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3 1833 03262 9153 



Gc 977, 802 Sp84re, 1 909 
Resume (Springf i ol. d, Mo.) 
The Resume 



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THE RESUME 

Seventh Year Book 

...Of... 

THE SPRINGFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 



PUBLISHED 

THE SENIOR CLASS 
1909 



Allen County Public Library 
900 Webster Street 
PO Box 2270 

Fort Wayne, IN 46801-2270 



TO THOSE 
who are doing most to maintain the 
high ideals of our school is 
this hool^ dedicated 



IN MEMORIAM 



MRS. CLARA RILEY DODD 



Sunset and evening star. 

And one clear call for me ! 
And may there be no moaning of the bar. 

When I put out to sea. 



Twilight and evening bell. 

And after that the dark ! 
And may there be no sadness of farewell, 

When I embark ; 



But such a tide as moving seems asleep. 

Too full for sound and foam. 
When that which drew from out the boundless deep. 

Turns again home. 



For tho" from out our bourne of Time and Place 

The flood may bear me far. 
I hope to see my Pilot face to face 
When I have crossed the bar. 



JONATHAN FAIRBANKS 

Superintendent of Public Schools of 
Springfield since 1875 



"OLD CKNTRAL 



"Old Ceiilral," tTL-clfil 1S71. Toi) lli.or ust-.l for ni.i;li School until l>S9.v 
111 1872 the first class (two nieinhers) t^radualed. 
Was used for Ward School until 19fl.S. 

Sold hy the School Hoard to n akt- way for future liusiness liloik. 



FACULTY 



E. E. DODD. A. M., 
Principal. 

ARTHUR M. HULL. A. B.. 
Assistant Principal, Engli.^h. 

COR.A B. OTT. 
;\rathcmaticg. 

XEX.V BAXTER, 
^rathcmatics. 

IDA AU.«HERMAX. 
Ensli-h. 

ALBERT.X .M, ROSS, A. B.. 
Civics. 

R. J. GREGG. A. B., 
^rathcmatics. 

M.\RV Is' RXEY. A. H.. 
( Iiiinan. 



FAXNIE SHEPPARD, 
English. 

ELLEX CRAIG, A. B., 
Latin. 

RUBY A. FITCH. A. M., 
Biology. 

ORA WRIGHT. A. B., 
Physical Geography. 

M. L. BURRIS, B. Pe.. 
Manual Training. 

ESTA DAYTOX, 
Domestic Science. 

LULA NICHOLS. A. :M., 
Latin. 

F. F. .M.VitTI.X. B. S.. 
Hi.storv. 



G. F. WILLIAMSOX, A. B., 
English. 

J. D. DELP, 
Bookkeeping. 

G. F. SEARS, B. S., 
Physics and Chemistry. 

JOE WILLEKE. 
English and Algebra. 

WIXXIFRED WYGAL. A. B. 
English. 

HATTIE REICH, 
Special. 

BESSIE B. SMITH. 
Siiin'i'visor of IMiisic. 

ALBE 1 1 T. V H K X I) U I C KS ( ) X . 
Librarian. 



LEXA PRIEST. 
Study Hall. 



^oard of Education 

G. A. McCOLLUM. 
President. 

G. ^X. HEXDRICKSOX. 
Vice-President. 

E. D. MERRITT, 

A. D. ALLEX. 
J. H. JARRETT. 
ED. V. AVILLLMAS. 

:\I. BO^VERI\LA.N, 
Seci'etary. 

.1. FAIRBAXKS. 
.'^uperinti'ndcnt. 



HARRY WELLS 
JEWELL JONES 
RACHEL HART 
ROY HART 
MAE "ROBERTSON 
WTH VEAKE 
cMARY CARSON 
HARRY LAWING 
EARL TURNER 
CORA B. OTT 
JRTHUR M. HULL 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
- LITERARY EDITOR 
ATHLETIC ETflTOR 
ART EDITOR 
ASSOCIATE JRT EDITOR 
- ASSOCIATE JRT EDITOR 
BUSINESS MANAGER 
ASSOCIATE BUSINESS MANAGER 

CRITIC 
CRITIC 



Commencement Program 

Address of Welcome Erwin Nelson 

Irish Wit and Humor Jessie Brown 

NiMROD, The Tyrant - - - . - - Lee Moore 

Grenfall of Labrador Gertrude Lewis 

Our Navy— What It Is and What It Ought To Be - Herman Hart 

Ireland's Tragedy Irma Russell 

Successful Failures Leonard Campbell 

The Message of The Arabian Nights - - - Esther Moore 
Our Debt to The Engineer - - - - Dorsey Williams 
Response for The Class Helene Muratta 




... CAST... 



Watson W. Higbee. a good fellow with millions, who knows neither fear nor grammar Arthur Myers 

Hon. V. D. Withrow, a blue-blooded ex-senator with a tall family tree and a short bank account Walter Eisenmayer 

Lorin Iligbee, son of Watson, champion athlete of Harvard Carl Israel 

Tlicodoi'r Dali'ymple, called "Ted." Worked his way throi;gh Harvard Harry Kuchinski 

IIiM:ji:ins. the l)utler Ralph Ekberg 

Nancy Withrow, the senator's daughter, an up-to-date, level-headed girl Caroyln Wells 

Madge Cummings, a (|uiet soi't, with temper when needed Josephine Routt 

^Irs. Ballon, the senator's si.ster, from New York Rebecca Garrett 

Mrs. Malvina Meddigrew, originally from i\lis.souri Rosa Rathbone 



Serene, indifferent of their fate, 

Sit the Seniors at Commencement Gate; 

Upon the heights so lately Won 

After four years' worl^ is done, 

Scornful of commands that sound 

From all the faculty around. 

All things, draw they, small or great. 

To them beside Commencement Gate. 

When forms familiar shall give place 

To stranger speech and newer face; 

When all their cares and anxious fears 

Lie hushed in the repose of years. 

Then shall they, yielding to the common lot. 

Lie unrecorded and forgot? 




^7)iCotto — Esse Quam Uidere 



Colors - Qreen and White 
'08 

Harry Lawing 
Earl Turner 
Helene Muratta 
DoRSEY Williams 
Esther Moore 
Lee Moore 1 
Herman Hart ( 



OFFICETIS 

President 
Vice-President - 
Secretary- 
Treasurer 
Class Editor 

Ser<^eant-at-Arnis 

YELL 



Flower — White T^ose 
'09 

Walter Eisenmayer 
Ralph Ekberg 
Carolyn Wells 
Lloyd INIiller 
Lester Bradley 

Arthur Myres 



Was 1ST das! Was ist das! 
Seniors! Seniors! Das ist was! 



LUTHER ADAMS. 
"Let the world slide.' 



FERX BEARDEX. 

"Her glossy hair was clu.'- 
tered o'er her brow — 

Bright with intelligence and 
fair and smooth." 



FRANK BLACK. 

"He is so thin he has to pass 
twice in the same place 
to make a shadow." 



JOHX BRECKENRIDGE. 

'Stands without a peer in tht 
art of grade making." 



TRESSIE BEASLEY. 

G. L. S., P. E. P. 

'A merry heart doeth good 
like a medicine." 




HOWARD AXDERSON. 

"A solemn youth with sobi^r 
phiz. 

Who eats his grub and minds 
his bizz." 



ALBERT AVERY. 
O. A. 

"Blow! Blow!! Blow!!! 



WIXXIFRED BARRETT. 

P. E. P. 

'She has no equal but her 
self." 



JAMES. BEXSON. 
"Still waters I'un deep. 



LESTER BRADLEY. 

Football. 

'A person of genius, a bril- 
liant mind." 



LEONARD CAMPBELL. 

O. A., Commencement. 

"Cai-cful of his speech and 
nevi'i' known to be rude." 



MARY CARSOX. 

"It warms me, it charms me 
to mention his name. 

It heats me, it beats me and 
sets me aflame." 



GEORGIA CROW. 
G. L. S. 
';\Iv ht^art's as ti'ue as steel." 



PHYLLIS DrXCAX. 

G. L. S. 

"A maiden sliy nf scarce six- 
teen, 

With rapturous eye and smile 
serene." 



U.\LPH KKI^ERG. 
O. A. 

A very inc|uiriiitc mind — a 
Cfi'tain mi-aiis to store 
up knowledge." 




JESSIE BROWX. 

Commencement. G. L. S. 

'She doth burn the midnight 
oil to good advantage." 



ELLA BRUGGER. 

'Deah muh, I'm from the 
South!" 



RAO DOXXELL. 

"I have tasted earthly happi- 
ness, 

I have lived and I have 
loved." 



WALTER EISEX^FAYER. 
"Dutch." 
Acorn. O. A. 

Tm not in the roll of com- 
mon men." 



ALMT'S EVAXS. 

"Little bodies have great 
souls." 



MADGE FINK. 
"Peggy." 
K. K. K. 

"Eye.s like the starlight of 

soft midnight, 
So darkly beautiful, so deeply 

bright." 



MABLE FOX. 

P. E. P. 

'Her voice was ever soft, gen- 
tle and low — an excel- 
lent thing in woman." 



EDITH GREGORY. 

"Of all sad words of tongue 
or pen 

The saddest are — 'I'm stung 
again.' " 



REBECCA GARRETT. 

"Reba." 

L. A. D. 

"Herself alone, none other 
she resembles." 



HARRIET GATES. 

"A countenance in which did 
meet 

Sweet records, promises as 
sweet." 




FAY HARMAN. 

"A creature not too bright or 
good 

For human nature's daily 
food." 



ROY HART. 
O. A., Baseball. 
"All the world loves a lover." 



CLAUDE HANSELL. 

"Full of sound and fury, sig- 
nifying nothing." 



RACHEL HART. 
"Ikey." 

"Her life was noble, pure and 
sweet. 

For she's a girl that's hard to 
beat." 



HERMAN HART. 

Commencement, O. A., 
Baseball. 

"I love me because I'm I. 



HELEX IRVIN. 

"Board." 

K. K. K., L. A. L. 

'A rosebud set with little 
willful thorns." 



CARL ISRAEL. 

P. L. E., O. A. 

'Lieber Himmel! Was haken 
wir hier." 



WINNIFRED JOXES. 

"This picture bears no bad 
resemblance to yourself." 



JEWELL JONES. 
"Jew." 
K. K. K. 
"All love her who know her." 




DOLPHIE KXABB. 
O. A. 

"Gentle by nature." 



GEORGE KELSO. 

O. A., Football, Baseball. 

All men have some good in 
them and this man has his 
.share, for he is capable, 
honest and trustworthv. ' 



MARIOX KXAPP. 

L. A. L.. G. L. S. 

'An active mind and a ready 
wit." 



KARRY KL'CHIXSKL 

"Chinskl." 

P. L. E., Basketball. 

"There must be something in 
him: 

Great names imply great- 
ness." 



CLARA LANGSFORD. 

'Silence is more eloquent 
than words." 



HARRY LAWIXG. _ 

"Snark." 

AcfH'n, O. A. 

'It is very clifReult to esteem 
a man as highly as he 
could wish." 



GERTRUDE LEWI.'^. 

Commencement, G. L. S. 

'See what a grace is seated 
on that hi'ow." 



ALBERT LECKIE. 
O. A., Baseball. 
'Chessy' but not chesty. 




OLGA LINDBURG. 

G. L. S. 

'She speaks, behaves and acts 
just as she ought." 



RAY LYLE. 

O. A., Football. 

'Modesty is an ornament of 
his youth." 



MARGARET LANGSFORD. 

"Among ten millions, one was 
she." 



ZEDA LIPPMAN. 

P. E. P. 

'She is pretty to walk with 
and witty to talk with." 



ARTHUR MYERS. 

"Sputs." 

Basketball, O. A., Acorn. 

•\Ve boys all like him, for- 
well, he's a good fellovi'." 



ESTHER :M00RE. 

Commencement, G. L. S. 

•What she wills to do or say 
seems wisest and best." 



EDITH MOON. 

"The gentleness of all the 
gods goes with her." 



CARL MOORE. 

'I'm so full of myself that I 
am quite empty." 



BESSIE MILLER. 

'Great feelings hath she of 
her own which lesser souls 
may never know." 



LOLA PAYTON. 
'I hear, but say nothing.' 



EUGENE NAPPER. 
"Modest as a maiden.' 




LLOYD MILLER. 
Treas., '09. 
"I am mightily abused." 

ETHEL MARTIN. 
G. L. S. 

"This maid can often pensive 
be, 

But when she smiles it is with 
glee." 



LEE MOORE. 
"Levi." 

Commencement, O. A., 
Football. 

'All the great men are dead 
and I don't feel very well 
myself." 



KELENE MURATTA. 

G. L. S., Commencement. 

"God sent this singer here on 
earth, 

With songs of gladness and 
of mirth." 



ERWIN NELSON. 
Commencement, O. A. 
"I know, teacher; I know." 



CAREY PARK. 

"A noble youth with toil pro- 
digous. 

His fault — he's almost too re- 
ligious." 



HAROLD PORTER. 

"Hacky." 

A. M., O. A. 

'Look! he is winding up the 
watch of his wit. By and 
by it will strike." 



RUTH PEAKE. 

"Rap." 

K. K. K. 

"These's a language in her 
eyes." 



GLADYS PURINTON. 



"The gentleness of all the 
gods goes with thee." 



JOSEPHINE ROUTT. 

"Joe." 

G. L. S. 

"Impulsive, earnest, prompt 
to act." 



CHARLES RUKES. 
"Chollie." 
O. A. 

''A dark browed youth with 
an owl-Iilte looli of wis- 
dom." 



MAE ROBERTSON. 
G. L. S. 

"A bundle of virtue, few fault;-^ 
to confess. 

Her loveliest virtue is unself- 
ishness." 



BERNARD THRALL. 

"Pete." 
Acorn, O. A., Baseball. 

"The gift of gab is very 
powerful." 



LOUIS SEALL. 

'He is well versed in his- 
torical events and well de- 
serves his name — Seall." 




CARL SCHWIEDER. 

Football. 

"The most finished man in 
the world is he who is nev- 
er irresolue, yet never in a 
hurry." 



MARY SHIVEL. 

"Irish." 

'She always has time to be 
good as well as sweet." 



REUBEN PEAK. 
Basketball. 
'Slave to a maiden's charms." 



JAMES STEWART. 
"Jim." 

'Spends half his time consid- 
ering how to spend the 
other hali." 



GRACE SPA:N'GLER. 

"A face with gladness over- 
spread. 

Soft smiles, by human kind- 
ness bred." 



IRMA RUSSELL. 

Commencement, G. L. S. 

'The gentle mind by gentl'- 
deeds is linown." 



ADELINE TORBIT. 

'I smile all day in my own 
sweet way." 



HARRIETT TIFFAXY. 

P. E. P. 

"A littl<- child shall lead 
them." 



SARAH TOWNSEXD. 
"Sally." 
'Woi U is not m\' recreation. 



LOGAN TUCK. 
"One of a thousand. 




ROSA RATHBONE. 
G. L. S. 

"The joy of health her eyes 

displayed, 
And ease of heart her every 

look conveyed." 



JANIE THOMPSON. 
'That Rubifoam smile." 



LILLIE TH0:MPS0N. 

G. L. S. 

'The mildest manners and 
the gentlest heart." 



EDNA TIFF.ANY. 

"All things I knew; Iml now 
con fess 

The more I know. 1 know the 
less." 



JESSIE WINANS. 
"Jess." 
P. E. P. 

"That paint just won't come 
off." 



HARRY WELLS. 

Acorn, O. A. 

''He thinks twice before he 
speaks." 



HELEN TRENARY. 

'Love! What a volume in a 
word; an ocean in a tear!" 



MIO VIERS. 

P. E. P. 

'Meek and retiring by the 
softness of her nature." 



GLADYS YARBROUGH. 



'Thoughtless of beauty, she 
is beauty itself." 





DORSEY WILLIAMS. 

"Mack." 
O. A., Commencement. 
"Every whit a gentleman." 



CAROLYN WELLS. 

"Carrie." 

P. E. P. 

'Of her bright face one glance 
"ill trace a picture in the 
brain." 



EARL TURNER. 

O. A., Baseball. 

'You are wisely silent of your 
worth, therefore it were a 
sin for others to be so." 



ONITA WOODY. 

'A mind serene for contem- 
plation." 



ELWYN WOODS. 
'And her name was Maud." 



<tJunioi^s 



COLORS SLUE ANT) GOLD ^OTTO—"T)0 OR BUST " FLOWETl— WHITE CjIRNjITION 

OFFICERS 

'08. '09. 

James Collins President Fred Phillips 

Evertt ITnbbard Vice-President Howard Nelson 

Stella K(Mser Secretary Stella Keiser 

rila(l\ s I )cii1 oil 1 

T, ■ , ,, ^ - J reasurer Edwai'd McSwcenev 

Kusscl rayton i 

'Sliwy Silst)y Class Editor ]\Iaiy ('hanil)ers 

^larviti l^>i-n\viiliiw Sergeant-at-Anns Ricliai-d ^1 itclioll 

YELL. 

Boom a laka, boom a laka. 

Bow, WOAV, wiiwl 
Chic a laka. chic a laka. 

Chow, chow, chow ! 
Boom a hika, chic a hika. 

I liiicss yes ! » 
Juiiiors ! Juniors ! 

S. II. S. 



Sheepskin or 'Pigskin — Which? 

Colors, Orange and (B^ack ^M^otto, Head, Heart and Hand 

OFFICERS 

'08. "09. 

Stanley Lippman President Charles Wagner 

Chester Leonard Vice-President Harry Frame 

Christine Kisenniayer Secretary Ruth "Wilson 

Roliei't Ross Treasurer Arthur Ilodiidoii 

Until AVilson Class Editor (Jladys i\lehl 

Robert Tisdal.. , _^ Sergeant-at-Arms i /J/'ll^J^ Roniin^er 

Sherman Lillie \ ^ Charles Bu.seh 

^ YELL. 

One, twii. Iln-cc, fnui-. lixc six. seven. 
We're the d.-iss of 1!)-11. 



GIRLS' LITERARY SOCIETY 

]\Iotto — "Loyal entoiit." Colors — Violet and A¥hite. 

OFFICETIS 

President Esther Moore Vice-President Stella Keiser 

Secretary Marie Gates Treasurer Edith :\Ioore 

Critic Miss Aushermau 



^EMBETtS 



Tressie Beasley. 
Essie Berst. 
Goldie Buckner. 
Mary Chambers. 
Georgie Crow. 
Phyllis Duncan. 
Doucette Foster. 
Sarah Foster. 
Marie Gates. 
Olga Grundberg. 
Mabel Gorman. 



Emma Helms. 
Ray Herd. 
Beatrice Hotham. 
Edna Jackson. 
Elizabeth Wendemuth. 
Jessie White. 
Ena Wright. 
Stella Keiser. 
Gladys Deaton. 
Rosa Rathbone. 
Ruby Stone. 



Eleanor Boehmer. 
Marjorie Finney. 
Alma Ramsey. 
Edith Horner. 
Irma Russell. 
Grace Spangler. 
Gertrude Lewis. 
Jessie Brown. 
Olga Lindberg. 
Mary Silsby. 
Ruth Johnson. 



Marion Knapp. 
Leila Leonard. 
Elma Leonard. 
Edith Moore. 
Esther Moore. 
Isabel Morse. 
Alberta Mitchell. 
Stella Maddox. 
Helene Muratta. 
Ethel Martin. 
Madge Morton. 



Ruth Minard. 
Carrie Myres. 
Rose Nerud. 
Margaret Palmer. 
Julia Pierce. 
Ethel Potter. 
Blanche Phinney. 
Mae Robertson. 
Josephine Routt. 
Hattie Striebinger. 
Stella Schoggan. 
Lillie Thompson. 



ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION 



"OS. 

Ilerniaii llai-t 

Dorsey Williams 

Lee 3Ioore : 

Walter Eiseniiiayer. 

Vxny Hart 

A. .M. Hull 



OFFICETIS 

President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

..Sergeant-at-Arms.. 
Critic 



'09. 

Dorsey Williams 

Carl Isreal 

Lee ]\Ioore 

Herman Hart 

Arthur ]\Iyers 

A. :\i. Hui: 



COLOKS. 
Blue and Brown. 

YELL. 

Blue and Brown ! 

Blue and Brown ! 

We 're the best there is in town ! 

Rah ! Rah ! Brown ! 

Rah ! Rah ! Blue ! 

Sprinytield High School ! 

AVho are vou ? 



Albert .\vir.v. 'on. 
Percy Appli by. '10. 
Miirvin I '.row iilow. 'lo. 
\Vill liradliy. •In. 
Lfonaril Campbfll. 'o:t. 
]lali)h EkbcrfT. "i"^. 
'I'diii I'M nil iii.'^' 111. '111. 



\\'aUiT Kiscnniayi'r, '09. 
'I'diii ['"()h-.\-. '10. 
H;ii ry Framo, '11. 
Herman Hart, '09. 
Hoy Hart, '09. 
Jo.siah Harrel. '10. 
lOvel-itt Hiilibaid. '10. 



MEMBETIS 

Prof. Hull. 
Carl Isreal. '0!l. 
Dolphie Knabb, '09. 
Harry Lawing, '09. 
Ray Lyie, '09. 
.Stanle.y Lipniann. '11. 
Unbelt .Mansfield. '10. 



Lee Moore, '0 9. 
Arthur Myers. '09. 
Ed, McSweeney. '10. 
Howard Nel.son, lo. 
Karl Xixon. '10. 
Harold Porter. '09. 
Cbarlie Itiikes. '09. 



Ben Seward. '10. 
Bernard Thrall. '09. 
Earl Turner. '09. 
Harry Well.s, '09. 
Dorsey Williams. '09. 
George Kelso, '09. 
Ren Ruberson. '11. 
Erwin .Velson. 'OH. 



B. O. A. 



DEBATING RECORD 



The debating record of the Boys' Oratorical Association for '09 is one to be proud of. For the first time in its 
history tlie Association crossed swords with out-of-town talent. The boys of Carthage High School were challenged 
and a debate was scheduled for April 9. The question discussed Avas: "Resolved, That every net income of over $5,000 
should 1)e subject to a tax by the Federal Government." Carthage chose the affirmative and sent as their champions 
James Rider and Allan Stemmons. The Springfield team was Lee Moore and Harold Porter. The school turned out 
in a body and by loyal support helped the local team to gain the decision. The victory undoubtedly gave the 0. A. 

claim to the high school debating championship of Southwest Missouri. 

This present year chronicles also the first defeat ever sustained by the organization. 
Esther Moore and Ethel Potter, representatives of the Girls' Literary Society, which was en- 
couraged to extra effort by the defeat last year in the first inter-society debate, took this 
year's contest from Earl Turner and Leonard Campbell by a two-to-one decision. Although 
defeated, the boys upheld the high standard set by preceding debates. While the success 
of the girls is lamented as breaking the otherwise perfect record of the association, there is 
consolation in the fact that it is "only a family affair, anyway," and that it Avill make 0. 
A.'s victory next year more appreciated. 

In brief, the record of the Oratorical Association consists of five debates — two with 
Drury Academy, two with the Girls' Literary Society, one with Carthage — and four of the 
five won l)y O. A. It is certain that tlie future record Avill be as praiseworthj- as the past 
and that the school will continue to show its appreciation of this organization. 




ACORN CLUB 




COLORS, 
^laroon and White. 



FLOWER. 

IMaroon and White Carnation. 



Walter Eisenmayer, H.C.L.. 
Joe Campbell, H. C. S. 
James Collins. 
Ralph Elkins. 



Tom Foley. 
Harry Lawing. 
Sherman Lillie. 



Stanley Lippman. 
Arthur Meyers, C. H. S. 
Louis iMichaels. 



Bernard Thrall. 
Harry Wells. 
Carl Hamlin. 



^ ^ ^ 

PAST MEMBERS 



Artliur Wright, 
liugene O' Byrne. 
John Xee. 
Frank Jezzard. 
Roy Brooke. 
Harry Knight. 
Paul Jezzard. 
Bert Waits. 
Paul Hawkins. 
Otto .Smith. 



Allen Bradshaw. 

Harold Lincoln. 

Jerry Fenton. 

Will Lincoln. 

Roland Kite. 

John Widbin (deceased). 

Earl Leonard. 

Oscar Crisman. 

Rufus King. 

Richard Wagstaff. 



Burr Singleton. 
Harry Singleton. 
Will Reps. 
Howard Nelson. 
Werdin Rainey. 
George Michaels. 
James Shelton. 
Will John on. 
Glenn Johnson. 



Fred McCrosky. 
Daniel Xee. 
Rex Singleton. 
Lloyd Halleck. 
Leonard Mullings. 
David Widbin. 
Louis Reps. 
Walter Cossey. 
Ell.urt Hulburt. 



ALPHA MU 

Oreanized October 10. "08. 



COLORS FLOWETl 

Gold and Maroon. YelloAV Rose. 



Ben Seward. G. E. T. 
Earl Nixon. 
Harold Porter. 
Everett Hubbard. 
]\[arvin Browulow, R. H. 
Charles Busch. 



Arthur Dooms, G. M. 
Edward IMeSweeney. 
David Mitchell. 
Robert Tisdale. 
Sherman Rogers. 



LAMBDA ALPHA LAMBDA 



NATIONAL CHAPTERS 



Deliver. ( '(iliii-jido Colorado Alpha 

I'uel)lo. C'oloratlo Colorado Beta 

Topoka. Kansas Kansas Alpha 

Wichita. Kansas Kansas Beta 

Spriniitieid. ^Missouri Missouri Alpha 



Joplin, ^lissouri IMissonri Beta 

Webb City, ^Missouri ^lissonri Gamma 

St. Joseph, ^lissouri ^Missouri Delta 

Lexington, Kentucky Kentucky Alpha 

Des Moines, Iowa Iowa Alpha 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Wilma FUgbee. 
Cathciine Brooks. 
Marjoi ic Campbell. 
Mar.v ("hambiTS. 



Elizabeth Cope. 
Rebecca Garrett. 
Helen Irvin. 
Marion Knapp. 



Irene McElhany 
Jessie Roberts. 
Maude Coffelt. 
Emily Diggins. 



Ethel Smith. 
Rowena Tucker. 
Marie Walker. 



GAMES 



S. II. S 

S. II. S 

K. II. S 

S. II. S 10 

Total 10 



Webb City 10 

Drury Second 1 

Ahiinni 27 

Webl) City 6 

Total 44 



LINE-UP 



Erwin Nelson, '09 Center 

Guy Hawkins, '10 Left Guard 

Lee Moore, '09 Right Guard 

Lester Bradley, '09 Left Tackle 

Carl Schweider, '09 Right Tackle 

Ray Lyle. '09 Left End 

Charles Biiseh. '11 Right End 

Sherman Lillie, '11 Quarter 

Joe Campbell. '11 Left Half 

Robert Tisdale, '11 1 ^ „ 

V Full 

Albert Leckio. '09 J 

Sherman Rogers, '11 (Captain) Right Half 



(ieorge Kelso. "09. Oscar Coffelt. '11. Siil)s. 




GIRLS' BASKET BALL 



Mary Chambers. '10 (Captain) Forward 

IMarie Gates, '10 Forward 

Eleonora Boehmer, '11 Center 

Edith Moore, "10 Guard 

Julia Pierce, '10 Guard 

Fern Bearden, "09 Substitiite 




LINE-UP 



Sherman Rogers, '11 Forward 

Ralph Elkins. '10 ForAvard 

Carl :\Ioore. '09 Forward 

Howard Nelson, '10 Forward 

Arthur .Myers, "09 (Captain) Center 

Harry Knehinski. "09 Guard 

Robert Tisdale, "11 Guard 



SUBSTITI'TES. 
Joe Camplx'U, '11 : 'roiiniiy (iihson. '11; 
ReulxMi Peak. '(19. 



LINE-UP 



Bernard Thrall, '09 \ 

James Collins, 10 | C^^^^^^^s 

Georo-e Kelso, "09 

Roy Hart, '09 I Pitchers 

Albert Leckie. '09 J 

Toney Clauser, '10 First Base 

Arthur Dooms, '10 Second Base 

Gordon Higgs, '09 (Captain) Third Base 

Albert Leckie. "09 Shortstop 

Herman Hart, "09 Center Field 

Thomas Foley, '10 Left Field 

Sherman Lillie, "11 Right Field 

SUBSTITITTES. 
Earl Turner. '09, and Lee Jones, "12. 



ATHLETIC 

Officers of A 



President 

Secretary 

Ti'easurer 

Cluiirman of Games Committee. 



Arthur IMyers 

Mary Chambers 
....Harry Lawing 
Mr. Martin 



Athletics started with a rush this year, for everyone seemed 
enthiised over the promising prospects for all branches oi' 
school sports. Many new recruits promised to aid the older 
experienced men to gain many victories and to keep up the 
record made in previous years. A large number of students 
and teachers were annexed to the membership of the Ath- 
letic Association, and it seemed that the student body Avas 
pulling and the faculty pushing. 

As usual, the football boys were called upon first to furnish 
amusement for the gridiron enthusiasts, and many promising 
recruits responded, who, it was thought, would work down 
into good material. 

Arthur IMyers held the captaincy of both the basketball 
team and the football team, and, since it was necessary for 
him to icsigu oiic or the other of these, he decided to give 
up his well-earned position as football captain. Sherman 
Rogers, elected to fill the place, soon gained the confidence 
of the rooters as a systematic football captain. It was lucky 
that this change was made, for jMyers soon received ;in in- 
ji'i-y which foiccd him fi'om the game for tiie remaindei' of 
the seasiin. In ;i shoi-1 lime the new captain, with the nec- 
essar\- licl|) of .Mr. Marl in. had developed the new matci'iai 
into a heavy, yet I'asl. team, which seenu'd fated to coiitend 
more with hard IncU' than with otliei' school teams. 

(iames seemed iiard to match with out-of-town teams. 
tlu)i^gh many pi'actice games and class games were i)layed, 



SUMMARY 

detic Association 



Football Captain 

Basketball Captain 
Basketball Captain. 
Baseball Captain 



Sherman Eogers 
-Mary Chambers 

Arthur ]\Iyers 

Gordon Higgs 



Avhich kept the team in good form. At length a game was 
procured with Webb City High School, to be played at Webb 
City October 10th. All of the players expected to win this 
contest by playing hard ; the student body and faculty also 
had hopes of victor^^ However, the favorite full-back did 
Jiot get to go on the trip, and when Hart, the heaviest man 
on the team, received a broken collar-bone, which necessarily 
put him out of the game, the team was not only very much 
weakened but greatly discouraged, and lost the game by the 
score of 10-0. The boys returned, feeling that though they 
had been beaten there they might win on the home grounds 
after having more practice and making changes in the line-up. 

Other games were played, including practice games with 
Drury and a match game with Drury Second, M hich was for- 
feited to Drury on account of a deficiency in tlu' umnber of 
High School players present. The Alumni were also played, 
and, though this game Avas lost, it proved that much good 
football nmterial has been developed in High School. 

The next game of importance was that played against 
Webb City on the home field. This contest was annexed to 
our "won" column by the score of 10-6. It was the last reg- 
ular game played, owing to minor difficulties in connection 
with members of the team, yet this game Avas proof of the 
ability of individual players as well as the team as a Avhole. 

By the end of the season the players had developed certain 
characteristics which will be given here for the benefit of 



those who did not see them play. Tisdale at full-back had 
the confidence of everyone as a player and always held his 
nerve, and Leckie, who replaced Tisdale during the latter 
part of the season, also proved to have these same qualities, 
except that he was faster, but not quite heavy enough to 
hit the line. Campbell was noted for knowing the game and 
being able to "boot" the leather; while Rogers proved him- 
self a star at all-round play. Lillie, at quarter, received the 
well-passed balls of "Big" Nelson at center with much ease 
and assurance. Nelson was a good center and was well 
guarded by Moore and Hawkins, who were heavy and sea- 
soned, with nerve and "ginger." Bradley certainly filled 
Hart's place at tackle — if anything, having him bested, be- 
cause he was almost as heavy and not so tall, which enabled 
him to get under his opponent. Schweider seldom failed to 
stop his opponent 's plays through his side of the line and to 
get his man out of the way when necessary. At the ends, 
Bush and Lyle were fast and always willing to try for a man, 
though they sometimes missed their tackles. Kelso and Cof- 
felt were good substitutes, since Kelso could be placed in the 
line and Coff'elt at end or half-back. No one has been chosen 
to captain the team next year, as it is thought better for the 
members of the next team to choose their own captain. 

Another game, which has for the last few years attracted 
much attention in High School, is girls' basketball. Last 
year the team was one of the best, if not the best, in the state : 
and though most of that material graduated, the team of this 
year was equally as good, since it won all of the games that 
were played. Their success was largely due to the regular 
practice which they began early in the season under the sup- 
ervision of their coach, ]Miss Kearney. The fact that they did 
not play many games does not mean that they were not cap- 
able of playing good ball, for each and every member of the 
team proved her ability to play a fast game in the few con- 
tests that were witnessed by the student body. 

No young ladies' team of the city could make it interesting 
for the High School six, and an attempt was made to schedule 
games with schools of other towns. A game with Carthage 
High School played here at the Y. M. C. A. gymnasium was 



won by the score of 31-7 in our favor. This proved that out- 
of-town teams as well as city teams could not compete with 
such players. More games should have been procured, but 
there was a deficiency in the treasury. This team was one 
that would do justice to any school or association. 

]\Iary Chambers, the captain, played hard and worked well 
with Marie Gates. They both had a good eye for baskets, 
and many were the one-handed throws that they made which 
resulted in field goals. Eleanor Boehmer and Peach Rogers 
played a hard game at center, for after successfully knocking 
the ball toward High's goal they used the best head work 
and basketball tactics to keep it at that end of the field. As 
guards, Edith Moore and Julia Pierce were superior to any 
other guards of the teams contested with, this fact being 
proven by the low scores made by the opponents. Although 
Fern Bearden played on the team last year, she did not take 
time to play regularly with this year's team, but acted as 
substitute, and certainly made a good one, for she was an 
experienced hand at the game and could fill any position on 
the team when it became necessary. 

The boys' basketball season opened with games against 
Alumni, Carthage, Webb City and Jasper, all of which were 
lost. The team started into the City League, which was com- 
posed of the Normal, Drury, Acorn Club and High School, 
Avith rather a poor standing, but hoped to improve with 
practice. Difficulty to get that practice, as well as other bar- 
riers, stood in the way of a strong team. ]Much of the new 
material was very light, and the experienced players did not 
keep in as good training as they should have to make a 
showing. 

With the responsibility of captain resting upon him, ]\Iyers 
did not play as good a game at center as he did last year, 
though his playing was first class, and he was thought to be 
the best center in the league. Tisdale, as one of the guards, 
played a hard game and held his place on the team during 
the entire season. This was also true of Kuchinski, who 
played a fast game as the other guard. The forwards were 
a little doubtful throughout the season ,- Elkins and Rogers, 
being perhaps the best material, played at these positions. 



Campbell played as first substitute, though some of the sec- 
ond team members were played occasionally in regular 
games. Nelson and Gibson both did well when in the game 
and pi'omise to make good material for next year's team. 

Many new men were out early to try for the baseball team, 
but. owing to some new rules made by the faculty, several 
of tbe boys were forced to quit playing. However, some good 
material was chosen to represent the school and was siiccess- 
ful at first, defeating the Woodland Heights nine, which is 
considered to be the best amateur team in the city. 

The members of the team, as they appeared on the field 
for practice at the time the Resume went to press, may be 
characterized in the following lines: Thrall, as catcher, 
was a good judge of what kind of a ball a batter liked and 
the reverse, also losing good judgment when men were on 
bases. Though he did not hit very well, he promised to im- 
])r()ve by the close of the season. R. Hart pitched most of 
the games, and the fact that he worked with his catcher 
was tiu^ explanation of his success. He hit very Aveli 
for a pitclier. At shortstop, Leckie had a good eye for a 
bounce and a neat "peg" to first. He hit well and could 
pitch good lijill Aviicn he was needed in the box. Clauser 
played a goo(l game at first, seldom "muffing" the ball, and 




hitting at a good pace; while "Cy" Dooms was noted for his 
hitting and fast fielding. Thircl base was guarded by one 
of the best amateurs in the city, Gordon Higgs. the captain, 
who deserved to fill that position from the way he hit and 
fielded. All of the players took pride in "Captain" Higgs' 
neat ball playing. H. Hart had the reputation of a pinch 
hitter, and when in the out-field he got everything that came 
his way. Foley and Lillie played in the remaining out-field 
positions and usually got the ball when it came within their 
reach, both hitting a good per cent. Turner and Jones were 
the substitutes. 

Baseball was the only spring sport indulged in. because 
there was no tennis court or track on which to keep teams in 
training if such had been organized. Thus baseball held the 
interest of everyone. 

Mr. Martin and Miss Kearney deserve much credit for the 
work which they did with the different teams. 




HICHEH EaUCATIDN 



MISERYS 

HUB BOWERS, leaning disconsolately against the 
steps of the boys' dormitory, abandoned himself to 
misery. Round of face, short of stature and indo- 
lent in manner, he scarcely fulfilled one's ideal of a 
person doomed to assume the role of a heavy traged- 
ian in life's drama, but at this particular time he looked any- 
thing but his usual jolly self. 

His woes were two, and from Chub's personal pomt oi view 
only a Shylock could hear of them unmoved. In the first 




COMPANY 

place, he had always kept an eye of longing on the leading 
part in the class play, and tonight would witness its pre- 
sentation with another — a usurper. Chub considered him — 
assuming the title role. He hoped that the whole thing 
would be a failure, and probably he would get his wish, for 
whoever said Ted Burnes could act ? 

But that was not the greatest of his woes. There was an- 
other, and at thought of it Chub's round face looked more 
woeful than ever, if such were possible. From Dorothy, who 
had sweetly consented to Avitness the play in his company, 
he had .just yesterday received a note in which she explained 
that she had been mistaken — so much to think of — how could 
she remember that three months ago she had promised Hal 
(his own roommate) the engagement ? With a feeling of 
helpless irritation he wondered why girls wouldn't play fair 
about such things. Why couldn't she own that Hal had dip- 
lomatically sent her a box of chocolates and a note yester- 
day an hour before she wrote this to him ? 

For Dorothy, it mu.st be said — and let it be spoken low — 
was sadly mercenary, and the boy who could furnish the 
most entertainment and — chocolates was the most favored 
so long as the attentions and candy lasted. Chul) had felt 
this to be true for some time, but luitil now he could not 
have confessed such a thought, even to himself. He despised 
himself for wisliing that his pocket had contained more than 
a (piaiter and a nickel, which amount represented tlu> price 
of admission for two to the class play, so that he couhl luive 
sent tile clu)colates. 

A merry whislh- l)roke in upon his liiltcr inusings. and a 
nionuMit latei' Ilal swung gaily around tlu' coi-ner. his cap 
tiitetl at a provokingly jaunty angle. 



■'I say, Chub," he asked as he reached his friend, "are 
you going- to take a girl to the play tonight?" 

There was a sullen shake of dissent from Chub. Hal's face 
became still brighter. 

"Well, I'm glad of that," he declared. "You know how 
luicertain my laundry is. Yours is all right this week?" he 
inquired with concern. 

Chub nodded shortly. A daring plan suggested itself to 
him, but before he could think it out Hal, in friendly fashion 
confided to him that he intended to dress early and "knock 
around town" before going after Dorothy. "With a mixture 
of generosity and condescension in his manner he added : 

"Come on up, old fellow, and stay with me while I dress." 

Chub could only assent feebly, and a few moments later 
the two boys were in their room, where Chub sat gloomily 
Avatching the progress of his roommate's painstaking toilet. 
The latter seemed unusually critical of his appearance to- 
night, a fact which tended to incense Chub further. Silently 
he saw his chum cooly help himself to the last clean collar 
without the customary "If yow don't need it.'* Evidently he 
was taking no chances this evening. When it came to ties he 
could afford to be more civil. 

"Chub, old man, I'd like one of your ties awfully well for 
tonight." he said. "I haven't a thing that'll look well with 
this suit." 

And without waiting for a reply he carefully selected the 
most expensive one in his friend's rack, and as carefully ad- 
justed it. When his toilet was completed, he glanced anx- 
iou.sly at his shoes. 

"Didn't have the price for a shine, and these certainly 
look bum," was his somewhat rueful comment. Then brigbt- 
ening, "How'd you like to have me break in those new ones 



of yours? Didn't I hear you say they're rather uncomfort- 
able in spots?" 

Chub, remembering one evening of torture spent with and 
because of those shoes, handed them over with fairly good 
grace. Bwt the daring plan still remained in his mind. Hal's 
nerve was maddening. His manner plainly said, "It doesn't 
matter Avhat you wear, you. know; it's a different thing, 
though, when a fellow's going to take a girl — and you 
arn't. " He remarked lightly as he rose: 

"Now, my hat." 

Fortifying himself against pleadings, threats, moral and 
physical persuasion. Chub announced stonily: 

"I guess you'll not wear that tonight." 

Now. while the boys had their individual clothing, there 
was one thing they shared in common. Going with girls of 
the Dorothy type had been rather expensive, and when 
winter came and there was need of something in the way of 
head-gear other than caps and felt hats, the two shared in 
buying a derby which was to be held jointly and worn by 
one when it Avoiild not interfere with the other's plans. 
There had been no trouble before this; each had been con- 
siderate of the other; therefore, Hal was amazed at Chub. 

"Not wear it!" was his astonished remark. "Why, you'll 
not need it tonight. Why won't I wear it?" 

To this Chub had apparently no reply other than stationing 
himself above the box containing the hat. 

"You must be crazy," was Hal's next enraged comment. 
"That hat's mine as much as it's yours!" 

"Yes, but Avho's worn it more, I'd like to know?" came 
indignantly from Chub. "You're wearing all my clothes to- 
night, but you just bet you'll not get this hat. Your cap's 
all right, anyway." This last tauntingly, for he knew how 



impossible a cap was for eveniiiii' Avear from Hal's point of 
view. 

The latter flushed aud faced him augrily. "You give me 
that hat or — " 

He left ott' impressively, thinking that an unfinished threat 
would imply worse things than a completed one. The other 
stood unmoved, closely guarding the box. Hal, goaded by 
the other's cm hnuess. struck out with his clenched fist. Cluib 
dodged, lost his i)alance and. alas ! crashed down npon the 
box. crushing the hat beyond recognition. Hal's hand met 
the wall with surprising suddeness and i)ain. 
and as he glared down at his rival and his 
rival glared u]) at him — there sounded on 
the (Inor a knock. 

Cliub I'osc with an effort and demanded 
wit li scant courtesy : 

"What do you want 

'I'he door opened, and a grinning imp of a 
boy stood at the threshold. The late combat- 
ants r'cali/.cd wratlifully that it was Doi'o- 
thy's kid l)rother and that he had heard I 
"With avai'icious eves fixed on Chub the bov 



"Here's a note from sis." 

f]agei'ly ("hub grasped it. and the boy con- 
tinued with siuuificance : 

"She fold me to hurry up — and I rail ail 
the way. It 's suic some ways hei'e an' — (Jee ! 
but I'm tired I" Breathless gasps at the end. 






His victim hastily drew from his pocket one of his two 
coins and deposited it into the grimy hand of the urchin. 
Without thanks the imp, half turning, said with a grin : 

"That ain't fer you — it's the other feller's. An' say — tell 
him," quickening his steps, "that Ted Burnes .just now sent 
sis a five-pounder of the best candy in town." 

With that he was gone, and Chub, surrendering the note to 
Hal, luiderstood the contents of it as well as if he had read it. 
His mind wandered regretfully to his lost nickel, and at the 
same time his hand sought his pocket. He started at the 
sickening discovery — he'd given that likeness 
of Satan his quarter ! He looked across at his 
chum, who had finished reading the note. 
Something like sympathy moved him to say, 
as he extended a soiled piece of paper: 

"I got one a good deal like that yester- 
day." 

Without a word they exchanged notes, 
then simultaneously tore them into bits, toss- 
ing the fragments into a brass ash tray ou 
the table. It was Chub who struck a match 
and toiiched it to the pajiei-. In silence both 
watched the flame fiare up. then slowly die 
out. Hal, with a look of mute understanding', 
extended his bi-uised baud as he said: 

"Shake." 

And silently they shook hands over the 
charred remains. 



I don 't know what they call it 

Up in Chem — • 
But, Gee! I wish somebody 'd 

Put the lid on them — 
Or IT ! 

And you ain't smelt it yet? 

And want a sniff? 
Just hang around 44. Now — 

There's a whiff! 
Bah ! Ugh ! ! Pah ! ! ! whew ! ! ! ! 

Gosh ! ain 't it rank ? 
It 's me skidoo ! 



li-m-m-m-m ! 

Hungry ! ! 
Why 'tain't no name for what I feel 
While steak er cake 
Er cookey smells are rollin' down ' 
When them girls bake ! 
D'you sniff that nine-course lot o' smells!! 

yank my belt, 
An ' draw 'er tight ! My appetite 
Ain 't never felt so much like eatin ! 
Hungry ! ! Well 
U-m-m-m-m ! 

Now ain 't that swell ! ! 



THE TIE GAME 



^^^^ HERE is a tradition at Hilton that Thanksgiving' 
^^|»| is always rainy, bnt this one proved an exception, 
^^^g for it dawned bright and clear. At a little before 
^^^^ three the grandstand was packed with a howling 
mob of students and other footbal enthusiasts, each 
waving either a i-ed pennant of Hilton or a blue one of St. 
Eustace. Though the Hilton coach was all smiles on the out- 
side, inwardly he Avas railing the fate that deprived Hilton of 
IMarch. her crack half-back and captain, who was on proba- 
tion. At this time he was before the faculty trying to (jual- 
ify himself. 

Suddenly a shout was heard, and almost at the same time 
the two teams trotted on to the field. Then the whistle blew, 
and the two teams bunched in the center of the tield. A coin 
was to.ssed, and the men lined up. The referee's whistle 
sounded, the pigskin soared aloft, tnd the game Avas on. 

The ball fell into the ready hands of Blair, the Hilton full- 
l)aek, who sped swiftly down the field. One white line passed 
under foot, then another. l)ut before a third could be made 
the St. Eustace ends were upon him. Three times Blair was 
rammed into the St. Eu.stace line, each time for a small gain, 
but at the end of the third down St. Eustace tore gaping 
holes ill tlieii' opponents' line big enough for a coach and 
foul'. UKii'c than large enough for the St. Eustace backs 
to go galio|)ing through for three, five and even a dozen 
yards. No line can long stand such treatment, and finally, by 
a i-iish through his position, the big left tackle of Hilton was 
knocked aside with such force that he lay where he had 
fallen. lilair held up his hand, and a snhstitnte struggled 



agitatedly with his sweater and bounded onto the field. The 
rest of the half w^as a losing one for Hilton, and when the 
w^histle blew the score stood St. Eustace 4, Hilton 0. 

The second half started about as the first had. Back, back 
went the Hilton line till it was only ten yards from their goal. 
At that moment March appeared on the run, struggling with 
his vest as he ran. Blair saAV him, and, suddenly discovering 
a lame ankle, called time. The referee's Avhistle piped. 

"I can play," shouted joyfully. 

"Then get in there at half," the captain commanded. 
"And oh! March!" he pleaded, "kick us out of this hole."' 
"All right," he addecl to the referee. 

"Hilton's ball, first down, five yards to gain," called the 
referee. 

Back on the goal line stood the half-back Avith his hands 
outstretched. Suddenly the ball was snapped. A second 
later it soared in the air, propelled by a mighty kick. A St. 
Eustace player caught the ball, but before his foot had tAviee 
touched the ground a Hilton end upset him. On the next 
play St. Eustace made her first disastrous fumble. A Hilton 
player grabbed the ball and sprinted for tAventy yards before 
a St. Eustace player tripped him. A double pass was made; 
the ball Avas in kicking distance of the St. Eustace goal. 
IMarch took his position for a kick. The ball came Ioav and 
straiglit into his hands. Taking a (juick step forAvard his 
toe met the ball and sent it safely over the goal posts just 
before a St. Eustace player, Avith strength born of despera- 
tio!i. kiu)eked him violently to the earth. The score Avas tied, 
and in a Avhirl of red the croAvd rushed over the ropes. 



Willie B. (in Dutch): "What does 'damit' mean? 
Miss K. : " Look it np in your vocabulary, and take the 
last meaning." 

Willie (stupidly) : "Did you say to look up 'damit'?" 
Miss K. (losing patience) : "Yes, D-A-M-I-T !" 



Miss Fitch: "Green fruit always contains a great amount 
of starch. Now what did the boy get that ate green apples?" 
Somebody blushes; the class giggles. 



Miss Dayton: "Rowena, did you break a whole egg?" 
Rowena: "I couldn't break a half one, could I?" 



A little piece of rubber, 
A little pen and ink. 

Make a bad report card 
Look better than you think. 



Josephine Routt says Homer Lee's visits often consume the 
midnight oil. 

Mr. Martin (on the first day of school) : "Don't you re- 
member me. Miss Ott?" 

Miss Ott (racking her brain) : "No-o. What class were 
you in?" 



HOW TO T>ASS AN EXAM. 

1. Go into the room five miniites late. Speak to every- 
body, especially the teacher. 

2. Take a seat right under the teacher's eye. This al- 
ways pays. 

3. After you get your paper out turn it over and sharpen 
your pencil for five minutes. 

4. Read the questions. Take at least five minutes for 
this. 

5. Look around the room and smile. 

6. (io up and ask the teacher about a question you just 
can't understand. 

7. If you know anything, write it down. 

8. Be sure to write at a furious rate if you write at all. 

9. Be sure not to read the paper over. This betrays lack 
of confidence. 

10. Walk up to the teacher and give him your paper. 

11. Coiiii)liinent him on such a fair examination, and ask 
him when he can come out to dinner. 

12. Don't worrv. 




Fro/- - /^' S A ^"^"^ ar-^"iid,ot- a J^or aTd ^^=^^ 
iiiHe yfeih. - Hully Qe<? I! Be - dad 1/ I jee . 




CHAPEL 

When to chapel Ave do flock, 
And then by chance do aught to shock, 
These very words will come to mock : 
"You'll surely come to grief." 

If some simple little lass 
llcf class-room door should chance to pass. 
And accidently ( ?) cut a class — 
"She'll surely come to grief." 

If some l)oy sluuild chanc(> to be 
Loud aiul rude, and then if he 
Sliould sometime go out on a si)ree — 
"IIc'Il siii'cly conic to grief." 



REFRAIN 

If a boy some bright noon-day 
Should walk home with a miss so gay^. 
Soon for it he'll have to pay — 
"He'll surely come to grief." 

If a teacher hears you cuss. 
Or flnds your books all in a muss, 
Or hears you get into a fuss — 
"You'll surely come to grief." 

If a teacluM' catches you 
Shooting beans, and i)eanuts. too. 
Or even ci'aps, things will be blue — 
"You'll surely come to grief." 



IVE WOULDN'T THINK OF SUCH A THINQ 



Reulx'ii jiiid Helen asked not to be advertised in the eol- 
luiins of the Resume. 

Of course we won't get mad because they thought such 
things of us, and we won't mention that they are sweet on 
each other, either. 



(iladys Yarl)roiigh told us that just because she liked a 
boy was no sign she wanted to be roasted. As if we would 
condescend to become so incadaverous as to rumor that her 
affections ever siiould ramify or become segregated. She. 
of course, will remain loyal to llenuan. and together they 
will drift down through history as having had the worst case 
in tlic records of High. 



Walter and Helen came personally to the Resume office 
and begged that we would not say anything about what they 
did the night of the class party at Dorsey's. 

Good gracious! We wouldn't think of telling people that 
they both have lived in Springfield this long and stiil got 
lost (?). 



Mary and Ray admit that since Freshmen thej^'ve — well — 
er — to say the least, been constant friends, but then you 
know some things don't look so well in print. 

Why we assure you, dear friends, that we'd no sooner tell 
people that YOU may be seen any morning before 8 :20 in 
the auditorium than Ave'd tell the same about ourselves, and 
everybody knows that one staffer won't peach on another ( ?). 



Among the pathetic appeals was one from Josephine Routt, 
beseeching us not to comment on any of her love affairs. 

No, sir. We think too much of her to tell that she is often 
most in tears in 9:42 English Avhen she thinks Carl isn't com- 
ing to class, but brightens up greatly when he arrives late, 
as usual. 




THE BLUFFER 

Breathes tliere a Bluff with soul so dead 
Who never to himself hath said : 
"This nijiht I'll study hard and well; 
I'll erani niy Chemistry and tell 
Of every stunt in History; 
Or demonstrate Geometry; 
Get up my Civil Gov., and Dutch 
And Enolish, too. or Trig, and such ; 
I'll make ]\liss Kearney proud of me; 
]\liss Ross will turn her eyes to me; 
The Principal may smile at me ; 
And sure Miss Ott Avill dote on me ; 
And Chem. will not then Sear me 
thi'ough : 

I'll do the things a Grind should do 
To ring a halo ring each day; 
I'll bone and dig — not bluff'?" I say 
Breathes there a Bluff' with soul so dead 
"Who never to himself hath said — 

All this and more ''. I also ask, What dif- 
fci-ence it made if he did say all this and 
mole when next day all the cards did 
a double-shufHe to what he hadn't 
crammed and they tui'ned out about like 
this: 





You've heard the minstrel footers. 
With their funny, tuneful Avays? 

The brass band 'roimd the corner 
In the sultry summer days? 

Ever heard the B. 0. A. quartette f 

You've heard the baseball rooters? 

And the circus organ scream? 
Harmonious zephyrs stealing 

Like the music of a dream? 

But NOT the B. O. A. quartette ? 

You've heard the cat a-wauling, 
Cat a-mewling, squalling too ? 
Heard the happy serenading 

When the night is crisp with dew? 
NEVER heard the B. 0. A. quar- 
tette ? 

Yon've faced the cannon's thunder? 

Had a buzz-saw charm your ears? 
You've caught the sparkling echoes 
Of the music of the si)heres? 
But never heard the voices 
Of that B. O. A. (|uartette? 
What? i\o!!! That IS funny. 



There was a young Junior named 

Trottr (?) 
Who strolled down the hallway to spot 

hr ; 

But the Prin. spotted hm. 
And he looked so blamed grm. 
That Trottr, the spottr, unspot hr. 




FAVO%ITE REFRAINS 



'Oh ! Where is My Wandering Boy Tonight?" Rao Donnel! 

'Mary Ann, My Mary Ann" Ray Lyle 

'One Little Boy Had Money" Albert Avery 

'Leave Me Alone to Grind" Jessie Brown 

'There's Just One Girl for Me" Herman Hart 

'Whose Little Girlie Are You?" Ednae Davis 

'Nothing to Do hnt Nothing" Robert Tisdale 

'I Love All the Boys and All the Boys Love Me" 

Frankie Hamel 

'Josephine. My Joe" Earl Turner 

'Is There Any Room in Heaven for a Little Girl Like 

Me?" Sarah T. 



"^Mannna's Boy" Frank Black 

"]\Iaking Eyes" Grace Nicholson 

"I Want Somebody to Love Me All the Time" Jose Route 

"Friends That Are Good and True" Oneta and Fay 

"Whistle It" Edwina Wilhoit 

"I Could Waltz on Forever" Zelma Young 

"Love for an Hour" "Spud" Rogers 

"Call Around on Sunday" Norval Kanning 

"Go While the Goin's Good" Clyde Bj^ers 

"Every Day Is Ladies' Day w^ith Me" Ed ]\IeS\veeney 

"Thursday Is My Jonah Day" ■• Stan Lippman 

"Love Me and the World Is Mine" Nell 'Bryant 





1 n c 










_LI — 'kjl J. 










4 ^ \ ^ 



CALENDAR 





SEPTEMBEai. 

8. School opens. Gee ! 
The Freshmen ! 

9. Mr. Dodcl makes his 
anniial spiel to the Freshies ; 
scares 'em simply awfiil. 

10. "Rowdy" Tisdale 
makes eyes at a girl. 

11. Big athletic meetin'. 
Ralph Elkins cracked a 
joke. Is is possible? 

14. Ringling Brothers' Circus. Holy smoke! Had some 
cutters at our school today. 

15. Mr. Byers shoots off his mouth in American Govern- 
ment. 

16. "Spud" Rogers makes a speech in athletic meeting: 
"Now, there's a lot of you fellows that ought to be out to 
football practice that isn't." 

17. Art Myers got bunged up in football practice. No 
wonder; lie got hit with a "Spi;d." 

IS. Acorns gave Harry Lawing the rest what 
was coming to him out to Eisenmayer 's. 

23. Senior class meetin' ; great doin's. Soph 
cla.ss meetin'; nothin' doin'. 

24. "Ain't it awful, :\Iabel'?" Mr. Hull an- 
nounced when the fii'st test would come oft'. 

2(). Harry Lawing went to see a girl!! 





27. Seniors give a big blow-out at Mabel 
Fox's. 

29. Oratorical picnic. Ask Walter Eisen- 
mayer and Albert Avery who they toted 
across the James. 

OCTOBER. 

2. Football. Crackin' good game. Senior-Freshmen ( ?) 
vs. Sophomores. 6-0 in favor of Seniors. 

5. Harry Lawing gets a quarter and takes a girl to dauc- 
in' school. 

7. Nothin' doin'. 

10. I\Iore football. S. H. S. bunch 
pull their freight for Webb City. Got 
skinned — 11-0. 

12. Sophs have a class meetin'. Try- 
in 'to Avork up nerve to have a party. 

13. Sophs have another class meetin'. 
Still tryin ' to stir up a class party. 

14. Sophs have another class meetin'. 
They get up the nerve to have that party, 
but the Seniors '11 "get 'em if they don't 
watch out.'' 

14. A crush came to light. Jewell Bell Grey pumps us 
all about Art Myers and his arm. 

15. Rachel and Carl put on that class pin committee. 

16. Class pins cause a rumpus in Senior class meetin'. 
AValt kicks about lookin' like a ten-cent store, and Ray says 

he won't be taken for a paint shop. 




17. Acorns land on Sherman Lillie and Louis Michaels 
good and proper. 

18. Seniors got the Sophs all right. Some socks damaged. 

19. Football some more. S. H. S. 
fixed Webb City— 11-6. 

23. Senior class meetin'. Harry 
got on his tin ear and stung Mr. By- 
ers a trifle. 

25. Big mix-up in 11 :15 Chem. 
class. No bones broken. 




2t. 



Mr. Harrison makes his get-away. 



NOVEMBER. 

3. Mr. Rook blows in. 

4. Mr. Hull worked a gag on the Seniors. Sprung a 
quotation. 

5-6. Exams ! ! Cramin ' ! Cribbin ' ! Flunkin ! 

10. Speakin' contest. Herman Hart skinned 
the whole lay-out. 

12. Rachel and Carl have a dime to spend. 

13. A dime missin' out of the class-pin 
money. 

16. Class football game. Seniors-Freshmen 
vs. Juniors-Sophs. Rotten game. Nobody 
killed. 

20. Harry Lawing gets stuck on a Freshman girl. Mr. 
Clements sells another Acorn pin. 

24. Goll ! The staff that Senior class elected ! 

26. Another Senior blow-out at Dorsey Williams'. 




28. Mr. Byers wunk at Helen. Ye Gods and little fishes ! 
30. Harry blows himself and buys a sack of peanuts. 

DECEIUBER. 

1. Miss Puller vamooses. How foolish to get tied up ! 

2. Miss Ross sprung a test in American Government. 

6. L. A. L. put ]Maude Coffelt and Marion Knapp thru. 

7. One of the teachers wouldn't listen to 
the lock-up gong and so had to make her get- 
away down the fire escape. 

8. The new librarian hove in sight. 

10. Harry Kuchinski ran a bluff and re- 
cited in German. 

13. Seniors spring ucav caps. Sophs neAv 
Jersies. 

14. Senior leap-year class party at James 
Stewart's. 

15. Jiminy crickets ! Dot White got hers 
at a K. K. K. initiation. 

17. Harry's lost Acorn pin is safely caught, 
but not by a safety catch. 

18. Chapel— B. 0. A. and G. L. S. try to show off. 

18-Jan. 4. Swell stunts for two whole weeks — Christmas 
vacation ! 

JANUARY. 

4. Five more months of hard labor ! 
6. Great kid ! Russell Markland wears long trousers. 

7. Mr. Rook blows out. 




!l. Frats fix Russell Peyton. 

12. ]\Ir. Sears ti'ics his hand at 
Chemistry. 

By uauii I The Senior class 
pins have eanie I 

13. Sad. sad fate — Mr. Byers bids 
adieu to dear old High. 

15. Acorns sic the goat on Stan- 
ley and Jimmy. 

16. Extry! Extry ! Frehmen. Sophs, 
Faculty, Board and Seniors ! Look ! Lis- 
ten ! Sit np ! Take notice ! The Juniors 
had a class party ! 

18. IMarion Knapp takes a tuml)l(' 
(downstairs). 

20. SiMiiors loosen up and give a 1)1()W- 
out. 

21. Chapel. Kay Lyle pulls off a stunl. 

22. .Mr. Byers is "pressing" his suit. 

23. llar'ry's class jiin comes up missin'. 

24. .Juniors sjjort tlieii' dinky caps. 

FEBRUARY. 

1. Chapel. \t}\[ i)ct. we were aujii'lic 

5. Scrummy lookin' ^\. S. T'. fellows in that glee club 
that caiiu' here today. 

('Iianecllnr ilaseltine ucls his wool Iriuiined. 

12. Liiu-oln's Birthday. Bully chapel. Bust of Lincoln 
that (i. L. S. and B. 0. A. were going to hand over didn't 
show up. 





14. Harry gets a valnetine. 

17. Chapel. Mr. Dodd makes the start- i 

ling statement that it's a sin to waste good 1 

peanuts by throwin' 'em aroiuid and not ^ 
eatin' 'em. 

20. Something doin' in the P. L. E. 
fraternity. ]\lalcom Ambrosia 'nitiated. 

22. No school. Wish Washington had 
a birthday every week. 

25. Art Dooms gets hungry and pulls 
the fire gong, thinkin' it's a dinner bell. 

28. Colder 'n the dickens today! 

MARCH. 

3. Exams announced. Groans heard 
everywhere. 

5. Everybody gets wise, as to postal 
rules 

8. That new frat 'nitiate "TJowdv"' 
Tisdell. 

10. Freshmen and Clarence Clarke introduce strictly 
humorous trick of knockin' a fellow's books out from under 
his arm. 

14. Mr. Dodd airs his opinion of strictly hmnorous tricks. 

17. Harrv s})rints out in a new cap and gets the name of 
"Snork." 

20. Mar.jorie Campbell, Elizabeth Cope and ^lary Cham- 
heis got through a L. A. L. initiation last night. Bet they 
(Ion "t want to do it again. 

22. (iirls" i)askell)all~Carthage vs. S. H. S. We skinned 
'em. 31-7. 






25-26. Wow I Exams for two whole clays ! 

30. Harry and "Pete" look all to the l)um ti)- 
day. Acorns took a turn at 'em last ni^ht. 

APRIL. 



1. April Fool. Nothin' happened today. 

3. "Spud" didn't come to school today. Wonder Avhat 
those Alpha Mi;'s did to him? 

6. Ain 't girls cowards ! All of 'em in the 
8:20 English class yell Avhen they see a dead 
mouse. 

9. Plarold and Lee make those Carthage fel- 
lows look like thirty cents in the debate. 

10. Some of them poppin' caps get thrown ^ 
around in the halls. 

15. Drury Glee Club sings for us in chapel. It was great. 

16. "Snork" parts his hair. Guess he is hunting for a 
new girl. 

18. Bully for Seniors ! Beat in baseball game ! 

19. Domestic science and manual training have 
some show. 

20. Thank goodness ! This old annual goes to 
print ! 





THE T)EPARTURE FROM CHAPEL 

I hear in the hall above me 

The rush of heavy feet, 
The sound of doors that are opened, 

And voices harsh and sweet. 

From my office I see through the doorAvay, 

Descending the broad hall stairs. 
Grave Seniors and giggling Sophomores 

And Juniors Avith haughty airs. 

A sudden rush for the stairway, 

A sudden raid for the halls. 
By four doors left ungarded 

They leave the chapel walls. 



Boov..,-Uc, "Boo~^.A-^fl<.^ 

4"-* ss yes 

^ RECITATION IN SOLID 

Professor G— gg begins program by asking Arthur Myers 
ail excuse. Arthur marches to the desk with it, accom- 
panied by a chorus of, "Who signed it, Art?" "Didn't E E 
tell you you mustn't sign your own excuses?" etc. etc Prof 
G— gg then assigns the lesson for Tuesday. Lee Moore takes 
the floor with, "Say, Mr. G— gg; that's the longest lesson 
you ve given us this year." Harry Lawing maintains it's the 
shortest, until Roy Hart, over by the door, makes a noise like 
Jlr. Dodd, and the question drops. 

Mr. G— gg then puts a circle on the board, draws a line 
through It and proceeds to demonstrate: "If the radius is 
greater than 'Y,' the line will intersect that sphere in how 
many points ? ' ' 



"Two," in concert. 

"If it is equal to 'Y,' in how many points?" 
"One," from a number. 

Ray Lyle objects, and a debate is soon on : "Resolved, That 
a tangent to a sphere does not intersect that sphere '"' Af- 
firmed by Lyle ; denied by Rukes. Mr. G— gg, after hearing 
able discussion from both sides, decides that it depends upon 
which way you look at the question. Illustrating bv a chalk 
box he says : 

^''The surface of this solid does not belong to the box." 

"I'll bet you can't take it away from it," from :\loore ■ and 
"Whose is it, then?" from Myers. 

Carl Israel's form darkening the doorway reminds the clas.s 
that it is nearly time for the bell to ring and Mr. G— gg makes 
one last effort. He snaps his fingers for attention, and awak- 
ening John Woods, who, to make up for lost time. Avaves his 
hand in the air with : 

"I can prove that one, Mr. G — gg." 

The Prof, takes courage and gives Mr. Woods the floor. 
He starts his recitation thus : 
"Well, hem-m-m — " 

The bell rings, and Mr. G— gg dismisses the class with : 
"We didn't get over as much of the les.son todav as I 
hoped to. I don't see what's the reason. I wish someone 
would suggest a faster way of getting these proofs." 




FOR THE UNLETTERED 



A is for Anderson, sober nnd solemn: 
B is for Black, as thin as a column. 
C is for Carson, who takes art for her call; 
I) is for Duncan, the yonngest of all. 
E is for Eisenmayer, at the President's chair; 
F is for Fink, Avith the blackest of hair. 
G is for Garrett— her smile's surely winning; 
H is for Hart, who thinks love is no sinning. 
I is for Isreal, beloved by the teachers; 
J is for Jones, the dearest of crea- 
tures. 

K's for Knnehinski — oh my! what a 
name ! 

L is for Lyle, and to act is his aim. 
'SI is for :M*yers. the greatest athlete : 
N is for Napper. knowing (ii'eek 

myths complete. 
O is for somebody we haven't got: 
P is for Portei', who's late such a lot. 
Q is for someone we'll have to leave 

ont : 

R is foi' smart little -losephine Rontt. 
S is for Seall. who liist'ry can spiel; 
T's for Trenai'v. who loves him a 



hilt V(eirs) can't 



great deal. 

V is for no one 
stay out : 

Ws \'i>r Woody, who is never in 
doiilil . 

Y is I'oi' ^'nrhroii'^h. who never does 
wrong : 

And now X and Z 
sonu'. 



le end of this 




INNOCENCE 



This was my first High School grade card. I approached 
the teacher hesitatingly, grabbed my card, rushed down the 
hall out into the yard, and sat down behing a large oak tree. 
With trembling fingers I opened it and found four "V. P.s" 

"What can they mean?" I asked myself over and over 
again. 

"Oh! They're vastly perfects." said a voice behind me. 
I turned around Avith a scared face. 
"Honest, are they?" I asked. 

"Why. of course," said the Seniin-, 
whom I recognized as the owner of 
the voice. "You've done fine. Take 
it home and let father see it. I bet 
he'll be surprised." 

"Yes, I knoAV he will be. too." I 
said. "]\Iuch obliged for telling me 
what the 'V. P.s' mean." 

"You're welcome," he said with a 
smile. 




Miss Ausherman, to Dolphie K. in Junior Eng- 
lish: "Now, Dolphie, take the subject, 'How to 
Sew on a Button, ' and tell us about it, either by 
use of exposition or description." 

Dolphie: "Well — er — a — that is, I haven't 
had much experience along- that line myself, 
but—" 



Miss Ross: "Harry, what was the 'Statute 
of Liveries'?" 

Harry K. (who hasn't been ])aying attention) : 
"Er— oh, the 'Statute of Liberty'? Oh. that 
was a law that a man should pay so much and 
get his liberty." 




Mr. Hull, calmly looking out of the windoAv, 
remarked: "Yes. Satan was as smooth as the 
devil." 

The class gasped. 



"Carl Isreal. have you ever read any other 
elegy besides Grav'.s 'Elegy in a Countrv Church 
Yard'?" 

"Yes, one — 'Burke's Conciliation'." 



Mr. Dodd (holding unruly pupil by collar) 
"I'm afraid Satan has a hold of you." 
Boy: "I'm fifraid so, too." 




THE LAST JOKE 




OUR BELIEF 

NM^; 

We believe in the Merchandise we are selling-. We be- 
lieve that honest g-oods can be sold to honest men by 
honest methods, 

We believe that one man's dollar should have. the same 
purchasing- power as another man's, and we believe in the 
absolute one price system, to all — as the only just basis 
of fair dealing-. We believe in giving value received for 
every dollar you leave with us, if we don't we cheerfully 
refund your money without quibble or question. We 
want you to know, that however small your purchase 
made from us, if it should prove unsatisfactory, that you 
have our positive guarantee of your money back cheer- 
fully, believing your interests are our interests. In trad- 
ing at our store every safeguard is thrown around your 
interests. If you know of any fairer way of doing busi- 
ness, tell us and we will certainly adopt it. 



"THE HOUSE OF A THOUSAND STYLES" 

MORRISON CLOTHING COMPANY 



One Price Sellers of 

CORRECT CLOTHES FOR MEN AND YOUNG MEN 

FURNISHING GOODS AND HATS 



Fresh Cut Flowers 



received daily from 
our own greenhouses 



Floral Emblems Prepared 



on short notice by an expert. 
We soHcit your patronage. 



SPRINGFIELD SEED CO., 

Cor. Campbell and Walnut Sts. 

Phone 21 or 353 

"The Big Seed Store" 




WARNER'S 

RUST-PROOF CORSETS 

Corset style is noted in the ex- 
treme length of skirt. This com- 
pletely encases the figure, but is 
unboned and soft and absolutely 
comfortable, sitting, standing or 
walking. These new Directoire 
Styles define the waist but do not 
emphasize its curves; the emphasis 
is on length — the corsetted figure 
presenting an appearance of long, 
unbroken lines, as shown in this 
Warner Corset. 

The complete line of our corsets 
shows a large variety of shapes — 
long, medium and short, making 
it possible for every type of figure 
to fill its requirements with this 
season's fashionable garments. 

These corsets are guaranteed to 
WEAR — not to rust, break or tear. 
Warner's standard of quality is so 
high that this guarantee is almost 
superfluous, 

On the tissue paper wrapped 
around each pair of Warner's Cor- 
sets is an illustrated story telling 
the proper method of lacing and 
fitting your corsets. 

Security Rubber Button Hose 
Supporters Attached 



Price $i.oo to $5.00 Per Pair 

EVERY PAIR GUARANTEED 
REPS DRY GOODS CO. 



Something You Should Have 




White Felt Hats 

Nobby for any time 

Flannel Pants 

For Park evening wear 

Duck Pants 

For Tennis Court 

Outing Suits 

For all occasions 

Straw Hats 

For Sun-Shades 



Something Swell— Any Time 

Hose, Tie and Handkerchief Sets to Match 
Tie and Hat Band Sets to Match 

THE LATEST CHAMOIS GLOVE FOR DRESS 



Globe Clothing Go. 

OuaUty Corner South St. and Square 



Hi^h School Souvenirs 

AND 

Graduation Gifts 



Hall Jewelry Co. 

219 Boonville St. 

MEET ME AT—— 

BARRETT'S 

AROUND THE 

BIG SODA FOUNTAIN 

THIS SUMMER 
YOURS 

JNO. R. BARRETT DRUG CO. 

PHONE 387 500 E. COMMERCIAL. ST. 



p i ON THE BEAUTIFUL WHITE RIVER 

WHERE THE FRUIT CROPS NEVER FAIL 

IS LOCATED OUR NEW TOWN 

HOLLISTER 




Ask for literature concerning our Bungalow and Club Sites, Fruit Farms and Town Site 

THE WM. H. JOHNSON TIMBER AND REALTY CO., SPRINGFIELD, MO. 



G.B.CUNNINGHAM Z.T.WELLS 

CUNNINGHAM & WELLS 

REAL ESTATE, 
LOANS AND 
INSURANCE 
AGENTS 

TELEPHONE 642 431 E- COMMERCIAL ST. 




Wc Sell Shoes 

THAT SATISFY 

VVEAVEIR-SCHILLING 
SHOE CO. 

"On the Square" 


DAVIS & HAWKINS 

JEWELERS 

GRADUATING PRESENTS, 

DIAMONDS, WATCHES 

CLOCKS AND JEWELRY 

Souvenir Spoons, Engraved With High School Building 
306 S. CAMPBELL ST. 



M. V. AUSHERMAN 



FRESH MEATS 



GROCERIES 



EAT THE BEST AND YOU WILL LIVE LONGER 



Telephone 318 



321 and 323 So. Campbell St. 




THE MODERN HARDWARE 

lCORINER colleger CAMPBELL ^TsS 



BRADLEY & TURNER 



Dry Goods, Shoes, Notions, 
MILLINERY A SPECIALTY 



308 South Campbell Street 



ROSE BOOK STORE 

Sporting Goods, Kodaks and Stationery 

We carry all High School Books and Classics 

403 East Commercial Street 


JAMES WALKER 

THE MAN WHO MAKES 
GOOD CLOTHES 

LARGEST AND FINEST 
STOCK IN THE CITY 

GRADUATION SUITS 
A SPECIALTY 

222 ST. LOUIS ST. 


Guarantee Shoe Co. 

The place where the 

Best Shoes 

Come from 

Guarantee Shoe Co. 




BOOKKEEPING ROOM 



LEARN IT RIGHT 



A }'Oung' man or young 
woman with the excellent 
foundation which the 
Springfield High School 
gives, is sure of a choice 
situation after completing 
a course in the 



SPRINGFIELD 
BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 



WE CANNOT SUPPLY 
THE DEMAND 

from tlie best business 
institutions of tbe cit}^ for 
young- persons thus pre- 
pared. 

Phone 241 

J. A. TAYLOR 

PRESIDENT 




TYPEWRITING ROOM 



L. E. Lines 


"The Quality Drug Store" 


Temple of Music 


Will appreciate 
your patronage 


Is the Best Place on Earth 
to Buy a 


C. E. DENTON 


PIAINO 


1 1 caLl ipilUll Ul UgglJal 

223 South Street 


Id nign urade IVlaKes to ijelert rrom 




L. S. MEYER, President J. H. KEET, Vice-President 


200 PIANOS IN STOCK 


M. C. BAKER, Cashier J. L. HINE, asst. Cashier 


We Save Yon from $73.00 to $150.00 on the 
rurcnase oi a riano. ijasy lerms oi 
Payment. Call and Examine 


The Merchants National Bank 


CAPITAL $200,000.00 


Our Fine Line 


34 YEARS IN BUSINESS 


DIRECTORS 


Ihe Uld neliabie Music House 


L. S. MEYER DR. J. H. GEORGE 
J. H. KEET IVAN LINK 


221-223 Boonville St. 


J. H. ROUNTREE E. D. LEVY 

H. H. SIMMONS J. T. WOODRUFF 

A. R. BALDWIN H. J. HEYER 


SPRINGFIELD 


M, C. BAKER 



WILLIAMS BOOK AND ART STORE 

300 BOONVILLE ST. 

A Cenefal Line ol Aft Goods 



PICTURE FRAMING A SPECIALTY 



ALSO A FULL LINE OF SCHOOL BOOKS 



SPRINGFIELD, 



MISSOURI 



D. J. LANDERS, 
PRESIDENT 



JOHN W. WILLIAMS, 
VICE-PRESIDENT. 



W. W. COFFMAN, 
CASHIER 



BANK OF COMMERCE 

SOUTH AND WALNUT STS. 

We are here to attend to all business in our line that comes along 
and are reaching out for that which does not come but can be legitimately 
and honorably obtained. We strive to give our patrons perfect satisfac- 
tion, by being courteous, conservative, honest and accommodating at ail 
times. Our directors are among your best and most successful business 
men, as follows: 



JOHN LANDERS 
D. J. LANDERS 
DR. J. H. GEORGE 
JOHN SCHMOOK 
JOHN W. WILLIAMS 



THOMAS YEAKLEY 

H. C. GARLICK 

H. N. SIMON 

F. B. TABOR 

W. W. COFFMAN 



"FUGITT'S DRUG STORE" 

400 WEST WALNUT, CORNER CAMPBELL 

"PRESCRIPTION DRUGGISTS" 



N. R. SMALL, 



Tlie sweet girl graduate QflT 
Wbo failed to pass iu 1908 ' 
But worked so hard 'til 1909 

Should soothe her nerves with a Goetziuau Piano BOONVILLE ST 



WHEN YOU ARE GETTING FIGURES ON 

PRINTING 

DONT FAIL TO SEE 

BEN LIPPMAN, 412 SOUTH ST. 



CLASS PINS 

DIRECT FROM FACTORY 
TO CUSTOMER AT 

LOWEST PRICES 

CATALOGUE FOR THE ASKING 



NAME CARDS AND INVITATIONS 

NEATLY ENGRAVED AT POPULAR PRICES 

BASTIAN BROS. CO. 

MFG. JEWELERS, ENGRAVERS AND STATIONERS 
280 SOUTH AVE. ROCHESTER N. Y. 



Diffendeiffer Buggy and Impleinent Co. 

Studebaker, Kauffman, Moon & Deere Bu^^ies, Surries, 

Storm Bu^^ies, Etc, 

Agent for E. M. F. "30" Studebaker Automobiles 

307-311 West Walnut Street 


Palace Drug Store 

THE BUSY STORE 

DRUGS WALL PAPER 
MEDICINES PERFUMES 
CHEMICALS PAINTS, OILS 
TOILET ARTICLES VARNISHES 
TOBACCO CIGARS 

Bs a Specialty 

306 S. CAHPBELL ST 


VACATION DAYS ARE HERE 

and with them comes the demand 
for traveling requisites. If it's a 

Trunk, Suit Case or Ba^ 

we have it 

Schwicdcr s Trunk Factory 

317 COLLEGE STREET 
Baggage Builders for All Kinds of People and All Kinds of Service 



FOR 

A FINE JOB OF 

PRINTING 




Jewell Publishing Co. 

SOUTHEAST CORNER SQUARE 
TELEPHONE 372 



SPRINGFIELD, MISSOURI 




MACEY SECTIONAL BOOK CASES 

In any Wood Style or Finish Shipped Anywhere 

Gardner Office Supply Go. 

325 South St. Telephone 842 
Springfield, Mo, 



THE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

SPRINGFIELD, MISSOURI 



A FIRST CLASS TEACHERS' COLLEGE 



Established by act of 
the General Assembly, 
1905, opened in 1906. In 
three years 2,100 different 
students have enrolled. 
The averag^e attendance 
has been 375. 

Course of study covers 
full four years of colleg^i 
work. Faculty consists 
of 26 specialists — college 
bred and professionally 
trained. 

Building and eqiiip- 
ment are the best. Large 
well selected library, four 
excellent science labora- 
tories, special equipment 
for free-hand, mechanic- 
al and ornamental draw- 
ing, for all craft-arts work, for domestic science and do- 
mestic art. 

Music conservatory — diiector and teacher trained in 




Berlin. Vocal music in- 
cludes class and individ- 
ual instruction, choruses 
and qi;artettes. Instru- 
mental music includes 
piano, violin, guitar, or- 
chestra and band. 

Best athletic field and 
tennis courts — much at- 
tention given to physical 
culture. Excellent equip- 
ment for indoor athlet- 
ics — shower baths. 

Best moral and Chris- 
tian influence, strong or- 
ganization of Y. j\I. C. A. 
and Y. W. C. A. Liter- 
ary societies, debating 
and dramatic clubs, and 
oratorical associations. 
High school graduates can get state license to teach 
after doing two terms work in the Normal School, one 
of which mav be done before graduation from high school 



SUMMER TERM DF 10 WEEKS BEGINS MAY 31, 1909 FALL TERM BEGINS SEPTEMBER 7, 1909 ASK FOR CATALOGUE OR BULLETIN 



W. T. CARRINGTON, PRESIDENT 



I WILL GIVE $100.00 

FOR ANY CORN OR BUNION THAT 

Malloch's Corn Remedy 



WILL NOT REMOVE 



For Sale by Agents, All Druggists, or by Mall 25c. 
The Malloch Remedy Co., 

Phone 2431 SPRINGFIELD. MO. 424 College St. 

AGENTS WANTED 



The Best Place in Springfield 

TO BUY MEN'S CLOTHES IS AT 

THE GLASGOW as 




300 ST. LOUIS ST. 

SPRINGFIELD, MO. 

U. G. DAWSON, Mgr. 

YOU DO YOURSELF AN INJUSTICE IF YOU 
BUY ELSEWHERE BEFORE SEEING OUR 

THOUSAND STYLES 



THE BEST CLE4N, FRESH 

GROCERIES 

AND CHOICE DELICACIES 
ON THE MARKET 

TELEPHONE 109 

SMITH BROS. 

Cily Hall Building 

Boonville 



DRURY COLLEGE 



WHEN YOU GRADUATE FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL GO TO 
DRURY TO COMPLETE YOUR EDUCATION 




"Look well to your eves that they may be a guide to your footsteps 
and a comfort to your old age." 

The hand of time cannot be sta3'ed. People grow old. As years ad- 
vance the eyes grow weaker. To preserve the sight means to help the 
eyes to do their work; to help the eyes means to wear glasses, scientific- 
ally fitted; that means to come here. Thousands of others took my ad- 
vice and are wearing glasses fitted by my methods and are pleased. You 
will he wlien \'ou have once worn glasses fitted my way. 

Crystalline Lenses aslovvas.the pair $1.00 Gold Filled Frames 2s-yr. guarantee $2.50 
Pebble Lenses as low as, the paT 2,00 Aluminum Frames ... 1.00 
Solid Odid frames as low as, the pair 3.50 Nickel-Plated Frames ... 50 

DR. G. [E. WARD. Eyesight Specialist 



UNIVERSAL 



308 SOUTH STREET 



Wise People Eat 
the Best 

Purity Bread 

Springfield Bakery Co. 

Phone 1071 



WHEN YOU THINK OF REAL ESTATE 

THINK OF 

CLARENCE C. KING 

When you want anything in the line of Boolcs, Stationery, Filing Gases, Loose Leaf Devices and Office Supplies 

OR WANT A PICTURE FRAMED CORRECTLY SEE 

J. B. ROSS, BOOK AND STATIONERY CO. 

PHONE X-1034— 320 COLLEGE ST. 
J. S. HARORICK ESTABLISHED 1882 B. A. HARDRICK 

HARDRICK BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES 
SPRINGFIELD, MO. 

221-223 ST. LOUIS ST. TELEPHONE 230 



St. Louis Patlefn Hat Company 


Sam Herrick & Son 


IVIllOi Hi III rHli IVIdlld^CI 


Wagonettes, 




Transfer and 


filgo Class Ml lioe[f Ou[ Specialty 


kjiorage 


333 East Commercial St. 


Furniture Carefully Packed, 






521 Boonvillc St. Telephone 2208 


Shipped and Stored 


Hat Hospital 




D. M. LEWIS, Hatter 


Real [state Sold aod Excliaogei 




Your Old Hat Made Like New 




Clothes Cleaned and Pressed 


Office Phone 4 


WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 


Residence Phone 1339 




PHONE 423 



Mehl & Anderson The Leading Ladies', Misses 
— — — — — and (jhildrens Wear More 

Best Materials, Best Styles and Best Values Always Rei^n Supreme 



f^/NE'S 



THE PLACE TO FIND GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

Always best to look ahead — ot conrse when you are married and think 



of economy yon will find the best place to buy your Groceries is 

THAT GOOD, CLEAN GROCERY pi,ones 310 and 2206 



FINE'S 



Landers-Davis Maindrctiring Company 



MANUFACTURERS OF 




^ ENHffe BLOCK SPB/mFIFLD.MO, 



COLONIAL COLUMNS AND ROOFING INTERIOR FINISH AND FIXTURES SASH AND DOORS 



C. F. Kannin^ 



Meat, Fish, Oysters, Game 
and Vegetable Market 



529 Boonville St. 



Telephooe X-488 



Commencement Presents 



Buhrman & Emery 

Jewelers and Opticians 



326 East Commercial St. 



E. E. O'BYRNE 


0. H. Raines 

Fancy Groceries, 
Fruits 

and Confections 

"The Aristocrat" 

877 Washington Ave. 
Phone 1804 


Transfer and Storage 

For Illinois Lump and Nut Coal and Weir 
City Lump Coal, Cord Wood and Chunks 

Yard 510 North Main 
Phone 990 


Home-Grown, Corn-Fed 

Beef, Pork, Veal, Mutton 

Turkeys, Chickens, Oysters 


PLANNER DRUG CO. 

601 North Jefferson St. 
Phone X-801 

Springfield, - - - Missouri 


A. CLAS 

327 Sonth Street Springfeld, Mo. 

Home-Made Lard 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 
Work Called for and Delivered 

TRY THE 

Steam fT"! Laundry 

DAVE YOUNG, Prop. 

Telephone 2559 426 E. Commercial St. 


G. W. NICHOLS 

Wood Sand Feed 
Coal Cement Salt 

Field and Garden Seeds 

514-516 E. Commercial St. 
Telephone 20 


Ship Your Hides, Furs and Wool 

...TO... 

Springfield Hide, Junk & Concrete Co. 

and Get Good Results 


Herman Tailoring Co. 

310-312 South St. 

Hi^h Class Tailors 

Knox Hats 
Reiser Cravats 

Suits to Order $25 and Up 




Ferns, Cycas Leaves, Bulbous 

Flowers 



^> CUT FLOWERS ^ 



Roses, Carnations, Chrysanthemums, 
•••• Lilies •••• 

Long Distance Phone 251 1328 Benton 4ve. 

SPRINGFIELD, MISSOURI 



A MARK OF GOOD BREEDING 




Is to be perfectly at ease in 
evening dress — impossible if 
one's shirt bosom is wrinkled, 
collar crumpled, cuffs fra\-ed. 
Avoid all such calamities by 
having us "do up" j-our linen. 
We will undertake the contract 
of putting you at ease so far as 
your linen is concerned if you 
will favor us with your orders. 

The Old Reliable 

Troy Steam Laundry 

PHONE 175 
213-215 WEST WALNUT 



= J. W. Crank Dru^ Co. 

WANTS YOUR BUSINESS 



Drugs, Perfumes, Toilet Articles and 
COLD SODA 



SOUTHWEST COR. COMMERCIAL AND BOONVILLE 

TELEPHONE 220 














'Id Reliable Place to Get Yotar 



Ice Cream, Frtuit Ice^ 



H. ami Hs ©ai-hfep 



Wmwmmwm ani Msrehants Bank 



P 



Surplus S8B|000 



Tliere are 12,000 State Banks in the United States. Of the 12,000, 619 are on the "Roll of Honor,'' 
and this bank is one of the 619. What is required to place a bank on the "Roll of Honor? " 
Phone 1052 and call the Cashier. 



Wdrtin Brothers Piano Company 

Pianos, Organs, Sheet ITlusk and Hlusical merchandise 

Biggest and Best Line of Pianos in 
Southwest Wissouri 

Our Wotto: Best Pianos Wade and Sold at the Lowest Prices ^ _ _ = 

=^ you are requested to call and look over our Immense Line 

masonic temple Building, 501=303 East Walnut St. 
Springfield, Wissouri 



FERGUSON 



THE LEADINO 

PHOTOGRAPHER 



All the Latest and Best 314 Boonville Street 

in Photography Springfield, Mo. 



J. [.ATKINSON Sfcft 

^^^^^^ ^^^^P 300 E. Walnut Street, Springfield, Mo. ^^^^^^^^S^^ 

IS THE BICVCLE MAIN 

BASE BALL, FOOT BALL AND ALL SPORTING GOODS 
EDISON PHONOGRAPHS AND VICTOR GOODS 

Automobiles and Electric Goods. We Repair Anything 


W, E. TALLEY, Pres. W. 0. OLDHAM. Active Vice-Pres. E.N. FERGUSON, Cashier 

STATE SAVINGS BANK 

156 North Side Public Square 

3 per cent Allowed on Savings Accounts 

4 " " " Time Deposits 

Your Business Solicited 


....THE.... 

A. 0. OLSON PHARMACY 

...FOR... 

Quality and Your 
Moneys Worth 

108 East Side Square Phone 27 



IT WILL PAY 

You to Know that we carry a 
High Grade Line of Clothes in 
Smart Styles for Men and Boys 

CAMPBELL OLIVER & SON 

Two-two-two Commercial St. 


Students in Mechanical Drawing 

AND ENGINEERING 

Will Find Instruments, Outfits and Supplies at the 

W. A. IRVINCO. 

Stprlin0 Fniint^^in Ppn< InI 00 s\nA iin riii;ir;ini'PpH 
308 St. Louis St. 


THE NOBBIEST IN CLOTHING 

SHOES. HATS, AND GENTS' FURNISHINGS 

PRIPF^ II 1<;T a I ITTI F 1 nWFP THAN THF nTHFP FFI ! OW come in and get acquainted 

ED. V. WILLIAMS 

224-226 Commercial St. 



Hart, Schaffner & Marx Suit or Overcoat 

and wear the best ready=made Clothing on earth 

$18.50 TO $30.00 

SCHNEIDER CLOTHING COMPANY 

BAKER BLOCK BAKER BLOCK BAKER BLOCK 

O'DAY'S BOOK STORE 

THE PLACE TO BUY 

Base Ball Goods, Tennis Goods, Kodaks and Fishing: Tackle. 

ALSO A FULL LINE OF BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 
PICTURES AND PICTURE FRAMING 

SOUTH SIDE SQUARE SPRINGFIELD, MO- 



Press of 
Jewell Publishing Company 
Springfield, Mo. 



f- 




1 



EISJHTEEJMTH eOJVIMEJ^CEMEJMT 



ppingfie 



/cT fEF^Kip«JS QF^ANO, 



■^118921^ 



Charles Nevalt, Pi intei 



P/fRT I. 

WEDNESDjOrY EVENING, JVIAY 18TH, EISHT O'ebOGK. 



Music "Welcome" Chorus 

INVOCATION. 

Salutfitory "The Russian Famine," Myrtle Calloway 

Orntion, "The New South, ' ... John Goldsmith 

Ussay "Independent Thinking," Laura West 

Oration "EvohUion of Thought," Herbert Chestnut 

Instrumental Duet Misses Slater and Gardner 

iCssay, "Government Influenced by Homes," Nellie Sheeran 

Ussay, "What is Left to Win," Nellie Howell 

Oration, . "The Future Great," I.on Biggs 

Kssaj- "Individnaiity, ' Annie Cooper 

(Juiutcttc Messrs. Pranter, Biggs, Winans, Baltz and Fairbanks 

Kssay "Philanthropy," I.ou I\dmonson 

Oration, "Hibernia," Pat Magee 

>fssay, "Woman's Influence," Blanche Mathers 

Kssay "Old Fashioned," ... Mary Howell 

Music, « "French Valse for Piano," Diiiaiid 

h. "Flolte Bursche." Snfipc 

Played by Prof Von Troemel. pupil of '>'r. Otto liendix, of Boston 
Conservatory. 

Oration ... "Chalktoga," Charles Dorscy 

gssav "Common Place Things," Fannie Lord 

Oration, : "The Jew," . . Ben Sweet 

Ussav, . American Kcccntricitics," Maude Toomcr 



PART I!. 



THUF^SDAY jiftrfTEF^fJOOJM, JVIAY 19T]H, TWO O'ObOCK. 



Music, ''Dearest May," Glee Club 

INVOCAilON. 

Kssay ... . "Kxtravagauce of .Speech," Tillie Kaiiiiing 

Oration, "Our Country," James Fairbanks 

Essay "Life's Duties," Jennie Crawford 

Oration, "You Can Not Conquer America," Victor Weir 

Essay, "Extravagance of To-day," Anna Keid 

In.strumeiital Solo, Lillian frarducr 

Oration, "Who Pays our Taxes,' Jay Adams 

Essay, "Environments," l.ida Smith 

Oration "Missouri," Ben Bartlett 

Essay, "Women as Wage Workers " Caddie Yarbrough 

Oration, "An Ideal Culture," Charles Rej-nolds 

Quartette Misses Cooper, Kanning, Ilartzell and West 

Oration, "Orient Your.selves," Kate Slater 

Oration, "The Present Age," Victor Pranter 

Essay, .... 'The Arab Element in Young America," .... May HartzcU 

Oration "Elements of National Greatness," Al Winans 

I',.ssav "Wholesome Di.scontent," Adah Writ^ht 



fAf^T III. 



T]HUF(SI3AY EVENINS, M/rY 19TH, EIG)HT O'CLOCK. 



Music Doublu yuarttltt 

INVOCATION. 

Essay "Character," Annie Donhani 

Oration, "American Patriotism." Omar Moore 

Essay, "Why Girls Graduate," Gertie Agiiew 

sextet Misses Hartzell, Cooper, Wright, Kanning and Messrs. 

Sweet and Pranter. 

Oration, "Each Has His Mission," Willie Kand 

Oration "Lax Justice," Thomas Baltz 

Essay, ' Power of Song, ' Carrie Abbott 

Music, Glee Club 

Essay, "Mothers' Heroes," Marie Minir 

Essay "Small Things," Lillian (Gardner 

Oration, "Centralization of Capital, " . Guy Ryker 

Music a. "Waldesrauschen for Piano," Biainigaiill 

h. "Song Without Words." Mt'ndflsohn 

Played by Prof, von Troemel, pupil of Otto Bendix, of Boston 
Conser\'atory. 

Essay, . . "No Star Goes Down but Lights Another Sky," . Ethel Anderson 

Oration "Patriotism and Politics," Edgar Chestnut 

Valedictory Kate Slater 

Address and Presentation of Diplomas. Pres. K. H. Jesse of State I' nivt rsity 
Earewcll Song Cliorns 




j/«tT f EF^KIJNS QF^ANia, 

Monday Evening, May 16th, 

•J'11592I«- 



Charles Nevati, Printer. 



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