions, that greater showers of blessing may descend 
and more abundant harvests be reaped, that speedily He shall reign 
Whose right it is, and this become Immanuel's land. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

The Executive Commission submits the following recommendations :- 

1. That, inasmuch as the discussions concerning the "Cost of 
Administration" is largely an academic one, and the usage of the word 
widely varies in different business managements, any exclusive definition, 
at this time, by the. Commission, is not considered wise or necessary, 

2. That the system of supervision under Field Men, now prevailing, 
should be temporary only, and that it should be the policy of the Board 



208 APPENDIX [1913 

to increase and develop Synodical and Presbyterial supervision and 
administration, through Home Mission Committees, so as to discontinue 
gradually, but as speedily as possible, the Field Men. 

3. That the Mexican and Indian Departments, while valuable 
for the time being, should be regarded by the Board as temporary, and, 
when careful surveys of their fields have been made and their Mission 
work properly organized, these departments should be discontinued, 
and their Mission work turned over to be supervised by the Presbyteries 
within whose bounds these churches and missions are located. 

4. That, while in fullest sympathy with every effort to revive, 
strengthen and perpetuate the country church, and with every movement 
to evangelize and Christianize the rural population, nevertheless, the 
Department of Church and Country Life should be discontinued as 
soon as practicable; that the vital interests and real needs of country 
churches be specially commended to the careful consideration of Home 
Mission Committees of Presbyteries as worthy and deserving fields for 
evangelistic and Home Mission effort; and that, when investigations 
or surveys are necessary in the interests of religious conditions or Social 
Service in the country, said investigations or surveys, if deemed advisable 
by Presbytery, should be made by the Bureau of Social Service. 

5. That, owing to the vast multitudes of immigrants that have 
come to our shores during recent years, and that are continuing to come 
in ever increasing numbers, the Department of Immigration is necessary 
for the present and should be continued, its efficiency commended, its 
work encouraged and pushed vigorously. 

6. That, although considerable criticism is made of the Bureau of 
Social Service, these criticisms seem to relate to methods rather than 
functions; that a Bureau of Social Service "to study social conditions 
as they are related to the progress of the Kingdom of God, and to suggest 
to the Church practical ways of realizing the social ideals of the Gospel" 
is needed and should be continued, but with such modifications in methods 
as will more fully exalt and magnify the Church as the Body of Christ, 
and with such enlargement of its scope so as to include Social Service in 
Country Life. 

7. That the Labor Temple should be transferred to the supervision 
and support of the Presbytery of New York to be conducted as, in its 
wisdom, the Presbytery shall determine. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. A. Matthews, 
Chairman Executive Commission. 



REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE ON HOME MISSIONS. 

Every true patriot has his heart stirred as he stands beside the 
graves of the soldiers who have fired the last shot and whose blood has 
consecrated the battlefields of North and South, and every true Presby- 
terian has something of the same feeling as he hears the names of those 
who, in this last year, have been called from home mission fields, the 
battlefields of the Church, to their rest and their reward. Their monu- 
ments are not in bronze or marble but in the strength and progress of 
that Church to which they have given their sacrificial service. Their 
names are as follows: — 

Rev. Herbert N. Bevier Centerville, California. 

Rev. Robert M. L. Braden, D. D... Bellevue, Nebraska. 

Rev. Oliver C. Cude McKenzie, Tennessee. 

Rev. A. B. C. Dinwiddie Baird, Texas. 

Rev. R. Y. Gray South West City, Missouri. 



1913.| APPENDIX. 209 

Rev. F. H. Gwynnc, D. D Stevensville, .Montana. 

Rev. John G. Lange Estclline, Texas. 

Rev. D. M. Lewis Lathrop, Missouri. 

Rev. Duncan McMillan Vesta, Minnesota. 

Rev. Duncan MacEachren Munich, North Dakota. 

Rev. S. W. Porter, Okarche, Oklahoma. 

Rev. William A. Robinson Halfway, Oregon. 

Rev. James M. Stultz Union, Missouri. 

Rev. Thomas T. Vincent Woodburn, Oregon. 

Rev. J. J. Williams Mineral Wells, Texa ? . 

Rev. Henry Wortmann George, Iowa. 

We especially desire to mention the name of the oldest member 
of the Board of Home Missions, the Rev. Wilson Phraner, D. D., who 
died at the age of ninety. Few men have served their generation so 
well and the whole constituency of the Board of Home Missions while 
it mourns their own loss, rejoices in his great reward. 

The concentration of the individual upon his own work, especially 
if he be a minister, sometimes makes him fail to estimate the greatness 
of the field of the Church's operation. When one considers that a single 
district of the Board has 722,000 square miles to be covered, with 20, 
000,000 of inhabitants, some conception of our national work may be 
obtained. The problems in the entire field have the widest range, 
almost everything of national importance has a home mission bearing, 
and the great problems such as the Indian and Mexican, the foreign- 
speaking people and the cities afford problems which only the consecra- 
tion of genius can solve. To these problems and to their solution, to all 
the difficult tasks connected with the various departments, the servants 
of the Church have given themselves with diligence and faithfulness. 

The Board has today 1750 missionaries in the field; they have 
aided 1847 churches; they have 1225 church buildings, and a total 
membership in these churches of more than 66,000. 

Your Committee desires to make mention of the faithfulness and 
self-sacrifice of the rank and file of the missionaries. A home missionary 
has not the glamor connected with him that comes through the association 
of foreign lands; nor is there connected with him in the minds of most 
people the idea of sacrifice which is associated with the foreign field. 
In an obscure place unnoticed by his brethren, unknown by the Church, 
he works and toils, often inadequately supported, to the praise and glory 
of God, without complaint, and with only the mighty compensation 
which those have who share in the upbuilding of the Master's Kingdom. 

Your Committee would approve the efforts which the Board have 
put forth to organize the non-self-supporting synods that they may care 
for their own work within their bounds, and the Committee urge the 
Board to continue this work wherever it may be possible. 

Your Committee thoroughly approve of the Department of Mission- 
ary Education in which this Board has a part. We believe that in that 
proportion in which the Church is educated to the claims of the home 
mission fields, in that proportion will the money be forthcoming in 
support of the work. 

Your Committee note with interest the work in the lumber camps, 
and the significant fact that this work seems to be involved in a large- 
degree with th^ temperance question. They rejoice in the testimony of 
the head of this work that its solution is vested in the preaching of the 
gospel of Christ by which preaching alone the work may be done. 

Your Committee feels that the full discussion of the departments of 
the Board of Home Missions presented to the Assembly in the report of 
the Executive Commission makes it unnecessary for them to say more, 
and to commend the fidelity of those engaged in this work. 

Your Committee feels that the recommendations of the Executive 



210 APPENDIX. ll ( M3. 

Commission adopted by the Assembly regarding the work of the Board 
of Home Missions indicates the Assembly's earnest desire for a new 
departure in the methods of the Board in the direction of an increase- 
in evangelistic emphasis. This will be a matter of approval by the whole 
Church. 

Your Committee has learned with satisfaction that the Social 
Service Department has been directed by the Assembly to make its 
methods more definitely religious in their character. It earnestly urges 
the Board that this should be done, and points out that the salvation of 
men is through the gospel of Christ, and that this is the vital and essential 
work committed to it by the Church, not in its evangelistic department 
alone, but in all its departments and through all of its officers. 

It is a cause of great thankfulness that the Woman's Board of Home 
Missions has done its work so well and achieved so magnificent a result. 
The amount which they raised was $598,244.24, and as the year opened 
with a depressing debt the fact that they have entirely paid it should be 
both to them and to the Church a matter of profound thanksgiving. 

Your Committee desires to call attention to the fact that there seems 
to have been some friction in some of the fields between the missionaries, 
the presbyteries and the representatives of the Board. Your Committee 
calls attention to one of the resolutions appended to this report which 
they believe will adjust this matter if adopted by you. 

FINANCES 

The total receipts for the year from all sources, was $1,419,893.06 
showing a decrease from last year of $71,289.79. 

It seems scarcely worth while to discuss the causes of this deficiency. 
The Board of Home Missions has been under criticism which justly or 
unjustly may have hurt the contribution of the Church. But with the 
action of this General Assembly, and the cheerful acquiescence of the 
Board, and the tremendous appeal of the work, your Committee calls on 
the ministers in all of our presbyteries for renewed interest, confidence 
and gifts that this great agency of the Church may continue to do its 
important work. There are missionary's salaries to be paid; there are 
millions to be reached by the gospel, and the money must be given. 
Surely it is the confidence, enthusiasm and loyalty of the ministry that 
the Church demands and expects to maintain and develop her great 
benevolent agencies. 

The report of the home mission work done in our country under the 
auspices of our Church would be entirely inadequate without some 
account of the immense work done by the self-sustaining synods. These 
reports are printed as a part of the report of the Board of Home Missions, 
and thus come under the review of your Committee. 

The Synod of Baltimore reports that distinct progress has been made 
in all its presbyteries, especially in work among foreign-speaking people, 
and that in its Presbytery of Washington City a successful effort to 
remove the indebtedness upon its churches has resulted in the raising 
of more than $80,000.00. 

The Synod of Indiana reports increases in the gift to its churches. 
According to the Indiana Plan, the churches send their home mission 
offerings directly to the presbyterial home mission treasurer, who retains 
seventy-five per cent, for presbyterial work; of the remainder fifteen 
per cent, goes to the synodical committee for the synod's work, and ten 
per cent, goes to the Board in New York. The Trust Fund left in the 
will of George B. Yandes opens a new era in the affairs of this synod. 

The Synod of Iowa began its self-support in 1904; the total amount 
contributed for home missions in this synod this year was $30,760.35, 
a net gain of $2,712.52. 

The Synod of Michigan reports that the work was never better in 
hand, nor more effectively done than at the present time. The greatest 



1913.] APPENDIX. 211 

need of the synod next to funds is efficient men to carry on the work. 

The Synod of New Jersey has completed twenty-six years of synodi- 
cal administration of its home mission work, with a record of continued 
encouragement in gifts secured for its support, and the work accomplished 
thereby; $35,074.00 were contributed during the last year, of which 
$13,104.00 had been secured and expended within the Presbytery of 
Newark through its church extension committee. This total represents 
three times the amount expended in the first year of synodical effort, and 
has not interfered with an increase of offerings made to. the Home Board 
during the whole period. 

The Synod of New ir'crk expended $36,670.00 in its enormous and 
important field, and in udi year making progress along every line of 
missionary endeavor. 

The Synod of Ohio ieports that it has felt the growing demand for 
more systematic effort among foreign -speaking people. Some progress 
has been made, and larger plans outlined for the future, especially in the 
Presbytery of Cleveland. It expended $39,757.50 on its work. 

The Synod of Pennsylvania has had under its care 134 ministers, 
whose salaries were supplemented from the home mission funds of the 
synod, serving 171 churches, 26 missions. To these churches were added 
1129 members on confession of faith. It is interesting to notice that this 
synod makes it a positive condition of giving aid that these churches 
must contribute to all the Boards, and to the synod's funds each year. 
This year the aided churches contributed for benevolences $23,848.00, 
which was eighty-one per cent, of the aid given them. The whole amount 
expended within the bounds of the synod last year was $200,315.68, 
of. which $77,598.00 was expended for work among foreigners. 

Your Committee begs leave to report action upon the following 
overtures: — 

Overture Number 125 from the Presbytery of Arc] more. It is 
recommended that it be referred to the Board of Home Missions with 
instructions^ to take up the matter contained in the overture with the 
Home Missions Council. 

Overture 266 from the Presbytery of Pueblo. It is recommended 
that it be referred to the Board of Home Missions without recommenda- 
tion. 

Overture US from the Presbytery of Sheridan, 121 from the Pres- 
bytery of Rochester, 122 from the Presbytery of Lincoln. It is recom- 
mended by your Committee that these overtures be referred to the 
Board of Home Missions for sympathetic action. 

Overture Number 300 from the Synod of New Jersey. 

Overture Number 124. It is recommended that the following 
answer be made: — 

Referring to the overture from the Presbytery of Philadelphia North 
calling upon the presbyteries and the Board of Home Missions to insti- 
tute methods by which; First, definite responsibility shall be fixed upon 
some denomination or agency for each field now neglected by religious 
ministry, by the conspicuous leadership it has been given. We ask that 
the Assembly heartily endorse the programme referred by the Council 
to its constituent Boards and accepted by our Assembly's Board. 

Overture Numbers 1 to 74 inclusive, and 274 to 277 inclusive, known 
as the Ogden overtures. It is recommended that these overtures be 
answered in the affirmative omitting the words " Under the American 
Flag" with the suggestion that the Board of Home Missions cooperate 
with the Board of Education who are already engaged in this work. 

Overture Number 123, from the Board of Home Missions and 
corresponding members. It is recommended that this overture be 
answered in the affirmative with the suggestion that the words "sometime 
during the year" be substituted for the words "during October and 
November. " 



212 APPENDIX. [1913. 

The Committee begs leave to present the following resolutions for 
the adoption of the Assembly: — 

1. Your Committee has examined the minutes of the Board of 
Home Missions, and find them correctly and excellently kept, and 
recommend that they be approved. 

2. The terms of service of the following members of the Board of 
Home Missions expire with this Assembly: — 

Ministers. Elders. 

Samuel J. Niccolls, D. D., LL. D. Walter M. Aikman. 

Joseph Dunn Burrell, D. D. Robert C. Ogden. 

Albert Edwin Keigwin, D. D. Henry W. Jessup. 

Edgar Whitaker Work, D. D. Fleming H. Revell. 
William Adams Brown, D. D. 

Your Committee recommend these gentlemen for election to succeed 
themselves with the exception of Dr. Samuel J. Niccolls, who after long 
years of service declines reelection. In his place we recommend the 
election of the Rev. Edgar P. Hill, D. D., of Chicago. 

In the place of the Rev. Wilson Phraner, D. D., your Committee 
recommend the Rev. W. Francis Irwin of Louisville, Kentucky. 

3. Your Committee recommends that, as in former years, the 
Sunday schools make special contributions on the Sabbath nearest 
Washington's Birthday for the work of the Assembly's Board, and on the 
Sabbath nearest Thanksgiving Day for the work of the Woman's Board. 

Your Committee observes with disappointment that the contribu- 
tions to the Board from the Young People's societies throughout the 
Church show a decline from last year's standard by nearly $2,000.; 
pastors and leaders in these societies are urged to correct this tendency 
and to enlarge their interest in and support of the work of the Board. 

4. That this Assembly goes on record as expressing its confidence 
in the Board of Home Missions and its secretaries, and commends them 
to the liberality and confidence of the whole Church. 

5. Inasmuch as many complaints and inquiries have been made 
concerning the authority of the agents of the Board of Home Missions on 
the field and in the presbyteries and synods in which they work, and 

Whereas, the Board of Home Missions through its officers have 
disavowed the authority of their agents over ministers or in presbyteries 
or synods, and ask that this Committee make known this fact to the 
Church, 

We therefore declare, that the agents of the Home Board, the secre- 
taries, district superintendents, department heads, pastor-evangelists, 
and field secretaries, and presbyterial missionaries have no authority 
over the individual missionary in anything in which he is responsible as a 
presbyter to his presbytery; nor shall these agents in any way interfere 
with the authority of action of the presbytery or synod within whose 
bounds he may labor. And we request the Board to send a copy of this 
resolution to every presbytery in the Church. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Mailtand Alexander, 

Chairman. 



Several items in the Committee's report will be made more clear by reference to the 
body of the Board's Report and to the Assembly records. Through printer's error in 
the advance edition no reference is made to the important work conducted by the Syn- 
ods of Illinois, Kansas, West Virginia and Wisconsin. The reader will find each treated 
in this edition of the Board's Report. A resolution was introduced from the floor relat- 
ing to the unAmerican custom of permitting the wearing of sectarian garb by teachers 
in the government Indian schools. It was adopted by the Assembly, but the text of the 
resolution was not supplied for these pages. 



INDEX. 



Alabama 26 

Alaska 50-61 

Annuity Funds 132 

Appendix 207 

Arizona 38 

Arkansas 27 

Assembly Herald 213 

Auditor's Certificate 121 

Balance Sheet 122-123 

Baltimore, Synod of 01,158 

Bequests 142-143 

Forms of 169 

Board, Members and Officers 

of 2 

Boxes 78 

Bureau of Social Service 11 

Church and Country Life, 

Department of 15 

Churches Reaching Self Sup- 
port 104 

Colorado 39 

Combined Statement of 

Receipts 160 

Comparison of Receipts .... 1 15-120 

Conclusion 89 

Corbin, Wm. H. Death of . . 3 

Cuba 65-69 

Deceased Missionaries 3 

Department of Church and 

Country Life 15 

Department of Immigration 18 
Indian Mis- 
sions 22 

Department of Miss'y Educa- 
tion 7 

Distribution of Missionaries. . 106 

District of the Northwest.... 31 
" " "* Pacific Coast 43 
" " " Rocky Moun- 
tains 36 

District of the South and 

Southwest 24 

Executive Commission, Re- 
port of 207 

Expenditures 125-129 

Classified by Departments 137 

" Presbyteries 144-151 

" Synods .. 155-157 



Federation of Self Adminis- 
tering Synods 4 

Financial Statement 124-138 

Foreign Speaking People, 

Churches Among 107 

Forms for Bequests 169 

General Assembly, Action of 

Summary 106-109 

" Self-Support- 
ing Synods 109 

Home Mission Monthly . . . 77,213 

Home Missions Council ... 6 

Honor Roll, The 105 

Idaho 40 

Illinois, Synod of 93,158 

Immigration, Dept. of 18 

Indian Mission, Depts. of . . 22 

Indiana, Synod of 94,158 

Individual Contributions . . 138-141 

Iowa, Synod of _ 95,158 

Itemized Expenditures .... 127-120 

Kansas, Synod of 96,158 

Kentucky 27 

Labor Temple, The 22 

Legacies 142-143 

Leaflets and Literature .... 213 

Literature Department .... 79.87-89 

Lumber Camp Work 9,46 

Members of the Board .... 2 
Members of the Board Re- 
elected 212 

Michigan, Synod of 97,158 

Minnesota, Synod of ^^ 

Missionaries, List of 170-199 

Missionary Education, Dept. 7 

Missionary Teachers, List of 200 
Mission Schools, Statistical 

Report of 108 

Mississippi 27 

Missouri 27 

Montana 40 

Nebraska 34 

New Jersey, Synod of 98,158 

New Mexico 41 

New York, Synod of 100,158 



INDEX 



1913 



North Dakota 35 

Northwest District 31 

Officers of the Board 2 

Ohio, Synod of 100,159 

Oklahoma 28 

Over Sea and Land 78,213 

Pacific Coast District 43 

Payments by Presbyteries. . 144-151 

" Synods 152-154 

Pennsylvania, Synod of .... 101,159 
Permanent and Annuity 

Funds 130-132 

Phraner, Rev. Wilson, D. D. 

Death of 3 

Porto Rico 61-65 

Recapitulation of Payments 

144-151,155-157 
Recapitulation of Receipts. .144,152-154 
Receipts and Expenditures. 124-129,138 

By Months ,.. . 117 

By Presbyteries 144-151 

Bv Self Supporting Svnods 158-159 

By Synods 152-154 

Results of Year's Work .... 106-109 

Rocky Mountain District . . 36 

Roll of Honor 105 

Report of Executive Commis- 
sion 207 

Report of Standing Committe 

On Home Missions .... 208 

Report of the Woman's Board 69,162 



PAGE. 

Schools, Statistical Report of 108 

Securities of the Board 133-136 

Self Supporting Synods .. . . 91,158 
" General 

Summary 109 

Soujth and Southwest District 24 

South Dakota 35 

Special Departments 7-10-24 

Specials, Sundry 141 

Standing Committee, Report 

of 

Summary, General 106-109 

Synodical Home Missions .. 91-104,109 

Teachers, List of 200 

Tennessee 29 

Texas 30 

Treasurer's Report 110-121 

Trust Funds 

Utah 42 

West Virginia, Synod of .... 102 

Wisconsin, Synod of 103 

Woman's Board; Permanent 

Funds 131 

Woman's Board, Report . . . 69-80 
" Treasurer's 

Report 162-168 

Wyoming 42 

Young People's Department 81-87 

Yukon Presbytery 50 



The Seventy-sixth Annual Report 



OF THE 



Board of Foreign Missions 



OF THE 



Presbyterian Church in the United 
States of America 



Presented to the General Assembly, May, 1913 



NEW YORK: 

PRESBYTERIAN BUILDING, 156 FIFTH AVENUE 
19 13 



BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 



1911-1914 



Rev. GEORGE ALEXANDER, D.D., Mr. WARNER VAN NORDEN, 

Rev. JOHN F. PATTERSON, D.D., Mr. JOHN T. UNDERWOOD, 

Rev. J. ROSS STEVENSON, D.D., Mr. D. W. McWILLIAMS, 

Mr. JAMES M. SPEERS. 

1912-1915 

KEv. CLELAND B. McAFEE, D.D., Rev. WM. PIERSON MERRILL, D.D. 

Rev. JOHN FOX, D.D., Mr. W. P. STEVENSON, 

Rev. CHARLES R. ERDMAN, D.D., Mr. SCOTT FOSTER, 

Rev. J. H. JOWETT, D.D., Mr. LOUIS H. SEVERANCE. 

1913-1916 

Rev. EBEN B. COBB, D.D., Mr. JOHN STEWART, 

Rev. JAMES S. DENNIS, D.D., WILLIAM E. STIGER, Esq., 

rev. john Mcdowell, d.d., me. Alfred e. marling, 

T. H. COBBS, Esq. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

Rev. GEORGE ALEXANDER, D.D., President. 
Mr. WARNER VAN NORDEN, Vice-President. 
Mr. ROBERT E. SPEER, \ 

Rev. ARTHUR J. BROWN, D.D., / 

Rev. A. WOODRUFF HALSEY, D.D., f " 
Rev. STANLEY WHITE, D.D., ) 

Rev. ORVILLE REED, Ph.D., Asst. Sec'y. 
Mr. RUSSELL CARTER, Asst. Sec'y. 
Mr. DWIGHT H. DAY, Treasurer. 

ASSISTANT SECRETARIES OF THE HOME DEPARTMENT 

Mr. DAVID McCONAUGHY, Eastern Section. 

Rev. CHARLES E. BRADT, Ph.D., Central Section. 

Mr. J. M. PATTERSON, Southern Section. 

Rev. ERNEST F. HALL, Western Section. 

T. H. P. SAILER, Ph.D., Honorary Educational Secretary. 

REV. GEORGE H. TRULL, Sabbath School Secretary. 

MEDICAL ADVISER 

DAVID BOVAIRD, M.D. 

Note — Dr. Sailer and Dr. Bovaird give their services without compensation. 



Note — The Annual Election of Officers is held on the first stated meeting in 
June. 

Communications relating to the Missions should be addressed to the Foreign 
Secretaries. Communications regarding Candidates should be addressed to the 
Rev. Stanley White, D.D. Communications regarding Literature and Missionary 
Speakers should be addressed to the Rev. A. W. Halsey, D.D., 156 Fifth Avenue, 
New York. 

Letters containing remittances of money or relating to bequests should be 
sent to Dwight H. Day, Treasurer of the Board of Foreign Missions of the Pres- 
byterian Church, 156 Fifth Avenue, New York. 



CHARTER 

Charter Granted by the State of New York, April 12TH, 1862. 
Laws of 1862, Chapter 187. 



an act to incorporate the board of foreign missions of the presbyterian 
church in the united states of america. 

Passed April 12TH, 1862 — Chapter 187. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, do 
enact as follows: 

Section i. — Walter Lowrie, Gardner Spring, William W. Phillips, George 
Potts, William Barnard, John D. Wells, Nathan L. Rice, Robert L. Stuart, Lebbeus 
B. Ward, Robert Carter, John C. Lowrie, citizens of the State of New York, and 
such others as they may associate with themselves, are hereby constituted a 
body corporate and politic forever, by the name of The Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States off 
America, for the purpose of establishing and conducting Christian Missions 
among the unevangelized or Pagan nations, and the general diffusion of Christi- 
anity; and by that name they and their successors and associates shall be capable 
of taking by purchase, grant, devise or otherwise, holding, conveying, or otherwise 
disposing of any real or personal estate for the purposes of the said corporation, 
but which estate within this State shall not at any time exceed the annual income 
of twenty thousand dollars. 

Section 2. — The said corporation shall possess the general powers, rights and 
privileges, and be subject to liabilities and provisions contained in the eighteenth 
chapter of the first part of the Revised Statutes, so far as the same is applicable, 
and also subject to the provisions of chapter three hundred and sixty of the laws 
of eighteen hundred and sixty. 

Section 3. — This Act shall take effect immediately. 



Laws of 1894, Chapter 326. 

an act to amend chapter one hundred and eighty-seven of the laws of eigh- 
teen hundred and sixty-two, entitled "an act to incorporate the board of 
foreign missions of the presbyterian church in the united states of 
america," and to regulate the number of trustees. 

Became a law April 19TH, 1894, with the Approval of the Governor; passed, 

THREE-FIFTHS BEING PRESENT. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, do 
enact as follows: 

Section i. — Section three of chapter one hundred and eighty-seven of the laws 
of eighteen hundred and sixty-two, entitled "An Act to incorporate the Board of 
Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church of the United States of America," 
is hereby amended to read as follows: 

Section 2. — "The management and disposition of the affairs and property of 
"the said Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
"States of America shall be vested in twenty-one Trustees, who shall be appointed 
"from time to time by the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the 
"United States of America for such terms as the Assembly may determine. But 
"the number of such Trustees may be increased or decreased at any time by the 
"said General Assembly, and in case of an increase the additional Trustees shall 
"be appointed by such General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
"States of America; provided, however, that the members of the Board as at 
"present constituted shall continue to hold office until their successors have been 
"appointed by the General Assembly. Not less than eleven members of the Board 
"shall constitute a quorum for the purpose of electing officers, making by-laws, or 
"for holding any special meeting; but for all other purposes, and at stated meet- 
"ings, five shall be a quorum." 

Section 3. — This Act shall take effect immediately. 



Laws of 1900, Chapter 136. 

an act to amend chapter one hundred and eighty-seven of the laws of 
eighteen hundred and sixty-two, entitled "an act to incorporate the 
board of foreign missions of the presbyterian church in the united 
states of america," as amended by chapter three hundred and twenty- 
six of the laws of eighteen hundred and ninety-four. 

Became a law March 15TH, 1900, with the approval of the Governor; passed, 

A MAJORITY BEING PRESENT. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, do 
enact as follows: 

Section 1. — Section three of chapter one hundred and eighty-seven of the laws 
of eighteen hundred and sixty-two, entitled "An Act to incorporate the Board of 
Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America," 
as amended by chapter three hundred and twenty-six of the laws of eighteen hun- 
dred and ninety-four, is further amended so as to read as follows: 

Section 2. — "The management and disposition of the affairs and property of 
"the said Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
"States of America shall be vested in twenty-one Trustees, who shall be appointed 
"from time to time by the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the 
"United States of America for such terms as the Assembly may determine. But 
"the number of such Trustees may be increased or decreased at any time by 
"said General Assembly, and in case of an increase the additional Trustees shall 
"be appointed by such General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
"States of America; provided, however, that the members of the Board as at 
"present constituted shall continue to hold office until their successors have been 
"appointed by the General Assembly. Not less than eleven members of the Board 
"shall constitute a quorum for the purpose of electing officers, making by-laws, or 
"for holding any special meeting; but for all other purposes, and at stated meet- 
ings, five shall be a quorum. All the business of the said corporation shall be 
"conducted by the Board under and subject to the direction of the said General 
"Assembly, so far as such direction shall be in accordance with the laws of the 
"State of New York and of the United States of America." 

Section 3. — This Act shall take effect immediately. 

Note. — The limit fixed by the Board's original Charter as to the amount of prop- 
erty which the Board may take or hold and the income to be derived therefrom was 
increased under a law passed June 30, 1911, amending the general corporation law 
in relation to the amount of property non- stock corporations may take or hold. The 
new law being as follows: 

"If any general or special law heretofore passed, or any certificate of incorpora- 
tion, shall limit the amount of property a corporation other than a stock corporation 
may take or hold, such corporation may take and hold property of the value of ten 
million dollars or less, or the yearly income derived from which shall be one mil- 
lion dollars or less, notwithstanding any such limitations. In computing the value 
of such property, no increase in value arising otherwise than from improvements 
made thereon shall be taken into account." 

BEQUESTS 

The Board is incorporated by an Act of the Legislature of 
the State of New York. The corporate name to be used is : 
The Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in 
the United States of America. 

FORM OF BEQUEST 

I give, devise and bequeath unto "The Board of Foreign Missions of the 
Presbyterian Church in the United States of America," incorporated April 12, 

1862, by Act of the Legislature of the State of New York, the sum of 

Dollars, to be expended for the appropriate objects of 

said corporation. 

FORM OF DEVISE 
(Real Estate.) 

I give and devise unto "The Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America," incorporated April 12, 1862, by Act of 
the Legislature of the State of New York, all that certain [here insert description 
if convenient] with the appurtenances in fee simple, for the use, benefit and behoof 
of said society forever. 

RESIDUARY CEAUSE 

All the rest, residue and remainder of my real estate and personal estate, I 
devise and bequeath unto "The Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America," incorporated April 12, 1862, by Act of 
the Legislature of the State of New York. 



ACTION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



The Seventy-sixth Annual Report of the Board of Foreign 
Missions and the manuscript volume of its Minutes for the 
year ending March 31, 1913, were presented to the General 
Assembly in session at Atlanta, Ga., May, 191 3, and were re- 
ferred to the Standing Committee on Foreign Missions. 

The Committee presented to the General Assembly its Re- 
port which was adopted. The Report and recommendations 
submitted are herewith presented: 

Your Committee on Foreign Missions, in presenting to you 
the 76th Annual Report of the Board, desires to call to your 
attention a few of the general facts therein contained; and 
also some of the convictions that have come to us through 
a study of this magnificent report. 

It is with much regret that we note the announcement of 
the death of several of our most noted and successful mission- 
aries; but we rejoice in the fact that 89 new missionaries have 
been sent out the past year, making our total force now under 
commission by the Board 1,155, the largest number our Church 
has ever had on the foreign field. 

We note also with gratification the increase last year in the 
gifts from the Church, Women's Boards and Sabbath-schools, 
amounting to $38,000.00 more than the preceding year, and 
$12,000.00 more than was ever before received from these 
sources in the Board's history. The total gifts from all sources 
amounted to almost Two Millions of Dollars ; and the Board's 
operations are now the largest of all the 349 mission boards 
and societies of all denominations in the world. 

It is with profound gratitude to God that we report to the 
Assembly the liberal response on the part of many of the 
churches to the special China Emergency Appeal, authorized 
by the last Assembly. More than three hundred thousand 
dollars have already been pledged, and about forty men and 
women have offered themselves to go to China. We would 
urge upon the churches and congregations, which have not 
already contributed to this fund for reenforcing the China 
Missions, to do so without delay, in view of the extraordinary 
opportunity now confronting the Church in the Republic of 
China. The China campaigns as carried on last year not only 
did not interfere with the other benevolences of the Board, 
but, so far as can be judged from the testimony of pastors 
and elders in whose churches the campaigns were held, were 
a great spiritual benefit to the church and the community. The 

(2) 



vi ACTION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

appeal sent forth by the Chinese Cabinet, asking that the Chris- 
tians of China set apart Sunday, April 27th, as a day of special 
prayer for the new Republic of China; the recognition of the 
Republic of China by the United States Government ; the en- 
thusiasm shown by thousands of students in connection with 
the meetings held under the auspices of the World Missionary 
Conference; the reports from many mission stations of in- 
creased attendance at services; and the very large number of 
those who confessed Christ, present an emergency call to the 
whole Church that is imperative. Not to listen to this call 
would be to lose an opportunity which has never before been 
given in all the history of foreign missions. 

Your Committee is impressed, first of all with the unpar- 
alleled opportunity now offered to the Church for the evan- 
gelization of the world. We can take but a bird's-eye view of 
the field in this report; but even a hasty review will disclose 
the marvelous opportunity: 

I. SYRIA. Despite the uncertainties and unsettled condi- 
tions attendant upon the Balkan War, the Syrian Mission re- 
ports a most prosperous year. One of the most prominent 
of our missionaries in Syria stated to your chairman a few 
months ago, that more men in Syria had inquired about Christ 
and Christianity in the last six months than in the preceding 
six years. 

II. PERSIA. Never since Mohammedanism arose, to 
curse and blight its millions, has there been so hopeful an in- 
terest and opportunity for the Christian Church as is now 
offered in Persia. The entire North Persia is being left for 
evangelization almost exclusively to our Church. In this terri- 
tory there are about five million people, with only two ordained 
men to carry on the work. 

III. AFRICA. In Africa God's favor is marvelously 
manifest. The work has increased one thousand per cent, in 
seven years. Mere weight of numbers is a problem ; audiences 
number thousands ; converts, hundreds ; multitudes are access- 
ible and receptive, and pleas for instruction pour in. Self- 
support and evangelism characterize the Church. Native pas- 
tors, native evangelists, supported by native funds, native 
teachers scattered through jungle towns, prophesy a self- 
propagating, self-perpetuating, church. One native church sup- 
ports 23 evangelists. Along with these the value and necessity 
of industrial work is more and more evident. Romish oppo- 
sition is a difficulty and incentive. The approach of Moslem 
propaganda constitutes at once a menace and a challenge to 
the Church. Large reinforcements are a necessity that the 
day of opportunity be not lost. 

IV. INDIA. The following are significant facts in India: 



ACTION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY vii 

i. A distinct renaissance, or awakening, of the country; 
visible in the recent unrest and demands, which were allayed 
only by the reform of Lord Morley, and the King-Emperor's 
visit; visible socially in the rise of the low castes, the educa- 
tion of women, and the adaptation of caste to modern condi- 
tions; visible religiously in the activity of the Arya Somao, 
and other reform movements. 

2. A coming to its own of the Indian church, as seen in a 
growing desire on the part of many leaders for a comprehen- 
sive church ; and a growing desire for freedom to develop 
along such lines as will conduce to the natural expression of 
the spiritual instincts of Indian Christians; and, furthermore, 
in the conviction that churches and missions should make a 
distinct advance by placing capable Indians on a footing of 
complete equality in status and responsibility with Europeans. 

3. A very marked growth in the spirit of unity and brother- 
hood in the spirit of missionaries in the various denominations. 

4. A marked growth in the scientific temper and method in 
mission work exemplified especially in various conferences 
held under Mr. Mott 1912-1913. 

V. SIAM. In Siam our mission work is becoming more 
hopeful. This is the land of white elephants, yellow-robed 
priests, and Presbyterians. The Presbyterian Church is prac- 
tically the only Protestant body working in this country. Siam 
has been one of our most difficult fields, but now shows hope- 
ful signs. Last year there was a net gain of twenty per cent, 
in the membership of the churches. While the total number of 
Christians in Siam is very small after seventy-six years of 
faithful work, we must remember that our force of mission- 
aries has been also small ; and, that in addition to the extreme- 
ly trying climate, which has compelled many of our mission- 
aries to return after a few years of service, we have also had 
to face in Siam that extremely southern type of Buddhism 
which is so difficult to meet; there is also in Siam one Buddhist 
yellow-robed priest for every forty-five of the population. 

VI. LAOS. Northern Siam, or Laos, is perhaps the sec- 
ond greatest mission field of our Church today, in its need 
and its opportunity. We believe that the time is ripe for 
bringing before the whole Church the situation in the Laos 
field. Within the past two years a series of providences has 
given us unprecedented opportunities for investigation and 
exploration among the Laos in Tonkin and China. We now 
know our field as we never did. Our task in Laos is distinct, 
important, and immense. It is distinct because our Church is 
the only church working among these people. It is important 
because the people themselves are important. It is immense 
because of the number of the people. There are at least four- 



viii ACTION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

teen, and, possibly, sixteen millions, most of whom have never 
heard the name of Jesus Christ. These people are scattered 
over a territory of four hundred thousand square miles; three 
times as large as Japan; five times as large as Korea; nearly 
half as large as that part of the United States east of the 
Mississippi River. 

Siam and Laos are distinctively Presbyterian missions, and 
call loudly for reinforcements at this time. 

VII. KOREA. It has been Korea's opportunity to refute 
once more the charge of "Rice Christians." Through these 
days of imprisonment there have come from the prisoners 
reports reminding us of Paul's incarcerations, when he con- 
verted his guards and fellow prisoners. During the year the 
first Korean General Assembly has met, composed of four 
branches of the Presbyterian Church. Is this prophetic? In 
the midst of their severe trials tKey raised one thousand dol- 
lars to send two evangelists to China. Instead of the trying 
experiences of the past year hindering the work in Korea, they 
have in reality been a blessing in driving the people to their 
knees in earnest prayer, in strengthening their- faith in God, 
and in making them more determined to preach the gospel of 
Jesus Christ, who is their only hope. 

VIII. JAPAN. The reports from Japan are very encour- 
aging. The Three Religions Conference shows the position 
Christianity has already gained in that empire. Its represen- 
tatives were invited by the Government to meet with Shin- 
toists and Buddhists to consider the ethical and religious' 
needs of the times. Then, too, one of the most earnest Chris- 
tian laymen in the nation has been raised to the peerage; and 
the common people are feeling the power of the life set forth 
by Christian teaching. 

We desire to unite with our missionaries in Japan in ex- 
pressing our strong appreciation of the wise and statesman- 
like course of President Wilson, in his effort to give full re- 
cognition alike to federal, state, and Japanese interests in Cali- 
fornia; and to express our earnest hope that the Christian 
people of the United States will aid in creating a public senti- 
ment which will effectively support our Government in this 
difficult and delicate situation. 

IX. CHINA. The marvelous results of missionary work 
in China are before the world today as evidence of what the 
gospel is accomplishing in that ancient land. To quote from 
the report of the China Council : "By means of the red cross, 

its hospital works far-reaching influence by means of 

the press, the schools, and rostrum by the Holy Spirit's 

working through the lives of native Christians through 

the four thousand Christian missionaries, through Christian 
books, and in answer to the prayers of God's faithful ones in 



ACTION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY ix 

all lands, this great people is being slowly moved Godward 

never since the days of Constantine has the Church 

faced such wide-open doors." For the first time in history a 
pagan people has asked for the prayers of Christians. At 
last China is opened for the gospel. Many of the leading 
officials are Christian men and in many places the officials 
are building houses for the preaching of the gospel. The old 
temples have been converted into barracks for the army; 
idols have been hurled into the streets, and missionaries can 
even preach the gospel today in heathen temples. Recently 
revival services were held in the Temple of Heaven at Peking. 
The Gentry classes are becoming sympathetic; the cities have 
opened their gates to missionaries, and never before in all the 
history of missions has any such opportunity come to the 
Christian Church. 

X. J.ATIN-AMERICA. A new day is coming also in 
Latin-America. The rapid completion of the Panama Canal, 
and the inspiration given to various commercial interests on 
account of this, together with the revolutions in South Ameri- 
can countries, have brought vividly to our attention the needs 
of Latin-America. It is the judgment of our Board that we 
should give more earnest attention to the work in these coun- 
tries. The Catholic Church is not meeting the needs of the 
people. Religious indifference, agnosticism, and infidelity, es- 
pecially in the more enlightened Latin-American countries, 
have laid a strong hand upon most of the seventy-one millions 
of people. There is a crying need and a great opportunity for 
Protestant missions in Latin-American countries. 

XL HOME DEPARTMENT AND THE HOME 
CHURCH. The Home Department and the Home Church 
deserve a moment of our special attention. The vital im- 
portance of this department is being increasingly recognized. 
It must furnish the sinews of war, not only in money, but still 
more in men. It must do this double task by keeping the 
Church at home in constant and living touch with the work 
abroad. It must have its thoroughly organized system for the 
steady year to year work; but that system must be elastic 
enough to respond to sudden and great emergencies, like the 
present call from China. 

Certain points need to be emphasized: i. At the foundation 
lies the missionary education of the young; in this connec- 
tion attention is called to the thoroughly organized and splen- 
didly effective work of the present department of missionary 
education. 

2. We desire to express our sense of the value of the li- 
brary and periodical literature sent out by the Board. We 
raise the question whether the illustrated lectures ought not 



x ACTION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

to be made free for all Presbyterian churches, the only charge 
being for expressage and breakage. 

3. We suggest also that missionaries on furlough should 
be brought into contact with the churches as largely as pos- 
sible. Even those who have no great gifts as speakers can 
render great service by making the field real to the Church. 
To this end we would suggest to the Board some more sys- 
tematic way of using the missionaries who are on furlough. 

4. We would urge upon the Presbyterial and Synodical 
Committees that the work in large measure depends upon the 
thoroughness of their organization, and their fidelity in the 
cause. Where these committees take themselves seriously, 
accepting responsibility as an integral part of the machinery 
of the Church, results are bound to follow. 

Such in brief is the opportunity that faces us on the foreign 
field. The widest, most hopeful, most pressing that has ever 
faced the Church. What does it mean? It is God's challenge 
to the Church. Brethren, these are awful days in which we 
are living. The opportunity is so great that it overwhelms us. 
Multitudes in all parts of the world are saying .to the Church: 
"We would see Jesus ;" and God is saying to us : "Go in and 
possess the land." Some one has said : "Again the world stands 

at the cross-roads of history A few brief years will fix 

the course of centuries." 

The King's business requires haste. Already the reaction 
against Christianity is setting in in many countries. In India, 
Burmah and Japan the native religions are being revived ; new 
temples are being built ; controversial literature is being dis- 
tributed; Buddhistic preaching is being encouraged, and our 
own methods of propaganda are being taken up by the advo- 
cates of non-Christian religions and being used for their 
revival. 

The growth of infidelity is another alarming sign of the 
times in non-iChristian lands. Educated people are breaking 
away from their old false religions, but comparatively few are 
accepting our faith. One thing is sure, the old non-Christian 
religions cannot stand in the light of modern education and 
civilization. They must and are going, but what shall take 
their place? 

The impact of unholy influences from the Western world 
upon the East is making it increasingly hard to evangelize the 
nations ; and every day lost lessens by that much the chances 
of our success. 

Your Committee feels, Mr. Moderator, that this is the day 
of the Lord ; that today is the day of salvation for the great 
non-Christian world. Never again will China be so receptive 
as she is today ; never again will the Church be so able to meet 



ACTION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY xi 

the power of Mohammedanism in Africa as today; never again 
can we hope for such an open door to all the fields of the 
world. The Church must enter the door while it is open. It 
has been truly said: "We blame the Church of the past — of 
Judea, of the Roman Empire, of the Crusades, of the Refor- 
mation, of the American Colonies — because it did not know 
the day of its visitation, but let so many opportunities slip 
from its grasp. What will the future say of us?" We are 
paying today for the neglect of the Church in former centur- 
ies. Who will pay for our sin of neglect if we fail God in 
this day of opportunity? No generation ever faced such an 
opportunity ; it is marvelous and alarming ; it staggers us with 
its appeal. It is God's challenge. Will we meet it? Can we 
meet it? By God's grace, we can. In God's name, we will. 

RESOLUTIONS 

We submit the following resolutions : 

1. That the Minutes of the Board, and the Financial Re- 
port, which have been examined and found in perfect order, 
be approved. 

2. That the Assembly expresses to the Board and its Sec- 
retaries the great confidence which it reposes in them ; and ex- 
tends to them its sincere thanks for their wise and faithful 
administration, invoking upon them the blessing of God during 
the coming year. 

That the following members of the Board, whose terms ex- 
pire with this meeting of the Assembly be re-elected to serve 
for three years in the class of 1913-1916: Rev. Eben B. Cobb, 
D.D., Rev. Jas. B. Dennis, D.D., Rev. Tohn McDowell, D.D., 
Mr. John Stewart, W. E. Stiger, Esq., Mr. Alfred E. Marl- 
ing, T. H. Cobbs, Esq. 

In recommending the re-election of Wm. E. Stiger, Esq., 
the Assembly wishes to express its high appreciation for his 
twenty years of loyal and unremunerated service as Special 
Legal Counsel for the Board; and extends to him its thanks. 

3. That the Assembly notes with great satisfaction the 
liberal response on the part of many of the churches to the 
China Emergency Appeal authorized by the last Assembly. It 
renews that appeal, and directs that it be pressed till the 
whole mead of men and money is completed. At the same 
time it urges upon the Board the necessity of securing in the 
near future a much larger force of missionaries for China than 
is now proposed ; and appeals to the churches to rise to the 
present unparalleled opportunity in the entire East so that we 
may have in every field as large a proportionate force of mis- 
sionaries as the Church's response of five years ago enabled 
us to pour into Korea. 



xii ACTION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

4. In view of the unparalleled opportunities for the invest- 
ment of life in the foreign field we urge all Sunday-school 
officers and teachers to pray, labor and expect pupils to conse- 
crate their lives to this service. As an aid to this end, we 
commend the use of the educational material provided by the 
Board. 

5. That the Assembly notes the splendid work accom- 
plished by the Women's Boards, and commends their conse- 
crated and faithful presentation of the great needs of the 
world-wide field, through which they have secured during this 
past year nearly one-third of the entire gifts reported from 
the Church. 

6. That the Foreign Board be commended for its wise and 
vigorous campaign of missionary education and encouraged 
to use every effort in harmony with the policy of the Assembly 
thoroughly and speedily to inform the Church of the needs 
of the great non-Christian world and arouse it to it3 oppor- 
tunity and responsibility; giving special attention to the 
churches in small towns and rural districts. 

7. That while fully appreciating the value of the budget 
system of finance, we call attention to the necessity for adding 
to the mere act of giving intelligence concerning fields and 
needs;. and would, therefore, urge the use of the Board's lit- 
erature, our church periodicals and other means for creating 
and maintaining a sustained interest in the varied causes in 
which we invest. More especially would we urge that Synod- 
ical and Presbyterial committees consider themselves as re- 
sponsible for their share of the work as the Board and secre- 
taries themselves. 

William R. King, Chairman. 



INTRODUCTION 

TO THE 

SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Board of Foreign Missions 

OF THE 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE U. S. A. 



"For all the saints who from their labors rest, 
Who thee by faith before the world confessed, 
Thy name, O Jesus, be forever blest. Alleluia !" 

These words seem most fitting to preface the Seventy-sixth 
Annual Report of the Board of Foreign Missions to the Gen- 
eral Assembly. While the number of deaths of devoted 
friends and faithful missionaries of the Board may not have 
been larger this year than in previous years, yet the types of 
character represented in those who have finished their labors, 
are most significant. 

William Rankin died at Princeton, N. J., October 2, 1912, 
in the one hundred and third year of his age. At the time of 
his election as Treasurer of the Board in 1850, the Honorable 
Walter Lowrie, Secretary of the Board, said to him : 

"Next to that of preaching the Gospel, the treasurership of 
the Foreign Board was the most responsible and important 
office in the gift of the Church." 

Mr. Rankin served the Board in this high office, 37 years, 
from 1850 to 1887, and though many years have elapsed since 
his retirement his interest continued to the last. Within a few 
months of his death he talked at length with one of the secre- 
taries regarding the whole financial work of the Board, show- 

1 

(3) 



2 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

ing great familiarity with the recent events as well as with 
those of the earlier history of the Board. It is not easy to 
calculate the services which such a man rendered both by his 
prayer, sympathy and labors through all these years. 

E. O. Emerson, of Titusville, Pa., died at York, Maine, 
on July 9, 1912. In a letter written shortly before his death 
he expressed a purpose to visit the Board rooms on his way 
through New York as was always his custom. He was a large 
donor to the Board, deeply interested in all its work, always 
ready to respond to any calls made upon him for funds, as 
well as contributing without any appeal. He represented a 
type of Christian layman blessed with this world's goods, 
ready to communicate, willing to distribute. 

During the year another such layman has made possible a 
model Station in China by a large gift. The Board's property 
at Tengchofu now embraces ten acres of land and six foreign 
buildings, these buildings accommodating 175 Chinese, besides 
foreigners in charge of the various institutions connected with 
the Station. This was made possible by the gift of a single 
donor of the Emerson type. The only possibility of the Board 
meeting the opportunities open in many lands in the last quar- 
ter of its history, is in such generous gifts as those which 
characterized Mr. Emerson. 

The Board opened in Colombia this year a new Station, 60 
miles from Cartegena, called Cerete. This was made possible 
b> a generous offer of a Christian man who has large business 
interests in this section, and who became deeply interested in 
the spiritual welfare of the families employed by him in his 
commercial undertakings. He belongs to the type of Christian 
business men represented by Mr. Emerson and which we pray 
may continue to increase. 

The Honorable Hamilton King, the American Minister 
to Siam, died at Bangkok, Siam on September 1, 1912. The 
Siam Mission adopted the following minute regarding Mr. 
King: 

"Mr. King had been in Siam for 14 years, the longest period 
that any American Minister has served at an Asiatic capital. 
He was an able, experienced and accomplished diplomatic 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 3 

representative of his country, a Christian gentleman of high 
personal character, and an elder in the Presbyterian Church. 
He had made a thorough study of the country to which he was 
accredited by our Government, traveling to the most distant 
parts of it and showing himself alert and efficient in looking, 
after the interests of his country and in promoting relations 
of harmony and good-will between the two nations. He had 
a high regard for the Government and people of Siam and 
exerted himself in every possible way to co-operate with them 
in those matters which related to the best interests of the coun- 
try. To the missionaries, he was always a friend and valued 
counselor. He manifested unfailing interest and sympathy in 
their work. He made no secret of his Christian faith, not 
only living a consistent life but frequently leading the union 
prayer meetings in Bangkok, and occasionally preaching at 
the Sunday services of the English-speaking people of the city. 
He had thoroughly familiarized himself with our missionaries 
and their problems and his advice and assistance were greatly 
valued by the missionaries and by the Board, while he was held 
in the highest respect by the Government and people of Siam. 
Mr. King represented the type of personal character which is 
most useful in a diplomatic representative to a non-Christian 
land and his death is a great loss both to his country and to 
the Mission work." 

Mr. King represented a type of Christian diplomat which 
we trust is to increase. He occupied a high political position, 
and furnished a notable example of one who fulfilled his pub- 
lic duties to the complete satisfaction of the State Department, 
cf the Government to which he was sent and of the missionary- 
body. Lord Cromer in a recently published statement avers 
that the efficiency of British officials in her Colonial dependen- 
cies is to be reckoned as follows : 75 per cent, character and 
25 per cent, brains. It is gratifying that the nations of the 
world are recognizing the worth of character in diplomatic 
positions. It is an indirect testimony to the value of fhe 
Gospel propaganda which is affecting all lands. 

On October 27, 1912, Dr. Horace M. Lane died at 
Sao Paulo, Brazil. For 27 years Dr. Lane was associated 



4 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

with Christian education in Sao Paulo, Brazil, and since its 
foundation was president of Mackenzie College. The Presby- 
terian Church knows of the record of this man of God. It is 
suggestive, however, that on the Monday following his death 
in both halls of the State Legislature of Brazil, then in session, 
resolutions were introduced and eulogies were pronounced by 
leading members. 

Senator Herculano de Freitas, who introduced the motion 
in the Senate, said in part : "Gentlemen, I know not in which 
aspect this venerable man is most to be admired, — as the 
exemplary and devoted father of a family, as the valuable and 
loyal friend, as the eminent physician, or as the progressive 
educator. A man of high culture, after a brilliant course of 
study, having received the degree of doctor of medicine, and 
likewise the honorary degree of doctor of laws, from his youth 
he had given 'himself to teaching. He took delight in studying 
the problems relating to instruction and education of youth, 
and accompanied with great interest the development and pro- 
gress of the teaching art in all civilized countries with the pur- 
pose, as he once told me, of applying to our Brazil what was 
best and most suited to our necessities. Few Brazilians would 
have done as much as this American has accomplished with 
the utmost modesty, with the greatest self-forgetfulness, and 
with the most extraordinary competence, not only leading us 
to new horizons unknown when he arrived here and com- 
menced his educational work, but also co-operating with his 
moral support and by active participation in the original or- 
ganization and development of our system of public instruc- 
tion, which is today the honor and glory of this State through- 
out all Brazil. It is only just that the Senate of Sao Paulo at 
his death should express its appreciation of these services so 
unselfishly rendered by one who worked to render service and 
not to obtain recompense." In seconding the motion, Senator 
Candido Rodrigues spoke of the inestimable services rendered 
to. the cause of public instruction in Sao Paulo by Dr. Lane. 

Similar addresses were made in the House of Representa- 
tives. Among these may be quoted the following phrases from 
the speech of Dr. Freitas Valle: "Dr. Horace Lane was a 
person who had rendered himself famous among us by a long 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 5 

life of faithful service to the cause of education in our midst. 
His name was loved and respected in society as an example 
of the virtues, of intelligent activity, and of happy initiative. 
In short, he was a great Brazilian through the right of one 
who, co-operating in the patriotic work of our development, 
has achieved for us notable services. He was a Brazilian, as 
much as anyone can be, although born in a far-away land, but 
dwelling among us about 40 years." 

No less significant, though the term of service was shorter, 
was the tribute paid to the Rev. Arthur H. Ewing, D.D., 
who died at Allahabad, India, September 13, 1912. Dr. Ewing 
went to India in 1890. His great work was the founding and 
upbuilding of Allahabad College, but the imprint of his life 
on all classes in the community is the best proof of the extra- 
ordinary influence of this missionary: better than the stately 
buildings .of the college or the large number of students gath- 
ered within its walls. A daily paper in Allahabad thus com- 
ments on one of the incidents connected with the funeral 
services : 

"For more than half an hour they passed in unbroken line 
before his bier — business men, students, neighbors, acquain- 
tances, missionaries, teachers, artisans, bearers, sweepers, 
Hindus, Mohammedans and Christians : all forgetting position 
and caste came to pay a last tribute. The man they honored 
had been the servant of the lowest of them all and the evi- 
dence of their sincere love for him deeply touched the hearts 
of all who saw." 

Even the strong walls of Islam cannot withstand such as- 
saults as the character of a Christian educator of the type of 
Arthur H. Ewing made upon them. 

Rev. Samuel Jessup, D.D., died at Sidon, Syria, July 15, 
1912. His name was closely associated with that of his bro- 
ther, the Rev. Henry Jessup, D.D., who died the previous year. 
Par nobile fratrum! Dr. Jessup was in the service of the 
Board from 1862 to the date of his death, a half century of 
untiring zeal, of marvelous enthusiasm, keeping his youth and 
buoyancy to the very end. It will take many years to rightly 
estimate the lasting effect of two such men as Henry and 



6 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Samuel Jessup on the intellectual, the social and the moral 
life of the Syrian people. 

The death roll of the year shows a number of other faithful 
soldiers of the Cross who had been granted long years of ser- 
vice on the foreign field. Mrs. E. P. Nfwton, of the Punjab 
Mission, who died at Kasauli, India, on May 12, 1912, was 
for 37 years a missionary of the Board. 

The Rev. Henry B. Pratt who died on December 13, 1912, 
was the first missionary of the Board to Colombia, and the 
second missionary to be sent to South America. While his 
terms of service in Colombia and South America were inter- 
rupted on account of the illness of his wife, yet as a translator 
and a missionary he spent the larger portion of a long life — 
being born in 1832 — either at work in South America or in 
Mexico or Cuba, or among Spanish-speaking people in Amer- 
ica. The mission spirit never died within him. When com- 
pelled to leave the field, he took up the work of translating 
and as soon as family cares permitted he began work among 
Spanish-speaking peoples in the home land : a type of the true 
missionary who finds his field next his door. 

Mrs. Samantha Knox Condit who died on August 18, 

1912, was the wife of the Rev. Ira M. Condit, D.D., of Oak- 
land, Cal. Mrs. Condit was a missionary of the Board labor- 
ing among the Chinese in the United States from 1872 to the 
date of her death. 

Mrs. J. M. W. Farnham died at Shanghai, February 22, 

191 3. She went out in 1859 with her husband who still sur- 
vives her, laboring in China for 54 years. During that time 
she took only four furloughs in the home land. In season 
and out of season, amid success and defeat, through all the 
changes which China has experienced from the Taiping Re- 
bellion which was raging at the time she landed in the country, 
tc the new Republic she labored diligently for the extension 
of the Kingdom. 

Mrs. T. C. Winn who died October 9, 1912, after 35 years 
of missionary service, was a woman greatly beloved and hon- 
ored by her missionary associates and among the Japanese with 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 7 

whom she lived and for whom she labored so efficiently for 
many years. 

The record of the year also shows the death of some who 
were either in mid-life or, who had spent but a few years on 
the foreign field. 

Rev. William B. Hamilton, D.D., of the Shantung Mis- 
sion, died on June 3, 1912, at Tsinanfu, China, after 24 years 
of conspicuous and signal service in the Shangtung Missions. 

Dr. Hamilton was a man of wide culture, sound judgment 
and broad vision. His brethren of the Mission chose him to 
various positions of trust and responsibility, and elected him 
one of its first representatives on the China Council. The 
Chinese gave him their full respect and affection as the true, 
large-hearted man that he was. The Board feels that the 
death of such a man is a heavy bereavement, but it rejoices in 
the memory of his godly life and of the large work which he 
so powerfully helped to develop. 

Mrs. S. A. Moffett, the wife of the Rev. Samuel A. Mof- 
fett, D.D., died at Pyeng Yang, Korea, on July 13, 1912. 
Mrs. Moffett was a physician and had endeared herself greatly 
to the women of Korea. Her death was peculiarly sad, since it 
came at a time when her husband was under great strain 
because of the arrest and trial of so many of his beloved 
co-laborers in the Korean Church. 

Mrs. Henry Forman died on December 1, 1912, in Swit- 
zerland. Mrs. Forman was Miss Constance Newton, a daugh- 
ter of the noble and devoted family which has contributed so 
many of its members to the work of evangelizing India, and 
establishing the Christian Church in the Punjab. She brought 
to her 15 years of work in India the family qualities of sound 
judgment, calmness, fidelity and patience. 

Mrs. James B. Cochran died in Boonton, N. J., on Sep- 
tember 22, 1912. Mrs. Cochran was home on her first fur- 
lough. She gave promise in her first eight years of service 
of becoming a missionary of extraordinary efficiency and her 
death was a sad blow to her associates and the native Chris- 
tians as well. 



8 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Dr. Nan M. Lattimer. Appointed August 16, 191 1, and 
sailing for China September 6th, she was on the field only 
17 months, but her brief service had given promise of large 
things. It appears a strange providence that takes her away 
so quickly from a post where she appeared from a human 
view-point to be so imperatively needed. 

The record of these lives emphasizes the deep and abiding 
influence on the social and moral life of the people which the 
missionary is exercising in so many lands. It is not necessary 
to wait for the passing away of any of these co-laborers of 
ours in the foreign field to recognize the influence which they 
are exerting. When one of the missionaries from Guatemala, 
who has done valiant service for the Master, was about to 
return home for a short furlough this year, the President of 
the Republic addressed him a letter of congratulation and God- 
speed in which were these words: 

"I do not wish to close this letter without expressing to you 
in a very special way my thanks for all you have done and 
are doing in favor of this country and to desire you a very 
prosperous and happy journey to the United States. 
"Your affectionate servant, 

"Estrada Cabrera/'' 

The Board received this year a letter signed by three Japan- 
ese elders and three Japanese pastors from the district of 
Wakayama. It is worth reproducing as evidencing the high 
esteem in which one of the missionaries who has labored more 
than a generation in Japan is held by his native brethren. 

On the 21st of March a meeting was held in the Presbyterian 
Church in Wakayama to celebrate the 35th anniversary of the arrival 
of Dr. J. B. Hail in Japan. At that meeting we were appointed a 
committee to convey to you the action of those there assembled. We 
were delighted to be accorded this honor. We have no words to ex- 
press our gratitude for Dr. Hail, who was sent to us 35 years ago 
by your Honorable Board, and who in spite of many difficulties has 
exerted himself to the uttermost to preach faithfully the Gospel of 
our Lord throughout the Prefecture at Wakayama. Having great 
esteem for his noble, simple, modest and honest personality, we 
earnestly desire him to spend the remainder of his life among us by 
laying himself out in his divine work. We are exceedingly grateful 
to you the Foreign Mission Board, for sending us our good Dr. Hail, 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 9 

and constantly supporting him so that he had been able to perform 
his mission. 

"May the God of all grace prosper the Mission Board more and 
more. With kindest wishes and greetings, on behalf of those appoint- 
ing us, believe us." 

These deaths above recorded have made great gaps in the 
ranks of the missionary army. We are glad to report that dur- 
ing the year the Board* has sent to the field 89 new mission- 
aries. These fill the places made vacant by deaths and resig- 
nations and add 63 to the army at the front. It is encouraging 
that so many of the youth of the Church are ready to offer 
themselves for the foreign service. 

It is 13 years since the Board formally constituted the Home 
Department as a separate branch of the organized work of 
the Board. At that time we reported to the Assembly: 

Missionaries 728 Communicants 37,820 

Ordained preachers 170 S. S. pupils 26,611 

Other helpers 1,163 Hospitals 35 

Organized churches 626 Dispensaries 47 

Patients treated 321,836 

This year we report : 

Missionaries i,i57 Communicants 122,009 

Ordained preachers 315 S. S. pupils 136,846 

Other helpers 4,970 Hospitals 73 

Organized churches 678 Dispensaries 118 

Patients treated 456,658 

This growth has not been confined to our own Church. And 
in our own Church it has been due to many co-operating influ- 
ences. In the Missionary Review of the World, the following 
figures are given as indicative of advance during the year: 

1911 1912 

Protestant missionaries on the field 22,058 24,092 

Number of native workers 88,309 111,982 

Communicants 2,304,318 2,644,170 

Adherents, including communicants 4,875,454 6,055,425 

Added during the year 152,216 212,635 

Some allowance must be made for the fact that in 1912 a 
larger number of societies reported than in 191 1. In 191 1 



10 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

the home income of the Foreign Missionary societies was $25,- 
297,074, In 1912, $30,404,401. The income from the fields 
in 191 1, $5,519,174 and in 1912, $7,902,256. 

The extension of the Home Department has involved in- 
creased operations, although the percentage of administrative 
expenses has not increased. It is well, however, for the 
General Assembly to realize that efficiency in conducting the 
home side of the work requires an increased expenditure of 
money, although the percentage of such expenditure should 
diminish. Two of the field secretaries have asked this year 
that additional field secretaries might be appointed. The Board 
did not see its way clear to comply with the request, but the 
request coming through them from the churches is indicative 
of the expansion of the work and the demands of the churches 
themselves. 

The use of the Assembly Room at 156 Fifth Avenue is a 
good evidence of the ever enlarging work of -the Board, and 
the prominent place which the Board has in all missionary 
movements in our own and other lands. Leaving out Sundays 
and holidays, the Assembly Room is open about three hundred 
days in the year. During the past year the room was occupied 
either by the Board or the Woman's Board, or committees rep- 
resenting many forms of Christian service, 300 times. 

The work is expanding along all lines. During the year 
there has been sent out from the Board rooms 973,672 pieces 
of literature setting forth the various phases of the work of 
the Board. The Library of the Foreign Board has loaned 
1,149 volumes, while the stereopticon slides were used 846 
times. 

In June, 19 12, acting upon the authorization given by the 
General Assembly, the Board united the work of its Educa- 
tional Department and the educational work of its Sunday 
School Department with similar work undertaken or outlined 
by the Boards of Home Missions and Missions for Freedmen 
and the Missionary Department of the Board of Publication 
and Sabbath School Work, in a joint department under the 
title, The Presbyterian Department of Missionary Education, 
with offices on the ninth floor of 156 Fifth Avenue. 

In this new department, Dr. Sailer, honorary secretary; Mr. 
Trull and Mr. Millikin, assistant secretaries of the Foreign 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 11 

Board, are working with two secretaries representing the 
Home Mission interests. 

The Presbyterian Department of Missionary Education re- 
ports the following results of its foreign missionary educa- 
tional work: 

Out of a total of 2,975 Mission Study Classes, with 47,230 
members, in 1,734 churches, which have been reported during 
the year, 2,076 classes have studied foreign missions. This 
was a net gain of 497 foreign classes over last year. 12,082 
text-books, both home and foreign, were sold,, and 67,520 
pieces of literature to aid class organizers and leaders, were 
distributed. 

Considerable literature for use in Sunday-schools was issued 
under the imprint of the department, notably a new catalogue 
of missionary supplies for the Sunday-school, listing literature 
of all of its constituent Boards, and an announcement of Mis- 
sionary Plans for Presbyterian Sunday-schools, 1912-1913. 
The last mentioned leaflet outlined eight Specific Plans for 
missionary education in Sunday-schools, copies being sent to 
every pastor and superintendent and thousands more were 
distributed on request. 

An increasing correspondence indicates a deepening interest 
in missionary education and much more thorough work being 
done by the schools. 

The concentration of study on Home Missions prior to 
Home Mission Week and Thanksgiving, and on Foreign Mis- 
sions prior to Easter and the Livingstone Centenary we believe 
was very advantageous. 

For the new year, 1913-1914, the department has outlined 
a complete curriculum of missionary education for the local 
church, and invites correspondence. 

As regards the offerings from Sunday-schools to Foreign 
Missions, the receipts a year ago were $76,410.34; this year 
$80,299.21 ; a gain of $3,888.87. In addition to this must be 
added receipts from Sunday-schools for the China Campaign 
Fund. A notable contribution was that of the Westminster 
Sunday-school of Elizabeth, N. J., on Easter, $4,000 towards 
the erection of the Men's Hospital at Changteh. Other schools 



12 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

are also responding generously to the China appeal, in addi- 
tion to their regular gifts. 

The secretary has given much thought to feasible plans of 
systematic giving in the Sunday-school, and early in the coming 
fiscal year three leaflets will be issued entitled Systematic 
Giving in the Sunday-school — Its Principles Set Forth ; Its 
Methods Explained; Its Difficulties Met. 

The Station Plan for Sunday-school has also been advocated 
throughout the year and an increasing number of Sunday- 
schools are adopting it. 

The interdenominational observance of the Livingstone 
Centenary in one big movement brought an unprecedented 
number of orders for the Easter supplies. The number of 
Easter orders this year as compared with last was: 1912, 1,- 
373 > I 9 I 3» ^640; a gain of 267. Programs on orders in 1912, 
147,527; in 1913, 166,561 ; a gain of 19,034. 

The district secretaries have been co-operating most effi- 
ciently with the representatives of other Boards in carrying 
out the Budget plan as recommended by the General Assembly- 
In the Eastern District a large portion of the time of the 
secretary has been devoted to co-operating with representa- 
tives of the Home Board, in united Missions campaigns both 
in city and country presbyteries. The campaign has been con- 
ducted by united Missions committees representing alike home 
and foreign missions. Churches have been grouped in dis- 
tricts and every effort made both by inspirational addresses, 
by careful presentation of best plans and methods, and by 
actual experiment to awaken the individual church to larger 
gifts both for the support of the home church and for the 
extension of the work at home and abroad. 

The Board has already — following the recommendation of 
the Joint Conference of the Executive Commission and repre- 
sentatives of the Boards — started plans for the Simultaneous 
Every-member Canvass to be held in March, 1914. An entire 
number of the little periodical, published by the Board, en- 
titled, "All the World," was devoted to the setting forth of 
principles which underlie the Simultaneous Every-member 
Campaign. We believe this has in it great potencies for good 
if the whole Church can be aroused in one month of the year 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 13 

to engage in an every-member canvass for all the benevolences 
of the Church. We would call the special attention of the 
General Assembly to this important movement which has al- 
ready been tried in several of the larger denominations and 
bids fair to produce almost a revolution in matters financial 
in many presbyteries and churches. 

The Treasurer's report will give in full the receipts of the 
year. 

Much of the time of the field secretaries and of the official 
secretaries of the Board was devoted to carrying out the 
resolution adopted unanimously by the last Assembly to the 
effect that the Board within three years should send to China 
ioo new missionaries as an extra, not including wives, and 
that an equipment necessary to appropriately provide for the 
needs of the new workers should be furnished. The China 
Campaign thus inaugurated has been carried on with great 
enthusiasm. It has occupied the time and attention of most of 
the missionaries at home on furlough from China, as well as 
much of the time of all the secretaries of the Board. Cam- 
paigns have been held in the following cities : Albany, Buffalo, 
Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Clarksburg, Erie, Parkers- 
burg, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, New York, Baltimore, Trenton, 
Wheeling, Rochester, Chicago, Kansas City, Omaha, Minne- 
apolis, St. Paul and the cities and towns in the immediate 
neighborhoods of these larger cities. It is the testimony of the 
secretaries longest in office, and of pastors who have been 
foremost in promoting missionary interest that never before 
has there been such enthusiasm manifested on any Foreign 
Missions topic as that which seems to have been evoked by 
the claims of the China Republic on the Christian Church at 
the present time. It is difficult to give in detail the sum raised, 
but the amount received in cash or by pledge as reported by 
the treasurer, up to March 31st, was $300,000. 

Only a few of the presbyteries throughout the country have 
thus far been visited. We believe that a larger sum will be 
raised during the two years which still remain for the carrying 
out of the recommendations of the Assembly. 

As to the spiritual up-lift and inspiration which the cam- 
paigns brought to the people we give the following taken from 
the report of the Southern District : 



14 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

"The effect on our work and community can hardly be over- 
stated. The ministers of other denominations together with 
their laymen, attended a number of the meetings. It was all 
exceptionally worth while." . . . "My church," writes the 
pastor at Joplin, Mo., "has been greatly blessed by it all. The 
people in this vicinity are saying all kinds of nice things about 
the Presbyterians. It looks like our past prejudice along these 
lines has gone." . . . "The campaign was a great spiritual 
revival to my church," writes a Kansas City pastor. "Many 
members converted to missions. It is the best thing that has 
come to us for years." . . . "No campaign has come to Kan- 
sas City, during my five and more years' residence that has 
stirred our people as the campaign for China." 

Reports which come from China indicate that conditions are 
growing even -more hopeful with the passing months, and the 
crisis so far from having passed, seems to be more imminent 
than it was when the Assembly instructed the Board to send 
out this emergency call to the whole Church, in order that 
China might be saved for Christ and the world. 

It is sometimes helpful to see ourselves as others see us. 
In the North China Herald, under date of October 12, 1912, 
after commenting on the Jubilee of Mission work in Amoy, 
we find the following suggestive paragraphs which we believe 
represent the condition in China and which should bring cheer 
to all who believe that in our day we shall see "these from the 
land of Sinim coming to crown Jesus King." 

Fifty years is a long enough period to test the character of a move- 
ment, no matter what its object be. One wondered, as he beheld a 
thousand Chinese Christians assembled in the commodious London 
Mission Chapel, what their influence might be. How, for instance, in 
the matter of behavior and intelligence and civilization generally does 
Amoy compare with other places of equal size and importance in. 
China? Is so much Christian life influencing for good its great mass 
of humanity? 

That it is a leavening influence in social life cannot be doubted and 
that its tendency is towards the uplifting of the masses to a higher 
plane of living is equally certain. At one of the meetings there were 
present the chief officials of the Government, both civil and military, 
to offer their goodwill and congratulations and to express their cordial 
recognition of the beneficent results of the Christian faith and work 
in their midst. One feels that it is being gradually borne in on the 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 15 

intelligence of this vast empire that the teaching of the Master is not 
a mere bundle of tenets or principles written in an old book called 
the Bible, but rather that it is a living life which is being imparted 
to many of the people, and that now, at this time of day, its florescence 
is seen and appreciated in the society in which it is lived. This impor- 
tant fact was recognized by those sympathetic officials who were 
present and spoke at the celebration. 

On the other hand, to an outsider like myself it seemed very 
strange that so little interest was manifested in these Jubilee celebra- 
tions by the foreign communities living in Amoy. The reason cannot 
be their lack of interest surely in Christianity. It is, perhaps, to be 
found in that refusal to believe that the Christian faith is making any 
headway in China and in the belief that the Chinese absolutely refuse 
to accept it as their creed or religion. 

If this be the reason they have assuredly missed a remarkable 
opportunity of testing so ill-founded an opinion. The Chinese gentle- 
men who spoke showed that they themselves possess deep insight into 
the spirit of Christianity. They value it themselves. They are also 
much concerned about declaring the faith to their fellow men. They 
realize what a valuable asset their new religion would be at present 
for their nation in order to give unity of aim and purpose, and to 
create a spirit of disinterestedness and devotion in their countrymen 
who are seeking to found for their country a stable constitution. 

The character which Christianity builds up in men is that which 
China needs in her rulers — faithfulness and perseverance in their 
great cause. This old philosopher who knew his fellow citizens well 
said, "Faithful words offend the ear." Faithfulness is distasteful to 
self-interestedness. China's present danger is in the possibility of 
having as her overseers self-interested persons. 

SURVEY OF THE FIELDS 

A survey of the year's work in the Mission fields under the 
care of our Board is not without encouragement. The work 
of the Board is carried on in so many lands and is so 
interlaced with the political, social, moral, as well as spiritual 
uplift of the people that the rapid commercial and political 
changes which are going on all over the world seriously affect 
the work of the missionary and while opening up many new 
fields of opportunity, also presents numerous problems taxing 
to the utmost the best thought and the best energy of the whole 
Church. 

LATIN AMERICA.— The rapid completion of the Panama 
Canal and the impetus given to various commercial interests on 
account of this, together with the Revolutions in South Ameri- 



16 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

can countries and the Revolution in Mexico which has contin- 
ued during the year, have brought vividly to the attention of 
the Church the needs of Latin America. The Boards' Confer- 
ence which meets in January appointed a committee to con- 
sider the entire question of work among Latin American 
peoples. This committee had a two day conference with the rep- 
resentatives of all Protestant bodies at work in South Amer- 
ica. The sessions of the conference were attended by secre- 
taries of the Boards and missionaries of various denominations 
and the papers presented revealed the appalling need in Latin 
American countries. The papers were considered of such im- 
portance that they are to be issued in book form. This confer- 
ence adopted the following platform which we believe should 
be carefully considered by the General Assembly in view of 
the possibility open for Christian service among these 
neglected peoples : 

"This Conference, called to consider the needs of Latin America, 
desires to record its conviction that the Mission Boards of North 
America and especially of the United States should as speedily as 
possible give more earnest and generous assistance to the people of 
many lands included within Latin America in their work of intellectual, 
moral and spiritual development. By Latin America we mean Mexico, 
the countries of South America and Central America, Cuba, Porto 
Rico and the Philippine Islands. All of these, we may note in passing, 
are under Republican form of government. 

While these lands contain a great variety of moral and spiritual 
need, we frankly recognize that, as a whole, Latin America presents 
a situation different in many respects from that presented by the 
non-Christian peoples of Asia and Africa. There we find ethnic faiths 
entrenched behind the sanction of many centuries of national thought 
and practice. To lead these Asiatic and African peoples into the 
liberty and fellowship of our common Lord and Master is the aim 
of all Christian effort. In Latin America we find no great non- 
Christian religious system. In all these lands we find the representa- 
tives of the Roman Communion. In all of them that Communion has 
been the dominant religious influence for centuries. 

But we also find for reasons into which we need not enter here — 
that the vast majority of the people of Latin America, especially the 
men, claim no vital relation and acknowledge no allegiance to, the 
Roman Communion. Religious indifference, agnosticism and infidelity, 
especially in the more enlightened Latin American countries, have laid 
a strong hand upon most of the 71,000,000 of people who dwell 
in these lands. Moreover, there are several millions of unevangelized 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 17 

Indians and other native peoples. They are surely pagan as any 
tribes in the heart of Africa. Their need of the Gospel is the same. 

We acknowledge gladly that the Roman Communion has done 
useful work among these varied peoples. We would do nothing to 
detach sincere Christians from their allegiance. There are patent 
facts, however, which call loudly upon the Christian communions of 
this land to more worthy effort to aid the people of Latin America 
to meet their spiritual, moral and intellectual needs. 

i. Millions of people in Latin America are without the Gospel 
today, either because they have never heard of it or because they 
have rejected it in the form in which it has been offered to them. 

2. The percentage of illiteracy in Latin America is from 50 per 
cent, to 85 per cent. 

3. The percentage of illegitimacy is appallingly high, being 
from 20 per cent, to 68 per cent. 

4. Agnosticism, if not infidelity, almost universally prevails in all 
the universities of Latin America. 

In undertaking a more vigorous and adequate work in Latin America, 
we are sure that the Mission Boards will continue to display that 
irenic spirit which on the whole has characterized their efforts in the 
past. To construct, not to destroy, to proclaim positive truth, not to 
denounce the message of others, to try to find what is best in the work 
of others, and bring that best to completeness — let these continue to 
be the principles governing all methods. 

In considering specific methods of work we urge: 

1. That continued emphasis be laid upon the proclamation of the 
Christian message through the preaching of the positive gospel of 
God's love for all men, and the personal relation of all men to Him 
through our Lord Jesus Christ, expressing itself in righteousness of 
life. This is of the first importance. In order that this may be ade- 
quately done, we call attention to the necessity for developing a 
ministry native to the several Latin American lands — not only well 
instructed in the truth of the gospel but imbued with the spirit of 
charity for the work of others. 

2. That special attention be given to the possibilities of evangel- 
istic work by women, both Saxon and Latin, for their Latin sisters 
who have never had the privilege of education. 

3. That the distribution of the Scriptures in the vernacular be con- 
tinued and extended. We commend heartily the work of the Ameri- 
can Bible Society and the British and Foreign Bible Society. We 
ask for both these agencies larger support in the important work they 
are doing for Latin America. 

4. That the distribution of the Scriptures should be accompanied 
by the explanation and interpretation of the Scriptures in a truly 
catholic spirit. 

5. That every effort should be made to supply the present urgent 
need for Christian literature — theological and general — in the vernacu- 



18 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

lar, and that more care should be taken that such translations should 
represent the highest available scholarship. 

6. That consideration should be given to the importance of estab- 
lishing a carefully planned system of Christian schools — of primary, 
grammar and high school grades. Without these the children of to- 
day will inevitably inherit the indifference, agnosticism and infidelity 
of the adults of today. 

7. That consideration be given to the possibility of establishing 
a lectureship similar to the Caroline Haskell Lectureship for India, 
through which the religious convictions which lie at the foundations 
of our national life may be made known and interpreted to the uni- 
versities and educated people of Latin America. 

In whatever work is undertaken by the Christian people of this 
land to discharge more adequately their responsibility for their broth- 
ers in the Latin American world, we urge that, wherever possible, the 
largest practicable measure of cooperation be employed. May we not 
endeavor to avoid the mistake of perpetuating among Latin peoples 
— familiar with the outward and visible unity of the Roman Com- 
munion — the inherited divisions of the past with their resulting weak- 
ness? As we endeavor to enthrone our Lord as the Eternal Saviour 
and King of Latin America as of all other lands, let us be constrained 
by the power and pathos of His prayer "that they all may be one 
that the world may believe." 

Eugene R. Hendrix, 
John W. Wood, 
James B. Rodgers, 
W. F. Oldham. 

MEXICO. — It is natural to begin with Mexico, since it is 
at out doors, and the condition of affairs in this unhappy re- 
public is most critical. 

Mexico again faces a parting of the ways. For the third 
time in 21 months she has seen a new government inaugurated. 
The Madero regime has been overturned. It is not our part 
either to criticize or to applaud the means that were used to 
achieve the end; only to say that they were such as are com- 
mon to the Latin American peoples. The altruistic plans of 
the Madero government for Mexican democracy were the re- 
sult of the high ideals of its leader, and it probably began with 
an honest effort to put them into effect. The practical results 
of a year and a half demonstrated clearly that the proposed 
changes in the administration of public affairs were not suited 
to this country and its people. A brief trial sufficed to show 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 19 

this in widespread disorder, shattered credit, loss of prestige 
and ruined business. 

That the Madero administration itself became fully con- 
vinced of the futility of its original plans, was evident in its 
late attempts to regain control of the situation by resorting to 
dictatorial methods. It was then too late to accomplish the 
end sought. For two years parts of the country have been 
the scenes of ceaseless and bloody struggles, diversified in pur- 
poses, and only united in one point, i. e., in armed opposition 
to the then existing government. The condition in the coun- 
try in general during the last four months has been that of 
gradual disintegration little by little approaching the precipice 
of anarchy. 

Suddenly a new aspect is given to affairs by the overthrow 
of the Madero administration, the death of the principal lead- 
ers, and the taking over of the control of the government by a 
new regime. The men at the head of the new government, 
Generals Huerta and Diaz, and their advisers, are probably the 
strongest men now available for the reconstruction of a dis- 
organized country. The new administration is distinctly mili- 
tary in character; hence it is more in accord with the national 
tradition than its predecessor. It has started its career with 
an exhibition of energy and determination that will carry con- 
viction with a large proportion of those elements of the popu- 
lation which are prone to recognize force as an indispensable 
factor in governmental power. 

For the present, the Madero idea of a Mexican democracy 
has failed. Official Mexico has much that it might do for the 
welfare of the people, but governments have come and gov- 
ernments have gone, leaving the peon and the Indian in about 
the same economic, social and spiritual condition as their 
predecessors. The latest census reports show that fully 85 
per cent, of her people can neither read nor write. It is as 
true in Mexico as in the United States that the national stand- 
ing must depend on the real condition of the mass of the peo- 
ple. No stable government, worthy of the present enlightened 
age, can be founded here unless the people become regener- 
ated; unless the principles of Jesus Christ permeate the 
thought of the nation and take root in the hearts of the peo- 



20 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

pie, convincing them that the end does not justify the means, 
that character is essential. 

This is the golden age for the extension of the Gospel in 
Mexico. Whatever else it may have done or not have done, 
the Madero epoch in Mexico awakened the mass of the peo- 
ple, opened their minds to receive the truth, taught them to 
take an interest in matters not bounded by their local horizon, 
made them easy of approach, and thus has prepared the way 
for a more rapid and wider dissemination of the Gospel. 

There is no doulbt but that the awakening in China is pre- 
senting to Christendom a magnificent opportunity to influence 
the future of the Asiatic world, by the christianization of a 
virile people. Here at our very doors an opportunity, equally 
as important, is forcing itself on our notice. It is not to be 
measured by the difference between 200,000,000 and 15,000,- 
000. As China is the key to Asia, so Mexico is the heart of 
Spanish America, at least as far south as Peru. -The case in- 
volves the entire Latin-American problem that is occupying so 
much the attention of our people and our government. Mex- 
ico is the dominating factor in this problem. Her influence ex- 
tends to the southward beyond the Panama Canal. Our treat- 
ment of her determines the making or the marring of Amer- 
ican prestige throughout this vast section of the New World. 
Should we withhold from her the formative influence of Je- 
sus' teachings in their purity, we can expect sooner or later to 
have a recurrence of the scenes of the last two years in greater 
intensity, driving her to a condition of anarchy from which it 
will be possible to redeem her only at the cost of the lives per- 
haps of hundreds of our best young men, and the waste of 
millions of property, and the creating of a prejudice against 
American influence that will hardly be overcome in three 
generations. 

To be able to meet the present crisis even in part we must 
at once double our present force. Now is the time for a 
dozen young leaders of men to invest their lives where they 
can be assured of returns on their investment even far beyond 
our imagination to conceive. The call is urgent and it is right 
at our door. 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 21 

GUATEMALA. — The increased interest in Guatemala cre- 
ated by the recent visit of Secretary White, has grown during 
the year. 

The year's work in Guatemala has gone steadily forward. 
There have 'been no revolutions in Central America, especially 
in Guatemala, to disturb the people, but Mexico seems to have 
furnished a sufficient amount of disturbance to supply the 
whole Continent. 

President Barrios has continued his progressive and en- 
lightened condition of affairs and has continued to show favor 
to our missionaries. A special request was received in the 
summer asking the Board to secure two nurses for service in 
the government hospitals. Some unexplained difficulty arose 
at the last moment that prevented their being sent out, a mat- 
ter much regretted by our missionaries. 

The hospital has been completed and equipment has been 
purchased and sent to Guatemala, and it is about to be opened 
ai the date of this writing. 

The Girls' School, under the competent direction of Miss 
Grace M. Stevens and Miss Beulah A. Love, has begun its ex- 
cellent work. They have been assisted by Miss Matilda Hay- 
maker during her short visit. 

The Mission has been favored during the year by a visit of 
the Rev. E. M. Haymaker, who was formerly a member of the 
Mission. Plans are on foot for greatly extending the evan- 
gelistic work of the Mission to nearby towns and villages in 
both Stations. The Mission is still in its beginnings, however, 
and needs the special prayer and helpfulness of our Church. 

Political conditions in Guatemala have been favorable to the 
progress of the work, liberty of religion is guaranteed by the 
favor of the present government, and great hopes are enter- 
tained of a successful advance during this coming year. 

SOUTH AMERICA.— The visits of the Rev. George Alex- 
ander, D.D., and of the Rev. Eben B. Cobb, D.D., to Colombia 
and Venezuela, respectively, have occasioned through the re- 
ports which they brought back an increased interest in these 
lands. 



22 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Colombia. — The Colombia Mission has had a year of steady 
prosperous work. The whole Mission is facing its problem 
with new encouragement. This is one of the neediest, and at 
the same time one of the most promising of our South Amer- 
ican fields. During the year the station at Caracas has been set 
apart as a separate mission to be called the Venezuela Mission. 
The relation of Caracas Station to the Colombia Mission has 
always been merely nominal, as the distance and the absence 
of any established means of inter-communication made it im- 
possible for the Caracas missionaries to have any real rela- 
tions to their fellow-workers in Colombia. 

Another event of very deep interest is the opening of a 
new station at Cerete. This station is situated in the fertile 
and populous valley of the Sinu River. The circumstances 
are described in connection with the detailed report of the Col- 
ombia Mission. 

Venezuela. — The year 1912 may well be spoken of as an 
"Annus Mirabilis" in the history of our mission work in the 
Republic of Venezuela. 

First. — By action of the Board, September 16, 1912, Venez- 
uela, and particularly the work in Caracas, its capital, which 
up to that .time had been an out-station of the Colombia Mis- 
sion, was erected into a separate Mission — not only because 
its distance from Colombia made this imperative, but also be- 
cause the work in Venezuela, which, since the year 1897, had 
been prosecuted on a "tentative" basis, had now, by the acqui- 
sition of land and the erection of a church building, become 
"permanent," and, further, because the need for the work 
seemed so great and the encouragement for its prosecution so 
manifest that the Board felt assured of the approval of God as 
it thus WENT FORWARD. 

Second. — On October 18, 1912, the Rev. Frederic F. Dar- 
ley and his bride reached Caracas to be associated with our 
veteran missionaries, the Rev. and Mrs. Theodore S. Pond, 
who for 16 years had labored there, single-handed and alone, 
and to whose kindly spirit, wise sagacity and tireless zeal a 
large measure of the success in Caracas is due. 

Third. — On October 31, 1912, the first Protestant Church in 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 28 

all the Republic of Venezuela was dedicated. This church, 
which is located in the midst of the magnificent city of Car- 
acas, and only one-half block distant from the central plaza on 
which the capital stands is known as the "Church of the Re- 
deemer," "Capilla del Redentor." It is most attractive in ap- 
pearance and complete in its appointments. A tourist, who 
recently visited Caracas, himself a member of the Episcopal 
Church, speaks of it as "a perfect gem." It was dedicated 
free of debt and will ever stand as a monument to the energy 
and self-sacrifice of Mr. and Mrs. Pond. 

On the evening of its dedication, the building was thronged, 
many standing even on the steps which led into the street. 
"The most perfect order prevailed," and that "without the aid 
of a single policeman." The singing, according to a German 
who was present, was "herrlich." And one of the newspapers 
of the city, after printing a picture of the building, referred 
to it as not only "a beautiful edifice" which had come "agree- 
ably to augment the public adornment of the city," but also as 
"a new testimony" "paid by the Constitution of the nation" 
"to the proper liberty of conscience." 

The outlook is full of hope and the thankfulness of the 
workers for God's unceasing goodness abounds. 

Chile. — The reports which have come to the Board from 
what one of our missionaries calls "the last corner of the 
earth" have been full of both light and shadow. The most 
prominent feature is what might be called a reviving of Ro- 
man Catholic ardor. Methodical effort is being made to 
break up every new work that is undertaken and to check, as 
far as possible, the work of our missions. 

The Archbishop of Chile launched a pastoral on the 14th 
of July, in which he anathematized all Protestants, and re- 
ports from stations all agree in the new access of zeal on the 
part of the hierarchy in all sections of the republic. As in 
other countries, there has been much that has been of bene- 
ficial result from these intolerant commands. The day is past 
when any priest by malediction or anathema can stay the pro- 
gress of truth. Such bulls are boomerangs, and were it not 
for the irreverence of the proceeding our Missions might al- 



24 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

most pray for an annual repetition of some such decree for 
the benefit of their work. In spite, however, of the retroac- 
tive effect of the archbishop's words there is no doubt that in 
the lesser places and among the lower classes of people, they 
have had much effect. 

In the north an epidemic of yellow fever has tested the faith 
and courage of the Christians, and they have measured up to 
the full standard of their responsibility. Many of our mis- 
sionaries have had to struggle also against ill health. The 
work does prosper and each success brings larger responsi- 
bilities and the responsibilities prove an ever increasing bur- 
den. 

In spite of these shadows there is much sunlight. Storms 
and darkness oppress, but, after all, cloudless days are in the 
majority. 

The Mission and the Presbytery report with great thank- 
fulness the close of fifty years of mission history and the con- 
trast between the then and the now fills their hearts with cour- 
age and gives them faith to go forward. The Presbytery is 
developing not only a sense of its own responsibility, but also 
the genuine desire to carry that responsibility. 

In spite of the difficulties caused by an unstable fiat cur- 
rency, the churches have done wonderfully well in the matter 
of self-support and the contributions for the year have in- 
creased. 

The reports bring only praise of faithful Chilean pastors 
and evangelists who are bearing their burden and making great 
sacrifices through their love for the Master and in their ser- 
vice for the kingdom. 

The work of the Instituto Ingles, under the efficient direc- 
tion of Mr. Elmore, has been prosperous during this past 
year (Dr. Browning, the principal of the school, is in the 
United States on furlough), and a positive religious influence 
has been exerted upon the students. Both Dr. Lester and Mr. 
McLean have been invited by the authorities of the University 
of Chile to give lectures on sociological subjects and have been 
given entire liberty to speak of the Gospel. Plans have been 
made extending the system of primary schools known as the 
Escuelas Populares, which have proven so efficacious in Val- 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 25 

paraiso that they are projected for Santiago, and it is hoped 
that with the return of Dr. Browning, Mr. Elmore will be per- 
mitted to take charge of this new work. 

The Mission modestly asks for one minister and the words 
used by a missionary in charge of the north field can well be 
applied to the whole field : "To do a great work in Chile, we 
need a man endowed with the spirit of the Master, and a 
physique that can endure extremes of heat and cold in the 
same day, long hours of hunger and thirst, eating all kinds of 
food, sleeping equally well on the sands of the desert, in the 
miner's hut, or the commodious guest chamber of an 'Admin- 
istration House' and a character that can become all things to 
all men." 

BRAZIL. — Increasing amounts of foreign capital are en- 
tering Brazil for the development of its resources — coffee and 
rubber and lumber and water-power. Necessary as this capi- 
tal is, however, its introduction is not entirely welcome, na- 
tional pride resenting the thought that the great development 
of Brazilian resources should be the work of foreigners. Laws 
have been introduced into congress hampering the acquisition 
cf business rights by foreign capital, and even proposing the 
expulsion of foreign capitalists who have not become perma- 
nent residents. The city of Sao Paulo continues its extraor- 
dinary advancement, checked slightly, however, because of the 
stringency of money on the European bourses, due to the Bal- 
kan War. It is said that last year five thousand new houses 
were built in Sao Paulo. The optimists predict indefinite ex- 
pansion and foresee a doubling of the present population with- 
in the next ten years, and a speedy growth till the city be- 
comes the greatest in South America. The Catholic Church 
has made great progress. Three large church buildings are at 
present in construction, using expensive materials and Euro- 
pean models, replacing the old "taipa" structures typical of 
Latin America. So far as the Church replaces materialism 
and unbelief, this is a welcome change. 

Ship captains and others assert a slow deterioration in the 
quality of Brazilian labor, and even this labor, such as it is, in 
the port cities is made more difficult by labor agitation. 



26 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

PHILIPPINES. — Closely related to the Spanish-speaking 
people in Latin America in many respects is the work in the 
Philippines. The year in these islands has not been with- 
out increased evidence of the strength and stability of the en- 
tire foreign missions enterprise as carried on by the Presby- 
terian Church for the uplift of the Filipino people. 

Interest in the political situation in the Philippines has been 
revived by the elections in the United States and the coming 
into power of the Democratic party. Whatever may be the 
purpose of the new administration in regard to the Philippine 
Islands, the Filipinos themselves are quite sure that it will 
mean their independence within a decade. Our missionaries, 
as well as other Americans in the islands, are intensely inter- 
ested in this question, and while not taking sides in the politi- 
cal aspects thereof, are working to the utmost of their en- 
deavors to prepare such of the Filipino people as come under 
their influence for this day of independence. The preachers 
themselves use the common desire of the people for independ- 
ence as a text for their sermons, deducing therefrom the 
great desirability and the necessity of real spiritual independ- 
ence as accompanying the idea of political independence, and 
many a sermon is preached on the text "The liberty wherewith 
Christ has set us free." 

During the past year the feeling in the Islands has become 
more and more tense on this subject, and the future will call 
for the exercise of a great deal of tact and delicacy of handling 
on the part of our missionaries of the various questions that 
are perplexing both the American and the Filipino people. The 
evangelical churches thus far have proved to be a common 
meeting ground where these questions have been considered 
with more quietness of spirit than is common in other places. 
The year has been a prosperous one spiritually. From all 
provinces comes the story of many baptisms and increased in- 
terest. Progress seems to vary from year to year in the dif- 
ferent stations. The stations which have reported the greatest 
number of accessions in the early years report now a lessening 
in this number, and those which had first showed little gain 
now report large gains. The spiritual environment of the 
great majority of the people has changed but little, although 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 27 

the official leaders of the Roman Church have been striving to 
reform the more patent abuses and to bring order out of the 
chaos that has existed in many places. Their work, however, 
has been greatly hampered by the inertia of their own people 
and the opposition of certain elements which remain from the 
old machine. While some of the greater abuses have been 
remedied, the substitutes proposed have been but slight im- 
provements. The Independent Filipino Church, which threat- 
ened ten years ago to be a great destroyer of the Roman Com- 
munion, has lost much of its initial energy. At times, when- 
ever there is a quarrel between the Roman bishop and the peo- 
ple in the town, the question is often solved by the people go- 
ing boldly to the Aglipayana Church. The need of the pres- 
ence of the Protestant Church in the Philippine Islands is not 
one whit less and is even more assured than before, because 
the experience of the past years has proved its worth. 

The educational work of our Mission has prospered as 
never before. Silliman Institute, which has had during the 
past year over 600 pupils, 320 of whom were internos (that 
is, boarding pupils), has closed a most prosperous year. There 
were 88 professions of faith among the students during the 
year, and the total number of church members in the college 
among them was about 250. The Institute is in absolute need 
of more buildings for dormitories with which to accommodate 
their ever-increasing list of pupils. By the first of January of 
this year applications were coming in by the score and the hun- 
dred for the new school year, so anxious are the students to 
get the precedence that assured them of reception. The Mis- 
sion earnestly requests one, or, if possible, two new buildings 
for Silliman Institute. 

The Ellinwood School for Girls in Manila has had a most 
prosperous year, but their accommodation is being taxed to 
the limit. The Ellinwood Bible Training School is one mem- 
ber of the Union Bible Seminary of Manila in which is con- 
ducted the work of the Methodist, Presbyterian and United 
Brethren Missions for the training of their young men for the 
ministry of the Gospel. It is hoped that the Baptists them- 
selves who are separated from Manila by a long distance will 
find it possible to unite in this splendid institution. 



28 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

INDIA. — During the year the Board appointed a commit- 
tee to consider the whole subject of secretarial visitation of 
the fields. An extended report of this committee was adopted 
by the Board and can be found spread on the Minutes. In ac- 
cordance with the suggestions of this report, Secretary White 
spent several months of the year in India. The wisdom of 
this action is manifest from the letters which have already 
come to the Board from places visited by Dr. White. We give 
short extracts from some of these letters : 

Lahore, India. — "We have just enjoyed a very delightful visit from 
Dr. and Mrs. Stanley White. His method and manner of studying the 
situation quite won our admiration, and I believe that his visit will be 

a great hdp to our India Missions." "Dr. White's visit was very 

helpful. He will carry back helpful advice to the Board." 

Ludhiana.—"We were all delighted and profited by Dr. Stanley 
White's visit. ... I am sure Dr. and Mrs. White will have gained 
information as to the work which will be of great value at home, 
but the stimulus given to all here by their personal influence and by 
their addresses will abide with us. If any one questions the value 
of such periodical visits of our secretaries, I am sure it is because they 
do not understand the situation. No one can understand the problem 
which confronts us here and the efforts made to solve them by 
relying on correspondence with individual missionaries. It requires 
the personal touch with many workers to make all clear." 

The Western India Mission sent a special letter of thanks to the 
Board for the visit of Secretary and Mrs. White. 

The unrest and spirit of sedition which have caused so much 
concern in India in recent years have largely died away under 
the conciliatory influence of the new Viceroy, coupled with the 
strong but patient assertion of authority on the part of the 
government, and reinforced by the influence of a visit of the 
king and queen and their coronation at the great Durbar in 
Delhi. Five years ago almost all the vernacular papers 
and periodicals in India were openly and bitterly dis- 
loyal in their spirit. A few judicious imprisonments 
and the firm enforcement of press and sedition laws, 
combined with moral and conciliatory influences have 
gone far to change the spirit of India, and the 
visit of the king and queen, together with the recent unsuc- 
cessful attempt upon the life of the viceroy, have called forth 
the warmest expressions of Indian loyalty to the British 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 29 

crown. Never before had a crowned head of England visited 
India, and King George was the more courageous in coming at 
the time he did in view of the unrest and racial bitterness that 
had prevailed, and in the face of threatened famine and 
plague. 

The Indian people themselves, also, have been given a far 
larger part in the government of the land. The provincial 
legislative bodies have now a majority of non-official Indian 
members. The supreme legislative body, the Vice-regal Coun- 
cil, has also taken in a larger Indian membership, and two bills 
introduced by Indian members in the past two years have 
aroused the deepest interest throughout the whole of India — 
one introduced by Bhupendra Nath Basu, aiming to bring free- 
dom to the individual from the bondage of caste in marriage 
customs, and the other by Mr. Gokhale, proposing free and 
compulsory primary education. Christian ideas have increas- 
ingly pervaded the thought of the land. In the Mysore na- 
tive state the dancing girls have been abolished from the tem- 
ples — a measure of social reform not yet attempted even by 
the British in their direct rule in India. 

The census of 191 1 showed a population of over 315,000,- 
000 in India. It is interesting to note that of all these only 17 
were registered in the census returns as atheists and only 50 
as agnostics . Of these 67, 45 were from Burma and are pre- 
sumed to have been Chinese. No other section of the world's 
population is as loyal to its own religions as India. Seventy 
per cent, of the population are in the Hindu communities. The 
ten years since 1901 show an increase of Hindus of about a 
million a year, the number now standing at 217,586,720. The 
Arya Samaj reports 243,000 followers. The Mohammedan 
population is the largest body of Mohammedans in any land — 
66,623,412. It has increased from 19 per cent, of the popula- 
tion in 1901 to 21 per cent, in 191 1. Only 333,870 Buddhists 
are now found in India outside of Burma, although India was 
the original home of Buddhism. The census reports 3,876,196 
Christians — a growth of nearly a million in the decade, Chris- 
tianity having advanced by a far more rapid percentage of 
growth than any of the other religions of India. The attitude 
of India to Christ would be very hospitable if Christianity 
were willing to lay aside its claim to be the absolute religion. 



30 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

In our own Missions the great problems are how to care for 
the baptized village Christian communities, and how to make 
the educational work, which is the chief door of access to the 
upper caste populations, more evangelistically fruitful, and 
how to lead on the weak and dependent native churches to a 
measure of genuine independence and self-support. 

The report of the district work of the Punjab Mission brings 
out some of these problems : 

During the past year regular work has been carried on in 332 more 
villages than in the preceding year, while there are 83 more villages 
in which there are Christians. That alone is sufficient to show that 
the forward movement, begun some years ago, still continues. But 
when we look at the figures in the first column the pleasure produced 
by the former figures is somewhat diminished. Regular work carried 
on only in 1,481 villages out of 9,705 found within the territory actually 
occupied by the Mission ! That is to say, in only 15 out of every 100 
villages is regular work being done ! Moreover, in these 1,481 villages 
only a small proportion of the people are effectively reached by the 
Gospel message. The great middle class, though on the whole friendly, 
are indifferent to the claims of Christ. No definite impression has yet 
been made upon them. The little that has been done seems very small 
in comparison with what still remains to be done. But let no one 
despise the day of small things. Though the result seems small when 
compared with the still unfinished task, yet the progress has been 
most rapid. Within five or six years the number of villages in which 
there are Christians has risen from a few score to 846. We may well 
thank God and take courage. And once the Christian community in 
each of these 15 villages becomes truly the people of God, living the 
Christian life and filled with missionary zeal, the evangelization of the 
remaining 85 villages can be left to them and will not be long in being 
accomplished. Important as it is that we should try to reach every 
village in each district and establish in it a Christian community, yet 
more important still is the work of strengthening and building up the 
converts already brought in in such a way that they may be fitted and 
compelled to bring in others. 

In India, as well as in the countries of the Far East, a most 
interesting series of Conferences has been held under the aus- 
pices of the Continuation Committee of the Edinburgh Mis- 
sionary Conference. The last of these conferences in India 
was held in Calcutta, where leaders, both Indian and foreign, 
from all the churches of India, gathered to consider the prob- 
lems of co-operation, occupation, education, the Indian Church 
Christian literature, etc. A permanent National Council was 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT »1 

established, with a view to co-ordinating the different mission- 
ary activities of the land. Cordial recognition was given to 
the importance of thorough unity of spirit and to such practi- 
cal measures of co-operation as the delimitation of territory, 
transfer of mission workers, scale of salaries of workers, and 
united evangelistic, educational, literary and medical effort. 

The India census report has proved to be full of encourage- 
ment for the missionary enterprise, and the Superintendent of 
the Census, Mr. Blunt, writing of the United Provinces of 
Agra and Oudh, says : 

I feel sure that the Christian of 191 1 is in a much less unhappy 
condition that he was ten years ago, and the reason in large measure 
I put down to the fact that he himself is a better man. . . . There 
can be no question that year by year Christianity is becoming far 
more of a reality for those who adopt it. (Census Report, pages 
144-148.) 

Missions again have a great indirect influence. Through their 
schools and colleges they influence the lives of their non-Christian 
pupils to an enormous extent. (Page 148.) 

Mr. Blunt is of the opinion that great as has been the suc- 
cess of Christian Missions in these Provinces, the success 
should have been greater. His argument is this : the position 
of Christianity in India is very similar to the position it occu- 
pied in the first centuries. It commenced with the lower strata 
of society, the Galilean fishermen, the Roman slave and the 
Pagan savage, and worked up to the higher. "With the ex- 
ample of what it achieved in the past before us, its success in 
India need not therefore cause surprise." 

Although much has been done, however still more remains 
to be done. South and east of the city of Cawnpore, for ex- 
ample, are 16 districts, with a population of over 16 millions 
of people, living in 46,633 towns and villages which are un- 
reached by missionary effort, and there are 32 other districts 
in the Province with tens of thousands of villages as yet un- 
touched. 

In the months of November and December Dr. White and 
Mrs. White visited the W. India Mission Stations. Dr. White 
reports that he had the privilege of many interesting interviews 
with those in high official position, and with the chiefs of some 



32 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

of the native states. The most vital part of his visit was the 
conference at its close, in which all felt the presence of the 
Spirit of God, which led to practically unanimous conclusions. 
As a result of this Conference it was agreed that the educa- 
tional work should be developed by the establishing of a High 
School in Kolhapur, where a marvelous opportunity, with the 
co-operation 'of the Maharajah, is presented. Emphasis is to 
be placed on the industrial work in the Sangli School. A care- 
ful plan of development and advance in the evangelistic work 
was mapped out. This plan includes the opening of four sta- 
tions in the Deccan or Plateau, and four in the Konkan, or 
lowlands. Reinforcements are called for to carry out this new 
work. Special thought was given to the relations with the In- 
dian Church and full appreciation of the fact that the policy 
must be that the Indian Church increase its authority and re- 
sponsibility for its work, even though that of the Mission be- 
come secondary. 

The situation in India seeems to indicate the near approach 
of a time of great changes, both social and religious, and spe- 
cial emphasis is laid upon the necessity of preparation for that 
time, which is so soon to come. 

SIAM AND LAOS. — The Siam Mission has had a year of 
quiet progress. Conditions in Siam are still such that the mis- 
sionaries have not been gladdened by the rapid advance which 
has characterized some other fields, but earnest, loyal, self- 
devoted work is being done, and both the Mission and the 
Board have no reason for discouragement, but, on the con- 
trary, have many reasons for pressing forward with renewed 
faith and hope. A serious handicap to self-support has been 
the business stagnation of the country. The rice crops have 
not been as bountiful as formerly. There is still very little 
manufacturing, and while the population of the country is in- 
creasing the development of the resources has not kept pace 
with the growth of the population and the cost of living has 
steadily arisen. 

In Laos the year was marked by an epidemic of malignant 
malaria. This disease, always a serious one in the tropics, was 
unusually virulent. The death rate was high. The pestilence 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 33 

swept through scores of villages with sorrowful consequences. 
The unhappy people, stricken with panic by the ravages of the 
disease and losing faith in gods upon whose protection they 
had in vain relied, turned to the missionaries for guidance and 
assistance. The demands upon the missionaries were three- 
fold. First: A heavy demand upon sympathy for 
the afflicted people. Missionaries were called upon to treat the 
sick, to bury the dead, and to comfort the sorrowful. Second : 
A special demand upon the physicians of the Mission, who 
seemed to the people to have miraculous power for healing. 
The physicians of the Mission worked almost literally night 
and day treating the sick and counseling the people about 
methods of prevention. 

The third demand upon the missionaries was for food. The 
shortage of the crops, the illness and death of so many of the 
men, and the terror of the people, brought the cultivation of 
the soil almost to a standstill and famine resulted. The mis- 
sionaries appealed to the Board for relief funds. The Board 
published these appeals widely in the religious and secular 
press. While the response was not as great as we had hoped 
it would be, we were able to send several thousand dollars to 
be distributed by the missionaries. The good that this money 
did was incalculable and the Board received many touching 
letters expressing the gratitude of both missionaries and peo- 
ple. Multitudes of the Laos people renounced their belief in 
gods and evil spirits and gladly confessed their faith in a 
Christ whose help in the time of need found such incarnation 
in devoted missionaries and in the contributions of the follow- 
ers of Christ in America. The year has therefore earned large 
accessions to the churches. Once more in the history of the 
Church calamities for which there was no remedy have been 
the means of inclining the hearts of men toward God. 

Both the Siam and Laos Missions continue to look with 
eager desire toward the unreached populations within their re- 
spective fields and to the north and east of our Laos Mission. 
A notable event of the year was the Board's action of Febru- 
ary 17th, authorizing the Laos Mission to send an exploring 
expedition into French territory east of the Mekong River, 
with a view to the selection of one more station for the devel- 

(4) 



34 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

opment of missionary work. There is a great Laos speaking 
population in this region, which is now wholly unreached save 
by a few French Roman Catholic priests. A report of this 
tour and a statement of any results which may follow will 
naturally have to be deferred until next year, as we can re- 
port now only the fact that the tour is to be made and that 
preparations are being actively made for it. The Church will 
also be interested to know that another expedition composed 
of representatives of the Laos Mission, the South China Mis- 
sion and the chairman of the China Council has been author- 
ized to make a similar tour of exploration among the Laos 
population in Southwestern China. This expedition in par- 
ticular will have to make a long journey through a region com- 
paratively little known except for the reports of the Rev. Dr. 
W. C. Dodd, and the Rev. J. H. Freeman, mentioned in a for- 
mer report. The fact that the Laos speaking people are far 
more numerous and widely distributed than they were sup- 
posed to be when the Laos Mission started a generation ago is 
pressing upon the Board with great force. There are some 
questions of peculiar difficulty that have to be met in connec- 
tion with the effort to extend our work among those people 
and these questions are being carefully studied. 

SYRIA. — The Syria Mission has lived in a state of political 
uncertainty during the whole of the past year. The war with 
Italy in Tripoli could not but have its reflex influence upon 
the distant province of Syria, and while the conditions during 
that war seemed bad enough and the future of Turkey seemed 
dark, it was as nothing to the effect of the storm which burst 
with the outbreak of the Balkan War. The report says : 

"The stirring events have lasted all through the year. They began 
on February 24th, when the Italian war vessels called and sank two 
Turkish boats which were supposed to have been disarmed. This 
generation will never forget the sound of those big shells hurtling 
over the city or the bursting of the smaller shells and the big torpedoes 
in and about the port. The death roll is now known to be over 60 
civilians, almost all Moslems, and 50 or 55 of the sailors. 

"All through the first nine months of the year the Government gave 
a most demoralizing example in the reports dealt out to the people 
of the Turkish successes by land in Tripoli and by sea. Then came 
the most awful retribution in a bewildering series of humiliating events 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 35 

such as the world has seldom seen. On October 8th, Montenegro 
declared war against Turkey. Just a week later, October 15th, 
peace was concluded with Italy. Two days later Turkey declared 
war on Bulgaria and Servia, and Greece declared war on Turkey. 
Then came that phenomenal campaign and crumpling up of Turkey's 
great army and the disappearance of the Turkish Empire in Europe, 
the danger of massacre and pillage, and the spectacular coming of the 
ships of war to save Constantinople from bloodshed. Now at the 
close of he year, we have perhaps a dozen warships along the Syrian 
coast, with three or four in our harbor. Every part of the empire has 
thrilled with the death agonies of this corrupt and barbarous system 
of anti-Christian government as it has been driven forever out of 
Africa and Europe. 

"During all the turmoil and confusion of the year we are glad 
to report that the interests and business of the Mission where it 
touches the Government, have not suffered from unrighteousness or 
unnecessary interference from the Government." 

The report was circulated in the American newspapers in 
October that the Europeans in Syria were in danger of mas- 
sacre from the angered population. The truth back of the re- 
port is found in a conspiracy that had for its object the pro- 
voking of British interference and the establishment of Brit- 
ish influence in the affairs of the province of ,Syria. It seems 
to be true that there was such a conspiracy, but it fell through 
with its own weight. In spite of the disturbances which have 
taken place, the year has been a most prosperous one in a 
spiritual sense. The Mission rep'orts special meetings of 
Christian soldiers in the barracks at Beirut and at Hums. One 
of the letters from the field says : 

"Large meetings of influential Moslems are being held daily and 
nightly in Beirut and we are continually waited upon by messengers 
or deputations begging for help and guidance in these present troubled 
times." 

The Sanatorium work for tuberculosis patients under Dr. 
Mary Eddy continues to grow. During the year there have 
been a number of remarkable death scenes and testimonies. 

The Mission has rejoiced in the visit of the Rev. Dr. and 
Mrs. Stanley White in October. The Missi'on says: 

"We heartily emphasize that their visit was in every way a great 
pleasure and an inspiration although far too short. They have at 
least seen Syria. They have seen a part of the Mission work, and 
they have come close to our hearts and problems." 



36 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Dr. T. H. P. Sailer, of our Board, and Dr. Charles Watson, 
of the United .Presbyterian Board, also visited the Mission in 
February, 1912. They were heartily welcomed and rendered 
great service. 

Dr. White's visit coincided with the inauguration and dedi- 
cation of Colton Hall, the new building put up for the train- 
ing 'of ministers and evangelists, through the generosity of Mr. 
J. Milton Colton, of Philadelphia. 

The work on the Tripoli Boys' School and the Beirut Girls' 
School has been going forward as rapidly as the funds will 
permit. The Mission and the Board regret exceedingly the 
resignation 'of Mr. E. G. Freyer. For 17 years Mr. Freyer 
has been the Mission Treasurer and Business Manager of the 
Press and has rendered valuable service. His own and Mrs. 
Freyer's continued ill health has compelled this step. 

The great sorrow during the year was the passing away of 
the Rev. Samuel Jessup, D.D., who for nearly 50 years was 
one of the grand men of the Syria Mission. 

A special memorial service was held on January 26, 1913, the date 
of Dr. Jessup's fiftieth anniversary of service and was an occasion of 
much interest in the joy of the splendid service of so many years as a 
servant of the Master. "The exercises were marked by chasteness 
and dignity worthy of all praise. The story of his life was told in 
singularly beautiful language by Dr. Ford; Mr. Naseeb el-Helou read 
extracts received from 15 Syrian pastors and preachers paying tribute 
to the Christian graces of Dr. Jessup's character and testifying to the 
wonderful influence of his intercourse with men of all religions and 
all conditions of life." 

PERSIA. — The inevitable submission of Persia to the ar- 
rangements between Russia and Great Britain, the withdrawal 
of the American financial advisers, the collapse of the Per- 
sian attempt at the establishment of an independent and pro- 
gressive parliamentary government, have created an entirely 
different atmosphere throughout the land from that which ex- 
isted two years ago. Politically the country has been quiet 
during the year, with the exception of minor disturbances. 
Conditions in the region of Kermanshah have been very un- 
settled and the city has suffered severely, but Northern Persia 
has been more tranquil than it has been for some time. While 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 37 

Great Britain has recognized the actual authority of Russia 
over the northern section, Russia has not disturbed the Per- 
sian forms of administration, and Russian influence has re- 
sulted in the re-establishment of order and the tranquilizing 
of the highways. 

Educationally, the nerve of the people's ambition was numb- 
ed by the destruction of Persia's dream of independence. The 
young men and women are realizing, however, that whatever 
the forms of government, their own usefulness depends upon 
intelligence, and the schools, instead of being less thronged 
are more crowded than ever. The spirit of intellectual en- 
quiry and religious tolerance is such as no one could have pre- 
dicted. There is entire freedom for evangelization through- 
out the country, and the majority of the pupils in the Mission 
schools, with the exception of the village schools among the 
Nestorians, are Mohammedans. 

The Missions have been involved in no political difficulties 
and anticipate hone, their purpose being of an entirely non- 
political character, and their whole influence being directed 
simply to making men and women better men and women, to 
live under whatever form of government .may prevail in the 
land. The Russian language is bei'ng taught in the schools, 
both in order to meet the needs of the people and to help them 
to relate themselves happily to the new political influences. 

A new day has come among the women of Persia. Mr. Sinis- 
ter testifies to the enthusiastic part they took in the national- 
istic movement, and the eagerness with which they are now 
seeking education shows that even the long years of Moham- 
medan repression under which they have lived have not suf- 
ficed to destroy the elasticity of the human spirit. Miss Stock- 
ing, of the Girls' School in Teheran, bears testimony to this 
new life among the women ,in Persia in an article in "The 
Moslem World" for October, 1912 : 

A few years ago arithmetic and geography were considered very 
advanced studies, not in the range of common education. Now they 
are taught in all the schools. New text-books are coming out all the 
time — history, physiology, ethics, nature books — most of these being 
arranged in the form of questions and answers. A foreign language, 
French or English, has always been greatly in demand. Now there 



38 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

is a sort of nationalistic reaction, and while foreign languages are 
popular, more attention is being given to Persian. The Koran is less 
read than formerly, text-books for the study of Arabic take its place 
to a large degree. As there is no public school system, the girls' 
schools are all managed by private individuals. No school can be 
opened without a permit or license from the Department of Education, 
and there is a woman supervisor who visits them all and makes her 
report to the Minister of Education. As might be expected in an 
educational movement of such mushroom growth, the emphasis is. 
laid entirely on information — what is put into the mind is the all- 
important thing, and "the more the better." The real meaning of 
education, the leading out and development of all one's powers, is 
unknown to the Persians. One's heart goes out to these women and 
girls, reaching so eagerly for higher things, so hungry for all that 
has been denied to Persian womanhood for centuries. These big 
girls who have come late to school and who work so hard "because 
their time is short," are the "sacrifice" for those who come after ; they 
have but a glimpse into the golden possibilities of life, and then regret- 
fully, rebelliously, turn away to a life hindered by many of the 
restrictions their mothers have known. But for their daughters, for 
the next generation, there is hope of a better day. 

A few schools accept married girls as pupils, and it is a common 
thing to hear older women express the wish that they might attend. 
Some of these women find satisfaction in belonging to ^societies or 
women's clubs. There are various organizations of this order, con- 
cerned with the progress and prosperity of the nation. They hold 
meetings and make speeches and plan great things. Last year they 
talked of a free hospital; this year they are giving theatrical perform- 
ances in some of the large gardens, on behalf of a free school. 

The whole of Northern Persia has been left for evangeliza- 
tion almost exclusively to our own Church. , There are here 
approximately five million people, scattered over a territory 
as large as the states of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wis- 
consin and Minnesota. The Tabriz field alone is larger in area 
than the whole state of New York, and there are available at 
the present time for the work in Tabriz, the second city 
in Persia, with its church and schools, including a High School 
which is grow'ing into a college, and for the evangelization of 
the thousands of villages throughout the field which are wide 
open, only two ordained men. Never since Mohammedanism 
arose has there been so hopeful and inviting an opportunity 
for its eva'ngelization presented to the Chnistian Church as is 
offered now in Persia. 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 3d 

AFRICA. — The work in Kamerun, in West Africa, up to 
the present ,time has not felt the influence of the Islam invasion. 
North Kamerun has in Adamawa and German Bornu an ex- 
clusively Mohammedan population, although everywhere a 
sprinkling of heathen is found. Besides the Fula, with their 
bondsmen and slaves numbering in all about 320,000, the Ka- 
nuri, the Shau Arabs, the Kotoko, the northern Musgu, and a 
small portion of the Mandara (about 40,000 out of 310,000) 
are Mohammedans. Altogether from 600,000 to 800,000 of 
the two or three million inhabitants of Kamerun are prob- 
ably Mohammedan; but in southern Kamerun the situation is 
quite different. The Mission, however, recognizes the possi- 
bility not only but the probability of a speedy invasion of the 
followers of Islam and is redoubling its efforts to reach these 
pagan people with the Gospel before they have been rendered 
more impervious to its demands by the subtle teachings of the 
apostles of the False Prophet. 

The West Africa Mission bids fair to be one of the banner 
missions of the Board in self-support, and in evangelistic fer- 
vor. 

The Board during the year completed arrangements where- 
by the station formerly known as Baraka was transferred to 
the Socielte des Missions Evangeliques of Paris. 

This transfer has been under consideration for a long time. 
Many years ago the Board transferred to the Paris Society 
one of its stations on the Ogowe. The change was so mani- 
festly for the good of the work that the Board made overtures 
to the Paris Society to take over Baraka Station. Owing to 
lack of funds in the Paris Society this was impossible till the 
present year. We believe that the sphere of influence of the 
Station will be greatly enlarged by the transfer. 

The level of interest in the things of God continues to rise 
in this mission, carrying with it a rising interest in the things 
cf education, of industry, of self-support. 

The increasing and tremendous appeal of the beach tribes 
and of the forest tribes of this country is being met by native 
leaders, so far as may be. Native pastors, native evangelists, 
supported by native fu'nds ; native teachers, scattered widely 
through the forest and along the coast, are doing an 



40 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

apostolic work. One church alone supports 23 such evangel- 
ists. The mission has made a most earnest effort this year to 
give something like adequate training to these simple and earn- 
est men. 

The simplicity and unity of the work in this region, so bless- 
ed in these latter years by God, is increasingly marred by Cath- 
olic opposition. No one who has followed the history of the 
mission but has noted the systematic "following" policy of the 
Catholic Church, first on the coast, and now in the forest. The 
mission knows, and it is well that the Church should know, 
that Catholic opposition is a fixed factor in our work, most 
successfully dealt with where we have been longest established 
before its operation. This is one of many reasons why the 
mission must press forw'ard into the unoccupied and needy 
interior. 

The large and reasonable success of the industrial effort of 
the mission is a matter of pride with us and must prove grati- 
fying to those whose sympathy for the African has informed 
them of the incalculable value of industrial training in the ele- 
vation of this race. 

The weight of numbers in this respect is a real weight. Very 
really do the many thousand inquirers press upon the strength 
of the mission. May the Church at home see through the sta- 
tistics of this report the brave and beautiful sight of a primi- 
tive church called into being by the Lord Jesus, and enlarged 
daily by such as are being saved. 

KOREA. — The most perplexing problem with which the 
Board has had to deal during the year has been in connection 
with the arrest, trial and conviction of a large group of Korean 
Christians. The Japanese Government, through its officials, 
saw fit to arrest and imprison many leading Koreans, teach- 
ers, evangelists and preachers, charging them with an attempt 
to assassinate the Governor General. Many of these men had 
been for years honored and respected by missionary and na- 
tive Christian alike. The total number of convictions in the 
first trial was 105. On appeal, however, 99 of these were ac- 
quitted, and the sentences of the remaining six much lighten- 
ed. The Board was placed in a most delicate position in deal- 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 41 

ing with this whole subject. The cordial relations which had 
always existed between the Board and the Japanese Govern- 
ment during (the long years of mission work in Jlapan, the 
great interests at stake in view of the rapid development of 
the Christian Church in Korea, and the fact that so many le- 
gal and political questions were involved, caused the Board 
to proceed with unusual care in dealing with this most deli- 
cate problem. Interviews were had with Japanese Ambassa- 
dors and letters were written to the Japanese Government. 
The Board kept itself in constant touch with the situation and 
carefully avoided publishing anything which might unjustly 
reflect on the Japanese Government. At times the situation 
was most difficult, as information was coming that Christians 
of undoubted integrity were being tortured and forced to give 
testimony incriminating themselves as well as missionaries of 
the Board. We believe the calm and judicial way in which 
this whole case was managed will commend itself to the Gen- 
eral Assembly. Secretary Brown, who has charge of Korea, 
prepared .a pamphlet which ,can be had on application, giving 
full details of the entire case. The acquittal "by the upper 
court of nearly all of the condemned men justifies the posi- 
tion which the Board took from the beginning that the evi- 
dence was insufficient to condemn the Korean Christians. 

The conduct of the Korean Church during this entire period 
was most praiseworthy. The Church was on its knees. If 
there were any signs of rebellion among Christians the most 
scrupulous examination on the part of the missionaries failed 
to reveal it. The Korean Christians gave an exhibition which 
the world has rarely witnessed of patience under trial, of 
submission to what seemed to be a wrong, and of trust in the 
ultimate triumph of the right, an exhibition worthy of Chris- 
tians of long and mature experience rather than of those who 
but yesterday emerged from the darkness of heathenism. 

Meanwhile the work in Korea has gone on, and while in 
some places the attendance on services decreased, and there 
has not been the same evangelistic zeal as in former years, yet 
under all the circumstances the report of the work done by 
the Korean Church during the year is most helpful. The first 
Korean General Assembly was held in September, 1912. This 



42 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Assembly embraces the Presbyteries represented by the Aus- 
tralian, Canadian, Southern and Northern Presbyterian 
Churches. 

One of the last acts of the Assembly was to authorize the 
raising of a thousand dollars to send two Korean evangelists 
to help in the work of preaching the Gospel in the Chinese 
Republic. A territory was assigned by the Chinese Mission in 
East Shangtung where dwell one and one-half million people, 
"for whose soul no man careth." This extraordinary evi- 
dence of foreign missionary enthusiasm on the part of the 
Korean Church in the midst of its severe trials, should hearten 
every lover of the kingdom of Christ. 

JAPAN. — The missionaries in Japan have rendered signal 
service to the missionaries in Korea during the trying experi- 
ences connected with the trial of the Korean Christians. Some 
of the missionaries from Japan were in constant attendance 
on the trial, their knowledge of the Japanese language enabling 
them to follow closely the entire trial, arid they were of great 
service to the Korean missionaries in the excellent counsel of- 
fered, and in the Christian fellowship manifested. 

In Japan the past year has witnessed a notable advance in 
the power and influence of the Christian., Church and the rec- 
ognition by the nation of the necessity of religion as the basis 
of its ethics and the foundation of its national life. The 
Synod of the Church of Chrisit in Japan held its twenty-sixth 
meeting at Sendai in October. The subject of the opening ser- 
mon was "The Signs of the Times," in which the retiring 
president, Dr. Ibuka, referred (i) to the Three Religions 
Conference, (2) to the death of the Emperor, and (3) to the 
suicide of General and Mrs. Nogi, and dealt with the duty of 
Christians in connection with these signs. The meeting of the 
Synod illustrated the spirit of independence and of Christian 
fearlessness which characterizes the Church. One committee 
reported that enquiries had been made of the Educational De- 
partment, asking whether it was not at variance with the free- 
dom of faith as set forth in the Constitution, for principals of 
schools to take their pupils to shrines and temples for wor- 
ship, and that the authorities concerned acknowledged that the 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 43 

previous Minister of Education had gone too far in this mat- 
ter and that such a custom would be no longer enforced. A 
special committee was appointed to consider and report on 
the propriety of Christians participating in funeral observ- 
ances which involved acquiescence in the Shinto traditions, 
and Mr. Uyemura, a member of the committee, and one of the 
most influential men in the Church, maintained the view that 
Christians should take a bold stand against customs which 
were in conflict with the teachings of Christianity. There are 
now sixty-six independent, self-supporting congregations in 
the Church of Christ, with 127 Mission Churches, and 55 ad- 
ditional preaching places .conducted by Missions which are 
recognized as affiliated with the Church of Christ, though tech- 
nically not co-operating with it. The number of church mem- 
bers is now approximately 22,000, and there are nearly 14,000 
Sunday school scholars in 231 schools. The largest church in 
the denomination is in Yokohama, with a membership of 
1,026, and the second in Tokyo, with a membership of 991. 
The Church in Japan and the Missions working with it are 
coming to a clearer realization of their task. It was natural, 
in the early years, when missionaries were forbidden to travel 
in the interior, that there should be a large .congestion of the 
Mission force in the cities, where, also, the more responsive 
population were found at that time. Now, however, that the 
whole country is open, the attention both of the Church and 
the Missions has been drawn out to the immense village popu- 
lation and the 85 per cent, of totally unevangelized people. 

The "signs of the times" referred to .by Dr. Ibuka have il- 
lustrated clearly the nation's recognition of its moral and re- 
ligious needs. The Three Religions Conference in March, 
1912, was an assembly in Tokyo called by the Vice-minister 
cf Education, to which the government invited representa- 
tives of Shintoism, Buddhism and Christianity, with a view to 
soliciting their help toward meeting the ethical and religious 
needs of the time. Some suspected in the scheme a plan for 
creating a conglomerate religion which might become organic- 
ally connected with the Church, but this was unequivocally 
disavowed by the government, which stated that it was sim- 
ply anxious to have all the religious forces of the Empire ex- 



44 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

ert themselves to meet the present urgent need. The Confer- 
ence adopted the following resolutions : 

We acknowledge the will of the Govenment authorities, which led 
us to hold the conference of the representatives of the three religions, 
is in conformity with the principle of the freedom of religious beliefs, 
to respect the authority of religion which each possesses, to promote 
national morality, and to improve public discipline, without departing 
from our original creeds; and that statesmen, religionists, and educa- 
tionists, without interfering with one another, should maintain the 
honor of the Imperial Household and contribute to the progress of the 
times. As this is in accordance with our own purpose we comply with 
the request of the authorities and promise to make all possible effort 
for perfectly discharging the onerous duty of working for the 
advancement of the nation, always adhering to our own belief. 
Simultaneously, we hope that the Government authorities will never 
cease their endeavor to assist in realizing the ultimate object of this 
conference. With these principles and this object in view, we have 
made the following decisions : 

(a) To foster and develop our respective creeds, to promote the 
welfare of the State, and to contribute to the development of national 
morality. 

(b) To hope that the authorities concerned will respect religion, 
promote friendly relations between the statesmen, religionists, and* 
educationists, and contribute to the progress of the nation. 

The Shintoists and the Buddhists accepted the statement 
prepared by the Christians with sOme additional suggestions. 

The Church and Christian Missions in Japan do not feel 
that they have been compromised at all in joining in the Con- 
ference, while on the other hand, the niation now understands 
that Christianity, which was at first prohibited and then mere- 
ly tolerated, is now distinctly recognized and removed from 
beneath the ban which has practically been laid against it as a 
foreign religion whose fundamental principles were inconsis- 
tent with loyalty and patriotism. 

The Christian Church is now openly accepted, as it has been 
for a long time tacitly recognized, as one of the great moral 
powers in the empire. It is remarkable to note this when one 
measures the small size of the Protestant Churches against the 
immense mass of the population, as indicated in the statistics 
presented at the meeting of the Federated Missions in Tokyo : 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 45 

Total population 51,287,091 

Total number Japanese preachers 1,010 

Total number Japanese evangelistic workers . . 1,366 

Total number resident Protestant Christians . . . 52,972 

Total number meeting places 2,017 

Among the evidences of the increasing influence of Chris- 
tianity are the elevation of Mr. Ebara, one of the most earn- 
est Christian laymen in Japan, to the peerage, the Three Re- 
ligions Conference just mentioned, the changed attitude of the 
Department of Education, the respect and influence accorded 
to Christian men like Judge Watanabe, chief justice of the 
highest court in Korea, and Mr. Yoshiyasu, chief secretary of 
the Red Cross Society, which is one of the most powerful and 
popular organizations in Japan. Judge Watanabe and Mr. 
Yoshiyasu visited the United States the past year and return- 
ed to Japan with the deepened conviction that the true foun- 
tains of a nation's life are to be found in Christianity. Among 
the common people, also, the power of the Christian life is 
steadily making its way. A single paragraph from a letter 
from the Rev. J. C. Worley, of Matsuyama, will suffice for il- 
lustration : 

We were very fortunate in securing a most competent Christian 
carpenter to take the contract to build our house. He was the most 
agreeable man with whom to work that I have ever had anything to 
do with. In a period of six months of closest intercourse, with a 
multitude of details of every kind to consider, we did not have a 
single disagreement of any kind. Nor did I see him lose his temper 
once during that time. As the work progressed we found it necessary 
to ask for some changes in the original plan, also additions and 
conveniences not thought of at the beginning. He was always ready 
to make such changes and in most of the cases made no extra charge. 
When he did make a charge it was always reasonable. He and his 
workmen were often singing Christian hymns while busy with their 
work. We have a weekly Bible Class in a preaching place near by, 
and he was a regular attendant and would often bring as many as eight 
of his workmen with him. 

The contract was signed with prayer and if ever a piece of work 
was done with the spirit of Christ, it was surely this one. It was a 
most beautiful illustration of how a man in an ordinary occupation 
can show forth the spirit of his Master. 

It is a matter of great encouragement, also, that the Chris- 



46 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

tian Church in Japan has leaders who are able to meet the 
apologetic necessities of the time and who refuse to allow 
Christianity to be emasculated in any eclectic religious con- 
glomerate. Mr. Ebina, regarded as one of the most advanced 
of the Christian thinkers in Japan, has yet stood forth sturdily 
in the defence of the divine uniqueness of Christ as against 
the leveling views of men like Dr. Inouye. 

"If Christ was only a contemplative sage like Buddha," Mr. Ebina 
is quoted as saying, "He was but one of the Essenes, and positively 
could not have been the Messiah. If His character was the result of 
acquired knowledge like that of Confucius he was no more than 
Hillel, and was not the Messiah. If He was but a logician like 
Socrates, He was no more than a philosopher such as Philo, and not 
the Messiah. He knew Himself to be the Messiah. Also, because 
His perfect will wholly conformed to the absolute, perfect will, He 
was believed to be the Messiah. He was conscious of his sonship with 
God through the perfect obedience of His own will. Herein is seen 
the truth of the profound relation existing between Father and Son. 
Christ, being a Holy One of will, His birth could not have been one 
of chance. It was the working out of a great purpose." 

It is an interesting religious situation which Japan presents 
to our view, calling for our deepest sympathy with earnest 
men who are facing great problems, calling also for our prayer 
that the Church in Japan may be filled with a living spirit of 
simple evangelical propagandism. 

Politically, the country is passing through troublous times, 
in which, however, is an element of great encouragement 
that the best sense of the nation has revolted against bureau- 
cracy and militarism. The Christian nations of the West need 
to remember, however, that it is their example and influence 
that give bureaucracy and militarism their power. All Amer- 
ican talk about war with Japan is simply fuel such as the mili- 
tary party in Japan desires for its fire of national suspicion, 
and justifies to Japan heavy armaments and bureaucratic ad- 
ministration. 

CHINA. — The great interest in foreign missions through- 
out the world during the year, however, has centered on the 
new Republic of China. The Board has already notified the 
Assembly of the organization three years ago of the China 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT it 

Council. This Council is composed of representatives of the 
seven Missions in China, and is given very large powers. The 
chairman, the Rev. J. Walter Lo'wrie, D.D., gives his entire 
time to the work of the Council, visiting the various stations, 
conferring with the missionaries and suggesting plans looking 
to the greater efficiency ,of the entire work under care of the 
Board in the Chinese Empire. We give extracts from the re- 
port of this Council as s'howing how the men actually on the 
field who are close to the scene of action regard the extraordi- 
nary opportunity now given to the Christian Church in the 
new China Republic. 

"We would preface our report by our expression of profound 
thanks to Almighty God for the unnumbered mercies of the year. 
As war has slain, famine devoured and mutiny devastated, the need 
of our Lord's saving power has become more and more evident. An 
hoary Kingdom gives place to youthful Republic in which all men 
have their share of honor and responsibility, the Word of God and 
the power of the resurrection life becomes all the more a manifest 
necessity. The need of the hour for missionaries is 'greater contact 
with God and greater contact with the unsaved,' that the 'greater 
works' of God may be done among this needy people, and that the 
'rivers of water' may flow to quench the thirst of thirsty souls. 

"By means of the Red Cross and hospital work's far-reaching 
benevolence, and now the Republican Government, prejudice against 
the Christian religion has largely given way. By means of the press, 
the schools and the rostrum, the multitudes are being instructed in 
the great themes of commerce, politics and religion. By the Holy 
Spirit's working through the lives of native Christians (a quarter of 
a million Protestants and a million and quarter Catholics) through 
the 4,600 Christian missionaries, through Christian books, and in 
answer to the prayers of God's faithful ones in all lands this great 
people is being slowly moved Godward. The approval of the Chris- 
tian religion has been in some measure at least, secured, and men and 
women by thousands are honestly seeking the truth, while not a few 
are saying, 'What must I do to be saved?' Never, since the days 
of Constantine has the Church faced such wide-open doors. 

"The world has seen a wonderful change taking place in this 
ancient Empire of China brought about by the Revolution. Well 
may the world consider it one of the greatest movements in its history 
whether there be considered the immensity of the population affected, 
the character of the change that is taking place, the magnitude of the 
interests involved, or the significance of the fact that a great and 
ancient race is undergoing in the period of a decade, a radical intel- 
lectual and spiritual readjustment 



48 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

"This movement may, by God's grace, if the Christian Church is 
faithful, result in the regeneration of a great nation. No change of 
institutions, of political principles, of social order or of economic condi- 
tions can avail to satisfy the deep needs of which China has now 
become conscious. Political reformation requires a new moral and 
religious life. 

"We are glad to see a considerable increase in the number of self- 
supporting and in some instances self-governing churches. 

"We would note with profound gratitude the awakening among the 
Government students, their willingness to enter Bible classes and in 
some cases to ask their teachers to teach the Bible. It is most impor- 
tant at such a time that we find in the church that which satisfies 
their needs. We even hear that Dr. Sun and President Yuan have 
been considering the advisability of introducing the Bible into the 
curriculum of Government Schools and of establishing a national 
Church. In any case, the thoughts of the leaders are upon foundation- 
making, and surely the Word of God is the true foundation. We 
do not mean to say that everything is favorable. By no means. Proud 
hearts are not so easily won. Many are sceptical. Others are taken 
up with Darwinism in its atheistic form. Materialistic and atheistic 
books coming in from the West are poisoning the minds of multitudes. 
Surely our 'King's business' in the East 'requireth haste' and most 
earnest effort on the part of His Church." 

The Council submitted a carefully prepared statement in 
which the claims of every Mission and every station were indi- 
vidually considered .as to the need of missionaries and of 
equipment. This list asks for one hundred additional mission- 
aries, including ministers, educators, physicians, nurses, lay- 
men to take charge of certain business interests, single women 
for special service, and stating the exact fields where each one 
of these is needed. 

The Council also sends in a partial list of the most urgent 
needs of property and equipment, not for new stations, but to 
render efficient the present strategic stations of the Board, the 
sum total amounting to $537,255. We would call the attention 
of the Assembly to the fact that this statement came not from 
one Mission, but from all and from the men whom the Mis- 
sions have chosen as best fitted to decide as to the needs of 
each, and all of the missions under care of the Board in China. 

The task before the Presbyterian Board in China is gigan- 
tic, and can only be accomplished by prayer and faith and a 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 49 

spirit of self-denial both in the consecration of life and of 
substance such as the Church has not yet begun to realize. 

In the summer of 1912 the Board purchased the property of 
the London Missionary Society at Hengchow and Changsha. 
In order to carry on the increased work in the city of Heng- 
chow Miss Coxon, a valuable worker in the London Society 
has been loaned to our mission work for one year. She is be- 
ing of great assistance to the local missionaries in the Girls' 
School at that station. It has been decided to open a station in 
the city of Changs'ha in order to care for the work and to meet 
the opportunities presented by our assuming with responsi- 
bilities of the London Society. Changsha is the capital city of 
Hunan province and careful plans are being laid by the Mis- 
sion and China Consul looking toward the opening of this sta- 
tion. New workers will be needed and special reinforcements, 
if this opportunity is to be met. 

CHINESE, JAPANESE AND KOREANS IN U. S.— 
The work among the Chinese, Japanese and Koreans in the 
United States has shown commendable growth during the year 
considering the restrictions imposed on these alien peoples by 
the immigration laws of the United States. The Standing Com- 
mittee of American Workers among Orientals on the Pacific 
Coast made a survey of the Chinese residing in California who 
were not receiving any religious instruction. This association 
of American workers was organized with a view of promot- 
ing efficiency in the work among the Orientals in the United 
States, and with a special aim to bring the Gospel to those for 
whose soul no man is caring. 

The Chinese connected with the Presbyterian Mission on 
the Pacific Coast contributed nearly $2,000 for the extension 
of the kingdom — the Koreans added $600 to this amount, 
while the Japanese raised the magnificent total of $11,000, this 
latter sum being double the amount spent on the Japanese 
work by the Board. To this of course must be added some 
$1,500, raised by the Chinese in New York. These figures not 
only indicate the increased prosperity of the Orientals in the 
United States, but also are an index of the development of the 
grace of giving. 



50 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

The Rescue Home at San Francisco has had at times a fam- 
ily as large as 70 during- the year, many of these girls being 
rescued from what might have been lives of shame. 

The great movements which are passing over the nations at 
the present time, the colossal racial awakening in China con- 
fronting the nation with new social, economic and political 
problems, the realization by Japan of the need of an ethical 
and religious basis for her national life, the quickening of the 
Indian mind in slow rejection of old social limitations and 
moral iniquities, the stirring of humanity within the prison 
house of Islam, and the recognition by the Latin-American 
republics of the necessity of a more solid foundation of na- 
tional character and intelligence under the weight of free 
political institutions — all these movements are emphasizing 
throughout the nations the world's need of Christianity as a 
social regenerative power. There is great hope in this awak- 
ening, and there is also great peril lest the recognition of the 
world's need of social and national regeneration should ob- 
scure the fundamental personal issues of religion and the 
necessity of building national reformation on the solid foun- 
dation of redeemed men. In a time like this we rejoice that in 
our missionary body we have a company of men and women 
who know both intellectually and by experience the truth and 
power of that Gospel delivered once for all which is the power 
of God unto salvation and in which is proclaimed to all the 
world the One Name given under Heaven whereby men must 
be saved, that in the midst of a world filled with unrest and 
doubt the Church possesses a company of men and women to 
whom our Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, and our only 
Mediator and Redeemer, is both the foundation of all 
their convictions and the living reality of their ex- 
perience, and by whom He and the word of His re- 
deeming love and power are daily preached on every conti- 
nent to multitudes who, except for them, would be ignorant of 
His Name. Nothing can be more important than the fidelity 
of the missionary enterprise to the great essentials of the evan- 
gelical message, and the Church may well thank God that in 
her missionaries and their work she has been blessed with un- 
equalled loyalty to the Saviour of mankind and the Gospel 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 51 

of His redeeming love and grace. No uncertainty as to the 
deity of the Lord Jesus Christ and His atoning mercy weakens 
their message or paralyzes their power. 

Professor Edward Warren Capen, in an article written for 
the "American Sociological Society," under the title of "Socio- 
logical Appraisal of Western Influence in the Orient" states 
as follows : 

"It is not so many years since the countries of the Orient were 
practically isolated from the life and thought of the West. For 
centuries Japan was all but hermetically sealed against outside influ- 
ence; the occasional diplomat and the trader whose business was 
confined to a few points on the coast, were the only means of inter- 
communication between China and the Occident ; while even in India 
foreign influence did not extend far inland. The result was that, 
comparatively speaking, the East deserved the epithet changeless. 

"Now all this has altered. Within a little more than a generation 
Japan 'has emerged from her position as a semi-mediaeval feudal 
country into a progressive power, which claims to be equal, if not 
superior to the greatest western nations. China, Siam, and India 
have all been undergoing great social changes. In the case of every 
one of these countries, the initial impulse to change was western in 
its origin, often western in the agents who gave the impulse. Now 
the leadership is passing, or has passed into the hands of the people 
themselves, but still it remains true that, directly or indirectly, western 
influence is at work in the Orient. Practically all the changes are 
being made in directions indicated by western experience, some of 
them because of their intrinsic worth, others in order to meet the 
competition and escape the domination of the West." 

It is evident from this hasty survey of the mission fields un- 
der the care of the Board, that many and new problems must 
be met during the coming years. The problems of gravest im- 
portance are those arising out of the development of the native 
church, and those connected with the question of religious edu- 
cation. The question of one national Protestant Church even 
in so young a Mission as the Philippines, has already been 
broached while in the older Missions, such as Africa, India, 
China and Japan, the problem is becoming acute. 

The reports which come from Japan not only on the action 
of the government in asking the co-operation of Christian 
forces in helping to solve the moral problems perplexing the 
3tate, but also the evident failure on the part of the non-Chris- 
tian religions to exercise the restraint which in former years 



52 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

they were able to do on the morals of the people — has render- 
ed the question of a great Christian university almost essential 
in the Japanese Empire. Statistics gathered by the Govern- 
ment University at Tokyo, where there are some 4,000 stu- 
dents reveal the spiritual destitution of the young men who 
are soon to be leaders in Japan. Less than 100 of the 
4.000 confessed themselves either Shinto or Buddhists. Only 
about 60 acknowledged themselves to be Christians. All the 
rest affirmed no belief or maintained that they were atheists 
or agnostics. Higher Christian education is fast becoming as 
great a problem in many non-Christian lands as in our own. 

The Board and its officers have done everything in their 
power to carry forward the budget and apportionment scheme. 
We feel that there is need of the greatest care lest the educa- 
tional processes which have hitherto prevailed should be neg- 
lected, and that every effort should be made to promote the 
every-member canvass and weekly subscription feature of the 
new plan, which are indispensable to its success. All receipts 
under the old system and also under the budget plan are as yet 
entirely inadequate to furnish the extra funds which the Board 
will need in the next few years for these problems confronting 
the missionary enterprise both in Latin-America, in the Islamic 
world, and in the ancient empires of the East. The Board 
must look to those whom Providence has blessed with large 
gifts to enable it to push forward the work in some way com- 
mensurate with the opportunity which is now presented in so 
many fields white unto the harvest. 

The Board reports the expiration of the terms of office of 
the following members and recommends their re-election to 
serve for three years in the class of 1913-1916: 

Rev. Eben B. Cobb, D.D. Mr. John Stewart. 

Rev. John McDowell, D.D. Win. E. Stiger, Esq. 

Rev. James S. Dennis, D.D. Mr. Alfred E. Marling. 
T. H. Cobbs, Esq. 
In behalf of the Board, 

ABRAM W. HALSEY. 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 53 



MISSIONARIES RETURNING AFTER FURLOUGH 

AFRICA 

Dr. W. S. Lehman; Rev. and Mrs. A. N. Krug; Miss Jean Mackenzie; Rev. 
J. A. Reis, Jr.; Rev. and Mrs. William Dager; Dr. and Mrs. Silas F. 
Johnson. 

BRAZIL 

Rev. W. A. Waddell, D.D.; Rev. and Mrs. J. B. Kolb; Mrs. G. A. Landes. 

CHINA 

Central China. — Mr. Gilbert Mcintosh; Rev. and Mrs. J. E. Shoemaker; Miss 

Margaret B. Duncan; Miss Emma Silver; Mr. C. W. Douglass; Miss 

Manuella D. Morton. 
Hainan. — Dr. Sidney Lasell. 
Hunan. — Miss Effie Murray; Rev. and Mrs. George F. Jenkins; Miss Annie R. 

Morton; Dr. and Mrs. E. D. Vanderberg; Rev. and Mrs. Gilbert Dovell. 
Kiang-an. — Mrs. Maud R. Jones; Rev. James B. Cochran. 
North China. — Dr. Eliza E. Leonard; Rev. and Mrs. W. A. Mather; Mrs. C. 

H. Fenn; Dr. and Mrs. Guy W. Hamilton. 
Shangtung. — Mr. and Mrs. Will C. Booth; Dr. and Mrs. Charles F. Johnson; 

Rev. William P. Chalfant; Miss Margaretta Franz; Miss Emma S. 

Boehne. 
South China. — Dr. and Mrs. H. W. Boyd; Miss Harriet' Noyes; Miss E. M. 

Butler; Rev. and Mrs. Rees F. Edwards. 

INDIA 

North India. — Mrs. Wesley L. Hemphill. 

Punjab. — Rev. and Mrs. H. D. Griswold; Rev. and Mrs. C. Borup; Rev. and 
Mrs. Frank B. McCuskey; Miss Sarah M. Wherry; Miss Mary E. Pratt. 
West India. — Rev. and Mrs. E. W. Simpson; Miss Amanda Jefferson. 

JAPAN 

Miss Mary B. Sherman; Rev. and Mrs. R. P. Gonbold; Miss Lila Halsey. 

KOREA 

Miss Jane Samuel; Rev. and Mrs. A. A. Pieters; Rev. William C. Kerr; Mrs. 
W. L. Swallen; Dr. and Mrs. H. C. Whiting; Rev. and Mrs. H. G. 
Underwood; Rev James E. Adams. 

PERSIA 

East Persia. — Rev. Charles R. Murray. 

West Persia. — .Rev. F. N. Jessup; Miss Mary E. Lewis. 

PHILIPPINES 

Miss Clyde Bartholomew; Rev. and Mrs. Fred Jansen; Rev. Kenneth P. 
MacDonald. 

SIAM 
Miss Margaret C. McCord; Rev. and Mrs. J. A. Eakin. 

LAOS 

Mrs. J. W. McKean; Rev. and Mrs. Hugh Taylor. 

SYRIA 

Rev. and Mrs. O. J. Hardin; Rev. and Mrs. F. W. March. 

COLOMBIA 

Rev. and Mrs. T. H. Candor. 

CHILE 

Rev. and Mrs. Jesse S. Smith. 

GUATEMALA 

Rev. and Mrs. W. B. Allison; Dr. Mary E. Gregg. 
Total, 99. 



54 SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

NEW MISSIONARIES 

Added to the force on the field during the year 
April 1, 1912-13 

* Appointed full missionary after short term of service on the field, 
t Appointed on the field. 

AFRICA 

Miss Hilda Laible, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Carr, Miss Christine Suderman, Mrs. 
Jacob A. Rels, Jr., Dr. and Mrs. Frank R. Senska. 



Central. — Rev. Philip S. Landis. 



CHINA 



Central China. — Rev. and Mrs. J. H. Arthur, Rev. and Mrs. Ray C. Roberts, 
Miss Mary E. Lee, Rev. and Mrs. Kepler VanEvera, Miss Helen E. 
Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Wilmot D. Boone, Miss Ada C. Russel, Mr. R. P. 
Montgomery.* 

Hainan. — Mrs. Sidney Lasell and Miss Clara L. Primm.t 

Hunan. — Miss Kathrina Van Wagenen, Dr. George T. Tootell. 

Kiang-an. — Dr. T. Dwight Sloan, iMiss Mabel L. Lee, Miss Harriet R. 

MacCurdy, Miss Florence Chaney, Mr. Harry demons, Rev. Joseph 

(Bailie t (Re-appointed as teacher in Nanking University). 
North China. — Miss Marion Oskamp (Mrs. A. K. Whallon), Miss Alice I. 

Guffin, Dr. Cora Clementine Bash. 
Shangtung. — Miss Elizabeth Small, Mr. Carl S. Rankin, Miss Marjorie Rankin, 

Mr. Ralph G. Coonradt, Dr. Benjamin M. Harding, Miss Anita Carter, 

Dr. L. H. Keator t (Re-appointed). 
South China. — Mr. and Mrs. Alexander G Small. Miss Helen I. Stockton. 

INDIA 

North India. — Mr. and Mrs. Winfield S. Dudgeon, Mr. George Dunbar.t Miss 

Evelyn C. Lucas.t 
Punjab. — Rev. and Mrs. A. D. Swogger, Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Love, Miss Eula 

H. Sleeth, Miss Allie May Fairchild, Miss Lena A. Boyd. 

JAPAN 

Miss Carrie H. McCrory, Mr. H. Carroll Whitener. 

KOREA 

Mrs. "William C. Kerr, Miss Norma Blunt, Mrs. James E. Adams, Miss Jessie 
L Rodgers, Miss Hilda Helstrom.* 

PERSIA 

East Persia Dr. Joseph W. Cook, Miss Mary Gardner, Miss Mira Sutherland, 

Miss Grace 'Murray. 
West Persia. — Mrs. Charles W. Lamme (Miss Jessie C. Garman). 

PHILIPPINES 

Miss Julia H. Hodges, Miss Emma J. Hannan, Miss Anna S. "Williamson, Mrs. 
K. P. MacDonald (Miss A. E. Compton), 'Mr. Carlos E. Smith.* 

SIAM 

Miss Daisy Martin, Miss Bertha M. Mercer, Miss Beatrice Moller. 

LAOS 

Rev. and Mrs. J. L. Hartzell, Mr. A. B. MoMullen, Miss Hazel Brunner, 
Dr. and Mrs. "William H. Beach, Miss Addie Burr, Dr. and Mrs. 
"William Tracy Lyon. 



SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 55 

SOUTH AND CENTRAL AMERICA 

Colombia. — Rev. and Mrs. Frederick F. Darley, Rev. and Mrs. John L. Jarrett. 

GUATEMALA 

Miss Beulah A. Love, Miss Grace M. Stevens. 

A total of 89 regularly appointed missionaries. During the year there 
have been 11 deaths and 15 resignations, making a net addition to the 
force of 63. 



THE FOLLOWING HAVE BEEN SENT OUT DURING THE YEAR UNDER 
SHORT TERM APPOINTMENT 

AFRICA 

Mr. R. O. Johnson, Rev. Pieter Jelle Kapteyn, Dr. Herbert W. Knight, 
Rev. Arnold Loewe. 

CHINA 

Hunan. — .Miss Coxon — taken over from the London Missionary Society for 
the year. 

KOREA 

Mr. Horace H. Underwood. 

NORTH INDIA 

Allahabad College. — Dr. Franklin D. Coggswell, Mr. Lester A. Hendrick. 
Fatehgarh Boys' High School. — Mr. John E. Wallace, Mr. Warren W. Ewing. 

WEST PERSIA 
Tabriz Boys' School. — Mr. William J. DuBourdieu. 

SIAM 

Mr. Arthur M. McClure. 

SOUTH AMERICA 

Chile. — Instituto Ingles, Santiago — Mr. Aldis B. Easterling, Mr. John W. 
MacDonald, Miss Ivah Linebarger (Fiancee of Mr. A. A. Scott). 




WEST AFRICA MISSION 



C C. SHIDOMAK, MARS. NEW TOait 



WEST AFRICA MISSION 

Benito: 77 miles north of Baraka; occupied as a Station, 1864. 
Missionaries — Dr. O. H. Pinney and Mrs. Pinney, Rev. John Wright 
and Mr. Wright, Rev. F. D. P. Hickman, Dr. H. W. Knight, Rev. 
Peter J. Kapteyn. 

Batanga: 170 miles north of Baraka, on the coast; occupied as a 
Station, 1885. Missionaries— Mr. A. G. Adams and Mrs. Adams, Rev. 
Albert I. Good, Mrs. A. C. Good, Mr. A. A. Hoisington and Mrs. 
Hoisington, Rev. J. G. Sutz and Mrs. Sutz, Dr. F. R. Senska and Mrs. 
Senska, Rev. J. S. Cunningham and Mrs. Cunningham. 

Efulen : 57 miles east of Batanga, behind the coast belt, and 180 
miles northeast of Baraka; occupied 1893. Missionaries— Rev. L. D. 
Heminger and Mrs. Heminger, Rev. Jacob A. Reis, Jr., and Mrs. Reis, 
Dr. H. L. Weber and Mrs. Weber, Miss Hilda Laible. 

Elat: 56 miles east of Efulen and 195 miles northeast of Baraka; 
occupied as a Station, 1895. Missionaries — Mrs. C. W. McCleary, 
Mr. A. N. Krug and Mrs. Krug, Rev. Wm. M. Dager and Mrs Dager, 
Rev. M. Fraser, Mr. F. H. Hope and Mrs. Hope, Mr. H. W. Grieg, 
Rev. W. C. Johnston and Mrs. Johnston, Miss Verna E. Eick, Rev. 
Fred. W. Neal and Mrs. Neal, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Carr, Rev. Arnold 
Loewe. 

MacLean Memorial Station : at Lolodorf , headquarters of the 
German Government in the Ngumba country, 70 miles northeast of 
Batanga and 210 miles northeast of Baraka; occupied as a Station in 
1897. Missionaries — Mr. R. B. Hummel and Mrs. Hummel, Dr. W. S. 
Lehman and Mrs. Lehman, Mr. A. B. Patterson and Mrs. Patterson, 
Rev. F. O. Emerson and Mrs. Emerson, Miss Jean Mackenzie, Miss 
Christine Suderman, Mr. R. O. Johnson. 

Metet: 73.5 miles northeast of Elat; opened in 1909. Missionaries 
—Dr. Silas F. Johnson and Mrs. Johnson, Rev. G C. Beanland, Rev. 
D. Coe Love and Mrs. Love, Rev. R. H. Evans, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. 
Schwab, Miss Elizabeth Christie. 

Resignations: Rev. and Mrs. F. A. Wyckoff. 

Transfers : Rev. and Mrs. J. S. Cunningham from Benito to Bat- 
anga; Miss Elizabeth Christie from Efulen to Metet; Mr. and Mrs. 
Geo. Schwab from Elat to Metet. 

Furloughs : Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Krug, Rev. and Mrs. W. M. 
Dager, Miss Jean Mackenzie, Rev. Jacob A. Reis, Mr. and Mrs. A. G. 
Adams, Mrs. W. C. Johnston, Dr. and Mrs. W. S. Lehman, Rev. A. I. 
Good, Mrs. A. C. Good, Rev. Melvin Fraser, Dr. and Mrs. Silas F. 
Johnson, Rev. R. H. Evans. 

The Board during the year completed arrangements whereby 
the station formerly known as Baraka was transferred to the 
Societe des Missions Evangeliques of Paris. 

57 



58 WEST AFRICA— BENITO 

This transfer has been under consideration for a long time. 
Many years ago the Board transferred to the Paris Society one 
of its stations on the Ogowe. The change was so manifestly 
for the good of the work that the Board made overtures to the 
Paris Society to take over Baraka Station. Owing to lack of 
funds in the Paris Society this was impossible till the present 
year. We believe that the sphere of influence of the station 
will be greatly enlarged by the transfer. 

BENITO STATION 

In the territory included between Corisco and the Campo, a 
distance of ioo miles, there are nine dialects spoken. For these 
people we are the only source of supply for the pure Gospel, 
for true education and for good medicine unmixed with super- 
stitious treatment, so that we feel that a great load of respon- 
sibility is upon us to provide this supply and to bring it home 
to these peoples. 

Much of the work of this district is by way of the sea, and 
the station is now in possession of two sound boats. The 
swamping of the old Lafayette on her return from mission 
meeting last year necessitated the purchase of a surf boat from 
a passing steamer, and in November a second boat, ordered 
from Germany, arrived. 

EVANGELISTIC— 

The response of the people to the gospel is not eager in this district. 
In the neighborhood of the station most of the young people claim 
allegiance to the Roman Catholic Church. At the Sunday services 
the attendance runs from 150 to 200, as influenced by school and vaca- 
tion. Special services are held for the Fang, who attend to something 
like 30. The chief of a neighboring Fang town is a regular attendant 
at Sunday services, has asked to be taught to read, and seems to be in 
earnest. Several of the Fang school boys give promise of becoming 
evangelists to their people. 

Our catechumen class, composed of those in the immediate vicin- 
ity, numbers 20 — some young people looking toward intelligent church 
membership, some old people who struggle toward a grasp of the 
rudiments of faith. The school children have classes for religious 
instruction, and there were enrolled from 50 to 86 children during the 
school terms. 

So much for the station church. Following is the report of 
the coast churches, under supervision from this station and 
supplied by native pastors. 

The Mbiko Church at Ndombo. is the smallest of them all. Since 
it was organized as an offshoot of Corisco Church, there has been 
no growth, owing to the sparsely settled community in which it is 
located and owing to the lack of proper management by the elder. It 
never has had a minister, and its future looks bad. 



WEST AFRICA— BENITO 59 

The Corisco Church has held its own and made a little advance- 
ment. This church has one preaching place on the mainland and 
another at Big Elobey. The gatherings at these places are small; 
the audiences on the Island of Corisco are good and they have given 
well for the support of the church. Roman Catholicism is the one 
stumbling block to the increase of this church. The pastor has trans- 
lated a number of English hymns into the Benga tongue. 

Hanje Church had the misfortune to have their church blown 
down in the beginning of the year. Services have been held on the 
veranda of the pastor's home. They are busy erecting a new house 
of worship. There are two other places where preaching is conducted 
regularly: one at Iduma, south of Hanje; the other at Nume, north 
of Hanje. The audiences at these places are small. The young men 
of this church are doing good work among the Bosheba. The people 
are giving splendidly for the new church, 

Bata Church has been holding its own against a very aggressive 
Mission of the Roman Catholic Church. Buildings for church pur- 
poses have been erected by them right in the midst of the Bata Church 
territory. A number of our people have gone over to them, especially 
those who have been disciplined for sin. 

There are three other preaching points where services are held each 
Sabbath : one at Ndibwanjolo near the Bata post. The gatherings 
are small at this point. Another at Asonga, north of the Bata post. 
The gatherings here are large. The other place is north of Asonga 
among the Baheke. The gathering is small. Bata Church cannot ac- 
commodate the crowds on Communion Sunday. Evune Church is 
still advancing^ but they have a hard battle to fight. The Roman 
Catholics have two white priests at this place, who will in time hinder 
the growth of this church. They have opened a school and are get- 
ting some of our boys and girls. The church has been repaired; new 
posts and beams have been put in by these people. This is the most 
aggressive church anywhere on the coast. 

There are two other preaching points : one at Evongo and the other 
at Ngane. The leaders at these places are supported by the church. 
The gatherings of this church are splendid. 

Myuma Church has a name, but that is all. It is living, but is 
almost dead. The elder who oversees this parish is very weak, and 
no aggressive work is done. The church is greatly scattered. A new 
building is in the process of erection. A minister with tact and ex- 
ecutive ability is sorely needed for this church. There are two other 
preaching points in this parish : one at Dipika, up the Campo River. 
The elder who is in charge is a strong and aggressive man. The 
other, at Ijave, near the mouth of the Campo, has also a good man 
as shepherd. 

EDUCATIONAL.— 

The boarding school has had two terms of three months each. The 
first term there were enrolled 54 boys and 46 girls, a total of 100. This 
number could easily have been larger, as boys were turned away be- 
cause of the difficulty in procuring casava for their food. A con- 
tinued drought had spoiled the local crop and people were experienc- 
ing almost a famine. The second term there were 120 in the boarding 
school — 73 boys and 47 girls. Again it would have been easy to have 
increased the number, but it was thought best to establish a rule that 
no pupil should be admitted after a certain date near the opening of 
the term, in order to teach the people promptness in coming. It is 
not always easy for the Evune and Corisco children to come on exact 
fixed date of opening. This rule was an effort to increase the cooper- 



60 WEST AFRICA— BATANGA 

ation of the parents for promptness in returning their children after 
the vacations. Monitors representing the more advanced class who 
were taught in Spanish by the missionaries the reading of the Gospels; 
in arithmetic, through the metric system and common fractions, 
weights and measures; geography, grammar and hygiene, have been 
very useful in the school. 

If it were permitted by the government authorities a part of the 
boys would be able to conduct village schools, being sufficiently trained 
in teaching and far enough advanced in Spanish to meet the need, but 
the law demands that each school must have a white man in it, which 
shuts out village schools. 

MEDICAL.— 

Medical and dispensary work has been very satisfactory this year. 
Dr. Pinney was here the last nine months and gave his mornings to 
the work. This arrangement has been more satisfactory than devot- 
ing the afternoons to it because the natives like to do most of their 
traveling in the early part of the day. We can report 1,284 individuals 
treated, and 1,050 treatments and dressings, a total of 2,334 calls at 
the dispensary in the nine months. The total received for this class 
is $243.56, of which $35.00 was from Europeans. This last is small 
in proportion to the work done, but as a large proportion was for 
government officials it was thought best not to render an account. The 
health of those at the station has been for the most part good. 

BATANGA STATION 

This station is the door to the interior stations. From this 
receiving port were sent last year over 2,000 one-man loads. 
It is hardly possible for one unfamiliar with pioneer work to 
imagine the long files of carriers who went out with these 
loads, made up of necessities and repacked to the 60-pound 
limit. 

Here, too, is the station treasury. And all the missionaries 
coming and going to the West Africa Mission pass through 
Batanga, where they are entertained as long as need be. 

EVANGELISTIC— 

The three churches in the Batanga district, Ubenji, Batanga and 
Kribi, have had a year of growth. Ninety-one persons, who have 
passed through at least two years of probation and instruction, have 
been received into church membership; 65 little children have been 
baptized. These churches are self-supporting with the exception of 
Ubenji; this church is in a district rich in bamboo and in the palm leaf 
used for thatching, and should be self-supporting in time. Four can- 
didates for the ministry have been under instruction by Mr. Good; 
they have been faithful, have progressed and have been helpful in 
the church work of the district. 

EDUCATIONAL.— 

The station school under Mr. Sutz, who has also oversight of from 
seven to nine village schools, has had two terms, covering seven 
months, with an enrollment of 164 pupils and an average attendance 



WEST AFRICA— EFULEN 61 

of ioo. One village school was unable to withstand Catholic oppo- 
sition. The progress of the boys has been satisfactory. 

The girls' school has grown under the care of the ladies of the 
6tation. Sixty odd girls, with an average attendance of somewhat 
less, have been under the discipline of this school. 

Mrs. Good has had a sewing class with the women at Waterfall. 
This class gave opportunity for Christian instruction, and was a 
strong influence for good. 

Very deep and very urgent has been the need of a doctor at this 
station. 

EFULEN STATION 

EVANGELISTIC— 

From the time of the awakening, three or four years ago, until 
the present, the interest in the Gospel has not slackened. It is the 
Lord's doing, and it is marvelous in our eyes. We do not put up the 
church walls any more, for if we do we are sure to have a large 
crowd and to have to take them down, that those outside may see and 
hear. Last April at communion time Efulen hill was a veritable bee- 
hive. The congregation numbered 2,252; hundreds had to sit outside. 
These large numbers come from towns farther and farther away, 
some as far as 80 miles, sleeping three or four nights on the road. 

There has been an average attendance at the Sunday morning ser- 
vice of 870. During communion season we have some very fine pre- 
paratory services. At the final meeting on Monday after the April 
communion, there were 1,125 people present, many of whom had been 
here the entire preceding week. 

Of the number of new converts there have been enrolled during 
the year in the beginners' class 725, making an enrollment in that 
class of 1,983. There are many more to be enrolled, but they must 
wait at least three months to settle all old scores and as a test to see 
how faithful they will be. 

From this advanced class 113 were accepted for baptism and this 
gives Efulen Church a membership of 387. 

Along with the growth in numbers there is greater growth in giv- 
ing. The last year the gifts amounted to $374-95, while this year they 
reached $575.50. These figures do not show all the freewill offerings 
which the Christians have made toward the building of chapels or 
the work put on them. 

Since last mission meeting we have divided the field so that people 
will not have to go so far to meetings. Two of our Efulen boys, who 
have been studying for years for the ministry, have finished their 
theological course and are placed at two points. Menge me Mve is at 
Alum, about 15 miles east of here, and is doing fine work. He 
is away so much that his wife, also an earnest worker, says that she 
has no husband these days. The house which the people built there 
at their own expense and which looked large then, looks small today 
when we see the hundreds who come to hear the Word. The audi- 
ences range from 200 to 1,000 and more. They are now making free- 
will offerings towards building a larger house. 

Licentiate Nlata Bikom is at Zingi, about 30 miles west of Efulen. 
He is one of the first two licensed natives in the interior and the first 
among the Bulu, and we are proud of him. 

We have at present, besides the two preaching places named above, 
15 evangelists out at various points preaching the Gospel, only two of 
whom receive more than $2.50 per month. Many of these are doing 



62 WEST AFRICA— EFULEN 

an excellent work, as is shown by the fact that people continue to come 
in from those points to be enrolled. Some of them are away off 
among other tribes, which means a great deal to a Bulu, without one 
of their own tribe with them. It takes courage, and some of them 
suffer hardships for the Gospel's sake. Several speak of suffering 
hunger and of being persecuted. Some speak of the dangerous streams 
they have to cross where one could easily lose his life. Some of these 
evangelists have brought converts in from these distant towns, espe- 
cially in Ntum, who otherwise would have been too timid to come so 
far. The church of Efulen has spent about $270 in just such work 
alone the last year. 

The Ntum tribe, to the south of us, is awakening. From places 
where we had sent evangelists before and where there had been little 
response, they are pleading for someone to preach to them. 

Visiting and advising with the women who come for collection 
Sundays and communion has been pleasurable and profitable. The 
women's meeting at such times, and the girls' meeting the other Sun- 
days of the month, have been well attended. Extensive town visitation 
among the women has not been possible under existing conditions. 
Visits have been made to some of the more distant towns, and more 
frequent calls upon those nearby. Classes were held half the year for 
ignorant or backward women of the two catechumen classes. 

EDUCATIONAL.— 

The fact that our Station school continues to grow though we have 
not had a German teacher, speaks well for our native assistants. _ Dur- 
ing the entire year it has been without a regular teacher and in the 
hands of anyone who could be spared from other pressing work. Had 
it not been for our splendid corps of teachers our school would have 
suffered very much. 

The enrollment in the first term of Station school was 365, "72 of 
whom were boarders. The second term there were 385 on the roll and 
140 of them were boarders. We had a separate teacher for every class 
in both Bulu and German schools, and most of these had had training. 
The five teachers in the German school were graduates. Most of our 
teachers are men of fine Christian character. 

Last vacation we had 18 village schools in session, and now 21. 
The Ntum tribe, which formerly did not care much for schools, now 
are calling for them, chiefly because the Christians there are wise 
enough to see that the schools strengthen the work of God. For this 
reason we trv to pick out the best Christian boys we can find as 
teachers for these schools. Our first German class of this year gradu- 
ated at Elat recently and now they are free for teaching. We have 
placed five of them in the village schools and this means a higher 
standard for these schools. A higher grade of teachers will be a 
greater expense, but it will also mean better education for our boys, 
who are to be leaders in years to come. 

The tuition from these village schools for the year amounted to 
$267.90, which was $49 more than the expenses for the same. Besides 
this tuition the boys have built five houses during the year at no 
expense to the Mission. 

The Girls' School has had a slight increase in numbers over last 
year, the first term having 78 as its high-water mark, and the second 
71, as compared to 26 and 54 of the previous year. The average 
attendance was about 45 or 50. An improvement in native teachers was 
one of the school's advantages for the year. Three of them were our 
best graduate teachers, who attended faithfully to their duties and_ 
showed an interest in their work. There were about 30 boarders on 



WEST AFRICA— EL AT 63 

the hill each term. These worked as usual in the gardens, planting, 
peanuts, cassava, corn and plantains. 

Besides plain sewing, some of the more advanced learned to do 
simple embroidery very nicely and were also instructed in machine 
sewing. Our aim is not to train the girls above their station and so 
make them dissatisfied and lazy, but to train them to be a help to their 
husbands and to make a beginning towards advancement. 

INDUSTRIAL.— 

The problem of building here is difficult : the sand must be carried 
from the river, trip stone must be carried and broken, the white ant- 
proof posts must be carried from the forest, the cement and iron from 
the beach (56 miles) and the lumber sawed by hand. All this has 
necessitated laborers, and Efulen has employed a yard force of more 
than 40 men to do this work. They have also been used for carrying 
personal effects, whereas it would have been difficult to secure enough 
carriers to meet the demands in any other way. The transporting of 
the cement and iron would have been practically impossible but for 
this force. Eight carpenters have helped in the work on the dormitory 
and beds for the same. 

There were a large number of school boys as boarders who have 
been used in grading for the new school buildings carrying sand and 
stone and in planting plantains in the cocoa and rubber plantations, 
also in caring for them, besides the usual care of the Station premises. 

During the year a new dwelling house has been erected, primarily 
for single missionaries. The work on this has been done by our yard 
force and the carpenters. The carpenters' class has been continued 
through the year, and one of the seven apprentices has completed 
his course. 

It is very evident that agricultural and industrial men are sorely 
needed to help with the improvement of the land. 

MEDICAL.— 

Owing to the lack of sufficient Station forces and necessary equip- 
ment, the medical work has been greatly restricted. The dispensing of 
medicines has been made from a small and inconvenient building for 
the storing of the same. Operating has been deferred until a more 
convenient season, or has taken place in the open under conditions 
most trying to the soul of a physician. Nevertheless, operations of 
various kinds, ranging from cataract and elephantiasis to the smallest 
minor cases of surgery, have taken place. 

Medical cases of all degrees of severity have been numerous, and 
although the great amount of sickness has been deplored, we rejoice 
to see that the people are gaining more confidence in the white man's 
medicine, as shown bv the increased demand for it. The receipts for 
the past eleven months amount to $240.00. The valuable services of 
the native medical assistant have relieved in a great measure the strain 
upon the missionary, and added much to the effectiveness of the 
medical work done, as the physician was compelled to be away much 
of the time during the earlier part of the year. 

ELAT STATION 

EVANGELISTIC— 

Three hundred and fifty-one adults have been received into mem- 
bership upon confession of faith in Jesus Christ, 47 little ones have 



64 . WEST AFRICA— EL AT 

been baptized, making a total adult membership of 712. Of this 
number 39 have been suspended and 14 debarred from the Communion 
table, leaving 673 in good standing. The attendance at the Elat Church 
has ranged from 500 on an ordinary Sabbath in vacation time to 5,200 
on a quarterly Communion day during the term of school. The num- 
bers confessing Christ have been, at Elat and the various evangelistic 
sub-centres, 3,322 — an average of more than nine persons a day. The 
average attendance at Sunday-school has been 1,835, the numerous 
classes of a Sunday morning calling for all persons fit to teach, and 
filling every nook and corner whether fit or not. 

The Nsamba, which meets once a week "for doctrine, for reproof, 
for correction, for instruction in righteousness," includes all the church 
members and all those within a year of membership, and numbers 
1,142, of whom 842 have been received during the year. The proper 
shepherding of the increasing numbers, many of them scattered, some 
of them as far as 150 miles distant, and all of them very partially 
instructed and in circumstances of great trial and temptation, is already 
a serious problem in the absence of enough qualified natives to go and 
stay where needed. The maintaining of regular services by evangelists, 
however, at such points as Mone Ko, Nlup Esa, and Mejape Mebae 
have been meeting the need in part. 

Four candidates for the ministry are under care of Elat Church 
session, and at least three others, well advanced in preparatory study, 
have expressed a desire. 

The total amount of collections has been $1,437. A new church, 
to accommodate 4,000 people and costing $825.00 so. far as completed, 
has been erected. 

The church has supported 19 regular evangelists in the out-lying 
country since January, together with the four candidates for the minis- 
try doing evangelistic work during their vacation intervals. Seventeen 
of the evangelists have been so located as to work with the village 
school teachers, thus making doubly strong evangelistic centres and 
giving to both the teacher and the preacher joint responsibility in the 
results of the work. These results have been such as the localizing 
of the work, the imparting of better instruction to inquirers and the 
gathering up and enrollment of the scattered ones interested. 

It has been seen that the evangelists can be carefully selected by the 
sessions and instructed in a way that will fit them for their work and 
make them wonderfully usable by God. Thirteen consecutive weeks 
immediately preceding the holidays of last year, Mr. Fraser was 
instructing 44 evangelists — six from Efulen, 18 from Lolodorf and 20 
from Elat — with a view to meeting their immediate needs. In the 
month of June, when all of Elat's evangelists excepting Meva's, who 
was away in Yebekolo country, returned with their trophies for Com- 
munion, they were detained one week for various instructions and devo- 
tions to further meet their needs in the midst of their active campaign. 
The experience of Elat confirms the belief that the use and training 
at intervals of such material as is thus on hand, is God's own way of 
dealing at present with the emergency created by His blessing upon 
the work and presented by the rapidly opening doors in Kamerun 
interior. 

Closely connected with the evangelistic enterprises is the training 
of a ministry. The theological class of seven candidates — two from 
Efulen and five from Elat — was in session, instructed by Mr. Fraser, 
during 16 weeks beginning in February. 

Considerable itinerating has been done by the missionaries. General 
inspection of village schools, oversight of the evangelists and direct 
evangelistic effort, are supplementary and have gone hand in hand. 



WEST AFRICA— EL AT 65 

The ladies of the Station have done a good deal of village visitation 
and several times, singly or in twos, they have gone out and stayed 
days in a community to cultivate the acquaintance and spiritual welfare 
of the people. 

In the settlement of lepers, where the government has segregated 
these afflicted people, a service has been held almost every Sunday 
morning. A goodly number of these poor people have confessed 
Christ, and all of them have welcomed a friendly call and Gospel mes- 
sage of cheer and instruction. There has been an average attendance 
of about 75. They have begun on monthly collection days to give out 
of their chastened hearts and their penury. 

EDUCATIONAL.— 

The schools, under care of Mr. Schwab after his arrival in Febru- 
ary, have been well attended. The number of pupils enrolled in 
the Station school has been about 1,000. There have been two terms 
of four months each. In the Bulu department, over which Mrs. 
McCleary presided, normal training was given one hour each morning, 
after which the members of the class exercised their gifts in teaching, 
thus rendering valuable service as well as getting the benefit of practice. 
The Bulu branch of school is graded in a curriculum which requires 
two to three years of study before advancement into the German 
department. Total receipts of tuition from boys of the Bulu branch 
have been 1,401 marks or $236.00, each boy paying one mark first term 
and one and a half marks second term. This department has been 
better than self-supporting; 225 Bulu bovs, including those of the 
German department, confessed Christ during the year. 

The German branch of school, in which Mr. Neal presided until the 
coming of Mr. Schwab, ran along beside the Bulu for the same length 
of time. First semester 354 were enrolled, second semester 408, and 
in harmony with the curriculum prescribed by the German govern- 
ment. The course in German covers five years. Sixteen were gradu- 
ated. The German department yielded 1,143 marks tuition, or $274 each 
pupil paying one mark first term, one and a half marks second term, 
and it has been self-supporting. 

Village schools have run two terms of eight weeks each. There 
were 51, located at strategic points, the enrollments being respectively 
3,666 and 3,564. The village schools are preparatory to the Station 
school and are locally evangelistic — primarily so. Little fellows, moved 
by a desire for knowledge, walk as much as eight miles to and from 
school each day, and manage to find the 12 cents tuition. The most 
distant school from Elat has been 145 miles east. The total amount 
of tuition for the two terms was $867.00. The village schools have 
been self-supporting, there being a deficit, however, of $12.00 the 
second term. The schools, dotting the country like stars, are mighty 
evangelistic centres of influence. 

The Girls' School, under care of Miss Eick and Mr. Johnston, has 
been developed and popularized. As many as 200 girls have been in 
the school; of these as many as 89 have been in the dormitory. It is 
significant that almost all of the girls who were in the dormitory 
expressed in their second term their desire to be Christians. In the 
village schools there have been girls and women to the number of 86. 

The school to the lepers may be mentioned by itself. By request 
of the government, near whose station the leper camp is located, a 
school has been running since January. The government assisted in 
the gathering of material for the building, and our Station placed a 
teacher. The school is made free to the pupils, of whom 45 have 

(5) 



66 WEST AFRICA— ELAT 

been enrolled. Some of them have reached the point of reading the 
gospels. 

INDUSTRIAL.— 

During the first semester 300 boys, second, 250 were at work on the 
place under direction of Mr. Hope. Their labor has been mostly in 
the gardens. Wet seasons precipitate a contest between boys and 
weeds. About 4,000 plantains were set, four acres of corn, one and a. 
half acres of Mekabos (Elephant Ear), two acres of cassava. Abo'ut 
one-twelfth of the food consumed by the boarders was raised on the 
place. Food famine followed when the outside supply failed at times, 
but the threatened interruption to school was averted by patience on 
the part of the boarders and the efforts of the Station. Two hundred 
and fifty dollars in cash accrued from the work of the boys, and food 
from the gardens to the value of $100. Worth of the boys' work for 
the general up-keep of the Station was unknown, but it was consider- 
able. Not all the work of the boarders was agricultural. They did 
much toward the building of the new church, replacing the work shops 
burned in March, re-roofing the German school house and Marysville 
College and erecting a temporary school building for the girls. The 
girls boarders helped in the gardens and in caring for the rubber 
plantation. Mrs. Hope, Miss Eick and Mrs. Schwab taught the girls, 
sewing parts of certain days of the week. 

The presence of the Frank James Industrial Plant, "under direction 
of Messrs. Hope and Grieg, at Elat, of course swelled the size of the 
Station with young men of somewhat mature calibre, and furnished 
many good helpers in church work as well as building undertakings 
and doing tailoring for the community, it attracted to the Station 
many purchasers, among whom were government officials, merchants 
and soldiers. 



FRANK JAMES INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

The past year has been one of misfortune in several ways. The 
first of March a fire swept away the carpenter shops, burning up most 
of the tools and the material on hand. The shops were built of bark 
and mats, and very little was saved. The loss of $i,43S was insured 
by the Board, which saved the class from entire loss. 

In December Mr. Hope and Mr. Greig went down to bring up from 
the beach the new traction engine, with saw mill and steam planer — 
the first heavy machinery to come into this part of the world. In 
eleven days the engine was set up and wagons ready to leave. On 
January nth they left, with the 15 tons of machinery, for Elat. For 
a few days the work was extremely hard and progress difficult. The 
roads were soft and many times the engine broke through the crust 
into mud beneath or into cave-ins. In 12 days they made 35 miles, 
when they went through a defective bridge over Zambe Anen. Every 
precaution necessary had been taken, but there was a rotten stick they 
did not find and they went through, narrowly escaping with their lives. 
In spite of these misfortunes the outlook is better than ever before. 

All instructors and helpers in all three of the classes are Bulu boys, 
products of the school. The reports from boys who have finished and 
gone elsewhere have been pleasing. One boy come in after finishing a 
three-year contract and deposited for safekeeping 1,287 marks. The 
total number of boys in school is 71. 



WEST AFRICA— MACLEAN 67 

Kamerun Chair Class. — (Chairs made of rattan.) 

The chair class has made advancement in numbers, kind and grade 
of work. During part of the year the class had 27 boys. More orders 
continue to come in than we have been able to fill. A number of chairs 
have been bought and taken to Europe. The government took two of 
our boys and started a class in the same work. The output of the 
class during the year was 2,430 marks, about $600. 

Tailor Class. — 

Soon after the year opened up, our Calabar tailor left us. This at 
first seemed a calamity, but it was a surprise to see how the Bulu boys 
were able to carry forward the work. During the year they have made 
several suits for business men returning to Europe. The class has had 
838 orders, has made over 860 garments consisting of suits, shirts and 
dresses, bringing into class 6,528 marks or $1,632, while running ex- 
penses have been 730 marks or $180. This of course does not include 
cost of cloth and material. The class has, however, been run at a 
profit. 

Carpenter Class. — 

The carpenter class, numbering 25 at the close of the year, has 
felt the misfortunes of the year more than the other classes. The 
wreck of the engine of course was a blow. The burning of the shops 
cut the class out of outside work that would have brought in a good 
profit. The rebuilding of Elat Church caused the class to lose a con- 
tract which we were offered, to build dwelling and storehouse for a 
business firm. In this was a splendid profit, while in the church there 
was little. The gross receipts of the class have been about $2,000. 

MEDICAL. — There has been no physician at this station 
most of the year. The sick have been cared for as well as 
might be, and medicines have been dispensed to the amount 
of $340 receipts. The statement should be underscored that a 
doctor was greatly needed and sorely missed. 



MACLEAN MEMORIAL STATION 

EVANGELISTIC— 

There has been a steady growth along all lines. Believers are stead- 
ily advancing from the classes of instruction and probation into the 
church. Our work has become to a remarkable degree intensive. 
A good quality of work is being done; gradual and permanent develop- 
ment is manifest. We need a revival of spirituality among our people, 
but we feel that the evangelistic work is moving along assured lines. 

The great bulk of the expenditure, the funds contributed by the 
churches of MacLean Memorial Station, has gone to the support of 
the native evangelists and Bible readers. 

Lam Church, besides supporting their stated supply, Bekalli Mendom, 
has since January supported a Bible reader on the lower waters of the 
Bekui near the coast, two Bible readers on the beach road beyond 
Bipindi, one among the Evusok people, one among the Mvele people, one 



68 WEST AFRICA— MACLEAN 

among the Bulu contingent of Lam Church, and for part of the time 
one near Bijuka. 

The Bulu branch of Lolodorf Church has engaged the time of four 
men, whose support has been amply supplied from their own contribu- 
tions. Ngua Ngiamba, a local evangelist, is in direct charge of the 
whole work; and three Bible teachers are stationed, one at Mabandi, 
one among the Fon people and one at Kungulu. The local branch of 
the Lolodorf Church has supported in its own work Zo Nzhonimo, our 
second local evangelist, who was at the Station until January and has 
since then been working among the Mvele people. Beginning in Janu- 
ary Bible readers have been maintained, one in the work in Muga and 
Nahinebot, one at Mbango, one on the Modoii road, one at Olama 
on the Nlong river. Bible readers have been maintained for part of 
this time at Mulumbu, Nkutu and at several places among the Yaunde 
people. Two other Bible readers have been supported from other funds 
among the Yeton people. Bands of school-boy evangelists have been 
maintained at various times by the churches. During July and August 
a band of two boys worked among the Yaunde people, and another 
among the Fon and Bene peoples. During January and February one 
band worked among the Mvele people, another among the Yaunde and 
Bene peoples, and a third among the Ngumba people near the coast. 

In the spring of the year, as the result of repeated requests 
of school boys of the Yeton tribe, two native evangelists were sent into 
that country. The Station consulted with the Yaunde officials under 
whose jurisdiction the Yeton people are, and found, them favorably 
disposed to our opening work in that territory, the more so as no 
missionaries had ever gone there. Mr. Emerson visited the region; he 
met with a hearty welcome on the part of the people, notably one of 
the chief headmen. 

A site for a village school was chosen and a clearing made before 
Mr. Emerson left. Hardly had he returned to the Station, however, be- 
fore we received word that the Catholic fathers had driven out our evan- 
gelists from the place where they had been working. This necessitated 
a full retreat or an advance, and it was decided that we should hold 
our ground. Accordingly Mr. Patterson was sent to make an investi- 
gation. Upon his report, it was decided that he and Mrs. Patterson 
should make an extended trip of investigation and exploration. Late in 
May they set out with 20 carriers for what proved to be a journey of 
something over 500 miles, covered in a matter of seven weeks. This 
journey was through an undeveloped country, by forest trail and among 
an exceedingly primitive people. The caravan preached the Gospel 
in about 300 villages. They worked back as far as the Sanaga River, 
where the grass country begins. They found, among the Yeton tribes 
which had been neglected up to the time of Mr. Emerson's visit a few 
weeks before, a wide and organized Catholic opposition. The evan- 
gelists had been disestablished and replaced by Catholic teachers. In 
the town where Mr. Emerson had placed the evangelists and from 
which they had been driven, a priest was met and an effort was made 
by Mr. Patterson to come to a frank understanding with him. 

Many people of the Yeton tribes were keen for schools, if they 
could be assured of government approval, which approval the Catholics 
had told them they could not hope for. In the town of Mbe Tama 
a school was built bv the people and formally opened before Mr. Pat- 
terson and his wife left the country. 

We now have two evangelists and two teachers working among the 
Yeton. They send favorable reports and urge the Mission to establish 
a permanent work in that country. 



WEST AFRICA—MACLEAN 69 

EDUCATIONAL.— 

Two terms both in the Station school and in the villages have been 
held since the last report, one of three months' duration and the other 
of four months. Both terms at the Station, the first with 343 pupds 
and the second with 447, show an advance over any previous term. 
Five boys accompanied Mr. Schwab to Elat for their last term and 
were graduated in May. All of them have since entered the service 
of the Mission as teachers. 

The term just opening has 20 village schools on its list, two of these 
in the Yeton country some 160 miles away. There are calls for still 
others, which we find it impossible to meet for want of the proper 
kind of teachers. Four young men have been sent into Yaunde for a 
year, having given up their class in school in order to do the Lord's 
work. They have been put upon evangelists' salaries and will be ex- 
pected to do fully as much evangelistic as school work. 

This educational work in Yaunde has met with strong opposition from 
the Catholics, who have paralleled our work in every place. Their 
long occupation of Yaunde and their intimate relations with the govern- 
ment coupled with their intrigues and free schools, have given them 
an advantage over us ; and yet we have made some headway. One 
school, that at Olama, is more than an average school and has met with 
the governor's favor. 

Owing to feeling on the part of the station that there is a 
lack of definiteness in our educational aim, it was thought that 
our work needed some more definite goal. To this end we 
decided on the following five-fold aim for our schools : 

1. To put the Bible in the hands of the people. 

2. To train up workers for every branch of our work. 

3. To fit the people for the life they now live and will live. 

4. To meet the government requirements. 

5. To meet the competition of competing bodies. 

One likes to report pleasant things, but this would not be a 
complete report if it left out some of the unpleasant features 
cf our work. The loss of our head teacher, seven graduate 
teachers and several student teachers, through sin and the lust 
for "goods" ; the changed attitude of many of our pupils, desir- 
ing the German language rather than the Word of God, so that 
very little more than half of them attend religious meetings, 
even under compulsion ; numerous stealing palavers ; and some 
lack of respect for and confidence in those over them — these 
are things, perhaps due to a transitional stage, that seek an ex- 
planation and call for a solution, nor can they be atoned for by 
mere increase of numbers. 

Girls' School. — 

The two terms of the Girls' School had an attendance of 50 and =;4 
respectively; the first term under Mrs. Schwab's supervision, the 
second term under Mrs. Hummel's. Besides the regular school work, 
Miss Hartwig one term and Mrs. Patterson the next, taught the girls 



70 WEST AFRICA— METET 

sewing one entire afternoon a week and the advanced girls three 
mornings a week. The latter were taught to make children's dresses 
and to run the machine, and were greatly interested in cross-stitch and 
other handwork. Mrs. Emerson had charge of the girls' dormitory 
during the entire year. The last term there were 33 boarders. 

MEDICAL.— 

Up until May the medical work was under Miss Hartwig and since 
then under Dr. Lehman, Mr. Patterson acting as physician in the 
absence of the one in charge. During the year there were 1,364 dis- 
pensary patients, and in the last five weeks there were 40 in the 
hospital. Under Miss Hartwig's management the hospitals were full 
most of the time and the medical work well cared for. The total 
cash receipts for the year were $356.10. 

METET STATION 

In reporting for this newest of the Africa stations we can do 
no better than to quote from the report received : 

EVANGELISTIC— 

At the beginning of the year Presbytery was asked to appoint a 
committee to organize a church here. The committee met on March 
9th, and after examining a number of applicants agreed that ten were 
worthy of membership, and so Metet Presbyterian Church was born. 
On Sunday, March 10th, we had the pleasure of seeing the largest 
crowd (something over 1,000) that has ever been gathered together 
here. Ten members were baptized. Catechumens were examined and 
advanced. At present there are 266 in the "Esulan" and 18 in the 
"Nsamba" classes. In July one member was received on confession 
and three bv letter from Elat. Our first collection amounted to marks 
18.55, and on each Sunday since the amount has steadily increased. 

Sunday-school is divided into ten classes, five of which are taught 
by missionaries and the others by our school teachers. 

A number of itinerating trips have been made by different members 
of the station to the adjacent tribes, and in January, 1912, an outpost 
was established among the great Yebekole tribe at a point about mid- 
way between Akonolinga and Abong Mbang, facing on the govern- 
ment telephone road which connects these two stations. 

/Vfter several days of scheming and planning, the headman agreed 
to sell us a small strip of land and to send his son to Akonolinga to 
have the "big governor cut the palaver and witness the sale." 

The building problem was quite a palaver, as the houses had to be 
made entirely of bamboo, there being no bark available, and bush-rope 
had to be carried for a long distance. One old headman promised to 
make mats, but only after I had agreed to give him a German rooster 
was I able to get him to make good his promise. 

On a second visit to the station 65 pupils were found in school. 
One chief in a town across the river Nlon promised a big house for 
a school and one for the teacher, if the missionary would provide the 
latter. Also would see to it that a lot of boys, possibly 200, would 
attend. 

The attendance on the services held in the school house on Sundays 
still continues good, reaching an average for the whole time of about 
265. 



WEST AFRICA— STATISTICS 71 

A school boy is stationed at the school house at Obut, where he has 
been holding regular services and spoken to carriers who stop there to 
rest. Simple and untutored, this boy in his earnest way tells the crowds 
the story of the Cross and has been instrumental in sending many to 
our schools, as well as the church services. 

EDUCATIONAL.— 

Besides the station schools, one for boys with an attendance of 
about 250, and one for girls with about 12 pupils, there are under the 
supervision of this station ten station schools taught by former pupils. 
Requests have come from far and near in the regions of the east and 
southeast for schools, but it has been deemed wise to try and combat 
the tide of Romanism to the north for the present. 

INDUSTRIAL.— 

The school boys are kept busy out of school hours, cleaning the 
grounds, planting peanuts, corn, micaboes, plantains, paw-paws, ban- 
anas, pears and other varieties of fruit trees. Two new dormitories, 
two servants' houses, one large plank-drying house and one small 
workhouse have been built, at which the boys have assisted. Bushrope 
chairs and stools have been made, carpentry taught, and soap made 
from the palm oil. 

MEDICAL.— 

The crying need is for a hospital where cases can be properly 
treated. Many are coming who before have been very superstitious. 
"Please give me some medicine" is the continual cry that rings in one's 
ears as he travels along the road. A small parcel of medicine and a 
kindly word may result in bringing some soul nearer to the Master. 



STATISTICS 



Men missionaries — 

Ordained 

Medical 

Lay 

Women missionaries — 

Married women 

Single women 

Ordained native preachers 

Native teachers and assistants 

Churches 

Communicants 

Added during the year 

Number of schools 

Total in boarding and day-schools 

Scholars in Sabbath-schools 

Contributions 

* Partial report. 



1911-12 1912-13 



15 


17 


4 


6 


8 


10 


21 


23 


6 


7 


*4 


5 


*II2 


252 


*i6 


15 


*4,30Q 


4,144 


*I,520 


917 


97 


125 


6,545 


9,56o 


♦4,962 


8,788 


>i 1,107 


$14,474 



100 



MISSIONS IN 

CHINA 




E. C. BRIDGMAN. Maps,, new york 



MISSIONS IN CHINA 
HAINAN MISSION 

Kiungchow (including Hoihow) : 3 miles from north coast of is- 
land; occupied as a Station in 1885. Missionaries — H. M. McCandliss, 
M.D., and Mrs. McCandliss, Miss Henrietta Montgomery, Rev. C. H. 
Newton and Mrs. Newton, Rev. W. M. Campbell and Mrs. Campbell, 
Miss Alice H. Skinner, Rev. George D. Byers and Mrs. Byers, Rev. 
F. P. Gilman and Mrs. Gilman. 

Nodoa: 60 miles southwest of Kiungchow; work opened 1884. 
Missionaries — Mrs. M. R. Melrose, Rev. William J. Leverett, Rev. P. 
W. McClintock and Mrs. McClintock, and Herman Bryan, M.D. 

Kachek: 60 miles south of Kiungchow; occupied as a Station in 
1900. Missionaries— Miss Kate L. Schaeffer, S. L. Lasell, M. D., and 
Mrs. Lasell, Rev. David S. Tappan, Jr., Rev. J. F. Kelly, M.D., and 
Mrs. Kelly. 

Furloughs : Rev. and Mrs. W. M. Campbell, S. L. Lasell, M.D. 

Rumors of war and the Consul's order that the women and 
children must seek places of safety disturbed our work to some 
extent ; but not till the day after Christmas, when the battle of 
Kiungchow was fought, did we really appreciate what war 
meant. From that time the schools in Kiungchow were closed 
till the end of the year, and the Hoihow Hospital was filled 
with refugees, school girls and Christians, who brought all 
their possessions as well as themselves, and placed them under 
the protection of the foreigner. 

In February the Bradt party came and brought us much in- 
spiration. We wish to record his very much appreciated and 
exceedingly helpful visit to Ka-check. Dr. Reherd was a per- 
sonal friend of some of the missionaries, and being from Iowa, 
had a special message for Hainan. The fact that the robber 
bands in the interior prevented him from visiting Nodoa, was 
the only disappointment in a visit which was a blessing to all 
who saw them. 

"Too good to be true," some one said when Dr. Lowrie's 
cable came; but true it was, and Dr. Lowrie not only came to 
Hainan, but visited each station, helping solve difficult prob- 
lems. We, as a mission, wish to record our heartfelt thanks 
to him for his visit and help in so many ways. 

This has been a wonderful year for our work, but the great- 
est blessing has been the increasing interest in the Gospel all 
over Hainan. Each station reports not only a lack of both 
foreign and native workers, but a lack of seating room for the 

73 



74 HAINAN— KIUNGCHOW 

crowds who come to hear the Gospel and a lack of accommo- 
dation for the pupils who are coming in increasing numbers to 
our schools. 

KIUNGCHOW STATION 
EVANGELISTIC— Hoihow.— 

The evangelistic services are held in Hoihow in connection with 
the hospital under Dr. and Mrs. McCandliss, in the street chapel under 
the direction of Mr. Gilman, who also conducted the Sunday services 
in the Jeremiassen Memorial Church, where the Sunday-school is 
under the superintendence of Dr. McCandliss. Besides, much has been 
done by Mrs. McCandliss and her Bible women for the women of 
Hoihow and for the leper village, which she attends each week. 

The street chapel is in the main street of Hoihow and is well 
located in the front of a large shop. Here every afternoon and many 
evenings preaching services are held which are well attended by men 
from the town and surrounding villages and from all parts of Hainan. 

There are 56 baptized communicants in the unorganized church, 
and they are very faithful in their attendance. The large Jeremiassen 
Church has each Sunday an attendance which averages over 300. 
During the year six have been received on confession of faith and 
there are many applicants for baptism. 

Kiungchow. — 

The evangelistic work connected with the Kiungchow Church con- 
sists of the church services and prayer meetings, the street chapel 
meetings, itinerating, and the meetings held at the ten country centers 
for Christian gatherings, and efforts for woman's work. 

In Kiungchow, the Sunday services are attended by the students in 
the schools and by the local Christians and their friends, and number 
about 250. Mr. Newton has had charge of these services and also of 
the mid-week prayer meeting. A Christian Endeavor is held each 
Sunday evening. 

In the Kiungchow street chapel Mr. Byers meets four times weekly 
those who come in from the streets, and has had many interesting 
services explaining Christian truth from wall pictures. In these 
services he has had the help of his school boys and of visiting 
evangelists. 

Itineration and Out-station Work. — 

The evangelistic work in the out-stations continues to show most 
gratifying progress. The whole number received into the churches of 
Hoihow and Kiungchow during the year, including those from the 
immediate vicinity and from the out-stations is 73, bringing the total 
membership up to 260. 

The Christians living in the country may at present be conveniently 
grouped into ten sub-centers. 

WOMAN'S WORK.— 

A weekly prayer meeting has been well attended and also the 
evening Bible class, which studied the Epistles of Paul, the Acts, and 
the Epistles of John. They were diligent in committing the Psalms, 
the First Epistle of John and other Scripture verses. 

The work for the lepers has been most encouraging. One Bible 



HAINAN— KIUNGCHOW 75 

woman has worked faithfully with Mrs. McCandliss, going regularly 
each Monday to the leper village. There are five baptized lepers, and 
a number have asked for baptism. The teacher (a leper) has done 
good work in the school, conducted in a mat shed outside his hut. 

Aside from the daily house to house work, the Bible women have 
gone to a number of the surrounding villages. Much has also been 
done by the women of the Hoihow Church to bring their neighbors 
and friends under the influence of the truth, and the prospects for the 
future are very bright. 

The first of April a school for women was opened, and ten women 
have been enrolled for a two years' course The women thus far 
enrolled are from Ang-zin, Ku-ciu, Vun-sio, Hoihow and Lui-chow. 

EDUCATIONAL.— 

The Paxton Training School for Christian Workers. — 

The beginning of the Revolution had caused unrest in the school, 
but on Christmas the prospect of an approaching battle at Kiungchow 
led some of the schoolboys to volunteer to go with the attacking force, 
and one of them was present at the fight that took place on December 
26th. After this it was thought best to close the school, and two student 
teachers were the only ones that remained and continued their studies. 

The school was reooened at the beginning of the spring term, on 
March 1st, and by the 15th of May there was an enrollment of 74 
pupils. The attendance has been unusually good. The students have 
made good progress and have paid more for board and tuition than 
formerly, amounting to a total of $606.46 Mex. 

A. J. Pitkin Memorial School for Girls. — 

There has been an enrollment of 75 with an average attendance of 
6=;. The students have been most faithful in their work. The 13th of 
June will be a red-letter day in the historv of this school, for then 
five of the oldest pupils will graduate, as the first who have completed 
the present High School course. Three have united with the church 
during the year, and there are several applicants for baptism. 

MEDICAL WORK.— Hoihow Hospital— 

This hospital has been opened during the entire year. 
Notable among the surgical operations was that of a man with an 
immense cartilaginous tumor attached to the ribs to the left of the 
breast-bone. It took an hour to chisel the mass free from the ribs. 
The patient made a good recovery. A Chinese lady with an immense 
carbuncle on her back, rented a room, was operated on, and was so 
much pleased with her cure, that she gave, in addition to the fees, 
$100, which is, for Hoihow, quite a good sum of money. 

The religious work in the hospital consists of a daily morning ser- 
vice with preaching for the out-patients who attend. Then, every 
afternoon, all the in-patients who are able, are collected in classes in 
the wards, and taught a catechism or other doctrinal book. Besides 
this, the women and others have been taught by Mrs. McCandliss in 
an evening class. 

The out-patient attendance was 10,606 

Maternity cases 16 

Serious surgical operations 92 

Total in-patients, including, of course, the last 

two items 451 

Average number of days in ward 35 

Total receipts $4,076 35 Mex. 



76 HAINAN— NODOA 

NODOA STATION 

EVANGELISTIC— 

We now have sometimes twice our chapel full for Sunday morn- 
ing service. Other rooms are pressed into service and the worship 
ascends in as many dialects. On a rainy day, when we can crowd 
together into our little chapel, we open with one dialect, preach in 
another, and sing in five. The Lord Himself alone knows in how 
many tongues the heart-prayers ascend to Him. 

By the sea, from Lim-ko District City to Hau-mong and No-Bseh 
and the coast, there are 25 Christians and ten catechumens. A 
day's journey southeast from them is another group, who meet some- 
times for a polyglot service of a Sunday at the Notia Chapel, some- 
times at a tea-house near the center of where they live, or again at 
the home of one of their number. Both groups have suffered perse- 
cution. At the sea they have lost property, been haled before magis- 
trates and been beaten for their beliefs. Still they come. It is 
not on account of change of government that they come to us, for 
that has meant nothing to them. It is not understood over there, — 
persecution goes on just the same, but under new forms, in its ignor- 
ance. Now they are threatened with the Manchus, and now again 
with the Revolutionists, both simple bug-bear names to the simple 
people about them, but as bug-bear names, good for persecution. 

Our Hainanese Christians live in the District of Dio-vai (Chieng- 
mai), and most of them live in villages clustered around the market 
town of Tai-foner and from there to the south near Au-min, and to 
the east towards Fah-hih. They have had a very hard year. 

The great event of the year in our church work has been the call 
extended by the No do a Church to Mr. Vang Deng-tin to be their 
pastor. It is the first call by a church in Hainan. Mr. Vang was 
ordained by Presbytery in June, and is the first native pastor in 
Hainan. He is a man little of stature, and of an humble, unassuming 
manner and spirit, but of very sound common sense; very reliable 
and of a calm, earnest spirit. He is a good preacher and a bright and 
careful student. 

We had 500 at services last "Big Sunday," distributed in three 
different rooms for service. We hope that by another year the Anna 
Roberts McLean Church, given by Mr. J. Milton Colton and named by 
him, will be ready for occupancy, so that we will be able to accommo- 
date the whole congregation in one room and have the inspiration of 
a large number worshipping at once. 

Women's Work. — 

Our Bible women number four, three of whom have spent alto- 
gether 360 days in the markets and near by villages. The fourth one 
is old and infirm and she can be seen daily in our compound, telling 
the story to patients in the hospital or with her picture scroll holding 
the attention of a crowd of idlers who have come in. 

We have in training one new Bible woman and she has proved 
herself very clever in interesting the women of her own clan in the 
Gospel. 

The Sunday classes have been so large that the question is where 
to hold them, and since we have changed the time of Sunday-school 
to directly after service, we manage to hold many more for the hour 
of study than we could formerly. 



HAINAN— NODOA 77 

EDUCATIONAL WORK. — Nodoa Boys' Boarding 
School. — 

We were this year quite swamped with applications, and though 
we did not keep an accurate account of the boys turned away, we esti- 
mate that for two boys admitted, one was turned away. The unsettled 
condition of the country seemed to have no effect on the applicants 
for admission. Seventy-two were enrolled. 

Thi9 year we graduate our largest class, there being five young 
men, who have completed the course. Of these, four are members of 
the church and are looking forward to Christian work, while the fifth 
one* is an applicant for baptism. The course of study which these 
boys complete is the equivalent of an academy course at home, and, 
in some branches, of the Freshman year in college. 

Nodoa Girls' Boarding School. — 

The spring term opened in April, and, even though there was an 
increase in the fees asked, many pupils asked to be taken in, but we 
were able to receive only 22 boarders and 14 day pupils, these quite 
filling both schoolroom and sleep ; ng-rooms. The town of Nodoa has at 
last opened its heart and gives us 14 pupils, while Nam-fong is also 
represented. Mandarin, Cantonese, Hainanese, Lim-ko and Hakka 
are the languages represented, Hakka having the largest following and 
being still the language of the school. 

Two girls were taken into the church during this year. 

MEDICAL WORK.— Mary Henry Hospital— 

During the year there have been 220 in-patients,' which is more 
than any year yet. 

Neither the war nor the plague has had any effect on the admissions. 
In fact there has been an increase of 15 per cent. 

As to religious work in the hospital, the matron is also a Bible 
woman as well as matron and teaches an hour in the morning and 
an hour in the afternoon. The assistants teach an hour in the morning. 
The physician has an evening class. The blind evangelist "talks doc- 
trine" to the ward patients in the morning and to the dispensary 
patients in the waiting-room in the afternoon. One of the other Station 
Bible women, when she is on the compound, brings her pictures and 
talks to the ward patients every morning. Being a very old woman it 
is perfectly proper for her to go into the men's wards as well as the 
women's. 

Ward Statistics 

Total admissions 220 

Males 137 Friends 89 

Females 83 Hakkas 95 

Hainanese 78 

Christians 51 Lim-ko 33 

Non-Christians 80 Miscellaneous 14 

Cured 164 

Died 6 

Improved (chronic cases) 35 

Refused to stay long enough to do any good 15 

Medical 155 Surgical 65 



78 HAINAN— KACHEK 

Dispensary. — 

The out-patients have numbered 1,750 first visits and 1,489 return 
visits ; while 2,053 came only to buv medicine. 

The two assistants have been trained in the use of the microscope, 
so that now they may be trusted to make a diagnosis of the following: 
round worms, hook worms, tuberculosis, leprosy, gonorrhea, opthalmia, 
malaria and tricocephalia dispar. They have not looked for the 
dysentery germ, for we rarely get a case, as we insist on absolute rest 
in bed, flat on the back and this they refuse to do. 

KACHEK STATION 

EVANGELISTIC WORK.— The station has been seriously 
handicapped on account of the smallness of the foreign force. 
Four months of the year one man was alone at the station, 
and no missionary has at any time been free to give his entire 
time to evangelistic work, though it is our most important and 
promising work. 

Our hospital chapel is entirely too small for our regular Sunday 
congregations, even in summer when all doors are open and verandah 
spaces occupied. At communion time, when the Christians come in 
froml the country, it does not give standing room for one half of 
those who attend. At our last communion we had an awning put up 
over the open court in front of the chapel, which accommodated half 
of the audience of 350. In bad weather it will be necessary to divide 
the congregation, unless we at once get an appropriation for a place 
of worship. Having no quarters for inquirers, the country people 
coming up for study at communion seasons greatly encroach upon the 
hospital wards, as well as upon the school. At the March communion, 
all the beds in the hospital were occupied as well as all benches, tables, 
desks and even floor space at the school. The inquirers are willing to 
undergo the discomfort of a 20 mile walk, sleep on the top of a school 
desk, eat their own rice and vegetables while here (the Station supplies 
only wood, salt and water to those who come) all this that they may 
have an opportunity to worship God and study His Word. In spite 
of these handicaps of lack of a missionary to oversee the work, lack 
of suitable lodgings, and lack of a proper assembly room, the past 
year has been in many respects the best in the history of the Station. 
Never before have there been such earnest crowds at communion, 
and at our regular services both in Ka-chek and in the villages. These 
results are due to the work of the Holy Spirit through the native 
evangelists and Christians. The Christians have decided to pray for 
1,000 catechumens this year, and have promised to spend a given num- 
ber of days each quarter in spreading the Gospel. 

At each communion we select a certain book of the Bible for study 
during the coming quarter. Each Christian and inquirer is expected 
to read the book through during the quarter. The selected book is 
also made the subject of evening prayers both in Ka-chek and the 
villages. Wednesday evening prayer meeting topics and Sunday 
sermons are also selected with reference to the book studied that 
quarter. When the Christians come in at communion time the classes 
review the quarter's work, and the Christians are questioned upon the 
book. 

Regular Sunday services have been held in the following centers. 
In Ngai-ciu District, Lok-lah, attendance, 30; Vang-ciu District, Tin- 



HAINAN— KACHEK 79 

tai, attendance, over 60; Vun-sio District, Deng-cilia, attendance, 15 
to 26; Deng-ang District, Liang-do-sang, 60 to 75, Cio-fo-hui, 40 to 60, 
Hai-bak-hui, 45 to 60; Ui-hong District, Doa-lou, 20 to 40, Ka-chek, 
lower market, 20. A branch of Hai-bak-hui has recently been started 
at Fo-voi in Deng-ang District with an attendance of 15 to 20. On 
alternate Sundays men are sent to the District City of Ui-hong, where 
services are held in the chapel. All of the above places, with the 
exception of Lok-lah and Tin-tai are supplied by men and older school 
boys leaving Ka-chek Saturday and returning Monday. 

EDUCATIONAL.— McCormick Boys' School— 

Enrollment. The total number of pupils enrolled the first term 
was 41, and the second term it is 66. 

Industrial Department. — 

It has been quite a problem to help poor but deserving boys to get 
an education. There was not sufficient work to give such boys an 
opportunity to earn their way. It was to meet this need that we 
opened this year an industrial department in the form of a vegetable 
garden. We had two vacant fields, abundance of fertilizer, a creek 
full of water the year round and strong boys to water the vegetables. 
Knowing that the customs of centuries were against students doing 
any manual labor, we were a little fearful as to the outcome. How- 
ever, our experiment has proven a great success and at present we 
grow all the vegetables needed to feed 66 boys. Four of the older 
boys, two of them last year honor boys, carry eight to ten loads 
of water from the creek and water the garden every morning. In 
addition one of the four teaches a class in arithmetic, another tends 
to school lamps, another goes out every other Sunday to the villages 
to preach, while the fourth pays for his rice and waters the garden to 
pay for his vegetables. Eight others of the larger boys pound all the 
rice used in the school. Of these eight, two are the junior teachers, who 
voluntarily consented to do the work, two to get a reduction of half 
the cost of their board because of poor parents, one is hospital assis- 
tant besides having an arithmetic class every other day, the other three 
pay $2.00 a month in addition to pounding rice. With the bran saved 
we feed four large pigs. When sold, these hogs should more than 
pay for any reduction in tuition granted to boys. The boys in the 
lower school are compelled to work one hour each day pulling up 
grass on the compound. The boys also assisted Mr. Tappan to dig 
two wells. 

Girls' Boarding School. — 

The opening of a Girls' Boarding School in Ka-chek Station, which 
has been postponed for a number of years, could be postponed no 
longer, as the requests from Christian men for a place to which to 
send their wives- and daughters for an education, have become more 
and more frequent and insistent. 

The school was opened on March 1st in the McCormick House, 
servants' quarters and additions. Twenty-four women and girls have 
thus far been admitted and half a dozen more have been declined for 
lack of room. 

MEDICAL WORK.— ' 

Dr. Lasell's absence attending China Council and early leave on 
furlough, with Dr. Kelly's late arrival in March, cut down the hospital 
work to six months' time. 



80 HAINAN— STATISTICS 

Nine thousand are recorded on the out-patient clinic and in-patients. 
Twenty-five of the latter were opium patients. 

Among the opium patients an old "kong," i. e., an old man, a 
"grand-pa," of 75 years came in and said that since he and his family 
had begun to worship God he wanted to quit the opium habit. He 
looked so frail and anemic that the odds were decidedly against him, 
and his courage and resolution appeared only pathetic and helpless 
against such a past. He had smoked opium for ten years and con- 
sumed as much as many a younger veteran of the habit. He had to 
take a long course of treatment, suffering much weakness, but slowly 
and gradually recovered strength and color and came off triumphant 
and praising God. 

STATISTICS 

1911-12 1912-13 

Men missionaries — 

Ordained 7 7 

Medical 4 4 

Women missionaries — 

Married women 6 8 

Single women 4 4 

Native teachers and assistants 55 49 

Churches 3 4 

Communicants 553 716 

Added during the year 100 181 

Number of schools 8 12 

Total in boarding and day-schools 220 398 

Scholars in Sabbath-schools 500 1,050 

Contributions $2,698 $3,506 



THE SOUTH CHINA MISSION 

Canton: capital of Province of Quangtung, on left branch of Choo- 
kiang River, about 70 miles from China Sea — a port city; occupied as 
a Station, 1845. Rev. H. V. Noyes, D.D., and Mrs. Noyes, Rev. A. A. 
Fulton, D.D„ and Mrs. Fulton, Rev. J. J. Boggs and Mrs. Boggs, M.D., 
Rev. W. D. Noyes and Mrs. Noyes, E. C. Machle, M.D., and Mrs. 
Machle, Mrs. J. G. Kerr, Miss Harriet N. Noyes, Miss E. M. Butler, 
Miss M. W. Niles, M.D., Miss M. H. Fulton, M.D., Miss H. Lewis, 
Miss E. A. Churchill, Miss L. Durham, Miss L. R. Patton, Miss Mary 
T. Bankes, Rev. James M. Henry and Mrs. Henry, Mr. Alex. G. Small 
and Mrs. Small, Miss Helen I. Stockton, Robert Ross, M.D., and Mrs. 
Ross. 

Shek Lung, out-station of Canton : Rev A. J. Fisher and Mrs. 
Fisher, Harry W. Boyd, M.D., and Mrs. Boyd, Rev. Geo. W. Mar- 
shall and Mrs. Marshall. 

Lien-chou : 125 miles northwest of Canton; occupied as a Station, 
1890. Rev. Reese F. Edwards and Mrs. Edwards, Rev. J. S. Kunkle, 
Miss Elda G. Patterson, Miss Hannah Kunkle and Rev. Paul J. Allured 
and Mrs. Allured. 

Yeung Kong: about 112 miles southwest of Canton; occupied as a 
Station, 1886. William H. Dobson, M.D., and Mrs. Dobson, Miss V. 
M. Wilcox, Rev. J. W. Creighton and Mrs. Creighton, Rev. Geo. D. 
Thomson and Mrs. Thomson, Miss Margaret S. Bliss. 

Ko-chau : about 183 miles southwest of Canton; occupied as a sta- 
tion, 1912. Rev. C. E. Patton and Mrs. Paitton. 

Death : Dr. Nan M. Latimer. 

Transfers: Rev. Geo. W. Marshall and Mrs. Marshall, from Lien- 
chow to Shek Lung ; Rev. Paul J. Allured and Mrs. Allured from Shek 
Lung to Lien-chow; Robert Ross, M.D., and Mrs. Ross, from Lien- 
chow to Shek Lung; Rev. C. E. Patton and Mrs. Patton from Yeung 
Kong to Ko-chau. 

Furloughs during the year : Dr. H. W. Boyd and Mrs. Boyd, Miss 
E. M. Butler, Miss Harriet N. Noyes, Miss Mary H. Fulton, M.D., 
Rev. W. D. Noyes and Mrs. Noyes, Rev. Reese F. Edwards and Mrs. 
Edwards, Robert Ross, M.D., and Mrs. Ross, Mrs. William H. Dobson, 
Miss V. M. Wilcox. 

The year 191 1 to 1912 was the one that was full of unrest 
and uncertainty, but in God's good providence no real harm 
came to any one of the American missionaries, though those 
who resided away from Canton were put to some inconveni- 
ence by having to move to Canton until the storm was over. 
In November the whole Yeung Kong contingent, advised by 
the Chinese leaders in the Church, left largely because of the 
uncertainty of the situation and not because of actual out- 
break. The Lien-chou Station was left to Mr. Kunkle, who 

83 



84 SOUTH CHINA 

bravely held the fort. He was able to do much in sheltering 
and feeding women and children who flocked to the Mission 
Compound for refuge when villages were burned in the con- 
flict between the government troops and the robbers who, de- 
serting their villages, fled to the hills. Ko-chau was not aban- 
doned until the United States Consul General urged it upon 
the representatives at that point. The same was true in re- 
gard to Sheklung, with the exception of one church building 
destroyed in the Shun Tak District in a clan feud, all mission 
property being left intact. After the return of Dr. Dobson to 
Yeung Kong the Mission Compound was the center of a battle 
between the government troops and robbers. There was a 
good opportunity to render service and win approval from 
those in power. Trie temporal abandonment of much of the 
work naturally was felt, though this effect was less 
than might have been feared, for as nearly as can be gathered 
the feeling of the Chinese towards the missionaries was even 
more friendly than before. Every courtesy that could be ex- 
tended was granted to them. Students who shortly before the 
outbreak were selling Bibles and portions reported that while 
in some regions men feared their coming and suggested that 
they find other places in which to operate, there were other 
places where the people were eager to buy, and these young 
colporteurs could scarcely hand the booklets out fast enough 
to suit the crowds. Of course these people thought the litera- 
ture was revolutionary, which it was, though in a somewhat 
different sense from what some of them thought. 

A remarkable feature of the change has been the sudden 
calling into public office of Christian men; men who are not 
ashamed of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. The pastor of the 
Second Church went back to Lien-chow to assist his country 
in putting down the robbers of those mountain fastnesses. In 
the very Yamen where several years ago he was beaten he 
came into office. Another man who was the Chinese dean of 
the Fati Theological College became one of the advisers of the 
new government in the Province of Kwangtung. A former 
preacher of Tai Leung became the District Governor of Shun 
Tak. The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the same 
province is the son of a Christian minister in Montreal. These 
are all Presbyterians, and the list does not include all that were 
called to office, nor does it include the students from our schools 
who served as public orators or that entered some of the lower 
offices, nor those who became soldiers. It is said 65 per cent, 
of the new officials are Christian men serving in Canton, be- 
cause they are considered men that can be trusted. 




Kochau, Canton, China. — Two colporteurs, selling and explaining Scriptures. — 

At times these men work in groups, again singly or in pairs. They aim to reach 
a market town on market days so as to catch the crowds, then visit the shops, 
one by one, on an off day, when the shopmen are more at leisure. Much of the 
pioneer work in outlying districts has been done by these men. 



SOUTH CHINA— CANTON 85 

CANTON STATION 

EVANGELISTIC WORK.— 

This work in the station was largely carried on during the year by 
Dr. A. A. Fulton, Rev. A. J. Fisher and Rev. W. D. Noyes. They 
report that the Revolution did not do as much harm as Halley's 
Comet and the openness of mind on the part of the Chinese was un- 
usual. Each made the ordinary trip as usual, with perhaps a few 
postponements. People flocked to the places of service and openings 
for the establishment of new places were more than the missionaries 
with their limited funds could enter, though thanks to a part of the 
Kennedy Fund several new chapels and churches were opened. Dr. 
A. A. Fulton had the joy of seeing a long-looked-forward-to dedica- 
tion of a large church building, and in Canton the rapid erection of 
the new First Church building. Mr. Fisher reports great eagerness on 
the part of many in different parts of his field. The opportunities are 
far too great for him unaided. With another missionary and proper 
Chinese associates a great section of country could be reached. In 
Shun Tak there is a desire for more harmony between the United 
Brethren London Mission and our own Mission. The London Mission 
gave up one of its chapels and both Presbyterian and United Brethren 
Missions are discussing the advisability of a withdrawal of one from 
one city and the other from another city so as to let one mission have 
the whole work in that given locality. 

The church leader conferences in each sub-field and a general 
conference in the summers of 191 1 and 1912 were largely attended and 
the results were good as far as could be ascertained. The meetings 
were helpful in the fellowship and in the discussion of problems that 
were facing the church. 

Dr. Fulton reports a year of strenuous endeavor and much 
encouragement. 

At a recent communion here (Canton) in the First Church, 13 were 
baptized, including three graduates of the First Degree. At the In- 
dependent Presbyterian Church here about 30 were baptized, including 
a man high in official position. Following communion in the first 
Church I visited my field in company with two native pastors, and we 
received 112 men and women on confession, and baptized 16 children. 
At some of my chapels we were crowded to seat communicants. At 
No Kat, one of my chapels in Yan Ping District, 30 men were baptized, 
and at Yeung Kiu 24 adults were baptized. We find the people very 
friendly and great doors are now wide open. They have a very high 
regard for America and Americans, and this is a very big asset that 
we must wisely and persistently foster. In this city (Canton) some 
soldiers tried to get up some excitement by cutting off heads of idols 
in the largest temple in the city, but it had no effect and idolatry is 
doomed. Onlv a few days ago the overthrow of idols in the temples 
in this city was advocated by a member of the Provincial Council, but 
it was decided to wait in the expectation that such worship will be 
abandoned speedily. I fully expect to see villages come over to the 
gospel. This is a glorious time to be alive, and to have 31 years of 
experience and to see what a change missionary effort has wrought 
in this mighty nation. I found at the different schools in my field 
quite a number of bright youths who will come here this year to pre- 
pare as teachers and preachers. I have the names of 11 such, and 
they have had an average of seven years' study in the country, and 
with five years here will be well fitted for evangelistic work. I also 



8C SOUTH CHINA— CANTON 

have 15 bright students from my field at Fati, supported largely by 
Mr. Severance, who gives $600 a year towards maintaining them at 
school. I find that after a boy has studied in the country at good 
schools for seven or eight years his parents are seldom able to do more 
for him, and he is then qualified to take charge of a country school, 
or go into business. The cost to parents has been about $500. Now 
it would be short-sighted in us to refuse some help to such young men, 
as we can fit them out for best work at cost of about $50 Mex. a year, 
and in about 5 years only $250 Mex., and they will be very well equipped 
for work at the end of that time. Of course it would be ideal if these 
young men would pay their own way, but there are many beautiful 
ideals that do not pan out when put to practical test. 

This must be our best year. In two weeks will be Chinese New 
Year. Soon after that I so to dedicate our big new church in Chung 
Lau, where Chinese have spent $12,000. Then I go to hold 24 com- 
munion services, and expect to receive another 100 or more of men 
and women. 

Matters are very quiet here. Lien-chou is quite safe. The men and 
women who came from Yeung Kong, Sheklung, Lien-chou, and Ko- 
chau will all be back to their fields soon. Some have already gone 
back. 

Not a church or chapel has been disturbed. We are making all 
plans for a most vis-orous evangelistic campaign. 

On the first of March we will organize a presbytery in my field. 
Meetings of all oreachers and helpers will continue about six days, 
and all plans perfected for simultaneous attacks against idolatry at all 
out-stations, and in hundreds of villages, accompanied by plain preach- 
ing of the glorious gospel. We have not a day to lose. 

We must concentrate on schools and on training of native preachers 
and teachers. 

We shall be hard pushed to care for the thousands of converts that 
will come in the next five years. The mightiest harvest ever reaped 
will be here in the next few decades. We must open hundreds of 
preaching halls, train preachers, get hold of Bible women, and help 
the Chinese to help themselves. They spend $150,000,000 a year in 
idolatry. Millions of money are here. The Chinese will support all 
their churches after we help them for a short time. 

Graduating exercises of Hackett Medical College last Monday. Big 
house and nine fine young women went forth to do work as Christian 
physicians. See report sent by my sister. Be strong and of good 
courage. Victory is ours. 

A few davs ago I returned from a nine-days' trip into the country. 
I found full encouragement and all men and women at work, and 
schools never so full, and everything on full time. At Chung Lau we 
dedicated a new church, costing with site $14,000, and Chinese paid 
$12,000 Mex. At Shun Kok a new church is nearly ready for dedi- 
cation, and also at Kam U, the latter costing $2,000, and will seat about 
350, with rooms for men and women on first floor. 

We have not lost a service since the trouble began, and matters are 
greatly_ improved since the disbandment of worthless soldiers who 
were picked up as a sort of emergency men. The city is said to have 
3,000 soldiers of trained class. Some looting occurs in different locali- 
ties, but this will ultimately be suppressed. There is a willingness on 
the part of the people to hear the gospel such as we have not hereto- 
fore experienced. We have not a dav to lose, but must ever seize fine 
opportunities to expand. I have opportunity now to enter two large 
markets where doors were shut. 

At Chung Lau, about 160 miles south, we have had a chapel for 
over 20 years. This market town is a large one, and the villages that 



SOUTH CHINA— CANTON 87 

surround this central locality number about ioo, and the population is 
estimated bv a native preacher to be over 40,000. Last week we dedi- 
cated the finest church outside of Canton, and that church is located 
on a fine site, just on the edge of the market. The site cost $3,000 
Mex., all paid for by Chinese. We have about two acres of ground. 
The San Ning magistrate and the military commander of troops in three 
districts came by train to be present. They were met at the depot by 
a large company of Christians with banners and music, and a pro- 
cession of 500 formed at the station and marched through the market 
to the chapel. More than 1,500 persons were at the church. Only 700 
could find seats. Addresses were made by our preachers, and also by 
the magistrate and military commander, expressing their gratification 
at the completion of the building, and their sympathies with us in the 
sacrifices made to secure these beneficient results. The military official ; 
Mr. Li Hoi Wan, was baptized in the old chapel, and is a very out- 
spoken Christian. On the next day, Sunday, at communion service, 
19 men, 23 women, and 13 children were baptized. The church 
now has a membership of over 300, is entirely self-supporting and 
supports a school which will become a power in the next few 
years. On Monday we organized the San Ning Presbytery with 12 
churches and about 2,000 members, and also founded the Home Mis- 
sionary Society, which begins at once, with support of two or three 
helpers. These will be increased until the entire force of preachers, 
teachers and Bible women become independent of mission support. 
This will enable me to open new chapels, and eventually these, too, will 
be under support of Presbytery. 

Back day before yesterday from country trip of over two weeks, 
and one that makes me glad I am a missionary. On this trip two new 
churches were dedicated, and nine elders ordained and four churches 
organized with nearly 300 members, and 115 men and women, and 35 
children baptized. In many of my chapels the overcrowding is a very 
serious matter, and we shall have to get up more new buildings. At 
Chung Lau, where we dedicated three months ago the finest building 
in the province for church use, we are planning for an additional 
school building, and already nearly $3,000 is in sight, and one man has 
given $1,000. The two new churches which were dedicated on this trip 
are in important market towns where we began in small dark shops. 
The united seating capacity is about 700, and the indication, judging 
from numbers at dedication, is that these buildings will have to be 
enlarged before another two years. At San Ning City the women 
were forced far into the room in rear of the preacher, and beyond 
seeing and hearing, and the preacher said it was fortunate that it was 
raining or there would have been many more women present. Had 
the weather been anything but bad we should not have been able to 
get the women into the building. At Chung Wan, another important 
place, the . brethren enlarged the upper rooms, putting in seats, but 
women were forced back into the kitchen. Subscriptions will be 
started to buy a new site. At San Cheung a church was organized 
with 100 members, and among those baptized were eight bright boys 
from the school. The teacher is a very earnest Christian and capable 
man, and the school is entirelv self-supporting. I was told that the 
entire class of 30 boys wished to unite with us on communion day, 
but some of their parents thought they should wait longer. 

At the village Taai Tong, where Rev. Li Yik So lives, we have a 
strong school, self-supporting, with 40 scholars, and in this village on 
a recent Sunday 30 were baptized, and steps will be taken to erect a 
chapel in this village. 

I not only have to supply men for my own field, but for U. S. A. 
At Hin Kong a church was organized with 70 members, and at Ngau 



88 SOUTH CHINA— CANTON 

Kong the church was organized with 75 members. At Sz Kau, where 
we own the building, a church was organized with about 60 members. 
At Yeung Kiu, an important market town, we own the building, and 
at last two services over 50 were baptized, and in the past 10 months 
nearly 100 have been received at that church, and money has been 
promised by the members to pay in part for ground in the rear, as the 
church will have to be enlarged soon to accommodate members. 

We now have 16 organized churches in the new presbytery in my 
field, and a committee is to start out soon to solicit funds, visiting every 
chapel, in support of Home Missionary Society that looks towards 
assuming ultimately all current work, including support of all preachers. 

Later he writes : 

Only recently I returned from a trip to my out-stations, completing 
the second quarterly communion service for year 1912. More than 
100 were baptized, which makes 225 received since September. Many 
of our chapels are so crowded that we cannot seat communicants, and 
1913 will be a big test of our seating capacity. At San Ning the breth- 
ren have purchased a site costing $6,500, and we propose putting up a 
church to cost $10,000, most to be given by Christians. But they will 
need some help. Among the 20 converts received at San Ning at last 
communion service, were eight young men, some of them in high offi- 
cial position, and all scholarly men. We are reaching many of this 
class and they will have strong influence on others. 

At Chiu King, one of our out-stations, the 30 converts there put 
down $500 for purchase of a new building. At Hin Kong where we 
have only 50 converts, the members subscribed $1,300 for enlarging 
work to include building of a girls' school. Five years ago we could 
not have raised $100. One of the greatest needs these days is enlarged 
accommodation for increasing number of converts. With some help 
in erection of buildings and with the large increase in converts that 
such buildings would help to obtain, the matter of self-support would 
soon be an easy problem. 

WOMEN'S WORK.— Miss Churchill writes : 

The past year has been one of trial and difficulty. Our work has 
been carried on, not under fire, but certainly under cover of guns and 
bayonets. 

The work went on uninterruptedly until October, when the assass- 
ination of the new Tartar General was the signal for renewed hos- 
tilities between the contending parties. My teachers and their pupils 
then all fled and went into hiding. In the several weeks' interval be- 
tween the killing of the Tartar General and the surrender of the city 
to the rebel army, all who could possibly get out of Canton left. Busi- 
ness was suspended — all stores and dwellings closed. 

EDUCATIONAL.— 

This work has been largely conducted in numbers of primary 
schools, including, for the first time, kindergarten work, step by step up 
to the True Light Seminary for girls and women and the Fati Theo- 
logical College for bovs and men. The Revolution more or less hin- 
dered the others, and interfered with the work of those who were in 
attendance. Both the highest institutions, the True Light Seminary 
and Fati Theological College have been made mission rather than mere 
station schools. The True Light Seminary discontinued work for 
some weeks; the Theological College kept right through, with the 



SOUTH CHINA— CANTON 89 

exception of a few days when Kwang-tung seceded from the Imperial 
authorities. 

Fati Theological College. — This institution, as at present or- 
ganized, was commenced in 1885. There had previously been 
a Training School for theological students, limited at first to 
10, and afterwards to 20. 

Commencing with an attendance of about 60 students, the number 
has gradually increased until the enrollment for the Semester ending 
June 30th, 1912, was 232, and for the full year ending with same date 
278. The prospect is for a large addition to this number as soon as 
buildings can be provided and sufficient arrangements made for teach- 
ing. The second part of 1912, September 1st to December 31, 1912, has 
an enrollment of 230, thus maintaining the number in the first half 
of the year. This has been an unusual thing in the past history of 
the school. 

Commencing with the merest rudiments of Western learning, and 
even this opposed to the wishes of both parents and children, the stand- 
ard has been gradually raised year by year, until our curriculum is 
what is now published, and instruction in the studies it contains is 
eagerly sought. 

Since 1885, 50 students have graduated from the regular theological 
course, and 97 have been employed as Evangelists after having studied 
in the Evangelistic Course. The latter course was for several years a 
two-year course, but has now been made three years. More than a 
thousand have meanwhile studied in the Middle and Secondary De- 
partments. Diplomas from the Middle School have only been given 
the last two years and 16 have received them. 

Our aim is to prepare ministers and evangelists for the churches, 
to give to the children of church members and others who care to at- 
tend, a good general education, preparing them to be manly Christian 
citizens, useful in the Church, useful in their own communities and in 
the service of their country, and in view of the present opportunity, 
to give special attention to the preparation of teachers for the schools 
about to be established throughout the length and breadth of the land. 

The object and scope of the institution is very fairly given in the 
following translation of a paper, prepared three years ago by one of 
the Chinese teachers, as an introduction to a curriculum drawn up for 
publication : 

"Christian doctrine has the first place and the endeavor to make it 
known is the controlling purpose of the institution Sound learning 
is the handmaid of the Christian religion, and therefore Chinese and. 
Western studies are thoroughly taught with the view of broadening 
and developing the intellect, and as an invaluable help to the full un- 
derstanding of Bible teaching. It is understood that there is no undue^ 
urging of students to make a public profession of Christianity. That* 
must be decided by every one for himself, but the regulations of the 
school in regard to attendance on religious exercises and Christian 
teaching must be observed and the curriculum followed." 

In his annual report Dr. E. C. Machle writes : "In the early part 
of our school year great excitement prevailed, for China was in the 
throes of a revolution. Students gathered in groups to hear the latest 
news and gave vent to the spirit of patriotism in speeches and shouts. 
Some were so fired with this zeal that studies seemed of minor im- 
portance and so they enlisted as volunteers. From the Fati School 



90 SOUTH CHINA— CANTON 

came a larger number of enlistments than from any other govern- 
ment or mission school in or around Canton. There were thirty in 
all, twelve from the Preparatory Department, eleven from the Middle 
School and seven from the Theological Seminary. These volunteers 
received. only clothes and rations for their services. 

Some of the students of the upper departments gave two weeks' 
service in addressing the people at various places on the purposes and 
plans of the new government. Many of the old graduates were called 
into government service and some to prominent positions. One was 
for a time adviser of the new Viceroy, another was in the Public 
Works Department. One who, when the missionaries first attempted 
residence in Lien-chou was beaten five hundred blows on account of 
his connection with them, was made Prefect and thus occupied the 
very Yamen in which he had been beaten. Three other Fati graduates 
were his leading coadjutors in bringing under subjection the turbu- 
lent robber bands, who, after the Revolution, were swarming from their 
mountain retreats and harassing all the northwestern portion of the 
province. Another former student who went into military service was 
for a time an aide-de-camp of General Wong-Hing. 

In the Theological Seminary the enrollment for the two courses, 
regular and evangelistic, was 51. This is a slight increase over last 
year. The work done has been thorough. A good number of the 
students are from other missions, as the New Zealand Presbyterian 
Mission, the Canadian Presbyterian Mission, and the United Brethren 
Mission. 

Besides taking part in the Y. M. C. A. Christian Endeavor and other 
religious meetings, held on the institution grounds, the students get 
frequent opportunities for putting into practice what they have learned 
by preaching in the churches and chapels in and about Canton. Six- 
teen theological students have agreed to give Saturdays to preaching 
in neighboring places. Since the founding of the Seminary on its 
present basis in 1885, 147 have gone out from its walls as preachers or 
evangelists. 

The Christian element predominates. In addition to the theo- 
logical students, nearly all the Middle School and a goodly number of 
the Preparatory are Christians. All the religious meetings during the 
week and on the Sabbath are well attended by the students of all the 
departments. 

The Chinese teachers have done good work. To them is due much 
praise. Two new teachers are needed to take the place of those who 
left. 

In conclusion we would say that this educational plant aims at all 
that is thorough and high in its different departments; as a mission 
institution, it is one of the leading educators for the people of Kwang- 
tung, not only in knowledge but in moral integrity and high ideais. 
We attempt to put first things first. All instruction clusters around 
the Cross of Christ. 

Day Schools. — Miss Churchill writes : 

All my schools have been kept going for the most of the year; two 
only having been closed for a time. One of these was situated near 
a barracks of disorderly soldiers and most of the pupils moved from 
the neighborhood. The last time I was there, several young lads of 
about eighteen or twenty greatly disturbed our meeting. While the 
Bible woman was talking and at prayer, they kept up a continual shout- 
ing of, "Sz kui, Sz kui" (kill her or them). My poor Bible woman's 



SOUTH CHINA— CANTON 91 

face was very pale (I could not see my own). I do not think they 
meant that, but they certainly did mean to break up our meeting, and 
if I had interfered it might have led to something more serious, so 
I concluded the wisest way would be to take no notice of it whatever. 
We finished our meeting, although nobody heard a word of what was 
said. 

I am glad to record that it has not been necessary for me to close 
my two schools in the Manchu and Bannermen neighborhoods, although 
three teachers (Chinese) have left in succession, fearing to remain in 
the neighborhood. I have received much kindness from these people 
during the eight years I have been laboring amongst them, and these 
troubles have made no difference in their attitude towards me and my 
work. Two Manchu soldiers with their guns sat within a few feet of 
my schoolroom door the greater part of the year, and their attitude 
towards me was always most friendly. Working amongst both Chin- 
ese and Manchus, I have had a somewhat difficult part to play. It has 
been my aim to make them see that I am the friend of all and the 
enemy of none; that mv mission to this land as a messenger of Jesus 
Christ is to proclaim the good tidings of salvation to all, irrespective of 
political party; that the Church of Christ is universal, composed of 
people of all nations, kindreds and tongues; that the Lord loves and 
died for the Manchu as well as the Chinese (which latter I think was 
looked upon by some of my Chinese women as rather doubtful doc- 
trine). On this basis with the Word of God for my foundation, I was 
enabled to steer a steady course, swerving neither to the right nor left; 
and I am satisfied that this was the only course for the Christian mis- 
sionary to pursue. 

Two hundred and forty-one pupils have been registered during the 
year — a larger number than last year; but the attendance has been of 
necessity irregular. We have done much better with fees than I had 
expected, being only $10.00 behind last year, $190 having been collected 
to date. I am profoundly thankful that, with all the hindrances and 
interruptions, we have thus far held our own so well. I am exceed- 
ingly grateful for an extra grant for my work this year, and hope 
next year's report will give a larger increase in the work. 

In proportion, the attendance at Sabbath-school has been sustained 
better than in anv other department of the work, keeping up to full 
two-thirds of the previous year's attendance. Five hundred was the 
highest attendance reached in my two schools, the general attendance 
being from 300 to 400. This is a cause for profound thanks to God. 

Our visiting in homes has been very satisfactory. Everywhere I 
have been welcomed. The women in their sorrow and anxiety have 
naturally turned to me for sympathy, which they have undoubtedly 
received. 

Seven women have received baptism during the year. My Bible 
women have done very faithful work and are to be commended for 
standing by the work in perilous places and at perilous times.. I my- 
self feel that a gracious Providence has directed mv steps and pre- 
served me to the present. Several times I have had a narrow escape 

passed by the Assembly Hall about half an hour before it was blown 

up, having come in from the city somewhat earlier than usual. My 
friends at home with a sense of humor would smile if they could have 
seen my chair sometimes marching in the rear of the rebel army — 
guns and bayonets and revolvers and bombs in front and my Bible 
and hymnbook bringing up the rear. I used to think at such times of 
the words of the Apostle: "The weapons of our warfare are not car- 
nal, but they are mighty." I felt that I was armed with a more for- 
midable weapon than those ahead of me. 



92 SOUTH CHINA— CANTON 

Other Schools. — 

Among the noteworthy school work is that done by the Light Giv- 
ing School for the Blind under Dr. Mary Niles and Miss Durham. 
The enlarged plant means enlarged facilities to render greater service. 
Those who have rendered great service in the kindergarten are Mrs. 
Fulton and Mrs. Bigelow. In the primary work Mrs. H. V. Noyes 
has had one large school with an enrollment of nearly forty. She has 
also done work among women and children in nearby towns. One 
school east of the city of Canton at Sha Ho had over 20 enrolled. Miss 
Harriett Lewis and Miss Churchill have each conducted several well 
attended schools and carried on a good deal of Sunday-school work. 
In fact the most promising Sunday-school work outside of the large 
institutions is done among the women and children connected with the 
different churches in and about Canton. 

MEDICAL.— 

MEDICAL. — During Dr. Mary H. Fulton's absence on 
furlough the medical work of the Lafayette Compound, Can- 
ton, progresses favorably under the guiding hand of Dr. Harry 
Boyd. 

Great delight is felt by the doctors of the David Gregg Hospital 
for Women and Children and the Julia M. Turner Training School 
for Nurses, on account of the presence of Miss Helen Stockton, 
trained nurse. Seldom have the Chinese showed greater appreciation 
of a missionary. They feel Miss Stockton loves them and is there for 
one object — to train nurses for China's good. 

The Hackett Medical College is all alive to the fact that Dr. 
Martha Hackett and Dr. Harriett Allyn are expected in the 
fall to begin work in connection with the E. A. K. Hackett 
Medical College for Women. 

Probably no two women sent out by our Board have ever 
been better qualified. They will take all the latest and best 
apparatus necessary for instruction in their various branches. 

Four of the doctors trained in this college have taken over the 
medical work of foreign doctors during their furloughs to America 
and England. 

One trained nurse has just been called to Peking. 

All the surgical work, which is sometimes 2,000 major and minor 
cases a year, besides the extraction of 1,300 teeth, is being per- 
formed during Dr. Fulton's absence by the Chinese women physicians, 
notably Dr. Toh. Instruction is given by fifteen or sixteen instructors 
— seven being foreigners. For many years Dr. Fulton has longed for 
some place to care for patients with tuberculosis. At last money has 
been given for this object. 

Since many doctors are now seeking practice, it is only by superior 
work that, the mission schools can compete with these and government 
schools. 

Hitherto the work has been self-supporting. What we 
greatly need now is for some one to come mightily to our 
help. 



SOUTH CHINA— YEUNG KONG 93 

In the Gregg Hospital, rich and poor alike continue to seek 
its healing touch. All who come either as in or out-patients 
have the Gospel preached to them and many, by kind treat- 
ment and direct explanations have forever cast away idolatry 
and turned to living fountains. 

Dr. Fulton wishes a building where she can receive the dis- 
carded wives now being put away and teach them practical 
nursing. Women to care for sick women meets all the Chin- 
ese ideas of propriety. 

Dr. Harry Boyd is pushing the work in every direction. He 
has developed in a nearby village a popular dispensary to 
which men are admitted and thousands come during the year 
from long distances. Mrs. Boyd is also pushing the work 
amongst the nurses and women. 

YEUNG KONG STATION 

EVANGELISTIC. — This has been under the care of Rev. 
C. E. Patton at Ko-chau, and Rev. G. D. Thomson and Rev. J. 
W. Creighton at Yeung Kong. The latter has had house- 
building and oversight of schools as well as the straight evan- 
gelistic work. 

All have itinerated extensively and report numerous openings, more 
than can be entered at the present time because largely of lack of 
funds and lack of workers. In Ko-chau, building operations, with 
special conferences, extensive trips, reorganization, more work given to 
Chinese leaders, more expected from church members in actually giv- 
■ ing of their time to preaching, have left Mr. Patton occupied. As the 
Revolution broke out at the time of special services, help expected from 
Canton did not arrive. The whole burden of responsibility of carrying 
out a heavy program fell largely upon the shoulders of the missionary 
in charge, but he put it through with his accustomed vigor. He had 
the satisfaction of seeing much interest manifested. 

Another feature of the work has been the reaching of some of the 
upper classes in Ko-chau in special conference with them along the line 
of receptions and open meetings. 

In Yeung Kong the special meetings just preceded the outbreak of 
the Revolution. One hundred and five cards were signed by those who 
attended, expressing their desire to become inquirers. Daily street- 
preaching was carried on in different parts of the city which resulted 
in large attendance on the evening services. Unfortunately because of 
the uneasiness and the fighting in the city, it was impossible to follow 
up immediately the ooenings that presented themselves. For several 
months there was more or less uncertainty, but the missionary men 
returned several times during the course of the succeeding months, 
giving encouragement to their Chinese fellow workers and the native 
Christians. 

EDUCATIONAL.— 

Like the evangelistic, this was more or less interrupted. Mr. Patton 
in Ko-chau, Mr. Creighton in Yeung Kong had several schools for boys 
under their care. The grammar school in the Yeung Kong church 



94 SOUTH CHINA— LIENCHOW 

building was quite flourishing, with its fine young Chinese teacher, 
and other associates. In Ko-chau a good grammar school is being 
established. The work among the girls was carried on by Miss Wilcox 
with great efficiency up to the time of the "Outbreak," during which 
Miss Wilcox returned home on furlough so as to come back the sooner 
when things were quiet once more. 

MEDICAL.— 

Dr. and Mrs. Dobson's furlough at home left Yeung Kong medical 
work largely in the hands of a Chinese woman physician. This made 
it necessary to shut down the men's department. During the period 
under survey Dr. Dobson returned and took up the work, which at 
times was strenuous, owing to numerous gunshot wounds caused in 
fights, as well as the ordinary run of medical work. The doctor puts 
religious exercises in the hospital in the foremost place in his work, 
so the good resulting will' be great, as the doctor is known all around. 
An attempt is being made to follow up those discharged from the hos- 
pital, to seek them in their homes, following up the religious work done 
in the hospital. Mrs. Patton, with interruptions of various kinds, with 
no suitable hospital, with no dispensary work, not only in Ko-chau, but 
traveling with Mr. Patton, was able to reach hundreds in a medical 
way, but more than that in a religious. 

In general, the year has been marked by advance in spite of un- 
settled conditions, so we can as a mission thank God and take courage. 
Dr. Lowrie, the chairman of the China Council, brought us much good 
in his visits in different parts of the field. 

Mr. Creighton writes : 

In Yeung Kong the outlook is bright. In 1909, when the work came 
to me there were only two preachers for nine chapels. This spring 
will see every point occupied. In the October communion we had 24 
candidates for baptism in the Yeung Kong City Church, the largest 
record for that church. At the January communion we had 22. The 
country places also promise well. The land for the schools has been 
bargained for, the deeds being signed after eleven o'clock one rainy 
night, the coldest of the season. We are hoping for great things. 

LIENCHOW STATION 

The autumn work was no more than fairly started before 
the Revolution broke out. At first, at a distance, it effected us 
little. When the revolutionists at length took over the local 
government, they met with practically no resistance. The real 
revolution was the leaven of new ideas at work in the hearts 
of the people. It was soon to burst all bounds of restraint and 
create for the time being utter chaos in its attempts to make 
ever the individual and society. In the growing disorder and 
uncertainty, it was thought best for all the members of the 
station but one to leave for the coast. 

The government forces, instead of pursuing the enemy, gave 
themselves over to burning and looting the villages connected 
with the revolt. For two days the awful work went on. A 
score of villages were looted of everything and more or less 



SOUTH CHINA— LIENCHOW 95 

burned. Many of the poor, having lost everything, knew not 
where to turn for help. We opened the mission buildings to 
them. Food, bedding, coffins were provided as needed. To 
help them help themselves small loans were made to the farm- 
ers to enable them to plant their spring crops. "Such way of 
treating rebels will never do," some murmured. "It is as 
though it came from heaven," the people themselves said. 

A mere recital of events conveys little impression of the far- 
reaching changes that have taken place in our field, particular- 
ly with reference to our work. It was only a few years ago 
that the village people about us arose against the mission, 
burned its property, killed its missionaries and considered that 
they had banished Christianity from Lienchow forever. Now 
the mission buildings stand, as it were, out of the ruins of the 
surrounding villages, their refuge and succor. Old suspicion 
is giving way to new appreciation of moral and religious ideals. 
Our Christians, long held back and rebuffed, are now to the 
front in everything. The highest office in each of the three 
districts in which our work mainly lies, is held by a Christian. 
Wong Yuk Shing now presides as chief official in a yamen 
where he was once beaten for his connection with Christianity. 
It is not too much to say the whole situation has changed. 

EVANGELISTIC— 

Our Christians have suffered with the other people from the general 
disorder and lawlessness of the year. For some it has meant a deep- 
ening of religious experience. The time for the month of study came 
during the period of conflict when our hill was a rebel stronghold, but 
about fifteen women and thirty men responded to the call. It was one 
of the best of such occasions we have ever held. 

A large use of tracts has been a feature of the work this year. The 
Chinese themselves have taken the initiative in organizing a book 
loaning society to supplement the work, with special reference to the 
needs of scholars. 

The long resistance of Lienchow City has been broken and we have 
been consoled for our many disappointments by securing a chapel on 
the main street. 

We are now engaged in a campaign of village evangelism. Fifty 
villages near Lienchow have been selected for summer work. Bands 
of workers go out to the villages daily, making the circuit each week. 
Such interest is shown in the preaching of the gospel as we have never 
seen before. "Fields are white," the workers say to one another. 
Everywhere the possibilities are such that we scarcely dare formulate 
our expectations. Aware of the dangers of such times, we are em- 
phasizing more than ever the need of actual religious experience on 
the part of all inquirers and indeed say little of entering the church. 
During the year 84 candidates were examined by the session and 20 
received into the Church. 

WOMEN'S WORK.— 

Mrs. Ross had a class of women in the fall for the study of tracts, 
with a view of their being used afterwards by the women in personal 



96 SOUTH CHINA— LIENCHOW 

work. Five Bible women have done faithful work during the year. 
The former Bible woman, Luk Neung, mother-in-law of the new mag- 
istrate of Lienchow, has been in a position of large influence in the 
city. Women in the city are asking for a school. This we are planning 
to open soon. The number of women finding refuge in the compound 
at various times during the year afforded a special opportunity for 
work. The large number of patients on dispensary days at the hos- 
pital is affording another. 

EDUCATIONAL.— 

The Boys' School started with a good attendance in the fall. On the 
arrival of Mr. Marshall, the school was placed in his charge, but dur- 
ing his absence, from December to May, was again under the care of 
Mr. Kunkle. The Revolution produced not a little excitement among 
the boys and carried off a number of the older ones as soldiers. At 
the time the new term was to begin this year, the conflict between the 
rebels and the government was at its height. The missionary had to 
personally conduct the teachers through the lines to insure their safety. 
It took some time to get the students together, but we finally had a 
full school of 55 boarders and four day pupils, and were re- 
fusing applicants. The whole seven years of the course is now being 
taken. It is proposed to add an eighth next year. The Chinese faculty 
has been increased to four. The boarding department was during the 
year given over to the Chinese teachers to manage. A good propor- 
tion of the boys have been doing manual work and they are asking 
for more. We are planning to develop the industrial side of the 
school and then give aid to the students only in work. The Chinese 
leaders, seeing the bad effects of the old system, are themselves urg- 
ing the change. Five students and one teacher were received into the 
church this year. 

The Girls' Boarding School went on in spite of sicknesses of teach- 
ers, the demands of infants and the Revolution itself. In the danger 
and uncertainty coming out of the Revolution, much credit is due to 
teachers and students for braving it out and finishing the year. 

With the Revolution has come a new demand for education for 
women and girls. One of the older pupils of the Lienchow school, 
not to be idle this spring, opened a day school at Tung Pei. It has 
an enrollment of 30 girls and 18 boys. A girls' day school was opened 
in Lienchow City with the generous help of Mr. Wong, who has rented 
us a government building and given $120 for equipment. The school 
has an enrollment of 30. The Sam Kong day school for girls, which 
his always been such a success, has responded to the new government 
by an increase of 50 per cent, in its attendance, making it 68. The 
Boys' School at Tsat Sing Tarn and Horn Kong have each had a 
successful year. 

MEDICAL.— 

The medical work for men continued in the fall much as in the 
earlier part of the year, as previously reported. It consisted mostly 
of dispensary work at the Van Norden Hospital and occasional visits 
to out-stations. The Revolution brought a number of in-patients to 
the hospital, mostly those injured by bomb explosions. Dr. Ross was 
compelled to leave for his furlough in December and close the hos- 
pital. The Christians have been appealing, so far in vain, for some 
one to re-open this work. We were pleased to have a visit in October 
from Mr. Warner Van Norden, to whose, father we are indebted for 
the present men's hospital and equipment. 



SOUTH CHINA— KO-CHAU 97 

With the coming of Drs. Latimer and Lei, the Brooks Memorial 
Hospital was at last opened for patients. Until December, Dr. Lei 
had the work of the hospital under the supervision, and with the help 
of Drs. Ross and Latimer. On Dr. Lei's return in May, she was given 
full charge of the hospital. The number of patients for the seven 
weeks the hospital was open in the fall, was — new 241, old 131, and in- 
patients six. For the same length of time this spring, the number of 
patients was — new 400, old 532, in-patients 30. Total number, — new 
641, old 633, in-patients 36; altogether, 1,340. It seems fitting that 
this successful resumption of the work of Dr. Chestnut should be 
made by Dr. Lei, one of her pupils. 

Altogether this has been a year never to be forgotten. We do not 
know all it means' for the future of the work. We only know that 
God has been working with plans far beyond our own. 

The Lienchow Field 

Cities 12 Schools 8 

Market Towns 70 Christians 360 

Population 750,000 Preachers 9 

Churches 3 Bible Women 5 

Chapels 9 Colporteurs 4 

Hospitals 2 Teachers 14 

Note. — As we go to press, we grieve to report the following 
cablegram : 

"Canton, Inculcate. Deeply regret to convey the sad news of the 
sudden death of Dr. Nan Latimer six days ago at Lienchow." 

From the first Dr. Latimer entered into ready sympathy 
with the Chinese. She writes : 

"To me they are like great big children with the fears that our 
children have at home. I wonder what a difference it would make on 
our lives if we were born with the heritage of fear and superstition 
that the Chinese have." 

The officers and members of the Board sympathize and sor- 
row with the mission in this sudden loss. 

KO=CHAU STATION 

The Ko-chau Out-station of the Yeung Kong Station, South 
China Mission, has been constituted a separate station^ 

The Ko-Chau River drains six governmental districts 
(Hien) and empties into the sea near Mwang Chau Wan 
(French Territory). All traffic follows the river southward 
to the sea, thence by steamer to Canton or Hong Kong. A 
mountain range makes a barrier to intercourse between the 
Ko-chau and Yeung Kong regions. 

The territory proposed for the new station is now known as 
the Ko-chau Field, a natural geographical division. It is also 
a governmental division — the six counties forming the district 
of Ko-chau under the new as well as the former government, 

(6) 



98 SOUTH CHINA— KO-OHAU 

centering in the City of Ko-chau, approximately 5,000 square 
miles in area. 

POPULATION. — Approximately 1,500,000; six walled 
cities of 30,000 to 50,000 each ; five towns of 10,000 to 20,000 
each; 159 market towns of an average of 1,000 each; over 
3,000 villages with an average of 300 each. 

HISTORY. — The field was opened about 20 years ago, but 
visited regularly by missionaries from Canton, later from 
Yeung Kong. Until the year 1903 there were but two chapels 
with less than 50 members. In 1903 two more chapels were 
opened and the field so stood, being visited a couple of times a 
year from Yeung Kong, until 1908. 

Our year has been a short one, partly because it covers but 
nine months, from September, 191 1, to July, 1912, and partly 
because of interruptions due to the revolution. In spite of dis- 
tractions, however, we covered 729 miles in itineration, chiefly 
by pony, examined 267 enquirers as against 220 for the previ- 
ous year ; also we have finished building and moved into the 
Collingwood Church and have the residence under roof. 

EXPANSION WORK.— It is just five years since fur- 
lough and the laying of certain plans for the development of 
our field. This makes a good time for stock-taking. To put 
this into the least compass possible, we present herewith a 
comparative table : 

1902 1907 1912 

Chapels 2 4 19 

Chinese Preachers 1 4 6 

Colporteurs . . 1 10 

Bible Women . . . . 6 

Schools . . 2 9 

Teachers . . 3 10 

Theological Students . . 6 12 

Communicants 47 309 502 

Native Contributions $20.00 $804.20 $976.32 

Medical : Patients annually 600 

Beginning with 1908, we proposed to open an average of two new 
chapels and graduate two new preachers per year. The foregoing 
table shows our chapels above the average, preachers somewhat below. 
Let us notice the reason why. (1) Preachers cannot be made in a 
day. It takes time. Moreover the lengthening of the preachers' train- 
ing course, with which we are in hearty sympathy, has affected our 
calculations somewhat and deferred the graduation dates of our men ' 
in training. Ultimately the average will be fairly well maintained. (2) 
Having the fixed sum, $650 per year, for the expansion work, and not 
needing so much immediately for preachers' salaries as our reckoning 
called for, we have thrown our stress for these few years upon the 
opening of new chapels. Later, most, if not all, of our funds will be 
needed to maintain the preaching force. (3) During these few years 



SOUTH CHINA KO-OHAU 99 

we have found it remarkably easy to open new chapels. We have been 
able to rent or purchase in almost any city or town of our field with- 
out opposition. Previously this could not have been done. No one 
can predict how many years it may be done. Now is our time. In 
pursuance of our policy therefore we have opened three chains of 
chapels covering the strategic points of our field. Later intervening 
links will be filled in our chain. In this way we have already taken 
possession of the ground and are holding it with the best force of 
workers available. As our better trained men become available we will 
use them to strengthen what has been opened. 

LOCAL GROUPS.— 

Supplementary to the policy outlined in 1907, we have adopted 
another method of developing our field. Two years ago we reported 
the formation of groups of Christians and inquirers under local lead- 
ers. Our object was to better care for our old members and to form 
new preaching centers. Several of these groups have already become 
fully fledged chapels. Within the past year a number of new groups 
or preaching places have been organized. The location of these groups 
follows the lines of natural development. They are without expense 
to the mission until well started, and presuppose a degree of local self- 
help and self-control from the very start. After a reasonable effort 
has been made locally mission funds will supplement the effort. "Seek 
men first, then places," however, has been the keynote of the years' 
development. 

WITHIN THE CHURCH.— 

During the past few years we have placed considerable stress upon 
the cultivation of our members and the organization of the church 
within. We now have 502 members, organized into two churches. 
Shui Tung and Mui Luk. We have a force of seven elders and 23 
deacons. At the fall meeting of presbytery we propose to divide our 
field into five church organizations, viz., from South to North : Mui 
Luk, Shui Tung, Faa Chau and San I churches respectively. These 
five churches will include the 19 chapels and preaching places of the 
field. 

VILLAGE WORK AND COLPORTAGE.— 

Somewhat in contrast with this intensive development we are now 
turning our eyes outward. Beginning with February of the current 
year we have had no fixed preacher at a given chapel. Instead, each 
preacher is a sort of circuit-rider, having at least four chapels or 
groups, at each of which he spends a week in turn, holding Sunday 
services and visiting neighboring villages during the week in company 
with the local deacon or members. A record is kept of all villages 
visited and a large map is slowly being filled in. There are no salaried 
colporters, each having a chapel in his care for the Sabbath in con- 
nection with his village and colporter work. Besides, some 40 volun- 
teers are selling Bibles on their odd days. We are trying the experi- 
ment of having a head colporter in charge of all book-sellers and 
sales. One of his aims is to induce volunteer work. He has been given 
large responsibilities and so far has more than fulfilled our expecta- 
tions. 



100 SOUTH CHINA— KO-CHAU 

BREVITIES.— 

Despite the excitement attendant upon the outbreak of the Revo- 
lution, our November Workers' Conference was pronounced by all a 
success. About 50 were present throughout the 16 days. This con- 
ference has become an annual feature. This year preachers' exam- 
inations; the study course, examination and ordination of 12 elders 
and deacons ; the organization of the Yeung Kong and Ko Chau 
Presbytery; the selection of candidates for theological study; the as- 
signment of next year's workers, etc., will accompany a full course 
of Bible instruction. 

A course in Church Government and Discipline, the Shorter Cate- 
chism and some Biblical work is being required of all elders and dea- 
cons prior to ordination. 

The Loan Fund for the purchase of chapels continues to render 
valuable service. So far 14 loans have been made and 12 chapels 
bought at a total valuation of about $6,600 entirely, with an original 
capital of $2,000. 

Eight boys' schools have enrolled 160 pupils. 

At Ko-chau City we carry a preparatory theological training class 
of eight members. 

Four students are in the Theological -Seminary at Canton. 

One preacher is taking a full Middle School Course at the Canton 
Christian College. 

The new church at Ko-chau has far surpassed our expectations so 
far as Sunday attendance is concerned. Every Sunday brings about 
200 to service, not more than 30 or 40 of whom are members. The 
smallest attendance during the calendar year was about 100, the largest 
600 when Dr. J. W. Lowrie occupied the pulpit, and the house was 
filled by leading people from the city. Some turned back because of 
the crowd. 

In Sunday attendance the women outvie the men. Nine women 
have united with the local church and seven more are in preparation. 
This is entirely due to the medical work and the Bible Women's Train- 
ing class of seven members under Mrs. Patton's care. 

The fact that the highest military official of the six districts is a 
Christian and regular attendant at our Sunday services has turned 
many of the upper classes toward the church. This also, as you can 
easily imagine, brings with it added responsibilities by no means light. 
Never were we in greater favor among high and low. Our oppor- 
tunities for developing the work far outmeasure the strength of both 
native and foreigner. Our constant problem is how to embrace every 
opportunity, yet care for what has already been begun, at the same time 
husbanding our own limited strength. 

Mrs. Patton has had 299 patients for her four months, including 33 
calls to patients' homes. Seeing patients upstairs in the church, put- 
ting up her own drugs downstairs, an outdoor temporary stairway, and 
almost daily rains have made her task anything but easy. 

Mrs. Patton has, in extemporized quarters, treated about 600 women 
and children per year. Some of these are on itinerating trips and visits 
to the various chapels. A small hospital, accommodating about six 
beds, is being built on the compound, as an extension to the Colling- 
wood Church. The mission expects Mrs. Patton to care for the for- 
eign force of the proposed station and carry on a limited work for 
women and children. Beyond that no medical plans have been formu- 
lated. 



SOUTH CHINA— STATISTICS 101 

STATISTICS 

1911-12 1912-13 

Men missionaries — 

Ordained 

Medical 

Lay 

Women missionaries — 

Married women 

Medical 

Other single women 

Ordained native preachers 

Native teachers and assistants 

Churches 

Communicants 

Added during the year 

Number of schools 

Total in boarding and day-schools 

Scholars in Sabbath-schools 

Contributions 

tLast year's figure. 

♦Incomplete. 



13 


13 


4 


4 




I 


16 


17 


3 


3 


12 


12 


6 


t6 


226 


*239 


35 


*38 


5,035 


*5,2I0 


614 


*6i4 


75 


*8 5 


2,115 


*2,292 


2,322 


*2,397 


17,882 


*$I9,675 



HUNAN MISSION 

Siangtan : on the Hsiangkiang River, 25 miles south of Chang- 
shafu, the capital of the Province; occupied 1900. Missionaries — Rev. 
W. H. Lingle and Mrs. Lingle, E. D. Vanderburgh, M.D., and Mrs. 
Vanderburgh, F. J. Tooker, M.D., and Mrs. Tooker, Miss Emma T. 
Kolfrat, Miss Erne Murray, Rev. Asher R. Kepler and Mrs. Kepler, 
Miss Catharine T. Woods, Mr. C. P. Althaus and Mrs. Althaus. 

Hengchow : on the Hsiangkiang River, 75 miles south of Siangtan; 
occupied 1902. Missionaries — Rev. Geo. L. Gelwicks and Mrs. Gel- 
wicks, Rev. D. E. Crabb and Mrs. Crabb, W. Edgar Robertson, M.D., 
and Mrs. Robertson, Rev. Samuel C. McKee and Mrs. McKee 

Chenchow : on branch of the Hsiangkiang River, 175 miles south- 
east of Siangtan ; occupied 1904. Missionaries — Stephen C. Lewis, 
M.D., Rev. T. W. Mitchell and Mrs. Mitchell, Rev. C. H Derr and 
Mrs Derr, W. L. Berst, M.D., and Mrs. Berst, Rev. W. T. Locke, Miss 
Annie Morton. 

Changteh : about 125 miles northwest of Siangtan; occupied 1898; 
received under Presbyterian Board 1906. Missionaries — Rev. T. J. 
Preston and Mrs. Preston, Rev. Gilbert Lovell and Mrs. Lovell, O. T. 
Logan, M.D., and Mrs. Logan, Miss Minta L. Ellington, Rev. W. C. 
Chapman and Mrs. Chapman. 

Taoyuen : as an out-station about 120 miles northwest of Siangtan. 
Missionaries — Rev. G. F. Jenkins and Mrs. Jenkins. 

Furloughs : Rev. W. T. Locke, Miss Annie Morton, Dr. and Mrs. E. 
D. Vanderburgh, Rev. Gilbert Lovell and Mrs. Lovell, Rev. T. J. Pres- 
ton and Mrs. Preston, Miss Erne Murray, Rev. and Mrs. G. F. Jen- 
kins. 

SIANGTAN STATION 

The past year has been one of radical change in China, and one 
of undesired interruption in our work. There has been, and is a new 
spirit abroad in the land and its effect is being felt among us. There is 
new eagerness to hear, to learn, a new trust in foreigners. 

Last fall, 191 1, we fell to bravely, but the Chinese Revolution caused 
consuls some anxiety, and they sent word for us to leave our work. It 
was with poor grace that we obeyed. Mr. Lingle stayed all winter 
and Mrs. Lingle returned in February, followed by Mr. and Mrs. 
Althaus and Miss. Kolfrat. Mrs. Tooker and the children, with Miss 
Woods brought up the rear in March, — being detained longer in Shang- 
hai, by reason of whooping cough. Since our return many have said 
that no fear was felt last fall until we left the city, and on our re- 
turn, others said, "The foreigners have come back. There will be peace." 

When the Revolution broke out, Mr. Kepler was sent to Hankow 
to secure necessary funds for use in the station work. While waiting 
for a return steamer, he assisted in Red Cross work on the Hankow 
battlefield. At the reopening of the battle, he withdrew to the settle- 
ment to watch and wait for the battle to finish, and while thus watch- 
ing, he was shot in the head by a stray bullet, causing paralysis of the 
left side of his face. He has recovered and been able to resume his 
work. 

103 



104 HUNAN— SIANGTAN 

EVANGELISTIC WORK.— 

The entire evangelistic work of the station for about 6 months of 
the year has been on Mr. Lingle's shoulders. During the fall and 
winter we had no evangelist, but in the early spring Mr. Liu, of Kuik- 
iang, returned to help us. 

The Church. — 

At the request of the Christians, Mr. Kepler returned from Kuling 
last fall in time to help them through the trying period of the first two 
weeks of the seventh month, when there is so much ancestral worship, 
and when pressure is brought to bear on the Christians to participate 
in the old heathen practice. House-to-house visitation was carried on, 
with a short service in each home. This culminated, on the second 
Sunday of the seventh moon, in a memorial service in the church, in 
behalf of those of our number who have died. "This is to be an an- 
nual event, and is an attempt to supply a Christian service to take the 
place of ancestral worship. A memorial book has been secured in 
which the names of the dead of the church, with a short sketch of 
their lives, is to be inscribed. The Christian Church should supply 
something to the convert to take the place of ancestral worship, and 
tablet, and the Clan Register, from which his name is expurged as soon 
as he becomes a Christian. It is still too early to express an opinion on 
the success of the above plan." 

In October we had a visit from Rev. Ding Li Mei. For the greater 
part of a week, daily union services were held in oue church, which 
were well attended. Mr. Ding brought a real live message and, at the 
conclusion of the week's service, a goodly number promised to pray 
daily and work to win others. Unfortunately, the Revolution pre- 
vented us from following up the results of his visit. 

October 18th we celebrated Confucius' Birthday with fitting 
exercises in the church which were attended by a large number 
of schools and literati. In spite of the interruptions the 
church services were continued throughout the year. After 
peace came, the numbers increased greatly. Sabbath school has 
had a prosperous year with an attendance of 125. The Ninth 
Ward chapel has had daily services, and the reading-room has 
been very popular. Good reports came from the out-stations 
of Siangtan, though the lack of preachers has kept the work 
from developing as it should. 

Women's work has made a beginning. Before leaving for 
Shanghai in the fall Miss Woods conducted Sunday afternoon 
classes with an attendance of 30. 

EDUCATIONAL WORK.— The John D. Wells Boarding 
School opened with a fair attendance and was able to continue 
until December 1st, 191 1, but then the revolution made it nec- 
essary to suspend classes. School was opened again on the 
first of March with many new pupils, although some of the 
old ones had gone to other schools. One result of the revolu- 
tion is a new attitude toward manual labor. The boys are anxi- 
ous for industrial work. A modest beginning has been made 
with tailoring. 



HUNAN— HENGCHOW 105 

Sunnyside School for Girls opened early in September, but 
was able to continue for six weeks only. When school was re- 
opened again in March a new staff of teachers had to be en- 
gaged and it was difficult to re-establish school discipline. The 
strong Christian influence of the Chinese matron was felt in 
the school. 

The Parish Day Schools had a most successful year. There 
has been an enrollment of 34, most of whom also attended the 
primary department in Sabbath school. One school has had to 
be discontinued for lack of a teacher, but the other three day 
schools had a very prosperous year. 

MEDICAL WORK.— 

In view of these unusual circumstances, the showing of 6,305 visits 
to the dispensary (4,537 being return visits) is not a bad one. There 
were 99 operations, major and minor, and about 50 out-calls made. It 
is with much satisfaction we report that two students have been sent 
away to medical school. We trust they will be a big help to us in 
years to come. We are also very thankful to have secured the services 
of Dr. Djang, who was trained under Drs. Neal and Johnson in Shang- 
tung, and who has been for five years resident physician in the Mis- 
sion Hospital at Tsinan-Fu. 

We have a capable evangelist — a man who knows his Bible well, 
though he has had but little theological training. He is a good per- 
sonal worker, and has interested many of the patients in the gospel. 
Several of the hospital servants are members of the inquirers' class, 
as a result of his efforts. There has been more real interest manifested 
among the patients than in any previous year. One of the attendants 
recently said, "The patients discuss religion at their meals, and as they 
lie on their beds before going to sleep in the evenings." 

The hospital and dispensary have been open all the year, though 
some of the time they have been in the hands of the medical students. 
We thought the Revolution was coming quite near to us when in Oc- 
tober, a military official, who has usurped considerable authority, was 
shot down on the main street, and five wounded soldiers and one civ- 
ilian were brought into the hospital in a body. Since then, there have 
been a number of soldiers among the patients, but not many for 
wounds received in fighting. 

HENGCHOW STATION 

The work at Hengchow has been increased by the taking up 
of the work of the London Missionary Society, which was 
transferred to our Mission during the past summer. It was 
impossible because of circumstances to open a hospital during 
the past year for regular work. A dispensary was held, how- 
ever, where 3,171 patients were treated. Medical itineration 
was not attempted in routine. A trip to two places not visited 
before proved that the people were ready and willing to re- 
ceive treatment. 

EDUCATIONAL.— The building of the new school for 
boys, for which money is already appropriated, was delayed 



106 HUNAN— HENGCHOW 

until the question of the London property was settled, but 
there is every hope that this building will be completed within 
a year. There were 15 boys in attendance at the close of 
school last June. Day schools have been maintained in three 
different places. 

EVANGELISTIC— 

In the country regular visits have been made by the six Chinese 
evangelists who itinerate. These six workers reach regularly between 
40 and 50 good towns in only 19 of which we as yet have chapel 
buildings. Some of these are towns which need to be regularly 
visited, but it would not be desirable at present to rent chapels in 
them. As rapidly as circumstances will permit, we are trying to de- 
velop in the country out-station the same regular religious services 
that are used in ministering to the city congregation, with, of course, 
certain differences of detail. Since the last annual meeting there have 
been in the entire station 32 baptisms. They are classified as fol- 
lows : In the city, five men, six women. In the country fields, 19 men, 
two women. This makes the total of 32. In addition, three adults have 
been received by letter from other churches. One has been dismissed and 
one has died, so that the present communicant membership of the sta- 
tion is 94. Of these 36 are enrolled on the city records and 58 in the 
country fields. It is but just to remark that we have -been much more 
conservative in baptizing country inquirers than those of the city, 
where they are constantly under our observation. Safety seemed to 
require this course, but as time goes on there will doubtless be less 
need to do so. 

We feel that each year there is more of encouragement to be found 
in the annual Conference of Christians from both city and country 
fields. This conference is held during the Chinese 8th month (Sep- 
tember). 

The opening of the city of Lei Yang was an evangelistic event of 
the year. It is a thriving county seat almost midway between our 
two main stations of Hengchow and Chen Chow. It should have long 
since been occupied by our mission. Out of deference to the London 
Mission we desisted, but now that this mission is withdrawing, it was 
felt that our interests should no longer suffer. The Chen Chow Sta- 
tion unanimously favored this advance and kindly loaned an evangel- 
ist for six months. We look for the day when between these two 
stations there shall be a solid chain of Presbyterian towns. 

The station is sincerely grateful for the "Literature Distri- 
bution Fund" tracts supplied through Mr. Blackstone. 

Mention has been made of the city Christians who voluntarily con- 
tribute one evening a week to bearing witness for the gospel at one of 
the chapels. Even more encouraging is the willingness manifested on 
the part of a growing number of country Christians to go to the mar- 
ket fairs at their own expense either alone or in company with the 
evangelist and preach to the crowds who gather there on market days. 
We have the goal of self-support in view. For several years the city 
congregation has paid the rent for one of the city chapels, which, 
however, we own. This money provides rent for a country chapel. 
Also for two years the congregation at Sin Shi Kai has paid the rent 
of its chapel. The annual total of these two contributions is $21 
Mexican. 



HUNAN— HENGCHOW 107 

Evangelist Training School. — Sixteen have been in attend- 
ance during- this year, among whom were many from the 
United Evangelical Mission in Hunan Province. 

The usual course of class-room instruction was followed. In ad- 
dition there were lectures on preaching and each student delivered 
two sermons, on texts assigned by the teacher, before the student body. 
Daily preaching in the city chapels was a part of the regular school 
work. Under the direction of Mr. McKee the men made substantial 
progress in singing. An encouraging feature of the term's work was 
the quite voluntary witnessing on the part of some of the students. 
Aside from that at New Year's season and at the time of Hengchow's 
great idol festival, when all the men had a share, on a number of 
Sabbath afternoons, students came to the teacher's study for literature 
and after prayer for the Spirit's help would go out on the streets to 
talk of the kingdom. 

As often as possible, the teacher improved the opportunity afforded 
by a stroll over the hills at the evening recreation period, to come into 
closer personal contact with the men. At Chinese New Year time and 
at the close of school we enjoyed social evenings with the students in 
our home. 

The Mission consulted the China Council as to the wisdom 
of joining in the Union Theological work. It was decided 
that for the present this Evangelists' Training School should 
be maintained and that the plans for a higher theological insti- 
tution in Hunan be held in abeyance. 

WOMAN'S WORK.— 

Woman's work has been carried on faithfully in Hengchow, though 
hampered by having no Bible woman or teacher for the Woman's 
Bible School. Four women attended this school in the fall term and 
eight in the soring term. Two girls from the London Mission Girls' 
School, which was not 'in session this winter, helped in teaching. All 
of the six women baptized this June received instruction in this school. 
Besides superintending- this school, Mrs. Gelwicks held women's meet- 
ings everv Wednesdav afternoon and Sundav afternoon at the street 
chapel. Attendance at the Wednesday meeting was not large, but it 
was encouraging that certain ones came regularly, and that for the 
first time enough were able to read to make it practical to read verse 
about. The Sundav afternoon meetings took the form of a Sunday- 
school. The uniform leaflets were used. The largest attendance was 
So. The best feature was that a dozen or more little girls came every 
Sunday and gave themselves seriously to the learning of the Golden 
Text, Lesson Story, and hymns. The wife of one of our evangel- 
ists and her daughter have been helpful in this work, and have been 
left 'in charge during the summer. 

In the fall Mrs. Gelwicks went in a house-boat on an itinerating 
trip with her husband. The wife of the evangelist of that district 
accompanied them. She proved to be a great help. Mrs. Gelwicks 
tells one incident about her: "One day I heard her talking- to some 
women about prayer and she said: 'If vou begin the day with praver 
everything will go smoothly, but if you omit it all goes wrong.' I 
remember how when she was beginning to learn the truth, she had 
shown such indifference that I had almost despaired. But now this 
testimony given not for show to the missionary but in earnest con- 



108 HUNAN— CHENCHOW 

versation with heathen women, showed how real a help her faith 
is for every day." 

It is with unbounded gratitude that we record being able to con- 
tinue our work without interruption or injury during the troubled 
months of the Revolution. Though it does not appear that the Revo- 
lution will bring unlimited advantages to missions, yet we do find in 
our field indications of a more friendly attitude toward the gospel. 

CHENCHOW STATION 

This Station was able because of its retired location to con- 
tinue its work during the winter of 1911-12 in spite of the 
Revolution. The cutting of communication disturbed them 
somewhat, but in spite of that they were able to go on. The 
station rejoiced in the welcome visit of Dr. Lowrie and Mr. 
Lingle in July. 

EVANGELISTIC— In -this department we feel that the 
year has been noted for presents received and prayers answer- 
ed. Some little itineration was done during 'the Fall, but had 
to be suspended until after the Revolution. Mr. Mitchell re- 
ports having spent 78 days in the country, traveling 930 miles. 
Seventy adults and 27 infants were baptized. There were 150 
inquirers examined. Preachers have been appointed in two 
new schools and negotiations have been going on for some time 
in another. The work of the local evangelists in Chenchow 
itself has been most effective and devoted. The completion of 
the new street chapel will be a great help to the evangelistic 
work of the station. 

Chenchow has instituted a monthly subscription plan. Little bags 
are given to each member with their number written on the outside. 
On the first Sabbath of each month these bags are brought to the 
church, containing the amount promised monthly. This scheme has 
worked well, and nearly 50 dollars have been promised for the year. 
This money was voted by the church to the renting and repairing of a 
chapel at Hsu Feng Du, fifty li from city, and one of the largest mar- 
kets in this district. 

Reports from the six out-stations are varied. Some have 
had their share of difficulties, others more than their share of 
blessings. The chief trouble of the members in developing real 
spiritual life lies in 'their tendency to litigation. The report 
says : 

"Our Sixth Annual Conference was held from March 9th to 17th 
and was pronounced the best we ever held. Ninety-two came in from 
the out-stations and among them were seven women, two of whom 
walked 60 miles and five 25 miles. This is the first time we ever had 
women delegates. A catechism class was held for them daily. The 
program, which was carefully prepared, consisted of devotional exer- 
cises, discussions of church and moral problems and Bible study, with 
a catechism class for all inquirers each afternoon. The topic for the 
conference was "The Sermon on the Mount," an outline of which was 



HUNAN— CHENCHOW 109 

prepared and posted where all could see. After the presentation of 
the subject each day the leader led an informal discussion, asking 
questions, and it was interesting to see how all the Chinese took part. 
The evenings were given up to popular lectures, with such subjects 
as, The Care of the Body, The Christian's Relation to His Country, 
The Reform Movements. These subjects were also thrown open to 
discussion. That these discussions were valuable, is shown by several 
incidents. In the discussion of reforms, some voluntarily promised to 
give up wine, and others to use their influence in having their wives 
and sisters unbind their feet. After the health lecture bv Dr. Lewis, 
several were so impressed, that they were found after the service in 
the hospital bath-rooms taking baths, and the windows of their bed- 
rooms were thrown open to let in fresh air. One of the main fea- 
tures of the conference was a consecration meeting, which had been 
announced several days before. At that meeting, 169 days were 
promised for direct evangelistic effort by the members of the different 
churches. Several promised, with God's help, to bring at least one to 
Christ this year. The last Saturday afternoon was given up to the ex- 
amination of inquirers. Over 40 were examined, and on the follow- 
ing Sabbath 16 were received into the Church. Seven children were 
presented for baptism, among them Grace Evelyn, daughter of Dr. 
and Mrs. Berst. The attendance at all the meetings was good, and 
the interest evinced, great. It became the sentiment of the conference 
that a Christian's business in the world was to show forth what he 
had seen and known, to be a leader in every good movement, and to 
let others know what he himself had enjoyed from religion. 

WOMEN'S WORK.— This work has suffered a great deal 
because of the Revolution. While the missionaries were able 
to remain upon the ground the unrest among the people has 
prevented full attendance. Mrs. Mitchell accompanied her 
husband on one of his long itinerating trips, rendering some 
assistance. A Bible School was opened for women by Mrs. 
Derr. The Girls' School has had a successful year and has 
been able to continue its sessions in spite of the disturbed con- 
ditions of the country; the girls operating and helping with 
the housekeeping so as to make it possible to keep the school 
open. There was a total of 32 enrolled. 

Boys' Academy. — Five pupils graduated from the Boys' 
Academy this year. The exercises were held in the church 
and were honored by the presence of the military commander 
and the civil official. All the graduates succeeded in passing 
entry examinations for the Yale School at Changsha. The doc- 
tors made a careful physical examination of each boy. Three 
boys united with the church this year and several others are 
earnest inquirers. Three day schools have been maintained in 
the out-stations. 

MEDICAL WORK.— 

Owing to the troublous condition of the country last fall and winter, 
the country people feared to leave their homes to come to the city, 
and those in the city seemed to be afraid to come to the hospital for 



110 HUNAN— CHENCHOW 

treatment. Therefore, the number of our in-patients does not total 
quite as many as last year. Those which we did have, however, were 
in for serious ailments, probably due to the fact that only that kind 
felt they could leave their homes, and those who suffered less and 
were able to work at all stayed at home to look after their belong- 
ings, as rumors of bandits were daily current. 

Our medical itineration this year has been very encouraging in its 
results. One trip was made in the early autumn, and as before stated 
in this report, further itineration was not extensive until after the 
declaration of peace. Since that time we have been pleased to note a 
greater number of men and women who have come a long distance for 
treatment. Most of these cases were seen by the doctors as they were 
out on their journeys. Greater confidence has been manifested through- 
out the country, and a greater willingness to submit to operations, 
many of which were performed in the open market before a won- 
dering crowd. In all, eight trips were made, covering 2,260 li or 754 
miles, and 66 days were spent in itinerating. Two thousand one hun- 
dred and seven cases were treated and 55 operations were performed. 
All trips were made in the company of the evangelist. 

Our work in the city has been encouraging. A better class of people 
than before have patronized the hospital, as even some of the gentry 
and officials have come for treatment. Since peace has been declared 
a great many of the soldiers have been quartered in our city and many 
of them became patients at the hospital, though we are sorry to say 
with diseases which did not show a very high moral tone among the 
men of the camp. We have treated numbers of the Hupeh famine 
refugees. Owing to a lack of workers in the evangelistic department, 
the hospital loaned its evangelist during the winter for work in the 
street chapel, and one of our hospital assistants who had taken three 
months' work in the Hengchow Training School gave much time to 
direct evangelistic work among the patients. As that seems to be his 
forte, he is now enrolled for the coming year in the evangelistic staff 
of the district. The health of all in the station has been excellent 
throughout the year. A bad epidemic of measles spread over the city, 
with high mortality among children. Many of our scholars, both boys, 
and girls, contracted the disease, but fortunately none were serious 
cases. There was an unusually large number of small-pox cases in 
the city, and for a time we were kept pretty busy vaccinating children. 
Although we are unable to report any direct conversions made in the 
hospital, yet we know that the seed has been sown, and as we see many 
of our old patients at our services, we hope that in time it may bear 
much fruit. The usual morning services held in the assembly room 
for patients and helpers, have been well attended. Books and tracts 
have been sold and given away on itinerating trips. Our field receipts, 
which amount to $395.21, show a material increase over the preceding 
year. This indicates a willingness on the part of the people to pay 
more. One grateful patient, who had been operated on last year for 
extensive necrosis of the tibia, this year brought us a gift of $20. Next 
fall, when our new institutional church on the main street of the city 
is finished, we shall open up a dispensary there. We hope in this way 
to reach a much greater number of people, as our hospital, although 
in an ideal location for health reasons, is not as convenient for our 
patients as it would be were it on the street. 

The following statistics are based on records from July 1, 191 1 to 
July 1, 1912: 



HUNAN— CHANGTEH 111 

The in-patients numbered 129. 

Among these were : 

Major operations 26 

Minor operations 3 

Operations on eye 20 

Total operations 49 

Out-patient department : 

New cases (this includes country cases) 3563 

Old or return 3503 

Out calls 35 

Total 7101 

Minor operations 151 

CHANGTEH STATION 

Work at Changteh station has been greatly crippled this 
year owing to the absence of so many workers from the field. 
The year began with Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins on furlough ; then 
in November Mr. and Mrs. Lovell had to leave for home, and 
in March Mr. and Mrs. Preston. Then owing to the Revolu- 
tion, all missionaries had to withdraw from the district for 
several months. Notwithstanding the above mentioned diffi- 
culties, which have made it impossible to open up new work, 
all the usual work has been maintained. 

The report naturally comes under the three divisions, Evan- 
gelistic, Educational and Medical. 

EVANGELISTIC— 

This work was in charge of Mr. and Mrs. Preston until the begin- 
ning of December. New property had been secured and preparations 
were just being made to erect a larger church building, when the work 
was interrupted by the Revolution. Church and street chapel ser- 
vices have been conducted as usual throughout the year, and we have 
had the joy of receiving nine new members into church fellowship. 

At Taoyuen the work for the past year has been mainly in the 
hands of the evangelist, and while attendance at services has been 
fairly good, at present we can only report the addition of a few new 
inquirers. 

In consequence of the work at Changteh and Taouyen having been 
superintended from Deshan, it allows little opportunity for entering 
into detail. When we have a fuller staff on the field, we shall look 
forward to opening out-station work in a number of the surrounding 
villages. 

EDUCATIONAL.— Boarding Schools.— 

Work at Deshan Boys' and Girls' Schools was in charge of Mr. 
and Mrs. Lovell until they had to leave for home in November, owing 
to Mr. Lovell's illness. Just before he left he had the joy of baptizing 
four of the senior boys. After Mr. and Mrs. Lovell left the Girls' 
School was by Mrs. Logan's kindness, transferred to the woman's hos- 



112 HUNAN— CHANGTEH 

pital compound, and temporarily placed in charge of Miss Ellington. 
Though, owing to the Revolution, the Boys' School had to be closed 
from Dec. 6th to April nth, the Girls' School was carried on, in Miss 
Ellington's absence, by the Chinese lady teacher, Miss Feng, who has 
done excellent work in the school. When Mr. and Mrs. Chapman ar- 
rived at Dehshan, after their marriage at Shanghai on the first of 
April, the Girls' School was again transferred to the school building, 
and placed in charge of Mrs. Chapman, thus setting Miss Ellington 
free to continue her language study. Miss Ellington has made good 
progress in Chinese study, having now successfully passed the second 
examination. Work in both schools, though somewhat interrupted, 
has been on the whole satisfactory. The term closed with 27 girls and 
23 boys on the rolls. 

Day Schools. — 

During Mr. and Mrs. Preston's absence from the field the Changteh 
Day Schools have been under the supervision of Dr. and Mrs. Logan. 
The attendance at both schools has been good, and the work has 
continued throughout the year without interruption. There are alto- 
gether 83 pupils on the roll, 55 girls and 28 boys. 

Taoyuen Day School began the year at a serious disadvantage. One 
teacher died of an illness contracted while trying to rescue his property 
from the flood. It has been found necessary to dismiss the other for 
persistent litigation. Shortly after his dismissal, he opened a school 
of his own, taking with him most of our pupils. A new teacher had 
to be secured and school was reopened with only four pupils. The 
number so increased, however, that soon another teacher had to be 
engaged, and the term closed with 60 boys and girls on the. roll. 

The Chinese physicians, Drs. Pao and Tai, have as in past 
years rendered invaluable service. They are a living argument 
of 'the value of medical education to the Chinese. During the 
revolution they rendered splendid service in connection with 
the Red Cross work, and during the absence of Dr. and Mrs. 
Logan, when the Consul ordered all foreigners to withdraw 
from the station, were able to maintain the hospital work. For 
part of the time they were engaged in Red Cross work at Han- 
kow. After the return of Dr. and Mrs. Logan the attendance 
at the hospital increased nearly one hundred per cent. The 
influence of the services of these missionaries during the 
Revolution on the community has been very great. The work 
in the Women's Hospital has also been most encouraging. At 
times the temporary building now in use is full to overflowing 
with women and children. Land has been purchased and 
plans are made for the erection of the Men's Hospital very 
near the present plant. 

In spite of the liberal appropriations during the past year to the 
medical work, owing to the high price of land we shall require several 
thousand dollars additional in order to build a Men's Hospital that 
will meet the present need. 



HUNAN— STATISTICS 113 

Statistical Report is as follows : 

Out-patients, old 5342 

Out-patients, new 3656 

8998 

In-patients, Changteh 324 

In-patients, Taoyuen 10 

Visits 650 

Total 9982 

Operations 413 

STATISTICS 

1911-12 1912-13 

Men missionaries — 

Ordained 

Medical 

Lay 

Women missionaries — 

Married women 

Single women 

Native teachers and assistants 

Churches 

Communicants 

Added during the year 

Number of schools 

Total in boarding and day-schools 

Scholars in Sabbath-schools 

Contributions 

incomplete. 



12 


12 


4 


6 


1 


1 


17 


17 


5 


5 


70 


♦89 


4 


*5 


497 


* 5 82 


77 


*II4 


20 


*17 


479 


*479 


46S 


*628 


;i,2i3.oo 


*$2,525.00 



CENTRAL CHINA MISSION 

Ningpo: on the Ningpo River, 12 miles from the sea; 100 miles 
south of Shanghai ; occupied as a Mission Station, 1845. Missionaries 
— Rev. Harrison K. Wright and Mrs. Wright, Rev. E. F. Knicker- 
bocker and Mrs. Knickerbocker, Miss Edith C. Dickie, Miss Margaret 
B. Duncan and Miss Esther M. Gauss. 

Shanghai: on the Woosong River, 14 miles from the sea; occupied 
as a Mission Station, 1850. Missionaries — Rev. J. M. W. Farnham, 
D.D., Rev. J. A. Silsby and Mrs. Silsby, Rev. G. F. Fitch, D.D., and 
Mrs. Fitch, Mr. Gilbert Mcintosh and Mrs. Mcintosh, Mr. C. W. 
Douglass and Mrs. Douglass, Rev. John M. Espey and Mrs. Espey, 
Rev. C. M. Meyers and Mrs. Meyers, Miss M. D. Morton, Miss Mary 
Posey, Miss Mary Cogdal, Miss Emma Silver, Rev. Geo. E. Partch, 
Rev. Sidney McKee, Mr. R. C. Roberts and Mrs. Roberts, and Mr. 
W. D. Boone and Mrs. Boone. 

Hangchow : the capital of Chekiang Province, at southern term- 
inus of Grand Canal, 100 miles northwest of Shanghai; occupied as a 
Mission Station, 1859. Missionaries — Rev. J. H. Judson and Mrs. 
Judson, Rev. E. L. Mattox and Mrs. Mattox, Rev. F. W. Bible and 
Mrs. Bible, Miss J. Ricketts, Miss Lois D. Lyon, Mr. Arthur W. March 
and Mrs. March, Rev. Robert F. Fitch and Mrs. Fitch, the Rev. James 
H. Arthur and Mrs. Arthur, the Rev. Kepler Van Evera and Mrs. 
Van Evera, Miss Mary E. Lee and Miss Ada C. Russell. 

Soochow : 70 miles west of Shanghai; occupied as a Mission Sta- 
tion, 1871. Missionaries — Rev. J. N. Hayes, D.D., and Mrs. Hayes, 
Rev. O. C. Crawford and Mrs. Crawford, Rev. Frank H. Thropp and 
Mrs. Thropp, Miss Mary Lattimore, Elizabeth Esther Anderson, M.D., 
Miss Helen E. Smith. 

Yu Yiao: occupied as a Mission Station, 1909. Missionaries — Rev. 
J. E. Shoemaker and Mrs. Shoemaker and Miss Lavina M. Rollestone. 

Death : Mrs. J. M. W. Farnham. 

Resignation : Agnes M. Carothers, M.D. 

Transfers : Miss Edna C. Alger from Soochow to Shuntefu (North 
China Mission). 

Furloughs: Miss M. D. Morton, Rev. F. W. Bible and Mrs. Bible, 
Mr. Arthur W. March and Mrs. March, Miss Mary Lattimore, the 
Rev. J. E. Shoemaker and Mrs. Shoemaker, Mrs. Gilbert Mcintosh. 

NINGPO STATION 

Our working force during this year has been more than in- 
adequate. We have simply held the fort. Our need for new 
workers continues. It is with sorrow that we record the death 
of Rev. Zi Kyuo-jing, former Pastor of the Ningpo Church. 

114 



CENTRAL CHINA— NINGPO 115 

EVANGELISTIC WORK.— 

During March a ten days' series of Union Revival Meetings for 
Christians was held in the Fu-zin Church. As many as 1,200 attended 
one meeting, and there were never less than several hundred present. 
The meetings were the climax of preparations which had lasted more 
than a year. The spiritual side of the work has not received any set- 
back on account of the calamities and upheavals. On the other hand, 
there has been an increase of interest: the regular services in the 
churches and chapels being more largely attended, and people of the 
so-called upper classes beginning to show much interest in the pros- 
perity of the "Jesus Religion," as a direct result of the hearty and 
efficient help in relieving the distress on account of famine. 

Last March, North Bank and Fu-zin Christian women united in 
forming a Dorcas Society. This work has been taken up very en- 
thusiastically. The women meet once a mouth alternately at the mis- 
sionaries' homes. The first hour is spent in devotional exercises, and 
the remainder of the afternoon is used in cutting out and making 
garments for the poor of the church, the orphanage, etc. Many gar- 
ments are taken home by busy women and finished there. The women 
enjoy the social time spent together over their work. 

The attendance at the Sunday-school for non-Christians in the city 
has steadily increased; and a class for non-Christian women has been 
necessarily added, for the children attract the mothers. The great 
day of the year was Christmas, with its beautiful display of dolls and 
other gifts from friends at home. 

EDUCATIONAL WORK.— Day Schools.— During the 
present year there have been 14 schools, with a registration of 
about 340 students. 

Boys' Academy. — We are most grateful that the increasing 
grants from the Board have made it possible to reopen the 
Academy. 

Girls' Boarding School. — Mrs. Wright says : 

The year just closed has been a memorable one in the history of 
our school, one reason being that it passed through the Revolution 
without the loss of one day from the regular work, though there were 
a few days of anxiety for those in charge, at the time when Ningpo 
passed from the old to the new regime. Too much cannot be said in 
praise of the devoted Chinese helpers who have done so much to make 
the year's work a success. The enrollment for the autumn term was 
49 boarders and 18 day pupils, and in the spring, 56 boarders and 26 
day pupils. 

Short Term Girls' School.— Of this, Miss Rollestone, who 
was in charge, writes : 

"Last autumn and winter passed quietly in Yii-yao, although an un- 
paralleled revolution was taking place. However, in near-by country 
districts things were not so quiet. A famine was on as well as a 
revolution and brigands were making the most of the conditions, and 
several times the inhabitants of our city were excited with fear of 
riots. Our Girls' Short-term School was then in session (with an 
attendance of 25), whith caused me some anxiety. If a crowd of 
ruffians broke into our compound I did not know what might be the 
consequence. The report of a boat-load of young widows brought 
in for sale was not especially reassuring. Such lawlessness was in- 



116 CENTRAL CHINA— NINGPO 

creased by people made desperate as time went on by hunger, and had 
not relief come we all believe before the China New Year arrived 
there would have been serious trouble. But God sent aid and the win- 
ter which began ominously passed quietly. For two months the girls 
remained in session quite undisturbed, going home at the end of that 
time, each the happy possessor of a doll and, I trust, of something 
much better." 

WORK FOR WOMEN.— Women's Classes.— Miss Dickie 
reports several genuine conversions. One woman handed over 
her household gods, while two women unbound their feet. 

Miss Rollestone says : 

Of course we had our devotional meetings in which the women 
were encouraged to take part, and during which from time to time 
they voiced a deeper conviction, and more determined purpose to live 
for and serve Christ by serving others. That love to the Lord is to 
be shown by love to others was the thought kept prominently before 
all, but especially the Christians, in the class during the whole session. 

Classes for Bible-women. — 

Each winter and summer the Bible-women have a short period for 
study, with the exception of which time they are employed almost 
constantly in country and city visiting. These classes for training 
were held as usual by Miss Rollestone. 

The Men's Bible School. — 

This was held in Ningpo, February 26th to March 26th. It was 
attended by 30 men, including the three young lay helpers, who con- 
ducted the school, and the two men who served the others while doing 
what they could in the line of studying. We are inclined to believe 
that more of this sort of work can be done by our Chinese brethren in 
the future. 

MEDICAL WORK.— The Hospital in Yu-yao. 

At last the Board has given consent to the request of our Station 
and our Mission for the opening of a hospital at Yii-yao, by allowing 
Mr. and Mrs. Shoemaker to ask for funds for this purpose. 

A friend has generously furnished the money for the site and 
helped select the land which was afterward purchased. 

In due time we hope to have this hospital in operation. 

The benefits derived from the Kennedy Bequest in the enlarge- 
ment and betterment of our equipment for service in the various 
centers of work calls for special mention. 

It surely would rejoice Mr. Kennedy's heart to see what a great 
opportunity he has given to expand and care for this growing work. 

Nuns and Nunneries. — 

The nunneries are being closed by order of the Government and 
the buildings used for schools or public halls. One near our Mission 
compound in Ningpo was closed in June. The idols were thrown 
into the street and the nuns have had to find shelter elsewhere. One 
of our Bible-women met a nun last January while traveling on a boat. 
She talked to her about the "Jesus Religion" and urged her to leave 
the nunnery and attend our Women's Class. She is 25 years old. She 



CENTRAL CHINA— SHANGHAI 117 

came, bringing a girl 13 years old, a relative who was being trained 
to be a nun. Later, one 23 years old came. 

FAMINE RELIEF.— The work of famine relief was done 
under the auspices of the Central China Famine Relief Com- 
mittee, of Shanghai. The local officials collected and distri- 
buted about $60,000 (Mexican). Among 500 Christians in the 
famine district we distributed through regular church chan- 
nels fully $700 (Mexican) — all special funds. 

SHANGHAI STATION 

EVANGELISTIC WORK.— 

The three- Presbyterian Churches in Shanghai are self-supporting 
and, with the exception of Lowrie Memorial, the chapels they occupy 
were built by the Chinese Christians. The Phoo-nen church in the 
country provides the building used for a chapel at Tsoong-sing-'oo 
and contributes a small sum toward the salary of Rev. Kyung Yoeu- 
faung, the evangelist who is its stated supply. 

The health of Rev. Li Ung-tsung being quite restored, he again 
took up his work as pastor of the First Presbyterian Church (South 
Gate) last November a year ago. His congregation and his mission- 
ary co-workers are very grateful to God for Mr. Li's recovery and 
believe that prayer for him has been answered in a very special way. 
Mr. Li's bright mind, his knowledge of Chinese Literature gained 
through wide reading, his knowledge of men and things gained 
through a business experience of several years in the Commercial 
Press at Shanghai, his love for his people and his belief in their final 
redemption, his disinterested motives made evident by his giving up 
a lucrative position to enter the ministry at a salary about one-third 
of what he had been receiving, and the spiritual fruits under God of a 
year of mental suffering, have combined to make him a very effective 
preacher and pastor, one to whom both Chinese and foreigners like 
to listen. 

Second Church (Lowrie Memorial Chapel). — 

Last Christmas there were so many calls for help that the church 
members decided to sell to themselves the contents of the Christmas 
box, so kindly sent them every year by the ladies of the Philadelphia 
Presbytery. In this way they raised money for the Orphanage which 
is so generously helped by Elder Kau and the "Door of Hope," also 
sending 150 bags of cakes to the inmates of the latter Home. 

Of course the end and aim of all our work is the evangelization of 
China, and is thus evangelistic. But some of our missionaries give 
most of their effort to what is termed direct evangelistic work. Mrs. 
Silsby and Mrs. Thaung went out daily visiting the homes of a large 
number of boys and girls who are pupils in our schools. They were 
well received, and were delighted to hear that many of the girls 
and boys from non-Christian homes have told the Gospel during their 
frequent visits home, and one of the boys teaches his sister to read 
whenever he goes home. We praise the Lord for many open doors, 
so many that our force is all too small for the work at hand. 

Miss Posey made a four-days' trip to Doo-ka-aung and Tsoong- 
sing-'po, and came back rejoicing over the experiences and oppor- 
tunities of the trip, and very enthusiastic as to the possibilities of 
this country work and the great need of more reapers for the whiten- 
ing harvest. 



118 CENTRAL CHINA— SHANGHAI 

We are the only Mission at work in this region, and have a chapel 
in a most strategic point on the main business thoroughfare between 
the old city and the Phoo-toong ferry. Preaching services were kept 
up three or four nights each week at this place. The attendance has 
been excellent, and two have been received into the South Gate 
Church. There has also been a crowded school for ragged little 
street urchins every Sabbath afternoon. Probably through this Sun- 
day-school alone, we have touched in some way at least two hundred 
homes in this region, but we feel that as a Mission and Church, we 
ought to be doing more for this great suburb. 

Evangelistic meetings have been held three evenings a week in the 
Lowrie Memorial Chapel on Pekin Road, and the help is all voluntary, 
a few faithful ones being always on hand. A number have given in 
their names as enquirers. 

Mokanshan Chapel. — 

Unsolicited funds were contributed by the Christian Chinese and 
a few of the foreign friends on the hill, but the largest gift was from 
Dr. J. Ackerman Coles, who not only gave the Church one of the 
famous Meneely bells, but most generously contributed £150 as well. 
The chapel will seat about one hundred persons, is well lighted by 
Gothic windows, and altogether is a very artistic little building. 

OUT-STATIONS.—^ Tseu-phoo.— 

Large posters printed in colors, announcing the meetings and in- 
viting all classes of men and women, young and old, rich and poor, 
to come and listen and learn, were posted in the houses and other 
prominent places, and nearly a thousand handbills giving topics to be 
discussed, were distributed in the shops and dwelling houses. The 
meetings were well attended, and five men enrolled themselves as 
enquirers. Two of them are teachers in a school subsidized by the 
Government, one a physician, and the two others are business men. 

There is still a strong prejudice against the foreigner and his re- 
ligion, but there are evidences that it is breaking down, and there is 
a more steady attendance at our Sabbath services. One man, the 
proprietor of a shoe-store, was examined and baptized early in June. 
Twenty-seven are enrolled as enquirers, and we desire your earnest 
prayers for them. 

At Kau-jau. — 

The year began with a falling away, for many who had crowded the 
chapel in the spring having discovered that the Church was not going 
to help them in their law-suits and other selfish schemes, stopped com- 
ing to the services. Our first church member, Mr. Sung, has remained 
faithful and now his wife has been admitted to communion and one 
of his daughters has applied for baptism. 

Tsen-so. — 

This is a thriving city about 17 miles east of Shanghai, and is said 
to contain about 2,000 inhabitants. The chapel is often crowded at 
the evening service, and the attendance is not so much the riff-raff of 
society as in former years, but the solid business men. 

Jau-deu. — 

This is a point central to our three principal out-stations, Tseu- 
phoo, Doo-ka-aung, and Tsoong-sing-oo, and early in May represen- 



CENTRAL CHINA— SHANGHAI 119 

tatives from this place came to Tseu-phoo, asking that we open a 
chapel there. They brought with them a list of 33 names of church 
members and enquirers who promised to provide a chapel building 
free of rent to the mission. 

Doo-ka-aung. — 

At the last meeting of the Presbytery in November, the church 
members in Doo-ka-aung and Tsoong-sing-oo, hitherto connected with 
our South Gate Church, presented a petition asking that a church be 
organized there, and in May the church was established. 

Tsoong-sing-oo. — 

Mr. Kyung continues to serve this field in addition to his responsi- 
bility at Doo-ka-aung. This station is in some respects the most 
promising of all, for the members show a loyalty in benevolence, in 
attendance on church services, and in personal work with unconverted 
neighbors, which is not shown in any other field. The attempt to 
keep up the prayer meeting has been in part successful. They meet 
from house to house, and at least one of these meetings was held in 
the home of a former enemy of Christianity. He it was who had the 
first enquirer, now an elder and a leader in the Church, arrested for 
renting a building for chapel use. This former persecutor is now an 
enquirer. 

WOMEN'S CLASSES.— 

Besides the almost daily house-to-house visitation, Mrs. Silsby con- 
ducted daily Bible lessons for the local Bible-women for a time, and 
during the months of November and April conducted classes for 
inquirers and the more ignorant Christian women. These women and 
girls were, as a rule, pathetically eager to learn to read, and a greater 
spiritual interest than usual was manifest in the spring term, while the 
closing meeting was one of unusual power. 

EDUCATIONAL WORK.— Lowrie High School— 

The school, which 52 years ago was founded by Dr. Farn- 
ham with two or three little orphan boys as a nucleus, has grown to 
be one of the largest mission schools in this province and with a few 
exceptions the pupils pay for both board and tuition. Our total en- 
rollment for the year has reached 200. At the last meeting of the 
church session there were 19 applicants for admission to communion. 

All pupils receive religious instruction daily at the chapel service 
and are required to take Bible studies as a part of the regular cur- 
riculum. In the four higher classes about two-thirds are church mem- 
bers, but in the lower classes a large majority are not yet members 
of any Christian Church. 

The need of good Christian schools for the Chinese was never more 
evident than at present, and the opportunities which the Church has 
now for reaching great numbers of the most promising young people 
in China, leading them to Christ and fitting them to be leaders in all 
departments of useful service, must present a strong appeal to all who 
desire to see God's kingdom established in this ancient land, with its 
teeming millions now more receptive than ever before. 

Girls' Boarding School. — 

During the last year, the attendance in this school has only been 
limited by its accommodations. Non-Christians have said that they 



120 CENTRAL CHINA— SHANGHAI 

prefer to send their daughters to our school instead of the non- 
Christian schools because they are more carefully looked after and 
are taught by experienced teachers. There are now 154 pupils in at- 
tendance and no larger number can be admitted until the much-desired 
new plant is given us. At present the assembly, class-rooms, dining- 
room, and dormitories are all crowded until there is no room for the 
proverbial "one more." 

Kindergartens. — 

Miss Yi, the very efficient and enthusiastic kindergarten teacher, has 
continued to superintend the South Gate Kindergarten and also teaches 
music and English in the Girls' Boarding School. 

Miss Lanman, our associate missionary, has continued to maintain 
a Kindergarten near the New Press Works for the children of our 
employees there, and with the help of Miss Liang opened another some 
distance away from the first. 

Day Schools. — 

Of the five day schools connected with our Shanghai Station, only 
one receives any fund from our appropriations and that is a little 
school which Miss Posey conducts for girls in the neighborhood of 
the Commercial Press, who are either too poor, or can not be spared 
from home, to attend other schools. 

The South Gate congregation maintains one day school and the 
Mission Press congregation maintains two, one at 18 Pekin Road, the 
other at the New Press Works. 

MISSION PRESS. — The past year has been one of un- 
usual exigencies in the working of the Press. On account of 
the Revolution, which called a good many missionaries from 
their work and very much curtailed their operations in other 
respects, the output of the year has been considerably lessened 
and the sales from the book-room have been much reduced, so 
that financially the year has been one of heavy strain. In this 
connection we are grateful to record the gift of $6,000 Gold 
from the Kennedy Fund for the erection of a double house on 
the premises on North Szechuen Road. 

The question of uniting with the Methodist Publishing 
House was discussed during the year with Dr. Lacy, the man- 
ager of that establishment, and members of the Council's Ad- 
visory Committee, and definite progress has been made. It is 
hoped that a practical plan of union will be instituted. 

We are glad to report that the Chinese Christiati Intelligencer has 
an ever increasing constituency, and a particularly encouraging fact 
is that many more copies are taken bv individuals than formerly, in- 
stead of being subscribed for by the Missions and furnished free or 
for a part of the cost. The paper serves as a connecting link between 
the Chinese preachers and evangelists throughout the country, and 
affords them a much needed and much used means of interchange of 
ideas such as they never had before and could not now have but for the 
Intelligencer. It is difficult to estimate the power for good of the 
paper among our Chinese constituency. Its present issue is 4,500 
copies weekly. 



CENTRAL CHINA— HANGCHOW 121 

During the twelve months under review the amount of 
Scripture printing in Chinese has more than doubled. 

HANGCHOW STATION 

The year has been a notable one in the history of Hangchow. The 
three weeks preceding the actual Revolution in Hangchow witnessed 
an almost indescribable panic among the people of the city; fugitives 
by tens of thousands left, fearing that the Manchu garrison, hopeless 
of successful defence, would shell the city as soon as attacked. The 
local revolutionary movement was carried through in the most order- 
ly manner by the provincial military forces, but a general stagnation 
of trade began in Hangchow with the outbreak at Wuchang, and the 
people have endured the most terrible suffering known since the Tai- 
ping rebellion. For many months tens of thousands of people have 
had no work; the death rate has been very high, and the suffering 
was, and still is, of such character that in any other land it would 
have produced great disorder. The several missions in the city united 
in relief work to the extent of their ability and some help has come 
from the Central Famine Relief Committee. The situation is far 
more difficult to deal with than that resulting from a famine, and, 
although especially acute in Hangchow because of general condi- 
tions, is probably typical of a stage through which China must pass. 

The political and social changes, since order emerged from the gen- 
eral confusion, have been extremely favorable to missionary work. 
The new officials have shown a most cordial attitude towards foreign- 
ers. On New Year's night, the provincial authorities entertained the 
foreign community in a most elaborate way, and pleasant social rela- 
tions have grown up between some of the officials and some of the 
missionaries. In the spring, the foreign community gave a simple re- 
ception to the new officials, several of whom have shown a very kindly 
attitude towards mission work. In both city and country the people 
have been more and more friendly and the merchant and business men 
have become more accessible. 

EVANGELISTIC WORK.— The City.— 

The city church is still under the efficient leadership of Pastor Dzi, 
although an urgent call to Ningpo, whose deep need strongly appealed 
to him, threatened at one time to take him from Hangchow. The 
church is growing steadily if not rapidly; the reorganization of the 
Sunday-school has been a notable feature of the year's work. 

Miss Ricketts had charge of the Beginners' Department with a 
group of High School and Normal School girls as teachers, and 
speaks of a Teachers' Class conference on a lesson on giving. She 
had told them that in America there was often a friendly rivalry in 
giving, the contributions of the several classes being reported. She 
was stopped by the surprised look on the faces of the girls and said : 
"But that would not be using the highest incentive for giving, would 
it?" They said emphatically "No, it would not!" 

The Institutional Centre. — 

This new department was opened in May in a comfortable Chinese 
house. The opening day brought a large crowd, and the people of 
the neighborhood have been very cordial. Mrs. Bible has been able to 
go into a good many homes with Mrs. Tse, the new Bible-woman, 
and she reports the most cordial reception and a good deal of interest 
everywhere, and a number of women from this district have united 
with the city church. 



122 CENTRAL CHINA— HANGCHOW 

Mr. Judson gathers the workmen employed in the gardens and 
orchards for daily morning prayers in his home, while Mrs. Judson 
has the same men in a Sunday-school class in which she is aided by 
several college students. The men are learning to read the Bible and 
one was admitted to the church recently. 

Mrs. Fitch tells an interesting story of a Buddhist priest in the un- 
settled condition following the revolution. The rabble began to cut 
down the fine old trees around his hill-top temple for fuel until Mr. 
Fitch appealed to the authorities and secured protection. This was 
the beginning of a relationship which opened the way for Christian 
teaching. During the recent Summer School for Christian workers 
the priest appeared one morning at Mr. Fitch's house and announced 
his desire to leave Buddhism and enter the Jesus priesthood. He was 
shown around the buildings where the Chinese pastors were in session 
— then went back to his temple with a supply of Christian books, prom- 
ising to come to the pastor for instruction. Mrs. Fitch also mentions 
numbers of country people who attend the "back-door clinic," many 
of whom have simple ills which Mr. Fitch is able to relieve, and others 
he sends to the hospital in the city, and in it all is the opportunity for 
effective evangelism. 

The Lower Road. — 

At Dzang-an we dedicated the chapel made possible by the gener- 
osity of friends in Brooklyn and Portland, Ore., and the splendid giv- 
ing of Chinese Christians. Here, as at Zeh-men, the evangelist is 
getting in touch with the younger business men. At the latter place 
Mr. Nyiu has continued his helpful relations with the gentry. This 
year he helped in the organization of an establishment for the cure 
of opium smokers and is allowed free access to the patients. The 
work at Tse-way-miao has been reopened by a young man just out 
of college and the first-fruits have come in the admission to the 
church of a former opium-smoker whose changed life has already 
made an impress on the community. 

The Revolution and its accompanying conditions limited the itiner- 
ating by Mr. Bible to some extent and made impossible the holding of 
night evangelistic meetings, which have been in recent years the most 
effective method of getting in touch with men. Yet the number of 
inquirers grows and the activity of the Christians is encouraging. 

At Sin-z the self-supporting church continues to excite our admira- 
tion. During the year the people of the church, under the leadership 
of elders and laymen, have held evangelistic services in the church 
and have gone out in small groups to Christian homes, where friends 
and neighbors have been invited to hear the Gospel message in sim- 
plest and most colloquial language. 

Miss Lyon writes of the "opportunities for heart-to-heart talks with 
women who were soul hungry," and of the value which knowledge of 
the home life of the girls would have for teachers. 

The Upper River Field. — 

For the first time in several years we have received additions on 
confession of faith, and have a group under instruction. In this, as 
in several other places, the work is much handicapped by the fact that 
the evangelist in charge, while full of zeal, has had little or no train- 
ing, either Biblical or general. 

At I-u, one of the men graduated this year from the Bible Training 
School has taken charge of this work. The strong opposition which 
has for the past two years hindered our work is dying out. The effect 
of the Revolution was quite marked. We had feared that the New 



CENTRAL CHINA— HANGCHOW 123 

Year season would bring a repetition of last year's attack upon Chris- 
tians for refusing to take part in idolatrous ceremonies, but from the 
time General Li's first proclamation reached this little city the atti- 
tude of the people changed. The attendance on the regular and special 
services is showing increase. 

Zang-kyi is the scene of the most interesting work of the Upper 
River Field. It is a small market town and our representative is a 
little uneducated Bible-woman, yet on the last visit of Mr. Bible 21 
men and women presented themselves for examination. Their knowl- 
edge is limited because the Bible-woman had little training, but they 
seem to have been drawn by this simple woman's demonstration of 
Christian love and her assurance that for them as for her, in spite of 
sin and ignorance, there is full salvation. We have here one of the 
rare instances of what seems to be instantaneous conversion. An old 
woman had been a member of the Vegetarian Society for 30 years, 
having risen to a position of some authority. She says that as soon as 
she had heard the simple testimony of the Bible woman and knew of 
her inner peace she believed. "I knew*"she had what I had wanted 
for so long. She said I might have it too, if I would believe. I did 
and now I have peace within." 

At Tong-yang we have been encouraged by a number of inquirers 
coming from the city, and on Mr. Bible's last visit one of these — a 
bright and successful business man — was admitted to membership. A 
number of others have also been admitted. Two out-stations have 
been opened by the Tong-yang Christians who have organized a com- 
mittee to take charge. Two volunteer preachers go to them every 
Sunday. Mr. Bible has not been able to visit the first of the two 
places, yet on his last visit to the field 11 inquirers from this place 
walked five to eight miles to another chapel to be examined. 

Me-san and Swe-koh. — 

The year has seen a notable departure in connection with the evan- 
gelistic work. In July a Summer Bible School was held on the college 
campus under direction of a committee of Chinese pastors and for- 
eign evangelists representing the five churches of the city. Planned in 
the first instance as a purely local matter, the registration expanded 
until the committee were literally overwhelmed; 108 students, repre- 
senting eight missions and three provinces were in attendance. A 
faculty of five foreigners and six Chinese, including Pastor Ding 
Lih-me and Dr. Yang, gave to pastors and country evangelists a unique 
opportunity. The most significant and encouraging feature was that 
the chief burden both of preliminary organization and actual admin- 
istration was born by two Chinese pastors. The conference was 
made notable by a communion service held July 14th in the Public 
Lecture Hall attached to the C. M. S. Hospital. There were 800 who 
partook of the sacrament administered by a Chinese, archdeacon of 
the Anglican Communion and a minister of the Southern Presbyterian 
Church. Two evening sessions were devoted to conference on Church 
union and there was not a dissenting voice in the whole conference 
to the idea of organic Church union. It was the almost unanimous 
opinion that the Summer Bible School properly organized may become 
one of the most valuable means for increasing the efficiency in evan- 
gelism. 

EDUCATIONAL WORK.— The College.— 

The growing fame of the college site has brought an increasing 
number of visitors from different parts of China and especially from 
abroad, giving to the ladies opportunity for service on the social side. 



124 CENTRAL CHINA— HANGCHOW 

Mr. Judson has continued the work of the Self-Help Department 
in which Hangchow College is the pioneer in China. He says of this 
department, after pointing out its economic value: "We believe that 
there is in this idea of student self-help a drill and discipline, which 
give an integrity of character and honesty in service which money 
cannot purchase and the class-room drill cannot give. 

The fall semester opened most auspiciously September 16, 191 1, 
with 104 students in attendance. These were carefully selected from 
those who had been present the former semester with the addition of 
a few new names. 

The regular work of the college went on till the end of the year, 
without interruption. All the Government schools were closed almost 
from the beginning of the Revolution till the end of the year. 

The great event of the year was the graduation of the first class at 
the new site. The day was perfect; there was a goodly attendance of 
foreigners from the city and even from other places to attend the 
exercises. Four fine young men completed the college course, all 
expecting to enter the ministry. Three of them are now in the sem- 
inary at Nanking and the fourth is preaching in a chapel at Chow 
Wang Miao of the Northern Presbyterian Mission. There were 16 
graduates from the academy, more than half of whom entered the 
Freshman class of the college. 

The first semester, 1912, opened with 113 students in attendance, 
32 in the college and 81 in the preparatory department. The Chris- 
tian work of the college has been continued as usual.. Of the student 
body, 64 are communicants and 24 others are from Christian homes. 
The Y. M. C. A., in addition to its regular gospel meetings, has made 
good use of its new reading room and library. Three-fourths of the 
students were enrolled in voluntary Bible study classes. The students 
are as enthusiastic as ever in their Sunday afternoon preaching. A 
number of new places have been opened up. The boys go out in 
bands of three to five and carry a banner announcing their object. Mr. 
Stuart has purchased a motor launch which has been of great service 
in taking the boys to and from the various preaching places along the 
river. It is hoped soon to open up still other places that can be reached 
in this way, as there are several villages and market towns not far 
away. This work is bearing fruit in the lives of our students and is 
good training for them. It gives them a little taste of Christian work 
and keeps the claims of the ministry constantly before them. Ten 
of our old students and teachers are at present in the Nanking Sem- 
inary in various degrees of preparation for the ministry. 

The Misses Tooker, of Orange, New Jersey, whose lamented father 
was deeply interested in the college, paid us two visits. They have 
decided to erect a fine memorial chapel on the campus in honor of 
their father. This will not only add greatly to the appearance of the 
plant and fill a felt want for our daily chapel exercises and various 
Sunday services, but will be serviceable for the larger gatherings that 
will meet from time to time on special occasions, commencement ex- 
ercises, conferences, etc. 

Day Schools. — 

The eight day schools of the mission are in charge of Mr. Mattox, 
who speaks of the great assistance given by Mr. Chow, the teacher of 
mathematics in the college. Mr. Mattox hopes to develop the schools 
in closest relationship to the evangelistic work, securing in this way 
continuity in spite of changes of teachers, and helping the people of 
each community to associate the idea of good education with Chris- 



CENTRAL CHINA— SOOCHOW 125 

tianity, while through the pupils many doors will open for direct evan- 
gelistic work. Regular Christian instruction is given in all schools 
and attendance on Sunday service is required. 

Theological Students. — 

We have five men in the seminary proper at Nanking and one in 
the Bible Training School, while there are two special students in 
the college preparing to enter the Training School. 

In view of the relatively small space allotted to educational work 
in this report it may not be amiss to record the fact that without ex- 
ception the members of the Station in educational work have given a 
measure of support and direct helpfulness in the evangelistic work, 
which, while it cannot be described in reports nor tabulated in sta- 
tistics, has been one of the chief elements in deepening the evangel- 
istic spirit of the Chinese Christians and increasing the zeal and 
earnestness of the Chinese evangelists, and has given to the foreign 
evangelist in charge proof positive of the essential one-ness of edu- 
cational and evangelistic departments of the missionary movement. 

SOOCHOW STATION 

We would thank our kind Heavenly Father that His mercy has 
been upon us throughout this year of unrest. In the midst of rioting 
and turmoil, our compound surrounded by looters, and shots flying 
in every direction, His hand has been over us and He allowed no 
accident to befall us. Although, at times, our work suffered interrup- 
tion, yet we were never obliged to suspend it entirely, except for a 
few weeks in the out-stations ; neither was it necessary for us to 
leave our Station, though once or twice we feared it might be. 

EVANGELISTIC WORK.— 

We united with the other missions in Soochow in a series of evan- 
gelistic meetings about Chinese New Year. All churches, chapels, and 
preaching places were opened simultaneously, afternoons and even- 
ings. The subjects were chosen by a union committee, all preaching 
on the same subject at the same time. Large crowds attended these 
meetings. 

We have held regular evangelistic evening meetings in all of our 
chapels on different evenings of the week, under the care of Mr. 
Crawford and Mr. Throop, assisted by the Chinese helpers. 

Church. — 

The church work this year has been especially encouraging. It has 
been a year of slow but steady growth. No internal strife nor un- 
pleasantness has occurred. More inquirers have been examined for 
baptism than in any former year in the history of the church. Seven- 
teen were taken in at one communion and the total number of addi- 
tions during the year was 50. The attendance at the regular Sunday 
afternoon services has been so large as to fill the building, and at the 
communion services it has taxed the seating capacity to the utmost. 
If advance work is to be pushed with vigor, we must have a new 
building or this one must be enlarged. 

One of the most gratifying departments of the church work is the 
Sunday-schools. At Zong-sin-gyao the school has been under the 
efficient leadership of Deacon Yang and a corps of teachers. There 
has been a steady growth in attendance, averaging for the year about 
125. 



126 CENTRAL CHINA— SOOCHOW 

Street Chapels. — 

For the first time in the history of the Station the street chapels 
have been put in such condition as to commend them to the people as 
being representative of a great Church. By means of the money from 
the Kennedy Fund, augmented by a gift from the Chairman of the 
China Council, one chapel in the city and one in the country have 
been completely renovated and one new building has been erected. 
The latter is worthy of special mention. Immediately after comple- 
tion, two weeks of evangelistic meetings were held with most gratify- 
ing results. When the two rooms are used in addition to the main 
room, the building seats about 400 people comfortably. It was well 
filled twice a day. All the helpers assisted in these meetings. 

As a result of the special meetings, a large number of people gave 
in their names as inquirers and many of them have been coming every 
Wednesday evening to inquirers' classes. 

Mrs. Crawford, assisted by the Bible-woman, conducted meetings 
for women at the Chon-chu-'ong chapel, for part of the year. These 
meetings were always well attended and after the special meetings a 
number of the inquirers came to them. We have had from 12 to 20 
women and usually as many children. 

Out-Stations. — 

Our out-station work lies in a section of fertile country having 
a large population, and a network of canals makes every part of it 
easily accessible by boat. 

EDUCATIONAL WORK.— Boarding School— 

The Soochow Academy has been carried on during the year, but 
under difficulties. Our building is well adapted for a day school for 
which it was built, but it is quite insufficient to provide comfortable 
quarters for a boarding school. We have had 19 boarders besides a 
number who have been provided with noon meals. We have had 20 
day pupils, but owing to the Revolution and to other causes, their 
attendance has been irregular. 

Day Schools. — 

Kwong-foh. — The attendance at this school during the past year 
has been better than ever before, because we have had a teacher who 
has been able to teach the Western branches. There were 23 pupils 
enrolled. The final examinations showed that both teacher and pupils 
had done good work. 

Moh-doh. — This school is well located and ought to have a large 
attendance. In this school, as well as in one of the city schools, the 
highest marks in the final examination were made by a girl. 

Tae-dsen-gyao (South Garden). — Mr. Chu, who was the teacher 
here for several years, went to Nanking to study theology, so we were 
obliged to find another teacher. We secured a graduate from the 
Kashing Academy. We have had 23 in attendance. 

San-lo-wan. — 

Mrs. Hayes, who has the oversight of this school, says : "A number 
of years ago, I had tried to get the children of this neighborhood to 
attend a day school but had failed in the effort. It was therefore 
with fear and trembling that I attempted it this year. However, we 
secured a fine teacher, one who in previous years had been my Bible- 



CENTRAL CHINA— SOOCHOW 127 

woman, and began the experiment. My great desire was to have 
only girls, but there were some small boys under ten years of age 
who were so anxious to attend that we could not refuse them. We 
admitted them with the understanding that ten years was to be the 
age limit. The first day we had 13 pupils and the number 
steadily increased until March 27th, the date of the Soo- 
chow riots, when we had to close the school for a few days. A 
number of the children moved away and when we reopened we had 
only 18 present. But, after a few days, more of the old pupils 
returned and new ones came too, until we had a total enrollment of 
over 30. This large number makes the enlargement of the school 
room necessary and we hope to have the alterations complete in time 
for the beginning of our fall term. In this school, the Chinese 
classics are taught in the morning and the Christian books in the 
afternoon. We are hoping for great things for this school and trust 
that it may grow and in time become something more than a day 
school." 

MEDICAL WORK.— Tooker Memorial Hospital— Dr. 
Anderson reports for the Hospital as follows : 

The year just past has been a stormy one, yet the turmoil without 
has only occasionally penetrated the usual calm and routine within 
our walls. While more inland stations found it necessary to close 
their hospitals for a time, our section was quiet and our city work 
uninterrupted. The night of the looting of this suburb, the in-pati- 
ents were much frightened, especially when repeated knockings were 
heard at our gate. It was encouraging when the keeper reported 
hearing someone call loudly to the others: "Do not go in, they are 
foreigners," and again : "That is a charitable institution, we must not 
disturb it." Truly our free dispensing to all suffering soldiers was 
quickly bringing its own reward. 

In the In-patient Department the increase has been about one-third 
above any previous hospital year, a large per cent, in the increase being 
children. The severe epidemic of measles in March and April 
demonstrated without question the immediate need of an isolation 
ward some distance from the main building. 

The regular hospital dispensary has been held every other day with 
good attendance. Strangers, those from a long distance or severe 
cases, coming at other times, were also seen, quite often the numbers 
being equal to those of regular dispensing days. 

Among the Chinese there is an increasing willingness to invite us 
to see them in their homes. One call to Kwong-foh, sixty li from Soo- 
chow, came at the close of a busy forenoon clinic in Moh-doh — our 
station half way between the two cities. By seven in the evening a 
little boat brought us to the door. The patient, reported as dying of 
typhoid fever, showed but few symptoms of that malady. # Closer ex- 
aminations and questions brought out the fact that she was an opium- 
smoker. As she became too ill to use the pipe, each well-meaning 
friend who came in gave her a teaspoonful of opium tea, seeking to 
relieve, but had succeeded in poisoning until there seemed but slight 
hopes of recovery. Her husband in the next room was in a similar 
condition, but not yet so serious. Another call was made on a school- 
boy nearby, apparently dying of general oedema. Midnight found us 
again with the waiting friends at Moh-doh weary but happy, for the 
hopes were realized and the three lives saved. The husband and wife 
have since broken off the opium habit : the boy is again in school. 

Itinerating has, for the most of the year, been impracticable, owing 
to robber bands in the country districts. Again and again we wanted 



128 CENTRAL CHINA— STATISTICS 

to answer the urgent pleas of the people to make our regular visits. 
The boat was called and loaded with necessary medicines, food, and 
bedding, then at the last minute dismissed because of the rumors of 
danger. The night of the riot our boat was ready to leave at day- 
light the next morning. It was seized by the soldiers and used to 
carry away their booty The next afternoon the frightened boatman 
returned. Our food and drugs were undisturbed, but he had lost all 
except his boat. 

An effort has always been made to keep the evangelistic side of our 
work one of the strong features. Morning prayers for patients, help- 
ers, and servants are held in the hospital chapel. In the wards, daily 
teaching of portions of Scripture, tracts, and hymns is in charge of 
the Bible-woman. A Sabbath-school is held in the wards on Sunday 
mornings for those unable to go to the church. The most influential 
one in our midst is a little old lady who has cancer of the breast. 
For over two years she has gone from bed to bed, preaching, teaching, 
and praying. The wonderful simplicity of her faith and prayer life is 
a stimulation to old and young. One cannot come to a difficult place 
or crisis, without the thought : "Chu T'a T'a is in some secret corner 
praying, — it must be a victory." 

House-to-house visitation is our aim; following up the in-patients 
and those, too, who have attended the dispensary and shown special 
interest in the gospel message. 

Our Station has had the pleasure of entertaining a number of dis- 
tinguished visitors during the year, among them being, Dr. Geo. Knox 
and his wife; Dr. Thos. C. Hall, of Union Theological Seminary, 
New York; Dr. Webster; Dr. ICing of Peking; the Misses Tooker; 
Mr. Vorhies of Japan; Mrs. Hobbs and Miss McClintock of Denver; 
Mr. Stanley Hunter of India; and the nine members of Dr. Bradt's 
party. 

STATISTICS 

Men missionaries — 1911-12 1912-13 

Ordained 17 19 

Lay 3 5 

Women missionaries — 

Married women 18 21 

Medical 2 1 

Other single women 12 14 

Ordained native preachers 18 18 

Native teachers and assistants 147 155 

Churches 18 19 

Communicants 2,631 2,920 

Added during the year 33© 372 

Number of schools 38 33 

Total in boarding and day-schools 1,311 1,586 

Scholars in. Sabbath-schools 2,325 2,978 

Contributions $14,587 $15,967 



KIANG-AN MISSION 

Nanking: on the Yang-tse-Kiang, about 280 miles from its mouth; 
occupied as a Mission Station, 1876. Missionaries — Rev. Charles Lea- 
man, Rev. W. J. Drummond and Mrs. Drummond, Rev. J. C. Garritt, 
D.D., and Mrs. Garritt, Rev. J. E. Williams and Mrs. Williams, Miss E. 
E. Dresser, Miss M. A. Leaman, Miss Lucy Leaman, Miss Jane A. 
Hyde, Miss Grace Lucas, Rev. Alfred V. Gray and Mrs. Gray, Mrs. 
A. M. R. Jones, Rev. A. A. Bullock and Mrs. Bullock, Dr. T. Dwight 
Sloan, Mr. Harry Clemons, Mr. J. Bailie and Miss Mabel Lee. 

Hwai-yuen : 150 miles northwest of Nanking; occupied as a Mis- 
sion Station, 1892. Missionaries — Rev. E. C. Lobenstine, Rev. D. S. 
Morris and Mrs. Morris, Rev. J. B. Cochran, Samuel Cochran, M.D., 
and Mrs. Cochran, Miss Agnes Gordon Murdoch, M.D., Miss Mary 
Cole Murdoch, Miss Margaret Falconer Murdoch, Miss Florence J. 
Chaney and Miss Hattie MacCurdy. 

Nanhsuchow: Rev. Thomas F. Carter and Mrs. Carter, and Rev. 
George C. Hood. 

Death : Mrs. James B. Cochran. 

Furloughs : Rev. J. C. Garritt, D.D., Rev. J. E. Williams and Mrs. 
Williams, Mrs. A. M. R. Jones, Rev. J. B. Cochran, and Mrs. J. Bailie. 



NANKING STATION 

For Nanking, as for all China, the year 1911-12 stands alone 
in the history of the country. Beginning with the riot in Au- 
gust which destroyed three country chapels, through the siege 
of Nanking — the meeting of the Kiang-si troops — the destruc- 
tion of the idols — even to the beginning of summer, we have 
scarcely been free from war or rumor of war. 

Nevertheless we have reason to be thankful for the way in 
which the year has dealt with us as a station, not only for our 
personal well-being, but especially for the increased oppor- 
tunities for work, increased willingness to hear the Gospel 
which may be traced directly to the revolution. 

We have to look back with pleasure on the visits — some far 
too short, of many friends. Dr. Bradt and his party brought 
love and fellowship and hearty encouragement, spurring us on 
to realize our ideals. Mrs. Van Norden's visit and that of the 
Misses Tooker were all too short. After the summer Dr. and 
Mrs. White and Miss Palmer visited the Bible School, and Dr. 
and Mrs. Merle Smith, Miss Van Sandvoord and Mrs. Knox 
spent two or three days with us on their way to Hwai Yuen. 

129 

(7) 



130 KIANG-AN— NANKING 

EVANGELISTIC WORK.— General Evangelistic— City.— 

Immediately before and during the siege of Nanking, the people 
were stricken with panic fear. Those who could, left the city. Those 
who could not moved from one place to another — dwellers in the 
south part going to the north and those in the north fleeing to the 
south. In their extremity many realized the futility of their old 
religions and not a few even joined the Christians in prayer for safety. 
The comparative calmness of the Christians, the refusal of the foreign 
gentlemen to leave the city, contributing by their presence to the safety 
of the people, and, finally, the victory of the revolutionists, all united 
to produce an openness of heart and a willingness to listen that the 
missionaries were glad to use to advantage. They organized all the 
evangelistic workers of all denominations in the city, with such teach- 
ers in the schools as were free to help, into an evangelistic campaign. 
The city was divided into sections and the workers into bands so that 
there was a systematic visiting of all parts of the city. The Gospel 
was preached and tracts distributed freely, the soldiers seeming eager 
to obtain them. 

Churches. — 

During September, meetings were held for the deepening of spirit- 
ual life — one week at Han Si Men and one each at Shwan Tang, Fu 
Dung and Hubugiai. 

Women's Work. — 

During the year, work has grown. The Day School, which was a 
failure last year has made good, with a regular attendance of 26 boys 
and girls. We have good audiences and the inquirers' classes have 
grown. The Night School has about ten boys in it. 

Women's work at FuDung has become more encouraging. Since 
the purchase of the new property, which enabled us to move the 
woman's meetings into a more convenient and attractive house, the 
attendance has been larger and more regular, and a class is being 
started of women who come an hour a day twice a week to learn 
to read. 

At Shwan Tang there are five classes in Sabbath-school lesson, one 
large evangelistic meeting for women, and a ragged school, taught by 
Mrs. Shields of the Southern Presbyterian Mission. We see a great 
future for this work when we have a new and commodious chapel to 
take the place of our crowded, noisy rooms, and hope Mrs. Jones, 
on return from furlough, will bring the means to build a church and 
rooms for women's work. 

Evangelistic meetings on Sabbath are well attended, week by week. 
Some have found the light, and we believe not a few have been influ- 
enced by the force of truth. Weekly meetings for study and prayer 
have been continued. 

Chapel Work. — 

The work at the Bau-bieu-ying Chapel continues to be very encour- 
aging. With the exception of a few weeks in the winter when the city 
was in a disturbed condition, regular Sabbath and mid-week services 
have been held. The Sabbath services, morning and afternoon, are 
conducted by Seminary students. On Easter Sabbath, one woman 
from this chapel was baptized and several others are willing to be 
called inquirers. 



KIANG-AN— NANKING 131 

OUT-STATIONS.— Tung-dsing.— 

Soon after New Year, Mr. Gray went to Tung-dzing, where he 
baptized one adult and three children of Christians. They were all 
devoutly thankful that God had protected them. An idol procession 
held at the beginning of the fourth month, which has for years 
attracted the whole countryside, was this year entirely discontinued, 
ten thousand people thus giving up a custom in vogue for centuries. 

Lih-shui. — 

In the spring, Mr. Drummond, Pastor Swen and Licentiate Djang 
spent 10 days in Lih-shui, holding three meetings a day, two for 
Christians and one at night for outsiders, when the magic lantern, 
showing scenes from the life of Christ, was used. The new church* 
room was packed every night and the Christians also testified to the 
great good received from the pictures. At the communion with which 
the meetings closed, three new members were received, but as an equal 
number were disciplined, there was no increase. 

In August, like a bolt out of a clear sky, came the news that our 
chapels at Sing Dieu Tien, Wang Si, and Shau Gau had been destroyed 
by a mob. It developed the trouble had nothing to do with our Mis- 
sions but arose over the arbitrary manner in which the gentry had 
taken possession of some uncultivated hill land to plant trees. The 
enraged farmers took their revenge by destroying the homes of all 
the gentry in the hsien, all public schools in the district, the police 
station, two Roman Catholic chapels, one Baptist church and our 
three chapels. 

In April, after trouble, an indemnity of about half the value of the 
property was paid, and in June a very conveniently located and com- 
modious building for a chapel was leased. 

Gu Yung. — 

In Gu Yung our chapel was threatened but not injured, being the 
only one left standing. 

Lih Yang. — 

In May Mr. Drummond went to Lih Yang to complete the lease 
of our chapel there, which had previously been only rented. At the 
time of this visit he found that a great change for the better had taken 
place in the attitude of the people toward us — probably due largely 
to the revolution. At the Sabbath service there was a good attendance 
of both men and women, who sat and listened attentively through 
the whole time. 

Mr. Gray reports of the evangelistic work : 

The city of Nanking was now wide open to evangelistic work. 
Every one was grateful to the foreigners for their services in helping 
on the peace negotiations between the two armies. 

We found the people so open to hear that we held some open-air 
meetings, and later organized all the workers of the various missions, 
and divided the city into four divisions, and began a systematic 
canvass of the whole city, holding evangelistic meetings in at least io 
different places in the city. 



132 KIANG-AN— NANKING 

The National Bible Society of Scotland, through Mr. Blockstone, 
and the British and Foreign Bible Society made us grants of 10,000 
Gospel portions and Acts, and we distributed from all sources about 
15,000 portions (Gospels and Acts) and between 30,000 and 40,000 
tracts of various kinds. 

The soldiers were all open-minded, and treated us with a great deal 
of courtesy. This work continued until nearly Chinese New Year. 

At the beginning of the fourth month, previous years, there has 
been an idol procession and all the countryside would come out, but 
this year the whole thing was discontinued. Thus 10,000 people gave 
up a custom that had been in vogue for hundreds of years. Surely we 
are seeing great things in China. We praise God for His goodness. 
I have always expected to see this day in China, but thought it to be 
some years before it would come. 



EDUCATIONAL WORK.— Girls' Boarding School.— 

In June we held our Commencement, graduating a class of two 
from High School and seven from Grammar School. 

We are most grateful for the assistance given us by Miss Holmes, 
Mrs. Bullock and Mrs. Shields. What we should have done without 
them is a problem we happily did not have to face. Miss Holmes has 
most faithfully kept up two daily classes with ,the older girls in 
English and Bible. Her contact with the girls has been as invaluable 
as the English. 

Women's School. — 

During the year 33 women have for a longer or shorter time been 
in the school, though never more than 24 at a time. 

Nurses' Training School. — 

The Nurses' Training School, in which we share, completed another 
year of work, graduating a class of three. 



Boys' Orphanage. — 

The Episcopalian Mission is joining with our own committee in 
orphanage work, and brought 13 boys from north of the river after 
the famine of last spring. The original number of boys in the 
orphanage was 60, but the Christian Herald support of this work 
in China being reduced, homes or trades for over 20 of the older 
boys were found. With the Episcopalian contingent they now number 
48. Besides regular school-room work, they work in the kitchen, 
garden and are taught various trades and industries. 

Bible Training School. — 

In 1904, the two Missions established the Presbyterian Uniorf 
Theological Seminary in Nanking; the central location and the Man- 
darin tongue being the determining factors in the choice of this place. 



KIANG-AN— HWAI YUEN 133 

A suitable site was procured, and a dormitory and a professor's resi- 
dence were erected, the school opening in October, 1906, with 22 
students in attendance. From the first it was found necessary to 
provide courses for two grades of students, the more and the less 
advanced, owing to the great difference in previous preparation. 
Thirty-seven were enrolled the second year, and 43 the third. 
An additional building for chapel and class-rooms was provided in 
1910; and the corps of teachers was increased to three foreign, and 
one Chinese, professors. Thirteen have received the Seminary diploma, 
and 21 the certificate of the Lay Training Course. 

When in the summer of 191 1, it was finally decided to affiliate the 
Theological and Biblical training of the Methodist Mission in Cen- 
tral China with the Nanking Bible Training School, thirteen of the 
men from Kiukiang were transferred to Nanking and became the 
nucleus of the Methodists' share in this new and promising project. 

On July 17, 1908, the Disciples' Mission, in convention, voted to 
establish the Disciples' Bible College and Training School, and asked 
Mr. A. E. Cory to move to Nanking for this purpose. 

The many difficulties attending the setting apart by each Mission 
severally, of sufficient men to train ministerial students, and the very 
urgent need for prompt and thorough equipment of the volunteers in 
our schools and colleges, together with the strong tendency toward 
cooperation and united endeavor in both Mission circles and the 
Chinese Church, — these and other causes made easy the step taken in 
1911, whereby the problems of training men for the ministry and other 
forms of Christian work were unitedly undertaken by the four Mis- 
sions already conducting this work in Nanking. 

HWAI YUEN STATION 

With profound sorrow, we record the death of Mrs. James 
B. Cochran, who, while on furlough at Boonton, N. J., passed 
from the service below into the presence of the King, on Sep- 
tember 22nd. 

With lavish devotion she poured out into her work the 
energies of her unusual capacity and her beautiful character. 
The home life, with the cares of her little children, instead of 
being a hindrance was with her an opportunity to instruct and 
comfort Chinese mothers. She entered into all the councils 
of the Mission Station, where her clever wit, her sound judg- 
ment and her courageous faith were a constant joy and stimu- 
lus to her associates, and the Board keenly laments the loss to 
the work in China of her rare personality, her great abilities, 
the loyalty and skill of her Christian service among the wo- 
men, the charm and Christ-like fragrance of her spirit. It re- 
joices to believe that somewhere, in the boundless ministries of 
God, her rich powers are finding even greater employment 
than could have been given to them here. 

The story of this year must begin with "Before the Revo- 
lution." Last autumn we came back early to our work seeing 
ahead of us a year full of opportunity. Our foreign staff has 
been composed of Dr. and Mrs. Cochran, Rev. and Mrs. Mor- 



134 KIANG-AN— HWAI YUEN 

ris, and the Misses Murdoch ; Rev. and Mrs. James Cochran 
were home on sick leave. Rev. and Mrs. Carter remained at 
Killing until the early spring, that Mr. Carter might be re- 
lieved of any station work and have some months of complete 
rest before again taking up language study, which had been 
interrupted the year before by famine relief work and his own 
illness. In February, upon their return to Hwai Yuen, he 
again took up famine relief work as well as acted as station 
treasurer, Mrs. Carter continuing her language study. Mr. 
Hood reached Hwai Yuen three days before our flight to 
Shanghai, and his first year in China has been one of constant 
change of environment, while his occupation has been con- 
stant, that of "fetching and carrying" and language study. 
Mr. Lobenstine was away from the station during the entire 
>ear, being set free for work on the Famine Relief Commit- 
tee ; and has been released for three years by the China Coun- 
cil from regular station work in order to engage in student 
work for Government students in accordance with the plan ap- 
proved by the China Council at its 1910-11 meetings. 

The city and country of Hwai Yuen were just recovering 
from the awful famine of the preceding winter ; and well into 
the summer there were many cases of fever applying for treat- 
ment. The work opened in a very promising way along the 
usual lines in the autumn, but was only fairly started when the 
Revolution broke out. It was the same story with the Boys' 
School. The prospects, upon opening, were good for a success- 
ful term, but after seven weeks the Revolution brought it to a 
speedy close. The Girls' School opened with a good attend- 
ance on the twentieth of September, and on November 12th the 
school doors were locked and all of the scholars were safely in 
their homes, except 10, who were standing disconsolately in 
the school yard waiting for the order to march, for the country 
between their homes and Hwai Yuen was so unsettled that 
they could not be sent back and the only course open was to 
take them with us in our flight to Shanghai. 

The church and out-station work are feeling the loss of Mr. 
Lobenstine. The work has also been crippled by the absence 
of Mr. James Cochran in America on sick leave. 

MEDICAL WORK.— Hope Hospital— 

Hope Hospital has been designated as a base hospital by the Chinese 
Red Cross Society, and a number of sick and wounded soldiers were 
brought to us by different parties of the Red Cross serving at the 
front. Beside this we had during the spring a very large attendance 
from the troops stationed in our neighborhood, 50 or 60 coming 
in a day to the dispensary. These troops have been without medical 



KIANG-AN— HWAI YUEN 135 

attendance until recently, when military surgeons have been sent here. 
The majority of the cases have been medical, though we have had 
altogether a very much larger number of gun-shot and stabbing 
wounds than usual. One of the cases which gave us most pleasure 
was that of Gen. Djang O Chwen, of the Cantonese corps, who came 
to us suffering with appendicitis. He was operated upon and made a 
good recovery. While in the hospital he and his friends read Chris- 
tian books with a great deal of interest and two of them asked for 
baptism. 

The attendance at the hospital has shown a marked increase over 
any previous year, as shown by the statistics from April ist to March 
31st. The following year will doubtless show great gains, as the' 
attendance was small during the fall and winter. We have had once 
or twice over 200 patients come in a single morning to the dispens- 
aries. Dr. and Miss Murdoch have been able for the first time this 
spring to give their time to the women's ward, unhindered by lan- 
guage study or other interruption, and a great increase has therefore 
been possible in help given to the women and children. 

Clinic and Dispensary Work. — 

For the first time in the history of the hospital a separate clinic 
for the women had been opened in three Chinese buildings at the 
front of the hospital, and it was hard to go off and leave it when the 
Revolution broke out and we were ordered down to the coast. But on 
our return in March the women came in large numbers to the dis- 
pensary — our record day being 91 patients. The women are very 
attentive during the ten minutes' talk before they are treated in the 
dispensary and we have recognized ex-patients at the church services. 
The patients in the ward receive regular instruction and generally 
memorize a prayer or a few verses of the Bible before they leave, 
and several have been an encouragement to us. Early in the summer 
a letter from Mr. James Cochran contained the news that the same 
generous friend who is supporting the woman physician at Hwai Yuen 
is willing to give her a separate woman's hospital, as soon as the land 
can be bought and the building undertaken. This will be a great 
advantage, as it is very difficult to train young Chinese women as 
nurses in a general hospital in this part of the country, where work 
of this kind must necessarily be of a pioneer character. 



EDUCATIONAL WORK.— Boys' School.— 

During the past term the school has had the largest enroll- 
ment in its history, the high-water mark being 50 boarders 
and 85 day scholars. This increase was due somewhat 
to the fact that no other schools in the city were opened after 
the Revolution, because of lack of funds. We have been for- 
tunate in being able to retain the same teaching force we had 
last year, one of the teachers refusing a much more lucrative 
government position in order to come back to us. 

The religious life of the school has centered in the Y. M. C. A. 
This organization has kept up its regular Sunday meetings and has, in 
addition, appointed boys to hold evangelistic services on Sunday 



136 KIANG-AN— HWAI YUEN 

afternoons in the hospital and occasionally in the out-stations. Three 
delegates have been sent to the summer Y. M. C. A. Conference at 
Kuling, one of these being a teacher of the Chinese Classics who has 
recently become a member of the Church. 

Women's Work. — 

The daily class for the women was again taken up as soon as we 
returned and a woman's enquirers' class was held. Four were received 
into church membership, and three took the enquirers' pledge. 



BIBLE STUDY.— 

In spite of the handicaps, there gathered in Hwai Yuen in 
March some 40 men for the usual spring study of the Bible. 
The increase in average intelligence and earnestness of those 
attending which we have noticed from year to year was again 
evident, and at its close 33 men and women acknowledged 
Christ by taking the enquirers' pledge and 13 were received 
into the church by baptism. 

Among them was Wan Gwoh Tung, who is a teacher of Chinese 
in the Boys' School and a literary graduate acknowledged by everyone 
to be one of the brightest young Chinese scholars in Hwai Yuen. He 
had been an enquirer several years but had at times seemed cold # 
toward the Church and the Gospel., Since his baptism he has shown" 
a warm and earnest Christian life that promises for him a useful 
future. One of these who took the enquirers' pledge in March was 
Mr. Lin, another young Chinese scholar, a teacher in the Boys' School. 
He was baptized at our communion service in September. A Mr. Li 
was also baptized at this time. He is a teacher and one of the influen- 
tial men of Ma Tou Cheng. His sincere desire to advance the cause 
of Christ we feel sure will bear fruit and bring others into the 
Church. Even before he was baptized, he was teaching Christian 
books in his school, which is the only one in that town. 

Mr. Swen in his work makes a feature of the Bu dao Hwei by 
which each Christian or enquirer agrees to bring in one other enquirer 
during the year. One man recently baptized is responsible for five 
such, in the past year. 

Nanhsuchow. — The people of Nanhsuchow have been very 
anxious to have us put a foreigner there to open a Western 
school, and an offer was made that if we would provide the 
man they would pay the expenses of the school. As this has 
not yet been possible, they have put a temple at our disposal 
and Mr. Dju and Dr. Swen have opened a flourishing day 
school of 30 scholars, with a girls' school of 10 in the rear tem- 
ple, the latter under the management of Mrs. Swen. The peo- 
ple have been so anxious that these schools should be enlarged 
that they have put at our disposal the large temple of the god 
of war, which adjoins our present school and we have added 



KIANG-AN— HWAI YUEN 137 

to our force there Mr. Dju's son, a former student at the Meth- 
odist University at Peking.* 

EVANGELISTIC WORK.— 

In Hwai Yuen itself there is evident, as there is everywhere, a 
warm and friendly feeling towards Christianity. A prayer meeting for 
non-Christians, started by Mr. Liu in January, was well attended for 
a while, by both curious and interested of a class who hitherto have 
not often come to our meetings. Then Bible Classes grew out of it 
which were well attended for a while, and finally lapsed simply because 
there was no one to give them sufficient attention. The regular Sunday 
services were at times crowded, a feature being the large number of 
soldiers who came, Sunday being a holiday. Often many had to be 
refused admittance in order to avoid over-crowding and disturbance. 
There is no question but that an organized effort to reach these men 
would have paid well, but we had no one to undertake it. The reading- 
room has been very popular, and has often been crowded all day lo.ng 
by appreciative readers, especially during the times of more acute 
tension in the political world. The lending library has been in constant 
use, — about seventy books are constantly in circulation. 

We will always remember the past year as the one in which we had 
visits from Mrs. Buell, the Merle-Smiths and party, and many others 
who were with us on their way to or from famine relief work. We 
would ask that a double portion of the encouragement, cheer and 
incentive to renewed earnestness which they brought to us may be 
theirs. 

Altogether we can see on every side opportunities of evangelism 
that were undreamed of a few years ago and which are passing away 
from us for lack of more workers to utilize them. Ten years of resi- 
dence in Hwai Yuen, the treatment of tens of thousands of patients 
in the hospital, the Boys' Schools, the famine relief, months of itinera- 
tion, the faithful work of Chinese evangelists and Christians, the 
general changes following the Revolution, have all conspired to put us 
in a position of advantage with the people of this region for which 
we have desired and prayed for years. Everything conspires to make 
it possible to gather in the results. What we need is simply the man- 
ning of our work to a normal standard of both Chinese and foreign 
workers. 

It has been said that God must have a year of great blessing in 
store for us, as He has sent us such a sorrow at its beginning. We 
would learn from Mrs. James Cochran's life a Christ-like, untiring 
love for the unlovely, a forgetfulness of self in zeal for her Father's 
work, a complete merging of her work with her interests and her 
interests with her work; that we, too, may "take the Kingdom of 
Heaven by storm." 

Famine Relief. — Mr. Lobenstine reports : 

Famine relief has become an integral part of our North Anhwei 
work, and is one of the agencies by which we are making plain the 
Christian message. It is not a method that anyone of us would have 
chosen ; but it is one that we could not refuse to make use of. Famine 
relief was in former years used as a means of influencing large num- 
bers to enroll themselves as enquirers. Most missionaries who have 



*Since the report was received from the Mission the Board has 
stationed Rev. Geo. C. Hood at Nanhsuchow. 



138 KIANG-AN— HWAI YUEN 

had experience in recent famines believe that the largest Christian 
influences from famine work are indirect, and that more is gained by 
leaving the direct work of preaching to follow rather than to accom- 
pany the famine relief. We believe that the message of this type of 
work is clear, and that it is showing/ the officials and educated men 
both in the famine region and in other parts of China that Christianity 
has a genuine concern for the physical, moral, intellectual and spiritual 
welfare of men in this life, and is not simply confined in its interest 
to their welfare in the next. I think we at Hwai Yuen all believe 
that North Anhwei is open to us as never before, and that this is due 
partly to the famine relief work which has been done in recent years. 
The time has now come, we trust, both for a broader sowing of the 
seed and for a more general reaping. Our work is limited only by 
the strength of the laborers. 

NANKING UNIVERSITY 

The work of the University has gone forward with 
great encouragement, and the whole project constitutes 
one of the most satisfactory evidences of the value 
and efficiency of union work. The Methodists, Chris- 
tians and Presbyterians have worked together in a most 
harmonious spirit, and now the Southern Methodists, South- 
ern Presbyterians and the Northern and Southern Baptists 
have joined in the work of the University so far' as the Medi- 
cal School is concerned. The University has opened, also, a 
Language School for new missionaries which has been attend- 
ed by 47 students and has met with success far beyond the 
boldest expectations. Through the work of Mr. Williams in 
the United States generous contributions have been made for 
land and buildings. The needs of the institution are not nearly 
met, however, and the Trustees, representing the different co- 
operating Boards, are anxious to secure an adequate endow- 
ment. The revolution and the disturbance of business caused 
some falling off in the number of students, but in the Spring 
term of 1912 the College had an attendance of 56, as follows: 
Seniors, 3; juniors, 7; sophomores, 15; freshmen, 31; while 
there were 179 in the High School, 224 in the Middle School 
and 42 in the Lower Middle. During the year, the first four 
students were graduated and received their diplomas from the 
Board of Regents of the University of New York. One of the 
Presbyterian teachers on the faculty, Mr. Bailie, was set aside 
entirely for the development of an Agricultural Department 
and a colonization scheme for the reclamation of waste lands 
and the settlement of famine refugees — a work which at once 
enlisted the interest and support of the most influential men in 
China. 

At the close of the fall term of 1912, little meetings for con- 
ference and prayer grew into such interest that special meet- 
ings were held addressed by members of the faculty. There 
was no outside evangelist, but so deep was the interest that 89 



KIANG-AN— STATISTICS 139 

students, almost all from non-Christian families, declared their 
allegiance to Christ and united with the churches. 

STATISTICS 

Men missionaries — 1911-12 1912-13 

Ordained :I " 

Medical l 2 

Lay 2 

Women missionaries — 

Married women 9 9 

Medical x J 

Other single women 8 II 

Ordained native preachers 2 T 2 

Native teachers and assistants 98 T98 

Churches 2 t 2 

Communicants 446 T440 

Added during the year 38 T38 

Number of schools 2I t 21 

Total in boarding and day-schools 774 T774 

Scholars in Sabbath-schools 7 2 5 t7 2 5 

Contributions $",859 t$i 1,859 

fLast year's figures. 



SHANTUNG MISSION 

Teng-chou : on the most northern point of the Shangtung promon- 
tory, 60 miles south of Port Arthur, and 35 miles northwest of Chefoo; 
occupied 1S61. Missionaries — Dr. W. F. Seymour and Mrs. Seymour, 
Rev. J. P. Irwin and Mrs. Irwin, Miss M. A. Snodgrass, Mrs. Calvin 
Wight, Miss M. A. Frame, Rev. Otto Braskamp, Miss Christine Bras- 
kamp, Miss Mary J. Stewart and Miss Alma Dodds. 

Chefoo : an important port of call for North China steamers, on 
northern coast of Shantung Peninsula; occupied 1862. Missionaries — 
Rev. Hunter Corbett, D.D., and Mrs. Corbett, Rev. W. O. Elterich, 
D.D., and Mrs. Elterich, Mrs. Annetta T. Mills, Mr. W. C. Booth and 
Mrs. Booth, Dr. Oscar F. Hills and Mrs. Hills, Mr. M. Wells and Mrs. 
Wells, Mr. H. F. Smith, Rev. Paul R. Abbott and Mrs. Abbott, 
Miss Susie F. Eames, Robert W. Dunlap, M.D., and Mrs. Dunlap and 
Miss Anita E. Carter. 

Tsing-tau : the important German port and terminus of the new 
railroad to the Provincial Capital, on Kiao-cheu Bay, about 100 miles 
southwest of Chefoo ; occupied 1898. Missionaries — Miss L. Vaughan, 
Rev. C. E. Scott and Mrs. Scott, Dr. Effie B. Cooper, Rev. T. H. Mont- 
gomery and Mrs. Montgomery. 

Wei-hsien: iio miles northeast of Tsinan-fu; occupied 1882. Mis- 
sionaries — Rev. R. M. Mateer and Mrs. Mateer, Rev. F. H. Chalfant 
and Mrs. Chalfant, Rev. J. A. Fitch and Mrs. Fitch, Prof. Ralph Wells 
and Mrs. Wells, Mrs. C. W. Mateer, Rev. Paul T. Bergen, D.D., and 
Mrs. Bergen, Rev. H. W. Luce and Mrs. Luce, C. K. Roys, M.D., and 
Mrs. Roys, Miss Charlotte E. Hawes, Mr. Horace E. Chandler and 
Mrs. Chandler, Rev. J. J. Heeren, Ph.D., and Mrs. Heeren, Mr. 
Samuel J. Mills, Miss G. M. Rowley, Miss Louise H. Keator, M.D., 
Mr. Carl S. Rankin and Miss Marjory Rankin. 

Tsinan-fu : capital of the Shantung Province; 300 miles south of 
Peking, on Ta Tsin River; occupied 1872. Missionaries — Mrs. W. B. 
Hamilton, Rev. John Murray, James B. Neal, M.D., and Mrs. Neal, 
Miss Emma S. Boehne, Rev. W. W. Johnston and Mrs. Johnston, 
Dr. W. M. Schultz, C. F. Johnson, M.D., and Mrs. Johnson, Rev. A. B. 
Dodd and Mrs. Dodd, Dr. Caroline S. Merwin, Mr. A. A. Torrance 
and Mrs. Torrance. 

Ichou-fu : 145 miles southeast of Tsinan-fu; occupied 1891. Mis- 
sionaries — Miss E. E. Fleming, M.D., Rev. Paul P. Faris and Mrs. 
Faris, Miss Margaret Faris, Benj. M. Harding, M.D., Rev. Roy M. 
Allison and Mrs. Allison, Miss Elizabeth Small, Mr. Kenneth K. 
Thompson and Mrs. Thompson. 

Tsining-chou : 95 miles southwest of Tsinan-fu; occupied 1892. 
Missionaries — Charles H. Lyon, M.D., and Mrs. Lyon, Rev. T. N. 
Thompson and Mrs. Thompson, Rev. C. M. Eames, Rev. F. E. Field. 

Yi-hsien : 20 miles from the Grand Canal, about 140 miles south- 
east of Tsinan-fu; occupied 1905. Rev. C. H. Yerkes and Mrs. 
Yerkes, W. R. Cunningham, M.D., Miss A. K. M. Franz, Rev. 
H. G. Romig and Mrs. Romig, Rev. Ralph G. Coonradt. 

141 



142 SHANTUNG— TENG-CHOU 

Rev. Dr. and Mrs. W. M. Hayes and Rev. W. P. Chalfant, D.D., and 
Mrs. Chalfant, are stationed at Tsing-chou-fu, Professors in the Union 
Theological Seminary. 

Deaths: Rev. William B. Hamilton, D.D. 

Resignations : Rev. George A. Armstrong. 

Transfers : Robert W. Dunlap, M.D., and Mrs. Dunlap from 
Ichou-fu to Chefoo, Rev. Roy M. Allison and Mrs. Allison from Yi- 
hsien to Ichou-fu, Mr. Kenneth K. Thompson and Mrs. Thompson 
from Tsing-tau to Ichou-fu, Miss Sarah Faris from Ichou-fu to 
Tsining, Rev. H. G. Romig and Mrs. Romig from Ichou-fu to Yi- 
hsien. 

Furloughs during the year: Mr. W. C. Booth and Mrs. Booth, Miss 
Emma S. Boehne, Charles F. Johnson, M.D., and Mrs. Johnson, Rev. 
W. P. Chalfant, D.D., and Mrs. Chalfant, Miss A. K. M. Franz, Rev. 
George A. Armstrong, Miss Anita E. Carter, Rev. F. H. Chalfant and 
Mrs Chalfant, Miss Erne B. Cooper, M.D., W. R. Cunningham, M.D., 
Rev. A. B. Dodd and Mrs. Dodd, Mrs. W. O. Elterich, Miss Charlotte 
E. Hawes, Rev. W. M. Hayes, D.D., and Mrs. Hayes, Oscar F. Hills, 
M.D., and Mrs. Hills, Rev. H. W. Luce and Mrs. Luce, Charles K. 
Roys, M.D., and Mrs. Roys, Miss Louise Vaughan, Rev. C. H. Yerkes 
and Mrs. Yerkes. 

TENG=CHOU STATION 

PERSONNEL.— The Teng-Chou Station welcomed the re- 
turn of Mr. and Mrs. Irwin from their furlough last October. 
This gave the station a working force of six, Dr. and Mrs. 
Seymour, Mr. and Mrs, Irwin, Miss Snodgrass and Mrs. 
Wight. 

The station rejoiced in the arrival of three new members, 
Miss Stewart, Mr. Braskamp and his sister, Miss Braskamp, 
who joined Miss Dodds and Miss Frame, arrivals of the pre- 
vious year, as students of the language. 

In its immediate, local importance to the work, the great 
event of the year has been the practical completion of the very 
fine new Hospital and Girls' Boarding School plant given 
by Mr. L. H. Severance. Two years ago the Board's property 
in the East Suburb was one foreign residence with Chinese 
servants' quarters. Now there are ten acres of land and build- 
ings which are expected to shelter 175 Chinese besides the for- 
eigners in charge of the two institutions, 

The hospital is heated by steam, has an elevator and a very 
good operating room. Already the fine modern equipment has 
had its effect on the medical work. 

Mr. Severance's generosity has not stopped with the gift of 
land and buildings, but has done much in attractively furnish- 
ing the buildings. 



SHANTUNG— TENG-CHOU 143 

EVANGELISTIC— Teng-chow City Church.— 

The work of the city church has gone on much as usual. The 
attendance at the services has been very good. During the winter the 
soldiers came in large numbers so that the church was crowded, but 
later, owing to changes in their camp regulations, not many could 
come. Since the last report 31 have been received into the Church. 
At the spring communion 19 were examined and seven received. At 
the summer communion 28 were examined and 19 received. There 
are at present a number of inquirers who hope to be received at the 
fall communion. 

Sunday-school. — The record of attendance since the middle of 
March shows a maximum attendance of 388 and an average of 246. 
The adult Sunday-school which is attended by the children of our 
city schools as well as by the adults, uses the "Uniform Lessons." 
Elder Sen is superintendent. The average attendance has been nearly 
250. 

For the past few months, Thursday afternoon meetings have been 
held in the church vestibule for non-Christians. The attendance has 
been good and the interest marked. It is a fine opportunity to tell 
out the Gospel message and to distribute tracts and leaflets to the 
men who can read and are interested. 

The workmen on the new buildings in the East Suburb have been 
men from a distance living in camps on the compound while work was 
going on. Efforts have been made to reach them with the Gospel 
message. Two Sunday services have been held for them during the 
whole time of the building operations. Each Sunday, also, a certain 
number of the men have gone to the city church for one service. A 
native evangelist has given much personal work among them. Last 
year the names of about 20 desiring to study were entered. Some 
evening classes were opened for them but did not prove a great 
success. However, five men passed the examination before the church 
session and were admitted into the church. Of these, one was the 
second man of the contracting firm, and one was the bookkeeper, 
two were carpenters and the fifth man a painter. Quite a large num- 
ber seem near to accepting the Gospel. Many come from the eastern 
end of the Province where there was fighting between the Revolu- 
tionaries and where several Christians were killed by their neighbors 
in the winter. Dr. Seymour thinks that this has made it hard for 
some to announce their determination to become Christians who might 
otherwise have done so. 

This year a street chapel has been opened on Chang San Dao 
(Long Mountain Island) from which place the evangelist brings 
back most encouraging reports. A native boat has just been procured 
for use in itinerating work among the islands. 

Work in Country Districts. — The proper oversight of coun- 
try districts is one of the great problems of our station. There 
are 1 1 evangelists, two Chinese pastors and two Bible women 
at work in it. But the only foreigners who have been able to 
do any work in our great territory are Mrs. Wight and Mr. 
Irwin, who have a multitude of duties in the city. 

Lai Djiu Fu District. — Conditions amounting almost to famine have 
prevailed. A relief effort was organized in Manchuria by benevolent 
Chinese merchants and others whose homes are in this part of Shan- 
tung. They shipped several junk loads of grain to Teng-chou and 



144 SHANTUNG— TENG-CHOU 

Lai Djiu Fu to be sold to the needy at about two-thirds of the 
market price. 

For a part of the winter and spring there was much unrest and 
threatened trouble on account of the war. Highway robbers were 
very bold. Imperialist soldiers looted in the neighborhood. Such 
conditions made it impossible for the Bible women to do their work, 
so Mrs. Sung did not return to that district and there was only one 
woman working for part of the time in that great territory. Now 
that it is again possible for them to work there is great need of more 
Bible women to carry on the work among the women. In spite of 
war and famine the Christians have supported their pastor, Mr. 
Djang, very well. 

There is need for more evangelistic work in all these districts. 
The people are ready to listen giving large opportunity to the worker. 

EDUCATIONAL. — The day school work in the country is 
very closely connected with the evangelistic work. In two 
villages new schools have been opened this year and about 
each has centered an interesting work. Djang Shi Djiu, a 
man baptized in the Teng-Chou church, has helped open a 
school in his home, Giu Dien, in the Lai Djiu Fu district, and 
there are quite a number of enquirers. This year the Chinese 
have paid a little over half the expenses of the school. Next 
year they are to pay half the expenses and provide a building 
for street chapel and school. 

Wherever there is a day school there is a Sunday school. 
At Kin Dao, where cards are given to those coming, the at- 
tendance has averaged about 50. 

In the country there are 16 boys' schools, two girls' schools 
and five mixed schools. In the city there are three boys' 
schools and four girls' or mixed schools, making a total of 30 
day schools. 

The Bovs' Boarding School. — There have been 50 enrolled in the 
Boys' School during the year. This spring there were 25 in the 
High School and 13 in the Intermediate Department. There have, 
been three Chinese teachers in the school. Mr. Irwin keeps in close 
touch with all the work of the school and meets the boys daily in 
the chapel when he is at home. Mrs. Irwin takes charge of the 
dormitories and buildings and sings with the boys twice a week. A 
new chapel organ, the gift of the Wellington young people and ladies, 
has been a great help in the music and highly appreciated by all the 
school. 

The general work of the school has been satisfactory but it has 
required much more care and oversight than in ordinary years. A 
spirit of unrest among the boys was apparent. The spiritual life 
among the students has not been as manifest as it should be, although 
the Y. M. C. A., Bible Studv. Sabbath-school work, and village 
preaching have been carried on as usual and most of the boys are 
Christians. Three united with the church this year. 

The Girls' Boarding School. — The total enrollment for the year 
was 64 but the enrollment for each semester was 51. In the first 
semester the High School had 33 and the Intermediate Department 18. 
In the second semester they had 30 and 21 respectively. At the end 
of the first semester six girls graduated. 



SHANTUNG-CHEFOO 14S 

In the fall semester a Girls' Missionary Society was organized for 
definite vacation work. Upon the girls' return from their New Year 
vacation they brought most interesting reports. Their talks to groups 
of women and children about Christianity numbered 31. The girls 
in the city had given 25 days' work in sewing for the Red Cross 
Society and 12 days to teaching inquirers. One new school had been 
opened. One made sraw-braid and gave the monev earned. One 
worked in a stocking factory and taught the women while she knitted. 
A young teacher invited nine wanderers from the Kiang Su famine 
district to her home for a day, giving them the regular meals which 
the family had and a place to rest. This witness as to what the spirit 
of Christianity is was not without its influence upon the villagers. 

MEDICAL.— 

On January 15th the Revolutionaries took possession of the city 
and the one victim was received into the hospital. As the next two 
weeks brought reports of fighting between Imperialists and Repub- 
licans about 50 miles from us steps were taken to organize a Red 
Cross Society of which Dr. Seymour was president and doctor in 
charge of the Hospital. On February first word was received that 20 
wounded were on their way from Hwang Hsien to Teng-chou. The 
old hospital quarters were very limited so missionaries, servants and 
native Christians went to work and soon had the upstairs of the 
Boys' Boarding School fitted up for a hospital. Our medical staff 
had all they could attend to. High School boys became nurses and 
Miss Dodds gave up language study for a time to superintend the 
nursing. Supplies of hospital bedding and clothing ran short, so Miss 
Dodds also directed the Chinese women in preparing these supplies 
For nearly three weeks her rooms were full of Chinese women busily 
sewing from morning until dark, — a service given freely on their 
part. Many of the wounded men came in after dark and were in 
a pitiable condition. 

In April the medical work was moved into the new Severance 
Hospital. The first patients on the men's side were a few of the 
soldiers and on the women's side the wife of a medical student, 
herself a school teacher. She came in the day after the hospital 
was moved and the next day presented the hospital with a fine baby 
boy. The number of patients in four months was 42, more than half 
as many as we formerly had in a whole year. Of these over a third 
have been women. The patients soon become accustomed to white 
beds, white clothing and baths. Miss Dodds reports calling upon a 
young mother who had taken her baby home after five days in the 
hospital. The baby was really clean and the mother said they gave 
it a bath every day. If only they all would so quickly adopt a 
new idea ! 

CHEFOO STATION 

PERSONNEL. — During the year the following members 
of the station were in active work on the field: Dr. and Mrs. 
H. Corbett, Dr. and Mrs. O. F. Hills, Rev. and Mrs. P. R. 
Abbott, Mr. and Mrs. M. Wells, Mrs. A. Mills, Mr. H. F. 
Smith, Rev. W. O. Elterich, Miss S. F. Eames and Miss A. 
E. Carter. Mr: and Mrs. W. Booth and Mrs. Elterich were 
at. home on furlough. 



146 SHANTUNG^CHEFOO 

Not long after mission meeting last autumn Miss Eames 
joined our number, having been transferred from Tsining to 
our station at our request. Having already a considerable 
knowledge of the language, she was fitted to take up work on 
arrival, and has proved a valuable and efficient worker in our 
kindergarten and primary schools, as well as in the city evan- 
gelistic work. 

Miss Carter, who has been an associate missionary working 
with Mrs. Mills in the School for the Deaf, left on furlough in 
February and has since been appointed by the Board as a 
regular missionary. 

EVANGELISTIC— City Work.— 

The street chapel and museum have been well attended during the 
year, the average attendance being about 200 to 300 daily, a total of 
about 80,000. On account of the Revolution the city has been full of 
soldiers many of which attended the chapel; also many of the silk 
spinners from the silk filatures which is the chief industry in Chefoo. 

On his return from the famine region, Mr. Wells opened up a little 
street chapel further to the north. Although the attendance has not 
been very large, as there is no museum to attract the people as in the 
old chapel, yet more individual and personal work has- been possible. 
In the fall it is hoped a small school can be started in connection with 
this chapel for the heathen children of that neighborhood. 

Evangelistic work among the women has been done by Mrs. Wells, 
Miss Eames and the Bible woman, Mrs. Chang. Many homes about 
Temple Hill and at T'ung Shin, on the west side of the city were 
visited, about 200 visits being made. Quite a number of women 
joined the church during the year, and the church services and the 
prayer meetings especially have been well attended. On an average 
40 attended the prayer meetings. Two inquirers' classes for women 
were conducted during the year and several of those attending were 
afterwards received into the church. 

Our regular Sunday services have been well attended, among those 
attending were large numbers of soldiers. Quite a number of these 
were Christians. Accessions to the church have been almost monthly, 
40 being received, a larger number than usual. 

Sunday-schools. — During the past year our Sunday-school was 
well attended, the average being 300. Under the able leadership of 
Mr. Abbott assisted by Mr. Smith, the primary department was re- 
organized and graded. The enrollment has doubled since last year 
being now over 200. Miss Eames has efficiently superintended the 
girls' department as well as presided at the organ. Mr. Smith also 
helped with the music. 

Country Evangelistic and Pastoral Work. — Dr. Corbett being away 
last autumn, Pastor Wang visited his entire field receiving 15 new 
members. 

During most of the spring, itinerating was out of the question on 
account of the disturbances caused by the revolution. In the south- 
east districts the people rose in rebellion against the new government. 
The people banded together by the thousands killing all men and boys 
found without queues, among them a number of Christians. They 
even put to death the relatives of those who had taken off their queues. 
Evangelistic work of all kinds was more or less interfered with, espe- 
cially as many of our preachers had cut off their queues. Two of 



SHANTUNG— CHEFOO 147 

our helpers were seized by a band of marauders, accused of being 
Republican spies, and preaching false doctrines. They were strung 
up by the arms for a whole night, threatened with death, but finally 
released by paying a heavy ransom. Three of these robbers were 
afterwards captured by the authorities and executed. 

After the visit of the Bradt party in April, Dr. Corbett and Mr. 
Abbott started out and visited 52 towns and villages receiving 27 
members into the church. 

On Dr. Corbett's return, Dr. Elterich visited his field in the south- 
west district. This field which has been in a languishing condition 
since the death of Mr. Cornwell, who was formerly in charge of the 
same, now shows new signs of life and progress. Thirty-two inquirers 
were examined of whom nine were received. A new method of 
systematic giving was introduced in all the out-stations resulting in 
over $100 being subscribed. 

Throughout these country districts we have a large force of helpers 
at work, these men being most of them graduates from our Bible 
Training School. They live at important centers, usually places where 
we have street chapels and are under the direct superintendence of 
Mr. Hiai Pao Kie, our oldest and most efficient worker. 

EDUCATIONAL.— Station Schools.— 

We have two Bible Training Schools, one for men and one for 
women. The Training School for Men has been under the charge 
of Drs. Corbett and Elterich assisted by Revs. Tung and Wang. 
About 30 men were in attendance until the close of the term in spring 
when four men were graduated. The men were then sent out to 
preach during spring and summer. A new class of 12 was opened in 
August. Owing to the heavy cut on our estimates this year we are 
able to provide for a class only half the size of the one we have been 
having. We consider this one of the most important departments of 
our work which should be adequately provided for in the shape of a 
plant and funds. They are poorly provided with accommodations and 
have to recite in one of the church buildings quite a distance from 
their quarters. This makes it very inconvenient. The men that have 
thus far been trained in this school, have proved efficient beyond our 
expectations and are far superior to the old style helpers. 

The Women's Bible Training School has been under the charge 
of Mrs. Wells. It has been four months in session during the year, 
seven women attending. One of the women who attended is now 
employed as Bible woman in our dispensary, and three others have 
done quite a little work without help. 

A Summer School for our country preachers, teachers and church 
leaders was held for a month this summer, and in connection with it 
a class for inquirers. About 50 attended this school with considerable 
profit. 

In the absence of Mr. Booth, the Anglo-Chinese School has been 
under the charge of the vice-principal, Mr. H. Smith, and records a 
prosperous year. The enrollment for the fall term of last year was 
60, and for the spring term 80, the entering class in March being 35. 
This number is encouraging as the Revolution upset the order of 
things so that only one-half of those enrolled in fall returned in spring. 
Altogether 43 new students came. 

The moral tone of the school is higher and stronger; the religious 
life has been a quiet one. 

The Boys' High School has had an attendance of 60. It was partly 
reorganized at the beginning of the year by the principal, Dr. Elterich. 
Our head teacher, Mr. Wang Shio Ching, who served us so faithfully 



148 SHANTUNG^CHEFOO 

for many years and helped to make the school efficient, left us at the 
beginning of the year in order to accept a position in the military 
yaman of the city. 

The School for the Deaf has been under the charee of Mrs. A. 
Mills, Miss Carter going home on furlough in February. Thirty pupils 
were enrolled during the year, 14 girls and 16 boys. 

The Primary and Kindergarten Schools have shown a phenomenal 
growth during the year. Last year the attendance was about 70, this 
spring it went up to over 170 so that several new teachers had to 
be added. 

This department has been under the efficient management of Miss 
Eames. With the tearing down of the old church building these 
schools were pressed for accommodations, now a fine new school 
building awaits the opening of the school in September. This does 
not meet all our needs, however, as we still need another building for 
a boys' school, and also one for girls; in fact we could open several 
such schools in the city if we had the funds. We have been approached 
by leading Chinese to open a school for girls of the higher classes. 

Our country schools, 15 in number, have done well, during the 
year, being regularly examined by our two school inspectors. 

MEDICAL. — The chief work of the year has been the com- 
pletion and equipment of the new dispensary and hospital, 
which are probably the finest buildings of their kind in North 
China. The hospital will be finished in two or- three months. 

The dispensary has been in charge of Dr. Chang, as former- 
ly, and has been well attended, treating some 600 patients per 
month, an increase over the number in the old building. The 
queue cutting riots interfered with the attendance. Mrs. Cor- 
bett has been looking after the needs of the women. A preacher 
and Bible woman are daily in the waiting room preaching to 
the patients. With the opening of the new dispensary a sys- 
tem of charges was introduced which met with satisfactory 
response. 

A new era has come and with it new prospects for work. In July 
our Station celebrated a memorable occasion, the 50th anniversary of 
the founding of the Station. Fifty years ago Dr. H. Corbett came to 
Chefoo from Tengchow to open up work here. At that time Chefoo 
was as yet nothing but a fishing hamlet. During the history of the 
Station, Dr. Corbett saw Chefoo displace Tengchow as a treaty port, 
and increase its population to over 100,000. To a very large extent the 
work in this Province was projected and developed from Chefoo by 
Drs. Corbett and Nevius. With only a membership of six, Dr. Corbett 
built a church holding 150, having faith the church would increase. 
This was 35 years ago ; this building about ten years ago gave place 
to a fine stone structure seating 500 and having a church membership 
of over 300. 

From the rudiments of a school of a few pupils, our school work 
has developed into two training institutes, one for men, and one for 
women; a school for the deaf, the only institution of the kind in 
China; a Boys' High School, a Business College, and what is probably 
the largest Primary School in the Mission. 

From a miserable little Chinese building (now used as