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Full text of "Reports of the missionary and benevolent boards and committees to the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America"

^^^SyToTPRINCfj^v, 






BX 8951 .A3 

Presbyterian Church in the 

U.S.A. General Assembly. 
Minutes of the General 



1922 



9. Cumberland Presbyterian Board of Missions and Church Erection. 

Prcsidint — Mit. \V. J. ICdwakds. 

Currcspondinu Secretary — Mu. John M. Pattkuson, 1318 Wright Building. St. Louis, Mo 

10. Ministerial Relief and Sustentation. 

President — Rev. George Francis Orkkne, D.D. 

General Secretary — Rev. Henry R. Master, D.D. t r t^ 

Associate Secrttaries—liF.w Robert Hintkk, D.D., Rev. Wm. S. Holt, D.D., LL.D. 

Treasurer — Rev. William W. Hebehton. D.D. 

Office — Witherspoon Building, 1319 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

11. Freedmen. 

President — Rev. Samuel J. Fisher, D.D., Pittsburph, Pa. 
Corresponding Secretary and Treasurer — Rev. .John M. Gaston, D.D. 
Office — 513 Bessemer BuildinK, Sixth Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

12. The College Board. {See General Board of Education.) 

13. Temperance and Moral Welfare. 

President— R¥^\ . Thomas W.^tters, D.D., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
General Secretary — Prof. Charles Scanlon, LL.D. 
Assistant Treasurer — Miss Anna M. Wycoff. 
Office — Columbia Bank Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

14. General Board of Education. 

President— Yi-EX . Hugh T. Kerr. D.D. 

General Secretary — Rev. Edg\r P. Hill, D.D., LL.D. 

Associate Secretaries — Rev. William H. Crothers, D.D., Rev. Frederick E. Stockwell, 

D.D., M. WiLLARD Lampe, D.D., Ph.D., Rev. W. O. Boschgen. 
Field Secretary — Rev. James E. Clarke, D.D., LL.D. 
Treasurer — ;\Ir. Edward R. Sterrett. 
Office — Presbyterian Building, 156 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

VIII. PERMANENT COMMITTEES. 
Permanent Committee on Evangelism. 

Chairman — Mr. Charles L. Huston, Coatesville, Pa. 
Gineral Secretary and Treasurer — Rev. George G. Mahy, D.D. 
Office — 825 Witherspoon Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Permanent Committee on Men's Work. 
Chairman— Rev. W. C. Covert, D. D., Chioago, 111. 
General Secretary — Rev. William F. Weir, D.D. 
Oifice— Room 1702, 17 No. State St., Chicago, 111. 

Permanent Committee on Vacancy and Supply. 

Manager — Rev. Robert E. Pugh, D.D., White-Haines Building, Columbus, Ohio. 
Permanent Committee on Sabbath Observance. 

Chairman — Rev. H. H. McQuilkin. D.D. 

Secretary — Rev. H. L. Bowlby, D.D. 

Treasurer — Columbia Trust Company, New York City, N. Y. 

Office— loG Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

IX. PRESBYTERIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

President — Rev. Henry van Dyke, D.D., LL.D. 

General Secretary — Rev. Joseph B. Turner. 

Honorary Librarian — Rev. Louis F. Benson, D.D. 

Treasurer — Mr. J. Lewis Twaddell. 

Library and Museum — Witherspoon Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 



ANNUAL CONTRIBUTIONS. 

For Churches that have not adopted the scheme of weekly oflFerings set forth in the 
Directory for Worship, Cluiper VI, it is recommended that the first Lord's Days of the follow- 
ing months be set apart for contributions to the Boards: 

BOARD month SEND COLLECTIONS TO 

1. Foreign Missions January. Dwight H. Day, Treaa, 

2. General Education Fei^ruary. Edward R. Sterrett, |] 

3. Church Erection March. Geo. R. Brauer, " 

4. Foreig.n Missions April. Dwight H. Day, 

5. Pub. and S. S. Work May. Marshall S. CoUingwood, "^ 

G. Home Missions June. Varian Banks, 

7. Gener.vl Work and Every- 

member Canvass July and August. 

8. AIiN. Relief and Sustent.\tion September. William W. Heberton, '_[ 
(•. General Eddc.4.tion October. Edward R. Sterrett, 

10. Temperance October (last Sunday) . A. M. Wycoff, '[ 

11. Home Missions November. Varian Banks, |] 

12. Freedmen December. J. M. Gaston, 



LIBRARY OF THE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

PRINCETON, N. J. 

Presented by 

dV\e. OerV cA-V'he, Gvsxri ■ CX&^O. . 

O J 

Division.....^^..'..u ^ < ^ 
Section W-L ( 2.vL 



y^Ll:'"' 



MINUTES * SEP 23192: 



OF THE 



^""^/CALStV^.'' 



General Assembly 



OF THE 



Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A. 



Third Series — Volume I — 1922 

including 

Part I. Journal. Part II. Statistics. Part III. Reports 



Part III 



The Reports of the Boards and Permanent Committees 

TO THE 

One Hundred and Thirty-fourth General Assembly 
Des Moines, Iowa, May 18-25, 1922 



■'A 
j 



Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Office of the General Assembly, Witherspoon Building 
July. 1922 



PREFACE 

The One Hundred and Thirty-third General Assembly in 
session at Winona Lake, Indiana, May, 1921, directed that, 
beginning with the year 1922, "The Minutes" should be 
published in three parts. 

Part One, it was ordered, should contain "The Journal" 
of the General Assembly together with such additional mat- 
ter as is closely related to or explanatory of "The Journal." 

Part Two, it was ordered, should contain The Synodical 
and Presbyterial Rolls, The Statistical Tables, and such 
other lists and summaries, of a similar character, as are 
essential for clearness or completeness. 

Part Three, it was ordered, should contain the Amuial 
Reports of the Boards and Agencies of the General Assembly. 

To the Stated Clerk of the General Assembly was commit- 
ted the responsibility of selecting and arranging the contents 
of these volumes so as to provide "a full, accurate, and 
usable record of the year's history of the Assembly, and its 
Boards and Agencies." 



CONTENTS OF PART III. 



The Reports of The Boards and 
Permanent Committees. 

I. Home Miysions. 

11. Home Missions, Woman's Board. 

III. Foreign Missions. 

IV. Education. 

V. Publication and Sabbath School Work. 

VI. Ministerial Relief and Sustentation. 

VII. Church Erection Fund. 

VIII. Frcedmen. 

IX. Temperance and Moral Welfare. 

X. Evangelism. 

XL Men's Work. 

XII. Sabbath Observance. 

XIII. Vacancy and Supply. 

XIV. New Era Movement. 



OFFICERS 

OF THE 

One Hundred and Thirty-fourth General Assembly 

Moderator 
Rev. Calvin C. Hays. D.D. 

Vice Moderator 
Rev. William O. Thompson, D.D., LL.D. 

Stated Clerk 
Rev. Lewis Seymour Mudge. D.D. 

Assistants to the Stated Clerk 

Rev. Joseph M-. Duff, D.D. 
Rev. Scott W. Smith, D.D. 
Rev. William B. Pugh 
Mr. Henry Barraclough 

Permanent Clerk Emeritus 
Rev. Edward L. Warren, D.D. 



One Hundred Twentieth 
Annual Report 



Board of Home Missions 



OF THE 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED 
STATES OF AMERICA 



Yearly Committees on Home Missions were appointed by the 

General Assembly from 1802 until the organization 

of the Board in 1816 




Presented to the General Assembly, at Des Moines, 
Iowa, May i8, ig22 



PRESBYTERIAN BUILDING 

No. 156 FIFTH AVENUE. NEW YORK 

1922 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

The term of servi(M> of the followiriK pxpires In i>la.v, 1923: 

Ministers liaymen 

Rev. WILTON MERLE-SMITH, D.D.' WILLIAM E. CARNOCHAN' 

" CALVIN C. HAYS, D.D.» FRANCIS S. PHRANBR'^ 

" RASMUS THOMSBN, D.D.i" HERBERT K. TWITCHELL' 

" ROBERT BREWSTER BEATTIE'^ GEORGE D. DAYTON"* 

" W. BEATTY JENNINGS, D.D." JAMES N. JARVIE^ 



The term of service of the follovvins expires in May, 1924: 



Ministers 
Rev HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, D.D.^ 
" W. FRANCIS IRWIN, D.D.» 
" GEORGE B. DAVIES, D.D.' 
" DWIGHT WITHERSPOON WYLIE.D.D. 
" JOHN DAVIES, D.D.'s 
•' JOHN J. MOMENT" 



Laymen 

W. M. COSBY« 
ROBERT D. SAMUELS' 
LBDYARD COGSWELL, Jr. 
GEORGE NICHOLSON' 
J. WILLIAM CLARK' 



The term of service of the following expires in May, 1925: 

Ministers Laymen 

ftev. JOSEPH DUNN BURRBLL, D.D." 
ALBERT EDWIN KEIGWIN, D.D.' 
EDGAR WHITAKER WORK, D.D.i 
WILLIAM ADAMS BROWN, D.D.' 



WENDELL. PRIME KBELBR^ 
CARL ELMORE'" 



WALTER M. AIKMAN' 
GEORGE B. AGNEW' 
FLEMING H. REVELL' 
J. A. GOULD' 



JOHN T. MANSON'* 



' Of the Presbytery nf New Yorli. 

2 Of tlie Presbytery of Newarli. 

' Of the Presbytery of Westchester. 

* Of the Presbytery of Salt Lalte. 

'■ Of the Presibytery of Brooklyn-Nassau. 

• Of the Presbytery of Birmingham-A. 
■ Of the Presbytery of I^ackawanna. 

« Of the Presbytery of Seattle. 
» Of the Presbytery of Blairsville 
•" Of the Presbytery of Amarillo. ^ 



' Of the Presbytery of Phila. North. 

2 Of the Presbytery of Morris and Orange 

' Of the Presbytery of Minneapolis. 

♦ Of the Presbytery of Cleveland. 

'' Of the Pires)bytery of Connecticut Valley. 

" Of the Presbytery of Jersey City. 

' Of the Presbytery of Albany. 

8 Of the Presbytery of Oneida. 

» Of the Presbytery of Elizabeth. 



CHARLES li. THOMPSON, D.D., Secretary Emeritus. 



THE EXECUTIVE 

WILTON MERLE-SMITH (ex-offlclo) President 

FRANCIS S. PHRANER (ex-offlcio) Vice-President 

JOHN DIXON (ex-offlcio) Clerk of the Board 

JOHN A. MARQUIS General Secretary 

BAXTER P. FULLERTON Secretary 

JOHN Mcdowell secretary 

WILLIAM R. KING Secretary 

WILLIAM P. SHRn^ER Director City and Immigrant Work 

WARREN H. WILSON Director Church and Country Life Work 

HERMANN N. MORSE Dtoector of Publicity and Research 

FRED EASTMAN Director of Educational Work 

VARIAN BANKS Treasurer 



OFFICE: 

PRESBYTERIAN BUILDING, 156 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 



SYNODICAL AND PRESBYTERIAL 
EXECUTIVES 

The officers of the various Synods and Presbyteries charged with 
the oversight of Home Mission work, as of March 31, 1922, are as> 
follows : 



SYNOD OF ALABAMA: 

Rev. J. P. Cotton, Synodical Supt., 
" Ingleiiook," 

Binninghani, Alabama. 

SYNOD DF ARIZONA: 

Rev. H. p. Cory, Synudical Supt., 
Webb, Arizona. 

SYNOD OF ARKANSAS: 

Rev. C.E.Hayes, D.D., Synodical Supt,. 
1114 A. O. U. W. Building. 
I,ittle Rock, Arkansas. 

SYNOD OF BAUTIMORK: 

Presbytery of Baltimore: 

Rev. James J. Coale, Executive Sec'y, 
501 Garrett Building, 

Baltimore, Maryland. 

SYNOD OF CAUFORNIA: 

Presbytery of Benicia : 

Rev. E;. K. Strong, Presbyterial Supt., 
Berkeley, California. 
Presbytery of Los Angeles: 

Rev. Guy W. Wausworth. Sui)t., 
Church Extension Board, 
403 Columbia Building, 

Los Angeles, California. 
Presbytery of San Francisco: 

Rev. R. S. Donaldson, Executive Sec'y, 
Church Extension Board, 
278 Post Street, 

San Francisco, California. 

Presbytery of San Joaquin: 

Rev. D. W. Montgomery. Presbyterial 
Superintendent, 

Fresno, California. 

SYNOD OF COLORADO: 

Presbytery of Denver: 

Rev. Howard I. Kerr. Executive Sec'y, 
Church Extension Board, 
306 Temple Court Building, 
Denver, Colorado. 

SYNOD OF FLORIDA: 

Rev. Joseph P. Calhotn, D.D., Syn- 
odical Supt., 

Braidenitown, Florida. 

SYNOD OF THE WEST, GERMAN: 
Rev. L. Hayenga. Synodical Supt., 
Sibley, Iowa. 

SYNOD OF IDAHO: 

Rev. J. H. Barton, D.D., Synodical 
Superintendent 

1210 Idaho Street, 
Boise, Idaho. 

SYNOD OF ILLINOIS: 

Rev. J. N. Elliott, D.D., Synodical 
Superintendent 
Decatur, Illinois. 



Presbytery of Chicago: 

Rev. Henrv Seymour Brown, Supt., 
Church Extension Board. ' '• 

17 North State _ Street, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

SYNOD OF INDIANA: 

Rev. F. W. BackmfyER, Synodical 
Superintendent, 

10 1 7 People's Bank Building, 
Indianapolis, Indiana. 

SYNOD OF IOWA: 

Rev. Theodore Morning, D.D., Syn- 
odical Supt., 

555 Seventh Street, 
Des Moines, Iowa. 

SYNOD OF KANSAS: • '• 

Rev. W. S. Smalley, D.D., Synodical 
Superintendent, 
Emporia, Kansas. 

SYNOD OF KENTUCKY: 

Rev. Francis J. Cheek, D.D., Synodi- 
cal Superintendent, 
Danville, Kentucky. 

SYNOD OF MICHIGAN: 

Rkv. John Comin, D.D., Synodical 
Superintendent. 

1314 Kresge Building, 
Detroit, Michigan. 

Presbytery of Detroit: 

Rev. W. B. Gantz, D.D., Presbyterial 
Superintendent. 

1314 Kresge Building, 
Detroit, Micliigan. 

SYNOD OF MINNESOTA: 

Rev. W. R. Harshaw, D.D., Synodical 
Superintendent. 

839 Plymouth Building, 

Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

SYNOD OF MISSISSIPPI: 

Kev. R. L. Phelps, D.D., Synodical 
Superintendent. 
West Point, Mississippi. 

SYNOD OF MISSOURI: '. 

Synodical Superintendent to be Ap- 
pointed. 

Presbytery of St. Louis: ■ s 

Rev. R. Calvin Dobson, D.D.. Execu- 
tive Secretary, 

1220 Arcade Building, 
St. Louis, Missouri. 

SYNOD OF MONTANA: ; ;,•> n'i 
Rev. J. F. Shepherd, D.D., Synodical 
Superintendetut. 

Great Falls, Montana. 



SYNOD OF NEBRASKA: 

Rev. W. H. Kearns, D.D., Synodical 
Superintendent, 

Peters Trust Building, 
Omaha. Nebraska. 

SYNOD OF NEW ENGLAND: 

Rev. C. a. Young, D.D., Synodical 
Chairman, 

25 Waumbeck Street, 

Boston, Massachusetts. 

SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY: 

Rev. Joseph L,. Ewing, Synodical 
Superintendent, 

4439 Spruce Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Presbytery of Newark : 

Kev. Davis W. Lusk, D.D., Presbyte- 
rial Superintendent, 
310 Ridge Street, 

Newark, New Jersey. 

SYNOD OF NEW MEXICO: 

Rev. J. E. Marquis, D.D., Synodical 
Superintendent, 

Y. M. C. A. Building, 

Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

SYNOD OF NEW YORK: 

Rev. U. L. Mackey, Synodical Supt., 
156 Fifth Avenue, 
New Yo'rk City. 
Presbytery of Albany: 

Rev. C. B. F. Pease, Presbyterial Sec'y. 
13 Shuler Street, 

Aiiiste_rdam, New York. 
Presbytery of Brooklyn-Nassau : 

Rev. Joseph D. Burrell, D.D., Ex 
ecutive Sec'y, Church Extension Bd., 
32 Court Street, 

Brooklyn, New York. 
Presbytery of Buffalo: 

Rev. G. a. PappErman, Presbyterial 
Superintendent. 
500 Massachusetts Avenue, 
Buffalo, New York. 
Presbytery of Neiv York: 

Rev. Jesse C. Forbes, D.D., Execu- 
tive Secretary, Church Extension 
Committee, 

156 Fifth .\ve.. New York. 
Presbytery of Rochester: 

Rev. James Je\vei.l, D.D., Presbyterial 
Secretary, 

66 Rockingham Street, 

Rochester, New York. 
Presbytery of Westchester: 

Rev. Benjamin H. Everitt, Executive 
Secretary, 

34 Hamilton Avenue, 

Ossitiing, New York. 

SYNOD OF NORTH DAKOTA: 

Rev. L. C. McEwen, D.D., Synodical 
Superintendent, 

210 Equity Building, 

Fargo, North Dakota. 

SYNOD OF OHIO: 

Rev. R. E. Pugh, D.D., Synodical 
Superintendent, 

8oj4 North High Street, 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Presbytery of Cleveland: 

Rev. Charles L. Zorbaugh, D.D.. 
Supt., Ohurch Extension Committee. 
801 Hippodrome Building, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



SYNOD OF OKLAHOMA: 

Rev. F. L. Schaub, District Supt., 
632 Fondulac Street, 

Muskogee, Oklahoma. 
Rev. R. J. Eamb, D.D,, District Supt., 
Box 1239, 

Tulsa, Oklahoma. 

SYNOD OF OREGON: 

Rev. D. A. Thompson, Synodical Supt., 
401 Tilford Building, 
Portland, Oregon. 
Presbytery of Portland: 

Rev. Boudinot Seeley, Supt. Church 
f%xtension Committee, 
401 Tilford Building, 
Portland, Oregon. 

SYNOD OF PENNSYLVANIA: 

Rev. Calvin C. Hays, D.D., Synodical 
Chairman, 

Johnstown, Pennsylvania. 
Pre^ytery of Blairsvitle: 

Rev. a. H. Jolly, D.D., Presbyterial 
Superintendent, 

Trafford, Pennsylvania. 
Presbytery of Butler: 

Rev. W. O. David, Presbyterial Supt., 
Butler, Pennsylvania. 
Presbytery of Clarion: 

Rev. David E. Hepler, Presbyterial 
Superintendent, 

Clarion, Pennsylvania. 
Presbytery uf Huntingdon: 

Rev. R. p. Miller, Presbyterial Supt., 
Philipsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Presbytery of Kitianning: 

Rev. Robert M. Offutt, Presbyterial 
.Superintendent, 

Indiana, Pennsylvania. 
Presbytery of Lackawanna: 

Rev. F. von Krug, Ph.D., Presbyterial 
Superintendent. 

Wyoming, Pennsylvania. 
Presbytery of Lehigh: 

Rev. F. S. Hort, Presbyterial Supt., 
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 
Presbytery of Northumberland: 

Rev. H. G. Moody, Presbyterial Supt., 
Milton, Pennsylvania. 
Presbytery of Philadelphia: 

Rev. W. p. Fulton, D.D., Presbyterial 
Superintendent, 

516 Witherspoon Building, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Presbytery of Philadelphia, North: 

Rev. T. Clayton Welles, D.D., Pres- 
byterial Superintendent^ 
Torresdale, Pennsylvania. 
Presbytery of Pittsburgh : 

Rev. p. W. Snyder, D.D., Presbyterial 
Superintendent, 

634 Fulton Building, 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Presbytery of Redstone: 

Rev. a. M. Buchanan, D.D., Presby- 
terial Superintendent, 

Union town, Pennsylvania. 

SYNOD OF SOUTH DAKOTA: 

Rev. William Wallace, D.D., District 
Superintendent, 

1307 South Spring Avenue, 

Sioux Falls, South Dakota. 
Rev. D. M. Butt, D.D., Dist. Supt., 
Aberdeen, South Dakota. 



SYNOD OF TENNESSKK: 

Rev. K- a. Ri.more. SyniMlical Cliair- 
man, 

513 Pine Street, 

Chattanooga, Tennessee. 
Presbytery of Cumberland Mountain: 
Rev. J. H. Miller^ D.D., Supt., 
Lebanon, Tennessee. 
Presbytery of French Broad: 

Rev. W. E. Finley, D.D., Supt., 
Marshall, North Carolina. 
Presbytery of Union: 

Rev. R. I. Gamon, D.D., Supt., 
Knoxville, Tennessee. 

SYNOD OF TEXAS: 

Rev. B. VVrenn Webb, D.D., Synodical 
Superintendent, 
City Temple, 

Dallas, Texas. 

SYNOD OF UTAH: 

Rev. W. M. Paden, D.D., Synodii^al 
Superintendent, 

New Grand Hotel, 
Salt Eake City, Utah. 

SYNOD OF WASHINGTON: 

Rev. a. B. Keeler, District Supt., 
301 American Bank Building, 
Seattle, Washington. 
Rev. James Thomson, District Supt., 
Ivast iii6-36th Avenue, 

Spokane, Washington. 

SYNOD OF .WEST VIRGINIA: 

Rev. J. M. Potter, D.D., Synodical 
Chairman, 
Woodsdale, 

Wheeling, West Virginia. 



SYNOD OF WISCONSIN: 

Rev. C. E. Bovard, Synodical Chairman 
121 Arcadian Avenue, 

Waukesha, Wisconsin. 
Rev. C. H. Giesselbrecht, Financial 
Secretary, 
. Waukesha, Wisconsin. 

SYNOD OF WYOMING: 

Rev. David McMartin, Synodical 
Superintendent, 
823 West 25th Street, 
Cheyenne, Wyoming. 

WEESH SYNODS: 

Rev. Euward Roberts, Superintendent, 
411 Hawthorne Place, 

Madison, Wisconsin. 

CUBA: 

Rev. 1',. A. Odeli.. Superintendent, 
40 Salud Street, 
Havana, Cuba. 

PORTO RICO: 

Missionary Sitperintendeni% 
Rev. Arthur Tames, 

San (German, Porto Rico. 
Rev. Byron G. Sacer, 

Eares, Porto Rico. 
Rev. William M. Orr, 
(On leave.) 

AEASKA-YUKON: 

Rev. S. Hall Young, D.D., General 
Missionary, 
Juneau, Alaska. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

I. Foreword 7 

II. HoNOKri) Names 10 

III. Some Preaching Points on the Year's Work 11-14 

IV. Organization and Scope of Work, 15-19 

V. Facts from the Field : 

A. Town and Country 20-39 

B. iCity and Industrial 40-48 

C. Extra Territorial 49-60 

D. Self-supporting Synods and Presbyteries 61-77 

VI. Promotion and Education 78-82 

VII. Relations of the Board with the Self-supporting Agencies. .83-85 

VIII. The Bo.'krd 86 

IX. The Budget 87-92 

X. Statistical Summary 93-102 

XI. A Standard fqr Home Mission Promotion 103, 104 

XII. Treasurer's Report : 

Forms for Bequest 105 

Balance Sheet 106, 107 

Revenues and Expenditures 108-112 

Certificates of Audit 107, 120 

Permanent, Trust and Annuity Funds 1 13, 114 

Securities 1 15-120 

Comparisons 122-124, 134 

Receipts and Expenditures by Presbyteries 126-128 

Expenditures by Types of Worlc 136 

Contributions from Individuals 137, 142 

Legacies 140, 144 

Self-Supporting Synods 145 

Combined Statement 146 

XIII. (Report of the Standing Committee on Home Missions 148-151 

XIV. Findings of the Home Mission Council 152, 153 



6 



ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 

I. Foreword 

The presentation to the General Assembly of this, the one hundred 
and twentieth Annual Report of the Board of Home Missions, is 
a fitting occasion to express anew our gratitude to God for the 
way in which His spirit has directed and blessed our Church in its 
vastly expanded work for the extension of His Kingdom in the 
Home T.and. We may well review, also, the historic purpose of 
Home Missions in the fulfillment of its commission from the Church. 

Four things have always been given primacy in Home Missions. 
The first and most important is evangelism. In what is perhaps the 
first written commission issued bv the General Assembly to a Home 
Missionary, in 1792, this description of his duties occurs: "In ful- 
filling his duty as a missionarv, he is to preach the Gospel in season 
and out of season, and be diligent in catechising and instructing 
youth in the general principles of religion wherever he goes; to insist 
on the doctrines of grace, and establish the people as much as possible 
in the fundamental truths of the Gospel ; to preach generally in an 
ovantreb'cal and practical strain, and in families to seek and embrace 
I bo oni-)ortunities of conversing on religious subjects." The spirit 
of this commission has never been obscured, from that dav to this, 
in Home Missions. 

The second emphasis has always been on Christian service. Re- 
nealedlv the General Assembly has stated its belief that for people 
in exceptional circumstances of poverty or paganism, the spoken 
Gospel must find support and interpretation in deeds of Christian 
helpfulness. The same Assemblv, 1802, that decreed the appointment 
of the first Standing Committee on Home Missions formallv approved 
certain eminentlv practical forms of agricultural missions among 
the Indians. They regarded service to those in obvious need as not 
onlv a natural expression of the true meaning of the Gospel, but as 
a necessary prerequisite to building men up in the Christian life. 

\\^ifb evanjTelism and service the Presbvterian Church has always 
emphasized Christian education. Every Home Missionary is an edu- 
cator, often in places where there is no other agency to lift the veil 
of irrnoranre and superstition from men's minds. 

Lastlw Home Missions has always been understood by us not in 
terms of religious strife, but in terms of true Christian brotherhood. 
In 1794. the General Assembly authorized the sending of a circular 
address to the inhabitants of the various communities to which its 
missionaries came, which read in part : "As our aim has not been 
to proselyte from other communities to our denomination, we have 
charged our missionaries to avoid all doubtful disputations, to ab- 
stain from unfriendly censures or reflections on other religious per- 
suasions and, adhering strictly to the great doctrines of our holy 



8 HOME MISSIONS 

religion which influence the heart and life in the ways of godliness, 
to follow after the things that make for peace and general edifica- 
tion." 

The Board of Home Missions remains true to these historic prin- 
ciples. As a Board we believe that Home Missions is the response 
of the Church to the command of Jesus Christ to Christianize the 
nation. Nothing short of the Christianization of America will 
satisfy this Divine command or meet the primary need of the nation. 
The supreme purpose, therefore, of all the workers and all the work 
of the Board is to bring the nation to Christ for salvation, and to 
put Christ into the nation for service. To win America to Jesus 
Christ is to guarantee its future as well as to meet its deepest needs. 
This the Board is endeavoring to do through a sound evangelism, 
effective Christian education and orenuinc Christian Social Service, 
in the spirit of fraternity and comity. 

Tn reviewing the work of the past year we have deep satisfaction 
in a record of substantial achievement. It has not been an easy year. 
Evervwhere there has been a profound industrial unrest, much un- 
emplo\nient, an unusual amount of shifting of the less securely 
attached elements of our population, wide-spread poverts- and not a 
little genuine distress. Such conditions are especiallv acute on Home 
Mission fields. The Home Missionarv stands in the hard places of 
our national life. More than other ministers he deals with povertv. 
instabilitv and hardship. It is iust such things that make a com- 
munitv a Home Mission responsibility. But in spite of such unto- 
ward conditions, few years in the entire history of the Board have 
shown such results for the Kingdom. 

The evangelistic gain for the year exceeds the hig^h record of a 
year ag:o. Home Mission churches have this year added 12 per cent 
of their previous membership on confession of faith. Their gross 
gain for the year was 18 per cent and their net gain 10.4 per cent. 
All of these percentages exceed those of last vear and are far above 
the corresponding percentages of the entire denomination. And the 
strikinpf thing about it is that the best records have been made where 
cnnditiniis are the hardest. In Porto Rico the gain by confession 
of faith was over 2.S per cent. Among our Mexican churches of the 
Southwest, in spite of an almost complete paralysis of the industries 
in which their people were employed, the gain was nearly 20 per cent. 
In Montana, after a prolonged period of drought and crop failure, 
the aid-receiving churches made a better record than any Synod in 
the Church. In Cuba, the inauguration of a systematic evangelistic 
policy more than doubled the rate of increase over the preceding 
vears. These are facts from which the Church may take heart. 
Thev seem to the Board to amplv justify its faith and courage in 
darine to maintain its work, put its missionaries on the basis of a 
fair living salary, and go forward in spite of debts and deficits. 
Debts can be retrieved, but the opportunity of these destiny-laden 
davs. once lost, can never be recovered. 

Financially, the year has not fulfilled expectations and for obvious 
reasons. Nevertheless, for the eighth successive year, there has been 
an increase in the receipts of the Board from living sources. These 



FOREWORD 9 

just passed the million mark during this year for the first time in 
our history, marking a more than threefold increase since the upward 
swing began, eight years ago. The debt of the Board is distressingly 
heavy, being now nearly $500,000, but it is not thinkable that the 
Board should have refused to take this risk in meeting the obligations 
which these last few years have laid upon it, especially in giving the 
missionary an adequate salary. 

This year has been our fifteenth year of work since the union 
with the Cumberland Church. The Presbyterian Church has never 
ceased to be a national church in the fullest sense, and has always 
recognized that every corner in the whole United States where need 
for our service exists has a rightful claim on the Home Mission 
forces of our beloved Zion, East, West, North and South. The 
Board of Home Missions is the logical pioneer of national Presby- 
terianism. The Cumberland reunion emphasized and increased our 
national responsibility which the Board continues to accept in good 
faith. 

In 1906. the Presbyterian Church U. S. A. had in the district of 
the South and Southwest 54,583 members and these contributed to 
Home Missions, both national and synodical. that year $44,386. In 
1921 the records show that in the same district we have 153.271 
members and these contributed during the year 1921 $218,157 for 
Home Missions. These figures indicate the growth which has been 
achieved in spite of the handicaps under which our people there 
have labored. There may be and doubtless are localities where 
comity arrangements with our brethren of the Southern Presbyterian 
Church should be entered into, whereby in the interests of larger 
effectiveness there should be mutual withdrawals, but such a course, 
if agreed upon, must not be interpreted as lessening our responsibility 
in these regions ; on the other hand, it can only be regarded as a 
realignment of forces for increased efficiency and new advances. 
The obligations we have undertaken in the great South and South- 
west to sustain our churches and missionaries must be observed. 

Finally, the Board is earnestly mindful of the responsibilit>- which 
rests upon it to use the money which it receives wisely and in such 
places and ways as will most effectively advance our purpose for 
the upbuilding of the Kingdom. With limited resources and limitless 
opportunities there must be no waste. This of itself, apart from 
any other motive, would sufficiently compel us to use our best efforts, 
as we are doing, for the securing of comity arrangements with other 
Evangelical denominations in all Home Mission fields. It is also 
a sufficient reason why the Board is carefully prosecuting a study of 
non-productive churches. There are churches which should be main- 
tained from which, for one reason or another, no large measure of 
return may be expected. But, generally speaking, the Church which 
over a period of years cannot be made really productive, and the 
measurement is of course in terms of Christian life, ought not to be 
maintained with missionary money. There are, we believe, not many 
of these. Ideally, there should be none and toward this end the 
Board is systematically moving. 



f \ 



II. Honored Names 



The earthly service of our fellow-workers named below 
closed during the year covered by this Report. Faithful 
unto death, their names will long be held in loving memory : 

Rev, J. C. F. Dillon, Bancroft, Idaho. 
Rev. John Eastman, Flandreau, South Dakota. 
Rev. R. W. Edwards, Jacksonville, Florida. 
Mrs. S. F. Sahn, Alpine, Tennessee. 

* * * 

Rev. D. Stuart Dodge, D.D., New York, New York. 

In chronicling the death of the Rev. D. Stuart Dodge, 
D.D., the Board of Home Missions is moved to pay an 
affectionate and generous tribute to his memory. His death 
occurred in New York City on December 17th, 1921, in 
the 86th year of his age. 

Dr. Dodge was elected a member of the Board in 1891 
and after the death of Dr. John Hall was chosen President 
in 1898. He continued in this position until 1915, when 
increasing infirmities constrained him to resign the office. 

Dr. Dodge was the very soul of courtesy and kindness. 
His whole life was consecrated to missionary and philan- 
thropic service. He gave of his time and wealth without 
stint. In his death every good cause has lost a friend, and 
above all the cause of missions. 



v^ ^^ 



III. Some Preaching Points^on the 
Year's Work 

Home Missions is primarily an evangelizing force. The gain on 
confession of faith for all Home Mission churches was 12% of their 
previous membership. The gross gain was 18.0%, the net gain 10.4%. 
Each of these percentages slightly exceeds the corresponding per- 
centage for the previous year. The net gain was at a rate more than 
three times the rate for the Church at large. 

The Spanish-speaking Churches of the Southwest, in the face of 
serious unemployment, added nearly a fifth to their membership 
on confession of faith. 

Porto Rico churches added a fourth to their membership on con- 
fession of faith. 

The receipts of the Board from living sources for current work 
have again set a new high record. 

The deficits of the Board during the last two years have been 
chiefly occasioned by the efifort made to pay each missionary a living 
salary. 

The total number of mission enterprises aided by the Board during 
the year was 2,607, a decrease of 7% from the preceding year. 

The total number of workers engaged was 1,611, a decrease of 5%. 

Women workers are an increasing factor in Home Mission work. 
They now comprise about one-seventh of the total. 

On nearly one-third of the Home Mission fields some language 
other than English is used. Forty-two different languages and dia- 
lects are employed. 

One rural demonstration parish has increased its membership five- 
fold in five years, trained fifty young people for active work in the 
Church and practically remade the social life of its community. 

The Presbyterian Church has approximately one-fourth of the 
entire Protestant constituency among the American Indians. 

In four great Indian tribes, four-fifths of the population are Chris- 
tian adherents. 

The Mexican Church at San Gabriel, California, has increased its 
gifts for benevolences from $12 two years ago to $300. 

At Douglas, Arizona, the Mexican Church turned a period of 
almost disastrous unemployment and want into a period of intense 
Christian activity and has registered one of the most notable ad- 
vances of the year. 

Building operations have been completed or are under way on 
seven Mexican fields. 

The generosity of two copper companies permitted the opening of 
a splendid hospital and social center for Mexicans in Bisbee, Arizona. 

A training school for Mexican young people in Los Angeles has 
enrolled 300 in night classes. 

2 — Home Miss. 11 



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HOME MISSIONS AS AN EVANGELIZING FORCE 

Gam in Membership, 1921-1922, expressed as percen- 
tage of previous Membership and compared with 
gam of entire denomination 1920-1921. 



NET GAIN OF ENTIRE DENOMINATION 
Net By Confession Gross 
3.4% 7.5% 13.4% 



5% 



10% 



15% 



20% 



25% 



FOR ALL HOME M 
NetGain-10.47o I 



Gross Gain-18.0% 



Gair^^on^ssior^l2^% 



SSION CHURCHES 



GAINS BY CONFESSION -BY D 
Indian Work -8.0% 



EPARTMENTS 



nods- 



Sel^jpbortingSv 
cS^SjrSWQrk-10:9°/Q 



09% 



Cuba -11.2% 



American Work -12.2% 



Alas ka -12.3% 

^nd Immigrant Work-1^.7% 



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Spanish^peaking Work in South West -19.3% 



Porto Rico- 



5% 



•252% 



10% 



15% 



20% 



25% 



13 



14 HOME MISSIONS 

Unemployment and unrest in the lumber camps have increased the 
difficulties of the missionaries. Over 40,000 lumber jacks have at- 
tended religious services in the camps. Two hundred and forty- 
five credible conversions are reported. 

An important and promising work for Japanese loggers has been 
initiated in the State of Washington. 

A laboring man in Luyano, Cuba, with his own hands and al- 
most entirely at his own expense has built, on his own land, a beauti- 
ful chapel for the work of our church. 

Porto Rico churches are making long strides forward in the de- 
velopment of a strong native church under native leadership. The 
number of American Missionaries in Porto Rico has been reduced 
from eleven to two in seven years. 

A union work in Santo Domingo has made an auspicious start with 
a well-equipped hospital and three important centers for evangelistic 
work. 

Porto Rico Christians have equipped the hospital at Santo Domingo. 

The Polytechnic Institute of Porto Rico has had to refuse over 
500 applications for admission since September because of lack of 
room. 

There are twenty candidates for the ministry among the students 
at the Polytechnic Institute. Fully one-half of the 347 students are 
actively engaged in Sunday school work outside of the Institute. 

In San Francisco, a five-year Presbyterial Demonstration has in- 
creased church membership 47% as compared with a 4% increase in 
the preceding five years. 

Five years ago San Francisco churches contributed about $3,000 
for Home Missions. Last year they gave the Home Board more 
than twice that amount and raised in addition $127,000 for local 
church extension and buildings. 

In only four major cities are the Presbyterian forces now lacking 
a standard City Church Extension organization. Important advances 
were made during the year, with Home Board cooperation, in Denver, 
Buffalo, Milwaukee and Indianapolis. 

The work of Jewish Evangelization is winning its way toward 
success in five major cities. 

The new hospital at Point Barrow, Alaska, "the mission nearest 
the North Pole," has begun its work of Christian service with a 
capable physician and nurse in charge. 

A great advance has been made during the year in the amount 
of Home Mission study materials used by the churches. 

The Fellowship for American Service has been formed during 
the year with branches in seventeen colleges and seminaries, as an 
enlistment movement for Home fission workers. 

The aid-receiving churches of Montana, in spite of the severe de- 
pression induced by three successive droughts and consequent crop 
failures, last year led all the Synods of the Church in percentage 
of net membership gain. 

A church organized at North Casper, Wyoming, last May, by 
April 1st numbered 250 members with 71 affiliated members. In 
twelve months the pastor baptized 110 infants. The population of 
the town is only 2,500. 



IV. Organization and Scope 
of Work 



Purpose : To make America Christian for the redemption of man- 
kind and the friendly service of the world. 

Scope : Work for twelve recognized divisions of our population in 45 
states, 2 territories and 2 contiguous foreign countries. 42 different lan- 
guages and dialects employed. 

Objectives: To do our part, as a Denomination, in bringing the Gospel 
of Christ in all its fulness and the Service of Christ in all its implica- 
tions to every community in America. 

Particular Needs: Money for adequate salaries and needed extensions 
of work, adequate buildings and equipment, additional workers to re- 
inforce our present corps of faithful and efficient missionaries. 



The present organization of the Board was determined by the 
General Assembly of 1917. The names of the officers who, in ac- 
cordance with that action, comprise the Executive are given 
on page two. 

In the conduct of work on the field, four main divisions are 
recognized : 

(A) Tozvn and Country, administered by a cabinet composed of 
Dr. B. P. Fullerton, Dr. Warren H. Wilson and Dr. A. J. Mont- 
gomery. The Western Office is maintained at 1220 Arcade Building, 
St. Louis, Missouri. The Town and Country Division includes five 
departments : 

(1) American Work. This comprises the aid-receiving territory 
west of the Mississippi and south of the Ohio. Grants are made to 
Presbyteries which contain churches requiring financial assistance. 
The Presbytery, either directly or through its Home Mission Com- 
mittee, apportions these funds and exercises supervision over the 
work. There are certain Synodical Superintendents or Field Men, 
elected by the Synods or Presbyteries, to whom is committed the 
general oversight of the fields. It is the task of the American Work 
to see that the Presbyterian Church is planted in such new communi- 
ties as should be so served and to provide for churches already estab- 
lished, chiefly in the open country or in villages, in frontier or rural 
■districts, a support sufficient to the performance of an adequate Chris- 
tian ministry. 

(2) Church and Country Life and Mountain Work. This is 
charged with the promotion of promising rural fields submitted to its 
supervision by the acts of Presbyteries and with the development of 
two mountain Presbyteries in Tennessee and North Carolina. 

(3) Indian Work includes all work among Indians outside of 
Alaska, with the exception of the Pimas of Southern Arizona, which 

15 



WHAT BECOMES 
HOME MISSION DOLLAR? 

Based on Expenditures for Year 1930-21 of $ 1,644.734.) 



TOWN AND COUNTRY 
52.2 ct 



33.2 


American Work 




6.2 


Country Church Work 




63 


American Indians 




4.4 


Spanish-Speaking Work in South West 




2.1 


Lumber CamDS 




17.7 


City and Immigrant Work 




1.3 


Jewish Evaneeljzation 




3.2 


Alaska 




9.2 


West Indies 




4.9 


Education and Promotion 




2.5 


Co-operating Agencies 


♦■ 


6.7 


General Administration 




2.3 


other Expenses 


** 



CITY AND INDUSTRIAL 
19.04: 



EXTRA-TERRITORIAL. 
12.4(t 



GENERAL EXPENSE 
16.4<1^ 



The Interest on Invested Funds more than covers the 
Cost of Administration. 
♦ Chiefly New Era Movement Expenses. 
** Chiefly Interest on Borrowed Money. 

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18 HOME MISSIONS 

have been placed under the care of the Country Church Department. 
It is carried on through the Presbyteries and Synods to which the 
various Indian churches belong. Dr. Thomas C. Moffett is Assistant 
Secretary in charge. 

(4) Spanish-speaking Work in the Southwest deals with the Span- 
ish-speaking population in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado 
and California. The Assistant Secretary in charge is Dr. R. N. 
McLean, whose office is 404 Columbia Building, Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. 

(5) Lumber Camp Work is a ministry to the men employed in 
lumber camps and mills in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Montana. 
There is also Lumber Camp Work in the Self-supporting Synods 
of Minnesota, Michigan and New York. 

(B) City and Industrial. This division deals primarily with cities 
of 200,000 or more and with industrial situations of lesser population 
size where foreign-speaking peoples, other than Mexicans, are con- 
cerned. Two departments are included : City and Immigrant Work, 
which has the major responsibility in the city and industrial field; 
and Jewish Evangelization, which is concerned with work for our 
Jewish populations concentrated chiefly in the great cities. Dr. W. P. 
Shriver is the Director of City and Immigrant Work with Rev. 
Kenneth Miller and Dr. Robert S. Donaldson as Associates. Dr. 
Donaldson's office is 278 Post Street, San Francisco, California. 
Dr. John S. Conning is Superintendent of Jewish Evangelization, 

(C) Extra-Territorial — Alaska, where the two Presbyteries carry 
on work among white people, Indians and Eskimos, Dr. S. Hall 
Young, General Missionary. West Indies, which includes work in 
Cuba, Porto Rico and Santo Domngo. Rev. E. A. Odell is Superin- 
tendent in Cuba. Three American missionaries in Porto Rico, Rev. 
Arthur James, Rev. Byron G. Sager and Rev. William M. Orr, have 
a supervisory relation to the work there. The work in Santo Do- 
mingo is interdenominational and is administered by a separately in- 
corporated Board, whose members are elected by the co-operating 
Boards. 

(D) Self-supporting Synods and Presbyteries. The Self-support- 
ing units which clear their work through the Board are the Synod 
of New York (all of New York except six Presbyteries), the Pres- 
bytery of New York, the Synod of New England, the Synod of 
Michigan (except Detroit Presbytery), the Welsh Synods, the Synod 
of Minnesota, the Synod of Kentucky, the Synod of South Dakota, 
the Synod of Missouri, the Synod of Nebraska, the Synod of Ten- 
nessee and the Presbyteries of Benicia and Riverside in California. 
The first five named are under the secretarial oversight of Dr. John 
McDowell, the Synod of New England and the Presbytery of New 
York, however, clearing their work through the City and Immigrant 
Office. The others named are related to the Board through the cabi- 
net in charge of Town and Country Work. 

In addition to these lines of work on the field, there are the various 
necessary service activities. There is a General Promotion Cabinet 
under the chairmanship of Dr. William R. King, composed of the 
heads of the various departments concerned with the educational and 



ORGANIZATION AND SCOPE OF WORK 19 

promotional program. Dr. King has immediate direction of the 
general work of field promotion. He has associated with him Dr. 
George H. Mack as Field Secretary for the South and Southwest, 
with headquarters at St. Louis; Dr. John A. Rodgers, Director of 
the Department of Legacies, Annuities and Gifts; Rev. James P. Gil- 
lespie, in charge of the Bureau of Specials, and Mr. Henry H. Welles, 
Jr., Field Representative. 

The Department of Education includes the creation of mission 
study materials, as lantern slides, pamphlets, etc., recruiting, summer 
work of seminary students and missionary education in Sunday 
schools. Rev. Fred Eastman is the_ Director with Rev. John Bailey 
Kelly and Rev. Paul G. Stevens as Associates. Mr. Stevens' ad- 
dress is 403 Columhia Building, Los Angeles, California. 

The general relationships of the Board to the Self-supporting 
Synods and Presbyteries are committed to the care of Dr. John 
McDowell, Secretary. 

An agreement has been reached with the Board of Foreign Mis- 
sions, on their initiative and subject to the approval of the General 
Assembly, for the transfer from the Foreign Board to the Home 
Board of the work among the Orientals in the United States. A 
similar arrangement is being made between the Woman's Boards of 
Home and Foreign Missions. According to this arrangement, the 
administration of the work is to be transferred as of June 1, 1922. 
For the fiscal year beginning April 1, 1922, the Board of Foreign 
Missions will carry the entire budget for this work. In the succeed- 
ing year the Board of Home Missions will assume one-third of the 
budget, in the year beginning April 1, 1924, two-thirds of it and 
thereafter all of it. The Foreign Board transfers all of the properties 
connected with this work to the Home Board without charge. 

Dr. W. R. King is the representative of the Board on the General 
Committee of the New Era Movement. Dr. John McDowell is the 
representative on the Managing Committee of the Presbyterian 
A'Iagasi)ie. Dr Warren H. Wilson, Rev. John Bailey Kelly and 
Rev. Fred Eastman are the representatives of the Board on the 
Board of Managers of the Missionary Education Movement. 
Dr. John A. Marquis, General Secretary, is the representative of 
the Board on the Committee on Cooperation in Latin America. The 
more important interdenominational agencies with which the Board 
directly and regularly cooperates are the Home Missions Council, 
the Federal Council of Churches of Christ in America, the Committee 
on Cooperation in Latin America and the Missionary Education 
Movement. 

The Publicity and Research Department includes general publicity 
and advertising, securing of reports from aided fields, the prepara- 
tion of the Annual Report, the ]:ireparation of budgets and, after 
April first, an office will be erected as an adjunct to this department 
which will be responsible for the recording of all appropriations, 
allocations, grants, etc., Rev. H. N. Morse, Director. 

Mr. Varian Banks is Treasurer; Rev. Dr. John Dixon. Clerk. 



V. Facts From the Field 

A. Town and Country 

There are six departments in the Board's work which are pre- 
dominantly rural. They are the American Work, Spanish-speaking 
Work in the Southwest, Indian Work, Country Church Work, 
Mountain Work and Lumber Camp Work. During the past year 
the Board combined them, for administrative purposes, into one 
Town and Country Division with Reverends B. P. Fullerton, Warren 
H. Wilson and A. J. Montgomery as joint Directors. This brings 
together all the Board 'i work in towns, villages and open country, in 
order to facilitate the general application of the principles and methods 
which have been developed in church and country life work and 
mountain work. In the direction of it, the three named are of equal 
authority. Dr. Fullerton being the oldest in service, presiding. The 
Assistant Secretaries in charge of the Spanish-speaking Work and 
the Indian Work will sit with the joint Directors when their work is 
being considered. Work will be carried on in cooperation with the 
Presbyteries as in the past, subject to the Executive Council and the 
Board. 

The first purpose of this combination is to unify and simplify 
the work of the Board in its service to Presbyteries and Synods. The 
special features of the new policy will be those which experience in 
the Western Office and the Country Life Work has shown to be of 
the most value. The Town and Country Work will develop first of 
all the service of Field Men and will attempt to increase their strength 
and efficiency by conferences and schools, to which they shall be in- 
vited for the study of a more efficient service to the churches and 
missionaries. To these conferences the rural pastors will be as- 
sembled as in the past for systematic, thorough study of their work. 
The Demonstration Parishes and the churches of greatest promise 
will be served with fullest use of the Board's resources. For every 
church and small community a program will be prepared, under the 
pastor's leadership, for submission to the Presbytery and to the 
various Boards of the Church. 

For the present the line of demarkation between the Town and 
Countrv and the City and Industrial Divisions is at presbyteries 
which contain cities of 200,000 population or over. It should be 
said that a comparatively small proportion of Home Mission work is 
conducted in cities of medium size, that is, from 25,000 to 200,000 
population. 

20 



FACTS FROM THE FIELD 21 

AMERICAN WORK 



The Field 

The support of churches in American communities in the South and 
West. 

Eighty-three Presbyteries in 17 Synods including 20 states (exclusive 
of Self-supporting Synods). 

Predominantly rural, but embracing great variety of conditions from 
isolated mountain to thriving city communities, from old settled farming 
areas to new and sparsely populated frontiers. Many oil, mining and 
other industrial communities are included. 

Problems are those of extension, evangelization, comity, community 
service and adjustment to changing conditions. 



The Work 

53 unorganiz 

7)2 Field Men selected jointly by Synod or Presbytery and the Board. 



735 organized churches and 53 unorganized stations served by 442 pas- 
tors and 2 women workers. 



On account of the lack of funds the Board made its appropriations 
to the Presbyteries on the basis of the manned and going work as 
of April first, 1921. Necessarily, there were churches which were 
unfortunately vacant at that date for which no provision could be 
made. There were about 125 such fields. They had been approved 
for aid by the Presbyterial Committees, and where there is review 
of Presbyterial estimates by Synod's Home Mission Committee, had 
again been given approval. The exclusion on account of lack of 
funds of so large a segment of the work must be borne in mind, 
especially when the entire Home Missionary task of the Board is 
passing under review. No one expects much in the way of results 
from an unshepherded church. 

There is another fact in the situation which must be remembered. 
The Board on September 27, 1921, in facing its declining income, 
issued an order to prohibit all new work, and to halt as far as possible 
all other work that could be postponed. The effect of this order 
on the field has everywhere been serious, especially in the South, 
where normally the supply of ministers is secured after October 
first, and in the Northwest, where churches found themselves unable 
to promise much until it was certain that there would be a grain 
crop to place on the market. So by exclusion unfortunately neces- 
sary and by inability to man fields during the second half of the year, 
a large part of the American Work has lain fallow. 

In spite of the seriousness of these handicaps, the work during 
the year has prospered. Evangelistic gains are reported from all 
quarters of the field. It seems fairly certain in advance of the publi- 
cation of the reports of the Presbyteries that there has been an in- 
crease in the number of the candidates for the Gospel ministry within 
the aid-receiving territory. Church building, though sorely needed 
in many congregations, has proceeded slowly. Old debts are reported 



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FACTS FROM THE FIELD 23 

being paid and New Era quotas largely accepted and met by con- 
gregations. 

A study of the list of churches aided reveals two general facts. 
Wherever a church secures as a leader a man of wisdom, energy, 
devotion and vision the work in that community prospers. Again 
and again it has been manifest that the right man can lead the con- 
gregation to unusual service and prosperity even where others have 
failed. The second fact is that the community service accomplished 
by the Board's missionaries bulks very large both in its extensive- 
ness and its effectiveness. No one can read the reports of our mis- 
sionaries without being impressed that many of them are potent 
factors in their communities not only as preachers of the Gospel but 
as doers of righteousness and promoters of the public weal. 

The Board maintains a Superintendent of Home Missions in all 
Synods of the aid-receiving territory and in some of them an assistant. 
Texas has two assistants. Each year there has been a conference 
of these men with the Secretaries and Directors, held in some central 
place, but last year on account of the financial situation the confer- 
ence was foregone. Nearly every year the Home Mission Council 
and the Standing Committee on Home Missions of the General As- 
sembly urge the Board to enlarge the field force as rapidly as funds 
will permit. The Self-supporting Synods generally have more field 
men than the Aid-receiving Synods. 

In Arizona, the depression in cattle, cotton, mining and agriculture 
has been acutely felt in the church life. But the work has been 
pressed vigorously. A church was organized in March at Kyreen. 
Many communities have been definitely assigned to the Presbyterians 
by the Interchurch organization of the state. To these we owe a 
two-fold responsibility. The aided churches have done what they 
could for local support, not forgetting the needs of the larger task 
of the Church. 

Two especiallv commendable community enterprises are the Grace 
Church, Little Rock, Arkansas, M. H. Krauss, pastor, and the church 
at Weed, California. The Little Rock church has maintained Daily 
Vacation Bible Schools and other religious activities which have en- 
abled it to reach in a large way the life of the community where it is 
located. The church at Weed, where Anderson Grain is pastor, has 
projected itself into the life of the community in a remarkable fashion 
through its program of religious education and service. 

The Synod of Idaho has suffered very serious depression. There 
has been some crop failure with considerable inability to market 
crops grown during the summer of 1921. This condition registered 
itself in the church work. A very large proportion of the churches 
aided are the only evangelical agencies in their communities. To 
allow them to cease work would be to deprive those communities 
for the time being of the Gospel. At Bellevue, where our church is 
the only evangelical church, a large interest has developed. The pas- 
tor has been successfully conducting for months a large Sunday 
School class of high school students. As the work developed a build- 
ing, formerly used for a saloon, was leased to be used for the com- 
munity activities of the church. This building was soon filled to over- 



24 HOME MISSIONS 

flowing and then a building, formerly used for business, was leased 
for the recreational program of the Church. Thus the church and 
pastor have taken the lead in the community life, directing both its 
educational and recreational life. 

Montana has had an unusually severe period of depression due to 
three successive droughts. One missionary reports that in his sec- 
tion three out of every four houses are vacated, many of them ap- 
parently abandoned by their owners. But notwithstanding, for the 
year ending March 31, 1921, the aid-receiving churches of this 
stricken Synod led all the Synods in the per cent of net gains to 
membership. The reports for the year just ending are, of course, 
not in hand but the evidence we have points to a continuance of the 
same evangelistic fervor and efficiency. Our missionary in the Big 
Hole Basin has to face pioneer conditions. His parish is 60 by 80 
miles in extent, with an average altitude of 6,600 feet. The entire 
population of this Basin is not more than a thousand. The people 
are scattered over this wide expanse in such a manner as to preclude 
the enjoyment of the ordinary church services. The missionary 
rides from one end of the Basin to the other as a veritable sky pilot. 
He is known by all and trusted by all. There is no other religious 
worker. 

Somewhat the same financial conditions prevail in North Dakota. 
West of Bismark five crops in succession have failed. The people 
are discouraged, without money and many of them ready to give up 
the interests which they have held. Some churches have been closed 
up indefinitely until the community life flows back. There has been 
a great deal of consolidation of the Home Missionary work. The 
weaker churches have been temporarily linked up with the stronger 
for service. In many of the communities referred to the Presbyterian 
is the only English-speaking church. 

Oklahoma is facing the rise of a large urban population in the 
rapidly growing cities of the State. Besides the Indians who have 
been ministered to for close to a century, aliens have flocked into 
the industrial centers and are today a challenge to the Church. From 
McAlester to Poteau, along the Rock Island railway, there is a con- 
siderable population for which, with the exception of one small 
mission, nothing is being done. 

Texas, likewise, faces the rise of the city. Ft. Worth, Dallas, 
Austin, Houston, El Paso and San Antonio are- growing beyond 
the ability of the local churches to meet the needs of the incoming 
people. A survey is soon to be made in San Antonio upon the basis 
of which a wise program of church extension may be planned, not 
only for the city itself, but with a view of undertaking the task of 
the entire Presbytery as well. 

A remarkable development is to be noted in connection with Cas- 
per, Wyoming. The church of North Casper was organized May 
15, 1921, calling the Rev. C. A. Marshall at the same time to be 
pastor. The members at the end of the year numbered 250, with 
71 affiliated members. From August 1st to March 31st, Dr. Marshall 
baptized 110 infants, a record which has possibly not been exceeded 
during the year within the entire field of Home Missions. The 



FACTS FROM THE FIELD 25 

church already has a chapel, which is being used as a manse and a 
large tabernacle. The population of the city is 2,500. Our church 
is the only church, although there is a mission of the "Pentecostal" 
type. West of the city of Casper and separated from it by the river 
and the oil refineries is the new municipality known as Mills. In 
March a Presbyterian Church was organized with an initial member- 
ship of 24. The population is 750. Within the County, Natrona, 
of which Casper is the seat, lies the Salt Creek oil field. The proven 
territory is ten or twelve miles by twenty and its producing life, con- 
servatively estimated, is twenty-five years. The Board maintains a 
missionary who must do sky pilot work in this territory. 

During the year, in spite of the difficulties growing out of the finan- 
cial situation, an effort has been made to maintain the standard sala- 
ries of our missionaries. The churches have loyally cooperated with 
the result that not many salaries have been decreased. 

CHURCH AND COUNTRY LIFE WORK 



The Field 

The besetting ills of the country church have been characteristically, 
its absentee, part-time ministry ; inadequate equipment ; narrow outlook 
and program ; its weakness, numerical and financial ; and its sectarianism. 

In typical rural areas, less than 10 oer cent of the open country 
churches have resident pastors ; only 6 per cent have the full time of a 
pastor; more than three-fourths have less than 100 members and more 
than a fifth have less than 25 members each; few of them have services 
of worship every Sabbath; less than a fourth of them are growing. 

The country community needs leadership, not only in religion and 
morals, but in every community interest. 

Education, public health, recreation, transportation, better homes are 
problems in most communities. 

To bring the country church to a position of influence and power is 
the greatest contribution that can be made to the spiritual, the intellectual 
and the material progre3s of the country-side. 

The Work 

43 Demonstration Country Parishes (7 are Indian), each selected be- 
cause of its strategic opportunity for the service of a country community, 
include churches in American, Bohemian and Indian communities. 

The guiding principle in each is the same — a resident pastor, well pre- 
pared for his work and properly supported in it, with a program worked 
out on the basis of an intelligent study of the community and its needs, 
stressing evangelism, education and every form of service required for 
the permanent upbuilding of a prosperous. Christian community life. 

Present working force, 26 ministers, 1 woman community worker and 
3 general field workers. 

Summer schools are held each year for the practical training of men 
for the rural ministry. 

"Home Lands," a magazine devoted to the country church, is published 
bi-monthly. Cooperation is given to Presbyteries or local congregations 
in surveys, conferences and the formation of programs of work. 



26 HOME MISSIONS 

The Church and Country Life Work, begun by the Board thirteen 
years ago, was the pioneer department in this work. It now has 
reached national proportions in our Church. Under the larger term 
"Town and Country Work" the Board has decided to "apply the 
Country Church Program to all our churches." This means that the 
Demonstration Parishes are to demonstrate what a church ought to 
do in a small community. 

These special enterprises, carried on by the Board in trust for the 
presbytery, have been for about three years past approximately fifty 
in number. Eight of them this year have come to the end of their 
term and were returned to the presbytery. Six of these should be 
continued in the Demonstration Parish class because the Board's work 
in them is not finished. In the same period twenty have been ofiFered 
by presbyteries, which the Board for lack of funds could not under- 
take to promote. These parishes are in all parts of the country. 
One pastor in Texas says in speaking of his work : 

"Concerniner the record of this church for five years, I feel that the phe- 
nomenal increase (for the rural district) in membership — from 32 to 158 — the 
training: of more than fifty young men and women for active work in the 
church, the steady increase from year to year in our financial budget, the 
building of our fine highways, the building ud of our public schools to where 
there are none better in the rural sections of this state, and the raising in cash 
and subscriptions of over five thousand dollars toward the building of a new 
and adequate church building, not to mention the building up of hopes in the 
life of every man, woman and child in this community towards a real com- 
munity center — I do feel that to impede the progress or curtail the assistance 
to these fields after they have been definitely established and have proven their 
worth,_ right on the eve of finishing the most important part of the program — 
and without which all the five years' work done before and all the money in- 
vested, will be practically lost — that this thing would be nothing short of a 
calamity to the Presbyterian Church, at least in Texas." 

From another Texas church we have the following: 
"Our church under your department has the advantage over the old way 
in that I am giving my time to one church and my time is not divided. One 
has only to visit the field now and see the results of the work since this church 
was placed under your direction. There has been a decided improvement in 
our school and still others to follow. The spiritual condition of the community 
has decidedly improved since I have been on the field. Nothing but a resident 
pastor and full time work could have brought about the condition as now exists 
in community. Our work this year has been very gratifying. Thirty- 
two additions to the church since March, two young people's societies, a well 
attended Sunday school, and the people as a whole interested in the work." 

An Arkansas pastor writes : 

"The program is not lop-sided. I think that is the very word to express 
what I mean. The program is well balanced. In all the work I have helped 
do before I came into your department and since when you sent me to help 
other men — special force or emphasis is put on one part of the program. Some 
way the churches receive the larger program and messages, and the response 
is much greater for the things than when we emphasize these things." 

The key to the Board's problem is personal attention in terms of 
a national program. We believe that what the small community 
needs is to be lifted up into a national spirit as preparation for a 
national service. The program of the local community is well ex- 
pressed in the words of a visitor: 

"The community center is to provide sane, practical preaching of the Gospel 



FACTS FROM THE FIELD 27 

by men of strong character, thus making it a place of real religious instruction 
and inspiration, — a religious center, an educational center, a social center, a 

health center and agricultural center, all in one Here lies a part of the 

unfinished task of the Church." 

Every one of the pastors and women workers in Demonstration 
fields is following this program according to his own abilities and 
the guidance of the Holy Spirit. These demonstration centers are 
maintained as examples only. Their purpose is to exhibit to other 
churches about them what can be done by a resident pastor working 
in the Spirit of Christ. 

During the past year the church at Post Falls, Idaho, has com- 
pleted, under Rev. J. Sherman Potter, the program which was initi- 
ated bv his predecessor, Rev. Nathan M. Fiske, five years ago. 
Methodist and Presbyterian churches are united in one congregation, 
their ])roperties in one structure, — a church building of fourteen 
rooms, ample and convenient for all the needs of the community. 
The pastor lives in a comfortable manse and is adequately supported 
bv his people, who are entirely united and proud of their community 
life. i ' 

At Toqua, Tennessee, for the Rev. T. J. Miles. D.D., pastor, the 
community, with the help of the Board of Church Erection, has built 
a manse ; thus keeping Dr. Miles in the open country where he 
chooses to live. At Ebenezer, Kentucky, the people have erected a 
manse for Rev. J. T. Stewart. These two churches illustrate that 
there are men enough who want to live in the country if they can 
be housed and supported there. Influential steps have been taken 
for extensive building enterprises at Corinth, Texas, Kingston, Ar- 
kansas and Novato, California, where exemplary church and com- 
munity plans are in preparation. 

During the vear the work among the Pima Indians in Phoenix 
Presbytery. Arizona, has been transferred to this department for 
special promotion along rural lines. 

In New Albany Presbytery the Board's cooperation has taken form 
in evansfelistic meetings and conferences, under Rev. Clair S. Adams, 
and we have assisted in securinsf Rev. W. W. Logan. D.D., who 
represents both the Board and the Synod in this great rural presby- 
tery. 

Eor twelve years the Country Life workers of the Board have co- 
operated in Summer Schools for Rural Pastors. The purpose of 
these schools is to impart the knowledge and call forth the skill which 
the country church requires in its workers. They are more than 
conferences. They are very far from being periods of rest. They 
are short courses, two or three weeks in length, at a Theological 
.Seminary or State College of Agriculture, in which ministers study 
how they may become consecrated and professional servants of 
the people who live in the country as the Spirit of Christ is leading 
them. 

The Board has had special satisfaction in the itinerary of Mr, 
Djang Fang, a brilliant Chinese student in Princeton Theological 
Seminary. He lectured among country churches upon Agriculture 
and Superstitions in China, and upon the effects of missionary work 
among his people, 

3 — Home Miss. 



28 HOME MISSIONS 

MOUNTAIN WORK 



The Field 

The Southern Mountain Area includes parts of nine states with 112,000 
square miles. 

Total population 5,500,000, 84.3 per cent being "native white of native 
parentage;" few large cities, less than 25 per cent living in places of 
more than 1,000 inhabitants. 

Natural resources in timber, minerals and water power are incalculably 
rich but very imperfectly developed. Agricultural resources are meager. 

Chief problems are lack of economic opportunity and consequent pov- 
erty; lack of adequate medical and hospital facilities and consequent 
prevalence of disease; lack of proper schools and consequent illiteracy; 
lack of good roads and adequate transportation facilities and consequent 
isolation and retardation. Housing and social life present important 
related problems. 

The Work 

Presbyterian Church small numerically, but strong in influence and 
growing rapidly. 

Presbyterian effort, through Home Board, centered chiefly on two 
mountain Presbyteries covering 14 mountain counties in Tennessee and 
North Carolina and certain scattered points in the Cumberlands and 
Ozarks. 

Aim is not to establish new churches, but to develop strong, well- 
manned service stations at strategic centers._ 

Present working force includes 17 ordained ministers, 17 lay com- 
munity workers, of which number 15 are women, 11 workers' compan- 
ions, all women, 23 teachers, of which number 17 are women, 2 doctors 
and 3 nurses, serving 42 organized churches, 24 unorganized stations, 
3 schools and 1 hospital. Rev. W. E. Finley is Superintendent in French 
Broad Presbytery, Rev. J. H. Miller in Cumberland Mountain Pres- 
bytery. 

Splendid hospital maintained at White Rock, North Carolina; medical 
and surgical cases cared for; school children regularly examined; clinics 
held. 

Important Practical Life Schools being developed at Alpine, Tennessee, 
and Burnsville, North Carolina, train boys and girls for life in the 
mountains. 



The Mountain Work is obviously rural work, with special distinc- 
tion in the two Presbyteries of French Broad and Cumberland Moun- 
tain, which the Board administers on the Country Life Program. 
We are carrying out in every community a work precisely suited 
to its needs, always centering in evangelism and pastoral service. 
This work is divided about equally between men and women, of whom 
the women are generally the pioneers, the men the constructors. At 
one extreme in Mountain Work is the house which we have built this 
past year at Higgins, North Carolina, where Miss Martha Robison 
is now residing to prepare the way for either a woman worker or 
a minister and wife. At the other extreme is the ample and varied 
service rendered at Alpine, Tennessee, near Livingston, where a pas- 
tor and his family reside and where a farm of one hundred fifty acres 
is under the care of Mr. Charles T. Greenway and his wife, and a 
community school, under the leadership of Miss Marie K. Schoen- 
hals, with eight teachers, is ministering to the children of this and 
other communities. At both these places the work has outrun our 
resources, though we have invested about $40,000 at Alpine during 



FACTS FROM THE FIELD 29 

the past three years. We believe that the investment of both life 
and money at Alpine will pay dividends to the State of Tennessee 
and to the Kingdom of God. The Laurel Hospital at White Rock, 
and the Stanley McCormick School at I^urnsville, North Carolina, 
are further illustrations of the large institution bearing its part in 
community w^ork alongside the church. 

In Cumberland Mountain Presbytery, as a result of evangelistic 
meetings held under the leadership of Rev. Clair S. Adams, there 
have been 221 additions to the various churches. 

At Vardy. Tennessee, w^here Miss Mary J. Rankin has given more 
than ten years of devoted service to aji isolated folk, Rev. C. F. Leon- 
ard and his wife are now living in a manse which he has built with 
his own hands, with the help of the church there, and a gift from the 
Board of Church Erection. Mr. Leonard has a great program which 
he is patiendy developing. The Board of Home Missions conceives 
itself to be the banker and backer of these men and women called 
of God to an adventurous and an enduring kind of service. 

Every move in the Church and Country Life Work is with the 
intent of establishing the Kingdom of God in the places where local 
interests and provincial sentiments tend to belittle the minds of men 
and to make religion cruel, fatalistic, instead of hopeful, joyous and 
world-hearted. It is the purpose of the Board to use its rural churches 
as models of what a Christian church can be to the people about it. 

AMERICAN INDIAN WORK 



The Field 

The number of Indians in the United States is probably greater now 
than at any previous time. Total for 1921, 340.838. 

This total includes more than 150 tribal bands and clans with as many 
different languages and dialects scattered on 147 reservations and many 
hundred communities in every state of the Union. 

The Dakotas or Sioux, the Chippewas and the Navajos are the largest 
tribal groups. 

Only 120,000 Indians use English, 79,000 are citizens and 26,000 are 
voters. Education, health and economic development are problems inti- 
mately affecting mission work. 

The Work 

Presbyterian work under the Home Board includes 147 organized 
churches, 35 unorganized stations, 14 neighborhood houses, 2 hospitals 
and a number of government schools where workers are maintained. The 
working force includes 82 ordained ministers, 48 lay helpers, of which 
number 4 are women, 4 teachers, of which number one is a woman, 4 
doctors and nurses, of which number 3 are women, and 5 field men. 

On many fields the missionary deals with practically pagan Indians. On 
the other hand, the conversion of practically the whole tribe of the Nez 
Perces of Idaho, the Pimas of Arizona and the Sioux of the Dakotas 
attests the victory gained by the patient labors of consecrated workers. 

Community service and broad lines of institutional work are developed 
where the pioneer labors of the preachers of the Gospel have prepared 
the way. 

Last year marked the fiftieth anniversary of the beginning of work 
with the Pimas. Twelve churches with a membership of over 2,000 and 
a tribe lifted from paganism to Christian civilization are the monument 
to those fifty years of labor. 

Rev. Thomas C. ]\foffett. D.D., is the Assistant Secretary in charge. 



30 HOME MISSIONS 

The Indian missions of the Presbyterian Church are strongly es- 
tabHshed among fifty tribal divisions located in twenty states. An 
aggregate Indian constitutency estimated at 20,000 gives the Presby- 
terian Church at least one- fourth of the whole Protestant member- 
ship. This has l)een the result of decades of faithful work on the 
part of consecrated missionaries and of painstaking superintendents 
and teachers in the schools conducted by the Woman's Board. There 
are 147 organized Presbyterian churches, eighty-two missionaries in 
charge are ordained, and almost an equal number of lay workers 
are rendering service. The result has been the overthrowing of 
paganism, destroying the power of the medicine men, the old Shamans 
of the tribe, and the establishment of Christianity as the religion 
of the great majority of the members of the tribes where Christian 
effort has been put forth. Among the Nez Perces, Pimas, Sioux 
and Senecas. four-fifths of the total population are adherents of the 
Christian faith, and have given up their Indian ceremonial dances and 
pagan customs. But for about 45,000 Red Men of the United States 
no mission work has yet been undertaken, and many communities 
of partially reached tribes are still semi-pagan or without intelligent 
understanding of the Christian revelation. The task of the Church 
is to complete this unfinished work and to strengthen the life and 
service among the professing Christians of a race that within one or 
two generations was almost totally in the darkness of paganism. The 
Indians were nature worshippers, having no written language, and 
the victory of Christian missions for the Red Men has a unique and 
primary significance in the history of Christian work in America. 

The past year has been signalized by the enlargement of the work 
in the Government Indian Schools, and by the successful outcome 
of long contested efforts to establish our work at strategic points 
on the great Navajo Reservation. At the Chemawa Indian School, 
Salem, Oregon, 62 of the young people were baptized on one evening 
at the organization of a Union Church of 260 members. Religious 
Work Directors have been appointed for united Protestant oversight 
of the pupils at Sherman Institute, Riverside. California, the Federal 
School at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Haskell Institute, Law- 
rence, Kansas. 

The Board is supporting an extensive work for the neglected Nava- 
jos of the Southwest numbering 32,000 Indians. Stations have been 
established at the most strategic points in this vast reservation which 
includes 16,000 square miles of territory. In New Mexico, four 
missions in the vicinity of Shiprock. the Government Agency center, 
are reaching thousands of pagan Navajos who have never before 
heard of or been instructed in the Christian faith. With the coming 
to the Redrock medical mission of Dr. and Mrs. Kay B. Urban from 
Texas, the work is now ready for equipping, the new building having 
been erected at this picturesque location, at an altitude of 5,000 feet, 
in the midst of massive red sandstone cliffs, thirty miles Southwest 
of Shiprock Agency. Furnishings and equipment for the new hos- 
pital are being sought by the Board, and appointments will soon be 
made to the positions of nurses and housekeeper. 

The victory at Chin Lee, Arizona, where opposition of priests and 



FACTS FROM THE FIELD 31 

an element of the tribe influenced l)y them, delayed building, has been 
a notable incident of the year. The (jovernment has confirmed the 
cite allotted for our mission and the chapel and manse planned last 
year will now be erected. 

The contributions of the Indian congregations have reached a total 
of $50,000 annually. 

The death of Rev. John Eastman, of the Sioux Missions, removed 
one of the leaders of Indian evangelism and administration who ex- 
hibited large capacity and ability. 

The Choctaw Indians are active in Christian Endeavor Society 
work and have a District Union. 

Rev. A. Fulton Johnson has completed thirty years of fruitful 
service on the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota, among the 
Ogalalla Sioux. He found heathenism rank there and the Indians 
saying they did not want Christianity. They were then hostile to 
the white man, for it was soon after the Indian uprising under Chief 
Sitting Bull. He was once shot at as he was leaving the church of. 
Wounded Knee, located near the scene of the battle of Wounded 
Knee, the last during that uprising. Today he has ten church organi- 
zations. All of Sitting Bull's connection there have l>ecome church 
members. Each church has a house of worship and a manse. Nearly 
every one is built of logs which he himself cut down and hauled 
with his own team. 

In the early stages of Indian mission work, because evangelism 
was the first great need among the pagan Indians and on account 
of lack of funds and of experienced leaders, the social service and 
medical mission work was not largely developed. Later, medical ser- 
vice became an important feature of our work. ]\Iore of this work 
should be established, as it is full of promise and will bring the In- 
dians to a more favorable attitude to hear and receive the message 
of the Gospel. The training of native workers is an outstanding 
need to the supply of which the Board has been systematically mov- 
ing through Bible Training Schools, Summer Institutes and Camp 
Meetings, and an Interdenominational Conference of Workers. The 
Board is ready to cooperate in all efforts to equip leaders and 
Indian workers for better service. Bible Training Schools are con- 
ducted at Phoenix, Arizona; Santee, Nebraska and Lapwai, Idaho, 
and scholarships are provided at the Roe Indian Institute, Wichita, 
Kansas. Summer Institutes and Camp Meetings have been held 
among the Pimas, Papagos, Choctaws, Creeks and Nez Perces, and 
annual conventions and conferences have been maintained for one or 
more weeks at Flagstaff, Arizona, in the Dakota Indian Presbytery, 
and at Talmaks, Idaho. Interdenominational Conferences have been 
held at eight western points. All of these efforts for the training 
of workers and the stimulating of new methods of work and Bible 
study have been forward looking. The Presbyterian Church is in 
the vanguard of the forces and is accepting leadership in the varied 
lines of activity. 

The Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Hon. Charles H. Burke, 
has shown special appreciation and cooperation in missionary ser- 
vice, and has recently borne this strong testimony: "No report of 



2>2 HOME MISSIONS 

important promising conditions among the Indians should fail to 
acknowledge the constant labors of the Christian missionaries; from 
the heroic days of John Eliot, there has been among the Indians 
a devoted and widening achievement by these faithful teachers of 
the spiritual conception that must hold a fundamental place in our 
civilization." 

The primary obligation in America, to give the Gospel to all of 
the Indians, is generally recognized. As one of our church leaders 
has written regarding neglected fields, "No one has been found to 
dispute the duty and responsibility of the Church for taking the 
Gospel to all of the Indians of America, and it seems a strange and 
disquieting thing that there should be in our land any Red Men who 
are unevangelized." An adequate program of action will include the 
following obligations : 

To speedily evangelize the 45,000 Indians of our Christian land 
who have no missionaries or churches, and the 175,000 who are not 
yet adherents of any denomination; to enlarge the number and 
■ capacity of Christian schools where the Bible is taught daily and 
the atmosphere of the schools is that of the Christian home; to 
establish an industrial and institutional work for the neediest tribes 
and to employ Christian lay workers, field missionaries and house- 
keepers to improve the material conditions and the home life of the 
Indians; to encourage the Indians everywhere in America to adjust 
themselves to the new conditions and relations into which they have 
been forced, and to help them, under God, to work out their own 
salvation and destiny in American life. 

SPANISH-SPEAKING WORK IN THE SOUTHWEST 



The Field 

1,750,000 Mexicans in the United States, concentrated chiefly in the 
border states, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California, and in south- 
ern Colorado. 

About one-third were born in the United States ; two-thirds were born 
in Mexico. 

El Paso and San Antonio, Texas, and Los Angeles, California, are 
the great Mexican centers. 

Chiefly employed on farms, in mines and at day labor on railroads. 

Illiteracy, superstition and a generally low standard of living are 
general problems. 

The Work 

55 organized churches, 16 unorganized stations, 8 neighborhood houses, 
5 schools, 2 hospitals or clinics in five states. 

A working force of 56 including 35 ordained ministers, 13 women 
community workers, 4 teachers of which number 3 are women, 2 doctors 
and 2 nurses. 

Rev. R. N. McLean, D.D., is the Assistant Secretary in charge. 



The industrial depression which has been noted all over the coun- 
try during the year 1921 has had a marked eflFect upon the Board's 
work among the Mexicans in the Southwest. Those who live from 
hand to mouth and are dependent upon their manual labor for their 



FACTS FROM THE FIELD 33 

maintenance are the ones who first feel the pinch of an industrial 
depression. The copper mines in the southeastern part of Arizona, 
which depend almost entirely upon Mexican labor, closed early in 
the year. Shortly after, the smelter at Douglas shut down. In Texas, 
Arizona and California the cotton price has been so low that in 
many places the crop has not been picked. In view of the fact that 
Mexican labor has harvested most of the cotton in the Southwest, 
the lack of work has been felt among our Mexican people. 

Large numbers of those who have been living in the Southwest 
came from Mexico because of the lure of opportunity. It has been 
inevitable, therefore, that large numbers of them should return to 
Mexico as soon as they were out of work. Most of our churches 
show good substantial gains for the year on confession of faith, but 
in many instances the losses due to the return to Mexico have more 
than offset the gains. 

Of course, this condition has not been an unmixed loss. Many of 
those who "learned the Gospel" in this country, as they express it, 
have doubtless gone back to Mexico to be good missionaries of the 
Cross among the folk of the towns where they were brought up. A 
meeting in the Phoenix Church in May of the past year was turned 
into a veritable consecration service. A special train provided by 
the Mexican government was to leave on the following Wednesday 
and practically one-third of the members of the church were planning 
to return to the home land at that time. One after another they 
arose in the meeting and gave solemn testimony to the blessings 
which had come into their lives in the United States through the 
power of the Gospel, and made definite pledge that upon their, return 
.to Mexico they would carry the seed of the Truth. 

The Mexican churches have proven their worth as evangelizing 
agencies. Each year these churches show a percentage of gain many 
fold greater than the percentage for the Presbyterian Church at 
large. Last year their gain on confession of faith was 19.3% of 
their previous membership. Their gross membership gain bv con- 
fession and letter was 24.6%. Their losses by removal were, however, 
"so heavy that the net gain for the year was only 6.4%. 

In spite of the industrial depression and the lack of work, the 
definite effort which has been made to awaken the Christian Mexi- 
cans to a sense of their financial responsibility has been bearing fruit. 
Our Spanish-speaking churches in the Southwest during the year 
1921 contributed $2,662.97 for benevolences and $8,701.03 for their 
own support, making a total of $1 1.364.00 contributed by all churches. 
Most of the churches definitely set goals at the beginning of the 
year and this has had a splendid effect upon the giving. The banner 
church in finances is the San Gabriel Church, San Gabriel, California. 
The benevolences of this church last year were $6.66 per member, 
or a total of $300.00 for the year. The gifts for benevolences in 
this church have increased from $12.00 two years ago to the sum 
which has been stated alx)ve. 

In some fields also the lack of work has given our Mexican people 
an opportunity to show the real fiber of their Christian character. 
When the smelter was shut down at Douglas, catastrophe was fore- 



34 HOME MISSIONS 

seen for our work, because of the fact that practically every wage 
earner was employed in the smelter. But Mr. Soto, the pastor of 
the church, was not to accept defeat so easily. The members of 
the little group banded together to help each other and by con- 
tributing each to the needs of the other in the true apostolic sense, 
they were able to weather the storm without great loss. The fact 
that they were not busy in the smelter made it possible for the pastor 
to call them to the church daily for religious work. Prayer bands 
and evangelistic bands were organized and the members of the 
church worked systematically every day for the salvation of their 
neighbors. The church has grown by leaps and bounds and can 
no longer accommodate the people who desire to worship in the little 
adobe building which is available for the services. One of the most 
encouraging features of the year's work has been the growth of 
the Douglas Church in the face of its adversities. It is needless to 
say that having gone through a testing of fire, the members of the 
church are more disposed than ever to bear their burdens in the work 
of the Kingdom. 

Five new churches have been organized during the year, viz., Braw- 
ley, Monrovia, La Verne, Upland and Otay, all in California. 

In June the Mexican Department cooperated with the Board of 
Church Extension in the raising of a fund of $60,000, 25% of which 
has been made available for buildings for the Mexican Work. This 
fund has made possible the purchase of a church and manse at Azusa, 
a settlement house at Monrovia, a manse at San Gabriel, still leaving 
the bulk of the amount raised for the first unit of the new plant in 
Los Angeles. The Board of Church Erection has already voted 
$15,000 for this first unit so that as soon as the money on the 
pledges made for the $60,000 campaign fund are paid in, a total 
of about $32,000 will be in hand and available for the erection of 
the first' unit of this plant. 

In addition to the buildings mentioned above, there have been 
secured during the present year, a new church costing $7,100 at San 
Gabriel, and a church costing $10,000 was begun at Albuquerque and 
has just been completed during the opening months of 1922. These 
two buildings were made possible through gifts of the Board of 
Church Erection. 

A building providing facilities for the church and school at San 
Angelo was also purchased, but was unfortunately destroyed by fire 
in November, 1921. Steps are already being taken for the erection 
of a new building in this very important field. 

Among the interesting features of the work has been the con- 
tinued success of the Homes of Neighborly Service. This work has 
been particularly noteworthy at Redlands and San Bernardino in 
California and at San Antonio in Texas. There is a very urgent 
need for more homes of this type throughout the Southwest. 

The second annual boys' camp was held at Laguna Beach during 
the last two weeks in August and was a decided success. Eighty- 
seven boys availed themselves of the opportunities of the camp and 
gained great benefit from the outdoor life, as well as from the re- 
ligious instruction which was given in the various class groups and 



FACTS FROM THE FIELD 35 

around the camp fires. The success of the boys' camp during the 
past two summers has brought im])eratively to our attention the need 
of doing something along the same line for girls. 

Daily Vacation Bible Schools were held in nearly all of the churches 
in California last summer and at several points in Arizona and New 
Mexico. Almost without exception these schools were a great suc- 
cess. It has been found that there is no type of work which pays 
such large returns in opening up a field as does the work of the 
Dailv \\acation Bible School. Funds ought to be provided for hold- 
ing a school upon each field. The Bisbee Hospital and Social Center 
has been another outstanding feature of the work of 1921. This 
work was started upon its enlarged scale with the opening of the 
fiscal vear and was made possible through the generosity of the 
Calumet and Arizona and Phelps-Dodge Copper Companies operat- 
ing at Bisbee. The former company was persuaded to turn over to 
oUr use a large building which had formerly been used as a hospital, 
and the latter company contributed $2,000 toward its furnishings. 
The plant with its equipment provides facilities for the chapel, Sun- 
day school room, living quarters for three of the workers, six hospital 
rooms, ward, clinical rooms and an operating room. The force con- 
sists of a pastor, a physician and two nurses, one of whom gives a 
large part of her time toward the organization and direction of the 
social program of the plant. 

A new plan of work has been tried during the past year with 
success in the Los Angeles field. In April a Training School for 
ten or a dozen Mexican young people was projected in the budget. 
When it came time to open the school in September, however, it 
was found that there was a large number of applicants for courses 
along various lines. Through the generosity of friends it was pos- 
sible to enlarge the budget and additional teachers were employed 
enabling us to carry on a Night School, the enrollment of which 
during the year has reached v^OO. This school has provided courses 
in English. Spanish, cooking, sewing, millinery, missionary educa- 
tion and in practical training for Christian work. The experiment 
has been noteworthy, in that it has brought Americans and Mexicans 
together on the basis of a common task and has. therefore, been a 
great Americanization feature. Furthermore, it has been found that 
practically 90% of those who attended the Night School are Roman 
Catholic people who were not being touched by any other feature 
of our work. Many of these have thus been brought into touch with 
the church. 

A splendid Night School work has been conducted at San Gabriel. 
Forty-five have been enrolled and in a recent evangelistic service 
twelve or fifteen of the young men attending the Night School made 
a confession of their faith and united with the church. 

The greatest outstanding need in the work is a training school at 
Albuquerque and a boys' school with training equipment in Los 
Angeles. We shall never be able to reap the fruits of our labor 
until we can send forth more laborers into the harvest. We cannot 
expect these to drop down upon us from the sky. but must set our- 
selves assiduously to the task of training them for the service. 



36 HOMK MISSIONS 

LUMBER CAMP WORK 



The Field and the Work 

Number of lumber camps regularly visited during the year 320. Total 
number of men employed in the same 17,545. 

Number of lumber camps visited occasionally 58. Total number of 
men employed 3,620. 

Number mining camps, factories, industrial plants and shops visited 
during the year 12. Number of men in the same 6,920. 

Number of mill towns visited 144. 

Number of days spent in the camps 1,772. 

Number of religious services held during the year 1,615. Total at- 
tendance 44,051. 

Other services held 416. Attendance 15,304. 

Number of personal interviews on religion 3,334. 

Number of requests for prayer 1,282. Number of men specially prayed 
with 276. 

Number of credible conversions 245. Number of persons who have 
joined with some church during the year 48. 

Number of Gospels distributed 8,431 — Bibles 187. 

Number of visits to sick and injured in the hospitals and elsewhere 439. 

Number of commissioned workers 16. 

Rev. A. J. Montgomery, D.D., is the Assistant Secretary in charge. 



The Lumber Camp work' for which the Board is directly respon- 
sible is conducted mainly in the North Pacific states. Duripg^ the 
past year sixteen men were commissioned as missionaries to log- 
g:ers and mill men and they were distributed as follows : One in 
California, three in Oregon and twelve in the Synod of Washing- 
ton, which includes the panhandle of Idaho. The work is stressed 
in the State of Washington because of the high development of the 
industry there. In 1920 the state produced 5,524,676,000 feet of 
lumber. The lumber cut was valued at $195,000,000. In addition 
to this 4.847,000.000 wooden shingles were cut, which is 70% of the 
shingles produced in the United States. Calls with increasing in- 
sistency are coming to the Board for this kind of missionary ser- 
vice in the great pine belt of Central Oregon, in the Coos Bay region 
of the same state, in western Montana and in the forest reserve and 
Dam Site of Hetch — Hetchy, California, where the city of San 
Francisco proposes to get its water supply. On account of the con- 
dition of the Board's Treasury during the year it has been impos- 
sible to respond to these calls for help. In addition to these calls 
from the lumber camps, great religious needs have developed in other 
branches of industry employing migrant labor. A missionary has 
been asked for service in the extensive oil field population in Califor- 
nia between Bakersfield and Coalinga. Increasingly the ranks of 
seasonal and migrant labor are being swelled and little or nothing so 
far has been done to reach with the Gospel the men who give them- 
selves to this type of employment. 

The production of logs and the lumber business during the year 



FACTi5 FROM THE FIELD il 

have suffered severely on account of the financial depression. Many 
logging camps were shut down for months at a time and only with 
the opening of the spring of 1922 is there a revival in the industry 
and a promise for better conditions. The shut down of so many 
camps with the consequent dispersion of loggers to cities and other 
types of employment reflects itself in the annual reports of the^mis- 
sionaries this year. ' "~"~5^ 

Radicalism has not been quite as aggressive in the camps as here- 
tofore. This may be due to many causes. The people of the west 
coast seem to have adopted a new attitude of mind toward it. Where- 
as they were formerly alarmed and used combative measures, not 
always wise or just, now they take radicalism as a matter of fact. 
This discounting of the significance of radicalism there may or may 
not have had its repercussion in the "Reds" themselves. Reports 
from the missionaries indicate that while at times they have faced 
the usual radical attitude toward the Church and the Gospel, yet 
in the main there is a better spirit in the camixs* which makes it pos- 
sible for them to do a better type of work. 

The long periods of unemployment to which the logger as a migrant 
worker is subjected and especiallv the many months last summer 
and fall when the camps were closed down, have without doubt 
sapped his morale. His response to the efforts of the missionary 
has reflected itself in his general despondencv over labor conditions. 
Then the general restlessness of the entire world naturally reproduces 
itself in the thoughts and opinions of the misfrants. In periods of 
extreme restlessness they are not as hospitable as usual to the re- 
lisrious appeal. The constant shifting of the men from point to point 
where labor can be obtained makes the work of the missionary ex- 
tremelv difficult. With all of this the propaganda of radicalism 
generates an attitude of suspicion toward religious workers. The 
Church is not believed in. The missionary is regarded as some kind 
of an exploiter and until he has lived down this suspicion and proven 
himself to be a genuine friend of the men he does not get very far 
along with his work. 

There is a helpful side to the work. A few years ago the unsani- 
tary condition of the logging camps was recognized as being a great 
deterrent to American and Christian ideals. But there has been in 
the last three or four years a most remarkable change in this particu- 
lar and in the environment which operators have striven to put around 
their employees. There has been a general clean-up in eighty-four 
per cent of the operations. Eighty-six per cent of the camps now 
have bathing facilities. Seventy-one per cent of the camps in this 
section have screened mess halls and toilets. The food given the 
men is of the very best and is offered in abundance. 

Our missionaries have addressed themselves to the task with great 
energy and consecration. They preach many times a week in camp 
reading rooms, mess halls and bunk houses. Some of them who 
are able to sing lead the men in a hearty service of song. They 
organize branch libraries in connection with state libraries, conduct 
evening classes for loggers who wish to improve their minds, some- 
times act as undertakers and preachers at the burial service of log- 



38 HOME MISSIONS 

gers, address open meetings of the labor unions, where possible find 
employment for men out of work, visit the sick and injured in 
hospitals and elsewhere, give first aid to injured men and assist 
surgeons in dressing wounds. One man carries on his back to the 
camps a phonograph with a selection of good records. After the 
concert which he gives the boys, he always finds the way open to 
speak to them about the intimate things of religion. These men 
are frequently called upon to serve in adjusting minor labor troubles 
and camp difficulties. They have thus a large field for service as 
varied as the needs of the loggers in their places of isolation in the 
camps of the great fir forests. During the year we have opened up 
work in the Humboldt Bay country in cooperation with the Presby- 
tery of Benicia. 

A great hydro-electric plant ultimately capable of developing 500.000 
H. P. is being installed for the city of Seattle, in the upoer Skagit 
Valley, Washington. A small town-camp has been built for the em- 
ployees which bears the name New Halem, about twentv miles above 
Rockport, the present terminus of the Great Northern Railway. The 
personnel of the camp consists of two divisions. In one are the 
men employed by the city of Seattle to be in preparatorv and super- 
visory contact with the other group which consists of those em- 
ployed by the contract company in putting in the first unit of the 
project, a two mile tunnel which will divert the entire water flow of 
the Skagit River. Extensive compressor plants, machine shops, gaso- 
line, steam and electric traction, logging camps and saw mills have 
been built so as to make possible the driving of the various tunnels 
through the mountain to secure the final installation of this great 
power plant. The service of Rev. L. H. Pedersen was secured for 
this camp last April. He has under his absolute care two entire build- 
ings, one of which is the club house with a reading room, library and 
pool room. The other is the theater which is used for religious ser- 
vices, lectures, athletics, social afifairs and dances. Mr. Pedersen 
directs everything except the dances, which are under the charge of 
a committee. Religious services are held for the camp every Sunday 
and include Sunday school and ])reaching. Tlie services on the 
first Sunday of each month are of a missionary character and the 
collection which is always taken is forwarded to the Board. At 
irregular intervals Mr. Pedersen issues a paper for the entire com- 
munity. He has superintended the educational work and the recrea- 
tional life of the camp and is doing a splendid piece of service in a 
community where the labor is very largely migrant. 

A year ago the Board took up work amongst the Japanese who were 
employed in the lumber camps of Washington. The last census 
shows that there are 17,387 Japanese in the State of Washington, 
most of them living in the western half of the State. They are found 
in the camps, mill towns, truck farrns and small communities. They 
have proven to be very accessible to the efforts being put forth to 
evangelize them. A publication entitled "Good News in English and 
Japanese" has been printed, by the use of which a local Sunday 
school teacher who is unable to speak the Japanese language can 
take charge of a numl^er of these Orientals and lead them effectively 



FACTS FROM THE FIELD 



39 



into Christian truth. The poHcy of the Board, as far as it has de- 
veloped is, first, to create a contact of sympathy between the Japanese 
colony and the American community and, second, to put the respon- 
sibility upon the local church for looking after these people. A 
Daily Vacation Bible School was held last summer which was at- 
tended by both Americans and Japanese and there was no friction 
in the school or in the community over this mingling of the races. 
We have but one missionary employed in this work, Rev. E. S. 
Morton. The calls for service in the rural districts of Idaho, Wash- 
ington and Oregon are beyond the power of the Board to meet at 
present. If we had the resources to man these fields of opportunity, 
without doubt, much could be done to mitigate the severity of racial 
prejudice against the Japanese on the Pacific Coast. 





B — City and Industrial 

CITY AND IMMIGRANT WORK 



The Field 

For the first time in our National history more than half of our popu- 
lation lives in our cities. 

We have 68 cities that exceed 100,000 population each, having a total 
of 27,000,000, about one-fourth of all in the United States. 

We have 14,000,000 foreign born and 20,000,000 more who are chil- 
dren of foreign born. The great proportion of these live in our cities 
and industrial areas. Eleven per cent of those ten years of age or older 
do not speak English. 

The Work 

123 aided fields, viz., 90 organized churches, 24 un-organized fields and 
9 Neighborhood Houses. 171 workers, viz., 88 ministers and 83 lay 
community workers, of which number 65 are women. 

Rev. William P. Shriver, D.D., Director; Rev. Kenneth D. Miller 
and Rev. Robert S. Donaldson, Associate Directors. 

The Aims 

A standard Church Extension Board for every Presbytery with a city 
of over 200,000, mobilizing the entire resources of our Church for a 
city-wide advance. 

A differentiation of city churches according to the various types of 
city neighborhood, with an appropriate church program including wor- 
ship, evangelism, religious education and service. 

A particular study of the down-town church, with demonstrations of 
a more effective ministry to the unchurched masses. 

An efficient church work for the various foreign-language groups, 
particularly the Czechs, Hungarians and Italians, for whom the Pres- 
byterian Church has assumed a large responsibility. Promotion of a 
national fellowship among those interested through Biennial Confer- 
ences on Presbyterian Work among Hungarians and Italians. 

Development of the Christian Neighborhood House as an effective 
approach to polyglot and industrial communities. 

Promotion of the City and the Industrial Parish, a federation of 
Presbyterian Church and Home Mission work in congested city or min- 
ing and industrial regions. 

Securing a more adequate leadership for the city and industrial task 
through conferences, summer schools, scholarships and Immigrant Work 
Fellowships for resident study abroad. 



About the aims above stated the City and Immigrant Work Office 
has organized its activities. Its contact with the field extends from 
Boston to San Francisco. It has an experience of thirteen years 
to draw on. Its work is administered from two headquarters, New 
York, and from San Francisco, where Dr. Robert S. Donald.son, 

40 



FACTS FROM THE FIELD 41 

Associate Director, maintains contact with the i'acific Coast and the 
mountain region. The Board has cooperated in specific projects in 
the Synods of New England, New York. HaUimore, Ohio, Indiana, 
Michigan, Wisconsin, Colorado, Montana and California and is serv- 
ing in an advisory way the Synod of Illinois. Including the self- 
sustaining Presbytery of New York and the Synod of New Eng- 
land, which clear their work through this office, 123 different fields 
were aided, viz., 90 organized churches, 24 unorganized fields and 9 
Neighborhood Houses. 171 workers were employed — 88 ministers 
and 83 lay community workers, of which number 65 were women. 
The large number of women employed in this department of the 
Board's work is significant; an increasing number are college trained. 
Approximately $123,000 was expended, about 11 per cent of the 
Board's disbursements for work under its immediate control. With 
the addition of New York Presbytery and the Synod of New England 
$244,000 was administered in detail by the City and Immigrant 
Work Office. 

City Church Extension 

Outstanding advances in City Church Extension this last year with 
Home Board cooperation have been : the organization of Denver 
Presbytery, Rev. Howard I. Kerr, D.D., Executive Secretary; the 
preliminary organization of Milwaukee Presbytery; the addition of 
Rev. Gustav A. Papperman to the staff of Buffalo Presbytery as 
Superintendent of Extension Work; the organization of a Presby- 
terian City Union in Indianapolis ; and with the close of the year 
applications from both Seattle and Portland Presbyteries for stand- 
ard City Church Extension agencies. In addition, St. Louis has 
secured Rev. R. C. Dobson, D.D., as Executive, and Rochester has 
effected an organization with Rev. James L. Jewell, D.D., as Secre- 
tary. There are now fifteen city Presbyteries with standard City 
Church Extension organizations and several others partially organ- 
ized. Among cities of the major class, Kansas City, Minneapolis, 
St. Paul and Washington are almost alone in lacking this more 
effective approach to the city task. 

The Denver city field is receiving splendid stimulus under the 
leadership of a strong Board of pastors and representative laymen 
with Dr. Kerr as executive. Sixteen Daily \'acation Bil^le Schools, 
five or six cooperative building campaigns, a Building Fellowship, 
various demonstrations in local church and community work and a 
progressive program of religious education are among the features 
of the first year's advance. 

In San Francisco, an epochal demonstration of City Church Ex- 
tension backed by the national Church, interest has been turned to 
giving our churches a desperately needed equipment. Through a 
Building Fellowship and cooperative community campaigns seven 
Home ]\lission churches have undertaken new buildings. $87,000 has 
been raised locally for this purpose. This is the first year of a five 
year building reconstruction program in which it is the aim of the 
Church Extension Board to supplant the twenty-five "Shingle 
Shanty" pioneer buildings with worth while modern church structures 



42 



HOME MISSIONS 



at an average cost of $25,000 to $30,000 each. Mr. S. D. Archibald, 
attached to the Board's City and Immigrant Work staff in San 
Francisco, a speciaHst in building campaigns, has directed campaigns 
also in Los Angeles, Portland, Denver and other western cities. 

During the five years prior to the church year 1916-17, the Board 
of Home Missions had been carrying on Home Mission work in the 
two Presbyteries now comprised within the bounds of San Francisco 
Presbytery, with an annual expenditure of from $10,000 to $13,000 
and with exceedingly limited returns. Beginning with the autumn 
of 1916 when Dr. Shriver undertook a preliminary work of survey 
and programizing, the Home Board entered upon this epochal demon- 
stration in city work. With the first of April, 1917, Dr. Robert S. 
Donaldson, special representative of the Board, was established as 
Executive Secretary. The aim was not only an expansion of Home 
Mission work, but the development of a cooperative enterprise on 
the part of the fifty-seven churches of the Bay Region. When this 
Home Board demonstration was inaugurated, Presbyterian church 
membership had been practically stationary for the previous five 
years. In the five years succeeding, the church membership was 
increased by nearly fifty per cent. 



Church Membership Preceding Hotfie 
Board Demonstration 

1911 8,169 

1912 8,110 

1913 8,342 

1914 8,398 

1915 8,409 

1916 8,536 

A four per cent growth for the five 
year period. 



Church Membership For Five Years 
Under Home Board Dononstration 

1917 8,941 

1918 9,796 

1919 9,935 

1920 10,708 

1921 12,590 

A gain of 47 per cent for the five 
year period from April 1, 1916. 



The Sunday School record has been somewhat irregular as follows 



Sunday School Enrollment Preceding 
Home Board Demonstration 

1911 7,817 

1912 8,271 

1913 9,117 

1914 8,996 

1915 9,726 

1916 9,671 

The growth for the five years was 
24 per cent. 



Sunday School Enrollment For Five 

Years During Home Board 

Demonstration 

1917 9,324 

1918 9,125 

1919 8,673 

1920 10,488 

1921 12,340 

For the second five years the gain 
is 28 per cent. 



The congregational expenses of all churches have increased from 
$154,000 in 1916 to $251,000 in 1921'; the benevolences from $28,000 
to $73,000. The contributions to the Board of Home Missions have 
increased from $3,158 in 1916 to $7,614 in the year ending March 
31, 1921. 

In addition to the foregoing, a local Church Extension treasury 
has been established. In the year closing March 31, 1922. the ex- 
pansion of interest in local Home Missions and Church Extension 
is indicated in the following approximate statement: 



FACTS FROM THE FIELD 43 

FOR HOME MISSIONS AND CHURCH EXTENSION 

Local Church Extension Treasury $12,500 

Salaries, paid Staff Workers by local churches 15,000 

Invested in 50 Daily Vacation Bible Schools 6,500 

Publicity in General Demonstration VVork 3,000 

Evangelism, special services 3,000 

Total raised locally for Home Mission Work $40,000 

Raised on local fields for seven Home Mission Church 

Buildings $80,000 

Presbytery contributed through Building Fellowship 7,000 

Total raised locally for Home Mission Church 
Building enterprises ■ — $87,000 

Total amount raised by San Francisco Presbytery 
during the past year for Church Extension $127,000 

DISBURSEMENTS BY THE HOME BOARD 
Year Ending 

1917 $ 15,357.74 

1918 21,444.63 

1919 21,978.91 

1920 *28,508.18 

1921 *28,457.53 

* In the year 1920-21, when Dr. Donaldson was related to the Home Board's 
entire work on the Pacific Coast, as Associate Director, the headquarters' ex- 
pense was not charged to San Francisco Presbytery. The special demonstra- 
tion work at Trinity Center also is not included in the above figures. 

Foreign Language Churches 

Presbyterian Church work has largely been developed among 
Czechs, Hungarians and Italians. Many of the Czech or Bohemian 
churches are located in the open country in Iowa, Nebraska and the 
Northwest. Rev. Joseph Teply, pastor of the Bohemian Church in 
Melnik, Wisconsin, has received 53 members by confession of faith 
in the last year, "Our great hope here is with the young people," he 
writes. "We have one of the best Young People's Societies in the 
country. If we had a hall or an addition built to our church, we 
could win all the young people and make this church a real com- 
munity center. We are planning to increase our membership again 
considerably this year and aim to make this congregation independent 
as soon as possible," 

The revival in Czecho-Slovakia appears to be reflected in a quick- 
ened interest in our churches in America. Rev. V. Cejnar, of 
Omaha, reports, "Attendance increasing with many strangers fre- 
quenting our night service. We had revival meetings last November. 
Fourteen persons decided for Christ. In spite of depression and 
wage reduction we were able to meet all obligations and to pay off 
an indebtedness of $700." 

In April the Biennial Conference concerning Presbyterian Church 
Work among Hungarians will be held at Bloomfield Theological 
Seminary, New Jersey. The Biennial Conference on Italian Evan- 
gelization will be held' May 31st to June 2nd at Auburn Theological 
Seminary, New York, 

Demonstration Churches 

In our cities, and especially in the congested and down-town sec- 
tions, it is essential that the Church find new ways of relating itself 



44 HOME MISSIONS 

to the transient, shifting- antl lariL^el}- indifferent populations, 'i'hc 
Home Board is cooperating in such effort in the F^resbyteries of 
Cleveland, San Francisco and Los Angeles. At Bethesda Church, 
Los Angeles, Rev. C. II. Gaskell, pastor, great resourcefulness is 
shown in adapting an old family church to its new neighbors. A 
twenty-five cent luncheon for the girls employed in the nearby laun- 
dries has been a grateful service. "Suffer the little children to come 
unto me," has been translated into a welfare and nutrition class for 
children from one to six years of age. A playground, equipped with 
swings, slides, sand-pile, may-pole and basket ball standards ; a branch 
of the public library, and community gatherings, help to keep this 
Church in touch with the families of this rapidly shifting neighbor- 
hood where 200 children were lost from the Sunday School in a 
year through removal. 21 members were this last year received into 
the church by confession of faith. 

At Trinity Center, San Francisco, a demonstration begun in 1919, 
under the leadership of Rev. Homer K. Pitman, remarkable success 
has been achieved in enlisting the attendance of the non-church going 
public. Rev. James H. Speer, New Era Secretary for the Pacific 
Coast, writes : 

"I had one of my unusual free Sunday nights yesterday and made it the 
occasion to attend Trinity Center. I wanted personal information concerning 
the work that was being done there. I want first of all to congratulate you in 
having a part in the beginning of the solution of what looked like an unsolvable 
problem in the Church. You are getting the man from the street into the 
House of God. Last night with an attendance of 1,179 over 100 people were 
turned away for lack of room. The service was a spiritual uplift from be- 
ginning to end. All the songs were the great old Psalms of the Covenanters. 
The sermon, which was a real sermon, was about twenty-two minutes long. 
The film shown last night was The Little Minister.' It was 'Scotch Night' 
and the film fitted admirably into the spirit aiid the purpose of the meeting." 

Neighborhood Houses 

In our polyglot immigrant communities, where there is not a suf- 
ficient number of any one race to justify a foreign-language church 
work, the Christian Neighborhood House furnishes a common meet- 
ing ground for Old and New Americans. It meets the recent immi- 
grant at the point of his most immediate human need and incarnates 
in ways he can readily understand the spirit of Christ's unselfish 
service. In San Francisco the Women's Synodical Society is erecting 
a building of the bungalow type for our Neighborhood House on 
Potrero Hill in a Russian and polyglot community. The Presbytery 
of Buffalo, with the aid of the Church Erection Board, has built the 
Friendship House at Lackawanna, a steel center, at a cost of $40,000. 
In Butte, Montana, the former Immanuel Church and manse, about 
to be abandoned because of changed conditions, was reconstructed 
as a Neighborhood House and under the direction of Miss Helen 
Crawley and Miss Oneita Jean is enlisting an attendance of over 
three thousand monthly. A Sunday School, five boys' clubs, five 
girls' clubs, three cooking classes, folk dancing, basket ball and gym- 
nasium classes, a chorus, story hour, craft school, library and garnes, 
and home visitation make up a typical week's program. At Caspian, 



FACTS FROM TIIF I'll-.I.!) 45 

Michigan, in the iron River district industrial parish, in a mining 
community, a new Nciglilx^rhood House has been erected at a cost 
of $18,000. This model httle building for a small community is 
described, with plans and photographs, in "A Neighborhood Service." 
These various illustrations of the Home Board's work in the city 
and immigrant field, selected somewhat at random from among the 
more than a hundred fields aided, show a fine resourcefulness in 
adapting the Christian Gospel and the Christian service to our new 
communities. At the heart of this work is the untiring devotion 
of the more than 170 men and women enlisted in this new home mis- 
sion. They are the agents of the whole Church in this soundly con- 
structive work of Christian Americanization. It is the part of the 
Home Board in behalf of our Church to hearten and sustain them. 

Cooperation With Work in Europe 

In the fall of 1921 Rev. Kenneth D. Miller, Associate Director, 
went to Czecho-Slovakia acting as the representative of General 
Assembly's Committee on Work on the Continent of Europe. Mr. 
Miller is effectively co-operating in serving the great revival of 
Protestantism. He writes: "From February 18th to 27th 1 was at 
Pilsen and the surrounding district where the movement into the 
Czech Brethren Church has been the largest. Two years ago there 
were but two small congregations in that district, both located in 
Pilsen, and together numbering not more than 500 members. Today 
there are no less than thirty^ congregations in that district, ranging 
in size from 100 to 5,000, and totalling 16,000 members. I had an 
opportunity to visit about half of these congregations personally, and 
during the eight days of my stay there made no less than sixteen 
addresses. It was a wonderful experience for me, for never in my 
life have I seen such a large body of new converts to Protestantism, 
and it was a delight to see the way they crowded into the halls and 
to see the rapt look on their faces as they listened to a straight Gospel 
message, and afterwards in private conversation with them to observe 
their enthusiasm and eagerness to push forward." - 

Mr. Miller was one of the first of the Home Board's Immigration 
Fellows and spent fifteen months abroad. There could be no finer 
justification of the Board's policy in this matter than the leadership 
which Mr, Miller is now furnishing. 

JEWISH EVANGELIZATION 



The Field 
Tlie Jewish population of the United States is 3,750,000. Nearly half 
are in New York City. Every great city has a large number of Jews. 
The Jewish Synagogue is losing its hold on its people. 

The Work 

Work is carried on in five centers. 13 workers, viz., 3 ministers and 
10 lay workers, all of the latter being women; also 8 part-time workers. 

Rev. John Stuart Conning, D.D., Superintendent. 

Official organ, "Our Jewish Neighbors," published quarterly, fifty cents 
a year. 



46 HOME MISSIONS 

TJic Situation in America 

There are more Jews in the United States than in any other coun- 
try. Our Jewish population is now 3,750,000, and steadily increas- 
ing. In spite of laws restricting immigration more of this race are 
entering America than any other, as they belong to many nations 
and form part of the quota of each. New York, with its 1,750,000, 
is the most extraordinary Jewish community the world has ever 
known. 

Most of the Jews in this country came from Eastern Europe where 
they were denied ordinary civil and political rights and subjected to 
deliberately organized injustice and persecution. Here in America, 
under the influence of the largest liberty and toleration, they are press- 
ing rapidly to the front in commerce, finance, science, politics and 
many other fields of himian endeavor. 

Religiously the results of American freedom have been disastrous. 
No longer held in by restrictive barriers in other lines of activity, 
the Jews are rebelling against the restraints of the ancient faith and 
the tyranny of the synagogue. The majority are religiously adrift, 
and this abandonment of religion is having its reaction on their char- 
acter. They are fast losing their pre-eminence as a moral and law- 
abiding people. 

These facts must claim the attention of all earnest Christians. Now 
that age-long prejudices are being removed and this once highly 
favored people are feverishly searching in many fields for religious 
satisfaction, a special responsibility is laid upon the Church for their 
evangelization. 

Centers of Evangelism 

Work is carried on by the Board in five cities : Brooklyn, Newark, 
Philadelphia, Baltimore and Chicago. The leaders in these centers 
are respectively: Mrs. Ida Bingener, Rev. E. S. Greenbaum, Miss 
Mary Lanard, Rev. S. Birnbaum and Rev. David Bronstein. In the 
Brownsville section of Brooklyn, where our mission is located, there 
is a Jewish population of 250,000 ; Newark has 70,000 Jews ; Phila- 
delphia, 230,000; Baltimore 70,000, and Chicago 300,000. In these 
fields 13 missionaries are employed, three ordained men and ten 
women. There are also eight part time workers and over two score 
volunteer helpers. 

In none of these missions is the service at all adequate to the op- 
portunity. The buildings are unsuitable and the facilities limited. 
Yet progress has been made, and it has been proven that Jews can 
be reached with the Gospel everywhere and under all circumstances. 
There are many other cities in which work should be undertaken. 

Forms of Service 

A Christian ministry to the Jews is beset with many difficulties. 
Age-long antagonism and oppression have bred deep-seated prejudice 
and mistrust. Back of all service, therefore, must be genuine sym- 
pathy, self-sacrifice and faith, if the barriers are to be overcome and 
the spirit of Christ revealed. The distribution of the Scriptures, and 
of carefully prepared tracts and Christian literature in English, Yid- 



FACTS FROM THE FIELD 47 

dish and Hebrew have proved effective means of removing misunder- 
standing's. These are circulated by our missionaries and by colpor- 
teurs of the Board of Publication and Sabbath School Work. The 
Gospel is preached in halls and in the open air in centers of Jev^^ish 
population. The missionaries are Hebrew Christians familiar with 
the habits and customs of the people, and able to use Yiddish and 
Hebrew. Through various classes and clubs many children, young 
people and adults receive Christian instruction. Lectures are also 
given and discussions held on leading Christian themes. The homes 
of the Jewish people are systematically visited. Prejudice is thus 
removed and many individuals reached bv the Gospel who would 
not otherwise hear it. Our missionaries also seek to minister to the 
actual needs of the people as they arise. Deeds of kindness break 
up the fallow ground of prejudice and fanaticism and open a way 
for the Gospel. 

In manv cities and tf)wns many Tews are living in the neighborhood 
of Christian churches. The Pioard is endeavoring to encourage and 
aid these churches in a ministry to their Jewish neighliors. Already 
a number of churches have engngcd in this work with encouraging 
results. Several have received Jews into their membership. There 
is great need at the present time of an itinerant ministry to develop 
interest in this work and form points of contact between churches 
and Jews in their neighborhood. The work of Jewish Evangelisation 
can never be fully undertaken until every church having Jews in 
its community is enlisted in the enterprise. 

As the work of Jev/ish Evangelization can only share proportion- 
ately in the total gifts provided by the Church for the maintenance 
of all the departments of the Board, and as the financial stringency 
of the past year has made it impossible to provide a budget adequate 
to the need and opportunity, the Board has authorized the department 
of Jewish Evangelization to make an appeal for special gifts from 
all who are interested in this work. Rev. Paul L. Berman has been 
appointed as Field Representative to present the claims of this work 
in the churches, and receive gifts and pledges for its support. Miss 
Mary Shipley has been appointed as Field Representative to interest 
the women of the Church in this work, form prayer and study groups 
and arrange missionary and educational exhibitions in different 
churches. As a result of these efforts a larger interest is being taken 
and several thousands of dollars have been contributed. 

Results of the Work 

There is a notion widely current, even among the friends of mis- 
sions that "it is no use trying' to convert the Jews," and that Jewish 
missions are without results. On the contrary, rio work for non- 
Christian people gives such rich reward to the labor and faith of 
the Church. The work of our own Church is too recent and too in- 
adequately supported to look for large results, yet in spite of the 
almost insurmountable obstacles thrown in the way of public confes- 
sion of Christ, our missionaries report four baptisms and ten or more 
now under instruction. In addition, individual churches have re- 
ported twenty or more who have been received into full membership. 



48 



HOME MISSIONS 



For quality and worth Jewish converts deserve special mention. 
They are usually among the most active in the work of the Church, 
while more Jewish converts give themselves to the Gospel ministry 
and other forms of self-deny^ing service than from any other race. 
Within the past year, fourteen Hebrew Christians have sought the 
help of the Board in order that they might become prepared for 
Christian service. 




C — Extra-Territorial 

ALASKA 



The Field 

Two Presbyteries covering the entire territory with 54,899 population, 
approximately half white and half native. 

Three native races, the Eskimo, Aleut and Alaskan "Indian." 

Approximately two-thirds of the white population arc men. 

26,000 miles of coast line, over five times as much as the rest of the 
United States. 

Navigation in Bering Sea (only access to our Eskimo mission) is 
closed from October to May. 

It costs $80 per ton freight to ship coal bought at $15 per ton in Seattle 
to Point Barrow. 

All territory in our Eskimo mission is above timber area. 

Comity arrangement made by Home Missions Council gives Presby- 
terian Church the responsibility for Southeastern Alaska, for part of 
the white churches in the Interior and for 500 miles radius in the North- 
ern extremity. 

Northern missionaries use dog-sled. Southern motorboat. 

The Work 

22 organized churches, 14 stations, 1 hospital. 

22 workers, viz., 15 ministers, 1 doctor (also ordained), 1 nurse, 5 
lay workers, besides native interpreters paid by the missions. 
The hospital at Point Barrow is the "mission nearest the North Pole." 
Rev. S. Hall Young, D.D., General Missionary. 



In last year's Report reference was made to the erection of the 
new hospital at Point Barrow, the mission nearest the North Pole. 
During the present fiscal year this building has been completed and 
has begun its much needed Christian service with the many scattered 
Eskimo of this region. The building was erected under the per- 
sonal direction of Mr. M. A. Brown, a member of the First Pres- 
byterian Church of Seattle, and a carpenter of proven ability. He 
was engaged to .spend as much time at Barrow as neces.sary for this 
work. The completion of this project was an exceptionally diflFicult 
and intricate task since the great distances and the isolation of Bar- 
row made it necessary to estimate exactly and to the last detail in 
advance just what materials would l)e needed for every phase of 
construction and equipment. The engagement of proper transporta- 
tion facilities was also a matter of great moment and some little 
difficulty. A vessel was secured to transport the supplies to Nome 
at which point they were transferred to another boat for Barrow. 
In order that all of these matters might have the personal attention 
which they required and which it was impossible for a representa- 

49 



so HOME MISSIONS 

tive of the Board at the New York ofifice to give, the Board enlisted 
the kind and efficient help of Mr. J. A. Gould, a member of the Board 
living in Seatde, Washington, who, with his son, Gene C. Gould, 
looked after practically all of the details from the time the building 
was projected until it was packed on the boat en route to Barrow. 
This entailed for them a large amount of work and was a labor of 
love, efficientlv and satisfactorily rendered. Without the cooperation 
of Mr. Gould and his son, the Board would have found this task 
almost impossibly difficult of performance. Grateful acknowled- 
ment is, therefore, hereby made to them. 

The cost of the building of the hospital was considerably increased 
through the great amount of freight charges incident to the transpor- 
tation of the material. The final cost, to date, including labor and 
freight, is not far from $50,000. 

During the year the Woman's Board of Home Missions requested 
the Board to release Rev. James H. Condit, D.D., who for ten years 
had rendered efficient service as General Missionary for Alaska, to 
become the Superintendent of the Sheldon Jackson School at Sitka. 
This transfer was made effective as of January first. Rev. S. Hall 
Young, D.D.. who was in Alaska at the time on a special mission 
for the Board, was appointed General Missionary to succeed Dr. 
Condit. It goes without saying that no man could bring to this task 
greater knowledge or greater zeal than Dr. Young. His connection 
with Alaska dates from the days of his early ministry when he was 
one of the pioneer missionaries to that territory, and he has become 
identified in the mind of the Church with the great land for which 
he pictures so glowing a future. 

The past year has been a transition time, marking a new era 
of constructive development for Alaska. The great Government 
Railroad, extending from Seward on the coast to Fairbanks in the 
Interior, has been completed and trains are running. Prices in the 
Interior have been dropped more than one-half and many mines 
which could not be worked at a profit while transportation was so 
hie^h are recommencing to yield their gold. Four or five great oil 
fields have been located and wells are going down. Three rich coal 
regions will be extensively mined. Paper pulp mills, saw mills, sal- 
mon, herring, clam, crab and shrimp canneries are beginning to yield 
larger returns, and above all the farming lands of the great Interior 
are being exploited. The newspapers of the territory, its officials, 
and magazines everywhere are proclaiming a new and prosperous 
era for Alaska. 

The Presbytery of Yukon did not add to the number of its mis- 
sionaries during 1921, but there are changes and achievements to 
be recorded. Dr. James IJ. Condit made his second trip to Point 
Barrow and transplanted Dr. and Mrs. Henry W. Greist from Cape 
Prince of Wales to the new hospital at Point Barrow. Dr. Frank 
H. Spence, who had been our Missionary Physician there from 1916 
to 1920, had been compelled to leave that frontier station on account 
of approaching old age. It was with great regret that the Board 
was compelled to take Dr. Greist from his very successful work at 
Cape Prince of Wales in order that our hospital at Barrow should. 



FACTS FROM THE FIELD 51 

not be left unmanned. A missionary pliysician is needed for Cape 
Prince of Wales, and it will be to tbe sbame of the Church if that 
important and interesting point and the progressive Christian Es- 
kimo there are left forlorn. 

Rev. Wallace S. Marple, in the prosperous railroad town of An- 
chorage, is doing fine work and building up our church. Rev. Robert 
J. Diven, D.D., was transferred in the spring of 1921 from Nenana, 
in the Presbytery of Yukon, to Wrangell, in the Presbytery of 
Alaska. Nenana will be ministered to by a visiting Presbyterian 
pastor during the summer of 1922, and measures will be taken to 
place a permanent pastor there. Rev. Fred G. Scherer at Fairbanks 
and Rev. R. S. Nickerson at Cordova are meeting with much success. 
The latter has completed a new church building to be dedicated this 
spring. Dr. S. Hall Young, General Missionary, plans to spend a 
number of months within the bounds of this Presbytery during the 
summer and fall of 1922 and to visit and take measures for evangeliz- 
ing any new camps and settlements that may open in the Territory. 

The Eskimo of the Southwestern Coast and of St. Lawrence and 
Nunivak Islands — all Presbyterian territory — will be visited by Dr. 
Young as soon as possible. The splendid humane work now carried 
on at Point Barrow and Cape Prince of Wales should' by all means 
be repeated in this now forsaken region. 

In the Presbytery of Alaska a movement looking toward the com- 
plete reconstruction of our work has been inaugurated. Several changes 
and readjustments have already taken place. The most important 
is the transfer already referred to of Dr. Condit from the office of 
General Missionary to the no less important position of Principal 
of the Sheldon Jackson School at Sitka. Dr. Young, who succeeds 
him, has taken up his residence at Juneau. During the past summer 
he traveled some fifteen hundred miles, mostly by gasboat and by 
our launch, the Lois, among the Islands of the great Archipelago, 
where forty years ago he did the work of explorer and missionary 
by canoe. 

There have been other changes of importance during the year. 
Rev. Dr. Diven came from Nenana, in the Interior, to the old Mother 
Mission at Wrangell. At once that rather seedy and discouraged 
mission took new life and hope. Dr. Diven has superintended the 
building of a new manse and both white and native congregations 
are going forward. Rev. W. E. Story, D.D., of California, came to 
be our missionary pastor at Hydaburg, in July, but was compelled 
by an attack of ill health, which proved to be appendicitis, to leave 
Alaska the first of Novenil>er, and Hydaburg has been ministered 
to since that by native lay pastors. Rev. E. E. Bromley, at Bayview, 
and Rev. J. R. Fitzgerald at Kake, are taking care of their native 
charges. 

Rev. Edward Marsden, our one fully educated native minister, is 
building up his new church at Metlakatla, and it will report one hun- 
dred and eighty-seven members. A splendid new building will be 
erected there by the natives without any white carpenters during the 
coming summer. Rev. Fred Falconer at Ketchikan is caring for 
that mission and also for Saxman and Kasaan. Rev. R. A. Buchanan 



52 HOME MISSIONS 

at Sitka cares for both white and native churches and new buildings 
are about to be erected for l)oth congregations. During the past 
winter he made a perilous trip in a small gasboat to Angoon, baptized 
and received eighteen members into the church, and at this old town 
will be erected a Presbyterian Church, and a native pastor installed. 

At Juneau, where Dr. Bruce ministers successfully to the only 
self-supporting church of any denomination in the Territory, Rev. 
David Waggoner cares for the native congregation with its branch 
mission at Douglas, three miles distant. Mr. Waggoner is Stated 
Clerk of the Presbytery and Chairman of the Committee on Church 
Erection, while Dr. Bruce is Chairman of the Home Mission Com- 
mittee. At Hoonah, one of our largest native villages, Rev. George 
J. Beck is doing a most successful work with the vigor and enthu- 
siasm which have always characterized him. His people have made 
a long step forward during the past winter by giving a rousing Home 
Mission collection and pledging $200 more than they have ever raised 
to the pastor's salary. Mr. Beck has charge of the mission boat Lois. 
He will be appointed Pastor Evangelist for this Presbytery and, 
during the coming summer, will have a young white minister with 
him to do evangelistic work in the various camps and towns in this 
vast region, -and will also have the supervision of several young 
native workers who will be in training for native pastorates. Mr. 
S. S. Childs, of restaurant fame, who gave the engine for the boat 
which was named after his daughter, has given $500 toward the main- 
tenance of the boat during the coming year, and an effort is being 
made to endow the Lois in the sum of $1,600 to enable Mr. Beck 
and his force to see to it that every town and camp, white or native, 
in this Archipelago, has the preaching of the Gospel of Christ. In 
the extreme Northern end of the Archipelago, Rev. E. L. Winter- 
berger, at Skagway in his white church, and Rev. C. G. Denton, at 
Haines in his combined white and Indian charge, have been doing 
their tasks efficiently. Klukwan, up the Chilkat River, has been with- 
out regular services except when ministered to by visiting ministers 
of other denominations. 

The greatest change contemplated in the Presbytery of Alaska is 
the inauguration of a theological school for the training of native 
ministers, and the gradual replacement of the white ministers now 
having charge of a number of native churches, by these educated 
native men. It is believed that this change will bring about the more 
speedy and fuller evangelization of the native races of Alaska, and 
also their more rapid progress towards self-support. During the 
summer of 1922 an earnest efifort will be made to have three efficient 
mission boats plying between the salmon canneries, fishing camps, 
gold and copper mines, and other settlements in the eiYort to see that 
no part of this Archipelago is left unevangelized at any season of 
the year, 

WEST INDIES 

In the West Indies more nearly than in any other field, Home Mis- 
sions approaches the problem and the method of Foreign Missions. 
Porto Rico, to be sure, is a part of the United States and is coming 



FACTS FROM THE FIELD 53 

progressively more completely under the dfjminance of American 
ideals and American characteristics. Still, it has over four centuries 
of Castillian history and the transformation is a slow one. Cuba 
and Santo Domingo are independent states, each intensely national 
and each resenting any intimation that Americanization is a neces- 
sary or a desirable process. These three islands represent the field 
of Presbyterian Home Missions in the West Indies. 

CUBA 



The Field 

The largest and richest island of the West Indies. 

Area, 44,164 square miles. Population over 2,500,000, 70 per cent 
white, 13 per cent Negro, 17 per cent mixed or yellow. Population of 
Havima is over 500,000. 

In twenty years illiteracy has been reduced from 84 per cent to 54 per 
cent, yet Cuba has facilities for only half of her 600,000 children. 

Gambling and social evil are Cuba's national vices. 

During the war, the soaring prices of sugar brought great prosperity. 
The spectacular price drop of the last year has paralyzed business and 
necessitated a national moratorium. 

Business depression plus political unrest and uncertainty have severely 
handicapped mission work of recent months. 

The Work 

Presbyterian effort chiefly confined to the three central provinces and 
centering in Havana. 

26 active, organized churches, 12 stations, a training school and six 
other schools. Mission staff of 27, 26 of whom are ordained. 

Equipment is a great need. Twenty major fields own no buildings. 
Rents consume one-third of the budget. 

Rev. E. A. Odell, Superintendent. 



In Cuba, Presbyterian Home Mission work is confined to the three 
central provinces which are the most populous and prosperous section 
of the Island. The last year has been decidedly the best year in our 
mission work since its inception. It has been the year of greatest 
trial since the organization of the Presbytery. Cuba has not been 
called upon to face such a situation as the last two years have pre- 
sented since the years of reconstruction, revolution and famine. At 
that time there was no organized Presbyterian Church on the Island. 
The cause of the present situation has, of course, been financial and 
the severity of the financial test can best be understood when we con- 
sider that three-fourths of Cuba's income is from sugar and that in 
the space of less than a year the price of that product dropped from 
$71.87 per bag at the port to $5.85 while, at the present time, there 
is almost no market at any price. 

It was reasonable to expect some effect on the church of such a 
financial crisis. The effect was wholesome. From extreme pride 
and wastefulness, the people of all classes have been brought to a 
very serious state of mind. In many places there has been actual 



54 HOME MISSIONS 

hunger and sufifering has been evident almost everywhere. The 
Gospel is the only hope at any time and more evidently in time of 
trial. The people of our churches have felt this during the past 
year. 

Our services have been attended as never before. In many places 
the rented buildings have not been able to accommodate the crowds. 
Our Sunday Schools have increased their average attendance in sev- 
eral missions more than 100%. In the town of Cabaiguan, the attend- 
ance has passed three hundred several times during the year. Until 
this year none of our schools has reached the two hundred mark. 
Now we have three schools that have passed two hundred and fifty 
and one of over three hundred with several others nearing two hun- 
dred. In the matter of contributions it is most significant that this 
year of adversity has been the year of largest gifts to the work. Funds 
have been increased looking to the construction of buildings in every 
mission. In Guines, where the Board of Church Erection is building 
a church and manse, more than $2,000 has been raised. A campaign 
for the Boards and for greater participation in the support of their 
own pastors has in some instances doubled the pledges for the coming 
year. 

This has also been the first year of definitely planned evangelistic 
campaigns. Under the leadership of Rev. B. G. Lavastida, a native 
Cuban and a recent graduate of McCormick Seminary, campaigns 
have been carried on in five cities. The result has been most heart- 
ening. In these five cities, more than six hundred young people 
have signified their desire for instruction and in one place fifty ad- 
ditions were made to the church at the close of the campaign. The 
instruction classes in all these places are taxing the strength of the 
pastors. Cuba is very evidently ripe for the harvest. 

The outstanding feature of the work, however, has been the defi- 
nite organization of the Seminary. A class of three, the first native 
Cuban class in a theological training school, is completing its first 
year. For this important work, Rev. and Mrs. H. G. Smith were 
transferred from Sancti Spiritus to Cardenas. The students have 
lived in the home of the director and have had the advantage of 
academic work in the Cardenas College. 

No report of the Cuban work would be complete without some 
reference to the completion of the Luyano Chapel. Reference was 
made in last year's report to this building. It is an outstanding ex- 
ample of love and devotion to the Gospel expressed in practical ser- 
vice. The donor of the building is a laborer, a stone mason. With 
his own hands and almost entirely at his own expense, he has built 
a chapel in this suburban district of Havana. The main room has 
a seating capacity of nearly two hundred and the choir loft of thirty. 
The gift is more remarkable when the financial conditions of Cuba 
and the living conditions of this man are taken into consideration. 
His own home is immediately back of the chapel. The street front- 
age was given to the House of the Lord. His own house is made of 
odd pieces of boards and roofed with pieces of zinc and tile. His 
furniture is of the very humblest sort. He has built a house of 
prayer. Its walls are of concrete, its furniture is mahogany, its roof 



FACTS FROM TIIF FIKLl) 55 

of the choicest tile. It is a labor of love consecrated with the most 
sacred sacrifice and its message to the Cuban people shall not be lost. 

PORTO RICO H^ 



The Field 

A population of 1,300,000— all American citizens. 80 per cent are rural. 

60 per cent are white, 35 per cent mulatto, 5 per cent Negro. Two- 
thirds are illiterate. Less than half the children of school age are in 
school. 

The per capita wealth is one-eleventh that of Continental United 
States. 15 per cent of the population have practically the entire wealth. 

The death rate is high and the health problem a serious one. 
The Work 

33 organized churches, 152 stations, a Union Evangelical Seminar}', a 
Polytechnic Institute, 4 local schools. 

27 ordained ministers, 26 lay community workers, of which number 
10 are women, 24 teachers, of which 14 are women. 

American missionaries in charge. Reverends Arthur James, Byron G. 
Sager and William M. Orr. President of Seminary, Rev. J. A. Mc- 
Allister. Principal of Polytechnic Institute, Rev. J. Will Harris. 



General Work : 

Home Mission work in Porto Rico dates from the American occu- 
pation of the Island. From the outset it has been free from denomi- 
national competition, each of the denominations conducting work 
being assigned a definite sphere of influence. During the first fifteen 
years of missionary labor, churches were established in every town 
and country work was so organized that there was no one on the 
Island who did not have the opportunity to hear the Gospel preached 
at least once a month. During these years there began to be devel- 
oped a group of young men brought up in the mission schools, who 
felt verv strongly the call to minister to their own people. They were 
not content merely to act as native helpers to American missionaries, 
but in due time applied for ordination and obtained it. As this group 
of Porto Rican ministers increased in numbers and experience, they 
were given an increasing share in the administration of the mission's 
affairs. The establishment and maintenance of the Union Evangeli- 
cal Seminary has greatly assisted in this process. The result has been 
that each year sees a better developed and more firmly established 
native church. The American missionaries and the Porto Rican 
ministers have alwavs worked together in the closest of harmony. 
The missionaries released from the detail of the local church have 
been able to devote their time to the organization of new points, the 
encouragement of weak churches, the planning of evangelistic and 
financial campaigns and the thousand and one things called for in 
the administration of the Board's funds. As American missionaries, 
from sickness or other causes, have retired from the field, the dis- 
tricts of the remaining ones have been enlarged. During the past 
year we have had three supervising missionaries where in 1915 there 
were eleven. One of these three. Rev. William M. Orr, retired at 
the close of the year after seven years of able and consecrated service. 



56 HOME MISSIONS 

Since the adoption of the policy of putting the chief responsibility 
for pastoral work upon the native pastors, the membership of the 
churches has steadily increased from about 2,300 in 1917 to nearly 
v3,000 at the present time. The Porto Rican churches have each 
year made an excellent evangelistic record. A year ago, their acces- 
sions on confession of faith were more than a fifth of their previous 
membership, while during the year just ended, they were more than 
a fourth. A similar advance has been made in contributions for the 
support of local work. The great proportion of the population of 
Porto Rico own no property of any sort and are very poor. Their 
average per capita wealth is only one-eleventh of the average on the 
main land of the United States. In 1914 these churches paid toward 
their pastors' salaries the sum of $1,692. Seven years later this sum 
was increased to $6,588. About twice this latter sum was raised 
for all purposes during the year 1920-21. There has been nothing 
forced or sensational about this progress. It is simply the result of 
a steadv and consecrated effort to achieve an attainable ideal of a self- 
governing, self-supporting native church. 

The record during the past year has been a particularly enviable 
one. Although the Presbytery reports to this General Assembly a 
smaller membership than a year ago ("due to the transfer of three 
congregations to the Disciples Church and to a rigorous cleaning of 
church rolls) the increase last year by confession of faith was twenty- 
five per cent. The net increase in Sunday school membership was 
seventeen per cent. The increase in financial contributions over 
the preceding year was fifteen per cent. 

The following statement of "How a Missionary Spends His Time" 
by one of the native Porto Rican pastors gives an insight into the 
nature of the work which these pastors are doing: 

"My rising hour is six a. m. — I have a little dauijhter fifteen months old 
and she is an accurate little clock. Even when I feel tired and there is the 
danger of oversleeping, Idalia is sure to wake me up and get me started on my 
day's work. 

"Wehave the family altar around the breakfast table. After being materially 
and spiritually fed, I undertake to do the task the good Lord has given me 
to do. The home itself is an inspiration. I like to compare it to a beehive; 
everybody has something to do and everybody is doing something. Even little 
Abidan, just three years old, gets ready for school, for he thinks he is as smart 
as his other three little brothers in the kindergarten and loves the school as 
he loves the home. 

"The mission school next to the manse is another inspiration. There we 
have 110 children in the kindergarten and the first two grades, all looking clean, 
happy and eager to learn. Only 17 of these come from Protestant homes, the 
rest come from Catholic and homes without religion. And my heart rejoices 
when I see those souls in the opening exercises every morning bowing their 
heads in prayer and learning the things of God. Already some of these children 
have been the means of bringing their parents to our church and giving their 
hearts to Christ. 

"After inspecting the school rooms and instructing the Bible reader on 
the day's work, I go to the Post Office, read the correspondence and come 
home to answer it. At the mnnse there are three persons waiting for me. 
They have some problems in their lives and would like the pastor to know 



FACTS FROM THK FIKLD 57 

about them and ofifer a possible solution. One <>{ them is a widow, sick and 
poor, who wants her oldest boy to get an education. She wants a letter of 
recommendation for the President of the Polytechnic Institute of San German. 
The second visitor is the Chief of Police, a good Christian man who. while 
faithfully discharging his duties, has been unjustly attacked by his enemies 
and has been removed to another town. He wants justice done him. The 
last visitor is a young woman whom I married four months ago to an appar- 
ently good man. He has abandoned her and is living with another woman. 
She has lost all hope of reconciliation with him and now desires a letter for 
the judge stating the facts of the case. 

"The visitors are gone and the sick wait for me. To them I go. But on 
the road I am stopped more than five times bv friends who have something to 
inform me or some help to ask. Have not visited more than three homes when 
it i.~ time to start back for dinner. 

"Right after dinner I start out on the 'Every Member Canvass.' I visit 22 
homes. Have heard all kinds of complaints about hard times, illne.'^s and bad 
luck, but have come back with $79.00 pledged for the new budget. 

"It is supper time. The phone rings to announce a special evangelistic meet- 
ing in one of the city districts. At seven p. m. I am on the way to gather part 
of my congregation for the service. There we speak for half an hour to an 
enthusiastic group of laboring people, and return home ready to rest for the 
next day's task. At the manse I find another group of people waiting for me. 
It is a couple that want to be married. 

"Thus happily ends a pastor's work in a busy day in Porto Rico." 

The Evangelical Seminary : 

This union enterprise is the result of the conviction that a native 
ministry prepared in their own languaeje in their own environment 
is a fundamental requisite for the establishing of a native church 
and bringing it to self-support. This means minisfers in the real 
sense. — they must be prepared, but then thev must be given the oppor- 
tunity, made to take the responsibility and held accountable for the 
results. The Seminar}' stands for this policy. Without it and its 
predecessors, and without the native ministers thus produced, the 
Protestant work now would have been so different that we can 
scarcelv imagine what it would be. not only in Porto Rico, but also 
in Cuba, where five of our graduates are taking the lead, and in 
Santo Domingo, where all three ministers are from Porto Rico. 

The Seminary is very meagerly equipped. It owns no property of 
anv kind, either for class room work or as homes for its teaching 
staff. The present rented building has practically reached its capacity. 
It can onlv accommodate thirty-one students and the Seminary, dur- 
ing the vear iust closed, has had twenty-nine enrolled, a number 
about a fifth larger than the preceding year. 

The Polytechnic Institute: 

The tenth year in the history of this institution has been the most 
gratifving and remarkable in its history. The apolications for admis- 
sion have far exceeded its capacitv. The enrollment has been 347. 
133 eirls and 215 boys. Since the opening of the school year in 
Sentember. there has been an average of three applications daily, 
fully 500 more than could be admitted. Of the present enrollment 
1 56 are in the elementarv grades. 1 80 in high school and 1 1 in the 
fir.st year of college Toffered now for the first time.) Of the 13 



58 HOME MISSIONS 

graduates from the high school last June, TO returned for college 
work. The local receipts for the year were nearly $15,000, not quite 
half the entire amount expended. 

The religious life has run deep this year. There are 20 candidates 
for the ministry. Fully one-half of the students are actively engaged 
in Sunday School work outside of the Institute. Eleven groups of 
students hold twelve services weekly. Some of the services so con- 
ducted have an average attendance of 120. Thirty-two students were 
baptized at a recent communion service. Most of the boarding stu- 
dents, in fact all but about a dozen of the larger students, are active 
members of the church. The Evangelical Union of Porto Rico 
has made the Institute their permanent location for Summer Con- 
ference. All denominations come here where local and foreign 
speakers are brought to conduct the meetings. The object is to give 
all the Christians an opportunity to get together and to receive new 
power for their work. It is in spirit a second Northfield. 

While the spiritual is cared for, the intellectual is by no means 
neglected. The graduates of the Institute have been awarded the 
highest marks in the Summer Normals of the Island for the past 
five years. So evident has the superiority of the preparation of 
graduates of the Polytechnic Institute shown itself that last year the 
Dean of the Summer School publicly announced to all the students 
that the Polytechnic Institute students had superior advantages over 
the other high school students and it was not just to compare others 
with them. The Institute demands of all students high scholarship 
and thorough preparation. The teachers always put their best ser- 
vice into the work for and with the students. 

The great immediate need is for more adequate buildings. Not 
only is the capacity of the present equipment far below the opportu- 
nity, but much of that equipment is such that it no longer ought to 
be used. A beautiful new Science Hall is now nearing completion 
but other buildings are a pressing necessity and efifort is being made 
to secure them. President Harris says, in this connection: "The 
firmness of the Porto Rican faith in the Polvtechnic Institute is evi- 
denced by their gifts and their desire to attend the school. On March 
thirteenth, I started out alone to secure $60,000 for a Girls' Resi- 
dence Hall. The times are critical in Porto Rico, more so than in 
New York. Sufrar is down below the cost of production to the 
farmer. The coflfee crop was a failure. Banks do not loan money. 
I divided the $60,000 up into 600 gifts of $100. In eleven days of 
actual solicitinsf I secured in cash and first class pledges $18,150 
from 70 individuals. No gift less than $100 was accepted. Five 
were for $1 .000 and one for $2,000. There is no doubt but that the 
whole $60,000 will be raised in Porto Rico for this first Residence 
Hall for Girls. The spirit of the giving in Porto Rico encourages 
one. The leading jeweler of the Island made his contribution and 
then followed me to the door of his office saying, 'You may hear 
people say that because you are a Protestant institution they do not 
care to help you. I want you to understand that such is not true 
with me. Any institution that is helping Porto Rico has my hearty 



FACTS I'ROM THK I'll: LI) 59 

support, ^'ou arc (loin<^ a great work. May God give you strength 
and long years till you see those plans all realized.' A similar sincere 
good wish was expressed by almost every man." 

The opportunities for the expansion of the school are almost limit- 
less. Nearly half of Porto Rico's 300,000 children cannot find a 
seat in the public schools. The neighboring Islands have no .schools 
worthy of the name. Santo Domingo and the Virgin Islands are 
looking to Porto Rico for educational advantages. 

SANTO DOMINGO 



The Field 

A repuhlic under United States protectorate. Area, 20,000 square 
miles. Population approximately 750,000. 

One of the richest, most beautiful and healthful islands of the West 
Indies, but for a century one of the worst governed. 

A small cultured aristocracy only intensifies the dark background of 
the prevailing poverty of life. 

The Work 

A union enterprise supported by three denominations. Supports a 
hospital and three centers of evangelistic work. 

7 workers, viz., 4 ordained ministers (one American and three Porto 
Rican), 1 physician and 2 women workers. 



The P)Oard for Christian Work in Santo Domingo is now in the 
second fiscal year of its existence. As a result of the recommenda- 
tions and investigations of the sub-committee on the West Indies 
of the Committee on Cooperation in Latin America, the Home 
Boards, general and woman's, of the Methodist Episcopal and the 
Presbvterian U. S. A., and the Board of the United Brethren are 
cooperating in a comprehensive program of evangelizaticfn and Chris- 
tian service in the Dominican Republic, with a budget for the first 
year of $80,000. 

Headquarters in New York are with the Committee on Coopera- 
tion's offices at 25 Madison Avenue, New York City. Headquarters 
on the field have been established in Santo Domingo City, where a 
large building was purchased for $50,000. which provides a center 
for church and social work and residence for some of the workers. 
The "Hospital Evangelico" was opened in a nearby building, funds 
for the initial equipment and lease of which were a gift from the 
united evangelical churches of Porto Rico. Rev. Nathan H. Huflf- 
man, U. B.. is acting Superintendent of the work. Dr. H. R. Taylor 
(Presbyterian) in charge of the hospital, and two American trained 
nurses. Miss V. M. Parker (Baptist) and Miss K. L. Fribley (P. E.) 
are helping Dr. Taylor. 

Three ordained Porto Rican pastors, from three different denomi- 
nations, are in charge of evangelistic work which ha's been well 
organized at three centers, in the capital city, at San Pedro de Macoris 
and La Romana. At these three points regular preaching services, 

4 — Home Miss. 



60 HOME MISSIONS 

prayer meetings and Sunday schools have been begun with very great 
success. The average attendance at the Sunday school in the capital 
is about one hundred and twenty-five. The preaching services at 
the capital and San Pedro are so overcrowded that the need for en- 
larging the facilities to accommodate the people is being felt. The 
hospital also has met with phenomenal success. In six months' opera- 
tion it has already outgrown the quarters in which it is housed, for- 
merly a private hospital building. It is now treating about a thou- 
sand patients a month and, besides the American staff, employs 
some eight or nine native workers in various capacities. 

Several members of the Board of Trustees recently visited the 
work on the Island for the first time and they have come back with 
most encouraging reports of the great results that have been achieved 
during this first year's work. There seems to be no limit to the op- 
portunities for service in all branches of the mission's enterprise. 
A willingness to help in the support of the work is already being evi- 
denced by the congregations organized. The people at La Romana 
have contributed to buy an organ for their services. One of the 
secretaries just returned from the field says: "I could not help but 
think, as I viewed the successes and achievements after these months 
of united effort, that they were evidences of God's approval upon 
this united work. The interest and attendance seemed almost phe- 
nomenal when I remembered that we were actually at work on the 
Island little more than a year." 




D — Self-Supporting Synods and Presbyteries 

Neither the problem of Home Missions nor the character of Home 
Mission work is necessarily effected by the fact of self-support. The 
Self-supporting Synods and Presbyteries differ among themselves 
quite as widely as any group of Synods. They have no outstanding 
common characteristic which is not shared by the entire Church ex- 
cept the fact of their self-support, and have not really that since 
there are many varieties and degrees of self-support. 

However, the implications of the self-support movement cannot be 
ignored in any consideration of the question of the task of Home 
Missions. The map on page 62 sets forth many facts of first rate 
importance to the Presbyterian Church. In the first place, it indi- 
cates the boundaries of the main self-support area. All of the area 
enclosed within the heavy dotted line is, with the exception of cer- 
tain mountain Presbyteries and the colored Synods in the South, in- 
cluded under some recognized self-support arrangement. There are, 
in addition, seven self-supporting Presbyteries on the Pacific Coast. 

One's first impression on studying the situation behind this area 
is an impression of variety, not to say confusion. In the first place, 
five main types of self-support may be recognized. These are com- 
plete Synodical self-support, using the Board's treasury ; complete 
Presbyterial self-support, using the Board's treasury; partial Synod- 
ical self-support (that is, with respect to certain types of work) us- 
ing the Board's treasur}^; complete Synodical and complete Presby- 
terial self-support with local treasuries. The joint Home Mission 
Budget recognizes sixty different Presbyterial or Synodical self- 
support units. In addition, of course, many other Presb}1:eries have 
a high degree of independence but operate through some Synodical 
arrangement. 

But it would be a superficial view that would not see farther than 
the confusion incident to our present arrangement. One must ob- 
serve, first, that this self-support area is the great industrial area of 
the United States. It is the area with the greatest concentration of 
population and of resources, with the greatest development of busi- 
ness and with the highest accentuation of many of those problems 
which most bafflingly confront the Church of our present day. 
Within the angle made by the heavy black lines on the map are to 
be found more than half of our population, two thirds of all of our 
cities of 50,000 population or upwards, 69 per cent of our city dwell- 
ers and three-fourths of our foreign-born. The center of population 
in the United States, as shown by the last census, is indicated on the 
map by the star numbered six. Providentially, in this area of con- 
centrated population and problems, the Presbyterian Church is also 
at its highest point of development. Within this same angle are 69 
per cent of the Presbyterians in Continental United States. The 

61 



r' 



..^^^ 



y 







IL i_._.J| 



62 



FACTS FROM THE FIELD 63 

center of Presbyterian meml)erslii]) is sliown by the star nunil)cred 
one, in the general vicinity of Cochocton, ( )hio. The center of I?res- 
byterian Home Mission expenditures in Continental United States, 
including both the Board and the Self-suj)])orting Agencies, is east 
of the western border of Ohio and is shown by the star numbered 
two at or about V'an Wert, Ohio. This is the area where Presby- 
terian wealth is concentrated. In the Colonial States, particularly, 
the necessities of self-supi)ort have not limited the great missionary 
spirit which these churches have had from of old. The stars num- 
bered three and four indicate, respectively, the center of Home Mis- 
sion receipts, including the Woman's I'oard. the Board and the Self- 
supporting Agencies, and the center of all benevolence gifts of our 
Church. The star numbered five indicates the center of the recei])ts 
of the Board of Home Missions in legacies. 

Certain other things of the utnuxst importance in the life of our 
Church lie behind the situation depicted by this map. These may be 
briefly summarized as follows : 

(1) The Presbytery primarily and the Synod secondarily repre- 
sent an association of more or less closely related local communities 
for the development and direction of local interests. This is a sound 
democratic principle, which is one of the fundamental principles of 
our Church and to which its Home Mission interests are com- 
mitted. The magnifying of the Presbytery and the Synod in the 
oversight of Home Mission work is the important development of the 
last decade. 

(2) The capitalization of the local initiative and the local pride to 
furnish resources for the work of Home Missions. Undoubtedly, 
the monetary motive has been an important one in the development 
of self-support. This is important both from the point of view of 
getting the money by giving the budget a direct appeal to givers who 
can be expected to have pride in that which they see and know as 
their own responsibility and, also, from the point of view of devel- 
oping the virtues of independence and self-reliance. 

(3) An efifort to tie together all of those forces and interests, how- 
ever separate they may be in our national church economy, which 
locally must be united for the development of an integrated pro- 
gram which shall deliver the whole force of the church upon the 
local community. It is in the local community that all of our ma- 
chinery has its ultimate test and it is in the local community, also, 
that the ultimate unity of the task is seen. Many of these Synods 
and Presbyteries have made important steps in the simplification and 
unification of the machinery for getting our work done. 

(4) A growing conception of a national relationship and a na- 
tional significance running through all our experience and of the 
need of a national outlook and fellowship and experience, particu- 
larly in relation to problems which are not purely local in their im- 
plications. It must not be thought that it is the tendency of the 
Church more and more to split its Home IMission forces up into 
minute units. There is an equally powerful tendency to unite us all 
in a practical, working fellowship. For one thing, the Board of 



64 HOME MISSIONS 

Home Missions cooperates in practically all of these Synods and 
Presbyteries in particular forms of work. F'or another thing, the 
various forms of associations, such as the annual conference of Self- 
supporting Home Mission Agencies, acquire each year an added sig- 
nificance. 

(5) The recognition that the whole Church has a responsibility 
in relation to work for under-privileged groups or areas, which re- 
sponsibility needs to h& taken into account locally. The experience 
of the last budget conference of the Home Mission Agencies is in 
point here. These Agencies, together with the Board of Home Mis- 
sions, frankly compared their budget needs. There was a frank 
effort to ascertain what percentage of the whole resources of the 
Church, from a Home Mission point of view, are in each Synod or 
Presbytery and what proportion of the whole task is there, in order 
that each Synod and Presbytery might take a suitable part in the na- 
tional task of the Church since those aspects of the task which are 
not local but national must be supported out of the surplus remaining 
above the self-support needs. 

The following statements have been received from the executives 
of certain of the Self-supporting Synods and Presbyteries. 

The Synod of New York 

Within the bounds of the Synod of New York, there is the work 
of pioneering in new communities. City and Immigrant Work in 
enormous quantities, Lumber Camp and Indian Work, together with 
the maintenance of the weaker churches, being the so-called Amer- 
ican Work. A number of the Presbyteries administer their own 
work and maintain their own treasuries. The Synodical Committee, 
however, has administrative responsibility in a measure, greater or 
less, in all the Presbyteries except two. 

The outstanding features of the work for the year seem to be the 
gradual approach of the Presbyteries toward central administration ; 
the united effort to meet the critical financial situation ; the growth of 
salaries of ministers toward a "living wage" and the uniformly 
successful service rendered by the field men. The Synod's organiza- 
tion is functioning this year for the first time in two of the largest 
Presbyteries and there is the probability that next year will add an- 
other to this number. 

Much time and effort has been given by the Superintendent and 
the other field men to cooperation with the Board and the New Era 
in the effqrt to secure the whole budget for the present year and 
make the canvass for the coming one. What the outcome of this 
effort may be we are unable yet to state, but practically all of the 
Presbyteries were covered in the effort to set before the churches 
the needs of the Boards and Agencies. 

A most gratifying consideration is the enlarging salaries offered to 
the ministers. In the so-called American Work the aid-receiving 
churches are for the most part in the covmtry. With this class of 
churches the average salary actually in operation has increased dur- 
ing the past five years from $875 to $1,434, this being 64 per cent. 
By far the larger proportion of this increase has come from the con- 



FACTS FROM THE FIELD 65 

gregations, and while paying these larger salaries their benevolences 
have grown in a still larger ratio. 

The Synod is definitely committed to the service of field men in the 
Presbyteries. There can be no question that much of the increase in 
salaries is due to the faithful and efiicient work that the field men 
have rendered. There are now working in the Synod among the 
twenty-four Presbyteries twelve men, some of whom are commis- 
sioned by the Synod, others engaged by the Presbyteries and confining 
their services to the Presbytery that employs them. These men have 
during the past year rendered services of the very highest type and 
have made themselves indispensable to the work of the Synod. New 
York Synod does not do things rapidly ; its aim, however, is to cover 
the entire territory with field men who will not limit their work to 
the cause of Home Missions and the administrative work thereof, 
but serve all the interests of the Church while they give the major 
portion of their time to Plome Missions. 

Synod of New Jersey 

The Home Mission cause has evidently taken hold of the Synod of 
New Jersey increasingly in these last few years. The year that is 
past has represented the largest year in the history of Home Mis- 
sions in the gifts to the Synod and to the P>oard of Home Missions, 
and the churches have increasingly shown their confidence in the 
work being done by both Agencies. Over $150,000 was raised for 
the joint budget within the Synod and while this was not the full 
amount which would have been received if the full apportionment 
had been met for all causes, it was an advance of over $25,000 over 
the preceding year which had been, in its turn, a $25,000 advance over 
the offerings of the year preceding that. 

The change of emphasis in modern Home Missions is to be seen 
in startling fashion by a comparison of the amounts now appropri- 
ated for the work of the Synod. Some twenty years ago, the Synod 
of New Jersey spent from its funds for the work in the Presbytery 
of Newark the sum of $1,766. This year it will expend in that 
Presbytery $28,000, or more than fourteen times the amount for- 
merly used. In Jersey City Presbytery twenty years ago we spent 
$2,288. This year we have appropriated $10,500 for their work. 
Formerly we expended in our rural Presbyteries of Monmouth and 
West Jersey almost one-half of the total spent in the Synod. This 
year those Presbyteries will use about one-sixth of the amount spent 
in all of our work. There is no way in which the change in respon- 
sibility for this work can be more readily recognized than by con- 
sideration of this contrast. The tremendous and increasing propor- 
tion of foreigners in the populous northern Presbyteries of the Synod 
make demands that are no less than appalling. Little by little we reach 
out after larger service as we have the funds to permit us to do so, 
but the need is ever in excess of our best efifort. 

A definite and distinct efifort has been made to discover the re- 
sponsibility of our Church to the colored people who are coming in 
large numbers to settle within our borders. It is a difficult work 
requiring tact and a good deal of consideration of the claims of other 



66 HOA'IE MISSIONS 

denominations doing work in their own way among these people. 
But there seems to be a distinct service to be rendered by the Pres- 
byterian Church to a certain class of these colored "immigrants" and 
we have been studying the situation with a view of making the wisest 
and most effective application of our resources to the problem- 
This does not seem to be by the multiplication of churches so much 
as by a strengthening of the centers where we are already engaged in 
such service and by thoroughly supporting what we undertake at all. 

Every Presbytery has something to report of progress in the work 
in many directions, particularly is this true in the matter of more 
adequate support of the mniister in his work. Many of the churches 
have come to the standard minimum which had before thought this 
impossi])le. Elizabeth has a colored church quickened into new life 
through the cooperation of a white elder in one of the local churches. 
Morris and Orange Presbytery reports a new work at Cedar Knolls 
which promises speedy development into an organized church. New- 
ark has organized an Italian church with seventy members and has 
spent $30,000 in equipping the plant. West Jersey reports one 
church organized five years ago which now is self-supporting and 
pays its minister $2,400 with manse. 

The Church in New Jersey is advancing. Much of this progress, 
though by no means fill of it, is due to the aid-receiving churches 
and missions where some of the best work of the Synod is being 
done. The organization of the Synod under Synodical Home Mis- 
sions is effective in bringing every individual work now existing 
under the personal supervision of a representative of the committee 
and every section of the state under the direct view of the committee, 
so that new opportunities are quickly recognized and strategic points 
occupied as rapidly as the funds at hand will permit. 

Synod of Pennsylvania 

The Synod of Pennsylvania expended $352,000 in mission work 
in its own bounds last year. Of this amount $47,000 was disbursed 
by the Synodical Committee and the rest through Presbyterial Com- 
mittees in self-supporting Presbyteries. The Synodical Committee 
appropriated $12,000 for buildings and ecjuipment to supplement the 
aid of Presbyteries in localities where work among foreigners is 
giving promise of permanency. This is the first time money has 
been appropriated by this committee for building work. 

In December, by authority of Synod, a conference was held between 
the Synodical Committee and Presbyterial Superintendents for the 
purpose of considering mission problems and of going over the 
whole field to the end that no needy section be overlooked. As a 
result of this conference, an annual meeting of a similar nature will 
be held in connection with the meeting of Synod. 

This Synod does not have a Synodical Superintendent, but four- 
teen of its nineteen Presbyteries now have Presbyterial Superin- 
tendents. Presbyterial rather than Synodical supervision has always 
been the policy of the Synod. 



FACTS FROM Till' I'IFI.l) 67 

Synod of Ohio 

As reported a year ago, the Synod of Ohio is giving its attention 
in a special manner to Christian Americanization. 

The program directed and supported jointly by Synod's Com- 
mittee and the Woman's Synodical Society has had for its first year 
a very beneficial one. 

A young v^^oman supervisor has given her entire time since June 
first. Three young women are w^hole-time resident workers in mining 
commimities. Thirty Daily Vacation I'ible Schools, reaching more 
than 3,900 children, were conducted during the summer of 1921. 

Plans already approved indicate that next year will be the most 
active one in the history of Home Missions in Ohio. 

Four general workers assist the Superintendent. This program 
consists of evangelistic meetings and reorganization activities among 
the 250 small churches in the Synod. 

Synod of West Virginia 

Very active work has been carried on in our mountain parish in 
Boone and Raleigh Counties vmder a Superintendent and Assistant 
Superintendent. The former position is vacant at present, but we are 
searching for the right man. Rev. Robert J. Topping is temporarily 
in charge and rendering excellent service. We have six consecrated 
and trained young women doing religious and social service at strate- 
gic points. Each one has two and three Sunday Schools under her 
charge. The whole work centers around the church and manse at 
Jarrold's Valley and Patti Stockdale School for Girls at Calcord. 
The latter is under the Woman's Board. 

We have quite successful work among the Italians at Follansl>ee 
under the direction of Rev. F. P. Patrona, the pastor of the organ- 
ized church. Another good work is being done in Clarksburg and 
vicinity with Rev. Alexander Moccia and an assistant in charge of a 
community house and chapel. Ilieir work is exerting a very whole- 
some and widespread influence throughout the community. 

Synod of Tennessee 

In the Synod of Tennessee the two mountain Presbyteries of 
French Broad and Cumberland Mountain have been specially ad- 
ministered by the Board through its Department of Country Church. 
All the rest of the Synod, the valley portion, six Presbyteries, have 
reached the stage of self-support and administer their work through 
a committee, which portion is the subject of this report. A Superin- 
tendent and Associate are sustained by the Board. 

During the past year sixty churches have been aided through the 
partial support of 33 pastors and supplies. Nearly all ministers with 
families, giving their whole time to their fields, receive the mini- 
mum of $1,500. and manse, this stage having been reached by virtue 
of recent financial efforts. 

The past year has been marked by emphasis on organization and 
efficiency and in these the New Era Movement has been of great 
help. Group organizations and better financial systems in our local 
churches have been installed. An increase in the number of available 



68 HOME MISSIONS 

ministers since the war has made it possible better to group our 
churches and provide pastors. We have but few vacancies. The 
emphasis for the next year will be on extension and evangelism. 

While most of our fields are of the usual rural and town type, one 
field deserves special mention, viz., that known as the Tennessee 
River section. The counties lying on either side of the river as it 
flows northward in the western part of the state have many reli- 
giously destitute communities. Here a pioneer work is being done 
by five ministers and a Sunday School missionary. Four new 
churches have recently been organized and these, beside nine churches 
and several preaching stations, are being sustained. This is the por- 
tion of the river below Muscle Shoals, and includes the location of 
the battlefields of Pittsburg Landing and Ft. Donelson. Travel is 
difficult, conditions adverse and the Home Missionary is doing true 
sacrificial work. In case of the development of Muscle Shoals this 
section, with Alabama and Mississippi, will have added responsibility. 

Synod of Indiana 

The Synod of Indiana meets some difficulties this year incident to 
the financial depression. A larger number of churches applied for 
Home Mission aid (one hundred and thirty-three in all) and in addi- 
tion the responsibilities in our City and Immigrant Work have in- 
creased. We are assuming a larger proportion of the burden of the 
Calumet Region and are nearing the point when we will relieve the 
Home Mission Board entirely so as to use its funds in standing by 
similar enterprises in other places as it has stood by the Calumet 
Region for a decade. 

The Calumet Region continues to grow and our work assumes cor- 
responding increases. The newly organized church for Negroes is 
making splendid development. With only sixty charter members 
this energetic group has contributed during the first year of its his- 
tory over $1,200 toward its own support. West Hammond is multi- 
plying its activities and a thriving Sunday school is now one of the 
chief features. Gary Neighborhood House, under the leadership of 
the Rev. Ralph Cummins, continues to have an increasing clientele 
among the vast numbers of foreign-speaking people. Recently indi- 
vidual gifts from generous donors and interested corporations en- 
abled us to purchase three additional lots for the future development 
of this work. Newcastle Olivet Community Center is going over the 
one hundred mark in its Sunday school, and a few less than that in 
regular preaching services. The baby clinic is most successful in 
reaching and helping families throughout the neighborhood. Clin- 
ton Hill Crest Center anxiously awaits building operations to open 
this Spring. The plan calls for a basement under the present build- 
ing and a gymnasium, in addition to adding another story to the 
present cottage, thus increasing several-fold the utility of the entire 
plant. 

In some Presbyteries churches have actually reached self-support 
and others are nearing it. In other Presbyteries the only way out of 
permanent difficulties seems to lie in the direction of federation, 
ppur Field Men are giving much thought and efifort to the elimina- 



FACTS FROM THK FIELD 69 

tion of the waste of men and money. Friendly cooperation obtains 
between our churches and those of other denominations and in some 
cases federations are now in operation. New churches appear in the 
rapidly growing centers only, such as the Negro congregation already 
referred to, and the Robertsdale Church which was organized as a 
response to popular demand in the thriving city of Whiting. Two 
recent dedications of new buildings are noteworthy, that of the Slo- 
vakian congregation in Whiting and of the Paoli congregation in 
New Albany Presljytery. The latter is a remarkable instance of the 
energy of a Home Mission church which by sheer will-power, busi- 
ness sense and sacrifice now possesses a beautiful structure, includ- 
ing gymnasium and other social features, at a cost of $24,000 com- 
plete. New Albany Presbytery is still our neediest field, having about 
forty churches that must have aid. The lack is not only for money, 
but for men. Evangelistic efiforts have proven very successful in 
several fields. 

From a financial standpoint, we are at present sharing our Home 
Mission income with the Home Board, so that from our receipts 
about fourteen per cent goes to the Board for the national work. 

Synod of Michigan 

The past year has been in every way most successful. Not much 
new work has been attempted, chiefly from lack of funds. Two 
flourishing churches have been organized with a combined church 
membership of 250 and Sunday school membership of 600. Consid- 
erable attention has been given to the question of bringing ministers' 
salaries up to a reasonable level and inducing the churches them- 
selves to carry the additional burden. Substantial increases have 
been obtained in this way in six churches. Commendable progress 
toward self-support on an adequate basis has been made on a num- 
ber of fields. Four fields which were a1x)ut to ask aid have been 
assisted to finance their work adequately without Home Mission 
money. In four instances the amount of aid granted can be sub- 
stantially reduced and five other fields have come to self-support on a 
basis of fair salaries to their ministers. 

A noteworthy item is the dedication of the new Community House 
at Caspian, referred to in the report of the City and Immigrant De- 
partment. This work is successful even beyond expectations. From 
January tenth to February first of this year 5,600 people made use of 
the facilities of the house. 

Last summer in Iron River Parish ten Daily Vacation Bible 
Schools were held, lasting five weeks, with a total attendance of over 
one thousand children. Greater success is expected this coming sum- 
mer. 

In addition to the reguh.r Home Mission work, the Home Mission 
force was instrumental in securing two new church buildings and 
have two or three more in prospect for the coming year. 

On the whole, nothing is lacking for a successful year's work ex- 
cept the funds and those we hope to secure. 



70 IU)\\E MISSIONS 

Detroit Presbytery 

During the past year one new church has been organized, one 
thought dead revived, and two new missions have been estabhshed, 
which give ])romise of shortly l>ecoming organized churches. One 
neighborhood and settlement house has been established and a clinic 
started, and plans have also been accepted for two new mission 
buildings. Also, a new edifice for one of the mission churches has 
been erected costing $50,000. The twenty-two mission churches of 
Detroit Presbytery have raised for their own support during the year 
$31,000, and contril)Uted $3,800 to the Boards of the denomination. 

Rev. W. P». Gantz, D.D., has been called to the office of Superin- 
tendent, taking office in April and succeeding W. T. Jaquess, who 
has been connected with the Home Mission work of this Presbytery 
and Synod for more than twenty years. 

Synod of Illinois 

The year has been an unusually encouraging one for our Tllinois 
work. We opened an office in Decatur last June, which is headquar- 
ters for our Presbyterian work down state. We are working in the 
closest cooperation with Preslwterial pastors in promoting the work 
throughout the Synod. We have added one field worker during the 
year and have a stenographer em])loyed full time in our office. 

Work is carried on among the Magyars in seven coal-mining towns 
of southern Tllinois, and a very encouraging work has been started in 
Divernon, Illinois, where we hope soon to have a community worker 
for full time. Two of the women engaged in community work have 
been employed on full time during the year. All told, work has been 
carried on in thirteen foreign-speaking centers. 

The results of evangelistic meetings in our American churches 
have been fruitful in awakening a new interest for the life and pro- 
gress of the churches. 

The two American churches organized during the year are in the 
industrial district, located between East St. Louis and Alton, and bid 
fair to become strong churches. 

One of the most encouraging features of the work has been the 
spirit of loyalty and hearty cooperation manifested not only by the 
Home Mission cliurches, but Iw all the churches of the Synod. 

Chicago Presbytery 

One hundred and twenty-one mission enteq^rises are supported, 
including one hundred and six organized churches. The working 
force consists of two hur.dred and thirty-six ordained pastors, forty- 
six community workers and two nurses. Forty-three dififerent na- 
tionalities are afifected. After the American, the Italian, Bohemian 
and Polish groups are the most numerous in the Home Mission con- 
stituency. 

The type of program ofifered and equipment used varies with local 
conditions. In the ordinary foreign-speaking community there are 
three general types of institutions — the Neighborhood House, the 
Community Service Church and the Foreign-speaking Church or 
Mission. The Neighljorhood House begins with its seven-day pro- 



FACTS FROAf TTTF FTFT.D 71 

gram to reach all groui).s oi all rigcs in its conmuinity, out of which is 
later developed the Suiulay scIkjoI and church. Usually there is a 
resident staff. The Community Service Church is usually an adapta- 
tion of a former conventional type church to new conditions with an 
expanded program heginning with the church grouj) left from former 
days. 'Jlie Foreign-speaking Church undertakes its ministry from the 
standpoint of the dominant foreign-speaking group in the community 
under the direction of a pastor speaking that language, although most 
of the activities other than preaching are in English. 

Synod of Wisconsin 

The following are some of the interesting achievements of the 
year in particular Home Mission fields in the Synod of Wisconsin : 

During the past fall and winter the Sunday School of Calvary 
Church, Milwaukee, has increased over thirty per cent, having a 
memhership of ahout 275. The Christian Endeavor Society is well 
organized. Every Sunday evening a social hour is held at six, fol- 
lowed hy light refreshments. After this, the regular Endeavor meet- 
ing takes place, with an attendance of from fifty to seventy. 

The Calvary Community House, with Miss Laura Dixon in charge, 
is crowded with activities. The Americanization Class has an aver- 
age attendance of thirty-five. Twelve meetings were held during 
January. The Sunday Bihle School has grown to have an average 
attendance of twenty-six. The week-day Bihle School has an attend- 
ance of seven. Eighty-two classes of various kinds with an attend- 
ance of 1,322 were held during January. 

The movement for Christian citizenship goes forward on the 
Iron Range. In the times of great industrial distress, there is always 
a strong leaning upon "the Giver of every good and perfect gift." 
There is an increasing get-together spirit on the part of all churches 
and pastors to meet this situation. There is a more marked unity of 
efifort and the Parish, with its high ideals of Christian service, is no 
doubt doing much to bring about this feeling of brotherhood. Our 
work continues to grow. New calls from many sources give us a 
feeling of stability never felt before. 

At Hurley, all club activities are being cared for in the Eagles' 
Hall, and Sunday school and church services in the Masonic Ban- 
quet Rooms. These improvised places have done much to enable us 
to hold our ground while the church is being rebuilt. We have found 
it necessary to lay aside our boy activities until the church can be 
used. In addition to our Girl Scouts. Junior Girls and a large group 
of Italian children, we have recently organized a Ladies' Aid, with 
an enrollment of over twenty members, and a ^'oung Ladies' Auxil- 
iary of an equal numl)er. Considerable enthusiasm is manifested in 
both of these groups. 

The church itself will soon be ready for occupancy. The committee 
has faithfully tried to do its work and has succeeded wonderfully 
well, except in the financial drive. This duty has fallen to the pastor, 
who has spent a great deal of his time supervising construction and 
urging contributions. In all justice, we cannot call this a remodeled 
church; it is rather rebuilt. At a cost of approximately $10,000, this 



-jZ HOME MISSIONS 

building has been rebuilt and made "a church oi which the com- 
munity may well be proud," as one local paper put it last week. To 
date Hurley has pledged some $4,000. When you consider that the 
mines have been practically closed for eighteen months, I feel like 
saying that Hurley, known as "the hell-hole of the Northwest," is 
not so bad, after all. 

Work is progressing very smoothly in Montreal, which is now 
entered by Protestants for the first time. The mining company has 
turned over its only furnace-heated Ixmgalow for our use. 

Miss Spickard carries on an enthusiastic piece of work in the for- 
saken community of Iron Belt. The one-room church has undergone 
some changes, so that clubs and classes can be held to some advan- 
tage. Our work is mainly with the girls, as the High School has 
rented a room and taken over the activities of the boys and young 
men. Preaching services are held but once a month, as the pastor 
must walk through cold and snow more than five miles after this 
service. 

The work at Ramsay is being pushed with considerable enthusi- 
asm. Clubs and classes make this little building a l^ee-hive of in- 
dustry. On open nights from eighty to one hundred make use 
of the building. Mr. Eells is assisted by Miss Wickstrom and Miss 
White, school teachers at Ramsay. Miss Sealy also assists here on 
Monday. Mrs. Eells still manages to keep the enthusiasm of the 
Ladies' Aid high. 

Synod of Minnesota 

Minnesota is still on the map. From the Home Mission angle the 
year 1921 has not differed greatly from the years that have gone be- 
fore it. The development of the Kingdom, through the Presbyterian 
Church, has gone steadily on and up. The agricultural regions of 
the state were hard hit by the partial failure of crop and the low 
prices. This was especially true in the northern and southern por- 
tions. The parts of the state dependent on the iron ore industry 
have felt very keenly the depression. There has, however, been 
very little disposition to cry "hard times" and present this as an ex- 
cuse for failure to meet obligation and responsibility. The buoyant, 
optimistic spirit of the state is largely due to the fact that the Home 
Mission field force is made up of men who have emphasized faith 
instead of fear as they have traveled over the state and come in 
touch with the parish life. There are two or three outstanding 
features of the church life of Minnesota that are worth keeping in 
mind. 

( 1 ) The state has been well supplied with pastors during the year. 
Never in all recent history have the parishes of the state been so well 
supplied with pastors and preaching as during this year. We have 
had no reason to feel, judging by our own condition, that there was 
any shortage of ministers. There has been little disposition among 
our men to leave. There have been few openings into the par- 
ishes of the state. This is due, in part, to the fact that the salaries of 
pastors have reached a living basis. We have not yet reached the 
ideal, but we have reached the point where our men can at least live 



FACTS FROM THE FIELD IZ 

without the fear of the poor house facing them. This has put heart 
into the men in the smaller fields and been an incentive and inspira- 
tion to better service. Not only have our fields been manned, but they 
have been well manned. The leadership in the average parish has 
been efficient. 

(2) An experiment in publicity has been successfully carried out 
in two of our Presbyteries, namely, St. Cloud and Red River. The 
average Presbyterian is ignorant about his own church. The need 
is intelligence in order to interest. In these two Presbyteries, 
under the leadership of Rev. W. S. Ward, Assistant Superintendent, 
a carefully planned campaign of education has been carried on 
during the winter. Almost every church has been visited and a 
"publicity day" observed. Assisted by members of Presbytery and 
laymen as well as women, a team has come into the community. The 
whole work of the whole Presbyterian Church has been presented. 
Every phase of it has been put up to the people. The machinery of 
the church has been explained. Three services were held, morning, 
afternoon and evening. The attendance has been exceptionally large. 
The people have responded with expressions of interest and pleasure. 
It has been a campaign of intensive education which is sure to bring 
forth results in the future. 

(3) The literature of the church has been extensively used. Pas- 
tors and laymen alike are getting hold of this educational idea. 
Stewardship literature has been used more extensively than ever be- 
fore. The demand for the printed page, exploiting the different 
phases of our work, has been continuous. The year has been marked 
by this thing in a very special way. A larger number of mission 
study classes have been conducted, a very much larger number of 
Daily Vacation Bible Schools, all this educational work being done in 
a new way and with a new energy. The result has been shown in 
the financial output. In spite of the depression prevalent everywhere, 
the missionary income of the state has kept right ahead of the corre- 
sponding dates of last year. The people have been less able to give 
and yet more willing to give. 

Minnesota rejoices in the blessing of God granted and in the privi- 
lege of continued service under Him in the interests of the Kingdom. 
She has no discouragements to record. She has no defeats to re- 
count. There has been nothing but progress and victory all along the 
line. 

Synod of Iowa 

The one aspect of the work in the Synod of Iowa which should 
be stressed most is the evidence of spiritual life in the Home Mis- 
sion churches as revealed in the number of members received and 
the amounts contributed to benevolences. Seventy-five Home Mis- 
sion churches received 680 members on profession of faith and 340 
by letter, a total of 1.020 during the past year, almost 70 per cent 
increase over the preceding year. One-sixth of the present total 
membership was received during the year. These aid-receiving 
churches gave to benevolences $14,045 and to self-support $70,380, 



74 HOME MISSIONS 

an increase of 11 per cent to iKMicvolences and 48 per cent to self- 
support. 

Very gratifying progress has been made in the advance in salaries 
of missionaries. At present most of the pastors on aid-receiving 
fields are getting $1,500 and manse, and some of them much more. 

In Des Moines Presbytery a church was organized among the 
Italians. With the help of the Synodical Board they have succeeded 
in raising more than $30,000 for a new building which is not com- 
pleted. It is a most encouraging work. 

During the past year the churches of the Synod gave more to 
Home Missions than ever before. In addition to supporting the local 
work, Iowa Synod gave to the Asseml)ly's Board a sum greater than 
ever before and greater than that given by any Synod except Penn- 
sylvania and New Jersey, not counting those that clear through the 
Board. 

The work is encouraging from every standpoint. 

Synod of Missouri 

Missouri has been struggling with a need twice as big as her pro- 
gram and with a lack of money to carry her program. Had it not 
been for the faith and generosity of the Board of Home Missions, 
we could not have pulled through the last two years. While two 
great cities are gateways to those who approach Missouri from east 
and west, the state is largely rural — three hundred and twenty-five 
out of four hundred and fifty churches are in the country. The 
Ozarks in the southern part of the state furnish the "type" hunter 
pictures for novel, stage and "movie." The people of the Ozarks 
have been exploited by religious mountebanks and in the inevitable 
"protracted meeting" conducted by a gypsying ministry, religion 
and hysteria are sadly mixed. We are penetrating the Ozarks with 
an educated and settled ministry. 

The mining district around Joplin has been dead for three years. 
Signs of industrial resurrection indicate that we have done the right 
thing in holding our Home Mission line of service through that re- 
gion. 

St. Louis has secured the Rev. R. Calvin Dobson, D.D., as Execu- 
tive Secretary, and is making great strides forward under his lead- 
ership. Kansas City will have a similar leadership and organization 
in the near future. The First Presbyterian Church of Kansas City, 
Rev. James Congdon, D.D., minister, is carrying on a great Home 
Mission work. Ten years ago this church was self-supporting. 
Today it is at the heart of a great "boarding house" district. One 
of the elders was knocked down the other day when he invited a 
man to church, but he continues with his brother officers in Saturday 
night and Sunday afternoon visitation of the apartment houses and 
hotels of the neighborhood. 

Since the resignation of Rev. C. C. McGinley, D.D., as Synodical 
Superintendent, Rev. Edgar L. Combs has 1)een the only man in the 
field and has rendered a Pauline service to the Presbyteries. Sev- 
eral Presbyteries plan to call field men to more intensive service. 



FACTS I'ROXf TllF. FIRLD 75 

The Synod is in iiiurli hcltcr shape ihan it was a }'ear aj^o and we 
"thank God and take com-au^e." 

Synod of South Dakota 

The Synod of South Dakota faced most unusual conditions dur- 
ing the year. The eastern and southern portion was in the area of 
surpkis corn production, with the average farm price in Decemher 
of twenty-one cents per ])usheL The western and northern portion 
suffered crop faikires. large areas not even yielding seed. There 
were many pitiful cases of destitution. In some localities men and 
women and children could not attend church services during the win- 
ter months because they did not have the warm clothes to wear. 
Such suffering has not been known for years. 

A most splendid spirit of sacrifice and consecrated leadershij) was 
exhibited by the 79 missionaries and two field superintendents. Not- 
withstanding this situation the churches of South Dakota raised 
$3,000 more for their current budgets than any other year in its his- 
tory. This was due to the splendid cooperation of the membership. 
Better work is being done by our missionaries than ever before. 
While we have been unable to meet our entire self-support budget, 
we have high hope of securing the deficit during the ensuing year. 

The Home Mission Committee of Synod has been enlarged by the 
addition of four outstanding laymen. A new Chairman has also been 
elected. Evangelistic effort has been incorporated in the Home 
Mission Program. There are two special features which we plan to 
organize this year: work among the foreign-born in the mining dis- 
trict of the Black Hills, in the largest gold mines in the world, and 
work among the employees of East Side Sioux Falls, where 
there is a great industrial problem. Both of these present great 
urgency and opportunity. This year we hope to bring the Synod 
to entire self-support. 

Synod of Nebraska 

The financial condition throughout the rtiral sections of Nebraska 
has had a rather depressing effect upon our mission churches, but 
the outlook for the coming year is very much more hopeful. Our 
fields have 1>een better supplied with ministers than for a number of 
years. Freqtient changes in ministerial service and long periods of 
vacancy are not conducive to rapid growth. The unified ])rogram of 
Church Extension is proving very satisfactory. The three field men 
associated with the Synodical Superintendent, viz.. Rev. J. W. 
Pressly, Rev. E. M. Steen and Dr. R. \V. Taylor, continue to do 
most efficient work. Our Synod's Committee has recently employed 
a special man to work tnider its general direction and in cooperation 
with Presbyteries. He will serve from two to six months, as may 
be neces.sary in certain churches preparing them financially and other- 
wise for the employment of a settled minister. We feel that we 
have secured just the right man for this very important work, and ex- 
pect to obtain excellent results. 

In the City of Omaha, we have taken over a small Bohemian 
church located in the South Side of ( hnaha and have emnloved a 



Id HOME MISSIONS 

pastor full time, paying his entire salary. We are expecting that this 
work will develop along institutional lines and later are hopeful of 
employing additional workers. This church is located in a com- 
munity having 7,000 or 8,000 Bohemians. 

More attention is being given constantly to the Omaha City 
problem. The Church Extension Committee, although not incor- 
porated, is functioning more effectively each year. The Synod rec- 
ognizes the fact that Home Missions is only a part of our great 
denominational program and the Superintendent and field force are 
charged with the prosecution of the whole program of the Church. 
For the past year we have not had a Director of Religious Educa- 
tion and our Synodical Evangelist has recently taken up the work of 
the pastorate. Evangelism, however, is being stressed not only by 
the Home Mission workers, but by a most efficient Evangelistic 
Committee. 

Synod of Kansas 

The work is in good shape in Kansas, perhaps the best in years. 
Nearly all our churches are supplied with pastors. 

We have just placed Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Rellinger in our Chero- 
kee-Crawford Mining Parish. We have no workers in the Slavic 
Mission in Kansas City, Kansas. The work there is undergoing a 
change, and we hope for better things in the Spring. 

Many of our Home Mission churches are planning to build new 
buildings or enlarge and repair old ones this summer. If times get 
better, we expect to do great things in Kansas. 

The Synodical Superintendent has one assistant. Rev. C. M. 
Mills is taking the work of Pastoral Evangelist in Emporia and 
Solomon Presbyteries beginning January first. 

Welsh Ssmods 

Twenty-five organized churches have been aided during the past 
year which have been served by twenty-two ordained pastors and 
one lay worker. Students are used during the summer vacation. 
One of the chief difficulties is in keeping the churches adequately 
supplied. The Welsh Synods cannot draw on the general supply 
of ministers, as it is necessary for the men to be able to preach in 
Welsh as well as in English. Welsh churches are also losing many 
of their most able young ministers from Home Mission churches that 
have not been able to pay adequate salaries. Eight have been lost 
during the year, most of them accepting calls from English-speaking 
churches. 

The future responsibility of the Welsh Board will probably nar- 
row down to the larger cities. It is probable that within a few years 
many of the rural churches will be combined with neighboring Eng- 
lish-speaking churches. But there are a number of cities where 
Welsh immigration is considerable where there are Welsh churches 
which will require the care of the Welsh Board. Welsh churches 
are stronger than ever before in New York, Utica, Chicago, Mil- 
waukee and Minneapolis. 



FACTS FROM THE FIELD 11 

Presbytery of Baltimore 

Baltimore Presbytery carries on a big program among foreign- 
speaking people of tbe City of Baltimore. It also maintains a Su- 
perintendent of Town and Country Work for the oversight of work 
outside the city and its immediate environs. 

Presbytery of Los Angeles 

Out of 101 churches, 26 have buildings projected or under way 
and the effort is being made to see that all these buildings are adapted 
to modern church and Sunday school purposes. 

Presbytery is stressing the advantages of having the churches of 
medium strength and the stronger churches employ a staff worker, 
such as a Religious Education Director, Boys' Work Director, Parish 
Worker, etc. 

Through the Department of Religious Education, Schools of Mis- 
sions, Mission Study Classes, Week Day Schools, Daily Vacation 
Bible Schools, Boys' and Girls' Clubs and Summer Camps are be- 
ing energetically promoted. 



VI. Promotion and Education 

GENERAL PROMOTION 

In making the work known to the Church during the past year in 
addition to the hterature and stereopticon lectures sent out and the 
missionary study institutes conducted Ijy the Educational Depart- 
ment, the Board has through its Secretaries, Directors and Mission- 
aries maintained a Bureau of Speakers who have delivered more 
than one thousand missionary addresses in the churches. It has 
conducted state-wide extensive educational campaigns in the Synods 
of Texas, Oklahoma and South Dakota. It has also cooperated in 
ten-day summer assemblies at Hollister, Mo., Ovoca, Tenn., and 
VVaxahachie, Texas. 

Representatives of the Board have attended all the synodical meet- 
ings and many presbyterial meetings. Board Secretaries and repre- 
sentatives have cooperated with the New Era Committee in its cam- 
paigns and in the budget canvass. 

Dr. and Mrs. F. H. Spence, our veteran missionaries from Point 
Barrow, Alaska, have been giving their entire time during the year 
speaking in the churches in Iowa, Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, Penn- 
sylvania, New Jersey and New York Synods. These good people 
have been talking almost daily, and frequently several times a day 
during the year telling the story of their work with splendid accept- 
ance. 

The Board's activities along promotional lines this past year have 
been more extensive than formerly but out force is still inadequate. 

Rev. George H. Mack, D.D., who has been Superintendent of 
Home Missions for the State of Tennessee for some years, has been 
called by the Board to be District Secretary for Promotion for the 
South and Southwest with headquarters in St. Louis. This is a 
transfer and an enlargement of Dr. Mack's work. He will be in the 
western office, 1220 Arcade Building, St. Louis, Mo. 
FINANCIAL PROMOTION 

The whole promotional and educational policy of the Board is 
designed, directly or indirectly, to assist churches. Presbyteries or 
Synods in raising their entire benevolence quotas. The Board of 
Home Missions has cooperated with the New Era Movement in the 
furtherance of its promotional program. In accordance with what 
the Board understands to be the spirit of the present joint budget 
arrangement, it has made no direct appeal for current work items out- 
side the budget. Special appeals during the past year have, therefore, 
been limited to three classes of items. At the beginning of the year 
a successful effort was made to secure pledges sufficient to cover the 
deficit on the preceding year, exclusive of the deficit incurred on 
account of the Self-supporting Synods and Presbyteries. In the sec- 
ond place, money was secured for certain urgent building needs, as 

7S 



PROMOTIOX AND KDUCATIOX 79 

authorized by the i'vxecutive Commission. In the third jtlacc, gifts 
were sought in annuities, legacies and other ])ermanent funds. 

With the close of the year certain changes are made in the method 
of conducting financial promotion. Dr. W. R. Patterson, Financial 
Secretary, is released for a year to serve the New Era Movement 
as Com])tr()ller. Dr. John A. Rodgers is made the Director of the 
newly formed Department of Legacies, Annuities and Gifts. Rev. 
James P. Cjilles])ie is placed in charge of the Bureau of Specials, 
the aim of which will he to interest churches. Sunday schools and 
individuals in the sujiport of s])ecial objects in mission fields through 
their regular benevolence funds. Ilenry II. Welles, jr.. is field 
representative for Financial Promotion. 

EDUCATION 

In the last analysis the report of the educational work of the 
Board will be found not so much in these pages as in the rank and 
file of the Presbyterian churches throughout the country. For if 
their information and interest in flome Missions have not consider- 
ably increased no record of the efforts of the educational staff would 
have any particular value. Tn lieu of such an ultimate report from 
the field, the following facts may be illuminating. 

Mission Study Books and Classes: 

"Unfinished Business." the principal textbook for mission study 
and a hook which dealt entirely with Presbyterian Flome Missions, 
ran rapidly through three editions with a total of .35.000 copies. 
The sales of this book by our Board have been three times the sales 
of the corresponding book last vear. The sales of the other Home 
Mission study books, "Playing Square With Tomorrow." and "Stay- 
at-Home Journevs." have also made a distinct advance over last year, 
and there has been an increasing demand for material for use in giv- 
ing information about the missionary work of the church. 

The number of mission study classes this \-ear (4.?i9?>, including 
those enrolled with the Home Board and the Woman's Home I'oard). 
is nearly twice that of any preceding year. 

The Educational Department has been instrumental in securing 
Roger Babson as the author of a general mission study lx)ok entitled 
"New Tasks for Old Churches." a study of the industrial community 
as the new frontier of the church. This l^ook will be published in the 
fall and should be helpful in enlisting the interest of the men of the 
churches in Home Mission tasks. The department has also been in- 
strumental in securing Dr. John Finley as author of the general mis- 
sionary book for 1923-4 on "Saving America lliroucfh Her Boys and 
Girls. " This book will be one of the regular missionary education 
books for the year. 

The Sunday School: 

The Sunday schools have evidenced their growing interest in ?Tomc 
Missions by an increased use of our Thanksgiving and Washington's 
Birthday programs and by a material increase in their gifts, the total 
receipts from this source for the current year reaching $59.18^.43. 
Many schools are adopting special fields or missionaries toward whose 



80 HOME MISSIONS 

support they contribute regularly throughout the year. Letters are 
being sent from missionaries to supporting Sunday Schools as a 
means of stimulating interest. 

Literature : 

2,944 orders were received from pastors or other church officers 
for Home Mission literature. This is in addition to the 1,250 orders 
received from Sunday Schools. Our one free promotional leaflet, 
"The Biggest Job in America," has run through six editions totaling 
230,000 copies, all sent out on order from pastors. 

The following pamphlets for which a price is charged have been 
produced this year. 

The Story of White Rock, by Francis Bellamy, 5c. 

Mudholes, Mountains and Humans, by H. L. Weir, 5c. 

The Christian Spirit in Industrial Relations, by John McDowell, 20c. 

The Neighborhood House, by Clyde Smith, 10c. 

Pathfinders of Civilization (4th edition), by Fred Eastman, 5c. 

A Christian Ministry to the Jews, by J. S. Conning, 5c. 

The Jews in America, by J. S. Conning, 5c. 

A Study of the Jews in Greater N. Y., by Robert W. Anthony. 10c. 

Close-ups of Presbyterian Home Missions, by H. N. Morse, 5c. 

Let's Go to Cuba, by C. C. Hayes, 2c. 

Twenty Years in Porto Rico, by Arthur James, 20c. 

Border Beacons, by Robert N. McLean, 5c. 

Farthest North and Farthest West, By Fred Eastman, 2c. 

Stereopticon Lectures: 

Six new depositories have been established : Pittsburgh, Nashville, 
Chicago, Columbus, Omaha and Portland. These with the older 
depositories at New York, St. Louis, Minneapolis, San Francisco 
and Los Angeles, make a total of eleven centers from which any of 
our sixteen lectures may be obtained. In nine of these we are co- 
operating with other Presbyterian Boards and Agencies in the Cen- 
tralized Lantern Slide Service, which is a system of joint depositories 
established in the interest of the convenience of pastors and churches. 
It is solely a distribution service, the creation and manufacture of 
the lectures remaining with the Boards. 

Six new Home Mission lectures have been produced during the 
past year: 

The Home Mission Task, by John A. Marquis, D.D. 

The Lumberjacks of the Pacific Coast, by Andrew J. Montgomery. 

New Tasks for Old Churches, by Edmund deS. Brunner. 

Navajo Land, by W. F. Wefer. 

Seventeen Varieties of Sunday Schools in New York City, by 

J. Milton Vance. 
Aloine Community School, by M. M. Abbe. 

The other ten lectures have all been revised and some of them 
almost completely rewritten during the year. 

The improvement in these Home Mission lectures and in the dis- 
tribution service has been followed by a 100% increase in their use 
by the churches. During the year 1920-21, 1,230 lectures were 
rented ; this year the number of rentals has reached 2,455. 



PROMOTION AND EDUCATION 81 

Conferences and Institutes : 

Home Mission Study groups were organized and conducted at 
Conferences held at the following centers : 

New York City Montclair, N. J. Petersburg, 111. Estes Park, Colo. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. Newark, N. J. Dixon, 111. Albany, Oregon. 

Silver Bay, N. Y. Blairstown, N. J. Minneapolis, Minn. Spokane, Wash. 
Middletown, N. Y. Westminster, Md. Lake Geneva, Wis. San Anselmo, Cal. 
Morristown, N. J. Washington, D. C. Jamestown, N. D. Occidental, Cal. 
Orange, N. J. Alma, Mich. Bellevue, Idaho 

In August a two-day Older High School Boys' Conference was 
put on in San Anselmo, California. The resulting interest of the 
boys in the ministry and missions as fields for life work was so 
marked that this conference was followed by a series of four others 
in Southern California under the leadership of Mr. Stevens of the 
Los Angeles office. 

Educational and Promotional campaigns have been made (jointly 
with other departments) in Texas. Arizona, New Mexico and Cali- 
fornia. One of the most successful of these was the one in Los 
Angeles Presbytery where $60,000 was raised for the Church Exten- 
sion Board work, $18,000 of which is to go directly to the Mexican 
work in this Presbytery. Five per cent of the total 1921 budget of 
the Los Angeles Presbytery is pledged to the Home Board. 

Recruiting : 

The Self-Supporting Synods, the Aid-Receiving Synods and 
the Home Board cooperated this^year in a joint recruiting campaign 
in Auburn, Princeton and McCormick Seminaries. In each Semi- 
nary a popular evening meeting with the student body was followed 
by a day of individual conferences with students. The names of all 
likely students interested in Home Missions were noted and confi- 
dential reports sent to all Synodical .Superintendents and Field Men. 
Ten seniors definitely applied for long-term Home Mission fields. 

The handicaps of this team plan of recruiting are obvious. But 
it has two distinct advantages : it presents a unified front to the stu- 
dents, and it avoids the confusion, duplication and waste of a free- 
for-all scramble for recruits. 

Student Summer Work : 

The best recruiting effort of the Board is its Summer Work plan. 
Thirty-one Seminary students, all of them seriously considering 
Home Missions as a field for service after graduation, were selected 
from nearly three times that number of applicants and employed for 
fifteen weeks each last summer upon Home Missions fields in various 
parts of America. The Board has pursued a similar policy for years, 
but the condition limiting employment not only to those who are 
well qualified to do good work, but to those who are seriously con- 
sidering Home Missions as a field for life service is comparatively 
recent and has proven valuable. Of the ten Seminary seniors apply- 
ing this year for Home Mission work after graduation every one 
has Rad at least one summer upon a mission field under the Board's 
summer work plan. 



82 IIUAIE MISSIONS 

The Fcllozvship for .imcrican Service: 

The Home Mission Council recommended to the General Assembly 
of 1921 that "the Board be directed to take steps for inauguratinji^ 
an Eulistnicnt Movement for Home Mission ivorkers similar to the 
Student Volunteer Movement in the interest of Foreign Missions." 

In accordance with this recommendation an organization known 
as the Fellowship for American Service has l)een formed and branches 
of it are now established in the University of California, McCormick, 
Princeton, San Francisco, Western and Auburn Seminaries, and in 
Coe College, Pennsylvania State College, Occidental, Oregon Agri- 
cultural and Trinity (Texas) Colleges. Other branches are in 
process of organization in Albany College, Oregon ; Wooster College, 
Ohio ; Bloomfield Seminary, N. J. ; Dubuque College, Iowa ; Omaha 
Seminary, Hamilton College and Union Seminary. 

The Purpose of this Fellowship as expressed in its constitution is : 

1. To unite the prayers, study, and viRorous effort of those who are in- 
terested in the task of making America Christian for the friendly service of 
the world. 

2. To secure and excliange information concerning the spiritual and social 
needs of America and especially the under-privileged groups — those whose 
opportunities for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness have been limited. 

3. To study methods of religious and social work and administration in 
rural, city and immigrant, industrial, migrant-labor, Alaskan, Indian, Mexican 
and West Indian fields. 

4. To provide means for making the results of our studies and thought 
along these lines known to the Student body, the faculty, the Church Boards, 
and such other bodies as should know them. 

5. To enlist the interest of all and the life service of those qualified for 
the task of ministering to those under-privileged groups in America and of 
advancing in this country a more Christian social order. 

Meetings of the Fellowships are held every other week and at each 
meetinfT some such subject as "The Rural Church," "Christian Ameri- 
canization," "The Work of the Protestant Church in Porto Rico" is 
the theme of inquiry and discussion. 

The Fellowship is inter-denominational ; it is first started in Pres- 
byterian institutions simply because our first duty is to our own 
constituency. The astonishing alacrity with which the students have 
welcomed this organization and its quick rooting in so many repre- 
sentative institutions indicate that it fills a need and that with wise 
leadership it may become a potent force for the Kingdom. 



VII. Relations of the Board With 
the Self-Supporting Agencies 

During the year certain of the Self-supporting Synods have en- 
tered into an arrangement with the Hoard whereby it is agreed that 
Home Missions shall Ixt presented 

1. In terms of a common task rather tlian in terms of Agencies, 
the task to be defnied as "The Christiani/.ing of America." 

2. In terms of a common program, wiiicii shall consist of Evan- 
gelism, Education and Social Service. 

3i. In terms of a common budget to finance the common task. 
This budget is to be divided on a percentage basis between the Board 
and the Synod, according to an agreement reached in conference. 

4. In terms of a common promotional program. 

That this arrangement works in the interests of the Synod and 
the Board is demonstrated by the experience of the Synod of New 
Jersey last year. This Synod adopted the plan and decided that the 
common task called for a budget of $130,000 from the Synod. By 
agreement between the Board and the Synod it was decided that 
two-thirds of the Synod's share of the common task of Christianizing 
America was within their own borders and, therefore, two-thirds of 
the budget should be spent in New Jersey by the Synod and one- 
third in the country at large by the Board. The Synod also agreed 
that all over $130,000 would l>e given to the Board. The Board co- 
operated with the Synod during the year in a promotional campaign, 
with the result that the Synod raised the sum of $152,049.65, an 
excess of $22,049.65 over the fixed amount. 

This plan we believe ofifers a solution to many of the problems 
connected with the work of the self-supporting agencies and the 
Board. Furthermore, it gives a unity to the cause and makes it 
possible to unify the appeal in behalf of the cause of Home Missions. 
The Board stands ready to enter into a similar arrangement with not 
only self-supporting Synods but self-supporting Presbyteries, some 
of which are now seriously considering the proposition. 

The fourth Annual Conference of the Board of Home Missions 
and the self-supporting Home Mission Agencies was held at Wallace 
Lodge, Yonkers, New York, September 22nd and 29th inclusive. 

The roll of the Conference included representatives of eighteen 
Synods and eleven City Presbyteries, all except four Synods and 
two City Presbyteries being directly represented. The Conference 
met in two sections. The first section was composed of the em- 
ployed executives and was in session through the twenty-sixth, with 
Dr. Charles L. Zorbaugh, of Cleveland, Chairman, and Rev. H. N. 
Morse, of the Home Board, as Secretary. On the twenty-seventh 
and twenty-eighth, the Conference included also the Chairmen of 

83 



84 HOME MISSIONS 

the Synodical Home Mission Committees and on the twenty-ninth, 
the meeting was a joint meeting with the Board of Home Missions 
which had its regular monthly meeting on that day. For the second 
part of the Conference the officers were Dr. Henry S. Brown, of 
Chicago, Chairman, and Dr. J. M. Potter, Wheeling, West Virginia, 
Vice-Chairman, and Rev. H. N. Morse, Secretary. 

The Conference this year assumed a new character and a new 
importance. In previous years this Conference has concerned itself 
witli the various problems and policies of Home Mission work and 
the relationships involved in its conduct. This year's Conference was 
planned as a genuine budgeting conference. Each Agency brought 
to the Conference the budget which it proposed to submit for inclu- 
sion in the New Era Budget of 1922-23. All of these budgets were 
carefully considered by the whole Conference and by a special com- 
mittee appointed for that purpose. To certain of the Agencies the 
Conference made recommendations looking to the reduction of their 
estimates. In the course of its deliberations, therefore, the Con- 
ference prepared what has never been in existence since self-support- 
ing Agencies began to be, that is, one joint Home Mission budget 
carefully analyzed as to its details and representing in its final figure 
the combined judgment of all of the Home Mission forces as to the 
amount of money which should be available for Home Missions next 
year. 

Although the budget consideration occupied the major part of the 
Conference's time, it was not the only matter of importance to receive 
attention. One of the most interesting sessions was devoted to the 
topic "The Solidity of the Home Alission Task." The speakers, 
Rev. Rol^ert E. Pugh, Synodical Superintendent of Ohio ; Rev. 
Charles L. Zorbaugh, Executive Secretary of Cleveland; Mrs. Fred 
S. Bennett, President of the Woman's Board of Home Missions 
and Dr. John A. Marquis, General Secretary of the Board of Home 
Missions, all testified that Home Missions can no longer be regarded 
as a collection of fragments, but must be conceived in one common 
statesmanlike plan. The Conference decided that the current situa- 
tion in the Church made it highly desirable that the whole status of 
our Home Mission enterprise be carefully reviewed and a well- 
studied program of advance prepared. It, therefore, voted for the 
creation of a joint committee representing the Synods, the Board 
of Home Missions, the Board of Church Erection and the Woman's 
Board of Home Missions to plan and carry through a survey of 
the needs of our Home Mission fields, both for buildings and for 
maintenance, budgeted in a five-year program from April 1, 1923. 
This committee will consider whether it is feasible to extend the 
inquiry to include the building needs of the whole denomination. It 
is expected that a preliminary report will be presented to the Con- 
ference in the fall of 1922 and a final report to the General Assembly 
in May, 1923. The Conference also considered the vital question 
of recruiting for Home Missions and arrived at two important con- 
clusions. The first is to initiate a unified plan of recruiting in the 
colleges and seminaries for all the Home Mission Agencies of the 
Church, under the direction of a Standing Committee of the Con- 



SELF-SUPPORTING AGENCIES 85 

ference. The second is that as the time now seems rijje to initiate 
the orj^anization of some Fellowship for American Service among 
students, which may do for Home Missions all that the Student 
Volunteer has done for Foreign Missions, the employment of a stu- 
dent organizer for this academic year was recommended to set the 
matter on foot. 

One further matter of importance which was considered was the 
question of securing more adequate reports from the Home Mission 
fields in order that such fields may have the sympathetic care and 
oversight which the importance of their work warrants. The Con- 
ference, therefore, voted to recommend 

First, the adoption of a system of monthly voucher reports with 
an annual brief summary report to supplement at certain i)oints the 
data called for on the monthly statement ; 

Second, the adoption of a form of application for aid which pro- 
poses to the Church a standard of Home Mission promotion and 
pledges the church asking aid to seriously undertake the task of 
bringing its work up to that standard. 

In these important recommendations the Board of Home Missions, 
at its regular meeting in September concurred. These actions are in 
line with the action of the last General Assembly, which both author- 
ized and directed the Board of Home Missions to secure such reports 
from all fields aided through its treasury. This new system will be 
put into effect April first. 

The personnel of the Standing Committees appointed by the Con- 
ference is as follows : 

Committee on Conference: Dr. H. S. Brown, Dr. R. E. Pugh, Rev. 

U. L. Mackey. 
Executive Committee: Rev. R. W. Anthony, Dr. George H. Mack, 

Dr. J. W. McDonald, Dr. John McDowell, Rev. H. N. Morse. 
Recruiting Committee : Dr. C. L. Zorbaugh, Dr. John Comin, Dr. 

F. W. Backmeyer. 
Survey Committee: Dr. H. S. Brown, Dr. R. E. Pugh, Rev. U. L. 

Mackey, Dr. Guy W. Wadsworth. 



VIII. The Board 

During the past year there have been two changes. One was 
caused by the death of the Rev. D. Stuart Dodge, D.D., on December 
17, 1921. Reference is made to Dr. Dodge's Hfe and service in a 
former part of this report. His place was taken by the Rev. John 
Davies, D.D., of Utica, N. Y., a member of the Welsh Board. This 
was decided upon by the last General Assembly, which made Dr. 
Davies member-elect to fill the first vacancy occurring. 

At the March meeting of the Board, the Rev. Lyman Whitney 
Allen, D.D.. tendered his resignation, which was regretfully accepted. 
The Rev. John J. Moment of Plainfield, N. J., was elected to fill the 
vacancy. 

The terms of the following ministers and laymen expire with this 
meeting of the General Assembly : 

Ministers Laymen 

Rev. Joseph Dunn Burrell, D.D. Walter M. Aikman. 

Rev. Albert Edwin Keigwin, D.D. George B. Agnew 

Rev. Edgar Whitaker Work, D.D. Fleming H. Revell 

Rev. William Adams Brown, D.D. J. A. Gould 

Rev. Wendell Prime Keeler Jf>hn T. Manson 
Rev. Carl H. Elmore 



86 



IX. The Budget 



When the New Era Movement was initiated the Board, planning 
its work in accordance with the spirit of that Movement, announced 
its New Era 01)jectives which were presented to the General Assem- 
hly in the report of the Standing Committee on Home Missions and 
approved. Chiefly, these ohjectives stressed the following points: 

(1) Putting the work of Home Missions on a hasis of self-respect. 
Primarily this meant paying missionaries an adequate living salary. 

(2) Putting Home Missions on a basis of efficiency. Primarily 
this meant providing adequate cquij^ment and buildings and recruit- 
ing a larger and better trained stafif of workers. 

(3) Accepting our full national responsibility with particular 
reference to the exceptional elements of our population and areas 
of exceptional difficulty. 

(4) Accepting our full interdenominational responsibility with 
particular reference to fields where definitely negotiated interde- 
nominational agreements have assigned certain areas to our denomi- 
nation. 

The Board has moved steadily forward, so far as its resources will 
permit, along these lines. Salaries have been substantially raised, 
though not yet to the point of complete adequacy. Some needed 
equipment has been secured, although that is still the outstanding 
lack of most of our fields. There has been a gain, until the present 
year, in the numbers of workers and an increased tendency to secure 
specially trained workers for particular tasks. In certain fields we 
have moved forward along lines of interdenominational agreement, 
although resources have not permitted any considerable enlargement 
of work, in consequence of which fact many interdenominational 
allocations have not as yet been taken up. 

In carrying out these objectives, insofar as they have been at- 
tained, a very considerable increase has been made in the expendi- 
tures of the Board. The necessity for this increase has rested on 
three considerations. The first is that the very existence of a for- 
ward movement in the Church created a presumption of advance and, 
hence, immediately increased the imperative demands upon the 
Board from Synods and Presbyteries everywhere for increased ap- 
propriations. The second consideration is that the work of no other 
Board is in quite such an intimate way related to the inner workings 
of the Church at home. In the so-called aid-receiving Synods, it is 
l^eculiarly true that the Home Mission forces carry a large part of 
the burden of any forward step. In practically every Synod, it is 
doubtless true that Home Missions has a very definite relation to the 
morale of the whole Church. The plain truth is that if the Home 
Board had not made important advances in its own work during the 
last three years, the Church as a whole would not have moved for- 
ward with such unanimity and enthusiasm as have characterized it. 
The third consideration is. of course, the need of the work itself, to a 
discussion of which practically all the pages of this Report are devoted. 

87 




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88 



BORROWED MONEY AS A FACTOR 
HOME MISSION EXPENDITURES 

A pril May June July Aug Sept. Oct. Nov Dec Jan. Feb. Ma r 



40% 



30% 



20% 



10% 



Expenditures proceed at an even rate- 
from 7.2% to 9.4% of the years total 
each month. But 45% of the years 
total receipts from living sources and 
35% of the receipts from all sources 
_| for current work were received during 
March. This necessitates heavy borrow- 
ing during first months of fiscal year. 




40% 



30% 



20% 



W% 



The solid black area shows percentage of year's total 
expenditures of Board of Honne Missions made each month. 

The super-imposed line shows percentage of years 
total receipts trom'living givers' received each month. 

(1921 -22) 



89 



90 HOMK MISSIONS 

If the Home Board has been under a special necessity to advance, 
it has also had special difficulties, financially, in doing so. Its rela- 
tions to the Self-supporting Synods and Presbyteries have involved 
many financial perplexities to the solution of vi^hich the Agencies 
concerned are now addressing themselves. The financial liabilities 
of the Board have also a clear relation to other Boards and Agencies 
of the Church. Certain of these have received, through the New 
Era Budget amounts in excess of the amounts which their percentages 
in the budget called for. The Board of Home Missions, however, 
has had an unfortunate experience in the working of the budget plan 
and, during each year of the New Era Movement, has received an 
amount of money through the budget substantially less than the 
amount to which its percentage entitled it. During the last three years 
the actual receipts of the Board from living sources were less than 
its "theoretical receipts" (that is. the amounts it should have received 
on the basis of its officially assigned percentage of those amounts 
actually received by all the Boards and Agencies) in the sum of 
.$755,055.61, which exceeds the amount of its present total debt by 
$262,264.49. In other words, if the Board had received the amount 
to which its percentage entitled it, instead of a debt, it would have a 
surplus of more than a quarter of a million dollars. 

In spite of this fact the receipts of the last year were the largest 
in the history of Home Missions and the expenditures were also 
the largest in the history of the Board. This latter fact is contrary 
both to the desire and intent of the Board which, at the outset of the 
year, decreased its appropriations for its own work by approximately 
eight per cent. Three things have conspired to increase expenditures. 
The first is the fact that the General Assembly put on the Boards 
the support of the New Era Movement, which had not been anticipated 
when the budgets were planned. The second is that the Self-support- 
ing Synods and Presbyteries which clear their work through the 
Board's treasury very considerably increased their appropriations. 
The third reason is that with a decreased appropriation, the Synods 
and Presbyteries have come closer to using the entire amount appro- 
priated. The two charts on pages 88 and 92 illustrate the increase in 
the Board's receipts and expenditures during recent years. The 
chart on page 92 shows all receipts from living sources whether 
applicable to the budget of the year or not. The figure here shown 
for 1922 includes contributions received from individual givers spe- 
cifically designated for the debt, and includes an amount of $30,940.78 
received through the New Era Movement for the equalization of 
receipts under the budget which amount is properly applicable to 
last year, but was received too late to be made a part of the official 
accounting. The chart on page 88 takes account only of those 
receipts which were actually applied to the current budget of the 
year, this amount being about $85,000 less than the amount shown 
on the other chart. 

The accumulated debt of the Board is now nearly half a million 
dollars. This great debt seriously limits its borrowing capacity which, 
in turn, automatically limits the size of the budget which it is able 
to carry through the lean months of the year. Therefore, the Board 



THE BUDGP:T 91 

has been under the necessity of seriously decreasing its appropria- 
tions for the fiscal year 1922-23. The budget appropriated for this 
year represents a cut of 10.5% below the expenditures for the pre- 
vious year on the Board's own work and of a little more than 8% 
below the total expenditures including the Self-supporting Synods 
using the Board's treasury. The decrease for the Self-supporting 
Synods is comparatively slight, but the various departments of the 
Board's own work have sufifered cuts below expenditures which range 
in general from 8% to 25%. The cut below last year's appropriation 
on the whole budget is 13.6%. 



5 — Home Miss. 



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92 



X. Statistical Summary 

A — From Reports of Secretaries and Directors for Year Ending 
March 31, 1922. 

1. Number and Kind of Mission Enterprises 

Organized Churches 1,768 

Unorganized Stations (Including Lumber Camps) . . 767 

Neighborhood or Community Houses 40 

Training Schools for Workers 5 

Other Schools 19 

Hospitals and Medical Service Stations 8 



Total 2,607 

Number Reported, 1920-21 2,803 

Decrease for the Year 196 or 7% 



2. Number and Kind of Missionary Personnel 

Ordained Ministers of Churches 1,189 

Unordained Mission Helpers : 

Men 102 

Women 167 

Teachers : 

Men 21 

Women 35 

Doctors 8 

Nurses 11 

Field Men 78 



Total 1,611 

Number Reported, 1920-21 1,692 

Decrease for the Year 81 or 4.8% 

Total Number of Women included in above Total 

of 1,611 214 or 13.3% 

3. Distribution of Mission Enterprises and Personnel by Divisions of 

Board's Work 



Town and Country 

City and Industrial 

Extra Territorial 

Self-supporting Synods and Pres- 
byteries 

Total 1,768 839 1,189 78 344 

Number of Churches Using Some Language Other Than ,„^^ 

English 340 or 19.2% 

Number of Dififerent Languages and Dialects Used 42 

93 



ENTERPRISES 
Org'd Churches Others 


Ord'd 
Pastors 


PERSONNEL 

Field 
Men 


others 


1,005 

68 
81 


553 

30 

196 


611 
59 
70 


42 
8 
2 


136 
64 
62 


614 


60 


449 


26 


82 



94 HOME MISSIONS 

4. Geographical Division of Mission Enterprises and Personnel 

Enter- Person- Enter- Person- 

prises nel prises nel 

Alabama 45 21 New England 7 9 

Alaska Zl 15 New Jersey 1 3 

Arizona 79 60 New Mexico 53 38 

Arkansas 68 45 New York 170 180 

California and Ne- North Dakota 38 20 

vada 146 122 Ohio 1 6 

Colorado 72 51 Oklahoma 98 57 

Cuba 45 38 Oregon 130 45 

Florida 24 17 Pennsylvania 1 2 

Idaho 19 13 Porto Rico 191 76 

Illinois 1 3 Santo Domingo .... 4 7 

Indiana 4 4 South Dakota 126 86 

Iowa 6 5 Tennessee 134 110 

Kentucky 56 35 Texas 165 90 

Maryland 2 5 Utah 23 15 

Michigan 55 46 Washington 392 85 

Minnesota 76 83 Wisconsin 22 14 

Mississippi 29 11 Wyoming 39 25 

Missouri 121 Th Welsh Synods 25 22 

Montana 59 Zf) 

Nebraska 43 40 Total 2,607 1,611 

B — From Annual Reports Received from Missionaries for the 
Year Ending December 31, 1921. 

Reports were received covering the work on 1,52.3 fields, exclusive 
of Lumber Camps (see page 36 for statistics of Lumber Camp 
Work). 1,231 organized churches are included. The following 
data are from these reports and refer only to the specified number of 
fields. It is believed, however, that they are fairly representative of 
the whole number of Home Mission enterprises. 

CHURCH GROWTH AND DECLINE 

Evangelism is the primary emphasis. The best index of church 
vitality is the ability to win men by confession of faith. The fol- 
lowing table shows the year's record by departments of work : 

1. Gain in Membership Expressed as Percentage of Previous Membership 

Gain by Confession Gross Gain Net Gain 

i i i 

American Work 12.2 20.6 12.3 

Country Church Work 10.9 16.4 11.5 

Spanish-speaking Work in the Southwest 19.3 24.4 6.4 

Indian Work 8.0 12.9 7.9 

City and Immigrant Work 12.7 19.5 12.5 

Cuba 11.2 14.1 7.2 

Porto Rico 25.2 30.1 15.7 

Alaska 12.3 15.4 8.8 

Self-supporting Synods 10.9 15.8 9.3 

Combined Average 12.0 18.0 10.4 

The considerable diiference between gross gain and net gain in 
certain departments, notably Spani.sh-speaking Work in the South- 
west, reflects the industrial unrest and consequent instability of popu- 
lation during the last year. 



VARIATIONS IN THE MEMBERSHIP 

OF 

HOME MISSION CHURCHES 



Percentage of Churches having a Membership of 
25 or less 26-50 51-100 101-150 151 or over 



30% 



25% 



20', 



15% 



10% 



5% 







32.2% 














i29.9% 








23.3% 




\ 












\ 












\ 












^ 


a2% 


6.4% 















30% 



25% 



20% 



15% 



10% 



5% 



85.4% have Memberships of 100 or less. 
The Average Membership is 63. 

(1921-1922) 



95 



96 HOME MISSIONS 

2. A Two-Year Comparison 

1920 1921 

Gross Gain 17.5% 18.0% 

Net Gain 9.9% 10.4% 

Gain by Confession 11-5% 12.0% 

Churches making Net Gain for Year 59.6% 63.9% 

Churches Breaking Even for Year 19.3% 18.7% 

Churches having Net Loss for Year 21.1% 17.4% 

3. Number of Members, Accessions, Losses 

Number of Churches Reporting 1,231 

Total Membership 78,045 

Number of Constituents, not Members 59,380 

Gain by Confession 8,437 

Gain by Letter 4,250 

Total Gain 12,687 

Loss — from all Causes 5,337 

Net Gain ' 7,350 

For variations in the present size of memberships of churches, see 
chart on page 95. 

THE SETTLEMENT OF PASTORS 
The displacement of the "Stated Supply" by the "Installed Pastor" 
marks an increasing stability on Home Mission fields. 
4. Installation of Pastors 

Number of Churches Reporting 1,161 

Number having "Installed Pastor" 297 or 25.6% 

Number having "Stated Supply" 864 or 74.4% 

About one-fifth of the whole number of churches were vacant at 
some time during the year for an, average of twenty weeks. 

One retarding factor is the necessity of giving one minister charge 
of several fields. The graph on page 100 shows this from the point 
of view of the minister. The reverse of it, from the point of view of 
the church, is that 65 per cent of aided churches have each only a 
part of a minister's time. This inevitably makes permanent settle- 
ment of pastors difficult. 

CHURCH BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

This is the weakest point in Home Missions and the greatest need. 
Over three-fourths of the church edifices are frame structures. 
Nearly three- fourths have one or two rooms only. About the same 
proportion have a value of less than $5,000. 

5. Property on 1,006 Fields Owning Buildings 

a. Number of churoh buildings 1,006 

Value $6,640,843 

Average value $6,600 

b. Number of these erected last year 46 

Value of these $677,850 

Average value of these $ 14,736 

c. Number of Manses 541 

Value $1,317,280 

Average value $2,624 

d. Number of fields having other building for church 

purposes 80 

Number of such buildings 92 



STATISTICAL SUMMARY 97 

6. Social Equipment 

Number of church Iniildings equipped witli stereopticon. . 194 

Number with moviuR' picture projector 56 

Number with a kitchen 71 

Number with other social equipment 101 

For other data on buildings see chart on page 98. 

LENGTH OF SERVICE OF WORKERS 
A transient working force means an unstable work. Every effort 
is being made to increase the terms of service of capable missionaries. 
Better salaries are already having a marked effect at this point. In 
table seven note that during the last year, as compared with the pre- 
ceding year, a substantially smaller number of workers were serving 
their first year on their present fields. 

7. Term of Service of Missionaries on PRESENT Fields 

Number who have been 
on present fields 

Less than one year 

Two to six years 

Seven to eleven years 

Twelve to twenty-one years . . 
Over twenty-one years 



OnD.\INICD - 
1921 report 


- MI.S.SIOXAUIBS — UNOUDAINED 
1920 1921 report 1920 

'i 'fc 4. 


31.8 


35.2 


39.4 56.7 


53.1 


50.0 


48.6 36.1 


10.0 


9.9 


3.5 5.0 


3.5 


3.5 


5.7 2.2 


1.6 


1.4 


2.8 



SERVICES AND ORGANIZATIONS WITHIN CHURCHES 
In frontier communities mission work usually began with a preach- 
ing service and a Sunday school. There is an increasing differentia- 
tion in the program of work and a steady substitution of intensive 
for extensive methods. 

8. Public Services — 1,163 Churches Reporting 

Having regular service each Sunday 63.7% 

Having regular service 3 Sundays a month 3.1% 

Having regular service 2 Sundays a month 16.6% 

Having regular service less frequently 16.6% 

9. Organizations — 1,163 Churches Reporting 

a. Maintaining a Sunday School 93.4% 

Total number of Sunday Schools maintained by these 

churches 1,219 

Total enrollment of these schools 100,790 

Average enrollment per school 82 

b. Conducting Daily Vacation Bible Schools 10.57o 

Total number of Daily Vacation Bible Schools con- 
ducted by these churches 147 

Total enrollment of these schools 13,213 

Average enrollment per school 90 

c. Organizations for Age and Sex Groups. 

<^ of churches having Number of such 

Organlz.ntions for such organizations organizations 

Men 5.8 79 

Women 48.8 738 

Adults, both sexes 4.4 74 

Boys 9.9 153 

Girls 10.5 174 

Minors, both sexes 10.2 141 



Total number of such organizations 1,359 

Total membership of these organizations 30,498 

Percentage of churclies with mid-week prayer-meeting.... 45.9% 



CHURCH BUILDINGS 

THE WEAKEST POINT IN HOME MISSIONS 



{"General Lack of Educational and Social Facilities 



49.4% 
have one room 




V////A 



18.3%? 



4 or more= 



roomj 



2-Three-fourths are Worth Under $5,000 




3-The Older Buildings are Usually Inadequate 



[M^ 



Lri 



1-5yrs 




:3a7%-i 



EQver 20 years old; 



4- No Manse Necessitates a Larger Grant in Aid 



54.6% 
Have a Manse 




;45.47o^^^ 
Have ^no Manse 




98 



UJ 




o 




tr 


0) 


o 


z: 


Ll. 


o 


o 


0) 


z: 


CO 


^ 


oS 


01 




o 


UJ 


^ 


^ 




o 


LJ 


X 


-i. 




H- 





C 

o 



(U 
C 

CO 



c 
Z) 

<u 



OJ 



CD 
00 



CO 
CO 



CO 

t_ 
O 

C/) 

dl 

;_ 
03 

-0\- 

CO 

1^ 



to 
in 

CO 

L. 

o 

-^ o_ 

4-> C 



£_ 
0) 

t_ 
o 



o 
O 

CO 



CD 



CO 

o 



CD 
CO 



f^ a> i^ 

^ ^- ^ 



M 



O 
GO 



a? 

o 



o 

CO 



o 



o 
CO 



o 

OJ 



o 



99 



SIZE AND GROWTH 

OF CHURCHES WITH A MEMBERSHIP OF- 
25 or less 26-50 51-100 101-150 Over 150 

DC©©® 



43.3% 60.9% 75.3% 78.7% 

-MADE A NET GAIN LAST YEAR 



81.8% 



The large Church, generally, is the most effective working unit. 



MAKING THE SUPPLY OF MINISTERS GO AROUND 

873 MINISTERS SERVE 1504 CHURCHES 



Distribution of Ministers with respect to number of fields servea by each 
10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 



///./// 



ZZZZZZ2ZZZZ 



V///// 



ZZZZTe 



, . 9.7% 

VUA 5.^% 



SERVIN 



6 DIME FIE 



LD ONLY 



zzzzzz 



unn 



176% 



^ [SERVING TWO 



FIELDS 



12.2% 



7% 



SERVING THREE 



SERVING FOUR OR MORE FIELDS 



////// 



'unn 



FIELDS 



605% 



n/n/ 



I 70.1°/ 



10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 

1 1921-22 snnnnnum 1920-21 



100 



STATISTICAL SUMMARY 101 

FINANCES 

Self-support is a definite ideal on all Home Mission fields. To at- 
tain it as soon as possible without essential impairment of work is 
the policy which is being pressed. Modern financial methods are be- 
ing introduced and the principles of stewardship are stressed. The 
record indicated in the tables below, considering the fact that they 
cover all types of fields, is encouraging. 

10. The Every Member Canvass 

77.5 per cent of the churches reporting made an Every Member 
Canvass during the year. Hereafter, by action of the Board, such a 
canvass is to be required as a pre-requisite of a grant from the Board. 

a. For 749 churches reporting as to results of canvass : 

Number of individuals represented in subscriptions... 41,256 

Amount secured for local expenses $627,806 

Amount secured for benevolence 97,310 

Total amount secured $725,116 

Additional amounts raised for new buildings (approx.) 427,000 

Grand Total $1,152,116 

b. Per Capita Amount Raised : 

For local expenses (except new buildings) $15.22 

For benevolences 2.36 

For new buildings 10.35 

Total per capita $27.93 

c. Total raised on fields, as per above $1,152,116 

Amount expended by Board on these same fields $512,018 

It, therefore, follows that for each dollar expended by the Board 
on these fields $2.25 was raised on the field. In other words, each 
dollar of the Board's money did $3.25 worth of work. 

11. Salaries of Ministers 

For all ordained ministers (exclusive of native Indian ministers) 
approximately 47 per cent of the salary is paid by the Board, the 
balance by the field. For these ministers the average salary, in cash, 
is $1,459 per year, which is somewhat above the average for a year 
ago. Twenty-eight per cent of the ministers, however, serving on 
fields where no manses are provided, paid their house-rent personally. 
In order to make a fair computation of the salaries received over and 
above house-rent, the average rental value of a free manse may be 
estimated arbitrarily at $250, and that amount added to the cash 
salary of each minister who has the free use of a house. This would 
make the average salary paid $1,640 or the equivalent, for all men, 
of $1,390 and a manse. 

12. Debts on Church Property 

a. Number of churches reporting a debt, 306 or 24.8% of total number. 

Total amount of these debts $521,376 

Average debt for these churches $1,704 



102 



HOME MISSIONS 



b. Number of these in debt to Board of Church Erection 
Total amount of these debts (included in above) 



267 
$373,697 



Many of these debts are of long standing. 

Number of instances % of total 



Incurred during last year 54 

Incurred 1916-1920 106 

Incurred 1911-1915 45 

Incurred prior to 191 1 72 

Date not reported in twenty-nine instances excluded 
percentages. 



from 



19.5 
38.3 
16.2 
26.0 

above 



POPULATION SERVED 

Home Missions is sLill pre/lominantly a rural undertaking, though 
city and industrial interests are increasing. 

13. Proportion of Churches Primarily Serving 

Farmers 55.4% 

Industrial Communities 44.6% 

14. Proportion of Churches Primarily Serving 

English-speaking communities 68.8% 

Other language communities 31.2% 

C — Combined Statement for Board and Self-supporting Agencies. 
1. Number and Kind of Mission Enterprises 



Aidefl or Main- 

The Board taiiicd ly f^elf- Self-suppovtiiic 

(exclusive of supporting Aiten- Agencies 

Self-supporting cies, oleariuK outside tlie 

Agencies) tinougli Board Board 



Organized Churches 

Unorganized Stations 

Neighborhood or Community 

Houses 

Train'ing Schools for Workers 

Other Schools 

Hospital and Medical Service 

Stations 



1,154 
713 

35 

4 

19 



614 

54 

5 
1 



1,441 
181 

28 
2 



Combined Totals 1,933 

Number reported, combined total, 1920-21, 
Decrease for Year 



674 



3,209 
948 

68 
7 
8 27 

3 11 

1,663 4,270 

4,492 
222 or 4.9% 



2. Number and Kind of Missionary Personnel 



Supported hy 
Tlie Board Self-supporting 
(exclusive of Agencies clear- 
Self-supporting ing through 



Ordained ministers of churches 
Unordained mission helpers : 

Men 

Women 

Teachers — Men 

Women 

Doctors 

Nurses 

Field Men 



Ajgencies) 

740 

74 
114 
21 
35 
7 
11 
52 



Board 

449 

28 

53 



26 
557 



Self-supporting 

Agencies 

outside the 

Board 

1.123 



66 

156 

2 

32 

4 
6 

58 



Combined Totals 1,054 

Number reported, combined total, 1920-21 

Increase for Year (all in Self-supporting Agencies out- 
side the Board ) 

Total number w^omen included in above total of 3,058. 



1,447 
2,908 



2,312 

168 
323 
23 
67 
12 
17 
136 

3,058 



150 or 5.2% 
621 or 20.3% 



XL A Standard for Home Mis- 
sion Promotion 

In order to set before each aided church certain definite objec- 
tives for its service to its community, the Board has this year made 
a Standard for Promotion the basis of the appHcations for grants 
from churches. While this Standard varies somewhat according to 
type of work, the principle underlying it is the same in all cases. 
It is not an attempt to create an inflexible arbitrary standard of 
church work and equipment. It is an attempt to state the various 
elements which ought to enter into any adequate program. It is not 
projected as an ideal. It presents the minimum of program and 
equipment below which a church should not be willing to fall and 
from which we may expect effective results. The form used in town 
and country churches is given herewith. 

An afifimiative answer to each item is not required as a condition 
to the grant except items 19-22, inclusive, an affirmative answer to 
which is required. It is expected, however, that each church will 
pledge itself to the effort to correct as promptly as possible whatever 
deficiency the analysis of its field and work discloses. 

A STANDARD OF HOME MISSION PROMOTION 

I. Pastor 

1. Church has a resident pastor living within the bounds of this com- 
munity. 

2. Pastor devotes his full time to the work of this community. (If this 
church receives only a portion of the minister's time, state what portion it re- 
ceives.) 

II. Parish 

3. Church works systematically to extend its parish to the limits of the 
community. 

4. Church works systematically to serve all occupational classes in the 
community and all racial elements which do not have their own Protestant 
Churches. 

III. Physical Equipment 

5. A church building with an auditorium having a seating capacity ade- 
quate to the maximum attendance at regular service, and equipped with organ 
or piano. 

6. Space for social and recreational purposes fitted with movable chairs 
and a platform and large enough for the largest crowds in the habit of assem- 
bling there. 

7. Separate rooms or curtained spaces for Sunday School classes or de- 
partments. 

8. A stereopticon or motion picture projection facilities. 

9. A well-equipped kitchen. 

10. Comfortable, attractive manse with modern improvements. 

11. Adequate sanitary toilets on the church property. 

12. Horsesheds or adequate parking space for automobiles. 

13. All property kept in good repair and in sigihtly condition. 

103 



104 HOME MISSIONS 

IV. Religious Education 

14. Sunday School maintained throughout the year. 

15. Sunday School enrollment at least equal to church membership, with 
an average attendance of at least two-thirds of its membership. 

16. Definite and regular attempt made to bring pupils into church mem- 
. bership and specific instruction in preparation therefor. 

17. Provision for teacher training or normal class. 

18. Definite provision for training of leaders for church and community 
work. 

V. Finance 

19. The church budget, including both local expenses and benevolences, 
adopted annually by the congregation. 

20. Every Member Canvass for weekly offerings made annually on the 
basis of the local and benevolent budget adopted; all church members and 
adherents canvassed ; envelope system used. 

21. Tihe budget for benevolence at least 25 per cent as large as the 
regular current expense budget. 

22. The pastor receiving a total salary of at least $1,500 a year and free 
use of house. 

VI. Program 

23. A definite program setting goals for the year's work adopted annu- 
ally by the officers and congregation and held steadily before the attention of 
the church. 

24. A definite assumption of responsibility with respect to some part of 
this program (as in 23) by at least 25 per cent of the active members. 

25. Public worsihip every Sunday. 

26. Systematic evangelism aimed to reach the entire community and 
every class in the community, and having as its aim a minimum member- 
ship increase of ten per cent. 

27. Co-operation with the Presbytery's Program and with the New Era 
Program as adopted by General Assembly. 

28. Community service a definite part of the church's work, including a 
continuous and cumulative study of the social, moral and economic forces of 
the community and a definite program of community co-operation led or par- 
ticipated in by the Church. 

29. Co-operation with the other churches of the community in a definite 
program for community betterment. 

30. Definite organized activities for the various age and sex groups in the 
congregation and community (as Young People's Society, Men's Brotherhood, 
Boy Scouts or similar efforts.) 

31. A systematic and cumulative survey of the parish with a view to de- 
termining the church relationships and religious needs of every family, and 
such a mapping of the parish as will show the relationship of each family to 
local religious institutions. 



Forms for Bequests 

TO THE BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS 



For the convenience of those intending to make gifts of money 
or property to the Board, by will, the following forms are given : 

THE FULL CORPORATE TITLE IS: 

"Board of Home Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States of America, incorporated April 19, 1872, by Act of the Legislature of 
the State of New York." 

FORM OF BEQUEST 

"I cnve. devise and bequeath unto the Board of Home Missions of the Pres-- 
byterian ChiircJi in the United States of America, incorporated April 19, 1872, 

by Act of the Legislature of the State of New York," the sum of 

Dollars to be expended for the appropriate objects of said corporation. 

FORM OF RESIDUARY CLAUSE 

"All the rest, residue and remainder of my real and personal estate I devise 
and bequeath unto the Board of Home Missions of the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States of America, incorporated April 19, 1872, by Act of the 
Legtstature of the State of Nezv York." 

FORM OF DEVISE 

(Real Estate) 
"/ give and devise unto the Board of Home Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America, incorporated April 19, 1872, by Act 
of the Legislature of the State of Nezv York, all that certain (here insert de- 
scription if convenient) ztrith the appurtenances in fee simple, for the use, 
benefit and behoof of said Board forever." 

NOTE. — H it be desired to bequeath a sum, 

"to be added to the General Permanent Fund of the Board, the income 
only to be used for the general zvork of the Board," 

or if it be desired to designate a sum 

"to be separately invested and to be knozvn as the 

Fund, the income only to be used for the general zvork of the Board," 

it may be so stated. 



XII. Treasurer's Report 

BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS OF THE PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES 

OF AMERICA 

Schedule No. 1 
BALANCE SHEET 

March 31, 1922 

ASSETS 
Current Assets: 

Cash on hand, in bank and in transit $303,616 83 

Sundry securities donated for current work 1,058 97 

Securities held for special work 3,287 95 

Advances to Boards, fields, etc 27,349 88 

Interest, rents, etc., receivable 5,153 00 

$340,466 63 

Invested Assets and Cash Awaiting Investment: 

Stocks and Bonds (at book value) of which $434,000 

are pledged to secure notes payable, per contra. $2, 768,315 10 

Real Estate Mortgages 270,000 00 

Ground rents 24,400 00 

Real estate and buildings before deduction of de- 
preciation reserve 950,753 63 

Securities and real estate unacknowledged as do- 
nations until converted into cash (contra) 48,864 15 

Securities held for other organizations (contra).. . . 20,502 00 

Cash 2,239 90 

Total book value of assets representing funds, 

per contra _....; _. . _. $4,085,074 78 

Deduct — Reserve for depreciation of buildings 140,361 35 

3,944,713 43 

Securities Held Awaiting Allocation to Funds: 
General Assembly certificates of indebtedness at 

par value 21,500 00 

Deferred Charges, Etc. 

Insurance prepaid $2,855 18 

Interchurch World Movement interest 1,243 68 

Loss on operation of building at 5 West 20th St. . . . 6,906 10 

11,004 96 

$4,317,685 02 

Deficiency Account: 

Balance at March 31, 1921 $331,992 74 

Deduct — Transfer from Helen Newton 

Jarvie Memorial Fund $8,000 00 

Contributions specifically designated to 
apply on deficit 55,875 04 63,875 04 

$268,117 70 
Add — Deficiency for year as per statement attach- 
ed (Exhibit II) 224,673 42 492,791 12 

$4,810,476 14 

106 



TREASURER'S RICI'ORT 107 

ScHiiDULK No. 1 (Conliniicd) 

Li7\iiiLrrn':s 

Current Liabilities: 

Accounts payable $5,345 84 

Accrued taxes and interest 5,014 02 

Special funds, deposits, etc 77,927 50 

Demand notes payable: 

Fully secured, per contra., $175,000 00 

Partly secured, " " 280,000 00 

Unsecured 141,500 00 596,500 00 $684,787 36 

Income From John S. Kennedy Fund: 

(Unallocated) 40,614 00 

Funds: 

Trust endowment funds $1,315,244 36 

Annuity funds 366,453 32 

John S. Kennedy funds. . 1,514,982 32 

Permanent funds not held in trust 819,028 63 

Unacknowledged receipts (contra) 48,864 15 

Funds held for other organizations (contra) 20,502 00 

4,085,074 78 

$4,810,476 14 



PRICE, ^VATERHO^JSE & CO. 

56 Pink Street 

NEW YORK 

CERTIFICATE OF AUDIT 

May 24, 1922 

We have examined the books and accounts of the Board of 
Home Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States 
of America for the year ending March 31, 1922. 

The stocks and bonds of a book value of $2,693,915.10 had a 
market value at that date of $1,966,828.31 but we were unable to 
secure market quotations for securities of the book value of 
$74,400.00, of which $68,000.00 represented certificates of indebted- 
ness of the General Assembly of Presbyterian Church in the United 
States of America maturing April 1, 1926. The Board also owns an 
additional $21,500 of the General Assembly certificates carried on 
the books as securities held awaiting investment. The certificates 
of indebtedness of the General Assembly are to be redeemed from 
monies received by the General Assembly in payment of levies against 
the several Boards. The amount to be paid by the Board of Home 
Missions under this assessment is $89,500.0(). which is equivalent 
to the face value of the certificates held. 

Subject to the foregoing, we certify that, in our (»i)inion. the 
above balance sheet presents fairly the financial position of the P>nard 
as at March 31. 1922, and the relative statement of revenues and 
expenditures for the year ending at that date is correct. 

Price. W.\ter house & Co. 



108 HOME MISSIONS 

REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 

For the Year Ended March 31, 1922 
Schedule No. 2 

REVENUES : 

Church Organizations: 

Churches $927,982 95 

Sabbath Schools 59,189 43 

Women's Societies 4,065 43 

Young People's Societies 900 56 

$992,138 37 

Individuals 28,577 89 

Total revenues from living sources $1,020,716 26 

Interest, dividends, etc., from: 

General and Sundry Permanent Funds $59,308 11 

Through Trustees of the General Assembly. . . 3,789 13 

John S. Kennedy Permanent Fund 70,000 00 

133,097 24 

Legacies for current work 266,447 60 

Miscellaneous 7,783 18 

Total Revenue for current work $1,428,044 28 

Contributions received for last year's debt 55,875 04 



$1,483,919 32 

Gifts, legacies, etc., for endowment and other permanent funds. 76,911 21 

Total revenues received $1,560,830 53 

Less — Contributions received specifically designated 

for last year's debt $55,875 04 

Gifts, legacies, etc., transferred to per- 
manent and other funds 76 911 21 132,786 25 

Balance of revenues received during the year available for 
current work $1,428,044 28 

EXPENDITURES : 

General work of the Board $1,363,882 95 

Promotion 24,104 48 

Educational Work 45,294 99 

Publicity and Research 11,666 32 

Cooperating Agencies — Presbyterian 59,250 00 

Cooperating Agencies — Interdenominational.... 5,867 24 

General Administration 108,977 86 

Miscellaneous 33,673 86 

Total expenditures for current work $1,652,717 70 

Deficiency for the year $224,673 42 

VARIAN BANKS, 

Treasurer 



TREASURER'S REPORT 109 

DEFICIENCY ACCOUNT 

Schedule No. 2 A 

Deficit March 31, 1921 $331,992 74 

Less — Transfer second one-tenth share of Helen 

Newton Jarvie Memorial Fund to apply 

toward the debt $8,000 00 

Contributions received during the year specifically 

designated for the debt 55,875 04 63,875 04 

$268,117 70 
Net deficit for current year 224,673 42 

Total Indebtedness April 1, 1922 $492,791 12 



Under the plan adopted by the Assembly's Committee of the New Era 
Movement for the equitable distribution of funds received by the Central Re- 
ceiving Agency in order to secure an equalization in the receipts of the Boards 
and Agencies so far as possible, the Board of Home Missions received from the 
Treasurer of the New Era Movement, too late to be included in the report of 
income for the year 1921-22, the sum of $30,940.78. This amount, however, is 
available for meeting the obligations of the Board for that year and should, there- 
fore, be considered as a part of its income. 

The indebtedness of the Board, as of April 1st, 1922, is thus reduced to 
$461,850.34. 



110 HOME MISSION'S 

PERMANENT, TRUST AND ANNUITY FUNDS 

Received During the Year Ended March oJ, 10l'2 
Schedule No. 3 

Permanent Funds 

General Permanent Fund : 

Estate of Sarah Jane Richey — additional $197 50 

Estate of Sarah E. Jones 13,508 93 

Estate of Thomas Martin 495 10 

Estate of Wm. H. Barnum 930 00 

Estate of Mary Foster — "In Memory of John 

Foster" 3,845 91 

Sundry Individuals 1,302 00 

$20,279 44 

Iowa Permanent Fund — Various sources 5,660 00 

David O. Ghormley Memorial Fund — Various sources 254 00 

Bryant Fund 11,956 16 

Morris K. or Maria De Witt Jesup Fund— additional 3,000 00 

John C. Martin Permanent Fund — additional 11 61 

Annuity Funds 

Maria L. Ogden $500 00 

Mrs. Clara L. Sapp 10,000 00 

Mrs. G. C. Yeisley 1,000 00 

Royal H. Hahn 500 00 

Ellora Munger 1,000 00 

Mrs. E. A. Taylor 2,000 00 

Rev. John A. B. Patterson 500 00 

S.J. Kiser 2,000 00 

T. F. Leidigh 2,500 00 

E. Bertha Whitaker— additional 1,000 00 

21,000 00 

Trust Funds 

Margaret Olivia Sage Fund — additional for Woman's Board 1,250 00 

Hester Winne Fund for Woman's Board 12,000 00 

David B. and Mary H. Gamble Endowment Excess Fund — add'l 500 00 

Robert M. Davidson Legacy Trust Fund 1,000 00 



Less 

Sage Fund transferred to Woman's Board $25,013 19 

Winne Fund transferred to Woman's Board 12,000 00 

Second annual reduction in Helen Newton Jarvie Me- 
morial Fund — Noted in Schedule No. 5 — as per 

terms of gift, viz: To apply on the debt 8,000 00 

Paid to Church Extension Committee Newark Presby- 
tery 2,000 00 

Reduction, in value only, Jane B. Moore-Bristor Fund 5,000 00 



^76,911 21 



52,013 19 
K24,898 02 



TRKASURKK'S Rl'I'OirP 

DETAILED EXPENDITURES 

For the Year Ended March HI, 1922 
Schedule No. 4 



111 



SELF-SUPPORTING SYNODS AND PRESBYTERIES: 

Aids to 
Fields 

Presby. of Benicia $5,921 85 

Presby. of Riverside . . 



Field Men. 
Sal. & Exp. 



Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Presby 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 

AID RECE 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Presby. < 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Syno(l o 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 
Synod o 



1,352 00 

596 16 

13,188 33 



Illinois 
Kentucky 

Michigan 

Minnesota... 31,641 85 
Missouri.... 52,390 88 
Nebraska. . . 12,944 91 
New England 8,817 40 

of New York 

New York 

S. Dakota . . . 18,426 85 
Tennessee. .. 13,788 72 



11,383 88 
5,575 55 
7,163 85 



Total 

$5,921 85 

1,352 00 

596 16 

13,188 33 

*34,005 15 

43,025 73 

57,966 43 

20,108 76 

8,817 40 

111,494 20 

*94,762 34 

18,426 85 

13,788 72 



VING SYNODS 

Alabama $7, 

Arizona 9, 

Arkansas. ... 16, 
California. . . 6, 

f Benicia 

Colorado. . . , 13, 

Florida 4, 

Idaho 6, 

Kentucky 

Mississippi. . 3, 

Montana 17! 

New Mexico. 7 
N. Dakota. . . 5^ 
Oklahoma. . . 14, 

Oregon 19, 

S. Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 23, 

Utah 10, 

Washington. 22, 
Wyoming ... 11, 



AND PRESBYTERIES: 

029 03 $2,826 86 $9,855 89 

058 09 2,627 51 11,685 60 

093 73 3,886 15 19,979 88 

869 31 4,868 54 11,737 85 

2,560 84 2,560 84 

952 78 5,649 14 19,601 92 

426 31 2,208 50 6,634 81 

628 45 2,411 10 9,039 55 

4,453 90 4,453 90 

,412 53 2,917 85 6,330 38 

,369 26 6,048 61 23,417 87 

,072 35 3,115 80 10,188 15 

,662 92 4,929 91 10,592 85 

390 91 5,892 12 20,283 03 

,287 04 4,868 45 24,155 49 

6,141 91 6,141 91 

4,737 47 4,737 47 

,480 58 12,128 54 35,609 12 

,271 45 2,367 88 12,639 33 

,602 33 7,236 88 29,839 21 

,463 57 3,298 77 14,762 34 



MEXICAN WORK 

LUMBER CAMPS 

ALASKA 

INDIANS 

WEST INDIES: 

Cuba 

Porto Rico — Missions 

Porto Rico — Polytechnic Institute. 

Santo Domingo 



CITIES 

IMMIGRANT WORK. 



COUNTRY LIFE WORK. 
MOUNTAIN WORK 



$60,023 47 
56,572 20 
18,616 70 
10,166 65 

$67,790 42 
49,320 80 

$40,533 46 
60,068 37 



JEWISH EVANGELIZ.VnON. 
STUDENT SUMMER WORK. 
WELSH CHURCH 



$423 ,45a 92 



294,247 39 
74,664 77 
24,179 64 
50,582 41 
82,504 52 



145,379 02 
117,111 22 



Total carried to next page. 
*Approi)riations made in bulk. 



100,601 83 

31,388 92 

12,826 99 

6,942 32 

$1,363,882 95 



112 HOME MISSIONS 

Schedule No. 4 (Continued) 

Total brought forward from previous page .11,363,882 95 

PROMOTION: 

General $13,829 99 

Social Service 247 13 

Financial 10,027 36 

24,104 48 

EDUCATIONAL WORK: 

Literature $8,672 04 

Stereopticon Lectures 6,522 74 

Sunday School Programs 5,060 60 

Mission Study Promotion 1,709 49 

Exhibits, maps and photos 1,236 49 

Salaries 13,788 83 

Travel 1,340 31 

Los Angeles office salaries, travel and expenses 5,437 63 

Equipment, postage, etc 1,226 60 

. Recruiting 300 26 

— — 45,294 99 

PUBLICITY AND RESEARCH: 

Annual Report $1,612 39 

Advertising 4,154 98 

"Home Lands" 2,405 86 

Salary Assistants, Bulletins, Blanks, etc 3,493 09 

11,666 32 

COOPERATING AGENCIES— PRESBYTERIAN : 

Home Mission Council $4,048 72 

New Era Movement 52,050 86 

Conference— Self-Supporting Synods 2,080 42 

Field Work 1,Q70 00 

59,250 00 

COOPERATING AGENCIES— INTERDENOMINATIONAL: 

Home Missions Council $1,300 00 

Committee on Cooperation in Latin America. . 1,080 00 

Missionary Education Movement 440 00 

"La Nueva Democracia" 500 00 

Home Missions Council in Montana 47 24 

Federal Council — Social Service Committee. . . 2,500 00 

5,867 24 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION: 

' Salaries— Officers and Directors $61,000 00 

Salaries — Stenographers and Clerks 34,776 15 

Travel — -Officers and Directors 3,986 66 

Travel— Board Members 1,281 50 

Postage, telegrams, telephone, etc 3,040 34 

Printing and stationery 1,285 09 

Office expenses, equipment, repairs, insurance, 

etc 2,138 12 

Rent of Safe Deposit Box 150 00 

Western Office, St. Louis— Rent. 1,320 00 

108,977 86 

OTHER EXPENSES: 

Refund of collections received last year $657 13 

Exchanges on out of town checks 170 25 

Legal Expenses 425 74 

Audit of Accounts 1,000 00 

Interest on Money Borrowed 31,420 74 

33,673 86 

$1,652,717 70 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



113 



PERMANENT. TRUST AND ANNUITY FUNDS 

HELD BY THE BOARD FALL UNDER FIVE CLASSES 
Schedule No. 5 



FIRST — Money or securities received by the Board as gifts or legacies to be 
invested or held by the Board, the income alone to be used, either for 
the general work of the Board or for some specific portion of that work. 
These permanent funds are as follows: 

General Permanent Fund $378,802 09 

John C. Green Fund 100,000 00 

Carson W. Adams Fund 7,116 26 

Baldwin Memorial Fund 4,250 00 

Romney E. Blanton Fund 1,000 00 

A. I. Bulkley Fund 1,000 00 

Charles W. Henry Fund 5,000 00 

George Long Fund 15,000 00 

"J. M. T." Permanent Fund 50,000 00 

George G. Negley Memorial Fund 200 00 

Charles R. Otis Missionary Fund 5,000 00 

Stephen C. Pinkerton Fund 952 50 

Cornelia B. Strong Fund 10,000 00 

"A Thank Offering from a friend of the Work" Fund 18,000 00 

"A Thank Offering from a Friend of Home Missions" Fund 18,000 00 

"Memorial to a Christian Mother" Fund 1,000 00 

Edith D. Canby Memorial Fund 1,300 00 

Orison Dean Fund 9,906 25 

Coates Fund 540 00 

Margaret L. Hogg Fund 5,000 00 

Robertson Darling Memorial Fund 10,000 00 

Anna Findley Memorial Fund 11,091 47 

Jas. W. and Eliza Smith Fund 10,000 00 

Sara A. Palmer Memorial Fund 5,000 00 

M. F. and W. A. S. Hyland Permanent Fund 1,000 00 

James Walker Fund 1,000 00 

E. M. Coolidge Memorial Fund 500 00 

Frank E. Higgins Memorial Fund 328 06 

The Bebout and Newell Fund 2,500 00 

M. Florence Brown Memorial Fund 237 50 

Iowa Permanent Fund 7,025 00 

George DeForest Lord Memorial Fund 15,317 35 

Rebecca W. Doughty Fund 500 00 

Judson E. Carpenter Permanent Fund 15,000 00 

David O. Ghormley Memorial Fund 717 72 

Bryant Fund 11.956 16 

Arthur A. Anderson Fund 30,825 00 

David W. Baxter Fund 5,000 00 

J. C. Blair Fund 150 00 

J. Milton Colton Permanent Fund 52,099 87 

David B. and Mary H. Gamble Endowment Fund 50,000 00 

Morris K. or Maria DeWitt Jesup Fund 154,025 63 

Julia F. Gould Fund 1.000 00 

J. C. Larimore Fund ^^^ ^ 

Susan Manslev Legacy Fund 500 00 

Clara S. Hay Permanent Fund .•••■_• ^'^^ ^" 

Helen Newton Jarvie Memorial Fund '. . $72,000 00 

Less — Second one-tenth share applied toward debt 

of previous year 8,000 00 

^ ^ 64,000 00 

John C. Martin Permanent Fund 109,253 50 

Samuel B. Huey Permanent Fund 10,000 00 

Sally P. Sharpe Memorial Fund 8,000 00 

Total carried forward to next page $1,214,494 36 



114 H0M1-: MISSIONS 

Schedule No. 5 — (Continued) 
Total brought over from previous page $1,214,494 36 

SECOND — Trust Funds, the interest to be used for 
some special work not a part of the Board's 
Budget: 

A. K. and Martha J. VanMeter Legacy $4,050 00 

Sarah P. McNair Memorial Fund 1,000 00 

J. E. Roach Fund 700 00 

Katherine Spencer Leavitt Fund 30,000 00 

Edward P. Bacon Fund 2,500 00 

McNeely Legacy Fund 10,000 00 

David B. and Mary H. Gamble Excess Fund 2,500 00 

M. Adelaide Allen Fund 7,000 00 

Helen Newton Jarvie Memorial Fund $18,000 00 
Le55— Second one-tenth share paid 
to Committee of Presbyterial 
Church Extension of the Pres- 
bytery of Newark, N. J 2,000 00 



Jane B. Moore-Bristor Fund 30,000 00 

Less — Reduction in book value of Fund 5 000 00 



16,000 00 



25,000 00 



Polytechnic Institute Hospital Fund 1,000 00 

Robert M. Davidson Legacy Fund 1,000 00 



THIRD. — ^Money or securities received from individuals as 
absolute gifts to the Board upon the principal sum of which 
a certain rate of interest is to be paid to the donor or some 
designated person during the life of the beneficiary. These 
annuity gifts amount in the aggregate to. . . . $366,453 32 
Less amount invested in Presbyterian 

Building and 20th St. Properties. . . . 131,725 00 



100,750 00 
1,315,244 36 



234,728 32 
FOURTH.— The John S. Kennedy Permanent Fund. 1,000,000 00 

FIFTH. — Gifts specially designated by the donors to be used in 
payment of the cost of the Presbyterian Building and also 
Special and Reserve Funds received with no conditions at- 
tached, used by the Board in completing payment due on 
said Building and in purchase of the adjoining property. No. 
5, West Twentieth St., viz: 

Funds Bearing No Interest 

Stuart Legacy $230,500 00 

Special Funds 156,321 99 

Special Gifts 432,206 64 

$819,028,63 

Funds Bearing Interest 

Rev. Alfred S. Badger, D.D.. $12,500 00 

Rev. John C. Bliss, D.D 500 00 

John H. Converse 3,125 00 

Mrs. Mary E. Officer 2,000 00 

Miss Emily M. Wheeler 5,000 00 

David B. and Mary H. Gamble Fund 12,500 00 
Special Funds 96,100 00 

131,725 00 950,753 63 



$3,500,726 31 



TREASURER'S REPORT 115 

THE SECURITIES 

IN WHICH THE PERMANENT, ANNUITY AND TRUST FUNDS 
OF THE BOARD ARE INVESTED 

Schedule No. 6 

Securities indicated by (B) were Bequeathed 
Securities indicated by (D) were Donated 



American Agricultural & Chemical Co., 17 shares p'fd stock (B) 

American Telephone & Telegrapli Co., .34 shares stoclc (B) 

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Ke Ry. Co.: 

General Mortgage 4% Gold Bonds, due 1995 

120 shares preferred stock (20 sliares U) (100 D) 

Atlantic City Gas Co. 5% First Mortgage Sinking Fund Gold Bond, 

due 1960 (B) 

Atlantic Coast Line R. R. Co.: 

L. & N. Collateral 4% Gold Bonds, due 19.52 (B) 

First Consolidated Mortgage 50 Year 4% Bonds, due 19.52 

Baldwin Locomotive Works First Mortgage 5% Sinking Fund Gold 

Bonds, due 1940 

Baltimore & Oliio R. R. Co.: 

First Mortgage 4% Gold Bonds, due 1948 (B) 

Pittsburgh, Lake Erie & W. Virginia 4% Refunding Bonds, due 
1941, ($1,000. D) 

Prior Lien 3^% Gold Bond, due 1925 

33 shares Common Stock (B) 

Bank of Marshall, Mo.. Certificate of Deposit 5% (D) 

Bank of Pittsburgh National Association ,50 shares stock (B) 

Bankers Trust Co. N. Y., 7 shares stock (5 shares B) 

Birmingham, Ala., Ry. Light & Power Co. General Mortgage Re- 
funding 4i% Gold Bonds, due 19.54 (D) 

Boston & Maine R. R. Co. 9 shares First Preferred stock Class D. 

(B) 

Brooklyn Union Gas Co., First Consolidated Mortgage 5% Gold 

Bonds, due 1945 

Canadian Pacific Ry. Co., Equipment Trust, Series A. 6%, due 1928 
Central Leather Co. First Lien 20 year 5% Gold Bonds, due 1925. . 
Central New England Ry. Co. Firs-t Mortgage 4% Bonds, due 1961 
Central R.R. of New Jersey 5% Gen'l Mortgage Gold Bonds, due 1987 

Central Syndicate Building Co., 39 shares stock (B) 

Chesapeake & Ohio R. R. Co. : 

Gen. Mtge 4J% Gold Bonds due 1992 ($6,000. D) 

First Consolidated Mortgage 5% Gold Bonds, due 1939(2,0OO.D) 

Equipment Trust Series "S" 6i%.due 1926 

Chicago & Alton R. R. Co., 3% Refunding Gold Bonds, due 1949. 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R. R. Co.: 

General Mortgage 4% Bonds, due 1958 ($2,000. B) 

Illinois Division 4% Bonds, due 1949 

Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Ry. Co. General Mortgage 4J% 

Bonds, due 1989 

Chicago & Northwestern Ry. Co.: 

3i% General Mortgage Registered Gold Bonds, due 1987 (D). 

General Mortgage 5% Bonds, due 1987 

15 Shares Common Stock (B) 

Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Ry. Co.: 

First & Refunding Mortgage Gold Registered Bond 4%, due 
1934 (D) 

First & Refunding Mortgage 4% Gold Bonds, due 19.34 

Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Ry. Co. Consolidated 6% 

Mortgage Bonds, due 1930 

Cincinnati, Indianapolis & Western R. R. Co.: 

29 Shares Common Stock 

29 Shares Preferred Stock 

First Mortgage 5% Gold Bonds, due 1965 

Cleveland Ry. Co. First Mortgage 5% Gold Bonds, due 1931 

Colorado Southern Railway Co. First Mortgage Bond, 4%, due 1929 

Commercial Trust Co. of Philadelphia, 5 shares stock (B) 

Commonwealth Power Ry. & Light Co., 100 shares Preferred Stock 

(B) 

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western R. R. Co. 60 shares stock (B) . . 
Dominion of Canada War Loan 10 year 5% Bond, due 1925 (D) . . 
East St. Louis & Suburban Ry. Co.: 

100 Shares Common Stock (B) 

150 Shares Preferred Stock (B) 



fiook Values 

Taken at 

Par 


Market 
Values as of 
April 1, '22 


1.700 00 
3,400 00 


% 1.113 50 
4.131 00 


29.000 00 
12.000 00 


25,447 50 
10,560 00 


1. 000 00 


600 00 


2.000 00 
10.000 00 


1,605 00 
8,862 50 


9,000 00 


9,011 25 


2,000 00 


1.582 50 


5,000 00 
1,000 00 
3,300 00 
1.000 00 
2,.500 00 
700 00 


3.850 00 
925 00 

1,357 12 
*1,000 00 
13,500 00 

2,282 00 


5.000 00 


3,537 50 


900 00 


504 00 


4.000 00 
6.000 00 
6,000 00 
4,000 00 
21,000 00 
3,900 00 


3.710 00 
6.000 00 
5,880 00 
2,380 00 
22,260 00 
*3,900 00 


7,000 00 

6,000 00 

5,000 00 

16,000 00 


5,985 00 
5,940 00 
5,150 00 
9,280 00 


17,000 00 
15,000 00 


14,705 00 
13,050 00 


4,000 00 


3,360 00 


5,000 00 

15,000 00 

1,.500 00 


3,706 25 

15,412 50 

1.070 62 


1,000 00 
29,000 00 


800 00 
23,200 00 


4,000 00 


4,225 00 


2.900 00 
2.900 00 
1.400 00 
2.000 00 
1.000 00 
500 00 


65 25 
130 50 
868 00 

1,790 00 
916 25 

1,645 00 


10.000 00 
3.000 00 
1.000 00 


5,450 00 

3,472 50 

980 00 


10.000 00 
15.000 00 


300 00 
3,450 00 



*Shown at book values, no public market quotations available. 



116 HOME MISSIONS 

Book Values Market 

Schedule No. 6 (Continued) Taken at Values as of 

Par April 1, '22 

Empire Trust Co. N. Y.. 6 Shares Capital Stock (B) $ 600 00 $ 1,800 00 

Erie R. R.— Penn. R. R. Coll. 4% Gold Bonds, due 1951 17,000 00 14.790 00 

Fidelity Storage & Warehouse Co. Consolidated 6% Mortgage 

Gold Loan, due 1922 (B) 1.000 00 *1,000 00 

Franklin National Bank, Philadelphia, 10 shares stock (B) 1,000 00 5,805 00 

French Republic (Government of) 25 Year External Gold Loan 8% 

Sinking Fund Bonds, due 1945 ($5,000 D) 15,000 00 16,012 50 

Garfield National Bank N. Y., 10 Shares Stock (B) 1,000 00 2.250 00 

General Assembly's Certificates of Indebtedness, 6%. due 1926. . 68.000 00 *68,000 00 

Georgia Ry. & Power Co. First and Refunding Mortgage 5% Sink- 
ing Fund Bonds, due 1954 4.000 00 3,470 00 

Girard Trust Co.. Philadelphia, 5 Shares Stock (B) 500 00 3,800 00 

Glen Alden Coal Co., 30 shares stock (D) 1,500 00 1,320 00 

Great Northern Iron Ore Properties, 2,868 Certificates of Beneficial 

Interest (B) 286,800 00 103,248 00 

Great Northern Ry. Co.. 4302 Shares Preferred Stock (B) 430,200 00 311.357 25 

Harwood Electric Co. 6% First & Refunding Mortgage Sinking 

Fund Gold Bond, due 1942 (B) 1,000 00 920 00 

Illinois Central: 

Equipment Trust— Series F. 7%, due 1925 10,000 00 10,400 00 

Equipment Trust— Series F. 7% due 1926 5,000 00 5,250 00 

Equipment Trust— Series F. 7%, due 1927 10,000 00 10,600 00 

Equipment Trust— Series E. 5%. due 1927 2.000 00 1.940 00 

Indianapolis Northern Traction Co. 5% First Mortgage Gold Bond, 

due 1932 (B) 1,000 00 375 00 

Kanawha & Michigan Ry. Co. First Mortgage 4% Bond, due 1990 . 1,000 00 838 75 

Kansas City, Ft. Scott & Memphis R. R. Consolidated Mortgage 

6% Bonds, due 1928 4,000 00 4,090 00 

Keokuk & Des Moines Ry. Co. First Mortgage 5% Bonds, due 1923 16.000 00 12,980 00 

Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Ry. Co.: 

3i% Registered Gold Bonds, due 1997 (D) 6.000 00 4,560 00 

4% Gold Bonds, due 1931 8,000 00 7,360 00 

Lehigh Coal & Navigation Co. Funding & Improvement 4% Gold 

Bonds, due 1948 (D) 2,000 00 1.740 00 

Lehigh Valley Coal Co. First Mortgage 4% Bonds, due 1933 5,000 00 4,368 75 

Lehigh Valley R. R. Co.: 

Collateral Trust 4% Gold Bonds, due 1923 9,000 00 8.910 00 

4% General Consolidated Mortgage Gold Bonds, due 2003 

($1,000. B) 4,000 00 3,200 00 

10 Year 6% Collateral Trust Gold Bond, due 1928 1.000 00 1,017 50 

Lehigh Valley Transit Co. 4% Consolidated Mortgage 30 Year Gold 

Bond, due 1935 (B) 1.000 00 720 00 

Louisville & Nashville R. R. Co.: 

Mobile * Mont. R. R. 4i% First Mortgage Gold Bonds, due 

1945. 5,000 00 4,387 50 

Unified 4% Bonds, due 1940 14,000 00 12,740 00 

Manhattan Ry. Co., 20 Shares Stock (B) 2,000 00 810 00 

Market St. Elevated Pass. Ry. Co. First Mortgage 4% Gold Bonds, 

due 1955 ($1,000. B) 4,000 00 3,400 00 

Metropolitan Trust Co., N. Y., 20 Shares Stock (B) 2,000 00 5,260 00 

Minneapolis, Lyndale & Minnetonka Ry. Co., First Consolidated 

Mortgage Bonds and the Minneapolis Street Ry. Co. 7%, ^ „„ 

due 1925 7,000 00 7,000 00 

Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie & Atlantic Ry. Co., First Mortgage „„ 

4% Bonds, due 1926 8.000 00 7.670 00 

Missouri, Kansas & Texas Ry. Co.: 

First Mortgage 4% Bond, due 1990 (Certificate of Deposit ^^ 

U. S. Trust Co. of N. Y.) 500 00 380 00 

First Mortgage 5% Bonds, due 1942 (D) Certificate of Deposit, „, „„ 

Empire Trust Co., N. Y 2,000 00 1,685 00 

Missouri Pacific R. R. Co. General Mortgage 4% Gold Bonds, due ,, „„ 

1975 (D) 2,000 00 1,255 00 

New York, Brooklyn & Manhattan Beach Ry. Co., 5% Con- 
solidated Bonds, due 1935 4,000 00 3,635 00 

New York Central R. R. Co.: 

4% Registered Gold Debenture Bond, due 1934 (D) 1,000 00 882 50 

4% Gold Debenture Bonds, due 1934 (B) 2.000 00 1.765 00 

15 Shares Stock 1,500 00 1,295 62 

Equipment Trust of 1917 4|%. due 1923 5,000 00 4,950 00 

Equipment Trust of 1920 7%, due 1923 5,000 00 6,100 00 

Equipment Trust of 1920 7%, due 1924 10,000 00 10,300 00 

Equipment Trust of 1917 4J%, due 1927 5,000 00 4,700 00 

Equipment Trust of 1920 7%, due 1927 10,000 00 10,500 00 

New York City Corporate Stock 4%, due 1957.. 3,000 00 2,880 00 

New York City Corporate Stock 4%, due 1959 5,000 00 4,800 00 

New York Telephone Co. First and General Mortgage 4i% Gold 

Sinking Fund Bonds, due 1939 8,000 00 7,340 00 

New York, Westchester & Boston R. R. Co. First Mortgage Gold 

4^% Bonds, due 1946 (34 B) 47.000 00 22.442 50 

New York & Rockaway Beach Ry. Co. First Mortgage 5% Bonds. 

due 1927 : 4,000 00 3.740 00 

♦Shown at book values, no public market quotations available. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 117 



Book Values 
Schedule No. 6 (Continued) Taken at 

Par 

Norfolk & Western Ry. Co. : 

20 Shares Common Stock (B) $ 2,000 00 

Improvement and Extension Loan 6% Bonds, due 1934 12,000 00 

First Consolidated Mortgage 4% Gold Bonds, due 1996 23,000 00 

Northern Pacific Ry. Co.: 

5736 Shares Capital Stock (B) 573,600 00 

General Lien Ry. & Land Grant 3% Gold Bonds, 2047 (B) . . 2,000 00 

Prior Lien Ry. & Land Grant 4% Gold Bonds, due 1997 3,000 00 

Northern Pacific-Great Northern-Joint C. B. & Q, 6i%, 15 year 

Gold Bonds, 1936 39,000 00 

Oregon Short Line R. R. Co. 4% Ref. 25 Year Gold Bonds, due 1929 12,000 00 

Pennsylvania R. R. Co.: 

631 Shares Capital Stock 31,5,30 00 

Consolidated 4J% Mortgage Bonds, due 1960 4,000 00 

General Mortgage 4J% Gold Bonds, due 1965 12,000 00 

General Mortgage 5% Gold Bonds Series B due 1968 5,000 00 

10 Year 7% Secured Gold Bonds, due 1930 15,000 00 

Pere Marquette Ry. Co.: 

First Mortgage 4% Gold Bonds, due 1946 40,000 00 

First Mortgage 5% Gold Bonds, due 1956 4,000 00 

Philadelphia Company Consolidated Mortgage & Collateral Trust 

5% Gold Bonds, due 1951— ($2,000. B) 6,000 00 

Philadelphia & Chester Valley R. R. Co. 

First Mortgage 4% Registered Bond, due 1938 (B) 500 00 

Philadelphia Traction Co. 17 shares Capital Stock (B) 850 00 

Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis R. R. Co., 5% Gold 

Bonds, Series A, due 1970 (B) 1.500 00 

Portland Ry. Light & Power Co.: 

50 Shares First Preferred Stock (B) 5,000 00 

40 Shares Second Preferred Stock (B) 4,000 00 

90 Shares Common Stock (B) 9,000 00 

Port Reading R. R. Co. First Mortgage 5% Bonds, due 1941 (B) . 5,000 00 

Pullman Co. 17 Shares Capital Stock (B) 1,700 00 

Reading Co. & Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Co. General 

Mortgage 4% Gold Bonds, due 1997 (B) 2,000 00 

Rio Grande Western Ry. Co. First Trust Mortgage 4% Gold Bonds, 

due 1939 13.000 00 

Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg R. R. Co. First Consolidated. 

Convertible Mortgage 5% Bond, due 1922 1,000 00 

St. Louis & San Francisco Ry. Co. Prior Lien Mortgage 4% Gold 

Bond Series A, due 1950 18,750 00 

St. Louis, Merchants Bridge Terminal Ry. Co. First Mortgage 5% 

Bonds, due 1930 4,000 00 

St. Louis, Southwestern Ry. Co. 4% First Mortgage Gold Bonds, 

due 1989 (D) 2,000 00 

St. Paul City Ry. Co. 5% Cable Consolidated Mortgage Gold 

Bonds, due 1937 ($1,000. B) 25,000 00 

St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Ry. Co.: 

Montana Extension First Mortgage 50 Year 4% Gold Bonds, 

due 1937 12,000 00 

Pacific Extension 4% Gold Bonds, due 1940—2 of £500 each . 5.000 00 

Consolidated Mortgage 4^% Bonds, due 1933 13,000 00 

Sherman, Shreveport & So. Ry. Co. First Mortgage 5% Bonds, 

due 1943 (Ctfe. of Deposit Columbia Trust Co. N. Y.) 12,000 00 

Southern Pacific R. R. Co. First Refunding Mortgage 4% Bonds, 

due 19.55 9,000 00 

Southern Ry. Co. First Consolidated Mortgage 5% Gold Bonds, 

due 1994, ($2,000. D) 13,000 00 

St. Louis Div. First Mortgage 4% Gold Bonds, due 1951 4,000 00 

South Jersey Gas, Electric & Traction Co. 5% First Mortgage 

Gold Bond, due 1953 (B) 1.000 00 

Spokane International Ry. Co. First Mortgage 5% Gold Bonds, due 

1955 32.000 00 

Tennessee Ry. Light & Power Co. 50 Shares Preferred Stock (B) . . 5,000 00 

Terminal R. R. Association of St. Louis. Mo., First Consolidated 

Mortgage Bonds 5%, due 1944 (D) 2,000 00 

Texas & Okla. R. R. Co., First Mortgage 5% Gold Bonds, due 1943 

($10,000. D) (Ctfe. of Deposit Bankers Trust Co. N. Y.) 23,000 00 

Texas & Pacific Ry. Co. First Mortgage 5% Bond (D) due 2000. . 1,000 00 

Toledo & Ohio Central Ry. Co. — St. Mary's Division — First Mtge. 

4% Gold Bonds, due 1951 10,000 00 

Union Pacific R. R. Co.: 

10 Year 6% Secured Gold Bonds, due 1928 '■ • • 21,000 00 

First Mortgage R. R. & Land Grant 4% Gold Bonds, due 1947 14,000 00 

First Lien & Refunding Mortgage 4% Bonds, due 2008 34,000 00 

United Gas Improvement Co. (Phila.) 17 Shares Capital Stock (B) . 850 00 

United Kingdom of Great Britain & Ireland 20 Year 5}% Gold 

Bonds, due 1937 5,000 00 

United Railways Gold Trust 4% Registered Certificate, due 1949 (B) 2,000 00 

United Shoe Machinery Corporation, 16 Shares Preferred Stock (B) 400 00 



Market 
Values as 
April 1, •; 


of 

22 


$ 2,060 00 
12,900 00 
20,010 00 


433,785 00 
1,2.50 00 
2,557 50 


41, .535 
10,935 


00 
00 


25,082 25 
3,810 00 

10,650 00 
4,875 00 

16,012 .50 


31,200 00 
3,765 00 


5,340 00 


*500 
1.113 


00 
50 


1,419 


37 


3,200 
1.160 
900 
4,9.50 
2,078 


00 
00 
00 
00 
25 


1.692 


50 


10,010 


00 


997 


50 


13,288 


62 


3,725 


00 


1,550 


00 


22,875 


00 


10,860 00 
4,000 00 
12,350 00 


1,815 


00 


7,762 


50 


12.317 50 
3,070 00 


850 


00 


24,680 00 
712 .50 


1,887 50 


8,050 
936 


00 
25 


6,700 00 


21,630 00 

12,740 00 

29,070 00 

745 87 


5,006 

1,100 

416 


25 
00 
00 



♦Shown at book values, no public market quotations available. 



118 HOAIE MISSIONS 

Book Values Market 

Schedule No. 6 (Continued) Taken at Values as o/ 

Par April 1, '22 

United States of America: 

Treasury 4J% Notes due 1926 $14,500 00 $14,500 00 

Second Liberty Loan Converted 4J% Gold Bonds of 1927-1942 16,450 00 16,236 15 

Third Liberty Loan 41% Gold Bonds of 1928 37,150 00 36,986 54 

Fourth Liberty Loan 4i% Gold Bonds of 1933-1938 41,100 00 40,647 90 

Victory Liberty Loan 4J% Convertible Gold Notes of 1922- 

1923 17,500 00 17.643 50 

United States Rubber Co.. 33 Shares Preferred Stock (B) 3,300 00 3,465 00 

United States Steel Corporation: 

5% Sinking Fund Gold Bonds, due 1963 (D) 2.000 00 2,040 00 

47 Shares Preferred Capital Stock (B) 4.700 00 5,522 50 

Wabash R. R. Co. First Mortgage 5% Bonds, due 1939 2.000 00 1.940 00 

Western Union Telegraph Co. 4i% Refunding & Real Estate Mort- 
gage Gold Bond, due 1950 (D) 1.000 00 927 50 

West Shore R. R. Co. Guaranteed 4% 1st Mortgage Bond, due 2361 

($1,000 B) 11,000 00 8.855 00 

Wilkes-Barre & Eastern R. R. Co. First Mortgage 5% Gold Bonds, 

due 1942 20,000 00 12,450 00 

Wilmington & Northern R. R. Co. General Registered 5% Gold 

Bonds, due 1932 3,000 00 2,670 00 

Wisconsin Central Ry. Co.: 

First General Mortgage 4% Gold Bond, due 1949 (D) 1.000 00 776 25 

Marshfield & South Eastern Purchase Money First Mortgage 

4% Gold Bonds, due 1951 16,000 00 11,520 00 

Superior & Duluth Div. & Terminal First Mortgage 4% Bonds, 

due 1936 4.000 00 3.130 00 

Bonds and Mortgages 270.000 00 270.000 00 

Jane B. Moore-Bristor. Ground Rents (D) 24,400 00 24.400 00 



Add: 

Premiums on securities at time of acquisition . . $180,982 32 

Less Discounts $ 83,267 22 

Less Kennedy Reserve Premi- 
um Reduction Account 40,614 00 

123,881 22 



$2,965,000 00 



57,101 10 



5,022,101 10 $2,335,628 31 



TRKASURER'S RKPORT 110 

SECURITIES AND REAL ESTATE 

Received as Donations or Legacies to re Acknowledged When 

Converted Into Cash 

Schedule No. 7 

Book Value 

Allen, G. H. and J. H., Note due 1923, (one-half interest) $1,500 00 

Arrowhead Reservoir & Power Co. — Preferred Stock 100 00 

Baldwin Locomotive Works — Preferred Stock 408 00 

Brown, Thomas H. and Margaret — Notes 2,147 05 

Central Railroad of New Jersey — Capital Stock 5,000 00 

Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Ry. Co., 1st and Refunding Mtge. 

4% Gold Bonds due 1934 2,000 00 

Columbus, Mississippi, Church Sale Notes 700 00 

Commonwealth Power, Ry. & Light Co. — Dividend Notes 1,950 00 

Continental — Equitable Title & Trust Co. — Capital Stock 214 00 

Douglas, W. L. Shoe Co. — Stock 1,144 00 

Douglass Lumber Co., Snohomish, Wash. — Capital Stock 1,496 00 

Enterprise Mining & Reduction Improvement Co. of Arizona — 

Capital Stock 10 00 

Girard Trust Co. of Philadelphia — Capital Stock 400 00 

Insurance Company of North America — Stock 295 00 

Jones, Julia G. and Margaret H. Ferris, Note 642 77 

Lookout Paint Manufacturing Co. of Chattanooga, Tenn. — Stock.. 1,000 00 
Metcalf, Fred G. and Ella, 1st Mtge. 6% Bond (State of North 

Dakota) due 1926 500 00 

Minnesota-Montana Development Co. 6% 1st Mtge. Gold Bonds 

due 1926 400 00 

Moir Estate, Emily H. Inc.— Stock 100 00 

Nesbit, Ambrose R. and Mary A. — Notes 395 00 

New York Central R. R. Co.— Capital Stock 375 00 

New York Gas & Electric Light, Heat & Power Co. 4% Gold Bond 

due 1949 660 00 

Octavia Hill Association — Capital Stock 225 00 

Proprietors of The Morris Aqueduct, N. J. 5% Gold Bonds due 1955. 2,250 00 

Prospect Park Land Co., Kansas City, Kansas — Stock 5 00 

Property in Conway, Mich 50 00 

Property in Montclair, N. J 1,000 00 

Property in Watertown, S. D 150 00 

Property in Chattanooga, Tenn 2,000 00 

Rampart City Gold Mining Co., Alaska — Capital Stock 10 00 

Real Estate Trust Co. of Philadelphia, Pa.,— Preferred Stock 300 00 

Santa Barbara (Calif.) Telephone Co. 1st Mtge. 5% 30 Year Sink- 
ing Fund Gold Bond 900 00 

St. Louis, San Francisco Ry. Co., Prior Lien Mtge. 4% Gold Bond, 

Series A, due 1950 350 00 

St. Louis, San Francisco Ry. Co., Adjustment Mtge. 6% Gold Bond, 

Series A, due 1955 100 00 

Trenton, Pennington and Hopewell Street Ry. Co., 1st Mtge. 5% 

_ Gold Bond due 1943 300 00 

L^nited States of America: 

Second Liberty Loan Converted 4\% Gold Bond of 1927-42. 50 00 

Third Liberty Loan 4i% Gold Bond of 1928 • 50 00 

Fourth Liberty Loan M% Gold Bonds of 1933-1938 200 00 

Victor^' Liberty Loan 4f % Convertible Gold Note of 1922-23 100 00 

Treasury 4^% Note, due 1926 500 00 

LInited States Steel Corporation: 

4 shares Preferred Stock 450 00 

5% Sinking Fund Bonds due 1963 2,000 00 

Urban Realty Mtge. Co., of Detroit Mich., Ctfe., 5% due 1923. . . . 1,000 00 
Winona & Interurban Railway Co., Bonds, Certificate of Deposit, 

Central Trust Co. of Illinois 2 00 



120 HOME MISSIONS 

Schedule No. 7 (Continued) 

Book Value 

Winona & Warsaw Railway Co. Bonds $2 00 

Winters, John R. and Abbie B., 1st Mtge. 5|% Bond (State of North 

Dakota) due 1923 100 00 

Bonds and Mortgages against Real Estate 15,333 33 

$48,864 15 

SUNDRY SECURITIES 

Schedule No. 8 
Acknowledged Under Legacies, Awaiting Sale 
2 Terre Haute, Indianapolis and Eastern Traction Co. First Refund- 
ing 5% Bonds due 1945 $1,058 97 

TEMPORARY INVESTMENTS FOR SPECIAL WORK 

Schedule No. 9 

Chesapeake & Ohio R. R. 4|% Bonds $3,198 75 

U. S. Third Liberty Loan 41% Bonds 89 20 

$3,287 95 



SECURITIES HELD FOR OTHER ORGANIZATIONS 

Schedule No. 10 

Allen, G. H. and J. H., Note due 1923 (^) . $1,500 00 

Winona & Interurban Railway Co. Bond, Certificate of Deposit, 

Central Trust Co. of Illinois 1 00 

Winona & Warsaw Railway Co. Bond 1 00 

Thomas, Cyrus, Notes— due 1926 5,000 00 

Bond and Mortgage against Real Estate 14,000 00 

$20,502 00 



SECURITIES HELD AWAITING INVESTMENT 

Schedule No. 11 
General Assembly's Certificates of Indebtedness due 1926 $21,500 00 



PRICE, AVATERHOUSE & CO. 

56 Pine Street 

NE'W YORK 

CERTIFICATE OF AUDIT 

We certify that as of March 31, 1922, we verified either by actual 
count or by certificates obtained from depositaries the securities 
shown on the foregoing schedules 6 to 11, inclusive, and that the 
book values shown thereon opposite the securities were in accordance 
with the books of the Board; the market values of the stocks and 
bonds (except where unavailable and so noted) are based on pub- 
lished quotations as at the close of business at March 31, 1922, or 
upon information obtained from other reliable sources. 

Price, Waterhouse & Co. 



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\2l HOME iMISSlONS 



A COMPARISON OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES FOR 

CURRENT WORK— BY MONTHS 

Income Excess 

IQ2I All Sources Expenditures Payments 

April $14,774 96 $116,831 78 $102,056 82 

May 53,144 93 156,563 91 103,418 98 

June 67,925 18 155,337 38 87,412 20 

July 100,279 69 135,839 53 35,559 84 

August 56,975 42 132,194 36 75,218 94 

September 115,916 86 139,388 43 23,47157 

October 87,671 89 147,100 87 59,428 98 

November 133,936 44 137,460 05 3,523 61 

December 90,500 48 137,718 85 47,218 37 

IQ22 

January 112,017 84 129,199 77 17,181 93 

February 100,722 11 120,524 72 19,802 61 



Totals for eleven months.. $933,865 80 $1,508,159 65 $574,293 85 
March 494,178 48 144,558 05 349,620 43 



$1,428,044 28 $1,652,717 70 $224,673 42 

From the foregoing, it will be readily understood why the Board is compelled 
to borrow so heavily during the year in order that all of its obligations may be 
promptly met, why the Board is unable to liquidate any of its notes until towards 
the close of March and why, among the expenditures, the item "Interest on 
Money Borrowed" looms up so large. 

Inclusive of the amount of loans brought over from the previous year the 
Board borrowed a total of $675,000.00 during the year ending March 31, 1922. 

During the first eleven months of the year but 65% of the total income was 
received; 35% being received in March and of this twelfth month total, $259,500. 
or 18% reached the Treasurer after March 31. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 123 



RECEIPTS FROM LIVING GIVERS— BY MONTHS 

1921 

April $10,880 64 

May 19,356 43 

June 24,570 37 

July 45,752 52 

August 30,918 13 

September 41,148 93 

October 82,188 53 

November 82,820 80 

December 67,707 33 

ig22 

January $87,918 32 

February 67,574 20 



Total for eleven months $560,836 20 

March 459,880 06 



$1,020,716 26 

On the basis of "Income from Living Givers" it will be understood why the 
Board is under such financial stress during the year. In the first eleven months 
the Board received but 55% of its income from living sources, while in the twelfth 
month the Board received 45% of the year's income from these same sources, of 
which latter amount $256,529.81 or 25% of the total from living givers reached 
the Board's Treasury in the ten closing days. 

Could there be a more potent reason given for the oft repeated and fully 
justified plea that Churches, Sabbath Schools and Individuals, forward their 
gifts to the Board earlier in the year? 



6 — Home Miss. 



124 riOME MISSIONS 

Congregational Offerings During the Past Five Years by Synods 



Synods 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

Atlantic 

Baltimore 

California 

Canadian 

Catawba 

Colorado 

E. Tennessee . . 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Michigan 

Minnesota. . . . 
Mississippi . . . . 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

New England. . 
New Jersey. . . . 
New Mexico. . . 

New York 

North Dakota . 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania. . 
South Dakota . 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Washington . . , 
West German. 
West Virginia. 
Wisconsin .... 
Wyoming. ... 
Welsh Church 



Plus New Era 
Less New Era 



1917-18 



$3,006 23 

2,416 68 

3,782 41 

63 27 

8,110 25 

18,723 65 

23 25 

130 00 

12,568 20 

35 00 

2,095 54 

3,686 53 

5,947 19 

12,407 12 

129 00 

10,097 35 

16,552 86 

24,702 84 

1,553 67 

33,244 42 

3,773 84 

18,097 28 

3,648 97 

33,712 70 

1,709 32 

121,118 83 

2,614 02 

13,240 24 

10,518 93 

2,527 11 

64,753 58 

5,135 31 

7,416 12 

12,052 71 

512 44 

14,364 05 

5,736 32 

160 11 

698 00 

621 57 



1918-19 



$3,391 92 

1,811 54 

3,352 86 
93 46 

9,953 41 

14,987 47 

9 00 

188 45 

6,819 29 
27 50 

1,720 28 
13,287 34 

9,627 36 
15,502 18 

9,488 70 
10,229 45 
15,947 08 
25,562 09 

1,738 27 
34,090 98 

2,078 24 
18,413 00 

5,055 18 
27,144 34 

1,167 01 
130,933 80 

4,617 91 
20,556 57 
10,123 78 

5,386 07 
71,446 26 
14,200 90 

9,894 58 

12,023 88 

460 00 

15,466 44 

4,839 79 

2,776 50 

1,250 94 
562 75 



1919-20 



$3,203 05 

2,502 66 

2,795 04 

1,125 61 

15,363 00 

23,194 81 

96 34 

2,543 66 

10,663 22 

428 80 

2,575 95 
26,220 99 
16,934 72 
19,055 28 

5,412 63 
12,338 88 
26,800 92 
29,205 11 

1,903 82 
46,328 91 

3,160 85 
29,222 00 

5,972 03 
32,879 36 

1,876 08 
174,240 67 

4,568 05 
44,315 97 
14,058 52 

3,137 86 
127,197 28 
14,249 30 
16,886 23 
17,674 14 
589 78 
20,658 10 

4,298 19 

3,781 65 
247 32 
538 92 



,258 77 
19 02 



1920-21 



$5,207 93 

3,182 82 

3,462 80 

824 41 

12,548 35 

25,683 88 

124 21 

1,501 79 

13,058 78 

476 23 

2,825 82 
20,146 13 

1,792 99 
26,275 12 

3,764 18 
16,843 52 
28,339 70 
31,847 58 

1,691 86 
41,986 28 

3,046 71 
21,127 28 

9,543 50 
52,942 17 

2,037 92 
253,230 27 

5,822 66 
25,282 98 
15,499 52 

4,511 97 
180,922 20 
17,753 83 
13,453 81 
17,858 60 
639 36 
24,705 05 

1,396 63 

2,612 98 
186 71 

1,484 91 



,877 44 
22 11 



1921-22 



$6,277 55 

4,114 51 

3,759 54 

468 51 

15,138 88 

31,097 88 

136 19 

1,440 12 

10,152 19 

383 03 

2,828 37 
17,048 86 

5,623 62 

8,968 50 

6,112 54 
15,873 78 
34,200 72 
33,983 16 

1,679 10 
60,737 64 

2,480 37 
22,927 42 

8,270 46 
60,113 36 

2,012 88 
275,155 91 

5,034 27 
20,280 49 
15,359 95 

3,892 97 
193,796 98 
13,422 78 
13,047 81 
20,653 45 
792 49 
23,187 33 

1,238 70 

1,486 24 

78 62 

827 93 

8,761 88 



$927,962 92 
20 03 



$481,686 91 1 $536,276 57 1 $768,277 79| $895,855 33 1 $927,982 95 



TREASURER'S REPORT 
Sabbath School Offerings, by Synods 



125 



Synods 



1917-18 



1918-19 



1919-20 



1920-21 



1921-22 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

Atlantic 

Baltimore. . . . 
California .... 

Catawba 

Colorado 

E. Tennessee . 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky. . . . 
Michigan .... 
Minnesota . . . 
Mississippi . . . 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska .... 
New England. , 
New Jersey. . . 
New Mexico. . 

New York 

North Dakota . 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania . . 
South Dakota . 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Washington . . . 
West German. . 
West Virginia. . 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



$262 68 

124 02 

123 13 

3 00 

1,072 67 

1,515 45 

11 00 

424 45 



137 65 
751 17 
392 44 
856 27 
92 68 
514 98 

2,144 67 

1,544 59 
18 97 

1,333 83 
108 60 
802 07 
321 49 

3,828 27 
119 30 

5,900 30 
336 40 

2,812 93 
523 85 
219 17 

7,535 94 

476 07 

608 23 

546 74 

85 83 

1,208 47 

229 77 

35 00 

43 25 

61 54 



$37,126 8/ 



$275 50 

159 57 
101 17 

1 50 

1,321 06 

1,575 99 

12 00 

264 78 

1 00 

160 09 
1,323 64 

467 14 
1,329 13 

35 38 
301 30 

2,974 00 
1,506 29 

36 86 
1,382 21 

129 36 
695 39 
381 66 

3,517 01 

95 50 

7,523 04 

273 30 

2,653 08 

836 60 

310 56 

10,619 38 

432 55 

798 40 

573 44 

50 35 

964 02 

226 41 

130 22 
104 87 

75 06 



$43,568 81 



$371 33 

86 89 

136 80 

3 50 

1,506 01 

1,730 85 

19 97 

509 17 

10 00 

318 69 

1,068 20 

1,172 50 

1,270 36 

385 80 

523 43 

3,108 79 

1,332 06 

41 50 

1,784 49 

161 07 

843 05 

511 25 

4,676 73 

39 20 

7,080 83 

155 29 

2,335 38 

701 64 

418 90 

9,796 35 

572 66 

732 11 

765 43 

47 12 

1,295 51 

127 22 

200 54 

134 64 

45 68 



$46,565 94 



$221 32 

175 71 

101 05 

28 15 

2,314 37 

4,542 31 

34 09 

567 19 



472 13 

2,064 36 
768 13 

2,074 47 
444 42 
509 15 

3,602 87 

1,423 70 
25 80 

1,386 24 
108 25 
951 10 
547 44 

4,629 16 
170 25 

9,366 42 
305 48 

4,240 12 
748 03 
560 86 
13,177 19 
366 68 
625 91 
707 03 
123 79 

1,532 84 

96 60 

207 71 

180 18 

110 50 



$179 24 

260 41 

32 69 

2 50 

1,639 00 

5,225 48 

8 27 

&38 31 

6 00 

243 09 

1,748 81 

572 56 

1,598 00 

548 37 

452 76 

3,628 73 

2,209 00 

39 35 

1,717 45 

77 10 

909 63 

552 71 

5,246 64 

133 22 

10,093 93 

222 13 

3,469 09 

887 44 

409 63 

12,225 23 

249 91 

789 32 

1,097 69 

75 99 

1,374 67 

15 25 

199 80 

104 76 

141 77 



$59,511 00 $59,189 43 



126 



HOME MISSIONS 



TOTAL RECEIVED AND TOTAL EXPENDED 
BY PRESBYTERIES 

During the year ended March 31, 1922 

For amounts expended by Types of Work, see pages 129-133 and 136 



AL/ABAMA Received 

Synod 

Birmingham-A $1,928 92 

Florida 3,236 80 

Cadsden 366 61 

Huntsville 954 97 



ARIZONA 

Synod 

Northern Arizona 
Phoenix 

Southern Arizona 



$6,487 


30 




$266 

3,462 

659 


13 

15 
64 


$4,387 


92 



ARKANSAS 

Synod 

Arkansas 1,432 07 

Fort Smith 1,618 45 

Tonesboro 267 99 

Little Rock 473 72 



Expended 

$5,065 06 

2,095 00 

4,412 50 

1,910 00 

4,288 14 

$17,770 70 



$8,209 29 

16,091 05 

21,223 65 

14,691 14 

$60,215 13 



$4,036 97 

7,400 00 

2,220 01 

3,522 02 

6,472 90 



COLORADO Received 

Synod 

Boulder $710 37 

Denver 4,658 33 

Gunnison 930 66 

Pueblo 4,692 45 



Expended 
$5,649 U 

3,409 95" 
12,815 00 

1,265 00 
11,902 22 



$10,991 81 $35,041 31 



EAST TENNESSEE 

Birmingham 

Le Vere 

Rogersville 



$100 06 

214 82 

78 70 

$393 58 



IDAHO 

Synod 

Boise $2,250 43 

Kendall 172 67 

Twin Falls 653 36 



$3,792 23 $23,651 90 



ATLANTIC 

Atlantic 

Fairfield 

Hodge 

Knox 

McClelland 



$47 34 

113 64 

68 64 

104 81 

136 58 

$471 01 



BALTIMORE 

Baltimore 

New Castle 

Washington City . 



$6,786 77 

516 72 

9,499 89 



$5,700 00 



ILLINOIS 

Synod 

Alton $1,201 02 

Bloomington 3,642 89 

Cairo 526 57 

Chicago 3,451 22 

Ewing 226 39 

Freeport 633 30 

Mattoon 1,061 93 

Ottawa 1,354 14 

Peoria 1,289 57 

Rock River 1,605 25 

Rushville 2,284 35 

Springfield 1,558 04 



$18,834 67 



$16,803 38 $5,700 00 



C.\LIFORNIA 

Synod 

Benicia $6,121 14 

Los Angeles 9,176 52 

Nevada 210 29 

Riverside 5,368 53 

Sacramento 2,494 21 

San Francisco — Oakland 9,600 49 

San Joaquin 1,291 53 

San Jose 1,460 05 

Santa Barbara 615 10 



$7,429 38 

8,918 87 

20,386 00 

6,808 91 

10,475 10 

5,584 71 

35,994 99 

707 06 



INDIANA 

Synod $4,733 71 

Crawfordsville 232 17 

Fort Wayne 156 28 

Indiana 151 42 

Indianapolis 191 82 

Logansport 150 77 

Muncie 221 89 

New Albany 313 90 

White Water 44 22 



$6,196 18 



$36,337 86 $96,305 02 



CANADIAN 

Kiamichi 

Rendall! 

White River .... 

CATAWBA 

Cape Fear 

Catawba 

Southern Virginia 
Yadkin 



$1 82 

66 67 

67 70 

$136 19 

$535 19 
288 12 
265 17 
377 91 

^,466 39 



IOWA 

Cedar Rapids 

Central West (Bohe- 
mian) 

Corning 

Council Bluffs 

Des Moines 

Dubuque 

Fort Dodge 

Iowa 

Iowa City 

Sioux City 

Waterloo 



$2,425 82 

1,375 00 

5,083 32 

1,104 98 



$3,076 46 $9,989 12 



$596 16 



$1,866 61 

672 04 
642 05 
289 15 
394 34 
105 18 
542 07 
491 11 
930 04 
3,549 25 
1,149 66 



$10,631 50 $3,575 00 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



127 



KANSAS 

Ijiiporia 

Iliijhland 

Larncd 

N 



sho 
■ '"'rnc 
inon 
. •cka. . 
\V ichita 



Received 

$172 03 

209 64 

692 16 

1,551 92 

520 05 

774 13 

1,260 61 

1,526 83 

$6,707 37 



Expended 



KENTUCKY 

Synod 

Buckhorn $654 02 

Ebenezer 7,090 25 

Lincoln 24 61 

IvOgan 1,013 14 

Louisville 4,039 53 

Princeton 1.449 80 

Transylvania 3,170 19 

$17,441 54 

MICHIGAN 

Synod 

Detroit $10,199 65 

Flint 3,751 47 

f.iand Rapids 3,677 90 

Kalamazoo 3,849 11 

Lake Superior 3,734 13 

Lansing 6,721 42 

IVtoskey 1,373 40 

Saginaw 4,522 37 



$37,829 45 

MINNESOTA 

Syn'od 

Adams $1,039 21 

Duluth 5,270 92 

Mankato 4,560 49 

Minneapolis 12,833 16 

Red River 961 97 

St. Cloud 1.099 76 

St. Paul 9,041 38 

Winona 1,545 42 



$4,738 71 
7,755 00 
1,836 2.-. 

'l',866'66 
643 50 

1,468 77 
300 00 

$18,542 23 
$23,989 79 

'4,566 44 
1,141 67 
900 00 
1,873 67 
1,400 00 
2,131 11 
2,274 22 

$38,276 90 

$11,383 88 

3,097 52 

17,128 73 

793 00 

2,195 00 

1,266 65 

4,161 52 

3,130 83 

395 82 



$36,352 31 $43,552 95 



MISSISSIPPI 

Synod 

Bell $403 58 

Meridian 856 41 

Oxford 464 46 

$1,724 45 

MISSOURI ■ 

Synod 

Carthage $3,315 48 

lr(in Mountain 572 22 

Kansas City 13,573 03 

Kirksville 2.077 08 

McGee 1,923 58 

Ozark 2,917 26 

Sr. Joseph 3,715 34 

St. Louis 32,522 91 

Silt River 1,577 91 

ScJalia 1,767 47 

$63,962 28 

MONTANA 

Synod 

Butte $414 71 

Great Falls 486 22 

Helena 719 88 

Kalispell 254 32 

Lewistown 190 17 

Yellowstone 497 17 



$2,955 38 
1,075 00 
1,450 00 
1,750 00 

$7,230 38 

$5,575 55 

2,108 73 

4.340 85 

7,310 00 

885 00 

1,808 33 

1,000 00 

1,446 60 

30,983 00 

1.000 00 

1,508 37 

$57,966 43 

$13,224 47 

1,865 34 

4,223 23 

1,424 95 

5,795 82 

2,794 79 

2,295 13 



NEBRASKA Received 

Synod $509 35 

Box Butte 966 69 

Hastings 2,868 90 

Kearney 4,219 77 

Nebraska City 7,042 35 

Niobrara 1.894 88 

Omaha 6,352 61 



$23,854 55 

NEW ENGLAND 

Synod 

Boston $2,926 80 

Connecticut Valley . . . 3,286 23 

Newburyport 1,253 48 

Providence 1,357 97 



$8,824 48 

NEW JERSEY 

Synod $40,266 05 

Elizabeth 1,936 35 

Havana 534 00 

Jersey City 8,198 48 

Monmouth 1,081 50 

Morris & Orange .... 8,012 67 

Newark 3,060 06 

New Brunswick 929 97 

Newton 647 61 

West Jersey 912 96 



Expended 

$7,163 85 

1,758 28 

950 00 

1.830 83 

1,600 00 

2.618 30 

5,687 50 

$21,608 76 



$ 17 40 

4,620 00 

2,700 00 

1,280 00 

200 00 

$8,817 40 



$10,483 89 



$65,579 65 $10,483 89 



NEW MEXICO 

Synod 

Pecos Valley $583 40 

Rio Grande 668 55 

Santa Fe 914 15 



$3,115 80 

1.933 37 

9.746 34 

18,923 17 



$2,166 10 $33,718 68 



NEW YORK 

Synod $1 

Albany 9 

Binghamton 8 

Brooklyn-Nassau 18 

Buffalo 7 

Cayuga 6 

Champlain 2 

Chemung 3 

Columbia 1 

Genesee 2 

Geneva 6 

Hudson 7 

Long Island 3 

Lyons 2 

New York 102 

Niagara 2. 

North River 4 

Otsego 3 

Porto Rico 

Rochester 21 

St. Lawrence 6 

Steuben 4 

Syracuse 12 

Troy 6 

Utica 13, 

Westchester 17, 



429 


75 


$29,392 


27 


546 


71 


6,500 


00 


112 


52 


4,363 


85 


201 


43 


29.612 


50 


561 


85 


10,996 


18 


376 


59 


3,225 


00 


474 


72 
34 






029 


1,191 


65 


657 


16 


800 


00 


412 


01 


845 


80 


236 


43 


808 


30 


180 


57 


3,333 


35 


757 


19 


1,516 


50 


168 


63 


1,185 


40 


660 


78 


112,698 


51 


839 


64 






975 


07 


1,266 


67 


208 


96 


2,135 


22 


135 


80 
75 






101 


3.070 


00 


202 


92 


2.130 


32 


511 


58 


2,100 


00 


004 


15 


2,212 


50 


940 


29 
46 






154 


2,716 


25 


275 


61 


6,770 


00 



$275,155 91 $228,960 27 



NORTH DAKOTA 

Synod 

Bismarck $705 18 

Fargo 2.375 83 

Minnewaukon 733 22 

.Minot 288 95 

Oakes 395 87 

Pembina 535 22 



$4,974 92 

1,512 50 

1,207 50 

700 00 

1,435 40 

762 53 



$2,562 47 $31,623 7: 



$5,034 27 $10,592 85 



128 



HOME MISSIONS 



OHIO Received 

Synod $2,000 00 

Athens 36 30 

Chillicolhe 92 10 

Cincinnati 3,777 58 

Cleveland 7,195 11 

Columbus 289 76 

Dayton 271 34 

Lima 21 00 

Mahonins 6,120 05 

Marion 91 21 

Portsmouth 152 48 

St. Clairsville 374 74 

Steubenville 1,487 35 

Toledo 1,031 09 

Wooster 103 46 

/anesville 756 01 



Expended 



$4,000 00 



$23,699 58 $4,000 00 



OKIvAlIOMA 

Synod 

Ardmore $1,565 81 

Choctaw 154 56 

Cimarron 821 10 

El Reno 158 59 

Hobart 581 04 

MdAlester 893 34 

Muskogee 1,235 02 

Oklahoma 4,544 21 

Tulsa 6,294 72 



$6,536 53 

1,816 70 

1,866 70 

1,076 25 

1,337 50 

1,608 35 

750 00 

4,506 49 

3,145 80 

4,235 71 



$16,248 39 $26,880 03 



OREGON 

Synod 

Coos Bay $278 43 

Grande Ronde 344 41 

Pendleton 779 62 

Portland 294 86 

Southern Oregon .... 824 27 

Willamette 1,821 14 



$4,911 49 

5,979 74 

2,879 69 

5,667 47 

713 99 

4,653 31 

8,356 00 



$4,342 73 $33,161 69 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Beaver $7,455 53 

Blairsville 13,086 61 

Butler 4,123 02 

Carlisle 7,512 94 

Chester 17,656 16 

Clarion 3,999 72 

Erie 22,716 34 

Huntingdon 8,983 15 

Kittanning 6,360 76 

Lackawanna 7,544 12 

Lehigh 2,024 90 

Northumberland 8,606 29 

Philadelphia 18,772 97 

Philadelphia — North .. 23,343 05 

Pittsburgh 18,23122 

Redstone 4,152 43 

Shenango 4,202 67 

Washington 6,711 87 

Westminster 8,313 23 



$193,796 98 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Synod $427 00 

Aberdeen 4,758 04 

Black Hills 815 15 

Dakota Indian 669 09 

Huron 3,065 84 

Sioux Falls 3,957 57 



$13,692 69 

TENNESSEE 

Synod 

Chattanooga $1,726 94 

Cumberland Mountain. 336 71 

Duck River 711 64 



$2,500 00 



$2,500 00 



$6,141 91 

7,598 33 

4,157 50 

13,635 41 

2,791 02 

3,880 00 

$38,204 17 



$4,737 47 

1,450 00 

25,203 95 

566 65 



Tennessee (Continued) Received Expended 

French Broad $311 88 $31,096 85 

Ilolston 853 79 2,900 00 

Nashville 1,611 39 2,918 75 

Union 7,083 33 6,468 41 

West Tennessee 1,365 45 2,519 97 

$14,001 13 $77,862 05 



TlCXAS 

Synod 

Abilene 

Aniarillo 

Austin 

Brownwood 

Dallas 

El Paso 

Fort Worth 

Houston 

Jefferson 

Paris 

Southwest Bohemian . 
Waco 



$775 41 

2,669 90 

974 88 

459 72 

4,460 22 

1,880 39 

1,876 57 

767 67 

651 59 

2,600 15 

270 00 

4,438 88 



P19,602 63 
2,893 97 
1,688 75 
3,466 60 
1,470 00 
4,095 m 
875 00 
4,199 05 
1,746 70 
2,740 03 
1,550 00 
5,665 75 
2,204 15 



UTAH 

Synod 

Ogden 

Salt Lake .... 
Southern Utah 



$21,825 38 $52,198 19 



$87 50 
629 50 
158 78 



$2,569 73 

2,905 00 

2,806 25 

6,103 56 



WAiSHINGTON 

Synod 

Bellingham 

Central Washington . 

Coeur d'Alene 

Columbia River . . . . 

Olympia 

Seattle 

Spokane 

Walla Walla 

Wenatchee 



$875 78 $14,384 54 



$2,464 06 

2,006 71 

1.086 92 

1,140 80 

2,416 35 

6,247 42 

3,511 02 

3,117 00 

2,108 84 



Alaska 
Yukon 



WEST GERMAN 

Galena 

George 

Waukon 



$24,099 
386 
164 


12 
04 
26 


$24,649 


42 


$363 
453 
467 


00 
00 
95 


$1,283 


95 



$7,437 76 

6,574 03 

3,528 75 

3,301 81 

4,572 99 

9,538 97 

9,745 49 

5,859 66 

3,353 35 

1,932 40 

$55,845 21 
21,407 13 
29,175 28 

$106,427 62 



WEST VIRGINIA 

Synod 

Grafton 

Wheeling 



WISCONSIN 

Synod 

Chippewa 

La Crosse 

Madison 

Milwaukee 

Winnebago 



$500 00 
775 84 
410 20 

$1,686 04 



$57 31 

15 00 

19 88 

36 39 

54 80 



WYOMING 

Synod 

Cheyenne 

Laramie . . 
Sheridan 



WELSH CHURCH 



$183 


38 




$259 
257 
462 


21 
13 
36 


$978 


70 


$8,761 


88 



$4,270 50 
1,200 00 



2,300 00 



$7,770 50 

$3,331 61 

5,586 17 

3,471 65 

4,314 99 

$16,704 42 

$6,942 32 



*Synod of Wisconsin also provided $2,632.00 for 
Immigrant Work at Gogebic Parish. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



129 



A SUMMARY BY PRESBYTERIES 

Showing the Amounts Expended by the Various Departments of the Board 
During the Year Ended March 31, 1922 

The figures embodied in the following statements are the details of, and are 
included in the combined statement on the three preceding pages, 126-128 



SELF SUPPORTING SYNODS AND PRESBYTERIES 



CALIFORNIA 

ISenicia $5,921 85 

Riverside 1,352 00 

$7,273 85 



ILLINOIS 

Interest on Rose & Roach Funds.. . $596 IG 

KENTUCKY 

Synod's Expenses $284 81 

Buckh'orn 7,755 00 

Ebenezer 1,836 25 

Logan 900 00 

Louisville 643 50 

Princeton 1,468 77 

Transylvania 300 00 



$13,188 33 



MICHIGAN 

Flint $2,016 44 

Grand Rapids 1,14167 

Kalamazoo 900 00 

Lake Superior 1,873 67 

Lansing 1,400 00 

Petoskey 2,13111 

Saginaw 2,274 22 

Administration 1,565 57 

City Extension 5,523 33 

Summer School 150 00 

Field Workers 7,915 36 

General Missionary 1,500 00 

Indian Work 650 00 

Iron River Parish 3,256 00 

Woodsmen 1,707 78 



$34,005 15 



MINNESOTA 

Field Men and Expenses $11,383 88 

Adams^ 3,097 52 

Duluth 5,52170 

Duluth— Range Work 7,658 35 

Duluth — Lumber Camps 3,421 46 

Mankato 793 00 

Minneapolis 2,195 00 

Red River 1,266 65 

St. Cloud 4,161 52 

St. Paul 3,130 83 

Winona 395 82 



$43,025 73 



MISSOURI 

Field Men and Expenses $5,575 55 

Carthage 2,108 73 

Iron Mountain 4,340 85 

Kansas City 7,310 00 

Kirksville 885 00 

McGee 1,808 33 

Ozark 1,000 00 

St. Joseph 1,446 60 

St. Louis 30,983 00 

Salt River 1,000 00 

Sedalia 1,508 37 



NEBRA^jKA 

Field Men and Expenses $7,163 85 

Box Butte 1,758 28 

Hastings 950 00 

Kearney 1,830 83 

Nebraska City 1,600 00 

Niobrara 2,618 30 

Omaha 4,187 50 



$20,108 76 



NEW ENGLAND 

Synod's Expenses $ 17 40 

Boston 4,620 00 

Connecticut V'allcv 2,700 00 

Newburyport . . . '. 1,280 00 

Providence 200 00 



$8,817 40 

NEW YORK 

Albany $6,500 00 

Binghamton 4,363 85 

Brooklyn-Nassau 21,626 24 

Buffalo 3,878 02 

Cayuga 3,225 00 

Chemung 1,191 65 

Columbia 890 00 

Genesee 845 80 

Geneva 808 30 

Hudson 3,333 35 

I^ng Island 1,516 50 

Lyons 1,185 40 

New York 111,869 20 

North River 1,266 67 

Otsego 2,135 22 

Rochester 3,070 00 

St. Lawrence 2,130 32 

Stuben 2,100 00 

Syracuse 2,212 50 

Utica 2.716 25 

Adirondack Work 7,178 66 

Administration 2,816 77 

Church Extension 7,837 61 

Emergency 2,234 73 

Foreign Work 1,725 07 

Publicity 181 91 

Synodical Supt 7,417 52 

$206,256 54 



SOUTH DAKOTA 

Aberdeen $7,598 33 

Black Hills 4,157 50 

Huron 2,791 02 

Sioux Falls 3,880 00 



$57,966 43 



$18,426 85 

TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga $1,450 00 

Duck River 525 00 

Holston 900 00 

Nashville 2,918 75 

Union 5,475 00 

West Tennessee 2,519 97 

$13,788 72 



130 



HOME MISSIONS 



AID RECEIVING SYNODS AND PRESBYTERIES 



AIvABAMA 

Field Men and Expenses $5,065 06 

Birmingham-A 1,315 00 

Florida 4,412 50 

Gadsden 1,910 00 

Huntsville 3,788 14 



$16,490 70 



ARIZONA 

Field Men and Expenses $2,698 05 

Northern Arizona 166 65 

Phoenix 7,127 80 

Southern Arizona 1,693 10 



$11,685 60 

ARKANSAS 

Field Men and Expenses $4,036 97 

Arkansas 5,250 00 

Fort Smith 2,220 01 

Jonesboro 2,000 00 

Little Rock 6,472 90 



$19,979 88 



CALIFORNIA 

Field Men and Expenses $7,429 38 

Nevada 3,284 60 

Sacramento 3,584 71 



$14,298 69 



COLORADO 

Field Men and Expenses $5,649 14 

Boulder 3,409 95 

Denver 4,825 00 

Gunnison 1,115 00 

Pueblo 4,602 83 



$19,601 92 



IDAHO 

Field Men and Expenses $2,425 82 

Boise 1,375 00 

Kendall 4,133 75 

Twin Falls 1,104 98 



),039 55 



KENTUCKY 

Field Men and Expenses $4,453 90 

MISSISSIPPI 

Field Men and Expenses $2,955 38 

Bell 1,075 00 

Meridian 1,450 00 

Oxford 850 00 



,330 38 



MONTANA 

Field Men and Expenses $6,086 97 

Butte 1,865 34 

Great Falls 4,061 65 

Helena 1,424 95 

Kalispell 5,295 82 

Lewistown 2,794 79 

Yellowstone 1,888 35 



$23,417 87 

NEW MEXICO 

Field Men and Expenses $3,115 80 

Pecos Valley 1,933 37 

Rio Grande 2,820 00 

Santa Fe 2,318 98 

$10,188 15 



NORTH DAKOTA 

Field Men and Expenses $4,974 92 

Bismarck 1,512 50 

Fargo 1,207 50 

Minnewaukon 700 00 

Minot 1,435 40 

Oakes 762 53 



OKLAHOMA 



$10,592 85 



Field Men and Expenses $5,999 73 

Ardmore 1,816 70 

Cimarron 1,076 25 

El Reno 1,337 50 

Ilobart 1,608 35 

McAlester 750 00 

Muskogee 1,581 27 

Oklahoma 3,145 80 

Tulsa 2,967 43 



OREGON 
Field Men and Expenses . 

Coos Bay 

Grande Ronde 

Pendleton 



$20,283 03 



$4,911 49 

3,628 12 

2,425 03 

3,867 47 

Southern Oregon 4,322 13 

Willamette 5,001 25 



$24,155 49 



SOUTH DAKOTA 

Field Men and Expenses $6,141 91 

TENNESSEE 

Field Men and Expenses $4,737 47 

TEXAS 

Field Men and Expenses $12,246 84 

Abilene 2,893 97 

Amarillo 1,688 75 

Austin 3,466 60 

Brownwood 1,470 00 

Dallas 2,403 34 

El Paso 875 00 

Fort Worth 3,422 12 

Houston 1,746 70 

Jefferson 1,64165 

Paris 1,550 00 

Waco 2,204 15 

$35,609 12 

UTAH 

Field Men and Expenses $2,569 73 

Ogden 2,905 00 

Salt Lake 2,806 25 

Southern Utah 4,358 35 



$12,639 33 



WASHINGTON 

Field Men and Expenses $7,386 46 

Bellingham 1,483 30 

Central Washington 3,528 75 

Coeur d'Alene 910 00 

Columbia River 3,057 50 

Olympia 3,76165 

Seattle 4,552 50 

Spokane 1,348 30 

Walla Walla 1,878 35 

Wenatchee 1,932 40 

$29,839 21 

WYOMING . 

Field Men and Expenses $3,331 61 

Cheyenne 4,286 17 

Laramie 3,015 15 

Sheridan 4,129 41 

$14,762 34 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



131 



MEXICAN WORK 



ARIZONA 

Phoenix $1,512 50 

Southern Arizona 12,486 49 



$13,998 99 



CALTFORNTA 

Los Angeles $14,712 14 

Riverside 8,515 60 

San Francisco 2,470 00 



$25,697 74 



COIvORADO 
I'ucblo $4,949 59 



NEW MKXICO 

Rio Grande $4,376 34 

Santa Fe 7,550 00 



$11,926 34 



TEXAS 

Synod $7,355 79 



Bcnicia 



LUMBER CAMPS AND MIGRANT GROUPS 

CALIFORNIA 



$443 02 



O RFC ON 

Coos Bay $2,351 62 

Portland 713 99 

Willamette 1,954 75 



$5,020 36 



WASHINTrTON 

Bellingham $5,090 73 

Coeur d'Alene 2,091 81 

Columbia River 915 49 

Olympia 3,974 65 

Seattle 3,778 21 

Spokane 2,063 63 

Walla Walla 800 00 



$18,714 5 



INDIANS 

ARIZONA OKLAHOMA 

Synod $5,511 24 Synod $ 536 80 

" ■ " ■ ■" Choctaw 1,866 70 

Muskogee 2,925 22 

Tulsa 1,268 28 



Northern Arizona 15,924 40 

Phoenix 6,463 35 



$27,898 99 

CALIFORNIA 

Benicia $1,600 00 

Nevada 3,524 31 

Riverside 150 00 



5,274 31 



COLORADO 
Pueblo $ 450 00 



IDAHO 
Kendall $ 157 50 



MONTANA 
Kalispell $ 500 00 



NEBRASKA 
Omaha $1,500 00 



NEW MEXICO 

Rio Grande $2,550 00 

Sante Fe 8,168 55 



$10,718 55 



NEW YORK 



$6,597 00 



OREGON 

Pendleton $1,800 00 

Willamette 1,400 00 



$3,200 00 



SOUTH DAKOTA 
Dakota Indian $13,049 85 



UTAH 
Southern Utah $ 818 59 



WASHINGTON 

Olympia $1,802 67 

Spokane 1,912 00 

Walla Walla 675 00 



$4,389 67 



WISCONSIN 
Chippewa $ 700 00 

WYOMING 



Buffalo $ 742 04 Cheyenne 1,300 00 



CITIES 
CALIFORNIA NEW YORK 

Los Angeles $3,871 76 Brooklyn-Nassau $4,493 23 

Sacramento 1,287 50 Buffalo 3,500 00 

San Francisco 21,199 99 ■ 

Trinity Center 9,000 00 $7,993 23 

' OHIO 

Cleveland $4,000 00 



COLORADO 



$35,359 25 



Denver $6,245 00 

MIOHiIGAN 



WISCONSIN 



Flint Civic Park $2,550 00 Milwaukee $ 600 00 



132 



HOME MISSIONS 
IMMIGRANT WORK 



BALTIMORE 
Baltimore $1,700 00 



MICHIGAN 
Synod , $1,72175 



CALIFORNIA 

Sacramento $ 712 50 

San Francisco 2,825 00 

San Joaquin 707 06 



MONTANA 
Synod $7,137 50 



$4,244 56 



NEW YORK 

Buffalo $1,950 00 ! 

Westchester 6,770 00 



$8,720 00 



COLORADO 

genver $1,745 00 WASHINGTON 

Pueblo 1,400 00 Seattle $ 300 00 



$3,145 00 

. WISCONSIN 

INDIANA Synod $4,270 50 

Synod $4,700 00 Chippewa 500 00 

■ Milwaukee 1,700 00 

IOWA 



Central West $3,575 00 



$6,470 50 



COUNTRY LIFE WORK 



ALuABAMA 

Birmingham-A $ 780 00 

Huntsville 500 00 



$1,280 00 



ARIZONA 
Phoenix $6,120 00 



CALIFORNIA 

Benicia $ 954 00 

Los Angeles 1,212 00 

San Francisco 500 00 



COLORADO 



Gur 



Logan 



KENTUCKY 



$2,666 


00 


$ 150 


00 


$ 900 


00 



MISSISSIPPI 
Oxford $ 900 00 



TENNESSEE 

Duck River $ 41 65 

Union 993 41 



$1,035 06 



TEXAS 

Dallas $1,692 22 

Fort Worth 776 93 

Jefferson 1,098 38 

Southwest Bohemian 5,665 75 



Synod . 
Coeur d'Alene . 
Columbia River 
Seattle 



WASHINGTON 



$9,233 


28 


$ 51 

300 

600 

1,114 


30 

00 
00 
78 


$2,066 


08 



MOUNTAIN WORK 



Arkansas 
Jonesboro 



ARKANSAS 



$2,150 00 
1,000 00 



$3,150- 00 



TENNESSEE 

Cumberland Mountain $24,772 19 

French Broad 30,146 18 

llolston 2,000 00 



$56,918 37 



JEWISH EVANGELIZATION 

BALTIMORE NEW YORK 
Bailtimore i$4,000 00 Brooklyn-Nassau $3,035 87 

ILLINOIS • 

Chicago $2,085 00 

NEW JEKSKV 
Newark, Bethany Center $10,483 89 



PENNSYLVANIA 
Philadelphia $2,500 00 



TREASURER'S REPORT UJ 

STUDENT SUMMER WORK 

ARIZONA NEW YORK 

vSoullicni Arizona $ 511 55 Brooklyn-Nassau $ 457 16 

RuflFalo 926 12 

ARKANSAS New York 829 31 

lonesboro $ 522 02 

$2,212 59 

CAIJFORNIA ORl-TON 

L°« A"gcU-^ $ 590 10 Grande Ronde .. ' $ 454 66 

'■'■^■"^''^^ '^S? 50 Southern Oregon * 331 18 

^'•^'' «Q $ 785 84 

I'uohin COLORADO SOUTH DAKOTA 

^"'^'''« $ ^99 80 Dakota Indian $ 585 56 

Kendall IDAHO TENNESSEE 

^^^"'*^" ^ ^^^ "" Cumberland Mountain $ 431 76 

French Broad 950 67 

INDIANA 

New Albany $ 396 63 $1,382 43 

MINNESOTA UTAH 

Duluth $ 527 22 Southern Utah $ 926 62 

MONTANA WASHINGTON 

Great talis $ 161 58 Spokane $ 535 73 

Yellowstone 406 78 

4 rao ofi WYOMING 

^ ^°" ^P Laramie $ 456 50 

Sheridan 185 58 

NEW MEXICO 

Santa Fe $ 885 64 $642 08 



134 



HOME MISSIONS 
Recapitulation of Receipts, by Synods 



Synods 


1917-18 


1918-19 


1919-20 


1920-21 


1921-22 


Alabama 


$3,342 78 


$3,748 63 


$3,657 18 


$5,472 12 


$6,487 30 


Arizona 


2,540 70 


2,005 53 


2,607 90 


3,358 53 


4,387 92 


Arkansas 


3,905 54 


3,456 53 


2,931 84 


3,563 85 


3,792 23 


Atlantic 


67 77 


95 96 


1,129 11 


852 56 


471 01 


Baltimore 


9,209 42 


11,279 47 


16,894 01 


14,882 41 


16,803 38 


California 


20,271 60 


16,616 31 


24,928 18 


30,228 19 


36,337 86 


Canadian 


23 25 


9 00 


96 34 


124 21 


136 19 


Catawba 


147 50 


217 76 


2,584 27 


1,544 51 


1,466 39 


Colorado 


13,000 65 


7,085 32 


11,209 29 


13,627 09 


10,991 81 


East Tennessee 


35 00 


41 50 


469 30 


478 23 


393 58 


Idaho 


2,238 19 


1,884 37 


2,894 64 


3,297 95 


3,076 46 


Illinois 


4,447 80 


14,631 98 


27,854 19 


22,291 49 


18,834 67 


Indiana 


6,339 63 


10,099 50 


18,117 22 


2,572 12 


6,196 18 


Iowa 


13,278 39 


16,836 31 


20,352 29 


28,349 59 


10,631 50 


Kansas 


221 68 


9,524 08 


5,798 43 


4,223 60 


6,707 37 


Kentucky 


10,633 33 


10,536 75 


12,906 33 


17,362 67 


17,441 54 


Michigan 


18,729 73 


18,957 40 


29,952 21 


32,000 69 


37,829 45 


Minnesota 


26,307 93 


27,106 38 


30,554 17 


33,288 28 


36,352 31 


Mississippi. . . . 


1,572 64 


1,775 13 


1,945 97 


1,717 66 


1,724 45 


Missouri 


34,608 25 


35,473 19 


48,263 10 


43,424 52 


63,962 28 


Montana 


3,892 44 


2,207 60 


3,326 92 


3,164 96 


2,562 47 


Nebraska 


18,966 35 


19,119 39 


30,067 55 


22,085 58 


23,854 55 


New England... 


3,970 46 


5,436 84 


6,503 28 


10,100 94 


8,824 48 


New Jersey. . . . 


37,588 63 


30,734 95 


37,692 34 


57,717 33 


65,579 65 


New Mexico. . . 


1,843 62 


1,269 51 


1,919 23 


2,208 17 


2,166 10 


New York 


127,282 20 


138,669 88 


181,575 10 


264,281 69 


275,155 91 


North Dakota. 


2,958 42 


4,938 33 


4,724 24 


6,141 51 


5,034 27 


Ohio 


16,100 87 


23,259 65 


46,651 35 


29,604 10 


23,699 58 


Oklahoma 


11,064 78 


10,961 38 


14,761 94 


16,257 55 


16,248 39 


Oregon 


2,751 28 


5,716 63 


3,558 86 


5,127 83 


4,342 73 


Pennsylvania . . 


72,546 32 


82,192 14 


137,091 69 


194,333 97 


193,796 98 


South Dakota . 


5,646 38 


14,645 45 


14,856 16 


18,134 01 


13,692 69 


Tennessee 


8,035 35 


10,717 98 


17,654 09 


14,095 32 


14,001 13 


Texas 


12,612 45 


12,612 32 


18,441 47 


18,565 63 


21,825 38 


Utah 


598 27 
*14,880 75 


510 35 
*15,713 21 


636 90 
*21,419 05 


763 15 
*25,559 85 


875 78 


Washington... . 


*24,099 12 


Wash. Alaska only. . 


718 00 


825 71 


664 06 


718 04 


550 30 


West German. . 


6,034 09 


5,283 70 


4,547 41 


1,633 23 


1,283 95 


West Virginia. . 


195 11 


2,906 72 


3,982 19 


2,820 69 


1,686 04 


Wisconsin 


746 25 


1,448 06 


431 96 


394 89 


183 38 


Wyoming 


683 11 


637 81 


584 60 


1,595 41 


978 70 


Welsh Church 










8,761 88 




















$816,254 43 


$957,964 12 


$992,118 34 


Plus New Era 


Adjustment 




19 02 




20 03 


Less New Era 


Adjustment 






22 11 














$520,050 91 


$581,178 71 


$816,273 45 


$957,942 01 


$992,138 37 



*Excluding Alaska. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 
Recapitulation of Expenditures, by Synods 



135 



Synods 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

Baltimore 

California 

Colorado 

Florida 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi. . . 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

New England. 
New Jersey. . . 
New Mexico. . 
New York. ... 
North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma. ... 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania . 
South Dakota 
Tennessee .... 

Texas 

Utah 

Washington . . 
Wash. Alaska only. 
West German. 
Wisconsin .... 
Wyoming .... 



1917-18 



$13,306 58 
39,683 86 
15,611 06 
6,041 65 
60,125 82 
24,788 71 



12,722 00 

594 30 

3,023 35 

4,547 64 

3,566 85 

12,871 93 

17,203 31 

26,422 24 

4,353 95 

29,558 86 

17,858 96 

19,653 79 

6,782 55 



28,165 47 

103,925 75 

11,970 40 

1,807 31 
32,994 78 
24,552 59 

3,750 00 
28,747 30 
37,106 47 
43,093 87 
14,859 49 
*47,028 49 
24,497 65 

9,800 85 

7,515 01 
16,079 27 



1918-19 



$9,448 21 
38,808 49 
13,068 90 
4,027 00 
53,754 52 
20,582 31 



8,983 91 

1,368 29 

3,113 30 

3,677 41 

1,796 75 

13,198 54 

18,215 74 

27,058 13 

5,635 25 

30,939 96 

12,571 25 

17,725 31 

5,392 60 



23,632 85 

98,058 67 

7,979 78 

1,717 39 

25,220 32 

19,045 53 

2,410 00 

27,032 43 

36,044 63 

33,689 22 

14,587 82 

*34,827 91 

28,890 30 

7,106 12 

6,847 50 

11,987 60 



1919-20 



m,691 56 
50,383 25 
16,827 49 
5,968 56 
67,274 21 
26,649 80 



9,338 17 

709 59 

4,438 30 

5,430 66 

1,450 00 

13,210 03 

26,887 84 

32,645 25 

7,119 2S 

42,307 63 

14,059 26 

21,155 46 

6,337 00 

6,727 85 

28,934 69 

104,860 67 

10,640 89 

500 00 

25,634 20 

27,763 52 

3,200 00 

32,948 40 

58,895 30 

41,768 63 

12,990 15 

*49,923 12 

31,023 56 

6,713 60 

8,554 50 

13,166 05 



1920-21 



$16,335 57 
62,378 79 
20,296 58 
8,183 30 
97,196 76 
28,240 72 



8,668 87 
669 48 

8,125 00 

6,736 20 

1,850 00 
15,701 76 
37,377 02 
38,508 97 

6,935 72 
54,586 51 
28,413 70 
21,703 73 

8,762 65 

12,079 50 

36,103 08 

221,330 05 

13,626 70 

5,000 00 
33,052 85 
33,729 54 

2,400 00 
36,395 71 
72,771 79 
56,079 13 
15,189 62 
*56,969 20 
52,359 07 



8,799 99 
13,728 35 



1921-22 



$11,135 89 

60,215 13 

23,651 90 

5,700 00 

96,305 02 

35,041 31 

6,634 81 

9,989 12 

2,681 16 

5,096 63 

3,575 00 



18,542 23 
38,276 90 
43,552 95 

7,230 38 
57,966 43 
31,623 73 
21,608 76 

8,817 40 

10,483 89 

33,718 68 

228,960 27 

10,592 85 

4,000 00 
26,880 03 
33,161 69 

2,500 00 
38,204 17 
77,862 05 
52,198 19 
14,384 54 
*55,845 21 
50,582 41 



7,770 50 
16,704 42 



$754,672 11 



$668,443 94 



$828,128 47 



$1,140,285 91 



$1,151,493 65 



Expenditures in PORTO RICO, 


CUBA AND SANTO DOMINGO 


Porto Rico. . . . 
Cuba 


$43,678 65 
33,648 37 


$35,443 56 

44,315 11 

360 00 


$65,104 76 

52,137 00 

1,440 00 


$82,023 47 

65,000 00 

4,970 00 


$75,188 90 
60,023 47 


Santo Domingo 


10,166 65 








$77,327 02 


$80,118 67 


$118,681 76 


$151,993 47 


$145,379 02 



^Excluding Alaska. 



^ 


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$11,135 89 

60,215 13 

23,651 90 

5,700 00 

96,.305 02 

35,041 31 

6,634 81 

9,9S9 12 

2,681 16 

5,093 63 

3.575 00 

18.542 23 

38,276 90 

43.552 95 

7,230 38 

57,966 43 

31,623 73 

21,608 76 

8,817 40 

10,483 89 

33,718 68 

228.960 27 

10.592 85 

4.000 00 

26.880 03 

33.161 69 

2..500 00 

38.204 17 

77.862 05 

52.198 19 

14.384 54 

55,845 21 

50,582 41 

7,770 50 

16,704 42 

60,037 96 

145,379 02 

6.942 32 


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4J 







TREASURER'S REPORT 



1.?; 



CONTRIBUTIONS FROM INDIVIDUALS, ETC. 

During Year Ended March 31, 1922 
FOR CURRENT^WORK. 



A. II. A." $50 00 

Abiams, Adj. J. 11 5 00 

Adams, Annie Graves 15 00 

Adams, B. Gould 5 00 

Ahrcns, Mrs. Kate S 20 44 

Aikman, Walter M 300 00 

"A I^dy Friend" 1 00 

"A Uady Friend," Dover, N. J... 10 00 

.Mien, Kev. C. H 25 00 

Allen, Rev. U. D 15 00 

Aniberson, Miss Sallie C 20 00 

Anderson, Frances B 5 00 

Andre, Mr. and Mrs. F. 15 250 00 

".■\nonymous" 10 00 

".\nOnymous," New York 36 

■■.\nonymous," Nebraska 40 00 

■"Anonymous," Ohio 36 

"Anonymous" 72 

Anthony, Kev. and Mrs. Robert VV. 20 00 

Armstrong, Mrs. Frank 29 20 

Armstrong, \V. C 1 00 

Art/, David 25 00 

Aul)urn Theo. Seminary, Y. M. 

C. A 56 00 

Bailey, J. G 10 00 

liaird, II. T 2 00 

liaird. Miss Jennie M 16 00 

Baird, Rev. W. M 5 00 

Baird, Mrs. Wm 5 00 

Baldwin, Mrs. A. II 3 00 

Ball, .Margaret G., Phila. Nurse.. 5 00 

Barnes, F. N 10 00 

Barton, Mr. and Mrs. Bowling.. 25 00 

Battles, Miss C. FHzabeth 100 00 

Bayha, Elizabeth J 7 00 

Behrens, Miss Sarah B 100 

Berger, Edward 50 00 

Berman, Rev. Paul L, 20 00 

Bewley, Miss Lizzie 100 

Bewley, Mr. M. G 1 00 

Black, C. W 100 00 

Blaine, Albert and nineteen others 13 00 

iUakeslee, Mrs. A. F 5 00 

Bodenhamer, Rev. David Shires. . 1 00 

Uosworth, Miss T. W .' 10 00 

Boughton, Mr. 1 1 00 

liowden, Mrs. J. S 100 

Bowen, Mrs 5 00 

Bowen, Wm. F 10 00 

Boynton, Mrs. W. E 10 00 

Bracken, B. F 7 30 

Brooklyn Life Line Mission .... 25 00 

Brown, Rev. Henry S., D.D 1 00 

Buchanan, Robt. J 3 00 

I'.ushnell, Miss Sara J 15 00 

'•C. S. S. Through S. W." 2,500 00 

Cannon, Mrs. T. N 5 00 

Cannon, Mrs. T. W 5 00 

Carlton, .Miss Lucy E 10 00 

Carnieom. Mrs. Mazo 12 50 

••C. E. O. per I). C. E." 100 00 

"Cash" 550 00 

••Cash" 20 00 

Castleman, R. H 7 30 

Chambers, Robert A 500 00 

Chapman, Ethel C 10 00 

Charlton, Miss Agnes 5 66 

Church, W. A. H 5 00 

Churchman, Mrs. Horace 10 00 

Clark, Miss Bertee , 10 22 

Clark, ElizabetJi M 10 00 



Coder, Harry E |1 00 

Colby, Mrs. Anna L 5 00 

Colton, Mrs. J. Milton 100 00 

Connell, Mr. J. E. P 10 00 

Conning, Rev. John S 8 00 

Cook, J. II 30 00 

Cooper, .Miss Sarah J 100 00 

Couse, Miss I. M 20 00 

Covert, Rev. VV. M 27 38 

Cox, iMiss Isabella Vaclie 5 00 

Cramer, Mrs. S. S 5 00 

Crawford, Rev. Geo. B 20 00 

Cross, .Miss A. D 3 00 

Cro.xlon, Phillip 20 00 

Crumb, Dr. G. P 25 00 

Currie, Miss Jean 5 00 

Daniels, Mrs. E 100 

Davis, Kev. B. Frank 20 00 

Davis, Miss Lottie M 10 00 

Day, Mrs. Florence 113 00 

Dayton, Mr. and Mrs. G. N 2,000 00 

Deacon, Mrs. C. J 10 00 

De Grali', .Mrs. Carrie M 225 00 

Denman, E. G 4 75 

Dixon, Rev. John 35 00 

Doughety, M. R 5 00 

Downer, Mrs. W. B 25 00 

Dredge, Mrs. John M., Jr 2 00 

Dulancy, H. S 25 00 

Dunlap, Dr. Robert W 50 00 

Dunn, S. B 18 25 

Duryea, Edward C 5 00 

Duryea, Icssie 15 00 

Eaton, Thomas 25 00 

"E. D. S. Through S. VV." 2,500 00 

Elcock, .Miss Elizabeth M 25 00 

Ellet, Lucinda E 10 00 

Ericson, Evelyn Jane 10 00 

Eyerly, J. H 30 00 

Evans, .Mrs. Wm. S 10 00 

Ferree, .Mrs. S. P. and Miss A. D. 10 00 

Findlay, L. C 2 00 

Finney, Wm. P 10 00 

Fisher, Horace 10 00 

File, Miss Kitty G 5 00 

Fcckler, Miss K. Laura 10 00 

Forsyth, E. K 40 00 

Foster, .Mrs. J. A. and Children.. 1 50 

Frackelton, Mrs. Constance C. . 5,000 00 

France, Homer A 30 00 

"Friend" 500 00 

"Friend" 5 00 

"Friend" 25 00 

"Friend" 20 00 

••Friend" 15 00 

••FrJetid" 6 00 

"Friend of Home Missions" .... 500 00 

••Friend" 2 00 

••Friend" 5 50 

"Friend" 300 00 

••Friend" 10 00 

••Friend, Waddington, N. Y." .. 20 00 

••Friend'- 5 00 

"Friend" 300 00 

■•Friend" 50 

•Friend" 500 00 

'•Friend, Scranton, Penna." .... 5 00 

••Friend of the Board" 500 00 

"Friend" 5 00 

"Friend" 05 



138 



HOME MISSIONS 



"Friend" $3 10 

"Friend" 500 00 

"Friends" 15 00 

"Friends" 150 00 

"Friends," East Orange, N. J... 4 00 

"Friends, Montclair, N. J." .. 18 00 

"Friends, Pleasantville, N. Y." . . 5 00 
Fuller, Mr. and Mrs. Roy and 

daughter Opal 20 00 

Fulton, Robert S 15 00 

Gaily, Mrs. Lide A 5 00 

Garrett, W. B 3 00 

Garritt, Miss Leila 5 10 

Gault, E;imer 5 00 

Gillespie, Rev. James 1' 100 00 

Gray, Miss Sadie 100 

Green, Caleb S 500 00 

Guild Enrollment Fees 34 50 

Haines, Mary A 20 00 

Hall, Henry M 50 00 

Hall, Mrs. John W 100 

Hallock, F. M 2 00 

Hamilton, Mrs. L. H 15 00 

Hannon, G. D 25 00 

Hanson, Carl L 10 00 

Harbison, Estate of vS. P 250 00 

Harkleroad, Miss Florence M... 10 00 

Harman, Miss 1 00 

Harris, W. B 100 00 

Harvey, O. F 25 00 

Hastings, Mrs. William 100 

Helwig, C. F 25 00 

Herrick, D. C 15 00 

Hester. W. T 3 00 

Hillirvell, Mrs. C 5 48 

Hine, Rev. C. C 3 65 

Hodge, Mrs. Henry L 5 00 

Hoffman, Mr. and Mrs. M. H. B. 5 00 

Hogel, M. H 5 00 

Holmes, Wm. h 10 00 

Hopewell, Mrs. M. C 1,250 00 

Horine, Mr. and Mrs. G. T. and 

Family 16 00 

Horn, Mrs. F. C 100 

Humke, Mrs. Geo 25 00 

Hunter, Rev. J. M 5 00 

Hutcliins, Charles L 10 00 

"Individual liberty in benevo- 
lences" 75 00 

"J. C. K." 10 00 

Jensen, S. C 8 00 

Josat, Rev. T. C 5 00 

"K." 400 00 

Keck, C. M 8 50 

Keefanvar, Mr. and Mrs. J. F... 3 00 

Keiry, Rev. and Mrs. Wm. Gordon 250 00 

Keiry, Rev. William 25 00 

Keith, Laura P 30 00 

Kellogg, Mrs. Mary E. J 100 00 

Kelly, Joseph 59 

Kepler, T. B 10 00 

Kerr, Alexander H 5 00 

Kerr, Mr. and Mrs. J. L 6 50 

Kersten, Rev. and Mrs. Geo. C. 16 00 

Kieffer, Rev. and Mrs. W. T. L. 7 00 

Kilbourn, Chalmers 5 00 

Kilgers, Geo. J 12 78 

King, Miss S. J 300 00 

King, Mrs. W. P 3 55 

Kingery, Anna J 5 00 

Kurd'e, J. C 5 00 

La Grange, Rev. S. W 5 10 

Lee, Mrs. Hutson 100 

Little, Rev. John W 5 00 

Lyle, Mrs. J. F 5 00 

MaoAllister, Miss S. E 2 00 

McCabe, John M 183 

MacLean, Rev. D. A 25 00 

McCorkle, Miss Letetia W 50 00 

McCracken, Clara G 25 00 

McCracken, C. R 5 00 

McCracken, J. C 10 00 

McCracken, J. H 25 00 

McCutchen, A. C 50 00 



McU. J $50 00 

Mac Donald, Mrs. M. L 5 00 

McHvaine, Miss M. Rebecca .... 1000 

McKinlcy, W. B 500 00 

McLeod, W. G. and family 50 00 

McMartin, Rev. David 20 00 

McSurely, Wm. J 10 00 

Maghan, Gertrude 5 00 

Mapel, Miss Sue A 1 05 

Marquis, Rev. J. A., D.D 100 00 

Marquis, Miss Sarah 14 36 

Marshall, Mrs. E. A 5 00 

Marshall, Mae E 3 00 

Marsilje, Mrs. P. J 5 00 

Marston, Rev. and Mrs. F 10 00 

Martin, Alice 40 00 

Martin, Chas. A 3 65 

Martin, John L 30 00 

May, W. G 146 

Meigs, Ferris J 25 00 

Melone, Lida and Cordia 5 00 

Meyer, The Misses 36 50 

Miller, Alice May 20 00 

Miller, Elmer 100 00 

Miller, I. R 5 00 

Mitchell, W. B 10 00 

Montgomery, Rev. D. W 25 00 

Montgomery, W. A 54 80 

Moody Bible Institute — Mission- 
ary Union 375 00 

Moore, Mrs. Ida C 150 00 

Morrison, Mrs. John Grant .... 500 

Morton, Mrs. Sallie S 20 00 

Mowat, Agnes 10 00 

Munger, Mrs. Gertrude B 10 50 

Munger, H. C 500 00 

Murray, Mrs. Elizabeth 100 

Nelson, H. M 3 65 

Nelson, Miss Mary S 10 00 

Newell, Rev. and Mrs. D. A. . . 35 00 

Nickell, Rev and Mrs. W. Nelson 15 00 

Niles, Rev. and Mrs. J. S 5 00 

"Obed" 8 00 

"Old Lady in Baltimore" 2 00 

O'Neill, Miss Martha 10 00 

Paden, Rev. W. M 10 00 

Palis, H 10 00 

Penrose, Valeria F 100 00 

Presbyterian Man 10 00 

Presbyterian Woman 5 00 

Price, Mrs. I. G. and Miss Mabel 10 00 
Price, Misses Mabel L. and Helen 

M 18 25 

Purmort, Rev. C. H 25 00 

Quarles, J. J 25 00 

Rasch, Miss Margaret A 11 00 

Reamer, Miss S 10 00 

Reed, A. A 20 00 

Reed, Chas 5 00 

Reeves, Mr. John T 25 00 

Reider, Mrs. S. A 4 00 

"Returned Missionary from Persia" 12 25 

Rex, Mrs. Elizabeth W 5 00 

Rice, Mrs. Minnie H 15 00 

Robinson, Samuel 50 00 

Rowen, Mrs. F. K 100 

Rufiin, J. L 12 50 

Santee Normal Training School.. 25 00 

Scarborough, CM 50 00 

Schell, Rev. Wm. P 18 25 

Scholl, Rev. and Mrs. Henry T. 13 00 
Scotia Women's College Miss'y 

Soc, Concord, N. C 20 00 

Scott, E. S 25 00 

Scow, Mr. M. 25 00 

Seblem, Mrs. John, Family of . . 50 00 

Seeley, Rev. Boudinot 10 00 

Shaw, Mrs. Emma C 5 00 

Sheller, Katharine 1 00 

Shepherd, Rev. and Mrs. J. F 5 00 

Shipley, Miss E. G 10 00 

Shipley, Miss Mary A 50 00 

Singer, Miss A 100 

Small, Samuel 60 00 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



139 



Smith, Rev. A. E 

Smith, Mrs. H. R 

Smith, Mr. Wm. Hastie, Jr 

Snyder, Miss Annie 

Sprague^ Mrs. Viette B 

Stage, G. S 

Steiner, isorman B 

Stewart, Mrs. Frew II 

Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. G. M 

Stiles, Mrs. Frank S 

Stik, Miss ARnes Watson 

Stoudts, T. L 

Stright, F. L 

Sturgeon, Mr. and Mrs. W. O. . . 

Swann, Rev. J. 15 

Taylor, Mrs. ICHzabeth S., and 

daughter 

Teachers' College, St. Cloud, Minn. 
Teachers and Students of Mary 

Holmes Sem 

Thayer, Mrs. Susan M 

Thompson, Elizabeth and Jeanette 

Tibbs, Elizabeth 

Twyeffort, L,. V 

Upson, J. E 

Various Sources 

Verner, A. W 

Vickers, Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Mclv. 

Wainwright, Carl 

Walton, II. J 



$20 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


9 


50 


2 


00 


.50 


00 


50 


00 


20 


00 


2 


00 


35 


50 


3 


65 


10 


00 




3(; 


12f) 


54 


5 


00 


10 


00 


25 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


2 


60 


12 


50 


250 


00 


113 


72 


20 


00 


25 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 



Warne, Rev. and Mrs. W. W. . . $7 00 

Warner, Miss Beth E 10 00 

Waterhouse, Mrs. Wm 12 00 

Watt, Miss E. E 400 00 

Way, Mrs. Eida M 10 00 

Weber, Geo. R 15 00 

Webster, Laura K 15 00 

Webster, Leslie C 5 50 

Wells, Richard 2 00 

Wheeler, Mrs. Arthur D 200 00 

White, J. W 3 65 

Whittemore, Howard 100 00 

Wiley, C. t 20 00 

Williams, Charlotte E 185 00 

Williams, Edward 5 00 

Williams, Mr. E. Purnell 2 00 

Williams, Morris 100 00 

Willis, A. P 2 00 

Wilson, Miss Margaret 40 00 

Wissinger, Rev. and Mrs. I,. 15. 5 48 

Woods, John, Jr 40 00 

Wray, Mrs. Robert 25 00 

Wyckoff, Miss Katharine 1% 10 00 

Yost, Miss Mary K 20 00 

Young, Miss Ella 10 00 

Young, Miss Henrietta (". 5 00 

Ziegler, H. J 20 00 

Total *28,577 89 



RECEIPTS FROM MISCELLANEOUS SOURCES 

During Year ended March 31, 1922 

Ilaines Mission Alaska — -Leases $25 00 

Sale property, Columbus, Miss 217 60 

Sale clothing, Big Pine, N. C 15 00 

Appropriations of last year charged off but not needed, returned to current account 7,525 58 

*7,783 IS 



140 



HOME MISSIONS 



LEGACIES 

RECEIVED DURING THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1922 
ARRANGED BY SYNODS 



BALTIMORE 
.1. Estelle Nichols, late of Wash- 
ington, D. C $443 56 

$443 56 

CALIFORNIA 
Mary Douglas Ballantyne, late of 

Los Angeles $974 50 

Edwin Robinson, late of Santa 

Barbara 25 00 

Emma E. Rupp, late of San Diego 250 00 

Mary Virginia S^impson, late of 

Santa Barbara 1,000 00 

$2,249 50 

ILLINOIS 
Anna H. Donovan, late of Watseka $3,500 00 
David Furguson, late of Staunton 100 00 
Mary Ann Hubbard, late of Chi- 
cago 72 94 

Wm. W. Mott, late of Princeville 4 00 

Sarah J. Snow, late of McLean.. 28'2 17 
Sara Eliza Thomson, late of 

Princeton 500 00 

$4,459 11 

IOWA 
Susan Alrich Ballord, late of Win- 

terset $50 30 

Mrs. S. D. Eadie, late of Storm 

Lake 1,997 83 

Nancy Merrill, late of Winthrop 50 00 

Sarah Jane Reed, late of Council 

Bluffs 200 00 

Ida P. Wilson, late of Burlington 1,185 42 

$3,483 55 

KANSAS 

Wm. Molyneaux, late a member 
of the East Branch Ch., Clif- 
ton $250 00 

Mrs. Sarah A. Otwell, late a mem- 
ber of First Ch., Indepen- 
dence 500 00 

Margaret E. Sessler, late of Kansas 25 00 

$775 00 

MICHIGAN 

John J. Cook, late of Petoskey $94 76 

Eliza L. Donaldson, late of Mount 

Clemens 190 00 

Eveline Sills Preston, late a mem- 
ber First Ch., Lansing 150 57 

Chas. Walton, late of Lyon Twp. 50 00 

$485 33 

MINNESOTA 
Edward A. Webb, late of St. Paul $4,850 00 

$4,850 00 

MISSOURI 
IClizabeth Stow, late of Shelby Co. $50 00 

$50 00 



NEW ENGLAND 

Mehitable M. Bursiel, late of Sut- 
ton, New Hampshire $207 50 

Nancy B. T. Greenough, late of 

Manchester, New Hampshire 5,613 50 

Mary G. Mcintosh, late of Woburn, 

Mass 30 00 

Marion W. Ramsdell, late of Chel- 
sea, Vt 1,376 57 

Mary Shoemaker, late of Spring- 
field, Mass 1,022 47 

$8,250 04 

NEW JERSEV 
Ellen Rea Carroll, late of Flem- 

ington $1,000 00 

Anna M. Haley late of Newark.. 3,000 00 
Anna M. Hutchinson, late of 

Trenton 3,755 48 

Caroline W. Mitchell, late of 

Hackettstown 1,332 95 

$9,088 43 

NEW YORK 

W. W. Atterbury, late of New 

York City $2,340 00 

Levi Bigalow, late of Port Henry 215 88 

Emmeline C. Davies, late of 

Brooklyn 2,000 00 

Harriet L. Farwell, late of Buffalo 249 10 

Washington Frothingham, late of 

Fonda 5 00 

Harriet F. Gardner, late of Roch- 
ester . 1,446 06 

Helen Louisa Gibson, late of 

Tarrytown 103 72 

Cassandra Goodenough, late of 

Worcester 250 00 

James W. Green, late of Glovers- 

ville 75 00 

Jane B. Harrison, late of Boonville 300 00 

Abbie E. Heslor, late of Marion 1,000 00 

Mary M. Holloway, late of Roch- 
ester (Mem. Ch.) 400 00 

Ferd. T. Hopkins, late of Somers 400 00 

Dudley Jardine, late of New 

York City 44 30 

Mary F. Johnson, late of Benton.. 2,008 88 

Emily H. Moir, late of New York 

City 300 00 

Elizabeth Moore, late of Boonville 500 00 

Thomas Motley, late of Brockport 739 83 

Fred. W. Osborn, late of Brook- 
lyn 563 18 

Mary W. Ottman, late of Albany 1,000 00 

Josephine L. Peyton, late of New 

York aty 10,304 67 

Jane G. Phelps, late of Tarrytown 40 00 

John B. V. Quackenbush, late of 

Hoosick Falls 1,000 00 

II. B. Silliman, late of Cohoes. . 1,500 00 

John Stewart, late of New York 

City 9,241 08 

Christiana H. Tillson, late of New 

York City 475 00 

Margaret H. Turner, late of Mea- 
dow Brook 1,000 00 

Tames G. Van Alstyne, late of 

Kinderhook 1,500 00 



J9,001 70 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



141 



OHIO 

Mary IC. Jimwn, l;ilr of ll;^lllillnll, 

Co $ I 

James Gladden, late of Ohio .... 4 

Simon Hartzell, late of North Ben- 
ton 1 

Samuel Q. March, late of Hubbard 

Harriet Milholland, late of Zanes- 

ville 1,250 00 

Joseph S. Patterson, late of Find- 
lay I 

Abel II. Potter, late of Cleveland i 

Joseph II. Smith, late of Marysville 

Marianne Smith, late of Ohio . . 



,4fiJ 
,001 



,300 
185 



,133 

,000 

463 

25 



OREGON 
Anna Mary 1",. Mann, late of 
Portland 

PeNNSYI^VANIA 

Ilattie N. C. Archer, late of Wash- 
ington 

Margaret A. Armstrong, late of 

Phila 35 

R. Dale Benson, late of Phila. . . 1 

Uliza S. Boyd, late of Phila 

Mary A. Boyd, late of l-'reeland.. 

l"<lizabeth C. i3urkhart, late of 
Phila 

Margaret S. Cadmus, late of 

Phila 2 

Susan Ramsey Christler, late of 
Boro. of Hookstown, Beaver 
Co 

John H. Converse, late of Phila. 

iClizabeth W. Cook, late of Green- 
castle 

Josefa Countermine, late of Phila. 

Elizabeth A. Davidson, late of 
Boro. of Newville, Cumber- 
land Co 1 

Letitia Deniston, late of County 

of Allegheny 18 

Rachel English, late of New Cas- 
tle 11 



$14,820 


08 


$1,250 


00 


$1,250 


00 



$195 01 



,107 

,000 

38 

150 


00 
00 
00 
00 


250 


00 


,783 


12 


384 
50 


37 
00 


113 

62 


73 
50 


,552 


46 


,572 


72 


,823 


39 



i;ilrn I'Vislcr, late of Phila $.=i2 01 

Josephine 1. llincs, late of Doyles- 

town 3,676 54 

Harriet Holland, late of I'hila. .. 120 00 

Miss Nannie Orr Ingram, lata of 

Spruce Creek 200 00 

Mrs. b. D. Knowles, late of Fair- 
view 7 50 

Chas. W. Kolb, late of Phila. .. 61,979 17 

Sarah McKinney, late of Clarks- 

ville 1,905 50 

Dr. J. C. Redick, late of Butler .. 923 28 

Henry II. Reed, late of Phila. . . 451 92 

Ann !•;. Rhode, late of Altoona .. 95 00 

John N. Robinson, late of Crafton 6,025 00 

Martha E. Russell, late of Indiana 285 64 

Charles J. Shoemaker, late of 

Wilkes-Barre 7,217 21 

IClizabeth Cummings Smead, late of 

Carlisle 50 00 

Eydia G. Smedley, late of Erie Co. 26 81 

Margaret R. Smith, late of Phila. 109 30 

Mary Smith, late of Greensboro.. 28 50 

Harmon Waddcll, late of Cham- 

bersville 316 18 

Wilson E. Wallace, late of Cass- 

ville, Harrison Co 162 50 

Charlotte L. Waters, late a mem- 
ber of the First Ch., War- 
ren 900 00 

Margaret Willson, late of Jefferson 

Twp., Allegheny Co 207 63 

William Willson, late of Jefferson 

Twp., Alleghany Co 17,271 73 

$174,093 72 

TENNESSEE 
H. D. Wyatt, late of Chattanooga $18 38 

$18 38 

TEXAS 
Mrs. Adeline E. Smith, late of 

Crockett $3,129 20 

$3,129 20 

Total $a00,447 60 



142 



HOME MISSIONS 



SPECIAL CONTRIBUTIONS AND GIFTS RECEIVED 

FOR THE DEBT OF 1920-1921 



Phoenix, Mexican Church $ 3 16 

Bisbee, Mexican Church 10 00 

Morenci, Mexican Church 10 00 

Atkins Church 6 00 

Stouts Chapel 2 00 

Los Angeles, Divine Saviour Ch. 600 00 

Redlands, 1st Church 100 00 

Riverside, Magnolia Ave. Church 50 00 

San Bernardino, 1st Church .... 50 00 

Alameda Church 71 40 

Alvardo Church 5 60 

Berkeley, 1st Church 100 00 

Berkeley, Calvary Church 46 00 

Centerville Church 3 40 

Hayward Church 34 40 

Ivivermore Church 50 00 

Oakland, Brooklyn Church 17 50 

Oakland, Centennial Church .... 52 00 

Oakland, Emmanuel Church .... 3 00 

Oakland, St. James' Church .... 25 00 

Oakland, Welsh Church 25 00 

San Francisco, Olivet Church . . 9 25 

San Francisco, Welsh Church . . 25 00 

Walnut Creek Church 20 00 

Bakersfield, 1st Church 10 00 

Fellows, Westminster Church . . 10 00 

Fresno, Arlington Heights Church 10 00 

Merced, Central Qinrch 10 00 

Modesto, 1st Church 10 00 

Oakdale Church 7 00 

Taft, 1st Church 12 00 

Alamosa, 1st S. Sch 10 00 

Alamosa, 2nd Church 10 00 

Canon City Church 20 00 

Colorado Springs, 1st Church . . 50 50 

Colorado Springs, Ivywild Church 5 00 

Holly S. Sch 5 00 

Monte Vista Church 50 00 

Pueblo, Mesa Church 10 00 

Pueblo, Park Ave. Church .... 13 50 

San Rafael Church 6 00 

Trinidad, Italian Church 10 00 

Walsenburg S. Sch 5 00 

Boise, 1st Church 50 00 

Pocatello Church 10 00 

Church Extension Committee of 

the Synod of Illinois 1,000 GO 

Church Extension Committee of 

Alton Presbytery 100 00 

Cedar Rapids, 1st Church 100 00 

Louisville, Warren Memorial Ch. 73 17 

Kansas City, Grace Church .... 100 00 

Grantsdale Church 8 75 

Bloomfield, Westminster Church.. 250 00 

Newark, Forest Hill, W. M. S... 100 00 

Alamogordo, 1st Church 50 00 

Clovis Church 8 00 

Dexter Church 3 01 

Hagerman Church 2 16 

Martha Taylor Memorial Church 2 35 

Roswell, 1st Church 25 00 

Taiban Church 3 00 

Albuquerque, 1st Church 10 00 

Deming Church 2154 

Magdalena Church 17 50 

Silver City Church 4 00 

Socorro Church 3 00 

Las Vegas, 2nd Spanish Church. . 5 00 

Navajo Mission 10 00 

Through Rev. R. C. Jackson, Sante 

Fe Pby 28 00 



Albany, 1st Church $100 00 

Albany, 4th Church 56 00 

Buffalo, Lafayette Ave. Church. . 250 00 

Buffalo, North Church 100 00 

Buffalo, Westminster Church .... 500 00 

Geneseo Village, Central Church 50 00 

Syracuse, 4th Church 50 00 

Troy, 1st Church 220 00 

Cincinnati Presbytery 1,500 00 

Cleveland, 1st Church 1,050 00 

Portsmouth Presbytery 500 00 

Bristow Church 500 00 

Dickson Church 50 00 

Salt Lake, 3rd Church 75 00 

Kamiah, 2nd Church 2 00 

Home Mission Committee of Wy- 
oming Synod 10 GO 

Agnew, C. R 300 GO 

Agnew, George B., Hon 500 GO 

Allen, Rev. Arthur H 500 00 

Ailing, Joseph T 100 GO 

Archibald, S. D 15 GO 

Bainton, Rev. Henry W 10 00 

Ballou, H. C 50 00 

Barley, W. M 1 00 

Barton, Rev. J. H 25 00 

Barrett, S. P 1 00 

Battles, Miss C. Elizabeth 25 00 

Beach, T. N 10 00 

BeJl, Eliza Dennis 100 GO 

Bell, Rev. Hugh H 10 GO 

Bentley, G. J 5 00 

Bishop, T. K 5 00 

Boand, Rev. A. V 25 00 

Briggs, F. N 10 00 

Brooks, A. D 1 GO 

Brown, Rev. Carl W 10 GO 

Bunton, C. L 10 00 

Burr, Rev. D. R 10 GO 

Caldwell, H. T 30 00 

Campbell, Mrs. Anna L 10 50 

Carnine, John R 5 GO 

Carnohan, A. E 5 00 

Carver, Rev. J. E 25 00 

Gary, Mr. and Mrs. Walter L. . . 10 00 

Cechrist, Albert 10 GO 

Cheek, E. E 2 00 

Cheek, Lee 1 00 

Clark, Pliny 10 GO 

Clason, C. L 10 00 

Cory, Harvey E 50 00 

Costello, Mr. and Mrs. J. P 5 GO 

Crouch, S. D 10 00 

Cromer, Rev. Frederick 10 00 

Cunningham, J. E. B 25 OG 

Dahl, A. E 5 GO 

Davenport, Kate 50 00 

Davies, Rev. Geo. E 25 GO 

Dayton, Geo. D 1,000 00 

Demarest, C. H 250 00 

Dill, L. S 1 60 

Dixon, Rev. John 50 00 

Dodd, Allison 500 GO 

Donaldson, Rev. R. S 50 00 

Douglass, H. M 10 00 

Elder, Rev. T. F 20 GO 

Elliott, B. E". 5 00 

Erdman, O. A 10 GO 

Ewart, Rev. John Y 10 00 

Fisher, Horace 5 00 

Frackelton, Mrs. Constance C. . . 1,000 00 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



143 



France, iromcr A $20 00 

Frank, Rev. Adam G 10 00 

Frear, W. li 100 00 

Freeland, C. A 5 00 

Freyschlag, E. M 1 00 

"Friend" 100 

"Friend A" 1 00 

"Friend A" 2 00 

"Friend of Home Missions, A" . . 10,000 00 

"Friends" 15 00 

"Friends" 15 50 

Fulton, John II 100 00 

Gallup, Mr. and Mrs. E. P. . . 25 00 

Garrett, W. B 6 00 

Gillies, Edwin J 100 00 

Girvin, R. T 10 00 

Girvin, William J 10 00 

Hamilton, Dr. A. B 25 00 

Hamilton, Chas. H 20 00 

Harbison, Estate of Samuel P. . . 500 00 

Harris, Rev. Edwin 1 00 

Hart, Mrs. John K 5 00 

Havice, J. L 5 00 

Hawley, Rev. C. A 2 50 

Hayes, Rev. C. E 10 00 

Helwig, C. F 25 00 

Henderson, Harry B 10 00 

Hogg, J. Rennick 50 00 

Hudson, Mrs. W. B 10 00 

Hunter, Thomas 10 00 

Irvin, S. J 15 00 

Irving, Miss Helen M 3 00 

Irwin, A. B 2 00 

Jarvie, Miss Margaret S 500 00 

Jenkins, J. A 25 00 

Keener, 1. L 3 00 

Kellner & Son, M 5 00 

Kelly, Rev. John Bailey 75 00 

Kenney, E. A 100 

Keusseff, Rev. T. M 10 00 

King, Theo. F 200 00 

Knight, Mrs. E. W 15 00 

Ladbury, Geo. T 10 00 

Lambie, C. S 25 00 

Leal, Hugh 25 00 

Eee, Arthur K 25 00 

Eemley, W. M 2 50 

Leyenberger, J. P 5 00 

Loughy, W. A 5 00 

McCarroll, W. II 5 00 

McCay, N. C 10 00 

MoCollem, A. T 1 00 

McColloch, T. L 5 00 

McElhinncy, D. C 25 00 

McEwen, Rev. L. C 25 00 

Mcintosh, H. P 250 00 

McKelvy, Mrs. Kila K 1,000 00 

Mackey, Rev. U. L 100 00 

McLeod, H. S 100 00 

McMartin. Rev. David 55 00 

McNeil, C. E 3 00 

Mann, W. R 10 00 

Manson, John T 100 00 

Marquis, Rev. J. 1 50 00 

Marquis, Miss Sarah 5 00 

Marrs, S. E 1 00 

May, Albert E 500 00 

Meeker, Rev. John 5 00 

Miller, Mary L 100 00 

Montgomery, Rev. D. W 25 00 

Morse, Rev. H. N 50 00 

Munger, H. C 100 00 



Newport, M. F $10 00 

Paden, Rev. W. M 25 00 

Parry, Miss Edna L 5 00 

Perkins, Dr. I. B 10 00 

Phraner, Francis S 1,000 00 

Piilsbury, Rev. Harris 10 00 

Pratt, T. L 10 00 

Purmort, C. II 25 00 

Rabor, Amos () 10 00 

Raymond, L. W 50 00 

Reed, Albert A 25 00 

Reed, L. A 25 00 

Reed, S. B 1 00 

Reeve, W. E 1 00 

Rhea, Mrs. C 10 00 

Rice, Rev. Arthur L 10 00 

Richey, I. F 50 00 

Rodriguez, Rev. and Mrs. A. T... 10 00 

Howell, Miss Ella C '... 50 00 

Rushing, II. A 1 00 

Sandercock, CM 10 00 

Schaub, Rev. F. L 25 00 

Seminary Mission Committee .... 50 00 

Shepherd, Rev. J. F 10 00 

Small, Samuel 50 00 

Smith, Elias D 50 00 

Smith, Rev. Willis 10 00 

Smolenske, W. C 5 00 

Stacklunge, C. C 2 50 

Street, C. W 10 00 

Stubblefield, Rev. J. S 10 00 

Tatman, T. M 1 00 

Thomas, Rev. F. W 10 00 

Thomson, E. P 5 00 

Van Gordon, Fred 10 00 

Vernon, Rev. James F 10 00 

Vogan, W. G 100 

Walker, O. L 10 00 

Watson, Chas. S 25 00 

Weatherby, W. II 10 00 

Webster, T. L 20 00 

Welles, H. H., Tr 25 00 

Williams, Dr. C. G 10 00 

Williams, Rev. W. S 10 00 

Williamson, Rev. James D 100 00 

Wilson, Chas. A 10 00 

Wilson, P. L 1 00 

Wilson, W. H 10 00 

Winter. B. B 50 00 

Zorbaugh, Rev. C. L 10 00 

The Hubbard Press, Inc., Auburn, 

N. Y 1,860 00 



$31,843 19 
Church E.xtension Committee of 

the Presbytery of New York.. 6,000 00 

New York, Central Church 1,000 00 

New York, Faith Church 144 00 

New York, Madison Avenue Ch. 1,000 00 

New York, Park Avenue Church. . 30 00 

New York, Rutgers Church .... 237 85 

New York, St. James' CJiurch.. 20 00 

Brown, Rev. Wm. Adams 100 00 

Harkness, Edward S 5,000 00 

Harkness, Mrs. Stephen \' 5,000 00 

James, Arthur Curtiss 5,000 00 

Merle-Smith, Rev. Wilton 500 00 

24,031 85 

Grand Total. . . . $55,875 04 



144 



HOME MISSIONS 



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9,088 43 

39,007 66 

14.820 08 

1.250 00 

174,087 76 


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TREASURER'S REPORT 



W: 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

FOR LOCAL HOME MISSION WORK WITHIN THE BOUNDS OF THE SELF SUPPORTING 

SYNODS AND PRESBYTERIES 

NOTE — These figures furnished by the respective Synods and Presbyteries, represent the amounts received 
and expended by tlieir own Treasurers, and cover the period April 1, 1921 to March 31, 1922, with 
the exception of the Synod of New Jersey. Tlie amounts received are included in the "Combined 
Statement" immediately following this table. 



Baltimori; 

Baltimore 

New Castle 

Washington (Mty. 



California 

Los Angeles 

San Joacjuin 



Illinois 

Alton 

Bloomington.. . . 

Cairo 

Chicago 

Ewing 

Freeport 

Mattoon 

Ottawa 

Peoria 

Rock River 

Rushville 

Springfield 



Indiana 

Synod 

Iowa 
Cedar Rapids.. 

Corning 

Council Bluffs. 
Des Moines. . . 

Dubuque 

Fort Dodge. . . . 

Iowa 

Iowa City 

Sioux City . . . . 
Waterloo 



Kansas 

Emporia 

Highland 

Larned 

Neosho 

Osborne 

Solomon 

Topeka 

W^ichita 

Miscellaneous.. 



Rec'd 

$24,978 74 
12,627 68 
23,201 00 



$60,807 42 



$71,71.5 38 
11.554 79 



$83,270 17 



$6,480 50 
7,137 34 
1,781 86 
175,710 10 
3,165 74 
3,.500 88 
5,602 57 
3,915 51 
2,756 86 
5,525 85 
3,312 92 
6,039 31 



$224,929 44 



$45,113 91 



$6,680 63 
2,679 74 
2,724 75 
5.863 23 
3,318 38 
4,951 56 
5,418 70 
5,856 37 
5,004 01 
5,790 81 



Exp'd 

$28,395 51 

14,392 30 

23,177 00 



$65,964 81 



$70,1.56 18 
8,896 07 



$79,052 25 



$5,609 61 
13,620 94 
2,198 .36 
83,4.34 41 
3,028 81 
3,. 500 88 
1,777 54 
1,116 42 
2,090 00 
2,279 62 
3,794 91 
6,377 96 



$128,829 46 



$1,809 94 
2,249 95 
3,.548 75 
4,690 .58 
3,831 97 
4.620 67 
3,984 09 
3,.508 45 
4,. 562 ,52 
5,742 93 



5,288 181 $38,549 85 

-I- 



MlCHIGAN 

Detroit 

New Jersey 
Oct. 1, 1920 to Oct. 1, 

Elizabeth 

Havana 

Jersey City 

Monmouth 

Morris and Orange. , 

Newark 

New Brunswick 

Newton 

West Jersey 

Miscellaneous 



$2,.377 01 
2,246 10 
2,471 49 
5,.537 19 
1,181 36 
2,992 16 
6,214 96 
5,473 78 
397 04 



528,891 09 



$112,573 33 



$2,175 40 
1,283 33 
2,870 83 
3,7.56 60 
1,640 98 
3,302 87 
5,537 46 
2,766 84 
8,718 .38 



$32,052 69 



$113,440 54 



1921 I 

$16,770 371 

84 201 

21.474 40 

10,600 87 

41,269 29 

27.466 18 

18.283 51 

4.155 33 

11,797 46 

1,522 23 



$6,630 00 



I $151,901 61 

Less surplus pai.l tol 33,266 05 

Board 



I $118,635 56 
I 



9,791 69 

10,164 07 

5,. 542 22 

24,669 92 

13,891 .34 

2,800 00 

6,627 67 

4,930 42 



$85,047 .33 



New York 

.Albany 

Buffalo 

Rochester 

Troy 

Westchester 



Rec'd I 

$7,767 82 
63,782 921 

9,296 901 
*3,851 35 

5.560 73 



$90,259 72 



Ohio 

Athens 

Chillicothe. . . 
Cleveland. . . , 
Cincinnati.. . . 
Columbus. . . , 

Dayton 

Lima 

Mahoning. . . . 

Marion 

Portsmouth. . 
St. Clairsville 
Steubenville. . 

Toledo 

Wooster 

Zanesville. . . 



Oregon 
Portland. 



$2,886 00 
2,794 00 

43,200 00 

12,907 00 
9.500 00 
8.860 00 
3.. 570 00 

13, .3.39 00 
5,496 00 
2.961 00 
5.905 00 

12.397 00 
5,403 00 
3,838 00 
5,337 00 



$138,398 00 




Pennsylvania 

Beaver 

Blairsville 

Butler 

Carlisle 

Chester 

Clarion 

Erie 

Huntingdon 

Kittanning 

Lackawanna 

Lehigh 

Northumberland. . 

Philadelphia 

Pliiladelphia Nortli 

Pittsburgh 

Redstone 

Shenango . . . 

Washington 



$9,701 76 

16,442 00 

8,926 00 

15,923 22 

9.415 .34 

3,037 46 

3,200 00 

8,914 16 

5.185 11 

25.464 54 

14,458 00 

12,111 04 

69.016 00 

18,698 71 

1.33,463 12 

21,918 63 

8.099 66 

5,699 .50 



West German 
Synod 

West Virginia | 
Synod , 



Wisconsin 



Sjnod . 



Exp'd 

$6,978 51 
58,917 83 

7,702 67 
*2,951 14 

6.172 99 



$82,723 14 



$2,100 00 
2.350 00 

43.200 00 

12.907 00 
7,200 00 
6,800 00 
3,100 00 

13,.3.39 00 
4,200 00 
2.200 00 
4,800 00 

10.030 00 
4.900 00 
2.7,50 00 
4.330 00 



$124,236 00 



$7,745 14 

16.442 00 

7,999 00 

6,291 78 

6,836 21 

2,283 62 

3,100 00 

8.914 16 

4.086 96 

25.464 54 

13.665 00 

11.414 60 

69,016 00 

18,698 71 

1.30.669 69 

19.054 88 

9.954 96 

4,438 52 



.$389,674 25 


$366,075 77 


$7,722 82 


$9,254 00 


$15,263 96 


$14,763 96 


$.^5,811 00 


$33,246 00 



*$1,735.10 of this amount was contributed and 
expended by the First Church of Glens Falls, N. Y., 
for certain country parish work under the approval 
of the Board of Home Missions and the Presbytery. 



146 



HOME MISSIONS 



A COMBINED STATEMENT 

Showing the Revenue of Board of Home Missions, Woman's Board of 

Home Missions, and Self-Supforting Synods and Presbyteries 

FOR National and Local Home Mission Work 



Synods 



1912-13 



1913-14 



1914-15 



1915-16 



1916-17 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

Atlantic 

Baltimore 

California ..... 

Canadian 

Catawba 

Colorado 

East Tennessee 

Idaho 

lUinios 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky .... 

Michigan 

Minnesota. . . . 
Mississippi.. . . 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

New England. 
New Jersey. . . 
New Mexico . . 
New York. . . . 
North Dakota.. 

Ohio 

Oklahoma . . . 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 
Philippines. . 
South Dakota. . 
Tennessee . . . 

Texas 

Utah. 

Washington. . 
West German. . 
West Virginia . . 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



$2,557 98 

992 66 

2,205 98 

80 86 

25,752 64 

47,963 43 

41 60 

192 75 

10,962 69 

44 99 

1,631 37 

83.860 67 

31.861 69 
31,184 46 
23,887 43 

9,417 90 

22,654 98 

21,170 99 

1,235 50 

25,550 00 

2,491 85 

18,438 55 

5,294 65 

104,851 08 

932 31 

185,930 66 

4,382 36 

84,990 44 

5,429 89 

12,232 67 

336,079 45 

5 00 

4,303 52 

7,191 59 

11,318 11 

962 29 

9,472 45 

2,648 81 

9,766 91 

21,546 02 



$2,184 26 

1,225 64 

2,403 94 

116 76 

70,710 88 

46,336 83 

22 05 

205 85 

9,990 61 

49 00 

1,455 09 

79,874 22 

38,729 39 

33,406 73 

25,156 34 

9,532 94 

24,370 00 

22,667 65 

1,153 77 

25,976 85 

2,631 84 

18,573 16 

5,878 85 

96,317 98 

940 23 

181,670 69 

3,921 04 

86,983 00 

5,147 43 

11,162 41 

323,684 83 



4,402 24 
8,718 82 

10,327 64 
1,016 51 
8,930 77 
2,150 59 
9,851 91 

19,229 27 



$2,921 96 

1,450 83 

2,346 97 

61 05 

42,408 16 

52,597 25 

13 92 

176 99 

11,159 78 

49 75 

1,385 52 

98,038 22 

33,964 91 

33,827 15 

24,315 59 

10,200 75 

28,573 09 

26,886 43 

1,057 43 

27,432 29 

2,971 75 

16,253 06 

6,450 25 

122,984 54 

1,134 32 

201,229 89 

4,313 25 

102,241 67 

6,634 65 

10,196 35 

343,893 40 

4 03 

4,974 09 

8,538 60 

11,398 19 

1,040 21 

10,704 29 

2,075 19 

10,618 84 

19,462 77 



$2,735 70 

1,333 75 

1,732 91 

87 80 

35,121 66 

51,856 96 

17 00 

185 97 

10,663 11 

19 00 

1,504 06 

80,571 40 

31,047 19 

34,786 81 

24,300 28 

9,780 32 

26,461 77 

24,412 44 

902 32 

27,473 51 

2,969 08 

17,990 77 

6,191 24 

106,145 23 

1,277 47 

231,268 78 

3,950 52 

105,953 03 

6,072 76 

9,601 17 

365,010 11 



4,574 23 

8,871 26 

10,501 30 

915 16 

9,381 82 

2,246 80 

10,964 61 

18,723 85 

477 35 



$ 2,726 00 

1,143 68 

2,737 92 

68 95 

38,462 61 

49,643 41 

19 40 

174 25 

10,318 20 

38 00 

1,936 82 

85,500 17 

43,713 97 

39,989 28 

24,518 73 

7,530 40 

26,972 71 

26,869 30 

786 16 

32,003 74 

2,730 30 

19,479 07 

6,839 53 

105,069 01 

1,355 24 

242,729 47 

4,336 14 

129,278 43 

6,719 80 

10,441 09 

366,761 44 



5,241 24 

8,223 60 
12,971 17 

1,012 08 
10,554 82 

2,958 92 

13,025 06 

22,132 65 

740 10 



Legacies 

Individuals and 
Miscellaneous. . . 
Woman's Board 
viz.: Individuals, 
Field Receipts, etc. 
not included above. 



,171,519 18 
403,431 36 
226,877 03 

112,173 96 



$1,197,108 01 
430,420 18 
196,198 71 

118,799 48 



$1,285,987 38 
387,252 01 
257,022 80 

98,155 62 



$1,288,080 50 
556,577 46 
162,755 19 

88,325 64 



$1,367,752 86 
384,243 35 
155,714 90 

80,990 74 



$1,914,001 53 



$1,942,526 38 $2,028,417 81 



$2,095,738 79 



$1,988,701 85 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



147 



A COMBINED STATEMENT (Continued) 

Showing the Revenue of Board of Home Missions, Woman's Board of 

Home Missions, and Self-Supporting Synods and Presbyteries 

FOR National and Local Home Mission Work 



Synods 



1917-18 



1918-19 



1919-20 



1920-21 



1921-22 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

Atlantic 

Baltimore .... 

California 

Canadian 

Catawba 

Colorado 

East Tennessee 

Florida 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

New England . . 

New Jersey. . . . 
New Mexico. . . 

New York 

North Dakota.. 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania. . 
Philippines. . . 
South Dakota. 
Tennessee .... 

Texas 

Utah 

Washington. . . 
West German. 
West Virginia. 
Wisconsin .... 
Wyoming .... 



Legacies 

Individuals and 
Miscellaneous. . . 
Woman's Board, 
viz.: Individuals, 
Field Receipts, etc., 
not included above. 



$4,047 13 

3,031 16 

4,732 56 

72 02 

49,861 29 

59,714 51 

23 25 

219 50 

19,798 47 

38 00 



3,037 44 

103,463 14 

41,469 98 

56,059 74 

30,269 15 

13,836 56 

34,364 20 

39,811 52 

1,797 10 

47,866 65 

5,335 54 

24,337 87 

7,276 16 

124,316 41 

2,470 90 

233,038 05 

4,744 53 

136,417 90 

14,368 54 

13,310 83 

385,700 48 



.$4,682 49 

2,577 49 

4,346 73 

189 66 

68,002 53 

76,030 95 

9 00 

317 38 

13,224 47 

49 00 



7,696 68 
12,168 59 
16,768 70 

1,214 58 
20,033 01 

6,039 09 
13,818 52 
21,615 82 

1,006 51 



,565,192 08 
187,542 25 
160,437 70 



2,780 27 

167,081 48 

62,638 62 

77,054 76 

33,421 45 

13,295 56 

34,583 00 

41,607 38 

2,047 12 

49,268 52 

3,675 65 

24,354 29 

8,827 09 

125,595 98 

1,784 51 

280,285 08 

6,801 28 

159,772 78 

14,541 18 

15,039 69 

398.561 46 



$5,103 56 
3,668 74 
4,297 78 
1,229 36 

89,710 33 

93,247 44 

104 34 

2,709 77 

22,488 25 
483 80 



17,236 95 
15,094 74 
17,093 96 

1,177 35 
21,185 42 

5,288 70 
15,731 63 
24,002 37 

1,003 71 



$1,810,251 68 
198,388 35 
183,176 16 



92,881 72 124,425 61 



4,269 79 

211,988 33 

106,503 05 

86,158 10 

48,442 65 

17,966 08 

54,437 75 

54,196 54 

2,509 91 

70,463 91 

5,645 70 

39,162 08 

10,721 63 

159,525 58 

2,860 74 

389,111 91 

7,758 57 

210,820 08 

18,735 91 

24,082 45 

567,736 50 



18,254 90 
24,803 77 
26,912 09 

1,647 10 
29,507 46 

4,547 41 
21,131 68 
32,991 79 

1,170 85 



$8,023 27 

4,775 18 

5,579 71 

1,055 31 

92,148 00 

109,826 30 

131 21 

1,860 99 

28,372 15 

508 23 



5,630 90 

291,136 05 

85,187 54 

101,852 22 

52,182 95 

23,061 57 

114,216 25 

65,901 07 

2,452 55 

69,769 08 

6,154 93 

33,128 26 

16,458 09 

189,836 80 

3,518 51 

465,916 53 

9,783 14 

243,600 89 

21,941 10 

25,455 41 

706,836 90 



1,477,107 68 
239,849 71 
163,099 53 

160,400 70 



24,313 48 
23,696 10 
29,124 62 

1,969 50 
37,216 67 
10,874 58 
27,554 21 
39,051 13 

2,277 36 



,982,378 74 
231,391 63 
136,107 41 



$3,250 50 

5,952 47 

5,562 39 

699 20 

106,358 28 

155,132 41 

139 19 

1,761 89 

28,486 39 

409 58 

4,806 01 

4,878 83 

292,123 73 

80,216 73 

87,013 01 

53,957 58 

22,065 10 

185,944 03 

70,912 51 

2,455 17 

91,557 89 

5,649 73 

36,131 08 

14,905 28 

249,743 42 

3,458 20 

496,494 90 

9,040 37 

251,379 09 

22,111 74 

31,951 85 

764,679 83 



18,601 82 
23,339 75 
33,481 50 

2,151 78 
36,747 31 

9,006 77 
25,847 32 
45,153 78 

1,833 07 



,285,391 48 
279,285 35 
169,458 31 

8,054 26 



l$2,006,053 75l$2,316,241 80 $3,040,457 62 



$3.349.877 78l$3,742,189 40 



XIII. Report of the Standing Com- 
mittee on Home Missions 

If, by some magic touch upon our brains, we could be delivered from the 
thoughts and feelings that are ours when the word "Board" is used; if instead 
of the sense of an abstraction or the conception of a remote group of ministers 
and laymen who are little to us and to whom we are nothing but who by the 
caprice of fortune are in the seat of power, we could conceive ourselves, this 
report would be of infinitely more 'interest. We all know that it is so, that 
the Missionary in Wyoming or Cuba is nothing without the Board, — they are 
partners ; that both are helpless without the Assembly, and that the Assembly 
is an airy nothing apart from the scattered churches of the nation and the 
supporting faith and works of the lowliest minister and elder. We know it is 
so. But we do not readily conceive it. Your Committee covets the art to 
make this conception real ; hut wanting that urges upon every Commissioner 
the careful reading of the annual report of the Board. The archives of that 
Bfoard contain a thoi^sand novels readily apparent to the eye of a Ralph Connor 
or a Norman Duncan. One may not speak of living heroes, but easily thinks 
of such daring patriotic dreamers as Pitman of Oregon, such statesman-like 
pioneers as Sheldon Jackson of Alaska, such indomitable doers of the will 
of God as Dr. Cook of the Pimas, or such sturdy fighters for the souls of 
men as Frank Higgins, the Sky Pilot of the lumber jacks, each a Presbyterian 
messenger. But such men are not all dead. Others have risen right worthily 
to take their places, to carry on their work, and to meet new situations beyond 
the guess of the men of yesterday with the same faith, imagination and cer- 
tainty of conquest. 

Snapshots of such men at work, swift pencil sketches that a little imagina- 
tion can easily fill in, may here, there and everyvvhere throughout the wide 
territory of Home Missionary Service appear in this report which our Board 
puts in our hands today. It is full of sermon copy. Its thirteen pages of charts 
give in a nutshell much truth and tease us on to read more fully. That chart 
on page 89 ought to be framed and sent to every chairman of benevolences 
in every church session. See the polyglot group in the sentence, "One-fifth 
of the Home Mission Churches use some language other than English." We 
could have a group larger than the Home Mission Council everyone of whom 
spoke a tongue no other of the company could understand, yet all 42 of whom 
with his people were being reached with the Gospel of Jesus Christ through 
the Home Missions Board of the Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A. 

Nor is there anything to be other than proud of in the character of the 
foreign-speaking people won by their effort. There are sensational stories 
come to us from the various Indian tribes among whom our men and women 
are serving. One Mexican church raises its benevolences in two years from 
$12 to $300, and one of its members earning only $18 a week to support him- 
self and family gives $15 of that wage to his church in self-denial week, 
while he and his family eke out through the seven days on the remaining $3. 
A laboring man in Luyano, Cuba, with his own hands and almost entirely 
at his own expense has built on his own land a beautiful Presbyterian chapel. 

The Board of Home Missions consistently emphasizes four things. Evan- 
gelism, practical Christian helpfulness, Christian education, and Christian 
brotherhood. We note with gratitude that the Evangelistic gain for the past 
twelve months exceeds the high record of a year ago. On confession of faith 
the Home Mission churches have added 12 per cent, of their previous member- 
ship against the whole Church's 7.5 per cent, and have a net gain of 10.4 per cent 
to 3.4 per cent in the whole Church. And the most striking thing is that 
the best records have been made where conditions are the hardest, 25 per cent 
on confession of faith in Porto Rico, and despite the paralysis of industries 

148 



REPORT OF THE STANDING COMMITTEE 149 

among the Mexicans in the southwest a 20 per cent gain on confession; while 
in Montana after drought and crop failure the aid-receiving churches made 
a better mark than any Synod in the Church. That evangelistic record is a 
notable one. 

At the same time and pari passu with it have gone forward multiplied 
activities for human welfare in neighborhood houses and downtown churches, 
in rural summer schools and in hospitals. The Board has been compelled to 
adapt itself to the startling new fact that more than half our population now 
lives in cities, about one-fourth of the whole in 68 cities of over 100,000 
population each. Demonstration centers or parishes (of course wholly ex- 
perimental in the City and Immigrant Department, as also in the Church and 
Country Life Department and not yet for general application) have been 
established in difficult but patently needy centers wherein the local church, 
the Church Extension Board of the Presbytery, and the Home Board itself, 
have cooperated to save a church when the tide had seemed to set against it 
but when the real need was some new rigging, an up-to-date work on naviga- 
tion to stimulate the imagination of the man at the helm, or an efficient mate 
to help share the resiwnsibility. 

The sheer mass and complexities of our cities have forced our Home Mis- 
sion Agencies to seek a new efficiency of organization and administration, 
followed by an increasing reshaping of the Presbyteries themselves. A Church 
Extension standard has been set, and sixteen cities are now fully organized 
each with a full-time salaried executive, a well-developed program, and a well- 
equipped business office with a stenographer. The Home Mission expenditures 
in these sixteen cities last year, including disbursements through Church Exten- 
sion treasuries and through local churches doing city mission work, amounted 
to a total of $1,200,000.00. In their pre-Assembly conference our Church 
Extension executives together with representatives of Church Extension Boards 
have this year organized the Presbyterian City Church Extension Council, and 
this movement facing the city task of the Church in our great centers of 
population with their baffling problems must be followed up with the sympathy 
and prayers of the whole Church. 

The comparatively isolated and lonely position of the pastors of foreign 
speech engaged in the work of our 100 Italian and SO Magyar churches and 
missions has led to the policy of holding biennial conferences of these pastors 
together with Home Mission Executives and Board Representatives interested 
in the work, the Italian conferences being held in the even years, and the 
Magyar in the odd years. These conferences with their ad interim com- 
mittees provide our foreign-speech pastors virith an opportunity for self- 
expression in relation to their special problems and in conference with their 
American brethren, and enable us to avoid the alternative of setting them 
aside in separate Presbyteries of their own. A number of these conferences 
have been held and the next Italian conference is to convene in Auburn, N. Y., 
immediately following this General Assembly, May 31, June 1, 2. They have 
proved their value and should be strongly supported. 

One phase of the educational work of Home Missions, namely. Missionary 
Education, has been notably well attended to by our Women's Board which 
reports 1,683 mission study classes and a total of 3,715 circles, classes, pro- 
gram meetings, etc., for missionary instruction, a gain of 1,665 classes over 
last year ; an increased sale of 26 per cent in the receipts from sales of mission- 
ary literature; and the astonishing record of 20,000 copies sold of the most 
popular book our own Presbyterian study, "Unfinished Business," indicating 
that there is still large place for the distinctly denominational text-book as 
well as place for those studies suited to interdenominational groups. Also 
20,000 copies of that most useful stimulant to enlighten petition on behalf 
of the workers of the Church, "The Year Book of Prayer," published jointly 
by the .Woman's Boards of Home and Foreign Missions, have happily found 
their way into Presbyterian homes. 

However, despite all that is encouraging our Board of Home Missions 
cannot report that all is well. Your Committee congratulates our Woman's 
Board whose report we have read, that although they started the year with a 
cash deficit of $77,000 they are able to announce an expenditure through the 
year of over a million dollars and a present indebtedness of only $2,000.00. 



150 HOME MISSIONS 

With the Board of Home Missions it is far otherwise, it having an accumulated 
debt of $462,000.00. True, the receipts of the Board have been greatly in- 
creased, but the expenditures have of necessity been greatly increased, too, 
and this for three reasons. The very existence of a forward movement in 
the Church created imperative demands from Synods and Pesbyteries every- 
where for increased appropriations. The second consideration is that Home 
Missions has a very definite relation to the morale of the whole Church, and 
must carry the burden of any forward step — there could be no long strides 
otherwise. The third is the need of the work itself. The salaries of Mission- 
aries have been increased until the average for all Home Missionaries is now 
$1,459.00 a year. Better work, longer pastorates, and larger evangelistic 
returns have resulted, and in this the Board has unquestionably the hearty 
approval of the whole Church, but it does cost money. Further, during the 
three years of the New Era Movement the Board has not received that percent- 
age of the actual receipts of the Boards and Agencies to which its position 
in the budget of the Church as approved by the General Assembly, entitled it. 
The loss to the Board from this failure of the percentage plan was, during 
the year just ended, nearly $300,000.00. For the three New Era years it was 
approximately $700,000, a sum which would cover its entire debt and provide 
a surplus of nearly $240,000. 

The expenditures of the year are also the largest in the history of the 
Board. This fact is contrary both to the desire and intent of the Board which, 
at the outset of the year, decreased its appropriations for its own work by 
approximately 8 per cent. 

Your Committee has examined the Minutes of both the Board of Home 
Missions and the Woman's Board of Home Missions, and finds them neatly 
kept and properly arranged for easy reference. We have had submitted to 
us the findings of the Home Mission Council, and recommend that they be 
adopted and printed elsewhere in the General Assembly Minutes. 

We beg to submit the following recommendations : 

(1) That we give thanks to Almighty God for the faithful labors and 
Christian spirit of four Home Missionaries called to their reward during the 
past year : 

Rev. J. C. F. Dillon, Bancroft, Idaho. 

Rev. John Eastman, Flandreau, South Dakota. 

Rev. R. W. Edwards, Jacksonville, Florida. 

Mrs. S. F. Sahn, Alpine, Tennessee. 
and for the long years of untiring service and unconstrained generosity of 
Rev. D. Stuart Dodge, D.D., New York, New York, a member of the Board 
of Home Missions for over thirty years, and for more than half of that time 
its President. 

(2) That the following ministers and laymen, whose terms of office as 
members of the Board now expire, be re-elected and constituted the class of 
1925: 

MINISTERS LAYMEN 

Rev. Joseph Dunn Burrell, D.D. Walter M. Aikman 

Rev. Albert Edwin Keigwin, D.D. George B. Agnew 

Rev. Edgar Whitaker Work, D.D. Fleming H. Revell 

Rev. William Adams Brown, D.D. J. A. Gould 

Rev. Wendell Prime Keeler John T. Manson 
Rev. Carl H. Elmore 

and that the following members of the Woman's Board of Home Missions 
be ratified : 

CLASS OF 1925 

Mrs. Chas. W. BVyan, Jr. Miss Mabel Gorden Parker 

Mrs. A. S. Crane Miss Lucy Slade 

Mrs. Chas. B. Fernald Mrs. C. L. Thompson 

Mrs. Wm. Edgar Geil Mrs. Clarke Tillinghast 

Mrs. Anna Hallock Mrs. James S. Webb, Jr. 

Mrs. Kenneth D. Miller Mrs. A. L. Whitaker 

Miss Emma Jessie Ogg Miss V. May White 



REPORT OF THE STANDING COMMITTEE 151 

The following members also have been appointed by the Board since the last 
General Assembly and are named for ratification in their respective classes : 

Mrs. Chas. M. Ford, 1923. 

Mrs. W. D. Harper, 1923. 

Mrs. W. R. Patterson, 1923 

Miss Mary Tooker, 1924 

(3) That to the Ukrainian Protestants themselves essentially Presby- 
terians, and whom we, first of all Protestants with our brethren in Canada, 
afforded light and help, we give assurance of our sympathy and desire to aid 
and that we recommend to our Board of Home Missions proper investigation 
of their need and, if possible, definite assistance. 

(4) That the General Assembly recognizing the rapidly growing difficulty 
and importance of the American city as a Home Mission field, welcome a 
new movement of City Church Extension which aims to recast our organization 
and consolidate our strength in the city centers in order to meet the tremendous 
needs which there confront the Church. 

(5) That the General Assembly approve the policy worked out under the 
guidance of the Home Board of organizing biennial conferences of pastors of 
foreign speech together with their interested American brethren, and commend 
the Italian biennial conference and the Magyar biennial conference to the Synods 
and Presbyteries of the Church for hearty cooperation and support. 

(6) That the Assembly e.xpress its pleasure in the gratifying growth of 
the Church in the South and Southwest as noted in the Board's report, and 
as a nation-wide Church reaffirm our duty as such to help meet the spiritual 
and moral needs of that part of our country as we have been doing for more 
than a century; and that owing to the impending rapid industrial develop- 
ment of that section and the continued failure to secure a united Presbyterian- 
ism which alone can adequately meet the spiritual needs of the South and the 
Southwest, the Board be charged with the responsibility of actively sustaining, 
encouraging and developing its work there in needy fields, while yet avoiding 
through fraternal comity relations with sister churches on the ground of mutual 
concessions, all unnecessary duplication of effort. 

(7) That in accordance with custom the Sundays nearest Thanksgiving 
Day and Washington's Birthday be set apart by our Sunday schools as Home 
Mission Days with appropriate exercises, and offerings to be sent to the 
Treasurer of the Board of Home Missions or to the local treasurer. 

(8) That the Board of Home Missions be authorized to take over the 
work among Orientals in America when committed to it by the Board of 
Foreign Missions. 

(9) That the Assembly ask the Executive Commission to have prepared 
for next year a simple form of pledge card, which will provide that the funds 
contributed (unless there is a specific declaration to the contrary) shall be 
used to assure to each Board and Agency that proportion of the total receipts, 
by which it is represented in the gross budget. 

(10) That in view of the action of the General Assembly consolidating 
the Boards and Agencies, and in view of the great handicap of debt upon 
the Board of Home Missions, and in view of generous offers from members 
and friends of the Board conditioned upon the liquidation of the entire debt 
this year, the Committee recommends that the General Assembly instruct the 
Board of Home Missions to undertake to raise at once from individuals money 
enough to cancel the whole obligation, and thus be enabled to go into the 
new Board of National Missions free of debt. 

(11) That the Assembly assure our Home Missionaries of our gratitude 
for and pride in their character, zeal, courage and self-forgetfulness without 
which qualities in the humblest of them the cause of Christ had never gone 
forward; and to our secretaries who in some cases bring to their office the 
wisdom of years of experience in the whole Church and in others highly 
specialized training to consecrate to the Lord our gratitude for their patience 
and resourcefulness. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert Freeman, Chairman. 



XIV. Findings 

HOME MISSION COUNCIL 
1922 

Des Moines, Iowa, May 20, 1922. 
To the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A.: 

The Home Mission Council met at Des Moines, Iowa, May 12, 1922, with 
representatives from thirty-seven Synods present. 

We have examined the Minutes of the Board and find them neatly kept and 
carefully prepared for preservation for future reference and we commend the 
Board and its Clerk for the splendid manner in which the records of the 
proceedings have been put into permanent form. 

We reaffirm our conviction that the Christianisation of America is the 
'objective of the whole Church. This objective is to be secured by the presen- 
tation in national terms of a common budget and a common promotional pro- 
gram for Evangelism, Education and Service. The share of each Synod or 
Presbytery in this national task is to be determined in a joint budgeting con- 
ference. 

We heartily approve the Community Social Service program as a necessary 
,'means of making the whole life of the community Christian. The Council 
believes that the primary emphasis should ever be on the original commission 
of the Church, "Go, Preach, Teach," and urges the Board in all its activities 
to continue to keep this principle in mind. 

The Home Mission Council approves the efforts being made for better 
unification of the whole Home Mission enterprise throughout our nation, but 
believes that in all efforts for such unification the desirability of independent 
action and the value of free local administration ought to be recognized and 
encouraged. 

We heartily endorse the action of the Home Mission Board in inaugurat- 
ing an enlistment movement for Home Mission workers as a Fellowship for 
American Service along the lines suggested by the Council last year and we 
rejoice in the success that has already rewarded such effort. 

We recognize and regret the necessity which has compelled retrenchment 
in the number of men and enterprises supported by the Btiard. We believe 
this condition should be given the widest publicity and that the whole Church 
.should set itself to the correction of this condition by largely increased gifts 
fo the benevolence budget. 

We would recommend for next year the adoption of a simple form^ o' 
pledge card which will provide that the funds contributed (unless there is a 
specific declaration to the contrary) shall be used to assure to each Board and 
Agency that per cent of the total receipts by which it is represented in the 
gross budget. It is further recommended that the Board of Home Missions 
confer with the other Boards and Agencies to this end. 

The division of receipts for this common budget between the Board and 
each self-supporting Home Mission Agency shall be determined upon a per- 
centage basis agreed upon between the Board of Home Missions and the 
Agency concerned. 

It shall be understood that each self-supporting Agency clearing through 
the Board shall put into the Board's Treasury during a given year an amount 
sufficient to cover all expenses for work within its own bounds for which it 
retains the initiative, direction and control and such share of expenditures 
for other work as may be agreed upon. The disposition of any surplus or 
deficit accruing in any given year shall also be a matter of agreement between 
the Board and the Agency concerned. Specific gifts for objects outside the 
Budget .shall not apply against the Budget appropriated for that year. Such 

152 



FINDINGS 153 

contributions, however, shall not be solicited without a previous agreement 
between the Board and the Synod or Presbytery. These Synods and Presby- 
teries shall agree to participate in the promotion of this program of national 
work outside their own bounds to the extent of their ability. 

The Council firmly believes that our people are vitally interested in work 
at home and commends the presentation of separate fields to churches for sup- 
port within the spirit and limits of the New Era plan. 

We would call attention to the rule of the General Assembly providing 
that Presbyterial and Synodical Chairmen of Home Mission Committees shall 
be invited to sit with Presbyterial and Synodical New Era Committees in mak- 
ing allocations to the churches of the annual benevolence budget, and recom- 
mend that the benevolence quotas for aid-receiving churches should be large 
enough to stimulate the grace of giving, but not so disproportionate as to 
make Home Mission treasuries in effect contribute to the other Boards and 
Agencies of the Church. 

The Home Mission Council approves the policy of a joint promotional 
program on the part of the Home Board, the Synod, and the Presbyteries and 
recommends that the policy be put into effect as rapidly as possible. In view 
of the apparent lack of missionary knowledge on the part of men of the 
Church it would seem wise to arrange the program so as to appeal especially 
to men. 

The Council recommends that as far as possible some form of definite 
and intensive Home Mission promotioJi be organized this year in each Presby- 
tery of the Church, assuming that in putting these programs into operation 
the Board of Home Missions will pursue a policy of cooperation always de- 
sirable between the Boards of the Church. 

We call the attention of the Board of Home Missions to the need of a 
presentation of the Home Mission history, program and outlook which shall 
include all noteworthy Plome Mission work whether under the supervision 
of the Board or other Agency, in textbook form for use in mission study classes 
and the general information of the Church. 

We declare the right of our Church to prosecute its u'ork in every part of 
our country and urge our Board and our ministers to an aggressive policy 
wherever, in the judgment of the Church, there seems a call for its services, 
and we also express our loyal support of its work in every Sj'nod where it 
exists or where it may be established. 

The Council expresses its deepest appreciation of the splendid work of 
the Woman's Board of Home Missions in the performance of its special tasks 
and its enlistment of so large a body of supporters, and urges the Assembly, 
in the consideration of the "Plan for Consolidation" to use every means to 
conserve the work now assigned to them through the preservation of the 
organizations in the local Church, Presbj'tery and Synod, the interest of their 
constituency, and the liberal gifts of the women to these special objects. 

James M. Potter, President. 
John C. E. Fry, Vice-President. 
BuFORD W. Tyler, Secretary. 



Forty-third Annual Report 

of the 

Woman's Board of Home Missions 
of the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States of America 



Presented to the General Assembly 

at Des Moines, Iowa 

May, 1922 



1 56 Fifth Avenue, New York 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 
Rost er 1922 -1923 

BOARD MEMBERS 

Term Expiring 1923 
Mrs. Richard S. Allen Mrs. W. U. Harper 

Miss Anna 1\I. Alward Mrs. W. E. Honeyman 

Mrs. Fred S. Bennett Mrs. Horace H. Lcavitt 

Mrs. James S. Dickson Mrs. John McDowell 

Mrs. Frederic P. Fiske Mrs. W. R. Patterson 

Mrs. Charles M. Ford Mrs. John Sinclair 

Mrs. W. A. M. Grier Mrs. Frederick E. Stockwell 

Mrs. James Yereance 

Term Expiring 1924 

Mrs. E. H. Bancker Mrs. J. E. McAfee 

Mrs E B Cobb Mrs. A. C. McMillan 

Mrs. A. W. Corning Mrs. E. C. Miles 

Miss Julia Fraser Mrs. J. K. Mitchell 

Mrs. E. K. Hopper Mrs. C. Edward Murray 

Miss Annie Hyatt Miss Elinor K. Purves 

Mrs. H. C. Louderbough Miss Mary Tooker 
Mrs. D. E. Waid 

Term Expiring 1925 

Mrs. Charles Bryan Miss Mabel Gordon Parker 

Mrs. Augustus S. Crane Miss Lucy Slade 

Mrs. Charles B. Fernald Mrs. Clarke Tillinghast 

Mrs. William Edgar Geil Mrs. Charles L. Thompson 

Miss Anna Hallock Mrs. De Witt Wallace 

Mrs. Kenneth D. Miller Mrs. James A. Webb, Jr. 

Miss Emma Jessie Ogg Mrs. A. L. Whitaker 
Miss V. May White 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

President Mrs. Fred S. Bennett 

First Vice-President Miss Annie Hyatt 

Second Vice-President Mrs. A. C. McMillan 

Third Vice-President Mrs. John McDowell 

Recording Secretary Miss Emma Jessie Ogg 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

General Secretary Miss Lucy H. Dawson 

Assistant Secretary Miss Mabel M. Sheibley 

Hecreiary for Missionary Education Mrs. M. J. Gildersleeve 

Secretary for Young People's Work Miss M. Josephine Petrie 

Assistant Secretary for Young People's Worh 

Secretary for Christian Social Service Miss Christine AVilson 

Treasurer Miss Mary W. Torrencc 

Editor of the Home Mission Monthly Miss Theodora Finks 

Superintendent of Field Work Miss Edna R. Voss 

Ansisldiif Supcriniviidcnt of Field Work i\Iiss Helen H. Dingman 

FIELD SECRETARIES 
Mrs. Adelaide I. Aldrich Miss R. Marie Preston 

Miss Elizabeth M. Hamilton Miss Helen W. Streeter 

JOINT OFFICERS WITH WOMAN'S BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS 

Executive Secretary for Student Work Miss Florence Tyler 

Student Field Secretaries Miss Mary Eliza Clark, Miss Rose Wilson 

Secretary Woman's Department of Board of Missions for Frecdmen 
Mrs. W. T. Larimer 

2 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



ADVISORY VICE-PRESIDENTS 



Alabama — *Mrs. W. M. Crawford 
Arizona — *Mrs. L. G. Hayes 
Arkansas — *Mrs. G. W. Neal 
/Ulantic — *Mrs. M. M. Jones, Mrs. 

G. W. Long 
Baltimore — *Mrs. Wallace Radcliffe, 

Mrs. Alfred II. Barr 
California — *Miss Julia Frascr, 

Mrs. R. B. Goddard, Miss Alartha 

E. Chase 
Canadian — *Mrs. C. S. Mebane 
Co/awfco— *Mrs. W. J. Rankin, Mrs. 

G. C. Campbell 
Colorado — *Mrs. George F. Sevier, 

Miss Eliza H. Glassey 
East Tennessee — *Mrs. H. M. Bra- 

zelton 
Florida — *Mrs. Edwin P. Thomson 
Idaho — *Mrs. G. William Barnum 
Illinois— *M.rs. B. H. Pinnell, Mrs. 

A. G. Beebe, Mrs. C. W. Robin- 
son, Mrs. E. W. Brainerd 
Indiana — *Mrs. F. F. McCrea, Miss 

Isabel W. Cooper 
Iowa — *Mrs. S. J. Brown, Mrs. L. 

S. Noble 
Kansas — *Mrs. L. L. Marcell, Mrs. 

E. H. Hoag, Mrs. E. Higginson 
Kentucky — *Mrs. E. S. Porter 
Michigan — *Mrs. J. K. Mitchell, 

Mrs. Oren Scotten 
Minnesota — *Mrs. Ida M. Gardner, 

Mrs. H. A. Merrill 
Mississippi — *Miss Kate McGuire 
Missouri — *Mrs. C. A. Revelle, Mrs. 

G. P. Baity, Mrs. S. L. McAfee 
Montanu — *Mrs. William Fergus 
Nebraska— *Mrs. H. V. Hilliker, 

Mrs. A. T. Sidwell 
New England — *Mrs. A. McDonald 

Paterson 



Nciv Jersey — *Mrs. W. C. Albert- 
son, Mrs. W. E, Honeyman, Mrs. 
James A. Webb, Jr. 

New Mexico — *Mrs. Nettie L. Ten 
Eyck 

Nczv York — *Mrs. Charles B. 
Quick, Mrs. George C. Yeisley, 
Mrs. Charles J. North, Mrs. 
A. E. Bridgen, Mrs. Allen Macey 
Dulles, Mrs. Frank H. Stephen- 
son, Mrs. Anthony Peterson, 
Mrs. H. K. Twitchell. 

North Dakota— *Mrs. H. C. Post- 
lethwaite, Mrs. Dugal Mclntyre 

Ohio — *Mrs. E. E. Lester, Mrs. 

D. G. Smith, Mrs. Ralph S. Tyler 
Oklahoma — *Mrs. W. H. Hendren, 

Mrs. Charles R. Hume 
Oregon — *Mrs. Fletcher Liun, Mrs. 

E. H. Pence 

Pennsylvania — *Mrs. Bion B. Wil- 
liams, Mrs. William Edgar Geil, 
Mrs. S. A. Reeder, Mrs. S. P. 
Harbison, Mrs. D. F. Diefen- 
derfer, Mrs. Joshua W. Sharpc, 
Mrs. William W. Fiske, Mrs. 
Charles H. Greenleaf, Miss Mari- 
anna Ross 

South Dakota — *Mrs. Hubert Ke- 
telle, Mrs. H. P. Carson 

Tennessee — *Mrs. T. S. Rankin, 
J. H. Byers, Mrs. D. B. Johnston 

Texas — *Mrs. W. B. Preston, Mrs. 
J. P Owen 

Utah— *Mrs. Adam G. Frank 

JVashington — *Mrs. Ernest L. Mc- 
Cartney, Mrs. J. Addison Camp- 
bell 

West Virginia — *Mrs. H. G. Stoet- 
zer 

JVisconsin — *Mrs. William Main- 
land, Mrs. W. J. McElroy 

Wyoming— *Mts. W. W. Hale. 



MCE-PRESIDENTS-AT-LARGE 



Mrs. W. J. Darby 

Mrs. M. E. Boyd, New Jersey 

Mrs. J. F. Kendall, Indiana 



Aliss Sarah F. Lincoln, New Jersey 
Mrs. J. F. Pingry, New Tersev 
Airs. C. E. Walker, New^ York 



♦President of the synodical society. 

3 



Table of Contents 

Board Members and Officers 2 

Field Secretaries, Advisory Vice-Presidents, Vice-Presidents- 

at-Large 3 

General Secretary's Report 5-38 

Reports from Headquarters 8-18 

The Mission Field 19-38 

Treasurer's Report 40-71 

Annual Statistics of Organization 72 

Statistics — Schools, Community Work, Hospitals 81 

List of Commissioned Workers 91 

Honorary Members 100 

Act of Incorporation 106 

Forms of Bequest 109 



Forty-third Annual Report 
Woman's Board of Home Missions 

THE Woman's Board of Home Missions of the Presbyte- 
rian Church in the U. S. A. presents herewith its Forty-third 
Annual Report. 

With thankfuhiess to our Heavenly Father for His continued 
guidance and goodness, the Woman's Board of Home Missions 
entered upon the year 1921-22 with a quickened sense of the 
need of America for the fullness of life which is in Christ Jesus, 
and of the responsibility resting upon the Board, as the represen- 
tative of the women and young people of the Presbyterian 
Church, U. S. A., for the doing of its share of the task. The rest- 
lessness in the industrial world, the lack of sympathy between 
groups and races, the breaking away from the observing of Sun- 
day as the Lord's Day, the lack of religious training in the home 
and the school, the spread of non-Christian faiths, the opening up 
of remote parts and peoples to new conditions without Christian 
safeguards all made the need of Home Missions more impera- 
tive than ever. 

The story of the year on the Mission Field has been encour- 
aging. The spirit in schools where the students have banded to- 
gether in groups for the purpose of going to outlying communi- 
ties to conduct classes and meetings to tell the "old, old story," 
the appreciation of the service rendered by community centers 
as shown in the desire to keep out illegal business no matter 
what the personal price, the gratitude of hospital patients for 
helped bodies and healed souls as shown by their wanting their 
friends to have the same benefits are all indications of the leaven 
of the Gospel. 

During the past year the following six missionaries were added 
to the list of those who have been granted service pins in honor 
of twenty-five years of service on the mission field : Miss Ida 
Boone (retired), Forsythe Memorial School. Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia; Miss Helen W. Clark, Neah Bay. Washington; Mr. H. 
T. Smith, Wolf Point Indian Training School, Wolf Point, Mon- 
tana ; Mrs. H. T. Smith, Wolf Point Indian Training School, 
Wolf Point, Montana; Aliss Sarah B. Sutherland, Embudo, 
Dixon, New Mexico ; Miss Jessie L. Turner, Langdon Memorial 
School, Mt. Vernon, Ky. 

The year has been a hard one financially. The country has 
been passing through an economic adjustment that has taxed its 
resources to the utmost. Every section of the country has felt the 
strain, but in some parts it has been very much greater than in 
others. The far Northwest has suffered very keenly. But a time 
of hardness of any kind is always met by real people in a spirit 
of loyalty and so this year many missionary women have given in 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

a wonderful way. The Pueblo Presbyterial, after their disastrous 
flood the first of June, met their second quarterly payment in full ! 

The business depression of the year has been felt by the 
Board in common with other benevolent organizations. Through 
correspondence carried with synodical societies at the begin- 
ning of the year it was found that it would not be safe to count 
upon receiving all of the budget of $1,140,000 as only $998,000 
was definitely accepted by synodical societies. In order to be 
absolutely safe it was therefore decided to base appropriations 
for the year upon receipts of $950,000 from organizations. This 
figure was believed to be a minimum. But business conditions 
were worse in many sections of the country than was antici- 
pated and instead of $950,000 from organizations, only $867,- 
000 was received. Still this is an increase over 192 1 of 6 1/3 
per cent., or $52,000, and represents hard work and sacrifice 
on the part of the women and young people in the missionary or- 
ganizations. 

The Board started the year with a cash deficit of $77,000 
and appropriations for buildings either in process of erection 
or contracted for of $88,000 more, making a total of $165,- 
000. This amount had to be taken from the already greatly re- 
duced budget. The field responded to the financial situation 
which the Board faced in a wholehearted way and effected a 
saving of over $42,000 on the current work account of the year. 
Of course needed things were left undone but the money was saved. 

At the beginning of the year the Board voted to apply as 
much as necessary of the undesignated amount of the Sage Leg- 
acy, part two, (see Annual Report 192 1 for policy of disposition 
of said legacy) to help cover the building program of the year. 

The receipts of the Board for the year from organizations 
were $867,000, from tuition on the field, $78,300, from interest 
on the Sage legacy $48,000, from interest on permanent funds 
and from other sources $34,200, making a total of $1,027,500 for 
the year, as against expenditures of $1,029,500. The saving of the 
field on current work and the interest on the Sage Legacy par- 
ticularly made it possible for the Board to close the year with the 
debt of 1920-1921 paid and all bills for the year met with the ex- 
ception of $2,000. In addition to receipts for current work and 
buildings, included in the budget, approximately $50,000 was re- 
ceived for objects outside the budget. 

To those who read this report it is not necessary to say that 
all the links in the missionary chain are important, but the synodi- 
cal is the link that has the strongest strain, for it gets the strain 
from both the Presbyterial Society and the Board — both look to 
the synodical. This year has been marked by the union of the 
Home and Foreign synodical societies in Illinois, Ohio, New 

6 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

York and West Virginia, which is further evidence of the fact 
that the missionary women are interested in an entire world 
and not segments of it. One new synodical society has been 
organized during the year, namely Florida, and the Board hear- 
tily welcomes it. 

The work on the Mission Field is made possible through the 
thirty-nine synodical societies, two hundred sixty-five presby- 
terial societies and 14,078 local societies, of which 5,653 are 
woman's societies with an approximate membership of 233,270 
and 8,425 young people's organizations with a membership of 
196,124. 

There could not be a more splendid set of workers than those 
in the missionary cause whether in the local church or on the 
mission field. Their faithfulness and efficiency are a splendid ex- 
ample of Christian consecration. 

One of the outstanding signs of synodical success 
is the general growth of synodical consciousness. Instead 
of thinking just in terms of the presbyterial, pres- 
byterial societies are thinking in [ terms of their work 
in relationship to the synodical organization. The programs of 
the synodical societies were generally planned with longer time 
and more care than ever before. The executive committees of 
the synodical societies are increasingly carrying and caring for 
the work. In many of the geographically larger synodicals the 
high cost of travel and the low state of the contingent fund pre- 
vent the executive committee from meeting together other than 
at the time of the synodical meeting, but many of the executive 
committees function through correspondence. If the synodical 
president was ever a figurehead that day is long past — she now 
carries big responsibilities. 

Another sign of synodical success is the growth in the culti- 
vation of the grace of stewardship. Many synodical societies 
have either had classes on stewardship, or a series of devotional 
services on stewardship. Stewardship has been brought before 
the membership of the missionary societies and emphasized as 
never before. 

There has been a growth in the membership of missionary or- 
ganizations, but it still falls far short of the Presbyterian ideal — 
every woman, young person and child an active member of a 
missionary organization. 

The officers of the synodical societies have worked hard the 
past year and they have accomplished much. May the successes 
of the past and the need of America and the world, at the present 
time, spur us all on to greater service in the coming year. Synod- 
ical successes in departmental work will be listed in the depart- 
mental reports. 

7 



Reports from Headquarters 

The promotional work of the Board is done through six de- 
partments — missionary education, young people's work, Christian 
social service, student work, publicity and the Home Mission 
Monthly. The respective officers and heads of these departments 
make the following reports for the year 1921-1922: 

Missionary Education 

The following report has been prepared by Mrs. M. J. Gilder- 
sleeve, Secretary for Missionary Education: 

After reading "The Submerged Tenth," by Jacob Riis, Theo- 
dore Roosevelt called on the author and said, "I have read your 
book. I have come to help." Results are proving that an inter- 
est has been awakened and a determination aroused "to help" in 
the field work through the reading and study of the books recom- 
mended for 1921-1922. These books were "From Survey to 
Service," by H. Paul Douglass, "Unfinished Business," by Fred 
Eastman, "Playing Square with Tomorrow" by Fred Eastman, 
and "Stay at Home Journeys" by Agnes Wilson Osborne. The 
statements received from a number of churches indicate that 
"Unfinished Business" has met the long felt need of studying 
the particular field for which we, as Presbyterians, are responsible. 

A memorable interdenominational conference was held at Wal- 
lace Lodge last June for all secretaries of Boards having for their 
particular responsibility the development of leadership for mis- 
sionary education. Normal classes were held in the morning, 
conferences in the afternoon and evening. Spiritual messages 
helped everyone to appreciate better that all are working for 
one purpose; the giving of definite information looking toward 
the bringing of the world to Christ. The dearth of leaders led 
to the decision that in all summer conferences under the auspices 
of the Missionary Education Movement the aim of training lead- 
ers for missionary education should be emphasized. 

Monthly meetings with the New Era Department of Mission- 
ary Education have been the rule this past year with the definite 
object of presenting missions to the church under a concerted 
plan. Joint announcements have been prepared and as far as 
possible a united approach to the church has been made with sat- 
isfactory results. As a result synodical and presbyterial secre- 
taries for missionary education have this year put special effort on 
the introduction of the church school of missions into churches 
that hitherto had not realized its value as a stimulant to greater 
giving, greater service, greater knowledge of the work of our own 
church and its vital problems. 

The opportunity given this department last fall to hold nor- 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

nial classes in connection wilh sy nodical meetings was appre- 
ciated, if one can judge by tiie increased demands for confer- 
ences on missionary education at the spring presbyterial meet- 
ings and the requests for suggestions for the conduct of these 
conferences from presbyterial secretaries for missionary educa- 
tion. At the recj[uest of secretaries for missionary education, 
one page leaflets on different features of missionary education 
have been provided and found acceptable to the organization. 
Such topics have been in terse form as Relay Class, Reading 
Circle, Missionary Education How, Reading Contest and How 
to Organize Mission Study Class. 

The report of classes in the Westminster Guild shows a de- 
sire to know the field so that giving may be intelligent. The young 
people's societies of Christian Endeavor have done better work 
this year in missionary education, but much of this field of work 
requires greater cultivation. The study classes for Light Bear- 
ers depend largely on women who, recognizing the possibilities 
in the children, are eager and ready to lead them and to teach 
them that in helping others less happily situated they are con- 
tributing to their own happiness by finding joy in service. 

The results of this year's study are shown in increased gifts, 
greater interest, applicants for definite service in the special fields 
studied. 

Report of Classes 

Mission study 1,683 

Relay 281 

Reading circles 249 

Program meetings 753 

Lecture 91 

Westminster Guild , 658 

Total 3,715 

The total of 3.715 compared with that of 2,050 for 1920-21 
shows a gain of 1,665 classes. 

Ohio is the banner synodical society with an increase of over 
200 per cent. The number of classes last year was loi as com- 
pared with 327 this year. Pennsylvania Synodical Society with 
516 shows the largest number of classes with more than 100 
per cent. gain. Texas gained 100 per cent., having had 65 classes 
last year and 130 this year. Detroit (Mich.) Presbytery is the 
banner presbytery with 159 classes. Westminster Guild organi- 
zations, enrolling 658 classes, lack only ten of having 100 per 
cent. gain. The mission study class as a method has made nearly 
100 per cent, gain, showing a higher standard of work accom- 
plished. 

Including the 87 study classes through the Sunday school 
and 591 church classes conducted under the direction of the 

9 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

Board of Home Missions the total number of classes enrolled in 
the study of home missions for this year was 4,393. 

Summer Conferences 

Twenty-eight conferences were supplied; with leaders for 
mission study classes and splendid reports have been received of 
their class work and their influence as indicated by the amount of 
correspondence carried on with these young people. 

Young People's Work 

The following report has been prepared by Miss M. Josephine 
Petrie, Secretary for Young People's Work: 

The aim of the young people's department of the Woman's 
Board of Home Missions is so to visualize the service commit- 
ted to the Board by the General Assembly that the members of 
all Presbyterian organizations of young people will feel a grow- 
ing and individual responsibility for some definite share in these 
home mission enterprises. 

The work of the department is as far reaching as the variety 
of organizations in the church, for the groups cultivated range 
from babyhood to graduation into the women's missionary socie- 
ties. The history of the past year records no unusual tasks in 
the promotion work. It has been a riormal year except in the 
development of joint organization methods. As synodical and 
presbyterial societies increasingly reorganize with one set of 
officers for home and foreign missions, and secretaries are elected 
to promote all phases of missionary work among the young 
people, so the work of the Board secretaries for young people 
becomes more and more intertwined and new policies or methods 
must be fully considered by the two secretaries and their com- 
mittees before sending to the constituency. 

The Committee on Young People's Work 

Until this year the Woman's Board has had no committee for 
this department of its work, but such a committee has been 
meeting during the year with the purpose of relieving the sec- 
retary of some of the details of the work. For instance, the 
committee assumed responsibility for the preparation of the 
Home Mission Christian Endeavor programs and thus released 
the time of the secretary for other duties. 

The Westminster Guild 

It has been another year of splendid success in Westminster 
Guild work. The Home Mission text-book was first in order 
of study and proved so popular that the enrollment cards list 
the largest number of classes ever reported. The constantly 
growing subscription list for the Westminster Guild Bulletin is 

10 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

also an encouragement. One free copy of the magazine is sent 
to each synodical and presbyterial secretary and through the 
Westminster Guild presbyterial secretary to each Chapter and 
Circle. In addition to the free copies we now carry a subscrip- 
tion list of 2,351. 

The practical work of the year is worthy of much more space 
than allowed in this report. Chapters and Circles have contributed 
hundreds of towels, wash cloths, stockings, aprons, bedding, hos- 
pital supplies, layettes, etc., in addition to the wonderful supply 
of gifts for the Ellis Island Christmas. There were for this 
purpose 630 boxes, barrels and bundles containing 40,000 arti- 
cles. The contributors gave generous permission to "send where 
needed," after the gifts required for Ellis Island were provided, 
and we were able not only to furnish some of the schools with 
a belated Christmas treat, but to send articles of wearing apparel 
to Haines House, Alaska, and several of the community stations. 

Young Women's Societies 

Possibly this group of the chain of organizations is the most 
difficult when building a "budget" or an apportionment, for they 
are constantly replenishing the women's societies as a body with- 
out first providing their substitutes in a younger group of girls 
organized for missions. There are nearly five hundred young 
women's missionary societies, strong, vital forces for the carry- 
ing on of the duties to which they expect to fall heir. Their 
gifts for home missions cover salaries, shares in numerous funds 
and the support of the nurses' training class at the Presbyterian 
Hospital, San Juan, Porto Rico. 

Christian Endeavor Societies 

While the Christian Endeavor Society is not listed as a mis- 
sionary organization, the Board has a "point of contact" through 
the missionary committee. In addition to all the usual corre- 
spondence with leaders of the three groups of Christian En- 
deavor, home missions has been definitely presented in the form 
of programs, "objects" for gifts, "follow up" information from 
the fields, stations and missionaries, coin receptacles, methods 
leaflets, etc. Several of the State Christian Endeavor Field Sec- 
retaries have given valuable assistance in publicity work for 
the publications, assignments and gifts of their organizations. 
It was a pleasure to welcome several hundred Presbyterian young 
people during the International Christian Endeavor Convention 
last July ; their interest in their Board headquarters was a joy. 

Light Bearers and Little Light Bearers 

If one could judge from the daily mails of the department, 
the greatest encouragement of the year has been the constantly 

11 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

increasing number of children's organizations which are tlie foun- 
dation of all the future missionary societies. Whether or not 
the final statistics of the year bear out this promise of the months, 
the fact is that there has been a continuous organizing, reorgan- 
izing and transfer among the children's societies. If only all 
women's societies would show the interest of one which con- 
tributed "Ten dollars to be credited for the children's work be- 
cause we have no children's society to report," there would be 
many more of these groups organized for the seed-sowing of 
missions. 

Missionary Mail 

This little paper has won its way steadily during this trial 
year. It gives latest news from the stations or "objects" as- 
signed to the children's societies, therefore a free copy is sent to 
each Junior Christian PIndeavor, Light Bearers and Little Light 
Bearers society through the secretary for children's work. Sup- 
plies are also sent to each of the depositories of the Woman's 
Board of Foreign Missions for free distribution and a copy is 
mailed to each home mission school and to the foreign mission 
stations and the homes of missionaries where there are children. 

Mission Study 

The young people's department must at all times bear an 
intimate relation to the department for missionary education in 
order that plans for mission study, etc., may be promptly put in 
operation among the local societies of young people. The sec- 
retary also cooperates with this department in the selection of 
leaders and speakers for conferences and institutes for young 
people. 

Other Cooperative Agencies 

A number of conferences have been held during the year 
with representatives of the department for Young People's Work 
in the Board of Publication and Sabbath School Work looking 
toward simplified uniform methods of approach to societies of 
young people and a program for work which shall harmonize 
the plans of the United Society of Christian Endeavor with de- 
nominational service. Progress has been made and a leaflet pub- 
lished with four missionary goals which shall supplement the 
"Four Square Program" published by the Reverend William 
Ralph Hall. 

Recruiting 

An earnest spirit of cooperation is also shown in the desire 
to cultivate and direct the young people who volunteer for life 
service at the conferences, institutes and conventions. Very 

12 



"Woman's Board of Home Missions 

definite plans for this service are under way in order that the 
"follow up" work may be more prompt and efficient. 

Cooperation 

In writing an annual report of the work of this department it 
is always a delight to make recognition of the splendid, loyal 
cooperation of the "volunteer workers"— the elected secretaries 
or young people in synodical and presbyterial societies. Words 
seem most inadequate as their service of the twelve months is re- 
viewed. There are now 

42 Synodical secretaries for young people. 

14 Synodical secretaries for children's work. 

21 Synodical secretaries for the Westminster Guild. 

277 Presbyterial secretaries for young people. 

104 Presbyterial secretaries for children's work. 

116 Presbyterial secretaries for the Westminster Guild. 

The statistical tables are as follows : 

Statistics 

The organizations — 

Total number of young people's societies 6,107 

Total number of young women's societies 504 

Total number of Westminster Guild chapters and circles.. 1,814 

Membership in young people's societies 164,941 

Alembership in Westminster Guild chapters and circles.... 31,183 

Number of new organizations 979 

Total increase in membership 30,887 

The Home Mission Gifts — 

1921 For regular work — 1922 Increase 

$40,512.40 Y. P. S. (including Jr. and Inter.) $40,688.00 $175.60 

35,018.80 Y. L. M. S., Light Bearers and L. L. B... 36,232.02 1.213.22 

34,032.18 W. G. Chapters and Circles 40,403.34 6,371.16 

13,623.58 S. S 14,027.73 1,004.15 

$123,186.96 Total $131,951.09 $8,764.13 



Ten years ago the total gifts reported by this department were 
$29,317.60. The figures for this year speak for the growth of 
the work. 

An appeal of a railroad to its employees and patrons in- 
cludes these words: "Shoulder to shoulder effort means success 
to all interests." Although not expressed in words, this has been 
the spirit of the past months in this department where the six 
hundred secretaries for the various groups of young women, 
young people and children have worked with the Board's sec- 
retary for young people "shoulder to shoulder" to make possible 
the record now presented to the Woman's Board of Home Mis- 
sions. 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

The Home Mission Monthly 

The following report has been prepared by Mrs. H. Paul 
Douglas, who is editing The Home Mission Monthly in the 
absence of the editor, Miss Finks: 

Although not sailing on wholly untroubled seas the Home 
Mission Monthly during the year 1 921 -1922 has not met with 
any storm that it has not been able to weather. The editor. Miss 
Finks, for three months during the spring was on part time duty 
and for the first three months of this calendar year has had a 
leave of absence. Although not present in person her systematic 
habits and forethought have made it possible for another to 
"carry on" until her return. 

In the year 1920-1921 we gained 1216 subscriptions in spite 
of the increased price. But during the past year our fate has 
been the common fate of many similar publications. While new 
subscriptions have come in fairly well, renewals have dropped 
ofif, although it is interesting to note that many who had allowed 
their subscriptions to lapse for one or two years have returned 
to the fold. Several reasons might be given for this decrease, 
but as the financial stringency passes we are confident our num- 
bers will rise and rapidly exceed our previous high mark. 

Editorially, we hope the magazine has been kept up to its high 
standard in spite of the handicap caused by the absence of the 
editor. We have, as usual, been able to secure our articles from 
those sufficiently interested in mission work to write for us with- 
out compensation. The only paid articles was a series on meth- 
ods of work for children's and young people's organizations. We 
feel that as an organ of publicity, an agency through which the 
Board accounts to its constituency, the magazine is invaluable. 
As a means of education it is perhaps the Board's best medium. 
While we are always tempted to recall the days when the Monthly 
turned thousands of dollars into the Board's treasury, we are 
confident that even now as its greatest "broadcasting" station, 
the magazine is highly profitable. 

Student Work 

The following report has been prepared by Miss Florence 
Tyler, Executive Secretary for Student Work, joint officer of 
the Woman's Boards of Home and Foreign Missions : 

The year 1921-1922 has seen great progress in the Student 
Department along a number of lines ; more definite results can 
be tabulated than ever before. On the lists of outgoing mission- 
aries and of appointments for the home field there appeared the 
names of twenty students with whom the student secretaries had 
been in touch during college years. Three colleges have ac- 

14 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

cepted and are definitely backing a large missionary program un- 
der Presbyterian auspices ; a greater number of colleges than ever 
before are contributing through the Boards of our church for 
work on the home and foreign field ; nine girls recruited through 
student department spent the summer months in work among 
the migrant groups in the East Central States ; four girls from 
Macalester spent the summer in Daily Vacation Bible School 
and camp work on the Mesaba Iron Range; four girls did vol- 
unteer work in stations under the Woman's Board of Home Mis- 
sions and it can be truly said that the work of these undergrad- 
uate students was in every way satisfactory and efiicient. Twelve 
girls are taking special preparation under fellowship of the 
Woman's Board of Homi, Missions for work among the foreign 
speaking groups. 

The department is fortunate in having had three student 
secretaries at work during the entire year. These secretaries 
have made 115 college visitations, interviewed 706 girls and made 
381 speeches; student work has also been presented at 12 presby- 
terial and 62 local meetings. 

Student department has had a part in the furthering of the 
work among the migrant groups which the Council of Women 
for Home Missions has especially delegated to students and 
also the cause of the Women's Christian Colleges in the Orient. 

Among the new departures of the year, the group visitation 
of the larger colleges and universities is the outstanding achieve- 
ment. These visitations have been tried out in nine colleges, 
namely. University of Washington, Washington State Agricul- 
tural, University of Idaho, University of Chicago, Wellesley, New 
Hampshire State, Syracuse University and Smith College. The 
most successful visitation was that made at Smith College, where 
Miss Agnes Hall of the Episcopal Board made an advance visit 
to the college and planned the three day program. The group 
of secretaries included Miss Calder, Congregational Board; Miss 
Lytton, Methodist ; Miss Hall, Episcopal ; Miss Greenough, 
Baptist; Miss Pepper, Lutheran; Miss Hoyt, Y. W. C. A., and 
Miss Clark, Presbyterian. The visitations lasted three days and 
the program included addresses, denominational meetings, for- 
ums on varied branches of church service, and interviews. The 
students were delighted to find that church unity and coopera- 
tion "worked." 

Special effort has been made by the department to reach the 
colleges having vocational guidance of life work conferences 
and a large number of these have been attended by the student 
secretaries. 

During the year a Federated Student Committee has been 
formed consisting of all the denominational and Y. W. C. A. 

IS 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

secretaries doing work among women students, and the fellow- 
ship and cooperation of this committee have been found most 
helpful. 

The Presbyterian mission program was presented at the six 
summer conferences of the Christian Association by representa- 
tives of the Woman's Boards of Missions, such representatives 
in most cases being student secretaries. The department was 
also represented in some other conferences. 

Undergraduate students have been taken into the counsel of 
the department and have attended one committee meeting. This 
has proved a most helpful experiment and will be. used to a 
greater extent in the coming year. 

District student committees have been set up in five of the 
six districts, centered around San Francisco, Portland, St. Louis, 
Philadelphia and New York, and while all these committees are 
not in full working order a start has been made and together 
with the new systems inaugurated in the office, these commit- 
tees will facilitate and make efficacious the follow-up work of 
the department. 

The year has been one of real accomplishment and its en- 
couragements make possible a renewal of enthusiasm for the 
coming year. 

Christian Social Service 

The following report has been prepared by Mrs. DeWitt 
Wallace, Secretary for Christian Social Service: 

The foreigner in our midst is a tremendous national chal- 
lenge — a force that has already made or marred vast sections 
of our country. Unrest, discontent, deep hatred and revolt are 
byproducts of this ever changing, active generating, questioning 
mass of our population. Presbyterian women have seen this, 
felt it and acted accordingly, knowing that their missionary in- 
terests were not fully rounded until the new American was in- 
cluded in their program. Synodical societies through their pres- 
byterial societies and local organizations are undertaking work 
along this line, and more and more this work is being thought of 
from the standpoint of the state as the unit. While the Board 
has no direct responsibility for this, as the money simply goes 
through the treasury and is returned for local disbursement, it 
is eager to help in the thinking out and executing of these plans 
and programs. The number of synodical societies doing this 
work among foreigners has now grown to eighteen and the 
number of centers increased in many of these states. 

16 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

Fellowships and Scholarships 

This year the fellowship and scholarship group was the lar- 
gest in the short history of this department for when the schools 
opened in the fall of 192 1 the Board had eight fellowship girls 
at Teachers College, Columbia, five at University of California, 
and three scholarships for foreign-born students, in all sixteen 
young women training for Christian leadership in work among 
foreigners. Reports from settlements, students and teachers 
show that the academic and field work as a whole is exceptionally 
satisfactory. 

Ellis Island 

The three per cent. law has been in efifect almost a year, and 
while some restrictive measure was necessary, the hardships it 
has brought make us very eager that constructive thought on 
the part of our lawmakers will give us a more adequate handling 
of this phase of our national and international life. Our work- 
ers under Mrs. J. C. Rivera have been putting forth extra ef- 
fort this year to make the work at this port of entry more ef- 
fective and far-reaching. Religious services on the Sabbath 
are a very gratifying innovation and a more intelligent coordina- 
tion of all the various phases of the work has made for a much 
more eiTective program for these new Americans in their first 
touch with this Christian land. Through the gifts of the West- 
minster Guild, Christmas on Ellis Island was successful beyond 
all expectations. The workers are still supplying many of the 
urgent needs of the newcomers from the gifts received through 
the Christmas boxes. 

Mesaba Iron Range and Macalester College 

Four girls from the Social Service Department of Macalester 
College journeyed north to the Mesaba Iron Range last June. 
The funds were supplied by the Christian Social Service Depart- 
ment of the Woman's Board of Home Missions. In what bet- 
ter way could the Board give Presbyterian girls, trained to do 
social service work, a vision of the possibilities of this work un- 
der our church Boards and agencies, than to set them to work in 
the vastness of our iron ranges ? We know that they never again 
will be content to do social service work without emphasizing 
the Christian side. The cooperation will be carried on again this 
summer and the Board is hoping that the example will be followed 
and financed by other Presbyterian colleges in connection with 
their needs in their own states. 

The department is looking forward at this time of year to 
its third summer's work carried on interdenominationally under 
the Council of Women for Home Missions among the foreign- 

17 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

ers in the canneries and truck gardens. Last year the experimen- 
tal stage was passed and a real piece of constructive work put 
on among these thousands of women and children who harvest 
our fruits and vegetables. Notwithstanding the very slack sea- 
son, there was a larger enrollment than during the 1920 sea- 
son. The group of college girls who gave of their vacation 
time to take care of the day nurseries, hot noon lunches, play- 
grounds, religious and patriotic hours and the numerous other 
necessary duties show what a force the Christian church has in 
its young people of today, if the needy fields that crave their de- 
voted service are opened to them. 

The momentum gained during the first two years should carry 
us far toward shouldering our real responsibility as Presbyterian 
women toward this group who are ever forming a larger part 
and exerting a greater influence in molding our national life. 

Literature Department 

A notable advance has been made during the year in the dis- 
tribution of the publications of the Board. The sales of litera- 
ture for the year show an increase of 26 per cent., the total 
amount credited being $21,862.98, or $5,645.84 more than a year 
ago. Sales in 29 synodical societies are ahead of last year. Those 
showing an increase of 25 per cent, or more are Colorado, Flor- 
ida, Idaho, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Mississippi, Montana, 
New England, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, South 
Dakota and Texas. 

The major portion of this advance may be credited to the 
sales of books for Home Mission study which have exceeded all 
previous years; 19,889 copies have been sold, "Unfinished Busi- 
ness" being the most popular book of the year. The second great 
cause for this advance is the increased use of the smaller leaflet 
and pamphlet issues. Priced literature has been in great demand, 
but there have been unprecedented calls for publications to be dis- 
tributed gratuitously. Treasurers' aids for collecting funds have 
been taken in larger quantities than in the past, 352,500 col- 
lection envelopes having been required. 

Publications numbering 1,110,251 copies bound into 3,734,350 
pages have been printed by the Board to serve auxiliaries ; 94,675 
copies of the smaller leaflets have in addition been issued jointly 
with the Woman's Board of Foreign Missions, A larger edi- 
tion of the "Year Book of Prayer," also a joint publication, was 
printed than ever before, and the Board has distributed 20,000 
copies. 

All of these statistics prove that larger missionary intelli- 
gence, increased efficiency and greater activity are being put 
into service in all auxiliaries. 

18 



The Mission Field 

The following report has been prepared by Miss Edna R. 
Voss, Superintendent of Field Work: 

To those of us who last April looked forward to the year ahead 
with misgiving and dread fear that funds would not be suf- 
ficient to maintain the work of the Board at all its stations, the 
record of the twelve months just ended has been a rebuke to our 
own faith and to our estimate of the ingenuity, the resourceful- 
ness, the spirit of cooperation, and consecrated, devotion of our 
missionaries on the field. Requisitions representing the needs 
of the stations for 1921-22 had to be cut nearly twenty per cent, 
to bring appropriations within the sum left after the large def- 
icit had been taken from the total amount promised for the year 
by the constituency. This cut could mean nothing but curtail- 
ment we at headquarters were sure, in spite of the fact that the 
cost of living was falling a little in some sections of the country. 
If we could only hold our own, we thought the advance we had 
planned might wait until brighter days dawned, but even this 
seemed too much to hope, and so it was with fearful hearts that 
we sent out the sadly reduced appropriations. 

But did our workers on the field receive these reductions in 
like spirit? Not at all. With the faith we lacked and a will to 
do, they accepted the smaller budgets with determination not 
only to hold the work intact, but to push ahead. And this they 
have done. Total expenses for current work on the field have 
been kept well within the appropriation allowed, notwithstanding 
the fact that two stations were reopened, Haines House, Alaska, 
and Mossop School for girls, Harriman, Tennessee; that the 
Board shared with the Executive Committee of Foreign Missions 
of the Presbyterian Church in the United States the current ex- 
penses of the work at Cardenas, Cuba, and that new extension 
work was developed in connection with many community cen- 
ters. There has been, moreover, a decided strengthening of es- 
tablished work. Additional upper grades have been added at 
the Normal, Home School, Farm School, Laura Sunderland, 
Allison-James, Ganado, and in Cuba, at Cardenas, Guines and 
Sancti Spiritus. This has meant the appointment of additional 
and better qualified teachers, the purchase of additional and more 
adequate equipment, and in many cases substantial provision for 
a larger enrollment of pupils. To make possible this program 
of advanced grade work to man the additional stations and ex- 
tension work, to care for an increased enrollment in boarding 
schools of over three hundred to teach the additional six hun- 
dred seventy-four pupils attending special classes this past twelve 
months, and to direct nearly one thousand additional children 

19 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

enrolled in Sabbath school and Young Peoples' classes, twenty- 
six new missionaries have entered the Board's service during 
the year. 

Because of the large dehcit, most of which was in the build- 
ing budget, the appropriation was not sufficient to cover the cost 
of even the most desperately needed buildings, and these were 
made possible only through an additional appropriation from the 
Sage Legacy. The little station for Mono Indians at North 
Fork, California, has been completely rehabilitated and is now 
well equipped and ready to serve that needy tribe through a 
boarding school accommodating forty. Tucson Indian Training 
School has its long needed school and administration building 
which has released the basement in the boys' dormitory for man- 
ual training activities. Ganado Mission is rejoicing in a big 
forward step toward the complete rehabilitation necessary to car- 
ry out the greatly enlarged program for the evangelization of 
the Navajo Indian. With a more nearly adequate water sup- 
ply, the completion of the dormitory and dining room, the re- 
modelling of Westminster dormitory, school and workers' home, 
and the building of temporary quarters for its Bible training 
school, Kirkwood Memorial can now admit one hundred pupils 
and give thorough instruction from the fourth grade through 
adult training in home-making, nursing, and Bible study. Hospi- 
tal facilities at Ganado have been improved also by the erection of 
three small screened houses for tubercular patients, two of these 
the gift of the Woman's Missionary Society of the Philadelphia 
Arch Street Presbyterian Church. At Indian Wells the water 
supply has been made adequate and the station's facilities for 
meeting the needs of Navajos in its vicinity have been increased 
by the addition of a fine, well equipped community house. 

The need of a gymnasium and a dining room at Wasatch 
Academy has at last been realized in the splendid new structure 
which was erected this past summer. Through a legacy from 
Passaic, New Jersey, and the generosity of Pittsburgh Presby- 
terian Society, Wasatch boasts a second new building this year, a 
beautifully equipped infirmary. The plant at Forsythe Memorial, 
Los Angeles, has been enlarged by the purchase of an adjoining 
lot containing a small cottage. This is being fitted up as a hospi- 
tal to meet the requirement of the Los Angeles law that institu- 
tions such as ours must care for their sick in a building apart 
from the school and dormitory. But building has not been con- 
fined to western stations. Florence Stephenson Hall, which will 
replace the old Home School on the Asheville Campus, is well 
under way and will, it is hoped, be ready for occupancy at the 
opening of school in September The faculty and boys at Farm 
School report that the new gymnasium dedicated in November 

20 



WfiMAN's Board of Home Missions 

is meeting a long felt need among them of supervised athletics. 
This building they claim has done much to promote the fine 
spirit of the school. Community centers at Smith and Wooton, 
Kentucky, have each completed a new structure during the year, 
a cottage dormitory at the former, a community house at the 
latter, and are reporting more and far better work accomplished 
because of the additions. 

The two largest and most outstanding additions to our equip- 
ment have been the Marina Mission Building at Mayaguez, Por- 
to Rico, and the school and administration building at Menaul, 
Albuquerque. Architecturally beautiful and designed and 
equipped for a large program of community work, the former 
stands as a challenge to us to capitalize the present interest and 
build up in that needy field of needy Porto Rico a work which 
shall be a model of its kind. Menaul School is already a plant 
of which the Board may be proud. The splendid school building 
completed this fall, together with the remodelled dormitories and 
the new teachers' home a little over a year ago, form with sev- 
eral small buildings a group which is a fitting memorial to those 
whose legacies have made this rehabilitation possible. 

Sage Memorials at Dwight, Oklahoma, and Mossop School 
for Girls, Tennessee, voted by the Board to have been erected 
during the past year have not been begun. A superintendent has 
only just been appointed for the former school and although a 
topographical survey of the property and tentative plans for the 
dormitories are under way, it was thought l^est not to commence 
actual building until the permanent superintendent was in charge. 
Mossop School has been started in a small building on the cam- 
pus, and the new school and dormitory will be begun probably 
this spring or early summer. 

But the greatest advance in the work has not been the ma- 
terial growth the foregoing list of new buildings and improve- 
ments would indicate. Development has been intensive as well as 
extensive, and too much cannot be said in praise of the effort 
our workers are making through attendance at summer school, 
through correspondence courses, professional reading, and con- 
sultation, station with station, to bring to the great missionary 
task a wider vision, a larger, better systematized program, and 
greatly improved methods of work. It has been a year in which 
high goals have been set and won. There has been a closer tie 
between the work of our Woman's Board and that of other 
Presbyterian forces for evangelization, a happier cooperation with 
other denominations, and within our own work there has been 
marked unanimity of effort in seeking to promote that train- 
ing which will result in active Christian leadership. The call to- 
day from every community and from every force organized for 

21 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

Christian work is for such leadership and it is most gratifying 
to see in the plans those on the field are submitting for meeting 
this need their keen realization of the fact that to answer the 
appeal it is not enough that the young people they are training 
should be equipped with facts, not enough that they should be 
strong in Christian character or even imbued with a vision of 
Christian service ; they must have added to all these a knowledge 
of methods of work through normal training and actual experi- 
ence in a laboratory of practical Christian work in the 
community. 

In the growing realization that such intensive training is im- 
perative — that only through trained active leadership from among 
their own will our exceptional peoples be brought to a full 
knowledge of the blessings and responsibilities of Christian liv- 
ing — and in the perfecting of plans to make such training pos- 
sible lies the really significant advance made in 1921-1922. 

ALASKAN FIELD 

Haines House. In answer to an appeal for a Christian home 
for small native children of Southeastern Alaska, Haines House 
was opened early in the fall. Here fourteen — seven boys and 
seven girls — are now forming a happy family in charge of Miss 
Emma Jackson. The native Indian bureau has cooperated to 
the fullest extent, enlarging its school building and employing 
a second teacher to care for the boys and girls from Haines 
House. A nurse has been appointed to this station not only 
to watch the health of the children of the home, teaching them 
health habits, but to visit and nurse among the Indian families 
of Haines and vicinity, holding classes and instructing the moth- 
ers and girls in first aid, simple home nursing and sanitation. 

Sheldon Jackson School. After the resignation of Superin- 
tendent McKean the first of August, the administration of the 
Sheldon Jackson School was put into the hands of a committee 
of the faculty. This committee did excellent work until Mr. 
McKean's successor, Dr. James H. Condit, took up his duties 
the first of January. The Board is most fortunate in having 
secured Dr. Condit as the head of this largest and most impor- 
tant school in the whole of Alaska. Dr. Condit comes to this 
work with a background of experience in Alaska, a thorough 
knowledge of, and love for, the Alaskan Indian, and faith in the 
far-reaching results of an intensive program for training Chris- 
tian leaders. With the opening of Haines House for younger 
children, it has been possible this past year to limit registration 
at Sheldon Jackson to older boys and girls and to emphasize 
work of the upper grades and high school departments. 

22 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

INDIAN FIELD 

Ganado. The enlarged program for the evangeHzation of 
the Navajo Indian is well under way with greatly improved fa- 
cilities for carrying on activities of school, hospital and church 
work. The number of pupils has increased to one hundred. 
Instead of nine beds in the hospital at Ganado there are now 
twenty-four, though as many as thirty-four patients have been 
cared for at one time. Good Samaritan Hospital at Indian Wells 
is most encouraging in its reports of full wards and many con- 
verts. Mr. Ward, the evangelist in charge at Indian Wells, and 
his wife are untiring in their efforts to reach the hundreds of 
families within a radius of twenty-five miles of the station and to 
claim that whole territory for Christ. 

Tucson. At Tucson the one hundred sixty-one students en- 
rolled are all members of the Sunday school and of the Young 
People's organizations. Leadership, independence and self-reli- 
ance are being developed through the industrial department. Su- 
perintendent Girton writes that the holding of certain "jobs" is 
now looked upon as an honor. "The boys who bake the bread 
have a big responsibility. Those who have had this to do this 
year can well let their chests swell with pride, for to date they 
have not spoiled one batch and have baked over fourteen thou- 
sand loaves." As a tangible evidence of community appreciation, 
the local friends of the school have given during the year one 
hundred seventy-one dollars for the department of music and 
over six hundred dollars to help light the new administration 
building. "Until this year, quite a number of our pupils have 
practically clothed themselves out of money they earned during 
the vacation. This year work could not be secured, and as a 
result the school has had to come to the rescue. No crops and 
falling prices of farm products have added greatly to the pov- 
erty of our patrons. This has been reflected in the meager 
amounts given to their children. The extra burden has been in 
part at least carried by the school. In this connection I might 
add that during the summer months a number of our pupils 
did not receive proper nourishment. They came to us in poor 
physical condition. They will go from us at the close of the 
school year to face another hard summer. I feel it our duty to 
fortify their bodies against disease by building them up in every 
way possible. This is being done, but it has meant an increased 
cost — an expense, however, that I am sure every person who 
knows conditions will heartily approve." 

Neah Bay. Miss Helen Clark's successor at Neah Bay is 
Miss Harriet Elliott, who reports that because of the foundation 
laid by Miss Clark in her twenty-two years of service, she has 

23 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

been able to build up in this little village of between four and 
five hundred people a spirit of Christian brotherhood and service 
which is already resulting in plans for civic improvement, clubs 
for old and young, and a new emphasis on things spiritual. 

San Miguel. The two community workers at San Miguel 
report an awakening interest in their Bible classes, personal 
workers' group, and teachers' training class. Miss Wolfe 
writes : "During our first years here there was only one Bible 
class and that here in San Miguel ; now we have classes in Var- 
moolie, Topowa, and Chew-lick. Where only a few homes were 
entered with the Gospel, we have now been into every home, 
isolated or in villages, within a radius of fifteen or twenty miles. 
In homes that were closed last year to the message, we have been 
welcomed this year." In their work of caring for the sick and 
administering simple remedies Miss Wolfe and her co-worker 
report like progress, there being many more calls for their serv- 
ices and a growing appreciation of the necessity in following in- 
structions as to health and sanitation. 

McBeth Mission. "The Nez Perces still continue to reach 
out to give the Gospel and to help in strengthening the work 
among other Indian tribes, besides doing their own evangelistic 
work. They have helped, or expect to help in evangelistic rneet- 
ings in the following tribes : Warm Springs, Umatilla, Spokanes, 
Cheyennes, Crows, Western Shoshones and Shoshones, Ban- 
nocks and Lemphis on Ft. Hall reservation in Southern Idaho. 
The expenses of the Nez Perces, who go from two to four at a 
time, are paid by their own people. They ask nothing from 
the Board nor the tribes to which they go, their expenses being 
assured before starting. If the people on the field choose to 
give them something they accept it, but it is usually a small 
amount in comparison with the expense of these long journeys. 
To meet these expenses the Nez Perces take offerings at each 
evangelistic meeting in the Nez Perce churches and keep this 
fund on hand for the 'Sent ones to the faraway people.' They 
give generously and love to do it." 

SPANISH-SPEAKING FIELD 
Boarding Schools 

Menaul. Mr. Donaldson reports a capacity enrollment this 
year of one hundred sixty-six and attributes the unusually fine 
spirit of the student body to the splendid group of workers at 
the school and to the inspiration which the new buildings, the 
improvements, and the added equipment have given. 

"The school renders aid to the community by sending out 
graduates and non-graduates who take a large part in community 
affairs. Many of the public school teachers are Menaul boys. 

24 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

The Supervisor of Schools in San Miguel County has written 
telling of the splendid work of the teachers in that community 
who were Menaul boys. The school band has been used in va- 
rious ways near the school. They are planning an entertain- 
ment now for the benefit of the Spanish Presbyterian Church. 
The greatest service this year, however, has been through the 
'Home Service Band.' During the fall we called for boys who 
were willing and who wished to do some definite Christian work. 
Thirty-four boys responded. These were divided into 'Gospel 
Teams.' Two of the teams hold services in the community about 
the school, while another is used each Sunday in connection with 
our own Sunday school. The rest of the boys are young and 
are preparing themselves for the work in the future. February 
fifth one of the teams went to Placitas, a little mountain vil- 
lage' twenty-five miles from Albuquerque. The little church was 
cold and barren, but the people did not mind the weather. They 
had not had any services for four months and appreciated the 
eiiforts of the boys very much. In both the morning and after- 
noon services the church was well filled. The boys had their 
band instruments and played many of the old hymns ; they sang 
special songs ; and three of them gave short addresses touching 
different phases of the same text. It was a day well spent and 
was much appreciated by the people. Other services have been 
held in Martineztown and at Rio Grande School. This is splen- 
did training for the boys and is a useful work in the community." 

Allison-James. There is no better indication of the work a 
school is doing than its standing in the community. Miss Bar- 
ber writes: "Nothing has been more encouraging than the cor- 
diality of the people of the community this year. The friendly 
relationship with the public school makes it possible for us to 
be a help to each other. Nearly all of the public high school girls 
came across the street to see an exhibit we had of work of the 
sewing classes ; we lend each other books, stereopticon slides, and 
such things. This week the executive committee of our Senior 
Christian Endeavor Society met with the executive committee of 
the society of the church to form a local Christian Endeavor 
Union. Joint meetings of the societies have been held during 
the year and our girls have been given important parts of the 
program. 

"The generous Christmas treats furnished by business houses 
in town at Christmas time are evidences of community appre- 
ciation. It was made possible for the entire school to attend 
all of the entertainments of the Lyceum course at very little 
cost to the girls, and two or three times the entire student body 
have been guests at good moving picture shows. The faculty 
has set apart the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month 

25 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

as 'At Home' days. We have had as many as twenty-four call- 
ers in one afternoon. Members of the faculty have been enter- 
tained in homes in town much more than usual and on every hand 
we hear words of commendation of the work of the school. The 
audience which listened to the sacred cantata given in the church 
by our girls on Christmas morning was most appreciative." 

That Allison-James is training for Christian service, the fol- 
lowing is evidence: "Last spring conferences were held with 
groups of girls who were interested in religious work for the 
summer. Many girls taught the Sunday school lessons every 
Sunday in their own homes. Two sisters had as many as seven- 
teen children in their Sunday school. The reorganization of the 
Christian Endeavor Society on a more systematic basis and the 
more practical work of the Teacher Training class with the 
primary department of the Sunday school have had the definite 
aim of preparation of the girls for leadership in their own com- 
munities." 

Forsythe Memorial School. It is planned to bring this school 
into line with the Board's policy of emphasizing work among 
children in the upper grades and high school, combining with 
the regular school instruction practical training for some form 
of Christian service. 

Day Schools and Medical Work 

The reports for all stations show steady progress ; day schools 
have had record enrollment; there has been increasing interest 
in the club work with young people and in adult classes and a 
growing appreciation of the district nursing which has been in- 
troduced. Miss Yeats, with Dr. W. H. Livingstone of Espanola 
as consulting physician, has rendered excellent service over a 
wide territory in addition to that which she has given at her 
headquarters, the Brooklyn Cottage Hospital, Embudo. 

Miss Alice Blake, who came East last spring to complete a 
course of study and receive her diploma from the Public Health 
Association, Bellevue Hospital Medical College, returned to Tre- 
mentina with renewed enthusiasm for her work along medical 
and general community lines. She reports : "Healthy spiritual 
life is manifest in the church services and Woman's Missionary 
Society, which grows stronger with each meeting." 

Miss Spear's report is typical of those of most of the "plaza" 
stations. "Perhaps the one kind of service the mission renders 
the community which is most genuinely and generally appre- 
ciated is our help in time of sickness— our 'district nursing,' as 
I call it. Personal friends have donated hospital gowns, sheets, 
etc., for this work and we are trying to make this service more 
effective. This year we have started a new Sunday school in 

26 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

Talpa, a neighboring plaza three miles away. This has brought 
us in touch witli new families which the mission has not been 
touching before. Two neigh])orhood English classes, one in 
Talpa, the other in a distant part of Ranches, have been another 
phase of our extension work undertaken during the winter. Com- 
munity appreciation is evident in the many little gifts made to the 
mission from time to time — apples, vegetables, eggs and meat. 
Some of these have been given out of such poverty that the 
worth of the gift was far more than its money value, it repre- 
sented such sacrifice and love." 

UTAH 
Boarding Schools 

Wasatch Academy. Mr. Johns reports progress along all 
lines in spite of the fact that total enrollment in the school as 
compared with last year shows a decrease. He writes : "In the 
two communion services held thus far this year eighteeen pupils 
have been admitted to church membership." 

New Jersey Academy. This school has been taxed to ca- 
pacity the past year and many applications for admission refused 
because of lack of room and equipment. One of the most val- 
uable aids in the Academy's program for training for leader- 
ship is its student association which, through its cabinet, sub- 
committees and class organizations, plans for most of the school's 
social and other activities. 

"Recently the older girls have gradually stepped into super- 
vising the younger in household duties. Executive ability has 
been discovered in the need of a substitute at preparing the even- 
ing meal once a week when the cook is out for the afternoon. 
During an epidemic of colds the home-nursing class assumed the 
responsibility for individual cases under direction of teacher 
and preceptress. In the absence of the cook on account of sick- 
ness, the domestic science class is making the desserts for the 
household. In rendering the ordinary or unusual services of 
the student association or the boarding department public and 
home life in a community are anticipated and corresponding 
ability is brought to the front. By doing, we learn at New Jer- 
sey Academy." 

Community Work 

Ferron. Mr. Johns of Wasatch Academy, who supervises 
the community work done in Utah, reports that the growth in 
Ferron has been phenomenal and the possibilities are now almost 
without limit. The junior high school, established here in the 
fall at the request of parents who have been financially respon- 
sible for it, has proved a great success not only educationally but 

27 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

as a means of enlisting the interest of the young people. A 
well equipped small community house is the next need to be 
met at this station. 

Monroe. Miss Lowry and her sister are back at Monroe 
after a year's leave of absence. 

Panguiich. Miss Paul writes: "The brightest spot in our 
work is where we see what the Word is accomplishing in some 
homes. We have given out Testaments for faithful attendance 
at Sunday school, and we know they are being read in some 
homes. In one in particular, the mother and her children read it 
over and over together evenings. She comes to us with questions 
as she reads, and though she will never leave the Mormon church 
for the Presbyterian, we believe she is developing into a true 
Christian. Her twelve year old boy was unmanageable a year 
ago ; now he seems entirely changed." 

St. George. Miss Conklin writes : Among our gifts from 
Detroit were a dozen New Testaments. The children were de- 
lighted with them, and I think will read them. One little tot 
said to me a few days ago : 'We read the Bible every morning 
now.' We have been gathering up spare bits of money for the 
Armenian orphans for some time. A few days ago a little fel- 
low came with a nickel, saying, 'We mustn't be pigs and keep all 
our money for ourselves, must we?'" 

MOUNTAIN FIELD 
Boarding Schools 

AshevUle Normal and Associated Schools. Dr. Calfee reports 
a total enrollment of four hundred forty-seven pupils in the four 
schools in this group. 

"All of the students are either active or associate members 
of the 'Y' or other Christian organizations maintained for 
students. A religious spirit has been more evident throughout 
the student body as a whole than in previous years. Christianity 
is coming to mean more to our students in their every-day deal- 
ings and daily life. The idea has more generally prevailed among 
the student body that religion is made up of worship and service. 
Many of them, before coming to us, had only the church idea 
of religion, which consisted in going to church and listening 
reverently to the preacher. The enlarged idea of religion has 
contributed good cheer and cooperation with the teachers and 
executive officers and has maintained high standards of conduct." 

Of Farm School in particular he adds : "There has been a 
decided improvement in the personal appearance, spirit and 
quality of the boys in Farm School. They have responded as 
young people usually do to the setting up of advanced ideals and 

28 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

standards. Consciously, hut unconsciously to the hoys, the faculty 
have been teaching appreciation for the school and what it is 
and has been doing for boys with limited opportunity. The 
boys are called upon to improve the campus, to beautify the 
grounds and buildings. 'Jlicy respond heartily because they have 
been made to feci that they have a vital part in making Farm 
School an institution to be respected and admired by other 
schools and outsiders in general. Much newspaper publicity 
has been given to Farm School events, including lectures and 
ball games, and one article dealt specifically with Farm School 
as an educational institution of which North Carolina should be 
justly proud." 

Miss Dunn, the dean, writes of the Normal: "If the strength 
and vitality of the church can be accurately measured by its 
missionary work, so may the strength and vitality of a school 
be gauged by its extension work. Until three years ago the 
Normal based most of its hope of extension work in the future 
of its graduates, although its influence reached out in other less 
conspicuous ways, but with the establishment of the Ashcville 
Summer School, which has grown in three years to an enroll- 
ment of nearly one thousand students from all over the South 
Atlantic States, and which holds its sessions on this campus un- 
der Doctor Calfee's direction, we find it possible to project the 
spirit and ideals and educational standards of the Normal into 
a wonderfully large field. 'The Summer School with a soul' is 
becoming so popularly known throughout the South that it 
threatens to outgrow its present quarters entirely. 

"It is a pity that so few of the host of unseen friends who 
are making the work of these schools possible can have the 
privilege of seeing it at first hand, for no amount of literature, 
pictures, letters, or talks can fully convey the fascination of the 
work or its worthwhileness ; this can only be explained by knowing 
our girls. As one of our best teachers said of them recently, 'The 
girls may be poor in cash, but they certainly are not in muscle, 
brains, or spirit.' I would that the universities and colleges of 
our country were full of as fine a type of womanhood as is in 
the making here. As a school with an educational standard to 
maintain, we have a right to desire, if we cannot demand, the 
means to give our students the most eiificient training possible, 
but we have a certain wealth that nothing can take from us, 
and that is the spirit of Christian service and its ensuing happiness 
which shines out from the faces of our attractive, appreciative 
girls from 'Back of the Beyond.' " 

The same high standards which have characterized the work 
at Home School and Pease House have been in evidence the past 
year in spite of a change of administration at the former in mid- 
29 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

year. Miss Josephine Bundy, who so ably followed Miss Flor- 
ence Stephenson as principal of Home School, resigned January 
first for a period of rest and study leaving Miss Lucile Tuttle in 
charge. 

The three schools on the Asheville Campus are rejoicing in 
the appointment of a trained nurse, Miss Frances Dickey, who 
has general charge of the health of the student body. 

Dorland-Bell and The Willoivs. Through the generosity of a 
friend, a trained nurse has been added to the force of workers 
and a cottage fully equipped for hospital service. Pupils at Dor- 
land now have the advantage of special instruction in health hab- 
its, home nursing and sanitation. 

"We have found," writes Miss Shafer, "that the Friday morn- 
ing chapel exercises in charge of the students have been most 
excellent training. At these times they are getting the practice 
of being able to face an audience without fear. At The Willows, 
the Sunday evening Christian Endeavor meetings give the boys 
splendid training not only in taking part themselves but in plan- 
ning for and in leading a meeting. The prayer circles held once 
a week afford opportunity for a small group of girls to gather in 
a teacher's room at the devotional hour. Here they discuss many 
perplexing problems and many have become accustomed to hear- 
ing their own voices in prayer in the little informal gathering. 
In the cottages the girls have charge of prayers each evening. 

"A reporter for the Asheville Citizen which devoted nearly 
two columns of one of its pages to the school not long ago said 
the following: Tt is a story of constant progress from the days 
when Dr. Luke Dorland and his wife first opened the school in 
their dining room in 1887 until the present day when the school 
campus in the town of Hot Springs contains almost eight acres 
upon which are standing splendid buildings taking care of the 
needs of one hundred girls, and the three hundred acre farm, 
The Willows, two miles down the French Broad River, cares for 
upward of fifty boys.' " 

Langdon Memorial School. "There has been decided growth 
in the Christian life and activity in the school. Six years ago 
we closed the year with twenty-seven who were not professing 
Christians. The next year the number was reduced to fifteen, 
the next to one, and since that time each year has closed with 
every member of our school family a professing Christian. In 
actual numbers also there has been a growth. In 1914-1915 the 
maximum attendance was twenty-nine. Now it is over fifty. 
The Sunday school has increased in numbers and influence in the 
community. In the amount of tuition paid in there has been a 
marked increase, and in benevolences and gifts to missions the 
increase has been several hundred fold. 

30 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

"A high school club composed of young people of other de- 
nominations as well as our own has been a blessing to the com- 
munity. The members, under the direction of two of our teach- 
ers, are in charge of their own programs which consist of de- 
votional exercises, real mission study, and a social hour. The 
young people are enthusiastic, and we feel that for one night each 
week there is a safe and wholesome program for the girls and 
boys for whom there is no proper amusement in the whole 
county. A Bible class, open to all high school students in the 
community, has greatly influenced many lives. About a fourth 
of the high school have joined the class and are in daily attend- 
ance. An adult Bible class is reaching men and women of the 
town. A social evening once a month has brought a new vision 
to several hardworking mothers, and one elderly man asks almost 
every week when the next social will be." 

Laura Sunderland Memorial School. Laura Sunderland is 
enjoying the new school building erected last year and the im- 
provements in the dormitory made possible by the removal to 
the new structure of class rooms and assembly room. One hun- 
dred students are now enrolled. Miss Montgomery writes: "I 
took ten days of the holiday vacation to visit old students, and 
how my heart swelled with wholesome pride as I flew from one 
home to another at various points along the way to Savannah, 
Georgia, and back to the sand hills in the section of the state 
well known to tourists, that near Pinehurst and Southern Pines. 
Devoted wives, tender mothers, frugal, industrious housekeep- 
ers, wide-awake members of society, earnest helpers in church 
and its organizations, I found these dear daughters of the Laura 
Sunderland School, each grateful for the training received while 
here and longing to be allowed to place their daughters here. 

"While this trip afforded a rare treat, the pleasure of going 
into homes much nearer is likewise a pleasure. I do not now 
recall a home in which Christ is not an honored guest, where the 
children are not trained to reverence God's word, and where 
they are not given the very best school advantages procurable 
for them. The loyalty of the girls is like sweet ointment at 
times ; a letter from a most successful community worker in one 
of our large mill towns is before me; the writer asking about 
the prospect of the longed-for practice cottage said, T wish I had 
thousands to give, for I love every inch of Sunderland.' " 

Pattic C. StockdCtle Memorial School. The excellent work 
done and the fine spirit of the school are bringing most favorable 
comment from all who visit this station. It is planned to add 
high school work to the present curriculum, one grade each year, 
beginning this coming September. 

31 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

Mossop School for Girls. This little home school of nine girls 
now occupies one of the cottages on the property donated the 
Woman's Board b}' citizens of Harriman, Tennessee. They will 
form the nucleus of the larger group which it is hoped will be en- 
rolled in the new school and dormitory about to be erected. 

Miss Avery writes : "From the beginning there has been a 
fine spirit of cordiality on the part of the community as a whole 
and of the Presbyterian Church especially. We have been in 
existence not a year, but we do not feel that we are of the mush- 
room kind of growth ; we believe we have come to stay. Our 
girls now are telling of the number they hope to bring with them 
next year, and if this spirit continues, our increase will be steady 
and lasting. The morale of the school is excellent. With so few, 
there has been little need for any rules ; the willing, helpful spirit 
of all the girls has been conducive to an atmosphere in home 
and school life happy in every respect. Some of the girls show 
qualities of leadership, but, of course, it is developed very little. 
Outside of the regular class room and the Sabbath school, which 
is attended at the Presbyterian Church in town, the girls by com- 
mittees plan for the Saturday evening's play hour. Even in this 
short time the growth in independence and self-reliance seems de- 
cidedly noticeable. The shy are now willing to play and to try 
with the others." 

Community Stations 

Kentucky 

Smith and Branch Stations. The Woman's Board suffered 
greatly in the loss last August of Miss Marion Crawford, who 
gave her life in an effort to save one of her pupils from drowning. 

There are now eight Sunday schools under the supervision of 
Smith and its branch stations. Some are still small in number, 
but the interest is growing and a nucleus of Christian work has 
been started. The new cottage completed during the year has 
made it possible to enroll twelve students, six boys and six girls, 
in the boarding school. In reporting the activities of the year in 
the community and at points where extension work is being de- 
veloped, Miss Dingman mentions as particularly encouraging the 
strong community sentiment against moonshining, the growing 
interest in ownership of land, the desire of the people to become 
better, more scientific farmers, and the marked development of 
the young people. Of the last she writes: "But perhaps the big- 
gest change can be seen in our young people. In no community 
in Harlan County, and I would be willing to challenge a larger 
territory, can a group of finer, steadier young men be found. 
In the summer we number twenty-eight in the Young Men's 
Club, and in the winter there are twenty-four, although some of 

32 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

them live quite far out. The average attendance in their Sunday 
school class for the calendar year has been fourteen, and one 
Sunday last summer there v^^ere thirty-five young men, some vis- 
itors, all perched on the fence rail for the class session. With 
Christian friendship and teaching, wholesome social life and or- 
ganized athletics, it has been splendid to see these young men 
develop. As one mother said the other day, 'I used to worry 
about my son, but you folks have made a different boy of him.' 
To have the number of gatherings we have in Smith with no 
shooting or drinking is certainly a mark of distinction in itself. 

"Although there are not as many girls, we have a fine group 
of twenty in the Girls' Club during the summer. A few of them 
are young wives and have started homes of their own. These two 
clubs are the moving spirits in the social life of Smith, and once 
a year they come together, during the Christmas holidays, for 
their turkey banquet, entertaining each other in turn." 

Cortland. Miss Loudon's report tells a story not only of con- 
secrated devotion on her part and that of her co-worker, but of 
steady progress toward improved conditions in her community. 
They have maintained two Sunday schools all the year and three 
during the pleasant weather. They have journeyed on horse- 
back and on foot through the creeks and over the mountain trails 
more than one thousand two hundred eighty miles, have dis- 
tributed three thousand two hundred eighty-seven Sunday school 
papers and other periodicals and have had ninety-six medical 
cases. They have made four hundred thirty visits and received 
many visitors at the community house. 

Wooton. Miss McCord writes of splendid progress. The 
new community house has already met many needs and is prov- 
ing a valuable addition to the plant. 

Westminster Mission. From Miss Reid comes word that 
there is "A change of attitude toward civic affairs ; many more 
people own their homes, are building better houses which are 
more comfortable and attractive inside and out. People are 
now having wells dug, securing a supply of fresh, pure water, 
whereas they formerly drank from little hollowed-out places and 
open springs which dried up in summer and overflowed in win- 
ter. The young people are seeking higher education; they are 
asking for better schools and more efficient teachers, and, I be- 
lieve, have generally higher moral standards. Illiteracy and il- 
legitimacy are on the -decrease." 

Tennessee 
Juniper. "In 1920 we had enrolled in special classes 122. 
In a year we have nearly doubled that number for we had 235 
enrolled the past summer. We are preparing girls to be better 

22 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

home makers, for we arc teaching them to cook, make their 
own garments, and to care for the home. This fall, we hope 
to start manual training classes for the boys. Through daily 
Bible classes, we are seeking to prepare our future Christian 
leaders." 

Rocky Fork. One of the evidences of growth here is the 
large number of boys and girls away at higher schools — fifty- 
two. "We see signs of growth in every department of our 
work," writes Miss Moore, "the people dress differently, eat bet- 
ter cooked, better balanced meals, and take better care of their 
homes. The hot soup that we serve the children at the noon 
hour is greatly appreciated. At first very few children brought 
cups for they had never eaten soup and did not like it. Now 
we have a long waiting line each day." 

Vardy. "The interest in Bible school work which the chil- 
dren are carrying over into their homes has been most inspiring. 
They tell and play their Bible stories and when there are Bible 
verses or songs to be memorized, they give their mothers no 
peace until they get the needed help. One little tot seven years 
old has learned the Lord's Prayer, the Twenty-third Psalm, and 
the Beatitudes from hearing her father, mother and older brothers 
and sister memorize them. The interest in Bible study seems 
greater than ever before." 

West Virginia 

Brush Creek. "We have tried to keep pace with the rapid 
growth of population within our borders. November thirteenth 
a Sunday school was organized at Nellis, a new mining town 
of about three hundred people. The enrollment soon reached 
one hundred, a large proportion, young people and children. A 
week-day Junior Club opened with an enrollment of twenty- 
eight. Our work there is backed by the ofificials of the company, 
who gave $150 toward a piano, and have urged us to call upon 
them for any help we need. We now have two libraries, one at 
Brushton and one at Cottage. As these are four miles apart, 
many more people are being interested in good reading. 

"When I came to Brush Creek in 1919, there were a few scat- 
tered homes along the creek with perhaps ten houses newly 
erected by the coal operators. When I was told that within a 
few years the creek would be built up solidly, I would not believe 
it. But in less than three years the prophecy has practically been 
fulfilled. We now have four mining camps and a logging and 
lumber camp that will operate for several years. One of these, 
the mining town of Nellis, extends for some distance along a 
fork of the creek and has now a population of about three hun- 
dred. Other camps have grown also. 

.34 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

"With this growth of the field we have increased our mission 
from two Sunday schools with an enrollment of one hundred 
sixty to four schools with a total enrollment of three hundred 
twenty-five. In all but one of these we now have some volun- 
teer teachers and have introduced graded lessons for elementary 
grades in two schools. We are doing some special work on week 
days in connection with all of these schools. Children who 
knew practically nothing of the Bible when we began, are now 
familiar with many Bible stories and characters and can repeat 
most of the books of the Bible. Programs given by the children 
on Children's Day and Christmas as well as other special days 
show that real progress has been made." 

Miss Laughlin gives a vivid picture of one phase of her 
work in the following: "Sometimes as we pass an isolated home 
near the close of day, we can see the glow of the open fire and 
the family within. This scene never fails to make its appeal. 
Here are narrow lives, shaped so by the very narrow valley in 
which they are confined; but here also are eager hearts with 
longings that cannot be named. Such are some for whom Christ 
died, and it is He alone who can satisfy these longings. One 
afternoon I stopped before one such home, tied the horse, and, tak- 
ing from the saddle pockets my Bible, a scrap book of pictures, 
and a rag doll, I entered the house. The rag doll won the im- 
mediate and strenuous affection of the baby and the older chil- 
dren were soon interested in the pictures. After a little con- 
versation with the parents, we read a chapter which held the 
explanation of a question which had been puzzling both and which 
involved a vital principle of Christian living. This home has 
been transformed by the power of the Gospel of Christ as it is 
read in His word and lived by the Christian mother." 

Dorothy. Miss Marie B. Faust is ably handling the work 
here in the absence of Miss Newcomb who is on leave of ab- 
sence because of illness. 

From both Dry Creek and Montcoal come encouraging re- 
ports of larger attendance at meetings and a growing sense of 
responsibility on the part of the people, an example of which 
has been the more generous contribution to the many appeals, 
from that of the West Virginia Educational Campaign to calls 
from China and the Far East. 

Missouri 
Work at the three stations in the Ozarks has progressed sat- 
isfactorily with no important changes during the year. 

CUBA 

The record for the year in Cuba has been one of unusual ad- 
vance in spite of the fact that the economical crisis through which 

35 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

the island is passing has had its effect on tuition receipts, re- 
ducing them considerably in a few schools, and on the number of 
students in attendance. There has been the closest tie between 
church and school and with the growth in numbers and spiritual 
life of the former has come a finer school spirit in the schools. 
The visitor is surprised to find that in the mission schools are en- 
rolled Cuba's coming leaders, children of present city and gov- 
ernment of^cials, prominent business and professional men. In 
this fact lies the tremendous opportunity of the church — to see 
that these boys and girls become men and women of character, 
dominated by Christian principles. 

The growth in both church and school has been so rapid that 
present buildings and equipment are utterly inadequate for the 
work to be done. Suitable buildings are an immediate necessity 
in practically all of the Cuban stations. 

PORTO RICO 

Mayaguez. Miss Hazen writes : "This has been the busiest 
year ever. One can even enjoy being overbusy, though, when in 
sight of such a splendid realization of hopes and desires as is 
presented by the completion of the Marina Neighborhood House 
dedicated February ii. 

"The new building has rooms for all our clubs and classes, 
kindergarten, primary, second grade and industrial classes five 
days each week, day nursery and clinic six days a week. There 
is room also for special evening clubs and classes, conferences, 
socials and religious services. The Marina Neighborhood House 
is a center where the beams of light, love, and truth radiate 
farther and farther. The new building makes the old avenues 
of approach more solid and attractive and opens up new ones 
limited only by the time, strength, efficiency and consecration 
of the workers and supporters." 

Agiiadilla. Miss Buxton writes : "That the work is coming 
to be more and more appreciated by the people is made very 
evident by the increased and increasing attendance in both the 
kindergarten and day nursery. There is a lengthening list of 
those who are hopefully waiting for the day to come when there 
will be a place in the latter for their children whom we have been 
obliged to refuse ; and on all but very cold or very rainy days, 
our kindergarten room is full — and often over-full. 

"Our youngest baby in the nursery is a wee mite of a thing, 
who spends her days in a hammock, although she should be walk- 
ing or at least creeping. When her mother brought her last Sep- 
tember, she was as pitiful an object as any famine baby of the 
other hemisphere, emaciated, hollow-eyed, and apathetic. Her 
diet had consisted largely of warm water with a supposedly 

36 



Woman's Board of PIome Missions 

nourishing leaf boiled in it. It does one's heart good to see 
the tiny frame filling out day by day, to note the return of ani- 
mation and activity. This is but one of the incidents which show 
what our day nursery means to the physical, mental and moral 
welfare and growth of the children and what a relief it is to the 
mothers who are too ignorant or busy to care for them properly. 

"At the recent anniversary of the church, the kindergarten 
was asked to participate by an actual representation of a kindergar- 
ten day. With no previous rehearsals and in the presence of an 
audience which filled the building a group of kindergarten chil- 
dren took their places in the diminutive circle chalked on the 
church floor, and, absorbed heart and soul in this extra kinder- 
garten session, went faultlessly through the songs, games and 
marches, at the direction of the teachers, with never a thought of 
the spectators and not in the least disturbed by the applause 
which greeted them. Such an incident speaks volumes for the 
order, quiet, and obedience that through our kindergarten has 
been brought thus early into the lives of the children who come 
under its influence." 

Presbyterian Hospital. The hospital has suffered a severe 
loss in the resignation of Dr. E. Raymond Hildreth, whose name 
has been so closely linked with its growth and its success, but 
it is most fortunate to have such a man as Dr. William R. Gal- 
breath to take his place. With an unusual army record and sev- 
eral years' association with Dr. Hildreth at the Presbyterian 
Hospital, Dr. Galbreath comes to his post of medical director well 
qualified to maintain the hospital's high standards. As acting 
medical director the past six months he has already won the con- 
fidence of the hospital's clientele. Dr. Gary R. Burke and his 
wife, Dr. Alice Burke, are again members of the hospital staff, 
the former as associate medical director. Here are three clinic 
pictures from Dr. AHce's pen : 

"To start to write you an inspiring report on a Tuesday morn- 
ing after a Monday clinic is an impossibility. Every one of the 
240 patients who came to clinic were interesting and in spite of 
the rush, most of them, I suspect, took time to tell us of their 
confidence in the place. 

"You will probably enjoy to hear about the little tired faced 
mother of eleven little tots who is unfitted now for her great job 
of home-maker because of a large tumor growth. It is true 
that there was no bed for her now, but she went home carrying 
a paper that promised her a bed in six weeks. You and I would 
feel that we could not wait and sufifer for those weeks, but in 
her patient nature there were no complaints. She will go back to 
her family soon after the operation, we hope, all well and strong. 

37 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

"Then there was the worried mother who came to see why 
her little son was continually having sore throat. She was told 
that Juan must have his tonsils and adenoids out. We told her 
that we could do it here later on when there was a bed or she 
could go to the new municipality hospital. She ruffled all up 
and said, 'You don't understand, this is my only son, I want the 
best and I will wait until there is a bed in the "Presbiteriano" 
where my faith is.' 

"Then came the man with five grapefruit. I asked if he 
wanted medicine and he said no, he had just come from his home, 
a walk of about five miles, to bring me the little present and 
to say that his wife who was operated on several months ago 
was well and fat. I thought of that little woman who had made 
such a fight for her life after a very serious operation, and I 
could picture what a blessing the plucky little mother was in 
her home now that she was well and strong again. And on and 
on I might write and tell how the folks of the Island have learned 
to love and believe in this, your hospital in San Juan." 

The officers of the Board herewith present their reports of 
the year's work with gratitude to God for His continued guid- 
ance and goodness. 

The following are members of the Woman's Board, with 
terms expiring respectively in 1922, 1923 and 1924: 

Term Expiring 1922 

Mrs. Charles Bryan Miss Mabel Gordon Parker 

Mrs. Augustus S. Crane Miss Lucy Slade 

Mrs. Charles B. Fernald Mrs. Clarke Tillinghast 

Mrs. William Edgar Ceil Mrs. Charles L. Thompson 

Miss Anna Halluck Mrs. James A. Webb, Jr. 

Mrs. Kenneth D. Miller Mrs. A. L. Whitaker 

Miss Emma Jessie Ogg Aliss V. May White 

Term Expiring 1923 

Mrs. Richard S. Allen Miss Dorothy Harrison 

Miss Anna M. Alward Mrs. W. E. Honeyman 

Mrs. Fred S. Bennett Mrs. John McDowell 

Mrs. James S. Dickson Mrs. W. R. Patterson 

Mrs. Charles M. Ford Mrs. John Sinclair 

Mrs. W. A. M. Grier Mrs. Frederick E. Stockwell 

Mrs. W. D. Harper Mrs. James Yereance 

Term Expiring 1924 

Mrs. E. H. Bancker Mrs. J. E. McAfee 

Mrs. E. B. Cobb Mrs. A. C. McMillan 

Mrs. A. W. Corning Mrs. E. C. Miles 

Miss Julia Eraser Mrs. J. K. Mitchell 

Mrs. E. K. Hopper Mrs. C. Edward Murray 

Miss Annie Hyatt Miss Elinor K. Purves 

Mrs. H. C. Louderbough Miss Marv Tooker 

Mrs. D. E. Waid 

Respectfully submitted, 
LUCY H. DAWSON, 
General Secretary. 
38 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



PRICE, WATERHOUSE & CO., 

UNITED STATES, CANADA. MEXICO, 
GREAT BRITAIN 

56 Pine Street, 
NEW YORK 

May 24, 1922. 
CERTIFICATE OF AUDIT 

We have audited the books and accounts of the Wom- 
an's Board of Home Missions of the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States of America for the fiscal year end- 
ing March 31, 1922, and we certify that, in our opinion, 
the foregoing balance sheet shows the true tinancial posi- 
tion of said Woman's Board of Home Missions as at 
March 31, 1922, and the foregoing statement of revenues 
and expenditures for the year ending on that date is cor- 
rect. 

(Signed:) Price, Waterpiouse & Co. 



May 24, 1922. 

We hereby certify that at March 31, 1922, we verified, 
either by actual count or by certificates obtained from de- 
positaries, securities carried at that date at $1,626,498.59 
of the Woman's Board of Home Missions of the Presby- 
terian Church in the United States of America; that of 
tliese, securities of the book value of $1,564,254.59 had a 
market value at that date of $1,567,076.73, but we were 
unable to secure market quotations for securities of the 
book value of $62,244.00, of which $30,000.00 represented 
certificates of indebtedness issued by the General As.sem- 
bly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of 
America for moneys borrowed to meet exjienses incurred 
by the Interchurch World Movement ; these certificates 
are redeemable on collection of assessments made on other 
Boards of the Presbyterian Churcli Ijy the General 
Assembly. 

(Signed:) Price, Wateriiouse & Co. 



39 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



Treasurer's 



In the following statement the treasurer presents 
Home Missions of the Presbyterian Church 

year ending 



BALANCE 

March 

ASSETS 
Current Assets 

Petty Cash $1,000 00 

Accounts Receivable 11,942 96 

Notes Receivable 2,166 66 

Inventory: Postage, Stationery and Provisions.. 1,988 04 

$17,097 66 

Invested Assets and Cash Awaiting Investment 

Invested Securities $1,626,498 59 

Cash Uninvested or Appropriated for Buildings. . 297,423 23 

1,923,921 82 
Office Equipment 8,767 99 

$1,932,689 81 

Advances to Missionaries, Deferred Charges and Unadjusted 

Balances 17,015 15 

Deficit 

Excess of Expenses over Receipts for the Year 

Ending March 31, 1921 $164,307 42 

Deduct — 

Amount Included in Budget and Received from 

Societies on Apportionments 164,307 42 

Excess of Expenses over Receipts for the Year Ending March 
31, 1922 2,001 75 

$1,968,804 37 
40 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



Report 



the financial report of the Woman's Board of 
the United States of America for the 
March 31, 1922. 



SHEET 

31st, 1922 

LIABILITIES 
Current Liabilities 

Cash $38,838 38 

Special Funds, Deposits, etc 5,444 17 

Accounts Payable 600 00 



Funds 

Trust Endowment Funds $321,031 52 

Sage Estate— Permanent Funds 500,000 00 

Annuity Funds 247,501 43 

San Juan Hospital Building Fund. 75,021 00 

Funds Temporarily Awaiting Disposition 780,277 87 



$44,882 55 



$1,923,921 82 



$1,968,804 37 
41 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 
REVENUE STATEMENT 



INCOME LIVING SOURCES 
For Current Work 

Woman's Missionary Societies. . . 

Westminster Guild 

Young Women's Societies 

Bands 

Y. P. and C. E. Societies 

Sabbath Schools 

Churches 

Individual Gifts 



For Building Fund 

Woman's Missionary Societies 

Westminster Guild 

Young Woman's Societies. . . . 

Bands 

Y. P. and C. E. Societies 

Sabbath Schools 

Churches 

Individual Gifts 



Income Otlier Sources for 
Current Work 

Tuition and Receipts from Fields 

Rents and Sales 

Interest on Permanent Fund 

Transfer from Legacy Income.. . . 



Excess of Expenses over Receipts 
for Year Ending March 31, 1922 



$630,676 40 
39,908 49 
20,545 88 
13,108 29 
39,682 25 
14,500 92 
1,532 64 
8,029 26 



$119,045 87 

494 85 

2,227 00 

350 85 

1,005 75 

126 81 

118 77 

25 00 



178,380 30 

1,077 74 

8,781 08 

48,038 43 



$767,984 13 



$123,394 90 



$136,277 55 



1,027,656 58 



2,001 75 



$1,029,658 33 



42 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 
EXPENSE STATEMENT 



Expenditures for Current 
Work 

Field Work 

Travel Teachers and Missionaries 
Buildings Appropriated and Cash 

Debt, 1921 

Christian Social Service 

Sabbatical Leave 

Retirement Allowance 

Operating Budget — 
Administration 

Auditor 

Office Expenses 

Postage 

Printing 

Rent 

Salaries, Officers 

Salary, Clerks 

Salaries, Clerks, Extra 

Stationery 

Travel Officers 



Making the Work Known 

Advertising 

Field Secretaries 

Home Mission Monthly (net cost).. 
Literature Department (net cost) . . 

Missionary Mail (net cost) 

Student Work 

Pacific Coast Office 



Expenses Directed by the Gen- 
eral Assembly 

Annual Report 

Minutes of the General Assembly. . 

New Era. 

Travel Board Officers to General 

Assembly 

Other Expenses 

Collections Refunded 

Council of Women for Home Mis- 
sions 

Exchanges 

Interest on Annuity Gifts 

Interest on Money Borrowed 

Insurance 

Latin American Committee 



1682,647 16 
14,761 34 

164,297 42 
9,768 73 
2,187 50 
1,260 00 



$800 00 

1,840 79 

2,423 35 

1,719 63 

7.235 88 

17,073 26 

27,978 21 

1,039 58 

951 39 

7,920 81 



$612 85 
11,630 40 
2,458 75 
18,988 24 
1,010 28 
4,936 29 
1,462 37 



$1,731 93 

381 48 

23,929 58 

933 90 



$30 00 

75 00 

290 49 

3,394 72 

6,492 90 

6,444 10 

950 00 



$1,029,658 33 

Note. — For further appropriations and expenditures for buildings from 
Sage Fund, see accounting for Sage Fund No. 2, Page 51. 



$874,922 1.5 



$68,982 90 



$41,099 18 



$26,976 89 



$17,677 21 



43 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



RECEIPTS OF THE WOMAN'S BOARD FOR THE YEAR 

ENDING MARCH 31, 1922, FROM ALL SOURCES FOR 

CURRENT WORK, FOR WORK NOT CURRENT, 

AND FOR OTHER ORGANIZATIONS. 



FOR CURRENT WORK 

For Current Work from Organizations and 
Individuals 

For Buildings (Appropriations) 

For Current Work from Other than Organiza- 
tions 



For Special Board Objects— Not Cur- 
rent Work 

Estate of Margaret Olivia Sage 

Profits from Sale of Sage Securities Not Con 
sidered Legal Investments for the Woman's 
Board 

Buildings (Not Appropriations) 

Emergency Fund 

Extras (Specified Gifts) 

Annuity Gifts 

Legacy Reserve 

Permanent Funds 



For Work Not Under the Board 

*Vaughn-Marquis Estate 

Immigrant Work 

Freedmen 

Cash Passed Through Suspense Account Dur 
ing Year 



♦Special Work within the Synod of Wisconsin 
Administered by the Board 



$767,984 13 
123,394 90 

136,277 55 



$291,932 08 



7,923 46 
51,053 27 

5,086 72 
11,875 00 

9,900 00 
30,718 41 
48,368 19 



$20,699 30 

54,386 66 

187,028 77 

205,376 77 



$1,027,656 58 



,857 13 



$467,491 50 



$1,952,005 21 



Note.— This page is intended only to show volume of receipts and is not 
part of the Balance Sheet. 

44 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

EXPENDITURES OF THE WOMAN'S BOARD FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1922, FOR CURRENT 

WORK, FOR WORK NOT CURRENT, AND 

FOR OTHER ORGANIZATIONS 



FOR CURRENT WORK 

For Mission School and Hospital Work on 

Field 

Deficit 1921 Building Appropriations ami cash. 
For Operating Budget 



For Special Board Objects — Not Cur 
rent Work 

Buildings, Sage Fund No. 2 

Buildings (Not Appropriations) 

Emergency Fund 

Extras (Specified Gifts) 

Interest on Annuity Gifts 

Legal Expenses 



For Work Not Under the Board 

Vaughn-Marquis Estate 

Immigrant Work 

Freedmen 

Cash Handled through Suspense Account 
During Year 



$710,624 73 
164,297 42 
154,736 18 



$75,240 50 

51,053 27 

7,000 87 

2,936 85 

15,821 63 

668 96 



$10,344 52 

54,386 66 

187,028 77 

202,919 61 



$1,029,658 33 



$152,722 08 



$454,679 56 



$1,637,059 97 



Note. — This page is intended only to show volume of expenses and is 
not part of the balance sheet. 

45 



WoMAif's Board of Home Missions 
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS 



From Synodical Societies 
for Current Work 

Alabama 

Arkansas 

Arizona 

Atlantic 

Baltimore 

California 

Canadian 

Catawba 

Colorado 

East Tennessee. 

Florida 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi. 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

New England 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah. 

Washington 

West German 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

From Organizations 

W. M. Societies 

Young Women 

Bands 

Westminster Guild 

Y. P. and C. E.'s 

Sunday Schools 

Churches 

From Individuals 



1919-1920 

$1,446 38 

1,365 94 

1,060 84 

100 25 

31,341 85 

31,863 58 

8 00 

125 50 

11,278 96 

14 50 

1,375 15 

37,131 22 

21,470 79 

23,540 93 

16,094 46 

5,059 75 

24,485 54 

23,642 37 

563 94 

22,200 81 

2,318 78 

9,094 53 

4,218 35 

54,672 02 

941 51 

104,129 23 

3,034 33 

05,354 96 

3,973 97 

6,363 92 

146,271 76 

3,398 74 

7,149 68 

8,487 67 

1,010 20 

7,424 35 

6,439 25 

5,798 34 

586 25 



585,200 77 
33,686 43 

27,885 64 

36,470 32 

12,702 52 

2,143 24 

5,951 25 
46 



1920-1921 

$2,551 15 

1,416 65 

2,015 86 

202 75 

32,296 26 

31,391 52 

7 00 

316 48 

14,745 06 

30 00 

1,652 95 
42,742 28 
24,539 62 
29,802 58 
17,668 30 

5,698 90 

36,923 89 

32,612 79 

734 89 

26,344 56 

2,989 97 
11,042 68 

6,357 15 
60,294 23 

1,310 34 
121,377 41 

3,641 63 
84,677 38 

5,683 55 

8,209 61 
168,669 19 

6,179 47 

9,607 05 
10,552 72 

1,206 35 

10,938 78 

58 00 

7,837 07 

7,439 64 
681 95 



706,091 36 
22,772 16 
12,246 64 
34,032 18 
40,512 40 
13,623 58 
3,244 34 

4,951 83 



1921-1922 

$1,682 34 

1,770 16 

1,564 55 

228 19 

2S,747 48 

35,518 79 

3 00 

295 50 

17,494 58 

16 00 

1,574 80 

1,802 37 

48,359 62 

28,906 64 

28,093 33 

18,359 12 

5,986 16 

35,541 25 

34,566 88 

730 72 

27,592 61 

3,087 26 

12,276 53 

6,080 80 

65,528 21 

1,292 10 

131,091 81 

4,006 12 

87,281 51 

5,863 35 

8,696 92 

181,096 04 

4,909 31 

9,338 62 

11,656 12 

1,276 00 

12,097 89 

8,898 32 

9,159 40 

854 37 



749,722 27 
22,772 88 
13,459 14 
40,403 34 
40,688 00 
14,627 73 
1,651 41 

8,054 26 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS OF RECEIPTS BY OBJECTS 



Current Work 

Current Work, Buildings. 

Buildings 

Extras Transmitted 

Emergency Fund 

I^iterature Sales , 

Home Mission Monthly. . . 

Annuity Gifts 

Legacies 

Permanent Invested Fund 
Work Among Immigrants. 
Freedmen 



1919-1920 

$578,026 03 

220,997 21 

26,301 13 

7,996 79 

5,304 21 

15,523 87 

22,523 90 

30,100 00 

23,818 85 

15,014 21 

42,042 79 

145,304 93 




1921-1922 

$904,261 68 

123,394 90 

40,489 04 

11,875 00 

5,086 72 

19,958 92 

30,684 00 

9,900 00 

31,201 94 

46,468 19 

54,386 66 

187,028 77 



COMPARATIVE EXPENDITURES UNDER THE BUDGET 
FOR SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS 



Alaskans 

Indians 

Mexicans 

Mormons 

Mountaineers 

Porto Ricans 

Cubans 

Santo Domingo 

School Scholarship Fund 

Religious Work in Government 

Indian Schools 

Diploma Account 

Brainerd Institute Salaries 



1919-1920 
$36,601 71 
90,768 37 
94,630 55 
47,550 27 
234,041 63 
30,636 47 
38,510 70 



1920-1921 


$49,468 45 


116,014 


28 


118,203 


63 


60,368 


47 


264,195 


49 


47,340 


55 


48,669 


40 


3,750 


00 


1,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


379 


37 



1921 

$43 

105 

101 

61 

246 

55, 

59 

9, 



1922 
,060 99 
938 32 
013 66 
598 73 
083 55 
029 42 
615 07 
291 65 
450 00 



1,000 00 

65 77 

500 00 



EXPENDED FOR BUILDINGS 

(Exclusive of Budget Appropriationsj 

The following payments have been made for buildings, equip- 
ment, etc., from building funds during 1921-1922: 



Indian 

Dwight Indian Training School, Marble City, Okla 

North Fork Indian School, North Fork, California 

Mormon 

Wasatch Infirmary, Mt. Pleasant, Utah 

Alountaineer 

Asheville Home Industrial School, Asheville, N. C 

Laura Sunderland School, Concord, N. C 

McCormick Cottage, Hot Springs, N. C 

Normal and Associated Schools, Asheville, N. C 

Mossop School for Girls, Harriman, Tenn 

Porto Rican 

Presbyterian Hospital-, San Juan, Porto Rico 

San Juan Bldg. Income, a|c 

Miscellaneous 

General Building and Equipment Fund, Small Amounts 
Used for Other Schools Not Mentioned Above 



Total. 



$125 00 

2,862 82 

4,000 GO 

29,582 21 

6,225 10 

1,114 10 

58 48 

432 29 

4,505 73 

12 28 



2,135 26 
$51,0.53 27 



47 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



MONTHLY RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR 

CURRENT WORK INCLUDING BUILDING 

APPROPRIATIONS 





Receipts 


Disbursements 


April 


$6,414 85 

17,898 10 

119,766 18 


$144,079 13 
143,407 05 
235,407 07 
504,763 33 


$69,910 95 
61,890 13 
73,961 68 




May . 




June 








First Quarter 

July 


$28,666 21 

10,926 67 

103,814 17 


$60,114 87 
71,517 51 
61,733 75 


$205,762 76 


August 




September 




Second Quarter 

October 


$42,623 79 

24,695 31 

168,087 97 


$96,186 14 
77,102 87 
64,156 27 


193,366 13 


November 

December 




Third Quarter... 
Tanuarv 


$39,122 94 

62,859 83 

402,780 56 


$63,559 11 

62,528 94 

266,996 11 


237,445 28 


February 




March 








Fourth Quarter. 






393,084 16 


Totals 


$1,027,656 58 


$1,029,058 33 



Honorary Members 

One hundred dollars paid into the treasury of the Board at 
one time, over and above amounts regularly apportioned for the 
general fund and special objects, is required for an honorary 
membership. Twenty-nine honorary members have been added 
to the roll within the last twelve months, making a total of 462. 

Life Members 

Twenty-five dollars paid into the treasury of the Board at 
one time, over and above amounts regularly apportioned for the 
general fund and special objects, is required for a life member- 
ship. The year has increased the enrollment of life members 
by 109 names, making a total of 661 members. 

Annuity Gifts ^ UNDS 

An annuity gift is a fund received by the Woman's Board on 
which an income is guaranteed to the annuitant for life. On the 

48 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

death of the annuitant this fund falls into the treasury of the 
Board without litij^ation, delay or uncertainties of courts of law. 

The following Ainiuity Gifts were received during the year: 

Name Amount of Gift 

Benedict, Miss Sarah $500 00 

Briscoe, Mrs. Serena R 1,150 00 

Chase, Miss Martha E 300 00 

Conklin, Miss S. Louisa 500 00 

Cowles, Wilbur M. and Isadore I .500 00 

Dawson, Miss Lucy Hohnes 500 00 

Harrington, Mrs. Elizabeth 1,000 00 

Heffron, Miss Ella 1 100 00 

Hess, Mrs. Mary C 3,000 00 

Miller, Mrs. M. M 150 00 

Ogg, Miss E. Jessie 100 00 

Reed, Miss Anna M 500 00 

Williams, Miss Jane P 1,000 00 

Winans, Mrs. Annie C 500 00 

Young, Mrs. Grace W 100 00 

.$9,900 00 
Acknowledged in previous years 243,791 43 

$253,691 43 
Less gifts of Annuitants who died during year: 

Carpenter, Mrs. Emily J $100 00 

Carver, Miss Nancy M $1,500 00 

Graham, Miss Martha 300 00 

Kyle, Miss Eliza J 100 00 

Kyle, Miss Margaret 500 00 

Patterson, Miss Alice C 1,000 00 

Reeder, Miss Margaret L .300 00 

Terrett, Miss Isabel M 300 00 

Tattle, Mrs. Ervilla G 1,000 00 

$5,100 00 
Aiken, Miss Charlotte A. Contract 

Released to Permanent Fund 1,000 00 

$G,100 00 

Balance on Hand April 1, 1922 .$247,591 43 

Annuity Gifts Matured 

Gifts to Board on the Annuity Basis now available 
for Board use: 

Carpenter, Mrs. Emily J $100 00 

Graham, Miss Martha 300 00 

Kyle, Miss Eliza J. .- 100 00 

Kyle, Miss Margaret 500 00 

Patterson, Miss Alice C 1,000 00 

Reeder, Miss Margaret L 300 00 

Terrett, Miss Isabel M 300 00 

Tuttle, Mrs. Ervilla G 1,000 00 

Previously Acknowledged 12,150 00 

$15,750 00 

49 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

Permanent Fund 

The Permanent Fund of the Board is an invested fund com- 
posed of gifts and legacies from societies and individuals, only 
the interest of which is applied toward the general work of the 
Board or toward the special objects designated in the gift. 

The Permanent Fund of the Board was increased during 
1921-1922 by the following gifts and legacies: 

Prospect Ohio Ladies Missionary Society $100 00 

Mrs. Fanny Sinclair 100 00 

Miss Nancy M. Carver (deceased) 1,500 00 

Miss Sophronia C. Aiken Memorial Fnnd 1,000 00 

Estate of Hester VVinne 12,000 00 

Estate of Margaret Olivia Sage 25,013 19 

Miss Christine Cowie Memorial Fund (Detroit 

Presbyterial) 2,500 00 

David Hoffman Martin, D.D. Memorial Fund 1,705 00 

Edward B. Everingham Memorial Fund 2,500 00 

Fannie C. Smith Memorial P'und 50 00 

Previously Acknowledged 274,563 33 

$321,031 52 

School Fire Prevention Fund 

Balance of a fund created from the principal of the 
Sage Estate to equip schools witii fire preven- 
tion devices. 

On hand April 1, 1921 $33,280 59 

Interest earned during year 757 51 

34,038 10 
Expended during year 1,485 68 

Balance on hand April 1, 1922 $32,552 42 

Property Sales 

Hindman, Ky $200 00 

Manchester, Ky 900 00 

Springville, Utah 1,066 66 

$2,166 66 

W. S. S. Building Fund 

Received from various societies and individuals during years 
1918-19 and 1920-21 for the purpose of erecting a school 
building in 1922, stamps and cash to the value of $327 50 

Legacy Reserve Fund 

By action of the Woman's Board under date of May 11, 191 5, 
it was voted that beginning with the tiscal year April i, 1915, all 
legacies undesignated should be deposited in a fund to be known 
as the "Legacy Reserve Fund," said fund to be drawn upon for 
buildings, the purchase of land, and other items specifically men- 
tioned in the action above referred to, only on vote of the Wom- 
an's Board. During the year the legacies as described below were 
received and deposited in this fund and expenditures were made 
as noted: 

50 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

Legacies received during the year 1921-22: 

Name Amount of Ciift 

Balance on hand April 1, 1921 .$20,383 30 

Estate of Jeannette C. Springs $1,993 95 

Estate of Eveline Sills Preston 300 57 

Estate of Eliza J. Kyle 312 20 

Estate of Fannie J. Cowan G 32 

Estate of Anna B. Gilmore 200 00 

Estate of Eliza Mcjunkin 000 00 

Estate of Helen E. Brainerd 4,000 00 

Estate of Cornelia F. Ham . 1,000 00 

Estate of Mary L. Baldwin (Cincin- 
nati Presbyterial) . 10,891 75 

Estate of Charlotte W. Battles 1,000 00 

Estate of Susanne E. Sewall 950 00 

Miss Katherine S. VVilford 500 00 

Estate of Mary [. Duff 500 00 

Estate of Cornelia B. Williams 5,000 00 

Profit on sale of stocks and bonds 3,403 t)2 

• $30,718 41 

$51,101 71 
Less Transfer to Mayaguez Marina Im- 
provements $3,400 00 

Less Transfer to Menaiil Building 34,214 96 

Less Loss on Bellingham Bonds 599 00 

Less Reduction of Principal, Cincinnati 

Tobacco Warehouse Co. Stock 50 00 

$38,263 96 

Balance on hand April 1, 1922 $12,837 75 

Estate of Margaret Olivia Sage No. 1 Account 

Permanent Fund $500,000 00 

Estate of Margaret Olivia Sage No. 2 Account 

Balance on hand April 1, 1921 $158,181 37 

Net Profits on Securities sold 153 87 

$158,335 24 

Less Bond Appreciation transferred to 
Special Account $33,335 24 

Less Transfer to Farm School Gymna- 
sium 12,322 69 

Less 'iVansfer to Farm Dairy Barn 2,582 38 

Less Transfer to Indian Wells Bldg 548 18 

Less Transfer to Mayaguez Marina Bldg 16,166 35 

Less Transfer to Smith, Ky. Bldg 1,956 99 

Less Transfer to Wooton, Ky 1,078 82 

Less Transfer to Wasatch Gymnasium 

Bldg 8,027 74 

Less Transfer to Tucson, Ariz. Bldg. . . . 2,641 73 

Less IVansfer to Kirkwood Meml. Bldg. 29,915 62 

■ $108,575 74 



Balance on hand April 1, 1922 $49,759 50 

51 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

Estate of Margaret Olivia Sage — Legacy Reserve 

The executors of the above estate made a further 
distribution of funds on hand and of this amount the 
share of the Woman's Board was $291,932.08. This 
amount was paid over to the Board's Treasury, March 
8, 1922, in the following manner: Cash, $72,942.42 and 
securities, $218,989.66; total, $291,932.08. Under date 
of May 18, 1920, the Board voted that all funds re- 
ceived from the above estate over and above the first 
million dollars "be placed in the Legacy Reserve Fund" 
and "that from this fund there be set apart an amount 
necessary to erect a suitable memorial building to the 
donor, Margaret Olivia Sage, further recommenda- 
tion regarding amount and allocation to be brought 
to the Board at a later date." 

Received from Above Estate as above stated $291,932 08 

Sage Estate Bond Appreciation 

Securities received from the Estate of Margaret 
Olivia Sage that were not considered good permanent 
investments. These securities were sold at a higher 
market and the following represents the profits derived 
from such sales : 

Net Profits as of April 1, 1922 $41,258 70 

Securities and Real Estate 

These are gifts received in previous years from vari- 
ous sources for permanent and other funds in the 
form of securities not legal for investment by the 
Board. These donations were accepted under special 
agreements and are held in a Holdings Account until 
such time as they will be credited to their various ac- 
counts. 

Balance on hand April 1, 1921 $89,521 GO 

Gift of Miss Eliza J. Bowes and Sister 650 GO 

$90,171 00 

Emergency Fund 

The Emergency Fund is a special fund created for 
the purpose of aiding those workers in the mission 
fields who may be ill or in special need. The payment 
of $1.00 by each Woman's Missionary Society has this 
year been sufficient to meet the needs, as will be seen 
by the following statement : 

Balance on hand April 1, 1921 $1,914 15 

Received from Societies during 1921-22 5,086 72 

$7,000 87 
Expended during Year 2,936 85 

Balance on hand April 1, 1922 $4,004 02 

52 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

Immigrant Teachers Fellowship Fund 

This is a fund created by the Board for the pur- 
pose of the training of Young Women for Immigrant 
work in the United States. This work is made possible 
by the Legacy of Josephine E. Nevin. 

Balance on hand April 1, 1921 $9,705 25 

Received from Interest on daily balances 240 42 

Balance on hand April 1, 1922 S9,945 67 

Extra (Special Gifts) 

Balance on hand April 1, 1921 $7,930 88 

Received from societies during year 11,875 00 

$19,805 88 
Expended during year 7,944 71 

Balance on hand April 1, 1922 $11,861 17 

Building Fund 

On hand April 1, 1922, unexpended $364,731 82 

Less San Juan Hospital overdraft 80,247 54 

$284,484 28 

Vaughn-Marquis Estate 

The Board signed an agreement on May 31, 1921, 
with the Woman's Synodical Missionary Society of the 
Presbyterian Church in Wisconsin agreeing to take 
over the administration of work within the Synod of 
Wisconsin. The above Missionary Society then 
turned over cash and securities to the amount of $20,- 
699.30 under date of July 20, 192 1. 

Received July 20, 1921 $20,699 30 

Expended to April 1, 1922 10,344 52 

Balance on hand April 1, 1922 $10,354 78 

Total Funds $1,926,088 48 



SECURITIES AND CASH HELD BY THE WOMAN'S BOARD 

(B), means bequeathed, that is, securities taken in settlement of an 
estate. (D), means donated, that is, securities given to the Board. (P), 
means purchased, that is, securities purchased by the Board. (H), means 
securities received from the Home Board in settlement of trust account. All 
securities purchased (P) are listed at cost. 

CASH 

Annuity Funds in Bank Awaiting Investment $1,337 36 

Annuity Gifts Matured Fund 1,145 64 

Building Fund (Net) 110,484 28 

Emergency Fund 4,064 02 

Extra (Special Gifts) 11,861 17 

53 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



Cash — Continued 



Immigrant Teachers Fellowship Fund 9,945 67 

Permanent Funds in Bank Awaiting Investment. . . . 10,714 55 

Sage Estate Account No. 1 6,927 95 

Sage Estate Account No. 2. 49,759 50 

Sage Estate Bond Appreciation 9,548 70 

Sage Estate Legacy Reserve 44,024 69 

School Fire Prevention Fund 32,552 42 

W. S. S. Building Fund 2 50 

Vaughn-Marquis Special Fund 5,054 78 



Annuity Gift Securities 

17M. Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Ry Co., 

G. M. 4%, 1995 (P) 

lOM. Baltimore & Ohio R. R. Co., 20 yr. Conv. 

41^%, 1933 (P) 

3M. Baltimore & Ohio R. R. Co., G. M. Scries 

"A," 5%, 1995 _ (P) 

IM. Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Ry Co., 

(Ills. Div.), ^y2%, 1949 (H) 

lOM. Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Ry. Co., 

G. M. 4%, 1958 (P) 

3M. Great Northern Ry. Co., 1st and Ref. 

Mtge. 4M%, 1961 (P) 

IM. Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Ry. Co., 

1st Mtge. 3M%, 1997 (P) 

6M. Louisville & Nashville Ry. Co., Unified 

4%, 1940 (1H5P) 

lOM. Manhattan Ry. Co., Con. Mtge. 4%, 

1990 (P) 

2M. Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie & Atlantic 

Ry. Co., 4%, 1926 (H) 

15M. New York Central & H. R. R. R. Co., 

Series "A" 4}^%, 2013 (P) 

IM. New York City, Corporate Stock for 

School Houses and Sites, 31/2%, 1928. . (P) 
3M. Norfolk & Western Ry. Co., Imp. & Ext. 

6%, 1934 (H) 

5M. Norfolk & Western Ry. Co., Con. Mtge. 

4%, 1996 (H) 

3M. Northern Pacific R. R. Co., P. L. Ry. & 

Land Grant 4%, 1997 (H) 

IM. Province of Nova Scotia, Deb. 5%, 1926.. (P) 
6M. Pennsylvania R. R. Co., Con. Mtge. 4%, 

1948 (P) 

IM. Pennsylvania R. R. Co., Con. Mtge. 

41^%, 1960 (H) 

12M. Pennsylvania R. R. Co., G. M. 4^%, 

1965 Series "A" (P) 

IM. St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Ry. 

Co. (Pacific Ext.), 4%, 1940 (H) 

14M. Southern Pacific Ry. Co., Ref. Mtge. 

4%, 1955 (2H12P) 

8M. Union Pacific R. R. Co., 1st Lien & Ref. 

4%, 2008 _.(2H6P) 

United States Liberty Bonds, 1st issue, 

4M% (D) 

54 



$297,423 23 



$14,847 50 


8,298 


75 


2,983 


75 


987 


12 


8,342 


50 


3,056 


25 


710 00 


5,329 


62 


7,741 


25 


2,074 


24 


12,898 75 


931 


25 


4,217 61 


4,131 


25 


2,853 
900 


75 
00 


5,288 


75 


1,133 


37 


11,441 


74 


1,040 


87 


11,424 


24 


6,701 


74 


9,600 


00 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

United States Liberty Boiuls, 2ncl issue 

iM% (D) 37,868 80 

United States Liberty Bonds, 3rd issue, 

4M% .....(D) 47,117 21 

United States Liberty Fionds, -Ith issue, 

4H7o .: (IJ) 30,920 63 

United States Liberty Bonds, Victory, 

41^% (D) 3,400 00 

United States War Saving Stamps (D) 4 13 

$246,254 07 

Annuity Gifts Matured Securities 

12M. Northern Tacific Great Northern C. B. 

and Q. Joint Coll. e'^^r, 1036 (P) $11,598 00 

3M. St. Paul, IMimieapolis aiul Manitoba Ry. 

Co. (Montana Extension) 4%, 1937.. . . (P) 3,006 36 

$14,604 36 

Permanent Fund Securities 

American Telephone & Telegrapli Co., 

4 shares Cap. Stock (H) $447 62 

3M. Atchison, Topeka & Santa F"e Ry. Co., 

G. M. 4%, 1995 (P) 2,771 25 

5M. Baltimore & Ohio Ry. Co., G. M. Series 

"A," 5%, 1995 • . (P) 5,062 50 

Bernstein Building Co., Mortgage against 

Real Estate (Guaranteed). (P) 5,500 00 

IM. Brooklyn LInion Gas Co., 1st Con. Mtgc. 

5%, 1945 (II) 1,055 87 

IM. Central Leather Co., 1st Lien, 20 yr. 

5%, 1925 (H) 1,128 37 

5M. Chesapeake & Ohio R. R. Co., G. M. 

41-^%, 1992 (P) 4,871 74 

9M. Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R. R. Co., 

3J 2%, 1949 (P) 7,016 63 

IM. Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R. R. Co., 

(Ills. Div.), 4%, 1949 (P) 779 62 

2M. Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Ry. Co., 

G. M. 4}4%, 1989, Registered (D) 2,000 00 

6M. Dominion of Canada, 512%, 1929. ... (1 B5P) 5,859 00 
Dove Mortgage against Real Estate 

(Guaranteed) (P) 4,250 00 

Frank Mortgage against Real Estate 

(Guaranteed) (P) 3,500 00 

Feldman Mortgage against Real Estate 

(Guaranteed) (P) 3,500 00 

IM. Kanawha & Michigan Ry. Co., 1st 

Mtge., 4%, 1990 (H) 860 87 

3M. Keokuk & Des Moines R. R. Co., 1st 

^ Mtge. 5%, 1923. (H) 2,447 61 

Klein Mortgage against Real Estate, 

(Guaranteed) (P) 8,500 00 

3M. Lehigh Valley R. R. Co., Coll. Trust 

4%, 1923 (H) 3,426 36 

17M. Louisville & Nashville Ry Co., Unified 

Mortgage, 4%, 1940 (P) 14,220 50 

12M. Louisville & Nashville Ry. Co., 4%, 

1940 (P) 9,705 00 

55 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

Mediator Construction Co., Mortgage 

(Guaranteed) 5K%, 1923 (P) 9,500 00 

Murphy Mortgage (Guaranteed) 5}4%, 

1924 . (P) 6,000 00 

2M. Missouri, Kansas & Texas Ry. Co., 1st 
Mtee. 4%, 1990, Certificate of Deposit 

U. S. Trust Co (H) 2,000 00 

Neblung Mortgage against Real Estate 

(Guaranteed) (P) 3,750 00 

lOM. New York Central & Hudson River R. R. 

Co., Gold, 3^%, 1997 (P) 6,802 50 

6M. New York State Highway Imp., 4%, 

1961, Registered (P) 6,060 00 

2M. New York, Westchester & Boston Ry. Co., 

1st Mtg. G|B Series 1, 43^%, 1946 (H) 1,461 74 

lOM. Norfolk & Western Ry. Co., Con. Mtge. 

4%,1996 (P) 9.212 50 

4M. Northern Pacific Great Northern (Joint 
C. B. & Q.) Joint 15 yr. Conv. Gold, 

61^%, 1936 (P) 3,860 00 

3M. Ontario of Province, 5^%, Sept. 23, 

1929 (P) 2,935 50 

3M. Ontario Province, 5^%, Dec. 1, 1929.. . . (P) 2,932 50 
Pennsylvania R. R. Co., 100 shares Cap. 

Stock „(H) 5,229 35 

15M. Pennsylvania R. R. Co., Series "B" 

5%, 1968 (B) 13,518 75 

Park Place Building Co., Mortgage 

against Real Estate (Guaranteed) (P) 13,000 00 

8M. Pere Marquette R. R. Co., 1st Mtge. 

4%, 1946 (H) 6,686 96 

3M. Rio Grande Western Ry. Co., 1st Trust 

Mtge., 4%, 1939 (H) 2,447 61 

7M. St. Paul City Ry. Co., Cable Con. Mtge., 

5%, 1937 (H) 8,091 09 

Shea Mortgage against Real Estate, 

(Guaranteed) (P) 5,000 00 

3M. Sherman, Shreveport & Southern Ry. 
Co., 1st Mtge. Temp. 50 yr. 5%, 1945, 
Certificate Deposit Columbia Trust 

Co . (H) 2,087 61 

IM. Southern Pacific Ry. Co., 7%, 1934 (P) 1,052 50 

lOM. Southern Pacific Ry. Co., Ref. Mtge., 

4%, 1955 (P) 7,815 00 

IM. Southern Ry. Co., 1st Mtge., 4%, 1951. . . (H) 830 87 

6M. Spokane International Ry. Co., 1st Mtge., 

5%, 1955 (H) 6,860 22 

5M. Texas & Oklahoma R. R. Co., 1st Mtge. 
5%, 1943, Certificate of Deposit Bank- 
ers Trust Co., N. Y (H) 5,679 35 

4M. Union Pacific R. R. Co., 1st Mtge. R. R. 

& Land Grant 4%, 1947 (P) 3,825 00 

United States Liberty Bonds, 4M%. 1st 

issue (D) 500 00 

United States Liberty Bonds, 4^%, 2nd 

issue (D). 13,603 14 

United States Liberty Bonds, 4J4%, 3rd 

issue (D) 895 42 

United States Liberty Bonds, 43^%, 4th 
issue (D) 31,097 07 

56 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

United States Victory Bonds, 4%%, 

1923 (P) 22,550 00 

U. S. War Saving Stamps, 1923 35 00 

IM. West Shore R. R. Co., Guaranteed, 4%, 

23G1, Registered (H) 890 00 

5M. Wilkes-Barre & Eastern, 1st Mtge. 5% 

1942 ...(H) 4,204 35 

Wolsk Mortgage, B. & M. Guarantee Co., 

53^%, 1924 (P) 8,000 00 

'Zariclc Mortgage, B. & M. Guarantee Co., 

51^%, 1924 (P) 5,000 00 

!5310,31G 97 

Legacy Reserve Securities 

Bellingham City Local Imp., I2 In- 
terest on 23^ Lots in Bellingham, 

Wash.. (B) $1 00 

Cincinnati & Suburban Bell Telephone 

Co., 7 shares Cap. Stock (B) 350 00 

CinciVinati Gas & Pllectric Co., 40 shares 

Cap. Stock (B) 3,970 00 

Cincinnati Street Ry. Co., 11 shares 

Cap. Stock (B) 550 00 

Cincinnati Tobacco Warehouse Co., 1 

share Cap. Stock (B) 50 00 

Cincinnati City Water Works, 1 $500 

4% Imp. Bond, 1930 (B) .500 00 

Conewango Lumber Co., 6% deb. notes, 

3 at .11,000.00 each, 1925 (B) 3,000 00 

Pennsylvania R. R. Co., Cap. Stock, 5 

shares 170 00 

United States Playing Card Co., 9 shares 

Cap. Stock. (B) 2,700 00 

United States Printing & Lithograph Co., 

1st pref. 7 30/100, 2nd pref. 4 ^'Jioo (B) 1,546 75 

$12,837 75 

Sage Estate Securities Account No. 1 (Permanent) 

lOM. American Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

Coll. Trust 4%, 1929 (P) $7,G65 00 

15M. Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Ry. Co., 

G. M. 4%, 1995 (P) 11,372 50 

12M. Baltimore & Ohio R. R. Co., P. L. 3K%, 

1925 .'. . . (P) 9,720 00 

Bankers Trust Co., 104 Shares Cap. 

Stock (B) 39,000 00 

3M. Belgian Government, 73^%, 1925 (P) 2,944 50 

25M. Central of Georgia, Con. 5%, 1945 (P) 21,703 75 

25M. Central R. R. of New Jersey, Genl. 5%, 

1987 (P) 24,943 75 

20M. Chesapeake & Ohio Ry. Co., Con. 5, 

1939 (P) 18,531 25 

25M. Chicago & Northwestern, Genl. 4%, 

1987 (P) 19,537 50 

14M. Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, 4%, 

1958 (P) 10,930 00 

5M. Dominion of Canada, 5%, 1931 (P) 4,550 25 

12M. Erie R. R. Co., Prior Lien, 4%, 199G (B) 6,030 00 

57 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

lOM. Government of French Republic, 8%, 

1945 (P) 10,028 75 

ISM. Illinois Central R. R., 1st 4%, 1951 (P) 14,967 00 

Importers & Traders National Bank, 20 

shares Cap. Stock (B) 11,200 00 

lOM. New York Central & Hudson River R. R. 

Co., 3K%, 1997 (P) 6,940 00 

38M. New York Telephone Co., 43^%, 1939.. . . (P) 28,310 00 

lOM. Norfolk & Western Ry. Co., G. M. 6%, 

1931 (P) 10,283 75 

32M. Northern Pacific Ry. Co., 4%, 1997 (P) 24,695 ,50 

6M. Pennsylvania R. R. Co., 43^%, Series 

"A" 1965 (P) 4,906 50 

6M. Pennsylvania R. R. Co., 5% Series "B" 

1968 (P) 5,416 50 

33M. Reading R. R. Co., Genl. 4%, 1997 (P) 27,567 00 

50M. Rochester, N. Y. Notes, 4.85%, 1922 (P) 50,066 30 

IIM. Southern Pacific Ry. Co., 4%, 1955 (P) 8,204 00 

34M. Southern Ry. Co., 1st Con. 5%, 1994. . . . (P) 29,923 50 

5M. Swiss Government, 8%, 1940 (P) 5,075 00 . 

20M. United Kingdom, Great Britain and Ire- 
land, 53-^%, 1937 (P) 16,986 25 

13M. Union Pacific Ry. Co., 4%, 1947 (P) 10,544 50 

23M. Union Pacific Ry. Co., 4%, 2008 (P) 17,017 00 

34M. United States Certificate of Indebtedness, 

5yi%, due June 15, 1922 (P) 34,000 00 

1493,072 05 

W. S; S. Building Fund Securities 

65 War Savings Stamps, due 1923 (D) $325 00 

Securities and Real Estate Securities 

IM. Borough of Moiiaca, Pa., Fuudlfig and 

Inip. 41 :>%, 1925 ^ (D) $1,000 00 

IM. Certificate of Deposit Securities Invest- 
ment Co. of Wansaw, Ind., for $1,400.00 
par value Winona luterurban Ry. Co. 
(Peru Uiv.) (D) 1,400 00 

9M. Independence, Mo., Water Co., 5% Ref. * 

Gold Bonds, 1922 (D) 9,000 00 

Oswego & Syracuse R. R. Co., 13 shares 

Cap. Stock (D) 650 00 

IM. Pittsburgh, McKeesport & Connellsville 

Ry., Co., 1st Con. Mtge. 5%, 1931, . . . (D) 1,000 00 

IM. Rochester Ry. Co., 5% Gold Mtge., 1930. (D) 1,000 00 

IM. West Penn. Rys. Co., 1st Mtge. 5%, 

1931 (D) 1,000 00 

IM. United States Liberty Bonds, 434%, 2nd 

issue (D) 100 00 

$15,150 00 



San Juan Hospital Building Kennedy Securities 
Cost as of Feb. 13, 1911. 

324 Shares Cap. Stock Northern Pacific Ry. 

Co. $100.00 each (D) 41,229 00 

198 Shares Cap. Stock Great Northern Ry. 

Co., $100.00 each (D) 25,.542 00 

132 Shares Certificates Great Northern Iron 

Ure, $100.00 each (D) 8,250 00 

58 



r5.021 00 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

BUILDING FUNDS SECURITIES 
Asheville Home Industrial School 
IIIM. U. S. Certificate of Indebtedness, 53^^% 

due 6-15-22 .(P) $111,000 00 

lOM. Cjovernment of the French Republic, 

5^2%, 20 year Bonds, 1941 (P) 9,500 00 

$120,500 00 

Asheville Home Industrial School Heating 
Plant 

United States Liberty Bonds, 2nd issue 

4K% .- . ■ . (P) $550 00 

United States Liberty Bonds, 3rd issue 

4M% . . . (P) 2,650 00 

United States Liberty Bonds, 4th issue 

4H% (P) 300 00 

$3,500 00 

Harrlman School, Tenn. 

50M. U. S. Certificate of Indebtedness, 514% 

6-15-22 (P) $5,000 000 

SAGE ESTATE BOND APPRECIATION SECURITIES 

30M. Certificates of Indebtedness of the General 

Assembly of the Presbyterian Church. ..(P) $30,000 00 

18 Shares Standard (Jil of California, Cap. 

Stock (B) 1,710 00 

$31,710 00 

VAUGHN-MARQUIS SECURITIES 

Louisville Gas & IClectric Co., 7%, 1923. . (B) $500 00 

United States Liberty Bonds, 1st issue 

414%, 1947 (B) 500 00 

United States Liberty Bonds, 3rd issue 

414%, 1928 .' .. .(B) 2,000 00 

United States Liberty Bonds, 4th issue 

4ii%, 1933-38. (B) 1,300 00 

LInited States Victory Bonds, 5th issue 

4?4%, 1925 .' (R) 1,000 00 

$5,300 00 

LEGACY RESERVE— SAGE SECURITIES 

8M. Baltimore & Ohio R. R. Co., Prior Lien. 

33^^%, 1925 (B) $6,980 00 

lOM. Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co., 7%, 1921. ..(B) 6,150 00 

12M. Buffalo General Electric Co., 5%, 1939. . .(B) 11,280 00 

4M. Buffalo ky. Co., 5%, 1931 (B) 3,600 00 

Chicago & Northwestern R. R., 102 

shares (B) 6,381 38 

8M. Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Ry. Co., 

4%, 1934 (B) 6,140 00 

Colorado & Southern R. R., 50 shares.. . . (B) 2,837 50 
4M. Detroit, Jackson & Chicago Ry., 5%, 

^ 1937 (B) 2,960 00 

Gold Car Heating & Lighting Co., 54 

shares Cap. Stock (B) 108 00 

Illinois Central R. R., 102 shares Cap. 
Stock (B) 10,174 50 

59 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

42M. Interborough Rapid Transit Co., 5%, 

1966 (B) 26,827 50 

Keokuk & Hamilton Bondholders Co., 

214 shares Cap. Stock (B) 535 00 

Manhattan R. R. Co., Consolidated, 

146 shares Cap. Stock (B) 7,071 88 

4M. Minneapolis, St. Paul & S. Ste. Marie 

Ry. Co., 4%, 1938 (B) 3,470 00 

Missouri Pacilic R. R. Co., Trust, 98 

shares Com. Stock (B) 1,59S 63 

20M. New Brunswick Southern Ry. Co., 3%, 

1933 (B) 16,200 00 

8M. New York Central Ry. Co., 4%, 1998 . . . . (B) 6,330 00 
8M. New York State Railways Co., 4)^%, 

1962 (B) 5,290 00 

4M. Norfolk & Southern R. R. Co., 5%, 1961.. (B) 2,.340 00 
Pennsylvania R. R. Co., 288 shares. Cap. 

Stock (B) 9,774 00 

4M. Pennsylvania R. R. Co., 43^%, Series 

"A," 1965 (B) 3,485 00 

2M. Remington Typewriter Co., 6%, 1924 (B) 1,940 00 

lOM. Rochester Ry. & Light Co., 5%, 1954. . . . (B) 8,950 00 

6M. St. Louis Southern Ry. Co., 4%, 1932. . . . (B) 4,260 00 
4M. St. Paul & Kansas City Short Line Ry. 

Co., 4K>%, 1941 (B) 3,080 00 

12M. Schenectady Ry. Co., 5%, 1946 (B) 7,380 00 

72M. United States Certificates of Indebted- 
ness 414%, 1923 (P) 72,000 00 

4M. Washington Water Power Co., 5%, 1939.. (B) 3,810 00 
Western Union Telegraph Co., 76 shares. 

Cap. Stock (B) 6,954 00 

— $247,907 39 

Property Sales — Notes Receivable 

Hindman, Ky., Alice S. G. Lloyd Notes $200 00 

Manchester, Ky., Clara Burchell Note 900 00 

Springville, Utah, Mr. Beaumann Note 1,066 66 

$2,166 66 



Total Securities and Uninvested Cash and 

Cash Appropriated for Buildings $1,926,088 48 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary W. Torrence, Treasurer. 



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71 



Annual Statistics of Organization 

1921 - 1922 



Increase Total 

in Mem- Member- 

bership ship 

No. of Including Including 

Woman's Associate Associate 

Soc. 1921- 1921- 

PrESBVTERIES: 1922 1922 

Synod of Alabama 

Birmingham 10 42 528 

Gadsen 7 36 99 

Huntsville 11 26 189 

Total '28 104 816 

Synod of Arizona 

Northern Arizona 1 . . 36 

Phoenix. 5 36 800 

Southern Arizona 5 9 170 

Total 11 45 506 

Synod of Arkansas 

Arkansas *16 .. *205 

Fort Smith *9 . . *170 

Jonesboro =^7 . . *63 

Little Rock *6 . . *65 

Total *38 .. *503 

Synod of Atlantic 

Atlantic *25 . . 150 

Fairfield 26 11 351 

Hodge 6 10 114 

Knox *8 . . 42 

McClelland 12 .. 60 

Total 77 21 717 

Synod of Baltimore 

Baltimore 52 142 2625 

New Castle 34 50 1275 

Washington City 36 . . 2341 

Total 122 192 6241 

Synod of Catawba 

Cape Fear *28 . . *180 

Catawba *26 . . *600 

Southern Virginia 29 23 384 

Yadkin ='21 .. "414 

Total 104 23 1578 

*From Report of 1920-1921. 

72 



No. of 
Y. P. & 
Chil- 
dren's 
Organi- 
zations 


Increase 
in Mem- 
bership 
1921- 
1922 


Total 
Member- 
ship 
1921- 
1922 


Grand 
Total 
Member- 
ship 


13 


212 


351 


879 
99 


*17 




*508 


697 


30 


212 


859 


1675 
36 


9 




146 


446 


*3 




*85 


255 



12 



231 



208 



4 
43 



17 



67 



67 



386 



737 



23 


251 


566 


771 


26 


276 


744 


914 
63 


*8 


527 


n3i 

1441 


196 


57 


1944 








150 








351 








114 








42 








60 




•• 




717 


58 


67 


1255 


3880 


44 


247 


1421 


2696 


06 


108 


1764 


4105 



422 4440 10681 



180 
114 714 

*272 656 

414 



1964 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



Annual Statistics of Organization— Continued 



No. of 

Womaii'i 

Soc. 

Synod of California 

Benecia 20 

Los Angeles 75 

Nevada *2 

Riverside 12 

Sacramento 18 

San Francisco 41 

San Joaquin 34 

San Jose 15 

Santa Barbara 13 

Total 230 

Synod of Colorado 

Boulder 20 

Denver 30 

Gunnison 10 

Pueblo _20 

Total SO 

Synod of East Tennessee 

Le Vere 10 

Total 10 

Synod of Florida 

North Florida 7 

Southeast Florida 6 

Southwest Florida 9 

Total ~22 

Synod of Idaho 

Boise 12 

Kendall 4 

Twin Falls 9 

Total .""25 

Synod of Illinois 

Alton.. 35 

Blooniington 40 

Cairo 13 

Chicago 78 

Ewing 21 

Freeport 25 

Mattoon 25 

Ottawa 22 

Peoria 26 

Rock River *28 

Rushville 30 

Springfield *35 

Total .378 



Increase 


Total 










in Mem- 


Member- 


No. of 








bership 


ship 


Y. P. & 


It) crease 


Total 




Inolufling 


Including 


Chil- 


in Mem- 


Member- 


Grand 


Associate 


Associate 


dren's 


bcrsliip 


ship 


Total 


in'2i- 


1021- 


Organ i- 


1921- 


1921- 


Member- 


1922 


1922 


zations 


1922 


1022 


ship 


24 


380 


11 


25 


79 


459 


511 


5355 
*15 


*136 




*2087 


74^2 
15 


67 


530 


19 


39 


153 


683 


43 


448 


34 


19 


629 


1087 


194 


2023 


*25 




893 
986 


2916 


60 


079 


40 


55 i 


1665 


60 


561 


28 


342 


711 


1272 


76 


524 


*22 




*276 


800 


1035 


10515 


315 


976 


5814 


16329 


62 


664 


58 


49 


986 


1650 


49 


1192 


53 


414 


1258 


12450 


22 


251 


21 




367 


618 


110 


1038 


56 


156 


926 


1964 


243 


3145 


188 


619 


3537 


6682 


6 


188 

188 








188 


6 




188 


o 


95 








95 


12 


219 




, ^ 




219 


10 


139 


5 




86 


225 


24 


453 


5 




86 


539 




373 


22 


226 


553 


926 




SO 


6 


12 


170 


250 


30 


255 


*4 




193 


448 


30 


708 


32 


238 


916 


1624 


60 


1142 


29 


143 


422 


1564 


124 


1192 


36 




515 


1707 


52 


285 


*2 




'40 


325 


242 


4923 


160 


(36i 


2510 


7433 


50 


549 


*4 




*66 


615 


11 


999 


40 


376 


808 


1807 


26 


951 


26 


31 


339 


1290 


40 


659 


23 


174 


679 


1338 




782 


57 


51 


942 


1724 




*677 


*48 




1375 


2052 




932 


24 


28 


365 


1297 




*1436 


24 


193 


543 


1979 



605 14527 473 1297 8604 23131 



♦From Report of 1920-1921. 



73 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



Annual Statistics of Organization— Continued 



Increase Total 

in Mem- Mcmbcr- 

bership sliip 

No. of Including Including 

Woman's Associate Associate 

.Sec. 1921- 1921- 

1922 1922 
Synod of Indiana 

Cravvfordsville 36 54 1223 

Fort Wayne 28 19 1080 

Indiana 28 47 506 

Indianapolis 33 23 1431 

Logansport *29 .. *1086 

Muncie 16 18 641 

New Albany *22 .. *669 

Whitewater 22 27 761 

Total 214 ISS 7397 

Synod of loiva 

Cedar Rapids 26 .... 718 

Corning 18 27 660 

Council Bluffs *14 .. "411 

Des Moines 32 73 956 

Dubuque *18 .. *654 

Fort Dodge 28 34 845 

Iowa *21 . . *921 

Iowa City *26 904 

Sioux City 30 70 1292 

Waterloo 24 50 705 

Total 237 254 8066 

Synod of Ka)isas 

Emporia 13 7 416 

Highland 16 . . 481 

Larned 22 75 799 

Neosho 31 89 872 

Osborne 15 21 418 

Solomon 22 51 876 

Topeka 37 68 1469 

Wichita 25 32 735 

Total 181 343 6066 

Synod of Kentucky 

Buckhorn 

Ebenezer *18 . . *376 

Logan 19 10 213 

Louisville 10 24 350 

Princeton.. _ 16 17 245 

Transylvania 8 13 188 

Total 71 64 1372 



♦From Report of 1920-1921. 



No.o 
V. P & 
(Chil- 
dren's 
Organi- 
zations 


Tiicrrasc 
in Mem- 
bership 
1921- 
1922 


Total 
Member- 
ship 
1921- 
1922 


Grand 

Total 
Member- 
ship 


34 


26 


1108 


2331 


37 


161 


906 


1986 


37 




954 


1460 


39 


96 


1228 


2659 


28 


99 


536 


1622 


28 


48 


587 


1228 


25 


9 


531 


1200 


23 


85 


324 


1085 



251 



58 



524 6174 13571 



48 


47 


955 


1673 


46 


196 


772 


1432 


49 


92 


816 


1227 


37 


73 


621 


1577 


42 


243 


761 


1415 


61 


197 


835 


1680 


60 


245 


1046 


1967 


63 


232 


1109 


2013 


65 


302 


895 


2187 


71 


206 


881 


1586 



542 1833 8691 16757 



23 


173 


544 


960 


35 


265 


845 


1326 


33 


25 


638 


1437 


54 


414 


1087 


1959 


10 


70 


279 


697 


35 


234 


771 


1647 


54 


289 


1011 


2480 


63 


172 


1533 


2268 



307 1642 6708 12774 



25 


72 


496 


872 


11 


59 


148 


361 


*4 




*124 


474 


*8 




*230 


475 


10 




196 


384 



131 1194 



2566 



74 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



Annual Statistics of Organization 



Inornasc Total 

in Mem- Member- 

bcrstiip ship 

No. of IiirlufliriR InrludinK 

Woman's Assoi-iafc Associate 

Soc. 1921- 1921- 

1922 1922 

Synod of Michigan 

Detroit 49 3832 

Flint 21 17 709 

Grand Rapids 13 430 

Kalamazoo 19 67 GH5 

Lake Superior 12 . . 578 

Lansing 22 1181 

Petoskcy 9 1 353 

Saginaw 12 235 985 

Total 157 320 8739 



izati 


on— 


Continued 


No. of 
Y. P. & 
Chil- 
dren's 
OrRani- 
zalionB 


Increase 
in Mem- 
bership 
1921- 
1922 


Total 
Member- 
ship 
1921- 
1922 


Grand 
Total 
Member- 
ship 


131 


449 


3487 


7319 


35 


82 


572 


1281 


11 


29 


223 


659 


12 


82 


218 


883 


38 


2()0 


1083 


1661 


39 


150 


553 


1734 


17 


201 


441 


794 


36 


168 


787 


1772 



319 1421 7364 16103 



Synod of Minnesota 

Adams 9 

Duluth 18 

Mankato 27 

Minneapolis 24 

Red River 8 

St. Cloud 11 

St. Paul 24 

Winona 18 

Total 139 



22 


231 


14 


19 


188 


419 


30 


530 


36 


55 


573 


1103 


39 


733 


30 


3 


850 


1583 


35 


1807 


52 


269 


774 


2581 


3 


144 


7 




163 


307 


50 


266 


12 




395 


661 


74 


980 


50 




2133 


3113 


19 


424 


22 


84 


457 


881 


172 


5115 


223 


430 


5533 


10648 



Synod of Mississippi 

Bell. no 

Meridian 6 

Oxford 14 

Total 30 





*55 


*7 




*84 


139 


7 


104 


*10 




*174 


278 


5 


111 

270 


6 
23 


10 
10 


86 
344 


197 


L2 


614 



Synod of Missouri 

Carthage 22 

Iron Mountain 9 

Kansas City 29 

Kirksville 7 

McGee *13 

Ozark 14 

St. JosepI! 25 

St. Louis 44 

Salt River 15 

Sedalia 22 

Total 200 



73 


789 


44 


99 


949 


1738 




174 


*7 




*55 


229 


112 


1563 


69 


345 


1826 


3389 


20 


228 


15 


30 


256 


484 




*3S0 


19 


233 


382 


762 


29 


527 


12 


7 


322 


849 


52 


610 


18 


56 


291 


901 


127 


2021 


90 


380 


2009 


4030 




449 


21 


41 


385 


834 




637 


*4 




*150 


787 



413 



*From Report of 1920-21. 



7378 299 1191 6625 14003 



75 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



Incrcaec 
in Mem- 
bership 

No. of Including 
Woman'd Asor-iatc 

Soc. 1921- 
1922 
Synod of Montana 

Butte 5 11 

Great Falls *3 

Helena 2 

Kalispell 2 10 

Lewiston *2 

Yellowstone 4 7 

Total 18 28 

Synod of Nebraska 

Box Butte 12 37 

Hastings 12 17 

Kearney 21 25 

Nebraska City 32 108 

Niobrara 11 

Omaha 32 54 

Total 120 241 

Synod of New England 

Boston.. 14 30 

Connecticut Valley 9 15 

Newburyport 14 65 

Providence 8 33 

Total 45 143 

Synod of New Jersey 

Elizabeth 30 79 

Jersey City 32 113 

Monmouth 34 

Morris and Oranc^e 37 233 

Newark ". 31 229 

New Brunswick 38 97 

Newton 19 86 

West Jersey 47 101 

Total 268 938 

Synod of New Mexico 

Pecos Valley 5 10 

Rio Grande 7 

Santa Fe 7 20 

Total 19 30 



♦From Report of 1920-1921. 



)rgan 


iizati 


on— 


Continued 


Total 










Momber- 


No. of 








ship 


Y. P.& 


Increase 


Total 




Including 


Chil- 


in Mem- 


Member- 


Grand 


Associate 


dren's 


bership 


ship 


Total 


1921- 


Organi- 


1921- 


1921- 


Member- 


1922 


zations 


1922 


1922 


ship 


223 


15 


18 


401 


624 


*49 








49 


85 


4 


34 


74 


159 


73 


11 


228 


345 


418 


*48 


*1 




*35 


83 


127 


*4 




*149 


276 



605 35 280 1004 



2118 



123 
171 
215 

509 



1609 



220 


14 




206 


426 


505 


17 




811 


1316 


578 


37 




1035 


1613 


1090 


46 


2i9 


618 


1708 


263 


11 




196 


459 


1220 


47 


65 


1052 


2272 



3876 172 284 3918 



7794 



702 


38 


4 


1025 


1274 


624 


26 


105 


650 


889 


482 


17 




407 


678 


310 


16 




368 


1727 



97 



109 2450 



4568 



2392 


81 


282 


1960 


4352 


1886 


25 


287 


1003 


2889 


1568 


47 


49 


934 


2502 


3296 


25 




808 


4104 


2241 


56 


790 


1828 


4069 


2331 


43 


106 


1313 


3644 


798 


23 


146 


728 


1526 


2004 


54 




511 


2515 



17516 354 1660 9085 26601 



7 
*3 
11 

21 



10 

lio 

120 



110 

*43 
253 

406 



233 

214 
468 



915 



76 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



Increase 
in Mem- 
bership 

No. of Iiiciuiliiig 
Woman's Associate 

Sop. 1921- 
1922 
Synod of New York 

Albany 40 Gl 

Binghamton 24 70 

Brooklyn Nassau 38 49 

Buffalo 41 181 

Cayuga 19 32 

Champlain 21 10 

Chemung 18 47 

Columbia 10 19 

Genesee 15 

Geneva 19 39 

Hudson 40 207 

Long Island 10 17 

Lyons 17 7 

New York 50 172 

Niagara 22 53 

North River 25 10 

Otsego 20 

Rochester 47 

St. Lawrence 22 20 

Steuben 23 33 

Syracuse 29 72 

Troy 29 58 

Utica 40 133 

Westchester 30 89 

Total 001 1357 

Synod of North Dakota 

Bismarck 13 

Fargo 5 

Minnewaukon 6 

Mousa River 

Oakes 10 2 

Pembina 18 17 

Total 52 25 

Synod of Oklahoma 

Ardmore 9 9 

Choctaw 14 

Cimaron 9 48 

El Reno 8 21 

Hobard 8 03 

McAlester 8 

Muskogee 12 GO 

Oklahoma 22 170 

Tulsa 12 82 

Total 102 405 



Jrgar 


iizati 


on— 


Continued 


Total 










Membor- 


No. of 








sliip 


Y. P. k 


Increase 


Total 




Including 


riiii- 


in Mem- 


Member- 


Grand 


Associate 


(iren'a 


IxTsliip 


sliip 


Total 


1921- 


Organi- 


1921- 


1921- 


Member- 


1922 


zations 


1922 


1922 


ship 


2370 


49 




812 


3188 


1391 


29 


119 


949 


2340 


1798 


73 


503 


2058 


3850 


3351 


51 


300 


1537 


4888 


973 


34 


244 


789 


1702 


087 


25 




312 


999 


751 


20 


3 


203 


1014 


289 


19 


57 


024 


913 


770 


10 


420 


043 


1419 


923 


31 


180 


542 


1405 


1003 


38 


38 


1059 


2002 


448 


21 




554 


1002 


854 


14 


131 


290 


1150 


2757 


98 


232 


704 


3401 


1085 


7 


35 


203 


1288 


1220 


40 


24 


908 


2134 


727 


21 


91 


580 


1307 


3008 


00 


558 


1491 


4499 


915 


35 


503 


1080 


1995 


854 


44 


102 


1089 


1943 


1209 


49 


89 


1327 


2596 


1932 


37 


92 


789 


2721 


2887 


52 


341 


1098 


3985 


2083 


43 
900 


131 
4445 


932 
20039 


3015 


34903 


55G02 




"s 


85 


247 


247 


a 


no 




*84 


155 




*7 




*218 


218 


154 


*7 




*130 


290 


371 


*14 
40 


85 


*337 
1022 


708 


590 


1618 


240 


*9 




*257 


497 


183 








183 


271 


17 


123 


274 


545 


187 







40 


233 


104 


12 


22 


210 


374 


183 


13 


21 


240 


429 


412 


20 




471 


883 


982 


50 


325 


1209 


2251 


723 


32 


2G8 


000 


1389 



3345 165 



759 3439 



6784 



*From Report of 1920-21. 



77 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



Annual Statistics of Organization— Continued 



No. of 

Woman'f 

Soc. 

Synod of Ohio 

Athens 17 

ChiUicothe 21 

Cincinnati 52 

Cleveland 32 

Columbus 27 

Dayton 3S 

Lima 28 

Mahoning 3.5 

Marion 30 

Portsmouth 21 

St. Clairsville 3G 

Steubenville 48 

Toledo 46 

Wooster 26 

Zanesville 34 

Total 497 

Synod of Oregon 

Grande Ronde 5 

Pendleton *4 

Portland *30 

Southern Oregon 11 

Willamette 22 

Total 72 

Synod of Pennsylvania 

Beaver 26 

Blairsville 45 

Butler 39 

Carlisle 45 

Chester 55 

Clarion 28 

Erie 69 

Huntingdon *46 

Kittanning 49 

Lackawanna 50 

Lehigh *27 

Northumberland 50 

Philadelphia *59 

Philadelphia North *61 

Pittsburgh 117 

Redstone *47 

Shenango 31 

Washington *35 

Westminster 28 

Total 907 



Increase 


Total 










in Mem- 


Member- 


No. of 








bership 


ship 


Y. P. & 


Increase 


Total 




Including 


Including 


Chil- 


in Mem- 


Member- 


Grand 


Associate 


Associate 


dren's 


bersliip 


ship 


Total 


1921- 


1921- 


Organi- 


1921- 


1921- 


Member- 


1922 


1922 


zations 


1922 


1922 


ship 


81 


829 


17 




418 


1247 


14 


785 


36 


4 


597 


1382 


319 


2136 


87 


309 


1392 


3528 


92 


1653 


58 


410 


1370 


3023 


126 


1697 


71 


044 


1425 


3122 


45 


2206 


67 


11 


1031 


3237 


23 


955 


19 


131 


384 


1339 


114 


2110 


38 


103 


1080 


3190 


73 


1592 


22 


202 


599 


2191 


47 


674 


44 


42 


324 


998 


58 


1176 


66 


84 


1200 


2436 


66 


1666 


88 


99 


880 


2552 


80 


1640 


55 


294 


1404 


3104 


59 


1570 


44 


45 


003 


2233 


59 


1618 


45 

757 


552 
3050 


1459 
14352 


3077 


1256 


22307 


36659 


8 


144 


10 


8 


203 


347 




102 


5 


32 


76 


178 




n368 


71 


43 


1408 


2836 


19 


245 


7 




119 


364 


79 


745 


39 
132 


92 
175 


498 
2364 


1343 


106 


2604 


5008 


40 


857 


43 


173 


859 


1710 


54 


1802 


82 


90 


1591 


3393 


28 


1473 


45 


52 


954 


2427 


165 


2380 


102 


102 


2488 


4868 


133 


4704 


95 


147 


2093 


7397 


82 


1032 


48 


24 


2833 


3865 


227 


3319 


61 


484 


932 


4251 




*1529 


70 


58 


2780 


4315 


44 


890 


39 


408 


1328 


2218 


24 


2111 


70 


45 


2090 


4801 




n477 


39 


154 


048 


2125 


2 


2424 


75 


103 


2700 


5190 




*4127 


109 


00 


3734 


7861 




*4082 


122 


581 


4092 


8174 


361 


0322 


264 


013 


9599 


15921 




='^1988 


90 


005 


2908 


4940 


53 


1100 


55 


192 


949 


2049 




*1443 


46 


237 


1204 


2047 


60 


2234 


00 
1521 


11 
4139 


1986 
47100 


4220 


1273 


45294 


92394 



Trom Report of 1920-21. 



Woman's Roard of TTome Missions 



Total 
Meml)er- 
aliip 
1921- 
1922 



818 
*2.57 

477 
*409 



Grand 

Total 

Member- 

sliip 

1108 
510 
712 
653 



Annual Statistics of Organization— Continued 

Increase Total 
in Mem- Member- No. of 
bersliip ship Y. P. & Increase 
No. of Including Including Chil- in Mem- 
Woman's A.s80ciate Associate dren's berahip 
Soc. 1921- 1921- Organi- 1921- 
1922 1922 zationa 1922 
Synod of Sotttli Dakota 

Aberdeen 12 10 290 .33 295 

Black Hills 10 20 253 *13 

Huron 7 235 17 14G 

Sioux Falls _[4 3 244 *20 .__ 

Total 43 45 1022 83 441 

Synod of Tennessee 

Chattanooga 9 212 478 20 124 

Cumberland Mountain... *3 .. *24 50 

Duck River 12 16 222 8 98 

French Broad 11 15 130 21 75 

Holston 8 16 208 11 94 

Nashville 16 47 351 24 143 

Union *37 . . *8.36 17 171 

West Tennessee _23 9 328 13 43 

Total ".119 "315 2577 120 798 

Synod of Texas 

Abilene 13 25 180 *9 

Amarillo 14 72 505 30 147 

Austin 10 20 181 *8 

Brownwood 11 9 143 *7 

Dallas 17 01 528 36 149 

El Paso 5 . . . . 12 132 

Fort Worth 18 38 442 35 109 

Houston 9 41 291 20 35 

Jefferson 6 .. 106 *7 

Paris 10 . . 243 28 134 

Waco _25 _75 683 26 JI78 

Total 138 341 3302 218 944 

Synod of Utah 

Ogden 4 10 76 2 4 

Salt Lake 6 36 200 *8 

South Utah _0 _14 98 _6 57 

Total 16 60 374 16 61 

Synod of Washington 

Bellingham 6 3 239 7 61 

Central Washington .. 9 13 

Columbia River 10 82 321 10 117 

Olympia 12 11 437 20 101 

Seattle 29 19 697 39 241 

Spokane 20 17 628 49 291 

Walla Walla . . . . 29 153 

Wenatchee 6 9 307 21 ,302 

Total ~83 "Hi 2029 184 1279 4385 7014 



1901 


2983 


511 


989 


180 


204 


175 


397 


803 


993 


.344 


5.52 


491 


842 


453 


1289 


280 


♦)08 


3297 


5874 


*122 


302 


1249 


17.54 


*172 


3.53 


*174 


317 


822 


1350 


.341 


341 


947 


1389 


533 


824 


*129 


235 


531 


774 


532 


1215 


5552 


8854 


79 


155 


*1,36 


336 


99 


197 


314 


688 


17S 


417 


245 


245 


188 


509 


654 


1091 


1047 


1744 


899 


1527 


538 


538 


636 


943 



♦From Report of 1920-1921. 



79 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



Annual Statistics of Organization— Continued 



Increase Total 

in Mem- Member- 

bership ship 

No. of Including Including 

Woman's Associate Associate 

Soc, 1921- 1921- 

1922 1922 

Synod of West Virginia 

Grafton 13 35 731 

Parkersburg 21 34 554 

Wheeling 19 15 622 



No. of 

Y. P. & Increase Total 

Oliil- in Mem- Member- Grand 

dren's bersliip ship Total 

Organi- 1921- 1921- Member- 

zations 1922 1922 ship 



32 
13 
32 



Total 53 84 1907 77 



27 

122 

50 



853 1584 

326 880 

1086 1708 



199 2205 



4172 



Synod of Wisconsin 

Chippewa 13 89 502 30 

La Crosse 9 27 284 7 

Madison 16 1 524 22 

Milwaukee 22 ... 902 41 

Winnebago 21 ... 839 37 

Total 81 117 3151 137 374 3328 



178 
23 

173 



801 
173 
673 
1148 
533 



1303 
457 
1197 
2050 
1372 

6479 



Synod of Wyoming 



Cheyenne 

Laramie 


.... 3 58 
2 


102 

50 

125 


7 


Sheridan 


9 19 

....14 77 
of 1920-1921. 


*3 


Total 


277 


10 


*From Report 
Grand Totals: 





139 



296 



139 296 



Synodical Societies 

Presbyterial Societies 

Woman's Societies 

Increase in Woman's Societies, 1921-1922 (not 

shown above) 134 

Young People's and Children's Organizations 

Increase in Young People's and Children's Or- 
ganizations, 1921-1922 (not shown above)... . 979 

Total number of Societies 

Increase in Membership, Woman's Societies 10,8-0 

Increase in Membership, Young People's and Chil- 
dren's Organizations 30,887 



Total Increase in Membership 

Membership in Woman's Societies 233,270 

Membership includes 24,627 in Department of as- 
sociate members. 

Membership in Young People's and Children's Or- 
ganizations 196,124 



398 

50 

125 



573 



39 

265 

5,653 



8,425 
14,078 

41,767 



Total Membership, 1921-1922 429,394 

80 



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90 



LIST OF COMMISSIONED WORKERS 

For School Year 192 1- 1922 



Name 



Station 



Field 



*Acevedo, Ines 


Mayagucz 


Porto Rico 


*Acosta, Esperanza 


Presbyterian Hospital 


Porto Rico 


Adams, Katherine 


Asheville Normal School 


Mountain 


Adams, Rebecca 


Juniper 


Mountain 


*Aguiar, Placida 


Cardenas School 


Cuba 


Akerstrom, Frances 


Laura Sunderland School 


Mountain 


*Alamo, Maria 


Presbyterian Hospital 


Porto Rico 


*Alan, Mary 


Rocky Fork 


Mountain 


Albertson, Mary 


Asheville Normal School 


Alountain 


Alexander, Kate 


Forsythe Memorial School 


Spanish-speak- 


Alexander, Mary 


On leave of absence 


ing 


Alexander, Rebecca 


I'orsythe Memorial School 


Spanish-speak- 


♦Alvarez, Benito 


Placetas School 


ing 
Cuba 


*Anderson, Adair 


Tucson Training School 


Indian 


Anderson, Charles B. 


On leave of absence 




Andrew, Ada Lou 


Laura Sunderland School 


Mountain 


*Arce, Carman 


Aguadilla 


Porto Rico 


*Arce, Mrs. Esther M. de 


Caibarien School 


Cuba 


* Armas, Laudelina de 


Cardenas School 


Cuba 


Arey, Allie May 


Cardenas School 


Cuba 


*Arias, Mrs. Isabel 


Sancti Spiritus School 


Cuba 


Avery, Rena E. 


Mossop School 


Mountain 


Badger, Angelina 


Agua Negra 


Spanish-speak- 


*Bado, Virginia 


Presbyterian Hospital 


ing 
Porto Rico 


*Bailey, Sallie 


Asheville Normal School 


Mountain 


Bair, Gertrude 


Asheville Normal School 


Mountain 


Baker, Margaret 


Mayaguez 


Porto Rico 


*Balais, Sofia 


Cardenas School 


Cuba 


Balderston, Laura 


Tucson Training School 


Indian 


♦Banta, Edith 


Farm School 


Mountain 


Barber, Ruth K. 


Allison-James School 


Spanish-speak- 


*Barnes, Florence 


Cortland 


ing 
Mountain 


Barrell, Zelpha 


Wasatch Academy 


Utah 


*Barreto, Justina 


Mayaguez 


Porto Rico 


"Bartlett, S. S. 


Farm School 


Mountain 


Bayless, Gertrude 


Menaul School 


Spanish-speak- 


*Bayron, Julia 


Presbyterian Hospital 


ing 
Porto Rico 


Bell, Annetta E. 


Agua Negra 


Spanish-speak- 


Benedict, Imogene 


Sheldon Jackson School 


ing 
Alaska 


Benfer, Rachel L. 


Langdon Memorial School 


Mountain 


*Betancourt, Resureccion 


Presbyterian Hospital 


Porto Rico 


Biggers, Martha 


Asheville Normal School 


Mountain 


Blair, Anna Yl. 


Truchas 


Spanish-speak- 
ing 



♦Non-commissioned. 



91 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



Name 



Station 



Field 



Blake, Alice M. 

*Blay, Inez 
Boand, Mrs. Mary A 
Boand, William F. 

*Bosch, Emilio 
Boucher, Francis E., 
Bourhill, Isabella C. 
Brown, Christine A. 
Brown, Jessie H. 

Brown, Sarah 



Trementina 

Cardenas School 
Wasatch Academy 
Tucson Training School 
Cardenas School 
M.D.Indian Wells Hospital 
Sheldon Jackson School 
Pease House 
Allison-James School 



Bryan, Alice M. 
Bundy, Josephine 
Burke, Gary R., M.D. 
Burke, Mrs. Alice, M.D. 
Buxton, Esther W. 
Byrns, Marion 

*Calero, Susana 

Calfee, John E. 

Callender, Bessie M, 
*Candelaria, Jose 

*Caro, Pura Mislan de 
*Carreras, Lorenza 
*Carrion, Hortensia 
*Carrion, Mercedes 

Carson, Eila 

Carson, Harriot 

Casebeer, Amy 

Chapin, Sarah H. 

Cheek, Elizabeth I. 
*Cintra, Leonela 
*Cintra, Santiago 
*Chirino, America 
*Clark, Elvira 

Clark, Helen W. 
*Clark, Leila 

Clarke, Margaret E. 

Clements, Mollie 
Cleveland, Hazel 

Clingan, Edwarda M. 

Clingan, Mary E. 
*Clitheroe, Harry 
^Cochrane, Mrs. Robert 

Cochrane, Sarah E. 
Cody, Mary E. 
'Collins, Sarah L. 



*Non-commissioned. 



Chimayo 

Laura Sunderland School 
On leave of absence 
Presbyterian Hospital 
Presbyterian Hospital 
Aguadilla 
Menaul School 

Aguadilla 

Asheville Normal School 
Climax Springs 
Menaul School 

Mayaguez 

Presbyterian Hospital 
Kate Plumer Bryan School 
Kate Plumer Bryan School 
Pattie C. Stockdale School 
Allison-James School 

Tucson Training School 
Tucson Training School 
Langdon Memorial School 
Caibarien School 
Caibarien School 
Nueva Paz School 
Wolf Point School 
On leave of absence. 
Asheville Normal School 
Menaul School 

San Juan, Colorado 

Allison-James School 

Proctor 

Proctor 

Wasatch Academy 

Forsythe Memorial School 

Juniper 

Tucson Training School 

Ganado Hospital 



92 



Spanish-speak- 
ing 

Cuba 

Utah 

Indian 

Cuba 

Indian 

Alaska 

Mountain 

Spanish-speak 
ing 

Spanish-speak- 
ing 

Mountain 

Porto Rico 

Porto Rico 

Porto Rico 

Spanish-speak- 
ing 

Porto Rico 

Mountain 

Mountain 

Spanish-speak- 
ing 

Porto Rico 

Porto Rico 

Cuba 

Cuba 

Mountain 

Spanish-speak- 
ing 

Indian 

Indian 

Mountain 

Cuba 

Cuba 

Cuba 

Indian 

Mountain 

Spanish-speak- 
ing 

Spanish-speak- 
ing 

Spanish-speak- 
ing 

Mountain 

Mountain 

Utah 

Spanish-speak- 
ing 

Mountain 

Indian 

Indian^ 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



Name 



Station 



Field 



Condit, James H. 


Sheldon Jackson School 


Alaska 


Conklin, S. Louisa 


St. George 


Utah 


Conley, Josic 


Asheville Home School 


Mountain 


Cooper, Audrey 


Ferron 


Utah 


Cooper, Sarah 


Laura Sunderland School 


Mountain 


*Cordell, L. C. 


Farm School 


Mountain 


Cordova, Delfido 


Asheville Normal School 


Mountain 


Cowan, Gertrude 


Sancti Spiritus School 


Cuba 


Cowen, Jennie 


Asheville Home School 


Mountain 


Craig, Elizabeth 


El Prado de Taos 


Spanish-speak- 


*Craig, Margaret 


Cardenas School 


ing 
Cuba 


Craig, Margaret V. 


Pease House 


Mountain 


Crawford, EHzabeth 


McBeth Mission 


Indian 


Crawford, Mazie 


McBeth Mission 


Indian 


Crouch, Jewell 


Kirkwood Memorial School 


Indian 


Culnan, Catherine 


Asheville Normal School 


Mountain 


Curtis, Josie 


Gunnison 


Utah 


Cushman, Ella 


Asheville Normal School 


Mountain 


Davis, Frances E, 


Langdon Memorial School 


Mountain 


*Davis, Margaret M. 


Cardenas School 


Cuba 


Dickey, Frances 


Asheville Normal School 


Mountain 


Dingman, Helen H. 


Harlan County 


Mountain 


Dixon, Mary E. 


Wasatch Academy 


Utah 


Donaldson, Harper C. 


Menaul School 


Spanish-speak- 


Donnelly, Mary J. 


Ferron 


ing 
Utah 


Dooley, Isla M. 


Asheville Normal School 


Mountain 


Douglas, Nellie I. 


Allison-James School 


Spanish-speak- 


Duckering, Mrs. D. H. 


Wasatch Academy 


ing 
Utah 


Dunn, lone H. 


Asheville Normal School 


Mountain 


Dutton, Marion D. 


Menaul School 


Spanish-speak- 


Elliott, Elizabeth 


On leave of absence 


ing 


Elliott, Harriet 


Neah Bay 


Indian 


♦Ellis, F. K. 


Menaul School 


Spanish-speak- 


Ellis, Faye M. 


Allison-James School 


ing 
Spanish-speak- 


Ellsworth, Zoe 


Chimayo 


ing 
Spanish-speak- 


Evans, Lillian M. 


On leave of absence 


ing 


Faust, Marie 


Dorothy 


Mountain 


*Finlay, Hattie M. 


Cardenas 


Cuba 


Fleming, Emily 


Wasatch Academy 


Utah 


♦Flores, Narcisa 


Camajuani School 


Cuba 


*Fox, Theodore 


Wasatch Academy 


Utah 


Freeman, Bess 


Majaguez 


Porto Rico 


*Freire, Maria L 


Presbyterian Hospital 


Porto Rico 


*Frink, Margery 


New Jersey Academy 


Utah 


*Fuentas, Ana 


Presbyterian Hospital 


Porto Rico 


Fuller, Jeanie S. 


On leave of absence 




Galbreath, Wm. R, M.D. 


Presbyterian Hospital 


Porto Rico 


♦Garcia, Irene 


Cabaiguan School 


Cuba 



♦Non-commissioned. 



93 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



Name 



Station 



Field 



♦Garcia, Lola 


Mayaguez 


Porto Rico 


Gardemann, Earl F. 


Wasatch Academy 


Utah 


*Gardeniann, Mrs. Earl F. 


Wasatch Academy 


Utah 


*Garmendia, Benito 


Cardenas School 


Cuba 


*Gcntry, Maude 


Dorland-Bell School 


Mountain 


*Gibson, Isabel 


Placetas School 


Cuba 


*Gibson, Olive 


Placetas School 


Cuba 


Gilgert, Birdie B. 


San Miguel 


Indian 


Gilman, Julia 


Langdon Memorial School 


Mountain 


Girton, Martin L. 


Tucson Indian School 


Indian 


*Gomez, Angelina 


Sancti Spiritus School 


Cuba 


*Gomez, Luisa 


Sancti Spiritus School 


Cuba 


♦Gonzalez, Flora 


Cardenas School 


Cuba 


Gonzalez, Rosa 


Presbyterian Hospital 


Porto Rico 


Goodell, Florence 


Harlan County 


Mountain 


Goodhand, Sadie 


Westminster Mission 


Mountain 


Gray, Sarah S. 


Nueva Paz School 


Cuba 


Greenway, Mrs. Sadie 


New Jersey Academy 


Utah 


*Grizarry, Dolores 


Presbyterian Hospital 


Porto Rico 


Grow, Lottie A. 


Panguitch 


Utah 


Grubbs, Richard H. 


Menaul School 


Spanish-speak- 


*Guitart, Rosario 


Cardenas School 


ing 
Cuba 


*Guitierrez, Antonia 


Presbyterian Hospital 


Porto Rico 


Haft, Ora E. 


Sheldon Jackson School 


Alaska 


Haines, Faith H. 


Wasatch Academy 


Utah 


Hale, Rosamond 


Allison-James School 


Spanish-speak- 


Hallock, Marion P. 


Asheville Home School 


ing 
Mountain 


Hammond, Lucy 


Cabaiguan School 


Cuba 


Hannan, Emma L. 


New Jersey Academy 


Utah 


Harris, F. Elizabeth 


Dry Creek 


Mountain 


Hart, Maude 


Menaul School 


Spanish-speak- 


Hartsock, Margaret 


Indian Wells Hospital 


ing 
Indian 


Hayslip, Elizabeth 


Allison-James School 


Spanish-speak- 


Hazen, Clara E. 


Mayaguez 


mg 
Porto Rico 


Heminger, Clara E. 


Pattie C. Stockdale School 


Mountain 


Hemphill, Elizabeth 


Traveler's Rest 


Mountain 


♦Henderson, Mildred 


Pease House 


Mountain 


♦Hernandez, Agripina 


Aguadilla 


Porto Rico 


♦Hernandez, Manuel 


Kate Plumer Bryan School 


Cuba 


Herron, Ella C. 


The Willows 


Mountain 


Hildreth, E. Raymond, 






M.D. 


On leave of absence 




Hilkerbaumer, Anna 


Osage Iron Works 


Mountain 


Hillard, Blanche 


Kate Plumer Bryan School 


Cuba 


Hilswick, Mildred M, 


Wasatch Academy 


Utah 


HoHingsworth, John 


Tucson Training School 


Indian 


Hope, Elizabeth M. 


Truchas 


Spanish-speak- 
ing 
Mountain 


Holt, Edith 


Harlan County 


Horner, Mary E. 


Presbyterian Hospital 


Porto Rico 


Horton, Lenora 


Dorland-Bell Sghool 


Mountain 



♦Non-commissioned. 



94 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



Name 



Station 



Field 



Hoskins, Burley 
Houghton, Edith 
Houston, Edith 
*Hubbard, David 
Huber, Anna E. 
Hull, Mary S. 

Hullinger, Glcnna 
Hunter, Sarah M. 

Hutchison, C. Stuart, M.D. 

Hutchison,' Margaret L. 

Irvine, Martha 

Jackson, Emma 

Jackson, Harriet 

Jennings, Cora L. 

Jennings, D. Russell 

Johns, Charles L. 
*Johnson, Darrell 
*Johnson, Henrietta 
*Johnston, James 
*Jones, Sarah 
*Jorge, Ricardo 

Joslyn, E. A. 

Joyner, Claudia 
*Kepheart, Delia 

King, Mrs. Cynthia 

Klar, Minnie 
*Labiosa, Magdalena F. 

Lange, Bernhardine 
*Laughlin, Dale 

Laughlin, Julia 

Leigh, Grace 
*Leiva, Mrs. Josefa M. de 

Light, Augusta 

Linn, Jennie F. 

Linney, Maude P. 

Lloyd, Margery 

Long, S. Nellie 
*Lopez, Asela 
*Lopez, Emma 

Lord, Elizabeth 

Loudon, Mary B. 

Lowry, Rosilla 

Lutzen, Mathilde 

Lyle, Anna M. 
*Lyle, Lura 
♦McAfee, Johnson 

McClellan, Bee 

McCord, M. Rose 

McCormac, Nora M. 

McCullough, Idabelle 
*McDaniel, Mrs. Josephine 
*McDevitt, Lillie 



Ashevillc Normal School 


Mountain 


Dorland-Bcll School 


Mountain 


Camajuani School 


Cuba 


Kirkwood Memorial School 


Indian 


Harlan County 


Mountain 


Menaul School 


Spanish-speak- 


Wasatch Academy 


ing 
Utah 


Menaul School 


Spanish-speak- 


. 


ing 


(ianado Hospital 


Indian 


Laura Sunderland School 


Mountain 


Asheville Home School 


Mountain 


Haines House 


Alaska 


Climax Springs 


Mountain 


Asheville Home School 


Mountain 


Slicldon Jackson School 


Alaska 


Wasatch Academy 


Utah 


Topowa School 


Indian 


Mossop School 


Mountain 


Sheldon Jackson School 


Alaska 


Asheville Normal School 


Mountain 


Santa Clara School 


Cuba 


Asheville Normal School 


Mountain 


Asheville Home School 


Mountain 


Kirkwood Memorial School 


Indian 


Wolf Point School 


Indian 


Wooton 


Mountain 


Aguadilla 


Porto Rico 


Perron 


Utah 


Brush Creek 


Mountain 


Brush Creek 


Mountain 


Kirkwood Memorial School 


Indian 


Camajuani School 


Cuba 


Farm School 


Mountain 


Wolf Point School 


Indian 


Dorland-Bell School 


Mountain 


Dorland-Bell School 


Mountain 


Wolf Point School 


Indian 


Cabaiguan School 


Cuba 


Cabaiguan School 


Cuba 


Laura Sunderland School 


Mountain 


Cortland 


Mountain 


Monroe 


Utah 


Placetas School 


Cuba 


Asheville Normal School 


Mountain 


Mossop School 


Mountain 


Stotonic School 


Indian 


On leave of absence 




Wooton 


Mountain 


Menaul School 


Spanish-speak- 




ing 


North Fork School 


Indian 


New Jersey Academy 


Utah 


The Willows 


Mountain 



*Non-commissioned, 



95 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



Name 



Station 



Field 



McEwen, Ethel M. 
♦McEwen, Mrs. Laura 

McGinn, Adelaide 
*McLear, Amelia 

MacLeod, Pearl 
*McLaury, G. G. 

McNeill, Jessie 

McSpadden, Kathrine 

MacVcan, Mrs. Ethel 
*McWilliams, Mrs. J. F. 

♦Mahood, Jean 

Manning, Iva N. 

Marsh, Miles E. 
♦Marsh, Mrs. Miles E. 

Martin, Bessie M. 
♦Martin, Jose 

Martin, Mary H. 
♦Martinez, Luisa 
♦Martino, Victoria 
♦May, Eva 

Means, Mrs. Florence 
♦Melendez, Bienvenida 
♦Meneses, Lia 
♦Mestres, Laura 

Miller, Maude 

Mills, Famy B. 

♦Miranda, Angela 

Mitchell, Rev. F. G. 
♦Monefeldt, Anna 
♦Monroe, Hattie 

Montgomery, Melissa 
Montgomery, Ruth 

♦Montes, Beatriz 

♦Montes, Martina 

Moore, Cora L. 

Moore, Mrs. Grace 
Moore, Jennie 
Moore, Myrtle H. 
Moore, Oliver F. 
♦Moore, Mrs. Sarah 
Morris, Ella 
Mosely, Celeste 
Mosely, Eleanor 
Murphy, Iva Dell 
Newcomb, Minnie B. 
Nickelsen, Mary J. 
Norman, Rosamond 
Ogg, Florence 
Ordway, Jennie 



♦Non-commissioned. 



Asheville Normal School 
Langdon Memorial School 
Asheville Normal School 
Tucson Training School 
Presbyterian Hospital 
The Willows 
Sycamore 
Forsythe Memorial School 

Asheville Home School 
Allison-James School 

Wasatch Academy 
Asheville Normal School 
Farm School 
Farm School 
Asheville Normal School 
Sancti Spiritus School 
New Jersey Academy 
Caibarien School 
Cabaiguan School 
Wasatch Academy 
Tucson Training School 
Presbyterian Hospital 
Sancti Spiritus School 
Camajuani School 
Kirkwood Memorial School 
Embudo 

Mayaguez 

Kirkwood Memorial School 
Presbyterian Hospital 
Menaul School 

Laura Sunderland School 
Menaul School 

Kate Plumer Bryan School 
Kate Plumer Bryan School 
Menaul School 

Wolf Point School 

Rocky Fork 

On leave of absence 

Wolf Point School 

Farm School 

Kirkwood Memorial School 

Wasatch Academy 

New Jersey Academy 

North Fork School 

On leave of absence 

Tucson Training School 

Tucson Training School 

Asheville Normal School 

Presbyterian Hospital 



96 



Mountain 

Mountain 

Mountain 

Indian 

Porto Rico 

Mountain 

Mountain 

Spanish-speak- 
ing 

Mountain 

Spanish-speak- 
ing 

Utah 

Mountain 

Mountain 

Mountain 

Mountain 

Cuba 

Utah 

Cuba 

Cuba 

Utah 

Indian 

Porto Rico 

Cuba 

Cuba 

Indian 

Spanish-speak- 
ing 

Porto Rico 

Indian 

Porto Rico 

Spanish-speak- 
ing 

Mountain 

Spanish-speak- 
ing 

Cuba 

Cuba 

Spanish-speak- 
ing 

Indian 

Mountain 

Indian 

Mountain 

Indian 

Utah 

Utah 

Indian 

Indian 
Indian 
Mountain 
Porto Rico 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



Name 



Station 



Field 



♦Ortiz, A.. M.D. 


Presbyterian Hospital 


Porto Rico 


♦Ortiz, Rita 


Presbyterian Hospital 


Porto Rico 


Osborne, Josephine 


Sheldon Jackson School 


Alaska 


Osborne, Lydia 


Sheldon Jackson School 


Alaska 


Osborne, Susan 


Wasatch Academy 


Utah 


Otto, Julia 


Pattie C. Stockdale School 


Mountain 


Parker, Anna M. 


Sheldon Jackson School 


Alaska 


Parker, May 


Sheldon Jackson School 


Alaska 


Parker, Minnie 


Tucson Training School 


Indian 


♦Pasco, Mrs. Margaret 


Allison-James School 


Spanish-speak- 


♦Patterson, Elizabeth 


Neah Bay 


ing 
Indian 


Patterson, Janie 


On leave of absence 




Paul, Leila 


Panguitch 


Utah 


Pease, Nola S. 


Wooton 


Mountain 


Pennebaker, Ruth N. 


Forsythe Memorial School 


Spanish-speak- 


♦Perez, Lola 


Presbyterian Hospital 


ing 
Porto Rico 


♦Phelps, Meda 


Asheville Home School 


Mountain 


Pollock. Elsie 


Dorland-Bell School 


Mountain 


Pond, Carrie 


Dorland-Bell School 


Mountain 


Potter, Eleanor 


Brooklyn Cottage Hospital 


Spanish-speak- 


Printup, Alta 


Elm Spring 


ing 
Indian 


Proctor, Ruth 


New Jersey Academy 


Utah 


♦Purdv, Olive 


Dorland-Bell School 


Mountain 


Pyland, Ida 


Sancti Spiritus School 


Cuba 


♦Rajas, Venerand 


Camajuani School 


Cuba 


♦Ramos, Maria L 


Vedado School 


Cuba 


Ramsaur, Elizabeth 


Tucson Training School 


Indian 


Rankin, Mary J. 


Yardy 


Mountain 


Raub, Anna B. 


Osage Iron Works 


Mountain 


Reaugh, George A. 


Montcoal 


Mountain 


Reaugh, Mrs. George A. 


Alontcoal 


Mountain 


♦Record, James F. 


Pikeville College 


Mountain 


Reece, Mattie R. 


Ranches of Taos 


Spanish-speak- 


♦Reed, Lola 


Fors3rthe Memorial School 


ing 
Spanish-speak- 


Reese, Rose E. 


Pease House 


ing 
Mountain 


♦Reeves, Mrs. Jessie 


The Willows 


Mountain 


Reid, Adeline A. 


Garrard 


Mountain 


Reist, Florence 


Wooton 


Mountain 


Robe, M. Frances 


Menaul School 


Spanish-speak- 


Roberts, Alton C. 


Farm School 


ing 
Mountain 


Robinson, Edna S. 


Farm School 


Mountain 


Robinson, Eliza N. 


Pattie C. Stockdale School 


Mountain 


♦Rodriguez, Isabel 


Placetas School 


Cuba 


♦Rodriguez, Pedro 


Sancti Spiritus School 


Cuba 


Rolofson, Luella 


Chacon School 


Spanish-speak- 


Rumple, Ida B. 


Asheville Normal School 


ing 
Mountain 


Russell, Grace 


Truchas School 


Spanish-speak- 
ing 



♦Non-commissioned. 



97 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



Name 



Station 



Field 



Sadler, Isabel T. 
*Sardinas, Delia 
*Sala, Zoila 

Sanchez, Tabita 


Harlan County 
Cardenas School 
Caibarien School 
Allison-James School 


Mountain 

Cuba 

Cuba 

Spanish-speak- 


Sargent, Vie Etta 
Schaefer, Roland T. 
Scheidemantel, Ethel 

*Senti, Rev. A. A. 

*Senti, Guadalupe 
Shafer, Lucy 
Sheets, Anna M. 


North Fork School 
Tucson Indian School 
Sheldon Jackson School 
Sancti Spiritus School 
Sancti Spiritus School 
Dorland-Bell School 
Menaul School 


ing 
Indian 
Indian 

Alaska 

Cuba 

Cuba 

Mountain 

Spanish-speak- 


Shields, Emma 
Sidebotham, Emily B. 
Sloan, Edith 
Smith, Elizabeth 


Dorland-Bell School 
Dorland-Bell School 
Cabaiguan School 
Forsythe Memorial School 


ing 
Mountain 
Mountain 
Cuba 
Spanish-speak- 


Smith, H. T. 
Smith, Mrs. H. T. 
Smith, Mary D. 


Wolf Point School 
Wolf Point School 
Embudo 


ing 
Indian 
Indian 
Spanish-speak- 


*Sosa, Conrado 
*Sosa, Ignacio 
Spear, Orra M. 


Cardenas School 
Cardenas School 
Ranches of Taos 


ing 
Cuba 
Cuba 
Spanish-speak- 


*SpilIman, Mary 
Sprowls, Hannah R. 
Starkey, Laura S. 


Pikeville College 
Langdon Memorial School 
Allison-James School 


ing 
Mountain 
Mountain 
Spanish-speak- 


Steele, Maud 
Stephenson, Florence 
Stevenson, Lottie E. 
Stewart, Anna Belle 
Stocks, Alfred R. 

♦Stocks, Mrs. Alfred R. 

♦Strong, Horace 


Aguadilla 

Asheville Home School 
Sheldon Jackson School 
Langdon Memorial School 
Sheldon Jackson School 
Sheldon Jackson School 
Menaul School 


ing 
Porto Rico 
Mountain 
Alaska 
Mountain 
Alaska 
Alaska 
Spanish-speak- 


Stuart, Charles G. 
Sutherland, Sarah B. 


Sheldon Jackson School 
Embudo 


ing 
Alaska 
Spanish-speak- 


Tappan, Margaret 
Thayer, A. Elizabeth 
Thompson, Alice L. 
♦Thompson, Bessie L. 
Thompson, Leah 


Wasatch Academy 
On leave of absence 
Asheville Normal School 
Langdon Memorial School 
Chimayo 


ing 
Utah 

Mountain 
Mountain 
Spanish-speak- 


Thompson, Mathilde 
Thompson, Vina 
Thorpe, Edith C. 
Tibbits, Mary B. 
Tilford, Eleanor 
Tinkham, Margaret 
Tillman, Mabel F. 


Asheville Home School 
Kirkwood Memorial School 
Wasatch Academy 
Asheville Normal School 
Tucson Training School 
"Sheldon Jackson School 
Ranches of Taos 


ing 

Mountain 

Indian 

Utah 

Mountain 

Indian 

Alaska 

Spanish-speak- 
ing 



♦Non-commissioned. 



98 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



Name 



Station 



Field 



Tipton, Ida 


Dorland-Bell School 


Mountain 


Tipton, Jessie 


Dorland-Bell School 


Mountain 


Tisall. Carl J. 


Asheville Normal School 


Mountain 


♦Torres, D. Ezequiel 


Cardenas School 


Cuba 


♦Torres, Francisco 


Cardenas School 


Cuba 


♦Torres, Sofia 


Cardenas School 


Cuba 


Towne, Lena G. 


Dorland-Bell School 


Mountain 


Turner, Edith 


Kirkwood Memorial School 


Indian 


♦Turner, George F. 


Cardenas School 


Cuba 


Turner, Jessie L. 


On leave of absence 




Tuttle, Lucile 


Asheville Home School 


Alountain 


Umdenstock, Myrtle 


Dorland-Bell School 


Mountain 


♦Valdes. Josefina 


Sancti Spiritus School 


Cuba 


♦Valdes, Rosario 


Vedado School 


Cuba 


Vance, Annie R. 


Presbyterian Hospital 


Porto Rico 


Van Hook, Anna M. 


Chacon 


Spanish-speak- 


Van Ness, Lona M. 


Dorland-Bell School 


ing 
Mountain 


♦Vargas, Maria 


Aguadilla 


Porto Rico 


*\'asquez, Isabel 


Mayaguez 


Porto Rico 


♦\^iamonte, Ofelia 


Nueva Paz School 


Cuba 


♦Walter, Mrs. Marian 


Indian Wells Hospital 


Indian 


♦W'alther, Mary E. 


Kirkwood Memorial School 


Indian 


Ward, Rev. D. K. 


Indian W^ells 


Indian 


Ward, Mrs. D. K. 


Indian Wells 


Indian 


Wardrep, Nora 


Nueva Paz School 


Cuba 


Ware, Lura M. 


Allison-James School 


Spanish-speak- 


Watkins, Lucius 


The V.'illovvs 


ing 
Mountain 


Weaver, Louise B. 


Sheldon Jackson School 


Alaska 


Webb, Airs. Clara 


Haines House 


Alaska 


Weter, Lucile 


Wasatch Academy 


Utah 


Webster, Mary P. 


Menaul School 


Spanish-speak- 


♦W^eld, 0. W. 


Farm School 


ing 
Mountain 


Wells, Katherine 


Cawood 


Mountain 


Wemple, Florence 


Asheville Normal School 


Mountain 


Wharton, Rev. R. L. 


Cardenas School 


Cuba 


Whitaker, Alice 


Sancti Spiritus School 


Cuba 


Wicklund, Ella M. 


Wasatch Academy 


Utah 


Williams. Elizabeth 


Farm School 


Mountain 


♦Wilson, Mrs. Aura 


Farm School 


Mountain 


Wilson, Mary E. 


On leave of absence 




Wolfe, Elizabeth T. 


San IMiguel 


Indian 


Wolfe, Olive 


Sheldon Jackson School 


Alaska 


♦Wood, C. D. 


Menaul School 


Spanish-speak- 


Woodmansee, ]VIrs. Kath- 




ing 


erine 


Kirkwood Memorial School 


Indian 


Wulp, Hilde 


Harlan County 


Mountain 


Yeats, Mary 


Brooklyn Cottage Hospital 


Spanish-speak- 


♦Yuizarri, Victoria 


Mayaguez 


ing 
Porto Rico 



♦Non-commissioned. 



99 



Woman^s Board of Home Missions 



Honorary Members 

ARIZONA 

Miss C. G. Gilchrist, Phoenix, Arizona. 



BALTIMORE 



»Mrs. Emily Wilson Blake, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Mrs. Nettie G. Bradley, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Miss Laura Brenizer, Salisbury, Md. 

Mrs. A. B. Cross, Baltimore, Md. 

Miss M. Alice Davis, Salisbury, Md. 

Miss Esther A. Davis, Salisbury, Md. 

Mrs. J. C. Ely, Oakland, Md. 

Mrs. Belle Williams Fowler, Salis- 
bury, Md. 

Mrs. John S. Gilman, Baltimore, Md. 

Mrs. Joseph A. Graham, Salisbury, 
Md. 

Mrs. Lydia Hall Grier, Salisbury, Md. 

Miss Bertha Harlan, Wilmington, Del. 

Mrs. Julius A. Herold, Salisbury, Md. 

Mrs. A. H. Hollaway, Salisbury, Md. 

Mrs. James S. Hopper, Chesapeake 
City, Md. 

Mrs. Harvey S. Irwin, Washington, 
D. C. 



Miss Louisa B. Johnson, Wilmington, 
Del. 

Mrs. Belle Humphreys Jones, Salis- 
bury, Md. 

Mrs. Joseph T. Kelly, Washington, 
D. C. 

Mrs. Thomas K. Noble, Washington, 
D. C. 

Mrs. Samuel M. Quillan, Salisbury, 
Md. 
"Mrs. John Carpenter Palmer, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 
*Mrs. Wallace Radcliffe, Washington, 
D. C. 

Mrs. Samuel S. Smyth, Salisbury, Md. 

Mrs. Mary Riegart Toadvine, Salis- 
bury, Md. 

Miss Katherine Todd, Salisbury, Md. 

Mrs. Anna Vincent Todd, Salisbury, 
Md. 

Mrs. George W. Todds, M. D., Sal- 
isbury, Md. 



CALIFORNIA 



Mrs. Adelaide I. Aldrich, Oakland, 

Cal. 
Mrs. H. T. Ames, San Francisco, Cal. 
Mrs. S. W. Blankenship, Oakland, 

Cal. 
Miss Ida L. Boone, Pasadena, Cal. 
Miss Margaret E. Boyce, Alameda, 

Cal. 
Mrs. George Bradbeer, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 
♦Mrs. S. E. Brown, Glendale, Cal. 
Mrs. W. K. Brown, Hollister, Cal. 
Mrs. Victoria Cadwallader, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 
Mrs. W. J. Cassidy, Oakland, Cal. 
Mrs. Martha J. Chambers, Los An- 
geles, Cal. 
Miss Martha E. Chase, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 
Mrs. S. G. Cleland, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Mrs. Thomas F. Day, San Rafael, Cal. 
Mrs. James Dible, East San Diego, 

Cal. 
Mrs. Isabel B. Dodds, Long Beach, 

Cal. 
Mrs. Angie Doolittle, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 
*Miss Adella Dutton, Orange, Cal. 
Mrs. B. F. Edwards, Oakland, Cal. 
Mrs. Lida J. Garber, Berkeley, Cal. 
Mrs. A. G. Garratt, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
Mrs. J. P. Gerrior, Oakland, Cal. 
Mrs. Rosamond B. Goddard, San 

Francisco, Cal. 
Mrs. Ernest F. Hall, Berkeley, Cal. 
Mrs. W. H. H. Hamilton, Oakland, 

Cal. 
Mrs. Janet D. Henderson, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 



Mrs. C. C. Herriott, Oakland, Cal. 
Mrs. Filema T. Hyde, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
Mrs. John Kelly, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Mrs. James Leispman, Pasadena, Cal. 
Mrs. L. A. McAfee, Berkeley, Cal. 
Mrs. D. C. Mitchell, Oakland, Cal. 
Mrs. James Mitchell, St. Helena, Cal. 
Mrs. Thomas Verner Moore, San 

Anselmo, Cal. 
*Mrs. Edward H. Morris, Pasadena, 

Cal. 

*Mrs. Ella A. Noble, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Mrs. H. J. Owen, San Francisco, Cal. 

Mrs. J. P. Prutzman, Berkeley, Cal. 

Mrs. Kate D. Rhodes, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 
*Miss Elizabeth V. Roberts, Pasadena, 

Cal. 
Mrs. Mary N. Robertson, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 
Mrs. Andrew Ross, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Mrs. H. N. Rowell, Oakland, Cal. 
Mrs. J. W. Shankin, Oakland, Cal. 
Mrs. W. W. Squire, Visalia, Cal. 
Mrs. Henrietta B. Stark, Pasadena, 

Cal. 
Mrs. Juliet H. Stever, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 
Mrs. Billy Sunday, San Anselmo, Cal. 
Mrs. E. A. Tate, San Jose, Cal. 
Miss Elsie A. Tomlinson, Eureka, 

Cal. 
Miss Virginia May White, New York 

City. 
Mrs. W. H. Wilkins, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Mrs. G. W. Williams, Oakland, Cal. 
Mrs. E. P. Wilson, Santa Rosa, Cal. 



♦Made Honorary Member in 1921-1922 



100 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



COLORADO 



Mrs. Robert Collier, Denver, Colo. 
Miss Nettie M. Doljbins, Longmont, 

Colo. 
Mrs. A. M. Donaldson, Denver, Colo. 
Miss Eliza H. Glassey, Ft. Morgan, 
Colo. 
•Mrs. V. Gilcrest, Grand Junction, Colo. 
Mrs. J. G. Klene, Ft. Collins, Colo. 
Mrs. M. F. Weir, 



Mrs. C. K. Powell, Colorado Springs, 

Colo. 
Mrs. Paul Raymond, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
Mrs. L. D. Robinson, Colorado 

Springs, Colo. 
Mrs. E. H. Silverthorn, Chicago, 111. 
Miss Alberta Soetje, Denver, Colo. 
Grand Junction, Colo. 



IDAHO 

Mrs. J. H. Barton, Boise, Idaho 



ILLINOIS 



Mrs. Albert G. Beebe, Oak Park, 111. 
Mrs. G. W. Cooper, Summer, 111. 
Mrs. William A. Dean, Chicago, 111. 
Mrs. J. R. Gott, Chicago, 111. 
Miss Esther A. Grieve, Toulon, 111. 
Mrs. Louise Rockenfeller, Galesburg, 
111. 



Mrs. Charles \V. Robinson, Blooming- 
ton, 111. 
Mrs. David D. Sabin, Belvidere, 111. 
Mrs. L. J. Seed, Bridgeport, 111. 
Mrs. Eda Steele, Kansas, 111. 
Mrs. Irving Terwilliger, Belvidere, 111. 



INDIANA 



Mrs. J. B. Kendall, La Porte, Ind. 
Mrs. F. F. McCrae, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Mrs. Walter Marmon, Indianapolis, 
Ind. 



IOWA 



Mrs. A. E. Cameron, Morning Sun, 

Iowa 
Mrs. Anna Ellis, Dallas Center, Iowa 



Mrs. I. N. Flickinger, Council BluflEs, 

Iowa. 
Mrs. Geo. P. Rose, Dubuque, Iowa 



KANSAS 



•Mrs. Rachael Bartholomew, Colby, 

Kan. 
*Mrs. George W. Bean, Kansas City, 

Kan. 
Mrs. W. A. Boyd, Holton, Kan. 
Mrs. Lucy Bracken, Osborne, Kan. 
*Mrs. Agnes Crawford, Bartlett, Kan. 
Mrs. R. O. Deming, Oswego, Kan. 
Mrs. C. H. Goodrich, Independence, 
Kan. 



Mrs. Edward H. Hoag, Newton, Kan. 
Mrs. L. L. McShane, Merriam, Kan. 
Mrs. John Meade, Ft. Scott, Kan. 
Mrs. Lucy Portetf McCurdy, New 

York City. 
Mrs. Mortimer Preston, Wichita, Kan. 
Mrs. Belle Skinner, Minneapolis, Kan. 
Dr. MaBelle True, Topeka, Kan. 



MICHIGAN 



Miss Anna Graves Adams, Detroit, 

Mich. 
Mrs. Ralph Ayers, Detroit, Mich. 
Miss Agnes L. Barclay, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Harry Barnard, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. F. E. Bay, Calumet, Mich. 
Miss Clara T. Billings, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Anna C. Bowman, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. George A. Brown, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. William Bryant, Detroit, Mich. 
Miss Edna Chope, Detroit, Mich. 
Miss Alice P. Clark, Detroit, Mich. 
Miss Mary F. Clark, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Jos. W. Cochran, Detroit, Mich. 
Miss Sarah Common, Detroit, Mich. 
Miss Frances B. Cressey, Detroit, 

Mich. 
Miss Jean Currie, Detroit, !Mich. 
Mrs. John Dalzell, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Harlow P. Davock, Detroit, 

Mich. 
Mrs. Jennie W. Dean, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. L. B. Devo, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. W. B. Eddy, Ypsilanti, Mich. 



Mrs. George H. Foote 

Mrs. William B. Gantz, Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. George M. Hankinson, St. 

Thomas, Canada. 
Mrs. Robert S. Harris, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. John Harvey 
Mrs. J. E. Hendersom, Cadillac, Mich. 
Miss Mary Hinchman 
Mrs. George E. Hopper, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Otto Horning, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. John Hoskins, Pontiac, Mich. 
Mrs. C. E. Howell, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. J. D. Je£Fry, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Fred Johnston, Lapeer, Mich. 
Mrs. James Joy 

INIrs. W. L. Kishler, Ypsilanti, Mich. 
Miss Charlotte Ladue 
Mrs. Mary Ladue, Detroit, Mich. 
Miss J. O. Lambie, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Henry Leonard 
Mrs. W. L. Lucking, Ypsilanti, Mich. 
Mrs. F. W. MacDonald, Detroit, Mich. 
*Mrs. Grant McDonald, Detroit, Mich. 
Miss Jennie McFadden, Detroit, Mich. 



'Made Honorary Member in 1921-1922 



101 



Woman's Board of Home ^Missions 



Michigan- 
Mrs. Robert McGregor, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Tracy McGregor, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Martha S. Marsh, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. C. E. Miller, Cadillac, Mich. 
Mrs. J. K. Mitchell, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Helen Moore 

Mrs. Minot C. Morgan, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. S. E. Morris, Highland Park, 

Mich. 
Mrs. R. L. Morrison, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. H. C. Moulthrop, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. C. H. Newkirk, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. H. L. O'Brien, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Richard Owen, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Hope Barr Peet, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. E. H. Pence, Portland, Ore. 
Mrs. John B. Pollock 
Mrs. Lottie G. Rankin, Ypsilanti, 

Mich. 
Mrs. A. B. Raymond, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Charles W. Resfrick, Detroit, 

Mich. 
*Mrs. Walter C. Robinson, Detroit, . 

Mich. 



-(Continued) 

Miss Florence Rodgcrs, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. StaiTord C. Reynolds, Detroit, 

Mich. 
Mrs. Edward Sanderson, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Oren Scotten, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. William Sidebotham, Munger, 

Mich. 
Miss Alice M. Slayton, Tecumseh, 

Mich. 
Mrs. D. T. Smith, Detroit, Mich. 
Miss Jane Spence, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Robert W. Standart. 
Mrs. J. A. Stine, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. C. A. Strelinger, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Henry H. Swann, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. F. M. Thompson, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. E. A. Taylor, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. H. M. Utley, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. W. A. Warner, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. J. E. Webber, Royal Oak, Mich. 
Mrs. J. W. Welton, Ann Arbor, 

Mich. 
Mrs. T. L. Wiggins 
Mrs. A. G. Work, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Joseph A. Vance, Detroit, Mich. 



MINNESOTA 



Mrs. Winifred C. Balch, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Mrs. E. A. Barton, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Mrs. H. H. Bell, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Mrs. C. H. Bigelow, Sr., St. Paul, 
Minn. 

Mrs. Mary E. Braden, St. Paul, 
Minn. 

Miss Alice Braden, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Mrs. Anna Norris Brooks, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

Mrs. E. V. Campbell, St. Cloud, Minn. 

Mrs. J. W. Carey, ISIinneapolis, Minn. 

Mrs. O. S. Clark, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Mrs. George Nelson Dayton, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

Mrs. H. P. Gallaher, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mrs. Stewart Gamble, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Mrs. Ida M. Gardiner, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Mrs. Emma E. Grimes, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Mrs. William Hengstler, Willmer, 
Minn. 

Mrs. Horace M. Hill, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Mrs. T. Morey Hodgman, St. Paul, 
Minn. 



Mrs. John N. Jackson, St. Paul, Minn. 

!Mrs. T. B. Janney, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Mrs. R. A. Kirk, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mrs. M. B. Lee, Minneapolis, Minn. 

j\Irs. D. S. McCasHn, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mrs. Clara Donnell Mclntyre, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

Mrs. Julius E. Miner, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Mrs. W. Paul Moorhead, Minneapo- 
lis, Minn. 
*Mrs. Anna H. Norris, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Mrs. C. P. Noyes, St. Paul, Minn. 

Miss Lydia Peterson, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Mrs. George B. Safford, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Mrs. Thomas Scotten, Willmar, Minn. 

Mrs. E. C. Stringer, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mrs. E. J. Taylor, Le Sueur, Minn. 

Mrs. Ell Torrance, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Miss Abbey H. J. Upham, Duluth, 
Minn. 

Mrs. C. W. V^an Tuyl, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Mrs. G. Bertram Ware, St. Paul, 
Minn. 

Mrs. W. C. Weld, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Mrs. Robert Yost, Duluth, Minn. 



MISSOURI 



Mrs. G. P. Baity, Kansas City, Mo. 
Mrs. Duncan Brown, St. Joseph, Mo. 
Mrs. S. L. McAfee, Parkville, Mo. 



Mrs. Harry C. Rogers, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Spurgin, Joplin, Mo. 



MONTANA 



Miss Gertrude Crane, Albuquerque, 

N. M. 
♦Mrs. H. F. Smith, Wolf Point, Mont. 



Mrs. Cynthia D. King, Wolf Point, 

Mont. 
'Mr. H. F. Smith, Wolf, Point, Mont. 



NEBRASKA 

Mrs. James Butter, Florence, Neb. Mrs. A. A. Halleck, Omaha, Neb. 



'■Made Honorary Member in 1921-1922 



102 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



NEW ENGLAND 

Mrs. Robert Shoemaker, Cambridge, Mass. 
NEW JERSEY 



Mrs. W. J. Atwood, Beverly, N. J. 

Mrs. Emily B. Baker, New York. 

Miss Elizabeth Ware Borden, Shrews- 
bury, N. J. 

Miss Olivia Borden, Shrewsbury, N. J. 

Mrs. W. Casselberry, Los Angeles, 
Cal. 

Mrs. Minerva Lee Crane, Summit, 
N. J. 

Mrs. Joel F. Freeman, East Orange, 
N. J. 

Mrs. W. D. Harper, Long Branch, 
N. J. 

Miss Emma G. Holmes, Shrewsbury, 
N. J. 

Mrs. Joseph V. Holmes, Shrewsbury, 
N. J. 

Mrs. Reta Eleanor Ketcham, Rock- 
ledge, Fla. 

Mrs. George D. McIIvaine, Beverly, 
N. J. 



Mrs. Catherine Ely Mann, Beverly, 

N. J. 
Mrs. J. D. Morris, Albuquerque, N. M. 
Mrs. Helen M. Paulding, Daretown, 

N. J. 
Mrs. Arthur Phillips, Beverly, N. J. 
Miss Charlotte E. Pudney, Passaic, 

N. J. 
Mrs. J. H. Sinex, Edgewater Park, 

N. J. 
Mrs. Robert E. Speer, Englewood, 

N. J. 
Miss Stella E. Taft, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Mrs. Arthur P. VanGelder, Dover. 

N. J. 
Miss Evahne S. Valentine, Shrews- 
bury, N. J. 
Mrs. 'Henry S. White, Red Bank, 

N. J. 
Miss Anna G. Young, Garfield, N. J. 
Mrs. E. H. Zandt, Jamesburg, N. J. 



NEW MEXICO 



Miss Alice Blake, Trementina, N. M. 

Miss Elizabeth Craig, Taos, N. M. 

Miss M. Francis Robe, Albuquerque, 

N. M. 



Miss Anna M. Sheets, Albuquerque, 

N. M. 
•Miss Sarah B. Sutherland, Dixon, 

N. M. 



Mrs. A. M. Thomas, Deming, N. M. 
NEW YORK 



Mrs. W^illiam Crittenden Adams, New 

York, N. Y. 
Miss Anna M. Alward, Bernardsville, 

N. J. 
Mrs. Seymour M. Ballard, New York 

City. 
Mrs. Alexander R. Barron, New York 

Mills, N. Y. 
Mrs. W. A. Bartlett, New York City. 
Mrs. Fred S. Bennett, Englewood, 

N. J. 
*Mrs. F. J. Buxton, Washington, D. C. 
Airs. Allan Douglas Carlile, Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
*Miss Jean W. Case, Elmhurst, N. Y. 
Mrs. John Lyon Caughey, New York 

Cit>'. 
*Miss Heh-n Clark, Huntingdon. Que. 
Mrs. A. W. Corning, Rye, N. Y. 
Mrs. Chas. F. Darlington, New York 

City. 
Miss Caroline Craig Darlington, New 

Y'ork City. 
Mrs. A. J. Dean, Utica, N. Y. 
Mrs. F. H. Dunham, Batavia, N. Y. 
Mrs. Lewis R. Foote, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Miss Esther Gibson, Rochester, N. Y. 
Mrs. Mary A. Gildersleeve, Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
Miss Florence Gilles, New York City. 
Mrs. W. A. M. Grier, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Miss Julia Guest, Canton, N. Y. 
Mrs. Franklin P. Guiliford, Geneva, 

N. \'. 
Miss Frances Elizabeth Harris, N. J. 
Mrs. J. C. Havemeyer, New York City. 
Mrs. S. F. Henderson, Catskill, N. Y. 

♦Made Honorary Member in 1921-1922 



Mrs. William Wilder Hopkins, Gen- 
eva, N. Y. 

Miss Fidelia Hopkins, Geneva, N. Y. 

Mrs. William H. Hubbard, Auburn, 
N. Y. 

Mrs. Henry Lindermann, New York 
City. 

Miss Edith Grier Long, New York 
City. 

Mrs. A. C. McMillan, Yonkers, N. Y 

Mrs. William P. Merrill, New York 
City. 

Mrs. T. Maxwell Morison, Bingham- 
ton, N. Y. . B 

Mrs. Charles J. North, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Miss Emma Jessie Ogg, Brooklyn,' 

Miss Margaret L. Parish, Naples, 

*Mrs. Anthony I'cter.son, Scarborou'h, 
N. Y. 

Mrs. Jessie Peterson, Lockport, N. Y. 

Miss M. Josephine Petrie, Plainfield, 
N. J. 

Mrs. John F. Pingry, Millbrook, N. Y. 
*Mrs. Louise McHardv Prentice, Ba- 
tavia, N. Y. 

Mrs. George S. Prince, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Miss Kate E. Putnam, Buffalo, N. Y. 

-Mrs. Charles Quick, Auburn, N. Y. 

Miss Florence E. Quinlan, Yonkers^ 

Mrs. C. M. Rexford, Watertown, N. 

*Mrs. C. H. Richards, Dunkirk, N. Y. 
Mrs. James Robertson, Canton, N. y! 
Miss S. Catherine Rue, Brooklyn, 



103 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 



New York — (Continued) 



*Miss Josephine Sanders, Yonkers, 

N. Y. 
Mrs. J. O. Sheldon, Gouverneur, N. 

Y. 
Mrs. John Sinclair, Williamstown, 

Mass. 
Mrs. George P. Slade, New Y'ork 

City. 
Mrs. O. W. Sloat, Yonkers, N. Y. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Cooper Stevenson, 

Yonkers, N. Y. 



Mrs. Fred C. Stewart, Geneva, N. Y. 
Mrs. Lucy TurnbuU, Gouverneur, 

N. Y. 

♦Miss Edna R. Voss, New York City. 

*Mrs. D. E. Waid, New York City. 

Miss Helen M. Wells, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

*Mrs. Ettie Warren Ware, Batavia, 

N. Y. 

Miss Fannie B. Way, Catskill, N. Y. 

Mrs. George C. Yeisley, Hudson, N. 

Y. 

Mrs. James Y'ereance, New \''ork City. 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Miss Alice M. Bryan, Concord, N. C. Miss Lucy M. Shafer, Hot Springs, 

N C 

Miss Ella C. Herron, Hot Springs, j^jj^^ Florence Stephenson, Asheville, 

N. C. j^-. c. 

Miss Elizabeth Williams, Farm School, 



Miss Melissa Montgomery, Concord, 



N. C. 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Mrs. A. D. Collins, Ruby, N. D. 



N. C. 



Mrs. Lavinia Fleming Gibson, Tyner, 
N. D. 



OHIO 



Mrs. Jessie F. Allen, Palestine, Ohio 
Mrs. J. F. Black, Sidney, Ohio. 
Mrs. Lizzie Campbell, Ironton, Ohio. 
Miss Louise M. Edwards, Y'oungstown, 

Ohio. 
Mrs. A. N. Elliott, Cleveland Heights, 
Ohio. 
•Mrs. Ella Hall, Alliance, Ohio. 
Mrs. E. C. Higbee, Cleveland, Ohio. 



Mrs. Walter Houston, Columbus, O. 
*Mrs. H. A. Kilbourne, Salem, Ohio. 

Mrs. Leola E. Offutt, Alliance, Ohio. 

Mrs. C. K. Randall, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Mrs. Homer C. Reid, Warren, Ohio. 

Mrs. Grace D. Smith, Salem, Ohio. 
*Miss Jessie L. Turner, Akron, Ohio. 

Mrs. J. H. Young, Washington, D. C. 



OKLAHOMA 



Mrs. E. T. Bowen, Tulsa, Oklahoma 

'Mrs. Percy Collins, Tulsa, Oklahoma. 

Mrs. J. M. Hall, Tulsa, Oklahoma. 

Mrs. W. H. Hendren, Tulsa, Okla. 



Mrs. C. W. Kerr, Tulsa, Oklahoma. 
Mrs. W. A. Knott, Oklahoma City, 
Oklahoma. 



OREGON 

Mrs. F. R. Leonard, Hoquiam, Washington 



PENNSYLVANIA 



Mrs. Margaret Alexander, HolUdays- 

burg. Pa. 
Mrs. J. A. Bogardus, i'hiladelphia. Pa. 
Miss Mary E. Boyer, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mrs. H. P. Camden, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mrs. Amanda C. Dickey, Oil City, Pa. 
Mrs. D. F. Diefenderfer, Erie, Pa. 
Mrs. John Downs, Bradford, Pa. 
Mrs. E. O. Emerson, Titusville, Pa. 
Mrs. Lucy Emerson, Titusville, Pa. 
Mrs. Sally Finley, Omaha, Neb. 
Mrs. Samuel Fleming, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Miss Julia Fraser, Oakland, Cal. 
Mrs. Margaret Gardner, Belleville, Pa. 
Mrs. William Edgar Ceil, Doylestown, 
Mrs. William Grassie, Meadville, Pa. 
Mrs. S. P. Harbison, Allegheny, Pa. 
*Mrs. Charles Harmon, Bryan, Ohio. 
Miss Emma R. Hastings, Lancaster, 
Pa. 

*Made Honorary Member in 1921-1922 



Mrs. Lydia Penrose Hodge, German- 
town, Pa. 

Mrs. Walter J. Hogue, York, Pa. 

Miss Margaret L. Hutchison, East Mc- 
Keesport, Pa. 

Mrs. W. R. Jennings, Germantown, 
Pa. 

Mrs. Mary S. Lyle, Hickory, Pa. 

Mrs. Michael M. McDivitt, Pittsburgh, 
Pa. 

Mrs. William L. McLean, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

ISIiss Nellie Morrell, Hollidaysburg, Pa. 

Mrs. Susan Todd Negley, Bell Ver- 
non, Pa. 

Mrs. George Norcross, Carlisle, Pa. 

Mrs. J. E. Ramsey, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Miss Florence Redway, Chicago, 111. 

Mrs. S. A. Reeder, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mrs. H. C. Roberts, Philadelphia, Pa. 



104 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

Pennsylvania — (Continued) 

Mrs. Samuel Semple, Titusville, Pa. Miss Annie E. Smith, Mt. Pleasant, 
Mrs. Joshua W. Sharpe, Chambers- Pa. 

burg, Pa. Mrs. Kate Smith Stevenson, ML 
Mrs. Henry T. Shillingford, Philadel- Pleasant, Pa. 

phia. Pa. Mrs. Howard Stiles, Altoona, Pa. 

Mrs. J. G. Shope, HoUidaysburg, Pa. Mrs. Morris A. Stout, Mt. Airy, Phila- 
Mrs. J. R. Simpson, Huntington, Pa. delphia. Pa. 

Mrs. Willis B. Skillman, Philadelphia, Mrs. J. R. Swain, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pa. Mrs. Bion B. Williams, East McKees- 
Mrs. William E. Slemmons, Washing- port. Pa. 

ton. Pa. Mrs. Anna E. Berry Woods, McKeea- 
Mrs. John H. Small, York, Pa. port. Pa. 

Mrs. A. D. B. Smead, Carlisle, Pa. Miss Nannie H. Zeigler, Carlisle, Pa. 

TENNESSEE 

Mrs. John M. Gaut, Nashville, Tenn. 

TEXAS 

Mrs. W. B. Preston, Teague, Texas. Mrs. J. C. Reed, Fort Worth, Texas. 

UTAH 

Miss Josie Curtis, Gunnison, Utah 

WASHINGTON 

Mrs. J. Addison Campbell, Seattle, Mrs. John W. Goss, Portland, Oregon. 

Wash. 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Miss Helen M. Atkinson, Elm Grove, Miss Helen W. Clark, Neah Bay, 

W. Va. Wash. 

Mrs. W. F. Butler, Wheeling, W. Va. 

WISCONSIN 

*Mrs. Charles A. Maynard, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

PORTO RICO 

Miss Jennie Ordway, San Juan, Porto Rico. 



•Made Honorary Member in 1921-1922 



105 



AN ACT TO INCORPORATE THE WOMAN'S BOARD OF 

HOME MISSIONS OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

The people of the State of New York represented in Senate and 
Assembly do enact as follows : 

Section 1. M. Katharine Bennett, Annie Hyatt, Minerva L. Crane, 
Charlotte R. Sackett, Mary C. Allen, Anna M. Alward, Annah Wolcott 
Bartlett, Sarah S. Brownell, Isabella R. M. Corning, Letitia Craig Darling- 
ton, Mary Agnes Dickson, Julia Eraser, Constance Emerson Geil, Lydia B. 
Grier, Anna Hallock, Punette Paull Hayden, Anna Hollenbeck, Hattie L. 
Honeyman, Mary M. Hopper, Ellen T. Louderbough, Harriet B. Miles, 
Harriet M. Mitchell, E. Jessie Ogg, Susan F. Pingry, Florence E. Quinlan, 
Fanny C. Sinclair, Margaret Stimson, Lillian H. Tillinghast, Eva Clark 
Waid, Oma C. Walker, Nellie S. Webb, Virginia May White, Jessie A. 
Yereance, and their successors in office chosen from time to time by the 
General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of 
America, are hereby constituted a body politic and corporate by and under 
the name of the Woman's Board of Home Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America, the object of which shall be to 
carry on the work of Missions through schools, hospitals and educational 
institutions generally in connection with and auxiliary to the work now 
being carried on by the Board of Home Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America, also receive, take charge of and 
disperse all property and funds which at any time and from time to time 
may be entrusted to said Board for its missionary or educational purposes. 

Section 2. The said corporation shall possess the general powers and 
be subject to the provisions of the Membership Corporation Law of the 
State of New York so far as the same are applicable thereto. 

Section 3. The management and disposition of the affairs and prop- 
erty of said corporation shall be vested in the persons named in the first 
section of this Act and their successors in office, who shall remain in office 
for such period and be removed and succeeded by others chosen at such 
time and in such manner as the said General Assembly of the Presbyterian 
Church of the United States of America shall from time to time direct and 
appoint, and the conduct, management and administration of all of the busi- 
ness and afifairs of such corporation shall, at all times, be expressly under 
and subject to the jurisdiction, supervision and direction of said General 
Assembly. 

Section 4. The said corporation shall be in law capable of taking, 
receiving and holding any real or personal estate which may hereafter be 
given, devised or bequeathed to it or which may accrue from the use of the 
same, subject, however, to all provisions of law relating to devises and 
bequests by last will and testament, but the said corporation shall not take 
and hold real and personal estate, the annual rental or income of which shall 
exceed the sum of $200,000.00. 

Section 5. The said Board shall have the power to administer its 
work among and in schools and hospitals from its headquarters in the 
State of New York. 

Section 6. The Finance Committee of the Board of Home Missions 
of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, which said 

106 



Woman's Board of Home Missions 

Board was incorporated by Chapter 287 of the laws of 1872 of the State of 
New York, shall have the power to approve or disapprove of all proposed 
investments of the said corporation, and if any such investment is not 
approved by the said Finance Committee, it shall not be made. 

Section 7. In the event of the dissolution of the corporation, all 
moneys, securities and property remaining after the payment of satisfac- 
tion of all its outstanding debts and liabilities, shall become the property 
of the Board of Home Missions of the Presbyterian Church of the 
United States of America to be used by said Board for the purpose named 
in its charter and for the purpose of making such payments and satisfac- 
tion, the right and title to all such moneys, securities and properties shall 
on the said dissolution immediately vest in the said Board of Home 
Missions. 

This Act shall take effect immediately. 

Adopted by the Executive Commission. 
February 25, 1915. 

Attest. 

Wm. H. Roberts, 

Secretary. 



107 



FORMS OF BEQUEST 

Personal Estate 

I give, devise and bequeath unto the "Woman's Board of 
Home Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States 
of America," incorporated by an Act of Legislature of the State 
of New York, being Chapter 420 of the Laws of 191 5, the sum 

of dollars, to be 

expended for the appropriate objects of said corporation. 

Form of Residuary Clause 

All the rest, residue and remainder of my real and personal 
estate I devise and bequeath unto the "Woman's Board of Home 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of 
America," incorporated by an Act of the Legislature of the 
State of New York, being Chapter 420 of the Laws of 19 15. 

Real Estate 

I give and devise to the "Woman's Board of Home Missions 
of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America," a 
corporation created under and by virtue of the Laws of the State 
of New York, all that certain (here insert a description of the 
real estate) with the appurtenances in fee simple, for the use, 
benefit and behoof of said Woman's Board forever. 



Note — If it be desired to bequeath a sum "to be added to 
the general Permanent Fund of the Woman's Board, the income 
only to be used for the appropriate objects of said corporation," 
or if it be desired to designate a sum "to be separately invested 

and to be known as the Fund, the 

income only to be used," etc., it should be so stated. 



The Eighty-fifth Annual Report 



OF THE 



Board of Foreign Missions 



OF THE 



Presbyterian Church in the United 
States of America 



Presented to the General A ssembly, May, igzz 



NEW YORK 

PRESBYTERIAN BUILDING, 156 FIFTH AVENUE 

1922 



BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

1920-1923 

Rev. GEORGE ALEXANDER, D.D. .Mr. JOHN T. UNDERWOOD 

Rev. JOHN F. PATTERSON, D.D. Mr. JAMES M. SPEERS 

Rev. J. ROSS STEVENSON, D.D. Mr. WILLIA.M I.. AMERMAN 

SETH M. MILDIKEN, M.D. 



, ,j 1931t1924 

Rev. CLELAND B. McAFEE, D.D. Rev. WM. PIBRSO.V MERRIT.r,. D P 

Rev. CHARLES R. ERDMAN. D.D. Mr. W. P. STEVENSON 

Rev. "WM. T. CHAPMAN, D.D. Mr. JOHN L. SEVERANCE 

Rev. JOHN KELMAN, D.D. Mr. RALPH W. HARBISON 

Rev. D. MORGAN RICHARDS 



1922-1925 

Rev. EBEN B. COBB, D.D. WILLIAM E. STIGER, Esq- 

Rev. CHARLES C. ALBERTSON. D.D. Mr. ALFRED E. MARLING 

Rev. ROBERT GARDNER MacCJREGOR. Mr. EDWIN M. BULKLEY 
D.D. Mr. HENRY J. COCHRAN 

Rev. CHARLES GRENVILLE SEWALL 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

Rev. GEORGE ALEXANDER, D.D., President 
Mr. JAMBS M. SPEERS. Vice-President 

Secretaries 

Mr. ROBERT E. SPEBR — East and West Persia, Assam, North India, Punjab and 
Wesitern India Mdssions. Intendenominational Relationi^hi'pB. 

Rev. ARTHUR J. BROWN, D.D.^North China, Shantung, Hainan, Scuth China. 
Japan, Chosen (Korea), Siiani. Matters pertaining to Far Eastern affairs. 

Rev. STANLEY WHITE, D.D. — Guatemala and Syria. Matters pertaining to Near 
Eastern affairs. In charge of Candidate Department and representative of 
Assembly's Board in its relations to the Woman's Board. 

Rev. GEORGE T. SCOTT — Central China, Kiangan, Hunan, Philippines; Higher 
Educational Institutions on the Foreign Field. 

Rev. WILLIAM P. SCIIELL — ^Secreta,ry in charge of the Home Department. General 
home correspondence with Synodical and Presbyterial Chairmen, Pastors and 
Churches: Leaflets, Ijibrary, Board representative on New Era Movement. 

Rev. W. REGINALD WHEELER (Asst. Secy, temporarily in charge). West- Africa. 
Central and Sou'thern Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Venezuela Missions, 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD (Continued) 
Associate Secretary 

Rev. ORVILLE REED. Ph.D. — Recording Secretary and Associate Secretarj of the 
Candidate Department 

Acting Medical Secretary 

EDWARD >I. DODD, M.D. 

Assistant Secretary 

(Serving teniporarily in the Candidate Department) 
Rev. ALFRED VT. MOORE 

Treasurer 

Mr. DWIGHT H. DAY 

Associate Treasurer 

^tr. RU.SSEI.I. CARTER 

Assistant Treasurer 

Mr. CLARENCE A. STEEr..E 

Educational Secretary 

Mr. B. CARTER MILLTKIX — Promotion of Missionary Education throughout the 
church: production of materials: training of leaders; correspondence with Sun- 
day Schools, men's organizations, and especially with pastors: organization of 
Church Schools of Missions: Christmas and Easter Programs for the Sunday 
Schools. 
Rev. EDWIN" E. WHITE, Asi.istant Educational Secretary. 

Honorary Educational Adviser 

T. H. P. SAILER. Ph.D. — Correspondenre with educational missionaries and with 
candidates for educational work. 

Secretary for Specific Work 

Rev. GEORGE H. TRULL — In charge of the assignment of all specific work within 
the regular budget to churches, Sunday Schools, and individuals giving direct 
to the Assembly's Board: furnishes field information quarterly to donors sup- 
porting specific work. 

District Secretaries 

Rev. CHARLES E. BRADT, D.D. (Central District), 17 North State Street, Chicago, 

lUinoia. 
Mr. J. M. PATTERSON (Southern District), 1276 Arcade Building, St. Louis, Missouri. 
Rev. W. M. CLEAVELAND, D.D., Associate Secretary (Southern District), 1276 

Arcade Building, St. Louis, Missouri. 
Rev. WESTON T. JOHis'SON (Western District), 278 Post Street, San Francisco, 

California. 
Rev. ERNE3ST F. H.\LL, D.D. (Field Secretary), 156 Fifth Avenue, N. Y. 
Rev. EDWARD ROBERTS (Working among Wel-'h-speaking Churches), Madison, 

Wisconsin. 

Medical Advisers 

THAYER ADAMS SMITH, M.D. (Honorary) 

ALLEN O. WHIPPLE, M.D. (Honorary) 

HERBERT S. CARTER. M.D., (Honorary) 

HUBERT 3. HOWE (Honorary) 

NOTE — The Annual Election of Officers is held on the first stated meeting in 
June. 



THE WOMAN'S BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS 



Administrative Officers and Members 

Miss MARGARET E HODGE, President 
Miss ALICE M. DAVISON. First Vice-President 
Mrs. JOHN HARVBY" LEE, Second Vice-President 
Mrs. JOHN R. McCURDY, Recording Secretary 



Term Expiring 1922 

Miss Mary E. AUis 

Mrs. R. W. Cleland 

Mrs. James S. Cushman 

Miss Alice M. Davison 

Mrs. Joseph M Dubbs 

Mrs. John H. Finley 

Mrs. Caleb S. Green 

Mrs. John W. Go.ss 

Mrs. W. Beatty Jennings 

Mr.s. John Harvey Lee 

Mrs. John R. McCurdy 

Miss Helen C. Miller 

Miss Elinor K. Purves 

Mrs. Wallace Radcliffe 

Mrs. B. P. Richard.son 

Miss Mary R. Tooker 

Mrs. William E. Waters 

Mrs. James A. Webb, Jr. 

Mrs. O. R. Williamson 



Term Expiring 1924 

Mr.s. S. M. Ballard 
Mrs. W. H. Bissland 
Mrs. Rawlins Cadwallader 
Mrs. John W. Cratty 
Mrs. D. J. Fleming 
Mrs. Frank A. Haskell 
Miss Margaret E. Hodge 
Mrs. Wiilliam Jennings 
Miss Belle Lobenstine 
Mrs. Cleland B. McAfee 
Mrs. Hugh B. McCrone 
Mrs. A. D. McPeterson 
Mrs. John F. Miller 
Miss Margaretta D. Purves 
Mrs. A. F. Schauffler 
Mr.s. Wm. P. Schell 
Mrs. B. A. Thaxter 
Mrs. Stanley White 



EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

General Secretary Mrs. Charle.'; K. Roys 

Secretary for Missionary Education Miss Gertrude Schultz 

Secretary for Young People's Work Miss Faye A. Steinmetz 

Assistant Secretary for Young People's Work Miss Marcia Kerr 

Candidate Secretary Miss Ann T. Reid 

Secretary for Specific Work Miss Mary W. Kerr 

Publicity Secretary Mrs. Julia I.. Alills 

Treasurer Miss I-ucy Lepper 

Assistant Treasurer 

Secretaries for Student Work in Common with Woman's Board of Home Missions: 
Miss Florence G. Tyler, Miss Mary Eliza Clark, Mis.s Rose D. Wilson 

DISTRICT SECRETARIES AND HEADQUARTERS 

Secretary for Philadelphia District Mrs. Andrew Todd Taylor, 

501 Witherspoon Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Secretary for New York District Mrs. James Duguid, Jr. 

156 Fifth Ave., New York City 

Secretary for Northwest District Mrs. E. H. Silverthorn, 

Room 1808. 17 North State St.. Chicago, 111. 

Secretary for Southwest District Mrs. Wallace S. Faris, 

1269 Arcade Building, St. Louis. Mo. 

Secretary for Occidental District Mrs. Evelyn Browne Keck, 

278 Post Street. San FrancLsco. Calif. 

.Secretary for North Pacific District Mrs. Charles W. Williams 

Room 310, 407 Washing'ton St., Portland. Oregon 



FIELD SECRETARIES 

MUs Mary J. Barry, Mrs. R. M. Graham. Mrs. S. I. Lindsay, Miss Ruth MoComb 



Charter 

Charter Granted by the State of New York, Aprii, i2Th, 1862. 
lyAws OF 1862, Chapter 187. 



an act to incorporate the board of foreign missions of the presbyterian church, 
in the united states of america. 

Passed April i2Th, 1862 — Chapter 187. 

The People of the State of Nezu York, represented in Senate and Assembly, do enact 
as follows: 

Section i. — Walter Lowrie, Gardner Spring, William W. Phillips, George Potts, 
William Barnard, John D. Wells, Nathan L,. Rice, Robert L,. Stuart, Lebbcus B. Ward, 
Robert Carter, John C. Lowrie, citizens of the iState of New York, and such others ;s 
they may associate with themselves are hereby constituted a body corporate and politic 
forever, by the name of THK BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE PRESBY- 
TERIAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, for the purpose of 
establishing and conducting Christian Missions among the une-'angeliced or Pagan nations, 
and the general diffusion of Christianity ; and by that name they and their successors and 
associates shall be capable of taking by purchase, grant, devise or otherwise, holding, 
conveying, or otherwise disposing of any real or personal estate for the purpose of the 
said corporation, but which estate within the State shall not at any time exceed the 
annual income of twenty thousand dollars. 

Section 2. — ^The said corporation shall possess the general powers, rights and privi- 
leges, and be subject to liabilities and provisions contained in the eighteenth chapter of 
the first part of the Revised Statutes, so far as the same is applicable, and also subject 
to the provisions of chapter three hundred and sixty of the laws -of eighteen hundred and 
sixty. 

Section 3. — This Act shall take effect immediately. 



Laws of 1894, Chapter 326. 
an act to amend chapter one hundred and eighty-seven of the laws of eighteen 

HUNDRED AND SIXTY-TWO ENTITLED "aN ACT TO INCORPORATE THE BOARD OF FOREIGN 
MISSIONS OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA," AND TO 
REGULATE THE NUMBER OF TRUSTEES. 

Became a Law April 19TH, 1894, with the Approval of the Governor; passed, 

THREE-FIFTHS BEING PRESENT. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, do enact as 
follows: 

Section i.- — Section three of chapter one hundred and eighty-seven of the laws of 
eighteen hundred and sixty-two, entitled "An Act to incorporate the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America," is hereby amended 
to read as follows: 

Section 2. — "The management and disposition of the affairs and property of the 
"said Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of 
"America shall be vested in twenty-one Trustees, who shall be appointed from time to 
"time by the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of 
"America for such terms as the Assembly may determine. But the number of such 
"Trustees may be increased or decreased at any time by the said General Assembly, and 
"in case of an increase, the additional Trustees shall be appointed by such General As- 
"sembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America; provided however, 
||that the members of the Board as at present constituted shall continue to hold office 
l^until their successors have been appointed by the General Assembly. Not less than 
I'eleven members of the Board shall constitute a quorum for the purpose of electing offi- 
"cers, making by-laws, or for holding any special meeting; but for all other purposes, 
"and at stated meetings, five shall be a quorum." 

Section 3. — This Act shall take effect immediately. 



AN ACT TO AMEND CHAPTER ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-SEVEN OF THE LAWS OF EIGHTEEN 
HUNDRED AND SIXTY-TWO ENTITLED "aN ACT TO INCORPORATE THE BOARD OF FOREIGN 
MISSIONS OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA," AS 
AlilENDED BY CHAPTER THREE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SIX OF THE LAWS OF EIGHTEEN 
HUNDRED AND NINETY-FOUR. 

Became a I^aw March 15TH, 1900, with the Approval of the Governor; passed, 
A majority being present. 

TIte People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, do enact as 
follows: 

Section i. — Section three of chapter one hundred and eighty-seven of the laws of 
eighteen hundred and si.\ty-two. entitled 'Wn \c\. to incorporate the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America," as amended by 
chapter three hundred and twenty-six of the laws of eighteen hundred and ninety-four, 
is further amended so as to read as follows: 

Section 2. — "The management and disposition of the affairs and proi)erty of the 
"said Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of 
"America shall be vested in twenty-one Trustees, who shall be app,ointed from time to 
"time by the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of 
"America for such terms as the Assembly may determine. But the number of such 
"Trustees may be increased or decreased at any time by the said General Assembly, and 
"in case of an increase, the additional Trustees shall be appointed by such General As- 
"senrbly of the Presbyterian Cliurch in the United States of America; provided however, 
"that the members of the Board as at present constituted shall continue to hold office 
"until their successors have been appointed by the General Assembly. Not less than 
"eleven members of the Board shall constitute a quorum for the purpose of electing offi- 
"cers, making by-laws, or for holding any special meeting; .but for all other purposes, 
"and at stated meetings, five shall be a quorum. All the business of the said corporation 
"shall be conducted by the Board under and subject to the direction of the said General 
"Assembly, so far as such direction shall be in accordance with the laws of the State of 
"New York and of the United States of Ajaierica." 

Section 3. — This Act shall take effect immediately. 

Note. — The limit fixed by the Board's original Charter as to the amount of property 
which the Board may take or hold and the income to be derived therefrom was increased 
under a law passed June 30, 191 1 amending the general corporation law in relation to 
the amount of property non-stock corporations may take or hold. The new law being as 
follows: 

"If any general or special law heretofore passed, or any certificate of incorporation, 
"shall limit the amount of property a corporati'on other than a stock corporation may take 
"or hold, such corporation may take and hold property of the value of ten million dollars 
"or less, or the yearly income derived from which shall be one million dollars or less, not- 
"withstanding any such limitation. In computing ithe value of such property, no increase 
"in value arising otherwise than from improvements made thereon shall be taken into 
"account." 

BEQUESTS 

The Board is incorporated by an Act of the Legislature of the 
State of New York. The corporate name to be used is : The Board 
of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States 
of America. 

FORM OF BEQUEST 

I give, devise and bequeath unto "The Board of Foreign Missions of the Presby- 
terian Church in the United States of America," incorporated April 12, 1862, by Act of 

the Legislature of the State of New York, the sum of 

Dollars, to be expended for the appropriate objects of 

said corporation. 

FORM OF DEVISE 

(Real Estate) 
I give and devise unto "The Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States of .America," incorporated April 12, 1862, by Act of the Legisla- 
ture of the State of New York, all that certain [here insert description if convenient] 
with the appurtenances in fee simple, for the use, benefit and behoof of said society 
forever. 

RESIDUARY CLAUSE 

All the rest, residue and remainder of my real estate and personal estate, I devise and 
bequeath unto "The Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States of America," incorporated April 12, 1862, by Act of the Legislature of the State of 
New York. 



CERTIFICATE OF INCORPORATION 



The Woman's Hoard ok I'Vikeign Missions oi" the Pbicsbyterian Church in the 
United States of America 

We, the undersigned, associate ourselves pursuant to the provisions of the Member- 
ship Corporations I^aw of the Slate of New York, Chap. 40, Laws of 1909, and all Acts 
amendatory thereof and supplementary thereto, and pursuant to and in conformity with 
the provisions thereof, we do certify and declare as follows, to wit: 

iMRST: That each of the subscribers is of full age. 

Second: That at least two-thirds of the subscribers are citizens of the United States. 

Third: That seven subscribers are residents of the State of New York. 

Fourth : That the particular objects for which said corporation is formed are as 
follows: 

To incorporate and to administer the foreign missionary work of the women, of the 
Presbyterian Church in the United States of America as heretofore prosecuted and ad- 
ministered by the societies known as 

The Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Presbyterian Church (incorporated 
in the State of Pennsylvania); 

The Women's Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church (incorporated 
in the State of New York) ; 

The Woman's Presbyterian Jtoard of Missions of the Northwest (incorporated in 
the State of Illinois) ; 

The Woman's Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions of the Southwest (incorpor- 
ated in the Slate of Missouri) ; 

The Woman's Occidental Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church 
(incorporated in the State of California), and 

Woman's North Pacific Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions (incorporated in 
the State of Oregon), 
pursuant to the corporate agreements, heretofore entered into between said corporations 
and to the consent and approval of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States of America, in connection with and subordinate to which the work 
of this corporation is to be administered. 

To act as the agent of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America, consisting of all the women in said church 
interested in and contributing to the work of foreign missions of that church but unin- 
corporated, and so acting to extend among non-Christian and unevangelized peoples the 
religion of Jesus Christ as interpreted by the General Assembly of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America, or its duly constituted successor. And ac- 
cordingly we certify and declare that this corporation is to be auxiliary to and co-operative 
with The Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States 
of America, incorporated by Chapter 187, Laws of 1862, and now in connection with 
the aforesaid General Assembly. 

To promote an interest in foreign missions among women and young people through- 
out that church, and, in furtherance of the foregoing purposes, to exercise all the powers 
of a corporation conferred by the General Corporation Law and the membershfp Cor- 
porations Law tliereto applicable; to take by purchase, grant, bequest, devise, or O'ther- 
w'ise, and to hold, manage, convey and dispose of any real or personal estate for the 
purposes of the said corporation as permitted by law. 

Fifth: That the corporate name is and shall be: The Woman's Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America. 

Sixth: That the territory in which the operations of said corporation are to be con- 
ducted is the United States of America and the mission fields throughout the world in 
connection with the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America. 

Seventh: That the principal office of said corporation shall be and is located in the 
Borough of Manhattan, City of New York, County of New York, and State of New York. 

Eighth: That the number of directors of said corporation shall be forty (40). 

Ninth: That the names of the persons to be the directors of said corporation until 
its first annual meeting are: 



Mrs. John Harvey Lee 
Miss Mary E. AUis 
Mrs. O. R. Williamson 
Mrs. C. B. McAfee 
Miss Alice M. Davison 
Mrs. W. P. Schell 
Mrs. W. H. Bissland 
Mrs. Joseph Dubbs 
Mrs. Rawlins Cadwallader 
Mrs. R. W. Cleland 
Mrs. John W. Goss 
Mrs. B. A. Thaxter 
Mrs. A. F. Schauffler 
Mrs. Jas. A. Webb, Tr 
Mrs. W. E. Waters 
Mrs. Harrison Serrell 
Miss Elinor K. Purves 
Miss Belle W. Lobenstine 
Mrs. Stanley White 
Mrs. W. Beatty Jennings 



Mrs. D. J. Fleminv; 
Mrs. John F. Miller 
Mrs. John H. Finley 
Mrs. Caleb S. Green 
Mrs. A. McD. Paterson 
Mrs. John Meigs 
Mrs. Wallace Radcliffe. 
Miss Margaret P. Mead 
Mrs. S. M. Ballard 
.Miss Margaret E. Hodge 
Dr. Ella B. Everitt 
Mrs. H. B. McCrone 
Mrs. B. F. Richardson 
Miss Mary R. Tooker 
Mrs. Jas. S. Cushman 
Mrs. Wm. Jennings 
Mrs. John R. McCurdy 
Mrs. Henry Sloanc Coffin 
Miss Helen C. Miller 
Mrs. Edwin B. Cragin 



Tenth: That the annual meeting of said corporation shall be held on the last 
Wednesday of April, 1921, and in each and every year thereafter. But the By-Laws may 
provide that the said corporation may meet biennially instead of annually for the trans- 
action of any business, including the election, of officers. 

Eleventh: And we do further certify and declare the following conditions of the 
membership and of the administration and management of the affairs of this corporation: 

Membership and \'otinc Rights 

A. There shall be two classes of membership: 
Sustaining Members, and Voting Members. 

Sustaining Members, shall consist of all women, members of a particular church 
connected with the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, who at the 
same time are interested in and contributing to the cause of Presbyterian Foreign Missions. 

Voting Members. At the annual meeting or special meeting of the cxsrporation any 
woman a member of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America con- 
tributing to the cause of its foreign missions and elected by any Woman's Presbyterial 
or Synodical Society, or District of Synodical Societies, as prescribed in the Constitution 
or By-Laws of this corporation, shall have the right to vote, which meeting of the cor- 
poration shall have power to pass upon the form and sufficiency of the credentials of 
such delegates. 

B. Directors. It being contemplated that the Directors of the corporation above 
named, and their successors from time to time, shall be widely representative of the 
constituency of the corporation throughout the Presbyterian Churches and Women's Mis- 
sionary Societies in the United States, and thus be residents of different states, and not 
frequently convened, such directors may delegate, in such manner as may be provided 
in the constitution or by-laws of such corporation, such powers as may be necessary to 
efficiently administer and carry out the work of the corporation and to assert and protect 
its rights, in the intervals between the meetings of said directors, to an Executive Com- 
mittee, to be appointed as provided in the bylaws. Such committee shall meet at least 
once every month and may, in addition to the duties laid upon it by the by-laws, appoint, 
from its own membership, a Finance Committee to manage the investments of the cor- 
poration, to report thereon statedly to such Executive Committee; and to prepare the 
annual budget for the appropriations to be made by the Board. 

In testimony whereof we have made and signed this Certificate in duplicate and 
have hereunto set our hands and affixed our respective seals this tenth day of November, 
One Thousand Nine Hundred Twenty. 

Margaret E. Hodge [l. s.] Margaret P. Mead [l. s.] 

Elizabeth Park Lee [l. s.] Elizabeth Cole Fleming [l. s.J 

Mary R. Tooker [l. s.] Mary E. Allis [l. s.] 

Alma O. Waters II. s.] Emily Mavo Schell El. s.] 

Jessie W. Radcliffe [l. s.] Nellie S. Webb [l. s.] 

Margaret T. McCrone [l. s.] Elinor K. Purves [l. s.] 

Mattie H. Jennings [l. s.] Lucy Porter McCurdy [l. s.] 

Eugenia M. Green [l. s.l Helen Clarkson Miller [l. s.] 

Jeanne M. Serrell [l. s.] Henrietta K. White [l. s.] 

Belle W. Lobenstine [l. s.] 

FORM OF BEQUEST AND DEVISE 

Personalty. I give and bequeath to "The Woman's Board of Foreign Missions of 
THE Presbyterian Church in the United States of America" incorporated under the 
laws of the State of New York, and having its principal offices in the City of New York, 

the sum of OR the following described securities, OR (particularize the 

thing specifically bequeathed) to be applied to the use of the said corporation. 

Real Estate: I give, devise and bequeath to "The Woman's Board of Foreign Mis- 
sions OF the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America," incorporated 
under the laws of the State of New York and having its principal offices in the City of 
New York, ALL that certain (here insert a description of the house, lot, ground, lease, 
rent, or other real property as you would in a deed) with the appurtenances thereof in 
fee absolute for the use, benefit and behoof of said corporation forever. 



NOTE. — In every case the testator should, if possible, consult reputable local coun- 
sel, in order to insure the purpose of the Will being carried out exactly as intended. 



SCOTT FOSTER 

3tember of the Board from 

1898—1932 



ACTION OF THE GENERAL. ASSEMBLY 



The Eij^hty-fifth Annual Report of the Board of Foreign Missions 
and the manuscript vohinie of its Minutes for the year ending March 
.^1, 1922, were presented to the General Assemhly in session at Des 
Moines, Iowa, May, 1922. and were referred to the Standing Com- 
mittee on Foreign Missions. The Committee presented to the Gen- 
eral Assemhly its report, which was adopted. The report and recom- 
mendations are suhmitted herewith : 

The Standing Committee on Foreign Missions hegs leave to sub- 
mit the following recommendations and resolutions, all of which have 
received the unanimous approval of its members : 

(1) After a careful review of the Minutes of the P^oard of For- 
eign Missions, our committee recommends their approval as admirable 
in form and content, an accurate and complete record of the pro- 
ceedings and actions of the Board. They evidence the most pains- 
taking and efficient discharge of a great trust. Through all of this 
extended record there runs like a golden thread the intelligent and 
sympathetic care of the missionaries and their families. 

(2) That the Assembly gratefully acknowledge the many splendid 
benefactions of money and property received by the Board during 
the past year. 

(3) The Assembly commends the Board's action in requiring that, 
as a general rule, the first furlough of all missionaries shall be used 
for further prei)aration under the direction of the mission and the 
Board and suggests that especially in the case of medical missionaries, 
a portion of each subsequent furlough be spent in requiring the latest 
practice in medicine and surgery. 

(4) The Assembly approves the adoption of the policy for the 
visitation of every mission by an officer of the Board once every 
seven years, that interval to be reduced to five years as soon as 
practicable. 

(5) The Assembly urges all churches to malce prompt and regu- 
lar remittances to the Treasurer of the Board in order to obviate 
the necessity for the heavy interest charges on money that the Board 
is compelled to l)orrow to meet its obligations. 

(6) The Assembly reaffirms its unswerving confidence in the 
Board's consecration and competence for the discharge of its sacred 
trust. It rejoices to learn that after most careful investigation of 
certain charges of irregular beliefs and teachings amongst our mis- 
sionaries, it has been unable to discover any ground for such accu- 
sations. Neither has it received any evidence with regard to any 
individual calling for or capable of transmission to any Presbytery. 
Our Church has full trust in and deep aflFection for our foreign mis- 



X ACTION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

sionaries and it is not in any mood of suspicion or misgiving with 
regard to them. We therefore call upon our churches loyally to 
support our Foreign Mission undertakings and to send their con- 
tributions to our own Board. 

(7) That the Assembly approve the report of the Treasurer as 
printed in the Annual Report of the P)oard, and heartily commends 
the lo'v percentages of administrative cost. 

(8) That the following members of the Board whose terms of 
ofifice expire with this meeting of the Assembly, be re-elected to 
serve for three years : 

Rev. Eben B. Cobb, D.D. 

Rev. Charles C. Albertson, D.D. 

Rev. Robert Gardner McGregor, D.D. 

Rev. Charles Grenville Sewell 

William E. Stiger, Esq. 

Mr. Alfred E. Marling 

Mr. Edwin M. Bulkley 

Mr. Henry J. Cochran 

Also that the election of Mr. Ralph W. Harbison as a member of 
the Board, in place of Mr. Scott Foster, deceased, be approved. 

(9) That the Assembly has learned with hearty satisfaction of 
the completion of the fund in memory of Dr. A. W. Halsey; the 
establishment of the Board's new Medical Department for con- 
serving the health of the missionary force, and for promoting the 
work of medical missions (see Report, pp. 40, 41) ; the new regula- 
tion equalizing the salaries of single men and single women mission- 
aries and making more liberal provision for our missionaries while 
sick and while traveling on furlough, and for the maintenance of 
their children (Report, pp. 20, 21) ; and especially the provision for 
the continuation of the salaries of the missionaries of the Board who 
have reached the age of 70 years or have given 40 years of service 
in the field, by this provision affording inexpressible relief and 
comfort to these faithful servants of Christ and His Church. 

(10) That the Assembly is pleased to hear of the good results 
following the consolidation of the six former Women's Boards into 
the Woman's Board of Foreign Missions and the closer co-operation 
with the Assembly's Board thus secured, and the Assembly congratu- 
lates the Woman's Board of Foreign Missions upon the signal 
achievements of its first year, especially upon the large increase of 
$110,000 in its receipts over those of the ])receding year. 

(11) The Assembly commends the tlome Department of the 
Board for its wise, energetic and highly successful work in promoting 
missionary interest, intelligence, and enthusiasm throughout the 
Church in the homeland. 

(12) That the Educational Department of the Board be com- 
mended for the effective promotion of the study of Foreign Missions 
in the churches, the Sunday schools, and the women's organizations ; 
and especially for the development of the lantern slide service of the 
Board. 



ACTION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY xi 

(13) That the Assembl\- ai)])rove the Board's plans for the study 
of India this year, and call upon each church and Sunday school to 
provide in its program ample opportunity for this study. 

(14) That the Assemlily again appoint the Sunday nearest Christ- 
mas and Easter for special offerings from the Sunday schools for 
work under the care of the Board of Foreign Missions, and urge 
each Sunday school to use the excellent programs provided by the 
Educational Department of the Board and to take part in the special 
offerings on each of these days. 

(15) That the Assembly reiterate its hearty approval of the plan 
whereby many churches. Sunday schools. Women's Missionary Socie- 
ties, other organizations, and individuals now support particular 
missionaries or some particular mission station, and are thereby 
brought into closer and more vital touch with the work. The Assem- 
bly recommends this plan of foreign missionary giving to all our 
churches and other donors. 

(16) The Assembly notes with great interest the work which 
the Board has done since the signing of the Armistice in the rehabili- 
tation of its mission work in Syria, including special contributions 
for enlargement of the work and the erection of new buildings, and 
notes also that the Board will probably be called upon to do a similar 
work of rebuilding for Persia, as a result of the investigations made 
I)v the Board's deputation who are just returning from that field. 
The Assembly, therefore, urges the churches to study this Near 
Eastern field with the greatest care and to strengthen it both by 
their ]:)rayers and their gifts. 

(17) The Assembly views with anxiety the reports that, under 
the new treaty to be negotiated between the allied countries and 
Turkey, power may be granted to Turkey which will seriously 
threaten the continuance of mission work in the Near East, and 
expresses its gratification at the expressed determination of our 
Government to guard American interests in this Near Eastern coun- 
try, and urges upon the United States Government utmost vigilance 
lest by any chance the work which has existed for more than a cen- 
tury be destroyed, and the Near East be deprived of those Christian 
influences through which alone its problems can be solved. 

(18) The Assembly notes with satisfaction that the Jones- 
Miller Bill restricting the export of morphine and opium has been 
passed by the national House of Representatives and appeals to the 
Senate to take similar action at an early date. Tt is a distress to all 
Christians and an obstacle to our mission work that the traffic in 
morphine seems to be on the increase ; that by subtle and sinuous 
ways this drug is being .sold, not only in America, but in China, 
contrary to the law. The Assembly, is gratified to learn that Great 
Britain is taking action to arrest this trade, and earnestly hopes 
that our own Government will promptly pass and enforce the Jones- 
Miller Bill, whose object is to break up this nefarious traffic. 

(19) The Assembly notes with profound interest the large num- 
ber of students in the colleges and other institutions who have signi- 
fied their desire to go to the foreign field, and that notwithstanding 
the fact that the Board has raised the standard of qualifications, it 



xii ACTION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

has been able to send the average number sent out in the past ten 
years. The Assembly calls the attention of the churches to the de- 
mand upon the Board for highly qualified men and women, and urges 
pastors, educational leaders, and parents to aid the Board, not only 
in discovering the choice young men and women of the Church, 
but also in presenting the needs of the foreign field and the call of 
God to missionary service. 

(20) The General Assembly has learned with interest of the ad- 
justment contemplated between the Board of Foreign Missions and 
the Board of the Welsh Calvinistic Methodists' Foreign Missions in 
regard to the Assam Mission formerly under the Welsh Calvinistic 
Methodist Church in the U. S. A. The Assembly ap])roves the Board's 
action in offering to turn over the properties to the Welsh Church 
without com])ensation. with the understanding that they are to con- 
duct the work in the future, and that all responsibilities for re])airs 
to buildings and for funds for running expenses are to be assumed 
by them. The Assembly in approving this action authorizes the 
transfer to be consummated as soon as the Board receives a definite 
acceptance of the offer from the General Assemblv of the Welsh 
Calvinistic Methodist Church which meets in Cardiff. Wales, Tune 
13-15. 1922. 

(21) That the Board be authorized to transfer to the Board 
of Home Missions and the Woman's Board of Home Missions the 
work among Orientals in the United States now under the direction 
of the Board of Foreign Missions and the Woman's Board of For- 
eign Missions — this transfer to be made on the following terms, 
already mutually agreed upon by the Boards concerned : 

(a) That the administration of the entire work be turned 
over to these two Boards June 1. 1922. 

(b) In accepting the action of the Woman's Board of 
Home Missions the Foreign Boards will contribute $18,000 
for the fiscal year 1922-23 towards the work among the 
Orientals on the Pacific Coast, which has been conducted 
by the Woman's Board of Foreign Missions; that for the 
year beginning April 1. 1923, they will contribute $12,000 
toward this work, and for the year beginning April 1, 1924, 
$6,000, and thereafter their financial responsibility will cease. 

(c) (1) That the Assembly's Board of Home Missions 
will accept the administration of the work suggested by the 
Foreign Board with the understanding that the Foreign 
Board carrv the entire budget for the year beginning April 
1, 1922. 

(2) That for the year beginning Aj:)ril 1, 1923, the 
Home Board will assume one-third of the budget; for the 
year beginning April 1, 1924, two-thirds of the budget; and 
thereafter all of it. 
In transferring this work the Foreign Board also agrees to 
transfer its property to the two Home Boards without charge, the 
legal papers in regard to this transfer to be prepared by the attorney 
of the Board of Foreign Missions. 



ACTION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY xiii 

(22) That no action l)e taken on the overtures relatinjj to the 
installation of ordained missionaries as pastors ahroad. of home 
churches assuming their financial support, such a douhle relation as 
is contemplated hetween the missionaries concerned and the churches 
and Presbyteries with which they would be connected being im- 
l)racticable. 

(23) That the Assembly heartily commends the ])lan of the 
Board for Annuity Gifts on which the Board pays interest until the 
death of the donor, or of the annuitant, when the princij^al becomes 
available for the foreign mission cause; and the Assembly urges all 
friends of the cause to remember the Board in their wills. 

(24) That the Assembly hereby records with sorrow, and in 
grateful remembrance of their services, the deaths, during the year, 
of the following missionaries : 

NAME TERM OF SERVICE 

Rev. Robert H. Nassau. D.D.. *Africa 1861-1906 

Mrs. Oscar J. Hardin. *Syria 1873-1Q19 

Miss Emilia Thompson, Svria 1876-1922 

Rev. Robert M. Mateer. D.D.. China 1881-1921 

Rev. Henrv M. Tandis. Japan 1888-1921 

Mrs. Horace G. Underwood. Chosen 1888-1921 

Miss Tennie Wheeler, Mexico 1888-1922 

Rev. T. H. Freeman. Siam 1894-1922 

Rev. James B. Cochran, *China 1899-1920 

Mrs. F. M. Stead. Persia 1900-1922 

Rev. Walter W. Hicks. China 1902-1921 

Mrs. Hugh C. Ramsav, China 191.V1921 

Mrs. Walter W. Wood. Brazil 1916-1921 

Rev. Lorin H. King. Mexico 1917-1922 

Rev. E. C. Cowden, Africa 1920-1922 

Also the death of Mr. Scott Foster, member of the Board 
1898-1922. 

(25) That, with ever-deepening conviction that the Gospel of 
Christ is the wisdom of God and the power of God unto salvation, 
not only of the individual soul but of human society in all its group- 
ings, from the family to nations and international alliances; and 
with our established confidence in the ability of our Board of Foreign 
Missions still further strengthened by the remarkable results achieved 
during the past year, both at home and abroad, in the face of unusual 
difficulties, the Assembly commends anew to the entire Church this 
Board and its divine enterprise ; and believing that the supreme 
philanthropy is the giving of the Gospel to men, the Assembly urges 
all members of our Church possessed of wealth to observe a juster 
proportion between their gifts and bequests for Christian missions 
and those they make with such splendid generosity to universities, 
libraries, hospitals, and other educational and philanthropic insti- 
tutions. William R. Taylor, Chairman. 

* Had resigned from Missionary service-. 



INTRODUCTION 

TO THE 

EIGHTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS 

OF THE 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

IN THE U. S. A. 

For THE Year 1921-1922 
The Board of Foreign Missions herewith submits to the General 
Assembly and to the Church its Eighty-fifth Annual Report. In this 
Introduction are brief statements on the General Situation, the 
Woman's Board, the Home Department, the Candidate Department 
and the Medical Department, a Survey of each Mission Field, "In 
Memoriam," and the names of Board members whose terms of ser- 
vice expire this year. Along with this introduction is presented 
the list of Interdenominational Enterprises in which the Missions 
cooperate, the combined Statistical Table of the twenty-seven Mis- 
sions, the Report of the Treasurer with the detailed schedules, and 
the list of the Names and Addresses of all the Foreign Missionaries 
of our Church. The fuller record of the work on the foreign field is 
given in the body of the Report under the various Missions and Sta- 
tions. 

GENERAL SITUATION 
The Church has accepted the world-wide Missionary mandate 
of its Lord and is steadily advancing into all the world with the 
objective of proclaiming the Gospel unto every creature. The For- 
eign Missionary Enterprise internationalizes the program of Christ, 
ignoring in its universal service the great barriers which divide the 
races and nations of men. Into all lands and among all peoples it 
carries the irresistible Gospel of one Father, one Savior, one Broth- 
erhood, and thus it acts as the greatest harmonizing, unifying and 
uplifting force among our diverse human groups. In this post-war 
reaction against militarism let us keep in mind the fact indicated 

3 — For. Miss. 



1 INTRODUCTIONS-FOREIGN MISSIONS 

by General Sir Charles Warren when Governor of Natal : "For 
the keeping of peace, one missionary is worth a battalion of soldiers," 
and lend ourselves to the peace-making processes of God. When 
among the national and racial groups so largely the goal is gain, the 
ethic ego and the method might, the Christian solution of our un- 
happy and dangerous relationships is obviously demanded. 

Decades ago, leaders in the Church set out to meet this need. One 
recalls the words of Jeremiah Evarts, an early secretary of the 
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, spoken 
in 1812: "It is now generally seen and felt, by those who have any 
claim to be considered as proper judges, that Christianity is the 
only remedy for the disorders and miseries of this world, as well 
as the only foundation of hope for the world to come. No other 
agent will ever control the violent passions of men, and without 
the true religion all attempts to ameliorate the condition of mankind 
will prove as illusory as a feverish dream. The genuine patriot, 
therefore, and the genuine philanthropist must labor, so far as they 
value the prosperity of their country and the happiness of the human 
race, to diffuse the knowledge and the influence of Christianity at 
home and abroad. Thus they will labor most effectually to put a 
final period to oppression and slavery, to perfidy and war, and to 
all the train of evils which falsehood, ambition, and cruelty have so 
profusely scattered through the world." 

This position' and purpose as related to a single nation has been 
stated within the last few months by Mr. D. Tagawa, a Presbyterian 
Elder in the Japanese group at the recent Washington Conference 
and a member of the Imperial Diet : "True liberalism is a product 
of Christianity and rests on Christian foundations. It depends on 
vital Christian faith for its own vitality. In Japan we shall have, 
in my opinion, a really strong, liberal movement only when millions 
of Japanese have been transformed by a vital Christianity. If we 
are to make a free Japan, we are to make a Christian Japan." Only 
the Christian Church with its program of redemption and righteous- 
ness, individual and social, can victoriously combat the unseen forces 
of greed, fear, and bate which so largely cause the depressing disease 
of which the world sufifers. 

The Washington Conference on the Limitation of Armament 
and Far Eastern Problems vitally interested our Presbyterian Church 
inasmuch as three-fifths of our foreign missionary work is con- 
ducted in the countries that border the western Pacific. Earnest 
prayer for the best results at the Conference and its Treaties has 
been ofifered throughout our country and we will continue to pray 



GENERAL SITUATION 3 

and work for Christian internationalism, both for its own sake and 
for its favorable reaction upon the extension of the Kingdom. The 
Commission on International Justice and Goodwill of the Federal 
Council of Churches issued a statement on relations with the Far 
East containing the following paragraph; "The one real and only 
hope of ])ridging the age-old chasm l)etween the East and the West 
lies in the practice of that spirit of service and brotherhood which 
constitutes the center and essence of the Christian way of life. Capi- 
talistic, commercial and political contacts of East and West often 
tend to deepen the natural gulf between the great and powerful 
races and widely differing civilization of these two streams of human 
history. It is the spirit of Christ alone that can reconcile the races, 
overcome and annul their ancient grudges, banish their inherited 
prejudices and bring peoples and nations into such relations of mutual 
confidence and good-will that their commercial and financial relations 
can permanently go forward to their mutual advantage." The high- 
est patriotism of every state is found in the service of the super- 
national Kingdom of God, which fact adds to Christianity another 
element of attractiveness in the minds of many national leaders who 
desire the truest welfare of their own lands and of the world at 
large. However, there is still a strong feeling by natives in some 
of our Mission Fields that Christianity is an alien religion, acceptance 
of which is in a sense unpatriotic, with a tendency to denationalize 
to some extent the individual convert. 

Besides these international and interracial difficulties which con- 
tinue to hamper, though we believe in diminishing degree, the pro- 
gress of the Gospel, there are also several outstanding antagonisms 
of religion and irreligion which call for a word of comment at this 
time. In many places and in many ways religious opposition to 
progress of the Gospel is breaking down as Christian truth, religious 
and scientific, dispels untenable superstition and unenlightened prac- 
tice. But on the other hand there are certain great religious or god- 
less systems which are rallying their hosts to withstand the progress 
if not to break the power of Christian propaganda: 

( 1 ) One regrets that the Church which alleges to have been 
founded by the apostle who first publicly voiced the confession, 
"Thou art the Christ, the Son of the Living God," continues its 
hostile opposition to evangelical Christianity in many mission fields, 
but most obviously and bitterly in Latin America. Overt and open 
attacks recurrently take place upon native workers, church services, 
and church property as well as the missionaries themselves in various 
countries to the south of us. For instance, our Brazil Mission 



4 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

reports in the Minutes of its x\nnual Meeting of November, 1921, 
as follows : "The Roman Catholic Church has officially declared 
'guerra sem treguas,' war without quarter, against Protestantism 
in Brazil. These are the official words of Cardinal Arcoverde, and 
that they were intended to produce results was seen by the publishing 
of a pastoral by the Archbishop of Marianna. This was a most 
violent attack, in which he stated in plainest Portuguese that the 
missionaries were 'political agents of the United States Government,' 
'spies, trying to enslave Brazil as they had done to Cuba, Porto Rico, 
and the Philippines.' Especially did he inveigh against all the evan- 
gelical schools as so many hotbeds of political plotting. This was 
followed by a most virulent article by Medeiros de Albuquerque, the 
brilliant journalist, which was scattered broadcast and was a highly 
inflammatory appeal to the national sentiment against the 'spies' 
of the U. S. The Bishop of Ribeirao Preto also published a pastoral 
along the same lines, all intended to inflame public sentiment. Only 
two weeks ago, in Apparecida, one of the chief miracle-working 
shrines of Brazil, after an impassioned sermon by one of the priests, 
a mob of 500 men broke into our Presbyterian place of worship, 
dragged all the furniture. Bibles, books, etc., into the street, poured 
kerosene over them and burned everything. Then they rushed on 
down the street, and meeting our pastor. Rev. Andre Jensen, would 
have lynched him on the spot, had it not been for the courage of a 
police sergeant, who. not having enough men to protect the pastor, 
put him and two believers in the jail where he kept them for three 
days until enough police were gathered to protect them. The repul- 
sion, which will be caused by this and similar violent acts, will give 
us an unparalleled opportunity to get a favorable hearing from the 
better class. The time is ripe for an all-along-the-line advance." 
Will the base support the front line troops in an advance? 

(2) Buddhism is according Christianity the highest form of 
flattery in the fullest possible imitation in organization, forms of 
worship, and social activities. Revised statements of belief attempt 
to omit everything that would be unacceptable to an educated mind, 
and the forms of religious and social service are being largely pat- 
terned after those of the churches on the field and in the homelands. 
In many places a modernized Buddhism has taken over bodily the 
Christian Sunday School, inserting in the service and in our common 
Sunday School songs the name "Buddha" for that of "Jesus." Young 
Men's Buddhist Associations have been organized, and effort is made 
to lead Buddhists out into social and economic reform and uplift, 
though, we understand, with little success. It is interesting to note 



GENERAL SITUATION 5 

in this connection that Baron Goto, Mayor of Tokyo, has stated that 
strong protests against the prevalent and" shameless, licensed 
prostitution had come from Christians and that there had been 
no earnest word of protest from any other source. This mechanical 
imitation, high-minded as some of it doubtless is, can at best be a 
vain effort by Buddhism to produce the vitalizing fruits of the Gospel 
without its roots ; the attempt is pitiable and it challenges the Church 
to more vigorous and loving service among these wayward children 
of God whose eager l)ut misguided search for the Way of Life is 
so desperately futile. 

(3) In Islam a new spirit of unity and aggression has appeared 
in certain centers. The restriction by European nations upon the 
realm and rule of the Turks and other Mohammedans in the Near 
East, with the decisions affecting the caliphate in Constantinople 
and the sovereign power in the holy cities of Mecca, Medina, and 
Jerusalem, have doubtless magnified the Moslem menace from Mo- 
rocco to Mandalay. The political storms in Egypt and in India 
seem to have been largely incited by an aggressive and retaliatory 
policy of Islam ; the same might also be said of the lesser but intense 
situations in Algiers, Syria, and elsewhere where a nominal Christian 
power has sovereign or mandate authority for a largely Moham- 
medan population. As this is being written, the Allied diplomats 
are revising the Sevres Treaty in the attempt to dissolve the threat- 
ening difficulties of the whole situation. Boycott of everything Chris- 
tian or foreign is a common weapon which recurrently threatens 
our Mission work in different places, but seldom with disastrous 
results. Unenlightened and fanatical Mohammedanism presents what 
is probably the largest, single, religious obstruction to God's modern 
prophets who have gone out to prepare a highway for our Lord. 

(4) Aside from these competitive and antagonistic religions, our 
Missions must cope with the constantly growing opposition and 
danger of crass and blatant irreligion. The New Thought Movement 
is sweeping forward in the Orient from the impact of Western 
learning. In many lands where the old untrue and superstitious 
faiths are fading away along with the other mists which science 
is driving from long-darkened minds there is coming in an ominous 
atheistic secularism which presents in many ways an even more diffi- 
cult task to the Christiain propagandist than did the old religions 
themselves. The educated classes of these lands, unable to retain 
their former beliefs, readily accept the self-seeking materialism 
which seems to them to motivate successful western countries. The 
surrender of the old creeds and codes leaves "the house swept and 



6 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

garnished and seven other spirits more wicked than the first" enter 
in and dwell there. The Church must quickly make use of its tre- 
mendous opportunity during these days when modern thought and 
science are so rapidly dispelling the superstitious beliefs among the 
primitive, retarded and other non-Christian cultures of the world 
and must enter into these open hearts and minds swept free of 
animism and anemic philosop'hy and occupy them with the one 
saving, satisfying and universal faith revealed of the Eternal Father 
for all mankind. We must strive to guide the powerful New- 
Thought Movement into Christian channels, converting it into an 
ally. When a famous British University Professor, denouncing 
religion in the name of science and philosophy, lectures in China 
that "regardless of human life, omnipotent matter rolls relentless on 
its way," and when he and a woman companion mislead the student 
classes of the world's most potential nation by their enticing and 
vicious doctrines, it is time for Christians to cease internal strife 
and to attack the enemy in force. The Church must take quick 
and strong action to counteract such destructive and deadly down- 
pulls with the straight, uplifting force of Christ. 

The world is rich in opportunity value for Christian service. The 
majority of the human race has yet to hear in any adequate way of its 
only Savior from sin unto righteousness, and the Church is every- 
where free to press forward with increasing zeal to carry the full 
message of Christ to our contemporaries. Our Master gloriously 
proves Himself adequate to every need which He is given a chance 
to meet, and in every land men, women, and children are being saved 
by Him from despairing lives of bondage to fear and evil. The 
Church advances with determination and assurance toward the dis- 
tant and difficult objective assigned by its Master and accepted ever 
since the first apostles served and died as missionaries of the Cross. 
Today the Great Commission is more generally obeyed than ever 
before. Your missionaries and the trained native workers associ- 
ated with them are zealously seeking to apply the Gospel to "every 
life and all of life" that they can reach. They carefully and prayer- 
fully seek to discover the very wisest mediums of service and to 
employ these means in the most effective and fruitful way. The 
methods of work of the various Missions are as well adapted to 
the Kingdom program as local conditions allow and as competent, 
experienced men and women investing their lives in the enter- 
prise can conceive and with very meagre resources develop. From 
the days of Carey and Dufif, of Lowrie and Nevius, the motive and 



GENERAL SITUATION 7 

method of Christian Missions has l)een as deep as the need of a 
soul for eternal redemption from sin and as broad as the pitiable 
desert of temporal life without Christian enlightenment. Christ re- 
deems and raises all that lie touches and He reaches for all that 
needs redemption. 

The efficient program of comprehensive and self-peri)etuating 
evangelism on the foreign held is commonly carried on in three cor- 
related functions of preaching. teaching, and healing, with their neces- 
sary and inevitable outflow into the uplift of degrading social stand- 
ards and processes. The preaching program, with the dignified 
church service and the most informal street meeting, with wide and 
constant itineration, with the gathering and training of ministers, 
evangelists and Bible women, with the wide use of printed Gospels, 
other literature, and newspaper evangelism, employs every practicable 
and appropriate method to carry the message directly to a needy 
world. A recent order for literature reached our Beirut press from 
the Persian Gulf by airplane, saving approximately three weeks in 
transmission ; "the King's business requireth haste." In the teaching 
process in schools of every grade and of many types, the great objec- 
tives of our missions are direct evangelism of non-Christian students, 
the education of the children of the Church, the training of Christian 
leaders, both clerical and lay, the development of a strong, Christian 
community, and the Christianization of the various phases of a 
people's life; for each one of these purposes the educational medium 
is admirably adapted. Through the beneficent ministry of healing is 
carried unmistakably and winsomely the loving, life-giving message 
of the Great Physician of all human ills ; the Gospel has entered 
myriads of lives as well as many a land "at the point of a lancet." 
Thus spirit, mind, and 'body, each with both religious and social hear- 
ing, form our missionary triangle. 

Our own Presbyterian Missionary representatives are pressing 
forward among sixty-seven nationalities, using ninety-four languages 
and hundreds of dialects, in 170 Stations where missionaries reside 
and 2,900 other centers of regular work. Cooperating with these 
missionaries are 8,262 native preachers, teachers, Bible women, and 
other trained workers. They carry forward their service of evan- 
gelism and training for leadership through 1.185 organized churches. 

4-557 Sunday Schools, and 4,198 other groups of believers, and 
2,562 educational institutions of every grade from kindergarten to 
professional school. In 191 hospitals and dispensaries, 704,026 
patients were treated last year in the name of Christ. Our printing 

presses sent out the written word on 102,750,879 pages; 20,145 



8 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

members were added to the Church during the year, of whom 1,414 
came from our mission schools and colleges ; more than one-third 
of the non-Christian students in seven colleges in China professed 
Christ publicly and joined the church last year. Toward the support 
of this work the equivalent of $1,801,022 gold was paid by the 
natives on the field in contribution and fees, which amount repre- 
sents a purchasing power vastly larger there than in America. 

This comprehensive program of world evangelism is resulting in 
a well developed and dependable native church constituency to carry 
forward through the future a vigorous and expanding Church of 
Christ in each land. The native Churches have been rapidly grow- 
ing in recent years in ability, in influence, and, partly due to the pow- 
erful tide toward nationalism, in self -consciousness. The theme 
of the latest Foreign Missions Conference of North America was 
the increasing self -consciousness of native Churches and its effect 
upon the relations of Missions to the Church. The chief aim of the 
Missionary Enterprise is an indigenous Church, and Missions in cer- 
tain lands are now somewhat embarrassed by the sudden and seem- 
ingly one-sided success of their effort in a desire by the Church for 
authority without commensurate responsibility, and great wisdom 
and love are needed for the best adjustment in all relations between 
the Mission and the Church in this day of the latter's self-determina- 
tion, in order that the fullest development of the Church may result 
and the rightful sphere of the Mission may be discovered and filled. 
The Board has placed before its Missions for study and report the 
proposals of various recent conferences upon this increasingly im- 
portant question of the Native Church, and is prepared in harmony 
with many actions of the Assembly to cooperate with its Missions 
in leading the Churches into the very fullest advisable assumption 
of authority and responsibility. The new Nationalism need not be 
anti-Christian, if Christians do not oppose it, and it can supply 
forces which would count mightily for the Kingdom campaign. The 
exercise, both of self-determination by the national Churches and of 
the missionary mandate by the home Churches, must lead harmoni- 
ously toward the realization of the one great object of both groups — • 
thorough, world-wide evangelism and full, Christian brotherhood. 

To advise and assist in these general problems and in other in- 
ternational and interdenominational missionary operations, the Inter- 
national Missionary Council has been constituted of representatives 
elected by the various national missionary organizations, both of the 
homelands and of the mission fields. As the Council is created solely 
for the purpose of investigation and cooperation within the appro- 



GENRRAI. SITUATION 9 

priate sphere of the national advisory groups, it does not represent 
churches as such and it declares that "No decision shall be sought 
from the Council, and no statement shall be issued by it on any 
matter involving an ecclesiastical or doctrinal question, on which 
the members of the Council or the bodies constituting the Council 
may differ among themselves." Among the members elected to repre- 
sent the Missionary Conference of North America are two secretaries 
of the Board, Mr. Robert E. Speer and Dr. Arthur J. Brown. The 
first meeting of the Council was held in October, 1921, and has 
given great hope as to its fulfilment of large and far-reaching possi- 
bilities for service in coordinating and focusing the overseas cam- 
paign of the scores of denominations of many lands. 

In these enterprises of cooperation with other Christian commun- 
ions the General Assembly has for decades cordially supported its 
Board of Foreign Missions by numerous and vigorous deliverances. 
The seventeenth chapter of John's Gospel is writ large in our Pres- 
byterian service manual and we seek to answer by love and life the 
high-priestly prayer of our Lord "that they all may be one that the 
world may believe that thou hast sent me." A convincing reason 
for cooperation was once stated by a British missionary who re- 
marked : "In China we get together because we have found that the 
factors of the Gospel that work in each denomination are common 
to us all." 

It is interesting to note that at the Foreign Missions Confer- 
ence in January a Chinese Christian called for "a limitation 
of competitive equipment" in missionary work, which remark, com- 
ing at the time of the Conference for the Limitation of Armament, 
was strikingly significant. The most consecrated use of meagre 
funds and inadequate forces, the most unselfish spirit of denomina- 
tional operations, and the most far-seeing plans for the divine and 
indigenous development of the native Church result in many forms 
of comity, cooperation, and unity — creating sometimes a single com- 
munion from the Missions of several denominations, or a division 
of territory for separate occupation, sometimes a union college and 
professional school as a training center for several Missions, or again 
a single translation bureau and press for all the communions in one 
language area, or a united evangelistic committee for an allied 
Christian attack upon a great heathen city. Few of these joint 
enterprises, absolutely indispensable for the progress of the work, 
could be satisfactorily undertaken and conducted within the resources 
of any one denomination, but are made possible through this cordial 
recognition of the need and propriety of united service for a common 



10 [A'TRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

Master. Your Missions last year cooperated with one or more other 
members of the body of Christ in the union undertakings which 
are Hsted at the end of this Introduction; it is planned hereafter to 
facilitate reference to the cooperative enterprises through the index 
of the Report under the heading of Union Work. 

The Post-War Conference of representatives of the two Foreign 
Boards, the Missions, and the Home Church made a large contribu- 
tion to our missionary organism in providing not only clear defini- 
tions of objectives and forms of work in harmony with changing 
conditions, but also better adjustments in the operations of a Mission, 
in relations of the Board with the Missions, in terms of service and 
use of furloughs, in the more nearly adequate support of missionaries 
during active service and upon possible retirement at seventy years 
of age, or after forty years of service. Among the new regulations 
which the Board has adopted as a result of the Post-War Confer- 
ence and of the subsequent votes of the twenty-seven Missions upon 
the Conference Findings, some of the most important are the fol- 
lowing : 

(1) The duration of the first term of service on the field is made 
five years and the first furlough as a general rule will be used in 
further direct preparation for service, presumably post-graduate 
study. The mission fields require a constantly rising level of qualifi- 
cation for leadership. 

(2) The salaries of single men and single women missionaries 
have 'been equaKzed and placed at a level approximating 60 per cent, 
of a married man's salary. 

(3) A personal allowance during travel has been granted to each 
missionary while journeying on furlough to or from the field; this 
allowance amounts to about one-half of home allowance for the same 
period. 

(4) As the scale of financial support was by common consent in- 
sufficient and distressing for missionaries with children, the chil- 
dren's allowance was increased. (Roger Babson says that there is 
only one group of people more successful than the children of min- 
isters and that is the children of missionaries. May the Church never 
fail to provide for the two most useful groups in the world!) 

(5) Larger provision for the medical expenses of missionaries is 
made ; also an allowance, not to exceed $25 per month, toward 
rent or residence for a family that may need such assistance on fur- 
lough. The good health of the personnel is the largest physical 
asset of missions and will hereafter be better conserved. 

(6) Opportunity is offered for a shorter furlough after a shorter 



GENERAL SITUATION 11 

term of service on the field. For example, in most Mission fields 
the full term of service is now seven years with a twelve months' 
furlough at the end of that time, i. e., one year's furlough in every 
eight years; but after five years of service a missionary may take 
a six months' furlough, the Board paying travel expenses both from 
and to the field ; heretofore the shorter furlough at home could be 
taken by only those missionaries who with private funds could pay 
a proportionate share of the cost of travel. 

(7) In view of long and painful experience with the disconcerting 
uneasiness and dread with which many missionaries look forward to 
the incapacity, of old age after decades of separation from their 
homeland, and in view of the unfavorable prospect for satisfactory 
solution of the involved problem of pensions and retirement insur- 
ance from either the commercial and the general denominational view- 
point, the Board, after exacting study extending over many years, 
has been led to what it believes the wisest course of providing itself, 
an adequate retiring allowance for a missionary who may desire it, 
after the age of seventy or after forty years of service on the field. 
Doubtless many missionaries will continue in active service beyond 
that age, but support is now offered to those whose time has come 
for retirement from the rigorous duties of Christian missionary ser- 
vice in a foreign land, and a depressing burden of anxiety has been 
lifted from those out on the distant firing line. 

These and other less important recent actions based on Post-War 
Conference Findings will be fully stated and explained in the Board's 
revised Manual which is now being issued. 

The Board deeply deplores that during these restless days of Post- 
War readjustments a doctrinal disturbance has arisen to produce 
evident ill effects upon the attitude of some members of the 
Church at home, resulting in disquieting reactions on the Mis- 
sion field. The Board has ever striven with prayerful earnest- 
ness to promote faithfully the fundamental and saving doctrines of 
our divinely revealed religion by commissioning and retaining in ser- 
vice only such missionaries as give themselves to this indispensable 
task. A message or a life without the vital truths of our Holy 
Scriptures would not produce the results for which your Board and 
Missions work night and day and with which God is so abundantly 
blessing their work. "By their fruits ye shall know them." As in- 
structed by the General Assembly of last year, the Board has ex- 
amined further into the reports which alleged irregular beliefs among 
some foreign missionaries. 

On this question of doctrinal soundness the Board sent to all of 



12 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

its missions and missionaries a statement which contained the fol- 
lowing paragraph : 

"It has heen the consistent policy of the Presbyterian Board of 
Foreign Missions scrupulously to avoid any encroachment upon 
the province of the church courts which have exclusive jurisdiction 
in all matters involving ministerial standing or ecclesiastical disci- 
pline, but as an administrative agency of the General Assembly it 
accepts its full share of responsibility for the evangelical teachings 
as wef! as the Missionary ctTectiveness of those whom it commis- 
sions and sends to the foreign field. 

"In obedience to the instructions of the General Assembly it is 
continuing the inquiry which it initiated before the reports referred 
to were put in circulation and will investigate carefully any definite 
chargfes fhat missionaries subject to its authority have departed from 
the faith. On the fundamental issue involved there is and can be 
no difiference of opinion in the Presbyterian Church. Our Foreign 
Mission work is carried on to make our Lord Jesus Christ known 
to all men as their Divine Saviour, and our missionaries must be, 
and our Board is confident that they are. men and women who be- 
lieve and trust in Him, and who hold the fundamental and essential 
convictions of the Gospel. 

"In conjunction with Sessions and Presbyteries the Board will 
endeavor in all faithfulness to discharge its responsibility and to send 
to the field only such workers as are definite in their evangelical 
convictions. 

"If anvwhere and at any time in the foreign mission force of 
the church men and women lose their loyalty to the great convictions 
for which the Church stands, the Board will expect that in honor 
they will report such change of view to their own Presbytery or to the 
Board, or that otherwise the Executive Committee of the Mission 
concerned will take up the matter with them and with the Board 
and with the Presbytery involved." 

The replies from the China and India Councils, the missions and 
the individual missionaries have been clear and thoroughly reassur- 
ing on this matter of vital importance. No evidence whatever has 
been received with regard to any individual calling for, or capable of, 
action by the Board or of transmission to any Presbytery. The 
Board exists to promote the Gospel of Jesus Christ and assist 
in developing His Church, and no one could deprecate more 
than would the Board itself, service by any missionary untrue 
to the essentials of our Christian faith. "Thou art the Christ, 
the Son of the Living God ;" "Upon this rock I will build my 
Church ;" "For other foundation can no man lay than that is laid, 
which is Jesus Christ." To this foundation the greatest apostle to 
the Gentiles was fearlessly faithful and upon this foundation the 



GENERAL SITUATION 13 

Board and yuur modern apostles stand squarely as they work in the 
construction of the world-wide Church. 

The Board's two commissions to Africa and to India and Persia 
were charged last year by the Assembly to "bear to the Churches 
and Missions in these fields the affectionate greetings of the Assembly 
and to assure them of the prayer of the Church in America that the 
Spirit of God may work through them to raise up in each of these 
lands a Christian Church and a Christian leadership, which shall 
bear persuasive witness to the sufficiency and power of the Gospel." 
They have made greatly needed and helpful visits, the expenses being 
largely provided without cost to the Board. The deputation to Africa 
consisted of Rev. William H. Hudnut, D.D., pastor of the First 
Presbyterian Church, Youngstown, Ohio, with Mrs. Hudnut, and 
Mr. J. M. Patterson, the District Secretary of the Board at St. Louis, 
Mo. West Africa had not been visited by representatives of the 
home Church for over seventeen years and it is easy to imagine the 
wonderful welcome which awaited the deputation and the large, long- 
delayed service which it was their privilege to render to the Mission 
and to the tremendous body of native Christians in Cameroun and 
Spanish Guinea. A fuller statement of the work and results of this 
deputation is given in the Africa section of the Report. The Missions 
and Churches in Persia had gone even longer than Africa without 
a visit by representatives of the Board, while the problems of India 
were likewise so pressing that the Board had for years been urged 
to send out a deputation. Consequently, Mr. Robert E. Speer, Secre- 
tary, and Mr. Russell Carter, Associate Treasurer, accompanied by 
Mr. Henry H. Welles, Junior, as Honorary Secretary of the party, 
found an exceptionally heavy burden of responsibility in connection 
with their very strenuous journey, and a correspondingly large op- 
portunity for constructive usefulness in these two extensive areas 
with their hundreds of missionaries and churches. This latter depu- 
tation has not returned as this statement goes to press, but it is 
expected to arrive in America some time during the month of May 
and will make a report at an early date. 

The vice-president of the Board, Mr. James M. Speers, and Mrs. 
Speers, are making a tour of the world and visiting a large majority 
of our Mission fields. They have sons at work as missionaries in 
Peking and Nanking, China, and in Lahore, India. In these days 
with great nations in the Orient in the remaking, it is very important 
that Christian leaders, competent to lend a helping hand, go out from 
the home Church, and it is hoped that an increasing number will 
visit the Mission field, carrying constructive messages and sympa- 



14 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

thetic cooperation at this time of unusual opportunity for service. 
The Board is happy that another of its members, Rev. Charles R. 
Erdman, D.D., Professor in Princeton Theological Seminary, with 
Mrs. Erdman, is visiting the Far East this spring and summer and 
will address conferences in a number of large missionary centers. 
Miss Margaret E. Hodge, President of the Woman's Board of 
Foreign Missions, is also in the Far East and along with Dr. Erd- 
man represents the two Presbyterian Boards at the National Chris- 
tian Conference in Shanghai during the first part of May. 

Regarding the missionary work of our Church among the Chinese, 
Japanese, and Koreans in the United States there has long been a 
feeling, which has been increasing in recent years, that it should 
be under the care of the Boards of Home Missions in harmony with 
the practice of all of the other denominations engaged in similar 
service. There have been a series of joint conferences with the Board 
of Home Missions and the Woman's Board of Home Missions, look- 
ing toward the transfer to them of these activities. A careful plan 
has been worked out by which supervision of the work could be 
taken over by the two Boards of Home Missions on the basis of 
a continuing but diminishing financial grant by the Foreign Board, 
if and when the General Assembly gives its approval to such transfer 
of responsibility. The proposal in detail will be presented to the 
General Assembly this year. Various advantages of the proposed 
arrangement are obvious and would make for the steady improve- 
ment of our denominational work among Orientals on the Pacific 
Coast and its closer coordination with the Home Mission Enterprises 
of our sister churches there. 

The Assam Mission, which came under the care of the Board 
through the recent union of our Church and the Welsh Calvinistic 
Church, has been closely associated in its history, personnel, and ser- 
vice with the neighboring mission of the Foreign Mission Society of 
Wales. Because of this fact and of the remoteness of the Assam 
Mission from our other work in India, it seems eminently advisable 
to negotiate the transfer of this small Mission to the Directors of 
the Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Society in Wales. The Board has 
been in correspondence with the Directors in Wales and it is prob- 
able that definite arrangements can be made by which that Society 
would extend its Mission to include the area of our Assam Mission 
and take over the work in which the four missionaries there will 
probably continue, at least temporarily. This transfer of territory 
will make for the efficiency and unity of the work in India under 
each Board. It may be wise for the Assembly to empower the Board 



GENERAL SITUATION IS 

in advance to make such a transfer, if the way opens; the Welsh 
churches in our denomination are favorably disposed to this pro- 
posal. 

The Board is happy to announce that during the year it has added 
two well qualified furloughed Missionaries to its Executive Staff. 
Rev. W. Reginald Wheeler, formerly connected with the Central 
China Mission and more recently with the North China Mission, was 
called to the office after the death of Dr. A. W. Halsey and as 
Assistant Secretary is conducting the correspondence, which Dr. 
Halsey laid down, with the missions in Latin America, in Africa, 
and among the Orientals on the Pacific Coast. Mr. Clarence A. 
Steele, formerly of the Siam Mission, is, as Assistant Treasurer, 
rendering very necessary service in the Treasury Department. An 
increase in the Staff of the Board was imperative and the Board is 
gratified in securing the services of two well qualified young men 
with mission experience without depleting the missionary force, 
for 'both Mr. Wheeler and Mr. Steele are unavoidably prevented 
from returning to the mission field. 

Financially, the year has been on the whole favorable in spite of ad- 
verse circumstances, and the Board has earnestly and prayerfully 
sought to sustain the overseas extension work of the Church with- 
out retrenchment. The great and continuing embarrassment of our 
Missions is inadequate support from the Home Base, which em- 
barrassment is largely due to the very success and opportunities for 
advance on all of the twenty-seven fronts of the Church's far-flung 
battle line. The Board and the Missions operate with such economy 
that they are frequently criticized by intelligent and sympa- 
thetic friends for trying to extend resources further than advisable. 
There was a surplus in the year's operations which reduces the old 
deficit inherited from the war period. The full details of the Board's 
financial operations with balance sheet, statement of receipts and 
expenditures, detailed schedules, comparative statements, etc., are 
given in the Treasurer's report which however reveals but little of 
the complexity and multiplicity of the financial operations. The rates 
at which the American dollar has been exchanged during the year 
into the many currencies with which the Board's business is con- 
ducted have l^een favorable in general, though in a few countries the 
native currency still costs more than it did prior to the War. 

The Halsey Memorial Fund which the Assembly endorsed last 
year has appealed to the beneficence of many of those who knew 
Dr. Halsey personally and to many more who had been blessed by 
his radiant and abundant living. The total of the Fund as author- 



16 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

ized by the Board was $100,000, to be used in the three missions 
with which Dr. Halsey had special relation : $25,000 for a press in 
Africa, $50,000 toward the press in Syria, and $25,000 toward school 
work in Mexico. At the time this paragraph is being written, the 
total received in cash and pledges toward this Fund is more than 
$93,000, and it is hoped that the full $100,000 will be received 
prior to the meeting of the General Assembly; the entire amount 
was included within the Board's budget as authorized for appeal 
for last year by the Executive Commission of the General Assembly. 

For the year 1922-23 the Assembly's Board and the Woman's 
Board have been allotted by the Executive Commission of 
the total benevolence budget of the whole Church, the com- 
bined sum of $4,643,000. Eighty per cent of this sum has 
been actually appropriated by the Board as guaranteed under- 
writing for the present year and was so reported out to the Mis- 
sions in March, as the Fields must know at the beginning of their 
year's operations the amount of expenditure which they can make. 
These actual, guaranteed commitments for the various departments 
of the work which the Board underwrote at the beginning of this 
year are as follows : 

Classes I and II, missionaries, furloughs, 

children's allowances, etc., etc $2,004,354.87 

Classes V to X required by the Missions for 
their actual work as per Column C in 
the estimates 1,066,628.13 

Class III^ — New Missionaries, New Mission- 
ary Conference, Language Teachers, etc. 123,000.00 

Emergency Health Changes, including Re- 
turns to U. S 20,000.00 

Furlough Study Fund 10,000.00 

F^urlough Rent Allowance 10,000.00 

Furlough Relief Fund 15,000.00 

Co-operative Work, e. g., Foreign Missions 
Conference, Latin-American Cooperation 
Committee, Anglo-American Communi- 
ties Committee, Missionary Education 
Movement, etc., etc 20,000.00 

Fire and Marine Insurance 20,000.00 

Administration, Promotion, Education of 
Home Church, and other expenditures in 
U. S 350,000.00 

New Era Assessment (Approximate) 100,000.00 

The total appropriation for the year 1922-23 is $3,738,983.00 
A large additional sum beyond these underwritten appropriations 



THE WOMAN'S BOARD 17 

is urgently needed for the operating deficit, the large deficits on 
account 'of property rehabilitation in Syria, Persia, and Guatemala, 
pressing needs of other new property, especially residences for mis- 
sionaries, and for increases in the native work classes everywhere. 
Appropriations for these objects will be made as added contributions 
available for them are received by the Board. We hope that suf- 
ficient additional funds will be received for such appropriations, 
which, when added to the above regular appropriations of $3,738,- 
983, will raise the total receipts to approximately the full $4,643,- 
000 allotted to P'oreign Missions by the Executive Commission. 
The Board looks forward eagerly to the time when its regular re- 
ceipts will justify it in planning in advance to undertake the con- 
struction of some of the most urgently needed property which can 
now only be supplied as particularly designated funds are received 
in response to special appeals; quite frequently the less comely fea- 
tures of mission work are the more necessary, but the Board is 
unable to care for them, as they do not attract the donors of special 
gifts. Seven other denominations in this country lead us in their 
per capita contributions to benevolences. 

In the Foreign Missionary Enterprise of rhe Church the Board 
believes that Divine energy, unceasing, resistless and redemptive, is 
released at highest potency in the most needy and productive field 
of constructive Christian service. Your missionaries are human 
engineers serving under God in the greatest reclamation project ever 
conceived. 

THE WOMAN'S BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS 

The Woman's Board reports with thanksgiving the completion of 
its first full year of service as a national Board. Substantial ad- 
vance has been made through the developing and strengthening of 
all the Departments and through the close cooperation with the 
Assembly's Board, made possible by the joint Executive Council 
and by the constant consultation among the officers of the two 
Boards. This year has demonstrated the wisdom of the united 
Departments of the Assembly's and Woman's Boards — Candidate, 
Education and Literature. The work of these departments has been 
carried on more economically and with greater efficiency because 
of this plan, and it has also made possible the presentation of the 
whole Foreign Mission program to the Church. 

A few outstanding results of the year's work are shown by the 
following facts: 69 women appointed as full missionaries and 11 
as special-term workers; 4,025 foreign mission study classes of 



18- INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

women and young i)eople ; 70,000 monthly readers of IVoniaii's 
Work; study hooks and leaflets sold, 153,546; more societies under- 
standing and adopting the $1,500 maintenance rate for the support 
of missionaries; 917 women missionaries heing kept in touch with 
their supporting societies ; over 9,000 missionary societies of Pres- 
byterian young people and about 50,000 children being trained in 
missionary service; the Jubilee gift translated into life in completed 
buildings for schools, hospitals, homes ; money pledged for the first 
college for women in all Persia. 

The six Districts, whose territory corresponds to that of the six 
former Woman's Boards, have been fully organized with District 
Committees and Executive Secretaries. These secretaries have co- 
operated with the District Secretaries of the Assembly's Board in 
cultivating the Foreign Mission interests in each District. There 
have been four regular Field Secretaries at work in the Districts, 
and in addition the Board has united with the Woman's Board of 
Home Missions in employing one Field Secretary to work among 
her own people in the negro presbyteries. 

This is only one evidence of the cooperation of the two Woman's 
Boards which jointly this spring are planning for a Young Woman's 
Conference to be held in Chicago. The Student Committee organ- 
ized under these two Boards has done a vital piece of work this year 
in keeping before Presbyterian young women in college their per- 
s'onal connection with the great Missionary task of the Presbyterian 
Churc'h. The three Student Secretaries have visited 115 colleges in 
this work. 

The Board has continued to have a share in the work of the 
New Era Movement, the outstanding features of this year being 
the Moderator's trips and the Missionary Expositions. Among the 
Board Secretaries who accompanied the Moderator on this visit to 
fifty Presbyteries was a representative of the Woman's Board. 

The Treasurer of the Board reports with gratitude the total re- 
ceipts for the year, applicable to the budget, as $1,254,144.26 and 
$33,384.99 received from legacies. This gift represents real 
sacrifice and deep devotion on the part of Presbyterian women, young 
people, and children. The order of the General Assembly of 1921 
has l>een complied with and all property and securities owned by 
the former six Woman's Boards have been transferred to the 
Woman's Board of Foreign Missions, with the exception of one case 
where state laws prevent. Miss Lucy Lepper, formerly the Assistant 



THE WOMAN'S BOARD 19 

Treasurer of the l)()ar(l, has heen elected Treasurer. The societies 
have not onl\ given generously to the Imdget, but in addition have 
sent boxes of hand-made supplies to almost every hospital on the 
field, at cost valuation of $35,000. While no financial credit is given 
to the societies for this "service of the heart," the missionary doctors 
at the front are receiving much needed help and renewed courage 
in their work. "We of the mission hospitals can never say too much 
of what these l)oxes mean to our work and to the workers in lifting 
the strain on those in charge of supplies." 

The financial campaign for the building fund of the seven Union 
Christian Colleges for Women in the Orient has been pushed aggres- 
sively by Presbyterian women. The Board is represented on the 
Campaign Committee as well as on the Committees of the individual 
colleges. Great care is always taken to safeguard the Christian 
ideals and teachings of these colleges and from them will come the 
Christian leadership of the womanhood of the Orient. They repre- 
sent one of the greatest opportunities before the Church of America 
and are not only the crown but also the unescapable responsibility of 
missionary endeavor for women. 

The President of the Woman's Board is an official delegate to the 
National Christian Conference in Shanghai in May, 1922. She has 
been granted a six months' leave of absence in order to visit the 
missions in Japan, Chosen, and the Philippines as well as the missions 
in China. 

A great loss and sorrow has come to the Board through the death 
of Dr. Ella B. Everitt on January 24, 1922. Dr. Everitt was a skill- 
ful surgeon of national reputation, but in the midst of a busy pro- 
fessional life she gave freely of herself in generous, consecrated 
service to the work of the Lord, especially in the cause of Foreign 
Missions. Coming to the national Board with wide experience from 
her touch with students and her work on the Candidate Committee 
of the Philadelphia Society, she was made Chairman of the Medical 
Committee of the Foreign Department. All who associated with 
Dr. Everitt were conscious of her mental activity, clear vision, and 
wise judgment which, combined with a rare womanly nature and 
deep Christian devotion, made a unique personality. 

The benediction of this life and of the lives of the other beloved 
workers at home and abroad who have gone on into the fuller ser- 
vice this year, remains as a blessing and inspiration for broader, more 
consecrated service in the 53rd year of the Woman's Board which 
is just opening. 



20 INTRODUCTION-FOREIGN MISSIONS 

THE HOME DEPARTMENT 

The Plome Department of the Board is charged with the task of 
educating and cultivating the Home Church in the interest of Foreign 
Missions. On April 20, 1921, Rev. Abram Woodrufif Halsey, D.D., 
who had served as Secretary of the Department for twenty-two 
years, passed to his reward. Seldom has any Mission Board been 
called upon to suffer such a heavy loss. Dr. Halsey was a man un- 
usually well informed on Missions, a speaker of exceptional power, 
and greatly beloved by the entire Church. The last General Assembly 
held a memorial service for him and authorized an appeal for a 
Halsey Memorial Fund, on which report is made elsewhere. Shortly 
before Dr. Halsey's death, Rev. William P. Schell, who had been 
his Assistant and Associate for eight years, was appointed to succeed 
him as Secretary of the Home Department. There has been one 
addition to the staff during the year. In May Rev. Edwin E. White, 
Pastor of Trinity Church, South Orange, New Jersey, was called 
to serve as Assistant Secretary of the Educational Department. 
The work of this Department has been rapidly increasing in volume 
and influence during the past few years and never have the oppor- 
tunities been more encouraging. 

The District Secretaries have been unusually busy during the year. 
Over twenty furloughed missionaries were used in deputation work 
in the Central District by Rev. Charles E. Bradt, D.D., the 
Secretary in charge, and 583 congregations were touched by this 
method. Church and World Visual Institutes have had a large 
place in the work of the District and there has been an unprecedented 
demand for illustrated lectures. 

Mr. J. M. Patterson, the Secretary of the Southern District, was 
sent by the Board in June as a member of a deputation to the West 
Africa Mission, returning late in the autumn. During his absence 
Rev. W. M. . Cleaveland, D.D., the Associate District Secretary, 
was in charge of the work in the District, caring for the heavy 
demands of the field work in Churches, Student Volunteer Con- 
venitions, and Institutes of various kinds. 

During the past year the Secretary of the Western District, 
Rev. Weston T. Johnson, D.D., visited every one of the Synods 
and a great many Presbyteries of his extensive district. The out- 
standing events of the year are the successful mission study groups 
held in connection with the Synods of Washington, Oregon, Cali- 
fornia, and Arizona. At the meeting of the Synod of California 
between 250 and 450 were enrolled in each of three mission study 
classes. From all parts of the District there has been an increasing 



THE HOME DEPARTMENT 21 

demand for speakers, lantern lectures, literature, and missionary edu- 
cational material. 

Rev. Ernest F.Hall, D.D., Field Secretary of the Board, has 
given 250 addresses in 14 States before Synods, Presbyteries, Wo- 
men's Synodical and Presbyterial Meetings, Churches, Sunday 
Schools, Young People's Meetings, and in universities, colleges, 
normal and high schools, Chambers of Commerce, and Men's Clubs. 
He has also conducted supper conferences for men only in 40 
churches attended by 2,922 men, including 60 pastors, and repre- 
senting 65 churches. He has also been active in many Summer 
Conferences and Synods. Dr. Hall will carry on most of his work 
in the future in the Eastern District and will have his headquarters 
at 156 Fifth Avenue, New York. 

The Secretary of the Home Department accompanied the Modera- 
tor of the General Assembly on his visits to twelve cities; the Asso- 
ciate Secretary of the Southern District and a furloughed mission- 
ary represented the Board in many other cities visited by Dr. Swear- 
ingen on his nation-wide tour. 

Educational Department. This year registers substantial progress 
in the study of Missions in the churches. Records which include the 
Assembly's and the Woman's Boards show 4,888 groups in 2.190 
different churches and 251 Presbyteries, with a total membership of 
104,011. Detroit Presbytery again reports the largest number of 
Foreign Mission Study Classes. Westport Avenue of Kansas City. 
Mo., holds the banner for the churches. 

Among the Sunday Schools there is a marked increase in the use 
of Foreign Mission Courses and Programs. 

The appreciation by the churches of the Board's development of 
its Lantern Slide service is shown by the use of our Stereopticon 
Lectures, which has nearly doubled. 

For the new year, the Board joins with other denominations in 
offering INDIA as the field for special study. The timeliness of this 
study is apparent ; its intense interest will best be appreciated by those 
who take part in it. The Educational Department is offering an 
exceptional list of textbooks, leaders' helps, and supplementary 
materials, of Stereopticon Lectures, and of programs and suggestions 
for Missionary Education in the Sunday Schools. The Secretaries 
of the Department will also help leaders by personal cor- 
respondence. 

Department for Specific Work. The scope of the work of this 
Department has been enlarged during the year by making it respon- 
sible for the records of all pledges and gifts to property items out- 



22 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

side of the Board's regular appropriations, in addition to the assign- 
ments and records of all pledges and gifts for objects within the 
appropriated budget hitherto handled. To give information about 
the field of investment, much time has been devoted to the prepara- 
tion and publication of a series of sketches descriptive of each 
Mission and of each Station of the Board, entitled "Pen Pictures." 
They present in summarized form local outstanding features, present- 
day problems, economic conditions, characteristics of the people, 
natural resources, as the background and appeal of the activities, 
needs, and opportunity of our Christian enterprise. To promote the 
continued interest of supporters of specific work, at least three 
letters for a particular field have been sent out during the year to 
many hundreds of churches, Sunday Schools, and individuals. The 
Board is indebted to and dependent upon the hearty and 
loyal response of the missionaries, to its very frequent re- 
quests for this field information for contributors. It has 
been a privilege and delight to help in this way to strengthen 
the ties between the home Church and the missionary, and we value 
highly these friendly and helpful relations established between mis- 
sions and the home constituency. In addition to "Pen Pictures," 
the Department has during the year issued two leaflets especially 
for the missionaries on the subject of field letters and correspond- 
ence, and four leaflets for the home Church on the forms of mis- 
sionary investment. 

During the year new pledges were received towards the annual 
support of thirty-two Stations, amounting to $9,320. One church 
also pledged $5,000 to open a new Station in Africa, and another 
church pledged $10,000 for the running expenses, extension needs, 
and property of a Station in India. The entire or partial support 
by "shares" have 1:)een taken in eighty-two missionaries. This does 
not include twelve Sunday Schools that took twenty shares, amounting 
to $825, in five missionaries assigned to them. There has been also 
an increase in former annual pledges of approximately $7,500. 

The Foreign Missions Library 'has helped to promote the mission- 
ary cause in the homeland. It has gone forward with the collection, 
care and loan of 'books, periodicals, pamphlets, photographs, curios, 
and costumes. It greatly served the needs of the office staff, and by 
assistance rto the many visitors to the Library, by correspondence, and 
by the loan of its various collections has been of significant service 
to the 'home Church. Any student of Foreign Missions is eligible 
to the privileges of the many rare records of the Library and a cor- 
dial invitation is extended to all to make use of its advantages. 



CANDIDATE DEPARTxMl-:i\T 23 

Literature Department. Since the merging of the six Woman's 
Boards of Foreign Missions into one Board, the General Board and 
the Woman's Board have conducted a Joint Literature Department. 
During the year the General Board has sent out 300,508 pieces of 
Hterature, eiither direct or through the CentraHzed Distribution Ser- 
vice of the New^ Era Movement, and approximately 100,000 copies 
of All the World have been circulated. The Woman's Board re- 
ports that 14,216 orders have been filled in the Joint Literature 
Department at a mailing cost of $1,424.33. Approximately 67,560 
leaflets have been sold by the Woman's Board at Literature Head- 
quarters. 

Publicity Department. From this Department have gone out the 
Annual Report of the Board, four issues of the Board's Quarterly, 
All the World, a number of occasional News Bulletins, and leaflets 
on the general work of the Board. Fresh, up-to-date missionary news 
has also been sent each month to a long list of religious and secular 
papers, and also to individuals, some of whom secure the publication 
of the material in their local paper. Printer's cuts with story attached 
have been loaned to churches for their weekly calendars, and records 
of all important missionary events at home and abroad have been 
issued for publication through various channels. 

CANDIDATE DEPARTMENT 

The Candidate Department reports the first year of the work of 
the United Candidate Department of the two Boards of Foreign 
Missions and indicates that the new arrangement is finding accept- 
ance among the schools, colleges, and seminaries in the homeland, 
and is enabling the Board to reach more accurate and satisfactory 
conclusions in selecting those who are to represent the Church on 
the Foreign Field. 

The Department has been able for the year to command the ser- 
vices of Rev. A. W. Moore, one of our India missionaries who 
is on furlough. Mr. Moore has traveled almost continuously, visiting 
the educational institutions and other centers of young people and 
holding personal interviews with individual applicants. There have 
been more requests for his services than he could accept ; he was 
also one of the number who accompanied the Moderator on his far- 
western tour. The value of this policy of field work of an intense 
and constant sort has been so manifest that the Board hopes in suc- 
ceeding years to make similar use of other men who come home on 
furlough. 

The consideration of the Candidate question in connection with 



24 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

the Post War Findings and of the new attitude and life of the Mission 
Fields has made it very clear that in the coming years a far more 
thorough equipment will be necessary for those who go to the field 
than ever before. Some of the INTissions are even asking for fewer 
but more highly equipped and competent men and women. To this 
end the first term of service on the field is to be five years, with the 
expectation that the first furlough be used for continued study under 
the guidance of the Board. A Committee has been appointed to 
counsel with the missionaries on the best use of their first furlough. 
The number of candidates appointed during the year just closed is 
130, and the net gain is 34. which is about the average gain for the 
last ten years, after allowing for deaths, resignations, and other with- 
drawals from service. 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

The newly organized Medical Department of the Board has a two- 
fold object: the health conservation of the missionary force and the 
promotion of the medical missionary branch of our work. The vital 
relationship of health to effectiveness and the increasing size and 
complexity of our organization have made it seem wise to correlate 
and unify these special problems of health and medical work in one 
of^ce. A furloughed medical missionary. Dr. E. M. Dodd of Persia, 
is the Acting Medical Secretary who has this department temporarily 
in charge. 

1. The purpose of the health phase of the Medical Department 
is both preventive and curative, or reconstructive. The preventive 
aim applies first to the physical qualifications of candidates. In this 
matter the Board has for years received the able assistance of examin- 
ing physicians in various parts of the country, but these examinations 
have not, until recently, been coordinated in the New York head- 
quarters. Now the medical reports and correspondence are handled 
by the Medical Office, and constitute a continuous health record which 
will run through all the years of a missionary's connection with the 
Board. The preventive aim applies, secondly, to the missionary's 
life on the field in cooperation with the medical missionaries of his 
mission, where health responsibility as well as the care of illness rests 
chiefly on the local medical force. A qualified medical secretary at the 
home base, visualizing the health situations abroad, giving his encour- 
agement to the plans and efforts of the medical missionaries, and 
representing and interpreting their views to the Board, can help 
greatly in safeguarding the health and usefulness of the whole over- 
seas personnel. 



MEDICAL — SURVEY OF FIELDS— AFRICA 25 

The health aim appHes, finally, to the missionary's furlough, where 
also the reconstructive phase is important. Most missionaries come 
home fairly well, and then often undertake strenuous study, deputa- 
tion and other forms of work, not infrequently without opportunity 
for recuperation and a well balanced furlough. Many come home 
with some latent or active tropical infection; some with a surgical 
operation indicated ; some with sanitarium or other special health 
measures necessary ; and many more with minor health problems. 
These present questions requiring professional knowledge, sym- 
pathetic understanding of the individual and of the field background, 
and sound judgment based on cumulative experience. Good health 
of the missionary personnel is one of the greatest assets of the 
Church, and the Board's full responsibility of stewardship demands 
that it be carefully guarded. 

2. The promotional work of the Medical Department involves 
recruiting medical missionary candidates. The appeal to the medical 
students naturally comes with the greatest force from medical people 
who know the challenging appeal from the field and can present it 
in professional terms. It also includes serving as a clearing house 
for the ideas, activities, and practical needs of the medical mission- 
aries. It handles the purchasing of medical and surgical supplies, 
supplies professional information to the men on the field (an informal 
Medical Bulletin for all medical missionaries has been started), 
assists the furloughed medical people in securing opportunities for 
post-graduate study, advises and helps native medical students in 
America in their study, carries on publicity and educational work 
in behalf of medical missions among the profession at home, and in 
general functions as the nerve center at G. H. Q. for medical afifairs. 

SURVEY OF FIELDS 

.AFRICA. At the Post-War Conference the problem of urgency 
and need of occupation of our various fields was approached from 
four different standpoints: (1) sole occupancy or the measure of 
our separate territorial responsibility; (2) the responsiveness of the 
field to the Gospel; (3) strategic importance; (4) human need for 
Christianity and its blessings. Classifying our mission fields ac- 
cording to these criteria, the leader of the discussion gave Africa 
first place among all our mission fields. 

During the past year the needs of this field, under these four dis- 
tinct heads, have become increasingly evident. Our Church is the 
only American Protestant Church at work in Spanish Guinea and 



2(i INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

Cameroun. Ikcause of the responsibility of sole occupancy, one 
cannot ignore their needs. In addition to our own territory, the de- 
cisions following the great war brought to us the responsibility for 
the territory formerly occupied in Cameroun (now a French Man- 
date) by the German Missionary Societies. The total population of 
Cameroun is estimated at 2,500,000. In this territory we have today 
only 70 missionaries, including wives. As one of our missionaries has 
recently written : "It is a thing calculated greatly to disturb even the 
most polished brand of patience — this trying constantly to man the 
different stations without men." From the standpoint of responsive- 
ness, Africa was also ranked in first place. The total enrollment 
of actual church members is over 25,000; the total Christian constitu- 
ency of our Church is placed at 62,000. The need of additional 
workers, if this responsive attitude of the people is not to be dis- 
appointed, was clearly stated bv the Mission at its latest annual 
meeting: "Efulen has 7,000 Christians with only one minister; 
MacLean has 10,000 Christians with only one minister; Metet has 
6,000 Christians with only one minister; Foulassi has 11,000 Chris- 
tians with only two ministers; Elat has 16,000 Christians with only 
two ministers; Sakbayeme has 12,000 Christians with only one 
minister. These ministers cannot look after these great numbers 
properly without more help. The Lord has given to the Presbyterian 
Church the whole of this field to occupy. No one else is responsible. 
These Christians have confessed Christ and now they need to l)e led 
and guided and admonished, for there are 'grievous wolves that 
have entered in.' Surely these simple minded must be helped in the 
way. We find among them examples of faith and love and devotion, 
so we know that Africans can become earnest Christians." 

In strategic importance Africa does not occupy such a relatively 
high place yet in the great contest now going on between Christianity 
and Islam. Equatorial Africa is on the direct front line. The forces 
of Mohammedanism are coming from the North and those of Chris- 
tianity are advancing from the South in the great African continent. 
They are meeting now near the equator. The sensations of our 
. missionaries who are stationed on this critical line are referred to 
by one of them in a recent letter : "It is useless to ask for the prayers 
of the Church— as if praying, as God wants us to pray, were the 
easiest instead of the most difficult thing in the life of a Christian! 
It seems useless to even mention these things. All the world is occu- 
pied with other things. So who cares if the Christ is daily losing 
thousands to Islam? I ask the Presbyterian Church why they 
have placed us here to face this thing and not back us up in it?" 



SURVEY OF FIELDS— AFRICA 27 

From the last standpoint of human need. Africa again was given 
first place among all our Mission fields. "Those drums that clamor 
in the dawn of a Sunday morning, calling the Christians of unnum- 
bered villages to keep Holy Day; these files of men and women 
who go to God's house by the dim ways of the forest or the sun- 
smitten ways of the beach ; these heavy loads of copper moneys that 
come in from the many Christian communities ; these witnesses to 
our Lord Jesus who speak morning and evening in the palaver houses 
of obscure villages; these mothers who teach their little black chil- 
dren to pray ; these young wives who follow their evangelist hus- 
bands on long missionary journeys — this mustering of Ethiopia — 
surely this must mean much to you?" Ethiopia is indeed stretching 
out her hands unto God. Her utter need, her eager longing, her 
menacing ignorance, and her overwhelming response to the Message 
are a challenge to the Church at home." 

Against this general background of obligation, opportunity and 
need there have been, during the past year, three developments of 
special importance. These were the visit of a Commission to the 
field ; the solution of several long-standing problems by its aid ; and 
the opening of a new station at Yaounde. The Commission spent 
approximately two months on the field ; it was composed of Dr. and 
Mrs. W. H. Hudnut of Youngstown, Ohio, and Mr. J. M. Patterson. 
Secretary for the Southern District, and made the first visit since 
17 years ago, when the late Dr. Halsey was there. They visited all 
the mission stations, which required traveling of 2,000 miles, held 
an important conference with the Executive Committee of the Mis- 
sion and representatives of the stations, and drew up findings con- 
cerning the work which were later brought for action before the 
Board. 

The Commission was instrumental in solving a number of distinct 
and pressing problems. One difficulty related to the delay in secur- 
ing permission for the building of a Central Hospital in Cameroun. 
Funds totalling $50,000 had been subscril^ed for this enterprise, 
but for various reasons permission has not been forthcoming from 
the French Government. The Commissioner, Monsieur Carde, gra- 
ciously gave permission for the building of this hospital and granted 
ground for its site. Preparations are going forward at once for the 
breaking of ground and the establishing of this important institution. 
The Mission has long felt the need of a modern printing press. In 
this case there was no difficulty in securing permission for its estab- 
lishment but funds were not yet in hand which would warrant this 
step. As a result of the Halsey Memorial Fund, $25,000 is now in 



28 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

hand which will mean the early establishment of the Halsey Memorial 
Press; the Commission was of large service in connection with the 
related field questions. As a token of their love and esteem for 
Dr. Halsey the missionaries themselves have provided a $3,000 
residence for the printer. A trying problem which has hitherto been 
unsolved is that relating to the education of missionaries' children 
on the field. Our Africa missionaries are justly loath to keep their 
children in the moral and physical climates of Cameroun. On the 
other hand, if the children come to America when they are young, 
this necessitates the separation of the families, as either father or 
mother must remain with the children of that age in America. The 
first step has now been taken towards establishing a school for mis- 
sionaries' children similar to schools in certain other mission countries. 

Cameroun is a French Mandate and therefore is not subject to the 
governmental rules and regulations of Colonies, such as those in 
French Equatorial Africa ; nevertheless, there has seemed to be a 
certain tendency on the part of the local government to rule this 
Mandate as a Colony. This attitude has meant that the regulations 
and restrictions with reference to education under any auspices other 
than that of the government have been applied to the schools of our 
Mission in that country. One of these rules requires the teaching 
of the school children, not in the vernacular but in French, which 
would mean the closing of all of our Bulu schools. The Commis- 
sion took this matter up with the local government and M. Carde has 
promulgated a decree which excepts the Mission or catechetical schools 
from the application of the general rules in force throughout the 
French Colonies in Africa and gives the Mission three years in 
which to conform to these regulations. 

A third development of importance during the past year has been 
the opening of a new station at Yaounde, the new capital of Came- 
roun. Funds have been secured toward the cost of this new work 
and the necessary transfer in missionary forces have been made to 
man this new station. Commissioner Carde has given the land for 
this station to the Mission, thus adding to the already long list of 
benefactions received at his hands on behalf of the Government. 

In view of the needs and opportunity which are so evident, the 
Board hopes that by special efifort on the part of its secretaries and 
of the West Africa Commission, the Church will be more fully 
aroused to the sense of the situation in Cameroun so that the forces 
there might be more adequately supported and the work of Christ 
go forward along clearly necessary lines of advance into the Dark 
Continent. 



SURVEY OF FIELDS— CHINA 29 

CHINA. — It is not necessary to dwell jpon the chaotic political 
conditions which still prevail in China. It may be well, however, 
for us to note that the actual life of the common people and our 
missionary work are not so seriously affected as readers in America 
might imagine. It is true that provincial authorities are unfriendly 
to the Central Government; that some parts of the country are in 
actual revolution; and that in certain sections bandits are numerous, 
particularly in Shantung, Hunan, and South China. A party of our 
own missionaries traveling by river from Canton to Lien-chou were 
attacked by robbers and stripped of all their belongings, bullets rid- 
dling their boat. Fortunately, the missionaries were not wounded. 
The murder of Dr. Albert L. Shelton, a medical missionary of the 
Disciples of Christ, near the border of Tibet was committed by 
Chinese bandits. In more than one part of China there have been 
times when missionaries appeared to be in danger, although none of 
our missionaries has been actually injured. We would not under- 
estimate these serious troubles. The corruption of officials, too. has 
never been worse. In spite of these untoward conditions, however, 
the life of the average Chinese, mostly villagers, is jogging along 
about as usual. 

China's relations with Japan, which have been severely strained 
for some time, have been noticeably improved by the Washington 
Conference on the Limitation of Armament. While some of 
China's grievances were not officially before the Conference itself, 
advantage was taken of the opportunity to bring about private con- 
ferences between the Chinese and Japanese delegates with friendly 
advisers. The Chinese publicly expressed themselves as very happy 
over the outcome; they were particularly gratified by the decision to 
abolish extra-territorial laws and foreign courts, in case an Inter- 
national Commission should find the way clear, and to withdraw alien 
postoffices. Japan has one hundred and twenty-four postoffices in 
China; France, thirteen; Great Britain, twelve; and America, one. 
All these foreign holdings and operations in China, together with 
the garrisons of foreign soldiers in Peking, Tientsin, Hangchow. 
and other cities, have been deeply resented by China as infringements 
on her sovereignty. The most acute of all the problems was the 
Japanese control of the great sacred Province of Shantung. This 
problem, which more than once has threatened the outbreak of war, 
was, after more than a score of futile conferences between the Chi- 
nese and Japanese delegates, finally adjusted through the good offices 
of the American Secretary of State in a mutually satisfactory way. 
Said one of the Chinese delegates. Dr. C. H. Wang : 



30 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

"We came here empty-handed and we leave with three 
treaties which are all in China's favor. We came here 
with the confideaice of America's sym-:)athy and friendship 
for us, and we leave this country with renewed confidence 
that the friendship between the two peoples of America and 
China will be perpetual. We came here with a message of 
good-will from the Chinese people to the American people, 
and we go back with a like message of good- will from the 
American people to the Chinese people." 

It is interesting to note that three of the four Chinese delegates 
to the Washington Conference were products of Protestant Mission 
Schools; that one of them is an active and devoted Christian; and 
that all of them received their University training in the United 
States. 

The appalling calamity of recent years was the famine, which was 
followed by destructive floods. It would ])e impossible to exaggerate 
the horrors that were caused by these disasters. The facts were 
widely published in the United States so that the Church is presum- 
ably familiar with them. The work of securing relief funds was 
vigorously undertaken under the leadership of the National Com- 
mittee appointed by President \\'ilson, in cooperation with the Mis- 
sionary Boards having work in China, whose representatives did a 
large proportion of the actual work. About eight million dollars 
altogether were secured by this and other agencies, including the 
Red Cross Society. On the field, the task of distribution was super- 
vised by a Committee headed by the American Minister to China, 
but the active supervision and local distribution was largely done by 
missionaries, prominent among whom were several of our Presby- 
terian force. Early in the campaign in America the National Con\- 
mittee requested the churches to send their contributions through 
the Central Committee in order to avoid danger of overlapping com- 
petition in purchasing food, and to secure efficient administration, 
wholesale prices, and reduced rates by shipment in large lots. Con- 
siderable sums, however, were sent to our Board with a request 
that they be forwarded separately to our own missionaries, and 
these were sent as requested. With the approach of the summer 
harvests, the worst is believed to be over ; but for a long time yet 
the missionaries will be confronted with the trying problems which 
the famines and floods have developed. Thousands of orphans must 
be cared for, and people who had to sell their tools and seeds and 
practically everything that they possessed to buy food must be as- 
sisted in getting a new stock, while account must be taken of the 
distressing number of families who, under stress of starvation, sold 



SURVRV OF FIELDS— CHINA 31 

their lands so that they have no homes of their own. The suffering 
Chinese still need our sympathies and our missionaries need the 
prayers aiid sympathies of the home Church. 

The surplus of something over one million dollars which remained 
in the hands of the National Famine Fund after notice had heen re- 
ceived from the Committee in China that additional funds were not 
required, will be carefully expended to the very best advantage for 
China famine sufferers, probably to save those of the future by scien- 
tific famine prevention work in agriculture and forestry. Our Pres- 
byterian China Council approves of this suggestion and two union 
missionary universities may be requested to undertake the direction 
of such a program of famine prevention. 

'Jlie opinion of well-informed observers is clear that the Chinese 
people possess qualities which, wisely developed, will fit them for a 
very large place in the life of the world. Sir Charles Addis, Chair- 
man of the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation, Director 
of the Bank of England and head of the British group of the Chinese 
Consortium, recently told a group of Ijankers in New York : "I am 
returning from China more profoundly impressed than ever before 
with the infinite possibilities for good or evil, for war or peace, which 
lie in the proper handling of the Far Eastern problem by the powers 
concerned. What is that problem ? It is the unification of China by 
the establishment of a strong and independent central government." 
Christianity will supply a great cohesive element in Chinese life and 
make her a power for limitless world service. 

An event which has attracted comparatively little attention in 
America, but which is fraught with enormous possibilities for good 
and which will be of immense benefit to missionary work, is the 
development of the phonetic script. One of the most formidable 
obstacles to Christian work in China is the language, composed of 
about 40.000 ideographs, of which it is necessary to become familiar 
with between three and four thousand in order to Use the language 
with a fair degree of success. John Wesley declared that "the devil 
invented the Chinese language to keep the Gosi:)el out of China." A 
phonetic alphabet of only 39 characters has now been formed. 
Primers to teach the new method are being printed by the million ; 
thousands of portions of Scripture have already been distributed, 
and classes are being formed everywhere in schools and churches, in 
villages, towns and cities, to introduce the new system. In addition, 
large quantities of lx)oks are being published which use the system 
as a medium to advance the study of the national language and litera- 
ture. Peking University and other educational institutions are teach- 



32 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

ing the new system to their students so that, as they carry on their 
religious and social-service work in Peking during the year or scatter 
to their homes in vacation time, they may teach it to others. Older 
Christians can learn to read the Bible in the phonetic script in a 
few weeks' time. 

Progress all along the line can be reported regarding our mission- 
ary work in China. One of the remarkable features of the Cities 
Evangelization project in Shantung, the largest mission, is the 
friendly cooperation of progressive officials and gentry which the 
superintendents, by their evident sincerity in promoting the highest 
welfare, have been able to obtain. Everywhere the missionaries find 
friendliness on the part of the people. They are the most thoroughly 
trusted foreigners in China; they have unlimited opportunities to 
preach the Gospel, and they are availing themselves of these oppor- 
tunities in a splendidly efifective way. Mission schools of all grades, 
from kindergartens to universities, find their accommodations taxed 
to the utmost. There has never been a time when the doors were 
so widely open to the Gospel. For a long period the official classes 
were almost inaccessible; now they, too, are being reached. Bible 
classes have been opened in government educational institutions, with 
many public confessions of Christ. 

A series of evangelistic meetings in Canton developed extraordi- 
nary interest. A site was secured in one of the prominent localities, 
and a large mat shed was erected at a cost of $1,600, the members 
of all the churches freely contributing. Two meetings were held 
daily for ten days. The meeting for women was held at two o'clock, 
and at this service more than 2,000 were frequently present. In the 
evening the meeting was crowded with men, though the seating 
capacity was almost 3,000. In the audience were officials, scholars, 
merchants, seated often side by side with men of laboring classes. 
No distinction in class or rank was made, yet in no instance was 
there slightest evidence of any resentment or disorder. The 
preaching was entirely by the Chinese, the missionaries aid- 
ing in every other possible way. The power of the Chinese preachers 
was greatly in evidence. Among those who gave great assistance 
were the students from the Canton Union Theological College. At 
these meetings more than 100.000 persons were present, and 2,900 
signed cards expressing determination to become Christians. More 
than 1,000 wfere organized into Bible classes. In Canton are some 
large department stores having hundreds of clerks. From one of 
these, 130 men came forward to make confession of faith. The 
entire cost of the meetings, $6,000, was oversubscribed, leaving 



SURVEY OF FIELDS— CHINA 33 

$1,500 in the treasury for a similar series in the future. The fact 
that high officials, prominent scholars and men of all classes listened 
with deep attention to Christian doctrines which Morrison would not 
have dared openly to mention, proves the transforming power of the 
Gospel. Despite or because of disturbed political conditions, China 
presents a wonderful field for the Gospel of Christ. China's friend- 
ship for the United States is an asset of tremendous value. The 
Chinese hold our nation in the highest esteem, Ijeyond that for any 
other nation. With courage, tact, patience and energy, we can help 
mightily to win China for Christ. 

The dedication of the Peking Union Medical College, in Septem- 
ber, brought to Peking a large number of influential men from 
Europe and America. Six Mission Boards cooperate with the China 
Medical Board, whose funds have made this the best equipped 
medical college in the world. Plans for strengthening the missionary 
educational institutions have steadily progressed, especial emphasis 
being placed upon a more adequate training of the Christian ministers 
that are going out to build and lead the new Church of China. In 
four union colleges and universities for men and two union colleges 
for women we carry our share of raising up Christian leaders for 
church, school, hospital, home and community life. Every Christian 
training center is a great power house for leadership. 

Report of the first fully constituted meeting of the General As- 
sembly of the Presbyterian Church in China, April, 1922, will be 
made next year. It is the consummation of a movement that has 
been long in progress and which unites in one great Presbyterian 
Church of China the 25 Presbyteries formed in connection with the 
work of the Missions of all the Presbyterian and Reformed Churches 
having work in China. 

One of the most encouraging signs of the times in China is the 
increasing number of highly trained Christian Chinese leaders. The 
pre-eminent need of China is capable, conscientious leadership and 
Christianity is slowly but surely supplying it. Among the most 
prominent Chinese educators and leaders of the nation is a Christian 
man, educated in our Lowrie High School, Shanghai, and at Columbia 
University, New York, Dr. P. W. Kwo, who is head of the govern- 
ment Normal School and of the new Southeastern University of 
Nanking. Mr. Fred B, Smith, who is now in China, writes : "These 
new great Christian personalities will solve the problem if the rest 
of the world will keep hands ofif and give them a fair chance. I 
met university and college presidents of as fine a grade of scholar- 
ship and administrative ability as are known anywhere in the West. 

4 — For. Miss. 



34 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

I met Church leaders of vision, courage and personal qualities quite 
as significant as anything I have come in contact with in thirty years. 
I met student leaders that are not second to any I have known in 
the West. I met manufacturers who are the last word in up-to- 
dateness. I met bankers, lawyers, doctors of a number one grade. 
I met student groups that would not be ashamed in the presence of 
Harvard, Yale, Cambridge or Oxford men. I saw girls' schools 
which reminded me of Vassar, Mt. Holyoke and Smith. The leaders 
are in China and more are rapidly being produced. I found any 
number of self-supporting churches, big, strong congregations. Per- 
haps no one item impressed me so much in contrast with the memo- 
ries of an earlier visit in 1913 as did this one. I was shown through 
a beautiful library building at St. John's College, all paid for and 
every dollar given by the alumni. I arrived in Hongkong just after 
the Morrison Memorial Church, which has never had a cent of out- 
side help, had voted $90,000 to build a new church, and at the same 
meeting voted $1,000 each toward two new churches just starting to 
build. The same week the Board of Directors of the Young Men's 
Christian Association had voted to erect another building to cost 
$100,000, all of which they will raise themselves. These illustrations 
can be multiplied indefinitely. They prove leadership. H China is 
treated fairly, if the people who believe in world peace, will help 
her in the period of transition, she will be a powerful factor in 
establishing the better order of brotherhood in the world." In this 
day of China's rapid change, the Church must give her every oppor- 
tunity to build the Gospel of Christ into her new civilization. 

A National Christian Conference of exceptional importance was 
held in Shanghai the first part of May and will be fully reported 
upon at a later time. Representatives of the many denominational 
and interdenominational missions met with the delegates of the 
Chinese churches to consider unitedly the great common task of the 
thorough evangelization of the 400,000,000 people of the world's 
most potential nation. The Churches in China are showing a deepened 
sense of responsibility and a heightened capacity for vigorous and 
substantial leadership and progress. 

CHOSEN. — ^^The survey of Chosen naturally shows two sections. 
The first relates to the attitude of the Japanese ofificials toward mis- 
sionaries and their work. We are glad to note an improvement over 
the conditions that prevailed a year ago. Governor General Saito 
has proved to be an honest and well-meaning man who has promul- 
gated many reforms, and is earnestly trying to deal wisely and hu- 



SURVEY OF FIELDS— CHOSEN 35 

inanely with the pe()i)le under his care. Unfortunately, some of the 
lower officials and police, through whom his orders have to be car- 
ried out, are not in sympathy with his kindly purposes and still 
feel that the best way to govern the Koreans is by the stern hand 
of authority. This is particularly true of the smaller places away 
from the capital. Spies frequently attend church services, and 
Mission schools arc jealously watched. An observer wrote last fall: 
"Notwithstanding official denials, torture is still the order of the 
day. During this last spring in my territory, to my own personal 
knowledge, unspeakable tortures have been inflicted on men and 
women, some of them members of my own churches, and my per- 
sonal friends. In my own field the situation has never been worse. 
As I traveled over the field this past spring, a pall seemed to rest 
on the whole country. No one knows what the police will do next. 

A letter just received from states that many are being 

arrested there at the present time, among them another Korean 
pastor. I do not know how many of the pastors are now in jail, 
but there must be several. Our minds are filled with forebodings 
for the future of that unhappy people." 

On the other hand, Japanese officials of high rank have been show- 
ing a notably friendly spirit toward the missionaries. Dr. R. Mizuno. 
Japanese Minister of Education, made an address September 21 at 
the Tenth Annual Conference of the Federal Council of Protestant 
Missions in Chosen, which defended the policy of the Government, 
but which f rankl}' admitted that "mistakes and blunders have not been 
entirely avoided." Mr. Fred B. Smith, who has recently visited 
Japan and Chosen writes : "The frankness with which many men 
of many kinds freely commented upon the fact that Japan had made 
some serious mistakes in relationships with China and Korea was 
to me an added earnest of a fervent desire for peace and a future 
free from the diplomatic blunders of the past. I am quite aware 
that admissions of this kind are not spoken by many, and it may not 
be realized by the majority, but among those I talked with and met 
there seemed an openness and liberty to speak of serious errors and 
acknowledge wrongs which was surprising and at the same time 
assuring." 

The Board was greatly relieved and gratified by the receipt of a 
cablegram on March 8th : 

"Government has granted permission religious liberty in College 
at Seoul, Avison." 

Details have not reached the Board as this goes to press, but ap- 
parently full freedom for religious exercises and Bible teaching with- 



36 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

in the required courses is now granted. There has been some mis- 
apprehension at home regarding the rehgious teaching in this college. 
The educational regulations of the Government prescribed a curricu- 
lum for all schools which have Government recognition, and these 
regulations forbade the teaching of any religion as a compulsory 
part of the curriculum. As a matter of fact, however, there have 
been vohuitary chapel services and Bible study classes in the Seoul 
College from the beginning. The faculty has interrupted the cur- 
riculum studies, for a period in the middle of each morning, during 
which time there was either a chapel service or a Bible class every 
day in the week attended this past year by more than 85% of the 
students. The only difference between religious teaching in this 
College and the other educational institutions of the Mission was that 
attendance at Chapel and Bible classes in the Seoul College could 
not under the law be obligatory. The restriction regarding com- 
pulsory attendance has been removed, and full religious liberty which 
the Board has long sought has been granted. This happy outcome 
is the result of quiet, tactful but earnest and persistent efforts by the 
College and the Board whose position in this matter was unanimously 
endorsed by the Chosen Commission of the General Assembly. 

The other phase of the work relates to the progress of missionary 
work along all lines. The reports are exceedingly interesting and 
inspiring. Religious services are largely attended. Schools and 
hospitals are crowded. The General Assembly of the Presbyterian 
Church in Korea, which was constituted with seven Presbyteries in 
1912, now has nineteen Presbyteries. The annual meeting of the 
Assembly was an occasion of remarkable interest and encouragement. 
In November the first Korean national Sunday School Convention 
was held in Seoul and was attended by more than 900 delegates from 
all over the country. None of the city churches were allowed to 
have more than five delegates, so it was a most representative gath- 
ering. Most of the meetings were held in the Central Presbyterian 
Church, though other nearby churches were used for some of the 
meetings. Dr. C. A. Clark of the Presbyterian Mission writes that 
it was one of the most inspiring audiences ever gathered in Korea. 
Nearly all were young people, all in earnest, with notebooks in hand, 
taking down every suggestion that they could get. A missionary, 
who had been in America on furlough, writes : "After my return 
many men poured in to call on me from all over the Taiku district. 
All were talking about the great interest which was stirring among 
the people toward the Faith and the Church. As time went on I 



SURVEY OF FIELDS— CHOSEN 37 

became very much impressed with the conditions, and myself sought 
to investigate it. I soon became convinced that, from whatever 
cause, there was no question with regard to the fact. The situation 
was very much Hke that of fifteen or twenty years ago, when most 
of our present churches were estabhshed. Planning for some way 
to get in line with this second wonderful movement of the Spirir 
of God, it soon became evident that it could not be in any way 
handled through the personnel of the Station. All the evangelistic 
workers were buried in the work of the unorganized churches. The 
zeal of many of the Korean Christians is deeply moving as witness 
the following extracts from one of the reports: 'Contrary to all 
previous experience, this winter term, the last of our school year, 
in spite of the bitter cold of an unprecedently cold winter, and in- 
creased fees, and urgent requests to all candidates to wait until the 
spring, shows the largest enrollment in the history of our school, 
about 140, all and more than we can properly accommodate even 
with our plan of two sessions, morning and afternoon, with the school 
reciting consecutively so as to get in the two "shifts" between day- 
light and dark. Soon we shall have to introduce a third "shift" at 
night unless buildings are provided for us, for the students will 
not be denied. The pressure is overwhelming.' " 

Statistics are said to be dry, but we are sure that no follower of 
Christ will deem the following statistics dry, especially when he 
recalls that the first missionary entered Chosen in 1884 and that ten 
years later there were only 140 believers in the whole country. Now 
in our own and other Missions there are 472 Protestant missionaries, 
including wives, working in Korea under the two Methodist and four 
Presbyterian Missions. They are assisted by 1,683 Korea workers 
of whom over 300 are ordained pastors and have under their care 
over 3,000 organized churches and unorganized groups which own 
nearly 3,000 church buildings. In these churches are nearly 92,000 
baptized adults and over 35,000 catechumens preparing for baptism. 
Over 11,000 of those baptized were received last year. There are 
more than 240,000 Christian adherents associated with these Protest- 
ant churches. Over 2,400 four to ten day Bible Classes were held 
in these churches, attended by more than 86,000 men and women. 
The total contributions of these Christians last year were $465,560 
(U. S. gold)- — a sum equivalent to one million, six hundred thousand 
days labor or four and a half million dollars from 3,000 American 
Christian Churches. Preparing for the future there are 255 theo- 
logical students in two seminaries, 64 medical students in Severance 
Union Medical College; 251 students in the two Union Colleges, and 



38 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

nearly 54,000 pupils in the lower schools of these missions. Continue 
to pray for suffering, hopeful Korea and her strong, out-reaching 
Church. 

INDIA. — The condition of Mission and Church work in India 
cannot be understood without some comprehension of the general 
Social and Political situation. The past year has not witnessed the 
diminution of India's unrest. That her problems are nearer solu- 
tion than they were a year ago, we must believe, but whether the end 
is to come with or without further strife no one can say. On the 
one hand, there are those of optimistic temperament who minimize 
the danger. Speaking recently in the House of Commons, Lloyd 
George interpreted the conditions as improving and not politically 
critical. Even though he may have been influenced by political ex- 
pedience, the words are significant : 

"Here you have a population with Eastern ideas and Eastern ex- 
perience. Modern ideas and Western ideas of liberty and self-gov- 
ernment were unknown. They acknowledged great overlords who 
according to their strength gave them peace, or according to their 
weakness gave them unrest, disturbance and ruin. I have been 
amazed at the kind of education given to the Indian child. There is 
no doubt it poisons the Indian mind. We have had a very consider- 
able number of rich Indians sending their children to be educated 
in English universities. They were saturated with Western ideas, 
and went back full of them. The great Western ideas of liberty 
became their ideals. It was bound to create unrest. It was putting 
new wine into old bottles — the fierce and often coarser wines of the 
West into the older bottles of the East, accustomed to mild vintages. 
They burst. There was leakage. The wine spread and intoxication 
spread over the East. It was not India alone. In the story of India 
you must not forget the story of Asia— Japan, China and India — 
the hundreds of millions who have been living in tranquility and satis- 
faction, with ideas of autocracy that gave them protection and guar- 
dianship and with which they were satisfied. Then comes in the 
West. It is because the West has got into contact with the East. 
It was inevitable. There were two chemicals bound sooner or later 
to produce some form of explosion." And after enumerating the 
various factors that have combined to make strife, he concludes: 
"I have only sketched very summarily some of the causes of disturb- 
ance. It is gradually subsiding. The position is improving, and as 
far as the tension of nerves of people is concerned they are not as 
ready to take ofifense. That is a matter of time." 



SURVEY OF FIELDS— INDIA 39 

On the other hand, there are those who view the situation with 
the gravest alarm and paint in lurid colors the strife and bloodshed 
which may lie between the present and the attainment of peace, and 
it must be acknowledged that some of the statements of Mahatma 
Ghandi and of the Nationalist Congress and Press bear out this view. 
There is alw^ays peril in prejudiced leadership even when accompanied 
as probably in this case, by sincerity. In the Bombay Chronicle of 
December, 1921, were these words, "Those Christian doctors of 
Europe and America who liken the Mahatma to Christ are not mis- 
taken. ... It is not in the least exaggerating if I say that the life 
of Christ is being reenacted by the Mahatma, the opponents of the 
Mahatma enacting the part of the opponents of Jesus Christ, seeking 
how they may arrest him without rousing the people, his followers. 
I am absolutely certain that when the Mahatma is arrested and tried, 
the Judge will once more wash his hands and repeat the same verdict 
that Pontius Pilate had pronounced upon Jesus Christ, *I am inno- 
cent of the blood of this just person.' " 

It is this man who is thus described who has been made practically 
the Dictator of the Nationalist party, whom multitudes of people are 
blindly following, and yet who is so ignorant of history and govern- 
ment as to speak as follows in his book, "Indian Home Rule :" 

"Parliaments are really emblems of slavery." 

"If money and time wasted by the Parliament were intrusted to a 
few good men the English nation would be occupying today a much 
higher platform." 

"It behooves every lover of India to cling to the old Indian civiliza- 
tion even as a child clings to its mother's breast." 

"In order to restore India to its pristine condition, we have to 
return to it." 

"Machinery is the chief symbol of modern civilization. It repre- 
sents a great sin." 

"We should only do what we can with our hands and feet." 

"My conviction is deeper today than ever. I feel that if India 
would discard modern civilization she can only gain by doing so." 

It is not difficult to understand how such a man cradled in a land 
which is the home of fanaticism does not hesitate to call the people 
to civil disobedience and in the same breath quietness and order. His 
dream is beautiful, his program impossible. The actual situation 
as in most cases can probably be found in the mean between the 
extreme views. Great Britain has a long history of generous and 
wise government in India. She is not likely to ignore any just de- 



40 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

mands of the Indian people, and there are a vast number of leading 
Indians who are counseling moderation. Their voices are not as 
articulate as those of agitators, but the weight of their opinion is 
very great. The following extract from the vernacular press voices 
the sentiment of this group : 

The Paisa Akhbar writes: "From the date of its birth the non- 
cooperation movement has changed many hues and played different 
games. At the recent meeting of the Delhi Political Conference held 
at Mattra under the chairmanship of Pundit Motilal Nehru, a resolu- 
tion was passed which, owing to its novelty and absurdity, has out- 
done all the past resolutions of the Congress party. The resolution 
declared that the Indian National Congress at its forthcoming session 
should declare to the whole world that it is an inherent and inalienable 
right of the Indian nation and its firm intention that it should be- 
come a fully independent and self-contained power and that it should 
have no relations of any kind with foreign powers and countries, 
among which Great Britain is included. Such resolution clearly in- 
dicates the intellectual state of the supporters of the non-cooperation 
movement and plainly declares their intention." 

It is in the midst of such stirring events that our Mission work 
must be carried on. Naturally, it has been afifected by its environ- 
ment. The mass of Indians do not distinguish between Englishmen 
and Americans. Hence the boycott affects our schools and other 
enterprises. The control in educational affairs, now almost entirely 
put in the hands of the Indians, brings up the problem of compulsory 
religious teaching in Christian schools and the question of "the Con- 
science Clause" which would forbid obligatory attendance upon re- 
ligious exercises in schools receiving government grants. It also 
affects the Indian Church which is demanding "great measure of 
independence." These, however, are not unhopeful signs. They call 
for greater wisdom and consecration. It is inspiring to read : 

"A feature of the meeting of the General Assembly of the Indian 
Presbyterian Church, held December 28-January 2 at Allahabad, 
was the impassioned plea of Rev. A. Ralla Ram, pastor of the church 
in which the Assembly was meeting, that the Indian Church send 
missionaries to other lands. Tibet and Mesopotamia were suggested 
as possible fields of effort. The discussion that centered around an 
overture from one of the presbyteries that foreign missionary work 
be undertaken was followed by the appointment of a committee to 
prepare plans for undertaking this new effort. Resolutions were 
adopted by the Assembly requesting the Indian government to pro- 
hibit the sale and manufacture of liquor, except for medicinal and 



SURVEY OF FIELDS— INDIA 41 

commercial purposes, and alsn to take action against commercialized 
vice." 

It has been a fortunate thing that just at this time two of the 
officers of the Board, Secretary Robert E. Speer and Associate Treas- 
urer Russell Carter, have been able to visit India and not only study 
these questions at first hand but also by many conferences with 
Indians to get the National viewpoint and bring back to the Board 
the new atmosphere in which the work must be conducted. In spite 
of all hostile conditions the work of Missions has gone steadily on 
and been a guiding and quieting influence. Perhaps the whole situa- 
tion cannot be more clearly expressed showing both the perplexities 
and the possibilities that are before the Christian workers than by 
quoting the following extracts from a letter recently received. In 
the first part of the letter the writer describes the conditions very 
much as they have been outlined above and then adds : "If after 
reading the above you should take a gloomy view of the situation 
in India, that certainly is not the impression I desire to give. There 
are many hopeful features in the present situation in India. Instead 
of sad and bitter disappointments the future may have some very 
strange and happy surprises in store for us. I have just read the 
resolutions of the Congress Committee at Ahmadabad and am deeply 
impressed with the high moral tone they breathe and the moderation, 
patience, self-restraint and self-sacrifice which they impose. Violence 
in any form is absolutely condemned. The pledges which the national 
volunteer corps, which the Government has declared unlawful and 
ordered to be disbanded, are required to take, take one back to 
Covenanter days in Scotland. Take, for example, the following: 
'So long as I remain a member of the corps I shall remain non- 
violent in word and deed and shall endeavor to be non-violent in intent 
since I believe that as India is circumstanced, non-violence alone 
can help the Khilafat and the Punjab and result in the attainment of 
swaraj and consolidation of unity among all the races and communi- 
ties of India whether Hindu, Mussulman, Sikh, Parsee. Christian 
or Jew. As a Hindu T believe in the justice and necessity of remov- 
ing the evil of untouchability and shall on all possible occasions seek 
personal contact with and endeavor to render service to the sub- 
merged classes. I am prepared to sufifer imprisonment, assault or 
even death for the sake of my religion and my country without 
resentment. In the event of my imprisonment I shall not claim from 
the Congress any support for my family or my dependents.' 

"We cannot but admire such a spirit as this, nor would it be hard 
for us to discover the source from which they proceed. The like 



42 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

has never before appeared in India, and would not have appeared 
today had not the Gospel message come here, the true meaning of 
which perhaps the people of India may help the rest of the world 
to understand. At the close of a lecture delivered recently by a mis- 
sionary in Bombay on 'Jesus Christ and Present Day Problems,' the 
chairman, a Hindu, said: 'Is it not remarkable that in the whole 
world, the only country where a great national movement, with many 
miscalculations and grievous failures, no doubt, has based itself 
avowedly on Christ's central doctrines of non-resistance to evil, 
should be India, a country which does not profess Christianity?' 
'The response of Christian men and nations to this challenge,' he 
added, 'will afford a practical test of their faith in the teachings of 
Jesus. In this season of Christmas it behooves us all to recall with 
reverence the central principles taught by the great Nazarene 2,000 
years ago.' " 

"At the annual gathering of the Social Reform Association just 
held in Ahmadabad, resolutions were adopted which any Christian 
Conference having similar aims might have adopted. The abolition 
of caste, the remarriage of widows, the education of women, the lift- 
ing up of the depressed classes, equal rights for men and women, 
these were some of the principles affirmed and re-afifirmed, and as a 
missionary remarked : 'Why these are some of the things that we 
have for years been trying to achieve in India.' True, at present 
the minds of the people are engrossed with politics, yet religion will 
ere long reassert its old power, for the people are intensely religious. 
We have never had so many earnest enquiries as we are having just 
now. Last Sunday a young man, a pleader and graduate of a Chris- 
tian College called on me and we had a most delightful and interest- 
ing conversation. He attends our church services pretty regularly 
and is in heart a Christian. He expressed the opinion that Hinduism 
as a religion was bound very soon to pass away. 'It cannot hold out,' 
he claimed, 'against the influences now at work under the new condi- 
tions. Whither are we to turn for the religion that will satisfy the 
heart of India? The Mohammedans are all about us and we are 
brought into daily contact with them, but the Christians are a mere 
handful and they live to a large extent apart from us. The Moham- 
medan religion will never meet our needs. Here,' he said, 'is your 
opportunity; will you not urge your society to flood India' (I am 
using his own words) 'with Christian preachers, who will mingle 
with the people and tell them what the Christian religion is ?' " 

With such a situation confronting the missionary cause, it is surely 



SURVEY OF FIELDS— JAPAN 43 

not a time for fear and relaxation but for reconsecration, and for 
going forward in the joy of the Lord, which is our strength. 

JAPAN. — The relations between the Japanese and American gov- 
ernments were greatly improved during the year by the happy out- 
come of the Conference on Limitation of Armaments in Washington. 
The agreements that were reached on the perplexing and irritating 
questions of Yap and Shantung, as well as in the reduction of naval 
armaments and the Four Power Treaty, have produced a psychological 
effect which is really far more important than the text of the agree- 
ments themselves. Much suspicion has been dissipated and a clearer 
atmosphere created. 

The year has been marked by the passing of some great figures 
in Japanese political life. Premier Kei Hara, a recognized leader 
and the hope of progressive Japanese, was foully assassinated No- 
vember 4. Marquis Okuma, widely known as "J^pan's grand old 
man," passed away January 6 at the ripe age of eighty-four. His 
death was followed February 1st by that of Prince Yamagata at 
the age of eighty-three, one of the few remaining members of the 
powerful Genro or Elder Statesmen who have been the incarnation 
of bureaucratic government. Llara, Okuma and Yamagata were men 
of widely different types, but all of really extraordinary ability and 
force of character. The year was also marked by the necessity of 
publicly recognizing the continued and incapacitating ill-health of 
Emperor Yoshito and Crown Prince Hirohito, a young man of 
twenty, was made Regent. 

Wide-spread interest was aroused by the celebration in Tokyo of 
the fiftieth anniversary of the inauguration of railway service in 
Japan, the first rail having been laid in 1871. There are now 8,500 
miles of railway in Japan proper in addition to the 2,900 lines that 
the Japanese have built in Chosen. Formosa, Manchuria and Sag- 
halien. 

Christianity as represented both by the Missions and Japanese 
churches has made gratifying progress during the year. Evangelistic 
meetings have been largely attended, in some places audiences throng- 
ing spacious buildings. One of the most successful of the Japanese 
evangelists, the Rev. Paul Kanamori, visited America during the 
year and delivered addresses based on his famous "three hour ser- 
mon" in many parts of the United States. The missionaries are 
vigorously pressing their work by the spoken word, the printed page, 
and Christian training centers. Sixteen well-trained Japanese were 
graduated from the theological department of the Meiji Gakuin in 



44 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

Tokyo. Plans for the Union Woman's College are developing satis- 
factorily as the result of the campaign conducted in America by the 
joint committee representing all the Boards concerned. Prominent 
Japanese have given notable testimony to the increasing influence 
of Christian ideas upon Japanese thought. Prince Tokugawa, the 
head of the Japanese delegation to the Washington Conference on 
Limitation of Armaments, and himself a Buddhist, declared in a pub- 
lished interview during his visit to America: "Today Japan has 
Christian adherents numbering more than a million. The American 
Bible Society at Tokyo can never print enough Bibles to meet the 
ever-increasing demand. There is no doubt that Christianity has 
already spread its roots wide and deep in Japanese soil. The Japa- 
nese newspapers, magazines, and fiction of today bear testimony 
to this statement. The prevailing popular conception of mankind 
and humanity, and of liberty, equality and fraternity, may be directly 
or indirectly traced to Christianity." Tokyo newspapers have an- 
nounced the recognition of Sunday by the Imperial Government as 
a national day of rest, upon which the public offices throughout the 
country shall be closed. 

The Japanese are among the greatest readers in the world. There 
are now more than 3,000 newspapers and periodicals in circulation. 
About 25,000 titles are published each year. In 1916 there were 
3,051 titles under the head of Religion and 2.560 under the head of 
Education. This growing desire on the part of Japanese for books 
dealing with religion is further shown by the record of the Christian 
Literature Society of Japan. Its sales in 1914 were 2,700 yen, and 
in 1920 were 26,000 yen. A gain of 1,000 per cent in sales in a 
period of six years is sufficient indication of the opportunity. Re- 
markable success has attended the issue of a monthly magazine for 
students called the "Myojo." It was started several years ago. It 
now has a circulation of 70,000 copies which reach 1,540 academies 
and universities and 1,672 elementary schools. A magazine for chil- 
dren just started, "The Little Children of Light," in spite of a 60 
per cent increase in price, reached a sale for the Christmas, 1920. 
number of more than 9,000 copies. 

The great event for which our Japan Mission and the Japanese 
Christians are now celebrating is the highly noteworthy Semi-centen- 
nial of the organization of the first Protestant church in Japan in 
Yokohama, March 10, 1872. There were eleven members, two of 
them middle-aged men who had been previously baptized, and the 
others were nine young men who had been baptized that day. They 
called their church "The Church of Christ in Japan." It has now 



SURVEY OF FIELDS— LATIN AMERICA 45 

grown into a great denomination of 1,224 organized churches of 
which 359 are entirely self supporting. Besides the churches there 
are 1,338 places where preaching is regularly held. There are 759 
church buildings, and church property worth 6,798,029 yen. In 
1920 there were over 11,000 baptisms. There are 137,823 communi- 
cants, and in 1920 these Christians contributed 1,161,575 yen for 
all purposes. There are besides, schools for boys and girls, from 
kindergarten to University; hospitals, orphanages and other forms 
of philanthropic work of the church and missions. In the beginning 
of Christian work in Japan, Christianity was under ban of the Gov- 
ernment, and the possession of a Christian lx)ok was a crime that 
was punished with imprisonment or death. But Christianity has now 
grown to an influence in the Empire such as to lead the Emperor 
to contribute to Christian institutions. And the Home Minister is 
quoted by Mr. Merle Davis, (a son of one of the pioneer Missionaries 
of the American Board, Rev. Dr. J. D. Davis) as saying, "More 
than technical knowledge and experience is needed for social work. 
It requires, primarily, ability to sacrifice and to serve unselfishly, 
and that for men and women of this type the Government is depend- 
ing increasingly on Christianit}^" Our own Church of Christ, the 
result of the work of the missionaries and native Christians of the 
Presbyterian and Reformed Churches, has 82 self-supporting 
churches, 146 mission churches, 33,668 communicants. At the latest 
meeting of the national Synod, the church resolved to cele- 
brate the fiftieth anniversary of the organization of the church by 
building a tabernacle in Tokyo, and in inaugurating a movement to 
double the membership in five years, and to send its esteemed mod- 
erator to the United States to thank the Presbyterian and Reformed 
Mission Boards for sending their missionaries to Japan. This modera- 
tor, is our fellow Presbyterian, the famous Dr. Masahisa Uemura, 
theologian, editor and preacher. He comes to bear the greetings of the 
Church of Christ to the Presbyterian and Reformed Churches of the 
United States. He expects to attend the General Assembly, which 
will thus have an opportunity of hearing this great Christian leader. 
Plans are under way for cooperating with him in soliciting the 
Memorial Fund which our Mission and the Church of Christ have 
asked us to aid him in securing. We will be happy to show sub- 
stantial interest in this celebration and opportunity for further ad- 
vance in Japan. 

LATIN AMERICA. — The seven Latin American Missions are 
situated in six countries; two of these countries are north of the 



46 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

Panama Canal — Mexico and Guatemala — and four of them are on 
the South American continent — Colombia, Venezuela, Brazil and 
Chile. Until a little over a year ago relationships between the Board 
and these Missions were scattered through the portfolios of several 
different Secretaries. In January, 1921 correspondence with all 
these Missions, with one exception, was brought into one depart- 
ment and placed in the hands of one Secretary. Last year was the 
first year, accordingly, in which the problems of these Missions were 
viewed from the standpoint of a single administrative unit. 

These Missions in Latin American lands represent one of the most 
appealing and most difficult fields which the Foreign Mission front 
of our Church is facing today. These countries are especially strong 
in their appeal to us because of their location, because of our rela- 
tionship to them under the Monroe Doctrine, because of the special 
relationships uniting practically every one of these countries to the 
United States, and because of the general similarities between thern 
and our own land. 

These nations are our nearest neighbors. The boundary lines of 
Mexico are contiguous with our own. The ports of most of these 
lands are the nearest foreign ports to our own coasts. In carrying 
out that farther duty "to the uttermost part of the earth" the Church 
cannot forget the duty to its immediate neighbors in America. 
In the second place, because of the Monroe Doctrine, there comes 
to us a special appeal for service to these lands. This doctrine has 
been too much the cause of suspicion: it has often been regarded, 
both by our South American neighbors and by other nations, as a 
cloak for imperialistic designs. There is an added obligation upon 
our country, and especially upon us who know Christ, to take to 
these peoples the best that we can give them, and to prove to them 
that we are bent not on conquest but on the highest service. Each 
of these nations has its special relationship to our country. Our in- 
terests and those of Mexico are closely intertwined. Venezuela, the 
first South American country to be discovered by Columbus after 
his discovery of North America, was the birthplace of Simon Boli- 
var, the "George Washington" of South America, who led the fight 
for freedom and independence of five of the South American re- 
publics; his statue was erected in April, 1921, in a great park in 
New York City as a monument to our mutual friendship and respect. 
With Colombia the United States has had special connection on ac- 
count of the Panama Canal. Brazil and Chile are two of the triple 
group of South American nations with which our own country has 
been very closely related during the past decade in diplomatic and 



SURVEY OF FIELDS— LATIN AMERICA 4? 

economic negotiations and agreements. Finally, these countries 
appeal to ours because they are part of the new world of America, 
and because we should go forward together and should be one in 
mind and in heart and in mutual regard just as we are one in geo- 
graphical relationship. "God has made us neighbors. Let justice 
make us friends." These countries present an appealing challenge 
for investment of life and capital on the part of our Church today. 
There are other factors which make these fields among the most 
difficult to which any of our missionaries go. There are similarities 
between these countries and ours, and yet the differences in inherit- 
ance, in race and in outlook are deep and wide. Our religious in- 
heritance is largely Protestant; theirs is Roman Catholic. Our 
political inheritance is democratic; theirs is autocratic. Our fore- 
fathers came to this land because of religious principle and for free- 
dom of worship; their forefathers came for conquest and for free- 
dom to exploit and possess the new land. Our language is uni- 
formly English ; their languages have been brought from southern 
Europe. Our racial roots are largely Anglo-Saxon ; theirs are chiefly 
Latin and Indian. And finally, just as our cultural outlook is largely 
Anglo-Saxon and British, so theirs is chiefly from France, Spain, 
Portugal and Italy. Indeed, as Ambassador Bryce has pointed out, 
"Teutonic Americans and Spanish Americans have nothing in com- 
mon except two names; the name American and the name Republi- 
can. In essentials they differ as widely as either of them does from 
any other group of peoples, and far more widely than citizens of the 
United States differ from Englishmen, or Chileans and Argentinians 
differ from Spaniards and Frenchmen." 

The second difficulty arises from the fierce opposition that is 
being brought to bear on our Protestant Mission work by the local 
representatives of Roman Catholicism. It is fair to say that the 
developments of this branch of the Christian Faith in Latin America 
resembles only slightly in spirit and methods Roman Catholicism as it 
is known in the United States. During the past year this opposition 
has been felt keenly at various points in our Mission fields. From the 
South Brazil Mission recently came the statement of the situation 
there as quoted earlier in this Introduction. 

In the third place, the field is difficult because of the immensity 
of the territory to be covered and the fewness of the workers. Mexico 
has a territory of 767,198 square miles, equal roughly to the territory 
east of the Mississippi in the United States. There are over 15,000,- 
000 people in Mexico. The Presbyterian Church, by special comity 
agreement, has taken over the complete responsibility of seven States 



•18 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

and Territories, roughly one-quarter of the entire population and 
one-fifth of the total area, and to meet this heavy responsibility 
we have in Mexico today 31 missionaries. The Presbyterian Mission 
moved from territory which had been well consolidated in the north 
of Mexico to take over these states and territories in the south. Perma- 
nent property has not yet been secured in this new territory and the 
Mission urgently desires permission to launch a campaign, which 
would mean the supplying of their new territory with equipment 
and buildings at least equivalent to what they had in 1914 when the 
present transfer of work among the Boards was arranged. The 
Mission is justified in this request and the Church should see that 
it is answered. In Guatemala, with its area of 48,290 square miles, 
and a population of over 2,000,000; in Colombia, with an area of 
440,846 square miles, equal to about the combined territory of France, 
Germany, Holland and Belgium, and a population of nearly 6,000,- 
000; and in Venezuela, with a territory of 398,594 square miles, 
equal in extent to two states the size of Texas, with Kentucky and 
Tennessee added, and a population of nearly 3,000,000, we are the 
only Protestanit Church represented, with the exception of scattered 
independent movements, and have the chief responsibility for the 
evangelism of these nearly 11,000,000 people. Our total missionary 
force in these three countries is 50. Brazil has a territory larger by 
200,000 square miles than that of the entire continental United 
States; into Chile could be placed four states the size of Nebraska, 
and in the three Missions in these two great countries we have 76 
missionaries attacking these giant tasks. 

From both Colombia and Brazil during the past year have come 
strong appeals for help and reinforcements. A year ago in the An- 
nual Report these words were written from South Brazil : *T feel 
like greeting you almost as the last survivors of the immortal six 
hundred must have greeted one another as they saw one after the 
other of their companions fall at their side. Four years ago we 
numbered twenty-two in the active service. Now eleven is the 
number. ..." and from the same Mission this year came this 
message : "Words seem to fail to convey an adequate idea of our 
desperate situation in regard to workers. We have received no itin- 
erating recruits from the States for ten years. , . . Will our Church 
in its field not try to approximate what other denominations are 
doing in theirs? . . . The time is ripe for an all along the line 
advance. Are we to be challenged and stand back? No, no. The 
Church must take up the gauntlet and enter the arena in His 
strength." 



SURVRY OF FIELDS— LATIN AMERICA 4y 

Added to these difficulties, many of which are inherent to the situa- 
tion, there have been developments during the past years indirectly 
related to the war, which have increased some of the problems of 
the Missions. The exchange has fluctuated both in l^razil and in Chile. 
In the former the peso which at par is valued at thirty-two cents, 
has fallen to thirteen cents ; in the latter the peso dropped from 
twenty-four cents to ten cents. These fluctuations have meant a 
shifting in the purchasing value of the local currency with conse- 
quent hardship and distress for the national pastors and workers, 
and have also brought difficulties to certain schools like the Institute 
Ingles, securing its income in silver currency but meeting its indebt- 
edness in gold. Mr. S. G. Inman, Secretary of the Committee on 
Cooperation, who returned in May, 1921, from an extensive trip 
through these countries, reports also the influence of new currents 
of thought in the labor movement, the feminist movement, the tem- 
perance movement and the modernizing of education, all of which 
bring fresh problems in relationship for both missionaries and gov- 
ernment. This is the background of need, challenge and appeal for 
Christian work in Latin America today. 

There have been during the past year encouraging signs of advance 
despite the difficulties. In Mexico the new Union Press is now well 
established, with practically all the Protestant Mission Boards co- 
operating. At the suggestion of one of our missionaries the Ameri- 
can community has presented to the Mexican Government, as its gift 
at the celebration of its centennial, a playground in the center of 
Mexico City. This gift has strengthened the friendship between 
the government, the business and missionary groups of the city 
and country as a whole. Progress has been made in the Union 
Seminary in Mexico City. The Girls' Schools at Vera Cruz, San 
Angel and Merida, have been facing difficulties of various kinds, but 
in general the year which has just closed has been one of advance. 
Strenuous efforts have been put forth to win over and consolidate 
adherents to our Church in the new territories which have been so 
recently entered. The Presbyterian Synod of Mexico held a very 
encouraging meeting during the summer with delegates from every 
Presbytery; the entire northern Presbytery is now independent of 
mission assistance. 

In Guatemala the year 1921 has seen the buildings begun in 1920 
after the earthquake brought to practical completion and the mission 
work re-established in many of its phases. It has also been a year 
of rapid changes, both political and in the work of the mission. The 
Government has been changed and General Jose Maria Orellana has 



50 INTRODUCTION-FOREIGN MISSIONS 

taken his seat as President of the Repubhc. He represents the Lib- 
eral element and the missionaries write that this will mean added 
freedom for them in their work. Already the Government has shown 
its sympathy and interest in the work of the schools and hospitals, 
and one of the letters received from a missionary who has been 
connected with Guatemala for many years says : "All the time I 
have known Guatemala, it has never been anywhere nearly so open 
for the Gospel as it is today. The present government is 
exceedingly 'sympathetic with us and it represents the senti- 
ment of the masses. Recently one of the national assemblymen 
who had been sent by the President to investigate the political con- 
ditions of a certain region reported that 'the trouble there is not politi- 
cal, but religious, and the remedy is not the bayonet, but the Gospel' " 
In Colombia there was an unusually large attendance at the Mission 
meeting; new territory in Cerete has been organized and brought 
into close relationship to Cartagena, and has been placed under the 
control and support of the Mission and the Board. In Chile the 
Woman's Training School at Valparaiso is now being built in close 
relationship to our Escuela Popular. 

The Board is planning for long delayed visits to Mexico, Colombia 
and Venezuela during the coming year and to Chile and Brazil in 
the following year. It has signified its intention to join with the 
other Foreign Mission Boards in participation in the coming Con- 
ference on Christian Work, a successor of the extremely successful 
Panama Congress, which is to be held in Montevideo in February 
or March, 1924. With the spirit of courageous devotion which exists 
on the field and with the hopeful plans of the Board if the Church 
will give adequate support to the work, a new day for the Living 
Christ should dawn in our needy and neglected fields in Latin 
America. 

ORIENTALS IN THE UNITED STATES.— During the past 
few years sentiment has been growing in favor of the transfer of 
the work among the Orientals in the United States from the Foreign 
to the Home Boards. This sentiment has arisen largely from the 
fact that the Presbyterian Foreign Board is the only Foreign Board 
represented among fourteen other Boards and Agencies conducting 
work among the Orientals on the Pacific Coast; from the fact that 
there is considerable overlapping and duplication of effort in this 
service, and that the work of all the Boards could best be reorgan- 
ized and simplified through the Home Missions Council of the Home 
Mission Boards, and from the fact that there is an evident need for 



SURVEY OF FIELDS— PERSIA 51 

the erection of additional churches and schools for the service of 
these Orientals in this country, and that funds for these buildings 
would come more naturally through Home rather than Foreign Mis- 
sion channels. On June 6, 1921, the Foreign Board appointed a 
Committee to confer with the Home Boards concerning the possi- 
bility of this transfer to them. Representatives of both the Home 
and Foreign Boards visited the Pacific Coast, where the largest part 
of this work is carried on ; such visits were made by Rev. William 
P. Schell and Rev. W. Reginald Wheeler of the Foreign Board, Dr. 
John A. Marquis and Mrs. F. S, Bennett of the Home Boards. A 
joint committee drew up recommendations and conditions upon which 
the transfer should be made. Their report was provisionally accepted 
by the Foreign Boards in February, 1922; it recommends that the 
administration be turned over to the Home Boards June 1, 1922, 
after approval by the General Assembly, and the financial responsi- 
bility be transferred in three years, the Home Boards to assume one- 
third of the budget for the year beginning April 1, 1923; two-thirds 
of the budget for the year beginning April 1, 1924; thereafter the 
entire budget to be taken over by the Home Boards. These negotia- 
tions and agreements are all subject to the action of the General 
Assembly; all of the Boards concerned in the transfer of this small 
but important work hope that the Assembly will endorse it this year. 

PERSIA. — In no one of the fields covered by the work of the 
Board is it more difficult to forecast events than in Persia. As part 
of the Near East it has felt the effect of every movement in that 
tragically stricken area. From the West have come terrible Kurdish 
raids which during recent years have devastated its land, destroyed 
its villages and cities and started vast numbers of its people on their 
long pilgrimages to find refuge and safety. Across its territory 
from Bagdad came the tramp of armies, ostensibly of rescue and 
relief, but whose purposes were not always free from self-interest. 
From the north came those who brought with them new and un- 
stable, and sometimes wild, ideas of government and who were seek- 
ing a field in which to sow the seeds of revolution. The whole devas- 
tated region about Urumia and the Salmas plain is still inaccessible 
to Mission work and from Hamadan and Kermanshah comes the call 
for increased help in men and money to care for the multitudes of 
refugees and orphaned children. These people, driven first east- 
ward and southward and then into the great Refugee Camp at Bag- 
dad, were again turned northward in the hope of finding a permanent 
abiding place. Strange is their love of home and their wilHngness 



52 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

to start over again if they can only be promised protection ; a mes 
sage pleads for sufficient funds to enable these people to be repatri- 
ated and put upon the land. 

These passing throngs of homeless ones have accentuated three 
phases of Mission work. First there is a greater need than ever 
before of Medical work; starvation breeds disease, and the need 
for additional doctors, nurses and hospitals is emphasized in all re- 
ports from the field. From Tabriz comes the plea for the building 
of a new hospital to take care of the throngs who have gathered 
there as a refuge from Urumia. It has also emphasized the need 
of work for orphans. This is especially the case in and around Ker- 
manshah. In this city there has been for some time a small orphanage 
work. The loving heart of Mrs. F. M. Stead responded to the plea 
of their suffering and she had hoped to build enlarged quarters so 
that many more could be accommodated. She had scarcely reached 
Persia when God called her home. Others must make her dream 
come true. A letter received from Mr. Speer in Hamadan describes 
the sight of these refugee children as heartbreaking and he speaks 
as follows : 

"The tragedy of these poor Syrian refugees whom we met in 
Bagdad, Mosul, Kermanshah and here is enough to break one's 
heart. Most of them are doing their best to get on their feet, and 
I trust that the Near East Relief can continue what help the mis- 
sionaries call for, for needy adults as well as for widows and orphans 
at least until the harvest in July. This afternoon I spent the whole 
time with the Syrians and with the Persian officials under whose 
care they fall. It has been a cold, wet day, the streets full of mud, 
but the large hall of the boys' school was crowded with Syrians with- 
out the presence of the children. Scores of the women who were 
there were widows who had seen their husbands shot down. Many 
of the men had been prosperous, influential men in their villages 
and were now absolutely penniless. I tried to put myself in their 
places and could understand as never before those Old Testament 
Psalms of the exiled people. It is hard work to talk to an audience 
like this with a steady voice, and it just tears one up to see the little 
children and to think of what they have been through and what they 
have yet to go through. In Bagdad nearly a thousand of the refugees 
came to the meeting Sunday morning. The children sat together 
on the big stairway at the back of the rough uncompleted hall where 
the meeting was held and which is made the home of a score or more 
of Syrian women who are trying to make their own way. After 
the benediction as the crowd was making their way out, the children 



SURVEY OF FIELDS— PERSIA 53 

began to sing in Syriac, 'Jesus, Tender Shepherd, I.ead Us.' Those 
very little children had come all the way from Urumia carried on 
their mothers' backs or trudging on their baby legs the hundreds 
of miles of that terrible journey. Still they could sing of being led 
by a tender shepherd. Much indeed do they need His loving care." 

A third phase of the work that must be noted is the Educational. 
Last year's report told of the demand of the Mohammedans that the 
missionaries take their children into the schools. Dr. Jordan, of 
Teheran, tells an inspiring story of the way in which God is holding 
the door into the Mohammedan stronghold open. Scepticism is some- 
times expressed as to whether Christianity will ever make an im- 
pression on the Mohammedan World. Dr. Jordan states that 
"The greatest degree of religious toleration in the Mohammedan 
world is probably found in Teheran, the capital of Persia. During 
the past year nine converts from Islam, two converted priests, have 
taken charge of regular church services, six of them have preached 
in our Sunday morning evangelistic service open to all, before con- 
gregations of 200 to 300, the majority of whom were Moslems. They 
have openly said, T was a Moslem, I was not satisfied with Islam, 
I have sought and found rest in Christ,' and they openly called upon 
all to accept Christ and be saved. In another of the stations of 
East Persia, 64 Moslem converts were baptized the past year. It 
looks as if the Persians were getting ready to make a change." The 
plans of the college at Teheran, interrupted by the events of the 
war must be completed or the flood tide of opportunity will pass. 

Another great opportunity of the work is that of direct preaching 
and itineration. There are large areas of the Persian field that are 
still untouched. Teheran is one of the most populous in all of Persia. 
It is waiting for the Gospel message. Only a small percentage of 
its 300,000 or 400,000 inhabitants have any real understanding of 
Christ and His Gospel. There are thousands of outlying villages 
which are never visited by the evangelists. The cities of Kazvin. 
Kashan, Saveh, Simnan, Damghan and Sharach are virgin soil for 
Christian seed sowing. The provinces of Mazenderan and Asterbad 
are waiting for the Story. Hamadan calls for help in rehabilitating 
the work and the Resht Station must be reopened while Meshed, 
oflF near the Appian frontier, reports that even during the political 
disturbances, the inquirers did not cease to come. This field has been 
recently inspected by Mr. Speer and Mr. Carter. They have visited 
each station, even including far distant Meshed, and the Church at 
home must be prepared to do for needy Persia what it has already 
done in such gratifying measure for Syria. The Board is convinced 



54 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

that the delegation will be led to recommend a real enlargement of 
work and increase of force to meet our responsibility. The Church 
at home should also be reminded that there is a special reason for 
faithfulness to the work in Persia; the eyes of the nations are not 
closed to Persia's resources and wealth. British and American syndi- 
cates are reported to be negotiating with her Government for com- 
mercial and other concessions. Christian forces must not be less 
eager to influence her spiritual life. Until the present, America has 
been known in the Near East and Persia as interested chiefly in 
philanthropic and religious work. She must not yield leadership to 
those whose objective is exploitation and financial gain. 

This report should also make mention of the plan to open a new 
station in the great unoccupied city of Mosul in Mesopotamia. For 
some time the Dutch Reformed Church, whose work is on the Per- 
sian Gulf, has been ready to join with the Presbyterian Board in a 
co-operative station at Mosul. Secretaries of both Boards have vis- 
ited the city of Mosul. They report it as one of the most inspiring 
places they have seen. Mr. Speer writes : "After two good days in 
Bagdad we went with Dr. McDowell to Mosul on one of the most 
inspiring visits I have ever made to any center of human need and 
appeal. The Church Missionary Society is giving up all its work in 
Mesopotamia, and Mosul will be totally abandoned unless we resume 
our old responsibilities there which it seems to me is our unmistak- 
able duty to do." Neither Board is in a position to do the work alone. 
Together they can hold it as a stronghold for Christ. It is the ancient 
city of Nineveh, and the echo of God's words to Jonah sounds in 
our ears, "Arise, go to Nineveh that great city, and cry against it 
for the wickedness is come up before me." Let us not repeat Jonah's 
disobedience. Mosul forms a connecting link with the Syria Mission 
whose farthest outpost at Mardin is only a few days' journey west- 
ward. It ought to be done. It can be done. The Church must say, 
"It shall be done !" 

PHILIPPINES.— The problem of the Philippine Islands is as 
full of interest and hope as ever. The change in our federal admin- 
istration here brought the problem anew to the consideration of Con- 
gress. President Harding was doubtless much puzzled by the con- 
flicting testimony which came to his ofifice — President Wilson had 
stated to Congress that the people of the Islands had proved their 
capacity for self-government and had fulfilled the conditions of the 
Jones Bill. Testimony from other men who had lived in the Islands 
was exactly contrary. The President acted wisely in choosing Gen- 



SURVEY OF FIELDS -PHILIPPINES 55 

eral Leonard Wood and ex-Governor Cameron Forbes as a special 
commission to investigate the conditions in the PhiHppines, and so 
to aid the President in his perplexities. The personnel of the com- 
mission was such as to inspire the greatest confidence among both 
Filipinos and Americans. It was a far wiser plan to appoint men 
well acquainted with the history and development of the islands. 
Their report based on the most careful investigation, recommends 
the maintenance of the present status — the strengthening of the 
authority of the Governor General and the stiffening up of discipline 
in the departments. Much is said in praise of many departments 
and some developments criticised. They agree that the faults are 
most of them due to the inexperience of the officials. Some of the 
criticisms have been keenly resented by the Filipino leaders, and 
a committee has been appointed to appear before Congress and com- 
bat the conclusions at which the Commission arrived. This report, 
in spite of its recommendation of making haste slowly is in fact a 
tribute to the good sense, the desire for knowledge and the idealism 
of the Filipino people. 

Their course of "active cooperation" in the administration of the 
Government is in great contrast with the non-cooperative campaign 
of the nationalists in India. The signature of the four-power Pacific 
Treaty will help solve one of the large difficulties that confront the 
Philippine program, viz., the danger of aggression by other nations. 

This report and the discussions that have arisen as the fruit thereof 
have brought to light by vivid contrast the changes that have occurred 
in the Philippine Islands during the years of American Occupation. 
Few realize that at least 50% of the present population have no 
memory of the affairs of the Spanish dominion. America took 
control 24 years ago, and if we add to those born since 1898, those 
that were children at that time we have over 50%. Consequently they 
lack the background by which to judge the progress made and the 
heights reached. This young generation is more keenly conscious 
of the^heights above than of the former lower levels and are therefore 
impatient at the delay and the realization of their aspirations. No 
one can blame them for their ambitions. This hope of a national 
identity and personality is most praiseworthy and if guided aright 
will vivify the social, political and religious life of the Filipinos. 
If any one is disposed to criticise the people for this aspiration he 
must blame the American system of universal and democratic educa- 
tion and the teaching of the Christian Missions. The Gospel and 
free education are always disturbing factors in an autocracy. 

In its report the Commission says, "The American and foreign 



5,6 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

church missions and schools have done much to improve the spiritual 
and physical condition of the people and to build up better relations 
between the Filipinos and Amercians." The progress of these years 
has of course modified the program of our missions in the achipelago. 
It has changed the emphasis. In early years people were driven by 
the memory of ecclesiastical tyranny to seek relief in the Gospel. 
The emphasis then and still is "note what Jesus taught and what 
the Roman Church teaches — contrast the simplicity of His teaching 
with the ornate ritual of the church on the field" — anger, disgust and 
a desire for freedom as well as the longing for the Word of God 
brought people by the thousands to learn of Christ's word. Places 
where there had been little or no such tyranny did not at first give 
ready hearing to the Gospel. The message was taken to a people 
hungry for God. In these days the message is taken also to the 
educated and student class. It is the same message but it goes to 
young men and women who have had slight if any acquaintance with 
the customs and practices of the past. Their study in the university 
has destroyed the unreasonable faith inherited from their fathers 
and the missions strive, and with success, to give them the true, 
reasoned and reasonable faith of the Gospel. The educated men 
and women must have a living faith if their people are to have a 
real life. Our mission has been wise in devoting much attention to 
the student class. They respond gladly and accept the Gospel. 

The station and personal reports of this mission reveal the burden 
of success, of unlimited opportunities, of doors no one can shut — 
the lure of successful service. The reports show noteworthy progress 
among the churches in self government, self support, in giving and 
in spreading the Gospel. The general contributions amounted to 
$1.25 per member and they hold property to the value of $50,000. 
all of which was contributed by the people themselves. A vigorous 
and successful Home Mission work is maintained by the Presbytery 
of Manila on the Island of Mindoro. Silliman Institute continues 
to be a great power in building character on the basis of a faith 
in Jesus Christ. Its students fill important positions in all parts of 
the islands. The Union Theological Seminary at Manila continues 
its work with success. There have been under instruction young men 
in preparation for various grades of the ministry. 

The Mission is contributing also a spiritual ozone to the general 
atmosphere of the people, an inspiring, refreshing element of life and 
conduct sometimes sadly deficient in the tepid atmosphere of the 
tropics. 



SURVEY OF i^IELDS— SIAM 57 

SIAM. — The outstanding event this year was the first meeting of 
the consolidated North and South Siam Missions, which was held 
in Bangkok in November, 1921. For a long time the absence of 
convenient means of intercommunication made it necessary to have 
two separate Missions; it is about 600 miles from Bangkok Station 
in the south to Chiengmai Station in the north; the only method of 
traveling was by slowly poling a heavy house boat up the river, and 
the journey usually required six weeks or longer, requiring as long 
to go from Bangkok to Chiengmai as from New York to Bangkok. 
With the completion of the railway, however, these two central 
stations of the North and South Siam Missions have been brought 
within two days travel. Announcement has been made that through 
trains will soon make the trip in 26 hours. A missionary writes 
from Lakawn : "You will appreciate the fact that isolation is a thing 
of the past in Siam (at least it is swiftly disappearing) when I tell 
you that we have roses on our table that were picked in Chiengmai. 
Trains run between here and Chengmai in less than five hours daily. 
Landing fields for airplanes are being established in all the northern 
cities of Siam. Planes have been traveling from Bangkok to Korat 
for some months. There is now a through once a week railroad 
service, Bangkok to Penang in 36-40 hours. London mail reaches 
Bangkok in a little less than a month, and we received a letter re- 
cently from an Indiana village in 38 days including the day of mail- 
ing" (Only 38 days from the home folks!) 

Under the wise and capable leadership of the King, the process 
of unification between the Siamese race of the south and the Laos 
race of the north has made rapid progress. It has therefore become 
both practicable and desirable that the Presbyterian missionary work 
in Siam should also be unified. Plans for the union were approved 
by the Board and reported to the General Assembly in 1920; but 
various circumstances delayed the consummation of the plans; now 
they have been happily carried out. Siam is a large and very im- 
portant field; and, as has been frequently noted, it is exclusively a 
Presbyterian field, no other Protestant Board being at work there. 
The meeting at Bangkok was characterized by a high degree of har- 
mony and spiritual devotion and the general feeling was that mission- 
ary work in Siam had entered upon a new and promising era. 

Another outstanding event relates to Chiengrung Station. This 
was opened in 1913 as a station of the North Siam Mission; but 
time has showed the impracticability of linking it with the work in 
Siam. Chiengrung is across the border in the southern part of the 
Province of Yunnan, China. The region concerned is one of the 



58 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

largest in area and in population of any of the unoccupied fields 
of the world. It is a great and needy field for whose evangelization 
the Presbyterian Church is especially responsible. The late Rev. 
Dr. W. Clifton Dodd, who explored it more thoroughly than it had 
ever been explored before, expressed the opinion that the Tai popu- 
lation alone is between twelve and fourteen millions, besides a con- 
siderable Chinese population ; although of course members of the 
Tai race who reside in China must be classified as Chinese from the 
point of view of nationality. The Station was opened with the full 
expectation that it was to be the nucleus of a future Mission and a 
connecting link between our missionary work in northern Siam and 
southern China. It was made the object of a special ILaster Offering 
of the Sunday Schools in 1921, which yielded $32,300 gold for the 
strengthening of the plant and equipment of the Station. Chiengrung 
is not only distant four hundred miles from the nearest station of 
the Siam Mission, but these four hundred miles include four moun- 
tain ranges. There are no roads, but only devious trails. A fast 
native runner can make this trip in about fifteen days, but a mis- 
sionary family could hardly make it in a month and, at certain 
seasons of the year, not at all. The Chiengrung missionaries go to 
and from their station, not through Siam but through southern China ; 
they get their mail through China, they are financed in Chinese cur- 
rency through the Fiscal Agent in Shanghai. They cannot attend 
the Siam Mission meetings, nor can that Mission maintain any real 
contact or supervision. The Board is therefore in correspondence 
with the China Council regarding the practicability of complying 
with the request of the Chiengrung Station and the Siam Mission 
to erect this field into a separate Mission in China to be called the 
Yunnan Mission. Meantime the physical necessities of the situation 
require the Board to handle this field separately from the Siam 
Mission. 

The reports from Chiengrung are of the most encouraging char- 
acter. The missionaries there are probably as isolated as any Presby- 
terian missionaries in the world, but their hearts are gladdened not 
only by the wonderful opportunity for preaching the Gospel of Christ 
to a people who have been hitherto wholly neglected but by undoubted 
evidences that the field is one that is ripe for the harvest. In a single 
district in Muang Chung, fifteen days north of Chiengrung, there 
are almost six hundred converts who are waiting for instruction in 
the Christian faith, having already done away with their spirit 
shrines. Four hundred and ninety-eight converts are at Muang Ya 



SURVEY OF FIELDS— SYRIA 59 

and eighty-eight at another place, with many other villages begging 
for some one to come and teach there. 

The year has seen gratifying progress in the plans for the new 
plant of the Harriet Plouse School for Girls in Bangkok. This 
famous school has so prospered under the efficient superintendence 
of Miss Edna Cole that its buildings were badly over-crowded. As 
the property was surrounded by properties, some of which could not 
be purchased and others of which were held at prohibitive prices, it 
was decided to move the higher classes to a new location where 
more ample space could be secured at a moderate cost and on which 
new and more suitable buildings could be erected. The Siamese them- 
selves, who have long been most friendly to this School, took a gen- 
erous interest in the proposal and a considerable sum for the new 
site was secured on the field. The Woman's Board in America con- 
tributed money for some new buildings. This move will give the 
School greatly needed additional facilities and extend its already 
large influence. The old property is being kept for the present as 
a Day School for younger children and as a center for evangelistic 
work in the homes from which they come. Plans have also been 
made during the year for enlarging the facilities of some of the 
other institutions of the Mission, particularly the Bangkok Christian 
College for Boys and the Prince Royal's College for Boys in Chieng- 
mai, and the boarding school for girls in Chiengmai. The interest 
of the royal family in the Presbyterian mission work is shown by 
repeated marks of favor. When the aunt of the present King 
visited the mission hospital at Nakawn not long ago, she made a 
donation of 500 ticals toward the work, and later made a second 
gift of 200 ticals for the girls' school dormitory. And now the 
Charles T. van Santvoord Hospital at Lakawn has received from a 
feudal prince the gift of a piece of land adjoining the present hospital 
compound. 

The Board earnestly commends the Siam Mission to the special 
sympathies and prayers of the home churches. The missionary force 
is small as compared with the immense field to be covered. Lying 
oflf the great thoroughfares of the world's travel, friendly visitors 
are seldom seen. A greatly appreciated message of cheer and inspira- 
tion was brought to them last year by the visit of the Rev. Dr. and 
Mrs. John N. Mills. 

SYRIA. — The work of the Syria Mission for the past year is a 
story of an opportunity clearly recognized but which could be only 
partially accepted because of difficulties which come with the constant 



60 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

kaleidoscopic changes in the Near East. The Syrian field, as part of 
the former Turkish Empire, naturally feels the effect of every 
political move on the part of the Allies and the lurkish Nationalists. 
This is particularly true in regard to any step w^hich the French Gov- 
ernment may take, as France holds the Mandate for Syria. When 
France made a secret alliance with the Kemalists and evacuated 
Cilicia, Syria immediately felt the consequences. Every letter that 
has been received has described the tragedy resulting from this act. 
In the midst of winter and during the rainy season, which this year 
was particularly severe and prolonged, fully 300,000 (some estimate 
the number as high as 500,000) Armenians came down into Syria 
seeking protection from what they feared would be certain death 
after France withdrew her protection and turned Cilicia over to the 
Turkish Government. 

The fact that neither the Government nor the relief organization 
could meet the religious needs of these people and that their distri- 
bution throughout Syria resulted in groups of persecuted Armenians 
in almost every community who needed spiritual attention, brought 
the Mission face to face with a difficult situation. Many of these 
Armenians could speak only Turkish or Armenian. It was necessary 
to maintain religious work among them. The problem was partially 
solved by the fact that several of their pastors came with them. In 
Beirut, there has been held a morning service, averaging 100, con- 
ducted in the Armenian language and another twice as large in the 
afternoon conducted in the Turkish language. This only partially 
solves the problem. 

The Syrian Mission and the Board must face their share of 
responsibility in solving this problem. As many of these Armenians 
had come from territory where the American Board of Commission- 
ers for Foreign Missions had prior to the war conducted its work, 
the matter was taken up with them, and a first step has been taken 
by their agreement to minister as far as possible to the Turkish 
speaking refugees while our Mission ministers to those who use the 
Arabic language. Until these persecuted people can return, this co- 
operative arrangement will last. 

It is impossible to watch Near Eastern political developments 
without a feeling of bitter disappointment, arising almost to a right- 
eous anger, at the course that has been pursued by the Allies in per- 
mitting, by apathy, opportunism and timidity, the Nationalist Turks 
practically to dictate terms. The late Lord Bryce said that "'had 
definite and decided action been taken immediately after the Armis- 
tice, there might have been a flurry, but there would undoubtedly 



SURVEY OF FIELDS— SYRIA 61 

have been a settlement once and for all of the old Turkish problem." 
Procrastination has enabled the Turk to gain an advantage which may 
now prevent a just solution and permit a continuation of the old 
complicated and unsatisfactory situation. The latest decision of the 
Allies, which apparently leaves the Armenians under the sovereignty 
of the Turk, seems to be a shocking betrayal of justice. Nor can the 
United States Government entirely escape responsibility. The plea 
that she must avoid entangling alliances does not warrant her refusal 
to insist on fair play when a helpless and beseeching sister nation 
is being brutally attacked, robbed and thrown out to die. She should 
be the "Good Samaritan" among the nations ; the American people, 
by their great gifts to Armenia, have poured in the oil and wine. 
But their work seems hopeless if the Government continues to excuse 
itself from participating in the effort to obtain a just settlement in 
the Near East. 

The Mission work in Syria will be uncertain until the political 
questions are settled right. It is this fact which makes Christian 
work in the Near East and in Syria so vital. The Church of Christ 
is the organized force whose field is benevolent and international. 
During all the tragic years in the Near East it has been a unifying, 
restraining and saving power. In one mission school, there are sixty 
Mohammedan students, and into the homes of these students the head 
of the school is eagerly welcomed. In the Boarding School, while 
only two-fifths of the students are Protestants, religious services are 
held for all the students, irrespective of race or inherited creed. 
Who can estimate the wide reach of these Christian influences ? Think 
of the Mission's influence in relation to the work of the Press, which 
this year is celebrating its Centennial, and which is the agency for 
printing and distributing the Scriptures and other Christian litera- 
ture throughout the Near East and beyond. The work of the Press 
is thus reported : 

"Today, February 10, as the American Mission Press at Beirut is 
celebrating its one-hundredth birthday there came as a birthday pres- 
ent the largest order Mesopotamia has yet placed for Press publica- 
tions. But the most interesting feature of this order for religious 
literature was its delivery by aeroplane in two days from Busrah 
to Syria. The course of a letter from Busrah to Beirut by ordinary 
post would be via India, the Red Sea and Egypt. As a rule the ex- 
change of letters by this route takes approximately three months. 
The American Press is celebrating its one hundredth anniversary^ 
by the erection of two new steel buildings designed according to the 
latest system of American construction. These are the gift of the 



62 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A. The old presses, which printed 
at the rate of 600 sheets an hour, are being replaced by the modern 
Kelly, automatic feed, 3,600 an hour. The new Arabic Linotype 
replaces sixteen hand type-setters. With these and many other mod- 
ern improvements, it is altogether fitting that the aeroplane should 
come in at this stage to play its part in the distribution of this in- 
creased output of religious literature. Our regret is that those noble 
pioneers, Fiske and Parsons, who came here a hundred years ago 
and laid the foundations of this remarkable work, could not share 
with us today the joy of seeing the new plant with all its marvelous 
facilities for accomplishing so rapidly the work which cost them 
such infinite pains and labor. Truly "the King's business requireth 
haste" and we hope that the next addition of modern equipment to 
the Beirut Mission Press will be an aeroplane for colportage work." 

The influence of the Mission on the social life of Syria must 
also be mentioned. Since the war, Syria has been made the prey 
of many evil social forces. Drink, gambling and prostitution have 
greatly increased in a land hitherto comparatively free. Some have 
said that in these matters they even prefer a return to the old days 
of Turkish rule. These facts have created new duties in the watch 
and care of the life of the Syrian Churches. 

It has been necessary for the various Mission Boards to consider 
carefully the negotiations of the Allied Powers to see that our large 
interests in the Near East were protected. To this end, a paper was 
drawn up by those representing the various religious, educational 
and philanthropic agencies working in the Near East and placed be- 
fore our Government ; it included the following : 

First, that the Government of the United States assure all of the 
Powers and Governments engaged in negotiations for the settlement 
of the future boundaries, international relations and internal status 
of what was formerly the Ottoman Empire, or what may so remain, 
that these American institutions with their directing personnel shall 
be guaranteed their properties, their rights, their privileges and im- 
munities enjoyed for a century or less under treaties, agreements, 
capitulations, concessions and precedent. 

Second, that the United States Government arrange that at the 
coming proposed conference, and at any future conference at which 
the affairs of the Near East, affecting the welfare of these American 
corporations, are liable to come up for consideration and decision, 
a representative or representatives of these American religious, edu- 
cational and charitable interests shall be present. 

While the Government has not taken formal action, positive assur- 
ance has been given that our Government is attentive in this matter, 



IN mp:moriam 63 

and that every practicable step would be taken to protect American 
interests. 

While the Syrian sky is not without some threatening clouds, the 
future is bright. No discouraging word comes from the men and wo- 
men of faith who constitute our Mission force. They feel that Syria is 
a strategic spot in determining the world's peace, and that when the 
righteousness of God is enthroned there, a source of world unrest 
will disappear. For the cause of Christ, they have dedicated their 
lives, — for this end, they work and pray unceasingly. 

IN MEMORIAM 

The following ended their earthly tasks during the past year: 

Mr. Scott Foster, Member of ithe Board 1898-1922 

MISSIONARIES AND FORMER MISSIONARIES 
NAME TERM OF SERVICE 

Rev. Robert H. Nassau, D.D..* Africa 1861-1906 

Mrs. Oscar J. Hardin, * Syria • • . . 1873-1919 

Miss Emilia Thomson, Syria 1876-1922 

Rev. Robert M. Mateer.'D.D.. China 1881-1921 

Rev. Henry M. Landis. Japan 18884921 

Mrs. Horace G. Underwood, Chosen 1888-1921 

Miss [ennie Wheeler. Mexico 1888-1922 

Rev. t- H. Freeman, Siam 1894-1922 

Rev. James B. Cochran, *CHina 1899-1920 

Mrs. F. M. Stead, Persia 1900-1922 

Rev. Walter W. Hicks, China 1902-1921 

Mrs. Hugh C. Ramsay, China 1913-1921 

Mrs. Walter W. Wood. Brasil 1916-1921 

Rev. Lorin H. King, Mexico • • . . 1917-1922 

Rev. E. C. Cowden, Africa 1920-1922 

♦Had resigned from missionary service. 

Mr. Scott Foster was one of the oldest and most highly esteemed 
members of the Board, of true character and of long and very faithful 
service in various capacities. He was elected in May, 1898. For 
several years he served as a member of the Committee for Persia, 
Africa and Syria. In 1899 he was appointed a member of the 
Clerical Committee, and in November, 1907, a member of the Finance 
Committee and served the Board in these positions until his death. 
A bank president of recognized prominence, he was a fine type of 
the capable business men whose ability and experience are freely 
placed at the disposal of the Boards of the Church. He entered upon 
the life eternal at 'his home in New York City on the 26th day 
of January, 1922, and his body rests amidst the quiet scenes of his 
early boyhood days. In the death of Mr. Foster, the Board has sus- 



64 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

tained a serious loss. Loyal to its traditions and obedient to its com- 
mands, his interest in its welfare and work in various parts of the 
world never wavered. Essentially a man of afifairs, the material in- 
terests of the Board received his constant attention and to their con- 
sideration and conservation, he gave prodigally of his time and 
strength. He was a tender and loving husband and father and in all 
of the relations of life domestic, business, social and church, he ex- 
hibited at all times the traits of an earnest, sincere and devoutly 
Christian gentleman. 

The Rev. Robert Hamill Nassau, M.D., S.T.D., died in Philadel- 
phia, May 6th, in his eighty-sixth year. Dr. Nassau was a member 
of the West Africa Mission from September 12, 1861 to December 
3, 1906, when he retired on account of advanced age. Since that 
time he has been residing in America. Dr. Nassau was a man of 
ability and culture, a thorough scholar, an indefatigable worker and 
a missionary whose supreme purpose was the making of Christ known 
to the darkened people of Africa. He was the author of several 
books and of many newspaper and magazine articles which evinced 
high literary ability. He was one of the recognized authorities of 
the ethnology of the peoples of West Africa. The Board has made 
grateful record of the long and conspicuously useful service of this 
devoted servant of God, who was permitted to reach such good old 
age in the enjoyment of the honors which were so justly bestowed 
upon him. 

Mrs. Mary Stuart Dodge Hardin, the wife of the Rev. Oscar J. 
Hardin, was born in Hartford, Conn., January 5, 1841, and was the 
daughter of David S. Dodge and Caroline Hyde Dodge. On May 
5, 1873, she was appointed a missionary to work in Syria, she having 
previously journeyed to Syria in the year 1871 to visit her sister, 
Mrs. H. H. Jessup. Mrs. Hardin inherited by birth a strong Chris- 
tian motive and a spirit of consecration that manifested itself 
throughout her whole life. The name of Dodge has been identified 
with the mission work in Syria for more than half a century. While 
Mrs. Hardin's work in the mission was that of the home-maker and 
home-keeper, she entered gladly into all the problems of the Mission, 
and became a strong influence in her own devoted and quiet way. 
She scarcely knew a day of sickness, not once having been confined 
to her bed because of illness. She assisted in the work of the School 
at Suk-El-Gharb, and she had the privilege, as was customary in 
those earlier days, of teaching some of the leading preachers of 
Syria, among them the present pastor of the Beirut Church, whose 
work is being singularly blessed of God. 



IN MEMORIAM 65 

Miss Emilia Thomson, for many years the faithful servant of 
Christ, in connection with the American School for Girls at Beirut, 
Syria, died July 1, 1921. She was born in Beirut, July 24, 1839. 
In the record in the Board offices, the answer to the question as to 
where her home was in the United States, is "none ;" her reply 
indicates that practically her whole life had Ix^en spent upon the 
Mission field and she was identified with it from childhood. From 
1876 she served the Mission until her retirement, when she still re- 
mained, although not enrolled as a regular missionary, as a valuable 
and faithful worker. Her name is closely associated in the minds 
of all lovers of Syria with that of Dr. William M. Thomson, her 
father, whose important volume, "The Land and the Book," is known 
widely. A letter from one of the former Mission boys now at the 
head of a large printing establishment in Cairo, and for many years 
editor of the leading newspaper and magazine of Egypt told of the 
helpful influence and inspiration of her life. He spoke of her as a 
saint and said the natives told of her self-sacrifice during the war 
in depriving herself of necessary food to contribute to their needs. 
Her going was a great sorrow and loss to Syria, which can never 
lose the impress of her beautiful personality and influence. 

Rev. Robert M. Matcer, D.D. Timothy's phrase, "a good soldier 
of Jesus Christ" might appropriately be applied to Robert McCheyne 
Mateer, who died at his station in Wei-hsien, China, September 5, 
1921, after a long and painful illness. He was born near Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, February 8, 1853, a son of John and Mary Mateer. 
He was educated at Monmouth College and Princeton University, 
after which he took his theological course at Princeton Seminary, 
graduating in 1880. His brother, Calvin Wilson Mateer, had then 
been twenty years in China. Robert's Christian motives and mis- 
sionary spirit were in full sympathy with his brother and it was 
quite natural that he should turn his eyes toward the same field. 
The Board gladly appointed him, and on October 25, 1881, he sailed 
under assignment to the Shantung Mission. With the exception of 
occasional furloughs, he labored there until failing health compelled 
him to give up active work, but he was unwilling to give up the 
field to which he had consecrated his life, and he died where he 
wished to die, among the people for whom he had given his all for 
his Master. His brother Calvin, early became identified with the 
educational work of the Mission; Robert gave himself to the itinera- 
tion. He journeyed in season and out of season among the numerous 
villages in his out-station field ! His physical endurance seemed to 
have no limit. However, even his iron frame gave way under the 

5 — For. Miss. 



66 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

strain of such incessant exposure and toil. After forty-one years of 
splendidly self sacrificing and heroic work for humanity and for 
God, he might have said with the Apostle Paul : "I have fought the 
good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith." 

Rev. Henry M. Landis was born in Barto, Berks County, Penn- 
sylvania, March 9, 1857. He graduated from Princeton College in 
1863, and after a period spent in traveling and post-graduate studies 
in Europe he entered Princeton Theological Seminary, and was 
ordained by the Presbytery of New Brunswick. He applied to the 
Board for appointment, and in 1888 sailed under assignment to 
Japan, accompanied by his wife whom he had married July 16th 
of that year. He died September 6, 1921. He was a man of sterl- 
ing character, a profound student, always willing and glad to help 
the other man, and kept open house for all. The students always 
found a helper in their problems, great or small. The work that 
does not loom up, but takes so much time and accuracy, — statistics — 
was always given to Dr. Landis. Map drawing, drawing plans for 
houses, churches, schools, he toiled over at midnight. He thought 
and planned for the boys. A great worker has gone, but will still 
live. He was a real scholar and a man of fine character and deep 
ingrained faith. His work covered more than three decades of un- 
stinted, solid work for Japan. His students had great respect for 
his scholarship and confidence in his character. His good offices 
extended far beyond the institution to other missions and to younger 
missionaries of our own Church. 

Mrs. Horace G. Underwood. A rarely gifted spirit left this earth 
in the death of Mrs. Lillias Horton Underwood, M.D., of the Chosen 
Mission, at Seoul, October 29th. Born in Albany, New York, June 
21, 1851, her life of three score and ten was crowded with stirring 
events. The Board of Foreign Missions assigned her to Korea, 
January, 1888. She was the first woman physician in Korea, and 
she therefore had to encounter appalling sanitary and disease con- 
ditions. But Miss Horton applied herself to her task with indomi- 
table courage and zeal. She quickly attracted the attention of the 
Royal Family, and the Queen was so impressed by her, that she made 
the young missionary physician her personal physician. This appoint- 
ment opened up wide opportunities which this consecrated worker 
suffused with the spirit of Christ. March 13, 1889, she was united 
in marriage with the Rev. Horace G. Underwood, the first ordained 
missionary of any denomination in Korea. Mrs. Underwood's heart 
was so burdened for the suffering women and children that she 
opened a little hospital, "The Shelter," to which was attached a small 



IN MEMORIAM 67 

dispensary given by Mrs. Hugh O'Neill of New York, where re- 
ligious services were held for all who came for treatment. She arrived 
in Korea in the day of small beginnings when there was only a 
handful of Christians, but when she died the number exceeded 
200.000, and the work of the Mission had grown to large proportions. 
In much of this wonderful development she had an influential part. 

Miss Jennie Wheeler. Miss Jennie Wheeler was born on Christ- 
mas day. 1856, in Neenah, Wisconsin. She was appointed to the 
Mexico Mission March 5, 1888, and left the United States for the 
field May 20, 1888. For twenty-six years she was the head of the 
Girl's School at Saltillo. and for seven years principal of the school 
at San Angel. She died in Mexico of cerebral hemorrhage, March 
15, 1922. She was thus in the sixty-sixth year of her age and in 
her thirty-fourth year of service under this Board. At the funeral 
services, Prof. Andres Osuna, who for twelve years was at the head 
of the State Normal and the Primary Schools, and had known Miss 
Wheeler intimately, with deep emotion gave an eloquent tribute to 
her work. He stated that he had never known any one who had 
impressed him so deeply with her rare executive ability in utilizing 
very limited funds to the very best purposes in building up an insti- 
tution of the very highest order. He repeated what her intimate 
friends already knew that she commanded the respect of not only 
her pupils but of all the teachers associated with her; that she never 
spared herself in looking after the minutest details of the life of the 
school and of each one of the pupils. She indeed distinguished 
herself among all of our missionaries by her strong personality and 
practical common sense. 

The Rev. John H. FrccTuan died March 4, 1922, and a faithful 
missionary service of twenty-seven years had come to its earthly 
close. He was born April 21, 1865, in Rockford, 111. Applying to 
the Board, he was appointed a missionary, January 15, 1894, and 
August 5th, of the same year, he sailed under assignment to what 
was then known as the Laos (now Siam) Mission. On November 
15, 1899, he was united in marriage to Miss Emma Hitchcock who 
survives him. Two children were born to them, of whom one sur- 
vives with the bereaved wife. Mr. Freeman was a man of sterling 
Christian character, of strong evangelical faith, and of marked 
devotion as a missionary. He gladly gave his life for the evangeliza- 
tion of the Laos people of Northern Siam. For a considerable period 
he and his wife lived at a. station at which there were no other 
missionary families, so that their life was one of peculiar loneliness. 
Mr. Freeman was a diligent student of the history, language, 



68 INTRODUCTION— F0RP:IGN MISSIONS 

manners and customs of the Laos people, and in 1910 he published 
an excellent book entitled "An Oriental Land of the Free or Life 
and Mission Work Among the Laos of Siam, Burma, China and 
Indo-China." In 1921, he received a painful injury in a fall from 
a horse. He struggled on with his work until fast increasing 
ill-health compelled him to return to America. He and Mrs. Free- 
man arrived in the United States about the middle of February; 
pneumonia quickly set in and he passed away March 4th. A true 
friend of Christ's work in Siam has been called to higher service. 

The Rev. James B. Cochran was born at Mendham, New Jersey, 
December 27, 1874, the son of Rev. Israel Williams Cochran 
and Annie Carter Cochran. His mother was the daughter of Robert 
Carter, one of the incorporators of the Board. On June 21, 1899, 
he was married to Margaret Huntington Jenkins, M.D. They sailed 
August 21, 1899, with his brother Samuel Cochran, M.D., and his 
wife, all being under assignment to Nanking. China. The year 1911 
brought disaster and death to the valleys of the Yangtse and the 
Hwai, famine and pestilence following unprecedented inundations, 
and Mr. Cochran was taken ill with sprue. On his return to this 
country the skill of physicians finally relieved his trouble sufficiently 
for him to go back to China in the spring of 1913. But he returned 
alone, for on September 22, 1912, his beloved wife was taken from 
him by a mysterious disease of but a day's duration. On the field 
again, Mr. Cochran realized that though but thirty-nine years old, 
he was working on borrowed time ; his labor was so abundantly 
blessed of God that, when in 1918 his returning malady forced him 
again to leave China, he declared that he would gladly forego the 
hope of many years of life elsewhere for the privilege of those five 
added years in China. He realized that he could never return to 
China, and he resigned his commission as a missionary of the Board 
on September 20. 1920. A secret of the abiding success which fol- 
lowed his efforts is revealed in a letter in which he wrote : "Being 
kept ill in bed so constantly, I am awake much at night and keep 
praying for China." A fellow missionary stated at the funeral ser- 
vice that whenever tangled station affairs seemed miraculously to 
straighten out, someone would remark : "Jim is praying for us."' 
He entered the life beyond August 31, 1921. 

Mrs. Blanche Wilson Stead, M.D., passed away in Persia on 
February 21, 1922, in her fifty-second year. She was assigned to 
the East Persia Mission in 1900, and after two years of service was 
married to the Rev. F. M. Stead. Record of Mrs. Stead's work has 
revealed a life of devoted service, undaunted persistency and deepest 



IN MEMORIAM 69 

sympathy for those to whom she was ministering. These gifts were 
especially manifest during the recent years when Persia was the 
scene of the war tragedies. Mrs. Stead was particularly hurdened 
in her heart for orphan children, who had been driven from their 
homes in the Urumia Plain and were congregated in Kermanshah. 
She felt as a mother to them all, and urged both the Mission and 
the Board to make some provision which would give these children 
the loving care which otherwise they would be deprived of. In many 
parts of our Mission fields there are noble Christians like Mrs. Stead 
whose names are not widely heralded, but whose lives are built into 
the very fiber of the growing Kingdom of God on earth. Our knowl- 
edge of the limitless resources of God must make us realize that 
though the work of a particular servant of God ceases, the strong 
influences continue, and the work laid down will be taken up and 
carried on by others. Mrs. Stead is missed by thousands whose lives 
she blessed. 

Rev. Walter W. Hicks. The Rev. Walter W. Hicks was cut off 
in his prime when he passed from earth December 15, 1921. He was 
born at Wamego, Kansas, July 4, 1873, and educated at Emporia 
College and McCormick Theological Seminary, graduating from the 
latter institution in 1902. Recognizing the paramount claims of 
foreign missionary service for those who are able to go, he applied 
for appointment at the beginning of his senior year, and the Board, 
on November 8, 1901, gladly appointed him. In April of the fol- 
lowing year, he was assigned to the North China Mission, for which 
he sailed August 26, 1902. He was assigned to evangelistic work, 
to which he devoted himself with marked zeal and fidelity until fail- 
ing health compelled him to return to America. The symptoms were 
such that there were grave fears regarding the outcome. He re- 
ceived skillful and sympathetic treatment at the Mayo Brothers Hos- 
pital at Rochester, Minnesota, but an operation could not save him, 
and death released him from his sufferings. Mr. Hicks was a mis- 
sionary of implicit faith in God, of large sympathy with the Chinese 
and of joyful consecration to the work of preaching the Gospel. He 
was twice married, his first wife. Miss Agnes M. Hubbard, to whom 
he was united May 8, 1902, died December 2, 1906. September 17, 
1908, he was married to Miss Cora Small, a fellow member of the 
Mission. A great field of service is left vacant by his departure. 

Mrs. Ada Alexander Ramsay, wife of the Rev. Hugh Clarence 
Ramsay of the North China Missions, died in Peking, July 16, 1921. 
After some years of service with the China Inland Mission they 
returned to America, where they were appointed by the Presbyterian 



70 INTRODUCTION— FOREIGN MISSIONS 

Board and assigned to the North China Mission. Mrs. Ramsay 
was in consecrated sympathy with her husband's evangelistic work 
in the numerous villages of the Shunte-fu field. She was a woman 
of faith and prayer, who made light of the loneliness and privations 
of missionary life in the joy of being associated with her husband 
in the work of her Lord. 

Mrs. Grace Brown Wood was appointed as a missionary in 1916 
with her husband, Dr. Walter W. Wood, and sailed in September of 
that year, going to Ponte Nova, Bahia, Central Brazil Mission. She 
was prepared for her work at the Lohriville High School and Huron 
College. Her death on June 18, 1921, was a great blow to the work 
of her sadly understaffed mission and she will be profoundly missed 
in every one of her relationships there. "The members of the Mis- 
sion have lost a friend, the work of the Mission a valuable helper 
and the Brazilian people one who devoted herself to their needs." 

The Rev. Lorin H. King was a son of the manse, and was born in 
Illinois on November 8, 1886, in McDonough County. Mr. King's 
educational training was received at the James Millikin University 
and McCormick Theological Seminary. His desire to be a foreign 
missionary was natural in his active and assertive Christian life. 
He was married to Miss Mary Emery Freeman on June 2, 1917, 
and in November of that year sailed for Mexico. His work was 
largely at Vera Cruz where he was able to render effective service 
in addition to his language study, but there developed the pernicious 
anemia which resulted in his death. He returned to the United States 
after two years of service, and two years later resigned from the 
Board, the long and hard fight for life being lost on January 12, 
1922. At every point in his career Mr. King left the impression 
of a faithful, earnest, wide-visioned missionary advocate. 

Rev. Earnest C. Cowden was born in Auckland, New Zealand, May 
11, 1889. He was appointed to the West Africa Mission May 3, 1920, 
and sailed for the field in July of that year. He died at Yaounde on 
December, 1921. After his death his widow retired from the Mission 
and returned with their children to the homeland. A member of their 
Mission writes : "They were very kind to the people and had a large 
place in their hearts. They were not afraid of work. Not only 
did the evangelists where Mr. Cowden was working like him but 
the people of the town also were his friends." 

"These all died in faith, not having received the promises, but 
having seen them afar off, and were persuaded of them, and em- 
braced them, and confessed that they were strangers and pilgrims on 



BOARD MEMBERSHIP 71 

the earth" . . . for they "looked for a city which hath foundations 
whose maker and builder is God." 

BOARD MEMBERSHIP 

To fill the vacancy in the membership of the Board in the class 
of 1921-1924, created by the death of Mr. Scott Foster, the Board 
has elected Mr. Ralph W. Harbison, of Pittsburgh, Penna. 

The terms of the following members of the Board expire with 
this meeting of the General Assembly : 

Rev. Eben B. Cobb, D.D. Mr. Alfred E. Marling 

Rev. Charles C. Albertson, D.D. Mr. Edwin M. Bulkley 

Rev. Robert G. MacGregor, D.D. Mr. Henry J. Cochran 

William E. Stiger, Esq. Rev. Charles Grenville Sewall 

Respectfully submitted in behalf of the Board, 

George T. Scott^ 

Secretary. 



MISSIONARIES ADDED TO THE FORCE DURING 
THE YEAR MARCH 31, 1921-1922 



West Africa 

Chazeaud, Rev. and Mrs. Car 
G-auH, Mrs. F. M. 
Graham, Miss Helen 
Johnson, Miss Lois 
Johnson, Miss Mary 
Senslca, Dr. and Mrs. Pranli 



R. 



Punjab 

McGee, Miss Mary I. 
Orbison, Miss Bertha 

Western India 

Rice, Dr. and Mr.s. William H. 
Taylor, Rev. and Mrs. Lewallaoe W. 



Hainan 

Brogden, Rev. and Mrs. Ura 
Tappan, Mrs. David S., Jr. 
Whelpley, Dr. and Mrs. Frank R. 

Hunan 

Brown, Dr. and Mrs. Chauncey F. 
Hughes, Miss Freidda 
Jacobson, Mis.s Josephine 
Luccock, Rev. Emory W. 
McKee, Miss Elizabeth 
Owens, Rev. and Mrs. A. 



C. 



Kiangan 

Barker, 



Rev. Joseph E. 



North Cliuia 

Gould, Miss Orpha B. 
Logan, Miss Florence L. 
Richards, Miss Laura B. 
Sailer, Miss Josephine 
Steinbeck, Mr. and Mrs. Clark C. 
Waddell, Dr. Susan S. 

Shantung: 

Anckner, Miss Ada 
Hayes, Miss M. May 

South China 

Cliness, Miss Lulu 
Rupert, Miss Grace 
Vaughn, Miss Helen 

Chosen 

Adams, Rev. and Mrs. Edward 
Byram, Dr. and Mrs. Roy M. 
Hartness, Miss Marion E. 
Malcolmson, Dr. and Mrs. O. K. 
Swler, Miss Effie 

Nortli India 

Campbell, Rev. Harry E. 
Hall, Miss Priscilla 
Sohweigert, Miss Emma M. 



Japan 

Buchanan, Rev. and Mrs. Daniel C. 
Chapman, Rev. and Mrs. Gordon K. 
Ensign, Miss Anna E. 
Miles, Miss Mary 
Palmer, Miss Helen 
Trimble, Miss Ruth E. 

East Persia 

Harker, Rev. and Mrs. Leo M. 
Shedd, Rev. and Mrs. Paul B. 

West Persia 

Peters, Mr. Thomas L. 
Smith, Mrs. Florence K. 
Wright, Rev. Edwin M. 

Pliilippines 

Bell, Rev. and Mrs. Roy H. 
Buck, Miss Anne M. 
Underwood, Miss Edith M. 

Siam 

Barland, Miss Agnes L. 
Mitchell, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar 

Syria 

Alter, Rev. S. Neale 
Doolittle, Miss Alice 
Greenslade, Mrs. William G. 
Leavitt, Rev. and Mrs. Leslie W. 
Stoltzfu.'^, Rev. and Mrs. William A. 

Brazil 

Allen, Miss Bessie 

Johnson, Rev. and Mrs. Frederick E. 

Guatemala 

Lake, Miss Prances E. 

Mexico 

MacLennan, Miss Elfreda 
Reifsnyder, Rev. and Mrs. Bancroft 

Venezuela 

Phillips, Miss Verna A. 



SPECIAL TERM MISSIONARIES 



Central Cliina 

Creighton, Mr. and Mrs. Roy L. 

Chosen 

McAnlis, Dr. and Mrs. J. A. 

Nortli India 

Griffiths, Mr. Walter B. 
Hayes, Mr. W. Brewster 
Health, Mr. Thomas L. 
Johnson, Mr. Omer C. 
Pederson, Mr. Ervln L. 
Vaugh, Mr. and Mrs. Mason 
Warburton, Mr. Clark A. 

East Persia 

Doolittle, Miss Jane 



West Persia 

Vannenian, Miss Irene 



Siam 

Moore, 



Mr. William R. 



Syria 

Lewis, Mr. Russell W. 
MoGuffln, Mr. Lawrence 
Simpson, Miss Edith 
Weiden'heimer, Mr. Paul 

ChUe 

Forry, Mr. Paulding 
Greenlee, Mr. Wendell W. 
Schaaf, Miss Elizabeth 
Whelan, Miss Mary E. 



FURLOUGHED MISSIONARIES RETURNING DURING 
YEAR MARCH 31, 1921-1922 



West Africa 

Eick, Miss Verna A. 

Kmerson, Mrs. F. O. 

Gault, Rev. F. M. 

Johnson, Dr. and Mrs. Silas F. 

Reis, Rev. Jacob A. 

Central China 

Becker, Mr. Tyoon M. 

Hille, Miss Bes.sie 

March, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. 

Ricketts, Miss Juniata 

Van Evera, Rev. and Mrs. Kepler 

White, Rev. and Mrs. Ralph 

Hainan 

McCandliss, Dr. and Mrs. H. M. 
Tappan, Rev. David S., Jr. 

Hunan 

Deiong-, Miss Nettie R, 
Dowling-, Rev. and Mrs. P. H. 
Preston, Rev. and Mrs. T. .T. 
Tootell, Dr. and Mrs. J. T. 
Vanderburgh, Dr. and Mr.s. E. D. 

Kianeran 

Hyde, Miss Jane A. 

Nortli China 

Bash, Dr. Clementine 

Dilley, Dr. and Mrs. P. E. 

Hamilton. Dr. and Jlrs. Guy W. 

Mateer, Mrs. A. H. 

Mather, Rev. and Mrs. W. A. 

Sliantungr 

Adolph, Dr. and Mrs. William H. 
Boehne, Miss Emma S. 
Booth, Rev. and Mrs. W. C. 
Braskamp. Rev. Otto 
Braskamp. Miss iChristina 
Bryan, Dr. Herman 
Cassat. Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. 
Christman. Miss Helen 
Coonradt. Rev. and Mrs. R. G. 
Corbett. Mrs. Hunter 
Dndd. Mrs. A. B. 
Elterich, Miss Helen 
Elterich, Dr. and Mrs. W. O. 
Hills, Dr. and Mr«. O. F. 
Irwin. Rev. and Mrs. .T. P. 
Merwin. Dr. Caroline S. 
Ruland, Rev. and Mrs. I..1oyd S. 
Terkes, Rev. and Mrs. C. H. 

South China 

Allyn, Dr. Harriett 

Butler, Miss Electa M. 

Carson, Rev. and Mrs. A. L. 

Edwards. Rev. and Mrs. Reese F. 

Fisher, Rev. and Mrs. A. J. 

Fulton, Miss Grace 

Fulton, Dr. and Mrs. A. 

Howe, Rev. E. C. 

Noyes. Miss Harriet N. 

Patton, Miss Lulu 

Pratt, Rev. and Mrs. A. 

Selden, Dr. and Mrs. C. 

Thomson, Rev. and Mrs. George D. 

Thomson, Rev. and Mrs. Herbert F. 

Thomson, Dr. and Mrs. J. Oscar 

Wilcox, Miss Vella M. 

Chosen 

Clark, Rev. and Mrs. C. A. 
Hopkirk, Rev. and Mrs. C. C. 
Ludlow, Dr. and Mrs. A. I. 
Moffatt, Rev. Samuel 
Soltau, Mr. and Mrs. David 
Swallen, Dr. and Mrs. W. L. 



A. 



A. 
C. 



Niortli India 

Ferger, Mr. and Mrs. W. P. 

Hezlep, Rev. and Mrs. W. H. 

Higg'inbottom, Mr. and Airs. Sam 

Johnson, Miss Mary E. 

Jones, Miss A. G. 

Lee, Miss J^ouisa 

McRobbie, Miss Sarah 

Robinson, Rev. and Mrs. Robert H. 

Punjab 

Boyd, Miss Lena A. 
Llewellyn, Mrs. Frank B. 
Love, Rev. and Mrs. R. B. 
MacDonald, M'iss Margaret J. R. 
Peterson, Miss Emily L. 
Rice, Rev. and Mrs. C. Herbert 
Schuyler, Rev. and Mrs. Burl T. 
Velte, Rev. and Mrs. H. C. 
Whltlock, Rev. H. A. 

Western India 

Browne, Miss Adelaide 
Goheen, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. 
Jefferson, M'iss Amanda L. 

Japan 

Curtis, Rev. and Mrs. F. S. 
Daugherty, Miss Lena 
Garvin, Mrs. A. E. 
Gorbold, Mrs. R. P. 
Hannaford, Mrs. Howard D. 
Luther, Miss Ida 
Murray, Mrs. D. A. 
Riker, Miss Jessie 

East Persia 

Murray, Miss Florence E. 
Schuler, Rev. and Mrs. H. C. 

West Persia 

Burgess, Miss Mary Edna 

Lamme, Miss Edith D. 

Miller, Miss Florence 

Packard, Dr. and Mrs. Harry P. 

Vanneman, Dr. Walter S. 

Pliilippines 

Doltz, Rev. Paul 

Graham, Dr. and Mrs. J. A. 

Hibbard, Mrs. D. S. 

Siam 

Gait, Miss Annabel 

Lyon, Rev. and Mrs. W. T. 

Mason, Dr. Claude W. 

Snyder, Rev. and Mrs. Frank S. 

Syria 

Dana, Mr. and Mrs. C. A. 
DooHttle, Mrs. Geo. C. 
Freidinger, Rev. and Mrs. W. A. 

Brazil 

Landes, Rev. and Mrs. G. A. 
Chile 

Smith, Miss Florence E. 

Spining, Mr. and Mrs. C. M. 
Colombia 

Barber, Rev and Mrs. Thomas E. 

Candor, Rev. and Mrs. T. H. 

Hunter, Miss Martha B. 
Guatemala 

Haymaker, Rev. E^dward 

Hayter, Rev. James 

Sullenberger, Rev. and Mrs. Linn P. 

Williams, Miss Ella M. 
Mexico 

Sage, Miss Lucille 

Turner, Miss Mary 

Wheeler, Miss Jennie 

Wolfe, Mrs. A. W. 



WEST AFRICA MISSION 

The stations are arranged in the order of their opening, not 
alphabetically. For dates see following list. 

Benito: In Spanish Guinea, on the coast, V/z degrees north of the equator; 
occupied as a station, 1864. Missionaries — Mr. A. N. Krug and Mrs. Krug, 
Lucius E. Smith, M.D., and Mrs. Smith. 

Batanga : on the coast 3 degrees north of the equator; occupied as a sta- 
tion, 1885. Missionaries— Mr. A. G. Adams and Mrs. Adams, Mr. H. A. 
Hoisington and Mrs. Hoisington, Rev. P. J. Kapteyn and Mrs. Kapteyn. 

Efulen : 57 miles east of Batanga, behind the coast belt; occupied, 1893. 
Missionaries- — Dr. H. L. Weber and Mrs. Weber, Rev. F. O. Emerson and 
Mrs. Emerson, Miss Lois Johnson. 

Elat: 56 miles east of Efulen; occupied as a station, 1895. Missionaries — 
Mrs. C. W. McCleary, Mr. F. H. Hope and Mrs. Hope, Mr. A. B. Carr and 
Mrs. Carr, Mr. E. Cozzens and Mrs. Cozzens, Rev. W. C. Johnston and Mrs. 
Johnston, Mr. John H. Bradford and Mrs. Bradford, Rev. Paul H. Combs and 
Mrs. Combs, Mr. Victor M. Buck, Miss Verna E. Eick, Miss Marguerite 
Pechin, Mr. L. Earle Deane and Mrs. Deane, Rev. Camille A. Chazeaud and 
Mrs. Chazeaud, Rev. Joseph McNeill. 

MacLean Memorial Station : at Lolodorf, in the Ngumba country, 70 
miles northeast of Batanga ; occupied as a station in 1897. Outstation at 
Olama, 62 miles north of MacLean. Missionaries — Dr. W. S. Lehman and 
Mrs. Lehman, Miss Ruth Aikin, Rev. A. B. Patterson and Mrs. Patterson, 
Rev. A. I. Good and Mrs. Good, Rev. Melvin Eraser, Rev. F. M. Gault and 
Mrs. Gault. 

Short Term : Air. George Anker and Mrs. Anker. 

Metet: 73.5 miles northeast of Elat; opened in 1909. Missionaries — 
Dr. Silas F. Johnson and Mrs. Johnson, Rev. G. C. Beanland and Mrs. Bean- 
land, Dr. A. B. T. Lippert and Mrs. Lippert, Miss G. Arista Staley, Rev. F. 
M. Grissett and Mrs. Grissett. 

FouLASsi : 70 miles east of Elat ; occupied as a station, 1916. Missionaries — 
Rev. R. H. Evans and Mrs. Evans, Miss Virginia D. McGilliard, Rev. Harry 
C. Neely and Mrs. Neely, Rev. D. Coe Love and Mrs. Love, Miss Helen R. 
Graham. 

Sakbayeme: in the Basa country; formerly occupied by the German Bap- 
tist Mission; 90 miles northwest of Elat. Occupied 1920. Missionaries — Mr. 
George Schwab and Mrs. Schwab, Rev. F. W. Neal and Mrs. Neal, Rev. J. 
A. Reis and Mrs. Reis, Dr. Frank R. Senska and Mrs. Senska. 

Yaounde: Mr. Herbert W. Grieg and Mrs. Grieg. 

Reinforcement: Miss Mary Johnson— Studying in France. 

Marriage: Rev. Edwin Cozzens and Miss Lucia Hammond. 

Death : Rev. E. C. Cowden. 

Resignations : Mrs. L. D. Heminger, Mrs. E. C. Cowden, Mrs. A. C. 
Good, Rev. F. D. P. Hickman. 

Transfers: Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Hoisington from Metet to Batanga; 
Rev. and Mrs. P. J. Kapteyn from Elat to Batanga ; Rev. and Mrs. J. A. Reis 
from Batanga to Sakbayeme ; Rev. and Mrs. F. M. Grissett from Efulen to 

75 



l(i WEST AFRICA— VISIT OF COJ/iMISSION 

Metet; Rev. Joseph McNeill from Foulassi to Elat; Rev. and Mrs. D. Coe 
Love from MacLean to Foulassi; Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Grieg from Elat to 
Yaounde. 

Absent from the Field All or Part of the Year : Rev. and Mrs. P. J. 
Kapteyn, Mrs. F. O. Emerson, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Carr, Mr. and Mrs. E. 
Cozzens, Miss Verna E. Eick, Mrs. F. H. Hope, Mrs. W. C. Johnston, Rev. 
Melvin Eraser, Rev. and Mrs. A. I. Good, Mrs. W. S. Lehman, Dr. and Mrs. 
S. F. Johnson, Rev. and Mrs. J. A. Reis. 

HISTORY. — The work in Africa was begun in 1842 by the American 
Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, at Baraka Station, about a 
half degree north of the Equator on the West Coast, and 10 miles inland. 
In 1871 this station was transferred to the Presbyterian Board of Foreign 
Missions, and added to the station already occupied by that Board on the 
Island of Corisco, where work had been opened in 1850, the combined work 
receiving the name of the Gabooii and Corisco Mission. These stations were 
in French territory. In 1862 a station was opened at Au(/oni, also in Congo 
Francais, 10 miles further inland. It was abandoned because of its unhealth- 
fulness, but afterwards reopened in 1881. 

Benito, in Spanish Guinea, 77 miles north of Baraka, was occupied in 
1864. Batanga, in the Cameroun, some 90 miles further north, was occupied 
in 1885 as an outstation of Benito, but in 1889 became the central station of 
the mission. The name of the mission was changed in 1900 from the Gaboon 
and Corisco Mission to the West Africa Mission. The work in the French 
territory was gradually transferred to the Societe des Missions Evangeliques 
of Paris, the first station transferred in 1892 and the last in 1912. In 1920 
the Board opened a new station at Sakbayeme, in the former Basler Mission 
field. This is in the Basa country. The mission now has stations in addition 
to Benito and Batanga, at Efnlcn (1893), Elat (1895), Lolodorf (1897), 
Mctet (1909), Foulassi (1916), and Sakbayeme (1920) in the Cameroun. 

Note. — The present missionary situation in each field is summarized in 
the General Introduction. A statistical summary "by stations appears at the 
end of the report of each mission. For fuller mformation send for "Pen 
Picture" of Africa. Price, 15 cents. 

VISIT OF COMMISSION TO THE WEST AFRICA 

MISSION 
On June 9, 1921, a Commission appointed by the Board sailed 
for Africa. This Commission was composed of Dr. and Mrs. W. 
H. Hudnut, of Youngstown, Ohio, and Mr. J. M. Patterson, Secre- 
tary for the Southern Di-strict of the Board. They spent 12 days 
in France and conferred there with the Societe des Missions Evan- 
gehques. They sailed from Bordeaux June 28th, arrived at Douala 
July 18th, and spent two months on the field visiting all the stations 
and traveling 2,000 miles for this purpose by motorcycle. Ford 
truck, push car, hammock chair, and surf boat. On September 7th 
and 8t'h they held a conference with the Executive Committee of 
the mission and the representatives of the stations and drew up find- 
ings concerning the work which were later brought before the 
Executive Council of the Board and acted upon. There were half a 
dozen pressing probleins in the Africa Mission, and there is cause 
for deep gratitude in the fact that through the co-operation of the 
Commission and of the mission all of these problems were solved, 
or processes were set in motion which wild bring about an early 
solution. The West Africa Mission had not been visited for 16 
years. Dr. Halsey having been the last representative of the Board 
on the field in 1906. His visit was a memorable one, and the trip 



WEST AFRICA— BENITO 11 

of the present Commission will mean almost as much in the future 
advance and development of the Mission. 

BENITO STATION 

EVANGELISTIC 

The church buildings and the other church property at Benito, away 
from the station itself, are in a shamefully run-down condition. As one tries 
to get in touch with the Christian life of the churches, there is also a feeling 
that the buildings are only typical of the spiritual lives of the members. No 
doubt the people are responsible to a large extent for the condition of things. 
But the people are not different in this respect from the other people with 
whom we are working. As you go down the coast from Batanga to the 
Campo you find that even with the care that has been given to this part of 
the coast, the people are not very different from those who are on the other 
side of the river in the Benito field. And one with experience in the Came- 
roun interior has only to be honest in his judgment to realize that many of 
the churches would be in very much the same spiritual condition in a few 
years, were they left with as little supervision as those places have had in the 
last few years. 

This field has been without a white minister for more than two years 
and for nearly a year of this time there has been no missionary at all at 
Benito Station. These have been years in which there has been an ebb in 
the spiritual lives of all the churches. The elders and deacons in a couple of 
the churches were called together and advice was given them regarding their 
work. They showed much appreciation. A conference of M the native 
ministers and elders and deacons of the district of Benito was held in August. 

EDUCATIONAL 

The work of the sclvjoH, which Mr. Krug was just getting started, was 
also beyond what it had been expected to find. There were about 150 boys 
and girls in the school. They were working in the yard in the afternoon, 
planting food and keeping the grounds in order, and instead of objecting to 
it, as would have been expected from a proud coast people, they were entering 
into it as though they enjoyed it. 

MEDICAL 

The work at the station itself is very encouraging. As soon as the Campo 
is crossed, one begins hearing of Dr. Smith and it continues as one goes down 
the coast. Everybody seems to know him, and that favorably. He is a great 
man in the eyes of both white and black. Benito is reached with no small 
degree of curiosity about this man who has made such an impression on these 
people. One finds a hospital and dispensary that is very ordinary. There is 
the usual variety of African patients, and the doctor and his wife are both at 
the service of the people. But after a morning in the hospital one would be 
ready to join with the crowd who had been singing the praises of the doctor 
as one came down the coast. There is no case too small for him to be in- 
terested in and to do something for, and there seemed to be nothing too hard 
for him to undertake. 

In the afternoon the doctor operated on a man for a hernia. He used 
local anesthetic, no gloves, said gloves are expensive and do not last at all in 
this climate. He talked all the time he was operating, which made it the more 
interesting for the looker-on. He had given the fellow morphine, and he 
slept right through the operation. When he was through he slapped the fel- 
low on the cheek and said, "Wake up !" The fellow opened his eyes, and 
Dr. Smith asked: "How are you?" Then he told the boy to get him some 
cough medicine, that his throat would be dry. The fellow took his medicine 
and began to take an interest in things. Dr. Smith picked him up and carried 
him out and put him in the bed himself. He was asked why he didn't let the 
boys do that. "O'h," he answered, "the boys twist him about and I know 
just how to handle him." I said, "Doctor, what does an operation like that 
cost?" He began figuring it up and replied: "With the present cost of 



78 WEST AFRICA— BATANGA 

things this operation would cost about 80 cents, but before the war we could 
have done it for 40 cents." 

I never saw people get as much for their money in a hospital as they 
were getting at Benito, The doctor is very kind in his treatment of his 
patients, which counts for much. He has something to say to everybody, 
and while they are getting their treatment they are also getting something 
of the man who is treating them. 

BATANGA STATION 

EVANGELISTIC 
As the mission considered it impossible to assign a minister to 
Batanga, it was decided to place the supervison of the evangelistic 
work in the hands of the ministers at Efulen and MacLean. 

Mr. Emerson had the oversight of the Batanga, Kribi, and Mintom 
Churches and held three series of session meetings at Batanga, Kribi, Bidu, 
and Mintom. He comments very favorably on the spirit of harmony and will- 
ingness to heed counsel on the part of the Batanga and Kribi sessions and 
churches and regards Mmtom as the most normal, progressive and satisfac- 
tory of all the churches under his direction. Mr. Love has devoted as much 
time to the Sionkwate Church as his work in the MacLean district would 
permit, and conducted the communion services with the usual session meetings 
in May and in August. He had planned a tour of the northern part of the 
district, but had to abandon it because of the call for his services with the 
tour of the Commission. 

An opportunity was given the entire constituency to meet Dr. and Mrs. 
Hudnut in a union meeting at Batanga. Representatives were present from 
every outpost, all the way from 60 miles north to 55 miles southeast. Group 
services were held in seven different dialects and at the afternoon service, in 
the natural amphitheater under the great bamboo. Dr. Hudnut preached 
through two interpreters, Banaka and Bulu. 

Economic conditions have not improved. The hoped-for trade revival 
has not materialized, and the people find it difficult to meet the increasing 
burden of taxation, but in spite of this there has been a very fair advance in 
offerings. While conditions are far from being discouraging, the work cer- 
tainly evidences the need of the close supervision which it had in 1916-19, 
and which has not since then been possible because of the inadequate force 
of the station. 

EDUCATIONAL 

Station School. — The school work has suffered from several serious 
handicaps. No competent native assistant for the station school could be 
secured, nor anything like enough teachers for the village schools. In spite 
of this the attendance at the station school was good for both terms. After 
Mr. Chazeaud took charge, under his excellent management the school has 
been all that could be asked of it. 

Devotional services were conducted each morning in French, the New 
Testament was studied, and certain passages were memorized. New hymns 
in French were also taught. The school was favored with a friendly visit 
of Monsieur I'Administrateur of the district. He visited the different grades 
and manifested a visible interest in the educational efforts. It has been 
demonstrated that it is entrely possible to maintain a good school that will 
mean a great deal to the future of the coast work of the mission if the mis- 
sion will continue it under a competent French teacher. 

Village Scho'>jls. — Mrs. Adams has had charge of the village schools. Not 
all of the schools could be operated because of lack of teachers, and a num- 
ber were closed in the second term because of the unwillingness of the peo- 
ple to contribute even a small proportion of the cost of the schools, as a 
substitute for the old system of tuition abolished at last Mission Meeting. 
This opposition was most pronounced in the newer parts of the work. 



WEST AFRICA— EFULEN 79 

MEDICAL 

Hospital and Dispensary. — The station has been without a physician and 
the missionaries have neither planned for nor desired to do any medical 
work, but it was impossible to resist many calls for help from those unable 
or unwilling to go to the government hospital and dispensary at Kribi. In 
consequence, Mrs. Adams, in addition to so many other duties, devoted a great 
deal of time to them. A few serious cases have been in the hospital, and 
more than a thousand treatments have been given to 500 different patients. A 
distressing feature of the work has been the large number of babies brought 
in with dreadful burns sustained by being allowed to fall into the open fire, 
which is usually made beside the bed in the native house. Rarely are the 
babies brought in before the wounds have become infected. Three mother- 
less babies have been cared for. 

Other Work. — 

Caravan Work. — After seven years of extreme difficulty, if not impossi- 
bility, in securing any supplies for the mission, the stocks have now been 
replenished and as a result cargo receipts have been heavier than in any three 
years of the history of the mission. The great bulk of this has been sent into 
the interior on wagons, and by timing the arrival of carriers in Kribi, it has 
been possible, except when cargo was being received, to attend to the caravan 
work in one or two days of each week. 

EFULEN STATION 

In the words of one of the 'little school girls, Efulen is especially 
grateful this year because "Last year we had no minister at all 
for a while, and we prayed and prayed, and now God has sent two 
ministers to help and teach us." The story of the church and evan- 
gelistic work is significant in view of the fact that the times are 
recognized as unfavorable, and the conditions at Efulen were more 
than ordinarily difficult. The sudden call home of Mr. Heminger 
the previous year had left the work for some months without sys- 
tematic direction. It was impossible to take it up where it had been 
left. The people had yearned and prayed for shepherding, but 
during the months of shifting for themselves they had developed a 
degree of willfulness which has not added to the ready develop- 
ment of the work, and vigorous disciplining was needed. 

EVANGELISTIC 
Churches. — 

Efulen; Zingi; Alum. — These churches have had services as usual and com- 
munion services have also been held at five centers in the Efulen field and 
three in the Batanga field, which aggregated for the missionaries who con- 
ducted them a total of some five months of travel. 

One trip of itihree weeks' duration was made to the Cameroun country 
lying between the Ntum River and the Spanish Guinea. Nearly all of the 
communions in Bulu centers have been attended by the women of the station, 
and two trips have been made by them, including communions in Ntum cen- 
ters and several trips of longer or shorter duration in the interests of medi- 
cal work and village schools along with the evangelistic interests. The work, 
outside of the portion of Batanga field directed from Efulen this year, com- 
prises a force of 50 plus evangelists ministering to a regular Sunday attend- 
ance averaging 9,466. 

The Intermediate Catechism, as a course in preparation for church mem- 
bership, had been discarded and the contemplated substitute had not been in- 
stalled up to the time of Mr. Heminger's death, with tlie inevitable result 
that during the interim systematic instruction of the catechumens had largely 
ceased. The lack of specific instruction, the general coldness which is felt 



80 WEST AFRICA— EFULEN 

throughout the mission, and a pronounced aversion to reform in some quarters 
has made the accessions to the churches very few. 

The enrolment of new believers had become not only formalistic, but 
essentials were even slighted by the natives in charge, and the effort to arrive 
at essentials has been difificult. Added to these difficulties in the way of ad- 
vancements and new enrolments, there has been the full quota of wayward- 
ness and backsliding among those already enroled, with the result that the 
total of enroled adherents is very much reduced below that of recent years. 
The church membership has been but slightly reduced in any quarter and has 
remained for the field about uniform. 

Work for Women. — 

Nothing new or startling has occurred in the Efulen field for this year. 
There has been more visiting in the towns since Mrs. Emerson has been 
added to the force. The class of women who have been studying Romans 
have been very faithful and much interested. While at times it seems as if 
they did not get out visiting as much as one would desire, there has been an 
abundance of rain, road work, and sickness which have all been more or less 
of a hindrance to consecutive town visiting, still the majority of the women 
"live in a house by the side of the road" and are friends to the man or woman 
passing by, and specially women. Some of them always have as a guest in 
their houses one stranger or more who has come to the doctor for medicine. 
In some towns the women are begging for some school boy or evangelist or 
some one to spend a week with them, drilling them in the catechism. And 
in others the women say : "Come out some morning and we will all stay 
away from work while you have a meeting and talk to us all the morning 
long; then in the afternoon we can hunt something to eat." 

EDUCATIONAL 

Girls' School. — The attendance has been very gratifying, but not without 
cause. There has always been more or less 'trouble in securing a large num- 
ber of girls to enrol during the first half week of school and to attend regu- 
larly and on time. Three terms ago, therefore, it was thought wise to offer a 
prize to the girls who would go through the whole term without being absent 
or tardy. At the close of that term only seven or eight girls received the 
prize of a small cloth. The matter of discipline has been given a great deal 
of time and thought, as it is a daily and ever-varying problem. The aim 
has been to establish self-government and yet have implicit obedience. 

The curriculum for the Girls' School has been followed closely, with the 
exception of sewing where the ability of the girls is still very limited. The 
lessons in hygiene have been given to the first class in rather a discussional 
manner. It was surprising to note how much could be drawn from the girls 
themselves, and interesting to make many surprise examinations of the whole 
school regarding their teeth and cleanliness in other respects. 

The work of tlhe year was brought to a spiritual climax in the girls' 
meeting, when they were asked to tell what particular thing they were espe- 
cially thankful for. Their "little thoughts" as they expressed it, clearly s'howed 
many of the results of the work of all the years in this country. Many ex- 
pressed their gratitude for "The Words of God" because girls their ages 
could now go to school instead of to their marriages ; because "The Words 
of God" sent the doctors here to care for them, when otherwise they would 
have died ; for the ministers who came to teach them "The Words of God," 
for until they came they knew nothing but to do badness and to get wood on 
Sundays; and they were thankful that now they knew that Jesus could save 
them. 

French School (boys). — The pitiable amount of French that most of the 
teachers know, and their added inability to teach all that they do know, 
makes real progress in a station French school decidedly uphill work. The 
boys coming from the village schools vary so widely in the work that they 
have had in their towns that it has been found necessary to put all new boys 
into a "preparatory" class. Of the 40 boys who were enroled in that class 
at the opening of school, only three have shown sufficient ability to warrant 
promotion into the lowest of the classes of the real French school. 



WEST AFRICA— EFULEX 81 

Every boy has had some experience in fermenting cocoa this year. The 
new method was very interesting to them and may prove to be profitable to 
them from a financial standpoint in the future. Hat-making, basket-weaving, 
and the making of soap were among the other activities. Some of the boys 
said that they wanted to pay to learn hat-making. As a rule, though, more in- 
terest and enthusiasm were displayed in manual training than in the other 
subject of the school. 

The Bible training in the French School has been rather varied and for 
it the first half hour of each day was set aside. One period was devoted to 
memorizing prescribed passages in French, another period was devoted to 
singing and memorizing French hymns, another to the catechism in Bulu, 
and two periods each week the whole school was taught the book of Mat- 
thew in Bulu, the boys learning an outline for the entire book, enabling them 
to identify each chapter. Six evangelists are enroled in the French School, 
four or five of whom aspire to the ministry and have therefore entered upon 
the first of their preparatory courses. 

p'il'iagc Scliools. — Fewer schools, shorter terms, and only half the usual 
number of teachers were outstanding facts in the conduct of the village schools. 
The first term without tuition showed a marked increase in the attendance 
in many schools in Ntum. The schools in Bulu did not seem to be much 
affected by the change, with the exception of the increased number of girls 
and women attending. The comparatively large number of girls and women 
in school among the Ntum is very encouraging. As a tribe they seem to 
have more "pep" than the Bulu. The women dare to fight for their girls in- 
stead of shrugging their shoulders and saying: "My husband did such a 
thing and what could I do?" Some schools had from a half to two-thirds as 
many girls and women as boys, and this where little girls are still being sold 
mto marriages. 

The School Inspector is certainly to be commended for his untiring ef- 
forts and constant traveling, no matter what the weather or condition of 
roads. The village schools form a very important branch of the mission 
work and should have the oversight of a man free to visit them frequently. 

MEDICAL 
Schaufflcr Hospital and Dispensary. — 

The medical work under the supervision of Efulen Station has this year 
been not only the largest and most successful of any year in its history, but it 
has covered a larger range of activity than ever before; .Immediately fol- 
lowing the last annual meeting a medical outpost at Njazcn near Okom, 60 
miles southeast, was opened. Njazen is located on the Nyabizan-Ambam 
road, three miles from the Alvila River, which is the division between Afnbam 
and the Nyabizan government districts. The urgent demand for an advance 
medical post there grew out of several facts, one of which was the great 
unmet medical need of the Ntum people. Anyone who has traveled at all 
among the Ntum will have realized the tremendous amount of sickness and 
disease, as well as the utter lack of any preventive measures against them. 
This medical work lends bodily relief to their ills and at tHe same time pre- 
sents the Gospel claims of the Master in a new and practical way to them. 
The plant consists of two parts which might be described as the residential 
^nd hospital units. 

The hospital unit is separated from the residences by several hundred 
yards and is within easy access to the Ebenese river. This unit consists of 
three large buildings or wards, the third of which is just completed, with a 
grand total of 162 beds. 

The residential unit is composed of dwellings for both missionaries and 
native assistants. There is also a large, well-built dispensary on posts. 
This has two rooms, one for dispensing and the other for operations and 
examinations. In charge of this plant is John Bula Mfum, for many years 
the doctor's assistant at Efulen and an elder in the Efulen Church. Words 
fail to describe the splendid service he is rendering to the v/hole district south 
of Elat and Efulen among the Ntum tribes. The hospital is constantly 



82 WEST AFRICA— MACLEAN MEMORIAL 

crowded and it has not been able to keep pace with the incoming patients. 
They come from Oyem, in the Congo Francaise, and from Spanish Guinea. 

At Efulen Station the medical plant remains substantially the same as 
last year, with the exception of the erection of a temporary women's ward 
with 21 beds. By far the most exhaustmg branch of the work is the surgical, 
where there is ever a paid-in-advance waiting list of operative cases. They 
have come from Duala, from beyond Yaounde (the capital of the Colony), 
from Bata in Spanish Guinea, from the Congo Francaise, and from other 
near and distant points, too numerous to mention. The maternity work is 
ever on the increase. The Bulu are gradually finding out that both mothers 
and children may be saved by coming early. So they come. One very im- 
portant aid to the night work of Efulen Station is the electric light plant. 
The Bulu stand amazed, gazing at the light, then explode in one word, "Jop" 
(The Sun). 

MACLEAN MEMORIAL STATION 
(Olama Outstation) 

The location of MacLean Station makes it a convenient stop- 
ping place for travelers to and from Kribi — as vv^ell as those who 
are on the way to and from Eseka in the Basa country. The great 
event of the year was the visit of Dr. and Mrs. Hudnut, of Youngs- 
town, Ohio, and Mr. J. M. Patterson, of St. Louis. 

EVANGELISTIC 
Churches. — 

The evangelistic work is the very heart of all the station's activities. 
Whether in the medical, the school, or the industrial side of the work, the aim 
is to evangelize the people. Yet there is a departrnent whose entire time is 
given to evangelistic work, that is, the church. The organized churches corn- 
prise one at the station, and one each at Mengale, Lam, and B'ihiu. 

There is the regular preaching service and Sunday School each Sabbath 
morning and also an afternoon service much like a Christian Endeavor Society. 
The latter service is in charge of the natives. Aside from the Sabbath ser- 
vices there is also the mid-week service. These services are held not only at 
the station, but similar services are held at each of the 62 evangelistic centers. 
These centers in charge of the native evangelists, are scattered out over the 
district at a distance of from five to 10 miles apart. 

EDUCATIONAL 

French School (Boys) ; Girls' Schootl (Station) ; Bulu School (Village) ; 
and other village schools ranging in number from 39 (first, term) to 54 (sec- 
ond term). 

The French school has two superior classes as well as the lower school. 
The superior classes have boys from Efulen, Batanga, Sakbayeme, and Olama 
as well as the Bibia boys who have finished the lower school. These two 
superior classes have had the direct instruction of Mr. and Mrs. Anker. The 
lower school and Bulu school have both had their supervision. In the be- 
ginning of October, 1921, the first class took the certificate examination at 
Ebolewo'o. Seven of them were successful. The tribes represented are 
Ngumba, Bulu, Yaounde, and Mvele. The majority of the boarders are of the 
last named. The boys are expected to be present at the daily morning 
prayers and the usual religious meetings of the station. 

There have been altogether 29 weeks of girls' school this year. Six of 
the pupils are the wives of young men in the French School. The rest are 
the daughters of Christian mothers. Some of the Christian women are be- 
ginning to have ideals, however vague, for their daughters. The girls have 
been taught to read and write and sew. The training and discipline of 
school and dormitory life give many opportunities for showing the girls how 
to live every day the words of Jesus which they so readily learn to read and 



. WEST AFRICA— MACLEAN MEMORIAL 83 

recite. Young girl graduates of the school have assisted in the teaching both 
terms. 

Both boys and girls have been employed in making gardens. Two plots of 
ground near the houses have been planted with bikabe and cassava. One of 
the problems is to keep the food from being stolen. There seems to be a 
feeling that it is no crime to take food that is on the mission property. 

Some of the village schools were closed the first term for lack of 
teachers. The second term this difficulty has been met by sending out evan- 
gelist teachers. The attendance for the second term was reduced by the inten- 
sive work being done on the roads everywhere. The most important thing 
is to be able to find earnest Christian teachers. 

Theological Class.—Dur'mg the three years of Dr. Fraser's sojourn at 
MacLean, the theological students with their wives and children have been 
at the station. But this year the class of 27 who were here for the first part 
of the year's work were obliged to migrate to Foulassi when Dr. Eraser 
left for his furlough. 

MEDICAL 

Hospital and Dispensary. — 

This has been the best year for the medical department thus far. Though 
the work has not been cared for as it should be, because of other work that 
has to be looked after, the results have been better. Two of the helpers 
have been with the station eight and 14 years, respectively. There are four 
who give all of their time and three who give a part of their time, but all are 
busy. There is a good spirit among them and they are interested in the 
spiritual welfare of the patients. 

The old buildings are still being used, even though funds are at hand to 
i)uikl a new plant. Now that the location of the central hospital seems a 
little more certain, more definite plans can be made for these new buildings. 
For most of the time there have been more than 100 patients in the hospital 
and about the place where they could find a place to stay. Most of them have 
come from Mvele. Many have been sent from around Sakbayeme. The 
Ngumba and Bulu and Yaounde and other outlying tribes have been well 
represented. The Mvele seem to be in greater need of operations. At least 
they are more willing to pay the price of pain and money. For the first 
time Haussa people have been in the hospital. The man and woman who 
came went away cured, but there have been only those who were willing to 
stay with the "infidels." They were talked to about Christ, but even though 
they appreciated what was done for them, they did not show any interest in 
the Gospel. 

The use of Neosalvarsan has done wonders for those suffering from yaws 
and lues and for the long list of diseases that follow in their trail. People 
unable to walk have been carried in to the hospital, but in a short lime after 
the injections they have been able to walk with ease. The difference is so 
apparent from the gloomy and painful life to one of cheerfulness and com- 
fort. 

During the year all the outposts have been occupied by evan- 
gelists. The Sunday and weekday services -have been held at each 
place continuously. There has been a noticeable falling off in the 
attendances at church and schools at home and in the out-villages. 
This is partly accounted for by the increasing demands made by the 
government on the people's time in the repairing of the roads and 
the supplying of building material and food for the continual in- 
creasing white and black population at the capital, Yaounde. 

EVANGELISTIC 

The new confessors have not been as numerous as in former years. 
They have numbered on the average 10 p^r evangelist. It has been discour- 
aging to the evangelists to see the coldness displayed. Many of \ht "sulan" 



84 WEST AFRICA— FOULASSI 

members who have for various reasons been unable to advance to the 
"nsaml)a" class have been struck off the register. They have, however, been 
helped to again get right with God and been rewritten as new confessors. 
The advancements to "nsamba" and "church" have been about normal. An 
indifference to eternal verities seems to be broadcast over the country, and 
this is noticeable with the Roman Catholic communion as well as with the 
Protestant. The one encouraging feature is that the church offerings have 
increased over 60 per cent over those of last year. But even so, only half the 
amount due as wages to the evangelists has been forthcoming. 

Itineration. — 

The outposts have all been visited several times during the year. There 
have also been journeys to other stations and Yaounde, on which oppor- 
tunities have been taken to advance the Kingdom of God. MacLean and 
Elat Stations have helped in finding evangelists and teachers. 

EDUCATIONAL 

The first term there were 22 village schools and one station school. The 
Gaboon teacher continued his good work till May, when he returned to 
Gaboon. Owing to unfavorable reports that schools in the villages were no 
longer to be permitted by the administration, the majority of the village 
school teachers failed to arrive. Therefore, only half the number of schools 
were reopened, and the attendance at them was poor. All boys apparently 
over 14 years of age who returned to school were dismissed for work on the 
roads. Nearly all the pupils have made a profession of faith in Jesus Christ 
and have been encouraged to follow Him. Many are true to their confession. 

MEDICAL 

Until the middle of March Dr. Lippert was at the outstation. The vast 
majority of the patients were treated then. From then to the end of the 
year there has been a considerable decrease. Many of the headmen, having 
seen the advantage of resident physician, have since Dr. Lippert's removal 
petitioned the administration to locate a doctor in their vicinity, but so far no 
success has attended their efforts. 

FOULASSI STATION 

EVANGELISTIC 
Church. — 

The numbers calling for discipline in the church and catechumen classes 
are somewhat less than last year, although of the more than 5,000 church 
members it has been necessary to excommunicate 114. In the catechumen 
classes the number that has been dropped is less than last year, but consider- 
ably larger in proportion to the number in the classes, or the number entering 
the classes. The average Sunday attendance, however, has been 12,838, a little 
better this year than last. It may be noted that the Christian people are a 
little more regular in attendance upon the means of grace and that the non- 
Christian people have not been as regular. 

An effort was made during the year to have the people increase their 
gifts in order to meet the demands of the substantial increase in wages of 
Bible readers. The people responded nobly in the pledge, but the total in- 
crease in offerings has been only 542 francs, while the increase in wages has 
been more than 25 per ceiit above the previous year. Last year the Foulassi 
field was about self-supporting, while this year it is seven thousand francs 
short. The people, however, have made a creditable attempt to meet their 
obligation. 

Itinerating. — 

All of the points in the Njnm field were visited once in the year by one 
of the missionaries, and several extended trips were made in Ako'ofem sub- 
division, in addition to the numerous shorter trips in Sangemetima sub-divi- 



CAMEROUN SCENES 




rossinq the Nqlonq River From 
^Cseka to Bibia.Rve canoes held 
[toqether b4 planks and pulled 
I^K^ross by heavt) wire attached 
1 to trees 



^^ Christian Home. 
On the road between Fou|assi and 
Metel: there is a house of a Christion 
boi) from the Metret school. Inside 
are three rooms instead of the 
usual one-room,dnd on the outside 
a porch with a call drum at the 
end. 





Drum Boy tn theCameroun,on a 
raised platform covered with 
mats for protection.while he 
beats out the calls. Raised so 
i the sound will carry better ovef 
; the tree tops to the surrounding 
; vilfacjes, to call in the Sunday 
; morninq conqreqations. 



WEST AFRICA— FOULASSI 85 

sion. A new communion point was opened during the year at Mfulaja, 24 
miles from the station on the road to Metet. 

In Satigemelhna district there are fully 1,000 lepers. Many of these 
have been brought together by the government into a leper colony, about six 
miles from Foulassi. There are perhaps 250 of them, among whom there are 
15 members of the church, and about 50 in the catechumen classes. A little 
chapel has been built by the lepers themselves, and regular services are being 
conducted there. Of course, there are many lepers not in this government 
colony, and some, among them members of the church, are attending the ser- 
vices of the churches in the various towns. Since the lepers cannot leave the 
colony, and it would not be desirable for them to do so, regular communion 
services have been instituted. During the year one term of school has been 
held there, and the attendance has been good. 

Work for Women. — 

The Sunday afternoon meetings for women in the vicinity of the station 
have been fairly well attended, and interest has been good. Monthly mission- 
ary meetings, in which the conditions and needs of women in other lands 
were presented by lecture and picture, were held during part of the year, 
continuing the series started last year. The women were much interested and 
have had their vision widened, as is frequently shown in the prayers they offer 
in the meetings. There was a Bulu school for women of the neighborhood 
during the first half of the year, in which the enrolment was 20. The 
women missionaries at the station have visited among the women in the 
nearby towns as opportunity presented. The theologs' wives have been taught 
for si.x hours or more during each week of the term. 

EDUCATIONAL 

Theological Class. — There are 27 wideawake, earnest young men in the 
class. The men and their families have shown an excellent spirit throughout 
the term, and have uncomplainingly submitted to the very poor living quar- 
ters. The influence of the men and their wives has been very beneficial to 
the local community. They have helped with the church in a number of ways, 
and almost every Sunday some of the boys have preached in the nearby 
points. 

French School. — The French School began its term with Ambroise 
Ikotto, the Gaboon instructor, at the head and with two natives as assistants. 
Of the 203 students who registered, 178 finished the term. There was mental 
progress. It is true some made longer strides than others in their pursuit 
of knowledge, but all found registered on the tablets of their brains mental 
impressions which will be lasting. 

During the second term there was no one to teach the French school. 
One of the missionaries at the station was asked to spend two hours each 
day in the instruction of the first class and with the help of three native 
assistants the school was conducted. 

Three of the members of the first class were accepted at Elat as being 
eligible to continue their studies there. The knowledge that there is a goal 
ahead has had a wholesome effect upon the students in general and will serve 
as a stimulus to better work in the future. 

Giitls' School. — Each term the station has been able to secure three very 
good teachers, pupils in the French School who were formerly village school 
teachers. Under these teachers and with the aid of the questions prepared on 
the Gospels, the girls have made good progress. 

Each girl has had industrial work for an hour and a half once a week. 
The smallest children have made carrying baskets of reed. Those who have 
already learned to make these baskets have learned to weave fishing baskets, 
and mats for their beds, both of split reed. The next higher classes have 
woven raffia pockets. As a rule, each of these courses requires one term, 
though some of the smallest tots spend two terms learning to make the carry- 
ing baskets. The older girls have had sewing taught by the missionary. 
Special Bible lessons have been given or Bible stories told to the girls each 
week. 



86 WEST AFRICA— ELAT 

Inditstriatl. — The present appearance of Foulassi is largely a testimony to 
the work of the school boys and girls. Since last year the old towns of 
N'igam and Konde Meyos have been entirely removed, the new road through 
the property completed and bordered with lemon grass and palms, and a 
spacious lawn has been planted in front of the New House. All these things 
have tended to make Foulassi one of the prettiest — if not the prettiest — station 
in the mission. On the old station property itself, old shabby houses have 
been torn or blown down and new ones built in their places in accordance with 
the plan for the New Foulassi approved by the Mission Property Committee 
for last year. 

Large areas have been deforested and gardens have been planted in these 
places by the school girls. These gardens are of pineapple, peanuts, sugar- 
cane, cassava, plantain, pawpaw, palms, native potatoes, cocoa, coffee, corn, 
and caladium. In addition, the old gardens of cocoa, plantain, and palms, 
and the pear orchard have been repeatedly cared for by the boys. The girls 
have been responsible for the appearance of the pineapple patches, old and 
new, the caladium gardens, and the paths and roads of the station. Other 
work by the boys includes new houses built for the servants, new garage, a 
new carpenter shop, numerous repairs of station property due to storms which 
are notoriously violent, mat making, and the preparing of bush-rope. 

Things which require constant attention, such as fences and water springs 
and the roads, have been kept in good order throughout the year. 

Village Schools. — The schools in session were 118 in a territory which 
has grand proportions ; one-tenth of the area of the State of Texas ; one-half 
the size of Pennsylvania, with 5,000 square miles to spare ; three times the 
size of New Jersey. It is a wonder that the schools go on at all ; certainly 
it is not the care of the parent village which is the cause, but the faithfulness 
of the large majority of teachers who day by day perform their unobserved 
tasks at their little bamboo tables. 

At the Mission Meeting last year it was resolved that all tuition be done 
away with, trusting that the people would voluntarily take upon themselves 
the burden of the support of the schools. The system was thoroughly ex- 
plained to the people, not only by the missionaries at the communion points, 
but by the different evangelists and teachers in the villages as well. From 
the pecuniary viewpoint it must be admitted that it has proved to be a dismal 
failure. But from the viewpoint of the numbers of men and women, boys 
and girls, to whom the words of God were read and expounded, who were 
reached by the influence of the mission in their ministry of the Spirit, the 
system adopted at the meeting last year is a grand success. Most note- 
worthy is the fact that so many grown men of taxable age wish to "make" 
school. The interest displayed by them is most remarkable, and in many cases 
where the small boys are so diffident and lazy, the men are most eager for 
the things of school. 

MEDICAL 

The year at Foulassi was one of progress in things medical. Dr. Lippert 
came for a visit and stayed for about a week. Great numbers of people 
flocked to Foulassi and the doctor's opening day must have resembled the old 
time days when doctors were new and the sick thronged the dispensaries. 
The visit for which all Foulassi was and is grateful proved to be short for 
those who had left their homes 70 and 100 miles away, and streams of people 
turned back when the news of the doctor's departure for Metet met them on 
the road. Some pushed on to Metet and found help there and returned to 
spread the news, and the people, seemingly for the first time realizing that aid 
could be had there, went there in great numbers. Thus the visit of the doc- 
tor brought Metet nearer to the people of Foulassi's field, and we feel now as 
though we freely share the doctor's time and skill. 

ELAT STATION 

A spirit of good fellowship has prevailed for the most part and 
Elat Station has been a very pleasant place to be in. The Sunday 
evening prayer services have been times of blessing and inspiration, 



WEST AFRICA— ELAT 87 

mingled with cordial relations among the members of the station. 
The heahh of the missionaries has been good. For the most part 
friendly and satisfactory -dealing has marked the relations with the 
government officials. 

EVANGELISTIC 

Churches. — 

The membership of the churches under the care of Elat Station is 11,682, 
to which may be added 2,429 members of the advanced catechumen class and 
about 2,500 in the second catechumen class, making a grand total of 16,311 
professing Christians. These people meet at 111 preaching points which are 
cared for by 76 evangelists, 32 teachers, 14 local evangelists, 8 theologs, 
2 licentiates, and 92 elders. 

The small evangelistic force is due to the poor monthly collections, 
making it impossible for the church to pay teachers and evangelists at preach- 
ing points. Of the 12,275 members, 2,487 are under suspension; 50 were 
given letters to other churches. More than 300 names were cut from the 
church roll by deaths. The largest deduction was 554 excommunications for 
all types of misconduct and misdemeanor. On the other hand, there were 
1,211 persons received into full church membership this year, a gain of 497 
over last year's report. 

Four local evangelists and two licentiates, nine young men in the Theo- 
logical School, and 10 more attending French School in preparation for the 
ministry are connected with Elat. The offerings of the churches are larger 
than last year's total because it has been insisted that giving is akin to god- 
liness. But not all have kept their pledges or responded to the need. 

Woman's J Fork. — 

The back porch of a missionary residence has served admirably as a lec- 
ture room, where many lessons on personal hygiene and care of children 
have been given. Sunday afternoon services for women have been held 
regularly. Representatives from 16 villages within five miles of Elat have met 
with the missionary every Tuesday for a devotional time, followed by re- 
ports from each woman on the Christian work in her town, considering the 
sick, those weak in the Christian life or fallen, or any difficulty which needed 
to be talked over and prayed about. These women have done their work in a 
Christian and helpful spirit, returning from each meeting to do m.ore and 
better work. 

EDUCATIONAL 

French School; Station Schools; Girls' Sckoois; Bulu School (Boys) ; 
Vtllaqe Schools. 

According to official regulation, the French School at Elat is a regional 
school, having the three prescribed courses, preparatory, elementary and 
middle, each course of two years, but permitting completion in five years if 
the student applies himself. The village schools have but the first two courses, 
pupils coming to Elat for the middle course. The enrolment included pupils 
varying in age from 13 to 25 or even 28 years. 

The change in government of the colony has made a real difficulty for 
the students because of new curriculum and language. The food shortage 
also served to show their mettle. Examination demands of perfect work 
also impose a burden on them because of the cost of necessary school sup- 
plies. Ten mistakes in dictation eliminate the pupil from the further parts of 
the examination, but a successful dictation assures the pleasure of going on 
to the two problems, a composition, a drawing, and the oral parts, including 
reading, definition, conversation, hygiene, agriculture, arithmetic, and geog- 
raphy. Eight of 15 boys passed the 1920 examination, delayed until February 
of 1921. On the test for 1921, 19 out of 30 passed. Of this 19, 13 took and 
passed the test for the superior school and are now at Yaounde for this three 
year course, seven as candidates for government service and six for the 
mission. 



88 WEST Al-RICA— ELAT 

The spiritual welfare of the pupils is cared for by daily prayers and a 
French Sunday School class. They have an hour a week of singing and the 
hoys of the middle course have half an hour each day of Bible study and 
hymns, in French. The boarders have work oii the grounds to earn their 
board and are required to look after the manual work necessary at the 
dormitories. 

The Bulu learns French very readily and correct pronunciation is easy 
for him. The younger boys ofTer better material to work with and promise 
better results for the future than do the older ones. The Government In- 
spector signified his pleasure and interest in this class by sincere and fre- 
quent commendation. 

At the station, the first term in the Bulu Boys' School enroled about 100 
pupils. Several dropped out of the ranks, but 86 completed the term, eight 
being present every day of the term. The second term enroled 76. Owing to 
lack of slates and writing material in .the villages, the pupils were not 
as thorough in numbers, nor as accurate in writing as former classes, but 
their progress in these branches was marked and they showed interest ai\d 
good work in the Bible lessons. 

The Girls' School has 'had fewer pupils, owing to the opening of several 
village schools near Elat which girls were allowed to enter, so the falling 
ofif at the station school was quite noticeable. The study of French was 
added to the curriculum for the first term, thus making it an accredited 
school. The boarders are required to attend morning prayers, the Sunday 
services, and the Monday catechumen class. The spirit among the girls is 
harmonious, the attitude toward school discipline is good, and most of them 
try to show their appreciation of school life. 

The plan of a dining room with a big table and individual plates and 
spoons, with a certain number of girls to do the cooking of food for the 
vv^hole group, has been very successful and greatly liked by the girls. The 
school has eight branches in nearby towns, which run concurrently with the 
station school, where the older girls go four afternoons a week to teach the 
women. 

The Buhl Girls' Schools have had two terms this year. Some 6,000 pupils, 
about half of whom were women and girls, were enroled. Ninety-three 
teachers in as many schools taught them the "Three R's" in their own lan- 
guage and some French, according to the teacher's ability. In a number of 
the school towns the teacher was also the acting evangelist. 

B'oarding School. — Boys to the number of 109 have been under the care of 
a housefather at the dormitories. All boarding pupils, boys and girls, work on 
the mission grounds every afternoon for their board. 

Frank James IndustHal Schooil. — The school was compelled by the officer 
in charge on the government hill to take out three licenses, one each for the 
carpenter, tailor and ivory classes. The last year it has been extremely diffi- 
cult to manage the finances and make ends meet. The world's commercial 
depression was especially hard on Cameroun. Many firms went bankrupt. 
The school was hard hit and caused no little anxiety and was carried on 
under a continual strain. For instance, an order for furniture was taken 
last year from a lawyer in Douala when the franc was worth 15 cents. . The 
order was finished and delivered this year at the rate of a six cent franc. 
The house furnishing order made for the mission was made at about cost, 
while the Foulassi house, as it appears now, was put up at a loss to the' school, 
the cause being the heavy cost of gas to run the sawmill, the gas costing 
over $500. 

The Carpenter Class has been very busy all the year. Many orders are 
still on the files waiting to be made, and much work refused altogether. 
The making of the Douala order of 54 pieces of furniture, the 260 pieces of 
furniture for the mission, and the building of the Foulassi house, has been the 
bulk of the work done. Yet many pieces of furniture have been made and 
sold. Two dormitories have been built for the Elat teachers, and all repairs 
at Elat Station have been done by the class. 

The Ivory Department has grown until it has now become a separate 
class. The men have become very skilful and are able to turn out many 



WEST AFRICA— ELAT 89 

articles of elephant ivory, etoiiiy and mahogany wood, the most popular 
article being necklaces of ivory beads, many of which have been made and 
sold to the Europeans. One of these was taken to Paris where a jeweler 
valued it at 12(10 francs. T:he demand for this kind of work has been many 
times what we have been able to make. 

The Tailor Class has done the regular work as in the years past. The 
class started with a boom, but when the financial smash came the demand fell 
of¥ and all the graduate students were dismissed. The class has in all 42 
men. The gross income of the class has been over 112,000 francs. 

The Rattan Furniture Class. — This class as usual has had more orders 
than it could possibly till. Three hundred and thirty-four chairs have been 
sold durhig the year, 37 settees, 24 tables, eight miscellaneous articles, in all 
404 pieces of furniture, bringing to the class 12,094 francs. This furniture is 
still very popular with the Europeans, some of it going to America, some of it 
to France, and to French and English colonies aloiig the West Coast. 

Tlie Shoe Class has made more advancement than any of the others dur- 
ing the year, possibly because it has never until this year had the proper 
equipment. Many pairs of excellent shoes "have been made and sold to Euro- 
peans. The shoes have been of good quality and fine appearance. Shoes have 
been repaired beyond count. The tanning with native bark has not been 
successful. The leather proves unreliable, but the class now has a good 
equipment and a splendid stock of good leather. 

The Blacksmith Class has been of great use in repairing motors and 
bicycles for the mission, and doing repairs of every conceivable nature for 
both Europeans and natives. 

Oil Presses have been kept busy during the year extracting oil from 
peanuts for missionaries and Europeans, and also extracting lubricating oil 
from the native castor bean for the sawmill and machines. 

Late in the year a class in zveaziiig was started. A number of rugs have 
been made from the cuttings from the tailor shop and some work has been 
done with raffia. Enough to show that there are great possibilities for this 
class. 

A night school has been in session during the entire term, two and three 
teachers teaching French to the apprentices. Also a night school for the 
logmen, teaching them to read in their own language. This has been a 
source of help and satisfaction, both to the apprentices of the Industrial 
School, and the logmen and workmen connected with the plant. In the after- 
noons there has been a school for the wives of the men connecied with the 
plant, directed by Mrs. Greig, teaching them reading, writing and Scripture, 
and also classes in sewing. The manager has tried to keep in touch with the 
spiritual side of of the men's lives. Morning prayers have been conducted six 
mornings in the week. Also the men of the plant compose one of the classes 
in the Sunday School, which has been taught by the manager. 

AgricMural Department. — There has been much attempted in the agricul- 
tural line during the past year and on the whole with encouraging results. 
The castor bean garden proved a success in the quantity of beans produced 
per plant. The pineapple garden is now bloomingj so early next season there 
should be plenty of fruits. The pawpaw orchard is also in heavy bloom, so 
that fruits will soon be available for not only men, but also for the poultry 
which relish them. Furthermore, the trees are furnishing the laiter with the 
much needed shade in a land of intense sunshine. A dwarf banana orchard 
has also been started, which is promising well. 

Broom corn was experimented with with excellent results. Bikabe. a root 
crop next in importance as a food to the cassava for the natives, was also 
planted the past season, as well as some sugarcane, which is one of the 
chief sources of sweets for the Bulu. Some few squeeze out the juice, but 
more often it is merely sucked. The cassava experiments have proved far 
more successful here the past year. The native cotton planted the last season 
is now bearing heavily and will prove a valuable asset to the industrial 
school. Experiments are also under way with foreign seeds. 

One of the largest experiments of the past season has been with the 
poultry. Several birds were brought to the Agricultural Department by Mr. 
Patterson, when returning from furlough. With two or three exceptions 



90 WEST AFRICA— METET 

these have all survived the hardships of tropical life. The egg production 
has not been as heavy as it should have been, due largely to the inability to 
obtain proper foods for a good balanced ration for them, as well as to their 
becoming acclimatized. 

Thus far the White Leghorns have surpassed all the other breeds in the 
number of eggs produced per bird, while the Buff Orpingtons, an excellent 
meat bird, were second to them. As to the difference in the number of eggs 
between the Rhode Island Reds and the Black Leghorns there was but little. 
Inasmuch as a year has not yet elapsed since their arrival, adequate results 
for compiling a valuable report are not yet available. Another year with them 
should prove with more certainty as to which is the more valuable breed. 

METET STATION 

Metet's field covers an extent of 200 miles east and west, by 50 
miles north and south, and includes, by a very conservative esti- 
mate, about 150,000 people. In this number are represented many 
dififerent dialects and, while the Bulu language may be used in most 
of the territory, yet there are towns where it is not practicable to use 
the Bulu in the schools and the preaching services, so it has been 
necessary to use some of the Makae speaking evangelists, and these 
men have done very good work. There are vast stretches in the 
Makae and Njem fields where these men have made evangelistic 
tours, and they tell us that these people are anxious for the mission- 
aries to send evangelists to occupy that territory. The time is ripe 
for an advance, but it does not seem feasible to handle the work 
with Metet as a base. 

EVANGELISTIC 

Church. — 

The church at the station has had an average Sunday attendance of 625, 
and as many as 1,975 at communion service. This has been very gratifying 
because it was feared the attendance would be greatly decreased since six 
evangelistic points had been removed to establish a new communion point at 
Nyep, and seven others to establish a new point at Melo Mabae, leaving only 
nine points in connection with the station. The combined average attendance 
for the 115 evangelistic points shows that 6,958 persons have been in attend- 
ance upon the services and have heard the Gospel every Sunday. 

Work for Women. — 

Metet has been particularly blessed this year in that there have been three 
women who have been free to devote themselves to v/ork among women for 
the greater part of the year. Systematic and regular visiting has been done in 
the surrounding towns to the distance of between three and four miles, and 
periodical visits made to towns from six to 10 miles away. The Sunday after- 
noon meeting for women has increased in attendance from between 20 and 30 
women to over 200. As a result of the practical work of the native Christian 
women alone, in the vicinity of Metet, during a period of four months, be- 
tween 175 and 200 conversions have been reported. Six missionary meetings 
have also been held during the year. 

Outstations. — 

Several new points have been opened up this year, and the evangelistic 
force has grown from 95 to 115 and yet there are several more points which 
could be opened to advantage. With the establishment of a new communion 
point at Meka'a Yetyan there are now eight such points to look after, and to 
any one versed in the work attached to supervising the evangelists and the 
many palavers that come up during the interim, that means about 32 weeks 
of rather hard work for the pastor and elders. 

The collections have fallen off considerably. It seems harder each month 



WEST AFRICA— METET 91 

to get the people to pay up the money that they have promised. On account 
of the low value of the franc, the offerings represent a very much smaller 
gift than last year, in American money. Real money is very scarce in the 
Metet field, and the bulk of the collections is composed of small iron darts, 
100 to the bundle and very cheap too, so that it is no small item to get the 
collection brought in to the station, and this is avoided when it is possible to 
exchange these darts for money at the various communion points. In season 
there are also many peanuts given as well as "ngon" seed, corn, eggs, palm ker- 
nels, wooden spoons, raffia bags, and mats, and many other things that are 
oftentimes hard to dispose of to advantage. 

Regular Sunday services have been held, both morning and afternoon, at 
each of the outlying evangelistic points, besides the Sunday Schools, and while 
the attendance has been wavering, the general average has been good and in- 
terest in things religious has been encouraging. 

EDUCATIONAL 

Station Schools. — French, Bulu, Girls' and IVoDien's Schools. — At the 
station during the first term of 1921, there were enroled in the French school 
232 boys, and in the Bulu school 280 boys. During the second term there 
were enroled 175 in the French school and 225 in the Bulu. The curriculum 
as laid down by the Educational Committee of last Mission Meeting has been 
followed as closely as possible with fairly good results. The food problem 
has been a very serious one. Those who are allowed to stay at the station, 
both boys and' girls, have worked in the gardens and in the general upkeep of 
the station. An examination was held for entrance into the higher French 
School at Elat, and 21 young men passed satisfactorily and were sent to Elat. 

The Girls' School has had a good year and is gradually becoming a 
strong influence in molding the Christian life of the people. Prayers have 
been held every morning at six o'clock, the day's work opened with prayer, 
and then evening prayers were held in the dormitory by the matron or some 
of the older girls who are church members. All pupils were required to at- 
tend Sunday School classes, church and afternoon services on Sunday, and the 
weekly church prayermeeting on Wednesday. The new extension on the 
dormitory which the girls call their palaver house furnishes a place for con- 
versation, sewing, hair combing and other "feminine foibles" which have 
been crowded out of the kitchen. The new dining room is nearing completion, 
and will be ready for occupancy for the next term. This is a step in advance, 
and the girls are justly proud of these new buildings. 

The industrial zvork has been quite a help and an inducement to the girls. 
The lower classes have spent one hour each week making the small "nden" 
baskets ; the Markus class made very creditably large bushrope baskets for 
carrying food and firewood. The Lukas class made grass hats, which they 
will wear with pride, because they made them themselves. The higher classes 
had sewing, and this is always an interesting and enthusiastic class. All this 
not only gives the girls a keener interest, but also fits them for something 
worth while when they return to their villages. 

The lVo)iien's School of Metet has been steadily improving. The perse- 
verance of the women is commendable, for it means that they must go to 
their gardens early and be at school promptly at 1 :o0 P. M. The women have 
been given a lesson in sewing once a week, which has been enthusiastically 
attended. It has also helped to improve the school attendance, in that being 
absent more than one day a week has debarred them from the privilege of 
sewing. They are also being taught simple lessons in physiology and hygiene. 
The standard of the women's school has wonderfully improved this year. 

Village Schootjs. — Ninety-two teachers were sent to the village schools in 
which there were enroled 4,143 boys and girls. During the first month 14 
schools were withdrawn from the subdivisions of Dume Abon Mban, and 
Lontie by an order from the Commandant, and up to the present time have 
not been reopened. 

Industrial. — During the past year, there has been built a four- family, 
personal boys' house, 20x60; a dining room for the girls' school plant, 44x16; 
and a palaver room, 20x20. The old Bulu school building and the old food 
store have been torn down and a new food store has been built. One three- 



92 WEST AFRICA— SAKBAYEME 

room house has been built for the workmen. A four-room hospital building, 
20x60, has been constructed under the physician's supervision. Also a three- 
room house for the medical assistants. Six buildings have been re-roofed, in- 
cluding the French School and the dispensary. The west end of house No. 1 
(i. e., the paper house) has been extended six feet, and other necessary 
changes have been made to accommodate two families, including the building 
of another kitchen. 

The station now has some cocoa trees which are seven years old, one tree 
bearing 70 pods, but this is above the average. There is about a ton of fermented 
cocoa in the food store at present and most of it is keeping well. About 15 
acres of plantain, bikabe, and corn were set out. Pears have been very pro- 
fitable. Guava, limes, pawpaws, pineapples, and oranges, even at lowest 
prices, can but rarely be sold to the natives. All the palm oil made has been 
.«old at the station. 

MEDICAL 

From the date of last year's report until the middle of March, Mr. Bean- 
land supervised the medical work. From that time until the date of this re- 
port, it was directed by Dr. Lippert, who was greatly aided by his native 
assistants. A Mvcle young man came, offering his service without remunera- 
tion, so that he might learn and be able to return to his people and be of ser- 
vice to them in a medical way. He had hoped to study for the ministry, but 
felt he could not surmovmt the difficulties in the way. 

Various causes served to limit the amount of work. Foremost was the 
general poverty among the people produced by their inability to sell palm 
kernels and cocoa, the two products upon the sale of which the natives mainly 
depend for their money income. Also the little money they did secure 
through the sale of food they were unwilling to part with, as they wished 
to hold it for the payment of taxes, which necessity hangs over them from 
one tax time to the next. No one who was known to be worthy was turned 
away without care or treatment, because of the lack of the wherewithal to 
pay for medicines. Treatment was given impartially to Protestants, Roman 
Catholics, heathen, and a number of Mohammedan Haussas, and included 
representatives of most of the tribes within a radius of 100 miles at least. 

SAKBAYEME STATION 

The Basa now realize that the niLssion has definitely taken over 
the work. There is, as one might expect, much rejoicing on their 
part that the Lord has remembered their petitions for white "fathers 
and mothers" to again lead them. It is evident that the associates 
of the mission have entire confidence in their ability, as they have 
been "left severely alone" for the entire year. Miss Aiken spent a 
few days at the station. Then came Mr. Patterson, accompanied by 
Messrs. Johnston and Love. It was regretted exceedingly that, ow- 
ing to the briefness of their stay, they saw practically nothing of 
the work. 

It was not deemed wise to attempt anything before the work had 
formally been handed over by representatives of the Evangelical 
Missionary Society of Paris. Mr. Scheibler, a former member of 
the Easier Society, who had lived for six years at Sakbayeme be- 
fore the war, arrived the 8th of January, 1921. The next day the 
station had a communion service, he officiating, during which he 
formally handed the work over to the Presbyterian Mission. 

EVANGELISTIC 
Church. — 

The church and evangelistic work of the Basa field this year has been 
one struggle and continually so, to get hold of things. With a new language 



WEST AFRICA— SAKBAYEME 93 

to learn, a new people with whom to work, a new work, and even new church 
customs and discipline, one felt himself in a strange land indeed. Church 
records were destroyed during the war. Since the war native pastors have 
come and administered communion and baptism, leaving the matter of records 
to the Bible readers in charge. These in turn have been content to keep a list 
of those baptized and of those who are candidates for baptism. Such records 
as the date of baptism, of confession, or of discipline, are not to be had, and 
must be remade from guesses as to the time of such statements as "during 
the German times" or "since the war." 

Itinerating. — 

A communion tour of the Sakbaycme field is a journey of some two 
months' duration, over paths and trails, with three communion services each 
v/eek on an average. The distance is, by the shortest routes possible, 350 
miles. With the exception of the Yaounde-Edea road and the new 15 mile 
branch from Sakbayeme to that road, there are no others fit for a motor. 

The station has 20 communion c^jiters, none of these as large as some in 
Bulu. Drunkenness is one of the besetting sins of the people. Many boys 
in their early teens are debarred from communion for this offence. Laxity 
of discipline has been the rule in this field, rather than the exception, conse- 
quently there has grown up a seeming disregard for the higher things of the 
Christian life. 

While the Bible readers are scattered over a wide territory., it does not 
mean that this is by any means adequately manned. For 30 miles on the 
Yaoundc-Edca road there arc but two Bible readers. From Edca to the A7ou 
crossing at Dchanc there is not one zvorkcr. There are many other places 
v.'here workers ought to be located within the confines of the far-flung battle 
line. Among the whole Yainhasa tribe, between the Basa and Bafia coun- 
tries, there is not a single Bible reader. Indeed, this whole field is so exten- 
sive that the station must have another minister to help care for the work 
already established. 

There are three Romanist schools and two Mohammedan in this territory. 
There are over 100 boys in the Mohammedan school in the village of the com- 
manding chief of the Bafia, not far from the mission school. There are also 
many converts to the "Prophet" in the region, the commanding chief among 
the number. While he is very friendly towards the work and is doing all he 
can to help it along, one can easily foresee what will happen as soon as the 
advance is being felt by the Mohammedan interests, with the pressure they 
will be able to exert upon the chief. At least a baker's dozen of workers will 
be needed to make an adequate beginning in this most promising field. 

There are now 165 evangelistic centers; 170 Bible readers are employed; 
5,515 enroled church members, and a total of 12,184 Christians in connection 
with the work in the Basa field. All of these have made a contribution to 
the Lord's work during the year. Besides those enumerated above, there are 
many others in the Bible readers' lists who have received envelopes and who, 
because they failed to keep pledges or show other signs of active Christian 
life, were not included. 

EDUCATIONAL 

Boys' School. — During the first semester and for half the second there were 
a dozen boarding pupils, boys who, coming from the Mengele region, had no 
friends in the nearby villages. When in October the Eseka official closed all 
but one of the mission schools in his district, 25 more boarders came from 
over that way. There was nothing to do but take them. Fortunately, the 
new dormitory was ready. It was regretted that, owing to both a lack of 
housing and financial provision, boys from a distance had to live in the vil- 
lages near Sakbayeme. The Basa hut is much smaller than that of the Bulu, 
consequently there ought not to be room for guests. Yet somehow the boys 
seemed to find a nook in which to stow themselves. 

Besides the regular French studies, there was given to the three upper 
classes a daily course in what would, in the catalogs of the theological semi- 
naries, be designated as a comparison of Basa and Jewish customs. After 



94 WEST AFRICA— SAKBAYEME 

one has listened to the painful efiforts of a native to make plain the truths 
of the Bible as delivered to him through the medium of Anglo-Saxon inter- 
pretation of Oriental custom and thought, when all the while his own cus- 
toms and traditions and inner experiences are practically like those of an 
Oriental, the temptation is strong to at least try to prepare future Bible 
readers who will use sudi material as they and their hearers are familiar 
with. 

The enrolment was 305 for the first term and 334 for the second. While 
there still remains much to be desired in the way of regular a:ttendance, a 
comparison of last year's roll book with that of this year shows satisfactory 
progress in this direction. With long rainy and cold and foggy seasons and 
consequent exposure going to their villages each week to get loads of uncooked 
food for the meals of the coming week, Mondays are frequently lost. Nor 
is it possible for all boys living north of the river to cross every morning 
when water is high. Often the canoe men refuse to make a trip after seven 
in the morning, leaving boys, even though they had come early, on the other 
side. The solution is a Board'.ng SchooH. 

Girls' School. — All last jear and this one, too, people in every part of the 
territory and of all classes, including "kings" and head chiefs, have been ask- 
ing and asking again, would the mission take their daughters to school and 
teach them? There being no dormitory to house girls, the mission had to re- 
fuse. When, however, towards mid-September, 12 local small girls enroled 
in the boys' department, and the new Basa primer had come from the Elat 
press, it was felt that the time had arrived for the opening of a day school 
for girls. Soon after its opening on September 20th, there were 35 on the 
roll. The sessions are held in the afternoon, because the girls go to work 
with their mothers in the gardens in the morning. The daily discipline and 
school work, together with learning of Bible verses, the catechism, and Bible 
stories, and the sewing taught twice a week, are already having a wholesome 
influence. 

The success of this girls' school led to two such schools for women in the 
villages. The women were enthusiastic and, quite contrary to expectations, 
their husbands made no objections. There are 35 enroled in the two schools. 
They meet four times a week for an hour and a half only, to enable them 
to get the evening meal on time. 

Village Schools. — When the new educational regulations were made 
known last year, it was feared that the village schools would have to close. 
However, the local officials have been very lenient in the interpretation of the 
regulations and the applying of them; all except one who has lately arrived. 
It would have been impossible to conduct schools in the vernacular, as there 
was no literature untiX mid-September, when the first loads of the new Basa 
primer arrived. The second one of these booklets sold was bought "by a ma- 
ture man, who, as he went gleefully dancing down the path, remarked: "Now 
at last I am going to learn my ozvn language!" 

Industrial Work.- — Of real industrial work there was little done. Very 
modest gardens of taro were planted, as the only help available was that of 
the laborers. Whoever has tried to raise food with such labor will agree 
that it can be done, but at considerable waste of mission funds. It was also 
again demonstrated that large crops of peanuts could be grown, provided one 
planted and looked after them. There is much need for teaching these peo- 
ple the process of fermenting cocoa, as must of them seem to know nothing 
about it. Consequently, they market an inferior product and receive a low 
price for it. New varieties of corn, with a large yield, should be procured 
and introduced throughout the country, and seed selection taught. Some 
500 more pineapple plants were set out. A teacher's house, two houses for 
boys and one for workmen, a dormitory, and half a school house have been 
completed. 

MEDICAL 

For medical work, there were no facilities. Nor were there any medicines 
with which to do any medical work at the beginning of the year. In mid- 
October, after nine long months of waiting and oi making unkeepable prom- 
ises to natives coming for treatment, that long-looked- for order of supplies 



WEST AFRICA— STATISTICS 



95 



and remedies arrived! Other stations of the mission were implored for 
whatever of medicines they could or would send, lend or sell, so that for the 
greater part of the year most of such cases as came within the hmited knowl- 
edge of the lay missionaries were treated. 

The central room of the house which has served as workroom, study, 
and place where natives, seeking spiritual guidance, met the pastor, has also 
served as dispensary. Poultices and hot solutions were made in the kitchen 
of the house. Those requiring medical or surgical aid which could not be 
given were advised to go to one of the mission's doctors. Many of those so 
advised went. Thus has the medical work opened the way for intercourse with 
the other part of the mission. Last year it would not have been possible to get 
a Basa man to venture into that, to them, unknown land. 

STATISTICS 











1 

C5 






§ 

>% 




a, 

•i 


ll 




3 

§ 

a 
1 

Oh 










STATIONS 


3 

o 
a 

3 

O 


1 

a 


i 

fa 

> 


■a 

§ 
1 

O 


h 

II 


a 




1 

3 
■0 

1 


1 




SI 

i 
ai 


5a 3 

5 hi m 

fa£a 


o 
o 

a 

m 

•s 

d 


2 

1 


p. 

<3 


1 

3 
a 

.a 

Q 


1 






















Pesetas 














Benito 


?.?, 


4 


24 


23 


4 


1,140 


39 


262 


1,198 


1,800 


2 


1.50 


1 


4.54 


1 


12,030 






















Francs 
















41 


6 


68 


37 


•> 


1,521 


143 


1,854 


4,724 


6,252 


?7 


818 


1 


1? 


1 


1,000 


Efulen 


45 


5 


82 


46 


1 


2,522 


141 


3,621 


11,360 


10,265 


34 


2,524 


2 


903 


2 


10,693 


MacLean and Olama 


84 


10 


178 


86 


4 


3,168 


413 


7,422 


8,381 


14,632 


81 


2,508 


2 


658 


2 


9,209 


Elat 


tin 


?1 


18? 


111 


8 


10,929 


1 ?''5 


4,629 


23,000 


20,817 


97 


4,454 


1 


75 


1 


4,306 


Metet 


119 


9 


234 


120 


1 


969 


186 


3,689 


8,340 


11,672 


100 


4,694 


1 


300 


1 


9,831 


Foulassi 


i?n 


8 


3?1 


1?1 




5,047 


739 


6,140 


15,807 


18,103 


117 


4,405 






1 


1,400 




164 


8 


311? 


165 




5,515 




6,669 




20,000 


137 


4,775 






1 


1,000 






? 


































ll 












:::;::: ::::;:i 




























































Gold 












Total 1922 


705 74 


1,401 


709 


20 


30,811 


2,886 


34,286 


72,810 


$8,409 


595 24,328 


8 


2,402 


10 1 49,469 




















Gold 




1 






Total 1921 


683 72 


1,192 


549 


26 


25,883 


2,683 


34,500 


75,369 


$6448. 


537 23,918 


7| 1,632 


8 


51,042 



MISSIONS IN CHINA 
CENTRAL CHINA MISSION 

The stations are arranged in the order of their opening, not 
alphabetically. For dates see following list. 

NiNGPO: on the Ningpo River, 12 miles from the sea; 100 miles south 
of Shanghai ; occupied as a mission station, 1844. Missionaries — Rev. Elleroy 
M. Smith and Mrs. Smith, Rev. Frank R. Millican and Mrs. Millican, Miss 
Edith C. Dickie, Miss Margaret B. Duncan, Miss Esther M. Gauss. 

Shanghai: on the Woosong River. 14 miles from the sea: occupied as 
a mission station, 1850. Missionaries — Rev. J. A. Silsby, D.D., and Mrs. Silsby, 
Rev. George F. Fitch, D.D., Rev. John M. Espev and Mrs. Espey, Miss M. 
D. Morton, Miss Mary E. Cogdal, Miss Emma Silver, Rev. Geo. E. Partch 
and Mrs. Partch. Rev. Sidney McKee, Miss Bessie M. Hille. Mr. Leon M. 
Bocker, Miss Elise S. Eddy, Rev. A. R. Kepler and Mrs. Kepler, Mr. James 
Bryan and Mrs. Bryan. 

General Workers : Rev. J. W. Lowrie, D.D., Rev. Charles E. Patton 
and Mrs. Patton, Rev. C. M. Myers and Mrs. Myers, Miss E. L. Sindles, Mr. 
Charles A. Gunn and Mrs. Gunn, Mr. Roy L. Creighton and Mrs. Creighton, 
Mr. Gilbert Mcintosh and Mrs. Mcintosh, Mr. C. W. Douglass and Mrs. 
Douglass, Rev. H. K. Wright and Mrs. Wright, Mr. M. Gardner Tewksbury 
and Mrs. Tewksbury, Rev. E. C. Lobenstine and Mrs. Lobenstine. 

Special Term : Miss Frances Graham, Miss Rosabel Stewart, Miss Eliza- 
beth Ritter. 

Hangchow : the capital of Chekiang Province, at southern terminus of 
Grand Canal, 100 miles southwest of Shanghai ; occupied as a mission station, 
1S59. Missionaries — Rev. J. H. Judson and Mrs. Judson, Rev. E. L. Mattox, 
D.D., and Mrs. Mattox, Miss Lois D. Lyon, Mr. Arthur W. March and Mrs. 
March, Rev. Robert F. Fitch, D.D., and Mrs. Fitch, Rev. J. Hillcoat Arthur 
and Mrs. Arthur, Rev. Kepler Van Evera and Mrs. Van Evera, Miss Juniata 
Ricketts, Miss Ada C. Russell, Sidney L. Lasell, M.D., and Mrs. Lasell, Rev. 
Clarence B. Day and Mrs. Day, Miss Hazel M. French, Miss Mary M. 
Millican. 

SoocHow : 70 miles west of Shanghai : occupied as a mission station, 1871. 
Missionaries — Rev. J. N. Hayes, D.D., and Mrs. Hayes, Rev. O. C. Crawford, 
D.D., and Mrs. Crawford, Mr. Ralph M. White and Mrs. White, Rev. Frank 
IT. Throop and Mrs. Throop, Miss Mamie C. Wilds. 

Yu Yao (outstation of Ningpo): 30 miles west of Ningpo; occupied 
1909. Missionaries — Rev. J. E. Shoemaker, D.D., and Mrs. Shoemaker, Miss 
L. M. Rollestone. 

Resignations : Mrs. Helen Cassilly Silsby. 

Transfers : Rev. Edward W. Perry and Mrs. Perry from Hangchow, 
China, to Siam; Mr. Charles A. Gunn and Mrs. Gunn from Manila, Philippines, 
to Shanghai. 

Absent from the field all or part of the year : Mr. Leon M. Bocker, 
Aliss Elise S. Eddy, Mrs. John M. Espey, Miss Hazel M. French, Miss Bessie 
M. Hille, Rev. Sidney McKee, Miss Juniata Ricketts, Mr. Kepler Van Evera 
and Mrs. Van Evera, Mr. Ralph M. White and Mrs. White. 

HISTORY. — The oldest mission uf our Board in China is the Central 
China Mission. The city of Ningpo was one of the treaty ports opened in 

97 

6 — For. Miss. 



98 CENTRAL CHINA— NINGPO 

1842. Two years later, as soon as it was possible for missionaries to enter 
China, the Board opened a station at Ningpo, where a church was organized 
in 1845. Among the founders of this station were some of China's most 
distinguished missionaries. In 1850 missionaries transferred from the Ningpo 
Station began their labors in Slnvu/liai. In 1859 the first convert was baptized 
and a native church was organized in 1860. Haiigclwiu was first occupied 
as a station by Rev. and Mrs. John L. Nevius, but as the treaty did not 
then allow residence in the interior, they were not able to remain perma- 
nently. The station was occupied in 1859. Work was begun at Soochow by 
Mr. Schmidt, a German, who had been in the employ of the Chinese govern- 
ment during the Taiping Rebellion. He was converted mainly through hear- 
ing Rev. D. D. Green, of our mission in Ningpo. He went to Soochow in 
1868, with an unofficial connection with our mission. The present station was 
occupied in 1871. Yu Yao was occupied in 1909, being an outstation of 
Ningpo. 

Note. — The present missionary situation in each field is summarized in 
the General Introduction. A statistical summary by stations appears at the 
end of the report of each mission. For fuller information send for "Pen Pic- 
ture" of Central China. Price, 15c. 

NINGPO STATION 

{Yu Yao Outstation) 

EVANGELISTIC 

There have been several encouraging things in the work among 
the churches, notably the increased attendance at the Bible 
study classes from the country churches, also the renewed life 
as indicated by the increased attendance at twoi or three of the couii- 
try places, making necessary the erection of one new church and two 
new chapels. 

The new plant at Pah-kivun consists of a chapel, a residence for the 
preacher, and rooms for the accommodation of the missionary. It will now 
be possible for the missionary to go to Pah-kwun and make these comfortable 
rooms his headquarters while he itinerates from there for weeks or even 
months ait a time. Sing-p'u-in, out in the seacoast region, has had a remark- 
able growth through the casting out of demons in answer to prayer. Some 30 
new families have been added to the congregation, and they seem very much 
in earnest. The church is being built at Dziang-'O-Z, where one of our best 
country congregations has outgrown its building. The new building will seat 
about 400 people. The church members contributed the major part of the 
labor, as was also true in the case at Smg-p'u-in; the financial responsibility 
was also assumed in a very gratifying manner. 

Special Campaigns. — A series of meetings for the deepening of spiritual 
life among the members of the country congregations in the Yu Yao and 
Ningpo fields was ^planned. Though bad weather hindered the work to some 
extent, much good was accomplished. 

In Ningpo City a series of meetings for personal workers was followed 
up by a visit, at which time the results of the personal work throughout the 
winter were brought out. Many men and women came forward, making 
definite decisions for the Lx)rd ; also a great number of students and teachers in 
the schools. 

Workers' Conferences. — At these many things were suggested which might 
profitably be put into practice among the churches. They also gave the • 
Chinese co-workers an opportunity to confer with the missionaries along 
these lines of work. 

Seven Daily Vacation Bible SchooHs were held in Ningpo' City, and several 
in the country, four of these carried on by students and teachers from our 
own schools. All of the missions in Ningpo conducted these schools as a 
union movement. 

In Ningpo, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoon meetings for women for 
prayer and Bible study are faithfully maintained. The Dorcas Society has 



CENTRAL CHINA— NINGPO 99 

met each month during the year, but has taken on a new form, the Chinese 
taking turns in entertaining the meeting at their homes, and assuming charge 
of the planning and preparation. 

A Ningpo Union Choir was organized, consisting of a few of the teach- 
ers from the Baptist and Presbyterian Schools and one or two young busi- 
ness men on the North Bank. It :has about 30 vaices, both foreign and 
Chinese, and has rendered special anthems and led the singing at several 
union meetings in the Fu-zin. 

There has been an unusual cordiality during the past year on the part of 
the people who have missionary and evangelistic visitors in their homes and 
places of business. This opens up a great opportunity for the presentation of 
the Gospel. 

Itineration. — 

Mr. Shoemaker has spent most of his Sabbaths since his return from 
furlough among the country churches. Mrs. Shoemaker has accompanied 
him on most of the trips and they have spent a number of days in each place 
calling in the homes of the church members. Miss Rollestone and Miss 
Gauss made a twelve-day trip in the country, visiting six of the outstations. 

Work for Women. — 

The Ningpo Biible women have also done country work, especially at 
Kao-gyiao, where they spent several weeks making calls and teaching the 
women. One Bible woman, who formerly worked in the city, is now spend- 
ing her whole time in the country place of D^ing-bu-deo. She is supported 
by a wealthy Chinese gentleman who was formerly a member of that church. 

The Bible women in the Yit Yao field have spent a great deal of time in 
the country, staying out for months at a time, spending every day in making 
calls, having private interviews, and leading meetings. The many calls for 
them from the churches show that their work is greatly appreciated. 

A Students' Association has been organized to meet every month. This 
it is hoped will be a means of keeping in touch with former students, as well 
as being an uplifting influence. One of the students is president. Lectures 
under the auspices of the Woman's Center were given to packed audiences of 
women on the evils of midwifery as practiced by the general Chinese mid- 
wife, and on the benefit of scientific methods. The lecturer was Dr. Dao, 
of our Tooker Memorial Hospital for women in Soochow. As Dr. Dao is a 
Chinese and a good talker, her lectures were listened to with much interest. 

The work among the men here has been steadily growing and there is 
now quite a large constituency who regularly attend the preaching services 
that are held three evenings every week. The most gratifying part of this 
work is that the Gospel 'is being brought to a part of the city which is full of 
great possibilities, but so far has been neglected by the churches of the city. 

Sunday Schools. — 

In Ningpo there has been an increase in the number of Sunday Schools 
conducted, aside from the regular Sunday Schools carried on for the church 
members. These special schools are for the non-Christian children who have 
no connection with the church. Schools are conducted at 11 centers in the 
city of Yu Yao. About 200 attend in four schools aside from the regular 
church Sunday Schools. 

Bible Study Schools and Classes were held for both men and 
women at Ningpo and Yu Yao. The response in both has been 
gratifying. As the missionaries go about among the country con- 
gregations, they see the results of the work of the Bible Schools in 
the ever-increasing number of men, women, and girls, who are read- 
ing their Bible and taking a more active part in the work of their own 
churches. 



100 CENTRAL CHINA— NINGPO 

EDUCATIONAL 

Boys' Academy. — The spring of 1921 brought a greater iiifiow 
of students than could be accommodated. By opening a new dormi- 
tory across the street, 160 students were accommodated. 

About SO students and two teachers made decisions to become Christians. 
Most of the middle school students are professing Christians and a majority 
of the higher primary boys. 

The Y. M. C. A. has kept up its work of service as usual. The students 
have been assisting in four Sunday Schools outside of the school. A personal 
workers' group has been organized for some time. This term all the students 
by general consent are in the Bible classes which meet once a week. 

The school won the interschool (middle school) oratorical contest; 
seven other schools participated. They hold the silver cup at present. If it 
is .twice more won, the school will become permanent possessors of the cup. 

Girls' School. — The writer of this report speaks of the prospect of being 
obliged to retreat unless relief comes soon through the consummation of the 
proposed new Union High School, for there is neither the room nor the 
funds to engage teachers at the prevailing prices of today, even with the 
increased budget it is planned to secure by again raising the school fees. 

The giirls have continued their former activities, the Christian Endeavor, 
the Y, W. C. A., the Rainbow Club, the Sunday Schools for the little non- 
Christian children in three centers at least. Last summer the girls conducted 
three Daily Vacation Bible Schools for four weeks. But the work that has 
pleased most has been their personal work with other students. 

Day Schools.- — There are 16 day schools receiving aid from the 
Presbytery's Finance Committee. While these schools are far below 
what they ought to be in efficiency because of the lack of properly 
qualified teachers, yet they are sufficiently above the average of the 
non-mission day schools in the same neighborhood to be over- 
crowded with pupils. 

In Yn Yao two institutes for the day school teachers have b?en held. 
The suggestions and interchange of ideas have made a decided improvement in 
the conduct of most of the schools. 

The North Bank Kindergarten continues to grow. The people here are 
beginning to see the advantages and real use of such a school for little chil- 
dren and are enthusiastic in their support of it. 

Union Schools. — -The station is still living in hopes that the union schools 
for the boys and girls will soon be realized. A committee was appointed to 
investigate the advisability of putting on a local compaign for funds here in 
Ningpo among the Chinese to raise the funds necessary for the schools. 

MEDICAL 

McCartee Hospital (men and women). — The hospital work has gone 
along without interruption throughout the year. The number of patients 
varies with the seasons. Sometimes all the beds are full and people sleeping 
on the floor. Then there will be a lull and comparatively few patients come 
in. 

Davison Memorial Hospital for Women. — The staff of the Davison 
Memorial Hospital has been greatly strengthened by the securing of a long- 
hoped-for trained nurse to act as matron, and we hope that the patronage 
will greatly increase as soon as people learn what a comfortable place to 
stay and what good medical care can be had for their women-folk at a very 
moderate cost. 

Literary Work. — 

Some of the members of the station have been taking part in literary 
work, which consists of the revision of the Ningpo Romanized Old Testa- 
ment. This work has been under way for five years and now at last tlie 



CENTRAL CHINA—SHANGHAI 101 

manuscript is in the hands of the printers. The new phonetic will be a long 

while in cominf^ into use among those speakinpf the Ningpo dialect, if indeed 
it ever docs; in the meantime, the Romanized Bible will continue to fill a 
need in the cluirch which will result in putting the Bible into the hands of the 
common people in their own dialect. 

MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES 

Compassion Orphanage. — The Orphanage numbers about 75. One of the 
boys, who took the course in Hangchow Trade School, is now employed to 
teach rugmaking in the Orphanage, and it is hoped that a shoemaking depart- 
ment can also be added later on. 

Widows' Home. — Three and a half persons constitute the membership of 
this home just now, the "half being a small boy of six years, the only child 
of a blind woman. 

Clubs. — The Christian Fellowship Club and the Women's Benefit Club 
continued to hold the enthusiasm and attendance of their members this year 
as well as ever. This year the women meet with the men at their Thursday 
evening meetings and join in the discussions following the papers given, and 
in the social part of the evening. 

(Children's Playground. — This is conducted under the auspices of the Wo- 
men's Benefit Club and gives an opportunity for the little children of the 
streets to enjoy the pleasures of the more favored children of the city. This 
plot is well covered with grass and has swings and sandpiles and a basketball 
court. The hour is closed by one of the leaders telling a Bible story to the 
children. 

Famine Relief. — Ningpo has taken an active interest this year in Famine 
Relief Work. In all, the money that passed through the hands of the Citi- 
zens' Famine Relief Committee exceeded $10,000. 

SHANGHAI STATION 

The rapidly increasing population in the South Gate suburbs 
makes the expansion of our work almost imperative, and a larger 
staff necessary in every department. Not only do the old Hnes of 
activities need strengthening, but new opportunities are awaiting on 
every hand. In everything — church, schools, country, and city — the 
missionaries are working side by side and together with the Chinese 
Christians. 

EVANGELISTIC 

The congregation at the South Gate are worshiping in the new and beau- 
tiful building which was opened in February, 1921. As there is still a debt of 
$5,000 for furnishings, it v/as decided not to dedicate the building until this 
was all paid. Pastor Li reports a membershp of 427. 

The removal of North Church to the Chapel of the Presbyterian Miss'ion 
Press Works has meant continued limitations, but the new life and interest 
that followed the election of new elders and deacons has meant greater in- 
terest in church affairs and more efficiency in Sunday School work. The 
foreign workers at the Press identify themselves with the work of the church. 

Sunday School. — 

At the South Gate. — On account of the increased number of boys' and 
girls' schools this term, the enrolment of Sunday School pupils has also gone 
up considerably. 

There are four branch Sunday Schools for street children located not 
very far from the school campus, and most of the teachers in these branch 
Sunday Schools are older boys and girls who are applying the teaching of 
Christ to actual practice by rendering this important service. During the 
year there are about 400 different children coming to these schools. 



102 CENTRAL CHINA— SHANGHAI 

Outstation Work. — 

The work in the eight outstations has l>een most faithfully car- 
ried on by Mr. and Mrs. Partcli. With the exception of occasional 
hurried trips to Shanghai on business or for necessary supplies, they 
have spent ten months of the year traveling in the country, by boat, 
wheelbarrow, or on foot. Each of the eight stations has been visited 
at least three times. 

Institutional features have been introduced in the work at the newest 
outstation by the helper in charge. An org-anization was formed, modelled 
after the Nantao Christian Institute. A Board of Directors looks after the 
general activities of the institution. They conducted a free vacation school 
during July and August. Then a day school for girls and a night school for 
men and boys were opened, which have continued until the present time. A 
club for the discussion of current topics meets every Saturday night. The 
needs of the famine stricken regions, the common vices, social hygiene, re- 
forms in social customs, and political reforms, are some of the topics dis- 
cussed. 

Work for Women. — 

Many opportunities for personal work have come during the missionary's 
stay in chapels and while traveling. At one outstation last fall all the women 
were picking cotton, so Mrs. Partch invited the mother of the day school 
teacher to go witli her to the cotton field to talk with these busy people. 
"We picked cotton," she writes, "for itwo hours, each earning four cents 
(Mexican), equal to about two cents (gold) — fairly good wages for China." 
Several young women at Doo-ka-aung, wanting to learn English, have studied 
the Bible, hymns, and other books. In June one afternoon was given at the 
Nantao Institute during the "Baby Welfare Cam.paign," teaching and demon- 
strating infant hygiene, with a week-old baby from the West Gate Hospital. 

Mrs. Silsby has visited the homes of nearly all the Lowrie Institute boys 
living in Shanghai, alsoi the homes of the children in the church day school. 
It is encouraging to hear from many of the mothers that their children, when 
they go home on Saturdays, read the Bible to their kinfolks and are not 
afraid to tell the story of Jesus and His love. 

The Women's Society of the church meets at the Nantao Christian Insti- 
tute every other Thursday for two hours or more. The first hour is devoted 
to sewing for the poor. This year many old garments were collected and 
many new ones made and sent to the famine sufferers. 

Every other Wednesday a Woman's Club of 30 meets at the Nantao In- 
stitute. The cooking classes lin connection with the club seem to be very 
popular. An effort is made to teach only those foreign dishes which can be 
made of Chinese materials and cooked on a Chinese stove. 

The meetings for women have been maintained : cottage prayermeetings 
every Friday afternoon, a Mothers' Meeting, and a Woman's Prayer meeting, 
two Thursdays each, in the month. Every Thursday there is also a class for 
Sunday School women teachers. 

EDUCATIONAL 

Lowrie Institute. — Mr. Z. L. Chang, as Dean of the Institute, 
has been a great help in administration and in teaching, also in super- 
intending the instruction in Chinese. He is one of the old students 
returned to the school. After graduating at St. John's University 
and taking further work at Columbia and Union Seminary, he went 
to France in the Y. M. C. A. His father and mother were both edu- 
cated in our South Gate schools. The Lowrie Institute celebrated its 
sixtieth anniversary this year. 



CENTRAL CHINA— SlIANGIIM 103. 

One of the most notable advances of the year has been the organization 
of a company of Boy Scouts by Mr. Chang. Most of the boys are from non- 
Christian homes, and a very important part of the work is that of religious 
instruction. They are required to attend chapel and church services, as well 
as the regular Bible classes. The Y. M. C. A. has. also been of great assist- 
ance in developing religious interest. All but two in the highest classes are 
communicants, and quite a number also have applied to the session for admis- 
sion to communion. 

Mary Farnimm School. — There are disadvantages, incoiiiVen- 
iences, and some extra expense incurred in conducting this school on 
two sides of the canal, and Lowrie Institute sorely needs the old 
campus which adjoins its property and is its only hope of expansion, 
so the graduates of the Institute and of the Mary Farnham School 
are united in working for the erection of a large, three-story building 
which will make it possible for the latter to vacate the old campus 
and buildings. 

This year there have been no political demonstrations on the part of the 
students and much* more has been accomplished in study and the usual school 
work. The students have been engaged in many activities. The musical 
department has given two very enjoyable recitals. Two new teachers, former 
graduates, were added to the high school staff. 

A party of students and teachers made a trip to Soochow, visiting many 
places of interest and going a day's journey into the country to the grave of 
one of China's heroes. For some who had never been out of Shanghai and 
had never seen a mountain nor traveled on a train, this trip was full of new 
experiences, of more educational value than weeks of book study. 

The religious activities among the girls have been much the same as in 
other years. Besides the five pupils who were received by the church ses- 
sion, 15 others are enroled as inquirers. All above the kindergarten grade 
are required to attend church service and Sunday School and daily chapel 
exercises, and every class has at least two lessons a week in Bible or some 
Biblical study. Every Sunday the girls assist in teaching the smaller pupils 
of the Sunday School and in three branch Sunday Schools for outside chil- 
dren. 

The real history of the school is written in the lives of the stu- 
dents. Almost without exception, the graduates have taught school 
or studied medicine or nursing. Mary Farnham School would be 
little or nothing were it not for the faithful, efficient and self-sacri- 
ficing work of its own graduates. 

Kindergarten. — An unusually large number of interested guests have vis- 
ited the school this past year. One never-to-be-forgotten day 40 young men 
from a nearby normal school spent the morning crowding in the room and 
doorways, observing and inspecting everything. During the recess, at their 
request. Miss Dzung gave them a most helpful talk on the need and reasons 
lor kindergartens. The enrolment of 49 children represented 43 families — 
only eight of which are Christians. 

Newberry Bible School. — It may be a matter of interest to glance 
at the sources from which the school draws its students. 

First, there are the women, most of whom are widows from 30 to 40 
years, who find themselves free to take up the work of telling the women who 
have not yet heard, the story of Christ's love, and teaching and gu'iding them 
into the way of salvation. 

Then, there are older women who in childhood did not have the privilege 
of learning to read, and now that they have believed on the Lord Jesus their 
hearts are hungry to be able to read of Him and know the precious truths of 



104 CENTRAL CHINA— SHANGHAI 

the Bible. A still larger per cent of the pupils are young women about 20 
years of age, who also in childhood missed the joy of school days and are 
now eagerly making up for lost time with an ambition to be women worth 
while in life. 

These women come from both rich and poor families in Shanghai, from 
groups of Christians in our country field and from those of the London 
Mission, from Soochow, Ningpo, Hangchow, and away beyond Wusih. 

Then, there are several young married women whose husbands, well edu- 
cated young business men, are away from home. Ten have been received 
into the church. Of the students who have graduated, all are in Christian 
work. 

Nantao Institute. — The outstanding event of the year was the 
campaign for membership and financial support. During the year 
three new members were added to the roll of our Honorary Direc- 
tors, making a total of nine. The most widely known of the new 
members is Dr. C. T. Wang, former General Secretary of the Na- 
tional Y. M. C. A., and one of China's representatives at the Peace 
Conference in Paris. Mr. S. L. Tien is one of the leading lumber 
merchants of Shanghai. The third member is Mr. A, O'Ben, man- 
ager of Sincere's, the largest department store in Shanghai. 

In the men's work some advance has been made in the social use of the 
building. Over half of the 700 men who are contributing members look upon 
ilie work as an opportunity for community service through their gifts, but 
have not availed themselves of the opportunities for personal use of the build- 
ing. With group meetings in our own and other buildings, this condition is 
improving to some extent, especially in the nearby cotton exchange where we 
have many members. 

The only really constructive work for the very poor of the year has been 
a "Loan Society." For men who were out of work, but could bring the 
recommendation of some responsible party, the plan was tried of lending 
amounts averaging $5 to each man, with which he could buy enough stock 
to set up as a curb-stone merchant. The results on the whole have been en- 
couraging. 

Work for Women. — 

As the men's work has grown, more and more has the need been 
felt of a separate building for the zvomen's activities, and especially 
as the committee of the women's department realized the time had 
come for more lines of work to be taken up. The request for the 
use of the building in the city has been granted, and there are plans 
for the opening of a kindergarten and a clinic for the women and 
children. 

One feature of the work has been to educate the women in the care of 
their children and homes. Last June a five days' exhibit of children's food, 
toys, books, and clothing was held. Charts on hygiene as well as the charts 
which had been made as the result of 500 questionnaires answered by the 
people of this district as to the health of children and home conditions, were 
shown. Lectures and demonstrations were given by women physicians and 
the religious ideals presented by kindergartners. There were 1,000 in at- 
tendance. 

LITERARY WORK 

Articles have been translated, prepared by Mr. Wright, chiefly in the 
fields of philosophy, anthropology, and the history of religions, aggregating 
some 60,000 characters, for the Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge pro- 
jected by the Christian Literature Society; four tracts in the Fundamental 



CENTRAL CHINA— HANGCHOW 105 

Truths Series of the Christian Literature Society ; and Harcourt's The Soul 
Winner and His Methods. Mr. Silsby has prepared the Gospel of John in 
p'Tionetic, and Mr. Espey has prepared a series of textbooks for teaching 
English. The total for the year is something under 100,000 characters. 

PRESS 
Although during the year under review there has l^een much 
similarity of condition and repetition of experience corresponding 
to what has been reported in former years, the past year has not 
been a mere "ditto" epoch, but bears the mark of response to move- 
ments of various kinds in and out of China. 11ie chaotic and hope- 
less nature of political afifairs, and the distressing economic condi- 
tions, are fanning the (lame of new thought and creating a significant, 
intellectual and social ferment among the younger men, Christian 
and non-Christian, whilst the Church in China is realizing that only 
in the Gospel of Christ can be found the remedy for the desperate 
condition of China. These facts have an eflfect on the working of 
the Mission Press and have meant more work and new opportunity. 

The unsettled condition of the world's markets made it difficult to main- 
tain the supplies of papers and materials. Gold and sterling rose rapidly in 
value (from the standpoint of a silver currency country), and in some cases 
the cost of goods was doubled before delivery in Shanghai. Work has been 
done for the Bible, Tract, Educational and Medical Missionary Societies, as 
well as for denominational and interdenominational societies and for indi- 
viduals. 

As in former years, the periodical output bulks most largely in our 
English and bi-lingual department. In addition to The Chinese Recorder and 
The China Medical Journal, eight journals are printed for missions, educa- 
tional institutions, and other organizations. 

Seed and other catalogs from the Agricultural Department of Nanking 
University keep the Press in touch with a work from which great results 
may be expected in this impoverished land of great possibilities. 

In addition to what has been reported in the preceding paragraphs, men- 
tion might be made of the influence exerted along many lines, through vari- 
ous channels, by men and methods and printed messages. The Commercial 
Press, in a recent history of its progress, refers to the influence it is exerting 
in a pioneer capacity and how it is "making it possible for other printing 
houses to profit by its experience and come to the front and put out books 
that are transforming ideas in China, just as 'it, in its early history, received 
inspiration from the Presbvterian Mission Press." The total output was 
2,089,623 copies, 123,674,021" pages. 

HANGCHOW STATION 

Although there seems to be nothing strikingly new in the work 
of the station this year, it has been a year of hard, steady plodding, 
developing the work in every line. 

EVANGELISTIC 

Ku-le Church. — The work in the city lying in the definite sphere of in- 
fluence of the station has been concentrated at this center. In spite of a de- 
pleted number of church members, due to the leaving of a large number to 
join the Bi-Z Church, the congregation, especially at the morning services, has 
been quite sizeable. The location has no rival in the whole city, yet we as a 
denomination have not done justice to it. In March a clinic was ooencd in 
the day school. With the help of a Chinese nurse, 88 children were examined 
and of that number over half were treated. Enthusiastic and gratifying re- 
ports come in constantly from the mothers. It has already opened the way 
into many homes in the neighborhood. 



106 CENTRAL CHINA— HANGCHOW 

Bi-Z Church. — The activities of this church have taken on a new im- 
petus since the forming- of the service ckib. It has organized itself into five 
committees: Bible, education, hygiene, children, and social. The artisan's 
night school, three evenings a week for illiterate men, and similar classes for 
women in the afternoons are filling a great need. 

Outstations. — 

Loiver Road Field. — Special series of meetings have been held at several 
sub-stations connected with Haining, with very good results. At Ly-lyia-un 
much interest has developed, owing to the efforts of Mr. T'so, one of the 
local gentry who joined the church a year ago. A Bible class was held for 
three weeks at Haining with unusual interest among the women. Mr. Tsiang, 
the school supervisor, reports favorable progress in the day schools at Sin-Z, 
Zch-men, Dasng-an, and Haw'ing. 

Up River Field. — Interest in Christianity has been growing for some 
years at T'sai-dzah. This year the Christians and inquirers rented a place 
for a chapel and pastor's residence. At Wu^t^szven the Christians are planning 
to enlarge the old temple where they have been holding services, in order to 
make room for a school, quarters for the teacher, and a residence for the 
preacher. The work at the center is unusual, inasmuch as the mission only 
contributes the preacher's salary. The buildings, together with certain fields 
the income of which pays the expense of the day school, were given to the 
mission by the villagers. 

The buildings at I-U offer scope for chapel, school, Bible conferences, 
and any other form of work. It is to be hoped that the finances will soon be 
in such shape as to allow a day school to be opened in this important city. 
At Me-san, a large market town, there has been offered to us a good location 
on mortgage for $1,000. But we are unable again to take the offer for lack 
of funds. 

One of the most encouraging features of the up river work this year 
has been the splendid way that Rev. We Zao-tsen has taken hold of the work. 
As a native of Tong-Yang, he has been earnestly welcomed by the Tong- 
Yang Christians. Coming from a scholarly family, and having many good 
family connections in the district, Mr. We gains a respectful hearing from all. 

The Chinese workers' conference was held at Yeh-dang, and proved de- 
cidedly helpful to all who attended. 

EDUCATIONAL 

Hangchozv Christian College. — This year marks the completion 
of the first decade on the new site. It has been a year of marked 
progress. Some of the outstanding events are: the President's trip 
to America, the adoption of an expanded pohcy by the cooperating 
Mission Boards, the incorporation, the beginning of a construction 
department, and the estabhshment of several scholarships. 

Educationally, the institution is on a higher plane than ever be- 
fore. The faculty has devoted considerable time to reorganization ; 
as a result the work of the college is being carried on more effi- 
ciently. Mr. Allison has thoroughly overhauled the Museum, and 
Mrs. Day has done the same for the Library. A splendid collection 
of Chinese books has been presented by the father of one of our 
former students. 

Religious ActrJih'.es. — This part of the work shows encouraging features 
also. The proportion of professing Christians in the student body is 40 per 
cent, somewhat larger than it has been lately. The Y. M. C. A. is better 
organized than heretofore. The Student Volunteer Band numbers seven, 
and many others are seriously considering the choice of a life work in reli- 
gious service. The week of recruiting for the ministry and the Retreat for 



CENTRAL CHINA— HANGCHOW 107 

Student Volunteers of Chekiang held here in the spring did much toward 
developing a good Christian atmosphere. The students have also rendered 
service as opportunity offered, in Sunday afternoon preaching and in famine 
relief. Many helped last summer in the Daily Vacation Bible Schools. Dr. 
Mattox, the pastor of the college church, reports that during the term 30 
have applied for baptism, of whom 10 have been received. Many others have 
expressed the desire to be Christians, but at present are opposed by their 
parents. The church supports three day schools. The students of the college 
held special Christmas services in each of the schools. This year in place of 
the voluntary study classes under the Y. M. C. A. a regular Sunday School 
has been organized. Five classes are led by the foreign faculty, iO classes are 
led by Chinese faculty and students. Then Sunday afternoon a vesper ser- 
vice in English is held tor the faculty, and such students as care to attend. 
Mrs. Mattox conducts a midweek prayer service and Christian Endeavor on 
Sunday for the Chinese women on the 'hill and in a nearby village. These 
new activities are very helpful. 

Union G^irls' High School. — It is now five years since the school 
moved to its present site. At that time there were three departments : 
the Primary, Higher Primary, and High School. Now we also have 
Kindergarten, Kindergarten Normal, and Primar}' Normal, with an 
enrolment of 336. There are 161 boarders, which is as many as can 
be taken until the new dormitory is built. 

The health of those in the school has been unusually good this year. 
Miss Yang, a graduate of St. Elizabeth's Training School for Nurses, has 
been most faithful and efficient in looking after the health of the girls. Miss 
Lyon was made head of the RciUgions Education Department and general reli- 
gious activities of the school. More interest has been shown in all the Bible 
classes and practical religious work. About 60 girls teach in the various 
Sunday Schools in the city. 

Trade School. — This has been a busy year in the school. The demand 
for carpets is greater than can be supplied with the present equipment. 
Articles made and sold this year were worth $1,640. There is a move on hand 
on the part of the alumni of Hangchow College to take up the support of the 
Trade School and True Model School. 

OTHER WORK 

The Social Service Department of the Union Committee has 
started something entirely new. This is the setting up of definite 
clinical work in 17 day schools. In addition to volunteer nurses and 
medical treatment, the Union Committee supports a trained nurse for 
a biweekly inspection of the school children. 

Dr. Lasell gives medical supervision to several schools. In the fall he 
went regularly once a week to examine and treat the students at the College. 
His coming has been a wonderful comfort to all the people on College Hill. 
Previous to his coming it was next to impossible to get any medical attend- 
ance from the hospital in the city. With the reorganization of the hospital, 
Dr. Lasell has had charge of certain wards in the hospital, and has taught 
in the Medical School. 

The Hangchozv Committee Ncivs, a bimonthly paper, has been 
published. Mrs. Fitch and Mr. Andrew Wu are the editors. The 
paper has done much to l)ring together the missionaries and the 
English-speaking Chinese in their common church interest. 

Dr. Fitch, in addition to his regular work as general secretary of 
the Union Evangelistic Committee, gave one month to famine relief 
work. 



108 CENTRAL CHINA— SOOCHOW 

SOOCHOW STATION 

EVANGELISTIC 
There is nothing new to report concerning the city churches, 
which have gone along about as usual. Some of the evan- 
gelistic services held under the auspices of these churches were very 
encouraging. At Ch' on-chu- aung there was a week of revival ser- 
vices, which the members attended and from which they received 
much help. The Chinese New Year Evangelistic Campaign meetings 
were well attended and resulted in about 30 inquirers, some of whom 
are very earnest and it is hoped will soon be received into the church. 

Institutional Center. — This has been the third year for this work, Which 
has continued to thrive during the year. Through it the mission has been 
brought into touch with many of the best men in the city. Many people 
throughout Soochow are interested in the work of this center. The Night 
Schovl held in connection with it has flourished. In the various classes no less 
than 85 students were studying English and typewriting. Through some of 
the friends of the institutional center, a way has been opened to hold evan- 
gelistic meetings at the Tsi-Iiang-so (Door of Hope) opened by city officials. 

The Directors of this institutional work are very anxious to have a 
women's department in connection with it. Looking forward to this, they 
have elected Mrs. Kwan, one of the leading church women, on the Board 
cf Directors. 

Sunday Schools. — 

Because the evangelistic force has been larger this year, more direct 

attention has been given to the Sunday Schools. An improvement in those held 

on Sunday is reported, and also at the two chapels at Tsu-ka-tsaung and 
San-dong-long, held during the week. 

Outstations. — 

The work in the five outstations has been about the same as in 
former years ; and when the difficulties are considered, it is even 
more prosperous than ever before. 

The Moh-doh Church, which was dedicated last year, is in a flourishing 
condition. At the meeting of Presbytery in the fall, Mr. Wo, the very effi- 
cient elder there, was ordained and made the stated supply. The step seems 
to have been a wise one, as he has handled the affairs in a most creditable 
manner. At the same time that Mr. Wo was made pastor, an elder was 
elected and ordained and the church has been carrying on its own affairs 
since that time. The work at Kwong-foh has sufifered a great loss in Mr. 
Leu, but Mr. T'sa is a man of good judgment and tact, and as he is to be 
made an elder he will then have a more active part in the conduct of the 
church. 

The prospects at Hyu-c-kivan are brighter. A good day school teacher 
there has been of great help in the evangelistic services. In spite of the fact 
that we have not succeeded in getting a place for our new helper, Mr. Dzen, 
at Wong-dan, the place has been visited a number of times and good crowds 
have attended the preaching services in the street chapel. Wamg-kytn, as 
usual, has presented many difficulties, not only with the church members and 
inquirers, but with the teachers. 

Work for Women. — 

During the past year the women have taken turns going out two 
together each week, visiting the four principal outstations and their 
adjoining villages once a month; there conducting women's and 
children's meetings and visiting the homes. 



CENTRAL CHINA— SOOCHOW 109 

The Womeyi's Society, which was organized a little over a year ago, has 
begun to be a real part of the church work. Some very good programs have 
been given and the meetings are quite well attended. What might be called the 
Ladies' Aid Department has done some sewing for the hospital. 

Every Monday evening a prayermeeting for the Bible women has been 
held, which has been a source of real help. 

A children's church has been started, which meets at the same time as 
the main service and helps to insure the peace of the big service. Quite_ a 
thriving IVovicn's Club has been started for the purpose of drawing the 
young women of the congregation more closely together, furnishing them 
with wholesome amusement, and through them reaching some of their non- 
Christian friends who are attracted by the social meetings. 

EDUCATIONAL 

Vincent Miller Academy. — At the time the report was written 
the attendance was the largest in the history of the school. 

A self-governing society has been started in the school. It is just an 
experiment and it remains to be seen whether it will work out or not. The 
literary classes have all done creditable work. Athletics has taken a part 
in school life this year, and a good football team has been developed. Fifteen 
of the boys are church members, seven being received into the church during 
the year. There is a Y. M. C. A. to which nearly all but the small boys 
belong. The presence of so many briglit, active boys is a splendid oppor- 
tunity for Christian work. The Bible is emphasized throughout the school. 
The lower primary department of Vincent Miller Academy has an enrolment 
of 83. 

Day Scliools. — In the Girls' Day School are enroled 40 pupils, the largest 
number of any year. This school is held in the dismal, little, old street 
chapel and fills it to the limit. One Superintendent of Schools counts this 
school as one of the best in maintaining a high standard in its work. 

Country Schools. — The school at Hwu Z-kivan, which has had great diffi- 
culty in getting a start, has more tlian doubled its attendance this spring term. 
At IVang-kyin the school problem has been a difficult one. We have had no 
less than three teachers this year. Two left us without giving any warning. 
On account of the unfaithfulness of the teachers, the attendance had fallen 
off miserably, but since the opening of the spring term it has been good. 

Kindergartens. — Althoug'h much of the work is undone in the homes of 
the little ones, still as they come day after day and learn the songs and things 
that work toward character building, we feel that the teaching is by no 
means all lost. 

MEDICAL 

Tooker Memorial Hospital has had one of the best years of its 
existence in many respects, under the care of Dr. Emma Dau. Much 
credit is due also to Miss Lieu, her able assistant, who has acted as 
druggist and matron, and whose management of the household de- 
partment has been both judicious and economical. 

Over a year ago we asked to have sent us Dr. Mary Tai, who had been 
with us the year before and was then studying in the U. S. A. We received 
no reply until March, 1921 ; then that sihe was to sail in April to take up work 
in Tooker Hospital. With two physicians we will hope for added efficiency 
and increased success. Dr. Dau's position at present is quite unique, as she 
is the only woman physician, Chinese or foreign, in this great city of Soo- 
chow. Some new nurses have been received, as required by the increasing 
number of patients. 

Attendance at the dispensary has been good. Mrs. Hong, the Bible wo- 



no 



CENTRAL CHINA— STATISTICS 



man, is always on hand to talk to the patients as they wait in the chapel for 
their turn to see the doctor. Our in-patient list has been the largest in the 
history of the hospital. 



STATISTICS 



STATIONS 


1 

=1 
o 


1 
1 

s 

1 


1 


1 

O 

g 

x: 

1 


1 

Is 

So 

II 


a 

a 

a 

o 


■2 

-a 

■2 

■o 

•0 


i 

3 
t 

Is 




si 

lis 

§11 


1 

6 


1 

a 

'S. 

3 


1 


3 

1 
p. 


.a 


1 

3.2 




25 

8 

20 

10 


10 
38 
21 
9 


79 
62 
72 
38 


25 

8 

30 

10 


2 
3 
2 
1 


1,869 

1,183 

1,354 

514 


117 
54 

104 
35 


479 
130 
243 
125 


2,286 

1,008 

1,400 

900 


Mex. 

1,748 

3,465 

1,887 

616 


34 
12 
15 

9 


991 
788 
739 
342 


1 


323 


1 


9,387 
















Soochow 


1 


231 


1 


8,783 


Totals, 1922 


63 


78 


251 


73 


8 


4,920 


310 


977 


5,594 


Mex. 
7,716 
Gold 
84,630 


70 


2,860 


2 


554 


2 


18,170 


Totals, 1921 


64 


71 


242 


69 


9 


4,855 309 


934 


5,294 


Gold 
$6,589 


69 


2,768 


2 554 


2 


8,946 



HAINAN MISSION 

The stations are arranged in the order of their opening, not 
alphabetically. 

NoDOA : 60 miles southwest of Kiung-chow ; work opened, 1884. Mis- 
sionaries — Mrs. J. C. Melrose, Rev. William J. Leverett, Rev. John Franklin 
Steiner and Mrs. Steiner, Miss Mary H. Taylor. 

KiUNG-cHow (including Hoihow) : three miles from coast of Island; 
occupied as a station in 1885. Missionaries — H. M. McCandliss, M.D., and 
Mrs. McCandliss, Miss Alice H. Skinner, Miss Mae Chapin, Rev. J. V. Shan- 
non and Mrs. Shannon, Rev. David S. Tappan, Jr., and Mrs. Tappan, Clar- 
ence G. Salsbury, M.D., and Mrs. Salsbury, Rev. Paul C. Melrose and Mrs. 
Melrose, Rev. W. V. Stinson, Miss Grace Macdonald, Rev. Ura A. Brogden 
and Mrs. Brogden. 

Kachek : 60 miles south of Kiung-chow ; occupied as a station in 1900. 
Missionaries — Miss Kate L. Schaeffer, Rev. Geo. D. Byers and Mrs. Byers, 
Mjss M. M. Moninger, Nathaniel Bercovitz, M.D., and Airs. Bercovitz, Rev. 
David H. Thomas and Mrs. Thomas, Rev. Wilbur M. Campbell and Mrs. 
Campbell, Frank R. Whelply, Jr., M.D., and Mrs. Whelply. 

Transfers : Rev. W. M. Campbell and Mrs. Campbell from Kiung-chow 
to Kachek, Miss Mary H. Taylor from Kiung-chow to Nodoa, W. K. Mc- 
Candliss, M.D., and Mrs. McCandliss from Nodoa to South China. 

Absent from the Field All or Part of the Year : Nathaniel Bercovitz, 
M.D., and Mrs. Bercovitz, Rev. George D. Byers and Mrs. Byers, Miss M. M. 
Moninger, H. M. McCandliss, M.D., and Mrs. McCandliss, Rev. David S. 
Tappan, Jr. 

HISTORY. — Hainan is a large island off the southeast coast of China, 
about 250 miles from Hongkong. It is in about the same latitude as Cuba 
and has about the same climate. In size it equals twice the area of the 
State of New Jersey. The first Protestant missionary effort was undertaken 
by Mr. C. C. Jeremiassen, an independent missionary, who came to the island 
in 1881 and made his headquarters at Hoiiwzv, the only port open to foreign 
trade. In the early part of the following year he made an entire circuit of 
the Island, selling books and dispensing medicines, continuing the work alone 
until he joined the Canton Mission in 1885. During that year a representative 
of the Canton Mission visited Nodoa and there examined 22 applicants lor 
baptism, nine of whom he baptized. In 1893 Hainan was formally organized 
into a mission. In 1885, Kiung-choiv, three miles inland, and the capital of 
the island, was occupied, large numbers of people being attracted by the 
medical work of the missionaries. In Kachek in 1900 the door for missionary 
effort was opened largely by the skilful surgery and medical treatment of the 
physician at that place. 

Hainan was at first connected with the Canton (or what is now known as 
the South China) Mission, but was organized as a separate Mission in 1893. 

Note. — The present missionary situation in each field is summarized in 
the General Introduction. A statistical summary by stations appears at the 
end of the report of each mission. For fuller information send for "Pen Pic- 
ture" of Hainan. Price, 15 cents. 

NODOA STATION 

EVANGELISTIC 
Nodoa Church. — After Mission Meeting last year Nodoa had its 
"Big Sunday," as has been the custom for many years. Big Sun- 
Ill 



112 HAINAN— NODOA 

days were formerly held four or six times a year. In late years, 
however, as the number of Christians greatly increased, this system 
has outgrown itself. This year it was proposed that each of the 
eight outstations have' its own "Big Sunday" four times a year. Each 
outstation now pays a definite proportion directly toward the sup- 
port of its own local evangelist. A considerable number of elders 
and deacons have been added, and judging from the increased in- 
terest, we feel that a good move forward has been made. 

The improved envelope system has added about one-half to the Sunday 
contributions. This method is an adaptation of that employed in the Chinese 
Vamen. The names of all the soldiers are written on small bamboo pallets 
and hung up just inside the door. When the soldier is on duty he carries the 
pallet with him. The Christian does the same. On Sunday morning, as he 
enters the church, he takes his pallet at the door. At the bottom of the pallet 
is fastened a narrow strip of leather on which to string his cash for the morn- 
ing offering. This also makes it possible to keep a record of the attendance. 

Among the additions for the year are two gentlemen of middle age, Mr. 
Deng, of Ui-ngou, a Mandarin-speaking market town along the west coast, 
and Mr. Hang, of the Canton Commercial Co. This company has head- 
quarters at Nodoa, with large rubber and coffee plantations three miles north. 
Both of these men are scholars and were for many years zealous Confucianists. 
Recently two Sunday evening services were given over to these two men, at 
which time each had an opportunity publicly to confess Christ and to relate 
his own interesting story as to how he was led to become a Christian. Mr. 
Deng is another example of the power of the written message. It was a copy 
of Pilgrim's Progress, handed to him by one of his Chinese brethren, that first 
aroused his interest. The final persuasion came, quoting his own words, after 
an answer to prayer in behalf of a member of the family who was very sick 
and pronounced beyond hope of recovery. Mr. Hang's home while on the 
mainland was located near a Gospel chapel. At first many heated arguments 
took place between himself and the preacher in the chapel. Gradually his 
former prejudices vanished and he became convinced of the truth of the 
Gospel, and finally came out by public profession of his faith and was bap- 
tized. 

Outstations. — 

The Christians at Kio-hau are pressing for a new chapel. The helper 
offered to preach without salary, so that all their contributions might be put 
into the chapel fund. One of the Christians has already presented to the 
church a splendid piece of property, upon which to build. 

Plans are now under way to rebuild the city of Dam-tsiu that was almost 
totally destroyed little over a year ago. There was formerly a small chapel 
in the city, which also suffered the same fate. The location for the future 
chapel is the King of Dragons' Temple just outside the east Rate. This is an 
ideal location. This property has been made a gift to the Mission. Among the 
signers was an old man over 80 years of age. He confessed that when Mr. 
Jeremiassen desired to obtain a place for a chapel 35 years ago, he was one 
of the chief opponents, but at that time he felt it was his duty. He now 
acknowledges that all his fears and misgivings were unfounded. 

The long-sought-for opportunity of opening up work among the abor- 
igines in the mountain regions south of Nodoa has come. During the year 
Kachek Station has furnished us a young Christian gentleman, an aborigine 
and a graduate of the Kachek schools. He has already come in touch with a 
number of his mountain brethren. 

Work for Women. — 

The three principal methods are : house-to-house visitation, Thursday 
prayermeeting, and country itineration by the Bible women. Many visits have 
been made to the homes of Christian women in the market in the effort to 
arouse in them new interest. The fact that so few women can read continues 



HAINAN— NODOA 113 

to be one of the greatest difficulties in the work. Some feel they are too old 
to begin, others have children who occupy most of their time, and some need 
to be given the heart to "want to." The number of girls graduating from the 
school and going back to their home communities is increasing, so that in 
time there is sure to be a great change. The Bible women have gone into the 
country two by two, usually making the outstation chapel their headquarters 
and from there working out into the villages where they sometimes spend a 
week at one place and then go on to another. In this way most of the out- 
stations have been visited during the year. 

EDUCATIONAL 

Ling Kzvany School (Boys). — The ages of the pupils ranged from seven 
to twenty-two years, according to the American style of reckoning ages. Five 
or six of the pupils were married during the last weeks of the year, ea