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Report 

of the 

Governor of Oklahoma 

to the 

Secretary of the Interior 



1903. 



mm 



Washington: 

Gk)vemment Printing Office. 

1903. 



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CONTENTS, 



Page. 

Altitudes 83 

Agriculture 51 

Agricultural and Mechanical Col- 
lege 29 

Average temi)erature 65 

Average precipitation 65 

Building and loan 94 

Building statistics 84 

Banks 90 

Bank statements 91 

County income 8 

Common school graduates 20 

Common school enrollment 21 

Colored Agricultural and Normal 

University 35 

Chilocco School 37 

Churches 99 

Courts 101 

County statistics - 115 

Commerce 47 

Crop conditions 61 

Cities 83 

Dairying. 55 

Development of cities 84 

Deaf mutes 105 

Dentistrv 106 

Elevators 88 

Experiment station 59 

Farm lands, sale of 58 

Fraternal organizations 101 

Forests and lumber 69 

Flouring mills 87 

Fund balances 11 

General revenue fund 9 

Geology and natural history 81 

Higher institutions 26 

Horticulture 56 

Horses and mules 68 

Indian boarding schools 38 

Insane 103 

Indians 70 

Immigration .^ . . . 89 

Investments 92 

Insurance 94 

Insurance tables 96 

Juvenile offenders 103 

Killing frosts 65 

Land districts 12 

Land taxation * . . 59 

Labor supply 70 

Legislation m 76 

Live stock 66 

Live stock association 68 

Lumber and forests 69 

Mission schools 38 

Medical practice 106 



Paga 

Manufacturing 86 

Military roster 109 

Mining 69 

Northwestern Normal 32 

National Guard 107 

Newspapers 112 



Official roster 

Oklahoma 

Opening to settlement 

Other schools 

Public schools 

Public school enrollment. . . 
Public school attendance. . . 

Public school receipts 

Public school expenditures. 

Preparatory school 

Population 

Public lands 



114 

4 

5 

37 

18 

22 

22 

23 

23 

28 

5 

12 

Penitentiary 102 

Pharmacy 105 

55 
75 
38 
42 
45 
40 
40 
48 
58 
66 
67 
11 
14 
16 
5 

24 
25 
34 



Poultry 

Public buildings 

Railways 

Railway buildings . . . 

Railways chartered . . 

Railroad mileage 

Ralroad assessments . 

Shipment tables 

Sale of farm lands . . . 

Stock raising 

Sanitary commission. 

Settlement of lands . . 

School lands 

School-land funds . . . 

Statehood 

Schoolhouses 

School fund 

I Southwestern Normal 

I Telegraph and telephone 51 

I Town-property assessments 84 

Territorial library 102 



Taxable property 

Taxable valuations 

Taxes 

Territorial tax levy 

Territorial indebtedness 

Teachers' salaries 

Teachers' certificates 

Territorial Normal 

The blind 

'TIniversity 

Undeveloped resources 

Various funds 

Wichita Mountain minerals 

Weather Bureau 

World's Fair 



7 

7 

8 

8 

9 

24 

25 

31 

105 

20 

80 

10 

69 

60 

111 



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REPORT 

OF THE 

GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



Territory of Oklahoma, 

Executive Department, 
Guthrie^ Okla,^ Septmnher 15^ 1903. 
Sir: In compliance with your communication dated June 27, 1903, 
I take pleasure in transmitting to j^ou herewith my report of the 
affairs, progress, and development of the Territory of Oklahoma for 
the year ended June 30, 1903. 

Very respectfully, T. B. Ferguson, 

Governor. 
Hon. E. A. Hitchcock, 

Secretary of the Interim^ Washington^ D. C. 



A perusal of the following pages will disclose the fact that the Ter- 
ritory of Oklahoma has an area of 38,830 square miles, is subdivided 
into 26 counties, and has an aggregate population of 650,000. She 
has 178,964 school children and 2,192 district schoolhouses valued at 
$1,347,257; also 7 higher institutions of learning, having a total 
enrollment of 2,818 last year; a school fund arising from the leasing 
of school land amounting to $181,8^8.88, which was apportioned duHng 
the year. 

Oklahoma leads in railway building, having completed over 1,000 
miles of new railroad, and on March 1 had over 2,500 miles of main 
track and grade completed. The assessed value of the ei^ht lines of 
railway is $7,851,187. The Territorial tax levy was 6i mills and the 
assessed value of taxable property was $84,134,472, as returned by the 
assessors, which was on a basis of about one-fourth actual value. The 
Territorial indebtedness is only $461,766.43. There were 7,451,918 
acres of land returned for taxation. 

Oklahoma has 232 Territorial banks having a combined capitaliza- 
tion of $2,026,330, with deposits of over $7,000,000, and an average 
reserve of 52 per cent, being nearly four times the legal requirement. 
There are 79 national baiiks, whose combined capital amounts to 
$2,792,500; the deposits therein are over $10,000,000, and they have 
an average reserve of 30 per cent. 

There are 193 licensed dentists, 403 registered pharmacists, and 
1,200 practicing* ph3"sicians. 

Oklahoma has 326 prisoners kept under contract in the Kansas Pen- 
itentiary, at a cost to the Territory of $45,742.62. There were 409 

3 



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4 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

insane cared for under contract, at a cost of $74,909.17 last year. Also 
64 deaf mutes cared for and educated, at a cost of $15,548.53, 
There are 243 weekly newspapers published in the Territory. The 

Eublic law library located at Guthrie is valued at $50,000. The Okla- 
oma National Guard is composed of 945 enlisted men. There is a 
church membership of nearly 100,000. There are 60 flouring mills 
whose combined capacity is over 10,000 barrels per day ; 280 grain 
elevators having a combined capacity of 3,525,000 bushels. This 
year's wheat crop was 36,000,000 bushels, and the corn is estimated 
about the same as last year — 65,000,000 bushels. 

Oklahoma's commerce amounted to over 27,000 carloads of various 
commodities shipped into and over 35,600 carloads shipped out of the 
Territory. 

There has been a phenomenal growth of all cities and towns, as indi- 
cated bj'^ statistics given. 

There are undeveloped resources in the immense gypsum deposits^ 
which are estimated to be over 125,000,000,000 tons; also in moun- 
tains of red granite and limestone beds. 

There are yet over 3,000,000 acres of vacant land subject to home- 
stead. 

OKLAHOMA. 

The portion of country now called Oklahoma was included in the 
Louisiana purchase and embraces some 24,000,000 acres of as fertile 
and productive land as can be found in any country. 

Oklahoma is situated between the thirty-fourth and thirty-seventh 

f)arallels north latitude and principally between 96^ 30' and 100^ west 
ongitude. Kansas bounds it on the north, Indian Territon^ on the 
east, and Texas on the south and west. That portion of the Territory 
called Beaver County was once known as ^' No Man's Land," and while 
only 32 miles wide extends westward 160 miles from the boundary of 
original Oklahoma, along the south lines of Kansas and Colorado, to 
New Mexico. 

By comparison Oklahoma is as large as the combined area of the 
States of belaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and 
New Jersey. It is larger than either Indiana, Maine, or West Vir- 
ginia, and nearly the size of Ohio. Its extreme length from north to 
south is 210 miles and extreme width from east to west 365 miles. 

According to the United States census of 1900 the population of 
Oklahoma was greater in proportion to area than that of 12 other 
States. Since the census was taken the population has nearly doubled 
in number. 

The climate of Oklahoma is similar to that of other States in this 
latitude, as northern Texas, Tennessee, and North Carolina. Portions 
of the Territory have been opened to settlement on six difl^erent occa- 
sions, one county added from the State of Texas and one made from 
No Man's Land. The altitude ranges from 3,900 feet in Beaver 
County, in the extreme northwest, to 776 feet in Payne County, in 
the east. The country as a whole is well watered, there being many 
small streams and rivers, the general course of which is to the south- 
east. Certain portions of the Territory are heavily timbered, and 
some 30 varieties of wood are found. 

The wonderful progress made by our citizens is due not only to their 
energy and activity, but to the great fertility of soil, favorable cli- 



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BEPOET OF THE GOVEBNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 5 

mate, abundance of rainfall, and the resultant bounteous crops of 
fruits and cereals. Oklahoma's natural resources are many and varied, 
and as yet have been but little developed. In the space of fourteen 
years the wealth of the inhabitants has steadily increased, until at the 
present time it approximates $400,000,000. 

In intelligence, energy, industry, and general progressiveness our 
inhabitants are the equals of any other Commonwealth. Oklahoma, 
for fourteen years under a Territorial form of government, with her 
650,000 inhabitants, seven Territorial educational institutions, indus- 
trial achievements, railway mileage, growing cities, extensive com- 
merce, and fertile soil, compares favorably with States that were 
admitted into the Union fifty years ago. 

OPENING OF OKLAHOMA TO SETTLEMENT. 

What is now known as Oklahoma was not all opened to the home- 
steader at one time, but on six different occasions portions were, by 
act of Congress, thrown open to settlement. The first lands to be 
occupied were some 3,000,000 acres lying in the center of the Terri- 
tory, opened April 22, 1889. The Sac and Fox and Pottawatomie 
reservations, containing 1,282,434 acres, were opened in September, 
1891. The Cheyenne and Arapahoe reservations, comprising 4,297,771 
acres, were opened in April, 1892. The Cherokee Strip, containing 
6,014,239 acres, was opened on September 16, 1893. The Kickapoo 
Reservation, comprising 206,662 acres, was opened in 1895. The 
Kiowa, Comanche, Apache, and Wichita reservations, comprising 
about 4,000,000 acres, were opened on August 6, 1901. There was 
also added in 1890 that portion of country known as No Man's Land, 
containing 3,681,000 acres, and now called Beaver County. 

In 1896 Greer County was acquired from Texas by decision of the 
Supreme Court of the United States and added to the Territory of 
Oklahoma. 

STATEHOOD. 

Oklahoma is entitled to statehood — entitled to it now. There are in 
the Territory 650,000 intelligent American citizens who are deprived of 
the right of self-government. A conservative estimate of the wealth of 
Oklahoma places it at $400,000,000. There are seven educational insti- 
tutions of higher learning under the control of the Territory, besides 
numerous high schools and colleges under the control of religious 
denominations. Our people are in every respect entitled to that which 
is dear to the heart of every progressive American — the right to gov- 
ern themselves. 

Against this proposition there can be no logical objection. Okla- 
homa has the intellect, the wealth, the moral force, the energ}'^, the 
natural resources, the development already achieved, and the promise 
of a splendid future suflScient to justly entitle her to careful consider- 
ation and Congressional action. No logical reason can be urged against 
her early admission into the sisterhood of States. 

POPULATION. 

Commencing back in 1890, when the population of Oklahoma was 
only 60,000, it is interesting to note the successive increase in biennial 



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6 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

enumerations. From 1890 to 1892 the population more than doubled. 
The census taken during the following years, 1894 and 1896, showed a 
gain of from 60,000 to 80,000 people at each enumeration. The census 
of 1898 shows an addition of over 35,000, although at that time the 
attention of the American people was directed to affairs in Cuba and 
the Philippines. To this excitement may be attributed the temporary 
falling off of immigration. Since 1898 our growth has been most 
remarkable. It reached its maximum during the past two or three 
years, but, as is shown by the table arranged below, tne increase during 
any two-year period has' not been less than 35,000, while in one instance 
(1900-1902) it has attained more than 143,000. 

The enumeration this year is incomplete, owing somewhat to the 
change from county to township assessors when the former were half 
through with their assessment, and to the fact that annual enumeration 
is not mandatory and no penalty follows when not taken. The above- 
mentioned change was occasioned bv an act of the recent legislature, 
which became opemtive from and after its passage. The gain in pop- 
ulation shown in those counties and townships from which returns nave 
been received evidences a growth of about 25 per cent during the past 
year. Hence I feel that a conservative estimate of the present popu- 
lation of Oklahoma is 650,000. 

The immigration to the Territory during the past five years is, no 
doubt, unprecedented in the histor}' of any commonwealth covering a 
similar period of time. Immigration to Oklahoma has been largely 
from the States lying to the east and north. Indomitable energy has 
characterized our inhabitants from the start. Success in accomplish- 
ing things and acquiring a home, and not infreouently a competence 
in a few years, has encouraged immigration to Oklahoma. This ele- 
ment of "push and get there" is evidenced in our numerous successful 
manufacturing enterprises, our cities, as well as the high state of our 
agricultural development. 

The number of foreign born in the Territory is exceedingly small, 
being not over 5 per cent. The percentage of illiteracy is still less, 
but this need not be surprising when it is stated that we have 180,000 
enrolled school children, and the money to maintain our common 
schools and higher educational institutions fully eight months in the 
year. 

Grovih in population. 



Year. 


1 
Census. ; 


Growth. 


Per cent of 
gain over 
preceding 
eniimera- 
tion. 


1890 


60,416 ' 
133,100 
212,635 1 
275,587 i 
311,400 , 
398,331 ! 
541,480 ' 






1892 


72,684 
79, 535 
62,952 
35,813 
86,931 
143, 149 


a 120 


1894 


a60 


1896 


aSO 


1898 


a 13 


1900 


a28 


1902 


a36 







a Nearly. 



Our Indian population is very small and is gradually decreasing. 
Of all tribes there are now only about 12,000, including children. 
Many have become self-supporting and are making good citizens. 
Agriculture is the pursuit usually followed. 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 7 

The colored population of the Territory is most numerous in the 
southern and eastern portion, having immigrated from neighboring 
States. In some counties, as in Kiowa, Wools, and Greer, there are 
few, if any, representatives of the race. 

The atmosphere of hospitality and good-fellowship that pervades 
our Commonwealth is peculiary western. It is most noticeable to the 
stranger, and induces a cordialitv of feeling and results in a unanimity 
of purpose where the good of all is concerned, such as the preparation 
and upbuilding of a new State. Because of this spirit and owing to 
the friendships which are its outgrowth, enterprises of considerable 
magnitude have been fostered, and institutions which speak well for 
the intellectuality of our future State have developed and prospered. 

The character of our citizenship is of the highest, and crime and 
lawlessness, as evidenced by the dockets of our courts, is much less 
than in many of our older sister States. 

TAXABLE PROPERTY. 

The sum of $84,134,472 is returned by the assessors for the year 
1903. This represents a gain of $11,467,049 over last year's assess- 
ment. 

When the fact is taken into consideration that property is assessed 
at not over one-fourth its actual value, and often some of it is over- 
looked entirely, these figures become all the more grati fying. The 
actual value of our taxable property is not far short of $400,000,000 
to-day. 

The following table of comparison shows the steady growth of 
values of certain classes of property during the past three years: 



Fann lands 

Town property 

Railroads 

Moneys and credit 
Other property 



1901. 



1902. 



1903. 



$17,279,809 

8,062,567 

4,538,375 

2,552,932 

28,031,013 



$22,614,650 I 
11,629,199 
6,339,462 , 
3,068,273 , 
29,025,839 | 



$27,204,160 
14,397,329 
7,851,187 
3, 612, 131 
31,069,665 



The Territorial tax levy being 6i mills will produce the sum of 
f 525,839. This is a decrease of $41,111.90 over 1902. 

Below is given a comparative table of the assessment of each of the 
counties for the past four years. 

Taxable valuation for four years paM. 



County. 


1900. 1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


Beaver 


$1,573,663 ' ftl.614.072 


$2,006,128 
1,689,512 
1,679,335 
3,274,929 
2,137,309 
1,735,739 
2,025,795 
407,514 
826, 826 
3,759,453 
3,302,209 
3,853,l>41 
3,775,955 


$1,843,148 


Blaine 


633,775 


996,096 


2,161,518 


Caddo 


2,,>41,944 


Canadian 


5,591,056 
1,^4,744 


4,971,229 
.2,177,522 


3,341,445 


Cleveland 


2, 320, 879 


Comanche 


4, 088, 702 


Custer 


i, 278, i94 
435,012 
674,200 
2,325,294 
1,864,393 
2,049,585 


i,65i,724 
477,913 
810, 725 
3,ia5.801 
2, 725, 624 
3. 363. 101 


2, 473, 304 


Dav 


519, 756 


Dewey 


979, 067 


Garfield 


4, M5, 039 


Grant 


3, 423, 855 


Greer 


4, 165, 534 


Kay 


2,647,044 i 3,404,931 


4,414,011 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

Taxable valuation for four years past — Continued. 



County. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


Kingfisher 


«2, 576, 510 


$3,261,709 


$3,448,792 
1,451,270 
3,217,845 
4,928,450 
2, 290, Oil 
5,683,067 
1,652,590 
3,214,212 
3,366,895 
1,333,691 
1,821,742 
6,553,761 
2,279,910 


13,369,469 


Kiowa 


2, 275, 211 


Lincoln 


1,967,596 
4,432,980 
1,647,120 
4,386,337 
1,920,093 
2,277,618 
1,933,734 
738,150 
1,124,241 
3,030,963 
2,386,459 


2,626,587 
4,690,417 
2,029,942 
4,738,133 
1,674,296 
3,215,641 
2,951,073 
913, 713 
1,438,309 
4,848,204 
2,079,114 


3, 611, 497 


Logcan 


4,911,079 


Noble 


2, 782, 907 


Oklahoma 


7,062,444 


Pawnee 


2, 742, 974 


Payne 


3,473,388 


Pottawatomie 


3,670,103 


Roger Mills 


1,514,375 


Washita 


2, 269, 957 


Woods 


6,831,022 
2,801,844 


Woodward 






Total 


49,338,661 


60,464,696 


71,707,918 
211,738 
757, 767 


84,134,472 


Kaw Reservation ^ 




Osage Reservation 
















Total 






72,677,423 













Note.— The assessment of 1903 in the Kaw, Ponca, and Osage reservations has been apportioned 
among the counties of Kay, Noble, and Pawnee, and is included in the above valuations of said 
counties. 

TAXES. 

Taxes in Oklahoma are not high. This year the Territorial board 
of equalization has lowered the levy from that of the two preceding 
years. The levy for 1903 is 6i mills. The bond interest fund has so 
increased, as the result of last year's levy, as to give assurance that the 
entire sum of $48,000 will be in the treasury by the end of the present 
year. Over four-fifths of this sum is now in the hands of the treas- 
urer, and the Territory will soon have paid the first and only bonds 
it has ever issued. 

Territorial tax levy^ 1903. 

Mills. 

General Territorial tax 3 

University, Norman, support 45 

University, Norman, equipment fund 4 

University Preparatory School, Tonka wa, support 2 

Territorial Normal School, Edmond, support 4 

Territorial Normal School, Edmond, building fund 3 

Territorial Normal School, Alva, support 4 

Liquidation of certificates of indebtedness of the Northwestern Normal School 

Building at Alva 25 

Southwestern Normal School, Weatherford, fund 2 

Agricultural and Mechanical College, Stillwater, support 2 

Agricultural and Normal University, Langston, fund 15 

School for the Deaf and Dumb, support 25 

Bond interest fund 05 

Total levy, 1903 6.25 

COUNTY INCOME FROM TAXATION. 

Whenever tax valuations are one-fourth or less than actual values, 
it necessarily follows that the levy will be proportionately high in 
order to raise the necessary revenue. To one not familiar with the 
customary values fixed by the assessors our tax rate seems very high. 
Had the assessments been made on actual values the same amount of 
revenue would have been raised with a levy of about \\ mills instead 
of 6i mills, which is the rate now fixed by the Territorial board of 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



9 



equalization. With valuations of live stock as follows — horses $16.95 ? 
cattle, $9.62; hogs, $2.28; sheep, $1.17 — it will be readily seen that the 
rate is very moderate. 

The table below shows the amount of income this levy will produce 
in each county: 



Beaver $11,520 

Blaine 13,509 

Caddo 15,887 

Canadian 20,884 

Cleveland 14,505 

Comanche 25,554 

Custer 15,458 

Day 3,248 

Dewey 6,119 

Garfield 28,406 

Grant 21,339 

Greer 26,035 

Kay 27,588 

Kingfisher 21,059 



Kiowa $14,220 

Lincoln 22,572 

Logan 30,694 

Noble 17,393 

Oklahoma 44,140 

Pawnee 17, 144 

Payne 21,709 

Pottawatomie 22, 938 

Roger Mills 9, 465 

Washita 14,187 

Woods 42,694 

Woodward 17, 512 



Total 525,839 



TERRITORIAL INDEBTEDNESS. 

The Territorial indebtedness on June 30, 1903, as shown by the 
report of the Territorial treasurer, was $461,766.43. 

To offset the bonds issued for educational purposes some years ago, 
amounting to $48,000, there is now in the bond interest fund the sum 
of $43,738. Thus it will be observed that the total indebtedness of 
the Territory has decreased during the past year. 

The condition of each of the several funds and the amount of cash 
in the Territorial treasur}^ is shown below in the statement of the 
Territorial treasurer dated June 30, 1903. The funds belonging to 
the Territory are deposited in banks under bond equal to or exceeding 
the deposit, and which pay into the treasury 3 per cent on daily 
balances. 

GENERAL REVENUE FUND. 

Warrants outstanding November 30, 1902 $462, 440. 23 

Warrants registered from November 30, 1902, to June 30, 1903 163, 089. 25 

625 529. 48 
Warrants redeemed from November 30, 1902, to June 30, 1903 143', 930. 98 

481,598.50 
Cash in fund for redemption on June 30, 1903 19,832.07 

Net general revenue fund indebtedness 461, 766. 43 

NORMAL SCHOOL FUND. 

Cash on hand June 30, 1903 $27,415.51 

Warrants outstanding June 30, 1903 3.33 

Available cash balance June 30, 1903 27,412.18 

NORTHWESTERN NORMAL SCHOOL FUND. 

Cash on hand June 30i 1903 $17,424.00 

Warrants outstanding 5, 634. 73 

Available cash balance June 30, 1903 11,789.27 



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10 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE FUND. 

Cash on hand June 30, 1903 $325.57 

Warrants outstanding June 30, 1903 47.59 

Balance on hand 277. 98 

COLORED AGRICULTURAL AND NORMAL UNIVERSITY FUND. 

Cash on hand June 30, 1903 $2,783.33 

Warrants outstanding June 30, 1903 1,033.46 

Balance on hand 1, 749. 87 

COLORED AGRICULTURAL AND NORMAL UNIVERSITY LEASE FUND. 

Cash on hand June 30, 1903 $4,579.46 

DEAF AND DUMB SCHOOL FUND. 

Cash on hand June 30, 1903 $15,254.19 

BOARD OF EDUCATION FUND. 

Cash on hand June 30, 1903 $2,521.61 

LIBRARY FUND. 

Cash on hand June 30, 1903 $1,439.04 

UNIVERSITY PREPARATORY SCHOOL FUND. 

Warrants outstanding June 30, 1903 $7, 914. 37 

Cash on hand for redemption 3, 870. 83 

Balance outstanding June 30, 1903 4,043.54 

UNIVERSITY FUND. 

Warrants outstanding June 30, 1903 $2,828.28 

Cash on hand for redemption 1, 851. 43 

Balance outstanding 976. 85 

UNIVERSITY BUILDING FUND. 

Warrants outstanding June 30, 1903 $14,477.05 

Cash on hand for redemption 4, 537. 18 

Balance outstanding 9, 939. 87 

COLORED AGRICULTURAL AND NORMAL UNIVERSITY BUILDING FUND. 

Cash on hand June 30, 1903 $1,731.72 

Warrants outstanding 700. 00 

Balance on hand 1, 031. 72 

NORTHWESTERN NORMAL BUILDING FUND. 

Warrants outstanding June 30, 1903 $100,056.87 

Cash on hand for redemption 24, 119. 69 

Balance outstanding 75, 937. 18 

AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE BUILDING FUND. 

Warrants outstanding June 30, 1903 $11,427.92 

Cash on hand for redemption 7, 176. 54 

Balance outstanding 4, 251. 38 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 11 

iStatement showing amount of cash at close of business June 30^ 1908, and amount to credit 

oftlve several funds named. 

General revenue fund $19,832.07 

Northwestern Normal School fund 17, 424. 00 

Normal School fund 27,415.51 

University fund 1,851.43 

Colored Agricultural and Normal University fund 2, 783. 33 

Common school fund 17, 400. 63 

Public building fund 254,406.69 

Common school indemnity fund 5, 889. 52 

University Preparatory School fund 3, 870. 83 

University, Agricultural and Mechanical College, and Normal School 

fund 1,525.89 

University building fund 4, 537. 18 

Agricultural and Mechanical Collie levy fund 325. 57 

Agricultural and Mechanical College bond 1. 73 

Northwestern Normal building fund 24, 119. 69 

Southwestern Normal building fund 37, 087. 51 

Agricultural and Mechanical College building fund 4, 176. 54 

Colored Agricultural and Normal University lease fund 4, 579. 46 

Colored Agricultural and Normal University building fund 1, 731. 72 

Deaf and Dumb School fund 15,254.19 

Blind School fund 7,199.27 

Board of education fund 2, 521. 61 

Condemnation school lands fund 13, 190. 35 

Greer County sections 13 fund 8,968.19 

Greer County sections 33 fund 8, 221. 34 

Library fund 1,439.04 

Bond interest fund 43,738.00 

Interest land lease fund 1, 818. 53 

Statutes and session laws fund 117. 00 

Permanent school fund , 100. 00 

Condemnation sections 13 fund 962. 70 

Condemnation sections 33 fund 2, 136. 83 

Beautif jring fund for Southwestern Normal School w 4, 642. 82 

University insurance indemnity fund 35,000.00 

574, 269. 17 

Balance on hand June 1, 1903 571,198.98 

Amount received from all sources from June 1 to June 30, 1903 17, 771. 44 

588,970.42 

Amount paid out from June 1 to June 30, 1903 14,701.25 

Balance on hand at close of business June 30, 1903 574, 269. 17 

588,970.42 
The above funds are deposited as follows: 

In Capitol National Bank, Guthrie, Okla $286,897.33 

In Guthrie National Bank, Guthrie, Okla 186,563.71 

In Bank of Indian Territory, Guthrie, Okla 50,462.66 

In Logan County Bank, Guthrie, Okla 50,345.47 

Total 574,269.17 

SETTLEMENT OF LANDS. 

The number of acres appropriated by the homesteader during the 
past year was considerably less than that of some former years. This 
may be accounted for by the fact that much of the land unappropri- 
ated in Beaver and Woodward counties, where the bulk of vacant land 
is located, is not as suitable for agriculture as stock raising. They are 
what is termed grass lands and are most valuable for grazing, being 
watered by numerous rivers, creeks, and running springs. The alti- 
tude is higher than that of Dewey, Day, or Roger Mills, where consid- 



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12 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



erable land is yet unoccupied. Occasional tracts of good farming land 
can yet be found. While this land has in the past been mostl}^ used 
by the cattlemen, during the past three or four years the people of the 
Territory have been so prosperous and have raised such immense crops, 
that the vacant land is now oeing settled up and the cattlemen driven 
to other parts. 

The climate is mild in winter and hot in summer, yet the heat of 
summer is tempered and most of the days made delightful by a steady 
Gulf breeze. The nights are cool and refreshing. 

Railroads are rapidly pushing forward into tnese newer counties, 
and will soon furnish transportetion for the newcomer and his neces- 
sary supplies, and also bring him in touch with the best markets of 
the country for his products. 

The following table indicates the number of acres filed on during the 
past year, in the respective counties, and the amount of land still vacant: 



County. 


Filed on 

during 

year. 


still 
vacant. 


County. 


Filed on 

during 

year. 


Still 
vacant. 


Beaver 


Acres. 
293,699 
1,589 


Aci'es. 

2,738,709 

395 

2,867 

882 

14,610 

1,703 

109,402 

7,000 


Greer 


Acres. 

120,000 

372 

3,226 

86,882 

400 

67,273 

234,349 


Aci-e^. 
34,000 


Blaine 


Kingfisher 




Caddo 


Kiowa 


5,081 


Canadian ' 


Roger Mills 


16, 218 


Comanche 


3,004 

974 

92,198 

12,000 

70 


Washita 




Custer 


Woods 


43,916 


Day 


Woodward 


114,985 


Dewey 


Total 




Grant 


916,036 


3, 089, 768 











PUBLIC LANDS. 

The Government land of the Territory is divided into eight districts, 
viz, Alva, El Reno, Guthrie, Lawton, itingfisher, Man^m, Oklahoma 
City, and Woodward, the registers and receivers of which have kindly 
furnished me with the following statistics concerning their respective 
districts: 

ALVA. 

Woods County alone comprises this district. 

Total area of land in district 1,732,000 

Number acres filed on during year 67, 273 

Number acres vacant 43, 916 

Number acres Saline Reservation '. 17, 263 

Number homestead entries made during year 509 

EL RENO. 

This district is composed of the public lands in six counties. Total 
area of district is 2,781,000 acres. 



County. 


Unappro- 
priated. 


Re- 
served. 


ApprM)Fi- 


Total area. 


Blaine 


Acres. 

22 

2,867 

882 

37 

3,010 


Acres. 


Acres. 
71,978 
948,586 
257,038 
339,963 
434,390 
645,440 


Acres. 
72,000 


Caddo 


27,547 
26,080 


979,000 


Canadian 


284,000 


Custer 


340,000 


Kiowa 


21,600 
1,560 


459,000 


Washita 


647,000 








Total 


6,818 


76,787 


2,697,395 


2,781,000 







The character of the unoccupied land in the above counties is either 
mountainous or sandy. 



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KEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



13 



In the seven counties which compose this district there are but 90 
acres of vacant land, and all figures remain the same as last year. 



Kay 

Lincoln 

Logan 

Noble 

Oklahoma . 

Pawnee 

Payne 



Total. 



County. 



Area un- 
appro- 
priated. 



90 



Area re- 
served. 



Acres. 
46,579 
56,622 
16,894 
30,345 
3,840 
30,949 
66,836 



252,065 



Area ap- 
propriated. 



Acres. 
426,421 
333,346 
313,106 
468,655 
88,160 
301,993 
417, 164 



2,377,845 



Total area. 



Acres. 
472,000 
390,000 
360,000 
499,000 
92,000 
333,000 
484,000 



2,630,000 



KINGFISHER. 



This district is next to the largest in size, and embraces lands in 
eleven counties. Total area of land surface in district, 4,421,000 acres. 



Blaine 

Canadian . . . 

Custer 

Dewey 

Day 

Grant 

Garfield 

Kingfisher . . 

Logan 

Oklahoma .. 
Roger Mills . 

Total.. 



County. 






Acres. 
373 



1,666 1 

7,000 

109,402 I 



8,218 I 



Acres. 
290, 587 
100,280 
265,274 
521,680 
518, 198 
596,665 
565,538 
493,760 
105,600 
21,720 
114,622 



126,659 I 3,593,924 



Area 
reserved. 



Acres. 

228,040 
38,720 
43,060 

108,320 
38,400 
75,335 
74,462 
74,240 
6,400 
1,280 
12, 160 



700, 417 



Total area. 



Acres. 
519,000 
139,000 
310,000 
637,000 
666,000 
672,000 
640,000 
568,000 
112,000 
23,000 
135,000 



4,421,000 



There are 2,120,000 acres embraced in this district, which is com- 
posed of Comanche County and a portion of Kiowa. 



County. 


Area un- 
appropri- 
ated. 


Area ap- 
propriated. 


Area 
reserved. 


Total area. 


Comanche 


Acres. 
14,610 
2,071 


Acres. 
1,238,670 
271,609 


Acres. 
691,720 
1,820 


Acres. 
1,846,000 
275,000 


Kiowa 




Total 


16,681 


1,510,279 


593,040 


2,120,000 





There was cancelled or relinquished in Comanche County, 128,157 
acres. There was cancelled or relinquished in Kiowa County, 
44,860 acres. Total land filed on during year ending June 30, 1903, 
176,604 acres. Number of homestead entries, 1,223. 



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14 



BEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



There are but two counties in this district, which covers an area of 
2,133,575 acres. 



County. 



Area 
vacant. 



Filed on 

during 

year 1903. 



Total area. 



Area 
can- 
celled. 



Greer 

Roger Mills 

Total. 



Acres. 
34,000 
8,000 



Acres. 
120,000 
80,000 



Acres. 
1,511,676 
622,000 



Acres. 
75,000 
60,000 



42,000 



200,000 



2,133,676 



136,000 



The above is given in round numbers. There were about 550 final 
proofs made during the year, and about the same number of home- 
steads commuted to cash. The receipts of the office amounted to over 

$76,000. 



OKLAHOMA CITY. 



There is no vacant land in this district, it being composed of five 
of the older counties. Total area is 1,581,630 acres. 



County. 


Area 
reserved. 


Area ap- 
propriated. 


Total area. 


Canadian 


Acres. 
8,375 

80,000 
118,000 

32,000 
273,380 


Acres. 
147,265 
268,000 
111,000 
316,000 
227,620 


Acres. 
155,630 


Cleveland 


348,000 


Tiinr»f>lTi 


229,000 


Oklahoma 


318,000 


Pottawatomie -. 


501,000 






Total 


511,755 


1,069,875 


1,581,630 






WOODWARD. 









This is the largest land district, comprising 5,805,000 acres, and 
covers two counties. 



County. 



Beaver 

Woodward . 



Total va- 
cant land. 



Total area 
of appro- 
priated 
lands. 



Total area 

of land 

surface of 

the county. 



_l_ 



Acres. Acres. 

2,738,709 942,291 

114,985 I 2,007,335 



Acres. 
3,681,000 
2, 124, 000 



Character of unappropriated 
lands. 



JGrazing and farming lands 



During the past year the total area filed on in Beaver County was 
328,711 acres, and in Woodward County 364,956 acres. Total number 
of entries for the year in the two counties, 4,390. 

SCHOOL AND OTHER RESERVED LANDS. 

The total amount of land reserved for the future State of Oklahoma 
under the provisions of the various acts opening the portions of Okla- 
homa to settlement aggregates 2,055,000 acres, practically all of 
which is leased for agricultural and grazing purposes, and the income 
from same for the year 1903 will amount to probably $375,000, or an 
average of over $1,000 a day. 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 15 

When the privilege of renting the school lands was first granted to 
the Territory it was considerea a matter of little moment, but the 
caring and looking after these lands, providing for their leasing, and 
the collection of the rentals has now come to be one of the most 
important functions of the Territorial government. The responsibility 
of directing the carrying on of this work imposed by Congress upon 
the governor, secretary, and superintendent of public instruction has 
become quite a burden when added to their other official duties, and 
requires much time and attention. The school-land department, as 
administered by a secretary working under the direction of the board, 
is now one of the most important parts of the Territorial government, 
handling large sums of money, dealing with nearly 8,000 lessees, and 
entailing constant supervision and watehfulness to prevent the abuse 
of the lands and the robbing of the future State by the illegal cutting 
of timber, quarrying of stone, and removing of mineral and other 
valuable deposits. 

While in a few instances lands have been leased for townsite and 
manufacturing purposes, the board has maintained as a rule that the 
intent was to Tease these lands only for agricultural and grazing pur- 
poses, and have insisted that the timber, stone, clay, cement, and 
mineral was a part of the land, and consequently intended to be 
reserved for the future State of Oklahoma and not subject to removal 
at this time. 

Speculators and prospectors have harassed many of the lessees in 
Kiowa, Comanche, and Caddo counties by prospecting for mineral, 
cutting timber and attempting to locate mining claims on school lands, 
but, believing that it was the intention of Congress to reserve all the 
mineral on these lands for the State, the board has uniformly refused 
to recognize that the mining laws applied to these reserved lands and 
have treated all prospectors and locators as intruders. 

The present system of leasing the land for a term of three years, 
with the privilege of renewal for another and succeeding terms at the 
appraised rental, gives general satisfaction. In the past there has 
been some difficulty in securing an equitable and uniform appraise- 
ment in all parts of the Territory, so it has been decided for this year 
to have a force of viewers go upon the lands whereon the lease is 
about to expire, obtain a complete description of same, and file it with 
the department, together with a plat of the land. These descriptions 
and plats will be taken up and passed upon by a board of five practical 
farmers and business men, to be selected by the board for leasing school 
lands, and they will classify the lands and fix the rentals for the entire 
Territory. The care a man takes of his land and the manner in which 
he farms it will be taken into consideration in fixing the rental, and it 
is believed that this will result in satisfying all reasonable objections 
that may have been raised to any of the rentals in the past. 

Owing to a tendency to speculate in these lands, the board has 
amended its rules to prevent the hypothecating of leases as security for 
loans and the transferring of same m blank, and has required that in 
the future all leases and transfers shall be executed before a notary 
public or other officer empowered to take acknowledgments in the 
same manner as required for a transfer of real estate. 

Lessees residing within the Territory will be allowed to rent for a 
single season such portion of their land^ as is deemed advisable by the 
board, upon application. 

The question of timber cutting has always been a troublesome one, 
7717—03—2 



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16 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

but there has been less of it the last year than heretofore, owing to the 
policy of careful supervision of all the timber lands. In every case 
where any timber is cut lessees are compelled to pay full value for 
same, and no land is allowed to be cleared except upon application to the 
board and a showing that it is desirable to remove the timber in order 
to put the land under cultivation, and that the land would be more 
valuable when so cultivated. Even when permit is given to clear tim- 
ber land for cultivation the lessee is required to pay for all timber 
taken off, and every application is thoroughly investigated by a special 
agent of the department. There has been less trouble in relation to 
the cutting of walnut and other valuable timber the past year, but it 
requires constant watching over and caring for the timber lands to 

Erevent this, and even then some of the valuable trees will occasionallj^ 
e cut and the logs stolen. Whenever a person not a lessee of school 
land has entered upon the land and cut any timber, action has been 
brought against him in the courts, and the aid of the Government has 
been asked in carrying these prosecutions to a successful termination. 

The unprecedented building of railways in the Territory in the last 
year has m many cases damaged school land to considerable extent, 
but on the other hand the development of the countrj^, the opening of 
markets contiguous to the land, and the general rise m values brought 
about has resulted in benefit much greater than the damage. In every 
case where railwaj^s cross or touch upon school land they have been 
compelled to comply with the provision of the Territorial statute relat- 
ing to '' eminent domain," and to pay into the permanent fund in the 
treasury the damages assessed. This fund now aggregates the sum of 
$19,601.28. 

The rapid development of the western portion of the Territory has 
resulted in the dividing up of the leases originall}'^ made there for 
grazing purposes into smaller tracts. Whenever this is done the rental 
has been fixed on the basis of agricultural land, and the revenue for the 
Territory is constantly growing larger in the west. 

The legislature at ite session the past winter provided for a special 
distribution from the school-land fund to the school children of the new 
counties who were missed in the distribution last year, owing to a tech- 
nical failure to compljr with the law. The amount so distributed aggre- 
gated $36,368.23, wnich will cut down the per capita distribution to be 
made to the entire Territory this month considerably, but it is a matter 
of justice that this should be done, and there is no cause for complaint 
from the other districts who had the benefit of the distribution of the 
large cash rental collected from these new counties last year. 

I present herewith itemized statement of the receipts for the past 
year, and for every year since the leasing of the lands began, also tables 
of other figures of general interest. 

Receipts and expenditures for the year ending June 30y 1903. 

On hand June 30, 1902 \. $3,737.10 

Received from June 30, 1902, to June 30, 1903 345,269.41 

Total 349,006.51 

Expenses for the year 22, 023. 81 

To treasurer 321 , 962. 07 

Returned to applicants 365. 06 

Balance on hand 4, 655. 57 

Total , 349,006.51 

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BEPORT OF THE GO^^ERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 17 

Receipts and expenditures of each fund for the year ending June SOy 1903. 

COMMON SCHOOL. 

Cash received $208,298.57 

Expenses $13,507.59 

Returned to applicants 167. 31 

Net proceeds 194,623.67 

208,298.57 

COLLEGE. 

Cash received $50,834.73 

Expenses $2,988.16 

Money returned 197. 75 

Net proceeds 47,648.82 

50, 834. 73 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Cash received $51,203.14 

Expenses $2,988.16 

Net proceeds 48,214.98 

51, 203. 14 

COMMON SCHOOL INDEMNITY. 

Cash received $30,040 89 

Expenses $2,116.92 

Net proceeds 27,923.97 

30,040.89 

GREER COUNTY. 

Section 13: 

Cash received $2,509.93 

Expenses $211.49 

Net proceeds 2,298.44 

2, 509. 93 

Section 33: 

Cash received J , 2,382.15 

Expenses 211.49 

Net proceeds 2,170.66 

2, 382. 15 

Net proceeds from leasing lands. 

Fiscal year ending June 30 — 

1891 , $4,536.82 

1892 21,346.13 

1893 19,164.67 

1894 45,989.98 

1895 88,627.97 

1896 71,740.68 

1897 98,467.81 

1898 173,442.83 

1899 : 133,047.19 

1900 177,190.24 

1901 213,303.67 

1902 435,915.85 

1903 322,880.54 

Total 1,805,654.38 

Total receipts and expenditures of each fund to June 30 ^ 1903. 

COMMON SCHOOLS. 

Cash received '. $1,337,626.39 

Expenses $96,580.87 

Money returned to applicants 5, 770. 56 

Net receipts 1,235,274.96 

1,337,626.39 



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18 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

COLLEGES. 

Cash received $271,124.29 

Expenses $17,567.66 

Money returned to applicants 1, 747. 16 

Net receipts 251,809.47 

271,124.29 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Cash received $268,965.75 

Expenses $17,559.30 

Money returned to applicants 1, 176. 09 

Net receipts 250,230.36 

268, 965. 75 

COMMON-SCHOOL INDEMNITY. 

Cash received $53,898.09 

Expenses $3,092.87 

Money returned 2. 50 

Net receipts 50,802.72 

53,89^.09 

GREER COUNTY. 

Section 13: 

Cash received $10,122.30 

Expenses $997.61 

Money returned 16. 50 

Net receipts 9,108.19 

10, 122. 30 

Section 33: 

Cash received 9,426.29 

Expenses 997.61 

Net receipts 8,428.68 

9, 426. 29 

GRAND TOTAL OP ALL FUNDS. 

Cash receipts $1,951,163.11 

Expenses $136,795.92 

Money returned to applicants 8, 712. 81 

Net receipts 1,805,654.38 

1,951,163.11 

Notes on hand. 



» 


Number. 


Amount. 


Common-school fund 


10, 774 
2,169 
2,302 
2,064 

144 
159 


S568, 177. 96 


College 


102, 705. 36 


Public building 


108, 579. 68 


Common-school indemnity , 


77,020.80 


Greer County: 

Section 13 


5, 543. 00 


Section 33 


6, 169. 05 






Total -. 


17,612 


868, 195. 85 







PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

The public schools have enjoyed a year of unexampled prosperity. 
Many new and more commodious schoolhouses have been erected, more 
thorough equipment provided, the curriculum systematized, mainte- 
nance was more liberal, teachers more efficient, the attendance more 
prompt and regular, and a healthier educational spirit developed. 

The last annual reports of the counties show that there are 2,192 
schoolhouses in Oklahoma, valued at $1,347,257.15. The 303 new 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 19 

schoolhouses erected the current year cost $190,861.44. The same 
reports show 2,857 organized school districts in which 2,290 schools 
were taught. 

The sources of income for the common schools are three: Direct dis- ' 
trict tax, county tax, and the rent from the leasing of the school lands. 
During the last biennium this office apportioned from the income of 
leasing school lands ^17,754.58, or $3.04 per capita. 

The total expenditures for teachers' salaries, sites, buildings, rents, 
repairs, librar}:, and apparatus was $1,116,230.77. 

The enumeration of children of school age was 178,964, of which 
131,959 were enrolled in the public schools. The salaries paid teach- 
ers for the year ending June 30, 1902, were as follows: For first grade, 
$45; for second grade, $37; for third grade, $32. The salaries for the 
year ending June 30, 1903, are higher by 10 per cent. The prospects 
for the coming year promise an increase of 20 per cent over those 
of 1903. 

The course of study for common schools was introduced in 1896. In 
the eig^t years 2,973 students have graduated. In 1903 there were 
1,162 common school graduates. 

The year 1902 was the first in the Territory that every county held a 
normal institute. These institutes encourage the teachers and greatly 
assist in equipping them for their important work. The institutes 
are in session from two to six weeks. In addition to the regular 
instruction formerlv given, much is gained by social contact and the 
free exchange of ideas. The institute stimulates and encourages to 
more thorough equipment and better effort, and develops a splendid 
professional spirit. 

The Territorial, county, and district teachers' associations are of 
great value. During the year 1902 the varioius county superintend- 
ents attended 162 such meetings. The official work of the county 
superintendents shows 2,098 schools visited in 1902 and 5,209 consul- 
tations with school boards. The various offices were kept open 5,832 
days. The majority of the superintendents keep their records in good 
condition, and perform their labors with not only zeal and enthusiasm, 
but also with a spirit consecrated to the work. 

The Territorial board of education dictates the educational policy 
and controls to a greater or less extent the educational system. This 
work is done gratuitously and well. During the biennium just closing 
the board held 25 meetings and has prepared questions for 25 teachers' 
examinations. It has revised the plans of examinations for county, 
city, Territorial, and normal institute certificates, and also the course of 
study for normal institutes and for the common school, and has many 
plans in view for the future improvement of the school system. 

The present educational tendenc}^ is toward centralized schools, 
through consolidation of school districts and transportation of chil- 
dren. In our Territory very many school districts are too small to 
yield sufficient revenue for even a three-months' school. Our law 
permits the merging of several districts into one large one, and some 
counties are taking advantage of the law. 

The union graded school and county high school laws have not been 
taken advantage of generally. There are now organizing in Washita, 
liOgan, and Greer counties union graded schools, and we expect much 
from them. 

The proposition to vote a count}" high school has not met with favor 



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20 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



where tried except in Logan County. In Kay, Cleveland, and Gar- 
field counties the proposition was defeated. The defeat, however, was 
occasioned by local conditions. In Lo^an County, at the last general 
election, the proposition carried with about 600 majority. Within a 
year Logan County will have established and running a county high 
school at Guthrie. 

The separate school law is working very satisfactorily. Last year 
there was some misunderstanding of the law and a misinterpretation 
of its provisions. It takes some time for a law to become operative. 
This year the county superintendents' reports show the erection of 
many separate school buildings and the creation of equal school facili- 
ties for both races. Better feeling prevails more generally than ever 
before in the history of the Territory. 

The statute enacted bv the legislature of 1901, returning 15 per cent 
of the rentals received trom the leasing of the indemnity school lands 
to the districts in which they are situated, while a great burden upon 
the Territorial treasurer, has been a great relief to these people and 
has materially benefited the schools. 

In conclusion, allow me to state that I believe that our general edu- 
cational system is the best yet known to man. Our people have very 
great cause for encouragement. The public school is the university 
of the masses. Upon it depends the education of the future man, the 
citizen. That our people realize its immense importance is plainly 
demonstmted by their generous financial support and personal interest 
in this institution. So long as the public school accomplishes its pur- 
pose, so long will the Territory continue to grow. 

The school is not merely a preparation for life, ''it is life itself." 
It develops the intellect, inspires higher ideals, greater ambitions, and 
loftier conceptions of life, thus building character and fitting individ- 
uals for complete living. 

Graduates from common schools in Oklahoma, 



County. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


1899. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


Total. 


Beaver . . . ■. 


5 








1 
14 


. 




9 
36 
68 
18 
62 
33 
15 


15 


Blaine . ... 




6 


10 


9 


32 
4 

1 

39 
3 

1 


107 


Caddo 






62 


Canadian 






3 
17 


12* 


7 
35 


6 
4 


35 


Cleveland 


27 


10 


206 


Comanche 


36 


Custer '. 






2 




4 


12 

1 

2 

12 

45 

5 

53 

23 


34 


Dav 






1 


Dewev 








9 
9 

i7* 

42 


i9' 

26 
26 
13 
60 


10 
25 
.34 
10 
41 
42 

9 

60 

138 

16 

30 

7 
22 
16 
18 

7 

12 
20 


20 
67 
65 
25 
82 
73 
2 
96 
187 
12 
44 
34 
45 
23 
36 
36 
69 
25 


41 


Garfleld 








122 


Grant 






13 
5 

12 
3 


183 


Greer 




88 


Kav 


46 
27 


6 
14 


297 


Kingfisher 


232 


Kiowa 


11 


Lincoln 






7 

io" 

10 

28 
11 
9 
2 
9 
8 
6 


3 
11 
20 
10 
23 
13 
33 
12 

2 
17 

6 


6 
18 
10 
20 
25 
26 

4 

I 

10 

4 


161 


Logan 


8 
8 


27 
16 
26 


43 


432 


Noble 


92 


Oklahoma 


139 


Pawnee 





117 


Payne 


6 


4' 


5 


127 


Pottawatomie 


89 


Roger Mills 




75 


Washita 




2 


34' 


60 


Woods 




150 


Wood ward 





61 












Total 


129 


104 


143 


199 


345 


303 


588 


1,262 


2,972 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

Schools taught during the fiscal year ending June SO, 1902, 



21 



County. 


Number 
of organ- 
ized 
districts. 


Number 
in wliich 

schools 
were 

taught. 


Schools 
taught. 


Days 
schools 

were 
taught. 


Average 
length 

school in 
days. 


Beaver 


52 

88 
155 

96 

69 
185 
112 

44 

89 
128 
124 
109 

89 
117 

94 
135 
110 

67 
105 

80 

. 100 

112 

49 

89 
260 
182 


45 

82 

20 

85 

69 

8 

80 

28 

75 

126 

124 

, 107 

88 

117 

44 

135 

110 

59 

105 

65 

100 

112 

46 

89 

258 

113 


45 

82 

28 

85 

75 

8 

80 

28 

75 

161 

127 

111 

88 

119 

44 

146 

162 

59 

172 

65 

132 

121 

46 

89 

258 

113 


4,365 
7,590 
2,693 
11,500 
7,840 


97 


Blaine 


93 


Caddo 


134 


Canadian 


134 


Cleveland 


105 


Comanche 




Custer 


7,800 
2,020 
6,440 
15,480 
15,842 
10,260 
12,285 
14.020 
2,120 
13,220 
22,160 
7,490 
10,840 
«,860 
12,240 
10, 470 
4,040 
7,780 
24, 310 
8,860 


97 


Day 


73 


Dewev 


86 


Garfield 


96 


Grant 


124 


G reer 


93 


Kingfisher!!!. !!!!.!!!..'...!.!.!.!!...!..!!.! 1.!!!!! 

Kiowa 

Lincoln 


138 
118 
50 
90 
136 


Nolle 

Oklahoma 

Pawnee 

Payne 

Pottawatomie 


126 
63 

106 
93 
88 


Roger Mills 


88 


Washita 


87 


Woods 


94 


Woodward 


78 


Total... 


2,840 


2,290 


2,519 


248,525 


954 



Enrollment of persons between the ages of 6 and 21 for the year 1902. 



County. 


White. 




Colored. 


Total. 


Aggre- 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


gate. 


Beaver 


622 
1,814 
2,710 
2,913 
3,582 
3,286 
2,661 

880 
2,990 
3,993 
3,355 
5, 749 
3,878 
3,169 
2,624 
4,977 
3,335 
1,941 
4,496 
2,472 
4,228 
5,935 
2,140 
3,897 
7,788 
6,644 


526 
2,433 
2,878 
2,832 
3,185 
2,968 
2,378 

771 
1,825 
3,817 
3,106 
5,371 
3,624 
2.926 
2,424 
4,654 
3,180 
1,807 
4, 743 
2,317 
2,914 
5,425 
2,000 
3,479 
7,058 


1,148 
4,247 
5,588 
5,745 
6,767 
7,257 
5,039 
1,651 
3,815 
7,810 
6,461 

11, 120 
7,502 
6,095 
5,048 
9,651 
6, 515 
3,748 
9,239 
4,789 
8,142 

11,360 
4,140 
7,376 

14,846 
6,644 








1,148 


Blaine 




164 
40 
65 

101 
46 
38 


153 

50 
90 
83 
36 
47 


3i7 
90 
155 
184 

82 
86 


4, 564 


Caddo 


5,678 


Canadian 


5,900 
6,951 


Cleveland 


Comanche 


7,539 


Custer 


5,124 


Day . • 


1,661 
3,848 


Dewey 


16 
42 
9 


17 
49 
27 


• 33 
91 
36 


Garfield 


7,901 


Grant 


6,497 


Greer 


11, 120 


Kay 


25 

457 

4 

434 

1,027 

56 
505 

62 
143 
184 


32 
433 


57 

890 

4 

846 

2,133 
114 

1,127 
117 
262 
356 


7,559 


Kingfisher 


6,985 


Kiowa 


6,062 


Lincoln 


4i2 
1,106 

58 
622 

55 
119 
172 


10, 477 


Logan 


8,648 


Noble 


3,862 
10, 366 


Oklahoma 


Pawnee 


4,906 


Pavne • 


8,404 


Pottawatomie 


11,716 


Roger Mills 


4,140 


Washita 








7,376 
14,908 


Woods 


34 


28 


62 


Woodward 


6,644 















Total 


88,982 


82,941 


171,923 


3, 452 


3,589 


7,041 


178, 964 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



22 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

Enrollment in public schoohy 1902. 



County. 



White. 



Male. 



Fe- I 

male. I 



Total. 



Colored. 



Male. 



Fe- 
male. 



Total. 



Total 
male. 



Total 
female. 



Aggre- 
gate. 



Beaver 

Blaine 

Canadian 

Caddo 

Cleveland 

Comanche 

Custer 

Day 

Dewey 

Garfield 

Grant 

Greer 

Kay 

Kintffisher 

Kiowa 

Lincoln 

Logan 

Noble 

Oklahoma 

Pawnee 

Payne 

Pottawatomie . 

Roger Mills 

Washita 

Woods 

Woodward 



Total. 



379 
1,492 

471 
2,422 
2,789 



364 
1,522 

585 
2,408 
2,801 



743 
3,014 
1,056 
4,830 
5,590 



133 
8 
54 



l,te 
518 
1,514 
3,697 
2,427 
4,205 
3,386 
3,086 
704 
4,227 
2,821 
1,669 
3,729 
2,091 
3,458 
5,767 
1,477 
2,637 
5,790 
1,974 



1,916 
433 
1,369 
3,532 
2,159 
3,866 
3,194 
2,750 
843 
4,127 
2,684 
1,576 
3,607 
1,967 
3,238 
5,477 
1,280 
2,752 
5,217 
1,774 



64,664 61,441 



3,861 
951 
2,883 
7,229 
4,586 
8,071 
6,579 
5,836 
1,547 
8,354 
5,505 
3,245 
7,336 
4,068 
6,696 

11,234 
2,757 
5,389 

11,007 
3,748 



26 



132 
10 
74 



265 

18 
128 
171 



379 
1,625 

479 
2,476 
2,877 



1,654 

695 

2,482 

2,884 



32 



58 



25 



126,105 



2,616 



18 


21 


371 


375 


347 


355 


739 


884 


54 


59 


416 


499 


32 


25 


81 


69 


175 


168 



746 



702 
1,623 
113 
915 
57 
150 



17 



1,971 
618 
1,526 
3,730 
2,431 
4,205 
3,403 
3,457 
704 
4,574 
3,560 
1,723 
4,146 
2,123 
3,639 
5,932 
1,477 
5,637 
5,816 
1,974 



1,948 
433 
1,382 
3,577 
2,178 
3,866 
3,215 
3,125 
843 
4,482 
3,568 
1,635 
4,106 
1,992 
3,307 
5,636 
1,280 
2,752 
5,234 
1,774 



2,870 



5,486 



67,281 



64,311 



743 
3,279 
1,074 
4,958 
5,761 



3,919 
951 
2,908 
7,307 
4,609 
8,071 
6,618 
6,582 
1,&47 
9,056 
7,128 
3,358 
8,251 
4,115 
6,846 

11,567 
2,767 
6,389 

11,049 
3,748 



131,591 



Average daily attendance for the year ending June SO, 1902, 



County. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Beaver 


258 
1,156 

278 
1,600 
1,739 
1,118 

390 

957 
2,505 
1,720 
2,798 
2,280 
2,183 

435 
2,663 
2,322 

949 
2,489 
1,298 
1,956 
3,415 
1,019 
1,629 
3,778 
1,152 


263 
1,024 

328 
1,591 
1,702 
1,165 

317 

893 
2,583 
1,515 
2,511 
2,240 
2,085 

580 
2,606 
2,357 

992 
2,603 
1,265 
1,931 
3,360 

842 
1,521 
3,497 
1,280 


621 


Blaine 


2,180 


Caddo 


606 


Canadian 


3,191 


Cleveland 


3,441 


Custer 


2,283 

707 
1,850 


Day ^ 

Dewev 


Garfield 


5,088 


Grant... V 


3,235 


Greer 


5,309 


Kay 


4,620 


Kingfisher 


4,268 


Kiowa 


11, 015 


Lincoln 


5,169 


Logan 


4,379 


Noble 


1,941 


Oklahoma 


6,092 


Pawnee 


2,663 


Payne 


3,887 


Pottawatomie 


6,775 


Roger Mills 


1,861 


Washita 


3,150 


Woods 


7,275 


Woodward 


2, 432 






Total 


41, 987 


41,052 


83, 039 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

Receipts for the year ending June SOj 1902. 



23 



County. 



Beaver 

Blaine 

Caddo 

Canadian 

Cleveland 

Comanche 

Custer 

Day 

Dewey 

Garfield 

Grant 

Greer 

Kay 

Kingfisher 

Kiowa 

Lincoln 

Logan 

Noble 

Oklahoma 

Pawnee 

Payne 

Pottawatomie . 

Roger Mills 

Washita. 

Woods 

Woodward 



Balance on 

hand June 

80, 1902. 



From ap- 
portion- 
ment of 
Territorial 
and county 
school 
fund. 



«3,083.00 
2,893.05 



District 
tax. 



Sale of 
bonds. 



92,432.20 I 
2,626.63 



$5,8a2.46 
12,396.06 



$1,500.00 
1,767.00 



Other 
sources. 



$424.04 
167.67 



Total 
receipts. 



$13,241.70 
16,845.36 



11,718.19 
8,269.89 



8,409.30 
12,367.48 I 



I 



36,836.36 
26,638.88 



1,476.00 



1,216.17 



6,989.31 
1,722.70 
3,109.45 
11,048.18 
1,889.16 
4,629.31 



14,287.57 



6,382.10 

1,778.68 

3,644.50 

9, 664. 76 

14,868.89 

16,968.46 

12,374.00 

7,666.94 



21,624.24 
2,976.06 
10,450.66 
37,211.26 
40,490.22 
26,652.06 



6,064.00 
660.00 
6,747.66 
20,106.00 
1,443.95 
1,907.93 



63.16 
276.42 
893.26 
388.66 
1,453.91 



49,661.44 



6,628.00 



1,023.46 



58,166.02 
46,276.76 



32,945.66 
7,130.48 
24,127.68 
71,142.88 
68,680.88 
60,496.67 
69,467.32 
78,946.41 



Total . 



4,883.00 
17,263.88 

3,908.00 
22,698.98 

1,642.88 

19,681.77 

11,465.88 

297.44 

59.33 

17,388.19 

6,562.20 



12,805.97 

9,691.76 

8,243.31 

10,633.88 

6,955.09 

10,976.71 

14,191.00 

6,475.04 

8,805.04 

22,678.06 

14,868.68 



40,690.46 
41,668.43 
24,483.86 
62,722.76 
21,987.41 
34,966.14 
37,632.69 
7,248.67 
15,659.69 
57, 626. 96 
18,703.98 



8,314.68 
1,850.00 
470.00 
1,100.00 
7,694.04 
4,486.00 

11,768.00 

834.00 

4,779.00 

22,388.00 
6,819.00 



6,904.65 
585.78 
3,945.26 
24,882.96 
2,089.02 
1,890.38 
1,150.26 



47.00 
76.00 
60.18 



66,998.66 
70,949.79 
40,996.41 

111,438.03 
89,268.89 
71,500.00 
76,207.77 
14,950.84 
28,690.78 

114,045.21 
44,998.94 



173,420.76 



231,556.72 



620,018.64 



112,172.25 



46,465.07 



1,207,895.62 



Expenditures for the year ending June SO, 1902. 



County. 



Teachers' 
salaries. 



Sites, 
buildings, 

and 
grounds. 



Rents, re- 
pairs, and 
incident- 



Library 
and ap- 
paratus. 



Other 
purposes. 



Total ex- 
penditures. 



Balance I 

on hand 

June 30, 

1902. 



Warrant 
indebt- 
edness. 



Beaver 

Blaine 

Caddo 

Canadian 

Cleveland 

Comanche . . . 

Custer 

Day 

Dewey 

Garfield 

Grant 

Greer 

Kay 

Kingfisher . . . 

Kiowa 

Lincoln 

Logan 

Noble 

Oklahoma ... 

Pawnee 

Payne 

Pottawatomie 
Roger Mills . . 

Washita 

Woods 

Woodward...! 



166.89 
024.11 
036.00 
676.64 
678.10 
641.17 



$3, 144. 17 
2,098.91 



$991.07 
2,648.98 



$124.66 
98.96 



$91.28 
316. 74 



2, 743. 27 



6,010.47 



48,473.28 



937. 51 



217.76 , 2,981.60 

1 2,849.30 

87.35 812.06 



I- 



456.65 
371.30 
837.95 
796.33 
264.61 
284.26 
983.16 
662.16 
231.60 
213.82 
491.66 
498.66 
961.44 
829. 77 
658.80 
799.13 
869.86 
296.16 
901.07 



747.82 
7,140.02 
18,823.82 
6, 417. 78 
7,791.87 



654.86 

205.43 

10,348.49 

7,375.43 

4,438.12. 



255.38 

341.02 

9,986.15 

1,406.83 



7,892.89 

13, 326. 00 

10,650.73 

4,115.64 

2,499.35 

18,088.68 

11,805.23 

16,734.58 

9,487.07 

3,483.95 

4,113.54 

25, 754. 99 

10,754.99 



8, 836. 10 
150.00 

5,859.91 
11,976.27 

4, 768. 09 
13,730.71 

3.503.62 

4, 908. 24 

6,023.29 
713.46 

2,642.32 
11,562.03 

3,566.65 



510. 49 
100.00 
266.10 
317. 72 
361.82 
692.60 
533.23 
398. 11 
117. 10 



494.50 

361.99 

1,809.80 

3, 740. 11 

938.07 



1,479.37 
1,540.00 
7,773.68 
164.16 
2,437.80 
3,004.00 
1,780.65 
3, 613. 65 
15,377.63 



115.41 , 412.91 
460.20 I 8,486.07 
987.75 1,996.80 



$12,148.44 
15,186.69 
6,035.00 
48,346.43 
37,527.40 
62,961.37 
29, 166. 15 
6,320.05 
19,838.05 
67,523.45 
52,375.80 
46,839.40 
42,234.26 
69,202.01 

210,778.16 
58,281.02 
78, 190. 59 
30,558.22 
85,964.55 
33,031.17 
58, 924. 32 
67,663.79 
21,098.70 
128,301.25 
97,559.25 
41, 196. 26 



$1,786.06 
1,658.67 



$691.80 
844.66 



11, 196. 75 
8,749.35 

"3,' 786.* 50* 
1,618.50 
4,289.68 
3,619.43 
6,256.08 
6,574.24 



1,387.16 



90,731.39 



790.92 



9,294.56 
6, 109. 86 
1,916.97 



19,744.40 



8,730.07 
7,691.67 

10,437.19 

25,473.48 
6,237.22 

12,576.68 
9, 889. 96 
4,319.58 
3,654.34 

16, 485. 96 
6, 639. 57 



13,017.16 
15, 128. 52 
23,916.56 
16,549.97 

6,019.68 

4,852.12 
22,657.93 
18,674.35 

5,843.78 
10, 420. 57 

3,314.28 

'i6,'566.'i7 



Total... 1260, 948. 08 



235,688.48 ,109,741.04 



17,387.51 62,409.56 1,116,230.77 181,607.33 ,260,728.30 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



24 



REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



Schoolhouses for the year ending June SOj 1902. 



County. 



School- 
houses. 



Value. 



I Erected 
' during 
I year. 



Cost. 



Total valu- 
i atiou of 
I all other 
property 

belonging 
j to district. 



Beaver 

Blaine 

Caddo 

Canadian 

Cleveland 

Comanche 

Custer 

Day 

Dewey 

Garfield 

Grant 

Greer 

Kay 

Kingfisher 

Kiowa 

Lincoln 

Logan 

Noble 

Oklahoma 

Pawnee 

Payne 

Pottawatomie . 

Roger Mills 

Washita 

Woods 

Woodward 



Total . 



$11,690.44 
19,656.44 
5,000.00 
60,250.60 
47,215.00 



25 

62 
131 
125 
108 

94 
122 

28 
165 
111 

62 
110 

65 
106 
117 

45 

85 
241 

94 



8,000.00 
15,549.50 
82,596.00 
74,050.00 
43, 459. 00 
56,440.00 
73, 151. 00 
13,326.00 
56, 797. 00 

117,350.00 
49,989.00 

197, 817. 00 
48,819.50 
62,193.00 

112,546.82 
18,070.00 
33,435.50 

111,550.00 
28,406.00 



2,192 



1,347,257.15 



83,281.64 
3,376.00 
5,000.00 
2,450.75 
3,025.00 



550.00 
906.55 
629.00 
690.00 
700.00 
300.00 
116.00 
326.00 
712.00 
917.65 
200.00 
000.00 
836.50 
007.00 
658.90 
250.00 
206.45 
524.00 
298.00 



302 190,861.44 



$895.00 
6,212.00 



«,583.00 
9,294.00 



5,939.31 



4,154.27 
9,154.00 
18,931.00 
19,964.60 



22,645.00 



19,720.00 
30,454.00 

8,275.00 
40,502.00 
16,407.00 
11,699.00 
12,480.53 

8,175.00 
500.00 



16,608.00 



271,592.61 



Teachers employed and the average salaries paid for the year ending June 30 j 1902. 



County. 



Male. 



Female. 



Total. 



Average salaries paid.. 



First 
grade. 



Second 
grade. 



Third 
grade. 



Beaver 

Blaine 

Caddo 

Canadian 

Cleveland 

Comanche ... 

Custer... 

Day 

Dewey 

Garfield 

Grant 

Greer 

Kay 

Kingfisher . . . 

Kiowa 

Lincoln 

Logan 

Noble 

Oklahoma ... 

Pawnee 

Payne 

Pottawatomie 
Roger Mills . . 

Washita 

Woods 

Woodward 

Total... 



10 
27 
14 
40 
60 
12 
39 
18 
35 
71 
56 
78 
50 
69 
14 
95 
50 
26 
60 
32 
49 
72 
29 
57 
108 
51 



35 
73 
13 
75 
60 
17 
62 
10 

' 45 
96 
79 
64 
87 
91 
30 
75 

112 
50 

116 
61 
98 
88 
26 
44 

166 
70 



46 
100 

27 
115 
100 

29 

91 

28 

80 
167 
135 
142 
137 
160 

44 
170 
162 

76 
176 

83 
147 
160 

56 
101 
264 
121 



$35.50 
43.00 
48.00 
46.00 
49.00 
36.00 
40.00 
38.00 
65.00 
65.00 
49.00 
48.00 
60.00 
62.00 
48.00 
41.00 
40.00 
46.00 
50.00 
48.00 
43.00 
49.00 
40.00 
46.00 
40.00 
60.00 



$32.00 
30.00 
36.00 
38.00 
40.00 
36.00 
32.00 
31.00 
40.00 
40.00 
40.00 
40.00 
42.00 
40.00 
41.00 
38.00 
35.00 I 
39.00 
37.00 ' 
36.00 I 
37.00 I 
40.00 I 
37.00 I 
39.00 I 

.37.60 
38.00 



$30.00 
27.00 



86.00 
35.00 
35.00 
30.00 
34.00 
31.00 
37.00 
38.00 
35.00 
40.00 
34.00 
40.00 
34. IK) 
30.00 
33.00 
32.00 
31.00 
32.00 
36.00 
30.00 
32.00 
35.00 
35.00 



1,212 



1,703 



2,915 



46.00 



37.00 



32.00 



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REPORT OF THE GOVEBNOK OF OKLAHOMA. 



25 



Teachers^ certificates issued during the year ending June 30, 190^. 



County. 


First 
grade. 


Second 
grade. 


Third 
grade. 


Tempo- 
rary. 


Total. 


Beaver 


. 15 
7 
2 
3 

10 
6 
2 
6 


10 
46 
15 
21 
46 
5 
30 
10 
16 
72 
55 
49 
44 
33 
48 
63 
22 
• 16 
48 
28 
24 
32 
27 
35 
108 
27 


20 
31 
6 
62 
48 
21 
15 

& 

68 
54 
41 
65 
36 
60 
73 
19 
35 
66 
30 
48 
16 
28 
18 
112 
29 


29 
17 
40 
5 
10 
30 


74 


Blaine 


101 


Caddo 


63 


Canadian 


91 


Cleveland 


114 


Comanche 


62 


Custer 


47 


Day 


28 
80 
30 
22 
25 
23 
32 


53 


Dewey 


88 


Garfield 


7 

14 

28 

5 

2 

12 
15 
8 
6 
20 
10 
3 
6 
17 
4 

12 
21 


177 


Grant ■ 


145 


Greer 


143 


Kay 


137 


Kingfisher 


103 


Kiowa 


120 


Lincoln 


25 
10 
6 
9 
16 
11 
22 
24 
20 
49 
28 


166 


Logan V '. 


59 


Noble ; 


63 


Oklahoma 


143 


Pawnee 


84 


Payne 


86 


Pottawatomie 


76 


Roger Mills 


96 


Washita 


77 


Woods 


281 


Woodward .' 


105 






Total 


241 


940 


1,052 


521 


2,754 







School fund apportionment^ 1903. 



County. 



Enumer- 
ation. 



0.94 per 
capita Jan- 
uary. 



0.08 per 
capita 
July. 



Total 
apportion- 
ment for 
year. 



Beaver 

Blaine 

Caddo 

Canadian 

Cleveland 

Comanche . . . , 

Custer 

Day 

Dewey 

Garfield 

Grant 

Greer 

Kay 

Kingfisher ... 

Kiowa 

Lincoln 

Logan 

Noble 

Oklahoma 

Pawnee 

Payne 

Pottawatomie 
Roger Mills . . 

Washita 

Woods 

Woodward . . . 

Total... 



1,148 
4,564 
5,678 
5,900 
6,951 
7,539 
5,124 
1,651 
3,848 
7,901 
6,497 

11, 120 
7,559 
6,985 
5,052 

10,477 
8,648 
3,862 

10,366 
4,906 
8,404 

11,716 
4,140 
7,376 

14,908 
6,644 



$1,079.12 
4,290.16 
5,337.32 
5,546.00 
6,533.94 
6,372.26 
4,816.56 
1, 551. 94 
3,617.12 
7,426.94 
6, 107. 18 

10,452.80 
7,105.46 
6,565.90 
4,748.88 
9,848.38 
8,129.12 
3,630.28 
9,744.04 
4, 611. 64 
7, 899. 76 

11,013.04 
3,891.60 
6,933.44 

14,013.52 
6,245.36 



$91.84 
365.12 
454.24 
472.00 
556.08 
603.12 
409.92 
132.08 
307.84 
632. 08 
519. 76 
889.60 
604. 72 
558.80 
404.16 
838.16 
691.84 
308.96 

• 829.28 
392.48 
672.32 
937.28 
331.20 
690.08 

1,192.64 
531. 52 



$1,170.96 
4,655.28 
5,791.56 
6,018.00 
7,090.02 
6, 975. 38 
5,226.48 
1,684.02 
3,924.96 
8,059.02 
6,626.94 

11,342.40 
7, 710. 18 
7, 124. 70 
5,153.04 

10,686.54 
8,820.96 
3,939.24 

10, 573. 32 
5,004.12 
8,572.08 

11,950.32 
4,222.80 
7, 523. 52 

15,206.16 
6,776.88 



178,964 167,511.76 



14,317.12 



181,828.88 



TJie amount apportioned in July, 1903, was considerably less than 
last year and somewhat lower than other years. This is explained by 
the fact that a large amount was derived last year from premiums or 
excess rentals of school land due to the opening of three new counties 
to settlement. The apportionment of July, 1902, was thus increased 
from 16 cents in 1901 to 91 cents in 1902. 

The apportionment of July, 1903, is less than in years prior to 1902, 



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26 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF. OKLAHOMA. 

because the scholastic population has increased 56 per cent in the past 
three years. 

HIGHER INSTITUTIONS OF LEARNING. 

There are seven institutions of learning under Territorial supervision, 
viz: The University of Oklahoma, located at Norman; the Agricultural 
and Mechanical College at Stillwater; Edmond Normal; Northwestern 
Normal at Alva; Southwestern Normal at Weatherford; the Colored 
Amcultural and Normal at Langston, and the University Preparatory 
School at Tonka wa. Oklahomans are justly proud of the excellent 
facilities with which they are enabled to educate the youth of the 
Territory. Each of these institutions is well equipped in every way 
for teaching by the most modern and approved methods. The total 
enrollment during the past year was 2,818. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA. 

The university is founded by authority of an act of the legislature 
of the Territory of Oklahoma entitled "An act to locate and establish 
the University of Oklahoma." The act provides that when $10,000 
and 40 acres of land should be donated to the Territory by the city of 
Norman, the institution should be located at that place. These require- 
ments having been met, the university was established at Norman in 
1892. 

The object of the institution is given in the following section of the 
law: 

(6787) Sec. 9. The object of the University of Oklahoma shall be to provide the 
means of acquiring a thorough knowledge of the various branches of learning con- 
nected with scientific, industrial, and professional pursuits, in the instruction and 
training of persons in the theory and art of teaching, and also the fundamental laws 
of the United States and this Territory in what regards the rights and duties of 
citizens. 

Location, — Norman, the county seat of Cleveland Countj^ is a grow- 
ing town of 3,500 inhabitants. It is situated 18 miles south of Okla- 
homa City, on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad, on high 
ground sloping to the Canadian River. It is preeminently healthful. 
The citizens are from all parts of the United btates and are united in 
their hearty sympathy with the work of the university. 

Grounds, — The university campus comprises 60 acres, 20 of which, 
lyinff just east of the old campus, wei'e lately donated to the university 
by the citizens of Norman. It lies at a good elevation 1 mile south of 
the business portion of town. The campus and approaching boulevard 
have been set out in trees, which have already obtained a size to render 
the spot one of the most pleasing in Oklahoma. 

Buildings, — By the opening of the second semester, February 8, 
1904, the university will nave seven buildings ready for use. 

University Hall, — By an act of the legislature approved March 8, 
1901, the university was granted the income for two years from the 
tax of seven-tenths of a mill on the dollar on all taxable property of 
the Territory; the amount to be spent, however, not to exceed $90,000. 
As a result of that appropriation, University Hall was built. It is 
built of buff brick with terra-cotta trimmings and basement of planed 
limestone, in the renaissance style of architecture. It contains ample 
office room foi* the president, secretary, registrar, and regents, together 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 27 

with suites of recitation rooms and private offices, society halls, etc. 
The west wing as planned was not built under the present appropria- 
tion. The formal entrance into University Hall took place .on March 
15, 1903. 

Science Hall. — Work on this building has been delayed by the failure 
of the first contractors to complete their bond. At a meeting of the 
board of regents held in July the contract was relet to a reliable con- 
tractor and the work is now being pushed forward rapidly. The 
building is to be read}^ for use by February, 1904. It is Romanesque 
in design, and will be built of gray brick with limestone trimmings. 
It will be 64 by 125 feet, with a basement and two floors. The depart- 
ment of chemistry will occupy the basement, the department of biology 
the first floor, and the department of geology the second floor. 

Carnegie Library. — The university has lately received from Mr. 
Carnegie a gift of $30,000, to be used in erecting a library building. 
Provisional plans for the building were accepted by the board of 
regents in July, and they are now being matured by the architect. 

Heating plant. — In accordance with the bill above referred to, a 
suitable heating plant has been put in at a cost of about $10,000. 

Gymnanum. — This building is now inclosed and will be read}^ for 
use by the opening of school, September 15. It is 100 by 55 feet. 
The large apparatus room is 40 by 80. In front of it, facing the 
athletic field on the east, are the directors' offices, each 15 by 20 feet, 
with a 5-foot hall between. On the south is the locker room, 52 by 15. 
On the southwest are the bathrooms, a shower bath, 12 by 15, and a 
tub bath, 11 by 15. 

Anatomical laboratory. — The anatomical laboratory occupies a sep- 
arate building, designed and constructed for the purpose. It contains 
the dissecting room, a class room and library, and a workroom for the 
preparation and storage of material. It is a frame building 50 by 24. 

Engineering building. — This building is 80 by 46, frame, one story, 
located adjacent to the heating and power plant. At present it is 
occupied by the chemical, biological, and geological laboratories, 
which will be removed to Science Hall as soon as it is completed. 

Organization. — The university organization consists of the follow- 
ing schools: College of arts and sciences, school of pharmacy, prepar- 
atory course in medicine, preparatory school; school of fine arts. 

The college of arts and sciences embraces an undergraduate course, 
in the main elective; a combined course in collegiate and medical 
studies; combined courses in collegiate and engineering studies: 
{a) civil engineering, {b) mining engineering. • 

The school of pharmacy covers two years' work, and leads to the 
degree of pharmaceutical chemist. 

The meaical course includes the first two years' work. 

The preparatory school covers a three years' course, leading to the 
freshman class. 

The school of fine arts embraces {a) a preparatory course in vocal 
and instrumental music, (5) an advanced course in music. 

Support. — The university is supported by appropriations made by 
the legislature of the Territor}^ of Oklahoma and by the income from 
certain lands reserved for university, normal school, and agricultural 
school purposes, the aggregate from all sources being about $40,000 
per annum. 

Faculty. — The faculty consists of 33 members. The instructors are 



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28 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

specialists in their work, chosen from such schools as Harvard, Prince- 
ton, Columbia, Johns Hopkins, etc. At the annual meeting of the 
board of regents, held in June, an instructor in economics, an instruc- 
tor in mathematics, and an assistant in English were added. There 
are no student teachers. 

Enrollment. — The following is a summary of the enrollment for 
1902-3, as shown by the catalogue for 1903-4: 

College of arts and sciences: 

Graduate students , 2 

Seniors 12 

Juniors 11 

Sophomores 13 

Freshmen ^ 36 

Specials 41 

Medical course 8 

123 

School of pharmacy: 

Second year 2 

First year 17 

19 

School of fine arts: 

Junior 1 

Sophomore 1 

Freshmen 13 

Preparatory course — 

Third year i 7 

Second year 2 

First year , . . . 6 

Specials 46 

76 

Preparatory school: 

Third year 19 

Second year 76 

First year 154 

249 

Business school 39 

Total 506 

Repetitions 41 

Total enrollment to May 11 465 

Enrollment of last year 359 

Gain over last year 106 

UNIVERSITY PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 

The University Preparatory School for Oklahoma was created by 
the legislature of 1901 and was located at Tonkawa, a rapidly growing 
town of 1,500 in the Salt Fork Valley. The town of Toilkawa donated 
20 acres of land for a school site. The building, a brick and stone 
structure 54 by 96, having four floors, was erected and equipped just 
in time for the opening of the school on the scheduled date, September 
8, 1902, at which time the school opened with a faculty of 7 instructors 
and an enrollment of 227 students. The building was erected and 
the school maintained the first year by means of a tax of one-fifth mill 
on all the taxable property of Oklahoma. The legislature of 1903 
changed the method of support and gave the institution, annually for 
two years, a direct appropriation of $12,000 and one-seventh of the 
rentals from section 13, reserved for higher education by Presidential 
proclamation of 1893, and subsequent similar proclamations. 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 29 

During the year four additional instructors were added, and the 
enrollment increased to 315 students. At the close of the year the 
board of regents added three more instructors, thus giving the school 
a faculty of 14 teachers for the opening of the second year. The 
faculty are men and women of special fitness, chosen on account of 
their training, energy, and successful experience as teachers in the 
public schools of the North and West. 

Early in the spring of 1903 the grounds were accurately surveyed 
and the campus platted, and over 1,600 trees (elms, locusts, maples. 
North Carolina poplars, and evergreens) were set out and are in a 
thriving condition. During the summer vacation (1903) the fourth 
floor of the building was finished and equipped, at a cost of about 
$1,000, for music and society halls. 

There were no regular graduates at the close of the year, but a class 
of 11 young men and women completed courses in the commercial 
department. 

The purpose of the University Preparatory School is, primarily, to 

{trepare young men and women for freshman standing in the Territorial 
Jniversity at Norman. The school aims to meet the wants and needs 
of all classes of secondary students. That this may be accomplished, 
the school is organized as follows: 

(1) The regular preparatory school, with three courses of study of 
three years each, the Latin, the modern languages,* and the scientific. 

(2) The school of commerce, with two courses of one year each. 

(3) The school of music, offering courses in piano, voice, violin, man- 
dolin, guitar, and reed and valve instruments. 

(4) The school of oratory and physical culture, providing a course of 
two years. 

(5) The school of art, which offers a two year couise. 

(6) A year of subpreparatory work in the common branches for 
those who are not qualified to take up the regular first year work. 

(7) A teachers' review course during the spring term. 

Tuition is free in all departments, the only restriction being that in 
order to obtain free instruction in music students must take at least 
three regular studies. 

THE AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

The Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College was established 
and located at Stillwater by an act of the Territorial legislature, which 
took effect December 25, 1890, accepting the provisions of the Federal 
statutes in aid of colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the 
mechanic arts. The town of Stillwater was required to vote bonds in 
the sum of $10,000, and to provide not less than 80 acres of land. 
The bonds were voted and 200 acres of land provided. 

The past year has been one of satisfactory growth and development. 
Owing to the advancing of the age limit of entrance to the preparatory 
department to 16 years, and to more stringent . requirements for 
entrance to the collegiate department, the attendance was not materially 
greater than during the preceding year — the enrollment standing at 
435. The departments of mechanical engineering, of domestic econ- 
omy, and of botany and entomology were able to move into new and 
commodious quarters, greatly contributing to the effectiveness of the 
work. For the first time in the history of the institution, also, ade- 



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30 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

quate auditorium and chapel room has been provided. Twenty-three 
students — twelve young men and eleven young women — received the 
degree of bachelor of science. This is the largest class graduated to 
this time. Seven of these students graduated in the general science and 
literature course, ten in the chemistry course, and six in the mechan- 
ical engineering course. . 

New features of importance have been determined upon. A two 
years' course in agriculture and domestic science has been established, 
to be known as the school of agriculture and domestic economy. It 
purposes to give to young men such theoretical and practical instruc- 
tion in agriculture, horticulture, and animal husbandry as every man 
on the farni should have; and to young women, theoretical and prac- 
tical training in cooking, sewing, sanitation, hygiene, and home man- 
agement. In connection with this work instruction in the common 
school branches is given to those who desire or need it. This course 
begins October 15 and closes March 15 of each year, to accommodate 
those who are doing work on the farm. It does not in any manner 
take the place of the regular agricultural course or the short courses 
in agriculture and mechanic arts. 

The preparatory department will be discontinued, except as work in 
the common school branches will be given in the school of agriculture 
and domestic science. A subf reshman class has been instituted, taking 
largely the work heretofore given in the freshman class. This is 
regarded as a collegiate class under the laws of the Territory, and 
extends the regular courses over five years. It will result in notice- 
ably raising the standard of work in the college. 

The resources of the college now amount to about $59,500 per year. 
Of this $37,500 comes from the Government to the college and experi- 
ment station (Morrill and Hatch funds, respectively), and the greater 
portion of the remainder from the Territory. Of the Government 
fund of $37,500 above mentioned, however, $15,000 (the Hatch fund), 
goes exclusively to the experiment station, and is used solely for 

Eurposes of experimentation and the publication of results. This 
javes about $44,500 per year applicable to purposes of maintenance, 
equipment, and instruction. Tne equipment for instruction now 
represents a valuation of about $80,000, and the building equipment 
about $100,000. 

Three regular courses, each leading to the degree of bachelor of 
science, are given — the general science course, the agricultural course, 
and the mechanical engineering course. In the course first mentioned 
opportunity is given for specialization in chosen sciences, Special 
courses are given in stenography, typewriting, bookkeeping, and 
printing, and a special short course (eight weeks) is given during the 
winter term in agriculture and mechanic arts. During the last winter 
a similar short course was given in domestic economy, for which there 
were more applicants than could be accommodated. 

The agricultural experiment station is connected with this institution 
and a department of it. While its work, as above stated, is devoted 
solely to experimentation and the publication of results, incidentally 
it is a valuable source of illustration, and affords a stimulus to students 
in every branch of science. Its bulletins now go to 20,000 farmers of 
Oklahoma and Indian Territory. 

Tuition is free, except to students outside of Oklahoma and Indian 
Territory. An incidental fee*of $1 per term is charged. Text-books 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 31 

cost from $3 to $4 per terra. Board with room in private families can 
be obtained from $2.50 to $3.50 per week. Furnisned rooms from $3 
to $6 per month. A considerable number of the students board in 
students' clubs, thus reducing expenses in that line to $2 to $2.25 per 
week. Very many of the students are practically self-supporting, 
making their way by work done during the summer vacation and by 
labor during the academic year in the town, about the college, and in 
connection with the operations of the college farm. 

The athletic interests of the college were favorabl}^ affected during 
the past year by the fitting up of a comfortable gymnasium in the 
basement of the library building. 

THE TERRITORIAL NORMAL SCHOOL. 

The Normal School of Oklahoma was located and established at 
Edmond by legislative enactment in 1890, upon the conditions — which 
were promptly met — that Oklahoma County donate $5,000 in bonds 
and the town of Edmond donate 40 acres of land for a school site. 
Two thousand dollars additional in bonds was donated by the town. 

Edmond is a thriving town of about 2,000 inhabitants, situated about 
midway between Guthrie and Oklahoma City, on the highest point on 
the Santa Fe Railway, and is preeminently distinguished for its health- 
fulness and for the beauty of its surroundings. It is distinctively a 
college town, its citizens having established homes here largely because 
the town is free from many of the vices commonly prevalent in county- 
seat towns. 

The main building of the normal school, built of brick, was com- 
pleted in 1893; the wings, built of stone, were erected in 1894 and 
1895. The entire building contains fifteen class rooms and an assembly 
hall of 500 seating capacity. The unprecedented growth of the insti- 
tution in the two years just past has made additional room imperative. 
Accordingly, the legislative assembly made an appropriation of $40,000 
for the erection of a new building which is now under construction. 
This building will contain an assembly hall of 800 seating capacity, 
offices, cloakrooms, library, and reading rooms, chemical and physical 
laboratories, together with fourteen recitation rooms. The plans of 
the building are in accordance with the highest attainments possible in 
modern educational facilities. 

In addition to the new building mentioned above, a power house and 
central heating building will be erected this summer. Both the old 
and the new normal school building will be supplied with heat and 
water from the central building. Such changes will be made in the old 
building as to render possible its equipment with the most approved 
modern conveniences and appliances. 

The library and the reading room are furnished with the best boo s 
and current magazines that the market affords. These are open to all 
students every day except Sunday. The laboratories — chemical, phys- 
ical, physiological, and biological — are well supplied with modern 
appliances for scientific experimentation and investigation. A new 
telescope has been added recently to the department of astronomy. 

The normal school is maintained by a Territorial tax levy and a 
seventh part of the rentals obtained from sections numbered 13 in the 
so-called Cherokee Outlet, and similar sections in the Kiowa, Comanche, 
Apache, and Wichita lands opened to settlement on August 6, 1901. 

7717—03- 3 



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32 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

The special function of the normal school is to prepare young men 
and young women for the work of teaching. This result is accom- 
plished, first, through thorough and liberal academic work; second, 
through the study of the child; third, through studying the philosoph^^ 
of teaching, and, fourth, through practice and training in the model 
school. 

The diploma given to the student upon graduation is a five-year 
Territorial certificate and is renewable by the Territorial superin- 
tendent of public instruction upon evidence of satisfactory work done 
in teaching. The diploma is therefore practically a life certificate. 

Eighty-eight students have within the past eight years completed 
the normal-school course of study and hundreds of others are now 
teaching in the Territory who have received a partial training in this 
school. About one-half the students who attended this institution the 
past year expect to teach in some of the schools of the Territory next 
year. More than 300 schools will be directly benefited, therefore, 
through the efforts of the normal school the past j^ear. It will be seen 
from these facts that the institution is subserving the ends for which 
it was established. 

The aggregate enrollment of the school for the first decade of its 
history is a little more than 2,000, making an average attendance of 
200 a year. The entire enrollment last year was 484; the enrollment 
for this 3^ear is 758. This is an increase of about 00 per cent over the 
preceding year. The growth of the school will be seen by considering 
the number of students enrolled by years. The enrollment was: 

1891-92 62 

1892-93 101 

1893-94 116 

1894-95 161 

1895-96 : 156 

1896-97 174 

1897-98 251 

1898-99... 250 

1899-1900 322 

1900-1901 337 

1901-2 484 

1902-3 758 

There is a fair prospect that the attendance for the ensuing year will 
be greater than in any former year. But a large attendance of students 
is not the object sought; it is excellence of work done, rather. 

A large number of the students attending this institution earn the 
money necessary to pa}^ their wav through school by teaching a part 
of the year; they then attend scliool the remaining part. Tuition is 
free in all departments, except that of instrumental music. 

The faculty consists of 24 members, all of whom are men and women 
of special training, education, and teaching abilit}^, who take a sym- 
pathetic interest in the welfare of the student. 

THE NORTHWESTERN NORMAL SCHOOL. 

The Northwestern Normal School, of Alva, was the second normal 
to be established in Oklahoma. The law establishing it was enacted by 
the legislative assembly of 1897, and the purpose of its founding was 
for the instruction of persons in the art of teaching and in all the 
various branches pertaining to the public schools of Oklahoma Terri- 
tory. The faculty was at first composed of a president and two 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. S3 

teachers, and it has grown from year to year until now the faculty is 
composed of a president and 23 teachers. The enrollment has increased 
from year to year until it reached 610 for the past school year. The 
Northwestern Normal School is located in the beautiful city of Alva, 
the county seat of Woods County, the most populous county in Okla- 
homa. The site of this school is one of the finest in the West, being 
situated on an eminence one-half mile south of the center of town. 

The sanitary history of the school and the city has demonstrated 
beyond any reasonable doubt that no more healthful place can be found 
than Alva and its immediate surroundings. The purest of spring 
water is furnished the school and city, which largely assists in main- 
taining a high degree of healthfulness. 

The city has a population of about 3,500 people, made up of people 
from all parts of the Union. Many fine homes have been built durmg 
the past year, and there is an effort on the part of all residents to make 
Alva a beautiful and refined town, one that by its outward appearance 
would indicate culture and refinement to the most casual observer upon 
first visitation. The school is the pride of all citizens, and to it they 
give most loyal support. 

During the past year many permanent improvements have been 
made, which add largely to the better equipment of the building. The 
cost of these improvements amount to $8,515.51. Besides these 
improvements, $2,800 of past indebtedness has been canceled. The 
seventh legislative assembly appropriated $2,200 and the literary 
societies paid the balance. The commercial department that was 
organized one year ago, and thoroughly equipped with all modern 
coveniences, has proven to be one of the popular departments, having 
enrolled between 40 and 50 pupils during the past year. A biological 
workshop with all modern tools and a museum of more than 100 
specimens, in a fine cabinet, have been a part of the improvements 
along scientific lines. New steel cases for the library and about $1,200 
worth of books have been added to this part of the institution. The 
interior of the building has been much improved by the addition of an 
electric-light system throughout. 

The seventh legislative assembl}^ made it mandatory upon the normal 
schools of Oklahoma Territory to establish kindergarten departments 
within one year after the passage of the bill. The Northwestern Nor- 
mal School has established such a department to carry out the provi- 
sions of the act. 

The course of study has been much extended and improved and is 
now equal to the best normal school in the West. 

One of the contemplated improvements for the coming year is to 
enlarge the seating capacity of the assembly hall. The hall is now 
seated with desks, and it is the purpose to have the hail seated with 
600 opera chairs, thus improving the seating accommodations. 

There are now six courses maintained in the institution — English - 
scientific, Latin, modern language, commercial, kindergarten, and 
music. Graduates of the first three courses receive diplomas, which 
are eq^ual to five-year certificates, and may be renewed at the end of 
each fave years by the Territorial superintendent. 

Teachers of Oklahoma holding first-grade certificates are admitted 
to the freshman year of the normal department without examination. 
Students from accredited high schools, other normal schools, university, 
agricultural college, and the preparatory university are admitted to 



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84 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

the normal department without examination and are given credits com- 
mensurate with the progress made in the other schools. Owing to the 
very satisfactory work done in all the departments during the past 
year, but little change was made in the membership of the faculty for 
the coming year. , 

The Northwestern Normal School is taking a very creditable rank 
with the very best institutions in the Territory. With its magnificent 
building, thoroughly equipped, and with a facult}' of 23 able and 
experieuQed teachers, and a student body of six or seven hundred 
zealous pupils, this institution is bound to have an excellent influence 
on Oklahoma and her institutions. 

THE SOUTHWESTERN NORMAL SCHOOL. 

The Southwestern Normal School was established bv an act of the 
legislature of 1901. This act provided for a normal school to be 
located in the southwestern part of Oklahoma. A committee appointed 
by the governor located the school in the city of Weatherford, in Cus- 
ter County. This is one of the newest and most promising districts 
of the Territory. The citizens of Weatherford are filled with the 
progressive spirit, which is characteristic of their district. They are 
proud of the normal school and will spare no pains in seeing that the 
wants of the normal and of the student body are readily supplied, so 
far as lies within their power. The cit}'^ is at an altitude of over 1,700 
feet above sea level, and is one of the most healthful of the Southwest. 
It is on the main line of the Choctaw Railroad which makes connections 
on the east at Geary and El Keno with the Rock Island system from 
the north and south, and on the west at Clinton with the Frisco and 
Orient roads. 

The building when equipped will cost about $52,000. It is a modern 
structure of pressed brick, heated by steam, lighted by either gas or 
electricity, and when completed will have both hot and cold water 
distributed throughout the building. It contains 18 class rooms, a 
library and reading room, offices, physical, chemical, and biological 
laboratories, a chapel, music rooms, cloakrooms, toilet rooms, lava- 
tories, and a number of shower baths. The building will be ready for 
occupancy b}^ November 1. The normal will open up in temporary 
quarters in buildings which have been carefully fitted for the purpose. 

A campus of 40 acres of land was donated by the city of Weather- 
ford as a normal site. The city has also expended $5,000 in fitting up 
and beautifying the grounds. The campus nas been carefully graded, 
drives and walks have been laid out, and several hundred trees have 
been set out and are growing nicely. The drainage is perfect and the 
most sanitar}^ conditions prevail. . 

The legislature of 1903 appropriated $12,500 for the support of the 
school for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1904, and a like amount for 
the year ending June 30, 1905. 

Tne course of study for the Southwestern Normal School is as com- 
plete in every particular as that of normal schools generally. In 
many respects the courses offered are more advanced than those of 
ordinary normals. It is the aim of the administration to offer ample 
opportunity for professional work, but along with it a thorough 
academic training. A subnormal course of three years is offered 
preparatory to the four years' normal course. Students coming with 



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REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 35 

diplomas from approved high schools are admitted to the normal with 
the standing of juniors in the regular course. Those students coming 
with public school diplomas issued by the Territorial superintendent 
of public instruction are admitted to the second year of the subnormal- 
course without examination. 

The course of study is arranged with particular regard to specializa- 
tion. Sufficient work is required in each department to warrant a cer- 
tain degree of breadth and general culture. Then the course is made 
flexible enough to allow a student to elect branches of work along the 
line for which he seems specially fitted or adapted. The head or the 
department under which the student elects his work becomes his 
patron and with the president constitutes a committee to plan and 
arrange his work thereafter. Thus students will have the advantage 
of an all-round course in the fundamentals of education and also spe- 
cial preparation in a particular field of related subjects. In this way 
special teachers of English, of mathematics, of science, of languages, 
of kindergarten, or of an}^ other branch are trained for the city or 
public schools. They are trained with special reference to that which 
they can do best. This puts experts in place of teachers with a gen- 
eral training and can not help but raise the standard of teaching. 

A special course in kindergarten is offered, arranged with regard to 
the preparation of teachers for kindergarten ana primary grades. 
This is considered one of the advanced semiprofessional courses and 
is open only to those having the standing or juniors in the regular 
normal course. 

The normal offers also a commercial course embracing two years of 
work. Students are admitted to this course who have standings equiva- 
lent to those of public school graduates. The department of music 
offers six years of work in instrumental and four years of work in 
vocal music. The department is well equipped with pianos and every- 
thing necessary for efficient work and thorough training. 

Since the Southwestern Normal School is so advantageously located, 
the prospects are good for a full attendance from the very first. 
Judging from the number of applications and communications already 
received, the first year's enrollment will far exceed the estimates of 
the most hopeful and optimistic observers. The board of regents has 
selected a faculty of 15 members to have charge of the work of the 
school, but the prospects are that this number will be far inadequate 
for the vast amount of work which will be required of them. 

THE COLORED AGRICULTURAL AND NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 

This institution was established by an act of the legislature in L897 
for ''the instruction of both male and female colored persons in the 
art of teaching, and in the various branches which pertain to a common 
school education; also, in such higher education as may be deemed 
advisable by such board, in the fundamental laws of the United States, 
in the rights and duties of citizens, and in the agricultural, mechanical, 
and industrial arts." Forty acres of land were donated for building 
and agricultural purposes by the citizens of Langston and its immedi- 
ate vicinity, and the regents of the institution soon after took steps to 
erect a building with the appropriation which had been made by the 
legislature. School was opened in the fall of 1898 with four teachers 
and an enrollment of 40 students. By having night as well as day ses- 



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36 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

sions during the greater part of the first year, the enrollment by the 
close of the year had reached 181. Owing to the fact that the regents 
were not able to employ a sufficient number of teachers, the night ses- 
sions were not continued after the first year. The enrollment at the 
close of the second year was 187; at the close of the third, 192; at the 
close of the fourth, 211: at the close of the fifth, 237. 

The faculty at present consists of 13 teachers, 5 of whom give their 
entire time to instructing students in the various industrial arts. The 
40 acres of land have increased to 160. There are now five commodi- 
ous buildings — the main building, the mechanical building, two dormi- 
tories, and the president's residence. These buildings are all two 
stories in height. The main building, the mechanical building, and 
the boys' dormitory are stone structures, while the girls' dormitory 
and the president's residence are frame. The main building has an 
auditorium with a seating capacity of 500, a fine society hall, an office 
for the president, and 10 recitation rooms. The mechanical building 
has a drawing room, a large machine shop, and a carpenter shop. Con- 
nected with tnis building is a large blacksmith shop built of corinigated 
iron. Each one of the dormitories has a sufficient number of rooms to 
accommodate over 60 students. The library has over 900 volumes, the 
reading room is well supplied with newspapers and periodicals, the 
laboratory and museum are well equipped, and the departments of 
agriculture, mechanic arts, and domestic economy are supplied with 
tools, implements, stock, machinery, and apparatus woith not less than 
$10,000. 

That the investment made by the Territory in the establishment and 
equipment of this institution was wisely made is shown by the record 
of its teachers and students. During the past five years much good 
work has been done in the various departments, besides the usual 
exercises which are conducted for the purpose of training the mental 
powers of the students, considerable stress has been placed upon the 
training of their moral powers. The effect of tKis training is seen in 
the fact that the conduct of the students from \^ear to year has been of 
such a character as to reflect no discredit upon the school, and has 
been the means of raising among the colored people of the Territory 
a higher standard of citizenship. While proper attention has been 
given by the management to mental and moral training, manual train 
mg has not been neglected. In addition to the work which is done 
from day to day under instructors in agriculture, domestic economy, 
machine work, carpentry, and blacksmithing the students do all the 
work which is necessary to keep their dormitories in proper condition, 
conduct the laundrv, perform all labor in connection with the board- 
ing-department, and see to it that the grounds about the buildings in 
which they live are kept clean. In this way industrial education is 
given a prominent place in the university, and the students are taught 
the importance and dignity of labor from the time they enter until 
they leave the institution. 

Judging from the efforts which are now being made to create a 
greater interest among the colored people of the Territory in the 
work of this institution, and from the success which it has had in the 
past, I am satisfied that the attendance next year will be the largest in 
its historv. 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 37 

OTHER SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES. 

There are several sectarian educational institutions located in various 
parts of the Territory. Among these may be mentioned the King- 
fisher College (Congregational), located at Kingfisher, which occupies 
three large buildings costing, together with their equipment, $75,000. 
This institution enjoys a large endowment, and has an annually 
increasing enrollment. 

The Epworth University located at Oklahoma City will open this 
year under peculiarly auspicious circumstances, having a magnificent 
building costing $50,000 and equipment 125,000 more. The institu- 
tion has an endowment of $40,000 at present. The enrollment will be 
about 250. 

The Baptist College is located at Blackwell. Their new building 
which is very commodious, was completed in 1901. 

The Presbyterians hav^e an academy at Newkirk, the Congrega- 
tionalists at Jennings, the Friends at Stella, and the Catholics a college 
for boys at Ponca and one for girls at Guthrie. 

UNITED STATES INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL AT CHILOCCO. 

The Chilocco Indian Industrial School was established by the Hon. 
James M. Haworth, the first superintendent of Indian schools. The 
school was opened in January, 1884, in what is now known as the boyii^ 
home. From this small beginning has grown the large institution 
known at present as the Chilocco Agricultural School. The school 
plant now consists of some thirty-five buildings, principally of stone, 
mostly heated b}^ steam or hut water and lighted with electricity by 
the school plant, and has many other modern conveniences. Chi- 
locco is a monev-order post-oflice; it has telephone connections north 
and south, and flag stations on the Santa Fe and Frisco railway 
systems, both railroads running through the school lands. 

The Chilocco Agricultural School is endeavoring to do for the 
Indian what the State agricultural colleges and experimental stations 
are doing for the white man, i. e., teach agriculture, dairying, and stock 
and poultry raising in all their branches both scientifically and prac- 
ticallv, at the same time striving to instill in the Indian youth a love 
and cfesire for such pursuits. It is the ambition of the present man- 
agement to bring the Chilocco Agricultural School up to the standard 
and pace set by the older institutions in the various States; hence 
every effort is concentrated along these lines, everything else taking 
a secondary place. Only such trades and shop work are taught as 
are necessary for keeping up the repairs of the school plant and equip- 
ment thereof. High school education is not attempted, while foot- 
ball and kindred sports do not receive the best attention or energy of 
the pupils. The superintendent has endeavored to secure a high class 
of instructors experienced along the various lines of agricultural 
tutelage, and in a measure has been quite successful. 

A more magnificent tract of land has never been set aside for educa- 
tional purposes than has been provided for Chilocco, consisting of 
thirteen and one-half sections of land. The area in cultivation has 
been largely increased the last two years, over 2,000 acres now being 
in crop or ready for planting this coming fall. A wheat crop of 700 
acres has just been harvested. 



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38 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

It is the desire to still further increase the cultivated area, but large 
tracts will be reserved for pasturage and hay land. It is hoped in tne 
near future to inaugurate a colonization scheme, which provides for 
the leasing to worthy graduates small farms for a series of years, thus 
enabling them to apply lessons learned, as well as to acquire a small 
capital for further farming operations elsewhere. Manj^ other im- 
provements in the way of buildings, machinery and other equipments 
of a general and special nature are contemplated. 

INDIAN BOARDING SCHOOLS. 

The Government maintains several boarding schools for Indian 
pupils. The following shows the attendance at each: 

Boarding schools: 

Absentee 60 

Cheyenne 140 

Fort Sill 170 

Kaw 43 

Osage ; >. 163 

Otoe 82 

Pawnee 182 

Ponca Ill 

Rainy Mountain 100 

Cantonment 105 

Red Moon 43 

Riverside 175 

Sac and Fox 94 

Seger 109 

MISSION SCHOOLS. 

Several religious denominations are maintaining industrial schools 
and academies at the locations mentioned below: 

Friends Mission Tecumseh. 

St. Louis Catholic Pawhuska. 

St. Johns Catholic Pawhuska. 

South Methodist Anadarko. 

Roman Catholic Anadarko. 

Presbyterian ( two) Anadarko. 

St. Benedicts Industrial for boys , Sacred H eart. 

St. Marys Academy for Girls Sacred Heart. 

The institutions located at Sacred Heart were established twent}"- 
five years ago by the Jesuit fathers. 

RAILWAYS. 

Oklahoma is well supplied with railroads, the principal trunk lines 
of the Southwest being represented. To the old lines of railway which 
were the pioneers have been added many extensions reaching out into 
new territory and acting as feeders for the main lines. New trunk 
lines are building into the principal cities, and scarcely a town of im- 
portance or county seat is not now in touch with the markets of cities 
of other States and the Gulf or seaboard by some more or less direct 
line of railroad. Eveiy county in the Territory has some railway 
mileage. 

Railroad building has been an important factor in the rapid devel- 
opment of our Western prairies. , Builders' materials and agricultural 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 39 

machinen^ are thus early at hand to supply the requirements of the 
homesteaHer. 

The Galveston branch of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe covers 
the eastern portion of the Territory from north to south,' from which 
are built connecting branches leaving the main line at Newkirk, Guth- 
rie, and Pauls Valley, which furnish transportation to those counties 
lying to the east. Direct communication is thus afforded to the Gulf 
ports as well as the eastern markets, Kansas City and Chicago. This 
road also has a line running through Woods and Woodward counties, 
in the northwest portion of the Territory. 

The Chicago and Rock Island parallels the Santa Fe from north 
to south, being about 35 miles distant at the nearest point. A branch 
from the main line runs west through the counties of Caddo, Kiowa, 
and Greer. At Enid another branch leaves the main line which it 
parallels in its southerly course, passing through several counties and 
joining the main line at Waurika. Another branch passes through 
Beaver County, in the extreme northwest portion of the Territory. 

The Choctaw, Oklahoma and Gulf Railway passes across the Terri- 
tor}'^ from east to west, crossing several other railways in its course. 
It transports a large quantity of the coal consumed in the Territory, 
coming direct through the coal fields on the east. It is a direct line 
to Memphis and points in northern Texas. 

The St. Louis and Sail Francisco runs diagonally through the Ter- 
ritory from St. Louis to Quannah, Tex. Another line traverses the 
Territorv from north to south in the western portion. 

The I^ansas Cit} , Mexico and Orient is now completed about half- 
way through the Territory and runs in a southwesterly direction 
through some of the western counties. Eventually this line will 
afford direct communication with Pacific ports and open up new 
markets for Oklahoma products. 

The Fort Smith and Western enters the Territory from the south- 
east, and has several important cities on its line, Fort Smith, Ark., 
being its eastern terminus. This new line will cross the Frisco four 
times, the Rock Island three times, the Katy twice, the Santa Fe four 
times, the Kansas City and Southern once, and the Orient once when 
completed to Pueblo. 

The Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma enters from the northeast and 
crosses a fertile and productive country. It is practically all graded, 
and steel is being laid as fast as they can. The connecting line from 
W^ybark on the north and south line in the eastern part of the Terri- 
tory is practically completed, as nearly all the steel has been laid and 
train service established. 

The Denver, Enid and Gulf is just completed between Guthrie and 
Enid, but is pushing on to the northwest. 

The Arkansas Valley and Western enters from the east and crosses 
several lines of railway in its course to the northwest. 

The following lines are under construction: Guthrie, Shawnee and 
Colgate; Colorado, Oklahoma and Texas; St. Louis, Oklahoma and 
Western; Oklahoma City and Northwestern. 

There is also under construction an electric line connecting the cities 
of Guthrie and Oklahoma City. Other lines are projected between 
Norman, Lexington, Tecumseh, and Shawnee. 



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40 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

Railway mileage by counties. 
County. 



Beaver 

Blaine 

Caddo 

Canadian . . 
Cleveland.. 
Comanche . 
Cuater 



Day. 

Dewey 

Garfield 

Grant 

Greer 

Kay 

Kingfisher 

Kiowa 

Lincoln 

Logan 

Noble 

Oklahoma 

Pawnee 

Payne 

Pottawatomie. 
Roger M ilia... 

Washita 

Woods 

Woodward 



Total. 



Main track. 


Side track. 


55.57 


3.41 


114. 10 


9.56 


128. 26 


11.02 


71.96 


13.48 


21. 6:^ 


3.57 


149. 71 


13.40 


70.38 


8.95 


3.78 




2.48 


.95 


129.36 


13.11 


81.66 


7.12 


103.53 


3.82 


118.64 


19.05 


46.51 


5.79 


116.83 


9.71 


177. 43 


4.79 


149.63 


14.17 


39.86 


4.02 


128.64 


21.48 


62.24 


4.97 


89.76 


8.42 


96.07 


11.31 


21.36 


7.13 


39.67 


4.23 


223.06 


14.25 


65.72 


7.76 



2,306.84 , 



225.47 



Mileage of the railroads in Oklahoma Territory, 



Railway. 



Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe . . 

St. Louis and San Francisco 

Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific. 

Choctaw, Oklahoma and Gulf 

Kansas City. Mexico and Orient. . 
Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma.. 

Fort Smith and Western 

Denver, Enid and Gulf 



Total . 



Main 
track. 



Side 
track. 



686.37 
417.40 
509.34 
374.63 
14.47 



71.06 
43.13 
53.59 
54.24 
.49 



26.85 



1,929.06 225.47 



Grade. Total. 



49.99 



30.00 , 
88.58 I 
121.42 
61.10 I 
27.69 



657.43 
510.52 
662.93 
458.87 
103.54 
121.42 
61.10 
57.50 



378. 78 



2,533.31 



The figures above given were taken from assessors' returns and 
indicates the status of railway building March 1, 1903. A report of 
new mileage at this time would show an increase of over 200 miles 
built since March 1. 



Assessment of the Atchison^ Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company in Oklahoma 

Territory in 1903. 



County. 


Main track. 


Side track. 


Value of 
build- 
ings. 


Total. 


Miles. 


Value. 


Miles. 


Value. 


Cleveland 


2L63 
3.78 
36.88 
89.16 
65.55 
37.36 
37.25 
25.41 
70.96 
42.85 
43.11 
46.80 
65.72 


$134, 171 
14,661 
120,856 
355,734 
317,509 
68, 797 
231,062 
157,618 
251,390 
109, 196 
17,244 
180,274 
263, 153 


3.57 


«7,140 


«1,545 


$142, 856 


Dav 


14,561 


Grant 


1.97 
16.27 
13.17 
1.67 
7.42 
6.43 
8.42 
4.97 


3,940 
32, 740 
26,340 

3,340 
14,840 
12,860 
16,840 

9,940 


i.'ieo 

3,460 
85,110 
285 
3,950 
3,855 
5,510 
2,570 


126,056 
392,564 
852,369 
67,422 
249,852 
174,333 
273,740 
115,998 


Kay 


Logan 


Lincoln 


Noble 


Oklahoma 


Pavne 


Pawnee 


Pottawatomie 


17, 244 


Woods 


3.41 
7.76 


6,820 
15,-520 


1,276 
7,426 


188,369 
276,098 


Woodward 




Total . 


586.46 


2,206,565 


75.06 


150,320 


116, 245 


2,391,462 





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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



41 



Assessment of the Chicago^ Rock Island and Pacific Railway Company in Oklahoma 

Territoiy in 1903, 



County. 


Main track. 


Side track. 


Value of 
build- 
ings. 


Total. 


Miles. 


Value. 


Miles. 


Value. 


Beaver 


65.57 
44.89 
92.98 
25.98 
78.85 
12.26 
30.26 
66.22 
41.94 
46.51 
2.70 
24.68 


$180,936 
106,315 
338,962 
150,865 
257,295 

49, 763 
175, 720 
294,287 
170,235 
233,293 
8,964 

82,382 


3.41 

2.80 

8.88 

6.74 

8.08 

1.95 

.4.32 

7.30 

2.72 

5.79 

.70 

.90 


$6,820 

5,600 

17,760 

13,480 

16,160 

3,900 

8,640 

14,600 

5,440 

11,580 

1,400 

1,800 


$3,000 
2,205 
6,080 
2,720 
5,645 
2,520 
3,060 
8,645 
4,516 
6,060 
1,105 
1,510 


$190,756 


Blaine 


119,336 


Caddo 


362,802 


Canadian 


167, 065 


Comanche 


279,000 


Greer .. 


56,183 


Grant 


187, 520 


Garfield 


317, 632 


Kiowa 


180,190 


Kingfisher 


250,833 


Noble 


11, 469 


Woods 


85,692 






Total 


522.84 


2,049,017 


53.59 


107,180 


46,965 


2,208,378 







Assessment of the Choctaw, Oklahoma and Gvlf Railway Company in Okldhomxi Territory 

in 1903. 



County. 


Main track. 


Side track. 


Value of 
build- 
ings. 


Total. 


Miles. 


Value. 


Miles. 


Value. 


Blaine 


48.87 
13.99 
39.52 
35.68 
21.25 
16.26 
31.16 
51.96 
21,36 
13.81 
81.01 


$189,711 
81,666 

230,256 

163,715 
92,170 
30,500 

182,147 

. 238,109 

92,647 

59,900 

280,457 


5.18 

1.07 
6.14 
6.25 
1.87 


$100,260 
2,140 
12,280 
10,500 
3,740 


$4,120 
1,550 
6,500 
3,850 
1,880 


$204,091 


Caddo 


85,356 


Canadian 


248,035 


Custer 


178,065 


Greer 


97,790 


Logan ... 


30,500 


Oklahoma 


6.28 
11.31 
7.13 
1.31 
8.75 


12,560 
22,620 
14,260 
2,620 
17,500 


6,460 
36,425 
4,550 
1,600 
8,316 


201, 157 


Pottawatomie 


297,154 


Roger Mills 


111,467 


Washita 


64,120 


Woods 


306,272 






Total 


373.85 


1,641,276 


54.24 


198,480 


74,240 


1,823,996 







Assessment of the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway Company in Oklahoma Territory 

in 1903. 



County. 


Main track. 


Side track. 


Value of 
build- 
ings. 


Total. 


Miles. 


Value. 


Miles. 


Value. 


Kay 


18.66 
36.18 
32 


$80,840 
206,084 
187,456 


1.98 
3.12 
5.23 


$3,960 
6,240 
10,460 


$2,335 
4,227 
9,806 


$87, 135 


Lincoln 


216, 551 


Oklahoma 


207, 721 






Total 


85.73 


474, 380 


10.33 


20,660 


16,367 


511, 407 







Assessment of the Oklahoma City and Southwestern Railway Company in Oklahoma Territory 

in 1903. 



County. 


Main track. 


Side track. 


Value of 
build- 
ings. 


Total. 


Miles. 


Value. 


Miles. 


Value. 


Caddo 


21.29 
6.92 
48.86 
41.34 
15.41 
9.81 


$60,868 
19,784 

129,315 
16,536 
19,406 
28,046 


1.07 

.60 

3.28 


$2,140 
1,200 
6,560 


$1,956 
1, 155 
4,485 


$64,963 


Canadian 


22, 139 


Comanche 


140, 360 


Greer 


16,536 


Kiowa 


2.71 
.74 


5,420 
1,480 


2,950 
665 


27, 776 


Oklahoma 


30,081 






Total 


143.63 


273,956 


8.40 


16,800 


11,100 


301,855 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



42 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



Assessment of the Kansas Cityy Mexico and Orient Railway Company in Oklahoma Ter - 

ritory in 1903. 





County. 


Main track. 


Side track. 


Value of 
build- 
ings. 


Total. 




Miles. 


Value. 


Miles. 


Value. 


Woods . . 




4.<l 01 


910,540 








f 10, 540 


i 











Assessment of the Blachvelly Enid and Southwestern Railway Comjmny in Oklahoma 

Territory in 1903. 



County. 


Main track. 


Side track. 


Value of 
build- 
ings. 


Total. 


Miles. 


Value. 


Miles. 


Value. 


Blaine 


32.34 
22 

34.70 
2.48 
14.62 
37.48 
10.93 
44.62 
25. 86 


$75,658 

48,686 

76, 791 

5,488 

39,392 

101,683 
29,663 
98,744 
.f>7. 22H 


1.63 
2.(M 
3.70 

.95 

.83 
3.85 

.70 
4.28 
2.92 

.70 


$3,260 
4,080 
7.400 
1,900 
1,660 
7,700 
1,400 
8,560 
5,840 
1,400 


$675 

750 

825 

150 

700 

3,075 

300 

1,775 

1,325 

650 


$79,593 


Comanche 


53.516 


Custer 


85,016 


Dewey . . 


7,538 


Grant 


41,752 


Garfield . 


112, 458 


Kay 


31,a53 


Kiowa 


109, 079 


Washita 


64,393 


Woods 


13.10 1 35; 540 


37,590 










Total 


238.03 1 5fi«.8fi3 


21.60 4.^200 


10,225 


622,288 






' 









Assessed valuation of railroad property. 



Beaver $190,956 

Blaine 403, 280 

Caddo 513,120 

Canadian 333, 597 

Cleveland 142,856 

Comanche 371, 877 

Custer : 263,081 

Day 14,561 

Dewey 7, 538 

Garfield 483,230 

Grant J 355,329 

Greer 1 177,759 

Kay 511,053 

Kingfisher 250,833 



Kiowa $320,761 

Lincoln .320,178 

Logan 442, 499 

Noble 261,321 

Oklahoma 645,997 

Pawnee 129,462 

Payne 281,260 

Pottawatomie 314, 398 

Roger Mills 111,457 

Washita 110,763 

Woods 617,923 

Woodward 276,098 • 



Total 7,851,187 



RAILWAY BUILDING. 

The large amount of railway mileage completed and now under 
construction in the Territory is particularly^ noteworthy. Fully 1,000 
miles of main track, besides about 250 miles of side track, has been 
completed. Much more will be finished and opened for traffic before 
the end of the year. In many localities new territory has been opened 
up, and its future development will doubtless soon equal that of the 
older settled communities. According to the Railwa}^ Age, Oklahoma 
Territory leads all other States and Territories in railway building, 
Texas being second, and Indian Territory third. 

ATCHISON, TOPEKA AND SANTA FE. 

Through the kindness of Mr. H. A. Tice, superintendent of the 
Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Compan}^ I am enabled to 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 43 

give the following information relative to the improvements made on 
this line during the past year: 

The depots at Shawnee will be of a substantial character, probably comparing 
very favorably with those at Guthrie. There are three gaps in the line which are 
yet* to be closed, namely: Between Fairfax and Kaw, 19 miles; between Truesdale 
and Tecumseh, 17 miles; and between Quay and Maramec, 8 miles, making a total 
of 44 miles which had not been completed on June 30. The grading work, however, 
is virtually finished, with the exception of some finishing work through the Osage 
Nation. As to improvements during the coming year, it is proposed to close up the 
three remaining gaps mentioned above and complete the station structures. Up to 
June 30 we had laid about 145 miles of main track between Newkirk and Pauls 
Valley; also the branch liae between Ripley and Gushing and between Pawnee and 
Esau Junction, approximating 16 miles. 

I am unable to give the sidings, from the fact that a great number of them are as 
yet incomplete and some of them are only temporary. 

In addition to the above, we have about completed the passenger depot at Guthrie, 
at an approximate expense of $40,000, and during the coming year expect to erect 
freight and. passenger stations at^ Oklahoma City of about the same character as those 
at Guthrie. 

CHICAGO, ROCK ISLAND AND PACIFIC. 

Mr. John F. Stevens, chief engineer of the Chicago, Rock Island 
and Pacific, furnishes the following information relative to this line: 

Enid and Anadarko, from Lawton to Waurika, 41.08 miles; Chicago, Rock 
Island and Pacific, from Lawton to Chattanooga, 21*.50 miles; Enid and Anadarko, 
from Watonga to Anadarko, 46.79 miles; Total new mileage, 109.37 miles. Two thou- 
sand seven hundred and eighty-one feet of additional sidetracks were laid on existing 
lines. 

New structures were erected as follows: Overhead bridge at Caddo Cut; new side- 
walks and platforms at Anadarko, Gotebo, Lahoma, and Kingfisher; new section 
tool houses at Anadarko, Hobart, and Mountain View; coal platform at Mountain 
View; new stock yards at North Enid and Komalty; new steel standpipe, 20 feet 
diameter by 60 feet high, and new wooden water tank at Enid. 

DENVER, ENID AND GULF. 

Mr. Ed L. Peckham, general manager of the Denver, Enid and 
Gulf Railroad Company, furnishes the following information relative 
to his line: 

Relative to additions and improvements contemplated now will state that it is our 
intention to build northwest from P^nid up through Kansas by way of Kiowa to 
some point on the Union Pacific, probably Hayes, and to build southeast from 
Guthne to probably Texarkana, and connect with the Texas and Pacific, making a 
direct and short Denver-New Orleans through line. 

IMPROVEMENTS MADE BY THE DENVER, ENID AND GULF RAILROAD IN OKLAHOMA 
DURING YEAR ENDING JULY 31, 1903. 

Fifty-six miles main line; 4.34 miles sidetrack; 3 No. 2 frame depots; 1 No. 3 
frame depot; 4 frame section houses built, one to be built; 1 frame storehouse, 24 by 
60 feet; 1 coach and engine shed, 28 by 220 feet; 1 frame blacksmith shop, 16 by 20 
feet; 1 frame car repair shop, 16 by 20 feet. Joint use terminals Santa Fe at Guthrie, 
Frisco at Enid. Three water tanks 16 by 20 feet; 3 stock pens, No. 2, one in contem- 
plation; two 8- wheel passenger engines; two 10-wheel freight engines; 1 baggage car; 
1 combination mail and coach; 1 chair car; 1 office car; 22 flat cars; 6 camp cars; 2 
cabooses; 25 box cars. 

CHOCTAW, OKLAHOMA AND GULF. 

Mr. W. W. Wentz, Jr., general superintendent of the Choctaw, 
Oklahoma and Gulf Railroad Company, makes the following statement 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



44 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

relative to the improvements and extensions of his line during the 
past year: 

There was laid 14.56 miles of main track on the Choctaw, Oklahoma and Western 
Railway from Guthrie toward the Indian Territory, and 3.31 miles of sidinjf. Dur- 
ing the same period we erected a new station building at Geary to replace one 
destroyed, and made some minor changes in the Geary yard tracks. 

About the only important piece of work in prospect for the Territory at this time 
is the rearrangement of the El Reno yards, which will constitute a cut-off from the 
Choctaw, Oklahoma and Gulf and the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific tracks, 
together with various sidings. 

PORT SMITH AND W^ESTERN. 

Mr. Frank Dale, solicitor for the Fort Smith and Western Kiiilroad, 
furnishes the following information relative to this line, under date 
of September 11: 

Relative to the Fort Smith and Western Railroad, I have to advise you that their 
road is now practically completed and trains will bQ in operation before the 1st day 
of October upon their line of railway from Fort Smith, Ark., to the city of Guthrie, 
Logan County, Okla. 

The road enters the east line of the Territory in township 13 north, running thence 
in a northwesterly direction along Deep Fork, crossing the Santa Fe road at Sparks; 
thence in a northwesterly direction, crossing the 'Frisco at Warwick, the Missouri, 
Kansas and Texas at Fallis, and from thence up along Bear Creek to the city of 
Guthrie. 

The entire length of the line.of road is 212 miles, 62 thereof being within Okla- 
homa Territory. The road is primarily built as a coal road and is built upon a low 
^rade, being one-half of 1 per cent to the mile, and runs through the coal fields 
m eastern Indian Territory. The coal fields in question being semianthracite in 
character and almost smokeless, with an excess of carbon above that usually carried 
by soft coal, makes it very desirable for all purposes for which coal is used. 

The company are now operating trains from Fort Smith to Sparks, in Lincoln 
County, ana will have complete service between Fort Smith and Guthrie by October 1 
of this year. At the city of Guthrie they will connect with a large number of roads 
and can distribute the coal over such lines to most parts of the Territory. 

They are constructing depots at each station as the road is being built, and by 
reason of the building of this road the towns along the line thereof will be enabled 
to procure coal for manufacturing purposes at a low rate, and it is confidently pre- 
dicted that the Fort Smith and Western Railway will be an important factor m the 
rapid development of the business interests of Oklahoma Territory. 

ST. LOUIS AND SAN FRANCISCO. 

Mr. B. L. Winchell, vice-president and general manager of the St. 
Louis and San Francisco Railroad Company, furnishes the following 
information relative to the extensions of this line: 

The line from Okeene to Yexowa was opened February 9, 1903; from Chickasha 
to Lawton, October 1, 1902; from Lawton to Snvder, February 9, 1903, and from 
Snyder to Olustee, March 29, 1903. 

MISSOURI, KANSAS AND OKLAHOMA, 

Mr. John Devereaux, general attorney for the Missouri, Kansas 
and Oklahoma Railroad Company, states, under date of June 30, that 
there were 32 miles completed on the Oklahoma line northwest from 
Oklahoma City, with side tracks at Oklahoma City, Witcher, Arcadia, 
and Luther. Depots are in course of construction at Guthrie, Okla- 
homa City, Witcher, and Arcadia. The entire grade in Oklahoma is 
completed. 

KANSAS CITY AND ORIENT. 

This line is completed and is running trains as far as Fairview, 
Woods County. Tne grade is also completed into Texas. Steel is 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 45 

rapidly being laid from the south northward, and it is expected that 
before the end of the year trains will be running from Kansas City 
over the entire line as far as Texas. 

RAILWAYS CHARTERED. 

The following is a list of the railways chartered within the Terri- 
tory during the past j^ear: 

The Chickasha Warehouse and Terminal Association. Place of business, Okla- 
homa City, Okla. Capital stock, $250,000. Incorporators, D. D. Sayer, M. M. 
Beavers, L. D. Stone, A. B. Snow, Wallace Hendricks, all of Chickasha, Ind. T.; 
Ed. B. Johnson, Norman, Okla.; C. H. Everest and John E. Duinars, Oklahoma 
City, Okla. ; John A. McClure, Marlow, Ind. T. 

The Oklahoma Traction Company. Place of business, Oklahoma City. Capital 
stock, $2,000,000. Incorporators, John W. Shartel, Selwyn Douglas, M. L. Spittler, 
Oklahoma City, Okla. ; George S. Green and U. C. Guss, Guthrie, Okla. 

Cheyenne and Washita Valley Railway Company. Place of business, Cheyenne, 
Okla. Capital stock, $250,000. Incorporators, John B. Harrison, H. D. Cox, A. S. 
McKinny, A. L. Thurmond, Milo Burlingham, G. W. Hodges, J. W. McMurty, 
W. A. Beaty, A. O. Miller, L. L. Collin, and J. P. Johnson, all of Cheyenne, Okla. 

The Metropolitan Railway Companv, Enid, Okla. Place of business, Enid, Okla. 
Capital stock, $600,000. Incorporators, P. J. Goulding, H.-B. Decker, J. A. Hill, 
Enid, Okla.; L. C. West, Kingfisher, Okla.; C. J. West and Arthur Hess, Enid, 
Okla.; B. L. Arbecan, New York City, N. Y. 

The Muskogee Union Railway Company. Place of business, Guthrie, Okla. 
Capital stock, $500,000. Incorporators, C. N. Haskell, Ottawa, Ohio; W. B. Eaton, 
Rauel Haskell, William T. Hutchings, Muskogee, Ind. T.; Horace Slpeed, Thomas J. 
Lowe, and Charles E. BiJlingsley, Guthrie, Okla. 

The Fort Smith, Black well, Wellington and Northwestern Railroad Company. 
Place of business, Blackwell, Okla.; branch office at Wellington, Kans. Capital 
stock, $1,000,000. Incorporators, George H. Hunter, S. P. Kramer, W. A. Wren, A. 
Graff, Wellington, Kans.; D. S. Rose, J. L. Waite, J. W. Randal, and George R. Wil- 
lett, Blackwell, Okla. 

The Lawton and Chickasaw Central Railwav Companv. Place of business. Law- 
ton, Okla. Capital stock, $2,000,000. Incorporators, J. \V. Martin, H. T. Sims, O. L. 
Abney, George M. Paschall, H. W. Hanna, James H. Wolverton, Lawton, Okla. 

Oklahoma and Southwestern Railroad. Place of business. Elk City, Okla. Capi- 
tal stock, $600,000. Incorporators, W. L. Mahoney, Calvin M. Rosser, M. G. Rob- 
inson, J. N. Cook, J. A. Mays, J. G. Queenan, R. E. Echols, Elk City, Okla.; Martin 
A. Lai ly. Little Rock, Ark.; John Overholt, Enid, Okla. 

The Missouri, Oklahoma and Western Railroad Company. Place of business, 
Guthrie, Okla. Capital stock, $5,000,000. Incorporators, Adelbert Hughes, N. D. 
McGinley, C. R. Brooks, W. H. Kay lor, and George Anderson, Guthrie, Okla. 

The Oklahoma City and Northwestern Railroad Company. Place of business, 
Oklahoma City, Okla. Capital stock, $15,000,000. Incorporators, C. G. Jones, R. J. 
Edwards, J. E. Carson, George W. C'arrico, and Warren K. Snyder, Oklahoma 
City, Okla. 

The Blackwell Northeastern Railway Company. Place of business, Blackwell, 
Okla. Capital stock, $50,000. Incorporators, Ed. L. Peckham, George F. Corwin, 
W. C. Rogers, G. J. Blanchard, Blackwell, Okla.; Don C. Smith, A. G. C. Bierer, 
Frank Dale, Guthrie, Okla. 

The Denver, El Reno and New Orleans Railway Company. Place of business. 
El Reno, Okla. Capital stock, $5,000,000. Incorporators, Dick T. Morgan, H. K. 
Ricker, J. A. LaBryer, John A. Masters, A. F. Newell, H. Lassen, L. Rardin, J. E. 
Bonebrake, George W. Bellamv, S. G. Humphreys, W. I. Goff, J. T. Allison, El Reno, 
Okla. " ' 

The Lawton, Wichita and Gulf Railwav Company. Place of business, Lawton, 
Okla. Capital stock, $1,000,000. Incorporators, Robert E. Huff, Wichita, Kans.; 
Hansford E. Julien, Frank M. English, Joseph W. Yoeman, and George W. Crosby, 
Lawton, Okla. 

Mountain Park Electric Railway Company. Place of business, Mountain Park, 
Okla. Capital stock, $150,000. Incorporators, W. G. Woodward, J. C. Brown, 
Mark Robberts, R. D. Simpson, R. J. Helena, Mountain Park, Okla. 

El Paso, Mountain Park and Oklahoma Central Railway Company. Place of • 
business. Mountain Park, Okla. Capital stock, $6,000,000. Incorporators, R. K. 
Kelly, Mark Robberts, B. Hillyer, W. P. Bryan, George Cales, Mountain Park, Okla. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



46 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR O^ OKLAHOMA. 

Central Oklahoma Union Depot and Terminal Railroad Company. Place of busi- 
ness, Guthrie, Okla. Capital stock, $5,000,000. Incorporators, W. S. McCaull, J. G. 
Trimble, George F. Riehl, L. Underwood, J. J. Collister, W. H. McHattie, Kansas 
City, Mo. ; L. M. Thompson, George M. Thompson, Oklahoma City, Okla. ; J. C. Rob)), 
Kingfisher, Okla. 

Oklahoma Central and St. Louis Railroad Company. Place of business, El Reno, 
Okla. Capital stock, $15,000,000. Incorporators, J. M. Carter, H. E. Hopkins, 
El Reno, Okla.; F. F. Ferguson, Union City, Okla.; Louis Underwood, W. S. 
McCaull, E. M. Line, C. B. Kelsea, J. J. Collister, W. H. McHattie, W. W. Davis, 
N. E. Douglass, Kansas City, Mo. 

('hickasaw and Northeastern Railway Company. Place of business, Shawnee, 
Okla. Capital stock, $5,000,000. Incorporators, Charles T. Reichert, Asher, Okla.; 
W. S. Search, Wanette, Okla.; J. H. Maxey, Jr., C. J. Benson, R. A. Timmons, 
B. F. Mann, R. E. Wood, Shawnee, Okla. ; John Laracy, Sacred Heart, Okla. 

Arkansas Valley and Gulf Railway Company. Place of business, Medford, Okla. 
Capital stock, $4,000,000. Incorporators, A. A. Richards, Wellington, Kans.; T. T. 
Godfrey, Medford, Okla.; A. H. Derington, Milan, Kans.; L. H. Simmons, Billings, 
Okla. ; F. E. Barnhill, Nardin, Okla. 

Texas, Mountain Park and Northwestern Railroad Company. Place of business, 
Mountain Park, Okla. Capital stock, $4,000,000. Incorporators, R. K. Kelley, 
Mark Robberts, A. J. Robinson, Burl Hillyer, Mountain Park, Okla. 

Colorado, Oklahoma and Texas Railway Company. Place of business, Hobart, 
Okla. Capital stock, $2,500,000. Incorporators, J. Cranmer, Chicago, 111.; E. E. 
Colby, Springfield, Mo.; G. A. Brown, Vernon, Tex.; R. E. Echols, p:ikCity, Okla.; 
George Sturgeon, Hobart, Okla.; Wallace Hendricks, Chickasha, Ind. T. 

Union Electric Railway Company. Place of business, Shawnee, Okla. Capital 
stock, $200,000. Incorporators, C. J. Benson, W. S. Pendleton, H. T. Douglas, H. G. 
Beard, C. W. Kerfoot, Shawnee, Okla; S. P. Larsh, W. J. Lewis, W. A. Ruggles, 
W. J. Dickerson, A. G. Caldwell, Tecumseh, Okla. 

The Texarkana, Oklahoma and Northwestern Railway Company. Place of busi- 
ness, Oklahoma City, Okla. Capital stock, $15,000,000. Incorporators, John 
Threadgill, C. Porter Johnson, Oklahoma City, Okla.; William Grimes, J. P. Cum- 
mins, Kingfisher, Okla.; C. E. Tool, Geo. H. Klein, Edmond, Okla.; Thos. P. 
Braidwood, Beaver, Okla.; Chas. R. Alexander, Woodward, Okla.; B. F. Nisbett, 
Aurora, Okla. 

The Cherryvale, Oklahoma and Texas Railway Company. Place of business, 
Perry, Okla., branch office at Independence, Kans. Capital stock, $18,000,000. 
Incorporators, R. E. Wade, Geo. A. Masters, Perry, Okla. ; S. M. Porter, Caney, 
Kans.; J. H. Brewster, T. H. Stanford, A. W. Shulthis, Independence, Kans. 

Oklahoma and Texas Railroad Company. Place of business, Sterling, Okla. Cap- 
ital stock, $10,000,000. Incorporators, James G. Depenbrink, A. P. Sanford, Chas. 
B. Selby, Frank G. Prouty, Edward Casey, Emil C. Knappe, Sterling, Okla. 

Guthrie, Shawnee and Colgate Railway Company. Place of business, Shawnee, 
Okla. Capital stock, $1,000,000. Incorporators, Frank P. Stearns, H. T. Douglas, 
M. J. Bentley, C. J. Bocher, D. N. Kennedy, Geo. E. McKinnis, W. A Havener, 
J. M. Aydelotte, C. M. Cade, Shawnee, Okla. 

Oklahoma Central Railroad Company. Place of business, Asher, Okla. Capital 
stock, $5,000,000. Incorporators, J. N. Cook, Elk City, Okla.; L. W. Van Home, 
Salt Lake City, Utah ; Graham Burnham, Oklahoma City, Okla. ; Geo. G. Boggs and 
Chas. T. Reichert, Asher, Okla.; M. L. Mosier, Norman, Okla. 

Kansas, Oklahoma Central and Southwestern Railroad Company. Place of busi- 
ness, Stillwater, Okla. Capital stock, $11,500,000. Incorporators, Geo. W. Hall, S. F. 
Swinford, O. M. Eyler, Dale Lytton, C. F. Jonnston, J. E. Sater, Stillwater, Okla., 
J. T. Ferryman, Morrison, Okla. 

Choctaw and Chickasaw Railroad Company. Place of business, Shawnee, Okla. 
Capital stock, $1,000,000. Incorporators, C. M. Cade, Willard Johnston, Shawnee, 
Okla; J. W. McLoud, F. A. Molitor, Little Rock, Ark.; H. H. Hagan, C. M. Barnes, 
A. G. C. Bierer, Guthrie, Okla. 

Muskogee Southern Railway Company. Place of business, Guthrie, Okla. Capi- 
tal stock, $2,000,000. Incorporators, G. N. Haskell, Ottawa, Ohio; W. R. Eaton, 
Wm. T. Hutchings, Muskogee, Ind. T.; Thomas J. Lowe, Horace Speed, M. Luther 
West, Guthrie, Okla. 

The Lawton Street Railway Company. Place of business, Lawton, Okla. Capital 
stock, $600,000. Incorporators, J. W. Martin, Geo. D. Key, F. M. English, A. R. 
McLeman, J. S. McDuffie, VV. E. Hudson, S. 0. Crutcher, Lawton, Okla.; W. J. 
Pearson, New York, N. Y. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 47 
COMMERCE. 

Oklahoma ships annually thousands of cattle, sheep, and hogs. 
During the months suceeedmg harvest the deluge of wheat to be sent 
by rail to the Gulf and eastern markets completely congests the arteries 
of traffic. The remarkable production of potatoes, peaches, and 
melons often taxes to the utmost the facilities of the railroads for 
moving them. Of her other crops, such as com, oats, castor beans, 
cotton, and cotton seed, Oklahoma ships thousands of tons to the 
markets beyond her borders. 

The great development along agricultural lines makes an increasing 
demand for farm machinery and implements. 

Continued immigration to the Territory brings hundreds of cars of 
household goods and other belongings of new settlers on our vacant 
lands. Upwards of 20,000 carloads of coal have been shipped into the 
Territory during the past year. 

The following statistical information relative to shipments in and 
out of the Territory has been furnished me by the Atchison, Topeka 
and Santa Fe, Chicago, Kock Island and Pacific, Choctaw and (jrulf , 
and St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad companies. 

ATCHiaON, TOPEKA AND SANTA FB RAILWAY. 

Statement showing number of carloads of freight received and forwarded from points on the 
Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway , in Oklahoma Territory, for the year ending 
June SO, 190S, 

Forwarded: Carloads. 

Cattle 3,310 

Hogs 1,321 

^heep 44 

Horses 122 

Wheat 4,'/35 

Corn 1,211 

Gate 359 

Castor beans 22 

Cottonseed 128 

Hay 347 

Melons 10 

Cotton (number of bales, 46,740) 901 

Other mill stuffs 498 

Flour 652 

Total 13,660 

Received: 

Farm machinery and implements 572 

Vehicles 166 

Immigrant movables 630 

Coal 3,284 

Flour 987 

Total 5,639 

CHICAGO, ROCK ISLAND AND PACIFIC RAILWAY. 

Statement showing number of carloads of freight forwarded and received from points on the 
Chix^ago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway, in Oklahoma Territory, for the year ending 
June SO, 190S, 

Forwarded: Carloads. 

Cattle 2,901 

Hogs 758 

Sheep 4 

Horses 303 

7717—03 4 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



48 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



Forwarded— Continued. Carloads. 

Wheat 3,661 

Corn : 326 

Oats 197 

Castor beans 1 

Cotton seed 78 

Hay 290 

Melons 12 

Flour 1,448 

Other mill stuffs 455 

Cotton (number of bales) 29,062 

Received: 

Farm machinery and implements 528 

Vehicles 116 

Flour 265 

Immigrant movables ^ 974 

Coal 2,967 

ST. LOUIS AND SAN FRANCISCO RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Statement showing number of carloads of freight forwarded from stations on line in Oklahoma 

Territory. 



Station. 


6 
1 


i 




o 


i 

81 

167 

53 

113 

76 

131 

89 

93 

104 

46 

123 

6 

10 

2 

12 

11 

3 

6 

9 

4 

2 

3 


39 

n 

35 

28 

14 

26 

2 

""ii" 

10 
56 

8 


30 
16 
32 

4 

9 
17 
17 

1 
19 

5 

"'"9' 


1 

6 


i 


c 





a- 

Ii 




1 


1 

1 

8 


Mlddletoii 


6 

26 
38 
18 
39 

2 
28 
16 
100 

9 
19 
63 

I 








1 




133 

161 

548 

111 

230 

140 

203 

106 

551 

167 

133 

302 

11 

59 

10 

94 

78 

90 

48 

14 

39 

3 

30 

1 

18 

6 

22 

1 

240 




Peckham 


14 
5 
7 
52 
10 
23 




i 

8 




............... 


■■"23" 
1 




Blackwell 




240 




Eddy 








Lamont 




2 
9 

1 






1 




Salt Fork 










Hunter 




1 










Breckinridge 

Enid 










1 
4 
9 
31 
4 
6 




37 


....„ 


i '....! i78 


111 
26 




Drummond 


1 

"14" 




8 




Ames 








Okeene 




7 


25 


22 





Carleton 






Eagle City 

Fav 


...J 1 


34 
5 
42 
34 
47 
19 
3 
1 


4 
...„ 

1 
1 


1 
3 
7 
4 




















50 


Custer 




15 
14 
17 


.......... 








14 

6 


416 


Thomas 


2? 








244 


Arapahoe 


....1 i 

1 








19 


Washita Junction. 








13 


10 




Stout 








...„ 


i 

6 

1 

12 
1 

14 
4 
3 


1 

2 






Cordell 


5 


1 


i 




12 


7 


262 


Rocky 




Hobart 








1 




1 


1 




8 


4 


552 


Mountain Park 








45 


Snvder 








2 

1 







1 


•1 






875 


Siboney 
















1 




Frederick 


10 








4 




5 

1 
27 






340 


Roosevelt 
















Stroud 


77 


32 


....' 3 

1 


42 


5 


10 


41 




3 


8, 721 


Doggett 


1 


100 


Chandler 


15 


24 


....1 7 


2 






41 


1 5 






94 


17, 059 


Warwick 












53 


Wellston 


6 
3 
1 
4 
107 
13 
2 


17 
11 
12 
3 
4 
6 
4 


1 

....; 2 




1 


150 

102 

36 


' 2 


■'■9' 


'"2 

1 

3 

101 

1 


176 
160 
108 
68 
761 
168 
87 
2 
71 
13 
61 

10 
37 
11 


9,133 


Luther 


31 
57 
58 
16 
70 
6 


1 






5 043 


Jones City 


::::::l i 






887 


Munger 


1 








588 


Oklahoma 

W^heatland 


...., 13 


3 

44 
61 


21 
30 
11 


20 
2 


6 
4 




469 


6,978 


Mustang 

Lavertv 




50 






90 












Cement 


16 
13 






3 






2 








141 


Cvril 




















Elgin 






1 


5 
2 




2 

1 


51 
1 






3 




Lawton 


1 

1 






10 
1 









519 


Cache 














Headrick 








10 
13 
4 









28 


Leger 

Olustee 


9 

1 






1 


2 
2 


12 

.1. 








210 






::::::::: 




4 








1 










Total 


681 


326 


1 


114 


1,488 


548 


256 


483 


170 1 10 


964 


343 


5,384 


33,109 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



49 



Statement showing number of carloads of freight received ai stations on line in Oklahoma 

Territory, 



Station. 



Farm 
machinery 
and im- 
plements. 



Vehicles. 



Immi- 
grant 
goods. 



Coal. 



Flour. 



Total. 



Peckham 

Blackwell 

Eddy 

Lament 

Hunter 

Breckinridge 

Enid 

Dnimmond 

Ames 

Okeene 

Carleton 

Eagle City 

Thomas 

Custer City 

Arapahoe 

Washita Junction . 

Stout 

Cordpll 

Rocky 

Hobart 

Roosevelt 

Mountain Park ... 

Snyder ;... 

Siboney 

Frederick 

Stroud 

Chandler 

Wellston 

Luther 

Jones City 

Munger 

Oklahoma 

Wheatland 

Mustang 

Laverty 

Cement 

Elgin 

Fort Sill 

Lawton 

Cache 

Indiahoma 

Headrick 

Leger 

Olustee 

Eldorado 



Total. 



124 
2 



409 



21 



159 



2 

5 

4 

3 

1 

6 

2 

7 
11 

3 
14 ( 

2 

8 
37 
32 

7 

2 

3 

1 
94 

3 

4 

1 
10 
10 

3 
37 

1 



76 

143 

24 

52 

64 

16 

233 

15 

2 

74 



8 
92 
119 

6 
10 

5 

4 

437 

10 

29 



1 
112 

1 



404 I 1,727 



387 



90 
197 
29 
70 
77 
21 
327 
23 
14 
130 

2 

5 
19 
46 
24 

6 
13 
63 
15 
44 
21 
14 
76 

4 
34 
250 
295 
64 
23 
14 

7 

678 

15 

37 

2 
27 
26 

4 
183 

4 



43 
17 
29 



CHOCTAW, OKLAHOMA AND GULF RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Statement showing number of carloads of freight forwarded from stations on line in Oklahoma 

Territory. 



Earlboro 

Shawnee 

McLoud 

Harrah 

Choctaw 

Oklahoma - . 

Yukon 

El Reno 

Calumet 

Geary 

Bridgeport . . 
Hydro . . - - - - ■ 
Weatherford . 

Wa.Khita 

Parkersburg - 



720 
301 
303 



132 



25 






826 
174 
27 
37 
165 



69 



32 I 6 



25 
67 
15 
63 
124 
1 



134 
3 
15 



17 

28 
117 
36 
25 



131 
20 



31 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



50 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



Statements shomng number of carloads of freight forwarded from stations (m line in Oklahoma 

Territory. 



Station. 


H 

B 

4 
1 


o 


i 


1! 

o 


1 

8 


6 

h 


1 


S 


t 


s 


i 


1 
s 

90 
52 
18 
23 
37 
30 
66 
24 


1 

11 
6 


i 


Foss 






4 


188 
105 
29 
61 
51 
125 
125 
45 






19 
29 


6 
3 






5 


Elk City 


2 












1 


Doxey 








.... 








Sayre 














23 


4 






2 




Romulus 




















TeciiTns^b 


2 














1... 








Asher 














1 








Watonga 


3 











3 


16 
6 
30 
34 
12 
36 
104 
96 
88 
27 
34 
21 






4 




Ferguson 


















Homestead 


1 




5 
4 










7 
27 
14 
10 


3 
3 




2 


3 




Rusk 


1 










Cleo 


1 
3 
2 
1 














9 
26 




Aline 






















Augusta 


4 


6 


4 


22 






1 
2 








Lambert 






15 
21 

I 






26 
2 
1 




In^ersoll 










' 










Driftwood 




1 
2 




















Amorita 


1 


















4.::. 


Alva 


70 


















Eriek 


2 

1 




5 


62 
18 






6o 
11 






33 


I"--- 


Texola 


1 








' 




1* ■• 


















\"" 



Statement showing number of carloads of freight received at stations on line in Oklahoma 

Territory. 



Station. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 

8 


1 


1 


] 


1 


> 


6 

5 


i 


a 

ft 
1 


! 
11 

u 



1 


Earlboro 




3 
45 


19 
64 

8 


""s 


7 
297 








15 
103 

38 
6 
1 

49 
9 
3 
2 
2 






1 

6 








Shawnee 


440 

6 

1 

4 

2,250 

76 

6,941 

23 

5 

109 

9 

5 

148 

93 

6 

80 

120 

9 

90 

61 

2 

2 

82 

12 

1 

8 

2 

15 

55 

36 

7 

7 

10 
14 
106 
27 
52 


47 


6 


12 


12 

1 


32 

1 


29 
2 


67 
3 

1 




McLoud 




Harrah 














Choctaw 


"i2' 
1 
2 

1 


1 
58 

6 
13 












1 
36 
5 
3 
1 
2 
2 

""u 

8 
1 
4 
3 










Oklahoma City 

Yukon 


294 

14 
48 


275 




91 

2 

36 


16 
"2 


73 
2 
3 


2 


9 
5 
3 


13 
1 


19 
6 


El Reno 


;;;;;; 






Fort Reno 






Calumet . 




3 

122 


1 
1 








2 
2 
5 
2 




2 
1 
3 
4 

12 
4 
1 
8 

11 






Geary 


2 

.... 

2 


6 
12 

2 
16 

8 
7 
9 

48 
1 

18 
6 




22 








Bridfirenort ... . . 


1 


17 
19 
10 
18 

1 

19 
54 
11 
23 
37 
13 
38 

5 


9 




Hydro 











Weatherford 


19 






13 
15 


"3' 






Washita 






1 
1 
4 
9 


.... 



6 

1 

...... 




Parkersburg 










Foss 





1 
1 






2 


Elk City 






1 




Doxey 








Sayre 










1 
2 
1 
2 


5 
2 


2 




8 
2 






Tecumseh 




45 






1 
1 
3 


4 


Romulus 










1 


Asher 




3. 

1 








2 








2 




Watonga 








2 

1 








Ferguson 






















Homestead 
















1 
9 
6 
4 
14 
3 
7 
2 












Rusk 




5 

1 
2 
6 
1 
9 












...... 


6 




2 






Cleo 
















Aline 






















Augusta 












3 






2 






Lambert 




















Ingeraoll 














1 




3 






Dm twood 












' 




Amorita 




3 












7 










Ashley 
























Alva 


"i" 


4 
13 
2 


16 






2 






1 






2 


2 

1 
1 


1 


Erick 








18 
8 


16 






Texola 
















4 

























Digitized by VjOQQIC 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 51 
TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE. 

In addition to the Western Union Telegraph system, that has so loni 
given its excellent service to all portions of the Territory, there wi 
soon be in operation the Postal system, which will add its facilities for 
the rapid transmission of messages. 

There are several telephone companies doing business in the Terri- 
tory, among which may be mentioned the Pioneer Telephone Company, 
the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Telephone Company, and Southwest- 
ern Telephone Company. 

During the past year several extensions have been made by the man- 
agement of the Pioneer Company. New lines, with two metallic cir- 
cuits, have been completed between the following-named cities and 
tfewns: 

Oklahoma City and El Reno; Oklahoma City and Shawnee; Okla- 
hpma City and Guthrie; Chandler and Wellston; Braman to South 
Haven, Kans.; Guthrie and Sparks; Cushing to Avery and Kendrick; 
Guthrie to Agra; Blackwell to Perry; Chandler and Shawnee. 

The exchange in Oklahoma City has been practically rebuilt. About 
$75,000 has been expended in construction and betterment of the toll 
lines and exchanges. 

The Missouri and Kansas Telephone Company have nearly 2.500 
miles of wire distributed among the following-named counties: 

Blaine, Canadian, Cleveland, Garfield, Grant, Kay, Kingfisher, Lin- 
coln, Logan, Oklahoma, Noble, Payne, and Pottawatomie. 

They have installed excellent exchanges in Guthrie, Oklahoma City, 
El Reno, Shawnee, and Ponca City, and have just finished a new line 
from Oklahoma City to Shawnee. 

AGRICULTURE. 

Oklahoma is primarily an agricultural region. Distant from tide 
water and devoid of navigable rivers, it has never possessed the advan- 
tages of commercial waterways. Coal deposits, if such exist, have not 
been discovered, and water power, while not lacking, has t3een very 
difficult to develop. The agricultural possibilities of Oklahoma, how- 
ever, have never been open to question. The fertile soil, the sunny 
skies, the equable climatic conditions, the indigenous flora and fauna, 
all betokened the possibilities of which men dreamed before Oklahoma 
was opened to settlement and which have now become living realities. 
Originally Oklahoma was a vast pasture ground, upon which buffalo, 
elk, deer, and antelope grazed m countless thousands. It was not 
strange, therefore, that when these had passed away the ranchman was 
quick to see and seize the opportunit}'^ and drive in herds of cattle from 
the ranges of Texas. But, as the huntsman of the roving aboriginal 
tribes had to give wav to the herdsman, even so the herdsman had in 
time to give place to the husbandman, and a single generation was per- 
mitted to witness this most remarkable transformation. 

The soils of Oklahoma are variable in character, the color, texture, 
and composition often presenting marked differences within the limits 
of relatively small areas, conditions that can be readilv accounted for 
by the geologist. Among the soils that may be foun(f in one part of 
Oklahoma or another are limestone or calcareous soils, sandstone or 
siliceous soils, gypsum soils, granitic soils, and even lava soil, the lat- 
ter only occurnng in the western part of Beaver County. This vari- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



52 REPORT OF T^E GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

ation in the character and composition of the soil accounts not only 
for the large measure of natural fertility, but also for the extent and 
variety of native flora and the ready adaptability of these soils to the 
support of vegetation which has been introduced by civilization with 
the certainty that it will find conditions peculiarly suited to successful 
culture somewhere in Oklahoma. 

Situated as it is, in the latitude of North Carolina and Tennessee, 
Oklahoma's climate might be classed as being distinctively southern, 
and yet, at the same time, its maximum summer temperature is seldom, 
if ever, greater than that of Nebraska or the Dakotas. But, while this 
be true, it has a much longer growing season than any of the States to 
the north and its minimum winter temperature is much higher, seldom 
reaching the zero point, and then only for a few hours. Lying west 
of the region of extreme humidity in the Mississippi Valley, for the 
most part it is east of the semiarid region of the Great Plains, and 
usually has suflScient precipitation of moisture to mature the ordinary 
field, garden, and orchard crops of the Temperate Zone. 

Wheat, oats, and corn are the staple crops in the northern part of 
Oklahoma, supplemented by cotton in the central and southern coun- 
ties, and Kafir corn and the other nonsaccharine sorghums in the 
western part of the Territory. Other iniportant crops are cultivated 
successfully, but not so extensively. 

WHEAT, 

The wheat product of Oklahoma has been graduall}^ increasing 
since the settlement of the countr}^ subject, of course, to the fluctua- 
tions incident to more or less unfavorable seasons. Within the past 
six years, however, th^ wheat-growing industry of Oklahoma has 
become a recognized factor in the grain supply of the nation. Accord- 
ing to the Federal census the total yield of wheat in Oklahoma in 
1899 was 18,124,520 bushels, an average of 14.16 bushels per acre. 
Since then the acreage of wheat has been increased in the older-settled 

Eortions of the Territory, while the thousands of new farms which 
ave been opened up in the western and southwestern counties have 
augmented the acreage to almost double that of 1899, while the aggre- 
gate yield for 1903 is believed to be more than twice that of- four 
years ago. Estimates range from 36,000,000 bushels to 40,000,000 
bushels. 

Comparatively little soft wheat is produced in Oklahoma, and the 
acreage of spring wheat is insignificant in comparison with that of 
winter wheat. Macaroni wheat has been introduced in the western 
part of Oklahoma, and, because of its hai'diness and drought-resisting 
qualities, it bids fair to become a staple crop there as elsewhere in the 
region of the Great Plains. 

In addition to the amount of grain produced, wheat is utilized by 
the farmers of Oklahoma as a winter pasture, thus effecting a great 
saving in the matter of winter feed. Many, if not most, of the wheat 
fields of Oklahoma are thus pastured every winter, and that too, appar- 
ently without an appreciable reduction of the yield. 

The local milling interests furnish a home market for about 10,000,000 
bushels of Oklahoma's wheat product. 



The yield of corn in Oklahoma in 1899 was 38,239,880 bushels, an 
^erage of 29.03 bushels per acre. Since that time the relative acre- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 53 

age of corn has decreased in several of the wheat-growing counties of 
central and northern Oklahoma, but with the acreage of the new farms 
which have been opened up in the western and southwestern parts of 
the Territory added, the aggregate area devoted to corn culture has 
been increased during the years that have elapsed since the census was 
taken. The estimate of the crop for 1903 is 60,000,000 bushels. 

Comparatively little of Oklahoma's corn crop is shipped be^^ond the 
borders of the Territory, the home demand for stock-feeding purposes 
generally equaling the available supply and insuring fair prices. 

OATS. 

The Federal census report places the total acreage of oats grown in 
the Territory in 1899 at 156,619, with an aggregate yield of 5,087,930 
bushels. The acreage and aggregate product are more than double 
those amounts this year. 

KAFFIR CORN. 

Kaffir corn has become recognized as a staple forage and grain crop 
throughout the drier regions of the Central West, and even where the 
rainfall is sufficient to readily mature Indian corn it is steadily grow- 
ing in popularity as a forage crop. In 1899 Oklahoma produced more 
Kaffir corn than any other State or Territory — Kansas alone excepted — 
the total acreage for grain being 63,145, the yield being 1,110,473 
bushels, while there were nearly 200,000 acres of Kaffir corn planted 
for fodder which yielded close to 3 tons of feed per acre. The culture 
of Kaffir corn for fodder and grain has greatlv increased in Oklahoma 
since its hardiness, productiveness, and feeding value have become 
more generally known and appreciated, the figures for the present 
year probably aggregating not less than three times those of four 
years ago. 



Sorghum is quite generally planted as a forage crop and, in some 
infrequent instances, for the purpose Of making syrup. It yields a 
heavy crop of nutritious forage, and, like its near relative, the Kaffir 
corn, is distinguished for it hardiness under extreme conditions. 

BROOM CORN. 

In 1899 only the States of Illinois, Kansas, and Missouri outranked 
Oklahoma in the acreage of broom corn and amount of brush produced. 
In that year the acreage of broom corn grown in Oklahoma was 12,366, 
and the product was 3,418,490 pounds. The present acreage is believed 
to be at least double that of four years ago. 



Cotton culture in Oklahoma dates from 1890, and despite the depres- 
sion in prices during the five years between 1893 and 1898 the industry 
gradual!}'' increased until, in 1899, the total yield was 72,012 bales, of 
aA average weight of 500 pounds, being the product of 240,678 acres. 
Since then the aggregate acreage has been greatly increased, the total 
yield for 1902 being placed at 218,390 bales. . 

Cotton growing is largely confined to the counties of the central and 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



54 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

southern parts of the Territory. The industry is one that entails great 
care and patience, but as a rule it has been found a remunerative one 
in Oklahoma. 

The by-products of cotton consist of the articles obtained by milling 
the seed — namely, cotton-seed oil, cotton-seed meal, and cotton-seed 
hulls, the last two being used extensively in the local feeding yards for 
fattening cattle. Cotton-seed oil, from having been used quite largely 
as an adulterant in many food products, such as oleomargarine, lard, 
olive oil, etc., is becoming recognized as a standard food product of 
itself, and one that is worthy of a place on the market because of 
its own merits. When properly refined it is not inferior to the best 
grade of olive oil, for which, for all practical purposes, both in culinary 
operations and in medicine, it can be substituted with satisfactory 
results. A cotton-oil refinery is being erected for this purpose at 
Oklahoma City. 

ALFALFA. 

Alfalfa has come to be regarded as the greatest hay crop throughout 
Oklahoma, as it is quite generally over the greater part of the trans- 
Mississippi region. A leguminous plant of relatively high nutritive 
value, yielding, as it does in Oklahoma, three and four crops of hay 
each year, and standing, when once thoroughly established, for many 
years without reseeding, it approaches very nearly to the ideal of eco- 
nomic hay production. There were only a little over 15,000 acres of 
alfalfa reported as growing in Oklahoma in 1899 by the census. This 
has been increased at such a rate that, while complete data is not 
available, there is reason to believe the acreage is now three times as 
great. Interest in the culture of alfalfa is growing, and the increase 
m acreage in the future promises to be even greater, as there are hun- 
dreds of thousands of acres of land in Oklahoma which are peculiarly 
adapted to the production of this staple ha}'^ crop. 

MILLET AND HUNGARIAN. 

Millet and Hungarian grass are extensively grown and some heavy 
yields are recorded, the average for the Territory some years being 
nearly 2 tons per acre. 

POTATOES. 

Within the past few years the farmers of eastern Oklahoma, espe- 
cially those of the North Canadian Valley in Pottawatomie County, 
have made a specialty of potato growing, and with very satisfactor}^ 
results. The yield is ordinarily from 100 to 200 bushels per acre. 
Two crops are frequently grown from the same ground in one season. 
The prices realized during the past three or four seasons, since the 
local growers have organized a shippers' association, have ranged from 
60 cents to $1 per bushel on the cars. The area that is especially 
adapted to the production of potatoes is a large one, and this particular 
industry seems destined to spread over a large part of several adjoin- 
ing counties. 

SWEET POTATOES. 

The sandstone soils of eastern Oklahoma, when cleared of timbei^, 
furnish ideal conditions for the production of the best grade of sweet 
potatoes. As yet there has been but little effort made to grow sweet 
potatoes on a commercial scale, but when the possibilities of this special 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 55 

line are once recognized and developed Oklahoma grown sweet potatoes 
will be in active demand in the northern markets. 

CASTOR BEANS AND PEANUTS. 

Considerable attention has been given to the production of castor 
beans and peanuts in some of the eastern counties of Oklahoma, nota- 
bly in Lincoln and Payne counties. The results, so far as yields are 
concerned, have been gratifying, but the distance from market and the 
lack of anything in the way of a plant to work up the product has ren- 
dered prices very unsatisfactory at times and has nad a strong tendency 
to discourage the further development of these industries. With 
proper effort on the part of the promoters, a plant for the extraction 
of oil from castor beans and one for cleaning and sorting peanuts 
should prove profitable investments in Oklahoma. 

TRUCK GARDENING. 

The truck gardening industry is one that has not been developed to 
any extent whatever in Oklahoma, though it is known that there are 
wonderful possibilities for the specialist along that line. Onions, 
cabbage, tomatoes, beans, peas, sweet corn, and, in fact, all kinds of 
vegetables can be grown to perfection in large quantities for shipment. 
Experienced truck gardeners can not find a better location, land 
values, local markets, climate, and other things considered, than may 
be found in Oklahoma to-day. 

DAIRYING. 

The dairy industry is not nearly so well developed in Oklahoma as it 
should be. While the natural conditions are highh^ favorable for the 
profitable production of butter and cheese, the opportunity for spe- 
cialists in these lines seems to be neglected, or at least overlooked. 
Thousands of pounds of butter are shipped into the Territory nearly 
every month in the year, while cheese actually comes in by the car- 
load, practicall}^ all of the last- mentioned commoditv which is con- 
sumed in Oklahoma being the product of dairies in the Northern and 
Eastern States. Creameries and cheese factories would find a steady 
demand for their products right at home if properly conducted, 
and, under good management, could not fail to prove profitable as 
investments. 

rOULTRY. 

That the ideal conditions for the profitable production of poultry 
existed in Oklahoma was a fact that might be said to have been dem- 
onstrated in advance of its settlement by the variety and quantity of 
its feathered fauna. Wild turkeys, prairie chickens, grouse, quail, and , 
partridges fairly swarmed upon its prairies and its wooded hills and 
valleys. Domesticated birds seem to thrive equally as well, and poul- 
try raising has been found to be a profitable industry from the first. 
The steady demand for live and dressed poultry, as well as for eggs, 
the remunerative prices, and the comparative ease with which poultry 
is raised in this climate, combine to render the poultry 3^ard one of the 
most profitable adjuncts of the Oklahoma farm. Eggs and dressed 
poultry are shipped from various points in Oklahoma in carload lots. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



56 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

Cold-storage facilities for the handling of such products are becoming 
more numerous, but there is still room for the investment of more 
capital in such enterprises. 

HORTICULTURE. 

Oklahoma is peculiarly adapted to fruit growing. In a state of 
nature, among its indigenous trees, vines, shrubs, and bushes, the 
first settlers found more than fifteen species of edible fruits, including 
grapes, plums, blackberries, dewberries, cun*ants, and others. Under 
these circumstances it was not strange that the pioneer planters quickl}^ 
decided that cultivated fruits in even greater profusion and variet}^ 
would be found to readily adapt themselves to the climate and soil of 
Oklahoma. The first orchards were necessarily small, being planted 
on newly broken ground in the fall of 1889 and the spring of 1890. 
Many of these have now been in full bearing for nearly or quite ten 
years and have far surpassed the expectations of the planters. 

While, in the very nature of things, all orchard planting was neces- 
sarily experimental so far as the selection of varieties was concerned, 
yet in all cases where good judgment has been used in the selection of 
site and varieties and proper care exercised in the way of cultivation, 
pruning, thinning, etc., orchardists have met with nearly uniform 
success in Oklahoma. Attempts at orchard j)lanting on a commercial 
scale have been more recent and, as yet, comparatively few in number. 
Indeed, the latter are only now beginning to come into full bearing. 
Several commercial orchards of from 500 to 2,000 acres each are being 
projected now, to consist principallj^ of Elberta peach trees, so that 
the fruit-growing industr^^ seems destined to be considerably expanded 
within the next few years in Oklahoma. 



Apples have been grown successfully throughout the greater part 
of the Territory. In size, color, and flavor Oklahoma apples are not 
inferior to those grown in regions which are exploited as being pecul- 
iarly adapted to the production of apples on a commercial scale. 



Pears have not been planted very largely in Oklahoma, but several 
of the varieties which have been thoroughl}^ tested have produced 
large crops of fruit of very fine qualit}^ thus evidencing the possibility 
of profit for the specialist. 



The peach seems to find an ideal habitat in the warm, sandy soils of 
central and eastern Oklahoma, where it reaches a state of perfect 
development. While this fruit has long been the pride of Oklahoma 
fruit growers, it was not until August, 1902, that peaches were shipped 
out of the Territory in carload lots to the large markets of the North 
and East, about 20 cars being billed out in all. This year it is estimated 
that there will be from 50 to 60 cars of fancy peaches shipped out of 
Oklahoma, besides large quantities that will be sent in small packages 



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REPOET OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 57 

by express. With large orchards now coming into bearing, and others 
still larger being planted, this special industry will in the near future 
become a very important one. Arrangements have been made, through 
the cooperation of the United States Department of Agriculture, to 
place a trial shipment of Oklahoma-grown Elberta peaches on the 
London, England, market during the present season. 

APRICOTS AND PLUMS. 

Apricots grow successfully in all parts of the Territory, though never 
in quantit}^ to equal the local demand. In its variety and profusion 
of wild plums Oklahoma is perhaps not equaled by any State in the 
Union. Nearly all kinds of cultivated plums are known to succeed in 
cultivation here, but plum culture has not received the attention which 
it deserves at the hands of fruit growers in Oklahoma. 

CHERRIES. 

Cherries have proved to be a profitable orchard crop, especially in 
the northern and eastern sections of the Territory. The fruit is of 
excellent quality and for several j^ears past has been in active demand 
not Only in the local markets but also for shipment. 



Grape culture has proven to be profitable in Oklahoma and a num- 
ber of commercial vine3^ards have been planted. While the larger 
plantations generally consist of two or three standard varieties, jet it 
has been demonstrated that practically all of the finest varieties can be 

frown successfully in Oklahoma. The local markets are supplied with 
ome-grown grapes continuously from the 1st of July to the 10th of 
October without resorting to cold storage. 

SMALL FRUITS. 

Nearly all of the small fruits can be grown successfully in Oklahoma, 
yet, strange to say, small-fruit specialists are so few in number that a 
large part of the demand for this class of stuff in local markets is of 
necessity supplied by shipment from adjoining States. Blackberries 
and dewberries, being indigenous, can be grown in large quantities 
and of the finest quality. Oklahoma strawberries are fully equal to 
the best grown elsewhere and the present acreage could be multiplied 
many times with profit. 

HORTICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT. 

In discussing the possible development of the gardening and fruit- 
growing industries of Oklahoma it is well to call attention to the field 
for profitable investment of capital in enterprises which are closely 
related thereto, namely, the erection and operation of cold-storage 
plants, canning and preserving factories, etc. It has been conserva- 
tively estimated that the people of Oklahoma contribute not less than 
$100,000 annually to the paj^ment of freight charges alone on canned 
fruit and vegetables that could be readily produced at home. Like- 



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58 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



wise, large quantities of fresh fruit and garden truck are shipped in 
from surrounding States which the home producer could easily supply 
if afforded the proper facilities and opportunities for cold storage. 
But with the multiplying evidences of enterprise on the part of those 
who are most interested, these advantages and conveniences will soon 
be supplied. 

SALE OF FARM LANDS. 

The registers of deeds in the various counties have reported upward 
of 1,300 transfers of farm properties during the month of April, at 
prices ranging for good land from $10 to $40 per acre. The prices 
generally obtained have ranged higher than in former years. 

Oklahoma farm land has shown its universal proHuctivit}^ and, 
being adapted to such a diversity of crops and often producing more 
than one crop during a season, it has become known abroad as a land 
of prosperity. Improved farm property at the present figures is 
cheap when compared with the oloer States. Markets are just as good 
for all farm products as in the East. They are raised on every hand 
much easier, with less labor, and in quantities nearly double those 
produced on older soils which have long been under cultivation. 

The table below shows the number of transfers recorded and prices 
per acre in each county, as returned by the register of deeds for one 
month: 



County. 



Number 
of sales. 



Total 
acres 
trans- 
ferred. 



Total 
price 
paid. 



Price per acre. 



Lowest. Highest. Average, 



Beaver 

Blaine :, 

Caddo 

Catiadian 

Cleveland 

Comanche 

Custer 

Day 

Dewey 

Garfield 

Grant 

Greer 

Kay 

Kingfisher ...... 

Kiowa 

Lincoln 

Logan 

Noble 

Oklahoma 

Pawnee , 

Payne 

Pottawatomie . 

Roger Mills 

Washita 

Woods , 

Woodward 



34 

58 

15 

3 

14 

45 

22 

160 

338 

29 

20 

200 

47 

14 

85 

13 



2,200 
2,647 
804 
8,800 
4,200 
7,988 
1,980 
480 
l,t»90 
6,988 
3,234 
7,920 

12,396 
3,175 
3,040 

20,000 
6, 121 
1,560 
8,965 
1,451 
4, 592 



$13, 670 
31,081 
16,647 
22,000 
79,800 
40,960 
31,481 
3,650 
20, 175 

159, 160 
70,450 
95,042 

594,008 
59,106 
46,550 

400,000 

134,275 
38,000 

119,622 
20,679 
75,950 



2,085 

2,601 

12,237 

3,219 



24,206 

53,000 

187,864 

19,584 



$2.18 
6.25 

10. 35 

12.50 
5.00 
7.75 
5.00 
5.31 
3.12 

13.13 
6.25 
4.00 

38.00 
1.00 
6.50 

10.00 
5.00 

12.50 
3.12 
3,12 
7.00 



$28.12 
28.00 
53.18 
37.50 
43.75 
23.50 

175.00 
11.25 
18.75 
33.75 
37.50 
30.00 
63.00 

250.00 
25. 70 
35.00 
42.57 

200.00 

833.00 
91.75 
40.00 



2.10 
12.50 
6.00 
2.50 



125. 00 
60.00 
54.00 
18.60 



$6.21 
11.74 
20.70 
26.00 
19.00 
13.95 
16.00 
7.60 
9.05 
22.77 
21.75 
12.00 
45.00 
18.61 
15.31 
20.00 
21.93 
24.00 
25.50 
20.97 
16.50 



11. 11 

20.37 

15.00 

5.77 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



59 



Below is given a comparative table showing the land taxed in each 
county of the Territory in the years 1901, 1902, and 1903: 

Land returned for taxation. 



County. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


Beaver -. 


Acres. 
132, %7 
82,500 


Acres. 
149,199 
188,304 


Acres. 
168,908 


Blaine 


224,894 


Caddo 


21,319 


Canadian 


366,702 
253,946 


345,267 
254,547 


368,770 


Cleveland 


276, 401 


Comanche 


100,736 


Custer •. 


66,243 
13,957 
49,483 
291,630 
267,203 
191,832 
214,268 
396,600 


157, 724 
20,715 
78, 627 
446,811 
442,994 
300,000 
319,693 
459,436 


221,919 


Dav 


30,950 


Dewey 


93, 118 


Garfield 


490,434 


Grant 


466,894 


Greer 


404,821 
340,030 


Kay 


Kingfisher 


472, 435 


Kiowa 


34,764 
427,648 


Lincoln 


263, 5i4 

403,899 

110,464 

340,790 

98,165 

295,193 

186,449 

23,822 

21,117 

425,380 

121,734 


384,086 
418,900 
173,886 
366,876 
138,238 
346, 177 
241,676 
42,014 
140,223 
753,322 
176,960 


Logan 


438, 894 


Noble 


306,190 
887,606 


Oklahoma 


Pawnee 


168,523 

364,068 

265,607 

77,654 


Pavne 


Pottawatomie 


Roger Mills 


Washita" 1 


230,405 
864,596 


Woods 


Woodward 


224,334 






Total '. 


4,551,847 


6,344,662 


7,451,918 







AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 

No material changes in the direction of the activities of the station 
have been made during the past year. The results of an experiment 
in feeding corn, Kaffir corn, alfalfa hay, and Kaffir stover to steers, 
covering three years, are being prepared for publication. Further 
experiments in feeding cotton-seed meal, wheat, and shorts to hogs 
have been completed. Three 3"ears' work with forage crops and grasses 
has resulted in extensive additions to our knowledge of these impor- 
tant sources of farm revenue. The planting of trees for posts, fuel, 
and windbreaks by farmers is being investigated, and the results of 
this study, together with six years of experience along this line on 
the station grounds, will be summarized and published as soon as 
practicable. 

The purchase of 160 additional acres of land has given an opportu- 
nity for more extended work with pasture and forage crops, and has 
provided better facilities for pasture experiments with steers. 

The manufacture and free distribution of vaccine for the prevention 
of blackleg in cattle has been continued and has resulted in greatly 
diminishing losses from this disease. 

Experiments in the growing of the more important field crops are 
in progress. Ten acres of bottom land have been leased for the pur- 
pose of making experiments with alfalfa and other crops on better soil 
than that afforded by the station upland farm. Small fruits are being 
investigated and variety studies are being made both on the station 
grounds and in widely scattered commercial plantings. The influence 
of stock on cion, the pollination of fruits, tomato growing, and vari- 



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60 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

eties, and various methods of combating insects and fungus diseases 
are receiving attention. 

Animal parasites, hog cholera, swine plague, and other diseases of 
animals are being studied. The first definite appearance of the Hessian 
fly in Oklahoma has been noted, and active efforts are being made to 
obtain the data necessary for successfully combating this pest. The 
melon louse, which was very destructive last season, and the boll 
weevil, which is just beginning to appear in the Territory, are being 
studied with the hope of minimizing tne damage from them. Experi- 
ments with castor beans, looking toward the improvement of the yield, 
oil content, and habit of growth, are being continued, and preliminary 
studies of cotton varieties have been instituted. Necessary chemical 
control of all experiments is maintained, and a study of the*chemical 
composition of red and white .Kaffir corn is in progress. 

Bulletins on Bermuda grass, garden vegetables, directions for the 
use of vaccine for the prevention of blackleg in cattle, and fattening 
steers, and the eleventh annual report have been published and sent 
to all of the addresses on the mailing list, which on June 1 contained 
19,410 names. 

Seven farmers' institutes were attended by members of the station 
staff during the 3^ear, and it is now planned to send a representative 
of the station to each annual meeting of the chartered county farmers' 
institutes. Valuable aid is being rendered by farmers of the Territory, 
who supply the station with information concerning the adaptability of 
crops to different regions; results of. trials of different varieties of 
fruits; the extent, character, and area of forest-tree plantings; insect 
ravages and fungus diseases, and general matters of agricultui-al 
interest. 

The large number of new settlers has added to the work of answer- 
ing inquiries, which is believed to equal in importance any other line 
of station work. Many farmers have visited the station during the 
past year, and have thus come into closer touch with its work and 
gained a better understanding of the manner in which experiments 
are conducted and the general application of the results which are 
secured. 

WEATHER AND CROPS. 

Through the courtesy of Section Director C. M. Strong, of the 
United States Weather Bureau, I am enabled to give the following 
information relative to temperature, precipitation, and prevailing 
winds during the past year, together with climate and crop conditions, 
by months, and a general summary for the year. 

THE WEATHER BUREAU. 

Valuable service is rendered by the system of issuing daily bulletins 
forecasting the weather conditions in various portions of the Terri- 
tory^ by the United States Weather Bureau. Particular benefit is 
derived from this service throughout the cotton-growing region, 
where the daily bulletin shows the amount of rainfall and maximum 
and minimum temperature at the selected stations. 

SYNOPSIS OF WEATHER CONDITIONS FOR THE OKLAHOMA AND INDIAN TERRITORIES FOR 

THE YEAR 1902. 

The year 1902 was remarkable for the heaviest precipitation on record since the 
opening of the section. As compared with normal conditions for the past eleven 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 61 

years, the average temperature was 0.1° above and the average precipitation was 8.72 
inches above the normal. 

The average temperature for 1902 was 60°. The highest annual temperature record 
since the opening of the section was 62°, in 1896, and the lowest 59°, in 1892 and 1895. 

By seasons, the winter (1901-2) gave the mean temperature of 37.4°, or 1.1° below 
the seasonal normal. The mean for the spring was 61.3°, or 1.2° above the normal. 
The mean temperature for the summer was 80.4°, or 0.6° above the normal; for the 
autumn it was 61.5°, or 0.1° below normal. The highest local mean temperature 
for the year was 63.2°, at Ardmore, Ind. T.; the lowest, 58°, at Fairland, Ind. T. 
The maximum temperature was 114°, at Mahgum, Okla., on August 5. The mini- 
mum was 10° below zero, at Fort Reno, Okla., January 27, and at Pawhuska, Okla., 
on February 10. Range for the year, 124°. 

The total annual precipitation was 40.54 inches. The greatest annual (40.54 
inches) occurred in 1902 and the lowest (22.78 inches) in 1901. The greatest annual 
precipitation, locally, was 53.20 inches, at South McAlester, Ind. T., and the lowest 
(27.82) at Jefferson, Okla. Precipitation fell heaviest over the Choctaw and Chicka- 
saw nations and lightest over Grant County. The greatest monthly precipitation 
was 20.18 inches, at Blackburn, Okla., in May, and the least was **no rainfall," at 
Beaver, Okla., in February and September. The greatest amount of precipitation in 
twenty-four consecutive hours was 7 inches, at Good water, Ind. T., on May 30. 

By seasons, the winter (1901-2) months gave a total of 2.12 inches, or 2.15 below 
the normal; the spring, 17.30 inches, or 6.47 above the normal; the summer, 6.83 
inches, or 2.76 below, and autumn, 13.32 inches, or 5.95 inches above the normal. 

The average total snowfall for the year was 6.1 inches. The greatest annual fall 
was 19.1 inches, at Fairland, Ind. T. 

The prevailing wind was from the south. 

The average number of clear days w^as one hundred and eighty-five, 51 per cent; 
partly cloudy days, eighty, 22 per cent; cloudy days, one hundred, 27 per cent; days 
with 0.01 inch precipitation, sixty-seven, 18 per cent. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF CLIMATE AND CROP CONDITIONS. 
1902. 

July. — The weather was generally favorable for the progress of farm work and the 
growth of crops and vegetation. The scattered daily showers after the 9th were very 
beneficial, and placed the ground in fine condition for fall-wheat plowing. Heavy 
local rains caused some delay in plowing over a few localities during the last week of the 
month. Wheat and oat harvesting were completed and thrashing progressed, with 
a light to fair yield of wheat and a large yield of oats reported. Early corn was made 
and was being cut, with good yields reported. The late corn made a good growth, 
and was maturing in good condition by the close of the month. Cotton made a good 
growth, and was laid by during the third week of the month, having squared, 
bloomed, and boiled rapidly, and commencing to fruit in fine condition. Cane, 
Kaffir, and broom corn, castor beans, millet, and flax made good growth. These 
crops w^ere being secured, with good yields reported; hay harvest continued, with 
large yields of a fine quality. Pastures were in good condition and stock became fat 
on range. June corn and late potatoes were planted and doing well. Fall-wheat 
ground was being prepared and work well advanced. Early fruit was being mar- 
keted and was abundant. The late fruit was benefited by the showers and was in 
good condition. Melons and vegetables were abundant. 

August. — Hot winds and high temperatures caused much damage to cotton, corn, 
and other late crops during the month; general rains occurred only on the 8th to 10th 
and 31st; cotton boiled and fruited well during the early portion of the month, but 
during the latter portion deteriorated rapidly under the damaging influence of hot 
winds and bollworms; the middle and top crops were most affected, the bolls open- 
ing prematurely or dropping off; picking was in progress by the 11th; early corn was 
secured with fair to good yields; late corn was matured and was being cut, with fair 
to poor yields; hot winds dried up fodder rapidly, reducing the cr6p prospects; broom 
and Kaffir corn, cane, castor beans, milo maize, millet, and alfalfa were being secured 
with fair to good yields; fall plowing was retarded, but by the close of the month the 
work was well advanced and the ground was ready to seed ; grass continued in fair 
condition and stock was generally doing well; late fruit suffered seriously from the 
hot winds and dried or withered up rapidly on the trees; peaches were the most 
damaged. 

September. — The month was remarkable for continued low temperature and heavy 
precipitation; the average temperature for the section was the lowest September aver- 
age on record, and the average precipitation was the greatest on record, except that of 



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62 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

the year 1900; the distribution of the precipitation over the section was very uneven, 
marked differences between near-by stations being recorded; the precipitation was 
torrential in character, and caused considerable damage to the growing crops and 
property on lowlands; the cool night temperatures culminated in light frost on the 
lath; a heavy frost occurred over Beaver County on the 27th, but caused no damage; 
the weather conditions were unfavorable to the growth and development of late crops, 
but were highly beneficial in supplying subsoil moisture for wheat and the late cot- 
ton, which was suffering from droughty conditions; plowing and preparation of ground 
for the fall wheat progressed at intervals, and the soft wheat was sown and came up 
to a good stand, and by the close of the month was nearly high enough to pasture; 
considerable rye was also sown and came up to a good stand; cotton picking pro- 
gressed slowlv; but about half of the crop was secured, with yields ranging from poor 
to good; the heavy rains caused considerable damage to the cotton by beating out on 
the ground and by staining it, but were beneficial to late cotton; June corn, late pota- 
toes, and turnips were benefited and were in fair condition ; pastures and range grass 
were good, and stock was in a healthy condition; late fruit improved and was making 
fair to good yields. 

October. — Fair weather, excess in temperature, and scattered precipitation caused 
favorable conditions for the progress of farm work and the growth of cereals in the 
ground; planting of wheat progressed rapidly and was about completed; the rains at 
the close of the month brought the late wheat up to a good stand, and rapidly 
advanced the growth of the early sown wheat, which was high enough to pasture; 
generally the wheat was in fine condition and the fields were as green as in April; 
cotton continued to open, and the late cotton ^ave a larger yield than was anticipated; 
the fiber and quality were generally good; picking continued with the general yield 
about two- thirds of an average crop; corn husking was in progress, with fair to good 
yields; June corn, late potatoes, and turnips were being gathered, with good crops 
in prospect; grass and pastures were in fine condition, and stock was doing well. 

November. — Abundant rainfall and mild temperatures were very favorable to the 
growing crops, but farni work was delayed considerably; wheat made a remarkable 
growth, but the ground was too soft to pasture the rapidly growing grain, hence it 
became too rank, and even jointed in some parts of the section; during the last week 
of the month, however, it dried up sufficiently to permit the farmers to turn the stock 
into the fields; some rust and damaging effects from green louse were reported from 
some of the northern counties; cotton picking was delayed, and the remainder of 
the crop damaged by the heavy rains; grass was livened up and pastures were very 
good, and stock was in good condition; potatoes and turnips made a rapid growth 
and were yielding well. 

December. — Cloudy weather, frequent precipitation, and occasional sharp dips in 
temperature marked the first half of the month, and caused conditions that delayed 
the progress of farm work and prevented the picking of late cotton; the latter por- 
tion of the month was fair and almost ideal winter weather, and permitted the prog- 
ress of work to some extent; wheat made slow growth, but was never in a more 
promising condition at this season of the year; stock continued to do well and was 
generally out on wheat, which afforded good pasturage; much of late cotton remained 
unpicked in the fields, and was badly damaged, and the prospect was that little more 
would be secured to advantage; winter oats were doing well; some damage resulted 
to fruit trees from sleet storm of 13th and 14th. 

The season of 1902, as a whole, was a f airly ""good one, while the returns of wheat 
late com, late fruit, and cotton were ranged from poor to fair, oats, early com, rye, 
barley, early potatoes, castor beans, millet, flax, Kaffir and broom corn, cane, alfalfa, 
vegetables, melons, and early fruit were good to excellent; the increased acreage in 
wheat, corn, and cotton making up largely for deficiencies per acre, and giving a 
total yield not far from the average given yearly from this section. 

1903. 

January. — ^Moderately cool weather and below average precipitation prevailed the 
greater portion of the month; the last week was, however, much warmer. The 
prevailing conditions tended to retard crop growth until the last week of the month, 
when the increased warmth caused wheat to develop rapidly. The ground was in 
almost perfect condition for farm work, and plowing for corn, oats, and early pota- 
toes progressed during the month and was well advanced, except over a few locali- 
ties where the wet condition of the ground prevented work. Wheat made a fair 
growth, was well rooted, and was generally in fine condition at the close of the 
month. Stock generally continued on wheat or range, and did well except over the 
Chociaw Nation, where conditions were unfavoraole and considerable loss was 



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20 TO 

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EEPORT OF THE GOVERKOR OF OKLAHOMA. 63 

reported. Winter rye and volunteer oats continued to do well and were in good 
condition. Cotton picking continued and some still remains in the fields over the 
central portion of Oklahoma. Fruit trees were reported in good condition, no dato- 
age of any kind being noted. 

i?<26ntary. --Moderate temperatures prevailed until the 15th, when a cold wave 
caused a decided reduction to nearly zero or below over the various portions of the 
section. The cold wave was, however, preceded by a general sleet and snow storm 
that gave ample protection to the wheat and rye in the ground, and averted injury. 
From the 20th to the close of the month moderate temperatures prevailed, with 
heavy precipitation general on the 26th. The ground generally throughout the month 
was in a wet, cold condition, and farm work was delayed, and but small progress was 
made in the seeding of oats and potatoes; practically the bulk of the crop remains to 
be seeded, and the work will progress rapidly as soon as the ground dries up. 

Wheat continued in good to fine condition over the various counties, and was well 
protected by the snow from the following cold period. It had made but small growth, 
but was in a healthy and promising condition. Stock generally was in a fair condi- 
tion, but suffered slight to serious loss during the cold period of the month, due to 
exposure, and in some cases scarcity of feed. Winter rye and volunteer oats con- 
tinued to do well, and were in good condition. Fruit trees suffered practically no 
injury during the cold period, and were reported generally in good and promising 
condition. The ground was full of moisture from the recent snows and rains, and 
the outlook was very promising for all spring crops. 

March. — The month was marked by decidedly cold periods on the 1st and 20th, 
and warm periods on the 16th to 18th, and 31st, also by continued daily precipitation 
until the 10th, and heavy precipitation on the 18th and 19th. The continued rains 
combined with moderate temperatures and light winds caused the ground to con- 
tinue during the first half of the month in a wet, cold condition, and prevented the 
progress of farm work, to any extent, over the section; this was especially true of 
the Indian Territory, where during the month but few oats and potatoes were sown 
or planted. Over the Territory of Oklahoma the conditions were more favorable 
during the latter half of the month, and farm work was advanced to a considerable 
extent, oats and potatoes being mostly planted, and the early sown oats coming up 
to a fair stand. Wheat was generally in a fine condition, and making a good growth; 
no damage resulted to the crop from the cold periods. Grass was starting up, and 
stock was still doing fairly well. Rye, alfalfa, and volunteer oats were in good con- 
dition and doing well. Fruit trees were damaged some by the cold periods, but 
generally the conditions were very promising; peach, apricot, and plum trees were 
blooming out by the close of the month. By the close of the month the ground 
generally was in good condition for work, and oats, potatoes, and corn were being 
planted and the ground being prepared for cotton. 

April. — The month was remarkable for short but decidedly cold periods, which 
lowered the average temperature to below normal, and caused the lowest minimum 
temperatures, locally on record for the month. The cold period commencing on the 
29th was accompanied by freezing temperatures and ice formation over a lar^ por- 
tion of the section, and much damage resulted to the growing crops and fruit over 
the lowland localities. The month was marked also by deficient and poorly distrib- 
uted precipitation, which, following the excessive rains of the preceding month, 
caused the surface soil to become hardened and almost imposible to work or cultivate 
for the growing crops. This condition continued over the Indian Territory, but was 
relieved by the good rains over Oklahoma on the 29th. 

Corn planting progressed rapidly during the fore part of the month, and the crop 
was nearly in by the close of the month, but owing to the hard ground came up 
slowly and received but little cultivation. The recent rains were very beneficial, 
and where not cut down by the frosts cultivation of the crop will be rapidly advanced. 
Cotton planting and preparation of the ground made slow progress, but some of the 
early planted came up in time to be cut down and killed by the freezing weather on 
tke 30th. The ground is now in good condition, and planting will be pushed over 
the greater portion of the section. Wheat suffered some from lack of sufficient 
precipitation, but the recent rains have placed the crop in good condition and it 
generally has an excellent stand and is making good growth. 

Oats made but a small growth during the month and are generally in poor condi- 
tion; abundant precipitation and warmth are needed to advance them. Potatoes 
came up well and were being cultivated, but the frosts cut them down to the ground 
to a large extent. It is probable that many fields will recover from the effects of the 
freeze, but much damage has resulted. Alfalfa, rye, and grass made fair growth and 
are generally in good condition. Garden vegetables were mostlj'^ injured or killed 
by the freeze. Grapes, strawberries, and some peaches and pears were killed by 

7717—03 5 

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64 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

the freeze. It is thought, however, that the greater portion of the larger fruit 
escaped serious damage, and the prospect continues for abundant yields of peaches, 
cherries, plums, pears, and apples. Cane, Kaffir corn, millo maize, and broom corn 
planting progressed during the month. Stock is generally doing well on range. 

May. — The month was remarkable for decidedly cool weather and long continued 
period of heavy and excessive precipitation. The lowest temperature on record for 
the season of the year was recorded on May 1 ; the minimum temperature at all 
reporting stations being nearly at or below the freezing point, and causing killing 
frosts and formation of light ice over nearly all portions of the section. All early 
crops up, vegetables, and fruit suffered serious damage, but owing to the weather 
following being favorable recovered to a large extent from their frozen condition. 

The general and excessive precipitation over Oklahoma on the 28d, and the north- 
ern portion of the Indian Territory on the 28th, caused damaging floods in all rivers 
and streams, which destroyed bottom-land crops, washed away bridges and roadbeds 
of railways, and flooded towns located on water courses. The actual damage caused 
can not be estimated, but it w4Il range into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. 
For several weeks over central Oklahoma all railway traffic was susp^ended and busi- 
ness interests suffered seriously through detention of traffic. During the last ten 
days of the month numerous hailstorms occurred, causing considerable damage over 
various localities to the growing crops and fruit trees. On the 18th and 23d consid- 
erable damage was inflicted by tornadoes passing over central and western Oklahoma, 
but owing to their occurrence during the daytime the loss of life was small. 

Wheat, oats, rye, alfalfa, and grass made good growth during the month, and are 
generally in an improved condition. Wheat, rye, and oats are heading out and doing 
well and promise fair to good yields. Corn planting was completed and crop came 
up to a fair stand and was cultivated generally the first time, but the continued cool 
weather has retarded its growth and the excessive rains prevented proi)er cultivation, 
so that it was very w^eedy and only a fair stand at the close of the month. Cotton 
planting and replanting continued throughout the month and the crop is generally 
very backward and a very poor stand; many fields have been replanted the second 
and third time; some chopping has been done; insects are damaging the crop over 
the central portion of the Chickasaw Nation. Kaffir corn, broom com, barley, cane, 
and millet are generally doing well. Grass made a good growth and the hay pros- 
pect is very good; range grass is in fine condition and stock is fattening up. The 
first cutting of alfalfa is in progress, with good yields reported. Potatoes, gardens, 
and large and small fruit were generally in fair to good condition, with small fruit 
and gardens yielding abundantly, strawberries and cherries having recovered from 
the effects of the freeze. 

June. — The weather conditions w^ere decidedly more favorable throughout the 
month for cultivation, harvesting, and growth of the various crops. Partly cloudy 
weather, with only light, scattered rains, prevailed until the 19th, with the cool night 
and moderate day temperatures; from the 19th to the 26th the rains were general in 
character and thoroughly freshened up all crops, which had commenced to need 
rain over portions of the section. During the month conditions were especially favor- 
able for cultivation of crops, and corn and cotton were placed in a good, clean condi- 
tion, the early corn being laid by after being well cultivated and the late placed to a 
good stand; the corn improved rapidly in growth during the month, advancing from 
a poor to fair and good condition, and is now tassel ing and silking out. Cotton 
growth was generally retarded until the last week of the month, when it improved 
rapidly in condition; the month opened with the cotton crop in a very poor condi- 
tion, a poor stand, and some replanting in progress; its condition was far reduced by 
the destructive working of webworms on the plant, which, commencing in the 
Chickasaw Nation, spread rapidly northw^ard over the counties, causing serious dam- 
age; however, by the close of the month the worms were rapidly disappearing; 
cotton chopping progressed and was well advanced and by the 30th the plant was 
squaring, making a fair growth, and ranged from poor to fair condition. 

Wheat filled and ripened well during the month, and soft- wheat harvest set in 
during the first and was completed by the third week, with yields ranging from light 
to good. Hard-wheat harvest commenced the third week and was nearing comple- 
tion by the 30th, with yields ranging from fair to good over Oklahoma and from 
light to fair over the Indian Territory, the quality ranging from fair to fine. Thrash- 
ing was in progress during the last week of the month. The general report was one 
of the best crops raised since the opening and secured in fine condition. 

Oats improved in condition, matured rapidly, and w^ere being harvested by the 
15th, with fair to good yields reported. During the latter j^irt of the month their 
condition deteriorated rapidly on account of red rust setting in generally over Okla- 
homa. Rye matured and was harvested with good yields by the close of the month. 



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BEPOBT OF THE GOVEBNOE OF OKLAHOMA. 



65 



Barley continued in good condition and was filling well. Cane, Kaffir and broom 
corn planting were completed and the crops came up to a good stand and were in a 
' good growing C' adition. Alfalfa and hay harvests were in progress by the 15th, with 
good to fine yields, secured in good condition. Potatoes matured well and were 
being gathered ^ 1th fair to heavy yields, secured in good condition. Range grass 
made a good growth and stock are in good condition and doing well. Early apricots, 
apples, plums, and peaches ripened and were marketed with short to fair yields of a 
good quality reported. 

June corn was being planted over the southern counties at the close of the month. 
Gardens continued in good condition and were doing well. 

Section Director C. M. Strong has prepared the following charts 
showing the average precipitation in inches for the year 1902, also 
prevailing winds and average annual temperature from 1891 to 1902, 
which are valuable for reference and comparison: 

Killing frosts of 1902-3. 
[Last in spring and first in autumn at stations recording their occurrence.] 



Stations. 



Ames 

Arapahoe 

Ardmore 

Beaver 

Blackburn .. 

Burnett 

Chandler 

Chickasha . . . 

Cleo 

Clifton 

Cloud Chief . 

Durant 

Fairland 

Fort Reno . . . 

Fort Sill 

Good water .. 

Guthrie 

Hartshome . . 
Healdton . . . . 
Hennessey .. 

Hobart 

Holdenville . 
Jefferson .... 



Last of First of 

spring, I autumn, 

1903. 1902. 



Apr. 

May 

i'.'.do 

May 

May 

Apr. 

May 

May 

May 

V.'Ao 
Mar. 

...do 
Apr. 
Apr. 
May 



Oct. 5 



Nov. 27 
Sept. 27 



Nov. 27 
Nov. 25 
Nov. 17 
Oct. 28 
Nov. 27 
Nov. 17 
Nov. 27 
Nov. 18 
Sept. 24 
Nov. 17 
I Nov. 27 
Nov. 26 
...do... 
Nov. 17 
...do... 



, Nov. 27 
I Oct. 28 



stations. 



Jenkins 

Kenton 

Kingfisher , 

Mangum 

Marlow 

Mu.skogee 

Newkirk 

Norman 

Oklahoma 

Pauls Valley 

Pawhuska 

Perry 

Ravia 

Sac and Fox Agency. 

Shawnee 

Stillwater 

Tahlequah 

Taloga 

Temple 

Ural 

Wagoner 

Waukomis 

Weatherf ord 



Last of 

spring, 

1903. 



First of 

autumn, 

1902. 



Apr. 30 
...do.., 
May 1 

!!'.do!!; 

...do... 
Apr. 30 
May 1 
Apr. 30 
May 2 
May 1 

!'.;]do!!; 
...do... 
...do... 
...do... 
...do... 
Apr. 30 
May 1 
...do... 



Nov. 14 



Nov. 17 
Do. 
Do. 
Nov. 26 
Nov. 17 
Nov. 16 
Nov. 17 



Nov. 26 
Nov. 17 



Nov. 27 



May 1 



Nov. 27 
Nov. 18 
Oct. 6 



Nov. 14 
Nov. 20 
Nov. 17 



Following are the sectional departures and averages for the season 
of 1902-3 for temperature and precipitation: 





Tempera- 
ture. 


Depar- 
ture. 


Precipi- 
tation. 


Depar- 
ture. 


SUMMER MONTHS. 

June, 1902 


77.4 
79.7 
84.2 


+0.3 
-1.7 
4-3.1 


2.42 
2.22 
2.19 


-0. 81 


July, 1902 


—1.16 


August, 1902 


-0.53 






Average 


80.4 


+0.6 


0.83 


-2.76 






FALL MONTHS. 

September, 1902 


68.2 
62.9 
53. 5 


-5.6 
-0.1 
+5.3 


6.94 
1.82 
5.56 


+3.12 


October, 1902 


-0.76 


November, 1902 


+3.59 






Average 


61.5 


-0.1 


13.32 


+5.95 






WINTER MONTHS. 

December, 1902 


37.4 
39.2 
35.7 


-2.2 
+1.4 
-2.1 


2.11 
0.59 
3.95 


+0.21 


January, 1903 


-0.57 


February, 1903 


+3.59 






Average 


37.4 


-LO 


6.65 


+2.21 







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66 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



Tempera- 
ture. 



Depar- 
ture. 



Precipi- 
tation. 



Depar- 
ture. 



March, 1903 . 
April, 1903... 
May,190S..., 



SPRING MONTHS. 



Average 

Seasonal averagre . 



49.8 
60.3 
65.8 



58.6 



+0.1 
-1.3 
-3.1 



-1.4 



2.73 
1.32 
7.33 



11.38 



i9.5 I -0.5 I 3^.18 j 



-1-0.50 
-1.54 
-f-1.57 



-hO.53 



-1-5.' 



Average monthly and annual precipitation. 



Year. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


An- 
nual. 


1892 


0.46 


2.02 


2.89 


2.25 


9.70 


3.05 


2.61 


4.03 


1.62 


5.23 


0.63 3.66 


38.15 


1893 


.63 


1.07 


1.47 


2.71 


2.68 


2.J2 


3.48 


5.16 


3.18 


.15 


1.51 1.33 


25.49 


1894 


2.33 


1.84 


2.97 


4.26 


3.25 


1.55 


1.72 


1.51 


2.73 


1.89 


.30 ' 1.22 


25.57 


1895 


1.07 


.56 


.72 


1.24 


2.91 


5.78 


5.58 


5.06 


1.10 


3.14 


3.79 ; 4.13 


35.08 


1896 


1.04 


.66 


1.09 


1.49 


3.79 


3.28 


3.96 


1.46 


2.19 


2.75 


1.83 


1.24 


•23.78 


1897 


1.87 


.96 


4.16 


5.38 


5.20 


3.12 


2.05 


3.12 


1.86 


1.87 


.51 


1.01 


30.61 


1898 


3.09 


2.50 


3.87 


1.52 


8.16 


4.64 


4.44 


3.26 1 2.24 


1.96 


1.04 


2.73 


39.45 


1899 


1.01 


.56 


.85 


3.62 


6.00 


5.06 


6.05 


.87 


1.90 


4.30 


4.01 


1.84 


36.07 


1900 


.69 


1.44 


.76 


4.44 


4.59 


2.58 


4.15 


1.75 


6.68 


3.73 


1.18 


.51 


32.50 


1901 


.52 
.61 


.94 
.39 


1.53 
4.02 


2.95 
3.15 


5.39 
10.13 


1.97 
2. 42 


1.92 
2.22 


1.55 
2.19 


1.56 
5.94 


1.99 
1.82 


1.34 
5.56 


1.12 
2.11 


22.78 


1902 


40.56 


1903 


.59 


3.95 


2.73 


1.32 


7.33 


2.10 




















Average... 


1.16 


1.41 


2.23 


2.86 


5.76 


3.14 


3.38 


2.72 1 2.82 

1 


2.58 


1.97 1 1.90 


31.93 



STOCK RAISING. 

In former years cattle were extensively fed on the range, roaming' 
for miles in any direction without molestation upon land that was once 
thouo^ht to be unfit for agricultural purposes, but has since been occu- 
pied by the homesteader and home builder. The scene is now changed, 
and but little of the old large pastures is now available for grazmg. 
The result is smaller herds of finer grades. Much attention is now 
paid to the qualities of the various strains which prove best for ship- 
ping beef or dairy products. 

The short cold season has always been an important factor in the 
wintering over of stock in this locality. Much less feed is required 
and the stock come out better in the spring than in any of the northern 
cattle districts. 

The short nutritious grass that grows so abundantly in the higher 
altitudes of the Territory becomes self -cured in the fall at the time of 
frost, and has often proved to contain sufiicient nutriment not only to 
sustain the life of vast herds but to actually fatten them during the 
winter months. 

The proximity of good markets, the abundance of grass and forag-e 
crops, together with the short cold season, make Oklahoma an ideal 
place in which to profitably pursue the stock-raising industry. 

The Texas Longhorn of the past has given way to the thoroughbred, 
and evidences of grading can be seen in every locality. The Hereford, 
Shorthorns, and the ever-popular Jersey can be seen on every hand. 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



67 



The following table shows the number of head of live stock returned 
for taxation in the Territory for the year 1903: 

Live stock returned for taxation^ 1903. 



County. 


Horses. 


Mules 
and 
asses. 


Cattle. 


Sheep. 


Swine. 


Beaver 


7,720 

9,101 

13,337 

10,287 

6, 921 

16, 195 

9,847 

4,765 

8,701 

14,901 

14,368 

21, 738 

12, 446 

11, 255 

7,377 

13,399 

10, 557 

8,021 

9,926 

11,911 

11,520 


647 
1,301 

967 
1,975 
2,509 
5,366 
2,055 

982 
1,617 
3,292 
2,002 
5,561 
2, 451 
2,080 
2,354 
4,116 
2,253 
1,873 
2,416 
3,180 
2,840 


100,808 
22,103 
23,393 
28,716 
14,686 
49, 077 
29,862 
20,222 
25,389 
42,265 
41,513 
61, 527 
55, 522 
82, 232 
22,586 
27,211 
23,361 
34, 105 
19, 193 
• 85,094 
26,078 
21,952 
30,318 
28, 142 
97,158 
74, 149 


18,157 

1,419 

574 

227 

326 

1,870 

281 

414 

554 

244 

178 

1,138 

90 

563 

345 

844 

872 

1,322 

1,645 

1,516 

408 

194 

468 

481 

3,107 

2,994 


437 


Blaine 


4, 952 


Caddo 


5, 408 


Canadian 


7,905 
7,867 


Cleveland 


Coinauche 


8,993 


Custer 1 


13,664 


Dav 


2,463 


Dewe V 


6,411 


Garfield 


11,737 


Grant 


15, 132 


Greer 


7,500 
17,586 


Kay 


Kingfisher 


7,670 
1,703 


Kiowa 


Li neoln 


12,025 


Log'an 


6,661 


Noble 


9,339 


Oklahoma 


7,910 


Pawnee 


16,902 


Pavne 


11,347 


Pottawatomie 


7,961 


Roger Mills 


8, 595 
10, 231 
33, 272 
18,322 


2,108 
3,770 
3,466 
2,271 


5,458 


Washita 


9,723 


W^oods 


27, 623 


Woodward 


4,841 






Total 


304,713 


63,452 


1,036,662 


35,231 


284,218 





OKLAHOMA LIVE-STOCK SANITARY COMMISSION. 

The maintaining of quarantine regulations in the Territory and the 
stamping out and prevention of disease are in charge of a live-stock 
sanitary commission. Through a thorough system of inspection all 
stock infected with Texas fever is being culled out and held in quaran- 
tine until rid of infection. 

Mr. Bolton, president of the commission, writes as follows concern- 
ing present conditions: 

The general live-stock conditions prevailing in Oklahoma are better at this time 
than during the corresponding period of last year. Very little disease of any kind 
is reported, arid the ravages of Texas fever have been reduced to a minimum, owing 
to a special quarantine oi the counties adjacent to the quarantine line. The range- 
cattle proposition is substantially a feature of the past, except in Beaver County, 
owing to the rapid settlement of the country during the past year. 

The profits of stock raising have resulted in more diversified interests, and there are 
many small herds bfeing, started by farmers who have hitherto confined, theit atten- 
tion to grain raising. Especially is this true in the field of pure-blooded stock, many 
new farms being opened and stocked with registered cattle and swine. This view of 
the situation is hopeful and causes confidence in Oklahoma, as it insures better blood 
and consequently better stock receiving better care. 

Thomas Morris, secretary of the commission, furnishes the following: 

Reports to this commission up to June 1, 1903, have been most favorable. Cattle 
have never been in better condition at this season, especially on the ranges. We 
have reports from Woodward and Beaver counties, from the western counties and 
Kiowa and Comanche country. Cattle are fattening fast on ranges and will soon be 
ready for movement to market. The health of live stock up to the present time has 
been exceptionallv good, very little complaint having come to this office. There 
has been less blackleg than ever before, no reports of tick fever and very little infec- 
tion, and I do not believe there is a case of tuberculosis in the Territory. There 



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68 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

have been some reports of itch or mange infection in Woodward and Beaver coun- 
ties. After a careful investigation we find this disease does not exist to any great 
extent, and that cattlemen are taking prompt measures to eradicate the same. 
There are a number of cases of glanders reported, all of which are being promptly 
looked after. Fifty per cent of these cases are found on investigation to be ao^gra- 
vated cases of distemper. We have found one herd of horses in the Territory 
affected with itch or mange, but the same have been promptly treated and at this 
time they are practically cured. 

No cholera or swine plague has been reported among hogs in the Territory. 

The commission is meeting with less opposition with the enforcement of quaran- 
tine regulations than at any time since its organization. The stockmen seem to 
realize that hearty cooperation with the commission is the one way to stamp out 
infection, and most of them are aiding us by burning pastures and treating infectious 
herds to rid them of infection. 

Bjr Federal regulation all cattle in counties bordering on Federal quarantine line 
require Territorial inspection before being moved farther north to pasture and Fed- 
eral inspection before being moved out of the Territory for grazing or market. Of 
sixty herds inspected to go farther north to pasture no infection has been found, 
and the Federal inspectors have reported no infection found above the Federal quar- 
antine line except in Greer County, where a few cases have been reported by Federal 
inspectors, all of which have been promptly quarantined by this board. 

THE OKLAHOMA LIVE STOCK ASSOCIATION. 

This association was founded in 1895 and primaril}^ had for its 
object the protection of its members. It maintained a brand inspec- 
tion and record, which proved of great vahie to the stock raisers, 
enabling them to identif v their property when stolen. The influence 
of the organization is also brought to bear upon the maintenance of 
the Federal quarantine line, both in and out of the Territory, and thus 
a large saving in values to stockmen results. 

Mr. W. E. Bolton, of Woodward, who is secretary of the associa- 
tion, writes as follows: 

Regarding the live stock association, it has been found necessary to largely change 
the method of its work as it formerly existed largely as a brand protective organiza- 
tion. A special committee appointed at the last convention of tne association have 
been empowered to revise the constitution and adapt the rates of membership and 
dues more especially to the needs of the stock farmers, and therefore it will continue 
as an organization and devote its energies mainly to the cooperation with the author- 
ities in stamping out disease and protecting the quarantine lines from violation. 
This feature alone commends itself to every cattle raiser in Oklahoma, and insures a 
larger membership in the future than ever held by any association in the past. 

Its brand record will also be continued, as this method of identifying and estab- 
lishing ownership of animals is steadily increasing in favor among small herdsmen 
and farmers, as it provides greater security against thieves. 

The plan and scope of the organization has been broadened to meet the new 
requirements of the cattle conditions in Oklahoma, and its future usefulness will 
only be limited by the growth of the industry in our Territory. 

HORSES AND MULES. 

In quality and value the horses and mules used and raised in Okla- 
homa will compare very favorably with any State in the Union. There 
is a good demand for horses of medium weight and good form and 
action, though all sorts of sound animals are bringing good prices. It 
has always been a profitable business for farmers to raise several colt^ 
each year. Brood mares, if properly handled, will do their share of 
the farm work, and many farmers are now using good teams of their 
own raising. The absurd idea that horses from the North do not 
thrive here is being dispelled. There were losses in the years imme- 
diately following the settling up of the country, but they were largely 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 69 

due to lack of feed and care. For heavy farm work, mules are much 
in favor, and some fine specimens have been raised. They command 
excellent prices and are always in demand. 

SHEEP AND ANGORA GOATS. 

Sheep raising is carried on more or less extensively in every county 
in the Territory. They are raised successfully and bring good prices 
in the market for slaughter, besides being a source of considerable 
income in wool produced. While not so numerous as in cooler and 
higher altitudes, they are recognized as profitable adjuncts to the stock 
of a farm. They have been remarkably free from disease. 

The angora goat thrives in this country, and the raising of them 
seems destined to become a settled industry. They are not only valu- 
able for market while young, but their fleece is a source of revenue. 
It is also advanced on good authority that a few angoras will protect a 
herd of sh^ep from the devastation of wolves and co3^ates. 

WICHITA MOUNTAIN MINERALS. 

The* mineral resources of the Wichita Mountains are practically 
undeveloped, hence no one knows the value or extent of the riches 
deposited therein. The mineral districts comprise townships 2, 3, 4, 
and 5 north, and ranges from 13 to 19 W. 1. M., inclusive, and 
embraces an area of over 3,000 square miles, which is of course 
interspersed with agricultural lands. It is claimed that there are 
dates on old rocks which indicate that gold was discovered in the 
Wichita Mountains as far back as 1832. 

Since the opening of the new country there has been more or less 
excitement over mineral prospects, but capital is slow to develop 
prospects, hence about all the work that has been done has been 
accomplished by the fellows of limited capital and unlimited faith. 

There are reported five shafts at a depth of 100 feet, while hundreds 
vary from a depth of 10 to 50 feet. 

The mineral-bearing mountains have been legally divided into five 
mining districts. 

It is reported that there are nearly 3,000 members who have 
recorded claims in the various districts. 

There are no shipping mines as yet, although single carloads have 
been recently sent to the smelters to ascertain the true value of the ore. 

Confidence in the presence of mineral in paying quantities has 
induced some capitalists, it is now reported, to establish a smelter and 
reduction plant at an accessible point. With these facilities and the 
assurance of capital becoming interested, it is expected that develop- 
ment will progress more rapidly than in the past. 

FORESTS AND THE PRODUCTION OF LUMBER. 

A vast variety of woods are indigenous to Oklahoma, among which 
may be mentioned black walnut, honey locust, hickory, box elder, 
black-jack, red elm, white sumach, catalpa, s^^camore, soft maple, 
burr oak, water elm, persimmon, birch, shellbark hickory, mulberry, 
black hickory, ash, red oak, white oak, paw paw, pecan, yellow pine, 
white locust, ironwood, red cedar, willow, wild cnerry, chinaberry, 
red bud, black locust, chittum, cottonwood. 



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70 REPOKT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

In some instances trees have attained immense size, and in some 
localities much lumber is being cut. While the central and western 
portions are but scantily supplied with timber except along the banks 
of streams, the eastern portion is in many places heavil^^ wooded. 
Here local sawmills have for many years been busily engaged during 
the winter months in getting out fuel and limiber. The cutting of 
black walnut logs and shipping them to foreign markets has become 
quite an industry. 

LABOR SUPPLY. 

The laborer can always find profitable employment in Oklahoma. 
Industries are growing and thriving, new enterprises starting, and all 
require man's labor, mental or physical, skilled and unskilled. Mills, 
compresses, manufactories, ana new lines of railway are annually 
increasing their pay rolls. 

The several new lines of railways have brought into the Territory 
large numbers' of laborers in the construction of their roadbeds. 
Good wages are generally paid. There is always a demand for good 
farm hands, and during wheat harvest, fruit seasons, and cotton- 
picking time the supplv seldom meets the demand. With the Contin- 
ued growth along industrial lines which is sure to follow in our 
numerous prosperous cities located on intersecting lines of railway, 
the outlook for the laborer is indeed promising. 

* INDIANS. 

The total number of Indians in the Territory as reported by the 
various agents and superintendents is now 11,938. 

In addition to the above are some 300 Apaches being held at Fort 
Sill as prisoners of war. 

Pawnee Agency 638 

Osage Agency: 

Osage 1,850 

Kaw 220 

White Eagle Agency: 

Poncaa 610 

Otoes 370 

Tonkawas 50 

Sac and Fox Agency: 

Sac and Fox 492 

lowas 92 

Pottawatomie 1, 686 

Shawnee 687 

Kickapoo 247 

Darlington Agency: 

Cheyenne and Arapahoe 1, 300 

Kiowa Agency: 

Apache 158 

Kiowa 1,170 

Comanche 1, 401 

Wichita 433 

Caddo 534 

WHITE EAGLE AGENCY. 

Through the courtesy of Hon. Hugh M. Noble, superintendent in 
charge of this agency, I am enabled to give the following report of the 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 71 

progress and condition of the Ponca, Otoe, and Tonkawa tribes of 
Indians: 

The conditions that eventually must make for the betterment of the Ponca and 
Otoe Indians in Oklahoma are in full force at present, and if not interfered with by 
unscrupulous white land seekers the day is not far distant when the red wards 
of the General Government will be fully qualified to take up their place in the 
body politic as citizens; not in that high degree that characterizes the mentally and 
otherwise well-equipped palefaced brother, but a not undesirable member of the 
community. 

Many of the Poncas have applied themselves to agriculture with a fair degree of 
skill, and many could be named who have harvested wheat crops that must show 
good returns, while numerous well advanced cornfields add another source of com- 
pensation to many others. 

The tepee is gradually bein^ forsaken for the more commodious and comfortable 
frame dwelling, and the Indian women, the toilers of their race by tradition, are 
learning the white woman* s way and make good housekeepers. 

It is safe to assume that the Poncas, who heretofore have numbered about 560 souls, 
will this year at time of census taking show a healthful increase. A conservative 
estimate is 50 new arrivals. At Otoe the census will probably show the same figures 
as those of a year ago. The Tonkawa Indians, located about 16 miles west of the 
Ponca Indian Agency's oflices, number 50 souls, some of them so old that it requires 
three figures to state their age. No baby has been born among the Tonkawas for 
many years, and each succe^ing year shows a gradual decline until in time the once 
boasted tribe of man-eaters will have faded from the earth. 

The present conditions of all of these Indians show a gain in wealth generally, the 
money derived from annuities, the leasing of allotments, and the sale of inherited 
Indian lands contributing to the accmnumtion of money among them, though, as a 
rule, they trade very freely, and not always are they dealt with honorably. These 
Indians produce very httle handiwork of any sort, the women working sluUfuUy in 
beaded trinkets, but to no considerable extent. They like a good time, and visit 
freely among their kinsmen. 

The blanket and clout and beaded moccasin have given way to the apparel of the 
civilian among these Indians, and as time wears on the young Indians, returned from 
the reservation and the nonreservation boarding schools, fast take the places of their 
progenitors, but equipped for the battle of life with an English education and a knowl- 
edge of the methods m vogue at the advanced centers of schooling that they can 
never forget and that remains with them permanently. 

Many of the tribal customs are being forsaken, and with the enforcement of the 
regulations of the Indian Department among the different tribes cutting off visiting 
and the so-called religious dances, a mere subterfuge for feasting and lazmees, it wull 
be an easy matter to finally bring our roving brother into the fold. 

If the system of civilizing the Indian that obtains at present is persevered in, the 
time must surely arrive when naught but the best results will manifest themselves, 
and the simple child of nature, whose history has been written in lurid letters of 
fire and blood, will toil for his bread and sweat for his existence. 

CHEYENNE AND ARAPAHOE AGENCY. 

Maj. George W. H. Stouch, superintendent of the Cheyenne and 
Arapahoe Indian Agency, located at Darlington, Okla., furnishes the 
following statement relative to the conditions of the tribes of Indians 
under his charge: 

The segregation of this agency, which was instigated by the Interior Department, 
was effected on November 30, 1902. By this action a portion of the agency was 
placed under the superintendent of the Cantonment Training School, Cantonment, 
Okla.; another portion under the superintendent of the Seger Colony Training 
School, Colony, Okla., and the remainder under a superintendent with headquarters 
at Darlington, Okla. The undersigned assumed charge as superintendent of the 
Chevenne and Arapahoe Agency July 1, 1903. 

While the segregation of this agency was in accordance with the policy of the 
Department with respect to Indian agencies, namely, placing smaller portions of an 
agencv under the management of bonded school superintendents, the fact remains 
that the Indians, as a whole, have not been greatly benefited thereby. The Chey- 
enne and Arapahoe Indians are too closely affiliated to make the segregation a prac- 
tical success from the beginning. The many difficulties encountered during the past 



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72 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

nine months bear testimony to this fact, and it is to be hoped that the current fiscal 
year will bring forth better results, and that the Chevenne and Arapahoe Indian 
will continue the upward march toward civilization which was momentarily inter- 
rupted by the confusion incident to the segregation. 

Census. — A recapitulation of the census of this agency shows the following popula- 
tion under date of June 30, 1903: 

Males over 18 years 355 

Females over 14 years 463 

Total number of males 616 

Total number of females 684 

Total of all ages 1,300 

Males between 6 and 16 148 

Females between 6 and 18 151 

Condition. — At no time in the past has the condition of these Indians been more 
favorable than at present. As a rule, they are contented and happy, and the majority 
of the able-bodied males are anxious to do something for themselvss and families. 
In view of the entire discontinuance of the issue of all ration supplies by the Govern- 
ment, it is to be hoped that the Indians of this agency will continue to grow^ more 
independent in character and spirit and learn to depend entirely upon themselves 
for their future support. 

The old and decrepit Indians have received issues of ration supplies during the 
past fiscal year, but the more able-bodied have been left to depend upon their own 
resources to procure the necessaries of life. They have, as a rule, taken kindly to 
this order of things, and have expressed a desire to work whenever an opening was 
offered. A large number have been employed by the Government during the past 
year in and about the agency and throughout the farming districts, repairing old 
roads and building new ones. This work they have accomplished in a first-class 
manner, rivaling even their white brethren in work of this character. The Depart- 
ment has appropriated $8,000, to be expended in a similar manner during the current 
fiscal year. 

Sanitary. — The health conditions on this reservation are no worse than in former 
vears. Tuberculosis continues to be the dread disease, but the death percentage 
from this source has not increased to any extent. The total number of deaths from 
all causes for this agency w^as 45, and the total number of births 44 — a decrease in 
the two tribes of one person. 

Education. — The Cheyenne and Arapahoe schools opened September 1, 1902, with 
a small attendance, which gradually swelled until the scholastic population from 
each tribe was almost entirely exhausted. The total average attendance during the 
school year for the two schools was 260. 

The literary education of the pupils has been along lines somewhat similar to the 
common schools of the Territory. The scholars have been apt learners in the 
majority of cases, and when the fact is taken into consideration that many of the 

ails, especially the smaller ones, must first learn to speak the P^nglish language 
)re making any material advancement, it shows a wonderful aptitude on their 
part and the capability of the Indian to adapt himself to existing conditions. The 
more advanced scholars, who are susceptible of higher education, are transferred to 
nonreservation schools, mainly Chilocco School and Haskell Institute, where they 
remain for a period of from three to five years. 

The industrial pursuits of these Indians consist principally of farming on a small 
scale, stock raising to some extent, and sundry occupations. More of these Indians 
have been locating on their allotments than formerly, and are trying to cultivate the 
same. Many more would do likewise, but are hindered from lack of the neces- 
sary farming machinery, implements, and, above all, of horses capable of performing 
the farm work satisfactorily. With the sale of inherited lands a number of these 
Indians will come into possession of considerable sums of money, which it is to be 
hoped they will utilize in the purchase of suitable stock and machinery and the 
building of comfortable homes on their allotments. Some have signified their inten- 
tion of using the proceeds of such sales in this manner. 

The old tribal customs and garb have almost disappeared. Nearly the total male 
population of this agency wear citizens' dress wholly or in part, and about one-half 
of the females still cling to their picturesque tribal garments. The males are the 
most susceptible to advancement in this respect, while the females, owing to their 
inborn shyness, are slow to adopt new modes of attire. Their present garb, however, 
is comfortable and entirely proper. It would take them some tmie to become adapted 
to the usual tight-fitting garments of the enlightened race, and it is very evident that 
the Indian women are not anxious to discard their cool, comfortable garb for the 
uncomfortable dress of civilization. , 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 73 

Dancing among these Indians is rarely indulged in. I have permitted them to come 
together once a year in a ceremonial meeting. The old torturous practices have been 
entirely eliminated, and the present ceremony is beautiful and very interesting. I 
have, however, always tried to discourage these practices, believing that an occa- 
sional indulgence in these dances will bring about the desired results sooner than a 
more vigorous policy. 

The marital relations have improved among these Indians, and it is seldom that 
an Indian takes unto himself a wife in the old tribal way. 

The use of intoxicants among these Indians has not increased, but I believe is on 
the decrease. This has been brought about in spite of adverse conditions. Whisky 
sellers have been allowed to go free by the Territorial courts. It has been impossible 
to obtain a conviction even in absolutely sure cases. The Territorial courts, for some 
reason, do not like to handle cases where the Federal authorities are concerned; con- 
sequently the boot leggers and a few Indians, who are tempted to disregard the 
marital laws, feel perfectly safe in carrying on their nefarious practices. They may 
be arrested but they are sure to escape conviction. If the Territorial authorities 
would cooperate witn the Federal authorities in endeavoring to suppress these prac- 
tices, conditions in this respect would be greatly improved, to the advantage of the 
Indians and society in general. 

In conclusion I desire to state that the work among these Indians during the past 
year has been, in the main, quite satisfactory. A gradual upward movement is per- 
ceptible, both morally and intellectually. The missionaries and other workers among 
these two tribes have been, with possibly one or two exceptions, whole-souled in 
their efforts to uplift the Indians, and it is only a question of a few years when these 
Indians will become entirely capable of assuming their share of the "burdens of 
state" and of becoming strong factors in society. The material for the making of 
good citizens is in them, but it requires painstaking and intelligent effort to bring 
out and develop their good qualities. 

SAUK AND FOX AGENCY. 

Through the kindness of the Hon. Ross Guffin, superintendent in 
charge of this agency, the following information has been received 
relative to the Sauk and Fox and Iowa tribes of Indians: 

The conditions prevailing among the Indians of this agency, while not flattering, 
are yet not devoid of encouragement. 

Two tribes are enrolled here, viz, the Sauk and Fox and the low^a. Of these the 
Sauk and Fox are the most advanced, and they are a long way from being self-sus- 
taining. In the main they take kindly to the methods of civilization, but they are 
woefully untutored and easily discouraged. They are fortunate in having had for 
their chief counselors the Keokuks — Moses, their present assistant chief and president 
of their council, and his father, the elder Keokuk, who gave name to one of the 
principal cities in Iowa. Moses Keokuk is now 84 years old, and though he does not 
speak our language he is thoroughly civilized, a devotee of and an ornament to the 
Christian religion, which he embraced thirty-odd years ago, and, as was his father 
before him, is intensely loyal to the Government of the United States. His father 
and himself have been the dominant spirits of the tribe since the treaty of 1843, and 
the elder Keokuk had a large foUowmg before that time, who with him remained 
true to the Government and refused to join in the Blackhawk war of 1832. 

The influence of the Keokuks is easily traceable to the patriotism of the present 
members of the tribe, who, while Indians, nomadic in their tendencies, keeping up 
their tribal relations, and adhering largely to the pagan religion of their fathers, are 
yet devoutly loyal to the Government. Indeed, the hope for these people lies in 
the fact that they accept without question the policy of the Government concerning 
them. This makes them all the more willing to attempt to become self-supporting 
on their farms and to send their children to school. 

The Iowa are not so fortunate. They seem docile and tractable, but have no well- 
defined ideas as to the Government or their relations to it. With them ''sufficient 
unto the day is the evil thereof. ' ' They roam around, passing from what was their 
own reservation to that of their neighbors, the Otoe, living for the most part in tents» 
reluctant to settle down, and generally opposed to sending their children to school. 
They have little concern for their future, and seem content to live in the present. 

The bane of all these Indians is strong drink and gambling, and this is especially 
true of the Iowa. How to curb these tendencies and break up the long-established 
habits is the problem. 

No effort is spared to induce them to settle down on their farms and go to work. 



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74 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

For the past six months Keokuk has been speaking to his tribe at every council 
meeting (twice a month) in their own language, and urging them to abandon their 
old w^ays and adopt the new and inevitable — the demands of civilization. The object 
has been to make these council meetings a school of instruction, and the results are 
quite satisfactory. Recently the Government has authorized two additional farmers 
to work among the Indians of this agency to instruct, help, and encourage them in 
farming and stock growing. Both are now on duty and have been for some weeks, 
one operating among the farmers of North Fork, or the southern district, and the 
other among those of the Cimarron, or northern district. Though just beginning 
their work, these farmers report that they have hopes of inducing many of the 
Indians to become self-supporting. They find the Indians generally willing, but 
inapt pupils. They have little or no knowledge of farming, and as to stock they 
know nothing save' the indifferent caring for a few ponies. They have no farming 
implements to speak of, and no money with which to buy them. The sale of their 
inherited lands, under the act of May* 27, 1902, will furnish many of them money in 
the near future, and it is hoped that they will use a good part of this to improve, 
stock, and furnish their fanns. 

The enumeration or census of these Indians taken June 30, 1903, shows: 

Sauk and Fox 492 

Iowa 92 

Total 584 

The census is exact, and while the number is not large they are dispersed over a 
wide district of country, embracing parts of Lincoln, Payne, Logan, and Pottawa- 
tomie counties. Their allotments are scattered over what was the Sauk and Fox and 
Iowa reservations, mostly along the water courses. The whole number of ori^nal 
allotments was 570, and of these 268 are subject to sale under the act above cated. 
The lands are selling for good prices, and it is hoped that the Indians will make 
good use of the money. 

As will be gatherea from the above, the Indians have made little advancement in 
the arts and ways of civilization. Very few of them show any aptitude or inclination 
for the useful arts. The most that can be expected is to get and keep them engaged 
in agriculture and stock growing. Their lands are well adapted to these purposes, 
and the rewards of the husbandman are sure. It is believed that getting even a few 
of them successfully started along these lines, others will be encouraged to greater 
endeavor and the body of them be saved from utter extinction. The great hope for 
these Indians, and especially of the Sauk and Fox tribe, lies in the school. 

They pay $5,000 per annum tow*ard the support of the school for their children. 
They do this willingly and all are coming to see the importance of educating their 
young. They are very fond of their children, and most of them take a deep interest 
m their education. We have a good school in a beautiful and healthful site, one of 
the best in the whole country, which is well and for the most part cheerfully patron- 
ized and attended. We have capacity for 100 pupils, and this last year had an enroll- 
ment of 101 and an average attendance of 99. 

This year we furnish our full quota of pupils for the higher schools at Chilocco, 
Carlisle, and Haskell, 14 in all. All these pupils, together with those who have pre- 
ceded them, promise to grow into useful, self-supporting, and self-respecting men and 
women. 

OSAGE AGENCY. 

Through the kindness of Hon. O. A. Miteher, United States Lndian 
agent, I am enabled to furnish the following information in regard to 
these tribes: 

The Osage and Kaw^ Indian reservations are located in the extreme northeastern 
corner of Oklahoma Territory and contain 1,500,000 acres, consisting of many fertile 
valleys, miles of rolling prairies, and a considerable area of rocky nills. A greater 
portion of the reservations at the present time is used for grazing purposes, the rev- 
enues derived from the grazing leases aggregating about $170,000 per annum. Corn, 
wheat, cotton, potatoes, sorghum, Kaffir corn, vegetables, and various kin;ls of fruit 
are grown in abundance, and the reservations are susceptible of sustaining a large 
population. 

The total white and Indian population of the Osage and Kaw reservations is esti- 
mated at about 9,000 or 10,000 people. 

A large quantity of oil is produced in the eastern portion of the Osage Reservation, 
and the number of producing wells is constantly increasing. Natural-gas wells are 



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BEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 75 

also being found, and there are abundant indications that the reservation contains 
coal, lead, and zinc. There are many flowing streams of water which furnish water 
in abundance, and the rainfall is sufficient to insure good crops. 

During the past year the Kaw Indians have had their lands allotted in severalty, 
each member of the tribe receiving 400 acres. The Kaw Indians now number 220 
persons, are citizens of the United States, and are steadily advancing in civilization. 
A great number of the Osage during the past year have made selections of home- 
steads, and most of them — men, women, and children — ^now have farms under 
cultivation. 

The Osage number 1,850 persons, of which number more than one-half are mixed 
bloods who will compare favorably with their white neighbors in education, intelli- 
gence, and thrift. Tne full blood* Indian is also improving his condition, and they 
will soon be able to care for themselves. 

KIOWA AGENCY. 

United States Indian agent, Lieut. Col. Jas. F. Randlett, in charge 
of the Kiowa Agency located at Anadarko, furnishes the following 
items relative to the condition of the Indians in his charge: 

There are five tribes in this agency, viz, Apache, Kiowa, Comanche, Wichita, and 
Caddo. There are 1,807 males and 1,889 females. About half of them are now wear- 
ing citizen's dress wholly and the others only in part, some clinging to the blanket 
and clout. About one-third can read and nearly half of them can use English 
enough for ordinary intercourse 

There are 895 Indian children of school age. Nearly 900 are living in dwelling 
houses and a few are engaged in civilized pursuits whereby they supply their own 
subsistence. 

There are 15 missionaries living and teaching at various points among the tribes, 
11 being of the Baptist denomination, 3 Methodist, and 1 Mennonite. In addition to 
the above there are 8 missionaries who are reported as teachers in the school statistics. 

There are now living 886 Indians who have been baptized, and 677 of the number 
are regular communicants. There are 14 church buildings. The various religious 
and missionary societies have expended among the tribes during the past year over 
$28,000. 

There have been 26 formal marriages .among the. Indians during the year, all but 
two of which were solemnized by ministers of the gospel. Three divorces were 
granted by the district court. There were 292 births and 254 deaths, one being a 
suicide. The number of criminal offenders was very small, there being only 17 con- 
victions and 8 held for the action of the grand jury. 

Some 13,710 acres have been cultivated during the year and 1,825 acres broken. 
There are 144,000 acres under fence and 19,160 rods of fencing was done during the 

Ct year. Some 634 families are actually living upon and cultivating their allotted 
ds. 

The Indians have raised by their own labor 13,600 bushels of wheat, 4,100 bushels 
of oats, 120,300 bushels of corn, 2,025 bushels of potatoes, 320 bushels of turnips, 800 
bushels of onions, 900 bushels of beans, 25,000 melons, 1,000 pumpkins, 1,350 tons 
of hay, and made 650 pounds of butter. The value of the products of Indian labor 
sold to the Government was $3,616.19, and sold otherwise is estimated to be $10,750. 
There are owned by the Indians some 8,728 horses, 480 mules, 8,552 cattle, 1,090 
swine, and 6,325 domestic fowls. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

There are no Territorial public buildings, and, as Congress has 
prohibited the locating of any structures of this kind, the Territorial 
prisoners, insane, dear, and dumb must be cared for by contract with 
private institutions or neighboring States, although there is an increas- 
ing fund in the treasury created for the purpose of erecting public 
buildings. This fund amounts at the present time to $256,606.69. 

Public library buildings have been erected by Andrew Carnegie in 
two cities, Guthrie and Oklahoma City, and another is under construc- 
tion in Norman, each costing about $30,000. 

Plans have been drawn for a public building to be erected in (juthrie 



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76 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

costing, complete, $250,000. Congress has appropriated the sum of 
$100,000 for this purpose, and also a similar amount for a building to 
be located in Oklahoma City. 

Among the new public edifices being erected for educational pur- 
poses at the present time may be mentioned Southwestern Normal, at 
Weatherfora; addition to Edmond Normal, at Edmond; countj^ high 
school, at Guthrie, and Epworth University, at Oklahoma City. 

LEGISIiATION. 

Mention is made below to the laws passed by the last legislature and 
amendments that have been made in tne laws there b3\ 

ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW. 

Applicants for admission to practice law are now required to pass 
an examination under direction of a commission appointed by the 
supreme court of the Territory. This may be either written or oral. 
Admission upon the report of this commission to the supreme court of 
the Territory admits one to all courts of record in the Territory. 

BANKS AND BANKING. 

A few changes were made by the last legislature in the Territorial 
banking law, the principal one of which is that no bank can hereafter 
be authorized to do busmess in the Territory unless it has a paid-up 
capital of not less than $10,000. Under the new law the capital stock 
of banks in cities of various populations is as follows: In towns or 
cities having less than 2,500 inhabitants, not less than $10,000; in 
cities having more than 2,500 inhabitants and less than 5,000, not less 
than $15,000; in cities having pore than 5,000 inhabitants and less 
than 10,000, not less than $20,000; and in cities having pver 10,000 
inhabitants, not less than $25,000. 

THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Changes were made in the law governing the board of health, prin- 
cipally in increasing their powers. Generally speaking, it is author- 
ized to quarantine against outside territory known to be infected with 
contagious or infectious diseases, to condemn or destroy impure or 
diseased articles of food, and to act in conjunction witK county and 
municipal boards of health, and it is given, to this end, ample police 
powe.rs. The regulation of admission to the practice of medicine is 
under the supermtendence of the board of health. Applicants for 
license to practice are required to be of good moral character and to 
offer proof of ten years' continuous practice or proof of graduation 
from a reputable medical college, and are required to stand an exam- 
ination given by the board of health. Each physician is required to 
file his license in the oflSce of the register of deeds. 

FIRE DEPARTMENTS. 

In cities of the first class, by an act of the last legislature, all fire 
departments are placed upon a nonpartisan basis, and, under penalty, 
no paid fireman is allowed to take part in any political campaign or to 
use his position to further the interest of anj^ political candidate. 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 77 



CORPORATIONS. 



Few changes were made in the law of corporations, principally in 
enlarging the number of purposes for which associations may become 
incorporated. Notably among these additions are corporations formed 
for literary, educational, and historical purposes; building and invest- 
ment companies; merchandizing companies, wholesale or retail, and 
companies for the purpose of locating, laying out, and improving town 
sites. Corporations are given the power to purchase, hold, and con- 
vey real estate for the purpose of their incorporation. Insurance 
companies are not allowed to become incorporated except under 
restrictions of the insurance laws of the Territory. 

The only change made in railroad legislation of note was the one 
requiring all railroad corporations in the Territory to fence their 
property and to render such corporations liable for such damages that 
maj" occur by reason of their failure to construct such fences. 



County commissioners are authorized to make a levy of 10 mills in 
any one year and to continue such levies from year to year for the 

{period not exceeding five years, for the purpose of erecting court- 
louses, jails, and other public buildings. 

CRIMES AND PUNISHMENTS. 

It is now made unlawful for any member of any board of county 
commissioners, board of trustees of a city, town, or village, any mem- 
ber of any board of education of any city or school district to accept 
any contract with the body of which he is a member for the furnishing 
of any material or supplies for public use. Statutes of a similar char- 
acter have existed before, but this is important because more sweep- 
ing. The harboring and aiding of criminals is penalized. Vagrancy 
is defined and punished. Trespassing on railways, or riding upon 
trains without authority from the conductor, is made a misdemeanor. 

ELECTIONS. 

An act was passed placing a severe penalty upon the giving or tak- 
ing of anv bribe for votes at any election. Registration in cities of 
the first class. 

GAME LAWS. 

The purchase or the sale of any of the following animals is prohib- 
ited: Deer, buck, doe, fawn, antelope, prairie chicken, grouse, quail, 
wild duck, dove, or insectiverous bird. The killing of any of the 
above-mentioned animals upon any public road or highway without 
first procuring the consent of the owners of land adjoming the high- 
way is made a misdemeanor. The transportation of any of the above- 
named animals by any common carrier is prohibited. The above 
{)rovisions of the game law are in addition to the act passed by the 
egislature in the year 1901. 

HERD LAW. 

Changes have been made in the herd law to meet the changed con- 
ditions of the western portion of Oklahoma. Duty is imposed upon 



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78 REPOBT OF THE GOVEKNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

all owners of cattle to restmin their stock, upon penalty of being held 
for damagfes, unless, upon an election held, tne resident freeholders of 
each stock district decide that free range shall govern. 

• 

HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE. 

Provision was made b^ the last legislature for the erection and 
maintenance by the Territory for a hospital for the insane, to take 
effect upon certain conditions. This class of patients has heretofore 
been cared for under private contract. 

INSPECTION OF OILS. 

A new oil-inspection law was passed b^^ the last legislature, the 
salient features of which are that all kerosene is deemed dangerous, 
and its sale is prohibited, which flashes at less than 120^ F. Gaso- 
line or other highly inflammable fluids are deemed dangerous and its 
sale prohibited whenever their specific gravity is found to be greater 
than 74° Baum6. In addition to the above prohibitions upon the sale 
of oils, brands are required to be placed upon each receptacle, which 
shall indicate the flash test, quality test, and the date of inspection. 
Manufacturers and wholesale dealers are made liable to retail dealers 
and all other persons for damages of everv kind and character occur- 
ring by reason of the inferior quality of the oil sold. 



Changes were made in the militia law, notablv in requiring the 
examination for obtaining of commissions; also making target practice 
compulsory and providing for an inspector and assistant inspector of 
rifle practice, whose duty it is to inspect each company or detachment 
at least quarterly. 

OSTEOPATHY. 

Admission to the practice of osteopathy is regulated by the Territo- 
rial board of osteopathic registration and examination. No one can 
f)ractice osteopathy who is less than 21 years of age or has not a pre- 
iminary education equal to that given in a high school or normal 
institute and shall have graduated from a reputable school of osteop- 
athy. The applicant is then required to stand an examination in the 
following subjects: Anatomy, physiology, physiological chemistr^^ 
toxicology, osteopathic diagnosis, hygiene, osteopathic obstetrics and 
gynecology, minor surger}", principles and practice of osteopathy, and 
such other subjects as the board may require, provided that the board 
of osteopathy may, in its discretion, dispense with the examination in 
the following cases: First, of an osteopathic physician duly authorized 
to practice osteopathy in any other State or Territory or in the Dit^i- 
trict of Columbia; second, an osteopath who has been in the actual 
practice of osteopathy for five years, who is a graduate of a reputable 
school of osteopathy. The certificate from the board of osteopathy 
shall be recorded in the office of the register of deeds in the county in 
which the physician desires to practice. The practice of osteopathj-, 
except in accordance with the provisions of law, is prohibited. 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 79 



SCHOOL FUNDS. 



Funds arising from the leasing of sections 13 were by the last legis- 
lature apportioned as follows: Qne-seventh of the total amount for the 
use and benefit of the University of Oklahoma at Norman; one-seventh 
to the Agricultural and Mechanical College at Stillwater; one-sev- 
enth to the Territorial Normal School at Edmond; one-seventh to the 
Northwestern Normal School at Alva; one-seventh to the South- 
western Normal School at Weatherford; one-seventh to the University 
Preparatory School at Tonkawa, and one-seventh to the Colored Agri- 
cultural and Normal University at Langston. 



TAXATION. 



Little change was made in the laws regulating revenue. Personal 
or real property situated in unorganized countrj^ of this Territor}^ is 
to be taxed in the organized county to which the unorganized country 
is attached for judicial purposes, and a special assessor is provided for 
such unorganized country. The rate of the general Territorial tax 
for the years 1903 and 1904 is made by law to be not in excess of 3 
mills on the dollar valuation. It is provided by law that before any 
holder of a certificate of purchase issued at any tiax sale of real estate 
shall be entitled to a tax deed he shall cause a written notice to be 
served upon the owner of the land in the county wherein the sale took 
place, and also upon the person in possession of the land, and in case 
of nonresidence of the above-named parties or in case they can not 
be found in the county where the real estate is located, the service of 
the notice is to be made by publication. 



SALE OF MERCHANDISE IN BULK. 



The sale of any portion of a stock of merchandise otherwise than in 
the ordinary course of trade in the regular and usual prosecution of 
the seller's business, or the sale of an entire stock of merchandise in 
bulk, is made by act of the legislature to be deemed fraudulent unless 
the seller and purchaser together shall, at least five days before the 
sale, make a full inventory of the articles to be included in the sale, 
and unless the purchaser shall, at least ten days before the sale,, make 
full and explicit inquiry of the seller, the names of all of the creditors 
of the seller and the amount owing to each, and obtain from the seller 
written answers to such inquiries, and unless the purchaser shall retain 
such inventory and written answers to his inquiries for at least ten 
days before the sale, in good faith, notify or cause to be notified, 
personall}^ or b}^ registered mail, each of the seller's creditors of 
whom the purchaser has knowledge. 



SCHOOLS. 



Provision is made by act of the last legislature for the directors of 
any school district or boards of education to establish and maintain 
kindergartens in connection with public schools under their jurisdic- 
tion for all children between the ages of 4 and 6 years. 



TAXATION. 



The last legislature changed the manner of assessment from that of 
the county -assessor system to that of the township-assessor system. 

7717—03 6 

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80 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

The township is now made a unit, and equalization is made by the 
township board of equalization. Equalization as between townships 
only is made by the county commissioners sitting as a county board 
of equalization. Equalization as between counties and all various 
classes of property is made by the Territorial board of equalization. 
The organic act of the Territory provides that no tax shall be 
imposed upon the property of the United States, nor shall the lands 
or other property of nonresidents be taxed higher than the lands or 
other property of residents, nor shall any unequal discrimination be 
made m taxing different kinds of property, but all property subject to 
taxation shall be taxed in proportion to its value. Some doubt has 
been expressed and seems to generally prevail as to whether the last 
clause means that property shall be taxed at its actual value or that 
all property shall be taxed in proportion to its value with other 
property. 

UNDEVELOPED RESOURCES. 

Oklahoma has many resources that have not been developed at all 
or only in a small way. Among the more important natural deposits, 
the extent and value of which only a meager conception is entertained 
by the people in general, may be mentioned gypsite and gyp rock, 
from which is manufactured cement and several grades of plaster. 

Professor Van Vleet, Territorial geologist, has made careful inves- 
tigation throughout the counties lying in the gj^psum region and esti- 
mates the available amount deposited in these beds to be 125,800,000,000 
tons. The location of these deposits is shown on the chart below. 
They are practically inexhaustible. The problems of transportation 
and cheap fuel are the most important ones to be solved, but since the 
extension of several lines of railroad through this region the greatest 
hindrance to its development seems to have been overcome, thus assur- 
ing the success of this industry. With oil as a fuel instead of coal, 
the cost of manufacture will be very much lessened. 

Oil and gas have been discovered in several locations, and further 
investigations are being made by companies who tind sufficient encour- 
agement in the outlook to warrant them in leasing thousands of acres 
of land and bringing to the Territor}^ extensive drilling equipments. 
The oil thus far produced is very heavy, and the output of several 
wells commands a good price for lubricating purposes. At the west 
end of the Wichita Mountain Range, in the vicinity of Granite, wells 
are producing from 10 to 50 barrels per da}^ from a depth of less than 
200 feet. 

Favorable reports have been received from other points, and at 
Lawton and Newkirk oil has been obtained in paying quantities. The 
gas wells at Newkirk are producing sufficient flow to afford light for 
the town. At a depth of about 600 feet the true gas sands were struck. 

The granite tields are located in Greer County. They consist for the 
most part of high and massive mountains, and there is such an abun- 
dance of the rock exposed above the ground that that portion alone 
would supply the granite-using world for years to come. The quality 
of the granite is of the very best. A large portion of it is a solid red 
granite, and is pronounced by experts to be equal to the celebrated 
Peterhead Red Scotch granite and equally adaptable for monumental 
and building purposes. The granite can be taken out in immense 
blocks, which adds much to the monetarj^value as well as increasing 
its desirability for building purposes. 



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KEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



81 



It is being demonstrated that the Wichita Mountains contain much 
hidden mineral wealth. Gold and copper have been found in payiuj 
quantities and capital has been interested. Concentrating plants an 
smelters are in course of construction. 

The salt areas are found in two localities known as the Salt Plains of 
Blaine County and the Salt Plains of the Cimarron. These are each 
of considerable commercial importance. In both places there are large 
salt springs, the waters of which contain a very high per cent of salt, 
and tne cost of evaporation and transportation is the only one con- 
nected with its production. Several concerns are manufacturing salt 
in a more or less crude manner, and it would seem that with modern 
appliances and better transportation this industry might be very 
profitable. 

Among the most valuable resources of the Territory are its clay, 
from which may be manufactured building brick, paving brick, tiling, 
etc. This is an industry that is but partially developed, but enough 
has been done along this line to prove that the Territory has an abun- 
dance of good raw material. 

Good limestone for building purposes is found in many localities. 
In the northeastern portion of the Territory several large quarries 
have been opened which are producing an excellent quality of material. 

GEOLOGY AND NATURAL HISTORY. 

The fifth session of the legislative assembly of Oklahoma created a 
department of geology and natural history, with headquarters at the 
University of Oklahoma. The object for which the department was 
created is thus stated in the act providing for it: 

A department of geology and natural history is hereby established for the purpose 
of beginning and continuing the geological and scientific survey of this Territory, 
and of discovering and developing its natural resources, and disseminating informa- 
tion in regard to its agricultural, mining, and manufacturing advantages. 

The department has made preliminary reports on the general geol- 
ogy, gjT^psum deposits, the Pernian fossils, both vertebrate and inver- 
tebrate, plants, birds, and snakes of the Territory. 

The red-beds formation is the most important in the Territory, as it 
is the origin of most of the soil and furnishes the gypsum and salt as 
well as a great part of the building stone and clays. The thickness of 
the red beds has not been determined, but it is not less than 2,000 feet. 
They consist largely of clays and shales, interstratilied with beds of 
sandstone, dalomite, and gypsum. These latter being harder, resist 
erosion, and so form the caps of hills, buttes, and blufi's of the region. 
These products are of great commercial importance. 

By reference to the last report of the department of geology and 
natural history it is found that there are 125,800,000,000 tons of gyp- 
sum, distributed as follows: 



County. 


Tons. 


1 

County. 


Tons. 


Blaine . . 


2,500,000,000 

3,000,000,000 

60,000,000 

200,000,000 
6,000,000,000 

500,000,000 
1,000,000,000 


Greer ... 


53, 000, 000, 000 


Caddo 


Kingfisher 


50,000,000 


Canadian 


i Roger Mills 


1,000,000 000 


Comanche 


1 Washita 


20, 000, 000, 000 


Custer 


Woods 


14,000,000,000 


Day 


Woodward 


24,000,000,000 


Dewey , 











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82 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

This estimate includes only the principal areas. 

The use of gypsum in the manufacture of cements, plasters, fertil- 
izers, etc., is well understood. That more mills have not been located 
in Oklahoma seems to be due solely to the lack of means of transpor- 
tation. Since these regions have been penetrated by railroads, and at 
g resent, the following are in operation: The Rubey Mill, in central 
laine County; the Watonga Mill, at Watonga, Blaine County; the 
Okarche Mill, Canadian County; the Kay County Mill, near Peckham, 
Kay County. 

There are many good sites for mills, and with its inexhaustible sup- 
ply of gypsum Oklahoma is bound to rank among the first, if not the 
first, in the manufacture of products from gypsum. 

There are at least two salt areas in Oklahoma of commercial impor- 
tance — the Salt Plains of the Cimmaron and the Salt Plains of Blaine 
Count}^ In both of these areas large springs of water containing a 
high per cent of salt occur, and shallow wells sunk almost anywhere on 
the plains yield an abundance of brine. The only cost connected with 
the manufacture of salt is evaporation and transportation. So far this 
has been sufficient to prevent its manufacture on a large scale, but 
adequate shipping facilities, with direct communication with the coal 
mines of Indian Territory, is sure to make this one of the most impor- 
tant industries of the Territory. 

The sandstone of the red beds varies in texture from a coarse rotten 
shale to a hard fine-grained sandstone. The better grades are used 
quite extensively for building purposes. 

In the northeastern portion large areas of limestone occur, much of 
it a superior quality of building stone. Large quarries have been 
opened and a great deal of stone is being quarried and shipped. 

Much is claimed for the granite of the Wichita Mountains, and while 
its use is as yet limited, there is no doubt but that it will prove of value 
as a building stone. 

The native timber of Oklahoma consists of the usual western varie- 
ties — several species of oak, elm. ash, hackberrv, hickory, pecan, Cot- 
tonwood, walnut, cedar, etc. The timber in the western portion of 
the Territory is, for the most part, found skirting the streams. 

In the central and eastern portions there are quite extensive areas of 
large timber, including the varieties mentioned. The so-called black- 
jack covers a large part of the southeastern portion. This furnishes 
a fine quality of fuel, and the land when cleared is fertile, this being 
the best cotton belt in the Territory. 

An. investigation of the native grasses has revealed a surprising num- 
ber of varieties. Over 100 are now on record, and the list is not com- 
plete. Many of these make excellent pasturage and hay, and long 
before it was opened for settlement Oklahoma was known as an excel- 
lent grazing country and supported thousands of head of horses and 
cattle. The mild climate, with an abundance of winter pasturage, has 
made Oklahoma one of the greatest stock countries in the West. 

Oklahoma is primarily an agricultural country, but with an abund- 
ance of coal, oil, and gas just on its eastern border and with its immense 
deposits of gypsum, salt, and building stone it is one of the most 
favorably located districts in the whole W^est. 



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EEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



83 



Altitudes in Oklahoma. 



Feet. 

Alva 1,330 

Anadarko 1, 171 

Arapaho 1, 560 

Beaver 2,500 

Bridgeport 1,425 

Burnett . 1,200 

Calumet 1,375 

Cashion 1,014 

Chandler 900 

Choctaw City 1,109 

Clifton 1,030 

Council Grove 1,234 

Dale 1,039 

Dickson 1,219 

Doggett 910 

Earlboro 1,028 

Edmond 1,191 

El Reno 1,326 

El Reno Junction 1,334 

Enid 1,244 

Fort Reno 1,345 

Oarber 1,183 

Geary 1, 545 

Granite 1,591 

Guthrie 932 

Hardesty 3,000 

Hennessey 1, 159 

Hobart 1,528 

Jones City 1, 145 

Kenton 3,900 

Kildare 1,102 

Kingfisher 1,048 



Feet. 

Lakeview 1, 214 

Lawton 1,250 

Luther 935 

McLoud 1,057 

I Mangum 1,585 

I Medford 1,091 

Mountain View 1,320 

Mulhall 936 

Munger 1, 195 

Newkirk 1,149 

Noble 1,158 

Norman 1, 159 

Oklahoma City 1 , 200 

Pawnee 786 

Perkins 794 

Perry 871 

Pond Creek 1,046 

PoncaCity 946 

Ripley 776 

Shawnee 1, 045 

Stil 1 water 832 

Stroud 910 

Sweeney 1, 070 

Union City 1,319 

Virginia 1,206 

Waukomis 1 , 238 

Waynoka 1, 464 

Weatherf ord 1 , 650 

Wei 1 ston 900 

Wichita Mountains 3,000 

Wood ward 1 , 880 

Yukon 1,299 



CITIES OF THE TERRITORY. 



An incorporated town may become a city of the first class when it 
attains a population of 2,500. At the present time some 21 towns 
have been proclaimed cities of the first class. Most of them have good 
systems of waterworks, electric lights, police and fire protection, good 
sidewalks, graded streets, and some public buildings. Some have 
paved streets of asphalt or brick, sewer systems, gas plants, electric 
street-car lines, public parks, fine opera houses, and churches. All 
have good graded schools, and many have beautiful and substantial 
school buildings. Each has its commercial club, composed of the ener- 
getic and influential element ( f the place, which exerts every effort to 
build up the town and secure business enterprises and manufacturing 
industries. They are enumerated below, together with their present 
population, as obtained from the school census taken this 3^ear: 



Alva 2,771 

Anadarko 3, 540 

Blackwell 3,440 

Chandler 3,320 

El Reno 9,400 

Enid 9,000 

Guthrie 20,277 

Geary 4,944 

Hobart 4,520 

Kingfisher 3,200 

Lawton 7,320 



Newkirk 3,430 

Norman 3,015 

Oklahoma City 24, 267 

Perry 3,618 

Pond Creek 2, 625 

Ponoa 6,585 

Stillwater 3, 284 

Shawnee 10,522 

Tecumseh 2,586 

Weatherford 3,250 



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84 KEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

Assessed value of town property jw the years 1902 and 1903, 



County. 



Beaver — 

Blaine 

Caddo 

Canadian . 
Cleveland . 
Comanche 

Custer 

Day 

Dewey 

Garfield ... 

Grant 

Greer 

Kay 

Kingfisher, 



1902. 



$8,476 
216,656 
385,625 
533,939 
350,468 
457,447 
188,884 
3,890 

44,088 
437,110 
230,873 
648,775 
661,130 
399,046 



1903. 



$11, 
248, 
532, 
673, 
404, 
980, 
333, 
4. 
44! 
703, 
169, 
584 
875, 
849, 



County. 



Kiowa 

Lincoln 

Logan 

Noble 

Oklahoma 

Pawnee 

Payne 

Pottawatomie . 

Roger Mills.... 

I Washita 

I Woods , 

Woodward 



Total. 



I 1902. 



9384,365 
346,874 

1,605,100 
343,619 

2,024,162 
227, 710 
632,262 
802,388 
165,624 
132,863 
446, 298 
161,641 



11,629,198 



1903. 



$688,360 
408,977 

1,467,195 
393,951 

2,861,340 
281,444 
615,664 
989,916 
192,224 
196,046 
453,268 
182,882 



14,397,329 



The following data arranged in tabular form have been gathered 
from information recently received from the mayors of the various 
cities and towns mentioned: 

DEVELOPMENT OF CITIES AND TOWNS DURING 1902-3. 

The table given below shows the growth of several of the most thrifty towns in 
the Territory during the past twelve months. 

Building statistics. 



Town. 


Business 
buildings 
erected. 


Business Residences 
buildings erected 
in course of during the 
erection. | year. 


Residences 

in course of 

erection. 


• 
Alva 


2 
20 
30 
3 
9 
4 

58 
26 
14 
14 
13 
6 

■ 1 

12 
5 
8 

10 

45 

13 
1 

12 

10 
6 
134 
5 
4 
3 
1 
7 

20 
2 
6 

14 
4 

40 
3 

31 
6 




25 
55 
36 
50 
79 
60 
79 
57 

250 

382 
87 
25 
5 
18 
26 

150 
20 
12 
15 

156 
75 
10 
15 
30 
75 

407 
5 
55 
50 

130 
12 
90 
25 

150 
22 
30 
49 
20 
56 
20. 


10 


Arapahoe 

Anadarko 

Blackwell 

Cordell 

Chandler 

Clinton 

Cleveland 

El Reno • 


6 
7 
2 
3 
5 

23 
9 
4 

10 
6 
2 
1 
5 
2 
4 
1 


10 
12 
9 
5 
10 
30 
1 
22 


Enid 

Geary 


100 
10 


Granite 


6 


Grand , 


5 


Guthrie 


5 


Hennessey 


5 


Hobart 


40 


Hydro - 


3 


JennincTS 




Kingfisher 


4 
7 
8 
1 
3 
3 


3 


Lawton 


27 


Mangiim 


5 


Medford 




Mountain Park 


6 


Newkirk 


10 


Norman 


35 


Oklahoma City 


45 
2 
4 


163 


Pawnee 


2 


Perry 


17 


Ponca . 


8 


Pond Creek 




7 


Roosevelt 


1 
5 


1 


Shawnee 


10 


Stillwater 


3 


Stroud 


2 
6 
1 

2 

1 
2 

1 


10 


Taloga 


4 


Tecumseh 


6 


Temple 


4 


Weather'ford 


6 


Waurika 


2 


Watonca . 









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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. * 85 

PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS COMPLETED DURING THE YEAR. 

BlachweU. — Waterworks system, $40,000; public school building, $16,000; 5 miles 
sidewalk and all brick and stone crossings. 

CordeU. — Eight-room stone public school building, costing $7,000. 

Chandler. — Street and park improvements; three-fourths of a mile brick sidewalk; 
third large and commodious school building. 

Clinton. — Town opened June 3; 1903; 2 school buildings; 2 bridges; 1 cold-storage 
plant. 

C^^e/and.— Two churches. 

El Reno. — County court-house, costing $50,000; curbing and guttering streets, 
$3,000; permanent sidewalks, $2,000. 

Eaid. — Sewer; extension of water system; light and gas; 5 miles of brick and 
cement sidewalk. 

Guthrie. — Main sewers built, 4.40 miles; lateral sewers, 1.57 miles; 40,000 yards 
brick street paving; 1 two-story brick fire station; $50,000 brick union railway sta- 
tion; 1 eight-room brick school building; $25,000 Carnegie library building; $25,000 
city hall; brick and cement sidewalks, $10,000; $10,000 freight depot, brick; ice 
plant. 

Hennessey. — Waterworks system. 

Hobart. — Street grading. 

Jennings. — Union stone school building, 4 rooms. 

Lawton. — Grading streets, building sidewalks and bridges. 

Mangum. — Street grading and tree planting. 

Medford. — Waterworks. 

Oklahoma City. — Paving, $275,000; sewer and waterworks extension, $175,000; 
street railway extension, $300,000. 

Perry. — Arkansas Valley and Western Railroad. 

P(mca. — Ten thousand dollar extension of waterworks system. 

Pond Creek. — Waterworks system. 

Roosevelt. — Street grading and crossings. 

Taloga. — Two stone and brick schoolhouses; brick two-story court-house. 

Temple.— Complete system of wat/crworks; telephone system. 

Waurika. — S(5hool house, jail, and fairgrounds. 

PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS IN PROGRESS. 

BlackiDell. — A 10-acre park. 

CordeU. — A $25,000 waterworks system. 

Chandler. — Waterworks, entire new system to take place of old; electric-lighting 
system. 

Clinton. — Twelve thousand feet of trackage. 

Clereland.—One schoolhouse, $4,000; river bridge, $14,000; IJ miles railroad grade 
in town; depot and roundhouse; 1 mile of sidewalk; 3 miles of street grading; first- 
class telephone exchange. 

El Reno. — Sanitary sewers and permanent sidewalks. 

Enid. — Schoolhouses. 

Geary, — Waterworks at a cost of $52,000. 

Guthrie. — Main sewers under construction, 2.28 miles; lateral sewers, 1.83 miles; 
Masonic lodge hall, $15,000; fair grounds; county high school, $35,000. 

Hennessey. — Sidewalks and guttering streets. 

Hydro. — Street grading. 

Lawton. — Street grading. 

Mangum. — Two additional schoolhouses. 

Oklahoma City. — Paving and waterworks extensions estimated to cost $450,000; 
additional street railway line. 

Perry. — One school building. 

Ponra.— Extension of water main and street improvement. 

Roosevelt. — Deep well. 

Taloga. — A 100-barrel flour mill, 

H'iea//i<'r/ord.— Southwestern normal building costing $35,000; church building, 
$5,000. 

Waurika. — One church. 

Watonga. — Laying all walks in cement. 

PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS CONTEMPLATED FOR COMING YEAR. 

Anadarko. — Waterworks, court-house, 3 brick schoolhouses, sewerage system, 
electric-light plant. 



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86 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

Blackwell. — Sewerage system. 

Cordell, — Two grain elevators, 300-barrel flour mill. 

Chandler. — Street and park improvements, waterworks, electric lights, and new 
business buildings. 

Clinton, — Oil mill, cotton press, 3 cotton gins, laundry, elevator, 3 depots, and 
24,000 feet of trackage. 

Cleveland. — Two churches, ice plant, electric-light system. 

El Reno. — Permanent street crossings, sewers, and paving; $24,000 high school 
building. 

Enid. — Court-house, street-car line, library, and city hall. 

Geary. — Sewerage system. 

Granite. — Water work and electric-light systems; rock-crushing plant, capacity 75 
cars ballast per day. 

Grand. — Court-house, jail, and waterworks system. 

Guthrie. — Fifty thousand yards paving; street railway; I. O. O. F. lodge hall, 
$25,000; 3 railroad depots; $40,000 elevator and warehouse. 

Hennessey. — Extension of waterworks system, opera house, 

Hobart. — Waterworks, sewer, cotton compress, court-house, schoolhouse, and jail. 

Ijawton. — Waterworks system, city hall, court-house, and high school building. 

Mangum. — Waterworks system, $30,000; high school building, $20,000; 3 churches, 
and brick plant. 

Norman. — University building. 

Oklahoma City. — Storm and sanitary sewers, waterworks extension, 3 colleges, 4 
public schools, 3 secret-society halls, 7 churches, 5 railway depots. 

Perry. — Two miles of brick sidewalk; 1 mile of cement sidewalk. 

Ponca City. — Extensions of waterworks, street improvements, and public school 
building. 

Roosevelt. — ^Jail, sidewalks, court room, street grading. 

Taloga. — A $15,000 bridge across the Canadian River. 

Tecumseh. — One school building. 

Temple. — Electric- light system, flour mill, brick plant, and cotton gin. 

MANUFACTURING. 

Manufacturing among the various industries which engage our popu- 
lation has made great advancement in the past few years. While not 
so fortunate as some other localities in our supply of cheap fuel or 
water power, yet those who have been the pioneers in establishing these 
enterprises have prospered. With several new lines of railroad coming 
directly through the coal fields on the east and the discovery of oil 
within and just outside our borders, the prospect is much brighter for 
cheaper fuel and the consequent success of other institutions now in 
contemplation. 

The raw material is at hand on every side and the increasing number 
of flour mills, cotton-seed oil mills, plaster and cement mills, broom 
factories, shoe factories, foundries, gas plants, cracker and candy manu- 
factories, etc., all of which are in a flourishing condition, indicate that 
Oklahoma in the near future may be classed among the manufacturing 
States. 

The immense amount of wheat straw that is burned or allowed to go 
to waste would seem to make this an inviting field for paper mills. 
The vast quantitv of farm machinery shipped into the Territory would 
suggest a possible lucrative industry in its manufacture. Ice factories, 
creameries, cheese factories, canning factories, brick plants, and man^^ 
other manufacturing industries would find an excellent field here in 
which to locate. 



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KEPOET OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



87 



Manufacturing establishments. 



Location. 



ADadarko . 
Blackwell . 
Cordell . . . . 
Chandler.. 
Clinton.... 
El Reno . . . 

Enid 

Geary 

Granite 

Hobart 

Hydro 

Guthrie ... 
Hennessey 
Jennings . . 

Lawton 

Kingfisher. 



Number. 


Hands 
employed. 


8 


75 


7 


60 


2 


15 


13 


190 


3 


35 


19 


136 


37 


768 


4 


50 


2 


60 


13 


175 


1 


7 


17 


242 


4 


2 


5 


25 


10 


100 


12 


130 



Location. 



Medford 

Mangum 

Newkirk 

Norman 

Oklahoma City 

Pawnee 

Perry 

Ponca City 

Pondcreek 

Shawnee 

Stroud ,..., 

Stillwater 

Taloga 

Tecumseh 

Weatherford . . 
Watonga 



Number. 



Hands 
employed. 



10 
52 
12 
50 
1,250 
25 
78 
75 
30 
450 
50 
30 
4 
50 
45 
20 



Wholesale establishments. 



Location. 



Anadarko 
Chandler . 
Clinton... 
El Reno . . 

Enid 

Geary 

Granite... 
Hobart . . . 
Guthrie... 



Number. 



Hands 
employed.!! 



Location. 



I' 



10 , 50 Lawton 

10 I 20 1 1 Kingfisher 

4 1 20 |l Mangum 

5 61 ' Oklahoma City 
18 ! 125 ll Pawnee 

2 I 22 I Perry 

3 20 Ponca City ... . 
12 ' 40 , Shawnee 

6 1 149 ' Stillwater 



Number. 



Hands 
employed. 



31 

45 

38 

1,400 

5 

60 

39 

50 

7 



FLOURING MILLS. 

At the present time there are 60 mills in operation in the Territory, 
half of them being owned and operated by incorporated milling com- 
panies having a total capitalization of over $1,500,000. A large num- 
ber of these corporations represent an investment of from $50,000 to 
$150,000. 

As the principal wheat-growing district lies west of the main line of 
the Santa Fe Railroad, we find that this area of wheat production 
influences the location of mills, and thus it is that we find 24 mills in 
operation which are located at points on and west of the Santa Fe 
Railway. 

The output of Oklahoma's flour mills during the past three years 
has been something enormous, and the products are distributed from 
the British provinces on the north to the Gulf States on the south, and 
a vast amount of Oklahoma flour has been going into the export trade 
and is no small factor in the ports of Galveston, Baltimore, and New 
York. Indian Territory, Arkansas, and the Texas Panhandle all 
purchase Oklahoma flour, and get more from here than anywhere else. 

Yet it is a fact that the milling business in Oklahoma is yet in its 
infancy. About 12 new mills were erected during the past year, the 
capacity of a number of others was increased, so that the increase in 
capacity during the twelve months past has exceeded 25 per cent. 

Flour manufacturing in this Territory has proven generally suc- 
cessful and but few lines of enterprise have shown as good profits. 
There has not been a notable or conspicuous failure in the flour-mill 
business in the Territory, and out of the 60 concerns established more 
than 20 have made records of conspicuous success. 



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88 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

Flouring mills of Oklahoma. 



Location. 



Alva 

Augusta 

Blackwell 

Blackburn 

Chandler 

Cordell 

Crescent City. . . 

Cushing 

Dover 

Edmond 

Do 

El Reno 

Do 

Enid 

Do 

Do 

Fairview 

Fobs 

Garber 

Geary 

Guthrie 

Do 

Hennessey 

Do 

Hobart 

Independence . . 

Jefferson 

Kingfisher 

Do!!'.'.!!!!!! 

Lamont 

Luther 

Do 

Mangum 

Marsnall 

Medford 

Meno 

Mulhall 

Newkirk 

Norman 

Okarche 

Okeene.... 

Do 

Oklahoma City. 

Do 

Do 

Pawnee 

Pawhuska 

Perry 

Pond Creek 

Ponca City 

Shawnee 

Do 

Stillwater 

Taloga 

Yukon 

Waukomis 

Weatherford ... 



Operator. 



I Ctipacity 
1 per day. 



Alva Roller Mills 

J. A. Allen , 

Blackwell Milling and Elevator Co . . .. 

Blackburn Mills 

Lincoln Countv Mills , 

Cordell Gin and Mill Co 

Crescent Milling Co , 

Betner <fe A His 

Dover Rolling Mills 

Snyder Rolling Mills 

Eagle Mills 

El Reno Mill and Elevator Co 

Canadian County Mill and Elevator Co 

Enid Mill and Elevator Co 

Garfield County Mill and Elevator Co . 

Farmers' Mill and Elevator Co 

Fairview Milling Co 

Foss Milling Co 

Garber Milling Co 

Geary Milling and Elevator Co 

Guthrie Milling Co 

Model Roller Mills 

Hennessey Roller Mills 

Farmers' Milling Co 

Hobart Mill Co 

Independence Roller Mills , 

Jefferson Milling Co 

Kingfisher Mill and Elevator Co 

Oklahoma Mill Co 

Farmers' Mill and Elevator Co 

Cross Brothers 

Luther Milling Co 

Arthur & Adams 

Mangum Mill and Elevator Co 

Marshall Mill and Elevator Co 

Medford Mill and Elevator Co 

Meno Milling Co 

Mulhall Roller Mills 

Newkirk Milling Co . . , 

Norman Miljing and Grain Co 

Okarche Roller Mills 

Okeene Roller Mills 

Oklahoma Mill and Elevator Co 

Oklahoma City Mill and Elevator Co 1 . 

Acme Milling Co 

Plainsifter Milling Co , 

Pawnee Mill Co , 

W. S. Mathers <fe Co 

Perry Mill Co 

Pond Creek Mill and Elevator Co , 

Ponca City Milling Co 

Shawnee Roller Mills 

Shawnee Mill and Grain Co 

Thomas & Plummer 

Taloga Mill Co , 

Yukon Mill and Grain Co 

Waukomis Milling Co 

Weatherford Milling Co 

Total aggregate capacity 



Barrds. 
300 
100 
500 
100 
100 
350 

40 

40 
100 
100 
100 
400 
400 
400 
150 
150 
100 
100 

75 
200 
200 
150 
150 
200 
300 
lOO 
100 
300 
400 
30O 

50 
lOO 
100 
lOO 
100 
250 

75 
100 
200 
150 
100 
150 
100 
300 
400 
250 
150 
100 
300 
300 
200 

75 
100 
150 
100 
150 

50 
150 



10,365 



ELEVATORS. 

In order to properly handle the annuall}^ increasing grain crop of 
the Territory many elevators have been erected and the capacity of 
the old ones increased. Oklahoma wheat is shipped to foreign markets 
via Galveston, and because of its excellent quality has gained and 
merited a high reputation abroad. Grain is inspected by a Territorial 
grain inspector and is graded at all elevators, tnus resulting in more 
satisfactory returns to the shipper. A uniformity of grading is a 
necessit}^ 

Hon. C. T. Prouty, secretary of the Grain Dealers' Association of 
the Territory, furnishes the following complete list of elevators and 
their capacity. The total elevator capacity is found to be 3,525,000 
bushels. 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

List of elevators in OldaJvoma, 



89 



Location. 



Alva 

Arta 

Augrusta 

Ames , 

Avery 

Apache 

Anadarko 

Blackwell 

Braman 

Breckinridge. 

Bliss 

Billings 

Bison 

Briton 

Cropper 

Coyle 

Clyde 

Cleo 

Calumet 

Cashion 

Cereal 

Carmen 

Carney 

Crescent 

Cherokee 

Carlton 

Carnegie 

Cordell 

Drummond .. 

Dover 

Deer Creek . . . 

Dixon 

Douglas 

Driftwood 

Edmond 

Enid 

El Reno 

Elk City 

Elgin 

Eagle City.... 

Foes 

Fairmont 

Fairfax 

Fort Cobb 

Geary 

Glencoe 

Garber 

Guthrie 

Greenfield 

Gotobo 

Granite 

Hunter 

Homestead . . . 

Hitchcock 

Hatfield 

Hennessey ... 

Hinton 

Independence 

Ingersoll 

Isabella 



tore I capacity. 



Location. 



Bushels. I 
40,000 ! 
20,000 I 
50,000 i 
20,000 i 
10,000 ' 
20,000 i 
20,000 

120,000 
30,000 I 
30,000 I 
20,000 I 
40,000 1 
20,000 
10,000 I 
35,000 
10,000 I 
8,000 I 
30,000 I 
20,000 I 
30,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
20,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
20,000 
30,000 
40,000 
20,000 
8,000 
20,000 
10,000 
20,000 

100,000 

230,000 

8,000 

20,000 

.20,000 
8,000 
20,000 
10,000 
10,000 
60,000 
16,000 
46,000 
30,000 
16,000 
20,000 
10,000 
40,000 
30,000 
35,000 
10,000 

100,000 I 
10,000 
10,000 
30,000 
10,000 



Jefferson 

Kingfisher 

Kildare 

Kremlin 

KawCity 

Lamont 

Lahoma 

Lawton 

Leger 

Lone Wolf 

Munger 

Mulhall 

Moore 

Manchester 

Minco 

Medford 

Mangum 

Marshall 

Navina 

Noble 

North Enid 

Norman 

Nardin 

Newkirk 

Okarche 

Okeene 

Orlando 

Oklahoma City 
Ponca City .... 

Perkins 

Perry 

Pond Creek . . . 

Pawnee 

Peckham 

Parkersburg. . . 

Quay 

Reaaing 

Ripley 

Ringwood 

Renfrow 

Redrock 

Rusk 

Salton 

Salt Fork 

Stillwater 

Temple 

Thomas 

Tonka wa 

Union City 

Walters 

Wakita 

Watonga 

Waukomis 

Weatherford .. 

Woodland 

Wheatland.... 
Yukon 

Total.... 



Number 
of eleva- 
tors. 



Aggregate 
capacity. 



Bushels. 
. 35,000 
150,000 
10,000 
30,000 
20,000 
40,000 
40,000 
20,000 
10,000 
20,000 
15,000 
25,000 
18,000 
30,000 

8,000 
25,000 
10,000 
30,000 
16,000 
10,000 
30,000 
50,000 
20,000 
35,000 
50,000 
50,000 
10,000 
142,000 
110,000 

5.000 
125,000 
50,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
16,000 
20,000 
20,000 
30,000 
30,000 

8,000 
24,000 
16,000 
25,000 
20,000 
20,000 
50,000 

8,000 
20,000 
20,000 
30,000 
50,000 
35,000 

5,000 
20,000 
50,000 



280 



3,525,000 



IMMIGRATION. 

The number of acres of Government land which have been filed 
upon as homesteads, the number of transfers reported by the registers 
oi deeds in each county, and the growth in population of every city 
and town in the Territory all indicate that the immigration into Okla- 
homa during the past year has been of considerable magnitude. 

Our unexcelled resources, bountiful crops, and continued prosperity 
along every line of industry invites those of other portions of the 
country who are not so fortunately located to come and make for 
themselves homes and acquire a competency. There is yet room for 



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90 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

more, and in some of our western counties good land is still obtain- 
able. It is predicted with good assurance of fulfillment that the com- 
ing year will witness the largest immigration to the Territory that has 
ever occurred in its history. 

, The immigration bureaus of the various systems of railroads enter- 
ing the Territory are alert to the opportunities offered and are induc- 
ing homeseekers to visit the country by reduced rates of transportation. 
During the summer and fall months thousands from the North, East, 
and South come seeking new homes, investments, employment, health, 
or pleasure. 

Oklahoma welcomes all good citizens who are earnest and loyal and 
who desire to better their condition. 

BANKS. 

The highly satisfactory condition of Oklahoma's banks, both national 
and Territorial, is indisputable evidence of our prosperity. The num- 
ber of institutions given in my report last year has been considerabl}^ 
augmented by the addition of 80 Territorial and 19 national. The act 
of the last legislature fixing $10,000 as the minimum capital stock of 
Territorial banks has had the effect of lessening the number of appli- 
cations and promoting a healthier condition. The average reserve 
held by national banks is 30 per cent and that of Territorial banks 52 
per cent. Attention is directed to the fact that the reserve carried by 
the Territorial institutions is nearly four times that required by law. 
By comparing with last year's report, it is a noticeable fact that the 
total capital invested in the banking business in the Territory has 
increased over 11,500,000. 

The statistics which I give below have been furnished me by the 
Territorial bank examiner. 

Consolidated statement showing condition of both national and Territorial banks, being all 
banks in Oklahoma Territory at close of business June 10, 1903, 

RESOURCES. 

Loans and discounts $15, 433, 531. 72 

Overdrafts 605,968.94 

United States bonds and premiums 1, 684, 434. 71 

Stocks, securities, judgments, and claims 824, 574. 47 

Due from all banks 6, 457, 550. 53 

Banking-house furniture and fixtures 972, 494. 26 

Other real estate 72,127.25 

Internal revenue 677. 70 

Cash, specie, exchanges, and items 2, 431, 145. 11 

Total 28,482,504.69 

LIABILITIES. 

Capital stock $4,818,830.00 

Surplus 532,114.98 

Undivided pi ofits.... 926,573.90 

National-bank notes outstanding 1, 171, 900. 00 

Deposits 20,738,763.37 

Bills payable 234,437.97 

Bills rediscounted 49, 615. 54 

All other liabilities 10,268.93 

. Total 28,482,504.69 

Total number of banks 311 

Average reserve -. per cent. . 41 

Per capita deposit for people of Oklahoma, on basis of 600,000 population, is $34. 
One bank to each 1,929 persons on same basis of population. 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 91 

Consolidated report of the nationcU banks of Okldhmna Territory at the dose of htmness 

June 9y 190S. 

RESOURCES. 

Loans and discounts $9,136,129.46 

Overdrafts : 344,621.76 

United States bonds on hand and for circulation and deposits 1, 558, 140. 00 

Premium on United States bonds 126,294.71 

Stocks, securities, judgments, and claims 567, 831. 75 

Banking-house furniture and fixtures 540, 666. 82 

Other real estate 36,007.13 

Due from other national banks not reserve agents v . . 1, 095, 439. 77 

Due from State and private banks and bankers 344, 806. 90 

Due from approved reserve agents 2, 177, 134. 16 

Internal revenue 677. 70 

Checks and cash items 163,736.00 

Exchanges for clearing house 29, 520. 05 

Notes of other national banks 210, 230. 00 

Fractional paper currency, nickels, and cents 18, 295. 98 

Specie 565,860.52 

Legal-tender notes 348,643.00 

Five 'per cen4 redemption fund 60, 190. 00 

Due from United States Treasurer 1,925.00 

Total 17,326,150.71 

LIABILITIES. 

Capital Stock $2,792,500.00 

Surplus 277,042.64 

Undivided profits (net) 543,451.72 

National bank notes outstanding 1, 171, 900. 00 

Due to other national banks not reserve agents 719, 311 . 71 

Due to State and private banks and bankers 712, 404. 12 

Due to trust companies and savings banks 78, 219. 26 

Due to approved reserve agents 5, 439. 52 

Individual deposits 10,635,973.77 

United States deposits 189,524.62 

Deposits of United States disbursing officers 39, 804. 52 

Bills rediscounted 15,309.90 

Bills payable 135,000.00 

Other liabilities 10,268.93 

Total 17,326,150.71 

Numl>er of banks reporting 79 

Average reserve held per cent. . 30 

Consolidated report of the Territorial hanks of Oklahoma Territory at the close of business 

June 10, 1903, 

RESOURCES. 

Loans and discounts $6,297,402/26 

Overdrafts 261,347.18 

Stocks and bonds 256,742.72 

Due from banks 2,840,169.70 

Banking-house furniture and fixtures 431, 827. 44 

Other real estate 36,120.12 

Cash 861,312.94 

Cash items..... 171,431.62 

Total 11,156,353.98 

LIABILITIES. 

Capital Stock $2,026,330.00 

Surplus 255,072.34 

Undivided profits 383,122.18 

Individual deposits 7,094,224.63 

Certificates of deposit 839,418.80 

Cashier checks 107,462.45 



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92 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



Due to banks $316,979.97 

Bills payable 99,437.97 

Bills rediscounted 34, 305. 64 

Total 11,156,353.98 

Number of banks reporting 232 

Average reserve hela per cent. . 52 

Consolidated statement of State banks of Oklahoma. 





1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


RESOURCES. 

Loans anri discounts 


$2,409,362.85 


83,359,985.78 

108,195.21 

182, 352. 90 

216,111.24 

3,566,871.79 


$6,297,402.26 
256, 742. 72 
261, 347. 18 


Warrants and bonds 


Overdrafts 


98,142.50 

299,426.13 

2,340,250.03 


Real estate, furniture, and fixtures 


■ 467,947.56 


Cash and sight exchange 


3,872,914.26 




Total 


5,147,181.51 


7,433,516.92 


11,156,353 98 






LIABILITIES. 

Capital 


744,588.66 

483,970.73 

3,918,622.12 


867,051.57 

374,232.76 

5,637,946.33 

5,080,10 


2,026,330.00 
638 194 52 


Surplus and profits 


Deposits 


8,358,086.85 
133,743.61 


Bills payable and rediscounts 






Total 


5, 147, 181. 51 


6,884,310.76 


11,156,353.98 




THE GAINS MADE. 

Keserve per cent. . 

Gains in deposits 


60 

^96,249.11 

510, 121. 91 

763,030.42 


54.1 
$1,719,324.21 
1,226,621.76 
950,622.93 


52 

$2,720,139.52 

306,042.47 

2,937,416.48 


Gains in cash 


Gains in loans and discounts 





INVESTMENTS — PUBLIC AND PRIVATE CREDIT. 

Eastern capital has during recent years found Oklahoma a safe and 
profitable tield for investment. Enterprises requiring funds to develop 
their possibilities into a possible realization have received substantial 
support. Municipal bonds command a premium. Farm loans are 
particularl}^ satisfactor}^ to the capitalists, as they are safe and secure 
and the interest is universally promptly paid. Foreclosures are ver}^ 
rare. Mercantile business throughout the Territory is enjoying a 
healthy, vigorous growth. In this regard R. G. Dun & Co. present 
the following facts: 

The general tenor of reports from all over the Territory indicates that a large 
volume of business was transacted during the past year, and our reports show the 
merchants to be in good financial condition. The increase in the new traders in the 
Territory, as well as the increase in the number of towns during the past ten years, 
has been remarkable. 

We are now reporting in our July, 1903, edition, 855 towns and villages. Ten 
years ago we reported less than 200. In July, 1893, our books contained 1,608 
names. Our July, 1903, book contains 9,260 names, thus showing a net growth of 
over 765 new traders each year. 

The period between July, 1894 and 1899, only showed an increase of 1,000 names. 
Since 1899 the growth has been exceedingly rapid, showing an increase of 4,420 
names, being an increase of over 1,100 new names per year during that period up to 
the present date. 

Mr. R. J. Edwards, of Oklahoma City, who has handled extensively 
Oklahoma securities for the past eleven years, makes the following 
statement: 

At the opening of Oklahoma to settlement in 1889 we had no credit whatever, and 
hence no market for our securities, resulting in the local market becoming congested 
and our warrants being depreciated in value to such an extent as to make them 
almost worthless. Counties, cities, towns, and school districts were all alike; even 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 93 

Territorial warrants sold at a great discount. All public and municipal securities 
were at a standstill, and what few necessities we got were bought on the basis of two 
prices on account of the depreciated values of the warrants. This condition became 
quite acute, and the legislature in 1889, by way of relief, gave us the funding law 
(chapter 9, laws of 1890), which enabled the Territory and the subdivisions to fund 
the floating indebtedness into bonds, for which only a fair market was obtained. 
The credit of the Territory did not become fixed and established until the enactment 
of the funding law in 1895 (article 1, chapter 7, laws of 1895). This law provided 
that the Territory or any subdivision could, by due process before the district court 
of the county, after notice, make proof of its indebtedness and issue bonds to pay the 
same. The provisions of this funding law were unique and very much different from 
anything existing in any of the States or Territories. One of its chief and best fea- 
tures was that any indebtedness sought to be funded had to be taken before the dis- 
trict court of the county, away from and beyond all the control of the authority that 
uttered it, and subjected to legal scrutiny and examination, the courts being em- 
powered and directed to render judgment thereon, thereby forever stopping any and 
all from ever questioning the indebtedness included therein, such judgments becom- 
ing the record and standing as res ad judicata. All bonds are signed by the court 
and recorded by both the municipality issuing and the Territonal auditor at the 
capitol, thus establishing a permanent and indestructible record in the hands of 
others than those issuing them. 

The legislature at the same time provided for the issuing of bonds for building 
Bchoolhouses (article 2, chapter 7, laws of 1895), and subsequently for building court- 
houses (chapter 12, laws oi 1897) . Authority to issue bonds to build waterworks 
was given in 1893, but this was wholly inadequate. Congress, in order to relieve us 
from the predicament, gave us the act of March 4, 1898, enabling all towns of 1,000 
people or more to issue bonds for waterworks, street improvements, sewers, and san- 
itary and health purposes, and laterally for the building of city halls. Limitation 
upon the incurring of indebtedness was fixed by an act of Congress in 1886, by what 
is known as the Harrison Act, which applies to all Territories, fixing the limitation in 
case of a Territory at 1 per cent and in the case of subdivisions of the Territory at 4 
per cent, estimated upon the assessment rolls. This limitation, however, did not 
apply to the act of Congress of March 4, 1X98, nor to cities of more than 5,000 for 
the building of schoolhouses, nor cities of more than 10,000 for the building of city 
halls. With such limitations and restrictions as to the amounts and by the inter- 
vention of the courts and proceedings thereunder as to the character and dass of the 
indebtedness which may be funded, Oklahoma has been unprecedentedly fortunate 
in escaping burdensome and fraudulent indebtedness usually fastened upon other 
States during their new and formative period. As proof oi this there never has 
been a question raised in any court as to the dollar of any bonded indebtedness in 
Oklahoma, and aside from occasional defaults in the payment of interest, due to 
misinterpretation of the law by newly elected officers, all obligations both for prin- 
cipal and interest have been promptly and faithfully met, fully up to and equal to 
the most substantial municipalities of the older States. 

Owing to the fact that we were created from a Territory of a whole down to the 
smallest school district without a dollar of cash reserve or equipment or supplies 
whatsoever, and have had to provide all necessities in the way of universities and 
normal schools, roads and bridges, schoolhouses, court-houses, jails, poor farms, and 
supplies of all kinds, and to take care or our insane, deaf, dumb, and blind, and our 
convicts, and organize our local governments, provide for and equip our courts and 
governing bodies, it is not surprising that we should call upon the older communities 
for financial aid and should have borrowed to a considerable extent. The people of 
Oklahoma have done in ten what it required older States fifty years to do, and to-day 
present to the world as perfect and well-equipped an organization as a considerable 
number of the older States. With all such requirements the indebtedness is small as 
compared to the results which have developed along with it; in fact, amounts to so 
small a sum as to be no burden whatever. With the exception of some few of the 
cities, where the indebtedness for waterworks have carried them beyond, the indebt- 
edness is less than the constitutional limitation of 4 per cent. 

Our revenue laws may well be compared to any of the States or Territories, and are 
that perfect that from 92 to 98 per cent of the taxes are collected. The people of 
Oklahoma pav taxes without complaint or evasion. All interest obligations are met 
promptly, and where the laws require it from municipalities or other subdivisions of 
the Territory sinking funds are provided for the payment of their bonds at maturity. 
A great many issues of bonds have already matured, and have either been paid out 
of the sinking fund provided, or refunded into obligations bearing lower rates of 
interest. As an illustration of the advancement of our credit, and in conclusion, I 
beg to call your attention to the case of Canadian County, which recently sold its 
issue of court-house 4 per cent bonds at a premium. This same county in the early 



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94 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



nineties sold its long-time 6 per cent obligations at a great discount. And in the 
case of the Territory, these warrants are now sold at a premium where a few years 
since sold at 15 per cent discount. 

BUILDING AND LOAN. 

The following reports have been received from the building and 
loan associations doing business in the cities of Guthrie, Norman, and 
Oklahoma; 

GUTHRIE. 

The following items are taken from the report of the secretary: 

Real estate loans $49,500.00 

Stock loans 3,565.00 

Total cash receipts 14,898.93 

Net gain 3,094.76 



The secretary of the association furnishes the following items: 

Number of shares in force January 1, 1902 ;. 982 

Number of shares in force January 1, 1903 1, 233 

Dividend declared December 1, 1902 per cent. . 15 

Amount securities January 1, 1902 $30, 337. 50 

Amount securities January 1, 1903 $37,298.80 

Cash received from all resources within the year 1902 $12, 986. 11 

OKLAHOMA. 

The association has loaned during the past twelve months $37,725. 
The secretary states that the association has never foreclosed a loan in 
the four and a half years of business, and its affairs are in the best 
possible condition. 

INSURANCE. 

Below is given a statement of the secretary of the Territory, show- 
ing the amount of business done during the year 1902 by the various 
fire, life, casualty, and other companies licensed to do business in the 
Territory. 

Insurance companies authorized to transact business in Oklahoma for the year 1903. 

FOREIGN FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 



Name of company. 



^tna 

Anchor 

American Central 

American Fire 

Austin Fire 

British America Assurance 

Commercial Union 

Connecticut 

Continental 

Farmers and Merchants . . 

Fire Association 

Firemen's Fund 

German 

German Alliance 

German American 

Greenwich 

Germania 

Hamburg Bremen 

Hanover 

Hart;ford Fire 

Home 

Insurance Company of 
North America. 

Liverpool, London and 
Globe. 
Do 

London and Lancashire. . . 

Manchester Assurance Co. 

Mercantile Fire and Ma- 
rine. 

Milwaukee Mechanics 



Location. 



Hart;ford, Conn, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Austin, Tex. 
Toronto, Canada. 
London, England. 
Hartford, Conn. 
New York, N.Y. 
Lincoln, Nebr. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Freeport, 111. 
New York, N.Y. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Hamburg, Germany. 
New York, N. Y. 
Hartford, Conn. 
New York, N.Y. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Liverpool, England. 

New York, N. Y. 
Liverpool, England. 
Manchester, England. 
Boston, Mass. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 



Name of company. 



National 

National Insurance and 

Investment. 

National Union 

New York Underwriters 

Agency. 

North British and Mer- 
cantile. 

Northern Assurance 

Northwestern National. . . 

Pennsylvania Fire 

Phenix 

Phoenix Assurance 

Phoenix 

Providence Washington . . 

Philadelphia Underwri- 
ters. 

Prussian National 

Queen 

Royal 

St. Paul Fire and Marine. . 

Scottish Union and Na- 
tional. 

Shawnee 

Springfield Fire and Ma- 
rine. 

Sun 

Traders 

Westchester 

Western Assurance 



Location. 



Hartford, Conn. 
Dover, Del. 

Pittsburg, Pa. 
New York, N. Y. 

Do. 
London, England. 

Do. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
London, England. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Providence, R. I. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Stettin, Germany. 
New York, N. Y. 
Liverpool, England. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Topeka, Kans. 
Springfield, Mass. 

London, England, 
Chicago, 111. 
New York, N. Y, 
Toronto, Canada. 



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EEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



95 



Insurance companies authorized to transact business in Oklahoma for the year 1903 — Con. 

FOREIGN LIFE COMPANIES. 




^tna Hartford, Conn. 

Bankers' Reserve Omaha, Nebr. 

Des Moines Life Des Moines, Iowa. 

Equitable Life Assurance. I New York, N. Y. 

Fidelity Mutual \ Philadelphia. Pa. 

Franklin i Springfield, 111. 

Hartford Life Hartford, Conn. 

Illinois Life Chicago, 111. 

Manhattan Life New York, N. Y. 

Massachusetts Mutual ; Springfield, Mass. 

Missouri State St. Louis, Mo. 

Mutual Life of New York. New York, N. Y. 

Mutual Benefit Life Newark, N. J. 

Mutual Reserve New York, N. Y. 

National Life i Montpeller, Vt. 

National Life and Trust. . . j Des Moines, Iowa. 
National of U. S. A ! Washington, D. C. 



New York Life 

Northwestern Mutual 

Northwestern Life and 
Savings. 

Northwestern National . . 

Pacific Mutual 

Penn Mutual 

Provident Savings 1 . 

Prudential 

Royal Union Mutual 

Security Mutual 

State Life 

Standard Life and Acci- 
dent. 

Union Central 

Wisconsin Life 



New York, N. Y. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Des Moines, Iowa. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
New York, N. Y. 
Newark, N. J. 
Des Moines, Iowa. 
New York, N. Y. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Detroit, Mich. 

Cincinnati. Ohio. 
Madison, Wis. 



FOREIGN ACCIDENT AND HEALTH. 



Continental Casualty 

Fidelity and Casualty 

Maryland Casualty 

North American Accident. 
Ocean Accident and Guar- 
antee. 


Chicago, 111. 
New York, N. Y. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Chicago, 111. 
New York, N, Y. 


Preferred Accident 

Travelers 


New York, N. Y. 
Hartford, Conn. 


Union Casualty and 

Surety. 
United States Fidelity 

and Guarantee. 


St, Louis, Mo. 
Baltimore, Md. 



FOREIGN MISCELLANEOUS. 



Hartford Steam Boiler 
and Inspection. 



Hartford, Conn. 



Lloyd Plate Glass and 

Insurance Company. 
Metropolitan Plate Glass. 



New York, N. Y. 
Do. 



FOREIGN FRATERNALS. 



A.O.U.W 

American Order of Pro- 
tection. 

American Annuity Asso- 
ciation. 

American Benevolent As- 


Meadville, Pa. 
Lincoln, Nebr. 

Wichita, Kans. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Richmond, Va. 
Topeka, Kans. 
Logansport, Ind. 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Omaha, Nebr. 

Des Moines, Iowa. 

Springfield, 111. 

Do. 
Rock Island, 111. 
Denver, Colo. 

Des Moines, Iowa. 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Detroit. Mich. 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Topeka, Kans. 


Knights of the Protected 
Ark. 

Knights of the Macca- 
bees. 

Ladies of the Maccabees. . 

Loyal Americans 


Topeka, Kans. 

Port Huron, Mich. 

Do. 
Springfield, 111. 
Rock Island, 111. 


sociation. 
American Guild 


Modern Woodmen of 
America. 

Mutual Protective League 

Modern Order of Prae- 
torians. 

Mystic Toilers 


Annuity Union 


Litchfield, 111. 


American Plowmen 

Ancient Order of the Pyra- 
mids 


Dallas, Tex. 

Des Moines, Iowa. 


Bankers' Union of the 

World. 
Brotherhood AniBriCAii 


1 National Masonic Acci- 

1 dent Association. 

1 Royal Neighbors 


Do. 
Rock Island, 111. 


Yeomen. 


1 Roval Arcanum 


Boston, Mass. 


Court of Honor 


Supreme Tribe of Ben Hur 
1 Tnpple Tie Benefit Asso- 
ciation. 

United Benevolent Asso- 
ciation. 

United Modems 


Crawfordsville, Ind. 


Fraternal Mystic Circle . . . 

Fraternal Tribunes 

Fraternal Union of Amer- 
ica. 

Fraternal Choppers of 
America. 

Giant Oaks 


Clay Center, Kans. 
Fort Worth Tex. 
Denver, Colo. 


Western Bohemian Asso- 
ciation. 

Western Mason Mutual 
Life. 

Woodmen Accident Asso- 
ciation. 

Woodmen of the World .. 


Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 


Ideal Reserve Association. 

Home Annuity Associa- 
tion. 

Knights and Ladles of 
Security. 


Los Angeles, Cal. 
Lincoln, Nebr. 
Omaha, Nebr. 



DOMESTIC FRATERNALS. 



Modern Arcanum. 



Oklahoma City, Okla . 



United Benevolent Asso- 
ciation. 



Oklahoma City, Okla. 



7717—03- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



96 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



Summary ofbuttiness done by fire insurance companies in Oklahoma during the year 1902, 



Name of company. 



iEtna 

American Central 

American Fire 

British-America 

Commercial Union 

Connecticut 

Continental 

Citizen's of St. Louis 

Fire Association a 

Firemen's Fund 

Germania 

German, Freeport 

German Alliance 

German-American 

Greenwich 

Hamburg-Bremen 

Hanover 

Hartford a 

Home 

Insurance Company of North America «. . . 
Liverpool, London and Globe of London.. 
Liverpool, London and Globe of New York 

London and Lancashire 

Manchester 

Mercantile Fire and Marine 

Milwaukee Mechanics 

National Fire 

Niagara 

North British and Mercantile 

Northern 

Orient 

Pennsylvania Fire 

Phoenix, Brooklyn 

Phcenix, Limited 

Phoenix, Hartford 

Providence, Washington 

Queen 

Royal 

St. Paul Fire and Marine 

Scotish Union and National 

Shawnee 

Springfield Fire and Marine 

Sun 

Traders 

Westchester 

Western Assurance 

Total 



Insurance writ- 
ten, 1902. 



$1,244, 

639, 

297, 

270, 

423, 

2,514, 

1,846, 

78, 

847, 

302, 

314, 

392, 

850, 

1,833, 

955, 

255, 

672, 

1,217, 

5,828, 

1,060, 

1,545, 

12, 

728, 

395, 

155, 

518, 

492, 

778, 

1,000, 

311, 

1,044, 

721 

2,240, 

375, 

808, 

530, 

776, 

250, 

4, 134 

964, 

2,939 

1,801, 

144 

46i; 

437, 

402, 



594.00 
213.00 
200.00 
726.00 
934.00 
616.00 
202.00 
500.00 
190.00 
664.00 
000.00 
125.00 
578.00 
788.60 
535.00 
785.00 
450.00 
146.00 
037.00 
090.00 
054.00 
000.00 
797.50 
798.00 
705.00 
916.00 
068.25 
810.00 
294.00 
725.00 
736.00 
264.00 
036.00 
965.00 
453.00 
557.00 
903.00 
798.32 
296.00 
802.84 
892.40 
873.00 
960.00 
828.00 
090.00 
929.00 



45,818,923.91 



Premiums 
collected. 



$19,894.99 

8,332.38 

3,832.83 

4,403.70 

6,274.81 

86,603.54 

23,716.37 

1,283.72 

22,202.53 

4,441.72 

5,519.51 

4,797.62 

. 16,061.58 

82,745.78 

14,083.54 

5,099.91 

7,065.23 

18,247.14 

62,774.70 

22,473.57 

22,113.71 

59.70 

18,825.60 

8,343.98 

2,686.62 

10,841.58 

10,914.97 

11,6(')6.39 

14,246.47 

4,299.39 

9, 127. 91 

15,996.00 

39,530.43 

7,172.88 

11,506.22 

4, 736. 14 

12, 136. 50 

3,601.49 

75,072.18 

23,076.57 

58,111.38 

26,164.27 

2,975.00 

7,458.39 

5,897.69 

4,638.69 



716,054.72 



Losses in- 
curred. 



$4,047.17 
3,800.60 
441.84 
188.81 
4,386.51 
8,030.00 
6,333.10 



11,681.05 

.2,736.00 

887.11 



3,248.45 
10,084.13 
4,843.92 
1,747.17 
2,238.26 
8,114.32 
27,645.36 
9,234.08 
4.250.17 



7,472.37 

3,708.68 

5,612.96 

1,736.62 

4,429.88 

4,462.84 

4,912.30 

1,499.36 

3,581.08 

12,486.00 

14,533.74 

7^296.88 

3,523.36 

3,047.42 

2,295.29 

2,458.77 

19,318.78 

12,084.17 

26,931.00 

6,029.88 

2,287.00 

4,386.09 

2,562.66 

4,567.30 



274,979.61 



Los^s paid. 



$4,672.92 
3,006.84 
463.84 
190.99 
5,295.61 
8,443.57 
5,742.10 



13,229.62 
2,276.24 
377. 11 
931.44 
3,234.50 
9,884.13 
7,003.92 
1,762.17 
1,767.88 
8,962.14 

26,037.54 
9 255.47 
5.866.17 



6,980.37 

3,658.68 

3,269.31 

1,766.67 

6,512.96 

4,862.84 

4,223.30 

1,499.36 

• 738.83 

12, 119. 00 

14,383.74 

5, 701. 88 

5,203.42 

3,290.49 

3,070.99 

2,483.77 

20,030.04 

12,993.18 

26, 343. 50 

9,520.20 

2,327.00 

6,241.43 

4,312.10 

4,241.71 



282,027.77 



a Philadelphia Underwriters policies guaranteed by Insurance Company of North America and Fire 
Association. New York Underwriters policies guaranteed by the Hartford. 



Life insurance companies — Business in Oklahoma. 



Companies. 



Policies in force 
December 31, 1901. 



No. Amount. 



Policies written in 
1902. 



No. Amount. 



Policies ceased to 

be In force during 

1902. 



No. Amount. 



Policies in force 
December 31, 1902. 



No. Amount. 



Equitable 

Fidelity Mutual 

Franklin 

Hartford 

Manhattan 

Massachusetts Mutual 

Missouri State 

Mutual Life of New York 
Mutual Benefit Life. . 
Mutual Life of Kentucky 

Mutual Reserve 

National of Montpelier . 
National Life, U.S.A... 
National Life and Trust. 

New York Life 

Northwestern Mutual 

Life 

Northwestern Life and 

Savings 

Northwestern National 

Life 



341 
64 

204 
50 
76 

132 



$634,593.00 
131,317.60 
323,652.00 
77,700.00 
112,250.00 
378,607.00 



13 

73 

137 



1,716,332.00 

18,047.00 

113,255.00 

322,671.00 



14 

60 

1,916 

586 

18 

60 



21,500.00 
36,550.00 
3,877,163.00 

1,103,504.00 

7,800.00 

56,750.00 



93 

116 

249 

15 

41 

68 

65 

1,055 

30 



$208,293.00 
196,485.00 
419,274.00 
22,000.00 
60,500.00 
145,000.00 
79,500.00 
1,766,360.00 
60,036.00 



107 
88 
124 



167 
2 



34 

22 

13 

127 

716 

140 

126 

41 



99,500.00 
29,155.88 
22,000.00 
73,000.00 
1,366,766.00 

298,000.00 

58,700.00 

37,477.00 



$239,450.00 
76,116.00 
202,28L00 
26,200.00 
73,000.00 
42,865.00 



278,268.00 
2,000.00 



88,334.00 
2,500.00 
9,500.00 

23,260.00 
632,216.00 

16,515.00 

8,100.00 

9,000.00 



327 

142 

829 

42 

70 

174 

65 

1,681 

41 

73 

122 

20 

22 

144 

2,264 



$603,436.00 

252,686.50 

540,695.00 

73,500.00 

99,750.00 

480,762.00 

79,600.00 

3,203,424.00 

76,082.00 

113,225.00 

333,837.00 

26,655.88 

84,000.00 

86,300.00 

14,610,694.00 



708 .1,884,989.00 



126 
96 



68,400.00 
84,227.00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

Life insurance companies — 'Business in Oklahoma — Continued. 



97 



Companies. 


Policies in force 
December 31, 1901. 


Policies written in 
1902. 


Policies ceased to 

be in force during 

1902. 


Policies in force 
December 31, 1902. 




No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


Pacific Mutual 


46 
11 
36 

Nil. 
58 
86 
90 


$84,000.00 
34,000.00 
66,672.00 

Nil. 
149,180.00 
194,980.00 
186,500.00 


40 
75 

74 

Nil. 

44 

7 

120 


$58,000.00 
361,423.00 
160,926.00 

Nil. 
62,606.00 
16,500.00 
163,600.00 


9 
17 

18 

Nil. 
39 
67 
16 


$12,600.00 
80,033.00 
23,344.00 

Nil. 
108,500.00 
89,700.00 
33,500.00 


77 
69 
91 

Nil. 
63 
36 
194 


$129,500.00 


Provident Savings 

Prudential 


315,390.00 
194,253.00 

Nil 


Royal Union Mutual 
Life 


Security Mutual 

State 


103,286.00 
121,780.00 


Union Central 


316, 500. 00 






Total 


4,751 


9,634,813.50 '3.300 


6,763,988.88 


1,187 


2,075,111.00 


6,864 


3,319,861.38 






' 



Companies. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Total premi- 
ums in 1902. 


Death claims paid 
in 1902. 




No. Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


Equitable 


! 


14 


$31,167.00 


$22,761.87 

8,008.26 

18,32L24 

2,411.16 

3,895.54 

16,352.11 

2,527.80 

158,011.81 

3,035.53 

1,642.25 

8,940.11 

388.53 

921.65 

10,484.81 

159,120.86 

42,011.10 

6,869.20 

1,017.61 
3,833.43 
8, 174. 71 
7,244.46 
Nil. 
1,573.16 
2,734.09 
8,069.70 


4 

1 
1 


$6,600.00 


Fidelity Mutual 


78 , $121,368.50 
125 217,043.00 


1,000.00 


Franklin 






1,007.61 


Hartford 


8 
6 


4,200.00 
12,500.00 


Manhattan 








Massachusetts Mutual... 


42 i62,i45.66 

65 79,500.00 

K»K 1 1.488.092.00 


2 


3,000.00 


Missouri. State 






Mutual Life of New York . 






5 


9,904.00 


Mutual Benefit Life 28 , 58. 035. 00 






Mutual Lifeof Kentucky. 


- 1 










Mutual Reserve 




11,166.00 


15 








National of Montpelier.. 
National Life, U. S. A . . . . 


20 

8 

94 

349 

123 

107 


26,656.88 

12,600.00 

49,750.00 

733,541.00 

281,485.00 

.'SO fioo. no 












1 


3,000.00 


National Life and Trust. 






New York Life 






21 
3 


36,898.04 


Northwestern Mutual 
Life 






6,000.00 


Northwestern Life and 
Savings 








Northwestern National 
Life 


1 ' 

35 2« 477. 00 






1 


1,000.00 


Pacific Mutual 


31 
58 
66 
Nil. 
5 


45,500.00 

281,390.00 

137,581.00 

Nil. 








Provident Savings 

Prudential 














1 
Nil. 


100.00 


Royal Union Mutual Life 
Security Mutual 


Nil. 


Nil. 
38,895.00 
73,200.00 


Nil. 


State 




50 






Union Central 


104 


130,000.00 


1 


1,000.00 










Total 


2,206 


3,854,829.38 


93 


159,952.00 


498,314.68 


41 


68,409.66 







ACCIDENT AND HEALTH. 



Companies. 


Insurance 
written. 


Premiums 
paid. 


Losses 
incurred. 


Losses 
paid. 


Aetna 


$120,500.00 
349,156.00 
966,850.00 
2,663,500.00 
209, 177. 50 
10,000.00 
112,500.00 
209,656.00 
354,500.00 


$621.10 

4,310.75 

3,068.60 

4,269.43 

62.88 

50.00 

298.00 

8,017.30 

1,633.96 


$1,256.28 

908.79 

671. 47 

1,497.61 

186.00 


$1,356.28 
808.79 


Continental Casualty 


Fidelity and Casualty 


671. 47 


Maryland Casualty 


1,497.61 
186.00 


North American Accident 


Ocean Accident and Guarantee 




Preferred Accident 


27.50 

1,163.66 

468.00 


27.50 


Travelers 


1, 168. 65 


Union Casualty and Surety 


468.00 






Total 


4,996,738.50 


17,332.02 


6,179.30 


6,179.30 





PLATE GLASS. 



Fidelity and Casualty 

Lloyds Plate Glass 

Maryland Casualty 

Metropolitan Plate Glass... 
Union Casualty and Surety 

Total 



$38,862.00 
17,932.80 
10,16L00 
43,401.80 
33,440.00 



143,787.6 



$1,298.47 

299.16 

62L00 

1,382.92 

854.09 



4,455.64 



$522.94 

n.06 

178.33 

375.96 

100. 15 



1,188.44 



$522.94 

11.06 

178.33 

375.96 

100.15 



1,188.44 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



98 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA.' 

Life insurance companies — Business in Oklahoma — Continued. 

STEAM BOILER. 



Companies. 


Insurance 
written. 


Premiums 
paid. 


Losses 
Incurred. 


Losses 
paid. 


Fidelity and Casualtv 


$10,000.00 
163,974.00 
15,000.00 


S55.00 

1,579.18 

67.69 






Hartford Steam Boiler 






Maryland Casualty ... 












Total 


188,974.00 


1,701.87 













Domestic Mviual Insurance Companies. 

HAIL. 



Companies. 


Insurance 
written. 


Premiums 
paid. 


Losses 
Incurred. 


Losses 
paid. 


Oklahoma Farmers' Mutual Insurance Asso- 
ciation! Perry 


$185,025.00 

226,707.80 
112, 214. 00 


$4,^86.30 

6,28L17 
1,664.95 


$2,397.66 

1,662.95 
890.25 


$2,968.46 


Oklahoma Farmers' Mutual Industrial In- 
surance Co , El Reno 


1,856.01 


State Mutual Insurance Co., Medford 


890.25 


Total 


623,946.80 


12,822.42 1 4.850.85 


5,714.72 











FIRE. 



Oklahoma Farmers' Mutual Insurance Asso- 
ciation, Perry 


$129,121.00 

283,059.00 
59,830.00 


$914. 12 
3.843.61 


$179.76 

349.00 
25.00 


$179. 75 


Oklahoma Farmers' Mutual Industrial In- 
surance Co., El Reno 


349.00 


State Mutual Insurance Co.. Medford 


26.00 









Total 


472,010.00 


4,757.73 


553.76 


553.75 







Fraternal insurance. 



Name of company. Insurance. 


Assessments. 


Losses in- 
curred. 


Losses paid. 


American Annuity Association 


$4,000.00 
86,600.00 
37,500.00 
66,000.00 
39,400.00 
229,000.00 
33, 500. 00 


$240.94 
272. 46 
872. 10 






American Guild 


$1,000.00 


$1,000.00 


Ancient Order of the Pyramids 




American Plowmen 






Bankers' Union of the World 


4i5.ii 

1,042.15 
778.40 
697.05 






Brotherhood of American Yeomen 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


Court of Honor 




Fraternal Mvstic Circle 


85,500.00 






Fraternal Tribunes ^ 






Fraternal Union of America 


529,800.00 

66, 300. 00 
400, 600. 00 

24,500.00 
943,500.00 
306, 000. 00 
176,000.00 

49,600.00 
6,033,000.00 

68,600.00 

473,500.00 

465,500.00 

5,200.00 

24, 068. 00 


3,422.00 

776.00 

• 8,977.70 






Giant Oaks 


1,423.05 
412.04 


1,423.05 


Home Annuity Association 


412.04 


Ideal Reserve Association 




Knights and Ladies of Security 


4,588.80 

4,352.25 

1,604.44 

651.00 

78, 656. 15 


8,250.00 


7,250.00 


Knights of the Maccabees 




Knights of the Protected Ark 


566.66 
1,250.00 
78,500.00 
6,000.00 
698. 40 
4,000.00 
2,250.00 
14.69 
2,000.00 


600.00 


Ladies of the Maccabees 


250.00 


Modern Woodmen of America 


73, 600. no 


Mutual Protective League ... 


3,000.00 


National Masonic Accident Association 

Roval Neighbors 


1,671.00 

2,206.90 

258.00 

165. 70 


698.40 
4,000.00 


Supreme Tribe of Ben Hur 


2,260.00 


United Benevolent Association 


14.69 


United Moderns 


197, 000. 00 






41,000.00 

10,800.00 

6,000.00 

2,039,200.00 


i, 484. 35 
38.00 




Woodmen Accident Association 


45.34 


45.34 






Woodmen of the World 


33,212.85 


21,663.80 


23,313.80 






Total 


12,441,268.00 


146,183.35 


130,007.32 


120,667.32 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 99 

CHURCHES, SOCIAL AND FRATERNAL ORGANIZATIONS. 

All of the leading denominations have representatives in the Terri- 
tory and are progressive workers. There has been a satisfactory 
growth in church membership during the past year, and many new 
edifices for worship have been erected. Social life has much the same 
aspects as in older settled communities. Everv town has its women^s 
clubs, musical and social societies, literary circles, and the Chautauqua 
society holds annual gatherings at several conveniently located points. 
The fraternal societies have a large and growing membership, the gen- 
eral gpod-f ellowship which generally prevails among our people making 
this a particularly good field for organizations of this character. The 
membership of the various organizations has been reported to me to be 
as follows: 

METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 

Church buildings 160 

Value of church buildings $200,160 

Parsonages 79 

Value of parsonages $47, 265 

Members 13,900 

Number of pastoral charges 160 

Number of Sunday schools 215 

Number of officers and teachers 1, 785 

Number of scholars 14, 369 

PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 

Organized missions 16 

Other regular stations 17 

Church buildings 17 

Parsonages '. 8 

Clergy 10 

Communicants • 804 

Children in Sunday school 300 

Value of church property $42, 000 

Total contributions $10,000 

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. 

Number of churches 85 

Membership 2,600 

Church buildings 73 

Value of church property $85, 000 

Preachers 40 

Colored churches 3 

Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor 29 

Sunday schools 105 

Membership 4, 000 

Expended by Home Missionary Society $150, 000 

FRIEIJJDS. 

Total white membership 1, 509 

Indian members 180 

Indian missions * 5 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 

Church organizations 62 

Church membership 3, 100 

Church buildings 44 

Manses 16 

Value of church property * $100,000 

Colored churches 2 

Academies 2 

Ministers 42 

Sunday-school missionaries 4 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



100 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH SOUTH. 

Charges 55 

Societies and churches 171 

Presiding elders 5 

Pastors 55 

Local preachers 64 

Church members 9, 451 

Additions 670 

Church buildings (value, $80,790) 72 

Parsonages (value, $17,200) 43 

Epworth Leagues 26 

Membership Ep worth Leagues 755 

Sunday schools 87 

Officers and teachers 499 

Scholars 4,040 

CHRISTIAN CHURCH. 

Number of organizations 270 

Membership 16, 000 

Buildings 97 

Value of buildings $225,000 

Preachers 140 

Colored preachers 6 

Colored churches 5 

Young People's Societies of Christian Endeavor 45 

Sunday schools 150 

BAPTIST CHURCH. 

Churches: 

White 280 

Colored 95 

Membership: 

White 13,000 

Colored 4,100 

Ministers: 

White 250 

Colored 100 

Membership of Sunday schools 9, 000 

ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. 

Bishop 1 

Priests 29 

Churches 53 

Chapels 6 

Stations visited 127 

New residences for priests 2 

Membership 15, 000 

Academies 2 

Colleges for boys 2 

Schools for boys and girls 10 

Schools for colored 2 

Convents 13 

Monasteries 2 

Hospital 1 

Value of school and church property $200, 000 

MEMBERSHIP OF COLORED CHURCHES. i 

Missionary Baptist 8, 682 

African Mijthodist Episcopal Church 3, 640 

Colored Methodist Episcopal Church 820 

Methodist Episcopal Church (colored wing) 840 

Primitive Baptist '. 486 

Colored Presbyterian 141 

Congregational 412 

Church of God 201 



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BEPOBT OF THE GOVEBNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



101 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S SOCIETIES OF CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR. 

Young people's societies 182 

Members 6,360 

Junior societies 21 

Members 420 

Total societies '. .. 203 

Total membership 6, 780 

New societies 27 

Associate members uniting with the church during the year 546 

Money given by the societies for missions and church expenses $7, 250 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

Number of schools 15, 000 

Officers and teachers 1 10, 000 

Scholars.. 80,000 

Fraternal organizations. 



Name. 


Organiza- 
tions. 


New 
organiza- 
tions. 


Members. 


New 
members. 


Value of 
property. 


Masons 


92 

50 

272 

49 

119 

70 

29 

40 

5 

136 

43 

35 

57 

8 

1 

3 


13 
2 

91 
5 

14 
4 
4 

15 
1 

11 
9 
7 

22 


4,148 

2,312 

13,242 

2,491 

3,354 

1,509 

1,600 

1,000 

709 

2,050 

1,025 

622 

2,700 

343 

546 

200 


883 
119 
5,415 
40 
592 
147 




A. 0. U. W 




Odd Fellows 


$100,000.00 
25,219.37 


K. of P 


W. of W 


G. A. R 


1,095.83 


Confederate Veterans 


Eastern Star ^ 


600 
152 
250 
180 
134 
528 
31 
133 




Order of Elks 


8,600.00 


W. C. T. U 

Women's Federated Clubs 


1,600.00 
3,000.00 


Women's Relief Corps 


1,787.00 
2, 154. 00 


Rebekah Lodges 


Knights Templars 


1,000.00 
75, 000. 00 


Scottish Rite Masons 




Rathbone Sisters 




300.00 











THE COURTS. 

Since the division of the Territory into seven instead of five districts, 
the business of the courts has been less congested and the utmost 
expedition has been used in the disposition of the cases. The necessity 
of a separate and distinct supreme bench in place of the present system 
becomes yearly more urgent as the judges require their entire time in 
these district sessions. The clerks of the several districts and supreme 
court have furnished me statistics of the past year's business, from 
which I have prepared the following statement: 



SUPREME COURT. 

Cases docketed during the year 107 

Cases disposed of during the year 138 

Total number of cases on docket June 30, 1903 107 

DISTRICT COURTS. 

First district: 

Cases docketed during the year 1, 268 

Cases disposed of during the year 901 

Total number of cases on docket June 30, 1903 642 

Second district: 

Cases docketed during the year , : 895 

Cases disposed of during the year 819 

Total number of cases on docket June 30, 1903 622 



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102 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

Third district: 

Cases docketed during the year 1, 171 

Cases disposed of during the year 851 

Total number of cases on docket June 30, 1903 720 

Fourth district: 

Cases docketed during the year 1 , 130 

Cases disposed of during the year — 1, 041 

Total number of cases on docket June 30, 1903 690 

Fifth district: 

Cases docketed during the year 920 

Cases disposed of during the year 736 

Total number of cases on docket June 30, 1903 387 

Sixth district: 

Cases docketed during the year 577 

Cases disposed of during the year 479 

Total number of cases on docket June 30, 1903 348 

Seventh district: 

Cases docketed during the year 1, 397 

Cases disposed of during the year 916 

Total number of cases on docket June 30, 1903 722 

TERRITORIAL LIBRARY. 

The following information has been furnished me by the librarian: 

The Territorial library was instituted in 1893, and is just entering upon the tenth 
year of its existence. 

It is with pleasure that I am able to report a steady growth in magnitude, popu- 
larity, and usefulness of this library, until it has become one of which an older Com- 
monwealth might be justly proiid, of both quality and quantity. 

The increase of the library has been rapid and continual from what the first 
librarian called a ''pocket edition," because he carried it around in his pocket; it 
has grown to contain many thousand valuable volumes. 

It has been the aim of the present management of the library to make the institu- 
tion as valuable as possible to all its patrons. Much has been accomplished in this 
direction, as shown by the large number of attorneys from all parts of both Terri- 
tories and adjoining States who come here to consult its volumes. 

Our last legislature was more generous than former ones and provided for its 
favorite institution most liberally, appropriating for the nurchase of books $2,000, 
for moving the library and purchasing furniture $500, and for contingent expenses 
$1,700. 

The library and fixtures are valued at $50,000. This amount includes $1^,000 
worth of Oklahoma publications held for sale, the proceeds of which are added to 
the library fund. 

Insurance to the amount of $15,000 is carried on the library and storerooms. 

Sales to the amount of $2,523.50 have been made in the last year. 

For the purchase of books $2,297.92 has been expended. 

The library is out of debt, with the sum of $1,562.04 to its credit. 

PENITENTIARY. 

Oklahoma has no Territorial prison, and its convicts are cared for 
at Lansing, Kans. , under a contract with the warden of the Kansas 
State Penitentiary. The Territory has heretofore paid the sum of 35 
cents per day for each convict. Recently, however, a new contract 
was entered into by which the Territory agrees to pay 40 cents per 
day for each prisoner, they to be treated in every way as are those of 
the State of Kansas. Prisoners adjudged insane are to be returned to 
the sheriff of the county from which they came, and 3^ouths under the 
age of 17 are not to be confined there. 

The number of inmates at present is 326, having been increased by 
24 since last year. This indicates a ratio of only one convict to about 
2,000 population. 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



103 



Below is given a table showing the number of convicts from each 
county: 

Prisoners in the penitentiary July 1 J 1903. 



County. 


Number. 


County. 


Number. 


Beaver 




Kiowa 


3 


Blaine 


4 

10 
29 
7 
5 
7 
2 
8 
15 
1 

10 
28 
9 


Lincoln 


27 


Caddo 


Logan 


39 


Canadian 


Noble 


13 


Cleveland 


Oklahoma 


23 


Oomfl.Tir»he ,--, -- 


Pawnee 


17 


Custer 


Payne 


10 


Dav 


Pottawatomie 


40 


Dewey 


Roger Mills 


4 


Garfield 


Washita 


4 


Grant 


Woods 


8 


Greer 


Woodward 


8 


Kay 


Total 




King^sher 


326 









The cost to the Territory of care and keeping for the year ending 
June 30, 1903, was $39,551.20, and for transportation $6,191.42; 
total, $45,742.62. 

JUVENILE OFFENDERS. 

Heretofore the incorrigible youth of the Territory have been kept 
under contract at the Kansas State Penitentiary with other criminals, 
there being no reform school in the Territory, nor in a neighboring 
State with whom a contract could be made. 

Realizing the demoralizing influence of hardened criminals upon 
the boys wno have been incarcerated for minor offenses, the last legis- 
lature passed an act providing for a system of parole by the district 
judge who tries the case. At his discretion the convicted youth may 
be allowed his liberty, but must report to the judge at each term of 
court and prove to his satisfaction, by witnesses, his good behavior. 

This act is now in effect and will continue to be operative until a 
place has been prepared for the confining of incorrigible youths of 
the Territory. 

. INSANE. 

The Oklahoma Sanitarium Company, with whom the Territory has 
a contract for the care and keeping of its insane, makes the following 
report as to its present condition: 

The institution is located at Norman, on high and well-drained land. Improve- 
ments aggregating $25,000 have been made during the past year, now making the 
investment of the Sanitarium Company $100,000. 

New buildings. — We have added a new ward building that is first-class in everjr 
particular. It is well located, well ventilated, and well lighted. This building is 
two full stories; is 40 by 100 feet. It is plumbed for hot and cold water, and in 
first-class sanitary condition; has bath tubs, water-closets, and lavatories on each 
floor. The building is painted inside and out with two coats of white lead and oil. 
It will accommodate 75 patients comfortably. 

We have also built, on the sanitarium grounds, a 7-room residence for Dt. Griffin, 
our resident physician. 

We have overhauled the plumbing throughout the entire institution and have 
connected it with our new septic tank, that is built on the same plan as the tank at 
Watertown, 111., which one, we are informed, has given perfect satisfaction. We 
have added a number of new bath tubs to those already in the institution and have 
reenameled those that we already had in place. Sanitary traps have been placed so 
as to prevent the escape of gas from the sewers into the buildings. 



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104 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



Water supply, — In the matter of the water supply, we have added a new tank that 
is twice as large as our old one, which gives us three times the amount of storage 
capacity we have had since last year. We have also purchased and have in opera- 
tion a new engine and water pump, so that at the present time we have an abun- 
dant water supply. In this respect the inmates of the institution are in far better 
condition than any of the citizens of the city of Norman. 

General repairs of buildings. — All the buildings have been generally overhauled and 
repaired; new screens have been placed on, and the buildings have been calcimined 
and painted throughout from cellar to garret. 

Laundry. — We have just added a complete steam laundry outfit, to take care of 
the laundry of the patients confined in the institution. Heretofore this has been 
done by hand. 

Lighting of the buildings. — Electric lights have been substituted in every case for oil 
lamps, and the institution is lighted throughout in every ward by electric lights. - 
There is not an oil lamp now bemg used in tne institution. 

Fire protection. — In addition to the water supply and the fire escapes, we have 
added Babcock fire extinguishers and hand grenades, and have them on every ward 
in the institution. 

Equipment of sanitarium buildings. — We have made a thorough inspection of all beds 
and oedding in this institution, and beds and bedding not considered first-class have 
been discarded, and hospital iron beds, new mattresses, pillows, and bedding have 
been substituted. Every bed in this institution has two muslin sheets and a white 
coverlid. We think our beds and bedding will compare very favorably with any 
State institution in the United States. 

kitchen and dining room conditions. — In this respect we have made many improve- 
ments. The kitchen has a concrete cement-topped floor, also the bake shop. A new 
range and a new meat-cutting department, also an automatic bread cutter has been 
added. 

In the dining room we have added a large amount of new cutlery, granite ware, 
and dishes. This department is in first-class condition. 

There are many other small improvements which we have made that we do not 
consider necessary to set forth herein. 

In a general way and in every feature the sanitarium is now in a better condition 
than at any time in its history, and we hope to repeat this assertion in each annual 
report. 

The following table shows the number of inmates in the Territorial asylum July 1, 
1902, the number received, the number of deaths, releases, and escapes, by counties, 
during the year beginning July 1, 1902, and ending July 1, 1903, also the number of 
inmates on hand July 1, 1903: 



Ctounty. 


On hand 

July 1, 

1902. 


Admitted. 


Released. 


Died. 


Escaped. 


On hand 

July 1, 

1903. 


Beaver 


3 

2 
5 

22 

19 
5 

10 
2 
6 

14 
6 
6 

18 
9 




1 






2 


Blaine 


6 

14 

16 

17 

14 

6 

1 

6 

10 

11 

11 

19 

10 

9 

10 

14 

8 

39 

10 

10 

16 

4 

8 

18 

9 


1 
1 
1 
4 
2 


1 


6 


Caddo 


4 

10 
3 

4 
1 
3 
4 
7 
6 

I 

1 
4 
7 
4 

18 
10 
5 
11 


13 


Canadian 


1 


29 


Cleveland 


. 22 


Comanche 




14 


Custer 




12 


Dav 






2 


Dewey 






9 


Garfield 


6 




15 


Grant 




9 


Greer 




1 
2 


10 


Kay 


2 

2 


26 


Kingflsher . . . 


15 


Kiowa 


1 


7 


Lincoln , 


ii 

24 

5 
35 
19. 
14 
28 

2 

9 

'I 


i 

4 

1 
3 


16 


Logan 


i 


26 


Noble . 


8 


Oklahoma 


1 


52 


Pawnee 


19 


Payne 


1 
2 
1 
1 
2 




18 


Pottawatomie 




31 


Roger Mills 




5 


Washita 


6 
10 
5 




10 


Woods 


2 

1 


21 


Woodward 


12 








Total • 


299 


296 


140 


34 


11 


409 







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UMPOMT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



105 



The cost to the Territory for transportatioii aad care of the insane 
for the past year was as follows: 

Care $69,189.71 

Transportation 5,719.46 

Total 74,909.17 

DEAF MUTES. 



The Territory has a contract with Mr. H. C. Beamer to care for and 
teach the deaf and dumb for the sum of $275 per year per scholar. 
The amount expended during the past year in caring for and educating 
these unfortunates was $15,548.53. The institute is located at Guthrie. 

Mr. Beamer makes the following report: 

The school has been under the charge of Mrs. Pearl H. Dunham as princii)al, who 
has rendered very satisfactory and efficient service, both as teacher and disciplinarian. 

Miss Frieda Bauman had charge of the first intermediate; Miss Edith Brummitt, 
second intermediate; Miss Frances Hockensmith, primary and physical culture 
classes. 

The progress made and the interest taken by the pupils in their school work is 
cause for great encouragement. A general examination was given the pupils the last 
week of school, Ui which they took great interest, and their work showed how much 
they had accomplished since the midwinter examination. 

The health oi the pupils has been very good throughout the year — no deaths and 
no severe illness. There was one case of measles and some malaria. 

The recommendation made by the legislative committee that there be additional 
sleeping: apartments, giving to each occupant 480 cubic feet, has been complied with 
by adding another dormitory to the mam building, 16 by. 24 feet, two stories high, 
with good ventilation. 

The greatest number of pupils in attendance during the year was 66. One moved 
out of the Territory, and 1 was discharged as incompetent to learn, leaving a total of 
64, from the following counties: 



Beaver 1 

Blaine 1 

Caddo 2 

Canadian 3 

Cleveland 1 

Comanche 1 

Custer .• 2 

Day 1 

Dewev 2 

Garfield 3 

Greer 2 

Kiowa 2 

Kingfisher 3 



Logan 11 

Lincoln 2 

Noble 4 

Oklahoma 2 

Payne 4 

Pottawatomie 7 

Roger Mills 1 

Washita 1 

Woods 5 

Woodward 3 



Total. 



64 



THE BLIND. 

The Territorial legislature of 1897 made provision for the governor 
to contract for the care and education of the blind, but up to the pres- 
ent time there have been so few of these unfortunates reported from 
the various counties that it has not been deemed necessary. 

As a nucleus for the building of an institution for the purpose of 
properly educating the blind of the Territory a levy of one-tenth of a 
mill was made in 1899. The fund thus derived amounts to $7,191.48. 

PHARMACY. 

The enforcement of the pharmacy law regulating the sale and man- 
ufacture of drugs and medicines is under the direct supervision of the 



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106 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

Territorial board of pharmacy, which is composed of three well- 
qualified practicing pharmacists. 

All applicants desiring to practice this profession in the Territory 
are obliged to pass a satisfactory examination before the board. These 
examinations are held at stated intervals at Guthrie. 

The secretary of the board reports as follows: 

A large portion of the applicants for registration during the past year have been 
proprietors of drug stores who have come into the Territory from other States, and 
they are of the progressive, wide-awake men, who knew how to make success of 
business and have left their old homes because they were too slow for them. We want 
just this kind of people to make up the pharmacists of Oklahoma, and extend tc 
them the glad hand of welcome. 

The growth and development of the drug business has kept pace with the develoj)- 
ment of the Territory, and as business men the druggists of every city in the Terri- 
tory are in the lead with other good citizens in everything that pertains to the 
welfare and best interests of their community. 

During the past year, since last report, four board meetings have been held. One 
hundred and twenty-four candidates have presented themselves for examination, 
and 58 have passed and received certificates of registration. Two have beerf registered 
upon diploma from the University of Oklahoma, pharmacy department. 

There are now 403 class A, or registered pharmacists, and 1 73 class B. 

DENTISTRY. 

Persons desiring to practice the profession of dentistry in the Ter- 
ritory are required by law to either file for record a diploma from a 
recognized college of dentistry or to pass a satisfactory examination 
before the board of dental examiners. 

The secretary of the dental board reports an addition of 52 licensed 
dentists during the past year. 

Total number licensed to practice is 193. 

MEDICAL PRACTICE AND PUBLIC HEALTH. 

The Territorial board of health by recent enactment is composed of 
three physicians appointed by the governor. The present incumbents 
are Dr. E. E. Cowdrick, of Enid; Dr. B. F. Hamilton, of Shawnee; 
and Dr. E. G. Sharp, of Orlando. 

The county board of health is composed of the chairman of the 
board of county commissioners and two physicians, one appointed by 
the Territorial superintendent of health and the other by the board of 
county commissioners. 

Dr. E. E. Cowdrick is superintendent of public health, and makes 
the following report: 

There would seem to be little cause for complaint against Oklahoma as a place in 
which to live, from a health standpoint, the past year, as we have been remarkably 
free from all epidemics of infectious and contagious diseases considering the number 
of people who make it their home. 

The only epidemic occurring was one late i;i the spring at Enid. We quarantined 
some 150 cases of smallpox in a space of two months, with no deaths and no sequel 
of any importance following it. 

The past year has been a busy one for the medical department of the Territory, 
and in the small space allotted to me to make this report I am at a loss to know just 
what to touch as of the most interest. 

During the past summer and fall the county superintendents reported to me some 
few scattered cases of typhoid fever and malarial fever. They could all be traced to 
the building of new sewers and the leveling of streets using dirt from under old 
buildings as top soil. This coming summer and fall we w^ill no doubt have more of 
this sickness, as the recent hard rains will have the same effect as did the exposing 
of filthy dirt to the sun's rays. 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 107 

Until the **old medical law** was repealed bv a new one there were many physi- 
cians all over the Umted States who availed tnemselves of the privilege accorded. 
To all who cared to make affidavit to the fact of a diploma in their possession and 
sent it to this office with a small fee, a license was issued. This caused quite a num- 
ber to register that otherwise would not have done so, as they did not intend to come 
here to practice medicine. I have registered some professors in medical schools now 
at work and who have no intention of making a change. I mention this as evidence 
that the number registered is not a criterion to the number who live in Oklahoma. 
As near as I am able to learn, there are some 1,200 doctors in Oklahoma, although 
the reports from the county superintendents do not show so many. 

The real work began when the present board was appointed. The complete 
change in the medical law made vacant some 26 offices and the appointing power is 
vested entirely in the s iperintendent. The salaj-y attached to each of the 26 offices 
is $100 per vear, including expenses. I found it a difficult matter to get even a bid 
for the work. Each office is filled at the piesent time — 2 are acting and 24 have 
commissions. It will be nothing more than we may attribute to human nature if 
some thin^ are negl icted by some $iOO men, though each knows his duty and what 
his salary is to be. 

The new board at its first, meeting organized and made rules for ita work not 
conflicting with the present law. The board has had some three or four business 
meetings, and held three examinations for doctors, embalmers, and midwives. 
There nave been 22 men and women who have reached the required grade of 
proficiency and were granted a license to practice medicine and surgery in Oklahoma. 
There were about 30 per cent of failures among the doctors. Only one came up for 
the examination in midwifery and failed. Some five applicants took the embalmers' 
examination and all were successful. 

In conducting these examinations the board has tried to elevate the standard of 
the profession, and I can truthfully, say that after an applicant has reached a grade of 
66S m each of the nine branches he is at least qualified to treat the diseases common 
to the general practitioner. 

The fact that partially decomposed meats were being offered for sale at different 
parts of the Territory was brought to the notice of the board. Upon investigating 
the matter it was found to be the truth. The board in session at Guthrie, May 15, 
made rules governing this menace to the public health, and in joint session with the 
live stock sanitary commission made provision whereby, upon a notification by one 
of their deputies to a county superintendent of health, such meat is to be destroyed. 
We have destroyed meat at Guthrie, Shaw^nee, Oklahoma City, and Enid. The 
board proposes to continue on the same lines and investigate ice-cream manufactories 
and the green vegetable and fruit markets. Oklahoma raises almost all the crude 
material lor her needs. All we need is the making of it in her limits. 

NATIONAL GUARD. 

Probably the most important events of the present year which 
relate to the guard are the passing of a militia law by Congress and 
the enactment of the Territorial legislature. 

The Congressional act known as the "Dick bill" became a law on 
January 21, 1903, and it was soon followed by an appropriation of 
$2,000,000 for providing the militia with a full complement of proper 
equipments. Of this appropriation the allotment to Oklahoma will 
approximate $14,000, wnich, with the annual allotment of $7,072.37, 
will furnish all the equipment that can be made use of until the legis- 
lature makes a sufficient appropriation to meet the ost of caring for 
stores and supplies in a proper manner. 

The militia act passed b}" the legislature in 1903 contains some excel- 
lent provisions, wnich lose much of their value by reason of limitation 
of the amount to be expended under the act to less than is required to 
carry out its provisions. After providing $20 per month for armory 
rent to each company, the allowance was made unavailable by limiting 
the appropriation to more than $800 less than is necessary to pay that 
amount. 

It is a matter of regret that the local law is not responsive to the 



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108 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

liberal provisions made by Congress for maintaining the guard and 
improvmg its efficiency. 

The inspection required by the act of Congress was concluded by 
Major Starr, Twenty-fifth U. S. Infantry, about the middle of May, 
and on May 23 I was notified that his report was filed in the War 
Department. This was the first report received by the Department 
unaer the new law. 

On June 8 the Adjutant-General United States Army gave notice 
that a provisional allotment of the $2,000,000 appropriation had placed 
$7,072. 37 subject to the requisition of the governor for such supplies as 
the War Department was authorized to issue. Requisitions were 
accordingly made upon this allotment for publications of the War 
Department, supplies for the signal corps, the hospital corps, the 
engineer company, and some additional equipments for the infantry 
companies. 

In compliance with instructions from Washington, requisition was 
forwarded for magazine rifles for the infantry and engineers, and also 
for a Gatling gun and two 3.2-inch guns, provided they could be fur- 
nished without being charged against the allotment. The Adjutant- 
General had given notice that this point was under consideration. 

The commander in chief, accompanied by his staflF, the cavalry band, 
and Companies B, 1, and M of the First Regiment Infantry, consti- 
tuting ''The Oklahoma Battalion," participated in the ceremonies 
dedicating the Louisiana Purchase Exposition held at St. Louis, Mo., 
April 30 to May 2, 1903. It is a pleasure to record that the display 
made by the troops in the parade was entirel}'^ creditable, and the dis- 
cipline and deportment of the men was at all times commendable and 
praiseworthy. ' 

Pursuant to authority conferred by the legislature of 1903, there 
have been organized — 

1. A Hospital Corps at Woodward, Okla., per Special Otd^rs, No. 
28, April 7, 1903, Capt. F. H. Racer, surgeon First Regiment, com- 
manding. This corps now numbers 32, including two officers. 

2. An Engineer (jompany at Lawton, Okla., per Special Orders, No. 
53, June 8, 1903, Capt. Joseph K. Tuttle, commanding. This company 
now numbers 58, including three officers. 

3. A Signal Service Corps at Black well, Okla., per Special Orders, 
No. 60, June 22, 1903, Capt. Alva J. Niles, commanding. This corps 
now numbers 25, including two officers. 

The law requires that applicants for appointment or promotion shall 
not be commissioned until they have passed a satisfactory examination 
before an examining board. The board as now constituted consists of 
the adjutant-general, Maj. E. H. Jayne, First Regiment, and Capt. 
J. C. Herr, inspector of rifle practice. It convenes at the office of the 
adjutant-general as circumstances require. Applicants are required 
to make written answers to printed lists of questions relating to phys- 
ical, moral, and educational qualifications, and are examined orally as 
to their professional attainments and their ability to perform the duties 
of the grade to which they seek appointment. 

The guard is steadily mcreasing in numbers. On December 31, 
1902, its aggregate numerical strength was 803. On June 30, 1903, it 
was 945, distributed as follows: 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



109 



ThjB governor's staff 7 

Special, inspector's rifle practice 2 

Regimental commissioned officers 5 

Regimental staff .- 8 

Regimental noncommissioned staff 5 

Company A, First Regiment 57 

Company B, First Regiment 92 

Company C, First Regiment 50 

Company D, First Regiment 69 

Company E, First Regiment : 29 

Company F, First Regiment 50 

Company G, First Regiment 46 

Company H, First Regiment 73 

Company I, First Regiment 62 

Company K, First Regiment _ 51 

Company L, First Regiment 49 

Company M, First Regiment 72 

Troop A 66 

First Battery 73 

Hospital Corps 32 

Engineer Company 32 

Signal Corps 15 

Total 945 

THE OFFICIAL ROSTER. 



Station. 



Governor T. B. Ferguson, commander in chief 

Brig. Gen. £. P. Burlin^ame, adjutant-general and 
chief of staff, ex officio quartermaster-general, 
commissary-general, paymaster-general, and chief 
of ordnance. 

Col. Samuel Billings, inspector-general 

Maj. Harry W. Pentecost, judge-advocate-general... 

Maj . John W. Duke, surgeon-general 

Capt. William A. Knipe, aid-decamp 

Capt. Seymour Foose, aid-de-camp 

Cai)t. James M. McConnell, aid-de-camp 



SPECIAL OFFICERS. 



Capt. Jacob C. Herr, inspector of rifle practice 

First Lieut. Walter S. Ferguson, assistant inspector 
rifle practice. 

FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY. 



Col. Roy Hoffman 

Lieut. Col. Charles West 

Ma^. Elta H. Jayne 

Mai. Ralph J, Ramer 

Maj. Edward G. M. Overholser. 



REGIMENTAL STAFF OFFICERS. 



Capt. Elmer Solomon, judge-advocate 

Capt. Job Ingram, chaplain 

Capt. Edgar West Jones, quartermaster 

Capt. Charles F. Barrett, commissary 

First Lieut. Fred. W. Hunter, adjutant 

First Lieut. Ross R. Way, battalion adjutant 

First Lieut. Ray McElhinney, battalion adjutant ... 
First Lieut. William Mattinglev 



NONCOMMISSIONED STAFF. 



John J. Davis, sergeant-major 

Ace McClelen, quartermaster-sergeant 

Owen R. Rouse, sergeant-major First Battalion 

James A. Embry, sergeant-major Second Battalion . 
John C. Pinson, chief trumpeter 



LINE OFFICERS, FIRST REGIMENT. 



Geo. E. Dunnica, captain Company A . 
Wm. O. Holcomb, first lieutenant 



Guthrie 

do 



Enid 

Guthrie .. 

do.... 

Perkins. . , 
Watonga . 
Guthrie .. 



Chandler . 
Guthrie .. 



Chandler 

Enid 

Edmond 

Oklahoma City... 
do 



Kingfisher 

Lawton 

Guthrie 

Shawnee 

Kingfisher 

Chandler 

Oklahoma City. 



Chandler . 
Shawnee . 
Pawnee .. 
Chandler . 
do.... 



Guthrie. 



Date of com- 
mission. 



Dec. 9, 1901 
Feb. 27,1902 



May 10,1902 

do 

do 

....do 

Dec. 27,1901 
Mar. 16,1903 



Apr. 11,1903 
do ;.. 



Feb. 19, 1900 
June 9, 1903 
Nov. 18, 1901 
June 9, 1903 
July 14, 1903 



Apr. 1,1903 
Dec. 26, 1899 
Apr. 4,1901 
Sept. 21, 1901 
Apr. 11, 1901 
Sept. 18, 1902 
Apr. 11, 1903 
do 



Aug. 20, 1902 
June 16, 1902 
do 



July 8,1901 
Sept. 17, 1902 



To rank 
from— 



July 9,1901 



Sept. 3,1901 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Dec. 27,1901 
Feb. 25,1903 



Mar. 16,1903 
Do. 



Feb. 19, 1900 
May 20, 1903 
Oct. 16, 1901 
May 20, 1903 
June 25, 1903 



Apr. 1,1903 
Oct. 7. 1899 
Mar. 29, 1901 
Sept. 20, 1901 
Feb. 25. 1901 
Aug. 14, 1902 
Mar. 16, 1903 
Do. 



Aug. 20, 1902 
June 16, 1902 

Do. 
Feb. 25, 1903 



July 6,1901 
Sept. 6,1902 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



110 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



The official roster — Continued. 



LINE OFFICERS, FIRST REGIMENT— continued. 



Rutherford R. Henry, second lieutenant . 

Daniel J. Norton, captain Company B 

Lewis E. Martin, first lieutenant 

Bennett McCoy, second lieutenant 

Roy W. Thomas, captain Company C 

Arthur J. Aikins, first lieutenant 

Frank L. Godfrey, second lieutenant 

El tie Wright, captain Company D 

George D. Glass, first lieutenant 

Bertrand H. Sitton, second lieutenant . . . 
James M. Grimsley, captain Company E . 
Thaddeus T. Rlcherson, first lieutenant.. 

Henry Sternberg, second lieutenant 

L. E. Minton, captain Company F 

Alie R. Bradshaw, first lieutenant * . . 

Milton Bryan, second lieutenant 

Harry C. Overfelt, captain Company G. . . 

Jesse J. Combes, second lieutenant 

C. B. Blake, captain Company H 

Alfred Spangler, first lieutenant 

Ober Elinu Haug, second lieutenant 

E. G. Douglas, captain Company I 

Jesse R. Langley, first lieutenant 

Robert Lee Wataon, second lieutenant... 
John R. Thompson, captain Company K. 

Roy Roach, first lieutenant 

Benjamin F. Rector, second lieutenant.. 
Herman P. Wetzel, captain Company L. . 

Frank M. Whinery, firs^t lieutenant 

Henry Grant, second lieutenant 

Mont. F. Highley, captain Company M . . 
Edgar F. Loughmiller, first lieutenant. . . 



HOSPITAL CORPS — WOODWARD. 



Capt. Floyd H. Racer, surgeon First Regiment 

First Lieut. Ralph A. Workman, assistant surgeon. 

CAVALRY, TROOP A—GUTHRIE. 



Thomas A. Neal, captain 

Gustave W. Dimke, first lieutenant. 



George H. Klein, second lieutenant . 



ARTILLERY, FIRST BATTERY— OKLAHOMA CITY. 

Joseph B. Thoburn, captain 

William H. Zwick, first lieutenant 

William J. Boyd, assistant surgeon 



ENGINEER COMPANY— LA WTON. 



Joseph K. Tuttle, captain 

Frank Ben King, first lieutenant. 



4,1908 

9,1903 

Frank Levant ICetch, second lieutenant I i July 14, 1903 



Station. 



. Dateofoom- 
I mission. 



Chandler . 



Medford. 



Blackwell . . 



Pawnee , 



Shawnee . 



Hennessey ... 
Edmond 



Alva 



Enid 



Perry . . 



Oklahoma City. . . 



June 9, 1903 
Aug. 22, 1901 
July 14, 1903 

do 

Sept. 3, 1901 
Aug. 16, 1901 
Sept. 28, 1901 
Nov. 18,1902 

do 

do 

July 8, 1901 

do 

Sept. 27,1901 
Sept. 24,1900 
July 12,1902 
June 16, 1903 
July 26,1902 
Nov. 19,1902 
Nov. 18,1901 
June 9,1903 

do 

Dec. 27,1901 
Sept. 21, 1901 
Aug. 4,1902 
July 21,1902 
Sept. 21,1901 
July 9, 1903 
Apr. 15,1902 
June 16, 1903 
July 24,1902 
July 14,1903 
do 



Nov. 18,1901 
Mar. 3,1903 



Aug. 19,1901 
Nov. 20,1902 
Jan. 31,1903 



Apr. 10,1902 
June 9, 1903 
Dec. 12,1902 



Apr. 
June 



SIGNAL CORPS— BLACKWELL. 



Alva J. Nilea. captain 

Frank H. Robertson, first lieutenant . 



. Apr. 4,1903 
.] July 14,1903 



To rank 
from — 



Jan. 1,1903 
Aug. 18, 1901 
June 29, 1903 

Do. 
Sept. 8, 1901 
Aug. 16, 1901 

Do. 
Nov. 18,1902 

Do. 

Do. 
July 8,1901 

Do. 
Sept. 27, 1901 
Sept. 24, 1900 
July 12,1902 
Apr. 14,1903 
June 27, 1902 
Nov. 19,1902 
Oct. 16,1901 
Jan. 13,1903 
June 1,1903 
Aug. 12,1901 
Sept. 20, 1901 
Aug. 4,1902 
July 21,1902 
Sept. 21, 1901 
June 2,1903 
Feb. 26,1902 
June 2,1903 
Feb. 15,1902 
June 26,1903 

Do. 



Oct. 16,1901 
Feb. 16,1903 



Aug. 19,1901 
Nov. 20,1902 
Nov. 29,1902 



Mar. 28,1902 
May 11,1903 
Dec. 12,1902 



Mar. 16,1903 
June 8,1903 
July 1,1903 



Mar. 16,1903 
June 27,1903 



The guard gives evidence of improvement in its morals, and officers 
manifest a desire and purpose to acquire a more perfect knowledge of 
the duties relating to the profession of arms. In aid of this laudable 
eflFort a library of military publications will be established in the office 
of the adjutant-general, from which each officer may obtain, as from a 
circulating library, any of the publications of the War Department 
and such text-books as may be added from time to time. 

Company commanders will receive a permanent supply for the use 
of officers and such of the enlisted men as have an ambition to make 
thorough mastery of the drill regulations, the manual of arms, manual 
of guard duty, etc. 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. Ill 
OKLAHOMA AT THE WORLD's FAIR. 

Oklahoma is preparing to take such active part in the Louisiana 
Purchase Centennial Exposition at St. Louis as befits her station as 
the youngest but most progressive Commonwealth within the borders 
of the purchase. 

The Territorial legislature made an appropriation of $20,000 in 1901 
for this purpose, and a commission of three business men was at once 
appointed who have been busy since planning and preparing for the 
exnibit, which will far surpass the excellent showing made by the 
Territory at Chicago, Omaha, and Paris. 

In March of the present year an additional appropriation of $40,000 
was made, making a total of $60,000 to be used by the commission in 
showing to the world the progress and prosperity, resources, advan- 
tages, products, and possibilities of the Territory. 

In October last the Territory was allotted a building site on the 
exposition grounds, and on May 1, 1903, the corner stone of the Okla- 
homa building was laid with imposing ceremonies and the building is 
now well along toward completion. It is a handsome, two-story 
structure, of Spanish style of architecture, located between the New 
York and Colorado buildings on the plateau of States in the south- 
eastern portion of the exposition grounds, and will cost $18,000, com- 
plete and equipped. 

A fine agricultural and horticultural exhibit has already been col- 
lected and is being added to daily, while a mineral, building stone, and 
natural-resource exhibit is in course of preparation under the direc- 
tion of the Territorial geologist that will compare favorably with that 
of any State in the Union. The Territorial board of education is 
preparing an educational exhibit that will show the excellent school 
system and the magnificent higher educational institutions of the Ter- 
ritory, as well as the social and religious status of the people. 

The showing of fine fruits to be made by the Territory will surprise 
the world and turn the attention of orchardists generally toward 
Oklahoma. In addition to all of the ordinary fruits of the temperate 
zone, which are produced here in such abundance and excellence, 
lemoms, bananas, pineapples, and other tropical fruits will be exhibited 
grown in the Territory. Of course, these fruits are grown in tubs 
and removed indoors several months in the winter, but they can be 
grown successfully without any hothouse. 

The agricultural exhibit will not only show an excellence of quality 
in all farm products and a large average yield, but an unusually great 
variety, every eflFort of the commission being directed to a showing 
by Oklahoma of a greater variety of agricultural and horticultural 
products grown successfully than can be found in any other State or 
country on earth. 

The report of the commission shows that up to July 1, 1903, but 
$5,560.77 of their appropriation had been expended, leaving $54,439.23 
still at their disposal. AH of the work in connection witL the Terri- 
tory's participation in the exposition is well under way, and when the 
opening day arrives Oklahoma will be found readv in every depart- 
ment of her exhibit. The active manner in which the work of the 
commission is being done is shown by the fact that Oklahoma was the 
first of the States and Territories of the Union to notify the exposi- 
tion company that they were ready to select a site for a building on 

7717—03 8 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



112 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

the grounds, and also the first State or Territory to lay a real corner 
stone of a building on the grounds. The corner stone of the building 
is of Oklahoma limestone, quarried and prepared in the Territory, and 
bears the inscription, ''Oklahoma the next star on the flag," which is 
fast becoming the rallying cry of the entire people of the Territory. 

NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED IN OKLAHOMA. 

Few towns of any importance are without their home paper. Okla- 
homa recognizes the value and importance of the newspaper. As a 
rule they have more than a local circulation, and many subscribers are 
found in the older States who are thus enabled to keep in touch with 
their relatives and friends who have located and made their homes in 
this prosperous Territory. 

To the newspapers and periodicals of the Territory, as well as the 
'press in general, do we owe much for the extensive publicity given 
our great resources, advantages, and advancement. We have a larger 
proportion of newspapers to population than will be found in the 
average State. 

At the present time there are published in the Territory 28 daily, 
242 weekly, 17 monthly, 4 semimonthly, and 2 quarterly publications. 
This is an increase of 30 weeklies during the year, 

DAILY. 

Anadarko: Democrat. 

El Reno: Evening Bell, Democrat, American. 

Lawton: Democrat, Enterprise. 

Enid: Wave, News, Eagle. 

Pond Creek: Vidette. 

Ponca: Courier. 

Black well: News. 

Newkirk: Socialist. 

Kingfisher: Star. 

Hennessey: Eagle. 

Hobart: News-Republican. 

Chandler: Publicist. 

Guthrie: Oklahoma State Capital, Leader. 

Perry: Enterprise-Times, Republican. 

Oklahoma: Times-Journal, Oklahoman. 

Stillwater: Democrat. 

Shawnee: Quill, Democrat, Evening News. 

Alva: Pioneer. 



Beaver County: Beaver — Herald, Journal; Guymon — Herald; Kenton — Cimar- 
ron News. 

Blaine County: Watonga — Republican, Herald; Gearv — Bulletin, Journal; Hitch- 
cock — Vanguard; Okeene — Eagle; Homestead — News; Eagle City — Star. 

Caddo County: Anadarko — ftibune, Democrat, Times; Hydro — Review, Democrat; 
Bridgeport — News, Free Press; Hinton — Record; Binger — Journal; Cobb — Record; 
Carnegie — Herald; Apache — Review; Cement — Courier. 

Canadian County: El Reno — American-News, Democrat, Globe-Bell, Volksblatt 
(German) ; Okarche— Times; Yukon — Sun; Mustang — Mail. 

Cleveland County: Nprman — Transcript, Democrat-Topic, Voice; Lexington — 
Leader. 

Comanche County: Lawton — Republican, Democrat, News, Lariet, Enterprise; Ster- 
ling — Star; Frederic — Enterprise; Walter — Leader; Temple — Tribune; Hastings — 
News; Waurika — News; Cache — Journal. 

Custer County: Arapahoe — Clarion, Bee, News; Weatherford — Republican, Okla- 
homa Vorwaerts( German), Democrat; Thomas — Tribune; Custer — Courier; Clinton — 
Chronicle. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 113 

Day County: Grand — Day County Progress. 

Dewey County: Taloga— Times, Advocate; Selling — Guide; Cestos — Reporter; 
Lenora — Leader. 

Garfield County: Enid — Eagle, Democrat, Wave, Events, Echo, Farmer and Stock- 
man, Post; Waukomis^ — Hornet; Garber— Sentinel; Hunter — Enterprise; Lahoma — 
Sun; Kremlin — Times; Carrier — Monitor. 

Grant County: Pond Creek — Vidette, News, Republican; Jefferson — Review; 
Medford — Patriot, Star; Wakita — Herald, Farmers' Union; Manchester — Journal; 
Renfrow — Tribune; Lamont — Dispatch, Valley New^s; Deer Creek— Times. 

Greer County: Mangum — Sun-Monitor, Star; Leger — News, Times; Granite — 
Enterprise; Erick— Enterprise; Eldorado — Courier; HoUis — Herald; Texola — Herald. 

Kay County: New^kirk — Republican-News-Journal> Herald-Democrat; Ponca — 
Courier^ Democrat, Times; Tonkawa — News; Blackwell — Times-Record, Sun; Narr 
din — Star; Braman — Star, Leader; Peck ham — Leader; Kaw City — Star. 

Kingfisher County : Kingfisher — Free Press, Times, Reformer; Hennessey — Clipper, 
Press-Democrat, Eagle; Kiel — Press; Dover — News; Cashion — Advance. 

Kiow^a County: Hobart — News-Republican, Chief, Pointer; Mountain Park — Eagle, 
News; Harrison — Herald, Gazette; Lone Wolf — Echo; Snyder — Signal, Star; Roose- 
velt — Record; Mountain View — Republican, Progress; Lathram— Herald. 

Lincoln County: Chandler — New^s, Publicist, Tribune; Stroud — Messenger, Star; 
Wellston — News; Prague — News; Carney — Enterprise; Pamell— Quapaw Valley 
News; Agra — Advocate; Meeker — Herald. 

Logan County: Guthrie — State Capital, Oklahoma Leader, Oklahoma Farmer, 
Register, Lance, Guide, Southwest World, Labor Signal, Searchlight; Mulhall — 
Enterprise, Oklahoma Christian ; Orlando — Herald; Langston — Constitution; Coyle — 
Clipper; Marshall — Tribune; Crescent — News. 

Noble County: Perry — Republican, Enterprise-Times, Sentinel, News, Nenigkaiten 
(German); Billings — Red Rock Valley News. 

Oklahoma County: Oklahoma — ^Times- Journal, Oklahoman, National Baptist Flag, 
LaborSignal, Western World; Edmond — Enterprise, Sun; Luther— Register; Jones — 
Canadian Valley. 

Pawnee County: Pawnee — Times-Democrat, Courier-Dispatch; Cleveland — Trian- 
gle, Enterprise; Ralston — Free Press, Reflector; Jennings— News; Blackburn — Flash- 
light; Keystone— A ppalachia News. 

Payne County: Stillw^ater — Gazette, Advance, Democrat; Perkins — Journal; Gush- 
ing — Herald, Independent; Glencoe — Mirror; Ripley — Times; Yale — Lance. 

Pottaw^atomie County: Tecumseh — Republican, Democrat, Standard; Shawnee — 
Quill, Democrat, Herald, News; McLoud — Sunbeam, Standard; Asher — Altruist; 
Earlsboro— Echo. 

Roger Mills County: Cheyenne — Sunbeam; Elk City — Roger Mills Democrat, Elk 
City Democrat, Record; Say re — Headlight, Enterprise. 

Washita County: Cordell — Herald-Sentinel, Beacon, News; Foss — Enterprise; 
Can ute — Bann er . 

Woods County: Alva — Courier, Pioneer, Review^; Augusta — Free Homes, Sun; 
Cleo — Chieftain, Journal; Byron — Republican; Carwile— Journal; Lahoma — Sun; 
Waynoka — Enterprise; Yewed — Happv Homes; Cherokee — Orient, News; Car- 
men — News, Headlight; Capron— Hustler; Fair view — Republican. 

Woodward County: Woodward — News, Bulletin, Dispatch; Gage — Record; Cur- 
tis — Courier; Fort Supply — Republican; Persimmon — Enterprise; Quinlan — Mirror; 
Mooreland — Leader. 



Norman: Reform Herald. 

Enid: Oklahoma Christian. 

Waukomis: Farmers' Elevator. 

Kingfisher: Oklahoma Sunday School Worker, The Kingfisher. 

Ponca: I. O. O. F. Journal. 

Hobart: Orphans' Friend. 

Guthrie: Oklahoma Churchman, Oklahoma Medical Journal, Practical Pointers 

Perry: Temperance Beacon. 

Oklahoma: Oklahoma Fancier, Oklahoma School Herald. 

Stillwater: College Paper. 

Sacred Heart Indian Mission: Indian Advocate. 

Alva: Northwestern X Ray. 

Woodward: Poultry Journal. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



114 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 



SEMIMONTHLY. 

Norman: University Umpire, University News Letter. 
Oklahoma: Oklahoma Farm Journal. 
Woodward: Live Stock Inspector. 

QUARTERLY. 

Norman: University Bulletin. 

Alva: Northwestern Normal Bulletin. 

OFFICIAL ROSTER. 

Governor: Thompson B. Ferguson. 

Private secretary to the governor: Robert M. Carr. 

Secretary of the Territory and ex officio lieutenant-governor: William Grimes. 

Assistant secretary: J. M. McConnell. 

Attorney-general: J. C. Robberts. 

Assistant attorney -general : Charles H. Woods. 

Treasurer: C. W. Rambo. 

Superintendent of public instruction and ex officio auditor: L. W. Baxter. 

Deputy auditor: E. P. McCabe. 

Secretary school land board and ex oflficio school land commissioner: Fred L. Wenner. 

Assistant secretary: H. F. Ardery. 

Oil inspector: F. A. Ash ton. 

Bank commissioner: Paul F. Cooper. 

Deputy bank commissioner: H. W. Pentecost. 

Librarian: J. W. Foose. 

Adjutant-general: E. P. Burlingame. 

Grain inspector: C. T. Prouty. 

Game Warden: J. C. Clark. 

Superintendent of public health: Dr. E. E. Cowdrick. 

Territorial geologist: A. H. Van Vleet. 

Territorial school land board : Governor Ferguson, Secretary Grimes, Auditor Baxter. 

Board of equalization : Governor Ferguson, Secretary Grimes, Auditor Baxter. 

Regents of Territorial university: Governor Ferguson; J. L. VVilkins, Oklahoma; 
D. L. Larsh, Norman; H. B. Gilstrap, Chandler; R. E. Wood, Shaw^nee; George W. 
Sutton, Cleveland. 

Regents of Agricultural and Mechanical College: Governor Ferguson; Frank J. 
Wikoff, Stillwater; Henry J. Beard, Shawnee; T. J. Hartman, Pondcreek; H. C. R. 
Brodball, Ponca; W. H. Merten, Guthrie, 

Live stock sanitary commission: W. E. Bolton, Woodward; Thomas Morris, secre- 
tary, Guthrie; Peter A. Becker, Jefferson. 

Board of education of normal schools: Superintendent Public Instruction Baxter; 
Treasurer Rambo; Charles M. Thacker, Mangum; William Wood, Edmond; G. E. 
Nichols, Alva. 

Board of regents Colored Agricultural and Normal University: Superintendent Pub- 
lic Instruction Baxter; Treasurer Rambo; U. C. Guss, Guthrie, E. O. Tyler, King- 
fisher; James A. Rouse, Cooper. 

Territorial board of education: Superintendent Public Instruction Baxter; President 
D. R. Boyd, Norman; President F. H. Umholtz, Edmond; Prof. G. D. Moss, King- 
fisher; Prof. Edward S. Vaught, Oklahoma. 

Regents of University Preparatory School: Governor Ferguson; William W. Gregory, 
Tonkawa; Jerre H. Johnson, Newkirk. 

Presidents of the Territorial institutions of learning: D. R. Boyd, Norman, Territorial 
University; F. H. Umholtz, Edmond, Oklahoma Normal School; T. W. Conway, 
Alva, Northwestern Normal; A. C. Scott, Stillwater, Agricultural and Mechanical 
College; Inman E. Page, Langston, Colored Agricultural and Normal University; 
J. F. Kelley, Tonkawa, University Preparatory School; J. R. Campbell, Weather- 
ford, Southwestern Normal. 

Board of health: Auditor Baxter; Dr. E. E. Cowdrick, Enid; Dr. B. F. Hamilton, 
Shawnee. 

Board of pharmacy: F. B. Lillie, Guthrie; A. B. Clark, Watonga; E. E. Howendob- 
ler. Perry. 

Board of dental examiners: A. C. Hixon, Guthrie; Fred C. Sparks, Ponca City; 
A. M. Detrick, Oklahoma City; J. Q. Waddell, Kingfisher; L. A. Kelsy, Chandler. 

Commissioners to the Louisiana Purchase Centennial Exposition, St. Louis: Jos. 
Meibergen, Enid; Otto A. Shuttee, El Reno; Fred L. Wenner, Guthrie. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 115 

Supreme court: Chief justice, John H. Burford, Guthrie; associate justices, C. E. 
Irwin, El Reno; B. F. Burwell, Oklahoma City; B. T. Hainer, Perry; J. L. Beau- 
champ, Enid; J. L. Pancoast, Alva; Frank E. Gillette, Anadarko. 

Clerks of courts: Supreme court, B. F. Hegler, Guthrie; first district, T. A. Neal, 
Guthrie; second district, E. M. Hegler, El Reno; third district, Byron D. Shear, 
Oklahoma City; fourth district, Jay E. Pickard, Perry; fifth district, C. F. McEl- 
rath, Enid; sixth district, E. P. Kelley, Alva; seventh district, N. E. Sisson, 
Anadarko. 

FEDERAL OFFICERS. 

United States attorney: Horace Speed. 

Assistant United States district attorneys: John W. Scothorn, Frank Hall, and H. D. 

McKnight. 
United States marshal: William B. Fossett. 
Registers and receivers United States land oflBces: Guthrie, J. J. Boles and William 

D. Hodge; Oklahoma City, Selwyn Douglas and William Young; Kingfisher, 

E. E. Brownlee and J. V. Admire; Alva, W. H. Cofield and A. R. Museller; 
Woodward, F. S. Healey and E. S. Wiggins; Mangum, John A. Oliphant and 
John A. Trotter; El Reno, Thomas R. Reid and James A. Sickles; Lawton, H. D. 
McKnight and J. D. Maguire. 

United States Indian agents and superintendents: Osage, O. A. ]VIitcher, Pawhuska; 
Ponca and Otoe, Hugh M. Noble, White Eagle; Iowa, Sac and Fox, Ross Guffin, 
Sac and Fox Agency; Cheyenne and Arapahoe, Maj. George W. Stouch, Darling- 
ton; Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache, Col. James F. Randlett, Anadarko; Pawnee, 
George M. Harvey, Pawnee. 

COUNTIES WITH STATISTICS OF EACH. 

Below is presented a brief statement of general information concern- 
ing each county in the Territory: 

Beaver County. — Location, extreme northwest; area, 3,681,000 acres; population, 
3,169 (1902 enumeration); land taxed, 168,908 acres; number of school districts, 52; 
number of school children, 1,148; school land in county, l,438i quarter sections; 
county seat, Beaver; other leading towns, Kenton and Guy mon; principal occupation 
of people, stock raising and agriculture; products, cattle, sheep, horses, and stock 
feed; undeveloped resources, fruit raising and agriculture by irrigation. 

Blaine County. — Location, middle west; area, 656,000 acres; population, 15,189 
(1902 enumeration); taxable valuation, $1,689,512; land taxed, 224,894 acres; county 
bonded debt, $45,5()0; county ta,x levy, 27 mills; amount expended for county pur- 
poses, $39,385.58; number of school districts, 88; number of school children, 4,564; 
school land in county, 226 quarter sections; Government land subject to homestead 
entry, 395 acres; county seat, Watonga; other leading towns, Geary, Okeene, Home- 
stead, Hitchcock, and Greenfield; principal occupation of people, agriculture and 
stock raising; products, wheat, cotton, corn, castor beans, peaches, hogs, cattle, salt, 
and cement; manufacturing industries, salt works, cement mills, and flouring mills; 
undeveloped resources, deposits of gypsum, salt, and building stone. 

Caddo County. — Location, south central; area, 979,000 acres; population, 25,639 
(1902 enumeration); land taxed, 21,319 acres; number of school districts, 155; num- 
ber of school children, 5,678; school land in county, 544 quarter sections; Govern- 
ment land subject to homestead entry, 2,867 acres; county seat, Anadarko; other 
leading towns, Caddo, Fort Cobb, Cement, Sickles, Apache, Bridgeport, Hydro; 
principal occupation of people, agriculture and stock raising; products, wheat, cot- 
ton, corn, and live stock; manufacturing industries, ice plants and flouring mills; 
undeveloped resources, cement beds, gas and oil wells, and minerals. 

Canadian County. — Location, south central; area, 598,630 acres; population, 15,200 
(1902 enumeration) ; taxable valuation, $3,341,445; land tax.ed, 358,770 acres; county 
bonded debt, $103,500; county tax levy, 15.75 mills; amount expended for county 
purposes, $96,958.26; number of school districts, 96; number of school children, 
5,900; school land in county, 210 quarter sections; Government land subject to 
homestead entry, 882 acres; county seat. El Reno; other leading towns, Okarche, 
Yukon, Calumet, Union, and Mustang; principal occupation of people, agriculture; 
products, wheat, cotton, corn, cattle, and hogs; manufacturing industries, flouring 
mills and cement works; undeveloped resources, cement and clay deposits. 

Cleveland Cmxnty. — Location, extreme south ; area, 348,000 acres; population, 17,253 
(1902 enumeration); taxable valuation, $2,137,309; land taxed, 276,401 acres; county 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



116 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

bonded debt, $76,500; county tax levy, 15 mills; amount expended for county pur- 
poses, $39,497.26; number of school districts, 69; number of school children, 6,951; 
school land in county, 122 quarter sections; Government land subject to homestead 
entry, none; county seat, Norman; other leading towns, Lexington, Noble, and 
Moore; principal occupation of people, agriculture; products, com, wheat, cotton, 
hogs, cattle, and sheep; manufacturing industries, cotton-seed oil mill, flouring mills, 
and ice plants. 

Comanche County. — Location, southwestern; area, 1,845,000 acres; population, 
25,509 (1902 enumeration); land taxed, 100,736 acres; number of school districts, 
185; number of school children, 7,539; school land in county, 1,016 quarter sections; 
Government land subject to homestead entry, 14,610 acres; county seat, Lawton; 
other leading towns, Waurika, Park City, Temple, Walters, Apache,* Frederick, and 
Tejsana; principal occupation of people, agriculture, stock raising, and mining; 
products, wheat, com, cotton, live stock; manufacturing industries, flouring mill, ice 
plant; undeveloped resources, building stone, oil, and mineral deposits. 

Custer County. — Location, central west; area, 647,00p acres; population, 16,127 (1902 
enumeration); taxable valuation, $2,785,748; land taxed, 221,919 acres; county 
bonded debt, $38,800; county tax levy, 13i mills; amount expended for county pur- 
poses, $38,242.85; number of school districts, 112; number of school children, 5,124; 
school land in county, 290 quarter sections; Government land subject to homestead 
entry, 1,703 acres; county seat, Arapahoe; other leading towns, Weatherford, Inde- 
pendence, Clinton, Parkersburg, and Thomas; manufacturing industries, flouring 
mills; principal occupation of people, agriculture and stock raising; products, corn, 
cotton, wheat, hogs, and cattle; undeveloped resources, cement and building stone 
deposits. 

Day County. — Location, extreme west; area, 666,000 acres; population, 4,966 (1902 
enumeration); taxable valuation, $407,514; land taxed, 30,950 acres; county bonded 
debt, $19,800; county tax levy, 28.9 mills; amount expended for county purposes, 
$14,098.29; number of school districts, 44; number of school children, 1,651; school 
land in county, 240 quarter sections; Government land subject to homestead entry, 
109,402 acres; county seat. Grand; other leading towns, loland, Texmo, and Stone; 
principal occupation of people, stock raising and agriculture; products, cattle and 
cattle feed. 

Dewey County. — Location, north middle west; area, 638,000 acres; population, 
11,358 (1902 enumeration); taxable valuation, $979,067; land taxed, 93,118 acres; 
county bonded debt, $34,450; county tax levy, 33 mills; amount expended for 
county purposes, $63,796.10; number of school districts, 89; number of school chil- 
dren, 3,848; school land in county, 259 quarter sections; Government land subject 
to homestead entry, 7,000 acres; county seat, Taloga; other leading towns. Selling, 
Butte, and Blaine; principal occupation of people, agriculture and stock raising; 
products, corn, wheat, Kaffir corn, castor beans, and cattle; undeveloped resources, 
cement deposits. 

Garfield County. — Location, north central; area, 640,000 acres; population, 23,732 
( 1902 enumeration ) ; taxable valuation, $3,759,453; land taxed, 490,434 acres; county 
bonded debt, $46,000; county tax levy, 13 mills; amount expended for county pur- 
poses, $53,920.13; number of school districts, 128; number of school children, 7,901; 
school land in county, 465 quarter sections; Government land subject to homestead 
entry, none; county seat, Enid; other leading towns, Waukomis, North Enid, Krem- 
lin, Roper, and Garber; principal occupation of people, agriculture; products, wheat, 
corn, castor beans, and fruit; manufacturing industries, flouring mills, brickyards, 
and ice plants; undeveloped resources, cement and clay deposits. 

Grant County. — Location, middle north; area, 672,000 acres; population, 19,096 
(1902 enumeration); taxable valuation, $3,423,855; land taxed, 466,894 acres; county 
bonded debt, $29,000; countv tax levy, lOf mills; amount expended for county pur- 
poses, $48,775.26; number or school districts, 124; number of school children, 6,497; 
school land in county, 480 quarter sections; Government land subject to homestead 
entry, none; county seat, Pond Creek; other leading towns, Medford, Jefferson, 
Manchester, Hunter, Lamont, and Eddy; principal occupation of people, agriculture; 
products, wheat, corn, castor beans, cattle and hogs; manufacturing industries, 
flouring mills; undeveloped resources, salt plains. 

Greer County. — Location, extreme southwest; area, 1,511,575 acres; population, 
29,771 (1902 enumeration) ; taxable valuation, $4,174,776; land taxed, 404,821 acres; 
county bonded debt, $20,000; county tax levy, 13.1 mills; amount expended for 
county purposes, $49,151.21; number of school districts, 109; number of school chil- 
dren, 11,120; school land in county, 1,134 quarter sections; Government land subject 
to homestead entry, 34,000 acres; county seat, Mangum; other leading towns, Altus, 
Navajoe, Granite, Leger, Texola, and Eldorado; principal occupation of people, 
agriculture and stock raising; products, wheat, corn, cotton, cane, cattle, hogs, and 



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sheep; manufacturing industries, salt and cement works, flouring mills; undevel- 
oped resources, granite quarry, cement deposits, oil and gas wells. 

Kay County. — Location, northeast; area, 575,000 acres; population, 22,766 (1902 
enumeration); taxable valuation, $3,775,955; land taxed, 340,030 acres; county 
bonded debt, $35,000; county tax levy, 17.8 mills; amount expended for county pur- 
poses, $36,652.24; number of school districts, 89; number of school children, 7,559; 
school land in county, 325 quarter sections; Government land subject to homestead 
entry, none; county seat, Newkirk; other leading towns, Ponca, Blackwell, Ton- 
kawa, Kildare, and'Kaw city; principal occupation of people,- agriculture; products, 
wheat, corn, cattle, and hogs; manufacturing mdustries, flouring mills, cement works, 
brickyards, and stone quarries; undeveloped resources, cement and stone deposits. 

Kingfisher County. — Location, central; area, 493,570 acres; population, 19,594 (1902 
enumeration); taxable valuation, $3,369,469; land taxed, 472,435 acres; county 
bonded debt, $40,900; county tax levy, .017 mills; amount expended for county 
purposes, $51,195.58; number of school districts, 117; number of school children, 
6,985; school land in county, 200 quarter sections; Government land subject to home- 
stead entry, none; county seat, Kin^sher; other leading towns, Hennessey, Cashion, 
Dover, and Kiel; principal occupation of people, agriculture; products, corn, wheat, 
cotton, castor beans; manufacturing industries, flouring mills, ice plants, cement 
works; undeveloped resources, cement beds. 

Kiowa County. — Location, south central; area, 734,000 acres; population, 22,685 
(1902 enumeration); land taxed, 34,764 acres; number of school districts, 94; num- 
ber of school children, 5,052; school land in county, 720 quarter sections; Govern- 
ment land subject to homestead entry, 5,081 acres'; county seat, Hobart; other lead- 
ing towns, Han'ison, Lone Wolf, Mountain View, Roosevelt, Snyder, and Mountain 
Park; principal occupation of people, agriculture and stock raising; products, wheat, 
corn, cotton, and live stock; manufacturing industries, cotton mill, cotton compress, 
ice plant, flouring mill, farm machinery manufactory; undeveloped resources, stone, 
gas, and mineral deposits. 

Lincoln County. — Location, middle east; area, 619,000 acres; population, 28,904 (1902 
enumeration) ; taxable valuation, $3,611,497; land taxed, 427,648 acres; county 
bonded debt, $67,000; county tax levy, 27f mills; amount expended for county pur- 
poses, $58,642.89; number of school districts, 135; number of school children, 
10,477; school land in county, 212 quarter sections; Government land subject to 
homestead entry, 32 acres; county seat, Chandler; other leading towns, Stroud, 
W^ellston, and Fallis; principal occupation of people, agriculture; products, cotton, 
corn, peanuts, castor beans, hogs, and cattle; manufacturing industries, oil mills, 
flouring mills, pressed brick plant; undeveloped resources, cement and clay deposits. 

Logan County. — Location, east central; area, 456,000 acres; population, 27,519 (1902 
enumeration); taxable valuation, $4,911,079; land taxed, 438,894 acres; county 
bonded debt, $163,000; county tax levy, 17i mills; amount expended for county pur- 
poses, $84,973.18; number of school districts, 110; number of school children, 8,648; 
school land in county, 165 quarter sections; Government land subject to homestead 
entry, none; .county seat, Guthrie; other leading towns, Mulhall, Orlando, Coyle, and 
Navina; principal occupation of people, agriculture and commerce; products, w^heat, 
corn, cotton, fruits, melons, castor beans, cattle, hogs, broom corn; manufacturing 
industries, oil mill, flouring mills, planing mills, broom factory, foundries, ice 
plants, etc. 

Noble County. — Location, northeast; area, 398,000 acres; population, 12,028 (1902 
enumeration); taxable valuation, $2,782,907; land taxed, 306,190 acres; county 
bonded debt, $70,500; county tax levy, 19i mills; amount expended for county pur- 
poses, $132,420.73; number of school districts, 67; number of school children, 3,862; 
school land in county, 192 quarter sections; Government land subject to homestead 
entry, none; county seat, Pen-y; other leading towns, Billings Morrison, and Red, 
rock; principal occupation of people, agriculture; products, wheat, corn, cotton, 
castor beans, cattle, and hogs; manufacturing industries, flouring mills, ice plant. 

Oklahoma County. — Location, south central; area, 461,720 acres; population, 32,761 
(1902 enumeration); taxable valuation, $7,062,444; land taxed, 387,606 acres; county 
bonded debt, $137,600; county tax levy, 12 mills; amount expended for county pur- 
poses, $89,406.13; number of school districts, 105; number of school children, 10,366; 
school land in county, 158 quarter sections; Government land subject to homestead 
entry, none; county seat, Oklahoma city; other leading towns, Edmond, Luther, 
Choctaw city, Jones, Britton; principal occupation of people, agriculture and com- 
merce; products, wheat, corn, cotton, fruits, grapes, cattle, and hogs; manufacturing 
industries, oil mill, cotton compress, flouring mills, brickyards, broom factory, ice 
plant, etc. 

Paivnee County. — Location, extreme northeast; area, 333,000 acres; population, 
13,327 (1902 enumeration); taxable valuation, $2,317,021; land taxed, 158,523 acres; 



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118 REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA. 

county bonded debt, $32,000; county tax levy, 30 mills; amount expended for 
county purposes, $70,361.93; number of school districts, 80; number of school chil- 
dren, 4,906; school land in county, 200 quarter sections; Government land subject to 
homestead entry, 58 acres; countj seat. Pawnee; other leading towns, Cleveland, 
Blackburn, Jennings, Ralston; prmcipal occupation of people, agriculture and stock 
raising; products, wheat, corn, cotton, castor beans, cattle, and hogs; manufacturing 
industries, flouring mills, sawmills, ice plants; undeveloped resources, building- 
stone deposits. 

Payne County. — Location, northeast; area, 484,000 acres; population, 22,084 (1902 
enumeration); taxable valuation, $3,812,330; land taxed, 364,068 acres; county 
bonded debt, $78,000; county tax levy, 9i mills; amount expended for county pur- 
poses, $43,088.10; number of school districts, 100; number of school children, 8,404; 
school land in county, 198 q^uarter sections; Government land subject to homestead 
entry, none; county seat, Stillwater; other leading towns, Perkins, Ripley, Gushing, 
Glencoe; principal occupation of people, agriculture; products, wheat, corn, cattle, 
cotton, castor beans, ana fruits; manufacturing industries, flouring mills, brick and 
ice plants. 

Pottauatomie County. — Location, extreme south; area, 501,000 acres; population, 
39,054 (1902 enumeration); taxable valuation, $3,670,103; land taxed, 265,607 acres; 
county bonded debt, $51,500; county tax levy, 15i mills; ambunt expended for 
county purposes, $58,359.56; number of school districts, 112; number of school 
children, 11,716; school land in county, 168 quarter sections; Government land sub- 
ject to homestead entrv, none; county seat, Tecumseh; other leading towns, Shaw- 
nee, McLoud, Avoca, keokuk Falls, Dale, and Earlsboro; principal occupation of 
people, agriculture; products, wheat, cotton, corn, cattle, hogs, peaches, apples, and 
grapes; manufacturing industries, flouring mill, oil mill, railway shops, brickyards; 
undeveloped resources, building-stone and clay deposits. 

Roger Mills County. — Location, extreme west; area, 757,000 acres; population, 
10,407 (1902 enumeration); taxable valuation, $1,514,375; land taxed, 77,654 acres; 
county bonded debt, $37,650; county tax levy, 20 mills; amount expended for county 
purposes, $26,972.47; number of school districts, 49; number of school children, 4,140; 
school land in county, 265 quarter sections; Government land subject to homestead 
entry, 16,218 acres; county seat, Cheyenne; other leading towns, Berlin, Busch, and 
Say re; principal occupation of people, agriculture and stock raising; products, cattle 
and cattle feed, corn, cotton, and wheat. 

Washita County. — Location, southwest; area, 1,275,000 acres; population, 19,880 
(1902 enumeration); taxable valuation, $1,785,725; land taxed, 230,405 acres; county 
bonded debt, $78,000; county tax levy, 44.9 mills; amount expended for county pur- 
poses, $50,225; number of school districts, 89; number of school children, 7,376; 
school land in county, 256 quarter sections; Government land subject to homestead 
entry, none; county seat, Cordell; other leading towns. Cloud Chief, Herald, Wood, 
Rocky, Foss, Stout, Sentinel; principal occupation of people, agriculture; products, 
cotton, wheat, corn, castor beans, cattle, and hogs; undeveloped resources, cement 
and gypsum beds. 

Woods County.— Loc&tion^ central north; area, 1,732,000 acres; population, 46,302 
(1902 enumeration) ; taxable valuation, $6,553,761; land taxed, §64,596 acres; county 
bonded debt, $47,200; county tax levy, 10 mills; amount expended for county pur- 
poses, $55,750.76; number of school districts, 260; number of school children, 14,908; 
school land in county, 1,223 quarter sections; Government land subject to home- 
stead entry, 43,916 acres; county seat, Alva; other leading towns, Cleo, Augusta, 
Carmen, Ingersoll, Ringwood, Rusk, Aline, Yewed, Waynoka; principal occupation 
of people, agriculture and stock raising; products, wheat, corn, cane, castor beans, 
peaches, cattle, and hogs; manufacturing industries, flouring mills, creameries; unde- 
veloped resources, salt, guano deposits. 

IVoodivard County. — Location, northwest; area, 2,124,000 acres; population, 17,163 
(1902 enumeration); taxable valuation, $2,373,234.60; land taxed, 224,334 acres; 
county bonded debt, $15,855; county tax levy, 23i mills; amount expended for 
county purposes, $140,937.13; number of school districts, 182; number of school 
children, 6,644; school land in county, 102 quarter sections; Government land sub- 
ject to homestead entry, none; county seat, Woodward; other leading towns, Curtis. 
Alston, Gage, Tangier, and Shattuck; principal occupation of people, agriculture and 
stock raising; products, cattle, sheep, wheat, com, cane; undeveloped resources, salt 
and cement deposits. 

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