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I 




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3 3<^.T? 

V ( ^ ^^ 

A? 



X^n-^ ^^r '^M*'*^ 



V 



OF THE ' ^ 



STHTESUBITOR 



TO THE 



THIRTY-FOURTH GENERllL ASSEMBLY 



OK THE 



State of Missouri, 



FOR THE TWO FISCAL YEARS 



BEGINNING JANUARY 1, 1885, AND ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1886. 



JEFFERSON CITY, MO.: 

TRXBOKH PRINTIK6 OOUPANY, STATE PRINTERS AND BINDERS. 

1887. 



tl»-^ 



REPORT 



OF THE 



...■STSTE SUDITOR 



TO THB 



THIRTY-FOURTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



OF THE 



STATE OF MISSOURI, 



FOE THE TWO FISCAL YBARS 



BEGINNING JANUARY 1. 1885, AND ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1833 



CITY. OF JEFFERSON, MO. : 

TBIBUKB PRINTING CSOMPANT 8TATB PRINTERS AND BINDERS. 

1887. 






Sec. 7564, Revised Statutes. * * * * He shall also at the commencement 
of each regular session of the General Assembly, prepare and report a ftill and 
detailed statement of the condition of the revenue, and the amount of the expendi- 
tures for the two preceding fiscal years, a ftiU and detailed statement of the public 
debt, estimates of the revenue and expenditures for the. two succeeding fiscal years, 
such plans as he may deem expedient for the support of the puplic credit^ for les- 
sening the public expenses, for promoting frugality and economy in the public 
offices, and generally for tha better management and more perfect understanding 
of the fiscal affairs of the State ; a tabular statement showing separately the whole 
amount of each appropriation of money made by law, the amount by law, the 
amount paid under the same, and the balance unexpended, a tabular statement 
showing the amount of revenue chargeable to each county for the two preceding 
fiscal years ; the aggregate amount of each object of taxation, together with the tax 
due on the same; and he shall also pablish annually an accurate account of all 
receipts and expenditures of the public moneys. 






Jll 2u 'WJ» 



/ 



aUDITOET'S REPORT. 



Auditob's Offick, Statb op Missouri, ) 
CiTT OF Jbff&rson, January 1, 1887. \ 

lo the Honorable Thirty-fourth General Assembly of the State of 
Missouri: 

Gentlemen : As required by law I have the honor to submit the 
follewing report of the traneactions of this department for the two fiscal 
years beginning January 1, 1885, and ending December 31, 1886 : 

On the first day of January, 1886, the general balance in the State 
treasury, after payment of all outstanding warrants', amounted to 
$1,411,883.61, which was apportioned among the several funds as fol- 
lows: 



State Revenue Fund 

State Interest Fund 

State School Fund 

State Seminary Fund 

State School Moneys 

State Seminary Moneys 

Road and Canal Fund .' 

Exeentors' and Administrators' Fund 

Insurance Department Fund 

Militia Fund 

Swamp Land Indemnity Fund 

Samings Missouri Penitentiary 

Balance in the treasury January 1, 1885, 



$331,903 62 
648,576 64 
201,331 66 
95 08 
175,640 00 
16,995 00 
7,924 40 
24,937 19 
582 88 
1,346 01 
308 93 
2,242 21 



$1,411,883 61 



320969 



auditor's report. 



A statement of the receipts and disburBements during the years 
1886 and 1886, and the balance remaining in the treasury January J, 
1887, is presented in the following table : 

RECEIPTS AND DIS BURSE fllENTS. 



By balance in the treasury January 1, 1885. 

By receipts from all sources in 1885 

By receipts from all sources in 1886 

To warrants issued in 1885 



Dr. 



Cr 



$1,411,883 61 
3,324,219 63 
3.425,562 36 



f 4, 251, 363 87 



To warrants issued in 1886 | 3,337,131 32 



Balance 

Totals 

Balance in the treasury January 1, 1887. 



573,170 41 



j8,161,66.^ 60 



$8,161,665 60 



$573,170 41 



The balance of $573,170.41 remaining in the treasury January 1, 
1887, is apportioned among the several funds as follows : 



State Revenue Fund 

State Interest Fund 

State School Fund 

State School Moneys 

Executors' and Administrators' Fund 

Militia Fund 

Insurance Department Fund 

State Seminary Fund 



$347,700 21 

148 16 

439 80 

180,165 00 

14,056 69 

1,472 01 

5,126 81 

95 08 

Road and Canal Fund j 6,360 27 

>tate Seminary Moneys , — 17,245 00 

j^wamp Land Indemnity Fund | 361 38 

Total balance in the treasury January 1, 1887 1 $573,170 41 



I 



auditor's repokt. 



The receipts and disbursements from the general revenue fund are 
presented as shown in the following balance sheet : 

STATE REVENUE FUND. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



By balance January 1, 1885 , $331,903 62 



By receipts in 1S85 from tax-books and ordinary, 
sources of revenue 



! 

By receipts In 1885 from fees of State officers and otherj 
miscellaneous sources 



By receipts in 1885 from R. B. Price, treasurer State 
University, for which a certificate of indebtedness' 
was Issued 



1,763,903 71 
68,322 16 

5,000 00 



By receipts in 1886 from tax-books and ordinary 

sources of revenue 1,600,622 13 



By receipts in 1886 from fees of State ofBcers and other; 
miscellaneous sources 



By receipts in 1886 from R. B. Price, treasurer State 
University, for which a certificate of indebtedness 
was issued 



By transfer from State School Fund in 1886. 



82,816 96 
5,000 00 

m 

2,000 00 



To warrants issued in 18S5 for ordinary current ex- 
penses 1 $1,447,224 80 



To transfer to State School Moneys in 1885. 



To warrants issued in 1886 for ordinary current ex- 
penses 



To transfer to School Moneys in 1886 

To transfer to State sinking Fund in 1886 
To transfer to State Interest Fund In 1886 
Balance 

Totals 

Balance in the fund January 1, 1887. . . . 



482,976 27 

992,645 78 

514,360 68 

30,000 00 

4,660 84 

347,700 2i; 




$3,819, 568 58 
$347,700 21 



STATE INTBRS8T FUND. 



From receipts into this fund the interest on the public debt has 
been promptly paid, and the sum of $1,134,282.81 transferred to the 
State Sinking Fund and used in the redemption and purchase of State 
bonds. 



Il 



auditor's rkport. 



STATU SINKING FUND. 

In 1885 and 1886 the sum of $1,365,282.81 was transferred from the 
State Interest^^State Revenue and State School Funds and placed to 
the credit of the State SinkingFund. With this amount and the pro- 
ceeds derived from the sale of $1,350,000, 3^ per cent, funding bonds, 
the Fund Commissioners redeemed and purchased State bonds aggre- 
gating $2,626,000. 

A description of the bonds so redeemed and purchased is given 
as follows : 

BONDS REDEEMED AND PURCHASED IN ISS.'S AND 1886. 



481 

S 
3 
2 
2 
1 

1,081 

75 

120 

391 

462 



2,626 



Bonds Purchased in 1886. 

Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad State Renewal bonds, face 
value 

North MlsBourl Railroad bonds, faoe value 

Platte Country Railroad bonds, face value 

St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad bonds, face value 

Cairo & Fulton Railroad bonds, face value 

State Funding bond, face value 

Bonds Purchased and Redeemed in 1886. 

Pacific Railroads bonds due March 17, 1886 

North Missouri Railroad bonds due June 13, 1886 

North Missouri Railroad bonds due August 22, 1886 

North Missouri Railroad bonds due September 10, 1886 

Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad bonds due November 10, 1886. . 

Total amount of six per cent, bonds purchased and re- 
deemed in 1885 and 1886 



$481,000 
8,0GO 
3,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,000 

1,081,000 

75,000 

120,000 

391,000 

462,000 



$2,626,000 



FUNDING ACT OP 1885. 



As authorized by an act of the General Assembly approved March 
31, 1885, the Fund Commissioners sold 650 three and a haif per 
cent. 5-20 funding bonds of $1,000 each, for the sura of $662,538.50, or 
at a premium of $12,538.50; and on the 17th day of August following, 
700 bonds of the same description were sold for $719,223.69, or for a 
premium of $19,223.69 — making the total premiums derived from the 
sale of 1,350 bonds amount to $31,762.19. 



auditor's rbport. 



THE STATE DEBT. 

Within two years, six per cent, bonds amounting to $1,276,000 
have been purchased or redeemed with iponey belonging to the State 
Sinking Fund. During the same time, the debt was increased 9213,000 
on account of the issue of five per cent, certificates of indebtedness for 
the benefit of the State School and Seminary Funds, as provided in the 
act of March 31, 1883. 

The actual reduction of the debt was $1,063,000, so that on January 
1, 1887, the total interest- bearing debt amounting to $14,180,000, as 
described below : 

OUTSTANDING DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1887. 



1,474 Paciflc Railroad bonds 

863 North Miesonri Railroad bonds 

1, 190 St. liOnis & Iron Mountain Railroad bonds 

246iCairo & Fulton Railroad bonds 

428 Platte Country Railroad bond 

I 
928; Hannibal A St. Joseph Railroad bond 

659' Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad State Renewal bonds 

2,483 Consolidation bonds 

I 

617 State Funding bonds 

80 State Ranlc Stock Reftinding bonds 

77 State University bonds 

lOSNorth western Lanatlc Asylum bonds 

24 Penitentiary Indemnity bonds 

1,350 State of Missouri 3} per cent. 5-20 funding bonds 



i Missouri consolidated six per cent, certificate of indebtedness 
held in trust for the State School Fund 

•Missouri five per cent, certificates of indebtedness held in trust 
for the State School Fund 

Missouri consolidated six per cent, certificate of indebtedness 
held in truist for the State Seminary Fund 

Missouri five per cent, certificates of indebtedness held In trust 
for the State Seminary Fund 

10,527 Total interest-bearing debt, January 1, 1887 



$1,474,000 

863,000 

1,190,000 

246,000 

428,000 

928,000 

650,000 

2,483,000 

617,000 

80,000 

77,000 

108,000 

24,000 

1,350,000 

2,909,000 

225,000 
122,000 

397,000 



$14,180,000 



s 



auditor's report. 



The bonded debt of the State amounts to $10,527,000, and matures 
as follows : 



Inl8S7 

In 1888 

In 1889 

In 1890 

In 1892 

In 1894 

In 1895 

In 1896 

In 1897 

In 1906 

Total bonded debt, January 1, 1887 



$3,720,000 

2,932,000 

742,000 

218,000 

185,000 

4^,000 

527,000 

892,000 

11,000 

1,350,000 



$10,527,000 



STATE SOHOOL FUND AND SEMINARY FUND. 

The State School Fund amounts to $3,134,439.80, and the Seminary 
Fund to $519,095.08. These funds are invested as follows : 

STATE SCHOOL FUND. 



Kissonri consolidated six per cent, certificate of indebtedness 

Missouri flve per cent, certificates of indebtedness 

Cash in the State Treasury 

Total School Fund, January 1, 1887 '. . . . 



$2,900,000 00 

225,000 00 

439 80 



$3,134,439 80 



The local school funds of the State, embracing county, township, 
special funds, fines and penalties, as reported on the 30th day of June, 
1886, amounted to $7,037,652.28. This sum, added to the State School 
Fund, makes an aggregate fund of $10,172,092.08, the interest upon 
which is annually disbursed for the maintenance of the public schools. 

The interest on the State School Fund and one-fourth of the ordi« 
nary receipts into the revenue fund, apportioned among the several 



AUOITOR^S REPORT. 9 



r 



counties for the maintenance of free schools, amounted in 1885 to 
$664,191.27, and in 1886 to $700,100.68. 

STATE SEMINARY FUND. 



Missoari six per cent, consolidated certlflcate of indebtedness $122,000 00 

Missouri five per cent, certificates of indebtedness | 397,000 00 

Cash in the Treasury ' 95 08 

Total Seminary Fund, January 1, 1887 0619,095 08 



-~r 



A detailed history of these funds from the date of their creation to 
December 31, 1886, will be found in part second of this report. 

AXEGUTORS' AND ADMINISTRATOES' FUND. 

This fund is derived from escheats and from the payments by ex- 
ecutors and administrators into the State treasury of the shares of 
legatees and distribatees which are not claimed within one year after 
final settlement of the estates of deceased persons. The balance re- 
maining to the credit of this fund amounts to tl4,056.69. 

INBURANCB DBPARTMBNT FUND. 

From fees paid to the Superintendent of the Insurance Department, 
as provided in chapter 119, Revised Statntes, the sum of $38,339.71 has 
been paid into the State treasury in 1885 and 1886. After paying all 
expenses of the department, including salaries of superintendent and 
deputy, a balance of $5,126.81 remained to the credit of this fund on 
January 1, 1887. 

SWAMP LAND INDEMNITY FUND. 

In addition to land indemnity, the Register of Lands has collected 
from the general government, on account of swamp and overflowed lands 
sold by the United States since the donation of such lands to the State 
of Missouri, cash indemnity amounting to $30,287.48. This amount has 
been disbursed to the counties entitled thereto as provided in sections 
6174-5, Revised Statutes. 



10 AUDITOB^S RBPOBT. 



8TATB PENITENTIARY. 

For the purpose of defraying expenses of said institution and for 
paying salaries of Warden, Inspectors, Physician, Chaplain, Matron, 
guards and employes; also for the purpose of erecting a four story 
stone lire proof building to be used as a kitchen, dining room, work- 
shop, library and chapel ; extending the main wall, and for other im- 
provements within the penitentiary area ; the preceding General As- 
sembly appropriated $210,000, which amount has been expended in 
the manner specified in said appropriation act. 

The cost of this institution from January 1, 1836, when it was 
opened for the reception of convicts to December 31, 1886, amounted 
to 92,591,552 72, in excess of its earnings. 

With additional shop room afforded by the erection of the stone 
building above referred to, and that which is now recommended by 
the Warden and Board of Inspectors, it is hoped such enlarged facili- 
ties for the employment of convict labor will result in materially les- 
sening the cost of maintaining the penitentiary. 

Elsewhere will be found more detailed information respecting the 
receipts and disbursements of this institution. 

COSTS IN CBIMINAL CABBB. 

For pa.vment of criminal costs in 1885 and 1886, the Thirty-third 
General Assembly appropriated $400,000. Excepting a small sum re- 
served to pay sheriflfs for transporting convicts to the penitentiary, this 
appropriation became exhausted in July, 1886. 

On December 10th, a circular letter was mailed by me to clerks 
of circuit and criminal courts of the several counties requesting them 
to furnish this oflSce with the aggregate amount of unpaid fee bills ac- 
cruing in 1886, and for the payment of which the State is liable. Re- 
sponses to this circular have been received from all clerks in the State 
excepting from the clerks of Dunklin, Grundy, Lewis, McDonald, New 
Madrid, Oregon, St. Francois, Stoddard, Stone and Texas counties. The 
deficiency as reported amounts to 9119,004.71. Estimating the aver- 
age deficiency in the ten counties not heard from at $200 per county, 
it will require an appropriation of $121,000 to pay off outstanding fee 
bills. The amount necessary to be appropriated for costs of criminal 
prosecutions, in 1887 and 1888, I estimate at $500,000. It is not im- 
possible that, within these years, a smaller sum would suffice, but 
while the criminal laws remain unchanged, I know of no safer way to 
estimate the expense for the future than to base such estimate upon 



auditor's rbport. 11 



the amount paid in the past. The amount of criminal costs annually- 
paid by the State of Missouri has assumed such large proportions as 
to seriously concern those entrusted with the management of State 
affairs, and I earnestly hope this General Assembly may devise some 
just and equitable remedy that will lessen the expenditure. 

Haying this end in view, I addressed a circular letter to the audi- 
tor of each State propounding certain questions based upon the laws 
of this State, in order to ascertain the modes prevailing in other States 
for the payment of criminal costs, as well as the fees paid for services 
of officers, witnesses and other attendants of criminal courts. Among 
other questions propounded in the letter was the following: '"Where 
the punishment for the crime charged is Death or Imprisonment in 
THE State Penitentiary, are costs incident to the trial of a defendant 
paid out of your State Trbasurt or by the Oounty in which the 
indictment was found ?" Nineteen States, to wit : Arkansas, Oalifor- 
nia, Georgia^ Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, 
Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, 
New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania., South Carolina and Wisconsin 
responded to this question substantially as follows : '^ They are paid 
out of the treasury of the county in which the indictment was found 
or information filed." In Illinois the question is thus answered : ''The 
costs are not usually paid by either State or county. Where, in cases 
of change of venue or in other criminal cases, witnesses are taken from 
another county than that in which trial is had, the county pays witness 
fees." In Alabama '' when the sentence is death, such costs are paid 
by the county out of the fund arising from fines and forfeitures. When 
the punishment is imprisonment in the penitentiary, the costs are a 
charge both on the fine and forfeiture fund of the .county and on pro- 
ceeds of first year's labor." In Virginia and West Virgmia the cost of 
prosecution is paid by the State ; but no part of defendant's cost is 
paid by either the State or county. In Kentucky, Rhode Island Ten- 
nessee and Vermont such costs are paid out of the State treasury as is 
the case in Missouri. No other States responded to the circular. I am 
fully persuaded that the fees allowed by our laws to officers and other 
attendants of criminal courts are not excessive. The very large ap- 
propriations required at yoor hands are not so much attributable to 
the schedule of fees, as to the multiplication of lees occasioned by 
continuances, changes of venue and other delays intervening between 
the commission of a crime and the conclusion of the action brought 
against its perpetrator. Pathways leading from scenes of crime to 
the penitentiary and scafibld are too long and tortuous, and any legisla- 
tion making them shorter and straighter will lessen your criminal 
budget 



12 auditor's report. 



A88ES8M8NT OF RBAL ESTATE. 

Section 6705, Kevised Statutes, provides that '^ real estate shall be 

assessed at the assessment which shall commence on the first day of 

Jane, 1881, and shall only be required to be assessed every two years 

thereafter. Each assessment of real estate so made shall be the basis 

. of taxation on the same for the next two years next succeeding." 

Notwithstanding the assessment of real estate is made but once in 
two years the law as construed in case of State ex rel Harvey vs.Oook, 
82d Mo., p. 185, requires the land book to be copied in each and every 
year, and to be properly verified by the assessor's affidavit, as provided 
in section 6718. This construction of the law did not generally obtain 
prior to the decision referred to, it being held that as the real estate as- 
sessment was made the basis of taxation for two years, a copy of such 
assessment was unnecessary to be made for the year when lands were 
not assessed. 

To carry into eflfect the law, as construed by the Supreme Oourt 
and recognizing the additional labor thereby imposed upon assessors, 
the Thirty-third General Assembly appropriated $20,000 for the purpose 
of compensating assessors for copying and verifying the land list of 
1883 for taxes of 1885. The act making this appropriation provided 
that county courts should fix the compensation of assessors at a price 
not to exceed one and a half cents per tract, one-half to be paid by the 
county and one-half by the State. 

As provided in section 6706 the pay of an assessor for making the 
land assessment is such an amount as may be allowed by the county 
court, not to exceed the sum of three cents for each and every tract as- 
sessed. 

Should the allowance of one and a half cents per tract for copying 
the land list, as authorized by the preceding General Assembly, be re- 
enacted by this and succeeding general assemblies, it will matenally 
increase the cost of assessing without the possibility of increased val- 
uations for the years in which such copy is made. If, however, provi- 
sion should be made for the annual assessment of real estate, such as- 
sessment would cost, once in two years, one and a half cents per tract 
more than it now does, but the value of permanent improvements 
placed upon real estate during the preceding year, together with the 
ordinary increase in the value of lands and town lots, would more than 
compensate for such extra cost. 

As the State and counties have identically the same assessment 
and thei same valuations, after the copies of such assessment books are 



» r 



auditor's rxpobt. is 



made that they had before, it occurs to me that the law ought to be 
amended so as not to require the books to be copied, or otherwise so as 
to require annual assessments of real estate and thereby secure the 
annual increase in the value of property. 

THB RAILROAD TAX-BOOK, 

Under the provisions of section 6881, Revised Statutes, each county 
clerk is required, annually, to make a separate tax -book, to be called 
the '^ Railroad Tax Book." On this tax-book is placed not only the 
valuation of all railroad, telegraph and bridge property described in 
sections 6866 and 6901, and which is subject to assessment by the State 
Board of Equalization, but all local property owned by railroad com- 
panies, such as lands, town lots, machine shops, workshops, round- 
houses and other buildings, goods, chattels and real and personal prop* 
erty of whatever kind and character which by virtue of section 687618 
assessed by the local or county assessors. The result of such an ar- 
rangement causes the same classes of property assessed by the same 
assessor to be placed upon two separate and distinct tax-books \ as for 
instance, the valuation of lands and town lots, or horses, mules or cat- 
tle belonging to a railroad corporation is placed upon the railroad tax- 
book, separate and apart from the valuation ot lands, town lots, horses, 
mules or cattle owned by other corporations or individuals, which val- 
uations are upon the general tax-book. In consequence of thus sepa- 
rating the various classes of property listed by the county assessor no 
one can know what the abstract of the railroad tax-book contains 
until an examination is had to ascertain the kind of railroad property, 
if any, listed by the local assessor. On the other han(}, if the railroad 
tax-book is made to contain only the valuations of such property as is 
assessed by the State Board of Equalization, every one knows the kind 
and character of the property assessed and contained therein. I know 
of no good and sufficient reason why the real or personal property of a 
railroad corporation assessed by the local assessor should not be carried 
on the general tax-book as is the case with all other property assessed by 
him. If the same rule prevailed with reference to merchants and man- 
ufacturers, and their real estate and personal property listed by local 
assessors should appear on the merchants and manufacturers tax-books, 
the abstracts of the several tax-books would present an intolerable 
mixture of incongruous assessment returns. An amendment to the ex- 
isting law confining the railroad tax-book to such property only as may 
be assessed by the State Board of Equalization would prevent the com- 
plication of assessment returns. 



14 auditor's report. 



STATE TAXES ON PROPERTY OF RAILROAD AND TELEGRAPH COMPANIES. 

State taxes levied upon property of railroad and telegraph compa- 
nies are required to be paid to the collector of each county in which such 
taxes are levied or through which a railioad or telegraph line may pass. 
This involves the distribution of such taxes among a large number of 
collectors, who, in turn, are required to transmit the same to the State 
Treasurer. As an illustration it may be stated that State taxes levied 
in 1886 on property of the Western Union Telegraph Company aggre- 
gates $2,319.90, and this amount, under the law, is required to be paid 
in sums ranging from 91-44 to $82.47, to no less than ninety-six collec- 
tors, said company having wires in ninety-six counties. What is true 
with reference to taxes on Western Union Telegraph property, is 
equally true as to taxes on railroad companies or railway systems, ex- 
cept that the wires of the Western Union Telegraph Oompany traverse 
a greater number of counties, and the tax paid is less in amount than 
that paid by railroad corporations. 

Section 6891 requires each collector to keep separate accounts of 
railroad taxes collected by him, to make monthly payments of the 
same into the State Treasury, and in transmitting them to the Treasurer 
to keep such taxes separately from other State taxes. In making such 
payments many collectors fail to specify that the money transmitted 
was collected from a railroad or telegraph company, and hence, when 
received, it is placed by the Treasurer to the collector's general ac- 
count. The result is, that notwithstanding a railway or telegraph com- 
pany may have paid, all taxes levied against its property, the books of 
this office and the Auditor's report do not show such payment, but sim- 
ply an over-payment on the collector's general account, which over- 
payment is credited on his railroad and telegraph account, and in this 
manner are his accounts balanced. 

Each railway and telegraph company is charged on the books of 
this office with the whole amount of State taxes levied against it. In 
no way can such accounts be properly credited^ except hy receipts of 
the State Treasurer for taxes paid. If balanced hy over-payment on 
general account^ as indicated above, the Auditor's report does not 
show that such companies have paid their taxes, nor can this fact be 
ascertained except by overhauling the accounts of the collector of each 
and every county traversed by a railroad or telegraph line. 

Regarding it of the utmost importance that the Auditor's reports 
and the books of his office should show the actual condition of each rail- 
road and telegraph account, and believing from past experience that 



auditor's report. 15 



this resalt cannot be attained under existing circamstances, I respect- 
fally recommend that the law be so amended as to authorize all corpo- 
rations assessed by the State Board of Equalization to pay their State 
taxes directly into the State Treasury. 

MODS OF PAYING OIKTAIN COURT OFFICBRS AND BMPL0YR8. 

As proivded in section 1077, the official reporter of the Supreme 
Court is paid his salary from the appropriation made for publishing the 
decisions of said court, and, as enacted in section 5 of the general ap- 
propriation act of 1885, reporters of the St. Louis and Kansas Oity 
Courts of Appeal are paid out of the appropriation for pay of civil offi- 
cers. 

The marshal and janitor of the St. Louis Court of Appeals are 
paid as civil officers, while the marshals and janitors of the Supreme 
Court and Kansas Oity Court of Appeals are paid out of money appro- 
priated for contingent expenses ot these courts, 

I know of no good reason why the marshal and janitor of one court 
should, in the matter of paying their salaries, be classed as civil officers 
while the like officers or employes of other courts should be paid in a 
diiferent manner, nor is it apparent why the official reporter of the Su- 
preme Court should be paid out of money appropriated for publishing 
tbe decisions of that court, while reporters for the Courts of Appeal are 
paid as civil officers. For the s%ke of uniformity in the mode of pay- 
ing these salaries, I would suggest the propriety of so changing the law 
that the salaries of all official reporters may be paid as civil officers, 
while those of the marshals and janitors be paid out of the appropri- 
priations made for contingent expenses of said courts. 

DRAMSHOP LIOKNSBS. 

From official reports made to this office by county clerks and the 
collector of the city of St. Louis, it is ascertained that on the fourth day of 
July, 1886, dramshop-keepers, having State and county licenses, num- 
bered 2>881, and that the revenue collected during the year ending on 
that day for State, county, city and town purposes amounted to $1,842,- 
208.26. On July 4, 1882, tbe number of dramshop, wine and beer house 
keepers, aggregated 3,601, and the State, county and municipal rev- 
enue derived from this source amounted to 9699,395.56. 

It will be observed that on July 4, 1886, the licensed drinking houses 
are 720 less in number than they were on July 4, 1882, while the revenue 
paid by them is $1,042,812.70 greater in amount. These figurse dem- 
onstrate that the high license system, now prevailing in Missouri, 



\ 



16 



AUDITOB^S RBPORT. 



lessens the number of dramshops and very largely increases the amount 
of revenue derived therefrom. 

For further comparison of this system with the law as it formerly 
existed, I submit the following tables : 



1886. 



Number of dramshops July 4, 1886 

Number of druggists having dramshop licenses 

Number of grocery and other dealers having dramshop licenses. 
Total number of dramshops in the State July 4, 1886 



2,837 
3 
1 



2,881 



State licenses paid by dramshop-keepers for the year ending July 4, 

1886 , J151, 477 74 

I 

County licenses paid by dramshop keepers for the year ending Julyi 

4, 1886 1 1,382,116 63 

City and town lioensespaid by dramshop keepers for the year ending' 

July 4, 1886 i 308, 613 89 

I """ -^— ■"— — ^— 
Total State, county, city and town licenses paid for the year 

ending July 4, 1886 , j $1,842,208 26 



1882. 



Number of dramshops July 4, 1882 , 

Number of druggists having dramshop licenses 

Number of grocery and other dealers having dramshop licenses. 
Number of wine and beer houses 



Total number of dramshops and wine and beer houses in the 
State July 4, 1882 

State licenses paid by dramshop-keepers for the year ending July 
4,1882 

County licenses paid by dramshop-keepers for the year ending July 
4 1882 



State licenses paid by wine and beer-faouse keepers for the year end- 
ing July 4, 1882 

County licenses paid by wine and beer-house keepers for the year 
ending July 4, 1882 

City and town licenses paid by dramshop, wine and beer-house keep- 
ers for the year ending July 4, 1882 

Total State, county, city and town licenses paid for the year end-; 
ing July 4, 1882 ! 



3,3G0 

35 

74 

132 



3,601 



$186,669 75 

356,136;26 

1,917 27 

2,597 02 

152,076 26 



$699,395 56 



Tfao licenses collected in St. Louis for each year are reported as 
county licenses. 



AUDITOR^S REPOHT. 



17 



EDUCATION, GHARITIBS AND CRIME. 

The amounts disbursed from the State Treasury in 1885 and 1886 
for the maintenance of free public schools, educational and charitable 
institutions and in the enforcement of the criminal laws, are shown in < 
the following tables : 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1885 AND 1886 FOR THE MAINTENANCE OP FREE 
PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 



Warrants Total amount 
issued in 1885 issued to each 
and 1886. Institution. 



Public schools — One-fourth of the State revenue 
appropriated for 1885 and 1886 

Public schools^Interest on the State school ftind 
appropriated for 1885 and 1886 

State University— Appropriation for maintenance 
in 1^5 and 1886 

State University — Interest on the State seminary 
fund disbursed in 1885 and 1886 

State University— Appropriation for completing 
and famishing additions thereto 

Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy— Appro- 
priation for maintenance in 1885 and 1886 

Missouri School of J^lnes and Metallurgy — Appro- 
priation for erecting a laboratory 

Normal School, First District — Appropriation for 
support of, In 1885 and 1886 

Normal School, Second District — Appropriation 
for support of 

Normal School, Second District— Appropriation 
for completing, furnishing, heating and light- 
ing the building 

Normal School, Third District — Appropriation for 
support of 

Lincoln Institute — Approprlatloxi for support of. . . 

Lincoln Institute — Approproprlatlon for the erec- 
tion of a dormitory, coal and wood shed, and 
for completing basement 

Total amount disbursed In 1885 and 1886 for 
educational purposes 



$997,336 95 
366,955 00 



62,810 00 
53,801 00 
25,000 00 



15,000 00 
10,000 00 

I 

20,000 00 



20,000 00 



30,000 oo; 



20,000 OOi 



16,000 00 



9,500 00 



$1,616,402 95 



$1,364,291 95 



141,611 00 



25,000 00 
20,000 00 



60,000 00 
20,000 00 



25,500 00 



$1,646,402 95 



PP— 2. 



18 



auditor's report. 



DISBURSEMENTS IN 1885 AND 1886 FOR THE MAINTENANCE OF 

CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS. 



Lunatic Asylum No. 1— Support of 



Lunatic Asylum No. l—Salaries of superintendent 
and officers 



Lunatic Asylum No. 1— Lighting and improvement 
of the building 



Lunatic Asylum No 2— Support of 



Lunatic Asylum No. 2— Salaries of superintendent 
and officers 



Lunatic Asylum No. 2— Construction of dead rooms 

Lunatic Asylum No. 2— Erection of additions to 
the building 



Lunatic Asylum No. 3 — ^Construction of. 



St. Louis Insane Asylum — Appropriation for in- 
digent insane therein 



Missouri Institution for the Education of the Deaf 
and Dumb—Support of 



Missouri Institution for the Education of the Deaf 
and Dumb— Salaries of superintendent, officers 
and teachers 

Missouri Institution for the Education of the Deaf 
and Dumb— Repairs and Improvement of 



Missouri School for the Blind— Support of. 



MisBSourl School for the Blind— Salaries of Super- 
intendent, officers and employes 



Total amount disbursed in 1885 and 1886 for the 
maintenance of charitable institutions. . . . 



Warrants 

issued in 1885 

and 1886. 



$70,000 00 
20,016 66 
10,300 00 



25,000 00 

15,999 98 
2,000 00 

98,000 00 



Total amount 

issued to each 

Institution. 



88,400 25 



50,000 00 



70,000 00 

22,732 29 

* 

7,800 00 



36,000 00 
15,900 60 



$532,149 68 



$100,316 66 



140,099 98 
88,400 25 

50,000 00 



100,532 29 



51,900 60 



$532,149 68 



AUDITOR^S RFPORT. 



19 



DISBURSEMENTS IN 1885 AND 1?86 ON ACCOUNT OF THE ENFORCE- 
MENT OF THE CRIMINAL LAWS. 



For costs in ciimiDal cases 

For the apprehension of criminals and the suppression of outlawry 

Missouri Penitentiary— Support of, including salaries of officers 
and employes ; 

Missouri Penitentiary- -Extension of walls and construction of 
additional buildings 



Missouri Penitentiary— Library of 

Penitentiary No. 2— Location of 

Jail in Butler county— Construction of 

Total disbursements in 1885 and 1886 on account of crime 



Warrants 

issued in 1886 

and 1886. 



$420,111 65 
10,332 29 

100,000 00 

110,000 00 

500 00 

1,684 35 

5,0(10 00 

$647,628 29 



PUBLIC PRINTING AND BINDING. 

> In compliance with an act of the General Assembly approved 
March 28, 1885, the Oommissioners of Public Printing, on the 18th day 
•of May, 1886, entered into a contract with the Tribane Printing Com- 
pany of Jefferson Oity for executing the several classes of public print- 
ing for the term of six years from and after the first day of July, 1886. 

The public printing is divided into three classes, and each class is 
let under a separate contract. Comprised in the first class, is the 
printing of all the bills for the General Assembly, together with such 
resolutions and other matters as may be ordered to be printed in bill 
form, and the printing of all reports, communications and other docu- 
ments ordered by the General Assembly, except such as shall be printed 
in pamphlet form. Glass second includes the printing of the House 
and Senate journal, appendixes, laws, and all reports, communications 
and other documents ordered by the General Assembly, or by the Ex- 
ecutive Departments to be printed in pamphlet form, together with 
the volumes of public docuntents. Class third comprises the printing 
of all blanks, circulars and other work necessary for the use of the 
Executive Departments, except such as shall be printed in pamphlet 
form. 

The contract for each class of the public printing was awarded to 
Che Tribune Printing Company on the following terms : 



20 



AUDITORS REPORT. 



First Class, — For composition per one ihousand ems, twenty-five- 
cents ; for press work per quire of twenty-four impressions of a side or 
page, five cents. 

Second Class* — For composition per one thousand ems forty five- 
cents; for press work per token forty cents. 

Third Class. — For composition per one thousand ems twenty-five 
cents; for Press work per quire, five cents. 

• 

BINDING. 

As provided in section 6603, Revised Statutes, the binding of the- 
House and Senate journals, laws, reports and other public documents 
was also awarded to the Tribune Printing Company for the term of one 
year, from and after the first day of July, 1886, and at the foUowing^^ 
named prices : 

FOR FOLDING, STITCHING, COVERING AND TRIMMING PAMFflLET^^ 

AS FOLLOWS : 



Pamphlets of 16 pages, per 100 copies . . 
Pamphlets of 32 pages, per 100 copies .. 
Pamphlets of 48 pages, per 100 copies. . 
Pamphlets of 100 pages, per 100 copies. 



Pamphlets of 200 pages, per 100 copies, one dollar and ninety-five 
cents } and for each additional page three-fourths of one cent. 

FOR BINDING THE LAWS AND JOURNALS. 

For each copy of 150 pages or less • 

For each copy of 250 pages and exceeding 150 pages 

For each copy of 500 pages and exceeding 250 pages 

For each additional 100 pages 

FOR BINDING REPORTS AND DOCUMENTS IN CLOTH. 

For each copy of 250 pages or less 

For each copy of 500 pages and exceeding 250 pages 

For each additional 100 pages over 500 pages 

For extra plates and extended tabulated sheets, per 1,000 copies 

FOR FOLDING AND STITCHING BILLS. 

For each copy of 50 pages or less 

For each copy of 100 pages and exceeding 50 pages 

For each additional 50 pages over 100 pages 



38 cents. 

56 cents. 

72 cents. 

one dollar. 



15 cents.. 
20 cents. 

22 cents. 
4 cents. 

23 cents% 
28 cents. 

3 eents^. 
65^cents . 

2 cents. 

3 cents^. 
1 cent. 



auditor's report. 



21 



REPORTS OF THE STATE AUDITOR. 

Section 7583, Revised Statutes, provides that the Auditor shal) 
4iCCompany his report to the General Assembly with three thousand 
printed copies. The number of these reports authorized to be printed 
by this old Statute is wholly inadequate to supply the demand for the 
same. I therefore renew the recommendation, contained in my report 
to the preceding General Assembly, that the number of printed copies 
of the Auditors' report be increased to correspond with the increased 
growth and importance of the State. 

TAXABLE WEALTH. 

The assessed valuation of real estate, pergonal property, railroad, 
bridge and telegraph companies for taxes of 1885, amounted to 9726,- 
283,377.78, and for taxes of 1886, the sum ot $74f« 381,08067. 

In the following tables are shown the assessment returns for taxes 
of 1885, naming the classes of property, assessed and the total valuation 
placed upon each } also the assessments for taxes of 1886, as equalized 
and adjusted by the State Board of Equalization : 

VALUATION OF PROPERTF JUNE 1, 1884, FOB TAXES OF 1885. 



Beal estate, number of acres, 38,836,986. . 

Horaee, number of, 707,680 

Mules, number of, 205,630 

Asses and jennets, number of, 4,536 

Neat cattle, number of, 1 ,899,943 

Sheep, number of, 1,386,978 

Hogs, number of, 3,040,163 

Other live stock, number of, 11,480 

Money, notes and bonds 

Brokers and exchange dealers 

<k>rporate companies 

All other personal property 

Aggregate valuation of personal property. 

Assessment of railroad companies 

Assessment of bridge companies 

Assessment of telegraph companies 

Total assessment for taxes of 1885 



$495,293,007 00 



$27,434,215 

9,644,062 

243,143 

25,647,571 

1,560,381 

5,882,968 

293,403 

57,561,919 

3,624,085 

13,172,917 

41,360,109 



186,425,373 00 

40,955,319 62 

3,000,000 00 

609,678 16 



$726,283,377 78 



22 



auditor's report. 



VALUATION OF PROPERTY JUNE 1, 1885, FOR TAXES OF 1886. 



Real estate, number of acres, 39,123,054 ' $518,803,118 00- 



Horses, number of, 719,325 

aiules, number of, 217,735 

Asses and jennets, number of, 4,530 

Neat cattle, number of, 2,090,841 

Sheep, number of, 1,147,948 

Hogs, number of, *2,926, 949 

Other live stock, number of, 11 ,423 

Money, notes and bonds 

Brokers and exchange dealers 

Corporate companies 

All other personal property 

Aggregate valuation of personal property, 

Assessment of railroad companies , 

Assessment of bridge companies 

Assessment of telegraph companies 

Total assessment for taxes of 1886 , 



$26,991,529 

9,637,520 

243,560 

26,814,749 

1,160,902 

4,653,168 

191,623 

53,027,439 

, 2,734,402 

15,214,400 

40,463,936 



181,133,128 OO 

42,847,264 41 

2,975,000 OO 

622,670 26 



$746,381,080 67 



TAXES LEVIBD FOR 1886. 

From official returns made to this ofBce by county clerks, it is as- 
certained that the taxes levied in 1886 for State, county, school, road 
and towDship purposes amount to $14,258,113.08. This sum comprisea 
taxes extended in 1886 upon the Real Estate and Personal Property 
Tax books, the Railroad, Telegraph and Bridge Tax books and the Mer- 
chants' and Manufacturers' Tax-book8, as follows : 



Real estate and personal property tax-books $12,780, 150 56- 

fiallroad, telegraph and bridge tax-books i 772 ,789 97 

Merchants* and manufacturers' tax-books ! 705,172 55- 

Total 114,258,113 OS- 



auditor's REPOaT. 



23 



These taxes are apportioned as indicated in the following table : 



State reyenue and State interest taxes 

County revenue tax , 

County interest and sinking fund taxes 

School taxes , 

Road, bridge and drainage taxes 

Township taxes , 

Total amount ef State and county taxes levied for 1886 



$3,205,025 86 

4,287,395 78 

2,459,155 91 

3,55i,191 63 

361,618 71 

389,725 29 



$14,258,113 08 



ESTIMATES. 

As provided in section 7564, Revised Statu tes« I submit the follow- 
ing estimates of the payments into the State treasury during the fiscal 
years 1887 and 1888, and of the expenditures of the State government 
for the same period oi time. 

ESTIMATED RECEIPTS. 



Hecelpts into the State Kevenne Fund from all sources in 1887 and 
1888 

Receipts into the State Interest Fund from all sources in 1887 and 
1888 

Total 



$3,600,000 
2,900,000 



$6,400,000 



24 



aupitor's report. 



STATE INTEREST FUND. 
Estimated ezpenditares. 



For the payment of interest on State bonds amounting to 910,527,000. 

For ttie payment of interest on Missouri six per cent, consolidated 
certificate of indebtedness for $2,909,000 held in trust for the State 
School Fund 

For the payment of interest on Missouri five per cent, certificates of in- 
debtedness for $225,000 held in trust for the State School Fund 

For the payment of interest on Missouri consolidated six per cent, 
certificate of indebtedness for $122,000 held in trust for the State 
Seminary Fund | 

For the payment of interest on Missouri five per cent, certificates of 
indebtedness for $397,000 held in trust for the State Seminary Fund 

For the payment of Commissions to the National Bank of Commerce 
In the city of New, York for services as fiscal agent of the State . .| 

For contingent expenses of the Fund Commissioners, Including post- 
age, expressage, advertising for sale or redemption of bonds and 
other necessary expenses 



For the State Sinking Fund to be used in the redemption of bonds 

Total 



$1,060,000 

349,080 
22,500 

14,640 

39,700 

8,000 

4,500 
1,401,580 



$2,900,000 



The above estimate for the State Sinking fund is based on tho 
estimated receipts for 1887 and 1888 into the State Interest Fund, 
which are placed at $2,900,000; but I would recommend a larger ap- 
propriation, as the receipts into the Interest fund may exceed the esti- 
mate. 

In anticipation of a favorable termination of the litigation between 
the State of Missouri and the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad Company 
now pending in the Supreme Court of the United States, and of extra- 
ordinary receipts into the State Revenue fund from any other source, 
I would also recommend an appropriation of $700,000 from this fund 
for the benefit of the State Sinking fund* 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



25 



ESriMATES. 

POB CURRENT EXPENSES OP THE STATE GOVERNMENT FOR THE YEARS 1887 

AND 1888.— STATE REVENUE FOND, 



Appropriations. 



MADnrXNANCE OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

One-fourth of the receipts into the State Revenue Fund derived from 
ordinary sources of revenue to be set apart and transferred to 
State School Moneys— estimated at 

For cost of assessing and collecting the revenue, including contlng- 
gent expenses of the State Board of Equalization 



Amount. 



For payment of costs in criminal cases 

CIVIL OFFICER^EXBCUTIVB DEPARTMBKT. 

For salary of Governor 

For salary of the Governor's Private Secretary 

JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT. 

For salaries of five judges of the Supreme Court 

For palaries of three judges of the'st. Louis Court of Appeals 

For salaries of three judges of the Kansas City Court of Appeals 

For salaries of thirty-four judges of Circuit Court 

For salary of the judge of the St. Louis Criminal Court 

For salary of the judge of the Criminal Court of Jackson county 

For salary of the judge of the Criminal Court of Buchanan county. . 

For salary of the judge of the Criminal Court of the Sixth Circuit 
and Johnson county 

For salary of the judge of the Cape Girardeau Court of Common 
Pleas 



For salary of the Attorney-Gkneral 

For salary of the clerk in the office of the Attorney-General. 

For salary of the Circuit Attorney of St. Louis , 

For salary of the State Librarian , 

For salary of the Assistant State Librarian , 

For salary of the Marshal of the St. Louis Court of Appeals. 
For salary of the janitor of the St. Louis Court of Appeals. . 



$950 

300 
600 

10 

4 

46 

33 

21 

136 

4 

4 

4 



2 

6 



000 00 

OGOOO 
000 00 

000 00 
000 00 

000 GO 
000 00 
000 00 
000 00 
000 00 
000 00 
000 00 

000 00 

000 00 
000 00 
000 00 
760 00 
800 00 
600 00 
000 00 
200 00 



26 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



ESTIMATES . — Continued . 



Appropriations. 



STATB DBPARTMBNT. 

For salary of the Secretary of State 

For salaries of clerks in the office of Secretary of State 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 

For salary of the State Treasurer 

For salary of the clerks in the office of State Treasurer, 

For salary of the State Auditor — 

For salaries of clerks in the office of State Auditor 



Amount. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. 

For salary of the Superintendent of Public Schools, 



For salary of the clerk in the office of Superintendent of Fublic 
Schools 

LAND DEPARTMENT. 

For salary of the Register of Lands 

For salaries of clerks in the office of Register of Lands 

RAILROAD DEPARTMENT. 

Foi salaries of three Railroad Commissioners 

For salary of the secretary of the Board of Railroad Commissioners . . 

MILITIA DEPARTMENT. 

For salary of Adjutant-General 

For salary of clerk in the office of Adjutant-General 



PENAL DEPARTMENT. 



For pay of officers, guards and employes of the Missouri Penitentiary, 
completion of walls and gruding, erection of two shop buildings 
and a house for the warden, extension of the female prison, pur- 
chase of a plant for electric light and ordinary repairs 



For library Missouri Penitentiary. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

For salary of the Commissioner of the Permanent Seat oi Govern- 
ment 

ELEEMOSYNARY AND EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS— LUNATIC ASYLUM NO. 1, 

AT FULTON. 

For support of Lunatic Asylum No. 1, at Fulton 



6,000 OO 
17,000 00 

6,000 oa 

7,000 00 

6,000 00 

16,000 00 

6,000 00 
3,000 00 

6,000 00 
6,000 00 

18,000 00 
3,000 00 

4,000 00 
3>000 00 



250,000 OO 
600 00 



700 00 



70,000 00 



auditor's report. 



27 



ESTIMATES.— CoxTiNUKD. 



Appropriations. 
For salaries of superintendeDt and officers 

LUNATIC ASYLUM KO. 2, AT ST. JOSEPH. 

For support of Lunatic Asylntu No. 2, at St. Joseph 

For salaries of superintendent and officers 

ST. LOUIS INSANE ASYLUM. 

For support of the indigent Insane in the at. Lonls Insane Asylum . . 

MISSOURI INSTITUTION FOR THE EDUCATION OF THK DEAF AND DUMB. 

For support and education of the deaf and dumb 

For salaries of superintendent, officers and teachers 

MISSOURI SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND. 

For support and education of the blind 

For salaries of superintendent, officers and emplojes 

UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI. 

For maintenance of the University at Columbia 

For maintenance of the School of Mines and Metallurgy 

NORMAL SCHOOLS. 

For support of the First District Normal School at Elrksyille 

For support of the Second District Normal School at Warrensburg. . 
For support of the Third District.Normal School at Cape Girardeau . . 
For support of Lincoln Institute at Jefferson City 

CONTINGENT KXPKNSBH. 

For contingent expeiises of the Governor's office 

For contingent expenses of the Secretary of State 

For contingent expenses of the State Treasurer 

For contingent expenses of the State Auditor 

For contingent expenses of the Superintendent of Public Schools 

For contingent expenses of the Register of Lands 

For contingent expenses of the Attorney-General 

For contingent expenses of the Railroad Commissioners 

For contingent expenses of the Adjutant-General 



Amount. 
19,200 00> 

70,000 00 
2a»200 00 

50,000 CO 

70,000 OO- 
24,600 00 

30,000 00 
19,000 00 

65,300 00 
16,000 00 

20,000 00' 
20,000 00 
20,000 00' 
18,000 OO- 

2,000 00 
1,500 00 
1,250 00 
1,600 00 
1,000 00- 
800 00 
1,000 00 
1,600 00 
1,200 00- 



28 



auditor's rkport. 



ESTIMATES. —Continued. 



Appropriations. 



For contingent expenses of the Supreme Court, including pay oT 
marshal. Janitor, night-watchman, insurance of library, gas, fuel, 
postage and expressage 



For the General Contingent Fund, including pay of Janitors for care 
ol capltol building and grounds, fuel, gas, and pay of night- 
watchman 

For travelling expenses of the Superintendent of Public Schools — 

For the distribution of blanks and laws to school ofilcera 

For repairs anc*. improvement of the Register of Land's office, includ- 
ing cost of file holders and shelving 

For contingent expenses Kansas City Court of Appeals 

For contingent expenses St. Louis Court of Appeals, including rent. . 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 



Amount. 



For ordinary repairs of the State Capitol 

For ordinary repairs of the State Armory 

For ordinary repairs of the Supreme Court building 

For improving the grounds of the Governor's mansion 

For improving the grounds of the State Capitol 

For keeping in good condition and repair the State cemetery 



For current expenses of the Governor's mansion, including pay of 
Janitors, servants, fuel, gas, household provisions, keeping the 
mansion in repair, and purchasing necessary furniture therefor. . 



PUBLIC PRINTING. 



For printing reports and documents ordered by the General Assem- 
bly, including repprts of the Boards of Agriculture, Horticulture, 
Railroad Commissioners, Curators of the University, and (bureau 
of Labor Statistics .• 



For printing for the Executive Departments. 
. IFor printing the laws and Journals , 



For publishing decisions of the Supreme Court, including salary of 
official reporter 



For publishing decisions St. Louis and Kansas City Courts of Appeal 

For paper for State printing 

For stationery for State departments 

For the distribution of laws and Journals 

For the apprehension of criminals and suppression of outlawry 



10,500 00 



6,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


675 00 


10,025 00 


4,800 00 


2,000 00 


100 00 


300 00 


500 00 


1,000 00 


100 OO 



10,000 00 



15,000 00 

10,000 00 

7,000 00 

20,000 00 
16,000 00 
20,000 OO 
6,000 00 
3,000 00 
16,000 00 



auditor's beport. 



29- 



ESTIMATES . —CoNTmuKD . 



Appropriations. 



For the purohHse of books ordered by judges of the Supreme Court 
for the State library 

For support and maintenance of the Fish Commission 

For salary of the Secretary of the Board of Fish Commissioners. . . . 

For expenses of the State Board of Agriculture, other than printing 

For salaries of the Secretary and Treasurer of the Board of Agricul- 
ture 



For expenses of the State Horticultural Society other than printing. 
For expenses of the State Bo'ard of Health 



For salaries of the Labor Commissioner and his clerk and expenses 
of the Bureau of Labor Statistics other than printing 



For pay of pensioner. 



For keeping scrap book bond register required to be kept by section 
7632, H. S., and purchase of scrap books 

For expenses incident to locating swamp and overflowed lands, in- 
cluding pay of swamp land agent, traveling expenses and other 
costs 'pertaining to the taking of proof and location of swamp 
land indemnity certificates 



Amount. 


3,000 00 


9,000 00 


1,000 00 


6,000 00 


1,280 00. 


2,500 00 


6,000 00 


10,000 00- 


200 00 



For the payment of wolf scalp certificates 

For pay of the General Assembly 

For contingent expenses of the General Assembly 
Total 



760 00 



4,500 00 

3,000 OO 

85,000 00 

60,000 00 



$3,285,830 g0« 



so 



auditor's Report. 



ESTIMATES OP APPROPRIATIONS NECESSARY TO BE MADE FROM 

TRUST FUNDS. 



IXSURANCB DEPARTMENT FUND. 

For salaries of Superintendent and deputy 

■For rent and incidental expenses, including clerk hire, printing, 
postage, etc 

SWAMP LAND INDEMNITY FUND. 

(For the payment to counties of the swamp land indemnity that may 
be received from the United States 

SXBCUTORS' AND ADMINISrSATOBS' FUND. 

^or the payment to legatees and distributees of the shares of estates 
belonging to them, which have been or may be paid into the 
State Treasury 

ROAD AND CANAL FUND. 

iFor payment to the several counties of this State such sum oi>sums 
of money as have been or mav be received from the United 
States on account of the sales of public land lying within the 
State of Missouri 

EARNINGS OF THE MISSOURI FENFrENTIARY . 

(For current expenses of the penitentiary to be paid from the earn- 
ings of the same 



$12,000 oO 
24,600 00 



30,000 00 



^ 



20,000 00 



16,000 00 



350,000 00 



AUDITOR S RKPORT. 



31 



DEFICIENCY APPROPRIATIONS. 



It will be necessary to appropriate about the sum of $148,971.48 for 
deficiencies in appropriations made for 1885 and 1886, and for expenses 
accrued since the adjournment of the last General Assembly which 
were not provided for. These deficiencies as reported to this office are 
as follows : 



COSTS IN CRIMINAL CASKS. 

For pay of officers, witnesses, jurors, etc., as reported by clerks of 
criminal courts 

FOBLISmNG DBCISIONS SUPREME COURT. 

Forpay of E. W. Stephens, publisher 

PUBLISHING DECISIONS OF THE COURTS OF APPEALS 

For pay of E. W. Stephens, publisher 

For pay of F. G. Farr, Clerk Kansas City Court of Appeals 

CONTINGENT EXPENSES 8UPBSMB COURT. 

For pay of S. C. Noland and others 

CONTIXGSNT EXPENSES ST. LOUIS COURT OF APPEALS. 

For pay of Buxton A Skinner Stationery Co. and others 

PUBUSHINO CONSITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS. 

For pay of 117 newspaper publishers 

PAPER FOR STATE PRINTING. 

For pay of Jas. E. McHenry, State stationer, (accounts assigned to 
First National Bank, Jefferson City 

For pay of Jas. E. McHenry, State stationer, (accounts assigned to 
J. S. Fleming) 

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

For expenses in 1885 and 1886 

For expenses in 1884 

REPAIRS OF STATE CAPITOL. 

For pay of F. H. Binder, architect and builder 

GENERAL CONTINGENT FUND. 

For pay of Jefferson City Gas Light Company and others 

PRINTING FOR EXECOTIVE DEPARTMENTS. 

For pay of the Tribune Printing Company 

pRnrriNG reports and documents ordered bt the general assembly. 

For pay of the Tribune Printing Company 

Total 



•121,000 00 



977 40 



1,860 60 
116 01 



1,387 24 



1,627 08 



4,096 00 



6,331 20 
1,373 40 



3,819 44 
2,776 72 



296 20 



1,016 96 



439 63 



1,866 71 



$148,971 48 



32 auditor's report. 



EXTRAORDINARY APPROPRIATIONS. 

Additional appropriations not embraced in the foregoing estimates 
will be asked for Asylum No. 1 at Fulton, Asylum No. 2 at St. Joseph, 
Asylum No. 3 at Nevada, the Missouri Institution for the Education of 
the Deaf and Dumb at Fulton, and the University at Columbia ; also 
by Hon. J. L. Smith for legal services in the circuit courts of Cole and 
Cooper counties and in the Supreme court in case of State of Missouri 
ex rel. State Journal Company vs. Michael K. McGrath et al., ex 
officio Commissioners of the Public Printing of the State of Missouri, 
and by A. M. Hough, Esq., attorney in case of State ex rel. John R. 
Walker vs. John Walker, State Auditor. 

Part second of this report contains a connectec^ history of the Staters 
indebtedness from it^ admission into the Union to December 31, 1886 ;. 
a history of the School and Seminary. Funds, andoi the location and 
cost of all State institutions ; abstracts of assessments ind of tax-books, 
amount of revenue derived from merchants and manufacturers, dram- 
shop-keepers, and other information. Much of this information was 
contained in my former report, but I have deemed it of sufficient im- 
portance to reproduce it in this report. 

Further information regarding the appropriaMons from the general 
revenue fund and the receipts and disbursements from other funds 
will be found in the succeeding pages. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN WALKER, 

State Auditor.. 



» 



RECEIPTS. 



TABLES SHOWING THE RECEIPTS INTO THE STATE TREASURY FROM 
ALL SOURCES DURING THE TWO FISCAL YEARS 
ENDING DECEMBER 31 , 1886. 



». P.— 3. 



auditor's report. 



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44 



auditor's report. 



EECEIPTS INTO SWAMP LAND INDEMNITY FUND 



(Section 6174, page 1217, Revised Statutes, 1879.) 



January, 1885. . 



February, 1885. 
March, 1885.... 

June, 1885 

July, 1885 

September, 1885 
December, 1885. 
March, 1886.... 

April, 1886 

May, 1886 

August, 1886. . . 
December, 1886. 



Received from Robert McCulloch, Register 

of Lands, for Mercer county 

Same, for Grundy county 

Same, for Nodaway county 

Same, for Cass county 

Same, for Morgan county 

Same, for Charlton county 

Same, for Buchanan county 

Same, for Harrison county 

Same, for Johnson county 

Same, for Camden county 

Same, for Gentry county 

Same, for McDonald county 

Same, for Newton county 

Same, for Randolph county 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886 



Receipts in! Receipts in 



1^. 



$4,160 14 
4,474 69 
621 73 
5,983 22 
687 05 
947 63 
730 97 
250 00 



$17,855 43 



1886. 



$2,208 67 

2,637 76 

5,776 47 

1,447 78 

231 38 

130 00 



$12,432J)5 
$30,287 48 



RECEIPTS INTO STATE SCHOOL FUND 



(Section 7095, p. 1397, R. S., 1879; p. 173, Laws of 1881.) 




Receipts from Notaries appointed In St. Louis city 

Totals $2,125 00 

Totals for 1885 and 1886 



1886 



$268 65 



$268 65 



$2,393 65 



RECEIPTS INTO INSURANCE DEPARTMENT FUND 



(Section 5927, p. 1153, R. S., 1879.) 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886. 



1885. 



Received of John F. Williams, superintendent $20,839 71 

Received of Alfred Carr, superintendent ' 2,500 00 



$23,339 71 



18S6. 



$15,000 00 
$15,000 Oo 



$38,339 71 



RECBIPTS. 



46 



llECEIPTS INTO EXECUTORS' AND ADMINISTRATORS' FUND. 
(Section 264, page 40, Revised Statutes, 1879.) 



February, 1885. 



March, 1885... 
April, 1885.... 
May, 1885 



Jane, 1885. 



July, 1885. 



August, 1885. .. 
September, 1885 

November, 1885. 
December, 1886 



January, 1885. . Received of R. J. Kennedy, exr. estate of Abron Ken- 

I ncdy , dec'd 

TV. J. Bobb, admr. estate of Jacob Dieter- 
man, dec'd 

M. D. Lewis,>dmr. estate of.D. E. Reese, 

dec'd 

Brokus & Cow den, admr. estate of R. C,. 

Cowden, dec'd ', 

A. C. Bouldin, admr. estate of Geo Boul- 

din, dec'd 

Jacob Persinger, admr. estate of Eliza Per- 

singer, dec'd 

F. K. Ryan, admr. estate of Edward Welch, 

dec'd 

H. S. Hall, admr. estate of Silas M. Frazee, 

dec'd 

Same, admr. estate of Sarah A. Connor, 

dec^d 

Jas. P. Haynes, admr. estate of Jas. Mur- 
phy, dec'd 

M. D. Lewis, admr. estate of Mary Malo- 

ney, dec'd 

Same, admr. estate of Elizabeth O'Meara, 

dec'd 

Same, admr. estate of Patrick Barnable, 

dec'd 

Same, admr. estate of John O'Callahan, 

dec'd 

Louis Wagner, admr.;^estate of Jacob F. 

Wagner, dec'd 

T. A. Stoddard, admr. estate of John Pugh, 

dec'd 



Viet Eppstein, admr. estate of Jas. Bruce, 

F. Diekroeger, admr. estate of John Dam- 
hoff, dec'd 

A. A. Mahan, admr. estate of Geo, Maus, 
dec'd 

A. J. Copenhaver, admr. estate Jacob Co- 
penhaver. dec'd 

F. M. D. McLure, admr. estate of John 
Lyons, dec'd 

H. S. Hall, admr. estate of James Morris, 
dec'd 

Jas. Clune, admr. estate of John Ormond, 
dec'd 

Harvey Bunce, admr. estate of Henry El- 
liott, dec'd 

JohnB. Seeley, admr. estate of Theresa 
Hurlburt, dec'd 

M. D. Lewis, admr. estate of Lola Mason, 
dec'd ii 

W. W. Wagner, admr. estate of Henrietta 
Zeb, dec'd 

M. D. Lewis, admr. estate of Thomas B.| 
Kelley, dec'd 

Asa Kirby^ admr. estate of Hall, Noland & 
Co., dec'd 

M. Chapman, admr. estate of H. G. Gra- 
ham, dec'd 

Henry Braim, admr. estate of Marie Laws, 
dec'd 



$230 00 

88 28 

45 93 

106 90 

160 09 

1 00 

1,715 05 

96 22 

32 62 
103 17 

30 10 

15 84 
25 20 

3,638 16 

10 00 

152 02 

8 65 

346 53 

33 00 
621^30 
19065 

76 68 

627 39 

102 00 

7 25 

19 60 

7 10 

345 25 

16 15 
462 13 

55 68 



46 



AUDITORS HEPORT. 



RECEIPTS INTO EXECUTORS' AND ADMINISTRATORS' FUND— Continukd 



Janaaxy, 1886. . 



February, 1886 



April, 1886 



May, 1886 

June, 1886 

July, 1888 

August, 1886... 
September, 1886 



October, 1886.. 



November, 1886 



December, 1886 



Received of M. D. Lewis, admr. estate of John H. Mc- 
Alpine, dec'd 

W. E. Alexander, admr. estate of Mary J. 
Couran, dec'd 

Uz. McGuire, admr. estate of btephen H. 
Ptielan, dec'd 

Irwin Gordon, admr . estate of Joshua Mad- 
ison, dec'd 

^Vm. Kindrick, admr. estate of John Mar- 
tin, dec'd 

Jas. Martin, admr. estate of Dennis Toner, 
dec'd .* 

W. C. Wells, admr. estate of Geo. Bouzer, 
dec'd 

Jas. Curd, admr. estate of Jane E. Sand- 
ridge, dec'd 

M. Chapman, admr. estate of Jas. S Light- 
ner, dec'd 

W. P. Amos. admr. estate of Eliza T. 
Thompson, aec'd 

M. D. Lewis, admr. estate of Henry O. 
W eber, dec'd 

S. W. ^Crocker, admr. estate of Catherine 
A . Carter, dec'd 

A.A.Mahan, admr. estate of Otto Schmidt, 
dec'd 

Jos. J. Williams, admr. estate of Abigail 
Wilkinson, dec'd 

L. M. Porta, admr. estate of John Cata- 
ners. dec'd 

J. F. Halbrook, admr. estate of M. Bald- 
ridge, dec'd 

M. D. Lewis, admr. estate of August 
Duenkel, dec'd 

Same, admr. estate of male floater, un- 
known, white, dec'd 

Mary S. Craighead, admr. estate of Jas. E. 
Moore, dec'd i 

Edward Slater, admr. estate of Mary E . I 
Slater, dec'd | 

J . D . Van Bibber, adm . .estate of Nathan 
Boone, dec'd j 

W. H. Harmon, admr. estate of John R.j 
Franklin, dec'd I 

H. E. Liggett, admr. estate of Enoch Lig-. 
gett, dec'd i 

H. T. Alkire, adm. estate of .Catherine; 
McCready, dec'd ' i 

M. Jordan, admr. estate of Carl Grone- 
meyer, dec'd 

R. A. Edmundson, admr. estate of Irwin 
C . Brown. dec*d 

Jas. Malone, admr. estate of Z. German, 
dec'd 

W. R. Baker, admr. estate of Henry 
Slaughter, dec'd 

N. Ford, admr. estate of David Walters, 
dec'd 



$640 30 

89 48 

73 65 

3 OU 

111 30 

1 00 

274 30 

45 00 

570 19 

68 68 

646 72 

10 00 

36 59 
157 58 
676 78 

40 00 
148 35 

37 40 
12 22 
23 05 

143 93 
22 80 
27 60 

107 25 
84 25 
52 25 
20 00 

515 87 

11 50 



Total for 1885 and 1886 $13,921 69 



• « 



RECEIPTS. 



47 



EAKNINGS MISSOURI PENITENTIARY. 



Received of J . R. Willis, Warden 

D. W. Marmaduke, Warden 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886. 



1885. 



1886. 



$9,387 76' 
162,883 46 $184,656 07 



$172,271 21 



$184,656 07 
$356,927 28 



MILITIA FUND. 



Received J. C. Jamison, Adjutant-General 

Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886 




1886. 



$8 00 



$8 00 



$126 00 



ROAD AND CANAL FUND. 



Received ftrom Secretary U. S Treasury under act of i 
March 6, 1820, and February 28, 1859 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886. 



1885. 



$1,709 81 



$1,709 81 



1888. 



$6,638 36 



$6,638 36 



$8,348 17 



48 



auditor's report. 



RECEIPTS FROM ALL SOURCES. 



RECAPITULATION. 



Funds. 



Receipts into State^revenue fund 

State interest fund 

Swamp land indemnity fund 

State school fund 

Insurance department fjnd 

Executors' and administrators' fund, 

Earnings Missouri Penitentiary 

Militia fund 



Road and canal fund 

Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886 



Total receipts 
in 1885. 



Total receipts 

in 1886. 



$1,837,225 87 $1,648,439 09 
1,260,204 85! 1,553,568 20 



17,855 43 


12,432 05 


2,125 00 


268 65 


23,339 71 


15,000 00 


9.369 75 


4,551 94 


172,271 21 


184,656 07 


118 00 


8 00 



1,709 81 



$3,324,219 63 



6,638 36 



$3,425,562 36 
f 6,749,781 99 



^ 



f 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

THE FOLLOWING TABLES SHOW THE AMOUNT OP WARRANTS ISSUED 
ON THE VARIOUS FUNDS DURING THE TWO FISCAL YEARS, 
COMMENCING JANUARY 1, 1885, AND ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1886. 



F- P. 4- 



AUDITOR S RKPORT. 



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112 



auditor's KKPOBT 



APPREHENSION OF CRFMINALS AND SUPPRESSION OF OUTLAWRY. 



(Section 9, page 7, Laws 18S5.) 



January 1, 1885, balance this date. 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 . . . 

Total 

Balance canceled f 

Total 



S2,6ai 95 
10,000 00 



$12,684 95 
2,340 20 



$10,338 75 



Names of persons to whom Names of persons appre- 
warrants were Issaed. bended. 



Appling 'David Wetherbee 

L. BY'- ^' ' "" 



J. R. 

Jas. L. filair, Vice-pres . . . ' W . H. L. Maxwell 

J. W. Byrd !Pomp. Chester 

Jno. B. Browning Chas. Williams 

Jno. C. Bailey !R. E. Vermillion 

Same I Allen and Miranda Jones , 

R. T. Brown John Jenkerson 



Thos. Allen... 
Jno. B. Jones, 



George Bryant 

J. S. Burns 

Same >A. B. Reeser 

R. L. Bennett |A. J. Poe 

Jas. Burgee E. Hettenhauser . , 

W. W. Olevenger Edward Anderson. 

Same jSamuel Miller. 

Same ! Harvey Tarwater, 

Same Isaac i oakum 

Mat. Critchlow Cornelius Lamb. . . 

John fl. Carey !R. W. Mitchell.... 

C. R. Carter IF P. Prultt 

N. M. Cobb 'John Jones 

Geo. Cloos IGeo. W. Clark.... 

A. H.Curtis 'WoodJarrett 

I. N. Daugherty G. R. Maloney 

Ed. C. Davis R. P. Webster 

Jas. Deagan lO. S. Mills 

Same iThos. Bond 

I. F. Donaldson Hillory Smith 

C. T. Davis 

John DeLong 

M. Fortin 

John Fielder 

M. S. Gillidet 



T. G. fluddleston 

W. F. Drew alias Slaven 

M.J. Kennedy et al 

Jas. Finlev 

Wm. M. Fox 



D. O. Guinn Jack Daffln 



Bernard Harris 
W. P. Martin .. 



B. B. Gaither 

S. J. George 

W. W, Hill Chas. Williams et al 

Geo. W. Herbert Geo. Divers 

R, W. Hickman OttoT. Engwer 

Henry Hurtgen Moss Bros, and Marsden 

W. F. Hanks tWm. Floyd 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885, 



$1,500 00 

69 40 

82 00 

7 20 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$120 26 



132 16 

90 90 

127 75 



85 15 



51 15 
36 80 
49 25! 



76 10 
138 75 



47 10 
141 25 
56 S!)\ 
45 15 
35 00 



■28 30 
92 70 

56 751 
15 00: 
51 65 



96 50 

88 95 
81 95 

54 20 



94 05 

23 75 

19 45 

167 22 



17 50 
45 80 



43 71 
75 30 
18 35 
98 So 
113 20 
112 80 



DIBBUBSBMENTS. 



113 



APPREHBK8ION OF CRIMINALS— Continukd. 



Name of persons to whom 
warrants were issued. 



Name of persons appre- | Warrants 



bended . 



J. C. Jamison, AdJ't-GenU. Suppression of outlawry 

W. R. Jackson Elijah James 

Isaac E. Jackson Chas. Seyerance 

J. B. Johnson T . B . Lindley 

Same Rob't and Wm. Surridge 

0. Kochtitzky i Suppression of outlawry 

A.Kissell Elijah Sublett 

Thos. H. Lord H. H. Quick 

Thos. Murphy Jas. Wlngfleld 

£. D. Meier, Col. Ist Reg., 

N. G. M Suppression of outlawry 

Y. E. McClendon W. N. 

W. A. Martin 

Same 

John H.Morgan.. 

John Moran 

J.C.Miller 

H. A. Newman. .. 
John F. N orris . . . 

E. S.Pike 

Same 

Same |H. B. Moran 

Same iGeo . Rush . . . 

W.J.PhUips. 

Same 

K.W.Pack.. 
A.F.Pierce. 
Vg]eotine Prewett 



Buroh 
Samuel Showon . 

John King 

Samuel Ingersoll 
Dent McCormack 

Henry Hellar 

Alfred Sheldon . . 
Cliff. C. Jones .. 

G. R.Scott 

Kirk Statts 



T. W. Park and J. T, Clarke 

A. J. Reyburn 

L. Bammons 

J.Thad.Ray 

Jas. F. Reed . 



Wm. McCormack 

E. W. Ball 

John F.Miller... 
Greo. E. Banner.. 
Fred 31 unger 



Suppression of outlawry 

Jas. Wingfleld 

R. D. Williamson 

W. A. Hansford 

Frank Pittman 

John Walker 

Frank Cunningham 



•^ W^. Ragsdale . . . 

W. L. Richardson 

Jts.F. Reed I Wm. Benton 

J. C- Seaburne Dickey, 

, Job. Street T. T. Center 

/ G.T.Smith G. T. Fist.... 

iLJ.Smith 

LeBlie Smith 

Same 

J.CSnell 

Same 

Ju. Seabaugh 

8.B Stafford 

Tribune Printing Co 

B.F. Turner 

W.T.Turner 

Honry Turner 

Same. 



Jas. Adams 

Thos. Welch 

Chas. Bridges 

Jas. Bond 

Samuel Clark 

W. A. Salisbury 

S.B. Falkner 

Advertising rewards, etc . . . . 

Geo. W. Moss 

Henry ThornhiU 

Jas. Rhodes 

A. D. Hoftman 

F. M. Coleman 

Philip Levy 



issued in 
1885. 



$57 80 

57 95 

141 25 



J D. Taylor 

Jta. Traoey 

W.J. Tucker ! Marco P. Saunders 

Thos. Tarpcy .Chas. Wingard . . . . 

Jas. R. Timberlake .W. Shafer 

N. H. Vincent Ij. S. Pervier 



93 35 
107 00 



99 25 

1,081 04 

64 50 

51 50 

100 75 

60 90 



100 00 



101 15 
58 10 
51 75 



93 75 
153 95 



289 70 
83 65 
80 65 
11 60 

102 60 



100 00 
73 00 
24 50 
39 50 
62 00 
57 00 
92 00 



123 65 
87 63 
30 00 
43 10 



14 00 

38 35 

129 65 

105 85l 

23 45| 
117 46 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$46 25 



168 50 
26 50 



92 90 



40 63 
72 40 

187 75 



66 75 

27 95 

106 90 



6 75 
70 00 



43 70 
70 40 



41 75 

50 00 
79 50 



67 41 
133 45 



F P— 8 



114 



auditor's rfport. 



APPREHBNSION OF CRIMINALS— Continued. 



Name of persons to whom 
warrants were issued. 


Name of persons appre- 
hended. 


Warrants 
issued in 

1885 . 

«43 85 

150 00 

99 05 


Warrants 
issued in 

1886. 


W H . Vancleve 


Daniel Abner 




W. L. Whitehead 


Wesley Pritchett 




O. V. Wilson 


Jos . L . Gordon 




W. A. Watson 


J. L. Able 


$95 33 


John C . Waymeyer 


Hansen Ballard 




54 05 








Totals 1 


87,511 58 


$2,820 71 








Total for 1885 and 1886 . . . 




$10,332 29 











DISBURSEMENTS. 



115 



PAY OF WOLF SCALPS. 



(Section 18, page 9, Laws 1885, 



Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $4,000 00 



Counties. iPersons to whom warrants were issued 



Adair.... 
Andrew.. 
Atchison. 



Barry 

Barton 

Bates 

Benton 

Bollinger %. 

Butler 



Caldwell. 
Callaway 
Camden . , 



S. S. McLaughlin, county clerk, 

W. L. Klrtley, county clerk 

D . A. Colvin, collector 

T . H . Oliver, collector , 



E . A. Frost, collector 

C. H. Brown & Co 

R. J. Starke, coanty clerk.. 
Jas. K. Jones, county clerk 
J. M. Snider, county clerk., 
C. Waddy, collector 



Cai>e Girardeau.. 
Carroll 



W. H. B. Carter, county clerk. . 

Jas. D. Henderson, county clerk 

H. George, collector 

G. B. Shubert, collector 

VV. R. Roche, county clerk 

Henry Schaefer , collector 

B. w . Bowdry, county clerk 

Carter Jas . M . McGhee, county clerk 

Cass S. E. Brown , collector 

Chariton 

Christian 



Clay 

Crawford 



Dallas . . 
Daviess . 

DeKalb . 

Dent 

Douglas. 



£. B. Kellogg, collector. 

B. A. Stone, collector 

Jno. 0. Rogers, county clerk, 
L. W. Burris, county clerk., 
G. W. Sanders, collector 



J. T. Pendleton, county clerk 

J. W. Miller, county clerk 

Jesse Read 

C. E. Moss, county clerk 

E. T. Butler, county clerk 

S. G. Haws, county clerk 

L. O. Hailey, county clerk 

B. Malonee, collector 



Fraoklin Robt. Hoffman, collector. 

W. M. Terry, collector... 



Gentry. , 
Grundy. 



Harrison. 
Hickory. . 



J. T. Liggett, collector 

R. A. Collier, county clerk 



Holt 



S. P. King, collector 

O. C. Macy, collector 

Wm. McCracken, collector 

J . S . Hartman , collector 

P. P. Weltv, collector 

J . L . Van W"ormer , county clerk 



Iron. 



G. B. Nail, county clerk. 
Jacob Schrum 



Warrants Warrants 

issued in i issued in 

1885. ' 1886. 



$22 50 

60 00 

7 50 

37 50, 

I 
6 00 



54 00 



4 50 
18 00, 



10 50 
15 00 



1 50 
4 50 

28 50 
112 501 

21 75' 



1 50 
31 50 



4 
1 
1 

7 

7 



50 
50 
50 

5o; 

50 



9 00 



9 00 



66 00 
3 00 

15 00 
60 00 

15 00 
3 00 

99 00 

16 50 

6 00 
1 50 



$21 00 
39 00 

102 00 

3 00 

1 50 

21 00 

10 50 

3 00 

13 50 
9 00 

3 00 
15 00 



12 00 
156 00 

10 50 
19 50 



1 50 
9 00 

9 00 
4 50 

1 50 
16 50 



1 50 
3 00 

60 00 

30 00 

3 00 



116 



auditor's report. 



PAY OF WOLF SCALPS Continubd. 



Counties . IPersons to whom warrants were issued . 



Jackson. 
Johnson 



Laclede . . 
Lafayette 

Lawrence 



R. G. Wilson, jr., collector. 

Wm . Shannon 

S. P. Williams, collector 

O. W. Lemmon, collector... 



W. A. Johnson, county clerk . . 

G. M. Montjoy, collector 

J. W. Harrison, collector 

W . S . Ryan, collector 

Linn Oeo . W . Adams, county clerk . , 

Liyingston !t. B. Brookshier, county clerk. 

Macon IP. Trammel, collector 

Madison N. B. Watts, county clerk 

Thos. O^Bannon, collector 

Maries tf. M. Anderson, collector 

T . A . Felker, collector 

Mercer J. D. Dykes, collector 

Mississippi Benj . Huff, collector 

Morgan Caleb Gunn, county clerk 

New Madrid i A. T. Neill, collector. 

Newton 

Nodaway 



Oregon. 
Ozark.. 



Phelps 



Platte . . 
Polk.. . . 

Pulaski 



Putnam 



Reynolds 

Ripley 



Saline . . . 
St. Clair. 
Scott .... 
Shannon . 



Stoddard 
Sullivan . 



Taney. 
Texas. 



Vernon 



B. P. Armstrong, collector. 
Jno. T. Daniel, collector... 



J. W. Stogsdill, collector 

G. R. Norman, collector 

M. G. Norman, county clerk 
W. R. Hawkins, collector... 



Wm . Fort , collector 

A. L. Stiff, collector '... 

Jno. T. Owen, collector 

J. W. Rains, county clerk... 

W. P. Skaggs, collector 

W. L. Bradford, county clerk 
A. J. Williams, county clerk 



H. C. Stevens, collector 

L. C . Dalton, collector 

J. K. Langford, county clerk, 

R. J. McMahan, county clerk 

A. S. Stewart, collector 

B. F. Allen, collector 

J . F. Norton, collector 

Joshua Sholar, county clerk . 

James A . J ad win 

James Orchard 

G. R. Kennamore 

W . C . Harty, collector 

S. C. Hutchison, collector. . . . 

T. A. Layton, county clerk . 
CM. Ross, county clerk 



A. O. Sterrett, collector, 
C. C. Williams 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



$99 00 

3 00 

1 60" 

33 00 

1 00 
13 50 



25 60 



39 m 

15 00 
4 50 
36 00 
28 50 
24 00 

12 00 

13 50 



1 50! 
72 



o6| 



39 001 
13 50 



9 GO 



900 
4 50 



6 00 
21 '66 



28 50 

7 50 

12 00 



19 50 

9 00 

27 00 

7 50 



12 00 

21 00 
12 00 

22 50 

1 50 
5 00 

30 00 
450 



Warrants 
Issued in 

1886. 



$51 00 



13 50 

4 00 

18 00 

16 00 

6 00 

1 50 

4 50 
13 60 



40 50 
3 00 
7 60 

10 50 



3 00 
13 50 

13 50 



1 50 

3 00 
6 00 



16 50 
18 00 

1 50 
10 60 

16 50 

10 50 
10 50 

1 50 



4 50 
3 75 

60 00 



DISBURSBHBNT8. 



117 



PAY OP WOLF SCALPS.—CoNTiNUED. 



Counties. 



Warrants 
Persons to whom warrants were issued, issued in 

1885. 



Washington 

Wayne 

Worth 

Wright 



L. B. Hiffginbotham, collector, 

John O. Long, collector 

J. F. Hatten, collector 

J. T. Tandy, collector 

W. L. MurreU, collector 

B. F. Hudson, collector 



$24 00 
36 00 
36 00 
52 50 
10 50 
24 00 



Warrants 
issued in 

1886. 



Totals , $1,689 75 

Total for 1885 and 1886 



$13 50 

55 50 

1 50 

$1,033 25 

$2,723 00 



r 



118 



AUDITORS^ REPORT. 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES— GOVERNOR. 



(Section 10, page 7, Laws 1885.) 



January 1, 1885 



Balance in former appropriation 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 . . 

Balance canceled 

Balance 



$64 53 
1,600 00 



1,664 53 
39 IS 



$1,625 35 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



John Crevelt, repairs 

Sam'l Engleton, notary seryice 

Addison Green, Janitor 

T> . Gundelfinger, repairs 

M.. F. Heinrichs, repairs 

J eff . Ci ty Prin tin g Co 

John S. Marmaduke, Governor, official trayeling expenses 

H. Monnig, stationery , 

Mo. Pao. Railroad Company, freight 

Missouri and Kansas Telepnone Company 

Wm . G. McCarty , postage 

Parker, Rltter & Co., type writer supplies 

Pacific Mutual Telegraph Company 

Pacific Express Company 

Wm. Roesen, repairs 

M. R. Sinks, sundries 

A. J. Shockley, hardware 

H . E. Schultz, dusters, etc 

H. A. Swift, ice 

J. Steininger, postage 

United Lines Telegraph Company 

John Upschulte, janitor 

Western Union Telegraph Company 

V. C. Yantls, carpet, etc. . . : 

Totals 



Warrants 
issued in 

1885. 



$21 
1 



00 

05; 



49 90 
3 00 

89 15; 
5 00 

10 33 

48 00 



1 00 
1 60 
880 
8 55 
1 751 
5 10 
1 45 
15 00 
153 76 



Total forlSSo and 1886 $1,625 35 




Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$1 00 
3 00 



42 00 
90 55 

1 15 
85 

1 60 
60 

1 60 
15 00 
33 78 

2 87 
275 00 
142 41 

1 40 



$612 71 



DI8BUR8BM£NT8. 



119 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES— SUPREME COURT. 



(Section 10, page 7 and section 1, page 11, Laws 1885.) 



Appropriated for 1885 and 1886. 
Deficiency appropriation 

Total 



$9,000 00 
46 00 

$9,046 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



J. B. Bruns, sandries 

A. M. Beckers Lumber Company 

Beck-Marshall Carpet Company, carpets, etc. 

EL BruDS, setting grates 

John Crevelt, repairs 

W. A. Dallmeycr, insurance 

N. DeWyl, glass 

Charles . F. Glenn, janitor 

D. Gundelfinger , repairing stoves, etc 

J. Guyot & Son, repairing clock 

A. Gast & Company, stationery 

William Huegel, janitor 

M. P. Heinricns, furniture 

Jesse W. Henry, brooms, brushes, etc 

Jefferson City Gas Company 

L. C . Lohman, hardware, etc 

John Miller, labor on roof 

William Meyer, hauling 

T. B. Mahan, woed and coal 

Mahan & Dircks, wood and coal 

Hugo Monnig, stationery * 

Missouri A Kansas Telephone Company 

William G . McCarty , postage etc 

S. C. Noland, marshal 

Parker, Uitter A Company, stationery 

Pacific Express Company 

John Price, painting 

William Roesen. repairs 

J. G . Riddler, sundries 

George B. Roberts, gas regulator 

J. Steininger, postage 

H. £. Schnltz, matting, etc 

A.J. Shockley, hardware 

H. A. Swift, ice 

Tribune Printing Company, dockets, etc 

T. M. Winston, marshal 4 

Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict, stationery 

Western Union Telegraph Company 



Totals. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



$6 70 
11 86 



6 10 

350 00 

1 50 

1.140 00 

' 20 65 



24 00 
23 00 
15 05 

522 70 

23 38 

10 00 

8 80 

476 55 



262 25 
48 00 



Totals for 1885 and 1886. 



756 00 
26 60 
3 55 
1 50 
7 95 
5 05 



262 16 
86 17 
21 30 
46 60 
709 65 
240 00 
92 00 



$5,207 87 



Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 



$4 72 

3 00 
2 50 



938 91 
9 60 

4 50 
78 85 

13 90 

6 70 

197 28 

10 80 

5 95 

228 05 
293 65 
31 00 
150 61 
8^ 00 

6 05 
2 05 

2 25 
10 05 
60 00 
90 10 

15 21 

16 60 
722 75 

4 60 
1 15 

$3,8 38 13 

$9,046 00 



120 



auditor's report. 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES— ST. LOUIS COURT OP APPEALS. 

(Section 10, page 7, Laws 1885). 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $3,500 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Joseph F. Baier, clerk 

Baxt(>n & Skinner Stationery Company 

Robert A. Campbell, comptroller, rent 

George Knapp& Company, adyertising docket 
Klein, Friton & Company, repairing clock 



Parker, Rltter & Company, type-writer supplies, 
Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict, stationery 



Totals , 

Totals for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 




87 50 
300 

17 40 
3 00 




Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$3,200 00 



83,200 00 



$3,499 65 



DISBUBSEMjSNTS. 



121 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES—KANSAS CITY COURT OF APPEALS. 

(Section 10, page 7, Laws 1886). 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $11,560 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued . 



John W. Booth, marshal 

P. H. Bierman, books, etc 

Brown Bros. , books, etc 

Banks & Bro., books 

H.J. Brunner , repairs 

Callahan & Company, books 

M. H. Dickinson, stationery 

O. W, Ditch, electric bells 

A. H . Everett, dockets 

P. C. Farr, clerk 

Charles Grimm, janitor 

Hall Bros. , rent 

£. D . Hornbrook, plnmbing 

W . C. Hardine, rubber cloth : . . . 

T. M. James & Son, chinaware, etc 

Kansas City Gas Light Company 

Bobert Keith Furnishing Company, carpets, etc 

Kansas City Bank Note Company, stationery 

North , Orrison A Company, furniture. 

John F. Philips, office sundries 

Parker, Bitter & Company, calegraph and supplies, 

Pacific Express Company 

J. W. Eaithel, janitor 

Bamsey , Millet & Hudson, books, etc 

W. H- Stevenson, books 

George M. Shelley, postage, etc 

E. w. Stephens, dockets 

F. H. Thomas A Company, books 

Tribune Printing Company, docket 

H . L. Thayer, book 

Wood Bros., ice and coal , 



Wightman-Hayden Printing Company. 
Winbush-Powell Printing Company. . . . 
West Publishing Company 



Totals , 

ToUl for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



$764 00 
48 50 
18 16 



1,200 00 
33 67 

7 50 



78 35 



976 66 
16 50 
75 
37 20 
41 25 
52 79 



502 25 
37 55 

86 00 



546 00 

240 50 

71 66 

16 00 



105 20 
129 00 



6 00 
48 00 
23 60 



$5,084 97 



Warrants 
issued in 
. 1886. 



$1,152 00 

92 54 

12 00 

1 15 



27 65 

120 00 
1,600 00 



7 00 

108 86 

2 60 

80 75 



118 60 

81 10 

582 00 

6 00 

100 40 

24 75 

9 39 

400 
33 20 



10 00 



$4, 172 88 
$9,267 86 



122 



auditor's report. 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES— STATE AUDITOR. 



(Section 10, page 7, Laws 1885.) 



Jan. 1, 1885. 



To balance in former appropriation 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 

Balance canceled , 

Balance 





$129 31 




1,600 00 








$1,729 31 
100 71 



$1,628 60 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



A Brandenberger, whitening, etc 

John Crevelt, repairs 

Samuel Engleton, notary serrices , 

A. Green, janitor 

D. GundelUnger, repairs 

Thos. Horrell, Janitor 

Jesse W. Henry, brooms, etc 

Haskell Engraving Co., rubber stamp. ... 

M. F. Heinrichs, awnings 

L. C. Lohman. hardware 

J. A. Linhardt, carpet sweeper , 

W . G. McCarty , postage, etc 

Mo. <& Kansas Telephone Co 

Mo. Pacific R. R. Co., freight 

Manchester & Beckby, repairs 

W. J. Noland, janitor 

Pacific Express Co , 

Pacific Mutual Telegraph Co 

Parker, Hitter & Co., stationery 

James Prince, blacking stoves , 

J. Steininger, postage , 

A. J. Shockley, hardware , 

H. A. Swift, ice 

T. E. Schultz, spittoons 

H. E. Schultz, water cooler, etc , 

Schlicht & IiMeld, letter file 

C . W . Thomas, packing boxes 

Tribune Printing Co . , binding 

U. S Express Co 

Western union Telegraph Co , 

J.N Wilson, book clamp 

P. Ward, hauling 

John Walker, official traveling expenses 



Totals. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



$ 25 
6 50 
3 00 

24 50 



197 56 
5 20 
2 00 



230 




15 00 

90 45 

70 



200 60 

5 80 

15 00 

3 75 

11 10 

113 00 

1 40 



Total for 1885 and 1886. 



45 42 

3 60 

50 

10 00 



$771 23 



Warrants 
issued in 

1886. 



$ 25 

2 50 
Q 00 

1 00 

248 00 

200 



40 10 

3 50 

3 50 

397 36 


2 25 


18 25 


50 

1 60 

28 47 


15 00 


6 50 


65 
16 00 

25 
23 45 



$818 13 



$1,589 36 



DISBURSJSMKNTB. 



123 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES— STATE TBEASUBER. 
(Section 10, p&ge 7, Laws 1885.) 



Jan. 1, 1885.. 



Balance in former appropriation 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 . . 



Balance canceled 



f 363 28 
1,325 00 



$1,688 28 
335 58 



Balance $1,352 70 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



A. Brandenberger, whitening, etc 

M. Chambers, repairs 

Clagae, Schlicht & Field, letter file 

Chicago & Alton R. B., flight 

♦•Dye's Connterfieit Detector " 

Samuel Engleton, notary services 

Addison Green, janitor 

Jesse W. Henry, brooms, etc 

M. F. Heinrichs, furniture 

Thos. Horrell, Janitor 

Jeff. City Gas Co 

Jeff. City Printing Co 

J. Kennard & Sons, carpet 

L. C. Lohman, hardware 

H . Monnig, stationery , 

Manchester & Beckby, repairs 

Mo. & Kansas Telephone Co 

W. G. MoCarty, postage 

W. J Noiand, Janitor 

John Price, painting, etc 

Pacific Express Co , 

Wm. Boesen, repairs 

F. Rommel, wall paper 

J. G. Riddler,o 11, etc 

J. M. Seibert, office expenses 

H. A. Swift, ice 

J. Steininffer, postage 

Sarffeant & Greenleaf. repairing time-lock. 

H. Sparks, P. O. scale 

H. K. Schaltz, sweeper, etc 

T. E. Schultz, sundries 

Tribune Printing Co 

Western Union Telegraph Co 



Totals. 



Total for 1885 and 1886. 



$ 75. 

113 00 
5 OOi 



3 OOj 
27 25! 

5 00 

82 25 

197 56 

1 86' 



146 60 

75 

4 00 

10 10' 

9 55! 



15 00, 
51 00! 



1 95 

101 00 

55 



15 OOi 

125 651 

10 00 




$992 16 



Warrants 

issued In 

1886. 



$ 65 



6 00 
6 00 



240 00 

1 50 

2 50 
75 

31 13 



60 
1 25 

35 

70 

15 00 

31 26 

1 00 

2 15 



19 70 



$360 54 



$1,352 70 



124 



AUDI join's KEPORT. 



CON^TIN^GENT EXPEISTSES— SECRETA.RY OF STATE. 



(Section 10, page 7, Laws 1886. 



Jan. 1, 1885.. By balance from former appropriation 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 

I Total 

L 



831 SS 
1,500 00 



SI, 531 SS 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



D. Frlemel, labor in office 

Gould Directory Co., "St. Louis Directory " 

D . Gundeltlnger, repairs 

Jefferson City Gas Co . , repairs 

C . KuUman, Jefferson City Directory , 

L. C. Lohman, step-ladder 

Wm. G. McCarty, postage 

Missouri & Kansas Telephone Co 

G. M. Maus, repairs 

Pacific Express Co 

Pacific Mutual Telegraph Co 

P. Ryan, Janitor 

Wm. Roesen, repairs 

J. Steininger, postage 

A.J. Shockley, repairs 

H. A. Swift, ice 

F. Schleer, repairs 



Tribune Printing Co 

Western Union Telegraph Co. 



Totals 



Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 


Warrants 
Issued in 

1886. 


$5 25 

5 30 

65 

4 60 


$5 30 



3 OU 
6 00 



9 55 
3 50 
1 15 



1^0 00 
1 75 

471 15 
12 45 
15 00 



58 4*? 



$777 77 



332 31 



2 05 
65 

ISO 00 

102 26 

15 00 

1 25 

10 00 

70 76 



-719 48 



$1,497 25 



N 



DISBURSBMBNTS. 



125 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES— ATTORNEY-GENERAL . 



Jan. 1, 1885. 



(Section 10, page 7, Laws 1885.) 

Balance in former appropriation 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 

Balanced canceled 

Balance 



$361 35 
750 00 

$1,111 35 
346 65 

$764 70 



Persons to whom warrants were Issned, 



B. G. Boone, Attorney-General, official traveling expenses 

Jos. Becker, janitor 

Jno. Brans, janitor 

H. H. Crittenden, copying briefs, etc 

J. Gnyot & Son, repairing clock 

Gilbert Book Co 

Wm. Hnegel, janitor 

L. C. Lohman, hardware ^ 

Edwin Moore, janitor 

W. G, McCarty , postage 

Jas. H. McEinney , clerk U. S. Supreme Court 

H. Monnig, stationery 

Pacific Mutual Telegraph Co 

F. Rommel, stationery 

Wm. Roesen, repairs 

J. Steininger, postage 

H. E . Schultz , oil cloth 

F. Sessinghaus, repairs 

W. H. Stevenson, Law Journal 

Tribune Printing Co., brieft 

A Uhlenburg, janitor 

Western Union Telegraph Co 



Totals.. 



Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



$20 00 



6 50 
1 2 



20 00 

2 90 

50 00 



1 25 



28 76 
3 60 
1 25 
7 00 



30 00 
6 50 



$179 01 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$40 00 
50 00 
70 00 
14 85 

5 00 

4 05 

81 76 
400 

6 35 
95 

1 50 
22 20 



7 00 
32 15 

17 43 



f 357 24 
$536 25 



J26 



auditor's report. 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES— SUPERINTENDENT PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



(Section 10, page 7, Laws 1885). 



Jan* 1, 1885. .Balance In former appropriation 

I Appropriated for 1885 and 1886.. . 

I Total 



$15 00 
1,000 00 



$1,015 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



T L Brown , janitor 

W. E. Coleman, office expenses. 
Jesse W. Henry, brooms, etc... 

W. G. Mc 3arty , postage , 

H. Monnig, stationery 

S. C. Noland, janitor 

W. J. Noland, janitor 

A. Opel & Co., repairs 

Paciflf* Express Co 

Geo. Porth, repairing clock 

Vfm. Roesen, repairs 

J . Steininger , postage , 

H . E, Schultz, oil cloth , 

Tribune Printing Co 

Western Union Telegraph Co.. 
Henry Wallan, rods 



Totals 



Total for 1885 and 1886, 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



9120 00 
16 00 



45 00 

15 00 

2 50 



209 10 



1 30 



$408 90 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$180 00 

14 30 

1 25 

130 06 

1 50 



95 
1 00 
1 75 
1 10 
1 15 
98 27 

3 00 



$434 33 



$843 23 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



127 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES— REGISTER OF LANDS. 



(Section 10, page 7, Laws 1885.) 



Jan. 1, 1885. 



Balance In former appropriation 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886. . . 

Total 

Balance canceled 



$164 32 
800 00 



$964 32 
40 62 



$923 80 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



J. H. Crane, farnltnre 

John F. Fltzpatrick, repairs 

Dan Gundemnger, repairs 

M. F Heinrichs, farnlture , 

Robert McCulioch, officiid traveling expenses 

W. G. McCarty. postage 

G. M. Mans, famishlngs 

Pacific Express Company . . . , 

John Price, paintiog 

P. Ryan, Janitor. . . . 

William Koesen, repairs 

J. Steininger,' postage , 

Simmons Hardware Company, fender, etc. . . . 

A. J. ^hockley, hardware 

H. E. Scbnltz, sundries 

M. R, Sinks, bucket, etc 

H. A. Sw^ift, ice 

Western Union Telegraph Company 

J. N. Wilson, book clamp 

L. Wolferman, oil cloth 



Totals. 



Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



$23 00, 



2 25 
37 00| 
10 60' 



2 65 

1 50 

180 00 

50 

24 87 

37 15 

1 50 



90 

15 00 

1 46 

3 50 

1 65 




Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$1 00 


2 50 


14 7C 


63 66 


25 50 


4 90 


27 25 


180 00 



19 08 



95 

15 00 
65 



$355 19 



$699 56 



128 



auditor's report. 



CONTINGENT BXPENSES-RAU^ROAD COMMISSIONERS. 



(Section 10, page 7, Laws 1885.) 



Jan. 1, 1886. . Balance this date, former appropriation. 

Appropriation for 1885 and 1886 



Total 



$31 92 
1,000 00 

$1,031 92 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



W. G. Downing, office expenses 

H. Ft. Gregg, office expenses 

Jefferson \My Printing Company 

W. G. McCarty, postage 

Hugo Monnig, stationery 

National Railway Publishing Company. 

Pacific Express Company 

R. L. Polk & Company, * * Gazeteer " 

Railway Age Publishing Company 

Railroad Gazette 

Railway Register 

Railway Review 

J. SteiniDger postage 

H. A. Swift, ice 

H. E. Shultz, sundries 

E. W. Stephens, circulars 

Tribune Printing Company , 

Edward Thompson, railroad cases. , 

John Upschulte, janitor 

Western Union Telegraph Company . . . . 



Totals. 



Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



$1 21 
18 67 



1 20 
4 00 



5 00 



245 18 

15 00 

65 

10 00 

2 00 
13 50 

131 50 

3 95 



$451 86 



Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 



$2 50 

279 41 

1 00 

4 00 

9 80 



4 
4 
4 
5 



00 
20 
00 
25 



16 04 

15 00 

2 50 



27 00 

161 00 

1 60 



$537 30 



$989 16 



DI8BUBSKMENTS. 



129 



CONTTXGEyT EXPENSES— ADJUTANT-GENERAL. 
(Section 10, page 8, Laws 1885.) 



Jan. 1, 1885. 



Balance in former appropriation 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 . . 

Total 

Balance canceled . 

Balance 



863 13 
800 00 

$863 13 
36 38 



$826 76 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Aftel & Company, sheep pelt 

A. Brand enberger, oil, etc 

John Brooks, labor 

William Bull, Inspector-General 

Joseph Becker, janitor. 

Chicago & Alton Railroad, freight 

Charles Dixon, cleaning guns 

Jesse W. Henry, sundries 

J. Q liowes, hauling 

K. L. Home, cleaning and packing guns 

J. C. Jaipison, Adjutant-General, trav. ex. official businees 

Jefferson City Gas Company 

L. C. Jx>hman, hardware 

Missouri Pad tic Kailway Company, freight 

H. Monnig, frame 

D. Merrltt, cleaning guns 

Martin May, firing salute 

W. G. McCarty, postage 

W. J. Noland, cleaning guns 

H. Neef, sundries 

Pacific Kxpress Company 

Pacific Mutual Telegraph Company 

>teamer D. R. Powell, freight 

H. Raithel, janitor 

Wm. Roesen, repairs 

W. K. Roache, janitor 

Jas. Richardson, cleaning guns 

J. Stampfli, repairs to furniture 

A J. Shockley, hardware 

J. S. Steininger, postage 

Tribane Printing Company 

United Lines Telegraph Company. 

L. Wolferman, ribbon, etc .' 

Western Union Telegraph Company 

Charles A. White, messenger 

Henry Young, labor 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886, 



S75 
6 36 



2 

3 



94 

501 

50 

6 16 

2 00 

50 25 



4 45 

54 33 

1 35 

7 25 

22 00 



5 75 



9 60 
1 59 



24 50 

3 50 

17-1 89 




75 



$461 25 



Warrants 


issued in 


1886. 


S75 


27 05 


27 35 


1 55 


5 50 


28 00 


57 50 


10 25 


2 25 


13 92 


1 50 


2 00 


16 12 


48 31 



1 70 
4 70 
9 35 
6 00 



45 00 
2 00 



15 14 

7 46 

22 10 

10 00 



$365 50 



S826 75 



F. P— 9 



130 



auditor's report. 



GENERAL CONTINGENT FUND. 



(Section 10, page 8, and section 1, page 11, Laws L^So.) 



Jan. 1, 1885 . 



Balance from former appropriation i $91 67 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1836 5,000 00 

Deficiency appropriation 50 60 

Total $5,142 27 

Balance canceled 7 50 



$5,134 76 



Persons to whom warrants were Issued. 



D. Austin & Co , lawn mowers 

\V m. Barton, hauling 

Thos. L. Brown, nlgntwatch Capitol. 

A. Beschoner, janitor Capitol 

A. M. Beclfers Lumber Co 

Chicago & Alton H. R., freight 

W. W. Davis, hauling 

W Q. Dallmeyer, repairs for gates . . . 

A. W. Ewing, janitor Capitol 

J. F. Fitzpacrlck, repairs 

D. Friemel, labor 

Win. Fisher, labor 

C. F. Glenn, janitor Library 

D. Gundeltinger, stoves, etc 

J. Q. Howes, hauling 

A. Hirsch, repairs 

M. F. Heinrichs, furniture for Library 

Jesse W. Henry, brooms, etc 

Jefferson City Gas Co 

\Vm. KJemert, labor , 

L. C. Lohman, hardware, etc 

H. Monnig, stationery 

Manchester & Beckby, repairs , 

T. B. Mahan, wood and coal 

Mahan <& Diercks, wood and coal 

Wni. G. McCarty, postage 

Jos. Melcher, labor 

Mo. Pac. R. R., freight 

S. 0. Noland, night watch Capitol . . . , 

O'Connor & Harder, stoves 

Pacific Express Co , 

J. G. Rlddler, sundries , 

A. J . Shockley, hardware, etc 

J. Stei ninger, postage 

H. E. Schultz, oilcloth, etc , 

Sylvester Coal Co., coal 

Geo. Schuetz, repairs , 

T. E. Schultz, tumblers 

Tribune Printing Co., binding, etc 

V. Zuber, clay pipe 



Totals 



Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants , Warrants 

issued in i issued in 

1885. 1886. 



*46 00! 

4 00 

450 00, 

326 451 



32 60 

15 00 

275 00 

1 75 

9 00 



320 00 

556 60i 

3 001 

21 50 



410 90 
4 50 
32 95 
3 20 
27 80 
18 80, 
96 OOl 



3 16 

50 00 

128 25 

9 90 



33 95 
24 00 

7 05 
507 00 

4 50 



12 00 




«550 00 

482 00 

1 65 

1 15 

6 30 



330 00 

1 75 

20 50 

29 00 

240 00 

4 15 



45 50 

5 20 

280 58 



1 75 



147 30 
17 00 
10 00 



1 40 

1 00 
90 

500 

50 

7 20 

6 00 



$2,202 &3 



J5,136 59 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



131 



CURRENT EXPENSES— GOVERNOR'S MANSION. 
(Section 11, page S, and section 1, page 11, Laws 1885.) 



Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $4,000 00 

Deficiency appropriation 811 45 



Total 



$4,811 45 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



Barstow Stove CJo 

Beckers & Brooks, lumber (deficiency 1884) 

A. Brandenber^er, sundries 

Ed. Craddock, janitor 

Chics^o & Alton R. R., freight and coal 

John F. Fitzpatrick, repairs 

Francis Gas Regulator 

Beuj. Hays, labor 

J. Q. Howes, hauling 

.Jeff. City Gas Co. (deficiency 1884) 

Same — 

L. C. Lohman, sundries 

John S. Marmaduke, Governor, pay of janitors, etc 

Mo. Pac. R. R., freight and coal 

Mo. & Kansas Teleghone Co 

W. G. McCarty, postage 

C. Mayer, repairs 

Bettie Mock, washing curtains, etc ,.,, 

H, Monnig, wire cord 

Manchester & Beckby, repairs 

Same (deficiency 1884) 

T. B. Mahan, coal and wood 



Same (deficiency 1884) 

X. O. Nelson, M'f 'g Co., piping, etc 

O'Connor & Harder, repairing fUrnace 

Pacific Express Co 

Geo. Porth, repairing clock 

Wm. Roesen, repairs 

Richardson Drug Co., Rlass « 

A. J. Shockley, hardware 

Same (deficiency 1884) 

Sylvester Coal Co 

H. £. Schultz, dusters, etc s 

Wleder Paint Co., glass 

Ware ^ Nunally, carriages for Cong, delegation 
V. C. Yantis, sundries 



Totals 



Total for 1885 and 1886, 



$15 55 

163 20, 

2 85) 



3 15, 
3 00; 



10 00 

3 00 

232 20 

453 60 

6 15 

722 45 

603 59, 

30 001 



2 10 



118 00 
92 00 
88 00 
10 46 
12 60 
7 15 



7 00 
21 83 

6 93 

29 80 

176 76 



45 00 



22 95 



$2,788 21 



»10 80 
750 85 
129 75 

46 00 



507 80 

12 45 
66 00 

2 31 
33 00 
26 20 

8 75 

13 65 

10 00 



3 60 

6 65 
5 25 



3 65 

7 00 
41 80 



$1,683 41 



$4,471 62 



132 



auditor's beport. 



IMPROVEMENT GROUNDS GOVERNOR'S MANSION. 

(Section 11, page 8, Laws 1885.) 

Appropriation for 1885 and 1886 $500 00 



Persons to whom warrants were Issued. 



D. Austin & Co., lawn mowers < 

Beckers & Brooks, lumber 

D. Friemel. labor 

P. Hess, hauling 

Jeff. City Iron Works 

F. Kaufman, labor 

L. C. Lohman, hardware 

Manchester & Beckby, repairing cistern, etc. 

Mo. Pac. R. R., freight 

M. J . Nagel, florist 

Price, Marmaduke & Co., grass seed 

George Hchuetz. repairs 

V. C. Yantis, sundries ^ 



Totals 



Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$18 50 
38 69 
2 25 
4 50 




Warrants 

issued in 

18SC. 



$3 00 

78 70 
53 12 



1^134 82 



844S 01 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



133 



REPAIRING AND REFURNISHING GOVERNOR'S MANSION. 



(Section 11, page 8, and section 1-9, page 11, Laws 1S85.) 



Appropriated for 1&S5 and 1886 
Deficiency appropriation 

Total 



$4,000 00 
3,863 25 

$7,863 25 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



A. S. Aloe, thermometer 

Barrel!, Comstock & Co., famitnre (deficiency 1884) 

Wm. Barr Dry Goods Company, blankets, etc 

Beckers Lnmber Company 

Barstow Stove Company, repairs to ftirnace 

J. K. Brettelle & Son, laundring 

F, A. Durgin, silverware 

Drey & Kahn, glass 

French Silvering Company, glass (deficiency 1884). . . 

Fay Gas Fixture Company (deficiency 1884) 

D. Gundelfinger, repairs 

I'. F. & J. A. Hapden 

M. F. Heinrichft, fttrnitnre 

Jeff. City Gas Light Company, fixtures 

£. Jaccard Jewelry Company, ladle 

Max Jacoby, pictures 

J, Kennard & ^)ons, carpet 

Same (deficiency 1884) 

M. Knoeddler & Co., engravings 

Kobt. Keith Furniture Company 

P. Lambert, janitor 

Lammert Furniture Company, furniture 

L. C. Lohman , hardware 

Miller & Stephenson , queensware 

Same (deficiency 1884) 

Manchester & Beckby , repairs 

H . Monnig, glass 

C. Majer, repairs 

Mo. Pac . Railroad , ft-eight 

M. Mumford, pictures 

Mermod, Jaccard & Co., clock, etc 

H. L. Niederinghaus, furniture 

Mrs. L. M. Nelson, traveling expenses for mansion . . 

Newcomb Bros., wall paper 

N O. Nelson Mf 'g, repairs 

O'Connor & Harder, stove, etc 



A. Opel & Co , repairs, 

Pacific Express Company 

Sam'l I. Pope <fe Co., pipe-fitting (deficiency 1884) 

F. Peterson, lumber , 

John Price, painting , 

W. H. Qnernneim & Bro., repairing roof 

L. M. Rnm0ey & Co., hose, etc 

Wm. Roesen, repairs 

F. W. Rosenthal, oil cloth 



Warrants Warrants 
issued in issued in 



1885. 



$4 00 

770 85 

1,072 47 

300 



14 50 

63 70, 

597 001 

503 16' 

59 13, 

85 

2 20' 

6 60 

6 7o| 

133 90 

221 60, 

468 46 

50 00 



116 35 

23 5o: 



436 05 
185 25 
104 85 

3 76 

4 15 
12 65 
25 00 



81 00 

11 05 

178 33 



lOi 60 

75 

33 80 

63 58 

6 55' 

8 85 

145 38 

80 22 

1 00, 



1886. 



$26 93 
17 50 
38 95 



41 10 



60 00 

59 27 

4 65 

44 20 

86 15 

30 

18 45 



75 00 

7 48 

80 

16 00 



1 OC 
1 60 



134 



auditor's report- 



BEPAIRING AND REFURNISHING GOVERNOR'S MANSION.— Continued. 



Persons to whom warraDts were issued. 



Simmons Hardware Company, sundries 

A. J. Shocklev , hardware , 

Seidel & Winkler, varnish , 

H. E. ^^chultz, carpet, etc , 

Gteorge Schuetz, repairs , 

Troriicht & Duncker. carpet (deficiency 1884) 

Same, hassocks 

Udell & Crunden , chairs , 

A. C. Williamson, upholstering 

V. Zuber, sewer pipe , 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



$126 05 
39 95 



Warrants 

Issued in 

1886. 



1,274 96 



Totals 



Total for 1885 and 1886 



86 75 
29 00 



$7,097 63' 



$4 50 
6 31 
3 50 

14 50 
12 50 



$592 19 
$7,689 82 



REFURNISHING GOVERNOR'S OFFICE. 



(Section 10, page 7, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $250 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



J. Kennard & Sons, carpet 
L. N. LePage, plastering.. 

John Price, painting 

Fred Rommel, wall paper . 
Jos.- Stampfii, chair 



Total 



Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



Warrants 
issued In 

1886. 



$153 50 


7 00 


46 00 


31 50 


12 00 



$250 00 



$250 00 



DIS6UR8KMBNTS. 



135 



REPAIRS OFFICE SECRETARY OF STATE. 



(Section 10, page 7, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1886 and 1888 $500 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Chamberlain Filing Case Company. 

£. Sessinghaus. book-case 

H. E. Scbultz, tapestry 

Jos. Stampfli, furniture 

Geo. Scbuetz, drilling iron window. 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886, 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



$285 00 
30 00 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$315 65 



$9 00 

54 00 

4 00 



867 00 



$382 56 



IMPROVEMENT OF STATE AUDITOR'S OFFICE. 



(Section 12, page 7, Laws 1883.) 
January 1. 1885, Balance in former appiropriation $82 14 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



George Porth , clock 

Total for 1885 and 1886, 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



Warrants 

Issued in 

1886. 



a27 00 



$27 0(» 



136 



auditors' report. 



BUILDING VAULT— OFFICE SECRETARY OF STATE. 

(Section 12, page 7, Laws 1883.) 
January 1, 1885, Balance In former appropriation $86 50 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Warrants 
issued in 

1885. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



Jolin J. Daly & Co., file holders 
Total for 1885 and 1886 




$86 50 



BUILDING VAULT— OFFICE REGISTER OF LANDS. 

(Section 12, page 7, Laws 1883.) 

January 1, 1885, Balance in former appropriation $48 50 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Jefferson City Gas Company. 
Total for 1885 and 1886 .. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



S7 00 



Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 



$7 00 



DISBUBSEMENT8. 



137 



REPAIRS OF STATE CAPITOL BUILDING. 

(Section 11, page 8, Laws 1885.) 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $1,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



A. Brandenberger, dasters, etc 

Jos. Catser, labor 

D. Priemel, labor 

Wm. Fisher, labor 

D. Gundelfinger, repairs 

Wm. Klamert, labor 

Manchester & Beckby, repairs. . 

W. L. Miller, repairs 

John Price, glazing, etc 

A. Opel & Co., repairs 

Jos. Ott, labor 

Wm. Boesen, repairs 

A.J. Shockley, hardware 



Totals 

Totals for 1886 and 1886 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 




31 60 



675 95 

7 50 

78 00 

6 05 

1 60 



16 6o' 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$1 ao 

4 60 

38 74 

39 16 

16 05 

47 26 
1 00 

31 20 
1 60 



t819 40: $180 60 



$1,000 00 



REPAIRS STATE ARMORY. 



(Section 11, page 8, Laws 1885.) 



Jan. 1, 1885.. 



Balance in former appropriation 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886... 



$44 40 
3,000 00 



Total $3 , 044 40 

Balance canceled 44 40 



Balance 



$3,000 00 



138 



auditor's report. 



REPAIRS STATE ARMORY -Continubd. 



PerBons to whom warrants were issued. 



A. Brandenberger, glass 

S. Browning, repairs 

J. C. Jamison, advertising 

Jas. K. Keefe, roof. 

J. H. McNamara, superintendent and architect, 

Manchester tt Beckby, repairs 

Mo. Pac. R. K., freight 

Pacific Express Co 



VVarran ts W arran ts 

issued in issued in 

1885. 1880- 



$2 50 


75 00 


6 80 


2,645 31 


168 00 


8 90 


43 79 


31 45 



Total 

Total for 1886 and 1886. 



$2,981 75 



$2,981 75 



REPAIRS OF STATE CEMETERY. 



Section 11, page 8, Laws 1885.) 



Appropriated for 1885 and 1886. 



$100 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



M. Oster 

Total for 1886 and 1886. 



Warrants 

issued Ih 

1885. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$25 00 



$75 00 



$100 00 



REPAIRS STATE CAPITOL GROUNDS 
(Section 12, page 1 , Laws 1885. ) 
By deficiency appropriation $1 ,867 38 



Persons to wliom warrants were issued. 



W. W. Davis, hauling 

D. W. Marmaduke, warden 

Manchester & Beckby, builders 



Total 

Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants | Warrants 
issued in issued in 



1885. 



1886. 



$268 80 

483 08| 

1,115 50 



$1,867 88 



81,867 3S 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



139 



RESTORING OIL PAINTINGS IN SENATE AND HOUSE. 



(Section 11, page 8, Laws 1885.) 



Appropriated for 1886 and 1886. 



$200 00 



Persons to whom warrants were Issued. 



Warrants 

Issued in 

1885. 



6.H. McConnell 

Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 
issued in 

1886. 



$200 00 



$200 00 



PRESERVAl'ION OF FLAGS AND WAR RELICS. 



(Section 1, page 17, Laws 1885.) 



1 



Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 



$600 00 



Persons to whom warrants were Issued. 



S. Browning', cases 

Mo. Pac. R. R., freight. 



Total 

Total for 1885 and 1886. 



I VVarrants 
! issued in 
1885. 



$596 97 
3 03 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



J600 00, 



$600 00 



; 



LUNATIC ASYLUM NO. 1— SUPPORT OF-FULTON, CALLAWAY CO. 



(Section 6, page 5, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $70, 000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



' Warrants Warrants 
issued in | issued in 
1885. , 1886. 



B.P.Bailey, treasurer 3^35,000 00 $35,000 00 

Total for 1885 and 1886 ' $70,000 00 



140 



auditor's rfport. 



LUNATIC ASYLUM NO. 1— SALARIES OF OFFICERS. 



(Section 6, page 5, Laws 1885.) 



Jan. 1, l$85...'To balance this date 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1886. 



Total 

Balance canceled 



$3,016 67 
20,400 00 



$23,416 67 
466 67 



Balance $22,950 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



C. O . Atkinson, steward 

B P. Bailey, treasurer: 

Mrs. Ann K. Gordon, matron 

Dr. W. R Kodes, superintendent 

Dr. T. R. H. Smith, superintendent , 

Dr. W. A. Tichenor, 2d assistant physician 
Dr. A Wilkerson, 1st assistant physician., 
Dr. D. H. Young, 3d assistant physician 



Totals. 



Total for 1?85 and 1886. 



Warrants Warrants 

Issued in issued in 

1886. 18j>6. 



$1,200 00 

1.200 00 

600 00 



3,000 00 
1,500 00 
1,500 00 
1,200 00 



$1,200 00 
1,200 00 

600 00 
2,250 00 

6(56 66 
1,350 00 
1,350 00 
1,200 00 



$10,200 00! $9,816 m 
I $20,016 66 



LUNATIC ASYLUM NO. 1— REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENT OF. 

(Section 6, page 5, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $10,300 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued . 



B. P. Bailey, treasurer 

Total for 1885 and 1886 



Warrants 
Issued in 

1886. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$10,300 001 



$10,300 00 



DISBUKSEMBNTS. 



141 



LUNATIC ASYLUM NO. 2:—SUPP0RT OF— ST. JOSEPH, BUCHANAN CO. 

(Section 6, page 5, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1S86 $25, 000 00 



Persons to whom warrants wereissaed. 



S. W, Walker, treasurer. . . 
Total for 1885 and 1886 



Warrants Warrants 

issued in > issued in 

1885. ' 1886. 



$15,000 jO' $10,000 00 



$25,000 00 



LUNATIC ASYLUM NO. 2— SALARIES OF OFFICERS. 



(Section 6, page 5, Laws 1885.) 



•Ian. 1, 1885.. 



Balance this date $2, 388 53 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 15,400 00 

Total I $17 , 788 53 

Balance canceled 463 53 

Balance 



$17,325 00 



; __ 



Persons to whom warrants were issued 



Dr. A. P. Busey, assistant physician 

Dr. Geo. C. Catlett, superintendent 

Mn. Sarah Dixon, matron 

Dr. Chas. F. Knight, assistant physician 

^- M. Saxton, treasurer 

Dr. R. E. Smith, superintendent 

L. H. Vorles, stewara 

P' E, Yandeventer, steward 

C. H. Wallace, assistant physician 

^. A. Walker, treasurer 



Totals 

ToUl for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 
issued in 

1885. 



$1,500 00 

3,000 OOi 

600 00, 



300 00 

1^266 00 



1,125 00 
100 00 



47,825 00 



Warrants 


issued in 


1886. 


$1,295 84 


1,908 33 


650 00 


204 16 


1,000 00 


GOO 00 


616 65 


1,.')00 00 


400 00 



S8,174 98 



$15,999 98 



142 



auditor's report. 



LUN ATIC ASYLUM NO. 2.-ENLARGEMENT OF. 

(^^ection 9, page 20, Laws 1885.) 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $98,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were Issued. 



S. A. Walker, treasurer . . . 
Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants Warrants 

issued in issued in 

1885. 1886. 



$98,000 00 



$98,000 00 



LUNATIC ASYLUM NO. 2 —REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENT OF. 

(Section 6, page 5, Laws 1885.) 



Appropriated for 1885 and 1886. 



$2,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



S. A. Walker, treasurer . . , 
Total for 1885 and 1886, 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



$2,000 001 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$2,000 00 



DISBUKSBMBNTS. 



148 



LUNATIC ASYLUM NO. 3.— LOCATION AND CONSTUCTION OF— NEVA- 
DA, VERNON CO. 

(Section 2, page 31, Laws 1885.) 



Appropriation. 



8200,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Warrants ; Warrants 
I issued in issued in 



1885. 



1886. 



1 



Martin Anderson, building material 

M. F. Bell, architect 

C. L. Dodson. commissioner 

M. G. Kern, gardener 

Theo. Lacofl^ con tractor 

W P. Munro, commissioner 

P. MeOrath, commissioner 

Nevada Ledger, advertising 

W. W. Pre Witt, examining titles 

T.R. H. 8mith, commissioner 

£. W^. {Stephens, commissioner 



ToUls 

Total for 1885 and 1886 



$050 00 
775 00 
544 99; 
600 00 



366 95 
279 60 
40 50 
25 00 
228 00 
567 85 



82.955 15 
5,486 75 

74,756 14 
514 05 
169 00 



541 27 



$3,977 89i 



$84 422 36 
$88,400 25 



ST. LOUIS ASYLUM.— SUPPORT OF INDIGENT INSANE. 

(Section 6, page 5, Laws 1885.) 

Appropriated for 1886 and 1886 $50,000 00 



; 



Persons to whom warrants were Issued. 



' Warrants 1 Warrants 



issued in 
1885. 



issued in 
1886. 



F. F. Espenschled, treesurer $25,000 00 $25,000 00 

Totals 

ToUls for 1885 and 1886 



$25,000 00 $25,000 00 



$50,000 00 



144 



auditor's report. 



DEAF A.ND DUMB ASYLUM.— SUPPORT OF— FULTON, CALLAWAY CO 



(Section 6, page 5, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1886 and 1886 $70,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Tho8. B. Nesbit, treasurer, 
Cbas. A. Bailey, treasurer. 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885 



$17,500 00 
17,500 IX) 



$35,000 00 



Warrants 
issued in 

1886. 



$35,000 00 
$35,000 00 



*70,0O0 00 



DEAF AND DUMB ASYLUM.— SALARIES OF OFFICERS. 



(Section 6, page 5, Laws 1886.) 



Balance in former appropriation 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886. . 

Total 

Balance canceled 

Balance 



83,812 50 
23,000 00 



$26,812 50 
987 50 



$25,826 00 



DISBUE8EM£NTS. 



145 



DEAF AND DUMB ASYLUM.— Continubd. 



I'ergons to whom warrants were issued. 



C. A . Bailey, treasurer 

Miss Nellie Bailey, teacher. . . 

H. C. English, teacher 

B . T . Gilkey, teacher 

Miss D. A. Grinnett, teacher. 
Miss MoUie Hughes, teacher . 

Miss Mary Harris, teacher 

W. D . Kerr, superintendent . 
W. 8. Marshall, teacher 

D. G. McCue, teacher 

Mrs. Ida McCue, teacher 

Mrs. £. P. Marshall, teacher. 

T . B . Nesbit, treasurer 

Miss Eliza Reed, teacher 

J. E . Sheley, steward 

Mrs. E. B. Sheley, matron.. . 

Mrs. M. M. Tate, teacher 

J. N. Tate, teacher 

Miss Ida Wheeler, teacher 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



$183 33 

450 oo; 

1,000 ooi 

1,000 00 

450 00 

388 86 

14 27 

1,500 00 

1,200 00 

537 50 

112 50 

600 00 

108 S3 

50G 00 

1,000 oo! 

400 OOf 

600 00 

1,000 00 

337 50 



Totals I $11,382 29 



Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 



$400 00 

450 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

450 00 

250 00 
1,600 00 
1,200 00 
550 00 
450 00 
600 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 

400 00 

600 00 

1,000 00 



811,350 00 



$22,732 29 



DEAF AND DUMB AS rLUM— REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENT OF. 

(Section 6, page 5, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $7,800 00 



/ 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Warrants Warrants 

issued in , issued in 

1885, 1886. 



Chas. A. Bailey, treasurer. 
Total for 1885 and 1886. 



$7,800 00 



$7,800 00 



p p— :o 



146 



auditor's RfcPORT. 



MISSOURI SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND— SUPPORT OF— ST. LOUIS 

(Section 6, page 5, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for ias5 and 1886 1 $36,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued . 



Warrants Warrants 

issued in , issued in 

1885. 1886. 



Jos. O'Neill, treasurer , $18,000 00 $18,000 00 



Total for 1885 and 1886 i S36,000 00 



MISSOURI SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND— SALARIES OF OFFICERS 



(Section 6, page 5, Laws 1885.) 



Jan. 1. 1885. 



Balance this date 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 



Total 



$2,638 00 
16,000 00 



$18,638 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Jno. T. Sibley, Superintendent, et al 
Total for 1885 and 1886 



] Warrants 
I issued in 
1885. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$7,763 00 $8,137 50 



$15,900 50 



DISBURSBMENTS. 



147 



STATE UNIVERSITY— MAINTENANCE OF-COLUMBIA, BOONE CO. 

(Section 6, page 6, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $62,810 00 



PerflonB to whom warrants were issued . 



R. B. Price, treasurer 

Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants i Warrants 

issued in i issued in 

1885. i 1886. 




$31,405 00 



962,810 00 



STATE UNIVERSITY— COMPLETION OF. 



(Section- 6, page 5, Laws 1885.; 



J Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $25,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued . 



R. B.Price, treasurer 

Total for 1885 and iaS6. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



$25,000 OOi 



Warrants 

Issued io 

1886. 



$25,000 00 



/ 



SCHOOL OP MINES AND METALLURGY- MAINTENANCE OF— ROLLA, 

PHELPS CO. 

(Section 6, page 5, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 S15,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Warrants 
issued in 

1885. 



Warrants 
issued in 

1886. 



Cyrus Frost, treasurer 

D. \¥. Malcolm, treasurer. 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 18S6. 



$7,500 00 




$7,500 00 
$7,500 00 



$15,000 00 



148 



auditor's report. 



SCHOOL OF MINES AND METALLURGY— CONSTRUCTION OF LABORA- 
TORY. 

(Section 1, page 18, Laws 1886.) 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $10,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



D. W, Malcolm, treasurer. 
Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 
issued in 

1885. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$8,000 00 $2,000 00 



$10,000 00 



NORMAL SCHOOL— FIRST DISTRICT— SUPPORT OF— KIRKS VILLE, 

ADAIR CO. 

(Section 6, page 5, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1886 and 1888 $20,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



Wm. T. Baird, treasurer.. 
Total for 1885 and 1886. 



$15,000 00 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$5,000 00 



$20,000 00 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



149 



NORMAL SCHOOLr-SECOND DISTRICT— SUPPORT OF— WARRENSBURG, 

JOHNSON CO. 

(Section 6, page 5, La^vs 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1886 and 1886 $20,000 00 



Persons to 'whom warrants were issued 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



Wm. P. Hunt, treasurer. . . 
Total for 1885 and 1886. 



I 



$10,000 00 



Warrants 
issued in 

1886. 



$10,000 00 



$20,000 00 



J 



NORMAL SCHOOL— SECOND DISTRICT— COMPLETION OF. 

(Section 1, page 24, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $30,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 


Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 

$25,000 00 


Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 


W. F, Hunt, treasurer 


$5,000 00 




Total for 1885 and 1886 




$30,000 00 







/ 



NORMAL SCHOOL-THIRD DISTRICT— SUPPORT OF— CAPE GIRAR- 
DEAU, CAPE GIRARDEAU COUNTY. 

(Section 6, page 5, Laws 1885. 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1886. $20,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



licon J*. Albert, treasurer. . . 
Totals for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 




$10,000 00 



$20,000 00 



150 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



LINCOLN INSTITUTE—SUPPORT OF-JEFFERSON CITY, COLE COUNTY. 

(Section 6, page 6, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1886 and 1886 $16,000 00 



• 

Persons to whom warrants were issued. 


Warrants 
issued In 

1886. 


Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 


John T, Sears, treasurer 


$8,000 00 


$8,000 00 




Total for 1885 and 1886 




$16,000 00 







LINCOLN INSTITUTE— COMPLETION AND IMPROVEMENT OF. 

(Section 6, page 5, Laws 1886.) 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $9,500 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



John T. Sears, treasurer 

Total for 1885 and 1886, 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



$9,500 00 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$9,500 00 



MISJOURI PENITENTIARY— SUPPORT OF. 

(Section 22, page 9, Laws 1SS5.) 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $100,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 



D. W. Marmaduke, warden. 
Totals for 1885 and 1886. 



$39,471 58 $60,528 42 



$100,000 00 



DtSBURSKMBNTS. 



151 



MISSOURI PENITENTIARY— EXTENSION OF WALLS, ETC 
• (Section 1, page 16, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1886 and 1886 *110,000 00 



Persona to whom warrants were issued. 



D. W. Marmadake, warden 
Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 
issaed in 
1885. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 



$69,376 40' $40,623 60 



$110,000 00 



BRANCH PENITENTIARY— LOCATION AND CONSTRUCTION OF. 



s (Section 11, page 212, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 



$200,000 00 



Persons to wliom warrants were issued. 



J. M. Siebert, cliairman Board of Inspectors 

W. M. Todd, salary as warden 

W, M. Todd, traveling expenses , 



Total 

Total for 1885 and 1886 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



Warrants 
issued in 

3886. 



$760 50 

833 35 

90 50 



$1,684 35 
$1,684 35 



162 



auditok's report. 



DISTRrBUTION LAWS AI^D CIRCULARS TO SCHOOL OFPICrALS. 

(Section 10, page 7, Laws 1885.) • 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1888 $1,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were Issued. 



A. Brandenberger, boxes for packing, 
T. L. Brown, packing and shipping. . . 

Church A Bro., boxes , 

Jesse VV Henry, boxes 

^y. G. McUarty, postage 

S. C. Noland, packing, etc 

Pacific Express Company 

State Journal Company, printing 

J. Steininger, postage , 

M. R. Sinks, boxes , 

0. W. Thomas, boxes 



Totals 



Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 
I issued in 
1SS5. 



n 40 

15 00 
2 15 
1 65 



Warrants 
issued in 

1886. 



20 00 

299 10 

13 00 

376 18 

4 90 

3 80 



$737 18 



$20 00 

102 60 

114 22 

26 00 

$262 82 



$1,000 00 



TRAVELING EXPENSES SUPERINTENDENT PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

(Section 10, page 7, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $1,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were isssned. 



Wm. £. Coleman, superintendent 
Total for 1885 and 1886 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



$449 05 



Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 



$550 95 



$1,000 00 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



153 



PKINTING REPORTS AND DOCUMENTS ORDERED BY THE GENERAL 

ASSEMBLY. 

(SectloD 12, page 8, Laws 1885.) 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $12,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



H. R. Page <ft Co., maps 
Tribune Printing Co 

Totals 



Warrants ' Warrants 
issued in I issued in 
1885. 1886. 



191 50 
9,048 51 13,291 93 



$9,140 01 



$3,291 93 



Total for 1885 and 1886 1 ; $12,431 94 



r 



PRINTING FOR EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. 



(Section 12, page 8, Laws 1885.) 



Jan. 1, 1885. .Balance in former appropriation. 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886.. . 



Balance canceled, 
Balance 



$2,020 02 
8,000 00 



$10,020 02 
639 19 



$9,380 83 



/ 



Persons to whom warrants were issued 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



A. Gast & Co 

J. Q. Howes, hauling paper 

H. ft. Page & Co., maps 

Tribnne Printing Co $4,048 98 

Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886 



Warrants 
issued in 

1886. 



$11 13 

4 30 

94 40 

5,206 54 



$4,048 98 $5,316 37 



$9,365 35 



154 



auditor's report. 



STATIONERY FOR STATE DEPARTMENTS 

(Seotion 12, page 8, Laws 1885.) 

Jan. 1, 1885. . iBalance in former appropriation 

! Appropriated for 1885 ana 1886 

I Balance canceled 

I Balance 



$315 58 
6,000 00 



$6,315 5$ 
315 58 

$6,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued 



Buxton & Skinner Stationery Co, 

J. J. Daly Stationery Co , 

A. Gast & Co 

Qeo. Knapp & Co., advertising. . , 
Kansas City Times, advertising. 

Jas. E. McHenry 

H. Monnig 

Sedalia Democrat, advertising.., 



Totals 

Total for 1886 and 1886. 



W arrants 

issued in 

1885. 



$6 50 
321 85 

171 85 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



2,926 95 
1 25 



$1,525 90 

23 00 

25 00 

1,004 70 

25 00 



$3,428 40; $2,605 6o 



$6,034 00 



PAPER FOR STATE PRINTING. 



(Section 12, page 8, Laws 1885.) 



Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $15,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 



John J. Daly 

J. E. McHenry $14,871 75 



$59 37 
63 75 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886, 



$14,871 75 



$123 12 



$14,994 87 



DI8B0BSEMBNTS. 



155 



DISTRIBUTION OF LAWS AND JOURNALS. 



(Section 12, page 8, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $3,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Warrants 
issued' in 

1885. 



Samuel Acton, packing and distributing $1 ,268 41 

Wm. Kelly, packing | 

W. G. McCarty, postage ; 

Geo. M. Maus, boxes ; 

Mo. Pacific R. R., freight ! 

Pacific Express Co 62 75 

J. Stetnlnger, postage 180 00 

E. Wilkerson 17 40 



Warrants 
issued in 

1886. 



7 



Totals $1,518 66 

Total for 1885 and 1886 



$40 00 

331 00 

7 80 

2 50 

132 50 



!$513 80 



$2,032 36 



PRINTING L\WS AND JOURNALS. 



(Section 12, page 8, Laws 1885.) 



Appropriated for 1886 and 1886 $7,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



W arrants Warrants 
issued in issued in 
1885. 1886. 



; Tribune Printing Co 

Total for 1885 and 1886. 



$5,607 78 8707 79 



$6,315 57 



PUBLISHING DECISIONS SUPREME COURT. 



(Section 14; page 8, Laws 1885.) 



Jan. 1, 1886. 



Balance this date 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1886. 



Balance canceled 
Balance 



$3,199 44 
15,000 00 



$18,199 44 
2,681 21 

$15,618 23 



156 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



F. M, Brown, reporter, salary, etc , 

H. W. Ewinp, clerk 

VVm. Kelly, packing and shipping reports 

Geo. Knapp <fc Co., advertising , 

Kansas (Mty Times, advertising 

W. G. McCarty, postage 

Pacific Ex press Co 

Ramsey, Millet tt Hudson, publishers 

E. W. Stephens, publisher 

J. Steininger, postage 



Totals. 



Total for 1b85 and 1886 



Warrants 
issued in 
IS85, 



Warrants 

issued in 

1880. 



I 



$1 ,956 95 

1,570 84 

100 00\ 

21 00 

68 25 



229 15 
3,610 00 



182 00 



82,048 01 

1,422 89 

40 00 



47 00 
245 10 

3,808 00 



;S^7,638 19» $7,611 00 
' S16,24919 



PUBLISHING REPORTS ST. LOUIS AND KANSAS CITY COURTS OF 

APPEALS. 

(Section 14, page 8, Laws 1885.) 

Appropriated for 1886 and 1886 1^7,500 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Jos. P. Baier, clerk St. Louis court; , 

F. C. Farr, clerk Kansas City court 

Wm. Kelly, packing and shipping reports, 

John Lewis, clerk St. Louis court 

Wm G. McCarty, postage . . .• 

Paciiic Express Co, 

E. W. Stephens, publisher 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886 



I Warrants j Warrants 

' issued in . issued in 

1886. ; 1880. 



$279 45 
1,160 64 



699 57 



$806 79 


50 


00 


829 


03 


124 


00 


40 


80 


3,536 


00 



$2,139 66' $5,386 62 



$7,526 28 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



157 



STATE LIBRARY— USE OF. 



(Section 20, page 9, Laws J885.) 



Jan. 1, 1885. . Balance this date 

Appropriated for 1886 and 1886, 



Balance canceled. 



$615 40 
2,500 00 



$3,115 40 
94 80 



$3,020 GO 



Person to whom warrants were issued . 



American Law Journal 

D. Appleton & Co., books 

Bancroft & Co., books 

Banks & Bro . , books 

y Baker, Voorhis & Co., books 

f D. B. Canfield, books 

Callahan & Co., books 

Jas. Connor, books 

Gilbert Book Co. , books 

Wm. Gould, book 

C. M. Heintz, books 

C. C. Hine. books 

Hoaghton, Miflin <fc Co , 

N. C. Eouns, books ^ 

L. C. Lohman. dusters.- 

y. D.Linn & Co., books 

W. G. McCarty, postage 

Mo. Bepubllcan', subscription 

Manchester A Beckby , repairs 

6. B. Maus, repairs 

H. Monnig, stationery , 

Pacific Express Co 

F. Bommel, stationery 

Beview Publishing Co 

* Chas. C. Soule, books 

Bdwaid Thompson, books . 

F. H . Thomas <?& Co. , books 

Tribune Printing Co., binding 

West Coast Reporter, subscription. 

West Publishing Co., books 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 




Warrants 
issued in 

1886. 



47 00 
57 80. 



49 50 



61 63 



5 00 



2 85 

1 90 

2 40 



TotaLi 



Totals for 1885 and 1886. 



2 35 

5 00 

1,048 22 

142 60 

45 45 

51 00 

5 00 

8 35 



$6 00 

28 50 

144 30 

453 68 

5 00 

235 60 

600 

56 00 

12 00 
10 00 
.10 00 
83 00 

28 85 

7 00 

36 80 



16 75 
48 45 



37 00 

115 50 

97 00 

35 09 



$1,546 05 $1,172 42 
$3,018 47 



158 . 



auditor's report. 



LIBRARY MISSOURI PENITENTIARIT. 



(Section 20, page 9, Laws 1885.) 



Appropriated for 1885 and 1886. 



Persona to whom warrants were Issued. 



H. F. Harrington, sheriff St. Louis, books 

F, Rommel, stationery and books 

Tribune Printing Co., binding, etc 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886. 



$500 00 



Warrants . Warrants 

issued issued 

in 1885. 1 in 1886. 



35 00 



$35 00 



$323 55 
76 00 
65 45 



$465 00 



$500 00 



BOND AND COUPON SCRAP BOOK. 



(Section 16, pp, 8 and 9, Laws 1885.) 



Appropriated for 1885 and 1886, 



$500 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued, 



Miss Mary Arnold, clerk 

Miss Eugenie Cordell, clerk 

Miss Eugenia Dunscomb, clerk. 
Jno. J. Dalv & Co., scrap books 

Miss Jessie Hackney, clerk 

Miss Mattie Tichenor. clerk 

Miss Aggie Walker, clerk 

Miss Bettie Walker, clerk 
Miss Bettie White, clerk 

Totals 

Totals for 1885 and 1886 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



S32 00 
70 00 



70 00 
32 00 




Warrants 

Issued in 

1886. 



$72 00 
102 45 



24 78 
72 00 
24 77 

$296 00 

$500 10 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



159 



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS. 



(Section 15, page 8, T^aws 1885.) 



Jan. 1, 1886. 



Balance in former appropriation 
Appropriated for 1886 and lb86 . . 



$819 26 
9,000 00 



$9,819 26 



PersonB to whom warrants were issued. 



T . L. Brown , janitor 

Michael Brown, obtaining statistics. . . 

Jno . J . Daly <fe Co . , stationery 

C. M. Glllispie. obtaining statistics;.. 

Thos. HorrelU janitor 

Mrs. K . Helnricbs. rent 

M . F . Helnricbs, famiture 

Jeff. CitT Gas Co 

)lis8 C . Kocbtitzky, clerk 

0. Kochtitzky, Commissioner's salary. 
Same, Commissioner's office expenses . 

Same, official traveling expenses 

T. B. Maban, coal 

W. 6. McCarty, postage 

HA. Newman, Commissioner 

Same, freight on reports 

T. W. Park, clerk. 

Same, collecting statistics, etc 

Pacific Express Co 

J. Steininger, postage 

H. A. Swift, ice 

Western Union Telegraph Co 

J. W. Zevely, clerk 



Warrants 
issaed in 
1886. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 



$6 00 
45 00 
48 75 
50 00 



36 65 

27 75 

4 20 



1,642 71 
177 00 

304 80; 
7 60 



381 30 



1,250 00 



60 81 
15 00 



177 39 



Totals ; $4 , 233 86 

Total for 1885 and 1886 



n'> 00 



100 00 

1,999 95 

390 65 



93 60 

12 50 

1,375 00 

325 25 

23 96 

25 76 

15 00 

5 55 



$4,392 10 
$8,625 96 



160 



auditor's rkport. 



BOARD OP AGRICULTURE— SALARIES OF OFFICERS. 



(Section 13, page 8, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 



$1,280 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



J. W. Sanborn, secretary , 
S . M. Tracey , treasurer . . . 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants ' Warrants 
issued in issued in 

1885. 1886. 



$450 00 
30 00 



$480 00 



$600 00 
10 00 



$610 00 



$1,090 00 



BOARD OF AGRICULTURE— EXPENSES OF. 



(Section 13, page 8 and section 1, page 12, Laws 1885.) 



Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 
Deficiency appropriation 



Total 



$6,000 (>0 
1,767 00 

$6,767 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



S. M. Tracey, treasurer 

Total for 1885 and 1886 



Warrants ' Warrants 



issued in 

1885. 



issued in 
1886. 



$4,267 00 $2,5n0 00 



16,767 00 



BOARD OF HORTICULTURE— EXPEN SES OF. 



(Section 13, page 8, and section 1, page 12, Laws 1885.) 



Appropriated for 1885 and 1886. 
Deficiency appropriation 



$2,500 00 
450 00 



Total $2,950 00 



DISBUR8EMBNT8. 



161 



BOARD OF HORTICULTURE-CoNTmuBD. 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



J. C Eyans, treasurer 

D. S. Holman, treasurer. 
Z. S. Ragan, treasurer. . . 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



$450 00 
11250 66 



$1,700 00 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$1,250 00 



$1,250 00 



$2,950 OC 



BOARD OF HEALTH— SALARIES OF OFFICERS. 



(Section 19, page 98, Laws of 1883.) 



^ January 1, 1S85. Balance in former approptiation $1,600 01 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 


Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 


Warrants 

Issued in 

1886. 


J.C. Heame. secretary 


$1,000 00 








ToUl for 1885 and 1886 




$1,000 00 







SUPPORT AND MAINTENANCE FISH COMMISSION 



(Section 19, page 9, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1885and 1886 $8,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 


Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 


W arrants 

Issued in 

1886. 


1. 6. W. Steedman, treasurer 


$5,000 00 


13,000 00 




Total for 1885 and 1886 




$8,000 00 







pp—ll. 



162 



A» ditor's rkpokt. 



PUBLISHItfG CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS. 



(Section 1, page 12, Laws 18S5.) 



Jan. 1, 1^5.. .! Balance in former appropriation. 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1886. . 



Total 

Balance canceled 



Balance . 



$985 00 
8,500 00 



t9,485 00 
9b5 00 



$8,500 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



F. H . Aastln, Osborn Oracle 

A.O. Allen, New Madrid Record 

"Amerika," St. Louis 

E. D . Ake, Iron County Kegister 

Atchison County Mall / .•. . 

Archie Herald 

Bolivar Herald 

Wm. A. Bums, Charleston Courier 

B F . Blanton, Monroe Appeal 

Brawner & Tyler, Linneus Bulletin 

Boonville Advertiser 

Crawford County Sentinel 

Crockett & Mc Henry, Nevada Democrat 

Coleman & Farmer, Public Opinion 

Wm. S. Carkton, Pemiscot Democrat.. 

Luclen Cover, Standard , 

O. K. Clardy, Plalndealer 

VV . A. Conklin, Ozark County News 

California Weekly Democrat 

W. Cloud, Pelrce City Democrat 

W. L. Chappell, Kirksville Democrat.... 

H . F. Chllders, Troy Free Press 

C. R. Church, Stockton Journal 

CassvlUe Democrat 

Chas. E. Duvall,Pineville News 

J no. H. Diggs, Maries Courier 

Enterprise Messenger 

(iriffin Frost, Knox County Democrat 

Thos. H . Frame, Liberty Advance 

Fulton Telegraph 

J . D. Finney, People's I'ress , 

T. D. Fisher, Farmington Times 

(J-asconade Democrat 

Glasgow Journal 

L. A. Greenlee, Clark County Gazette. . . 

Herald Printing Co 

Frank Harris, Potosl Independent 

Alex Humble, Hickory County Herald... 

Houston Herald 

VV. B. Harris. Piedmont Leader 

W. M. Hunter, Lancaster Excelsior 

J. B. H limes. Perry ville Sun 

H. S. Herbert, Rolla Herald 

T. F. Hensley, People's Press 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



Warrants 

Issued In 

1886. 



$70 00 
70 00 
70 00, 
70 OO' 
70 00 
70 00, 
70 00 
70 001 
70 00; 
70 00 
70 00' 
70 00 
70 00 
70 00 
70 00 
70 00 
70 00 

70 oo: 

70 00 
70 00 
70 00 
70 00 
70 00, 
70 OOl 
70 00 
70 00 
70 00| 
70 00 

70 oo; 

70 00 
70 »' 
70 00 
70 00 
70 00 
70 OOl 
70 00 
70 001 
70 00' 
70 OOl 
70 OO' 
70 00 
70 00 
70 00 
70 00 



J 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



163 



PUBLISHING CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS—CoNTOfUKD. 



Persons to whom warrants were issued . 



Hannibal Journal 

Jdo. a. Hannay, Versailles Gazette 

C. W. Huggins, Lamar Democrat 

Holt County Press 

D. J. Heaston, Bethany Broad-Ax 

D. R. Henderson , Salem News 

Hamilton News-Graphic 

0. J. Hurley, Savannah Domocrat .' 

J. W. & J. p. Johnston, Plattsburg Democrat 

Joarnal-Democrat 

Jefferson City Tribune 

Jonesburg Journal 

Robert H. Jones. Maiden Clipper 

J. A. Jetter, Buffklo Reflex 

J. B. Jewell, Democrat and Triple-Link 

Geo. Knapp & Co., Missouri Republican 

G B. Kelly & Co., Moberly Monitor 

Kansas City Times 

M. G Kennedy, Grundy County Times 

Lingle Bros., Henry County Democrat 

Lebanon Rustic 

Linn Creek Reveille 

Lexington Intelligencer 

Lewis Lumpkin, Gallatin Democrat 

Mexico Weekly Ledger 

Morsey & Blume, Warrenton Banner 

Mar»htleld Chronicle 

T. W. Mabrey, Doniphan Prospect 

J. 0. W. Moles, Spy and Mirror 

J. B. Mundy, Weston Chronicle 

Macon Times 

R. W . McMullen, Jefferson Democrat 

L. A. McGulre, Missouri Cash Book 

Neosho Times 

B. B. Price, Taney County Enterprise 

Walter T. Payne, Clayton Democrat 

J. H. Payne, DouglasCounty Herald 

W. II. Powers, Current Local 

Poplar Bluff Citizen 

J. G . Reeds, Post-Observer 

Richmond Conservator ? 

Rails County Guide 

W. L. Robertson, New Century 

H. W. Reynolds. Chlllicothe Constitution 

John C Rogers. Ozark News 

A. Rodemeyer, Fireside Guard 

Sedalia Democrat 

Henry S. Shaw, Ste. Genevieve Fair-Play. . . 

J. D . Storts, Eminence Argus 

St. Louis Post-Dispatch 

Scotland Democrat 

^tratton Bros., Saline County Democrat 

Henry Smith, Express-Record 

St. Charles News 

Sheibina Democrat 

S. S. Slier, Galena Times 

A. P. Shiver, Reynolds County Outlook 

F. 1). Snyder, MaryvlUe Times 

Springfield Trader 



Warrants Warrants 


1 Issued In 


Issued In 


1885. 


1886. 


*70 00 


70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00' 


70 00. 


70 00! 


70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




1 70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




t 70 00 




1 70 00 




I 70 00 




70 00 




70 00! 


70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




1 70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




1 70 00 




1 70 00 




; 70 00 




! 70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 001 


70 001 


70 00, 


70 00, 


70 00 
70 00 





164 



auditor's report. 



PUBLISHING CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS— Continukd. 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



St. Joseph Gazette 

M. Taibott, Dade County Advocate. 

Unterrlfied Democrat 

Worth County Times 

F. A. Weimer, Stanberry Sentinel... 

Western Observer 

Jno. C. Whalley, Osceola Sun 

J. P. Woodside, South Missourlan.. 

West Plains Gazette 

R. M. Wallace, LaGrange Democrat. 

Western Enterprise 

H. C. Williams, Pacific Citv Herald. 

Warsaw Missouri Enterprise 

Weekly Brunswicker 



Total 



Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 


Warrants 


issued in 


issued in 


1885. 


1886. 


$70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 




70 00 





$8 190 00 



$8,190 00 



PAY OP PBESIDENTIAL ELECTORS 



(Section 1, page 11, Laws 1886.) 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 



$916 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Geo. W. Allen, Ninth District 

HeniT C. Brokmeyer, at large 

tf as. Craig, at large 

Nat. C. Uryden, Seventh District. . . 

D. A. D'Armond, Twelfth District.. 

Jas. Ellison, First District 

Alexander W. Kelso, Third District. 

E. C. More, Sixth District 

Jno. I. Martin, Eighth District 

John O'Fttllon. Tenth District 

Thos. fl. Parrlsh, Fourth District.. . 

G. P. Rothwell, Second District 

Jos. J. Russell, Fourteenth District. 
Jno. N. Southern, Fifth District.... 

E. A. Seay, Eleventh District 

O. H. Travers, Thirteenth District.. 



Total 



Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 
issued in 

1885. 



$40 00 
40 00 
75 00 
42 00 
50 00 
45 00 
97 00 
32 00 
40 00 
57 OOj 
79 00 
37 00 
88 00 
45 00 

63 00: 

85 00 
$915 00 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$915 00 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



165 



SWAMP AND OVERFLOWED LANDS— EXPENSES OF. 



(Section 17, page 9, Lawg 1885.) 



Jan. 1, 1885. . To balance in former appropriation. 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 



Balance canceled 



Balance 



$455 19 
5,000 00 



15,455 19 
288 49 



$5,166 70 



; 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



T. M. Bradbury, salary as clerk 

T. M. Bradbury, traveling expenses 

Miss Bettle McCuUoch, clerk 

Robert McCuUoch, Register of Lands 

Gustay Reiche, U. S. Kegister of Lands, Boonyille. 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



iOOO 00 

117 50 

250 05 

4S!) 45 

3 00 



Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 



$1,756 00 



$1,200 00 
451 00 

387 10 



$2,038 1 



$3,794 10 



PAT OF PENSIONER. 



(Section 26, page 10, Laws 1886.) 



Appropriation for 1883, 1884, 1885 and 1886 



$400 00 



; 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 


W arrants 
issued in 
1885. 

$300 00 


Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 


Samuel Tarwater 


$100 00 






Total for 1885 and 1886 




€400 00 









166 



auditor's report. 



HANNIBAL & ST. JOE R. R LITIGATION— EXPENSES OF. 



(Section 25, page 9, Laws 1885.) 



Jan. 1, 1885. 



Balance in former appropriation 
Appropriated for 1886 and 1886 . . 



Balance canceled 
Balance 



S2,579 33 
2r),000 00 

$22,579 33 
2,579 33 



$20,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued 



B. G. Boone, Attorney-General, ofScial traveling expenses. 

John M. Glover, for Glover ifc Shepley, attorneys 

Henderson & Shields, attorneys 

Rowan Ray, copying brief 

Tribune Printing Company, briefs 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



$5,000 00 
5,000 00 



Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886 



$150 00 



28 00 
79 73 



$10,000 00 



$257 73 



$10,257 73 



PAYMENT OF COUNSEL FEES 
(Section 25, page 10, Laws 1885.) 



Appropriated for 1885 and 1886. 



S400 00 



Persons to whom warrants were Issued. 



Smith & KrauthofT. 

Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 
issued in 

1885. 



$400 00 



Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 



$400 00 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



167 



PAYMENT OF UNION MILITARY BONDS. 



(Section 1, page 22, and section 1, page 23, Laws 1885.) 



Appropriated for lS85and;i8S6 



$127 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issaed. 



Jae. E. Brock 
W.R. Watts.. 



Total 

ToUl for 18S5 and 1886. 



Warrants 
issued in 

1885. 



$105 00 
22 (0 



Warrants 

Issned in 

1886. 



«127 00 



8127 00 



PAYMENT OF OLD AUDITOR'S WARRANTS 



(Section 2, page 12, Laws 1885.) 



'Appropriated for 1885 and 1886. 



$347 60 



Persons to whom warrants were issaed. 



I Warrants 
issaed In 

1886. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 



J. W. Uppercu . . . 
Charles Welling. 



Total 

Total for 1885 and 1886, 



$287 60 

60 00 

I 

$347 60 



$ai7 60 



168 



AUDITOR^S REPORT. 



WORLD'S EXPOSITION, NEW ORLEANS— EXPENSES OF. 

(Section 3, page 12, Laws 1885.)r 
Appropriated for 1S85 and 1886 f5,220 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



J. C. Evans, treasurer Horticultural Society 

D. R. Francis, mayor St. Louis 

Mrs. A. A. Gilliam, treasurer Woman's Exchange. 



Total 

Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



$500 00 
3,150 00 
1,000 00 



$4,650 00 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$4,650 00 



RELIEF AND BENEFIT HEIRS OF WM. RIGGINS. 



(Section 1, page 15, Laws 1885.) 



Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 



$127 63 



Persons to whom warrants were issued, 



G. W. Riggins 

Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$127 63 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



169 



RELEEP OF NEW MADRID, MISSISSIPPI, DUNKLIN AND PEMISCOT 

COUNTIES. 

(Section 1, page 15, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $17 ,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



T. £. Bald win,' tresnrer Dunklin county 

H. C. Latham, treasurer New Madrid county, 
Samuel Ogilvie, treasurer Mississippi county 
Wm. T. Oates, treasurer Pemiscot county 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$5,000 00 
5,000 00 
3,000 00! 



$4,000 00 



Totals $13,000 00 $4,000 00 



Total for 1885 and 1886 



$17,000 00 



REBUILDING JAIL— BUTLER COUNTY 



(Section 1, page 13, Laws 1886. 



Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $5,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Wm. B. Adams, treasurer 

Total for 1885 and 1886 



Warrants i Warrants 
issued in issued in 



1885. 



1886. 



$5,000 00 



$5,000 00 



170 



auditors' KEPORT, 



Jan, 1. 1885.. 



PAY OF MILITIA CLAIMS. 
(Section 9, page 205, Laws 1885.) 

To balance in former appropriation 99,003 03 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1886. 2,500 00 

$11,503 63 
Balance canceled 9,003 63 

Balance $2,500 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



L. B. Crandall, 



Co., P. R. R. Reg. E. M. M. . . . 



J. P. Haynes, adm'r Jno. King—Serg't Co. C, 4th Pro. 
Beg. E. M. M 



Warrants i Warrants 

Issued in issued in 

1886. , 1S86. 



$63 75^ 
466 59> 



Total 

Total for 1885 and 1886. 



$530 34 



$530 34 



COPY OF RECORDS— OFFICE REGISTER OF LANDS. 

(Section 5, page 5, Laws 1883.) 
Balance in former appropriation . $83 35 



Persons to whom warrants were Issued . 



T. M. Bradbury, clerk 

Total for 1885 and 1886 i 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



$83 351 



Warrants 

issued in 

18S6. 



$83 35 



f 



f 



DISBUKSKMBNTS. 171 



SURVEY OF SUNK AND OVERFLOWED LANDS— S. E. MO. 

(Section 6, page 108, Laws 1883.) 
Jan. 1 , 1885, balance in former appropriation $801 66 



Warrants ■ Warrants 
Persons to whom -n arrants were issued . ' issued in Issued in 

1885. 1886. 



Jas. F. Brooks, engineer $801 66 

^■^^H^^^^^ ^HH^H^^^i^- ^^>^^^^^— ^a^i^-^ ^m^^^ 

Total for 1885 and 1886 $801 66 



172 



auditor's rkport. 



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178 



auditor's report. 



STATE INTEREST FUND. 



(Section 8, Schedule Constitution of Missouri.) 



PAYMENT OF INTEREST ON THE BONDED DEBT. 

(Section 1, page 3, Laws 1885.) 

Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $1,416,360 W 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 


Warrants 
issued in 

1885. 


Warrants 

Issued in 

1886. 


National Bank of Commerce, New York 


$680,130 00 


$634,997 84 


Total for 1885 and 1886 


$1,315,127 84 







PAYMENT OF INTEREST PAST DUE ON HANNIBAL & ST. JOE BONDS. 

(Section 1, page 4, Laws 1886.) 
Appropriated for 1886 and 1886 . $685,704 70 



Persons to whom warrants were Issued. 


Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 


Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 


National Bank of Commerce, New York 


$585,704 70 




Total for 1885 and 1886 


$585,704 70 









s. 



DISBURSEMBHTS. 



179 



PAYMENT OP FISCAL AGENT. 



(Section 2, page 4, Laws 1885.) 



Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $4,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 


Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 


Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 


National Bank of Commerce, New York 


1804 50 


$2,672 74 


Totals for 1885 and 1886 


$3,477 24 









CONTINGENT EXPENSES FUND COMMISSIONERS. 



(Section 2, page 4, Laws 1885.) 



Appropriated for 1885 and 1886. 



$600 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



John J. Daly & Co., stationery 

Samuel Engleton, notary services 

Joamal of Commerce 

George Knapp & Co., advertising 

W. G. McOarty , postage 

Pacific Express Co 

J. Steininger , postage 

Tliompson's 6ank Note and Commercial Reporter. 
U. S. Express Co 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886. . ... 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



$ 75 

60 00 
22 70 



Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 



$30 75 



400 

42 22 

5 00 

200 




19 80 

3 20 

86 72 



$140 47 



$277 14 



180 



auditor's repobt. 



FUNDING THE STATE DEBT—EXPENSES OF. 
(Seotion 10, page 40, Laws 1885.) 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $3,500 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Franklin Bank Note Co., bonds , 

Geo. Knapp & Co., advertising 

Journal of Commerce, advertising, 

J. M. Oldham, clerical services 

J. M. Seibert and B. G. Boone, expenses delivering bonds. 
J. M. Seibert and J. M. Oldham, expenses delivering bonds 
S. Winans, photograph of capitol 



Warrants 
issuea in 

1885. 



Totals 

Total for 1883 and 1886. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1886. 



$1,239 50 
128 13 
186 76 
200 00 
356 60 
348 85 
2 00 



$2,460 84 



* $2,460 84 



* This amount was transferred ft-om the Interest Fund to the Revenue Fund 
to conform to the wording of the appropriation. 



RECAPITULATION OF WARRANTS DRAWN ON STATE INTEREST 

FUND. 



Payment of interest on bonded debt 

Payment of past due interest Han. & St. Joe bonds, 

Payment of Fiscal Agent 

Contingent expenses Fund Commissioners 

Funding tlie IState debt—expenses of 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886 



Warrants 
Issued in 

1885. 



$680,130 00 

586,704 70 

804 50 

136 67 






«1, 266,775 87 



Warrants 
issued in 
1886.. 



$634 997 84 

2,672 74 

140 47 

2,460 84 



$640,271 89 



$1,907,047 76 



DISBUBSEMEKT8. 



181 



STATE SINKING FUND. 



(Section 8, Schedule Constitntion Missouri.) 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Warrants 
issued in 

1885. 



Fond Commissioners 1 $618,045 00 

Total for 1885 and 1886 



Warrants 
issued in 

ISSO. 



S747,237 81 



$1,365,282 81 



STATE SEMINARY MONEYS. 



(Interest on bonds in (seminary Fund.) 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



R. B. Price, treasurer State University. 
Total for 1885 and 1886 



Warrants 
issued in 

1885. 



Warrants 
issued in 
188G. 



$26,795 00 $27,006 80 



$53,801 80 



182 



AUDXTOR^S REPORT. 



STATE SCHOOL MONEYS DISTRIBUTED IN 1885 AND 1886, 

(Interest on School Funds and 25 per cent, of the Revenue, Section 3, page 4, 

Laws 1885.) 



Counties. 



JSkUcEAA ••«••• •••••• 

Andrew 

Atchison 

Audrain 



Barry. 
Barton 
Bates .... 
Benton .. 
BoUinge r 
Boone. . . . 
Buchanan 
Butler . . . 



«••••• 



Caldwell. 
Callaway. 
Camden . . 



Cape Girardeau.. 

Carroll 

Carter 

Cass 

Cedar 

Chariton. ........ 

Christian 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Cole 

Cooper 

Crawford 



Persons to whom warrants were Issued. 



M.J. Ross, treasurer 

W. D. Ruddell, treasurer. 
P. A. Foster, treasurer. . . 

W, H. Lee, treasurer 

T. H. Marshall, treasurer, 



Chas. Ray, treasurer 

R. P. Smith, treasurer. . . . 
R. S. Catron, treasurer... 
W. J. Huse, treasurer . . . . 
W. F. Kinder, treasurer. . 
G. W, Trimble, treasurer. 
James Hull, treasurer . . . . 
W. B. Adams, treasurer . . 



B C. Hicks, treasurer 

John A. Moore, treasurer 

A. C. Ellis, treasurer 

George W. Miller, treasurer. . 

J. fl. Schaefer, treasurer 

George Diegel. treasurer 

James J. Holland, treasurer . . 
Samuel E. Brown, treasurer. . 
John F Rutledge. treasurer.. 

E. B. Kellogx, treasurer 

G. T. B. Perry, treasurer 

Thomas M. Daggs, treasurer. 
John J. Stogsdale, treasurer . 

E. K. Bedford, treasurer 

Jacob Tanner, treasurer 

M. K. Gentry, treasurer , 

Eugene Trask, treasurer 



Dade... 
Dallas . 
Daviess 
DeKalb 
Dent. . . . 
Douglas. 



James L. Wetzell, treasurer. . 
John Hendrickson, treasurer, 
Wm . M. Givens, treasurer. . , , 

M. T^ancaster, treasurer •, 

W. L. Triplett, treasurer 

M 0. Reynolds, treasurer . . . . 



Dunklin F. E. Baldwin, treasurer 



Franklin |F. W. Reinhart, treasurer 



Gasconade, 

Gentry. 

Greene..... 
Grundy 



Harrison 
Henry 



William Klinger, treasurer. 
R. W. Crockett, treasurer. 

A. F. Ingram, treasurer 

D. W. Coon, treasurer 



O. C. Macy, treasurer 

W. G. Watkins, treasurer . 

Hickory 'James R. Marsh, treasurer 

Holt ^ . - - . 

Howard 

Howell 



Daniel Zachman, treasurer, 
W. A.. Dudgeon, treasurer.. 
G . H. Carter, treasurer 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



$4,586 85 
4,774 70 

4.162 20 
5,248 25 

732 80 

5,604 55 
5,082 60 

9.163 60; 
4,229 87i 
3,625 00, 
7,407 35; 

15^835 75 
1,991 45 

4,033 60 
6,567 25 
2,462 60 



6,265 25 
7,047 75 
750 40 
6,767 75 
4.613 95 
7,521 50 
3,637 70 

4.337 30 

4.338 15 
4,972 65 
4,556 45 
5,989 45 
3,462 55 

4,558 10 
3,256 95 
5,714 55 
4,208 75 
3,338 20 
3,407 60 
2,883 05 

8,839 55 

3,435 60 

6,421 75 

10,815 70 

4,699 35 

6,241 60 
7,219 50 
2,650 40 
4,548 80, 
4,763 65! 
4,262 85i 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$4,637 00 
4,874 85 
4,241 50 

6,392 40 

6,428 60 
5,447 90 
9,069 00 
4,682 75 
3,746 85 
7,664 35 
16,486 90 
2,092 30 

4,150 15 
6,753 45 

2.966 10 
6,535 45 
7,173 15 
722 0S> 
6,942 20 
4,860 25 
7,729 00 
4,367 30 
4,394 So 
4,509 45 
5,162 55 
4,634 45 
6,053 70 
3,945 90 

5,016 20 
3,626 25 
6,055 45 
4,345 75 
3,414 25 
3.843 35 
3,255 65 

9,102 60 

3,527 10 

5,662 55 

11,284 50 

4,762 95 

6.499 25 
8,036 70 
2,889 40 
4,612 95 
4,995 50 
4,814 55 



DISBURSEMSNTS. 



183 



STATE SCHOOL MONEYS— Contdoted. 



Counties. 



Iron 



Jackson.. 
Jasper . . . 
Jefferson 
Johnson.. 



Persons to whom warrants were issued . 



W. H. Whitworth, treasurer, 



John Murray, treasurer — 
James Spenoe, treasurer. . . 
K. W. McMillan ) treasurer 
George K. Hunt, treasurer 



£dox 



Laclede 

Lafayette 

Lawrence 

Lewis 

^LIqcoId 

LiTliigston 



McDonald 
Macon 



John F. Beal, treasurer. 



Samuel Farrar. treasurer 

M. y. L. McLelland, treasurer. 

J. A. Perigo, treasurer 

John T. Staples, treasurer 

Wm . S Bragg, treasurer 

J. T. Hamilton, treasurer 

T. McN alley, treasurer 



.V C. Walters, treasurer t 

P. Trammel, treasurer 

Madison N.J, Berry man, treasurer 

Maries iR. L. Schenker, treasurer 

Marion [Edward VVhaley, treasurer 

Mercer John Brantley, treasurer 

Miller P. T. Hauenstein, treasurer 

Mississippi jSamuel Ogilvie, treasurer 

Moniteau I VV. J Fulks, treasurer 

Monroe .J. A. Curtright, treasurer 

Montgomery ilsham McMahon, treasurer 

Morgan |j. S. Thruston, treasurer , 



New Madrid . 

Newton 

^'odaway .... 



Oregon 

Ozark 



Pemiscot 

Perry 

Pettis 

Phelps 

Pike 

Platte 

Polk 

Pulaski 

Putnam 



H. C. Latham, treasurer. , 
Lake KeLIey, treasurer . . . 
John T. Daniel, treasurer. 



J, W, Naney, treasurer 

R. P. Henderson, treasurer. 
James K. Woods, treasurer. 



Ralls 

Randolph 

Ray.... 

Reynolds 

Ripley 



St. Charles. . 
St. Clair.... 
St. Francois 



Wm. T Oates, treasurer. . . 
W. P. Flaherty, treasurer . 

John L. Hall, treasurer 

James L. Smith, Masurer. 
John T. Rule, treasurer . . . 

A. R. Jack, treasurer 

H. L. Carey, treasurer 

J. B. Chrlsteson, treasurer 
John F. Guffy, treasurer .. 



T. M . Winn, treasurer 

W. D. Malone, treasurer. . 
A. M. Fowler, treasurer . . 
Wm. C. Brooks, treasurer. 
R. C. Barrett, treasurer. . . 



Henry Angert, treasurer . . . 

L M.'Woodall. treasurer 

John B. Highley, treasurer 



Warrants 

Issued in 

1885. 



•2,626 10 

26,535 55 
10,378 36 

6,028 40 
8,417 40 

3,861 00 

4,230 70 
7,737 25 
6,061 45j 
4,484 40! 

5.145 15 
6,082 50 
6,105 35 

3,150 40 
8,101 85| 
2,492 251 
2,096 35 

7.146 76 
4,351 65 
3,596 20 
2,103 10 
4,381 30 
5,343 15 
4,504 80 
3,207 90 

2,021 85 
6,288 95 
9,205 90 

2,153 00 
3,869 50 
2,148 75 

1,197 90 
3,294 20 
8,211 00 
4,053 05 
8,489 45 
5,047 05 
5,247 55 
2,653 85 
4.203 60 

3,353 45 
6,689 10 
5,829 65 
1,682 65 
1,979 60 



6,350 70 
5,016 60 
4,103 00 






Warrants 

Issued In 

1886. 



$2,686 05 

30,124 76 

10,584 85 

6,540 65 

8,336 60 

3.571 90 

4,633 55 
7,897 00 
6,600 10 
4,481 90 
5,277 30 
6,362 20 
6,315 05 

3.572 75 
8,515 75 

2.795 50 
2,539 55 
7,227 46 
4,386 90 

3.796 00 
2,072 50 
4,581 90 
5,642 70 
4,979 15 
3,433 20 

1,963 00 
6,703 50 
9,445 55 

2,401 70 
3,908 85 
2.579 15 

1,284 00 
3,468 50 
8,220 20 
4,178 60 
8,623 45 
5,236 80 
5,858 10 
3,104 00 
4,279 40 

3,663 20 
7,086 10 
6,115 80 
1,956 15 
2,585 25 

6.291 55 
5,584 05 
4,736 25 



184 



auditor's report. 



STATE SCHOOL MONEYS-Continukd. 



Counties . 



PersoDS to whom warrants were issued. 



St. Louis county. 

Saline 

Schuyler 

Scotland 

Scott 

Shannon 

Shelby 

Stoddard 

Stone 

Sullivan 



Taney. 
Texas.. 



Vernon 



Ste. Genevieve. . . O. D. Harris, treasurer 

St. Louis city — President and Board of Directors Public 

Schools 

O. H. W, Heidorn , treasurer 

Lee Hughes, treasurer 

J. O. Jewett, treasurer 

John C. Hoaglacd. treasurer 

V. Heisserer, treasurer 

G*. R . Eenamore, treasurer 

G. W . McCosliin, treasurer 

J. I>. Melson, treasurer 

W. P. Renner, treasurer 

Henry Baker, treasurer 

S. 0. Hutchison, treasurer 



Warrants ! Warranta 



issued in 
1885. 



Warren 

Washington 

TT av ne «•••■* >«■ 

Webster' 

Worth;.; 

Wright 



Charles H* Groom, treasurer 
D. P. Klllion, treasurer 



A. McGovndJ', treasurer. 



D. Boclchorst, treasurer . . 
T. A. Waring, treasurer. . 

E. P. Settle, treasurer .... 
Freeman Evans, treasurer 
Jacob Stobe, treasurer . . . 
James A. Tate, treasurer. 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886 



issued in 
1886. 



$3,213 00 $3,197 90 



89,987 65, 
9,113 70; 
8,980 00 
3,301 00 
3,ft75 90 
2,539 60 
1,428 85 



4,356 80 
4.030 20 
1,602 25 
6,255 20 

1,991 60 
4,4(58 40 



3.014 20| 
3,871 20 
2,962 ()0: 
4.591 95j 
2,743 45' 
3,949 85, 



93,459 63 

9.627 35 
9,324 90 
3.444 45 

3.628 75 
2,592 95 

1,464 95 
4,484 45 
4,327 65 
1,849 25 
5,448 80 

2,127 65 
5,827 95 



7,969 05 8,458 90 



3,060 90 
4,113 J)5 
3,010 9l> 
5,024 85 
2,730 85 
4,556 05 



$604,191 27 $700,100 6?^ 



1^1,364,291 95. 



DISBUBSBMENTS. 



185^ 



SWAMP LAND INDEMNITY FUND. 



(Section 21, page 9, Laws 1885.) 



Appropriated forl886 aod 1886 $30,000 00 



FersoDB to whom warrants were issued. 



C. W. Asper, agent, Grundy county 

Saone, Gentry county 

John Brantley, treasurer, Mercer county 
Samuel E. Brown, treasurer, Cass county.... 
John Donovan, agent, Buchanan county. . . . 

T. T. Elliott, agent, Chariton county 

F. A. Foster, treasurer, Atchison county... 

M. K. Grentry, treasurer. Cooper county 

Alfred Garrison, treasurer, Camden county, 

V. Heisserer, treasurer, Scott county 

George K. Hunt, treasurer, Johnson county. 

O. C. Macy, treasurer, Harrison county 

Henry C. Pepper, agent, McDonald county, 
Nathaniel Sisson, agent, Nodaway county.. , 
Jas. F. Yancey, agent, Morgan county 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



$4,474 69 



4,160 14 

5,983 22 

730 97 

947 63 

48 85 

25 00 



235 08 



621 73 

687 05( 



Warrants 

issued in 

•1886. 



$5,776 47 



2,637 75 

2,208 67 

250 00 

1,447 78 



$17,914 36 $12,320 67 



$30. 235 03 



186 



auditor's bbport. 



EXECUTORS' AND ADMINISTEATOBS' FUND, 



(Section 23, page 9, Laws 1885). 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



H. C. Bfown, att^y for heirs of Agnes Enfinger, dec'd 

B. W. Bowdry, heirs of Jas. J. Bowdry, dec'd 

Broadhead & Hausseler, att^ for heirs of H'y Boers, dec'd. 

• Jno. P. Brashear, heirs of w m. Patton, dec'd 

Albert Baum, att'y for heirs of H. O. M^eber, dec'd 

J. B. Crocker, att'y for heirs of Jno. H. McCausland, dec'd. 

Julia Canfiela, heirs of Ellen Shannon, dec'd 

Ruby L. Cox, heirs of H. R. Walker 

Jas. H. English, guardian for heirs of Thos. Merrett, dec'd. 
Geo. Ti. Evens, att'y for heirs of D. R. Lovell, dec'd 

C. C. Fuller, att'y for heirs of D. M. Erton, dec'd 

A. J. P. Garesche. att'y for lieirs of Peter Bomino, dec'd.. 
G. G. Gibson, trustee for heirs of Sarah J. Russell, dec'd. . 

Edward Hahn, heirs of Chas. A. Hahn, dec'd 

Ruhy M. Johnson, heirs of H. R. Walker, dec'd 

-Jno. Kennedy, heirs of Mary Miller, dec'd 

Jas. C. McGinnis, att'y for heirs of Peter Bomino, dec'd. . . 

Geo. May, att'y for heirs of Calvin Carpenter, dec'd 

Wm. M. Morgan, att'y for heirs of Jos. Nowak, dec'd 

H. W. Mills, att'y for heirs of Jos. Mills, dec'd 

Frank McGulre, att'y for heirs of Jno. Canterberry, dec'd. 
Anna McCausland, heirs of Jno. H. McCausland, dec'd. . 

Minerva Marshall, heirs of Richard Marshall, dec'd 

Mary and Alice Mudd, heirs of Nicholas Robey, dec'd 

Mary O'Malley, heirs of Patrick Henry, dec'd. 

•Carl H. Obergoenner, heirs of Wilhelmina Niederhoff, dec'd 
Pattison & Timmonds, att'ys for heir of Patrick Henry, 

dec'd 

Louis A . Rohr, heirs of Abner Beal, dec'd 

Smith Slater, heirs of Alex. Slater, dec'd '. 

Fred . Truetzel, for heir of Peter Bomino, dec'd 

Jos. Weaver, att'y for heir of Geneveva Klein, dec'd 

A. S. Williamson, heir of Jarvis Williamson, dec'd 

L. F. Wood, att'y for heir of Wm. O'Colbern, dec'd 

-Chas. Watson, heir of Silas Freeze 



Warrants 

issued in 

1885. 



Totals 



Total for 1885 and 1886, 



JP184 18 
160 32 

1,380 61 
105 33 



6 67 
150 00 



7,200 82 



1,264 68 

1,547 84 

250 00 

285 50 

62 43 

30 37 

6 68 

17 77 



14 97 



74 87 

55 00 

7 60 

396 01 

23 30 

43 41 

6,261 88 



Warrants 

Issued in 

1886. 



$646 72 



100 00 

115 70 

17 43 

30 31 

670 00 

51 83 

100 00 



42 00 
557 77 



3,130 94 
96 22 



$19,529 27 $5,558 42 



$25,087 69 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



187 



IK8UBAKCE DEPARTMENT FUND 



(Section 8, page 7, Laws 18S5.) 



SALA.RIES OF OFFICERS. 



f Appropriated for 1&S5 and 1886 $12,000 00 



Persons to whom warrants were Issned . 



Jno. F. Williams, superintendent. .. . 

Alfred Carr, superintendent 

£. W. Knott, deputy superintendent 



Totals . 

Total for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants 
issued in 

1885. 



$1,166 70 
2,999 97 
1,833 27 



$6,999 94 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$3,999 96 
1,999 92 



$5,999 88 



$11,999 82 



EXPEJ^SES OF DEPARTMEN^T. 
Appropriated for 1885 and 1886 $22, 500 00 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



Jno . F. Williams, superintendent 
Alfred Carr, superintendent 



Totals, 

ToUl for 1885 and 1886. 



Warrants ' Warrants 

issued in issued in 

1885. 1 1886. 



$2,775 72 
7,599 22 911,421 02 



911,421 02 




$21,795 96 



188 



auditor's rbport. 



ROAD AND CANAL FUND. 



(Secaion 24, page 9, Laws 1885.) 



Countief. 



Persons to whom warrants werft issued. 



Adair M.J. Hoss, treasurer 

Andrew W. D. Ruddell, treasurer. 

Atchison. . . : |F. A. Kopter, treasurer . . . 

Audrain T. H. Marshall, treasurer, 



Barry Charles Ray, treasurer 

Barton IK. P. Smith, treasurer. 

Bates !R. S. (lijitron, treasurer 

Benton 

Bollinger 

Boone 



W. J. Huse, treasurer. 
W. F. Kinder, treasurer. , 
G. VV. Trimble, treasurer. 

Buchanan James Hull, treasurer. . . . 

Butler W. B. Adams, treasurer.. . 



Caldwell 

Callaway 

Camden 

Cape Girardeau 

<^arroll 

Carter 

Cass 



Cedar 

Chariton. 
Christian , 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton.. 

Cole 

Cooper — 
Crawford 



B. C. Hicks, treasurer 

John A. Moore, treasurer. . . . 
George W. Miller, treasurer. 
J. U. Schaefer, treasurer.... 

George Diegel, treasurer 

J.J. Holland, treasurer , 

S. E. Brown, treasurer 

John F. Rutledge, treasurer. , 
E . B . Kellogg, treasurer. . . . , 

G. T. B. Perry, treasurer 

T . M . Daggs, treasurer 

John J St ogsdale, treasurer, 
E . K . Bedford, treasurer . . . , 

Jacob Tanner, treasurer 

M. K. Gentry, treasurer 

E . Trask, treasurer 



Dade James L. Wetzell, treasurer. 

Dallas. John Henderson, treasurer, 

Daviess W. M. Givens, treasurer, 

DeKalb |M. Lancaster, treasurer. . . 

Dent • W. L. Triplett. treasurer. 

Douglas M. C. Reynolds, treasurer. 



Dunklin. 



Franklin 



Gasconade 

Gentry 

Greene 

Grundy.... 



T. E. Baldwin, treasurer 



F. W. Reinhardt, treasurer. 



Harrison 
Henry. . 
Hickory. 
Holt 



William Kllnger, treasurer, 
R. W.Crockett, treasurer 

A. F. Ingram, treasurer 

D . W . Coon, treasurer 



O. C. Macy, treasurer 

W. G. M''atkins. treasurer. 

James R . Marsh, treasurer 

Daniel Zackman, treasurer 

Howard ;W. A. Dudgeon, treasurer 

Howell 



Iron. 



George H . Carter, treasurer . 
W. H. Whit worth, treasurer, 



Amount 


paid in 


18S6. 


$86 95 


86 05 


86 95 


86 95 


80 95 


86 95 


86 95 


8<i 95 


86 95 


86 95 


»> 95 


86 95 


80 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


8B95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


88 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 


S6 95 


86 95 


86 95 


86 95 



86 95 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



189 



KG AD AND CANAL FUND.— Continum). 



Counties. 



Jacksoo . . 
Jasper.. . . 
Jefferson. 
Johnson.. 



Enox . 



Laclede 

Lafayette . . 
Lawrence.. 

Lewis 

Lincoln . . . . 

Linn 

Livingston. 



McDonald 

Macon 

Madison 

Maries 

Marion 

Mercer 

Miller 

Mississippi 

Moniteau 

Monroe 

Montgomery. . . . , 
Morgfan 



Xew Madrid 

Kcwton 

Nodaway . . . . 



Oregon 
Osage.. 
Ozark.. 



Pemiscot 

Perry 

Pettis.... 
Phelps... 

Pike 

Platte. .. 

Polk 

Pulaski.. 
Putnam . . 



Ralls 

Randolph. 
Ray....... 

Reynolds , 
Ripley 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



John Mnrray, treasurer 

J ames Spencer, treasurer . . 
R. W. McMullen, treasurer 
George B. Hunt, treasurer. 



John F. Beal, treasurer. 



Samuel Farrar. treasurer 

M. V. L. Mcl..illand, treasurer. 

John A . Perigo, treasurer , 

John F. Staples, treasurer 

W. Bragg, treasurer 

J. F. Hamilton, treasurer 

Thomas McNalley, treasurer. . . 



A. C. Walters, treasurer 

P. Trammel, treasurer 

N.J. Berryman , treasurer 

R. L. Schenker, treasurer 

Edward Whaley, treasurer. . . . 

John Brantley, treasurer 

Phil. T. Hauenstein, treasurer . 

Samuel Ofl^ilvie, treasurer 

W. S. Fulks. treasurer , 

James A. Curtrlght, treasurer. 

Isham McMahan, treasurer 

J. S. ThruBton, treasurer 



H. C. Latham, treasurer., 
Luke Kelly, treasurer. — 
John T. Daniel, treasurer. 



John W. Naney, treasurer . 
R. P. Henderson, treasurer 
James £. Wood, treasurer. . 



W. T. Oates, treasurer 

W. P. Faherty, treasurer. . . 

John L Hall, treasurer 

James L. Smith, treasurer. . 

John T. Rule, treasurer 

A. R. Jack, treasurer 

H. Ij. Gary, treasurer 

J. B. Chrfsteson, treasurer. 
John F. Guffey, treasurer. . . 



St. Charles 

^t. Clair 

St. Francois 

Ste. Genevieve 

St. Jyouiscity 

St. Louis county... 
Saline 



Thomas M. Winn, treasurer. . 

W. D. Malone, treasurer 

A.M. Fowler, treasurer 

William C Brooks, treasurer. 
R. C. Barrett, treasurer 



Henry Angert, treasurer . . . , 
I M.' Woodall, treasurer. .. 

J. B. Highly, treasurer 

J. B. Cox, treasurer 

F. F. Espenschied, treasurer. 

G. W. u. Heidorn, treasurer. 
Lee Hughes, treasurer 



Amount 

paid in 

1886. 



$86 95 
86 »5 
86 95 
86 95 

86 95 

86 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 
m 95 
86 95 
86 95 

86 95 
86 95 
8Q 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 

86 95 
86 96 
86 95 

86 95 
86 95 
86 95 

86 95 
86 95 
m 95 
Sf{ 95 
86 95 
86 95 
m 95 
86 95 
86 95 

88 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 

86 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 



190 



auditor's rbpost. 



ROAD AND CANAL FQKD.— Comtinubd. 



CouDties. 



Sohayler' 

Scotland 

Scott 

Shannon 

Shelby 

Stoddard 

Stone 

SaUivan 

Taney 

TexaB 

Vernon 

Warren 

Washington.... 

Wayne 

Webster 

Worth 

Wright 



Persons to whom warrants were issoed. 



J. O. Jewett, treasurer 

J. 0. Hougland, treasurer ... 
Vincent. Heisserer, treasurer. 
G. W. McCoskill, treasurer. . 

J. D. Melson, treasurer 

William P. Renner, treasurer. 

Henry Baker, treasurer 

S. C. Hutchison, treasurer. . . . 



0. H. Groom, treasurer.. 
D. P. Kill ion, treasurer. 



A. McGoveney, treasurer. 



Detrick Bockhorst, treasurer. 

T. A. Waring, treasurer 

Refused to make requisition. . 
Freeman Evans, treasurer. . . . 

Jacob Stabe, treasurer 

James A. Tate, treasurer. ... 



Total amount paid in 1886. 



Amount 
paid in 

1886. 



$86 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 
86 95 


86 95 
86 95 


86 95 


86 95 
86 95 


86 95 
86 95 
86 95 



$9,912 30 



EARNINGS MISSOURI PENITENTIARY 



(Section 22, page 9, Laws 1885.) 



Persons to whom warrants were issued. 



J. R. Willis, warden 

D. W. Harmaduke, warden 



Totals 

Total for 1885 and 188<S. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



$11,629 96 
162,883 46 



$174,513 42 



Warrants 

issued in 

1886. 



$184,656 07 



$184,656 07 
$359,169 49 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



191 



TABLE SHOWING THE AGGREGATE AMOUNT OP WARRANTS ISSUED* 
Oy[ Ta£ SEVERAL FUNDS DURING THE YEARS OP 1885 AND 1886. 



Reoapitalation. 



State Revenue Fnnd , 

State Interest Fnad 

State Sfnklnpr Fond 

State School Jdoneys 

State Seminary Moneys 

Swamp Lfand IndemDlty Fand 

Executors' an<l A.dinlDi8trator8' Fund. 

Insurance Department Fund; 

Road and Canal Fund , 

Earning^ Mlssotirl Penitentiary 



Totals. 



Warrants 
issued in 
1885. 



$1,447,224 80 

1,266,775 87 

618,045 00 

664,191 27 

26,795 00 

17,914 36 

19,529 27 

16,374 88 



174,512 42 



••* •••••••••••• 



• • • • 



• « 



Total fOT 1885 and 1886. 



$4,251,363 87 



Warrants 
issued in 
1888. 



$992,645 78 
640,271 89* 
747,237 81 
700,100 68 
27,006 80- 
12,320 67 
5,558 42 
17,420 90* 
9,912 30 
184,650 07 



$3,337,131 82^ 



$7,588,495 19> 



auditob's rbpobt. 



EOAD AND CANAL FOND.— Cknrrr 



Peraons to vhom varrauCs ^ 



Schuyler'. 
Scotland... " 

Scott 

ShannoD 

Shelby. 

Stoddard..;; 

saiiiTanV.;;;; 



, O. Jewett, treasurer 

. C, Hougland, treasurer 
. VlDceat.HelBserer, treasir 
" . W. MoCoBklll, treafiur. 
, . J . D . Uelson, treasurer 
. William P. Renner, tn 
. Heorv Baker, treasuri' 
. S. C. Hutchison, trea- 



^ernoD 



. A. McGoTeney, ' 

. Detrick Boekb 
. r.A. Wariiii. 
. Refused to i>i 
. Freeman K i 
. . JacobStal 
. . James A 

Tot 



^-^'IV 



_,./^LANCE SHEETS 



OF THE SEVERAL FUNDS 



:pio:E2, rj?:B3::E2 iTEj^ie^s isss j^istjd isss. 



r 



V. F—''i 



> 



B/^LANCE SHEETS 



OF THE SEVERAL FUNDS 



FOie* "mEJ ITEj^IS/S 1885 J^UTT) 1886. 



F. P ''^ 



BALANCK SHEETS. 



195 



STATE REVENUE FUND. 



(Section 8, Art. 10, CoDstitution. and Sec. 6663, Revised Statutes.) 



Date. 



Jan. 1,1886.. 



Jan. 1, 1887.. 



By balance this date 

By receipts in 1885 

By receipts in 1886 

By transfer from School Fand, 1886, 

To warrants issued in 1885 

To warrants issued in 1886 , 

To tranfer to Interest Fund, 1886 . . 
To transfer to Sinking Fund, 18^. . 
To transfer to School Moneys, 1885 
To transfer to School Moneys, 1886 . 
Balance , 



Totals 



By balance this date. 



Dr. 



$1,447,224 80 
092,645 78 
4,660 84 
30.000 00 
482,976 27 
514,360 68 
347,700 21 



$3,819,568 58 



Cr. 



$331,903 62 

1,837,226 87 

1,648,439 09 

2,000 00 



$3,819,568 58 



$347,700 21 



STATE INTEREST FUND. 
(Section 8, Art. 10, Constitution, and Sec. 6663, Revised Statutes.) 



Date. 



Jan. 1, 1886. . 



By balance this date 

By receipts in 1885 

By receipts in 1886 

By transfer to Revenue Fund, 1886 

To warrants issued in 1885 

To warrants issued in 1886 

To trnnsfer to Sinking Fund, 1886 

To transfer to Sinking Fund, 1886 

To transfer to School Moneys, 1885 

To transfer to School Moneys, 1886 

To transfer to Seminary Moneys, 1885.. . 

To transfer to Seminary Moneys, 1886 . . . 

Balance 



Dr. 



$1,266,775 87 

640,271 89 

417,046 00 

717,237 81 

185,690 00 

185,790 00 

26,920 00 

27,131 80 

148 16 



Totals ! $3,467 , 010 53 



Jan. 1, 1887.. By balance this date. 



Cr. 



$648,576 64 

1,260,204 86 

1,563,568 20 

4,660 84 



$3,467,010 53 



$148 16 



196 



auditor's rbport. 



STATE SINKING FUND. 



(Section 14, Art. 10, Constitation, and Sec. 7624, Revised Statutes.) 



Date. 




By transfer from Interest Fund, 1886. . 
Uy transfer from Interest Fund, 1886. . 
By transfer from Revenue Fund, 1886. 
By transfer from School Fund, 1885. . . 

To warrants issued in 1885 

To warrants issued in 1886 



Totals 



$618,045 00 
747,237 81 



$1,365,282 81 «1, 365,282 81 



Cr. 



$417,045 00 

717,237 81 

30,000 00 

201,000 00 



STATE SCHOOL FUND. 



(Section 6, Art. 10, Constitution of Missouri.) 



Date. 



Jan. 1, 1885.. 



Jan. 1, 1887.. 



By balance this date 

By receipts in 1885 

By receipts in 1886 

To transfer to Sinking Fund, 1885 

To tranfer to Ex. and Adm'r Fund, 1885. 

To transfer to Revenue Fund, 1886 

Balance 



Totals 

By balance this date. 



Dr. 



$201,000 00 

285 50 

2,000 00 

439 80 



$203,725 30 



Cr. 



$201,331 65 

2,125 00 

268 65 



$208,725 30 
$439 80 



BALANOB SBBSTS. 



197 



STATE SCHOOL MONEYS. 



(Interest on School Fund and twenty-flve per cent, of the revenue, Sec. 7122, R. S.) 



Date. 



Jan.l, 1885. 



Jan. 1, 1867.. 



By balance this date 

By transfer from Revenue Fund, 1885. 
By transfer from Revenue Fund, 1886, 
By transfer from Interest Fnud, 1885 . . 
By transfer from Interest Fund, 1886 . . 

To warrants issued in 1885 , 

To warrants issued in 1886 

Balance 



. Totals 

By balance this date 



Dr 



$664,191 27 
700,100 68 
180,165 00 



$1,544,456 95 



Cr. 



$175,640 00 
482,976 27 
514,360 68 
185,690 00 
185,790 00 



$1,544,456 95 



$180,165 00 



STATE SEMINARY MONEYS. 



(Interest on Seminary Fund.) 



Date. 



Jan. 1, 1885. 



By balance this date 

By transfer from Interest Fund, 1885. 
By transfer from Interest Fund, 1886. 

To warrants issued in 1885 

To warrants issued in 1886 

Balance 



Jan.l, 1887 



Totals 

By balance this date. 



Dr. 



$26,795 00 
27,006 80 
17,245 00 



$71,046 80 



Cr. 



$16,995 00 
26,920 00 
27,131 80 



$71,046 80 



$17,245 00 



STATE SEMINARY FUND. 



Date. 


• 


Dr. 


Cr. 


Jan.l, 1885.. 


By balance this date 




$95 08 




By balance this date 






Jan. 1, 1887.. 




$95 08 




1 







198 



auditor's repoet. 



SWAMP LAND INDEMNITY FUND. 



(Section 6174, Revised Statutes.) 



Date. 



Jan.l, 1885.. 



Jan. 1, 1887.. 



By balance this date 

By receipts in 1886 

By receipts in 1886 .... . . . 

To warrants issued in 1885. . 

To warrants issued in 1886, 

Balance 



Totals. 



By balance this date. 



Dr. 



$17,914 36 

12,320 67 

361 38 



Cf. 



¥308 93 
17,855 43 
12,432 05 



$30,596 41 $30,596 41 



$361 38 



EXECUTORS' AND ADMINISTRATORS' FUND 



(Section 259, Revised Statutes.) 



Date. 



Jan. 1, 1885. . By balance this date 

By receipts in 1885. .s 

By receipts in 1886 

By transfer from School Fund, 1885. 

To warrants issued in 1885 

To warrants issued in 1886 , 

Balance , 




Jan. 1, 1887.. 



Totals 

By balance this date 



$19,529 27 

5,558 42 

14,056 69 



$39,144 38 



Or. 



$24,937 19 

9,369 75 

4,551 94 

285 50 



$39,144 38 
$14,056 69 



BALANCE SHEETS. 



199 



INSURANCE DEPARTMENT FUND, 
(Section 5d34, Revised Statutes.) 



Date 



Jan. 1, 1885.. |By balance this date 

:By receipts in 1885 

■By receipts in 1886 

To warrants issued in 1885 
To warrants issued in 1886 
Balance 




Totals 

I 

Jan. 1, 1887. . By balance this date 



10,374 88 

17,420 90 

5,126 81 



Cr. 



.*582 88 
23,339 71 
15,000 00 



f 38,922 59 $38,022 59 



$5,126 81 



EARNINGS MISSOURI PENITENTIARY. 



Date. 



Jan. 1, 1885. 



By balance this date 

I By receipts in 1885 

By receipts in 1888 

To warrants Issued in 1885 
To warrants issued in 1886 



Dr. 



$174,513 42 
184,656 07 



Cr 



$2,242 21 
172,271 21 
184,656 07 



Totals [ $359, 169 49, $359 . 169 49 



MILITIA FUND. 



(From sale of old guns, etc.) 



Date. 



Dr. 



Jan. 1, 1885. . By balance this date, 

By receipts in 1885.. 
; By receipts In 1886.. 



Jan. 1, 1887. . By balance this date. 



Cr. 



$1,346 01 

118 00 
8 00 

$1,472 01 



200 



auditor's report. 



ROAD AND CANAL FUND. 



(Section 6912, Bevised Statutes.) 



Date. 



Jan. 1, 1886.. 



Jan. 1, 1887.. 



By balance this date 

By receipts in 1885. 

By receipts in 1886 

To warrants issued in 1886 
Balance 



Totals 

By balance this date. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



$9,912 30. 
6,360 27| 



$7,924 40 
1,709 81 
6,638 36 



$16,272 57| $16,272 67 



$6,360 27 



LIST OF BALANCES IN THE SBVEBAL FUNDS CONSTITUTING THE 

6EN1CRAL BALANCE IN THE TREASURY DECEMBER 81, 1886, 

AFTER PAYMENT OF ALL OUTSTANDING WARRANTS. 



Funds. 



State Revenue Fund 

State Interest Fund 

State School Fund 

State School Moneys 

State Seminary Moneys 

State Seminary Fund 

Swamp I«and Indemnity Fund 

Executors' and Administrators' Fund. 

Insurance Department Fund 

Militia Fund 

Road and Canal Fund 



Cr. 



$347,700 21 

148 16 

439 80 

180,165 00 

17,245 00 

95 06 

361 38 

14,056 69 

5,126 81 

1,472 01 

6,360 27 



Total. 



$573,170 41 



r-»" 



BALANCE SHEETS. 



201 



GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— RECAPITULATION OF. 



Date. 



I Jan. 1, 1885.. 



By balance this date 

By receipts in 1885 and 1886 

By transfers in 1885 and 1886 

To warrants issued in 1885 and 1886. 

To transfers in 1885 and 1886 

Balan ce 



Jan. I, 1887.. 



Totals 

By balance this date , 



Dr. 



Cr. 



$7,688,495 19 

2,795,097 90 

573,170 41 



$1,411,883 61 
6,749,781 99 
2,795,097 90 



$10,966,763 50 $10,956,763 50 



$573,170 41 



202 



auditor's kbport. 



TABLE SHOWING MONTHLY RECEIPTS INTO EACH FUND AND THE 

THE TWO YEARS ENDING 



Months. 



1885 January — 
February... 

March 

April 

May 

^une 

July 

August 

September. . 

October 

November.. . 
December . . 

Totals . , 

1886 January..., 
February . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

Septembber 

October 

November.. 
December . . 

Totals . . 



Receipts into 



Receipts into Receipts I Receipts 



State Rev- State Interest into State into Swamp 



enue Fund. 



$488,102 28 

286,964 33 

148,343 87 

167,293 05 

77,661 15 

20,428 85 

78,810 13 

130,299 98 

56,082 25 

54,691 73 

83,307 39 

245,240 86 



Fund. 



School 
Fund. 



Land In- 

demnitv 

Fund.' 



$1,837,225 87 



$524,740 44 

212,947 07 

153,676 56 

104,349 66 

68,274 78 

23,215 09 

32,251 04 

35,925 70 

86,435 74 

61,469 40 

111,377 20 

243,776 41 



$455,470 70 
139,185 25 
42.879 54 
24,233 17 
80,544 31 
46,474 24 
39,139 18 
87,957 62 
32,366 00 
41,374 64 
72,459 71 
248,120 49 



$25 00 $8,034 83 

' 621 73 



25 00 5,983 22 

25 001 

60 OO' 

1,750 00, 687 05 

12.5 00 947 63 

25 00 

73U 97 



$1,260,204 85 



25 00 
50 00 
25 00; 



250 00 



$507,964 88 
181,322 13 
115,603 32 

86.397 39 
46,785 65 

17.398 91 
18,813 44 
30,585 51 
84,271 10 
57,346 42 
95,188 03 

312,891 42 



»2,125 00 



$50 00 



$17,855 43 



$1,648,439 09 $1,553,668 20 



6866 


$2,208 67 
2,637 75 
5,776 47 






60 00 






1^447 78 


50 00 








26 00 




25 00 


36i*38 




$12,432 05 



BALANCK SHEET. 



203 



AGGREGATE MONTHLY KECEIPTS INTO THE STATE TREASURY FOR 
DECEMBER 31, 1886. 



Receipts into Receipts into 

Executors' Insurance 
and Admin is- Department 
trators' Fund Fund. 



Receipts into Receipts 
earnings Mis-.into Militia 
souriPeni- I Fund, 
tentiary. ' 



f 318 28' 

312 83 

1 00: 

1,715 05 

232 01 

3,871 32. 

1,904 lOl 

102 00' 

26 85 



$8,837 31 
12,66246 



7 10 
879 21, 



2,500 00 



$9,369 75 $23,339 71 



$803 43; 
115 30, 



789 49' 
68 68 

656 72 
36 59 

157 58! 

902 53 
36 17 

385 83 

599 62 



10,000 00 



5,000 00 



$9,387 75 
9,3-21 70; 
9,075 Oli 
16,122 77; 
10.928 00' 
14,109 641 
19,080 56 
17,097 34 
18,483 35 
16,936 34 
17,608 42 
15,120 43 



Receipts 

into Road 

and Canal 

Fund. 



Aggregate 
momthly re- 
ceipts. 



$1,709 81 



$118 OOi 



$970,776 15 
436,405 84 
218,310 04 
208.389 04 
119,415 47 
87,321 10 
141,716 41 
235,481 94 
107,689 42 
113,145 61 
173,432 62 
512,135 99 



$172,271 21 $118 001 *1,709 81; $3,324,219 63 



$14,277 58 
14,145 87 
14,313 16 
12,619 9u 
16,708 93 
13.062 79 
12,058 96, 
12,657 75, 
23,760 04i 
17,290 20J 
10,791 34 
23,069 49 



1 

1 


$8 00 


$6,638 36 







J4,551 94; $16,000 00 $184,656 07 























$8 00 


$6,638 36 



$1,047 

408 

295 

205 

134 

54 

68 

80 

195 

136 

217 

580 



,836 33 
,630 37 
,801 71 
,862 90 
,260 87 
,333 61 
,210 03 
,674 32 
,419 41 
,142 19 
,767 40 
,723 32 



$3,425,562 36 



204 



auditok's report. 



TABLE SHOWING WARRANTS ISSUED MONTHLY ON EACH OP THE 

TWO YEARS ENDING 



1885 



Months. 



Warrants Warrants 
issued on { issued on 
State Rev- State Inter- 
enue Fund, est Fund. 



January $50,037 83 

February 881 85 

March 276.596 61 

April 297.396 22, 

Way 75,721 99 

June 123,836 67! 

July 139,467 74 

70,262 34 
76,8.52 13 
179,265 09 
69.046 05 
87.860 38 



Warrants is- 
sued on State 
Sinking Fund 



Warrants is- 
sued on State 
School 
Moneys. 



August 
September 

October 

November , 
December. , 



Totals 



$1,447,22480 



585,709 70 

15 00 

67 70 

341,142 50 

75 

21 46 

526 00 



$553,045 00 



2 00 
339,290 76 



65,000 001 



«1,266,775 87 



$618,045 00 



1886 January A 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



Totals 



$176,462 32 
100,441 08 
55,173 40 
101,217 45 
85,394 72 
60,866 71 
79,077 63 
60,777 55 
54,611 15 
74,366 05 
84,446 72 
59,811 00 



$119 22 

14,146 41 

1,050 50 



2,784 75 

311,133 20 

1.240 00 

4,532 84 

79 53 

10,010 00 



$418,461 50 



75,000 00 



295,175 44 



$992,645 78 $640,271 89 



120,000 00 
82,296 31 

*5i*486 66 



$747,237 81 



$463,417 52 

103,495 15 

5,685 45 

9,756 55 

74,170 05 

3,912 15 

1,633 45 

798 90 

1,322 05 



$664,191 27 



$678,096 08 

11,874 00 

3,255 65 

2,966 10 

3,908 85 



$700,100 68 



BALANCE SHEET. 



205 



FUNDS AND THE AGGREGATE MONTHLY AMOUNT DRAWN FOR THE 
DECEMCER 31, 1886. 



Warrants j Warrants 

issaed on issued on 

State Semi-' Swamp 

nary Land In- 

Moneys. ; demnity 

Fund 



$16,995 00 



Warrants 
issued on 
Execu- 
tors' and 
Adminis- 
tors'Fund 



Warrants 
issued on 
Insurance 
Depart- 
ment Fund. 



I Warrants 
[ issued on 
I earnings 
I Missouri 
Peniten- 
tiary. 



Warrants 

issued on 

Road and 

Canal 

Fund. 



Aggregate 
amount of 
warrants is- 
sued in each 
month. 



$8,634 83 

"ejooi'ss 



9,800 00 



687 05 

947 63 

73 85 

730 97 



235 08 



$8,480 47 

1,440 16 

434 18 

315 47 

22 90 

2,081 46 

150 00 

188 43 

55 00 

24 45 

6,336 75 



$1,988 88 $11,629 96' 



$26,795 00 $17,914 36 



f 




2,286 87, 
1,123 35 
1,103 15 
2,573 86 
1,076 40 
1,411 74; 
1,233 20 
1,207 79' 
1,189 65 
1,180 00 



18,396 71' 
15,122 77' 
10,928 00 
14,109 64i 
19,080 56 
17,097 34 
18,483 35 
16,936 24 
17,608 42 
15,120 43 



$16,374 88; $174,513 42 



$89,132 14 

10,956 84 

883,424 07 

1,337,040 28 

191.338 89 

490,116 52 

180,279 63 

163,225 21 

166,792 80 

199,067 02 

94,981 77 

445,008 70 



$4,251,363 87 



$17,120 00 



9,886 80 



$250 00 



2,208 67 
8,414 22 



$42 00 



766 22 



1,447 78 



$27,006 80 



$12,320 67 



709 10 

3,161 155 

215 70 



17 43 
646 72 



$5,558 42 



$1,674 00 
1,216 15 
1,270 10 
1,631 15 
2,564 45 
1,220 20 
1,495 85 
1,184 85 
1,123 65 
1,189 45 
1,202 40 
1,648 65 



$17,420 90 



$14,277 68 
14,145 87 
14,313 16 
12,619 96 
16,708 93 
13,062 79 
12,058 96 
12,557 75 
23,760 04 
17,290 20 
10,791 34 
23,069 49 



$184,656,07 



$8,868 90 

434 75 

347 80 

173 90 

86 95 



$9,912 30 



1209,695 12 
548,661 01 

71,807 16 
118,443 45 
190,867 07 
386,282 90 
224,468 34 
852,923 31 

92,098 82 
157,939 15 

99,597 89 
384.347 10 

$3,337,131 32 



206 



AUDITOP/S RKPORT. 



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BALANCE 8Hli.£TS. 



207 



EXECUTORS' AND ADMINISTRATORS' FUND. 

Statement showing the amounts remaining in the Execators' and Administrators' 
Fund to the credit of the following named persons, December 31, 1886. 



Heirs of. 



Amount. 



Jno. B. Allard 

Henry L. Arnold 

Joshua Adams 

Oral S. Algus 

Wm.R- Allen 

Wm. Aldridge 

Marshall Allen 

Hoda Arnson, (F. Kollenheier) 

8ame. ( Hirsh Arnson j 

Alex. Allison 

ThoR. Bentley 

Elijah Barthlow 

Geo. Buckholly 

N. I. Boardman 

Jno. G. Bectler 

Jaa. G. Bell. . .' 

Davl d Bu rri 8 

Francis r»remian . . . , 

Christopher F. Bass 

Elial Barton 

Jonathan Bills 

Thos. Beatley 

Jno. H. Binder 

Nicholas Bougnair 

Claus Bosehen , 

Nicholas Bartoline 

John Boylen 

Wm. Brickey 

Chas. D. Brandt 

Mary Bruffer 

a.B. Bush 

Robt. H. Bush , 

John Barnard .• 

Anna Bond 

Wm Bacon 

Isaac Bollinger 

F. Brennecke , 

Louis Beck 

Fred Bchrens 

Philip Block 

Lucille Berkenbine 

A. Brown, or person No. 2, lost on steamer Stonewall 

Hicb'l Buckley, or person No. 16, lost on steamer Stonewall 

Thos. Brown 

Jas. Bowen 

Wiley Bird 

Jaco6 Busch 

Hinna Bennett 

JobnBurris 

Thos. Burke 

Taylor Blew 

Benjamin Bradley 

Mary Barnett 

Conrad Beckneuse 

Casper Bucher 

Stephen Bowles 



$100 00 
20 00 

14 59 
66 14 

23 65 
223 80 

35 62 
90 13 

110 80 
194 42 
288 60 

41 79 
101 00 

12 15 

26 37 

202 00 

15 00 
52 39 

17 27 

68 39 
59 74 

4 07 
476 28 
263 52 

36 00 
10 00 
78 23 
20 12 

69 04 
32 00 

108 30 
26 58 

138 00 
74 40 

168 20 

85 70 
19 02 
39 23 

103 00 

42 84 

24 62 

18 42 
105 40 
332 35 

87 89 

86 72 
12 00 
36 21 

5 00 

6 99 
2 40 

65 00 
73 60 
31 90 
100 00 
10 00 



208 



auditor's report. 



EXECUTORS' AND ADMINISTRATORS' FUND— Continued. 



Heirs of. 



-•- — 



Mary F.Bond 

John Bender 

Nancy BurraB 

Mary Boles 

Thos. J. Barnum 

Bingham <& Mc Arthur. 

Chas. K. Barnett 

Christian Burri 

James Beatty 

Geo. Bouldln 

Patrick Barnable 

Jas. Brace , 

Geo. Bouzer 

M. Baldridge 

Irwin C. Brown 

George Crong 

Richard Crook 

Ann Coleman 

Alice Campbell 

Clossin 



SamM Cox 

Francis Carr 

Matthew Crockett 

Christopher F Chene /. 

James Corrlng 

Mathew Canaher 

James Caldwell 

Wm. Carroll, ct al 

Gabriel Crisman 

Jesse Couts 

Susannah Carson 

David Chapman 

John Cronan 

Annie Casey 

TVm. Cook ! 

A. M. Copeland 

James Campbell 

Nathaniel Cook 

P G. Chalfant 

John Canterbury 

Christ. Clower 

Leonard Calvert 

Jas Cook 

Jas. Collins 

Gideon Carter [ 

Jerry Conelo, or person No. 36, lost on steamer Stonewall 

G. L. Colley 

George Collins 

John Corbett /..,,,... 

H.A.Cooper .. 

F. Childress !..'!.!!.'..!." 

Evangeline Catlin 

W m . C arl i 8l e '..'.".'.'.'. V. '.'.','. 

Vina Chrisman !.....!!.....! 

Geo. Cnitzinger ....!....!!....!.!.!!.!].. 

Samuel Cox .....,,/.... .... 

Newton Chambers .!..!.....!!!!!.. 

Russell Campbell ! .V..\.[..[]...] ........ 

Bernard Crossin .................. 

Martha Clopper and Jas. M. Connell .....!......... 

Abigail Carpenter 



Amount. 


i $106 45 


8 51 


40 23 


1 10 00 


80 89 


201 07 


829 41 


20 90 


5 OO 


160 00 


25 20 


8 55 


274 30 


40 00 


o2 25 


1 G 43 


95 63 


3 12 


32 00 


10 13 


30 19 


152 87 


92 80 


W 38 


150 64 


60 08 


.52 .30 


1 32 


; 266 42 


i 42 96 


1 67 44 


275 49 


i 70 71 


259 63 


67 14 


30 00 


9 20 


615 91 


< 142 98 


20 25 


11 00 


; 128 67 


21 43 


72 50 


7 .S5 


343 77 


1 74 36 


j 171 50 


1 195 90 


35 53 


143 70 


i 4 52 


122 63 


117 47 


28 GO 


5 00 


30 00 


200 UO 


46 30 


24: 80 


9 94 



BALANCE SHEETS. 



209 



EXECUTORS' AND ADMINISTRATORS' FUND~^ontinu«d. 



Heirs of. 



Amount. 



Sarah A. Carter 

Jos. Carter 

Elisha A. Chapman 

Tho8. Coffey 

K. G. Cowden 

Sarah A . Connor 

Jacob Oopenhayen 

Mary J. Cooran 

Catherine A. Carter 

John Cataner 

Jas. DonahaT 

Jno. Dillingham 

Jos. Delisle 

Allen Dickerman 

Peter Deichert 

Peter Diah 

John Dangan •. 

Wm . Davis, Jr 

John Dent 

Joseph Declair 

Wm. Doherty ; .' 

Oliver Duncan 

Adam Dickinson 

J. Doyle, or person No. 35, lost on steamer Stonewall 

Ennis Dixon 

John Dillon 

Michael Donovan 

Alfred Davidson 

Jno. Dunboy 

. Archibald Dunn 

Theodore Drees 

August Dick 

Wm . Duncan , 

Leo. DIerberger 

Owen Dallev 

Samuel K . Dinsmore 

Jacob Dlerterman 

John Damhoff 

Augnist Duenkel 

John E. Buell 

Thos. Erry 

David Edmonds 

Henry Effgers 

W.D. ^Iflott 

Jeremiah Evans 

Christlai- Esllnger 

Richard Elms 

Susan EUer 

Daniel M.. Eaton 

Tottv En^rlish 

Chas'. EUTott • 

Henry Elliott 

Bernard Fitzimmons 

Havier Purer 

Martin Felkins 

Jno. Frick 

SarahFarris , 

Antoine Ferris 

Andrew J. Farrls 

David Faulkner 



$2 00 

47 88 

9 00 

229 16 

106 90 

32 62 

621 30 

89 48 
10 00 

676 78 
19 00 
32 19 
42 70 
96 00 
6 71 
10 00 

146 00 
63 32 
74 06 

18 40 
63 80 

8 50 

90 94 
22 42 

269 00 

30 26 

1,258 60 

•10 d5 

72 98 

17 56 
15 82 

179 86 

82 56 

1 00 

46 42 

5 00 

88 28 

346 53 

148 35 

113 00 

24 85 

42 16 

40 84 

134 21 

73 87 
136 99 
210 00 

19 44 
15 16 

8 10 

260 23 

102 00 

442 95 

86 66 

20 00 
39 65 

18 80 
1C8 64 

12 40 
28 77 



F P — M. 



210 



auditor's report. 



EXECUTORS' A^D ADMINISTRATORS' FUND— Continoed. 



Heirs of. 



Amount. 



Nicholas Fleener 

Jas. Fisher, M. D 

Jesse T . Fore 

Jas. K. Fleming 

Thos. Fitzgerald 

Cecelie Fey 

Jas. Gallaher 

Jas. I. Galllhan 

N. B. W. Griffin 

Jno . Grand 

Jno. Glodden 

Lorentz Gelger 

Daniel Glllis 

Jacob Glaucht 

Celeste Guyenet 

Barney Garvey 

Samuel W. Glasscock. 

Spencer Giley 

Daniel Greason 

Daniel Grant 

Jesse Garland 

Henry Gramblin 

E. R. Grove 

Fred Grebe 

Casper Greber 

Hyman G. Graham ... 

Z. German 

Redman Hastings 

Isaac Hilderbrand 

Malcolm Henry 

Wm. Hale 

Jas. Humphreys (col.) 

W. C. Hopkins 

Jno . Hopewood 

Joseph Hahn 

James Herry 

John H Morning 

Henry Hambrock 

John Hogan 

Anthony Hannigan . . . 

Wenslaw Huecky 

Fritz Henitz 

Catherine Helnrichs . 

John L. Harris 

Sarah G. Harvey 

Harrison Hatcher 

Leonard Hettinger 

George Hardin .'. 

James Hayden 

John Hall 

Washington Hill 

Ellen Hays 

Wm. Hempel 

Barney Holcomb 

Margaretta Hartman . . 

H. Heitel 

A. Hoover 

Sarah Humphreys . . . . 

John Hoops 

Matilda Hatlej^ 

F. K. Hartman 



$11 85 


•17 33 


50 00 


39 27 


126 95 


79 .S3 


153 83 


201 01 


32 57 


180 00 


14 00 


4 00 


9 65 


38 23 


180 00 


45 00 


117 69 


40 19 


94 70 


60 94 


3 00 


15 00 


464 37 


230 13 


327 44 


462 13 


20 OO 


32 82 


16 00 


20 00 


227 50 


120 80 


69 03 


58 13 


11 34 


38 32 


16 90 


14 80 


3 19 


30 07 


16 00 


86 94 


80 30 


24 07 


19 21 


7 05 


68 38 


106 13 


45 46 


16 90 


56 77 


123 68 


7 04 


646 


58 44 


382 05 


14 SO 


7 35 


5 00 


31 00 


76 31 



BALANCE SUE£TS. 



211 



KXECUTORS' AND ADMINISTRATORS' FUND— Continued. 



Heirs of. 

Liicinda Hall 

James Hicklins 

Sallie P. Hanna 

George Hemdon 

Thomas Hoover 

Leonard Harold 

Sarah Hardin , 

Owen Hughes 

Charles hammer 

David Hanna 

Michael Hanon 

Theresa HurJhurt , 

Hall, Noland «& Co 

Charles Irwin 

Wm. Johnson 

John Job ^ 

James M. Johnson 

Margaret Janis 

Charles Jadelot 

Sarah Julian 

Stephen Julian 

John Page Johnson 

Die Johnson 

James Johnston 

James Jordan 

£livira Johnson , 

Charles Keiphold 

Frederick Kisker 

Edward Kuhnert : 

Koger Kiley 

Laurent Knausc 

yellx Kircher 

William Krense 

James Eagle 

Jacob Kartner 

Reuben Killlngsworth 

Kdward Keiths 

Nicholas Kennel 

>V illlam KlouB 

Owen Eenney 

David Kidweil 

Charles Kirkpatrick 

Margaret Kelley 

S. H. Kelley 

James Kane 

H . A . Koenlg 

Julius Krusch 

LoQis C. Koos 

Abron Kennedy 

Thomas B. Kelley 

John P. Long 

Jerome Lancement 

Henry Likins 

James Lemon 

William LewiB 

Catherine Llnebaugh 

C- Lyons, or person No. 19 lost on steamer Stonewall 

W ilUam Logan 

Barton D liovelace 

John London 



' 


Amount. 


$64 50 


10 00 


54 80 


20 49 


13 93 


29 00 


87 38 


850 00 


4 50 


189 65 


423 79 


7 25 


16 15 


600 


1,624 16 


25 00 


8 34 


43 53 


25 74 


3 54 


18 26 


60 00 


27 74 


30 00 


564 31 


30 98 


233 00 


75 95 


200 05 


17 41 


47 70 


8 00 


46 01 


41 SO 


59 39 


15 57 


20 50 


9 90 


14 09 


6 77 


5 00 


697 78 


19 00 


S3 00 


17 67 


513 95 


106 00 


211 84 


-m) 00 


345 25 


10 20 


169 30 


972 05 


240 01 


17 00 


30 88 


14 72 


5 00 


4()0 92 


158 20 



212 



auditor's rkport^ 



EXECUTORS' AND ADMINISTEATOKS' FUND— Ck)NTiNUED. 



Heirs of. 



Amount 



G. W. Lewis 

P. H. Lee 

W. K. Lamm 

S. B. Lamm 

Sarah Bi. Lanham. . . 

John Lyons 

Marie Laws 

James S. Lightner.. 
(Stephen Mallowney. 

James Maher 

George Martin 

Samuel Moore 

Hiram Moss 

James McSweeny . . . 
Richard McDoughty 
Elizabeth McClare . . 

John Malker 

Stephen Milton 

Henry McClosky 

George Molter 

Christian Mueller . . . 

Mary Mueller..! 

Terrence McKenna . 

Thomas Maney 

John McFatridge . . . 

Daniel McLard 

Charles MuUin 

P. B. Muller 

Nathan McCarver. . . 
Michael McCormack 
Milley 



Henry Morse 

Frank Mayberry 

Jacob fl. Mock 

Celeste Messplay 

Michael McGuinn 

Thomas Murphy 

Alfrey Medlin 

George W. Martin , 

Philip Maddin 

Anna D. Moyers 

Auffust Morgan 

T.W.Moses 

Elizabeth McMillan 

Samuel McFadden 

Albert Miller 

William Morrison 

John McN ally 

David McFaggart 

Daniel Marto, or person No. 21, lost on steamer Stonewall 

Philip Mohr 

Catherine Medders 

Adam Marcus , 

Samuel McGaity 

Christian Mueller 

John Moore 

Moses Markel , 

William Martin 

John Meyers 

Francis Mallaban , 

V. Mueller 



$46 40 
96 ST) 
56 40 
14 10 
82 20 

190 65 
55 68 

470 19 

234 64 

246 2S 
8 00 

182 13 

50 31 

itS 00 

29 00 

250 43 

419 99 

37 85 

142 43 

127 09 

22 37 

42 38 

40 78 

7 59 
14 23 
19 25 

213 -22 
126 00 

247 35 
46 62 
50 12 

10 75 
88 05 
93 75 
36 80 
34 25 

167 46 

11 10 

214 00 
85 12 

337 22 
77 15 
26 79 

242 00 
60 00 
71 00 
65 92 

381 34 

12 87 
22 02 
55 SO 
71 87 

277 74 

8 21 
22 00 

121 85 

48 00 

3 no 

46 00 

16 95 

124 25 



RECKIPTS. 



213 



EXECUTORS' AND ADMINISTRATORS' FUND— Coktinukd. 



Heirs of. 



Amount. 



Aurora Moran 

John McCaleb •. 

Barbara Maus 

Ooorad Maus 

Kobert McHenry ' 

Elizabeth McDonough 

Ella McCune 

Christina Meyer 

Henry Murta 

Daniel Manley 

James Matthews 

Frederick Muller 

Richard Marshall 

Joseph Maurens 

Jeremiah McOrath 

James Murphy 

Mary Malowney 

Georjj^e Maus • 

James Morris 

Lola Mason 

John H. McAlpine 

Joibua Madison 

John Martin 

Joseph B. Nelson 

Nicholas Nedwin. 

Samuel F. Nigh 

John T. Nash 

Soathway Nelson 

William Noetzer 

Thomas Neeley 

Major Nash 

Archibald Offner 

Adam Offher 

John O'Leary 

>Ilchael O'Brien 

Warren Offult 

R. R. Osborn 

John B. Owens 

Michael O'Toole, or person No. 50 lost on steamer Stonewall 

Alexander O'Take 

R B. Owen 

Ellen O'Connor 

Martha O'Neill 

Elizabeth O'Meara 

John O'CalUhan 

John Ormond 

John Pepperman 

Calvin Preston 

Uaptiste Picon. . .^ 

Thomas Parsons 

Margaret Parks 

Henry Prensch 

William Price 

William Pense 

Henry Philips 

WUliam Pollard 

WiUlam Patton 

Hulda Patterson 

Letitia Parker 

Eliza Persinger 

John Pagh 



$44 25 

96 45 

113 47 

113 47 

29 51 
1,357 04 

17 38 
71 08 
88 10 

110 57 
25 05 

100 00 
17 78 

373 96 
50 31 

103 17 

30 10 
33 00 
76 68 

19 60 
640 30 

3 00 

111 30 
81 92 

2 25 

20 00 
41 77 
41 &3 

405 10 

73 03 

2 80 

20 00 

6 73 

45 50 

60 

24 53 

47 00 

, 92 64 

330 27 

10 82 

61 83 

219 11 

32 14 

15 84 

3,638 16 

627 39 

78 00 

6 57 

443 75 

10 20 

19 82 
73 93 

264 62 
37 00 
83 03 

20 00 
156 82 

67 80 

111 47 

1 00 

152 02 



214 



auditor's report. 



EXECUTORS' AND ADMIN ISTRA.TORS' FUND.— Continued. 



Heirs of. 



Stephen M. Phelan 

Daniel and Mary Quinlan 

Marv Quinlan 

Reuben , (colored, Miller county) 

William Rohr 

Henry Rickoian 

Frances Rigliord 

Frances Repetto 

Enoch Randall 

William Rowles 

Ruf us Renox 

Anthony Randol 

Mary A . Rogers 

John Romego 

Thomas W . Ranney 

Sarah Robertson 

Sophia Roy 

Roxaiia Koy 

•lane Ring 

John Koark 

Anna Reld 

Nicholas Robey 

F. Rasat 

Michael Rowen 

-X.J. Roundtree 



Edwin Rogers 

Jacob Roberts 

Wilhelmina Riecher, 

D. E. Reese 

Fred. K. Suhman... 

John Self. 

Cornelius Sheridan . 
George W. Seaward. 

William Seward 

Gottfried Schmidt.. 

Francis chinde 

JaiAes Summerville. 

John D Siefels 

Jacob shroyer 

I. G. Smith 

Monsier Ste. Ange. . 

Polly Smith 

Isaac Schwartz 

Hamilton Smith 

Henry Shale 

Lo rents Sauerbier . . 

Tobias Schridder 

John Schultz 

Hartley Stevens 

Peter Smith 

Ellsha Slmms 

Fred Schlloof 

Wm. --mith 

Jas. P. Scull 

l-icwis Stofel 

Catherine SuUens. 

Azabia Stone 

John Sites 

Meredith Smith 

Benjamin Shannon.. 
George Shoemaker.. 



Amount. 


3 73 65 


700 


10 40 


30 36 


240 17 


4 28 


18 99 


21 89 


44 02 


15 25 


70 00 


40 ()3 


87 25 


9 39 


51 00 


26 10 


479 42 


60 55 


55 94 


58 79 


876 70 


70 OO 


43 58 


9 65 


67 11 


47 OO 


17 20 


32 50 


45 93 


123 70 


9 91 


33 OO 


6 00 


29 00 


3S 00 


55 OG 


11 10 


7 IS 


127 35 


30 00 


159 20 


58 72 


16 55 


35 07 


311 58 


113 71 


32 92 


121 05) 


48 59 


26 70 


387 60 


36 30 


187 87 


852 20 


37 11 


76 HO 


49 12 


20 (X) 


27 70 


112 00 


150 32 



BALANCE 8HKETS. 



215 



EXECUTORS' AND ADMINISTRATORS' FUND— Continued. 



Heirs of. 



Amount. 



George Schenhanser 

Henry Scherman 

Jesse Satton 

R. B. Shamblln 

John ii^mith 

Benedict Schmidt 

S. Shaon -. 

Wm. A. Smith 

Charles Schultz 

Martin Schuler 

Oliver Scott 

John Schumpe 

Sebra Smith . . . : 

P. Schrogue 

E. Stetnkemper 

G. D. Stout 

P.A.H. Stein 

Leonard Schussler 

Tiios. H. Sands 

Peter Scolten 

Wm. Shaw 

Magdeiena SpaenJe 

John G. Stohl 

Alex Slater ; 

Patrick Shannessy 

John Sabadlo 

W. C- Sands 

Stacey & Stone . . 

Nancy Schoolcraft 

Jane E Sandridge 

Otto Schmidt 

Henry Slaughter 

Jacob Thomas 

Allen C. Turner 

John Tierney 

Peyton Thomas 

Alfred Turner 

Fred C. Thiele , 

Joseph T welvetree 

Samael Truelove 

Jackson Todd 

Chas. F. Tiernan 

Thos. H. Tonby 

Margaret Thorp 

W. S. True 

BasilL. Thorpe 

Eliza R. Toler 

Mary Thies • 

Dennis Toner , 

Eliza T. Thompson 

Unknown man ' ' A" 

John Usher 

Unknown person No . 2 

Unknown man No. I, lost on steamer Stonewall 

Unknown person No. 9, lost on steamer Stonewall. . . 
Unknown woman No. 38, lost on steamer Stonewall. 

Unknown white male floater 

Samuel Vanleer 

Fred Van Beeham 

AbiBhai Van Meter , 

S. H. VadervaUe 



$120 18 

184 00 

104 92 
19 80 
40 00 

152 82 

109 44 

9 44 

12 67 

12 83 
190 00 

25 60 
121 66 

33 49 

140 39 

15 35 

16 95 
100 00 

70 00 
10 15 

510 15 

3 00 

500 

22 80 

47 14 

1 00 

30 37 

8 26 

141 92 
45 00 

36 59 
515 87 

18 11 
375 00 

37 45 
340 00 

5 30 
25 09 

105 00 
229 63 

HO 
448 25 
288 77 

14 50 

71 96 
37 58 
16 55 
10 CO 

1 00 
68 68 

102 00 

150 58 

27 04 

18 58 

22S 72 

80 62 

37 40 

108 92 

174 36 

5 00 

185 80 



216 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



EXECUTORS' AMD ADMINISTRATORS' FUND— Continued. 



Heirs of. 



Amount'^ 



Wm. Williams 

Littleberry Webb... 
JohnC. Wolfram.. 

P. Whipple 

Jas. Welsh 

Geo. Woepple 

Elizabeth Wavers.. 
G. W. Whitehead.. 

John C. White 

Jas. A.Washington 
LukeD. Williams.. 

Tye Wallace 

John H. Williams.. 

Pollaru Wisdom 

Christian Wurt 

Joseph White 

David Wallace 

Samuel Woods 

Jarvis Williamson. . 

R. W. Walker 

John Wallace 

Presley Worster 

Wallace vvineland.. 
Jas. M. Whitemore. 

Michael White 

Gottfried Wedow... 

George Worth«n 

Jas. Walsh 

Elizabeth Willis 

Jas. B. Welden 

Sallie E. Westbrook . 
rhos. P. Westbrook . 
Theo. D. Wheaton . . 

W. H. Waters 

R. C. Waters 

Ransom G. Waits . . . 

A . Wemecke 

Edward Welch 

Jacob F. Wagner... 
Abigail Wilkinson . . 

David vv alters 

John Yehling 

Joseph Tetter 

John Zenier 

Simon Ziegelmeyer. . 
Henrietta Zeb 



|;310 70 

23 43 

100 00 

112 50 

13 19 

66 56 

3(J9 47 

80 00 

39 95 

174 41 

103 54 

217 77 

176 04 

160 85 

55 00 

41 40 

15 00 

10 00 

1,730 58 

7 02 

8 65 
180 00 

35 20 

69 75 

709 

109 01 

10 35 
63 41 

354 42 

97 08 

19 'U 

2 74 

580 34 

29 75 

7 90 

11 28 
22 40 

1,716 05 

10 00 
157 58 

11 50 
35 29 

343 88 

9 35 
5 00 
7 10 



Contain Lng^ asBesament returns, abstract of tax-books, history of the bonded 
indebtedness of the State, bonded debt of counties, townships, cities and towns, 
history of tHe State school and seminary funds, history of the location and cost of 
the State University, School of Mines and Metallurgy, Normal Schools, State 
Lunatic Asylum No. 1 at Fulton, State Lunatic Xsylum No. 2 at St. Joseph, State 
Lanatic Asylani No. 3 at Neveda, St. Louis Insane Asylum, the Missouri Institu- 
tion for the Sducation of the Deaf and Dumb, the Missouri School for the Blind, 
the Penitentiary of the State of Missouri, and other institutions to which the State 
h&sgiren aidl. Tables showing amounts paid by the State on account of educa- 
tion, charity and crime ; taxes IcTied in 1886 for county and other local purposes ; 
taxes paid by merchants, manufacturers, dramshop keepers ; commissions allowed 
oollectors; cost of General Assemblies, and other statistical information. 



X. 1. 



auditor's report. 



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'^G*lSOl>-»Or->OXa6"^XX 



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CO t^x 



oo3co 
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;50 



sgs 



as 



Average 
value. 



"t>-'X "t^ CO'N'X CO OC rf to X l>« 

i-iCDCOXC^Or-OOOX"^ 

Xi— i-i^iOXOCOXOCO^ 
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8S 

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i-irH CO r^r-i rH i-i C^l 00 »-• rH r^ i-H <N 



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IMCO 



<M 'it !>. 
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O I— I 



CO 



tOOiOt-OOCOCOQt»-»-»X 
W'^iMOi-'OlNX^l^Xl'- 

Ot>.0<MOCOtOOCOTfJ»OtO 
■^ CO CO CO "^ CO CO 00 CO CO 00 00 



Number. 



to lO O i^ ^ l>- 'fHO to 1-* 00 t«- CO ^ 

g'-' c«5Sxco'rixcocgtOcoQX 
l>- --fi O O X tM O r-1 "W O X X -^ 



XX COi— '<MC«t*t'«'^«-^»OQC)tO-^ 



COX o 
to t>»r-( 

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■ OOO CO' 

ooogo 

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f-Tcc'i^T 



t^*<OtO 

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XXX 
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as 



STATISTICAL INVOKMATION. 



25 



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A9 O 9d I 

lO lO ^^ I 






iCQQ i00«0 «-! 
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'•11 1>- ^ » lis ^ I— I 



i-i ^ » i> -H 00 c^ 
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"* r-i » ©< C* »«l CO 






csoa c» » oo lo o^i »o t^-Mro -H i>-^ CO !-• 

iax:i;o35x»oxi^»coxx»a 



i>«t«« 



rH I— i"»r -H-M 



CO 



♦ICO 



lO r-( -H 1* f-H 



l>- O "M »R »^ C^l (» 

X O X t^ el l>. rH 



06 « 3a p X O "M 
OD C CO 9l id ^ -T)* 



c5Ci»-!i'2o QioocO'-icosiXQOX"— ''-^obco' OC*! 



r^ p^ p^ p^ p^ i-H r^ rH i-H 1-^ f-4 i— t r^ i— 1 r^ i— « r-t i— • rH r-< r^ i— t r— I i— I r— i i-H rH p-* 



X »0 05 "H^ X O ^ 
CO t^ Cd O r-i iO (71 

^ sa X o oco o 



N h- !>. r« C5 CO » 
Ntt- x^^co 



CO O -^ -M O 
O »5 »C O l>- 

O O t>- O -T« 



So^-^^ox 
^ 5<l l-H « PI «»i 



o ft C! o «5 tO »o 
X I* r>. ra CO :£ c» 

N n :3 -r i?q -^ CO 



b-p-f X ;ox 



OQt*»OiCiXCD»-HXCO'^'7^t>.l'» 






CO ir rr o o C5 CO 

X 'M CO »0 Ol C5 :5 

X CO ^ t.O CO l^ CO 



O O ar- 

r-< X ^ 



CO »0 »0 »0 pH 



ee-^'^fl^so »-• Gori'^ 



co-rxQ^ O 
'- — '-'COO W X 

gf^OCOCSOCi 
COXt-'^'MCO 

c h!^ 'i' CO CO "O 

O n ii CO tt !?i CO 



S it — to 5 i-j 15 



-f c«i><.co CO 
eO c» 10 CO CO 

iox:ocOp-( 



ph p^ O P-t 
CO CO l-* p-< ^ 



ift »0 »0 lO 



Ci 10 xco 
io;oi>Q 

CO '"^ CO '^ 



C0 05 »0 CO 

i-H la-iTi p-» 



O »0 O i.O «C "O t>- O X 

^ O :0 CO p t>. OS »o o 
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Or-i<M 



la r-i P-) <M 



cp I.O 1^ O CI O CI X p- 1 

^XOiOCOOiOiCO"^ 

Cii>-r>>oo'MgaOp-i 



050 
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CO ^ 



CO O Oi t- 'M -M r-i 
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CO 
CO 



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O Ol I— pH CO O CO 
<M '^ CO t>- 05 CO "^ 

O "^ d ^ ^ 'T< lO 



05 



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CO 



g^XiOXCOOCOp^ '-^"^ -tp-"05XOOC0 
CICOp-i CO^OlTjl C4»ii CO-MClCOiOO^ 



«0 O C: CI O p O O O O O «0 O 05 lO 

xxocor'.x— «'-^o:i-:o-t;p::j 
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05XO»'«'MXO»»0C0O 
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0^ 1-1 C5 t>- --f X X 
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i^rt>.i>.x"'r»o 

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oc^coo 

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coco 
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05 l^ CO P ^ rj< CO 



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pH p^pS 1-1 pH Ci|pHplPHp1 i—l 



»0 p P 05 »0 C5 CO CI O X P lO CO to tO 

Tfi lO P ^ -1 p -* "O CI CI CO O »:t 05 -1 

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CO p O lO l>. CO CO 
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CI CO « lo 25 -^ i>« 




CO CO 


CO CO CO CO T(< CO ^ 




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26 



AUDITOR^S REPORT, 



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<^G^(Ot»r^ coioe^ccto 



a> CO IC CNJ 9) CO (» (M <o Cl « 



8:^'<'QO-J0^XCO "C^IOCSOCCMCCQOaO-tO 
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00 OS Ci — , 
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CD ^ « O X ?C 'M lO 

<M o cc OS i:^ »o ic CO 
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^ :& -t <M CO »0 'N 05 t>- QC •<! 

o^ccoo-^OsCccooG^c: 



Tf o »o »t: «* 

t>. 5 T X 20 



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lOX -M 



C^» C^ "4 «^ i-i ^ CO 



COCOrtCO-^ »0 C^l CO C<l rH cq -sji r^ 00 i-l 



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r-«OC0«0»0 0iC0C0t>»i— i»CI>-Q'-<CftOft ^ 

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(Tl t>- X i-i CO O CO O CO 50 O ri O r- 1 lO -^ 00 

{N "<«f lO t>. t^r-Tio'co'cft OtTcO^C'r^N^ atTiO CO '-<' 

•MCO 1-4 r^ r-li-^i-i C5 rH 



X0ftt^000fti-<0 cSC>000:OOOOQOO?IOOftOA 



cs 



Ci 05 CO »— »c CO -r t'- 

CS;OC5»0 0'Mr-iX) 
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C9»Qa<li-l i-"»OOftOr-iCftCO 



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BTATISTIOAI. INFOBMATION. 



27 



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1^ lO rc >5 CI 






i^ t'- Ci ;:? 

CO t>» p— * •— ^ 

CD 00 l>- t>. 



CO 



O CO 05 l^ »0 Oi CO 
'M rr "M lO O ?b 05 
CO ... i-H 00 CO O t* 



CO l-^CO t* 

»o :o CO •-« 
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2 r* •?• ca » o 

Ci t»» cs »^ F^ 00 



CO-l"N -•> 



"5 --^ X 3^! O "«i< 






»-' o — ^ Tj^^ ca CO "^ CO f-* 1-^ 00 

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eot>.(» .— laQca-T^r- co i>oo«c© "t^ 



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t>«l> 



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ft »o t>- fN. -M ro o 

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Ci7*-0 O I— I CO -^ 



CO O •-I -* 
^r r- i I— I <M 
t»dl XCD 



05 Xt CO ^ "M <M 
CO :p 'M -^ t-- »0 

CO '"ii (jq t»- o) o 



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X CO 00 00 C5 ;0 'M 
CO ^t i-H 50 OS rH 



38 






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28 



AUDlTOR^S REPORT. 



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29 



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34 



AUDITOR S REPOHT. 



SUMMARY OF THE REAL ESTATE AND PERSONAL PROPERTY, AS- 
SESSMENTS FOR TAXES OF 1885 AND 1S8G. 



ASSESSMENT FOR TASKS OF 1885. 

Real estate, number of acres, 38,836,985 

Horses, namber, 707, 680 

Mules, number, 205,650 

Asses and Jennets, number, 4,536 

Neat cattle, number, 1,899,943 

Sheep, number, 1,386,978 

Hogs, number, 3,040,163 

Other live stock, number, 11,480 

Money, notes and bonds 

Brokers and exchange dealers 

Corporate companies 

All other personal property 

Aggregate valuation of personal property, 



$27,434,215; 
9 644 062' 

243, 143 

I 

25,647,571| 

1,560,381' 

5,882,968 

293,403 

57.561,919 
3,624,685 

13,172,917 

41.360.109 



Total assessment of real estate and personal prop- 
erty for taxes of 1885 



ASSBSSMBNT FOB TAXKS OF 1886. 

Real estate, number of acres, 39,123,054 

Horses, number, 719,325 

Mules, number, 217,735 

Asses and jennets, number, 4,530 

Neat cattle, number, 2,090,841 

Sheep, number, 1,147,948 , 

Hogs, number, 2,926,949 

Other live stock, number, 11,423 

Money, notes and bonds 

Brokers and exchange dealers 

Corporate companies , 

All other personal property 

Aggregate valuation of personal property, 




Total assessment of real estate and personal prop- 
erty for taxes of 1886 



26.991,529] 

I 

9,637.520 

243,560 

26,814,749 

1,160,902 

4,663,168 

191,523 

53,027,439 

2.734,402 
15,214,400 
40,463,936 



1495,293,007 



$186,425,373 



f681,718,380 



$518,803,118 



$181,133,128 



$699,936,246 



NoTK— The valuation of town lots opposite counties marked thus * is consoli- 
dated with the valuation of lands. 



STAtlSTICAL INFORMATION. 






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AUDITOR 8 REPORT. 



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STATISTICAL IHFORMATIOH. 



37 






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38 



auditor's rkport. 



! BRIDGE COMPANIES. 



Names of Companies. 



Valuation for Valuation for 
taxes of 1885. taxes of 1886. 



St» Louis Bridge Company ". . . . 

^orth Missouri and Quincy Bridge Company 

Hannibal Bridge Company 

Chicago & Atchison Bridge Company 

St. Joseph Bridge Company 

Leavenworth & Missouri Bridge Company 

Mississippi River Bridge Company 

Boonville Railroad Bridge Company 

Kansas City Bridge 

Total assessment of bridges for 1885 and 18S6. 



81,200,000 00 
150,000 00 
200,000 00 
200,000 00 
100,000 00 
75,000 00 
125,000 00 
250,000 00' 
700,000 00 

$3,0^0,000 00 



$1,200,000 00 
175,000 00 
200,000 00 
200,000 00 
100,000 00 
75,000 00 
125,000 00 
250,000 00 
650,000 00 



$2,975,000 00 



TELEGRAPH COMPANIES. 



Names of Companies. 



Valuation for 
taxes of 1885. 



Valuation for 
taxes of 1886. 



Western Union Telegraph Company 

Baltimore & Ohio Telegraph Company 

Brownville & Nodaway Valley Railroad Telegraph 
Company 

Leon, Mt. Ayr & Southwestern Railroad Telegraph 
Company 

Chicago, Burlington & Kansas City Railroad 'J'ele- 
graph 

Pacific Mutual Telegraph Company (Bankers & 
Merchants Telegraph Company, lessees) 

Total assessment of Tel. Co.'s for 1885 and 1S86. 



$566,786 80, $579,973 80 
6,024 80l 9,687 90 



390 48 



1,982 08 



2,994 OO: 



31,500 00 



390 4S 



1,982 08 



3,836 00 



26,700 00 



$609,678 16 $622,570 26 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



39 



RECAPITULATION. 



Valuation for Valuation for 
taxes of 1885. taxes of 1886. 



Assessment of railway companies , $40,955,319 62 

Assessment of bridge companies | 3,000,000 00 

Assessment of telegraph companies i 609,678 16 



$42,847,264 41 

2,975,000 00 

622,570 26 



Total railway, bridge and telegraph assessment $44,564,997 78 $46,444,834 67 



AGGREGATE STATEMENT OF THE ASSESSED VALUA TION OF REAL 
ESTATE, PERSONAL PROPERTY, RAILWAY, BRIDGE AND TELE 
GRAPH COMPANIES FOR THE TAXES OF 1885 AND 1886. 



Valuation for < Valuation for 
taxes of 1885. I taxes of 1886. 



Assessed valuation of real estate 

Assessed valuation of p^sonal property 

Assessed valuation of railway companies 

Assessed valuation of bridge companies 

Assessed valuation of telegraph companies 

Aggregate assessment for taxes of 1885 and 1886 



$495,293,007 00 $518,803,118 00 

I 

186.425,373 00: 181,138,128 00 

I 

40,955,319 62 42,847,264 41 

3,000,000 Oo! 2,975,000 00 

609,678 16 622,570 26 



$726,283,377 78! $746,381,080 67 



II 



AUDITOU'B BBPORT. 



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auditor's report. 



GENERAL SUMMARY OF TAXES LEVIED FOR 1886. 

REAL ESTATB AND PERSONAL TAX BOOKS OF 1886. 



State rerenue and State interest taxes. . 

CouDty revenue tax 

County interest and sinking Aind taxes, 

School taxes 

Road, bridge and drainage taxes 

Township taxes 



Total amount of taxes on the real estate and personal tax 
books for 1886 



$2,890,270 76 

3,765,427 96 

2,326,382 87 

3,209,456 28 

320,690 51 

337,910 W 



$12,780,150 56 



RAILROAD, TELEGRAPH AND BRIDGE TAX BOOK OF 1886. 



State revenue and State interest taxes, 

County revenue tax 

County interest and sinking fdnd taxes. 

School taxes 

Road, bridge and drainage taxes 

Township taxes 



Total amount of taxes on the railroad, telegraph and bridge 
tax books for 1886 



$198,398 16 

185,286 50 

100,921 08 

218,968 09 

33,853 80 

35,363 34 



$772,789 97 



MERCHANTS AND MANUFACTURERS TAX BOOK OF 1866. 



State revenue and State interest taxes 



County revenue tax , 

County, interest and sinking fund taxes, 

School taxes 

Road, bridge and drainage taxes 

Township taxes , 



Total amount of taxes on the merchants and manufacturers 
tax book for 1886 



$186,356 95 

336,682 32 

31,841 96 

126.765 16 

7,074 40 

16,451 76 



•705,172 55 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



67 



GENERAL SUMMAEY OP ALL STATE AND COUNTY TAXES LEVIED 

FOR 1886. 

State revenue and State interest taxes $3,205,025 86 



County reyeniie tax 

Connty interest and sinking fdnd taxes 

School taxes 

Road, bridge and drainage taxes 

Township taxes , 

Total amount of State and county taxes levied for 1886. 



I 



4,287,396 78 

2,459,155 91 

3,555,191 53 

361,618 71 

380,725 29 



3114,258,113 08 



ABSTRACT OF TAX BOOKS. 

Not including the valuation of merchandise and railroad property, 
the following table will show the taxable wealth of the State for each 
year from 1860 to 1886, as ascertained from the abstracts of the tax 
books for those years ; also the aggregate amount of State taxes levied 
each year from 1867 to 1886 : 



Years. 



Total taxable, State revenue 
wealth. tax. 



1S60 
1863 



$296,552,806 
198,602,216 



454,863,895 



18W ' 214 , 514 , 968 

1865 ' 262,354,932 

1866 332,681,668 

1867 

1868 1 470,773,119 

1869 504,255,885 1,261,650 70 

1870 559 , 082 , 569 1 , 396 , 715 50 

1871 585.239,795 1,463,606 20 

1872 572,293,377 1,147,972 11 



$1,207,730 67 
1,260,743 04 



State interest 
tax. 



1873 



685,532,089: 1,171,798 94 



1874 i 595,814,440 1,191 ,777 30 

1875 556,444,456 1,113,967 52 

1876 j 560,777,361 1,121,987 95 

1877 1 580,592,000 1,161,117 68 



$1,810,415 39 
1,178,502 32 
1,261,673 65 
1,396,773 19 
1,463,606 96 
1,433,061 31 
1,464,042 54 
1,489,794 33 
1,392,934 11 
1,122,049 07 
1,161,117 68 



68 auditor's report. 



ABSTRACTS OF TAX BOOKS— Coxtinukd. 



Years. iTotal taxable State revenue State interest 

wealth. tax. tax. 



1878 $589,538,985 $1,180,107 85 $1,180,107 85 

I I 

1879 ' 527,993,520 1, 056,094 98 1,056,094 98 



1880 
1881 
1882 



532,692,043 1,0W,766 09 1,064,756 09 

573,120,539 1,145,697 58 1.145,699 13 

I I 

615,260,539 1,231,492 81^ 1,231,492 79 



1883 1 623,522,930, 1,246,147 07 1,246,147 07 



1884 



686,236,538 1,372,130 02 1,372,130 00 



1885 1 684,446,0021 1,363,904 79 1,363,904 79 



1886 707,201,180 



1,410,135 30 1,410,136 37 



RATES OF TAXATION FOR STATE PURPOSES. 

For i^et?— Revenue tax, 20 cents on the $100. Interest tax, 10 
cents on the $100. Asylum tax, 1-60 of one per cent. Poll tax 37 1-2 
centp. 

jpbr ^^^^-4— Revenue tax, 32 cents. Military tax, 20 cents. Rev- 
enue poll tax, $1. Military poll tax, $2. Military commutation tax of 
$30 each, upon persons exempted from military services and one per 
cent, upon the assessed valuation of their property. 

For 1865 — Revenue tax, 40 cents. Revenue poll tax, $1. Military 
tax, 20 cents. Military poll tax, ¥2. 

For 1866 — Revenue tax, 40 cents. Military tax, 50 cents. Military 
poll tax, $2. Revenue poll tax, $L. 

For 1867 — Revenue tax, 25 cents. Revenue poll tax, 50 cents. 
State interest tax, 40 cents. 

For 1868 — Revenue tax, 25 cents. Revenue poll tax, 50 cents. 
State interest tax, 25 cents. 

For 1869, 1870, and i<^7-?— Revenue tax, 25 cents. Interest tax, 
25 cents. 

For 1872, 1873, 187 U and i<575— Revenue tax, 20 cents. Interest 
tax, 25 cents. 

From 1876 to 1886 — Tevenue tax, 20 cents. Interest tax, 20 cents. 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION* 



59 



ASSESSMENT OF RAILROAD, BRIDGB AND TELEGRAPH COMPANIES. 

In 1872 the assessed valuation of railroad property, not iDcluding 
lands, town lots and buildings, and cash land contracts, amounted to 
$20,867,895. In 1873 there was no assessment of 'railroad property. 
The assessment of 1874, 1875, 1876 and 1877 included lands and town 
lots, and as the valuation of lands and town lots was not kept sepa- 
rately from the valuation of the road-beds, superstrrcture and rolling 
stock, the assessment for those years is omitted. 

The following table will show the assessed valuation of railroad, 
bridge and telegraph companies, not including lands and town lots, 
from 1878 to 1886 : 

ASSESSMENT OP 1878. 



Railroad companies $^,118,441 46 



Bridge companies. . . . 

Telegraph companies. 

Total 



1,800,000 00 

203,756 94 

$26,122,198 40 



ASSESSMENT OF 1879. 



Bailroad companies $25,463,296 56 



Bridge companies 

Telegraph companies. 
Total 



1,450,000 00 
207,25) 69 



127,120,550 25 



ASSESSMENT OF 1880. 



Railroad companies. . 

Bridge companies — 

Telegraph Companies 

Total 



$27,484,211 81 

1,450,000 00 

209,757 69 



$29,143,969 50 



60 



auditor's report. 



ASSESSMENT OF 1881. 



Railroad companies . . 

Bridge companies . . . 

Telegraph companies 

Total 



$30,309,878 85 

1,695,000 00 

348,219 90 



132,363,098 75 



ASSESSMENT OF 1882. 



Railroad companies . . 

Bridge companies . . . . 

Telegraph companies 

Total 



$33,373,739 46 

1,910,000 00 
342,785 'JO 



$35,626,524 86 



ASSESSMENT OF 1883. 



Railroad companies . . 

Bridge companies 

Telegraph companies 
Total 



$36,871,955 79 
2,425,000 00 
. 463,812 89 



$39,760,768 68 



ASSESSMENT OF 1884. 



Railroad companies. . 

Bridge companies. . . . 

Telegraph companies 

Total 



$38,380,316 98 

3,000,000 00 

618,628 47 



$41,898,846 46 



STATISTICAL IHFORMATION. 



61 



Railway companies. . , 

Bridge companies 

Telegraph companies, 
TotaL 



ASSESSMENT OF 1885. 



$40,955,319 62 

3,000,000 00 

609,678 16 



$44,564,997 78 



ASSESSMENT OP 1886. 



Kailway companies | $42,847,264 41 

Bridge companies 2,975,000 00 



Telegraph companies 
Total 



622,570 26 



$46,444,834 67 



PROGRESS OF RAILROAD CONSTRUCIION. 

The number of miles of road operated at the end of each year since 
construction began is shown in the following table taken from the report 
of the Board ot Railroad Commissioners. 



Year. 

*1851.... 
tl852 ... 
tl853.... 

1854.... 
J1855.... 

1856.... 

1867.... 

1858.... 

1859.... 

I860.... 



Miles. 



Year. 





5 

37 

37 

140 

144 

318 

547 

724 

817 



1861. 

1862, 

I 

il863. 

I 

11864. 

I 

1865. 
1866. 
1867. 
1868. 



Miles. 

838 
838 
868 
925 
925 
925 



Year. 



Miles. 



1871 1 2,580 

1872 2,673 

1873 1 2,858 

I 

1874 1 2,880 



1875. 
1876. 



1,055 i 1877, 



3,050 
3,140 
3,190 



1,354 1878 1 3,250 



Year. 


Miles. 


1881 


4,234 00 


1882 


4,501 00 


1883 


4,615 00 


1884 


4,741 00 


1885 


5,017 00 


1886 


5,078 80 



1869 1,712 1879 j 3,617 



1870 2,000 ,1880, 



4,007 



* Construction commenced on Missouri Pacific July 4. 
t Passenger car run to Cheltenham, 5 miles. 

1 Missouri Pacific opened to Pacific, 37 mUe. 

2 Gasconade disaster November 1, 



62 



AUDITOR^S REPORT. 



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Total amount of licenses and 
ad valorem taxes paid for 
State and county purposes 
for the year ending July 
4, 1886 



Amount of county licenses 
and ad valorem taxes paid 
by dramshop keepers for 
the year ending July 4, 
1886 



Amount of State licenses 
and ad valorem taxes paid 
by dramshop keepers for 
the year ending July 4, 
1886 7 ... 



Rate of county licenses paid 
for the period of six 
months by dramshop keep- 



ers 



Kate of State licenses paid 
for the period of six 
months by dramshop keep- 



ers 



Number of grocery and other 
dealers retailing liquor un- 
der dramshop licenses 



Number of drug stores re- 
tailing liquor under dram- 
shop licenses 



Number of dramshops in the 
county July 4, 1886 



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4,1886 



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auditor's report. 



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State and connty parposes 
for the year ending July 
4, 1886 



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Amount of county licenses 
and ad valorem taxes paid 
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the year endlns: July 4, 
1886 ,.......' 



Amount of State licenses 
and ad valorem taxes paid 
by dramshop keepers for 
the year ending July 4, 
1886 



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Number of grocery and other 
dealers retailing liquor un- 
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Number of drug stores re- 
tailing liquor under dram- 
shop licenses 



Number of dramshops in the 
county July 4, 1886 



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RTaTISTICAL ikforhation. 



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dramshop keep- 
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ending July 4/86 



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auditor's kbport. 






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Total amount of 
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dramshop keep- 



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Number of gro- 
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Number of drug 
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Number of dram- 
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auditor's report. 



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ending July V86 



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Hate of town or 
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Number of drug 
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liquor under 
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Number of dram- 
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STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



73 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS. 

In order to secare accurate information concerning the bonded indebtedness of 
counties and townships, blanks were prepared by me and mailed to coanty 
clerks, as contemplated by Section 7210, Revised Statutes. Official returns to 
these blanks were made, chiefly, in the months of October and November, 
1886. The information contained in the following table, shows, substantially, 
the condition of the bonded debt of each county and township on the first day 
of January, 1887, the rates of taxation on each 9100 valuation for interest and 
sinking funds, and the taxable wealth of each county and township : 



ADAIR. 

33 seven per cent. 20-year bonds of $50 each, issued 
March 1, 1871; 27 do. of ;^100 each, and 20 do. of 
$600 each, issued March 12, 1871. to aid in the con- 
struction of the First District Normal School build- 
ing, interest payable annually at the office of the 
county treasurer , 

;60 ten per cent. 20-year bonds of 2i^l,000 each, issued. 
May 1, 1871, to aid in the construction of the Normal! 
School building, interest payable semi-annually at 
the National Bank of Commerce in New York | 

loO seven per cent. 20 year bonds of ^500 each, issued; 
^)eptember 2, 1872, under sections 17 and 18, chapter 
03, General Statutes, 1865, in payment of subscrip-, 
tion to capital stock of the Quincy, Missouri &, 
Pacific Railway Company, interest payable an- 
nually at the National Bank of Commerce in New 
York 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax 35 cents on the' 
$100 valuation. Sinking fund tax 20 cents. Tax- 
able wealth, $3,545,199. 

BKNTON TOWNSHIP. 

I 

20 eight per cent 20-year bonds of $500 each, issued 
September 2, 1872, in payment of a subscription to 
the capital stock of the Quincy, Missouri & Pacilic 
Railroad Company, interest payable annually at 
the National Bank of Commerce in New York i 

60 six per cent. 5-20 funding bonds of ^600 each, issued 
August 7, 1882, under article 1. chapter 83, Revised 
Statutes, in compromise and redemption of bonds 
issued to the Quincy, Missouri & Pacific Railroad 
Company, interest payable annually at the Bank 

of CoQimerce In St. Louis 

I, 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax 15 cents on the' 

$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $1,278,940. 

I 

BAST HALF SALT RIVER TOWNSHIP. 

10 six per cent. 5-20 funding bonds of $500 each, issued 
August 7, 1882, under article 1, chapter 83, Revised 
Statutes, in compromise and redemption of bonds 
issued to the Quincy, Missouri & Pacific Railroad 



$14,350 00 



59,000 00, 



75,000 00 



$148,350 00 



10,000 00 



25,000 00 



35,000 00 



74 



auditor's report. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS.— Continukd. 



ADAIBr-Continued. 

I 

CompaDy, interest j^ayable annually at the Bankj 
of Commerce in 6t» lioals 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax 18} cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $207,906. 

ANDREW. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 

$5,242,700. 

ATCHISON. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$6,063,010. 

AUDRAIN. 

No countyor township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 

$6,218,095. 

BARRr. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$2,111,822. 

BARTON. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$4,382,551. 

BATES . 
No county indebtedness. Taxable wealth, *7, 982, 440.. 

PRAIRIIC CITY TOWNSHIP. 

33 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of SI .000 each issued Octo-! 
ber 1, 188.3, unc'er chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in 
compromise and redemption of bonds issued to aid 
in the construction of the Tebo & Neosho Railroad, 
interest payable annually on the first day of April 
at the State Savings Association in St Louis 

interest promptly paid. Interest tax 40 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Sinking fund tax, 40 cents. 

MOUNT PLBASANT TOWNSHIP. 

170 six per C/Cnt. 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each, and 50 do 
of $100 each, issued October 1, 1885, under chapter 
83, Revised Statutes, in compromise and redemp- 
tion of bonds issued to aid in the construction of 
the Lexington, Lake & 'Gulf Railroad. interest pay-j 
able annually on the lirst day of April at the State 
Savings Association in St. Louis 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund 
taT $1.20 on the i^lOO valuation. 



$5,000 00 



$5,000 00 



33,00C 00 



175,000 00 



33,000 00 



175,000 00 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



75 



BONDED IND:?BTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS.- Continued. 



BATES— Continued. 



GRAND RIVER TOWNSHIP. 



40 ten per cent. 10, 15 and 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, 
Issued April 13, 1872, under the act of March 23, 
1868, to aid in the construction of the Lexington, 
Lake & Gulf Railroad, interest payable annually at 
the Bank of .America in New York 



No provision made for the payment of either interest 
or principal of these bonds . 



BENTON. 

Six per cent. 10-30 bonds of the denominations of $500| 
and SlOO each, issued July 1, 1S82, under chapter 
83, Revised Statutes, in compromise and redemp-l 
tion of bonds issued to aid in the construction of 
the Osage Valley A Southern Kansas Railroad, in- 
terest payable annually on the first day of Feb- 
ruary, at the National Bank of Commerce in New 
York 

Ten per cent. 20-year bonds, of sundry denominations, 
issued in 1870 and 1871, to aid in the construction 
of the Osage Valley and Southern Kansas Railroad, 
interest payable annually January 1st, at the Na- 
tional Bank of Commerce in Tew York 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax 70 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $2,857,590 

BOLLINGER. 

No countv or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth. 
$1,937,040. 

BOONE. 

294 six per cent. 5-20 bondn of :^500 each, and 494 do. of 
$100 each, issued issued May 1, 1879, under chap- 
ter 83, Revised Statutes, in compromise and re- 
demption of bonds issued to aid in the construc- 
tion of rock and railroads, interest payable semi- 
annually at office of the county treasurer 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax. 20 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Sinking fund tax, 60 cents. Tax- 
able w'^alth, $6,631,280. 

ROCKY FORK TOWNSHIP. 

i 
26 six per cent 5-20 bonds of '^.500 each, and 10 do. of 
$100 each. Issued May 1, 1880, under chapter 33,' 
Revised Statutes, in compromise and redemption i 
of bonds Issued to aid in the construction of thej 
Louisiana & Missouri River Railroad, Interest 
payable annually at oflSce of the county treasurer 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund tax,| 
SOcenU on the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth, I 
$626,834. ; 



$40,000 00 



$40,000 00 



292,500 00 



6,^00 00 




298,000 00 



196,400 00 



14,000 00 



14,000 00 



76 



auditor's rkport. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS —Contisoed. 



PBKGHB TOWNSHIP. 

30 Six per cent 5-20 bonds of $500 each, and 20 do. of 
$100 each, issued May 1, 1880, under chapter 83, 
Kevised >tatutes, in compromise and redemption 
of bonds issued to aid in the construction of the 
Louisiana & Missouri River Railroad, interest pay- 
able annually at office of the county treasurer — 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund 
tax, 50 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable 
wealth, $487,580. 

BUCHANAN. 

Five per cent. 10-20 bonds of the denominations of 
$1,000, $600 and $100 each, issued August 1, 1881, 
under article 1, chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in com- 
promise and redemption of bonds issued to the St. 
Louis & St. Joseph Railroad Company, interest 
payable annually, on the first day of August at the 
American Exchange National Bank in New York. 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 15 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Sinking fund tax, 5 cents. Tax- 
able wealth. $14,127,486. 

BLOOMINaTOK TOWNSHIP 

66 six per cent. lT)-30 bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
August 29th. 1885, under chapter 83 Revised Stat- 
utes, in compromise and redemption of bonds is- 
sued to aid in the construction of the Atchison 
branch of the Chicago & Southwestern Railroad, 
interest payable annually on the first day of Jan- 
nary, at the State Savings' Association of St. 
Louis 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund 
tax, 95 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable 
wealth, *435,000 

BUTLER. 

7 six p^r cent 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
October 1, 1878, 13 do. issued October 1, 1880, 29 do 
of $500 each, and 43 of .*100 issued October 1, 1880, 5 
. do. or $100 issued October 1. 1878, and 27 do. for ;>100 
issued October 1, 1881, issued under act of April 
12, 1877. in compromise and redemption of out- 
standing bonds, interest payable annually on first 
day of October at Boatman's Savings Bank, St. 

Louis, Mo 

Ten per cent. 10 year funding bonds of $100 and $500 
each, issued In 1869, 1871 and 1874, interest pay- 
able annually at the Boatman's Savings Bank in 
St. Louis 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 25 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Sinking fund tax, 25 cents. Tax- 
able wealth, $1,092,378. 

CALDWELL 

No county or township Indebtedness Taxable wealth, 
$4,5^,141. 



$17,000 00 



$17,000 00 



546,400 00 



56,000 00 



546,400 00 



66,000 00 



42,000 00 



2,300 00, 



44,300 00 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



77 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWN0HIP8.— Continuicd. 



CALLAWAY. 

127 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $50 each issued August 
1, 1£p77, under an act of the General Assembly, ap- 
proved April 12, 1877, in compromise and redemp- 
tion of bonds issued to aid in the construction of 
the Louisiana <& Missouri Kiver Railroad, interest 
payable semi-annually on the first days of February 
and August, at the National Bank of Commerce in 
New York 

600 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $100 each— other history 
same as above 

190 six per cent 5-20 bonds of $500 each— other history 
same as above 

304 Six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each— other his- 
tory same as above 

3 nine per cent. 12-year bonds of $100 each, issued 
January 1, 1871, under an act of the General Assem 
bly, approved March 10, 1859, as amended by an 
act approved March 24, 1868, to aid in the con- 
struction of the Louisiana & Missouri River Kail- 
road, interest payable semi-annually on the first > 
days of January and July at the National Bank of I 
Commerce in New York 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund 
tax 60, cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth, 
$5,651,760. 

CAMDEN. 



Ten per cent, bonds of sundry denominations, issued I 
May 1, 1875, under a special act of the General 
Assembly, approved February 8, 1875, to fund in-, 
debtedness to school funds of the county, Interestl 
payable annually on the first day of May atofiicej 
of county treasurer 

!■ 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 10 cents on the| 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $933,535. 

CAPE GIRARDEAU. 

No county indebtedness. Taxable wealth, $4,022,850. 

CAFB GIBaBDBAU TOWNSHIP. I 

I 

I 

Eight per cent. 20-year bonds of the denomination of 
$1,000 and $500 each, issued July 1, 1869, under act 
of March 23, 1868, to aid in the construction of the' 
Cape Girardeau. & State Line Railroad, interest 
payable annually on the first day of July in NeW; 
'ork and St Louis 



pa 



Interest defaulted since July 1, 1876. Numerous suits 
pending in the Circuit and Supreme Court of the 
United States. 

CARROLL. [ 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, ' 
$6,939,213. 



f6,350 00, 
60,000 00. 

95,000 OOj 

I 

304,000 00' 



300 00 



$465,650 00 



4,744 39 



4,744 39 



134,000 00 



134,000 00 



.^^ 



78 



auditor's report. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OP COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS.— Contikukd. 



CARTER. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$657,729. 

CASS. I 

292 ten per cent. SO-year bonds of $1,000 each. Issued; 
February 1, 1871, to aid in the construction of the 
Clinton & Kansas City branch of the Tebo & 
Neosho Railroad, under an act of the General As- 
sembly incorporating the Tebo & Neosho Railroad,: 
approved January 16, 1860, and an act approved 
March 21, 1868, entitled, ''An act to aid the build-; 
ing of branch railroads In the State of Missouri,'*! 
interest payable on the tirst days of February and! 
August at the National Park Bank in New xoris.i 
These bonds and accumulated interest amount to. . < 
8 ten per cent. 8-year bonds of $500 each, issued 
August 1, 1871, to fund interest on railroad bonds. 
Interest payable on the first days of February and 
August at the banking house of Donnell, Lawson 

& Co., New York 

1 ten per cent 5-year bond for $500. issued January 
15, 1872, to fund interest on railroad bonds. Interest 
payable on the 16th of January and July at the 
banking house of Northrup & Chick, New York. . . 
629 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each, issued Feb- 
ruary 1, 1883, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, 
compromise and redemption of bonds issued to the 
Clinton & Kansas City branch of the Tebo & 
Neosho railroad, interest payable annually on thej 
first day of February at the National Bank of Com- 
merce in New York | 

68 six percent 5-20bondsof $100 each— other descrip-j 
tion same as above 

The old ten per cent, bonds are in litigation and no 
interest is paid on the same On the compromise 
bonds the interest is promptly paid. Interest tax, 
30 cents oa the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth,, 
$6,933,707. j 

GRAND RIVKR TOWNSHIP. | 

84 ten per cent. 6. 7, 8 and 9-vear bonds of $500 each,; 
issued August 26, 1869. 28 do 9 and 10-year bonds, i 
issued July 11, 1870, 39 do. 11, 12, 13 and 14-year, 
bonds issued October 1, 1869, 30 do. 3- year bonds 
issued October 1, 1871, under act of March 23, 1868, 
to aid in the construction of the St. Louis & Santa 
Fe Railroad, and to fund interest on bonds issued 
to said railroad company, interest payable semi- 
annuallv at the banking house of Northrup &, 
Chick in New York ' 

25 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each. Issued Febru- 
ary 1. 1883, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, In 
compromise and redemption of bonds issued to the 
St. Louis & Santa Fe Railroad, interest payable 
annually on the first day of Februarv at the Na- 
tional Bank of Commerce in New York 

24 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $100 each— other descrip- 
tion same as above 



$495,371 00, 



10,554 00 



1,326 24; 



264,500 00 
6,800 00 



$778,551 24 



267,315 00 



12,500 00 
2.400 00 



282,215 00 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



79 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OP COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS.— Continukd. 



CASS— OoDtinaed. ! 

On old ten per cent, bonds the interest is not paid.j 
On six per cent, compromise bonds the interest is 
promptly paid. Interest tax. 15 cents on the $100 
valuation. Taxable wealth, $1,341,930. I 

CAMP BRANCH TOWNSHIP. 

27 ten percent. 6, 7, 8 and 9-year bonds of $600 each, 
issued August 26, 1869,11 do. 10-year bonds issuea' 
July lltii, 1870, 10 do. 3-year bonds isgued October 
1st, 1871, under act of March 28, 1868, to aid in the 
construction of the St. Louis A ^santa Fe Railroad,, 
and to flind interest on bonds Issued to said rall-j 
road, interest payable semi-annually at the bank-l 
ing house of Northrup & Chick in New York ' 

15 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of 9500 each and 15 do. of 
$100 each, issued February 1. 1883, under article 1, 
chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in compromise and 
redemption of railroad bonds, interest payable an-' 
nually od the first (^y of February at the National 
Bank of Commerce in New York i 

Interest on compromise bonds promptly paid. In-| 
terest tax, 10 cents on the $100 yaluation. No pro- 
Yision is made for Interest on old bonds. Taxable 
wealth, $668,687. 

COLD WATER TOWNSHIP. 

10 ten per cent. 6, 7, 8 and 9-year bonds of $500 each,i 
Issued August 26. 1869, and 4 do. Issued July 11,' 
1870, under act of March 23, 1868. to aid in the con- 
struction of the St. Louis A Santa Fe Railroad, in-i 
terest payable semi-annually at the banking house' 
of Northrup & Chick in New York I 

8 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each and 5 do. of 
$100 each, issued February 1, 1883, under article 1, 
chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in compromise and 
redemption of railroad bonds, interest payable an- 
nually on the first day of February at the National 
Bank of Commerce in New York 

Interest tax, 10 cents on the $100 valuation. Interest 
paid on compromise bonds, but no provision is 
made for interest on ten per cent, bonds. Taxable 
wealth, $242,920. 

EVERETT TOWNSHIP. 



10 ten per cent. 6, 7, 8 and 9-year bonds of 9500 each, 
issued August 26, 1869, and 5 do. 9 and 10-year 
bonds, issued July 11, 1870, under act of March*. 23, 
1868, to aid in the construction of the St. Louis A 
Santa Fe Railroad, interest payable semi-annually 
at the banking house of Northru > A Chick in New 

York : 

7 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each, and 10 do of 
8100 each, issued February 1, 1883, under article 1. 
chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in compromise ana 
redemption of railroad bonds. Interest payable an- 
nually on the first day of February at the National 
Bank of Commerce in New York. .' 



$61,342 00 



9,000 00 



$70,342 00 



16,607 00 



4,500 00 



21,107 00 



17,014 00 



4,500 OC 



21,514 00 



80 



auditor's report. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS.— Continued. 



CASS— Continued. 

Interest tax, 10 cents on the 8100 valuation. Interest 
paid on compromise bonds, but no provision is 
made for interest on ten per cent, bonas. Taxable 
wealth, $275,850. 



AUSTIN TOWNSHIP. 

. 28 ten per cent 15 and 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, is- 
sued May 2, 1871, under act of March 23, 1808, to 
aid in the construction of the Lexington, Lake & 
Gulf ({ailroad, interest payable semi-annually on 
the second days of May and November nt the Hank: 
of America, and 6 do. 3- year bonds of 9^500 each, is- 
sueH October 1, 1871, to fund interest on railroad 
bonds, interest payable on the lirst days of April 
and October at the baiiking house of Northrup & 

Chick in New York 

34 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each, and 9 do. of 
$100 each, issued February 1, 1883, under chapter; 
83, Revised Statutes, in compromise and redemp- 
tion of bonds issued to the Lexington, Lake «& bulf 
Railroad, interest payable annually on the first day, 
of February at the National Bank of Commerce in 
New ^ ork 

Interest on compromise bonds promptly paid. Inter- 
est tax, 30 cents on the $100 valuation. The ten 
per cent, bonds are in litigation, and no interest is 
paid on them Taxable wealth, $443,695. ^ 

POLK TOWNSHIP. 

29 ten per cent. 15 and 20-year bonds of S500 each, is- 
sued May 2, 1871, under act of March 23, 1808, to 
aid in the construction of the Lexington, Lake d: 
Gulf Railroad, interest payable semi-annnallv on 
the second days of May and November at the Bank 
of America in'New York, and 3 do. 3-year bonds of 
8500 each, issued October 1, 1871, to fund interest 
on railroad bonds, interest payable on the first day 
of April and October at banking house of Northrup 

& Chick in New York 

2 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each, and 4 do. of 
8100 each, issued February 1, 1883, under chapter 
83, Revised Statutes, in compromise and redemp- 
tion of bonds issued to the Lexington, Lake & Gulf 
Railroad, interefit payable annually on the first day 
of February ai the National Bank of Commerce in 
New York 



Interest is not paid on the ten per cent, bonds. On the 
six per cent, compromise bonds the int-erest is 
promptly paid. Taxable wealth, 8418,608. 

BIG CREEK TOWNSHIP. 

3 ten per cent. 17, 18 and 19-year bonds of $1,000 
each, issued iluguBt24, 1809, under act of March 
23, 1SG8, to aid in the construction of the Pleasant 
Hill & Lawrence Railroad, and one 3-year ten pei 
cent, bond issued October 1, 1^<71, to fund interesl 
on railroad bonds, interest payable semi-annually 
the former at the Bank of America, and the latter 



I 



887.649 00, 



17,900 00, 



$105,549 00 



46,695 00 



1.400 00 



48,095 00 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



81 



BONDED INDEBTEDNEH8 OP COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS.— CJontinukd. 



CASS— Continued 

at the banking house of Northrup & Chick In New 

York 

38 six per cent. 5-10 bonds of $100 each, issued Feb- 
ruary 2, 1880, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, 
in compromise and redemption of railroad bonds', 
interest payable annually on the first day of Feb- 
ruary at the Bank of Commerce, St. Louis', Mo 

Interest on ten per cent, bonds not paid. On six per 
cent, compromise bonds the interest is promptly 
paid. Interest tax, 15 cents on the $100 valuation. 
Taxable wealth, $515,710. 

PLRASANT HILX TOWNSHIP. 

25 six per cent. 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19-year bonds of 
$1,000 each, issued August 24, 1869, under act of, 
March 23, 186S, to aid In the construction of the 
Pleasant Hill and Lawrence Railroad ; 4 ten peri 
cent. 3-year bonds issued October 1. 1871, to fUnd 
Interest on railroad bonds; 8 six per cent. 16 and 
17-year bonds issued January 16, 1871. under act of 
March 23. 1868, to aid in ihe construction of the 
Lexington, Lake and Oulf Railroad ; 11 do. 17 and 
IS-year bonds issued March 1, 1871 ; eighteen do 
18, 19 and 20-year bonds issued May 2, 1871, and 1 
ten per cent. 3-year bond issued October 1, 1871, to 
funa interest on railroad bonds, interest payable 
semi-annually at the Bank of America, and at the 
banking house of Northrup & Chick, in New 
York 

9 six per cent. 5-10 bonds of $500 each and 33 do. of 
$100 each, Issued February 2, 1880, under chapter 
83, Revised Statutes, In compromise and redemp- 
tion of railroad bonds, interest payable annually 
on the first day of February at uie Bank of Com- 
merce in St. Louis 

Interest on compromise bonds promptly paid. On 
other bonds no interest paid. Interest tax, 20 cents 
on the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $676,989. 

DOLAN TOWNSHIP. 

25 Six per cent. &-20 bonds of $500 each ; 10 do. of 
$100 each, issued February 1, 1883; 79 do. of $500 
each, issued February 1, 1886, under article 1, 
chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in compromise and 
redemption of bonds issued to the St, Louis & Santa 
Fe Railroad, interest payable annually on the first 
day of February, at the Bank of Commerce in 
New York 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 75 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $897,333. 

XoTE— The clerk of the county court of Cass county; 
computed interest on defaulted county and town-l 
ship bonds at the rate of six per cent, per annum J 
up to January 1, 1887, and extended the amount. 



$7,940 00, 



3,800 00 



$11,740 00 



132,790 00 




140,590 00 



53,000 00 



8. P. — 6 



82 



auditor's rkport. 



BONDED lNDEBTl!;DNE-S OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS— Ck)NTiNUKD. 



CEDAR. 

No county or township indebtedness, 
wealth, $2,477,716. 

CHARITON. 



Taxable' 



101 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each, and 130 do. I 
of $l00each« issued July 1, 1879, under act of April 
12, 1S77, in compromise and redemption of bondaj 
issued to aid in the construction of the Missouri' 
& Mississippi and the Brunswick & Chillicothe 
Railroads, interest payable semi-annually on the 
first days of January and July, at the Laclede; 
Bank in St. Louis ' 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 16 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Sinking fund tax, ^5 cents. Tax-| 
aole wealth, $4,991,399. I 

CHRISTIAN. I 

I 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, i 
$1,44*8,301. 

CLARK. 

216 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each, issued Aprill 
1, 1881, under cjbiapter 83, Revised Statutes, in com- 

Sromise and redemption of bonds issued to the 
[issouri & Mississippi Railroad Com paivy, interest 
payable annually April 1, at the National Bank of 
Commerce in New York 

100 six per cent. 20-30 bonds of $500 each, issued Jan- 
uary 1, 1885, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in 
compromise and redemption of bonds issued to the 
Alexandria & Bloom field Railroad Company, in- 
terest payable annuallv, January 1, at the National 
Bank of Commerce in New Vork 

150 seven per cent. 20-year bonds of $500 each, issued 
August 10, 18G7, to aid in the construction of the 
Alexandria & Nebraska City Railroad, interest 
payable annually, August 15, at olfice of the county 
treasurer 



$114,000 00 



Interest promptly paid. Interest tax 55 cents on the' 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $3,109,516. i 

VBRNON TOWNSHIP. 

14 Six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each, and 30 do. 
of $100 each, issued May 12, 1886, under chapter 83, 
Revised Statutes, in compromise and redemption 
of bonds issued to aid in the construction of Mis- 
souri. Iowa & Nebraska Railroad, interest payable 
annually at State Savings Association, St. Louis. 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax 90 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $116,200. 

CLAY. 

342 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $100 each, issued Jan- 
uary 1, 1883, under article 1, chapter 83, Revised 
Statutes, in compromise and redemption of bonds' 



$114,000 00 



107,600 00 



50,000 001 



75,000 00 



232,500 00 



17,000 00 



17,000 00 



i 



W' 



STATISTICAL INVORMATION. 



88 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS— CoNTiNueD. 

I 



CLAY— Continued. 

issued to aid in the construction of the Cameron 
& Kansas City Railroad, interest payable annually 
on the first day of January, at the office of the 
county treasurer 

73 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each— other 
description same as above 

23 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each— other 
description same as above 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund 
tax, SSi cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable 
wealth, $6,222,057. 

CLINTON. 

50 six per cent 10-20 bonds of $1,000 each, issued July 
8, I0S5, under chapter 83 Revised Statutes, in com- 
promise and redemption of bonds issued to aid in 
the construction of the St Joseph <& St. Louis and 
Chicago & Southwestern Railroads,interest payable 
annually on the first day of July at the Bank of 
Commerce in St. Louis 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, six cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $5,544,321. 

COLE. 

124 six per cent. 10-year bonds of $100 each, issued 
March 12, 1878. under act of April 12, 1877, for the 
use of the Jeft^erson City, Lebanon <& Southwestern 
Rail way T and in compromise and redemption 
of bonds issued to the Laclede & Fort Scott 
Railroad Company, interest payable semi-annuallv 
on the first days of January and July at the Fourth 
National Bank in :st. Louis' 

49 six per cent. 10-year bonds of $500.each— other de- 
scription same as above 

H six per cent. 10-year bonds of $1,000 each— other de- 
scription same as above 



Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund tax, 
20 cents on the »100 valuation. Taxable wealth . 
$3,012,040. 

COOPER. 

140 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $100 each, issued Jan- 
uary 1, 1881, and 111 do. of $500 each, issued Jan- 
uary 2, 1884, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes of 
Missouri, in compromise and redemption of bonds 
issued to aid in the construction of the Osage Val- 
ley & Southern Kansas and the Tebo & Neosho 
Railroads, interest payable annually on the first 
day of January^ interest on the $100 bonds being 

Said at the St Louis National Bank in St. Louis, 
Co., and on the $500 bonds at the American Ex- 
change National Bank, New York 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 15 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Sinking fund tax, 10 cents. Tax- 
able wealth, $5,776,858. 



$34,200 00 
36,500 00 
23,000 00 



50,000 00 



$93,700 00 



50,000 00 



12,400 00 

I 

24,500 00 
04,000 00 




130,900 00 



69,600 00 



84 



AUDITOK S RKPORT. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS— Cohtikuh) 



$9,000 00 



38,000 00 



$47,000 00 



17,000 00 



COOPER— Oontlnued. | 

CLKAR CRBXK TOWNSHIP. 

I 

18 ten per cent. 20-year bonds of $500 each, issued 

Jnly 1, 1869, under act of March 23, 1868, to aid in' 

* the construction of the Tebo & Neosho Railroad J 

interest payable semi-annually on the first days of 

January and July at the Bank of America in New 

York s 

76 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each. Issued Jan-: 
uary 2,1884, in compromise and redemption of! 
bonds issuea to aid in the construction of tne Tebo, 
A Neosho Railroad, interest payable annually at 
the American Exchange National Bank in New, 

York ' 

I- 
The interest is not paid on old ten per cent, bonds. On 
six per cent, compromise bonds the interest is' 
promptly paid. Interest tax, $ 1.00 on the $100 valu- 
ation. Sinking fund tax, 60 cents. Taxable wealth, 
$235,333 , 

PILOT OROVE TOWNSHIP. I 

34 ten per cent. 20-year bonds of $500 each, issued 
July 1, 1869, under act of March 23, 1868, to aid in 
the construction of the Tebo & Neosho Railroad, 
interest payable semi-annually on the first days of 
January and July at the Bank of America in New 
York 

87 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each, issued Jan- 
uary 2, 1884, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, 
in compromise and redemption of bonds issued to, 
aid in the construction of the Tebo & Neosho 
Railroad, interest payable annually at the Ameri- 
can Exchange National Bank in* New York 

On old ten per cent, bonds the interest is not paid. On 
six per cent, compromise bonds the interest is, 
promptly paid Interest tax, $1.00 on the $100 val-l 
uatlon . Sinking fund tax, 50 cents. Taxable 
wealth, $352,000. 

BOOmriLLX TOWNf«HIP. 

74 ten per cent. 20-year bonds of $500 each, issued 
Vuly 1, 1869, under act of March 23, 1868, to aid In 
the construction of the Tebo & Neosho Railroad, 
^ ^interest payable semi-annually on the first davs of 
**'^ January and July at the Bank of America in Newj 

York I 

79 five per cent. 5-20 bonds of 8500 each and 48 do. ofi 
$100 each, issued February 1, 1882, under chapter! 
8^ Revised Statutes, In compromise and redemption 
of bonds issued to aid in the construction of the 
Tebo & Neosho Railroad, interest payable annually 
at the St. Louis National Bank in St. Louis 

Interest on ten per cent, bonds not paid. On six per 
cent, compromise bonds the interest is promptly 

Said. Interest tax, 35 cents on the $100 valuation, 
inking fund tax, 15 cents. Taxable wealth, 

$1,828,608. 



43,500 00 



37,000 00 



00,500 00 



44,300 00 



81,300 00 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



85 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OP COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS-- Coktinukd. 



CRAWFORD. 
No county bonded debt. Taxable wealth, $1,668,924. 

MERAMKC TOWNSHIP. 

9 six per cent. 6-16 bonds of $600 each, issued Feb- 
ruary 2, 1880, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, 
in compromise and redemption of bonds issued to 
the St. Louis, Salem & Little Rock Railroad Com- 
pany, interest payable annually on the first day of 
February at the State Savings^ Association in St. 
Louis 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 70 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $398,686. 

BKNTON T0WK8HIP. 

7 six per cent. 6-16 bonds of $600 each— other descrip- 
tion same as bonds of Meramec township 



Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 60 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, 1 282,630. 

UNION TOWNSHIP. 

7 six per cent. 6-16 bonds of $600 each— other de- 
scription same as bonds of Meramec township 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 90 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth. $256,462. 

DADE. 

150 six per cent. 6-20 bonds of $1,000 each, issued Aug. 
25, (883, under article 1, chapter 83, Revised Stat- 
utes, in compromise and redemption of bonds is- 
sued to the Kansas City & Memphis Railroad Com- 
pany, interest pavable annually, on the first day of 
February, at the National Park Bank in New York. 

jO six per cent. 6-20 bonds of $1,000 each. Issued Sep- 
tember 10, 1883 — other description same as above. . 

50 six per cent. 6-20 bonds of $600 each, issued August 
25, 1883— other description same as above 

20 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each, issued Sep- 
tember 10, 1883, other description same as above.. 

18 eight per cent. 20'year bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
October 2, 1871. to aid in the construction of the 
Kansas City & Memphis Railroad, interest payable 
semi-annually at the National Park Bank in New 
York.: 

26 eight per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
December 1, 1871 — other description same as above. 

Interest promptly paid . Interest tax 60 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $2,622,875. Fund- 
ing or compromise bonds amounting to $10,000 are 
in the hands of the financial agent of Dade county 
and not yet exchanged for old bonds. 

DALLAS. 

i 
I 

148 seven per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, issued 

July 1, 1870, to aid in the construction of the La-I 



$4,600 00 



3,600 00 



160,000 00 

60,000 00 

26,000 00 

I 

10,000 00 



3,600 00 



18,000 00 
26,000 00 



279,000 00 



86 



auditor's rbport. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS —CosriNum). 



DALLAS— Ck)ntinued. 

clede A Fort Scott Railroad, Interest payable semi- 
annaally on the first days of January and July at 

the German American Bank In New York 

81 ten per cent. 15-Tear bonds of ;F1,000 each, Issued 
December 28, ;1871, other description same as 
above \ »> 

These bonds are in litigation. No interest paid and 
no provision made for Interest or sinking fund. 
Taxable wealth, $1,434,877. 

DAVIESS. 

58 seven per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, Issued 
July 1, 1870, to aid In the construction of the Chi- 
cago & So ' I th western and Chllllcothe & Omaha 
Railroads, interest payable semi-annually on the 
first days df January and July at the National 
Bank of Commerce in New York 

11 seven per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
July 1, 1869~other description same as above 



$148,000 00 
81,000 00 



Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund tax, 
40 cents on the $100 valuation . Bonds will be re- 
deemed on date of maturity. County treasurer 
now has $6,000 In sinking fund . Taxable wealth, 
$5,055,718. 

DEKALB. 

26 six DAr cent. 2-year bonds of $600 each, and 1 do. 
for $333.33^,26 3-year bonds of $500 each, and 1 do. 
for $333.3^, Issued February 5, 1885, for the con- 
struction of a court-house and iail. Interest pay- 
able semi-annually on the 5th days of February 
and August at office of the county treasurer 

Interest promptly paid. Taxable wealth, $3,872,930. 

DENT. 

20 seven per cent. 15-year bonds of $1,000 each, Issued 
August 1. 1872, under section 17, article 2 of chap-, 
ter 37, Wagner's Statutes, to aid in the construc- 
tion of the St. Louis, Salem & Little Rock Railroad J 
interest payable semi-annually on the first days oft 
February and August at the National Bank of 



Rolla, Mo 



Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 10 cents on the 
•100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $1 ,586,949. 

DOUGLAS. 

No county or township bonded Indebtedness. Taxable 
wealth, $819,600. 

DUNKLIN. 

22 six per cent 5-10 bonds of $100 each, issued March 
6, 1882, under article 2, chapter 95, Revised Stat- 
utes, to build a county jail, interest payable semi- 



$229,000 00 



58,000 00 
11,000 00 



69,000 00 



26,666 66} 



26,666 66} 



20,000 00 



2C,000 00 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



87 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS.— Continukd. 



DUNKLIN— Continued. 

annually on the 6th days of March and September 
at office of county treasurer. 

Funds set apart to pay these bonds as soon as they 
mature. Taxable wealth, $1,235,659. 

FRANKLIN. 

Ten per cent. 20-year funding bonds of sundry denomi- 
nations, issued in 1871-2-3-4-5, interest payable an- 
nually at ofSce of the county treasurer 

Eight per cent. 10-year bonds of $1,000 and $500 each, 
issued November 10, 1876, in compromise of Budd 
& Decker bonds, or bonds issued for the construc- 
tion of rock roads, bridges, etc., interest payable 
annually at office of the county treasurer 

200 six per cent. 20-year bonds of >1 ,000 each, 150 do. 15- 
year bonds of f 1,000 and ^oOO each, and 160 do. 10- 
year bonds of $250 and .<V,o each, issued Feb. 1, 1881, 
under chapter 83, Revi^^^.d Statutes, in compromise 
and redemption of bond ^ i issued for the construction 
of rock roads and bridges, interest payable an- 
nually on the first day of February^ at the Third 
National Bank of St. Louis or at the Bank of Wash- 
ington in Washington, Mo 



Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 60 cents on the 
$100 valuation Sinking fund tax, 10 cents. Tax- 
able wealth, $4,837,707. 



GASCONADE. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth. 
$2,725,968. 

GENTRY. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$4,363,415. 

GREENE. 

283 eight per cent. 20-year bonds of 31,000 each, issued 
August 1. 1871, to aid in the construction of the 
Kansas City & Memphis Railroad, interest payable 
semi-annually on the 1st days of February and Au- 
gust at the iNational Park ;6ank in New York 

272 six per cent. 10-20 bonds of $500 each, issued May 
1, 1885, under acticle 1, chapter 83, 'Revised Stat- 
utes, in compromise and redemption of bonds is- 
sued to aid in the construction of the Kansas City 
& Memphis Railroad, interest payable annually on 
the Ist day of May at the Fourth National Bank in 
St. Louis 



No interest is paid on the original eight per cent, bonds 
and no provision is made for a siUKing fund. On 
the compromise bonds the interest is promptly 
paid. Taxable wealth, ^9,499,672. 



$2,200 00 



57,491 84 



36,500 00 



325,000 00 



/ 



283,000 00 



$2,200 00 



418,991 84 



136,000 00 



419,000 00 



S8 



auditok's ri«port. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS.— Continckd. 



GRUNDY, 

108 six per oent. 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each, issued June 
21, 1881, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, In 
compromise and redemption of bonds issued to aid 
in the construction of the Chiilicothe & Des Moines 
Railroad, interest nayable annually on the first 
day of July, at the National Bank of Commerce in 

New York 

64 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each — other his- 
tory same as above 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 10 cents on the 
$100 valuation. The county has $30,000 in the 
sinking fUnd, most of which is loaned out at 8 per 
cent, interest. Taxable wealth, $4,035,147. 

HARRISON. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$5,167,072. 

HENRY. 

389 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of 91,000 each, and 130 do. 
of $500 each, issued Julyl, 1882, under chapter 
83, Revised Statutes, in compromise and red'emp- 
tion of bonds issued to aid in the construction of 
the Tebo & Neosho, now the Missouri, Kansas & 
Texas Railroad, interest payable annually on the 
first day of July, at the National Bank of Com- 
merce in New York 



Interest on six per cent, compromise bonds promptly 

Eaid. Interest tax, 40 cents on the $100 valuation, 
inking fund tax, 20 cents. Taxable wealth, $(>,- 
786,030. 
Of the original debt of Henry county, there are out- 
standing in bonds, coupons and judgments on the 
same, the sum of $125,000. No interest is paid on 
the old bonds • 

HICKORY. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$1,710,012. 

HOLT. 

No county or township indedtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$5,069,155. 

HOWARD. 

6 eight per cent. 10-year bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
December 1, 1869, 28 do. issued November 3, 1871, to 
aid in the construction of the Tebo & Neosho Rail- 
road, 4 do. issued September 1, 1870, and 4 do. issued 
March 1, 1871, to aid in the construction of the 
Louisiana & Missouri River Railroad, interest pay- 
able semi-annually at National Bank of Commerce 

in New York 

234 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each, 8 do. of $500 
each, and 32 do. of $100 each, issued February 1, 
1884, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in com- 



$108,000 00 
32,000 00 




$140,000 00 



42,000 00 



454,000 00 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



8d 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS.— Continukd. 



HOWARD— Continued. 

promise and redemption of bonds issued to aid in! 
the construction of tne Louisiana & Missouri River 
Railroad, interest payable annually at the Laclede| 
Bank In St. Louis ; $241,200 00 

• 

Interest on six per cent, compromise bonds promptly! 
paid. Interest and sinking fund tax, 50 cents on; 
the $100 valuation. A tax of 25 cents on the $100 
valuation is levied to pay interest and principal of 
the Tebo & Neosho Railroad bonds. On bonds is- 
sued to the Louisiana & Missouri River Railroad 
Company, no provision is made for interest and 
sinking fund. Accumulated interest on old rail- 
road bonds amounts to $28,305. Taxable wealth, 
$4,715,329. 

CHARrrON TOWNSHIP. 

3'eight per cent, matured bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
July 1, 1869, under act of March 23, 1868. to aid in 
the construction of the Missouri & Mississippi 
Railroad, interest payable annually at the National 
Bank of Commerce in New York 3,000 00 

85 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each, issued Jan- 
nary 1, 1880, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in 
compromise and redemption of bonds issued to the 
Missouri & Mississippi Railroad, interest payable 
annually at the banking house of Bartholow, 
Lewis and Company in St. Louis 



Interest on compromise six per cent, bonds promptly 
paid. On old bonds the interest is not paid. In- 
terest and sinking fund tax, 50 cents on the $100 
valuation. Accumulated interest on old bonds 
amounts to $2,760. Taxable wealth, $1,265,800. 

HOWELL. 

2 ten per cent. 10-year bonds of $500 each, and 3 do. 
of $100 each, issued in 1876, to fund county indebt- 
edness, interest payable semi-annually at the Ex- 
change Bank in Jefferson City, Mo ^. . . 

30 sixper cent. 6-20 bonds of $500 each, issued May 7, 
1883, under article 5, chapter 145, Revised Statutes, 
for building a courthouse, interest payable semi- 
annually at the office of county treasurer in West 
Plains, Mo 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 20 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $1,508,183. 

IRON. 

No county or township Indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$1,790,430. 

JACKSON. 

200 eight per cent. 20-year funding bonds of *1, 000 each, 
issued September 6, 1871, interest payable semi- 
annually on the first days of January and July at 
the National Bank of Commerce In New York 



|283,200 00 



86,000,00 



1,300 00 



15,000 00 



88,000 00 



16,300 00 



200,000 001 



200,000 00 



90 



AUDITOK^S RBPORT. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS —Continuh). 



JACKSON.— Continued. 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 25 cents on the! 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $54,310,986. I 

KAW TOWNSHIP. ! 

160 seven per cent. SO-year bonds of 91,000 each, Issued 
Mav 20, 1873, to aid In the construction of the VVyJ 
andotte, Kansas City & Northwestern Railroad, in- 
terest payable semi-annually on the first days of 
January and July at the Ninth National Bank in 
New York ' 

100 seven per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
August 1, 1873, to aid in the construction of the' 
Kansas City, Lawrence & Topeka Railroad, inter-', 
est payable annually on the first day of February! 
at tne banking house of Jay Cooke & Co. in ISew, 

York ' 

I" 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 5 cents on the! 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $42,983,760. 

BLUB TOWNSHIP. 

100 seven per cent. 30-year bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
July 1, 1873, to aid in the construction of the Wy- 
andotte, Kansas City & Northwestern Railroad, in- 
terest payable semi-annually on the first days of 
January and July at the Ninth National Bank of 
New York ! 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 10 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $2,796,320 

VAN BURKN TOWNSHIP. 

48 six per cent 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
January 4, 1871, to aid in the construction of the 
Lexington, Lake & Gulf Railroad, interest payable 
semi-annually on the first days of January and July 
at the Bank of America in New York 

Bonds in litigation. No provision made for interest or 
sinking fund. Taxable wealth, $600,000. 

WK8TP0RT TOWNSHIP. 

11 ten per cent. 15-year bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
June 8, 1871. to aid in the construction of a horse 
railroad, interest payable semi-annually on the first 
days of January and July at the Bank of America 
in New York 

Bonds in litigation. No provision made for interest or 
sinking fund. Taxable wealth, $807,400. 

JASPER. 

No county bonded debt. Taxable wealth, $7,768,404. 

SARCOXIE TOWNSHIP. 

80 eight per cent. 20-year bonds of $500 each, issued 
November 1, 1871, undet act of March 23, 1868, to 



$150,000 00 



100,000 00 



$250,000 00 



100,000 00 



100,000 00 



48,000 00 



48,000 00 



11,000 00 



11,000 00 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



91 



BOXDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS —CoxxiNUia). 



J \SPER,— Continued. 

aid in the construction of the Memphis, Carthage 
& Northwestern Railroad, interest payable semi-, 
annually at the National Park Bank in New \ork. . 

Bonds in litigation and interest not paid. 

I 

MARION TOWNSHIP. j 

100 eight per cent. 20-year bonds of $500 each, issued, 
Novenoiberl, 1871, under act of March 23, 1868, to; 
aid in the construction of the Memphis, Carthage: 
& Northwestern Railroad, interest payable semi- 
annually at the National Park Bank in New York. 

Bonds in litigation and interest not paid. 

MINERAL TOWNSHIP. 

60 eight per cent. 20-year bonds of $500 each, issued 
November 1. 1871, under act of M^rch 23, 1868, to 
aid in the construction of the Memphis, Carthage 
& Northwestern Railroad, interest payable semi- 
annually at the National Park Bank in New York. 

Bonds in litigation and interest not paid. 

JEFFERSON. 

Ten per cent, bonds of sundry denominations due in 
188ft-7-8-0 and 1891 

These bonds were issued for the construction of 
firavel roads. The interest is promptly paid in 
January and July at office of county treasurer. In-| 
terest and sinkingiifund tax. 30 cents on the $100 
valuation. Taxable wealth. $3,677,678. 

JOHNSON. 

58 ten per cent. 20-year bonds of f 1,000 each, issued 
February 1, 1871, under act of March 19, 1870,to se- 
cure the location of the Second District Normal 
School, interest payable semi-annually on the first 
days of February and August at the Bank of Amer- 
ica In New York 

77 eight per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, and 72 
00. of $100 each, issued November 26, 1878, under 
act of April 12, 1877, in compromise and redemp- 
tion of bonds issued to secure the location of the 
Second District Normal School, interest payable 
semi-annually on the first days of January and 
July at the Bank of America in New York. .\ 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 10 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $9,214,685. 

WARRENSBURG TOWNSHIP. 

8 ten per cent. 10-year bonds of $500 each, 12 do. 15- 
year bonds of $500 each, 15 do. 20-year bonds of 
$500 each, issued February 1, 1871, under act of 
March 23, 1868, to aid in the construction of the 
Warrensburg and Marshall Railroad, interest pay- 



$40,000 00, 



$40,000 00 



50,000 00 



50,000 00 



30,000 00 



30,000 00 



27,000 00 



27,000 00 



58,000 00 



84,200 00 



142,200 00 



92 



auditor's report. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OP COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS— Contikuh). 



JOHNSON— Continued. 

able seml-annaallT on the first days of Febniary 
and August at the Bank of America In New 

York ; 

166 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each, and 70 do of 
$100 each, issued August 1, 1882, under chapter 
83, Revised Statutes, in compromise and redemp-; 
tion of bonds issued to the Warrensburff and{ 
Marshall Railroad, Interest payable annually on 
the first day of February at the banking house of 
Donnell, Lawson & Simpson in New York 

Interest on compromise bonds promptly paid. The 
old ten per cent, bondb are In litigation, and the 
Interest 18 not paid. Interest tax, oO cents on tbei 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $1,360,000. 

KNOX. 

33 seven per cent. 10-year bonds of $500 each, and 100 
do. of $50 each, Issued October 1, 1867, interest' 
payable annually at office of the couAty treasurer.,' 

192 seven per cent 10-year bonds of $500 each, and 282; 
do. of $50 each, issued February 1, 1868, and 106, 
do. of $500 each, issued February 1, 1870, interest' 
payable semi-annually at the National Bank of, 
Ck>mmerce in New York i 

i' 
The above described bonds were Issued to aldlnthei 
construction of the Missouri A Mississippi RtM- 
road, under an act approved February 20, 1865, en- 
titled ^^An act to incorporate the Missouri A\ 
Mississippi Railroad Company.'* The bonds are 
all past due, and exceptlni^ a small amount, have, 
been sued upon either in Knox county or in U. S. 
courts, where Judgments have been obtained; 
amounting to about $300 ,000. An annual tax of 1-20 
of one per cent, is levied, which yields scarcely, 
yl.500. This amount Is applied to payment of the, 
Judgments. Taxable wealth, )3, 201, 198. 

JKDDO TOWNSHIP. 

40 eight per cent. 2()-year bonds of $500 each, Issued 
December 1, 1870, under act of March 23, 1868, to 
aid in the construction of the Quincy, Missouri &\ 
Pacific Railroad, interest payable semi-annually 
on the first days of June and December at the Na- 
tional Bank of Commerce in New York 



Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 65 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $361,800. 

CENTbB TOWNSHIP. 

100 eight per cent. 20 -year bonds of $500 each. Issued 
January 1, 1872. under act of March 23, 1868, to 
aid in the construction of the Quincy, Missouri <&: 
Pacific Railroad, Interest payable semi-annually! 
on the first days of January and July at the Na- 
tional Bank of Commerce in New York 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 65 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealih, $771 , 100. 



$15,000 00 



90,000 00 



$105,000 00 



21,500 oo; 



163,100 00 



184,600 00 



20,000 00 



20,000 00 



50,000 00 



50.000 00 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



93 ' 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OP COUNTIES A.ND TOWNSHIPS— Continukd. 



LYON TOWNSHIP. 

15 six per cent. &-year bonds of 7100 each, issued July 
6, 18SI, in compromise and redemption of bonds 
issued to aid in the construction of the Oulncy,| 
Missouri & Pacltic Railroad, interest payable an-; 
nnally July 6th at office of county treasurer 

Interest and sinking fund tax. $1.25 on the $100 valua- 
tion. Taxable wealth, $76,500. 

LA.CLEDE. 

S.seven per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
July 1, 1870, to aid in the construction of the La- 
clede & Fort Scott Railroad, interest payable semi-; 
annually on the first days of January and July at, 
the State Savings Association in St. Louis 

69 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each, and 121 do.' 
of $100 each, issued January 1, 1878, under act of 
April 12, 1877, in compromise and redemption of 
bonds Issued to aid in the construction of the La-' 
clede & Fort Scott Railroad, interest payable an-j 
nually on the first day of January at the State' 
Savings Association in St Louis 

i' 

Interest on compromise bonds promptly paid. Inter-' 
est tax, 40 cents on the i^lOO valuation. Taxable' 
wealth, $1,865,725. No interest paid on seven per 
cent, bonds since 1883. ' 

LAFAYETTE. 

Six per cent. 10-year bonds of the denominations ot 
$1,000 and $100 each, issued December 2, 1868, to, 
aid in the construction of the Lexington A St.] 
Louis Railroad, under an act incorporating said; 
company approved December 9, 1859, interest pa}-- 

able at the Exchange Bank of St. Louis, Mo 

6 ten per cent. lOyear bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
September 1. 1869, and 6 do. issued August 1, 1870, 
to aid in the construction of the Lexington & St. 
Louis Railroad, interest payable semi-annually, at 

the Bank of America in New York 

4 six per cent. 10- vear bonds ofSl,000each, issued 
Aug. 12, 1870, to aid in the construction of the Lex- 
ington A St. Louis Railroad, interest payable semi- 
annually, at the Bank of America in New York. . . 

Ten per cent. 5-year bonds of the denominations of 
$500 and $100 each, issued in 1869 and 1870, under an 
act approved March 24, 1868, authorizing counties 
to fnna their debts, interest payable semi-annually, 
at the office of the county treasurer 

Six per cent. 25-year bonds ot the denominations of 
$1,000 and 8100 each, issued January 1, 1876, in 
compromise and redemption of bonos issued to 
the Lexington & St. Louis Railroad Company, and 
for other purposes, and as provided, in an act ap- 
proved March 27, 1875, entitled ^^An act to facili- 
tate the settlement of county * * * bonded 
indebtednesp,'' interest payable semi-annually on 
the first days of January and July, at the Bank of 
America in New York 



$1,500 00 



$1,500 00 



3,000 00: 



81,100 00 



84,100 00 



23,900 00 



12,000 00 



4,000 00 



26,600 00 



578,100 00 



639,600 00 



94 



auditor's repokt. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OP COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS-Continukd. 



LAFAYETTE— Continued. 

Interest promptly paid on six per cent, compromise 
bonds. On old bonds the interest is not paid. In- 
terest and sinking ftind tax, 40 cents on the $100 
valuation. Taxable wealth, $8,S0S,273. 

DAVIS TOWNSHIP. 

12 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each, and 31 do. 
of $100 each, issued September 1, 1882, under 
chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in compromise and 
redemption of bonds issued to the Lexington & 
St. Louis Kailroad, interest payable annually, on 
the first day of September at office of county 
treasurer 

Interest promptlv paid. Interest tax, 25 cents on the 
$100 valuation Taxable wealth, $1,003,200. 

FRBELOU TOWNSHIP. 

Six per cent. 5-20J[)onds of $1,000 and $100 each, issued 
September 1, 1882, under chapter 83, Revised Stat- 
utes, in compromise and redemption of bonds is- 
sued to aid in the construction or the Lexington A 
St. Louis Railroad, interest payable annually at 
office of the county treasurer 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 25 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $1 ,040,000. 

MIDDLKTON TOWNSHIP. 

Six per cent. 5-20 bonds of the denominations of $1,000 
and $100 each, issued September 1, 1882, under 
chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in compromise and 
redemption of bonds issued to the Northwestern 
Branch of the Tebo & Neosho Railroad, interest 
payable annually at office of the county treasurer. 

■ 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax 25 cents on the| 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $860,000. 

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP. 

17 six per cent. 6-20 bonds of $1,0(X) each, and 50 do. 
of tlOO each, issued September 1, 1882, under 
chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in compromise and 
redemption of bonds issued to the Lexington, 
Chillicothe & Gulf Railroad Company, interest 
payable annually at office of county treasurer 

78 six per cent. 25-year bonds of SI, 000 each, and 24 
do. of $100 each, redeemable in 5, 10 and 15 years, 
issued under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in com- 
promise and redemption of bonds to the Lexing- 
ton, Chillicothe A Gulf Railroad, interest payable 
annually at office of county treasurer 



Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 80 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, 1979,875. 



$15,100 00: 



$15,100 00 



37,000 00 



37,000 00 



^,800 00 



24,800 00 



22,000 00 



80,400 00 



102,400 09 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



95 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIP— Continukd. 



BNI-A-BAR TOWNSHIP. 

1 six per cent 5-20 bond of ^1,000, and 17 do. of $100 
each, issued September 1, 1882, under chapter 83, 
Revised Statutes, in compromise and redemption 
of bonds issued to aid in the construction of the 
Lexington, Chilllcothe & Gulf Railroad, interest 
payable annually at office of the county treasurer. 
45 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of .'$^1,000 each, and 22 do. 
8100 each, issued July 1, 1885— other description 
same as above 

5 ten per cent. 7-year bonds of $1 000 each, issued 
July 19, 1870, under act of March 23, 1868, to aid in 
the construction of the Lexington, Chillicothe & 
Gulf Railroad, interest payable annually at the 
Bank of America In New York 



On six per cent, compromise bonds the interest is 
promptly paid. The old bonds are in litigation, 
and the interest is not paid. Interest tax, 50 cents 
on the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth, ?G93,600. 

i 

LKXINGTOX TOWNSHIP. 

Six per cent. 5-20 bonds of the denominations of :^l,000j 
and :i^l00 each, issued September 1, 1882, underj 
chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in compromise and! 
redemption of bonds issued to the Lexington, 
Chillicothe & Gulf Railroad Company, interest 
payable annually at office of county treasurer 

ISI six per cent. 25-year bonds of $1,000 each, and 97 
do. of $100 each, redeemable'in 5, 10 and 15 years, 
issued under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in com- 
promise and redemption of bonds issued to the 
Lexington & St. Joseph, and Lexington, Chilli- 
cothe A Gulf Railroad; interest payable annually, 
at the office of county treasurer 

Ten per cent. 10-year bonds of a $1,000 and $100 each, 
issued September 1st, 1868, under an act of March 
23d, 1868, to aid In the construction of the Lexing- 
ton & St. Joseph Railroad, interest payable an- 
nually at Lexington, Missouri 

Interest promptly paid on six per cent, compromise 
bonds. On old boixds it is not paid. Interest tax, 
80 cents on the $100 valuation.' Taxable wealth 
$2,181,250. I 

LAWRENCE. 

No county indebtedness. Taxable wealth, $3,459,703. 

PIKRCB TOWNSHIP. 

35 ten per cent. 20-year bonds of $500 each, issued 
October 6, 1871, to aid in the construction of the 
Memphis, Carthage & Northwestern Railroad, in- 
terest payable semi-annually on the first days of 
May and November in the city of Ne<v York 

2S six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each, 34 do of $100 
each, issued July 1, 1880, under chapter 83, Revised 
Statutes, in compromise and redemption of bonds 
issued to the Memphis, Carthage & Northwestern 
Railroad, interest payable annually on the first day 



$2,700 00 
47,200 00 



5,000 00 



$54,900 00 



39,400 00 



193,700 00 



1,700 00 



234,800 00 



17,500 00 



96 



auditor's report. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS.— Continue. 



LAWRENCE— Continued. 

of July at office of Farmers' Loan and Trust Com- 
pany In New York. 

Interest on six per cent, compromise bonds promptly 
paid. The old bonds are in litigation and the in- 
terest is not paid. Taxable wealth, $636,800. 

LEWIS. 

30 eight per cent. 20-year bonds of S500 each, issued 
October 5, 1869, and September 27, 1870, under an 
act of March 23. 1868, to aid in the constniction of the 
Mississippi ana Missouri River Air Line Railroad, 
interest payable annually on the tirst day of Janu- 
ary at the National Bank of Commerce in New 
York 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fand tax, 
20 cents on the $100 valuation TaxalMe wealth, 
$4,463,843. 

HIGHLAND TOWNSHIP I 

60 ten per cent. 20-year bonds of $600 each, issued 
January 1, 1871, under act of March 23, 1868, to aid^ 
in the construction of the Quincy, Missouri &\ 
Pacitic Railroad, interest pavable semi-annually onj 
the first days of January and July at the First Na-; 
tlonal Bank In Quincy, Illinois 

Bonds in litigation, and interest is not promptly paid. 
A tax of $1.50 on the f 100 levied to pay Judgments. 
Taxable wealth, $351,000. 

LA BKLLE TOWN8HIF. 

90 six per cent. 10-30 bonds of *500 each, issued Sep- 
ber 26, 1881, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in; 
compromise and redemption of bonds Issued to the, 
Quincy, Missouri &. Pacific Railroad, interest pay-; 
able annually on the first day of January^ at the' 

Bank of Commerce in St. Louis 

• 
Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 50 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $525,250. 

LINCOLN. I 

300 six per cent. 5 20 bonds of 1^1,000 each, 101 do. of, 
$500 each, and 74 do. of $100 each, issued May 1, 
1883, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in com-, 
promise and redemption of bonds issued to aid In I 
the construction of the St. Louis, Hannibal & Keo-j 
kuk Railroad, interest payable annually on the' 
first day of February at the Third National Bank in' 
St. Louis ' 

18 ten per cent. lO-year bonds of t500 each, issued' 
January 1, 1870, to aid In the construction of tlie 
St. Louis, Hannibal & Keokuk Railroad, Interest! 
payable seml-annuallv on the first days of Januaryl 
and July at the Third National Bank,* St Louis . . . ' 



17,400 00 



■ 



34,900 00 



15,000 00 



26,000 00 



15,000 00 



25,000 00 



46,000 00 



367,900 00 



9,000 00 



46,000 00 



366,900 Ou 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION 



97 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OP COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS.— Contikukd. 



LINCOLN— Continued, 

Interest on compromise bonds promptly paid, interest 
tax, 60 cents on the $100 valuation. Original ten 
per cent, bonds in litigation. Taxable wealth, $4,- 
170,320. 

LINN. 

No county indebtedness. Taxable wealth, $4,525,343. 

BROOKPIELD TOWNSHIP. 

20 Blx per cent. 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each, and 3 do. of 
of $500 each, issued April 1, 1883, under chapter 83, 
Revised Statutes, in compromise and redemption 
of bonds issued to aid in the construction of the 
Kansas City, Brookfield & Chicago Railroad, inter- 
est payable annually April 1 at the Koontz Bros.' 
Banx in New York 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund 
tax, 40 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable 
wealth, $749,780. 

BBNTON TOWNSHIP. 

15 six per cent. &-20 bonds of $1 ,000 each. Issued April 
2, 1883, under chapter 83, Rievised Statutes, in com- 
promise and redemption of bonds issued to aid In 
construction of the Central North Missouri Rail- 
road, interest payable annually April 2 at the Com- 
mercial Bank in St. Louis 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund 
tax, 80 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable 
wealth, $235,058. 

LOCUST CREKK TOWNSHIP. 

22 Six per cent. 5 20 bonds of $1,000 each, and 18 do. 
Of $500 each, Issued A^ril 2, 1883, under chapter 83, 
Revised Statutes, in coiapromise and redemption 
of bonds issued to aid in the construction of the 
Central North Missouri Railroad, interest pay- 
able annually at the Commercial Bank in St. Louis 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund 
tax, $1 on the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth, 
$477,437. 

JXFPXRSON TOWNSHIP. 

31 Six per cent. 5-20 bondb of $1,000 ea«*.h, and 23 do. 
of $500 each, issued April 2, 1883, in compromise 
and reaemption of bonds issued to aid in the con- 
struction of the Central North Missouri Railroad, 
interest payable annually at office of county treas- 
urer 



Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund 
tax, $1 on the ^100 valuation. Taxable wealth, 
•427, 17L 

8 P — 7 



$21,500 00 




$21,600 00 



15,000 00 



31,000 00 



42,500 00 



31,000 00 



42,5U0 00 



98 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS.— Contikcbd. 



LIVINGSTON. 
No county bonded debt. Taxable wealth, $4,797,672. 

CHILLICOTHK TOWNSHIP. 

24 eight per cent. 15-year bonds of :f 500 each, issued 
July 1, 1870, under act of March 23, 1868, to aid in 
the construction of the Chillicothe & Omaha Rail- 
road, but issued to the St Louis, Council Blufts & 
Omaha Railroad, Interest payable semi-annually 
on the first days of January and July at the Na- 
tional Bank of Commerce in New York 

Bonds in litigation, and no provision made for Interest 
or sinking funa . 

McDonald. 

No county or township indebtedness Taxable wealth, 

$1,216,845. 

MACON. 

87 six per cent 5-year bonds of $50 each, 10 do. of $500 
each, and 10 do. of $1,000 each, issued September 
16, 1867, under an act approved February 20, 1865, 
to aid in the construction of the Missouri & Missis-j 
sippi Railroad Company, interest payable annually j 
at office of the county treasurer 

17 six per cent. 5-year bonds of $1,000 each, issued' 
November 1, 1867, 101 six per cent. 6-year bonds of 
$50 each, and 49 do. of 4^500 each, issued November 

1, 1867— other description same as above 

2 seven per cent. 10-year bonds of $500 each, and 13 
do. of $1,000 each, issued February 1 , 1869, interest 
payable annually 'at the National Bank of Com- 
merce in New York 

57 ten per cent. 12 year bonds of $l,OtO each, issued 
January 1. 1870, interest payable semi-annually at 

National Bank of Commerce in New York 

175 eight per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
May 2, 1870, interest payable semi-annually at the 
National Bank of Commerce in New York 



Bonds in litigation. An interest tax of 1-20 of one per 
cent is levied, which is wholly insufficient to meet 
the interest account. Taxable w^ealth, $5,451,258. 
These bonds were issued as a subscription to the 
Missouri ct Mississippi Railroad Company, under 
section 13 of an act entitled *^ An act to incorporate 
the Missouri & Mississippi Railroad Company,'' 
approved February 20, 1865 ; to pay said bonds the 
act provided that a tax not to exceed one-twentieth 
of 1 per cent, should be levied each year. The 
county has never failed to levy this tax, but the 
revenue derived therefrom is insufficient to pay the 
interest. No other provision is made for interest 
or sinking fund, consequently a large amount of in- 
terest is now due upon the bonds. 

LIBERTY TOWNSHIP. 

26 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each, and 32 do. of; 
$100 each, issued February 1, 1881, under act ofl 



$12 ,000 00 



$12,000 00 



19,350 00 

46,550 00 

14,000 00 

57,000 00 

175,000 00 



311,900 00 



-»"" 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



99 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS.— Continued. 



MACON— Contlnacd. 

May 16, 1879, in compromise and redemption of 
bonds issued to aid in the oonstruction of the St. 
Louis, Macon & Omaha Air Line Railroad Inter- 
est payable annually at the Third National Bank 
of St. Louis 



Interest promptly yaid. Interest tax, 28 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Sinking fund tax, 82 cents. Tax- 
able wealth, $306,737. 

HUDSON T0WN8HIF. 

29 six per cent 5-20 bonds of $500 each, and 23 do. of 
$100 each, issued February 1, 1881, under act of 
May 16, 1879, in compromise and redemption of 
bonds issued to the St. Louis, Macon & Omaha 
Air Line Railroad Company, interest payable an- 
nually at the Third National Bank of St. Louis 

Interest promptly paid . Interest tax, 9 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Sinking fand tax, ll cents. Tax- 
able wealth, $1,005,882. 

MADISON. 

Xo countv or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$1,542,475. 

MARIES. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$1,341,204. 

MARION. 

No county indebtedness. Taxable wealth, $7,351,328. 

MA80N TOWNSHIP. 

197 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each, 85 do. of 
$500 each, and 174 do. of $100 each, issued February 
1, 1883, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in com- 
promise and redemption of bonds issued to aid in 
the construction of tne Hannibal & Central Missouri 
Railroad, interest payable annually at the Third 
National Bank of St. Louis 



Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 60 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $2, 649,463. 

MERCER. 

Eight per cent. 10-20 bonds of the denominations of 
$1,000, $500 and $100 each, issued in 1869, to aid in 
the construction of the Chillicothe & Des Moines 
Railroad, interest payable semi-annually on the 
first days of January and July at the Valley Na- 
tional Bank in St. Louis 

215 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each, and 1 do. of 
$100, issued in 1883, 1884, 1885 and 1886, under chap, 
ter 83, Revised Statutes, in compromise and re- 
demption of bonds issued to aid in the construc- 



$16,200 00 



$16,200 00 



16,800 00 



16,800 00 



256,900 00 



6,400 00 



266,900 00 



100 



auditor's report. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OP COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS.— Oontikukd. 



MERCER— Continued . 

tion of the Chillicothe & Des Moines Railroad, in- 
terest payable semi-annually on the first days of 
March and September at the Valley National Bank 
in St. Louis 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund 
tax, 75 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable 
wealth, $2,642,823. The county has on hand a 
sinking fund amounting to $10,000. 

MILLER. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$1,632,374. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$1,37'2,531. 

MONITEAU. 

No county or township Indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$3,251,321. 

MOJSTROE. 

129 six per cent. 5-15-year bonds of $500 each aYid 63{ 
do. of $1,000 each, issued May 15, 1880, under chap. i 
83, Revised Statutes, in compromise and redemp- 
tion of bonds issued to aid in the construction ofl 
the Hannibal & Central Missouri Railroad, interest 
payable annually on the 15th day of May at the Na- 
tional Park Bank in New York 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 50 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $4,826,700. 

MONTGOMERY. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 

$3,181,292. 

MORGAN. 

'^65 six per cent. 20-year bonds of $500 each, issued 
April 7, 1879, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, 
in compromise and redemption of bonds issued to 
aid in the construction of the Osage Valley & 
Southern Kansas Railroad, interest payable an- 
nually on the first day of February at oflice of the 
county treasurer 

155 six per cent. 10-30 bonds of $500 each, 92 do. of 
$100 each and 70 do. of $300 each, issued August 
1, 1883— other description same as above 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 40 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $2,164,364. 

NEW MADRID. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 

$1,286,480. 



$107,600 00 



127,500 00 



27,500 00 
107,700 00 



$114,000 00 



127,500 00 



135,200 00 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



101 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS— Ooutinuid. 



NEWTON. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$3,609,235. 

NODAWAY. 

16 six per cent. 6-year bonds of 9500 each, 16 do. 7- 
year, 16 do. S-year, 16 do. 9-year and 16 do. 10-year| 
bonds, issaed September 8, 1881, under sectlonj 
6812, Kevised Statulies, for the erection of a court, 
house and Jail, interest payable semi-annually on; 
on the first days March and September at the office 
of the county treasurer 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 2 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Sinking fUnd tax, 8 cents, which 
is sufficient to pay off, annually, bonds amounting 
to $8,009. Taxable wealth, $9,990,308. 

OREGON. 

10 eight per cent. 10-year bonds of $600 each, issued 
Augast 20, 1883, to aid in the construction of a 
court house, interest payable semi-annually at the 
Exchange Bank in Jefferson City, Mo 

Interest promptly paid. Taxable wealth, $926,274. 

OSAGE. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$2,523,979. 

OZARK. 

4 ten per cent. 10-year b<>nds of $600 each and 2 do. 
of $100 each, issued July 1, 1874, to fund county in- 
debtedness, interest payable semi-annually at the 
Exchange Bank in Jefferson City, Mo 

3 ten per cent 10-year bonds of $500 each, issued 

June 6, 1875— other description same as above i 

30 six Der cent. 10-year funding bonds of $100 each,, 

issaed April 11, 1878— other history same as above.! 

10 eight per cent. 5-20 funding bonds of $100 each, is-. 

sued April 11, 1879, and 3 do. issued August 6, 

1879, interest payable semi-annually 

1 six per cent. 5-20 funding bond of $100, issuedi 
April 12, 1879- -other history same as above ! 

Interest la not paid on bonds amounting to 93,700, is-: 
sued July 1, 1874, and June 6, 1875. On the remain- 
der the interest is promptly paid. Interest tax, 40 
cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth,- 
$533,965. 

PEMISCOT. 

61 ten per cent, option bonds of $100 each, issued No- 
vember 17, 1869, to fund floating indebtedness, in- 
terest payable annually on the first day of January 
at the ofiBce of the county treasurer ; 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 10 cents on the 
$100 valuation . Taxable wealth, $828,115. 



$40,000 00 



$40,000 00 



5,000 00 



5,000 00 



2,200 00 
1,500 00 

3.000 oo; 

1,300 00 
100 00 



8,100 00 



6,100 00 



6,100,00 



102 



auditor's report. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS-^CosriHuro. 



PERRY. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$2,663,160. 

PETTIS. 

288 six per cent 5-30 bonds of $1,000 each, 149 do. of 
$600 each, and 236 do. of $100 each, issued May 1, 
1878, 30 do. of $1,000 and 40 do. of $600, issued May 
1, 1882, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes of Mis- 
souri, in compromise and redemption of bonds 
issued to aid in the construction of the Tebo & 
Neosho and Lexington & St. Louis Railroads, in- 
terest payable semi-annually on the first days of 
May and NoYember at the First National Bank in 
New York 

200 six per cent. 6-20 bonds of $600 each, issued July 1, 
1884, under chapter 146, Revised Statutes, for the 
erection of a county court house, interest payable 
semi-annually on the first days of January and July 
at office of the county treasurer 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 20 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Sinking ftind tax, 10 cents. Tax- 
able wealth, $8,773,907. 

PHELPS. 

8 six per cent. 5-20 fbndlng bonds of $600 each, issued 
December 22, 1882, interest payable annuiUly on the 
first day of January at the i^ational Bank of RoUa 

Interest promptly paid Interest tax, 10 c«nts on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $1,778,744. 

PIKE. 

1 ten per cent. 20-year bond for $9,000, issued in 1870 to 
purchase a gravel road, interest payable semi- 
annually on the first days of January and July at 
office of the county treasurer 

Sight per cent, past due bonds of sundry denomina- 
tions, issued in 1866-8-9 and 1870-1-2 to aid in the 
coBStruction of the Louisiana & Mo. River Rail- 
road, and to erect a court house, interest payable 
semi-annually at office of county treasurer 

Sight per cent, bonds held for county school fund 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 30 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $6,647,435. 

CUrVRE TOWNSHIP. 

< 

94 six per cent. 5-30 bonds of $1,000 each, issued Sep- 
tember 1, 1882, under chapter 83, Hevised statutes, 
in compromise and redemption of bonds issued to 
aid in the construction of the Pike County Short 
Line Railroad, interest payable annually at the 
Bank of Commerce in St. Xouis 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund tax, 
80 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth, 
$969,497. 



$386,100 00 



100,000 00 



4,000 00 



9,000 00 



16,400 00 
30,244 33 



$486,100 00 



4,000 00 



94.000 00 



66,644 S;} 



94,000 00 



8TATI8TICA1. INFORMATION. 



103 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS— Continukd. 



CALUMBT TOWNSHIP. 

100 Six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $l,000each, 94 do. of $500 
eacD and 44 do. of $100 each, issued January 1, 1883, 
.under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in compromise 
and redemption of bonds issued to aid in tne con- 
struction of the Clarksville & Western Railroad, 
interest payable annually January 1 at the Bank 
of Commerce in St. Louis, Mo 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund tax, 
70 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth, 
$1,629,020. 

BUFFALO TOWNSHIP. 

92 Six per cent. 6-20 bonds of $1 ,000 each. 70 do. of $500| 
each and 49 do. of $100 each, issued January 1, 1883,j 
under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in compromisci 
and redemption of bonds issued to aid in the con- 
struction of the Clarksville & Western Railroad, in- 
terest payable annually January 1 at the Bank of 
Commerce in St. Louis 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund tax, 
70 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth, 
$1,653,530. 

PENO TOWNSHIP. 

57 six percent. 5-30 bonds of $1,000 each, issued Novem- 
ber 1, 1882, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in 
compromise and redemption of bonds Issued to aid 
in the construction of the Pike County Short Line 
Railroad, interest payable annually on the first day 
of February at the Bank of Commerce in St. Louis. 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund tax, 
80 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth, 
$579,768. 

PLATTE. 

152 six per cent. 5-30 bonds of ^1,000 each, and 142 do- 
ofS50()each, issued July 1, 1880, in compromise 
and redemption of bonds issued to aid in the con- 
struction of the Parkville & Grand River Railroad, 
and for buildinfl^ a court house and Jail, interest 
payable annually at the National Park Bank in 
New York 

200 six per cent. 5-30 bonds of $100 each, other descrip- 
tion same as above; except that the interest is paid 

at office of the county treasurer 

1 ten percent. 20-year bond of $1,000, issued July 
1, 1869, to build a court house and jail, interest 
payable semi-annually on the first days of January 
and July at the American Exchange National 
Bank in New York 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 30 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Sinking fund tax, 20 cents. Tax- 
able wealth, $4,630,655. 



$151,400 00| 



131,900 00 



57,000 00 



$151,400 00 



131 ,900 00 



57,000 00 



223,000 00 
20,000 00 



1,000 00 



244,000 00 



104 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS. -Continued. 



POLK. 

1 seven per cent. 20-year bond of $500, Issued Julyj 
6, 1871, 3 do. of $1,000 each, issued December 23j 
1870, and 30 do. of $1,000 each, issued July 15, 1871,1 
to aid In the construction of the Laclede and Fortj 
Scott Railroad, Interest payable semi-annually onj 
the first days of January and July at the GermanI 

American Bank In New York 

1. 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund! 
tax, 20 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable i 
wealth, $3,401,659. { 

PULASKI. 1 

No county or township Indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$1,008,015. 

PUTNAM. 

32 seven per cent. 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
July 1, 1872, to aid in the construction of the St. 
Joseph & Iowa Railroad, interest payable semi- 
annually on the first days of January and July at 
the Third National Bank of St. Louis 

51 seven per cent. 5-20 bonds of $820 each, issued May 
1, 1878, under act of April 12, 1877, in compromise 
and redemption of bonds issued to aid in the con- 
struction of the St. Joseph & Iowa Railroad, inter- 
est payable semi-annually on the first days of May 
and November at the Manufacturer's Bank in St. 
Louis, Mo I 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 20 cents on thei 

$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $2,592,106. 

i 

BALLS. 1 

283 six per cent. 5-30 bonds of $1,000 each, 101 do. of! 
$500 each, and 118 do. of $100 each, issued October, 
1, 1883, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in^ 
compromise and redemption of bonds issued to aid 
in the construction of the St. Louis & Keokuk 
Railroad, interest payable annually on the first day 
February at the Third National Bank in St. Louis 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 60 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth. $3,807,490. 

RANDOLPH. 

Randolph county has no bonded debit, but owes the 
county and township school fund the sum of 

Upon this Indebtedness the county pays interest at 
the rate of seven per cent, per annum. Interest 
tax, 10 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable 
wealth, $6,088,356. 



$33,500 00>. 



$33,600 00 



32,000 00, 



41,820 OOi 



345,300 00 



22,692 44 



73,820 00 



345,300 00 



22,692 44 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



105 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS.— Contikubd. 



SUGAR CRKBK TOWNSHIP. 

49 six per cent. 5-10 bonds, of $500 each, and 65 do. of' 
8100 each, issued Jaly 14, 1879, ander act of April; 
12,1877, in compromise and redemption of bonds is-! 
sued to aid in the construction of the Tebo & Ne- 
osho Sailroad, interest payable semi-annually on 
the first days of April and October at'the Exchange! 
Bank in Moberly, Mo i 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking: ^Qi^d 
tax, $1.00 on the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth, 
$1,230,570. 

BAY. 

173 six per cent. 10-20 bonds of $1,000 each, 119 do. of 
$500 each, and 86 do. of $100 each, issued October 
1, 1881,ander chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in com- 
promise and redemption of bonds issued to aid in 
the construction or the St. Joseph & St. Louis 
Railroad, interest payable annually on the first 
day of January at omce of the county treasurer. .. 

I 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinkino: fund tax,' 
40 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth, 
$6,088,356. 

I 

REYNOLDS. ! 

I 
No county or township bonds. Taxable wealth, $1,-! 

297.2^. I 

RIPLEY. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$1,129,171. 



ST. CHARLES. 

20 ten per cent. 20-year bonds of $500 each, issued 
August 1, 1873, to build a county iail, interest pay- 
able semi-annually on the first days of February 
and August at the offtce of county treasurer 

50 eight per cent. 20-year bonds of $100 each, issued 
September 1, 1^73, for improvement of county 
roads, interest payable semi-annually on the first 
days of March and September at office of the coun-l 
ty treasurer 

I 

Interest promptly paid. Taxable wealth, $7,660,730. 

ST. CLAIR. 

2.31 ten per cent. 12-year bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
July 1, 1870, under act of March 23, 1868, to aid in 
the construction of the Tebo & Neosho, now the 
Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad, interest pay- 
able semi-annually at the National Bank of Com- 
merce in New York 

Bonds in litigation. No provision made for interest or 
sinking fbnd. Taxable wealth, $4,129,201. 



$31,000 00 



$31,000 00 



241,100 00 



10,000 00 



5,000 00 



241,100 00 



15,000 00 



231,000 CO 



231,000 00 



106 



AUDITORS RBPORT- 



BOl^DED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS.— Continubd. 



ST. FRANCOIS. 

No oounty or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$2,229,189. 

STE. GENEVIEVE. 

No bonded debt. Taxable wealth, $2,080,281. 

ST. LOUIS. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$19,199,225. 

SALINE. 

20 six per cent. S-year bonds of $500 each, 25 do. 6- 
vear bonds of $500 each, and 1 do. for $300, issued 
May 1. 1882, under article 5, chapter 145, Hevised 
Statutes, for the purpose of building a court house, 
interest payable semi-annually on tne first days of 
May ana November at office of the county treas- 
urer 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund tax, 
10 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth, 
$10,269,962. 

SALT POND TOWNSHIP. 

99 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each, issued Feb- 
ruary 1, 1883, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, 
in compromise and redemption of bonds issued to 
aid in the construction of the Lexin^on & St. 
Louis Railroad, interest payable annually on the 
first day of February at tne Third National Bank 
in St. Louis 



Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund 
tax, 40 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable 
wealth, $1,215,050. 

SCHUYLER. 

11 eight per cent. 20-year bonds of $1 ,000 each, issued 
September 1, 1871, to aid in the construction of 
the Missouri, Iowa & Nebraska Railroad, interest 
payable annually at office of the Farmers' Loan and 

Trust Company, New York 

158 six per cent. 10-20 bonds of $1,000 each, 25 do. of 
$500 each, and 26 do. of $100 each, issued Septem- 
ber 1, 1882, under chapter 83, Revised Statutes, in 
compromise and redemption of bonds issued to aid 
in the construction of the Missouri, Iowa and Ne- 
braska Railroad, interest payable annually on the 
first day of January at office of the Farmers' Loan 
and Trust Company in New York 

Interest on six per cent, bonds promptly paid. Inter- 
est tax, 30 cents on the $100 valuation. The 11 
eight per cent, bonds are in litigation. Taxable 
wealth, $1,941,301. 



$22,800 00 



$22,800 00 



49,600 00 



11,000 00 



173,100 00 



49,600 00 



184,100 00 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



107 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS.— OomiNUED, 



SCHUYLEKr-Continued. 



UBBBTT TOWNSHIP. 



13 six per oent 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
September 1, 1871, to aid in the construction of 
Missouri, Iowa & Nebraska Railroad, interest pay- 
able annually on the first day of January at the 
office of the Farmers* 'Loan and Trust Company in 
New York 



Interest promptly paid. 

SCOTLAND. 

165 eight per cent. 25-year bonds, of $1,000 each, Issued 
Sept 1, 1870. to aid in the construction of the Mis- 
souri, Iowa & Nebraska Railroad, interest payable 
annually on the 31st day of December at the Farm- 
ers Loan and l^ust Company in New York 

Interest due and unpaid on the above described bonds 
11 eight per cent. 10-20 bonds of $500 each, and 11 do. 
of $100 each, issued December 22, 1877* under act 
of April 12, 1877, in compromise and redemption of 
bonas issued to aid in the construction of the Mis- 
souri, Iowa A Nebraska Railroad, interest payable 
semi-annually on the first days of March and Sep- 
'tember at the Metropolitan National Bank in New 
York 

Eight and ten per cent, bonds of sundry denominations 
issued in 1864-5-6 and 1872 for money borrowed 
from the county school fund, interest payable an- 
nually on the 31st day of December at office of the 
county treasurer. 

The bondp issued September 1, 1870, amounting to 
$165,000 are in litigation and no interest is paid 
on the same. On compromise bonds and those is- 
sued to the school fund, the interest Is promptly 
paid. Interest tax. 10 cents on the $100 valuation. 
Taxable wealth, $2,781,745. 

SCOTT. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$1,739,237. 

SHANNON. 

Ten per cent. 10-year funding bonds, issued June I, 
1875, interest payable semi-annually on the first 
days of June and December at the Commercial 
Bank in St. Louis 

Seven per cent. 5*20 finding bonds of the denomina- 
tions of $500 and $100 each, issued September 1, 
1879 — other description same as above 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 15 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Sinking fund tax, 50 cenU. Tax- 
able wealth, $779,644. 

SHELBY. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$4,305,515. 



$13,000 00 



165,000 00 
113,759 88 



$13,000 00 



6,600 00 



16,629 40 



4,000 00 
9,400 00 



301,989 28 



13,400 00 



108 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS.— CoNToanBD. 



STODDARD. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth. 
$1,497,962. 

STONE. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 

t7ol. 



$597 



SULLIVAN. 



6 seven per cent. 20-year bonds of $1 ,000 each, issued 
November 1, 1871, to aid in the construction of the 
CentrnL North Missouri Branch of the St. Joseph & 
Iowa Railroad, interest payable semi-annually on 
the lirst days of May and November at the Farmers 

Loan A Trust Company in New York 

213 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of r500 each, 100 do of 
$C00 each, and 25 do. of $100 each, issued January 
1, 1879, under act approved April 12, 1877, in 
compromise and redemption of bonds issued to the 
Central North Missouri Branch of the St. Joseph 
& Ipwa Railroad Company, interest payable semi- 
annually on the Urst days of January and July at 
the St. Louis National Bank in St. Louis 



Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 334 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $3,827 C18. 

TANEY. 

33 six per cent. 5-10 bonds of $1,000 each, issued N^o- 
vember 13, 1883, under chapter 83. Revised .'Stat- 
utes, in compromise and redemption of funding 
bonds, interest payable annually at the Third Na- 
tional Bank in 8t. Louis 

Six per cent. 5-10 bonds of sundry denominations, is 
sued in 1884 and 1885~other description same as 
above 



Interest tax, 40 cents on the $100 valuation. Sinking 
fund tax, 30 cents. Taxable wealth, 9578,749. 

TEXAS. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$1,657,746. 

VERNON. 

2 eight per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
June 15, 1870, to aid in the construction of the 
Laclede <fc Fort Scott Railroad, interest payable 
semi-annually on the first days of January and J uly 
at the National Bank of Commerce in New York. . 

21 eight per cent. 20-vear bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
July 1, 1870, to aid in the construction of the Tebo 
& Neosho, now the Missouri, Kansas & Texas 
Railroad, interest payable semi-annually on the 
first days of January and July at the National 
Bank of Commerce in New Yorfc 

296 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each and 52 do. of 
$100 each, issued January 1, 1878, under act of 



$6,000 00 



169,000 0(^ 



$175,000 00 



33,O0C 00 

1 
2,010 16 



35,010 16 



2,000 00 



21,000 00 



STATISTICAL INFORM Al ION. 



109 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS— Continued. 



VERNON— Continued . 

April 12, 1877. In compromise and redemption of 
bonds Issued to aid In the construction of the I^a- 
clede & Fort Scott and the Tebo & Neosho Rail- 
roads, interest payable semi-annually on the first 
davs of March and September at the Banking House 
of ^Vm. Ballou & Co. in New York 

Interest on six per cent, compromise bonds promptly 
paid. Interest tax, 20 cents on the #100 valuation. 
On 23 original eight per cent bonds the interest is 
not paid. Taxable wealth, $6,282,855. 

WARREN. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$2,209,5''^ 



.288. 



WASHINGTON. 



No county or township indebt'Cdness. Taxable wealth, 
$2,270,437. 

WAYNE. 

No county or township Indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$1,410,047. 

WEBSTER. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$2,104,059. 

WORTH. 

No county or township indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$1,^1,065. 

WRIGHT. 

No county or township Indebtedness. Taxable wealth, 
$1,614,005. ' 



$153,200 00 



$176,200 00 



RECAPITULATION. 



Bonded indebtedness of counties . . 

Bonded indebtedness of townships. 

Total 



$10,598,210 34 

3,787,552 00 

$14,385,762 34 



NoTB. — ^Fifty-four counties Save no bonded indebtedness, sixty have bonds 
outstanding and twenty-flye have townships with bonds outstanding. 

The yaluation of merchandise and of railroad property is not included in the 
'^taxable wealth" of counties and townships as reported in the foregoing table. 

The bonded debt of Cass county and its townships, as reported, includes un- 
paid interest. 



110 



auditor's report. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF CITIES AND INCORPORATED TOWNS. 

From returns of city and town clerks made to this office in the months of October 
and November, 1886, the following table has been compiled, showing substan- 
tially the bonded debt of each city and town on the first day of Januaiy, 18S7 



BOONVILLE. 

38 six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each and 25 do. of 
$100 each, issued December 1, 1879, under chapter! 
83, Revised Statutes, in compromise and redemp-, 
tion of bonds issued for improvement of the city, 
and to aid in the construction of the Osage Valley | 
& Southern Kansas Railroad, interest payable 
semi-annually on the first days of June and Decem- 
ber at the St. Louis National Bank in St. Louis,; 
Mo 



$21,500 00 



Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund tax, 
20 cents oh the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth, 
$1,191,670. 

CAPE GIRARDEAU. 

2 nine per cent. 20-year bonds of $500 each, issued July 
1, 1SG9, to aid in the construction of the Cape Gir- 
ardeau & State liine Railroad, interest payable 
semi-annually on the firstdaysof January and July 
at the National Bank of Commerce in New York . . 

Past due ten per cent, city improvement bonds, inter- 
est payable at office of the city treasurer 

Past due eight per cent, city improvement bonds, in- 
terest payable at office of the city treasurer 

100 eight per cent. 10-30 bonds of $500 each, issued Jan- 
uary 1, 1874, as a donation to secure the location of 
the Third District Normal School, interest paya- 
ble semi-annu^y on the first days of January and' 
July at office of the city treasurer 

91 six per cent. 5-15 bonds of $500 each and 141 do. of 
$100 each, issued January 1, 1878, under act of 
April 12, 1877, in compromise and redemption of' 
bonds issued to aid in the construction of the Cape, 
Girardeau & State Line Railroad, interest payable 
semi-annuallv on the first days of January and' 
July at the National Bank of Commerce in New I 
York ! 

I 

Interest promptly paid on all bonds excepting the nine 
per cent, railroad bonds. Interest tax, $1.25 on 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $627,050. 

CARTHAGE. 

70 six per cent. 10-year bonds of $100 each, issued Oc- 
tober 1, 1883, for building a city hall, engine house 
and other necessary city buildings, interest payable 
semi-annuall.^ on the first days of April and Octo- 
ber at office of city treasurer 

Interest promptly paid. Eight per cent, of the city, 
revenue is set' apart for interest and sinking funds 
Taxable wealth, $1,930,203. 



$21,600 00 



1,000 00 

I 

3,500 00 
300 00 



50,000 00 



59,000 00, 



114,400 00 



7,000 00' 



7,000 00 



STATISTICAL INPOKMATION. 



Ill 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF CITIES, Etc.-Oontinxjed . 



CLARKSVILLE. 

50 six percent. 5-20 bonds of S500 each and 94 do. of* 
9100 each, issued April 1, 1884, under chapter 83, 
Revised Statutes, in compromise and redemption 
of bonds issued for city Improvement, interest pay- 
able annually on the iirst day of April at the La- 
clede Bank in St. Louis 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund tax, 
50 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth, 
$287,000. 



DkSOTO 



/ 



Ten per cent, bonds issued to purchase lands to donate to 

theSi. Louis, I. M. ^ S, R. R. Co I 

Six per cent, compromise funding bonds 

These bonds are in litififation and no provision is made 
for interest or sinking fund. No further descrip- 
tion of the bonds has been furnished. 

GLASGOW. 

29 seven per cent. 5-10 funding bonds of SlOO each, is- 
sued January 1. 1881, under chapter 83, Revised 
Statutes, interest payable annually on the first day 
of June at office of the city treasurer '. 

Interest promptly paid. 

HANNIBAL. 

15 six per cent. 20-year bonds of $600 each, issued in 
April, 1868, to compromise and redeem bonds is- 
sued to the Pike county & 111. R. R. Co., Interest 
payable semi-annually on the first days of April 
and October at office of city treasurer 

98 six per cent. 25-year bonds of .1^1 000 each and 18 
do. of :^100 each,'i8sued April 1,1868, in compromise! 
and redemption of railroad bonds, interest payable 
semi-annually on the first days of January and 
July at office of Union Trust Compan3% in New 
York 

20 six per cent, bonds of $1«000 each, one bond ma- 
turing each year until the 20 are paid. These bonds 
were issued April 15, 1886, for lighting the city with 
electric light, interest payable annually April 15 
at office of city treasurer 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund tax, 
50 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth, 
«3,331,000. ' 

INDEPENDENCE. 

Ten per cent, past due Improvement bonds, issued at; 
sundry dates and of sundry denominations, interest 
paid at office of city treasurer 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and einking fund tax, 
10 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth, 
$1»1G0,908. 



$34,400 00 



174,000 00 
78,000 00 



2,900 00 



$34,400 00 



252,000 00 



7,500 00 



2,900 00 



99,800 00 



20,000 00 




127,300 00 



1,326 48 



112 



auditor's rkport. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF CITIE<, Etc.— Continued. 



JEFFERSON CITY. 

~30 eight per cent. 10-20 funding bonds of ^500 each, and 
141 do. of $100 each, issued July 1,1877, interest pay- 
able semi-annually on the first days of January and 

July at office of city treasurer | 

93 six per cent. 5-20 funding bonds of $100 each, 30 do., 
of j:500 each, and 10 do. of $1,000 each, issued Julyj 
1, 1879, interest payable semi-annually on the first 
days of January and July at the Fourth National 
Bank in St Louis 

86 six per cent, 5-20 funding bonds of $500 each, issued 
July 1, 1882, interest payable semi-annually on th^ 
first days of January and July at the Fourth Na- 
tional Bank in St. Louis 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund 
tax, 50 cents on the $100 valuation Taxable 
wealth, >1, 255. 616 

KANSAS CITY. 

87 seven per cent. 20-yearhonds of $1,000 each, issued 
January 1 , 1870, to"^ aid in the construction of the 
Kansas* City A Santa Fe Kailroad, interest payable 
semi-annually on the first days of January and 
July at the N'inth National Bank in New York 

250 eigiit per cent. 20-year funding bonds of $1,000 each, 
issued May 1, 1873, interest payable on the first 
days of May and November at the Ninth National 
Bank In New York 

50 eight per cent. 20-year renewal bonds of $1,000 
each, issued June 1, 1875, interest payable on the 
first days of June and December at tne Ninth Na- 
tional Bank in New York 

285 eight per cent. 20-year funding and renewal bonds 
of $500 each, issued August 15, 1875. interest pay- 
able on the 15th days of August and February at the 
Ninth National Bank in New York 

20 eight per cent. 20-year renewal bonds of $1,000 
each, issued May 1. 1876, interest payable on the 
first days of May and November at the Ninth Na- 
tional Bank in New York 

60 eight per cent. 20-year renewal bonds of $1,000 
each. Issued December 1, 1876, interest payable on 
the first days of June and December at the Ninth 
National Bank in New York 

60 eight per cent. 20-year renewal bonds of $1,000 
each, issued December 15, 1876. interest payable 
on the 15th days of June and December at the Ninth 

National Bank in New York 

161 seven per cent. 30-year bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
January 1. 1867, to aid in the construction of the 
Kansas* City k Neosho Valley Railroad, interest 
payable on the first days of January and July at the 
.^ inth National Bank in New York 

40 eight per cent. 20-year renewal bonds of $1,000 
each, issued January 1, 1877, Interest payable on 
the first days July and January at the Ninth Na- 
tional Bank in New York 

70 eight per cent 20-year renewal bon.-ii of $1,000 
each, issued August 15. 1877, interest payable on 
the 15ih days of February and August at the Ninth 
National Bank in New i ork 



$29,100 00 



34,300 00 



18,000 00 



$81,400 01) 



87,000 00 



250,000 00 



60,000 00 



142,500 00 



20,000 00 



60,000 00 



60,000 00 



161,000 00 



40,000 00 



70,000 00 



STATISTICAL INFORMATIOK. 



113 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF CITIES, Etc.— CoiramjED. 



KANSAS CITY— Continued. 

80 seven per nent. 20-year renewal bonds of f 600 each, 
issaed November 1, 1878, interest payable on the 
first days of May and November at the Ninth Na- 
tional Bank in New York 

50 six per cent. renewaJ 20-year bonds of $1 ,000 each, 
issued January 1, 1881, Interest payable on the first 
days of January and July at tne Ninth National 
HankinNew York 

Bonds due at various times prior to June 30, 1886, and 
not presented for payment 



Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 15 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Sinkin^c ftind tax, 25 cents. Tax- 
able wealth, $46,909,210. The city has a sinking 
fund of $200,000 invested in Jackson county bonds. 

LOUISIANA. 

Six per cent. 5-20 finding bonds of the denominations 
of $1,000 and ^500 each, issued May 15, 1881, under 
chapter 83, Revised Statutes, interest payable an- 
nually on the first day of January at the State Sav- 
ings Association in St. Louis 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking ftind 
tax, $1 . 00 on the $100 valuation . Taxable wealth, 
$1,095,469. 

MEXICO. 

6 five per cent. 10-20 bonds of $1,000 each, issued 
October !1, 1881, under chapter 83, Revised SUt- 
utes. to ttind city debt, interest payable semi-an- 
nually on the first days of January and July at the 
Savings Bank in Mexico, Mo , 



Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fUnd 
tax. 10 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth, 
$1,069,598. The city now has the sum of $2,250, 
loaned at 8 per cent, interest, the principal and in- 
terest of which will be applied to the redemption 
of the bonds when they mature. 

PALMYRA. 

6 seven per cent. 10-year ftmdinff bonds of $1,000 
each, and 1 do. for $500, issued March 15, 1879, in- 
terest payable annually at the Marion County Sav- 
ings Bank 

7 eight per cent. 10-year funding bonds of $1,000 each, 
and 1 do. for $500, issued March 15, 1879, interest 
payable annually at the Marion County Savings 
Bank 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 60 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $621,565. 



$40,000 00 

50,000 00 
14,621 25 



$1,045,121:25 



138,000 00 



188,000 00 



6,000 00 



6,500 00 



7,600 00 



6,000 00 



14,000 00 



A, R« — O. 



114 



auditor's report. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OP CITIES, Etc.— CoNrmuM). 



FLATTSBURQ. 

241 six per cent. 5-20 funding bonds of $100 each, is* 
sued Jaly 2, 18S3, under chapter 83, Bevised Stat* 
tutes, in compromise and redemption of bonds is- 
sued to aid in the construction of the Chicago A 
Southwestern Railroad, interest payable annually, 
on the first day of July at the National Bank of St. 
Joseph, Mo 



Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, 50 cents on the 
$100 valuation. Taxable wealth, $400,000. 

STE. GENEVIEVE. 

10 seven per cent. 5 and 6-year bonds of $100 each. 
Issued October 27, 1882, for city improvement, in- 
terest payable annually at office of city treasurer. . 
I seven per cent. 1-year bond issued December 1, 
1885— other description same as above 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund 
tax, 10 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable 
wealth. $435,110. 

ST. CHARLES. 

22 sexen per cent. 5-20 bonds of $500 each, issued 
September 1, 1879, under chapter 83, Revised Stat- 
utes, in compromise and redemption of the citvi 
debt, interest payable annually on the first days of! 
March and September, at office of the city treas- 
urer 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking ftind 
tax, 25 cents on the $100 valuation, llixable 
wealth, $1,689,615. 

ST. JOSEPH, 

Six per cent. 20-year bonds of the denominations of 
$500 and $100 each, issued in 1860 and 1803. to aid 
in the construction of the St. Joseph & Topeka 
Railroad, interest payable semi-annually at office 
of the city treasurer 

48 six per cent. 20-year citv improvement bonds of 
$50 each, issued in 1866. interest payable semi- 
annually at office of the city treasurer 

85 six per cent 20-year city improvement bonds of 
$50 each, issued in 1867, interest payable semi an- 
nually at office of city treasurer 

71 six per cent. 20-year city improvement bonds of 
$50 each, issued in 1868, and 13 do. issued in 1869, 
interest payable semi-annually at office of city 
treasurer : 

12 seven per cent. 20-year bends of $500 each, issued 
in 1869, to aid in the construction of the St. Joseph 
& Denver City and Missouri Valley Railroads, in- 
terest payable semi-annually at the National Bank 

of Commerce in New York 

238 ten per cent. 20-vear bonds of $500 each, issued 
July 1, 1871, to aid in the construction of the St. 
Joseph Briage, interest payable semi-annually on 
the nrst days of January and July at the National 



$24,100 00 



1,000 00 
500 00' 



$24,100 00 



1,500 00 



11,000 00 



11,000 00 



3,000 00 
2,400 00 
4,250 00 

4,200 00 



6,000 00 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



115 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF CITIES, Etc.— Continubd. 



ST. JOSEPH— CoDtinued. 

Bank of Commerce in New York 

6 four per cent. 20-year funding bonds of $1,000 each, 
8 do. of S500 each, 31 do. of $100 each, and 6 do. 
of $50 each, ISBued April 1, 1880, interest payable 
semi-annaally at office of city treasurer 

664 four per cent. 20-year funding bonds of $1,000 each, 
250 do. of $500 each, 473 do. of $100 each, 153 do. 
of S50 each, issued February 1, 1881, interest pay- 
able semi-annually on the first davs of February 
and August at the National Bank of Commerce in 

iSevf York 

2 five per cent. 20-year funding bonds of $1,000 each, 
6 do. of $100 each, and 1 do. for $50 Issued April 1 , 
1880, interest payable semi-annually at office of city 
treasurer. 

600 six per cent. 20-year funding bonds of 81,000 each, 
571 do. of $500 each, and 165 do. of $100 each, is- 
sued August 1, 1883,' under chapter 83, Revised 
Statutes, interest payable semi-annually on the 
first days of February and August at the National 
Bank of Commerce in New York 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, $2 on the $100 
valuation. A special tax of one-fourth of one per 
cent, on all real and personal property is set apart 
for a sinking fbnd. Taxable wealth, $13,093,888. 



8118,000 00 



13,400 00 



843,950 00 



2,650 00 



902,000 00 




$1,899,850 00 



116 



AUDITOR fl REPORT. 



BONDED DEBT OF THE CITY 



(Inclnding Debt of former County of 



Authority 
of Issue. 



C4 
( ( 
( i 
«( 

C ( 

(( 



Ordinance 5745 
5745 
5745 
3616 
6053 
6053 
3665 
6053] 
3668 
r6177 
^6*268 
16364 
6220 
State act, Mar. 

7 1867 
Ordinance 6220 
* * 6219 



6368 
6368 
3616 
3616 
3616 
6449 
6449 
3890 
3890 
6633 
3565 
btate act, Mar. 
2, 1867 



State act, Mar. 

2 1867 

Ordinance 6995 



State act 

Ordinance 682.. 



How 
payable. 



Wlien issued. 



Currency . 



Gold 

Currency . 



tc 






7344 

7628 



(k 






I January 1, 1867 

'January 15, 1867 . . . 
February 1, 1867 . . . 

April 1,1857 

April 1,1867 

May 1,1867 

May 16, 1857 

Junel, 1867 

June 10, 1857 

June 25, 1867.. 

July 1, 1867 

July 1,1867 

August 1, 1867 

September 1, 1867.. 



January 1, 1868 . 
January 1. 1866 . 
February 1, 1868 
February 5, 1858 
March 6, 1868 . . . 

May 1, 1868 

May 1, 1868 

May 20, 1858 

June 2,1858 

August 15, 1868 . 
August 27, 1858 . 



Rate of 
Interest. 



September 1, 1868.. 



July 1, 1869 . . . 
August 1, 1869. 



Gold 

Currency . . 



Currency . . 
Gold 



Jund 25, 1870 

December 1, 1840.. 



6 per ct.. 

Ci 

i . 
( ( 

C( 
C( 
4( 
(C 

( ( 

C4 

7 per ct.. 
6 per ct.. 

8 per ct.. 



6 per ct. . 

« < 

4C 
44 
4 4 
44 
44 
44 
. 4» 
44 
44 

7 per ct.. 



7 per ct. . 
6 per ct. . 



6 perct. 
5 perct. 




February 1, 1871 ... 6 per ct. 
Junel, 1871 .1 '* 



When Due. 



DuK 1887. 



20 January 1, 1887.. 
20 January 16, 1887 . 
20 February 1. 1887. 

30April 1,1887 

20 April 1, 1887 

20May 1,1887 

30 May 16, 1887 

21) June 1,1887 

30JunelO, 1887 



20* June 25, 1887. 



20 July 1, 1887 



20July 1,1887 

20 August 1, 1887 .... 
20 September 1 , 1887. 



Dub 1888. 



20; January 1, 1888 

20| January 1, 1888 .... 
SOiFebruary 1, 1888... 
30,Fcbruary 5, 1888 . . . 

30l March 6, 1888 

20May 1,1888 

20May 1, 1888 

30May20, 1888 

30|June 2,1888 

20 August 15, 1888.... 
30' August 27, 1888 .... 

20 September 1, 1888. . 

Dub 1889. 



20: July 1, 1889 . . . 
20 August 1, 1889 



Dub 1890. 



20June25, 1890 

50 December 1, 1890... 

j Dub 1891. 

20|February 1,1891... 
20June 1,1891 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



117 



OP ST, LOUIS, JANUAKr 1, 1887, 



St. Louis asflumed by City nader the Charter.) 



Where Payable. 



For what Parpoae 
issaed. 



Amount of 

Outstanding 

Principal. 



National Bank of Republic, K. Y, 



t ( 

C ( 
6« 
t t 
« 4 
44 
44 
4t 

4 ( 

• 4 



(4 
• 4 
44 
44 
4 4 
%4 
44 
44 

4 4 

44 



Improvement of Harbor. . . 

44 44 

44 '44 

City Hospital 

Floating debt 

4 4 

Sewers 

Floating debt 

Improvement of streets 



New Water Works 
Sanitary purposes . 
Insane Asylum 



National Bank of Commerce, K. Y — 

National Bank of Republic, N. Y Floating debt 

Soulard Market 



4 4 



44 



I 



National Bank of Republic, N. Y. 



4 4 
4 • 
4 * 



4 4 

44 
4 4 



4 4 44 

National Bank of Commerce, K. Y. . . 



4 4 



4 4 



National Bank of Republic, N. Y. 

44 4* 



4 4 

4 4 



44 
44 



National Bank of Commerce, N. Y. . . 



National Bank of Commerce, N. Y 



4 4 



44 



(See also " Due 1900 ") 



City Treasury 

4 4 



National Bank of Republic, N. Y 

Bonds at NatU Bank of Commerce, N. Y. 
(Int. at Nat'l Bank Republic, N. Y.) 



Union Market . . 
Renewal Bonds, 
City Hospital . . . 



4 4 
4 • 



Floating debt 

Sewers , 

General purposes, 



4 4 



Improvement of Harbor. . . 
Sewers 



County Jail 



Renewal Bonds, 
Sewers 



New Water Works. 
Public Square 



Renewal Bonds, 

44 44 



$8,000 00 

20,000 00 

82,000 00 

20,000 00 

145,000 00 

140,000 00 

22,000 00 

191 ,000 00 

10,000 00 

3,308,000 00 

133,000 00 

100,000 00 

100,000 00 

25,000 00 



100,000 00 

200,000 00 

1,000 00 

7,000 00 

2,000 (K) 

930,000 00 

487.000 00 

4,000 00 

38,000 00 

44,000 00 

25,000 00 

600,000 00 



100,000 00 
228,000 00 



460,000 00 
25,000 00 



155,000 00 
475,000 00 



118 



auditor's repobt. 



BONDED DEBT OF THE CITY OF ST. 



Authority 
of issue. 


How 
payable- 


When Issued. 


Bate of 
Interest. 


Y'rs to run.' 

1 


When Due. 












Dub 1892. 


State act 


Gold 




April 1, 1872 ..%... . 


6 perct.. 


20' April 1, 1892 


State act, Mar. 












9, 1872 


(( 


••••■• 


Junel, 1872 




20Junel, 1892 


Ordinance 8103 


( ( 




December 10, 1872.. 




20 December 10, 1892. . 

1 














Dub 1893. 


Ordinance 7970 


C( 




January 1, 1873 




i 

20 January 1, 1893 


State act, Mar. 










•i 


9, 1872....... 


ft ( 


• ••••• 


July 1,1873 




20July 1,1893 


Oruinance 8661 


(ft 


$1,000 














£200 


November 1, 1873.. 




20 November 1, 1893.. 














Dub 1894. 


State act, Mar. 














9, 1872 


ft( 




January 1, 1874 

March!, 1874 




20 January 1,1894.... 


Ordinance 8748 


i( 


•«.... 




20 March 1, 1894 


** 8792 


'* 


$1,000 






1 






£200 


July 1, 1874 




20,Julyl, 1894 

• 


*' 8792 


ft ft 


$1,000 










£200 July 1, 1874 




20Julyl. 1894 


State act 


(ft 


$1,000 






1 






£200 


July 1,1874 




20July 1,1894 


, 












Dub 1895. 


State act, Mar. 












■ 


9 1872 . . 
Ordinance 9470 


Gold 




January 1, 1876 


6 perct.. 


20 January 1,1895.... 


• ft 


$1,000 












£2(0 


May 1,1876 




20May 1,1895 


** 9470 


kft 

i 


$1,000 














£200 


May 1,1876 


* * 


20May 1,1895 


*• 947(^ 


ft ft 


$1,000 




1 






£200 May 1,1876 




20'MRy 1,1895 


State act 


ft ft 


$1,000 










£200 May 1,1875 




20;May 1,1895 


State act, Mar. 










1 

1 _ 


25,1876 


fti 




May 1, 1876 




20May 1,1896 


Ordinance 1494 


Currency . . 


July 21, 1846 




60 July 21, 1895 


9792 


Gold, $1,000 




1 






£200 


November 17, 1876. 




20 


November 17, 1895. 
Dub 1896. 


State act. Mar. 














9, 1872 


Gold 




January 1, 1876 


6 per ct. . 


20 January 1. 1896 














Dub 1898. 


Ordinance 1074a 


ftft 


$1,000 












£200, June. 1,1878 


6 perct.. 


20June 1,1898 


'- 6806 


ft ft 




August 1,1868 


ft ft 


30 August 1,1898.... 














Dub 1899. 


♦* 10743 


ft c 


$1,000 














£200 


January 1, 1879 — 


6 per ct. . 


20 


January 1, 1899... 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



119 



LOUIS, JANUARY 1, 1887— Contindkd. 



Where Payable. 



For what Purpose 
issued. 



New Water Works 



General purposes 



{See also " Due 190£.") 

National Bank of Commerce, N. Y — 

Nat. Bk. Com'rce, N Y , or City Tres»y 

National Bank of Commerce, N. Y — Bridge Approaches 

{See aleo '' Due 1903 ") 

National Bank of Commerce, "S.H,,., Sewers 

Nat Bk. Com'rce, N.Y., or City Xres'y Renewal Bonds. 

Nat Bk. Commerce, N. Y. or London . . 



Nat. Bk. Com'rce, N.Y., or City Tres'y 
National Bank of Commerce, N. Y 

Nat. Bk. Commerce, N.Y. or London. . 

(Interest payable Ist May and Nov.) 
Nat. Bk. Commerce, N. Y. or London. . 

(Interest payable Ist May and Nov.) 
Nat. Bk. Commerce, N. Y. or London. . 

(Interest payable Ist May and Not.) 
{SeeaUo ** Due 1906 y) 

National Bank of Commerce, N. Y 

Nat. Bk Commerce, N. Y. or London. . 



» • 



(4 



(( 



(( 



i ( 



fc« 



( 4 



( ( 



44 



4 4 



4 4 



44 



44 



Nat. Bk Commerce, N Y. or London , 
(Interest payable 1 May and Nov.) 



National Bank of Commerce, N. Y 



Nat. Bk Commerce, N. Y. or London.. 
National Bank Republic, N. Y 



Nat. Bk Commerce, N. Y. or London. . 



<« 



4 4 



Renewal Bonds. 
Sewers 



Renewal Bonds 

Floating debt 

Refunding Water Pipe Tax 



Renewal Bonds 



44 



4 4 



Mill Creek sewer 

Carondelet indebtedness. 

Fire Department 

General purposes 

Purchase Block 7 

House of Refuge 



Renewal Bonds 



Renewal Bonds 

Tower Grove Park. 



Renewal Bonds 



Amount of 

Outstanding 

Principal. 



$1,260,000 00 

600,000 00 
461^000 00 



200,000 00 

260,000 00 

1,074,000 00 

100,000 00 
6,000 00 

372,000 00 

900,000 OU 

800,000 00 

100,000 00 

372,000 00 

130,000 00 

56,000 00 

100,000 00 

500,000 00 

45,000 00 

50,000 00 



100,000 00 



593,000 00 
340,000 00 



675,000 00 



120 



AUDlTOR^S REPORT. 



BONDED DEBT OF THE CITY OF ST. 



Authority 
of iBsne. 



Ordlnanoe 11066 
* * 11361 

Ordinance 190S8 



Ordinance 13061 
Ordinance 13279 



How 

payable. 



When iBsned. 



(4 ^1 QQQ 

£200 January 1,1880. 
*' $1,000 

£200June 1,1880.... 



Gold,$1.000 

£200May3,1882. 



Ordinance 12486|Gold,f 1,000 

£200 July 2, 1883. 



Gold,$l,000 

£200 February 2, 1885 . . 

Gold, $1,000 

£200June 1,1885 



State act, Feb. 

2, 1875 Gold. 

State act, Mar.< 

12,1875 ;Gold, 

State act, MarJ 

22, 1875 Gold, 



Ordinance 5780 
Total due Jan. 



Currency . . 
1,1887 



April 1, 1875. 
April 1, 1875. 
April 1, 1875. 



Bate of 
Interest. 



5 per ct. 



«( 



4 per ct. . 

4 per ct.. 

4 per ct.. 

6 per ct.. 

6 per ct. . 
<( 



3 



April 10, 1866. 



6 per ct.. 



20 
10 

20 

10 

20 

10 

20 

10 

20 

20 

30 
30 
30 

40 



When Due. 



Dub 1900. 
January 1, 1900.... 
♦June 1,1900 

Dub 1902. 
t May 3, 1902 

Dub 1903. 
J:July2, 1908 

Dub 1905. 

June 1,1905 

April 1,1905 

April 1,1905 

April 1,1905 

Dub 1906. 



April 10, 1906. 



/• 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



LOUIS, JAiJUARY 1, 18»r— Contikum). 



121 



Where Payable. 



Nat Bk Commerce, N. Y. or London . . 



For what purpose 
issued. 



Nat. Bk Commerce, N. Y. or London . . 



Nat. Bk Commerce, N Y. or London . . 



Nat. Bk Commerce, K. Y. or London . . 



Renewal Bonds. 

(4 (( 



( • 



tc 



i( 



4( 



National Bank of Commerce, N. Y . 



C4 



44 



44 



44 



It 



44 



4 4 



44 



Amount of 

Outstanding 

Principal. 



National Bank Republic, N. Y. 



Renewal Bonds 



Renewal Bonds 



Renewal Bonds 

Judgment in favor St Louis 
Gas Light Co 

Purchase Forest Park 

Purchase Carondelet Park . 

Purchase O'Fallon Park. . . 



Purchase Block 121. 



f476,000 00 
548,000 00 

203,000 00 

90,000 00 

620,000 00 

960,000 00 

1,300,000 00 

200,000 00 

400,000 00 

246,000 00 



$22,190,000 00 



* Redeemable, at City's option, on or after June 1, 1890. 
t Redeemable, at City's option, on or after May 3, 1892. 
X Redeemable, at City's option, on or after July 2, 1893. 
( Redeemable, at City's option, on or after February 2, 1896. 



122 



auditor's report. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF CITIES, Etc.— Continubd. 



SARCOXIE. 

19 six per cent. 5-20 funding bonds of $1,000 each, is- 
saed May 1, 1886 under section 4939, Revised Stat- 
utes, interest payable semi- annually on the first 
days of May and November at the Continental Bank 
in St. Louis . . 



Interest promptly paid. 

SPRINGFIELD. 

52 eight per cent. 15 and 20-year bonds of $500 each, 
and I do for $100, issued in 1871 and 1872, for 
street improvement, interest payable annually at 

the National Park Bank in New York 

8 six per cent. 5-20 finding bonds of $500 each and 
3 do. of $100 each, Issued April 19, 1879, 1 do. for 
$500. and 3 do. for $100, issued Mav 20, 1879, In- 
terest pavable semi-annually at the National Park 
Bank in New York 

74 six per cent. 10 year ftindlng bonds of $500 each, 
issued July 15, 1885, interest payable semi-an- 
nually at the National Park Bank in New York.. . . 

Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund tax, 
25 cents on the $100 valuation. Interest on bonds 
issued in 1885 is paid out of the city current ex- 
pense fund for which a tax of 50 cents on the $100 
is levied. Taxable wealth, 94,500,000. 

NORTH SPRINGFIELD. 

15 eight per cent. 1-vear bonds of $100 t^ach, issued 
October 20, 1884, for construction of sewers, inter- 
est payable annually at office of city treasurer 

Lnterest promptly paid. Surplus revenues of 1886 suf- 
ficient to pay off the indebtedness. 

SEDALIA. 

194 five per cent. 5-30 ftinding bonds of $1,000 each, 
100 do. of $500 each, and 80 do. of $100 each, issued 
November 1, 1877, under act of Apriir2, 1877, in- 
terest payable semi-annually on the first days of 
May and November at the Bank of America in 

New York 

11 ten per cent 10^20 funding bonds of 8100 each, is- 
sued August 1, 1871, Interest payable semi-an- 
nually on the first days of Februaiy and August at 

the Bank of America in New York 

5 seven per cent. 1-year current expense bonds of 
$1,000 each, issued May 14, 1886, under act ap- 
proved April 10, 1885, interest payable semi-an- 
nually on the first days of May and November at 
the First National Bank in Sedalia, Mo 



Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund 
tax, 40 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable 
wealth, $3,303,719. 



$1,900 OO 



$1,900 00 



26,100 00 



5,100 00! 



37,000 00, 



68,200 00 



1,500 OOi 



252,000 00 



1,100 00 



6,000 00 



1,500 00 



268,100 00 



STATISTICAL INPORMATIOIT. 



123 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OP CITnSS, Etc.— Continued. 



WARRBNSBURG. 



per cent. 5-20 fanding bonds of $500 each, and 
do. of :#100 each, isf^ned September 1, 1878, in- 



117 six 
118 

terest payable semi-annually on the first days of 
March and September at the banking house of 
George Wm. Ballou A Co. in New York 



Interest promptly paid. Interest and sinking fund tax, 
80 cents on the $100 valuation. Taxable wealth, 
$800,000. 

WASHINGTON. 

89 six per cent. 10-20 funding bonds of $500 ea(;h. is- 
sued August 1, 1882, un(^er chapter 83, Revised 
Statutes, interest payable semi-annually on the 
first days of January and Juij at the ofiSce of the 
city treasurer 

Interest promptly paid. Interest tax, $1.00 on the 
$100 valuation. 



Total 



870,300 00 



44,500 00 



$70,300 00 



44,500 00 



$26,416,297 73 



NO BONDED DEBT. 



The following named cities and towns have no bonded debt : 
Appleton Oity» Arrow Rock, West Bethany, Bloomfield, Bolivar, 
Holing Qreen, Breckinridge, Brookfield, Browning, Brownsville, 
Brunswick, California, Oainsville, Oarrollton, Oarterville, Oaruthers- 
ville, OasBville, Ohamois, Olmton, Ooncordia, Gurry ville, Dalton, Edina, 
Farmington, Fayette, Frederickton, Freeman, Fulton, Qower, Grant 
Oity, Greenfield, Hardin, Hamilton, Harrison ville, Hermann, Higgins- 
ville^ Hunnewell, Houston, Jackson, Jameston, Eimmswick, Kings- 
ton, Kirksville, Kirkwood, LaBelle, Lancaster, LaPIata, Lexington, 
Longtown, Luray, Lebanon, Macon Oity, Madison,' Maiden, Malta Bend, 
Marble Hill, Marshall, Martinsburg, Mary ville, Milan, Mill Grove, 
Monticello, Mound Oity, Montgomery Oity, Missoi'.ri Oity, Montrose, 
Neosho, New Haven, New London, Nevada, Orrick, Odessa, Oregon, 
Osceola, Perry ville, Pilot Knob, Platte City, Potosi, Renick, Rich Hill, 
Richmond, Roanoke, St. Ferdinand, Salem, Savannah, Salisbury, 
Schell City, Sbelbina, Shelbyville, Slater, Spickardsville, Steelvill^', 
Stewartsville, Sturgeon, Tipton, Troy, Tuscumbia, Union, Unionyille, 
Warrenton, Warsaw, Westline, Wright Oity, Windsor and Westpn. 



124 auditor's report. 



HISTORY OF THE INDEBTEDNESS OF MISSOURI 

FROM THE ADMISSION OF THE STATE INTO THE UNION TO DECEMBER 31, 1886. 

The act of Oongress, Approved March 6, 1820, authorizing the peo- 
ple of the Missouri Territory to form a constitution and State Govern- 
ment, and for the admission of such State into the Union, contained, 
among other provisions, the following grants : 

First — Twelve salt springs with six sections ^of land adjoining to 
each, to be selected by the Legislature on or before the first day of 
January, 1825, and to be used under such terms and conditions as the 
Legislature should prescribe. 

Second — Five per cent, of the net proceeds of the sale of public 
lands lying within the State were to be reserved for making public 
roads and canals, of which three-fiith were to be applied to those 
objects within the State, under direction of the Legislature, and the 
other two fifths in defraying, under direction of Congress, the expenses 
incurred in making roads or canals leading to the State. 

Third — In addition to the land reserved by act of Congress, 
approved February 17, 1818, thirty six sections of lund, making in all 
two entire townships, or 46,080 acres, to be appropriated by the Legis- 
lature solely for the use of a seminary of learning. 

Prior to the establishment of a permanent public school fund by 
the act of February 6, 1887, all moneys paid into the State Treasury 
from the sale of lands, adjacent to salt springs, constituted what was 
known as *' The Saline FundV After 1837 these moneys were known 
as " The State School Fund:' 

Collections from the United States on account of public lands sold 
within the State were first known as " 2he Three Per Cent. Fund^^^ 
afterwards as *' The Road and Canal Fund.'' 

Proceeds derived from sales of seminary lands were paid into the 
Treasury and known as " The Seminary Fund." 

In the early history of the State its revenues were often insufScient 
to meet its current expenses, and the State in such emergencies bor- 
rowed from the Saline Fund, the Three Per Cent. Fund and the Sem- 
inary Fund to make good the deficiency in the revenue. These loans, 
as will be seen hereafter, constituted at times the whole or a greater 
part of the State's indebtedness, and hence the necessity of this refer- 
ence. 



STATISTICAL INFORMATIOIT. 125 

ESTABLISHMENT OF LOAN OFFICES* 

Id 1821 the entire civilized population of Missouri consisted of 
32,r29 free white males, 26,903 free white females, 32 L free persons of 
color, 11,234 slaves and 60, persons bound to service — in all, 70,647 
soale. How to aid and encourage these pioneers in their efforts 
to build homes, open farms, construct roads and subdue the wilderness 
surrounding them was a matter of serious concern to the General As- 
sembly of that year. The amount of gold and silver in circulation was 
wholly insufficient for the proper transaction of business, nor could the 
inhabitants secure loans essentially necessary to surround them wi^h 
the ordinary comforts of life and to assist them in developing the re- 
sources of an infant State. Actuated by a patriotic but mistaken 
policy, the Legislature not only determined to supply the place of 
specie currency with a circulating medium of the State, but to furnish 
loans^at a reasonable rate of interest based upon the credit and faith 
of the State. This determination resulted in the establishment of what 
were known as loan offices, and the division of the State into five loan 
office districts, as provided in the act approved June 27,1821. The first 
district was composed of the counties of Ray, Ohariton, Howard and 
Boone, with office at the town of Chariton. The second district com- 
prised the counties of Lillard, Saline, Oooper and Oole, with office at 
Boonville. The third district embraced the counties of Ralls, Pike, 
Lincoln, St. Oharles, Blontgomery, Oallaway, Gasconade and Franklin, 
with office at St. Charles. The fourth district included the counties of 
St. Louis, Jefferson and Washington, with office at St. Louis. The fifth 
district comprised the counties of Ste. Genevieve, Perry, Madison, 
Wayne, Oape Girardeau and New Madrid, with office at Jackson. Each 
loan office was under the management of three commissioners, chosen 
by the General Assembly, who were empowered to make loans of the 
certificates, herein aftar described, to citizens of their respective dis- 
tricts, fora period not longer than one year, and at a rate of interest 
not greater than six per centum per annum. The certificates were 
loaned to citizens of counties comprising the loan office district in 
proportion to the number of inhibitants, and the amounts loaned were 
secured by mortgages on real estate or personal property, provided the 
loan on real estate should never exceed one thousand dollars to any 
one individual, and on personal property it was required to be a sum 
less than two hundred dollars. 

The Auditor of Public Accounts and State Treasurer were required 
to issue certificates to the amount of $200,000, in denominations not ex- 
ceeding ten dollars, nor less than fifty cents, and in the following form : 



126 AUDITOtt'S RKPORT. 



" This certificate shall be receivable at the Treasury, or any of the 
loan ofSces of the State of Missouri, in the discharge of taxes or debts 
due to the State for the sum of $5.00, with interest for the same at the 
rate of two per centum per annum from this date, the first day ot Sep- 
tember, 1821. 

" WILLIAM CHRISTY, 

" Auditor of Public Accounts. 

« NATHANIEL SIMONDS, 

'' State Treasurer.'' 

These certificates were made receivable not only for taxes and 
debts of whatever kind due the State, but for the salaries and fees of 
all officers, civil and military, and in payment of salt sold by the lessees 
of Salt Springs. As shown by reports of State Treasurers who seem to 
have kept the account of loan office certificates, the amount issued and 
put in circulation was $184,788.00, but the amount actually redeemed 
and destroyed, as attested by the Auditor's report of 1830, was 91 8S,- 
647.00 or $3,859 more than the books show to have been issued. Gov- 
ernor Miller, in his message of that year, calls attention to this discrep- 
ancy, and avers that '^ besides this there are upwards of $5,000 of these 
certificates known to be in the hands of agents of the United States at 
St. Louis, making an aggregate of more than $9,000 over and above the 
amount said to have been issued." The loan office law failed to meet 
the expectation of its friends. Loss sustained by reason of the insuffi- 
ciency of securities taken, the litigation which followed, and yarious 
other causes, combined to render it unpopular and to bring about its 
repeal, which Occurred on the 18th of December, 1822. Its name be- 
came a reproach, and a by- word — the meanest tobacco used by the set- 
tler being often denominated ^^ loan office.^' Borrowers resisted pay- 
ment of the notes given for certificates on the ground that the loan 
office act authorized the State to emit bills of credit, and thereby vio- 
lated the 10th sefition of article 1 of the Constitution of the United 
States, which provides that " no State shall * * * coin money, 
emit bills of credit or make anything but gold and silver coin a tender 
in payment of debts." 

At the May term, 1824, of the State Supreme Oourt, in the case of 
Mansker et al. vs. The State, loan office 'certificates were declared to 
be ^^ bills of credit " within the meaning of the Constitution of the 
United States, but a majority of the court held that a borrower of 
these certificates would not be permitted to set up the unconstitution 
ality of their emission as a defense in a suit brought by the State to 
recover the amount borrowed. In the case of Hiram Craig et al. vs. 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 127 



The State of Missouri, 4th Feters, 431, the Supreme Court of the United 
Srates, at its January term, 1830, reversed this decision and declared 
" loan office certificates " not only *' bills of credit " prohibited by the 
Constitntion, but that the unconstitutionality of their emission could 
be set up as a defense in a suit brought by the State to recover the 
amount borrowed. 

Commenting upon this decision, Gov. Miller's message of Novem- 
ber 16, 1830, contains the following : 

** The outstanding debts dbe from the borrowers amount to $42,- 
896.49, the interest on which, calculating from the year 1822 to 1830, 
amounts to about $20,000. This, added to the principal, will make a 
total sum of $62,896.49 due from loan office debtors, by whom it may 
be assumed as highly probable further payments will not be made. 
Thus terminates a system which must be considel'ed as unfortunate as 
it waff impolitic. It has been a losing business to all, except to the 
borrowers who are sheltered by the decision ot the Supreme Court, and 
to the speculators who purchased the paper at reduced prices." 

8TATB LOAN OV 1829. 

As provided in an act, approved January 23, 1829, the Governor 
was authorized to borrow 970,000 at not exceeding six per cent* inter- 
est, and payable in four equal annual installments, as follows : 

First installment, January 1, 1831. 
Second installment, Januar^l, 1832. 
Third installment, January 1, 1833. 
Fourth installment, January 1, 1834. 

This loan was designed for the redemption of all outstanding 
Auditor's warrants and loan office certificates which had been legdtily 
issued. 

Between the years 1820 and 1836 warrants issued by the Auditor 
in excess ol the revenue, and loan office certificates, constituted the 
basis of the entire State debt, to redeem which the State in turn became 
indebted to the Three Per Cent. Fund, the Saline Fund and the Semi- 
nary Fund. It is now proposed to show the amount of this indebted- 
ness at various periods within the time named. 

STATE DEBT, JULY 1, 1826. 



Outstanding Auditor's warrants and loan office certificates. 



;rl40,381 48 



128 



auditor's report. 



STATE DEBT, OCTOBER 1, 1828. 



Oatstanding Audltor^s warranto and loan office certificates. 



$104,710 6*2 



CONDITION OF THE STATE DEBT, OCTOBER 1, 1830. 



Amount of debt October 1, 182S 

State loan authorized by act of January 23, 1829 

Three Per Cent. Fund borrowed, act of January 22, 1829.. 

Auditor's warrants issued flrom Oct. 1,1828, to Sept. 30,1830 

Total 



From which deduct Auditor's warrants and loan office cer- 
tificates redeemed, and cash in the treasury as follows : 



Warranto redeemed 

Warranto received as revenue , 

Loan office certificates redeemed by Treasurer. 

Loan office certificates received as revenue 

Cash in the treasury Sept. 30, 1830 , 



Total debt October 1, 1830. 



$117,564 82 

49,886 21 

325 00 

3,777 50 

14,869 69 



$104,710 63 
70,000 00 
19,369 51 
76,737 76 



$270,^17 89 



$186,372 22 



$84,445 67 



STATE DEBT, OCTOBER 1, 1832. 



Third installment of State loan due Jan. 1, 1833. . . 

Five months interest on same, due Jan. 1, 1833 

Six monthH interest on State loan, aue Feb. 1, 1833 

Six months interest on same, Aug. 1, 183*8 

Fourth installment of State loan, due Jan 1, 1834. 
Five months interest on samn, due Jan. 1, 1834. . . . 

Three Per Cent. Fund borrowed, April 1, 1829 

Interest on same to Jan. 1, 1833 

Total debt, Oct. 1, 1832 



$17,500 00 

437 60 

525 00 

525 OO 

17,500 00 

437 50 

19,369 51 

3,273 64 



$59,568 15 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



129 



STATE DEBT, OCTOBER 1, 1834. 



Amount borrowed from the Seminary Fund, act of Feb. 13, 1833 
Amoant borrowed from the Saline Fund, act of Feb. 13, 1833 — 

Uaiedeemed warrant in faror of B. B. Ray 

Total debt, Oct. 1, 1834 



$25,621 31 

22,904 80 

203 

$48,528 14 



STATE DEBT, OCTOBER 1, 1836. 



Amoant borrowed of the Seminary Fund in 1833 and 1834 for revenue 
purposes 

Amount borrowed of said fUnd in 1833 to pay off State loan 

Amount borrowed for revenue purposes, Oct. 1, 1834 

Amount borrowed Sf arch 21, 1835« for revenue purposes 

Interest on amounts borrowed from the Seminary Fund to Oct. 1,1836. 

Amount borrowed from the Saline Fund under act of Feb. 13, 1833 — 

Total debt, Oct. 1,1836 



$20,000 00 

3,903 75 

10,000 00 

23,113 07 

7,897 45 

22,904 80 

$87,819 07 



8 P — ^9 



180 auditor's report. 



ACT TO CHARTER THE BANK OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI. 

FIRST ISSUE OF BONDS. 

The eighth article of the constitution of Missouri, adopted in 1820, 
provided for the incorporation of not more than one banking company 
and not exceeding five branches, but not more than one branch could 
be established at any one session of the General Assembly. The capi 
tal stock of the bank to be incorporated was limited to five millions of 
dollars, at least one-half of which should be reserved for the use of the 
State. 

As authorized by the constitution, it was provided in an act of the 
General Assembly, approved February 2, 1837, entitled " An act to 
charter the bank of the State of Missouri," that ^' There shall be estab- 
lished in the eity of St. Louis a banking company to be called ^The 
Bank of the State of Missouri,' the capital stock of which shall be five 
millions of dollars, divided into fifty thousand shares of one hundred 
dollars each, one-half of which stock shall be reserved for the use of 
the State, and the other half of said stock shall be subscribed for by 
individuals." The government of the bank was vested in a president 
and twelve directors, the president and six directors being elected for 
two years by a joint vote of the two houses of the General Assembly. 

Under the superintendence of citizens named in the second section 
of said act, books were opened on the third Monday in February, 1837, 
for the subscription of thirty thousand shares of the capital stock of 
said bank at the following named places : City of Jefferson, St. Louis, 
Columbia, Ste. Genevieve, Palmyra, Fayette, Independence, Liberty, 
Potosi, Jackson, Boonville and Troy. 

The Governor was required to subscribe fifteen thousand, or one- 
half of said thirty thousand shares, on behalf of the State, and such 
number of shares so subscribed as would equal the principal and in- 
terest of the Seminary and Saline Funds were required to be held by 
the State for the use of said funds and the residue of the shares sub* 
scribed for the use of the State. By way of explanation it is proper to 
state that, by virtue of an act approved February 6, 1837, entitled ^'An 
act to establish a permanent fund for the support of common schools," 
the principal and interest of the Saline Fund invested in stock of the 
bank became known as the ''Common School Fund " and has ever 
since remained a part of said fund. 

After deducting the amount of Seminary and Saline Funds from 
the subscription authorized, the Governor was directed to execute and 
deliver to the president and directors of the bank, bonds of the State 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 131 



in full payment of the remainder of the stock subscribed by hiro* 
These bonds were to be of the denomination of one thousand dollars 
each, the fir^t half million to bear interest at a rate not exceeding six 
per cent.^per annum, and the remainder not exceeding five and a half 
percent, per annum, payable semi-annually in the city of New York. 
They were made payable to the Bank of the State of Missouri at the 
end of twenty-five years after their negotiation. The president and 
directors on the part of the State were required to appoint an agent for 
the State, vested with power to negotiate a sale of bonds to the amount 
of five hundred thousand dollars in any part of the United States, or if 
necessary, through an agent in Europe, but such bonds were not to be 
sold at a discount or so as to create a loss to the State. If all of said 
bonds were not negotiated when the bank commenced business, the 
agent was thereafter to be continued under the superintendence and 
control of the bank, and the bank was authorized in any other man- 
ner, or by any other means best suited to its interest, to bring into 
market and sell the bonds then unsold. 

It was also provided that when a second branch of the bank was 
established, the Governor should subscribe five thousand additional 
shares, and execute and deliver to the bank bonds of the State for t[|ie 
stock so subscribed, in like sums, manner and amounts as directed in 
the first instance — the bonds to bear a rate of interest not exceeding 
five and a half per centum per annum. Upon the establishment of the 
third branch of said bank another subscription of five thousand shares 
was authorizod for the amount of which bonds were to be issued in the 
same manner and on the same terms as provided for the second branch. 
In consideration of the privileges granted by its charter, the bank 
agreed to pay the State, annually, one-fourth of one per cent, on the 
amount of capital stock paid in by stockholders other than the State, 
which was to be in lieu of all State taxes for which the bank was 
liable. 

From the foregoing it is seen that bonds aggregating two millions 
five hundred thousand dollars, less the amount of cash in the Seminary 
and Saline Funds, were authorized under this act as follows : 



For stock in the Bank of the State of Missouri. 

For stock upon the organization of the second branch.. 

For stock upon the organization of the third branch. 

Total 



$1,500,000 
500,000 
500,000 



$2,500,000 



132 AUDITOlCs REPORT. 



SUBSCRIPTION OF STOCK TO THE BANK OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI. 

At the proper time the Executive subscribed $1,500,000 to the cap- 
ital stock of the bank as follows: 



Cash inyested for use of the School and Seminary Fnnds i ¥535,144 63 

Bonds to reimburse the School and Seminary Fund 89,736 40 

Bonds for the use of the State j 875,119 78 

Total subscription 1 1 1 , 500,000 81 

The following description of the first issue of bonds subscribed for 
stock in the bank is taken from the report of Auditor Baber, made in 
1842: 

I 
Five and a half per cent, bonds issued May 17, 1837 $464,856 18 

Six per cent, bonds issued August 7, 1837 i 600,000 00 

• Total bonds subscribed | $964,856 18 

It appears that a large number of bonds issued under the act of 
1837 and delivered to the bank were not in conformity with its charter 
or were otherwise defective and irregular. When defects of any kind 
were discovered they were returned, canceled and new bonds ex- 
ecuted in their place, thus involving frequent issues. The grossest 
carelessness prevailed in the execution of these bonds and it is impos- 
sible to obtain the precise number, amount or dates of those issued. 

From the following extract taken from a report made to the Sen* 
ate, January 29, 1841, by Hon. Beverly Allen, chairman of the select 
committee on the subject of State bonds, the negligence here com- 
plained of is made painfully manifest: 

" It is impossible, from the correspondence between the Executive 
and the bank, to ascertain the number or amount of bonds outstand- 
ing, or when issued ; either the evidence has been lost or not preserved 
or not communicated* It seems, from what is communicated, that it 
was otL necessary to ask, and the Governor issued, and this some- 
times without a return of the bonds in lieu of which the new issue was 
asked. If the bank found it inconvenient to use the bonds issued, 
others were substituted on the request of the bank and at the pleasure 
of the Governor. This the committee think was unwarrantable. When 
the Executive had inssued the amount of bonds authorized under any 
of the acts, his power to issue ceased — was executed, and he could not 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 133 



issue others in lieu of those he had preyioasly issued, even when they 
were returned, much less when they were not returned, as he act- 
ually did. The correspondence shows the grossest want of care 
in the execution of tbe acts, and in the management of the iuter" 
est of the State. It appears that in one instance a bond for one 
thousand dollars has been issued in lieu of one while outstandimg 
in hands of a purchaser, and which is yet unretnrned, and for aught 
that appears, is still in the hands of the purchaser. In another instance 
it appears that three bonds of one thousand dollars each, bearing six 
per cent, interest, have been lost by the bank; and in another, that two 
bonds of like amount and bearing like interest are missing from the 
bank and new ones have been issued in lieu of them by the Executive. 
Discretion was at times given to the bank to number and date the 
bouds, which has led to much confusion." 

For the purpose of this inquiry it matters very little how many 
irregularities were committed in the emission of these bonds, nor is it 
essential to know the numbers, amounts or dates of those returned and 
canceled. What most concerns us, is to know the precise amount sold 
and for the payment of which the State became liable. This has been 
ascertained and we are enabled to state that of the whole number is- 
sued under the act of 1837, it was possible to sell only 362 bonds, 
aggregating 9382,000 — an accurate description of which and the names 
of purchasers is presented in the following table: 



63 fiye and a half per cent. 25-year bonds, numbered 215 to 277 in- 
clusive, issued as follows : 35, August 4 ; 18, October 23, and 
10, November 25, 1837, interest payable Ist January and July 
in New York— sold to the War Department 



100 six per cent. 25-year bonds, numbered 401 to 500 Inclusive, issued 
August 7, 1837, interest payable 1st January and July in New 
York — sold to John Jacob Astor 



100 six per cent. 25-yeaT bonds, numbered 1 to 100 inclusiye. issued 
May 1, 1838, interest payable 3Qth April and October in New 
York— sold to F. De Lizardi & Co 



99 six per cent. 25-year bonds, numbered 301 to 400 inclusive, ex- 
cept 377, issued September 1, 1838, interest payable Ist Janu- 
ary and July in New York— sold to Prime, Ward and King. . 



362 Total. 



$63,000 



100,000 



100,000 



99,000 



$362,000 



Financial and commercial distress prevailing in 1837 and subse- 
quent years rendered the negotiation of bonds almost impossible. On 
the accession of GeneralJackson to the presidency the policy of his 
administration on the question of rechartering the Bank of the United 
States was plainly foreshadowed. In his first annual message to Oon- 



134 auditor's report. 



gress, delivered December 8th, 1829, he avows the failure of the bank 
to provide auniform|and sound currency, and calls in question its con- 
stitutionality and expediency in the following language: ''The 
charter of the Bank of the United States expires in 1836, and its stock- 
holders will most probably apply for a renewal of their privileges. In 
order to avoid the evils resulting from precipitancy in a measure m- 
volving such important principles, and such deep pecuniary interests, 
I feel that I cannot, in justice to the parties interested, too soon pre- 
sent it to the deliberate consideration of the Legislature and the 
people. Both the constitntionality and expediency of the law creating 
this bank are well questioned by a large portion of our fellow citizens, 
and it must be admitted by all that it has failed in the great end of 
establishing a uniform and sound currency." 

In 1832, after a struggle of nearly six months, the bill to recharter 
the Bank of the United states passed both branches of Congress. 
President Jackson promptly vetoed the measure, and in 1833, by vir- 
tue of an order sanctioned by the President, Hon Roger B. Taney, 
then Secretary of the Treasury, caused the removal of all government 
deposits from the Bank of the United States. 

Clothed with vast privileges the bank had grown to be a powerful 
institution. Its management became arrogant and despotic and in 
futherance of its aims, sought to dictate legislation, and through 
lavish expenditures of money, to control public sentiment, influence 
elections and defeat General Jackson for re-election to the presidency. 
In 1830, replying to a question put by the chairman of the Finance 
Committee of the Senate, Mr. Biddle, president of the Bank, boldly 
announced that " there were very few banks which might not have 
been destroyed by an exertion of the power of the Bank of the United 
States." After the removal of the deposits in 1833 the bank merci- 
lessly exerted its power over the business interest of the country in 
the hope thereby to force a return of the deposits and its recharter. 
Fabulous sums were paid politicians engaged in spreading alarm, 
t)rganizing distress meetings and creating panic. Business men were 
suddenly called upon to pay all they owed and loans were refused at 
the bank and all its branches. Thousands of workmen were thrown 
out of employment and universal stagnation and distrust existed. 
This condition of affairs prevailed to a greater or less extent until 1837 
and a part of 1838, and the general distrust then prevailing militated 
greatly against the negotiation of State bonds subscribed for stock in 
the Bank of the State of Missouri. 

Other reasons, however, were assigned why these bonds could not 
be sold, the principal objection being to the time and place of their 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 135 



redemption and the omission of the legislature to provide for the pay- 
ment of interest in Europe, it being held that the bonds should have a 
longer time to run, and that the interest should be payable at places 
nearer the purchasers. 

Whatever may have been the real cause of failure to negotiate, 
suffice it to say that, after every exertion on the part of the bank, the 
bonds of the State, excepting a small amount, were not sold but were 
subsequently withdrawn from the bank and canceled as provided in 
the act approved February 8, 1839. 

ACT OF 1839. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE BANE OF BONDS ISSUBD UNDER THE AOT OF 1837. 

BONDS AUTHORIZED IN LIEU OF THE SAME. 

Convinced of the impossibility to complete the negotiation of 
bonds originally issued to the Bank of the State of Missouri, the Gen- 
eral Assembly determined upon their withdrawal and cancellation, 
which was accomplished by virtue of the act of February 8, 1839, the 
same being amendatory of the act to charter the bank approved Feb- 
ruary 2, 1837. 

By the first section of this act the Governor was required to with- 
draw from the bank all State bonds issued under the actof 1837, which 
had been delivered to the bank in payment of stock subscribed by the 
State and remained unsold, and in lieu thereof to execute to the bank 
other bonds of the State for the same amount. 

The bonds thus authorized bore interest at the rate of six per 
centum per annum, payable semi-annually. Both principal and in- 
terest were made payable in the City of London, in England, or else- 
where, in sterling currency, francs or guilders, as the bank deemed 
advisable. The bank was empowered to pay interest on all State 
bonds sold, or that might hereafter be sold, and to deduct the amount 
of interest so paid from any dividends accruing to the State on ac- 
count of its stock. 

Under this act bonds were issued as follows : 



1,230 six per cent. 2&-year sterling bonds of $1,000, or £225 each, num-! 
Dered 501 to 1,730 inclusive, issued April 1, 1839, interest' 
"payable on lirst days of April and October In London i $1 ,230,000 

1,000 six per cent. 25-year sterling bonds of $1,000, or £225 each, nnm- 
oered 2,001 to 3,000 Incluslye, issued deptember 2, 1840, 
interest payable on first days of January and July in Lon- 
don 1 ,000,000 

2,230 Total $2,230,000 



136 auditor's report. 



These bonds were not negotiated. By resolution of the General 
Assembly, approved January 30, 1845, the President and Directors 
of the bank were instructed to deliver all unsold bonds in their pos- 
session, or under their control, to Hon. William Fort, who was required 
to deliver the same to the legislature then in session, to be disposed 
of as deemed proper by that body. 

Subsequently a joint committee was appointed for the cancella- 
tion of the bonds thus surrendered, and on the 28th of February, 1845, 
that committee made the following report: 

^' Mr« Presidbnt: The joint committee to cancel the State bonds, 
in obedience to the resolution further instructing said committee to 
make a memorandum of said bonds and file a copy of the same with 
the Secretary of State and Auditor of Public Accounts, and cause said 
bonds and coupons ito be bnrnti have performed the duties required 
by said resolution by filing with the said oflicers the following memo- 
randum : 



No. of Bonds. 


Date. 


Numbering. 


1,230 


Anrill, 1839 


From 501 to 1,730 inclusive. 
From 2,001 to 3,000 inclusive. 


1,000 


Sentember 2. 1840 





^' The above bonds are given for £225 each, bearing interest at the 
rale of 6 per centum per annum, payable semi-annually at London, 
making in total amount the sum of two millions two hundred and 
thirty thousand dollars. The committee likewise caused the said bonds 
to be burned in their presence February 28, 1845. 

''A. REESE, Chairman of Senate. 

" WM. V. N. BAY, Chairman of House." 

BRANOH BANES. 

The Bank of the State of Missouri had five branches, the first of 
*which being established by section 33 of the act of February 2, 1837, 
was located at Fayette, in the county of Howard. A second branch 
was established by the act of January 17, 1839, and located at Pal- 
myra, in Marion county. The third branch was established by the act 
of February 6, 1841, and located at Jackson, in the county of Oape 
Girardeau. A fourth branch by the act of February 6th, 1843, and 
located at Springfield, in Greene county. The fifth and last branch 
was established at Lexington, in Lafayette county, by an act approved 
February 21, 1845. 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



187 



By sectioD 11 of the act to charter the bank $500,000 in Bi per 
cent, bonds were to be subscribed on the organization of the second 
branch, and by section 12 a like amount upon the establishment of the 
third branch. As heretofore shown, these bonds were issued but never 
negotiated. 

Table showing amount of stock owned by the State in the Bank 
of the State of Missouri on the Ist day of October, 1842 : 



FOR THE STATE SCHOOL FUND. 

Certificate of stock Ko. 1, dated July 19, ia39 

Certificate of Stock No. 2, dated February 22, 1840 

Certificate of stock No. 3, dated September 8, 1840 

Certificate of stock No. 4, dated March 15, 1842 

FOR THE GTTATE SEMINARY FUND. 

Certificate of stock No. 1, dated July 19, 1839 

Certificate of stock No. 2, dated February 22, 1840 

Certificate of stock No. 3, dated September 8, 1840 

Certificate of stock No. 4, dated March 15, 1842 

FOR THE STATE SINEINO FCNI>. 

Certificate of stock No. 1, dated August 9, 1839 ......... 

Certificate of stock No. 2, dated February 22, 1840 

Certificate of stock No. 3, dated September 8, 1840 

Certificate of stock No. 4, dated February 4, 1842 



FOR THE STATE PROPER. 



Stock owned by the State in her own right which was 
boufl^ht with proceeds derired from sale of State 
bonas 



Total stock owned October, 1, 1842, 



$515,518 83 
24,474 97 
18,139 11 
17,535 05 



$91,711 36 
3,209 89 
2,847 64 
2,231 11 



$5,685 96 
199 00 
176 55 
212 15 



$272,263 60 



$575,667 96 



$100,000 00 



f6,273 66 



$272,263 60 



$954,205 22 



The amonnt of stock which the State held in the bank remained 
unchanged nntil 1857, when the dividends which had been declared on 
the Sinking Fund stock amounting to $9,284.88 were invested in 
stock. In like manner the profits on the stock owned by the State in 
her own right, and amounting to $36,509.90, were invested November 
1, 1858. No other changes occurred, except that of the consolidation 
of certificates. 

The following table will show the amount of stock in the Bank of 
the State of Missouri, owned by the State on the first day of January, 
1859. 



138 



AUDITOR^S REPORT. 



$575,667 96i 



$100,000 00 



FOR THB STATE SCHOOL FUND. 

Certificate of stock No*. 1, dated May 25, 1857 

FOR THE STATE SEMINARY FUND. 

Certificate of stock No. 1, dated May 25, 1857 

FOR THE STATE SINKING FUND. 

Certificate of stock No. 1, dated May 25, 1857 

Certificate of stock No. 2, dated June 26, 1857 

STATE STOCK PROPER. 

Certificate of stock No. l>dated May 25, 1857 $272,263 60 

36,509 90 



$6,273 66 
9,281 88 



Certificate of stock No. 2, dated November 1, 1858. 
Total stock owned January 1, 1859 



$575,667 96 



100,000 00 



16,658 54 



308,773 60 
91,000,000 00 



As required by an act approved March 14, 1869, entitled '* An act 
authorizing the Governor to subscribe additional stock to the Bank of 
the State of Missouri," the Governor subscribed for eight hundred and 
sixty-three shares of stock in said bank, to constitute a part of the 
State School Fund, thereby increasing the amount of stock in said 
bank $86,300, so that on the 1st day of October, 1860, the total amount 
of stock owned by the State was ¥1,086,300, as follows : 



FOR THE STATE SCHOOL FUND. 

Certificate of stock No. 1, dated May 25, 1857 . . . . 
Certificate of stock Xo. 3, dated January 7, 1860. 

FOR THE STATE SEMINARY FUND. 

Certificate of stock No. 1, dated May 26, 1857 



FOR THE STATE SINKING FUND. 

Certificate of stock No. 1, dated May 25, 1857 

Certificate of stock No. 2, dated June 26, 1857 

STATE STOCK PROPER. 

Certificate of stock No. 1, dated May 25, 1857 

Certificate of stock No. 2, dated November 1, 1858. 

Total stock owned October 1, 1860 



$575,667 96 
86,300 00 



$100,000 00 



96,273 66 
9,284 88 



$272,263 60 
36,509 90 



$661,967 96 



100,000 00 



15,558 54 



308,773 50 



$1,086,300 00 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 139 

No further investments in bank stock were made by the State, but 
by virtue of an act approved March 5, 1866, entitled ^' An act to author- 
ize the Bank of the State of Missouri to reorganize as a National 
Bank, to provide for the sale of the stock owned by this State in said 
bank," etc., the whole amount of stock owned and controlled by the 
State in said bank was sold to Oaptain James B. Eads at $108.50 per 
share of f 100. 

The face value of the stock sold was $l,086,300j and the proceeds 
arising from its sale amounted to $1,178,636.50. Payments therefor 
were made in bonds and coupons of the State as follows : 



Jane 18, 1866. 

July 14, 1866. 

Total.... 



$210,080 00 
067,655 50 



$1,178,635 50 



DEPOSITS OF SURPLUS RBVfiNUB OF THE UNITED STATES. 

The thirteenth and fourteenth sections of an act of Congress ap- 
proved June 23, 1836, entitled ^'An act to regulate the deposits of the 
public money," contained the following provision : 

^' That the money which shall be in the treasury of the United 
States on the first day of January, eighteen hundred and thirty seven, 
reserving the sum of five millions of dollars, shall be deposited with 
such of the several States, in proportion to their respective representa- 
tion in the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States, 
as shall by law authorize their treasurers or other competent authori- 
ties to receive the same on the terms heieinafter specified ; and the 
Secretary of the Treasury shall deliver the same to such treasurers or 
other competent authorities, on receiving certificates of deposit there- 
for, « « « which certificates shall express the usual and 
legal obligations, and pledge the faith of the State for the safe keeping 
and repayment thereof, and shall pledge the faith of the States receiv- 
ing the same to pay the said moneys, and every part thereof, from time 
to time, whenever the same shall be required by the Secretary of the 
Treasury for the purpose of defraying any wants of the public treasury 
beyond the amount of the five millions aforesaid. « « « « 
That the said deposits shall be made with said States in the following 
proportions, and at the following times, to wit: One-quarter part on 
the first day of January, eighteen hundred and thirty-seven, or as soon 
thereafter as may be ; one-quarter part on the first day of April ; one- 



140 auditor's report. 



quarter part on the first day of July, and one-quarter part on the first 
day of October, all in the same year." 

By virtue of an act of the General Assembly, approved December 
29, 1886, the Treasurer of the State ot Missouri was authorized to re- 
ceive that portion of the suplus revenue due this State, and to execute 
a certificate therefor, in such form as might be prescribed by the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury of the United States, pledging the faith of the 
State for the safe keeping of said money and the repayment thereof, 
from time to time, whenever the same should be required by the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury for the purpose of defraying the wants of the pub- 
lic treasury. 

The first, second and third installments of surplus revenue were 
recived by the treasurer as follows : 



April 12, 1837, first and second Ingtallments. 

June 10, 1837, third installment 

Total tkmount received by Missouri 



9254,890 20 
127,445 10 



$382,335 30 



Payment of the fourth installment was postponed by an act of 
Congress, approved Octobet 2, 1837, until the first day of January, 
1839, and by an act approved August 13, 1841, all the provisions of the 
act regulating the deposits of the public money, approved June 23, 
1836, were repealed, excepting the thirteenth and fourteenth sections 
thereof. These sections related to the terms and conditions upon which 
the surplus revenue was to be received by the States and the time when 
the deposits were to be made. 

On the first day of January, 1837, the money in the United States 
Treasury, in excess of $5,000,000, which was required to be deposited 
with the several States, amounted to $37,468,859.88. 

The provisions of the act of Congress of June 23, 1836, were ac- 
cepted by the twenty- six States then in existence, and three install- 
ments of the revenue were deposited as provided in said act. 

The following table will show the dates of acts of acceptance by 
States and the amount of the first, second and third installments re- 
ceived by each State : 



STATISTICAL IISTFORMATION. 



141 



States. 



Dates of acts of acceptance. 



AJabama December 16, 1836 

Arkansas October 29, 1836 

Connecticut December 29, 1836 

Delaware January 16, 1837 

Georgia December 26, 1836 

I 

Illinois December 17, 1836 

Indiana December 21, 1836 

Kentucky December 16, 1836 

Louisiana Feb. 7 and March 13 , 1837 . 



Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania 

Bhode Island 

South Carolina 

Tennessee 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Total amH reo'd by the States. 



January 26, 1837 .. 
December 30, 1836. 
January 19, 1837 . . 

July 22, 1836 

May 2, 1837 

December 29, 1836. 
January 11, 1837... 
November 4, 1836 . 
January 10, 1837... 
January 11,. 1837... 
December 19, 1836. 
December 22, 1836. 
November 10, 1836 
December 21, 1836. 
October 29, 1836 . . , 
November 17, 1836 
December 20, 1836. 



Amount of 1st, 
2d and 3d in- 
stallments. 



f669 
286 
764 
286 

1,061 
477 
860 

1,433 
477 
955 
965 



1,338. 


,173 58 


286 


,751 49 


382. 


,335 30 


' 382. 


,335 30 


669, 


086 79 


764. 


,670 60 


4,014 


,520 71 


1,433, 


,757 39 


2,007, 


,260 34 


2,867, 


514 78 


382, 


,335 30 


1,051, 


,422 09 


1,433, 


,757 39 


669, 


,086 79 


2,198, 


427 99 



$28,101 



086 79 
751 49 
670 60 
751 49 
422 09 
919 14 
254 44 
757 39 
919 14 
838 25 
838 25 



644 91 



The fourth installment, the payment of which was postponed by 
the act of October 2, 1887, and which has never been apportioned 
among the States, amounted in the aggregate to $9,367,214.97. The 
shares of this installment due each State is presented in the following 
table : 



142 



auditor's bbport. 



states. 



Alabaina 

Arkansas 

Gonneeticnt 

Delaware 

Oeorgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Kentucky 

Loaislana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachasetts 

Michigan 

Mississippi 

Missouri .* 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania 

Bhode Island 

South Carolina 

Tennessee 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Total amount of fourth Installment yet due the States 



Fourth install- 
ment yet due. 



$223,028 93 
95,583 83 
254,890 20 
96,683 $3 
360,474 03 
159,306 38 
286,751 48 
477,919 13 
159,306 3S 
318,612 75 
318,612 75 
446,057 86 
95,683 83 
127,445 10 
127,445 10 
223,028 93 
254,890 20 
1,338,173 57 
477,919 13 
669,086 78 
955,838 26 
127,445 10 
350,474 03 
477,919 13 
223,028 93 
732,809 33 



$9,367,214 97 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 143 

By an act of the General Assembly, approved February 6, 1837, 
establishing a permanent fund for the use and support of common 
schools, it was provided that all that portion of money which may be 
received by the State from the United States, by virtue of the provis- 
ions of an act of Congress, approved June 23, 1836, should be invested 
by the Governor in ^ome safe and productive stock, and that the inter- 
est and profits accruing thereon should be applied to the use and sup- 
port of common schools. In compliance with this provision, the first, 
second and third installments of the surplus revenue received by the 
State, and amounting to $382,335.30, were invested in stock of the Bank 
of the State of Missouri. 

The sixth section of said act provided that it should be the duty 
of the Governor, whenever any portion of the deposits made with this 
State should be demanded by the government to issue bonds of the 
State for the amount so required by the United States. These bonds 
were to be isrued in the same manner and for the same time as the 
bonds issued under the charter of the Bank of the State of Missouri, 
but were not to bear a greater interest than five per centum per annum. 
The bank was required to accept said bonds and furnish the money 
demanded by the United States according to the terms of the requisi- 
tion. No demand has ever been made by the United States for the 
return of any part of the surplus revenue deposited with this State, 
and consequently no bonds weie issued for this purpose. 

MORMON AND OSAGE WAR LOAN. 

For the purpose of paying the troops and other expenses of expedi- 
tions sent out to suppress disturbances created by Mormans and Osage 
Indians in the years 1837-8, the Governor was authorized, by an act 
approved February 9, 1839, to contract for a loan of $200,000, at a rate 
of interest not exceeding six per centum per annum. The State obli- 
gated itself to return the money borrowed in ten equal installments, the 
first installment being payable on the first day of January, 1841, ^nd the 
remainder in equal annual installments on the first day of January in 
each year thereafter. Under this act, 200 six per cent, bonds of $1,000 
each, amoanting to $200,000, were issued and placed in the Bank of the 
State of Missouri, but were not negotiated. The bank, however, ad- 
vanced money from time to time as it was required to pay the expenses 
of the expeditions. The whole amount loaned by the bank was $182,- 
000, for the payment of which bonds of the State, bearing ten per cent, 
interest, were issued and sold as provided in the act of February 15, 
1841. Those issued under the act of 1839 were returned by the bank 
and canceled. 



144 auditor's report. 



DESCREPnON OF MORMON AKD OSAGE WAR BONDS. 



I 
364 ten per cent. 5-10 bonds of $500 each, issued June 22. 1841, underi 
act of February 15, 1841, interest payable first of Januury and 
July at St. Louis— sold ; . . : $182,000 



IOWA WAR BONDS. 

In 1839 the location of the northern boundary line of Missouri be- 
came the subject of serious dispute between the inhabitants of the 
Territory of Iowa and citizens of this State. The sheriff of Clark 
county, engaged in the collection of the revenue within a portion of 
the disputed district, was seized by an armed force, carried into the 
Territory of Iowa and there imprisoned for an alleged violation of its 
laws, the governor of that territory having previously issued his proc- 
lamation denying jurisdiction of this State over the domain in ques- 
tion, and authorizing the arrest and trial of all persons exercising offi- 
cial functions therein not granted by the laws of that territory. This 
proclamation was responded toby the Governor of Missouri and instruc- 
tions were issued by him to civil ofScers in the border counties to pro- 
ceed in discharging their several duties, and in case of interference by 
persons claiming not to be citizens of this State and denying its juris- 
diction, to call to their assistance the power of their counties in their 
efforts to enforce the laws of this State. Subsequently a body of 
militia was sent to the assistance of the sheriff of Olark county and the 
expenses of this expedition, amounting to $19,000, were paid by the 
issue of bonds, as provided m the act of February 15, 1841, entitled 
^^ An act to issue State bonds to pay the State debt." 

DESCRIPTION OF IOWA WAE BONDS. 



38 ten per cent. 5-10 bonds of 8500 each, Issued under act of Feb- 
ruary 15, 1841. Interest payable first of January andJuly at St. 
Louis— sold 



$19,000 



INTEREST BONDS. 



The state often became indebted to the Bank of the State of Mis- 
souri for interest on money borrowed and for money advanced by the 
bank to pay interest on State bonds. To reimburse the bank on this 
account, bonds, aggregating 827,261, were required to be issued ander 



STATISTIC iL INFORMATION. 



145 



the act of Febroary 15, 1841, and under the act of February 25, 1843, 
aDother issue of $55,000 was authorized. It also happened that in 1847 
the revenue was insufficient to meet current expenses and the interest 
falling due on the Staters bonded debt. This deficiency in the revenue 
necessitated the act of February 16, 1847, entitled ^' An act to sustain 
the credit ol the State," under which the Governor was authorized to 
borrow not exceeding $60,000, for the payment of which eight percent, 
bonds were issued, payable in five years, but redeemable at any time 
after the expiration of two years* 

DESCRIPTION OF INTEBEST BONDS. 



54 ten per cent. 10-year bonds of $500 each, issned June 22. 1841, 
under act of February 15, 1841, interest payable first of January 
and July— sold 



1 ten per cent, bond for $261— other deficriptlon same as above. . .. 

550 el^t per cent. 10-year bonds of $100 each, issued under act of 
February 25, 1843, interest payable May and November— sold . . . 

15 eieht per cent. 5-year bonds of $1,000 each, issued in 1847, 
under act of February 16, 1847, interest payable annually 

8 eight i>er cent. 5-year bonds of $500 each--other description same 
as above 



628 



Total 



$27,000 
261 

55,000 

15,000 

4,000 



$101,261 



TOBACCO WABEHOUSE BONDS. 

It was provided in the act of February 27, 1843, that a public ware* 
house for the storage and inspection of tobacco should be erected in 
the city of St. Louis. Three commissioners were to be appointed by 
the Governor to select a proper site for said warehouse and supervise 
its constrnction. To carry into effect the provisions of this act the sum 
of $25,000 was appropriated, and in order to raise that amount, bonds 
of the state, bearing ten per cent, interest, were authorized. 

DESCRIPTION OP TOBACCO WAREHOUSE BONDS. 



250 ten per cent. 10-year bonds of $100 each, numbered 1 to 105, and! 



106 to 250, issued under act of February 27, 1843, interest payable 
first days of June and December — sold 



825,000 



CAPITOL BONDS. 

In an act approved February 2, 1837, the Governor, Secretary of 

State, Auditor of Public Accounts, Treasurer and Attorney-General 

were appointed commissioners to superintend the erection of a State 

Capitol, on what was then known as *Oapitol Hill," in the City of Jef- 

s. p.— 10 



146 auditor's report. 



ferson. To enable the commissioners to proceed with the erection of 
said building the sum of $75,000 was appropriated. The proceeds to 
be derived from the sale of the old State House and all other lots in 
the Oity of Jefferson belonging to the state were required to be placed 
in the treasury and set apart as so much of the appropriation of $75,000. 
To provide for the remainder of this appropriation the Governor was 
directed to cause the negotiation of a loan or loans for such sum or 
sums of mone> as might be necessary to meet the engagements of the 
State in erecting the capitol, and to secure the payment of loans thus 
authorized he was required to issue six per cent, bonds of the State, 
payable fifty years after date, but redeemable at the pleasure of the 
State after the expiration of twenty-five years. The interest on said 
bonds was made payable semi-annually in New York, Philadelphia, 
Baltimore or St. Louis, as might be stipulated. 

By an act of February 11, 1839, being supplementary to that of 
February 2, 1837, the Governor was authorized to negotiate a further 
loan of 9125,000, and to secure the payment of this loan bonds of the 
State were to be issued bearing interest at a rate not exceeding six per 
cent., payable semi-annually in the city of New York, or elsewhere, as 
might be stipulated in the negotiation. As in the act of 1837, these 
bonds were payable fifty years after date, the State reserving the right 
of redemption after the expiration of twenty-five years. 

Bonds of the State amounting to $25,000 were authorized under 
the act of February 15, 1841, entitled ^^An act to issue State bonds to 
pay the State debt." These bonds were of the denomination of $500 
each, payable in ten years, but redeemable at the option of thb Slate 
after five years, and bore interest at the rate of ten per cent, per anaam^ 
both principal and interest being payable in gold and silver at the City 
of Jefi'erson, the Bank of the State of Missouri, or in the cities of New- 
York, Boston or Philadelphia, as might be agreed upon at the time of 
negotiation. On the next day, under the act of February 16, 1841, a 
further issue of $12,000 was authorized upon the same terms and con- 
ditions^, except that these bonds were to bear interest at a rate not ex- 
ceeding seven per centum per annum. 

Under the act of February 25, 1843, the Governor was required to 
execute and deliver to the Bank of the State of Missouri bonds of the 
State amounting to f 155,000, to be applied in refunding to the bank 
that amount of money advanced by the bank for the purpose of build- 
ing the capitol and for which amount the bank had not been paid. On 
delivery of these bonds to the bank that institution was directed to 
surrender a similar amount of state bonds, then in its possession, which 
had been issued on account of internal improvement and for building 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



147 



the capitol, and the bonds so surrendered were to be canceled. These 
were eight per cent. 10-year bonds, the principal and interest being 
payable in the city of St. Louis. 

The following table will furnish a description of all bonds issued 
under the several acts authorizing bonds for the construction of the 
State Oapitol and how the same were disposed of : 



No. of 

Bonds* 



Description and Disposition of Bonds Issued. 



Amount of 
Bonds Sold. 



4 Six per cent. 25-50 bonds of $10,000 each, issned July 7, 1837, un-i 
der act of February 2, 1837, interest payable semi-annually, 
in St. Louis. These bonds were returned by the Bank of thej 
State of Missouri and canceled 



40 Six per cent. 25-60 bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 1 to 40, issued) 
under the act of February 2, 1837, hs follows : Ten July 1, 
ten October 1, 1837, ten January 1 and ten April 1, 1838, in- 
terest payable semi-annually at St. Louis. Sold to Prime,! 
Ward & King 

30{Six per cent. 25-50 bonds of $1,000 each numbered 41 to 50 and 51, 
to 70 inclusive; other description same as above. These! 
bonds were held by the Bank of the State of Missouri until' 
exchanged for eight per cent, bonds, issued under act of 
February 25, 1843 



125 Six per cent, sterling bonds of j&225, or $1,000 each, issued under 
act of Februarv 11, 1839, interest payable semi-annually in 
London. Hela by the Bank of the State of Missouri until 
exchanged for eight per cent, bonds, issued under act of! 
February 25, 1843 



K),Ten per cent. 5-10 bonds of $500 each, Issued June 22, 1841, under 
act of February 15, 1841, interest payable 1st January and' 
July. Sold I 

i 

24!SeTen ner cent. 5-10 bonds of $500 each, issued October 15, 1841, 
under act of February 16, 1841, interest payable 1st of May 
and November. Sold 

15oOSight per cent. 10-year bonds of $100 each, issued under act ofl 
February 25, 1843, interest payable May and November in! 
city of St. Louis. Sold ; 



l,823j 



Total amount sold, 



$40,000 



25,000 



12,000 



155,000 



$232,000 



RECAPITULATION. 



Total number of bonds issued 

Number canceled , 

Number sold 



Number exchanged for 8 per cent, bonds issued under act 
of February 25, 1843 



Totals. 



4 
1,664 

155 
1,823 



1,823 



1,823 



148 auditor's report. 



BRIEF STATEMENT OF THE CAPITOL DEBT. 



40 Six per cent. SI , 000 bonds, issued under act of Feb. 2, 1837 | $40,000 

I - . I 

50|TeD per cent. $500 bonds, issued under act of Feb. 15, 1841 j 25,000 

24h''even per cent. $500 bonds, issued under act of Feb. 16, 1841 1 12,000 

1,650 Eight per cent. $100 bonds, issued under act of Feb. 25, 1843 155,000 



1,664, Totalcapltol debt | $232,000 



INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT BONDS. 

A Board of Internal Improvement was created by act of the Gen- 
eral Assembly, approved Febraary 11, 1839, and consisted of five di* 
rectors appointed by the Governor, with the advice and consent of the 
Senate. It was the duty of this board to report to each General As- 
sembly the roads and navigable waters of the State most requiring 
improvement, to superintend works of internal improvement and exer- 
cise a general supervision and control over all State roads, railroads, 
slack water navigation, or canals that ma; be authorized by law, 
wherein the State shall own or reserve any interests or rights. 

By virtue of the act of February 13, 1839, the board was directed 
to cause surveys to be made of the Osage river from its mouth to Os- 
ceola ; of North Grand river from its mouth to Gallatin ; of Salt- river 
from its mouth to the three forks in Monroe county, and of the Mera- 
mec river from its mouth to Massey's Iron Works in Crawford county. 
Also a survey for a railroad from the city of St. Louis leading by the 
nearest route to the Iron Mountain in St. Francois county. 

To raise money to carry this act into execution the Governor was 
authorized to issue bonds of the State, payable twenty-five years from 
date and bearing interest at 6 per cent, per annum. 

Twenty thousand dollars were advanced by the Bank of the State 
of Missouri, and on the 28th of May, 1839, twenty six per cent, bonds 
of $1,000 each were issued and delivered to the bank in payment of 
the money so advanced. 

These bonds were not negotiated, but remained in the bank until 
exchanged for eight per cent, bonds as provided in section one of the 
act of February 25, 1843. 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 149 



DESCRIPTION OF INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT BONDS. 

\ 



200 eight per cent, ten-year bonds of $100 each, issued under act of Feb- 
ruary 25, 1843, interest payable May and November In the city of St. 
Louis— sold 



$20,000 



LOAN OF 1845. 

By virtue of an act approved March 14, 1845, the Governor was 
authorized to borrow from the Bank of the State of Missouri, or any of 
its branches, a sum of money not exceeding $75,000 at a rate of inter- 
est not greater than six per cent, per annum, to be applied in the pay- 
ment of such appropriations as may be prescribed by law. 

Bonds of the State necessary to procure this loan were required to 
be issued in sums not less than $500, payable twelve months from the 
time of their negotiation, and redeemable at any time within that 
period. 

In compliance with this act the Governor, on the 20th of March, 
1846, borrowed $20,000 from the Branch Bank at Jackson, and issued 
therefor six per cent, bonds of the State for $10,000 each, and on the 
19th oi May, 1845, another loan of $15,000 was obtained from the branch 
of the bank at Palmyra and six per cent, bond No. 3 for 915,000 was 
issaed. At the maturity of these bonds the State was unable redeem 
them, and renewal bonds were issued as provided m the fourth section 
of said act. 

DESCRIPTION OF RENEWAL LOAN BONDS.' 



2 Six per cent, bonds of $10,000 each, issued March 20, 1846, under act of 

March 14, 1845, principal and Interest payable to Branch Bank at 
Jackson, March 20, 1847 

1 Six per cent, bond for $15,000, issued May 19, 1846, under act of March 14, 
1845, principal 'and interest payable to Branch Bank at Palmyra, 
May 19, 1847. . . ." 

3 Total 



$20,000 



15,000 



$35,000 



150 auditor's report. 



STATE DEBT, OCTOBER, 1, 1838. 



Bonds issaed and sold in payment of stock in the Bank of the State of 
Missouri which the Stat« owned in her own right 



Bonds issued and sold in payment of a debt due to the Seminary and 
Saline Funds at the time of their investment in stock of the Bank 
of the State of Missouri 



Bonds issued and sold for building the State oapitoL, 



Loan by the Bank of the State of Missouri for building the State capi- 
for which bonds were issued but not negotiated 



Total debt, October 1, 1838 < 



$272,203 60 

89,736 40 
40,000 00 

10,000 00 



$412,000 00 



The Auditor's report and Governor's message for 1838 show that 
bonds issued to indemnify the Seminary and Saline Funds amounted to 
$89,681.27, or $105.13 less than the amount actually issued. This error 
was corrected in Auditor's reports for subsequent years. It is proper 
also to state that in 1838 the Auditor and Governor did not reckon the 
bonds sold in payment of stock owned exclusively by the state as a 
part of the State debt; said stock being equal in amount, was like- 
wise regarded as of equal value to the outstanding bonds. On this 
hypothesis the State debt was then reported as being f 272,263.60, 
less than the outstanding obligations of the State. Having shown the 
investments made by the State in stock of the Bank of the State of 
Missouri, it is deemed advisable in this review to treat all outstanding 
bonds and other obligations of the State as a part of its debt, notwith- 
standing the investment might offset a portion of these liabilities. 



STATISTICAL INFOBMATION. 



151 



STATE DEBT, OCTOBER 1, 1840. 



Bonds isBued and sold in payment of bank stock owned by the State. . 

Bonds issued and sold to reimburse the Seminary and Saline Funds. . . 

Bonds issued and sold for building the State capitol 

Loan by the Bank of the State of Missouri for building the State capi- 
tol, for which bonds were issued but not negotiated 

Loan by the Bank of the State of Missouri for expenses of Mormon 
and Osage wars, for which bonds were issued but not negotiated . 

Loan by the Bank of the State of Missouri for internal improvement, 
for which bonds were issued but not negotiated 



' Total debt, October 1, 1840. 



$272,263 60 
89,736 40 
40,000 00 

166,000 00 

100,000 00 

20,000 00 



$677,000 00 



KoTs. — All bonds of the State which were sold prior to October 1, 1840, bore 
interest at the rate of six per centum per annum, except $63,000 bank stock bonds j 
which were five and a half per cent, bonds. 



STATE DEBT, OCTOBEB 1, 1842. 



Bank Stock— 5} per cent. 25-year bonds issued in 1837 

Bank Stock— 6 per cent 25-year bonds issued in 1837-8 

Capitol Bonds— 6 per cent. 26-year bonds issued in 1837-8 

Capitol Bonds— 10 per cent. 10-year bonds issued June 22, 1841. . . 
Capitol Bonds— 7 per cent. 10-year bonds issued October 15, 1841. 



Capitol Loan -Money borrowed from Bank of the State of Missouri for, 
building the capitol 

Mormon and Osage war bonds— 10 per cent. lO-year bonds issued in 
1841 



Iowa "War Bonds— 10 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1841 
Interest Bonds— 10 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1841 . . 



Internal Improvement Loan— Money borrowed from Bank of State of 
Missouri for internal improvement 



Total debt, October 1, 1842. 



863.000 00 

299,000 00 

40,000 00 

25,000 00 

12,000 00 

165,000 00 

182,000 00 
19,000 00 
27,261 00 

20,000 00 



$842,261 00 



152 



AUDITOR'S REPOBT. 



STATE DEBT, OCTOBER 1, 1844. 



Bank Stock— 5} per cent. 25-year bonds issaed in 1837 

Bank Stook--6 per cent. 25-year bonds issned in 1837-8 

Capitol Bonds— 6 per cent. 25-year bonds issued in 1837-8 

Capitol Bonds— 10 per cent. 10-year bonds issued June 22, 1841 

Capitol Bonds— 7 per cent. 10-year bonds issued October 15, 1841 

Capitol Bonds— 8 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1843-4 

Mormon and Osage War Bonds— 10 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 
1841 

Iowa War Bonds— 10 per cent. 10-year bonds Issued in 1841 

Interest Bonds— 10 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1841 

Interest Bonds— 8 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1843-4 

Tobacco Warehouse Bonds— 10 per cent 10-year bonds issued in 1843. . 

Internal Improvement Bonds— 8 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1843 

Total debt, October 1 , 1844 

• 
STATE DEBT, OCTOBER 1, 1846. 

Bank Stock— 5)^ per cent. 25-year bonds issued in 1837 

Bank Stock— 6 per cent. 25-year bonds issued in 1837-8 

Capitol Bonds— 6 per cent. 25-year bonds issued in 1837-8 

Capitol Bonds— 10 per cent. 10-year bonds issued June 22, 1841 

Capitol Bonds — 7 per cent. 10-year bonds issued October 15, 1841 

Capitol Bonds— 8 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1843-4 

Mormon and Osage War Bonds— 10 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 
1841 

Iowa War Bonds— 10 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1841 

Interest Bonds— 10 per cent. 10-year bonds issued In 1841 

Interest Bonds— 8 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1843-4 

Tobacco Warehouse Bonds— 8 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1843. : 

Internal Improvement Bonds — 8 per cent. lO.year bonds issued in 1843 

Loan of 1845—2 six per cent. 1-year bonds of $10,000 each, issued in 
1846 to branch bank at Jackson, and 1 do. for $15,000 to branch bank 
at Palmyra for money borrowed 

Total debt, October 1, 1846 



$63,000 00 

299,000 00 

40,000 00 

25,000 00 

12,000 00 

155,000 00 

182,000 00 
19,000 00 
27,261 00 
55,000 00 
25,000 00 
20,000 00 



$922,261 00 



$63,00 00 
299,000 00 
40,000 00 
25,000 00 
12,000 00 
155,000 00 

182,000 00 
19,000 00 
27,26100 
55,000 00 
25,OOM0 
20,000> 

35,000 00 
$957,261 00 



STATISTICAL INFOBHATION. 



153 



STATE DEBT, OCTOBER 1, 1848. 

• 

In 1847-8 bonds amounting to $20,000, issued to the Branch Bank 
at Jackson, were redeemed, but other bonds aggregating $19,000, were 
issued and sold as provided in the act of February 16, 1847, entitled 
^^An act to sustain the credit of the State," so that the debt on the 1st 
day of October, 1848, remained as follows : 



Bank Stock — 5} per cent. 26-year bonds issued in 1S37 

Bank Stock— 6 per cent. 25-year bonds issued in 1837-S 

Capitol Bonds— 6 per cent. 25-year bonds issued in 1837-8 

Capitol Bonds— 10 per cent. 10-year bonds issued June 22, 1841 

Capitol Bonds— 7 per cent 10-year bonds issued Oct. 15, 1841 

Capitol Bonds— 8 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1843-4 

Mormon and Osage War Bonds— 10 per cent. 10 year bonds issued in 1841 

Iowa War Bonds— 10 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1841 

Interest Bonds— 10 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1841 

Interest Bonds— 8 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1843-4 

Tobacco Warehouse Bonds — 10 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1843 

Internal Improvement Bonds— 8 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1843.. . 

Ix>an of 1845 — One 6 per cent. 1-year bond issued May 19, 1848, to Branch 
Bank of Palmyra for borrowed money 



Interest Bonds—^ percent. 2-5 bonds issued in 1847 
Total debt, Oct. 1, 1848 



$63,000 

290,000 

40,000 

25,000 

12,000 

155,000 

182,000 

19,000 

27,261 

55,000 

25,000 

20,000 

15,000 
19,000 



9956,261 



STATE DEBT, OCTOBER 1, 1860. 

The 6 per cent, bond for 1(15,000, issued to the Branch Bank at Pal- 
myra, and 23 eight per cent, bonds amounting to 919,000, issued in 
1847, under the act entitled '^An act to sustain the credit of the State/' 
were redeemed and canceled during the years 1849 and 1850, thereby 
reducing the debt $34,000. On the 1st day of October, 1850, the bonded 
indebtedness amounted to 9922,261. 

In 1851 the following described bonds were redeemed and can- 
celed : 



154 



auditor's rkpobt. 



Interest Bonds — ^10 per cent., Issued In 1841 

Capitol Bonds — 10 per cent., issued in 1841 

Capitol Bonds— 7 per cent., issued in 1841 

Mormon and Osage War Bonds^lO per cent., issued in 1841 

Iowa War Bonds— 10 per cent., issued in 1841 

Total 



aa7,26i 

25,000 

12,000 

182,000 

19,000 

$265,261 



TEMPORARY LOAN OF 1861. 
Bonds of the State matured in 1851 as follows : 



Interest bonds issued in 1«43 ! $27,261 

I 

Iowa war bonds issued in 1841 19,000 

Capitol bonds issued in 1841 37,000 

Osage and Mormon war bonds issued in 1841 182,000 

Total $265,261 



For the purpose of redeeming those bonds six per cent, bonds 
amounting to $200^000, and known as "Temporary Loan Bonds," were 
issued under the act approved March 3, 1851, entitled "An act to 
authorize a temporary loan." These bonds sold for $188,000, with 
which amount and $77,261,appropriated in the general appropriation act 
of 1861, the bonds maturing in that year were redeemed and canceled. 

The following is a description of Temporary Loan Bonds : 



2006 per cent. 5-year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 1 to 200, issued May, 
24, 1851, under act of March ^, 1S51, interest payable semi-annually 
inNewYork $200,000 



FUNDING BONDS OF 1853. 

To enable the State to redeem bonds amounting to 1(255,000, which 
matured in 1853, Funding Bonds were issued as provided in act ap- 
proved February 24, 1853, entitled ''An act to provide means to pay 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



155 



the State bonds falling due in the year eighteen hundred and fifty- 
three." These were six per cent, thirty-year bonds, redeemable at the 
pleasure of the State after twenty years, and are described as follows : 



200 six per cent. 90-year bonds of SI, 000 each, numbered 1 to 200, issued 
April 15, 1853, under act of March 24, 1853, interest payable first days 
of January and July 



$200,000 



The act of 1853 authorized the issuance of $250,000 in Funding 
Bonds, but there being a surplus in the treasury, the remainder were 
not issued. These bonds sold at 104f . 

STATE DBBT, OCTOBER 1, 1852 



Bank Stock— 5} per cent. 2^year bonds issued in 1837 

Bank Stock— 6 per cent. 25-year bonds issued in 1837-8 

Capital Bonds— 6 per cent. 25-year bonds issued in 1837-8 

Capitol Bonds— 8 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1843-4 

Interest Bonds — 8 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1843-4 

Tobacco Warehouse Bonds — 10 per cent, 10-year bonds issued in 1843 

Internal Improyement Bonds— 8 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1843. . 

Temporary Loan Bonds of 1851—6 per cent. 5-year bonds issued in 1851 . 

Total debt October 1, 1852 



$63,000 

299,000 
40,000 

155,000 
55,000 
25,000 
20,000 

200,000 
9857,000 



The following described bonds were redeemed and canceled in 



1853: 



Capitol Bonds— 8 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1843 

Interest Bonds — 8 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in 1843 

Tobacco Warehouse Bonds— 10 per cent. 10-year bonds issued in IS4'6 25,000 



Internal Improvement Bonds — 8 percent. lO-year bonds issued in 1S43. . 
Total 



.^155.000 
55,000 



20,000 



$265,000 



156 auditor's report. 



STATE DEBT, OCTOBER 1, 1854. 

Bank Stock— 5 J per cent. 25-year bond? issued in 1837 > $63,000 

Bank Stock— 6 per cent. 25.year bonds issued in lS:^-8 299,000 

I 

Capitol Bonds— C per cent. 25-year bonds issued In 1837-8 40.000 

Temporary Loan Bonds of 1851—6 per cent. 6-year bonds issued in 1851 . . , 200,000 
Funding Bonds of 1853—6 per cent. SO-year bonds issued in 1853 j 200,000 

Total debt October 1, 1854' I $802,000 

I 

In the general appropriation act, approved March 5, 1855, entitled 
"An act for the support of government for the years 1855 and 1856," 
the sum of $200,000 was appropriated and intended to be need in the 
redemption of the Temporary Loan Bonds of 1851, which matured July 
1, 1856- As will be seen by the subjoined correspondence. Temporary 
Loan Bonds numbered 93 to 112, inclusive, amounting to $20,000, were 
not redeemed with this appropriation. They became involved in liti- 
gation, in the case of the United States vs. Gardnier, and were not 
presented for payment at the date of their maturity, but were retained 
in possession of the Treasurer of the United States from 1855 until 
1877, when they were paid as provided in section 2, page 12, Laws of 
1877: 

56 Wall Street, New Tobk, Jan. 8, 1874. 

To the Fund Commissioners of the State of Missouri^ Jefferson Gity^ 
Missouri: 

Sirs : We hold lor collection |;20,000.00 bonds of the State of Mis- 
souri, dated January 24, 1851, due July 1,1856, Nos. 93 and 112, for 
$1,000 each, with 1st July, 1855, and subsequent coupons thereto at- 
tached. On presenting the bonds to cashier Bank of Commerce in this 
city, he informed us that he had no instructions to pay them, and re- 
ferred us to you. Will you please inform us, per return mail, what 
provision has been made for their payment, and to whom we shall pre- 
sent them. The bonds came to us from our Washington house (Riggs 
& Co.)i who, in explanation of their being so long past due, say they 
have been for a long time locked up in the Treasury of the United 
States, owing to a lawsuit. 

We are, sirs, very truly yours, 

RIGGS & 00. 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 157 



Treasury of the United States, Cash Division,/ 

Washington, January 22, 1874, J 

Gentlemen : Referring to the matter of the 320,000.00 bonds of 
the State of Missouri, Nos. 93 to 112 inclusive, of $1,000 each, placed 
by this office in year hands for collection, I have now to state for your 
information, that these bonds, and the coupons attached, are the prop 
erty of the United States, having been received by virtue of a decree 
in the case of the United States vs. Gardnier, and that they have been 
in the possession of this office since April, 1855. 

- Very respectfully, 

(Signed) L. D. TUTTLE, 

Assistant Treasurer U. S. 

RiGGS & Oo., Washington, D. 0. 

Although said bonds were not paid until 1877 they were not re- 
ported in the Auditor^s report of 1856, and subsequent years, as bein/z: 
a part of the State debt. In this review they will be treated as a lia- 
bility of the State until paid and canceled, consequently the State 
debt between 1856 and 1877, as shown in the following tables, will be 
$20,000 greater than the amount shown in reports of State Auditors 
during the same period. 

STATE DEBT, OCTOBER 1, 1866. 



Bank Stock— 5^ per cent . 2(Vyear bonds issued in 1837 ; $63 , 000 



Bank Stock~6 per cent. 25'year bonds issued in 1837-8 . . 
Capitol Bonds— 6 per cent. 25-year bonds issued in 1837-8. 



Temporary Loan Bonds of 1851— 6 per cent. 5-year bonds issued in 
1851 



Funding Bonds of 1853—6 per cent. 30-year bonds issued in 1853 
Total debt, October 1, 1 866 



299,000 
40,000 

20,000 
200,000 



$622,000 



No change occured in the bonded debt until June 1, 1659, when 
400 two-year bonds, amounting to $400,000, were issued and sold to the 
State Savings Association and the Boatmens' Savings Institution of St. 
Louis for the payment of interest due upon bonds loaned to the North 
Missouri and St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad Oompanies. On the 
12th of December, 1859, another issue of $400,000 in two-year bonds 
was hypothecated with said banks to seciire a loan of $400,000 neces- 
sitated by reason of the failure of the Pacific, North Missouri and St. 
Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad Oompanies to pay interest due on 



15S 



AUDITOR^S REPORT. 



State bonds loaned to said companies. The bonds so hypothecated 
were taken up and canceled February 18, 1860, or sixty days from the 
date of their issue. 



STATE DEBT, OCTOBER 1, 1860. 



Bank Stock-~5} per cent. 25-year bonds issued in 1837 

Bank Stock— 6 per cent. 25-year bonds issued in 1837-8 

Capitol Bond8-~6 per cent. 25-year bonds issued in 1837-8 

Temporary Loan Bonds of 1851—6 per cent. 5-year bonds issued in 
1851 s 

Funding Bonds of 1853--6 per cent. 30-year bonds issued in 1853 

. Railroad Interest Bonds— 6 per cent . 2 year bonds issued in 1860 

Total debt, October 1, 1860 



$63,000 

299,000 

40,000 

20,000 
200,000 
400,000 



$1,022,000 



The railroad interest bonds amounting to $400,000, which were is- 
sued in 1859, were retired June 1, 1861, that being the date of their 
maturity. For this purpose a further issue of railroad interest bonds, 
aggregating $431,000, was made June 1, 1861. These bonds bore 9 per 
cent, interest, and are elsewhere described. 

THE RAILROD DEBT. 

To aid in the construction of railroads, Missouri loaned its credit 
to the amount of $24,950,000, as follows : 



To the Pacific Railroad Company 

To the Pacific Railroad Company for its Southwestern Branch 

To the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad Company 

To the North Missouri Railroad Company 

To the St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad Company 

To the Cairo & Fulton Railroad Company 

To the Platte county Railroad Company 

Total 



$7,000,000 
4,500,000 
3,000,000 
5,500,000 
3,600,000 
660,000 
700,000 



$24,950,000 



The act of March 3, 1857, entitled "An act to amend *An act to 
secure the completion of certain railroads in this State, and for other 
purposes,' " approved December 10, 1855, provided that the failure of 
any company to pay any part of the principal or interest of the bonds 



STATISTICAL INFQBMATlOir. 159 



issued under said act when the same became due, shoald work a for- 
feiture of all right in such company to demaind and receive any further 
issue of bonds under that or any former act. By failing to pay matured 
interest, as required by the act of 1857, the North Missouri Eailroad 
Company forfeited $1,150,000 in bonds granted to said company, and 
for the same reason bonds amounting to $99,000 were forfeited by the 
St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad Company. 

In consequence of thesjB forfeitures, aggregating $1,249000, the 
total amount of State bonds actually issued and loaned to the several 
railroad companies aggregated 923,701,000, as presented in the follow- 
ing table : 



To the Pacific Railroad Company 

To the Pacific Railroad Company for its Southwestern Branch 

To the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad Company 

To the Vorth Missouri Railroad Company 

To the St. Louis & iron Mountain Railroad Company 

To the Cairo & Fulton Railroad Company 

To the Platte County Railroad Company 

Total amount of State bonds issued 



$7,000,000 
4,500,000 
3,000,000 
4,350,000 
3,601,000 
650,000 
700,000 



$23,701,000 



Failure on behalf of all the above named railroad companies, ex- 
cept the Hannibal & St. Joseph, to comply with the conditions upon 
which they received loans of the credit of the S(ate, resulted in fasten- 
ing upon the people an interest- bearing indebtedness of 920,701,000. 
On 97,851,000, or that portion of this debt representing bonds loaned to 
the North Missouri and St. Louis & Iron Mountain Eailroad Oom- 
panies, no interest has been paid by those companies since July 1, 
1858, and on the remainder no interest has been paid by the several 
companies since the first day of January, 1861. 

The magnitude of this debt and the various changes to which it 
has been subjected requires a more comprehensive review than that of 
any liability yet assumed by the State. Entertaining this view, a short 
account of its origin and subsequent history wili be presented in the 
following order : 

Firat — A synopsis of the acts of incorporation or charters of the 
several railroad companies to whom the State loaned its credit. 

Second — A synopsis of the acts of Congress donating to the State 
of Missouri public lands of the United States to aid in constructing 
certain railroads. 



160 auditor's report. 



Third — A synopsis of the acts of the General Assembly accepting 
the donation of lands granted by the United States. 

Fourth — A synopsis of the several acts of the General Assembly 
authorizing the issue of State bonds to aid in the constroction of rail- 
roads, followed by a description of the bonds issued, and an account of 
the forfeiture and sale of the railroads by the State. 

ACTS OF INCORPORATION. 

CHARTS a OF THE PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY* 

The Pacific Railroad Oompauy was incorporated by an act of the 
General Assembly, approved March 12, 1849, with an authorized capital 
slock of $10,000,000, to be divided into shares of $100 each. 

John O' Fallon, Louis V. Bogy, James H. Lucas, Edward Walsh, 
Geo. OoUier, Thomas B. Hudson, Daniel D. Page, Henry M. Shreve, 
James E. Yeatman, John B. Sarpy, Wayman Orow, Joshua B. Brant, 
Thomas Allen, Robert Campbell, Pierre Chouteau, junior, Henry 
Shaw, Bernard Pratte, Ernst Angelrodt, Adolphus Meyer, Lewis A. 
Benoist and Adam L. Mills, or any nine of them, constituted the first 
Board of Directors. Whenever two thousand shares of stock bad 
been subscribed the above named directors were required to cause an 
election to be held for nine directors for the ensuing year, and annually 
thereafter, on the last Monday in March, nine directors were to be 
elected and entrusted with governing the affairs of said company. 

This company was empowered to survey, locate and construct a 
railroad from the city of St. Louis to the City of Jefferson, and thence to 
some point on the western line of Van Buren, now Cass county, with 
a view that the same should be continued westwardly to the Pacific 
Ocean. By an amendment to the charter in 1851, the company was 
authorized to construct the road on any route leading from St. Louis 
to any point on the western line of the State, and for this purpose they 
were permitted to hold a right of way not exceeding one hundred feet 
wide, and sufficient land for depots, water stations, warehouses, etc. 
The company was required to commence the construction of their road 
within seven years, and to complete the same within ten years there- 
after. In addition to private subscriptions, county courts were author- 
ized to subscribe to the stock of said company, on behalf of counties, 
and to issue county bonds to pay for stock thus subscribed, and like 
power was given to the authorities of incorporated cities and towns, 
and to incorporated companies. The company also had power to bor> 
row money, issue bonds, and, subject to the prior lien of the State, to 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 161 



mortgage their corporate property aod franchises to secure the payment 
of any debt contracted m building and equipping their road. 

Work of constraction was be/e;un July 4, 1851, the first spadeful of 
earth being moved by Hon. Luther M. Eennett, then mayor of St. Louis. 
The first engine was placed upon the track in November, 1852, and 
passenger trains were run out to Cheltenham, five miles from St. Louis, 
before the close of thai year. The road was opened to Franklin (now 
Pacific) in July, 1853, to the City of Jefierson in March, 1856, to Tipton 
in July, 1858, to Sedalia in February, 1861, and to Kansas Oity, a dis- 
tance of 283^ miles, in October, 1865. 

From the report of the Board of Public Works, submitted in 1861, 
it is ascertained that the gross cost of the road between St. Louis and 
Otterville, a distance of 175 miles, was ^9,417,595.18, or $53,700 per 
mile, and that the acti^l cost of the same, including everything except 
rolling stock, general expenses, interest, exchange and discounts, was 
$7,717,186.35, or $43,847.65 per mile. Oost of rolling stock and 
machinery, ^56,481.60. 

OHABTKR OF THE HANNIBAL A BT. JOSEPH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

The act incorporating the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad Company 
was approved February 16, 1847. Those persons comprising the corpo- 
ration were Joseph Roubidoux, John Corby and Robert J. Boyd of 
Buchanan county ; samuel J. Harrison, Zachariah G. Draper and Eras, 
mus M. Moffett of Marion ; Alexander McMurtry of Shelby ; George 
A. Shortridge and Thomas Sharp of Macon ; Wesley Halliburton of 
Linn ; John Graves of Livingston ; Robert Wilson of Daviess and Geo 
W. Smith of Caldwell, togother with such other persons as might 
afterwards become stockholders in said company. This company was 
vested with power to construct a railroad from St. Joseph in fiuchanan 
county, to Palmyra in Marion county, and thence to ^Hannibal, and 
was subjected to the same restrictions and entitled to all the privi- 
leges, rights and immunities granted in the charter of the Louisiana & 
Columbia Railroad Company, which was approved Janury 27, 1837^ 
Its authorized capital stock was $2,000,000, increased by act of Febru- 
ary 24, 1853, to 1(5,000,000, which was to be divided into shares of $L00 
each. 

The company was given four years from the 12th of March, 1849, 
in which to commence the construction of their road. With reference 
to the right of way, government of the company, subscriptions to its 
capital stock by individuals, counties, incorporated cities, towns and 

B'P— 11 



162 auditor's repokt. 



companies, the power to borrow money, issne bonds, mortgage its cor- 
porate property and franchises, the charter of the Hannibal & St. Jo- 
seph Railroad Company and amendments thereto, contained similar 
provisions to .those found in the charter of the Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany. 

The contract for building the entire road was awarded to John Duflf, 
August 19, 1852, and on the 17th of March, 1854, an amended contract . 
was made with said Duff and associates. Work was commenced under 
this contract in the spring of 1853, but progressed slowly until 1855, after 
which it was prosecuted with vigor, and in February, 1859, the road was 
completed from Hannibal to St. Joseph, a distance of 206 8-10 miles. 

The total gross cost of this road to October 1, 1860, including equip- 
ment, engineering expenses ftnd contingencies, interest, discount, com- 
mission, exchange, etc., was $11,974,750.67, or $58,129.86 per mile. The 
actual cash cost of construction and equipment was 96,605,072.40, or 
$28,447.79 per mile. The cost of equipment was $744,827.15. The dis- 
cojint, commission and exchange amounted to $3,292,971.94, and the 

» 

whole expenditure for interest, discount, exchange and commission was 
$6,295,072.32. 

CHARTER OF THE NORTH MISSOURI RAILROAD COMPANY. 

A company known as the North Missouri Railroad Company, with 
an authorized capital stock of $6,000,000, to be divided into shares of 
$100 each, was incorporated March 3, 1851, The following named per- 
sons, or any nine of them, compnsed the first Board of Directors : 
David E. Pitman, Charles M. Johnson, William J. McElhiney, Benja- 
min A. Alderson, Arnold Krekel, Ludwell E. Powell, Robert H. Parks, 
Andrew King and Robert Frazier of St. Oharles county, John A. Pal- 
liam and Thomas J. Marshall of Warren, Charles B Harper and James 
H. Robinson of Montgomery, Jefferson F. Jones and John Harrison of 
Callaway, R. C. Calhoun and B. Z. Uffutt of Audrain, William H. Par- 
cels and James C. Goode of Adair, George A.Shortridge and Benjamin 
Sharp of Macon, Dabney Garth, John McCampbell and Hancock Jack- 
son of Randolph county. This company was clothed with power to 
survey, locate and build a railroad from the city of St. Charles in 
St. Charles county, passing along the divide between the tributaries of 
the Mississippi and Missouri rivers as near as may be to the northern 
bounary line of this State with a view to its ultimate extension into 
the State of Iowa. By an amendment to the charter approved Janu- 
ary 7, 1853, this company was authorized to continue the road from 
the city of St. Charles to any point in the city of St. Louis. The tran- 
chises granted by the charter regarding right of way, subscriptions 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 163 



to its capital stock, government of the company, etc., were substan- 
tially the same granted in the acts incorporating the Pacific and Han- 
nibal & St. Joseph Railroad companies. Work on the construction of 
the road was to commence within nine years from the approval of the 
charter, and twenty years thereafter the company were required to 
the same completed. 

The first Board of Directors elected by the stockholders was or- 
ganized June 11th, 1853, and surveys were commenced at North 
Market street in St. Louis, on the fourth of July following. The work 
of construction began in the sprin of 1854, and *the first division of the 
road from St. Louis to the Missouri river opposite St Charles was com- 
pleted on the 15th of August, 1855, and on the 20th of the same month 
was opened for the use of the public. In July, 1857, the road was com- 
pleted as far as Warrenton, to Mexico in May, 1858, to Moberly Novem- 
ber 30th, 1858, to Macon in February, 1859, and to the State line at 
Coatesville in Schuyler county, in 1868, a distance of 236.75 miles. The 
total amount expended by the company in building the road from St* 
Louis to Macon was $5,866,677.68 ; the actual cost of construction and 
equipment was $5,310,495.85. Cost of equipment, $393,316.99. Gross 
cost per mile was $34,765.01. The actual cash cost per mile, including 
engineering, equipments, machinery and tools, machine shops, engine 
houses, land damages, real estate, printing, stationery, etc., was 
$31,469.01. 



V 



CHARTEB OF THE ST. LOUIS AND IRON MOUNTAIH RAILROAD OOHPANT. 

By an act approved March 3d, 1851, the St. Louis & Iron Mountain 
Railroad company was incorporated with an authorized capital of 
$6,000,000, to be divided into shares of $100 each. James Harrison, 
Bernard Pratte, Felix Valle, Andrew Ohristy, John O'Fallon, Hudson 
£. Bridge, Samuel Gaty, William Palin, James H. Lucas, Henry W. 
Grow, James A. Bryan, Oharles Rankin and William M. McPherson, or 
a majority of them, constituted the first Board of Directors. This com- 
pany was granted power to construct a railroad from any point within 
the city of St. Louis, or from some point on the Pacific railroad, run- 
ning thence to the Iron Mountain and Pilot Knob, or to the vicinty of 
either of said points, and to extend the same at any time within tan 
years to the Mississippi river at Oape Girardeau or at any point below 
that city within the limits of the State, or to the suthwestern part of the 
State, and for the purpose of such extension in either direction they 
were authorized to increase their capital stock to any amount neces- 



164 auditor's report. 



sary. The act incorporating the St. Louis & Belleview Mineral Rail- 
road company, approved January 25th, 1837, was revived and made a 
part of the charter of this company. The charter contained provisions 
similar to those of the Pacific charter concerning the government of 
the company, subscriptions to its capital stock, issuing bonds, borrow- 
ing money and mortgaging corporate property to secure payment of 
sums borrowed. The company was required to organize within two 
years and commence the construction of the road within six years from 
the date of approval of the charter. An organization of the stock- 
holders was effected January 4th, 1853, and the work of construction 
began in November of the same year. The first locomotive was placed 
on the road in 1856, and in 1858 the track was laid and the road oper- 
ated to Pilot Knob, a distance of 86^ miles. The gross cost of the road 
and equipment, as reported by the Board of Public Works in 1859, was 
$5,892,377.51. Actual cash cost of construction and equipment was 
94,177,720.01. Expenditures in discounts, commissions, interest and 
exchange amounted to $1,214,657.50. The gross original cost of the 
road per mile was $56,174.00. Actual cash cost for construction and 
equipment, $43,517.90 per mile. Oost of equipment, $322,524.96. The 
Potosi Branch, 3.65 miles in length, cost $67,223.70. 

CHARTER OF TUB CAIRO AND FULTON RAILROAD COMPANY. 

The Oairo & Fulton Railroad Company organized December 
30th, 1853, under the general railroad law, entitled ^' An act to author- 
ize the formation of railroad associations and to regulate the same,'' 
approved February 24th, 1853. Its capital stock was $1,500,000, to be 
divided into shares of $25 each. This company was authorized to con- 
struct a railroad from a point on the Mississippi, opposite the mouth of 
the Ohio river, to the northern boundary line of Arkansas, about 78 
miles, where it was to connect with the Oairo & Fulton Railroad of 
Arkansas, which was to be constructed by way of Little ROck to the 
Texas boundary line near Fulton in Arkansas, with branches from 
Little Rock to the Mississippi river and to Fort Smith. Oounty courts 
and the authorities of incorporated cities and towns were authorized 
to subscribe to its capital stock, and general power was granted the 
company to issue bonds, borrow money and mortgage the road and 
lands donated by the United States to secure the payment of the sums 
borrowed. Work was commenced in 1858, and in 1860 the road was 
completed from Bird's Point, opposite Oairo, to Sikeston, in Scott 
county, a distance of 26^ miles, but it was not until September, 1873, 
after the extension of the Arkansas Branch of the St. Louis & Iron 
Mountain Railroad had been completed to the Arkansas line, that the 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 165 

Cairo & Fulton was opened from Bird's Point to Poplar Bluff. Oross 
cost of construction and equipment, as reported November 1, 1859, in- 
cluding interest, commission and discount, $842,673.53. Actual cash 
cost of canstruction and equipment, including office furniture and ex- 
penses, incidental and other expenses in classifying lands donated by 
the United States and counties was $703,868.17. Gash cost of construc- 
tion and equipment, $595,897.04. Oost of classifying lands, office fur- 
niture, incidental expenses, etc., $107,966.13. Interest, discounts and 
commission, $246,776.49. 

GHABTEB OF THE PLATTE OOUNTY BAILKOAD COMPANY. 

The Platte County Railroad Company was incorporated by an act 
of the General Assembly, approved February 24, 1853, with an author- 
ized capital stock of $2,000,000, divided into shares of S50 each. This 
company was vested with power to construct a railroad from the western 
terminus of the Pacific Railroad, in Jackson county, to the town of St. 
Joseph, in Buchanan county, with the privilege of extending it to the 
northern boundary line of the State. 

It was required to commence the construction of the road within 
five years, and to complete the same within ten years thereafter. A 
meeting of the stockholders was held at St. Joseph on the 29th of Oc- 
tober, 1857, and an organization of the company effected. Fart of the 
line was located and surveys commenced before the 20th of February, 
1858, or within the time prescribed by the charter. By an act of the 
General Assembly, approved December 11, 1855, the Atchison & St. 
Joseph Riilroad Company was incorporated with power to build a 
railroad from a point opposite the town of Atchison, in the Territory of 
Kansas, to the city of St. Joseph, in Buchanan county, a distance of 
about nineteen miles. On the 29th of April, 1859, the Weston & Atchi- 
son Railroad Company, as provided in the general railroad law, filed 
articles of association in the office of the Secretary of State. This cor- 
poration had for its object the construction of a railroad from the city 
of Weston, in Platte county, to the town of Winthrop, in Buchanan 
county, opposite the city of Atchison, in the Territory of Kansas', 
about fifteen and one-half miles in length. The Platte County Rail- 
road, south of St. Joseph, was located upon the right of way and unfin- 
ished road-bed of these last named corporations, which formed a con- 
tinuous line from St. Joseph down the Missouri river valley to Weston, 
in Platte county, a distance of about thirty-four and one-half miles. 
In July, 1859, the Atchison & St. Joseph and Weston & Atchison Rail- 
road Companies conveyed to the Platte County Railroad Company the 



166 auditor's report. 



right of way and road-bed of these companies in consideration that the 
Platte County Railroad Company would iron and equip the same. The 
road was completed and operated in I860 from Weston to SU Joseph, 
forty-four and one-half miles, but the entire main line from Harlem, 
opposite Kansas City, to the State line, was not finished until 1868. 

By an act of the General Assembly, approved March 23, 1863, the 
name of this company was changed to that of the ^^ Platte Country 
Bailroad Company." 

' ACTS OF OONGRBSS GRAKTING LANDS. 

By virtue of an act of Congress, approved June 10, 1852, entitled 
'^An act granting the right of way to the State of Missouri and a por- 
tion of the public lands to aid iii the construction of certain railroads 
in said State," the United States granted the right of way to the State 
of Missouri for the construction of railroads from the town of Hannibal 
to the town of St. Joseph, and from the city of St. Louis to a point on 
the western boundary line of the State, and to aid in the construction 
of these railroads a further grant of every alternate section of land, 
designated by even numbers, for six sections in width on each side of 
said roads. 

Whenever it happened that the United States had sold any section 
or part thereof at the time of locating said roads, or that the right of pre- 
emption had attached to the same, then other lands were to be selected 
in lieu of those sold, or to which pre-emption rights had attached. 

The act of Congress, approved February 9, 1853, made a like grant 
of land to the States of Arkansas and Missouri for the construction of 
a railroad from a point on the Mississippi river, opposite the mouth of 
the Ohio, in the State of Missouri, by way of Little Rock to the Texas 
boundary line, near Fulton, in Arkansas, with branches from Little 
Bock to the Mississippi river and to Fort Smith in said State. 

ACTS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY ACCEPTING LANDS DONATED BY THE UNITED 

STATES. 

It was provided in an act of the General Assembly of this State, 
approved September 20, 1862, that all that portion of the lands granted 
to this State by an act of Congress, approved June 10, 1852, so far as 
the same are applicable to the construction of a railroad from the town 
of Hannibal to the town of St. Joseph, in this State, and which may be 
selected and located in conformity with its provisions, together with 
all the rights and privileges thereto belonging or in said act granted, 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 167 

shall vest in full and complete title in the Hannibal & St. Joseph Rail- 
road Company. 

The lands granted by the United States for constructing a railroad 
from the city of St. Louis to the western boundary line of the State 
were accepted by the State and the title thereto vested in the Pacific 
Railroad Company through an act of the General Assembly, approved 
December 25, 1852. This act authorized the location and constraction 
of the Southwestern Branch of the Pacific Railroad, which was re- 
quired to be built from a point on the main line, east of the Osage 
river, to any point on the western boundary line of the State south of 
the Osage river. The Pacific Railroad Company Were required to ap- 
ply the lands granted as aforesaid to the construction of the main line 
from its commencement in St. Louis to a point of divergence there- 
from of its Southwestern Branch, wl^ch is now the town of Pacific, and 
the remainder of said lands to the said Southwestern Branch, so that 
said lands should be applied to the construction of a railroad from St. 
Lonis to the western boundary of the State, south of the Osage river, 
as contemplated by the act of Congress donating the same. 

The lands in this State granted by the United States for construct- 
ing a railroad from a point on the Mississippi opposite the mouth of the 
Ohio, to Fulton, in the State of Arkansas, were accepted by the State 
of Missouri in an act of the General Assembly, approved February 20, 
1855, and the title thereto vested in the Cairo & Fulton^ailroad Com- 
pany. At their own expense, and through an agent or agents appointed 
by the Governor, the selection and location of lands thus accepted were 
vested in the railroad companies, and in consideration of the grants 
and privileges thereby conferred each company was obligated, as soon 
as its road had been completed, opened and operated and a dividend 
had been declared, to pay an annual tax upon its road-bed, buildings, 
machinery, engines, cars and other property equal to that levied by 
the State on other real and personal property of like value. 

For the purpose of raising funds to build and equip their roads, 
each company was authorized to sell said lands in the manner pre- 
scribed by the acts of Congress or mortgage the same to secure the 
payment of bonds which they were empowered to issue. 

The following table will show the number of acres selected and 
located by each company, as reported by the Board of Public Works 
in 1860 : 



16S auditor's report. 



Pacific Railroad Company | 127,096.84 acres 



Pacific Railroad Company for its Southwestern Branch 

Hannibal A St. Joseph Railroad Company. 

Cairo & Fulton Railroad Company , 

Total land grants by Congress 



1,040,000.00 '' 

601,329.39 *' 

56,007.93 •* 



1.824,434.16 acres 



ACTS OF THE GKNBRAL ASSEMBLY GRANTING STATE AID. 

As a condition precedent to the delivery of State -bonds to any 
railroad company, a certificate of acceptance, attested by the corporate 
seal of the company, and the signature of its president, was required 
to be filed in the ofSce of the Secretary of State. 

When a certificate of acceptance had been executed and filed by 
any company, as aforesaid, it became a mortgage to the people of Mis- 
souri upon every part and section of their railroad and its appurten- 
ances to secure payment of the principal and interest of the sums of 
money for which such bonds were issued and accepted. Satisfactory 
evidence, approved by the Attorney-General, had to be furnished to 
the Governor that no prior lien or incumbrance had been created or 
existed on the road of the company applying for bonds. 

The earlier acts provided for the isffue and delivery of bonds in in- 
stallments of 950,000. Whenever any company to whom the State had 
loaned its credit produced satisfactory evidence to the Governor, at- 
tested by the afiidavit of its treasurer and two directors, that the sum 
of $50,000 collected on its capital stock had been expended by them in 
the survey, location and construction of their railroad, then he was 
directed to cause to be issued and delivered to said company bonds of 
the State to the amount of $50,000. After the expenditure of $50,000 
realized from the sale of State bonds and the production of like proof 
that they had expended the further sum of 950,000 of their own money 
in the actual construction of their road, another issue of $50,000 in 
State bonds was to be delivered to the company. In like manner as 
often as any company, from time to time, furnished evidence that 
they bad expended of their own money further sums of not less than 
$50,000 each, in constructing their road, and that they had also ex- 
pended the entire proceeds derived from sales of bonds previously 
issued by the State, the Governor was required to issue and deliver to 
the company further State bonds to the amount of $50,000 each time* 
This provision was modified by the act of December 10, 1855, so as to 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 169 

allow each company an amount in bonds equal to twice the amount of 
their own money proven to have been invested in the construction and 
equipment of their road; and subsequent modilScations authorized the 
issue and delivery of bonds without evidence of the expenditure of 
other resources of the company. 

Each company was required to make provision for the punctual re- 
demption of the bonds loaned to it, and for the payment of interest 
accruiog thereon, so as to preserve the State from loss, and to prevent 
advances of money by the State for such purposes. In addition to this 
requirement the faith and credit of the State were pledged for the pay- 
ment of interest and redemption of the principal of all bonds issued 
to railroad companies. 

Should any railroad company default in paying either interest or 
principal, or any part thereof, no other bonds could be issued to such 
delinqaent company, but it was made lawful for the Governor, first 
giving six months' notice of the time and place of sale, to sell the road 
of such defaulting company and all of its appurtenances^ to the highest 
bidder, at public auction, or buy the same at such sale for the use and 
benefit of the State, subject to such disposition as the Legislature might 
thereafter direct. 

Excepting the seven per cent, construction or guarantee bonds 
issued under acts of December 10, 1855, and March 3, 1857, for the 
construction of the Southwestern Branch of the Pacific Railroad, all 
State bonds loaned to the several railroad companies were either 
straight twenty or thirty-year bonds, redeemable at the pleasure of the 
General Assembly at any time after the expiration of twenty or thirty 
years from the dates when issued, and bore interest at the rate of six 
per centum per annum, payable semi-annually, in the city of New 
York on the first days of January and July of each year. 

The act of December 10, 1855, empowered the Pacific Railroad 
Oompany to issue bonds to an amount not exceeding 910,000,000, the 
proceeds arising from their sale to be applied solely in constructing its 
Southwestern Branch. 

To secure payment of these bonds said company was authorized to 
mortgage the Southwest Branch and all the lands donated by the 
United States to the State of Missouri, and by the State to the Pacific 
Railroad Oompany for constructing the Southwest Branch. 

Payment of the interest and principal of ^3,000,000 in seven per 
cent, bonds issued as aforesaid was guaranteed by the State of Mis- 
souri, in manner and fopm as follows : 



170 auditor's kbport. 



FORM OF GUARANTBB. 

^^ This witnesseth that the State of Missouri, bv virtue of an act 
of the Legislature of said State, approved December 10, 1855, and for 
good and valid considerations, has and hereby does guarantee the 
faithful payment of the interest and principal secured by the within 
bond, at the time and times, and at the place named in said bond. 

^' It being the intention of the said State fully to assume the 
prompt, full and ample payment of the within bond, and to make it 
the obligation of this State, and to pledge the faith of the State to the 
payment thereof as fully and perfectly in all respects as though the 
same had been the original undertaking of the State, which original 
undertaking the State hereby fully assumes." 

By virtue of an act approved March 3, 1857, amendatory of the act 
of December 10, 1855, the amount of guarantee bonds was increased to 
$4,500,000. Under these acts the amount of seven per cent, bonds 
issued was $3,800,000. For some reason guaranteed seven per cent, bonds 
would not sell as readily as direct sixes. To obviate this difficulty the 
first section of the act of November 19, 1857, provided for the issue of 
$700,000 direct six per cent, bonds in lieu of a like amount of seven 
per cent, guaranteed bonds that had been authorized but not issued. 

The third section of said act also required the Pacific Railroad 
Company to deliver lo the State Treasurer all guaranteed seven per 
cent, bonds held or controlled by said company in lieu of which a like 
amount of six per cent, bonds were to be issued and delivered to the 
company. Under the provisions of this section $568,000 guaranteed 
bonds were exchanged. 

It was also provided in the act approved March 2, 1861, that any 
person holding guarscnteed bonds might, within five years, deliver the 
same to the State Treasurer, and be entitled to receive in exchange 
therefor an equal number of direct bonds of the State bearing interest 
at the rate ot six per cent. As contemplated in the acts of November 
19, 1857, and March 2, 1861, the sum of $1,889,000 in seven per cent, 
guaranteed bonds were exchanged for an equal amount of direct sixes, 
leaving outstanding $1,911,000 in guaranteed bonds. 

The fourth section of the act of March 3, 1857, provided that in case 
the Pacific Railroad Company failed to complete its Southwest Branch 
from Franklin (now Pacific) to Springfield, in four years from the pas- 
sage of said act, or to pay all intere^ t accruing on its guaranteed bonds, 
then the Southwest Branch, its lands, appurtenances and franchises 
became at once, by operation of law, and without any process or pro- 
ceeding, the property of the State. Failure of the Pacific Railroad 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



171 



Oompany to comply with these provisions subsequently resulted in the 
Southwest Branch becoming State property by mere operation of law. 
As shown by the bond register on file in this oflSce, I present in 
the following table a correct description of all State bonds issued to 
railroad companies, for the payment of which the State became liable * 

DESCRIPTION OF STATE BONDS ISSUED TO RAILROAD COMPANIES. 



No.of 
bonds 



Description. 



Amount 
issued. 



PACIFIC RAILROAD BONDS. | 

2,000 Six per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered. 
1 to 2,000, issued under ^'An act to expedite the 
construction of the Pacific and Hannibal & St. 
Joseph Railroads,*' approved February 22, 1861, 
interest payable semi-annually on the first days 
of January and July at Phoenix Bank in New 
York $2,000,000 

1,000, Six per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered; 
2,001 to 3,000, issued under *^An act to accept a 
grant of land made to the State of Missouri by 
the Congress of the United States, to aid in the 
construction of certain railroads in the State and' 
to apply a portion thereof to the Pacific Rail-' 
roaa/' approved December 25, 1852, interest pay-' 
able semi-annually on the first days of January | 
and July at Phoenix Bank in New York 



Aggregate 
amount to 
each com- 
pany. 



1,000,000 



1,000 Six per cent 30-year bonds of $1 ,000 each, numberedj 
I 3,001 to 4,000, issued under ''An act to secure! 
the .completion of certain railroads in this State," 
approved December 10, 1855, interest payable 
semi-annually on the first days of January and 
July at Phoenix Bank in New York. These bondsi 
were first granted to the Southwest Branch by 
the 9th section of the act of Dec. 25, 1852, but 
were transferred to the Pacific Main Line by act 
' of Dec. 10, 1855 

2,000,Six per cent. 30-year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 
4,001 to 6,000, issued under *'An act to secure 
the completion of certain railroads in this State,", 
approved December 10, 1855, interest payable' 
semi-annually on first days of January and July, 
at Phoenix Bank in New York 



1,000 



1,000,000 



2,000,000 



Six per cent. 30-year bonds of $1, 000 each, numbered 
6.001 to 7,000, issued under the act of March 3, 
1857, entitled ^*An act to amend ^An act to secure 
the completion of certain railroads in this State,", 
approved December 10, 1855, interest payable 
semi-annually on the first days of January and 
July in each year 



1,000,000 



$7,000 000 



172 



auditor's report. 



DESCRIPTION OF STATE BONDS— Continukd. 



No.of 
bonds 



f 



Description. 



PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANT— SOUTHWEST BRANCH. 

1,911 Seven per cent, bonds of 91,000 each, payable July 
1, 1876, issued under act of Decern oer 10, 1855, 
entitled '* An act to secure the completion of cer- 
tain railroads in this State," and the act amend- 
atory, approved March 3, 1857, interest payable 
first days of January and July at American Ex- 
change Bank in New York 

700 Direct six per cent 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, is- 
sued in lieu of guarantee bonds under section one 
of the act of Nov. 19, 1857, entitled ''An act sup- 
plemental to an act to amend 'An act to secure 
the completion of certain railroads in this State, 
and for other purposes,' '* approved March 3. 1857. 
interest pay able on first days of January and 
July at Bank of Commerce in New York, 

668 Six per cent, bonds of $1,000 each, issued under sec- 
tion 3 of the act of Nov. 19, 1857, in exchange for 
guarantee seven per cent, bonds, interest payable 
on first days of January and July at Bank of 
Commerce in New York I 



,321 



1,500 



1,600 



1,950 



Six per cent, bonds of $1 ,000 each, issued in exchange] 
forguarantee seven per cent, bonds under act of 
March 2, 1861, entitled "An act concerning the 
bonds of the Pacific Railroad, guaranteed by the 
State," interest payable on first days of January 
and July at Bank of Commerce in New York. . . 

HANNIBAL 9s ST. JOSEPH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Six per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 
1 to 1,500, issued under act of February 22, 1851, 
entitled '^An act to expedite the construction of 
the Pacific Railroad and of the Hannibal & St. Jo- 
seph Railroad," interest payable semi-annually 
on first days of Januarv and July at American 
Exchange Bank, New York 

Six per cent. 30-year bonds of Sl,000each, numbered 
1,501 to 3,000, issued under act of December 10, 
1855, entitled '^ An act to secure the completion 
of certain railroads in this State," interest pay- 
able semi annually on first days of January and 
Julv at Bank of Commerce in New STork. 



NORTH MISSOURI RAILROAD COMPANY 

Six percent. 20-year bonds of *S1, 000 each, numbered 
Ito 1,127,1,242 to 1,323, 1,524 to 1,725,2,412 to 
2,709 and 2,910 to 3,150, issued under act of Dec. 
23, 1852, entitled '^An act to expedite the con- 
struction of the North Missouri Railroad, inter- 
est payable semi-annually on the first days of 
January and July at Phoenix Bank in New York. 



Amount 
issued. 



$1,911,000 



Aggregate 
amount to 
each com- 
pany. 



700,000 



568,000 



1,321,000 



$1,500,000 



1,600,000 



1,950,000 



$4,500,000 



3,000,000 



8TATISTI0AL INFORMATION. 



173 



DESCKIPTION OP STATE BONDS.— Continukd. 



No.of| 
bonds 



Description. 



2,400 Six per cent. 30-year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 
1,128 to 1,241. 1,324 to 1,623, 1,726 to 2,411, 2,710 
to 2,909 and 3.151 to 4,350, issued under act of 
December 10, ld55, entitled *^ An act to secure the 
completion of certain railroads in this State," 
and the act of March 3, 1857, amendatory of the 
act of December 10, 1855, interest payable semi- 
annually at Poenix Bank in New York 



8T. LOUIS tc IRON MOUNTAIN RAILROAD COMPANY. 

l,600|Six per cent 20-7ear bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 
1 to 1,500, issued under an act approyed Decem- 
ber 25, 1852, entitled *^An act to expedite the 
construction of the Iron Mountain Branch of the 
Pacific Railroad,'* and the act of February 23, 
1853, entitled *' An act explanatory and amenda- 
tory of an act to expedite the construction of the 
Iron Mountain Branch of the Pacific Railroad, 
approved December 25. 1852," interest payable 
semi-annually on the first days of January and 
July at Pcenix Bank, New York 

1,600 Six per cent. 30-year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 
1,501 to 3,000, issued under act of December 10, 
1855, entitl«»d ^^An act to secure the completion 
of certain railroads in this State," interest paya- 
ble semi-annually on the first days of January 
and July ac Phcenix Bank, New ^ork 

276 Six per cent. 30-year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 
3,001 to 3,276, issued under act of March 3, 1857, 
entitled ^^An act to amend ^An act to secure the 
completion of certain railroads in this State,' " 
approyed December 10. 1855, interest payable 
first days of January ana July, at Phoenix Bank 
in New York 



Amount 
issued. 



$2,400,000 



$1,600,000 



Aggregate 
amount to 
each com- 
pany. 



$4,360,000 



1,500,000 



225 



Six per cent 30-year bonds of $1 ,000 each, numbered 
3,277 to 3,501, issued under act of March 9, 1859, 
entitled **An act in relation to the St. Louis & 
Iron Mountain Railroad Company,'' interest 
payable firnt days of January and July at Phoenix 
Bank, New York 



26aSix 



CAIRO Si FULTON RAILROAD COMPANY. 

?er cent. 20-year bonds of 81 ,000 each, numbered 
to 260, issued under act of December 11, 1855, 
entitled ^* An act to expedite the construction of 
the Cairo & Fulton Railroad of Missouri," inter- 
est payable first days of January and July at 
Phoenix Bank, New \ ork 



400 Six per cent. 30-year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 
251 to 650, issued under act of March 3, 1857, en- 
titled ^ ^ An act to amend an act to secure the 
completion of certain railroads in this State, and 
for other purposes.*' interest payable first days 
of January and July at Phoenix Bank, New York 



276,000 



226,000 



$250,000 



400,000 



3,501,000 



660,000 



174 



auditor's report. 



DESCRIPTION OF STATE BONDS— Contikukd. 



No/of 
bonds 



DeBcription . 



PLATTE COUNTY RAILROAD COMPANY. 



700!Sixper cent. 30-year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered I 
1 to 700, issued under act of March 3, 1857, en- 
titled '*An act to amend ^ An act to decure the 
completion of certain railroads in this State,' 
and for other purposes,'* interest payable semi- 
annually on the first days of January and July 
at American Exchange Bank, New York. 



23,701 



Total amount of State bonds issued to R. R. Go's 



Amount 
issued. 



Aggregate 
amount to 
each com- 
pany. 



$700,000 



$700,000 



$23,701,000 



NoTE.~The total amount of bonds authorized to be issued to the North Mis- 
souri Railroad Company was $5,500,000. Of this amount $1,150,000 became for- 
feited because of non-payment of interest. For like reason, thA St. Louis & Iron 
Mountain Railroftd Company forfeited $d9,000 of the $3,600,000 authorized to be 
issued to that company. # 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



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176 auditor's report. 



FORFEITURE AND SALE OF RAILROADS BY THE STATE. 

Of all the railroad companies to whom the State loaned its bonds 
the Hannibal & St. Joseph was the only company that promptly paid 
interest accruing thereon, and otherwise complied with the conditions 
upon which it received loans of the credit of the State. 

Failure on behalf of the remaining companies to provide for inter- 
est and to comply with other conditions upon which they accept«(^ 
State aid resulted in their roads and franchises being forfeited to the 
State and in fastening upon the people of Missouri an interest bearing 
debt of *20,701,000. 

The dates when each railroad became delinquent for non-payment 
of interest is given as follows : 

North Missouri Railroad Company — Default in payment of inter- 
est due January 1, 1859. 

St Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad Company —Default in pay- 
ment of interest due January 1, 1859. 

Pacific Railroad Company — ^Default in payment of interest due 
January 1 1860. 

Southwest Branch — Default in payment of interest due July 1, 
1861. 

Cairo & Fulton Railroad Company — Default for interest due Jan- 
nary 1, 1860. 

Platte Country Railroad Company — Default for interest due July 
1, 1861. 

SALE OF THE PLATTE COUNTRY RAILROAD. 

As provided in the act of February 12, 1864, entitled "An act or- 
dering the sale oi the Platte Country Railroad and for other purposes,^' 
notice was given by Governor Willard P. Hall that said railroad and 
its appurtenances would be sold at public auction at the court house 
door in the city of St. Joseph on the 5th day of September, 1864 In 
accordance with this notice the Platte Country Railroad was offered for 
sale and the State of Missouri became its purchaser for the sum of 
J847,000 The Governor appointed J. T. K. Haywood an agent to oper- 
ate the road north of St. Joseph for the State until the Governor or 
Gsneral Assembly might otherwise direct. 

It will be remembered that the Platte Country Railroad south of 
St Joseph was located upon the unfinished road-bed and right of way 
of the Atchison & St. Joseph and Weston & Atchison Railroad Com- 
panies, and that in 1859 said companies conveyed their franchises to the 





STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 177 



Platte Country Railroad Company in consideration of an agreement of 
the latter company to finieh, iron and equip a road, on the right of 
way granted from St. Joseph to Weston, in Platte county. 

About thirty days before the day fixed for the sale of the Platte 
Country Railroad the directors thereof discovered, or pretended to dis- 
cover, that the conveyances which had been made in 1859 by the Atchi- 
son & St. Joseph and Weston & Atchison Railroad Companies were 
void, and that all the rights and franchises which had ever belonged to 
these companies were vested in them still, together with the iron that 
had been placed on the right of way by the Platte Country Company. 
The directors accordingly turned over all that portion of the Platte 
Country Railroad south of St. Joseph, and as far as Weston to the At- 
chison & St. Joseph and Weston and Atchison Companies^ 

Governor Uall regarded these proceedings as being illegal and un- 
just, and soon thereafter employed Messrs. VoriesA Woodson to insti- 
tute suit to recover the Platte Country Railroad and appurtenances 
south of St. Joseph. By virtue of an act approved February 10,1865, 
the Governor was required to take immediate possession of the road, 
and to appoint a commissioner and superintendent to operate the same 
until otherwise disposed of by the General Assembly. 

• On the 18th of February, 1865, another act was approved, having 
for its object a compromise of the litigation between the State and the 
Atchison & St. Joseph and Weston & Atchison Companies, and to 
secure the payment of State bonds loaned to the Platte Country Rail- 
road Company. 

. The first section of this act provided that said companies should 
pay to the State of Missouri $434,000 in four installments with six per 
cent, semi-annual interest on each installment from January 1, 1865. 
Payments were to be made as follows : 



First installment, January 1, 1866.. . 
Second installment, January 1, 1868. 
Third Installment, January 1, 1871 . 
Fourth Installment, January 1, 1875. 
Total 



$100,000 

.100,000 

100,000 

134,000 



$434,000 



The seventh section authorized the sale of the Platte Country 
Railroad to these companies for an additional sum of $434,000, to be 
paid in two installments with six per cent, interest thereon from Jan- 
uary 1, 1865, as follows : 

8 P— 12 



178 auditor's rrport. 



First installment to be paid January 1, 1866 $200,000 

Second installment to be paid January 1, 1869 j 2^.000 

Total I $434,000 



The amount of State bonds loaned to the Platte Country Railroad 
Company was $700,000, on which no interest had been paid by the com- 
pany since January 1st, 1861. Thus it will be seen that the amount of 
principal and interest for which the company became responsible Jan- 
uary Ist, 18H5, was $868,000, or the precise sum fixed upon by the Oen- 
eral Assembly as the basis of compromise between the State and the 
Atchison & St. Joseph and Weston & Atchison Companies. 

To secure the State in the prompt payment of the debt created by 
the act of February ]8th| 1865, and interest thereon, it was provided 
that when said companies filed in the office of the Secretary of State 
their acceptances of the provisions of the act, such acceptance should 
be deemed and held a mortgage upon their roads, appurtenances and 
franchises from Kansas City to the Iowa line. If at any time the com- 
panies defaulted in paying either interest or principal of the debt, then 
the G-overnor was empowered, without any proceeding or process in 
law or equity, to take possession of said roads and sell the same to the 
highest bidder. 

Within thirty days, the time specified, each company filed in the 
oflSce of the Secretary of State its acceptance of the provisions of said 
act, and thereupon the suit instituted by the State was dismissed, and 
all the right, title and interest of the State in and to said roads were 
vested in the Atchison & St. Joseph and Weston & Atchison compa- 
nies on the conditions and terms named in the compromise. These 
companies defaulted in paying the first installment due under the 
compromise of 1865, and thereupon and as provided in the. act of Feb- 
ruary 19th, 1866, entitled ^^An act to provide for the sale of certain 
railroads," etc., G-overnor Fletcher caused the Platte Country Railroad 
to be igain advertised for sale April 21st, 1866. 

Before the day fixed for sale the Atchison & St. Joseph and Wes- 
ton & Atchison companies paid $100,000 in State bonds and coupons, 
that amount being the first installment due January 1st, 1866, and ac- 
crued interest on the debt owing by said companies. The sale was 
then postponed. 

By virtue of an act approved March 8th, 1867, the name of the 
Atchison & St. Joseph Railroad Company was changed to that of the 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 179 



Missoari Valley Railroad Oompany, and the Weston & Atchison Oom- 
pany was authorized to consolidate with and become merged in the 
Missoari Valley Railroad Company. The consolidation was effected 
and the Missouri Valley Railroad Company became vested with all the 
rights, privileges, immunities and iranchises of the former companies 
and assamed all the liabilities. By the act of March 17th, 1868, en- 
titled ^^ An act to aid the Missouri Valley Railroad Company," that 
company in consideration of the constroction of its road up the valley 
of the One Hundred and Two river to the Iowa line, and from Leaven- 
worth City to a point opposite Kansas City was virtually released of 
all liabilites to the State which it had assumed. 

BALE OF THE ST. LOUIS & IRON MOUNTAIN AND CAIRO & FULTON RAILROADS* 

The St. Louis & Iron Mountain and Cairo & Fulton railroads were 
advertised for sale under the act of March 19th, 1866, entitled ^^ An act 
to provide for the sale of certain railroads and property by the Gov- 
ernor, to foreclose the State's lien thereon, and to secure an early com- 
pletion of the Southwest Branch Pacific, the Platte Country, the St. 
Louis & Iron Mountain and Cairo & Fulton railroads of Missouri.'' 

The conditions upon which such sales were made are given as fol- 
lows: That one-fourth of the purchase money should be paid on clos- 
ing the contract and the remainder in five equal annual installments 
with six per cent, interest on deferred payments. 

That^the St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad should be finished to 
a point south of Pilot Knob, to connect with the Cairo & Fulton line, 
in three yeurs, and finished to the Mississippi river, opposite to or be- 
low Columbus, Kentucky, in five years after the date of sale of said 
road, and the purchasers of said road were required to expend in each 
and every year between the date of sale and the completion of the 
road, at least $500,000 in work of gradation, masonry or superstructure 
on said extension. 

That the Cairo & Fulton Railroad should be completed from the 
Mississippi river, opposite Cairo, to the intersection of the St. Louis & 
Iron Mountain Railroad line within three years after the date of sale 
thereof. 

As provided in said act the St. Louis & Iron Mountain road was 
advertised for sale on the 27th of September, 1866, and the Cairo & 
Fulton on the first of October in that year* The commissioners ap- 
pointed under said act attended the sale ot these roads and bid in the 
same for the use and benefit of the State, the price bid being the 
amount of the liens held by the State thereon. 



180 auditor's rkpobt. 



On the 14th of November, 1866, they were sold by the commis- 
sioners to A. J. Mackay, John C. Yogel, Samuel Simmons and Joseph 
0. Read, for $900,000, the St. Louis & Iron Mountain bringing $650,000 
and the Oairo & Fulton $350,000. Upon closing their contract with the 
Boards of Commissioners entrusted with the sale of said roads the pur- 
chasers paid into the State Treasury, January 7th, 1867, in bonds and 
coupons of the State, the sum of $225,700, that sum being the first 
payment required in accordance with the terms of sale. On the same 
day they also executed and delivered to the State of Missouri mort- 
gages on said roads, franchises, lands and other property to secure 
payment of the balance due. 

Messrs. Mackay, YogeK Simmons and Read sold the roads to 
Thomas Allen, who assumed their contract and all payments and lia- 
bilities of the mortgage given by them to the State. 

On the 29th of July, 1867, Mr. Allen filed articles of association in 
the office of the Secretary of State, and a new corporation was thereby 
created, known as the St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad Company. 

By an act of the General Assembly approved March 17th, 1868, the 
title to the St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad was confirmed to 
Thomas Allen, his heirs and assigns, and possession thereof delivered 
to the St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad Company. 

The eighth section of. said act further provided that the unpaid 
balance due from Mr. Allen and his associates on account of the pur- 
chase of the St. Louis & Iron Mountain and Cairo & Fulton Railroads, 
then amounting to $664,300, together with all interest that might ac- 
crue thereon, should be appropriated to the building of a railroad from 
Pilot Knob to the State line of Arkansas. 

SALB OF THE NORTH MISSOURI RAILROAD. 

The North Missouri Railroad was sold, as provided in the act ap- 
proved March 17th, 1868, entitled *^An act to sell the claims of the State 
against the North Missouri Railroad Company and to amend the char- 
ter of said company." 

It was enacted in the first section of this act that the debt due or 
to become due from the North Missouri Railroad Company to the State 
of Missouri and amounting to $4,350,000 in State bonds, together with 
the interest paid thereon by the State, should be sold and assigned to 
Henry T. Blow, John F. Roe, Gerard B. Allen, John H. Beach, Solon 
Humphreys, Robert Lenox Kennedy and their associates for the sum 
of $200,000, to be paid in State bonds or cash, on or before July 4th, 
1868. 



I I 



STATISTICAL IKPORMATIOK. 181 



Upon the payment of said sum it was made the duty of the Gov- 
ernor to transfer and assign to (he above named parties all the right, 
title and claim of the State of Missouri against the North Missouri 
Eaiiroad Company on account of bonds loaned to said company, and 
interest thereon paid by the State, together with the mortgage lien 
held by the State upon the road and appurtenances of said company. 

On the 3d day of July, 1868, the North Missouri Railroad Com- 
pany paid into the State Treasury $200,000, as contemplated in said 
act, and thereupon the mortgage lien held by the State on said road 
was released and assigned to said parties. 

SALB OF THE PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

The Pacific Railroad was sold by authority of an act of the Gen- 
eral Assembly, approved March 31st, 1868, entitled ^' An act for the 
sale of the Pacific Railroad, and to foreclose the State's lien thereon 
and to amend the charter thereof." By the fifth section of said act it 
was provided that if the Pacific Railroad Company should, at any time 
within ninety days from the first day of April, 1868, pay into the State 
Treasury $350,000 in bonds of the State or in money, then the Gover- 
nor should not advertise said road for sale; dnd if the company, within 
ninety days thereafter, paid an additional sum of $4,650,000 in cash or 
State bonds, then the Governor was required to deliver to the Pacific 
Railroad Company a deed of release for all claims, title and interest 
which the State of Missouri had in and to the Pacific Railroad, its 
property and appurtenances. 

In compliance with the provisions ot this act the Pacific Railroad 
Company became the purchaser of said road for the sum of $5,000,000. 
Payments were made by the company in bonds and coupons of the 
State as follows : 



First payment June 19, 1868 

Second payment October 1, 1868. 
Total 



•350.000 

4,65C,000 

$5,000,000 



BALE OF THE SOUTHWEST BRANCH. 



The act of February 19th, 1866, provided for the sale of this road 
upon certain conditions, among which are the following: 

First — One-fourth of the consideration was required to be paid on 
closing the contract, and the balance in five equal annual installments. 



182 AUDITOB^S RBPOBT. 



Second— Thsii the road and rolling stock belonging thereto should 
be kept in good condition during the progress of the work necessary 
to complete the road. 

Third— Th^t it should be finished to Lebanon within three years ; 
to Springfield within four years ; to the western boundary line of the 
State within five years from date of sale, and the purchaser was re- 
quired to expend in the work of gradation, masonry or surperstruc- 
tion, at least $500,000 each year from date of sale to the dat« fixed for 
its completion. 

On the 12th of May, 1866, the commissioners appointed under said 
act sold the Southwest Branch to General John C. Fremont for the 
sum of Si ,300,000. 

One-fourth of this amount was paid in bonds and coupons by R- 
J. McIIhaney, one of the commissioners, as follow^: 



June 14, 1866 

June 23, 1866. 

Total 



$319,660 
5,850 



$325,000 



General Fremont failed to comply with the conditions of the sale 
in not making annual payments of the purchase price and in not ex- 
pending $500,000 annually in the work of extension. In June, 1867, 
Governor Fletcher took possession of the road and appointed General 
Clinton B. Fisk an agent to operate the same until it should be other- 
wise disposed. of by the General Assembly. By the act of March 17, 
1868, the Southwest Branch, with all its rolling stock, appurtenances 
and franchises, was declared to be forfeited by General Fremont and 
his associates, and the title thereto became vested in the State. 

The second section of said act granted the road, and all its fran- 
chises in fee simple to A. 0. Kingsland & Son, G. D. Oragin, Freeman 
Clarke, A. S. Diven, Ben. Holladay, E. H. Greene, N. Randall, W. H. 
Coffin, Lewis Seyle, A. 0. Wilder, T. C. Bates, J. B. Gray, G. V. Fox, 
C. B. Fisk, D. A. January, Jas. J. O'Fallon, Chas. M. EUeard, Charles 
P. Chouteau, James Harrison, Erastus Wells, E. S. Rowse, M. D. 
Reese, Andrew Pierce, Jr., J. J. Dixwell, Thomas W. Pierce, Dwight 
Durkee, Louis 0. Fisher and James B. Hodgskin, their associates and 
assigns, upon the following conditions : That said grantees and their 
associates should organize into a body corporate under the laws ot this 
State, to be known as the *' South Pacij5c Railroad Company," and said 
road should be known as the *' South Pacific Railroad," which was to 
commence at or near the intersection of Washington and Grand 



8TATISII0AL INFOBMitTION. 



183 



Avennes in the city of St. Louis and terminate at the western bound- 
ary of the State, passing through or near Springfield and Neosho, when 
tiie title to the property above granted should vest in said company. 
That the South Pacific Railroad Company should expend in the exten- 
sion of said railroad not less than $500,000, within one year after they 
shall have filed with the Secretary of State a written acceptance of said 
grant That the road should be completed to Lebanon within two 
years; to Springfield within three years and six months after filing 
said acceptance ; and to the western boundary of the State in Newton 
county by the 10th of June, 1872; provided that if Congress extended 
the grant of lands for one year or more, then the company should have 
five years from the date of filing their acceptance m which to complete 
their road to the State line. On the 26th of October, 1870, the South 
Pacific Railroad Company conveyed its road and all its property and 
franchises to the Atlantic & Pacific Railroad Company. 

This company completed and opened the road to Neosho on the 
first of December, 1870, a distance of 315 miles; to Seneca, on the 
western boundary line> 330 miles, on the 1st of April, 1871, and to 
Yinita, in the Indian Territory, 364 miles from St. Louis, September 
1, 1871. 

Table showing the amount realized from the sale of each railroad, 
and the amount of interest paid into the State Treasury by each com- 
pany between the time when it became delinquent, and the date of 
sale or the time when the St&te released its lieu on the property of said 
companies : 



June 28, 1865. 



Aug. 16, 1866. 



Aug. 16, 1866. 

Jan. 4, 1867 . . 
July 1,1867.. 



PLATT8 COUNTY RAILKOAD. 

Interest paid by James N. Burns for the 
Atchison & St. Joseph and Weston 
& Atchison R. R. Companies under 
act of Feb. 18, 18G5 

First installment due Jan. 1, 1866,under 
act of Feb. 18, 1865, from sale of Platte 
County R. R , paid by J. Condit 
Smith, president Weston & Atchison 
and Atchison & St. Joseph R. R. Co. 

Interest paid by J. Condit Smith on 
purchase price of Platte County R.| 
R., under act of Feb. 18, 1865 | 

Interest on same due Jan. 1, 1867, paid 
by J. Condit Smith I 

Interest on same due July 1. 1867, and 
Jan 1, 1868. paid by J. Condit Smith, 
president Missouri Valley R. R. Co. . 



126,670 00 



100,000 00 

26,360 00 
9,520 00 

23,120 00 



184 



auditob's report. 



Dec. 31, 1867. 



PLATTE COUNTY nAUMOATh—CoTltinued, 

Interest on Bame due Jan. 1, 1868, paid 
bv John G. tticbardson, president 
Missouri Valley Railroad Co 



July 1, 1S68 Interest on same due July 1, 1868, paid; 

i by Missouri Valley R. R. Co 



Sept. 1,1863.. 

Sept. 16, 1863. 
Oct. 27, 1863. . 
Jan 7, 1867 . . 



8T. LOUIS Se IRON MOUNTAIN AND CAIBO & 
FULTON RAILROADS. 



. . Interest paid by S. D. Barlow, presi- 
dent St. L. & 1. M. R. R. Co 



. .iSame 
Same 



..First installment of purchase price 
! paid this date by John C. Vogei, 
Samuel Simmons, A. J. Mackay and 
Joseph C. Read 



623,040 00 



6,180 00 



$38,800 00 

1,200 00 

20,000 00 



Jan. 11, 1868 {Interest on deferred payment paid by 

I Thomas Allen 



Jan. 15,1869.. 
July 1,1869... 



Same 



Amount paid by A. J. Mackay, J. C. 
Vogel on account of judgment in 
favor of State In circuit court of St 
Louis 



PACIFIC RAILROAD. 



225,700 00 

40,458 00 
40,458 00 



25,000 00 



June 19, 1868. . . I First payment of purchase price under 

act of March 31, 1868, by Pacific R. R. 
Co 



Oct. 1, 1868 Second payment by Pacific R. R. Co . . 

I SOUTHWEST BRANCH. 

I 

June 14, 1866. . . Part of the first Installment of purchase 

• I price paid by R. I. Mcllhaney, one of 
the commissioners who sold the road 
to Gen. Fremont under act of Feb. 19, 
1866 



$350,000 00 
4,650,000 CO 



June 23, 1866... 



Remainder of first installment paid by 
Mcllhaney 



July 3, 1868. 



NORTH MISSOURI RAILROAD. 



Amount paid by Gerard B. Allen, John 
J. Roe, Solon Humphreys, and their 
associates for the North* Mo. R. R. as 
provided in the act of March 17, 1868. 



Total 



$319,650 00 



5,350 00 



$200,000 00 



$214.880 00 



391,616 00 



5,000.000 00 



325,000 00 



200,000 00 
$6. 131 ,496 00 



\ 

STATISTIGAt IKFORMATION. 



185 



Table showing the principal of the bonds loaned each railroad 
company, and the interest accomulated thereon up to date of sale or 
the time when the State released its lien on the property of said com- 
panies : 



Pacific railroad bonds, direct sixes ! $7,000,000 



Interest on same from July 1, 1859, to July 1, 1868, about which tlmei 
the road was sold to the raciflc R. R. Co. under act of March 31, 186S 



Southwest Branch bonds, direct sixes 

Southwest Branch bonds, seven per cent/guaranteed 



Interest on same firom Jan. 1, 1861, to Jan. 1, 1868, a short time after 
which said property being conveyed to A. C. Kingsland and asso* 
ciatesunder actof Marchl7, 1868 



Korth Missouri Bailroad bonds, direct sixes. 



Interest on same from July 1, 1868, to July 1, 1868, at which time 
Henry T. Blow and his associates purchased the road under act of 
March 17, 1868 



St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad bonds, direct sixes, 



Interest on same from Julv 1, 1858, to Jan. 1. 1868, a short time after 
which title to the road was confirmed to Thomas Allen and asso- 
ciates underlet of March 17, 1868 



Cairo & Fulton Railroad bonds, direct sixes. 



Interest on same from July 1, 1859, to Jan. 1, 1868, a short time after 
which title to the road was confirmed to Thomas Alien and asso- 
ciates under act of March 17, 1868 



Platte county railroad bonds, direct sixes. 



Interest from Jan. 1, 1861, to Jan. 1, 1868, soon after which time the 
State virtually released Its lien under act of March 17, 1868, to the 
Missouri Valley R. R. Co., successor of Platte Co. R. R. Co 



3,780,000 
2,589,000 
1,911,000 

2,023,770 
4,350,000 

2,610,000 
3,501,000 

1,995,570 
650,000 

331,500 
700,000 

294,000 



Total i $31,735,840 



CONSOLIDATION BONDS. 



The State was compelled to assume payment of nearly all the in- 
terest that had accumnlated on the railroad debt from January 1, 18H1, 
to January 1, 1867. Not having sufficient cash in the Treasury to meet 
such an obligation it became necessary to issue bonds as provided in 
the act of March 12, 1867, entitled "An act to provide for the payment 
of the interest upon the State debt." 

The first section of this act authorized a tax of forty cents to be 
levied and collected in the years 1867 and 1868 on each one hundred 
dollars of taxable property, which tax, when collected, was to be 
placed to the credit of the State Interest Fund and applied to the pay- 



186 auditor's report. 



ment of interest on the State debt. By the second section of said act 
all moneys appropriated by Congress to reimburse the State of Missouri 
for moneys expended for the United States in enrolling, equipping 
and provisioning the militia forces engaged in suppressing the rebellion 
were placed in the National Bank of Commerce in New York, and ap* 
plied to the payment of over due coupons, excepting $1,500,000 appro- 
priated for the benefit of the State School Fund, and $500,000 to reim- 
burse the State Seminary Fund, and to pa;f outstanding Union Military 
Bonds. 

After all money received from the United States had been applied 
to the payment of overdue coupons, the Commissioners of the State 
Interest Fund were required to report to the Governor the amount of 
outstanding overdue coupons unprovided for, whereupon bonds of the 
State were issued to an amount equal to the amount of said outstand- 
ing over due coupons. 

Bonds were issued under this act to the amount of 13,944,000, and 
are known as '^ Consolidation Bonds." 

They were dated January 1, 1&68, and were payable at the National 
Bank of Commerce in New York in twenty years after date, with six 
per cent, interest, payable semi-annually, at the same place. 

DESCRIPTION OF CONSOLIDATION BONDS. 



3944— six per cent. 20-year bonds $1,000 each, numbered 1 to 3944, is- 
sued under section three of ''An act to provide for the payment 
of the interest upon the State debt," approved March 12, 1S67, in- 
terest payable on flrRt days of January and July at National Bank 
of Commerce, New York 



S3,944.000 



RAILROAD INTEREST BONDS OF 1859. 

The seventh section of the act of November 19, 1857, entitled "An 
act supplemental to an act to amend an act to secure the completion 
of certain railroads in this State and for other purposes," approved 
March 3, 1857, contained the following provision : " In order to pro- 
vide for the certain and prompt payment of the interest on any State 
bond or bonds guaranteed by the State, and which may fail due on the 
first days of January and July, 1858, and first day of January, lfi59, or 
at any time thereafter, and remain unprovided for thirty days before 
said interest shall become due by any railroad company to which the 
credit of the State has been loaned, the commissioneres of the State 
Interest Fund shall temporarily take from and use out of any funds in 
the treasury, except the State School Fund, the Koad and Oanal Fund 
and the Internal Improvement Fund, a sum or sums sufficient to pay 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



187 



said interest; and shoold there not be sufficient funds in the treasury 
that could be used for that purpose the Govemer of the State is hereby 
authorized to execute and deliver to the said commissioners bonds of 
the State of Missouri, to be called ^' Revenue Bonds," in sums of one 
thousand dollars each, payable either i i St. Louis or New York, two 
years after the date when the aforesaid interest shall be due, and bear- 
ing interest at the rate not exceeding ten per cent, per annum." 
The commissioners were authorized to fiell the bonds and out of the 
proceeds pay said interest, or to hypothecate the same for a loan, in 
anticipation of moneys to be received into the State Interest Fund, 
and thus provide for the payment of said interest. 

The following table will furnish a description of the bonds is- 
sued and sold under said act : 



i 



200 Six per cent, ^year bonds of SI, 000 each, numbered 1 to 200,i88aed 
June 1, 1859, under act of November 19, 1857, for payment of 
interest due on bonds loaned to the North Missouri and St. 
liOuis & Iron Mountain Railroad Companies, principal and in- 
terest payable at Bank of Commerce, New x ork. Sold to State 
Savings Association for 96 cents on the dollar 

200 Six per cent. 2-^ear bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 201 to 400— 
other description same as above. Sold to Boatman's Savings 
institution for 96 cents on the dollar v 



400 



Total 



$200,000 



200,000 



$4000,00 



These bonds were redeemed at the date of maturity out of pro- 
ceeds arising from sale of Railroad Interest Bonds issued June 1, 1861. 

Another issue of $100,000, under the same act, were hypothecated 
December 15, 1859, to secure loans of $400,000 obtained from the 
Boatman's Savings Institution and the State Savings Aspociation of 
St. Louis. 

DESCRIPTION OF BONDS HYPOTHECATED. 



200 Eight per cent. 2-vear bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 401 to 600,1 
issued December 12, 1869, under act of November 19, 1857, fori 
payment of interest due January 1, 1860, on bonds loaned to the' 
Pacific, North Missouri and St. Louis & Iron Mountain Rail- 
road Companies, principal and interest payable at Bank of 
Commerce, N. Y. Hypothecated with Boatman's Savings in- 
stitution December 15, 1859 j 

200 Bight per cent. 2 year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 601 to 800— 
other description same as above Hypothecated with the State 
Savings Association of St. Louis, December 16, 1859 

400! 

I 



$200,000 



200,000 



Total I $400,000 



188 AHDITOR'S RKPOKT. 



The loans effected, as aforesaid, were payable in sixty days, and 
on the 13th day of February, 1860, the bonds so hypothecated were 
taken up and canceled. 

RAILROAD INTEREST BONDS OF 1861. 

Section 14 of an act approved March 18, 1861, entitled '*An act 
for the relief of the Bank of the State of Missouri, the Merchant's 
Bank, the Mechanic's Bank, the Exchange Bank^ the Southern Bank, 
the Union Bank, the Bank of St. Louis, the Farmers' Bank of Mis- 
souri and the Western Bank of Missouri," authorized, among other 
things, the issue of revenue bonds amounting to $500,000, in order to 
provide for the redemption of railroad interest bonds of 1859, which 
matured June 1, 1861. The provisions of said section are given as fol- 
lows : ^^ That in order to provide the means for the redemption oi the 
revenue bonds due June 1, 1861, and tor paying the interest due on the 
Ist July, 1861, the Governor of this State is hereby authorized and em- 
powered to sell three thousand two hundred and fifty-three shares of 
the stock owned by the State in the Bank of the State of Missouri and 
deposit the proceeds thereof in the State Treasury to the credit of the 
Fund Commissioners. The president and directors of each and every 
bank incorporated in this State shall, within three months from the 
date of the passage of this act, pay into the State Treasury, to the credit 
of the Fund Commissioners, their pro rata share of five bunred thou- 
sand dollars, to be apportioned according to the capital stock of said 
banks paid in : provided, that for the amount paid by each bank, as 
aforesaid, the Governor is hereby authorized to issue revenue bonds, 
payable in three and five years, bearing interest at the rate of nine per 
cent, per annum, with coupons attached, and for the payment of the 
principal and interest on said bonds the revenues of the State are 
hereby pledged." 

The following described bonds were issued under this section and 
the proceeds arising therefrom were applied to the payment of the 
principal and interest of revenue or railroad interest bonds due June • 
1,1861: 



217 Nine per cent. 3-year bonds of $1,000 eacb, issued Jane 1, 1S61, 
' under act approved March 18, 1861, interest payable seml-an- 
; nually at the Bank of the State of Missouri 



$217,000 



214 Nine per cent. 5-year bonds of $1,000 each— other description samei 

as above i 214,(.00 



431 Total $431,000 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



189 



These bonds were sold to the following named banks as follows : 



Name of Bank. 



No. of 3-year No of 5-year 
bonds sold, i bonds sold. 



Southern Bank 

Mechanics' Bank 

Bank of the State of Missouri 

Union Bank 

Merchants^ Bank .* 

Bank of St. Louis 

Fanners' Bank of Missouri . . . 
Total 



24 
25 
76 
19 
38 
13 
22 



217 



23 
24 
76 
19 
36 
14 
22 



214 



Total am't 
sold. 



«47,000 
49,000 

152,000 
38,000 
74,000 
27,000 
44 000 



$431,000 



THE WAB DEBT. 

This indebtedness was created for the purpose of paying the ex- 
penses incurred by different militia organizations called into the ser- 
vice of the*State during the civil war and consisted of Defense Warrants, 
Union Military Bonds and notes of Governor Gamble given in pay- 
ment of arms purchased by him. 



DBFBNSE WARRANTS. 

An ordinance of the State Convention, adopted October 18, 1861, 
entitled, "An ordinance to provide for the defense of the State," con- 
tained, among others^ the following provision : " That in order to facil- 
itate the prompt and regular acknowledgment of such indebtedness as 
may accrue under the provisions of the ordinance ' to provide for the 
organization and government of the Missouri State Militia,' * * 
the Auditor of Public Accounts shall cause to be prepared warrants in 
the form hereafter prescribed. * * * Such warrants to be 
of the denominations of five, ten, twenty, fifty, one hundred and one 
thousand dollars, making the amount in dollars of each denomination 
equal, and the whole amount to be outstanding at any time not to ex- 
ceed one million dollars, which warrants shall be signed by the Auditor 
and countersigned by the Secretary of (State * * * 

and shall be at all times redeemable at the treasury out of any money 
in the treasury not otherwise appropriated." 



190 auditor's report. 



The form prescribed for these warrants is given as follows: 
^^ The State of Missouri promises to pay to John Doe or to his 
assignee Ten dollars, and this warrant shall be receivable in taxes due 
the State, and the bank stock owned by the State is pledgec^for its 
redemption, if it shall not be otherwise redeemed or paid in for taxes 
before the thirty-first day of December, 1862. 



Countersigned : Auditor. 



Secretary of State." 

Warrants thus issued were known as '^Defense Warrants," and 
were paid out by disbursing officers of the State militia to such persons 
as the State became indebted to for services rendered and for subsis- 
tence, forage, clothing, transportation or other necessaries furnished to 
troops in the service of the State* 

As shown above. Defense Warrants were made receivable for 
taxes and '^ were redeemable at all times at the treasury out of any 
money not otherwise appropriated," and did not bear interest. The 
amount issued was $1,476,575. 

UNION MILITARY BONDS. 

The first section of an act approved March 9, 1863, entitled, ^^An 
act to provide the means for the payment and support of the enrolled 
militia forces of the State of Missouri," authorized the issuing of ''Union 
Military Bonds^' to an amount not exceeding three millions ot dollars. 

These bonds were issued in denominations of one, three, five, ten 
and twenty dollars, and were payable out of the Union Military Fund, 
at the office of the State Treasurer, twelve months after date, with in- 
terest thereon at six per cent, per annum. 

They were made receivable for all taxes, assessments, dues, fines, 
or other liabilities which were levied and collected for military pur- 
poses, and were in the followmg form : 

" Jbffkrson Citt, Missouri, ) 
July 30, 1863. J 

This bond for Ten Dollars is issued to bearer for actual services 

rendered in the enrolled militia of the State in the defense thereof and 

is payable at the office of the Treasurer in Jefferson City, twelve 

months after date, with six per cent, interest from date, out of the 

Union Military Fund. 



State Auditor." 



Secretary of State. 



STATISTICAL IKFOBMATIOK* 191 



The whole amoaot of bonds authorized by said act, or $3,000,000, 
were issued and placed in circulation. 

(Jnder the act of February 20, 1865, entitled ''An act for the pay- 
ment of arrears due the enrolled militia for services actually rendered 
to the State," a further issue of Union Military Bonds, aggregating!; 
$2,000,000, were put in circulation. Another issue of $1,400,000 was 
disbursed as provided in the act of December 20, 1865, entitled, ^'An 
act to provide means for the payment of the enrolled Missouri militia, 
and the Missouri militia, for services rendered, and for the payment of 
certain claims incurred against the State by the Quartermaster's De- 
partment." 

These bonds were in the same form, bore the same rate of inteiest 
and were payable in like manner as those authorized by the act of 
March 9, 1863. 

UNION UILITART FUND. 

The Union Military Fund above referred to was created by the act 
of March 9, 1863, and consisted of all appropriations made by Congress 
to the State of Missouri for paying the militia, or for indemnity for ex- 
penses incurred in suppressing the rebellion, or by loan for that pur- 
pose; and all taxes, dues, assessments, fines and other liabilities levied 
and collected for the special purpose of paying the militia. This fund 
was pledged for the payment and redemption of all the bonds, princi- 
ple and interest, issued under said act. 

The act and amendment thereto, approved March 23, 1863, also 
provided the following special tax for military purposes to be levied, 
collected and paid into the Union Military Fund : 

First — Upon all persons liable to pay a poll tax the sum of two 
dollars each. 

Second — Upon all property made taxable by law, the sum of twen- 
ty cents on every one hundred dollars valuation. 

Third-^K commutation tax of thirty dollars upon each person 
liable to perform military service who for any cause refused to per- 
form such service. 

In 1865, in addition to the foregoing taxes, an income tax of three 
per cent, was levied upon the salaries of all ofBcers who were exempt 
from military duty in consequence of such offices, and two per cent 
on the salaries and incomes of all other persons including military 
officers, whether such incomes were derived from fees or any other 
source whatsoever, provided that the taxes se levied should be on the 
-excess of salaries and incomes over and above the sum of six hundred 
dollars. 



192f auditor's rbport. 



For the year 1866, the property tax was increased to fifty cents on 
the one hundred dollars valuation, as provided in the act of December, 
20, 1865. 

/ LOAN OF GOVERNOR GAMBLE. 

In 1862, when large forces were being recruited for the Federal 
armies, the government of the United States was unable to supply 
this State with the arms necessary to equip the Enrolled Militia called 
into the service of the State. 

The State was therefore compelled to purchase arms, and for this 
purpose Governor Gamble, in the months of September and October 
1862, borrowed of certain banking institutions in St. Louis, the sum of 
$150,000, which amount, together with interest paid thereon, has been 
treated as a part of the War Debt. 

WAR DEBT— RECAPITULATION. 



Defense Warrants issued under ordinance of the convention, adopted 
October 18, 1861 



Union Military Bonds, issued under act of March 9, 1863 

Union Military Bonds, issued under act of February 20, 1865. 
Union Military Bonds, issued under act of December 20, 1865, 

Loan of Governor Gamble in 1862 

Total 



$1,476,575 

3,000,000 

2,000,000 

1,400,000 

150,000 



$8,026,575 



SETTLEMBNT OF THE LOAN OF GOVERNOR GAMBLE. 

Under an act approved February 15, 1864, entitled ''An act to 
authorize the issue of State bonds for the sum of one hundred and fifty 
thousand dollars advanced to the State for the purpose of purchasing: 
arms," a final settlement of the loan of Governor Gamble was effected. 

The first section of this act directed the Governor to settle with the 
banks, and upon such settlement to adjust and deduct the bonus due 
the State and unpaid by said banks, and for the balance owing by the 
State to issue bonds payable in not less than three nor more than ten 
years with six per cent, interest, payable semi-annually at the office of 
the State Treasurer. 

In his report of December 31, 1867, Auditor Thompson fixes the 
amount due the several banks at $162,860.24, as follows: 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



193 



Check of Gov. Gamble on Bank State of Missouri 

Check of Gov. Gamble on Bank of St. Louis 

Check of Gov. Gamble on Mechanics Bank 

Check of Gov. Gamble on Merchants Bank 

Check of Gov. Gamble on Union Bank 

Check of Gov. Gamble on Exchange Bank 

Check of Gov. Gamble on Boatmen's Savings Institution, 
Check of Gov. Gamble on Southern Bank 



INTEREST ALLOWED AND PAID TO 

Bank State of Missouri 

Bank of St. Louis 

Mechanics' Bank 

Merchants' Bank 

Union Bank 

Exchange Bank 

Boatmen's Savings Institution 

Southern Bank 



Aggregate. 



148,000 00 
4, 982 59 
15,648 00 
22,915 00 
11,243 00 
14,011 00 
5,604 00 
15,193 00 



$137,496 59 



$11,009 81 

875 80 

2,731 69 

3,864 98 

2.120 74 



1,281 44 
3,479 19' 



26,363 65 
$162,860 24 



The a^astment of this account is given in the same report as 
follows : 



By bonus due firom banks 

By bonds issued and delivered to banks. 

By balance due paid in cash 

Total 



$112,904 09 

48,000 00 

1,956 15 



$162,860 24 



A description ol the bonds issued in payment of the loan of Gov. 
Gamble is furnished as follows : 



s. p.— 13. 



194 



auditor's report. 



[Interest at six per cent. ; coupons due January and July in each year.] 



Number. 



Date. 



540 to 645 June 23, 1866. 
646 to 563May30, 1867.. 
664 to 586! Aug. 28, 1867. 
687 Sept. 80, 1867., 



48 



To whom. 



Amount., When due. 



Boatmen's Savings Institution ; $6,000 July 1, 1860 



Southern Bank of St. Louis. 

Merchants Bank 

Bank of State of Missouri. . 



18,000July 1,1869 

23,000'july 1,1868 

1,000'July 1,1868 



$48,000. 



The act of March 4, 1869, appropriated out of the nnion Military 
Fand a sum sufficient to pay the principal and interest of these bonds 
and in that year they were redeemed and canceled. 

It is proper to state that there is a discrepancy between the prin- 
cipal sum paid to the banks, and the amount claimed to have been 
borrowed by Gov. Gamble, And so reported by him to the General 
Assembly. Upon this point the Auditor makes the following observa- 
tion : 

^' It will be observed that only 9137,496.59 is here accounted for as 
principal of the debt which Gov. Gamble, in his message to the Gen- 
eral Assembly, December, 1862, (Senate Journal, p. 17,) stated to be 
$150,000. I have no papers in my office showing the original accounts 
as the vouchers relating to the disbursement of this sum belong to 
the State Quartermaster's Department." 

This discrepancy is substantially explained in the act of March 4, 
1869, which .appropriated $9,107, with interest at six per cent., to reim- 
burse the State Savings Associatioq of St. Lauis for money advanced 
to Gov. Gamble, September 2, 1862, for the purchase of arms. In the 
message referred to, the Governor says that *^ the sum expended in the 
purchase by the agent who went to New York, and in the transporta- 
tion, is $146,553.59. If we add ¥9,107, amount appropriated by the act 
of 1869, to reimburse the State Savings Association of St. Louis, to 
9137,496.59, the sum paid other banking institution, it makes an aggre- 
|r;ate of $146,603.59, or only $50 more than the amount reported by Gov- 
ernor Gamble to have been actually expended. 

DEFENSE WARRANT ACCOUNT. 

As heretofore shown the total amount of Defense Warrants issued 
was $1,476,575. 



STATISTICAL INFOEMATION. 



195 



The following table will show the amount redeemed at various 
times by State Treasurers : 

REDEMPTION OP DEFENSE WARRANTS. 



Amount of Defense Warrants received by Geo. C. Bingham, State 
Treasurer, up to Oct. 1, 1862, and destroyed by Legislative Com- 
mittees 

Amount of Defense Warrants received by Oeo. 0. Bingham ft*om Oct. 
1, 1862, to Sept. 30, 1863, and destroyed by Legislative Committee. 

Amount of Defense Warrants destroyed by committee Dec. 22, 1864. . . 

Amount returned by paymasters and canceled 

Amount of Defense Warrants received by Wm. Bishop, State Treas- 
urer, and destroyed by Legislative Committee appointed under 
resolution of March 13, 1867 

Amount destroyed by Legislative Committee appointed in 1868 



Amount of Defense Warrants received by Wm. Q Dallmeyer, State 
Treasurer, and destroyed by Legislative Committee appointed in 
1870 /. 

Amount of Defense Warrants received by Samuel Hays, State Treas- 
urer, and destroyed by Legislative Committee appointed in 1872. . 

Amount of Defense Warrants paid under act of March 28, 1874 

Total amount of Defense Warrants paid 



$182,025 00 

618,166 00 

461,056 00 

16,836 00 

296,780 00 
7,276 00 

2,280 00 

446 00 
»6 00 



$1,476,796 00 



UNION MILITARY BOND ACCOUNT. 



Amount issued under act March 9 , 1863 

Amount issued under act of February 20, 1866. . 

Amount issued under act of December 20, 1866. 

Total amount issued 



$3,000,000 00 
2,000,000 00 
1,400,000 00 

$6,400,000 00 



196 



auditor's report. 



Union military bonds were paid and retired as shown in the fol- 
lowing table : 

BONDS RECEIVED AND PAID BY GEO. C. BINGHAM, STATE 

TREASURER. 



March 31, 1864. . .'Amount destroyed by Legislative Committee 
May 10, 1864 i Amount destroyed by Legislativf^ Committee. 

May 27, 1864 lAmount destroyed by Legislative Committee. 

I 

June 4, 1864 i Amount destroyed by Legislative Committee. 

June 6, 1864 'Amount destroyed by Legislative Committee. 

Aug. 30, 1864 Amount destroyed by Legislative Committee. 

Nov. 25, 1864 'Amount destroyed by Legislative Committee. 

Nov. 30, 1864 ! Amount destroyed by Legislative Committee. 

Dec. 21, 1864 1 Amount destroyed by Legislative Committee. 

Dec. 23, 1864 'Amount destroyed by Legislative Committee. 



Jan. 3, 1865.. 
Jan. 21, 1865. 



Amount deatroyed by Legislative Committee 

Amount destroyed by Legislative Committee 



Jan. 25, 1865 'Amount destroyed by Legislative Committee 



BONDS RECKIVBD AND. PAID BY WILLIAM BISHOP, 

STATE TRSA8URBR. 



May 1, 1865 Amount destroyed by Legislative Committee 



Amount destroyed by Messrs. Winters, Ryland 
and Dallmeyer, a committee of tbe Legislature, 
appointed under concurrent resolution, ap- 
proved March 13, 1867 



December, 1868. .Amount destroyed by Legislative Committee 



BONDS RECEIVED AND PAID BY WM. Q. DALLMEYKR, 
* TREASURER. 

Amount destroyed by Legislative Committee of, 
1870 1 

BONDS RECEIVED AND PAID BY SAMUEL HAYS, STATE I 

TREASURER. 

I 

Amount destroyed by Legislative Committee of '72 

Amount paid under act of March 28, 1874 

Amount paid under act of April 12, 1877 j 

Amount paid under act of March 26, 1881 i 

Amount paid under acts of March 2l8t and 24th.' 
I 1883 j 

Amount paid under acts of March 17th and 18th, 
1885 




$353,152 00 

278,819 00 

146,998 00 

119,414 00 

6,181 00 

223,9^ 00 

96,592 00 

3,890 00 

89,850 00 

32,750 00 

116,051 00 

137,142 00 

3,384 00 



134,394 00 



4,606,165 00 
126,308 00 



17,977 00 



tl0,072 00 

2,328 00 

27 00 

1,455 00 

233 00 

127 00 



^$6,406,253 00 



STATISTICAL INFOBMATION. 



197 



UNION MILITARY BONDS-INTEREST ACCOUNT. 



Interest on Union Military Bonds paid by George 0. Bingham. State 
Treasurer, and allowed by committees at various times firom 
March 31, 1864, to January 25, 1865 

Interest on Union Military Bonds paid by Wm. Bishop, State Treas- 
urer, and allowed by committees appointed in 1867 and 1869 

Interest on Union Military Bonds paid by Wm. Q. Dallmeyer. State 
Treasurer, and allowed by committee of 1870 

Interest on Union Military Bonds paid by Samual Hays. State Treas- 
urer, and allowed by committee of 1872 



Interest on Union Military Bonds paid as provided in the act of 
March28,1874 

Interest on Union Military Bonds paid as provided in the act of April 
12,1877 



Total amount of Interest paid on Union Military Bonds, 



$22,637 96 

378,162 00 

3,332 46 

t2,180 40 

408 84 
4 86 



$406,726 52 



WAR DEBT—RECAPITULATION OF. 



Notes of Governor Gamble and interest thereon as adjusted and set- 
tled under act of February 15, 1864 



Note of Governor Gamble for $9,107 with Interest theron at six per 
cent, from September 2, 1862, to May 13« 1869, paid as provided in 
act of March 4, 1869 

Defense Warrants paid 

Union. Military Bonds redeemed 

Interest paid on Union Military Bonds 

Total war debt 



$162,860 24 

12,768 03 

1,475,795 00 

*6,406,253 00 

406.726 52 



1^8,464,402 79 



* For reasons unknown to me the aggregate amount of Union Military Bonds 
paid by the State Is $6,253 greater than the amount Issued. 

+ Except the one Item of Union Military Bonds and Interest paid by treasurer 
Hays, and amounting to $12,252.40, which amount was credited to him by the Leg- 
islative committee of 1872, the amount of interest allowed on Union Military Bonds 
to the several State Treasurers has been reported separately. Estimating three 
and a half years Interest due upon the bonds allowed treasurer Hays, I have placed 
the interest credited by the committee at $2,180.40, and the principal of the bonds 
^ at $10,072, which makes the aggregate credit of $12,252.40 received by him. 



198 auditor's bbport. 



FUNDING BONDS OF 1864. 

In the years 1862 and 1863 State bonds, aggregating $402,000, ma- 
tured. Of this amount $362,000 had been Issued in 1837-8 in payment 
for stock in the Bank of the State of Missouri, and $40,000, during the 
same years, for building the State Capitol. For the redemption of 
these bonds the act of January 26, 1864, entitled "An act to provide 
means to pay State bonds that matured in 1862 and falling due in 1863^ 
issued for State purposes," authorized the Governor to issue not ex- 
ceeding $402,000 in six per cent, bonds of $1,000 each, redeemable at 
the pleasure of the State after twenty years and payable in either of 
the cities of New York or St. Louis. He was further authorized to 
negotiate for the exchange of said bonds in renewal of the bonds of 
the State which matured in 1862 and 1863. 

A description of the bonds issued under this act and exchanged, 
is given as follows : 



308 six per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 201 to 508, is- 
sued under act of January 24, 1864, and exchanged for State bonds, 
matured in 1862-3, interest payable semi-annually at Bank of 
Commerce, New York, on first days of January and July 



$308,000 



As shown above the bonds that matured in 1862 and 1863 amounted 
to $402,000, as follows : 



Bank Stock— 6} per cent. 26-year bonds, issued in 1837 $63,000 



Bank Stock—O per cent. 25-year bonds, Issued in 1837-8 

Capitol Bonds— 6 per cent. 2&-year bonds, issued in 1837-8, 
Total 



299,000 
40,000 



$402,000 



This indebtedness was disposed of in the following manner: 



Capitol Bonds exchanged under act of January 26, 1864 , $36,000 

Bank stock Bonds exchanged under act of January 26, 1864 272,000 

Bank Stock 5} per cent. b(>nds redeemed in 1867 63,000 

Bank Stock 6 per cent, bonds, paid in 1868 27,000 

Capitol Bonds, paid in 1868 4,000 

I I ■■ ■ ■ 1 1 II I I- II 

Total $402,000 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 199 



CONDITION OF THE STATE DEBT FROM JANUARY 1, 1866, 

TO DECEMBER 31, 1868. 



Ihe War Debt — Accumulation of Interest on Railroad Bonds — Large 
Reduction of the Debt in 1866^ 1867 and 1868^ and how the same 
was accomplished — Proceeds from Sale of Bank Stock and Rail- 
roads — Payments by Oen, John B. Oray. 

The outstanding war debt, consisting mainly of Defense Warrants 
issued under the convention ordinance of 1861 and ofcUnion Military 
Bonds authorized by acts of the General Assembly in 1863 and 1865, 
cannot be accurately stated at any speciAed date^ and in the tables 
which follow neither the war debt nor the past due interest on the rail- 
road debt will be treated as a part of the State debt. From 1862 to 
1866 Defense Warrants and Military Bonds became a part of the cur- 
rency of the State, and being at all times receiyed by collectors in pay- 
ment of military taxes, assessments, dues and fines, the precise amount 
outstanding at any given time could not be ascertained. As hereto- 
fore shown the principal of this debt amounted to $8,026,575, and the 
interest to $437,700.79, making the total amount paid by the State 
$8,464,275.79. 

The war debt outstanding December 1, 1864, not including interest 
on Union Military Bonds and Governor Gamble's note, is reported by 
Auditor Moseley to have been $2,165,309. 

In his report of October 30, 1865, Auditor Thompson reports the 
condition of this debt as detailed below. 

^^ The correct amounts, as far as ascertained by my office, are as fol- 
lows: . 



200 



auditor's report. 



Defense Warrants of 1861 and 1864 

Loan of Governor Gamble of 1862 

Interest on same to January 1, 1866 

Union Military Bonds of 1863 

Interest on same, as far as reported * 

Union Military Bonds of 1865 

Interest on same to May 15, 1866 

Unpaid claims in Quartermaster's Department 
Unpaid claims in Paymaster's Department 



I 

} 



Interest on Union Military Bonds of 1863, outstanding to May, 1866, 
estimated 



$1,476,675 

150,000 

30,000 

3,000,000 

37,545 

2,000,000 

100,000 

500,000 
253,455 



Total I $7,546,575 



Of this sum there have been paid and canceled, up to February 6, 
the date of the last certificates : 



Defense Warrants. . . . 
Union Military Bonds 

Interest on same 

Total 



$1,219,601 

1,759,511 

37,546 



$3,016,667 " 



ACCUMULATION OF INTEREST ON RAILROAD BONDS. 

From January 1, 1859, when the North Missouri and St. Louis & 
Iron Mountain Railroad Companies defaulted in the payment of inter- 
est, up to October 30, 1865, the State, at various times, had paid inter- 
est on railroad bonds amounting to $2,141,856.85. The interest on 
these bonds was accumulating at the rate of $1,307,850 annually, and 
on the first of January, 1866, the aggregate amount past due and re. 
maining unpaid was $6,316,090. 

On that date the several railroad companies were indebted to the 
State in the sum of 832,362,836.85, as shown in the following table : 



* Exclusive of a large amount allowed on bonds redeemed and not yet de^ 
fltroyed. 



STATI8TI0AL INFORMATION. 



201 



RAILKOAD DEBT TO THE STATE JANUARY 1, 1866. 



For principal of bonds. 

For intereet paid by the State 

For past due interest remaining unpaid January 1 , 1866 

For interest and discount on railroad interest bonds. . . . 

Total 



$23,701,000 00 

2,141.856 86 

6,316,090 00 

203,890 00 

I I m 

$32,362,.836 85 



The total railroad indebtedness remaining unpaid on the first of 
January, 1866, was $30,448, 090, as follows : 

RAILROAD INDEBTEDNESS REMAINING UNPAID JANUARY 1, 1866. 



For principal of bonds. . . .^ $23,701,000 00 

For railroad interest bonds 431,000 00 

For past due interest remaining nnpaid January 1, 1866 6,316,000 00 



Total ; $30,448,090 00 



The aggregate State indebtedness January 1, 1865, as reported by 
Auditor Thompson, December 31, 1867, is submitted as follows : 

AGGREGATE STATE DEBT JANUARY 1, 1865. 



The old State debt , . . . . 

The railroad debt, principal 

The railroad debt, interest, (revenue bonds). . 

Past due interest upon the two 

The war debt of 1862, (reported) 

Interest on same 

Defense warrants, outstanding 

Union military bonds of 1863, outstanding 

Interest on same, estimated 

Unpaid military claims (paid in 1865 and 1867) 
Aggregate 



$622,000 00 

23,701,000 00 

431,000 00 

5,923,320 00 

150,000 00 

21,0C0 00 

292,099 00 

1,230,489 00 

123,000 00 

3,601,000 00 



$36,094,908 00 



202 



auditor's rkport. 



REDUCTION OF THE STATE DEBT. 

On the first of January, 1869| this indebtedness had been reduced 
to $21,675,000, a decrease of $14,419,908 within four years, beginning 
January 1, 1865, and ending December 31, 1868. Proceeds derived 
from sale of stock owned by the State in the Bank of the State of Mis- 
souri, payments for railroads sold, together with interest and dues 
paid into the treasury by railroad companies and the collections by 
General John B. Gray from the United States for reimbursement of 
war expenditures, contributed mainly to such an extraordinary redac- 
tion of the public debt within the period named. 

The Stock held by the State in the Bank of the State of Missoari 
amounted to 91^086,300. In 1866 this stock was sold to Captain James 
B. Eads for $1,178,635.50, and as payments therefor were made in bonds 
and coupons I he State debt was correspondingly reduced. 

Payments made by purchasers of railroads and interest and dues 
paid into the State treasury by railroad companies from January 1, 
1865, to Ddcember 31, 1868, amounted to $6,006,038. 

Under the act of Oongress, approved April 17, 1866, General John 
B. Gray collected the sum of $6,472,289.35 as indemnity to the State 
of Missouri for military expenses incurred during the rebellion. The 
amount collected by General Gray was applied as follows : 



For the State School Fund , 

To reimburse the University for bank stock sold to Eads 

For the redemption of Union military bonds 

For the payment of past due coupons 



For the payment of past due State bonds and coupons held by the 
United States 



$1,500,000 00 

10S.364 4d 

1,683,232 27 

3,070,682 63 

110,010 00 



Total I i>6,472,289 35 



Receipts into the State treasury from the sources named, and 
whir.h were applied to the reduction of the State debt, amounted to 
$12,048,598.40, as follows : 



From the sale of bank stock. 



$1,178,635 50 



From the sale of railroads an«t the payment of interest and dues 
by railroad companies 

From collections by Gen. John B. Gray from the United States — 

Total 



6,006,038 00 
4,803,924 90 



$12,048,598 40 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



203 



Dedncting the above amonnt, or $12,048,598.40 from 4(14,419^908, 
the ag^egate indebtedness retired within the four years ending De- 
cember 31, 1868, there remains to be accounted for a balance of 92,371,- ' 
309.60* The amount withheld from the public schools in consequence 
of the suspension in 1865, 1866 and 1867, of twenty-five per cent, of 
the State revenue ; bonus paid into the State Treasury by banks in lieu 
of all other taxes ; surplus funds arising from tne military taxes levied 
in 1865 and 1866 and from the interest tax of 40 cents on the 9100 valu- 
ation levied in 1867 and 1868, together with miscellaneous receipts, 
fully accounts for this balance. 

As before stated, no part of the war debt or of the accumulated 
interest upon the railroad debt, will be accounted for in the succeeding 
tables. 

The principal of the bonded debt January 1, 1863, amounted to 
$24,754,000. As no change occurred in the years 1863 and 1864, a de- 
scription of the debt as it existed on the first day of January, 1865, is 
^ven as follows : 

BONDED DEBT JANUARY 1, 1866. 



STATB BONDS PROPKB. 

Bank Stock— 5} per cent. 26-year bonds issued in 1837 

Bank Stock--6 per cent. 26-year bonds issued in 1837-8 

Capitol Bonds— 6 per cent. 26-year bonds issued in 1837-8. . 



Temporary Loan Bonds— 6 percent. 6-year bonds issued 
in 1851 



Funding Bonds— 6 per cent. 30-year bonds issued in 1863. . 

RAILROAD BONDS. 

Pacific Railroad Bonds, 6 per cent 

Pacific Railroad— Southwest Branch direct sixes 

Pacific Railroad— Southwest Branch guaranteed 7 per cent. 

North Missouri— 6 per cent 

bt. Louis <fe Iron Mountain— 6 per cent 

Cairo & Fulton— 6 per cent 

Platte Country — 6 per cent 

Hannibal & St. Joseph— 6 per cent 

Railroad Interest Bonds — 9 per cent., issued in 1861 

Total Railroad and State Bonds Proper, Jan. 1, 1865. , . 




$7,000,000: 
2,589,000j 
1,911,000; 
4,350,000 
3,601,000; 

650,00o! 

700,000! 
3,000,000| 

431,000 



1622,000 



824,132,000 



$24,754,000 



204 



AUDITOR^S REPOBT. 



From January 1,1565, to December 31, 1867, State bonds, amount- 
ing to $1,587,000| were redeemed and canceled, as shown in the follow- 
ing table : 



BONDS CANCELED FROM JANUARY 1, 1806, TO DECEMBER 31, 1867. 



199 
311 
133 
119 
100 



BONDS RECEIVXD JUNK 18 AND JULY 14, 1866, FROM CAPTAIN 
JAMES B. EAD8 FOR STOCK IN THE BANK OF THE STATE OF 
MISSOURI SOLD TO HIM BY THE STATS. 



Pacific Railroad Bonds 

Pacific Railroad — Sonthwest Branch guaranteed 7 per ct. 

Pacific Railroad— Sonthwest Branch direct sixes 

North Missouri 

St. Lonis A Iron Mountain 

16 Cairo A Fnlton 

13 Platte Country ., 

73 Railroad interest Bonds, 9 per cent 



964 



15 



BONDS RECEIVED JUNE 14, 1866, FROM R. J. M'ILHANEY, 
COMMISSIONER, PROCEEDS FROM SALE OF THE SOUTH- 
WEST BRANCH OF THE PACIFIC RAILROAD. 



Pacific Railroad Bonds 

49 Pacific Railroad — Southwest Branch direct sixes. 

74 St. Louis A Iron Mountain 

58 North Missouri 



3 State Bonds Proper 

32Platte Country 

19 Cairo i^ Fulton 

260 

BONDS RECEIVED JANUARY 7, 1867, FROM JOHN C. VOGKL 
AND OTHKRS IN PAYMENT OF THE PURCHASE PRICE OF 
THE ST LOUIS & IRON MOUNTAIN AND CAIRO ft FULTON 
RAILROADS. 



69 North Missouri Railroad Bonds 

48 St. Louis & Iron Mountain 

20 Cairo & Fulton 



26 

3 

166 



Pacific Railroad (Southwest Branch), direct sixes. 
Platte Country 



$199,000 

311,000 

133,0l>0 

119,000 

100,000 

16,000 

13,000 

73,000 



$15,000 
49,000 
74,000 
68,000 
3,000 
32,000 
19,000 



$69,000 

48,000! 

20,000 

26,000 

3,000 



$964,000 



230,000 



166,000 



STATISTICAL INFOBMATION. 



205 



BONDS CANCELED FROM JANUARY 1, 1865, TO DECEMBER 31, 1867- 

CONTIKTJia). 



fc 



BONDS RECSIVSD IN 1867 FROM GENERAL JOHN B. GRAY IN 
I PART PAYMENT OF THE CLAIM OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI 
AGAINST THE UNITED STATES FOR WAR EXPENSES. 



' 63 Bank Stock— 5} per cent, bonds 



B0ND8 RKCEIYRD IN 1865, 1866 AND 1867 FROM THE ATCHISON 
& ST. JOvSEPH, WFSTON ft ATCHISON AND MISSOURI VAL- 
LEY RAILROAD COMPANIES ON ACCOUNT OF PRINCIPAL 
AND INTEREST DUB ON SALE OF THE PLATTB COUNTRY 
RAILROAD. 



21 Pacific Railroad Bonds 

49 North Missouri 

27 >t, Loais & Iron Mountain 

14 Cairo & Fulton 

23 Pacilic Railroad (Southwest Branch), direct sixes 

1 State Bond Proper 

5 Platte Country 

m 

BONDS RECEIVED OF THE UNION BANK OF ST. LOUIS IN PAY- 
I MENT OF BONUS DUE THE STATE. 



4 Railroad Interest Bonds, 9 per cent, 



1587. Total amount of bonds canceled flrom Jan. 1, 1865, to 
' Dec. 31, 1867 





$63,000 



140,000 



4,000 
$1,587,000 



RECAPITULATION— BONDS CANCELED IN 1866, 1866 AND 1867. 



Pacific Railroad 

Pacific Railroad — Southwest Branch, direct sixes 

Pacific Railroad — Southwest Branch, guaranteed 7 per cent 

North Misflouri Railroad 

St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad 

Cairo & Fulton Railroad 

Platte C>)untry 

State Bonds Proper 

Railroad Interest Bonds, 9 per cent 

Total 



$235,000 

231,000 

311,000 

296,000 

249,000 

69,000 

53,000 

67,000 

77,000 



$1,587,000 



206 



AUDITOR'S REPORT* 



As provided in the act of February 15, 1864, bonds amounting to 
$48,000 were issued in 1867, and delivered to the Boatmen's Savings 
Institution, the Southern Bank of St. Louis, the Merchants Bank and 
the Bank of the State of Missouri in payment of Governor Gamblers 
notes given in 1862, for money borrowed and used in arming and 
equipping the militia. Within the three years ending December 31, 
1867, the bonded debt was decreased $1,587,000, and increased by the 
issue of War Debt Bonds $48,000, making an actual reduction during 
this time of $1,539,000. 

On the morning of the first day of January, 1868, the interest- 
bearing debt of the State was $23,215,000, as detailed in the following 
table : 

BONDED DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1868. 



State Bonds Proper, six per cent 

Pacific Railroad, six per cent 

Pacific Railroad (Southwest Branch), direct sixes 

Pacific Railroad (Southwest Branch), guaranteed seven per cent 

North Missouri Railroad six per cent 

St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad, six per c€nt 

Cairo & Fulton, six per cent 

Platte Country Railroad, six per cent 

Hannibal A St. Joseph Railroad, six per cent 

War Debt— six per cent, bonds issued in payment of Gov Gamble's 
notes 

Railroad Interest Bonds, 9 per cent 

Total bonded debt on the morning of January 1, 1868 



$555,000 
6,765,000 
2,358,000 
1,600,000 
4,(^,000 
3,252,000 
581,000 
647,000 
3,000.000 

48,000 
354,000 



$23,215,000 



The bonded debt was increased on the first day of January, 1868, 
in the sam of $3,868,000 by the issue of that amount of six per cent, 
twenty-year bonds, known as "Consolidation Bonds," as authorized 
by the act of March 12, 1867, entitled ^*An act to provide for the pay- 
ment of the interest upon the State debt." These bonds, elsewhere 
described, were exchanged by the National Bank of Commerce in 
Kew York for outstanding, unpaid coupons, representing accumulated 
interest on State bonds issui^d to railroad companies which the State 
has been unable to pay. 

From January 1 to December 31, 1868, bonds aggregating $5,408,- 
000 were retired and canceled as shown in the following table : 



STATISTICAL INFOBMATION* 



207 



BONDS CANCELED IN 1868 



354 



Railroad Interest Bonds paid by Auditor's warrents Im 
March. 1868, as provided in the act of March 10, | 
1868, entitled ''An act to provide for the payment 
of three hundred and fifty-four Revenue Bonds and 
the interest due thereon." ' 



31 State Bonds Proper paid by Auditor's warrants in 

—I 1868, as provided in the act of March 18, 1868, enti- 

'' tied, ' * An act to pay thirty-five bonds of the State, 

which fell due in 1862 and 1863, and which have not 

been exchanged for new bonds." 



BONDS RECEIVED JANUARY 11, 1868, FROM THOMAS ALLEN, 
ON ACCOUNT OF INTEREST DUE FROM THE ST. LOUIS tc. 

\ IRON MOUNTAIN AND CAIRO A FULTON RAILROAD COM- 

PANIES. 



20 St. Louis «& Iron Mountain Railroad bonds 



11 
1 
1 

33 



Pacific Railroad (Southwest Branch), guaranteed 
North Missouri 



Pacific Railroad (Southwest Branch), direct sixes, 



BONDS RECEIVED FROM THE MISSOURI VALLEY RAILROAD 
COJfPANY DECEMBER 31, 1867, AND JULY 1, 1868, ON 
ACCOUNT OF INTEREST DUE ON PURCHASE OF THE 
PLATTE COUNTRY RAILROAD. 



3 Pacific Railroad bonds 

7 Pacific Railroad (Southwest Branch), direct sixes. 

North Missouri 

2 Cairo & Pulton 

^ St. Louis &. Iron Mountain 



6 
25 



Consolidation 



BONDS BECKTVBD JULY 3, 1868, FROM GERARD B. ALLEN AND 
OTHERS IN PAYMENT FOR THE NORTH MISSOURI BAIL- 
ROAD. 



82Pacific Railroad bonds 

58 Pacific Railroad (Southwest Branch), direct sixes. 
35Nortli Missouri 

2| St. Louis & Iron Mountain 

2 Cairo & Fulton 



1 

14 

6 

2001 



Platte Country 

Consolidation 

State Debt Proper. 



$354,000 



31,000 



$20,000 

11,000 

1,000 

1,000 



$3,000 
7,000 
3,000 
2,000 
4,000 
6,000 



$82,000 

58,000 

35,000 

2,000 

2,000 

1,000 

14,000 

6,000 



$354,000 



31,000 



$33,000 



$25,000 



$200,000 



208 



auditob's report. 



BONDS CANCELED IN 1888.— Conxinubd. 



BONDS RBCEIYED OF TBB PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY, JUNE 19 
AMD OCTOBER 1, 1868, IN PAYMENT FOR THE PACIFIC RAIL-j 
ROAD. 

PacifiG Railroad bonds 

Pacific Railroad (Southwest Branch) direct sixes i 

North Missouri Railroad 

St. Louis A Iron Mountain Railroad ' 

Cairo A Fulton Railroad 

Platte Country Railroad 

Consolidation 1,018,000 

State Bonds Proper 44, 000 



91.110.000 
662,000 
925,000 

748,000 

1 

165,000 
103,000 



Total amount of bonds canceled in 1868. 



$4,765,000 

$5,40S,GOO 



RECAPITULATION— BONDS CANCELED IN 1868. 



Pacific Railroad bonds 

■ 

Pacific Railroad (Southwest Branch), sixes 

Pacific Railroad (Southwest Branch), guaranteed 7 per cent. 

North Missouri Railroad 

St. Louis A Iron Mountain Railroad 

Cairo & Fulton Railroad 

Platte Country 

Consolidation 

State Bonds Proper 

Railroad Interest Bonds, 9 per cent 

Total amount of bonds canceled in 1868 



$1,195,000 

728,000 

11,000 

964,000 

774,000 

159,000 

104,000 

1,038,000 

81,000 

354,000 



$5,40S,OCO 



\ 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



20& 



BONDED DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1869. 



State Bonds Proper .\ . . 

Pacific Ballroad 

Pacific Railroad (Southwest Branch) direct sixes 

Pacific Railroad (Southwest Branch) guaranteed 7 per cent 

North Missouri Railroad 

St. Louis & lion Mountain Railroad 

Cairo & Fulton Railroad 

Platte Country 1 

Hannibal & St. Joseph '. 

Consolidation 

War Debt^-6 per cent, bonds, iaaued in pasrment of Gov. Gamble's notes 
Total bonded debt, January 1, 1869 



9474,000 

6,670,000 

1,630,000 

1,689,000 

3,091,000 

2,478,000 

422,000 

543,000 

3,000,000 

2,830,000 

48,000 

$21,675,000 



BONDS CANCELED IN 1869 AND 1870. 



1 

48 War Debt— Bonds issued in payment of Governor Gam- 
ble's notes and paid in 1869 out of the Union Military 
Fund as provided in the act approved March 4, 1869. 



BOMBS RSCBIVKD OF THOMAS ALLBN, JAKUARY 15, 1869, IN 
PAYMBNT OF IKTERBST DUX FROM THK ST. LOUIS * IRON 
MOUNTAIN AND CAIRO * FULTON RAILROAD COMPANY. 




7 State Bonds Proper 

3 St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad, 
2Pacific Railroad 



4North Missouri Railroad 

16| Pacific Railroad (Southwest Branch;, 6 per cent. 
9 Consolidation 



BONDS RECBIVKD OF A. J. M'KAY AND OTHERS, JULY 1, 1869, 
IN PAYMBNT OF A JUDOMBNT RENDBRED IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF ST. LOUIS. 



Pacific Railroad. 



Platte Country, 



1 North Missouri , 

1! Pacific Railroad (Southwest Branch). 6 per cent. 
19 Consolidation , 

25; 

s. P.— 14 



7,000 
3,000 
2,000 
4,000 
15,000 
9,000 



1,000 
3,000 

1,000 

I 

1,000 
19,000 



$48,000 



40,000 



26,000 



210 



auditor's report. 



BONDS CANCELED IN 1869 AND 1870.— Continued. 



I BONDS RBDBEMED BY THE FUND COHMISSIONSR8 IN 1870. 

I 

148JPacific Railroad 

157 Pacific Railroad (Southwest Branch), 6 per ceot 



123 
96 
36 
30 

151 
8 

749 



North Missouri 

St. Louis & Iron Mountain 

Platte Country 

Cairo A Fulton 

Consolidation 

State Bonds Proper 

Total amount of bonds canceled in 1869 and 1870. 



$148,000 

157,000 

123,000; 

96,000' 

36,000 

30,000 

151,000 

8,000 



$749,000 




RECAPITULATION— BONDS CANCELED IN 1869 AND 1870. 



Pacific Railroad. 

Pacific Railroad (Southwest Branch), 6 per cent 

North Missouri 

St. Louis & Iron Mountain : 

Cairo & Fulton 

Platte Country 

Consolidation 

State Bonds Proper 

War Debt Bonds 

Total amount of bonds canceled in 1869 and 1870. 



$151,000 

173,000 

128,000 

89,000 

30,000 

39,000 

179,000 

15,000 

48,000 



$862,000 



STATISTICAL INFORJIATION. 



211 



In 1869 and 1870, Consolidation Bonds amounting to $76,000 were 
exchanged for past due interest coupons, thereby increasing the' bonded 
debt to that extent, and making the actual reduction of the same 
$786,000 instead of 9862,000, the amount of bonds redeemed. 

BONDED DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1871. 



State Bonds Proper 

Pacific RftUroad 

Pacific Railroad— Southwest Branch 6 per ceni 

Pacific Railroad— Southwest Branch guaranteed 7 per cent 

North Missouri 

St. Louis & Iron Mountain 

Cairo and Fnlton '. 

Platte Country 

Hannibal & St. Joseph 

ConsoUdatioD . .'. 

Total bonded debt January 1, 1871 



$469,000 
5,419,000 
1,457,000 
1,589,000 
2,963,000 
2,379,000 
392,000 
504,000 
3,000,000 
2,727,000 



$20,889,000 



The interest'bearing debt was increased during the years 1871 and 
1872 in the sum of $1,301,000, as follows : 



Bonds issued to the State University as provided in the act of March 
29,1872 

Bonds issued for the construction of the Northwestern Lunatic Asylum 
at St. Joseph as provided in the act of March 28, 1872 

Certificate of Indebtedness issued under act of March 29, 1872, to re-im- 
burse the State School Fund for Bank Stock sold to Captain James 
B. Eads, June 12, 1866 



$201,000 
200,000 

900,000 



Total amount of bonds issued in 1872 $1,301,000 



A description of these bonds is submitted as follows : 

STATB UNIVERSITY BONDS. 



201— Six per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 1 to 201, is-' 
sued July 1, 1872, under act of March 29, 1872, entitled ^* An act 
for the benefit of the State University, the Agricultural and Me-' 
chanical College of Missouri, and the School of Mines and Metal- 
lurgy ^nd to settle the account between the State and the Sem-' 
inary Fund, arising from the sale of the stock held by the State 
In tbe Bank of the State of Missouri , in trust for the Seminary, 
Fund, " interest payable semi-annually on first days of Jan. and 
July, at Kational Bank of Commerce, New York $201,000 



212 



auditor's report. 



NORTHWESTERN LUNATIC ASYLUM BONDS. 



200^Six per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 1 to 200, is- 
sued Julv 1, 1872, under act of March 28, 1872, entitled ** An act 
to establish an Insane Asylum in the northwest or southwest 
portion of the State, to be called the Northwestern or Southwest- 
em Missouri Insane Asylum.'Mnterest payable semi-annually on 
first days of January and July, at National Bank of Commerce, 
New York 



$200,000 



SCHOOL FUND CERTIFICATE OF INDEBTEDNESS. 



1— Six per cent, certificate of Indebtedness issued July 1, 1872, to the 
State Board of Education as trustees of the public school fund 
under act of March 29, 1872, entitled '*An act to settle the account 
of the State of Missouri with the Public School Fund of the State 
on account of the stock held by the State in the Bank of the State 
of Missouri, in trust for the Public School Fuad," interest paya- 
ble annually on the first day of March in each year $900,000 



In 1872, Pacific Railroad bonds amounting to $422,000 were pur- 
chased by the Fund Oommissioners and canceled, leaving the outstand- 
ing debt January 1, 1873, $21,768,000, as shown in the following table : 

BONDED DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1873. 



State Bonds Proper 

Pacific Railroad 

Pacific Railroad— South west Branch 6 per cent 

Pacific Railroad— Southwest Branch guaranteed 7 per cent. 

North Missouri Railroad 

St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railroad 

Cairo and Fulton Railroad 

Platte Country Railroad 

Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad 

Consolidation 

State University 

Northwestern Lunatic Asylum 

School Fund Certificate of Indebtedness 

Total debt January 1 , 1873 



$458,000 

4,997,000 

1,457,000 

1,589,000 

2,963,000 

2,379,000 

392,000 

504,000 

3,000,000 

2,727,000 

201,000 

200,000 

900,000 



$21,768,000 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



213 



For the purpose of funding that portion of the debt which ma- 
tured in 1874 and 1875, State funding bonds, amounting to 151,000,000, 
were authorized by the act of March 30, 1874. 



DESCRIPTION OF STATE FUNDING BONDS. 



400 Six per cent. 20-year bonds of SI, 000 each, numbered 1 to 400, is- 
sued July I, 1874, underact of March 30, 1874, entitled ''An 
act to provide for the Issuing of funding bonds for the pur- 
pose or paying the State indebtedness maturing daring the 
years 1874 and 1875, so far as the means otherwise provided 
by law for their payment shall prove insufficient,' Interest! 
payable semi-annually on first days of January and July at; 
the National Qank of Commerce in New York 



600 



1,000 



Six per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 401 to 1,000,' 
Issued January 1, 1875— other description same as above 



$400,000 



600,000 



Total amount of Funding Bonds issued < $1,000,000 



STATB BANE STOCK REFUNDING BONDS. 

The first section of an act approved March 11, 1874, directed the 
issue of bonds amounting to $104,410, ^^for the purpose of refunding 
to certain stockholders of the National Bank of the State of Missouri 
the dividend declared June 30, 1866, upon ten thousand six hundred 
and eighty three shares of stock formerly owned by the State in the 
Bank of the State of Missouri.'^ These bonds were issued in 1874 and 
delivered to the National Bank of the State of Missouri for the use of 
stockholders aforesaid. 



DESCRIPTION OF STATE BANK STOCK REFUNDING BONDS. 



104 Six per cent. 20-jear bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 1 to 104, is- 
; sued April 1^ 1874, nnder act of March 11, 1874, entitled ^^An act 
I refandinff to the National Bank of the State of Missouri, for 
the use 01 certain stockholders therein, the dividend declared 
June 30, 1866, i:u)on the stock formerly held by the State in the 
Bank of the State of Missouri," interest payable semi-annually 
I on the first days of January and July at National Bank of Com- 
merce, New I ork 

1 Six per cent. 20-year bond for $410, numbered 135— other descrip- 
tion same as above 



105 



Total amount of bank stock bonds issued 



$104,000 
410 



$104,410 



214 



auditor's report. 



HANNIBAL k ST. JOSEPH RAILROAD— STATE RENEWAL BONDS. 

Under the act of February 22, 1851, entitled "An act to expedite 
the construction of the Pacific Railroad and of the Hannibal & St 
Joseph Railroad," twenty -year bonds aggregating $1,500,000 were is- 
sued to the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad Company. With one 
exception, that of bond No. 1,244 for $1,000, these bonds were taken 
up and canceled, and in lieu thereof renewal bonds were issued as 
provided in the act of March 21, 1874, entitled "An act to authorize 
the issue of new State bonds in renewal of certain other bonds here- 
tofore issued to the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad Company, and to 
maintain and perpetuate the first lien of the State to secure the pay- 
ment thereof." 



DESCRIPTION OF HAKNIBAL & ST. JOSEPH RAILROAD— STATE RE- 

NEWAL BONDS. 



500, Six per cent. 30-year bonds of SI, 000 each, numbered 1 to 500, issued 
July 1, 1874, underact of March 21, 1874, interest payable semi- 
annually at the National Bank of Commerce, New York 



203 



Six per cent. 20-year bonds of 81.000 each, numbered 501 to 703, is- 
sued July 1 , 1875— other description same as above 



lU5Six percent. 20-year bonds of SI, 000 each, numbered 704 to 868, is- 
I sued Jan. 1 , 1876— other description same as above 



614>Six per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 869 to 1,482, 
lissued July 1, 1876— other description same as above 



17 



1499 



Six per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 1,483 to 1,499, 
issued July 1, 1877— other description same as above 



Total amount of H. & St. Jo. Renewal Bonds issued, 



$600,000 

203,000 

165,000 

614,000 

17,000 



$1,499^000 



During the years 1873 and 1874 State bonds were redeemed and 
canceled as follows : 



Pacific Railroad bonds redeemed in 1873 , 

State Bank Stock Refunding bond redeemed in 1874 

Pacific Railroad bonds redeemed in 1874 

St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad bonds redeemed in 1874 , 

North Missouri Railroad bonds redeemed in 1874 

Total amount of bonds redeemed and canceled in 1873-4 



$599,000 

410 

663,000 

39,000 

111,000 



$1,412,410 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



215 



From the foregoing it is seen that in 1874 the interest-bearing debt 
was increased $504,410 by issuing that amount of Funding and Bank 
Stock Retunding Bonds, and that in 1873 and 1874 it was reduced 
$1,412,410 through the redemption of a like amount of Railroad and 
Bank Stock Refunding Bonds, leaving the total indebtedness January 
1, 1875, $20,860,000, as follows : 

BONDED DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1875. 



State bonds proper , 

Pacific Railroad 

Pacific Railroad— Southwest Branch 6 per cent 

Pacific Railroad — Southwest Branch guaranteed 7 per cent. 

North Missouri Railroad 

St. Lonis & Iron Mountain Railroad 

Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad 

Platte Country Railroad 

Cairo & Fulton Railroad 

Ck)n8olidatlon 

State Universitv , 

Northwestern Lunatic Asylum 

School Fund Certificate of Indebtedness 

State Funding 

State Bank Stock Refunding 

Total debt, January 1, 1875 



$459,000 

3,735,000 

1,457,000 

1,589,000 

2,852,000 

2,340,000 

3,000.000 

504,000 

392,000 

2,727,000 

201,000 

200,000 

900,000 

400,000 

104,000 



$20,860,000 



In the years 1875, 1876 and 1877, a large amount of railroad bonds 
matured which necessitated the funding act approved March 29, 1875, 
entitled ^^An act to authorize the issue and sale of Renewal Funding 
bonds for the purpose of meeting and paying the maturing State in- 
debtedness/' By this act it was declared to be the pleasure of the 
Legislature that all bonds of this State issued in the years 1855, 1856 
and 1857, and made redeemable at the pleasure of the Legislature at 
any time after the expiration of twenty years from the date of issue, 
should be redeemed and paid, principal and accrued interest, at the 
expiration of twenty years from their respective dates. The Fund 
Commissioners were authorized to issue from time to time such num- 
ber of these bonds, not exceeding, in the aggregate, 95,000,000, as 
should be necessary to pay off and redeem said maturing railroad 



— — »_ I 



216 



auditor's repokt. 



bonds. They were designated " Renewal Funding Bonds," and were 
sold by the Governor and Fund Oommissioners after notice of thirty 
days had 'been given to purchasers* The amount issued under this act 
was $4,350,000. 



DESCRIPTION OF STATE RENEWAL FUNDING BONDS. 



260 



540 

2,287 

200 

225 

838 



4,350 



Six per cent. 5-20 bonds of 1,000 each, numbered 1 to 260, issued 
May 1, 1875, under act of March 29, 1875, interest payable 
semi-annually on the first days of January and July at Na- 
tional Bank of Commerce in New York 

Six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 261 to 800 is- 
sued July 1 , 1875, other description same as above 

Six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 801 to 3,087, is- 
sued December 1, 1875, otner description same as above 



Six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 3,088 to 3,2^, 
issued July 1, 1876, other description same as above 

Six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 3,288 to 3,512, 
issued December 1, 1876, other description same as above.. 

Six per cent. 5-20 bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 3.513 to 4,350, 
issued May 15, 1877, other description same as above 

Total amount of Renewal Funding bonds issued 



$260,000 
540,000 

2,287,000 
200,009 
225,000 
838,000 



$4,350,000 



When the State Penitentiary was leased in 1873, the contracts for 
convict labor held with the State by Messrs. Meyberg and Wangelin 
and Hancock, Koach & Company were annulled. These firms sub- 
mitted to the Legislature claims for damages resulting from the abro- 
gation of their contracts. For the purpose of adjusting said claims, 
the former amounting to $26,002 and the latter to f 15,180, the act of 
March 29, 1875, authorized bonds to be issued and delivered to said 
contractors. These bonds are knoVn as ^^Penitentiary Indemnity 
Bonds,'' and amounted to $41,000, the remainder of the claims being 
paid in cash. 

» 

DESCRIPTION OF PENITENTIA.RY INDEMNITY BONDS. 



41 six per cent. 20-year bonds of $1,000 each, ndmbered 1 to 41, issued 
April 1, 1875, under act of March 29, 1875, interest payable semi-an- 
nually at National Bank of Commerce, New York 



$41,000 



STATISTIOAL INFOBMATION. 



217 



In 1875 and 1876 the following described bonds were issned : 



State Funding bonds, issued Jan. 1, 1876 

State Renewal Funding bonds, issued in 1875 

State Penitentiary Indemnity bonds, issned April 1, 1876 

State Renewal Funding bonds, issued in 1876 

Total amount. of bonds issued in 1875 and 1876 



$600,000 

3,087,000 

41,000 

425,000 

$4,153,000 



During the same period State bonds were redeemed and canceled 
as follows: 



Pacific Railroad bonds, 6 per cent 

faciflc Railroad bonds (Southwest Branch), 6 per cent 

Pacific Railroad bonds (Southwest Branch), guaranteed 7 per cent — 

North Missouri Railroad bon^ds, 6 per cent 

St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad bonds, 6 per cent 

Total amount of bonds redeemed and canceled in 1875 and 1876 — 



$764,000 
671,000 

1,589,000 
908,000 
812.000 



$4,744,000 



The actual reduction of the debt within the time named was $591,* 
000, leaving outstanding January 1, 1877, $20,269,000, as detailed in the 
following table : 

BONDED DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1877. 



State bonds proper. 

Pacific Railroad 

Pacific Railroad (Southwest Branch), direct sixes 

North Missouri Railroad 

St. Louis & Ir«n Mountain Railroad 

Hannibal A St. Joseph Railroad 

Cairo & Fulton Railroad 

Platte Country Railroad 

Consolidation 

State University 

Northwestern Lunatic Asylum 

School Fund Certificate of Indebtedness 



$459,000 

2,971,000 

786, COO 

1,944,000 

1,528,000 

3,000,000 

392,000 

504,000 

2,727,000 

201,000 

200,000 

900,000 



218 



auditor's rrport. 



BONDED DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1877.— Continued. 



State Funding bonds $1,000,000 

State Bank Stock Refunding 104,000 

State Renewal Funding bonds 3,512,000 

Penitentiary Indemnity 41,000 

Total debt, January 1, 1877 



$20,269,000 



The anticipated receipts into the State Revenue Fand during the 
year 1877 were deemed insufficient for the prompt payment of outstand- 
ing warrants and the current expenses of the State government for 
that year. This deficiency in the revenue occasioned the act of April 
23, 1877, entitled ^^ An act to authorize the issue and sale of revenue 
bonds for the purpose of meeting and paying outstanding Auditor's 
warrants.^' Under this act bonds amounting to $250,000, and known as 
''Revenue Bonds of the State of Missouri," were issued. 

DESCRIPTION OF REVENUE BONDS. 



260 six per cent. 2-year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 1 to 260, Issued 
June 1, 1877, under act of April 23, 1877, interest pavable semi- 
annually on the first days of January and July at the office of State 
Treasurer 



$250,000 



In 1877 bonds amounting to $1,088,000 were issued as follows : 



Renewal Funding bonds. Issued May 15, 1877 

Revenue bonds, issued June 1, 1877 

Total amount of bonds Issued In 1877 



$838,000 
250,000 



$1,088,000 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



219 



Bonds redeemed and canceled in 1877 and 1878 are described as 
follows: 



State bonds proper, or what were formerly known as '^Temporary 
Loan Bonds," issued in 1851, held by James H. Britton and pay- 
ment made April 23, 1877, as provided in section 2 of the general 
oppropriation act of 1877 

North Missouri Railroad bonds 

St. Loula & Iron Mountain Railroad 

Cairo & Fulton Railroad 

Pacific Railroad (Southwest Branch) 

Total amount of bonds redeemed and canceled in 1877 and 1878 . . 



$20,000 
250,000 
167,000 
125,000 
786,000 



$1,348,000 



As shown in the foregoing tables the State debt was reduced 
f 260,000 in the years 1877-8, and that on the first day of January, 1879, 
it amounted to $20,009,000, as follows: 

BONDED DEBT JANUARY 1, 1879. 



State bonds proper 

Pacific Railroad bonds 

North Missouri Railroad 

St. Louis 4& Iron Mountain Railroad . . . . . 

Hannibal A St. Joseph Railroad , 

Cairo A Fulton Railroad 

Platte Country Railroad 

Consolidation 

State University 

Northwestern Lunatic Asylum 

School Fund Certificate of Indebtedness 

State Funding bonds 

State Bank State Reftinding 

State Renewal Funding 

Penitentiary Indemnity 

Revenue bonds 

Total debt January 1, 1879 



$439,000 

2,971,000 

1,694,000 

1,361,000 

3,000,000 

267,000 

504,000 

2,727,000 

201,000 

200,000 

900,000 

1,000,000 

104,000 

4,350,000 

41,000 

250,000 



$20,009,000 



220 



auditor's bepobt. 



In 1879 the surplus revenue was insuflSicient to redeem $250,0C0 
revenue bonds, issued June 1, 1877, and falling due June 1, 1879, con- 
sequently the General Assembly, by an act approved May 9, 1879, 
authorized the issue and sale of $250,000 renewal revenue bonds with 
which to redeem said outstanding revenue bonds. 

DESCRIPTION OF RENEWAL REVENUE BONDS. 



250 six per cent. 2-year bonds of $1,000 each, numbered 1 to 250, issued 
June 1, 1879, under act of May 9, 1879« interest payable semi-an- 
nually on first days of January and July at office of State Treas- 
urer 



$250,000 



During 1880 the Fund Commissioners called in for redemption re- 
newal funding bonds amounting to $500,000, leaving the outstanding 
bonded debt January 1, 1881, $19,509,000, as follows : 

BONDED DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1881. 



State bonds proper 

Pacific Railroad bonds , 

Nortn Missouri Railroad bonds 

St. Lonis & Iron Mountain Railroad bonds 
Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad bonds. . . . 

Cairo A Fulton Railroad bonds 

Platte Country Railroad bonds 

Consolidation bonds 

State University 

Northwestern Lunatic Asylum 

School Fund Certificate of indebtedness . . . 

State Funding bonds 

State Bank Stock Refunding 

State Renewal Funding 

Penitentiary Indemnity 

Renewal Revenue bonds 

Total bonded debt, January 1, 1881 



$439,000 

2,971,000 

1,694,000 

1,361,000 

3,000,0CO 

267,000 

504,000 

2,727,000 

201,000 



200,000 

900,000 
1,000,000 

104,000 

3,850,000 

41,000 

250,000 



819,509,000 



\ 

STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 221 



PATMBNT BY THE HANNIBAL & ST. J08BPH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

It was provided in an act of the General Assembly, approved 
February 20, 1865, that *' Whenever the trustees provided for in the 
first section of this act shall pay into the treasury of the State a sum 
of money equal in amount to all indebtedness due or owing by said 
company to the State, and all liabilities incurred by the State, by rea- 
son of having issued her bonds and loaned the same to said company 
as a loan of the credit of the State, together with all interest that has, 
and may at the time when such payment shall be made, have accrued 
and remain unpaid by said company," the Governor was authorized 
and required, upon receiving a certificate of such fact from the State 
Treasurer, to make over, assign and convey to the trustees provided 
for in said act all the first liens and mortgages held by the State under 
the provision of an act of the Legislature, approved February 22, 1851, 
to secure the payment of a loan of the credit of the State to said rail- 
road company in the sum of $1,500,000, and also of an act of the Legis- 
lature, approved December 10, 1855, to secure the payment of a like 
loan of the credit of the State in the sum of $1,500,000. 

On the 20th day of June, 1881, R. G. Kolston, Heman Dowd and 
Oren Root, Jr., trustees of the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad Com- 
pany, paid into the State Treasury the sum of three millions and 
ninety thousand dollars. Of this amount $3,000,000 was placed to the 
credit of the State Revenue Fund and the remainder, or $90,000, was 
credited to the State Interest Fund and used in the payment of the 
semi-annual interest maturing July 1, 1881, on Hannibal & St. Joseph 
Railroad bonds. 

At the time this payment was made, bonds issued to said railroad 
company and all other State bonds were commanding a large premium 
in every money market of this country and Europe. Excepting a por- 
tion of the Renewal Funding bonds and 1(156,000 State bonds proper 
that had matured, the State had no outstanding bonds subject to call 
and in the redemption of which the payment by the Hannibal & St. 
Joseph Railroad Company could be utilized. The taxable wealth of 
the State for taxes of 1882 had increased over 990,000,000, as compared 
with the assessment for taxes of 1880, so that with the ordinary surplus 
revenae derived from taxation not reckoning any further increase in 
valuations, every outstanding bond of the State maturing or subject to 
redemption prior to 1886 could have been retired before the close of 
1884. 

Under these circumstances it was held by the Fund Commissioners 
that the payment of three millions of dollars was not such '^ a sum of 



222 auditok's report. 



money equal in amount to all indebtedness due or owing by said com- 
pany to the State, and all liabilities incurred by the State by reason of 
having issued her bonds and loaned the same to said company." 

The payment equaled in amount the face value of the bonds but 
was wholly insufficient to purchase the bonds themselves, or any other 
State bonds having the same length of time to run. With a Sinking 
Fund sufficient for the retirement of all maturing obligations of the 
State, the acceptance of the three millions as full payment of the bonds 
would have involved the State with the payment of interest on Han- 
nibal & St. Joseph Railroad bonds from July 1, 1881, to the dates of 
their maturity. The Fund Commissioners therefore directed the State 
Treasurer to receive the money in part payment of the amount due 
the State, which was done in the following language : 

" OiTT OP Jefferson, June 20, 1881. 

Received of R. G. Rolston, Heman Dowd and Oren Root, Jr., 
trustees Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad Oompany, Three Millions and 
Ninety Thousand Dollars on account of the statutory mortgage now 
held by the State of Missouri against the said railroad." 

After this receipt had been executed a proceeding was commenced 
in the Supreme Court of Missouri to compel the Treasurer to certify to 
the Governor that the relators had paid into the State treasury ^' a 
sum of money equal in amount to all indebtedness due or owing by 
said company to the State," so that the relators might secure the 
release of the Staters lien on said railroad as contemplated in section 
2 of the act of March 20, 1865. The writ of jnandamus was denied 
and the petition dismissed, the court holding that as the Hannibal & 
St. Joseph Railroad Company did not accept the act of 1865 or take 
any other action under it until after the adoption of the Constitution 
of 1875, the State's lien could not be released or the company relieved 
from the payment of interest yet to accrue on the bonds loaned to said 
company without violating the provisions of section 50, article 4, of 
the Constitution. See 74 Mo., p. 335. 

After the decision rendered by the Supreme Court of Missouri, the 
company filed a bill in equity in the United States Circuit Court at 
Jeflferson City, praying that the Governor be enjoined from selling the 
road and that he make over, assign and convey to the trustees all the 
first liens and mortgages held by the State under the provisions of the 
acts of February 22, 1851, and December lO, 1855. Justice Miller, in a 
decision rendered at St. Louis, February 10, 1882, declined to grant an 
injunction, holding that the payment was insufficient to hold the State 
harmless of all liability incurred by reason of having loaned her 
bonds to said company. 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION 223 



The company thereupon filed an amended bill which asked for the 
same relief heretofore sought, and in the event of its being refused, 
that the $3,000,000 paid into the State Treasury be refunded. 

On the 8th day of August, 1882, Justice McOreary of the U. S. Cir- 
cuit Court filed his decision, in which it was affirmed that the payment 
of $3,000,000 did not satisfy the claim of the State nor entitle the com- 
pany to an assignment of the State's statutory mortgage. 

An injunction was granted to enjoin the sale of the road on condi- 
tion that the company pay the installment of interest due January 1, 
1882, on the Hannibal & St. Joseph bonds. 

A special master in chancery was also appointed, whose duty it was 
to ascertain from certain rules prescribed by the court, the sum of 
money to be paid by the company to the State. In obedience to this 
decision the company paid into the Treasury, October 2, 1882, $90,000, 
a sum sufficient to pay the installment of interest due January 1, 1882. 

The special master in chancery, Hon. John E. Cravens, of Kansas 
City, filed his final report on the 19th day of March, 1883. This report 
gave the State $549,083.58, as the amount due from the company on the 
first day of January, 1883, with interest thereafter at the rate of one- 
fourth of one per cent, per month, to be compounded on the first days 
of July and January until paid. 

Exceptions to the master's report were filed by both parties, and 
by order of the circuit judge the cause was set for hearing on the said 
exceptions on the 24th of April, 1883. 

After full argument by the solicitors of their respective exceptions 
to the master's report, the case was submitted to the court on the 25th 
day of April, 1883. On the 11th day of May thereafter the opinion of 
the court was filed and on the 2d day of July following, during the same 
term of court, the final decree was filed. This decree gave the State, 
in addition to all other amounts theretofore paid, the sum of $476,049.27, 
^ith interest at the rate of three per cent, per andum on said amount 
from the 11th day of May, 1883, until paid. 

From this judgment and decree the complainants at once prayed 
an appeal to the Supreme Court of the United States, and the respon- 
dents, upon the advice of their counsel, also pr^tyed for an appeal. 

The appeals were granted, and being returnable to the October 
term, 1883 of said court, the transcript of the proceedings of the cir- 
cuit court was accordingly returned and filed in that court. 

The cause is now pending in the Supreme Court of the United 
States, where it will be disposed of according to the usual course of 
proceediui^s in that tribunal. 

In the general appropriation act of March 26th, 1885, appropria- 
tions were made for the payment of three years past due interest on 
Hannibal & St» Joseph Railroad bonds and for accrj^ing interest. 



224 



auditor's report. 



The following balance sheet will show the payments made by the 
Hannibul & St. Joseph Railroad Oompany, and how the same were in- 
vested by the Fund Commissioners up to January 1, 1883 : 



Hannibal A St. Joseph Railroad Company. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Jane 20, 1881 By Treasurer's recei^at 

October 2, 1882 By Treasurer's receipt. 



July 1, 1881 To interest paid on Hannibal & 

St. Joseph bonds for July 1, 1881 

July 7 , 1881 To cash paid for Hannibal & S t . 

Joseph bond No. 1244 



$3,090,000 00 
90,000 00 



January 1, 1882 To cash paid for interest matur- 

ine January 1, 1882, on Hanni- 
bal & St. Joseph bonds 

August 10, 1882 To cash paid for 1270 Missouri Re- 
newal Funding bonds of 81,000 
each and accrued interest 



$90,000 Op 

1,000 00 

I 
I 

90,000 Oo' 
1,282,700 00 



August 23, 1882 To cash paid for 1171 U. S. Reg. 

4 per cent, bonds of 81,000 ea&i 

and premium on same ^..i 1,399,345 00 



August 23, 1882 To cash paid for 20 Missouri State 

bonds proper of $1,000 each and 
accrued interest 



August 23, 1882 To cash paid for 156 Missouri 

State bonds of $1,000 each and 
accrued interest 

August 23, 1882 To cash paid for 122 Missouri 

bonds of Sundry Series, includ- 
ing premium and accrued Inter- 
est 



20,200 00 



157,660 00 



To cash inyested in other bonds. 
Total 



138,399 60 
795 40' 



$3,180,000 00, $3,180,000 00 



In 1883 and 1884 the Fund Oommissioners sold the U. 8. bonds 
bought August 23, 1882, and the proceeds arising from their sale were 
invested in the purchase of 1,235 outstanding bonds of the State of Mis- 
souri. 

The 1,171 U. S. bonds thus disposed of cost the State 119^ and were 
sold at an average of a fraction over 121.08, bringing the sum of $1,417,- 
868.75. Between the date of purchase and the dates when these bonds 
were sold interest was received on the same amounting to 1^63,470.00^ 
With the money thus realized, including $795.40 reported January 1 
1883, as invested in other bonds, 1,235 Missouri bonds were retired at a 
cost of $1,481,961.38. 



STAtnSTICAL IirroBMATION. 



225 



In the following accoant is 9hown a description of the State bonds 
purchased and the cost, of the same: 



Hiinnibftl & St. Joseph Ballroad Company. 



1883-4 By cash from sale of 1,171 U. S. bonds 
By interest collected on U. S. bonds. . 
By balance January 1, 1883 




To cash paid for 469 Hannibal & St. Joseph Rail- 
road bonds 

To cash paid for 242 State Funding bonds 

To cash paid for 113 State University bonds 

To cash paid for 97 Consolidation bonds 

To cash paid for 97 North Missouri R. R. bonds. . 

To cash paid for 81 Pacific Railroad bonds 

To cash paid for 53 St. Louis & Iron Mountain 
Railroad bonds 

To cash paid for 45 Northwestern Lunatic Asylum 
bonds .' 



To cash paid for 17 Platte Country Railroad bonds. 

To cash paid for 12 Penitentiary Indemnity bonds. 

To cash paid for 8 State Bank Stock Reftinding 
bonds 

To cash paid for 1 Cairo & Fulton Railroad bond. 

Balance 

Totals 



1669,800 93 
307,145 20 
139,777 13 
108,443 58 
106,692 10 
90,525 48 

58,727 90 

54,579 80 
19,618 46 
15,286 80 

10,173 00 

1,191 00 

172 77 



Cr. 



$1,417,868 75 

63,470 00 

795 40 



$1,482,134 15 



$1,482,134 15 



8 P— 15 



226 



auditor's report. 



From January 1, 1881, to Decem'ber 31, 1882, the following de- 
scribed bonds, amounting to $2,531)000 were redeemed and purchased 
by the Fund Oommissioners : 

BONDS REDEEMED AND PURCHASED IN 1881 AND 1882. 



In 1881. 

250 Renewal Revenae bonds 

I 
250 Renewal Funding bonds 

2 State bonds proper , 

1 Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad bond 

In 1882. 



1 ,520 Renewal funding bonds . . 
87 Pacific Railroad bonds.. . 
41. North Missouri Railroad. 



29 St Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad. 

I 
4 Cairo & Fulton Railroad 

1 Platte Country Railroad 

41 Consolidation 

I 
260 State bonds proper 



15 
12 



Bank Stock Refunding 

State Funding bonds 

I 
16 Northwestern Lunatic Aaylum bonds 

I'State University bond : 

1 Penitentiary Indemnity bond 



2,331 Total amount of bonds redeemed and purchased in 1881-2 



$250,000 

250,000 

2,000 

1,000 

1,520,000 

87,000 

41,000 

29,000 

4,000 

1,000 

41,000 

260,000 

15,000 

12,000 

16,000 

1,000 

1,000 



•2,531,000 



CANCELLATION OF BONDS IN THB SCHOOL AND SEMINARY FUNDS. 

On the first day of July, 1881, the Board of Fund Oommissioners 
canceled all State bonds held in trust for the Public School and Semi* 
nary Funds, as provided in an act of the General Assembly, approved 
March 23, 1881, entitled ''An act to consolidate the Permanent School 
Fund and the Seminary Fund in Oertificates of Indebtedness of the 
State bearing six per cent, interest, and to provide for canceling the 
State bonds and certificate of indebtedness now held in trust for said 
funds." 



8TATI8T10AL INFORMATION. 



227 



A description of the bonds and certificate of indebtedness thas 
-canceled is furnished in the following table : 

SCHOOL AND SEMINARY BONDS CANCELED. 



2,080 
25 
6 
1 
2 
16 
1 



3,131 



Renewal Funding bonds 

Pacific Railroad bonds 

North Missouri Railroad bonds 

St. Louis A Iron Mountain Railroad bond.. 

Cairo& Fulton Railroad bonds 

Consolidation bonds 

State bond proper 

School Fund Certificate of Indebtedness 

Total amount of bonds and certificates canceled in 1881 



$2,080,000 

26,000 

6,000 

1,000 

2,000 

16,000 

1,000 

900,000 



$3,031,000 



Two thousand and nine bonds and the certificate of indebtedness 
for $900,000 so canceled, belonged to the Permanent School Fond, and 
one hundred and twenty-two bonds to' the State Seminary Fund. 

In place of the bonds and the certificate of indebtedness belonging 
to the School Fund, the Fund Commissioners issued a consolidated 
Oertificate of Indebtedness for $2,909,000, payable thirty years from 
the first day of July, 1881, with interest at the rate of six per cent, per 
annum, payable annually on the first day of January. 

A certificate of indebtedness for $122,000, payable thirty years 
afrer Jaly 1, 1881, and with interest at six per cent, per annum, was, in 
like manner, issued in lieu of the bonds held in the Seminary Fund. 

From the foregoing it is seen that certificates of indebtedness, 
amounting to 1^3,031,000 were issued in 1881, as a permanent invest- 
ment for the use and benefit of the School and Seminary Funds. 

That in 1881 and 1882 the bonds purchased and redeemed by the 
Fund Commissioners, and those belonging to the School and Seminary 
Funds, including the School Oertificate for $900,000, that were canceled 
as provided in the act of March 23, 1881, represent a3 indebtedness of 
■$5,562,000. 

A recapitulation of the bonds and certificates so retired is pre- 
«ented in the following table: 



228 



auditor's report. 



RECAPITULATION— BONDS CANCELED IN 1881 AND 1882. 



1 

250 

3,850 

112 

47 

30 

6 

1 

57 

263 

15 

12 

m 

16 
1 
1 



4,682 



Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad bond 

Renewal Revenue bonds . . . , 

Renewal Funding bonds 

Paciflo Railroad bonds 

North Missouri Railroad bonds 

St. I^ouis & Iron Mountain Railroad bonds 

Cairo & Fulton Railroad bonds 

Platte Country Railroad bond 

Consolidation bonds 

State bonds proper 

Bank Stock Refunding bonds r 

State Funding bonds 

Northwestern Lunatic Asylum bonds 

State University bond ; 

Penitentiary Indemnity bond. . .* 

School Fund Certificate of Indebtedness 

Total amount of bonds canceled in 1881 and 1882. 



$1,UOO 

250,000 

3,850,000 

112,000 

47,000 

30,000 

6,000 

1,000 

67,000 

263,000 

15,000^ 

12,000 

16,000 

1,000 

1,000 

900,000 



$5,562,000- 



On the first day of January, 1883, the State debt amouiited to $16^ 
978,000, as follows : 

STATE DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1883. 



State bonds proper 

Pacific Railroad bonds 

North Missouri Railroad bonds 

St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad bonds 

flannibal & St. Joseph Railroad bonds 

Cairo & Fulton Railroad bonds 

Platte Country Railroad bonds 

Consolidation bonds 

State University bonds 

Korth western Lunatic Asylum bonds 



$176,000- 
2,859,000 
1,647,000 
1,331,000 
2,999,000 
261,000 
503,000 
2,670,000 
200,000 
184,000» 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



229 



BONDED DEBT JANUARr 1, 1883— CoNxmuito. 

$tate Fanding bonds 

State Bank Stock Refunding bonds 

Penitentiary Indemnity bonds 

Missouri Consolidated 6 per cent. Certificate of Indebtedness held in 
trust for the permanent School Fund 

Hissonri Consolidated 6 per cent. Certificate of Indebtedness held in 
trust for the ^tate Seminary Fund 

Total State debt January 1, 1883 



$988,000 
89,000 
40,000 

2,909,000 

122,000 
$16,978,000 



From January 1, 18S3, to December 31, 1884, the Fund Oommis- 
«ioner8 redeemed and purchased the following described bonds, 
amounting to $2,144,000 : 

BONDS EEDEEMED AND PURCHASED IN 1883 AND 1884. 



In 1883. 

* 

176 State bonds proper. .• 

I 
258 Missouri Pacific Railroad bonds. . . . 

! 

117 North Missouri Railroad bonds 



112 



50 



St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad bonds. 

Cairo & Fulton Railroad bonds 

Platte Country Railroad bonds 



117 State University bonds 

156 Consolidation bonds 

502 state Funding bonds v 

21 Northwestern Lunatic Asylum bonds 

4; Penitentiary Indemnity bonds 

9 state Bank Stock Refunding bonds 

In 1884. 

46 Missouri Pacific Railroads bonds 

73'North Missouri Railroad bonds 

27 St Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad bonds , 



Cairo & Fulton Railroad bonds, 



22, Platte Country Railroad bonds 



$176,000 

258,000 

117,000 

112,000 

9,000 

50,000 

117,000 

156,000 

302,000 

21,000 

4,000 

9,000 

46,000 
73,000 
27,000 
4,000 
22,000 



230 



auditor's bkpobt. 



BONDS REDEEMED AND PURCHASED IN 1883 AND 1884— Continubd. 



31 Consolidation bonds 

68 State Funding bonds 

6 State University bonds 

65 Northwestern Lunatic Asylum bonds, 

I 

12 Penitentiary Indemnity bonds 



110 
359 



2,144 



Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad bonds 

Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad State Renewal bonds 



Total amount of bonds redeemed and purchased in 1883 and '84 



$31,000- 

68,000* 

6.000 

55,000- 

12,000^ 

IIO.OOO 

359,000* 



$2,144,000- 



INCBEA8B OF THE STaT£ DEBT. 

The act approved March 31, 1883, entitled '' An act to provide for 
the permanent investment of any moneys remaining in the State treas* 
ury and belonging to either the '* Public School Fund " or the '' Semi- 
nary Fond," etc., provided that when any moneys should be paid into 
the State treasury, from whatever source derived, whether by grants 
gift or devise, or from any other source, and the same were credited lo 
either the Public School or Seminary Funds, it should be the duty of 
the Fund Commissioners to issue certificates of indebtedness of the 
State of Missouri, payable twenty years after date and bearing interest 
at the rate of five per cent, per annum, said certificates to be sacredly 
held and preserved in the treasury for the use and benefit of said 
funds, the interest thereon to be appropriated for educational purposes 
in accordance with law and the grant, gift or devise. 

Under the provisions of this act a certificate of $22,000 was issued 
for the benefit of the Public School Fund, and certificates aggregating; 
1^87,000, were issued for the benefit of the State University, the same 
being described as follows : 



STATISTIOAL INFOBMATION. 



231 



Ml88onri five per cent, certificate of indebtedness issued July 1, 1883, for 
the State School Fund 

Missouri five per cent, certificate of Indebtedness, Issued July 2, 1883, for 
the benefit of the State University 

Missouri Aye per cent, certificate of Indebtedness, Issued July 20, 1883, for 
the benefit of the State University 

Missouri five per cent.certificate of indebtedness, issued November 1, 1883, 
for the benefit of the State University 

Missouri five per cent, certificate of indebtedness, Issued January 30, 1884, 
for the benefit of the State University 

Missouri five per cent certificate of Indebtedness, Issued April 19, 1884, 
for the benefit of the State University 

Total amount of certificates Issued in 1883 and 1884 



$22,000 

242,000 

100, COO 

5,000 

5,000 

35,000 
$409,000 



Id 1883 and 1884, as shown above, the interest-bearing debt was 
decreased 92,144,000^by the redemption and purchase of State bonds, 
and during the same period it was increased $409,000 by reason of cer- 
tificates having been issued for the benefit of the State School Fund 
and the University, as contemplated by the act of March 31, 1883. The 
actual reduction of the debt within the time named is, therefore, $1,- 
735,000, leaving the total indebtedness on the first day of January, 
1885, $15,243,000, as described in the following table: 

OUTSTANDING DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1885. 



2,555 Pacific Railroad bonds 

1,457 North Miseoari Railroad bonds 

I 
l,192iSt. Louis <fc Iron Mountain Railroad bonds 

248 Cairo & Fulton Railroad bonds 

I 
431 Platte Country Railroad bonds , 

1,390'Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad bonds 

1,140 Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad State Renewal bonds*. . , 

2,483 Consolidation bonds 

I 
618;State Funding bonds.. 

80.State Bank Stock Refunding bonds 

77 State University bonds 

108' Northwestern Lunatic Asylum bonds T 

I 

24: Penitentiary Indemnity bonds , 



$2,555 000 

1,457,000 

1,192,000 

248,000 

431,000 

1,390,000 

1,140,000 

2,483,000 

618,000 

80,000 

77,000 

108,000 

24,000 



232 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



OUTSTANDHSTG DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1885.— Continubd. 



Mlssonri consolidated glx per cent, certificate of indebtedneBS 
held in traBt for the State School Fund 



MisBouri conBolidated six per cent, certificate of indebtedness 
held in truBt for the State Seminary Fund 

Missonri five per cent, certificate of indebtedness, issued July 
1, 1883, for the State School Fund 

MisBouri five per cent, certificate of indebtedness, issued July 2, 
1883, for the State Seminary Fund 

Missouri five per cent, certificate of indebtedness, issued July 20, 
1883, for the State Seminary Fund 

Missouri five percent, certificate of indebtedness, issued Novem- 
ber 1, 1883, for the State Seminary Fund 



Missouri five per cent, certificate of indebtedness, issued Janu- 
ary 30, 1884, for the State Seminary Fund 



Missouri five per cent, certificate of indebtedness, issued April 
19, 1884, for the State Seminary Fund 



11,803 



Total interest-bearing debt, January 1, 1885. 



$2,900,000 

122,000 

22,000 

242,000 

100,000 

6,000 

5,000 

35,000 



$16,243,000 



FUNDING ACT OF 1885. 

By virtne of an act of the General Assembly, approved March 31, 
1885, provision is made for issuing funding bonds with which to redeem 
bonds of the State maturing in the years 1886, 1887 and 1888. 

Bonds issued under said act cannot exceed in amount seven million 
dollars; are to be denominated ^' State of Missouri Funding Bonds,'' 
and are made payable twenty years from the date of their issue, but 
redeemable at the pleasure of the State, at any time after five years 
from the date thereof. They are to bear interest at a rate not exceed- 
ing four per cent, per annum, payable semi-annually on the first days 
of January and Jaly, interest and principal payable at the National 
Bank of Commerce in the city of New York. 

For engraving and printing said bonds, the Fund Oommissionere 
contracted with the Franklin Bank Note Company, of New York. They 
also advertised, as provided in the act, for sealed bids, to be opened at 
Doon, on Friday, January 15, 1886, at the olSSce of the Fund Commis- 
sioners, for the purchase of a part of these bonds amounting to $650,- 
000 — that amoui^t being required for the redemption of bonds that 
matured March 17, 1886. 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



233 



Bids were solicited by the Fund Commissioners for bonds to bear 
interest at the rates of three and a half, three and sixty-five hundredth 
and four per cent, per annum, and each bidder was required to definitely 
€tate whether, his bid was for all or a part of the bonds offered for sale, 
and to designate specifically the price and the rate or rates of inter- 
est upon which his offer was based. Bidders were also notified that no 
bid would be entertained that was less in amount than the par value 
of the bonds. 

In like manner the Fund Commissioners advertised for sale, on the 
17th day of August, 1886, three and a half per cent, bonds amounting 
to $700,000, the proceeds from such sale being required for the redemp- 
tion of bonds that matured September 5 and November 10, 1886. 

At the sale January 15, 1886, six hundred and fifty three and a 
half per cent, bonds of $U000 each were sold to Messrs. Eubn, Loeb & 
Co., and Simon, Borg & Co., of New York, for the sum of S66 2,538.50, 
Euhn,Loeb & Co. bought 390 of these bonds at a premium of t7,312.50 
and Simon, Borg & Co. 260 at a premium of $5,226.00, making the total 
premium on 650 bonds amount to $12,538.50. 

The 700 three and a half per cent, bonds of 91,000 each, sold Au- 
gust 17, 1886, were bought by Simon, Borg & Co. and Coffin & Stanton, 
also of New York, at a premium of $19,223.69, or for the sum of $719,- 
223.69. Simon, Borg & Co. bought 400 at a premium of $10,520.00, and 
Coffin & Stanton, 300 at a premium of $8,703.69. 

DESCKIPTION OF FUNDING BONDS. 



650 Three and a half per cent, 5-20 bonds of ¥1 ,000 each, numbered 

1 to 650 inchiaive, issued March 15. 188(>,under act of March 

31, 1S85, interest payable semi-annually on the first days of 

January and July at National Bank of Commerce In New 

York 

300 Three and a half per cent. 5-20 bonds of $1 ,000 each , numbered 
651 to 950 inclusive, issued September 1, 1886— other de- 
scription same as above 

400 Three and a half per cent 5-20 bonds of $1 ,000 each, numbered 
051 to 1,350 inclusive, issued November 1, 1886— other de- 
scription same as above 



1,350 



Total amount of funding bonds issued 



$650,000 



300,000 



400,000 



$1,350,000 



Surplus money in the State Revenue and State Interest Funds and 
the proceeds derived from the sale of the above described funding^ 
bonds enabled the Funi Commissioners, in 1885 and 1886 to purchase 
and redeem the following described six per cent bonds : 



284 



auditor's report. 



SIX PER CENT. BONDS PURCHASED AND REDEE&IED IN 1885 AND 1886 



481 

8 
3 
2 
2 
1 

1,081 

75 

120 

891 

462 



2,626 



B0KI>8 PURCHASED IN 1885. 

Hannibal A St. Joseph Railroad State Renewal bonds, face 
value 

North Missouri Railroad bonds, face value 

Platte Country Railroad bonds, face value 

3t Louis <& Iron Mountain Railroad bonds, face value 

Cairo & Fulton Railroad bonds, face value 

State Funding bond, face value 

BONDS PURCHASKD AND MKDEBMED IN 1886. 

Pacific Railroad bonds due March 17, 1886 

North Misscuri Railroad bonds due June 13, 1886 

North Missouri Railroad bonds due Aug. 22, 1886 

North Missouri Railroad bonds due Sept 10, 1866 

Hannibal A !^t. Joseph Railroad bonds due Nov. 10, 1886 

Total amt. of 6 per cent, bonds retired in 1885 and 1886 



•481,000 
8,000 
3,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,00(^ 

1,081,000 

75,000 

120,000 

381,000 

462.000 



$2,626,000 



Of the six per cent, bonds amounting to $^2,626,000, retired in 1885 
and 1886 $1,276,000 were purchased and redeemed with mony belong- 
ing to the State Sinking Fund, while the remainder, or $1,350,000, were 
funded with three and a half per cent, b^^nds, thereby reducing the 
interest on that amount two and a half per cent, or $33,750 annually. 

CERTIFICATE OF INDEBTEDNESS ISSUED FOR THE BENE- 
FIT OF THE STATE SCHOOL AND SEMINARY FDNDS, 



SCHOOL FUND CERTIFICATES. 

On the 28th of April, 1885, in obedience to an act approved March 
31, 1883, authorizing the investment of moneys paid into the State 
Treasury for the use of the School or Seminary Fundd, the Board of 
Fund Commissioners caused to be issued a certificate of indebtedness 
for $201,000, payable twenty years from the first day of January, 1885» 
and bearing interest at the rate of five per centum per annum, payable 
semi annually on the first days of January and July of each year. 
Another five per cent, certificate for $2,000, payable twenty years from 
January 1, 1886, was issued for the benefit of the School Fund on the 
2d day of January, 1886. The money for which these certificates 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



285* 



were issued consisted of 9200,000 traosf erred to the State School Fand 
in December, 1881, from receipts into tho State Revenue Fund of that 
year, as provided in an act entitled ^^An act to appropriate money for 
the support of the State Government for the years 1883 and 1884,'' ap- 
proved April 2, 1883, and of payments into the State Treasury by no- 
taries public appointed in the city of St. Louis under the act of March^ 
24, 1881. 

SEMINARY FUND CERTIFICATES. 

In compliance with said act of March 31, 1883, certificates of in- 
debtedness for ten thousand dollars were issued in 1885 and 1886 for 
the use and benefit of the State Seminary Fund. These certificates 
were issued in lieu of money paid into the Treasury by R. B. Price,, 
Esq., Treasurer of the Board of Curators of the State University, the 
same being derived from the sale of Agricultural College Lands, do- 
nated to the State of Missouri by virtue of an act of OongresSi approved 
July 2, 1862. 

The certificates of indebtedness issued for the benefit of the State 
School and Seminary Funds are further described as follows : 



SCHOOL FUND CBRTIFICATBS. 

Missouri five percent, twenty-year certificate of indebtedness, issued 
April 23, 1885, under act of March 31. 1883, interest payable semi- 
annually on the first days of January and July, said certificate be-i 
ing held in trust by the ?«tate Board of Education for the use and 
benefit of the School Fund 

Missouri five per cent, twenty-year certificate of indebtedness, issued 
January 2, 1886— other description same as above 

SEMINARY FUND CBRTIFICATB8. 

Missouri five per cent, twenty-year certificate of indebtedness held in 
trust by the State Board of Education for the benefit of the Sem-' 
Inary Fund, issued April 2, 1885, for money paid into the treasury! 
January 13, 1885, interest payable semi-annually on first days of 
January and July 

Missouri five per cent, certificate of indebtedness, issued February 25, { 
1886. for money paid into the Treasury February 23, 1886— other de- 
scription same as above 

Total amount of certificates issued in 1885 and 1886 — 



$20}, GOO* 
2,000^ 



5,000- 



5,000* 



$213,000* 



:236 



AUDITOR^S RBPORT. 



CONDITION OF THE STATE DEBT JANUARY 1, 1887. 

From the foregoing it will be seen that in 1886 six per cent, bonds, 
amounting to $1,350,000, have been funded with a like amount of three 
and a half per cent, bonds, thereby reducin/^ the interest to be paid 
•$33,750 annually. 

It will also be observed that in 1885 «nd 1866 six per cent, bonds 
^aggregating $1,276,000, have been purchased or redeemed out of money 
belonging to the State Sinking Fund. During these years the interest- 
bearing debt was increased $213,000 by reason of five per cent, certifi- 
cates of indebtedness having been issued for the benefit of the School 
and Seminary Funds, as provided in the act of March 31, 1883. The 
actual reduction of the debt in 1885 and 1836 was therefore $1,063,000, 
leaving the total interest bearing debt on the first day of January, 
1887, ¥ 14, 180,000, as described in the following table : 

OUTSTANDING DEBT JANUARY 1, 1887. 



1,474 Pacific Railroad bonds 

863 North Missouri Railroad bonds 

1,190 St. Lonis & Iron Mountain Ruilroad bonds 

246 Cairo and Fulton Railroad bonds 

428 Platte Country Railroad bonds 

928 Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad bonds 

659 Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad State Henewal bonds. 

.2,483,Con8olidation bonds 

617 State Funding bonds 

80 State Bank Stock Refunding bonds 

77 State University bonds 

108 Northwestern Lunatic Asylum bonds 

24 Penitentiary Indemnity bonds 

1,350 State of Missouri 3} per cent. 5-20 Funding bonds. 



Missouri consolidated six per cent, certificate of indebtedness 
held in trust for the State School Fund 



Missouri consolidated six per cent, certificate of Indebtedness 
held in trust for the State Seminary Fund 



Missouri five per cent, certificate of indebtedness, Issued July 
1, 1883, for the State School Fund 



Missouri five per cent, certificate of indebtedness, Issued July 
2, 1883, for the State Seminary Fund 



$1,474,000 

863,000 

1,190,000 

246,000 

428,000 

928,000 

659,000 

2,483,000 

617,000 

80,000 

77,000 

108,000 

24,000 

1,350,000 

2,909,000 

122,000 

22,000 

242,000 



SOTATISTICAL infobmation. 



23T 



OUTSTANDING DEBT JANUARY 1, 1887— Continued. 



10,527 



Missouri five per cent, certificate of indebtedness, issued July 
20, 1883, for the State Seminary Fund 

Missouri five per cent, certificate of indebtedness, issued No- 
yember 1, 1883, for the State Seminary Fund 

Missouri five per cent, certificate of indebtedness, Issued Jan- 
uary 30, 1884, for the State Semiuary Fund 

Missouri five per cent, certificate of indebtedness, issued April 

19. 1884, for the -.tate Seminary Fund 

Missouri five per cent certificate of indebtedness, issued April 
2, 1885, for the State Seminary Fund 

Missouri five per cent, certificate of indebtedness, issued April 

28. 1885, for the ^tate School Fund 

Missouri five per cent, certificate of indebtedness, issued Jan- 
uary 2, 1886, for the State School Fund 

Missouri five per cent, certificate of indebtedness, issued Feb- 
ruary 23, 1886, for the State Seminary Fund 

Total interest bearing debt January 1, 1887 



$100,000 
5,000 
5,000 
35,000 
6,000 
201,000 
2,000- 
5,000 



$14, 180, 000' 



THE BONDED DEBT AND WHEN IT MATURE?. 

The bonded debt of Missouri January 1, 1887, amounts to $10,527,- 
000, a description of which, and the dates when it matures, is presented 
in the following table: 



BONDS FALLIKO DUB IN J887. 

928 Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad bonds, due February 28, 1887. 

640 [Pacific Railroad bonds, due March 10,1887 

66 'St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad bonds, due April 13, 1887. 



100 
115 



Pacific Railroad bonds, due May 29, 1887 

St. IfOuis & Iron Mountain Railrod bonds, due June 2, 1887. . . 



Ill St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad bonds, due June 20, 1887. . 
110 North Missouri Railroad bonds, due July 1, 1887 

60 Pacific Railroad bonds, duly July 16, 1887 

26 Pacific Railroad bonds, due July 28, 1887 

131 St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad bonds, due Aug. 5, 1887. . 
106 [St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad bonds, due Sept. 9, 1887. . 



$928,000- 

649,000* 

56,000- 

100,000 

115,000' 

111,000 

110,000 

60,000 

26,000' 

131, OCO' 

106,000* 



238 



AUDITOB^S REPORT. 



BONDED DEBT— CoNTiNUD. 



238 Pacific Railroad bonds, dae Sept 24,1887 

126 St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad bonds, due Oct. 12, 1887. . 
122 ;St. Louis A Iron Mountain Railroad bonds, due Oct. 16, 1887.. 

151 North Missouri Railroad bonds, due Not. 15, 1887 

153 North Missouri Railroad bonds, due Nov. 30, 1887 

86 Pacific Railroad bonds, due Dec. 7, 1887 . . . . , 

280 ;St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad bonds, due Dec. 11, 1887. . 
172 iPacific Railroad bonds, due Deo. 24, 1887 
3,720 Total amount of bonds falling due in 1887 

BONDS PALLING DUB IK 1888. 

2,483 iConsolidation bonds, due Jan. 1, 1888 
I 
1 15 North Missouri Railroad bonds, due June 3, 1888 

127 'North Missouri Railroad bonds, due Aug. 4, 1888 

103 j North Missouri Railroad bonds, due Oct. 13, 1888 

104 jNorth Missouri Railroad bonds, due Nov. 13, 1888 

2,932 . Total amount of bonds falling due in 1888 

BONDS FALLING DUE IN 1889. 

143 Pacific Railroad bonds, due March 7, 1889 

59 Cairo & Fulton Railroad bonds, due April 16, 1889 

143 St. Ix>uis & Iron Mountain Railroad bonds, due May 16, 1889. . 

187 Cairo & Fulton Railroad bonds, due July 25, 1889 

60 Platte Country Railroad bond3, due Aug. 4, 1889 

20 Platte country Railroad bonds, due Oct. 10, 1889 

34 Platte Country Railroad bonds, due Nov, 22, 1889 

35 Platte Country Railroad bonds, due Nov. 23, 1889 

36 Platte Country Railroad bonds, due Nov. 24, 1889 

25 Platte Country Railroad bonds, due Dec. 7, 1889 

742 Total amount of bonds falling due in 1889 

BONDS FALLING DUR IN 1890. 

39 Platte Country Railroad bonds, due Jan. 26, 1890 

26 Platte Country Railroad bonds, due Feb. 22, 1890 

27 Platte Country Railroad bonds, due March 6, 1890 

41 Platte Country Railroad bonds, due May 17, 1890 



$238,000 
126,000 
122,000 
151,000 
153,000 
86,000 
280,000 
172,000 
$3,720,000 

2,483,000 
115,000 
127,000 
103,000 
lf>4,000 
$2^932,000 

143,000 

59,000 

143,000 

• 187,000 

60.000 

20,000 

34,000 

35,000 

36,000 

25,000 

$742,000 

39,000 

26,000 

27,000 

* 41,000 



STATISTICAL INFOBMATION. 



239 



BONDED DEBT---Co3mxuw>. 



36 
21 
28 



Platte Country Railroad bonds, dae Jane 18, 1890. 
Platte Country Railroad bonds, dne Aug. 7, 1890. . 



218 



108 

77 



185 



80 
162 

208 



Platte Country Railroad bonds, due Nov. 17, 1890. 



Total amount of bonds falling due in 1890 



BONDS FALLING DUB IN 1892. 

Northwestern Lunatic Asylum bond, due July 1, 1892. 

State University bonds, dne July 1, 1892 

Total amount of bonds falling due in 1892 



BONDS FALLING DUB IN 1894. 

State Bank Stock Reftinding bonds, due April 1, 1894. 



Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad State Renewal bonds, due 
Julyl, 1894 



450 



409 
24 
94 



State Funding bonds, due July 1, 1894 , 

Total amount of bonds falling due in 1894. 



526 



BONDS FALLING DUB IN 1895, 

State Funding bonds, due Jan. 1, 1895 

Penitentiary Indemnity bonds, due April 1, 1895 



Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad State Renewal bonds, dne 
July 1,1895 



Total amount of bonds falling due in 1895. 



BONDS FALLING DUE IN 1896. 



66 Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad State Renewal bonds, due 
January 1, 1896 



336 



Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad State Renewal bonds, due 
Julyl, 1896 



392 



•050 



Total amount of bonds falling due in 1896 



BONDS FALLING DUE IN 1897. 

Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad State Renewal bonds, due 
July 1,1897 



BONDS FALLING DUE IN 1906. 

State of Missouri Funding 3^ per cent. 5-20 bonds, due March 
16 , 1906 



136,000 
21,000 
28,000 



$218,000 



108,000 
77,000 



$18ri,000 



80,000 

162,000 
208,000 



•450,000 



409,000 
24,000 

94,000 
$527,000 



56,000 
336,000 



$392,000 



11,000 



650,000 



240 



AUDlTOR^S REPORT. 



BONDED DEBT— CoNTiNUBD. 



800 

400 

1,350 



State of MiBBOuri Funding 3} per cent. 5-20 bonds, due Sept. 

1, 1906 :.. 

State of Missouri Funding iih per cent. 5-20 bonds due Nov. 1, 

1906 : 



Total amount of bonds falling due in 1906, 
Total bonded debt, January 1, 1887 



$300,000 
400,000 



$1,350,000 



$10,527,000 



Excepting 3| per cent. 5-20 bonds issaed under the act of March 
81, 1885, MisBoari has no option bonds ootstanding. Tho^e issued to 
the Missouri Pacific, North Missouri, St. Louis & Iron Mountain, Cairo 
& Fulton, Platte Oonnty and Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad Com- 
panies are straight six per cent, thirty -year bonds. The six per cent. 
Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad State Renewal, Consolidation, State 
Bank Stock Refunding, State Funding, State University, Northwestern 
Lunatic Asylum, and Penitentiary Indemnity bonds, have twenty years 
to run from the dates of their issue. Consolidated Certificates of In- 
debtedness held in trust for the School and Seminary Funds mature 
thirty years from the first day of July, 1881. The certificates issued 
under the act of March 31, 1883, and held in trust for the School and 
Seminary Funds, are payable twenty years from the dates of their re- 
spective issues. 

MARKET VALUE OF STATE BONDS. 

The original sales of State bonds issued to railroad companies were 
effected at ruinous discounts. A statement of the amounts sold by 
each company, together with the discounts and commissions allowed, 
is submitted as follows : 

ORIGINAL SALE OF $3,501,000 ST. LOUIS & IRON MOUNTAIN RAILROAD 

BONDS. 



Disconnts on sales $608,037 16 

Commissions 30,370 14 

Net proceeds 2,862,592 70 



$3,501,000 00 



STATISTICAL INFOBMATION. 



241 



Average discount, 18.2 per cent Average ne<. proceeds, 81.8 per 
cent. Lowest rate at which any of these bonds were sold was 67 per 
cent. 



ORIGINAL SALE OF $3,000,000 HANNIBAL A ST. JOSEPH RAILROAD 

BONDS. 



Discounts : I $667,301 94 



Net proceeds 



2,432,69S 06 



$3,000,000 00 



Average discount, 18.901 per cent. Average net proceeds, 81.099 
per cent. Lowest rate at which these bonds were sold was 64f per 
cent. 

ORIGINAL SALE OF $4,350,000 NORTH MISSOURI RAILROAD BONDS. 



Discounts.... 
Net proceeds, 



$660,470 88 
3,699,529 12 



$4,360,000 00 



Average discount, 14.95 per cent. Average net proceeds, 85.05 per 



cent. 



ORIGINAL SALE OF $660,000 CAIRO & FULTON RAILROAD BONDS. 



Discounts.... 
Commissions 
Net proceeds 



$108,822 60 

1,208 00 

539,969 50 



$650,000 00 



Average discount, 16.93 per cent. Average net proceeds, 83.07 per 
cent. 

8 p— 16 



242 



auditor's report. 



ORIGINAL SALE OF $7,000,000 PACIFIC RAILROAD BONDS. 



Face value of bonds issued and sold 

Premium onl, 505 bonds of $1,000 each, sold in 1852-3-4 

Total 

Discount on remainder of bonds sold 

Ket proceeds 



$778,143 12 
6,293,451 18 



$7,000,000 00 
71,594 30 



$7,071,594 30 



$7,071,5^4 30 



Average discoant, 11 per cent. Average net proceeds, 89 percent 

♦ORIGINAL SALE OF $3,922,000 PACIFIC RAILROAD (SOUTHWEST 

BRANCH) BONDS. 



Discounts.... 
Net proceeds. 



$653,272 50 
3,268,727 50 



$3,922,000 00 



Average discoant, 16.66 per cent. Average net proceeds, 83.34 per 
cent* The lowest rate at which 7 per cent, guaranteed bonds were sold 
was 76 cents on the dollar. 

* I am unable to ascertain at what price the remainder of these bonds were 
sold. 

The bonds issued to the Platte Country Railroad Company, amount- 
ing to $700,000, were sold without discount. 

In 1865 the highest price paid for Missouri bonds was 79, and the 
lowest 51 per cent* In 1866 the highest price paid was 93 and the low- 
est 71 per cent. In 1867 they sold as high as 95 per cent. All past 
due coupons went with the bonds that were sold in the years 1865, 1866 
and 1867, thus a bond sold in 1867 had attached to it the coupon due 
July 1, 1861, and all subsequently matured coupons, for which the pur- 
chaser of the bond paid no additional consideration. 

In 1870 Missouri bonds were worth 87 per cent, of their face value. 
In 1871 they sold as high as 89-} per cent. 

Up to 1873 the various issues did not differ in price ; that is to say, 
a bond having five or ten years to run sold at the same price. 

In 1873 the Fund Oommissioners sold bonds at 92^ per cent In 
1875 the Fund Commissioners sold 3,687 State Funding and State Re- 
newal Funding bonds for $3,623,746.50, or at a fraction over 98.28 per 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION, 243 



cent, in 1&76, 425 Renewal Funding bonds were sold for $441,951.31, 
or at a fraction over $1,039. The average price paid for 4,112 bonds 
sold in 1875 and 1876 was $988.73 per bond. In 1876 the highest price 
paid was $1,045.03 per bond, and in 1875 the lowest price paid was a 
fraction over $950 per bond. 

In 1879 the market valae of bonds having ten years to run was 
103}. In 1881 they were quoted at 110. 

Since the early part of 1881 but few Missouri bonds have been on 
the market. They were picked up from time to time by Savings 
Banks and Trdst Companies at such rates as would jyield 3 or 3^ per 
cent, on tbe investment. 

In 1881 and 1882 a few bonds were sold on a basis of 3^ per cent., 
80 that in 188^ a bond having ten years to run was worth 120.94. At 
no time during the years 1883 and 1884 could as many as 50 or 100 Mis- 
souri bonds have been bought on the open market. From January 1, 
1883, to the present time, purchases have been made on a basis of 3 per 
cent., consequently a Missouri bond having ten years to run is now 
worth 125f. Three and a half per cent. 5-20 bonds amounting to 
$650,000 were sold January 15, 1886, for $662,538.50, or at a premium of 
$12,538.50. On the 17th of August, 1886, another lot of these bonds 
amounting to $700,000 were sold for $719,223.69, or at a premium of 
$19,223.69. 

For information as to the price of Missouri bonds from 1865 to 
1871, and from 1879 to 1884, 1 am indebted to the National Bank of Oom- 
merce in New York, the State's fiscal agent, also to Messrs. Kohn, Pro- 
per & Co., of 66 Broadway and 19 New Street, New York, who have 
dealt more largely in our bonds than any other firm in the United 
States. 

STATE SCHOOL FUND. 

The law devolves upon me the duty of exhibiting to each regular 
session of the General Assembl]p a complete account and report of the 
Public School Fund. That the sources from which this fund is derived 
may be clearly presented, and also the numerous changes occurring in 
its investment, I have deemed it of sufficient importance to submit the 
history of its receipts, disbursements and investments from the date of 
its creation to the present time. 

An act of Congress, approved March 6, 1820, entitled "An act to 
authorize the people of the Missouri Territory to form a Constitution 
and State Government, and for the admission of such State into the 
Union, etc," provided, among other things, " That all salt springs, not 
exceeding twelve in number, with six sections of land, adjoining to 



244 auditor's report. 



each^ shall be granted to said State for the use of said State.'' By aa- 
thority of an act of the General Assembly approved February 6, 1837, 
entitled ^^An act to establish a permanent school fond for the use and 
support of common schools," the donation of saline lands made by 
Congress, formed the nucleus of the present school fund. Section 1 of 
said act provides that ^The principal and interest which has accrued 
on the saline fund shall be invosted by the Governor of this State in 
some safe and productive stock, and when so invested shall continue, 
remain and be known as ^^ the Gommon sch-ool fundJ^'* It was further 
provided in said act that the interest and profits accruing upon the sur- 
plus revenues of the United States deposited with the State Treasurer as 
authorized by act of Congress approved June 23, 1836, and entitled ^^An 
act to regulate the deposit of the public money," should be held and 
applied to the use and support of common schools, and should become 
a part of the common school fund. Accruing interest and dividends 
upon these appropriations were to be applied to increasing the capital 
of the school fund until the same aggregated five hundred thousand 
dollars, after which the income derived therefrom was to be appropri- 
ated for the payment of ^^ teachers in common schools.^^ The amount 
credited to the school fund from deposits of surplus revenues of the 
United States is as follows : 



Treasurer's receipt, dated April 12, 1837. 

Treasurer's receipt, dated Jane 10, 1837. . 

Total 



$2&4,890 90 
127,445 10 



$382,335 30 



On the first day of October, 1838, the condition of the school fand 
is thus reported by Auditor Baber : 



I 



Amount received from the United States on account of surplus reve- 
nue $382, 335 3t> 

Amount received ftom the saline fund | 39,935 04 

Dividends declared on investment of surplus revenue 

Dividends declared on investment of saline fund 

Saline fund in the Treasury awaiting investment 

Total 



27,222 27 

2,168 60 

996 32 



$452,657 53 



In obedience to section 3 of an act approved February 6, 1837, en- 
titled "An act to charter the Bank of the State of Missouri," all moneys 



STATISTICAL UrFQRMATION. 245 



belonging to the school fund were invested by the Governor in the 
stock of said bank. The act of February 9, 1839, entitled *' An act to 
provide for the organization, support and government of common 
schools, created a fund known as '' the State School Fund," which con- 
sisted of the following items : 

First — All moneys heretofore deposited, or which shall be here- 
after deposited with this State, according to the act of Congress en- 
titled " An att to regulate the deposit of public moneys," approved 
June 23, 1886. 

Second— The proceeds of all lands now or heretofore belongmg to 
the State known as saline lands, and of all lands now or hereafter 
vested in this State by escheat, or by purchase orfoffeiture for taxes. 

Third— The interest, dividends, proceeds and profits of such 
moneys and lands, until a distribution shall be authorized by law. 

As in the act of 1837, it was also provided in that of 18ii9, that no 
distribution of the income ot the School Fund should take place until 
the tund amounted to 9500,000. The earnings of the School Fund were, 
by the act of 1839, denominated '''State School Moneys? and by this 
name the fund annually distributed to maintain public schools is now 
known. October 1, 1842, the School Fund amounted to $575,667 96, 
invested in the Bank of the State ot Missouri, as follows : 



Certificate of stock No. 1, dated July 19, 1839 

Certificate of stock No. 2, dated February 22, 1840. 

Certificate of stock No. 3, dated September 8, 1840, 

Certificate of stock No 4, dated March 15, 1842 . . . . 

Total 



$615,518 83 
24,474 97 
18,139 11 
17,535 05 



$575,667 96 



From October 1, 1838, to October 1, 1842, the fund increased $123,- 
010.43, which was wholly derived from dividends declared by the bank, 
and the investment of small sums realized from the sale of saline lands. 
In 1842 bank dividends ceased to be added to the principal of the 
School Fund; but in that year, and annually thereafter, they were 
credited to State School Moneys and distributed among the several 
counties. No change occurred in the investment of the School Fund 
until April, 1857, when twenty Pacific Railroad bonds of $1,000 each, 
costing $17,000, were purchased with proc^ds arising from the sale of 
saline lands. In 1857 the stock held in the bank was consolidated into 
one general certificate. 



246 



auditor's report- 



condition OP THE SCHOOL FUND, OCTOBER 1, l^SS. 



Certificate of stock, No. 1, dated May 25, 1857 

Invested in Pacific Kailroad bonds, April 15, 1857 
Total 



$575,687 % 
17,000 00 



$502,667 96 



As required by an act approved March 14, 1859, entitled "An act 
authorizing the Governor to subscribe additional stock to the Bank of 
the State of Missouri," the Governor of the State subscribed for eight 
hundred and sixty three shares of stock in said bank, to constitute a part 
of the State School Fund, thereby increasing said fund $86,300, so that 
on the Ist day of October, 1860, it amounted to $678,967.96, invested as 
follows : 



Certificate of stock No. 1, in the Bank of the State of Missouri, dated 
May 25, 1857 

Certificate of stock No. 3, dated January 7, 1860, in said bank 

Invested in twenty Pacific Railroad bonds costing 

Total 



$575,667 96 
86,300 00 
17,000 00 



$678,967 96 



SALB OF BANK STOCK. 



The fund remained in this condition until 1866, when by virtue of 
an act approved March 5, 1866, the stock held by the State m the Bank 
of the State of Missouri was sold to Captain James B. Eads at $108.50 
per share of $100. Payments therefor were made by him in bonds and 
coupons of the State, June 18 and July 14, 1866, Section seven of said 
act required the State Treasurer to invest the proceeds arising from 
the sale of bank stock in interest-bearing bonds of the United States. 
Until this was done the State was held as debtor of the School Fund 
and the Treasurer directed to pay to said fund on the first days of Jan- 
uary and July, semi-annual interest at the rate of six per centum per 
annum. No investment was made and no interest paid as contem- 
plated by said section ; but the bonds and coupons received in pay- 
ment of the bank stock were placed on the books of the Treasury De- 
partment to the credit of an account known as the '' Railroad Debt — 
Sinking Fund." Bonds and coupons were thus retired, and State in- 



STATI8TI0AL INFORMATION. 247 

- 

debtedness reduced $718,235.26 at the expense of the School Fund. 
Nothing was'done towards reimbursing the School Fund for the stock 
so disposed ot, and no interest paid until 1872, when by virtue of an act 
approved March 29, 1872, entitled, "An act to settle the account of the 
State of Missouri with the Public School Fund, etc.," the State Auditor 
was directed to issue a certificate of indebtedness to the State Board of 
Education as trustees of the Public School Fund for the sum of 9900,- 
000, with interest thereon at the rate of six per centum, payable an- 
nually on the first day of March. The certificate of indebtedness was 
designed to reimburse the fund for the face value of the stock sold to 
Captain Eads or $661,967*96 and interest thereon at six per centum per 
annum from July 1, 1866, to July 1, 1872. 

SALK OF THB STATE TOBACCO WARBUOUSB. 

An act approved December 15, 1866, required the Governor to ap- 
point a commissioner whose duty it was to sell the State Tobacco 
Warehouse located in the city of St. Louis. The purchaser of this 
property was required to pay one third of the purchase money on the 
day of sale, and the remaining two-thirds in equal payments in one 
and two years thereafter, giving notes for deferred payments, bearing 
six per cent, interest until paid. Messrs. Jameson and Cotting became 
purchasers of the tobacco warehouse for the sam of $132,000 — one-third 
of the purchase money, or $44,000, being paid to the State Treasurer, 
June 13, 1866, and the remainder secured by notes as in said act pro- 
vided. In compliance with section 59 of an act approved March 29, 
1866, entitled '^ An act to provide for the reorganization, supervision 
and maintenance of common schools," the net proceeds arising from 
the sale of the State Tobacco Warehouse were placed to the credit of 
the School Fund. October 1, 1866, this iund amounted to $872,521.98, 
comprising the following items : 



In bonds and coupons derived firom sale of $661,967.96 in bank stock at 
$108.60 per share of $100 

Twenty Pacific Railroad bonds, face value 

Cash received firom Jameson & Cotting, sale of tobacco warehouse 

Two six per cent, notes of Jameson & Cotting for tobacco warehouse.. 

In the Saline Fund awaiting investment 

Total 



$718,235 25 

20,000 00 

44,000 00 

88,000 00 

2,286 73 



$872,521 98 



248 



AUDITOP/S RBPORT. 



Of the above amonnt the sam of $718,235.25 was wholly unavail- 
able. It represented canceled bonds and coupons which had been re- 
ceived of Oaptain Eads in payment of bank stock, and the figures were 
carried on the books of the Treasury Department only as a memoran- 
dum. No receipts are reported between October 1 and December 31, 
1866, but on November 22, a warrant for ^97.35 was drawn in favor of 
Josiah Fogg in payment of commissions on sale of bank stock, llie 
actual condition of the School Fund on the first day of January, 1867, 
is shown yb the following balance sheet : 



By balance, October 1, 1866 

To anavailable assets, being canceled bonds and conpons. 

To warrant to Josiah Fogg 

Balance 

Totals 




$718,236 26 
897 36 
163,389 38 



$872,621 98 



Cr. 



$872,621 98 



$872,621 98 



Available fund January 1, 1867, $153,389.88 invested as follows: 



Twenty Pacific Railroad bonds 

Jameson & Cotting^s notes 

Cash in the treasury awaiting investment. 
Total 



$20,000 00 
88,000 00 
46,389 38 



$163,389 38 



During the succeeding four years ending December 31« 1870, the 
fund was largely increased and most important changes occurred in its 
investment. Under the provisions of an act of Congress, approved 
April 17, 1866, the State of Missouri was reimbursed for large sums of 
money expended in enrolling, equipping and maintaining militia 
forces employed by the United States in suppressing the rebellion. The 
amount thus expended by the State exceeded seven millions of dollars, 
to raise which oppressive taxes were levied during the years 1863, 1864, 
1866 and 1866. When, therefore, the State was reimbursed for these 
taxes, it was eminently proper that at least a portion of the reimburse- 
ment, should be credited to the School Fund, in which all citizens are 



STATISTIOAL INFORMATION. 249 



80 directly concerned. In view of this fact, and moved by the further 
consideration that for seven years, ending December 31, 1867, the 
annual distribution of twenty-five per centum of the State revenue had 
been withheld from the public schools, the General Assembly, by an 
act approved March 11, 1867, appropriated the sum of $1,500,000 of the 
moneys received from the United States, and authorized the State 
Treasurer to invest the whole amount appropriated in United States 
six per cent, bonds for the use and benefit of the Public School Fund. 
In addition to this appropriation, transfers from the Saline, Koad 
and Oanal and Internal Improvement Funds, as authorized by the gen- 
eral appropriation act of March 4, 1867 ; the payment of notes given 
by Jameson & Getting for the tobacco warehouse ; sundry receipts for 
moneys arising from escheats and the premium on gold interest collect- 
ed on United States bonds, materially augmented the capital of the 
School Fund. The sum of $57,987.86 was also credited to the fund, be- 
ing part of a judgment rendered at the March term, 1870, of the 
Supreme Oourt against the Bank of the State of Missouri for dividends 
declared June 30, 1866, on stock belonging to the State which the bank 
withheld. 

INVESTMBNT OF THE SCHOOL FUND IN U. 8. BONDS. 

The state Board of Education in March, 1867, invested a part of 
the cash receipts in purchasing United States six per cent, bonds 
amounting to 9^0,000. In the same year, Hon. William Bishop, then 
State Treasurer, purchased U. S. six per cent, bonds aggregating 
$1,430,900, and in January, 1868, $11,950. In 1869, Hon. Wm. Q.Dall- 
meyer, State Treasurer, bought $85,000, and in 1876, $82,250. The U. 
S. bonds purchased in 1867, 1868,1869 and 1870, aggregated $1,650,100. 
Added to this large outlay in the purchase of bonds, were transfers to 
the Saline and Internal Improvement Funds made necessary to re- 
imburse persons who had entered school lands from the State which had 
been previously patented by the General Government. 



250 



AUDITOR^S REPORT. 



The following balance sheet will exhibit the receipts and disbarse- 
ments of the School Fund for the lour years beginning January 1, 1867, 
and ending December 31, 1870: 



State School Fund. 



By cash in the treasury January 1, 1867. 
By receipts in 1867 from escheats 



By receipts in 1867, payment of Jameson and Cottings^ 
note and interest 



By receipts in 1867, premium on gold interest. 



By receipts in 1867 from United States, reimbursement 
of war expenditures 



By transfer from Internal Improvement Fund. 

By transfer from Saline Fund , 

By receipts in 1868, premium on gold Interest. , 



By receipts in 1868 from Road and Canal Fund, act of 
March 4, 1867 



By receipt in 1868, payment of Jameson and Cottlngs' 
note 



By receipt in 1868 from Commissioner Permanent Seat 
of Government 



By receipts in 1869, premium on gold interest. 
By receipts in 1870, premium on gold interest. 



By receipts in 1870, Judgment vs. Bank of the State of 
Missouri 



By receipts in 1870 from escheats. 



To cash in 1867 for $1,470,900 in United States six per 
cent, bonds, including premium and expressage. . . 

To transfer to school moneys, interest on Jameson and 
Cottings' note ' 



To transfer to Saline Fund , 

To transfer to Internal Improvement Fund. 



To warranto in 1868 for $11,950 in United States bonds, 
premium and expressage 

To warrants in 1869 for $85,000 in United State bonds, 
including premium 



To transfer to Internal Improvement Fund 
To transfer to Saline Fund 



Dr. 



To warrants in 1870 for $82,250 in United States bonds, 
including premium 



To transfer to Saline Fund. 



$1,696,160 60 

2,640 00 

500 00 

8,259 45 

12,700 47 

94,750 00 
5,409 39 
2,387 77 

91,105 96 
238 13 



Cr. 



$45,389 38 
881 91 

46,640 00 
4,300 12 

1,500,000 00 

31,290 39 

4,150 90 

33,898 13 

5,223 67 

44,000 00 

60 00 
31,465 66 
15,108 83 

67,987 86 
638 00 



8TATI8TI0AL IN70BMATI0N. 



251 



INVESTMENT OF THE SCHOOL FUND IN U. 8. BONDS— Contdtokd. 



State School Fund. 



$1,881 30 
4,886 78 



To transfer to Internal Improvement Fund 

Balance » 

Totals $1,821,019 85; $1,821,019 86 

January 1, 1871. By cash in Treasury ; $4,886 78 



Dr. 



Or. 



CONDITION OF THE SCHOOL FUND JANUARY 1, 1871. 



Invested in United States six per cent, bonds held by the Treasurer. 

Invested in Missouri six per cent, bonds held by the Auditor 

Cash in the treasury awaiting Investment , — 

Total 



$1,660.100 00 

20,000 00 

4,886 78 



$1,674,986 78 



A list of the United States bonds purchased for the School Fund, 
dne in the years 1867, 1868, 1869 and 1870, and the premium paid on 
each parchase is presented in the following table : 



Bonds of 1864 registered in name of the State Treasurer 
October 3, 1867, date of Issue November 1, 1864, in- 
terest due May and November, payable In St. Louis. 
l*en bonds of $10,000 each. No. 4,845 to 4,854, both 
inclusive 



Pteminm, 9f per cent. 



Bonds of 1865 registered in name of State Treasurer 
October 3, 1867, date of Issue November 1, 1865, In- 
terest due May and November, payable in St. Louis. 
One bond, Letter A, No. 3605 



Seventeen bonds of $10,000 each. Letter A, No. 4477 to 
4493, both. Inclusive 



Premium, 9f per cent, 



Bonds of 1865 registered In name of State Treasurer 
October 10, 1867, date of issue July 1, 1867. One; 
hundred and ten bonds of $10,000 each. Letter B,' 
No. 766 to 875, both inclusive 



$100,000 00 
9,625 00 



$5,000 00 

170,000 00 
16,843 75 



One bond. Letter B, No. 1070. 
One bond, Jjctter B, No. 3832. 
Premium. 8i per cent 



1,100,000 00 

5,000 00 

1,000 00 

91,245 00 



$109,625 00 



191,843 75 



1,197,245 00 



252 



auditor's rbport* 



Two coupon bonds of $600 each, D, 31836, and E. 86926, 
dated July 1, 1867 



Premium, 7| per cent 

One coupon bond, C, 61006, July 1, 1866, 



Three coupon bonds, $600 each, E, 76626, 86922, 86928, 
July 1, 1867 



Four coupon bonds, 9100 each, B, 106171 to 106174,both 
inclusive, July 1, 1867 



Premium, 10} per cent. 



Bonds of 1866 registered in name of State Board of 
Education October 10, 1867, date of issue July 1, 
1867, Interest due January and July : 

Four bonds of $10,000 each. Letter B, No. 876 to 879, 
both IncluslTe 

Two bonds of $1,000 each, Letter B, No. 3833 and 3834. 

Premium, 8} per cent 



Bonds of 1866 registered in name of State Board ofj 
Education March 11, 1867, date of issue, November 
1, 1866, interest due May and November : 

Four boftds of $10,000 each, No. 4476 to 4479, both in- 
clusive 



Premium, 7} per cent 

Coupon bonds of 1866, dated July 1, 1867 : 

Four bonds of $1,000 each, Nos. 90290, 90291, 90293 and 
291999 



Premium, 8} per cent 

Coupon bonds of 1866, dated July 1, 1867 : 

Eleven bonds of $1,000 each, C, 58386; C, 61006, J, 
92092, C, 200207, C, 200210, D, 302387, D, 202488, D, 
202389, D, 202392, D, 202391, D, 202390 



One bond, E, 85927, July 1 1867 



Four bonds, A. of $100 each; No. 170280 to 170283, both 
inclusive, July 1, 1867 



One bond, G, No. 78854, July 1, 1867 
Premium, 6} per cent 



U. S. 6-20 Consols, of 1865 registered in name of State 
Treasurer, January 30, 1869, date of issue January 
1, 1869, interest due January and July, payable in 
St. Louis. Six bonds of $10,000 each, Letter A, 
No. 5437 to 6442, both inclusive 

Premium, 8| per cent 



$1,000 00 
78 76 



1,000 00 

1,500 00 

400 00 
304 50 



40,000 00 
2,000 00 
3,466 00 



40,000 00 
3,100 00 



4,000 00 
330 00 



11,000 00 
600 00 

400 Ool 

60 00 

746 87 



60,000 00 

I 

6,260 00 



$1,078 75 



3,204 50 



45,465 00 



43,100 00 



4,330 00 



12,696 87 



65,250 00 



STATISTICAL IKFOBMATION. 



253 



U. S. 5-20 bonds registered in name of Jitate Treasurer : 

Five bonds of $5,000 each, Letter A, No. 6741 to 6745, 
inciusive 



Premium, 18 per cent 

U. 8. 5-20 bonds of 1864 

Three U. S. 5-20 bonds of 1867 of $10,000 each 

Premium on $150, 11 per cent, on $30,000 9} per cent. . 

U. 8. 5-20 coupon bonds of 1864 

Premium, 11 per cent 

Sxpressage, telegraphing and other costs incident to 
purchase 



$25,000 00 
4,500 00 



150 00 

30,000 00 

2,979 00 



52,100 00 

I 

6,731 oo; 



Total cost of bonds purchased $1,794,717 03 




$29,500 00 



33,129 00 

57,881 00 
418 16 



EECAPITULATION. 



Cash paid for bonds— face yalue 

Premiums paid 

Ezpressage, telegraphing and other costs. 
Total 



$1,660,100 00 

144,198 87 

418 16 



$1,794,717 03 



REIMBURSEMENT OF BANE STOCK AND OTHER INVESTMENTS. 

The next im^>ortaDt addition to the School Fund was the certificate 
of indebtednes for $900,000 issued by the St-ite Auditor, July 1, 1872, 
to reimburse the fund for stock held in the Bank of the State of Mis- 
souri, which had been sold in 1866 to Oaptain James B. Eads. 



264 



auditor's bepobt. 



Another increase occurred in 1873 in the purchase of United States 
registered six per cent, bonds amounting to $21,500. 

Receipts and disbursements of the fund from January 1, 1871, to 
December 81, 1874, are shown by the following balance sheet: 



1871. 



•Tannary 1 



January 1, 1875. 



State School Fund. 



By cash in treasury. 



By receipts in' 1871, premium on gold In- 
terest 



By receipts In' 1872, premium on gold in- 
terest 



By receipts in 1873, mileage donated by 
Hon. A. Ittner 



By receipts in 1873, premium on gold in- 
terest 



By sundry receipts in 1873 for fines, forfeit- 
ures, etc 



By receip|» in 1874, premium on gold in- 
terest 



By surdry receipts in 1874, for fines, forfeit- 
ures, etc 



To transfer in 1871 to internal improve- 
ment Aind 



To transfer in 1872 to internal improve- 
ment fund 

To amount due from Wm. Bishop, late 
State Treasurer 

To warrants in 1872 for school lands sold 
in error 

To warrants in 1873 for $21,500 U. S. six 
per cent, bonds 

To warrants in 1873 for school lands sold 
in error 



To warrants in 1874 

Balance 

Totals 

By cash in the treasury. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



$414 80 

811 68 

2,150 00 

1,368 78 

24,535 94 

507 98 

491 35 

32,754 63 



$63,035 16 



$4,886 78 
11,220 67 
15,795 54 
60 00 
12,600 32 

5,634 64 
11,030 18 

1,717 06 



$63,0a5 16 



$32,754 63 



8TATISTI0AL INFORMATION. 255 

January 1, 1875, the school fund amounted to $2,624,354.63, in- 
vested as follows : 



In United States six i>er cent, bonds 

In Missouri six per cent, bonds 

In Missouri six per cent, certificates of indebtedness. 

Cash in the treasury awaiting investment 

Total 



$1,671,600 CO 

20,000 00 

900,000 00 

32,754 63 



$2,624,354 63 

I 
I 



TRANSFER FROM THE EXBOUTORS' AND ADMINISTRATORS' FUND. 

As provided in an act of the General Assembly approved March 
20, 1875, thirty-eight bonds of the denomination of $1,000 each, and in- 
terest thereon amounting to |K6,738.75 were transferred to the School 
Fund. These bonds had been purchased by State Treasurer Hays in 
accordance with an act approved March 9, 1871, entitled ^' An act to 
provide for the investment of balances in the Executors' and Admin- 
istrators' Fund and Redemption of Land Funds." 

CONVERSION OF UNITED STATES BONDS INTO MISSOURI SIXES. 

In December, 1876, by direction of tjie State Board of Education, 
the United States six per cent, bonds amounting to SI,67 1,600 were 
sold for the sum of $1,913,866, or at a premium of about 14^ per cent. 

Missouri six per cent, bonds, aggregating 81,949,000 were pur. 
chased in lieu of the Government bonds at the following prices : 

Bonds amouDting to $1,260,000 at f of one per cent, above par. 
' * ' ' 600,000 at 7-16 of one per cent, above par. 

* ' ^^ 59,000 at one per cent, above par. 

^ * ' ' 40,000 at one per cent, below par. 

Total $1,949,000 

Seven Missouri bonds, amounting to $7,000, miatured in 1876 and 
1877, and in Majch, 1878, nine Missouri sixes were purchased. The 
following table presents the receipts and disbursements from January 
1, 1875, to December 31, 1880 : 



256 



AITDITOB'S REPORT. 



State School Fand. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



By cash in the treasury Jan. 1, 1875 

By receipts in 1876 from fines, sale of lands, etc 



By receipts in 1875 for interest on bonds in Executors' 
and Administrators' Fund 



By receipts in 1875, premium on gold interest. 



$32,75163 
285 34 

6,738 75 
9,659 78 



By receipts in 1875, sale of $1,671,600 U. ». bonds > i 1,913,866 00 



By receipt in 1876, three Missouri bonds matured 

By receipts in 1876 from fines, etc 

By receipts in 1877, four Missouri bonds matured 

By receipts in 1880, fines and sale of land 

To warrants in 1S75 for $1,949,000 Missouri bonds 

To warrant for commission on purchase of bonds 

To warrants in 1875 for lands sold in error 

To warrants In 1876 for lands sold in error 

To warrant in 1878 for cost of $9,000 Missouri bonds. . . 

Balance 

Totals 

January 1, 1881. By cash in the treasury 



$1,956,533 90 

2,312 50 

832 56 

791 93 
9,517 50 

792 66 



3,000 00 
13100 

4,000 00 
335 56 



$1,970,781 06; $1,970,781 05 



$792 66 



Table showing condition of the fund January 1, 1876, after conver- 
sion of United States bonds into Missouri sixes : 



Missouri six per cent certificates of indebtedness I 

Twenty Missouri six i>er cent, bonds bought prior to conversion 

Missouri six per cent, bonds transferred from Executors' and* Ad-! 
ministrators' Fund ' 

Missouri six per cent, bonds bought after sale of United States bonds 

Cash in the treasury 

Total 

Januabt 1, 1879. 

Missouri six per cent, bonds 

Missouri six per cent, certificate of indebtedness 

Cash in the treasury 

Total 



$900,000 00 
20,000 00 

38,000 00 

1,949,000 00 

5,974 61 

$2,912,974 6 1 

$2,009,000 00 

900,000 00 

467 11 



$2,909,457 11 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



257 



January 1, 1881. 

Missouri six per cent, bonds 

Missouri six per cent, eertificate of indebtedness 

Cash in the treasury 

Total 



$2,009,000 00 

900,000 00 

792 66 



$2,909,792 66 



CONSOLIDATION OF THE SCHOOL FUND. 

As authorized by an act of the General Assembly, approved March 
23, 1881, entitled ^^ An act to consolidate the Permanent School Fand, 
etc.,'' the Board of Fund Commissioners, on the first day of July, 1881, 
issued in lien of the above named bonds and certificates of indebted- 
ness, a consolidated certificate of indebtedness for $2«909,000, payable 
thirty years after date with interest thereon at the rate of six percent, 
per annum, payable annually on the first day of January. 

The Missouri six per cent, bonds and certificate of indebtedness 
which has been held in trust for the School Fund were canceled by me 
in the presence of the Fund Commissioners and are preserved in this 
office as required in the fourth section of said act. 

paymjjints by notaries public 

By the first section of an act regulating the appointment of No- 
taries Public in cities having a population of one hundred thousand in- 
habitants or more, approved March 24, 1881, it is enacted that notaries, 
when receiving their commissions and before qualifying as such, shall 
pay into the Treasury of the State, to the use of the Common School 
Fund, the sum of twenty five dollars each. From this source $2,75000 
was received during the years 1881 and 1882. 

CONDITION OF THE SCHOOL FUND, JANUARY 1, 1883. 



Jan. 1 , 1881— By cash in the treasury 

By receipts In 1881 and 1882 

Missouri six per cent, consolidated certificate of in- 
debtedness 

Total fund January 1, 1883 



$792 66 
2,750 00 

2,909,000 00 



82,912,542 66 



8. P.— 17. 



258 



auditor's bepokt. 



List of Missouri bonds canceled as provided in the act of March 23, 
1881, creating the consolidated certificate of indebtedness: 

DESCRIPTION OF BONDS. 



20 Renewal funding 5-20 bonds, issued May 1 1875, Nob. 80 to 99 
both inclusive 

1,929 i^enewal Amding 5-20 bonds, issued December 1, 1875, Nos. 
1083, 1097 and 1161 to 3087, both inclusive 



9 

1 
2 

1 

6 



Renewal fundincr 5-20 bonds issued Mav 15, 1877,3548, 3551, 
3657, 3558, 3559, 3560, 3578, 3890 and 3891 



^tate debt proper No. 28, due April 15, 1883, 



Cairo & Fulton Railroad bonds, Nos. 345 and 389, due April 16 
and July 25, 1889 

St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad bond, No. 1649, due June 
2,1887 

North Missouri Railroad bonds, Nos. 1148, 2153, 2789, 3788, 4239, 
4245. due June 13 and September 5, 1886, July 1, 1887, 
June 3 and November 12, 1888 



16 Missouri consolidation bonds, Nos. 68. 69, 70. 71, 72, 73, 74. 648, 
1674, 1675, 1676, 1677, 1678, 1679, 1680 and 2256, due Janu- 
ary 1,1888 



25 



2,009 



Missouri Pacific Railroad bonds, Nos. 3754 and 4762 to 4781, 
both inclusive, 5530, 6430, 6847 and 6849, due March 17, 
1886 



Total 



$20,000 00 

1,929,000 00 

9,000 09 
1,000 00 

2,000 00 

1 000 00 

6,000 00 

16,000 00 

25,000 00 



$2,009,000 00 



TRAKSFERS FROM THB STATE REVENUE, EXECUTORS* AND ADMmiSlRATORS' 

AND ROAD AND CANAL FUNDS. 

By virtue of an act entitled '* An act to appropriate money for the 
support of the State Government for the years 1883 and 1884," approved 
April 2, 1883, the sum of $200,000 has been transferred from the State 
revenue collected in 1884 and placed to the credit of the State School 
Fund ; also the sum of $18,000 from the Executors' and Administrators' 
Fund ; and in ^compliance with an act approved on the same day ap- 
propriating money for deficiencies of 1881 and 1882, the further sum of 
$463.99 was transferred from the Road and Oanal Fond and placed to 
the credit of said fund. In addition to the foregoing the sum of $325 
was received from notaries public appointed in the city of St. Louis 
under the act of March 24, 1881, and $1,000 as a fine adjudged by the 
circuit court of Jasper county against the estate of Peter Meyer, for 
failure to pay in 1873, the license required of him as a banker. 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 259 

r 

As provided in the act approved March 31, 1883, authorizing the 
investment of moneys paid into the treasary for the use of the School 
or Seminary Fands, the Board of Fund Commissioners caused to be 
issued a certificate of indebtedness for $22,000, payable twenty years 
from the first day of July, 1883, and bearing interest at the rate of five 
per centum per annum, payable semi-annually on the first days of Jan- 
uary and July of each year. 

On the first day of January, 1885, the condition. of the State School 
Fund is reported as follows : 

CONDITION OF THE STATE SCHOOL FUND, JANUARY 1, 1886. 



Mlssoarl six per cent, consolidated certificate of Indebtedness 

3Ii8Sourl five per cent, certificate of indebtedness, issued July 1, 1883. 

Oash in the treasury 

Total State School Fun d, January 1, 1885 



$2,900,000 00 

22,000 00 

201,331 65 



$3,132,331 06 



On the 28th of April, 1885, the Board of Fund Commissioners caused 
to be issued a five per cent. 20-year certificate of indebtedness for $201,- 
000 in lieu of that amount of the cash balance remaining in the treas- 
ury on the first day of January, 18S5. Another five percent, certificate 
for 82,000, payable twenty years from January 1, 1886, was issued on 
the 2d day of January, 1886. 

Those certificates were, likewise, issued in accordance with the act 
of March 31, 1883, providing for the investment of moneys paid into the 
treasury for the benefit of the School and Seminary Funds. The money 
for which said certificates were issued, consisted of $200,000 appro- 
priated for the benefit of the Sr.ate School Fund as provided in the 
general appropriation act of April 2, 1883, and of receipts into the treas- 
-ury from notaries public appointed in the city of St. Louis under the 
actof March 24, 1881. 



260 auditor's report. 



The State School Fund on the first day of January, 1887, amounted 
to $3,134,439.80, and is invested as follows: 

STATE SCHOOL FUND JANUARY 1, 1887. 



Missouri six per cent, thirty-year consolidated certificate of indebt- 



ednesSfJssued July 1, 1881 



Missouri five per cent, twenty-year certificate of indebtedness, is- 
sued July 1, 1883, under act of March 31, 1883 



92,909,000 00- 
22,000 00- 



Missouri ^ve per cent, twenty-year certificate of indebtedness,^ is- 
sued April 28, 1885, under act of March 31, 1883 1 201,000 00 



Missouri five per cent, twenty-year certificate of indebtedness, is- 
sued January 2, 1886, under act of March 31, 1883 

Cash in the treasury 

Total State School Fund January 1, 1887 



2,000 00 

439 80 

$3, 134,439 80^ 



Total school funds, including fines, penalties, etc., as reported to 
the Superintendent of Public Schools for the school year ending Jane 
30, 1886, amount to $7,037,652.28. This sum, added to the State School 
Fund, reported above, makes an aggregate fund of $10,172,092.08, the 
interest upon which is annually applied to the maintenance of public 
schools. These funds are classified as follows : 

AGGREGATE INTEREST-BEARING PUBLIC SCHOOL FUNDS OF MIS- 
SOURI. 



State School Fund I $3,134,439 80 



County School Funds 

Township School Funds 

Special School Funds 

Fines, penalties, etc., collected to Juue 30, 1886. 
Total amount of Public School Funds 



3,333,068 39 

3,490,548 16 

71 ,4^ U 

121 980 29 



$10,172,092 08 



No report of the school funds of Butler county was made by the 
county clerk. The school funds of that county amount to about $20,- 
000 and are not embraced in the above aggregate. 



ANALYSIS OF THE SCHOOL FUND. 



1837 to 1842. — Proceeds from sale or Saline lands. Surplus rev- 
enues of the United States. Dividends declared by the Bank o^ the 
State of Missouri. 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 261 

* 

1843 to 1860. — Proceeds from sale of Saline lands. Habscription to 
stock in the Bank of the State of Missoari anthorized by act approved 
March 14, 1859. 

1861 to 1870. — Transfers from the Saline, Koad and Canal and In- 
ternallmprovement Funds, as provided in the general appropriation 
act of March 4, 1867. Appropriation of moneys received from the 
•United States for reimbursement of war expenditures, act of March U, 
18t)7. Proceeds arising from sale of State Tobacco Warehouee- Pre- 
miums on gold interest collected on United States bonds in School 
fund. Judgment rendered by the Supreme Court against the Bank of 
the State of Missouri. Receipts for moneys arising from fines and for- 
failures, sale of school land and escheats. 

1871 to 1887. — Transfers from Saline and Internal Improvement 
Funds. Premium on gold interest. Certificate of indebtedness to re- 
imburse for bank stock sold to Captain Eads. Receipts from fines and 
forfeitures, escheats and sale of land. 

Transfers from Executors' and Administrators' and Road and 
Oanal Funds. Payments by notaries public, act of March 24, 1881. 
Appropriation of $200,000 from the State Revenue Fund. Laws of 
1883, p. 4, sec. 3. 

BTATB SCHOOL MONEYS. 

By the third section of an act approved February 9, 1839, the inter- 
est, dividends, proceeds and profits of the invested School Fund were 
•denominated '' State School Moneys." The first apportionment under 
this act was made in 1842, at which time the Stale School Fund was in- 
vested in stock of the Bank of the State of Missouri at St. Louis. 
From 1842 to 1853 the amounts annually apportioned were wholly de- 
rived iroQi dividends declared by the bank. An act approved Febru- 
ary 24, 1853, entitled ^^ An act to provide for the organization, support 
and government of common schools in the State of Missouri," required 
twenty five per centum of the State revenue to be set apart and an- 
nually apportioned as a part of the State Schools Moneys. In 1854 and 
annually thereafter one-fourth of the revenue was placed to the credit 
of school moneys until the apportionment for tbe year 1861 was sus- 
pended by resolution of the General Assembly, approved May 11, 
1861. On the same day, by virtue of an act entitled ^^An act to raise 
money to arm the State, repel invasion and protect the lives and prop- 
•erty of the people of Missouri," the apportionment was still further 
suspended until May 1, 1863. The apportionment was again suspended 
b^ authority of a joint resolution, approved March 23, 1863, until the 



262 



aitdttor's report. 



next meeting of the General Assembly of ■ this State in November^ 
1863. By resolution, approved Februafy 20, 1865, another snspension 
occurred until the meeting of the Legislature in November, 1865, and 
by the 59th section of an act approved M^rch 29, 1866, it was pro* 
vided '' that the twenty-five percent, of the State Revenue shall not 
be applied to the support of public schools until the year 1867." The 
act of March 13, 1867, amended said 59th secHon, so as to defer the ap 
portionment until 1868. From the foregoing it will be seen that public 
schools did not receive any portion of the State Revenue during the 
years 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, 1865, 1866 and 1867, nor was the income of 
the School Fund apportioned, except in 1864, when the Secretary of 
State, as ex oMcio Superintendent of Oommon Schools, did so in pur- 
suance of an act approved February 10| 1864, and again in 1866 as pro- 
vided in the act of March 29 of that year. In March, 1868, the income 
of the School Fund and twenty-five per cent, of the State Revenue 
were again apportioned and such has been the case every subsequent 
year. By virtue of an act of the General Assembly approved March 
4, 1885, the apportionment of State School Moneys is now annually 
made in the month of July. The apportionment is made by the Sup- 
erintendent of Fublic^^Schools upon enumeration returns furnished bis 
office and in the proportion^which the number of children of school 
age in each county bears to the whole number of children of school 
age in the State. 

ArPORTIONMIfiNT FOR THE YEAKS 1S85 AND 1886. 



• 


1885. 


1886. 


TweDty-flve per centum of the State Revenue. . ? 


$482,976 27 
181,215 00 


$514,300 68 
185,740 00 


Income of the State School Fund 




Total amount apportioned in 1886 and 1886 


$664,191 27 


$700,100 6S 





Number of persons of school age upon which the apportionment 
of 1885 was made was 785,122/ Number in'.! 886, 812,245, Per capita 
in 1885, $0.845971. Per capita in 1886, $0.86174. 



STATISTICAL IWFQRMATIOlT. 



263 



The following table will exhibit the several apportionments from 
1842 to 1886, inclasive, showing separately the amount thereof derived 
from the earnings of the School Fund and the State Revenue : 



Year. 



Twenty-five ' Income of the 
percent, of the School Fund, 
btate revenue. 



1842. 
1S43. 



3845 


1846 


1847 


1848 


1849 


1850 


1851 


1852 


1853 : 



1854. 
1855. 
1856. 
1857. 
1858. 
1859. 
1860. 
1^61. 
1862. 
1863. 
1864. 
1865. 
1866. 
1867. 
1868. 
1869. 
1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874. 
1875. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 



$74,178 57 
108,962 01 
119.853 33 
143,488 38 
165,626 75 
194,026 88 
203,732 82 



$1,999 60 
6,043 80 
11,892 42 
16,481 70 
23,720 02 
48,770 74 
66,959 20' 
59,456 01 
27,761 52 
69,895 20 
68.411 08 
65,425 S3 
98,386 76 
69,127 59; 
98.321 07; 
96.799 36 
79,653 89 
60,924 24 
58,501 70 



Total 
apportionment. 



$1,999 60 

6,043 80 

11,892 42 

16,481 70 

23,720 02 

48.770 74 

56,959 20 

59,456 01 

27,751 62 

69,895 20 

58,411 08 

66,423 83 

172,665 32 

178,089 60 

217,674 40 

240,287 74 

245,280 64 

254.951 12 

262,234 52 



169,685 56 



169,685 56 



42,698 81; 



42,698 81 



• • • • • 



Totals 



217,011 10 
218.740 64 
228,629 CA 
24:^197 33 
255.475 11, 
215,669 90 
264,770 65' 
310,809 49, 
311,652 25! 
366,516 80 
363 276 32 
328,255 18" 
340,746 09; 
344.401 16, 



366,131 8:^ 
392,242 14 
427,-205 93 
482,976 27 
614,360 68 



46,71f^ 44i 
89,628 79; 
88,530 35 
96,370 48! 
100,206 69 
136,206 61 
155.498 73 
155,496 03 
158,567 61 
174,352 42 
174,030 15 
174,540 00 
174,540 00 
174,640 OOl 
174,540 OOl 
174,540 00 
175,090 00! 
181.215 00 
185,740 00 



263,726 54 
308,369 43 
317,159 99 
339,567 81 
355,681 80 
361,876 41 
410,269 2S 
466,306 62 
470,119 86 
539,868 22 
637,306 47 
502,795 18 
516,286 09 
519,001 16 
549,671 83 
566,782 14 
602,295 93 
664,191 27 
700,100 68 



$7,189,396 15 $4,011,254 29 $11,200,650 44 



264: AUDITOR^B REPORT, 



EDUCAriONAL INSTITUTIONS. 

UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI— STATE SEMINARY FUND. 

By virtue ot an act of the General Assembly, approved February 
8, 1839, Peter H. Burnett of Clay; Chancy Durkee of Lewis, Archi- 
bald Gamble of St. Louis, John G. Bryan of Washington, and John S. 
Phelps of Greene county, were appointed commissioners to select a 
site for the State University, which was to be located on a tract of land 
containing at least forty acres, and within two miles of the county seat 
of Cole, Ooopei, Howard, Boone, Callaway or Saline county. The act 
provided that said commissioners should receive conveyances of such 
land as might be offered as a site for the University, also, sealed bids 
from the difierent counties and from the citizens thereof, for such sums 
of money as might be secured to the State for the use and benefit of 
the University. After the commissioners had visited the several coun- 
ties to receive conveyances of real estate and subscriptions, they met 
in the City of Jefferson, and on the 24th of June, 183R, opened all the 
bids and located the University of Missouri at Columbia, Boone county 
— the award being made in the following: language : 

'' The commissioners appointed by law to select a site for the State 
University, have agreed unanimously in the choice of Boone county 
for its location. 

*' Given under our hands at the City of Jefferson, this 24th day of 
June, in the year 1839. 

(Signed) JOHN GANG BRYAN, 

CH. DURKEE, 
ARCHIBALD GAMBLE, 
JOHN S. PHELPS, 
PETER H. BURNETT." 

After selecting the site for the University, the commissioners de- 
posited all conveyances for land and subscriptions with the Auditor of 
Public Accounts, who was required, as soon as any part of the sub- 
scription became due, to place the evidences of such subscription in 
the hands of the attorney prosecuting for the State in the county in 
which the subscribers resided for collection. On the first day of June, 
1840, the Auditor of Public Accounts charged James M. Gordon, cir- 
cuit attorney of the 2d judicial circuit, with subscriptions amounting 
to $82,381.75, one-half of which was payable on that date, and the re- 
maiuder one year thereafter. The act of February 8, 1839, provided 



STATIStlOAL IinPOEMATION. 



265 



that snbscriptions collected by the circuit attorney should be paid into 
the State Treasury for the use of the University; but the fourth section 
of an act amendatory thereof, approved February 6, 1841, required 
sach collections to be paid to the treasurer of the Board of Curators, 
and upon production of the treasurer's receipt, the attorney received 
credit on the books of the Auditor. 

The following balance sheet shows the subscription list charged to 
Mr. Gordon, and the amounts collected by him: 



Dates. 



Jane 1, 1S40. 



January 10, 1855. . 

June 23, 1840 

Sept. 28, 1840 

October 26, 1841 . . 
March 12, 1842 . . 
October 31, 1842.. 
January 16, 1845. 
January 15, 1848. . 
January 10, 1855. . 
Totals 



James M. Gordon, Circuit. Attorney of 
the 2d Judicial Circuit. 



To amount subscribed by citizena of 
Boone county to aid In the establish- 
ment of the tlniverBity and placed in 
the bands of James M. Gordon, circuit 
attorney of the 2d judicial circuit, for 
collection 



Dr. 



To interest collected on deferred pay- 
ments 



By amount paid State Treasurer by Jas. 
M. Gordon 



By amount paid State Treasurer by Jas. 
M. Gordon 



By amount paid Treasurer Board of 
Curators by James ISi . Gordon 



By amount paid Treasurer Board of 
Curators by James M. Gordon 



By amount paid Treasurer Board of 
Curators by James M. Gordon 



By amount paid Treasurer Board of 
Curators by James M. Gordon 



By amount paid Treasurer Board of 
Curators by James M. Gordon 



$82,381 75 
88 14 



By amount paid Treasurer Board of 
Curators by James M. Gordon 



$82,464 89 



Cr. 



$10,000 00 

10,075 00 

21,301 50 

11,000 00 

25,277 04 

2,641 07 

750 39 

1,419 89 



$82,464 89 



In addition to cash subscriptions, accounted for above, the citizens 
of Boone county contributed lands estimated in 1839, to be worth about 
thirty-six thousand dollars. On the fourth day of July, 1840, the 
•corner stone of the main University edifice was laid — the address of 
the occasion having been delivered by Gen. James L. Minor, now a 
citizen of Jefferson Oity. 



266 auditor's rkport. 



The first President of the University was John H. Lathrop, LL. 
D., elected by the Board of Curators, in the month of October, 1840, 
while a Professor of Hamilton College, ^ew York. President Lathrop 
was elected for a term of six years, and entered upon the duties of his 
office March 1,1841. 

The first section of an act approved February 11, 1839, entitled 
**An act to provide for the institution and support of a State University 
and for the government of colleges and academies," provides for a fund 
to support the University which consisted ot the following items : 

First — The proceeds of all lands now lield by the State and known 
as '* Seminary lands." 

Second — All moneys derived from the sales of " Seminary lands,"" 
heretofore made and the interest thereof. 

Ikird — The interest, dividends, proceeds and profits of such- 
moneys and lands, until a distribution thereof shall be authorized. 

This fund was invested in stock of the Bank of the State of Mis- 
souri, and the income thereof was added to, and became a part of such 
fund, until the principal amounted to $100,000. In 1843, and annually 
thereafter, the earnings of the Seminary Fund were applied to the sup- 
port of the University. 

A short history of the Seminary Fund and its subsequent invest- 
ments is presented as follows : 

STATE SEMINARY FUND. 

The acts of Congress, approved February 17, 1818, and March 6^ 
1820, provided that two entire townships, or 46,080 acres of the public 
lands, should be reserved from sale and appropriated solely for the use 
of a seminary of learning. These lands were selected and the title 
thereto vested in the State of Missouri in pursuance of an act of Con- 
gress, approved January 24, 18'2T. 

A decription of the lands so selected, number of acres, counties- 
and land districts in which the same were located, will be found in the^ 
following table : 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



2«7 



Section. 



£ i and nw } 



Nwjfir. J 
J?eJ^ 
»e fr. J 
Sw J 



28 

33 

32 

31 

6 

3 

12 

13 

21 

19 

20 

29 

3() 

17 

33 

32 

27 

35 

34 

3G 

25 

26 

35 

34 

13 

24 

10 

15 

21 

20 

14 

11 

28 

3 

2 

1 

4 

17 

9 

8 

11 

2 

3 

1(1 

15 

21 

22 

17 

20 

4 

9 

19 

2f^ 

23 

5 

31 

36 

25 

25 

36 

1 

2 

15 



To' nshlp. 



Range. 



51 
51 
51 
51 
50 
60 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
60 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
60 
50 
50 
50 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
50 
50 
61 
61 
61 
61 
61 
61 
52 
52 
66 



30 west. 

!30 

130 

130 

;30 

30 

31 

31 

31 

31 

31 

31 

31 

31 

31 

31 

31 

33 

3:^ 

32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
132 
132 
132 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 

as 

33 
33 
33 
33 
29 
29 
6 



I 

6 
6 
1 
1 
5 



No. of 
acres. 



Ck)unty. 



640. 00 Jackson... 
640.00 



640.00 
639.26 
629.56 
621.34, 
640.00 
640. <0 
640.00' 
642.88 
640.00 
640.00 
644.01 
64U.00 
640.001 

640.oo; 

640.00 
640.00 
640.00! 
WO. 001 
640.001 
640.00 
640.00; 
640.00 
640.00 
641.00 
640.00 
640.001 
WO OO 
640.001 
640.00 
640.00 
640.00 
655.19 
493.48 
648.47 
656.72 
640.00 
640.00 
640.00 
640.00 
648.89 
648.02 
640.00 
640.00 
640.00 
640.00 
640.001 
640.001 
647.011 
640.00' 
572.62! 

640. 00 Lafayette.... 
543.65 '* 

590.14 I^wlg 

96.15, *' 

160.00) ** 

125.49, *' - 

160.00! *» 

160.00 ** 



Land District. 



W'st 



rnLandDlst'ict.. 

4fc 
*( 
• 4 

« 4 
> 44 
44 
4 k 
4 i 
44 
44 
44 
4 4 
4 4- 
44 
44 
4 •- 
44 
k4 
44 
44 
4 4 
4 4 
44 
44 
44 
44- 
44. 
4 « 
4 4 
44 
44- 
4 4 
44 
4 4- 
44 
14. 
44. 
44. 
44 
i 4 
« 4. 
44 
4i 
44 
t 4 
hi 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
«4 
4 4 



239.89 
265.41 
640.00 rlalls 



Pike 



Salt Riyer District.. 



4 4 
4 4 

44. 
4 4. 
4 4. 
44 
41. 
44 



268 



auditor's rvport. 





• 


Towns'p. 
34 


1 

( 

Range. 
11 east. 


1 




Section. 


No. of 
acres. 


Coanty. 


Land District 




12 


640.00 


Perry 


Cape Girardean Dis't. 




3 


34 


U '* 


630.67! ** 






18 


34 


12 '* 


637.48 *' 






24 
2i> 


27 
27 


13 '* 

13 *» 


575.45 


Scott 






625.04 


i t 






30 


27 


13 *' 


624. 9S 


it 






1 


26 


13 *' 


603.68 


i ( 






12 


26 


13 " 


713.95 ** 






13 


26 


13 '* 


723.65 *» 






21 


29 


14 *' 


640.00 ** 






30 


25 


14 " 


476.85 New Madrid. 






31 


25 


14 '* 


640.^5 '* 






27 


24 


14 '* 


640.00 '• 




E} 


13 


57 

1 


33 west. 


320.00 DeKalb 

1 


Lacation approved 


Ne} &D}8e} 


24 


57 i 


33 «* 


240. . . jClinton 


August 29, 1853. 
Location approved 














August 29, 1853. 






Totftl acres - - 






45.460 68 






1 













The area of the sections and fractional sections described in the 
foregoing list is taken from the ofBcial plats of the snrvey thereof, ap- 
proved by the Surveyor General for Missouri, now in the custody of 
the Register of Lands of the State of Missouri. It appears that the 
ectual area of the lands located falls short of two entire townships to 
the amount of 619 32-100 acres. By act of Congress approved March 
•3, 1831, the Legislature was authorized to sell the Seminary lands, 
'^ and to invest the money arising from the sale thereof in some pro* 
ductive fund, the proceeds of which shall be forever applied * * ♦ 
solely to the use of such Seminary and for the no other use or purpose 
whatsoever." The larger portion of these lands was sold between the 
years 1831 and 1838, and the proceeds derived therefrom were borrowed 
by the State for revenue purposes. In compliance with an act of the 
'General Assembly, approved February 2, 1837, entitled "An act to 
charter the Bank of the State of Missouri," the Governor invested the 
amount received from sales of Seminary lands and interest due thereon 
from the State in stock of the bank of the State of Missouri. 

The condition of the Seminary Fund, October 1, 1838, is reported 
by Auditor Baber as follows : 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION, 



269 



Amount invested in bank stock. April 12, 1837, being the amount due 
by the State to said fund and interest thereon up to April 12, 1837. 

Amount in the treasury on that day for which a warrant was drawn 
for investment 

Cash in treasury, October 1, J838 

Total 



$66,726 47 

8,333 18 
6,600 14 



$81,659 79- 



An act approved February 11, 1839, entitled ^'An act to provide 
for the institution and support of a State University,'' provided that 
the Governor, Secretary of State and Attorney-General should be 
Oommissioners of the Seminary Fund, and that said fund shall be and 
remain ^^ a permanent fund for the promotion of literature and the 
arts and sciences, and the income thereof shall be added to and be- 
come a part of such fund until the principal shall amount to one hun- 
dred thousand dollars, and thereafter until distribution of such income 
shall be made as hereinafter provided." 

Dividends declared on bank stock and the sale of Seminary lands 
had, by the first day of October, 1842, increased the fund to $100,000, 
which was invented in the Bank of the State of Missouri as follows : 



Certificate of stock No. 1, dated July 19, 1839 

Certificate of stoclc No. 2, dated February 22, 1840 
Certificate of stock No. 3, dated September 8, 1840 

Certificate of stock No. 4, dated March 15, 1842 

Total investment, October 1 1842 



$91,711 36 
3,209 89 
2,847 C4 
2,231 11 



$100,000 00- 



As authorized by act of the General Assembly, approved Febru- 
28, 1843, the earnings of the Seminary Fund were in that year, and an- 
nually thereafter, applied to the maintenance of the State University. 
The act ofFebruary 25, 1851, required all moneys in ths State Treasury 
belonging to the Seminary Fund, or which might be paid therein from 
the sale of Seminary lands, to be paid to the treasurer of the Univer- 
sity, and thereupon the Board of Curators were authorized to appro- 
priate the moneys thus received in such manner as would best pro- 
mote the interests of that institution. In consequence of this legisla- 
tion and of applying the annual income of the Seminary Fund to the 
maintenance of the University, the principal of the fund was not in- 



J. 



270 



AUBtTOR'S REPORT. 



creased; nor did any chaiigd occur iu it8 iavestoieat until 1866, wneii 
the stock held in the Bank of the 8tate of Missouri was sold to Captaiij 
James B. Eads as provided in the act approved March 5, 1866. The 
stock brought $108,500 or SIOS 50100 per share of $100, and paymeDti 
therefor were made June 18 and July 14, 1866, in bonds and couponi 
of the State which were canceled. By this transaction the Seminarr 
Fund ceased to exist; but in December, 1861, and as contemplated bj 
the Genera) Assembly in an act approved March 12, 1867, laws of 1S6T, 
p. 169, the sum of 9108,364,45 was transferred from the amount received 
from the United States as reimbursement of war expenditures and 
placed to the credit of the Seminary Fund. On the 6th of June, 1870, 
the fund received a further credit by the payment of a judgment ren- 
dered by the Supreme Court, April 4, 1870, against the bank of the 
State of Missouri for dividends declared June 30, 1866, which the bank 
withheld. With these resources United States six per cent* 5 SO bonds 
amounting to $10S,700 were purchased as indicated in the following 
table : 






D6e6mber, 7, 1867, U. S. bonds, face valae 

Premium on the same, 7| per cent 

Commissions, expressage, etc 

May 10, 1870, U. S. bonds, face valae 

Premium, 11 per cent 

Expressage 

August 10, 1870, U. S. bonds, face value. . 

Premium, 11} per cent 

November 23, 1870, U. 8. bonds, face value.. 

Premium, 11 per cent .' 

Expressage 

Total cost . . . . 



$100,000 00 

7,750 00 

135 00 

600 00 

66 00 

75 

aoooo 

7,900 00 

869 00 

17 54 

9117.551 19 



CONVERSION OF UNITED STATES BONDS INTO MISSOURI SIXES. 

December 24, 1876, the United States six per cent* bonds held in 
trust for the Seminary Fond and amounMng to $108,700, and the accrued 
interest thereon, were sold by the State Board of Education for the sum 
of $126,635.50. Missouri six per cent. Renewal Fundinfi;Bonds amoant- 
ing to $122,000 were immediately thereafter purchased. 



.a-Ml 



STATISnOAL INFORMATION. 



271 



The following table will show in what manner the proceeds derived 
from the sale of United States bonds were invested : 



ParchaBe of 122 Renewal Fanding Bonds, face value , 

Preminm on same at 1 per cent 

Interest on United States bonds credited to Seminary moneys 

■Otsh placed to the credit of the Seminary Fund 

Total Investment ^ , 



$122,000 00 

1,220 00 

3,320 42 

95 08 



$126,635 60 



By reason of the conversion of United States bonds into Missouri 
sixes the Seminary Fand was increased $13,395.08 and the annual in- 
come thereof in the snm of $798. 

GONSOLIDATON OF THB SEMINARY FUND. 

The investment of the Seminary Fund remained unchanged until 
July 1, 1881, when in compliance with an act of the General Assembly^ 
approved March 23, 1881, the Board of Fund Commissioners issued in 
lieu of the renewal funding bonds, a consolidated certificate of indebt- 
edness of the State of Missouri for $122,000, payable thirty years after 
date with interest at^the rate of six per centum per annum payable 
annually on the first day of January. The 122 renewal funding bonds 
of the State of Missouri numbered from 100 to 121 and from 572 to 671, 
hoth inclusive, were canceled by me as required in the fourth section 
of said act. 

CONDITION 07 THE SEMINARY FUND JANUARY 1, 1883. 



Missouri six per cent. Consolidated Certificate of Indebtedness 

'Cash in the State Treasury 

Total fund January 1, 1883 



$122,000 00 
95 08 



$122,095 08 



CSRTIPI0ATK6 OF INDEBTEDNESS ISSUED. 

During the years 1883 and 1884 R. B. Price, Esq., treasurer of the 
Board of Curators of the State University, paid into the State Treasury 
the sum of $387,000, for investment as provided in an act of the 
<3eneral Assembly, approved March 31, 1883, authorizing the perma- 



272 



afditor's rfpoft. 



'"nent investment of moneys belonging to the Pablic School and Sem- 
nary Funds. Of this payment the sum of $287,000 was derived from 
the Sale of Agricultural OoUege Lands donated to the State of Missouri 
by virtue of an act of Congress, approved July 2, 1862, entitled ''An 
act donating public lands to the several States and Territories which 
may provide colleges for the benfit of agriculture and the mechanic 
arts." 

The remainder, or $100,000, was derived from the sale of one hun* 
dred six per cent, bonds of the State of Missouri held by the Treasurer 
of the Board of Ourators and issued under an act of the General As- 
senbly, approved March 29,1872, entitled ^^An act for the benefit of the 
State University, the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Missouri 
and the School of Mines and Metallurgy," etc. The dates of the sev- 
eral payments made by Mr. Price, and the sources from which the 
money was derived, are presented as follows : 



June 27,1883 

June 30, 1883 

July 30,1883 

Novembers, 1883.. 
January 30, 1884 . . . 



From sale of Agricultural College Lands ' $236,000 00 

From sale of Agricultural College Lands 6,000 00 

From sale of bonde authorized by the act of 1872. . | 100,000 00 

From sale of Agricultural College Lands ' 5,000 00 

From sale of Agricaltural College Lands 5,00000 



April 19, 1884 From sale of Agricultural College Lands 35,000 00 

t I 

Total payments ' $387,000 Oa 



As contemplated by the act of March 31, 1883, the Board of Fund 
Oommisdioners caused to be issued certificates for the above payments 
payable twenty years after date and bearing interest at the rate of five 
per centum per annum, payable semi-annually on the first days of Jan- 
nary and July of each year. The condition of the Seminary Fund on 
the first day of January, 1885, is submitted as follows: 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 273 



CONDITION C»F THE SEBilNAEY FUND JANUARY 1, 1885. 



Missoori six per cent. Consolidated Certificate of Indebtedness $122,000 00 

Missouri fiye per cent. Certificate of Indebtedness, issued July 2, 1888. 242,000 00 

I 

Missouri five per cent. Certificate of Indebtedness, issued July 20, 1883 . ' 100,000 00 
Missouri five per cent. Certificate of Indebtedness, issued Nov. 1, 1883. 5,000 00 
Missouri five per cent. Certificate of Indebtedness, issued Jan. 30, 1884. 6,000 00 



Missouri five per cent. Certificate of Indebtedness, issued April 19,1884. 



35,000 00 



Cash in the State Treasury 95 08 

TotalSeminaryFund January 1, 1886 $609,095 08 



In 1885 and 1886, R. B. Price, Treasurer of the Board of Curators 
of the State University, paid into the State treasury the sum of $10,000, 
moneys derived from the «ale of Agricultural College Lands. As pro- 
vided in the act of March 31,1883, certificates of^indebtedness were is- 
sued for said payments as follows : One for $5,000, of date April 2, 
1885, for money paid into the treasury January 13, 1885, and one for 
f5,000, dated February 25, 1886, for the second payment made Febru- 
ary 23, 1886. 

CONDITION OP THE SEMINARY FUND JANUARY 1,1887. 



Missouri six per cent. Consolidated Certificate of Indebtedness j $122,000 00 

Missouri five per cent. Certificate of Indebtedness, issued July 2, 1883., 242,000 00 
Missouri five per cent. Certificate of Indebtedness, issued July 20, 1883.| 100,000 00 
Missouri five per cent. Certificate of Indebtedness, issued Nov. 1, 1883. 6,000 00 
Missouri five per cent. Certificate of Indebtedness, issued Jan. 30, 1884. 5,000 00 
Missouri five per cent. Certificate of Indebtedness, issued April 19, 1884.' 35,000 00 
Missouri five per cent. Certificate of indebtedness, issued April 2, 1S85. ! 5,00,000 
Missouri SiYe per cent. Certificate of indebtedness, issued Feb. 23, 1886. : 5,000 00 

Cash in the State Treasury 96 08 

Total amount of Seminary Fund January 1, 1887 , $519,095 08 



The following table will show the amounts received by the Uni- 
versity from investments of the Seminary Fund in bank stock and 
bonds; also the amounts appropriated by the General Assembly for 
its support and endowment from October 1, 1841, to December 31, 
1886: 

8 p— 18 



274 



auditor's report. 



en 



o 
o 

O 

<1 

(/) 

Q 

Id 



GQ 
013 

;z; 



M Q> BO • 

K CO a V 
©"g a g 



CO 
CO 



«» 



CO 



00 



s 

lO 



i 



■♦**'■' Q. BO 

a e o S 



.^ t3 n p o *^ 
c£^ " " fl-g 



P S9 29-^ 



o 

CO 

s 



o 

CO 



s 
s 



■§§88 




8 SS88 



lOlO 




r-i^^CO 




ffrATlBTlOAL TNPOBHATlnM. 



8181 8l~T;SSS" 

§IS 11 S§l§ 






« 1 

i s 

O s 

S £ 



-it. 
11 






IS 



I 

I- 
I' 



i • 

i I 



a ? 



II 



pi £m' 



S11 

isi 
I si 

ill 



if 



J- 






-:_; _rfe^ 






d« wf^ 



S SS"S 



O fc.>^d5 .= -^^ 



276 



auditor's report* 







»25 c s a 



H 






OB 

o 



^^53 I I 









00 r^ 



•3^ 



ISO 



STATlSnOAL INFOBHATION. 












Jli. 



Haf-§&-£HgHg-2g 

^^" tea Ma (ic«-g^ 

■^ -s ** «: -a* <* 
3 3 S 3 S S 



2- 

fl 
is 

^iH^tCgBgcdgBil 
3 S S S S 3 



additok'^s report. 



'Ill 






9: 

n 












si 3 """"-I 



a £ 
e 4 






1:1 



^sfc 









ll 






STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



279 



00 
CO 

s 



s 



$ 



s 


s 


S 


i 




03SS8 

^ ci ci 



0$^ tf a^ojo: pj fi^ 



^ So CD 

« -, »^ 

>^ *< »-> 



a • 






00 



s 



S5* .3 '3SS p' s 



* iC. * ^& * ^^ 00 * * 

Soo SSs ffl "^ S*:^® 



-2 



oTS^- S 






►% 

"S 

•^ 



OS 



'~'i-(CO 
flS at 



280 



auditor's report. 



s s c s 

r^ 00 ^ >> 
•^ fC "f-i 

|sss 







STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



281 



STATE BONDS APPROPRIATED FOR THE ENDOWMENT AND USE OF 

THE STATE UNIVERSITY, LAWS 1872, p. 152. 



Date of is- I Time to 
sue. ran. 



Denomina- 
tion. 



July 1, 187220 years $1,000 each. 



Rate of 
interest. 



Six per 
cent. 



Where pay- 
able. 



When pay- 
able. 



B'k of Com- Ist days of 
merce,N. Y. Jan. <& July. 



A mount 
issued. 



$166,000 00 



The curators of the University were authorized to use so much of 
the proceeds of the sale of sixty-six of these bonds as might have been 
necessary to finish and fully equip the scientific building of the Agri- 
cultural and Mechanical College ; to pay off outstanding indebtedness 
of the University, amounting to 919,600.00 ; to expend the further sum 
of $5,000.00 in making additions to the library, and the remainder of 
said bonds were to become a part of the permanent endowment of the 
State University. The endowment bonds, amounting to $100,000, were 
held by the Treasurer of the Board of Curators and the interest thereon 
collected and used in the payment of current expenses of the Uni- 
versity. 

In 188S, these bonds were sold and the proceeds derived from their 
sale were paid into the State Treasury, for which a five per cent, cer- 
tificate of indebtedness for $100,000 was issued July 20, 1883, under act 
of March 31, of that year, as heretofore described. 

RECAPITULATION. 



Cash received from citizens of Boone county. 



Cash received flrom bank dividends, sale of Seminary lands, interest 
on bonds and certificates in Seminary Fund and premium on gold 
interest 

Warrants issued on appropriations of the General Assembly 

Bonds Issued as provided in the act of March 29, 1872 

Total 



$82,464 89 

432,698 23 

534,043 82 

166,000 00 

$1,215,206 94 



282 



auditor's report- 



state AID GKANTBD TO THE UNIVERSITY FROM OCTOBER 1, 1841, 

TO DECEMBER 31, 1886. 



Appropriations by the General Assembly 

Bonds issaed as provided in tlie act of March 29, 1872 
Total 



$534,043 82 
166,000 00 



$700,043 82 



SCHOOL OP MINES AND METALLURGY, ROLLA, MO. 

The School of Mines and Metallurgy was established as provided 
in an act of the General Assembly, approved February 24, 1870. This 
school is a department of the University of the State of Missoun, and 
was opened for the reception of students November 23, 1871. 

The amount of aid given by the State to this institution is set forth 
in the following tables : 



STATE BONDS APPROPRIATED FOR THE USE OF THE SCHOOL OF 

MINES AND METALLURGY. 

Laws of 1872, p. 153, section 3. 



Date of is- ' Time to 
sue. ran. 



Denomina- Rate of 



tlon. 



interest. 



July 1,1872.20 years... 



$1,000 each. 6 per cent 



Bonds and I Interest, 
int's, where when pay- 



Amount 
issued. 



payable. 



able. 



Bank of First days 
Commerce, of January 
New York., and July. 



$35,000 00 



The act of 1872 provided that the proceeds arising from the sale 
of these bonds should be used, under the direction of the Board of Oa- 
rators of the State University, in the erection and equipment of a suit- 
able building for the School of Mines and Metallurgy. 



STATISTIOAL iKFOBMATiON. 



283 



CASH APPROPRIATIONS BY THE GE5>rERAL ASSEMBLY. 



Persons to whom warrants were issued— references to Warrants is- 
laws aathori/ing appropriations. ^sued on each 

appropriat'n . 



From January 1, 1875, to Dbckmbrr 31, 1876. 
Support of— Laws of 1875, p. 14. 



For making geological survey— Laws of 1875, p. 73, 
sec 4 

From January 1, 1877, to Deckmbbr 31, 1878. 

Support of— Laws of 1875, p. 14, and Laws of 1877, p. 
14, sec. 6 

For making geological suryey— Laws of 1875, p. 73, 
sec. 4 

From January 1, 1879, to Dbckmber 31, 1880. 
Support o*— Laws of 1879, p. 5, sec. 6 

From January 1, 1881, to Dbcbmber 31, 1882. 
Support of— Laws of 1881 , p. 5, sec. 6 



9 Payment of Rolla Board of Education for balance due 
on building for School of Mines— Laws of 1881, p. 13. 

From January 1,1883, to Diccbmbbr31, 1884. 
Support of— Laws of 1883, p. 6, sec. 6 

From January 1, 1885, to Dbcbmber 31, 1886. 

Support of— Laws 1885, p. 6, sec. 6 

Construction of Laboratory — ^Laws 1885, p. 18 



Total warrants Issued on cash appropriations 



$8,750 00 
10,000 00 



Total amount 
Issued. 



16,250 00 
5,000 00 



15,000 00 



15,000 00 
16,000 00 



15,000 00 



15,000 00 
10,000 00 



$18,750 00 



21,250 00 



15,000 00 



31,000 00 



15,000 00 



25,000 00 



£126,000 00 



RECAPITULATION. 



Bonds iBBued as provided in the act of March 29, 1872 

■ 

Warrants issued on appropriations of the General Assembly. 
Total aid given by the State to December 31, 1886 



$35,000 00 

126,000 00 

$161,000 00 



284 



auditor's report. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 

Under the provisions of an act of the General Assembly, approved 
March 19, 1870, the First District Normal School was located at Kirks- 
vllle, in Adair county, and the Second District Normal School at War- 
rensburg, in Johnson county. The Third District Normal School was 
established in the city of Cape Girardeau, as provided in an act ap- 
proved March 22, 1873. The general control and management of each 
normal school is vested in a hoard of regents, consisting of seven mem- 
bers, all appointed by the Governor, with the ooncurrence of the Sen- 
ate, except the State Superintendent, of public Schools, who is ex 
officio a member of each board. 

By virtue of an act approved February 14, 1870, a normal depart- 
ment in Lincoln Institute, located in the City of Jefferson, was estab- 
lished for the purpose of educating and training colored teachers for 
the public schools. In compliance with a resolution of the Board of 
Trustees, Lincoln Institute and all property, real and personal, therean- 
to belonging, was conveyed to the State of Missouri March 19, 1879. The 
following table shows the total amount paid by the State in support of 
normal schools from the time each school was established to December 
31, 1886; also the mileage and per diem of regents, with reference to 
the various laws authorizing appropriations and under which warrants 
were issued : 

NORMAL SCHOOL-FIRST DISTRICT, KIRKS VILLB, MO. 
Opened as a State Normal School, January 2, 1871.. 



For what purpose warrants were issued— references to 
laws authorizing appropriations. 



Amount of 
warrants is- 
sued on each 
appropriati'n 



From January 1, 1871, to December 31, 1872. 

Support of— Laws of 1870, page 135. section 7 

Completion of Normal School building— Laws of 1872, 
page 157, section 1, 

From January 1, 1873, to December 31, 1874. 

Support of— Laws of 1870, page 135, section 7, and 
Laws of 1873, page 78 

Completion of Normal School building— Laws of 1872, 
page 157, section 1 



$10,000 00 
33,680 17 



18,888 87 
15,991 52 



Aggregate 
amount. 



$43,680 17 



34,880 39 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



285 



NOKMAL SCHOOL— FIRST DISTRICT— Continubd. 



I Amount of 
For what purpose warrants were issued— references to' warrants is- 



laws authorizing appropriations. 



sued on each 
appropriation 



From January I, 1875, to December 31, 1876. 
Support of— Laws of 1873, page 78 

From January 1, 1877, to December 31, 1878. 
Support of— Laws of 1877, page 14, section 6 

From January 1, 1879, to December 31, 1880. 
Support of— Laws of 1879, page 6, section 6 

From January 1, 1881, to December 31, 1882. 

I 

Support of— Laws of 1881, page 6, section 6 

From January 1, 1883, to December 31, 1884. [ 

Support of— Laws of 1883, page 6, section 6 1 

Purchase of heating apparatus and repairs — Laws of' 
1883, page 6, seoti9n 6 

From January 1, 1886, to December 31, 1886. 

Support of— Laws of 1886, section 6, page 6 

Total amount of aid given by the State 



920,000 (lO; 



15,000 00' 



16,000 OOl 



20,000 00 



20,000 00 
15,966 80 




Aggregate 
amount. 



$20,000 00 



15,000 00 



15,000 00 



20,000 00 



35,965 80 



20,000 00 
$204,526 36 



286 



auditor's report. 



NORMAL. SCHOOI^SECOND DISTRICT, WARRENSBURG, MO 



Openhd for thb Rkckption of Students May 10, 1871. 



For what purpose warrants were issued— references to 
laws authorizing appropriations. 



Amount of 
warrants is- 
sued on each 
appropriati' n 



From January 1, 1871, to Dbcembkr 81. 1872. 



Support of— Laws 1870, page 136, section 7 

From January 1, 1873, to Dbcrhber 31, 1874. 
Support of— Laws of 1873, page 78 

From January 1, 1875, to Decbmbbr 31, 1876. 
Support of Laws of 1873, page 78 

From January 1, 1877, to Deckmbbr 31, 1878. 
Support of— Laws of 1877, page 14, section 6 

From January 1, 1879, to Dkcbmbbr 31, 1880. 
Support of— Laws of 1879, page 5, section 6 

From January 1, 1881, to Dbcbmber 31, 1882. 
Support of— Laws of 1881, page 6, section 6 



$10,000 00 



.2r),000 00 



Completion of Normal School building— Laws of 1881, 
page 12, section 1 

From January 1, 1883, to December 31, 1884. 

Support of -Laws 1883, page 6, section 6 

Repairs of building— Laws 1883, page 6, section 6 

From January 1, 1885, to Dkckmbbr 31, 1886. 

Support of— Laws 1885, section 6, page 6 

Completion of building— Laws 1885, page 24 

Total amount of aid g^ven by the State 



20,000 00 



15,000 00 



15,000 00 



20,000 00 
10,000 00 



20,000 00 
15,000 00 



20,000 00 
30,000 00 



Aggregate 
amount. 



$10,000 00 



20,000 00 



20,000 00 



15,000 00 



15,000 00 



30,000 00 



35,000 00 



50,000 00 



$195,000 00 



STATISTICAL INFOBMATION. 



287 



NORMAL SCHOOLr-THlRD DISTRICT, CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO. 



Located Dbcbmbbb 3 and opkhbd for thk Rkciption of Stupknts Dbcbmbbr 

10, 1873. 



Amount of 
For what purpose warrants were issued — ^references to warrants is- 
laws authorlzg appropriations. 



Aggregate 
sued on eachi amount. 



appropriation 



From March 22, 1873, to Dbcsmbbr 31, 1S74. 
Support of— Laws of 1873, page 81, section 6 

From January 1, 1875, to Dbcbmbbr 31, 187C. 
Support of— Laws of 1875. page 72 

From January 1, 1877, to Dbcbmbbr 31, 1878. 
Support of— Laws of 1877, page 14, section 6 

From January 1, 1879, to Dbcbmbrr 31, 18S0. 
Support of— Laws of 1879, page 6, section 6 

From January 1, 1881, to Dbcembkr 31, 1882. 
Support of— Laws of 1881, page 5, section 6 

From January 1, 1883, to Dbcbmbbr 31, 1884. 
Support of— Laws of 1883, page 6, section 6 




Completion of building, furniture, library, etc. — ^Laws 
of 1883, page 6, section 6 

From January 1, 1885, to Dbcbmbbr 31, 1886. 

Support of— Laws 1885, page 6, section 6 

Total amount of aid given by the State 



20,000 00 



15,000 00, 



15,000 00, 



20,000 oo; 



20,000 00 
12,784 00 



20,000 00 



$5,000 00 



20,000 00 



15,000 00 



15,000 00 



20,000 00 



32,784 00 

20,000 00 



$127,784 00 



288 



auditor's report. 



LINCOLN INSTITUTE— NORMAL SCHOOL FOR THE TRAINING OP COL- 
ORED TEACHERS, CITY OF JEFFERSON, MO. NORMAL DEPART- 
MENT ESTABLISHED FEBRUARY 14, 1870. 



A mount of 
For what purpose warrants were issued —references to'warrants is- 
lawB authorizing appropriations. sued on each 

appropriate n. 



From January 1 to Dbcember 31, 1870. 
Support of— Laws of 1870, p. 137, sec. 3 

From January 1, 1871, to Dkcembkr 31, 1872. 
Support of— Laws of 1870, p. 137, sec. 3 

From January 1, 1873, to Decembrr 31, 1874. 
Support of— Laws of 1870, p. 137, sec. 3 

From January 1, 1876, to Dsgbmbbr 31, 1876. 
Support of— Wagner^s Statutes, p. 1269, sec. 3 

From January 1, 1877, to Dkcembbr 31, 1878. 
Support of— Laws of 1877, p. 14, sec. 6 

From January 1, 1879, to Dbcembbr 31, 1880. 

Support of— Laws of 1879, p. 6. sec. 6 

Payment of debts— Laws of 1879, p. 5, sec. 6 

From January 1, 1881, to Dbcember 31, 1882. 

Support of— Laws of 1881, p. 5, sec. 6 

Erection of a dormitory— Laws of 1881, p. 6, sec. 6 

Purchase of school apparatus — Laws of 1881, p. 5, sec. 6. 

From January 1, 1883, to December 31, 1884. 

Support of— Laws of 1883, p. 6, sec. 6 i 

Completion of building, repairs and Library— Laws of 
1883, p. 6, sec. 6 

From January 1, 1885, to December 31, 1886. 

Support of— Laws of 1885, p. 6, sec. 6 



Ihrection of dormitory and completion of building- 
Laws 1885, p. 6 



Total amount of aid given by the State. 



$2,500 00, 



10,000 00' 



10,000 00 



10,000 00 



10,000 00, 



10,000 00 
5,000 00 



10,000 OOj 
5,000 00 
1,000 00 



12,600 00 
3,500 00 



Aggregate 
amount. 



16,000 06 
9,500 00 



$2,500 00 



10,000 00 



10,000 00 



10,000 00 



10,000 00 



15,000 00 



16,000 00 



16,000 a^ 



25,600 00 



$116,000 00 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



2S0 



EXPENSES OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS. 

Regents of Normal Schools were formerly entitled to receive six 
cents per mile in going to and returning from meetings of the Board, 
and three dollars for each day the Board was in session. Laws of 1870, 
p. 136, sec. 8 ; laws of 1878, p; 81. 



From January 1 to December 31, 1870 


$247 02 
3,412 92 

• 

2,221 30 
436 50 


1 

1 


From January 1, 1871 . to December 31, 1872 


i 


From January 1, 1873, to December 31, 1874 




From January 1. 1875, to December 31. 1876 






$6,317 73 






Total '. 


$6,317 74 


. 



RECAPITULATION. 



Warrants issued to Normal School, First District, KirksylUe, Mo > $204,526 36 



Warrants issued to Normal School, Second District, Warrensburg, Mo 

Warrants issued to Normal School, Third District, Cape Girardeau, Mo. 

Warrants issued to Lincoln Institute, Jefferson City, Mo 

Expenses of Regents 

Total amount paid by the State on account of Normal Schools to 
December 31, 1886 



195,000 00 

127,784 00 

115,000 00 

6,317 74 



)»648,628 10 



MISSOURI MILITABY INBTITUIB, LEXINGTON, MO. 

The Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons proposed 
to donate to the State of Missouri the college grounds and property of 
said Grand Lodge, located in the city of Lexington, provided the State 
would establish and forever support a first-class military or Normal 
School, or other literary institution upon the grounds of said college. 

As provided in act approved May 13, 1861, this proposition was 
accepted, and the sum of three thousand dollars was appropriated, 
annoally, for the support of the Military Institute. By virtue of an act 
approved March 22, 1870, the college grounds and property thereon 
was reconveyed to the Grand Lodge of Masons. 

The amount paid by the State to support this educational institu- 
tion is shown in the following table: 



B 



19 



290 



AUDITOP- S RBPORT. 



For what purpose warrants were issued. Reference, Warrants is- i Total war- 
to laws authorizing appropriations. } sued on ap- irants issaed. 

propriations.i 



From October 1, 1865, to Sbptembbr 30, 1866. 
Support ol— Laws of 1860-1, p. 55, sec. 2 

From October 1, 1S66, to December 31, 1868. 
Support of— Laws of 1860-1, p. 55, sec. 2 

From January 1, 1869, to December 31, 1870. 
Support of— Laws of 1860-1 , p. 55, sec. 2 



Total aid given to the Military Institute. 



¥3,000 OOj 

I 



6,000 00 



6,000 OOi 



$15,000 00 



$15,000 00 



STATE CHARITIES. 



STATE LUNATIC ASTLUM NO. ONE. 



As provided in an act approved Febrnary 16, 1847, entitled "An 
act to establish an asylum for the insane," three commissioners were 
elected by the General Assembly, who were entrusted with the selec- 
tion of a suitable site f^r the location of said institution and with con- 
tracting for and supervising its erection. In selecting the location of 
the Asylum, the commissioners were confined to the counties of Boone, 
Callaway, Chariton, Cole, Cooper, Howard, Moniteau and Saline. After 
visiting each of the counties named for the purpose ot receiving dona- 
tions or bids, the commissioners met in Ihe city of Boonville, where 
sealed propositions were opened on the I3th day of July, 1847. The 
citizens of Callaway county having offered greater inducements, the 
Asylum was located near Fulton, in that county, upon a tract of land 
containing about five hundred acres, which has been conveyed to the 
commissioners by warrantee deed. In addition to the land a further 
donation of about $11,500 was subscribed and payment thereof secured 
as provided in said act. The contract for building the asylum was let 
to Solomon Jenkins, April 16, 1849, at the price of $47,450. By direc- 
tion of the Board of Managers it was advertised that the Asylum would 
be opened for the reception of patients on the first day of December, 
1851, but owing to disappointment in not having certain improvements 
completed, the advertisement was countermanded. A few natients, 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 291 



however, were received during the winter. By act approved February 
28, 1851, the government of the Asylum was vested in a Board of Man- 
agers, consisting of seven members, who were entrusted with general 
control of the institution, with power to prescribe rules, regulations 
and by-laws for its government, discipline and management, and to 
appoint its officers. The first officers appointed by the Board of Man« 
agers were Turner K. H. Smith, M. D., Medical Superintendent; Wm. 
B. Wilson, Steward ; Mrs. Eliza J. Swope, Matron, and James S. Hen- 
derson, Treasurer. By order of the Board the Superintendent entered 
upon duty in August, 1851. 

Appropriations were made by the General Assembly from time to 
time, and as provided in acts approved February 17, 1857, and March 
27, 1861, taxes were levied for the support of the Asylum. On the 1st 
of October, 1861, in consequence of the troubled condition of the 
country, the Board of Managers were forced to suspend the institution, 
and it was not re-opened until September 7, 1863. 

In 1881 the General Assembly appropriated fifteen thousand dol- 
lars for the erection of a building. for the accommodation and treat- 
ment of insane criminals ; said building to be located on the premises 
of the State Lunatic Asylum at Fulton. The government of the Asy- 
lum is now vested in a Board of Managers, consisting of nine mem- 
bers, three of whom are required to be competent physicians. Mem- 
bers of the Board are appointed by the Governor by and with the con- 
currence of the Senate. 

The following table will show the entire amount paid by the State 
on account of the Asylum from the date of the act authorizing its 
erection in 1847, to December 31, 1886 : also the number of patients 
remaining in the institution at the end of each biennial term since its 
opening in 1851, as well as references to the various laws authorizing 
appropriations and under which warrants]were issued : 



292 



AUDITOR^B REPORT. 



STATE LUNATIC ASYLUM NO. 1. 



For what purposes warrants were issued References Amount of < 

to laws authorizing appropriations. Number warrants; is- Aggregate 

of patients. Dates, etc. , sued on each; amount. 

approprlat'n . 



From July 13, 1847, to Skftxmbkr 30, 1848. 

Adyertising and other expenses of commissioners. 
Laws 1847, p 62, sec. 22 

Fbom October 1, 1848, to Srptbbiber 30, 1850. 

Expenses of commissioners— building of Asylum. 
Laws 1847, p. 62. Laws 1849, p. 69 



From October 1, 1850, to Sbftehber 30, 1852. 

Building, purchase of heating apparatus, ftimiture, 
medicine, erection of cisterns, sewers, sinks, pur- 
cease of provisions and clothing, and payment of 
salaries. Laws 1849, p. 59. Laws 1851, p. 225 . 

Number of patients NoTember 29, 1852, 62. 

From October 1, 1862, to September 30, 1854. 

Furnishing of. Laws 1861, p. 225 

Support of and payment of salaries. Laws 1863, p. 11 . 

Salaries of officers— Paid from appropriation for gen- 
eral contingent expenses 

-I 
Building wings and chapel, purchase of surgical in- 
struments, furniture, medicines and improvements. 
Laws 1863, p. 11 

Number of patients November 27, 1864, 94. 

From October 1, 1864, to Sbptember 30« 1866. 

Support of and payment of salaries. Laws 1858, p . 11 . ' 

Enlargement and improvement of. Laws 1863, p. 11 . . 

I 
I 

Salaries of officers — ^Paid from appropriation for gen- 
eral contingent expenses < 

Payment of debts, current expenses, finishing and fur- 
nishing wings. Laws 1855, p . 5 



..••*• 



Salaries of offic.ers. Laws 1856, p. 143, sec. 5 

Number of patients November 24, 1866, 135. 

From October 1, 1856, to September 30, 1858. 
Salaries of officers 



Support and enlargement of payment of debts and cur- 
rent expenses. Laws 1856-7, p. 9 

Number of patients November 29, 1858, 171. 



$465 38! 



$22,607 22' 



61,319 09 



696 19 

30,000 00 

I 

3,482 66' 

i 

23,000 00 



7,300 00 
6,600 00 



1,326 00 

I 

60,000 00 
4,825 OOi 



6,972 50 
70,037 35 



$465 38 



22,607 22 



61,319 09 



67,078 85 



80,050 00 



77,009-85 



STATISTICAL INFOIWIATION. 



293 



STATE LUNATIC ASYLUM NO. 1. —Continued. 



For what purposes warrants were issued. Reference AmoTlintof 

to laws authorizing appropriations. Number warrants is- i Aggregate 
of patients. Dates, etc. sued on eachi amount. 

appropriat'n., 



Fbom Octobbr 1, 1858, to September 30, 1860. I 

Salaries of officers 

Support and enlargement of. Laws 1856-7. p. 9 

I 

Erection of hospitals, infirmaries and other improve- 
ments. Laws 1858-9, p. 11 : 

Support of and payment of debts. Laws of 1856-7, p. 9 
(Asylum tax) 

Number of patients November 26, 1860, 233 . . 

From October 1, 1860 to Skptbmbbr 30, 1862. 

Salaries of ofScers 

Support of— Asylum tax. Laws 1860-1, p. 63 



$10,122 10 
42,462 65 



Suspended October 1, 1861. Re-opened September 7, 
1863. 

From October 1, 1862, to September 30, 1864. 

Salaries of officers \ 

Support of— Asylum tax. Laws 1860-1 , p . 63 

Current expenses. Laws 1863, p. 24 

Repairs and improvements. Laws of 1863-4, p. 136 

Number of patients November 28, 1864, 152. 

From October 1, 1864, to September, 30, 1866. 

Salaries of officers 

Current expenses. Laws of 1865, p. 6 

Payment of debts. Laws of 186&-6, p. 10 

Number of patients November 26, 1866, 265. 

From October 1, 1866, to December 31, 1868. 
Salaries of officers 



Support of. General Statutes 1865, p. 305, sec. 8, 



Furnishing with water and gas, construction of sewer, 
purchase of piano and melodeon, books, guttering, 
and other repairs. Laws 1868, p. 10 

Number of patients .Vovember 30, 1868, 369. 



50,000 00' 



106,300 05 



6,321 66 
26,792 20 



3,951 66 

8,795 44 

19,166 67 

5,000 00 



6,227 75 
33,733 33; 
20,000 00 



8,887 70 
39,500 00 

20,000 OOi 



$208,884 80 



33,113 86 



86,913 77 



59,961 08 



68,387 70 



294 



auditor's report. 



STATE LUNALIC ASYLUM NO. 1. Contindied. 



For what purpose warranto were issned^-references to 
laws authorizg appropriations. 



From Jakuart 1, 1869, to Dbcbbiber 31, 1870. 
Salaries of officers 



Maintenance of Sarah Oriffin at the Asylum. Laws 
1869, p. 201 



Support of. Qeneral Statutes 1865, p. 905, sec. 8. 



Purchase of carpeting and matting, purchase of engine 
and boilers, erection of building and sundry repairs 
and improvements. Laws 1869, p. 5; laws 1870, 
p. 10 

Number ofpatiento November 28, 1870, 303. 

From January 1, 1871, to Dbcsmber 31, 1872. 
Salaries of officers 



Support of and sundry repairs. Laws of 1871, pp. 9 
and 10 



Number of patients November 28, 1872—315. 

From January 1, 1873, to Dscbmbbr 31, 1874. 

Salaries of officers 

Support of— Laws of 1873, p. 14, sec. 2 



Maintenance of Sarah Qrlffin at the Asylum. Laws 
1869, p. 201 



Sundry repairs andlmprovements— Laws 1873, p. 14, 
sec. 1 



Number of patients November 30, 1874—338. 

From January 1, 1875, to Decembbr 31, 1876. 

Salaries of officers 

Support of— Laws 1S73, p. 15 



Maintenance of Sarah Griffin at the Asylum— Laws 
1869, p. 201 \ 



Amount of I 
warranto is- ' Aggregate 
sued on eachj amount 
appropriation' 



Construction of pond, purchase of machinery and re- 
pairs — Laws 1875, p. 8 



Payment of debts — Laws 1875, p. 8 

Number of patients November 27, 1876—350. 

From January 1, 1877, to Dkcbmbkr 31, 1878. 
Salaries of officers 



$9,451 66 

319 55 
32,000 00 



55,000 00 



$9,506 92 



49,800 00 



12,059 88J 
35,000 Ool 

299 35 

58,587 75 



17,042 79 
50,000 00 

507 4lj 

1 
8,700 OOi 

28,846 36 



15,800 00 



$96,771 21 



$59,306 1» 



105,946 98 



106,096 66 



I 



8TATIBTI0AL INFOBMATION. 



295 



STATE LUNATIC ASYLUM NO. 1— Continued. 



For what purpose warrants were issued— references to 
laws authori/ing appropriations. 



Support of— Laws 1877, p. 14. sec. 6 

Payment of debts— Laws 1877, p. 18, sec. 1 



Improvement of grounds and amusements— Laws 1877, 
p. 14, sec. 6 

Number of patients November 28, 1878—410. 

From January 1, 1879. to Dkcbmber 31, 1880. 

Salaries of officers 

Support of— Laws of 1879, pp 5 and 9 

Number of patients November 29, 1880—507. 

From January 1, 1881, to Dbcbmbbr 31, 1882. 
Salaries of officers — Laws of 1881, p. 5, sec. 6 



Erection of hospital for insane criminals — Laws of 
1881, p. 123 



Support of— La ws of 1881 , p. 5, sec. 6 

Number of patients December 18. 1882 — 514. 

From January 1, 1883, to Dbcembkr 31, 1884. 

Salaries of officers — Laws of 1883, p. 5, sec. 11, and p. 
, 11 , sec. i3 



Amount of 
warrants is- 
sued on each 
appropriat'n . 



$70,000 00 

22,650 36' 

I 

1,000 00; 



Support of— Laws of 1883, p. 5, sec. 6 



Completion of building for insane criminals. Laws of 
1883, p. 5, sec. 6 

Construction of straw house— Laws of 1883, p. 5, 
sec. 6 

Purchase of iron stairway — Laws of 1883, p. 5, sec. 6. . 

Erection of dead rooms — Laws of 1883, p. 5, sec. 6 

Number ofpatients November 24, 1884r-^0. 

From January 1, 1885, to December 31, 1886. 

Salaries of officers —Laws 1885, sec. 6, p 6 

Support of— Laws of 1885, sec. 6, p. 5 

Lighting and improvement— Laws 1S85, sec. 6, p. 5. . . 

Number of patients December 20, 1886—557. 

Total amount of aid given by the State 



15,800 00, 
71,000 00| 



17,775 OOi 

15,000 00 
50,000 00 



19,969 21 
60,000 00 

5,000 00 

3,275 00 

4,800 00 
1,800 00 



20,016 66 
70,000 00 
10,300 00 



Aggregate 
amount. 



8109,450 36 



86,800 00 



82,775 00 



94,844 21 



100,316 66 



91,537,099 50 



296 auditor's report. 



STATE LUNATIC ASYLUM NO. TWO. 

This iDstitution was established by virtue of an act of the General 
Assembly, approved March 28, 1872, which provided for its location in 
the northwestern or southwestern part of the State, and that it should 
be known as 'The Northwestern or Southwestern Missouri Lunatic 
Asylum." 

Five commissioners, to be appointed by the Governor, were en- 
trusted with the selection of a location for the building and with con- 
tracting for its erection. To purchase a site and erect thereon a suita- 
ble building, bonds of the State, amounting to two hundred thousand 
dollars, were authorized to be issued by said act. On the 25th of Hay, 
1872, the board of commissioners determined to locate the asylum in 
Buchanan county, near the city of St. Joseph, and in June following, 
purchased 122.83 acres of land adjoining said city, and known as the 
"Loomis, Miller and Hartwig Tract," for which the State paid, Nov. 
15, 1872, the sum of $29,479.20, or at th^ rate of $240 per acre. The 
contract for building the asylum was awarded to James Gorman, Sep- 
tember 10, 1872, at. the price and sum of 3188,879. On the 9th of No- 
vember, 1874, it was opened for the reception of patients, the board of 
managers having previously elected the following named resident offi- 
cers : George 0. Catlett, M. D., Superintendent ; A. P. Busy, H. D., 
Assistant Physician ; D. M. McDonald, Steward. Mrs. Laura Calhoun 
was subsequently elected Matron. By virtue of an act approved Feb- 
ruary 13, 1874, the name of the institution was changed to that of 
^^ State Lunatic Asylum No. 2,'' by which it is now known. On (he 
evening of January 25, 1879, the asylum was totally destroyed by fire, 
and thereby two hundred and seventeen insane people were deprived 
of shelter. Temporary quarters were provided in the court house and 
city hospital of St. Joseph, and through the kindness and charity of 
the citizens of that city these unfortunate people were comfortably 
cared for until the Legislature made provision for rebuilding the insti- 
tution. The act to rebuild the asylum at St. Joseph was approved May 
5, 1879, and the sum of seventy-five thousand dollars was appropriated 
for that purpose. Pending the rebuilding of the institution a tempo- 
rary frame structure, built upon the asylum grounds, and a brick farm 
house adjoining thereto, were occupied by patients. The asylum was 
reopened for the reception of patients April 1, 1880. 

The amount paid by the State on account of this institution from 
the date of the act authorizing its construction, March 28« 1872, to De- 

« 

cember 31, 1886, is presented in the following table ; also, the number 



STATISTICAL IKFORMATION. 



297 



of patients remaining therein at the end of each biennial term since its 
opening, November 9, 1874, as well as references to the various laws 
authorizing appropriations and under which warrants were issued : 



STATE LUNATIC ASYLUM NO. 2. 



For what parposes warrants were Issaed. Referencos Amount of ! 

to laws authorizing appropriations. Number ! w aidants Is- . Aggregate 
of patients. Dates, etc. sued on each, amount. 

appropriation' 



From March 28, 1872, to December 31, 1874. I 

Purchase of location and erection of buildings— State' 

bonds. Laws of 1872, p. 160, sec . 2 * $200,000 00 



Pay of commissioners. Laws of 1872, p. 160, sec 4 — 

Engraving and printing asylum bonds. Laws of 1873, 
. p. 9.. J. 

Completion of asylum, furnishing the same, purchase 
^ of supplies, etc Laws of 1874, p. 8 

Number of patients. 

From January 1, 1875, to December 31, 1876. 

■ 

Con.pletion of Asylum, furnishing the same, purchase 
of supplies, etc. Laws of 1874, p. 8 

Belmbursement of asylum fUnd, insurance, salaries, 
etc. Laws of 1875, p. 13 

Suppor t , Improvement and furnishing asylum . Laws 
1S75, p. 70 

Salaries of officers. Laws of 1875, p . 8 

Nuinber of patients November 9, 1876, 160. 

From January 1, 1877, to December 31, 1878. 

Support of— Laws of 1877, p. 14 

Sundry improvements— Laws of 1877, p 14 

Salaries of officers— Laws of 1877, p. 14 1 

Number of patients December 31, 1878, 216 | 

From January 1, 1879, to December 31, 1880. j 

Support of— Laws of 1879, p. 5, sec. 6 and p. 7, sec. 20.! 

I 
Bebuildlng Asylum Xo. 2— Laws of 1879, p. 115, sec. 1.' 

Salaries of officers— Laws of 1879, p. 5, sec. 6. Laws 
of 1877, p. 14 

Number of patients December 31, 1880, 195.. 



7,853 48 

854 38 

69,171 93 



8,967 93 

4,985 35 

60,400 OC 
11,037 50 



$35,000 00 

4,325 00 

11,726 00 



38,570 00 

I 

76,000 00' 

I 
I 

13,005 00 



$277,879 79 



85,390 78 



$51,050 00 



126,575 00 



*State bonds sold at less than par in 1872-3-4, and it is proper to state that the 
asylum only realized $180,100.49 from the sale of $200,000 In bonds voted for its 
erection. 



298 



auditor's rkport. 



STATE LUXATIC ASYLUM NO. 2— Continukp. 



For what purpose warrants were issued. References to Amount of 



»urp< 
autn 



laws authorizing appropriations. Number 



)ropr 



of patients. Dates, etc. 



warrants is- 
' sued on each 
approprlati'n 



From January 1, 1881, to December 31, 1882. 

Support of— Lawas of 1881, p 6 

Salaries of officers—Laws of 1881, pp. 5 and 10 

Number of patients December 18, 1882, 257. 

From Jaijojart 1, 1883, to December 31, 1884. 

Support of— Laws of 1883, p. 5, sec. 6 

Salaries of officers— Laws of 1883, p. 6, sec. 6 

Repairs and improvements— Laws of 1883, p. 6, sec. 6. 
Number of patients December 1, 1884, 278 

From January 1, 1886, to December 31, 1886. 
Salaries of officers— Laws of 1885 sec. 6, p. 6 

I 

Support of— Laws of 1886, sec* 6, p. 6 ; 

Construction of dead rooms— Laws of 1885, p. 6 

Erection of additions to the building. Laws of 1886, 
p. 19 

Number of patients December 20, 1886, 395 

Total amount of aid given by the State to Decem- 
ber 31, 1886 



$25,000 00 
12,425 35, 



15,999 98 

25,000 00' 

2,000 00 

98,000 OOi 



Aggregate 
amount. 



$37,425 35 



30,000 00: 
14,269 45| . 
12,900 00 



57,169 45 



140,999 9S 



$776,490 35 



LDNATIO ASYLUM NO. 3. 

The act of March 19, 1885, appropriated $200,000 for the construc- 
tion' of an insane asylum to be located south of township line 44 and 
west of range 15, in Southwest Missouri, and to be known as *' State 
Lunatic Asylum Number Three." 

Five commissioners, non-residents of the territory in which the 
asylum was to be located, were appointed by the Governor, and they 
were entrusted with the duty of selecting its location, the employment 
of an architect and superintendent and of contracting for the erection 
and furnishing of the necessary buildings for such an institution. 






STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 299 

7 ' ~ 

The commissioners appointed by the Governor were Dr. T. R. H. 
Smith of Fulton, E. W. Stephens of Columbia, P. McGrath of St. 
Louis, 0. L. Dobson of Kansas City and W. P. Munro of Chillicothe. 

Dr. Smith served as chairman of the commission during his life- 
time, and after his death, which occurred December 21, 1885, Mr. 
Stephens was elected chairman. To fill the vacancy in the commis- 
sion occasioned by the death ot Dr. Smith, the Governor subsequently 
appointed Dr. R. E. Youn^ of Jefferson Oity. 

On the 4th day of August, 1885, M. F. Bell, Esq., of Fulton, was 
selected by the commission as the architect and superintendent of con- 
struction. After carefully considering the advantages of all competing 
towns, the commission, on the first day of September, 1885, voted to 
locate the asylum on a tract of land adjoining the city of Nevada, in 
Vernon county. 

In consideration of its location near their city the citizans of Ne- 
vada and Vernon county gave to the State of Missouri a tract of land 
consisting of 520 acres, for which they paid $20,000. They have also 
laid water and gas mains, telegraph and telephone wires to the asylum 
grounds free of cost to the State. The Board of Commissioners esti- 
mate that the donations thus made to the State are worti;i fully $30,000. 

On the third day of March, 1886, the commissioners awarded the 
contract for building the asylum to Mr. Theodore Lacaff of Fulton, for the 
sum of $164,900. The contractor obligated himself to complete the work 
on or before September 3, 1887, it being specified in the act that the 
asylum should be completed within eighteen months from the date of 
awarding the contract. 

The amount so far disbursed by the State on account Of the loca- 
tion and construction of this institution is presented in the following 
table : 

LUNATIC ASYLUM NO. 3. 



For what purpose warrants were iesued. Reference to laws authoriz- Amoant of 

ing appropriations. warrants 

issued.. 



From Habch 19, 1885, to Decembkr 31, 1886. 
Location and construction of— Laws of 1885, p. 31 $88,400 2^ 



300 



auditor's report. 






ST. LQUIS IN8ANB ASYLUM. 

The St. Louis Insane Asylum was opened for the reception of 
patients on the 23d day of April, 1869. It was established by the county 
of St. Louis for the express purpose of caring for and affording protec- 
tion to the insane of said county. ^ 

Recognizing that this institution was erected and equipped without 
any expense whatever to the State, and that its proper support would 
greatly relieve the State Asylum at Fulton, the General Assembly, by 
virtue of an act approved April 1, 1872, donated the sum of fifteen 
thousand dollars, annually, to aid in its maintenance and for the ad- 
vancement of the humane object contemplated by its establishment. 
The amount given by the State to aid this institution, from the date of 
the first appropriation, April I, 1872, to December 31, 1886, is shown 
in the following table ; also references to laws authorizing appropria- 
tions under which warrants were issued, and the number of patients 
remaining in the institution at the end of each year since its opening : 



Amount of i Total amount 
For what purpose warrants were issued— references to warrants is- of warrants 



laws authorizing appropriation— number of patients, sued on each 

jappropriati'n 



From Afkil 1, to Dkcbmber 31, 1872. 
Support of— Laws of 1872, p. 11 



Number of patients April 23, 1869, 128. April 23, 1870, 
216. April 23. 1871, 253, and April 23, 1872, 299. 

From January 1, 1873, to December 31, 1874. 

Support of— Laws of 1872 p 11 



Number of patients April 23, 1873, 300. April 23, 1874, 
320. 

From January 1, 1875, to Decbmbfr 31, 1876. 

Support of— Laws of 1875, p. 71 



Number of patients April 23, 1875, 348. April 23, 1876,. 
299. ' 

From January 1, 1877, to Dkcbmber 31, 1878. 

Support of— No appropriation . 

Number of patients April 23, 1877, 339. April 23, 1878, 
316. 



$7,500 00 



37,600 00 



60,000 00 



issued. 



STATISTICAL INFOHMATION. 



301 



bT. LOUIS INSANE ABYLUM— Continukd 



Amount of Total amount 
For what purpose warrants were issaed— references to warrants is- ' of warrants 
laws authorizing appropriation— number of patients, sued on each issued. 

appropriation 



Fboh January 1, 1879, to Decembbr 31, 1880. 

Support of— No appropriation . 

Number of patients April 23, 1879, 331. April 23, 1880, 
314. 

From January 1, 1881, to Dbcbmbbr, 31, 1882. 

Support of— Laws of 1881, p. 5, sec. 6 



Number of patients April 23,1881,357. October 
1882, 382. 

From January 1, 1883, to Dbcbmbbr 31, 1884. 
Support of indigent insane — Laws of 1883, p. 5, sec. 
Number of patients December 21, 1884, 463. 

From January 1, 18S5, to Dbcbmbkr 31, 1886. 
Support of indigent insane— Laws 1885, sec. 6, p. 6. 
Number of patients December 20, 1886, 940. 

Total amount of aid given by the Sate 



12,1 



6.. 



$30,000 00; 



60,000 00 



50.000 00 



$225,000 00 



THE MI880UIR1 INSTITOTION FOR THB EDUCATION OF THE DEAF AMD DUMB. 

By virtae of an act, approved February 13, 1839, the sum of two 
thousand dollars was appropriated for the annual tuition of deaf and 
dumb children in the Deaf and Dumb Asylum at Oarondelet, in the 
county of St. Louis. The Superintendent of said asylum was entitled 
to receive from the State Auditor a warrant for forty dollars for each 
deaf and dumb pupil, resident of this State, who had been taught 
therein for six months. On the same day an act was approved appro- 
priating two hundred and ten dollars to aid in the education of the 
deaf and dumb son of Jefferson Ray, of Howard county, at the Deaf 
and Dumb Asylum in Danville, Kentucky- 

The next general law providing for the instruction of the deaf and 
dumb was approved on the 16th day of February, 1847. Under this 
act parents or guardians of deaf and dumb persons between the ages 
of eight and twenty years were entitled, upon the certificate of the 
county court and superintendent of common schools, that such per- 



302 auditor's rbport* 



sons were proper subjects of charity, to receive anQually from the 
State Auditor, a warrant for eighty dollars for each deaf and damb 
person, to be applied to his or her education. For this purpose the sum 
of two thousand dollars was appropriation for each year, but no one of 
the beneficiaries provided for in the act could receive a greater amoant 
than one hundred and sixty dollars. An act to establish an asjiam 
for the deaf and dumb, approved February 28, 1851, provided for its 
location near the town of Fulton, in Callaway county, and appropriated 
for that purpose forty acres of Innd, and the buildings thereon, which 
had been donated to the State of Missouri in compliance with an act 
entitled ''An act to establish an Asylum for the Insane," approved 
February 16, 1847. Deaf and dumb persons bietween the ages of ten 
and thirty years were entitled to the benefits of the asylum, and trie 
sum of eighty dollars annually was appropriated for the maintenance 
of each person. The asylum was opened for the reception of pupils on 
the firstMonday in November, 1851, the first pupil being received on 
the fifth of that month. William D. Kerr, A. M., of Danville, Ken 
tucky, was elected by the Board of Commissioners, as Superintendent 
of the Asylum, and is still occupying that position. The building now 
used as an asylum was authorized to be erected by the provisions of 
an act approved February 28, 1853. In consequence of the war, the 
Deaf and Dumb Asylum suspended July 1, 1861, and was not reopened 
until the second day of June, 1863. In 1874, the name of the Asylntn 
was changed, and it is now known as '' The Missouri Institution for the 
Education of the Deaf and Dumb." 

The government of the Institution is vested in a Board of Com- 
missioners, consisting of five members, who are appointed by the Got- 
ernor, with the advice and consent of the Senate. All deaf and dnmb 
persons between the ages of nine and twenty-one years, possessing the 
requisite qualifications, are entitled to the benefits of the Institution, 
and may remain therein, as wards of the State for eight years, unless 
sooner discharged by the Commissioners. 

The total amount paid by the State ior the education and mainten- 
ance ot the deaf and dumb, from Februrry 13, 1839, to the 3l8t day of 
December, 1886, is shown in the following table; also the number of 
pupils remaining in the Institution at the end of each biennial term 
since its opening in 1851, as well as references to the various laws au- 
thorizing appropriations, and under which warrants were issued: 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



308 



EDUCATION OF THE DEAF AND DUMB. 



For what purpose warrantB were issued. Reference to 

laws authorising appropriations. Number 

of pupils. Dates. 



Amounts of 
warrants is- 
sued on each 
appropriati' n 



Aggregate 
amount. 



From Fkbruary 13, 1839, to Sbftkmbkr 30, 1840. 

Education of deaf and dumb children— Laws of 1838-9, 
p. 37 

Education of deaf and dumb son of Jefferson Bay, of 
Howard county— Laws 1838-9, p. 213 



From October 1, 1840, to Sbftbmbbr 30, 1842. 

Education of deaf and dumb children — Laws 1838-9, 
p. 37 



Education of deaf and dumb son of Jefferson Ray, of 
Howard county— Laws 1838-9, p. 213 

From October 1, 1842, to Seftbmbbr 30, 1844. 

Education of deaf and dumb children— Laws 1838-9, 
p. 37 

From Ocotober 1, 1844, to Sepbtmbsr 30, 1846. 

Education of deaf and dumb children— Laws 1838-9, 
p. 37 

From October 1, 1846, to September 30, 1848. 
Education of the deaf and dumb— Laws of 1847, p. 48. 

From October 1, 1848, to SEFrsifBER 30, 1850. 
Education of the deaf and dumb— Laws of 1847, p. 48. 

From October 1, 1860, to Hepiember 30, 1852. 

Education of the deaf and dumb— Laws of 1847, p. 48. 

Support and education of the deaf and dumb— Laws 
of 1851, p. 212, sec. 4 

Number of pupils December 31, 1851, 6; July 31, 
1852, 17. 

From October 1, 1852, to Sbftembkr 30, 1854. 

Education of the deaf and dumb— Laws of 1851, p. 
212, sec. 4, and p. 639 

Building deaf and dumb asylum and salaries of officers 
and teachers— Laws 1853, p. 10 

Number of pupils December 31, 1854, 52. 



$120 00< 
105 00 




1,120 001 



7,922 89 
33,648 16 



$225 00 



265 00 



240 00 



160 00 



1,120 00 



3,520 00 



1,719 91 



41,571 05 



304 



auditor's rkport. 



EDUCATION OF THE DEAF \SD DUMB -Oontinckd 



For what purpose warrants were issued. References to Amount of j 

laws authorizing appropriations. Number of warrants is- I Aggregate 

pupils. Dates. isued on each, amount. 

appropriat'n.! 



From October 1, 1854, to Septbmbrr 30, 1856. 

Education of the deaf and dumb. General Statutes 
1855, p. 217, sec. 14 

Building deaf and dumb asylum and salaries of offi- 
cers. Laws of 1853, p. 10, sec. 6 

I 

Enlargement of deaf and dumb asylum and salaries of 
officers and teachers. Laws of 1855, p. 13C 

Number of pupils December 31, 1856, 87. 

From October 1, 1856, to September 30, 1858. 

Education of the deaf and dumb. General Statutes 

1855, p. 217, sec. 14 

I 

Erection of additional buildings, indigent fund, sala- 
ries, etc. Laws 1856-7, p. 11 

Salaries of officers and teachers. General Statutes 
1885, p. 216, sec 7 

Number of pupils December 31, 1858, 80. 

From Octobrr 1, 1858, to September 30, 1860. 

Education of the deaf and dumb. General Statutes, 

1856, p. 217, sec. 14 | 

Fuel, bedding, apparatus for heating, gas, salaries oft 
officers, etc. Laws of 1858-©, p. 12 ' 



Sundry improvements. Laws of 1856-7, p. 11 



Salaries of officers and teachers. General Statutes 
1865, p 216, sec. 7 



Number of pupils December 31, 1860, 66. 

Ffom October 1, 1860, to September 30, 1862. 

Education of the deaf and dumb. General Statutes 
185o, p. 217, sec. 14 

Fuel, indigent fund , salaries of physician and steward 
and sundry repairs. Laws 1858-9, p. 12; laws 
186()-1, p. 26 



Salaries of officers and teachers 

Number of pupils— no report. 

From October 1, 18G2, to September 30, 1864. 

Education of the deaf and dumb. General Statutes 
1866, p. 217, sec. 14 



«11,814 46| 



2,751 84 



16,799 75j 



14,609 27 

17,650 00 

4,084 46 



13,333 61 

5,000 00 
2,350 25 

10,050 00 



6,154 40 

1,400 00 
4,050 00 



1,617 94 



$31,366 04 



36,343 73 



30,733 86 



11,604 40 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



305 



JfiDUCATION OF THE DBAF ASD DUMB— Continokd. 



For what purpose warrants were issued. Reference' Amount of 



to laws authorizlag appropriations. Number 
of pupils. Dates. 



warrants is- 
sued on each 
appropriat'n . 



Fuel, indigent ftind, salaries of physician and steward, 
andry ' - - -* . 

1860-1, p. 25 



and sundry repairs. Laws of 1858-9, p. 12 ; laws 



Salaries of officers and teachers 

Number of pupils December 31, 1864, 38. 

From October 1, 1864, to Sbptbmbbr 30, 1866. 

Education of the deaf and dumb. General Statutes 
1865, p. 316, sec. 14 



Current expenses. Laws of 1865, p. 9, sec. 5 

Indigent fund for the deaf and dumb. Laws of 1865, 
p. 9, sec. 3 

Kepairs, fuel, clothing, furniture and salaries of offi- 
cers. Laws of 1861, p. 25, and Laws 1863, p. 5 

Repairs, furniture, building workshop, library. Laws 
of 1865-6, p. 5 



Salaries of officers and teachers 

Number of pupils December 31, 1866, 66. 

From October 1, 1866, to Dkcehbsr 31, 1868. 

Education of the deaf and dumb. General Statutes 
1865, p. 316, sec. 14 



Current expenses. General titatutes 1865, p. 316, sec. 
22 

Indigent fund for the deaf and dumb. General Stat-, 
utes 1865, p. 316, sec. 21 



Salaries of officers and teachers 

Number of pupils December 31, 1868, 99. 

From January 1, 1S69, to Dsobmbbb 31, 1870. 

Education of the deaf and dumb. General Statutes 
1865, p. 316, sec. 14 



Current expenses. General Statutes 1865, p. 316, sec. 
22 



Indigent fund for the deaf and dumb. General Stat- 
utes 1865 , p. 316 , sec. 21 



$9,500 00 
1,622 59 



9,371 17 
7,500 00 

4,000 00 

8,000 00 

8,500 00 
4,583 31 



25,000 61 

10,000 00 

4,000 00 
7,786 23 



30,890 54 

10,000 00 

4,000 00 



Aggregate 
amount. 



$12,640 53 



41,951 48 



46,786 84 



8. P.— 20. 



806 



auditor's report. 



EDUCATION OF THE DEAF AND DUMB— Contikukd. 



For what purpose warrants were issued. References to 
laws authorizing appropriations. Number of 

pupils. Dates. 



Ck>n8tructlon of additional buildings, furniture, gas ap- 
paratus and repairs. Laws 1869, p. 6, ana law 
1870, p. 6 



Salaries of officers and teachers 

Number of pupils December 31, 1870. 128. 

From January 1, 1871, to Deceicbsr 31, 1872. 

Education of the deaf and dumb. General Statutes 
1865, p. 316, sec. 14 



Amount of 

warrants is-i Aggregate 
sued on each: amount, 
appropriation! 



$40,000 00 
12,316 67 



Current expenses. Laws of 1871, p. 13, sec. 5 

Indigent ftind for the deal and dumb. Laws 1871, p. 
13, sec. 4 

Completion of buildings, purchase of lands, sundry im- 

?>royements and repairs. Laws 1871, p . 7 , and laws 
872, p. 6 

Salaries of officers and teachers 

Number of pupils December 31, 1872, 146. 

From January 1, 1873, to Dkckmbbr 31, 1874. 

Current expenses Deaf and Dumb Asylum. Wagner's 
statutes 1872, p. 174, sec 22 

Education of the deaf and dumb. Wagner's Statutes 
1872, p. 173, sec. 14 

Deaf and dumb— indigent fund. Wagner's Statutes 

1872, p. 174, sec. 21 

Completion, erection and furnishing buildings. Laws 

1873 , p. 10 



Salaries of officers and teachers. Laws 1873, p. 4 

Number pupils December 31, 1874, 172. 

From January 1, 1875, to Dbgember 31, 1876. 

Current expenses Deaf and Dumb Asylum. Warper's 
Statutes 1872, p. 174, sec. 22. Laws 1875, p. 70 

Education of the deaf and dumb. Wagner's Statutes 
1872, p . 173, sec. 14 '. 

Deaf and dumb — Indigent fund. Wagner's Statutes 
1872, p. 174, sec. 21 

Salaries of officers and teachers. Laws of 1875, p. 8. . 

Number of pupils December 31, 1876, 224. 



39,365 27 
14,000 00| 

I 

I 
5,000 OOj 

26,200 00 
13,254 33 



14,000 00 

44,669 50 

5,000 00 

30,000 00 
15,616 57 



15,500 00 

53,347 13 

5,000 00 
16,346 93 



$97,207 21 



97,819 60 



109,885 07 



90,1^06 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



307 



EDUCATION OF THE DEAF AND DUMB— Continukd. 



For what purpose warrants were issued. References Amount of 
to laws authorizing appropriations. Number I warrants is- 

of pupils. Dates. sued on each 

. appro priat'n. 



Fkom January 1, 1877, to Decbmbkr 31, 1878. 

Current expenses Deaf and Dumb Asylum. Laws 1877, 
p. 14, sec. 6 ! 

Education of the d^f and dumb. Laws 1877, p. 14,| 
sec. 6 

Deaf and dumb— indigent fund. Laws 1877, p. 14, sec. 6 

Salaries of officers and teachers. Laws 1877, sec. 6, p. 
14 and sec. 1, p. 18 

Number of pupils December 31, 1878, 190 

From January 1, 1879, to DscBiiBBR 31, 1880. 

Support and education of the deaf and dumb. Laws 
1879, p . 6, sec . 6 

Salaries of officers and teachers. Laws 1879, p. 5, sec. 6. 

Number of pupils December 31, 1880, 196. 

From January 1, 1881, to Dscbmbkr 31, 1882. 

Support and education of the deaf and dumb. Laws 
of 1881, p. 5, sec 6 

Salaries of officers and teachers. Laws of 1881, p. 5, 
sec. 6 

Number of pupils December 18, 1882, 197. 

Frou January 1, 1883, to Dbcbmber 31, 1884. 

Support and education of the deaf and dumb. Laws 
of 1883, p. 6, sec. 6 

Salaries of officers and teachers. Laws of 1883, p. 6, 
sec. 6 



Erection of hospital, etc. Laws of 1883, p. 6, sec. 6. . 

Construction of gymnasium. Laws of 1883, p. 6, sec. 6. 

Number of pupils December 23, 1884, 209. 

From January 1, 1885, to Decbmbkr 31, 1886. 

Support and education of the deaf and dumb. Laws 
1886, sec. 6, p. 6 



Salaries of officers and teachers. Laws 1885, p. 6, sec. 6. 

Repairs and improyement. Laws 1885, p. 6, sec. 6 

Number of pupils December 20, 1886, 186 

Total amount of aid giyen by the State 



914,000 00 

52,000 CO 
5,000 00 

22,296 67 



71,000 00 
19,025 00 



70,000 00 



19,722 92 



70,000 00 

21,100 00 

I 

25,000 00' 

1,000 00 



70,000 00 

22,732 29 

7,800 00 



Aggregate 
aiaount. 



$93,296 67 



90,025 00 



89,722 92 



117,100 00 



100,532 29 



$1,145,433 66 



308 auditor's report. 



MISSOURI SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND. 

The instruction of the blind was first provided for in an act of the 
General Assembly, approved February 16, 1847. Under this act each 
blind person between the ages of eight and twenty years was entitled 
to eighty dollars per annum, to be paid on warrant of the State Audi- 
tor to the parent or guardian of such person, upon application of the 
parent or guardian, accompanied by a certificate of the superintendent 
of common schools, based on a certificate made by the county court, 
that such blind person was a proper subject of charity. The sum of 
twelve hundred dollars was appropriated for this purpose, but it was 
stipulated that no one of the beneficiaries of said act was to receive a 
greater amount than one hundred and sixty dollars. In 1849, this act 
was amended so as to include blind persons between the ages of ten 
and thirty years, and to allow each person sixty dollars per annum^ 
provided that no beneficiary should receive a greater sum than two 
hundred and forty dollars. By virtue of an act approved February 
27, 1851, James E. Yeatman, Wayman Grow, John 0'Fallon,S. Pollock, 
A. B. Chambers, Joseph Charless, Hudson E. Bridge, Edward Wyman 
and others, were constituted a body corporate under the name and 
style of " The Missouri Institute for the Education of the Blind." To 
aid this corporation in its humane mission, the fourth section of said 
act appropriated fifteen thousand dollars, to be paid in five annual 
installments ; provided, that no part of said appropriation should be 
drawn from the treasury until at least ten thousand dollars should be 
subscribed in aid of said Institution by citizens of the county or city of 
St. Louis. By an act approved February 24, 1853, the sum of twenty 
thousand dollars was appropriated to be used in the erection of suita- 
ble buildings upon ground purchased by or donated to said Institute* 
In 1854, the Board of Trustees purchased the property known as the 
estate of General John Ruland, situated on Morgan, between Nine- 
teenth and Twentieth streets, in the city of 8t. Louis, for which the 
sum of twenty-seven thousand dollars was paid. The act of February 
24, 1855, declared, " The Missouri Institute for the Education of the 
Blind," to be a State Institution, and James E. Yeatman and his asso- 
ciates, who were created a body corporate by the act of 1851, were 
made trustees thereof, for the use and benefit of the State of Missouri. 
The sum of twelve thousand dollars per annum, for a period of two 
years, was appropriated to complete the payment for grounds and 
buildings already purchased, and five thousand dollars per annum for 
the ensuing two years for the support of said Institution. In Novem- 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



809 



ber, 1855, the government of the Institution was vested in seven 
trustees, to be appointed by the Governor, by and with the consent of 
the Senate. In 1879, the name of the Institution was changed, and it 
is now known as the ^^ Missouri School for the Blind." By an act, 
approved February 21, 1881, the government of the school was vested 
in nine trustees, five of whom are residents of the city of St. Louis, 
and constitute an Executive Board, one a resident of the Oity of Jef- 
ferson, one of Kansas Oity, one of North and one of South Miseouri. 

All blind persons of suitable mental and physical capacity, be- 
tween the ages of nine and twenty- five years, and who are citizens 
of this State, are entitled to the benefits of the school, and are per- 
mitted to remain in the Institution for eight years, unless sooner dis- 
charged therefrom by the Board of Trustees. 

The following table will show the amount paid by the State for the 
education and maintenance of the blind from February 16, 1847, to 
December 31, 1886; also the number of pupils remaining in the insti- 
tution at the end of each biennial term since its opening in 1851, as 
well as reference to the various laws authorizing appropriations and 
under which warrants were issued : 



For what purpose warrants were issued. References 
to laws authorizing appropriations. Number 

of pupils . Dates. 



From February 16, 1&47, to Septsmber 30, 1848. 
Education of the blind. Laws of 1847, p. 48 

From October 1, 1848, to September 30. 1850. 
Education of the blind. Laws 1847, p. 48 

From October 1, 1850, to Seftembkr 30,' 1852, 

Education of the blind. Laws of 1847, p. 48 

Education of the bli nd . Laws of 1851 , p . 59, sec. 4 

Number of pupils November 1, 1852, 14 

From October 1, 18fi2, to ShPTEMBsR 30, 1854. 
Education of the blind . Laws of 1851, p, 59, sec 4 . . . . 
Pcrchase of buildings and ground. Laws of 1853,p. 12. 
Number of pupils November 6, 1854, 21. 

From October 1, 1854, to September 30, 1866. 
Education of the blind . Laws of 1851, p . 59, sec. 4. . . . 



Amount of 
warrants is- 
sued on each 
approprlati' n 



$400 00 



560 00 



180 00 
3,000 00 



6,000 00 
20,000 00 



3,000 00 



Aggregate 
amount. 



$400 00 



560 00 



3,180 00 



26,000 00 



310 



AUDITOK S RBPORT. 



MISSOURI SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND.— Continued. 



For what purpose warrants were issued. Reference? 
to laws authorizing appropriations. Number 

of pupils. Dates. 



Amount of 
warrants is- 
sued on each 
approprlati'n 



Completing the payment for grounds and erection of 
buildings. Laws of 1855, p. 9, sec. 4 

Support of the Institute. Laws of 1855, p. 9, sec. 5 

Number of pupils December 23, 1856, 33. 

From Octobbr 1, 1856, to Skptbmbbr 30, 186S. 

Education and support of the blind. Laws of 1856-7, p. 
12, sec. 3 



Payment of debts and completion of buildings. Laws 
of 1856-7, p. 12, sec. 1 



Number of pupils October 31, 1858, 34. 

From October 1, 1858, to Sbftbmbkr 30, 1860. 

Education and support of the blind. Laws of 1858-9, 
p. 5, sec. 1 

Payment of debts, purchase of heating apparatus, fenc- 
ing, etc. Laws of 1858-9, p. 5, sec. 2 



Number of pupils October 9, 1860, 51 . 

From October 1, 1860 to, Sbftkmbbr 30, 1862. 

Education and support of the blind. Law;s of 1860-1 « p. 
8, sec. 1 



Number of pupils October 1, 1862, 33. 

From October 1, 1862, to September 30, L^64. 

Education and Support of the blind. Laws of 1856-7, 
p. 12, sec. 3 '. 



Repairs and impro Yemen ts of the institute. Laws 1863- 
4, p . 135 

Number of pupils October 11, 1864, 50. 

From October 1, 1864, to September 30, 1866. 

Education and support of the blind. Laws 1856-7, p. 
1 2 , sec. 3 

Education and support of the blind . Laws of 1865, p. 5. 

Number of pupils November 1, 1866, 57. 

From October 1, 1866, to Decembkr 31, 1868. 

Education and support of the blind. General Statutes 
of 1865, p. 319, sec. 17. Laws of 1867, p. 7 

Number of pupils November 1, 1868, 69. 



$24,000 00 
10,000 00 



14,000 00 
12,000 00 



20,000 00 
6,500 00 



20,000 00 



14,000 00 
5,000 00 



14,000 00 
16,000 00 



25,000 00 



Aggregate 
amount. 



$37,000 00 



26,000 00 



26,500 00 



20,000 00 



19,000 00 



30,000 00 



25,000 00 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



311 



MISSOURI SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND.— Continued, 



For what porpoBes warrantB were issned. ReferenceB Amount of 
to laws authorizing appropriations. Number warrants is- 
of patients. Dates, etc. jsued on each 

jappropriati'n 



From January 1, 1869, to Dkcember 31, 1870. 

Education and support of the blind . Generaf Statutes 
of 1865, p. 319, sec. 17. Laws of 1870, pp. 1 and 22. . 

Salaries of officers Missouri Institute for the Blind. 
Laws of 1870, p. 22, sec. 2 

Number of pupils November 1, 1870, 85 j 

From January 1, 1871, to December 31, 1872. 

Education and support of the blind . Laws of 1870, p . 
22, sec. 3 

Construction of additional buildings. Laws of 1871, 
p. 10 

Purchase of heating apparatus and sundry improve- 
ments. Laws of 1872, p. 7 



Salaries of officers . Laws of 1670, p . 22, sec . 2 

Number of pupils October 31, 1872, 99. | 

From January 1, 1873, to December 31, 1874. 

Education and support of the blind . Wagner's Stat-' 
utes, p. 177, sec. 1? 

I 
Salaries of officers. Wagner's Statutes, p. 176, sec. 7. 

Number of pupils December 1, 1874, 108. 

From January 1, 1875, to December 31, 1876. 

Edacation and support of the blind. Wagner's Stat- 
utes, p. 177, sec. 17 

Purchase of books and maps. Laws of 1875, p . 68 



Kefarnishing, repairing and repainting building, pur- 
chase of heating apparatus ,etc . Laws of 1875,p. 69. 

Indigent fund for the blind. Laws of 1874, p. 177 , sec. 3. 

Salaries of officers. Laws of 1873, p. 4, and laws of 
1876, p. 8 

Number of pupils December 1, 1876, 94. 

From January 1, 1877, to December 31, 1878. 

Education and support of the blind. Laws of 1877, p. 
14, sec. 6 

Indigent fand for the blind. Laws of 1877, p. 14, sec. 6. 

Salaries of officers. Laws of 1877, p. 14, sec. 6 

Number of pupils December 31, 1878, 74. 



$30,000 00 



2,908 83 



30,000 00 

50,000 00 

25,000 00 
9,820 00 



30,000 00 
11,700 78 



30,000 00 
300 00 

10,000 00 
2,086 80 

15,398 55 



25,000 OQ 

1,738 55 

15,050 00 



Aggregate 
amount. 



$32,908 33 



114,820 00 



41, 700 78 



57,785 35 



41,788 56 



312 



auditor's REPORT- 



MISSOURI SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND— Continukd 



For what purpose warrants were issued. References to Amount of {Total amount 
laws authorizing appropriation. Number warrants is- | of warrants 

of patients. Dates, etc. |sued on each' issued. 

appropriation.] 



From January 1, 1879, to Dbcbmbbr 31, 1880. 

Education and support of the blind. Laws of 1879, p. 
6, sec. 6 

Salaries of officers. Laws of 1879, p. 5, sec. 6 

Number of pupils December 31, 1880, 88. 

From January 1, 1881, to Dbcember 31, 1882. 

Education and support of the blind. Laws of 1881, p. 
6, sec. 6 

Repairs and refurnishing institution. Laws of 1881, 
p. 5, sec. 6 , 

Library. Laws of 1881, p. 5, sec. 6 



. I 



Salaries of officers and employes. Laws of 1881, p. 5, 
sec. 6 

Number of pupils December 18, 1882, 90. 

From January 1, 1883, to December 31, 1884. 

Education and support of the blind. Laws of 1883, p. 
6, sec. 6 

Salaries of officers and employes. Laws of 1883, p. 6, 
sec. 6 

Repairs and improvements. Laws of 1883, p. 6, sec. G. 

Number of pupils December 20, 1884, 87. 

From January 1, 1885, to December 31, 1886. 

Education and support of the blind. Laws 1885, sec. 
6, p. 6 



Salaries of officers and employes. Laws of 1885, sec. 
6, p. 6 

Number of pupils December 20, 1886, 81. 

Total amount of aid given by the State. 



$30,000 00' 

I 

13,287 60 



36,000 00 

5,000 00 
1,000 oo' 

15,674 50| 



.36,000 00' 

16,987 50 
5,000 00 



36,000 00 
15,900 50 




$43,287 30 



57,674 60 



57,987 50 



51,900 50 



$713,493 01 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



313 



THE DTDUSTRIAI^ HOME OF THE ORPHlNS AND INDIGENT CHILDREN OF MIS- 
SOURI, KANSAS C FIT, MO. 

A corporation, organized under the laws of the State of Missouri, 
and known as " The Widows' and Orphans' Home of Confederate 
Soldiers of tlissouri," owned in fee simple and unincumbered, a certain 
tract of land containing forty acres, situated in Jackson county, near 
Kansas City. This land, and the improvements thereon, the said cor- 
poration proposed to donate to the State of Missouri, provided the 
State would receive and hold the same and forever maintain thereon 
an institution for the care, custody, maintenance aod education of des- 
titute orphans and other indigent children. The proposition was ac- 
cepted by the State, and ^^ Tlie ladustrial Home of the Orphans and 
Indigent Ohildreu of Missouri " was established by virtue of an act of 
the General Assembly, approved March 12, 1874. 

In 1877 the State of Missouri, through its legislature, declined to 
make appropriations for the future support of this institutioa, and as 
provided in an act approved April 21, 1877, the land and improvements 
thereon were reconveyed and the title thereto vested in said Widows' 
and Orphans' Home Society. 

The cost of this Institution from March 12, 1874, the date of the act 
establishing the same, is shown in the following table, also references 
to laws authorizing appropriations and under which warrants were is- 
sued: 



' Amount of 
For what purpose warrants were issued— references to warr<(nts is- 
lawB authorizing appropriations.; sued on each 

iappropriaVn. 



1 



From March 12, 1874, to Dbckmbek 31, 1S76. 

Erection of buildings, furnishing the same and sup-' 
port of the Home. Laws of 1874, p. 176, sec. 7 i 

Support of the Home in 1875 and 1876. Laws of 1875, 
p. 14 

From January 1, 1877, to Dkckmbbr 31, 1878. 

I 

Support of the Home in 1877. Laws of 1877, p. 14, 
sec. 6 

Orphans' Home, payment of debts. Laws of 1877, p.! 
267 , sec. 2 i 



»n 



Total, 



$40,000 00 
10,000 00 



1,875 00 
5,467 00 



Aggregate 
amount. 



950,000 00 



7,342 00 
$57,342 00 



314 



auditor's report. 



soldiers' orphans' home of ST. LOUIS. 

This was a corporation created by virtue of an act approved Jan- 
uary 7, 1865, and had for its object the education and maintenance of 
the children of soldiers who had fallen in the late civil war. 

It was provided in an act approved January 31, 1865, that the sum 
of five thousand dollars, annually, for ten years, should be appropri- 
ated for the support and to aid in the endowment of the Soldiers' Or* 
phans' Home of St. Louis. To further aid this institution the Union 
Insurance Company, Missouri Benevolent and Loan Association, St. 
Louis Lead and Oil Company, and sundry other corporations created 
in 1866, were required to pay into the State Treasury one per cent, per 
annum of their net earnings for the use of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home 
Fund. From these sources only the sum of S793.21 was realized, and 
this amount was not drawn from the State Treasury, but by resolution 
of the General Assembly, approved March 20, 1877, it was transferred 

to the State Revenue Fund. 

The amount paid by the State on account of the Soldiers' Orphans' 

Home of St. Louis, from January 31, 1865, the date of the act appro- 
priating money therefor, is shown in the following table : 



Amount of 

For what purpose warrants were issued— references to warrants is- 1 Aggregate 
laws authorizing appropriations. sued on each i aoaouDt. 

appropriat'n . 



From January 31, 1866, to Decbmbrr 31, 1866. 

Support of in 1865. Laws of 1865, p. 299 

Support of in 1866. Laws of 1865, p. 299, 

From January 1, 1867, to Dbcbmber 31, 1868. 

Support of in 1867. Laws of 1865, p. 299 

Support of in 1868. Laws of 1865, p. 299 

From January 1, 1869, to Dkcembkr 31, 1870. 

Support of in 1869. Laws of 1865, p. 299 

Support of in 1870. Laws of 1865, p. 299 

From January 1, 1871, to December 31, 1872. 

Support of in 1871. Laws of 1865, p. 299 

Support of in 1872. Laws of 1865, p. 299 

From January 1, 1873, ix> December 31, 1874. 
Support of in 1873. Laws of 1865, p. 299 



Total 



$5,000 00 
5,000 001 



2,500 001 

i 

5,000 00- 



5,000 00 
5,000 00 



2,500 00 
5,000 00 



7,500 00; 



$10,000 00 



7,600 00 



10,000 00 



7,500 00 



7,500 00 



$42,500 00 



Note. — In 1874 the balance of the appropriation made for the support of the 
Soldiers ' Orphans^ Home was relinquished by the Board of Managers. 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 315 

I I IP . I « 

CRIME. 

PENITENTIARY OF THE STATE OP MISSOURI. 

An act of the General Assembly approved January 16, 1833, au- 
thorized the coDstruction ot a jail and penitentiary hoase at the City 
of Jefferson, and appropriated for said purpose the sum of twenty-five 
thousand dollars. Two Oommissioners were appointed by a joint vote 
of both houses of the General Assembly and entrusted with the selec- 
tion of a plan for the building, as well as general supervision of the 
work. The Commissioners thus selected were James Dunnica and 
John Walker, who, as provided in the act, proceeded to advertise "in 
all the newspapers printed in the State^^^ that the building of the jail 
and penitentiary house would be let to the lowest bidder at public auc- 
tion in the Oity of Jefferson. They were required to have the ^building 
completed and ready for the reception of convicts on or before the first 
day of October, 1834. Before the completion, John Walker, one of the 
Oommissioners, was succeeded by Lewis Bolton. The first act for the 
government of the penitentiary was approved March 18, 1835, which 
provided that the Treasurer, Auditor and Attorney -General should be 
ex oMcio Inspectors, and that the officers of the penitentiary should 
consist of one warden, one physician, and as many overseers as the In- 
spectors should deem to be necessary, not exceeding three. Onder 
this act the Warden was appointed by joint vote of both houses of the 
General Assembly, and th§ physician and overseers by the Warden. 
Guards, not exceeding four in number, were authorized to be employed 
by the Warden, whenever the Inspectors believed their employment 
necessary. The Board of Inspectors, as at first constituted, has con- 
tinued to be composed of the same officers. Officers and guards were 
entitled to compensation per annum as follows : Warden, $750 ; phy- 
sician, 9100 ; overseers, $200 ; guards, $132. Convicts were not to be 
received until January 1, 1836, but it was provided that persons con- 
victed in any court and sentenced to imprisonment in the penitentiary, 
should, by direction of the court in which such conviction and sentence 
was obtained, be detained in the county jail until January 1,1836, and 
the time served in jail after conviction was held to be a part of their 
imprisonment in the penitentiary. Wilson Edson, a native of Tennes- 
see, convicted of grand larceny in the circuit court of Greene county, 
and sentenced to two years and forty-five days, was the first convict 
received. He was admitted March 8, 1836, and was the sole occupant 
of the penitentiary until the 28th day of May following. Governor 
Daniel Dunklin granted the first pardon to Jonathan Hilton, convicted 



316 auditor's report. 



in the circuit court of Randolph county, for ^^stahbing with intent r? 
kilL^^ Hilton was born in Culpepper county, Virginia, and was par 
doned August 22, 1836, thirteen days after his commitmeDt. Lewis 
Bolton had the honor of being the first Warden, and continued in office 
until the 10th day of ApriK 1S38, when he resigned, and on that day 
was succeeded in office by W. S. Burch. In his report to the Genersl 
Assembly of date November 26, 1836, Warden Bolton reported four- 
teen convicts in prison, and on the 29th of November, 1838, the num- 
ber reported by Warden Burch was forty-six. 

THE FIRST LBASB. 

The act approved February 11, 1839, entitled "An act to provide 
for the leasing of the penitentiary," abolished the office of Warden. 
and appointed John 0. Gordon and William S. Burch, " Keepers and 
Agents of the Penitentiary," for the term of four years from the 15ih 
day of February, 1839, with full power and authority to have the sole 
management and control thereof, except as restricted in said act. They 
were required^ at their own expense, to feed and clothe all convict? 
therein confined ; to employ all necessary overseers, guards and phy- 
sicians ; defray contingent expenses, and in all respects to keep the 
penitentiary from becoming a charge to the State. Provision was made 
for the erection of cell buildings, walls and other improvements, for 
which the keepers were to be paid by the Stale ^^ at the usual rates of 
similar work in the City of JeflFerson." For the privilege granted by 
this act, the keepers or contractors, at the expiration of their term, ob- 
ligated themselves to pay to the State of Mis£OUii the sum of f6,500. 
The sum of $4,000 was advanced to said keepers to enable them '* to 
carry on said establishment," which amount was to be refunded to the 
State at the expiration of their lease with interest at the rate of 6 per 
cent, per annum. Two unprovoked murders occurred in the peniteo- 
tiary during the pendency of this lease. On the 12th day of August, 
1839, Henry Lane,'an overseer, wantonly shot and killed a prisoner 
named Henry Ooatmier. Lane was tried at a special term of the cir- 
cuit court of Oole county, convened on the second day of September, 
1839, by Judge William Scott. He was convicted on the sixth day of 
the same month, and was publicly executed on the 14th day of Octo- 
ber, 1839. 

William S. Bullard, an overseer, was murdered on the 14th day of 
June, 1841, by a convict named William H. Berry. At the October 
term, 1841, of the circuit court of Oole county. Berry was tried, con- 
victed of murder in the first degree, and sentenced to death. He was 



STATISTICAL INFOBMATION. 317 



hanged on the 10th day of December, 1841. No other execations have 
taken place for crimes committed within the penitentiary. 

THB BBOONI) LEASE. 

By an act approved January 26, 1843, the penitentiary was leased 
to Ezra Richmond and James Brown, for the period of ten years from 
Febrnary 15, 1843, the day on which the former lease expired. As pro- 
vided in the act of 1839, it was also enacted in the leasing act of 1843, 
that the keepers or lessees should in all respects keep the penitentiary 
from becoming a charge to the State. They were subject to the super- 
vision of Inspectors, and were required at the end of each term of the 
Criminal Oourt in St. Louis county to receive at the jail in St. Louis all 
persons convicted of felony, and, without charge, bring them safely 
and well-guarded to the penitentiary. In consideration of the use of 
the penitentiary said lessees were required to make payments into the 
State Treasury as follows : At the end of the second year $8,000 ; at 
the end of the fourth year $9,000 ; at the end of the sixth year $10,000 ; 
at the end of the eigth year 911)000, and at the end of the tenth year 
$12,000. On the 9th day of December, 1843, the interest of Ezra Bich- 
mond in the lease was purchased by Messrs. Blaine, Tompkins and 
Barrett of St. Louis, and on the same day Thomas L. Price of Jefferson 
Oity purchased onefourth of the interest of James Brown, the other 
lessee. The Governor was authorized to approve the bond of said sub- 
lessees by act approved March 26, 1845. 

At the expiration of this lease, and as provided in an act for the 
management of the penitentiary, approved February 16, 1863, the war- 
den system was re-established, and the government of the penitentiary 
vested in one warden, one deputy warden, one factor, ouq clerk, one 
physician and one chaplain, with such overseers, turnkeys and guards 
as were necessary, all subject to supervisory control of the board of in- 
spectors. James Oochran received the appointment of warden and en- 
tered upon the discharge of his duties on the 22d day of February, 1853, 
Since that date the warden system has prevailed and the following 
named persons have been appointed wardens : 

F. C. Hughes, March 19, 1857. 

John L. Blaine, June 3, 1861. 

P. T. Miller, August 28, 186L 

Horace A. Swilt, January 5, 1865. 

David A. Wilson, March 3, 1869. 

W.J. Dougherty, January 13, 1871. 

John F. Sebree, January 18, 1873. 

James K. Willis, January 23, 1877. 

Darwin W. Marmaduke, February 2, 1885. 



318 auditor's report. 



THE THIRD LBA8E. 

In compliance with an act of the General Assembly approved 
March 22, 1873, the penitentiary was leased for ten years to Charles A. 
Perry, Elias H. Perry, Waller Young and James R. Willis. The 
lessees assumed control of the institution May 29, 1873, and on the 
18th day of April, 1874, the penitentiary was sub-leased to the St. 
Louis Manufacturing Oompany, as contemplated by section 3 of the 
act above referred to. It was provided in the act of March 28, 1874, 
that in case the lease was forfeited or surrendered by the lessees, the 
warden should carry on the penitentiary and employ the convicts on 
account of the State, under the supervision of the inspectors. Antici- 
pating such a contingency the sum of $4,000 per month was appropri- 
ated. On the 22d day of November, 1875, the lease became forfeited 
and the penitentiary again reverted to the sole management and con* 
trol of the State, under which it has since remained. The leasing 
system proved a miserable failure, involving the State with large ex- 
penditures in the liquidation of claims for broken contracts, and when 
it came to an end, left the management of the penitentiary without 
means for the profitable employment of convicts; without food or 
clothing for them, and confronted with indebtedness, past, present and 
prospective. A picture of its destitution is thus presented by Gov. 
Hardin in his message to the Qeneral Assembly : 

^^ At the time of the surrender, the State had only the walls, 
houses and unclothed convicts. An entire supply of clothing, pro- 
visions, beddings, furniture of every kind, machinery, tools, wagons, 
teams, and all other articles necessary and proper for the management 
of the prison and its labor had to be provided." 

On the night of the 9th day of May, 1881, a fire occurred within 
the penitentiary, which destroyed a large building in which was lo- 
cated the saddle- tree shop of J. S. Sullivan & Co., the shop of Mr. A. 
Priesmeyer, engaged in the manufacture of ladies' shoes, the State 
weave shop and the prison engine. The principal loss to the State 
was occasioned by the destruction of the State weave shop, tools, dam- 
age done to the new cell building, and the temporary disarrangement 
of convict labor. The building consumed was not regarded as a serious 
loss. It was an old, rickety affair, ill-adapted to the wants and neces- 
sities of contractors, and their removal therefrom would have taken 
place in a short time, shops having been provided in a building then 
rapidly approaching completion. The engine and boiler located in 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 319 

the burned building had recently been contracted for exchange as old 
iron in part payment of the cost of a new engine^ and hence but little 
loss accrued from that source. 

Another fire, far more disastrous in its consequences, occurred dur- 
ing the noon hour of February 23, 1883. 

John B. Johnson, a convict sentenced in the circuit court of Shelby 
county to twelve years imprisonment for the crime of highway rob- 
bery, entered into an agreement with a fellow-convict from Jackson 
county, who was serving a sixteen years sentence for the same offense, 
to effiect their escape on that day. 

Becoming desperate, on the failure of his plans to escape, Johnson 
set fire to the shop occupied by Jacob Strauss & Company as a harness 
manufactory. 

This shop contained a large quantity of straw and other combust- 
ible materials which caused the flames to spread so rapidly that before 
the fire could be controlled, three buildings were destroyed. These 
buildings were occupied by the harness manufactory of Jacob Strauss 
& Company, the Giesecke Boot and Shoe Company, the Standard Shoe 
Company and the Excelsior Broom Company. 4 

Upon inquiry made by adjusters of insurance companies, the loss 
in stock and machinery sustained by the above named firms amounted 
to about 9210,000. 

The State lo3t in buildings and machinery about 980,971, as ascer- 
tained from the inventory of penitentiary property made in December 
preceding. 

From 1853 to the present time officers, guards and employes have 
been paid out of the usual appropriations made for the payment of 
civil officers. 

In the following table will be seen the total warrants issued to the 
penitentiary, in excess of its earnings, from January 16, 1833, the date 
of the act authorizing its erection, to December 31, 1886, and also the 
number of convicts remaining in prison at the end of each biennial 
term since the institution was opened, January 1, 1836, as well as 
references to the various laws authorizing appropriations to be made 
and under which warrants were issued : 



320 



auditor's report. 



MISSOURI PENITENTIARY— CONTINUBD. 



For what parposes warrants were is&aed. References 
to laws authorizing appropriations. Number 
of convicts. Dates, etc. 



Fbom January 1, 1833, to Septrmbbr 30, 1834. 

Building Jail and penitentiary house. Territorial laws, 
vol. 2, p. 336 

From October 1, 1834, to Skptember 30, 1836. 

Building Jail and penitentiary house. Torritorial laws, 
vol. 2, p. 336 

Salaries of officers and contingent expenses. General 
contingent fund appropriation 

Number of convicts December 31, 1836, 17. 

Ffoh October 1, 1836, to Sbptembbr 30, 1838. 

Salaries of officers and contingent expenses. General 
contingent fund appropriation 

I 

Contingent expenses of the penitentiary. Laws ofi 
1836-7,p.7 

Number of convicts December 31, 1838, 53. 

From Octobbr 1, 1838, to September 30, 1840. 

Contingent expenses. Laws of 1838-9, p. 5 



Amount of 
warrants is- 
sued on each 
appropriation 



Purchase of provisions and clothing for convicts. Laws 
1838-9, p. 4 



Payment of debts. Laws of 1838-9, p. 94. 

Expenses under act to lease. Laws 1838-9, p. 94. 



Relief of Dr. John H. Edwards, medical services ren- 
dered. Laws of 1838-9, p. 210 

Number of convicts December 31, 1840, 71. 

From October 1, 1840, to September 30, 1842. 

Contingent expenses. Laws of 1838-9 , p . 5 



Payment of Lewis Bolton, warden. Laws of 1841, p. 
206 

Expenses under act to lease. Laws of 1838-9, p. 94. . . 

Number of convicts December 31, 1842, 129. 



$16,666 66 



8,333 34 
851 99 



1,902 41| 
6,012 29| 



1,251 98 

500 00 

8,233 94 

24,110 95 

90 00 



13 10 

5 56| 
11,433 3l[ 



Aggregate 
amount. 



$16,666 66 



9,185 33 



7,914 70 



34,206 87 



11,451 9: 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



321 



MISSOURI PENITENTIARY— CoNTiNDBD. 



For what purpose warrants were issued. References to 
laws authorizing appropriations. Number of 
, conyfcts. Dates, etc. 



From Octobkr 1, 1842, to Skfteubbr 30, 1844. 

Relief of Elijah Miller for supplies furnished convicts. 
Laws of 1843, p. 302 

Expenses under act for leasing. Laws 1838-9, p. 94. . . 

Galy & Coonce for bell furnished penitentiary in 1838. 
Laws of 1843 , p. 257 



Amount of 
warrants is- 
sued on each 
appropriat'n. 



Namber of convicts December 31, 1844, 184. 

From Octobkr 1, 1844, to Sbptbmbbr 30, 1846. 

Jfay of Wm.Z. Angney, B. F. Hickman and Wm. M. 
Kerr, arbitrators. Laws of 1845, p. 290 



Number of convicts December 31, 1846, 140. 

From October 1, 1846, to Skftbmbbr 30, 1848. 

I 

Pay of W. L. Gordon, medical services rendered a con-| 
Vict. Laws 1847, p. 294 

Number of convicts December 31, 1848, 130. 

From Ociobbr 1, 1848, to Sbptbmbbr 30, 1850. 
Porchase of books for convicts. Laws of 1849, p. 16. . . . 
Number of convicts December 31, 1860, 198. 

From Octobkr 1, 1850, to Sbptbmbbr 30, 1852. 

Pay of W, R Reynolds for capture of escaped convict. 
Laws 1851, p. 640. 

Number "Of convicts December 31, 1852, 225. 

From Ocotobbr 1, 1852, to Sbpbticbbr 30, 1854. 

Pay of officers, guards and employes 



Act to provide for management of. Laws of 1853, 
p. 116 

Reimbursement of Alexander Hamilton and purchase 
of books for convicts. Laws 1853. p. 117 

Number of convicts December 31, 1854, 235. 



$38 00 

84 00 

I 

35 88i 



40 00 



$18 00 




50 00 



13,741 88 

25,000 00 

1,050 00 



Aggregate 
amount. 



$157 88 



40 00 



$18 00 



50 00 



39,791 88 



S. P —20 



32-2 



AUDITOR S KKPOKT. 



MISSOURI PENITENTlARY-^CoNTiKUi D. 



For what parpose warrants were issned. References tOj Amount of 



laws authorizing appropriations. Number of 
convicts, dates, etc. 



From October 1, 1854, to Sbptkubkr 30, 1856. 

Pay of ofBcers, guards and employes 

Act concerning the penitentiary. Laws 1855, p. 168 . . . 

Purchase of an engine. Local acts 1855. p. 13 

Act for payment of Factor. Laws 1855, p. 591 

Number of convicts December 31, 1856, 259. 

From October 1, 1856, to Srptbmbbr 30, 1858. 

Pay of officers, guards and employes 

Payment of debts. Laws 1856-7, p. 5 

Act to establish and regulate. Revised Statutes 1855, 
p. 1143, sec. 32 

Number of convicts December 31 « 1858, 388. 

t 

From Octobbr 1, 1858«to Septbmbbr 30, 1860. 

Pay of officers, gsards and employes 

Payment of debts, building female department, books, 
etc. Laws 1859, p. 58. Laws 1859-60, p. 5 

Number of convicts December 31 , 1860, 524. 

From October 1, 1860, to Skptembrr 30, 1862. 

Pay of officers, guards and employes 

Payment of debts. Laws of 1861, p. 7 

Expenses under act to lease. Laws 1861 , p 46 

Number of convicts December 31, 1862. 443. 

From October 1, 1862, to Seftember 30, 1864. 

Pay of civil officers, guards and employes 

Payment of debts. Laws 1863, p. 5 and laws 1863-4, 
p. 474 

Maintenance and support. Laws of 1863-4, p. 475 

Payment of debts. Laws of 1863-4 , p. 422 

Library. Laws 1855, p. 168 

Number of convicts December 31, 1864, 384. 



warrants is- ; Aggregate 
sued on each amount 
appropriati* n 



22,836 10, 

7,000 00 

I 

6,000 00' 
1,133 00 



24,946 97 

21.000 00 



I 



25,151 75 






41,488 85 



.1 



118,303 85 



41,222 61 

22,502 55 

943 00 



39,968 08' 

15,579 48 

6,044 Oo' 

2,834 50 

50 CO 



36,969 10 



71,098 7 



70 



159,792 70 



64,66ijl6 



64,478 06 



AUDITOP/S RBPORT. 



323 



MISSOURI PENlTENTIARY—CoNTmuBD. 



For what purpose warrants were issued. Beferences, Amount of 
to laws authorizing appropriations. Number of i warrants is- 

convicts, dates, etc. Isued on each 

.appropriati' n 



From October 1, 1864 to Sbptembbr 30, 1866. 

Pay of officers, guards and employes 

Pay of debts. Laws of 1865, p. 6. Laws 1865-6, p. 9 

Library, Laws 1855, p. 168 

Number of conylcts December 31, 1866—597. 

From October 1, 1866, to December 31, 1868. 

Pay of officers, guards and employes 

Extension of walls, erection of new cell building and 
payment of debts. Laws 1867, p. 8. Laws 1868, 
p. 9 

Library. Laws 1867, p. 8, and General Statutes, p. 875, 
sec. 29 

Number of convicts December 31, 1868. 735. 

From January 1, 1869. to December 31, 1870. 

Pay of officers, guards and employes 



Extension of walls, completion of new cell building 
payment of debts and current expenses. Laws of 
1869, p. 6. Laws of 1870, p. 12 

Purchase of machinery. Laws 1870, p. 11 



Library. Laws 1869, p. 6. General Statutes, p. 875, 
sec. 29 

Number of convicts December 31, 1870, 797, 

From January 1, 1871, to December 31, 1872. 

Pay of officers, guards and employes , 



Payment of debts and current expenses. Laws 1872, 
pp. 7-8 

» * 

Library 

Number of convicts December 31 , 1872, 841. 

From January 1, 1873, to December 31, 1874. 
Pay of officers, guards and employes .-. 



Payment of outstanding indebtedness accrued prior to 
1873. Law8ofl873,p. 7 T 

I 

i 

Library. Laws of 1874, j). 181 i 



61,488 27. 
37,547 16j 

I 

25 00 



87,718 30 

76,529 85 
275 00 



96,661 53 

178,470 15 
2,055 84 

716 62 



103,540 25 

150,000 00 
345 08 



42,670 01 

112,410 60 
521 97 



Aggregate 
amount. 



99,060 43 



164,523 15 



277,904 14 



253,885 33 



324 



auditor's report. 



MISSOURI PENITENTIARY— CoNTiNUBD. 



For what purpose warrants were issued. References to 

laws autnorlzing appropriations . N umber 

^of convicts, dates, etc. 



Laying gas pipe and gas fixtures. Laws of 1874, p. 11. 

Lumber furnished in 1861. Laws of 1874, p . 12 

Reimbursement of P. T. Miller and James L. Minor. 
Laws of 1873, p. 309 

Number of convicts December 31, 1874, 1,069. 

From January 1, 1875, to Dbcbmbbr 31, 1876. 

Pay of officers, guards and employes 

Maintenance of. Laws of 1874, p. 180, sec. 6 



Construction of additional buildings. Laws of 1875, p. 
67 

Adjustment of claims of lessees. Laws of 1875, p. 65. . 

Payment of damages to Preston & Scovern, contract- 
ors. Laws of 1875, p. 62 

Payment of damages to A. W. Griffith, contractor. 
Laws 1875, p. 63 

Payment of damages to Meyberg & Wangelin, con- 
tractors. Laws 1875, p. 64 

Payment of damages to Hancock, Roach <fc Co . , con- 
tractors. Laws of 1874, p. 64 



Amount of 
warrants is- 
sued on each 
appropriation 



i|4,860 35 
1,270 19 

188 00 



Repairs of. Laws of 1875, p. 66, sec. 3 

Library. Laws of 1874, p. 181 

Number of convicts December 31, 1876, 1,346. 
From January 1, 1877, to Dvcehbbr 31, 1878. 

Pay of officers, guards and employes 

Maintenance of. Laws of 1877, p. 15, sec. 11 

Repairs of. Laws of 1877, p. 15, sec. 11 .- 



Purchase of property on surrender of lease. Laws of 
1877, p. 17, sec. 1 

Construction of additional buildings. Laws of 1875, 
p. 67 



Library of. Laws of 1877, p. 15 

Number of convicts December 31, 1878, 1,294. 

From January 1, 1879, to Dbcbmbbr 31, 1880. 
Pay of officers, guards and employes 



34,573 76 
53,200 00 

89,610 18 
43,208 75 

2,700 00 

1,250 00 

26,002 00 

15,180 00 

10,159 83 

73 30 



75,076 99 
45,912 88 
18,312 12 

8,009 54 

150 00 
500 00 



77,408 64 



Aggregate 
amount. 



9161,911 12 



275,957 82 



146,961 53 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



e325 



MfssouRi penitentiary-Continued 



For what purposes warrants were Issued. References 

to laws authorizing appropriations. Number 

of convicts, dates, etc. 



Repairs of. Laws of 1879, p. 6, 



Amount of 
warrants is- 
sued on each 
appropriate n. 



Use of steamboat "Tom Stevens" in 1872. Laws of 
1879, p. 184 



Library. Laws of 1879, p . 6 

Number of convicts December 31, 1880, 1,218. 

From January 1, 1881, to Dbgkmbeb 31, 1882. 

Pay of officers, guards and employes 

Repairs and improvements . Laws of 1881 , p . 6 

Library. Laws of 1881, p. 6 

Organ for chapel. Laws of 1881, p. 6 

Number of convicts December 31, 1882, 1,348. 

From January 1, 1883, to Dscsmbsr 31, 1884. 

Pay of officers, guards and employes. Laws of 1883, 
p . 5, sec .5 

Extension of walls, erection of bhops, etc. Laws of 
1883, p. 13. sec. 1 

Construction of temporary buildings. Laws of 1883. 
p. 12, sec. 1 



Library. Laws of 1883, p. 7, sec. 10, 



Purchase of Are engine and equipments. Laws of 1883, 
p. 10, sec. 25 

Number of convicts December 31, 1884, 1,538. 

From January 1, 1885, to Dbcbmber 31, 1886. 

Support of, including salaries of officers. Laws of 1885. 

Extension of walls and construction of additional 
buildings. Laws of 1885, p. 16 



l^ibrary . Laws of 1885, sec. 20, p. 9 

Number of convicts December 31, 1886, 1,636. 
Total cost of the penitentiary 



41,687 88 



690 00 
500 00 



80,757 10 

36,973 00 

500 00 

51 16 



79,093 53 

145,000 00 

10,000 00 
499 86 

10.000 00 



100,000 00 

110,000 00 
500 00 



-Aggregate 
amount. 



120,286 52 



118,281 26 



244,593 39 



210,500 00 



$2,591,552 72 



S2f> 



auditor's report. 



CRIME. • 

TABLE BhoWlng amounts paid by the State for costs in cilmlnal cases, apprehen- 
sion of criminals, suppression of outlawry and for the execution and enforce- 
ment of civil law from November 30, 1840, to December 31, 1886. 



' Apprehension , Execution 
Cost in criminal of criminals and and enforce- | Special ap- 
cases. ' suppression of I ment' of civil | propriations. 

outlawry. law. 



Year. 



1840-1--2.. 

18:13-4.... 

184.>-6.... 
1847-8.... 
1849-50. . . 
1851-2.... 
1853-4.... 
1855-6.... 
1857-8.... 
1850-60... 
1861-2.... 
1863-4.... 
1865-6.... 
1867-«.... 
1869-70... 
1871-2.... 
1873^.... 
187&-6.... 
1877-8.... 
1879-80... 
1881-2.... 
1883-4.... 
1885-6..., 

Total 



$44,759 

43,221 

24,958 

31,350 

42,590 

40,734 

61,750 

67,869 

86,742 

110,028 

99,402 

85,778 

117,475 

323,364 

414,954 

344,078 

386,848 

360,606 

511,547 

376,578 

297,270 

360,257 

420,111 



47 

37 

61 

04 

79 

48 

67 

75 

37 

36 

64 

06 

64 

24 

86 

38 

07i 

69, 

99 

61' 

70 

42, 

65 



$198 26 

2,300 87 
11,967 63 
12,086 54, 

8,647 63' 
10,163 55! 
13,427 371 

8,109 16, 
13,514 42, 
15,053 29' 

9,626 30; 
10,332 291 



$3,097 80 

11,822 61 

2,014 26 



$4,632,270 74 $115,427 31 



$16,934 57 



$2,208 88 

2,066 98 

640 97 

650 96 

803 01 

734 36 

332 40 

415 53 

1,362 62 

301 57 

2,709 13 

42 10 



833 87 
221 20 



298 40 
468 60 



$14,080 48 



RECAPITULATION. 



Amount of criminal costs paid by the State since 1840 

Amount paid for the apprehension of criminals and suppression 
of outlawry '. •. 

Amount paid for the execution and enforcement of civil law 

Amount of criminal costs paid by special appropriations 

Total amount paid by the State since 1840 



$4,682,270 74 

115,427 31 
16,934 57 
14,080 48 



$4,778,713 10 



Note.— Prior to 1840 criminal costs and costs incident to the enforcement of 
the criminal laws were paid out of the appropriations made for general contingent 
expenses, and as no separate ledger account was kept of the same the amount paid 
by the State is restricted to such expenditures as occurred since 1840. 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



327 



EDUCATION, CHARITIBS AND CRIMB. 

General summary of the aggregate amounts disbursed from the 
State treasury for educational and charitable purposes and for the 
suppression of crime, showing in separate columns the appropriations 
made by the General Assembly and the income derived from the in- 
vestment of State funds held in trnst for educational purposes : 

EDUCATION. 



Maintenance of public schools 

University of tlie State of Missouri 
School of Mines and Metallurgy. . . 

Normal schools 

Missouri Military Institute 



Approprations 

by the Earnings of in- 
General Assem- vested funds, 
bly. 



Aggregate 
disbursements. 



I 






$7,189,396 15 $4,011,254 29 $11,200,650 44 



700,043 82 

161,000 00 

648,628 10' 

15,000 001 



Totals $8,714,068 07 



432,698 23 



1,132,742 05 
161,000 00. 
648,628 10 
15,000 00 



$4,443,952 52 $13,158,020 59 



CHARITIES. 



Names of Eleemosynary Institutions. 



State Lunatic Asylum No. 1, at Fulton 

State Lunatic Asylum No. 2, at St. Joseph 

State Lunatic Asylum No. 3, at Nevada 

St Louis Insane Asylum 

Missouri Institution for the Education of the Deaf and Dumb at 
Fulton 

Missouri ^^chool for the Blind at St. Louis 

Home for Orphans and Indigent Children formerly at Kansas City 

Soldiers' Orphans' Home formerly at St. Louis 

Total 



Amount of ap- 
propriations 
by General As- 
semblies. 



$l,b37,099 50 

776,490 35 

88,400 25 

225,000 00 

1,145,433 66 

713,493 01 

57,342 00 

42,500 00 



$4,585,758 77 



328 



auditor's report. 



CRIMES. 



Appropriations upon which warrants were issued. 



I Amount of ap- 
I propriatioDS 
' disbursed. 



Costs in criminai cases since 1840 $4,632,270 74 

Special appropriations for payment of costs in criminal cases 14,060 48 

Execution and enforcement of civil law i 16,934 57 

Apprehension of criminals and su >presslon of outlawry ' 116,427 31 

Maintenance of the State Penitentiary 2,596,552 72 

Location of Penitentiary No. 2 1,684 35 

Total amount paid by the State for suppression of crime $7,371, 950 17 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY BXPENHEsi. 



. Table showing the cost of General Assemblies during each biennial period ft*om 

October 1, 1828, to December 31, 1886. 



For what purpose warrants were issued. 

■ 
From October 1, 1828, to Seftemb]er30, 1830. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From Octobkr 1, 1830, to Septembbr 30, 1832. ' 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

FbOM OGTOBBR 1, 1832, to ^^BFTBMBER 30, 1834. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From October 1, 1834, to September 30, 1836. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From October 1, 1836, to September 30, 1838. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 



Amounts of I Aggregate 
warrants is- amount. 

sued on each| 

appropriation! 



$15,094 78 
2,442 04 

16,746 25 
1,041 54 



22,555 00 
5,512 00 



43,004 42' 
4,513 95' 



30.081 82 
3,737 40 



$17,536 82 



17,786 79 



28,087 00 



47.518 37 



33,819 22 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



329 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY EXPENSES— Continued. 



For what purposes warrants were issned. 



Amount of ' 

warrants is- : 

sued on eachj 

appropriation: 



From October 1, 1838, to SuprKMBiRSO, 1840. 
Per diem and mileage of Members ! f 41 ,385 13 



Contingent expenses 

From Octobkr 1, 1840, to Ssptembbr 30, 1842. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From October 1, 1842, to September 30, 1844. 

•Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From October 1, 1844, to September 30, 1846. 

Per .diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From October 1, 1846, to September 30, 1848. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From October 1, 1848, to September 30, 1860. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From October 1, 1850, to SeptembeB'30« 1852. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From October 1, 1852, to September 30, 1854. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From October 1, 1854, to September 30, 1866. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From October 1, 1856, to September 30, 1868. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 



4,801 06 



I 



44,804 21; 
6,107 70! 



48,484 94 
5,863 23 



63,580 19 
4,965 44 



48,111 47 
4,400 88 



42,136 66 
6,914 31 



59,793 08' 
5,764 36' 



55,994 80 
12,213 21 



84,549 80> 
51,366 731 



119,133 90i 
58,492 18; 



Aggregate 
amount. > 



$46,186 19 



50,911 91 



54,348 17 



68,654 63 



52,512 35 



48,049 97 



65,647 44 



68,208 01 



135,915 63 



177,626 08 



330 



auditor's eepobt. 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY EXPENSES— (;ontinukd 



For what purposes warrants were issued. 



I Amount of 
I warrants is- 
sued on each 
I appropriation 



From October 1, 18^^, to ShPTSMBBR 30, 1860. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From October 1, 1860, to Seftxmbkb 30, 1862. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From Octobbr 1, 1862, to Skptjembsr 30, 1864. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From Octobkr 1, 1864, to Sbftsmbkr 30, 1866. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From October 1, 1866 to December 31, 1868. 

Per diem and mileage of Members . . . 

Contingent expenses 

From January 1, 1869, to December 31, 1870. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From January 1, 1871, to December 31, 1872. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From January 1, 1873, to December 31, 1874. 

Per diem and milage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From January 1, 1875, to December 31, 1876. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 



$170,196 63 
113,114 67! 



107,708 82' 
43,105 24 



157,275 75| 
58,401 54! 



229,902 00 
109,999 82 



196,476 86, 
183,4& 19 



180,842 80 
161,423 56 



268,377 61 
183,564 00 



$199,237 10 
113,079 72 



90,513 50 
48,365 01 



Aggregate 
amount. 



$283,311 30 



150.814 06 



216,677 29 



339,901 82 



379,915 05 



342,266 36 



451,941 61 



$312,316 S2 



138,878 51 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



331 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY EXPENSES— Ck)NTiKUKD. 



\ 



For what purpoBe warrants were issued. 



Fhom January 1, 1877, to Degembbb 31, 1878. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From January 1, 1879, to December 31, 18S0. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From January 1, 1881, to December 31, 1882. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From January 1, 1883, to December 31, 1884. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 

From January 1, 1885, to Dbcemfer 31, 1886. 

Per diem and mileage of Members 

Contingent expenses 



Amount of ; 

warrants is- . Aggregate 
sued on each amount, 
appro priat'n | 



$125,876 00 
49, 979 871 



130,964 00 

I 
72,314 63 



107,145 50 
34,751 75 

82,585 6l! 
45,712 74 



81,831 20| 
53,212 80 



$175,865 87 



203,278 63 



141 897 25 



128,298 35 



135,044 00 



332 



auditor's rkport. 



COUNTY AND TOWNSHIP BONDS REGISTERED IN THE YEARS 1885 

AND 1886. 



Counties . 



Bates coanty : , 
Mount Pleasant township. 5-20 six per cent, fund- 
ing 

Prairie City township, 5-20 six per cent, fhnding. . I 

Benton county : ! 

10-20 six per cent, funding ! 



Buchanan county : 

Bloomington township, 10-20 six per cent, funding. 



Cass county : 
Dolan to^ 
Gran(} River township, 6-20 six per cent, funding. . 



polan township, 5-20 six per ecnt. funding. 

;. fu 



Cape Girardeau county : 

Cape Girardeau township', 30-year compromise 

Clark county: 

20-30 year six per cent, funding, 

Vernon township, 10-20 six per cent, compromise. . 



Chariton county : 

5-20 six per cent, compromise. 



Clinton county : 

5-20 six per cent, funding. 



Crawford county : 

One and two years six per cent, court house 



Cooper county : 

Clear Creek township, 5-20 six per cent, funding. . . 
Pilot GroYe township, 5-20 six per cent, funding.'. 

DeKalb county : 

One. two and three years six per cent, court 
house 



Greene county : 

10-20 six per cent, funding. 



Howard county : 

5-20 six per cent, funding. 



Jasper county : 

Sarcoxie township, 5-20 six per cent, funding, 



Lafayette county : 

Lexington township, fiye, ten, twenty and twenty- 
five year six per cent, compromise 

Sni-a-bar township, live, ten, twentv and twenty- 
five year six per cent, compromise 

Washington township, five, ten, twenty and 
twenty-five years six per cent, compromise 



1885. 



$180,000 
5,000,. 



61,000 



56«<000| 



25,000, 
1001 



400 
50,000 



1,400 
50,000 



1,000 
8,000 



40,000 

25,000 

203,800 



184,000 
46,000 
88,400 



1886. 



39,700 



15,000 



1,000 



19,000 
62,900 
45,500 

10,000 
1,700 



Lincoln county : 

5-20 six per cent, funding. 



19,000^ 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 



333 



COUNTY AND TOWNSHIP BONDS, ETC.— Contikubd. 



Connties. 



Mercer county : 

5-20 six per cent, compromise. 



Taney county : 

5-20 six per cent, funding. 




1886. 



$58,500 



BONDS OP CITIES AND TOWNS REGISTERED IN THE YEARS 1885 

AND 1886. 



Name of City or Town— Description of Bond. 



Butler — 2 to 6-year 8 per cent, improvement 

Bntler— 6 mos. and 1-year 10 per cent, improvement. 

Hannibal— 1 to 20-year 6 per cent, electric light 

Independence — 1 to 10-year 6 per cent, improvement. 

Lamar— 1 to 10-year 8 per cent, improvement 

Marionyille— 1-year 10 per cent, improvement 

Poplar Bluff— 1-year 10 per cent, improvement 

Peirce City— 1-year 10 per cent improvement , 

Sarcoxie— 5-20 6 per cent, funding , . . 

Sedalla— 1-year 7 per cent, revenue 

Springfield- l(>-year 6 per cent, funding 

St. Genevieve— 1-year 10 per cent. Improvement 



Amount in Amount in 
1885. 1886. 



$2,000 00 



1,500 00 
1.300 00 



37,000 
1,000| 



$2,000 00 

20,000 00 

2,300 00 
175 
1,400 
1,500 
},920 
5,000 

1*000 






334 



auditor's rkport. 




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INDEX TO PART FIRST. 



A 

PAGS 

Auditor's introductory remarks 3 to 32 

Assessing and collecting the revenue 77 to 100 

Apprehension of criminals 112 to 114 

AKvlum No. l—support of 139 

Asylum No. l~salaries of oflScers 140 

Asylum Vo. 1 — repairs and improvement of 140 

Asylum No. 2~8upport of 141 

Asylum No. 2 — salaries of offlcers 141 

Asylum No. 2— enlargement of 142 

Asylum No. 2— repairs and improvement of 142 

Asylum No. 3— location and construction of 143 

Asylum, St. Louis-— support of indigent insane 143 

Agricultural Board— salaries of otQcers 160 

Agricultural Board — expenses of 160 

Armory, State — repairs 137 

Auditor's warrants — payment of 167 



Blind, Missouri School— support of 146 

Blind, Missouri School — salaries of officers 146 

Bond and Coupon Scrap-hook account 158 

Bureau of Labor Statistics 169 

Board of Agriculture— salaries and expenses 160 

Board of Horticulture 160-1 

Board of Health 161 

Balance Sheet of Revenue Fund 172 to 176 

Balance Sheets of the several funds 195 to 201 

c 

T'^ntingent expenses General Assembly 60 to 70 

Civil officers-'pay of 72 to 76 

Costs in criminal cases 101 to 110 

Contingent expenses Governor 118 

Contingent expenses Supreme Court 119 



II INDEX. 



PACK 

Contingent expenses St. Louis Court of Appeals 120 

Contingent expenses Kansas City Court of Appeals 121 

Contingent expenses State Auditor 122 

Contingent expenses State Treasurer 123 

Contingent axpenses Secretary of State 124 

Contingent expenses Attorney-General 125 

Contingent expenses Superintendent Public Schools 126 

Contingent expenses Register of Lands 127 

Contingent expenses Railroad Commissioners 128 

Contingent expenses Adjutant-General 129 

Contingent expenses Governor's Mansion 131 

Constitutional Amendments— publishing of 162-4 

Counsel fees— pay of 166 

Contingent expenses Fund Commissioners 179 

D 

Deaf and Dumb Asylum— support of. 144 

Deaf and Dumb Asylums-salaries of officers . . 144-5 

Deaf and Dumb Asylum — ^repairs of 145 

Distribution of Laws and Circulars to school officers 152 

Distribution of Laws and Journals 155 

E 

Executors' and Administrators' Fund 186 

Executors' and Administrators' Fund— heirs of 207 t-o 216 

Earnings Missouri Penitentiary 190 

P 

Fish Commission — maintenance of. 161 

Funding State Ddebt— expenses of ISO 

Flags— preservation of. 139 

Fiscal agent — pay of 179 

o 

General Contingent Fund 130 

General Assembly — pay of 51 to 59 

General Assembly— contingent expenses of GO to 71 

General Contingent Fund 130 

General Balance Sheet of all ftnds. '206 

H 

Hannibal <fe St, Joe Litigation— expenses of 160 

Hannibal & St. Joe Bonds— pay of interest on 178 



INDEX. Ill 



I 

FA6R 

Insurance Depait meat— salaries and expenses of 187 

Improvement grounds of Mansion 132 

Improvement of Auditor's office 136 

Interest on Bonded Debt. 178 



Lincoln Institute 150 

Labor - tatistics— Bureau of 159 

M 

Militia— pay of claims 170 

N 

Normal Schools 148-9 

New Orleans Exposition — expenses of 168 



Penitentiary — support of 150 

Penitentiary— extension of walls 151 

Penitentiary — earnings of 190 

Penitentiary No. 2— location of 151 

Printing reports and documents ordered by General Assembly 153 

Printing for Executive departments 153 

Paper for t>tate printing 154 

Printing Laws and Journals 155 

Publishing Decisions Supreme Court 155 

Publishing reports St. Louis and Kansas City Courts of Appeal 156 

Penitentiary— library of 158 

Presidential electors— pay of 164 

Pensioner — pay of. 165 

R 

Receipts from all sources and into all fUnds 35 to 48 

Repairing and improvement of Governor's Mansion 133 

Repairing and refurnishing Governor's Mansion 134 

Refurnishing Governor's office : 134 

Repairs office Secretary of State 135 

Repairs of State Capitol 137 

Repairs of State Armory 137-8 

Repairs of State Cemetery 138 

Repairs of Capitol grounds 138 

Restoring oil paintings in Senate aud House 139 



r 



IV INDEX. 



PAOK 

Relief and benefit of Wm. Riggins lOS 

Relief of New Madrid and other countiee 1G9 

Rebuilding jail in Butler county 16t^ 

Register of Land's office— copy of records 170 

Road and Canal Fund 188 to 190 

Receipts, monthly into the several funds 202-3 



School of Mines and Metallurgy 147^ 

Stationery for State departments 1 54 

State Library-use of 157 

Swamp and Overflowed Lands— expenses of 165 

Survey of Swamp and Overflowed Lands 171 

State Seminary Moneys 181 

State Sinking Fund • • • 181 

State School Moneys 182 to 184 

Swamp Land Indemnity Fund 185 

T 

Traveling expenses Superintendent Public (Schools 152 

D 

University— maintenance of, completion, etc 147 

Union Military Bonds— payment of 167 



Vault— building of for Secretary of State 136 

Vault— building of for Register of Lands f 136 

• 

W 

Wolf Scalps— pay of 116-7 

Warrants issued in 1885 and 1886 191 

Warrants issued each month in 1885 and 1886 J?04-5 



INDEX TO PART SECOND. 



A 

PAGE 

Assessment returns of real and personal property Ito 34 

Assessment of railroad, bridge and telegraph companies 35 to 39 

Aggregate assessment 39 

Abstract of real estate and personal tax-books 40 to 46 

Abstracts of railroad, bridge and telegraph tax-books 48 to 51 

Abstracts of merchants' and manufacturers' tax-books 52 to 58 

Asylum No. 1— history and cost of. 290 to 295 

Asylum No. 2— history and cost of. 296 to 298 

Asylum No. 3— history and cost of 298 to 299 

Asylum— St. Louis Insane 300 to 301 

B 

Bonded debt of counties 73 to 109 

Bonded debt of cities and towns 110 to 123 

Bonded debt of Missouri— history of 124 to 243 

Bonds registered in l&So and 1886 332 to 336 

Blind— Missouri school for 308 to 312 

% 

c 

Crime— cost of 326 and 328 

Charities— cost of 327 

D 

Dramshop licences 62 to 72 

D eaf and Dumb— Missouri Institution for the education of 301 to 307 

Deposits of surplus revenue by United States 139 to 143 

Defense warrants 189 



VI ;dkx. 

E 

PAGE 

Education — cost of 327 

F 
Forfeiture and sale of railroads 176 to 186 

G 

General Assemblies— cost of. 328 to 331 

I 

Industrial home for orphans and indigent chlldreen 313 

Iowa War Bonds 144 

L 

Loan offices— establishment of 126 

Lincoln Institute 288 

M 

Mormon and Osage War Bonds 143-4 

Military Institute— cost of 289 

N 
Normal Schools 284 to 287 

P 

Penitentiary— history and cost of 315 to 326 

B 

Railroad construction— progress of 61 

Railroad debt 158 

Railroads— assessment of 59 

S 

Soldiers' Orphans' flome 314 

School Fund 243 to 261 

School Moneys 261 to 263 

Seminary Fund x 366 

School of Mines and Metallurgy 282 to 283 

St. Louis Insane Asylum 300 



INDEX. VII 

T 

PAGE 

Taxation— -rates of for State purposes 58 

. xes levied in 1886 56 to 57 

u 

Iversity 264 to 281 

w 

ir debt— history of. 189 to 197 



V - 



On page 15, Part First, seoond line from bottom, for $1,042,812.70, read $1,142, 
812.70. 

On page 56. Part Second, in caption of third table for 1866, read 1886. 



a ■ 



II 



b: 



OF THB 



STME AUDITOR 



TO THE 



THIRTY-FIFTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



OF THB 



STATE OF MISSOURI, 



FOR THE TWO FISCAL YEARS 



BEGINNING JAN. 1, 1887, AND ENDING DEC. 31, 1888. 



JEFFERSON CITY, MO. : 

TRIBUKE PRINTING COMPANY, STATE PRINTERS ANB BINDERS. 

1889. 



Sec. 7564, Revised Statutes. * * * * He shall also, at the commencement 
of each regular seesion of the General Assembly, prepare and report a full and 
detailed statement of the condition of the revenuevand the amount of the expendi- 
tures for the two preceding fiscal years ; a full and detailed statement of the public 
debt ; estimates of the revenue and expenditures for the two succeeding fiscal 
years ; such plans as he may deem expedient for the support of the public credit, 
for lessening the public expenses, for promoting frugality and economy in the 
public offices, and generally for the better management and more perfect under- 
standing of the fiscal affairs of the State ; a tabular statement showing separately 
the whole amount of each appropriation of money made by law, the amount paid 
under the same, and the balance unexpended; a tabular statement showing the 
amount of revenue chargeable to each county for the two preceding fiscal years ; 
the aggregate amount of each object of taxation , together with the tax due on the 
same ; and he shall also publish annually an accurate account of all receipts and 
expenditures of the public moneys. 



REPORT. 



Auditoh'8 Office, Statk op Missouri, 1 
City of Jis-ferson, January 1, 1889. j 

To the Honorable Thirty-fifth General Assembly of the State of Missouri: 

Gentlemen : I have the honor to submit the following report of 
the transactions of this department for the two fiscal years beginning 
January 1, 1887, and ending December 31, 1888. 

On the first day of Januaiy, 1887, the general balance in the State 
treasury, after the payment of all warrants, amounted to $573,170.41, 
which was apportioned among the several funds as follows : 



State Revenue fond 

State Interest fond 

State School fand 

State Seminary fdnd 

State School moneys 

State Seminary moneys 

Road and Canal fund ■. . . . 

Executors' and Administrators' fund 

Insurance Department fund 

Militia fund 

Swamp Land Indemnity fund 

Earnings Missouri Penitentiary 

Balance in the treasury January 1, 1887 



§347,700 21 


148 16 


439 80 


95 08 


180,165 00 


17,245 00 


6,360 27 


14,056 69 


5,126 81 


1,472 01 


361 38 


$573,170 41 



4* 



AUDITOE'S BEPOBT. 



A statement of the receipts and disbursements during the years 
1887 and 1888, and the balance remaining in the treasury January 1, 
1889, is presented in the following table : 



By balance in treasary January 1, 1887. 

By receipts ftom all sources in 1887 

By receipts ftom all sources in 1888 

To warrant issued in 1887 

To warrants issued in 1888 

Balance '. . . 

Total 

Balance in treasury January 1, 1889. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



$573,170 41 
3,706,455 72 
3,463,211 19 



$3,870,644 21 

3,346,694 04 

586,499 07 



$7,802,837 32 $7,802,837 32 



$585,499 07 



The balance of $585,499.07, remaining in the treasury January 1, 
1889, is apportioned among the several funds as follows : 



State Revenue fund 

State Interest fund 

State Sinking Aind 

State School fUnd * 

State Seminary fund 

State School moneys 

State Seminary moneys ^ 

Road and Canal fund 

Executois' and Administrators' fund 

Insurance Department fund 

Militia fund 

Swamp Land Indemnity fund 

Total balance in treasury January 1, 1889 



$15,937 91 

330,025 78 

2,206 74 

05 OS 

187,025 60 

17.672 08 

7,482 85 

15,596 21 

7,976 28 

1,480 51 



$585,499 07 



auditoe's eeport. 5. 

The receipts and disburgements from the General Eevenue fund 
are ahown in the following table : 

. STATE REVEXUE FUND. 



By balance January 1, 1887. 



By receipts in 1887 from tax books and ordinary soarces 
of revenue 



By receipts in 1887 from fees from State officers and 
other miscellaneous sources 



By receipts in 1887 from R, B. Price, Treasurer of the 
State University, for which certificate of indebt- 
edness was issued 



By receipt, 1887, from W. J. Hilton, treasurer H. & St. 
Joe K. R. Co., amount of judgment awarded by 
Supreme Court (J. S 



By receipts in 1888 from tax books and ordinary sources 
of revenue 



By receipts in 1888 fk'om fees of State officers and other 
miscellaneous sources 



By receipts in 1888 from R. B. Price, treasurer of State 
University, for which certificate of indebtednesss 
was issued 



^Y receipt in 1888 from heirs of James S. Rollins, for 
use of Seminary fund, for which certificate of in- 
debtedness was issued 



Warrants issued in 1887 for ordinary current expenses. 

Transfer to State School moneys in 1887 

Warrants issued in 1888 for ordinary current expenses. 

Transfer to State School moneys in 1S8S 

Balance ^ 

Totals 

Balance in State Revenue fund January 1, 1^89 



Dr. 



$1,856,208 63 

575,219 80 

1,447,547 51 

586,335 57 

15,937 94 



$4,481,249 45 



Cr. 



$347,700 21 

1,979,565 33 

135,058 11 

5,000 00 

172.842 37 

1,726,434 03 

103,649 40 

5,000 00 

6,000 00 



§4,481,249 45 



$15,937 94 



STATE INTEREST FUND. 



From receipts into this fund, the interest on the public debt has 
been promptly paid, and the sum of $1,298,705.41 transferred to the 
State Sinking fund, and used in the redemption of State bonds, except 
balance of $330,025.78 transferred December 31, 1888, under provisions 
of section 7626, R. S., 1879. 



6 



AUDITOE'S EEPOET. 



INTEREST PAID DURING THE EIGHT YEARS ENDING DEC. 31, 1888 



Interest on Bonded Debt. 



Year. 



1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

Total 



Amount. 

$988,680 
958,500 
896,820 
750,960 
708,106 
678,360 
610,620 
551,560 
$6,143,606 



Int. on School & Seminary Certificates, 



Year. 



1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 . ... 

1888 

Total 



Amount. 

$181,680 
181, 6SD 
181,680 
191,905 
202,130 
212,610 
212,960 
213,460 
$1,578,105 



STATE SINKI]^G FUND. 

Five hundred and fifty-three six per cent, bonds of $1,000 each, 
were paid out of the Sinking fund, during the year 1887, and 449 do. 
during the year 1888, making a total payment out of the Sinking fund 
of $1,002,000 during the years 1887 and 1888. On December 31, 1888, 
the sum of $330,025.78 was transferred from the Interest fund to the 
State Sinking fund, and is now in the State treasury to the credit of 
that fund, to be applied in the redemption of outstanding bonds matur- 
ing in 1889. 

BONDS RETIRED IN 1887. 

The following outstanding 6 per cent, matured bonds were retired 
during the year out of the Sinking fund and from the proceeds of the 
sales of 5-20 year 3 1-2 per cent. Interest Funding bonds : 



1,331 

1,047 

978 

414 

3,770^ 



Missouri Pacific Railroad State bonds 

St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad State bonds 

Hannibal & St. Joe Railroad State bonds 

North Missouri Railroad State bonds 

Total 6 per cent, bonds retired in 1887 



$1,331,000 

1,047,000 

978,000 

414,000 



$3,770,000 



AUDITOE'S EEPOET. 



BONDS RETIRED IN 1888. 



2,48:^ 
449 



2,932 



* * Consolidation " (matured January 1 , 1888) 

North Missouri Railroad State bonds 

Total retired In 1888 

Total amount of 6 per cent, bonds retired In 1887 and 1888. . 



$2,483,000 
449,000 



$2,932,000 



$6.702,au0 



BONDS REDEEMED OUT OF THE SINKING FUND. 



In 1881— 503 bonds 

1882—2,028 bonds 

1883—1,331 bonds 

1884r--813 bonds 

Total 

In 1885 & 1886-1,276 bonds 

1887— 553 bonds 

1888—449 bonds 

Total 

For 1881-2-3-4 

1885-6-7-8 

Total for eight years. 



$ri03,000 

2,028,000 

1,331,000 

813,000 



$4,675,000 

$1,276,000 

553,000 

449,000 



$2,278,000 



$4,675,000 
2,278,000 



$6,953,000 



FUNDING ACT OP 1885. 

Under an act of the General Assembly approved March 31, 1885, 
the Fand Commissioners were authorized to issue $7,000,000 in 5-20- 
jear Funding bonds at not exceediug four per cent, interest. To meet 
the outstanding bonds of the State, maturing in the years 1836, 1887 
and 1888, in excess of the resources of the Sinking fund, these bonds 
have all been issued and sold, and the proceeds arising from the 
sales have all been promptly applied in the redemption of outstanding 
bonds maturing in 1886, 1887 and 1888. As provided in the Funding 
Act, $1,350,000 were issued in 1886, and $5,650,000 were issued and 
sold in 1887. 

The $7,000,000 of Funding bonds are all of the denomination of 
$1,000 each, and bear interest at the rate of 3 1-2 per cent, per annum, 



8 



auditor's bepobt. 



interest payable semi-annually on the first day of January and first day 
of Jnly of each year. Principal and interest payable at the National 
Bank of Commerce in the city of New York. 



STATE DEBT. 



OUTSTANDING DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1889. 



143 
69 
143 
187 
60 
20 
34 
35 
36 
25 
39 
26 
27 
41 
36 



Missouri Pacific bonds, March 7 

Cairo & Falton bonds, April 16 

St. Louis & Iron Mountain bonds, May 16. 

Cairo & Fulton bonds, July 25 , 

Platte Country bonds, August 4 

Platte Country bonds , October 10 

Platte Country bonds, November 22 

Platte Country bonds, November 23 

Platte Country bonds, November 24 

Platte Country bonds, December 7 

Platte Country bonds, January 26 ... 

Platte Country bonds, February 22 

Platte Country bonds, March 6 

Platte Country bonds, May 17 

Platte Country bonds, June 18 



21 Platte Country bonds, August 7. 



28 

108 

77 

80 

162 

20S 

409 

24 

94 

66 

336 

11 

7,000 



Platte Country bonds, November 17 

Northwestern Lunatic Asylum bonds, July 1. . 

State University bonds. July 1 

Bank Stock Refunding bonds , April 1 

Hannibal and St. Joe Renewal bonds, July 1.. . 

State Funding bonds, July 1 

State Funding bonds , January 1 

Penitentiary Indemnity bonds, April 1 

Hannibal & St. Joe Renewal bonds, July 1 

Hannibal & St. Joe Renewal bonds, January 1. 

Hannibal & St. Joe Renewal bonds, July 1 

Hannibal & St. Joe Renewal bonds, July 1 

Outstanding 3} per cent, bonds 



$143,000 

69,000 

143,000 

187,000 

60,000 

20,000 

34,000 

35,000 

36,000 

25,000 

39,000 

26,000 

27,000 

41,000 

36,00;) 

21,000 

28,000 

108,000 

77,000 

80,000 

162.(»0O 

208,000 

409,000 

24,000 

94,000 

66,000 

336,000 

11,000 

7,000,000 



AUDITOE'S EBPOBT. 



d- 



OUTSTANDING DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1889— Ck)NTiNUED. 



Six per cent. State School Fund certificate of indebtedness. . 
Five per cent. State School Fund certificates of indebtedness 
Six per cent. State Seminary Fund certificate of indebtedness 
Five percent. State Seminary Fund certificates of indebtedness 
Total interest-bearing debt January 1, 1889 



$2,909,000 

225,000 

122,000' 

413,000 

$13,197,000. 



The bonded debt January 1, 1889, amounts, to $9,525,000.00, and 
matures as follows : 



In 1889 
1890 
1892 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1906 
1907 
1908 



Total bonded debt January 1, 1889. 



$742,000 

218,000- 

185, OOa 

450,000 

627,000 

392,000 

11,000 

l,350,00a 

2,713,000 

2,937,000- 



$9,525,000- 



STATE SCHOOL FUND. 

The State School fund amounts to $3,136,206.74, and is invested^ 
as follows : 



One 30-year 6 per cent, certificate of indebtedness 
One 20-year 5 per cent, certificate of indebtedness 

Balance in State treasury ; 

Total 



$2,909,000 00 

225,000 00' 

2,206 74 



$3,136,206 74f 



10 auditor's bbpoet. 



The local School fand for 1888 ainoants to 

The State School fand amoants to 

Making an aggregate fund of 



$7,016,331 84 
3,136,206 74 



$10,152,538 58 



The interest on the State School fund and one-third of the ordi- 
nary receipts into the Eevenne fund apportioned among the several 
•connties for the maintenance of free schools amounted in 1887 to $755,- 
534.74, in 1888 to $772,125.57. 

The State Seminary fund amounts to $535,000, as follows : 



One 6 per cent, certificate of indehtedness 

Eleven 5 per cent, certiflcates, each of various amounts, aggregating 
Total 



$122,000 00 

413,000 00 

$535,000 00 



EXECUTORS' AND ADMINISTRATORS' FUND. 

This fund is derived from escheats and from the payments by ex- 
ecutors and administrators into the State treasury of the shares of 
legatees and distributees which are not claimed within one year after 
final settlement of the estates of deceased persons. The balance re- 
maining to the credit of this fund amounts to $15,596.21. 

SWAMP LAND INDExMNITY FUND. 

The Register of Lands has received from the general government 
on account of swamp land indemnity, during the years 1887 and 1888 
^16,209.79 cash, and 7,857 acres land indemnity. Estimating the land at 
$1.25 per acre, the receipts from this source would amount to $26,031.65. 

The total amount of cash indemnity received from the general 
^government up to this date is $191,135.43, and land indemnity awarded 
to the State for the benefit of the several counties amounts to 71,664 
acres. The money collected has been paid into the State treasury and 
paid over to the counties entitled to it, as provided by sections 6174-5. 

INSURANCE DEPARTMENT FUND. 

In 1887 and 1888 fees collected and paid into the State treasury 
by the Superintendent of this department amounted to $40,000. After 
paying all expenses a balance of $7,976.28 remained to the credit of this 
fund on January 1, 1889. 



auditor's report. 11 



STATE PBNITBNTIAEY. 

This inBtitation is one of the largest in the United States, the total 
number of convicts on January 1, 1889, being 1,821. In addition to 
$350,000 earnings of penitentiary appropriated for the support of same, 
the preceding General Assembly appropriated $140,000 for pay of 
officers, guards, and employes ; also the sum of $110,000 was appro- 
priated for improvements and repairs. 

Total amount appropriated for support, pay of officers, guards, em- 
ployes, improvement and repairs for 1887 and 1888, $600,000. 

FISCAL YEAR. 

The fiscal year ending on the 31st day of December greatly retards 
the completion and diminishes the value of the Auditor's report, so far 
as its usefulness to the General Assembly is concerned. The fiscal 
year should commence October 1 and close on the 30th of Septem- 
ber. Under this arrangement each appropriation could be closed and 
the balances remaining in the several funds set forth in sufficient time 
to allow the report to be printed and in the hands of those desiring the 
information it contains, several weeks before the time appointed for the 
convening of the General Assembly. This change would not necessarily 
conflict with any part of the revenue law, and would be of very great 
advantage to the Auditor, as at this season there is no extraordinary 
press of business. 

DRAMSHOP LICENSES. 

The following tables will show the effect of high license on the 
revenue collected from dramshops : 

1888. 



Namber of dramshops July 4, 1888 

^Number of drag stores having dramshop licenses 

Number of grocery and other dealers having licenses 

Total number of dramshops in the State July 4, 1888 

State licenses paid by dramshop keepers for the year ending July 
4,1888 

County licenses paid by dramshop keepers for same period 

City and town licenses paid by dramshop keepers for same period. 

Total licenses paid for all purposes in 1888 



3,485 
4 



3,489 



$155,382 96 

1,492,063 66 

194,697 53 



$1,842,044 15 



12 



auditor's report. 



1886. 



Number of dramshops July 4, 1886 

Number of druggists having dramshop licenses 

Number of grocery and other dealers having dramshop licenses. . . 

Total number of dramshops in the State July 4, 1S86 

State licenses paid by dramshop Iceepers for the year ending July 
4,1886 

I 
I 

County licenses paid by dramshop keepers for the rear ending July 
4, 1886 /. 

City and town licenses paid by dramshop keepers for the year end- 
ing July 4, 1886 

Total State, county, city and town licenses paid for the year 
ending July 4, 1886 



2,837 

a 
1 



2,S8I 



$161,477 74 

1,382,116 63 

308,613 89 

$1,842,208 26 



1882. 



Number of dramshops July 4, 1882 

Number of druggists having dramshop licenses 

Number of grocery and other dealers having dramshop licenses. . . 

Number of wine and beer houses 

Total number of dramshops and wine and beer houses in the 
State July 4, 1882 

State licenses paid by dramshop keepers for the year ending July 
4, 1882 

Count V licenses paid by dramshop keepers for the year ending July 
4/1882 

State licenses paid by wine and beer-house keepers for the year 
ending July 4, 1882 

County licenses paid by wine and beer-house keepers for the year 
ending July 4, 1882 

City and town licenses paid by dramshop, wine and beer-house 
keepers for the year ending July 4, 1882 

I'otal State, county, city and town licenses paid for the year 
end ing July 4, 1882 



3,360 

35 

74 

132 



3,601 



9186,669 75 

356,136 26 

1,917 27 

2,597 02 

152,075 26 



$699,395 56 



The licenses collected iu St. Louis for each year are reported as 
county licenses. 



auditor's bepoet. 



13 



The following table will show the disbursements made in 1887 and 
1888 for the maintenance of public schools and other educational in- 
etitutions : 



Pablio schools— One-third of the State revenue appropriated for 
1887 and 1888 

Pablic schools — Interest on the State school fund appropriated for 
1887 and 1888 

State University— Appropriation for maintenance in 1887 and 1888 

State University— Interest on State seminary fund for 1887 and 
1888 



State University— Improvements and repairs of. 



Mlsssouri School of Mines and Metallurgy— Maintenance 1887 and 
1888 



Normal School, First district— Support of 

Normal School, First district — Repairs and Improvement of.. 

Normal School, Second district— Support of 

Normal School, Third district— Support of 

Normal School, Third district— Repairs and Improvement of. 
Liincoln Institute— Support of 



Total amount disbursed in 1887 and 1883 for edueational 
purposes 



$1,161,555 37 

366,104 94 
65,300 00 

54,595 00 
34,161 00 

15,000 00 
25,000 00 

3,118 50 
25,000 00 
20,000 00 

1,000 00 
18,000 00 

$1,788,834 81 



DISBURSEMENTS IN 1887 AND 1888 FOR THE MAINTENANCE OF 

CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS. 



C^unatic Asylum No. 1— Support of 

Liunatic Asylum No. 1— Salary of Superintendent and officers. . . . 

Xiunatic Asylum No. 1 — Repairs and improvements of 

Liunatlc Asylum No. 2— Support of 

Lunatic Asylum No. 2— Salary of Superintendent and officers.... 

Lunatic Asylum No. 2— Repairs and improvements of 

Lunatic Asylum No. 3 — Support of 

Lunatic Asylum No. 3— Salary of Superintendent and officers 

Lunatic Asylum No. 3— Extension of wings, etc 

St. Louis Insane Asylum— Support of 

Missouri, Institute for the education of deaf and dumb— support of 

Missouri Institute for the education of deaf and dumb— Salary of 
Superintendent, officers and teachers 



$70,000 00 
19,200 00 
94,400 00 
70,000 00 
20,200 00 
36,500 00 
35,000 00 
14,127 00 

149,000 00 
70,000 00 
70,000 00 

24,500 00 



14 



auditor's bepobt. 



DISBURSEMEN^TS FOR CHARITABLE INSTITDTIONS-^CoyxiNUKD. 



Missouri Institute for the education of the deaf and dumb — Re- 
pairs and improvements of 

Missouri School for the blind— Support bf , . . . . 

Missouri School for the blind—Salary of Superintendent, officers 
and employes 

Total amount disbursed 

1 



12,600 00 
30,000 00 

16,000 00 



$731,427 00 



DISBURSEMENTS IN 1S87 AND 1888 ON ACCOUNT OF THE ENFORCE- 
MENT OF THE CRIMINAL LAWS. • 



For costs in criminal cases 

For the apprehension of criminals and suppression of outlawry. . 

Missouri Penitentiary — Support of, including salary of officers and 
employes ". 

Missouri Penitentiary— Extension of walls, etc 

Missouri Penitentiary— Library of 

Total amount disbursed 



$620,097 71 
13,999 S9 

140,000 00 

27,258 46 

oOO 00 



$802,756 06 



PUBLIC PKINTIXG AND BINDING. 

In compliance with an act of the General Assembly, approved 
March 28, 1885, the Commissioners of Public Printing, on the 18th day 
of May, 1886, entered into a contract with the Tribune Printing Com- 
pany of Jefferson City for executing the several classes of public print- 
ing for the term of six years from and after the first day of July, 1886. 

The i)ublic printing is divided into three classes, and each class is 
let under a separate contract. Comprised in the first class is the 
printing of all bills for the General Assembly, together with such reso- 
lutions and other matters as may be ordered to be printed in bill form^ 
and the printing of all reports, communications and other documents 
ordered by the General Assembly, except such as shall be printed in 
pamphlet form. Class second includes the printing of the House and 
Senate journal, appendixes, laws, and all reports, communications and 
other documents ordered by the General Assembly, or by the Execu- 
tive departments to be printed in pamphlet form, together with the vol- 
umes of public documents. Class third comprises the printing of all 



auditor's bepobt. 



15 



blanks, circulars and other work necessary for the use of the Execu^ 
live department, except such as shall be printed in pamphlet form. 

The contract for each class of the public printing was awarded to 
the Tribune Printing Company on the following terms : 

Mrst Glass. — For composition, per one thousand ems, twenty-five 
cents'; for press-work, per quire of twenty-four impressions of a side or 
page, five cents. 

Second Class. — For composition, per one thousand ems, forty-five 
cents ; for press-work, per token, forty cents. 

Third Class. — For composition, per one thousand ems, twenty-five 
cents ; for press-work, per quire, five cents. 

TAXABLE WEALTH. 

The assessed valuation of the several classes of property for the 
years 1887 and 1888 will be found in the following tables : 

VALUATION OF PROPERTY JUNK 1, 1886, FOR THE TAXES OF 1877. 



Real estate, acres, 39,123,054 

Horses, 714,816 

Mules, 219,668 

Asses and Jeonets, 4,504 

Neat cattle,.2,277,222 

Sheep, 942,350 

Hogs, 2, 616 ,024 

All othor-live stock, 16,149 

Money, notes and bonds 

Brokers and exchange dealers 

Corporate companies 

All other personal property 

Total personal property 

Railroad companies 

Bridge companies 

Telegpraph companies 

Total assessment for the taxes of 1887 



$26,504,763 00 

9,^2,977 00 

248,388 00 

27,4-20,617 00 

908,639 00 

3,911,214 00 

20c, 453 00 

52,901,676 00 

3,113,406 00 

16,742,247 00 

40,971,029 00 



$519,771,078 OO 



182,070,408 OO 

45,980,625 64 

2,900,000 OO 

665,701 64 



$751,387,813 28 



16 



auditor's bepobt. 



FOR THE TAXES OF 1888. 



Real estate, number of acres, 39,635,371 

BorBes, number, 746,728 

Mules, number, 220,346 

Asses and jennets, number, 5,035 

l^eat cattle, number, 2,467,623 

Sbeep, number, 816,247 

Hogs, number, 2,343,748, 

-Other live stock, number, 16,117 , 

Money, notes and bonds. 

Brokers and exchange dealers 

-Corporate companies 

All other personal property 

Total personal property 

Railroad companies 

Bridge companies 

Telegraph companies , 

Total assessment for taxes of 1888.. 



$27,079,336 00 

9,086,916 00 

297,146 00 

25,429,490 00 

868,177 00 

3,921,134 00 

335,755 00 

56,054,180 00 

4,208,747 00 

16,760,375 00 

42,442,763 00 



$662,946,976 00 



185,474,107 00 

47,705,349 83 

2,900,000 00 

665,812 55 

$789,692,245 38 



As provided by section 7564, 1 have the honor to submit the follow- 
ing estimates : 

ESTIMATED RECEIPTS. 



Keceipts into the State Revenue fund Arom all sources in 1889 and 1890. 

Receipts into the State Interest fund from all sources in 1889 and 1890 

Total receipts 



$3,850,000 

3,100,000 

$6,950,000 



auditor's report. 



17 



STATE INTEREST FUND. 



Estimated expenditures. 



For payment of interest on State bonds amoantiog to $9,525,000, 



For payment of interest on Missouri six per cent, consolidated cer- 
tificate of indebtedness for $2,909,000, held in trust for the State 
School fund 



For payment of interest on Miasonri five per cent, certificates of in- 
debtedness for $225,000, held in trust for the State School fund. . 

For the payment of interest on the Missouri consolidated six per 
cent, certificates of indebtedness for $122,000, held in trust for the 
State Seminary fund 



For the payment of interest on Missouri five per cent, certificates of 
indebtedness for $407,000, held in trust for the State Seminary 
fund 



For payment of interest on Missouri five per cent, certificates of in- 
debtedness for $6,000, held in trust for State Seminary fund« (be- 
queathed by Hon. Jas. S. Rollins) 



For the. payment of commissions to the National Bank of Commerce, 
City of 2)ew York, for services as fiscal agent of the State 

For contingent expenses of Fund Commissioners, including postage, 
expressage and other necessary expenses 



For State Sinking fund, to be used in redemption of bonds, 
Total 



$793,000 

349,080 
22,500 

14,640 

40,700 

600 

2,000 

2,000 
1,876,680 



$3,100,000 



ESTIMATES 

FOR CURRENT EXPENSES OF THE STATE GOVERNMENT FOR THE 

I'EARS 1889 AND 1890. 



Appropriations. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

One-third of the ordinary receipts into the State Revenue Fund — 

For cost of assessing and collecting the revenue, including contingent 
expenses of the State Board of Equalization 

For payment of costs in criminal cases 

CIVIL OFFICERS — KXECrTrV'B DKPARTMENT. 

For salary of Governor 

For salary of the Governor's Private Secretary 

PF— 2 



Amounts. 



$1,200,000 

300,000 
550,000 

10,000 
4,000 



18 



auditor's bepobt. 



ESTIMATES— CONTIKUED. 



Appropriations. 



AmoantB. 



JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT. 

For salaries of five judges of the Supreme Ck>urt 

For salaries of three Judges of the St. Louis Court of Appeals 

For salaries of three judges of the Kansas City Ck)urt of Appeals. . . . 

For salaries of thirty-four judges of Circuit Court 

For salary of the judge of the St. Louift Criminal Court 

For salary of the judge of the Criminal Court of Jackson county 

For salary of the judge of the Criminal Court of Buchanan county. . 



For salary of the judge of the Criminal Court of the Sixth Circuit 
and Johnson county 

For salary of the judge of the Capo .Girardeau Court of Common 
Pleas 



For salary of the Attorney-General 

For salary of the clerk in the office of the Attorney-GenerBl . 

For salary of the Circuit Attorney of St. Louis 

For salary of the State Librarian, , 

For salary of the Assistant State Librarian 

For salary of the Marshal of the St. Louis Court of Appeals. 
For salary of the janitor of the St. Louis Court of Appeals. . . 



STATE DEPARTMENT. 



For salary of the Secretary of State 

For salary of clerks in the office of Secretary of State. 

TRKASURY DEPARTMENT. 



For salary of State Treasurer 

For salaries of the clerks in the office of State Treasurer. 

auditor's DEPARTMENT. 

For salary of State Auditor 

For salaries of the clerks in the office of State Auditor. . . 



DJCPARTMENT OF EDUCA'nON. 

For salary of Superintendent of Public Schools 



For salary of the clerk In the office of the Superintendent of Public 
Schools 



$45,000 

33,000 

21,000 

136,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

3,ooa 

2,000 
6,000 
4,000 

750 
1,SOO 

COO 
3,000 
1,200 

6,000 
17,000 

6,000 
7,000 

6,000 
16,000 

6,000 
3,000 



AUDITOB'S BEPOET. 



19 



ESTIMATES— CoNTiNUKD. 



Appropriations. 

LAND DEPARTMENT. 

For salary of Register of Lands 

For salaries of the clerks in the office of Register of Lands 

RAILROAD DEPARTMENT. 

For salaries of three Railroad Commissioners 

For salary of the secretary of the Board of Railroad Commissioners. . 

MIIJTIA DEPIRTMEST. 

For salary of Adjatant-Oeneral 

For salary of clerk in the office of Adjutant-General 

PEXAL DEPARTMENT. 

For pay of officers, gaards and employes of Missouri Penitentiary and 
ordinary repairs 

Improvements of Penitentiary 

For library of Missouri Penitentiary 

B0Y8* INDUSTRIAL HOME. 

For salaries of officers 

For contingent expenses 

GIRLS* INDUSTRIAL HOME. 

For salaries of officers 

For contingent expenses 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

For salary of Commissioner of the Permanent Seat of Government.. . 

ELEEMOSYNARY INSTITUTIONS. 

For Lunatic Asylum No. 1 at Fulton , support of 

For salaries of superintendent and officers 

For printing and ordinary repairs 

For Lunatic Asylum No. 2 at St. Joseph, support of 

For salaries of superintendent and officers 

For printing and ordinary repairs 

For Lunatic Asylum No. 3 at Nevada, support of 

For salaries of superintendent and officers 

For ordinary repairs 



Amounts. 



$6,000 
6,000 

18,000 
3,000 

4,000 
8,000 



130,000 

60,000 

1,000 

5,600 
10,000 

6,100 
10,000 

700 

70,000 
17,800 

8,000 
70,000 
20,2u0 

8,000 
70,000 
19,300 

3,000 



20 



auditor's bepoet. 



ESTIMATES— Continued. 



Appropriations. 



For support of the indigent insane in the St. Louis Insane Asylum.. . 

JnsSOUltl INSTITUTE FOR THE EDUCATION OF THE DEAF AND DUMB. 

For support and education of the deaf and dumb 

For salaries of superintendent, officers and teachers 

For ordinary repairs 



Amount. 



MISSOURI SCHOOL FOR IHE BLIND. 

For support and education of the blind 

For salaries of superintendent, officers and employes 

For ordinary repairs 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 

For maintenance of State University at Columbia 

■ 

For Agricultural College barn 

For maintenance of School of Mines and Metallurgy 

NORMAL SCHOOLS, ETC. 

For First District Normal School at Kirksville, support of 

For Second District Normal School at Warrensburg, support of 

For Third District Normal School, Cape Girardeau, support of 

For Lincoln Institute at Jefferson City, support of. 

For repairs and furniture 

For contingent expenses of Governor's office 

For contingent expenses of Secretary of State 

For contingent expenses of the State Treasurer 

For contingent expenses of the State Auditor 

For contingent expenses of the Superintendent of Public Schools.. . 

For contingent expenses of the Register of Lands 

For contingent expenses of the Attorney-General 

For contingent expenses of the Railroad Commissioners 

For contingent expenses of the Adjutant-General 

For contingent expenses of the Supreme Court, including pay of 
marshal, janitor, night watchman, insurance of library, gas, 
fuel, postage and expressage 

For the General Contingent fund, including pay of janitors for care 
of capitol building and grounds, fuel, gas, electric lights, engi- 
neer, helper and night watchman ', , 



70,000 

70,000 ^ 
24,500 
8,000 

30,000 

16,000 

5,000 

70,000 

3,000 

15,000 

25,000 
25,0C0 
20,000 
18.0M) 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

1,500 

2,000 

1,000 
SOO 

1,000 

1,200 

1,20-^ 

10,500 
11,700 



auditor's bbport. 



21 



ESTIMATES— CoTiNUKD . 



Appropriations. 



For traveling expenses of the Superintendent of Pubiic Schools 

For distribution of blanks and laws to school officers. 

For contingent expenses Kansas City Court of Appeals 

For contingent expenses St. Louis Court of Appeals, including rent. 

PUBUC BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 

For ordinary repairs State capltol 

For ordinary repairs of State armory 

For ordinary repairs of Supreme Court building 

For improving grounds Governor's mansion 

For keeping State cemetery in good condition and repair. 

For current expenses of the Governor's mansion, Including pay for 
Janitor, fuel, gas and ordinary repairs 



For improvement capitol grounds 

FOR PUBLIC PRINTING. 

For printing reports and documents ordered by the General Assem- 
bly, including reports of Board of Agriculture, Horticulture. 
Railroad Commissioners, Curators of the University and Bureau 
of Labor Statistics 



Amount. 



For printing for Executive departments, 
For printing laws and joarnals 



For publishing decisions of the Supreme Court, including salary of 
official reporter 



For publishing decisions of the Kansas City and St. Louis Courts of 
Appeals 



For paper for State printing 

For stationery for State departments 

For the distribution of laws and journals 

For the apprehension of criminals and the suppression of outlawry.. 

For the purchase of books ordered by judges of supreme court for 
State library 

For support and maintenance of Fish Commission 

For salary of the secretary of the board of Fish Commissioners 

For expenses of State Board of Agriculture, other than printing — 

For salary of secretary of Board of Agriculture 

For salary of treasurer of Board of Agriculture 



SI, 000 
1,000 

10,000 
8,000 

2,000 
100 
300 
600 
100 

6,000 
2,000 



15,000 

12,000 

7,000 

20,000 

17,500 

20,000 

6,000 

3,000 

15,000 

2,500 
5,000 
1,000 
6,000 
2,000 
80 



22 



AUDITOR'S BEPORT. 



ESTIMATES— Continued. 



Appropriations. 



For expenses of State Board of Horticulture, other than printing.. . . 

For expenses of State Board of Health 

For salaries of the Labor Commissioner and clerk and expenses of 
the Bureau of Labor Statistics, other than printing 



For pay of pensioner 



For koeping 4crap book bond register required by section 7G32, R. S., 
and purchase of scrap books 

For expenses Incident to