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Research Report 
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1984-1985 RESEARCH REPORT 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS, URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 

Table of Contents 

Page 

INTRODUCTION 1 

GRADUATE RESEARCH AREAS IN GEOLOGY 3 

FACULTY PROFILES 4 

RECENTLY FUNDED PROJECTS 12 

LIST OF PUBLICATIONS 15 

COURSE OFFERINGS 26 

FIELD-BASED RESEARCH AND INSTRUCTION 28 

LABORATORY FACILITIES 31 

GEOLOGY LIBRARY 3 2 

COLLOQUIUM PROGRAM 34 



(Compiled and edited by S. Marshak and P. Lane) 



li 




Rob Lander, a graduate student studying volcanic sediments with Professor 
Hay, analyzing the output of the X-ray diffraction unit. 



in 



INTRODUCTION 

The Department of Geology continues to evolve rapidly with the appointment 
of six new assistant-professors- and the filling of the Ralph E. Grim Chair by Richard 
L. Hay. One additional appointment in geochemistry/mineralogy will be made during 
the 1985 academic year. 

These new appointments have completed our new research and teaching program 
in geophysics-seismology as well as reinforcing previous strengths in the areas of 
groundwater geology, clay mineralogy, geochemistry and the broad study of tectonics, 
diagenesis, sedimentology, structural geology, and historical geology. 

One of the major advantages of the University of Illinois is the easy access to 
facilities in other Departments. The Department, for example, has access to superb 
micro-analytical facilities (SEM, high-resolution STEM, SIMS, etc.) in the Center 
for the Microanalysis of Materials (a National Facility in the Materials Research 
Laboratory) and the Center for Electron Microscopy and the NMR Center in Chemistry. 

The Department is fortunate to share the campus with the Illinois State Geological 
Survey. Members of the Survey and the Department cooperate in research programs 
and graduate teaching in areas such as groundwater and environmental geology, clay 
mineralogy, quaternary geology, coal geology, stratigraphy and paleobiology. 

With 60 students, the Department maintains strong programs in graduate research 
and teaching. The list on the following page outlines some major areas that include 
a broad coverage of theoretical, experimental and field research. The list is not 
exhaustive and some cross-disciplinary programs are available. 




Geology graduate students, Charles Weiss and Wang-Hong Yang using one of 
the high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers. These spectrome- 
ters are used to examine the structures of a wide variety of crystalline and 
amorphous materials. 



GRADUATE RESEARCH AREAS IN GEOLOGY 



Clays and Clastic Diagenesis - S. P. Altaner, T. A. Anderson, C. M. Bethke, 
R. L. Hay, R. J. Kirkpatrick, G. deV. Klein, R. C. Reynolds, Jr. (adj.) 

Carbonate Rocks and Diagenesis - T. A. Anderson, A. V. Carozzi, R. L. Hay, 
P. A. Sandberg 

Engineering Geology and Applied Rock Mechanics - A. S. Nieto 

Geochemistry - S. P. Altaner, T. F. Anderson, C. M. Bethke, C-Y. Chen, 
R. J. Kirkpatrick 

Geomorphology and Quaternary Geology - W.H. Johnson, L. R. Follmer (adj.), 
J. E. King (adj) 

Geophysics - J. D. Bass, W-P. Chen, A. T. Hsui, S. Grand (1986) 

History of Geology - A. V. Carozzi 

Hydrogeology - C. M. Bethke, K. Cartwright (ISGS-adj.) 

Igneous/Metamorphic Petrology - D. E. Anderson, C-Y. Chen, R. L. Hay, 
R.J. Kirkpatrick 

Mantle Dynamics - J. D. Bass, C.-Y. Chen, A. T. Hsui 

Mineralogy/Mineral Physics - S. P. Altaner, J. D. Bass, C.-Y. Chen, 
R. L. Hay, D.M. Henderson, R.J. Kirkpatrick 

Paleobiology - D.B. Blake, R.L. Langenheim, P. A. Sandberg, J. King (adj) 

Sedimentary Basin Analysis - S. P. Altaner, C. M. Bethke, D. B. Blake, 
A. V. Carozzi, R. L. Hay, A. T. Hsui, G. deV. Klein, R. L. Langenheim, 
S. Marshak 

Seismology - W.-P. Chen, S. Grand 

Stratigraphy and Sedimentation - T. F. Anderson, D. B. Blake, A. V. Carozzi, 
R. L. Hay, G. deV. Klein, R. L. Langenheim, C.J. Mann, P. A. Sandberg 

Structural Geology, Rock Physics, Tectonics - D. E. Anderson, J. D. Bass, 
W-P. Chen, A. T. Hsui, S. Marshak, A. S. Nieto 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

FACULTY PROFILES 

The information given below is generalized and conveys only work done in the 
last few years. For more specific information about courses or research, please 
contact the individual faculty member at the Department address. 



STEPHEN P. ALTANER, Assist. Professor D986 Appointment] (B.S., Colgate U. 
1979; Ph.D. Univ. of Illinois 1985) - Clays and Diagenesis; Sedimentary Rocks 
and Stratigraphy 

Stephen Altaner will be setting up a program in clay mineralogic and 
petrologic research. Among his broad range of interests in clay mineralogy, 
he plans to investigate conditions of clay mineral formation in sedimentary 
and diagenetic environments, in soils, and in hydrothermal environments 
associated with epithermal ore deposits, modern geothermal fields, and acid 
sulfate systems. Specific research topics will include diffusion in argillaceous 
rocks, kinetics of diagenetic clay mineral reactions, determination of thermal 
and burial histories of sediments, and occurrence of ammonium in epithermal 
ore deposits. Results of this type of research will have applications in the fields 
of petroleum exploration, mineral prospecting, and nuclear waste disposal. Field 
relations, petrography, chemical analysis, x-ray diffraction, stable and radiogenic 
isotope analysis, mathematical modeling, and experimental petrology techniques 
will be used for this research. Mineralogic research will include examination 
of mixed-layer and non mixed-layer clay minerals by transmission electron 
microscopy, by near- and mid-infrared spectroscopy, and by nuclear magnetic 
resonance (to complement the existing program of R.J. Kirkpatrick). 

DAVID E. ANDERSON, Professor and Head (BSc-Hons., Univ. of Sydney, 
Australia, 1961; M.S. & PH.D. 1967, Univ. of Sydney, Australia) - Metamorphic 
and Theoretical Petrology 

Professor Anderson has been department head since 1983. His research 
involves metamorphic processes and their relationship to the thermal and tectonic 
history of various metamorphic terraines. Current projects include: 1) Studies 
(with Stephen Marshak) of the metamorphism of rocks in the Granite Wash 
and Buckskin Mountains of Western Arizona and the relationship of metamorphism 
to thrust faults in the region. 2) Compositional and textural zoning in garnets 
and their relationship to the tectonic history of the Moine Schists of Scotland. 
3) Chemical changes associated with shearing and mylonitization of basic igneous 
rocks in Scotland and Upper Michigan. 4) Theoretical modelling of diffusion 
processes in aqueous and crystalline electrolytes. Funds are currently being 
sought jointly by Stephen Marshak and D.E. Anderson for a comprehensive study 
of the deformation and metamorphism of the Transantartic Mountains. Professor 
Anderson teaches graduate courses in thermodynamics (including non-equilibrium 
thermodynamics) and metamorphic petrology. 

THOMAS F. ANDERSON, Professor (B.S. 1961, DePauw University, Ph.D. 1967, 
Columbia University) - Stable Isotope Geochemistry 

Professor Anderson's research involves the application of stable isotope 
variations to investigating the origin and diagenesis of sediments. He collaborates 
with Dr. John D. Hudson of the University of Leicester on oxygen isotope 
variations in Phanerozoic carbonates and their implications for diagenesis, 
paleoclimates, and hydrosphere-lithosphere interactions. Much of the data 
used is from a continuing joint project with Prof. P. A. Sandberg on textural, 
chemical, and isotopic characterization of constituents in Phanerozoic limestones. 
Three Ph.D. students are currently involved in this joint project. Professor 

4 



Anderson is also collaborating with Dr. M. A. Arthur (University of Rhode Island) 
on mass and isotopic balance considerations on the burial of organic carbon 
and sulfur in marine sediments. The results of this study will improve our general 
understanding of the role of sedimentary cycles in global redox balancing. One 
Ph.D. student is conducting research in this area. Professor Anderson also 
maintains his interests in paleo-oceanographic implications of isotopic variations 
in Quaternary nannofossils, the origin of ground ice and the sulfur isotope 
geochemistry of coal. Future plans include the continuation of studies on secular 
isotope variations (oxygen, carbon, sulfur) in marine sediments, with particular 
emphasis on mid- and lower-Paleozoic limestones and shales and on oxygen 
isotope variations in biogenic phosphates. Professor Anderson would also like 
to resume studies of experimental carbonate diagenesis. 

JAY D. BASS, Assistant Professor (Ph.D. 1982, State University of New York 
at Stony Brook) - Geophysics; Mineral Physics; Elastic Properties of Minerals 

Jay D. Bass has been at Illinois since August 1984. His major research efforts 
are in the area of experimental geophysics and laboratory measurements of 
the physical properties of minerals. Much of his recent work has focused on 
measurements of elastic wave velocities in minerals and high-pressure 
polymorphic phases by Brillouin spectroscopy, and this work is being further 
pursued at Illinois. Brillouin spectroscopy is a light scattering technique that 
is particularly well suited for measuring wave velocities in microscopic-sized 
samples, many of which are synthesized at high pressures and high temperatures. 
The results of such experiments are used to calculate the wave velocities and 
density of mineral aggregates under the high-pressure and high-temperature 
environment of the Earths deep interior. Comparisons with seismological models 
of velocity versus depth in the Earth provide a powerful constraint upon the 
chemistry and mineralogy of the Earths mantle, and this is a prime motivation 
for measuring elastic properties. In addition to measurements under room 
conditions, a program will be initiated to perform these experiments at high 
pressure in diamond-window pressure cells, and at high temperatures. Other 
research pursuits include: 1) X-ray studies of crystal structures at high pressure, 
2) The high-pressure equation of state of oxides and metals which bear on the 
composition of the mantle and core, using shock-wave techniques (in collaboration 
with the California Institute of Technology), 3) In-situ measurements of stress 
in the Earths crust by holographic interfermetry (also with Cal Tech). 

CRAIG M. BETHKE, Assistant Professor (A.B. 1980, Dartmouth College, Ph.D. 
1985, University of Illinois) Hydrogeology 

Craig Bethke's primary research interest is study of the groundwater hydrology 
of sedimentary basins through geologic time, and the effects of groundwater 
motion on petroleum migration, ore formation, and sediment diagenesis. Recent 
work includes a theoretical analysis of the role of compaction-driven groundwater 
flow during subsidence of sedimentary basins, performed on a CRAY 
supercomputer. He applied this analysis in a study of the relative importance 
of compaction-driven and gravity-driven groundwater flow over the geologic 
history of the Illinois Basin, and this work has improved understanding of 
petroleum migration, as well as the genesis of Mississippi Valley-type ore deposits. 
Craig also recently completed research on the illitization reaction of smectite, 
a clay mineral dehydration reaction which is an important contributor of deep 
fluids and cements in evolving basins. This research was recognized with an 
award from the Clay Minerals Society. Current work involves construction 
of a numerical chemical reactor model to study the dynamics of sediment 
diagenesis, including effects of transport by groundwaters, and study of the 
origins of geopressured zones in the subsurface. With the support of petroleum 
and minerals companies and governmental sources, Craig is building a 
hydrogeology laboratory, complete with supercomputer and interactive computer 
graphics facilities. 

5 



DANIEL B. BLAKE, Professor (B.S. I960, University of Illinois, M.S. 196Z, Michigan 
State, Ph.D. 1966, University of California) Invertebrate Paleontology; 
Biostratigraphy 

Professor Blake continues to study fossil and modern sea stars, and Paleozoic 
Bryozoa. In recent years, his work has taken him to numerous museums in North 
America, Europe and Australia. Professor Blake and Dennis Kolata, a geologist 
at the Illinois Geological Survey, have begun a paleoecological study of a Middle 
Ordovician carbonate and shale interval which is bounded by K-bentonite (altered 
volcanic ashes) isochrones. Individual K-bentonites can be recognized from 
Minneapolis-St. Paul to south of St. Louis and therefore it is possible to 
characterize coeval paleoenvironments on a subcontinental scale. Professor 
Blake teaches Introductory Physical Geology, undergraduate Paleontology, and 
graduate courses in Paleoecology and Principles of Paleontology. Paleoecology 
includes field trips to Southern Illinois and Kentucky. 

ALBERT V. CAROZZI, Professor (M.S. 1947, University of Geneva; [Geology 
and Mineralogy] Dr.Sc. 1948, University of Geneva) - Sedimentary Petrography; 
Petroleum Geology 

Professor Carozzi supervises many graduate students in the department 
and at the request of one of his major research sponsors, PETROBRAS (The 
National Oil Company of Brazil) has recently worked with them in setting up 
and implementing a new educational venture which consists of an MS program 
by PETROBRAS in association with the Federal University of Ouro Preto (Minas 
Gerais). This program includes reservoir geology, structural geology, engineering 
geology and basin analysis. Professor Carozzi taught short courses dealing 
with the sedimentary petrography of carbonate and siliciclastic rocks, followed 
by their depositional models applied to oil exploration for the first phase of 
this program in Brazil. He is presently working on the second phase and the 
planning of a Ph.D. program. In addition to PETROBRAS research support, 
TEXACO USA is supporting microfacies work and experimental development 
of secondary porosity in carbonate rocks under simulated deep burial conditions 
with application to the Atokan of the Midland Basin and the Smackover of the 
Gulf Coast. 

CHU-YUNG CHEN, Assistant Professor (B.S. 1977, National Taiwan University, 
Ph.D. 1983, MIT) Trace Element Geochemistry; Isotope Geochemistry; Igneous 
Petrology 

Chu-Yung Chen joined the Department in August 1983 and is setting up a 
neutron activation laboratory and an isotope dilution laboratory for high quality 
trace-element and isotope analyses. Her research projects include: (1) The 
geochemical evolution of Haleakala volcano, East Maui. (2) Trace element 
variations of tholeiites, transitional basalts and alkalaic basalts from Mauna 
Kea volcano, Hawaii. (3) Rare-earth geochemistry of Hilina formation, Kilauea 
volcano, Hawaii. (4) Pb isotopic geochemistry of Loihi seamount. (5) Sr and 
Nd isotopes and trace element geochemistry of ultramafic nodules from Mt. 
Leura, Victoria, Australia. (6) Trace element studies and factor analyses of 
coal from Freeport and aerosol from Houston. (7) Petrological and geochemical 
studies of West Maui volcano. (8) Trace element and isotopic (Nd, Sr and Pd) 
studies of the transition from tholeiitic to alkalic volcanism on Hawaiian islands. 
(9) Geochemistry of high-MgO basalts from Hawaiian volcanoes. (10) Mineral 
chemistry of Hawaiian basalts. (11) Ophiolites from Cyprus. (1Z) Kimberlites 
and Carbonatites from Illinois. (13) Oxygen isotopic geochemistry of Hawaiian 
basalts. 



WANG-PING CHEN, Assistant Professor (B.S., National Taiwan University, 
1974, Ph.D., MIT, 1979) - Geophysics, Seismology, Tectonics 

The research activity of the earthquake seismology group centers around 
the quantitative understanding of large scale deformation of the lithosphere. 
The most important constraints are obtained from the precise determination 
of depth and source mechanism of earthquakes as well as the gravity and geoid 
anomalies derived from satellite altimetry observations. Dr. Chen's current 
research efforts include studying the relationship between seismic activity 
and the thermal-mechanical properties of the lithosphere, source kinematics 
of large earthquakes, and the role of strike-slip faulting in the evolution of 
regions of extensional tectonics. As a spin-off, a seismic study of the 
Azores-Gibraltar plate boundary is also funded by the NSF. The tectonic setting 
of this plate boundary is unique because of the presence of divergent, 
transcurrent, and convergent characteristics along a single boundary; the 
occurrence of ocean-ocean convergence apparently without a Benioff zone; 
and the transition from such convergence to continental collision. Dr. Chen 
was recently an invited speaker at the Regional Assembly of the International 
Association of Seismology and Physics of the Earth's Interior in India (1984) 
and visited the Himalaya as a part of his study on the quantitative aspects 
between seismicity and mountain building. 

STEPHEN GRAND, Assistant Professor [1986 appointment] (B.Sc. 1978, McGill 
University; PhD. 1985, Cal Tech) - Geophysics, Seismology 

Stephen Grand is interested in the elastic fine structure of the mantle. Using 
synthetic seismogram techniques to understand wave propagation in the mantle, 
shear waves from earthquakes can be used to determine structure. Using multiple 
bounce shear waves increases the resolution and applicability of the technique. 
Recently, using the synthetic seismogram technique, vertical shear profiles 
were developed for the Canadian shield, the western United States and the 
northwest Atlantic ocean, showing large differences to 400 km depth. Current 
research efforts are to derive fully three-dimensional models of the mantle 
shear structure beneath North America using the tomography technique, 
developing computer codes to make synthetic seismograms appropriate for 
propagation through laterally varying structure and investigating deep mantle 
structure beneath individual tectonic provinces on a world-wide scale. The 
ultimate goal of this research is to help answer questions such as how deep 
do continents extend, is the mantle layered and on what scale does convection 
occur in the earth. 

RICHARD L. HAY, Ralph E. Grim Professor of Geology (B.S. 1947, Northwestern 
University; M.S. 1949, Northwestern University; Ph.D. 1952, Princeton University) 
- Stratigraphy; Sedimentary Petrology 

Most of Professor Hay's work has been concentrated on the general fields 
of stratigraphy, paleo-environment of non-marine sediments, pedogenesis, silicate 
diagenesis, and volcaniclastic sedimentology. His present major research effort 
is on spring-related carbonate rocks and Mg-silicate clays (sepiolite, smectite 
and kerolite) that were chemically precipitated in a Pliocene lake basin in the 
Amargosa Desert of Nevada-California. By field and laboratory work he and 
his students are working out the distribution and paleoenvironments of the 
different types of carbonates and clays. A new research interest, developed 
at Illinois, is the diagenetic alteration of Ordovician Midcontinent tuffs to 
K-feldspar and K-bentonite. He is trying to determine when and under what 
conditions the K-feldspar and mixed-layer illite-smectite were formed. This 
research is in collaboration with Dennis Kolata of the Illinois Geological Survey. 



DONALD M. HENDERSON, Professor (A.B. 1943, Brown University; Ph.D. 1950, 
Harvard) - Mineralogy; Crystallography 

Professor Henderson's research interests are in the area of transmission 
electron microscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance study of the local structures 
of minerals. He teaches graduate and undergraduate classes in mineralogy, 
optical mineralogy, structural mineralogy and crystallography. 

ALBERT T. HSUI, Associate Professor (B.S. 1968, Lowell Technological Institute; 
M.S. 1969, Cornell University; Ph.D. 1972, Cornell University) - Geophysics; 
Mathematical Modelling; Geodynamics; Planetary Evolution and Borehole 
Seismology 

Dr. Hsui's research interests include: (a) Planetary differentiation and its 
effects on mantle evolution and mantle dynamics; (b) Magma dynamics and 
its relationship to the structure of igneous rocks; (c) investigations on the geo- 
dynamics at convergent plate boundaries and (d) a new project to study wave 
propagation around a borehole. Dr. Hsui teaches a general geology course for 
science and geology majors, exploration geophysics and two other graduate 
courses in Geodynamics and Mathematical Methods in Geology. 

W. HILTON JOHNSON, Associate Professor (A.B. 1956, Earlham College, M.S. 
1961, University of Illinois; Ph.D. 1962, University of Illinois) - Quaternary 
Stratigraphy; Glacial Geology 

Dr. Johnson is working on a project, supported by NASA through the Jet 
Propulsion Lab, to evaluate the use of Shuttle Imaging Radar-B data in the 
delineation and mapping of glacial geology and meltwater drainage landforms 
from central Illinois to central Ohio. The radar and other remote sensing data 
will be integrated with ongoing stratigraphic and sedimentologic studies in making 
interpretations of the dynamics and interactions of some of the major lobes 
and sublobes along the southern margin of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Graduate 
students under Johnson's supervision are working on a variety of projects 
including: Quaternary geology and glacial sedimentology in the Precambrian 
shield terraine of south-central Ontario, late Pleistocene and Holocene fluvial 
geomorphology, stratigraphy and sedimentology of the lower Illinois River valley 
region, provenance of Illinoian and pre-Illinoian tills in south-central Illinois, 
and late Quaternary geology of the Napoleon Hollow Archeological site, Illinois 
River valley. Dr. Johnson teaches Introduction to the Study of the Earth, Glacial 
Geology, Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology. Field trips taken locally 
and to central Wisconsin emphasize glacial geology and stratigraphy, to central 
and southwestern Illinois focus on glacial stratigraphy, paleosols, late Pleistocene 
and Holocene fluvial geomorphology and alluvial stratigraphy; trips to Indiana 
emphasize glacial and bedrock geomorphology of the karst plain near Bedford. 

R. JAMES KIRKPATRICK, Professor (B.S. 1968, Cornell University; Ph.D. 1972, 
University of Illinois) - Igneous and Experimental Petrology, NMR Spectroscopy 

For several years Professor Kirkpatrick's research has centered on the use 
of magic-angle sample-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MASS 
NMR) in examining the structures of silicate crystals and glasses (quenched 
melts). One aim of this work is to better understand the thermodynamic, 
mechanical, and crystallization behavior of lava and magma and thereby the 
origin, evolution, and crystallization of igneous rocks. Another major objective 
is to use MASS NMR to examine the structure of crystalline phases that are 
too fine grained to be examined by single crystal x-ray or neutron diffraction 
such as clay minerals. This research program is being conducted in collaboration 
with Prof. Eric Oldfield of the School of Chemical Sciences, Professor D.M. 
Henderson and students and post-doctoral fellows in both Geology and Chemistry. 
Professor Kirkpatrick teaches Igneous and Metamorphic Petrography, Igneous 
Petrology (Graduate Level) and Geochemical Kinetics. 

8 



GEORGE deVRIES KLEIN, Professor (B.A. 1954, Wesleyan University; M.A. 
1957, University of Kansas; Ph.D. I960, Yale University) Sedimentology; Marine 
Geology; Sandstone Petrology and Diagenesis; Petroleum Geology of Clastic 
Reservoirs; Basin Analysis 

Dr. Klein's research interests are focused on several topics. These include 
(1) Paleogeographic distribution of depositional systems through time, (2) Analysis 
of the timing of depositional systems and sandstone diagenetic events to the 
geodynamic and tectonic evolution of sedimentary basins, (3) Correlation of 
sedimentological, tectonic and volcanic events in back-arc basins of the western 
Pacific, and (4) Understanding processes of sedimentation, preservation potential 
and mass balancing of terrigenous sediments delivered from continents to ocean 
basins. This last project involves analysis of changing turbidite sedimentation 
history in submarine fans to changes in continental sediment yield, uplift rate 
and denudation rate, and comparing such data to petrologic data so as to ascertain 
the role of weathering history, sea level change and tectonics to preservation 
potential of marine sediments. Analysis of sedimentary basins has focused 
on back-arc basins and cratonic basins and devising solutions for recognizing 
ancient basins of controversial origin. Paleogeographic analysis has focused 
on storm and tidal sedimentary systems. 

RALPH L. LANGENHEIM, JR., Professor (B.S. Geol. Engineering 1943, University 
of Tulsa; M.S. 1947, University of Colorado; Ph.D. 1951, University of Minnesota) 
- Stratigraphy, Paleontology, Field Geology, Geology of Energy, Coal 

Professor Langenheim's research centers on Pennsylvanian stratigraphy 
and biostratigraphy in the Illinois Basin and southern Nevada. Presently major 
effort is being devoted to determining brachiopod ranges in the Arrow Canyon, 
Nevada section which has been proposed for several regional and/or world 
stratotypes. Study of latest Chesterian and early Atokan brachiopods is planned 
for the immediate future as well as regional study of Atokan and Desmoinesian 
stratigraphy and biostratigraphy in the southern part of the Cordilleran 
Miogeocline. He teaches History of the Earth, Geology of Energy and Field 
Geology at the elementary level; Principles of Stratigraphy at the intermediate 
level and graduate courses in Stratigraphy. He is Director of the Summer Geology 
Field Camp which is held in Wyoming. 

C. JOHN MANN, Professor (B.S. 1953, University of Kansas; M.S. 1957, University 
of Kansas; Ph.D. 1961, University of Wisconsin) - Stratigraphy; Mathematical 
Geology; Petroelum Geology 

Professor Mann's mathematical geology research work, sponsored by Sandia 
National Laboratories, attempts to determine probabilities and probability density 
functions of natural geological events and processes in order to more accurately 
predict hazards accompanying long-term storage of nuclear waste materials. 
Dr. Mann is also examining the evolution of stratigraphic sequences in an effort 
to more accurately determine periodicities and cyclicities which are known 
to be present as well as to perhaps detect new ones which previously have gone 
undetected. He teaches Geology for Engineers, General Geology, and Principles 
of Stratigraphy. These courses include field trips to southern Indiana, Upper 
Wabash River Valley and San Salvador Island, Bahamas. Studies in the Bahamas 
are on algal structures in a brackish to hypersaline lake in an attempt to relate 
structures and lack of structures in the mounds to environmental conditions 
under which they are growing. 

STEPHEN MARSHAK, Assistant Professor (A.B. 1976, Cornell University; M.S. 
1979, University of Arizona; Ph.D. 1983, Columbia University) - Structural 
Geology and Tectonics 

Dr. Marshak's current research focuses on field analysis of structural geometry 
and fabrics in fold-thrust belts and in poly-phase deformed metamorphic terranes. 

9 



This work presently involves studies in two regions: the Appalachian foreland 
in New York State and the Sonoran desert of western Arizona. His work on 
oroclinal bending in the Appalachians is currently being funded by the National 
Science Foundation. Conditional on funding, Dr. Marshak anticipates beginning 
a new project (with D.E. Anderson) on basement geology of the Transantarctic 
Mountains. Student theses in structural geology and tectonics (some of which 
are shared with D.E. Anderson) at the University of Illinois are on topics such 
as: structures of the Appalachian fold-thrust belt near Kingston, New York; 
polyphase deformation of Mesozoic strata in the Granite Wash Mountains, 
Arizona; mylonite evolution in the Buckskin Mountains, Arizona; petrographic 
and geochemical changes occuring during deformation of limestone; shear zone 
development in mafic dikes of northwest Scotland. Dr. Marshak's teaching 
responsibilities include: introductory structure, advanced structure, and 
geotectonics. Course field trips have run to northern Michigan, central Wisconsin, 
and eastern Tennessee. Two new courses are anticipated: Tectonics of the 
southern Cordillera (with D.E. Anderson), and Rock rheology (with J.D. Bass 
and W.-P. Chen). 

ALBERTO S. NIETO, Associate Professor (B.S. 1961, San Marcos University; 
M.S. 1963, Washington University; Ph.D. 1974, University of Illinois) - Engineering 
Geology; Applied Rock Mechanics 

Dr. Nieto's main professional interests are applied rock mechanics and the 
geotechnical characterization of large engineering sites such as hydroelectric 
projects, underground storage caverns, waste disposal sites, surface and 
underground mines, major highways, foundations for large structures and others. 
He is presently supervising Ph.D. theses on shear strength of soil-filled 
discontinuities in rock masses and the analysis of a new model for slope failures 
that involves a combination of toppling and sliding. Dr. Nieto teaches Geology 
for Engineers, Principles of Engineering Geology and Practice of Engineering 
Geology at undergraduate and graduate levels; he also holds a joint appointment 
in the Civil Engineering Department. 

PHILIP A. SANDBERG, Professor (B.S. cum laude I960; M.S. 1961, Louisiana 
State University. Fil. Lie, 1964; Fil. Dr., 1965 University of Stockholm) - 
Carbonate Sedimentology; Micropaleontology; Historical Geology 

Professor Sandberg's current research is in part on the temporal variation 
in non-skeletal carbonate mineralogy and its relationship to plate-tectonically 
mediated chemical changes in the ocean, particularly pCO;>. Another major 
research effort is devoted to the study of microcrystalline limestones, including 
the role of cementation and compaction in lime mud diagenesis, and temporal 
and environmental variations in lime mud diagenesis and precursor carbonate 
mud types. Professor Sandberg teaches Carbonate Sedimentology, the SEM 
portion of Microbeam Analysis (SEM and electron microprobe), Micropaleontology, 
and an Intersession field course entitled "Introduction to Modern Marine 
Carbonate Environments" This field group looks at Florida Cenozoic carbonates 
in the panhandle area, along the west coast and around Miami, then goes to 
the Florida Keys region to study modern equivalents of ancient carbonates. 



10 




Nina Grimison, a graduate student in geophysics, calibrating a portable seismo- 
graph. The globe shows her thesis area in the eastern Atlantic. 



11 



RECENTLY FUNDED PROJECTS 
Principal Investigator Title 



Agency 



Thomas F. Anderson 



Jay D. Bass 



Craig Bethke 



Chu-Yung Chen 



Wang-Ping Chen 



Burial of Organic Carbon and Sulfur 
in Cretaceous Marine Sediments: 
Mass and Isotopic Balances 

Mineral Elasticity by Brillouin 
Scattering 



Paleohydrologic Modeling of 
Sedimentary Basins 

Techniques of Hydrologic Modeling 

Chemical Kinetics of Diagenetic 
Reactions 



Petrological and Geochemical 
Study of the Evolution of West 
Maui Volcano 

A Study of Intracontinental and 
Intraplate Intermediate Depth 
(Sub-Crustal) Earthquakes 

A Seismic Study of the Azores- 
Gibralter Plate Boundary 



Interlobate Comparison of Glacial- 
Depositional Style as Evidenced by 
Small-Relief Glacial Landscape 
Features, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio, 
Utilizing Shuttle Imaging Radar-B 



R. James Kirkpatrick Kinetics of Igneous Processes 



High-Resolution NMR Spectroscopy 
of Geologically Important Crystals 
and Glasses 

Study of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 
(NMR) Spectroscopy of Solids 

Study of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 
(NMR) Spectroscopy of Solids 



W. Hilton Johnson 



National 
Science 
Foundation 

National 

Science 

Foundation 

ARCO 



TEXACO 

EXXON 

Production 

Research 

National 

Science 

Foundation 

National 

Science 

Foundation 

National 

Science 

Foundation 

National 
Aeronautics 
& Space 
Administration 



National 

Science 

Foundation 



Sandia 

National 

Laboratories 



12 



Principal Investigator 



Title 



Agency 



George deV. Klein 



Synthesis of Back-Arc Basin Sedimen- 
tology Based on DSDP/IPOD Drilling 



National 

Science 

Foundation 



Stephen Marshak 



Kingston Arc of Eastern New York: National 

Structural Geometry, Strain and Science 

Tectonic Significance of an Foundation 
Oroclinal Bend in the Appalachians 



Philip A. Sandberg 



Original Mineralogy in Micrites: 
Genetic and Diagenetic Implica- 
tions 



National 

Science 

Foundation 



Original Mineralogy in Micrites: 
Genetic and Diagenetic Implica- 
tions 



American 
Chemical 
Society 
Petroleum 
Research Fund 



Original Mineralogy in Micrites: 
Genetic and Diagenetic Implica- 
tions 



AMOCO 



13 




The stable Isotope Geochemistry Laboratory. Kyung Sik Woo is working on 
a vacuum extracts line. Professor Tom Anderson, Linda Bonnell and Brian 
Popp ponder the output of a mass spectrometer. 



14 



LIST OF PUBLICATIONS 1984-1985 

Geophysics/Structural Geology/Tectonics/Engineering Geology 

Books and Articles 

Anderson, D. L. and J. D. Bass, 1984. Mineralogy and Composition of the 
upper mantle: Geophys. Res. Lett., v. 11, p. 637-640. 

Bass, J. D., 1984. Elasticity of single-crystal SmA10 3 , GdA10 3 and ScA10 3 
perovskites: Phys. Earth. Planet. Interiors, v. 36, p. 145-156. 

Bass, J. D. and D. L. Anderson, 1984, Composition of the upper mantle: 
geophysical tests of two petrological models: Geophys. Res. Lett. , v. 11, 
p. 237-240. 

Bass, J. D., and D. J. Weidner, 1984. Elasticity of single-crystal orthoferro- 
silite: J. Geophys. Res., v. 89, p. 4359-4372. 

Bass, J. D., D. Schmitt and T. J. Ahrens, 1984. Holographic in-situ stress 
measurements. Geophys. J. R. Astr. Soc, in press. 

Sasaki, S., C. T. Prewitt, J. D. Bass and W. A. Schulze, 1984. The space 
group and crystal structure of orthorhombic perovskites CaTi0 3 and CdTi0 3 . 
Acta. Cryst. B, Submitted. 

Molnar, P., and W.-P. Chen, 1984. S-P wave travel time residuals and 
lateral inhomogeneity in the mantle beneath Tibet and the Himalaya. J. 
Geophys. Res., v. 89, p. 6911-6917. 

Nabelek, J. L., W.-P. Chen, and H. Ye, 1984. The Tangshan, North China, 
earthquake sequence of 1976: A complicated multiple rupture and its tectonic 
implications. Submitted to J. Geophy. Res. 

Huang, J., and W.-P. Chen, 1985. Source mechanisms of the Mogod 
earthquake sequence of 1967 and the event of July 4, 1974 in Mongolia. 
Submitted to Bull. Seism. Soc. Am. 

Grimison, N., and W.-P. Chen, 1985. The Azores-Gibraltar plate boundary: 
Focal mechanisms, depths of earthquakes, and their tectonic implications. 
Submitted to J. Geophys. Res. 

Grimison, N., G. Karner, W.-P. Chen, and J. Weissel, 1985. A diffuse zone 
of ocean-ocean convergence: Gravity and geoid signitures of the Horseshoe 
Seamounts. Submitted to Tectonics. 

Hsui, A. T., B. D. Marsh and M. N. Toksoz, 1984. On melting of the subducted 
oceanic crust. Tectonophysics, v. 99, p. 207-221. 

Sawyer, D. S., A. T. Hsui and M. N. Toksoz, 1985. Subsidence and thermal 
history resulting from middle Miocene extension in the Los Angeles Basin. 
Submitted to Tectonophysics. 



15 



Hsui, A. T. and N. Riahi, 1985. Onset of double-diffusive convection with 
crystallization. Submitted to Int. J. of Eng. Sci. 

Hsui, A. T. and M. N. Toksoz, 1985. A model for tube wave attentuation 
and its application to the determination of in-situ formation permeability. 
In preparation. 

Marshak, S., 1985. Structure and tectonic setting of the Hudson Valley 
Fold-Thrust Belt, New York: A buckled thrust system. Geol. Soc. Am. 
Bull, (in press). 

Laubach, S.E., and Marshak, S., Pattern of faulting developed during 
extension of crystalline basement, northwest Scotland: In preparation 
for J. Geol. Soc. London. 

Marshak, S., and T. Engelder, 1985. The development of cleavage in 
limestones of a fold-thrust belt in eastern New York. J. Struc. Geol. (in 
press). 

Engelder, T., and S. Marshak, 1985. Disjunctive cleavage formed at shallow 
depths in sedimentary rocks. J. Struc. Geol. (in press). 

Marshak, S., and T. Engelder, 1985. The deformed Lower Devonian strata 
of the Hudson Valley, west of Catskill, New York. Geol. Soc. Am., DNAG 
Centennial Field Guide, (in press). 

Nieto, A. S., D. Stump and D. G. Russell, 1984. A mechanism for sinkhole 
development above brine cavities in the Windsor-Detroit area, Procs. 6th 
Intern. Symp. on Silt, v. II, p. 1063-1092. 

Nieto, A. S. and D. C. Russell, 1984. Sinkhole development in Windsor Detroit 
solution mines and the role of downward mass transfer in subsidence, In 
Situ, Quarterly, v. 8, p. 293-3 27. 

Nieto, A. S. and P. K. Mathews, 1985. Moment-driven deformation of rock 
slopes. Procs. 36th Symp. Highway Geology; Purdue University, West 
Lafayette, IN, 12 p. 

Nieto, A. S. and C. Zambak, 1985. Design of rock slopes susceptible to 
toppling, Sect. 9, Chapter in Handbook of Civil Engineering, Technomics 
Pull. Co., P. N. Sheremisenoff, N. P. Sheeremisenoff, S. L. Cheng, editors. 

Abstracts 

Bass, J. D. and D. L. Anderson, 1983. Mantle compositions and mineral 
elasticity. Trans. Am. Geophys. Union, v. 64, p. 848. 

Bass, J. D. and D. L. Anderson, 1984. Geophysical tests of two chemical 
models for the Earth's upper mantle. Abstracts, Lunar Planet. Sci. Confer. 
XV, March 12-16, 1984, p. 38-39. 

Bass, J. D., C. Chang, B. Svendsen and T. J. Ahrens, 1984. Temperature 
measurements of shock-compressed iron. Trans. Am. Geophys. Union, 
v. 65, p. 1090. 



16 



Anderson, D. L., and J. D. Bass, 1984. The seismic structure and mineralogy 
of the upper mantle transition region. Trans. Am. Geophys. Union, v. 65, 
p. 999. 

Schmitt, D. , J. D. Bass and T. J. Ahrens, 1984. Holographic In-situ stress 
measurements. Trans. Am. Geophys. Union, v. 65, p. 1102. 

Huang, J., and W.-P. Chen, 1984. Source mechanism of the Mogod earthquake 
sequence of January, 1967 in Mongolia. EOS Trans. A.G.U., v. 65, p. Z41. 

Chen, W.-P. and P. Molnar, 1984. Seismic wave velocity structure beneath 
the Tibetan plateau: A summary of constraints from regional and teleseismic 
observations. Abstract, Regional Assembly of the International Association 
of Seismology and Physics of the Earth's Interior, National Geophysical 
Research Institute, Hyderabad, India. 

Grimison, N., and W.-P. Chen, Source mechanisms of earthquakes and the 
present-day tectonics along the Azores Gibraltar plate boundary, EOS Trans. 
A.G.U., 66, 1985. 

Karner, G. D., N. L. Grimison, W.-P. Chen, and J. K. Weissel, SEASAT 
derived gravity and geoid anomalies of the Azores-Gibraltar plate boundary: 
A diffused zone of ocean-ocean convergence near Gibraltar, ibid, 1985. 

Chen, W.-P., Sub-crustal earthquakes beneath the Shillong plateau and 
their tectonic implications, ibid, 1985. 

Hsui, A. T., 1984. A preliminary dynamic model for planetary differentiation. 
Lunar and Planetary Science Conf. XV, Houston, Texas, p. 383-384. 

Hsui, A. T., 1984. Crustal differentiation and mantle evolution. EOS Amer. 
Geophys. Un. Trans., v. 65, p. 27 2. 

Marshak, S., P. Kwiecinski, D. McEachran, and J. Tabor, 1985. Structural 
geometry of the "Orocline" in the Appalachian foreland, near Kingston, 
New York. Geol. Soc. Am. Abst., w. Pgms., v. 17, p. 53. 

Marshak, S., 1985. Evidence for a buckled thrust system in the northern 
Appalachian fold-thrust belt, New York. Geol. Soc. Am. Abst. w. Pgms. 

Marshak, S., D.E. Anderson, and S. Laubach, 1985. Modes of fracture 
propagation and rock-water interaction in extensional terranes: (in) 
"Conference on extensional tectonics," Durham, England. 

Marshak, S., T. Engelder, and S. Bhagat, 1985. Mechanism of 
cleavage-parallel extension in lime wackestone. "Conference on structures 
of sedimentary rocks," London, England. 

Laubach, S. E., S. J. Reynolds, J. E. Spencer, and S. Marshak, 1984. Polyphase 
deformation history of Mesozoic metasedimentary rocks in western Arizona: 
Geol. Soc. Am. Abst. w. Pgms., v. 16, p. 570. 

Marshak, S., and T. Engelder, 1984. Development, distribution and evolution 

of cleavage in a fold-thrust belt in eastern New York State. Int. Conf. 

on multiple deformation & foliation development, Bermagui, Australia, 

p. 2. 

17 



Petrology/Mineralogy/Geochemistry/Hydrogeology 

Books and Articles 

Westgate, L. M. and T. F. Anderson, 1984. Isotopic evidence for the origin 
of sulfur in the Herrin (No. 6) Coal Member of Illinois. Intl. J. Coal Geology, 
v. 4, p. 1-20. 

Steinmetz, J. C. and T. F. Anderson, 1984. The significance of isotopic 
and paleontologic results on Quaternary calcareous nannofossil assemblages 
from Caribbean core P6304-4. Mar. Micropaleo., v. 8, p. 403-424. 

Bethke, C. M., and R. C. Reynolds, 1985. Recursive method for determining 
frequency factors in interstratified clay diffraction calculations, Clays 
and Clay Minerals. 

Bethke, C. M., 1985. A numerical model of compaction-driven groundwater 
flow and heat transfer and its application to the paleohydrology of 
intracratonic sedimentary basins. J. Geophys. Research. 

Bethke, C. M., in review. Hydrologic constraints on genesis of the Upper 
Mississippi Valley Mineral District from Illinois Basin brines. 

Bethke, C. M., N. Vergo, and S. P. Altaner, in review. Pathways of smectite 
illitization. 

Bethke, C. M., and S. P. Altaner, in review. A layer-by-layer mechanism 
of smectite illitization and application to a new rate law. 

Roscoe, B. A., C.-Y. Chen, and P. K. Hopke, 1984. Comparison of the target 
transformation factor analysis of coal composition data with x-ray diffraction 
analysis. Analytica Chimica Acta, v. 160, p. 121-134. 

Staudigel, H., A. Zindler, S. R. Hart, T. Leslie, C.-Y. Chen and D. Clague, 

1984. The isotopic systematics of a juvenile intraplate volcano: Pb, Nd, 
and Sr isotope ratios of basalts from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii. Earth. Planet. 
Sci. Lett., v. 69, p. 13-29. 

Chen, C.-Y. and F. A. Frey, 1985. Trace element and isotope Geochemistry 
of Haleakala volcanic series, East Maui: Implications to the origin of 
Hawaiian basalts, J. Geophys. Res. 

Kuo, L.-C, and R. J. Kirkpatrick, 1985. Kinetics of crystal dissolution 
in the system forsterite-diopside-silica. Am. J. Sci., 285, 51-90. 

Kirkpatrick, R. J., R. A. Kinsey, K. A. Smith, D. M. Henderson, and E. 

Oldfield, 1985. High-resolution solid-state sodium-23, aluminum-27, and 

silicon-29 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic reconnaissance of 
alkali and plagioclase feldspars. Am. Min., v. 70. 

Kinsey, R. A., R. J. Kirkpatrick, J. Hower, K. A. Smith, and E. Oldfield, 

1985. High-resolution aluminum-27 and silicon-29 nuclear magnetic resonance 
spectroscopic study of layer silicates, including clay minerals. Am. Min., 
v. 70. 



18 



Oldfield, E., and R. J. Kirkpatrick, 1985. High-resolution NMR of inorganic 
solids. Science, 277, 1537-1544. 

Kirkpatrick, R. J., T. Dunn, S. Schramm, K. A. Smith, Oestrike, R., and 
Turner, G., 1985. Magic-angle sample-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance 
spectroscopy of silicate glasses: a review. Structure and Bonding in Glass, 
Walrafen, G., and Revez, A., eds., Nat. Bureau of Stds. 

Kirkpatrick, R. J., K. A. Smith, S. Schramm, G. Turner, and W.-H. Yang, 
1985. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of minerals. 
Ann. Rev. of Earth and Planetary Sci., v. 13. 

Yang, W.-H., R. J. Kirkpatrick, T. Emilsson, N. Vergo, J. McHone, and 
E. Oldfield, 1985. Detection of high-pressure silica polymorphs in whole-rock 
samples from meteor impact sites using solid-state silicon-29 nuclear 
magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Meteoritics, in press. 

Kirkpatrick, R. J., K. A. Smith, E. Oldfield, and R. Oestrike, 1985. High- 
resolution aluminum-27 and silicon-29 NMR spectroscopy of glasses and 
crystals along the join CaMgSi^O^, - CaA^O^. Am. Min., in press. 

Goodman, B. A., J. D. Russell, B. Montez, E. Oldfield, and R. J. Kirkpatrick, 
1985. Structural studies of imogolite and allophanes by aluminum-27 and 
silicon-29 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Phys. Chem. Minerals, 
in press. 

Turner, G., K. A. Smith, R. J. Kirkpatrick, and E. Oldfield, 1985. Boron-11 
nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of borate and borosilicate 
minerals and a borosilicate glass. J. Mag. Res., submitted 

Yang, W.-H., R. J. Kirkpatrick, and D. M. Henderson, 1985. High-resolution 
silicon-29, aluminum-27, and sodium-23 nuclear magnetic resonance 
spectroscopic study of aluminum-silicon disordering in annealed albite 
and oligoclase. Am. Min., submitted. 

Kirkpatrick, R. J., R. A. Kinsey, K. A. Smith, D. M. Henderson, and E. 
Oldfield, 1985. High resolution solid-state sodium-23, aluminum-27, and 
silicon-29 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic reconnaissance of 
alkali and plagioclase feldspars. Amer. Mineralogist, v. 70, p. 106-123. 

Abstracts 

Bonnell, L. M. and T. F. Anderson, 1984. Sulfur isotopic variations in 
Cretaceous green and black shales. Geol. Soc. Am., 1984 Annual Meetings, 
p. 449. 

Bethke, C. M., J. D. Pruitt, and M. H. Barrows, 1984. Petrographic, 
geochemical, and paleohydrologic evidence of the nature of petroleum 
migration in the Illinois Basin. Amer. Assoc. Petrol. Geol. Bulletin, v. 
68, p. 454. 

Bethke, C. M., S. P. Altaner, and N. Vergo, 1984. A layer-by-layer mechanism 
of smectite illitization and its application to a new rate law. Clay Minerals 
Soc. Ann. Mtg., invited paper. 

19 



Chen, C.-Y., M. O. Garcia, and F. A. Frey, 1984. The Role of crystal 
fractionation in the Haleakala Volcanic Series - Major and Trace Element 
Constraints. E.O.S. Trans. AGU, v. 65, p. 1131. 

Frey, F. A., C.-Y. Chen, M. Roden, and A. Kennedy, 1985. Utilization of 
geochemistry to understand the origin of the Hawaiian islands. The Am. 
Nuclear. Soc, Annual Meeting, Boston. 

Schramm, S., E. Oldfield, and R. J. Kirkpatrick, 1984. High-Resolution 
Solid-State Oxygen-17 NMR Spectroscopy of Oxides and Silicates. Am. 
Geophys. Union, Spring 1984 Meeting. 

Smith, K. A., E. Oldfield, R. J. Kirkpatrick, D. M. Henderson, and R. 
Oestrike, 1984. Correlation of Silicon-29 NMR Chemical Shift and Crystal 
Structure Parameters for Crystalline Silicates. Am. Geophys. Union, Spring 
1984 Meeting. 

Kirkpatrick, R. J., D. M. Henderson, R. Oestrike, L. Rowan, R. A. Kinsey, 
K. A. Smith, B. Montez, and E. Oldfield, 1984. High-Resolution 27 A1 NMR 
Spectroscopy of Crystalline Aluminosilicates. Am. Geophys. Union, Spring 
1984 Meeting. 

Turner, G. L., K.A. Smith, E. Oldfield and R. J. Kirkpatrick, 1984. High 
resolution solid state Boron-11 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy 
of crystalline Borate and Borosilicate minerals and model compounds. Am. 
Geophys. Union, Spring 1984 Meeting. 

Oestrike, R., R. J. Kirkpatrick, 1984. Silicate glass structure in the system 
Anorthite-Diopside-Forsterite: A high resolution solid state NMR study. 
Am. Geophys. Union, Spring 1984 Meeting. 

Yang, W.-H., R. J. Kirkpatrick and E. Oldfield. High-resolution 23 Na, 
2 ' Al, and 2 "Si NMR spectroscopy of Al/Si disordering in annealed albite. 
Am. Geophys. Union, Spring 1984 Meeting. 

McHone, J., T. Emilsson, W.-H. Yang, R.J. Kirkpatrick, N. Vergo, and E. 
Oldfield, 1984. Coesite and Stishovite detected in natural concentrations 
by solid-state silicon-Z9 nuclear magnetic resonance. 1984 Meteorites 
Society Ann. Meeting, Albequerque, NM. 

Oestrike, R., W.-H. Yang, R. J. Kirkpatrick, E. Oldfield, B. Montez, A. 
Navrotsky, and R. Hervig, 1985. Investigation of framework-stoichiometry 
aluminosilicate glasses using silicon-29 and aluminum-27 MASS NMR 
spectroscopy. Am. Geophys. Union, Spring 1985 Meeting. 

Weiss, C. A., Jr., R. J. Kirkpatrick, and T. Dunn, 1985. Aluminum-27 and 
silicon-29 NMR spectroscopy of peraluminous gels. Am. Geophys. Union, 
Spring 1985 Meeting. 

Turner, G. L., K. A. Smith, E. Oldfield and R. J. Kirkpatrick, 1985. Structure 
and cation effect on phosphorus-31 NMR chemical shift and anisotropy 
of model and mineral orthophosphates. Am. Geophys. Union, Spring 1985 
Meeting. 



20 



Yang, W.-H., R. J. Kirkpatrick, G. L. Turner, and E. Oldfield, 1985. 
Phosphorus-31 and aluminum-Z7 NMR spectroscopy of alumino-silicate 
glasses. Am. Geophys. Union, Spring 1985 Meeting. 

Sedimentary Geology/Stratigraphy/Paleontology/Geomorphology 

Books and Articles 

Blake, D. B., 1985. The Benthopectinidae (Asteroidea: Echinodermata) of 
the Jurassic of Switzerland. Eel. Geol. Helv. v. 77(3) p. 631-647. 

Blake, D. B., 1985. Some post-Paleozoic sea stars (Asteroidea: 
Echinodermata) suggesting slow rates of evolution. J. Paleont. (in press). 

Blake, D. B., 1984. Constructional morphology and life habits of the Jurassic 
sea star Sphaeraster Quenstedt. N. Jb. Geol. Palaont. abh., v. 169(1) p. 
74-101. 

Carozzi, A. V., 1984. Glaciology and the Ice Age. Jour. Geol. Education, 
v. 32 (3), p. 158-170. 

Carozzi, A. V. and B. Wolff, 1984. Microfacies, depositional environments, 
and diagenesis of the Amapa carbonates (Paleocene-Middle Miocene), Foz 
do Amazonas Basin, offshore N.E. Brazil. Petrobras-Cenpes, Ciencia, 
Tecnica, Petroleo, v. 13, 103 p., 17 plates. 

Carozzi, A. V. and R. T. Bertani, 1984. Microfacies, depositional models 
and diagenesis of Lagoa Feia Formation (Lower Cretaceous), Campos Basin, 
offshore Brazil: Petrobras-Cenpes, Ciencia, Tecnica Petroleo, v. 14, 104 
p., 25 plates. 

Carozzi, A. V. and D.C. Ward, 1984. Geology Emerging, a catalog illustrating 
the history of geology (1500-1850) from a collection in the Library of the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Robert B. Downs Publication 
Fund No. 8, U of I Library and the Graduate School of Library and Informa- 
tion Science, 565 p., 106 figures. 

Carozzi, A. V. and I. Diaby, 1984. The St. Louis Limestone (Middle Mississip- 
pian) of Illinois Basin, U.S.A. - A carbonate ramp-bar-platform model. 
Archieves Sciences Geneve, v. 37 (2), p. 123-169. 

Carozzi, A. V. and Jila Banaee, 1984. Bailey Limestone (Lower Devonian) 
of Southwestern Illinois: a carbonate turbidite. Trans. Illinois Acad. 
Sciences, v. 77 (3-4), p. 271-282. 

Carozzi, A. V. and R. T. Bertani, 1985. Lagoa Feia Formation (Lower Cretac- 
eous), Campos Basin, offshore Brazil: rift stage lacustrine carbonate 
reservoirs. Part I. Jour. Pet. Geol., v. 8(1), p. 37-58. 

Bowman, H., F. H. Stross, F. Asaro, R. L. Hay, R. F. Heizer, and H. V. 
Michel, 1984. The northern Colossus of Memnon: new slants. Archaeometry, 
v. 26, p. 218-229. 



21 



Hay, R. L., and R. K. Stoessell, 1984. Sepiolite in the Amboseli Basin of 
Kenya: a new interpretation. hi Singer, A., and Galan, E. (eds.) Palygorskite — 
sepiolite occurrences, genesis and uses. Elsevier Developments in Sedimen- 
tology No. 37., p. 125-136. 

Johnson, W. H. Stratigraphy and correlation of the glacial deposits of the 
Lake Michigan Lobe prior to 14,000 B.P. Submitted as chapter in IGCP 
Project 24, Quaternary glaciations in the northern heimisphere. 

Johnson, W. EL, A. K. Hansel, L. R. Follmer, 1985. Wedron Section, Wedron, 
Illinois - Concepts of Woodfordian glaciation in Illinois m. Decade of North 
American Geology - Centennial Field Guides, GSA (in press). 

Johnson, W. H., A. K. Hansel, B. A. Socha, L. R. Follmer and J. M. Masters, 
1985, Depositional environments and correlation problems of the Wedron 
Formation (Wisconsinnan), northeastern Illinois: North-central Section, 
GSA Field Trip, Illinois State Geological Survey Guidebook, 16, 91 p. 

Klein, G. deV., 1984. Relative rates of tectonic uplift as determined from 
episodic turbidite deposition in marine basins. Geology., v. 12, p. 48-50. 

Klein, G. deV. and Y.I. Lee, 1984. A preliminary assessment of geodynamic 
controls on depositional systems and sandstone diagenesis in back-arc basins, 
western Pacific Ocean. Tectonophysics, v. 102, p. 119-152. 

Klein, G. deV., 1984. Sedimentary structures, hi Heath, G. R., editor, 1984, 
Sedimentology, physical properties and geochemistry in the Initial Reports 
of the Deep Sea Drilling Project, v. 1-44: an Overview: World Data Center 
A for Marine Geology and Geophysics Rept. MCG-1, p. 27-61. 

Klein, G. deV., 1984. Vertical sequences and log shapes of major sandstone 
reservoir systems (Chart): Boston, MA, IHRDC Pub. Co. (Wall Chart). 

Klein, G. deV., 1985. The control of depositional depth, tectonic uplift 
and volcanism on sedimentation processes in the back-arc basins of the 
western Pacific Ocean. Jour. Geol., v. 93, p. 1-25. 

Marsaglia, K. M. and Klein, G. deV., 1985. The paleogeography of Paleozoic 
and Mesozoic storm depositional systems: A Reply. Jour. Geol., v. 93, 
p. 91-94. 

Klein, G. deV., 1985. Intertidal flats and intertidal sand bodies: hi Davis, 
R. A., Jr., editor, 1985. Coastal sedimentary environments, 2nd ed. New 
York, Springer-Verlag, p. 187-224. 

Klein, G. deV., 1985. Sedimentation patterns in relation to rifting, arc 
volcanism, and tectonic uplift in back-arc basins of the western Pacific 
Ocean: hi Kobayashi, K., and Uyeda, S., editors, Proceedings of the OJI 
Conference on continental margins. Tokyo, Terra Sci. Pub. Co. (in press). 

Klein, G. deV., 1985. Sandstone depositional models for exploration for 
fossil fuels, 3rd ed. Boston, IHRDC Publishing Co., 209 p. 

Klein, G. deV. The frequency and periodicity of preserved turbidites in 
submarine fans as a quantitative record of tectonic uplift in collision zones. 
Tectonophysics (in press, 1985). 



22 



Haslett, J. M., Johnston, J. M. and Langenheim, R. L., Jr., Geology of the 
Wamp Spring Area, Hayford Peak Quadrangle, Clark County, Nevada, Earth 
Sci. Bull., v. 13, no. 3-4 and v. 14, nos. 1-4, p. 19-23. 

Webster, G. D. and R. L. Langenheim, Jr. Atokan stratigraphy of the south- 
ern Cordilleran Miogeosyncline and adjacent shelf platform, southeastern 
California to northwestern Nevada, p. 123-131 jn Sutherland, P. K. and Manger, 
W. L. (eds.), The Atokan Series (Pennsylvanian) and its boundaries — a 
symposium, Okla. Geol. Survey Bull., v. 136, 198 p. 

Langenheim, R. L., Jr., Webster, G. D. and Weibel, C. P., Atokan rocks 
of the Bird Spring Group Arrow Canyon, Clark County, Nevada, p. 133-156 
in Sutherland, P. K. and Manger, W. L. (eds.), Atokan Series (Pennsylvanian) 
and its boundaries — a symposium, Okla. Geol. Survey Bull. v. 136, 198 p. 

Webster, G. D., Gordon, Mackenzie, Langenheim, R. L., Jr. and henry, 
T. W., Road logs for the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian boundary in the Eastern 
Great Basin: Salt Lake City, Utah to Las Vegas, Nevada, p. 1-74 in Lintz, 
Joseph, Jr. (ed), Western Geological Excursions, v. 1, Geol. Soc. Amer., 
1984 Ann'l Mtg., Reno, Nev., Dept. Geol. Sci., Mackay School of Mines, 
Univ., Nev. Reno., 281 p. 

Webster, G. D., P. Brenckle, M. Gordon, H. R. Lane, R. L. Langenheim, 
Jr., G. A. Sanderson and W. D. Tidwell, 1984. The Mississippian-Pennsylvanian 
boundary in the Eastern Great Basin, p. 406-418 m. Sutherland, P. K. and 
Manger, W. L. (eds), Compte Rendu, v. 2, Neuvieme Cong. Internat. Strat. 
et Geol. Carbonif., Wah., D.C. and Champaign-Urbana, IL, 530 p. 

Petersen, D. W. and R. L. Langenheim, Jr., 1985. Spiriferellina lata Lane 
in the Uppermost Chesterian in the Bird Spring Group at Arrow Canyon, 
Clark County, Nevada, Trans. 111. State Acad. Sci., v. 77, no. 3-4, p. 207-218. 

Mann, C. J. and L. R. Hoffman, 1984. Algal Mounds in Storr's Lake, San 
Salvador Island, Bahamas. Proc. Second Symposium on Geology of the 
Bahamas, CCFL Bahamas Field Station, San Salvador. 

Mann, C. J., 1985. Changing Faces. Math. Geol., v. 17, p. 219-220. 

Lasemi, Z., and P. A. Sandberg, 1984. Transformation of aragonite-dominated 
lime muds to microcrystalline limestones, Geology, v. 14, p. 420-423. 

Sandberg, P. A., 1985. Non-skeletal aragonite and pCO^ in the Proterozoic 
and Phanerozoic, in The Carbon Cycle and Atmospheric CO^: Natural Varia- 
tions Archean to Present. Amer. Geophys. Union, Geophys. Mon. Ser., v. 
32 (in press). 

Sandberg, P. A., 1985. Recognition criteria for calcitized skeletal and 
non-skeletal aragonite. Palaeontographica Americana, no. 54, p. 27 2-281. 

Sandberg, P. A., 1985. Ancient aragonite cements and their occurrence 
in ancient limestones, in Harris, P. M. and Schneidermann (eds.) "Carbonate 
Cements", Soc. Econ. Paleont. Mineral., Spec. Publ. 36, 27 pp., 3 pis. 



23 



Bailey, J. B. and P. A. Sandberg, 1985. Preserved Mineralogy and Ultrastruc- 
ture in Two New Pennsylvanian Bivalves. Proc. Ninth Int. Cong, of Carbonif- 
erous Strat. and Geol., v. 4 (in press). 

Abstracts 

Blake, D. B., 1984. Stability and Change in the History of Sea Stars. Abs. 
for 5th Internat. Conf. on Echinoderms, Galway, Ireland. 

Carozzi, A. V. and W. C. Dawson, 1985. Experimental fabric-selective 
porosity in phylloid algal limestones. A.A.P.G. Bull., v. 69 (2), p. 248. 

Carozzi, A. V. and R. T. Bertani, 1985. Lagoa Feia Formation (Lower Cretac- 
eous), Campos Basin, offshore Brazil - rift-valley-stage lacustrine carbonate 
reservoirs. A.A.P.G. Bull., v. 69 (2), p. 237-238. 

Hay, R. L., D. R. Kolata, M. Lee and W. D. Huff, 1984. Age of potassium 
metasomatism in an Ordovician tuff of the Mississippi Valley. GSA Abst. 
with Prog. v. 16, p. 533. 

Socha, B. J., W. H. Johnson and A. K. Hansel, 1985. Glacigenic diamictons 
of late Wisconsinan age at Wedron, Illinois. GSA Abst. with Prog., v. 17, 
no. 5, p. 327. 

Klein G. deV., 1984. Role of depositional depth and source terrain uplift 
rates on sedimentation patterns in back-arc basins of Western Pacific. 
A.A.P.G. Bull., v. 68, p. 495. 

Klein, G. deV., 1984. Linear sand bodies in the Yellow Sea of Korea. Korea-US 
Seminar and Workshop on Marine Geology and Physical Processes of the 
Yellow Sea, p. 53-55. 

Klein, G. deV., 1984. Determination of relative tectonic uplift rates in 
sediment source terrains from analysis of preserved turbidite frequencies 
occurring in submarine fans. Soc. Econ. Paleont. and Min. Annual Midyear 
Mtg. Abstracts, p. 43-44. 

Klein, G. deV., 1984. Continental drilling targets sedimentary systems, 
and deep-hole diagenesis. EOS, v. 65, p. 1102. 

Fritz, J. L., C. P. Weibel and R. L. Langenheim, Jr., 1984. Biostratigraphy 
of Pennsylvanian syringoporoid corals, Bird Spring Group, Arrow Canyon 
Range, Clark County, Nevada. GSA Abstr. with Prog., v. 16, no. 3, p. 139. 

Huff, B. G. and R. L. Langenheim, Jr., 1984. Late Atokan brachiopod biostra- 
trigraphy, Bird Spring Group, Arrow Canyon, Clark County, Nevada, Bull. 
AAPG, v. 68, no. 4, p. 489. 

Langenheim, R. L., Jr., General geology and natural history of the Galapagos 
Islands, Earth Sci. Bull., v. 15 (1982), p. 145. 

Vaiden, R. C. and R. L. Langenheim, Jr., 1985. Biostratigraphy and paleo- 
environment of Morrowan (Zone 2) brachiopoda, Bird Spring Group, Arrow 
Canyon, Clark County, Nevada. Bull. AAPG, v. 69, no. 2, p. 313. 



24 



Mann, C. J., 1984. Quantitative Stratigraphic Correlation. Edited by J. 
M. Cubitt and R. A. Reyment: A Review. Math. Geology, v. 16, p. 213-215. 

Mann, C. J., 1984. When Regressing with linear models, beware! GSA Abstr. 
with Progr., v. 16, no. 6, p. 584. 

Sandberg, P. A., 1984. Phanerozoic cyclicity in non-skeletal carbonate 
mineralogy. Invited paper AGU Chapman Conference on Natural Variation 
in Carbon Dioxide and the Carbon Cycle, Tarpon Springs, Florida. 

Sandberg, P. A., 1984. Ancient aragonites: their recognition and temporal 
distribution. 7th Meeting of Carbonate Sedimentologists, University of 
Liverpool, U.K. 




Graduate student Don Von Bergen, who works with Prof. Carozzi, operating 
a unique high-pressure triaxial compression apparatus, which allows the 
circulation of C02~charged water under controlled conditions of temperature 
and pressure. This apparatus, which simulates burial conditions, is used to study 
development of secondary porosity in carbonate rocks. 



25 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY: COURSE OFFERINGS, 1982-1985, & ANTICIPATED 



Geophysics - Structural Geology - Tectonics 
Engineering Geology 

Introduction to Geophysics 350 

Geophysical Prospecting 351 

Physics of Earthquakes 397 

Mathematical Methods in Geology 480 

Geodynamics 493 

Numerical Methods in Geomechanics 493 

Introduction to Seismology 493 

Advanced Topics in Seismology 493 

Geophysical Inverse Theory 493 

Deformation of the Upper Mantle 493 

Mineral Physics 493 

Rheology of Earth Materials 493 

Introduction to Structural Geology 311 

Advanced Structural Geology 488 

Geotectonics 489 

Southern Cordilleran Geology 493 

Practice of Engineering Geology 451 

Principles of Engineering Geology 450 

Geology for Engineers 250 



Bass/Chen/Chen 

Hsui 

W.-P. Chen 

Hsui 

Hsui 

Hsui 

W.-P. Chen 

W.-P. Chen 

W.-P. Chen 

W.-P. Chen/Bass/Marshak 

Bass 
Bass/Marshak 

Marshak 
Marshak 
Marshak 
D. Anderson/Marshak 

Nieto 
Nieto 
Nieto 



Sedimentary Geology - Stratigraphy - Paleobiology 
Quaternary Geology - Geomorphology 

Principles of Stratigraphy 
Advanced Stratigraphic Geology 
Selected Topics in Stratigraphy 

Introduction to Paleontology 

Paleoecology 

Seminar in Paleontology 

Micropaleontology 

Sedimentology and Arkoma Basin 
Field & Lab Procedures in Sedimentology 
Sedimentary Petrography 
Sedimentary Processes 
Analysis of Sedimentary Basins 
Sedimentology of Non-Marine Rocks 
Sedimentology of Volcanoclastic Rocks 
Recent Sedimentary Environments 

Introduction to Modern Marine Carbonate 

Environments 
Carbonate Sedimentology 
Carbonate Sedimentology 
Depositional Models for Petroleum 

Exploration 
Carbonate infrastructure and Diagenesis 
Marine Geology of the Bahamas 
Geochemistry of Sediments and 

Natural Waters 
Oceanography 

26 



321 


Langenheim/Mann 


422 


Langenheim 


493 


Langenheim 


320 


Blake 


420 


Blake 


493 


Blake 


493 


Sandberg 


309 


Klein 


310 


Klein 


338 


Carozzi 


437 


Klein 


493 


Klein 


493 


Hay 


493 


Hay 


477 


Klein 


315F 


Sandberg 


438 


Carozzi 


439 


Sandberg 


444 


Carozzi 


493 


Sandberg 


315M 


Mann 


432 


T. Anderson 


370 


T. Anderson 



Electron Beam Microanalysis 
X-ray Mineralogy 
Mineralogy of Clays 
Mineralogy of Clays II 

Coal Geology 
Paleobotany 

Geomorphology 
Quaternary Geology 
Glacial Geology 
Introduction to Palynology 



493 


D. Anderson/Sandberj 


493 


Altaner 


46Z 


Altaner 


463 


Altaner 


493 


Damburger 


350 


Phillips 


301 


Johnson 


457 


Johnson 


357 


Johnson 


493 


King 



Mineralogy - Igneous & Metamorphic Petrology 
Geochemistry, Hydrogeology 

Mineralogy 
Petrology 

Optical Mineralogy 
Petrography & Petrogenesis 
Advanced Igneous Petrology 
Advanced Metamorphic Petrology 
Theoretical Petrology & 

Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics 
Kinetics of Geological Processes 
Seminar on Melt Structure 
Structural Mineralogy 
X-Ray Mineralogy 
Crystallography 
Mineralogy of Clays 
Mineralogy of Clays II 
Electron-beam Microanalysis 

Introduction to SEM & TEM 
Neutron Activation Analysis 
Chemistry of the Earth 
Geochemistry of Sediments and 

Natural Waters 
Trace-element Geochemistry 
Isotope Geology 
Advanced Isotope Geochemistry 

Introductory Hydrogeology 
Groundwater Hydrology 

Introductory Courses 

Introduction to Study of the Earth 
History of the Earth 
General Geology I & II 
Regional Field Study (Grand Canyon) 
Physical Sciences in Modern Science 
Geology for Engineers 
Geology of Energy 
Field Geology in Rocky Mountains 
(Field Camp) 

See also listings from depts. of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Metallurgy, 
Civil Engineering, Materials Research, and Geography. 



333 


Henderson 


334 


Henderson/ 




Kirkpatrick/C.-Y. Chen 


335 


Henderson 


336 


Kirkpatrick 


435 


Kirkpatrick/C.-Y. Chen 


493 


D. Anderson 


434 


D. Anderson 


493 


Kirkpatrick 


493 


Kirkpatrick 


431 


Henderson 


493 


Henderson/ Altaner 


493 


Henderson 


462 


Altaner 


463 


Altaner 


493 


D. Anderson/Sandberg 


469 


T. Kriven(Ceramics) 


493 


C.-Y. Chen 


360 


T. Anderson/C.-Y. Chen 


493 


T. Anderson 


493 


C.-Y. Chen 


433 


T. Anderson/C.-Y. Chen 


493 


C.-Y. Chen 


397 


Bethke 


455 


Bethke 


101 




102 




107, 108 




115 




142 




250 




105 




317 





27 



FIELD-BASED RESEARCH AND INSTRUCTION 

The Department of Geology has traditionally maintained a strong emphasis 
on field-related studies. This tradition has continued through both field-based 
instruction and field-based research. In many instances, this work is closely 
tied to state-of-the-art laboratory or theoretical studies. Below, we highlight 
some of the field areas in which members of our faculty are currently under- 
taking or recently completed field research or teaching. 

Field Research 

D. E. Anderson: Metamorphic reactions in rocks of northwest Scotland 

J. Bass: In Situ stress measurements in Colorado 

A. V. Carozzi: Minifacies of Mid-Continent Carbonates 

C.-Y. Chen: Geochemical studies in Hawaii basalts and in Cyprus ophiolite 

W.-P. Chen: Central Himalayas, India 

R. L. Hay: Diagenetic studies in California; stratigraphy, diagenesis and 
early man studies in east Africa 

W.H. Johnson: Quaternary stratigraphy, glacial geology, and geomorphology 
in Illinois 

R. J. Kirkpatrick: Study of the Cyprus ophiolite 

G. deV. Klein: Submarine sedimentology in the Sea of Japan and the Yellow 
Sea, Korea 

R. L. Langenheim, Jr.: Stratigraphy and paleontology, Nevada 

C.J. Mann: Stratigraphy of Illinois basin; Bahamas 

S. Marshak: Structural analysis in eastern New York, western Arizona, 
and the Transantarctic Mountains 

A. S. Nieto: Engineering geology problems in western Canada and Peru 

P. A. Sandberg: Diagenesis in Pennsylvanian carbonates, S. E. Kansas 

Field Teaching 

Carbonate Geology: Florida Keys 

Engineering Geology: Pennsylvania; central Wisconsin 

Field Methods: Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming; western Arizona and southern 
California; Bahamas; central Wisconsin 

Hydrogeology; Viburnian-trend mineral district; St. Francois Mountains 

Introductory Geology: Ozark Mountains, Missouri; Colorado and Northern 
Arizona; central Wisconsin; east-central Illinois; Colorado, 
Utah, S. Nevada 

Mineralogy/Petrology: Northern Michigan; western Arizona and southern 
California 

Paleontology: Southern Illinois; Kentucky; Indiana; Wisconsin; Iowa; Minnesota; 
Missouri 



28 



Quaternary Geology/Geomorphology: Northern Illinois, southern and eastern 
Wisconsin; south-central Indiana; east-central Illinois/central, 
western and southern Illinois 

Sedimentology: Ouachita Mountains 

Stratigraphy: Wabash Valley; western Illinois 

Structural Geology: Northern Michigan; eastern Tennessee; central Wisconsin; 
western Arizona and southern California 



' ~'?W5&~- ■' 'i " - * --• % Ty- s 
fee. .^-..: .«»* ^r «: .- >«-,&■• ^K? 




John Tabor, a graduate student in structural geology, about to descend into 
a quarry to map fold-thrust structures in eastern New York 



29 




Jack Pullen, the department's thin-section technician, preparing specimens 
using the automated Logitech polisher. 



30 



LABORATORY FACILITIES 

Applied Rock Mechanics ; direct shear devices, uniaxial compression column, 
slaking durability unit, soil testing equipment, base-friction table, and 
rock-wedge simulator. 

Computer : University computer services provide: CDC Cuber 175 and 
174, IBM 4341, DEC Vax II, Pyramid 90X, and on order, Cray MPX, along 
with necessary peripherals. 

Electron-Mi crobeam: JEOL microprobe, Cambridge SEM, High-resolution 
SEM/EDAX systems (at the Center for Electron Microscopy), TEM and 
STEM systems and Argon Mill (at the Center for Materials Research). 

Experimental Petrology : TemPress cold-seal pressure vessels, Deltech 
and Lindburg high-temperature furnaces (for synthesis, kinetics, and phase- 
equilibrium experiments). 

Geochemistry : Siemens X-Ray Fluorescence and Perkin-Elmer Atomic 
Absorption Spectrophotometer for bulk-chemical (major, minor, and trace 
elements) analysis; MAT 250 isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (set up for 
carbon, oxygen, and sulfur); trace-element Neutron-Activation system 
(Germanium co-axial detector and multi-channel analyzer) (on order). 

Hydrogeology : Equipment for accessing campus and remote cray supercom- 
puters; computer colorgraphics and digitizing equipment. 

Mineral Physics : (On order) Brillouin spectrometer (laser-light scattering 
for measuring elastic properties). Diamond-Anvil Pressure Cell (for optical 
and x-ray measurements on samples at pressures up to 300 kbar. 

NMR Spectroscopy : High-resolution nuclear-magnetic resonance spectrom- 
eters and associated equipment for solution and solid spectroscopy (in Chemi- 
stry Building). 

Seismology : Microfilm library of post-1960 WWSSN seismograms; computer 
file of post-1980 GDSN seismograms; digital seismic signal processing facili- 
ties including dedicated computer, interactive graphics, and record digitizer; 
portable short-period seismograph. 

Soft-Rock Studies : Cathode luminescence; microscopes, settling tanks; 
isodynamic magnetic separator, acid preparation equipment, X-ray radio- 
graphy. 

Support : Logitech Automated thin-section preparation equipment; Numerous 
research-quality petrographic microscopes; photographic darkrooms. 

Triatrial Loading : Hydraulic equipment for burial simulation and fluid circula- 
tion 

X-Ray : Seimens X-ray powder diffractometer system, X-ray fluorescence 
analyzer, Philips X-ray diffractometer, Single-crystand and powder cameras, 
preparation equipment for clay minerals. 

31 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS GEOLOGY LIBRARY 



The Library of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is the 
third largest university library in the country; our collection is surpassed 
in size only by the collections of Harvard and Yale. At present, we have 
over 6 million books and printed serials, and over 3 million non-book items 
including microfilms, videotapes, and maps. In 1985 the University of Illinois 
Library switched to a computer catalog system, which permits the 
identification of items by authors, titles, or keywords. The new system 
will also search the collections of affiliated libraries in addition to our 
own, and will automatically request books for delivery via campus mail. 
A terminal in the Geology Library permits direct access to GeoRef and 
other online sci/tech databases. 

The Geology Library is housed in the Natural History Building along 
with the Department, thereby permitting easy access to books, journals, 
and maps. The total geology collection of the University includes over 
160,000 volumes (of which half are in the Geology Library and the remainder 
are in the Main Library) and 55,000 catalogued sheet maps. Our holdings 
are notable for complete sets of all primary and most secondary American 
and foreign geological journals. The collection also includes a substantial 
selection of Soviet geological literature. 

The University Library's Rare Books Room is repository for one of the 

world's outstanding collections of rare and early geological literature. 
Included in the collection are, among others, first editions of classic works 
by Agricola, Steno, Gesner, Biringucci, Smith, Maclure, Hutton, Werner, 
and Agassiz. We also possess a substantial selection of early American 
geological works. An annotated 565 page catalog to this collection by 
D. Ward and A. Carozzi was published in 1984 by the University of Illinois 
Library. 

The Geology Library is managed by full-time staff, headed by Dederick 
Ward. Mr. Ward is active in national and international geoscience 
information efforts. He currently serves on the GeoRef advisory committee 
of the American Geological Institute. 



32 




Library Staff member Suzanne Hayes, Librarian Dederick C. Ward and staff 
member Diana Walter in Geology Library Map Room. The Geology Library 
houses over 80,000 volumes and 55,000 sheet maps in the Natural History Building. 



33 



COLLOQUIUM PROGRAMS 

Students and faculty of the Department of Geology have a broad range of 
professional specialties, therefore, Colloquium programs are sought to provide 
topics of interest to all. Colloquia are held on Friday afternoons and begin 
with informal conversation, coffee and cookies in the lounge with the formal 
presentation following in the lecture hall. Recent speakers have included: 

FALL 1983 

Dr. GEORGE deVRIES KLEIN (Dept. of Geology, UIUC) "Tectonics and 
Sedimentation of the Back-arc Basins of the Western Pacific Ocean." 

MR. RICK SCHULT Dept. of Geophysics, Stanford Univ.) "On the Speed of 
Continents over Hot Spots Since the Jurassic." (special colloq.). 

DR. RICHARD L. HAY (Dept. of Geology, UIUC) "Fossil Footprints of Laetoli 
in Tanzania, East Africa." 

DR. HARLAN P. BANKS (Div. of Biological Science, Cornell Univ.) "Intriguing 
Aspects of Early Land Plants (Silvrian - Devonian)." 

DR. DEREK E. G. BRIGGS (Geology Dept., Univ. of London, England) "The 
Soft-bodied Organisms of the Burgess Shale." 

DR. CHU-YUNG CHEN (Dept. of Geology, UIUC) "Geochemical and Petrologic 

Systematics in Lavas from Haleakala Volcano, East Maui, Hawaii: Implications 
for the Origin of Hot-spot Volcanism." 

DR. DONALD J. LEVERENZ (Construction Eng. Res. Lab., Champaign) 
"Engineering Problems in the Exploitation of Non-fossil Fuels." 

DR. HAROLD A. ILLICH (Sun Expl. and Production Co. of Texas) "Significance 
of Petroleum in Biochemical Evolutionary Studies." 

DR. JOHANNES SCHROEDER (Geologisch - Palaontologisches Institut, Kiel 
Univ. at Berlin, Germany) "Multiple Choice in Carbonate Diagenesis." (special 
colloquium) 

DR. MORRIS W. LEIGHTON (Chief, Illinois State Geological Survey) "Keys 
to Recent Significant Hydrocarbon Discoveries in Latin America." 

DR. JOHN M. HAYES (Dept. of Geology, Indiana Univ.) "Redox Balances in 
Early Cycles." 

DR. PETER A RONA (Sr. Res. Geophysicist, AAPG Distinguished Lecturer) 
"Hydrothermal Mineralization at Sea Floor Spreading Centers." 

DR. MICHAEL A. ARTHUR (Grad. Schl. of Oceanography, Univ. of Rhode Island) 
"Biotic Extinction at the Cretaceous-tertiary Boundary: Terrestrial Versus 
Extraterrestrial Explanations." 

DR. ALEXANDRA NAVROTSKY (Dept. of Chemistry, Arizona St. Univ.) 
"Structure of Glasses." 

34 



MS. ANNEMARIE MEIKE (Univ. of California, Berkeley) "TEM Studies of the 
Microstructure of Stylolites in Limestone." (special seminar) 

DR. CARL E. JACOBSON (Dept. of Earth Sci., Iowa St. Univ.) "Structure, 
Metamorphism, and Tectonic Significance of the Pelona Schist and Vincent 
Thrust, Southern California." 

DR. RICHARD J. REEDER (SUNY-Stony Brook, NY) "Carbonate Mineralogy." 

DR. PATRICK BROWNE (Geothermal Inst., Univ. of Auckland, New Zealand) 
"Active Geothermal Systems and Ore Deposition." 

DR. MICHAEL J. DeNIRO (Dept. of Earth and Space Sci., Univ. of California) 
"Developing Geochemical Methods to Study Anthropologic Problems." (special 
lecture) 

DR. CARL WOESE (Microbiology Dept., UIUC) "Early Life: Recent Advances 
in Knowledge." 

SPRING 1984 

DR. STEPHEN MARSHAK (Dept. of Geology, UIUC) "The Development and 
Evolution of Tectonic Cleavage in Limestone." 

DR. HUAN-YEN LOO (Inst, of Geology, St. Seismological Bur., Beijing, P.R.C.) 
"Three Dimensional Numerical Modeling of Formation Mechanism of the Shangxi 
Graben." 

DR. YONG AHN PARK (Seoul National Univ.) "Late Quaternary Sedimentation 
on the Continental Shelf Off the Southeast Coasts of Korea." 

DR. CHARLES W. COLLINSON (Head, Stratigraphy and Areal Geol. Sect., Illinois 
State Geological Survey) "Littoral Sediment Systems and Lake Level Dynamics 
in Southern Lake Michigan." 

DR. PAUL McMILLAN (Dept. of Chemistry, Arizona St. Univ.) "Structural Studies 
of Silicate Melts by RAMAN Spectroscopy." 

DR. JAMES E. KING (Head, Scientific Sections; Curator of Paleontology, Illinois 
State Museum) "Comparison of Terrestrial and Marine Quaternary 
Paleoenvironmental Records." 

DR. NICHOLAS WOODWARD (Dept. of Geology, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville) 
"Thrust Deformation Geometries and Structural Lithic Units in Wyoming and 
Tennessee." 

DR. R. JAMES KIRKPATRICK (Dept. of Geology, UIUC) "NMR Spectroscopy 
of Silicate Crystals and Glasses." 

DR. J. BRUNO RISATTI (Illinois State Geological Survey) "Deep Sea Natural 
Gas and Origins of Sedimentary Methane." 

DR. JAMES L. WILSON (Dept. of Geol. Sci., Univ. of Michigan) "Tectonic 
Positions and Stratigraphy of Basinal and Shelf Evaporites: A World-wide View." 



35 



DR. OTTO W. NUTTLI (Dept. of Earth and Atmos. Sci., St. Louis Univ.) 
"Seismicity and Source Mechanics in Midplate Earthquakes." 

DR. WARREN HAMILTON (Res. Geologist, AAPG Distinguished Lecturer) "Mode 
of Extension of Continental Crust." 

DR. ALFRED M. ZIEGLER (Dept. of Geophysical Sci., Univ. of Chicago) 
"Climates of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic." 

DR. MICHAEL A DUNGAN (Dept. of Geol. Sci., Southern Methodist Univ.) "The 
Petrologic Evolution of the Taos Plateau Volcanic Field, Northern New Mexico." 

DR. NORBERT MORGENSTERN (Dept. of Civil Engineering, University of 
Alberta, Canada) "Terror of Engineering in the Pleistocene." 

FALL 1984 

DR. RICHARD G. GORDEN (Dept. of Geol. Sciences, Northwestern Univ.) 
"Paleomagnetism and Absolute Plate Motions." 

DR. ROBERT RAISWELL (Univ. of Leeds) "Carbon and Sulfer Variations in 
Different Depositional Environments through Phanerozoic Time." 

DR. PAUL GUION (Oxford Polytechnic, Headlington, Oxford, U.K.) "Crevasse 
Splays in the East Midlands Coalfield." 

DR. EDWARD M. STOLPER (Div. Geol. & Planetary Science, Cal Tech) 12:00 
- "Densities of Silicate Melts at High Pressures by Shock Wave Measurements"; 
4:00 - "Volatiles in Magmas." 

DR. GRANT GARVEN (Dept. of Earth & Planetary Sciences and Dept. of 
Geography & Environmental Engineering, Johns Hopkins Univ.) "Regional 
Groundwater Flow and Ore Genesis in Sedimentary Basins." 

DR. PAUL NADEAU (The Macaulay Institute for Soil Research, Craigiebuckler, 
Aberdeen, Scotland, U.K.) "Aspects of Interstratified Clays and Clastic 
Diagenesis." 

DR. NEIL A. CHAPMAN (British Geol. Survey) "Geological Disposal of 
Radioactive Waste." 

DR. ROBERT NEWTON (Dept. of Geophysical Sciences, Univ. of Chicago) 
"Geobarometry & Geothermometry and their Applications to Tectonic Processes." 

DR. ROBERT NOWACK (Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric & Planetary Sciences, 
MIT) "The Two-Dimensional Gaussian Beam Synthetic Method: Testing and 
Applications." 

DR. THOMAS H. ANDERSON (Dept. of Geology & Planetary Science, Univ. 
of Pittsburgh) "Evolution of the Continental Margin, Northwest Mexico." 

MR. STEPHEN ALTANER (U1UC) "Formation of K-Bentonites by Potassium 
Metasomatism: Applications to Nuclear Waste Disposal." 



36 



DR. JUNG HOO LEE (University of Michigan) "Transitions in Clay Minerals 
during Slaty Cleavage Development: Stem STEM Study of the Martinsburgh 
Formation Near Lehigh Gap, Pennsylvania." 

DR. R. L. LANGENHEIM, JR. (Dept. of Geology, UIUC) "Definition of 
Mid-Carboniferous Boundary." 

MARK R. BAKER (Exxon Production Research Co., Houston, TX) "Well Log 
Interpretation for Geotechnical and Coal Quality Assessment." 

DR. DAVID R. JANECKY (Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, Univ. of Minnesota) 
"High-Temperature Oceanic Geothermal Systems — Experimental and Theoretical 
Considerations with Respect to the Formation of Massive Sulfide Deposits." 

DR. HSIN YI LING (Dept. of Geology, Northern Illinois University) "Radiolarian 
Occurrence and its Implication to Plate Tectonics and Paleoceanography." 

DR. LYNN WALTER (Dept. of Earth & Planetary Sciences, Washington Univ.) 
"Controls on Relative Rates of Carbonate Dissolution and Precipitation: Insights 
from Laboratory Experiments." 

DR. DENNIS R. KOLATA (Illinois State Geol. Survey) "K-Bentonite of the 
Ordovician Decorah Subgroup, Mississippi Valley: Correlation by Chemical 
Fingerprinting. " 

DR. KEITH RIGBY (Dept. of Earth Sciences, Univ. of Notre Dame) "Evolutionary 
Effects of an Asteroid Impact at the End of the Cretaceous." 

SPRING 1985 

DR. JAMES TYBURCZY (Div. of Geol. & Planetary Science, Cal Tech) "Electrical 
Conductivity of Melts and the Earth's Low Velocity Zone." 

DR. PETER DAVIS (Princeton Univ.) "Upper Mantel Structure Inferred from 
Normal Mode Measurements." 

DR. GERARD BOND (Lamont-Doherty Geol. Observatory of Columbia Univ.) 
"New Evidence for a Breakup Chronology of a Late Precambrian Supercontinent, 
from Subsidence Analysis of Sedimentary Sequences." 

DR. STEPHEN GRAND (Cal Tech) "Shear Velocity Structure Beneath North 
America." 

DR. GEORGE ZANDT (State Univ. of New York, Binghamton) "Lithosphere 
Structure Determined from Teleseismic Waveforms." 

DR. WALTRAUD KRIVEN (Ceramic Eng., UIUC) "Transmission Electron 
Microscopy on Ceramics and Minerals." 

DR. THURE CERLTNG (Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, Univ. of Utah) "Soils, 
Climate and Geochemistry." 

DR. PHILIP C. ENGLAND (Dept. of Geol. Sciences, Harvard University) "The 
Tertiary Deformation of Asia." 



37 



DR. LAURA CROSSEY (Univ. of Wyoming) "Organic Acids and Porosity 
Enhancement." 

DR. DAVID JANECKY (Los Alamos Nat. Lab.) "Peridotite-Water Interactions 
at Z00° and 300°C: Experimental and Theoretical REsults." 

DR. CHRISTOPHER PAOLA (Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, Univ. of Minnesota, 
MN) "Transport of Sand in Suspension." 

DR. DENNIS PREZBINDOWSKI (Amoco Prod. Co. Research Center) "Evolution 
of Formation Water." 

DR. ARTHUR L. BLOOM (Dept. of Geol. Sciences, Cornell Univ.) "Tectonic 
Geomorphology and Coral Reefs." 

DR. S. KIRBY (U.S. Geol. Survey, Menlo Park, Calif.) "Rheology of the 
Lithosphere from Experimental Rock Mechanics." 

DR. MARK REED (Univ. of Oregon) "Boiling and Oxidation in Epithermal 

Systems." 

DR. RONALD H. VERNON (Dept. of Geology, Univ. of New Mexico) 12:00 - 

"K-Feldspar Megacrysts in Granites - Phenocrysts, not Porphyroblasts." 4:00 

- "Metamorphic/Deformational Relationships around the Sandia Granite, New 
Mexico." 

DR. PHILIP BETHKE (U.S. Geol. Survey, Reston, VA) "Geothermal Systems 
and Epithermal Ores: Lessons from Creede, Colorado." 

DR. DAVID DINGLEY (University of Bristol, England) "Crystal Symmetry 
Determination in the Scanning Microscope and Applications to Minerals." 

DR. LANIER ROWAN (U.S. Geol Survey, Denver, CO) "Genesis of Mississippi 
Valley- Type Ore Deposits." 

DR. ROBERT DIETZ (Dept. of Geology, Arizona State Univ.) "Creation/Evolution: 
Did the Devil Make Darwin Do It?" 

DR. G. MUYZER (Dept. of Biochemistry, University of Leiden, The Netherlands) 
"Immunology of Macromolecules from Fossil and Recent Shells." 

DR. NOBU SHIMIZU (Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric & Planetary Science, MIT) 
"Applications of the Ion Microprobe to Geochemistry and Cosmochemistry." 

DR. FREDERICK FREY (Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric & Planetary Science, 
MIT) "Trace Element Geochemistry of Igneous Rocks." 

DR. MIRIAM KASTNER (Scripps Institution of Oceanography) "Origin of Dolomite 
and its Spatial and Chronological Distribution - a New Insight." 



38 



RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS OF NEW FACULTY MEMBERS 




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a) Figure 5, from: Bethke, C. M., 1985, A numerical model of compaction-driven 
groundwater flow and heat transfer and its application to the paleohydrology 
of intracratonic sedimentary basins: J. Geophys. Res., v. 90, p. 6817-6828. 
A cross-sectional illustration of fluid velocities relative to the subsiding 
medium. The solid lines show equipotentials. 

b) Figure 9, from: Chen, C.-Y., 1985, Trace element and isotopic geochemistry 
of lavas from Haleakala Volcano, East Maui Hawaii - Implications for the 
origin of Hawaiian basalts: J. Geophys. Res., in press. An illustration of 
a two-reservoir but multi-component mixing model for the origin of Hawaiian 
basalts. 

c) Figure 1, from: Hay, R. L., 1983, Natrocarbonatite tephra of Kerimasi volcano, 
Tanzania: Geology, v. 11, p. 599-602. A map of Kerimasi volcano and vicinity 
showing sample localities of modern carbonatite eruptive rocks. 

d) Figure 8, from: Marshak, S., 1986, Structure and tectonics of the Hudson 
Valley fold-thrust belt, New York: Geological Society of America Bulletin, 
in prep. Cross-sectional sketches showing the rapid variation in structural 
geometry that can result from lateral ramping in a fold-thrust belt. 

e) Figure 12, from: Grand, S. P., and Helmberger, D. V., 1984, Upper mantle 
structure beneath the northwest Atlantic Ocean: J. Geophys. Res., v. 89, 
p. 11,465-11,475. A comparison of recorded synthetic seismograms for earth- 
quakes in the distance range of 26° to 40°, indicating a small amount of 
upper mantle heterogeneity. 

f) Figure 12, from: Bethke, C. M., and Altaner, S., 1985, A layer-by-layer 
mechanism of smectite illitization and application to a new rate law: Clays 
and Clay Minerals, in press. Diffracation pattern resulting from a removed- 
neighbor model of illitization, at 85% illite layers. 

g) Figure 1, from: Bass, J.D., and Anderson, D.L., 1984, Composition of the 
upper mantle: Geophysical tests of two petrological models: Geophys. Res. 
Letters, v. 11, p. 237-240. Velocity profiles and denisty for various minerals 
based on laboratory measurements. Earth model PREM is shown (heavy 
solid line) along with a range of velocities from other studies. 

h) Figure 2, from: Grimison, N.L., and Chen, W.-P., 1985, The Azores-Gibraltar 
plate boundary: Focal mechanisms, depths of earthquakes, and their tectonic 
implications: J. Geophys. Res., in press. The bathymetric map also shows 
epicenters of all earthquakes of magnitude > 4.0 in the region of the Azores 
Islands to Gibraltar in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Focal mechanisms for 
fifteen large events are also shown, indicating the complexity of plate inter- 
actions in the region. 



40 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 




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1986-1987 RESEARCH REPORT 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS, URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 

Table of Contents 

Page 

INTRODUCTION l 

GRADUATE RESEARCH AREAS IN GEOLOGY 3 

FACULTY PROFILES 5 

RECENTLY FUNDED PROJECTS 15 

LIST OF PUBLICATIONS 1985-1986 I 7 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY: COURSE 

OFFERINGS, 1982-1986 29 

FIELD-BASED RESEARCH AND INSTRUCTION 31 

WYOMING FIELD CAMP 33 

GEOLOGY LIBRARY 35 

LABORATORY FACILITIES 37 

COLLOQUIUM PROGRAMS 39 



Compiled and edited by D. E. Anderson and P. Lane 

Fall 1986 



INTRODUCTION 

Recent appointments in the Geology Department have completed our new 
research and teaching program in geophysics-seismology and mineral physics 
as well as reinforcing previous strengths in the areas of groundwater geology, 
clay mineralogy, geochemistry and the broad study of tectonics, diagenesis, 
sedimentology, structural geology, and historical geology. 

A diverse range of research instrumentation is housed within the Geology 
department including: an automated electron microprobe; gas source mass spec- 
trometer, SEM; 11. 7T NMR spectrometer, X-ray diffractometers, XRF and 
AA units; neutron activation analysis system; seismological laboratory and library; 
hydrology laboratory with high-speed link to a supercomputer ; Brillouin spec- 
trometer; cold seal and diamond-anvil high-pressure equipment; laboratories 
for sedimentological and mineralogical studies. Departmental computing facilit- 
ies include an Alliant FX-8 Supercomputer with a high speed link to CRAY-XMP 
in the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. An outstanding geology 
library is located in the Geology building. 

The Department of Geology encourages cooperative research with the depart- 
ments of Physics, Chemistry, Plant Biology, and Mathematics, the School of 
Engineering, and the Centers for Materials Research and Electron Microscopy. 
The extensive facilities in these and other units on campus are readily available 
and commonly used by Geology faculty and students. Examples include transmis- 
sion and scanning electron microscopes, ion probes and diffractometers in the 
Materials Research Laboratory and Center for Electron Microscopy; facilities 
for NMR, ESR, and IR spectroscopy in the School of Chemical Sciences. 

The Department is fortunate to share the campus with the Illinois State 
Geological Survey, an organization with a rich tradition of research. Members 
of the Survey and the Department cooperate in research programs and graduate 
teaching in areas such as groundwater and environmental geology, clay mineral- 
ogy, quaternary geology, coal geology, stratigraphy and paleobiology. 

With approximately 60 graduate students, the Department maintains strong 
programs in research and teaching. The list on the following page outlines some 
major areas that include a broad coverage of theoretical, experimental and 
field research. The list is not exhaustive and cross-disciplinary programs are 
available. 



FIELDWORK 







GRADUATE RESEARCH AREAS IN GEOLOGY 



Clays and Clastic Diagenesis - S. P. Altaner, T. A. Anderson, C. M. Bethke, 
R. L. Hay, R. J. Kirkpatrick, G. deV. Klein, R. C. Reynolds, Jr. (adj.) 

Carbonate Rocks and Diagenesis - T. A. Anderson, A. V. Carozzi, R. L. Hay, 
P. A. Sandberg 

Engineering Geology and Applied Rock Mechanics - A. S. Nieto 

Geochemistry - S. P. Altaner, T. F. Anderson, C. M. Bethke, C-Y. Chen, R. 
Cygan, R. J. Kirkpatrick 

Geomorphology and Quaternary Geology - W.H. Johnson, L. R. Follmer (adj.), 
J. E. King (adj) 

Geophysics - J. D. Bass, W-P. Chen, A. T. Hsui, S. Grand (1986) 

History of Geology - A. V. Carozzi 

Hydrogeology - C. M. Bethke, K. Cartwright (ISGS-adj.), A. T. Hsui 

Igneous/Metamorphic Petrology - D. E. Anderson, C-Y. Chen, R. L. Hay, 
R.J. Kirkpatrick 

Mantle Dynamics - J. D. Bass, C-Y. Chen, A. T. Hsui 

Mineralogy/Mineral Physics - S. P. Altaner, J. D. Bass, C.-Y. Chen, R. Cygan 
R. L. Hay, D.M. Henderson, R.J. Kirkpatrick 

Paleobiology - D.B. Blake, R.L. Langenheim, P. A. Sandberg, J. King (adj) 

Sedimentary Basin Analysis- S. P. Altaner, C. M. Bethke, D. B. Blake, 
A. V. Carozzi, R. L. Hay, A. T. Hsui, G. deV. Klein, R. L. Langenheim, 
M. W. Leighton (ISGS-adj.), S. Marshak 

Seismology - W.-P. Chen, S. Grand 

Stratigraphy and Sedimentation - T. F. Anderson, D. B. Blake, A. V. Carozzi, 
R. L. Hay, G. deV. Klein, R. L. Langenheim, C.J. Mann, P. A. Sandberg 

Structural Geology, Rock Physics, Tectonics - D. E. Anderson, J. D. Bass, 
W-P. Chen, A. T. Hsui, S. Marshak, A. S. Nieto 



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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

FACULTY. PROFILES 

STEPHEN P. ALTANER, Assist. Professor [1986 Appointment] (B.S., Colgate 
U. 1979; Ph.D. Univ. of Illinois 1985) - Clays and Diagenesis; Sedimentary Petrol- 
ogy 

Professor Altaner's main research interests are in the fields of clay mineralogy 
and clay petrology. He investigates conditions of clay mineral formation in 
sedimentary and diagenetic environments, in soils, and in hydrothermal environ- 
ments. Specific research topics in clay petrology include diffusion in argillaceous 
rocks, kinetics of diagenetic clay mineral reactions, determination of thermal 
and burial histories of sediments, occurrence of ammonium in rocks and minerals, 
and clay mineral formation in saline, alkaline lakes. Results of this type of 
research will have applications in the fields of petroleum exploration, mineral 
prospecting, and nuclear waste disposal. Field relations, petrography, chemical 
analysis, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, stable and radiogenic 
isotope analysis, mathematical modeling, and experimental petrology techniques 
will be used for this research. Mineralogical research will include the structural 
analysis of mixed-layer and non mixed-layer clay minerals using transmission 
electron microscopy, near- and mid-infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic 
resonance (to complement the program of R.J. Kirkpatrick). 



DAVID E. ANDERSON, Professor and Head (BSc-Hons., Univ. of Sydney, 
Australia, 1961; M.S. & PH.D. 1967, Univ. of Sydney, Australia) - Metamorphic 
and Theoretical Petrology 

Professor Anderson has been department head since 1983. His research 
involves metamorphic processes and their relationship to the thermal and tectonic 
history of various metamorphic terraines. Current projects include: 1) Studies 
(with Stephen Marshak) of the metamorphism of rocks in the Granite Wash 
and Buckskin Mountains of Western Arizona and the relationship of metamorphism 
to thrust faults in the region. 2) Compositional and textural zoning in garnets 
and their relationship to the tectonic history of the Moine Schists of Scotland. 
3) Chemical changes associated with shearing and mylonitization of basic igneous 
rocks in Scotland and Upper Michigan. 4) Theoretical modelling of diffusion 
processes in aqueous and crystalline electrolytes. Funds are currently being 
sought jointly by Stephen Marshak and D.E. Anderson for a comprehensive study 
of the deformation and metamorphism of the Transantartic Mountains. Professor 
Anderson teaches graduate courses in thermodynamics (including non-equilibrium 
thermodynamics) and metamorphic petrology. 

THOMAS F. ANDERSON, Professor (B.S. 1961, DePauw University, Ph.D. 1967, 
Columbia University) - Stable Isotope Geochemistry 

Professor Anderson's principal research interests are in the stable isotope 
geochemistry of sediments and natural waters. The focus of his current activities 
is on the significance of stable isotope variations in marine sediments during 
the Phanerozoic. Investigations in progress in this area include the following: 

(1) The oxygen isotope record of Paleozoic calcite fossils as implications of 
the history of oceanic temperatures and hydrosphere - lithosphere interactions. 

(2) Mass and isotopic burial fluxes of reduced sulfur and organic carbon during 
the Cretaceous. (3) Chemical and isotopic studies (including oxygen isotopes 
in biogenic phosphates) on rocks and fossils along a Middle Ordovician depth 
gradient in the Taconic Fouland Basin. (4) The petrology. Chemistry, and isotopic 



composition of sulfides from hydrothermally altered oceanic rocks, with emphasis 
on the role of sea water - crust interaction in controlling the mass and isotopic 
cycle of marine sulfate. Professor Anderson is also involved in experimental 
and theoretical studies of the partitioning of isotopes and trace elements during 
the dissolution and precipitation of carbonates. Professor Anderson teaches 
chemistry of the Earth, Oceanography, Isotope Geochemistry, and Sedimentary 
Geochemistry. 

JAY D. BASS, Assistant Professor (Ph.D. 1982, State University of New York 
at Stony Brook) - Geophysics; Mineral Physics; Elastic Properties of Minerals 

Jay D. Bass has been at Illinois since August 1984. His major research efforts 
are in the area of experimental geophysics and laboratory measurements of 
the physical properties of minerals. Much of his recent work has focused on 
measurements of elastic wave velocities in minerals and high-pressure polymor- 
phic phases by Brillouin spectroscopy, and this work is being further pursued 
at Illinois. Brillouin spectroscopy is a light scattering technique that is particu- 
larly well suited for measuring wave velocities in microscopic-sized samples, 
many of which are synthesized at high pressures and high temperatures. The 
results of such experiments are used to calculate the wave velocities and density 
of mineral aggregates under the high-pressure and high-temperature environment 
of the Earths deep interior. Comparisons with seismological models of velocity 
versus depth in the Earth provide a powerful constraint upon the chemistry 
and mineralogy of the Earths mantle, and this is a prime motivation for measuring 
elastic properties. In addition to measurements under room conditions, a program 
will be initiated to perform these experiments at high pressure in diamond-window 
pressure cells, and at high temperatures. Other research pursuits include: 1) 
X-ray studies of crystal structures at high pressure, 2) The high-pressure equation 
of state of oxides and metals which bear on the composition of the mantle and 
core, using shock-wave techniques (in collaboration with the California Institute 
of Technology), 3) In-situ measurements of stress in the Earths crust by holograph- 
ic interfermetry (also with Cal Tech). 

CRAIG M. BETHKE, Assistant Professor (A.B. 1980, Dartmouth College, Ph.D. 
1985, University of Illinois) Hydrogeology 

Craig Bethke's primary research interest is study of the groundwater hydrology 
of sedimentary basins through geologic time, and the effects of groundwater 
motion on petroleum migration, ore formation, and sediment diagenesis. Craig 
received a 1986 Presidential Young Investigator Award for this research. Recent 
work includes a theoretical analysis of the role of compaction-driven groundwater 
flow during subsidence of sedimentary basins, performed on a CRAY supercompu- 
ter. He applied this analysis in a study of the relative importance of compaction- 
driven and gravity-driven groundwater flow over the geologic history of the 
Illinois Basin, and this work has improved understanding of petroleum migration, 
as well as the genesis of Mississippi Valley-type ore deposits. Craig also recently 
completed research on the illitization reaction of smectite, a clay mineral dehy- 
dration reaction which is an important contributor of deep fluids and cements 
in evolving basins. Current work involves construction of a numerical chemical 
reactor model to study the dynamics of sediment diagenesis, including effects 
of transport by groundwaters, and study of the origins of geopressured zones 
in the subsurface, and investigation of the fluid pressure regimes within 
fold-thrust belts during orogenies. With the support of petroleum and minerals 
companies and governmental sources, Craig is building a hydrogeology laboratory, 
complete with an Alliant FX/8 supercomputer, one of the world's most powerful 
computers. 



DANIEL B. BLAKE, Professor (B.S. 1960, University of Illinois, M.S. 1962, Michigan 
State, Ph.D. 1966, University of California) Invertebrate Paleontology; 
Biostratigraphy 

Professor Blake has recently completed a phylogenetic analysis of all post- 
Paleozoic asteroids, and a review of asteroid classification and functional mor- 
phology. With Thomas E. Guensburg, a former graduate student, he is now study- 
ing the water vascular system and functional morphology of Paleozoic asteroids, 
and with Edward M. Snyder, another former student, he is studying phylogeny 
of Paleozoic bryozoans. He and his graduate students are working on field and 
laboratory studies of the paleoecology and biogeography of Carboniferous bryozo- 
ans, and a paleoecological analysis of a widely distributed Ordovician interval 
bounded by two K-bentonite (altered volcanic ash) isochrones. Professor Blake 
teaches Introductory Physical Geology, undergraduate Paleontology, and graduate 
courses in Paleoecology and Principles of Paleontology. Paleoecology includes 
field trips to Southern Illinois and Kentucky. 

ALBERT V. CAROZZI, Professor (M.S. 1947, University of Geneva;[Geology 
and Mineralogy] Dr.Sc. 1948, University of Geneva) - Sedimentary Petrography; 
Petroleum Geology 

Professor Carozzi is continuing carbonate microfacies studies in the Paleozoic 
of the Mid-Continent and with support from TEXACO USA is undertaking experi- 
mental studies on the development of stylolitic secondary porosity under simulat- 
ed deep burial conditions with application to the Atokan of the Midland Basin 
and the Smackover of the Gulf Coast. He has just completed two books. The 
first one entitled "Carbonate Rock Depositional Models: a Microfacies Approach" 
is a worldwide synthesis of his own studies and that of his graduate students 
over a period of more than 35 years. The volume which has 500 illustrations 
is scheduled to be published by I.H.R.D.C. Press in Boston in late fall 1986. The 
second volume was prepared in collaboration with Dr. Chengyun Yang of the 
Department of Geology, Peking University who was a research associate with 
Professor Carozzi in this Department in 1982. The book is entitled "Practical 
Classification and Microfacies Analysis of Carbonate Rocks" and illustrated 
by 200 plates of photomicrographs. This bilingual (Chinese-English) volume 
has a preface by Dr. Shicung Guan of Academia Sinica. It will be released late 
this year by the Printing House of Peking University. It will be the first book 
on carbonate rocks ever published in the People's Republic of China. 

CHU-YUNG CHEN, Assistant Professor (B.S. 1977, National Taiwan University, 
Ph.D. 1983, MIT) Trace Element Geochemistry; Isotope Geochemistry; Igneous 
Petrology 

Chu-Yung Chen joined the Department in August 1983 and is setting up a 
neutron activation laboratory and an isotope dilution laboratory for high quality 
trace-element and isotope analyses. Her research projects include: (1) The 
geochemical evolution of Haleakala volcano, East Maui. (2) Trace element 
variations of tholeiites, transitional basalts and alkalaic basalts from Mauna 
Kea volcano, Hawaii. (3) Rare-earth geochemistry of Hilina formation, Kilauea 
volcano, Hawaii. (4) Pb isotopic geochemistry of Loihi seamount. (5) Sr and 
Nd isotopes and trace element geochemistry of ultramafic nodules from Mt. 
Leura, Victoria, Australia. (6) Trace element studies and factor analyses of 
coal from Freeport and aerosol from Houston. (7) Petrological and geochemical 
studies of West Maui volcano. (8) Trace element and isotopic (Nd, Sr and Pd) 
studies of the transition from tholeiitic to alkalic volcanism on Hawaiian islands. 
(9) Geochemistry of high-MgO basalts from Hawaiian volcanoes. (10) Mineral 
chemistry of Hawaiian basalts. (11) Ophiolites from Cyprus. (12) Kimberlites 
and Carbonatites from Illinois. (13) Oxygen isotopic geochemistry of Hawaiian 
basalts. 



WANG-PING CHEN, Associate Professor (B.S., National Taiwan Univ., 1974, 
Ph.D., MIT, 1979) - Geophysics, Seismology, Tectonics 

The research activity of the earthquake seismology group is focusing on 
the quantitative understanding of large scale deformation of the lithosphere. 
We constrain the thermo-mechanical properties of the lithosphere by precisely 
determining the depth and focal mechanism of earthquakes, and by analyzing 
the gravity and geoid anomalies derived from satellite altimetry. Our current 
research projects include: plate coupling and the unbending of the subducted 
lithosphere, the relationship between earthquake generation and rheology, source 
kinematics of large earthquake sequences, the nature of strike-slip faulting 
in regions of extensional tectonics, and the high resolution reflection imaging 
of a fold-and-thrust belt in the Hudson valley. 



RANDALL T. CYGAN, Assistant Professor (1987) (B.S. 1977, University of 
Illinois at Chicago, M.S. 1980 and Ph.D. 1983, Pennsylvania State University) 
- Geochemistry, Mineral Physics 

Randall Cygan is active in research dealing with the mineral equilibria and 
chemical kenetics of geochemical processes. Of primary interest in his research 
is the examination of chemical diffusion processes in silicate minerals as a 
means of extracting the thermal histories of mineral assemblages in crystalline 
rocks. Experimental research includes the examination of cation diffusion rates 
in high temperature phases, such as garnet and olivine, using electron and ion 
microprobe analytical techniques. High temperature measurements of electrical 
behavior involving the conductivity and dielectric response of silicate minerals 
are being performed to elucidate the point defect structure of the phase. The 
type and number of defects will dictate the energies and, ultimately, the rates 
of ionic transport. Theoretical approaches, including the ionic modeling of 
silicate mineral structures and physical properties, complement the experimental 
work and provide insight into the nature of chemical bonding in silicates. His 
other research interests include the examination of rock-water interactions 
and the kinetics and mechanisms of mineral dissolution, chemical fractionation 
and transport processes in magmatic systems, and the nucleation kinetics of 
silicate minerals. 



STEPHEN GRAND, Assistant Professor [1986 appointment] (B.Sc. 1978, McGill 
University; PhD. 1986, Cal Tech) - Geophysics, Seismology 

Stephen Grand is interested in the elastic fine structure of the mantle. Using 
synthetic seismogram techniques to understand wave propagation in the mantle, 
shear waves from earthquakes can be used to determine structure. Using multiple 
bounce shear waves increases the resolution and applicability of the technique. 
Recently, using the synthetic seismogram technique, vertical shear profiles 
were developed for the Canadian shield, the western United States and the 
northwest Atlantic ocean, showing large differences to 400 km depth. Current 
research efforts are to derive fully three-dimensional models of the mantle 
shear structure beneath North America using the tomography technique, 
developing computer codes to make synthetic seismograms appropriate for 
propagation through laterally varying structure and investigating deep mantle 
structure beneath individual tectonic provinces on a world-wide scale. The 
ultimate goal of this research is to help answer questions such as how deep 
do continents extend, is the mantle layered and on what scale does convection 
occur in the earth. 



RICHARD L. HAY, Ralph E. Grim Professor of Geology (B.S. 1947, Northwestern 
University; M.S. 1949, Northwestern University; Ph.D. 1952, Princeton University) 
- Stratigraphy; Sedimentary Petrology 

Professor Hay's work has been concentrated on the general fields of strati- 
graphy, paleoenvironments of semiarid basins, pedogenesis, silicate diagenesis, 
and volcaniclastic sedimentology. His present major research effort is on spring- 
related carbonate rocks and Mg-silicate clays (sepiolite, smectite and kerolite) 
that were chemically precipitated in a Pliocene lake basin in the Amargosa 
Desert of Nevada-California. He and his students have worked out the distribu- 
tion, paleoenvironment, and origin of the different types of carbonates and 
clays. Other research interests are diagenetic alteration of Ordovician tuffs 
in the Midcontinent to K-feldspar and K-bentonite (with Dennis Kolata of the 
ISGS and Mingchou Lee of Case Western University), silicate diagenesis in Searles 
Lake, California (with Sandra Guldman), and carbonatite eruptive rocks. 



DONALD M. HENDERSON, Professor (A.B. 1943, Brown University; Ph.D. 1950, 
Harvard) - Mineralogy; Crystallography 

Professor Henderson's principal research interests are concerned with local 
structures in minerals and with their study via such approaches as nuclear magnet- 
ic resonance, electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Current- 
ly, he is studying ordering and local structures in feldspars. He is interested 
also in the educational uses of microcomputers. He teaches undergraduate 
and graduate courses in mineralogy, optical mineralogy, x-ray diffraction, struc- 
tural mineralogy and crystallography. 



ALBERT T. HSUI, Associate Professor (B.S. 1968, Lowell Technological Institute; 
M.S. 1969, Cornell University; Ph.D. 1972, Cornell University) - Geophysics; 
Mathematical Modelling; Geodynamics; Planetary Evolution and Borehole 
Seismology 

Dr. Hsui's research interests are basically in the pursue of fundamental under- 
standing of the working principles of various geological and tectonic processes. 
Some of his past and continuing research topics include: (a) investigations of 
geodynamic processes at convergent plate boundaries; (b) planetary differentiation 
and its effects on mantle evolution and mantle dynamics; (c) fluid dynamics 
within magma bodies and their relationships to the formation of igneous rocks. 
More recently, a few new projects have been formulated. One of the new topics 
is to study wave propagation around a borehole. This is to improve our present 
understanding of vertical seismic profiling and to provide improved interpretation 
of acoustic logging results. Another project is to carry out a comparative analysis 
of the SEASAT altimetry data and the MAGSAT data to gain better understanding 
of the crustal and the upper mantle structure of the Earth. Additionally, a 
new project has been developed jointly with Professor G. deV. Klein to study 
sedimentation, subsidence, thermal and tectonic evolution of sedimentary basins. 
Dr. Hsui teaches a general geology course for science and geology majors, explor- 
ation geophysics and other graduate courses in Geodynamics and Mathematical 
Methods in Geology. 



W. HILTON JOHNSON, Associate Professor (A.B. 1956, Earlham CoUege, M.S. 
1961, University of Illinois; Ph.D. 1962, University of Illinois) - Quaternary Strati- 
graphy; Glacial Geology 

Dr. Johnson's research interests are in the areas of geomorphology, glacial 
geology and stratigraphy. His work is concentrated on the surficial deposits 
in Illinois in cooperation with colleagues at the State Geological Survey. Current- 
ly he is working on relict periglacial features dating from the last glaciation, 
Wisconsinan stratigraphic correlations and drainage events in northeastern Illinois 
(with A. K. Hansel), on geomorphic mapping of the Woodfordian drift plain using 
remote sensing and related methods, and on interactions between the Lake 
Michigan and Huron-Erie glacial lobes in eastern Illinois and western Indiana 
(with N. K. Bleuer). Graduate students under Johnson's supervision are working 
on a variety of projects including: Quaternary geology and glacial sedimentology 
in the Precambrian shield terraine of south-central Ontario, late Pleistocene 
and Holocene fluvial geomorphology, stratigraphy and sedimentology of the 
lower Illinois River valley region, provenance of Illinoian and pre-Illinoian tills 
in south-central Illinois, and late Quaternary geology of the Middle Fork Vermilion 
River valley. Dr. Johnson teaches Introduction to the Study of the Earth, Glacial 
Geology, Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology. Field trips taken locally 
and to central Wisconsin emphasize glacial geology and stratigraphy; trips to 
central and southwestern Illinois focus on glacial stratigraphy, paleosols, late 
Pleistocene and Holocene fluvial geomorphology and alluvial stratigraphy; trips 
to Indiana emphasize glacial geology and bedrock and Karst geomorphology 
of the unglaciated area of south-central Indiana. 

R. JAMES KIRKPATRICK, Professor (B.S. 1968, CorneU University; Ph.D. 1972, 
University of niinois) - Igneous and Experimental Petrology, NMR Spectroscopy 

For several years Professor Kirkpatrick's research has centered on the use 
of magic-angle sample-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MASS 
NMR) in examining the structures of silicate crystals and glasses (quenched 
melts). One major objective of this work is to better understand the 
thermodynamic, mechanical, and crystallization behavior of lava and magma 
and thereby the origin, evolution, and crystallization of igneous rocks. Another 
major objective is to use MASS NMR to examine the structure of crystalline 
phases that are too fine grained to be examined by single crystal x-ray or neutron 
diffraction, such as clay minerals. A third major objective is to develop advanced 
NMR spectroscopic methods to examine solid materials. This research program 
is being conducted in collaboration with Professor Eric Oldfield of the School 
of Chemical Sciences, Professor D.M. Henderson, Professor S. P. Altaner, and 
students and post-doctoral fellows in both Geology and Chemistry. Professor 
Kirkpatrick teaches Igneous and Metamorphic Petrography, Igneous Petrology 
(Graduate Level) and Geochemical Kinetics. 

GEORGE deVRIES KLEIN, Professor (B.A. 1954, Wesleyan University; M.A. 
1957, University of Kansas; Ph.D. 1960, Yale University) Basin Analysis; Clastic 
Sedimentology Geology and Sedimentology; Sandstone Petrology and Diagenesis 

Dr. Klein's research activities deal with several aspects of basin analysis 
and Clastic sedimentary systems. These include (1) Analysis of the timing of 
depositional systems, diagenetic events, sea level history, global sedimentary 
cycling and paleoclimatic events to the geodynamic and tectonic subsidence 
history of sedimentary basins. Research in this area has focused on the Illinois 
Basin in cooperation with Dr. A. T. Hsui and with the Illinois State Geological 
Survey, and on back-arc basins of the western Pacific. Analysis of sedimentary 
basins involving the transition from an active margin into continental crust 

10 



is in the planning stage in the Yellow Sea of Korea. (2) Paleogeographic distribu- 
tion of depositional systems through time. Research in this area has focused 
on storm depositional systems, tidal sedimentary systems and deep water subma- 
rine fans and turbidites. (3) clastic diagenesis. Research in this area has focused 
on downhole diagenetic changes in response to thermally-driven fluid circulation 
in back-arc basins, and a current project in the Illinois Basin. (4) Understanding 
the controls and processes of correlating bedload sediment yield from continents 
to oceans. This program has focused on bedload sediment yield in active continen- 
tal margins tying sediment yield and turbidite periodicity in ocean basins to 
rate of tectonic uplift. Dr. Klein teaches Geology 309 (Sedimentology and Sedi- 
mentary Geology), Geology 310 (Field and Laboratory Procedures in Sedimen- 
tology; this is a laboratory course which accompanies Geology 309, Geology 
477 (Recent Sedimentary Environments). Course field trips are run to the 
Vermillion River of Illinois (to study point bar evolution), central Indiana (to 
examine clastic and carbonate facies), and the Arkoma Basin and Ouachita 
Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma to examine Carboniferous clastic deposi- 
tional systems. 



RALPH L. LANGENHEIM, JR., Professor (B.S. Geol. Engineering 1943, University 
of Tulsa; M.S. 1947, University of Colorado; Ph.D. 1951, University of Minnesota) 
- Stratigraphy, Paleontology, Field Geology, Geology of Energy, Coal 

Professor Langenheim's research centers on Pennsylvanian stratigraphy 
and biostratigraphy in the Illinois Basin and southern Nevada. Presently major 
effort is being devoted to determining brachiopod ranges in the Arrow Canyon, 
Nevada section which has been proposed for several regional and/or world strato- 
types. Study of Latest Chesterian through Late Morrowan faunas is currently 
under way as well as a regional study of Atokan and Desmoinesian stratigraphy 
and biostratigraphy in the southern part of the Cordilleran Miogeocline. He 
also is involved in the work of the various IUGS subcommittees seeking to define 
Late Carboniferous stratotypes. He teaches History of the Earth, Geology 
of Energy and Field Geology at the elementary level; Principles of Stratigraphy 
at the intermediate level and graduate courses in Stratigraphy. He is Director 
of the Summer Geology Field Camp which is held in Wyoming. 



C. JOHN MANN, Professor (B.S. 1953, University of Kansas; M.S. 1957, University 
of Kansas; Ph.D. 1961, University of Wisconsin) - Stratigraphy; Mathematical 
Geology; Petroelum Geology 

Professor Mann's mathematical geology research work, sponsored by Sandia 
National Laboratories, attempts to determine probabilities and probability density 
functions of natural geological events and processes in order to more accurately 
predict hazards accompanying long-term storage of nuclear waste materials. 
Dr. Mann is also examining the evolution of stratigraphic sequences in an effort 
to more accurately determine periodicities and cyclicities which are known 
to be present as well as to perhaps detect new ones which previously have gone 
undetected. He teaches Geology for Engineers, General Geology, and Principles 
of Stratigraphy. These courses include field trips to southern Indiana, Upper 
Wabash River Valley and San Salvador Island, Bahamas. Studies in the Bahamas 
are on algal structures in a brackish to hypersaline lake in an attempt to relate 
structures and lack of structures in the mounds to environmental conditions 
under which they are growing. 

11 



STEPHEN MARSHAK, Assistant Professor (A.B. 1976, Cornell University; M.S. 
1979, University of Arizona; Ph.D. 1983, Columbia University) - Structural 
Geology and Tectonics 

Dr. Marshak's current research interests are in the area of field structural 
geology. Along with several graduate students, he has been focusing efforts 
on two field areas during the past three years. One group has been studying 
the mechanism of orocline formation in the Appalachian fold-thrust belt near 
Kingston, New York (the work was supported by NSF). As a result of this work, 
they have been able to demonstrate that oroclines in thin-skinned domains can 
develop by reactivation of detachment faults during non-coaxial shear; 
second-generation movement on such faults results in rotation of hanging-wall 
folds and in development of complex accommodation structures. One student 
in the group has also looked in detail at the nature of grain-scale extensional 
fabrics in cleaved limestone of the fold-thrust belt. He has discovered, by appli- 
cation of Fry strain analysis, that the microlithons between cleavage domains 
are locally stretched by as much as 8096 parallel to cleavage, and thus are not 
passive during cleavage formation. A second group has been working in the 
Sonoran desert region of western Arizona. One of the students has just completed 
a study of poly-phase contractional Mesozoic structures in the Granite Wash 
Mountains. A second student has been working on the nature of basement/cover 
relations and on fold evolution and metamorphic history in the mylonite of the 
Buckskin Mountains "core complex." Another of the structure students is current- 
ly working on the relationship between basement structure and seismicity in 
the central Adirondack Mountains of New York. Contingent on funding, Dr. 
Marshak anticipates initiating two new projects; the first concerns chronology 
of tectonism in the mid-continent, and the second concerns the basement tecton- 
ics of a portion of the Transantarctic Mountains. 



ALBERTO S. NIETO, Associate Professor (B.S. 1961, San Marcos University; 
M.S. 1963, Washington University; Ph.D. 1974, University of Illinois) - Engineering 
Geology; Applied Rock Mechanics 

Dr. Nieto's main professional interests are applied rock mechanics and the 
geotechnical characterization of large engineering sites such as hydroelectric 
projects, underground storage caverns, waste disposal sites, surface and under- 
ground mines, major highways, foundations for large structures and others. 
In the last two years he has investigated the precursory, moment-driven deforma- 
tion of some very large rockslides in Peru, Italy and Canada. He is also studying 
the role of water (apart from its effect on effective stresses) in the triggering 
of slope movements in mountainous, semiarid regions. He is presently supervising 
Ph.D. theses on shear strength of soil-filled discontinuities in rock masses and 
the analysis of a new model for slope failures that involves a combination of 
toppling and sliding. Dr. Nieto teaches Geology for Engineers, Principles of 
Engineering Geology and Practice of Engineering Geology at undergraduate 
and graduate levels; he also holds a joint appointment in the Civil Engineering 
Department where he collaborates in research projects in geotechnical engineer- 
ing. 



12 



PHILIP A. SANDBERG, Professor (B.S. cum laude 1960; M.S. 1961, Louisiana 
State University. Fil. Lie., 1964; Fil. Dr., 1965 University of Stockholm) - 
Carbonate Sedimentology; Micropaleontology; Historical Geology 

Dr. Sandberg has begun a new research program on appliation of immunology 
to carbonate sedimentology and paleontology. This NSF-funded study is a joint 
effort with Peter Westbroek (a Visiting Professor, in our department, from 
the Dept. of Biochemistry, Univ. of Leiden, Netherlands). This study will investi- 
gate the use of antibodies raised against the matrix of modern carbonate skeletons 
for determination of source organisms for carbonate sediments and taxonomic 
affinity of uncertain fossil taxa. In connection with this new research program, 
Dr. Sandberg has taken coursework in immunochemistry and has been awarded 
an Associateship in the Center for Advanced Studies (Spring 1987), and a Fellow- 
ship in the LAS program of Study in a Second Discipline (Fall 1986). During 
part of that time, he will be engaged in training and research in Leiden, where 
an international Center for Geoimmunology is developing. Research on carbonate 
mud sources and micrite diagenesis is continuing, including textural-compositional 
studies of ancient micrites, experimental diagenesis (hydrothermal bombs) of 
carbonate muds, and investigation of trace element-isotopic signatures as indicat- 
ors of most probable modern carbonate mud contributors. Dr. Sandberg's teaching 
responsibilities include: Carbonate Sedimentology, the SEM portion of Microbeam 
Analysis (SEM and electron microprobe), Micropaleontology, and an Intersession 
field course in the Florida Keys entitled "Introduction to Modern Marine Carbon- 
ate Environments". 






PLEASE NOTE: The faculty profile information given above is generalized 
and conveys only work done in the last few years. For more specific information 
about courses or research, please contact the individual faculty member at 
the Department address. 



L3 




Tom Corbet and Ming-Ku 
Lee model deep groundwater 
flow on the Alliant FX-8 
in the department's Center 
for Supercomputing in Hydro- 
geology. The revolutionary 
architecture of the FX-8 
uses eight parallel computing 
heads simultaneously to 
perform at speeds rivaling 
the world's fastest computer. 
A fiber optic link connects 
the FX-8 to other campus 
computers including a Cray 
XMP-48. 



Wang-Hong Yang using 
one of the high- 
resolution nuclear 
magnetic resonance 
spectrometers. 
These spectrometers 
are used to examine 
the structures of a 
wide variety of crystal- 
line and amorphous 
materials 




11 



RECENTLY FUNDED PROJECTS 
Principal Investigator Title 



Agency 



Thomas F. Anderson 



Jay D. Bass 
Craig Bethke 



Albert Carozzi 



Chu-Yung Chen 



Wang-Ping Chen 



Integrated Paleontological, Geochemical 
and Paleo-Oceanographie Studies 
on the Taconic Foreland Basin 

The Petrology of Sulfides and the 
Geochemistry of Sulfur in Hydrothermally 
Metamorphosed Ocean Rocks 

Mineral Elasticity by Brillouin 
Scattering 

Paleohydrologic Modeling of 
Sedimentary Basins 

Techniques of Hydrologic Modeling 

Simultaneous Chemical Transport 
and Reaction 

Faculty Research Initiation Grant 

Research Initiation Grant 

Theoretical Modeling of Simultaneous Mass 
Transport and Chemical Reaction during 
Diagenetic Alteration of Sedimentary Rocks 

Presidential Young Investigator Award 

Sponsored Research Grant Program 



Stylolitization Processes, Natural Stylolitic 
Porosity, and Experimental Development 
of Stylolitic Porosity in Carbonate Rocks 
Under Simulated Deep Burial 

Petrological and Geochemical 
Study of the Evolution of West 
Maui Volcano 

A Study of Intracontinental and Intraplate 
Earthquakes 

Shallow Seismic Profiling of a Fold-and - 
Thrust Belt in New York 



NSF 

NSF 

NSF 

ARCO 

TEXACO 
AMOCO 

SHELL 

EXXON 

NSF 

NSF 

ALLIANT 
Computer 

Systems 

TEXACO 



NSF 



NSF 



AMOCO/ 
TEXACO 



15 



Principal Investigator 



Title 



Agency 



Stephen P. Grand 



Tomographic Inversion for Mantle 
Shear Structure 



NSF 



Albert T. Hsui 



Determination of Q as a Function 
of Depth and Tectonic Province 

SEASAT Altimetry Interpretation and 
Geoid Modelling 

Numerical Modelling of Sedimentary 
Basin Evolution 



DARPA 



U.S. AIR 
FORCE 

CHEVRON 



W. Hilton Johnson Interlobate Comparison of Glacial- 

Depositional Style as Evidenced by 
Small-Relief Glacial Landscape 
Features, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio, 
Utilizing Shuttle Imaging Radar-B 

R. James Kirkpatrick Kinetics of Igneous Processes 

High-Resolution NMR Spectroscopy 
of Geologically Important Crystals 
and Glasses 



NASA 



NSF 

NSF 



George deV. Klein 



Stephen Marshak 



Philip A. Sandberg 



Study of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 
(NMR) Spectroscopy of Solids 

Study of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 
(NMR) Spectroscopy of Solids 

Synthesis of Back-Arc Basin Sedimen- 
tology Based on DSDP/IPOD Drilling 

Kingston Arc of Eastern New York: 
Structural Geometry, Strain and 
Tectonic Significance of an 
Oroclinal Bend in the Appalachians 

Original Mineralogy in Micrites: 
Genetic and Diagenetic Implications 

Original Mineralogy in Micrites: 
Genetic and Diagenetic Implica- 
tions 



SANDIA 
Nat. Lab. 

SANDIA 
Nat. Lab. 

NSF 



NSF 



NSF 



ACS Pet. 
Research 
Fund 



Original Mineralogy in Micrites: 
Genetic and Diagenetic Implications 

Application of Immunology to Carbonate 
Sedimentology and Paleontology 



AMOCO 



NSF 



16 



LIST OF PUBLICATIONS 1985-1986 

Geophysics/Structural Geology /Tectonics/Engineering Geology 

Books and Articles 

Huang, J., and W.-P. Chen , 1985, Source mechanisms of the Mogod earthquake 
sequence of 1967 and the event of July 4, 1974 in Mongolia, Geophys. J. 
R. Astr. Soc. 

Grimison, N., and W.-P. Chen , 1985, The Azores-Gibraltar plate boundary: 
Focal mechanisms, depths of earthquakes, and their tectonic implications, 
J. Geophys. Res., v. 91, p. 2029-2047. 

Grand , S. P. and D. V. Helmberger, 1985, Uppermantle shear structure 
beneath Asia from multi-bounce S waves, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., v. 41, 
p. 154-169. 

Grand , S. P., D. V. Helmberger and L. J. Burdick, 1985, Attenuation bias 
measurements of the semipalatinsk and North African test sites, Woodward- 
Clyde Consultants Technical Report, WCCP-R-85-01. 

Helmberger, D. V., G. R. Engen and S. P. Grand , 1985, Long period wave 
propagation in laterally varying structure, J. Geophys., v. 58, p. 82-91. 

Helmberger, D. V., G. R. Engen and S. P. Grand , 1985, Upper-mantle cross 
section from California to Greenland, J. Geophys., v. 58, p. 92-100. 

S. P. Grand , Shear velocity structure of the mantle beneath the North Ameri- 
can plate, Ph.D. thesis, Caltech, Pasadena, 228 pp. 

Hsui, A. T., J. Zhang, C. H. Cheng and M. N. Toksoz, 1985, Tube wave attenu- 
ation and in-situ permeability, MIT Full Wave Form Acoustic Logging Consor- 
tium Report, p. 193-204. 

Hsui, A. T. and S. Youngquist, 1985, A dynamic model of the curvature 
of the Mariana Trench, Nature, v. 318, n. 6045, p. 455-457. 

Riahi, N. and A. T. Hsui, 1986, Non-linear double diffusive convection with 
local heat and solute sources, Int. J. of Engineering Sci., v. 24, p. 529-544. 

Sawyer, D. S., A. T. Hsui and M. N. Toksoz, 1986, Subsidence and thermal 
history resulting from middle Miocene extension in the Los Angeles Basin. 
Tectonophysics, in press. 

Hsui, A. T. and M. N. Toksoz, 1986, Application of an acoustic model to 
determine in-situ permeability of a borehole, J. of the Acoustical Society 
of America., in press. 

Heidlauf, D. T., A. T. Hsui and G. deV. Klein , 1986, Tectonic subsidence 
analysis of the Illinois Basin, J. of Geology, in press. 

Marshak , S., and Engelder T., 1985, Development of cleavage in limestones 
of a fold-thrust belt in eastern New York, J. Struc. Geol., v. 7, p. 345-359. 

17 



Engelder, T., and Marshak , S., 1985, Disjunctive cleavage formed at shallow 
depths in sedimentary rocks, J. Struc. GeoL, v. 7, p. 327-343. 

Laubach, S. E., and Marshak , S., 1986, Geometry of fault arrays generated 
during extension of fractured crystalline basement, J. Geol. Soc. London, 
Special issue on extensional Tectonics, in press. 

Marshak , S., and Engelder, T., 1986, The deformed Lower Devonian strata 
of the Hudson Valley, west of Catskill, New York, Geol. Soc. Am., DNAG 
Centennial Field Guide to the Northeast, in press. 

McEachran, D. B., and Marshak , S., 1986, Teaching strain theory in structural 
geology using graphics programs for the Apple Macintosh computer, J. 
of National Assoc, of Geology Teachers, in press. 

Marshak , S., 1986, Structure of the Hudson Valley fold-thrust belt between 
Catskill and Kingston, New York: A field guide, Geol. Soc. Am. NE-section 
1986 Field Trip Guidebook, 70 p. 

Marshak , S., 1986, Structure and tectonics of the Hudson Valley fold-thrust 
belt, New York, Geol. Soc. Am. Bull., v. 97, p. 354-368. 

Nieto, A. S. and P. K. Mathews, 1985, Moment-driven deformation of rock 
slopes, Procs. 36th Symp. Highway Geology; Purdue University, West Lafay- 
ette, IN, 12 p. 

Nieto , A. S. and C. Zambak, 1985, Design of rock slopes susceptible to top- 
pling, Sect. 9, Chapter in Handbook of Civil Engineering, Technomics Pull. 
Co., P. N. Sheremisenoff, N. P. Sheeremisenoff, S. L. Cheng, editors. 

Abstracts 

Grimison, N., and VV.-P. Chen , 1985, Source mechanisms of earthquakes 
and the present-day tectonics along the Azores Gibraltar plate boundary, 
EOS Trans. A.G.U., v. 66, p. 298. 

Karner, G. D., N. L. Grimison, W.-P. Chen , and J. K. Weissel, 1985, SEASAT 
derived gravity and geoid anomalies of the Azores-Gibraltar plate boundary: 
A diffused zone of ocean-ocean convergence near Gibraltar, ibid, p. 361. 

Chen , W.-P., 1985, Sub-crustal earthquakes beneath the Shillong plateau 
and their tectonic implications, ibid, p. 306. 

Chen , W.-P., and J. L. Nabelek, 1985, Strike-slip earthquakes and the devel- 
opment of the North China basin, ibid, v. 66, p. 1067. 

Nabelek, J. L., and W.-P. Chen , 1985, The Tangshan earthquake sequence 
of 1976 and its implications for the evolution of the North China basin, 
ibid, v. 66, p. 961. 

Graves, R., S. P. Grand and D. V. Helmberger, 1985, Upper mantle cross- 
section from Tonga to California, EOS trans. AGU, v. 66, p. 975. 

Hsui, A. T., 1985, On the curvature of the Mariana Trench, EOS, Trans. 
Am. Geophys. Un., v. 66, n. 18, p. 369. 

18 



Hsui, A. T., J. Zhang, C. H. Cheng and M. N. Toksoz, 1985, Tube wave 
attenuation and in-situ permeability, Proceedings of the Soc. of Professional 
Well Log Analysts 26th Annual Logging Symposium, June 17-20, Dallas 
Texas. 

Hutasoit, L. M. and A. T. Hsui, 1985, Finite amplitude double diffusive 
convection in porous media, Proceedings of the North Central Regional 
Meeting of the Geological Society of America, DeKalb, Illinois. 

Heidlauf, D. T., A. T. Hsui and G. deV. Klein , 1985, Tectonic and subsidence 
history of Illinois Basin, EOS Trans. Am. Geophys. Un., v. 66, n. 46, p. 1059. 

Youngquist, S. and A. T. Hsui, 1985, Geometric evolution of the Mariana 
Trench and associated back-arc system, EOS, Trans. Am., Geophys. Un., 
v. 66, n. 46, p. 1077. 

Hsui , A. T. and M. N. Toksoz, 1985, Attenuation of Stoneley Wave and 
the determination of in-situ permeability, EOS, Trans. Am. Geophys. Un., 
v. 66, n. 46, p. 977. 

Hsui , A. T., 1986, Evolution of the Mariana Trench and its implication to 
plate reconstruction at convergent plate boundaries, Proceedings of the 
1986 Texas A & M University Geodynamic Symposium on Mesozoic and 
Cenozoic plate reconstructions, p. 49-101. 

Laubach, S. E. and Marshak , S., 1985, Fault patterns generated during exten- 
sion of crystalline basement, Geol. Soc. Am. Absts. v. 17, p. 460. 

Marshak , S., Kwiecinski, P., McEachran, D., and Tabor, J., 1985, Structural 
geometry of the "orocline" in the Appalachian foreland, near Kingston 
New York, Geol. Soc. Am. Abst. w/pgms., v. 17, p. 53. 

Marshak, S., 1985, Evidence for a buckled thrust system in the northern 
Appalachian fold-thrust belt, New York, Geol. Soc. Am. Abst. w/pgms., 
v. 17. 

Marshak , S., Anderson, D.E., and Laubach, S., 1985, Modes of fracture 
propagation and rock-water interaction in extensional terranes: in "Confer- 
ence on extensional tectonics," Durham, England. 

Marshak , S., Engelder, T., and Bhagat, S., 1985, Mechanism of cleavage- 
parallel extension in lime wackestone, "Conference on structures of sedimen- 
tary rocks," London, England. 

Dawers, N., Marshak , S., Seeber, N., et al., 1986, Geologic controls on 
seismicity in the central Adirondacks, Geol. Soc. Am. Abst. w/pgms., v. 
18, p. 12. 

Tabor, J., and Marshak , S., 1986, Along-strike variations in structural geom- 
etry of the Appalachian fold-thrust belt south of Kingston, New York, Geol. 
Soc. Am. Abst. w/pgms, v. 18, p. 70. 



19 



Petrology/Mineralogy /Geochemistry/Hydrogeology 

Books and Articles 

Bethke , C. M., 1985, A numerical model of compaction-driven groundwater 
flow and heat transfer and its application to the paleohydrology of intracra- 
tonic sedimentary basins, Jour, of Geophys. Research, v. 90, p. 6817-6828. 

Bethke , C. M., and R. C. Reynolds , 1986, Recursive method for determining 
frequency factors in interstratified clay diffraction calculations, Clays 
and Clay Minerals, v. 34, p. 224-226. 

Bethke , C. M., 1986, Hydrologic constraints on genesis of the Upper Missis- 
sippi Valley Mineral District from Illinois Basin brines, Economic Geology, 
v. 81, p. 233-249. 

Bethke , C. M., N. Vergo, and S. P. Altaner , 1986, Pathways of smectite 
illitization, Clays and Clay Minerals, v. 34, p. 125-135. 

Bethke , C. M., and S. P. Altaner , 1986, Layer-by-layer mechanism of smec- 
tite illitization and application to a new rate law, Clays and Clay Minerals, 
v. 34, p. 136-145. 

Bethke , C. M., 1986, Inverse hydrologic analysis of the distribution and 
origin of gulf coast-type geopressured zones, Jour, of Geophys. Research, 
v. 91, p. 6535-6545. 

Chen , C.-Y. and F. A. Frey, 1985, Trace element and isotope Geochemistry 
of Haleakala volcanic series, East Maui: Implications to the origin of Hawaii- 
an basalts, J. Geophys. Res. v. 90, p. 8743-8768. 

Frey, F. A., C.-Y. Chen , A. Kennedy and M. F. Roden, 1985, Utilization 
of Geochemistry to understand the origin of the Hawaiian Islands, Trans. 
Amer. Nuclear. Soc, v. 49, p. 175-178. 

Henderson , D. M., W.-H. Yang and R. J. Kirkpatrick , 1986, High-resolution 
z ^Si; ZY A1, and 23]\j a nmr spectroscopic study of Al-Si disordering in an- 
nealed albite and oligoclase, Amer. Min., v. 71, p. 712-726. 

Kuo, L.-C, and R. J. Kirkpatrick , 1985, Kinetics of crystal dissolution 
in the system forsterite-diopside-silica, Am. J. Sci., v. 285, p. 51-90. 

Kirkpatrick , R. J., R. A. Kinsey, K. A. Smith, D. M. Henderson , and E. Old- 
field, 1985. High-resolution solid-state sodium-23, aluminum-27, and silicon- 
29 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic reconnaissance of alkali and 
plagioclase feldspars, Am. Min., v. 70, p. 106-123. 

Kinsey, R. A., R. J. Kirkpatrick , J. Hower, K. A. Smith, and E. Oldfield, 
1985, High-resolution aluminum-27 and silicon-29 nuclear magnetic resonance 
spectroscopic study of layer silicates, including clay minerals, Am. Min., 
v. 70, p. 537-548. 

Kuo, L.-C, and R. J. Kirkpatrick, 1985, Dissolution of mafic minerals and 
its implications for the ascent velocities of perdotite-bearing basalts mag- 
mas, J. Geol., v. 93, p. 691-700. 

20 



Oldfield, E., and R. J. Kirkpatrick , 1985, High-resolution NMR of inorganic 
solids, Science, v. 277, p. 1537-1544. 

Kirkpatrick , R. J., T. Dunn, S. Schramm, K. A. Smith, Oestrike, R., and 
Turner, G., 1985, Magic-angle sample-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance 
spectroscopy of silicate glasses: a review, Structure and Bonding in Glass, 
Walrafen, G., and Revez, A., eds., Nat. Bureau of Stds. 

Kirkpatrick , R. J., K. A. Smith, S. Schramm, G. Turner, and W.-H. Yang, 
1985, Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of minerals. 
Ann. Rev. of Earth and Planetary Sci., v. 13, p. 29-47. 

Yang, W.-H., R. J. Kirkpatrick , T. Emilsson, N. Vergo, J. McHone, and 
E. Oldfield, 1985. Detection of high-pressure silica polymorphs in whole-rock 
samples from meteor impact sites using solid-state silicon-29 nuclear mag- 
netic resonance spectroscopy, Meteoritics, v. 21, p. 117-124. 

Kirkpatrick , R. J., K. A. Smith, E. Oldfield, and R. Oestrike, 1985, High- 
resolution aluminum-27 and silicon-29 NMR spectroscopy of glasses and 
crystals along the join CaMgSi 2 06 - CaA^Og. Am. Min., v. 71, p. 705-711. 

Goodman, B. A., J. D. Russell, B. Montez, E. Oldfield, and R. J. Kirkpatrick , 
1985, Structural studies of imogolite and allophanes by aluminum-27 and 
silicon-29 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Phys. Chem. Minerals, 
v. 12, p. 342-346. 

Turner, G., K. A. Smith, R. J. Kirkpatrick , and E. Oldfield, 1986, Boron-11 
nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of borate and borosilicate 
minerals and a borosilicate glass, J. Mag. Res., v. 67, p. 544-550. 

Kirkpatrick , R. J., R. A. Kinsey, K. A. Smith, D. M. Henderson , and E. 
Oldfield, 1986. High resolution solid-state sodium-23, aluminum-27, and 
silicon-29 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic reconnaissance of 
alkali and plagioclase feldspars. Amer. Mineralogist, v. 70, p. 106-123. 

Knight, C.T.G., R. J. Kirkpatrick , and E. Oldfield, 1986, The unexpectedly 
slow approach to thermodynamic equilibrium of the silicate anions in aqueous 
tetramethylammonium silicate solutions, J. Chem. Soc. Chem. Comm., 
p. 66-67. 

Oestrike, R. W., and R. J. Kirkpatrick , 1986, 27 A1 and 29 Si MASS NMR 
spectroscopy of glasses in the system anorthite-diopside-forsterite, Am. 
Min. 

Turner, G. L., R. J. Kirkpatrick , S. H. Risbud, and E. Oldfield, submitted, 
Multi-nuclear magic-angle sample-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance 
spectroscopic studies of crystalline and amorphous ceramic materials, 
J. Am. Cer. Soc. 

Ramachandran, R., C.T.G. Knight, R. J. Kirkpatrick , and E. Oldfield, 1986, 
A two-dimensional NMR approach to the study of intermolecular scrambling 
reactions, J. Mag. Res., in press. 

Kirkpatrick , R. J., and C. A. Weiss, Jr., 1986, Magic-angle sample-spinning 
NMR spectroscopy of clay minerals, in Advanced Chemical Methods for 

21 



Soil and Clay Minerals Research, Stucki, J. W., ed., D. Reidel Co., New 
York, in press. 

Wood, B. J., R. J. Kirkpatrick , and B. Montez, 1986, Order-disorder phenom- 
ena in MgAl204 Spinels, Am. Min., v. 71, in press. 

Yang, W.-H., R. J. Kirkpatrick and G. Turner, 1986, 31 P and 29 Si MASS 
NMR investigation of the structural environment of phosphorus in alkaline- 
earth silicate glasses, J. Am. Cr. Soc, in press. 

Risbud, S. H., R. J. Kirkpatrick , A. P. Taglialavore, and B. Montez, 1986, 
Solid-state NMR evidence of 4-5, and 6-fold Al sites in roller-quenched 
Si02-Al2C>3 glasses, J. Am. Cer. Soc, in press. 

Knight, C. T. G., G. L. Turner, R. J. Kirkpatrick , and E. Oldfield, 1986, 
Solid-state tangsten-183 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, J. Am. 



Chem. Soc, Chem. Comm. 



Abstracts 



Bethke , C. M., 1985, Hydrologic analysis of Gulf Coast-type geopressured 
zones: 98th Ann. Geol. Soc. Amer. Mtg. 

Altaner, S. P., and C. M. Bethke , 1986, Layer ordering in interstratified 
illite/smectite: Inter. Mineral. Soc. Ann. Mtg. 

Bethke , C. M., 1986, Roles of sediment compaction, tectonic compression, 
and topographic relief in driving deep groundwater migration: 99th Ann. 
Geol. Soc. Amer. Mtg. (invited paper). 

Harrison, W. J., and C. M. Bethke , 1986, Paleohydrologic analysis of interact- 
ing meteoric and compactional flow regimes in the U.S. Gulf Coast, 99th 
Ann. Geol. Soc. Amer. Mtg. 

Bethke , C. M., and W. J. Harrison, 1986, Dynamics of geopressured zones 
during compaction of the U.S. Gulf Coast basin, 99th Ann. Geol. Soc. Amer. 
Mtg. 

Engelder, T., and C. M. Bethke , 1986, Reexamination of the Gulf Coast 
model used by the Rubey-Hubbert hypothesis for thrust belt tectonics, 
99th Ann. Geol. Soc Amer. Mtg. 

Frey, C.-Y. Chen , M. Roden, and A. Kennedy, 1985, Utilization of geochemis- 
try to understand the origin of the Hawaiian islands. The Am. Nuclear. 
Soc, Annual Meeting, Boston. 

Chen , C.-Y., F. A. Frey, S. R. Hart and M. O. Garcia, 1985, Isotopic and 
rare-earth element geochemistry of the transition from tholeiitic to alkalic 
volcanism in the Haleakala volcano, East Maui, E.O.S. Trans. AGU Fall 
Meeting- 
Henderson, D. M., 1986, Some mineralogic and petrographic programs for 
the Apple Macintosh microcomputer, 1986 General Meeting of the Inter- 
national Mineralogical Association, Stanford, CA. Abstracts w/pgms, p. 
123. 

22 



Oestrike, R., W.-H. Yang, R. J. Kirkpatrick , E. Oldfield, B. Montez, A. 
Navrotsky, and R. Hervig, 1985, Investigation of framework-stoichiometry 
aluminosilicate glasses using silicon-29 and aluminum-27 MASS NMR spectro- 
scopy. Am. Geophys. Union, Spring 1985 Meeting. 

Weiss, C. A., Jr., R. J. Kirkpatrick , and T. Dunn, 1985, Aluminum-27 and 
silicon-29 NMR spectroscopy of peraluminous gels, Am. Geophys. Union, 
Spring 1985 Meeting. 

Turner, G. L., K. A. Smith, E. Oldfield and R. J. Kirkpatrick , 1985, Structure 
and cation effect on phosphorus-31 NMR chemical shift and anisotropy 
of model and mineral orthophosphates, Am. Geophys. Union, Spring 1985 
Meeting. 

Yang, W.-H., R. J. Kirkpatrick , G. L. Turner, and E. Oldfield, 1985, Phos- 
phorus-31 and aluminum-27 NMR spectroscopy of alumino-silicate glasses, 
Am. Geophys. Union, Spring 1985 Meeting. 

Turner, G. L., C. Nelson, R. J. Kirkpatrick and R. Oestrike, 1986, n B and 
2 ?A1 Mass-NMR spectroscopy of Ca0-B203-Al203 glasses. Amer. Cer. 
Soc, Fall 1986 Meeting. 

Kirkpatrick , R. J., 1986, High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of amorphous 
solids. 1986 Quantum Geochemistry Conference. 

Phillips, Brian and R. J. Kirkpatrick , 1986, A new method for increasing 
resolution of 2 ?A1 mass NMR spectra, A.G.U., 1986 Spring Meeting. 

Kirkpatrick , R. J., W.-H. Yang and M. Carpenter, 1986, 29 Si mass NMR 
spectroscopy of plagioclase feldspars, A.G.U., 1986 Spring Meeting. 

Oestrike, R., K. Geisinger, A. Navrotsky, G. L. Turner, and R. J. Kirkpatrick , 
1986, Structure and thermochemistry of glasses along the join NaAlSi30g- 
NaBSi 3 8 : the effect of boron, GSA. 

Kirkpatrick , R. J., 1986, IMA 86 crystal growth symposium - introduction, 
Int. Min. Assoc, 1986 Meeting. 

Kirkpatrick , R. J., W.-H. Yang, and M. Carpenter, 1986, 29 Si NMR spectros- 
copy of plagioclase feldspars, Int. Min. Assoc, 1986 Meeting. 

Weiss, C. A., Jr., and R. J. Kirkpatrick , 1986, Aluminum-27 and silicon-29 
NMR spectroscopy of mixed-layered illite/smectites, Int. Min. Assoc, 1986 
Meeting. 

Phillips, B. and R. J. Kirkpatrick , 1986, Increased resolution for solid-state 
27 A1 NMR, Int. Min. Assoc, 1986 Meeting. 

Yang, W.-H. and R. J. Kirkpatrick , 1986, 29 Si, 27 A1, 23 Na mass and 29 Si 
CP/mass NMR spectroscopic studies of the reaction of rock-forming silicate 
minerals and glasses with aqueous solution, Int. Min. Assoc, 1986 Meeting. 

23 



Sedimentary Geology /Stratigraphy/Paleontology/Geomorphology 

Books and Articles 

Altaner , S. P., Comparison of rates of smectite illitization to rates of K-f eld- 
spar dissolution: Clays and Clay Minerals, v. 34 in press. 

Whitney G. and S. P. Altaner , 1985, The low-grade metamorphic transforma- 
tion of clay minerals in sedimentary rocks within the Montana disturbed 
belt: Guidebook of field trip for 1985 International Clay Conference, 32 
pp. 

Bethke , C. M. and S. P. Altaner , 1986, Layer-by layer mechanism of smectite 
illitization and application to a new rate law: Clays and Clay Minerals, 
v. 34, p. 136-145. 

Bethke , C. M., N. Vergo, and S. P. Altaner , 1986, Pathways of smectite 
illitization: Clays and Clay Minerals, v. 34, p. 125-135. 

Blake , D. B., 1985, The Benthopectinidae (Asteroidea: Echinodermata) of 
the Jurassic of Switzerland. Eel. Geol. Helv., v. 77, n. 3, p. 631-647. 

Blake , D. B., 1985, Some post-Paleozoic sea stars (Asteroidea: Echinodermata) 
suggesting slow rates of evolution, J. Paleont. 

Blake , D. B., 1986, A classification and phylogeny of post-Paleozoic sea 
stars, Jour. Natural History. 

Carozzi, A. V. and R. T. Bertani, 1985, Lagoa Feia Formation (Lower Cretac- 
eous), Campos Basin, offshore Brazil: rift stage lacustrine carbonate reser- 
voirs, Part I, Jour. Pet. Geol., v. 8, n. 1, p. 37-58, Part II, v. 8, n. 2, p. 199- 
220. 

Carozzi, A. V. and Frank U. H. Falkenhein, 1985, Depositional and diagenetic 
evolution of Cretaceous oncolitic packstone reservoirs, Macae Formation, 
Campos Basin, offshore Brazil: in P.O. Roehl and P. W. Choquette (eds.), 
Carbonate Petroleum Reservoirs, Springer Verlag, p. 473-484. 

Carozzi, A. V., 1985, The reaction of continental Europe to Wegener's theory 
of continental drift: Earth Sciences History, v. 4, n. 2, p. 122-137. 

Carozzi, A. V. and M. R. Owen, 1986, Southern provenance of Upper Jackfork 
Sandstone, southern Ouachita Mountains: Cathodoluminescence petrology, 
Geol. Soc. America Bull., v. 97, n. 1, p. 110-115. 

Carozzi, A. V. and Wm. C. Dawson, 1986, Anatomy of a phylloid algal buildup, 
Raytown Limestone, Iola Formation, Pennsylvanian, Southeast Kansas, 
U.S.A.: Sedimentary Geology, v. 47, n. 3/4, p. 221-261. 

Carozzi , A. V., 1986, Carbonate Rock Depositional Models: A Microfacies 
Approach, 425 p., 560 figs., I.H.R.D.C. Press, (Book). Carozzi, A. V. and 
Sadeg H. Bakush, Subtidal storm-influenced carbonate ramp model: Galena 
Group (Middle Ordovician) along Mississippi River (Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois 
and Missouri), U.S.A., Archives des Sciences, Geneve, in press. 

24 



Carozzi , A. V., 1986, New eustatic model for the origin of carbonate cyclic 
sedimentation: Archives des Sciences, Geneve, in press. 

Cerling, T. E., and R. L. Hay , 1986, An isotopic study of paleosol carbonates 
from Oldurai Gorge. Quat. Res., v. 25, p. 63-78. 

Johnson , VV. H., A. K. Hansel, L. R. Follmer, 1985. Wedron Section, Wedron, 
Illinois - Concepts of Woodfordian glaciation in Illinois m. Decade of North 
American Geology - Centennial Field Guides, GSA. 

Johnson , W. H., A. K. Hansel, B. A. Socha, L. R. Follmer and J. M. Masters, 
1985, Depositional environments and correlation problems of the Wedron 
Formation (Wisconsinnan), northeastern Illinois: North-central Section, 
GSA Field Trip, Illinois State Geological Survey Guidebook, v. 16, 91 p. 

Klein , G. deV., 1985, The control of depositional depth, tectonic uplift and 
volcanism on sedimentation processes in the back-arc basins of the western 
Pacific Ocean, Jour. Geol., v. 93, p. 1-25. 

Marsaglia, K. M. and Klein , G. deV., 1985, The paleogeography of Paleozoic 
and Mesozoic storm depositional systems: A Reply. Jour. Geol., v. 93, 
p. 91-94. 

Klein , G. deV., 1985, Intertidal flats and intertidal sand bodies: in R. A. 
Davis, Jr., editor, 1985, Coastal sedimentary environments, 2nd ed. New 
York, Springer-Verlag, p. 187-224. 

Klein , G. deV., 1985, Sandstone depositional models for exploration for 
fossil fuels, 3rd ed. Boston, IHRDC Publishing Co., 209 p. (Book). 

Klein , G. deV., 1985, The frequency and periodicity of preserved turbidites 
in submarine fans as a quantitative record of tectonic uplift in collision 
zones, Tectonophysics, v. 119, p. 181-193. 

Klein , G. deV., 1986, Sedimentation patterns in relation to rifting, arc volcan- 
ism, and tectonic uplift in back-arc basins of the western Pacific Ocean: 
in Kobayashi, K., and Uyeda, S., editors, Proceedings of the OJI Conference 
on continental margins. Tokyo, Terra Sci. Pub. Co., in press. 

Lee, Y. I., and G. deV. Klein , 1986, Diagenesis of sandstones in the back-arc 
basins of the Western Pacific Ocean: Sedimentology, in press. 

Heidlauf, D. T., A. T. Hsui and G. deV. Klein , 1986, Tectonic subsidence 
analysis of the Illinois Basin: Jour. Geology, in press. 

Klein , G. deV., 1987, Current aspects of Basin Analysis, Sed. Geol., in press. 

Langenheim , R. L., Jr., B. G. Huff, E.W. Lipman and R.C. Vaiden, 1985, 
Preliminary report of the brachiopod fauna, Arrow Canyon section, Southern 
Nevada, U.S.A., Compte Rendu, lOeme, Cong. Internat., Sratigraphie et 
Geologie Carbonifere, Madrid, Spain, v. 2, p. 425-433. 

Petersen, D. W. and R. L. Langenheim , Jr., 1985, Spiriferellina lata Lane 
in the Uppermost Chesterian in the Bird Spring Group at Arrow Canyon, 

25 



Clark County, Nevada, Trans. 111. State Acad. Sci., v. 77 (1984), n. 3-4, 
p. 207-218 (issued Feb. 1985). 

Scheihing, M. H. and R. L. Langenheim , Jr., 1985, Depositional history 
of an Upper Pennsylvanian Cyclothem in the Illinois Basin and comparison 
to Kansas in cyclothemic sequences, p. 373-382 in J. T. Dutro, Jr and H. 
W. Pfefferkorn (eds), Compte Rendu, v. 5, Neuvieme Cong. Internat. Strat. 
et Geol. Carbonif., Wash. D.C. and Champaign-Urbana, IL, 549 p. 

Mann , C. J., 1985, Changing Faces, Math. Geol., v. 17, p. 219-220. 

Hunter, R. L., C. J. Mann and R. M. Cranwell, 1985, Determining probabil- 
ities of geologic events and processes, Proc. Intern. Topical Meeting on 
High-Level Nuclear Waste Disposal, Sept. 24-26, 1985, Pasco, Washington. 

Mann , C. John, 1985, Changing our name officially, Math. Geology, v. 17, 
n. 8, p. 783-784. 

Mann , C. John, 1985, Revised classification of meteoritic impact sites 
on Earth, Meteoritics, v. 20, n. 3, p. 591-592. 

Mann , C. John, 1986, Composition and origin of material in Pre-Columbian 
pottery, San Salvador Island, Bahamas, Geoarchaeology, v. 1, p. 183-194. 

Mann , C. John, 1986, Mathematical Geology, Geotimes, v. 31, n. 2, p. 36-37. 

Mann , C. John, 1986, Misuses of linear regression in Earth sciences in William 
E. Size, editor, Mathematical Geology Memoir, n. 1. 

Hunter, Regina L. and C. John Mann , 1986, Techniques for determining 
probabilities of geologic processes and events, v. I, Sandia National Labora- 
tories SAND86-0196. 

Hunter, Regina L. and C. John Mann (editors), 1986, Techniques for determin- 
ing probabilities of geologic processes and events, v. II, Sandia National 
Laboratories, SAND86-0196. 

Hunter, Regina L., C. John Mann , W. J. Conover and Robert Budnitz, 1986, 
Introduction: Chapter 1 in Hunter, Regina L. and C. John Mann (editors), 
Techniques for determining probabilities of geologic processes and events, 
v. II, Sandia National Laboratories, SAND86-0196. 

Mann, C. John, 1986, The elements of graphing data by William S. Cleveland, 



Book Review, Math. Geology, v. 18, n. 8, p. 707-710. 

Lee, Yong II, Bernie Lindsey, T. May and C. John Mann , 1986, Grain size 
distribution of calcareous sands, San Salvador Island, Bahamas, CCFL Marine 
Studies, Occasional Paper 1986, n. 1, 10 p. 

Sandberg , P. A., 1985, Non-skeletal aragonite and pC02 in the Proterozoic 
and Phanerozoic, in The Carbon Cycle and Atmospheric CO2: Natural Varia- 
tions Archean to Present. Amer. Geophys. Union, Geophys. Mon. Ser., v. 
32. 

26 



Sandberg , P. A., 1985, Recognition criteria for calcitized skeletal and non- 
skeletal aragonite. Palaeontographica Americana, n. 54, p. 272-281. 

Sandberg , P. A., 1985, Ancient aragonite cements and their occurrence 
in ancient limestones, in P. M. Harris, and Schneidermann (eds.) "Carbonate 
Cements", Soc. Econ. Paleont. Mineral., Spec. Publ. 36, 27 pp., 3 pis. 

Bailey, J. B. and P. A. Sandberg , 1985, Preserved mineralogy and ultrastruc- 
ture in two new Pennsylvanian bivalves, in J. T. Dutro and H. W. Pfefferkorn 
(eds) Paleontology, Paleoecology & Paleogeography, v. 5, Comptes Rendu, 
9e Congr. Int. du Strat. et Geol. Carbonif, p. 271-281. 

Popp, B. N., T. F. Anderson , and P. A. Sandberg , 1986, Textural, elemental 
and isotopic variations among constituents in middle Devonian limestones, 
North America, Jour. Sed. Petrol., v. 56, n. 5, 13 p. 

Turner, J. V., T. F. Anderson , P. A. Sandberg and S. J. Goldstein, 1986, 
Isotopic, chemical and textural relations during the experimental alteration 
of biogenic high-magnesian calcite, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, v. 50, 
p. 495-506. 

Popp, B. N., T. F. Anderson and P. A. Sandberg , 1986, Brachiopods as indicat- 
ors of original oxygen and carbon isotope compositions in some Paleozoic 
limestones, Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull., v. 97, 9 p. 

Abstracts 

Altaner , S. P., 1985, X-ray diffraction analysis of mixed-layer illite/smectite: 
Applications to geologic problems (invited speaker): 34th Ann. Denver Conf. 
on Applic. of X-ray Analysis, Snowmass, CO, p. 48 

Altaner, S. P., 1985, Ion exchange experiments in the system (NH.4,10 Cl- 
H20-silicate at temperatures between 200 and 400°C, 8th Internat. Clay 
Conf., Denver, CO, p. 6. 

Altaner , S. P., M. D. Krohn and P. R. Klock, 1985, Analytical techniques 
for determining bound ammonium, 98th Ann. Geol. Soc. Amer. Mtg., Orlando, 
FL, p. 512. 

Altaner , S. P. and C. M. Bethke , 1986, Layer ordering in interstratified 
illite/smectite, Internat. Min. Assoc. Mtg., Stanford, CA. 

Blake , D. B., 1986, New Eocene sea stars from Seymour Island, Antarctic 
Penninsula, and comments on preservation of fossil sea stars. GSA Ab. 
Prog. v. 18(4). 

Blake , D. B. and E. M. Snyder, 1986, Tason limits and phylogeny in Paleozoic 
stenolaemates: computerized analyses of the Rhabdomesina and some possible 
close allies. Internat. Bryozoological Assoc. Abs. and Prog, for 1986. 

Carozzi, A. V. and W. C. Dawson, 1985, Experimental fabric-selective poros- 
ity in phylloid algal limestones. A.A.P.G. Bull., v. 69 (2), p. 248. 

Carozzi , A. V. and R. T. Bertani, 1985, Lagoa Feia Formation (Lower Cretac- 
eous), Campos Basin, offshore Brazil - rift-valley-stage lacustrine carbonate 

27 



reservoirs. A.A.P.G. Bull., v. 69 (2), p. 237-238. 

Socha, B. J., W. H. Johnson and A. K. Hansel, 1985, Glacigenic diamictons 
of late Wisconsinan age at Wedron, Illinois. GSA Abst. with Prog., v. 17, 
n. 5, p. 327. 

Klein , G. deV., 1985, Tidal friction and the earth's rotation II, edited by 
P. Brosche and J. Sundermann (Rev) Sedimentology, v. 32, p. 309. 

Klein , G. deV., 1985, Sediment diagenesis, edited by A. Parker and B. W. 
Sellwood (Rev), Am. Scientist, v. 73, p. 290-291. 

Heidlauf, D. T., A. T. Hsui and G. deV. Klein, 1985, Tectonic and subsidence 
history of Illinois Basin, Am. Geophys. Union Trans. (EOS), v. 66, p. 1059. 

Lee, Mingchou, R. L. Hay and D. R. Kolata, 1985, Episodic potassic alteration 
of Ordovician tuffs in the upper Mississippi valley, Geol. Soc. Amer. Abs. 
w/prog. v. 17, p. 641. 

Langenheim , R. L., Jr., 1985, Brachiopod paleoecology on the Pennsylvanian 
shelf margin, southern Nevada, U.S.A., Resumes Abstracts, ler Cong. Inter- 
nal Brachiopodes, Univ. Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France, p. 56. 

Langenheim , R. L., Jr., 1985, Extensional tectonics in the Great Basin: 
Bristol Range Thrust, Pioche District, Nevada, an example? Wyo. Geol. 
Assoc, v. 31, n. 6, p. 3. 

Mansholt, M. S., J. E. Utgaard and R. L. Langenheim , Jr., Paleoecology 
and depositional environments of Wolfcampian carbonates in Arrow Canyon, 
Clark County, Nevada, Soc. Econ. Paleont. Mineral., Midyear Meeting, 
Abstracts, v. 2, p. 59. 

Vaiden, R. C. and R. L. Langenheim , Jr., 1985, Biostratigraphy and paleo- 
environment of Morrowan (Zone 2) brachiopoda, Bird Spring Group, Arrow 
Canyon, Clark County, Nevada. Bull. AAPG, v. 69, no. 2, p. 313. (Typographi- 
cal error in published title - should read 'Zone 20'). 



28 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY; COURSE OFFERINGS, 1982-1986 



Geophysics - Structural Geology - Tectonics 
Engineering Geology 

Introduction to Geophysics 350 

Geophysical Prospecting 351 

Physics of Earthquakes 397 

Mathematical Methods in Geology 480 

Geodynamics 493 

Numerical Methods in Geomechanics 493 

Introduction to Seismology 493 

Advanced Topics in Seismology 493 

Geophysical Inverse Theory 493 

Deformation of the Upper Mantle 493 

Mineral Physics 493 

Rheology of Earth Materials 493 

Introduction to Structural Geology 311 

Advanced Structural Geology 488 

Geotectonics 489 

Southern Cordilleran Geology 493 

Practice of Engineering Geology 451 

Principles of Engineering Geology 450 

Geology for Engineers 250 

Sedimentary Geology - Stratigraphy - Paleobiology 
Quaternary Geology - Geomorphology 

Principles of Stratigraphy 
Advanced Stratigraphic Geology 
Selected Topics in Stratigraphy 

Introduction to Paleontology 

Paleoecology 

Seminar in Paleontology 

Micropaleontology 

Sedimentology and Sedimentary Geology 
Field & Lab Procedures in Sedimentology 
Sedimentary Petrography 
Basin Analysis and Sedimentary Geology 
Analysis of Sedimentary Basins 
Sedimentology of Non-Marine Rocks 
Sedimentology of Volcaniclastic Rocks 
Recent Sedimentary Environments 

Introduction to Modern Marine Carbonate 

Environments 
Carbonate Sedimentology 
Carbonate Sedimentology 
Depositional Models for Petroleum 

Exploration 
Carbonate Ultrastructure and Diagenesis 
Marine Geology of the Bahamas 
Geochemistry of Sediments and 

Natural Waters 



321 
422 
493 

320 
420 
493 
493 

309 
310 
338 
437 
493 
493 
493 
477 

315F 

438 

439 

444 
493 
315 M 

432 



Bass/Chen/Chen 

Hsui 

W.-P. Chen 

Hsui 

Hsui 

Hsui 

W.-P. Chen 

W.-P. Chen 

W.-P. Chen 

W.-P. Chen/Bass/Marshak 

Bass 

Bass/Marshak 

Marshak 
Marshak 
Marshak 
D. Anderson/Marshak 

Nieto 
Nieto 
Nieto 



Langenheim/Mann 

Langenheim 

Langenheim 

Blake 
Blake 
Blake 

Sandberg 

Klein 

Klein 

Carozzi 

Klein 

Klein 

Hay 

Hay 

Klein 



Sandberg 

Carozzi 

Sandberg 

Carozzi 

Sandberg 

Mann 

T. Anderson 



29 



Oceanography 

Electron Beam Microanalysis 
Mineralogy of Clays 
Mineralogy of Clays II 

Coal Geology 
Paleobotany 

Geomorphology 
Quaternary Geology 
Glacial Geology 
Introduction to Palynology 

Mineralogy - Igneous & Metamorphic 
Geochemistry, Ilydrogeology 

Mineralogy 

Petrology 

Optical Mineralogy 

Petrography & Petrogenesis 

Advanced Igneous Petrology 

Advanced Metamorphic Petrology 

Theoretical Petrology & 

Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics 
Kinetics of Geological Processes 
Seminar on Melt Structure 
Structural Mineralogy 
X-Ray Mineralogy 
Crystallography 
Mineralogy of Clays 
Mineralogy of Clays II 
Electron-beam Microanalysis 
Introduction to SEM & TEM 
Neutron Activation Analysis 
Chemistry of the Earth 
Geochemistry of Sediments and 

Natural Waters 
Trace-element Geochemistry 
Isotope Geology 
Advanced Isotope Geochemistry 

Introductory Hydrogeology 
Groundwater Hydrology 

Introductory Courses 

Introduction to Study of the Earth 
History of the Earth 
General Geology I & II 
Regional Field Study (Grand Canyon) 
Physical Sciences in Modern Science 
Geology for Engineers 
Geology of Energy 
Field Geology in Rocky Mountains 
(Field Camp) 

See also listings from depts. of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Metallurgy, 
Civil Engineering, Materials Research, and Geography. 



370 


T. Anderson 


493 


D. Anderson/Sandberg 


462 


Altaner 


463 


Altaner 


493 


Damburger 


350 


Phillips 


301 


Johnson 


457 


Johnson 


357 


Johnson 


493 


King 


Petrology - 




333 


Henderson 


334 


Kirkpatrick/C.-Y. Chen 


335 


Henderson 


336 


Kirkpatrick 


435 


Kirkpatrick/C.-Y. Chen 


493 


D. Anderson 


434 


D. Anderson 


493 


Kirkpatrick 


493 


Kirkpatrick 


431 


Henderson 


493 


Henderson/Altaner 


493 


Henderson 


462 


Altaner 


463 


Altaner 


493 


D. Anderson/Sandberg 


469 


T. Kriven(Ceramics) 


493 


C.-Y. Chen 


360 


T. Anderson/C.-Y. Chen 


493 


T. Anderson 


493 


C.-Y. Chen 


433 


T. Anderson/C.-Y. Chen 


493 


C.-Y. Chen 


355 


Bethke 


455 


Bethke 


101 




102 




107, 108 




115 




142 




250 




105 




317 





30 



FIELD-BASED RESEARCH AND INSTRUCTION 

The Department of Geology has traditionally maintained a strong emphasis 
on field-related studies. This tradition has continued through both field-based 
instruction and field-based research. In many instances, this work is closely 
tied to state-of-the-art laboratory or theoretical studies. Below, we highlight 
some of the field areas in which members of our faculty are currently under- 
taking or recently completed field research or teaching. 

Field Research 

S. P. Altaner: Diagenisis in coal-rich shale, Pennsylvania 

D. E. Anderson: Metamorphic reactions in rocks of northwest Scotland 

J. Bass: In Situ stress measurements in Colorado 

D. B. Blake: Paleoecology of the Ordovician of the Upper Mississippi Valley; 
Bryozoa of the Carboniferous of the Illinois Basin 

A. V. Carozzi: Microfacies of Mid-Continent Carbonates 

C.-Y. Chen: Geochemical studies in Hawaii basalts and in Cyprus ophiolite 

W.-P. Chen: Central Himalayas, India 

R. L. Hay: Diagenetic studies in California; stratigraphy, diagenesis and 
early man studies in east Africa 

W.H. Johnson: Quaternary stratigraphy, glacial geology, and geomorphology 
in Illinois 

R. J. Kirkpatrick: Study of the Cyprus ophiolite 

G. deV. Klein: Submarine sediments off Japan and Korea; Illinois Basin 

R. L. Langenheim, Jr.: Stratigraphy and paleontology, Nevada 

C.J. Mann: Stratigraphy of Illinois Basin; Bahamas 

S. Marshak: Structural analysis in eastern New York, western Arizona, 
and the Transantarctic Mountains 

A. S. Nieto: Engineering geology problems in western Canada, Peru, and Columbia 

P. A. Sandberg: Carbonate sedimentology & diagenesis, Florida Keys and 
Diagenesis in Pennsylvanian carbonates, S. E. Kansas 

Field Teaching 

Basin Analysis and Sedimentary Geology: Basin Analysis Symposium, Minneapolis, MN 

Carbonate Geology: Florida Keys 

Engineering Geology: Pennsylvania; central Wisconsin 

Exploration Geophysics: Basement structure of the Illinois Basin, Central Illinois 

Hydrogeology: Viburnian-trend mineral district; St. Francois Mountains 

Introductory Geology: Ozark Mountains, Missouri; Colorado and Northern Arizona; 
central Wisconsin; east-central Illinois; Colorado, Utah, S. Nevada 

Mineralogy/Petrology: Northern Michigan; western Arizona and southern 
California 



31 



Field Teaching - Cont. 

Paleontology: Southern Illinois; Kentucky; Indiana; Wisconsin; Iowa; Minnesota; 
Missouri 

Quaternary Geology/Geomorphology: Northern Illinois, southern and eastern 
Wisconsin; south-central Indiana; east-central Illinois/central, 
western and southern Illinois 

Recent Sedimentary Environments: Arkoma Basin and Ouachita Mountains, AK 
and OK 

Sedimentology and Sedimentary Geology: East central Illinois and central Indiana 

Stratigraphy: Wabash Valley; western Illinois 

Structural Geology: Northern Michigan; eastern Tennessee; central Wisconsin; 
western Arizona and southern California 




WYOMING FIELD WORK 



32 



WYOMING FIELD CAMP 

The Summer Geology Field Camp presents a comprehensive instructional 
program; beginning with teaching the principal techniques of field geology, 
continuing through semi-independent mapping and problem solving, and culminat- 
ing in reconnaissance of regional relationships between the Central Stable Region, 
the Rocky Mountain Foreland, the Paleozoic Continental Margin, the Sevier 
and Laramide thrust belts and the Yellowstone volcanic province. Students 
map on topographic base, with aerial photographs and, briefly, with plane table. 
Stratigraphic sections are measured by several techniques. Mapping ranges 
from detailed study of intensely deformed rocks, through large scale studies 
of small areas to reconnaissance mapping of areas in excess of twenty square 
miles. The program is designed to accommodate students of moderate to little 
formal geologic background and essentially no knowledge of field geology. It 
is intended to enable them to begin independent work in the field and to qualify 
them for entry-level professional work as field geologists. 

Field mapping is conducted on the northeastern flack of the Big Horn Moun- 
tains which exposes a Cambrian through Paleocene sedimentary sequence resting 
on a Precambrian crystalline complex. Structural relationships are moderately 
challenging and exposures range from very good to poor. Regional study involves 
field trips through the High Black Hills, Yellowstone, Tetons, Beartooth Mtns., 
Hoback Canyon, Wind River Range, Owl Creek Mtns., and the Big Horn Mountains. 

We try to maintain a student staff ratio of 6:1. Our staff is diverse in interests 
with most of the main branches of field-oriented geology represented. Currently 
we have operated with three to four senior staff aided by a similar number 
of graduate teaching assistants. 

In addition to its instructional program, the field camp staff maintains a 
continuing research effort in the field area. Currently the staff is engaged 
in compiling geologic maps on newly published 7 1/2' quadrangles and in special 
projects on the Precambrian, the Bighorn Dolomite, the Devono-Silurian interval, 
the Tensleep Sandstone, and the uppermost Cretaceous. Six quadrangles with 
supporting structure sections have been published and another is in press. A 
paper on Late Ordovician paleontology and stratigraphy is in press. Several 
presentations have been made at national and local GSA or AAPG meetings. 
Staff personnel have been active in Penrose Conferences on foreland structure 
and have made many presentations at meetings of the Wyoming Geological 
Association. Seven graduate and/or senior theses have been completed since 
1980 and one is currently in progress. Investigators from Urbana, as well as 
from other institutions, frequently seek our aid in gathering data and/or ideas 
on many aspects of local geology. 



33 




Library Staff member Suzanne Hayes, Librarian Dederiek C. Ward and staff 
member Diana Walter in Geology Library Map Room. The Geology Library 
houses over 80,000 volumes and 55,000 sheet maps in the Natural History Building. 



34 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS GEOLOGY LIBRARY 



The Library of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is the 
third largest university library in the country; our collection is surpassed 
in size only by the collections of Harvard and Yale. At present, we have 
over 6 million books and printed serials, and over 3 million non-book items 
including microfilms, videotapes, and maps. In 1985 the University of Illinois 
Library switched to a computer catalog system, which permits the 
identification of items by authors, titles, or keywords. The new system 
will also search the collections of affiliated libraries in addition to our 
own, and will automatically request books for delivery via campus mail. 
A terminal in the Geology Library permits direct access to GeoRef and 
other online sci/tech databases. 

The Geology Library is housed in the Natural History Building along 
with the Department, thereby permitting easy access to books, journals, 
and maps. The total geology collection of the University includes over 
160,000 volumes (of which half are in the Geology Library and the remainder 
are in the Main Library) and 55,000 catalogued sheet maps. Our holdings 
are notable for complete sets of all primary and most secondary American 
and foreign geological journals. The collection also includes a substantial 
selection of Soviet geological literature. 

The University Library's Rare Books Room is repository for one of the 
world's outstanding collections of rare and early geological literature. 
Included in the collection are, among others, first editions of classic works 
by Agricola, Steno, Gesner, Biringucci, Smith, Maclure, Hutton, Werner, 
and Agassiz. We also possess a substantial selection of early American 
geological works. An annotated 565 page catalog to this collection by 
D. Ward and A. Carozzi was published in 1984 by the University of Illinois 
Library. 

The Geology Library is managed by full-time staff, headed by Dederick 
Ward. Mr. Ward is active in national and international geoscience 
information efforts. He currently serves on the GeoRef advisory committee 
of the American Geological Institute. 



35 




The Stable Isotope 
Geochemistry Labora- 
tory. K-S. Woo is 
working on a vacuum 
extraction line. 
Professor T.F. Anderson, 
Linda Bonnell and Brian 
Popp ponder the output 
of a mass spectrometer 



Graduate student 
Don Von Bergen, who 
works for Prof. 
Carozzi, operating 
a unique high-pressure 
triaxial compression 
apparatus, which 
allows the circula- 
tion of CC>2-charged 
water under controlled 
conditions of tempera- 
ture and pressure. 
This apparatus, which 
simulates burial con- 
ditions, is used to 
study development of 
secondary porosity in 
carbonate rocks 




36 



LABORATORY FACILITIES 

Applied Rock Mechanics : direct shear devices, uniaxial compression column, 
slaking durability unit, soil testing equipment, base-friction table, and 
rock-wedge simulator. 

Computer : An Alliant FX/8, a state-of-the-art processor with parallel- 
vector architecture, has been installed in the hydrogeology laboratory. The 
geophysics group will have a SUN 3-160 work station. In addition, a CRAY- 
XMP48 is available on campus at the National Center for Supercomputing 
Applications. Other University computers available to the Department 
include: CDC Cyber 175 and 174, IBM 4341, DEC Vax II, Pyramid 90X, along 
with necessary peripherals. 

Electron-Microbeam : JEOL microprobe, Cambridge SEM, High-resolution 
JEOL SEM (JSM-840A) with Kevex microanalyzer, TEM and STEM systems 
and Argon Mill (at the Center for Materials Research). 

Experimental Petrology : Tern Press cold-seal pressure vessels, Deltech 
and Lindburg high-temperature furnaces (for synthesis, kinetics, and phase- 
equilibrium experiments). 

Geochemistry : Siemens X-Ray Fluorescence and Perkin-Elmer Atomic 
Absorption Spectrophotometer for bulk-chemical (major, minor, and trace 
elements) analysis; MAT 250 isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (set up for 
carbon, oxygen, and sulfur); trace-element Neutron-Activation system 
(Germanium co-axial detector and multi-channel analyzer) (on order). 

Hydrogeology : Alliant FX/8 supercomputer; equipment for accessing campus 
and remote Cray supercomputers; computer colorgraphics and digitizing 
equipment. 

Mineral Physics : Brillouin spectrometer (laser-light scattering for measuring 
elastic properties). Diamond-Anvil Pressure Cell (for optical and x-ray 
measurements on samples at pressures up to 300 kbar. 

NMR Spectroscopy : High-resolution nuclear-magnetic resonance spectrom- 
eters and associated equipment for solution and solid spectroscopy (in Chemi- 
stry Building). 

Seismology : Microfilm library of post-1960 WWSSN seismograms; computer 
file of post-1980 GDSN seismograms; digital seismic signal processing facili- 
ties including dedicated computer, interactive graphics, and record digitizer; 
portable short-period seismograph. 

Soft-Rock Studies : Cathode luminescence; microscopes, settling tanks; 
isodynamic magnetic separator, acid preparation equipment, X-ray radio- 
graphy. 

Support : Logitech Automated thin-section preparation equipment; Numerous 
research-quality petrographic microscopes; photographic darkrooms. 

Triaxial Loading : Hydraulic equipment for burial simulation and fluid circula- 
tion. 

X-Ray : Seimens X-ray powder diffractometer system, X-ray fluorescence 
analyzer, Philips X-ray diffractometer, Single-crystal and powder cameras, 
preparation equipment for clay minerals. 

37 




Rob Lander, a 
graduate student 
studying volcanic 
sediments with 
Professor Hay, 
analyzing the out- 
put of the X-ray 
diffraction unit 



Jack Pullen, the 
department's thin- 
section technician, 
preparing specimens 
using the automated 
Logitech polisher 




38 



COLLOQUIUM PROGRAMS 

Students and faculty of the Department of Geology have a broad range of 
professional specialties, therefore, Colloquium programs are sought to provide 
topics of interest to all. Colloquia are held on Friday afternoons and begin 
with informal conversation, coffee and cookies in the lounge with the formal 
presentation following in the lecture hall. Recent speakers have included: 

FALL 1985 

Dr. J. James Eidel (Illinois State Geological Survey) "The Illinois Superdeep 
Drillhole." 

Dr. Albert T. Hsui (Dept. of Geology, UIUC) "The Origin of Trench Curvatures— A 
New Dynamic Model." 

Dr. Jay D. Bass (Dept. of Geology, UIUC) "Elasticity of Micro-Crystals and 
the Chemical Composition of the Earth." 

Dr. Paul Enos (University of Kansas) "Diagenesis in Mid-Cretaceous Reefs, 
El Abra Limestone, Mexico." 

Dr. Lewis E. Snyder (Dept. of Astronomy, UIUC) "Radio Observations of Comets." 

Dr. Sandra J. Lindquist (AAPG Distinguished Lecturer) "Practical 
Characterization of Eolian Reservoirs for Development: Nugget Sandstone, 
Utah-Wyoming Thrust Belt." 

Dr. David W. Houseknecht (University of Missouri, Columbia) "Tectonic and 
Sedimentary Evolution of the Arkoma Basin." 

Dr. S. N. Casshyap (Visiting Professor, University of Chicago) "Changing Patterns 
of Alluvial Systems Through Time and Coal-Forming Models: Examples from 
Gondwana Basins of India." 

Dr. Keene Swett (Dept. of Geology, University of Iowa) "Later Proterozoic 
Sedimentary Successions in E. Greenland and Spitzbergen: Some Sedimentological 
and Diagenetic Insights and Some Paleontological Surprises." 

Dr. John Horner (Montana State University) "Dinosaur Social Behavior." 

Dr. Donald Oltz (Illinois State Geological Survey) "Petroleum Geology of the 
Gulf of Suez." 

Dr. Robert R. Loucks (Dept. of Geosciences, Purdue University) "Zoning and 
Origin of Epithermal Silver-Gold-Lead-Zinc Veins, Topia, Durango, Mexico." 

SPRING 1986 

Dr. George W. Viele (Dept. of Geology, University of Missouri-Columbia) 
"Collision Effects of the Ouachita Orogeny on the Midcontinent." 

Dr. James W. Truran (Dept. of Astronomy, UIUC) "Element Synthesis in Stars 
and Supernovae." 



39 



Dr. Stephen P. Altaner (Dept. of Geology, UIUC) "Geochemistry of Ammonium 
in Hot Springs Deposits, Western U.S. and Remote Sensing Applications." 

Professor Nikolas I. Christensen (Dept. of Geosciences, Purdue University) "Samail 
Ophiolite, Oman: A Model for the Oceanic Crust and Upper Mantle." 

Professor Adolf Seilaeher (Geologisch-Palaontologisches Institut) "The 
Precambrian Ediacaran Fauna: Alien Beings Here on Earth." 

Dr. Terry Engelder (Dept. of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University) "The 
Effect of a Paleozoic Abnormal Pore-Pressure Event on Present-Day 
Hydrofracture Measurements of Lithospheric Stress." 

Dr. David M. Sherman (U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia) "Electronic 
Structures of Minerals: Applications to the Physics and Chemistry of the Earth." 

Dr. Arthur Bettis (Iowa State Geological Survey) "Late Wisconsinan and Holocene 
Landscape Evolution in the Central Des Moines River Valley, Iowa." 

Dr. Charles Kreitler (Bureau of Economic Geology, University of Texas at Austin) 
"Hydrogeology of Sedimentary Basins: Palo Duro Basin as an Example." 

Dr. Paul K. Sims (U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO) "Anatomy of the Early 
Proterozoic Penokean Orogeny." 

Dr. Hugh Hay-Roe (Murray Assoc. Int., Houston, TX) "Scientific Writing." 

Professor Paul Ribbe (Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg, VA) "Structure 
and Characterization of Alkali Feldspars." 

Dr. David R. Kingston (AAPG Distinguished Lecturer) "Worldwide Basin 
Classification and Oil Play Prediction." 

Dr. Charles Meyers (Sedona, AZ) "Mineral Deposits Over Geologic Time: 1. 
Petrologic, Tectonic & Temporal Patterns. 2. Tectonic & Chemical History." 

Dr. Frank A. Podosek (Dept. of Earth & Planetary Sciences, Washington 
University) "Application of SR Isotopes to Studies of Carbonate Diagenesis." 

Dr. Daniel Nahon (Dept. of Geology, University of Marseille-St. Jerome) "Tropical 
Weathering and Landscape Evolution." 

Dr. Heikki Ignatius (Geological Survey of Finland) "Geochemical Prospecting 
in Finland." 

Dr. Jerry Jameson (Exxon Production Research Company) "Carbonate Facies 
Models in the Petershill Formation, Mississippian, Midland Valley of Scotland." 

Dr. John V. Walther (Dept. of Geological Sciences, Northwestern University) 
"The Role of Fluids in Progressive Metamorphism." 

40 



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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 





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