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RETURN. 



2 1 JAN 



BRITISH MUSEUM 



1916 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 
2 May 1916. 



LONDON : 

PRINTED UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF HIS MAJESTY'S 

STATIONERY OFFICE 

Br JAS. TRUSCOTT & SON, Ltd., Cai^non Street, E.G. 



To be purchased, either directly or through any Bookseller, from 

WYMAN & SONS, Ltd., 29, Breams Buildings, Fetter Lane, E.G., and 

28, Abingdon Street, S.W., and 54, St. Mary Street, Gardiff ; or 

H.M. STATIONERY OFFICE (Scottish Brai^ch), 23, Forth Street, Edinburgh ; or 

E, PONSONBY, Ltd., 116, Grafton Street, Dublin ; 

or from the Agencies in the British Golonies and Dependencies, 

the United States of America and other Foreign Countries of 

T. FISHER UNWIN, Ltd., London, W.G. 



1916. 
68 Price 5^d. 



<^M(}> 



BKITISH MUSEUM. 



31 JAN 1967 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 16 February, 1916 ; for, 

COPY "of Account of the Income and Expenditure of 
the British Museum (Special Trust Funds) for 
the Year ending the 31st day of March 1916 ; and? 
Return of the Number of Persons admitted to visit 
the Museum and the British Museum (Natural 
History) in each Year from 1910 to 1915, both Years 
inclusive ; together with a Statement of the Progress 
made in the Arrangement and Description of the 
Collections, and an Account of Objects added to 
them in the Year 1915." 



Treasury Chambers," 
2 May 1916 



E. S. MONTAGU. 



{Mr. Lewis Harcourt.) 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Prmted, 
2 May 1916. 



LONDON : 

printed under the authority of his MAJESTY'S 

STATIONERY OFFICE 

By JAS. TRUSOOTT & SON, Ltd., Cannon Street, E.G. 



To be purchased, either directly or through any Bookseller, from 

WYMaN & SONS, Ltd., 29, Breams Buildings, Fetter Lane, E.C., and 

28, ABINGDON STREET, S.W., and 54, St. Mary Street, Cardiff ; or 

H.M. STATIONERY OF MCE (SCOTTISH BRANCH), 23, FORTH STREET, Edinburgh ; or 

E. PONSONBY, Ltd., 11(5, GRAFTON STREET. DUBLIN ; 

or from the Agencies in the British Colonies and Dependencies, 

the United States of Ami-rica and other foreign Countries of 

T. FISHER UN WIN, LONDON, W.C. 



68 



Price 5^d. 



CONTENTS. 



BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Page 
ACCOUNTS (SPECIAL TRUST FUNDS, 1915-1916) : 

Bridgewatee 4 

Farnborough 4 

SWIKEY 4 

Birch 6 

Charles Drurt Edward Fortnum 6 

Carchemish Excavations 6 

NUMBERS OF PERSONS ADMITTED : 

British Museum ....g 

British Museum (Natural History) 12 

HOURS OF ADMISSION : 

British Museum 10 

British Museum (Natural History) 13 

GENERAL STATEMENT OF PROGRESS : 

Visitors 14 

Reading Room and Newspaper Room 14 

Official Guides 14 

The War— Protective Measures 14 

Military Service of the Staff 15 

Principal Acquisitions 15 

Publications 16 

ARRANGEMENT OF COLLECTIONS, &c. : 

Printed Books 17 

Manuscripts 21 

Oriental Printed Books and MSS. - - 23 

Prints and Drawings 25 

Oriental Prints and Drawings 33 

Egyptian Antiquities 36 

Assyrian Antiquities 37 

Greek and Roman Antiquities 40 

British and Medieval Antiquities 43 

Coins and Medals 48 

ACQUISITIONS : 

Newspapers 19 

Printed Books 19 

Maps 19 

Music - - - - - - 19 

Manuscripts 22 

Orikntal Printed Books and MSS. 24 

Prints and Drawings 26 

Oriental Prints and Drawings 33 

Egyptian Antiquities ----- 37 

Assyrian Antiquities 38 

Greek and Roman Antiquities 41 

Prehistoric, Early British and other Antiquities - - - 44 

Ceramic and Glass Objects 46 

Oriental and Ethnographical Objects (including those 

added to the christy collection) 46 

Coins and Medals 49 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY.) 

GENERAL STATEMENT OF PROGEESS : Page 

Visitors 54 

SwiNEY Lectures - 54 

Museums Association 54 

The War 54 

Hibernation op the House Fly 56 

Protection of Animals - - 56 

Investigation op Antarctic Whales 57 

Stranded Whales . - 57 

Bequests and Gifts 57 

Principal Purchases 59 

Duplicates . - - - 60 

Publications 60 

INDEX MUSEUM 63 

ECONOMIC ZOOLOGY ' - - 82 

ECONOMIC ENTOMOLOGY 88 

ARRANGEMENT AND CONSERVATION OF COLLECTIONS : 

Zoology 66 

Entomology 85 

Geology 91 

Mineralogy 101 

Botany 107 

ACQUISITIONS : 

Zoology . - - 74 

Entomology 87 

Geology 96 

Mineralogy 102 

Botany 109 

DUPLICATES AND EXCHANGES : 

Zoology 73 

Entomology 87 

Geology 96 

Mineralogy 106 

Botany .--.---- 109 

LIBRARIES : 

General 62 

Zoological 73 

Entomological 87 

Geological 96 

MiNBRALOGICAL 102 

Botanical 108 

PUBLICATIONS, DEPARTMENTAL : 

Zoology 74 

Entomology 87 

Geology 96 

Botany 109 

STUDENTS : 

Zoology 84 

Entomology 90 

Geology 100 

Mineralogy 106 

Botany . . - 110 

INVESTIGATION: 

Mineralogical .... - 101 

Botanical 108 

DEMONSTRATIONS : 

Geology 100 

Botany - 110 

IMPERIAL BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY 86 

INDEX GENERUM ET SPECIERUM ANIMALIUM 63 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



I. — AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 

STOCK, 

Cash. 2^% Consols. 

£. s. d. £,. 8. d. 

To Balances on the 1st April 1915 - - - 217 14 1 13,659 3 2 

- Dividends received on 13,659Z. 3«. 2d. Stock 
in 2^ per Cent. Consols, bequeathed 
by the Earl of Bridgewater, viz. : 
On the 5th April 1915 - £.85 7 4 

5th July 1915 - - 85 7 4 
5th October 1915 - 85 7 4 
5th January 1916 - 85 7 4 

341 9 4 



- Rent of a Real Estate, Whitchurch, 
bequeathed by the Earl of Bridgev^ater (less 
charges) - 23 13 8 



£.582 17 1 13,659 3 2 



II.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 

STOCK, 

Cash. 210/^ Consols. 

A. .S-. d. £. s. d. 

To Balances on the 1st Aprill915- - - - 84 13 2,879 10 7 

- Dividends received on 2,879Z. 10#. Id. Stock in 
2 1 per Cent. Consols, bequeathed by 
Lord Farnborough, viz. : 
On the 5th April 1915 - £. 17 19 11 

5th July 1915 - - 17 19 11 



5th October 1915 - 17 19 11 
5th January, 1916 - 17 19 11 



71 19 



£.156 12 8 2,879 10 7 



III. — AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 

Stock, 
Cash. 2^% Consols. 

£. s. d. £. s. d. 

To Balances on the 1st April 1915 - - - 16 11 1 5,744 - 8 

- Dividends received on 5,744Z. - 8^. Stock in 
2^ per Cent. Consols, bequeathed by 
Dr. George Swiney for Lectures on 
Geology, viz. : 
On the 5th April 1915 - £.35 18 - 

5th July 1915 - - 35 18 - 

5th October 1915 - 35 18 - 
„ 5th January 1916 - 35 18 - 

143 12 - 



£.160 3 1 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



BRIDGEWATER FUND, from the 1st April 1915 to the 81st March 1916. 

Stock, 
Cash. 2^% Consols. 

£. s. d. £. s. d. 

By One Year's Salary of the Egerton Librarian - 175 - - 



Balances on the 31st March 1916, 
carried to Account for 1916-1917 - - - 407 17 1 13,659 3 2 



£.582 17 1 13,659 3 2 



FARNBOROUGH FUND, from the Ist April 1915 to the 31st March 1916. 

Stock, 
Cash. 2\% Consols. 

£. s. d. £. s. d. 

By Amount expended in purchase of Manuscripts - 52 10 - 



- Balances on the 31st March 1916, 

carried to Account for 1916-1917 - - - 104 2 8 2,879 10 7 



£. 156 12 8 2,879 10 7 



SWINE Y FUND, from the Ist April 1915 to the 31st March 1916. 



Stock, 
Cash. 2^% Consols. 

£. s. d. £,. s. d. 



By Amount paid to Dr. J. D. Falconer, for Lectures 

on Geology in 1915 140 



Balances on the 31st March 1916, 
carried to Account for 1916-1917 - - - 20 3 1 5,744 



£.160 3 1 5,744 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



IV.— AN ACCOUNT of the Eeceipts and Expenditure of 

Stock, 
Cash. 2^% Consols. 

£. s. d. £,. s. d. 

To Balance on the 1st April 1915 - - - - _ 565 3 9 

- Dividends received on 565Z. 3*. 9d. Stock in 

2^ per Cent. Consols, bequeathed 

by Dr. Birch in 1766, for the three 

Under Librarians of the British 

Museum, viz. : 

Onthe5th April 191 Tv - 

5th July 1915 

5th October 1915 - 

,, 5th January 1916- 



-£.3 10 

- 3 10 

- 3 10 

- 3 10 


8 
8 
8 
8 

14 2 8 














£.14 2 8 


565 


3 9 



Y. — AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the bequest 

1st April 1915 to 

Cash. 

£. s. d. 
To Balance on the 1st April 1915 2,715 - - 



£.2,715 - 



VI.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 

1st April 1915 to 

Cash. 

£. s. A. 
To Balance on the 1st April 1916 - 488 14 1 



£.488 14 1 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



the BIECH FUND from the 1st April 1915 to the 31 st March 1916. 

Stock, 
Cash. 2^% Consols. 

£. s. d. &. s. d. 

By Legacy paid to the three Under Librarians of 
the British Museum, whose offices existed 
in 1766, viz., the Keepers of the Departments 
of Printed Books. Manuscripts, and Natural 
History 14 2 8 



Balance on the 31st Maech 1916. carried 
to Account for 1916-1917 . . . - — 565 3 



£.14 2 



of the late MR. CHAELES DRURY EDWARD FORTNUM from the 
the 31st March 1916. 



Cash. 
£. s. d. 



Bt Amount transferred to H.M. Paymaster-General in aid of the 

Parliamentary Vote, 1915-1916 - 875 

- Balance on the 31st March 1916, carried to Account for 

1916-1917 1,840 



£.2,715 



CARCHEMISH EXCAVATIONS FUND from the 
the 31st March 1916. 



Cash. 



£. s. d. 

By Amount expended on Exca-vations *400 - - 

- Balance on the 31st March 1916, carried to Account for 1916-1917 88 14 1 

£.488 14 1 



* Including 200Z. advance not yet accounted for by the Explorer. 

Frederic G. Kenyon, 

Director and Principal Librarian. 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



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10 



ACCOUNTS. ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



The British Museum, Bloomsbury (including the Departments 
of Printed Books and Maps, Manuscripts, Oriental Printed Books 
and Manuscripts, Prints and Drawings, Egyptian and Assyrian 
Antiquities, Greek and Roman Antiquities, British and Mediaeval 
Antiquities and Ethnography, and Coins and Medals) is normally 
open to the public free daily (except on Good Friday and 
Christmas Day and days of Public Fast or Thanksgiving) as 
follov\rs : — 



On Weekdays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

After 4 p.m. in January, February, November, December, 
and after 5 p.m. in March, September, October, only certain 
of the galleries remain open, viz. : — 



On Mondays, 

Wednesdays, 

and 

Fridays. 



Exhibitions of Manuscripts, Printed 
Books, Prints and Drawings, Porcelain, 
Glass and Majolica ; Prehistoric, British, 
Anglo-Saxon, Mediaeval and Ethno- 
graphical Collections. 



On Tuesdays, 
Thursdays, 

and 
Saturdays. 



Egyptian, Assyrian, Greek and Roman 
Galleries ; Gold Ornament Room, 
American, Prehistoric, British, Anglo- 
Saxon Collections, and the Waddesdon 
Bequest Room. 



On Sunday Afternoons 



From 



to 


4 


p.m. 


in 


January, February, 


November, 










December. 






5? 


5 


5» 


55 


October. 






5) 


5.30 


5? 


»5 


March, September. 






»? 


6 


?5 


>5 


April, May, June, July, 


August. 



Persons applying for the purposes of research and reference 
are admitted to the Reading Room under certain regulations every 
weekday, except the days specified below, from 9 a.m. until 7 p.m. 
The Newspaper Room is open, under similar regulations, from 
10 a.m. until 5 p.m. 



The Reading Room, Newspaper Room, and Students' Rooms 
in the Library and Department of Manuscripts are closed on 
Sundays, Good Friday, Christmas Day, and the first four week- 
days in March and September. 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 11 

Other Students' Rooms are closed on Sundays, Good Friday, 
and Christmas Day, and occasionally for cleaning. 

Students are admitted generally to the several Departments 
on weekdays, from 10 till 4 or 5 o'clock ; and to the Sculpture 
Galleries from 9 o'clock to the hour of closing. 

At present, however, the provision for keeping the galleries 
open having been suspended by His Majesty's Government in the 
interests of economy, the Exhibition Galleries are wholly closed to 
the public. The Reading Room is open to Students from 9 a.m. 
to 5 p.m., the Newspaper Room and Manuscript Students' Room 
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., on every weekday except Good Friday, 
Christmas Day, and the first four weekdays in March and Sep- 
tember. 

British Museum,] Frederic G. Kenyan, 

1 April 1916. I Director and Principal Librarian. 



12 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 







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ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



13 



The Exhibition Galleries of the British Museum (Natural 
History), Cromwell Road, South Kensington, including the Depart- 
ments of Zoology, Entomology, Geology and Palaeontology, 
Mineralogy, and Botany, are open to the public (with certain 
restrictions due to the need for economy) free, daily, except Good 
Friday and Christmas Day, and days of Public Fast or Thanks- 
giving. 

The regulations at present in force are as under : — 

The Galleries are open to the public, free, as follows : — 
Week-Days. 

Daily. — Central Hall (Special Exhibits), North Hall (Domesti- 
cated Animals, &c.), Bird Gallery, Upper and Lower Mammal 
Galleries, Shell Gallery, and Botanical Gallery. 

On Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. — Fossil Mammal 
Gallery, Fossil Reptile Gallery, and Mineral Gallery. (Eastern 
side.) 

On Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. — (joral Gallery, Star- 
fish Gallery, Reptile Gallery, Insect Gallery, Fish Gallery, and 
Whale Room. (Western side.) 

Sundays. 

Central Hall, North Hall, Bird Gallery, Mammal Galleries 
(including Whale Room), Fossil Mammal Gallery, Fossil Reptile 
Gallery, and Mineral Gallery. 

The Hours of Admission are : — 



On W^eek-Days, throughout the year from J 
January 

February 1 to 14 ... 
„ 15 to end ... 


a.m., i 


n 
. t 


4 p. 
, 4.30 
, 5 


tn 


March 




. 


, 5.30 




April to August (inclusive) 

September ... 

October 




• 


, 6 

, 5.30 
, 5 




November and December ... 


... 


. 


, 4 




On Sundays, in 






January 

February 1 to 14 ... 
„ 15 to end ... 


from 2 t 
„ 2 
» 2 


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„ 5 


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March 


„ 2 


„ 5.30 




April 

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September ... 

October 


„ 2 

„ 2.30 
„ 2 

„ 2 


, 6 
, 7 

, 5.30 
, 5 




November and December ... 


„ 2 




, 4 





Persons are admitted to study in these Departments every week- 
day from 10 till 4 o'clock. 

British Museum (Natural History), t^- \' p n \r . ^ 

oc T? -u ini^ i Director ot the Natural 

26 liebruary 1916. tt- x t% x ^ 

•^ ^ History Departments. 



14 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



VIII. General Progress at the Museum, Bloomsbury. 

The first complete year of war naturally shows a reduction in 
the number of visitors to the Museum as compared with the 
exceptionally high figures of 1913 and the first seven months of 
1914. The absence of Continental and American visitors and of 
holiday tourists in general was bound to make itself evident in these 
returns. On the other hand, the use of the Museum by our own 
people has been more than fully maintained. The total number of 
visits for the year 1915 was 733,091 (680,000 on week-days and 
53,091 on Sundays), which is a figure slightly in advance of the 
total for 1911, and slightly below those for 1910 and 1912, all of 
which were years in which London enjoyed a normal influx of 
foreign visitors and holiday tourists. 

A marked feature in the use of the Museum was the number of 
soldiers who visited the galleries, including many from the Overseas 
Dominions. 

The visits of students to particular departments showed more 
reduction than the visits of the general public to the exhibition 
galleries. The visitors to the Reading Room numbered 178,410 as 
compared with 224,560, to the Newspaper Room 12,650 as 
compared with 16,704, to the other departments 24,984 as compared 
with 31,949. After deducting these figures from the general totals, 
it will be found that the visits to the public exhibition galleries were 
greatly in excess of those in any of the seven years preceding 1913. 

The lectures of the Official Guides were well attended through- 
out the year. Some special lectures were given to Belgian 
refugees. 

In continuation of the measures taken in the first months of the 
war, a considerable number of the more valuable objects in the 
collections were removed to places of greater safety. Among these 
were the statues from the pediments of the Parthenon and certain 
other sculptures of special value ; while the metopes and frieze of 
the Parthenon, and the greater part of the Assyrian bas-reliefs, have 
received special protection m situ. In some cases casts and 
reproductions were substituted for originals in the public galleries. 

The transference of the collections to King Edward the Seventh's 
Galleries, and the re-arrangement of the rooms in the older parts of 
the Museum, have been very greatly delayed by the necessity for 
economies in labour and the difficulty of obtaining materials. 
Nevertheless some progress has been made in the re-arrangement of 
the Department of British and Mediaeval Antiquities, as described 
below. 

A corridor connecting the north-east staircase of the old building 
(near the King's Library) with the Ground Floor Gallery of the 
new building has been completed, and will be available when the 
latter Gallery is opened to the public. 

The only publications have been works which were in hand 
before the outbreak of war, and which it was more economical to 
complete and issue than to suspend. 



GENERAL PROGRESS AT THE MUSEUM. 15 

Reductions of staff have continued throughout the year, and no 
man has been held back from volunteering for military duty unless 
his services were essential for the maintenance of the work of the 
Museum. At the end of the year 99 members of the staff at 
Bloomsbury and 52 at the Natural History Museum had gone on 
military service, 38 at Bloomsbury and 12 at the Natural History 
Museum had been attested under the Derby scheme, and 20 at 
Bloomsbury and 13 at the Natural History Museum had been 
rejected as medically unlit. 

The suspension of the purchase-grant (with the exception of a 
sum devoted to the purchase of foreign books and periodicals for the 
Library) has greatly affected the accessions, though the full falling 
off will not be visible until the next year, since the suspension did 
not come into effect until April, 1915, and several outstanding 
purchases were completed by means of the reserve accumulated in 
times of peace. The number of separate objects incorporated in the 
collections of the several Departments during the year 1915 is as 
follows : — 

Printed Books : 

Books and Pamphlets - - - - - 26,351 

Serials and Parts of Volumes - - - - 61,538 

Maps and Atlases ------ 1,942 

Music -------- 10,720 

Newspapers (single numbers) _ . - - 278,924 

Miscellaneous ------- 5,431 

Manuscripts and Seals ------ 2,650 

Oriental Printed Books and Manuscripts - - 2,041 

Prints and Drawings ------ 3,819 

(Oriental) - - - - 1,138 

Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities - _ - 88 

Greek and Roman Antiquities _ _ _ - gg 

British and Mediaeval Antiquities - - - - 1,322 

Coins and Medals - - - - - - 3,655 

Total ----- 399,685 

The principal acquisitions will be found indicated in the 
Departmental reports which follow, though these reports are given 
on a less extensive scale than usual, in the interests of economy. 
Special recognition is due to the friends of the Museum whose 
liberality has, in several instances, enabled the Trustees to take 
advantage of opportunities which otherwise would have been missed 
through the suspension of the purchase grant. Five collections of 
considerable importance have been acquired in the course of the 
year, namely the Sale bequest of water colour drawings (notable for 
its fine examples of David Cox, but very comprehensive in other 
directions also) ; a selection from the Ransom collection of British 
and other antiquities, in which the most conspicuous single object is 
the remarkable 12th cent, bronze bowl, engraved with scenes from 
the life of St. Thomas : the Whitcombe Greene collection of 



16 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Renaissance plaquettes ; the Evans collection o£ English coins ; 
and the Prideaux collection of Oriental coins. Of single objects, 
special attention may be called to the autograph MSS. of several 
poems by A. C. Swinburne ; to a Diirer drawing of peculiar 
importance ; to two early German woodcuts from the Leigh Sotheby 
collection ; to the clay cylinders of Sennacherib and Esarhaddon ; 
to the royal guitar of Uganda, formerly presented by Sir F. Lugard 
to Mr. Joseph Chamberlain ; and to a number of rare coins. 

The Parliamentary grant for the issue of reproductions of works 
of art to Art Schools and similar institutions has been suspended for 
the period of the war. 

The following are the publications issued by the Departments at 
Bloomsbury during the year : — 

Bronze Reliefs from the Gates of Shalmaneser, king of Assyria, 
B.C. 860-825. Edited by L. W. King, M.A., Litt. D. With 
80 plates. 4to. 11. 15s. 

Select Bronzes, Greek, Roman, and Etruscan, in the Departments 
of Antiquities. 73 plates. With a commentary by H. B. Walters, 
M.A., F.S.A. 4to. 11. 15s. 

Catalogue of the Engraved Gems of the Post-Classical Periods 
in the Department of British and Mediaeval Antiquities and 
Ethnography in the British Museum. By 0. M. Dalton, M.A. 
4to. 11. 5s. 

Select Italian Medals of the Renaissance in the British Museum. 
Illustrated on 50 plates. Portfolio. 8s. 6d. 

List of Catalogues of English Book Sales, 1676-1900, now in 
the British Museum. 8vo. 12s. 6d. 

The Codex Alexandrinus (Royal MS. 1 D v-viii) in reduced 
photographic facsimile. Old Testament. Part I. Genesis-Ruth. 
4to. Portfolio. 11. 15s. 

Schools of Illumination. Reproductions from Manuscripts in 
the British Museum. Part II. English : 12th and 13th centt. 
15 plates. Folio. 175. 6d. 

Miscellaneous Coptic Texts in the Dialect of Upper Egypt. 
(Coptic Texts. Vol. V.). Edited, with English Translations, by 
E. A. Wallis Budge, M.A., Litt. D. With 40 plates and 20 illustra- 
tions in the text. 8vo. 21. 

Catalogue of the Hebrew and Samaritan MSS. in the British 
Museum. By G. Margoliouth, M.A. Part III. Sections VIII, IX. 
Miscellaneous MSS. ; Charters. 4to. 11. lis. 6d. 

Set of 10 plates illustrating Part III. of the Catalogue of 
Hebrew and Samaritan MSS. 4to. Ss. ' 

Catalogue of the Hebrew and Samaritan MSS. in the British 
Museum. By G. Margoliouth, M.A. Part III., complete (Sections 
I-IX, and 10 plates). 4to. 51. 

Supplementary Catalogue of Marathi and Gujarati Books in the 
British Museum. By J. F. Blumhardt, M.A. 4to. IZ. 12*. 6d. 

Catalogue of Drawings by Dutch and Flemish Artists preserved 
in the Department of Prints and Drawings, British Museum. 
Vol. I. Drawings by Rembrandt and his School. 8vo. 12^. 

British Museum, Frederic G. Kenyon, 

1 April 1916. Director and Principal Librarian. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTED BOOKS. 17 



IX. — PROGRESS made in the Arrangement and Description 
OF THE Collections, and Account of Objects added 
TO THEM in the Year 1915 (Bloomsbury). 



Department of Printed Books. 

I. Arrangement. — The works added to the collection during the 
past year have, as far as possible, been placed on the shelves of the 
Library according to the system of classification adopted in the 
Museum. 

The press-marks, indicating their respective localities, have been 
marked on the inside and affixed to the back of each volume. 

The total number of these press-marks amounts to 65,731 ; in 
addition to which 57,971 press-marks have been altered, on books 
and in the catalogues, in consequence of changes and re-arrange- 
ments carried out in the Library ; 23,259 labels have been affixed 
to books and volumes of newspapers, and 84,898 obliterated labels 
have been renewed. 

The number of stamps impressed upon articles received is 
398,237. 

3,864 presses of books and newspapers have been dusted in the 
course of the year. 

II. Catalogues. — Cataloguing. — 42,663 titles have been written 
for the General Catalogue and for the Catalogues of Maps and 
Music. 

Printing. — 29,176 titles and index-slips for the General Cata- 
logue, 2,495 for the Map Catalogue, and 2,330 for the Music 
Catalogue, have been printed during the year. 

Incorporation. — General Catalogue. — 29,092 title-slips and 
index-slips have been incorporated into each of the three copies of 
this Catalogue. This has rendered it necessary, in order to maintain 
as far as possible the alphabetical arrangement, to re-arrange 45,627 
title-slips and index-slips in each copy and to add to each copy 621 
new leaves. 

The system of fortnightly incorporation of accessions was carried 
out regularly until March, after which date it was replaced by a 
system of monthly incorporation. 

Map Catalogue. — 3,011 titles have been written for this Cata- 
logue, and 2,489 title-slips have been incorporated into each of 
three copies of it. This has rendered it necessary to re-arrange 
1,766 title-slips in each copy and to add to each copy 16 new 
leaves. 

Music Catalogue. — 11,737 titles have been written for this 
Catalogue, and 4,021 title-slips have been incorporated into each 
of two copies of it. This has rendered it necessary to re-arrange 
4,109 title-slips in each copy and to add to each copy 97 new leaves. 

B 



18 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Shelf Catalogue. — For this Catalogue, in which the title-slips, 
mounted on cards, are arranged in order o£ press-marks, 24,625 
have been so mounted and 55,121 have been incorporated in their 
proper order. 

Catalogue of Books printed in the XVth Century. — Progress was 
made early in the year with Part IV. of this Catalogue, and the 
section dealing with Subiaco and Rome was passed through the 
press. Work on the Catalogue was then discontinued. 

III. Binding. — The number of volumes and sets of pamphlets 
sent to be bound in the course of the year was 19,344, including 
5,087 volumes of newspapers. In consequence of the frequent 
adoption of the plan of binding two or more volumes in one, the 
number of volumes returned was 11,724. In addition, 735 volumes 
have been repaired in the binders' shops. 

Besides this, the following binding work has been done in the 
Library itself : — 4,006 volumes have been repaired, 9,089 cleaned 
and polished, and 4,597 volumes of reports, parts of periodicals, &c., 
have been bound in a light style of binding. 

The following maps, &c., have also been bound or mounted 
during the year : — 68 volumes of the 6-inch and 25-inch Ordnance 
Survey have been bound ; in addition, 176 parts of the 1-inch 
Ordnance Survey and 400 general maps have been mounted on 
linen in 1,203 sheets, and 350 maps have been mounted on cards in 
421 sheets. 

46,882 numbers of Colonial Newspapers have been made up 
into 1,221 parcels, and 1,278 parcels have been tied up and labelled. 

37 volumes of the General Catalogue have been broken up and 
re-bound in 39 volumes. 370 columns have been re-laid, owing to 
the accumulation of titles under certain headings. 21 volumes of 
the Music Catalogue have been re-bound in 22 new volumes, 

IV. Reading Room Service. — The number of volumes replaced in 
the General Library after use in the Reading Room was 581,319 ; 
in the King's Library, 17,927 ; in the Grenville Library, 1,991 ; in 
the Map Room 4,625 ; in the presses in which books are kept from 
day to day for the use of readers, 635,112 ; and in the Oriental 
Department, 2,359 ; making a total of 1,243,333 volumes supplied 
to readers during the year, exclusive of those to which the readers 
have personal access on the shelves of the Reading Room. 

The number of readers during the year was 178,410, giving an 
average of 588 daily, the room having been open 303 days. 

Neiospaper Room. — The number of readers during the year was 
12,650, giving a daily average of 42, the room having been open on 
303 days. The number of volumes replaced after use was 43,541, 
giving a daily average of 144, not reckoning volumes taken fi-om 
the shelves of the Newspaper Room by the readers themselves. In 
addition, 1,389 country newspapers were brought up to the Library 
from the Repository at Hendon for the use of readers. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTED BOOKS. 19 

Map Room. — 380 students were admitted to the Map Room. 

Photography. — There were 262 applications for leave to photo- 
graph from books in the Library, and 712 volumes were supplied 
for this purpose. 

V. Accessions. — General Library. — 26,351 complete volumes 
and pamphlets have been added to the General Library during the 
year. Of these, 4,914 were presented ; 14,319 received by Copy- 
right ; 377 by Colonial Copyright ; 830 by International Exchange ; 
and 5,911 acquired by purchase. 

61,538 parts or volumes of serial publications and of works in 
progress have been added to the General Library. Of these, 3,172 
were presented ; 41,180 received by Copyright ; 391 by Colonial 
Copyright ; 1,024 by International Exchange ; and 15,771 acquired 
by purchase. 

Maps. — 84 atlases, 98 parts of atlases, and 1,760 maps in 6,921 
sheets have been added to the collection during the year. Of these, 
27 atlases, &2 parts of atlases, and 1,107 maps were presented ; 34 
atlases and 612 maps received by Copyright ; 15 atlases and 2& 
map8 by Colonial Copyright ; and 8 atlases, 36 parts of atlases and 
15 maps acquired by purchase. 

Music. — 10,720 musical publications have been added to the 
collection during the year. Of these, 2 books were presented ; 
9,273 books and pieces and 1,046 parts were received by Copyright ; 
351 pieces by Colonial Copyright ; and 15 books and 33 parts 
acquired by purchase. 

Newspapers. — The number of newspapers published in the 
United Kingdom, received under the provisions of the Copyright 
Act during the year, was 3,215, comprising 216,516 single 
numbers. Fifteen sets, comprising 2,555 single numbers, were 
received by Colonial Copyright ; 371 sets, comprising 43,319 single 
numbers, of colonial and foreign newspapers have been presented ; 
and 92 sets, comprising nine volumes and 16,534 single numbers, 
of current colonial and foreign newspapers have been purchased. 

Miscellaneous. — 5,431 articles not included in the foregoing 
paragraphs have been received in the Department. These consist of 
Parliamentary Papers, single sheets, and other miscellaneous items. 

The total number of articles enumerated above as having been 
received in the Department during the year, exclusive of newspapers, 
is 105,982. 

Donations. 

The following is a list of the more important donations received 
during the year : — 

TJepi Xapckaoi) TpucovTrrj. 9 vols. Presented hy P . Ralli, Esq. 

Acta Capitulorum Generalium. Vol. I. 1318-1593. Edidit 
F. G. Wessels. Presented by the Rev. B. Zimmerman. 



20 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Illustrated Catalogue o£ the Pictures in the Collection o£ 
P. A. B. Widener. Presented hy P. A. B. Widener, Esq. 

Original Drawings by the Old Masters. The Collection formed 
by J. G. Cogswell, 1786-1871. 1915. Presented hy M. L. Schiff, 
Esq. 

The Barbizon School of Painters, by David Croal Thomson, 
1890. Presented hy D. C. Thomson, Esq. 

The Royal Commission on the Losses and Services of American 
Loyalists, 1783-1785. Edited by H. E. Egerton, 1915. Presented 
hy Mrs. Whitelaw Reid. 

The Wedderburn Book, 1296-1896, by Alexander Wedderburn. 
Vols. 1, 2. Presented hy A. Wedderhurn, Esq. 

L' Astronomic Nautique au Portugal, par Joaquim Bensaude. 
Presented hy J. Pensaude, Esq. 

Early Statutes of St. John's College, Cambridge. Edited by 
J. E. B. Mayor, 1859. Presented hy the Master of St. Johns 
College, Cambridge. 

Records of the town of Plymouth, Mass. Vols. 1-3. 1636- 
1783. Presented hy the Pilgrim Society., Plymouth, Mass. 

Private Correspondence of Lord Byron. A proof of part of a 
suppressed edition. Presented hy Mrs. Shaw. 

Catalogue of the Paintings, &c., belonging to the Honourable 
Society of the Inner Temple, 1915. Presented hy the Treasurer 
and Masters of the Bench, Inner Temple. 

Noticias historicas y genealogicas de los Estados de Montijo y 
Teba, 1915. Presented hy the Duque de Berwick y de Alba. 

G. F. Barwick. 



DEPARTMENT OF MANUSCRIPTS. 21 



Department of Manuscripts. 



1. Catalogue of Additioiis. ^Egerton MSS. 2890, 2891, 
acquired in 1911, and 2899, acquired in 1912, have been described 
and indexed. 

The following MSS. acquired in 1913 have been described and 
indexed : Additional 38662-38664, 38683, 38686, 38687, 38725, 
38732, 38782-38788, 38790, 38791, and Egerton 2902-2904, 
2906, 2907. 

0£ those acquired in 1914, Additional 38808, 38838, 38840, 
38865-38890, 38892-38895, 38898-38930, 39165, 39167, 39168, 
and o£ those acquired in 1915, Additional 39169-39177, 39179, 
39184, 39212, 39214 have been described and indexed. 

The descriptions o£ Additional MSS. acquired in 1913 have been 
printed. 

2. Catalogue of Greek Papyri. — For Vol. V. o£ the Catalogue, 
1769-1911 (catalogue numbers) have been finally revised for press, 
sheets E-Kk have been printed off, and pp. 1-248 have been 
indexed. 

3. Catalogue of the Royal and King^s MSS. — Sheets 3 A-3 E 
of Vol, II. have been revised, completing the volume (to end of 
Royal Appendix). For Vol. III., descriptions of King's MSS. 
1-147, 161-172 have been revised and 1-145 sent to press ; sheet 
B is in print. The index to the Royal MSS. has been sorted into 
order. 

4. Catalogue of Irish MSS. — The following MSS. have been 
described :— Royal' 6 B. III. ; Additional 18748 ; Egerton 113, 
117, 122, 124, 130, 134, 141, 166, 168, 187, 195, 213, 214, 2899. 
The revision of the section Miscellaneous has been completed, and 
that of the sections Poetry, Tales, and Theology nearly so. 

5. Catalogue of Charters. — Additional Charters 57357-57418, 
acquired in 1912, have been described and indexed. 

6. Binding. — 167 Additional and Egerton MSS. newly acquired 
and 90 MSS. of the old collections have been bound, repaired, or 
lettered, together with 146 pieces of Papyri and 87 Books of 
Reference, volumes of Facsimiles, and Catalogues. 6 Charters have 
been repaired. 

7. Verification. — The entire collection of MSS. has been verified 
by comparison with the Shelf-Lists. 

8. Reproductions. — Part II. (English, 12th and 13th centt.) 
of the Schools of Illumination has been completed and issued. 

Part I. (Genesis-Ruth) of the reduced facsimile of the Codex 
Alexandrinus has been completed and issued. 

The introduction by Sir George Warner to the facsimiles from 
the Lindisfarne Gospels is in preparation. 

9. Stamping, folioing, and placing. — 67 Additional MSS., 1 
Egerton MS., and 145 Books of Reference have been stamped. 
The total of impressions made was 3,842. 



22 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

170 MSS. have been folioed, with a total of 32,268 folios. 696 
sheets have been numbered. 

125 newly acquired MSS. and 336 Papyri have been placed. 
All have been press-marked and entered in Hand- and Shelf-Lists. 

437 Charters and Rolls have been placed and have been entered 
in the Hand-Lists. Numbers have been written on 829 newly 
acquired Charters. 29 Seals and Casts have been provided with 
boxes, placed, and entered in Hand- and Drawer-Lists. 

10. Books of Reference. — 119 volumes and parts have been 
received, catalogued, and placed. 

15 volumes and parts of Facsimiles were added to the series 
now deposited in the Department and available for the use of 
Readers. 

11. Consultation of M^xS.— 23,332 MSS. and 2,001 Charters 
and Seals have been consulted in the Students' Room, and 69 
MSS. in the Reading Room. The number of Students was 7,781. 

Magna Charta was exhibited to 10,361 visitors. 

12. MSS. photographed. — 376 MSS. (including Papyri, 
Charters, and Seals) were allowed to be photographed, with a total 
of 3,073 photographs taken, of which 3 were for official purposes. 

13. Acquisitions. — The number of Manuscripts and Documents, 
&c., acquired during the year has been : — 

Additional MSS. - - - - - - - 87 

Charters and Rolls __--_- 2,541 
Detached Seals and Casts - - - - - -22 

A few of the most important accessions by gift or purchase are 
as follows : — 

The Wodehouse Papers (calendared by the Historical MSS. 
Commission in 1892), a collection valuable for the history of 
Norfolk and Suffolk and of the families of Buttes, Bacon, and 
Wodehouse. 30 volumes, 5 rolls, and 1,333 charters. Presented 
hy Mrs. Wodehouse, widow of the late Right Hon. Edmond R. 
Wodehouse. 

The Mackenzie Papers, 16th-19th centt., relating to the Clan 
Mackenzie and especially the families of Suddie, Scatwell, and 
Findon, and including military papers and diary of Gen. J. R. 
Mackenzie, killed at Talavera. 25 volumes. 

Autograph MS. of five pages of Charles Dickens' Pickwick 
Papers. Presented hy Lady Wernher, who purchased it at the Red 
Cross sale. 

Autograph MSS. of "A Century of Roundels" and about twenty 
other poems and one prose article of A. C. Swinburne. Bequeathed 
by Miss Isabel Swinburne. 

Autograph MS. of Robert Louis Stevenson's Fables. 

J. P. Gilson. 



DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL PRINTED BOOKS AND MSS. 23 



Department of Oriental Printed Books and MSS. 

Arrangement and Cataloguing. — The numbers o£ the sheets o£ 
the various Oriental Catalogues and other publications of the 
Department which were sent to press in 1915 are: — Arabic Printed 
Books Catalogue, 14 sheets ; Coptic Texts, vol. 5, ^2 sheets ; Gujarati 
Printed Books Catalogue, 19 sheets ; Hebrew MSS. Catalogue, 7| 
sheets. 

The numbers of Titles written for the Catalogues are : — Abor 
Miri, 2 ; Arabic, 389 ; Assamese, 24 ; Avestan, 5 ; Bengali, 733 ; 
Bodo, 14 ; Burmese, 169 ; Cachari, 2 ; Chin, 2 ; Chinese, 2,506 ; 
Gujarati, 186 ; Hebrew, 261 ; Hindi, 502 ; Hindustani, 599 ; Ho, 
4 ; Kachin, 5 ; Kanarese, 131 ; Karen, 14 ; Kashmiri, 7 ; Khasi, 
12 ; Kurku, 6 ; Lakher, 2 ; Lushai, 15 ; Malayalam, 44 ; Manipuri, 
6 ; Marathi, 39 ; Mundari, 11 ; Naga, 2^ ; Oriya, 35 ; Pali, 117 ; 
Panjabi, 170 ; Persian, 384 ; Prakrit, 44 ; Pushtu, 4 ; Sanskrit, 
567 : Santali, 10 ; Savara, 2 ; Siamese, 2 ; Sindhi, 9 ; Sinhalese, 
115 ; Syriac, 28 ; Taking, 2 ; Tamil, 471 ; Telugu, 437 ; Tibetan, 
3 ; Turkish, 55. Total, 8,171. 

65 Hebrew MSS. and 45 Indian Charters have been fully 
catalogued. 

32 short descriptions of MSS. have been entered in the Descrip- 
tive List, the Register, and the Classed Inventory. 

125 MSS. (7,885 folios) have been folioed. 

Publications. — Vol. 5 of the Series of Coptic Texts edited by 
Dr. E. A. Wallis Budge, a Supplementary Catalogue of Marathi 
and Gujarati Printed Books, and part 3 of the Catalogue of Hebrew 
MSS. have been issued. 

Binding. — The numbers of Printed Books and MSS. sent to the 
Binders are : — Arabic, Hindustani, and Persian Books, 32 ; Chinese 
Books, 37 ; Hebrew Books, 41 ; Books in Sanskrit and other 
Indian languages, 183 ; MSS., 170. 

Students. — The number of visits of Students working in the 
Students' Room attached to the Department during the year was 
2,705. The number of Oriental Printed Books read by them in the 
Department was 16,954 (7,873 of which were issued once only, and 
9,081 reserved) and of those used in the Reading Room, 2,359. 
The number of Oriental MSS. read in the Students' Room was 5,450. 

Photography. — 25 applications have been made to photograph 
books and MSS. in this Department. 

Additions. — The number of volumes, pamphlets, etc., added to 
the collections of the Department during the year is 2,041, of which 
2,020 are Printed Books and 21 are MSS. 

Of the Printed Books, 119 were bought ; 1,698 were received 
under the India Copyright Act ; 81 were received under the 
Colonial Copyright Acts from Ceylon and Hongkong ; 2 were 



24 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

received in exchange for duplicates ; and 120 were presented. Of 
the MSS., 10 were bought and 11 presented. 

The MSS. are as follows :— 

Arabic ------ 10 

Chinese ------ 2 

Hebrew ___--- 2 

Persian __-_-- 3 

Persian and Arabic _ _ _ _ 1 

Sanskrit ------ 1 

Sogdian ------ 1 

Turkish ------ 1 

Total - - - - 21 

The most important acquisitions are : — 

Arabic MSS. — 1. Sharh al-kulliyat, a commentary by Kutb 
al-Din Muh. b. Mahmiid al-Shirazi on Ibn Sina's Kaniin. Bk. 1. 
Copied A.H.' 715 (a.d. 1315). 8°. Rare. 

2. Durrat al-mudiyah, a commentary on Ibn Malik's Alfiyah, 
by his son Badr al-Din Abu 'Abd Allah Muhammad. Copied a.h. 
793 (a.d. 1390). 4°. Very rare. 

3. A supercommentary by Shams al-Din al-Shaubari on Al- 
Ansari's commentary on the Minhaj al-talibin. 2 vols. Copied 
A.H. 1100 (a.d. 1688). 8". No other copy appears to be on 
record. 

4. Kitab al-wafi, a work on scholastic theology by Muh. b. 
Murtada (Muhsin). Pt. 2. 18th-l 9th cent. S°. Apparently unique. 

5. Kitiib ikmal al-din, a treatise on Shi'ah doctrine by 'Imad 
al-Din Abu Ja'far Muh. b. 'AH (Ibn Babawaih). Copied a.h. 1204 
(a.d. 1789). 4". No other copy appears to be on record. 

Chinese MS. — 1. A letter, written on yellow silk, from a T'ai- 
ping leader to the Rev. Joseph Edkins, asking to be instructed in 
Christian doctrine. Presented by Mrs. Lockhart. 

HebreiD Books. — 1. The Yoreh De'ah of Jacob ben Asher. 
Printed at Fez about 1520. Fol. Only one other copy of this 
edition is known to exist. 

2. The Hebrew Grammar of Kimhi. The earliest edition 
known. 1525. 8°. 

Persian MSS. — 1. Tazkirat i Minuchihr, lives of eminent Per- 
sians, with specimens of their works, by Mu'tamad ul-Daulah 
Minuchihr Khan. Copied a.h. 1264 (a.d. 1847). Fol. No other 
copy appears to be on record. 

2. Rag i miisiki, a treatise on the modes of Hindu music, 
illuminated, and illustrated with 39 paintings. 18th cent. Fol. 

Presented by the Royal College of Music. 

L. D. Barnett. 



department of prints and drawings. 25 

Department of Prints and Drawings. 
I. — Arrangement and Cataloguing, Sfc. 

Exhibition. — The contents of the exhibition of Select Prints and 
that of Recent Acquisitions have been varied in detail, among the 
prints exhibited being selections of etchings by Meryon, Legros, 
Frank Brangwyn, A.R.A., Sir Alfred East, R.A., Muirhead Bone, 
and Col. R. Goff, lithographs by Albert Belleroche, and colour- 
prints by A. W. Seaby. In July all the recently acquired prints 
were removed to make room for an exhibition of the Sale Collection 
of water-colour drawings. 

The engraved fans presented by Lady Charlotte Schreiber are 
being exhibited in rotation. Two selections, of twenty each, were 
shown during the year. 

Catalogues. — Vol. I. of the Catalogue of Dutch and Flemish 
Drawings, describing the work of Rembrandt and his school, has 
been published. 

A portion of Vol. V. of the Catalogue of Engraved British 
Portraits, containing descriptions of the portrait groups, has been 
printed, and an index to the separate persons contained in these 
groups is being prepared. Progress has been made with the pre- 
paration of a supplement to the main body of the Catalogue. 

The work of indexing foreign portraits contained in books of 
prints, the works of engravers, and other parts of the collection to 
which references had not yet been given, has been commenced. 

Arrangement. — The books of prints and books of drawings have 
been completely rearranged, with more regard to schools, dates, 
and subjects, and re-labelled. 

The card index to the books of reference has been continued, 
and over 3,000 cards have been written. 

All books of prints and books of reference recently acquired 
have been catalogued, labelled, and placed. 

The index of periodicals has been brought up to date. 

3,153 prints and drawings recently acquired have been incor- 
porated with the divisions of the collection to which they severally 
belong. 

Registration. — 3,694 items have been entered in the Register of 
Acquisitions. 

Stamping and Mounting. — 11,288 drawings, prints, &c., recently 
acquired, have been impressed with the departmental stamp and 
references to the Register. 

The whole of the French drawings in the Malcolm Collection 
have been mounted. 

242 drawings, recently acquired, have been prepared and 
mounted on sunk mounts ; 59 prints have been mounted on sunk, and 
57 on plain mounts ; 310 book-plates have been placed on paper 
mounts. A large number of mezzotints from the Cheylesmore 
Collection have also been placed on sunk mounts. All the above 



26 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

have been lettered with the artists' names and references to the 
Register and to Catalogues. 

161 drawings have been mounted in albums. 

101 drawings, 634 prints, and 664 mounts have been cleaned. 

Students. — The total number of visitors admitted to the Print 
Room during the year ended 31st December 1915 was 5,781, being 
375 in excess of the number for 1914 ; in the latter year, however, 
the room was closed for over four months. 

Photographing. — 231 applications were made for leave to photo- 
graph, and 803 photographs were taken. 

II . — A cquisitions. 

The total number of prints, drawings, books, &c., acquired 
during the year was 3,819, of which the following are the most 
important : — 

Italian School. 
Drawings. 
Tiepolo, Giovanni Battista. Two drawings of figures ; pen and 
bistre wash. 

Prints arranged to illustrate the Works of Masters. 
Sanzio, Raffaello. St. George, from the picture now at Petro- 
grad. Engraved in 1628 by David des Granges, an engraver of 
whom no record appears to exist. Presented by R. Ross, Esq. 

German School. 
P>rawi7igs. 
Diirer, Albrecht. Group of knights riding and tilting ; signed 
and dated 1489 ; pen and ink ; from the Andreossi, Lawrence, and 
Ginsburg Collections. Study of costume, undated ; pen and ink ; 
from the Wellesley and Ginsburg Collections. Presented hy the 
Diirer Society. 

Engravings. 
Anonymous engraver called " Der Meister mit den Blumen- 
rahmen " (15th cent.). " The Passion of Christ," twenty-six small 
engravings in a volume, from the Huth Collection. 

Metal-cut. 
SS. Oswald and Notburga. Unique dotted print of the 15th 
cent. Schreiber 1717. From the Huth Collection. 

Woodcuts. 
St. Anne. Coloured woodcut of the 15th cent., with a prayer 
for use in time of pestilence, and an indulgence containing the date 
1494, cut upon the block. From the S. Leigh Sotheby Collection. 
A copy of this woodcut, at Nuremberg, is described by Schreiber, 
No. 1195. Presented by H. Van den Bergh, Esq., through the 
National Art- Collections Fund. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 27 

St. Nicholas. Coloured woodcut o£ the 15th cent., from the 
S. Leigh Sotheby Collection ; unique and undescribed. Presented 
hy the National Art- Collections Fund, with the aid of contributions 
from J. P. Heseltine, Esq., C. W. Dyson Perrins, Esq., and Campbell 
Dodgson, Esq. 

Schools of the Netherlands. 

Drawing. 

Witel, Gaspar Van (Vanvitelli). Pen and wash drawing of 
Italian scenery, from the Lawrence and Ginsburg Collections. 
Presented by Campbell Dodgson, Esq. 

Etching. 

Rembrandt. Jacob lamenting the supposed death of Joseph, B. 
38. Undescribed first state. 

French School. 
Drawings. 
Guys, Constantin. Two drawings of scenes of Roman life, 
about 1865 ; pen and Indian ink wash. Presented by M. T. H. 
Sadler, Esq. 

Engravings. 
Grateloup, Jean Baptiste. Portraits of Bossuet, first state, 
Descartes, second state, Montesquieu, second state, and Polignac, 
first state. 

Etchings. 

Jacquemart, Jules. Christ at the Column. Presented hy A. E, 
Anderson, Esq. 

Meryon, Charles. Title to " Voyage a la Nouvelle-Zelande," 
Delteil, 63, 11. Frame for a portrait, Delteil, 95, IX. Presented 
by Campbell Dodgson, Esq. 

Waltner, Charles. Wayfarers, after F. Walker, A.R.A. Vellum 
proof of the rare first state, before the plate was altered by instruc- 
tions from Millais. The Peaceful Thames, after F. Walker, A.R.A. 
Remarque proof on vellum. Presented by E. E. Leggatt, Esq. 

Lithograph. 
Corot, J. B. C. La Lecture sous les Arbres. Delteil 33. 

Scandinavian Schools. 
Etchings. 
Martin, Johan Fredrik. Two views in Stockholm, etched in 
outline and tinted in water colours by the artist. 

American School. 

Etchings. 

J. A. McN. Whistler. The Swan Brewery. Wedmore 89. 



20 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Lithographs. 

Brown, Bolton. Nine original lithographs (landscape and 
figures). Presented hy the Artist. 

Sargent, John Singer, R.A. Portrait o£ Albert Belleroche. 
Presented anonymously. 

Veresmith, D. A. Four original lithographs : The Romany 
Chal ; " You shall also mount with me " ; The Jumble Sale ; " Chi e 
la ? " Presented hy the Artist. 

English School. 
Drawings. 

The principal acquisition of the year in this class is the collec- 
tion of water-colour drawings, seventy-five in number, of which only 
fifty-two belong strictly to the English school, bequeathed by the 
Rev. C. J. Sale (d. 1896), to which must be added nine water- 
colours (four by David Cox, two by Copley Fielding, and three by 
J. M. W. Turner, R.A.) bequeathed by his widow, Mrs. Mary Sale, 
of Wick Episcopi, near Worcester, who died on January 25th, 1915. 
The Sale bequest includes eighteen specimens of David Cox, includ- 
ing two of unusual size and importance, " The Vale of Clwyd " and 
" Beeston Castle," as well as many others of smaller size, but greater 
artistic interest, which add much in variety of style to the large 
collection of Cox's work already in the department. Three 
specimens of Turner's work, " St. Agatha's Abbey, Easby," " Glacier 
des Bossons," and a Venetian subject, " Storm on the Lagoons," are 
notable acquisitions. The collection also includes specimens of the 
following English artists, many of whom were not hitherto represented 
in the department : — G. Barrett, jun., R. Beavis, C. Branwhite, W. 
Callow, G. Cattermole, T. S. Cooper, R.A., P. DeWint, M. Birket 
Foster, G. A. Fripp, Sir J. Gilbert, R.A., J. Holland, W. H. Hunt, 
W. J. Miiller, P. J. Naftel, W. H. Pike, S. Prout, T. M. Richardson, 
jun., D. Roberts, R.A., F. J. Skill, F. Smallfield, F. Tayler, H. B. 
Willis, and E. M. Wimperis. The artists of foreign birth, drawings 
by whom are included in the bequest, are Guido Bach, Carl Haag, 
Sir Hubert von Herkomer, R.A., E. S. Lundgren, Jozef Israels, and 
the French animal painter, Charles Olivier de Penne. 

Among other English drawings, the following deserve mention : — 

Alexander, Edwin. Ten studies of Pigeons ; water-colours. 
Presented hy the Artist. 

Boyce, George Price. Farm Buildings at Streatley-on-Thames ; 
View from Pompey's Pillar at Alexandria ; water-colours. Be- 
queathed hy Mrs. Gillum. 

Bright, Henry. Coast scene ; black chalk. Presented hy G. 
Bellingham Smith, Esq. 

Eve, George William. Twelve preliminary drawings for book- 
plates. Presented hy G. H. Viner, Esq. 

Mahoney, James. Two illustrations to "Little Dorrit"; pen 
and ink. 

Prout, Samuel. View in Cologne ; pencil. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 29 

Robertson, George. View near Tunbridge Wells ; water-colours. 
Presented hy W. C. Alexander, Esq. Burnham Abbey, Bucks ; 
water-colours. Presented hy Sir Hickman Bacon, Bart. 

Shaw, R. Norman, R.A. Two architectural drawings ; pencil. 
Presented hy Mrs. Norman Shaw. 

Steer, P. Wilson. Rodborough Common ; The North Sea ; 
water-colours. Presented by the Artist. A Bend of the Severn ; 
water-colours. Presented by Geoffrey Blackwell, Esq. 

Thackeray, W. M. The Little Rebel ; pen and ink. Bequeathed 
by Mrs. Gillum. 

Etchings. 

Baskett, C. H. Four landscape subjects ; aquatint. Presented 
by Messrs. P. and D. Colnaghi and Obach. 

Bentley, Alfred. Five original landscape and subject etchings. 
Presented by the Artist. 

Bone, Muirhead. Piccadilly Circus, 1915 ; dry-point, trial 
proof and finished state. Presented hy the Artist. Orvieto ; dry- 
point, first state (one of two impressions only). 

Brangwyn, Frank, A. R.A. Twenty-four etchings of architecture 
and landscape, including the etchings of the earthquake of Messina 
and others of the artist's chief works. Presented by the Artist. 

Cameron, Katharine. Eleven etchings, chiefly of insects and 
flowers. Presented hy the Artist. 

Eve, G. W. Fifteen proofs of diplomas, invitation tickets, &c. 
Presented hy G. II. Viner, Esq. 

Gethin, P. F. Gerona, Spain. Presented by Messrs. P. and D. 
Colnaghi and Obach. 

Gosse, Sylvia. Eight etchings of interiors, models, landscapes, 
&c. Presented by the Artist. 

Griggs, F. L. The Ford. Presented by the Artist. 

Hay, James Hamilton. The new lion, British Museum ; dry- 
point. Presented hy the Artist. 

Heseltine, J. P. Twenty-one landscape subjects. Presented by 
the Artist. 

Hill, Vernon. Six allegorical subjects. Presented by John 
Lane, Esq. 

Osborne, Malcolm. Eight landscape subjects. Presented by the 
Artist. 

Robins, W. P. The Brook ; Interior of a Barn ; dry-point. 
Presented hy Messrs. P. and U. Colnaghi and Obach. 

Sickert, Walter. Nine etchings of architectural and figure 
subjects. Presented by the Artist. The Market, Dieppe. Presented 
by Miss S. Gosse. 

Smart, D. I. The Four Chimneys. Presented by Miss E. P. 
McGhee. Twelve etchings of landscape and architecture. Presented 
hy the Artist. 

Strang, William, A. R.A. Portrait of the Earl Beauchamp, K.G. 
Presented hy the Earl Beauchamp, K.G. 

Walcot, William. Baths of Oaracalla ; Palazzo Pesaro ; and two 
others. Presented by H. C. Dickins, Esq. 



30 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Wheatley, John. Susanna and the Elders. Study for the head 
of elder. Presented hy the Artist. 

Lithographs. 

Becker, Harry. Three rustic subjects. Presented hy the Artist. 
Four lithographs (landscape and animals). Presented hy Campbell 
Dodgson, Esq. 

Belleroche, Albert. Eighteen original works : portraits, land- 
scape, still life. 

Flint, W. Russell. The Destruction of a Zeppelin by Flight- 
Lieutenant Warneford, V.C. Presented hy the Medici Society, Ltd. 

Johnson, E. Borough. Belgian Refugees. Presented by the 
Artist. 

Lawson, J. Kerr. Spanish Gipsies (set of six). Presented hy 
the Artist. 

Linnell, John (jun.) The Sonnet, after W. Mulready, R.A. 
Presented by Campbell Dodgson, Esq. 

Pryse, G. Spencer. Belgian Mothers. Presented by Mrs. Lewis 
Hind. Home ; Belgium, 1914. Presented by the Artist. 

Shannon, Charles, A.R.A. The Morning Visit. Presented by 
A. E. Anderson, Esq. 

Various posters, by H. Becker, A. S. Hartrick, F. E. Jackson, 
J. Kerr-Lawson, J. Pennell, G. Spencer Pryse, and L. Raven-Hill, 
in proof state. Presented by the Underground Railways, Ltd. 

Woodcuts. 

Mahoney, James (designed by). Twenty-four illustrations, in 
proof state. Presented by E. E. Leggatt, Esq. 

Montbard, G. (after). Seventy-eight proofs of " English 
Homes." Presented hy E. E. Leggatt, Esq. 

Raverat, Gwendolen. Twelve original woodcuts. Presented by 
the Artist. 

Walker, F. S. (designed by). Eighteen illustrations. Presented 
hy the Artist. 

PORTKAITS. 
Foreign. 

102 engraved portraits, and 14 reproduced by photographic pro- 
cesses, have been acquired. 

English. 

699 engraved portraits, and 2&^ reproduced by photographic 
processes, have been acquired. In addition to 52 portraits of 
members of Grillion's Club, presented by the Rt. Hon. Sir George 
Murray, G.C.B., the following may be specially mentioned. 

Beaconsfield, Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of. Mezzotint by 
T. L. Atkinson after H. von Angeli. 

Bedford, Elizabeth, Duchess of. Mezzotint by G. Zobel after 
R. Buckner. 

Buccleuch, the 5th and 6th Dukes of. Engraved by H. 
Robinson and J. Brown after G. Richmond. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 31 

Butler, Rev. H. Montagu, D.D., Master of Trinity College, 
Cambridge. Mezzotint by F. Sternberg after Herkomer. 

Colenso, J. W., Bishop of Natal. Mezzotint by C. H. Tomkins 
after S. Sidney. 

Exeter, 2nd Marquess of. Mezzotint by C. W. Wass after J. 
Sant, R.A. 

Haden, Sir F. Seymour. Etching by Flameng. 

Howard, Philip, Cardinal. Engraving by De Poilly. 

Kean, Edmund, as Brutus. Mezzotint by S. W. Reynolds after 
J. Northcote. 

Laurie, Sir Peter. Mezzotint by J. Scott after T. Phillips. 

Maeready, William Charles (as Werner). Engraving by C. W. 
Sharpe after D. Maclise, R.A. 

Mill, John Stuart. Etching by P. Rajon after G. F. Watts, 
R.A. 

Nightingale, Florence. Engraving by T. H. Ellis after Elston. 

Victoria, Duchess of Kent. Engraving by F. Holl after F. 
Winterhalter. 

Westminster, Hugh, 1st Duke of. Mezzotint by T. 0. Barlow 
after Sir. J. E. Millais, P.R.A. 

Book-plates. 

459 etched by G. W. Eve, chiefly proofs in many varieties of 
state. Presented hy G. H. Viner, Esq., and others. 

157 engraved on wood by W. H. Hooper, in proof state. 
Presented hy Campbell Dodgson, Esq. 

278 engraved by C. W. Sherborn, in the final state, as used. 
Presented hy C. Davies Sherhorn, Esq. 

4 engraved on wood by T. Sturge Moore, in proof state. Pre- 
sented by the Artist. 

11 etched by H. J. F. Badeley. Presented by the Artist. 

Collections and Sets. 

4}] engravings and etchings after Rembrandt. Presented by 
J. Charrington, Esq. 

150 caricatures etched by M. Darly, entitled "Macaronies" 
(1771-73), with the six title-pages. 

40 rare etchings by various minor etchers of the Norwich School 
(M. E. Cotman, R. Girling, W. H. Hunt, R. Leman, J. Middleton, 
H. Ninham, A. Priest, &c.). 

A set of progress proofs (partly in duplicate) of the portrait of 
Henry Graves, the joint work of fifteen different engravers. Pre- 
sented by Algernon Graves, Esq., F.S.A. 

37 etchings, mezzotints, &c., after modern artists, published by 
Messrs. Dowdeswell & Dowdeswells, in proof state. Presented by 
Messrs. Dowdeswell ^ Dowdeswells, Ltd. 

A very extensive collection illustrating the life and work of 
Frederick Walker, A.R.A., consisting of woodcuts, etchings, photo- 
graphs from pictures and drawings, &c., arranged in chronological 



32 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

order, mounted on cards in two Solander volumes, and accompanied 
by copious notes and documents. Presented hy E. E. Leggatt, Esq. 

Books of Prints and Books of Reference. 

W. Bode, Frans Hals, his life and work. 2 vols. 1914. 

J. Flaxman, The Acts of Mercy, engraved in aquatint by F. C. 
Lewis. Extra large India paper proofs in wrapper, as issued. 
Presented hy Mrs. Harvey. 

Das Werk Ferdinand Hodlers. No. 14 of the Museumsausgabe 
(15 copies). Presented hy Prof. Michael Sadler. 

E. J. Kennedy, The Lithographs of Whistler. Completely 
illustrated catalogue. 

J. D. Harding, Sketches at Home and Abroad. E. Puroell, 
Sketches in Lithography, 1822. D. Roberts, The Holy Land. 2 
vols. 1843, with coloured lithographs. 

F. Gourboin, Grraveurs et Marchands d'estampes au xviii® siecle. 
E. Dacier, L'ffiuvre grave de Gabriel de St. Aubin. A. Mellerio, 
Odilon Redon. H. T. Bossert and W. F. Storck, Das mittelalterliche 
Hausbuch. 0. A. Weigmann, Neuere Maler-Radierer, Bd. I. S. L. 
Wenban. Presented hy Camphell Dodgson, Esq. 

Caniphell Dodgson. 



sub-department of oriental prints and drawings. 33 

Sub- Department of Oriental Prints and Drawings. 
I. — Arrangement and Cataloguing, ^c. 

A woodcut, printed in colour, bj: Y. Urushibara, after the 
Chinese painting o£ Greese (Sung period) in the Museum Collection, 
has been published and placed on sale. 

The final revision and printing of the Catalogue of Japanese 
Woodcuts has been completed, and an introduction to it has been 
prepared for press. The Supplementary Catalogue of Chinese 
Woodcuts has been begun. 

With the consent of the Keeper of Oriental Printed Books and 
MSS., the greater portion of the Japanese picture books and books 
of designs preserved in that department have been transferred to the 
Sub-Department in the interests of students of Japanese Art. 
Among these books are a number of albums of colour-prints ; these 
have been broken up, and the prints of better quality selected and 
arranged for mounting. The books have been arranged according 
to schools, placed, and labelled ; and a list of them has been prepared 
for the use of students. 

The Index of Japanese Artists has been completed. 

All books of prints and books of reference, recently acquired, 
have been catalogued, placed, and labelled. 

A card index of the books of reference has been made. 161 
prints, paintings, &c., recently acquired, have been incorporated with 
the divisions of the collection to which they severally belong. 

Registration. — 834 items have been entered in the Register of 
Acquisitions. 

Stamping and Mounting. — 347 prints, paintings, &c., recently 
acquired,, have been impressed with the departmental stamp and 
references to the Register. 

3 Japanese paintings have been repaired and remounted. 

31 Indian paintings and drawings have been mounted on sunk 
mounts, twenty-five of which have been specially cleaned and 
repaired. 

428 Japanese prints have been mounted on sunk mounts, 98 of 
which have been specially cleaned and repaired. 

II. — A cquisitions. 

The total number of paintings, prints, &c., acquired during the 
year was 1,138, of which the following are the most important : — 

Chinese. 

Painting. 

Chao Meng-fu, after. Horses and Grooms. Makimono, painted 
in colours. Presented hy Dr. Scott. 



34 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Japanese. 

Woodcuts. 

Ch5ki. Girls in the Naniwa-ya. Hashirakake. Presented hi/ 
R. N. Shaw, Esq. 

Harunobu. Girls embracing ; Girls shooting toy darts ; diptych. 
Both presented hy R. N. Shaw, Esq. 

Hiroshige, Tdkaido Meishd Gwaj5. Set of fifty-five prints. 
Transferred from the Department of Orierital Frinted Books. 

Kiyonaga. Sheltering from a Shower ; part of a triptych. 
Ladies at the Hot Springs ; one of a set. 

Koriusai. Walking in the Snow. 

Kitawo Masanobu. Fair ones of the Yoshiwara, completing the 
Museum set of Seiro Meikun Jihitsu-Shu. Presented hy R. N. Shaw, 
Esq. 

Moronobu. Amusements of Men and Women. Set of eighteen 
prints, coloured by hand. Transferred from the Department of 
Oriental Printed Books. 

Shunsho. Visit to a Lady. Presented hy R. iV. Shaw, Esq. 

Shunsh5's School. One hundred and ninety-eight prints of 
actors, including sixty-eight diptychs, and nine triptychs. Transferred 
from the Department of Oriental Printed Books. 

Shunzan. The Niwaka Procession ; part of a triptych. 
Presented hy R. iV. Shaw, Esq. 

Toyokuni. Girls in a Garden ; triptych. Presented hy 
R. N. Shaw, Esq. 

Utamaro. Girls in the House of the Fan ; Oiran with Attendants. 
Both presented hy R. N. Shaw, Esq. 

Picture Books and Books of Designs. 

Harunobu, 3 ; Hiroshige, 4 ; Hokkei, 2 ; Hokusai, 34 ; Itchd, 5 ; 
Korin, 4 ; Kyosai, 7 ; Okumura Masanobu, 4 ; Masayoshi, 10 ; 
Morikuni, 8 ; Moronobu, 4 ; Okyo, 2 ; Sekiyen, 4 ; Shigemasa and 
Shunshd, 1 ; Shunsho, 3 ; Sukenobu, 5 ; Toyokuni, 2 ; Utamaro, 2. 
Transferred from the Department of Oriental Printed Books and 
MSS.' 

Indian. 
Paintings and Drawings. 

Mogul School. Lady and Yogi ; in colours. Presented hy 
Charles Ricketts, Esq. 

Kangra School. Girl under flowering tree at night. Krishna 
at play. The Proud Lady. A man performing an incantation. A 
prince giving audience. Two girls at a window. Lady and maid 
on a terrace. Lovers on a balcony at night. All painted in colours. 
71ie last three presented hy Herhert Cook, Esq. 

Kashmir School. An Interview ; in colours. Presented hy 
Herhert Cook, Esq. 



SUB-DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 35 

Woodcuts. 

Fourteen woodcuts illustrating legends o£ Krishna, &c. Pre- 
sented hy W. Bateson, Esq. 



Books of Prints and Books of Reference. 

Gillot Collection Sale Catalogue. Two vols. Presented hy 
Arthur Morrison, Esq. 

Reproduction of a Landscape Roll, by Sesshii, in the Hara 
Collection. Presented hy Hamilton Bell, Esq. 

Paintings by Sesshu (Sesshii Gwashu) ; Paintings of the Southern 
School (Nangwajudaikashu) ; Bunjingwa Paintings. Presented hy 
Rohert Ross, Esq. 

Smith, Vincent. History of Fine Art in India and Ceylon. 

Laurence Binyon. 



36 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Department of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities. 
I. — Arrangement, Cataloguing, Sfc. 
Egyptian Antiquities : — 

The removal of portions of the collections to places protected 
against hostile air-craft has been continued. 

The classification and re-arrangement of the Egyptian Collections 
have been continued, and the greater number of the objects acquired 
during the year have been cleaned and mounted in readiness for 
exhibition in due course. 

The washing and cleansing of monuments, statues, &c., have been 
continued, and many stelse and earthenware vessels have been soaked 
in water and treated to free them from salt deposits. 

The labelling of the Collections has been continued, and broken 
numbers have been restored, and old, worn-out labels have been 
replaced by new, full ones. Ill labels have been written and 
painted, 463 numbers have been painted on objects, and about 20 
objects have been photographed. 

411 scarabs have been removed from their mounts, moulds and 
casts of the bases have been made for the Catalogue of Scarabs, 
which is in course of publication, and the scarabs have been 
remounted and renumbered. 297 impressions of scarabs have been 
made. 

12 oak cases for mummied birds and animals, 9 alabaster 
plinths, 4 satin-wood plinths, 9 oak plinths, and 1 frame have 
been made, and 27 Caen-stone plinths have been prepared ; fittings 
for wall cases in the Fourth Egyptian Room have been prepared 
and fixed ; the locks and bolts of all the table-cases have been 
examined, and eased where necessary ; cuj)boards and cases in the 
Students' Room have been fitted with shelves and drawers, &c. 

A complete copy of the facsimile of the Ani Papyrus has been 
fixed to the screen in the room adjoining the E.^tension, and a cast 
of the Rosetta Stone has been mounted and exhibited in the Egyptian 
Gallery. Three objects have been cleaned and repaired. 

15 objects have been registered, about 30 stelse have been 
copied, and labels have been written for 50 plates of text. Drawings 
of a number of stelse have been made for reproduction. 

Works m Progress. 

1. Coptic Texts. — Nine MSS. have been copied and the copies 
collated and printed ; indexes have been compiled, descriptions of 
the plates have been written, and a preface and introduction have 
been written. 

2. Catalogue of Scarabs. — 329 scarabs have been catalogued 
for Vol. II. 

3. Egyptian Texts. — 50 plates for Part VI. have been printed. 

4. Hieratic Papyri. — The transcribing of texts has been begun. 



department of egyptian and assyrian antiquities. 37 

Assyrian Antiquities : — 

The Knyunjik Collections have been examined and the numbers 
verified ; the Babylonian Collections have been checked and arranged 
on trays with reference boards ; and numbers have been affixed to 
1,200 trays. The exhibited tablets in the Nineveh Gallery have 
been removed to the Basement. 

100 tablets have been cleaned and 92 repaired ; 4,069 tablets 
have been placed in numbered boxes ; 3,150 tablets have been, 
numbered, &c. 

13 stone plinths, 2 oak plinths, 6 stands, and 3 frames have 
been made, and 24 cylinders, vases, &c., have been mounted. 

2,184 tablets, &c., have been registered ; 43 tablets or fragments 
have been copied : 2,349 tablets have been catalogued, and 
283 slips have been revised ; a Preface for the Bronze Gates of 
Shalmaneser has been written, the making of reference slips for 
cataloguing purposes has been continued, and the case-books have 
been kept up to date ; and 100 lithographic plates have been 
checked in proof. 

Phoenician and Hittite Antiquities : 

122 votive inscriptions have been remounted on stone plinths 
and labelled ; 36 Hittite antiquities have been mounted on satin-wood 
pedestals and cloth-covered mounts. 

Works in Progress. 
1. Cuneiform Texts. — 50 plates of epigraph texts, and 50 plates 
of Hittite texts have been printed off. 

Publications. 

1. Miscellaneous Coptic Texts in the Dialect of Upper Egypt. 

2. Bronze Reliefs from the Gates of Shalmaneser. 

Students. — About 1,700 visits have been made to the Department 
by students and inquirers, and 4,840 objects have been issued for 
their use. 

Personally Conducted Parties. — Eighteen parties with a total of 
nearly 500 persons have been personally conducted through the 
Department. 

II. — Acquisitions. 
I. — Egyptian : — 

I. — 1-65. Miscellaneous Egyptian antiquities, including bronze 
figures, XXth — XXVIth Dynasties, a blue porcelain Canopic jar of 
Amen-hetep II., bronze boat and figure of Osiris-Ptah, a fine group 
of ushabtiu figures (some royal), a blue porcelain scarab and two 
Gnostic gems. 

II. — 1—22. A valuable collection of Coptic antiquities com- 
prising : Two bas-reliefs, two large painted vases, a lamp, two 



38 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

writing tablets, painted panel, the scene of the Resurrection, spoon, 
hair-pin, pair of cymbals, and ten miscellaneous wooden objects, 
many of which were employed at the celebration of the Eucharist. 

II. — Assyrian, &c. : — 

I. — 1. A complete baked clay inscribed barrel-cylinder of 
Sennacherib, king of Assyria, B.C. 705-681. The 
first part of the text describes his expedition against 
Merodach-Baladan in 703, and supplies a number of 
new and important historical facts, and the second part 
records the building operations of the king of Assyria. 

2. Limestone tablet of Anam, or Ilumaila, who may be 

identified with Anam-gishdabba, a contemporary of 
Sin-gamil, king of Erech. The text records the 
restoration of the temple of the goddess Ninni. B.C. 
2200. 

3. Baked clay foundation record from the palace of Sin- 

gashid of Erech, who reigned about B.C. 2200. 

4. A nearly complete baked clay cylinder of Esarhaddon, 

king of Assyria, b. c. 681-668, inscribed in the 
Assyrian character. The text contains a prayer to 
Nana, a prayer for long life, a statement of the king's 
genealogy, and a series of curses on any successor 
who shall harm or neglect the Temple of Nana, which 
Esarhaddon restored. 

5. A barrel-shaped clay cylinder inscribed with a prayer to a 

goddess on behalf of Arad-Nana, an official of Erech. 

6. Portion of a Sumerian liturgical composition containing 

references to various deities. B.C. 2200. 
7-17. A group of tablets dealing with sales of land and house 
property, the transfer of slaves, accounts, &c. B.C. 
2200-2000. 

II. — 1. Bronze bull-pendant, with Himyaritic inscription. 

2. Silver armlet with the legend Wadam Abam in 

Himyaritic characters. 

3. Chalcedony cone engraved with the figure of a priest at 

an altar, and a name in Phoenician characters. About 
B.C. 400. 

4. Fragment of an Assyrian relief cut from a slab at 

Nineveh. 

III. Presents. 
I. — 1. A stone figure of the Ba, or human soul, in the form 
of a human-headed hawk with pendent Sudani female 
breasts. From Nubia. 1st or 2nd cent., a.d. 
Presented hy the Rev. W. Russell Finlay. 



DEPARTMENT OF EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 39 

II. — 1-2. Two stone altars with Himyaritic inscriptions. 

3. Figure from a sepulchral ornament. 

4. Fragment with figure of a horned animal. 

5-7. Three small sepulchral monuments. From the collection 
of the late General Prideaux of Aden. 

Presented by H. Oppenheimer, Esq., F.S.A., and 
Maurice Rosenheim, Esq., F.S.A. 

III. — 1-3. Three mummied children, one in a pottery coffin. 
4-24. Twenty-one mummied birds and animals. 

25. A pottery case. 
2&, 21. Two gilded masks. 

Presented hy E. L. Grunning, Esq. 

IV. — 1. Painted ushabtiu box of Anhai, a princess, priestess and 
singing woman of Amen-Ra. B.C. 1000. 

2. Four painted ushabtiu of Anhai inscribed with a version 
of the Vlth Chapter of the Book of the Dead. 
Presented hy T. H. Green, Esq. 

V. — 1-13. A collection of thirteen mud-sealings for jars. 
Presented hy the Egypt Exploration Fund. 

VI. — 1. Baked clay cylinder of Neriglissar, king of Babylon, 
B.C. 559-556, with a text describing some of the 
building operations of this king. 

2. Contract of year 18 of Shamash-shum-ukin. B.C. 651. 

3. Sumerian liturgical composition. B.C. 2000. 

4-7. Fragment of a similar text, fragment of inlaid plaque, 
and two figures of apes. 

Presented hy L. A. Lawrence, Esq. 

VII. — Ushabti figure of a divine father. 

Presented hy W. Plowman, Esq. 

VIII.— The Archseological Survey of Nubia for 1909-10. 
Presented hy C. H. Firth, Esq., M.A. 

IX. — Sumerian tablets from Umma by C. L. Bedale. 

Presented hy the Rylands Lihrary, Manchester. 

X. — Documents of economic statistics of ancient Chaldea 
(Part II.) from the collection of N. P. Likhachev, 
Moscow, 1915. 

Presented hy the Moscow Archceological Society. 

E. A. Wallis Budge. 



40 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities. 
I. — Arrangement, ^c. 

Special measures have been taken for the protection o£ the more 
valuable part of the collection against hostile aircraft attacks, by 
removal to positions of greater safety, or by methods of protection 
in situ. 

In the Sculpture Galleries a series of fragments and mouldings 
has been arranged in the Mausoleum Room, and some additional 
fragments of the Priene sculptures mounted. The Salutaris inscrip- 
tion from Ephesus has been improved by the insertion of eighteen 
new fragments. 

In the Upper Galleries the series of armour transferred from 
the Tower Armoury has been arranged in the Room of Greek and 
Roman Life ; the arrangement of the unexhibited lamps in drawers 
in the Fourth Vase Room has been completed, the plain black wares 
in the Third Vase Room rearranged, and the objects from the 
Ephesus excavations exhibited in the First Vase Room. A finding- 
list has been made of the Cypriote vases' in the First Vase Room. 

The publication of the Select Bronzes was completed, and pro- 
gress was made with the Catalogue of Silver Plate. Progress has 
also been made 'with the second part of Volume IV. of the Greek 
Inscriptions, which has now been set up in page form. An Index 
to the four volumes of Inscriptions has been compiled, and is now 
passing through the press. 

Moulds have been made of three slabs of the Parthenon frieze 
and of one slab of the Phigaleian frieze ; of the Nike of the Par- 
thenon pediment ; of the bronze Apollo (Cat. No. 209) ; and of the 
cast of the Guilford puteal. Thirty-five pieces of sculpture have 
been mounted on stone plinths or pedestals, and twenty-two frag- 
ments of inscriptions mounted or incorporated. Two plaster casts 
and two bronzes have been mounted on wooden pedestals, and a 
series of gems mounted and rearranged in the Gold Ornament 
Room ; the bronze pumps in the Room of Greek and Roman Life 
have been remounted. A set of drawers has been fitted in a case 
in the First Vase Room ; additional shelves in the Bronze Room for 
unexhibited bronzes, and a new book-case for the Keeper's study, 
have been made. 58 vases, 11 bronzes, 7 terracottas, 6 iron spear- 
heads, 3 ivories, and 2 wooden objects have been cleaned and 
repaired. && objects were registered, 47 labels written and 7 
printed, and 101 objects numbered. 

The number of visits to the Departmental Library for the pur- 
poses of research was 572 ; there were 629 other visits to the Staff 
for enquiry or on departmental business, and 1,798 attendances of 
students of art and architecture in the Sculpture Galleries. 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES. 41 

II. — Acquisitions. 
I. — Marble. 

1. Sepulchral tablet with an amphora o£ the type known as 
Loutrophoros in relief, and a pair of doves naturalistically treated. 
Inscribed with the names of Menalkes and Melantes. 

2. Relief of a family group within a portico, two of the figures 
inscribed as Metagenes and Philumene, of the deme of Kyda- 
thenaion. 

3. Fragment of a sacrificial inscription. From Cos. Presented 
by the Rev. Henry Francis^ Vicar of Tring. (Cf. Paton & Hicks, 
Inscriptions of Cos, p. 94). 

II. — Gems. 

4. Paste cameo with head of Silenus in white glass on blue 
ground. From Rome. 

5. Paste cameo with laureate head of Apollo, imitating a 
sardonyx. From Sicily. 

4 and 5 Presented by Henry Wallis, Esq., R. W.S. 

III. — Silver. 

6. Lamp with four nozzles, in the form of a boat, on which is 
a figure of the infant Herakles grasping two serpents. Journ. Hell. 
Stud., xxviii., p. 274, pi. 33. Found in Switzerland. 

IV. — Bronze, Sf-c. 

7. A series of thirty pieces of armour on deposit from the Tower 
Armoury, including (a) a set of helmet, dagger, and body-armour, 
from Cumae, (/>) three helmets, (c) a double axe, (d) bronze and 
iron spear-heads, and lead sling-bolts from Marathon. 

8. Fibula of the early Iron Age (anonymous donation). 

V. — Vases. 

9. Two Apulian vases of the 3rd cent. B.C., in the form of 
squat jugs with covers and knotted handles ; on one Eros offering 
a wreath to a woman, on the other Eros seated and a woman stand- 
ing. Cf. Roemische Mitteilungen, 1914, p. 95. 

10. Amphora of blue glazed ware, of the 2nd cent, after 
Christ. From North Syria. 

11. Black glazed lekythos with patterns in red body colour. 

12. A series of vases and fragments of pottery from the collec- 
tion of the late William Ransom of Hitchin, including : 

(a) Jug in form of negro's head, from Etruria. 



42 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

(6) Fragments of Arretine ware with potters' stamps, found 
in the Tiber. 

(c) Flask of St. Remy-en-Rollat fabric (about a.d. 25), 

from Andernach. 

(d) Bowl of Lezoux ware (about a.d. 120), signed by the 

potter Flavius, from Orange, and other red wares 
from the Rhine. 

(e) Local Rhenish wares, including a jar inscribed MISCE 

MI. 

(/) Tile with stamp of Oohors IV. Vindelicorum, from Ems. 
Cf. Limes, I. 3 (Arzbach), pi. 3, fig. 26. 

(ff) Bronze bowl from top of censer, from Siena. 
Presented hy F. Ransom, Esq. 

VI. — Terracottas. 

13. Antefix with head of young Herakles. Presented hy R. 
Snead Broion, Esq. 

Yll.— Plaster Casts. 

14. Cast of the Lansdowne Herakles. 

15. Cast of the throne with reliefs in the Boston Museum. 

A. R. Smith. 



BRITISH AND MEDIiEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 43 



Department of British and Medieval Antiquities and 
Ethnography. 

1. — Arrangement, Cataloguing, ^c. 

Prehistoric Room. — Most o£ the wall-cases in the iron gallery of 
this room, as well as the table-cases, have been painted and re- 
arranged, to illustrate the Stone and Bronze Ages respectively in 
foreign countries. 

Central Saloon. — Bronze Age remains from Great Britain and 
Ireland will occupy the centre, and three table-cases and two ranges 
of wall-cases have already been arranged. The Greenwell collection 
of bronzes has been incorporated, and in the south wing Stone Age 
antiquities from these islands have been exhibited. 

Iron Age Gallery. — In what was formerly the Glass and 
Ceramic Gallery have been exhibited British and Foreign remains 
of the Iron Age. The Hallstatt and La Tene periods of the 
Continent with the Late Keltic series occupy the northern side, 
dating from the 9th cent. B.C. to the Roman period in Britain ; 
on the south side are Anglo-Saxon and Viking remains with the 
corresponding collections from Europe, usually assigned to the later 
Iron Age. Two Ogham inscriptions on stone slabs have been 
transferred from the ground floor ; and the gallery, which was 
opened December 1st, contains national antiquities of about 1,500 
years, exclusive of the Roman period. 

Ro7na7i Britain. — Six table-cases of Roman remains from 
Britain have been transferred to what was formerly the Medigeval 
Room, and the wall-cases have been cleared for refitting. The 
collection of " Samian '' ware and the lead coffins have already been 
arranged in wall-cases ; and the removal of the remainder from the 
Central Saloon is in progress. 

King Edward VII. Gallery (Ground floor). — This gallery has 
been cleared and prepared for the Waddesdon collection, the Franks 
collection of mediaeval cups and metalwork, the mediaeval collection, 
the English, continental and oriental porcelain and pottery, and 
glass of all periods. Progress has been made with the transfer and 
arrangement of several sections. 

Christian Room. — The Christian Antiquities will be accommodated 
at the south end of what was formerly the exhibition gallery of 
Prints and Drawings. The former Christian Room and the two 
adjoining rooms are being cleared for transfer to the Department 
of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities. A Coptic fresco from Egypt 
has been restored and mounted. 

Buddhist Room. — Some progress has been made with the 
arrangement of the Buddhist collection from the Northern Gallery, 
in what was formerly the exhibition gallery of the Department of 
Prints and Drawings. 



44 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Brahman Room. — After structural alterations, the exhibition of 
Brahman antiquities and the series of Gandhara sculptures has been 
almost completed in what was formerly the students' room of the 
Department of Prints and Drawings. 

Asiatic Saloo7i. — Three table-cases have been removed to King- 
Edward VII. gallery and others containing oriental swords trans- 
ferred from the Ethnographical Gallery. Much of the porcelain has 
also been removed, to accommodate exhibits of oriental art, especially 
metal- work. The collection of netsukes and other Japanese carvings 
has been re-arranged, and the cases placed on temporary plinths. 

Etlinograpldcal Gallery. — A collection of Malayan silver has 
been arranged in table-cases and labelled ; and various additions 
made to most sections. A large standard case and four table-cases 
of oriental arms have been removed to the Asiatic Saloon. 

Registration. — The registration of current acquisitions has been 
continued, and 1,322 objects have been added, including ethno- 
graphical specimens. Numbers have been painted on 1,293 
specimens, and 969 permanent labels written. 

Objects have been mounted to the number of 1,474, and the 
card-catalogue of the departmental library continued. 

The series collected by Sir M. A. Stein and formerly exhibited 
in King Edward VII. gallery, has been divided for distribution. 

Many of the most valuable exhibits have been removed from the 
galleries in view of possible air-raids. 

Puhlications. — The catalogue of Engraved Gems of the post- 
classical period was published in March. Current additions have 
been made to the slip-catalogue of Oriental pottery and porcelain, 
and further illustrations prepared for the Romano-British and 
Anglo-Saxon guides. A report of the excavations conducted at 
Rickmansworth in 1914 has been prepared and published in 
Archo'ologia, vol. Ixvi., 195. 

Students. — 1,488 students and visitors have been received in the 
Department, and a demonstration given in the Prehistoric section 
by a member of the staff. 

2. Principal Acquisitions. 
(1.) Prehistoric and Early British Antiquities. 

(a) Stone Age. — A series of chipped flints found below the Orag 
deposits and in the middle glacial sands near Ipswich : described by 
Sir E. Ray Lankester in Philosophical Transactions, Series B, vol. 
202, pp. 283-336 (1912). Collected and presented by J. Reid Moir, 
Esq. 

An ovate flint implement found in the raised beach at Brighton. 
Presented hy W. Beane,Esq. 

A series of flint implements, flakes and cores of Le Moustier 
date, from the C^oombe-rock at Northfleet, Kent : described in 



BRITISH AND MEDIAEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 45 

Archa'ologia, Ixii., 515. Presented by the Associated Portland 
Cement Manufacturers, Ltd. 

Ten flint implements of unusual types found in North Ireland. 
Presented hy Rohert Welch, Esq. 

A series of flint implements from Kent and other districts in 
England. Bequeathed hy Ricliard Jones, Esq. 

(h) Bronze Age. — Two British swords and rapier, and socketed 
sickle and celt of rare type from Co. Mayo. On deposit from the 
Tower Armoury. 

(c) Early Iron Age. — Ten bronze vessels, including supposed 
water-clocks, found together at Wotton, Surrey, and described in 
Proc. Soc. Antiq.^ xxvii., 76. Presented hy J. H. C. Ecelyn, Esq. 

A series of Late Keltic cinerary urns found near Hitchin, Herts. 
Presented hy F. Ransom, Esq. 

(d) Foreign. — Crystal pygmy implements from Ceylon, described 
in Spolia Zeylanica, Dec, 1914. Collected and presented hy Principal 
Hartley. 

Bronze sword of unusual dimensions and type from India. 

Bronze socketed axe-head found in Asiatic Russia. Presented hy 
Sir Hercules Read, LL.D. 

Iron sword and ornamented scabbard of the La Tene II. period 
found in Canton Berne, Switzerland ; described in Proc. Soc. Antiq., 
xxvii., 107. Presented hy Oscar C. Raphael, Esq., F.S.A. 

Two bronze swords from Germany. On deposit from the Tower 
Armoury. 

(2.) Romano-British. 

Bronze lamp in the form of a dolphin, found at Brettenham, 
near Thetford, Norfolk. Presented hy Sir Hercules Read, LL.D. 

Series of " Samian " pottery found in London, and near Hitchin, 
Herts. Presented hy F. Ransom, Esq. 

(3.) Anglo-Saxon and Foreign Teutonic. 

Weapons and fragments of a glass beaker and bronze bowl, from 
a grave at Asgarby, Lines. Presented hy C. E. Robinson, Esq. 

Sword found at Herringswell, Suffolk. Presented hy Oscar C. 
Raphael, Esq., F.S.A. 

Gold finger-ring of the Viking period from the river-bed, Chew 
valley, W.R. Yorks. Presented hy Herbert Horsfall, Esq. 

Sword with inlaid hilt of the Viking period, found in the Lea at 
Edmonton, and described in Proc. Soc. Antiq., xxvii., 217. Presented 
hy Sir Hercules Read, LL.D. 

Irish penannular brooch, spear-head from Nottingham, Viking 
swords and axe-head ; and spear-head, axe and scramasax from a 
burial at Mannheim, Germany. On deposit from the Tower Armoury. 

(4.) Mediceval and later. 
Remarkable bronze bowl of the 12th cent., engraved with scenes 
in the life of St. Thomas. Presented by F. Ransom, Esq. 



46 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM, 

A valuable collection o£ over 300 plaquettes, chiefly of bronze 
and of Italian origin, dating from the 16th cent. Presented hy 
T. Whitcombe Greene, Esq., F.S.A. 

Oval medallion of John Locke, painted in Japan in lacquer on 
copper. Presented hy Aid)rey Le Blond, Esq. 

Bronze medallion portrait of Queen Anne, from model by 
O'Brisset. Presented hy T. Whitcomhe Greene, Esq., F.S.A. 

(5.) Ceramic and Glass Collections. 

Three large pottery vases probably of the Han dynasty, from 
Yen-ling, Hsien, Honan. Presented by J. Brock, Esq. 

A large series of pottery and porcelain vases from ( -hina, chiefly 
of the Sung and Ming periods. 

Persian pottery lamp of Mosque type, from Aleppo, Syria. 

Four specimens of Persian pottery, 13th cent. Presented by 
H. van den Bergli, Esq., tliroiigh the National Art- Collections Fund. 

Series of cameo portraits in Derby biscuit-porcelain. Presented 
hy Sir Hercules Read, LL.D. 

(6.) Collection illustrating various Religions. 

Jain figure of 11th cent, obtained in India by the late Sir 
Alfred Lyall, and presented in his memory. 

A model standard, figures of Buddha, &c., in gilded wood from 
Mandalay. Bequeathed by Mrs. Sale 

A Japanese shrine, enamelled and gilt. Presented by Sir Edgar 
Boehm, Bt. 

(7.) Oriental and EtJinographical. 

A large and remarkable series of oriental arms and armour 
formerly exhibited at the Tower of London, including a number of 
suits of armour mounted on models ; a fine series of matchlocks and 
other firearms, two swivel guns, brass cannons and early Saracenic 
helmets. On deposit from the Tower Armoury. 

Guitar from the house of King Mwanga, Uganda, and knife 
once used for human sacrifice in Ashanti. Presented by the Rt. Hon. 
Austen Chamberlain. 

Series from the Wa Nyika tribes of British East Africa. 
Presented by A. M. Champion, Esq. 

Dress of fibre with human skull attached, worn by the chief juju 
man of a secret society in S. Nigeria. Presented by Dr. J. Crawford 
Maxwell, C.M.G. 

A collection from Togoland and N. Ashanti. Presented by Capt. 
C. H. Armitage. 

Stone pounders, axes, adzes, and other objects, mainly from the 
Hervey Islands. Presented hy E. L. Gruning, Esq. 



british and mediieval antiquities. 47 

Christy Collection. 

During the year the Trustees have acquired by donation the 
following among other objects, which have been transferred to the 
Trustees of the British Museum : — 

1. Ethnography of Africa. 

Two carved wooden combs from Mendiland, Sierra Leone. 
Presented hy A. C. Bollis, Esq., C.M.G. 

Two pottery figures, emblems of fertility, Lala tribe, Nigeria. 
Presented hy Mrs. Boyle. 

Spear from the North Ikurava clan of the Munshis of the 
Katsena Allah district, Muri Province, Nigeria, N.P. Presented hy 
Ronald S. Chapman, Esq. 

2. Ethnography of Oceania. 

A Philippine and two Masai spears, and three Bushman arrows 
(one with stone point). Presented hy A. W. F. Fuller, Esq. 

A reed with one end cleft and the other pierced, Philippine 
Islands. Presented hy A. D. Power, Esq. 

3. Ethnography of America. 

Wooden painted doll, from Navajo and Hopi Indians. Presented 
hy Mrs. G. Holmes Thomas. 

In addition to the above donations the Christy Trustees have 
acquired by purchase a series of openwork stone and shell ornaments, 
also a number of clubs, axes, and articles of dress, from the Solomon 
Islands. 

Charles H. Read. 



48 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Department of Coins and Medals. 
I. — Registration and Arrangement. 

1. Greek Series. 

459 coins recently acquired have been registered and incor- 
porated, and numerous casts and electrotypes o£ coins not in the 
British Museum have been incorporated. Various collections o£ 
coins offered have been examined and selections made. A systematic 
re-examination o£ the coins, which had in former years been set aside 
as duplicates, has been begun. The bibliography of Greek Numis- 
matics has been kept up to date, and additions made to the Card 
Index of coin-types. 

2. JRoman Series. 

12 coins recently acquired have been registered and incorporated. 
A large collection of casts of Roman medallions presented by Comm. 
Francesco Gnecchi has been arranged tor reference. Collections 
offered have been examined and selections made. The Roman 
Imperial denarii of the second half of the 3rd cent, have been 
examined on behalf of a numismatist studying the subject. The 
bibliography has been kept up to date. 

3. British and Colonial Series. 

613 coins, medals and tokens recently acquired have been regis- 
tered and 337 incorporated. Collections offered have been examined 
and selections made. The coins in the Bodleian Library and 
Ashmolean Museum have been examined. Re-arrangements in 
accordance with recent researches have been made in the following 
series : the coinage of the 8th — 9th cent. ; the short-cross series 
(Henry II. — Henry III.) ; the 17th cent, tokens of the counties 
from Rutland to Yorks and Wales, and the 18th cent, tokens of 
Somerset and Scotland ; the war medals later than 1760. 

4. Mediaeval and Modern Series. 

130 coins and medals recently acquired have been registered and 
■90 incorporated, and 2& casts of coins not in the British Museum 
incorporated. The re-arrangement of the series of Northern Italy 
has been begun in accordance with the King of Italy's Corpus. 
Collections of coins offered have been examined and selections made. 
The casts of Italian medals not in the British Museum have been 
arranged for reference in a new cabinet. 

5. Oriental Series. 

222 coins recently acquired have been registered and incor- 
porated. The coins in the Stein Collection from Central Asia have 
been revised ; the re-examination of the duplicates has been begun ; 
the coins of the modern Indian States and of the sub-Sassanian 
series have been studied and various collections submitted have been 
examined and selections made. 

6. Departmental Library. 

The re-cataloguing of the library of numismatic works on the 
card system has been begun, and about two-thirds of the books 
catalogued. 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 



49 



7. Kchibition. 

A selection o£ coins and medals illustrating the history of the 
Netherlands and their relations with this country has been exhibited. 

8. Safely of the Collections. 

A large and representative selection of the more valuable coins 
and medals in the collection has been removed to a place of greater 
safety than the Medal Room for the period of the War. 

II. — Publications. 

1. Catalogue of Greeh Coins. 

Coins of Arabia, Mesopotamia, Sfc, by G. F. Hill. 

619 coins have been arranged and catalogued. The historical 
introductions to the mints of Mesopotamia, Babylonia and Assyria 
have been written, 

2. Catalogue of English Coins. 

Norman Kings, by G. C. Brooke. 

The text down to signature Bb has been passed for Press ; 
the rest of the work, with the exception of the Indexes, is in type. 

3. Catalogue of Indian Coins. 

Hindu Coins, by J. Allan. 

491 coins have been arranged and catalogued. Classifications 
have been worked out for the early anonymous cast bronze, and the 
silver punch-marked coins. 

4. Medals. 

Select Italian Medals, by G. F. Hill. 

This portfolio, with 50 plates, has been completed and published. 

III. — Acquisitions. 

The total number of coins and medals added to the Department 
during the year 1915 was 3,655, of which 253 were of gold, 2,763 
of silver, 473 of 'bronze and 166 of other metals. 

The following table shows the numbers of the new acquisitions 
classified according to the several series to which they belong : — 



Class. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Bronze. 


Other 
Metals. 


Total. 


Greek 

Roman 

British and Colonial . . . . 
Meiiiseval and Modern 

Oriental 

Chinese 


8 

6 

177 

11 

51 


92 

34 

2,355 

97 

184 

1 


IIG 
33 

201 
70 
53 


105 
23 

38 


216 

73 

2,838 

201 

288 

39 


Total 


253 


2,763 


473 


166 


3,655 



50 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Of the above 640 have been presented, viz, 12 of gold, 219 of 
silver, 287 of bronze and 122 of other metals. 

The following is a list of benefactors to the Department of Coins 
and Medals during the past year : — 

The Rt. Hon. the Earl Spencer, K.G. ; the Deputy Master of the 
Mint ; the Government of Madras ; the Government of the United 
Provinces ; the Director of Agriculture for the Central Provinces ; 
the Society of Antiquaries ; the British School in Egypt ; the 
National Art Collections Fund ; the Bombay Branch of the Royal 
Asiatic Society ; the American Numismatic Society ; J. Allan, Esq. ; 
Signor Arturo Anzani ; R. D. Banerji, Esq., M.A. ; J. E. Baskett, 
Esq. ; Miss E. Boyer-Brown ; E. C. Birch, Esq. : W. H. Buckler, 
Esq. ; Albert H. Caslon, Esq. ; H. C. Churton, Esq. ; S. C. 
('ockerell, Esq. ; Richard Dalton, Esq. ; Guy Dickins, Esq. : Rev. 
Francis J. Eld; Miss Helen Farquhar ; J. T. R. Fussell, Esq. ; 
Henry Garside, Esq. ; Sir Hamilton Goold-Adams, G.C.M.G. ; 
R. W. Goulding, Esq. ; A. S. F. Gow, Esq. ; S. W. Grose, Esq. ; 
W. G. Groves, Esq. ; H. A. Grueber, Esq., F.S.A. ; F. D. Harford, 
Esq., C.V.O. ; D. T. Harris, Esq. ; Lionel Heath, Esq. ; Gray Hill, 
Esq. ; J. R. Kelly, Esq. ; L. A. Lawrence, Esq., F.S.A. ; Prof. 
Dr. J. Leite de Vasconcellos ; T. 0. Mabbott, Esq. : George 
Macdonald, Esq., C.B. ; Alex. Macrae, Esq., M.D. ; J. Grafton 
Milne, Esq. ; Ellis H. Minns, Esq. ; Professor C. Oman ; Don 
Guillermo de Osma ; C. R. Peers, Esq., F.S.A. ; Mrs. J. E. 
Powell ; A. E. Press, Esq. ; Sir Hercules Read, LL.D. ; Rev. 
Edgar Rogers ; Maurice Rosenheim, Esq., F.S.A. ; Horace Sandars, 
Esq., F.S.A. ; T. Sheppard, Esq., F.G.S. ; Ernest B. Smith, Esq. ; 
A. H. Smith, Esq. ; J. Henderson Smith, Esq. ; Mrs. Alfred 
Sotheby ; Messrs. Spink and Son, Ltd. ; W. Barclay Squire, Esq., 
F.S.A. ; Henry Symonds, Esq., F.S.A. ; E. Timperley, Esq. ; 
Charles Tite, Esq. ; Sir William Treloar, Bart. ; Dr. L. 0. Tudeer ; 
Henry Van den Bergh, Esq. ; Rev. J. A. Vanes ; Rev. Hedley 
Vicars ; W. H. Valentine, Esq. ; Emery Walker, Esq., F.S.A. ; 
Percy H. Webb, Esq. ; H. Nelson Wright, Esq., I.C.S. : A. M. 
Woodward, Esq. 

IV. — Remarkable Coins and Medals. 

The year has been marked by the acquisition of a large selection 
of English coins from the collection made by the late Sir John 
Evans. Taken as a whole this is the most important addition to the 
English series that has been made since the purchase of the Roberts 
Collection in 1810. Among the pieces of outstanding interest may 
be mentioned the following : A gold Penny of Henry III., one of 
six specimens now existing of the first gold coinage of England 
which was ordered by Henry III. in 1257 ; a set of the Florin, 
Half-florin and Quarter-florin of Edward III. (only one other 
complete set is at present known of this first attempt of Edward III. 
to establish a gold coinage) ; also a fine specimen of the very rare 
first noble of the same reign ; a heavy and a light Half-noble of 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 51 

Henry IV., the former probably unique ; and an extremely rare 
Quarter-noble o£ the heavy issue of Edward IV., one of two 
specimens known of the issue previous to the introduction of the 
Rose Noble, or Rial. 

Of the individual coins acquired, the following are the most 
important : — 

1. Greek Series : — 

Lysimacheia in Thrace. — Seven bronze coins restruck on Seleucid 
coins in the 3rd — 2nd cent. B.C. Presented hy W. H. Bvckler, Esq. 

Autocane in Aeolis. — A rare bronze coin of the 4th cent. B.C., 
types, heads of Zeus and Athena. Presented by Prof. C. Oman. 

Alabanda in Caria. — A bronze coin of Antoninus Pius, rev. 
Dionysus. Presented by W. H, Buckler, Esq. 

Alinda in Caria. — An unpublished silver coin of the 1st cent. 
B.C., obv. Head of Heracles, rev. Heracles standing. 

Cotiaeum in Phrygia. — A very fine specimen of a bronze coin of 
Philip Senior, rev. Cybele in lion-car. Presented hy W. H. Buckler., 
Esq. 

Temenotliyrae in Phrygia. — A rare bronze " medallion " of 
Philip Senior, rev. Artemis in car drawn by two deer. Presented 
by Messrs Spink 8f Son. 

Cappadocia. — King Ariaramnes (about 280-230 B.C.). A rare 
bronze coin with his portrait, rev. Horseman. 

Cyprus. — An unusual variety of the silver stater of Azbaal, king 
of Citium (449-425 B.C.), with the stag on the reverse in a half- 
standing position. Presented by Sir Hamilton Goold- Adams , 
G.C.M.G. 

Barce in Cyrenaica. A very rare silver stater of the early 5th 
cent. B.C. ; ohv. Silphium plant ; 7'ev. Bull standing before palm-tree. 

Arabia. — Sahaean and Himyarite kings. A large and important 
selection of very rare coins, including one of the only two known 
gold coins of the series, and nine coins of six rulers of the latest 
period (1st — 2nd cent, after Christ). From the collection of the 
late Col. W. F. Prideaux, C.S.I. 

A fine specimen of a silver coin of the latest Himyarite period, 
ohv. Arab head, rev. Bucranium. Presented hy Dr. Alex. Macrae. 

2. Roman and Byzantine Series : — 

Two rare aurei of Galba ; one with rev. S.P.Q.R. OB C.S. 
(hitherto onlv known in silver) ; the other with 7'ev. DIVA 
AVGVSTA (Livia?). 

A rare double siliqua of Julian II., struck at Sirmium and found 
at Bulbourne, near Tring. 

Four rare gold coins of 'Ezana, Chaleb, Esbael and Bachasa (?) 
kings of Axum (Aethiopia) of the 4th — 5th cent, after Christ. 
From the collection of the late Col. W. F. Prideaux. 



52 accounTkS, etc., of the British museum. 

Two bronze coins o£ Anaeb and Joel, kings of Axum. Presented 
hy Signor A. Anzani. 

3. British and Colonial Series : — 

A London penny of type V of William II. ALGAR.ON.LVNDN. 
Presented hy L. A. Lawrence, Esq. F.S.A. 

A half-crown of Charles I., struck at York ; on the reverse to 
right of crown, a small letter, apparently B, for Nicholas Briot. 
Presented hy Miss Helen Farquhar. 

Fifty-one 17th. cent, traders' tokens of Somerset. Presented hy 
Cliarles 71te, Esq. 

Unique silver plaque of the time of Charles II., engraved with 
portraits of Charles I. and Charles II., and an inscription : " Give 
thy Judgments, God, unto the King and thy Righteousnesse to 
the King's Sonn." Presented hy the Rev. Francis J. Eld. 

4. Mediwval and Modern Series : — 

A gold Merovingian tremissis of the 7th cent., attributed to 
Pfalzel in Rhenish Prussia. Presented hy A. E. Press^ Esq. 

An unpublished gold solidus of Ervigius king of the Visigoths 
(680-687 A.D.), struck at Elvira in Spain. 

A gold coin of Alfonso VIII. of Castile (1158-1214), imitated 
from contemporary Moorish coins, with ALF and a cross added. 

A silver triple-daler of Christian IV. of Denmark (1588-1648). 
Presented hy the Rt. Hon. the Earl Spencer, K.G. 

A series of rare Portuguese Colonial Coins from the Grogan 
Collection, including a unique double Xerafim of Don Pedro II. ; a 
Xerafim of the same ruler struck at Diu, and six other unique Goa 
coins of various rulers. 

5. Oriental Series : — 

A fine series of gold, silver, and copper coins of various 
Muhammadan dynasties from the collection formed by the late 
Colonel W. F. Prideaux, C.S.I. These include rare coins of the 
Umayyad and Abbasid caliphates of South Arabian mints, a unique 
series of coins of the Rasulid dynasty, the Imams of Sana, the 
Imams of Sa'ada and other South Arabian dynasties, a small collec- 
tion of the coins of Harar, which are almost unknown in European 
collections, and rarities from Central Asian and Indian mints. 

A very rare gold coin of Abd al-Rahiro, a feudatory of al-Mansur 
of Valencia, struck at Valencia between 470-485 a.h. Presented by 
Horace Sandars, Esq., F.S.A. 

A series of 23 early Hindu copper coins of various states. 
Presented hy H. Nelson Wright, Esq., I.C.S. 

A series of 109 rupees of Shah Alam II. of Oudh mints, and of 
his successors the independent Shahs of Oudh from the Rai Bareli 
find. Presented hy the Government of the United Provinces. 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 53 

6. Casts and Electrotypes : — 

The collection of casts and electrotypes of coins and medals not 
in the British Museum has been increased by the following important 
gifts : 

84 plates of casts of coins of Ancient Italy and Sicily in the 
McClean Collection, Cambridge. From the Director of the Fitz- 
icilliani Museum. 

19 boxes of casts of coins from recent auction sales. Fro^n 

Messrs. Spink ^ Son. 



V. — Students ami Visitors. 

The number of visits made to the Department of Coins and 
Medals by students and others during the year 1915 was 2,150, the 
average for the preceeding ten years being 4,080. 

G. F. Hill. 



54 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

British Museum (Natural History). 



STATEMENT o£ Progress made in the Arrangement and 
Description of the Collections, and Account of Objects 
added to them, in the Year 1915. 

General Progress. 

Visitors. 

The total number of visits made by the public to the Natural 
History Museum during 1915 was 433,581, as compared with 
420,914 in 1914. 

The attendance on Sunday afternoons was 48,409, as against 
46,960 in the previous year. 

The average daily attendance for all open days was 1,194 ; for 
weekdays, 1,238 ; and for Sunday afternoons, 931. 

It will be noted that the figures for 1915 show a considerable 
increase on those for 1914. 

Classes of London County Council School Teachers have again 
visited the Museum under the guidance of Mr. Leonard, the Official 
Guide, who has given them a series of demonstrations in the 
galleries. 

Parties of wounded soldiers from the hospitals in and around 
London have visited the Museum in large numbers, and the services 
of Mr. Leonard have been in constant demand to explain the exhibits 
to the men. Warm appreciation of his services in this capacity has 
been expressed by the hospital authorities and soldiers. 

Swiney Lectures. 

Dr. J. D. Falconer gave his second course of Swiney Lectures 
in November and December, the subject being, " Ice and the Ice 
Age." 

The lectures, twelve in number, were delivered in the theatre at 
the Victoria and Albert Museum, and were attended on an average 
by 143 persons a lecture, as compared with 122 in the previous 
year. 

Museums Association. 

A report on the proceedings of the Annual Conference of the 
Museums Association, held in July at the Victoria and Albert 
Museum, was submitted by Dr. Bather, who represented the Natural 
History Museum at the Conference. The two main subjects for 
discussion were, " Museums and the War" and " Museums in relation 
to Education." The members visited the Natural History Museum, 
where demonstrations were given by some of the staff. 

The War. 

Up to the end of the year 1915, 58 members of the staff of the 
Natural History Museum have joined the Colours, with the permission 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 55 

of the Trustees, for service during the war. In addition, 31 tem- 
porary assistants and outside workers associated with the Museum, 
and 61 sons of members, or of former members, of the staff are 
serving in either the Navy, the Regular Army, or the Territorials. 
With one exception, every man of military age on the stafE has 
offered himself for attestation, and been either accepted or excused 
on the ground of unfitness. 

The Museum has been able to render assistance to Government 
Departments in various matters connected with the war. The 
following may be mentioned : — 

The Zoological Department received from the Military Hospital, 
Tooting, a specimen of a leech which had been removed from 
the nose of a soldier invalided home from the Dardanelles. The 
leech was found to belong to a Mediterranean species well known 
to give trouble by entering the nasal cavities or the larynx of man, 
being introduced when swallowing water, or by crawling into 
the nostrils. As the facts of the case suggested that our soldiers 
serving in the Near East might be exposed to a danger unknown to 
the Medical Departments of the Navy and Army, a report on the 
matter, prepared by Dr. Harmer, was sent to the Head of the 
Medical Department of the Admiralty and to the Director General 
of the Army Medical Service, from both of whom acknowledgments 
have been received, together with an intimation that the medical 
officers serving in the Mediterranean would be notified in order 
that the necessary precautions might be taken. The report has also 
been reproduced in the Journal of the Royal Naval Medical Service. 

Advice has been given by the Entomological Department in the 
matter of the eradication of vermin. 

In connection with this subject the Trustees have issued a leaflet 
for general information on " The Danger of Disease from Flies and 
Lice " (price Id. for six copies. Is. for 100), and also a pamphlet on 
" The Louse and its Relation to Disease " (price Id.), uniform with 
the pamphlet on " The House-fly as a Danger to Health," published 
two years ago. Steps have been taken to give these pamphlets the 
widest possible circulation, and large numbers of them have been 
placed at the service of the Admiralty and the War Office for the 
use of the Medical Services of the Navy and Army. 

The Botanical Department has been consulted by the Naval 
Air Service as regards the use of a suitable wood material for air- 
ship construction. The same Department has given help to the 
War Office by answering inquiries of a varied nature ; for example, 
as to an organism which was damaging the fabric of air-ships : 
it proved to be a fungus ; the examination of oats with a view to the 
discovery of poisonous seeds, in connection with an outbreak of 
presumed fodder poisoning at a Military Veterinary Hospital. 

The Army Council have expressed their appreciation of the 
assistance rendered by the Museum in connection with the inquiry 
into moth infestation of Army biscuit. The inquiry has given 



56 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

valuable results as regards methods oE treatment for the prevention 
of such infestation. An exhibit illustrating the subject, brought up 
to date, has been set up in the Central Hall. (Cf. B. M. Return, 
1914, page 123.) 

The cases of specimens illustrating the part played by insects as 
carriers of disease have been largely used for instruction of classes 
of men of the Royal Army Medical Corps, the Sanitary Corps, 
and Army Veterinary Corps. Parties of these men have been 
brought to the Museum almost daily for demonstrations and lectures 
by their officers. 

The War Office having, through the Press, drawn attention to 
the penalty attaching to the destruction of Homing- or Carrier- 
pigeons, a case of birds has been placed in the Central Hall to show 
the difference between these pigeons and the ordinary Dovecot- 
pigeons, Wood-pigeons, Rock-doves and Stock-doves. Explanatory 
labels have also been prepared. The specimens of Carrier-pigeons 
exhibited were specially selected and presented to the Museum by 
Captain A. H. Osman, of the Pigeon Service Branch of the War 
Office. 

Hihernation of the House-fiy. 

Considerable attention has been given in the Entomological 
Department to the problem of the hibernation of the house-fly. As 
a result of the publicity given to the matter in the Press and 
elsewhere, a very large number of hibernating and other flies found 
in houses in the winter have been sent to the Museum ; and in 
this way it is hoped to get evidence on a wide scale. Very few of 
the specimens so far received are true house-flies, and none of these 
had been found in a hibernating condition. The vast majority of 
the flies found hibernating proved on examination to belong to a 
species {Pollenia rudis) which is not unlike the house-fly and which 
is frequently mistaken for it. This species lives out of doors 
in the summer, and only enters houses at the approach of cold 
weather in order to find shelter and a place in which to hibernate. 
Its mode of life is different from that of the house-fly, and there is 
no reason to apprehend any danger to health owing to its presence 
in the house. While the evidence so far obtained gives no support 
to the view that house-flies usually hibernate in the adult state, it 
helps greatly to explain how that view may have arisen and why it 
is so widely entertained. 

Protection of Animals. 

The question of the protection of birds and other animals in our 
Crown Colonies and Protectorates continues to be the subject of 
considerable correspondence between the Colonial Office and the 
Museum. Papers relating to Zanzibar, Fiji, Gambia, Trinidad, 
Gibraltar, Weihaiwei, British Honduras, South Georgia, Federated 
Malay States, Turks and Caicos Islands, Gilbert and Ellice Islands, 
have been sent to the Museum for observations and reports. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 57 

Various recommendations have been made for the consideration 
of the Secretary of State, having for their object the better protec- 
tion of birds, especially those species which are slaughtered for the 
trade in plumes. 

Investigation of Antarctic Whales. 

A report on whales, based on the notes made by the late Major 
G. E. H. Barrett-Hamilton during his mission to South Georgia, 
has been prepared by Mr. M. A. C. Hinton and forwarded to the 
Colonial Office. The document is of considerable importance in 
relation to the question of the threatened extinction of some of the 
species of whales found in the Antarctic seas, and it will be laid in 
due course before the Inter-Departmental Committee on Whales. 

Dr. Harmer has also submitted a report on the result of his 
study of official papers and statistics on the whaling operations at 
South Georgia. Dr. Harmer draws attention to the fall in the 
number of Humpback Whales captured, a reduction which is so 
marked as to give rise to grave anxiety for the future of the species. 
The whalers are now devoting their labours principally to the larger 
species, such as the Fin and Blue Whales, and this appears to be 
due to the fact that the number of Humpbacks in those waters 
has seriously diminished. 

Stranded Whales. 

The systematic inquiry into the stranding of Cetacea on the 
British coasts, started with the concurrence and help of the 
Board of Trade, has been continued. Owing to the abnormal con- 
ditions caused by the war, the total number of stranded specimens 
reported only reached 28, as compared with 76 in 1913 and 57 
in 1914. The year's record has nevertheless been of exceptional 
interest, in that a male specimen of " Cuvier's Whale " (Zi.phius 
cavirostris), which was stranded at Fethard, Co. Wexford, has been 
obtained for the collection. It is noteworthy that the first specimen 
received at South Kensington after the inauguration of the arrange- 
ment with the Board of Trade proved to be another Ziphius caviros- 
tris, probably a female, so that two skeletons of this rare cetacean, 
both from the Irish coast, have through this arrangement been 
preserved. The Natural History Museum had hitherto possessed 
no European specimen of the species. A specimen of the rare 
"Sowerby's Whale" (Mesoplodon bidens) was stranded off the coast 
of Inverness. The thanks of the Trustees are again due to the 
Receivers of Wreck and Coastguard Officers who have given valuable 
assistance in the prosecution of this inquiry. A report (the third) 
on the Cetacea stranded during the year 1915 will be issued early 
in 1916. 

Rowland W^ard Bequest. 

The specimens received during 1915 as gifts from the Trustees 
of the Rowland Ward Bequest amounted to seventeen items in all, 



58 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

including a Somali Rhinoceros, a Hudson Bay Walrus, a recon- 
structed model o£ a Dodo, two Darwin's Rheas (with sterna), a 
Manchurian Leopard, and a Siberian Wolf. 

Douhleday Collection. 

The Douhleday Collection of British and European Lepidoptera, 
which was deposited on loan in the Bethnal Green Museum in 1876, 
has been transferred by the Board of Education to the Natural 
History Museum (as being a more appropriate place for it). The 
collection has been placed near the other study collections of 
Lepidoptera in the Entomological Department, under the same 
conditions of tenure as existed with regard to it prior to the transfer. 

Chatham Elephant. 

In the autumn of 1913, information was received from Mr. 
Sydney Turner, of Luton, Chatham, of a discovery of fossil bones 
in the grounds of the Royal School of Military Engineering, Upnor, 
near Chatham. Dr. C. W. Andrews, an Assistant in the Department 
of Geology, was sent to make an investigation on the spot, and was 
at once able to identify the remains as those of an elephant. The 
War Office and the Commandant gave permission to excavate the 
skeleton and remove it to the Museum. During the dry season of 
1914 the outbreak of war prevented the work, but in 1915 the 
excavation was proceeded with, and the specimen was successfully 
removed to South Kensington. The find proved to comprise the 
greater part of a skeleton of Elephas antiquus (probably the largest 
elephant yet discovered in Britain), though of the skull only the 
molar teeth, one tusk, and part of the lower jaw are capable of 
preservation. The discovery is especially important as being the 
first occasion on which the skeleton of this species has been found 
in England in direct association with the teeth. 

The Trustees have recorded their appreciation of the action of 
the War Office authorities and of the Commandant of the Royal 
School of Military Engineering, Chatham, in allowing the excava- 
tions to be made, and of the valuable assistance rendered by the 
officers to Dr. Andrews during the progress of the excavations. 

Presents. 

The total number of gifts received during the year by the 
several Departments was 1,825, as compared with 2,336 in the 
previous year. Many of these comprised large numbers of 
individual specimens. The details of all the more important of 
them will be found in the reports of the Keepers of Departments, 
but the following are mentioned here also as being of special interest 
or value : — 

From Lady Church — the valuable collection of gem-stones formed 
by her husband, the late Sir Arthur Church, K.C.V.O., consisting 
of 203 specimens, besides 8 diamond points and 21 diamond 
brilliants employed in the setting of two of them. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 59 

From Mr. A. L. Butler — an important collection of about 2,000 
specimens of birds and a number of small mammals, from the 
Upper Sudan, all admirably prepared and labelled. 

From Mr. C. Boden Kloss — an interesting collection of zoological 
tpecimens from Siam. 

From Mr. George Lewis — a collection of about 7,000 specimens 
of coleoptera from various localities, contained in a cabinet and seven 
store-boxes ; also a number of papers published by Marseul and the 
donor. 

From Mr. H. J. Elwes, F.R.S. — a further selection of specimens 
from his large collection of butterflies. 

From the Executors of the late Mr. William Hill, of Hitchin — 
a cabinet containing about 2,700 slides of thin sedimentary rocks, 
including the original preparations on which Mr. Hill's published 
writings were based, and about 400 slides from the collection of the 
late Mr. Jukes-Browne, F.R.S. 

From the Committee of the Middlesex Hos})ital — the collection of 
•diatoms and literature relating thereto formed by the late Mr. John 
Augustus Tulk, of Chertsey. 

From Mrs. Emily Owen — 78 volumes of works by her father- 
in-law, the late Sir Richard Owen, mostly author's copies con- 
taining his autograph notes. 

From the Zoological Society — five volumes of a MS. Catalogue 
of the mammals formerly in the Societ3^'s old museum, many of 
the specimens in which were transferred to the British Museum 
about the year 1851, when the Society's museum was broken up. 

From Mr. C. D. Sherborn — Sir Richard Owen's own interleaved 
copy of his work on " British Fossil Mammals and Birds." 

From Prof. H. F. Osborn — Four hypothetically restored busts 
of fossil men, and restored models of the skulls and brain-casts of 
Pithecanthropus and Eoanthropus (Piltdown). 

Purchases. 

Purchases have practically been restricted to a few transactions 
which partook of the nature of liabilities incurred prior to the 
outbreak of war. Among the more important of them special 
attention may be drawn to the following : — 

The second and final instalment of the Lowe collection of West 
Lidian Birds, comprising 1,195 skins ; the fifth instalment of the 
Distant collection of Rhynchota ond other insects ; the first instal- 
ment of Dr. Malcolm Burr's collection of Dermaptera (earwigs), 
consisting of 4,500 specimens (55 being types and 390 co-types) ; a 
collection of 1,500 fossils, from the Bala rocks of North Wales, 
made by the late Mr. Thomas Ruddy, all labelled with localities ; 
fossil remains of Woolly Rhinoceros and Mammoth from the frozen 
earth of Northern Siberia ; the W. E. Cutler collection of fossils 
from the Upper Cretaceous of Alberta, Canada, comprising a 
considerable part of a large herbivorous Dinosaur, Trachodon, bones 
of Dinosaurians, and other remains. 



60 ACdOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Exchanges and Gifts of Duplicates. 

Exchanges of duplicate specimens have been made with various- 
institutions and individuals. 

A replica of the restored plaster cast of the Piltdown skull and 
mandible has been given to the Public Museum at Cheltenham. 

Duplicate specimens have been presented as follows: — 

Zoological specimens (other than entomology) — to the Royal 
Scottish Museum, Edinburgh ; the North Staffordshire Field Club 
Museum, Hanley ; Warrington Museum ; Newbury Museum ; 
Dundee Central Museum ; Sheffield Museum ; Tring Museum ; 
Dr. R. F. Leiper ; and Dr. N. Annandale (Calcutta), 

Entomological specimens — to Sheffield Museum ; Prof. Chr. 
Aurivillius (Stockholm) ; Prof. T. D. A. CJockerell (Colorado) ; Mr. 
H. J. Franklin ; the Rev. F. D. Morice ; and Mr. A. M. Lea 
(Adelaide). 

Fossils and casts of fossils — to Maidstone Museum ; the Welsh 
National Museum, Cardiff ; Dr. Eliot Curwen ; Prof. A. G. Nathorst 
(Stockholm) ; Dr. Marie C. Stopes ; and Prof. C. Schuchert (Yale 
University). 

Meteorite fragments — to the Geological Survey of India, Calcutta., 

(N.B. — All the individuals named have presented specimens or 
otherwise benefited the Museum.) 

Piddications. 

The following works on Natural History have been published 
during the year : — 

Catalogue of Books, Manuscripts, &c., in the British Museum 
(Natural History). By B. B. Woodward. Vol. v. SO— Z. 
Pp. 1,957—2,403. 4to. 11. 

British Antarctic ("Terra Nova") Expedition, 1910. Natural 
History Report : Zoology. 4to. 

Vol. i.. No. 2. Natural History of the Adelie Penguin. 
By Staff-Surgeon G. Murray Levick, r.n. Pp. 55 — 84 : 
21 plates. 5^. 
Vol. i., No. 3. Cetacea. By D. G. Lillie, m.a. Pp. 

85 — 124 : 14 text-figures and 8 plates. 7*. 6d. 
Vol. ii., No. 2. Oligocheeta. By H. A. Baylis, b.a. 

Pp. 13—18 : 1 plate. Is. 
Vol. ii., No. 3. Parasitic Worms. By R. T. Leiper, d.sc, 
and Surgeon E. L. Atkinson, r.n. Pp. 19 — 60 : 11 text- 
figures and 5 plates. 7s. 6d. 
Vol. ii., No. 4. Mollusca, Part I. By E. A. Smith, i.s.o. 

Pp. 61—112 : 2 plates. 4*. 
Vol. ii.. No. 5. Nemertinea. By H. A. Baylis, b.a. Pp. 

113 — 134 : 4 text-figures and 2 plates. 2s. 6d. 
Vol. iii., No. 1. Pycnogonida. By W. T. Caiman, d.sc. 
Pp. 74 : 22 text-figures. 5^. 
Report on Cetacea stranded on the British coasts. By S. F. 
Harmer, SC.D., f.r.s. No. 2. Cetacea stranded during 1914.. 
Pp. 16:3 maps, 1 text-figure. 4to. Is. 6d. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 61 

Catalogue o£ Ungulate Mammals. Vol. iv. By R. Lydekker, 
F.R.s. Pp. xxi., 438 : 56 text-figures. 8vo. 10s. 6d. 

Catalogue of the Fresh-water Fishes of Africa. By G. A. 
Boulenger, f.r.s. YoL iii. Pp. xii., 526 : 351 text-figures. 
Imp. 8vo. 21. 5s. 

Revision of the Ichneumonidse. By Claude Morley. Part IV. 
Pp. X., 167 : 1 coloured plate. 8vo. 6s. 

The Syrphidse of the Ethiopian Region. By Mario Bezzi. 
Pp. 146 : 2S text- figures. 8vo. 6s. 

Catalogue of Lepidoptera Phalsenae (Moths). By Sir George 
F. Hampson, Bart. Supplement, Vol. i. Atlas of 41 coloured 
plates. 8vo. 1/. 13s. 6d. 

Catalogue of Mesozoic Plants. Part VI. The Cretaceous 
Flora, Part II. — Lower Greensand (Aptian) Plants of Great 
Britain. By Marie C. Stopes, d.sc. Pp. xxxvi., 360 : 112 text- 
figures and 32 plates. 8vo. 1/. Is. 

Guide to the Fossil Remains of Man in the Department of 
Geology and Palaeontology. By A. S. Woodward, ll.d., f.r.s.. 
Pp. 33 : 4 plates and 12 text-figures. 8vo. 4(i. 

Instructions for Collectors, No. 12 — Worms. By H. A. Baylis. 
Pp. 23 : 17 text-figures. 8vo. 3d. 

Economic Series, No. 2 — The Louse and its Relation to Disease. 
Its Life History and Habits, and how to deal with it. By B. F. 
Cummings. Pp. 16 : 1 plate, and two text-figures. 8vo. Id. 

Economic Leaflets, No. 1 — The Danger of Disease from Flies 
and Lice. Pp. 4. 8vo. 1^. for 6 copies. Is. for 100. 

Reprints have been issued of the " Guide to the Specimens 
illustrating the Races of Mankind (Anthropology)," price Id. ; and 
of the pamphlet, " The House-Fly as a Danger to Health," price Id. 

Selections of the natural history publications of the Museum 
have been sent to free libraries and other institutions in Great 
Britain and Ireland, to Colonial, Indian, and foreign (neutral) 
museums, libraries, and scientific societies, and to persons who have 
benefited the Museum by helping in the preparation of the works, or 
in other ways. 

The undermentioned works were in preparation during 1915 : — 
Library Catalogue. Supplement, Vol. i. 
" Terra Nova " Antarctic Report. Further Sections. 
Report on Getacea stranded on the British coasts during 

1915, by Dr. S. F. Harmer, f.r.s. 
Catalogue of Bats, Vol. ii., by Dr. Knud Andersen. 
Catalogue of Ungulate Mammals, Vol. V., by R. Lydekker, f.r.s. 
Catalogue of the Freshwater Fishes of Africa, Vol. iv., by 

G. A. Boulenger, f.r.s. 
Third Report on Economic Zoology. 
Illustrations of British Flies, Second Series. 
Illustrations of African Blood-sucking Flies, Vol. ii., by 

E, E, Austen. 



62 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Catalogue o£ Moths, Supplement, Vol. ii., by Sir George F. 
Hampson, Bart. 

Flora of Jamaica, Vol. iv., by W. Fawcett and Dr. A. B. 
Rendle, f.r.s. 

Revision o£ Crombie's Monograph of British Lichens, Part I., 
by Miss A. L. Smith. 

Catalogue of the Sloane Herbarium, by J. Britten. 

Catalogue of Fossil Fishes, Part V., by Dr. A. S. Wood- 
ward, F.R.S. 

Guide to British Lichens. 

Economic Series, No. 3. Fleas as a Menace to Man and 
Animals, by Rev. J. Waterston. 

Economic Series, No. 4. Mosquitoes, by F. W. Edwards. 



General Library. 

The additions to the General Library during the past year have 
been : — 

By purchase - - - 356 volumes. 

By transference from other 

Departments - - - 5 volumes. 

By donation _ _ _ 840 volumes, 12 maps, and 21 

photographs. 



Total - - 1,201 volumes, 12 maps, and 21 
photographs. 

All the volumes and maps have been catalogued, press-marked 
and put in their places, whilst 1,428 volumes have been bound in 
617, and 6 have been repaired. 

The extent of the collection on the 31st of December was 
44, 963 volumes, .5,928 maps, and 864 photographs (not including 
those in the Owen Collection of Drawings, &c.). 

The accessions to the Departmental Libraries have also been 
catalogued as they came in, and duplicate transcripts of the titles 
have been returned with the books. 

Altogether 2,923 title-slips have been written, 81 rewritten, 
and 3,184 revised (independently of those prepared for printing). 

There are now, on a rough estimate, 100,459 volumes (exclusive 
of continuations and minor separata) and 6,235 maps in the whole 
building. 

The number of visits paid to the General Library during the 
year by Students and others (irrespective of the Staff and persons 
to whom the use of a key is granted) was 1,804. 

Donations have been received from a great number of Museums, 
Academies and other corporate bodies, as well as from personal 
donors. Included is a set of the works and memoirs of the late 
Sir Richard Owen, K.C.B., being his personal copies and containing 
his autograph notes, drawings and other memoranda, presented by 
his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Emily Owen. These have been placed ini 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY).; 63 

special presses with the letters of naturalists to Owen, largely 
referring to specimens in the collections (presented in 1908) that 
are now bound in twenty-seven volumes. The whole constitute, as 
it were, a memorial to the distinguished naturalist who was the 
prime and successful advocate for the separate establishment of the 
Natural History Museum. 

The printing of the Catalogue was completed with the issue of 
the fifth volume " SO — Z " in June. Letter " A " of the Supplement, 
which is estimated to contain upwards of 25,700 entries, has been 
prepared for press. ^ 



Index Generum et Specierum Animalium. 

During the year considerable progress has been made with this 
Index, under Mr. C. Davies Sherborn's charge, and some 30,000 
slips have been compiled and incorporated. 

The manuscript has been consulted to a more than usual extent 
during the past year by the Staff and Students, whilst many 
enquiries have been replied to by Mr. Sherborn in correspondence. 

The chief rarities secured for the Library by Mr. Sherborn 
were : — The first and second issues of Swainson's " Exotic Oon- 
chology," 1821 — 22, and 1834 — 35 ; and a curiosity in the shape 
of a previously unknown little work, " The Naturalists' Pocket Book 
for 1813," by George Shaw of the British Museum. 

The issues of Swainson formed the subject of a paper by C. D. 
Sherborn and A. Reynell in the Proceedings of the Malacological 
Society of London (Vol. xi, 1915, pp. 276—282). 



Index Museum. 

All the dissections exhibited in the Hall that are mounted in 
preservative fluid have been inspected during the year, and several 
have been resealed and many refilled. 

Further progress has been made in the introductory series of 
animals, plants and rocks, which, when completed, will be exhibited 
in four table-cases in the middle of the Hall ; twenty-four new 
specimens have been prepared during the year for the fourth case 
(Vertebrate Animals), and the series of minerals and rocks has been 
roughly planned out. 

The " Dental Exhibition," consisting of skulls, jaws and teeth 
showing interesting features of dentition, which had been on view in 
the Hall since July, 1914, was dispersed in July, 1915. One of 
the two table-cases thus liberated was employed for exhibiting once 
more, with some additions, the results of experiments conducted by 
Lieut.-Col. W. W. 0. Beveridge and Mr. J. Hartley Durrant with 
a view to combating the ravages of certain beetles and moths that 



'64 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

had been found to be injuring biscuits made for army service. In 
the other case has been displayed a series of disease-carrying ticks 
and some of their harmless relatives, twenty-eight specimens in all. 
Small maps show the distribution of each of the species selected, 
and any points of interest in the connection of the ticks with the 
dissemination of the organisms of disease are explained in the labels 
placed alongside the specimens. 

The series of specimens illustrating the structure and the life- 
history of house-flies has been increased during the year, and set out 
in a new, specially designed table case : the series now includes 
selected specimens of a male and a female of each of the four 
species of house-fly most frequently met with, models, on an 
enlarged scale, of the egg, larva, pupa and adult of the common 
house-fly, Musca domestica, and representations of food contaminated 
by flies, and refuse of the dust-bin serving as a breeding-place for 
flies. 

During the summer a new, specially designed table-case was set 
up in the middle of the Hall to contain specimens illustrating the 
life-history of the tropical rat-flea, Xenopsylla cheojyis, a flea largely 
responsible for the spread of plague in hot countries. The series as 
at present displayed comprises a large model, x 200 linear, of a 
male, together with a coloured drawing giving the names of the 
external parts of the body, and models of an egg, a larva, and the 
head and hind end of an adult female, and models, x 6,000 linear, 
of plague bacilli and human blood-corpuscles. The model of the 
male flea was previously shown in a small temporary case in the 
Hall ; the others are new. Actual specimens are also shown of the 
adult flea and a larva. 

In July important additions were made in the Hall by intro- 
ducing two large table-cases that had previously been sent to the 
International Exhibition at Ghent, in 1913, as an illustration of the 
work being done by the Museum in making known to the public the 
important part played by insects in the spread of disease. In one of 
these cases is a series of 335 pinned s})ecimens of tsetse-flies, tabanid 
flies and mosquitoes, with labels in English and French, and small 
maps explaining the- distribution of each of the species shown ; also 
coloured drawings of ten species of tsetse-flies, and some specimens 
mounted in alcohol. In the other case are shown two models of one 
of the disease-spreading mosquitoes. Anopheles macuiipemiis, twenty- 
eight times (linear) the actual size, and twenty-six models 
(x 6,000) explaining the complete life-history of the organism of 
pernicious malaria, a parasite that is transmitted to man by this and 
other mosquitoes. 

A smaller case of the same collection contains a specimen and a 
model (x 28) of the tiger-mosquito, Stegomijia fasciata, of interest as 
being the cause of the spread of yellow-fever. The distribution 
of this mosquito over the surface of the earth is explained by means 
of a map in which the regions where the insect is found are marked 
in red. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 65 

A new microscope, showing in rotation twelve slides o£ fleas, 
lice and bugs, has been set up on the west side o£ the Hall ; the 
interest of each of the specimens in its relation to the spread of 
disease is indicated in a label placed by the side of the microscope. 

An explanatory guide-book to the specimens and models of 
disease-spreading insects and ticks exhiliited in the Hall is in 
preparation, the pamphlet being to a large extent a compilation of 
the labels that are attached to the specimens displayed, redrafted in 
such a manner that they read consecutively. The guide-book will 
be illustrated by fourteen text-figures, and consist of about fifty 
pages. 

L. Fletcher, 

Director. 
British Museum (Natural History), 
26 February 1916. 



66 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Department of Zoology. 

I. — Arrangement and Conservation. 

Mammalia. 

Mammal Galleries. 

Work in these as well as in the other Exhibition Galleries has 
been reduced to a minimum, in order to avoid unnecessary 
expenditure during the War. 

For many years the exhibited specimens of Mammals, Reptiles, 
and Domestic Animals were in the charge of Mr. Richard Lydekker, 
F.R.S. His death, on April 16, 1915, has left these important 
parts of the public galleries without any special provision for their 
arrangement. The value of the services he had given in rendering 
the exhibited series attractive to visitors, in writing Guide Books, 
and in many other ways, can hardly be overestimated. 

In the Upper Mammal Gallery the Gorilla Case has been 
rearranged, with the view of minimising some of the inconveniences 
due to the reflection of light from the surface of the glass fronts of 
the cases. The amount of light received by the eye from a black 
specimen is often less than that reflected by the glass from the floor, 
windows, and other parts of tlie gallery. Such specimens may thus 
be hardly visible through the glass to an observer, who sees the floor 
and his own reflection with undesirable distinctness. 

In the Lower Mammal Gallery two squares of glass have been 
removed in the large Buffalo Case, and have been replaced by sash 
windows, facilitating access to the specimens. 

The principal additions have been received by presentation from 
the Trustees of the late James Rowland Ward, and they include the 
following : — a Somali Rhinoceros {Rhinoceros hicornis somaliensis)^ 
an Atlantic Walrus {Odohenvs rosmarvs), a Chinese Leopard (Felis 
fontaneiri), a Siberian Wolf (Canis lupus), a Ruffed Lemur (Lemur 
varius), a Tamandua Anteater {Tamandua tetradacti/la) and other 
specimens. Lady Seton-Karr has given several remarkably fine 
specimens selected from the collection of her late husband, the well- 
known sportsman. Sir Henry Seton-Karr ; including two heads of 
Wapiti {Cervus canadensis), a head of a Mule Deer {Odocoileus 
hemionus) and a skull with horns of a Bighorn Sheep (Ovis 
canadensis). A recently born Russian Brown Bear {Ursus arctos), 
presented by Dr. Maxime Goldberg, shows the striking disproportion 
in size between young and adult Bears. Two Squirrels (Sciurus 
vulgaris fuscoater), from the Thuringian Forest, presented by 
C. T, Seltman, Esq., and the head of a Diggle's Hartebeest (Bubalis 
tora digglei), the gift of W. H. Diggle, also deserve attention. 
Prof. H. F. Osborn, of the American Museum of Natural History, 
New York, has presented four busts representing reconstructions of 
PithecantJirojms and the Piltdown, Neanderthal and Cro-Magnon 
races of Man. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY, 67 

Whale Room. — To the series o£ casts of flippers exhibited on the 
walls of the galleries have been added preparations of the following 
Cetacea : — Mesoplodon, from Rosslare ; Cuvier's Whale (Ziphius 
cavirostris), from Co. Wexford ; White-beaked Dolphin {Lageno- 
rhynchus albirostris), from the Inner Hebrides ; Bottle-nosed Dolphin 
(Tursiops truncatus), from St. Mary's, Scilly Islands ; Common 
Dolphin (^Delphinus delpliis), from Co. Donegal. 

Study Series. — The usual work of labelling, registering and 
incorporating the mammals added to the collection, and their skulls,, 
has been continued, though much impeded by the absence of the 
lady label-writer hitherto employed. 

The whole collection of skins of Cliiroptera has been rearranged 
and spaced, to facilitate Dr. Andersen's work on the Order. The 
rearrangement of the Ungulata has also been continued, as the 
result of the publication of the volumes of Mr. Lydekker's Catalogue. 

Mr. R. C. Wroughton, Mr. T. B. Fry, and Mr. Martin Hinton 
have again afforded valuable help in working out accessions lo the 
collection, Mr. W roughton especially in connection with the large 
series obtained through the Bombay Natural History Society's 
Mammal Survey. The species have all been named, reports written 
on them, and series selected for registration and distribution. Much 
voluntary assistance has also been given by Miss G. M. Hayman in 
cleaning skulls ; and this help has been of particular value owing 
to the depletion of the ordinary staff. The services of Dr. Knud 
Andersen have been continued for the preparation of the second 
volume of the Catalogue of Bats. 

The fourth volume of the Catalogue of Ungulates, by R. 
Lydekker, was published in 1915, and the greater portion of the 
fifth had been prepared before his death in April. 

Osteological Room. — The arrangement of the skeleton collection 
has made progress. A cabinet for the bones of large Ungulates has 
been added, but the storage of the Equida3 is still in an unsatisfactory 
state. 

A number of new skeletons of British Birds have been prepared, 
to replace old and imperfect specimens. A new Cabinet for Birds' 
skeletons has been added. 

A new sand-pit of large size has been constructed, and will be 
specially useful for preparing the skeletons of Whales. 

AVES. 

The remounting of specimens in the General Gallery has made 
considerable progress, and the families Phytotomidse, Pittidse, Phile- 
pittidfe, Xenicidse, Hirundinidse, Muscicapidas, (kmpophagidse, and 
Timeliidfe have been completed, with distribution-maps, labels, &c. 
Among the more noteworthy additions to the Gallery may be men- 
tioned two examples of Darwin's Rhea (Rhea dandni) and a model 
of the Dodo {Didus ineptus) presented by the Trustees of the late 
James Rowland Ward. 



68 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

In the Bird Room the Bustards and Cranes have been arranged 
in new cabinets. A large portion o£ the Passeres have been finally 
arranged and spaced out. Printed labels of the contents have 
been prepared for the drawers and the outsides of each cabinet. The 
exact position of each species has been entered in the special 
Reference Catalogue. 

The Report on the Collections of Birds formed by the British 
Ornithologists' Union Expedition and the Wollaston Expedition to 
Dutch New Guinea, 1909 — 1913, has been completed and published 
in ''The Ibis" Jubilee Supplement No. 2. The collection contained 
3,395 skins of 312 species, of which 25 proved to be new to science 
and 39 new to the collection, while there were also eggs of 15 
species not previously represented. A complete account of the 
Scientific results of the Expeditions will shortly appear in two quarto 
volumes of about 1,200 pages, illustrated by 2 maps and 38 plates. 

Register numbers have been put on 15,151 eggs of the Seebohm 
Collection and 2,681 eggs of the Radcliffe Saunders Collection. 

Mr. D. A. Bannerman has completed his series of Reports on the 
Collections of the late Mr, Boyd Alexander from Annabon, Cameroon 
Peak and the Manenguba Mountains. 

Mr. Claude H. B. Grant has continued his work on the Collec- 
tion formed by Capt. Gordon P. Cosens in East Africa. 

Help in labelling and preparing specimens for incorporation was 
also received from Mr. Arthur Denman, Mr. Lewis and Mr. Roy 
Sheppard, who kindly gave up a good deal of their leisure time for 
this purpose. 

Mr. Court Treatt is still absent at the front on Military Service. 

The more notable presents were the following : — 
From the Bombay Natural History Society the types of three 
new species. From Messrs, C. B. Kloss and H. C. Robinson a 
collection of Siamese Birds, including the types of two new species. 
From Mr. W. J, F. Williamson a collection of birds from Siam, 
including the types of two new sub-species. From Mr, A. L. Butler a 
large and very valuable collection from the Sudan, including species 
new to the British Museum Collection. From the Trustees of the 
the late James Rowland Ward, two magnificent mounted specimens 
of Darwin's Rhea ; a fine model of the Dodo and other mounted 
specimens for the Exhibition Gallery. 

Among the more important purchases are : — 

The remaining portion of the unique West Indian Collection 
formed by Dr. Percy R, Lowe, 

During the year the collection has been regularly consulted by 
a large number of visitors ; systematic work has been done on 
various groups by Mr, W, L, Sclater, Mr, E. C, Stuart Baker, Mr. 
C. H. B. Grant, Mr. D. A, Bannerman, Mr, G, M, Mathews, Mr. T. 
Iredale, Dr. P, R. Lowe, Mr, H. F, Witherby, Lord Rothschild, F.R.S., 
Dr, E. Hartert, Rev. F. C. R. Jourdain, Dr. H. Langton, the 
Marquess of Tavistock, Miss A, Jackson, Col, R. G. Ward law- 
Ramsay, Dr, C, B. Ticehurst, Rev. J. Waterston, Mr. L. Harrison, 



I 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 69 

Prof. W. Bateson, F.R.S., Mr. C. F. M. Swynnerton, and Dr.V. G. L. 
van Someren. 

The following artists engaged in preparing drawings for forth- 
coming books have also made regular use of the collection : — Mr. H. 
Gronvold, Mr. G. E. Lodge, Mr. Archibald Thorburn, Mr. R. Green, 
Mr. H. Goodchild, Miss Medland, Major H. Jones. 

Domesticated Animals. 

The skeleton of the famous race-horse, " St. Simon," alluded to 
in the last Return, has been re-articulated. 

The additions to this series include the following : — 

A remarkable Donkey, perhaps a Zebra- Ass Hybrid, from the 
Gold Coast Colony, presented by Capt. C. H. Armitage, C.M.G. A 
Cross-bred Karakul x Scotch Blackface Sheep, presented by the 
Governors of the Edinburgh and East of Scotland College of Agri- 
culture. A Great Dane Dog, presented by the Rowland Ward 
Trustees, and a Blue Pug, presented by Miss Grace Bellamy. 

A hybrid Greenfinch x Canary, presented by Fred Archer, Esq. 

Pisces. 

Exliihilion Galleries. — In the Fish Gallery several of the old 
exhibits have been remodelled, or restuffed and repainted ; nearly 
all the fishes of the families Scombridoe and Carangidae have been 
treated in this w^ay. Some new exhibits have also been added and 
amongst these attention may be drawn to casts of a Rainbow Trout 
\Salmo irideus) and a Brown Trout (Salmo trutta) made from fishes 
presented by P. 0. Boase, Esq. 

In the British Saloon the exhibition of British Freshwater Fishes 
has been reorganised ; nearly all the specimens formerly exhibited 
have been discarded and they have been replaced by new acquisi- 
tions, most of which have been cast or mounted in the museum. 
The exhibition is now practically completed and includes a series 
illustrating the various stages in the life-history of the Salmon. 
There are also some fine examples of other freshwater fishes, 
including a Bream (Abramis brania) from the River Wensum ; a 
Crucian Carp (^Carassius carassius) from Cheshunt, presented by J. 
Andrews, Esq. ; a Roach (Rutilus rutilus) from Hornsea Mere, pre- 
sented by E. Kempsey Esq. ; a hybrid Roach and Rudd (Rutilus 
rutilus X Scardinius erf/throphthalmus) from Doncaster, presented by 
W. E. Park, Esq. ; and a Perch (Perca fluviatilis) from Newbury, 
and a Tench (Tinea tinea) from Buckinghamshire, presented by 
A. P. Zerfass, Esq. Artistic models of a Gudgeon (Gohio gobio), a 
Stickleback (Gastrosteus aculeatus) and male and female Minnows 
(Phoxinus phoxinus) have been made and presented by F. Page, 
Esq., and a series of enlarged photographs of Scales, presented by 
J. A. Milne, Esq., have been added to this exhibition. 

Study Series. — All the accessions have been incorporated, and 
the work of replenishment with spirit has been continued ; but it is 



70 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

more than ever urgent that some steps should be taken to relieve the 
congestion in the Spirit Building. A considerable amount of time 
has been given to the determination o£ the larval and post-larval 
fishes of the " Terra Nova " Collection, and a report on them has 
been prepared. 

TUNICATA. 

The specimens collected by the " Terra Nova " have been put in 
order, and arrangements have been made for having them investi- 
gated. 

MOLLUSCA. 

The roof of the Shell Gallery was repainted during the spring. 

In the exhibited series additions have been made to the Sikes 
Collection of British Land and Freshwater Shells, mainly from 
further series presented by Mr. Sikes. Mr. G. K. Gude has con- 
tinued the renaming and re-arrangement of the Helicidse. The 
specimens representing several groups (e.g. the Sepiidse, Eglisia^ 
Mesalia and 2\irritelopsis) have been re-arranged and relabelled, 
and an account of the latter genera published. 

A considerable number of the jars and bottles containing spirit 
specimens have been refilled. 

The study of the shells of the Prosobranchia, Scaphopoda, and 
Lamellibranchia obtained by the British Antarctic (" Terra Nova ") 
Expedition has been completed and the Report published. 

The Nudibranchia and Cephalopoda obtained by the same 
expedition have been investigated and reports on the collections are 
being prepared. The Reports upon the Lamellibranchia (anatomy) 
and Gastropoda Streptoneura (anatomy) commenced in 1914 have 
been temporarily stopped. 

Several collections have been worked out and reported upon, 
e.g. from Borneo, the Philippines, E. Africa and the Sudan. The 
extension of the range of the American Slipper Limpet (Crepidvla 
fornicata) in English coastal waters has been further studied and a 
paper published upon its extension up the East Coast. A Gastropod 
commensal with a Crinoid and exhibiting remarkable pigmentation 
has been examined and reported upon. A selection has been made 
and specimens mounted from a large series of Buliminus and 
Petrceiis presented by J. H. Ponsonby, Esq. During the year 
seventy-four microscopical preparations illustrating Molluscan 
anatomy have been made and added to the collection. These are 
mainly representative of Antarctic Nudibranchia. Mr. W. Denison 
Roebuck having kindly volunteered to furnish the Museum with 
examples of new or rare varieties of British Slugs, experiments 
have been made with a view to securing a satisfactory preservation 
of the colour and shape of these animals. 

Lieut.-Col. H. H. Godwin-Austen, F.R.S., has continued the 
preparation and arrangement of the Blanford and Godwin-Austen 
collections of Indian land and freshwater Mollusca. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 71 

The thanks oE the Trustees are again due to Mr. E. A. Smithy 
I.S.O., formerly Assistant Keeper in the Department of Zoology, 
who has continued to lend valuable assistance to the Department. 

Brachiopoda. 
The collection of Brachiopoda obtained by the " Terra Nova " 
Expedition is being studied by J. W. Jackson, Esq. Owing to 
service in connection with the war the work can only be proceeded 
with at intervals. 

Myriopoda and Arachnida. 

Systematic work on parasitic Acari was continued during the 
year, and several reports on these Arachnids were published, includ- 
ing a description of a new species found on the domestic fowl and 
the first detailed description of the Akamushi Mite, carrier of the 
Kedani or River-Fever of Japan. Of the Koch Collection, 6,913 
specimens were registered and a considerable portion arranged and 
labelled. All other accessions received have been incorporated into 
the general collection. 

Crustacea and Pycnogonida. 

A large specimen of the Common Lobster has been added to the 
Exhibited series. 

The registration of the spirit specimens in the Norman collec- 
tion has been completed, a total of 49,284 specimens having been 
registered during the past three years. The registration of the 
collection of microscopic slides has been begun, and 1,673 slides 
have been entered during the year. The other collections alluded 
to in last year's Return remain untouched. 

A Report on the " Terra Nova " collection of Pycnogonida has 
been published, and the collection itself has been registered and 
incorporated. In connection therewith many determinations of 
Pycnogonida have been revised and the whole collection re-arranged. 

A large number of bottles of plankton collected by the " Terra 
Nova " have been searched through and the Crustacea of various 
orders contained in them have been sorted out. 

The doors of the cupboards containing the spirit collection are 
being re-fitted and made dust-proof. 

ECHINODERMA. 

Great difficulty has been experienced in finding accommodation 
for specimens preserved in spirit, and the further orderly arrange- 
ment of species cannot be completely carried out. Most of the 
specimens obtained during the year have been determined and all 
have been incorporated. 

The arrangement of microscopic slides in suitable cabinets has 
been completed, and an index-catalogue to them is in course of 
preparation ; this remark also applies to the Prototracheata, to the 
Polychseta and their allies, as well as to the Anthozoa. 



72 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The revision o£ the MS. Catalogue of Asteroidea has been com- 
pleted and progress has been made with that of the Echinoidea. 

Worms. 

A few specimens obtained during the year have been named and 
incorporated. The " Terra Nova " collection of Myzostomida has 
been worked out by Dr. C. L. Boulenger, and a report on them is 
in preparation. 

The collections of Nemertinea, both in spirit and mounted as 
slide-preparations, have been re-arranged, the former being re- 
spirited. The classification and nomenclature have been largely 
brought up to date, and a MS. list has been drawn up. There 
remain, however, many unnamed specimens. 

The numerous additions to the Helminthological collections 
have been accommodated, as far as possible, in the cases in the 
spirit building, with the usual difficulties owing to the congested 
condition that prevails there. Many useful additions have been 
made to the slide-collection of parasitic worms. 

POLYZOA. 

The " Discovery " collection (partly worked out by Mr. H. W. 
Burrows) and the " Terra Nova " collection have been entrusted to 
the Hon. Mary E. Palk to describe, and this work is now well in 
progress. 

Anthozoa. 

Before the shortage of attendants became acute the Ccral 
Gallery was completely cleaned. Owing to the large quantity of 
glass almost incessant attention is required in this part of the 
collection. 

Hydrozoa. 

Captain A. K. Totton, who is in charge of this group, has been 
on active service since the beginning of the war. 

127 specimens of Hydroida acquired previously to 1915 have 
been registered and incorporated. 

PoRiFERA (Sponges). 

The whole spirit-collection of sponges has been re-spirited. To 
prevent evaporation the method of sealing each bottle with a mix- 
ture of vaseline and beeswax has been adopted. 

The working out of the sponges collected by the " Terra Nova " 
in the Antarctic region has been continued. Those collected by the 
same expedition in the New Zealand area and in localities other 
than Antarctic have been entrusted to Prof. A. Dendy, F.R.S., and 
Mr. R. W. H. Row for description. 

Protozoa. 
The "Terra Nova " collections of Foraminifera, including sea- 
bottom samples likely to contain these organisms, have been entrusted 
to Messrs. E. Heron-Allen and A. Earland to work out. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 73 

2,078 slides o£ Foraminifera o£ the Norman collection have 
been registered. 

II. — Duplicates and Exchanges. 

(a) Duplicates. 

Duplicates have been distributed among museums, scientific 
institutions, &c., as follows : — 

Mammalia. — Albert Institute and Victoria Galleries, Dundee. 

Aves. — Royal Scottish Museum, Edinburgh ; Newbury Museum. 

BatracJda. — Dr. N. Annandale. 

Pisces. — Albert Institute and Victoria Galleries, Dundee ; North 
Staffordshire Field Club Museum, Hanley. 
Mollusca. — Warrington Museum. 

Araclinida. — 

Myriopoda. — 

Crustacea. — VPublic Museum, Weston Park, Sheffield. 

Pycnogonida. — ' 

Choetopoda. — 

Parasitic Worms. — Public Museum, Weston Park, Sheffield ; Dr. 
R. T. Leiper. 

Echinoderma. — Albert Institute and Victoria Galleries, Dundee. 
Ccelenterata. — "(Albert Institute and Victoria Galleries, Dundee ; 
Porifera. — /Public Museum, Weston Park, Sheffield. 

(b) Exchanges. 

Exchanges have been made with the following institutions and 
individuals : — 

Aves. — With the University Museum, Oxford ; Tring Museum ; 
and Colonel Stephenson R. Clarke. 

Reptilia. — |With Dr. T. Barbour, Museum of Comparative 

Batrachia. — J Zoology, Cambridge, Mass. 

Pisces.— ^'ith Prof. J. P. Hill, F.R.S. ; Prof. D. Vinciguerra ; 
and Prof. Max Weber. 

Cestoda. — With Dr. 0. Fuhrmann. 

III. — Departmental Library. 

The acquisitions of the Library of the Departments of Zoology 
and Entomology (including the Walsingham Library) during the 
year, obtained by purchase, presentation and exchange, consist of 
42 separate works and pamphlets in 59 volumes, and 1,228 parts 
of periodicals and works in progress. 

466 volumes, including those belonging to the Walsingham 
Library, have been bound. 

The work of collating, stamping, press-marking and entering all 
additions in the Catalogue has been performed as usual. 



74 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The Attendant in the Library, with the aid and supervision of 
an Assistant, has checked all the entries o£ Zoological works in that 
portion of the General Catalogue of Books which has been printed 
during the year. 

Of the donations the following are worthy of special mention : — 
The Birds of Australia, Vol. IV., parts 2 and 3 ; Vol. V., part 1 ; 
presented by G. M. Matthews, Esq. 

Manuscript Catalogue of the specimens in the Zoological Society's 
Museum : — Mammalia Catalogue, 5 vols. ; Osteological Catalogue, 
1 Vol. ; 65 Manuscript Reports of the Curator of the Society's 
Museum, Dec. 21st, 1836, to Jan. 1st, 1840 ; Manuscript Catalogue 
of Skulls, 1 Vol. ; presented hy the Zoological Society of London. 

The most important addition by purchase during the year, was 
made possible through the generosity of Mr. Alexander Reynell, 
who allowed the Library to acquire his splendid copies of the first 
and second issues of Swainson's Exotic Conchology. 

IV. — Puhlications. 

In addition to the Official Catalogues and other volumes pub- 
lished by the Trustees {see pp. 60-62), various reports and descriptive 
paper? have been prepared in connection with the different branches 
of the collection, and have been published for the most part in 
scientific journals. 

V. — A cquisitions* 

Mammalia. 

The total number of Mammals added during 1915 was 2,072, 
of which 1,936 were donations, 134 were purchases, and 2 were 
received in exchange. 

Special attention should be drawn to the Mammalia presented 
by the Bombay Natural History Society in further continuance of 
their Mammal Survey of the Indian Empire. The set presented, 
which form a first and liberal selection from the much larger num^ber 
collected, amounted in 1915 to 1,190 specimens, more than half of 
the whole Mammal accessions of the year, and includes 40 types of 
new species, besides fine series of many rare and little known forms 
which had not previously been obtained since modern methods of 
collection and study came into operation. The most notable series 
included were 2&& from Ceylon, collected by Major E. W. Mayor ; 
250 from the Chindwin River, Upper Burma (G. C. Shortridge 
and S. A. Macmillan) ; 238 from Sikkim and 161 from Behar and 
Orissa (C. A. Crump) ; and 128 from Sind (S. H. Prater). 

All the British collectors mentioned have now gone to the front, 
but the Society is still making an effort to carry on the Survey by 
the help of native workers. The Society also undertakes the 
expense of publishing in its Journal a full account of the collections 
made during the Survey. 

*A table showing the number of specimens added during the year is given on 
page 82. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 75 

The following Mammals have been presented by the Trustees 
tinder the Will of the late Mr. J. Rowland Ward : — Chinese 
Leopard (Felis fontanieri) from Manchuria, Siberian Wolf (Canis 
lupus) from the Upper Yenisei, a Walrus (Odvhenus rosmarus) from 
Hudson's Bay, a Somali Rhinoceros (Rhinoceros hicornis somaliensis) 
and a few smaller Mammals. 

Several of the more interesting animals that have died in the 
Gardens of the Zoological Society, notably the types of Mungotictis 
svhstriatus and G-alididis eximius, Pocock, and a young Elephant 
Seal have been presented by the Council of the Zoological Society. 

Europe. 

Harvest Mice (Micromr/s minutus) and House Mice (^Mus 
musculus) from the trenches at the front in Northern France ; 
presented hy Capt. G. C. Sliortridge, Indian Army. 

A series of small Mammalia from the neighbourhood of the 
trenches, including examples of five species of Shrews ; presented 
hy Capt. Philip Gosse, R.A.M.C. 

88 small Mammals from the Islands off the Coast of Scotland, 
including the types of four new forms described by Mr. Hinton ; 
presented hy W. R. Ogilvie- Grant, Esq. 

A Cuvier's whale (ZipJdus oavirostris) stranded at Bannow Bay, 
Co. Wexford ; presented hy the Board of Trade. 

Jaws and other parts of Cetacea stranded on the British Coasts 
during 1915 ; presented hy the Board of Trade. 

Asia. 

1,190 Mammals collected during the Society's Mammal Survey 
of India, including series from Ceylon, Upper Burma, Sikkim, Behar 
and Orissa, Sind and elsewhere, with forty types of new species and 
subspecies ; presented hy tlie Bomhay Natural History Society. 

225 Mammals from S.E. Siam, including the types of twenty- 
five new species and subspecies ; presented hy C. Boderi Kloss, Esq. 

29 Mammals from Siam ; presented hy K. G. Gairdner, Esq. 

8 Mammals from E. Burma, collected by F. Kingdon Ward, 
and 43 from Lake Baikal, collected by G. A. Burney ; p)resented 
hy Oldtield Tliomas, Esq., F.R.S. 

5 Mammals from Tibet ; presented hy Major F. M. Bailey. 

Africa. 

90 Mammals from the Sudan, collected by Willoughby P. Lowe, 
including the types of three new species ; presented hy Ahel Chap- 
man, Esq. 

An embryo of the Dwarf Congo Buffalo, Bos (Buhalus) nanus, 
from the Belgian Congo ; p)resented hy Br. C. Christy. 

A skull (human) of " Unzimkulu," South Africa ; presented hy 
Miss W. Hoskyns Ahrahall. 

America, South. 

32 Mammals from Ecuador, including the type of a new 
genus and species of Bat (Corvira hidens) ; presented hy Walter 
Goodfellow, Esq. 



76 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

98 Mammals from Ecuador collected by G. Hammond, and 6 
from Bogota collected by M. Gonsalez ; presented hy Oldfield 7'homas, 
Esq., F.R.S. 

A skeleton and two skulls (human) from Port San Julian, 
Santa Cruz, Patagonia ; presented hy A. M. E. M. Foamier, through 
Miss E. A. Warne. 

Australasia. 

16 specimens of the genus Nyctophilus, including the type of 
JV. bifax ; presented by the Australian Museum., Sydney. 

13 small Mammals, including the types of Pteropus basiliscus 
and P. vulcanius from Dampier and Vulcan Is., New Guinea, 
collected by A. S. Meek ; presented by Oldfield Thomas, Esq., 
F.R.S. 

115 Mammals from Cape York, N. Queensland, collected by 
Robin Kemp ; purchased. 

Antarctica. 

Foetus of a Common Rorqual (^Bala^noptera physalus) ; head 
and paddles of a larger foetus (16^ feet) of the same species ; 
paddles and scapulse, and a strip of developing baleen of a foetal 
Sibbald's Rorqual {B. musculus), all from the South Shetlands ; 
presented by Dr. J. Hjort, Fiskeridireldor, Norway. 

AVES. 

The acquisitions number 6,072. Of these the most noteworthy 
are as follows : — 

Europe. 

35 Birds from Devonshire ; presented by Willoughby P. Lowe, 
Esq. 

22 Birds from Iceland ; collected by Mr. G. B. Dinesen ; 
purchased. 

Skeletons of various British Birds ; presented respectively by the 
Marchioness of Breadalbane, Miss D. M. A. Bate, Dr. Percy R. 
Lowe, William Brice, Esq., and W. R. Ogilvie- Grant, Esq. 

Asia. 

4 Birds from India, Burma, and Tibet, including the type- 
specimens of Tragopan molesworthi, Ithagenes tibetanus and La'iscopus 
nipalensis whymperi ; presented by the Bombay Natural History 
Society. 

Skeleton of an Open-bill Stork, Anastomus oscitans, from India ; 
presented by the Zoological Society of London. 

152 Birds from S.E. Siam, including the type-specimens of 
P yrotrogon klossi and Myiophoneus klossi ; presented by C. Boden Kloss 
and H. C. Robinson, Esqs. 

255 Birds from Siam, including the type-specimens of Mirafra 
williamsoni and AI. marionce ; collected and presented by W. J. F. 
Williamson, Esq. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 77 

48 Birds from Baluchistan ; presented hy Capt. F. E. W. Venning. 
38 Birds from Siam ; presented hy K. G. Gairdner, Esq. 
15 Bustards, Cranes and Geese from Chin-Wang-tao, N. China ; 
presented by J. D. La Toucke, Esq. 

Africa. 

2,357 Birds from the Sudan ; collected and presented hy A. L. 
Butler, Esq. 

57 Birds from Egypt ; collected by the late Capt. J. B. Jen- 
kinson. Rifle Brigade ; presented hy Mrs. Jenkinson. 

6 Birds from the Gold Coast, mounted for the public gallery ; 
presented hy the Trustees of the late James Rowland Ward. 

A Restoration of the Dodo (Didiis ineptus) ; presented hy the 
Trustees of the late James Roioland Ward. 

America, North. 

40 Birds from North Carolina ; presented hy the Hon. G. 
Charter is. 

America, Central and South. 

2 mounted examples of Rhea darwini from Patagonia ; 
presented hy the Trustees of the late James Rowland Ward. 

367 Birds from the neighbourhood of Merida, Venezuela ; 
purchased. 

1,211 Birds, chiefly from the West Indies, including the type- 
specimens of Euethia johnstonei and Coereha laurce ; collected by 
Dr. Percy R. Lowe ; purchased. 

Australasia. 

The type-specimen of Trichoglossus brooki from Pulo Swangi, 
South of Tarangan Island, Aru Islands ; presented hy E. J. Brook, 
Esq. 

45 Birds from Dampier and Vulcan Islands, Northern New 
Guinea ; purchased. 

Antarctica. 

2 nestling specimens of Macronectes gigantea from the South 
Orkney Islands ; presented hy Vere Pack, Esq. 

Reptilia. 

281 specimens were received ; 270 by presentation, 3 by 
purchase, 8 by exchange. 

The following are the most important additions : — 

44 specimens from Asia Minor ; jwesented hy M. Henri Gadeau 
de Kerville. 

24 snakes from Ceylon ; j^resented hy A. F. Ahercromhy, Esq. 

23 specimens from Siam ; presented hy Dr. Malcolm Smith 
and C. Boden Kloss, Esq. 

13 specimens from Siam, including a Sea-snake (Distira 
tuherculata) new to the collection ; presented hy Dr. Malcolm Smith. 



78 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

38 specimens from Sumatra, including types of two new Lizards 
(Japalura robinsoni and Gonyocephalus klossi) ; from the Robinson- 
Kloss Expedition to Korinchi Peak. 

15 specimens from Mount Chirinda and the Chirinda Forest, 
Mashonaland ; presented bij C. F. M. Swynnertoii, Esq. 

Examples of three Lizards {Anolis maynardi, A. luteosignifer, 
and A. argillaceus), new to the collection, from the West Indies ; 
received in exchange from the Museum of Comparative Zoology, 
Cambridge, Mass. 

44 specimens from Southern Colombia, including types of a 
new AmpJdshama (A. spurrelli), and a new Snake (Herpetodryas 
vicinus^ ; presented by l)r. H. G. F. Spurrell. 

A new Lizard {Lygosoma scliarfi), from Queensland ; presented 
by Dr. R. F. ScJiarf. 

Batrachia. 

323 specimens were received, 169 by presentation, 20 by 
purchase, 134 by exchange. 

The following may be specially noticed : — 

22 specimens from Asia Minor ; presented by M. IJenri Gadeau 
de Kerville. 

125 specimens of different tadpoles from India and Burma ; 
received in exchange from the Indian Museum, Calcutta. 

17 specimens from Siam ; presented by JJr. Malcolm Smith and 
C. Boden Kloss, Esq. 

32 specimens from Sumatra, including types of three new 
species (Rhacophorus modestus, R. paciloyiotus^ Ijcalus cornutus) ; 
from the Robinson-Kloss Expedition to Korinchi Peak. 

The types of two new Frogs (Rappia chlorostea and R. aylmeri), 
from Sierra Leone ; presented by the Zoological Society of London. 

Frogs (^Syrrhopus campi, from Texas, and Hylodes dimidiatus, 
from Cuba), new to the collection ; received in exchange from the 
Museum of Com])arative Zoology, Cambridge, Mass. 

A Frog (Hylodes cuneatus\ new to the collection, and types of 
a new Frog (Geobatrachus walkeri), from Northern Colombia ; 
preserited by Prof. A. G. Ruthven. 

76 specimens from Southern Colombia ; p)resented by Dr. 11. 
G. F. Spurrell. 

The types of a new Frog {Hyla angiana), from the Arfak 
Mountains, New Guinea ; presented by A. E. Pratt, Esq. 

Pisces. 

The additions number 645. 578 were presented, 56 were 
purchased and 11 were received in exchange. The most important 
are : — 

Europe. 

A large Roach (Rutilus rutilus), from Hornsea Mere ; presented 
by E. Kemjysey, Esq. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 79 

A large Perch {Perca Jluviatilis), from Newbury, and a Tench 
(^Tinca tinea), from Buckinghamshire ; presented hy A. P. Zerfass, 
Esq, 

A very fine hybrid Roach and Rudd (^Rutilus rutilus x Scardinius 
erytlirophthalnv! s) from Doncaster ; presented hy W. E. Park, Esq. 

A large Crucian Carp (Carassius carassius) from Cheshunt ; 
presented by J. Andrews, Esq. 

A large Bream (Abramis brama) from the River Wensum ; 
purchased. 

A Pelamid (Pelamys sarda) from Devon ; presented by G. Todd, 
Esq. 

Asia. 

19 fishes from Sumatra ; from the Robinson-Kloss Expedition 
to Korinchi Peak. 

17 fishes from Siam ; presented by C. L. Groundwater, Esq. 

Africa. 

12 fishes from the Red Sea, including the types of a new Eel 
(^Neenchelys microtretus) and a new Pipe-fish (^Halicampus macro- 
rhynchus) and examples of other species new to the collection ; 
presented by Dr. C. Grassland and Prof. W. ^{. [Jerdman F.R.S. 

33 fishes from the coast of Natal, including the types of two 
new species (JdoplegnatJius robinsoni and Pseudochromis natalensis) ; 
presented by Romer Robinson, Esq. 

175 fishes from Sierra Leone and Cameroon, including the types 
of several new species ; presented by N. W. Thomas, Esq. 

193 fishes from British East Africa ; presented by Lieutenant S. 
L. Hinde. 

20 fishes from Zululand, including the types of a new species 
(^Barbus toppini) ; presented by E. C. Ghubb, Esq. 

30 fishes from Angola, collected by the late Dr. W. J. Ansorge ; 
purchased. 

A large mounted Characinid Fish (^Hydrocyon lineatus) from the 

Zambesi ; presented by Lady Seton-Karr. 

• 
America. 

An Ouananiche (Salmo salar ouananiche) from the Saguenay 
River ; purchased. 

An Ouananiche (Salmo salar ouananiche) from Lake St. John ; 
presented by G. J. Disbarats, Esq. 

16 fishes from Manaos, including 2 Cat-fishes (Doras lithogaster 
and Piramutana piramuta) new to the collection ; presented by 
Dr. A. Aiken Clark. 

Hemichordata. 

A specimen of Cephalodiscus gilchristi from South Africa, pre- 
sented by Dr. J. D. F. Gilchrist, is noteworthy for showing a massive 
base of attachment. 



80 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

MOLLUSCA. 

The total number of acquisitions received and registered during 
the year is 2,467. 0£ these 532 were "Terra Nova" specimens, 
1,761 were presented by other donors and 174 were purchased. 

Attention is directed to the following noteworthy accessions : — 

The type and 16 other complete specimens of Katayama 
(Blanfordia) nosophora from Japan ; presented hy Lieut.- Col. R. T. 
Leiper, M.B. (This Mollusc is suspected in connection .with the 
transmission of Schistosomiasis = Bilharziosis). 

59 exotic Gastropoda and Lamellibranchia from abyssal depths 
in the E. Atlantic ; presented by the Irish Fishery Board. 

643 shells of Palsearctic Buliminoids ; presented hy John H. 
Po7isonhy, -Esq. 

337 freshwater Gastropoda and Lamellibranchia, presumed to 
be intermediate hosts of Trematodes, from the White Nile ; presented 
hy the Director of the Wellcome Tropical Research Bureau, Khartoum. 

2 valves of Tridacna gigas weighing 250 and 233 pounds 
respectively ; presented hy Mrs. G. W. Young. 

42 shells of brackish-water Gastropoda and Lamellibranchia 
from Lake Chilka, Orissa ; purchased. 

Arachnida. 

The accessions number 621, of which the following should be 
mentioned : — 

350 Arachnida from various localities, including the type of 
a new species of Tick (Ixodes nairobiensis) ; presented hy the 
Imperial Bureau of Entomology. 

10 parasitic Mites, including co-types of two new species, from 
India ; presented hy the Trustees of the India?! Museum, Calcutta. 

20 specimens of a new parasitic mite (Laelaps nuttalli) found 
on rats at Colombo ; presented hy Dr. L. F. Hirst. 

The type of a new Scorpion (Charmus indicus) ; presented hy T. 
Bainhrigge Fletcher, Esq. 

The type of a new Pedipalp (Stygophrynus moultoni) from 
Sarawak ; presented hy J. C. Moulton, Esq. 

Crustacea. 

The accessions number 208, of which the following are the most 
important : — 

Syntypes of a recently described species of Copepod from 
Epping Forest ; j^resented hy D. J. Scourfield, Esq. 

A large specimen of the common Lobster from Selsey ; presented 
hy E. Heron- Allen, Esq. . , : 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 81 

16 specimens o£ rare deep-sea Decapods from Irish waters ; 
presented by the Department of Agriculture for Ireland. 

Syntypes of two species of Isopoda from Cape Town ; presented 
by K. H. Barnard, Esq. 

90 specimens of Copepoda, including syntypes of one recently- 
described species, from Durban ; presented by E, C. Chubb, Esq. 

10 specimens of a Copepod parasite (Pennella exoceti) oi a 
Flying-fish from Barbadoes ; presented by the Imperial Bureau of 
Entomology . 

Specimens of a Copepod ( Cancrincola jamaicensis) parasitic on a 
land-crab, from Jamaica ; presented by Br. C. B. Wilson. 

Pycnogonida. 

From the " Terra Nova " collection 303 specimens have been 
registered, including holotypes of eleven new species. 

23 specimens from South Georgia, obtained by the late Major 
O. E. H. Barrett-Hamilton's Expedition, were presented by the 
British Association and the Zoological Society of London^ 

ECHINODERMA. 

62 specimens from the "Terra Nova" collection have been 
registered, in addition to those reported last year. 

Worms. 

79 Nemertines collected by the "Terra Nova" Expedition, 
including the types of two new species, were received during the 
year. 

The total number of parasitic worms registered and incorporated 
was 340. The following are the most important accessions : — 

39 Cestodes, representing 13 species, and including 26 co-types, 
from animals dying in the Zoological Society's Gardens, Regent's 
Park ; presented by the Zoological Society of London. 

48 Nematodes, representing 7 species, of which several are new, 
from the Indian Elephant ; presented by Major Clayton Lane, 
M.D., I.M.S. 

Numerous Nematodes, including the types of about a dozen new 
species, from various Indian animals ; presented by Major Clayton 
Lane, M.D., I.M.S. 

25 specimens of a new and interesting Trematode (^Heter orchis 
crumeiiifer) parasitic in Protopterus, from Lake Victoria ; presented 
hy the hnpenal Bureau of Entomology. 

POLYZOA. 

Mr. A. W. Waters has presented 12 specimens, including 3 
•co-types from various localities, chiefly from British East Africa. 



82 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Summary of the Acquisitions in the Department of Zoology 
durinq 1915. 





Donations. 


Purchases. 


Exchange. 


Totals. 




/General Collection 


1,936 


134 


2 


2,072 


Osteological Collection : — 










Mammalian Anthropology 


3 


— 


— 


3 


Cetacea 


14 


. — 


— 


14 


V Other Mammals 


6 


1 


— 


7 


/Skins 


3,685 


2,259 


53 


5,997 


AvPR J Eggs 

^^^^ ] Nests 


73 
2 


— 


— 


73 
2 


.Skeletons 


17 


_ 





17 


Domesticated Animals 


6 





— 


6 


Keptilia 


270 


3 


8 


281 


Batrachia 


169 


20 


134 


323 


Pisces 


578 


56 


11 


645 


Tunicata 


1 





— 


1 


Hemichordata and Phoronidea 


2 


— 


— 


2 


T.ir 11 ("Terra Nova" collection ... 
^""'"'^^ ] Other sources 


532 

1,761 


174 


=1 


2.467 


Myriopoda 


16 


— 




16 


Prototracheata 








— 


— 


Arachnida 


577 


44 


— 


621 


Crustacea 


208 








208 


P,c„„g„„ida|o^-J-; «»"-"- 


303 
23 


— 


=} 


326 


Echinoderma 


63 







63 


Chaetopoda, &c. 


81 


— 


— 


81 


"Worms ■ Parasitic Worms, &c 


340 





— 1 


41'J 


"Terra Nova" Nemertinea ... 


79 


— 


Brachiopoda 


16 


6 


— 


22 


Polyzoa ... 


18 


— 


1 


19 


\.nthozoa 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Hydrozoa 


2 


— 


— 


2 


Porifera 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Protozoa 


2 


— 


— 


2 


Totals 


10,783 


2,697 


209 


13,689 



VI. — Economic Zoology. 

I. Information relating to various matters connected with 
War has been given to Government Departments. 



the 



II. Mammalia. 

The question of Whaling in Southern waters has received a 
considerable amount of attention, particularly with regard to the 
rate of destruction of the Whales. Several communications on this 
subject have passed between the Colonial Office and the Trustees. 



III. AVES. 

A number of questions relating to the protection of Birds in 
British Colonies and Protectorates have been referred to the Trustees 
by the Colonial Office, and have been duly dealt with. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 83 

IV. Pisces. 

All work connected with the conservation and arrangement o£ 
the collection of Fishes may be regarded as of potential economic 
importance. 

Several investigators engaged in work on economic problems 
have made use of the collection and have received assistance in their 
work ; among these may be mentioned Mr. G. W. Paget, of the 
Board of Agriculture and Fisheries, working on Herrings ; Dr. 
H. M. Kyle, working on Flat fishes ; and Dr. Mottram and Dr. 
Hammond-Smith, investigating the life-histories of Salmon and Trout. 

A Report has been published on the Fishes trawled off Lagos by 
the Western Fisheries, Ltd., whose interest in the fishes of this 
region was commercial. 

Among the enquiries answered and specimens determined may 
be mentioned : 

Strips of skins of various sharks, used for covering sword- 
handles, were identified and their probable place of origin indicated. 

Tins of Californian Sardines were examined and the specific 
name of the fishes contained therein was determined. 

An enquiry from the Metropolitan Asylums Board as to the 
specific name, food-value, &c., of fishes supplied to them under a 
contract was answered. 

An enquiry from the Colonial Office as to poisonous fishes of the 
West Indies was made the subject of a report. 

V. MOLLUSCA. 

Information has been given to the Military Medical Commission 
working upon the transmission of BiUiarzia in Egypt. 

Sundry fresh-water Lamellibranchia and Gastropoda suspected 
of being the intermediate hosts of Trematodes have been identified 
for the Wellcome Bureau, Khartoum. A Succinea suspected of 
causing " itch " in bathing tanks (Tehran) and a Corhicula infesting 
water-supply (Egypt) have been reported upon, and advice and 
information concerning the identity, habits and reproduction of 
wood-boring Lamellibranchia (Teredo and Xylotrya) have been 
given. 

VI. Arachnida. 

The following injurious Arachnida were examined and reported 
upon. 

1. A Mite (Leiognatlius mo7'sitans) parasitic on the domestic 
Fowl. 

2. A Mite, the " Harvest Bug " (larval form of MicrotromhkUum 
imsillum), attacking human beings at Ventnor. 

3. The Tsutsugamushi (Mite) — Microtromhidium akamushi — 
carrier of Kedani or River Fever in Japan. 

4. Information given to the Military Authorities on the life- 
history of the Itch Mite (Sarcoptes scabiei). 



84 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

5. Ticks (Dermacentor reticulatus and Ixodes ricinus) biting 
human beings in Devonshire. 

6. A mite {Rliizoglyphus echinopus), damaging tubers of an 
exotic Aroid (^Sauromatum guttatum). 

VII. Crustacea. 

A report on Copepod parasites of Flying Fish has been supplied 
to the Imperial Bureau of Entomology. 

Information has been given to correspondents relating to the 
invasion of a house at Hastings by Sandhoppers. 

VIII. Parasitic Worms. 

Parasitic worms and other organisms affecting man and 
domestic or other animals of economic importance have been 
determined for the following : — 

The Imperial Bureau of Entomology (for a correspondent in 
Northern Nigeria, and for the Government Economic Biologist in 
British Guiana). 

The Military Hospital, Tooting. In this case the parasite was a 
leech taken from the nasal cavities of a soldier who had been in the 
Gallipoli Peninsula ; advice was given with a view to the prevention 
of such cases. 

Various Entozoa and other worms have been determined for 
private individuals, and information has been given regarding them. 

VII. — Students and Visitors. 

The number of visits paid to the Zoological Department during 
the year 1915 by students and other persons requiring assistance or 
information amounted to 8,020. This number includes the visits 
paid by Students holding tickets entitling them to do special work 
in the Exhibition Galleries. 

In the 10 previous years the numbers were as follows. From 
1905 to 1912 inclusive, the present Department of Entomology was 
included in the Department of Zoology : — 



9,235 in 


the year 1914. 


9,982 


1913. 


12,564 


1912. 


12,175 


1911. 


12,443 


1910. 


11,461 


1909. 


10,220 


1908. 


11,043 


1907. 


10,813 


1906. 


11,811 


1905. 



Sidney F. Harmer. 



department of entomology. 85 

Department of Entomology. 
I. — Arrangement and Conservation. 

Exhibition Series. — The only change to record in the Exhibition 
Series is the addition of a cabinet of specimens illustrating the 
various kinds of flies which serve for food to Trout and Grayling. 
The collection v^^as presented by Mr. Martin S. Mosely and is dis- 
played in a series of small glass cells, accompanied by figures and 
explanatory labels and by a series of artificial flies, as used by 
anglers, for comparison. 

Study Series. — In the Coleoptera, a large series of undetermined 
Australian Rhynchophora and Phytophaga (Eumolpidse) was sent to 
Mr. Arthur Lea for identification, and on their return by him incor- 
porated in the general collection. The important named series of 
Pselaphida3 and Scydmoenidse in the Sharp and Lewis Collections 
have been incorporated, as well as the Japanese Erotylidse and 
Endomychidse, while a considerable part of the general collection of 
Endomychidse has been transferred and re-arranged, the African 
genera worked out and many new species described. The new 
species of Rutelidse from all parts of the Indian Empire have been 
described and numerous types acquired by this means. The Bostri- 
chidse have also been re-arranged. 

In the Hymenoptera, the arrangement of the Apidse has been 
continued, the sub-family Bombinse completed, and much progress 
made with the Andreninas. Mr. Turner, as in former years, has 
continued voluntarily to devote a great deal of his time to working- 
out the collections, especially those formed by himself in Australia 
and Tasmania. Considerable collections of Heterogyna, named by 
specialists, have been received and incorporated, the most important 
being from Australia and S. Africa. The collection has continued 
to benefit very much by the help of specialists, loans of specimens 
having been sent to the Rev. F. D. Morice, Woking, and Mr. S. A. 
Rohwer, Washington (Tenthredinidse) to Prof. T. D. A. Cockerell, 
Colorado, and Dr. Franklin, Massachusetts (Apidse). Mr. Claude 
Morley has completed the revision of the sub-families Ichneumonidae 
and Cryptinse, while Mr. Waterston of the Imperial Bureau of 
Entomology has continued work on the family Chalcididse. 

The collection of Anoplura and Mallophaga continues to grow 
rapidly, several hundreds of microscopic slide preparations having 
been made. The general collection has been removed to slide boxes 
arranged on a system which will allow of a rapid expansion, while 
the historic Denny Collection has been housed in a special slide 
cabinet. A long report is in the Press on a collection of these 
ectoparasites received from animals in the Zoological Gardens. 

In the Orthoptera and Neuroptera a considerable number of 
accessions have been dealt with and many small collections named 
and incorporated. 



S6 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

In the Rhynchota the enumeration and description o£ the large 
collection o£ Homoptera made in the Seychelle Islands by the Percy 
Sladen Trust Expedition have been completed, but owing to the war 
the report has not yet been published. The revision and re-arrange- 
ment o£ the Membracidse has been begun, and large collections o£ 
Homoptera £rom India have been worked out and new species 
described, the types o£ which, as a rule, remain in the British 
Museum. The re-arrangement o£ the important economic £amilies 
o£ Aphidse and OoccidaB has also been commenced. 

In the Lepidoptera the re-arrangement o£ the Moths o£ the sub- 
family Arctianse and the family Agaristidge have been completed ; 
also the sub-family Pyralinse of the Pyralidas. The MS. of Volume 
II. of the Supplement to the Catalogue of Moths has been completed 
and most of the plates drawn, and the preparation of the MS. on the 
sub-family Noctuinse of the Noctuidse nearly completed. 

In the Tineina, the determination and arrangement of unincor- 
porated material has been continued, and the concluding parts of the 
Lepidoptera of the Biologia Centrali-America have been published 
during the year. 

The Henry Doubleday Collections of British and European 
Lepidoptera were transferred without injury from the Bethnal Green 
Museum to the British Museum (Nat. Hist.) on 12th August 1915. 

In the Diptera, the collection made by Mr. A. F. R. Wollaston 
in Dutch New Guinea and numerous and extensive collections of 
mosquitoes from India, Hong Kong, Sarawak, Natal, Sierra Leone, 
and elsewhere have been worked out and incorporated ; a large 
collection of Tabanidse made by Mr. S. A. Neave in Nyassaland, and 
determined by him, has also been incorporated. Prof. M. Bezzi's 
work on Ethiopian Syrphidse has been published and the collections 
belonging to the Imperial Bureau of Entomology with which it deals 
have been presented to the Museum, and incorporated together with 
numerous recent accessions of African Syrphidse. The arrangement 
of the British species of Simulidse and Chironomidse has been com- 
pleted and the results of a study of the adults of the former family 
published. A number of undetermined Empidida3 have been sub- 
mitted to Mr. J. E. Collin, Newmarket, and of Oriental Bombylid?e 
to Mr, E. Brunetti, Calcutta, for identification. 

Several papers dealing with the collection have been published 
during the year. 



Imperial Bureau of Entomology. " 

The Entomological Department has continued to benefit greatly 
by the accession of specimens presented by the Imperial Bureau of 
Entomology. Most of the specimens were already named, or if new, 
described before being presented by it, and in this way the Depart- 
ment secured a considerable number of valuable types. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY. 



87 



II. — Duplicates and Exchanges. 

(a) Duplicates. 

Duplicates have been presented to the following institution : — 
The Public Museum, Sheffield. Duplicates have also been 
presented to the following gentlemen who have rendered service by- 
naming specimens: — Prof. Chr. Aurivillius, Prof. T. D. A. Cockerell, 
Mr. H. J. Franklin, Mr. A. M. Lea, and the Rev. F. D. Morice. 

(b) Exchanges. 

Exchanges have been made with the following museums and 
individuals : — 

Hope Department, University Museum, Oxford ; and with the 
Rev. Dexter Allen, Mr. H. Arnold, Mr. G. T. Bethune Baker, M. 
A. Bourgoin, Mr. E. Brunetti, Dr. R. Hamlyn Harris, M. Pierre 
Lesne, Mr. J. R. Mallock, Mr. Mark Pallis, Lord Rothschild, Dr. 
A. von Schultess, and Mr. C. B. Williams. 

III. — Departmental Library. 

The Library has continued to be worked in conjunction with that 
of the Zoological Department, and particulars in reference to it will 
be found included under the corresponding head, in the return made 
by the Keeper of Zoology. 

IV. — Publications. 

In addition to the official publications issued by the Trustees 
(see pp. 60-62), several papers and reports have been prepared in con- 
nection with different branches of the collection and have been 
published in scientific journals. 



V. — A cquisitions. 

The number of specimens added to the Insect Collection during 
the year is 60,282, made up as shown in the following table : — 





Donations. 


Purchases. 


Exchanges. 


Totals. 


Coleoptera 


14,032 


_ 


33 


14,065 


Lepidoptera - 


19,948 


120 


42 


20,110 


Hymenoptera - 


4,938 


— 


45 


4,983 


Diptera - - - - 


6,212 


32 


201 


6,445 


Ehynchota 


2,304 


3,325 


— 


5,629 


Orthoptera 


501 


5,769 


14 


6,284 


Neuroptera 


658 


406 


— . 


1,064 


Other Orders - 


649 


10 


16 


675 


Larvte, Pupas, &c. - 


1,027 


— 


— 


1,027 


Totals - 


50,269 


9,662 


351 


60,282 



88 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The most important o£ these accessions are the following, from 
various localities : — 

13,051 specimens of all orders presented by the Imperial Bureau 
of Entomology. 

13,251 Lepidoptera Rhopalocera, including 205 types; presented 
hy F. Du Cane Godman, Esq., D.C.L., F.R.S. 

7,003 Coleoptera ; presented hy George Lewis, Esq. 

1,297 specimens of various orders ; presented hy the Hon. N. C. 
Rothscliild. 

The fifth instalment of the Distant Collection, containing 3,325 
Rhynchota, 1,269 Orthoptera, 406 Neuroptera and Odonata. 

The first instalment of the Burr Collection of Dermaptera, con- 
taining 4,500 specimens, including 55 types and 390 co-types. 

Europe. 

831 specimens of British Diptera ; presented hy F. W. Edwards, 
Esq. 

570 Coleoptera and Rhynchota from France ; presented hy 
H. B. Preston, Esq. 

Australia. 

889 Hymenoptera, mainly from Queensland ; presented hy R. E. 
Tvrner, Esq. 

489 Coleoptera, including many co-types ; presented hy Arthur 
Lea, Esq. 

S. America. 

640 Lepidoptera from Ecuador and Colombia ; /»res6>i^a^ hy 

M. Paid Dognin. 

VI. — Economic Entomology. 

The work of the Department in Economic Entomology has 
been carried on with the assistance of Mr. C. A. Ealand, whose 
services as a specialist in that branch have again been engaged 
during the year. 

The arrangement of the Economic Series has been completed, 
and extensive accessions have been incorporated during the year, 
the chief being presented by the Imperial Bureau of Entomology. 
Many thousand references have been added to the card index. 

The exhibit illustrating the Army Biscuit Enquiry has been 
relabelled and re-exhibited in the Central Hall at the request of 
the War Office. 

Enquiries on matters of interest have continued to come in from 
various parts of the country. Amongst the subjects on which 
information or advice have been sought, and as far as possible 
given, the following may be mentioned : — 

DiPTERA (Flies). 

(1) Warbles caused by Hypoderma sp. on horses in an army 
remount station. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY. 89 

(2) Leather jackets (Tipula spp.) damaging flowers in a garden. 

(3) Chrysanthemum leaves ruined by Spilographa zoe, Phyto- 

myza albiceps. and Agromyza fiaveola. 

(4) Various enquiries as to how to prevent mosquitoes breeding 

in small ponds and water butts. 

(5) Cecidomyia pyri rolling the leaves o£ pear trees. 

(6) Sciara tritici Coq. seriously damaging orchids in Yorkshire. 

(7) Leaves o£ Henbane ruined by larvse o£ Pegomyia hyoscyami. 

(8) (Estrus ovis from North Patagonia (through the Secretary 

of the Board of Agriculture). 

(9) Enquiries from the trenches regarding mosquitoes and the 

likelihood of their transmitting malaria. 

(10) Plagues of flies (Limnophora septemnotata) in houses. 

(11) Many enquiries regarding houseflies, their breeding places, 

and how to get rid of them. 

COLEOPTERA (BeETLES). 

(12) Dermestes lardar'ms and Ptinus tectus damaging books and 

papers in a house. 

(13) Niptus hololeucus increasing yearly in a house in such 

numbers as to become a perfect pest. 

(14) Sitodrepa panicea boring into and ruining packets of soups 

in a shop. (From a Medical Officer of Health.) Also 
damaging biscuits at Reading. 

(15) Plinthus caliginosus Fabr. damaging the roots of hops and 

now attacking the leaves. (From Prof. F. V. Theobald.) 

(16) Lyctus hrunneus destroying Italian walnut and oak. 

Lepidoptera (Moths). 

(17) Magpie Moth (^Abraxas grossulariatd) defoliating Goose- 

berry and Currant plants. 

(18) Orgy'ia antiqua, the caterpillars causing an irritation and 

rash when they fall off the trees on to the skin. 

(19) Moths damaging the coverings of balloons. 

(20) The Cotton Worm (^Alabama argillacea) attacking cotton 

to such an extent in Montserrat that the correspondent 
seriously thought of giving up the plantation. 

(21) OinopJiila v-Jiava damaging wine corks. 

(22) Myelois phoenicis Drnt. bred from dates in Algeria, and 

from dates purchased in London ; dates infested by 
larvse, probably of this species, received from France, 
and information received of its occurrence at Putney. 

(23) Plodia interpunctella Hb. damaging split peas in barrel on 

board H.M.S. " Cornwall." 

(24) Two enquiries regarding Ephestia kiihniella Z. infesting 

packets of barley and patent food. 

(25) Ephestia elutella Hb. damaging cocoa beans. 

(26) Corcyra cephalonica Stn. infesting chocolate crackers, &c., 

in the United States. 



90 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Oethoptera and Anoplura. 

(27) Repeated enquiries regarding remedies for cockroaches — 

the common Cockroach {Blatta orientalis) and the German 
Cockroach (^Phyllodromia germanicd) — both in private 
houses and in hospitals. 

(28) A full report on the most approved methods of dealing 

with locusts sent to a correspondent in British Columbia. 

(29) Information supplied regarding body vermin to private 

enquirers and to the authorities at New Scotland Yard. 
A visit was also paid to a military hospital in which 
Pediculosis had broken out, and advice given on the best 
means of eradicating it. 

Miscellaneous. 

(30) Clothilla sp. damaging artificial silk used in insulating 

electric cables — conditions under which it could live and 
breed. 

(31) The Bed Bug (Cimea; lectularius) infesting a house. 

(32) Lepisma saecharina, a perfect plague in a house. 

(33) Larvse of Empliytus cinctus destroying roses in Surrey. 

(34) Larvse of Gooseberry Sawfly [Nematus ribesii) defoliating 

gooseberries and currants in Anglesea. 

(35) How to get rid of bees which had taken up their abode 

between the ceiling and the floor of the room above. 

(36) Information wanted regarding various species of Greenfly 

(Aphidse). 

VII. — Students and Visitors. 

The number of visits paid to the department during the year by 
students and other persons seeking information or assistance was 
3,354. 

C. J. Galian. 



department of geology. 91 

Department of Geology. 
I. — Arrangement and Conservation. 

Mammalia (Galleries 1 and 2). — The Palseolithic implements 
exhibited in table-case 1a have been retableted with new printed 
labels. The unexhibited flint implements have also been re-arranged 
in drawers. 

A skeleton of the extinct wolf, Canis dims, from the asphalt of 
Rancho La Brea, California, has been prepared for mounting. 

The newly-acquired horn of Rhinoceros antiquitatis from Siberia 
has been mounted on a corresponding skull in pier-case 6. 

A partially restored skeleton of the Oligocene American Camel, 
Stenomi/lvs hitcJicocki, has been mounted and exhibited in pier- 
case 13. 

Pier-case 18, containing British Pleistocene remains of Bos, 
has been cleaned and re-arranged, and numerous specimens have been 
mounted on stands. 

The labelling and arrangement of the remains of Rodentia 
exhibited in table-case 16 have been completed. 

The unexhibited remains of Australian Marsupialia have been 
examined, re-arranged and labelled in the drawers of table-case 14. 

Progress has been made with the preparation of an imperfect 
skeleton of Elephas antiquns from Chatham, Kent. Numerous 
mammalian remains from the Lower Tertiary formations of 
Baluchistan have also been prepared for study. 

A revision of the unexhibited Mammalian remains in the base- 
ment store-rooms has been completed. 

Number of specimens of Mammalia registered, 1,206. 

Aves (Gallery 2). — Two specimens of the pelvis of y^pyornis 
liildehrandti have been mounted for exhibition in wall-case 25. 

The unexhibited collection of remains of JEpyornis, from Mada- 
gascar, has been arranged, labelled, and indexed in the drawers of 
table-case 12a. Part of the unexhibited collection of Dinornis from 
New Zealand has also been arranged and labelled in drawers of the 
same table-case. 

The unexhibited Tertiary bird-remains from Patagonia have been 
arranged, labelled, and indexed in the drawers of table-case 13. 
Progress has also been made with the arrangement and labelling of 
the European Tertiary bird- remains in the drawers of the same 
table-case. 

The unexhibited collection of Pleistocene bird-remains from the 
Chatham Islands has been arranged and labelled in the drawers of 
table-case 13a. 

Number of specimens of Aves registered, 458. 

Reptilia and Batracliia (Galleries 3, 4, 5, 11). — Progress has 
been made with the preparation of Triassic Reptiles from South 
Africa and Cretaceous Reptiles from Alberta, Canada. 

Number of specimens of Reptilia and Batrachia registered, 315. 



92 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Pisces (Gallery 6). — Some skulls o£ Hyhodus basanus, from the 
Wealden of Pevensey Bay, Sussex (Beckles coll.), have been 
prepared for study and exhibition. 

Four slabs of Upper Old Red Sandstone from Dura Den, Fife- 
shire, showing remains of Crossopterygian and other fishes, have 
been prepared for study and exhibition, and provided with mahogany 
frames. 

Wall-cases 8, 9, have been cleaned and re-arranged, and refitted 
to admit new specimens of Lepidotus. The unexhibited remains of 
Lepidotus in the drawers of table-case 16, have also been examined 
and re-arranged. 

The branchial apparatus of Leedsia problematica, from the 
Oxford Clay of Peterborough (Leeds coll.), has been mounted 
for study and exhibition. 

Numerous slabs of fossil fishes have been mounted in mahogany 
frames. 

Number of specimens of Pisces registered, 296. 

Mollusca (Galleries 7 and 8, and Workroom). — The Cephalopoda 
registered, labelled and incorporated include : — Ordovician Nau- 
tiloidea from Scotland (Wm. McPherson coll.) ; Ammonoidea and 
Nautiloidea mostly from the Devonian of Devon (A. Champernowne 
coll.) ; Devonian Nautiloidea from the Eifel, Germany (S. Dohm 
coll.) ; Carboniferous Ammonoidea and Nautiloidea from Yorkshire 
(J. F. Blake coll.), and Scotland (R. Dunlop coll.) ; English 
Liassic Ammonites (J. F. Blake, T. Hunter, L. Richardson and 
T. J. Slatter colls.) ; Ammonoidea from the Gault of Kent, Surrey 
and Sussex (G. E. Dibley, S. C. Tinne, and A. S. Woodward colls.) ; 
Upper Cretaceous Ammonoidea and Nautiloidea from Hertfordshire, 
Lincolnshire and Norfolk (W. Hill coll.) ; Ammonoidea and Nauti- 
loidea from the Upper Cretaceous of Zululand described by G. C. 
Crick in the 3rd Report of the Geological Survey of Natal and 
Zululand, 1907 (W. Anderson coll.) ; opalised Belemnites from 
New South Wales (L. A. Lawrence coll.) ; and a Nautilus from 
the Barton Cliff, Hampshire (H. Eliot Walton coll.). 

A large Carboniferous Nautiloid from Belgium, and two 
Devonian Nautiloids from Germany have been mounted on blocks 
in Wall-case 1 ; and the Carboniferous and Devonian Nautiloids in 
this case and in the glass case adjoining have been rearranged. 

A Cretaceous Nautilus from Kent, one from Saxony, three 
Cretaceous Nautili from Zululand, and a Nautilus from the Eocene 
of Belgium have been mounted on blocks in Wall-case 2. 

A large British Chalk Ammonite has been added to the glass 
case between Wall-cases 3 and 4. A Cretaceous Ammonite from 
Westphalia and two Cretaceous Ammonites from Zululand have 
been mounted on blocks in Wall-case 4. 

A small glass case for two British Chalk Ammonites has been 
fixed between Wall-cases 4 and 5, and a well-preserved Greensand 
Ammonite has been placed in the case beneath. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 93 

A fine example o£ Plesioteuthis prisca from the Lithographic 
Stone, Bavaria (described by Gr. C. Crick in Proc. Malac. Soc, 
1915), has been framed and added to Wall-case 7. 

A small glass case has been fitted between Wall-cases 10 and 
11 for the exhibition of two fine British Inferior Oolite Ammonites. 

One section of Wall-case 11 containing Liassic Ammonites has 
been cleaned, and all the specimens have been re-arranged and 
relabelled. 

A slab of Lower Lias Limestone with Ammonites has been 
mounted on a block and placed on the top of Wall-case 12. 

The Ordovician Nautiloids in Wall-case 14 have been re- 
^arranged, and representatives of four additional genera added. 

Further progress has been made with the revision of the whole 
of the Museum collection of British Lias Ammonites, and with the 
labelling of the selection prepared for exhibition. 

The slip-catalogue of type, figured, and historical specimens of 
Cephalopoda has been continued. 

Palseozoic Gastropoda and Lamellibranchia registered, labelled, 
and mostly incorporated include : — Ordovician Gastropoda and 
Lamellibranchia from North Wales (T. Ruddy coll.) ; Silurian 
Lamellibranchia from Scotland (W. McPherson coll.) ; Devonian 
Gastropoda and Lamellibranchia from the Eifel, Germany (S. 
Dohm coll.) ; Gastropoda and Lamellibranchia from the Car- 
boniferous Limestone of Derbyshire (F. A. Bather coll.) ; Car- 
boniferous Gastropoda and Lamellibranchia from Scotland (J. 
Bennie and R. Dunlop colls.) ; Gastropoda and Lamellibranchia 
from the Lower Carboniferous of Missouri, U.S.A. (D. K. Greger 
coll.) ; and Permian Gastropoda and Lamellibranchia from the 
Malay Peninsula (J. B. Scrivenor coll.). 

The unexhibited specimens of Foreign Palseozoic Gastropoda 
and Lamellibranchia have been transferred from Gallery 8 to 
drawers in a new cabinet in the back corridor, and the British 
Oarboniferous Gastropoda and Lamellibranchia have been trans- 
feried from drawers in the Workroom to drawers beneath the 
upright cases A 6 and A 7 in Gallery 8. 

Progress has been made in the identification and relabellino- 
of the Klipstein collection of Triassic Mollusca from St. Cassian in 
the Tyrol. 

The slip-catalogues of type, figured, and historical specimens of 
Palreozoic Lamellibranchia and Gastropoda have been continued. 
Slip-catalogues of the exhibited collections have also been prepared. 

The Mesozoic and Tertiary Gastropoda and Lamellibranchia 
registered, labelled, and incorporated, include : — Upper Ch-etaceous 
(Danian) Mollusca from Denmark (Pindborg coll.) ; and British 
Lower Cretaceous shells (Aptian) from Great (/hart near Ashford, 
collected by Prof. J. W. Gregory and noticed by him in the Geol. 
Mag. 1895. 

A series of Tertiary non-marine Mollusca from European con- 
tinental localities has been arranged for exhibition in an upright 
<case in the centre of Gallery 8. A slip-catalogue has been prepared 



94 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BKITISH. MUSEUM. 

both for this and the remainder o£ the same collection, which has 
been arranged in drawers. 

Progress has also been made in the arrangement o£ drawers o£ 
French and Italian Tertiary Mollnsca in the cabinets in the Work- 
room. 

Cretaceous and Tertiary Mollusca from Angola and British East 
Africa have been examined for determination and cataloguing ; and 
Pliocene Mollusca from Lenham (Kent) and the bed of the North 
Sea, have also been determined and catalogued. 

Number of Mollusca registered : — Cephalopoda, 683 ; Gastro- 
poda, 376 ; Lamellibranchia, 360. Total, 1,419. 

Artliropoda (Gallery 8 and Workroom). — The acquisitions 
registered, labelled, and incorporated include : — Ordovician Ostra- 
coda and Trilobita from Wales and Shropshire (T. Ruddy coll.) ; 
Silurian and Devonian Trilobita from Britain and Germany 
(Champernowne coll.) ; Cirripedia from the Cretaceous of Bohemia 
(Fritsch coll.), Denmark (Br. Nielsen coll. and Copenhagen Univer- 
sity), and England, and from the Miocene of Italy ; Oligocene 
Insecta from the Isle of Wight (A'Court Smith coll.) ; and Crustacea 
from the Red Crag (A. Bell and A. S. Kennard colls.) 

The revision of the old collection of Cirripedia has been continued, 
and several Cretaceous and Tertiary specimens have been mounted 
for exhibition. Thin sections of various fossil Arthropod shells have 
been cut to determine the affinities of some Palaeozoic fossils referred 
to Cirripedes. 

Among other additions to the exhibited collection are a repro- 
duction of Arthropleura moyseyi and several Cambrian trilobites. 

The mounting of the collection of amber inclusa has been 
completed, as also has that of the gum-copal inclusa, except some 
recent acquisitions. 

The slip-catalogue of exhibited specimens has been continued. 

Number of specimens of Arthropoda registered, 2,269. 

Echinoderma (Gallery 8). — The acquisitions registered, labelled, 
and incorporated, include : — Ordovician Cystidea, Crinoidea, and 
Asteroidea from Wales (T. Ruddy coll.) ; squeezes of Devonian 
Crinoidea from Germany (made by W. E. Schmidt) and of Asteroidea 
(made by F. Schoendorf) ; Blastoidea from the Carboniferous of 
Valcour Id. (Hudson coll.) and of Missouri (Greger coll.) ; Lias 
Crinoidea from the West of England (L. Richardson coll.) ; Jurassic 
Echinoidea and Crinoidea from Cutch ; and Cretaceous Echinoidea 
and Crinoidea from Bohemia (A. Fritsch coll.) 

An incomplete set of the plaster casts of Echinoids made by L. 
Agassiz (presented by the Geological Society) has been checked by 
his " Catalogus Ectyporum " and labelled accordingly. 

New Edrioasteroidea have been mounted for exhibition with 
enlarged drawings. A group of the Liassic crinoid, JPentaonnus, 
attached to a piece of wood, has also been exhibited. 

The slip-catalogue of exhibited specimens has been continued, 
and that of specimens of Blastoidea has been brought up to date. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 95 

Progress has also been made with the slip-catalogue o£ genera and 
species o£ the Cystidea and Edrioasteroidea. 

Number o£ specimens of Echinoderma registered : — Echinoidea, 
52 ; Stelliformia, 52 ; Crinoidea, 627 ; Blastoidea, 45 ; Cystidea 
and Edrioasteroidea, 138. Total, 914. 

Annelida (Gallery 8 and Workroom). — The acquisitions 
registered, labelled, and incorporated include : — Specimens from the 
Ordovician o£ Wales (T. Ruddy coll.) ; Jurassic of W. England 
(L. Richardson coll.) and of Outch ; Cretaceous of Bohemia (Fritsch 
coll.) ; and Red Crag of Essex (A. Bell coll.). 

Number of specimens of Annelida registered, 143. 

Brachiopoda (Gallery 8 and Workroom). — The acquisitions 
registered, labelled, and incorporated include specimens from the 
Ordovician of Wales (T. Ruddy coll.), Devonian of Germany 
(S. Dohm coll.), and the Upper Cretaceous of Denmark (Pindborg 
coll.). 

Number of specimens of Brachiopoda registered, 820. 

Polyzoa (Gallery 8 and Workroom). — Progress has been made 
in preparing, mounting, and registering Oetaceous Polyzoa as a 
preliminary to cataloguing. Ordovician Polyzoa from North Wales 
(T. Ruddy coll.) have also been registered and incorporated, and 
numerous Palfeozoic Polyzoa originally included among Corals have 
been removed to the cabinets of Polyzoa. 

Number of specimens of Polyzoa registered, 653. 

Anthozoa and Hydrozoa (Gallery 10 and Workroom). — The 
revision of the Carboniferous Corals has been continued, and 137 
specimens have been cut, including many thin sections. To make 
space for this collection in gallery 10, the unexhibited Ordovician 
and Silurian Corals have been removed to cabinets in the Workroom. 
The Ruddy collection of Ordovician Corals from North Wales 
has been registered and incorporated. 

Number of specimens of Anthozoa and Hydrozoa registered, 278. 

Porifera (Gallery 10). — Ordovician Sponges from North Wales 
(T. Ruddy coll.) have been registered and incorporated. 

Number of specimens of Porifera registered, 16. 

Protozoa (Gallery 10). — The William Hill collection of thin 
sections of Chalk has been placed in a slide cabinet in the Work- 
room. Eocene Foraminifera from Nigeria (Parkinson coll.) have 
also been registered and incorporated. 

Number of specimens of Protozoa registered, 23. 

Plantce (Gallery 10). — A selection of the catalogued remains 
of Cretaceous plants has been tableted and labelled for exhibition in 
table-case 19 ; and the catalogued microscope-slides have been 
labelled and arranged in a cabinet in the Workroom. 

Numerous microscope-sections of Cretaceous woods have been 
prepared. 

Number of specimens of Plantse registered, 48. 



96 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

II. — Duplicates and Exchanges. 

Duplicate fossils and plaster casts of fossils have been presented 
to the National Museum of Wales and the Cheltenham Museum ; 
also (in return for services rendered to the Department of Geology) 
to the Sedgwick Museum (Cambridge), Maidstone Museum, Peabody 
Museum (Yale University), Prof. A. G. Nathorst, Dr. Marie C. 
Stopes, and Dr. E. Curwen. 

Exchanges of duplicate fossils have been made with the Royal 
Agricultural College, Cirencester, and with Mr. W. E. Crane. 

III. — Dej^artmental Library. 

The additions to the Library which have been registered, stamped, 
catalogued, and press-marked, comprise 131 new works and 
pamphlets, of which 16 were purchased and 115 presented ; 296 
parts of serials in progress, of which 103 were purchased and 
193 presented. 35 sheets of maps were acquired, 9 by purchase 
and 26 presented. 4 photographs were presented. 19 volumes 
and pamphlets were obtained by transfer from other Departments. 
169 volumes have been bound, press-marked, and returned to the 
shelves. 1,168 visits were made to the Library by students and 
others. 

IV. — Publications. 

The second part of the Catalogue of Cretaceous Plants has been 
published. 

A Guide Book to the Fossil Remains of Man has been published. 

V. — A cquisitions. 
A. — By Donation. 
Among numerous donations the following may be enumerated : — 

Mariimalia. — A cervical vertebra of Zeuglodon from the Barton 
Clay, Barton, Hampshire, described and figured in Quart. Journ. 
Geol. Soc, vol. Ixiii (1907), p. 124. H. Eliot Walton, Esq. 

Remains of a Zeuglodont from an Eocene formation in a cutting 
on the Port Harcourt Railway, Omobialla district. Southern Nigeria. 
Sir Frederick Lugard, G.C.M.G. 

A nearly complete skeleton of a Beaver from Wicken Fen, 
Cambridge. E. B. Williams, Esq. 

Specimens, chiefly limb-bones, of Anaglocliis and other Ruminants 
from the Pleistocene cave-deposits of Crete. Miss D. M. A. Bate. 

A collection of remains of Vertebrata from rock-fissures in 
the Balearic Isles, obtained by Miss D. M. A. Bate, namely about 
40 limb-bones of Mijotragus balearicus from Majorca, and 1 skull, 
10 portions of skulls, 9 mandibular rami, 12 vertebrge and various 
other bones of Myotragus from Minorca. The Percy^ Sladen 
Memorial Trustees. 

A collection of remains from Pleistocene Gravel at Piltdown, 
Sussex, including the nasal bones, part of a turbinal, and the right 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 97 

lower canine tooth of Eoanthropus dawsoni ; a bone implement ; a 
Palseolithic flint implement ; 2 Eoliths ; a lower incisor and frag- 
ment of mandible of Castor ; portions of molars of Stegodon and 
Mastodon ; portions of 2 teeth of Rhinoceros ; and 4 rock-specimens. 
Described by the donor and Dr. A. S. Woodward in Quart. Journ. 
Geol. Soc, vols. Ixx., Ixxi. (1914-5). Charles Dawson, Esq. 

Plaster casts of restored models of skull and mandible of Pithe- 
canthropus and Eoanthropus, with casts of brain cavity of the same. 
Plaster casts of bust-restorations of Pithecanthropus, Eoanthropus, 
Neanderthal Man, and Man of Cro Magnon. Prof. Henry Fairfield 
Oshorn. 

The greater part of a skeleton of Elephas antiquus from Frinds- 
bury Hill, Chatham, Kent. War Op.ce. 

Reptilia. — The hinder portion of a mandibular ramus, the type- 
specimen of Lahyrinthodon lavisi, H. G. Seeley, Quart. Journ. Geol. 
Soc, vol. xxxii. (1876), p. 278, pi. xix., with associated fragments, 
from the Trias of Sidmouth, Devonshire. I'he family of the late 
H. J. Johnston-Lavis, Esq., M.D. 

A fossil Turtle from the Upper Greensand of Melbury Down, 
near Shaftesbury, Dorset. Clarence E. Putter, Esq. 

Portions of carapace and about 15 limb-bones of Testudo 
gymnesica from Minorca, described in Geol. Mag., 1914, pp. 100-107, 
obtained by Miss D. M. A. Bate from rock-fissures in the Balearic 
Isles. 1 he Percy Sladen Memorial Trustees. 

Pisces. — Slabs of Old Red Sandstone from Dura Den, Fifeshire, 
with Fossil Fishes (including Phyllolepis, Gyropty chins, &c.). The 
British Association per Dr. John Home, F.R.S. 

Selachian teeth and Coelorhynchus from an Eocene formation in a 
cutting on the Port Harcourt iiailway, Omobialla district. Southern 
Nigeria. Sir Frederick Lugard, G.C.M.G. 

12 Selachian teeth and 1 fragment of Coelorhynchus from an 
Eocene formation in a cutting on the Port Harcourt Railway, 
Omobialla district, Southern Nigeria. E. M. Bland, Esq. 

Mollusca. — A collection of fossils from the Malay Peninsula, 
including Carboniferous Cephalopoda, Permian Cephalopoda and 
Scaphopoda, and Triassic Mollusca ; recorded in the donor's memoir 
on " The Geology and Mining Industries of Ulu Pahang, &c." 
(1911) ; also three portions of Jurassic Ammonites from Borneo. 
J. B. Scrivenor, Esq. 

10 Upper Jurassic Ammonites from Kukatta, Juba River, British 
East Africa ; and a rock-specimen containing Belemnites from 
Serenli, Juba River, British East Africa. John Parkinson, Esq. \ 

38 Ammonites and 12 other Molluscs from the Lower Gault, 
Wrecclesham, near Farnham. Lieut. S. C. Tinne. 

An opalised Belemnite and an opalised Bivalve from the Upper 
Cretaceous of New South Wales. Dr. L. A. Lawrence. 

Upper Cretaceous and Eocene Mollusca from Portuguese East 
Africa. E. 0. Thiele, Esq., and R. C. Wilson, Esq. 

G 



98 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Mollusca from an Eocene formation in a cutting on the Port 
Harcourt Railway, Omobialla district, Southern Nigeria. Sir 
Frederick Lugard, G.C.M.G. 

12 Gastropoda, 4 Scaphopoda, and 105 Lamellibranchs from the 
Tertiary rocks of New Zealand. Director of the Geological Survey of 
New Zealand. 

About 500 Tertiary fossils, chiefly Mollusca, collected by the 
donor in Colombia, South America. Beehy llwmpson, Esq. 

A small piece of Pliocene shell-limestone dredged by Capt. 
Wood from the sea-bottom, about 80-100 miles E.N.E. of Aberdeen. 
R. W. Thomson, Esq. 

50 Gastropods and 10 Lamellibranchs from the Upper Pliocene 
of Corfu, Greece. Count John Sordina. 

About 50 late Tertiary non-marine Mollusca, collected by the 
donor in British East Africa, noticed by R. B. Newton, Abstr. Proc. 
Geol. Soc, No. 980 (1915), pp. 6-8. John Parkinson, Esq. 

45 Post-Pliocene shells from the Cape Verde Islands. Walter 
Child, Esq. 

26 non-marine Gastropoda from cavern deposits in the Balearic 
Isles. Miss D. M. A. Bate. 

Arthropoda. — A Caryocaris from the Skiddaw Slates. John 
Postlethwaite, Esq. 

2 Trilobites from the Lower Carboniferous of Missouri. Dr. 
D. K. Greger. 

50 remains of Oabs from the Crag, Suffolk. ^4. S. Kennard, 
Esq. 

Echinoderma. — 60 Blastoids and 78 Crinoids from the Lower 
Carboniferous of Missouri, U.S.A. Dr. D. K. Greger. 

A piece of Palaeozoic siliceous rock, containing Fusulina and 
Crinoidal remains, &c., from South Portuguese Timor. F. W. 
Moon, Esq. 

2 Crinoids (Tribrachiocrinus) from the Permo-Carboniferous, 
Upper Marine Series, of Gerringong, co. Camden, N.S.W. C. 
T. Trechmann, Esq. 

12 Echinoid and 27 Crinoid remains from the Jurassic of Cutch. 
Director of the Geological Survey of India. 

Eocene Echinoids from Portuguese East Africa. E. 0. lliiele, 
Esq., and R. C. Wilson, Esq. 

BracUopoda. — 14 Brachiopoda, probably Permo-Triassic, from 
Warepa and other localities in New Zealand. D. G. Lillie, Esq. 

187 Brachiopoda from the Tertiary rocks of New Zealand. 
Director of Geological Survey of New Zealand. 

Polyzoa. — A piece of Polyzoa-bearing rock from the Lower 
Greensand near Shanklin, I. of W. LI. Treacher, Esq. 

100 Polyzoa from the Chalk of Sompting, Sussex. T. H. 
Withers, Esq. 

145 Polyzoa from the Chalk of Sussex. C. T. A. Gaster, Esq. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 99 

Vermes. — 9 Annelids from the Jurassic of Cutch. Director of 
the Geological Survey of India. 

3 opercula of Serpula heptagona from the Barton Beds of Barton. 
H. Eliot Walton, Esq. 

Coelentera. — 38 Graptolites from the Skiddaw Slates. John 
Postletliwaite, Esq. 

The type-specimen and a figured specimen of the Stromatoporoid 
Labechia rotunda, from the Wenlock Limestone, Much Wenlock, 
described and figured by the donor in Geol. Mag., 1915, p. 433, 
pi. XV. Miss Mary S. Johnston. 

25 British Carboniferous Corals. Stanley Smith, Esq., D.Sc. 

Protozoa. — -Eocene Foraminifera from Portuguese East Africa. 
E. 0. Thiele, Esq., and R. C. Wilson, Esq. 

Plantce. — A slab with leaves of a fern (Pecopteris) from the 
Jurassic Mataura Series at Curio Bay near Waikawa, South Head, 
South I., N. Zealand. Lady Campbell. 

A fossil Cycad and fragment of a second specimen from 
Portland. President and Council of the Royal Botanic Society. 

4 type-specimens of fossil wood from the Lower Greensand of 
the I. of Wight, namely, Sequoia giganteoides, Cupressinoxylon 
luccombense, Podocarpoxylon gothani and Vectia luccombensis ; also 
two specimens of Cupressinoxylon vectense from the Lower Green- 
sand of the I. of Wight, Dr. Marie C. Stopes. 

3 type-specimens of fossil wood from the Lower Greensand, 
Maidstone, namely, Hythia elgari, Cantia arborescens, and Cupress- 
inoxylon cryptomerioides ; also a second fragment of the last species. 
Committee of the Maidstone Museum. 

2 fruits (Nipadites) from the Eocene Limestone of Mokattam, 
Cairo. G. Foster Smith, Esq. 

Rock-specimens. — A collection of about 2,700 slides of thin 
sections of sedimentary rocks, including about 400 slides from the 
collection of the late Mr. A, J. Jukes-Browne, F.R.S. Most of the 
slides are of British Cretaceous rocks, referred to in the writings of 
Messrs. Hill and Jukes-Browne. Others are of the Tertiary rocks 
of the West Indies and Cyprus, referred to in the writings of 
Messrs. Hill, Jukes-Browne and Harrison. Executors of the late 
William Bill, Esq., F.G.S. 

B. — By Purchase. 

Among specimens purchased by the grant brought forward from 
the financial year 1914-15, the following may be enumerated : — 

Mammalia. — 50 jaws and portions of dentition of American 
Eocene Creodonts. 

Horn and skull of Rhinoceros antiquitatis from Siberia. 

Reptilia. — 8 fossil reptiles from the Trias of Lossiemouth, Elgin 
(W. Taylor coll.). 



100 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Associated set o£ bones o£ a Trachodont Dinosaur from the Upper 
Cretaceous, Alberta, Canada (W. E. Cutler coll.) 

Mollusca. — 25 Mollusca from the Upper Cretaceous, Alberta, 
Canada (W. E. Cutler coll.). 

20 Ammonites, &c., from the Gault, Aylesford, Kent. 

A block of fossiliferous Pliocene Rock dredged up from North 

Sea. 

Polyzoa. — 200 Polyzoa from the Chalk of Surrey. 

Miscellaneous Invertehrata. — The Thomas Ruddy Collection of 
Bala Fossils from North Wales, comprising 120 Ostracoda, 160 
Trilobita, 61 Echinoderma, 23 Annelida, 100 Cephalopoda, 143 
Lamellibranchia, 37 Conularida, 540 Brachiopoda, 47 Corals, 63 
Polyzoa, 4 Hydrozoa and 5 Sponges. 

Plantce. — 8 plant-remains from the Upper Cretaceous of Alberta, 
Canada (W. E. Cutler coll.). 

The total accessions during 1915 are as follows : — 





Donation. 


Purchase. 


Exchange. 


Total. 


Vertebrata 


329 


101 


— 


430 


Invertebrata 


- 5,123 


2,382 


8 


7,513 


Plantge 


18 


8 


1 


27 



Total - - 5,470 2,491 9 7,970 



The total number of specimens registered is 8,810. 

VI. — Students and Visitors. 

The number of visits paid to the Department by students and 
other persons for the purpose of consultation or study during 1915 
was 2,531. 

The staff received 8 parties (169 persons) for demonstrations in 
the public galleries. 

Arthur Smith Woodward. 



department of mineralogy. 101 

Department of Mineralogy. 
I. — Arrangement. 

The Collection of Precious Stones formed by the late Sir Arthur 
Church has been arranged according to species in a special case. 

Labels have been prepared and specimens selected and arranged 
for an Introductory Series of minerals and rocks for the Central 
Hall. 

A selection of the more valuable and unique specimens has been 
removed from the Gallery and placed in a safe. 

Mineral and rock-specimens have been unpacked and examined, 
and thirty-nine boxes have been packed and despatched. 

II. — Registration, Indexing, and Cataloguing. 

All the specimens of minerals, rocks, and meteorites acquired 
during the year have been registered, numbered, labelled, and 
incorporated with the Collection. 

The preparation of the slip-catalogues of the mineral-specimens 
in the Collection, species by species, and of permanent labels giving 
all available information for each specimen, has been continued for 
the Divisions of the Oxides and Carbonates. In this connexion 
permanent labels have been written and placed with the specimens 
of minium, beauxite, chrysoberyl, calcite and magnesite ; permanent 
labels have also been prepared for pyrolusite, crednerite, and 
polianite ; and specimens belonging to Old Collections have been 
labelled and entered in the General Register. 

The preparation of a copy of the three-volume MS. Catalogue of 
the Allan-Greg Collection of minerals has been completed ; modern 
names of species have been written in the headings ; and a new 
index has been made. 

The history of the physical apparatus in the Department has 
been investigated, and the items in the Catalogue of Instruments 
have been arranged as far as possible in order of date of acquisition. 

The large collection of rock-specimens from the Cape Verd 
Islands presented by Mr. Walter Child has been examined, num- 
bered, and arranged. 

The preparation of a copy of the register of the specimens in the 
Collection has been continued, and permanent labels containing 
particulars drawn from the register have been prepared for the 
specimens of minerals acquired during the year. 

III. — Preparation. 

165 thin-sections of rocks have been prepared, and thirteen 
specimens of laterite have been cut. 

IV. — Investigation. 

The crystallographic examination of chabazite and the associated 
minerals from Co. Antrim collected by Mr. F. N. Ashcroft has 



102 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

been completed. In the course o£ this work many crystals of 
various types of chabazite and also of calcite, analcite, and natrolite 
associated with it have been measured on the goniometer. 

Complex crystals of sartorite and other sulph-arsenites from the 
Binnenthal, aragonite, barytes, and garnet have been measured, and 
crystals of iron phosphide from a blast-furnace have been studied 
and described. 

Various doubtful minerals have been examined and determined, 
including brochantite, bayldonite, tsumebite, from Otavi, S. W. 
Africa ; albite, apophyllite, pectolite, prehnite, &c., from Pwllheli, 
N. Wales ; pascoite from Peru ; roscherite and jezekite from 
Saxony ; diopside from Burma ; topaz from Tasmania. 

The refractive indices of the precious stones in the Church 
Collection have been determined, and, where possible, the double 
refraction, dichroism, and absorption have been observed. 

Investigations have been made of the meteoric stones of Laun- 
ton, Warbreccan, Cronstad, and Daniel's Kuil, and quantitative 
analyses of each have been made in the chemical laboratory. 



V. — Departmental Library. 

Cataloguing and Press-marking. — 14 guard-books of letters 
have been indexed. 

239 volumes and 80 title-slips have been press-marked or re- 
press-marked. All the accessions, including 673 plates, have been 
catalogued and stamped. 

Proofs of the Library Catalogue have been read and checked 
against the slip-catalogue in the Department. 

Accessions. — 22 volumes of separate works, 24 periodicals (in 
254 volumes and parts), 26 pamphlets, 11 parts of works, and 53 
mining and survey reports have been added to the Library. 

Bindirig. — 94 volumes have been bound. 



VI. — Acquisitions. 

1,299 specimens have been acquired, namely : — 

357 minerals, 930 rocks, and 12 meteorites. 

The most important of these acquisitions is the remarkable 
collection of 203 Precious Stones formed by the late Sir Arthur 
Church (see pp. 101 and 103). 

Exchanges of specimens have been arranged with the Bloemfon- 
tein Museum and with Mr. J. Morrow Campbell. 

The following mineral names added to the Museum List were 
previously not represented by specimens in the collection : — 

Ferrimolybdite, jezekite, metahewettite, paratooite, pascoite, 
skemmatite. 

The specimens acquired by presentation (arranged alphabetically 
according to donors) and by exchange, and a selection of the more 
important of those obtained by purchase, are as follows : — 



DEPARTMENT OF MINERALOGY. 103 

Minerals. 
By Presentation : 

Calcite from Trecastell mine, near Conway, Carnarvonshire : 
hy F. N. Ashcroft, Esq. 

Ruby from Rimu, South Island, New Zealand : hy B. C. Aston, 
Esq. 

Anhydrite and gypsum from the Hatfield Main Colliery, near 
Doncaster : by H. Berry ^ Esq. 

Salt from Cape Verd Islands : hy Senlior Carvalho. 

A blue crystal of zircon, probably from Siam : hy the late Sir 
Arthur Herbert Church, K.C. V.O., F.R.S. 

A valuable collection of gem-stones formed by the late Sir 
Arthur Herbert Church, K.C.Y.O., F.K.S., presented, in accordance 
with a wish expressed in his will, hy his widow. Lady Church. 

The collection comprises 203 choice and selected faceted stones, 
170 of which are mounted in 162 gold rings (33 stones being un- 
mounted) : in addition, 29 small diamonds are employed in the 
settings. The following 21 mineral species are represented : 
corundum (13 stones), spinel (19), chrysoberyl (8), quartz (2), 
chrysoprase (2), opal (15), zircon (69), peridot (7), phenakite (l), 
spodumene (1), enstatite (1), moonstone (3), labradorite (1), garnet 
(22), beryl (4), topaz (8), andalusite (1), cordierite (2), tourmaline 
(22), sphene (1), turquoise (1). Amongst the garnets is a fine 
example of spessartite, the rare manganese-garnet ; amongst the 
tourmalines a very fine rubellite ; amongst the opals very good 
examples of " black " opal and fire-opal ; and amongst the zircons 
a fine suite of green stones and two remarkable blue stones. 

Chalcedony pseudomorphous after bone from Radley Park, 
Berks : hy Dr. Frank Corner. 

Glauconite from Cowcroft, Bucks : by T. Crook, Esq. 

Aragonite from Alston, Cumberland : hy Rev. Thomas C. 
Crosby. 

Radiated topaz (pycnite) from Mount Bischoff, Tasmania : hy 
Rev. Alfred Curtis. 

Forms of artificial silica : by Allan B. Dick, Esq. 

Grilbertite and quai;^z pseudomorphs simulating an orthoceroid 
fossil, from near St. Austell, Cornwall : by Philip Dollman, Esq. 

Chrysotile, and 10 specimens of gold and tin ores, all from 
Rhodesia : hy Wm. Drabble, Esq. 

Artificial preparations of various forms of silica : by Dr. C. N. 
Fenner. 

Blue beryl from Mont Blanc : by Miss J. M. Fry. 

Geikelite from Ceylon : hy Sir A. Geikie, K.C.B., F.R.S. 

Pyrrhotite from Pondoland, South Africa : hy W. H. Goodchild, 
Esq. 

Fluor, a group of large green cubes, from Faulhorn ; adularia, 
as tabular crystals with asbestos, from Maderanerthal, and, as 
twisted crystals with black zonal enclosures, from Disentis ; and 
quartz, enclosing rutile, from Sasso rosso, St. Gotthard ; all from 
Switzerland : by Rev. J. M. Gordon. 



104 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Almandine garnet from Kidsty Pike, Westmoreland : hy J. F. 
N. Green, Esq. 

Monazite sand from Burma : hy Miss D. M. Jewett. 

Blende, molybdenite, phosphorite, and alunogen, from Japanese 
localities : hy Prof. Kotora Jimlib. 

Yivianite from the Port Harcourt railway, Omobialla district. 
Southern Nigeria : hy His Excellency Col. Sir Frederick J. D. 
Lugard, G.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O. 

Vanadinite from Arizona : hy C. Maitland, Esq. 

Paratooite, a variety of rock-phosphate from South Australia, 
named and described by the donor : hy Sir Douglas Mawson. 

Chalcedony pebbles, cut and polished, from St. Leonards-on- 
Sea, Sussex : hy W. H. Pemherton- Barnes, Esq. 

Haematite and nitratine from Taltal, Chili : hy Major F. I. 
Ricarde-Seaver. 

Dolomite, mispickel, axinite, and blende, a series of specimens 
collected by the donor in 1914 at Mt. Avala, Belgrade, Serbia ; 
and albite on quartz, from Gimlet Rock, Pwllheli, Carnarvonshire : 
hy Arthur Russell, Esq. 

Axinite from Penmaenmawr, Carnarvonshire : hy H. C. Sargent^ 
Esq. 

Artificial crystals of iron phosphide from a blast-furnace : hy 
Dr. J. E. Stead, F.R.S. 

A large crystal of cassiterite weighing 8,253 grams, from 
Karibib, South-West Africa : by Percy C. Tarhutt, Esq. 

Alunogen from Dolcoath mine, Camborne, Cornwall : hy R. 
Arthur Thomas, Esq. 

Phosphorite from Curasao, West Indies : hy W. H. Wickes, 
Esq. 

Blende as large black cubes, and stream-tin from Lerui'n Kano, 
Northern Nigeria : by A. Stanley Williams, Esq. 

A fine isolated crystal of cassiterite from Tronoh village, Kinta, 
Perak, Federated Malay States : by Cecil Wray, Esq. 

Corundum and columbite from Cape Province, South Africa : 
hy J. Truro Wylde, Esq. 

By Purchase : 

A series of specimens from new occurrences in Madagascar, 
including large brown crystals of beryl, clear yellow crystals of 
orthoclase, corundum, tourmaline, spessartite, amazon-stone, korne- 
rupine, ampangabeite, bismutite, quartz. 

New occurrences of American minerals : — including atacamite, 
connellite (a fine specimen), seligmannite, onofrite, metahewettite, 
hydrozincite from Utah '; precious opal in the form of a tree branch 
from Nevada ; a fine mass of crystals of native silver from 
Michigan ; skemmatite from South Carolina ; pseudomorphous 
quartz, leucophoenicite, and manganosite from New Jersey. 

Miargyrite from Mexico. 

Albite, apophyllite, pectolite, prehnite, and quartz from Pwllheli, 
Carnarvonshire. 



DEPARTMENT OF MINERALOGY. 105 

Miscellaneous specimens illustrating British occurrences selected 
from the collections of the late Mr. F. W. Rudler, Mr. W. Semmons, 
and Mr. Warburton, including : — fluor, apatite, chalcotrichite, and 
copper-glance, from Cornwall ; chalybite from Cumberland ; 
anhydrite from Newark. 

Rocks. 
By Presentation. 

Phonolite from the Wolf Rock, Cornwall : hy Walter Barratt, 
Esq. 

Set of 16 specimens collected by the donor in British East 
Africa : hy Arthur Champion, Esq. 

A large collection, numbering 879 specimens, collected by the 
donor in the Cape Verd Islands : hy Walter Child, Esq. 

Topaz-quartz-porphyry from Mt. Bischoff, Tasmania : hy Rev. 
Alfred Curtis. 

Lava from the volcano of Sakurajima, Japan (eruption of 
January, 1914) : hy Prof. Kotora Jimho. 

Metamorphosed diabase with axinite from St. Ives, Cornwall : 
hy F. P. Mennell, Esq. 

Andesite from Mt. Tarawera, New Zealand (eruption of June, 
1886) : by Br. A. B. Rendle, F.R.S. 

Porphyritic basalt from Rye Water, Ayrshire : hy John Smith.. 
Esq. 

Riebeckite-rhyolites from Lerui'n Kano, Northern Nigeria ; 
by A. Stanley Williams, Esq. 

By Exchange : 
24 specimens of laterite from West African localities. 

Meteorites. 
By Presentation : 

Bholghati, Deloi, Orissa, India, a fragment weighing 28*6 
grams of the stone which fell on 29th October, 1905. 

Chainpur, Azamgarh, United Provinces, India, a fragment 
weighing 399 grams of the stone which fell on 9th May, 1907. 

Karkh, Jhalawan, Baluchistan, 18 chips weighing together 226 
grams of the stone which fell on 27th April, 1905. 

Khobar, Banda, United Provinces, India, a fragment weighing 
338 grams of the stone which fell on 19th September, 1910. 

Kuttipuram, Malabar, Madras, India, a fragment weighing 725 
grams of the stone which fell on 6th April, 1914. 

Lakangaon, Nimar, Indore, India, a fragment weighing 93*8 
grams of the stone which fell on 24th November, 1910. 

Mirzapur Mauza, Dahariabad, United Provinces, India, a 
fragment weighing 208'8 grams of the stone which fell on 7th 
January, 1910. 

Shupiyan, Kashmir, India, a fragment weighing 68'9 grams of 
the stone which fell in April, 1912. 



106 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

These 8 meteoric stones : hy the Director of the Geological Survey 
■of India. 

Delegate, Wellesley Co., New South Wales, an etched slice 
weighing 186 grams o£ this meteoric iron : by the Department of 
Mijies of New South Wales. 

Molong, Ashburnham Co., New South Wales, fragments weighing 
2,022 grams of this meteoric iron : hy the Department of Mines of 
New South Wales. 

Gilgoin, Clyde Co., New South Wales, a fragment weighing 
261*6 grams of one (No. 7) of the stones : hy J. C. H. Mingaye, 
Esq. 

By Exchange : 

Winburg, Orange Free State, South Africa, an etched fragment 
weighing 42 grams of the iron seen to fall in 1881. 

All the above Meteorites except Gilgoin and Kuttipuram belong 
to falls hitherto unrepresented in the Museum Collection. 



VII. — Donations of Duplicates. 

Duplicate specimens of meteorites have been given to the 
•Geological Survey Museum at Calcutta and to Sir William Crookes, 
F.R.S. 

VIII. — Students and Visitors. 

The number of visits recorded as made to the Department for 
purposes of consultation or study is .510. Many specimens of 
minerals and rocks have been determined for visitors and 
correspondents. 

G. T. Prior. 



department of botany. 107 

Department of Botany. 

I. — Arrangement and Conservation. 

During the past year 24,050 specimens have been incorporated 
with the Herbarium. This number includes 17,200 Flowering 
Plants, 2,637 Vascular Cryptogams, 2,035 Mosses, 222 Hepatics, 
495 Lichens, 378 Alg^, and 1,083 Fungi. 

Flowering Plants. — Additions acquired during the year by donation, 
purchase and exchange have been mounted and incorporated. Pro- 
gress has been made with the determination, selection and incorpora- 
tion o£ the early Australian collections, and outstanding specimens 
have been determined and incorporated in various families, especially 
Melastomaceae, Onagraceae, Loasacese, Turneraceae, and Rosacese. 

Work of revision and re-arrangement has been done in various 
families and genera, especially the genera Acaena. and B,uhus 
which have been revised and arranged in accordance with recent 
monographs. A large accumulation of unnamed fruits and seeds 
has been identified and incorporated and the first half of the fruit 
collection has been re-arranged. 

The separation and re-arrangement in the new gallery of the 
European specimens has been completed. 

Ferns and Mosses. — The selection and incorporation of outstand- 
ing collections of Ferns and Fern-Allies have been continued, and the 
incorporation of various collections of Indian, Chinese, and Central 
American Mosses has been completed. 

Alga;. — The sorting of the Merrifield herbarium has been com- 
pleted and the George Herbarium of British Algae has been largely 
determined and arranged preparatory to incorporation. Progress 
has been made with the incorporation of outstanding material. 

Fungi and Lichens. — In the general collection outstanding 
material of Sphaeropsideae has been incorporated and in part that of 
Hyphomycetes ; the arrangement of the Polyporaceae has been 
revised. Progress has been made with the revision and incorpora- 
tion of the British Lichens. 

Mycetozoa. — Various new collections have been prepared for 
incorporation, as before with the assistance of Miss G. Lister. 

Exhibition Series. — In the Public Gallery the general exhibition 
of Algae has been re-arranged and progress has been made with the 
exhibition of British Seaweeds. Work of revision has been done 
generally and numerous additions have been made. In the Index 
Museum in the Central Hall progress has been made with the 
preparation of the exhibition illustrating the lower Cellular plants 
(Thallophytes). 



108 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Catalogues and Guides. — Progress has been made with the 
preparation o£ the Flora of Jamaica (Vols, iv and v) by Mr. W. 
Fawcett and Dr. Rendle ; and with the revision o£ the first volume 
of the Monograph of British Lichens and the preparation of a guide 
to the exhibition of British Lichens by Miss Annie Lorrain Smith. 
Some work on the preparation of the Catalogue of the Sloane 
Herbarium has been done by Mr. J. Britten. An account of the 
freshwater Algas collected on the " Terra Nova " expedition has been 
prepared by Dr. F. E. Fritsch, and of the marine Algae by Mr. Gepp. 



II. — Investigation. 

Collections have been determined wholly or in part from the 
following localities and collectors : New Guinea (Wollaston expedi- 
tion, Miss Gibbs), New Caledonia (Compton), Sumatra (Robinson 
and Kloss), Uganda (Diimmer), Queensland (Miss Gibbs), and 
various smaller collections from different localities. 

Dr. Rendle has completed his study of the Tropical Africa genera 
and species of the family Moracefe, and Mr. W. Fawcett and Dr. 
Rendle have continued their work on the Jamaica species of the 
families of Dicotyledons, mainly Leguminosse. Mr. Baker ha& 
continued his work on the Tropical African species of Indigofera and 
has determined the Anonacese collected in Sumatra by H. 0. Forbes. 
Mr. Willmott has continued his critical study of various European 
genera. Mr. Gepp has investigated small collections of Ferns and 
Algse from various localities ; and Mr. Ramsbottom has continued 
his work on Microfungi. 

Assistance has been given to numerous British and foreign 
workers engaged on special investigations, and many specimens and 
small collections have been determined for students and collectors. 
Valuable assistance has been rendered to various GoA^ernment 
departments in response to inquiries on matters connected with the 
war. 

In connection with work done in the Department specimens have 
been generously lent by the Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew ; 
the Regius Keeper of Botany, Edinburgh ; the Bristol Museum ; 
and the Government of Jamaica. 

Undetermined material has been lent for study and determination 
to the Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew ; the Regius Keeper of 
Botany, Edinburgh ; and Mr. H. N. Dixon, Northampton. 



III. — Departmental Library. 

The arrangement, cataloguing, press-marking and other routine 
work has been carried out. 165 volumes and 187 pamphlets were 
acquired by donation and 71 volumes by purchase — in all 236 
volumes and 187 pamphlets ; these numbers include 39 periodicals 
in 192 parts presented, and 47 periodicals in 401 parts purchased — 
in all 86 periodicals in 593 parts. 71 volumes and 30 pamphlets 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 109 

from the library of the late J. A. Talk were presented by the 
Oommittee of Middlesex Hospital. 

88 volumes have been bound and several others repaired. 

TV. — Publications. 

There have been no official publications issued by the Trustees 
but work has been continued on the Flora of Jamaica by Mr. W. 
Fawcett and Dr. Rendle and on the second edition of Vol. i. of the 
Monograph of British Lichens by Miss A. Lorrain Smith. 

The publications by Members of the Staff issued by the 
permission of the Trustees number 13, and 23 have been issued by 
other Students of the Collections. 



V. — Acquisitions. 

(1) By Donation. 

The following are the more important additions to the British 
Herbarium : — Flowering Plants ; 85 specimens from C. E. Britton, 
Esq. ; 124 specimens from Rev. E. S. Marshall ; 54 specimens from 
0. E. Salmon, Esq. ; and 49 specimens from the Watson Botanical 
Exchange Club. A large collection of Seaweeds, Mosses and Lichens 
by the late E. George, from the London County Council. 

The following are the more important additions to the General 
Herbarium : — B. Digby, Esq., 92 Siberian plants ; Mrs. M. E. 
Prescott-Decie, 413 specimens from Northern India ; H. N. Ridley, 
Esq., C.M.G., 943 Selangor plants ; Dr. E. Hartert, 50 Sahara 
plants ; A. E. Kitson, Esq., 19 West African plants ; P. Amaury 
Talbot, Esq., 82 specimens from Degema, Southern Nigeria ; T. F. 
Cheeseman, Esq., 33 New Zealand plants ; Dr. R. S. Rogers, 82 
Australian Orchids ; Dr. F. Stoward, 89 West Australian plants ; 
A. H. Lyell, Esq., 139 North American plants. 

The late J. A. Tulk's collection of Diatoms, comprising 2,665 
slides from the C'ommittee of Middlesex Hospital. 

(2) By Purchase. 

The following are the more important additions ; — The Botanical 
Exchange Club, 419 British Flowering plants ; U. Faurie, 1,800 
Formosa plants ; R. A. Diimmer, 800 plants from Uganda and 
British East Africa ; and Miss A. Pegler, 50 Fungi from Kentani, 
South Africa. Continuations of published sets of European plants 
from H. Dahlstedt, 55 specimens ; H. Sudre, 100 specimens ; and 
of North American Algse by Collins, Holden and Setchell, 100 
specimens. 

(3) By Exchange of Duplicates. 

The Regius Keeper, Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh, 2,401 
plants from China, Tibet and India ; Director, South African 



110 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Museum, Cape Town, 100 Basutoland plants ; Director, National 
Herbarium, Sydney, 101 Australian plants ; Curator, National 
Museum, Melbourne, 28 Australian plants ; Botanist, Bureau o£ 
Science, Manila, 1,643 Philippine plants ; Director, Museu Goeldi, 
Para, Brazil, 94 Brazilian plants ; California Academy o£ Sciences, 
San Francisco, 165 North American plants. 

VI. — Students and Visitors. 

The number o£ visits to the Department for consultation and 
research during the year was 3,226. 

VII . — Demonstrations . 

Demonstrations on the collections have been given to members 
of the Ethical Society and of the Birbeck College Natural History 
Society. 

A. B. Rendle. 







RETURN. 



BRITISH MUSEUM 

1916. 



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Ordered, hy The House of Commons, to he Printed, 
2 May 1916. 



LONDON : 

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1916. 



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BRITISH MUSEUM. 



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Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 
1 May 1917. 



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CONTENTS 



BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Page 
ACCOUNTS (SPECIAL TRUST FUNDS, 1916-1917) : 

Bkidgewater 4 

Farnborough - . 4 

SWINEY 5 

Birch 5 

Charles Drury Edward Fortnum ------- 6 

Carchemish Excavations - - - - 6 

H. L. Florence 7 

NUMBERS OF PERSONS ADMITTED : 

British Museum .--.8 

British Museum (Natural History) - - - - - - 12 

HOURS OF ADMISSION : 

British Museum 10 

British Museum (Natural History) - - - - - - 13 

GENERAL STATEMENT OF PROGRESS : 

Visitors 14 

Reading Room and Newspaper Room 14 

The War— Protective Measures .---.-. 14 

Military Service of the Staff 14 

Principal Acquisitions 15 

Publications -15 

ARRANGEMENT OF COLLECTIONS, &c. : 

Printed Books 16 

Manuscripts 20 

Oriental Printed Books and MSS. - - 22 

Prints and Drawings 24 

Oriental Prints and Drawings ------- 32 

Egyptian Antiquities 34 

ASSYRIAN Antiquities - - - 34 

Greek and Roman Antiquities 36 

British and Mediaeval Antiquities - - - - ' - - - 38 

Coins and Medals 43 

ACQUISITIONS : 

Newspapers ------- 18 

Printed Books - - - - 18 

Maps 18 

Music . - . - -18 

Manuscripts - - - - 21 

Oriental Printed Books and MSS. 23 

Prints and Drawings - 25 

Oriental Prints and Drawings ------- 32 

E gyptian Antiquities 35 

Assyrian Antiquities 35 

Greek and Roman Antiquities 36 

Prehistoric, Early British and other Antiquities - - - 39 

Ceramic and Glass Objects 41 

Oriental and Ethnographical Objects (including those 

ADDED to the ChRISTY COLLECTION) 41 

Coins and Medals - 43 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY.) 

GENERAL STATEMENT OF PROGRESS : Page 

ViSITOES 48 

SWINEY Lectuees - 48 

Museums Association 48 

Tkout.flibs Exhibition - - . - 48 

The War and the Museum - - . 48, 49 

British and Russian Men of Science - 50 

Grain Pests Committee - - 50 

Stranded Whales 50 

Investigation of Antarctic Whales and Seals - - - -50, 51 

Other Investigations - 51 

Bequests and Gifts - - - 51 

Principal Purchases - - - 53 

Duplicates 53 

Publications 53 

INDEX museum'- - . 55 

ECONOMIC ZOOLOGY 72 

ECONOMIC ENTOMOLOGY 78 

ARRANGEMENT AND CONSERVATION OF COLLECTIONS : 

Zoology . 57 

Entomology 75 

Geology 81 

Mineralogy 90 

Botany 96 

ACQUISITIONS: 

Zoology 62 

Entomology - 77 

Geology 85 

Mineralogy 91 

Botany 97 

DUPLICATES AND EXCHANGES : 

Zoology 61 ' 

Entomology 76 

Geology .... - 85 

Mineralogy 95 

Botany 98 

LIBRARIES : 

General 55 

Zoological 62 

Entomological 77 

Geological - - - 85 

MiNERALOGICAL 91 

Botanical 97 

PUBLICATIONS, DEPARTMENTAL : 

Zoology 62 

Entomology 77 

Geology - 85 

Botany 97 

STUDENTS : 

Zoology 73 

Entomology 80 

Geology 89 

Mineralogy 95 

Botany 98 

INVESTIGATION : 

MiNERALOGICAL 91 

Botanical 96 

DEMONSTRATIONS : 

Botany ....... 98 

IMPERIAL BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY 76 

INDEX GENERUM ET SPECIERUM ANIMALIUM 55 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



I.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 
BRIDGEWATER FUND, from the 1st April 1916 to the 31st March 1917. 



To Balances on the 1st April 1916 
- Dividends received on 13,659Z. 3*. 2d. Stock 
in 2^ per Cent. Consols, bequeathed 
by the Earl of Bridgewater, viz. : 



On the 5th April 1916 
5th .July 1916 - 
5th October 1916 
„ 5th January 1917 



£.85 

85 
85 
85 



Kent of a Keal Estate, Whitchurch, 
bequeathed by the Earl of Bridgewater (less 
charges) 



Cash. 



£. 5. 
407 17 



35 1 3 



£.784 7 8 



Stock, 
2^% Consols. 



£. 
13,659 



3 2 



13,659 3 2 



By One Year's SALARY of the Bgerton Librarian 
- Balances on the 31st Mabch 1917, 
carried to Account for 1917-1918 



Cash. 



£. 
175 



609 7 



STOCK, 

2i% Consols. 

£. s. d. 

13,659 3 2 
13,659 3 2 



II.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 
FARNBOROUGH FUND, from the Ist April 1916 to the Slat March 1917. 



Cash. 



'To Balances on the 1st April 1916 - - - - 

- Dividends received on 2,879Z. 10s. Id. Stock in 

2^ per Cent. Consols, bequeathed by 

Lord Farnborough, viz. : 

On the 5th Aprill916 - £.17 19 11 

5th July 1916 - - 17 19 11 

5th October 1916 - 17 19 11 

,, 5th January, 1917 - 17 19 11 



£. 

104 



- 71 19 8 

£.176 2 4 



Stock, 

2i% Consols. 

£. s. d. 

2,879 10 7 



r9 10 7 



Cash. 



By Amount expended in purchase of Manuscripts - 
- Balances on the 31st March 1917, 
carried to Account for 1917-1918 



£. 
135 



£.176 2 4 



STOCK, 

2^% Consols. 



2,879 10 7 



2,879 10 7 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. ( 

III.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure 
of the SWINEY FUND, from the 1st April 1916 to the Slst March 1917. 

STOCK, 



Cash. 



To Balances on the 1st April 1916 

- Dividends received on 5,744Z. - 8d. Slock in 

2^ per Cent. Consols, bequeathed by 

Dr. George Swiney for Lectures on 

Geology, viz. : 

On the 5th April 1916 - £.35 18 - 

5th July 1916 - - 35 18 - 

5th October 1916 - 35 18 - 

„ 5th January 1917 - 35 18 - 



3 1 



2J%i Consols. 

£. s. d. 
5,744 - 8 



143 12 



£.163 15 1 



By Amount paid to Dr. J. S. Flett. for Lectures on 

Geology in 1916 

- Balances on the 31st March 1917, 
carried to Account for 1917-1918 



Cash. 


2A% Consols. 


£. s. d. 


£. s. d. 


150 - - 




13 15 1 


5,744 - 8 



£.163 15 1 



5,744 



IV.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of 
the BIRCH FUND from the 1st April 1916 to the 31st March 1917. 

Stock, 



Cash. 



£. 



To Balance on the 1st April 1916 - - - - 

- Dividends received on 565^. 3s. 9d. Stock in 

2^ per Cent. Consols, bequeathed 

by Dr. Birch in 1766, for the three 



2^o/o Consols. 

£. s. d. 
565 3 9 



Under Librarians of 


the British 


Museum, viz. : 




On the 5th April 1916 - 


-£.3 10 8 


„ 5th July 1916 


- 3 10 8 


5th October 1916 - 


- 3 10 8 


„ 5th January 1917 - 


- 3 10 8 



14 



£.14 2 



565 3 9 



By Legacy paid to the three Under Librarians of 
the British Museum, whose offices existed 
in 1766, viz., the Keepers of the Departments 
of Printed Books. Manuscripts, and Natural 

History 

- Balance on the 31st March 1917, carried 
to Account for 1917-1918 - - . - 



Cash. 



£. 



£.14 



Stock, 
2^% Console. 

£. .?. d. 



565 3 9 



565 3 9 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Y. — AN ACCOUNT of the Eeceipts and Expenditure of the bequest of 

the late MR. CHARLES DRURY EDWARD FORTNUM from the 

1st April 1916 to the 31st March 1917. 



Cash. 



To Balance on the 1st April 1916 - - - - 

- 5% War Loan, 1929-1947, purchased with 1,805Z. 

- Interest on fully paid purchase of War Loan - 



£.. 
1,840 



Stock, 
Vo War Loan. 

£. s. d. 
1,900 - - 



By Amount expended in the purchase of 1,900Z 
5% War Loan, 1929-1947 
- Balance on the 31st March 1917, carried 
to Account for 1917-1918 



£. 1,843 3 4 


1,900 - - 


Cash. 

£. s. d. 
•I. 

- 1,805 - - 
:d 

38 3 4 


Stock, 
5% War Loan. 

£. s. d. 
1,900 - - 


£. 1,843 3 4 


1,900 - - 



VI.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 

CARCHEMISH EXCAVATIONS FUND from the 

1st April 1916 to the 31st March 1917. 



To Balance on the 1st April 1916 



Cash. 



£. s. d. 

88 14 1 



£.88 14 1 



By Amount expended on Excavations 

- Balance on the 31st March 1917, carried to Account for 1917-1918 



Cash. 





£. 


s. 


d. 




10 


- 


- 




78 


14 


1 


A 


.88 


14 


1 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



YII. — AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the bequest 
of the late ME. HENRY LOUIS FLORENCE from the 
1st August 1916 to the 31 st March 1917. 



Cash. 

A. s. d. 
To Amottnt received from the Executors of the late 

Mr. Henry Louis Florence . - - - 1,000 - - 

- 6% Exchequer Bond, 1920, purchased with 1,000Z. — 

- iNTBKESX on Exchequer Bond - - - - 18 14 9 



£.1,018 14 9 



Stock, 

6% Exchequer 

Bond, 1920. 

£. s. d. 
1,000 - - 
1,000 - - 



Cash. 



Stock, 
%) Exchequer 
Bond, 1920. 



By Amount expended in the purchase of 6% Ex- 



chequer Bond. 1920 



1,000 - - 



- Balance on the 31st March 1917, carried 
to Account for 1917-1918 - - . - 



18 14 9 
£.1,018 14 9 



1,000 



1,000 



Frederic G. Kenyan, 

Director and Principal Librarian. 



ACCOUNTS, ETC. 



OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 






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January 

February • 

March 

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September 

October 

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3 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 









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10 



ACCOUNTS ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



The British Museum, Bloomsbury (including the Departments 
o£ Printed Books and Maps, Manuscripts, Oriental Printed Books 
and Manuscripts, Prints and Drawings, Egyptian and Assyrian 
Antiquities, Greek and Roman Antiquities, British and Mediseval 
Antiquities and Ethnography, and Coins and Medals) is normally 
open to the public free daily (except on Good Friday and Christmas 
Day and days o£ Public Fast or Thanksgiving) as follows : — 



On Weekdays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

After 4 p.m. in January, February, November, December, 
and after 5 p.m. in March, September, October, only certain of 
the galleries remain open, viz. : — 



On Mondays 

Wednesdays 

and 

Fridays. 



Exhibitions of Manuscripts, Printed 
Books, Prints and Drawings, Porcelain, 
Glass and Majolica ; Prehistoric, Briti.sh, 
Anglo-Saxon, Mediaeval and Ethnographical 

Collections. 



On Tuesdays, 

Thursdays, 

and 

Saturdays. 



Egyptian, Assyrian, Greek and Roman 
Galleries ; Gold Ornament Room, 
American, Prehistoric, British, Anglo- 
Saxon Collections, and the Waddesdon 
Bequest Room. 



On Sunday Afternoons 
From 2 to 4 



p.m. in January, February, November, 
December. 
2 ,, 5 „ ,, October. 

2 „ 5.30 „ „ March, September. 
2 „ 6 „ „ April, May, June, July, August. 



Persons applying for the purposes of research and reference are 
admitted to the Reading Room under certain regulations every week- 
day, except the days specified below, from 9 a.m. until 7 p.m. The 
Newspaper Room is open, under similar regulations, from 10 a.m. 
until 5 p.m. 



The Reading Room, Newspaper Room, and Students' Rooms in 
the Library and Department of Manuscripts are closed on Sundays, 
Good Friday, Christmas Day, and the first four weekdays in March 
and September. 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. H 

Other Students' Rooms are closed on Sundays, Good Friday, 
and Christmas Day, and occasionally for cleaning. 



Students are admitted generally to the several Departments 
on weekdays, from 10 till 4 or 5 o'clock ; and to the Sculpture 
Galleries from 9 o'clock to the hour of closing. 



At present, however, the provision for keeping the galleries 
open having been suspended by His Majesty's Government in the 
interests of economy, the Exhibition Galleries are wholly closed to 
the public. The Reading Room is open to Students from 9 a.m. 
to 5 p.m., the Newspaper Room and Manuscript Students' Room 
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., on every weekday except Good Friday, 
Christmas Day, and the first four weekdays in March and Sep- 
tember. 



British Museum,) Frederic G. Kenyan, 

2 April 1917. J Director and Principal Librarian. 



12 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEDM. 







,_(_50rt — OO^fNCOGOCrsCO 


-* 






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ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM, 



18 



The Exhibition Galleries o£ the British Museum (Natural History), 
Cromwell Road, South Kensington, including the Departments o£ 
Zoology, Entomology, Geology and Palseontology, Mineralogy, and 
Botany, are open to the public (with certain restrictions due to the 
need for economy) free, daily, except Good Friday and Christmas 
Day, and days of Public Fast or Thanksgiving. 

The regulations at present in force are as under : — 
The Galleries are open to the public, free, as follows : — 
Week-Days. 
Daily.— QeniviA Hall (Special Exhibits), North Hall (Domesti- 
cated Animals, &c.). Bird Gallery, Upper and Lower Mammal 
Galleries, Shell Gallery, and Botanical Gallery. 

On Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. — Fossil Mammal Gallery, 
Fossil Reptile Gallery, and Mineral Gallery. (Eastern side). 

On Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. — Coral Gallery, Star- 
fish Gallery, Reptile Gallery, Insect Gallery, Fish Gallery, and 
Whale Room. (Western side.) 

Sundays. 
Central Hall, North Hall, Bird Gallery, Mammal Galleries 
(including Whale Room), Fossil Mammal Gallery, Fossil Reptile 
Gallery, and Mineral Gallery. 

The Hours of Admission are : — 
On Week-Days, throughout the year from 10 a.m., in 
January 

February 1 to 14... 
,, 15 to end... 
March 

April to August (inclusive) ., . , 

September ... 
October 

November and December ... 
On Sundays, in 
January 

February 1 to 14 ... 
„ 15 to end... 

March 

April 

May to August (inclusive) ... 
September ... 
October 

November and December ... 
Persons are admitted to study in these Departments every week- 
day from 10 till 4 o'clock. 

The following Galleries are closed continuously for the duration 
of the War, viz. — Fossil Fishes ; Fossil Cephalopods ; other Fossil 
Shells, etc. ; Fossil Corals and Sponges, and Fossil Plants ; Strati- 
graphical and Special Palseontological Collections. 

British Muspum (Natural History), / Direct rrfth'rNaturd 







to 


4 p.m. 






,, 


4.30 „ 






?5 


5 
5.30 „ 






?» 


6 






)? 


5.30 ., 




... 


?> 


5 




... 


55 


4 


from 


2 


to 


4 p.m. 


?? 


2 


»5 


4.30 „ 


T> 


2 


?5 


5 


5? 


2 


•5? 


5.30 „ 


„ 


2 


„ 


6 


,, 


2.30 


„ 


7 


'5 


2 


?? 


5.30 „ 


?? 


2 


55 


5 


,, 


2 


55 


4 



24 February, 1917. 



History Departments. 



14 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



IX. General Progress at the Museum, Bloomsbury. 

The work o£ the Museum and all statistics connected with it 
have been fundamentally affected by the decision to which the 
Government came, early in the year, to close the Museums and 
public galleries in London generally, in the interests o£ economy. 
Certain exceptions were made to the original drastic proposal. It 
was obvious that the service o£ the Library and free access to the 
Reading Room could not cease without serious injury to public 
interests, since the Library of the British Museum is the principal 
national storehouse of knowledge, constantly in request for purposes 
of business and research of all kinds. It was also found possible to 
maintain the service of the Manuscript Students' Room, which is 
essential for the students of history. All the exhibition galleries, 
however, were closed on March 1st, and the Museum thenceforth 
ceased its educative and recreative work on behalf of the public 
generally, as distinct from the students of printed books and of 
manuscripts. 

Statistics of the number of visitors consequently come to an end 
automatically after the end of February, up to which time there had 
been 102,733 visitors, as compared with 121,182 in the corres- 
ponding months of the previous year. 

Visitors to the several departments were fewer than in the 
previous year, though the total was considerable. Visits to the 
Reading Room amounted to 134,501, as compared with 178,410 ; 
to the Newspaper Room 9,461, as against 12,650 ; and to the other 
departments (which were naturally affected by the closing of the 
galleries) 11,124, as against 24,934. 

The staff of the Museum has been very much depleted, only 
the minimum necessary for the conservation of the collections and 
the service of the Library being retained. At the end of the year 
115 members of the staff at Bloomsbury were absent on military 
service, and 59 from the Natural History Museum. No member of 
the staff below the age of 26, and fit for general service, remained 
in the two Museums, and very few below the age of 35. Seven 
members of the staff have lost their lives in the service of their 
country ; 20 have been wounded ; two have received the Military 
Cross, and three the Military Medal. 

Progress with the re-arrangement of the collections has naturally 
been very slight ; since, in addition to the absence of staff, some 
materials required for fittings have been practically unobtainable. 

On the closing of the galleries, the opportunity was taken to 
remove the larger part of the collections from the show-cases, and 
to store them in places of greater safety Fortunately no injury 
has been incurred through air attacks. 



20,697 


54,415 


1,234 


9,905 


300,594 


3,400 


189 


2,037 


1,140 


225 


208 


73 


1,569 


834 


396,520 



GENERAL PROGRESS AT THE MUSEUM. lO 

The number o£ separate objects incorporated in the several 
Departments during 1916 is as follows : — 
Printed Books : 

Books and Pamphlets _ _ _ _ 

Serials and Parts o£ Volumes _ - _ 

Maps and Atlases _ _ - - - 

Music ------- 

Newspapers (single numbers) - - :. 

Miscellaneous ------ 

Manuscripts and Seals - - - - - 

Oriental Printed Books and Manuscripts 
Prints and Drawings ----- 

,, ,, (Oriental) - - - 

Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities 
Greek and Roman Antiquities - _ - 

British and Mediaeval Antiquities - 
Coins and Medals ----- 

Total - - - - 

The number o£ accessions is, o£ course, small, since purchases 
have been almost impossible ; but again the Museum has cause to 
be grateful to many generous friends. The most notable among the 
accessions, which are set out at greater length in the departmental 
reports, is the late Lord Avebury's collections illustrating the earliest 
Iron Age in Europe, obtained by excavations at Hallstatt in 1869 
and now presented by his son, together with stone implements from 
Le Moustier and elsewhere. Some fine mediaeval ornaments and a 
considerable number of prints and drawings have also been presented 
by various friends of the Museum. 

Steps have been taken to obtain for the Museum a representative 
collection of war posters, trench literature, trench maps, and aerial 
photographs ; in which undertaking cordial assistance has been 
given by the military authorities. Attention may also be called 
to the collection of German war-medals, which, though artistically 
contemptible, are historically valuable, and form an instructive 
commentary on the psychology of the nation. 

The following publications have been issued in the course of the 
year : — 

Catalogue of Books printed in the XVth Century now in the 
British Museum. Part IV. Italy : Subiaco and Rome. With 13 
plates of facsimiles. 4to. 18^. 

Ancient Greek Inscriptions. Part IV. Section II. Fol. 11. 10s. 

Catalogue of English Coins. The Norman Kings, by G. C. 
Brooke. In two vols., with an introduction and 62 plates. 8vo. 21. 

British Museum, Frederic G. Kenyan., 

2nd April, 1917. Director and Principal Librarian. 



16 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM, 



-PROGRESS made in the Arrangement and Description of 
THE Collections, and Account of Objects added to 
THEM in the Year 1916 (Bloomsbury). 



Department of Printed Books. 

I. Arrangement. — The works added to the collection during the 
past year have, as far as possible, been placed on the shelves of 
the Library according to the system of classification adopted in 
the Museum. 

The press-marks, indicating their respective localities, have been 
marked on the inside and affixed to the back of each volume. 

The total number of these press-marks amounts to 59,251 ; in 
addition to which 70,282 press-marks have been altered, on books 
and in the catalogues, in consequence of changes and re-arrange- 
ments carried out in the Library ; 24,418 labels have been affixed 
to books and volumes of newspapers, and 57,633 obliterated labels 
have been renewed. 

The number of stamps impressed upon articles received is 
318,209. 

2,236 presses of books and newspapers have been dusted in the 
course of the year. 

II. Cataloguing. — 29,856 titles have been written for the 
General Catalogue and for the Catalogues of Maps and Music. 

Printing. — 28,441 titles and index-slips for the General Cata- 
logue, 2,450 for the Map Catalogue, and 12,200 for the Music 
Catalogue, have been printed during the year. 

Incorporation. — General Catalogue. — 28,163 title-slips and 
index-slips have been incorporated into each of the three copies of 
this Catalogue. This has rendered it necessary, in order to maintain 
as far as possible the alphabetical arrangement, to re-arrange 48,609 
title-slips and index-slips in each copy and to add to each copy 649 
new leaves. 

The system of monthly incorporation of accessions, inaugurated 
in April, 1915, was carried out regularly throughout the year. 

Map Catalogue. — 1,000 titles have been w^ritten for this Cata- 
logue, and 4,798 title-slips have been incorporated into each of 
three copies of it. This has rendered it necessary to re-arrange 
3,753 title-slips in each copy and to add to each copy 42 new 
leaves. 

Music Catalogue. — 4,771 titles have been written for this 
Catalogue, and 10,529 title-slips have been incorporated into each 
of two copies of it. This has rendered it necessary to re-arrange 
15,020 title-slips in each copy and to add to each copy 148 new 

leaves. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTED BOOKS. 17 

Shelf Catalogue. — For this Catalogue, in which the title-sHps, 
mounted on cards, are arranged in order o£ press-marks, 24,863 
have been so mounted, and 25,342 have been incorporated in their 
proper order. 

Catalogue of Books Printed in the XVth Centura/. — Part IV. o£ 
this Catalogue, rafentioned in the last Report as having been passed 
through the press, has been published. No work has been done on 
the Catalogue during the year. 

III. Binding. — The number of volumes and sets o£ pamphlets 
sent to be bound in the course o£ the year was 13,805, including 
3,719 volumes o£ newspapers. In consequence o£ the frequent 
adoption o£ the plan o£ binding two or more volumes in one, the 
number of volumes returned was 10,612. In addition, 600 volumes 
have been repaired in the binders' shops. 

Besides this, the following binding work has been done in the 
Library itself : — 5,073 volumes have been repaired, 7,409 cleaned 
and polished, and 5,933 volumes of reports, parts of periodicals, &c., 
have been bound in a light style of binding. 

The following maps, &c., have also been bound or mounted 
during the year : — 23 atlases and 139 volumes of the 6-inch and 
25-inch Ordnance Survey have been bound ; in addition, 226 parts 
of the 1-inch Ordnance Survey and 259 general maps have been 
mounted on linen in 1,784 sheets, and 45 maps have been mounted 
on cards in 537 sheets. 

41,967 numbers of Colonial Newspapers have been made up 
into 1,087 parcels, and 1,080 parcels have been tied up and labelled. 

Seven volumes of the General Catalogue have been broken up and 
re-bound. 120 columns have been re-laid, owing to the accumulation 
of titles under certain headings. 17 volumes of the Music Catalogue 
have been re-bound in 20 new volumes. 

IV. Reading Room Service. — The number of volumes replaced in 
the General Library after use in the Reading Room was 433,307 ; 
in the King's Library, 15,537 ; in the Grenville Library, 1,875 ; in 
the Map Room, 2,678 ; in the presses in which books are kept from 
day to day for the use of readers, 571,173 ; and in the Oriental 
Department, 3,040; making a total of 1,027,610 volumes supplied 
to readers during the year, exclusive of those to which the readers 
have personal access on the shelves of the Reading Room. 

The number of readers during the year was 134,501, giving an 
average of 443 daily, the room having been open on 303 days. 

JVewspaper Room. — The number of readers during the year was 
9,461, giving a daily average of 32, the room having been open on 
303 days. The number of volumes replaced after use was 43,400, 
giving a daily average of 144, not reckoning volumes taken from 
the shelves of the Newspaper Room by the readers themselves. In 
addition, 1,138 country newspapers were brought up to the Library 
from the Repository at Hendon for the use of readers. 

B 



18 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Map Room. — 142 students were admitted to the Map Room. 

Photography. — There were 324 applications for leave to photo- 
graph from books in the Library, and 1,045 volumes were supplied 
for this purpose. 

V. Accessions. — General Lihrary. — 20,697 complete volumes 
and pamphlets have been added to the General Library during the 
year. Of these, 3,184 were presented; 11,268 received by C-opy- 
right ; 473 by Colonial Copyright ; 1,434 by International Exchange ; 
and 4,338 acquired by purchase. 

54,415 parts or volumes of serial publications and of works in 
progress have been added to the General Library. Of these, 2,403 
were presented; 33,146 received by Copyright; 420 by Colonial 
Copyright; 2,066 by International Exchange; and 16,380 acquired 
by purchase. 

Maps. — 39 atlases, 28 parts of atlases, and 1,167 maps in 4,856 
sheets have been added to the collection during the year. Of these, 
6 atlases, 28 parts of atlases, and 729 maps were presented ; 9 
atlases and 399 maps received by Copyright ; 13 atlases and 14 
maps by Colonial Copyright ; 9 atlases and 25 maps acquired by 
purchase, and 2 atlases by exchange. 

Music. — 9,905 musical publications have been added to the 
collection during the year. Of these, 8,628 books and pieces and 
868 parts were received by Copyright ; 331 pieces by Colonial 
Copyright ; and 2 books and 76 parts acquired by purchase. 

Newspapers. — The number of newspapers published in the 
United Kingdom, received under the provisions of the Copyright 
Act during the year, was 3,038, comprising 207,144 single 
numbers. Thirteen sets, comprising 2,123 single numbers, were 
received by Colonial Copyright; 347 sets, comprising 76,341 single 
numbers, of colonial and foreign newspapers have been presented ; 
and 90 sets, comprising three volumes and 14,986 single numbers, 
of current colonial and foreign newspapers have been purchased. 

Miscellaneous. — 3,400 articles not included in the foregoing 
paragraphs have been received in the Department. These consist of 
Parliamentary Papers, single sheets, and other miscellaneous items. 

The total number of articles enumerated above as having been 
received in the Department during the year, exclusive of newspapers, 
is 89,651. 

Acquisitions of Special Interest. -^The only book of importance 
acquired by purchase during the year is — 

Parasitaster, or the Fawne. By John Marston. T. P. for W.C. 
[T. Pavier, for W. Creede ?] 1606. 

The following have been acquired by exchange : — 
Breviarium secundum morem Romanse Curiae. Venice, B. Pictor, 
Ratdolt and Loslein, 1478. 



DEPARTMENT OF FEINTED BOOKS. 19 

Horarium. For the use o£ Utrecht. Antwerp, Adreaen van 
Liesvelt, 1495. 

Lichtenberger. Pronosticatio Latina. Mainz, [Jacob Mey- 
denbach], 1491. 

Psalterium Latinum cum canticis et symbolo. [Leipzig, Moritz 
Brandiss, circa 1488.] 

Blaeu. Atlas. 1641-1655. 

Donations. 

A collection o£ 79 books and pamphlets, mostly printed in 
England and America in the seventeenth century, forming a 
portion of the Library bequeathed to the Society for the Propa- 
gation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts by Bishop White Kennett. 
Presented hy the Society. 

Archive y Biblioteca de la Casa de Medinaceli. Vol. 1. 
Presented hy the Duque de Medinaceli. 

Fourteen leaves completing a copy in the Museum of R. Greene's 
" Planetomachia," 1585. Presented by T. J. Wise., Esq., and Prof. 
Candy. 

The Rape of Lucrece. By Thomas Heywood. 1608. Pre- 
sented hy W. A. White, Esq. 

Pictures in the Collection of P. A. B. Widener. Early Italian 
and Spanish Schools. Presented hy P. A. B. Widener, Esq. 

The Mellvill Book of Roundels. (Roxburghe Club.) Presented 
hy M. Tomkinson, Esq. 

Handleiding tot de Paardenkennis. Deel. 1, 2. Presented hy 
Captain Thomas sen. 

G. F. Barwick. 



20 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Department of Manuscripts. 

1. Catalogue of Additions. — Sheets R, S, containing part o£ 
the descriptions o£ MSS. acquired in 1914, have been printed off 
and part of Sheet T (to Additional MS. 38841) is in type. 

Of other MSS. acquired in 1914, Additional 38841, 38842, 
38845, 38975-38979 have been described and indexed, and the 
descriptions down to 38857 revised and sent to the printer. 

Of those acquired in 1915, Additional 39180-39183, 39185, 
' 39186, 39216-39252 have been described and indexed. 

Of those acquired in 1916, Egerton MSS. 2910-2936 and 
Additional MSS. 39288-39292, 39294-39298 have been described 
and indexed. 

2. Catalogue of Greek Papyri. Vol. V. — Sheets Ll-3 B, 
completing the descriptions and indices, have been passed through 
the press, and the introductory matter sent to the printer. 

3. Catalogue of the Royal and King'' s MSS. — Sheets C-I of 
Vol. III. have been printed off and Sheet K, completing the 
descriptions, is in type. The revision of the general index is in 
progress and the introduction in preparation. 

4. Catalogue of Cotton MSS.— The MSS. Caligula E. III., IV. 
have been indexed. 

5. Catalogue of Early Additional and Egerton MSS. — Additional 
MSS. 4500-4756, excepting a few Oriental MSS. and Nos. 4576- 
4695 (Rymer's collections, &c.) reserved for further consideration, 
have been described and indexed. 

6. Voluntary assistance. — The department is indebted to 
Sir George Warner for much assistance in the revision of the 
description of the King's MSS. for the new catalogue, and to 
Mr. Edward Alexander Fry for help in sorting the Dunkin 
collection. 

7. Binding. — 80 Additional and 37 Egerton MSS. newly 
acquired and 105 MSS. of the old collections have been bound, 
repaired or lettered, together with 180 Rolls or Charters and 65 
Books of Reference, Facsimiles or Catalogues. 

8. Verification. — The entire collection of MSS. has been 
verified by comparison with the Shelf-lists. 

9. Stamping, folioing and placing. — 136 Additional MSS., 37 
Egerton MSS., and 101 Books of Reference have been stamped. 
The total of impressions made was 7,003. 

154 MSS. have been fohoed, with a total of 25,081 folios. 

15,196 sheets, &c., have been numbered. 

166 newly acquired MSS. have been placed and 61 MSS. of the 
old collections replaced. All have been press-marked and entered 
in Hand- and Shelf-lists. 10 seals and casts have been provided 
with boxes, placed and entered in Hand- and Drawer-lists. 



i 



DEPARTMENT OF MANUSCRIPTS. 21 

10. Books of Reference. — 82 volumes and parts have been 
received, catalogued and placed. 

9 volumes and parts o£ Facsimiles were added to the series 
now deposited in the Department and available for the use of 
Readers. 

11. Consultation of MSS.—U,7n MSS. and 3,813 Charters 
and Seals have been consulted in the Students' Room, and 37 MSS. 
in the Reading Room. The number o£ Students was 5,713. In 
addition 2,567 Oriental MSS. have been consulted in the Students' 
Room by 817 Students. 

12. MSS. pJwtographe'd. — 272 MSS. (including Papyri, 
Charters, and Seals) were allowed to be photographed, with a 
total o£ 4,676 photographs taken. 

13. Acquisitions. — The number o£ Manuscripts and Documents, 
&c., acquired during the year has been : — 

Additional MSS. ------- 70 

Egerton MSS. ------- 43 

Charters and Rolls ------- 20 

Detached Seals and Casts - - - - - - 56 

This enumeration does not include the Dunkin Collection, the 
arrangement o£ which is not completed, but includes 17 volumes 
transferred from other Departments. 

With one small exception (a continuation of Mr. Downman's 
plans of ancient earthworks) the Department has been entirely 
dependent this year on the generosity of private donors or on 
funds for purchase accruing from private bequests. The more 
important additions are : — 

Three holograph letters of Dr. Johnson relating to the King's 
Library. Presented hy Lady Wernher, who purchased them at the 
Red Cross Sale. 

Biographical and Topographical collections of the late E. H. W. 
Dunkin, Esq., relating to the Sussex clergy, &c. Presented hy 
Mrs. Dunkin. 

Collections for the history of co. Clare by the late R. W. Twigge, 
Esq., 10 volumes, besides rolls, &c. Presented hy Mrs. Twigge. 

Transcripts of monumental inscriptions in co. Hertford, by 
W. B. Gerish, Esq., 14 volumes. Presented hy the compiler. 

Autograph draft of part of Bishop Berkeley's works, corres- 
pondence of his family, &c., 13 volumes. Presented hy Mrs. Rose. 

The Granville collection of scores by Handel in 37 volumes. 
Miracles of Our Lady, 12th cent. 

Latin Poems of Robert Partes, a Reading monk, 12th cent. 
Court-book of Rayleigh, co. Essex, 1553-1606. 
Autograph letters (4) of S. L. Clemens (Mark Twain). 
These five purchased from the Farnhorough fund. 

Julius P. Gilson. 



22 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Department of Oriental Printed Books and MSS. 

Cataloguing. — The numbers of Titles written for the Catalogues 
are : — Arabic, 83 ; Armenian, 24 ; Assamese, 16 ; Avestan, 17 ; 
Bengali, 514 ; Bodo, 2 ; Burmese, 150 ; Chakma, 3 ; Chin, 16 ; 
Chinese, 124 ; Ethiopic, 4 ; Gujarati, 497 ; Hebrew, 16 ; Hindi, 
514 ; Hindustani, 231 ; Ho, 2 ; Javanese, 6 ; Kachin, 9 ; Kanarese, 
227 ; Kanawari, 3 ; Karen, 6 ; Kashmiri, 27 ; Khond, 3 ; Kurku, 
2 ; Lepcha, 1 ; Lisu, 2 ; Lushai, 5 ; Malayalam, 59 ; Marathi, 346 ; 
Naga, 7 ; Nagpuria, 6 ; Oriya, 7 ; Pahlavi, 2 ; Pali, 113 ; Panjabi, 
45 ; Persian, 332 ; Prakrit, 60 ; Sanskrit, 731 ; Siamese, 20 ; 
Sindhi, 92 ; Sinhalese, 40 ; Taking, 2 ; Tamil, 859 ; Telugu, 607 ; 
Turkish, 15 ; Uigur, 6. Total, 5,851. 

11 Indian Charters have been fully catalogued. 

11 short descriptions of MSS. have been entered in the Descriptive 
List, the Register, and the Classed Inventory. 

9 MSS (1,119 folios) have been folioed. 

Bindmg. — The numbers of Printed Books and MSS. sent to the 
Binders are : — Arabic, Persian, and Hindustani Books, 84 ; Chinese 
and Japanese Books, 2 ; Ethiopic and Syriac Books, 3 ; Malay 
Books, 9 ; Books in Sanskrit and other Indian languages, 165 ; 
MSS., 24. 

Students. — The number of visits of Students working upon 
Oriental MSS. in the Students' Room attached to the Department 
of Manuscripts during the year has been 817. The number of 
Oriental MSS. consulted by them was 2,567. The number of 
Oriental Printed Books used in the Reading Room was 3,040. 

Photography. — 31 applications have been made to photograph 
books and MSS. in this Department. 

Additions. — The number of volumes, pamphlets, &c., added to 
the collections of the Department during the year is 2,037. Of 
these 2,026 are Printed Books, and 11 are MSS. 

Of the Printed Books, 94 were bought ; 1,763 were received 
under the India Copyright Act ; 62 were received under the 
Colonial Copyright Acts from Ceylon and Hongkong ; and 107 
were presented. Of the MSS., 9 were presented, 1 was bought, and 
1 was found in the binding of a book belonging to the Department. 
The MSS. are as follows :— 

Batta- - - - - - - 2 

Chinese ------ 1 

Hebrew - - - _ - _ 1 

Pali and Sinhalese _ - - - 1 

Persian -___-- 3 

Sanskrit - - - - - - 1 

Sanskrit and Grujarati - - - - 1 

Sanskrit and Hindi ' - - - - 1 

11 



DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL PRINTED BOOKS AND MSS. 23 

The most important acquisitions are : 

Batta MSS. — A Batta Calendar of comparative dates for a 
number of years from 1720 a.d. onwards ; together with a large 
number of epistles extracted from the original binding of the 
calendar. Presented hy Miss E. G. Wren. 

Persian MSS. — 1. Ta'rikh i Sighari, an account of Khokand 
and its rulers during the first half of the 18th century. Copied 
a.H. 1161 (a.d. 1748). 8°. Presented hy Sir Henry H. Boworth, 
K.C.I.E. 

2. Part (about half) of Kazvini's 'Aja'ib ul-makhliikat, with 
some good Indian drawings in colour. 18th cent. 8°. Presented 
by Sir Henry H. Boworth, K. CLE. 

3. A large collection of the poems, with some prose works, of 
Sardar Ghulam Muhammad Khan Durrani, called Tarzi, a modern 
Afghan writer. Copied, a.h. 1305 (a.d. 1887). 8"'. 

L. D. Barnett. 



24 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Department of Prints and Drawings. 
I. — Arrangement and Cataloguing, ^'c. 

Arrangement. — 1,150 English portraits recently acquired have 
been distributed according to periods and classes. 

2,699 other prints and drawings recently acquired have been 
incorporated with the divisions of the collection to which they 
severally belong. 

36 books of drawings and prints have been placed. 

The unfinished proofs by English engravers, formerly kept 
apart, have been incorporated with the engravers' works, and the 
large prints by English engravers have been rearranged. 

A new series of solanders containing the mounted work of 
modern etchers and lithographers is in course of arrangement. 

A large number of solanders, portfolios, and books containing 
drawings and prints of special value have been removed for greater 
safety to a strong room in the basement. 

All books of prints and books of reference recently acquired 
have been catalogued, labelled, and placed. 

Catalogues and Indexes. — The new card index to books of 
reference has been nearly completed. 

The index to periodicals has been brought up to date. 

The new references to case, shelf, and number have been inserted 
all through the index to the books of prints. 

The new references to cases and books have been inserted in the 
indexes of artists of the Spanish, Russian, Scandinavian and American 
schools, and in the index of Foreign Artists working in England ; 
in the case of the Italian school all new references have been inserted 
except those relating to books. 

The artists represented in the collection of woodcuts by the 
Brothers Dalziel have been indexed as far as vol. 13. 

117 references to drawings by Dutch and Flemish artists in the 
Malcolm collection have been inserted in the index of artists of 
these schools. 

The work of indexing foreign portraits contained in books of 
prints has been continued. A complete list has been made of all 
such portraits ; references to them have been added on the slips 
made for the general portrait collection, and new slips have been 
written for all names occurring only in the books of prints. More 
detailed slips have also been written for all these portraits with a 
view to incorporation in a future printed catalogue of the foreign 
portraits. 

Exhibition. — No alterations in the exhibition were made during 
the first two months of the year. On March 1st the gallery was 
closed, and all prints and drawings were removed from the wall 
cases, screens and slopes. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWIl|pS. 25 

Registration. — 1,063 items have been entered in the Register of 
Acquisitions. 

Stamping and Mounting. — 5,047 drawings, prints, Ac, recently 
acquired, have been impressed with the departmental stamp and 
references to the Register. 

1,338 prints from the Montague Guest Collection have been 
impressed with a special stamp. 

The work of stamping the foreign book-plates in the Franks 
Collection has been continued. 

The whole of the German drawings in the Malcolm Collection 
have been mounted. 

28 drawings, recently acquired, have been prepared and mounted 
on sunk mounts ; 53 woodcuts by Burgkmair and 16 other early 
engravings and woodcuts have been mounted ; 48 mezzotints from 
the Cheylesmore Collection and 3 mezzotints printed in colours by 
Le Blon have been mounted on sunk mounts. 

The following modern prints have been mounted, in addition to 
smaller numbers by other artists : — D. Y. Cameron, 59 etchings ; 
K. Cameron, 12 etchings ; C. Conder, 39 lithographs ; Eric Gill, 
12 woodcuts ; Seymour Haden, 270 etchings and mezzotints ; 
E. S. Lumsden, 48 etchings ; J. F. Millet, 23 etchings ; G. 
Raverat, 14 woodcuts ; C. H. Shannon, 84 lithographs ; W. Strang, 
102 etchings ; F. S. Unwin, 13 etchings. 

19 drawings by E. W. Cooke, 20 drawings by J. Webster, 143 
drawings by Sir. J. Wyatville, 46 drawings by Parkinson, 131 
anonymous drawings, 110 woodcuts by Tenniel, and 303 woodcuts 
by Whymper, have been mounted in albums. 

414 book-plates have been mounted on paper mounts. 

All the above have been lettered with the artists' names and 
references to the Register and to catalogues. 

Numerous prints, drawings, and mounts have been cleaned. 

Students. — The total number of visitors admitted to the Print 
Room during the year ended December 31st, 1916, was 2,063 ; of 
these admissions 1,234 were previous to the closing of the Museum 
to the public on March 1st. 

Pliotographing . — 176 applications were made for leave to 
photograph, and 634 photographs were taken. 

II. — Acquisitions. 

The total number of prints, drawings, books, &c., acquired 
during the year was 1,140, of which the following are the most 
important : — 

Italian School. 

Drawing. 
Cardi, L. (II Cigoli). The facade of St. Peter's, and two 
cartouches ; pen and sepia. Presented hy Sir E. J. Poynter., Bart.., 
P.K.A. 



26 acdiunts, etc., of the british museum. 

German School. 
Drawings. 

Breu, Jorg (I.) The Calumny of Apelles ; pen and ink version 
o£ the original drawing by Mantegna in the Department. The 
immediate original o£ Breu's free copy is the engraving by Mocetto, 
in which the church of SS. Giovanni and Paolo and the equestrian 
statue of Colleoni are introduced in the background. Presented hi/ 
Sir E. J. Poynter, Bart., P.R.A. 

Ermels, J. F. Classical landscape ; pen and Indian ink wash. 
Presented hy John Lane, Esq. 

Woodcuts. 

Anonymous, 15th century. The relics and insignia of the Holy 
Roman Empire ; undescribed. Presented hy Senhor G. de Vianna 
Kelscli. 

Anonymous, 16th century. A woman with a monstrous 
deformity of the stomach ; broadside with text and coloured 
woodcut. 

Schaufelein, H. L. The Siege of Bethulia. Presented hy 
Major Howard. 

Springinklee, Hans. St. John, from a rare set of the Apostles 
(1520-21). 

Schools of the Netherlands. 

Drawings. 

Raemaekers, L. Jackals in the political field ; Ferdinand the 
Chameleon. Presented hy A. E. Anderson, Esq. The third German 
war loan. Presented hy W. Tinker, Esq. War cartoons ; black 
chalk and water-colour. 

Etchings. 

Gheyn, J. de (II.) Five of the series of Seven Sages of Greece 
(1616). Presented hy Camphell Dodgson, Esq. 

Bruycker, Jules de. The Death Knell in Flanders ; Kultur. 
Presented hy J. de Graaff, Esq. 

Maris, Matthijs. Original plate of the etching. Girl under a 
tree. Presented hy G. Reid, Esq. 

Poortenaar, Jan. Nine original etchings (views in Amsterdam 
and London, tiger-lilies). Presented hy J. de Graaff, Esq. 

Lithographs. 

Poortenaar, Jan. Nine original lithographs (views in Amsterdam 
and Newcastle, sunflowers). Presented hy J. de Graaff, Esq. 

Woodcut. 

Anonymous, early 16th cent. Soldiers ; fragment of a very rare 
set, of which other specimens exist at Berlin, Vienna, and Oxford. 
Presented hy Mr. C. Aymes. , 



department of prints and drawings. 27 

French School. 
Drawings. 

Natoire, C. J. Nude study ; black and white chalk. Presented 
hy E. Peter Jones, Esq. 

Noe, A. C H. de ("Cham"). The enthusiastic collector. 
Water colours. Presented hy A. E. Anderson, Esq. 

Engravings. 

Moitte, P. E. Le Confessional, after P. A. Baudoin ; first state. 
Presented hy Camphell Dodgson, Esq. 

Etchings. 

Buhot, F. Three etchings (Bourcard 54 I, 61 I, 73). Presented 
hy S. Vacher, Esq. 

Guerard, H. Four etchings. Presented hy S. Vacher, Esq. 

Jou, Louis. Belgique, 1914 ; L'Exode. Presented hy Mont. 
Eug. Rodrigues. 

Lithographs. 

Dore, Gr. Three original lithographs. Presented hy E. E. 
Leggatt, Esq. 

Fantin-Latour, H. Andromede. Presented hy Camphell Dodg- 
son, Esq. 

Grevedon, H. La Duchesse de Berry, after Lawrence ; proof. 
Presented hy Camphell Dodgson, Esq. 

Poster. 

Forain, J. L. Le Prisonnier. Presented hy Dr. Michael 
Sadler, CD. 

Scandinavian Schools. 
Drawings. 

Thorwaldsen, B. Pan and a young faun ; three mythological 
subjects ; pen and ink. Presented hy Camphell Dodgson, Esq. 

Etchings. 

Annual publication of Foreningen for Grafisk Konst, 1915 (four 
etchings and one lithograph). Presented hy Camphell Dodgson, Esq. 

American School. 

Engraving. 

Cole, Timothy. " Primavera," after Botticelli. Unique proof 
of an experiment by a special process of intaglio engraving on 
wood ; printed from an electrotype. Presented hy C. Fairfax 
Murray, Esq. 



28 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM.. 

EtcMng. 

Whistler, J. A. McN. Title-page for the French set, 1858 ; 
from a rejected and unpublished plate ; undescribed and probably 
unique. Presented by Dennis Day. Esq. 

Lithographs. 

Brown, Bolton. Twenty-eight original lithographs ; figures, 
landscape, &c. Presented by the Artist. 

Whistler, J. A. McN. Study of Thomas Way, a variant 
(undescribed) of Way, Nos. 107, 108 ; unpublished and cancelled. 
Presented by H. J. Wright, Esq. 

Foreign Artists Resident in England. 
Drawings. 

Fuseli, H., R.A. Two life studies ; pen and ink and water- 
colours. Presented hy E. Peter Jones, Esq. 

Etchings. 

Lund, N. M. Eight original landscapes, views in the High- 
lands and the South of England. Presented by A. E. Anderson, 
Esq., Mrs. Lund, and Campbell Dodgson, Esq. 

Woodcuts. 

Kristian, Roald. Animals ; proofs of three original woodcuts 
published in Form. Presented by the Artist. 

British School. 
Drawings. 

Burnet, J. Looking at a horse's mouth ; pen and ink. Pre- 
sented by Campbell Dodgson, Esq. 

Gethin, P. F. View near Lisdoonvarna ; water colours. The 
City of Cashel ; water colours. Irish landscape ; water colours. 
Grerona ; water colours. Study for an etching of Chancellor 
Dowdall ; pen and ink and wash. Two girls' heads ; black, red, 
and white chalks. Five studies of Irish girls ; water colours and 
chalk. Presented by Mrs. Gethin and Captain Gethin. A County 
Mayo town on Market Day ; water colours. Presented by Miss 

E. P. McGhee. 

Arthur Hughes. Design for " April Love " ; pen and ink. 
Presented by J. P. Heseltine, Esq. Two designs for " La Belle 
Dame sans merci " ; pen and ink. Presented by Dr. Michael Sadler, 
C.B. " Home from Work " ; pen and ink. Presented by Mrs. 

F. Dodd. 

Lewis, J. F., R.A. A Turkish interior ; chalk and water- 
colour sketch. Presented by the National Art- Collections Fiind. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 29 

Robertson, G. Landscape with the journey to Emmaus ; water 
colours. Two oval landscapes with cattle and sheep (1775), from 
the collection of James Moore, F.S.A. ; water colours. Presented 
hy Campbell Dodgson, Esq. 

Tenniel, Sir J. Two Punch cartoons : " The Learned Welsh 
Goat," 1895 ; " Good Dog ! " 1895 ; pencil. Presented by Campbell 
T>odgson, Esq. 

Walker- F. S. Water-lilies; study for a wood engraving ; Indian 
ink wash, brightened with white. Presented by the Artist. 

Engravings. 

Chapman, J. Watkins. Six unpublished proof mezzotints, after 
Greuze, Romney, &c. Presented by E. E. Leggatt, Esq. 

Crawford, T. Hamilton. Sixteen proof mezzotints, chiefly 
portraits (Duchess of Abercorn, after H. Draper, Duke and Duchess 
of Northumberland, after Sir E. J. Poynter, P.R.A., H. L. Bischoffs- 
heim and Martin R. Smith, after Sir H. Von Herkomer, R.A., 
Edward Caird, Dr. J. Clifford, and Sir John Bland-Sutton, after 
the Hon. John Collier, &c). Presented by the Artist. 

Medland, Thomas. The Panshanger Oak. Presented by E. E. 
Leggatt, Esq. 

Smith, J. R. The Hurdy-Gurdy Player, after George Carter, 
1775, rare and undescribed. Presented by Campbell Eodgson, Esq. 

Etchings. 

Airy, Anna. The Cast of Dice. Five etchings of flowers and 
leaves. Presented by the Artist. 

Barker, Anthony R. The First Italian Portfolio (12 plates, 
1912). Presented by Campbell Dodgson, Esq. 

Baskett, C. H. Five aquatint landscapes. Presented by Messrs. 
P. and D. Colnaghi and Obach. 

Cameron, D. Y., A.R.A. The Royal Scottish Academy, and 
others, chiefly book-plates. Presented by James MacLehose, Esq., 
Miss K: Cameron, and others. 

Dawson, Nelson. Arms of Winchester College and Stamford 
Grammar School. Soft ground, coloured. Presented by Campbell 
Dodgson, Esq. 

Dodd, Francis. Verona. Greenwich. Portraits of J. Craig Annan, 
W. Burton, J. Hamilton Hay, A. L. Smith, and H. Rushbury ; 
dry-points. Presented by the Artist. 

Exley, J. R. G. Seven etchings of fowls ; three landscapes. 
Presented by the Artist and by Miss E. P. McGhee. 

Fisher, A. Hugh. Nine etchings of landscape and architecture. 
Preseiaed by the Artist and by Campbell Dodgson, Esq. 

Geddes, A. Three states of portrait etchings. Presented by 
R. K. Blair, Esq. 

Gethin, P. F. Portrait of Chancellor Dowdall. Presented by 
Chancellor Dowdall, K. C. 

Hay, J. Hamilton. The Encased Statue, British Museum 
Presented by Campbell Dodgson, Esq. 



30 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. ' 

Holroyd, Sir Charles. Eve and the Serpent. Presented hy the 
Artist. 

James, Hon. Walter. The Ilex. Pegwell Bay. Presented hy 
Miss E. P. McGhee. 

Ray- Jones, R. Portrait o£ the Artist. Presented hy the Artist. 

Strang, D. R. Breton Landscape. Presented hy the Artist. 

Strang, W., A.R.A. Mealtime. Joan o£ Arc. Dr. Garnett. 
Presented hy Camphell Dodgson, Esq. 

Unwin, F. S. Twelve etchings of landscape and architecture. 
Presented hy the Artist. 

Urwick, W. H. Ten landscape etchings and aquatints. Presented 
hy Douglas R. Urwick, Esq. 

Watson, C. J. La Chapelle, Rue. Presented hy Miss E. P. 
McGhee. 

Lithographs. 

Blatherwick, L. Spider's web. Presented hy the Artist. 

Oonder, C. Lucien and Esther ; second state. Presented hy 
Camphell Dodgson, Esq. 

Gethin, P. F. A girl's head. The Ghe£. Presented hy F. V. 
Burridge, Esq. 

Hartrick, A. S. The Man on the Hill. Presented hy Camphell 
Dodgson, Esq. 

Shannon, C. H., A.R.A. Five lithographs (Derry, Nos. 79-83). 
Presented hy the Artist. 

■ Woodcuts. 

Anonymous, 16th cent. Allegorical subject o£ anti-papal 
tendency. Presented hy Camphell Dodgson, Esq. 

Gill, Eric. Sixteen proof woodcuts and a book of emblems. 
Presented hy Camphell Dodgson, Esq. 

Raverat, G. The Prodigal Son, and two landscapes. Presented 
hy the Artist. 

Metal Cuts Printed in Colours. 

Giles, W. The Last Glow, Central Corsica ; printed from eight 
zinc blocks. Presented by the Artist. 

Shrimpton-Giles, A. M. Norcia, early Spring ; printed from 
six zinc blocks. Presented hy the Artist. 

Prints arranged to illustrate the Works of Masters. 

Sir E. Landseer, R.A. A Member of the Royal Humane Society, 
engraved by Thomas Landseer ; proof touched by Sir Edwin 
Landseer. Presented hy E. E. Leggatt, Esq. 

Portraits. 

Of the 90 English and 42 foreign portraits acquired during the 
year, none call for special mention except a collection of 20 
portraits of W. Harvey, M.D. Presented hy Sidney H. Badcock, Esq. 



department of prints and drawings. 31 

Book-plates. 

26 by A. J. Downey. Presented hy the Artist. 
12 by G. W. Eve, Presented hy G. H. Viner, Esq., and others. 
45 by W. F. Hopson. Presented hy the Artist and hy G. H. 
Viner, Esq. 

7 by S. L. Smith. Presented hy G. H. Viner, Esq., and others. 
17 by C. A. Voysey. Presented hy the Artist. 
44 miscellaneous. Presented hy various donors. 

Collections and Sets. 

34 lithographic war cartoons by W. Sluiter, Jan Sluyters, and 
P. Yanderhem, from De Nieuwe Amsterdammer, 1915-16. Presented! 
hy H. Van den Bergh, Esq. 

37 French lithographic music covers o£ the 19th cent. Presented 
hy Captain A. M. Bind, A.S.C. 

Camphell Dodgson. 



32 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Sub-Department of Oriental Prints and Drawings. 
I. — Arrangement and Cataloguing, 8fc. 

Immediately after the closing o£ the Museum in March all the 
Chinese and Japanese Paintings exhibited in the Gallery were 
removed. A selection o£ all the most valuable items in the collections 
were transferred to the stro'ng room allotted to the Department. 

The Catalogue of Chinese Woodcuts has been completed and 
printed as a supplement to the Catalogue of Japanese Woodcuts. 
The whole work has been printed off, with the illustrations, and is in 
process of being bound. 

The preparation of a Catalogue of the Japanese Illustrated Books 
in the Sub-Department has been begun. The greater part of the 
catalogue has been written in a form which it is intended to 
amplify later with translations of the more important prefaces and 
other detail. 

The Index of Japanese Artists has been revised. 

The preparation of material for a future Catalogue of Chinese 
Paintings has been set on foot. Translations have been made of 
passages in Chinese books relative to pictures in the collection ; also 
of all pooms and other inscriptions on paintings in the Wegener 
Collection. 

The " Kokka " Magazine has been indexed up to date. 

All books of prints and books of reference have been labelled, 
placed, and catalogued. 

653 prints, paintings, &c., recently acquired, have been incor- 
porated with the divisions of the collection to which they severally 
belong. 

Registration. — 120 items have been entered in the Register of 
Acquisitions. 

Stamping and Mounting. — 1,462 prints, paintings, &c., recently 
acquired, have been impressed with the departmental stamp and 
references to the Register. 

15 Japanese paintings have been mounted, one as a kakemono. 

2 Chinese paintings have been mounted as kakemono, and 2 
others backed with silk. 

6 Indian paintings have been mounted on sunk mounts. 

421 Japanese prints (including 55 " triptychs " and 6 five- 
sheet prints) have been mounted on sunk mounts. 82 of these have 
been specially cleaned and repaired. All have been lettered with 
the artists' names and references to the Register and to the 
Catalogue. 

II . — A cquisitions. 

The total number of paintings, prints, &c., acquired during the 
year was 225, of which the following are the most important : — 



sub-department of oriental prints and drawings. 33 

Chinese. 
Engravings. 

A set of line-engravings of palaces. Presented by the Dowager 
Viscountess Wolseley. 

Japanese. 
Painting. 

Tosa School. " Ippen Shonin Monogatari " ; makimono, in ink 
and colours. Presented hy Oscar Raphael, Esq., and H. P. and 
H. D. Waley, Esqs. 

Woodcuts. 

A set of theatre-programmes, and games. Presented by W. 
Bateson, Esq., F.R.S. 

Indian. 

Painting. 

Kashmir School. " Teaching a Moslem how to Shoot ; " in 
colour. Presented hy Ernest Debenham, Esq. 

Tibetan. 

Painting. 

Magic Circle, with figures of divinities ; in colours, on silk. 
Presented by A. L. Hall, Esq. 

Books of Prints and Books of Reference. 

Ajanta Frescoes. 

Catalogue of the Li Wen-ch'ing Collection. Presented by 
Charles L. Freer, Esq. 

Coomaraswamy, A. K. Rajput Painting. 2 vols. Presented 
by Laurence Binyon, Esq. 

Laurence Binyon. 



34 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Department of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities. 
I. — Arrangement, Cataloguing, Sfc. 
Egyptian Antiquities : — 

The removal of portions o£ the collections to places protected 
against hostile air-craft has been continued. 

The objects acquired during the year have been cleaned, repaired 
(when necessary) and mounted in readiness for exhibition in due 
course. 

The labelling of the collections has been continued. 22 labels 
have been written and painted, and 25 numbers have been painted 
on plinths, and broken letters and numbers have been repaired. 

12 objects have been mounted on stone plinths, one stele has 
been repaired, several stelse have been cleaned, 9 pedestals, 5 labels, 
and several small mounts have been made. 

A large selection of autotype reproductions of the principal royal 
mummies from Der al-Bahari has been mounted in four frames for 
exhibition, and each autotype has been labelled. 

The Coptic stelse from the Egyptian Gallery have been removed 
to a room in the Second Northern Gallery, and the arrangement of 
a Coptic Room has been begun. 

The casts of the sarcophagi of Tabnith and Eshmunazar have been 
repaired and painted, and inscriptions picked out in a lighter colour. 
The Hebrew gravestones from Aden have been cleaned, remounted, 
and removed upstairs. 

The miscellaneous collections and fragments in the Basement 
have been examined, and a number of objects selected for mounting 
and exhibition. 

The Wall-cases on the North-West Staircase Landing have been 
re-arranged, and a number of recently acquired objects have been 
placed in them. 

The busts, figures, terra-cottas, inscriptions, &c., from Cyprus 
have been transferred to the Greek and Roman Department, and the 
cases which held them have been re-fitted, and filled with Phoenician 
Inscriptions, &c. 

The Semitic Inscriptions have been re -arranged in the First and 
Second Rooms in the Second Northern Gallery. The First Room 
contains the inscriptions in the Northern Semitic dialects (Phoenician, 
Hebrew, &c.), and the Second Room contains those in Southern 
dialects (Himyaritic, Arabic, &c.). The antiquities from Carthage 
have also been grouped. 

Assyrian Antiquities : 

4,746 tablets have been numbered, 48 trays have been numbered, 
1,992 tablets have been boxed, slip numbers have been affixed to 296 
boxes of tablets, 12 labels have been written, 2 tablets have been 
repaired, the reference numbers to the collections have been continued, 
and 78 tablets have been catalogued. 



DEPARTMENT OF EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 35 

Students. — About 500 visits have been made to the Department 
by enquirers, and 333 objects have been issued for the use of 
students. 

II. — Acquisitions. 

A collection of Coptic monuments from the ruins of a church at 
Edfu and the Monastery of St. Jeremiah, to the south of Cairo : — 

1. A Coptic stele with crosses and pediment in relief. 

2. Coptic sepulchral inscription of Theodore and others. 

3. Decorated stele with panels, arch, &c. 

4. Stele of Theodore, with Greek inscription and Coptic 

decoration. 

5. Stele of the lady Tsamma, with Cross in relief, on which is 

cut the name of Apa Psate. 

6. Memorial stele of Apa Horp, Herem, and others. 

7. Memorial stele of Phoibammon, Apa Serene, and others. 

8. Stele of one John, a monk (?). 

9-13. Five sepulchral stelse, richly decorated with sculptures in 
relief. 

III. — Presents. 

I. 1-38. Thirty-eight figures of Egyptian gods and sacred 

animals. 
39-58. Twenty hard stone and porcelain amulets. 
59, 60. Two plaques of Isis, Horus, and Nephthys. 
^1-150. Ninety scarabs, chiefly of the XVIIIth dynasty. 
151-159. Nine stone scarabs, uninscribed. 
160-164. Five scarabs in rings. 
165, 166. Two beads for inlaying ; very fine work. 
166-170. Five rectangular steatite plaques. 
171-177. Seven miscellaneous objects. 

178. String of beads. 

179. Necklace of flat circular beads. 

180. Blue glazed ware vase of Rameses III. 

181. Ivory figure for inlaying. 
182-190. Nine rings and other objects. 
191-193. Three Gnostic gems. 

Bequeathed hy the late Rev. W. F. Rose, M.A. 

II. A large earthenware Egyptian jar, Graeco-Roman Period. 

Presented by Lady Watson. 

III. Scarab of Rameses II. 

Presented hy Lieut.-Col. E. Mansel Sympson, M.A., M.D., 
F.S.A. 

E. A. Wallis Budge. 



36 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities. 
I. — Arrangement, Sfc. 

On the closing of the Museum, in March, further measures were 
taken for the protection of the collections from attack. Many 
objects were removed from the galleries to places of greater safety, 
or were put in safer positions in situ. 

While the cases were thus empty, the dust-intercepting velvet 
puffings were renewed in the upper galleries, the cases of the Room 
of Ancient Life, and four blocks of cases in the Third Vase Room 
were repainted. A rearrangement of the frescoes in the Gold 
Ornament Room was undertaken ; 21 of the locks were modified to 
the Departmental suite ; the sculptures of Cyprus were transferred 
from the Department of Egyptian Antiquities, and their arrange- 
ment was begun. A rearrangement of the Hall of Inscriptions is in 
progress. The arrangement of Slabs I. — XIII. of the North Frieze 
of the Parthenon has been revised. 

The publication of the Greek Inscriptions has been completed 
with the issue of Vol. IV., Part 2, which includes Indices to the 
whole collection. Progress was made with the Catalogue of Silver 
Plate, and with full labels for the Hall of Inscriptions. 

Moulds have been made of six slabs of the Phigaleian frieze ; of 
the Blacas Asclepios, the bust of Trajan, the relief of a warrior 
from Rhodes, and the Towneley bronze Heracles. Twenty-seven 
pieces of sculpture and 41 Greek and Latin inscriptions haw been 
cleaned, repaired, and mounted. The mosaic from Vienne (Isere) 
has been laid on the floor in the Grseco-Roman basement, and 
surrounded with a marble curbing. A wooden pedestal, and a 
box for large negatives were made ; 15 vases were cleaned 
and repaired ; 68 labels were written, and the Greek inscriptions 
were numbered according to Vol. IV., Part 2 ; 73 objects were 
registered. 

The number of visits to the Departmental Library for the 
purpose of research was 322 ; there were 195 other visits to the 
Staff for enquiry or on departmental business. 249 attendances 
of students of art and architecture were made in the Sculpture 
Galleries during the months of January and February. 

11. — Acquisitions. 
I. — Marble. 
1. Fragment of marble kymation with lion's head spout. From 
an unrecorded site in the Mediterranean. Obtained by the late Capt. 
i^. D. Lyon and presented by Mrs. Lyon. 

II. — Bronze. 

1. A portion of the collection formed by the late Lord Avebury, 
including : — 

11 Fibulse. 
6 Spear heads. 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES. 37 

1 Arrow head. 

5 Celts. 

1 Sword blade. 

1 " Tanged " dagger from Cyprus. 

1 Mirror. 

1 Armlet (?) 

4 "Mace heads." 
Presented (together with the collection in the Department of 
British and Mediceval Antiquities) by Lord Avehury. 

2. Bell from Perugia. Presented hy the Rev. C. H. Goddard. 
III. — Vases. 

1. Jug of Dipylon geometric ware, decorated with mseanders, 
chequers, and other ornaments. Two nude figures, on square seats, 
are seen on either side of an uncertain object, a table, tomb, or altar. 

2. Similar jug, with subjects of Cretan goats. 

1-2 found near Athens. 
Presented hy Sir H. H. Howorth, K.C.I.E., through the National 
Art- Collections Fund. 

TV.— Cast. 

1. Cast of the mask of the Leconfield Aphrodite. Presented hy 
Mrs. S. A. Strong. 

y. — Manuscripts. 
Six field note-books, used by the late R. P. Pullan during the 
excavations at Priene, Teos and the Smintheum. (Cf. Antiquities of 
Ionia, v., p. 25.) Presented by the Society of Dilettanti. 

A. H. Smith. 



38 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Department of British and Medieval Antiquities and 
Ethnography. 

1. — Arrangement, Cataloguing, ^c. 

Prehistoric Room. — Three more wall-cases in the iron gallery 
have been cleared, painted and rearranged ; and the contents o£ one 
removed to the south wing. Two wall-cases below have been painted 
and refitted for antiquities discovered in barrows, and the cup-and- 
ring stones have been placed in the lower part of these cases. 

Central Saloon. — The series of bron2;e celts have been exhibited 
according to counties, and the bronze bucket from Heathery Burn 
placed above the other antiquities from that site in a wall-case. 
Two wall-cases have been painted, and filled respectively with Bronze 
Age specimens from Wales, and a type series from England. The 
doors of a pier-case have .been relined. A number of flint imple- 
ments, not hitherto exhibited, have been mounted and placed in 
drawers accessible to the public, in the south wing. 

Iron Age Gallery. — Labelling has been continued, and the Hall- 
statt series, collected by the late Lord Avebury, has been mounted 
and exhibited at the west end. Additions have also been made to the 
British pottery section, and a series from Glastonbury marsh- village 
incorporated. 

Roman Britain. — The arrangement of this new room is prac- 
tically complete, and progress has been made with labelling. A 
large quantity of pottery removed from the basement has been 
cleaned and incorporated, and the Ransom collection of pottery 
added. Two amphorse have been restored, and shelves and other 
fittings prepared and fixed. Turned wood models of two bronze 
bowls have been provided. 

King Edward VII. Gallery (^Ground fioor). — The transfer of 
the ceramic, glass and mediaeval collections to this gallery has been 
completed, and fittings prepared for most of the pier-cases in the 
western half. Several cases have been cleared for strengthening 
the sash-bars of the brackets ; various enamels and keys have been 
exhibited in a desk-case, and the Wedgwood plaques replaced on 
screens. One table-case has been lined with cloth, and several have 
been newly arranged. The seal matrices with impressions have 
been placed in exhibition drawers, accessible to the public. 

Christian Room. — The collection of Early Christian antiquities 
has been transferred to new wall-cases, and fittings provided. 
Progress has been made with the rearrangement. 

Buddhist Room. — The arrangement of the collection in new 
wall-cases is nearly complete, and a large number of labels and 
plinths have been provided. Many large carvings not previously 
exhibited are now included. 



BRITISH AND MEDIEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 39 

Brahman Room. — The arrangement and labelling in new wall- 
cases have been completed, and several important Hindu carvings not 
previously exhibited have been mounted inside and outside the cases. 

Asiatic Saloon. — The remainder of the porcelain has been 
transferred to King Edward VII. Gallery, to make room for 
exhibits of Oriental art, including the armour recently deposited 
on loan from the Tower Armoury. Accommodation is also provided 
for the Stein collection from Chinese Turkestan. 

Exhibition of Plaquettes. — The collection of Italian plaquettes 
presented by Whitcombe Greene, Esq., has been mounted in 
desk-cases in what was formerly the Anglo-Saxon room ; and 
plaquettes and similar objects from the mediaeval collection have 
also been transferred for a temporary exhibition. 

Registration. — The registration of current acquisitions has been 
continued, and 1,569 objects have been added. Numbers have been 
painted on 1,361 specimens, and 625 permanent labels written. 

Objects have been mounted to the number of 1,479 ; 41 
photographs and 15 lantern-slides have been prepared, and 426 
type-written labels bordered. 20 Roman vases have been repaired, 
and the negatives of the Waddesdon collection numbered and 
identified. 

The arrangement of the collections illustrating Oriental religions 
has been greatly facilitated by the assistance of Mr. Longworth 
Dames, and Mr. Oscar Raphael has given much time to the 
arrangement of the Ceramic collections. The services of these 
two gentlemen, when the stafE is reduced to a minimum, deserve 
special acknowledgment. 

Students. — 746 students and visitors have been received in the 
Department. 

2. — Principal Acquisitions. 

(1.) Prehistoric and Early British Antiquities. 

(a) Stone Age. — Series of palgeolithic implements collected by 
the late Lord Avebury, from Ightham and West Wickham, Kent'; 
Thames gravels at Acton ; and Paviland Cave, Glamorganshire. 
Presented hy Rt. Hon. Lord Avebury. 

A large palseolith from Romsey, Hants ; implement of spear- 
head form from Hayes Common, Kent ; and series of implements 
from Hitchin, Herts ; and Limpsfield, Surrey. Presented by Sir 
Hercules Read, LL.D. 

Flint chopper from the surface at Limpsfield, Surrey. Presented 
hy V. P. Kitchin, Esq. 

Type-series of the flint and other stone relics of Le Moustier 
date excavated at St. Brelade Cave, Jersey : described in Archceo- 
logia, vol. Ixvii. Presented by the British Association, with the 
approval of the Socidt4 Jersiaise. 



40 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BKITISH MUSEUM. 

Flint implements excavated on Hackpen Hill, and found at 
Winterbourn Bassett, Wilts : described in Proc. Soc. Antiq., vol. 
xxviii. Presented hy Rev. H. G. 0. Kendall, F.S.A. 

Implements and flakes found by the donor in brickearth at 
Luton, near Chatham, Kent. Presented hy S. K. Turner, Esq. 

Flake-implement with facetted batt from Grime's Graves, 
Weeting, Norfolk ; and two implements from Ightham, Kent. 
Presented hy J. Reid Moir, Esq. 

(b) Bronze Age. — Two bronze armlets found (with another in 
the Museum) in a grave near Ramsgate, Kent. Presented hy Sir 
Hercules Read, LL.D. 

Circular shield and spear-head found on Brumby Common, near 
Scunthorpe, Lines. Presented hy Rt. Hon. Lord St. Oswald. 

(c) Early Iron Age. — Series of worked bones, spindle- whorls, 
rubbing-stones and loom-weights, from the marsh-village at 
Glastonbury, Somerset. Presented hy the Glastonhury Antiquarian 
Society. 

Boat-shaped bronze brooch of early Italian type, found near 
Taunton, Somerset. Presented hy Sir Hercules Read, LL.D. 

(d) Foreign. — An important series illustrating the earliest Iron 
Age of Europe, excavated in 1869 at Hallstatt, in the Salzkammergut, 
Upper Austria, and collected by the first Lord Avebury (Sir John 
Lubbock). The principal specimen is a bronze bucket, nearly perfect, 
of the 8th cent. B.C., the best of its kind from the site ; and 
the collection is illustrated in Archceologia, vol. Ixvii. Earlier 
periods are represented by a series of flints from Le Moustier Cavern 
in the Dordogne, and implements from La Ganterie, C6tes-du-Nord ; 
Aarhus kitchen-middens, Denmark ; Swiss Lake Dwellings and 
Algeria ; and bronze implements from Saxony, Spain, Denmark, and 
Italy. All the specimens not required for the Museum were dis- 
tributed among 29 provincial museums on behalf of the donor, 
Rt. Hon. Lord Avehury. 

Bronze socketed celt from the Thayetmyo district of Burma. 
Presented hy J. C. Mackenzie, Esq.,I.C.S. 

Two bronze open-work relief of animals preying on each other, 
Archaic Scythian, described in Man, 1917, No. 1. Presented hy 
Louis C. G. Clarke, Esq. 

(2.) Romano- British. 

Pair of cinerary urns found with others in an ironstone recess, 
Bramby Common, Lines. Presented hy Rt. Hon. Lord St. Oswald. 

(3.) Anglo-Saxon and Foreign Teutonic. 

Bronze-gilt boss, probably from the cross of a shrine, with engraved 
interlaced animals and spirals, niello and settings for amber or glass, 
a fine example of Irish work of the 8th cent. Found in the church- 
yard at Steeple Bumpstead, Essex, and for some years preserved 



BRITISH AND MEDIiEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 41 

in the Church. Described in Proc. Soc. Antiq., vol. xxviii. 
Presented hy Henry Oppenheimer, Esq., F.S.A., through the 
National Art- Collections Fund. 

Silver-gilt circular brooch with filigree and garnet cell-work, 
Kentish, earJy 7th cent., from the Kennard collection, and 
probably found in the King's Field, Faversham, Kent. Also a pair 
of gold discs, with cruciform design and gold filigree, forming the 
clasp of a belt, Lombardic work of the 8th cent. Both presented 
hy the National Art- Collections Fund. 

Quadruple gold chain, formed of open-work discs ; a gold com- 
posite chain with jewelled discs at the ends and centre ; pair of gold 
ear-rings with jewelled settings and three hanging chains ; and pair 
of gold bracelets of serpent pattern. Byzantine, said to have been 
found in Egypt. Presented hy Mrs. Burns. 

(4.) Mediceval and Later. 

A double ivory comb, with three sunk medallions on each face, 
enclosing figures of animals, 12th cent, work ; on one end in 
mediaeval lettering is a Latin inscription, stating that the comb was 
sent by Pope Gregory to Queen Bertha, but the identity of both is 
uncertain. Described in Proc. Soc. Antiq., vol. xxviii. Presented 
hy Maurice Rosenheim, Esq., F.S.A. 

A jet pendant with bust of Charles I., and date of his execution. 
Presented by Capt. Annesley Warre, F.S.A. 

Three tiles simulating bricks, from the front of Smithfield Gate- 
House, late 17th cent. Presented hy E. A. Webb, Esq., F.S.A. 

Two wooden trenchers, one with cavity for salt, from the Drane 
collection, 17th cent. Presented by Sir Hercules Read, LL.D. 

Brass lamp folding into the form of a book, early 18th cent. 
Presented hy Maurice Rosenheim, Esq., F.S.A. 

(5.) Ceramic and Glass Collections. 

Slipware dish with Royal Arms within the Garter, and C.R. in 
the field, with name of the maker, Thomas Toft. Presented by Lady 
Wernher. 

Bristol porcelain dish in form of vine-leaf, with mark. Presented 
hy Miss Bird. 

Five pieces of Chinese and Japanese pottery and porcelain from 
the collection of the late R. Phene Spiers, Esq., F.S.A. Presented 
by W. L. Spiers, Esq., F.S.A. 

(6.) — Collection illustrating various Religions. 

Chalcedony intaglio with the Adoration of the Magi, Early 
Christian. Presented by Sir Hercules Read, LL.D. 

(7.) — Oriental and Ethnographical. 

Copper hand-warmer, with coloured enamels, Japanese ; and a 
silver kohl-flask, with chain, probably Syrian. Presented hy Maurice 
Rosenheim, Esq., F.S.A. 



42 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Bronze spoon with shallow bowl and forked end, probably from 
an interment in Corea. Presented hy Prof. Bateson, F.R.S. 

Japanese chain used in sword-play ; Chinese padlocks and one 
from Sweden ; Japanese hand-cuffs and an Indian brass vessel. 
Presented hy Dr. Hildburgh, F.S.A. 

Embroidered bag and ornaments of a Shan woman. Upper 
Burma. Presented hy Oscar Raphael, Esq., F.S.A. 

Specimens from the Orang Dusun, British North Borneo, and a 
stone adze from the coast. Presented hy I. H. N. Evans, Esq. 

Tiger-cowry hook for catching squid, from the Sandwich Islands 
(Hawaii). Presented hy J. Edge Partington, Esq. 

Four stone body rubbers, from Temma, 100 miles north of 
Coomassie, Gold 'Coast. Presented hy B. K. N. Wyllie, Esq., B.Sc. 

Two wooden figures from the Bauchi Province, N. Nigeria. 
Presented by E. A. Langslow Cock, Esq. 

A shield, swords, spearheads and quiver from the Nandi Tribe, 
E. Africa. Presented hy Capt. Noel Monckton. 

Glass and other beads from the beach of Pemba Island, 
Zanzibar. Presented hy C. E. Hartland, Esq. 

Hat of an Indian woman from Alaska. Presented by Airs. J. Y. 
W. MacAlister. 

A series of ornaments from the Jibaro Indians of Ecuador. 
Presented hy J. L. Hermessen, Esq. 

Fifteen specimens of pottery from Pueblo Rico, S. Cauca, and 
from Apia, Colombia. Presented hy Dr. Spurrell. 

Four pottery bowls, Indian, from Uruguay. Presented hy C. E. 
R. Rowland, Esq. 

Native implements from Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, and 
needlework from Fez. Presented hy Mrs. E. A. Warne. 

Jade tikis, fish hook and celts from New Zealand ; and selected 
specimens from North, Central and South America, New Guinea and 
South Africa, including a series of Bushman stone implements, from 
the collection of the late Lord Avebury. Presented hy Rt. Hon. 
Lord Avebury. 

Christy Collection. 

During the year the Trustees have acquired by donation the 
following objects, which have been transferred to the Trustees of the 
British Museum : — 

A wooden figure from the N.W. Coast of America. Presented 
hy Louis C. G. Clarke, Esq. 

A reaping knife from Dor, arrows from Dinka, and a stone club 
from the Lafofa tribe, S. Kordofan. Presented hy Dr. C. G. Seligman. 

Charles H. Read. 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 



43 



Department of Coins and Medals. 

I. — Registration and Arrangement. 
1. The registration and incorporation o£ recent acquisitions has 



proceeded as follows 


— 












Greek. 


Roman. 


British. 


Mediseval, 
&c. 


Oriental, 
4c. 


Kegistered 

Incorporated 


115 
32 


8 
1 


146 

77 


577 
364 


21 

7 



2. Eleven collections of coins and medals submitted for examina- 
tion by their owners have been examined. 

The bibliographies of Greek and Roman Numismatics, and of 
General Numismatic Subjects, have been kept up to date. Progress 
has also been made with the card-index of Greek coin-types. The 
Alexandrine coins of Cyprus have been brought together and re- 
arranged in accordance with recent research. 

3. The re-cataloguing of the Departmental Library of numismatic 
works has proceeded. 

4. The exhibitions have been withdrawn, and about five-sixths 
of the whole collection have been placed in greater security for the 
period of the War. In order to maintain access to the objects thus 
removed, lists have been drawn up of the cabinets with reference to 
their new positions, so that in the majority of cases the removal of 
the coins has not hindered the work of answering enquiries, or of 
supplying casts for the illustration of serious numismatic publications. 

11. — Publications. 

1. Catalogue of Greek Coins. 

Coins of Arabia, Mesopotamia, Sfc, by G. F. Hill. 

The coins of Elymais and Susiana (289 in number) have been 
weighed and catalogued ; and the historical introduction to the 
coinage of the Persian Empire, and part of that to the coinage of 
Elymais and Susiana, have been written. 

27 plates of casts for illustration have been prepared. 

2. Catalogue of J^nglish Coins. 

Norman Kings, by G. C. Brooke. 

This work, in two volumes, has been completed and published. 

Ill, — Acquisitions. 

The total number of coins and medals added to the Department 
during the year 1916 was 834, of which 13 were of gold, 249 of 
silver, 341 of bronze or copper, and 231 of other materials. 



44 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE RRITISH MUSEUM. 



The following table shows the number o£ the new acquisitions 
classified according to the several series to which they belong : — 



Class. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Bronze. 


Other 
Materials 


Total. 


Greek 

Eoman 

British and Colonial 

MediaBval and Modern 

Oriental 


1 

3 

i 
5 


63 
1 
29 
135 
21 


52 

8 

32 

241 

8 


21 

207 
3 


116 
9 

85 
587 
37 


Total 


13 


249 


341 


231 


834 



Of the above, 799 have been presented, viz. 11 of gold, 230 
of silver, 334 of bronze, and 224 of other materials. 

The following is a list of the benefactors to the Department 
during the year : — 

Admiral The Marquis of Milford Haven, G.C.B., K.C.M.G. ; 
the Government of Assam ; the Government of the United Provinces ; 
the Deputy Master of the Royal Mint ; the Deputy Keeper, Public 
Record Office ; the Director, Prisoners of War ; the Director, 
Victoria and Albert Museum ; the Director of the Fitzwilliam 
Museum, Cambridge ; the National Art Collections Fund ; the 
American Numismatic Society ; the Society of Antiquaries, London ; 
the Bombay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society ; the British 
School of Archaeology in Egypt ; the Yorkshire Archaeological 
Society ; the Joan of Arc Statue Committee, New York ; the 
Governors of the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre, Stratf ord-on-Avon ; 
the Directors of the Great Northern Railway Company ; E. Heron 
Allen, Esq. ; J. R. Ayris, Esq. ; E. D. BarfP, Esq. ; F. J. Brittan, 
Esq. ; W. H. Buckler, Esq. ; Sig. Memmo Cagiati ; W. Charlton, 
Esq., J.P. ; J. T. Chell, Esq. ; the Executors of the late S. Cohen, 
Esq. ; Richard Dalton, Esq. ; A. M. Daniel, Esq. ; M. Achilles 
Diamantaras ; Sir Arthur Evans, P.S.A., F.R.S. ; Miss Helen 
Farquhar ; J. T. Fripp, Esq. ; Henry Garside, Esq. ; W. Gilbert, 
Esq. ; A. Goodwin, Esq. ; Sir Evelyn Grant DufE, K.C.M.G. ; H. 
St. George Gray, Esq. ; H. T. Grogan, Esq. ; S. W. Grose, Esq. ; 
W. G. Groves, Esq., J.P. ; Miss Hargrove ; D. T. Harris, Esq. ; 
F. W. Hasluck, Esq. ; G. F. Hill, Esq. ; Mrs. G. F. Hill ; W. J. 
Hocking, Esq. ; J. Home, Esq. ; W. R. Hubbard, Esq. ; L. P. 
Johnston, Esq. ; R. Lloyd Kenyon, Esq., J. P., D.L. ; L. A. 
Lawrence, Esq., F.S.A. ; W. Leaf, Esq. ; R. E. Low, Esq. ; G. 
Macdonald, Esq., C.B. ; C. Macpherson, Esq. ; the late Alexander 
Mann, Esq. ; J. G. Milne, Esq. ; M. Victor Morin ; E. T. Newell, 
Esq. ; M. Henry Nocq ; Henry Oppenheimer, Esq., F.S.A. ; M. A.V. 
Oreshnikov ; Sir Lionel Phillips, Bart. ; H. L. Rabino, Esq. ; Sir 
Hercules Read ; the Rev. Edgar Rogers ; Maurice Rosenheim, Esq., 
F.S.A. ; H. Ling Roth, Esq. ; Horace Sandars, Esq., F.S.A. ; 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 45 

Captain Edw. Shepherd ; Messrs. Spink and Son ; Mrs. Staunton ; 
Henry Symonds, Esq., F.S.A, ; Prof. J. Havard Thomas ; Henry 
Yan den Bergh, Esq. ; the Rev. J. A. Vanes ; Emery Walker, Esq., 
F.S.A. ; W. C. Wells, Esq. ; Mr. J. Wilcke ; Mrs. J. S. Wilks ; 
W. J. Wintle,Esq. ; Howland Wood, Esq. ; A. M. Woodward, Esq. 



IV. — Remarkable Coins and Medals. 
A. Coins. 

An electrum half-stater (84-6 grs.) of the 7th cent. B.C., of an 
micertain Ionian mint ; obv. Star in wreath ; rev. Two incuse 
impressions, one of which has been obliterated by a second impression. 
From the Kessissoglou Collection. Presented by Henry Oppenheimer, 
Esq., F.S.A. 

Twenty silver Persian sigloi from a hoard said to have been found 
in Ionia, including some hitherto unknown varieties and many 
peculiar countermarks. Presented by J. G. Milne, Esq. 

A very rare silver tetradrachm of Syracuse ; obv. Four-horse 
chariot, crowned by Victory ; below, olive-branch ; rev. Head of 
nymph surrounded by four dolphins and usual inscription. Weight 
262 grs. From the collection of Dr. A. C. Headlam. The olive- 
branch symbol suggests that this coin commemorates the peace- 
congress which was held at Gela in 424 B.C. Presented by Sir 
Arthur Evans, F.K.S., P.S.A . 

A hoard of 39 silver Athenian tetradrachms of the 5th and 4th 
cent, of the usual types, found in the Ptah teraenos at Memphis ; 
most of the specimens are punchmarked or disfigured by testing- 
marks ; one is a contemporary forgery ; and some are of excep- 
tionally free style. Presented by the British School of Archceology in 
Egypt. 

A rare silver didrachm of Croton (types, eagle and tripod 
crowned by Victory) of reduced weight (95 grs.), dating from 
the period 280-277 B.C. From the collection of Dr. A. C. 
Headlam. Presented by S. W. Grose, Esq. 

A minute brass coin of the Emperor Hadrian, weighing 13'2 
grs ; obv. Head of the Emperor ; rev. S.C in wreath. Only one 
other specimen is recorded. Presented anonymously. 

A remarkable and hitherto unknown gold coin of the 18th 
cent., issued by one of the West Indian colonies, probably 
Jamaica ; it is made out of a Spanish Peruvian gold onza of 1738, 
which has been plugged with a piece of gold, bringing the weight 
up to that of the current " double doubloon," 415*4 grs. On the 
plug are impressed an alligator and the letters G. C, the initials of 
the issuing authority. The coin probably dates from the end of the 
18th cent. Presented by the late Alex. Mann, Esq. 

Ten silver reals of the reign of Charles V., with the types of 
Ferdinand and Isabella. Presented by Horace Sandars, Esq., F.S.A. 



46 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Forty-eight specimens o£ the German thaler coinage of various 
states, chiefly Austria, Mansfeld and Saxony, including a fine double 
thaler of Johann Georg, Duke of Saxony, 1616. Presented hy the 
Executors of the late S. Cohen, Esq. 

A selection of 392 modern coins, including a very complete 
series of the nickel and copper coinage of the German Empire, of 
various dates and mints hitherto unrepresented in the Museum. 
Presented hy Henry Garside, Esq. 

Two specimens of the gold pond struck by the Boer Government in 
1902 out of gold taken from the battery of the Transvaal Gold 
Mining Estates ; obv. EEN POND ; rev. monogram of Z.A.R. and 
date 1902. Only three specimens are said to have been made of 
one of these varieties. Presented by Sir Lionel Phillips, Bart. 

Three gold coins of the vassals of the Almoravids, llth-12th cent., 
from a hoard discovered about three years ago in the banks of the 
Guadalquivir. Presented by Horace Sandars, Esq., F.S.A. 

A gold Padma Tanka of Shri Rama, 15th-16th cent. Presented 
by the Bombay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society. • 

B. — Medals. 

An unpublished bronze medal commemorating the foundation by 
Cardinal Jacopo Savelli in 1565 of a house for the association of 
Papal grooms ; obv. Virgin and Child with St. Anne ; rev. Arms 
of Savelli. Presented by Maurice Rosenheim, Esq., F.S.A. 

A silver medal of the Swedish freemason Patrick Alstromer, 
1785. Presented by Mrs. J. S. Wilks. 

Twenty-nine medals issued in Germany during the present war, 
commemorating various events and embodying various claims. 
Among these are : a large cast iron medal representing an air attack 
on London, 17th-18th August, 1915, with Zeppelins over the 
Tower Bridge ; the medal (in iron) commemorating the sinking of 
the " Lusitania " (represented as a war-ship with ram, laden with 
aeroplanes, guns, &c.) ; a medal (in bronze) of Admiral von Tirpit/, 
with Neptune afloat on a submarine shaking his fist at English 
shipping ; a medal (in bronze) of the Crown Prince Wilhelm as 
young Siegfried ; and a silver medal of General von Kluck, rev. 
Fury on horseback " Nach Paris, 1914." Twenty-one of these were 
presented by a friend of the Museum. 

Bronze medal or plaque commemorating the Victory of the 
Marne, by S. Kinsburger. 

Bronze medal in memory of the French men of letters who 
have fallen in the war, by M. Henry Nocq. Presented by the Artist. 

A silver medal by Chaplain of the 25th anniversary of the Ny- 
Carlsberg Brewery. Presented by Miss Hargrove. 

Two bronze medals commemorating the Battles of Heligoland 
Bight and Dogger Bank, and the Battle of Jutland Bank. Presented 
by Admiral The Marquis of Milford Haven, G. C.B. 



DEPAKTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 47 

The Shakespeare Tercentenary Medal, in silver and in bronze, by 
Mrs. Dorothy Dick. Presented by the Governors of the Shakespeare 
Memorial T'heatre. 

Two bronze prize medals in memory o£ Miss Rosa Morison, by 
Prof. J. Havard Thomas. Presented by the Artist. 

Bronze medal of the unveiling of the statue of Joan of Arc in 
New York. Presented by the Joan of Arc Statue Committee. 

V. — Students and Visitors. 

The number of students and visitors admitted to the Department 
during the months of January and February, 1916, was 377. From 
March 1st onwards the Department has been closed to the public. 

G. F. Hill, 



48 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

British Museum (Natural History). 



STATEMENT o£ Progress made in the Arrangement and 
Description o£ the Collections, and Account o£ Objects 
added to them, in the Year 1916. 

General Progress. 
Visitors. 

The total number o£ visits made by the public to the Natural 
History Museum during 1916 was 402,673, as compared with 
433,581 in 1915. 

The attendance on Sunday afternoons was 43,414, as against 
48,409 in the previous year. 

The average daily attendance lor all open days was 1,106 ; 
for week-days, 1,155 ; and for Sunday afternoons, 819. 

To meet the wishes of His Majesty's Government some of the 
Geological Galleries are closed to the public for the duration of 
the war ; but the Central Hall and certain of the Zoological 
Galleries are open to the public daily, and other parts of the Museum 
on alternate days. 

Swiney Lectures. 

Dr. J. D. Falconer having relinquished his appointment as 
Swiney Lecturer in order to take up a temporary administrative 
post in Nigeria, Dr. J. S. Flett was appointed to give the course 
of Swiney lectures in November and December of 1916. The 
subject on this occasion was " The Mineral Resources of Europe." 
The lectures, twelve in number, were delivered at the Royal Society 
of Arts, the theatre at the Victoria and Albert Museum not being 
available, and were attended, on an average, by 96 persons a lecture. 

Museums Association. 

The Museum was again represented by Dr. F. A. Bather at the 
Annual Meeting of the Museums Association, held at Ipswich in 
July. Among the subjects discussed was the prospect of organising 
a scheme with a view to museums in this country combining 
to obtain from home manufacturers all museum apparatus, such as 
rectangular glass jars, hitherto chiefly supplied by Germany. 

Special Exhibition. 
An exhibition of " Trout-flies " (the natural insects and the 
artificial " flies " used as bait by anglers), presented by Mr. Martin 
H. Mosely, has been arranged and placed in the Insect Gallery. 

The War and the Museum, Staf. 

At the end of 1916, 59 members of the stafE of the Natural 
History Museum were serving with the Naval and Military forces. 
In addition, 12 Museum men have joined the Volunteers [1st 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 49 

Battalion Central London Regiment (United Arts Rifles) ] ; six men 
are serving as Special Constables ; and six men form a Museum 
detachment o£ the London Ambulance Column. This detachment 
has been very active during the past year, having received and dealt 
with 2S6 separate calls to attend wounded men from hospital trains 
or from the hospitals. Four members of the staff have been lent to 
the Ministry of Munitions ; one assistant is doing duty as 
Bacteriologist at Haslar Hospital under the Admiralty ; and another 
Assistant has been lent to the War Ofiice and is shortly proceeding 
to Salonika as Protozoologist. Only one man of military age and 
passed as fit for general service is at present employed at the Museum. 
This man received exemption as being indispensable for the 
preservation of the collections. 

Three members of the Museum Establishment have been killed in 
action, and one is reported as missing since the 19th September ; 
seven have been wounded. 

The Military Cross has been awarded to two assistants, viz. : — 
Captain A. K. Totton, Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry, and 
Captain W. Campbell Smith, attached to the Gras Company, Royal 
Engineers. 

A Parliamentary Return has been issued of the number of civil 
servants on military service, showing that of 26 men of military age 
remaining at the Natural History Museum on 1st April, 1916, 11 were 
enrolled, 14 were rejected on medical grounds, and one applied for 
exemption on the ground of conscientious objection and is now 
working on a fruit farm. 

The War and the Work of the Museum. 

The Museum has been able to render assistance to various public 
departments in matters connected with the war. S,ome of these 
being of a confidential nature cannot be mentioned here, but note may 
be made of the following as examples of the sort of inquiries which 
reach the Museum : — 

(a) Nature of some organisms which caused blocking-up of 
certain sea-water pipes ; 

(h) As to some mite-infested oats at the Front ; 

(c) Application of a remedy for the rice-weevil in connection 

with the disease of beri-beri ; 

(d) As to methods of destruction of bed-bugs ; 

(e) The identification of specimens of larvae found in drinking 

water ; 

(/) Nature of wood used in the construction of a propeller of 
a Zeppelin brought down in this country ; 

(g) Advice as to certain samples of so-called " Silver Spruce " 
from British North America ; 

(A) Inquiry as to certain wood stated to possess luminous 
properties. 

D 



50 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The Museum is assisting in the distribution, through its 
correspondents abroad, o£ propagandist literature presenting the 
cause o£ the Allies. In many cases thesfe correspondents have shown 
their interest and keenness to help by asking to be supplied with 
additional copies o£ the pamphlets, &c. 

British and Russian Men of Science. 

A correspondence has passed between the Museum, the Foreign 
Office, and the Board of Education with reference to the desirability 
of a closer intercourse between British and Russian men of science. 

The Museum represented that one of the chief difficulties in 
the past that has stood in the way of closer co-operation had been 
the language, and it was- suggested that much might be done to 
facilitate closer intercourse by the publication in English and 
French of scientific papers by Russian workers. It was also 
stated that the Museum would always be ready to encourage 
exchange of specimens with Russian institutions. 

Royal Society Committee on Grain Pests. 

Accommodation at the Museum has been placed at the disposal 
of the Committee formed by the Royal Society to inquire into the 
bionomics and economics of grain-infesting insect pests, and 
Mr. J. Hartley Durrant, a member of the staff of the Entomo- 
logical Department, has been appointed to serve on the Committee. 

Stranded Whales. 

The interest of the records of Cetacea stranded on the British 
coasts has by no means fallen off during the past year. Altogether 
29 records were received (one more than in 1915), the most 
interesting being a Cuvier's Whale, believed to be the first specimen 
of this species recorded from the English coast ; a Sowerby's 
Whale ; a White-sided Dolphin ; a young Sperm Whale ; and a 
Killer, or Grampus, of exceptional size. Parts of most of the 
specimens were secured for the Museum. Valuable help in this 
inquiry has again been given by Receivers of Wreck, Coastguard 
Officers, and others ; and the thanks of the Trustees are due also to 
the Board of Trade for continuing the arrangements which have 
made it possible to carry on the work. 

Antarctic Whales. 

Considerable attention continues to be given to the investigation 
of whales in the Antarctic. A number of papers and statistics 
relating to the subject, and especially to whaling operations in 
South Georgia, have been referred to the Museum by the Colonial 
Office. In this connection Dr. Harmer has drawn attention to the 
large increase in the number of Blue Whales captured in the season 
1914-15 as compared with previous seasons, and to a corresponding 
diminution in the number of Humpbacks caught by the whalers — a 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 51 

very significant and disquieting feature of the operations, as indicative 
of the consequences of over-fishing of a particular species. Similar 
evidence is forthcoming from his examination of a report on the South 
Shetland Whaling Season, 1915-16, which contains valuable informa- 
tion supplementing the reports received from South Georgia. In 
this case, the statistics show that the total number of whales captured 
during the season was 4,431, the majority being Blue and Fin Whales, 
and only 219 Humpbacks, of which comparatively few are left in 
the South Shetlands area. 

Sealing Industry in South Georgia. 

Dr. Harmer has also reported on a number of papers transmitted 
by the Colonial Office relating to the sealing industry in South 
Georgia. From these papers it appeared that there was no observable 
decrease in the number of Elephant-Seals since the industry was 
established under the terms of an Ordinance of 1909, notwithstanding 
that the number killed averaged 3,028 annually. 

Other Investigations. 

Other matters that have come within the scope of the activities 
of the Museum during the past year, which may be briefly noted 
here, are : — 

(a) Questions arising out of the Canadian Commission to 
consider the alleged depredations of Sea Lions on the Pacific 
Coasts of North America, in connection with the fishing and 
canning industries ; 

(b) The identification of certain animal forms of tinned food 
such as Pacific Lobsters, Sardines or Sprats, &c. ; 

(c) The identification of Poisonous Fishes in the West Indies ; 

(d) The Sponge Fishery in the West Indies ; 

(e) The introduction of Reindeer "and other animals into South 
Georgia ; 

(/) The protection of Birds and Wild Mammals in the Crown 
Colonies and Protectorates ; 

(g) The desirability of a measure to restrict the importation of 
Wild Birds' Plumage. 

Rowland Ward Bequest. 

The Trustees of the Rowland Ward Bequest have presented to 
the Museum during the year twelve mounted specimens, including a 
Wild Sheep from Thian-Shan, a Lion from British East Africa, and 
a female Gorilla from the Cameroons. 

Presents. 

The total number of gifts received during the year by the 
several Departments was 1,697, as compared with 1,825 in 1915. 
Many of these comprised large numbers of individual specimens. 



52 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The details o£ all the more important o£ them will be found in the 
reports o£ the Keepers o£ Departments, but the following are 
mentioned here also as being o£ special interest or value : — 



Lady Seton-Karr — five very fine specimens o£ heads o£ Big 
Game selected from the collection o£ her husband, the late Sir 
Henry Seton-Karr. (^See Return, 1916, p. ^&.^ 

The Duke of Hamilton — the head of a bull from his herd of 
" Wild " white cattle in Cadzow Forest. 

Mr. H. F. Varian — a remarkably fine pair of horns, with mask, 
of a new sub-species of Sable Antelope from Angola. 

Lady Strathcona — two complete skeletons and a skull of Musk- 
Ox, formerly the property of the late Lord Strathcona, her father. 

The Board of Trade — the head and paddles of a White-sided 
Dolphin, stranded at Rathlee, Co. Sligo ; and parts of a Grrampus 
or Killer Whale, captured on the Colvend shore, Kirkcudbrightshire. 

Captain D. McCalmont — the skeleton of the famous racehorse 
" Isinglass," winner of the Derby of 1893. 

Mr. E. J. Brook — a selection of birds from a collection obtained 
by Mr. Walter Goodfellow in the high mountains of Ecuador, 
including the types and co-types of five new species. 

Mr. A. L. Butler — a series of birds, consisting of the remainder 
of his Soudanese collection, specimens from Ceylon, India, and Europe, 
and a number of Paradise-birds, Kingfishers, and Pittas ; in all 
1,452 specimens, including several types. 

Mr. E. G. Herbert — a fine collection of Siamese birds, consisting 
of 1,061 skins and 500 eggs. 

The Lords of the Admiralty — a Leathery Turtle captured in a 
net off the Scilly Islands, a very rare specimen. 

Messrs. W. Hewlett & Sons — a large Sunfish caught off the 
South of Ireland. 

Mr. A. 0. Walker — a collection of 657 tubes of specimens of 
Crustacea, chiefly Amphipoda. 

Mr. C. F. Rousselet — his valuable collection of about 1,200 
mounted slides of Rotifera and Freshwater Polyzoa. 

Mr. Henry Sidebottom — a collection of Foraminifora, of high 
scientific value, consisting of about 18,000 specimens, including 
numerous types. 

The Trustees of the Percy Sladen Memorial Fund — the first 
selection from a valuable collection of fossil reptiles from the 
Cretaceous rocks of Alberta, Canada. 

Sir John Eagiesome, Director of Railways and Works in 
Nigeria — an important collection of Eocene fossils, including part 
of the sternum of the largest known bird of flight, and interesting 
remains of other vertebrates, from a railway cutting in Nigeria. 

Sir W. Crookes, F.R.S. — a valuable series of mineral specimens 
from his private collection, consisting of gold, platinum, silver, 
diamonds (including a crystal coloured by radium), &c. 

Mr. F. N. Ashcroft — a fine series of specimens of Zeolities. 



BRITISH MUSEUM ^NATURAL HISTORY). 53 

Mrs. Litchfield — five sheets o£ the manuscript of her father 
Mr. Charles Darwin's famous work " The Origin of Species," for 
preservation with the series of specimens of handwritings of 
naturalists. 

Mrs. McConnell — a handsomely bound copy of a work on the 
Birds of British Guiana, published by her in memory of her late 
husband, Mr. F. V. McConnell, a benefactor of the Museum. 

Lord Rothschild — five volumes of drawings of plants, by W. G. 
Smith, the originals of published plates. 

Purchases. 

With the exception of the purchase for £100 of the sixth 
instalment of the Distant collection of insects, to which the Trustees 
were committed, and of books for the upkeep of the several libraries, 
purchases were restricted to a few unimportant transactions. 

Exchanges and Gifts of Duplicates. 

Exchanges of duplicate specimens have been made with various 
institutions and individuals. 

The Trustees have readily agreed to a request from the Prime 
Minister of New Zealand that a representative set of duplicate 
specimens from the collections of the Scott (" Terra Nova ") 
Antarctic Expedition may be presented to the Dominion Museum at 
Wellington, and, if numbers permit, to the three other chief Museums 
of the Dominion at Dunedin, Christchurch, and Auckland. A first 
set of the duplicates will accordingly be placed at the disposal of 
the New Zealand Government in due course. 

Duplicate specimens have been presented as follows : — 

Zoological specimens (other than entomological) — to the Royal 
Scottish Museum, Edinburgh ; Prof. G. H. F. Nuttall, f.r.s. ; Major 
E. E. Austen ; Dr. E. Pawlowsky (Petrograd) ; Lt. Commr. A. 
Cherry-Garrard, r.n. ; Surgeon E. L. Atkinson, r.n. ; Mr. C. S. 
Wright ; and Prof. E. Fawcett. 

Entomological specimens — to Prof. A. Hustache ; M. Antoine 
Grouvelle ; Mr. H. E. Andre wes ; and Mr. L. B. Prout. 

Fossils---to the Sedgwick Museum, Cambridge. 

(N.B. — All the individuals named have rendered services to the 
Museum.) 

Publications. 

The following works on Natural History have been published 
during the year : — 

British [Scott] Antarctic ("Terra Nova") Expedition, 1910. 
Natural History Report. Zoology. 4to : — 

Vol. i. No. 4. Larval and Post-larval Fishes. By C. Tate 

Regan, M.A. Pp.125 — 156: 5 text-figures, 10 plates. 9s. 

Vol. ii, No. 6. Myzostomida. By C. L. Boulenger, M.A., 

D.sc. Pp. 135—140 : 1 plate. Is. 
Vol. iii, No. 2. Crustacea, Pt. I, Decapoda. By L. A. 
Borradaile, m.a. Pp. 75 — 110 : 16 text-figures. 3^. 



54 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Vol. iii, No. 3. Crustacea, Pt. II, Porcellanopagurus : an 
instance of Carcinization. By L. A. Borradaile, m.a. 
Pp. 111—126 : 13 text-figures. Is. U. 
Vol. iii, No. 4. Crustacea, Pt. Ill, Cirripedia. By L. A. 
Borradaile, m.a. Pp. 127 — 136 : 7 text-figures. Is. 

Report on Cetacea stranded on the British coasts. By S. F. 
Harmer, so.D., f.r.s. No. 3. Cetacea stranded during 1915. 
Pp. 12 : 1 map. 4to. Is. 6d. 

Catalogue of Ungulate Mammals. Vol. v. Perissodactyla, Hyra- 
coidea, Proboscidea. With Addenda to the earlier volumes. By the 
late R. Lydekker, f.r.s. Pp. xlv, 207 : 31 text-figures. 8vo. 7^. Qd. 

Catalogue of the Fresh-water Fishes of Africa. By G. A. 
Boulenger, f.r.s. Vol. iv. Pp. xxvii, 392 : 195 text-figures. 
Imp. 8vo. £1 105. 

Guide to the specimens and enlarged models of Insects and Ticks 
exhibited in the Central Hall, illustrating their importance in the 
spread of Disease. By W. G. Ridewood, d.sc. Pp. 44 : 14 text- 
figures. 8vo. 6d. 

Instructions for Collectors/ No. 13 — Alcohol and Alcoholometers. 
By S. F. Harmer, sc.D., f.r.s. Pp. 8. 8vo. M. 

Economic Series, No. 3. — Fleas as a Menace to Man and Domestic 
Animals. Their Life-History, Habits and Control. By J. Water- 
ston, B.D., B.sc. Pp. 21 : 1 plate, 6 text-figures. 8vo. Id. 

Economic Series, No. 4. — Mosquitoes and their relation to Disease, 
Their Life-History, Habits and Control. By F. W. Edwards, b.a. 
Pp. 20 : 6 text-figures. 8vo. Id. 

New editions have been issued of two numbers of the " Instruc- 
tions for Collectors," namely, No. 2, " Birds and their Eggs " (Sixth 
edition, pp. 14 : 6 text-figures. 8vo. 3<i.), and No. 3, " Reptiles, 
Batrachians, and Fishes" (Fourth edition, pp. 12. 8vo. Zd.). 

Selections of the natural history publications have been sent to 
free libraries and other institutions at home and abroad, and to 
persons who have benefited the Museum by helping in the prepara- 
tion of the works, or in other ways. 

General Library. 

The additions to the General Library during the past year 
have been : — 

By purchase - 191 volumes. 

By donation - 719 volumes, 1 map, and 158 photographs. 

Total - 910 1 158 

All the volumes and maps have been catalogued, press-marked 
and put in their places, whilst 834 volumes have been bound in 540. 

The extent of the collection on the 31st December was 45,873, 
volumes, 5,929 maps, and 1,022 photographs (not including those 
in the Owen Collection of Drawings, &c.). 

The accessions to the Departmental Libraries have also been 
catalogued as they came in, and duplicate transcripts of the titles 
have been returned with the books. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 55 

Altogether 1,488 title-slips have been written, 68 rewritten, 
and 1,934 revised (independently of those prepared for printing). 

There are now, on a rough estimate, 101,806 volumes (exclusive 
of continuations and minor separata) and 6,250 maps in the whole 
building. 

The number of visits paid to the General Library during the 
year by students and others (irrespective of the staff and persons 
to whom the use of a key is granted) was 1,681. 

Donations have been received from a great number of Museums, 
Academies, and other corporate bodies, as well as from personal 
donors. 

The printing of the Supplement to the Library Catalogue has 
been begun, the whole of letter "A" has been set up in type and 
has been printed off as far as "ALMQ." 

Index Generum et Specierum Animalium. 

During the year considerable progress has been made with this 
Index, under Mr. C. Davies Sherborn's charge, and some 35,000 
slips have been compiled and incorporated. 

The manuscript has been continuously and extensively consulted 
during the past year by the staff and students, whilst many 
enquiries have been answered by Mr. Sherborn in correspondence. 

The recording for the year has been principally done from the 
journals of Academies and from periodical publications, with a view 
to the convenience of consultants, and the Index is now in an 
advanced state, having been carried out as far as the letter " T." 

Index Museum. 

All the dissections exhibited in the Hall that are mounted in 
preservative fluid were inspected during the year, and several have 
been resealed and others refilled. 

An explanatory guide-book to the specimens and models of 
disease-spreading insects and ticks exhibited in the Hall was issued 
in January. The pamphlet, which is to a large extent a compilation 
of the labels that are attached to the specimens displayed, redrafted 
in such a manner that they read consecutively, consists of forty-five 
pages and is illustrated by fourteen text-figures. 

A series of drawings, enlarged and of actual size, of insects that 
lay their eggs in the puparia of tsetse-flies was mounted for exhibition 
in the early part of the year. These insects, from the fact that they 
prevent the development of the tsetse-flies in the puparia thus para- 
sitised, tend to reduce the numbers of tsetse-flies occurring in a 
district, and to limit the spread of sleeping-sickness and other 
diseases of trypanosome origin, such as " nagana," and are con- 
sequently to be regarded as beneficial. 

In connection with a notice issued by the military authorities 
forbidding the shooting of carrier-pigeons, a series of three typical 
carrier-pigeons has been mounted, together with specimens of other 



56 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

pigeons with which they might be confused. The distinguishing 
features of the various birds exhibited are explained in the labels 
that accompany the specimens. 

During the month of May there was placed on exhibition a small 
series illustrating the natural history of the worm Bilharzia (^Schisto- 
somuni), that causes a disease of the bladder and rectum, known as 
bilharziosis, common in Africa, the West Indies, and Japan. The 
series includes actual specimens of the worms as they occur in the 
veins of the intestine, and examples are shown of pond-snails which 
are known to harbour the alternate generation of the parasites. The 
life-history of the worm is explained by means of drawings of the 
egg, and of the sporocyst and cercaria stages, and photographs of 
bilharzia-infected canals in Egypt are mounted to illustrate how 
the disease may be communicated to human beings by bathing or 
standing in infected water. 

In consequence of the interest taken in the series of lice exhibited 
under simple lenses in the Hall, the method of display has been 
adopted in the case of three disease-spreading species of mosquitoes, 
a flea, and two bugs. 

Further progress has been made in the introductory series of 
animals, plants and rocks which, when completed, will be exhibited 
in four table-cases in the middle of the Hall. The third case 
(Invertebrates other than Protozoa) has been roughly planned out, 
and some progress has been made in the preparation of the specimens 
it is intended to display in the case. 

L. Fletcher, 

Director. 
British Museum (Natural History), 
24 February, 1917. 



depaetment of zoology. 57 

Department of Zoology. 

I. — Arrangement and Conservation. 

Mammalia. 

Mammal Galleries. 

The principal additions to the Exhibition Galleries have been 
received from the Trustees o£ the late James Rowland Ward, and 
include the following : — 

A Lion (Felis leo) from the Athi Plains, British East Africa ; 
a female Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) and three Duikers from the 
Cameroons ; a Big-horn (Ovis karelini) from the Thian Shan ; a 
Muntjac (Muntiacus lacrymans) from Sze-chwan, and a Dik-Dik 
(Rhyncliotragus damarensis variant) from Angola. 

Other specimens are an Albino Badger from Surrey, presented 
by Lord Hylton ; the Head of a Nilgiri Ibex (Hemitragus liylocrius) 
from the Kundah Hills, presented by W. S. Rowson, Esq. ; a skull 
of a Musk Ox (^Ovibos moschatus), presented by Lady Strathcona 
and" Mount Royal ; two skulls of the West African Hartebeest 
(Bubalis major), presented by A. E. Kitson, Esq. ; and male and 
female horns of the Angolan Sable (Hipjyotragus niger variani), 
presented by H. F. Varian, Esq. 

The specimens in the Gorilla, Lion and large Sheep cases have 
been rearranged and the ground-work has been remade. 

Study Series. — The usual work of labelling, registering and 
incorporating the Mammals added to the Collection, and their skulls, 
has been continued. 

The skins of the Canidse, Viverridse, and (yaviidae have been 
rearranged, in connection with scientific work done upon them. 
The Seal-skins and the skulls of Hystricomorph Rodents have also 
been placed in better order. 

Mr. R. C. Wroughton, Mr. T. B. Fry and Mr. M. A. C. Hinton 
have again afforded valuable voluntary help in working out accessions 
to the collection, the first two especially in connection with the 
specimens received through the Bombay Natural History Society's 
Survey. The species have all been named, reports written on them, 
and series selected for registration and distribution. The services 
of Dr. Knud Andersen have been continued for the preparation of 
the second volume of the Catalogue of Bats, but a large part of his 
time has been taken up at the War Office. 

The fifth and last volume of the Catalogue of Ungulates, by the 
late R. Lydekker, F.R.S., was published in 1916. 

Osteological Room. — Two large cases, not required in the Exhibi- 
tion Galleries, have been refitted and re-erected in the Osteological 
Room, to contain Human crania and skeletons. A number of racks 
have also been erected to contain skeletons awaiting cabinets. 
Several Human skulls and skeletons have been removed from the 



58 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Exhibition Galleries to the Osteological Room, on account o£ their 
great rarity, as a protective measure against the raids of hostile 
aircraft. 

Mr. L. Charliers has worked in this part of the Museum at the 
conservation of the Collections which have been received on behalf 
of the Congo Museum at Tervueren. 

A Report has been issued on the Human Crania collected by 
the British Ornithologists' Union Expedition and the Wollaston 
Expedition to Dutch New Guinea. 

A number of casts of Whale-flippers have been made. 

AVES. 

The remounting of specimens in the Exhibition Gallery has been 
continued, and the families Pycnonotidae, Troglodytidse, Cinclidse, 
and Mimidge have been completed, with distribution-maps, 
labels, &c. 

The rearrangement of the study series in the Bird Room has 
been continued and the remaining portions of the Passeres have been 
finally arranged in the cabinets, the names of the species placed on 
the outside of each drawer and the names of the family and genera 
on the outside of each cabinet ; the position of each species of the 
entire collection has been entered in the Reference Catalogue. 

Register-numbers have been put on 3,233 eggs of the Seebohm 
Collection and on 2,722 eggs of the Radcliffe Saunders Collection. 
Help in labelling and preparing specimens for incorporation was 
received from Mr. Cyril W. Mackworth Praed and Miss M. Garnett. 

The more notable presents were the following : — 

From Mr. A. L. Butler, a large and valuable collection of 
European, Asiatic and African birds, including three types of new 
species. From Mr. E. G. Herbert, a valuable collection of birds 
and eggs from Siam. From Mr. J. D. La Touche, a large collection 
of eggs from Eastern China. From Mr. G. L. Bates, a collection of 
eggs from West Africa. From Mr. E. J. Brook, a valuable collection 
from Western South America, including the types of five forms 
recently described as new to science. From the Subscribers to the 
British Ornithologists' Union Expedition to Dutch New Guinea, a 
very large and valuable collection of birds and eggs from Dutch 
New Guinea, including the types of nine newly described species. 
From Lord Rothschild, F.R.S., a fine specimen of Keysser's 
Cassowary, mounted in the Exhibition Gallery. From the Trustees 
of the late James Rowland Ward, a restoration of the Great Auk 
mounted for the Exhibition Gallery. 

During the year the study collection has been consulted by the 
following visitors, who have been occupied in systematic work on 
various groups : — Mr. E. C. Stuart Baker, Mr. T. Iredale, Colonel 
Stephenson Clark, Mr. W. L. Sclater, Mr. E. Gibson, Lord 
Rothschild, F.R.S., Dr. P. R. Lowe, Mr. ,G. M. Mathews, Mr. W. 
Goodfellow, Mr. H. F. Witherby, Miss A. Jackson, Mr. W. E. 
Wait, Dr. H. Langton, Dr. E. Hartert. 



DEPAKTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 59 

The following artists engaged'in preparing drawings for forth- 
coming works have also made use of the collection : — Mr. H. 
Goodchild, Major H. Jones, Mr. H. Gronvold, Miss Medland, 
Mr. R. Green, Mr. Archibald E. Thorburn, Mr. G. E. Lodge. 

Domesticated Animals. 

The more interesting additions are the following : — 

The head of a bnll from the herd of "Wild White Cattle" in 

Cadzow Forest, presented by the Duke of Hamilton. The head of 

a " Siberian Sheep," a race of unknown origin, presented by H. J. 

Elwes, Esq., F.R.S. A Tibetan Spaniel, presented by Mrs. Wilmot 

Corfield. 

A Coucou de Malines Fowl, presented by Mrs. R. Terrot. Three 

Homing Pigeons, presented by Capt. A. H. Osman. 

Reptilia and Batrachia. 

The Assistant in charge has completed a revision of the Family 
Lacertidse, of which parts have already been published and others 
are in the press. 

Owing to the lack of assistance, little could be done in the 
way of changing spirit and replenishing jars in the collection, but 
the greater part of the Snakes and the whole of the Lacertidse have 
been overhauled. 

Casts and dissections have been made of a large Leathery Turtle 
obtained off the Scilly Islands and presented by the Admiralty. 

Pisces. 

Exhibition Galleries. — Of the additions to the Fish Gallery special 
mention may be made of a very large Sunfish (^Orthagoriscus mola) 
presented by Messrs. W. Hewlett ; and of the model of a Goldsinny 
(Crenilabriis melops), made and painted by the donor, F. Page, Esq. 

The Exhibition of Freshwater Fishes in the British Saloon has 
been finished and a Guide to this series has been written. Notable 
additions during the year are a Tench (Tinea tinea) of 5 lbs. from 
Gatton Park, Surrey, presented by F. R. Graham, Esq. ; and a Dace 
(Leueiscus leuciseus) weighing 1;^ lbs. from the Kennet, presented by 
F. Barker, Esq. 

Study Series. — All the accessions have been incorporated and 
have added to the congestion in the Spirit Building. The work of 
replenishing the collection with spirit has been continued ; nearly 
200 gallons have been used during the year and have sufficed 
for about one-third of the Fish Collection. It is most important that 
this work should continue at the same rate. 

Considerable progress has been made with a revision and rearrange- 
ment of the Glupeidse. 

Mollusca. 

Mr. Robson, the Assistant in charge of the Mollusca, was absent 
on military duty during the greater part of the year, and there are 
few changes to notice in this part of the collection. 



60 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

A Report on the Cephalopoda 'o£ the British Antarctic (" Terra 
Nova ") Expedition, by Miss A. L. Massy, has been published, and 
the specimens have been returned to the Museum. 

Lieut.-Col. H. H. Godwin-Austen, F.R.S., has continued his 
work on the Oriental land and freshwater Mollusca. 

The death, on July 22nd, 1916, of Mr. E. A. Smith, I.S.O., 
formerly Assistant-Keeper, was a very serious loss to the Depart- 
ment, to which he continued to give valuable aid, after his retire- 
ment in 1913, almost to the end of his life. 

Myeiopoda and Arachnida. 

Special attention was given to parasitic Acari during the year, 
and a number of species of economic importance were dealt with, 
including some rare forms, such as the Demodex of the horse, the 
Chorioptes affecting the feet of sheep, &c. A Guide to the species 
of Arachnida and Myriopoda injurious to Man has been prepared 
and is now in the press. The arrangement of the Koch Collection 
was continued but has been somewhat impeded by the delay in 
delivering the glass tubes necessary for this work. 

Crustacea and Pycnogonida. 

A few spirit specimens in the exhibited series have been refilled 
and resealed. 

The periodical refilling and cleaning of the bottles in the Spirit 
Collection has been carried on with many interruptions due to lack 
of assistance. 

A large collection presented during the year by Mr. A. 0. Walker 
has been roughly sorted and stored to await proper arrangement 
and registration. With this exception the specimens received have 
all been registered and incorporated in the general collection. It has 
not been possible to make any progress with the registration of the 
Norman Collection or of the other collections alluded to in former 
Returns. 

Echinoderma. 

The respiriting of several groups of Echinoderms has been 
carried out. 

A small but interesting collection from South Australia, received 
some time since, has been determined and will shortly be incorporated. 

The Index Catalogue to the collection of Microscopic slides, 
illustrating this and other groups mentioned in last year's Return, 
has been completed. 

The revision of the MS. Catalogue of Echinoidea has been 
finished, and progress ^las been made with that of the Ophiuroidea. 

Worms. 

Mr. Baylis, the Assistant in charge of part of the collection of 
Worms, is absent, being engaged in war work at the R. Naval Hospital, 
Haslar. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 61 

The Beddard Collection o£ Oligochaeta has been respirited and 
the exhibited collection o£ worms has been rearranged. 

POLYZOA. 

Important acquisitions have been registered and incorporated. 

Anthozoa. 

The chief work with this portion o£ the collection has been the 
cleaning o£ part o£ the study collection. 

Hydrozoa. 

Mr. Totton, Assistant, to whom the Military Cross has been 
awarded, is still absent owing to the war ; and hardly any work has 
therefore been done in this part o£ the collection. 

PoRiFERA (Sponges;. 

The working out o£ the " Terra Nova " collection has been 
continued. 

The conservation o£ the spirit collection, which was completely 
respirited in 1915 and partly sealed with a preparation o£ beeswax and 
vaseline, has received further attention. 

Protozoa. 

The acquisitions of the year have been registered and incorporated. 
The most important addition is the collection of Foraminifera, 
presented by H. Sidebottom, Esq., and noticed on p. 71. 

II. — Duplicates and Exchanges. 

(a) Duplicates. 

Duplicates have been distributed among museums, scientific insti- 
tutions, &c., as follows : — 

Mammalia. — Mr. A. J. Rudd. 

Aves. — Royal Scottish Museum, Edinburgh ; Surg. E. L. 
Atkinson, R.N. ; Lt.-Com. A. Cherry-Garrard, R.N. ; Mr. C. S. 
Wright. 

Reptilia.—Fvoi. E. Fawcett. 

il/o//M5ca. — Major E. E. Austen. 

Araclinida.—Vvoi. G. H. F. Nuttall, F.R.S. 

(b) Exchanges. 

Exchanges have been made with the following institutions and 
individuals : — 

Mammalia. — University Museum of Zoology, Cambridge ; Museo 
Civico, Genoa ; Prof. W. Leche. 



Q2 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Aves. — Tring Museum ; Mr. E. C. Stuart Baker ; Messrs. 
Rowland Ward, Ltd. 

Reptilia and Batrachia. — U.S. National Museum, Washington ; 
Prof. S. Hatta. 

Pisces.— VroL C. H. Eigenmann ; Col. C. E. Shepherd. 

Mollusca. — Wellcome Laboratory, London ; M. J. H. Young. 

Arachnida. — Lidian Museum, Calcutta ; Dr. E. Pawlowsky. 

III. — Departmental Library. 

The acquisitions to the Library o£ the Departments of Zoology 
and Entomology (including the Walsingham Library) during the 
year, obtained by purchase, presentation and exchange, consist of 
38 separate works and pamphlets in 50 volumes, and 1,285 parts of 
periodicals and works in progress. 

236 volumes, including those belonging to the Walsingham 
Library, have been bound. 

The work of collating, stamping, press-marking, and entering all 
additions in the Catalogue has been performed as usual. 

The Attendant in the Library, with the aid and supervision of an 
Assistant, has checked all the entries of Zoological works in the 
portion of the General Catalogue of Books which has been printed 
during the year. 

Of the donations the following are worthy of special mention : — 
The Birds of Australia, Vol. V., parts 2-4 ; Vol. VI., part 1 ; 
presented by (x. M. Mathews, Esq. ; and a very fine copy of 
Wilkes, B., " The English Moths and Butterflies together with the 
Plants, Flowers and Fruits whereon they feed and are usually 
found." First edition ; presented by Lord Rothschild, F.R.S. 

The most important addition by purchase during the year was : 
Poda, N., " Insecta Musei Grsecensis." 

IV. — Publications. 

In addition to the Official Catalogues and other volumes published 
by the Trustees (see pp. 53-54), various reports and descriptive 
papers have been prepared in connection with the different branches 
of the collection, and have been published for the most part in 
scientific journals. 

V . — A cquisitions . * 
Mammalia. 

Total number 922, of which 872 were donations, 36 were 
purchases, and 14 were received in exchange. 

The contribution of the Bombay Natural History Society again 
forms the largest item (382 specimens) of the accessions, although 
not to the same extent as last year. All the Society's regular 

* A table showing the number of specimens added during the year is given on 
page 71, 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 63 

collectors have gone to the Front, but by the help of native 
collectors and the donations o£ Mr. Mackenzie of the Forest 
Service, much good work is still being carried out. Papers on 
the various collections, mostly by R. C Wroughton and 0. Thomas, 
have continued to be published. 

The Mammals presented by the Trustees of the Will of the late 
James Rowland Ward have already been enumerated (p. 57). 

Several of the more interesting animals which have died in the 
Gardens of the Zoological Society have been presented by the 
Society. 

Various friends of the Museum engaged in the war have sent 
contributions obtained during the campaign, as follows : — 

Two Lemmings [Lemmiis lemmus) from the Murman Coast of 
N.W. Russia. Presented hy CajJt. R. S. Gwat kin- Williams, R.N. 

A Souslik (Cifellus citellus) from Salonika. Presented hy Capt. 
H. S. Ilollis. 

A Rodent Mole (Spala.v) from Salonika ; presented by Capt. 
Malcolm Purr ; and another from Lemnos, presented by Capt. H. M. 
Warrender. 

A Field Mouse {Apodemns sylvaticus) from Lemnos. Presented 
by Viscount Ennismore. 

Other accessions : — 

Europe. 

Three Wild Cats (Felis silvestris grampia) from Ross-shire. 
Presented by Aliss Firth. 

An Albino Badger (Meles meles) from Surrey. Presented by 
Lord Hylton. 

11 British Bats and Shrews from the collection of the Rev. L. 
Jenyns, including the types of four species described by him about 
1837 ; received in exchange from the University Museum of 
Zoology, Cambridge. 

Parts of Cetacea stranded on the British Coasts during 1916, 
including several specimens of much interest, and particularly : — 

Part of the skull of a Cuvier's Whale {Ziphius cavirostris) 

from the Cornish Coast ; 
The head of a White-sided Dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus) 

from Co. Mayo ; 
The flippers and other parts of a specially large Killer Whale 

(Orcinus orco) from the Solway Firth ; 
The head of a Sowerby's Whale (Mesoplodon bidens) from 

Lincolnshire ; 
Part of the lower jaw, with uncut teeth, of a young Sperm 
Whale (Physeter catodon) from Co. Galway. 
Presented by the Board of Trade. 

The skeleton of the celebrated thoroughbred Horse " Isinglass." 
Presented by Capt. Dermot McCalmont. 

Cranium and portion of the face of a Romano-British skull, and 
portions of a Human trunk-skeleton of the same period, found near 
Grantham. Presented by C. J. Brown, Esq. 



64 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Asia. 

19 Mammals from Chih-li, N. China. Presented hy J. D. La 
Touche, Esq. 

382 mammals collected during the Bombay Natural History 
Society's Mammal Survey of India, including 117 from Darjeeling 
obtained by Messrs. R. S. Lister & H. Stevens, with the types of four 
new species, one of these forming a new genus (Dacnomys) ; 89 from 
the Bhutan Duars, collected by N. A. Baptista ; 31 Jackals and 56 
specimens of Scotophilus from various localities ; and 89 specimens 
from the Chin Hills, contributed by J. V. D. Mackenzie, Esq. 
Presented hy the Bombay Natural History Society. 

2 skulls of Porcupines, 11 Muridse, and 57 Bats from Sumatra 
and the Malay Peninsula, including the types of three new species. 
Presented hy the Government of the Federated Malay States, through 
H. C. Robinson, Esq., Director of Museums, Kuala Lumpur. 

2 Molars of Elephas indicus. Presented hy Mrs. R. F. Thorp. 

Africa. 

19 Mammals from British East Africa. Presented hy C. W. 
Machworth Praed, Esq. 

20 Mammals from Angola, including the typical head and 
horns of the Angolan Sable (Hijypotrayus niger variani). Presented 
by H. F. Varian,- Esq. 

20 skulls of Monkeys, Carnivora and Ungulates from Northern 
Bhodesia. Presented hy Hereward C. Dollman, Esq. 

America, North. 

The skeletons of a male and female Musk Ox (Ovihos moschatus). 
Presented hy Lady Strathcona and Mount Royal. 

America, South. 

58 Mammals from Cordova and 95 from Bonifacio, Buenos 
Ay res, collected by Robin Kemp. Presented hy Old field Thomas, 
Esq., F.R.S. 

A skull, and portions of the trunk-skeleton, of a " Bolivian 
Indian " from Argentina. Presented hy Wilfred Smithers, Esq. 

The skulls of two Indians from Peru. Presented hy C. E. R. 
Rowlands, Esq. 

AVES. 

The acquisitions number 9,466. Of these the most noteworthy 
are as follows : — 

Europe. 

A restoration of the Great Auk (Plautus impennis). Presented 
by the Trustees of the late James Rowland Ward. 

261 birds from various localities in Europe. Presented by A. L. 
Btitler, Esq. 

3 Carrion Crows (^Corvus corone) from Berwickshire. Presented 
hy Miss D. M. A. Bate. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 65 

A short-eared Owl (Asio accipitrinus) from King's Co., Ireland. 
Presented hy R. Mc Combe, Esq. 

A little Owl (^Athene noctua) from Tonbridge. Presented hy the 
Rev. J. H. Hale. 

A Red-legged Partridge (Caccabis ricfa) from Pershore, Worces- 
tershire. Presented by Col. A. C. Bailward. 

A little Auk {Alca alle) from Perth. Presented by G. 
Brooksbank, Esq. 

Asia. 

10 Eggs of the Mikado Pheasant (Calophasis mikado). Presented 
by the Duke of Bedford, K.G. 

1,077 birds and 380 eggs from Siam. Presented by E. G. 
Herbert, Esq. 

906 eggs of birds from Eastern China. Presented by J. D. La 
Touche, Esq. 

293 birds, chiefly from India and Ceylon. Presented by A. L. 
Butler, Esq. 

Africa. 

713 birds from various localities, chiefly the Sudan, including 
the types of three newly-described species. Presented by A. L. 
Butler, Esq. 

1,315 birds from British East Africa and Uganda, including 
two types of newly-described forms. Presented by Capt. G. P. 
Cosens. 

590 eggs of birds from the Cameroons. Presented by G. L. Bates, 
Esq. 

98 birds from the Cameroons, collected by G. L. Bates, Esq. 
Received in exchange. 

America, South. 

Two examples of the Great Snipe (Gallinago gigantea), from 
Paraguay. Presented by the Trustees of the late James Rowland 
Ward. 

20 eggs and four nests of birds from Western Ecuador. 
Presented by W. Goodfellow, Esq. 

89 birds from Western Ecuador, including the types of five new 
species. Presented by E. J. Brook, Esq. ■ 

Australasia. 

1,529 birds, 38 eggs, and 13 nests, including nine types of newly- 
described species, from Dutch New Guinea. Presented by the 
Subscribers to the British Ornithologists^ Union Expedition to Dutch 
New Guinea. 

A mounted example of Keysser's Cassowary ( Casuarius keysseri) 
from the Rawlinson Mountains, N.E. New Guinea. Presented by 
Lord Rothschild, F.R.S. 



6& accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Reptilia. 

The additions number 232, o£ which 223 were received by 
presentation and 9 by exchange. 

Principal additions : — 

Europe. 

A Leathery Turtle {Dermochelys coriacea) caught in the vicinity 
of the Scilly Islands, June 16th. Presented hy the Admiralty. 
14 lizards from Switzerland. Presented hy W. Morton, Esq. 

19 lizards from France. Presented hy M. Chabanaud. 

14 lizards from Marseilles. Presented hy Prof. A. Vayssiere. 

A-sia. 

8 specimens from Saghalien Island and Japan. Received in 
exchange from Prof. S. Hatta. 

20 specimens from Chih-fung, N.E. Chih-li, China, including 
a new snake (Coluher anomalus). Presented hy A. L. Hall, Esq. 

A lizard ( Tacliydromus dorsalis) from the Loo Ohoo Islands, new 
to the collection. Received in exchange from the United States 
National Museum. 

50 specimens from Siam, including examples of a lizard 
(Gyninodactylus oldhami) and two snn\i.es (Tropido7iotus inas, Thal- 
assophis anomalus) new to the collection. Presented hy Dr. Malcolm 
Smith. 

Africa. 

14 specimens from Southern Abyssinia. Presented hy A. P. 
Abercromhy, Esq. 

15 specimens from Southern Nigeria. Presented hy C. A. 
Francis, Esq. 

A Blind Snake (lyphlops ccecatus), from West Africa, new to the 
collection. Presented hy the East Africa and Uganda Natural 
History Society. 

6 lizards from South Africa, including a syntype of a new species 
(Eremias aspera). Presented hy the South African Museum. 

10 lizards from Kimberley. Presented hy J. H. Power, Esq. 

America, North. 

A Terrapin (Chrysemys mobiliensis) , new to the collection, and 
the type of a new Horned Lizard (^Phrynosoma hrevicornis^ . Pre- 
sented hy the Zoological Society of London. 

America, South. 

22 specimens from South-West Colombia. Presented hy Dr. 
H. G. F. Spurrell. 

5 specimens from Western Ecuador. Presented hy W. Good- 
fellow, Esq. 

A specimen of a rare lizard (^Tupinamhis rufescens), from 
Argentina. Presented hy the Zoological Society of London. 



department of zoology. 67 

Batrachia. 

The additions number 204, of which 193 were received by- 
presentation and 11 by exchange. 
Principal additions : — 

Asia. 

11 specimens from Japan. Received in exchange from Prof. S. 
Hatta. 

80 specimens from Siam, including the very rare Glyphoglossus 
molossus. Presented hy Dr. Malcolm Smith. 

Africa. 

51 specimens from British East Africa, including a frog (Rappia 
halfouri), new to the collection. Presented by H. J. Allen Turner^ 
Esq. 

9 specimens from Nairobi. Presented hy the East Africa and 
Uganda Natural History Society. 

4 Caecilians from South Cameroon. Presented hy G. L. Bates, 
Esq. 

An example of a rare frog (Heleophryne regis) from Knysna, 
Cape Colony. Presented by the South African Museum. 

America, North. 

Examples of the recently discovered salamander, Batrachoseps 
major, from California. Presented by Dr. C. L. Camp. 

America, South. 

21 specimens from Colombia, including 10 syntypes of a new toad, 
Atelopus carrilseri. Presented by Dr. A. G. Ruthven. 

19 specimens from South- West Colombia. Presented hy Dr. 
H. G. F. Spurrell. 

Examples of the rare aquatic Csecilian, Typhlonectes compressi- 
cauda, from Manaos, Brazil. Presented by A. Aiken Clark, Esq. 

Pisces. 

The additions number 587. 545 were presented, 25 were pur- 
chased, and 17 were received in exchange. 

The most important are : — 

A collection of otoliths, mounted on slides. Presented by E. 
Heron-Allen, Esq. 

211 larval and post-larval fishes from the " Terra Nova " collec- 
tion, including the types of five new species (^Paraliparis terrae-novae, 
Lampanyctus longipinnis, Stylophthalmus macrenteron, Leptocephalus 
acuticeps and L. hexastigma. Presented by the British Antarctic 
Expedition, 1910. 

Europe. 

A large Sun-fish (Orthagoriscus mala) from off the S. of Ireland. 
Presented by Messrs. W. Howlett. 



68 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

A very rare fish (^Centrolophus brkarinicus), from off the S. of 
Ireland. Presented by J. Pryor,' Esq. 

A rare Ray (Raia undulata), from Plymouth ; purchased. 

70 Parr of the Salmon (Sahno salar) from the Wye, illustrating 
the growth of the species in fresh water. Presented hy J. A. Hutton, 
Esq. 

A large Tench {Tinea tinea), from Gratton Park, Surrey. Pre- 
sented hy F. R. Graham, Esq. 

Three large Dace (Leueiseus leuciscus), from the Kennet. Pre- 
sented hy F. Barker, Esq. 

Asia. 

Four fishes from Japan, including examples of two species new to 
the collection (JDactylopterus peterseni and Callionymus altivelis). 
Presented hy Colonel C. E. Shepherd. 

Africa. 

47 fishes from Durban, Natal, including specimens of Anthias 
squamipinnis and A. manadensis, species new to the collection. Pre- 
sented hy Romer Robinson, Esq., and H. W. Bell Marley, Esq. 

29 fishes from the Benue River, including the type of a new 
Barbel (^Barhus francisci). Presented hy A. Claude Francis, Esq. 

14 fishes from San Thome. Presented hy Dr. J. A. Henriques. 

A Horse-fish (Agnopus torvus) from South Africa. Presented by 
W. Hart, Esq. 

24 fishes from British East Africa, including the types of three 
new Cyprinids (Labeo gracilis, Barhus procatopus and B. loveridgii. 
Presented by the East Africa and Uganda Natural History Society. 

America. 

14 fishes from the San Juan River, Colombia. Presented hy 
Dr. H. G. F. Spurrell. 

19 fishes fromManaos, including a Cai-G.sh. (Piratinga /ilamentosa), 
new to the collection. Presented hy Dr. A. Aiken Clark. 

The" type of a new Loricariid (^Arges mindoensis), from Ecuador. 
Presented by W. Goodfellow, Esq. 

15 fishes of the genus Arges, from Ecuador and Colombia. 
•Received in exchange from Prof. C. H. Eigenmann. 

TUNICATA. 

Nine specimens of the rare, deep-sea, stalked Simple Ascidian, 
Culeolus murrayi Herdman, in various stages of growth (only one 
specimen, the type, had been previously known). Attached to a 
cable brought up from 1,500 fathoms between Java and West 
Australia. Presented by the Eastern and Associated Telegraph 
Companies. 

MOLLUSCA. 

45 specimens were presented, and 24 were purchased during the 
year. The more noteworthy are : — 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 69 

14 land-shells, from the Oriental Region. Presented hy G. K. 
Gude, Esq. 

23 land-shells, from the same Region. Purchased. 

9 land-shells, from the Abor Hills. Presented hy the Indian 
Museum, Calcutta. 

9 British Slugs. Presented hy W. Denison Roehuck, Esq. 

A Pecten {Pecten (Chlamys) scahricostatus, 8owb.), from Da 
Costa's collection. Presented by G. B. Sowerby, Esq. 

A remarkably fine group of Vermetidse ( Vermiculus spiratus), 
from Bermuda. Presented hy John P. Bartram, Esq. 

Myriopoda. 

The accessions numbered 17, including the syntypes of a European 
Bristly Millipede (Lophoproctus inferus). Presented hy Prof. F. 
Silvestri. 

Arachnida. 

The acquisitions numbered 435, the following being especially 
noteworthy : — 

The types of a new Solpuga (S. toppini), from Zululand. Pre- 
sented by E. C. Chuhh, Esq. 

63 Pseudoscorpions, from S. Africa, representing 14 different 
species, most of which are new to the collection. Presented hy 
Robert Godfrey, Esq. 

55 slides of British Water-Mites (Hydrachnidse), mounted by 
W. Saville Kent, Esq. Presented hy A. S. Hirst, Esq. 

A specimen of Limidus, from Kuching River, Sarawak, Borneo, 
having the telson bifurcated. Presented by Philip Schidrowitz, Esq., 
Ph.D., F.C.S. 

Crustacea. 

The most important addition made during the year was the col- 
lection presented by Mr. A. 0. Walker, consisting of Amphipoda, 
Isopoda, and other Crustacea, chiefly from British seas, the Mediter- 
ranean, and the Indian Ocean. The extent of this collection, which 
contains many types and other specimens described by the donor, 
cannot be precisely stated until it has been properly arranged, but it 
is contained in over 650 bottles and tubes, and comprises also about 
40 microscopic preparations. The other accessions number 379, and 
include : — • 

89 specimens taken from Telegraph cables in the West Indies, 
the Mediterranean, and the Malay Archipelago. Presented hy the 
Eastern and Associated Telegraph Companies. 

49 River-crabs and prawns, from Sierra Leone. Presented by N. 
W. Thomas, Esq. 

144 Amphipoda and Isopoda, from South Africa, including syn- 
types of 17 species. Presented by K. H. Barnard, Esq. 

16 Crustacea, from the Mawson Antarctic Expedition, including 
the holotype of one species, and paratypes of another.' Presented hy 
Prof. W. A. Haswell, F.R.S. 



70 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Syntypes o£ three species o£ Decapoda, from the Red Sea. 
Presented hy Prof. W. A. Herdman, F.R.S. 

EcHIi^ODEEMA. 

The Eastern and Associated Telegraph Companies have again 
presented interesting specimens from deep water, most of which 
have been determined. 

' Worms. 

The most important acquisition in this part of the collection is 
the series of Rotifera and other microscopic organisms, mostly from 
fresh water, collected, mounted, and presented by Mr. C. F. Rousselet. 
The collection consists of more than 1,000 slides of Rotifera, with a 
few Gastrotricha, the Polyzoa noticed below, and other slides and 
tubes. The specimens are admirably preserved, and the slides are 
mounted with great skill. 

Other noteworthy additions are as follows : — 

A specimen of the rare Marionina georgiana, from the Falkland 
Islands. Presented hy Dr. J. H. Ashworth, F.R.S. 

Small collections of parasitic worms made by Mr. G. E. Bodkin 
in British Guiana, and by Dr. W. M. Aders in Zanzibar. Presented 
by the Imperial Bureau of Entomology. 

3 species of parasitic worms, &c., including types. Presented hy 
Dr. J. H. Ashworth, F.R.S. 

Specimens of Bilharzia or Schistosoma, producing the formidable 
disease Bilharziosis, from Egypt. Presented hy Major E. E. Austen. 

Specimens of the Land-Planarian, Rhynchodemus terrestris, and 
their egg-capsules, from Oswestry. Collected and presented hy Capt. 
H. E. Quick, R.A.M.C., T. 

Anthozoa. 

The only specimens obtained during the year have been a few 
collected in deep water. Presented hy the Eastern and Associated 
Telegraph Companies. 

Polyzoa. 

109 specimens, comprising a duplicate set, including many 
paratypes, of the species of Polyzoa described in "The Polyzoa 
of the ' Siboga ' Expedition," Part I, " Entoprocta, Ctenostomata 
and Cyclostomata," by S. F. Harmer. Presented hy Prof. Dr. 
Max Weber. 

8 specimens of Polyzoa, including two types and four other 
figured specimens described or referred to in Dr. Harmer's " Siboga " 
Report. Presented hy the University Museum of Zoology, Cambridge. 

178 specimens of Polyzoa, mostly fresh-water, including 
numerous examples beautifully preserved and mounted, with tentacles 
extended. Presented hy C. F. Rousselet, Esq. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 



71 



Hydrozoa. 
1 specimen o£ the deep-sea Siphonophoran, Pterophysa studeri, 
Lens and Riemsdijk ; found adhering to a cable brought up from 
800 fathoms between Java and W. Australia. Presented by the 
Eastern and Associated Telegraph Companies. 

PoRiFERA (Sponges). 
15 specimens of the deep-sea Monaxonellid Sponge Esperella 
biserialis, Ridley and Dendy, growing on a cable brought up from 
1,500 fathoms between Java and W. Australia. Presented hy the 
Eastern and Associated Telegraph Companies. 

Protozoa. 
18,000 specimens of Foraminifera belonging to the genus Lagena, 
from the South West Pacific, known as the " W. B. Thornhill 
Collection." The collection was bequeathed to H. Sidebottom, Esq., 
who completed the sorting and mounting of the material, and 
described the species in the Journal of the Quekett Microscopical 
Club (1912-13). Presented hy H. Sidebottom, Esq. 

-Summary of the Acquisitions in the Department of Zoology 
during 1916. 





Donations. 


Purchases. 


Exchanges. 


Totals. 




/General Collection 


851 


36 


14 


901 


Osteological Collection : — 










Mammalia^ Anthropology 


5 


— 


— 


5 


Cetacea 


11 


— 


— 


11 


\ Other Mammals 


5 


— 


— 


5 


fSkins 


5,506 


100 


— 


5,606 


AveB J Eggs 


3,829 


4 


— 


3,833 


] Nests 


17 


— 


— 


17. 


(.Skeletons 


10 


_ 





10 


Domesticated 4mmals 


9 


_ 


— 


9 


Keptilia 


223 


— 


9 


232 


Batrachia 


193 





11 


204 


Pisces 


545 


25 


17 


687 


Tunicata 


9 


— 


— 


9 


Hermichordata and Phoronidea 


1 








1 


MoUusca 


45 


24 


— 


69 


Myriopoda 


17 


— 


— 


17 


Prototracheata 














Arachnida 


435 


— 





435 


(Walker Collection 










Crustacea (approximate) 


700 


— 


4J 


1,079 


(other sources 


375 


— 


Pycnogonida 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Echinoderma 


16 


— 


— 


16 


Worms iS^^^^T'lx;*^ 

I Parasitic Worms 


3 


— 


— 


3 


137 


— . 


— . 


137 


Rotifera, &c 


1,000 


— 


— 


. 1,000 


Brachiopoda 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Polyzoa 


302 


— 


— 


302 


Anthozoa 


9 


— 


— 


9 


Hydrozoa 


17 


— 





17 


Porifera 


17 


— 


— 


17 


Protozoa 


18,009 








18,009 


Sea-bottom samples 


9 


— 


— 


9 


Totals 


32,305 


189 


55 


32,549 



72 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

VI. — Economic Zoology. 

I. Information relating to various matters connected with the War 
has been given to Government Departments. 

II. Mammalia. 



The question o£ Whaling in Sub-Antarctic waters has continued 
to engage much attention. A large body o£ statistics bearing on 
this subject has been analysed, and the results have been forwarded 
to the Colonial Office. 

Reports have also been sent to the Colonial Office on other 
subjects connected with South Georgia, namely the pursuit of 
Elephant Seals, and the acclimatization of Reindeer and other 
animals in that Island. 

Correspondence has passed between the Department and Mr. W. 
Hamar Greenwood, with reference to the protection of Pacific 
Sea-Lions. 

III. AVES. 

A large number of enquiries relating to the protection of Birds 
in British Colonies and Protectorates have been dealt with, in 
response to applications from the Colonial Office. Some of these 
enquiries have included subsidiary references to Mammals, Reptiles, 
and Fishes. 

IV. Pisces. 

Considerable progress has been made with the revision and 
re-arrangement of the collection of Clupeidse. 

A memoir dealing with the genera Clupea, Sardina and Alosa 
has been published ; and further papers are in the press and in 
course of preparation. 

Among the enquiries answered and specimens determined may 
be mentioned : — 

Further questions from the Colonial Office on the subject of 
poisonous fishes in the West Indies. 

Fragments of " Indian Sardines " received from the Board of 
Agriculture and Fisheries ; species determined as Sardinella 
longiceps. 

V. Arachnida (Ticks, Mites, Etc.). 

The following enquiries have been dealt with : — 

1. A Sarcoptid Mite (Cnemidocoptes mutans) causing "Scaly 
leg " in poultry. 

2. A tropical Fowl-mite (Liponyssus bursa) occurring in Australia 
and attacking human beings. 

.3. Parasitic Mange in horses, caused by various species of 
Acari ; advice on this subject has been given to the Veterinary 
Service (Territorial). 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 73 

4. A parasitic Mite (Chorioptes ovis) affecting the feet of 
English Sheep. 

5. A Mite (^Tyroglyphus longior, var.) destroying stored corn in 
Colombia. 

6. Tyroglyphid Mites damaging stored oats in Flanders ; 
information given to the Military authorities. 

7. Several enquiries referring to the Furniture Mite (^Glycy- 
phagus domesticus), infesting houses. 

VI. Crustacea. 

At the request of the London Chamber of Commence, an investi- 
gation was made of certain brands of tinned " Lobster," and it was 
demonstrated to the satisfaction of representatives of the firms 
engaged in the trade that .the contents of the tins were the leg- 
muscles of a Japanese crab, Paralitliodes camtschatica. 

Boring Crustacea (Limnoria and Chelura) have been determined 
as causing damage to submarine telegraph-cables in the Mediter- 
ranean, and measures have been suggested for preventing their 
attacks. 

Young crabs (Ccdlinectes, sp.) found preying on mosquito larvae 
in West Africa have been determined for the Imperial Bureau of 
Entomology. 

Information has been given to the manufacturers of anti-fouling 
composition regarding the fouling of ships by barnacles, and to 
other visitors and correspondents with reference to damage done by 
Woodlice. 

VII. Porifera. 

The question of the cultivation of commercial Sponges in the 
West Indies has been reported on for the Colonial QjEfice. 

VIII. Miscellaneous Questions. 

Injuries to Submarine Telegraph cables due to various animals, 
such as Fishes, Crustacea and Polychsete Worms, have been 
examined and reported on. 

A series of specimens illustrating the " Biology of Waterworks " 
has been assembled and will shortly be exhibited in the Central 
Hall ; and an illustrated Guide to the series is in course of 
preparation. 



VII. — Students and Visitors. 

The number of visits paid to the Zoological Department during 
the year 1916 by students and other persons requiring assistance 
or information amounted to 7,018. 

This number includes the visits paid by Students holding tickets 
entitling them to do special work in the Exhibition Galleries. 



74 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

In the 10 previous years the numbers were as follows. From 
1906 to 1912 inclusive, the present Department of Entomology was 
included in the Department of Zoology : — 

8,020 in the year 1915. 



9,235 „ 1914. 


9,982 


1913. 


12,564 „ 1912. 


12,175 „ 1911. 


12,443 „ 1910. 


11,461 


1909. 


10,220 


1908. 


11,043 


1907. 


10,813 


1906. 



Sidney F. Harmer. 



department of entomology. 75 

Department of Entomology. 

I. — Arrangement and Conservation. 

Exhibition Series. — No change o£ importance either by additions 
or alterations has been made in this series during the year. 

Study Series. — Owing to the services rendered by voluntary 
workers, the progress made in the naming and arrangement o£ the 
collections has been greater than could have been anticipated in view 
o£ the loss sustained by the death in March o£ Mr. G. Meade Waldo, 
Assistant in charge o£ the Hymenoptera, and the absence on War 
Service o£ so many other members of the Staff o£ the Department. 

In the Coleoptera, the undetermined Carabidse o£ many Oriental 
genera have been incorporated and arranged after determination by 
Mr. H. E. Andrewes. Rhynchophora of various groups have been 
similarly dealt with after having been submitted to Prof. A. Hustache 
and Mr. Arthur Lea and named by those specialists. The Hawaian 
Nitidulidse have been incorporated ; and numerous undetermined 
Cryptophagidae have been named or described by Monsieur Grouvelle. 
The Endomychidse have been expanded and revised and many new 
species described. A large number of new species of Rutelinae and 
Melolonthinse have also been described. The family Meloidae has 
been in great part revised and the accessions incorporated. The 
Australian species of Alleculidse have been reincorporated in the 
collection after determination by Mr. H. J. Carter. The Bruchidse 
have been revised and re-arranged and the accessions incorporated. 
By the kind permission of Mr.- Godman, Mr. G. C. Champion 
has continued to work upon the collections of Coleoptera and in 
the course of the year has arranged the Heteromera of the families 
Melandryidse, Scraptiidse, Xylophilidse, and Pedilidse as well as 
part of the Lagriidge, and has described many new species. 

In the Hymenoptera the arrangement of the Apidse was continued 
and completed. The Rev. F. D. Morice, who has voluntarily devoted 
almost the whole of his time to the work, has arranged the British 
Aculeates and incorporated the Saunders Collection. Mr. Rowland 
Turner has continued to give his services voluntarily as in previous 
years, and has completed the arrangement of the Psammocharidse, 
while Mr. H. St. J. Donisthorpe, another voluntary worker, has 
arranged the Formicidse of the Palsearctic region. Several small 
collections sent to him on loan have been named by Prof. T. A. 
Cockerell. Mr. J. Waterston, of the Imperial Bureau of Entomology, 
has continued his work in determining and arranging the economi- 
cally very important parasitic Hymenoptera of the family Chalci- 
didse. 

In the Rhynchota the revision and re-arrangement of the 
Membracidse have been completed so far as the Oriental and 
-Ethiopian regions are represented, and accessions from the Distant 



76 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

collection and other sources have been incorporated. Progress has 
also been made in working out some large collections of Homoptera 
received from various sources in India and from Indo-China. 

The work of mounting Coccidse and Aphidse on slides, thus 
making them more valuable for the purpose of study, and the in- 
corporation of accessions in these important economic groups have 
been continued. 

The arrangement of the Anoplura and Mallophaga has been 
continued, and two parts of a long report on a fine collection of these 
insects received from the Zoological Society have been published 
with illustrations in the Society's " Proceedings." 

In the Lepidoptera, the re-arrangement of the Pyralidae of the 
sub-families Hydrocampinse, Scoparianae, and Gallerianae has been 
completed and that of the Crambinse commenced. The preparation 
of the MS. dealing with the Noctuinse for the Catalogue of Moths 
has been continued and completed, and the MS. is now about 
equivalent in extent to that of three published volumes. 

In the Tineina, the determination and incorporation of species 
belonging to the Gelechiadse, ^Egeriadse, llyponomeutidse, Tortricidse, 
and Hepialidse have been continued, and some new forms have been 
described. 

In the Diptera, the arrangement of the exotic Tipulidse has been 
continued and completed, and accessions have been incorporated ; 
the collection of flies made by the Robinson-Kloss Expedition to 
West Sumatra has been worked out and a report on it prepared for 
publication. Several collections of mosquitoes have been deter- 
mined ; and a pamphlet on " Mosquitoes in Relation to Disease *' 
has been published in the Economic Series. 



Imperial Bureau of Entomology. 

The work carried on by the Imperial Bureau of Entomology has 
continued to be of considerable benefit to the Department of 
Entomology ; a large number of accessions has been received 
through that source, and as many of these accessions had been 
worked out and in some cases contained a good proportion of types, 
they formed a valuable addition to the Museum collection. 



II. — Duplicates and Exchanges. 

(a) Duplicates. 

Duplicates have been presented to the following gentlemen who 
have rendered service by naming specimens : — Mr. H. E. Andrewes, 
M. Antoine Grouvelle, Prof. A. Hustache, and Mr. L. B. Prout. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY. 



77 



(b) Exchanges. 

Exchanges have been made with the following : — M. A. 
Grouvelle, Dr. E. W. Ferguson, Mr. 0. E. Janson, Prof. N. 
Sacharov, Mr. T. V. Sherrin, and Mr. H. G. T. Watkins. 



III. — Depai'tmental Library. 

As the Library has continued to be worked in conjunction with 
that of the Zoological Department, particulars in reference to it 
will be found included under the corresponding head, in the return 
made by the Keeper of Zoology. 

IV. — Publications. 

In addition to the official publications issued by the Trustees 
(see pp. 53, 54) several papers and reports have been prepared in 
connection with different branches of the collection and have been 
published in scientific journals. 



V. — Acquisitions. 

The number of specimens added to the Insect Collection during 
the year is 40,124, made up as shown in the following table : — 





Donations. 


Purchases. 


Exchanges. 


Totals. 


Coleoptera 


12,233 


2,000 


1,273 


15,506 


Lepidoptera 


6,436 


— 


4 


6,440 


Hymenoptera 


3,554 


— 


12 


3,566 


Diptera 


6,843 


— 


36 


6,869 


Ehynchota 


2,694 


3,000 


42 


5,736 


Orthoptera 


633 


— 


5 


638 


Neuroptera 


176 


— 


— 


176 


Other Orders 


595 


— 


— 


595 


Larvse, Pupae, &c. 


598 


— 


— 


598 


Totals 


33,762 


5,000 


1,362 


40,124 



The most important of these accessions are the following from 
various localities : — 

12,565 insects of all orders including types of 131 new species. 
Presented by the Impe7'ial Bureau of Entomology. 

The sixth instalment of the Distant Collection containing 3,000 
specimens of Rhynchota and 2,000 specimens of Coleoptera. 

Europe. 

3,786 named British Diptera. Presented by Lieut.-Col. J. W. 
Yerbury. 

1,743 Coleoptera and Rhynchota. Presented by H. B. Preston^ 
Esq. 



78 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

1,041 Coleoptera from South Russia ; received in exchange from 
Prof. N. Sacharov. 

Asia. 

5,000 Coleoptera from Sikkim collected by Mr. H. Stevens. 
Presented hy H. E. Andrewes, Esq. 

667 Coleoptera from Ceylon. Presented hy E. E. Green, Esq. 

Africa. 

270 Thysanura and Oollembola from the Seychelles. Presented 
hy Prof. J. Stanley Gardiner, F.R.S. 

Australia. 

937 Hymenoptera from North Queensland. Presented hy R. E.. 
Turner, Esq. 

America. 

4,139 Lepidoptera Rhopalocera, including 91 types. Presented' 
hy F. iJu Cane Godman, Esq., D.C.L., F.R.S. 



VI. — Economic Entomology. 

The work of the Department in Economic Entomology has been 
carried on by members of the staft" with the assistance of Mr. C. A. 
Ealand, whose services as a specialist in that branch were again 
engaged during the year. 

Further large accessions of material presented for the most part 
by the Imperial Bureau of Entomology, have been incorporated in 
the Economic Series, and considerable additions have been made 
to the card index of injurious insects. 

The naming and arranging of families and groups of insects of 
more than ordinary economic importance, such as the Aphidse and 
Coccidse amongst the Rhynchota, and the Bruchidge amongst the 
Coleoptera, have received special attention, and have made a fair 
amount of progress. 

As a result o£ a correspondence in the Press on the question of 
hibernation of the common house-fly (Musca domestical large numbers 
of flies found in houses in various parts of the United Kingdom 
during the first three months of the year were received at the 
Museum. These flies have all been examined and identified, and it 
has been found that in the consignments from more than 160 
different persons, the common house-fly was present in only 18, 
the total number of specimens of this species (^M. domestica) received 
being 32, most of which had been captured in kitchens or other 
warm rooms, and while in a more or less active condition. The 
evidence thus obtained gave no support whatever to the idea that 
the common house-fly passes through the winter as a rule in the 
adult stage. In contrast with the very small proportion of true 



DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY. 79 

house-flies received, was the great preponderance of Pollenia rudis, 
a species known as the cluster-fly. This species was present in 103 
out of the 160 consignments, and the specimens received, although 
stated in most cases to be only a few samples of the kinds found, 
reached to some thousands in number. In several houses, the 
cluster-fly was hibernating in such vast numbers as to become a 
serious nuisance, and many requests for information on the best 
means of getting rid of them were received. Next in point of 
numbers to the cluster-flies, and frequently associated with them 
in the same hibernating swarms, were the two species, Limnophora 
septemnotata and Musca autumnalis. Flies found hibernating under 
the roofs of churches were found in a few cases to consist chiefly of 
the latter species. 

Enquiries on other matters of importance from an economic 
point of view have continued to come in both from this country and 
abroad, including Government and Colonial Departments. Amongst 
the subjects on which information or advice has been sought and as 
far as possible given the following may be mentioned : — 

DiPTERA (Flies). 

(1) House-flies. Several enquiries. 

(2) Gnats and biting-flies and how to prevent their attacks. 

(3) Measures to take in regard to infestations of fleas, and 

possible origin of the pest. 

(4) Warble-flies on cattle and deer. 

(5) Larvae of Eristalis evacuated per rectum by a soldier. 

COLEOPTERA (BeETLES). 

(6) Species of J.no&mm destroying books and furniture. 

(7) „ Lyctus injurious to panelling, furniture, and 
imported woods. 

(8) Dinoderus japonicus damaging bamboo poles. 

(9) Tribolium confusum, Necrohia rufipes, &c., as pests in ware- 

houses and factories (from Public Health Department, 
Glasgow). 

(10) Bruchus chinensis, infesting peas (from the Admiralty). 

(11) Arceocerus fasciculatus destroying cocoa beans. 

(12) Ptinus tectus feeding on red pepper. 

(13) Carpophiius hemipterus in dried figs. 

(14) Rhizotrogus solstitialis and Phyllopertha Tiorticola as garden 

pests. 

Lepidoptera (Moths). 

(15) Anaphe spp. The commercial possibilities of silk manu- 

facture from their cocoons. 

(16) Gazalina sp. Defoliating forests in Burma (from Chief 

Conservator of Forests, Burma). 

(17) Tceniocampa gothica. Defoliating oaks in the Isle of Wight. 



80 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Miscellaneous. 

(18) Bed-bugs infesting houses and a ship. 

(19) Ccecilius pedicularis swarming in macaroni. 

(20) Cockroaches and methods o£ getting rid of them. 

(21) Ants in houses. 

(22) Lepisma saccharina as a food pest. 

VII. — Students and Visitors. 

The number of visits paid to the department during the year by- 
students and other persons seeking information or assistance was 
3,149. 

C. J. Gahan. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 81 



Department of Geology. 

I. — A rrangement and Conservation. 

Mammalia (Galleries 1 and 2). — The collection o£ Lower Pliocene 
mammalian remains from Pikermi, Greece, has been examined in 
detail, and duplicates have been removed from it. The whole 
collection has now been registered and incorporated. Skulls, jaws, 
and limb-bones of Rhinoceros have been mounted and labelled for 
exhibition in pier-case 8, and skulls and frontlets of Antelopes have 
been similarly mounted and labelled in pier-case 16. 

Feet of the primitive rhinoceros Hyracodon, from the Oligocene 
of Dakota, U.S.A., have been mounted and exhibited in table- 
case 4. 

A fine pair of Antlers of Cervus belgrandi (C verticornis), from 
the Forest Bed of Pakefield, Norfolk, has been restored and mounted 
on the top of pier-case 13. 

The first stages in the preparation of the skeleton of Elephas 
antiquus from Chatham have been completed, and a selection of the 
bones has been placed on exhibition in pier-case 31. 

Number of specimens of Mammalia registered, 787. 

Aiies (Gallery 2). — The original specimen of Archceopteryx has 
been further prepared, the right coracoid and the two pubes being 
now completely exposed. 

The sternum of the largest known bird of flight (^Gigantornis 
eaglesomei), from the Eocene of Southern Nigeria, has been prepared 
and mounted in table-case 13. 

A slab of footprints of Dinornis has been prepared and placed 
in wall-case 23. 

The miscellaneous European Pleistocene remains of birds in 
drawers have been arranged and labelled. 

Number of specimens of Aves registered, 430. 

Reptilia and JBatrachia (Galleries, 3, 4, 5, 11).^ — Progress has 
been made with the preparation of Triassic Reptiles from South 
Africa and Cretaceous Reptiles from Alberta, Canada. 

A skull of the horned dinosaurian Monoclonius, from the 
Cretaceous of Alberta, has been mounted, with a cast of its brain- 
cavity, in wall-case 5. 

The unexhibited collection of Coprolites and remains of 
Mosasaurians in the drawers have been arranged and labelled. 
Miscellaneous other unexhibited specimens have also been labelled. 

Wall-cases 10 and 11 have been reconstructed to admit large 
specimens of Amphibia and Anomodont Reptiles. 

Number of specimens of Reptilia and Batrachia registered, 78. 

Pisces (Gallery 6). — The fossil fishes contained in the Geological 
Society's Collection have been registered, labelled, and incorporated. 

Several specimens of Lepidotus have been prepared and 
mounted for exhibition in wall-case 9, and numerous slabs of fossil 
fishes have been mounted in mahogany frames. 

F 



82 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Wall-case 14b, containing specimens o£ Aspidorhf/nchus, has 
been cleaned and repainted. 

Number o£ specimens o£ Pisces registered, 34 L. 

Mollusca (Galleries 7 and 8, and Workroom). — The Cephalopoda 
registered, labelled and incorporated include : — Upper Ordovician 
Nautiloidea from Wales (T. Ruddy coll.) ; Devonian specimens from 
Belgium (A. Champernowne coll.) ; English Liassic Ammonoidea 
(J. F. Blake, Lieut. Dan Haggard, and W. D. Lang colls.) ; 
Callovian Ammonoidea from France (A. de Grossouvre coll.) ; 
Oxfordian Ammonoidea from the neighbourhood of Peterborough 
(E. T. Leeds coll.) ; Upper Cretaceous Nautiloidea from Denmark 
(Miss C. Birley coll.) ; Upper Cretaceous Ammonoidea from Natal 
(Natal Government, per Sir Frederick Abel, Bart.) ; Cretaceous 
Ammonoidea from Canada (W. E. Cutler coll.) ; Cretaceous 
Belemnoidea from New Zealand (Prof. James Park coll.) ; and 
Cretaceous Ammonoidea and Tertiary Nautiloidea from Portuguese 
East Africa (E. 0. Thiele and R. C. Wilson coll.). 

All the Jurassic and Cretaceous Ammonoidea previously exhibited 
in table-cases 5 to 15 have been so re-arranged that the British 
Jurassic specimens now occupy table-cases 5 to 8 ; the Foreign 
Jurassic examples, table-cases 9 and 10 (in part) ; the British 
Cretaceous Ammonoidea, table-cases 10 (in part), 11, 12 and 13 
(in part) ; and the Foreign Cretaceous specimens, table-cases 13 
(in part), 14 and 15. 

The following Cephalopoda have been mounted, labelled, and 
added to the exhibited collection : — An Ammonite from the 
Kimeridge Clay (table-case 8), 5 Foreign Cretaceous Ammonites 
(table-case 14), 39 Ammonoids from the Upper Cretaceous of 
Zululand, North America, and Syria (table-case 15), 8 Cretaceous 
Belemnoids from England, New Zealand, and New South Wales 
(table-case 16), a specimen of Bostrychoceras polyplocum from the 
Cretaceous of Westphalia (wall-case 3), the example of Ammoni- 
toceras tovilense, from the Lower Greensand near Maidstone, 
described by G. C. Crick, Proc. Malac. Soc, vol. xii., parts 2 and 3, 
1916, pp. 118-120, pi. vi. (wall-case 3), and an Ordovician 
Nautiloid from China (wall-case 14). 

The nomenclature of some of the Cretaceous Ammonoidea 
exhibited in wall-cases 4 and 5, and in table-cases 12, 14 and 15, 
has been revised. 

Further progress has been made with the labelling of the selection 
of British Liassic Ammonites prepared for exhibition. 

The slip-catalogue of type, figured, and historical specimens of 
Cephalopoda has been continued. 

The Palaeozoic Gastropoda and Lamellibranchia registered, 
labelled, and mostly incorporated, include : — Devonian Gastropoda 
from Devon (J. G. Hamling coll.) and the Eifel (Upfield Green 
coll.) ; and Devonian Lamellibranchia from Devon (A. Champer- 
nowne and J. G. Hamling colls.). 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 83 

The Mesozoic and Tertiary Gastropoda and Lamellibranchia 
registered, labelled, and incorporated, include : — British Jurassic and 
Cretaceous specimens (J. W. Butler coll.) ; Post-pliocene marine 
shells from Ayrshire (John Smith coll.) ; Tertiary Mollusca from 
Australia (J. H. Young coll.) ; New Zealand Tertiary Mollusca 
(Geological Survey of New Zealand) ; Cretaceous Mollusca from 
Africa (Angola) (J. W. Gregory coll.), described by R. Bullen 
Newton, Trans. Roy. Soc. Edinburgh, 1916, vol. li., part 3 (No. 15), 
pp. 561-580, pis. i., ii. ; and natural casts of British Lower Green- 
sand (Aptian) Lamellibranchia (R. Broom coll.). 

Number of Mollusca registered : — Cephalopoda, 947 ; Gastro- 
poda, 294 : Lamellibranchia, 494. Total, 1,735. 

Arthropoda (Gallery 8 and Workroom). — The acquisitions 
registered, labelled, and incorporated include : — Devonian and Car- 
boniferous trilobites from Devonshire (J. G. Hamling coll.) ; various 
groups from the Coal Measures of Coseley, Staffs. (S. Priest coll.) ; 
and insects in amber and gum copal transferred from the Zoological 
Department. 

The large collection of Arthro})ods, mainly insects, from the 
Bembridge beds of Gurnet Bay, has been sorted into Orders. 

Number of specimens of Arthropoda registered, 1,148. 

Ecliinoderma (Gallery 8). — The acquisitions registered, labelled, 
and incorporated include : — Ashgillian Cystoids from the Lake 
District (Marr coll.) ; Silurian Stephanocrinus from Canada and 
Tennessee (Parks and Foerste colls.) ; Crinoids from the Chouteau, 
Keokuk, and St. Louis Limestones of Missouri, Illinois, and Iowa 
(Greger and Worthen colls.) ; from the Mesozoic rocks of England 
(Mockler coll.) ; Blastoids from the Chouteau and Keokuk Lime- 
stones of Missouri (Greger coll.) ; Echinoids from the Jurassic of 
Dorset (J. W. Butler coll.) and the Tertiary of Portuguese East 
Africa (Thiele and Wilson coll.) ; Asteroids from the Mesozoic of 
England (Mockler coll.) and Bohemia (Fritsch coll.). 

In the exhibited series the chief accessions are : — A Melocrinus 
gregeri (see Donations) and a Stereocidaris merceyi with apical 
system in place. Various specimens from the Pliensbachian of 
Mickleton tunnel have been re-mounted and re-labelled. 

The collections of Agaricocrinus and Dorycrinus from North 
America, and of the Cidarids from the Hartwell Clay, have been 
revised and relabelled. 

The slip-catalogues of exhibited specimens, of specimens of 
Blastoidea, and of genera and species of other Classes, have been 
continued. 

Number of specimens of Ecliinoderma registered : — Echinoidea, 
121 ; Stelliformia, 95 ; Crinoidea, 274 ; Blastoidea, 58 ; Cystoidea 
and Edrioasteroidea, 24. Total, 572. 

Annelida (Gallery 8 and Workroom). — The acquisitions regis- 
tered, labelled, and incorporated unclude specimens from the 



84 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Devonian and Carboniferous of Devonshire (Hamling coll.), the 
Cornbrash of England (Blake coll.), and the Cretaceous of Angola 
(J. W. Gregory coll.). 

Number of specimens of Ann(dida registered, 39. 

Bracldopoda (Gallery 8 and Workroom). — The acquisitions 
registered, labelled, and incorporated include specimens from the 
Silurian of England, the Devonian of England (R. H. Valpy coll.) 
and Asia Minor, the Trias of New Zealand (T. W. Lillie coll.), and 
the Tertiar}-- of New Zealand (Geol. Surv. N. Zealand coll.) Many 
type and figured specimens have been mounted, labelled, and placed 
in the exhibition cases. 

Number of specimens of Brachiopoda registered, 637. 

Polyzoa (Gallery 8 and Workroom). — The acquisitions registered, 
labelled, and incorporated include specimens from the Palseozoic of 
the N. Shan States (Geol. Surv. India coll.), from the British 
Devonian (J. G. Hamling coll.), the Carboniferous of Derbyshire 
(F. A. Bather coll.), and the Chalk of Surrey and Sussex (Gamble, 
Gaster, and Wright colls.) 

Enlarged models of Cretaceous Polyzoa have l)een prepared and 
exhibited in a table-case. 

Number of specimens of Polyzoa registered, 250. 

Antliozoa and Hydrozoa (Gallery 10 and Workroom). — The 
acquisitions registered, labelled, and incorporated include specimens 
from the Palaeozoic of the N. Shan States (Geol. Surv. India coll.) 
and the Federated Malay States (J. B. Scrivenor coll.), from the 
Devonian of the Eifel (R. F. Tomes coll.) and Devonshire (J. G. 
Hamling coll.), the Jurassic of India (J. F. Blake coll.), various 
Cretaceous formations (J. E. Lee coll.), the Miocene of Burma 
(Dalton coll.), and the Tertiary of Colombia, S. America (Beeby 
Thompson coll.). 

Enlarged models showing the relations of the hard and soft parts 
of Corals have been prepared and exhibited in wall-case 1. 

Number of specimens of Anthozoa and Hydrozoa registered, 
1,509. 

Porifera and Protozoa (Gallery 10). — Among specimens 
registered and incorporated are Foraminiferal rocks from the Eocene 
of Burma (Dalton coll.) 

Number of specimens of Porifera and Protozoa registered, 54. 

Plantce (Gallery 10). — The making of microscope sections of 
Cretaceous petrified plants has been continued. 

Number of specimens of Plantse registered, 72. 

Rock-specimens and Tracks (Gallery 11). — Acquisitions have been 
incorporated. 

Number of specimens registered, 29. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 85 

II. — Duplicates and Exchanges. 

Duplicate fossils have been presented to the Sedgwick Museum, 
Cambridge, in return for services rendered to the Department of 
Geology. 

Exchanges of duplicate fossils and plaster casts have been made 
with the Zoological Museum, (kmbridge, and the Denstone College 
Museum, Uttoxeter. 

III. — Departmental Lihrary. 

The additions to the Library which have been registered, stamped, 
catalogued, and press-marked, comprise IIG new works and 
pamphlets, of which 27 were purchased and 89 presented ; 452 
parts of serials in progress, of which 114 were purchased and 338 
presented. Nine sheets of maps were acquired by presentation. 
Eight photographs were presented. 10 volumes and pamphlets were 
obtained by transfer from other Departments. 100 volumes have 
been bound, press-marked, and returned to the shelves. 446 British 
Geological Survey maps were mounted on linen. 1,053 visits were 
made to the Library by students and others. 

IV. — Research and Pid)lications. 

Among researchers in the department may be mentioned a detailed 
study of the fossils of Trinidad made to facilitate the explorations for 
oil-bearing deposits in that island. 

21 papers have been contributed to scientific serials by members 
of the staff and others working in the Department. 

V. — Acquisitions. 
A. — By Donation. 

Among numerous donations the following may be enumerated : — 

Mammalia, — One upper premolar and one astragalus of Palceo- 
therium, from the Barton Clay, Hampshire. H. Eliot Walton, Esq. 

Zeuglodont jaws from an Eocene formation in a cutting on the 
Port Harcourt raihvay, Ombialla district. Southern Nigeria. Sir 
John Eaglesome, K.C.M.G. 

Twelve Mammalian remains from the Miocene Santa Cruz Beds 
of Maquinchao, Argentina, including a skull and mandible of a 
carnivorous Marsupial, Pharsophorus. T. C. JVorris, Esq. 

Fragment of antler of Cervus verticornis (C helgrandi) from the 
Forest Bed, Pakefield ; being a portion of a specimen in the British 
Museum. Committee, The Castle Museum, Norwich. 

Portion of mandible and associated bones of Mastodon from the 
Island of Imbros, Grecian Archipelago. Col. R. Girvin, R.A.M.S. 

Molar and tusk of a small elephant from an alluvial deposit in 
the Mongbwalo Gold Mine, Ituri River, N. E. Belgian Congo. 
Monsieur Gregoire, Managing Engineer of the Mongbwalo Mines, per 
Sir Alfred Sharpe, K.C.M.G. 



86 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Aves. — Sternum of a new bird (Gigantornis eaglesomei) from an 
Eocene formation in a cutting on the Port Harcourt railway, 
Ombialla district, Southern Nigeria. Sir John Eaglesome, K. CM. G. 

Rejytilia, — Group of vertebrae, &c., of Mixosaurus, from the 
Trias of Sticky Keep, Sassen Bay, Spitzbergen. John Newton, Esq. 

Two portions of a Cetiosaurian pelvis from the Inferior Oolite of 
Harlestone, Northampton. Eli Craddock, Esq. 

A Chelonian mandibular symphysis and a sacrum and ungual 
phalange of Trionyx, from the Barton Clay, Hampshire. H. Eliot 
Walton, Esq. 

Pisces. — A dentary bone of Cyhium bartonense, and other fish- 
remains, from the Barton Clay, Hampshire. H. Eliot Walton, Esq. 

Portions of four Siluroid skulls, from an Eocene formation in a 
cutting on the Port Harcourt railway, Ombialla district. Southern 
Nigeria. Sir John Eagle some, K.C.M.G. 

Mollusca. — Polished section of a coiled Nautiloid, probably of 
Ordovician age, from China, and a portion of Baculite obtained by 
Mr. Archibald Little near Pike's Peak, Colorado, July, 1865. Miss 
Alice Jjittle. 

168 Mollusca from the Devonian of Devonshire illustrating papers 
by the donor in Quart. Journ. Geol. See, 1895, Trans. Devon. Assoc, 
1908, and Proc. Geol. Assoc, 1910. J. G. Hamling, Esq., F.G.S. 

About a hundred Ammonites from the Oxford Clay near Peter- 
borough. E. Thurlow Leeds, Esq. 

One Cephalopod, fourteen Gastropods and twenty-two Lamelli- 
branchs from the British Jurassic and Cretaceous, being part of the 
collection of the late James W. Butler, Esq. Miss Daisy Butler. 

A Hippurite from the Chalk of Boughton churchyard, near 
Faversham, Kent. Joseph Acworth Plommer, Esq. 

Thirty fragments of Belemnites from the Upper Cretaceous of 
New Zealand. Prof. James Park. 

Cretaceous Mollusca from Angola, West Africa, described and 
figured by R. Bullen Newton, Trans. Roy. Soc Edinburgh, vol. li. 
(1916), pp. 561-580, pis. i., ii. Prof. J. W. Gregory, F.R.S. 

Eight Mollusca from the Tertiary and Cretaceous of Saghalien, 
Siberia. Bequeathed hy the late D. A. Louis, Esq. 

12 Mollusca, from an Eocene formation in a cutting on the Port 
Harcourt Railway, Ombialla district, Southern Nigeria. Sir John 
Eaglesome, K.C.M.G. 

Two Gastropods and 9 Lamellibranchs, from the Miocene of 
Eastern Cyreniaca. Captain R. S. Gwatkin- Williams, R.N. 

Tertiary Mollusca from Trinidad. John Parkinson, Esq., M.A. 

32 Gastropods and 11 Lamellibranchs, from the Tertiary of 
Trinidad. C. S. Rogers, Esq., Conservator of Forests, Trinidad. 

Arthropoda. — Two specimens of Homalonotus, and one plaster 
cast of the same, from the Llanvirn rocks, Carmarthenshire. John 
Innes, Esq. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 87 

Phyllopods, from the Lower Ordovician of Victoria, Australia. 
J. H. Young^ Esq. 

31 Trilobites, being part of a collection of Devonian and Carbon- 
iferous fossils from Devonshire, illustrating papers by the donor, in 
Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 1895, Trans. Devon. Assoc, 1908, and 
Proc. Geol. Assoc, 1910. J. G. Hamling, Esq., F.G.S. 

42 Arthropoda (twenty having counterparts) in Iron-stone nodules, 
from the Coal Measures of Coseley, near Dudley ; including the type- 
specimen of Anthracomartiis priesti, Pocock. S. Priest, Esq., F.G.S. 

Echinoderma. — One (Jystid, from the Ordovician of Oddgill, 
Cautley, Yorkshire, and two Cystids, from the Ashgillian beds, near 
Windermere. Br. J. E. Marr, F.R.S. 

Three calyces of Stephanocrinus, collected by the donor in the 
Upper Ordovician of Sweden. Dr. F. A. Bather, F.R.S. 

19 Crinoids (Stephanocrinus), from the Silurian of Grimsby, 
Ontario. Prof. W. A. Parkes. 

Two Asteroidea and 53 Crinoidea, being part of the collection of 
the donor, from the Devonian and Carboniferous rocks of Devonshire, 
illustrating papers by the donor in Quart, Journ. Geol. Soc, 1895, 
Trans. Devon. Assoc, 1908, and Proc. Geol. Assoc, 1910. J. G. 
Hamling, Esq., F.G.S. 

One of the four known specimens of Melocrinus gregeri from the 
Devonian, Craghead Creek, Callaway Co., Missouri, twenty-three 
Crinoids from the basal Burlington Limestone of the same locality ; 
five Crinoids and one Blastoid from the Chouteau Limestone, and one 
Blastoid from the basal Burlington Limestone, Easily, Boore Co., 
Missouri ; two Crinoids (Onychocriiius and Scytalocrinus), from the 
Carboniferous of Missouri, and twenty-one Crinoids, and six Blastoids 
from the Chouteau Limestone, Lupus, Moniteau Co., Missouri. 
Mr. B. K. Greger. 

12 Oolitic Echinoids, from the collection of the late James W. 
Butler, Esq. Miss Baisy Butler. 

One Miocene Echinoid, from Eastern Cyreniaca. Captain R. S. 
Gwatkin- \i'illiams, R.N. 

Brachiopoda — 250 Brachiopoda, being part of the donor's collec- 
tion from the Devonian and Carboniferous of Devonshire, illustrating 
his papers in Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 1895, Trans. Devon. Assoc, 
1908, and Proc Geol. Assoc, 1910. J. G. Hamling, Esq., F.G.S. 

Brachiopoda from Angola, West Africa, described and figured 
by R. Bullen Newton, Trans. Roy. Soc Edinburgh, vol. li. (1916), 
pp. 561-580, pis. i. and ii. Prof. J. W. Gregory, F.R.S. 

Vermes. — One Annelid (Spirorbis) on a plant, from the Ludlow 
Beds, near Clun, Shropshire. Johii Bateson, Esq. 

Polyzoa — Twenty-five Polyzoa, being part of the collection of the 
donor from the Devonian of Devonshire, illustrating his papers in 
Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 1895, Trans. Devon. Assoc, 1908, and 
Proc Geol. Assoc, 1910. J. G. Hamling, Esq., F.G.S. 



<50 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

108 Polyzoa from the Chalk of Surrey and Sussex. C. T. A. 
Gaster, Esq. 

Tertiary Polyzoa from Trinidad. John Parkinson, Esq., M.A. 

Coelentera. — Graptolites from the Lower Ordovician, Victoria, 
Australia. J. H. Young, Esq. 

Twenty-eight Corals, being part of the collection of the donor 
from the Devonian and Carboniferous of Devonshire, illustrating 
his papers in Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 1895, Trans. Devon. Assoc, 
1908, and Proc. Geol. Assoc, 1910. J. G. Hamling, Esq., F.G.S. 

Thirteen pieces of Carboniferous Limestone containing corals 
from Bukit Cheras, Kuantan district, Pahang, Federated Malay 
States. J. B. Scrivenor, Esq., M.A. 

Porifera. — One Sponge from the Culm of Codden Hill, Devon- 
shire. J. G. Hamling, Esq., F.G.S. 

One Sponge (Cliona) from the Upper Greensand Cornstones of 
Wiltshire. B. Pope Bartlett, Esq., M.E.C.S. 

Protozoa. — Ten Foraminiferal rocks and other Foraminifera from 
the Tertiary of Trinidad. John Parkinson, Esq., M.A. 

Miscellaneous Invertehrata. — Ninety-eight fossils from the Tertiary 
of Victoria, Australia. J. H. Young, Esq. 

Tracks. — Tracks (Cruziana) from the Carboniferous Lower 
Limestones, above Hosie Limestone, Seafield, Fife. James Wright, 
jun., Esq. 

Plantce. — Seven specimens of fossil wood and a piece of a cone 
of Bennettites, sp. nov., from the Gault of Folkestone. G. C. Walton, 
Esq., F.L.S. 

A piece of coniferous wood from the Upper Greensand of Pewsey, 
Wilts, and five microscope-slides of the same ; four pieces of Sarsen 
Stone from Little Bedwin, Wilts, containing rootlets of Palms and 
six microscope-slides of the same. Thomas Codrington, Esq., F.G.S. 

Rock-specimens. — Three clay-ironstone nodules from Ardley, 
British Columbia. John H. Wright, Esq. 

Sands, &c., collected by the late Rev. P. Ashington Bullen in 
Bermuda, illustrating his paper on the Geology of the Bermuda 
Islands, Geol. Mag., 1911, pp. 385-395, 433-442. Mrs. Ashington 
Bullen. 

22 facetted pebbles from Glacial Gravel, Pendleton, Manchester, 
described by the donor in Abstr. Proc. Geol. Soc, Nov. 17th, 1916, 
p. 5. J. Wilfrid Jackson, Esq. 



B. — Bi/ Exchange. 

Mammalia. — Antlers of Cervus helgrandi (C. verticornis) from 
the Forest Bed of Pakefield, Norfolk, described by Dr. S. F. Harmer 
in Trans. Zool. Soc, vol. xv. (1899), p. 97, pi. xxi. Zoological 
Museum, Cambridge. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 89 

Maxilla o£ Hycena from the Upper Tertiary of Salonika, Greece. 
Denstone College Museum. 

C. — Bi/ Purchase. 

The following specimens were purchased by the grant brought 
forward from the financial year 1914-15 : — 

Reptilia. — A large part of the skeleton of an armoured Dinosaur, 
a skull of Monoclonius, the snout of a Megalosaurian, a foot of Ornitho- 
mimus, and other reptilian remains from the Upper Cretaceous, 
Alberta, Canada (W. E. Cutler coll.). 

Mollusca. — A small series of shells associated with the above 
(W. E. Cutler coll.). 

The total accessions during 1916 are as follows : 





Donation. 


Purchase. 


Exchange. Total. 


Vertebrata 


59 


100 


2 161 


Invertebrata 


2,021 


25 


— 2,046 


Plantas 


25 


— 


— 25 


Kocks and Tracks 


29 


— 


— 29 



2,261 



The total number of specimens registered is 7,609. 



VI. Students and Visitors. 

The number of visits paid to the Department by students and 
other persons for the purpose of consultation or study during 1916 
was 3,009. 

The staff received 10 parties (246 persons) for demonstrations in 
the public galleries. 

Arthur Smith Woodward. 



90 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Department of Mineralogy. 
I. — Arrangement. 

The incorporation in the General Collection o£ the recent acquisi- 
tions, including specimens o£ zeolites belonging to the large Ashcroft 
collection, has involved many re-arrangements o£ the species in the 
case-tops and drawers, and the opportunity has been taken in the 
case o£ some species to arrange them topographically. 

Mineral and rock-specimens have been unpacked and examined, 
and twenty-six boxes have been packed and despatched. 

II. — Registration, Indexing, and Cataloguing. 

All the specimens o£ minerals, rocks, and meteorites acquired 
during the year have been registered, numbered, labelled, and 
incorporated with the Collection. 

The preparation o£ the slip-catalogues o£ the mineral-specimens 
in the Collection, species by species, and of permanent labels giving 
all available information for each specimen, has been continued for 
the Divisions of the Oxides and Carbonates. In this connexion 
slips have been prepared for the species zircon, thorite, rutile, 
anatase, brookite, baddeleyite, melanophlogite, cristobalite, and 
tridymite amongst the Oxides, and for thirty-three species from 
dolomite to malachite of the Carbonates ; specimens belonging to 
old collections have been entered in the General Register ; and 
permanent labels have been written and placed with the specimens. 
In the course of this work many doubtful specimens have been 
examined and determined, and additions and corrections have been 
made in the General Register. 

The slip-catalogue of the Precious Stones has been brought up 
to date, and a list has been prepared of all the gem-stones in the 
Collection mounted in finger-rings. 

All the specimens of Meteoric Irons and Siderolites have been 
carefully examined for rusting, and those showing signs of rust have 
been cleaned and coated with french polish. A card index of the 
specimens has been prepared to facilitate reference to the dates at 
which particular specimens were treated. 

Sixteen guard-books of letters for the years 1800-1900 have 
been indexed. 

The preparation of a copy of the register of the specimens in 
the Collection has been continued, and permanent labels containing 
particulars drawn from the register have been prepared for the 
specimens of minerals acquired during the year. 

III. — Preparation. 
54 thin-sections of rocks and meteorites have been prepared. 



DEPARTMENT OF MINERALOGY. 91 

IV. — Investigation. 

A crystal lographic investigation of sartorite has been in progress, 
a considerable number of crystals of this rare mineral having been 
made available for a detailed study through the kindness of Mr. 
R. H. Solly and Dr. C. 0. Trechmann. In the course of this 
work several crystals of other sulpharsenites of lead (baumhauerite, 
jordanite, and rathite) from the Binnenthal were measured and the 
indices of the faces were determined. 

A twin-crystal of gypsum representing a new type has been 
examined, figured, and described. 

Investigations have been made of the meteoric stones of Khairpur, 
Soko-Banja, and Simondium. As a result of these and previous 
investigations a genetic relationship of all meteorites has been 
suggested, and on this a new classification has been based. 

Y. — Departmental Library. 

Cataloguing and Press-marking. — All the accessions, including 
713 plates, have been catalogued and stamped. 

The collection of treatises on mineralogy, numbering 490 volumes, 
have been removed from the Keeper's Room and arranged in chrono- 
logical order in the new case in the Library Room. 

Proofs of the Library Catalogue (Supplement) have been read and 
checked against the slip catalogue in the Department. 

Accessions. — 27 volumes of separate works, 19 periodicals (in 
211 volumes and parts), one print, 20 pamphlets, three parts of 
works, <^4 Mining and Survey reports, and six sheets of maps have 
been added to the Library. 

Binding. — 116 volumes have been bound. 

VI. — Acquisitions. 

^&& specimens have been acquired, namely : — 

464 minerals (including artificial crystallized products), 395 
rocks, and 7 meteorites. 

Three meteorites have been acquired by exchange from the 
South African Museum, Cape Town. 

The following mineral names added to the Museum List were 
previously not represented by specimens in the collection : — 

Pyroxmangite, spencerite, yukonite. 

Only three specimens of minerals have been purchased. 

The specimens acquired by presentation (arranged alphabetically 
according to donors) and by exchange are as follows : — 

Minei'als. 

By Presentation : 

Further instalments from the donor's collection of zeolites, 
comprising 304 specimens from 47 localities in the British Isles, 
Germany, Bohemia, Tyrol, Switzerland, Australia, Japan, U.S.A., 



92 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

and Mexico. Many of these are choice specimens, and their value is 
enhanced by the detailed information on the accompanying labels as 
to their exact locality and mode of occm-rence. Also a series of 
specimens recently collected by the donor in Wales ; namely, 
paracelsian, albite on quartz, and cerussite with dundasite, from 
Carnarvonshire ; and fluor with blende, copper-pyrites, and calcite, 
from Halkin mine, Flintshire ; large cubes of grey fluor from a new^ 
occurrence in Stanhope Burn mine, Weardale, Co. Durham ; and 
fine crystals of idocrase in matrix from Achtaragda River, Siberia : 
hy F. N. Ashcroft, Esq. 

Crystallized corundum (ruby) artificially produced in the 
extraction of chromium : by The British Thermit Co., Ltd. 

Witherite and barytes, from Virgin mine, Redmire, Yorks : hy 
James Broadhead, Esq. 

Artificial forms of calcium carbonate from water-works : hy W. T. 
Burgess, Esq. 

Stalactitic calcite from Mexico, and magnetite from Taberg, 
Sweden (from the collection of the donor's husband, the late Colonel 
G. Earl CJhurch) : hy Mrs. A. M. Church. 

Mica sand from Mauritius : hy Miss E. E. Clark. 

Percylite, two specimens from Chili (from the collection of the 
donor's father, the late F. W. Crick) : hy G. C. Crick, Esq. 

Ankerite in coal from Lancashire ; phosphorite from Ocean 
Island, South Pacific ; tourmaline, a large brown crystal from 
Ceylon ; quartz, showing conchoidal fracture ; diatomite from Skye : 
by T. Crook, Esq. 

Gold from North Wales, South Australia, Peru and Ashanti ; 
11 crystals of diamond, one of them coloured by exposure to radium 
emanations ; platinum from the Urals ; silver from Kongsberg, 
Norway ; rhabdophane from Cornwall ; blende from the Pyrenees, a 
portion of the original material in which gallium was discovered by 
Lecoq de Boisbaudran in 1875 ; pitchblende and carnotite from 
Colorado ; wulfenite from Arizona ; monazite sand from North 
Carolina ; and various other specimens selected from the donor's 
private collection : hy Sir William Crookes, O.M., F.R.S. 

Three crystals of diamond from Agua Suja, and crystals of 
brookite from Arassuahy, Brazil : by David Draper, Esq. 

Pilolite from Gourdon, Kincardineshire : hy W. Duncan, Esq. 

Crystals of corundum from Namaqualand, South Africa : hy 
H. C. Fowler, Esq. 

Zircon, corundum, and graphite, from Madagascar : hy Benjamin 
Gallewski, Esq. 

Epidote, a fine polished slice (10 x 6 cm.) from a large, clear, 
rich green crystal ; pyrrhotite collected by the donor at Carrock Fell 
Mine, Cumberland ; two fine, large specimens of iridescent pyrites 
from Wanlockhead, Dumfriesshire : hy the Rev. J. M. Gordon. 

Wavellite and beekite from Devonshire : by J. G. Hamling, Esq. 

Plumbogummite with cassiterite from Ninkada, Northern Nigeria : 
hy R. T. Hancock, Esq. 



DEPARTMENT OF MINERALOGY. 93 

Artificially crystallized tnngstic oxide : hy Bigli Speed Steel 
Alloys Ltd. 

Quartz psendomorphous after limonite, perforated with holes, 
from Llandrindod Wells, Wales : hy J. Tunes, Esq. 

Wolframite from Lower Burma : hy Miss D. M. Jewett. 

Tremolite crystals in crystalline dolomite from Southern Nigeria : 
hy A. E. Kitson, Esq. 

Bitumen in limestone from Sicily : hy C. C. Lacaita, Esq. 

A fine suite of 12 rich specimens of gold tellurides with native 
gold from North Block, Oroya Brownhill mine, Boulder, Kalgoorlie, 
Western Australia : hy the Directors, Lake View and Oroya 
Exploration Ltd. 

Diamond, a small faceted stone, mauve coloured, showing 
dichroism ; two faceted blue zircons : hy Dr. L. A. Lawrence. 

Zircon crystals isolated from monazite sand, from Travancore, 
India : hy Prof. Henry L^ouis. 

Gold in quartz from Rio de Contas, Bahia, Brazil : by Joseph 
Alawson, Esq. 

Chalybite (clay-ironstone) nodule from Westmoreland : hy 
R. A. Metcalje-Gihson, Esq. 

Monazite sand from Bahia, Brazil : hy R. Tucker Pain, Esq. 

Idocrase with achtaragdite from Achtaragda River, Siberia : hy 
Madame Maria Rings. 

Crystals of scheelite from South-West Africa : hy Dr. A. W. 
Rogers. 

Fire-opal from Mexico, agate from Uruguay, quartz from 
Madagascar, and malachite from North-Western Rhodesia : hy W. 
Schmassmann, Esq. 

Calcite with fluor from Beith, Ayrshire : hy John Smith, Esq. 

Kyanite-garnet gravel from Zanzibar : hy Dr. Spurrier. 

Cut and polished section of malachite showing remarkable 
regular concentric structure, probably from Bwana M'Kubwa, 
North-Western Rhodesia : hy Dr. J. E. Stead, F.R.S. 

Twinned crystal of cerussite, encrusted with hemimorphite, from 
Broken Hill, Rhodesia : hy Percy C. Tarhutt, Esq. 

Different varieties of sugar crystals : hy Messrs. TTenry Tate 8f 
Sons, Ltd. 

Limonite from Elgin : hy W. Taylor, Esq. 

Garnet and chalcedony from Cumberland : hy Sir John Tweedy. 

Yukonite, from Yukon, Canada ; a new species described by the 
donor : hy J. B. Tyrrell, Esq. 

Spencerite, a new species of zinc phosphate, from British 
Columbia, described by the donor and named by him after 
Mr. L. J. Spencer of the Mineral Department : hy Prof. T. L. 
Walker. 

Almandine-garnet in biotite-gneiss from Southern Rhodesia : 
hy Miss E. M. Whittaker. 



94 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Rocks. 
Bij Presentation. 

Australites (obsidianites) from Kalgoorlie, Western Australia : 
hy J. Vere Arkle, Esq. 

Ophicalcite, two polished slabs, the one from Glen Tilt, Perth- 
shire, and the other from lona, Argyllshire : bi/ the Rev. J. M. 
Gordon. 

A series of miscellaneous rock-specimens (14 from British and 
three from foreign localities) : hij Upfield Green, Esq. 

A small selection from a collection from Pechili province, north 
China : hy Alexander L. Hall, Esq. 

A series of 307 specimens collected by the donor at various 
localities in Devonshire ; also 14 specimens from neighbouring- 
districts in east Cornwall and west Somerset : hy J. G. Hamling, 
Esq. 

Rocks collected by the late D. A. Louis on the island of 
Sakhalin, East Siberia : hy the Exors. of the late D. A. Louis. 

Volcanic sand from Jan Mayen Island, Arctic Ocean : hy R. 
Tucker Pain, Esq. 

A series of 28 volcanic rocks collected by the donor in British 
East Africa : hy J. Parkinson, Esq. 

Septarian nodule of limestone from Montgomeryshire : hy F. R. 
Paxford, Esq. 

Picrite with pyrope from Millour Burn, Ayrshire : hy John 
Smith, Esq. 

Meteorites. 
Bi) Presentation : 

Barraba, Darling Co., New South Wales, a slice weighing 
107 grams, of this iron. 

Bingera, Murchison Co., New South Wales, a slice weighing 
14'7 grams, of the iron found in 1880. 

Temora, Bland Co., New South Wales, a slice weighing &•& 
grams, of the iron found in 1890. 

Gilgoin, Clyde Co., New South Wales, a coloured plaster cast of 
the stone No. 7. 

These three meteorites and cast : hy the Department of Mines of 
New South Wales. 

By Exchange : 

St. Marks, Tembuland, Cape Province, South Africa, a partly 
crusted fragment weighing 102*6 grams, of the stone which fell on 
January 3, 1903. 

Kouga Mountains, Humansdorp district. Cape Province, South 
Africa, a slice weighing 297 grams, of the 2,585 lb. mass of this iron. 

Ratteldraai, Kenhardt Co., Cape Province, South Africa, a slice 
weighing 235"5 grams, of the 1,210 lb. mass of iron found in 1909. 

All the above Meteorites except Gilgoin belong to falls hitherto 
unrepresented in the Museum Collection. 



DEPARTMENT OF MINERALOGY. 95 

YII. — Donations of Duplicates. 

Duplicate specimens o£ meteorites have been given to Sir William 
Crookes, and to the Mining Museum o£ Sydney, New South Wales. 



VIII. — Students and Visitors. 

The number o£ visits recorded as made to the Department for 
purposes o£ consultation or study is 354. Many specimens o£ minerals 
and rocks have been determined for visitors and correspondents. 

G. T. Prior. 



96 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Department of Botany. 
I. — Arrangement and Conservation. 



wit 



During the past year 14,125 specimens have been incorporated 
ith the Herbarium. This number includes 13,475 Flowering 
Plants, and 650 Cryptogams. 

Flowering Plants. — Additions acquired during the year by 
donation, purchase and exchange have been mounted and incorporated. 
Progress has been made with the determination, selection and 
incorporation of the early Australian collections, and outstanding 
specimens have been determined and incorporated in various families, 
especially Geraniacese, Rutacese, Leguminosse, Passifloraceae, Cactacese, 
Rubiacese, Compositfe, Lauracese, and Amaryllidaceae. 

Work of revision and re-arrangement has been done in various 
families, especially Capparidace?e, Araliacese, Gompositse, and 
Urticacere, and genera, especially Vigna, Rhynchosia, EujjJiorhia and 
Croton (Tropical African species) and Anchusa and Fuhnonaria 
(European species). 

The British H(n-barium has been placed in the same gallery as 
the Europeaii Herbarium, and the space thus gained in the Great 
Herbarium has been allotted to the General Collection, where room 
for expansion is greatly needed. 

Ferns and Mosses. — The selection and incorporation of outstanding 
extra-European material of Ferns and Mosses (including Liverworts) 
has been continued and several genera have been revised. 

Algce. — Work of incorporation has been done in several families. 

Fungi and Lichens. — Work of revision and incorporation has 
been done in the Microfungi, mainly British, and in various genera 
of other groups of Fungi. Progress has been made with the 
revision and incorporation of the British Lichens. 

ExTiihition Series. — Progress has been made with the exhibition 
of the Cellular Cryptogams in the Index Museum and with the 
exhibition of British Seaweeds. Some time has been devoted to 
experiments in preparing specimens, including seaweeds, for exhibi- 
tion in their natural colours. 

Catalogues and Guides. — Progress has been made with the 
preparation of the Flora of Jamaica (Vols. iv. and v.) by Mr. W. 
Fawcett and Dr. Rendle ; and with the revision of the first volume 
of the Monograph of British Lichens and the preparation of a guide 
to the exhibition of British Lichens by Miss Annie Lorrain Smith. 

II. — Investigation. 

Collections have been determined wholly or in part from the 
following localities and collectors : Southern Nigeria (Talbot), 
Cameroons (Bates), Angola (Gossweiler), Uganda (Diimmer), 
British East Africa (Buchanan), Rhodesia and Transvaal (Rogers), 
West Australia (Steward, Maryon), New Caledonia (Compton), and 
various smaller collections from different localities. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 97 

Work o£ investigation has been done in various families of 
flowering plants, especially Urticacese (Tropical African species) and 
Rubiacese, also in several critical European genera and on the 
Microfungi. 

Assistance has been given to numerous students engaged on 
special investigations, and specimens and small collections have been 
determined for students and collectors. 

Assistance has been rendered to various Government Departments 
in response to inquiries on matters connected with the War. 

In connection with work done in the Department specimens have 
been generously lent by the Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, 
Kew ; the Regius Keeper of Botany, Edinburgh ; the Bristol 
Museum ; and the Government of Jamaica. 

Undetermined material has been lent for study and determination 
to the Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and to the 
Regius Professor, Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh. 

III. — Departmental Library. 
The arrangement, cataloguing, press-marking and other work has 
been carried out. 30 volumes and 146 pamphlets have been acquired 
by donation and 71 volumes by purchase — in all 101 volumes and 
146 pamphlets ; these numbers include 15 periodicals in 118 parts 
presented and 50 periodicals in 307 parts purchased — in all 65 
periodicals in 425 parts. 

IV. — Publications. 

There have been no official publications issued by the Trustees, 
but work has been continued on the Flora of Jamaica, by Mr. W. 
Fawcett and Dr. Rendle, and on the second edition of Vol. I. of 
the Monograph of British Lichens, by Miss A. Lorrain Smith. 

Various members of the staff assisted Mr. H. N. Ridley, C.M.G., 
in his Report on the Botany of the Wollaston Expedition to Dutch 
New Guinea which has been published in the Transactions of the 
Linnean Society. 

Other publications by members of the staff issued by permission 
of the Trustees number six, and six have been issued by other 
students of the collections. 

V. — Acquisitions. 
(1) By Donation. 

The following are the more important additions to the British 
Herbarium : — Flowering Plants ; 64 Portfolios, estimated to contain 
3,000 specimens, from R. S. Standen, Esq. ; 27 specimens from 
G. C. Druce, Esq. ; 26 specimens from C. E. Salmon, Esq. ; 
33 specimens from H. S. Thompson, Esq. 

Th*e following are the more important additions to the General 
Herbarium : — Lt. A. Buchanan, 109 specimens from British East 
Africa ; P. Amaury Talbot, Esq., 171 specimens from Degema, 
S. Nigeria ; G. L. Bates, Esq., 254 specimens from West Tropical 



98 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Africa ; R. A. Diiminer, Esq., 160 specimens from Uganda ; Capt. 
C. Tristram, 38 specimens from Himalayas ; Director, Botanic 
Gardens, Singapore, 33 specimens from Malay Peninsula ; Capt. 
W. H. iShakespear, 36 specimens from Arabia ; Linnean Society, 
1G3 Australian plants ; Dr. F. Steward, 525 specimens, and J. E. C. 
Maryon, Esq., 109 specimens, from West Australia ; Dr. R, R. 
Gates, 135 specimens of cultivated Oenothera ; E. A. Bowles, Esq., 
"62 specimens, W. F. Ledger, Esq., 8 specimens, and Royal 
Horticultural Society, 14 specimens of cultivated plants. P. A. 
Saccardo " Mycotheca Veneta," being 1,600 dried Fungi, trans- 
ferred from the Department of Printed Books ; J. Groves, Esq., 
7 European Characese ; Torquay Natural History Society, 33 
Muscinese from the East Indies and North America ; Dr. (J. W. 
Andrews, 13 Cryptogams from Christmas Island ; Mrs. Cara Shinn, 
11 species of Fungi from Nyasaland. 

(2) By Purchase. 
Botanical Exchange Club, 570 specimens of British Flowering 
plants ; Miss B. Corfe, 12 coloured drawings of British plants ; 
R. A. DLimnier, 222 Flowering plants and 164 Cryptogams from 
Uganda and British East Africa ; Miss A. Pegler, 50 Cryptogams 
from Kentani, South Africa ; continuations of published sets of 
European plants, from H. Dahlstedt, 50 specimens, and from 
H. Sudre, LOO specimens, and of North American Algse by Collins, 
Holden and Setchell, 50 specimens. 

(3) By Exchange of Duplicates. 
The Regius Keeper, Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh, 18 
species of BrimuLa from i'unnan, W. China ; Director, South 
African Museum, Cape Town, 75 South African Ericaceae and 
Leguminosse ; (Jurator, Auckland Museum, Auckland, New Zealand, 
33 New Zealand plants ; Prince Bonaparte, 97 Mexican plants ; 
Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C., U.S.A., 200 North 
American Grasses ; United States National Museum, Washington, 
D.C., U.S.A., 1,142 North American plants, 263 Tropical African 
plants (Col. Theo, Roosevelt Expedition, 1909-10), and 163 
Argentine and North American plants ; Director, Botanic Gardens, 
New York, U.S.A., 703 Jamaica plants ; Director, Museu Goeldi, 
Para, Brazil, 972 Brazilian plants. 

VI. — Students and Visitors. 
The number of visits to the Department for consultation and 
research during the year was 3,303. 

VII. — Demonstrations. 
A demonstration on the collections was given to members, of the 
Birkbeck Natural History Society. 

A. B. Rendle. 



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BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Page 
ACCOUNTS (SPECIAL TRUST FUNDS, 1917~191S): 

Bkidgewatek .... - 5 

Farnborough 5 

SWINEY 6 

Birch 6 

Charles Drury Edward Fortnum ....... 7 

. Carchemish Excavations - - -' - 7 

H. L. Florence 8 

NUMBERS OF PERSONS ADMITTED : 

British Museum 9 

British Museum (Natural History) 12 

HOURS OF ADMISSION : 

British Museum ---11 

British Museum (Natural History) - 13 

GENERAL STATEMENT OF PROGRESS : 

Visitors 14 

Reading Room and Newspaper Room 14 

The War — Protective Measures 14 

Military Service of the Staff 14 

Principal Acquisitions - - -, - 16 

Publications - 18 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY.) 

GENERAL STATEMENT OF PROGRESS: Page 

Visitors ----- 19 

SwiNEY Lectures 1& 

The War and the Museum - 19 

Stranded Whales 21 

Investigation op Antarctic Whales 21 

Other Investigations - - - - - 20 

Bequests and Gifts 22 

Purchases . . - 23 

Publications 23 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



I.— AN ACCOUNT of the Reckipts and Expendftuke of the 
BRIDGEWATER FUND, from the 1st April 1917 to the 31st March 1918. 

Stock, 
Cash. 2^% Consols. 



To Balances on the 1st April 1917 
- Dividends received on 13,659Z. 3,». 2d. Stock 
in 2^ per Cent. Consols, bequeathed 
by the Earl of Bridgewater, viz. : 



On the 5th April 1917 
5th July 1917 - 
5th October 1917 
„ 5th January 1918 



£.85 
85 

85 
85 



Rent of a Real Estate, Whitchurch, 
bequeathed by the Earl of Bridgewater (less 
charges) - - 



£. 
609 



7 8 



31! 



23 12 11 
£.974 9 11 



£. s. d. 
13,659 3 2 



13,659 3 2 



By One Year's Salary of the Egertoa Librarian 

- Amount expended in purchase of Manuscripts 

- Balances on the 31st March 191 
carried to Account for 1918-1919 



Cash. 

£. s. d. 
175 - - 
477 14 6 



321 15 

£.974 9 



STOCK, 

2i% Consols. 



13,659 3 2 
13,659 3 2 



II.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 
FARNBOROUGH FUND, from the 1st April 1917 to the 31st March 1918. 



To Balances on the 1st April 1917 - - - - 

- Dividends received on 2,879^. 10s. Id. Stock in 

2.;- per Cent. Consols, bequeathed by 

Lord Farnborough, viz. : 

On the 5th April 1917 - £. 17 19 11 

5th July 1917 - - 17 19 11 

5th October 1917 - 17 19 11 

5th January, 1918 - 17 19 11 



Cash. 

£. .S-. d. 
40 16 1 



71 19 8 



STOCK, 

2i% Consols. 



£. s. 
2,879 10 



2,879 10 7 



By Amount expended in purchase of Manuscripts - 
- Balances on the 31st March 1918, 
carried to Account for 1918-1919 - 



Cash. 

£. s. 
40 19 



71 16 9 
£.112 15 9 



Stock, 
2\o/o Consols. 



2,879 10 7 
2,879 10 7 



3 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

III.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure 
of the SWINE? FUND, from the Ist April 1917 to the Slst March 1918. 

STOCK. 

Cash. '25% Consols. 

d. 

8 



To Balances on the 1st April 1917 

- Dividends received on 5,744Z. - 9id. Stock in 

2\ per Cent. Consols, bequeathed by 

Dr. George Swiney for Lectures on 

Geology, viz. : 

On the 5th April 1917 - £.35 18 - 

5th July 1917 - - 35 18 - 

5th October 1917 - 35 18 - 

5th January 1918 - 35 18 - 



13 15 



- 143 12 - 
£.157 7 1 



£. 
5,744 



Cash. 



Stock, 

2i% Consols. 



By Amount paid to Dr. J. S. Flett for Lectures on 

Geology in 1917 140 - - 

- Balances on the 31st March 1918, 

carried to Account for 1918-1919 - - - 17 7 1 



£.157 7 1 



IV.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of 

the BIRCH FUND from the 1st April 1917 to the Slst March 1918. 

Stock, 
Cash. 2^% Consols. 

£. s. d. £. s. d. 



To Balance on the 1st April 1917 - 


. 


_ 


565 8 9 


- Dividends received on 565^. Ss. 9d. Stock 


m 






2i per Cent. Consols, bequeathed 






by Dr. Birch in 1766, for the three 






Under Librarians of the British 






Museum, viz. : 








On the 5th April 1917 - -£. 3 10 


8 






.5th July 1917 - - 3 10 


8 






5th October 1917 - - 3 10 


8 






„ 5th January 1918- - 3 10 


8 


14 2 8 












£.14 2 8 


565 3 9 






Stock, 






Cash. 


2|% Consols. 



£. 



By Legacy paid to the three Under Librarians of 
the British Museum, whose offices existed 
in 1766, viz., the Keepers of the Departments 
of Printed Books, Manuscripts, and Natural 

' History - - 

- Balance on the 31st March 1918, carried 
to Account for 1918-1919 - - . - 



£. 14 2 



565 3 9 



060 3 9 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



V. — AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the bequest of 

the late MR. CHARLES DRURY EDWARD FORTNUM from the 

1st April 1917 to the 31st March 1918. 



To Balance on the 1st April 1917 
- Interest on War Loan 



By Balance on the 31st March 1918, carried 
to Account for 1918-1919 







Stock, 


Cash. 




5% War Loan. 


£. s. 


d. 


£. s. d. 


38 3 


4 


1,900 - - 


74 16 


3 




£.112 19 


7 


1,900 - - 






Stock, 


CASH. 




5% War Loan. 


£. s. 
1 


d. 


£. s. d. 


- 112 19 


7 


1,900 - - 


£.112 19 


7 


1,900 - - 



VI.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 

CARCHEMISH EXCAVATIONS FUND from the 

1st April 1917 to the ^Ist March 1918. 

Cash. 

£. s. d 
To Balance ou the 1st April 1917 ------- 78 14 1 



£.78 14 1 



Cash. 

£. s. d. 

By Amount expended on Excavations 10 - - 

- BALANCEonthe 31st March 1918, carriedto Account for 1918-1919 68 14 1 



£.78 14 1 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



VII. — AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the bequest 
of the late MR. HENRY LOUIS FLORENCE from the 
1st April 1917 to the 31st March 1918. 



To Balance on the 1st April 1917, Cash and 6% 
Exchequer Bond, 1920 

- 5% War Loan, 1929-4 7 from conversion of 6% 

Exchequer Bond 

- Interest on Exchequer Bond . - - - 

„ 5% War Loan, 1929-47 - 



Cash. 


Stock. 


£. s. d. 


£. ■ s. d. 


IS U 9 


1,000 - - 





1,052 12 6 



15 2 6 
26 6 3 



By 6% Exchequer Bond. 1920, converted into 1052Z 
12s. 6d. b% War Loan, 1929-47 
- Balance on the 31st March 1918, carried 
to Account for 1918-1919 



£. 60 3 6 


2,052 12 


6 


Cash. 


Stock. 




£,. s. d. 


£. .*. 


d. 




1,000 - 


- 


60 3 6 


1,052 12 


6 


£. 60 3 6 


2,052 12 


6 



Ut April 1918. 



Frederic G. Kenyon 

Director and Principal Librarian. 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



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4,148 
3,532 

eries 
sed. 


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CO 

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56;474 
38,579 

Gall 
Clo 


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in 

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1 

03 


4,224 
3,779 
5,435 
5,314 

4,859 
3,341 
4,011 
5,545 
4,1)76 
5,126 
3.844 
3,537 


^ 1 


55 

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05»0005a>(Nr-lO'-l«20>r-( 

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61,198 

48,745 
70,292 
70,361 
67,464 
61,330 
90,497 
107,901 
102,107 
83,091 
61,502 
59,440 


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a 

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January - - - - 
February - - - - 
March - - - - 
April . - - - 
May - - - - 
June ... - 
July .... 
August - - ' - 
September - 

October . - - - 
November - - - - 
December - - - - 

Total Number of Persons admit- 
ted to view the General Collec- 
tions. 



10 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 





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ACCOUNTS ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 11 

The British Museum, Bloomsbury (including the Departments 
o£ Printed Books and Maps, Manuscripts, Oriental Printed Books 
and Manuscripts, Prints and Drawings, Egyptian and Assyrian 
Antiquities, Greek and Etonian Antiquities, British and Mediseval 
Antiquities and Ethnography, and Coins and Medals) is normally 
open to the public free daily (except on Good Friday and Christmas 
Day and days of Public Fast or Thanksgiving). 



At present, however, the provision for keeping the galleries 
open having been suspended by His Majesty's Government in the 
interests of economy, the Exhibition Galleries are wholly closed to 
the public, though the re-opening of certain galleries with a tem- 
porary exhibition is in contemplation. The Reading Room is open 
to Students from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., the Newspaper Room and 
Manuscript Students' Room from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., on every 
weekday except Good Friday, Christmas Day, and the first four 
weekdays in March and September. 



British Museum, ) Frederic G. Kenyon, 

25th April 1918. J Director and Principal Librarian. 



12- 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



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er of Per 
view the 
Collectio: 
udents) 



































XI c "S 








^b :| :ll 










iii^^s 41111 


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o ~ 


• 2 3 









s 


■* 35 CO ^ .-1 
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7,018 
3,149 
3,000 
354 
3,303 


co' 




8,020 
3,354 
2,531 
510 
3,226 


CD_^ 


OS 


9,235 
4,284 
4.962 
717 
3,164 


CD 
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of 

C<1 


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9,982 

. 4,837 

5,613 

641 

3,455 


lO_^ 


IK! 

05 


12,564 

5,974 
1,415 
3,962 




1 
1 

1 


Zoology (including Art Students) 
Entomology . . - . 
Geology . . . . - 
Mineralogyf .... 
Botany - . - - 

Total - 









«:s 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 13 

The Exhibition Galleries of the British Museum (Natural History), 
Cromwell Road, South Kensington, including the Departments of 
Zoology, Entomology, Geology and Palaeontology, Mineralogy, and 
Botany, are open to the public (with certain restrictions due to the 
need for economy) free, daily, except Good Friday and Christmas 
Day, and days of Public Fast or Thanksgiving. 

The regulations at present in force are as under : — 
The Galleries are open to the public, free, as follows : — 
Week-Days. 

i)m7^.— Central Hall (Special Exhibits), North Hall (Domesti- 
cated Animals, &c.). Bird Gallery, Upper and Lower Mammal 
Galleries, Shell Gallery, and Botanical Gallery. 

On Mondays^ Wednesdays, and Fridays. — Fossil Mammal Gallery, 
Fossil Reptile Gallery, and Mineral Gallery. (Eastern side). 

On Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. — Coral Gallery, Star- 
fish Gallery, Reptile Gallery, Insect Gallery, Fish Gallery, and 
Whale Room. (Western side.) 

Sundays. 

Central Hall, North Hall, Bird Gallery, Mammal Galleries 
(including Whale Room), Fossil Mammal Gallery, Fossil Reptile 
Gallery, and Mineral Gallery. 

The Hours of Admission are : — 

On Week-Days, throughout the year from 10 a.m., in 
January and February 
March 

April to August (inclusive) 

September ... 

October, November and December 

On Sundays, in 

January ... ... ... ... f i 

February 1 to 14 ... 
„ 15 to end... 

March 

April 

May to August (inclusive) ... 

September ... 

October 

November and December ... 

Persons are admitted to study in these Departments every week- 
day from 10 till 4 o'clock. 

The following Galleries are closed continuously for the duration 
of the War, viz. — Fossil Fishes ; Fossil Cephalopods ; other Fossil 
Shells, etc. ; Fossil Corals and Sponges, and Fossil Plants ; Strati- 
graphical and Special Palseontological Collections. 

British Museum (Natural History), f ^. {"' ^^^tf^'lx , , 

9^Fb 1Q1M -^ ^' < Director or the Natural 

' ' I History Departments. 





to 


5 p.m. 




?5 


5.30 „ 






5.30 ., 
5 


2 


to 


4 p.m. 


2 


,, 


4.30 „ 


2 


,, 


5 


2 


,, 


5.30 „ 


2 


,, 


6 


2.30 


5> 


7 


2 


?5 


5.30 „ 


2 


■>■> 


5 


2 


■>■> 


4 



14 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



IX. General Progress at the Museum, Bloomsbury. 

The exhibition galleries ot' the Museum have continued closed 
throughout the year. In order to palliate the loss to the nation of 
so important a source o£ education and recreation, and in particular 
to avoid the distressing necessity of turning away from the doors 
hundreds of Overseas and other soldiers desiring admittance, 
authority was obtained towards the end of the year to arrange 
for parties to be personally conducted round such parts of the 
galleries as had not been stripped of their contents for purposes 
of protection. This scheme, however, was frustrated by the 
necessity, which became obvious towards the end of the year, of 
taking precautions against air-raids of a much more formidable 
character than those previously experienced. Steps were accord- 
ingly taken, and were in progress at the end of the year, to remove 
a larger proportion of the collections to places of greater safety, 
and to cover up the others m situ. These measures have made it 
impossible, at any rate for the present, to proceed with the scheme 
for the partial readmittance of visitors. 

The Reading Room, Newspaper Room, Manuscript Students' 
Room, and to some extent the other departmental Students' Rooms, 
have remained open. Visitors to the Reading Room numbered 
121,538, as compared with 134,501 in 1916. This total is slightly 
less than half the total in 1913. The Newspaper Room figures 
were 9,108, a reduction of 353, and less than half the figures of 
1911 and 1912. The Manuscript Room had 5,483 visits, 230 less 
than in 1916, but again less than half the latest peace-time figures. 
Other departments had only 2,820 visitors, as against 5,411 in 1916. 

Further reductions in the staff were made in the course of the 
year for purposes connected with the war, and by the end of the 
year all men fit for general service below the age of 36 had been 
released, with the exception of one fireman, whose services are 
indispensable. At one time all men of the highest classification 
had been released ; bat a fresh medical classification placed a few 
of the older men in the general service category, whom it has not as 
yet been possible to replace. A beginning has been made with the 
employment of women as attendants in the Reading Room. 

The total number of members of the staff at Bloomsbury on 
military service is now 115, and at the Natural History Museum 60. 
16 have lost their lives in the service of their country ; 34 have 
been wounded ; 19 have been invalided out of the army ; 3 have 
received the Military Medal ; 36 have been granted commissions. 

Progress was made with the re-arrangement of the collections 
in the departments of Antiquities. The Coptic Room has been 
arranged, and the collections of Babylonian and Assyrian bricks, 
boundary-stones, gate sockets, &c., transferred to their new quarters 
in the Second Northern Gallery. The Hall of Greek and Latin 



GENERAL PROGRESS AT THE MUSEUM. 15 

Inscriptions has been re-arranged, and a small hand-book to it 
prepared. The Phigaleian Room and the Gold Ornament Room 
have also been taken in hand. The Brahman Room has been 
completed, and the Baddhist Room nearly so, and progress made 
with the Asiatic Saloon and the Glass and China Gallery in the 
King Edward VII. 's Galleries. All work of this kind was much 
delayed through the difficulty of obtaining labour or furniture, and 
was ultimately entirely suspended on account of the measures, above 
referred to, for the greater protection of the collections against air 
attack. 

The number of separate objects incorporated in the several 
Departments during 1917 is as follows : — 

Printed Books : 

Books and Pamphlets - _ _ _ . 18,947 

Serials and Parts of Volumes _ _ - _ 52,155 

Maps and Atlases ------ 939 

Music - - - - - - - - 8,421 

Newspapers (single numbers) - - - _ 271,580 

Miscellaneous ------- 3,763 

Manuscripts and Seals - - - - - - 1,989 

Oriental Printed Books and MSS. - - - - 1,971 

Prints and Drawings ----__ 5,172 

(Oriental) - - - - 106 

Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities - - - - 51 

Greek and Roman Antiquities _ - - _ 18 

British and Medieeval Antiquities - - - - 930 

Coins and Medals -_-___ 1,861 



Total ----- 367,903 



In consequence of the shortage of paper, it has been thought 
right this year to omit the usual departmental reports of accessions. 
The necessity of omitting these reports is the more regrettable, since 
it involves the omission of a public recognition and record of many 
generous gifts to the national collections. It would also be unfor- 
tunate, for the purposes of future reference, if the completeness of 
the record of the more important accessions to the Museum were to 
be broken. It is accordingly intended that the detailed reports 
shall eventually be issued in full in the first Annual Report after 
the restoration of normal conditions. 

MeaiiAvhile brief reference must be made to a few of the most 
important additions made to the collections in the course of 1917. 
Foremost among them stand three benefactions, of special size and 
importance, namely the papers of Sir Robert Peel, presented by the 
Hon. George Peel, the Zouche manuscripts, bequeathed by the late 
Baroness Zouche, and the splendid collection of engravings pre- 
sented by I^ady Lacas. In the Department of Antiquities special 
mention may be made of the famous Orestes vase from the Deepdene 
collection, towards the purchase of which a generous contribution 
was made by the National Art-Collections Fund ; a remarkable 



16 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Chinese statue in glazed pottery, presented by the same Fund and 
other donors ; and the unique silver penny of the Welsh King 
Howel Dda (913-948), purchased with the assistance of several 
private benefactors. 

Arranged by Departments, tlu^ most notable accessions are as 
follows : — 

Fnnted Books. — Caxton's " Dictes and Sayings of the Philo- 
sophers," 3rd ed., 1489. 

Dialogas lingua3 et ventris, l)y W. Horman, Vice-Provost of 
Eton, printed by Pynson (c. 1494). 

Life of Petronylla, printed by Pynson (c. 1495j. 

Wiirzburg Missal of 1509. Presented hij Mr. Camphell Dodgson, 
Mr. C. H. St. John Hornhij^ and Mr. M. Rosenheim. 

Private Prayers of Queen Elizabeth, 1563. 

Fifteen volumes from the sixth portion of the Huth sale. 

Thirteen musical works by Bach, Handel, &c., from the 
Oummings sale. 

A set of 567 trench maps, forwarded by the Ordnance Survey, 
as a first instalment. 

Manuscripts. Correspondence and political papers of Sir Robert 
Peel. Presented hy the Hon. George Peel. 

The Zouche MSS., a collection of 91 Western and 103 Oriental 
MSS. Bequeathed hy the late Baroness Zouche. 

Autographs of Charles I (after Naseby), Charles II, Louis XI 
of France, Michael Angelo, Philip de Comines, W. Hogarth, 
William Cowper, Charles Lamb, Danton, Lafayette, several of 
Napoleon's Marshals, etc., from the Morrison sale. 

A collection of Gypsy Stories by C. G. Leland, and of drawings 
of gypsies by Mr. Joseph Pennell. Presented by Mr. and Mrs. 
Pennell. 

Letters and collections of Bishop Percy. Presented hy Mrs. A. 
Broadwood. 

Fourteen musical MSS. by Purcell, Croft, Mendelssohn, etc., 
from the Cummings sale. 

A collection of MS. Music of the 17th century for viols and 
lute. Bequeathed hy Dr. 7'. L. Southgate. 

Sixty-one letters of Sir F. Seymour Haden. Presented hy 
Mr. C. D. Sherhorn. 

A volume of Middle English religious pieces in prose and verse, 
early 15th century. Purchased ivith the assistance of contributions 
collected by Prof. I. Gollancz in memory of the late Mr. H. B. 
Wheatley. 

Holograph letter of the Duke of Wellington, begun before 
and finished after Waterloo, Presented hy R. F. Norton, Esq., 
K.C. 

Prints and PJrawings. The Lucas Collection ; about 4,400 prints, 
selected from the collection at Wrest Park, of all schools, but 



GENERAL PROGRESS AT THE MUSEUM. 17 

especially French and English, 17th — 19th centuries, with special 
groups of Naval and Topographical prints. Presented bi/ Baroness 
Lucas, in memory of her brother, the late Lord Lucas, R.F.C. 

The original Drawings made by Mr. Muirhead Bono on the 
Western Front ; to pass to the Museum as soon as they cease to be 
required by the Government for purposes of propaganda. 

About 120 Drawings of Munition Works, by Mr. Joseph 
Pennell. Presented by the Artist. 

Portrait of Anne, Countess of Radnor, by Gainsborough. 
Presented by Mr, G. Harland Peck. 

Twenty Engravings and Woodcuts of the Italian, Flemish, and 
German schools, from the Pembroke sale. 

Twenty Drawings and forty-four Engravings, by foreign artists 
working in England, early 17th century, taken from a book of 
goldsmithV patterns. 

Proofs of original etchings, by Mr. Frank W. Benson. 
Presented by the Artist. 

Greek and Roman Antiquities. The famous Orestes vase from 
the Deepdene sale. Purchased with the assistance of the National 
Art-Collections Fund. 

Two important Vases, the Anodos of Dionysus and Apollo on 
the Swan, from the Deepdene sale. 

Five Vases from the Deepdene sale. Presented by Mr. G. 
Durlacher. 

British and Mediaeval Antiquities. A nnmber of ancient 
Chinese Sculptures, including some assigned to the Han and Tang 
dynasties. Presented by Messrs. Hampton and Sons. 

An important Chinese Pottery Statue, of the Ming dynasty. 
Presented through the National Art- Collections Fund, by eighteen 
contributors, through the exertions of Mr. 0. C. Raphael. 

A series of Gandhara Sculptures, from the Deepdene sale. 
Presented by Mr. G. Eumorfopoulos and the National Art- Collections 
Fund. 

Polynesian stone implements, collected on Pitcairn Island. 
Presented by the Pitcairn Islanders. 

Coins and Medals. Two Greek Gold Staters, from a hoard found 
in Macedonia. 

Unique Silver Penny of Howel Dda, 10th century. Purchased 
with the assistance of contributions by Sir A. Evans, Sir H. Howorth. 
Mr. 0. C. Raphael, and others. 

Leaden impression of a bust engraved by Roettier as a model for 
a medal of James II. Presented by Mr. J. Whitcombe Greene. 

A set of nine Plaquettes representing rulers of Baroda, designed 
by modern medallists from contemporary native drawings. 
Presented by H.H. the Gaekwar of Baroda. 

Three bronze medals, commemorating the battle of Jutland, to 
which prizes offered by Sir A. Evans were awarded. Presented by 
Sir A. Evans. 



18 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

A collection o£ 217 German War medals, confiscated by H.M. 
Procurator General. 

The following publications have been issued in the course o£ the 
year : — 

Catalogue of Greek Papyri, vol. v. by H. I. Bell, 4to. 

2Z. 2s. 
Catalogue of Japanese and Chinese Woodcuts, by L. 

Binyon. 4to. 11. 
Guide to Select Greek and Latin Inscriptions, bv A. H. 
Smith. Small 4to. 6d. 



Frederic G. Kenyon, 
Director and Principal Librarian. 

British Museum, 

25th April 1918. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 19 



X. British Museum (Natural History). 



SUMMARY o£ General Progress made at the Natural History 
Museum in the year 1917. 

On account o£ the extreme shortage o£ paper the Annual Return 
for 1917 has been confined to the Director's Summary, on the 
understanding that the full reports by the Keepers o£ the several 
Departments will be printed a£ter the close o£ the war £or purposes 
o£ record. 

The total number o£ visits made by the public to the Natural 
History Museum during 1917 was 423,128, as compared with 
402,673 in 1916. The attendance on Sunday afternoons was 46,468, 
as against 43,414 in the previous year. The average daily attend- 
ance for all open days was 1,166 ; for week-days 1,211 ; and for 
Sundav afternoons, 894. 

Dr". J. S. Flett, F.R.S., gave, at the Royal Society of Arts in 
November and December, the Swiney course of twelve lectures, 
his subject being " The Mineral Resources of the British Empire," 
which were attended, on an average, by 80 persons a lecture. 
The lectures attracted considerable attention, and a copy of the 
full abstract has been supplied to the Ministry of Munitions of 
War, Department of Development of Mineral Resources, for 
purposes of reference. 

The Trustees have readily given their assent to a request of 
the Committee formed to promote a National Memorial to the 
late Captain F. C. Selous, D.S.O., who was killed in action in 
East Africa, on January 4th, 1917, to place in the Natural History 
Museum a bronze bust of the ^reat hunter and naturalist, to whom 
the Museum is indebted for so many of its finest exhibited specimens 
of big game. The Trustees desire to place on record here their sense 
of the valuable services rendered by Captain Selous to the Museum. 

At the close of 1917, 60 members of the staff of the Natural 
History Museum were serving with the Military Forces, while seven 
were doing war work in other Government Departments to which 
they were lent for the purpose. 

Since the outbreak of war seven members of the staff have been 
killed, fourteen have been wounded, and seven have been invalided 
out of the army ; ten have been granted commissions, of whom two 
have received the Military Cross, and one has been mentioned in 
despatches. 

As will be seen, the staff has been considerably depleted by 
military duty and the calls of the War Departments for the services 
of scientific experts. Nevertheless the Museum has been able to 
render important help in various ways in matters directly relating 
to the War. 



2G ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MU8EUM. 

The Museum has co-operated with othcn- Departments in the 
consideration o£ questions connected with food economy and the food 
resources of the country. Information has been furnished on matters 
relating to the utilization of the eggs of sea-gulls and other wild birds 
as food and for industrial purposes ; the facilities that might safely 
be granted for the shooting of migratory edible birds ; measures for 
increasing the supplies of fresh- water fishes for food, &c. 

A new case has been installed in the Central Hall dealing with 
the subject of Food Economy as related to food-stuffs obtained from 
plants. The several sections of the exhibit comprise cereals, bread, 
roots and tubers and other vegetables, nuts, pulses, fresh fruits, 
beverages, and sugar and its substitutes. A feature of the exhibit is 
the series of coloured diagrams showing the nutritive values of some 
typical foods. 

In view of the enormous ravages of rats and mice, which are 
responsible for the loss of thousands of tons of valuable food- 
material, and for the dissemination of disease, the Trustees have 
undertaken the preparation of a short treatise dealing with the 
mode of life, breeding, and economic importance of these small 
rodents. . The pamphlet, which is in preparation by Mr. M. A. C 
Hinton, will be published as a number of the Economic Series. 

In the Department of Botany the following matters, among 
others, have been dealt with : — The examination of a fungus which 
was destroying army tents at Malta and causing serious loss — an 
effective remedy being suggested ; inquiries as to camouflage of 
guns in winter ; the source of supply of sphagnum moss for surgical 
dressings ; sources of supply of timbers ; damage to timber by 
diseases. Inquiries connected with food production, including the 
cause of ropiness in bread and the fungus-attack of sacks of flour 
during transport, were also dealt with. 

Reports have been prepared in the Department of Geology on 
several collections of fossils from Trinidad, to facilitate the explora- 
tions for oil-bearing deposits in that island. 

A memorandum was prepared in the Department of Minerals on 
sources of supply of colourless fluor and of Iceland spar, and 
fragments of rocks from concrete used in German fortifications 
were compared with the large series of German rocks in the 
Department. 

Owing to the influx of malaria* patients f roin overseas, and the 
danger that malaria might be spread in this country through the 
agency of the native anopheline (or malaria carrying) species of 
mosquitoes, it had become very important to know the distribution 
of the latter in England and Wales, and in consequence every effort 
has been made to obtain all the knowledge possible on the subject. 
With the assistance of the Local Government Board and of various 
scientific bodies, specimens of mosquitoes have been received from 
many parts of the country, and have been identified in the Entomo- 
logical Department. This work is still being carried on, and the 
Department has in hand the preparation of a map which will make 
the knowledge thus obtained accessible in a convenient form. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 21 

Much correspondence has taken place with the Colonial Office 
relating to the protection o£ birds in the British C/olonies and 
Dependencies, also with reference to such questions as food fishes 
and poisonous fishes, the sponge fisheries in the West Indies, 
investigation into whales and the whale fisheries in Southern 
waters, and acclimatisation of animals in South Georgia. 

An exhibition illustrating the Biology of Waterworks has been 
set up in the Central Hall to the east of the principal staircase, and 
has attracted much interest. The importance of the scientific and 
practical (questions connected with this subject is, perhaps, not 
generally appreciated. It has been proved by sad experience in this 
country and abroad, that in a water-supply which is not protected by 
adequate filtration microscopic organisms gain access to the pipes, 
and can there serve as food for animals which depend on this kind of 
nutriment. The result may be the occurence, in the water-pipes of 
a town, of masses of various fresh-water animals. Not only do these 
tend to restrict the effective size of the pipes and block strainers and 
taps, but their decay results in the fouling of the water and the 
encouragement of the growth of bacteria. 

These and other points are illustrated in the Exhibition, to which 
an illustrated guide-book has been issued (see p. 23). 

An exhibit of birds useful to agriculture is in preparation. 

The records of Cetacea stranded on the British coasts show no 
sign of falling off in interest. The number of specimens reported 
from various sources in 1917 was 31, or two more than in the 
preceding year. Special mention may be made of the following 
specimens : — A white-sided Dolphin, from Lincolnshire, believed 
to be the first specimen to have been recorded from the English 
coast ; a large Sperm Whale, from Caithness ; a Cuvier's Whale, 
from CO. Clare ; a Risso's Grampus, from Devonshire ; and a 
Common Rorqual, from the Scilly Islands. In Dr. Harmer's 
Report on the subject (the fifth since the commencement of the 
series) special attention has been devoted to the occurrence of 
the Bottle-nosed Whale in British waters. The cordial thanks of 
the Trustees are due to the Board of Trade and its Officers for the 
great interest shown in the inquiry and the valuable assistance so 
willingly afforded, as well as to many others who have given their 
help. 

The project for an Anglo-Swedish Biological Station in Graham 
Land in which the Museum was to have participated has been 
abandoned in consequence of the war. 

Mr. A. E. Kitson, Director of the Geological Survey of the 
Gold Coast, visited the Ameki cuttings of the new Port Harcourt 
Railway, Southern Nigeria, and made for the Museum an important 
collection of Eocene fossils, chiefly Mollusca, which will add much 
to our knowledge of the geology of that part of Africa. The 
necessary expenses were paid by Mr. W\ Heward Bell. 

The mounted specimens received during the year from the 
Trustees of the Rowland Ward Bequest include fine specimens of 
a male Tschego and a young female Gorilla, from the Bapindi 



22 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

District, (;ameroons, a female Ostrich from British East Africa, 
a Chanler's Reedbiick, a Queensland Koala, two Galago Lemurs, 
and a Pygmy Squirrel, besides about 100 small birds. 

The total number of gifts received during the year by the several 
Departments was 1,393. Many of these comprised large numbers of 
individual specimens. The following may be mentioned as being of 
special interest or value ; from : — 

Mrs. L. de L. Gwatkin — the collection of Molluscan Radulse 
formed by her husband, the late Professor H. M. Gwatkin, and 
presented by her in accordance with his wishes. The collection 
consists of some 8,000 specimens, contained in three microscope- 
slide cabinets, besides some 3,500 so-called " duplicate " slides. 

Mr. F. D. Godman — two fragments and a lower molar tooth of 
a second skull discovered in the Piltdown gravel in a new locality 
by the late Mr. Charles Dawson. 

The Duke of Portland — the skeleton of the thoroughbred 
stallion "William III." 

Mr. A. G. Dixon — the complete skeleton and skin of a specially 
fin(^ specimen of female Dugong, captured in Delagoa Bay some 
years ago. 

The Bombay Natural History Society — 162 Mammals. 

Mrs. Manby — a series of 18 specimens of heads of Big Game, 
specially selected from the collection of sporting trophies, made in 
Burma by the late Mr. C. W. A. Bruce. 

Mr. Lowther Bridger — an exceptionally fine salmon, weighing 
about 55 lbs., caught by him in the river Eden in 1888. 

Miss Margaret Tanner — a collection of land and fresh-water 
shells, mainly British, formed by the late Mr. Kenneth McKean. 

Lady Strathcona — a collection of butterflies from the Niger 
Delta at Warri, Calabar. 

Mr. Rowland E. Turner — a well-made mahogany insect cabinet, 
together witli such of the contents (butterflies, beetles, hymenoptera) 
as might be desired for the Museum. 

The First Commissioner of H.M. Works, &c. — a main purlin 
from the roof of Westminster Hall, in which the destructive work of 
the beetle Xestohium tesselatum is very well shown. 

Dr. C. T. Trechmann — an interesting and valuable series of 
upwards of 100 specimens of minerals selected from the collection 
formed by his father, the late Charles Otto Trechmann. 

The Government of Peru — a large and important series of 
minerals and ore specimens presented through the Peruvian Consul- 
General in London. 

The Derwent Valley Water Board — a fine ganoid fish (Acrolepis 
hopkinsi) from the Lower Carboniferous of Bamford, Derbyshire. 

Mr. W. G. Wallace and Miss V. I. Wallace— Two MS. note- 
books in the handwriting of their father, the late Mr. Alfred Russel 
Wallace, on specimens (chiefly insects), collected by him in the 
Malay Archipelago. 

The Board of Governors of the Adelaide Public Library, Museum, 
and Art Gallery — a fine series of coloured casts of Meteorites. 



I 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 23 

With the exception o£ the purchase for 1001. of the seventh 
instahnent of the Distant Collection of insects (4,000 Rhynchota 
and 1,000 Coleoptera, including 250 types), a continuation of an 
arrangement to which the Trustees were committed, and of books 
for the upkeep of the Library, purchases were limited to a few 
unimportant transactions. 

The following works on Natural History have been published 
during the year : — 

British Antarctic ("Terra Nova ") Expedition, 1910. Natural 
History Report. 4to : — 

Zoology : 

Vol. III., No. .5. Crustacea, Part IV. Stomatopoda, Cumacea, 
Phyllocarida, and Cladocera. By W. T. Caiman, D.sc. 
Pp. 137—162 : 9 text-figures. 2^. 

Vol. IV., No. 1. Echinoderma, Part I. Actinogonidiata. By 
F. J. Bell, M.A. Pp. 10 : 2 plates. 2^. 6d. 

Botany : 

Part I. Freshwater Alga?. By F. E. Fritsch, d.sc. Pp. 
16 : 1 plate. 1^. 

Part II. Marine Algse. By A. Grepp, M.A., and Ethel S. 
Gepp. Melobesiese. By Mme. Paul Lemoine. Pp. 17 — 
28 : 4 text-figures. 1^. 

Report on Cetacea stranded on the British Coasts. By S. F. 
Harmer, sc.D., f.r.s. No. 4. Cetacea stranded during 1916. Pp. 
13 : 1 map. 4to. 1^. 6d. 

Guide to British Fresh-water Fishes. By C. Tate Regan, m.a., 
F.R.S. Pp. 39 : 23 text-figures. 8vo. 6d. 

Instructions for Collectors. No. la. Mammals. Part II. Skeletons, 
with special notes on the collection of specimens of Cetacea. By 
S. F. Harmer, sc.D., f.r.s. Pp. 8 : 4 text-figures. 8vo. 3d. 

Economic Series of Pamphlets : 

No. 5. The Bed-Bug : its Habits and Life-History, and 
how to deal with it. By B. F. Cummings. Pp. 20 : 
7 text-figures. 8vo. Id. 

No. 6. Species of Arachnida and Myriopoda (Scorpions, 
Spiders, Mites, Ticks, and Centipedes) injurious to Man. 
By S. Hirst. Pp. 60 : 26 text-figures, 3 plates. 8vo. 6d. 

No. 7. The Biology of Waterworks. Bv R. Kirkpatrick. 
Pp. 58 : 18 text-figures. 8vo. l.*;. 

Poster-leaflets, 18 in. by 12 in., on "The Fly Danger" and 
" The Mosquito Danger.' 



24 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Permission has been obtained from the Colonial Office to utilize 
the portions of the journal kept by the late Major G. E. H. Barrett- 
Hamilton during his mission to South G-eorgia, 1913-14, other than 
those relating to whales, which have been dealt with by Mr. M. A. C. 
Hinton. The journal has been presented to the Museum by Mrs. 
Ba rr ett-Hamilton . 

The extent of the collection of books, &c., in the Library on the 
31st December, 1917, was, on a rough estimate, 102,975 volumes 
(exclusive of continuations and minor separata) and 6,263 maps. 



L. Fletcher, 

Director. 



British Museum (Natural History), 
23 February 1918. 




Printed under the autbority of His Majesty's Stationery Office, 
By Jas. Tbuscott a Son, Ltd.. Suffolk Lane, E.G. 



BEITISH MUSEUM 



^ GENERAL 

- 7 JUL 1978 
^ LIBRARY ^. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 1 April 1919 ; for, 

COPY "o£ Account of the Income and Expenditure of 
the British Museum (Special Trust Funds) for 
the Year endmg the 3Lst day of March 1919 ; and 
Return of the Xumber of Persons admitted to visit 
the Museum and the British Museum (Natural 
History) in each Year from 1913 to 1918, both Years 
inclusive ; together with a Statement of the Progress 
made in the Arrangement and Description of the 
Collections, and an Account of Objects added to 
them in the Year 1918." 



^'TrJunf m9'''' } STANLEY BALDWIN. 



(A/r. Herbert Fisher.) 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to he Printed, 
24 June 1919. 



LONDON: 
published by his MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE. 




To be purchased through anv Bookseller or directly from 

H.M. STATIONERY OFFICE at the following addresses : 

Imperial House, Kingsway. London, W.C.2, and 28, Abingdon street, London, S w.l; 

37, Peter Street, Manchester ; l, St. Andrew's Crescent. Cardiff; 

2.S, Forth Street, Edinburgh ; 

or from E. PONSONBY, LTD., 116, GRAFTON STREET, DUBLIN, 

120 Price 2cl, 



COT^TENTS 



BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Page 
ACCOUNTS (SPECIAL TRUST FUNDS, 1916-1919): 

Bridg-bwater - 3 

Farnborough -- --3 

SWINEY 4 

Birch - . 4 

Charles Drury Edward Fortnum 5 

Carchemish Excavations - - - - 5 

H. L. Florence 6 

J. A. EOEBLING - - 6 

NUMBERS OF PERSONS ADMITTED : 

British Museum 7 

British Museum (Natural History) - 10 

HOURS OF ADMISSION : 

British Museum - - 9 

British Museum (Natural History) ...... h 

GENERAL STATEMENT OF PROGRESS : • 

The War— Protective Measures 12 

Space Lent to other Departments - - - - - - - 12 

Temporary Exhibition - - 13 

Visitors . - - 13 

REA.DING Room and Newspaper Room 13 

Principal Acquisitions . . . .' 14 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY.) 

GENERAL STATEMENT OF PROGRESS : Page 

Visitors 17 

Official Guide - 17 

SwiNEY Lectures 17 

Special Exhibits 18 

The War and the Museum - 18 

Investigations . . . 18 

Bequests and Gifts . , . 19 

Purchases t 20 

Publications - . ^ ....,,. 21 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



I.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 
BRIDGEWATER FUND, from the 1st April 1918 to the 31st March 1919. 



To Balances on the 1st April 1918 
- Dividends received on 13,659^. Ss. 2d. Stock 
in 2^ per Cent. Consols, bequeathed 
by the Earl of Bridgewater, viz. : 



On the 5th April 1918 
5th July 1918 - 
5th October 1918 
,, 5th January 1919 



85 



85 



Rent of a Real Estate, Whitchurch, 
bequeathed by the Earl of Bridgewater (less 
charges) - - - - - - 



Cash. 



£. 
321 



341 9 4 



23 12 



Stock, 

21% Consols. 



13,659 3 



£.686 16 9 13,659 3 2 



By One Year's Salary of the Egerton Librarian 

- Amount expended in purchase of Manuscripts - 

- Balances on the 31st March 1919, 
carried to Account for 1919-1920 



Cash. 



175 
395 



^.686 16 



Stock, 

2^% Consols. 



13,659 3 2 
13,659 3 2 



II.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 
FARNBOROUOH FUND, from the 1st April 1918 to the 31st March 1919. 



To Balances on the 1st April 1918 - 

- Dividends received on 2,879L 10*'. Id. Stock in 

2^ per Cent. Consols, bequeathed by 

Lord Farnborough, viz. : 

On the 5th April 1918 - £. 17 19 11 

5th July 1918 - - 17 19 11 

5th October 1918 - 17 19 11 

„ 5th January, 1919 - . 17 19 11 



Cash. 



M,. .S-. 
71 16 



71 19 8 



£.143 16 5 



Stock, 

21% Consols. 



£. s. d. 
2,879 10 7 



2,879 10 7 



By Amount expended in purchase of Manuscripts - 
- Balances on the 31st March 1919, 
carried to Account for 1919-1920 - 



Cash. 



Stock, 
2i% Consols. 



£. s. 
124 11 

19 5 


d. 
5 


£. s. d. 

2,879 10 7 


£. 143 16 


5 


2,879 10 7 



1: A.CCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

III.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure 
of the SWINE y FUND, from the 1st April 1918 to the 31st March 1919. 

STOCK, 



To Balances on the 1st April 1918 

- Dividends received on 5,744Z. - 8^. Stock in 

24 per Cent. Consols, bequeathed by 

Dr. George Swiiiey for Lectures on 

Geology, viz. : 

On the 5th April 1918 - £.35 18 - 

6th July 1918 - - 35 18 - 

5th October 1918 - 35 18 - 

„ 6th January 1919 - 35 18 - 



Cash. 



By Amount paid to Dr. T. J. Jehu, for Lectures on 

Geology in 1918 155 - - 

- Balances on the 31st March 1919, 

carried to Account for 1919-1920 - - - 5 19 1 



£.160 19 1 



2J% Consols. 

£. s. d. 
5,744 - 8 





£.160 19 1 


5,744 - 8 


Cash. 

£. s. d. 


STOCK, 

2i% Consols. 

£. s. d. 



5,744 



5,744 



IV.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of 
the BIRCH FUND from the 1st April 1918 to the Slst March 1919. 

Stock, 

Cash. 2i% Consols. 



£. 



To Balance on the 1st April 1918 - - - - 

- Dividends received on 565Z. 3.«. 9d. Stock in 

2^ per Cent. Consols, bequeathed 

by Dr. Birch in 1766, for. the three 

Under Librarians of the British 

Museum, viz. : 

On the 5th April 1918 - 

„ 5th July 1918 

5th October 1918 - 
,, 5th January 1919 - 



By Legacy paid to the three Under Librarians of 
the British Museum, vs^hose offices existed 
in 1766, viz., the Keepers of the Departments 
of Printed Books, Manuscripts, and Natural 

History 

- Balance on the 31st March 1919, carried 
to Account for 1919-1920 ... - 



14 2 



£. s. d. 
565 3 9 



.£.3 10 

- 3 10 

- 3 10 

- 3 10 


8 
8 
8 
8 












£.14 2 8 


565 3 9 




Cash. 


Stock, 

2^0/0 Consols. 



£. s. d. 



565 3 9 



666 3 9 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



V. — AN ACCOUNT of the Keceipts and Expenditure of the bequest of 

the late MR. CHARLES DRURY EDWARD FORTNUM from the 

1st April 1918 to the 31st March 1919. 

Stock, 
Cash. 5% War Loan. 

£. s. d. £. s. d. 

To Balances on the 1st April 1918 - - - 112 19 7 1,900 - - 

- Interest on War Loan 95 - - 



Bt Balances on the 31st March 1919, carried 
to Account for 1919-1920 . . . - 



£.207 19 


7 


1,900 - - 






Stock, 


Cash. 




5% War Loan. 


£. i. 


d. 


£. s. d. 


■ 207 19 


7 


1,900 - - 


£.207 19 


7 


1,900 - - 



VI. — AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 

CARCHEMISH EXCAVATIONS FUND from the 

1st April 1918 to the 31st March 1919. 

Cash. 

To Balance on the 1st April 1918 ------ 



By Balance on the 31st March 1919, carried to Account for 1919-1920 



£. s. 

68 U 


d. 

1 


£.68.14 


1 


CASH. 

£. s. 

68 14 


d. 

1 


£.68 14 


1 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



VII.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the bequest 
of the late MR. HENRY LOUIS FLORENCE from the 
1st April 1918 to the 31st March 1919. 

Stock. 
Cash. 5% War Loan. 

£. s. d. 
To Balances on the 1st April 1918 - - - 60 3 6 1,052 12 & 



- Interest on ?>% War Loan, 1929-47 



&: s. 
60 3 
52 12 


d. 

6 
6 


£.112 16 






Stock. 
Cash. 5% War Loan.. 

£. s. d. £. s. d. 

By Balances on the 31st March 1919, carried 

to Account for 1919-1920 - - - - 112 16 1,052 12 6 



£.112 16 1,052 12 6 



Vin.— AN ACCOUNT of the JOHN A. ROEBLINO FUND from the 
3rd February 1919 to the 31st March 1919. 

Stock. 
b%, War Loan. 

£. s. d. 
To Stock purchased with proceeds of sale of $ 5,000 Bonds 

presented by Mr. John A. Roebling 1,049 8 10 



l.si; ^^)77 1919. Frederic G. Kenyan, 

Director and Principal Librarian. 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BKITISH MUSEUM. 



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■ 

Galleries 

Closed 

Jan.— July. 


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33.995 
28,408 
27,417 
24,590 
36,032 




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ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



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ACCOUNTS ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. d 

The British Museum, Bloomsbury (including the Departments 
o£ Printed Books and Maps, Manuscripts, Oriental Printed Books 
and Manuscripts, Prints and Drawings, Egyptian and Assyrian 
Antiquities, Greek and Roman Antiquities, British and Mediaeval 
Antiquities and Ethnography, and Coins and Medals) is normally 
open to the public free daily (except on Good Friday and Christmas 
Day and days o£ Public Fast or Thanksgiving). 



At present, however, the Print Department and the galleries 
o£ the Egyptian and Assyrian Department on the upper floor, 
being still in the occupation of the Registry of Friendly Societies, 
to which they were lent during the war, are closed to the public. 
The remainder of the Museum, excepting King Edward VII. 's 
Galleries, is open to the public daily on week-days from 10 a.m. 
to 6 p.m., from April to August inclusive. After 4 p.m! in 
January, February, November, and December, and after 5 p.m. 
in March, September, and October, only certain of the galleries 
remain open. 

Sunday opening of the Exhibition Galleries has not yet been 
resumed. 

The Reading Room is open to Students from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., 
the Newspaper Room and Manuscript Students' Room from 10 a.m. 
to 5 p.m., on every weekday except Good Friday, Christmas Day, 
and the first four weekdays in March and September. 



British Museum, | F7'ederic G. Keni/on, 

10th June 1919. j Director and Principal Librarian. 



10 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEOM. 







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i!^ § 








Per 

the 
ictio 
ts) 








er of 
view 
Colle 
uden 















^ o r„\ 






January 
February 
March - 
April - 
May 
June 
July 

August - 
September 
October - 
November 
December 


Num 
ted t 
tory 
ling 






f 


Si 









00 
OS 


5.553 
3,277 
3,214 
461 
2,657 


(M 

to 

lo" 


t-' 

o> 


6,314 
2,909 
3,623 
404 
2,751 


i 

to 


to 

05 


7,018 
3,149 
3,000 
354 
3,303 


IM 

°° 

to' 


lo" 

05 


8,020 
3,354 
2,531 
510 
3,226 


to__ 
t-" 


2 


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CO CO to rl to 
N IM 05 t^ .-H 

of-jT^jT co" 


IM 

to 

CO 

im" 

C<1 


CO 
Oi 


9,982 
4,837 
5,613 
641 
3,455 


IM 


1 


Zoology (including Art Students) 
Entomology . . - . 
Geology . . - . - 
Mineralogyf .... 
Botany 

Total - 









ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



11 



The Exhibition Galleries o£ the British Museum (Natural 
History), Cromwell Road, South Kensington, including the 
Departments o£ Zoology, Entomology, Geology and Palseon- 
tology, Mineralogy, and Botany, are open to the public, free 
daily, except Good Friday and Christmas Day, and days of 
Public Fast or Thanksgiving. 

The Hours of Admission are as under : — 



On Week-Days, throughout the year from 10 a.m., in 

January and February 

March 

April to August 

September ... 

October, November and December 



On Sundays, in 

January 

February 1st to 14th 
„ 15th to end 

March 

April 

May to August 

September ... 

October 

November and December 







to 


5 p.m. 






,, 


5.30 „ 


... 




>5 


6 

5.30 ., 






?J 


5 


from 


2 


to 


4 p.m. 


•>■> 


2 


?J 


4.30 „ 


5> 


2 


?? 


5 


)? 


2 


">■> 


5.30 „ 


•>') 


2 


5? 


6 


?? 


2.30 


?5 


7 


5? 


2 


■>■> 


5.30 „ 


5? 


2 


5? 


5 




2 


?> 


4 



Persons are admitted to study in these Departments every week- 
day from 10 till 4 o'clock. 



British Museum (Natural History), 
1st April, 1919. 



S. F. Harmer, 
Director of the Natural 
History Departments. 



12 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



X. General Progress at the Museum, Bloomsbury. 

During the early part o£ the year the whole work o£ the Museum 
was conditioned by the warning, received towards the close of 1917, 
that air-raids in greater force, and utilising much heavier bombs, 
might be expected in the spring. Since the Museum offered a 
large and conspicuovis area for attack, and no building could be 
considered proof against a direct hit by a heavy bomb, it was 
resolved to remove (so far as might be practicable) the most 
valuable objects in the collections to positions of greater safety. 
Accordingly the most important among the portable objects in 
the Departments of Antiquities (including the Frieze of the 
Parthenon, the best of the Greek vases and bronzes, the chief 
Assyrian bas-reliefs, the Rosetta Stone, and the finest objects of 
mediaeval art), together with practically the whole collection of 
Coins and Medals, were transferred to a station on the newly 
completed Postal Tube Railway, some fifty feet below the surface 
of Holborn. Special provision for their accommodation and for 
their protection against damp was made by His Majesty's Office 
of Works ; and the station was continuously warded by members 
of the Museum staff. 

For the printed books, manuscripts, and prints and drawings, 
accommodation was offered by the Governors of the National 
Library of Wales in their new buildings at Aberystwyth, and some 
fifteen van-loads of the most precious literary and artistic treasures 
of the Museum were transferred thither, together with a portion of 
the staff. A small selection of exceptionally valuable printed books 
was housed by Mr. C. W. Dyson Perrins in the strong room of his 
house near Malvern. 

A further selection of objects, ranking next in importance to 
those removed, was placed in the strong rooms in the basement of 
the Museum, where they were believed to be safe against anything 
except a direct hit from a bomb of the heaviest type. In the 
basement also were placed, under coverings of sandbags, the 
sculptures which were too heavy for removal to the Tube, including 
the figures from the Pediment of the Parthenon, and the collection 
of mummies. The Assyrian bulls, the larger Egyptian sculptures, 
and the metopes of the Parthenon, which could not be removed 
from their positions in the galleries, were protected in situ by 
sandbags. Much of the glass and china, which could not be 
removed, was protected against the risk of concussion by being 
stored in packing cases. 

In view of this partial clearance of the galleries (which, 
however, was very far indeed from emptying the Museum), it 
was suggested that the vacant space might be utilised for the 
accommodation of Government Departments, thereby relieving 



GENERAL PROGRESS AT THE MUSEUM. 13 

the pressure upon hotels and other buildings in London ; and, 
in particular, a most unfortunate proposal was made to place the 
Air Board there. Fortunately both for the Air Board and the 
Museum the approval originally given to the scheme by the 
Government was rescinded, in view of (1) the proved unsuitability 
of the accommodation for the purposes of the Board, (2) the length 
of time that would be required to remove the contents of the 
Museum with due regard to their safety, (3) the reluctance of 
the public to see the Museum endangered by placing^ a large 
combatant Department in it, thereby making it a very legitimate 
as well as conspicuous mark for air attack. After the rejection of 
this proposal it was, however, agreed to provide accommodation, in 
two ranges of almost unoccupied galleries, for the Registry of 
Friendly Societies. The 'accommodation was very inconvenient for 
the purposes of the Registry, and since the armistice the presence 
of this alien Department has greatly retarded the restoration of the 
Museum as a whole ; so that this experiment on a comparatively 
small scale has confirmed the wisdom of the rejection of the earlier 
and more far reaching proposal. 

The occupation of a portion of the Sub-Ground Floor of the 
new wing by the Statistics Branch of the Medical Research 
Committee, and of a portion of the Basement by the effects- of 
German prisoners under the charge of the Prisoners of War Bureau, 
has continued throughout the year. ^ 

The work of all this removal of collections by a much depleted 
staff necessitated the postponement of the scheme for re-opening 
portions of the Museum to the public ; but as soon as the removal 
was completed the scheme was taken up again. The originals in 
the galleries of Greek and Roman sculpture, including the Elgin 
Room, were replaced by casts ; electrotypes of coins and a selection 
of Greek vases were added ; an "exhibition of manuscripts and 
printed books was arranged in the Grenville Room ; and thus a 
small exhibition, reaching from the Grenville Room through the 
Entrance Hall and Graeco-Roman galleries to the Elgin Room, 
was prepared and opened to the public in August. The exhibition 
proved attractive and enabled many of the overseas troops to see 
something at least of the British Museum. 

As soon as the armistice was signed, the restoration of the 
Museum was at once taken in hand. The removal of sandbags 
began immediately, and before the end of the year the Assyrian 
Transept, containing the great bulls and lions from Nineveh, had 
been restored to view. The return of collections from Aberystwyth, 
Malvern, and the Tube station began in. December. But the main 
work of bringing back the collections from their places of safety, 
and of restoring them to their positions, fell into the ensuing year. 

Visitors to the Reading Room during the year amounted to 
114,543, as compared with 121,538 in 1917, giving a daily 
average of 378. The visitors to the Newspaper Room were 
10,890, as against 9,108, and to the Manuscript Room 4,621, as 
against 5,483. Much use was made of the resources of the Library 



14 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

by the Intelligence Departments o£ the Admiralty and War Office. 
The visitors to the temporary exhibition between August and 
December amomited to 150,442. 

The number o£ separate objects incorporated in the several 
Departments during 1918 is as follows :-r- 
Printed Books : 

Books and Pamphlets - - _ _ _ 18,612 

Serials and Parts o£ Volumes _ _ - _ 51,835 

Maps and Atlases ------ 2,344 

Music - - - ----- - 6,938 

Newspapers (single numbers) _ - _ - 258,084 

Miscellaneous ------- 3,609 

Manuscripts and Seals ------ 244 

Oriental Printed Books and MSS.- *- - - 1,356 

Prints and Drawings ------ 2,234 

(Oriental) - - - - 114 

Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities - - - - 690 

Greek and Roman Antiquities - - - _ 15 

British and Mediaeval Antiquities - - - .- 652 

Coins and Medals ------ 1,149 



Total ----- 347,876 



The full list of accessions is again omitted, since the need for 
economy in paper and printing still continues. The departmental 
reports are accordingly reserved for future publication. 

The purchase grant being still limited to the acquisition of 
current books, notable acquisitions were again mainly confined to 
the gifts of generous friends of the Museum. The most important 
were a selection of drawings of Old Masters from Sir Edward 
Poynter's collection, presented by Mr. Otto Beit ; the bequest of 
the Rev. E. S. Dewick, supplemented by gifts from his son, 
the Rev. E. C. Dewick, including twelve printed and eight 
manuscript liturgical books ; a selection of Blake's illustrations to 
Dante, partly purchased and partly presented ; and the torso of 
an Aphrodite, some classical gems, and 162 fine Greek coins, 
bequeathed by Mr. and Mrs. John Ford. In addition the Museum 
derived some early Sumerian objects from excavations undertaken 
by Mr. R. Campbell Thompson on its behalf at the sites of Ur and 
Erech in Mesopotamia. On Mr. Thompson's return from the East, 
Mr. H. R. Hall was sent out to assist the military authorities in 
Mesopotamia with advice as to the protection of antiquities, and to 
make such further researches as might be feasible. 

Arranged by Departments, the most notable accessions are as 
follows : — 

Printed Books : 

Phalaris, Epistolse, printed at Valencia, about 1474. 
Amadis of Gaul, book vi, printed at Salamanca, 1510. 
Indulgence, printed by Pynson, 1515. 



GENERAL PROGRESS AT THE MUSEUM. 15 

Palmerin da Oliva, printed at Seville, 1525. 

Twelve service-books, 1499-1590. Bequeathed hy the Rev. 

E. S. Dewick. 
Cavendish, Book of Madrigals, 1598. 
Ptolemy, Geographia, 1513, Speed's Theatrnm Magnse 

Britannia3, 1616, and 13 maritime atlases and pilot books, 

1794-1810. 
The Glen Collection of Scottish Music, containing over 500 

volumes. Deposited hy Lady Dorothea Raggles-Brise. 

Manuscripts. Four liturgical MSS., including a Hereford Missal, 
14th century, and a York Diurnal, 15th century. Bequeathed hy 
the Rev. E. S. Dewick. 

Pontifical of Treves, 1456-1503. Presented hy the Rev. E. C. 
Dewick. 

Missal of the Cistercian Abbey of Morimondo, 1302, and two 
other MSS., purchased from the Dewick Library. 

Dante, Divina Commedia, early 14th century, from the Vernon 
Library. 

Peterborough chartulary, 14th century. 

Hogarth's Analysis of Beauty, autograph. 

Several autographs from the Morrison collection. 

Vala, by William Blake, autograph, w^th drawings. Presented 
anonymously . 

Eight letters of Charlotte Bronte to G. H. Lewes. Presented hy 
Mrs. C. Lewes. 

Oriental. A Persian MS. of the 14th century and a fine Turki 
and Persian MS., about 1500. Presented hy R. S. Greenshields, Esq. 

Prints and Di^awings. Nine drawings from the Poynter collection- 
Presented hy Otto Beit, Esq. 

Several chiaroscuro woodcuts from the collection of the Rev. 
J. Franck Bright. Partly presented by Lord Glencomier.^ J. P. 
Heseltine, Esq., and other donors. 

A. Diirer, Death and the Soldier, the rare first edition. Presented 
hy the Diirer Society. 

A, large collection of lithographs by Daumier^ Gavarni, etc. 
Presented hy C. L. Rutherston, Esq. 

W. Blake, Illustrations to the Divina Commedia. Partly 
presented hy tJie National Art- Collections Ennd, E. Dehenham, 
Esq. and C. Ricketts, Esq. 

Louisa, Marchioness of Waterford, 24 drawings and a sketch 
book. Presented hy Major-Gen. the Hon. Sir Richard Talhot, 
K.C.B., and Lady Talbot. 

Sir Charles Holroyd, 46 etchings. Presented hy Lady Holroyd. 

Various war subjects, by E. A. Kennington, C. R. W. Nevinson, 
and P. Nash. Presented by the Artists. 

Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities. Basalt statue of a Ptolemaic 
official, about 260 B.C., and other Egyptian sculptures. 

About 670 objects excavated at Abu Shahren, Mukayyar, and 
other early Babylonian sites. 



16 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Greek and Roman Antiquities. Torso o£ a nude Aphrodite, 
probably of the Medici type, and six engraved gems. Bequeathed 
by Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Ford. , Contents of a tomb, excavated on 
the Strymon. Presented hij Dr. Eric Gardner^ R.A.M.C. 

. British and Mediaeval Antiquities. A series of hand-axes from 
gravel near Bournemouth, collected by the Rev. D. WoodrofEe. 
Presented hy 0. C. Raphael, Esq. 

Bronze Age hoard from Kilnhurst, formerly in the Greenwell 
Collection., and an iron axe-head of the Viking period. Presented 
hy Louis Clarke^ Esq. 

Pottery fragments, excavated by the donor in the New Forest. 
Presented hy G. Heywood Sumner, Esq. 

Three alabaster figures of saints, an ivory group, and nine Italian 
plaquettes. Bequeathed hy the Rev. E. S. Dewick. 

Coins and Medals. Collection of 162 Greek coins, mostly of 
the finest period, from Metapontum, Heraclea, Syracuse, Macedonia, 
Corinth, etc. Bequeathed hy J. G. For J, Esq. 

Thirty-eight Parthian coins, and a very fine series of the 
Sassanian dynasty of Persia. Presented hy Sir E. Grant Duff, 
K.C.M.G. 

Sixteen gold solidi and eight silver coins of the Byzantine 
emperors ; a series of English gold and silver coins, and other 
coins. Bequeathed hy the Rev. E. S. Dewick. 

A series of 270 silver and bronze coins of European states and 
their colonies, including a set from German East Africa ; and 180 
modern British and Colonial coins. Presented hy H. Garside, Esq. 

A very fine specimen, perhaps an artist's trial proof, of the 
medal of Domenico Malatesta, by Pisanello. Bequeathed by 
Constance, Lady Stern. 

A lead portrait medal of Bernhard TV alter of Augsburg, 
apparently unique. Presented hy Maurice Rosenheim, Esq. 

Several war medals, German, French, and Dutch. 

The only publication issued during the year was a short Guide 
to the Temporary Exhibition. 



Frederic G. Kenyon, 
Director and Principal Librarian. 

British Museum, 

10th June 1919. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 17 

XI. British Museum (Natural History). 



SUMMARY o£ General Progress made at the Natural History 
Museum in the year 1918. 

In view o£ the continued shortage of paper, only a summary of 
the departmental reports of progress and acquisitions has been 
printed, as in the preceding year. 

The total number of visits made by the public to the Natural 
History Museum during 1918 was 422,805, as compared with 
423,128 in 1917. The attendance on Sunday afternoons was 
46,109, as against 46,468 in the preceding year. The average 
daily attendance for all open days was 1,165 ; for week-days, 
1,211 ; and for Sunday afternoons, 887. 

With the exception of the northern Geological Galleries all the 
Exhibition Galleries of the Natural History Museum were open 
to the public either on alternate days or daily, including Sundays, 
<luring the war. 

The daily opening of all the Exhibition galleries has been 
resumed, and steps have been taken with a - view to the release 
from military service of all members of the staff, so as to enable 
them to take up their duties at the Museum as soon as possible. 

It has been decided to keep the Museum open to the public 
till 5 p.m. on weekdays during the winter months (November- 
February) . 

The services of the Official Guide Lecturer have been continued 
throughout the same period, and have been much in request by 
parties of soldiers, many of them wounded, and others. The 
principles of colour-protection have been demonstrated by him to 
officers and men of the Camouflage School on many occasions, and 
in these demonstrations the following exhibits have been of special 
service : — In the Central Hall, Thayer's bird-models illustrating 
protective coloration, the cases containing Northern Animals in 
Summer and Winter Dress and Desert Animals, and the Mimicry 
case ; amongst the Mammals, the Lion, Tiger, and Leopard, the 
Ruffed Lemur, Great Panda, Takin, Zebra, and Giraffe ; and in 
other galleries, such exhibits as the cases of Terns and Plovers 
with eggs and chicks, the Little Bittern, the Python, Coral Snake 
and Krait, the Tree Frogs, Mackerel and Tunny, and many Insects, 
Dr. T. J. Jehu gave, at the Roj^al Society of Arts, a course of 
twelve lectures on the Swiney foundation, his subject being " Man 
and his Ancestry." The total attendance for the course was 2,563, 
or on an average 214 persons per lecture. 

A " Guide to Rats and Mice as Enemies of Mankind " has been 
prepared, giving some account of the instrumentality of these rodents 
in destroying crops and in spreading various serious diseases such 
as Bubonic Plague and Trichinosis. (Economic Series, No. 8.) 



18 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

A small exhibit is being prepared to illustrate the transmission 
o£ disease by rodents and other small mammals. 

A special exhibit o£ Birds Beneficial to Agriculture is also in 
preparation, to which a Guide-book will be issued forming a further 
number of the Economic Series. 

A series of mounted birds, collected by Officers of the 10th 
Black Watch and 77th Infantry Brigade Headquarters on the 
Balkan front during the years 1915-18, has been lent for exhibition 
by Major P. Stormonth-Darling. 

Various arrangements were made for the security of the contents 
of the Museum against hostile air raids, including the temporary 
removal of the more valuable collections to places outside London. 
Accommodation for the study collection of small mammals was 
kindly provided by the Committee of the Royal Albert Memorial 
Museum, Exeter ; the Sloane herbarium and a number of type 
specimens and original drawings of plants of historical value as 
well as a number of meteorites were, by the kindness of Lord 
Rothschild, housed in his Museum at Tring. Since the cessation 
of hostilities all the specimens removed have been safely returned 
without loss or mishap. 

The following matters connected with the war have been referred 
to the Natural History Museum for advice and information : — 

A report has been furnished to the l^ood (War) Committee of 
the Royal Society with reference to an important practical question 
in relation to the movements of certain fishes. 

Research work has been undertaken by a member of the staff 
(Dr. W. T. Caiman) in connection with an inquiry into the corrosion 
of cement, metals, and wood in sea water, initiated by the Institution 
of Civil Engineers at the request of the Food (War) Committee of 
the Royal Society. To illastrate this work an exhibit of boring- 
animals is in preparation. 

Information has been given to the Board of Agriculture and 
Fisheries with reference to consignments of frozen fish sent over 
from Canada for Army food purposes and determined as being 
" Squirrel Hake," a species of fish very inferior to genuine Hake, 
under which name the fish had b(,^en released from cold storage for 
distribution. 

The attention of the Ministry of Food and other Departments 
has been called to the possibility of utilizing whale flesh as a source 
of food supply. 

In reply to an enquiry, information has been furnished to the 
Admiralty with regard to the rate of growth of certain marine 
invertebrates. 

Correspondence has continued to take place with the Colonial 
Office in relation to a variety of subjects, of which the following 
are the most important : — 

(a) The occurrence of poisonous fishes in the West Indies and 
Malay States. 

(/>) The re-introduction of the Fur-Seal into South Georgia. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 19 

(c) The protection of animals in Tonga Island and British 
Honduras. 

(d) Whaling statistics in Southern waters. On this subject 
attention has been drawn to the very significant diminution in the 
catch of Humpback Whales during recent years. A Committee 
has been formed for the Dependencies of the Falkland Islands, 
including in its terms of reference the consideration of a scheme 
for an investigation into Whales and other problems in the Antarctic. 
On this Committee the Natural History Museum is represented by 
Dr. Harmer. 

(e) The possibilities of a fishing industry in South Georgia, with 
special reference to a certain species known as Notothenia rossii. 

(/) The preservation of Elephant-Seals in South Georgia. 
Reports have been received furnishing information as to the relative 
abundance of these animals during different months of the year, 
the general impression produced by a perusal of which is a satis- 
factory one, inasmuch as it appears that the effect of sealing 
during recent years has not been a marked reduction of the stock of 
Elephant-Seals, the evidence indicating that they are still abundant. 
The Colonial Office has been informed that the Trustees regard with 
satisfaction the suggested establishment of a Seal Reserve at South 
Georgia. 

(g) Sponge culture in the Bahamas. 

(li) The acclimatization of Reindeer in South Georgia. The 
experiment of introducing these animals has met with considerable 
success, inasmuch as from the 17 individuals imported seven years 
ago at least 62 are known to have sprung. It has been recom- 
mended that fresh stock should be imported from Norway to 
strengthen the breed. 

In reply to an inquiry as to the possibility of exterminating 
Land-leeches in the Tropics, information has been furnished as to 
the life-history and mode of life of these animals. 

Lord Swaythling has generously provided a sum of money 
sufficient to defray the expenses of a zoological collector for one year,, 
to wo!-k for the benefit of the Museum in ex-German East Africa. 

Mrs. Anderson, widow of the late Dr. John Anderson, f.r.s., 
formerly Director of the Indian Museum, Calcutta, has bequeathed 
to the Museum the heads and horns of 10 mammals, six of the 
sjteciiuens being specially mentioned in Dr. Anderson's " Mammals 
of Egypt" (1902). 

Tiie mounted specimens received during the year from the 
Tru tees of the Rowland Ward Bequest include examples of 
Mandrill, male and female, from the Cameroons ; Grevy's Zebra^ 
male, from British East Africa ; Yellow Baboon, Red Howler 
Monkey, White-headed Saki Monkey, Illiger's Marmoset, Indri, 
Tiipaia, tusks of Water Elephant, Toy Bull-terrier, 67 Birds for 
the Gallery, and 44 Birds for the exhibit " Birds and Agriculture." 

The total number of gifts received during the year by the 
several Departments was 1,280. Many of these comprised large 
numbers of individual specimens. 



20 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The following may be mentioned as being o£ special interest or 
value, namely, from : — 

Mr. R. L. Scott — a mounted specimen o£ the Water Elephant 
from Lake Leopold II., Belgian Congo. 

Captain H. W. Murray — the skull of a lion of specially large 
size, and the skull and horns of a Blackfaced Highland or Scotch 
Mountain Sheep, male, from Loch Awe, 1887. 

Mr. Guy R. G. Nevinson — the remainder of the collection of 
Exotic Coleoptera formed by his father, the late Mr. B. G. Nevinson, 
consisting of about 120,000 specimens contained in 19 cabinets and 
numerous boxes. 

The Council of the Royal Microscopical Society — about 1,000 
microscope-slides illustrating the " oozes " spread over the ocean 
floor at great depths, forming part of the collection of the late 
Dr. G. C. Wallich. 

Mr. E. Heron- Allen — a supplementary set of some 212 slides 
of oozes from the same collection, with notebooks, maps and charts. 

Mrs. Hinde — the valuable collection of fossils, chiefly specimens 
from the Silurian and Ordovician rocks of Canada, the United States, 
and Sweden, made by the late Dr. George J. Hinde, f.r.s., 
together with his unique series of microscopic preparations of rocks 
and fossils. 

Mr. A. E. Kitson, Director of the Geological Survey of the 
Gold Coast — a large collection of fossil shells and vertebrate 
remains from the Ameki cuttings on the Port Harcourt Railway, 
Southern Nigeria. 

Mr. James Groves — the British and European herbarium (6,000 
specimens) formed by himself and his brother, Mr. Henry Groves. 

The Rev. E. F. Linton — his British and European herbarium of 
2,500 specimens. 

Mrs. Ethel B. Ede — an interesting table with a top of inlaid 
marbles removed, 1850-1853, from the ancient tombs beside the 
Appian Way. 

The principal purchases made during the year include the eighth 
instalment of the Distant collection of insects, comprising 5,000 
specimens of Rhynchota and Coleoptera, and including 250 types ; 
the second and final instalment of the Malcolm Burr collection 
of Dermaptera (Earwigs), consisting of about 4,500 specimens, 
and including 64 types and 406 co- types ; series of 255 and 144 
microscope-slides of anatomical preparations of Land Mollusca, 
mounted by Lt.-Col. H. H. Godwin-Austen, f.r.s. ; and nine 
volumes containing some 700 original drawings of the plates in 
the first 18 volumes of " Curtis's Botanical Magazine," for 100/., 
towards which sum 25/. was generously contributed by Lord 
Rothschild. 

Exchanges and gifts of duplicate specimens have been made 
with various institutions and persons. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 21 

The following new works on Natnral History have been pub- 
lished during the year : — 

British Antarctic ("Terra Nova") Expedition, 1910. Natural 
History Report. 4to — 

Zoology : 

Vol. II., No. 8. Brachiopoda. By J. W. Jackson, f.g.s. 

Pp. 177—202 : 1 plate. 5^. 
Vol. III., No. 6. Arachnida, Part I. — Aranese (Spiders). 
By H. R. Hogg, m.a., f.z.s. Pp. 163—174: 3 text- 
figures. 1^. 6d. 
Vol. IV., No. 2. Cephalodiscus. By W. -G. Ridewood, 
i>.sc. Pp. 11 — 82 : 12 text-figures, 5 plates, 1 map. 
.125. 
Vol. v.. No. 1. Coelenterata, Part I. — Actiniaria. By 
T. A. Stephenson. Pp. 68 : 6 plates. 10s. 
Report on Oetacea stranded on the British Coasts. By S. F. 
Harmer, sc.D., f.r.s. No. 5. Getacea stranded during 1917. Pp. 
21 : 3 text-figures, 1 map. 4to. 2s. 6d. 

Monograph of British Lichens. Part I. Second Edition. By 
Annie Lorrain Smith, f.l.s. Pp. xxiv, 520 : 12 text-figures, 71 
plates. 8vo. 1/. 10^. 

Report of the Temperature reached in Army Biscuits during 
baking, especially with reference to the destruction of the imported 
Flour-moth, Ephestia kilhniella, Zeller. By J. H. Durrant and 
Col. W. W. 0. Beveridge, c.b., d.s.o., r.a.m.c. Pp. 24. Royal 
8vo. 2s. 

Map showing the known distribution in England and Wales 
of the Anopheline Mosquitos, with explanatory text and notes. 
By W. D. Lang, m.a. Pp. 63 : map (2 ft. 3 in. by 1 ft. 9^ in.). 
Royal 8vo. 2s. U. 

Economic Series, No. 8. Rats and Mice as Enemies of Man- 
kind. By M. A. C. Hinton. Pp. 63 : 2 plates, 6 text-figures. 
8vo. Is. 

Poster-leaflet : The Louse Danger. Price ^d. 

New editions have been issued of the following Gruide-books, 
etc. : — 

Guide to the Races of Mankind (Anthropology). Third edition. 
Pp. 35 : 16 illustrations. 8vo. Is. 

Guide to Fossil Remains of Man. Second edition. Pp. vi, 32 : 
4 plates, 13 text-figures. 8vo. &d. 

Guide to Domesticated Animals (other than Horses). Third 
edition. Pp. 56 : 25 illustrations. 8vo. Is. 

Introduction to the Study of Minerals. Fifteenth edition. Pp. 
123 : 41 text-figures. 8vo. Is. &d. 

Introduction to the Study of Rocks. Fifth edition. Pp. 155. 
8vo. 2s. 



22 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Instructions for Collectors, No. 9. Soft-bodied and other 
Invertebrate Animals. Fourth edition. Pp. 18. 8vo. 6d. 

Economic Series, No. 5. The Bed-Bug : its habits and life- 
history, and how to deal with it. Second edition. Pp. 20 : 7 text- 
figures. 8vo. 2cl. 

Economic Leaflet, No. 1. The Danger of Disease from Flies 
and Lice. Second edition. Pp. 4. 8vo. Id. for 3 copies, 2s. 6d. 
for 100. 

Poster-leaflet : The Fly Danger. Second edition. Price ^d. 
The undermentioned works are in preparation : — 

Library Catalogue. Supplement, Vol. I. 

" Terra Nova " Antarctic Report. Further sections. 

Report on Cetacea stranded during 1918. By Dr. S. F. 
Harmer, f.r.s. 

Catalogue of Moths, Supplement, Vol. II. By Sir G. F. 
Hampson, Bart. 

Studies on Acari (Mites), No. 1. The Genus Demodex. 
By A. S. Hirst. 
Dr. A. J. Chalmers, Director of the Wellcome Tropical Research 
Laboratories, Khartoum, has been allowed to issue Arabic transla- 
tions of the posters on '" The Fly Danger " and " The Mosquito 
Danger," for free distribution to the peoples of the Sudan. 

Mohamed Shafik Pasha, Under-Secretary of State, Ministry 
of Wakfs, Cairo, has been granted permission to have the first 
seven numbers of the Economic Series of pamphlets translated into 
Arabic and published at his own expense in Egypt, where he 
considered they would be of great interest and importance to the 
people. 

The Museum has prepared series of lantern slides to illustrate 
protective coloration of animals, and sets of these have, at the 
request of the Military Authorities, been sent to France for the 
British Army Schools for Scouting and Sniping, and to the Sniping 
School at Aldershot. 

The extent of the collection of books, etc., in the Library on the 
31st December, 1918, was, on a rough estimate, 103,939 volumes 
(exclusive of continuations and minor separata) and 6,263 maps. 



S. F. Harmer^ 

Director. 

British Museum (Natural History), 

1st April, 1919. .^^^i^f, j^tUSeiJZ 



Printed under 
By JAS. 



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1 1 JUL 19' 



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BRITISH MUSEUM 



1920. 



Ordered, by Tke House of Commons, to be Printed, 
21 July 1920. 



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To be purchased thioneh any Bookseller or directly from 

H.M. STATIONERY OFFICE at the following addressee : 

Imp; -^T. HousB, KiSGSWAr, London, W.C.2, and 28, Abin&don St., London, S.W.I; 

i, J aTWB Btbmt, Manchester; 1, St. Andrew's Cbbscbnt, Cardiff; 

23, Forth Stbebt, Bdinburoh; 

or from E. PONSONFY, Ltd., 116, (Jbaftok Strbbt, Dublin. 



1920. 
153 Price Is. 6d. net. 



>};J^ift;,{-' 



mm 



BRITISH MUSEUM. 



3 1 JAN 1967 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 27 February 1920 ; for, 

COPY "o£ Account o£ the Income and Expenditure of 
the British Museum (Special Trust Funds) for 
the Year ending the 3Lst day of March 1920 ; and 
Return of the Number of Persons admitted to visit 
the Museum and the British Museum (Natural 
History) in each Year from 1914 to 1919, both Years 
inclusive ; together with a Statement of the Progress 
made in the Arrangement and Description of the 
Collections, and an Account of Objects added to 
them in the Year 1919." 



Treasury Chambers, ) 
21 July 1920 I 



STANLEY BALDWIN. 



(.V/r. Herbert Fisher.) 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 
21 Jidy 1920. 



LONDON : 
published by his MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE. 



To be purchased through any Bookseller or directly from 

H.M. STATIONERY OFFICE at the following addresses: 

Imperial House, Kingsway, London, w.c.2, and 28, Abingdon Street, London, S.W.l; 

37. Peter Street, Manchester; 1, St. Andrew's Crescent, Cardiff; 

23, Forth street, Edinburgh ; 

or from E. PONSONBY, LTD., 116, GRAFTON STREET, DUBLIN. 

153 Price Is. 6d. net. 



CONTENTS 



BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Page 



ACCOUNTS (SPECIAL TRUST FUNDS, 1919-1920): 

Bridgewater 3 

Farnborough -- 3 

SWINEY - - 4- 

Birch - 4 

Charles Drury Edward Fortnum 5 

Carohbmish Excavations . . - - 5 

H. L. Florence 6 

J. A. EOEBLING - - 6 

NUMBERS OF PERSONS ADMITTED : 

British Museum .....7 

British Museum (Natural History) 10 

HOURS OF ADMISSION : 

British Museum - - 9 

British Museum (Natural History) ------ h 

GENERAL STATEMENT OF PROGRESS : 

Visitors 12 

Reading Room and Newspaper Room -..--. 12 

Principal Acquisitions 13 

Department of Printed Books - - 14 

,, ,, Manuscripts - - - - - - - - 19 

,, ,, Oriental Printed Books and MSS. - - - 28 

„ „ Prints and Drawings 27 

Sub-Department op Oriental Prints and Drawings - - - 39 

Department of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities - - - 43 

„ „ Greek and Roman Antiquities - - - - 53 

,, ,, British and Medieval Antiquities and Ethno- 
graphy --------- 58 

„ Coins and Medals 69 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY.) 



Pa< 



GENERAL STATEMENT OF PROGRESS,: 

A^isitors -..----. 77 

Goldman Memorial - 78 

Antarctic Whales - - - - - - - - - - 78 

Sealing in the Falkla>;!> Islands ------- 79 

Reindeer in south Georgia 79 

Investigations - - - - - - - - - - - fO 

Bequests and Gifts 80 

Purchases ----------- ^3 

General Library 85 

Index of the Genera and Spkcies op Animals - - - - 8(5 

Index Museum and Morphological Collections - - - - 86 

Department of Zoology - - - gy 

„ „ Entomology 118 

,. ,, Geology T?7 

,, ,, Mineralogy 1 lO 

„ „ Botany 149 



i 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



I.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expendftuke of the 
BRIDGEWATER FUND, from the 1st April 1919 to the 31st March 1920. 

Stock, 
Cash. 2^1 Consols. 



To Balances ou the 1st April 1919 
- Dividends received on 13,6o9Z. 3.?. 2d. Stock 
in 2^ per Cent. Consols, bequeathed 
by the Earl of Bridgewater, viz. : 



On the 5th April 1919 
5th July 1919 - 
5th October 1919 
„ 5th January I 920 



£.85 
85 
85 
85 



Kent of a Eeal Estate, Whitchurch, 
bequeathed by the Earl of Bridgewater (less 
charges) ------- 



&. s. 
116 14 



341 9 4 



23 7 



£.481 11 7 



£. .0. d. 
13,659 3 2 



13,659 3 2 



Cash. 



Stock, 

2^% Consols. 



By One Year s Salary of the Egerton Librarian 

- Amount expended in purchase of Manuscripts 

- Balances on the 31st March 19i 
carried to Account for 1920-1921 



175 - 


- 


106 1 


- 


200 10 


7 


(-.481 11 


7 



13,659 3 2 
13,659 3 2 



II.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 
EARN BOROUGH FUND, from the Ist April 1919 to the 31 st March 1920. 



To Balances on the 1st April 1919 - - - - 

- Dividends received on 2,879^. 10s. 7d. Stock in 

2^ per Cent. Consols, bequeathed by 

Lord Farnborough, viz. : 

On the 5th April 1919 - £.17 19 11 

.5th July 1919 - - 17 19 11 

5th October 1919 - 17 19 11 

5th January, 1920 - 17 19 11 



Cash. 



71 19 8 

£.91 5 1 



STOCK, 

2i% Consols. 



£. s. d. 
2,879 10 7 



2,879 10 7 



By AiiioUNT expended in purchase of Manuscripts - 
- Balances on the 31 st March 1920, 
carried to Account for 1920-1921 - 



Stock, 
Cash. 2^% Consols. 



£. s. d. 
55 13 - 



35 12 1 



£.91 5 1 



s. d. 



2,879 10 7 
2,879 10 7 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



III.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure 
of the SWINEY FUND, from the let April 1919 to the Slst March 1920. 

Stock, 



Cash. 



To Balances on the Ist April 1919 

- Dividends received on 5,744Z. - 8d. Siock in 

2 4 per Cent. Consols, bequeathed by 

Dr. George Swiney for Lectures on 

Geology, viz. : 

On the 5th Aprill919 - £.35 18 - 

5th July 1919 - - 35 18 - 

5th October 1919 - 35 18 - 

5th January 1920 - 35 18 - 



By Amount paid to Dr. J. U. Falconer, for Lectures 

on Geology in 1919 

- Balances on the 3 Ist March 1920, 
carried to Account for 1920-1921 



2^% Consols. 



£. .?. d. 
5,744 - 8 



,.149 11 1 


5,744 - 8 




Stock, 


Cash. 


2^% Consols. 


£. s. d. 


A. .9. d. 


140 - - 




9 11 1 


5,744 - 8 


.149 11 1 


5,744 - 8 



IV.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of 

the BIRCH FUND from the Ist April 1919 to the Slat March 1920. 

Stock, 
Cash. 2^% Consols. 

£. s. d. £,. s. d. 

To Balance on the Ist April 1919 - - - - _ 565 3 9 

-.Dividends received on 565^. 'Ss. 9d. Stock in 

2^ per Cent. Consols, bequeathed 

by Dr. Birch in 1766, for the three 

' Under Librarians of the British 

Museum, viz. : 

On the 5lh April 1919 

.5th July 1919 

5th October 1919 

„ 5th January 1920 



-£.3 10 

- 3 10 

- 3 10 

- 3 10 


8 
8 
8. 
8 












£.14 2 8 


565 3 9 




Cash. 


Stock, 
2^% Console. 



£. 



By Legacy paid to the three Under Librarians of 

the British Museum, whose offices existed 

,'"'« in 1766, viz., the Keepers of the Departments 

of Printed Books. Manuscripts, and Natural 

History - - 

-^ Balance on the 318T March 1920, carried 
.— . to Account for 1920-1921 . . . . 



£. s. d. 



£.14 2 



565 3 9 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



V. — AN ACCOUNT of the Eeceipts and Expenditure of the bequest of 

the late MR. CHARLES DRURY EDWARD FORTNUM from the 

1st April 1919 to the Slst March 1920. 



To Balances on the 1st April 1919 

- 5 per Cent. War Loan 1929-47, purchased witli 

189/. 8.y. 6d. 

- Interest on War Loan 



By Atnouut expended in the purchase of 2001. 5 per 

Cent. War Loan, 1929-47 . - . - 

- Balances on the 31st March 1920, cairied 

to Account for 1920-1921 . . . . 



Cash. 




Stock, 
5% War Loan. 


£. s. 
- 207 19 


d. 

7 


£. s. d. 
1,900 - - 


- 100 - 


- 


200 - - 


£.307 19 


7 


2,100 - - 


Cash. 




Stock, 
5% War Loan. 


£. s. 


d. 


£. s. d. 


189 8 


6 




■ 118 11 


1 


2,100 - - 


£.307 19 


7 


2,100 - - 



VI.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 

CARCHEMISH EXCAVATIONS FUND from the 

1st April 1919 to the 51st March 1920. 

Cash. 

£. s. d. 
To Balance on the 1st April 1919 ------- 68 14 1 

- Donation (further anonymous contribution) . - - - 2,000 - - 



£.2,068 14 1 



Cash. 

£. s. d. 
By Expenditure on Excavations ------- 1,534 2 3 

- BALANCEonthe31stMarchl920, carried to Account for 1920-1921 534 11 10 



£.2,068 14 1 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



VII. — AN ACCOUNT of the Eeceipts and Expenditure of the bequest 
of the late MR. HENRY LOUIS FLORENCE from the 
1st April 1919 to the 31st March 1920. 



To Balances on the 1st April 1919 
- Interest on 5% War Loan, 1929-47 



By Amount expended in purchase of Prints and 
Drawings ------- 

- Balances on the .SIst March 1920, carried 
to Account for 1920-1921 





Stock. 


Cash. 


5% War Loan. 


&. s. d. 


£. s. d. 


- 112 16 - 


1,052 12 6 


52 12 6 




&. 165 8 6 


1,052 12 6 




Stock. 


Cash. 


5o/o War Loan. 


£. s. d. 


£. s. d. 


- 120 8 - 




45-6 


1,052 12 6 


£.165 8 6 


1,052 12 6 



YIIL— AN ACCOUNT of the JOHN A. ROEBLING FUND from the 
1st April 1919 to the 31st March 1920. 

Stock. 
5% War Loan. 



To Balance on the 1st April 1919 

- Interest on War Loan - 



Cash. 

&. s. d. 

52 9 6 



£,. s. d. 
1.049 8 10 



By Balances on the 31st March 1920, carried 
to Account for 1920-1921 - . - - 



£.52 9 6 


1,049 8 10 


Cash. 

£. s. d. 
1 

52 9 6 


Stock. 
5% War Loan. 

£. s. d. 
1,049 8 10 


£.52 9 6 


1,049 8 10 



1st April 1920. 



Frederic G. Kenyan, 

Director and Principal Librarian. 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



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ACCOUNTS ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 9^ 

The British Miisenm, Bloomsbury (including the Departments 
o£ Printed Books and Maps, Manuscripts, Oriental Printed Books 
and Manuscripts, Prints and Drawings, Egyptian and Assyrian 
Antiquities, Greek and Roman Antiquities, British and Mediseval 
Antiquities and Ethnography, and Coins and Medals) is normally 
open to the public free daily (except on Good Friday and Christmas 
Day and days o£ Public Fast or Thanksgiving). 



At present, however, the Print Department and the galleries 
of the Egyptian and Assyrian Department on the upper floor, 
having only been vacated by the Registr}^ of Friendly Societies, 
to which they were lent during the war, at the end of March, 1920, 
are closed to the public. The remainder of the Museum, excepting 
King Edward VII. 's Galleries, is open to the public daily on week- 
days from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., from April to September inclusive. 
After 4 p.m. in January, February, November, and December, and 
after 5 p.m. in March, and October, only certain of the galleries 
remain open. 

Sunday opening of the Exhibition Galleries will be resumed 
in the course of 1920. 

The Reading Room is open to Students from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., 
the Newspaper Room and Manuscript Students' Room from 10 a.m. 
to 5 p.m., on every weekday except Good Friday, Christmas Day, 
and the first four weekdays in March and September. 



British Museum, \ Frederic G. Kenyon, 

1st April, 1920. J Director and Principal Librarian. 



10 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



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3,628 
3.912 
6,843 
4,577 
4.721 
5,311 
5,676 
5,989 
4,600 
3.829 
4,076 
3,511 


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Zoology 
Entomo 
Geology 
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ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



11 



The Exhibition Galleries of the British Museum (Natural 
History), Cromwell Road, South Kensington, including the 
Departments of Zoology, Entomology, Geology and Palyeon- 
tology, Mineralogy, and Botany, are open to the public, free 
daily, except Good Friday and Christmas Day, and days of 
Public Fast or Thanksgiving. 

The Hours of Admission are as under : — 



On Week-Day8, throughout the year from 10 a.m. 

January and February 

March' "^ 

April to September 

October, November and December 



On Sundays, in 

January 

February 1st to 14tli 
„ 15th to end 
March 
April 

May to August 
September ... 
October 
November and December 



KJ il.ll 


1., in 


to 


5 p.m 
5.30 „ 


• 




55 


6 

5 


from 


2 


to 


4 p.m 


,, 


2 


55 


4.30 „ 


1) 


2 
2 


55 


5 
5.30 „ 


95 


2 
2.30 


55 
55 


6 

7 


55 
55 


2 
2 


55 
55 


6 
5 




2 


55 


4 



Persons are admitted to study in these Departments every week- 
day from 10 till 4 o'clock. 



On Sundays the following galleries are open, namely : — Central 
Hall, North Hall, Bird Gallery, Mammal Galleries (including 
¥/hale Room), Fossil Mammal Gallery, Fossil Reptile Gallery, and 
Mineral Gallery. 



British Museum (Natural History), 
1st April, 1920. 



S. F. Ilarmer, 
Director of the Natural 
History Departments. 



12 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



X. General Progress at the Museum, Bloomsbury. 

The year 1919 saw the return to the Museum o£ all objects 
removed from it to places of safety during the war, and the 
restoration of the greater part of the galleries to their normal state. 
But for the continued occupation of parts of the Museum by the 
Government Departments housed there during the war, the 
restoration could have been completed within the year. All the 
collections deposited at Malvern and Aberystwyth, and in the Tube 
Station under the West Central Post Office, had been brought back 
before the end of March. The re-opening of exhibition galleries 
continued progressively up to July, by which time all had been 
restored to the public except those that were still occupied by the 
Registry of Friendly Societies. But (in spite of promises of pre- 
ferential treatment of Museums) it was not until the end of 
September that the effects of German Prisoners of War were 
removed from the basement of the new wing, while the Medical 
Research Committee were still in occupation of the sub-ground 
floor of the new wing, and the Registry of Friendly Societies was 
still in the Department of Prints and Drawings and a great part of 
the Department of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities at the end 
of the year. 

The re-opening of the galleries was at once appreciated by the 
public. Visitors to the Museum on week-days (the Museum still 
remaining closed on Sundays) amounted to 691,650 in 1919, as 
compared with 680,000 in 1915, the last complete year : a 
satisfactory total, though far below the 884,028 of 1913. Visitors 
to the Reading Room were 130,198 as compared with 114,543 in 
the previous year, and 243,659 in 1913 ; while the students admitted 
to the Departmental working rooms amounted to 16,197, as compared 
with just under 7,000 in 1918 and just under 37,800 in 1913. 
Visitors to the Newspaper Room were 10,407, a total about 480 below 
that of 1918, and 7,500 below that of 1913. When the Students' 
Room of the Prints Department is once again open, considerable 
additions may be expected to the figures of visitors. 

The number of separate objects incorporated in the several 
Departments during 1919 is as follows : — 

Printed Books : 

Books and Pamphlets ----- 23,932 

Serials and Parts of Volumes _ - - _ 71,403 

Maps and Atlases - - - - - - 1,610 

Music - . - - - - - - - 9,506 

Newspapers (single numbers) - - - - 199,107 

Miscellaneous ------- 1,649 

Manuscripts and Seals - - - - - - 45 ii 



GENERAL PROGRESS AT THE MUSEUM. 13 

Oriental Printed Books and MSS. - - - - 2,768 

Prints and Drawings - - - - - - 3,237 

(Oriental) - - - - 477 

Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities - _ _ _ 10,819 

Greek and Roman Antiquities _ _ _ _ 42 

British and Mediseval Antiquities - - - - 1,626 

Coins and Medals ------ 6,301 



Total ----- 332,930 

The most notable variations are an increase o£ 20,000 in the 
number o£ serial publications, a reduction of 59,000 in the news- 
papers, and an increase o£ 10,000 in the acquisitions of the 
Department of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities, 

The restoration of the Purchase Grant, which took effect from 
the beginning of the financial year, naturally produced marked 
increases in the acquisitions of all Departments. 

The usual Departmental lists of accessions are resumed in this 
Report, after being discontinued for two years. It is hoped to issue 
the lists for 1917-18 separately, in order to maintain the complete- 
ness of the series. 

The particulars of the most notable accessions will be found in 
the Departmental reports which follow ; but special attention may be 
called to the two magnificent illuminated manuscripts from the 
collection of Mr. Yates Thompson, one acquired by gift from the 
owner, the other by purchase at his sale ; the Trafalgar Log-Book of 
H.M.S. Victory, generously purchased for 5,000L by Mr. James 
Buchanan and presented to the nation ; the Northwick collection of 
engravings and woodcuts, presented by the Hon. E. Spencer 
Churchill ; a portion of a slab of the frieze of the Parthenon, 
discovered several years ago on a rockery in Essex, and presented 
by Mr. J. Dumville-Botterell ; the bequest by Dr. Allen Sturge, 
M.V.O., of his immense collection of stone implements ; the gift by 
Sir Arthur Evans of his father's collection of Early British and 
other Celtic coins ; and the purchase, with the aid of a special grant 
of 10,000L by the Treasury, supplemented by the gifts of various 
donors, of the most important part of Sir Hermann Weber's 
magnificent collection of Greek coins. 

Publications issued during 1919 : — 

Guide to the Use of the Reading Room. New Edition, 1919. 
8vo. 9fZ. 

Summary Guides to the Exhibition Galleries of the British 
Museum. Third Edition, 1919. 8vo. M. 



British Museum, Frederic G. Kenyon, 

1st April, 1920. Director and Principal Librarian. 



14 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



XI. — PROGRESS made in the Arrangement and Description 
OF THE Collections and Account of Objects added 
to them in the year 1919 (Bloomsbury). 



Department of Printed Books. 

I. Arrangement. — The works added to the collection during the 
past year have, as far as possible, been placed on the shelves of the 
Library according to the system of classification adopted in the 
Museum. 

The press-marks, indicating their respective localities, have been 
marked on the inside and affixed to the back of each volume. 

The total number of these press-marks amounts to 56,810 ; in 
addition to which 50,821 press-marks have been altered on books 
and in the catalogues, in consequence of changes and re-arrange- 
ments carried out in the Library ; 37,512 labels have been affixed 
to books and volumes of newspapers, and 37,056 obliterated labels 
have been renewed. 

The number of stamps impressed upon articles received is 
341,111. 

7,755 presses of books and newspapers have been dusted in the 
course of the year. 

II. Cataloguing. — 37,905 titles have been written for the 
General (catalogue and for the Catalogues of Maps and Music. 

Printing. — 22,806 titles and index-slips for^ the General, and 
3,063 for the Map, Catalogue have been printed during the year. 

Incorporation. — General Catalogue. — 21,713 title-slips and index- 
slips have been incorporated into each of the three copies of this 
Catalogue. This has rendered it necessary, in order to maintain as 
far as possible the alphabetical arrangement, to re-arrange 45,560 
title-slips and index-slips in each copy and to add to each copy 634 
new leaves. 

The system of monthly incorporation of accessions, inaugurated 
in April, 1915, was carried out regularly throughout the year. 

Map Catalogue. — 2,414 titles have been written for this catalogue, 
and 1,488 title-slips have been incorporated into each of three copies 
of it. This has rendered it necessary to re-arrange 1,898 title-slips 
in each copy and to add to each copy 27 new leaves. 

Music Catalogue. — 7,507 titles have been written for this 
Catalogue. 22,247 title-slips have been relaid on 1,489 new 
leaves. 

Shelf Catalogue. — For this Catalogue, in which the title-slips, 
mounted on cards, are arranged in order of press-marks, 20,300 
have been so mounted, and 22,740 have been incorporated in their 
proper order. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTED BOOKS. 15 

Catalogue of Books printed in the X Vth Century. — Work on this 
Catalogue was resumed in July, 1919, and full descriptions of the 
incunabula from the first 42 Venetian presses have now been 
completed. Rather more than a quarter of the Venetian books 
have thus been dealt with. 

III. Binding. — The number of volumes and sets of pamphlets 
sent to be bound in the course of the year was 13,251, including 
4,228 volumes of newspapers. In consequence of the frequent 
adoption of the plan of binding two or more volumes in one, the 
number of volumes returned was 10,742. In addition, 956 volumes 
have been repaired in the binders' shops. 

Besides this, the following binding work has been done in the 
Library itself : — 4,334 volumes have been repaired, 7,668 cleaned 
and polished, 5,152 volumes of reports, parts of periodicals, &c., 
have been bound in a light style of binding. 

The following maps, &c., have also been bound or mounted 
daring the year :— r-Four atlases and 80 volumes of the 25-inch 
Ordnance Survey have been bound ; in addition, 115 general maps, 
in 419 sheets, have been mounted on linen, 180 maps in 644 
sheets mounted on cards, and 468 Admiralty Charts mounted on 
linen. 

56,943 numbers of Colonial Newspapers have been made up inta 
1,251 parcels, and 1,259 parcels have been tied up and labelled. 

74 volumes of the General Catalogue have been broken up and 
re-bound. 632 columns have been re-laid, owing to the accumula- 
tion of titles under certain headings. 15 volumes of the Music 
Catalogue have been re-bound. 

IV. Reading Room Service. — The number of volumes replaced 
in the General Library after use in the Reading Room was 413,719; 
in the King's Library, 12,507 ; in the Grenville Library, 1,803 ; 
in the Map Room, 2,974 ; in the presses in which books are kept 
frosn day to day for the use of readers, 605,214 ; and in the Oriental 
Department, 3,396 ; making a total of 1,039,613 volumes supplied 
to readers during the year, exclusive of those to which the readers 
have |)ersonal access on the shelves of the Reading Room. The 
number ol readers during the year was 130,198, giving an average 
ot" 431 daily — the room having been open on 302 days. 

Newspapv^r Room. — The number of readers during the year was 
10,407, giving a daily average of 35 — the room having been open 
on 302 days. The number of volumes replaced after use was 
38,868, giving a daily average of 129 not reckoning volumes 
taken from the shelves of the Newspaper Room by the readers 
themselves. In addition, 1,100 country newspapers were brought 
up to the Library from the Repositorv at Hendon for the use o£ 
readers. 

Map Room. -^-260 students were admitted to the Map Room. 



16 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

P liotograpliy . — There were 200 applications for leave to photo- 
graph from books in the Library and 601 volumes were supplied 
for this purpose. 

V. Accessions. — General Library. — 23,932 complete volumes 
and pamphlets have been added to the General Librar}'^ during the 
year. Of these, 3,377 were presented, 13,060 received by Copy- 
right, 311 by Colonial Copyright, 1,600 by International Exchange 
and 5,584 acquired by purchase. 

71,403 parts or volumes of serial publications and of works in 
progress have been added to the General Library. Of these, 6,406 
were presented, 49,118 received by Copyright, 150 by Colonial 
Copyright, 3,534 by International Exchange, and 12,195 acquired 
by purchase. 

Maps. — 56 atlases, 49 parts of atlases, and 1,505 maps in 4,398 
sheets have been added to the collection during the year. Of 
these 39 atlases, 24 parts of atlases and 603 maps were presented ; 
9 atlases, 25 parts of atlases and 654 maps were received by Copy- 
right ; 2 atlases and 16 maps were received by Colonial Copyright ; 
and 6 atlases and 232 maps were acquired by purchase. 

Music. — 9,506 musical publications have been added to the 
collection during the year. Of these 21 books were presented, 
8,365 books and 659 parts were received by Copyright ; 310 pieces 
by Colonial Copyright ; and 23 books and .128 parts acquired by 
purchase. 

NewsiJapers. — The number of newspapers published in the 
United Kingdom and received under the provisions of the Copy- 
right Act during the year was 3,050, comprising 199,107 single 
numbers. Of these newspapers, 1,056 were published in London - 
and its suburbs, 1,474 in other parts of England and Wales and in 
the Channel Islands, 289 in Scotland, and 231 in Ireland. Two 
sets, comprising 311 single numbers, were received by International 
Exchange ; 35 sets, comprising 4,289 single numbers, by Colonial 
Copyright ; 708 sets, comprising 190,020 single numbers, of 
colonial and foreign newspapers have been presented ; and 43 sets, 
comprising 8,595 single numbers, have been purchased. 

Miscellaneous. — 1,649 articles not included in the foregoing 
paragraphs have been received, consisting of single sheets, photo- 
graphs and other items. 

Acquisitio7is of Special Interest. 
The following is a list of the most important and interesting 
books acquired by purchase during the year. 

(1) Books printed in the 15th century. 

Augustinus Datus : Isagogicus libellus in eloquentiae prsecepta. 
Printed by Philippus de Lavagna, Milan, 1475, and one of the 
earliest books produced by his press. 



DEPAKTMENT OF PRINTED BOOKS. 17 

Thomas Aquinas : De diuinis moribus. Printed by Seuerinus 
Ferrariensis, Ferrara, ca. 1475, and possibly the earliest of his 
productions. 

Albertus de Eyb : Margarita poetica. Printed by Stephan 
Plannck, Rome, 1480. Only one earlier book from Plannck's 
press is known to exist. 

Martyrologium siue Viola sanctorum. Printed by Nicolaus 
Philippi and Marcus Reinhard, Lyons, ca. 1480. 

Maurice de Sully, Bishop of Paris : Lexposition des euuangilles 
et des epistres de tout Ian translatees de nouueau de latin en 
francoys. Printed by Antoine Neyret, Ohambery, 1484. The 
earliest of the four dated incunabula, all excessively rare, registered 
as having been printed at Ohambery. It contains about fifty wood- 
cuts and the present copy is a particularly large and clean one. 

Bernardus : Sermons in Dutch. Printed by Petrus de Os, 
Zwolle, 1484, 1485. In two parts. A fine woodcut representing 
the Virgin and Child and S. Bernard occurs in each part. 

Psalterium latinum cum canticis. Printed by Pierre -Levet, 
Paris, 1488. 

Joannes Balbus : Oatholicon. Printed by Jean du Pre, Lyons, 
1492. 

Terentius : Ooraoedise. Printed by Perrin Le Masson, Lyons, 
1495. 

Altogether 25 Fifteenth Oentury books were acquired for the 
Museum b}^ purchase during the year. 

(2) English Books printed before 1640. 

The Forme and Maner of subuention or helpyng for pore people, 
deuysed and practysed in the cytie of Hypres in Flaunders, whiche 
forme is auctorised by the Emperour, and approved by the facultie 
of diuinitie in Paris. Translated out of laten into englishe. Printed 
by Thomas Godfray, London, 1535. 

Thomas Phaer : The Regiment of Life. Edward Whitchurch, 
London, 1550. 

The Tragedie of (^iaudius Tiberias Nero, Romes greatest tyrant. 
Francis Burton, London, 1607. From the library of Lord Mostyn. 
. Thomas Heywood : The Ra})e of Lucrece . . . The third im- 
pression. Nathaniel Butter, London, 1614. From the library of 
Lord Mostyn. A very rare edition. 

R. Speed. The Oounter Scuifle. Whereunto is added, the 
Oounter Ratt. Written [in verse] by R. S. R. Meighens, London, 
1628. 

Altogether 59 English books of this period were acquired by 
purchase during the year, including numerous pamphlets of his- 
torical interest from the Ohristie Miller collection. 

(3) Later English books. 

Edmond Wingate : The Use of the Rule of Proportion in 
Arithmetique and Geometric. First published at Paris in the 
French tongue. M. F. for P. Stephens, London, 1645. 



18 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BKITISH MUSEUM. 

Oliver Wallinby : Planometria or the whole Art o£ Surveying 
o£ Land. ISFathanael Brooks, London, 1650. Really written by 
W. Leybourn. 

Tears Wip'd Off, or the second essay o£ the Quakers by way of 
poetry : occasioned by the coronation of James and Mary. By 
W. P., a Servant to the Light. J. P. for Henry Playford, London, 
1685. This piece was disavowed by William Penn in a specially 
issued broadside. 

The English Hermit, or the Adventures of one Philip Quarll. 
London, 1727. A dedication copy, bearing the name of the author, 
Peter Longueville, hitherto unknown. 

(4) Early Spanish books. 

Aurea expositio hymnorum, studio lacobi Alora correcta, 
annotata a Petro Aguesalaga, 1506. Libri minores de nouo 
correcti per Antonium Nebrissensem, ca. 1506. Orationes ex 
diuino officio collectae, 1507. All three books printed by Arnaldus 
Guillen de Brocar at Logrono. 

Antonio de Aranda : Verdadera informacion de la tierra santa. 
Juan de Ayala, Toledo, 1537. 

Pedro Mexia : Silua de varia lecion. M. Nucio, Antwerp, 
1544. 

Pedro de Medina : Arte de nauegar. Francisco Fernandez de 
(Jordoua, Valladolid, 1545. A fine copy of the very rare first 
edition of this famous work on navigation. 

La Regla y establecimiento de la Orden de la Caualleria de 
Santiago del Espa.da. Andres de Angulo, Alcala de Henares, 1565. 
A very fine copy of an early edition of the rules of this Order. 

Donations. 

The following donations may be mentioned : — 

Jacobo Sannazaro : Libro pastorale nominato Arcadia. Venice, 
1502. In the original pasteboard covers, each cover decorated with 
a woodcut ornamental design. Presented hy C. W. Dyson PerrinSy 
Esq. 

Girolamo di Portia : The Spirituall Conflict, Antwerp, 1598, 
and seven other Roman Catholic books dating from 1564 to 1605, 
walled up after the Gunpowder Plot by the Tresham family .in 
Rushton Hal], Northamptonshire, and unwalled in 1828. Presented 
hy T. B. Clarice- TJiornhiU, Esq. 

Walter Thornbury : The Life of J. M. W. Turner, London, 
1862. Extra illustrated by John Piatt, Llandudno, 1899. In 
thirteen volumes. Bequeathed, hy John Piatt, Esq. 

A collection of Old Charts and Maps. Presented hy the Marquis 
of Lansdow7ie. 

A Collection of Siamese Postage Stamps, formed by the late 
R. W. Harold Row, Demonstrator in Zoology, King's College, 
University of London. Presented in his memory by Jiis mother, Mrs. 
Eliza Row. 

Alfred W. Pollard. 



I 



DEPARTMENT OF MANUSCRIPTS. 19 



Department of Manuscripts* 

1. Catalogue of Additions. — The following MSS. acquired in 
1914 have been described and indexed : — Additional 38,981-38,986, 
38,997-39,020, 39,049-39,052, 39,056-39,059, 39,061-39,063, 
39,067, 39,070, 39,071, 39,076-39,078, 39,081-39,090, 39,097. 

Of those acquired in 1915, Additional 39,172, 39,178, 39,187- 
39,211, 39,213, 39,215, 39,255 ; of those acquired in 1916, 
Additional 39,256, 39,317, 39,319-39,321, 39,325, and Egerton 
2,949-2,951 ; of those acquired in 1917, Additional 39,547, 39,548, 
39,558-39,562, 39,575, 39,576, 39,585-39,597, 39,638, 39,639, 
39,643, 39,646, 39,665, 39,671-39,674, and Egerton 2,974, 2,975 ; 
of those acquired in 1918, Additional 39,775-39,777, 39,780- 
39,793 ; and of those acquired in 1919, Additional 39,828-39,839, 
39,863, 39,871-39,904, and Egerton 3,022-3,024, have been 
described and indexed. 

2. Catalogue of Greek Papyri. — Papyri 2,078-2,102, acquired 
in 1919, have been provisionally transcribed. 

3. Catalogue of the Royal and King's MSS. — Sheets K-Y" of 
Vol. Ill, completing the descriptions and beginning the general 
index, have been printed off, and sheets Z, Aa are in type. The 
revision of the index of initia has been continued. 

4. Catalogue of Irish MSS.— Additional 39,665 has been 
described. 

5. Catalogue of Charters. — Additional Charters 57,625-57,768, 
acquired in 1913, have been described and indexed. 

6. Binding. — Sixty-five additional MSS. and one Egerton MS., 
newly acquired, and sixty-two MSS. of the old collections have 
been bound, repaired, or lettered, together with twenty-eight Books 
of Reference and Catalogues. Five Charters and Rolls have been 
repaired. 

7. Verification. — The entire collection of MSS. has been verified 
by comparison with the Shelf-lists. 

8. Reproductions. -^Tliree sets of Pictorial i Postcards (Months' 
Occupations, Twelfth Century Initials, and Henry VI's Psalter) 
have been issued. Three miniatures have been selected for re- 
production in colours ; two of these (Royal 15 D. II, f. 3, and 
Additional 25,698, f. 8) have been passed, the third (Additional 
18,850, f. 65) is in course of preparation. 

9. Stamping, folioing, and placing. — 42 Additional MSS., 8 
Arundel MSS., 2,594 Charters and 97 Books of Reference have 
been stamped. The total number of impressions made was 8,798. 

223 MSS. have been folioed, with a total of 41,915 folios. 
21,098 slips have been numbered. 



20 ACCOUNTS, ETC, OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Twenty-seven newly acquired MSS. have been placed. All have 
been press-marked and entered in Hand- and Shelf-lists. 1,121 
Additional Charters and Rolls have been placed, and have been 
entered in the Hand-list. Thirty-seven seals and casts have been 
j^rovided with boxes, placed, and entered in Hand- and Drawer-lists. 

10. Books of Reference. — 134 volumes and parts have been 
received, catalogued and placed. 

Eight volumes and parts o£ Facsimiles were added to the series 
now deposited in the Department and available for the use of 
readers. 

11. Consultation of il//S*S.— 17,946 MSS. and 3,015 Charters 
and Seals have been consulted in the Students' Room. The number 
of Students was 6,013. In addition 2,012 Oriental MSS. have 
been consulted in the Students' Room by 801 Students. 

12. MSS. photographed. — 61C MSS. (including Papyri, Charters, 
and Seals) were allowed to be photographed, with a total of 2,456 
photographs taken. 

13. Reconstruction. — Early in the year the restoration to their 
usual places of the MSS., Charters, Papyri, Seals, and Casts, which 
had been sent to Aberystwyth, or removed to the basement, as a 
precaution against hostile aircraft, was completed. 

A selection of the most valuable MSS. has been placed perma- 
nently in safes. 

14. Exhibitions. — In the course of the year the temporary 
exhibition was replaced by the permanent exhibition as before the 
war (with a few slight modifications, mainly due to recent 
acquisitions of exceptional public interest). 

15. Acqui.ntions. The number of Manuscripts and Documents, 
&c., acquired during the year has been : — 

Additional MSS. ' - - - - - - - 113 

Egerton MSS. -------- 6 

Charters and Rolls - - - - - - - 275 

Papyri --------- 25 

Detached Seals and Casts ------ 34 

The additions this year, if not so many as usual, are of more than 
average importance. By the generosity of Mr. Henry Yates 
Thompson, whose unequalled private collection of illuminated MSS. 
is being dispersed, the Museum received the gift of the very fine 
East Anglian Psalter of the early 14th century, which was executed 
for the St. Omer family. An even finer MS. executed in France 
about the same period or a little earlier, The Sainte Abbaye, with 
other tracts, was acquired by purchase at Mr. Yates Thompson's sale, 
together with an Italian illuminated MS. of Brunetto Latini's Tresor 
and other treatises, dated 1425. The former purchase brings to- 
gether again the two parts of one splendid volume, for the Somme 
Le Roi which has been in the Museum since 1869 is part of the 
same book. 



DEPARTMENT OF MANUSCRIPTS. 21 

Another munificent donation was received from Mr. (now Sir) 
James Buchanan, who purchased for 5,000Z at Sotheby's auction- 
rooms the Master's Log of H.M.S. Victory, from Sept., 1805, to 
Jan., 1806, including entries relating to the battle of Trafalgar. 

Other gifts and purchases include : — 

Twenty-four Greek papyri, nearly all from the archives of Zeno, 
a Philadelphia official of the 3rd century B.C. 

Fragments of an 11th century martyrology (N. France) and of 
Edward Grim's Life of St. Thomas of Canterbury, &c. 

An original bull of Pope Lucius II to the Abbey of St. Omer, 
1144. 

Original instructions from Margaret, Duchess of Burgundy, to 
hjr deputies to treat with Henry IV, 1404. 

Letter of Henry VI to the town of Schiedam, 1436. 

Over forty original letters of Sir John Fastolf and other 
documents from the Paston family archives, 1435-1472. 

Wardrobe-book of Henry VIII, 1511-1512. Also Proceedings 
at the Coronation of Edward VI, 1547. Both parcliased from the 
Bridgewater Fund. 

Letter-book of Sir Thomas Chamberlayne, Ambassador to Spain, 
1559-1561. 

Collections relating to Martin Frobisher's voyages. 

The Tresham Papers, chiefly of Sir Thomas Tresham, father of 
Francis Tresham who was arrested on suspicion of complicity in the 
Gunpowder Plot. The papers were found in 1828 concealed in a 
wall at Rushton Hall, co. Northt. Presented by T. B. Clarke- 
Thornhill, Esq. 

Papers of Sir Charles Cornwallis, tempp. Jas. I and Chas. I, 
transcribed by his son. 

"■ Truth cleared of Scandals," a work of the 17th cent. Quaker, 
Richard Farnworth. 

Copies by Samuel Pepys, in his cypher, of evidence concerning 
the birth of the Old Pretender ; also his memorandum to the King 
about the Navy, 1686. 

A letter-book of Royal letters of William III, 1695-1701. 

The original correspondence between Jonathan Swift and Esther 
Vanhomrigh (Vanessa). From the Morrison sale. 

Proceedings of the Prize Court of Barbados, relating to capture 
of French ships, 1744. 

A naval signal-book, 1779, and other nautical MSS. Presented 
hy the Marquess of Lansdowne. 

Entry-book of correspondence relating to Tan j ore, 1782. 

Entrv-book of correspondence of the Embassy to Tipu Sultan, 
1783-1784, 2 vols. 

Memoirs by Sir Alexander Cuming concerning his relations with 
the Cherokee Indians. 

Diaries and other papers of Warren Hastings, supplementary to 
the large collections already in the Museum. Bequeathed by Miss 
Marian Winter. 



22 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Letters of Lord Grenville to the Austrian Ambassador, 1793- 
1801. 

Letter-book of Gen. Gordon Forbes in San Domingo, 1795-1796. 

Reminiscences and impressions of European travel after Waterloo 
by Major Fr je. Presented by Mademoiselle Gatayes, of Paris. 

Correspondence of Sir John Hall, Inspector-General of Hospitals 
in the Crimea, with Florence Nightingale and others. 

Autograph letter of Gen. Hugh Wheeler from Cawnpore, 
immediately before the outbreak, 1857. 

Autograph MS. of Samuel Butler's novel, " The Way of All 
Flesh." Presented hy H. Festing Jones, Esq. 

Autographs of Presidents of the United States, from Washington 
to Pres. Wilson. Bequeathed hy Zenas Crane, Esq., of Dalton, 
Mass. 

Court-rolls and reeves' accounts of Greenham and Kittisford, co. 
Som., 1335-1480. 

An illuminated deed of Philip and Mary, with portraits. 

Grant of Arms to Edw. Barker, 1580. 

Copies by Ralph Starkey in 1595 of original charters relating to 
Cheshire. 

Thirty-four Spanish charters, 12th-17th centt. 

Twenty-six maps of English manors or estates, 1669-1810. 
From the Farnhorough Fund. 

Italian cantatas by Scarlatti and others, 17th cent. 

Proserpina Rapita, drama with music, by Antonio Ottoboni, 
1713. 3 vols. From the Farnhorough Fund. 

Confitebor by Antonio Lotti. 

An organ-book, 1724, containing anthems by Tallis and others. 

Two operas by J. F. Lampe, circ. 1732. 

Concerto Buffo by W^ilhelm Bach, autograph. 

Treatise on the construction of flutes, in the autograjjh of 
Theobald Boehm. Presented hy the executors of Christopher Welch, 
Esq. 



Julius P. Gilson. 



DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL PRINTED BOOKS AND MSS* 



Department of Oriental Printed Books and MSS. 



Arrangement arid Cataloc/uing. — The number o£ the sheets o£ the 
Catalogue of Persian Printed Books sent to press in 1919 was 1. 

The number of Titles written for the Catalogues is : — Arabic, 
109 ; Assamese, 26 ; Bengali, 435 : Burmese, 73 ; Chinese, 92 
Gujarati, 404 ; Hebrew, 155 ; Hindi, 578 ; Hindustani, 178 
Japanese, 39 ; Javanese, 4 ; Kachin, 5 ; Kanarese, 188 ; Karen, 21 
Kashmiri, 15 ; Kond, 2 ; Kurdish, 3 ; Lahu, 3 ; Malay, 62 
Malayalam, 67 ; Maltese, 2 ; Marathi, 284 ; Mardia, 2 ; Mundari, 8 
Naoa, 5; Oriya, 110; Pali, 45; Panjabi, 16; Persian, 1,203 
Prakrit, 102 ; Sanskrit, 816 ; iSantali, 11 ; Sindhi, 2 ; Sinhalese 
33 ; Syriac, 6 ; Talaing, 6 ; Tamil, 721 ; Telugu, 551 ; Tibetan 
39 ; Tulu, 3 ; Turkish, 11 ; Total, 6,453. 

One thousand four hundred and thirty-four Chinese MSS. have 
been catalogued for the Hand-list of the Stein Collection. 

Thirty-seven short descriptions of MSS. have been entered in the 
Descriptive List, the Register, and the Classed Inventory. 

Twenty-five MSS. (4,832 folios) and one printed book (128 
folios) have been folioed. 

Binding. — The number of Printed Books and MSS. sent to the 
binders is : — Arabic, Persian, and Hindustani Books, 16 ; Armenian 
Books, 3 ; Chinese Books, 3 ; Coptic Books, 1 ; English Books, 1 ; 
Hebrew Books, 29 ; Javanese Books, 1 ; Malay Books, 1 ; Books 
in Sanskrit and other Indian languages, 189 ; Syriac Books, 1 ; 
Tibetan Books, 1 ; Turkish Books, 1 ; MSS., 314. 

Students. — The number of visits of Students to the MS. Students' 
Room during the year is 888. The number of Oriental MSS. used 
by them is 2,403, and the number of Oriental Printed Books used in 
the Reading Room 3,386. 

Photography . — Fifty-nine applications have been made to photo- 
graph books and MSS. in this Department. 

Additions. — The number of volumes, etc., added to the collections 
of the Department during the year (exclusive of the Stein Collection) 
is 2,768, of which 2,361 are Printed Books and 407 are MSS. 

Of the Printed Books, 57 were bought ; 2,059 were received 
under the India Copyright Act ; 99 were received under the Colonial 
Copyright Acts from Ceylon and Hongkong ; and 146 were 
presented. Of the MSS., 398 were bought and the remainder 
presented. 



24 . ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The MSS. are as follows :— 

Arabic ------ 298 

Chinese _--.--- 3 

Hindustani _ _ _ - _ 1 

Kurdish - _ _ _ - 1 

Pali ------ 2 

Persian - - - - - - 96 

Persian and Turkish - - _ 1 

Sanskrit - _ _ _ _ 2 

Shan ------ 1 

Sinhalese _ - _ - - 1 

Turkish - - - _ _ 1 

Total - _ - - 407 

The Stein Collection, comprising a portion of the MSS. brought 
home by Sir M. Aurel Stein, K.C.I.E., from his second expedition 
to Chinese Turkestan, consists of about 6,000 Chinese rolls and 
documents and a considerable number of documents and literary 
fragments in Prakrit, Sanskrit, and local languages. 
The most important acquisitions are : — 

Arabic MSS. — (1) A MS. on vellum, containing an apparently 
unknown Arabic version of the Acts of the Apostles, v. 2. to end, 
and of the Catholic Epistles. 9-lOth century. 12° . 

(2) Mujmil al-iughah, a lexicon by Ahmad b.al-Faris al-Kazwini. 
10th century (possibly older). Fol. 

(3) Jana al-jannatain, a lexicon by Fakhr al-Din Abu al-Ma'ali 
Muh.b.al-Mas'ud al-Kassam. Copied A. H. 593 (A.D. 1197). 8^. 
No other copy seems to be on record. 

(4) Dlwan or poems of Ahmad b.Muh.Abu Bakr Nasih al-Din 
Arrajani, Ahmad b.Muh.b.Fadil b.'Abd al-Khalik al-Katib, and 
al-Khalil Muh.b.Zaid al-Khaziz. 12-13th century.' 8°. Contents 
are partly unknown. 

(5) Akrabadin or pharmacopoeia of Baghdad, by Abu al-Hasan 
Hibat Allah b.Sa'id. Copied a.h. 625 (a.d. 1228). 8°.' No 
other complete copy appears on record. 

(6) Kuwa al-adwiyah, another pharmaco])oeia by the same 
author. Copied a.h. 654 (a.d. 1256). 8°. No other copy seems 
to be known. 

(7) Shara'i' al-islam, a standard manual of Shi'ah jurisprudence 
by Ja'far b.Muh.al-Hilli, in the author's handwriting, with mar- 
ginal notes by another writer. Copied a.h. 662 (a.d. 1264). 
Extremely valuable. 

(8) A cyclopaedia of physics, ethics, and metaphysics, styled in 
the last section Bayan al-haldc, and wanting the end of pt. 1 and 
beginning of pt. 2. 13th century. Fol. Otherwise unknown. 

(9) Al-Mukhtar, the dlwan or poems of Kadi al-Sa'id Abu 
al-Kasim Hibat Allah b.Kadi al-Rashid Abu al-Fadl Ja'far ibn 
Sana al-Mulk. 13th century. 8°. Very rare. 



DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL PRINTED BOOKS AND MSS. 25 

(10) Sunan, the Traditions o£ Muhammad compiled by Abu 
Da'iid Sulaiman al-Sijistani, in 10 juz\ 13th century. Fol. 

(11) Majazat al-Kur'an, an exposition of the metaphors and 
other figures o£ speech used in the Kur'an, by al-Shari£ Rida 
Muh.b.al-Husain al-MCisawi. 13th century. 12°. No copy seems 
to be recorded. 

(12) Ru'us al-masa'il, a catechism on fundamentals of Islam. 
13-14th century. 12°. Apparently otherwise unknown. 

(13) Lives of Muhammad, his relatives of the tribe of Kuraish, 
and others, by Muh.b.Sa'id b.'Ali ibn al-Hajjaj. Copied a.h. 728 
(a.d. 1328). 4°. Apparently not known. 

(14) Zubdat al-fikrah, a history of Islam down to a.d. 724, by 
al-Amir Rukn al-Din Baibars al-Mansiiri al-Dawadar. Vol. 3, from 
42 to 121 A.H. 14th century. 8°. No other copy of vol. 3 
seems to be on record. 

(15) Tahdib al-kamal, being Ibn al-Naj jar's Kitab al-kamal, 
biographies of Traditionists, revised and greatly augmented by 
al-Mizzi. Vol. 1. 14-1 5th century. 4°. Very scarce. 

(16) Diwan of Muh.ibn al-Ablah. Copied a.h. 881 (a.d.. 
1476). 8°. No other complete copy of this collection of poems 
seems to be known. 

(17) Matalib al-su'ul, lives of descendants of Muhammad. 
Copied A.H. 941 (a.d. 1534-5). 8°. No copy appears* to be 
recorded. 

(18) A history of the 'Abbilsl Caliphs from Harun al-Rashid to 
Mutawakkil, by an anonymous Tunisian author ; with appendices on 
the Governors of Tunis under the 'Abbasis, etc. 18th century. 
4°. Not otherwise known. 

(19) Diwan or poems of Ghulam 'Ali Azad, styled Hassan i 
Hind. 18th century. 8°. Apparently not on record. 

(20) Al-Tiraz, a lexicon by 'Ali Sadr al-Din al-Husaini 
al-Hasani. Copied a.h. 1277 (a.d. 1860-61). Fol. Apparently 
not otherwise known. 

C/miese MSS. and Books.— (1) About 6,000 MSS. and prints of 
religious and secular literature, documents, etc., acquired by Sir 
M. Aurel Stein in the course of his second expedition to Chinese 
TuKkestan. 

Persian MSS. — (1) A work on Moslem theology and ethics, 
composed about 500 a.h. 13th century. 4°. Apparently other- 
wise unknown. 

(2) Kulliyat or Divan, the collected poems of Khvaju. Copied 
a.h. 970. 4°. Contains some poems of great rarity. 

(3) Kitab al-bahirah, an encyclopfedia of history, biography, 
etc., by Fuzimi Astarabadi. Copied a.h. 1263 (a.d. 1847). Fol. 
Extremely rare. 



26 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

(4:) Vaka'i', a metrical history of Muhammad, 'Ali, Fatimah, 
Hasan, Husain, etc., by Raji Kirmani. Copied a.h. 1263 (a.d. 
1847). *Fol. Exceedingly rare. 

(5) Si fasl, poems by 'Attar. Copied a.h. 1298 (a.d. 1881). 
12'-\ Apparently not otherwise known. 

(6) Silsilah i salatin i 'usmaniyyah, a history of the Ottoman 
Sultans from the fomidation of the dynasty to 725 A.H., by Khair 
Uilah Efendi. 19th century. 8°. Extremely rare. 

Persian and Turkish MS. — (1) The Masnavi poem of Sultan 
Valad, a Persian exposition of his father Jalal al-Din Rami's mystic 
poem Masnavi i ma'navi (including in pt. 1, which is usually styled 
Rabab-namah, 156 verses in Seljuk Turkish). Copied a.h. 965 
(a.d. 1558). 8^. Rare and valuable. 

Sanskrit MS. — (1) Bhagavata-purana, written on a roll of thin 
Indian paper 3|- inches wide, richly illuminated and profusely 
illustrated. About 1780 a.d. Beqaeatlied hy Miss M. Winter (from 
the Hastings Papers). 



L. I). Barnett. 



department of prints and drawings. 27 

Department of Prints and Drawings. 
I. — Arrangement and Cataloguing, Sfc. 

Arrangement. — 188 drawings and 2,088 prints recently acquired 
liave been incorporated with the divisions of the collection to which 
they severally belong. 

133 Dutch and Flemish drawings from the Malcolm collection 
have been placed with the drawings by the same artists that were 
previously in the collection. The Malcolm collection is thereby 
completely incorporated with the other drawings. 

41 books of drawings and prints have been placed. 

The etchings and engravings by Le Clerc, Picart and Eidinger 
have been re-arranged, after the addition of numerous specimens 
presented in 1917 by Lady Lucas. 

A selection of engravings of the French school printed in 
colours has been mounted and arranged in ten solanders as the first 
instalment of a new series of select colour prints. 

The work of mountino- and lettering the Select Mezzotints of 
the Cheylesmore collection has been completed. 

Aquatints of the Dutch, Flemish and German schools have been 
separated from etchings, as the first instalment of a new series of 
aquatints placed as a separate class. 

The drawings by Diirer have been marked with the numbers of 
Lippmann's publication ; the drawings of Rembrandt and his 
school with the numbers of the catalogue by Mr. A. M. Hind ; and 
the etchings of Whistler with the numbers and dates of Mr. E. G. 
Kennedy's catalogue. 

The work of re-arranging the engravings by Raimondi in the 
order of Bartsch has been begun. 

Catalogues and Indexes. — Work has been resumed on the 
catalogue of Dutch and Flemish Drawings, and study of the 
drawings by Rubens for this purpose is in progress. 

Work has been resumed on the catalogue of British engraved 
portraits, and the preparation of the fifth volume is in progress. 

The work of indexing foreign portraits contained in books of 
prints has been continued. 

The work of inserting the new references to case, shelf and 
number in the indexes of artists has been continued, and this has 
now been completely done with the exception of the German index. 
An index of painters and engravers represented in the Lucas 
collection has been completed. 

ExJiihition. — The exhibition gallery remained closed throughout 
the year. 

Registration. — 4,244 items have been entered in the Register of 
Acquisitions. 



28 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Stamping ani Mounting. — 4,498 drawings, prints, &c,, recently 
acquired, have been impressed with the departmental stamp and 
references to the Register. 

186 drawings have been mounted. 

128 select colour prints of the French school have been mounted. 

55 etchings by Sir Charles Holroyd, 38 woodcuts by L. Rodo, 
9 etchings and lithographs by R. Schwabe, and other prints by 
modern artists in smaller numbers have been mounted. 

Numerous prints and drawings have been mended and cleaned. 

Students. — The total number of visitors admitted to the Print 
Room during the year ended December 31st, 1919, was 2,588. 

Photographing. — 142 applications were made for leave to photo- 
graph, and 744 photographs were taken. 

II. — Acquisitions. 

The total number of prints, drawings, books, &c., acquired 
during the year was 3,237. The most important acquisition was 
that of a selection of fine and rare engravings and woodcuts of the 
Italian, German, Flemish and French Schools from the collection at 
Northwick Park, Worcestershire, formed in the first half of the 19th 
century by Lord Northwick. These are mentioned, with other 
acquisitions, under the various schools. 

Italian School. 
Drawings. 

Parentino, Bernardo. Composition in the style of an antique 
I'elief ; captives seated beneath a trophy of arms, and Victory 
writing on a shield (a companion drawing, of similar subject, is 
in Christ Church Library, Oxford) ; pen and ink. Fresented by 
the late Sir Edward Poi/nter, Bart., P.R.A. 

Piazzetta, Giovanni Battista. Group of figures ; black chalk. 
Presented hi/ A. G. B. Russell, Esq., Rouge Croix. 

Engravings. 

Anonymous, 15th Century. A white horse rearing, and a 
draped female statute ; with the initials F. A., probably not a 
signature. From the Sykes, Lloyd and Northwick collections. 
One other impression is known, at Rome. 

Anonymous, Milanese School (after Zoan Andrea). Two upright 
panels of ornament, copies of B. xiii. 308, 27 and 309, 30. 
Northwick collection, 

Barbari, Jacopo de. The Sacrifice to Priapus, B. 21. Northwick 
collection. 

Brescia, Giovanni Antonio da. Trophy of arms, undescribed. 
Panel of ornament inscribed " Victoria Augusta," after Nicoletto da 
Modena, also undescribed, but Bartsch (xiii. 330, 22) describes a 
woodcut copy of this engraving. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 29 

Oampagnola, Domenico. Martyrdom of St. Catherine, B. 6. 
Very fine impression. Sykes, Lloyd and Northwick collections. 

Caraglio, Jacopo. The Rape of the Sabines, after Bandinelli, 
B. 63 ; the rare unfinished state, from the Spencer collection. 

Modena, Nicoletto da. Neptune, B. 49. Sykes, Lloyd and 
Northwick collections. 

Monogrammist H. F. E. Christ disputing with the Doctors, 
B. 2, dry-point ; very fine early impression. Buckingham and 
Northwick collections. 

Montagna, Benedetto (after). Shepherd blowing a horn. Copy 
in reverse of B. 27. Northwick collection. 

Raimondi, Carlo. Potrait of the engraver Toschi ; proof before 
letters. Presented hy Campbell Dodgson, Esq., C.B.E. 

Robetta, Christofano. St. Laurence, not described by Bartsch. 
Storck, Sykes, Lloyd and Northwick collections. 

Uberti, Lucantonio degli. Virgin and Child between two 
Saints. Pass. v. 69, 67. Lloyd and Northwick collections. 

Etchings. 

Tiepolo, Giovanni Battista. 40 etchings, chiefly from the " Vari 
Capricci " and " Scherzi di Fantasia." The latter set was hitherto 
imperfectly represented in the department, which now possesses, 
with the addition of this gift, all of Tiepolo's etchings in at least one 
state. Presented hy C. H. SJiannon, Esq., A.R.A. 

Tiepolo, Giovanni Domenico. 13 etchings, partly original, 
partlv after the elder Tiepolo. Presented by Charles Shannon, Esq., 

a.e'^.a. 

Woodcuts. 

Andreani, Andrea. The Triumph of the Faith, after Titian ; 
large framed woodcat in eight sheets (first edition of this version of 
the subject) from the Poynter collection. Presented by Messrs. P. 
4" E. Colnaghi nd Ohach. 

Jacobus (Argentoratensis) . The Madonna enthroned between 
St. Sebastian and St. Roch, after Benedetto Montagna. Large and 
exceedingly rare woodcut, of which there is another impression at 
Paris. Pass. v. 159, 58. Buckingham and Northwick collections. 

Ruina, Gasparo. A battle, undescribed. Lloyd, Ottley and 
Northwick collections. 

Vecellio, Cesare. The Doge and Signoria of Venice giving 
audience to an ambassador. Signed C. V. ; published by Ludovico 
Ziletti, 1575. Described by Nagler as being after Tintoretto. 
Bequeathed by Sir Edward Poynter, Bart., P.R.A. 

Prints arranged to illustrate the works of Masters. 

Tiepolo, Giovanni Battista. Christ falling under the weight of 
the cross. Engraved by Giuliano Giampiccoli. Presented by 
Charles Shannon, Esq., A.R.A. 



30 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

German School. 
Drawings. 

Durer, Albrecht. Christ as Man o£ Sorrows ; pen and ink- 
From the Hebich and Locker-Lampson collections. 

Engravings. 

Anonymous, 15th- century. Christ before Pilate, with the 
scourging and crowning with thorns in the background. Undescribed, 
but belonging to a Passion set mentioned by Lehrs in Repertorium,. 
fur Kunstwissenschaft, xiv. 207. Balmanno and Northwick col- 
lections. 

Anonymous, in the manner of B. Beham. Small ornament 
print with two female torsos. Undescribed. 

Anonymous "little master." 1 Judgment of Paris. Undescribed. 

Master E. S. Virgin and Child, Lehrs 67. Very fine im- 
pression of an engraving otherwise known only in the Albertina. 
SS. Philip and James, Lehrs 96. S8. Bartholomew and Matthew, 
Lehrs 98. St. Michael, Lehrs 152. All from the Northwick 
collection. 

Master B. S. (" Barthel Schon.") Wild woman and child, 
undescribed. Buckingham and Northwick collections. 

Meckenem, Israhel van. SS. Cosmas and Damian. B. 180. 
Very rare ; fine impression of the first state. Bequeathed by A. G. 
W. Murray, Esq. The lovers, B. 181 ; woman spinning, B. 183 ; 
both from the Northwick collection. 

Mey, Raphael de. The temptation of St. Anthony, after 
Schongauer. Northwick collection. 

Five engravings by German artists of the 16 th century known 
only by their monograms. From the Northwick collection. 

EtcMngs. 

J. E. Ridinger. Five of a series of large etchings of animals. 
Thienemann 187—189, 192, 194. 

Woodcuts. 

A wooden box ornamented with coloured German woodcuts of 
the early 16th century ; a manner of applying such prints of which 
the Department has hitherto possessed no example. Presented hy 
V. Koch, Esq. 

Two original wood-blocks by Diirer : The Martyrdom of the 
10,000 Christians, B. 117, and " Ercules," B. 127. Presented hy 
Junius S. Morgan, Esq. 

Anonymous, 15th century. The Mass of St. Gregory, coloured, 
with long xylographic text ; undescribed, but Schreiber 1460, at 
Munich, is a copy of this, omitting many details. Northwick, 
collection. 



1 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 31 

Anonymous, in the style o£ Diirer, early 16th century. The 
Lamentation for Christ, a very important undescribed woodcut in 
perfect preservation. Northwick collection. 

Baldung, Hans. Christopher, Margrave of Baden, 1511. B. 59. 
Mariette and Northwick collections. 

Baldung, Hans (after). Rare copy of a still rarer original wood- 
cut of the arms of the Baldung family. 

Baldung, Hans (wrongly attributed to). Christ as the Light of 
the World, Meyer's Kiinstler-Lexikon, II. 631, No. 43. 

Beham, Hans Sebald. The Feast of Herodias, Pauli 832 ; the 
only known impression of the finished state with the address of 
Albrecht Glockendon. North wick collection. 

Burgkmair, Hans. The Emperor Maximilian, equestrian por- 
trait, B. 32, printed in two colours. Northwick collection. Five 
of the Seven Virtues, B. 48-54, completing the set (modern im- 
pressions). 

Cranach, Lucas (School of). Lions and hares. 

Diirer, Albrecht (School of). The Sacred Monogram and four 
Saints, described " Der Titel Des Creutzs in drey sprach." 

Schalifelein, Hans. A battle ; portion of a large woodcut, B.. 
102. 

Traut, Wolf. The Nativity, 1511, and twelve scenes from the- 
Passion. Pass. III. 206, 265 ; the complete sheet. 

W^echtlin, Hans. St. Jerome, undescribed. 

Schools of the Netherlands. 



D 



rawing s. 



Anonymous, ca. 1540. The Rape of the Sabines ; pen and ink 
with indigo wash. 

Bloemen, J. F. van (" Orizzonte "). Nine landscape com- 
positions introducing monuments of Ancient Rome ; pen and ink. 
Presented by W. Barclay Squire, Esq., F.S.A., through the National 
Art- Collections Fund. 

Dupont, Pieter. Study of a cart horse ; charcoal. 

Laer, Pieter van (" Bamboccio "). Turkey and ducks. Black 
chalk and Indian ink wash. 

Rubens, Petrus Paulus. Study of an antique cameo ; pen and 
bistre, signed — the drawing has been engraved. 

Saftleven, Herman. View in Utrecht ; red chalk and bistre 
wash. 

Visscher, Nicolaes Jansz. Execution of the Gunpowder Plot 
conspirators ; pen and bistre, with bistre wash ; original sketch for 
the highly finished etching of the subject by Visscher. 

Engravings. 

Allaert Claesz. Ornament print in two compartments with the 
Virgin and Child and St. Anne, undescribed. St. Mary Magdalen, 
undescribed. Cleopatra, Aum. 104. Winged female figure with 



32 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

sceptre, and Cupids. Auin. 118, second state. All from the North- 
wick collection. 

Coornhert, Dirk V. Hercules and Cacus, 1554. 

Voet, Alexander (published by). SS. Peter and Paul. 



Etchi 



ngs. 



Bauer, Marius. An Oriental Pasha. 

Bruycker, Jules de. Kermesse macabre en Flandre. Presented 
by Campbell Dodgson, Esq., C.B.E. 

Dupont, Pieter. Eighteen original etchings (horses, oxen, land- 
scape, architecture). 

Woodcuts. 

Cornelisz, Jacob. Two of the rare series of the Life of the 
Virgin ; five of the round Passion (B. 5, 7-9, 11) in the early state 
with the dates ; a late impression of B. 11 with border of fruit, &c., 
from the edition of 1651 ; St. John, undescribed, from a rare 
series of the Apostles ; one of the series of Counts of Flanders, 
Pass. 122, with text at the foot. 

Heylen, Gonzales van. Decorative design with bust of Apelles, 
after G-. Maes, engraved for the artist's reception into the Guild of 
St. Luke, at Antwerp, 1694. 

Jegher, Jan Cristoffel. Forty woodcuts after A. Sallaert, from 
a book published at Antwerp in 1649. 

Various woodcutters. Nineteen woodcuts after A. Sallaert, from 
a book published in 1654 (proofs on thin paper), and a series of the 
four Evangelists, after the same. 

All the above are from the North wick collection. 

Delstanche, Albert. Proofs on Japanese paper of twenty illus- 
trations to C. de Coster's " Adventures of Tyl Ulenspiegel." Pre- 
sented by the Artist. 

French School. 
Drawings. 

Corot, Jean Baptiste Camille. Landscape with a figure gather- 
ing wood ; black chalk (study for picture in the National Gallery, 
No. 2626, Salting Bequest). Presented by H. Van den Pergh, 
Esq., through the National .irt- Collections Fund. 

Greuze, Jean Baptiste. Group of three figures, two of whom 
are fighting with poniards ; pen and ink and Lidian ink wash, signed. 

Robert, Nicolas. Six drawings of birds ; black and red chalk. 

Engravings. 

Master C. C. (Corneille de Lyon ?) The Last Judgment, R.-D. 6 ; 
very fine impression, from the Northwick collection. 

- Duvet, Jean. St. Peter and Moses, B. 9, R.-D. 19 ; very rare, 
from the Northwick collection. 



I 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 33 

Janinet, Francois. La baraque rustique, after Ostade, printed in 
colours. 

Robert, Nicolas. Recueil d'Ojseanx les plus rares du pare de 
Versailles, 1676. 

Etchings. 

Degas, H. G. E. Loges d'actrices. Presented by Frank Stoop, 
Esq. Les Blanchisseuses. Presented by C. Ricketts, Esq. Au 
Louvre, Musee dcs Antiques. 

Woodcuts. 

Beltrand, Camille. Portraits of Gerard de Nerval and J. J. 
Rousseau, printed in colours. Presented by the Artist. 

Chalandre, Fernand. Twenty-four small original woodcuts, 
views in Nevers and various subjects. Presented by the Artist. 

Gusman, Pierre. Ten original woodcuts, of which three are 
printed in colours. Presented by the Artist. 

Pissarro, Paul Emile. Eight original woodcuts (landscape, 
poultry, &c.). Presented by the Artist. 

American School. 

Etchings. 

Benson, Frank W. Twenty original etchings (wild duck, other 
))irds, portraits, book-plates). Presented by the Artist. 

Lithographs. 

Brown, Bolton. Thirty-seven original lithographs (figures, 
landscapes, &c.). Presented by the Artist. 

Watson, Ernest. Portrait of Bolton BroAvn. Presented by the 
^\rtist. 

Foreign Artists Resident in England. 
Drawings. 

Loutherbourg, P. J. de, R.A. (A sketch-book 'of 97 leaves, 
containing numerous views drawn on the Thames above London and 
at Althorp, This book was formerly attributed to Girtin, but is 
undoubtedly of earlier date, and there is strong internal evidence for 
Loutherbourg's authorship). Presented by F. Treharne James, Esq. 

Roussel, Theodore. Five pen and ink and pencil drawings of 
Phaethon and the horses of the Sun, and a decorative design with 
stags, used in his etchings. Presented by the Artist. 

Engravings. 

Merigot, J., Colonna Square, Rome, in Carnival time, after La 
Chesnaye, 1804. Aquatint, coloured. Presented by J. P. Heseltine, 
Esq. 



34 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Etchings. 

Legroi^, Alphonse. St. John, one o£ three impressions only. 
Iluine Romaine, first and third states. 

Roussel, Theodore. A collection o£ 114 rare and specially 
selected proofs o£ etchings (figures, portraits, landscapes, ornamental 
frames, &c.), including nine trial proofs of the colour print " Dawn." 
Partly purchased, partly presented hy the Artist and by Campbell 
Dodgson, Esq.^ C.B.E. 

Woodcuts. 

Urushibara, Y. A portfolio of woodcuts of Bruges, after F. 
Brangwyn, R.A., and " The Bridge," a single subject after the same, 
printed in colours. 

Prints arranged to illustrate the Works of Masters. 

Miiller, J. S. Twelve views of the Castle of Herrenhausen, 
1752, engraved by Pars. 

British School. 
Drawings. 

Beardsley, A. " The Toilet of Salome " ; pen and ink. Bequeath- 
ed hy the late Robert Ross, Esq., to the National Art- Collections Fund 
for the British Museum. 

Bone, M. Seventy-one drawings made as official artist on the 
Western Front ; seven drawings of Munition Works ; twenty-eight 
of Naval subjects and seventeen various and minor drawings. 
Presented by U.M. Government. 

Constable, J., R.A. Studies of moor-hens rising from the 
water ; oil colour on paper.. Study of leaves ; oil colour on paper. 
Study of leaves ; oil colour on canvas. Study of flowers ; oil colour 
on canvas. Three studies of water lilies ; oil colour on paper. 
Sketch in a wood ; black chalk on paper. 

Charlton, W. H. Notre Dame, Grande Rue, C^audebec ; black 
chalk. Vieilles maisons. Place Victor Hugo, Lisieux ; black chalk. 
Coucher du Soleil ; black chalk. Fishing boats, Concarneau : black 
and coloured chalks. Presented by G. F. Charlton, Esq., through 
Armstrong College, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. 

Crealock, Maj. Gen., H. H., C.B., C.M.G, Twelve drawings of 
animals in chalky pencil, pen and ink and water colour. Presented 
by Miss Edith Price. 

Dadd, F. Two sketches for water colour drawings ; water 
colours. Presented by E. E. Leggatt, Esq. 

Dadd, R. " General Yiew of Part of Port Stragglin " ; water 
colours. Bequeathed by the late Robert Ross, Esq., to the National 
Art- Collections Fund for the British Museum. "The Crooked 
Path " ; body colour on parchment. 

Frith, W. P., R.A. Study for the figure of Pope in " Pope 
rejected by Lady Mary Wortley Montague " ; black and white chalk 
on tinted paper. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 35 

Hayes, F. W., A.R.C.A. Landscape study in oils. Presented 
by Gerald Hayes, Esq. 

Linnell, J. Portraits o£ Major Sutherland and of an unknown 
lady ; red, white and black chalk on tinted paper. Presented by the 
Trustees of the National Portrait Gallery. 

McBey, J. A series of seventy-four drawings made as official 
artist with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force. They range in date 
from May 28th, 1917, to January 1919, and are executed in water 
colours and pen and ink. Presented by H.M. Government. 

Patch, T. Bacchus and Silenus ; red chalk. Presented by C. 
H. V. Bancalari, Esq. 

Phillip, J. Portrait sketch of Robert Dadd ; black and white 
chalk on grey paper. Presented by E. E. Leggatt, Esq. 

Poynter, Sir E. J., Bart., P.R.A. Forty-seven drawings, a 
collection fairly representing all stages of his career. They include 
sketches for early woodcuts (4), studies for " Israel in Egypt " (4), 
a study for a mosaic of St. George in St. Stephen's Hall, West- 
minster, studies for " A Suppliant to Venus " (3), studies for the 
fresco of St. Stephen in St. Stephen's Church, S. Dulwich (3), 
studies for Ashanti War Medal (4), studies for " Atalanta's Race " 
(3), designs and studies for ewer with the story of Psyche (4), 
studies for numerous later works (12), and careful drawings of 
flowers and trees (9). 

Skeaf, D. Ruins of St. Anthony's Chapel, Edinburgh ; water 
colours. Mill near Fascally, West Highlands ; water colours. 
Presented by E. E. Leggutt, Esq. 

Stott, E., A.R.A. Child carrying a sheaf of corn ; pastel on 
brown paper. Landscape ; pastel on brown paper. Presented by 
Miss A. Dinnage. Study of a cart horse ; pastel on brown paper. 
Studies of hay waggons and horses ; black chalk and pastel on 
brown paper. 

Sunderland, T. A view in the Lake District ; water colours. 
Wastwater ; water colours. Hunsriick, on the Rhine ; water 
colours. 

Tarrant, C. A view of Charles Fort near Kinsale in Ireland, 
1756 ; water colours. Presented by J. C. Lyell, Esq. 

Vincent, Gr. Scene on the River Yare ; pencil. A cottage on 
the edge of an open space ; pencil. A cottage with stream and 
cattle ; pencil. 

Engravings. 

Blake, W. The twenty-two original copper plates of the 
engraved illustrations to the Book of Job. Presented bij H. Linnell, 
Esq. 

Cousins, S., R.A. Portrait of Mrs. Braddyll, after Sir J. 
Reynolds. Mezzotint, Whitman 25. 

" McArdell, J. The Tribute Money, after Rembrandt. Mezzotint, 
Goodwyn 215, fine early state. 

Turner, J. M. W., R.A. Paestum. Original mezzotint, 
Rawlinson 799 b, touched proof. The Mew-Stone. Original 



36 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

mezzotint, Rawlinson 804, unique trial proof. The Medway — 
Thunderstorm with Rainbow. Original mezzotint, Rawlinson 809a, 
unfinished, unique impression. Presented hy W. G. Rawlinson, Esq. 

Etchings. 

Baskett, C. H., R.E. Eleven aquatints of landscape subjects. 
Prtsented hy Messrs. P. Sf D. Colnaglii and Obacli. 

Belcher, G. Two ladies of Walham Avenue, Mrs. Harris of 
Jollop Yard. Preserited by the Artist. 

Bolingbroke, M. Three etchings of animals and landscape. 
Presented by Miss E. P. McGhee. 

Bone, M. Shipbreakers, Genoa. Dry-point ; one of two 
impressions of first state. Presented hy E. Peter Jones, Esq. 

Buchanan, Lt. Col. B. Two aquatints and two etchings of 
landscape. Presented by the Artist. 

Buckler, J. Eight proofs in line of views of English Cathedrals 
subsequently aquatinted. 

Detmold, M. & E. J. Portfolio of eight etchings of animals. 
Presented by Cavvphell Dodgson, Esq., C.B.E. 

Drewitt, F. G. D., M.D. Three etchings. Presented hy the 
Artist. 

Geddes, A., A.R.A. View on a hill with trees and figures. 
Dodgson 28, undescribed early state. 

George, Sir B., R.A. Twenty landscape and architectural 
etchings. Presented hy the Artist. 

Gosse, S. The Fiddler. Presented by the Artist. 

Griggs, F. L. Barnack Church. Presented by the Artist. St. 
Botolph's Bridge, final state. Presented by R. A. Walker, Esq. 
St. Botolph's Bridge, second state. Presented hy Campbell Dodgson, 
Esq., C.B.E. 

Green, B. Two crayon etchings of Chelsea. 

Holroyd, Sir C. Advertisement of the Monte Oliveto Maggiore 
set. Prayer. Presented hy Lady Holroyd. 

Hughes, M. K. Seven landscape etchings. Presented by Miss 
Mary C. Hamilton. 

McBey, J. Seven etchings of subjects in Sinai and Palestine. 
Presented by the Artist. 

Paton, F. Thirteen original etchings of animals. Forty 
etchings after other artists. Presented by E. E. Leggatt, Esq. 

Pissarro, Orovida C. Fourteen etchings of animals (one in two 
states). Presented by the Artist. 

Robins, W. P. Seven etchings of landscape, heads and an 
interior. Presented by the Artist. Ten landscape etchings. 
Presented hy Messrs. P. 4' B. Colnaghi and Obach. 

Robins, M. L. Five etchings of figures and heads. Presented 
by W. P. Robins, Esq. 

Sickert, W. Eleven etchings. Presented hy the ^irtist. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 37 

Strang, W., A.R.A. Portraits of J. B. Clarke, catalogue 46 
and supplement 515, Austin Dobson, catalogue 238 and Emery 
Walker, catalogue supplement 473. 

Walker, F. S. St. Paul's by Moonlight. Presented by the 
Misses Walker. 

Lithographs. 

Charlton. W. H. Five lithographs o£ North Shields. Presented 
hij 6r. F. Charlton^ Esq., through Armstrong College, Newcastle-upon- 
Tyne. 

Nevinson, C. R, W. Wet Evening, Oxford Street, Le Port. 
Presented hij the Artist. 

Shannon, C. H., A.R A. The Tyrant. Presented hy the Artist, 

Woodcuts. 

Blake, W. Two trial proofs for illustrations to Ambrose Philips' 
Pastorals before the blocks were cut down, Russell 30 ii-ix. Pre- 
sented hy H. Linnell, Esq. 

Burne-Jones, Sir E. Summer Snow. King Sigurd. 

Gibbings, Capt. R. Eight woodcuts of landscape or towns. 
Presented hy the Artist. 

Poynter, Sir E. J., Bart., P.R.A. Seventeen proofs of woodcut 
illustrations to " Once a Week," &c. Presented by the executors of 
Sir E. J. Poynter, Bart., P.R.A. 

Sandys, F. Seven proofs of illustrations to "Good Words" and 
'•* Once a Week." 

Prints arranged to illustrate the Vorks of Masters. 

Holmes, C. J. " In Wordsworth's Country." Lithograph in 
colour. Presented by Campbell Dodgson, Esq., C.B.E. 

Hunt, W. Holman. The Lady of Shalott. Mezzotint by J. D. 
Miller. Presented by Messrs. Arthur Tooth Sf Son. 

Leech, J. Three coloured lithographs published by Thos. 
Agnew, 1865. 

Turner, J. M. W., R.A. Norham Castle, Rawlinson, 317. 
Unique impression of steel engraving by P. Heath, 1827. Presented 
by W. G. Rawlinson , Esq. 

Portraits. 

The 246 English and 76 foreign portraits acquired during the 
year include a series of nine engraved by F. Holl, A.R.A., after 
G. Richmond, R.A. {Presented by J. P. Heseltine, Esq.), an 
anonymous mezzotint of Capt. John Elphinstone, R.N., an engrav- 
ing of Charles Albert, King of Sardinia by P. Toschi after Horace 
Vernet, a lithograph of Leopold I. of Belgium as King designate of 
Greece, by F. Kriiger, and a series of eleven lithographs of the 
Orleans family. 

Book Plates. 

Three by E. D. French. Presented by H. G. Weicker, Esq. 
Twenty-one by E. H. New. Presented by the Artist. A 
further three, presented by 7 ho mas Ogden, Esq. 



38 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Collections and Sets. 

A series o£ forty-two reproductions of drawings by J. Constable, 
R.A., in the Victoria and Albert Museum. 

A folio volume containing 605 proofs of etchings and aquatints 
by F. Rosaspina after drawings by F. Mazzuola (Parmigiano). A 
collection made by the artist himself and sold by him to Richard 
Ford. 

A large volume containing 654 drawings, etchings, photographs 
and miscellanea by or connected with R. C. Lucas, by whom the 
collection was made. Presented hj/ Mrs. Henry Millstead through 
the National Art- Collections Fund. 

Six lithographs of the War by F. Brangwyn, R.A. Presented 
hy the Canadian War Memorials O^ce. 

Thirty-two lithographs of the Australian Imperial Force in 
France by W. Dyson. Presented hy the Australian Intelligence 
Department. 

Six lithographs hy M. Bone," On the Clyde." Presented hy the 
artist. 

Six colour reproductions of pictures representing Britain's Sea 
Power. Presented by the Medici Modern Art Society, Ltd. 

Books of Prints and Books of Reference. 

Calvert, F. Lessons on Landscape, London, 1815. 

Cust, L. Eton College Portraits. 

Haelwegh, A. Regum Daniae Icones, Copenhagen, [1646]. 

Lavallee-Poussin, E. de. Nouvelle Collection d' Arabesques 
propres a la decoration des appartements. 40 engravings by Guyot. 

Robson, Gr. F. Scenery of the Grampian Mountains, London, 
1819. 41 aquatint plates. 

Strang. W. Catalogue of his etched work ; supplement, 1912. 
Presented by Messrs. J. MacLehose & Son. 



Campbell Dodgson. 



sub-department of oriental prints and drawings. 39 

Sub-Department of Oriental Prints and Drawings. 
I. — Arrangment and Cataloguing, 8fc. 

The Chinese, Japanese, and Indian paintings, which had been 
removed for storage in the Post Office Tube, were brought back 
without injury at the beginning of the year and returned to their 
places in the collection. 

The framed pictures in the Stein Collection have been labelled 
and arranged in the special cases designed for them. 

The several collections of Chinese paintings, hitherto kept 
separate, have been incorporated in a single series, arranged accor- 
ding to period. The items have all been re-numbered. A similar 
task has been undertaken with regard to the Japanese paintings, 
the Morrison Collection having to be incorporated with the main 
collection. The paintings have been checked for this purpose, and 
the work is in process of being carried out. The prints after 
Japanese Masters have been re-arranged in portfolios. 

Two books of reference and 35 prints, recently acquired, have 
been placed. 

The subject-index to the Japanese collections has been completed. 

A list has been made of the Chinese paintings arranged accor- 
ding to the new numbering. A finding-list has also been prepared, 
giving the correspondence between the new numbers and the old. 

A list has been made of the Japanese paintings in the proposed 
new order of arrangement. 

Corrections in the Index of (Chinese Artists, rendered necessary 
by the new numbering, have been made. 

Additions to the hand-lists of Japanese woodcuts, rendered 
necessary by new acquisitions, have been made. 

A subject-index of the Stein Collection has been prepared, with 
cross-references from Sanskrit to Japanese names. 

A study has been made of the paintings in the Stein Collection 
from the point of view of Buddhist iconography. 

A list of the paintings and woodcuts in the Stein Collection has 
been prepared. 

Registration. — Three hundred and sixty-nine items have been 
entered in the Register of Acquisitions. 

Stamping and Mounting. — Three hundred and eight paintings, 
prints, &c., have been impressed with the departmental stamp and 
references to the Register. 

Thirty-nine paintings and drawings from the Stein Collection 
have been mounted. 

Two paintings from the Stein Collection have been framed. 

One Chinese painting of the Sung period, recently acquired, 
has been remounted and repaired. 

Five Chinese paintings have been cleaned, and four others 
backed and mounted. 



40 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

One hundred and seventy-eight Japanese prints have been 
mounted on sunk mounts and lettered with the artists' names and 
references to Register and Catalogue. 

One Indian painting has been mounted' on a sunk mount. 

II. — A cquisitions. 

At the beginning o£ the year the paintings, drawings, and 
woodcuts allotted to the Sub-department as a result o£ the partition 
of the Stein Collection between the Government of India and the 
Museum, were finally taken over and incorporated. The acquisition 
of this precious series of works of ancient Buddhist art enormously 
increases the value and importance of the collections in the Sub- 
department. 

The total number of paintings, prints, &c., acquired daring the 
year was 477, of which the following are the most important. 

The Stein Collection. 

Frescoes. — Twenty-one, mostly fragments from the Khadalik 
site. The most important frescoes are two compositions, represen- 
ting monks and hermits, from Mingoi, and a standing Bodhisattva 
from Ferhad Beg. 

Paintings and Drawings on Silk, Paper or Linen. — Two hundred 
and thirty-one. These are all part of the treasure discovered by 
Sir Aurel Stein in 1908 in the rock temple of The T]u)u:<and 
Buddhas at Tun-huang, on the western frontier of China. Several 
bear dates of the 9th and 10th centuries, and the great majority 
undoubtedly belong to the latter part of the T'ang dynasty. Apart 
from the Tun-huang paintings, almost nothing survives from the 
T'ang period, the grandest period of Chinese art. Many of these 
paintings show the local styles and mixed influences prevailing in 
the Central Asian regions ; but others belong to the main tradition 
of Chinese Buddhist painting, and the finest of these are of singular 
beauty. One painting in distemper on linen is of the well-defined 
Tibetan type, and is possibly the most ancient specimen now exis- 
ting. The collection includes also some Tibetan outline drawings, 
and part of a series of small paintings of Nepalese type. 

From the point of view of subject these paintings, which throw 
new light on the history of Mahayana Buddhism, may be divided 
into four groups (1) Pictures of the Western Paradise, or Assem- 
blages of Divine Beings, (2) Figures of Bodhisattvas, es})ecial]y 
of Avalokitesvara or Kuan-yin, and of the Lokapalas, (3j Scenes 
from the Jatakas, or stories of the successive incarnations of the 
Buddha, of especial interest from the fact that Chinese costume and 
conventions are used throughout, affording a valuable sidelight on 
the secular art of the period ; (4) Miscellaneous drawings ; a man 
leading a camel and a man leading a horse ; a study of human 
proportions ; drawings of mudnis, charms, &c. 



i 



si]b-dp:paktment of oriental pkints and drawings. 41 

Woodcuts. — Twenty-nine, including one dated with the year 
corresponding to 947 a.d. In some of these prints the same figure 
is stamped repeatedly from a single block. These are among the 
oldest woodcuts in the world. 

Miscellaneous Acquisitions. 
Chinese. 

Paintings. 

Chien Shun-chii (late ] 3th century), e'arly copy after. Horse- 
men escorting- a famous beauty, Wang Chao-chiin, to the Court 
of the Emperor. A roll, painted in colours on silk. 

Chiao Ping-chen. Record of an official tour of inspection, south 
of the River, in October, 1699. A long roll, in colours on silk. 

Chiian-hu (17th century). Figures in landscape. Four small 
idyllic paintings. Presented hy Lieut.- Col. R. H. Whitwell. 

Tsai Han (18th century). Birds on a bough at evening. 
Kakemono on silk, in colours, by a lady artist greatly esteemed 
in her day. 

Li Ken (18th century). An Arhat ; after Wu Tao-tzu, the 
greatest of Chinese masters (8th century), whose work is only 
known through copies. Kakemono on silk, in colours. 

W^oodoits. 

The Money Dragon ; and two sheets of illustrations to romances. 
Three broadsheets, printed in colours ; probably late 18th century. 

Japanese. 
Paintings. 

S5ami (15th century), attributed to. A leaping carp : ink 
painting on paper. 

Ukiyo-ye School (17th century). Three youths. Two-fold 
screen, painted in colours on gold. An early work of the school, 
by a follower of Matabei. 

Woodcuts. . 

Nichiren, attributed to. The god Indra. A large woodcut 
of primitive design, traditionally attri})uted to the famous Saint 
Nichiren, of the 13th century. Presented hy Prof. W. Bateson, 
F.R.S. 

Moronobu. Scene from the story of the Shiuten D5ji. Hand- 
coloured. 

Harunobu. A Flower Seller. An early work, of unusual size 
and extreme rarity. Presented by Prof. W. Bateson, F.R.S. 

Kiyomasu. Two Actors. Print in three colours, of great rarity. 

Koriusai. Two Girls. Atsumori taking leave of his wife. 
Hashvra-kake. 



42 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Kiyonaga. A Child Calligraphist. 

Toyoliaru. A Water Festival. 

Utamaro. A married Woman giving a Scroll to a Girl. 

Hoknsai. Four prints from" the set of " Hundred Poets," 
Nos. 3, 19, 24 and 36. Girls admiring Cherry-blossom. Large 
Surimono. Men and Girls bj a River. Large Surimono. 

Hiroshige and Yeisen. Fushimi ; Ota ; Sekigahara ; Imasu ; 
Kashiwabara. Five prints from the Kisokaido series. 

Indian. 
Mogul School. Painting. 17th century. An ascetic. 

Siamese. 

Pamtings. 

Buddha between two saints ; below, the stages of mortality. 
Divinities of the Zodiac ; below, a scene from legend. Buddha be- 
tween two saints ; below, scenes from the Buddha legend. Large 
paintings on cotton, in colours and gold. Seventeenth century (?) 

Books of Reference. 

Fenollosa, B. S. Epochs of Chinese and Japanese Art. Pre- 
sented hy Laurence Binyon, Esq. 

Foucher, A. The Beginnings of Buddhist Art. Presented hy 
Laurence Binyon, Esq. 

Lange, R. Thesaurus Japonicus, Band II. 



Laurence Binyon. 



i 



DPJPARTMENT OF EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 43 



Department of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities. 

I. — Arrangement, Cataloguing, ^'c. 

Egyptian Antiquities : — 

Many thousands of bags of sand have been removed from the 
Egyptian Galleries, and the statues and other monuments have been 
replaced in their original positions in the Egyptian Galleries. All 
the Egy[)tian stelse have been unpacked and replaced on the shelves, 
together with a number of recently acquired Nubian funerary slabs 
and memorial stones. The stelse of the Graeco-Roman Period have 
been collected and grouped. 

The hieroglyphic, hieratic and demotic papyri, which had been 
carefully packed inside the large stone sarcophagi, have been 
unpacked and replaced in the wall cases in the Carthaginian Base- 
ment, and an exhaustive examination has shown that none of them 
has suffered injury. 

Three hundred and thirty-three cases of antiquities have been 
brought from the Postal Tube to the Museum, and the Rosetta Stone, 
and the choice monuments of the Ancient Empire have been re- 
placed uninjured in the Egyptian Galleries. 

All the mummies and coffins stored in the strong rooms in the 
Basement have been brought up to the First Northern Gallery, and 
arranged tentatively in the Wall Cases ready for the general re- 
arrangement of the Gallery. As many of the dowels in the coffins 
had shrunk and fallen out, new dowels have been cut and inserted, 
and all cracks in the plaster casings have been stopped. During 
the rearrangement all the rectangular and anthropoid coffins acquired 
during the last ten or fifteen years have been incorporated. 

The greater number of the objects acquired during the year have 
been cleaned, and repaired where necessary, in readiness for 
exhibition. 

The damaged labels in the Egyptian Galleries have been 
repaired, and all numbers restored. 

Twelve stelae frames have been made ; several hundred feet of 
mahogany have been prepared for ebonizing ; thirty-eight wooden 
pedestals for coffins have been enlarged, and about forty new ones 
made. Twelve stone pedestals have been prepared and objects 
mounted on them. Eight cartonnage cases have been cleaned and 
repaired. 

One hundred and eighty-three objects have been registered ; 
one hundred and eighty-nine labels have been drafted and painted, 
and numbers have been painted on about five hundred objects. 

A set of eight coloured post cards with scenes and vignettes 
from the Book of the Dead have been published. 



44 accounts, etc., of the british mttsefm. 

Assyrian Antiquities : — 

Many thousands of bags of sand have been removed from the 
bulls, bas-reliefs and other sculptures, and the protective screens of 
steel plates and slag wool have been taken down in the Nimrud and 
Kuyunjik Galleries, and dismantled. 

The bas-reliefs of Ashur-nasir-pal and of the Lion Hunt of 
Ashi.r-bani-pal have been rebuilt into the walls, and the slate and 
wooden framework and the glass replaced. The ]jlinths have been 
gritted and cleaned and the labels restored. No bas-relief has 
suffered injury. 

The Bronze Gates of Shalmaneser have been unpacked and 
replaced. 

Two hundred and forty-three cases of tablets, cylinders, &c. 
have been unpacked and their contents brought up from the Base- 
ment to the rooms leading to the new extension. 

Seventy-six thousand, three hundred and forty-six tablets (k 
Collection, &c.) have been unpacked, and checked and replaced on 
their shelves. A few of the shellac joinings gave way, but other- 
wise no tablet suffered injury. 

Fifteen Table-Cases have been brought up to the Second 
Northern Gallery and their contents replaced. 

Eighty-six cases of Babylonian Antiquities, results of the 
Trustees' Excavations in Mesopotamia, have been unpacked, and 
their contents examined. 

One hundred and ten vases, dishes, bowls, tablets, cylinders. &c. 
have been repaired. 

Eight hundred and seventy-one tablets have been placed in glass- 
topped boxes lined with cotton wool. 

Four thousand and thirty-six objects have been numbered. 

One thousand and sixteen objects have been registered, and eight 
tablets and two texts have been co})ied. 

Students. — About 2,300 visits have been made to the Depart- 
m(mt, chiefly l)y soldiers from Egypt and Meso})otamia, and the 
objects brought by them for examination have been described. 

If. — Acquisitions. 

I. — Egyptian : — 

1. Fine white limestone ushabti tigure of Ba-en-Ra nieri 

Amen, or Menephthah, King of Egypt. About B.C. 
1250. 

2. Alabaster ushabti figure from the tomb of Rameses II. at 

Thebes. About B.C. 1300. 

3. Stone ushabti figure with decorations in green colour. 

Archaic period. From Abydos. 

4. Green okzed faience ushabti figure of Tehuti-artas, son of 

Ant. From Der al-Bahari. 

5. Bronze figure of An-hetep, a royal butler. Very fine 

work of the XXth dynasty. 



DErAKTMENT OF EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 45 

6-10. Five blue glazed faience ushabtiu figures of Pen-ta-urt, 
the scribe who wrote the description of the campaigns 
of Rameses II. About B.C. 1300. 
11-15. Five flat figures, of unusual shape, of a priest of Amen ; 
the hieroglyphs are cut in relief. From Thebes. 

16. Portion of a bronze figure of a Queen, or lady of high 

rank, inlaid with gold. XVIIIth dynasty. B.C. 1500. 

17. Bronze figure of " Horus of the Two Horizons," wearing- 

plumes. Unique. XXth dynasty, 
ly. Faience bead with the cartouche of Nubkaura, i.e., 
Amenemhat II. Xllth dynasty. 

19. Blue faience ball for children. 

20. Ithyphallic mummied figure in the form of Osiris, from 

the newly-excavated temple of Osiris at Karnak. 

21. Burnt brick mould for casting figures of Osiris. Sa'ite 

Period. Unique. 

22. Alabaster unguent vase with the cartouche of Thothmes 

III. on the side and on the cover. B.C. 1500. 

23. Bronze jar, or pitcher, with lotus-shaped handle. 

24. Model of a group of the hieroglyphs for "life, stability, 

and power," for inlaying in a plaque or relief. 

25. Model of the hieroglyph for " field " or " meadow," for 

inlaying. 

26. Solid bronze head from the statue of a priest or high 

official. XlXth or XXth dynasty. 

27. Opaque glass vessel from the' tomb of Thothmes III. A 

rare subject. About B.C. 1500. 

28. Bronze lamp, with the handle in the form of a mouse. 

Late period. 

29. A bronze censer, with chain. Late period. 

30. Blue glazed faience figure of a priest. 

31. Wooden figure of Osiris. XlXth dynasty. 

32. Wooden figure of Amenhetep III. (b.c. 1450), with the 

attributes of Osiris, 

33. Wooden figure of Rameses II. (b.c. 1300), with the 

attributes of Osiris. 
34-39. Six large steatite scarabs bearing the cartouches of 
Amenhetep and Queen Ti. From the Sudan. 

40. Faience pendant " heart " scarab, for laying on a mummy. 

41. Reed flute with six holes, with metal band at each end. 

42. Blue glazed faience plaque with a head of Bes in relief. 

Fine colour. XXIInd dynasty. 

43-48. Six flint implements. Predynastic period. 

49-52. A pair of shell bracelets and a pair of bone bracelets. 

53. Stone model of the claw of an animal. 

54. Massive stone mace-head, with inscription. 

55. Black stone toilet box. XXIInd dynasty. 

56. Part of a large faience ankh, or symbol of " life," with the 

signs for '• serenity " and " stability " superimposed. It 



46 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

was mounted on a stafE and carried in religious proces- 
sions. From the Temple of Tirhakah at Gebel Barkal. 

57. Part of a similar object of fine green colour. From the 

same temple. 

58. Red ware vase. Archaic period. From Abydos. 
59, 60. Two bronze lamps. Late period. 

61. Hard stone figure of a frog. Archaic period. From 

Abydos. 

62. Figure of the Ba-bird, i.e., Soul-bird, with outstretched 

wings. From the Sudan. 

63. Bronze figure of Ra, with disk. From a statue. 

64. Portion of an alabaster statue of a prince or king. 

65. End of a bronze bolt from a door, with the end in the 

form of a lion's head. XXVIth dynasty. 

66. Bronze toilet box. XXth dynasty. 

67. Plaques from foundation deposits of Thothmes IV. and 

Rameses II. 

68. Part of an inscribed blue glazed plaque for inlaying. 

XXVIth dynasty. 

69. Two stone figures inscribed with passages from the Book 

of the Dead. 
70, 71. Terra-cotta figure and an object in basalt. 
72-75. A carved ivory figure, two cylinder seals, and a " button '^ 

seal. Archaic period. 

76. A gold ring with a sunk cartouche. 

77. A gold ring inscribed with the legend Shai-nefer, i.e., 

" good luck." 

78. Porcelain bead of Seti I., glazed. 

79. Porcelain bead decorated with an unusual pattern. 

80. Porcelain bead decorated with utchats, &c. 

81. Blue glazed faience hawk of Horus. 

82. Scarab inlaid with buds, &c. Xllth dynasty. 

83. White stone head for inlaying in a " heart " scarab. 

84. Scarab of Amenhetep III. and Ti. 

85. Steatite plaque ; obv. Boat of Ra ; rev. lion. 

86. Stone cover of a jar or mould for cakes. 

87. Painted vase (biigelkann). 

88-92. A group of objects of the late Roman and Christian 
Periods, viz., terra-cotta lamp, three ivory objects, 
necklace with ornaments, crescents, bulls, &c. 
93-98. Six fine large wooden combs, with hollow-work carvings, 
Coptic period. 
99-102. A set of four bronze pillar-ornaments from a processional 
shrine. XXIInd dynasty. 
103-112, A collection of ten inscribed funerary stelse of the Coptic 
Period (Vlllth-XIth century A.D.) 

113. Large terra-cotta vase decorated with paintings of fish. 

gazelle, &c. 

114. Large wheel-turned wine jar with hieratic inscriptions. 

XXth dynasty. 



DEPARTMENT OF EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 47 

A group of objects in hard stone dating from the IVth to 
the XXth dynasty, viz. : — 

115. A black granite altar. XVIIIth dynasty. 

116. A red granite bowl dedicated to Thothmes III. 

117. A large basalt libation bowl with four ears. • 

118. Black stone squatting -figure of Ser, a divine father and 

libationer of A men. 

119. Limestone figure of Mes-Ptah, a "' real royal kinsman." 

120. Limestone stele of Tataa. IVth dynasty. 

121. Limestone stele for a whole family. Xllth dynasty. 

122. Quartzite stele with funerary scenes on the obverse and 

reverse.. 

II. — Assyrian : — 

I. A large and miscellaneous collection of antiquities, chiefly 

of the Chaleolithic Period, from the Trustees' excava- 
tions in Babylonia. 

A. Antiquities excavated by Mr. H. R. Hall, Assistant 

Keeper in the Department : — 

From Ur : — 

1. A collection of objects comprising stone implements, 

painted pottery, &c. 

2. Portion of two stone portrait heads in the '' Gudea " 

style. From the Palace of Dungi ; about B.C. 2500. 

3. Four fragments of inscribed stone ; about B.C. 2500. 

4. A good, typical collection of inscribed bricks of the 

kings Ur-Engur, Dangi, Bur-Sin IL, Kudur-Mabuk, 
Nebuchadnezzar II. and Nabonidus from the Palace of 
E-Kharsag. B.C. 2400-550. 

5. Inscribed stone tablet of Ur-Engur. 

6. A group of blue glazed bricks from the temple tower. 

7. Forty inscribed clay tablets, and 230 fragments of 

tablets containing legal and commercial and religious 
texts, which were written for priestly families who lived 
in the dwellings that were erected on the ruins of 
E-Kharsag, the Palace of Dungi. From the reign of 
Ashur-bani-pal (B.C. 668-626) to that of Xerxes 
(B.C. 480). 

8. An Egyptian mould for scarabs, and a group of objects 

from the ruins of the temple tower. B.C. 600. 

9. A group of rude clay figures of men and animals. B.C. 600. 

10. 277 pottery vases and a large collection of fragments 

from graves of the Vllth-Vth centuries B.C. 

11. A miscellaneous collection of bronze and iron rings, 

bracelets, pins, bead necklaces, and a cylinder-seal 
from the same graves. 

12. Iron bit and remains of horse equipment, dagger and 

knife. Vllth-Vth centuries B.C. 



48 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

13. Two silver pins from a grave of the late period. 

14. Part of the brick tomb and the large pottery coffin from 

the same grave. 

15. A group of pottery coffins, v^^ith human bones and a 

child buried in bowels. 

16. Bronze lamp in the form of a lion. B.C. 700. 

From Abu Shahren. 

17. A collection of 739 implements, ornaments, &c., in flint, 

chert, crystal, obsidian, and other stones, found on the 
surface of the desert. Ohaleolithic period. 

18. A collection of 386 fragments of painted pottery ; same 

period. Found on the surface of the desert. Same 
period. 

19. A rude figure of a man in clay. Sanie period. 

20. Fragment of a plaque of obsidian on which is cut the 

figure of a lion passant. Same period. 

21. A collection of 190 fragmentary stone objects. Same 

period. 

22. A collection of 142 pottery cones, sickles, whorls, &c. 

Same period. 

23. A miscellaneous collection of 29 objects and 14 cups and 

vases of the early Sumerian period.. 

24. 28 inscribed bricks of Bur-Sin II., King of Ur, B.C. 

2300. 

25. Gold nail and pendant, copper nails in gold beads, and 

fragment of gold leaf. Sumerian period. 

26. Stone beads of the Ohaleolithic and Sumerian periods. 

From Tall al-'Ubed. 

27. 760 implements, ornaments, and other objects of flint, 

chert, crystal, obsidian, jasper, &c. 

28. 95 small stone objects, &c. 

29. 1,017 fragments of painted pottery, cones, sickles, 

whorls, &c. 

The objects under Nos. 27 — 29 are of the same type 
and period as those from Abu Shahren, and were all 
found on the surface of the desert. 

30. 50 whole and fragmentary bowls, vases, &c., of the 

early Sumerian [)eriod. 

31. Six plano-convex bricks from the temple of Damkina. 

Early Sumerian period. 

32. 56 fragments of stone vases, architectural fragments, &c. 

33. A series of black and red stone and mother-of-pearl 

tesserse from mosaic pillars. 

34. 15 whole and fragmentary pottery flowers with petals 

made of stone and bitumen ; and one bitumen flower. 
35 Limestone torso of a male figure dedicated by Kur-lil, 
storekeeper of Erech, to the goddess Damkina. Period 
of Ur-Nina, or earlier ; B.C. 3500. 



I 



DEPARTMENT OF EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 49 

36. Brown tufa figure o£ a squatting man with a fragmentary 

inscription on one shoulder. Period of Ur-Nina, 
about B.C. 3500. 

37. Copper relief representing Imgig, the lion-headed eagle 

cognizance of Lagash, seizing two stags by their tails. 
Period of the supremacy of Lagash ; before B.C. 3000. 

38. Fragments of two small copper bulls ; before B.C. 3000. 

39. Gold horn of a bull overlaid on bitumen ; before B.C. 3000. 

40. Colossal head of a lion in bitumen, with red, white and 

black stone and shell eyes, tongue and teeth, and 
fragments of the copper mask ; before B.C. 3000. 

41. Fragments of three similar lions' heads. 

42. Smaller lion's head. 

43. Two bitumen panther heads, life size, with copper masks ; 

eyes, teeth, &c., not inlaid. 

44. Five birds' heads in copper. 

45. A mass of copper fragments, pillars, pipes, &c. 

46. Four bricks, one inscribed, from a building of Dungi. 

[Nos. 31 — 44 are all from the temple of Damkina.] 

From Tall Abu Sakhari near Tall al-'Ubed. 

47. Fragments of pottery and flints found on the surface of 

the desert. 

From Tall As-Sulebiyah near Abu Shahren. 

48. Pottery and iron objects, beads, &c., from late graves. 

From NuFAR (Nippur). 

49. Brick of Ur-Ungur. 
Brick of Melishipak II. 
Glazed brick of the late period. 

From Babylon. 

Bronze pin with bird on head. 
Pottery stilt for baking vases in a kiln. 
Various small objects and a fragment of a brick of 
Nebuchadnezzar II. 

B. Antiquities excavated by Mr. R. Campbell Thompson, M.A., at 
Abu Shahren and Ur. 

From Abu Shahren. 

1. 2,000 implements of chert, flint, obsidian, &c. 

2. About 500 rough stone hoe-blades and other implements. 

3. 1,000 fragments of painted pottery. Chaleolithic period. 

4. 119 pottery sickles, and fragments of sickles. Same 

period. 

5. 200 pottery votive cones, nails, &c. Same period. 

6. 15 Sumerian vases and bowls, from burials. Same period. 

7. Miscellaneous vases and fragments. 

8. 6 bricks of Bur-Sin II. B.C. 2300. 



50 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

From Ur. 

1. A miscellaneons collection of stone implements, &c. 

2. A collection o£ pottery and miscellaneous objects from 

late graves. 
II. — 1. A Babylonian contract tablet dated in the 3rd year of 
the reign of Cambyses. 

2. A Babylonian contract tablet dated in the 5th yea" of 

Cyrus. 

3. A Babylonian contract tablet dated in the 19th year of 

Nebuchadnezzar II (?). 

III. — 1. A large limestone memorial slab inscribed with a text in 
the Assyrian monumental character recording the 
conquest of the Kassite king Bibea by Tukulti Ninib, 
king of Assyria, B.C. 1275, who deported his conquered 
foe to his capital, the city of Ashur (Kalah Sharkat). 

W. — 1. Bronze figure of the king Ur-Engur, king of Ur, about 
B.C. 2500, in the character of the priest who presented 
the basket of offerings to the goddess of the city. 

2. Stone tablet with an inscription of Ur-Engur, mentioning 

the dedication of a temple to the goddess Beltis. 

3. A bronze mace head round which are coiled seven serpents ; 

the heads of these project separately. About B.C. 2500. 

4. Portion of a bronze animal with illegible Babylonian 

inscription. 

5. Bronze implement or bolt bearing an inscription of 

Ur-Ningirsu (?). 

6. Bronze spear head. 

7-10. Four bronze axe-heads with brackets supporting the blades. 

11. Bronze axe-head with remains of the wooden handle. 

The back of the socket is ribbed, and each end of it is 
flanged. A rare specimen, B.C. 2300. 

12. Diorite jar for unguents. Nos. 1-12 are from Ur. 

13. Bronze lamp with broken handle. 

14. Babylonian duck-weight, uninscribed. Weight lOflbs. 

From Mukayyar (Ur.) 

15. Portion of a limestone boundary stone sculptured with 

astronomical and other emblems on one side. About 
B.C. 900. 
16-33. A collection of very fine cylinder seals in marble, crystal, 
carnelian, basalt, lapis-lazuli, &c., of the period B.C. 
2000-600. A few of them came from Shushtar. 
34. Chalcedony pebble, with scene representing an adorer 
pouring out a libation to the king. 
35-39. Four archaic stone stamps and a dark stone cylinder seal. 
From Shushtar. 

40. Model of a sheep in schist or steatite. Early period. 

41. Black stone amulet inscribed with the names of several 

gods and goddesses as words of power. 

42. Pendant inscribed with the name of Ashur-etil-itani, sou 

of Sennacherib, son of Sargon. 



DEPARTMENT OF EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 51 

43-62. A miscellaneous collection of 22 portions of tablets and 
cases of tablets, many bearing very perfect impressions 
of cylinder seals. About B.C. 2000. 

63. White limestone object with annules and herring-bone 

pattern ; perhaps a model of a turtle. 

64. Silver bangle ; late period. 

65-274. A collection of 210 "account tablets" from Jokha, the 
site of the ancient city of Umma. They are written 
in Sumerian and are dated not by regnal years of 
kings, but by events, and belong to the period about 
B.C. 2300. They were used by the Viceroy to record 
his various business transactions, the principal medium- 
of which seems to have been copper. 
275-686. A large and important collection, consisting of 412 in- 
scribed tablets of the class which is now known as 
" Cappadocian," from Boghaz Keui. About 300 of 
them are letters concerning sums of money of lead and 
silver. The remainder are bonds for money, notes of 
loans, and documents of this kind ; all these are dated 
by eponyms (limu). The material used is quite differ- 
ent from the ordinary clay of Babylonia, and is red, 
or white, or black in colour. The writing resembles 
that in use about B.C. 2000, and is peculiar to " Cappa- 
docian " tablets ; the ordinary shape is that of a 
" pillow " with a curved edge. The names of Ashur, 
Ishtar, Adad, Sin and Shamash appear in many of the 
names of the contracting parties. 

Presents. 

I. — 1. Ushabti figure of Maat-Ka-Ra, i.e. Queen Hatshepset. 
B.C. 1550. 

2. Green glazed faience ushabti figure. XXYIth dynasty. 

3. Bronze Apis Bull. XXth dynasty. 
4, 5. Two figures of animals in bronze. 

6, 7. Two figures of the god Bes. 

8. A glazed faience ring. 

9. Figure of Ptah-Seker-Asar. 

10-40. A collection of thirty-one scarabs, beads, plaques, &c., 
in steatite. 
Presented hy the Dowager Viscountess Wolseley. 
II. — Portion of the cover of a large outer Egyptian coffin. 
XXVIth dynasty. 

Presented hy Captaiyi Arnold Palmer, R.A. 
III. — Cast of the death-mask of Amen-hetep IV., King of 
Egjpt about B.C. 1450. 
Presented hy the Right Hon. the Earl of Carnarvon. 
IV. — Blue faience figure of Qebhsenuf, son of Horus, and a 
protector of the dead. 
Presented hy Capt. A. French Brewster, 



52 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

V. — A gold plaque on which are cut in hieroglyphs " Ncter Tuat 
Shep-en-Upt," i.e. the name and title of Shep-en Upt, 
high priestess of Amen-Ra at Thebes. About B.C. 740. 
Presented hy Mrs. Margaret Hole. 
VI. — 1. A marble Cippus of Horus, sculptured with figures of 
Isis and Horus ; on the back is cut in hieroglyphs a 
series of magical texts resembling those found on the 
Metternich Stele. Ptolemaic Period. Found at 
Babylon. 
2. Large fragment of an unbaked clay Babylonian tablet 
written about B.C. 650. From Babylon. 
Presented hy Capt. E. Cuthbert Aston. 
VII. — Oast of a Hittite inscription at Jarabis. 
Presented by Capt. J. Martin. 
VIII. — Funerary stele with " Safaitic " inscription. From the 
Sawad Desert. 

Presented hy Miss Gertrude Bell. 
IX. — Wooden model of a mummy in a wooden coffin. XXth 
dynasty. 

Presented hy li. Sidney, Esq. 
X. — Stone cylinder on which is cut a copy of an inscription of 
Nebuchadnezzar II. Modern imitation. 
Presented hy A. R. Pollard., Esq. 
XI. — White marble kriophoros figure. From the ruins of the 
old city of Zuber near Basrah. 
Presented by Col. A. T. Wilson, C.S.L, C.M.G. 
XII. — Light greenish-blue glazed faience ushabti figure made 
for a priest of Khnemu. Saite Period. 
Pi'esented hy General G. W. Biddvlph. 
XIII. — Nubische Texte in Dialekte der Kuniizi by H. Schaefer, 
Berlin, 1917. Presented by Lt.-Col. 'WaJce, C.M.G. 



lilV. — Survey of Egypt. Maps. 


Scale 1 : 100,000. 


1. Tahta. 


16. Faqus. 


2. Sohag. 


17. El-Faiyum. 


3. Suez. 


18. El-Fashn. 


4. Cairo. 


19. Beni Suef. 


5. Ashmun. 


20. Qatia. 


6. Nag Hammadi. 


21. Little Bitter Lake. 


7. Helwan. 


22. Suez Bay. 


8. Wadi en-Natrun. 


23. Rosetta. 


9. Bilbeis. 


24. Fuwa. 


10. Damanhur. 


25. Baltim. 


11. Alexandria. 


2&. Damietta. 


12. Kafr ez-Zaiyat. 


27. Port Said. 


13. Zifta. 


28. Beni Mazar. 


14. Ismailia. 


29. Minya. 


15. Dairut. 


30. Asyut. 


Presented hy the Eqyp 


tian Government. 



E. A. Wallis Budge. 



department of greek and roman antiquities. 53 

Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities. 

I. — Arrangement. 

All the collections of the Department had been returned to the 
Museum from their places of safety by February 10th. 

1. The Sculpture Galleries. — The removal of sandbags and 
other protections was begun immediately after the armistice, and 
the rooms were re-opened as soon as their condition allowed. The 
Nereid and Mausoleum Rooms were re-opened to the public on 
January 6th ; the Phigaleian Room on January 27th ; the three 
Graeco-Roman Rooms during March and April. The Gallery of 
Casts and the Grseco-Roman Basement were re-opened on May 27th. 
All sculptures in the round had been replaced throughout the 
Galleries by June 27th. 

In the Elgin Room the protective covering was removed from 
the metopes in January. The frieze was brought back from the 
Post Office Tube and unpacked during February and March. The 
reconstruction was completed in October. The pedimental sculptures 
were brought back and replaced during May and June. The Elgin 
Room was repainted and completed in November. 

Throughout the galleries the sculptures have been cleaned ; they 
were moved in the Phigaleian Room, the Ephesus Room, and three 
Grseco-Roman Rooms and Basement, to allow for the re-painting of 
the walls. 

Archer's Picture of the Elgin Room in 1819 lias been mounted 
in the Elgin Room. In the Cast Gallery the labels have been 
remounted. Six inscriptions have been mounted ; and six sculptures 
from Salonica have been mounted and placed on exhibition in the 
Archaic Room. The store casts which during the war had been 
exhibited in lieu of the originals have been replaced and arranged 
in the Basements. 

2. The Upper Galleries. — The Terracotta Room was re-opened 
on January 27th ; The Exhibition of Greek and Roman Life on 
March 31st ; the Gold Ornament Room on April 21st ; the Bronze 
Room and Third and Fourth Vase Rooms on April 28th. In the 
First and Second Yase Rooms the vases were unpacked and 
stored in the wall cases pending the return of these rooms from 
occupation by the Registry of Friendly Societies. A temporary 
exhibition of typical vases of the First and Second Rooms has been 
installed in the Third Vase Room. The rings and gold ornaments 
have been rearranged, and the Franks collection has been 
incorporated in the general series. The Terracotta Room Annexe 
has been fitted with additional cupboards. The Exhibition of 
Greek and Roman Life has been rearranged in part, and revised. 

Progress has been made with a Catalogue of Silver Plate and 
with a new edition of the Guide to the Exhibition of Greek and 
Roman Life. A Finding-list for the Gold Ornament Room has 
been compiled. 



54 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

A large series of objects from the Museum of the British 
Salonica Force has been unpacked, cleaned and repaired for 
exhibition. Two hundred and four gold rings have been mounted 
and casts have been taken of nineteen gems. One hundred and 
forty-three vases, forty terracottas, nineteen bronzes, two ivory, six 
porcelain, one lead, two amber and two gold objects have been 
cleaned and repaired. One thousand two hundred and forty-four 
objects were numbered and two hundred and fifty-four registered. 
Three hundred and one labels were written and twenty printed. 

The number of visits to the Departmental Library and Students' 
Room for purposes of research was 368 ; there were 746 other visits 
to the staff for enquiry or on departmental business, and 552 atten- 
dances of students of art and architecture in the Sculpture Galleries. 

II. — Acquisiti07\s. 
I. — Sculpture in stone or marble. 

1. Marble female head in high relief. Ht. •305 m. From 

Gyrene.' 

2. Marble head of man with closed eyes. Ht. .1 m. From 

Seville. 

Nos. 1 and 2 presented by Mrs. Fitzroy Lyon. 

3. Marble fragment of slab xxxvi. of the north side of the 

Frieze of the Parthenon, containing the head and body of 
the rider No. 110 and the head of the horse No. 111. 
Ht. -46 m. Cf. Journal of R.I.B.A., 22nd Nov., 1902, 
and Times of 15th July, 1919. Found in a rockery at 
Golne Park, Essex. Presented by J. J. Dumville-BottereU, 
Esq. 

4. Marble statue of draped woman of 4th century type ; the 

head has been inserted and is now missing. Ht. 1*05 m. 
Found at Zangliveri in Macedonia. 

5. Marble sepulchral stele, dedicated by Arescusa to her husband, 

with male and female busts enclosed in a frame. Ht. 1*28 m. 
Found by the Leinster Regiment in trenches S.E. of 
Aivasil. 

6. Marble sepulchral stele of Alfidius Secundus, with a relief of 

four draped standing figures ; below this a relief of horse 
and groom. Ht. 1'185 m. Found by the Wiltshire 
Regiment in the trenches S.E. of Laina. 

7. Fragment of relief ; draped standing figures and boy holding- 

horse. L. -49 m. 

8. Golossal head, surface much worn. Ht. -45 m. 

9. Lower part of draped female statuette. Ht. -64 m. iVo5. 4-9 

collected and presented by the British Salonica Force, with the 
sanction of the Greek Government. 

II. — Gems and Glass. 
10. Chalcedony scarabaeoid, with intaglio design of Victory in a 
two-horse chariot. Found at Garma, near Jajarni, in North 
Persia. 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES. 55 

11. Gold ring with sard intaglio : Achilles dragging the body o£ 

Hector round the walls o£ Troy. Presented hy L. A. 
Lawrence, Esq. 

12. Turquoise cameo : portrait o£ Tiberius, o£ fine quality. Found 

by an English soldier among rubbish at Canopus. 

13. Steatite lenticular gem with intaglio design o£ horned goat. 

Presented hy C. A. Lembessis, Esq. 

14. Fragments o£ Roman window glass, from the Saalburg, 

Presented hy Capt. E. G. Spencer-Churchill. 

III. — Ivory and Bone. 

15. Base o£ a stag's horn, probably forming the head of a staff, 

worked in the form o£ a bearded head. The eyes have 
been inlaid with ivory eye-ball and black pupil. From 
Crete ; a work of the Mycensean period. Presented hy 
Capt. E. J. Forsdyke and Capt. F. N. Pryce. 

IV. — Gold and Silver. 

16. Grold pendant in the form of a lion's head, surmounted by a 

double palmette. From Acarnania. 

17. Gold necklace of plain and poppy-shaped beads. From 

Acarnania. 

18. Silver-gilt statuette o£ Jupiter seated, half -draped, wreathed, 

and holding a thunderbolt. Almost certainly belonging to 
the great find of silver statuettes made at Macon on 1st 
March, 1760, from which eight other statuettes passed 
through the Payne Knight collection into the Museum in 
1824. See De Caylus, Pecueil, vii., p. 243. Ht. -072 m. 

Y.—Lead. . 

19. Head of a bearded man. Ht. -045 m. 

VI. — Bronze. 

20. Helmet parade mask, of Roman Imperial date. The surface, 

except the hair, has been covered with a coat of white metal. 
Width '275 m. Acquired at Aintab by Major C. L. 
Woolley. 

21. Corinthian helmet, of fine workmanship, with palm'ette and 

tongue pattern. Ht. '238 m. From Karaburun. Presented 
hy the British Salonica Force. 

22. Two handled cup with fluted sides, of the Hellenistic period, 

from Causica. Similarly acquired. 

23. A large number of other bronze or iron objects from tombs 

near Salonica, similarly acquired, including two shield 
bosses ; spear heads, swords, &c. ; fibulae of the Hallstatt 
spiral and other types ; pins, beads, rings and armlets. 

24. Statuette of a gladiator in armour, with arm raised appealing 

for a decision. Ht. -135 m. Greau Sale, 1884, lot 264. 
Weber Sale, lot 185. 



56 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

25. Statuette o£ Cer})erus with heads o£ lion, panther and dog. 

Greau Sale, 1884, lot 850. Weber Sale, lot 184. 

26. Statuette of a Boar, inscribed with a dedication by Myrtine 

to the Theos Sabazios. 

27. Statuette of a winged Gryphon. 

28. Statuette of a female Faun carrying a child. 

29. Plaque with design of a Gryphon. (Nos. 26-29 Weber Sale^ 

lot 231). 

30. Fragment of relief ; Achilles dipped in the Styx by his 

mother and Achilles delivered by Peleus to Chiron. 
Castellani Sale, 1884, lot 283. Weber Sale, lot 172a. 
Cf. Bull. d. Com. Arch. Com., 1877, Plates XI, XII, 
XIII. 

VII. — Pottery. 

31. Cypriote Bronze-age vase with decoration of incised lines. 

Presented hy Mrs. Broadwood. 

32. Attic kylix with the otherwise unknown signature ' Arch- 

eneides.' Van Branteghem and Weber Collections. 

33. Attic red-figured kantharos, with designs of a woman spinning 

and a woman holding an alabastron. Weber Sale, lot 276, 

34. Calene phiale with reliefs from the Odyssey : the Sirens, 

Scylla, the Phseacian ship, Odysseus and Argus. Found 
at Corneto (Tarquinii). Bull. d. Inst., 1867, p. 129, and 
Ann. d. Inst., 1875, Tav. N. Presented hy F. Parkes 
Weber, Esq., M.D. 

35. A fragment of a mould for Arretine ware with design of 

dancing girls, and a series of fragments of Roman pottery 
with relief decoration and pottery stamps. From the C E. 
Norton collection. 

36. A large series of vases and sherds from tombs in Macedonia, 

comprising various prehistoric wares, including a restored 
vase and many fragments of incised ware, and Thessalian 
painted wares ; painted pottery of the Mycensean and 
Geometric periods ; a pyxis of Corinthian style with three 
female busts in relief ; a kothon of black-figure style ; sherds 
of Attic red-figure fabric ; a jug of the Hellenistic period 
with gilt design of a wreath ; and many unpainted vases, 
mainly of Roman date. Also the miscellaneous contents of 
the tombs including implements in stone or bone, glass, 
metal, &c. Collected and presented hy the British Salo)dca 
Force, with the sanction of the Greeh Government. 

VIII. — Terracotta. 

37. Tanagra statuette of a girl holding a fan. Presented hy the 

late Dowager Viscountess Wolseley. 

38. Statuette of Artemis with deer. From Corinth. Weber 

Sale, lot 115. C. Lecuyer, Terres Cuites Ant., pi. B ; 
Winter, Typen, III. 2, p. 163, No. 3. 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES. 57 

39. Group in relief of two women, one playing on pipes, the 

other on a lyre. Weber Sale, lot 117. 

40. Statuette of a girl playing on a stringed instrument. Weber 

Sale, lot 117. 

IX. — Casts and Reproductions. 

41. Model of an Etruscan tomb in cork. 

42. Cast of the face of horseman No. 30 of South side of the 

Frieze of the Parthenon (Acropolis Museum, No. 4865). 
Presented hy M. A. Keramopoulos^ Acropolis Museum, Athens. 



A. H. Smith. 



58 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Department of British and Medieval Antiquities and 
Ethnography. 

1. Arrangement, Cataloguing, Sfc. 

Prehistoric Room. — The exhibition drawers have been overhauled 
and a number o£ additions made. 

Iron Age Gallery. — The arrangement o£ the collections illustrating 
the Early and Later Iron Ages was completed and the gallery opened 
to the public in January, 1919. 

Room of Roman Britain. — The exhibition drawe-rs have been 
overhauled and fresh labels added. 

King Edward VII. Gallery {Ground fioor). — There-arrangement 
of the Mediaeval and of the Ceramic collections, which had been 
packed and removed for safety, is in progress ; the English and 
Italian pottery and the foreign porcelain have been arranged, and a 
temporary arrangement of the Chinese porcelain made. 

Christian Room, and Buddhist Room. — The arrangement in 
exhibition cases of the early Christian collections, and of those 
illustrating Buddhism, has been completed, and these rooms were 
opened to the public in April, 1919. A number of fresh labels have 
been pre})ared for the lattc^r collection. 

Room of hidian Religions. — Some re-arrangement of the Gand- 
hara sculptures has been made, and a number of fresh labels provided 
for these and for the Jain sculptures. The room was opened to the 
public in January, 1919. 

Asiatic Saloon. — The arrangement of the Chinese and Japanese 
collections and of oriental metal work has been completed ; the 
Stein collections from Chinese Turkestan have been placed in 
exhibition cases, and a temporary exhibition of Buddhist scrolls was 
arranged for the Conference of the Asiatic Societies of the Allied 
Nations. 

Accommodation is also provided for an ethnographical collection 
from Uganda, deposited by His Majesty the King. The room was 
re-opened to the public in January, 1919. 

Plaquette Room. — -The arrangement and labelling of the pla- 
quettes has been completed, and the room opened to the public 
early in 1919. 

Ethnogrcqjhical Gallery. — The gallery was re-opened to the 
public in February, 1919. A temporary arrangement of a portion 
of the Mexican and Peruvian Antiquities has been made in the 
Asiatic section. The ivory carvings from Benin, the Hawaiian 
feather cloaks, and the Fijian pottery, which had been removed for 
safety, have been re-exhibited ; type cases illustrating primitive 
currency and methods of making fire have been arranged and labelled 
for demonstration by Museum Lecturers, and a number of additions 
made to the exhibits in the African section. 



DEPARTMENT OF BRITISH AND MEDIEVAL ANTIQUITIES. OU 

Basement. — A complete re-arrangement of the Ethnographical 
collections stored in the basement is in progress. The unpacking o£ 
the collections placed in cubes and removed for safety has been 
completed. The Sturge collection of stone implements has been 
transported, partly unpacked, and stored. 

Registration, 8fc. — The registration of current acquisitions has 
been continued and 1,626 objects have been added including 
ethnographical specimens. A slip catalogue of the Harland gift of 
salt-glaze pottery has been made. Numbers have been painted on 
1,772 specimens, and 428 permanent labels written. Objects have 
been mounted to the number of 771, as v^^ell as a large number of 
rings and ring-impressions ; 105 mounting boards have been papered, 
a number of case fittings lined with cloth, and 545 printed and 
typewritten labels bordered ; 20 photographs have been taken, and 
48 photographic prints made. A large number of ethnographical 
specimens have been examined, cleaned, and remounted. 

An index of the photographs and of the ethnographical documents 
is in progress, two volumes of the register have been indexed, and 
the card-catalogue of the departmental library continued. 

A number of stucco figures of the Stein collection has been 
mounted on specially prepared stands, the model of a Chinese house 
has been reconstructed, and a special case prepared for the exhibition 
of the jade terrapin from Northern India. 

The arrangement and labelling of the collections illustrating 
Oriental religions have been greatly facilitated by the assistance of 
Mr. Long worth Dames, and Mr. Oscar Raphael has given much 
time to the arrangement of the Ceramic collection. 

Two lectures have been delivered in the Iron Age Gallery, and 
one to the Geologists' Association. 

Students. — 804 students and visitors have been received in the 
Department. 

2 . — Acquisitions. 
(1) Prehistoric and Early British Antiquities : — 

(a) Stone Age. — Series of worked flints from the Middle Glacial 
gravel (below the Chalky Boulder-clay) in a sand-pit north of 
Ipswich, described in Journal of Royal Anthropological histitufe, 
xlix, 74 ; and a series of flint implements showing the transition 
from rostro-carinate to hand-axe form. Presented hy J. Reid Moir, 
Esq. 

Large flint palaeolithic hand-axe from Pokesdown, Hants. 
Presented hy W. M. Neicton, Esq. 

Implement of rare form, found 6 feet down in gravel between 
Pokesdown and Boscombe stations, Hants. Presented hy Dr. 
T. G. Longstajf. 

Seven palaeoliths from gravel at Botwell, Middlesex ; two cones 
of Aurignac type from Suffolk, and selected specimens from various 
sites in England. Presented hy G. Buscall Fox, Esq. 



60 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Two white paleeoliths from gravel-pit at Dunbridge, Hants., 
described in Archceologia, Ixiii, 138, fig. 32, and in Proceedings- 
of the Society of Antiquaries, xxiv, 114. Presented hy William 
bale, Esq., F.S.A. 

Patinated celt with traces of polish, from a pit at Heacham, 
Norfolk ; described in Proc. Soc. Antiq., xxxi, 54. Presented hy 
B. Lowerison, Esq. 

Series of patinated flints from below Avebury Down, Wilts ;, 
described in Proc. Soc. Antiq., xxxi, 78. Presented hy Rev. H. G~ 
0. Kendall, F.S.A. 

Series of flint arrowheads, &c. from the Cotswold Hills. 
Presented hy Col. F. Cardew. 

Selection from specimens found at Penmaenmawr, Carnarvon- 
shire, on working site described in Journ. R. Anthrop. Inst. vol. xlix. 
Presented hy S. H. Warren, Esq. F'.G.S. 

Two pottery spoons of the neolithic period, found at Hassocks, 
Sussex ; described in Proc. Soc. Antiq., xxxi, 175. Presented hy 
J. E. Couchman, Esq., F.S.A. 

(b) Bronze Aye. — Bronze blade of narrow leaf form, found at 
Nanmor, near Beddgelert, Carnarvonshire ; described in Proc. Soc. 
Antiq., XXX, 175. Presented hy Capt. G. H. Higsoii. 

Bronze oval razor, perforated, from the Thames at Putney. 
Presented hy Capt. Jolin Ball. 

(^;) Early Iron Age. — Four portions of bronze bridle-bits from 
Carneddau Hengwm, Merionethshire. Presented hy Mrs. Charles 
Williams. 

Bronze bow of early Italian brooch with traces of iron, said to 
be from York. Presented hy Capt. J. Ball. 

(d) Foreign. — Twenty stone implements from gravel and surface, 
found by the donor in South Africa. Described in Journ. R. 
Anthrop. Inst., xlv, 79. Presented hy Major E. R. Collins, I^.S.O- 

Eleven drift-type implements, and ten small black implements 
from gravel at Taungs, Cape Province, collected by the donor. 
Presented hy Rev. Neville Jones. 

Series of diorite implements of palseolithic types, found on 
surface of De Put farm, 42 miles S.W. of Bloemfontein, by the 
donor's son. Presented hy M. Leviseur, Esq. 

Selection from an Egyptian collection of flint implements. 
Presented hy Montagu Porch, Esq. 

Flint tortoise-core found on the plateau above river at Uqbah, 
near Ramadi, Mesopotamia, by Major A. G. Lyell (the donor's son). 
Presented hy J. C. Lyell, Esq. 

Flint flake with " battered back," found one mile west of Rafa, 
Palestine. Presented hy the Hon. W: Lindsay. 

Series of chalcedony cores, &c., from Wadgaon, Nira Valley, 
Poona District, Bombay Presidency. Presented hy G. Keatinge., 
Esq., I.e. S. 



DEPARTMENT OF BRITISH AND MEDIAEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 61 

Large stone implement from Taunghu, Lower Burma, and two 
smaller implements from the Southern Shan States. Presented hji 
W. A. Robertson, Esq. 

Part of diorite celt, found at Kwang-ning, Manchuria. Presented 
by Rev. W illiam Hunter. 

Implements of stone and crystal from the northern (Tamil) district 
of IJeylon. Presented by Principal C. Hartley. 

Series of flint flakes from Dept. Eure, France. Presented by 
M. Ldon Coutil, Hon. F.S.A. 

Bronze sickle from Yillacarrillo, Jaen, Spain (from Grreenw(>ll ■ 
Collection). Presented by Horace Sandars, Esq., F.S.A. 

(2). — y'he Starge Bequest. 

By the death of Dr. Allen Sturge, M.V.O., on 27th March, 
1919, the finest private collection of stone implements in existence 
])assed by bequest to this Department. When packed, the collection, 
including the exhibition and storage cases that formed part of the 
Bequest, weighed about 25 tons, and was conveyed by road from 
Icklingham Hall, Suffolk, during the summer. 

The north-west angle of Suffolk is abundantly represented by 
specimens excavated from clay and gravel or more frequently 
picked up on the surface, to a large extent by Dr. and Mrs. Sturge ; 
and the series from Warren Hill, High Lodge and Elveden are of 
the highest importance. Hundreds of Drift implements come from 
gravel pits in the Thames valley near Dawley (Hayes, Middlesex) 
and quantities from other well-known sites, such as Swanscombe, 
Farnham, Dunbridge, Southampton, Savernake Forest, Bedford and 
Broom. A large quantity had been acquired from Mr. Worthington 
Smith, mostly found in north-east London ; and other collections 
made by Canon Greenwell, and Messrs. Grreenhill, Allen Brown, 
Simeon Fenton, Robert Elliot, Bryce Wright and Thomas Bateman 
were incorporated. 

The foreign section is also very rich, the entire contents of 
many French caves having been obtained from M. Reverdi. Chief 
among such specimens is a Solutre blade from the hoard found at 
Volgu in the Dept.-Saone-et-Loire ; and the French Drift and 
neolithic series are well selected. Scandinavia, Western and 
Southern Europe are adequately represented, and there is a large 
collection from the Swiss lake-dwellings. An ample Egyptian 
series contains some of the best flint work known, and there are 
hundreds of excellent examples from America, South and East 
Africa, and Madras. A summary description in French of the 
whole collection was printed for the meeting of the International 
Congress of Anthropology and Prehistoric Archseology which met at 
Monaco in 1906. 

The unpacking and arrangement of the collection are hindered 
by want of space, owing to continued occupation by a Government 
Department ; and even after the existing cases have been filled. 



62 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

inuny new exhibition cases suitable for the public gallery, and 
sufficient space to accommodate them, must be provided, before the 
public can obtain access to this remarkable bequest. 

(3.) Afiglo-Saxon and Foreign Teutonic, 

Anglian cinerary urn, and a bronze Viking barrel-padlock key, 
both found near Icklingham, Suffolk. Presented hy Mrs. Sturge. 

(4.) MedicEval and Later. 

(a) British. — The Breadalbane penannular brooch, found pro- 
bably in Scotland ; a fine example of Irish (Scotic) work dating 
about 780 a.d. of silver M'ith gold filigree and glass inlay, and two 
discs of trumpet-scrolls on the back ; described in Proc. Sac. Antiq.^ 
xxxii. Presented In/ Sir John Ramsden, Bart. 

Top of a large bronze censer, originally gilt, dating about 1200. 
Bequeathed hy Robert John Steggles, Esq. 

Leaden seal-matrix, 12th century. Presented by Sir Hercules 
Read, P.S.A. 

Embroidery panel of ajjus anglicanum, with scenes from the life 
of the Virgin, 13th century. Bequeathed by Condesa de Valencia de 
Bon Juan. 

Ivory diptychs and panels, 14th century. 

Copper censer in Romanesque style, and copper incense boat.. 

Bronze prong in case, late 15th or 16th century, from Colchester. 
Presented by W. G. W. Lake, Esq. 

Bronze seal-matrix, 16th century, and leaden pound weight with 
portcullis (badge of Henry VII). Presented by Mrs. Sturge. 

Shell cameo with female bust, gold watch by Le Roy, another 
with enamelled case, and three gold chains. Bequeathed by 
Miss A. M. Newton. 

(IS) Foreign. — Iron arrowhead, probably for a cross-bow, found 
in the citadel of Aleppo. Presented by Airs. Clifford Bax. 

Bronze and iron arrowheads, and a leaf-shaped bronze blade, 
from Jerusalem. Presented by Major Paget. 

Brass seal-matrix of the High Court, Republic of Swaziland. 
Presented by C. B. Jones, Esq. 

Two large shells finely carved in cameo with figure-subjects ; 
Neapolitan, 19th century. Presented by the I)owager_ Countess 
Brassey. 

(5) Ceramic and Glass Collections. 

(a) Oriental Wares. — Stone-ware vessel said to be of the Han 
dynasty. Presented by Professor Bateson, F.R.S. 

Chinese pottery vase, with figures of animals in relief, probably 
6th century. Presented by C. T. Loo, Esq, 

Chinese pottery figure of a lady, believed to date from the 6th 
century. Presented by Julius Spier, Esq. 

Celadon cup, Sung dynasty. 



DEPARTMENT OF BRITISH AND MEDIEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 63 

Chinese pottery vase with black glaze, probably 14th century. 
Presented hy Sir Hercules Read, P.S.A. 

Two Chinese porcelain plates painted in blue with the crest of 
the donor's family, and another painted in colour with the arms and 
crest of the same, made in 1731, with photographs of the original 
invoices. Presented hy C. R. Peers, Esq., Sec. S.A. 

Reddish brown pottery vase with traces of blue ground and two 
figures of horses in relief, from Sampsunte, near Trebizond. Pre- 
sented hy M. C. A. Lamhressis. 

Pottery tile with inlaid design on black ground, from Kazi 
Main, site of old Baghdad, destroyed in 1259. Presented hy Brig.- 
Gen. Pope Hennessy. 

(h) Continental. — ^Italian maiolica vase with bust of Giulio 
Romano on side, and scroll bearing his name, early 16th century. 
Bequeathed hy Elton Bechely Ede, Esq. 

(c) English. — Three Wedgwood oval medallion portraits. Be- 
queathed hy Condesa de Valencia de Bon Juan. 

Pottery reliquary (?) in the shape of a high saddle, mediaeval. 
Presented hy Capt. F. Corner, R.A.M.C. 

•A valuable addition has been made to the collection of English 
pottery by Mr. Bryan T. Harland's gift of 120 selected pieces of 
Staffordshire salt-glaze. This ware, which is perhaps the most 
original of our native earthenwares, was inadequately represented in 
the Museum ; but it can now be studied here in all its known types. 
The addition comprises some rare figures, a good series of white and 
some admirable coloured examples, including a number of inscribed 
and dated pieces. 

(d) Glass. — Pigment bottle of the Arab period from Palestine. 
Presented by Airs. C. H. Evans. 

Fifteen specimens of bottles, &c., from a Roman tomb in Cyprus. 
Presented hy Mrs. Broad loood. 

(6.) Collection illustrating various Religions. 

(a) Christianity. — A large series of Coptic antiquities excavated 
at Wadi Sarga near Assiut in the winter of 1913-14, including a 
mural painting with the " Three Children of Babylon " in the fiery 
furnace, examples of architectural sculpture, ostraka, pottery and 
various small objects. Presented by the Committee of the Byzantine 
Research and Puhlicatioii Fund. 

A pottery lamp inscribed in Greek characters, from Elephantine 
Island, Assuan. Presented hy the Dowager Viscountess Wolseley. 

A stone slab of the 12th century with carved decoration on both 
sides, said to come from a church at Miafarkin, N.E. of Diarbekr, 
Kurdistan. 

(b) Buddhism. — An alabaster seated Jain figure found in a well 
in Shahpura, Rajputana. Presented by Col. J. Biddulph. 

A large bronze seated figure of Buddha, from Burma. 



64 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

(<^) Bralimanism. — A number o£ Hindu religious figurines in 
cast bronze, and a silver incense spoon from Ceylon. Presented hy 
Col. F. H. Ward. 

An alabaster head and a bronze hand-bell with anthropomorphic 
handle, from India. Presented anonymously . 

(7.) Oriental and Ethnographical. 

Asia. — Two bronze lamps and a pair of bronze horns worn by 
trotting bullocks in Madras, from India ; carved ivory comb from 
Ceylon ; and an ivory merchant's seal and set of porcelain gambling- 
house tokens, from Siam. Presented hy Col. F. H. Ward. 

Seven ancient seals and intaglios inscribed in various characters, 
from India and Persia. Presented hy Col. H. E. Deane. 

A magic triangular copper plate engraved in Dcvanagari 
characters, from India. Presented hy Miss Burgess. 

A bronze chape with design of birds and floral scrolls in relief, 
of mediaeval Persian workmanship, found in the ruins of old Cairo. 
Presented hy G. D. Hornhloiver, Esq. 

A bronze bowl and cover of mediseval Korean work, found in 
a grave. Presented hy Prof. W. Bateson, F.R.S. 

A bronze seated figure, 16th century, from Java. Presented hy 
Miss Bieher. 

A football with stand and case as used by the Japanese aristocracy, 
and a piece of batik cloth, dyed with Chinese designs, from Java. 
Presented hy Dr. Hildhurgk, F.S.A. 

A silk banner presented to Col. Charles Ellis by the Chinese 
government in 1870, in recognition of his humanity in saving the 
lives of the Chinese City Guard. Presented hy Mrs. Pembroke 
Stevens. 

A series of painted wooden figures, worshipped by the boat-living 
community of Southern China. 

An ethnographical series from the Veddas, (Jeylon. Presented 
hy Prof. C. G. Seligman F.R.S. 

A number of weapons, helmets, and other objects from the Naga 
tribes, Assam. Presented hy Major J. Hardcastle. 

Six woven and embroidered shoulder bags from the Kachin 
tribes. Upper Burma. Presented by L. Lacy Langley., Esq. 

A bow and staff from Ceylon, a powder flask from Tibet, and a 
pipe and other objects from the Naga of Assam. Presented by 
A. W. Fuller, Esq. 

A fire-piston of buffalo horn from the Kachin, Upper Burma. 
Presented hy H. W. L. Way, Esq. 

A blow-gun and bamboo quiver containing darts, from the 
Sakai of Perak, Malay States. Presented by Mrs. A. W. Franklin. 

A number of models of houses, wooden figures, textiles, and 
other objects from Burma. 

Africa. — A number of weapons, paddles and other objects from 
various parts of Africa. Presented hy A. W. Fuller, Esq. 



DEPARTMENT OF BRITISH AND MEt)IiEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 65 

An ethnographical series from the Mwimbe tribe, Kenya Province, 
British East Africa. Presented hy W. Allen, Esq. 

A number o£ ethnographical objects from South of Lake Albert 
and from Ruwenzori, Uganda. Presented by Lieut-Col. E. M. 
Jack. 

An otter-skin tobacco pouch from the Wa-Tusi of Ruanda. 
East Africa. Presented hy Capt. T. L. Phillips, M.C. 

A number of weapons and other objects from Togoland. Pre- 
sented hy Capt. C. H. Armitage. 

A series of stone implements of neolithic type from Zaria 
Province, Northern Nigeria. Presented hy Montagu Porch, Esq. 

A network " juju " dress from Ikom, Cross River, Nigeria. 
Presented hy W. H. Whitehead, Esq. 

A wooden statuette of a male native, from the neighbourhood of 
Lagos, Nigeria. Presented hy Louis C. G. Clarke, Esq., F.S.A. 

A pair of wooden dancing masks, probably from Nigeria. Pre- 
sented hy Dr. F. Corner. 

A wooden standing figure of a Zulu, from South Africa. Pre- 
sented hy Henry A. Pegram, Esq. A.R.A. 

A number of head-dresses of native regiments, beerstrainers, and 
clay models from the Matabili, Cape Province. 

Oceania. — A series of spears from the Northern Territory and 
West Australia, and a carved double head from Easter Island. 
Presented hy A. W. Fidler, Esq. 

A prepared skull from the Augusta River district, New Guinea. 
Presented by C. Steioart Mackay, Esq. 

An important ethnographical series including a number of 
prepared skulls, from the Augusta River region. New Guinea. 

A jade " tiki " from New Zealand. Presented hy the Dowager 
Viscountess Wolseley. 

Two small carved figures of modern workmanship, from Easter 
Island. Presented by Fleet Surgeon W. S. H. Sequeira. 

A fine carved figure of the god " Oro " from Rarotonga, Hervey 
Islands. 

America. — A number of pottery vessels and other objects from 
ancient graves, Peru. Presented hy A. W. Fuller, Esq. 

Three pieces of stone sculpture from Costa Rica, and two pottery 
vases. Presented hy Mrs. A. M. Church. 

A fine collection of South American " mate's " (Paraguay — tea- 
vessels) showing evolution from the simple gourd form, and three 
harpoon heads from Tierra del Fuego. Presented hy Col. F. H. 
Ward. 

A series of textiles, pottery, and copper ornaments from ancient 
graves at Nasca, Peru. Collected hy Dr. H. 0. Forbes, F.R.S. 

The contents of two Indian graves and a totemic figure, from the 
Queen Charlotte Islands, together with a Chilkat cloak from the 
North West Coast. 

A Chilkat cloak with inwoven totemic desio;ns. 



66 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Christy Collection. 

During the year the Trustees have acquired by donation the 
following objects, which have been transferred to the Trustees of 
the British Museum : — 

(1.) Etlinograpliy of Asia. 

A scroll picture of Buddhist divinities from China, and an 
amuletic necklace of carnelian arrowheads, probably Syrian. 
Presented hy Sir Hercules Read, P.S.A. 

A chain mail shirt obtained at the Tartar bazaar in Tiflis. 
Presented hy Major J. J. Darlow. 

A pottery reliquary cover, found on the surface near Amplur 
Pak Bong, Lampun District, Upper Siam. Presented by A. L. 
Queripel, Esq. 

A double skull hand-drum, used in Lamaistic ritual, Tibet. 
Presented hy Mrs. Herbert Godsal. 

Three photographic negatives of a Dyak man wearing an 
ornament called " ampallang," Borneo. Presented hy Dr. C. L. 
Sansom, C.M.G. 

(2.) Ethnography of Africa. 

A series of obsidian flaked implements from British East Africa. 
Presented hy C. W. Hohley, Esq., C.M.G. 

Two shields and a number of spears from the Wa-Kinyikiusa, 
Lake Nyassa. Presented hy T. A . V. Pest, Esq. 

Two ceremonial masks worn by boys after initiation, from the 
Zombo country, lower Congo. Presented hy the Baptist Missionary 
Society. 

A number of conventional iron arrow-heads used as currency by 
the bush people of the Abajali District, Southern Nigeria. 
Presented hy the Director of the Bank of British West Africa. 

A fetish of shells and hair bound with string, probably from 
West Africa. Presented by Airs. Flecknoe. 

A wooden carved figure representing a man emerging from a 
serpent's mouth, from West Africa. Presented hy Capt. P. L. 0. 
Guy. 

A seated female figure carved in black wood, from Mendiland, 
Sierra Leone. Presented hy Capt. Keith Henderson. 

A white metal cup from Zanzibar. Presented hy 2\ B. Clarke- 
Thornhill, Esq. 

A carved wooden cup from the Kasai River, Congo. Presented 
hy Louis G. C. Clarke, Esq., F.S.A. 

(3.) Ethnography of Oceania. 

An ethnographical series from British New Guinea. Presented 
hy Capt. F. R. Barton, C.M.G. 

Two spears with shell and feather ornament, from New Britain. 
Presented hv A. E. Ridsdale, Esq. 



I 



DEPARTMENT OF BRITISH AND MEDIEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 67 

Two painted wooden clubs from the Santa Cruz Islands. 
Presented hy Alfred Fowler^ Esq. 

An appliance for catching devil-fish, made of the claw of a 
devil-fish, from Ysabel, Solomon Islands. Presented hy J. Edge- 
Partington, Esq. 

A wooden hook for catching " lavenga," from Ontong Java, 
Solomon Islands. Presented by C. M. Woodford, Esq., C.M.G. 

Two featherwork bags from the Maori, New Zealand. Presented 
hy Mrs. Frank Morley. 

A wooden adze-handle of exceptional length, from New Zealand. 
Presented hy A. D. Passmore, Esq. 

A woven belt from the Caroline Islands. Presented, hy Mrs. 
Greg. 

(4.) Antiquities and Ethnography of America. 

A carved stone pendant, a stone arrow-head, a finger ring, a 
copper spatula with spherical handle in openwork design, represent- 
ing fighting warriors and lizards, and other objects, from graves at 
Ancon, Peru. Presented hy Louis C. G. Clarke, Esq., F.S.A. 

A carved ivory fragment in the form of a lion's head, found on 
the inter-Andean plateau near Cuzco, Peru. Presented hy Dr. 
H. 0. Forbes, F.R.S. 

A number of stone arrow-heads from Vancouver, British 
Columbia. Presented hy Lieut. -Col. C. E. Cardeiv. 

A shruilk human head from the Jivaro Indians, Ecuador. 
Presented by E. G. Drexel, Esq. 

An embroidered leather band, from the Eskimo. Presented by 
Mrs. Greg. 

A " corvo," or fighting knife, in a leather sheath, from (Jhile. 
Presented hy Dr. Olegario Olivares. 

(5.) Ethnography of Europe. 

A woollen costume consisting of cap, cloak, and trousers, from 
the neighbourhood of Boris Gleb, Russian Lapknd. Presented hy 
Miss Noel. 

In addition to the above donations, the Christy Trustees have 
acquired by purchase a pre-Columbian carved wooden stool, found 
in a cave in the Bahama Islands, in about the year 1820. 

Permanent Loans. 

The following additions have been made to the Collections 
permanently deposited in the Department : — 

A ceremonial dress and silver-gilt ornaments, presented to H.M. 
the Queen by the Royal Embassy from Abyssinia. Deposited by 
H.M. the Queen. 

A number of robes, and head-dresses, and a state sword, forming 
a conqueror's equipment, presented to H.M. the King by the Royal 
Embassy from Abyssinia. Deposited hy H.M. the King. 



68 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

An ethnographical series from Uganda, presented to H.M. the 
King by H.H. the King of Uganda. Deposited hy H.M. the King. 

A series of ivory ornaments and charms presented to H.M. the 
King by the chief of the Ondonga tribe, Ovamboland, S.W. Africa. 
Deposited hy H.M. the King. 

Several pieces of Oriental armour. Iransferred from the Royal 
United Service Institution. 

Charles H. Read. 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 



Department of Coins and Medals. 
I. — Registration and Arrangement. 

1. — Greek Series. 

918 coins recently acquired have been weighed and registered 
and 1,333 incorporated, while 104 casts and electrotypes have been 
incorporated in the collection of casts, &c., of coins not in the 
Museum. Various collections of coins offered for purchase or 
donation have been examined and selections made, notably from the 
well-known collection of the late Sir Hermann Weber. All the 
coin trays in the Greek series have been re-labelled with running 
numbers and the labels of the cabinets containing them have been 
re-written so as to correspond with their contents. The series of 
early electrum coins has been transferred into glazed trays of the 
new pattern. The bibliography has been kept up to date. 

2. — Roman Series. 

438 coins recently acquired have been registered and 504 
incorporated, while a considerable number of coins hitherto classed 
as "duplicates" or "miscellaneous" have been re-examined, and 
souk; of them have been found worthy of incorporation in the regular 
series. The collection of casts and electrotypes of coins not in the 
British Museum has been re-arranged throughout and important 
additions made. Collections offered for purchase or donation have 
b(Hm examined and selections made. The collections of forgeries and 
of barbarous imitations of the Imperial Series have been re-arranged, 
while the coinage of the reign of Septimius Severus has been re- 
classified chronologically and according to mints. A beginning has 
also been made with the re-classification of the issues of the later 
third century. The bibliography has been kept up to date. 

3. — British and Colonial Series. 

4,446 coins have been registered and 3,538 incorporated, the 
large totals being due to the recent accession of the Morgan-Evans 
Collection of Anglo-Saxon and English coins, of the Evans Col- 
lection of early British coins and of the Graham Collection of 
English coins. Collections offered for purchase or donation have 
been examined and selections made. 

4. — Modern and Mediaeval Series. 

1,446 coins have been registered and 2,977 incorporated (in- 
cluding the Dewick bequest). Various collections offered for pur- 
chase or donation have been examined and selections made. The 
Italian medals of the fifteenth century have been re-arranged and 
re-labelled and the German and other War Medals have been 
re-classified according to subjects. 



70 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



5. — Oriental Series. 

469 coins have been registered and 549 have been incorporated, 
while duplicates and unclassed miscellaneous have been re-examined 
and a certain number inserted in the general series. Several parcels 
of coins offered for purchase or donation have been examined and 
selections made. The series of the Moghul Emperors has been 
revised, certain rectifications made and many additional heading- 
cards added. 

II. — Publications. 
1. — Catalogue of Greek Coins. 
Coins of Arabia, Mesopotamia, S,-i'., by G. F. Hill. The text of 
the portions relating to Nabataea, Roman Arabia, Mesopotamia, 
Ancient Persia and Persis has been revised and the introduction 
vi^ritten to that relating to Elymais. 

Coins of Cyrenaica, 8fr., by E. S. G. Robinson. 

Work has been resumed on the catalogue of this series. 

2. Catalogue of Roman Coins. 

Coins of the Early Empire, Augustus to Vitellius, by H. 
Mattingly. 

The coins have been arranged and described as far as the end of 
the reign of Claudius. 

3. Catalogue of Oriental Coins. 
Ancient Indiati Coins, by J. Allan. 

Work has been resumed on the Catalooue of this series. 



III. — Acquisitions. 

The total number of coins and medals added to the Department 
during the year 1919 was 6,301, of which 602 were of gold, 3,328 
of silver, 1,905 of bronze, and 466 of other jnetals. The average of 
the preceding ten years was 2,406. 

The following table shows the numbers of the new acquisitions 
classified according to the several series to which they belong : — 



i 



Class. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Bronze. 


Other 
Metals. 


Total. 


Greek 

Roman 

British and Colonial 

Mediae val and Modern 

Oriental 

Chinese 


507 
13 
22 
36 

24 


854 

364 

1,150 

788 
172 


694 
111 

530 
494 
76. 


21 
1 

25 

412 

6 

1 


2,076 

489 

1,727 

1,730 

278 
1 


Totals 


602 


3,328 


1,905 


466 


6,301 



Of the above 5,249 were presented, viz. 525 of gold, 2,682 of 
silver, 1,592 of bronze, and 450 of other metals. 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 71 

The following is a list of benefactors to the De})artment of Coins 
and Medals during the past year : — 

H.M. the Queen ; H.I.H. the Prince Napoleon ; Admiral the 
Marquess of Milford Haven ; the Marquess of Lansdowne ; the 
Deputy Master of the Royal Mint ; the Deputy Master of the Royal 
Mint, Ottawa ; the Bihar and Orissa Coin Committee, Patna ; the 
Bombay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society ; the Egypt Explora- 
tion Fund ; the National Art Collections Fund ; the Air Force 
Administration ; the Joan of Arc Statue Committee ; the United 
Grand Lodge of England ; the St. Paul's Royal Arch Chapter, 
Boston, Mass. ; More Adey, Esq. ; Captain Amundsen ; Shirley 
Atchley, Esq. 5 the late Colonel W. F. Badgley ; Oswald N. 
Bake well, Esq. ; A. H. Baldwin, Esq. ; F. Pierrepont Barnard, 
Esq., D. Litt. ; Mrs. M. Blake ; S. M. Gr. Box, Esq. ; Edwin 
Bradnam, Esq. ; Major P. W. Browne ; Major J. P. Bushe-Fox ; 
J. T. Chell, Esq. ; John Copland, Esq. ; M. F. Crooy ; H. R. 
Crosthwaite, Esq., CLE. ; Captain S. Culverwell ; Glenn H. 
Curtiss, Esq. ; Colonel H. E. Deane, I.M.S. ; the late Rev. E. S. 
Dewick ; Rev. R. H. Dickson ; K. Dingwall, Esq. ; Campbell 
Dodgson, Esq., C.B.E. ; Edmund Dulac, Esq. ; S. M. Edwardes, 
Esq., C.S.T., C.V.O. ; General Sir Raleigh Egerton ; Sir Arthur 
Evans, ,F.R.S. ; G. Eumorfopoulos, Esq. ; Miss Helen Farquhar ; 
L. T. Ford, Esq. ; Heer M. Frankenhuis ; G. H. Gabb, Esq. ; 
Henry Garside, Esq. ; the Gas Light & Coke Company ; Stephen 
Gaselee, Esq. : Rev. L. Goodenough ; Lt.-Col. C. L. Graham ; 
T. H. B. Graham, Esq. ; Sir Evelyn Grant Duff, K.C.M.G. ; 
William Gordon Gray, Esq. ; Mrs. H. Grogan ; H, M. Hake, Esq. ; 
H. R. Hall, Esq. ; Lt. Herbert Hart ; G. F. Hill, Esq. ; Sir Henry 
H. Howorth, K.C.I.E. ; Miss C. A. Hutton ; T. Jennings, Esq. ; 
Louis Keen, Esq. ; F. C. Kelly, Esq. ; L/Cpl. P. Lanauze ; L. A. 
Lawrence, Esq. ; Capt. W. H. Lee-Warner ; W. Earle Leigh, Esq ; 
Miss Lidgett ; the Hon. W. Lindsay ; Dr. August von Loehr ; 
the London Stereoscopic Co. ; Staff-Sgt. R. Longstaff ; Miss 
Lyon ; George Macdonald, Esq., C.B. ; W. Marchant, Esq. ; P. J. 
Marks, Esq. ; Colonel A. Masters ; H. Mattingly, Esq. ; J. 
Mavrogordato, Esq. ; J. G. Milne, Esq. ; C. Minter, Esq. ; A. T. 
Monck-Mason, Esq. ; the Mond Nickel Co. ; Prof. J. L. Myres ; 
H. Nelson Wright, Esq. ; Henry E. Parkes, Esq. ; Lt. C. E. S. 
Palmer, R.N.V.R. ; Colonel A. G. Phear, A.M.8. ; MandeviUe B. 
Phillips, Esq. ; T. Poska, Esq. ; Executors of the late Sir Edward 
Poynter, P.R.A. ; Sir Hercules Read, P.S.A. ; A. P. Ready, Esq. ; 
R. D. Roberts, Esq. ; E. S. G. Robinson, Esq. ; Maurice Rosenheim, 
Esq. ; Lady Rumbold, (representing the British Section, Berne 
Bread Bureau) ; Mrs. Ernest Schuster ; Edward Shepherd, Esq. ; 
Messrs. Spink & Son ; Maurice Stack, Esq. ; Henry Symonds, Esq. ; 
Lt.-Col. the Hon. M. G. Talbot ; Miss E. M. Thompson ; P. 
Thorburn, Esq. ; J. E. A. Titley, Esq. ; J. Toubkin, Esq. ; H. C. 
W. Tucker, Esq. ; W. H. Valentine, Esq. ; Henry Van den Bergh, 
Esq. ; Dr. Gordon Ward ; Captain A. W. T. Webb ; Dr. F. Parkes 
Weber ; Mr. J. Wilcke ; Howland Wood, Esq. ; W. H.Woodward, 
Esq. ; A. H. S. Yeames, Esq. ; Philip Ziegler, Esq. 



12 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

IV. — Remarkable Coins and Medals. 

The year has been remarkable both for the quality and for the 
number of acquisitions. The bequest of the Dewick Collection, 
consisting chiefly of mediaeval Continental coins ; the gifts by Sir 
Arthur Evans of the collection of Early British and other Celtic 
coins formed by his father. Sir John Evans ; and by Mr. T. H. B. 
Graham of his collection of English silver and copper ; and above 
all the purchase, with the help of a special grant of £10,000, and 
of subscriptions from the National Art Collections Fund and a 
number of private sources, of a selection of the most important 
Greek coins from the Sir Hermann Weber Collection, are the chief 
features in the year's record. 

1. Greek Series. 

The acquisitions from the Weber Collection by donation or 
purchase are 34 gold or electrum, 204 silver and 37 bronze coins of 
all parts of the Greek world, and of all periods from the seventh 
century B.C. to the third century of our era. Some of the most 
important among them are the following : — 

Catana and Gela in Sicily. Two rare fifth-century tetradrachms, 
of unusual style. Presented hy W. H. Woodivard, Esq. 

Himera in Sicily. Silver tetradrachm of the second quarter of 
the fifth century ; obv. Pelops in his car ; rev. the nymph Himera — a 
remarkable study of the archaic draped female figure. Of this coin 
only one other specimen is known, in the Prince of Waldeck's 
collection. 

Silver didrachm of the same period. Obv. Horseman alighting. 
Rev. Nymph Himera sacrificing, with the masculine inscription 
Soter. Similar to the only other published specimen, which is at 
Berlin. 

Mende in Thrace. A unique silver tetradrachm of the fifth 
century ; type : the ass of Dionysus. 

TJiracian Chersonese (Gallipoli). Silver stater of about 500 B.C. 
Obv. Lion with reverted head. Rev. Head of Athena. One of 
the five recorded specimens of t\\(\ earliest issues of the Chersonese. 

Lycceins, King of Paeonia (about 359-340 B.C.). A rare silver 
tetradrachm ; obv. male portrait (?) head ; rev. Heracles and the 
lion. Presented by Dr. F. Parkes Weber. 

Edones of Macedonia. — Silver octodrachm of King Geta, about 
500 B.C. Obv. Herdsman leading two oxen. Rev. The king's name. 
The best preserved specimen extant of a very rare coin. 

Thebes. — Silver stater of the sixth century B.C. Type : Boeotian 
shield. The only known specimen of the stater of this period. 

Thespiae in Boeotia. — A silver stater of the early fourth century ; 
obv. Boeotian shield ; rev. head of Aphrodite, with a crescent in 
front. Presented by Mrs. Ernest Schuster. 

Euboea. — Silver tetradrachm of the sixth century B.C. (some- 
times attributed to Olynthus). Type : quadriga to front. The 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 73 

only known specimen of this denomination. Together with a 
drachm of the same series (type : horseman to front). 

Elis. — Two silver staters of the period 400-365 B.C. ; obv. head 
of Hera ; rev. eagle. On the second, the eagle stands on a rani's 
head. Both are rare varieties. Presented hy Henry Van den 
Bergh, Esq., and George Eumorfopoulos, Esq., respectively. 

Delos. — Two early silver staters, of about 500 B.C. Type : 
Lyre, with letter A above. The only two known specimens of 
this coinage. 

Chersonesus in Crete. — Silver stater of the fourth century B.C. ; 
obv. Nymph's head ; rev. Heracles wielding his club. The only 
known specimen of the stater of fine style, other issues being by 
inferior engravers. 

Cyzicus. — Four fine electrum staters of the fifth-fourth centuries, 
Avith the types of a lion breaking a sword, a lioness, an eagle, and 
the head of Perseus. 

Lampsacus in Mysla. — Five gold staters of the fourth century, 
with the types of Victory sacrificing a ram, head of Hera, head of 
Dionysus, head of Hecate, and head of a nymph. The first two are 
unique, and all five are among the most precious of Greek coins. 

Smyrna. — A unique stater (obv. head of Apollo, rev. lyre), 
proving that the city, which was hitherto supposed to have lain 
in ruins from 585 B.C. to the Hellenistic period, was restored about 
400 B.C., the date of the coin. 

Cnidus in Caria. — A silver tetradrachm of the early third cen- 
tury B.C. ; obv. head of Aphrodite ; rev. forepart of a lion, with 
the magistrate's name Telesiphron. The finest known tetradrachm 
of the period. Presented by the National Art Collections Fund. 

Barca in Cyrenaica. — A silver tetradrachm of the fourth century 
B.C. ; obv. Silphium plant ; rev. head of Zeus Amnion. Presented 
by Mrs. Ernest Schuster. 

Other Greek coins acquired during the year : — 

A rare silver fourth-century stater of Velia in S. Italy ; obv. 
head of Athena, with hippocamp on helmet ; rev. lion prowling ; 
symbol, trident. Presented by Stanley Robinson, Esq. 

A fine didrachm of Thurium in S. Italy of the end of the fifth 
century, having the artist's initial A on the haunch of the bull which 
forms the reverse type. 

A rare fifth century silver tetradrachm of Messana in Sicily, 
with the sequence letter p on the reverse. 

An electrum 1/3 stater of the Milesian Standard, of the 7th 
cent. B.C., found at Calymnos. Presented by Prof. J. L. Myres. 

34 silver coins of Sinope, of the end of the fifth and beginning 
of the fourth century B.C., from a find. 

A rare fourth century silver stater of Aspendus in Pamphylia, 
with the usual types of a slinger and a pair of wrestlers, and the 
additional inscription in the Pamphylian alphabet : Menetys Elypsa. 

An unpublished silver fifth century half-drachm of Gyrene with 
the types of a swan's head and a Gorgon's mask. 



74 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

2. Roman and Byzantine Series. 

An unpublished denarius of the period of the Civil Wars, a.d. 
m : ohv. BONI EVENTVS Bust r. ; rev. VIRTVS Virtus 
standing 1. 

A rare denarius of Vitellius with rev. L VITELLIVS COS 
III CENSOR. Vitellius the Elder seated I. 

A sestertius of Marcus Aurelius, of exceptional size and weight 
and fine style ; rev. CONCORD AVGVSTOR TR P XVI COS 
III S (J Marcus Aurelius and L. Verus clasping hands. 

An unpublished aureus of Septimius Severus with rev. LEG 
VIII AVG TRP COS ; Eagle between Standards. (Hitherto the 
onl}^ legion certainly known to be represented in gold was the LEG 
Xlill MARTIALIS VICTRIX.) 

A rare denarius of Septimius Severus with rev. VOTA 
SVSCEPTA XX Septimius and Caracalla sacrificing at an altar : 
behind them a flute-player. 

A rare solidus of Theodosius II with rev. FELICITER 
NVBTIIS Marriage group, commemorating the marriage of Val- 
entinian III and Eudoxia. 

A fine solidus of the Empress Galla Placidia, of the Mint of 
Ravenna ; rev. SALVS REIPVBLICAE. Victory seated r. 
Presented hy the late Rev. E. S. Bewick 

3. British ami Colonial Series. 

The collection of early British and other Celtic coins, formed by 
Sir John Evans has long been famous. It was offered to the nation 
by his son. Sir Arthur Evans, without conditions, but with the 
suggestion that any duplicates not required should be handed over 
to the Ashmolenn Museum, and any still remaining duplicates 
exchanged for other coins required by the British Museum. The 
coins which have accordingly been retained by the Museum are 
1453 in number (468 gold, 571 silver and 414 bronze). Some idea 
of the extent to which the Museum Collection has been enriched 
may be gathered from the fact that the series of Cunobelinus 
(Cymbeline) has been increased from 20 gold, 12 silver and 28 
bronze to 50 gold, 24 silver and 91 bronze. The scientific value of 
the collection consists not merely in the rarities in which it abounds, 
but in the care with which the provenance of the coins (often the 
only guide to their attribution) has been recorded. 

The British series of a later date, from the Commonwealth 
onwards, has also been greatly improved, both in quality and 
quantity, by Mr. T. H. B. Graham's gift of his collection of English 
silver, copper, bronze and tin (1,462 in number). The collection is 
nearly complete for these metals, and, when combined with the 
main collection, will leave very few gaps to be filled. 

4. Mediceval and Modern Series. 

Fine specimens of the chaise d'or of Philip VI. and the mouton 
d'or of Jean I. of France ; the fourteenth century sequin of the 
Roman Senate ; the Annunciation ducat of Charles II. d'Anjou as 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 75 

King of Naples (1285-1309) ; portrait coins of Ludovico 11., 
Marquis of Saluzzo (1475-1504) and Ferdinand I. of Naples 
(1458-94), and a series of gold ducats of the Popes and of various 
■Grerman mints, and other coins, 597 in all. From the Deivick Bequest. 

A number of Mexican Revolutionary Coins, viz., a 5 centavos, 
1914, struck at Durango ; a 2 centavos, no date, struck at Parral ; 
a cast silver peso of Sinaloa ; five silver and eight copper coins of 
Oaxaca ; a dollar struck by Calixto at Cuencame ; and a peso of 
Tasco, 1915. Presented hy Howland Wood, Esq., of New York. 

A series of 348 modern coins in various metals of European 
states. Presented hy Henry Garside, Esq. 

A collection of 117 paper notes issued by Gorman towns during 
the War. Presented hy Heer M. Frankenliuis. 

5. Oriental Series. 

Two silver coins of the Sassanian king Khusru II. Presented, 
hy L. A. Lawrence, Esq., F.S..[. 

A series of 45 silver coins with Sassanian types struck by the 
■early Arab conquerors of Persia. Presented hy M. J. de Morgan. 

A silver coin of an Arab governor of Persia. Presented hy Sir 
Evelyn Grant Dug, K.C.M.G. 

A very rare gold dinar of the Seljuk Alp Arslan struck at 
Baghdad in 461 A.H. Presented hy Sir Evelyn Grant Duf, 
K.C.M.G. 

A rare bronze coin of the Othmanli Sulaiman I struck at 
Damascus in 968 A.H. Presented hy the Hon. W. Lindsay. 

Three silver coins of the Sultan of Tarim. Presented hy Capt. 
W. H. Lee- Warner. 

Two silver and 2 bronze coins of the Imam of San'a. Presented 
hy 0. N. Bakewell, Es(j. 

A gold Meshhed pilgrim's token and a silver kran of Muzaffar 
.al-Din, Shah of Persia. Presented hy Sir Evelyn Grant Duff, 
K.C.M.G. 

A very rare bronze coin of the Indo-Greek king Archebius ; 
another of Kadphises and two silver White Hun coins with Sas- 
sanian types. Presented hy Lt.-Col. H. E. Hean, I. M.S. 

A unique gold tanka of Shihab al-Din Omar 715 A.H. and a 
series of silver tankas of other sultans of Delhi ; a very rare gold 
tanka of Ghiyas Shah of Malwa 862 A.H. ; a unique gold muhur 
of Akbar, Urdu Zafar Karin 985 A.H. ; rare muhurs of Akbar, 
Jaunpur 979 and Dehli 972 A.H. : of Shah Jahan, Agra 1047 
A.H. and Burhampur 1050 A.H. ; and a series of Moghul rupees, 
all from the Thornhill collection. 

Seventy Indian coins, gold, silver and bronze of Vijayanagara, 
the Moghul Empire, the Western Satraps, and the modern native 
states of Baroda, Indore and Kacch. Presented hy S. M. Edwardes, 
Esq., C.S.I., C.V.O. 

A series of 58 coins, including rare silver coins of the Moghid 
Empire, and of the kings of Oudh, Indore, Baroda and Garhwal. 
Presented hy the late Colonel W. F. Badgley. 



76 A00OUNT8, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Two gold pagodas of Krishna Raja of Mysore. Presented //(/■ 
the Bombay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society. 

6. Medals. 

A specimen in silver of the medal by Sir W. Goscombe John, 
R.A., commemorating the investiture of H.R.H. the Prince of 
Wales at Carnarvon in 1914. Presented by Her Majesty the Queen. 

Three very rare cast bronze Italian Renaissance medals, viz. the 
Sultan Mohammad II, by Bertoldo di Giovanni (about 1481), a 
very fine specimen of the artist's only signed medal ; Clemente and 
Giuliano della Rovere, by Giovanni Candida (betv^^een 1493 and 
1497) ; and Cornelia Siciliana, by Pastorino (about 1540-50). 
Presented by Henry Van den Bergh, Esq., tliromih the National .\rt 
Collections Fund. 

Eight lead Italian Renaissance medals, seven by Pastorino and 
one by Domenico Poggini. Presented by Sir Hercules Read, P.S.A. 

A rare bronze medal of the Genoese Admiral, Giovan Andrea 
Doria, 1599. 

A rare gold medal of the death of Gustavus Adolphus, 1632. 

Four bronze castings of medals by Sir Edward Poynter, and an 
electrotype of his Cambridge Prince Consort Prize Medal. Pre- 
sented by the Executors of the late Sir Edward Poynter. 

Original model of the medal by Mr. Ednmnd Dulac, represent- 
ing the return of the German Fury "nach Hause," in parody of the 
German medal "nach Paris, 1914." I^resented by the artist. 

Bronze medallion of the landing on V Beach from the " River 
Clyde," by E. Carter Preston and G. H. Tyson Smith. Presented 
anonymously. 

Silver medal of the Peace, by E. Carter Preston. Presented by 
the United Grand Lodcfe of Elnglaud. 

A collection of 347 German medals relating to the Great War, 
including a number by L. Gies. Presented by Heer M. Frankenhvis. 

Bronze medal struck in anticipation of the expected entry of the 
German troops into Paris in 1914. Presented by Captain Amundsen. 

Bronze medal of Cardinal Mercier, by J. Jourdain. Presented 
by M. Fernand Crooy. 

Bronze medal of the dedication of the Joan of Arc Park on 6th 
January, 1919. This medal was brought to England by R 34. 
Presented by the Joan of Arc Statue Committee. 

Bronze medal of the trans- Atlantic flight of N.C.4. Presented 
by Glenn H. Curtiss, Esq. 

y. — Students and Visitors. 
The number of visits made to the Department of Coins and 
Medals during the year 1919 was 2,424. The average for the last 
ten years before the closing of the Exhibition was 3,854. The 
Department was in working order by 1st January, 1919, but in 
tluly the Exhibition was dismantled with a view to fitting the new 
Exhibition Room and has since remained closed. 

G. F. HilL 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 



British Musp]um (Natural History). 



STATEMENT of Progress made in the Arrangement and 
Description of the Collections, and Account of Objects 
added to them, in the year 1919. 

General Progress. 

Visitors, Sic. 

The total number of visitors to the Natural History Museum 
during 1919 was 455,736, as compared with 422,805 in 1918. 
This is the largest total since 1913, the year before the war, when 
the number was 486,320. The attendance on Sunday afternoons 
was 56,673, as against 46,109 in the previous year. The average 
daily attendance for all open days was 1,255 ; for week-days, 
1,286 ; and for Sunday afternoons, 1,090. 

The number of persoiis who attended the demonstrations of the 
Official Guide during the year was 12,236. His services were 
placed at the disposal of the officers and men of the Indian Con- 
tingent attending the Peace Celebrations, many parties being- 
conducted by him on special tours round the Museum. Parties from 
the R.A.F. Armament School, Uxbridge, from the United States 
troops in London at that time, and from various Welfare Associations, 
Military Hospitals, &c., also availed themselves of his guidance on 
special tours. 

All the exhibition galleries have been re-opened to the public 
daily, on week-days ; but, owing to the increased cost for constables 
for warding them, the Botanical Gallery and some of the back 
galleries closed during the war have not been re-opened on Sundays. 

The exhibition cases of British Nesting Birds and British 
Mammals have been restored to their proper positions in the 
Bird Gallery and Western Pavilion, and the collection of shells 
has been re-arranged in the Shell Gallery. 

Eepresentation of the Museum on Committees, &c. 

Dr. G. T. Prior, F.R.S., has been nominated to represent the 
Museum on the Chemical Industries Committee and the Mis- 
cellaneous Committee of the Imperial Mineral Resources Bureau. 

Dr. F. A. Bather, F.R.S., Assistant Keeper of Geology, has 
been appointed to serve on a special Committee of the Museums 
Association to consider a proposal of the Ministry of Reconstruction 
to transfer the control of municipal Museums to the local education 
authority. 

Mr. M. A. C. Hinton was delegated by the Trustees to represent 
the Museum at the 30th Congress of the Royal Sanitary Institute, 
held at Newcastle-upon-Tyne in July. 



18 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Swiney Lectures. 

Dr. J, D. Falconer, Swiney Lecturer for 1919, gave a course of 
lectures in the Lecture Theatre of the Imperial College of Science 
on " The Geology and Mineral Resources of the British Possessions 
in Africa." The total attendance for the course was 1,290, or, on 
an average, 108 persons per lecture. 

The Trustees have accepted Dr. Falconer's suggestion to take 
" The Modelling of the Earth's Crust " as the subject of his next 
course of lectures under this foundation to be given in November 
and December-, 1920. 

Ma?Hne Boring Animals. 

An exhibit of Marine Boring Animals has been placed in the 
(Jentral Hall, and a Guide, forming No. 10 of the Economic Series, 
has been prepared to explain it. 

Qodman Memorial. 

A National Committee has been formed to establish a memorial 
to the late Mr. F. D. Godman, F.R.S., a Trustee of the British 
Museum and a most generous benefactor of the Zoological and 
Entomological Departments, who enriched during his lifetime the 
Entomological collections by many thousands of specimens. The 
Committee propose to place in the Museum a bronze medallion 
portrait of Mr. Godman and his coadjutor in his scientific work, the 
late Mr. Osbert Salvin, F.R.S. 

In memory of her husband, Dame Alice Godman, D.B.E., has 
endowed a Trust with a sum of £5,000 to form a Godman Explora- 
tion Fund, with the object of providing means for collecting 
specimens for the Natural History Museum by way of exploration. 

Antarctic Whales. 

Further papers have been received from the Colonial Office, the 
Governor of the Falkland Islands, and the High Commissioners for 
Australia, New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa on the 
subject of Whaling operations in South Georgia, the South 
Shetlands, and other southern localities. 

A detailed report on southern whaling, including analyses 
of the statistics received, has been prepared by Dr. Harmer, and 
sent in full to the Colonial Office, attention being specially called to 
the necessity for the immediate protection of the Humpback and 
probably of the Right Whale. Whaling operations in sub- Antarctic 
waters commenced at the end of 1904, the Humpback constituting 
over 90 per cent, of the total catch during the early days of the 
industry. This species of whale has now become, after no more 
than fifteen years, an unimportant constituent, and perhaps a 
vanishing quantity, the great majority of the whales at present 
being captured belonging to two other species, the Fin Whale and 
the Blue Whale. Although these are still obtained in large numbers, 
there are already signs which may indicate the probability of a 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 79 

serious falling off in their numbers in the near future ; and the 
security of the whales and of the whaling industry gives rise to 
much anxiety. The oil obtainable from whales was shown to be a 
national asset of vital importance during the War, and the necessity 
of avoiding over-production leading to the extermination of the 
whales is admitted by all those who know the facts. The urgency 
of the question has been recognised by the Trustees, who have made 
representations to the Colonial Office on the importance of taking 
action, including international action if necessary, in order to prevent 
an undue depletion of the stock of whales. 

The Falkland Islands Committee, on which the Museum was 
represented by the Director of the Natural History Departments, 
has completed its labours, and has prepared a Report, which was 
signed by all its members. This report contains the recommendation 
that an expedition should be equipped and maintained for a period of 
years, for the purpose of investigating whaling and other problems 
in southern waters, with the view of obtaining scientific evidence on 
which protective measures could be based. This recommendation 
lias received the full support of the Trustees. 

Sealing in the Falkland Islands. 

A report was received through the Governor of the Falkland 
Islands and the Colonial Office on the sealing operations in that 
Dependency for the season ending 30th September, 1918, the 
results showing a slight decrease in the total catch on that for the 
preceding year. The Colonial Office has been asked to ensourage 
the delivery of satisfactory annual reports, and to be on the look-out 
for oversealing — special emphasis being laid on the importance of 
maintaining a Seal Reserve for the permanent protection of these 
animals. 

Reindeer in South Georgia. 

Further information has been received with regard to the 
progress of the experiment of the acclimatization of reindeer in 
South Georgia. A herd of 70 animals was observed in the early 
part of 1919, mostly full-grown and in excellent condition. This 
news is specially interesting in view of a serious accident which 
took place in August, 1918, when 17 reindeer were lost by falling 
over a precipice. 

With regard to the destructive effect said to be produced by 
sheep on the native " tussac " grass, it has been found that when 
sheep have been grazing the grass dies off for about three years, 
and is then capable of re-establishing itself only from seed. The 
grass will not spring up again from the roots even when left to 
itself. This result is not produced by the grazing of reindeer or 
goats. 

Proteotion of Animals. 

Further papers (ordinances, regulations, &c.) with reference to 
the protection of animals in the Dominions and various British 
Colonies and Dependencies have been received from the Colonial 



80 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Office. The papers cover a wide range, dealing with ^Australia, 
Nigeria, Quebec, Yukon Territory, New Brunswick, and British 
Honduras. The Acts passed seem to indicate the existence of a 
real desire to protect such species as are not economically injurious, 
and the Trustees have informed the Colonial Office that they view 
with interest and sympathy the efforts made for the preservation of 
the native fauna in the Dominions and Colonies. 

Other Investigations. 

At the request of the Army Medical Department, Mr. C. T. 
Regan, F.R.S., Assistant Keeper of Zoology, visited the Isle of 
Sheppey in order to inspect the marshes, and gave advice with regard 
to the introduction of fishes which would eat mosquito larvse. 

Mr. Regan acted as Secretary to the Fisheries Committee of the 
British Science Guild, and prepared a memorandum on scientific 
work in relation to fisheries. This was adopted by the Guild and 
sent by them to the Government Departments concerned. 

An inquiry was received from the Director of Army Contracts, 
Ministry of Munitions, as to the nature and origin of beetles and 
maggots found in large quantities in condemned bacon received in 
Egypt from Australia. A reply was sent to the effect that the 
beetles in question comprised two species which occurred in both 
countries, and were in fact cosmopolitan in their distribution ; and 
that therefore it was not possible to say where the bacon had become 
infested. 

Advice has been asked by a firm of engineers, and given, in 
connection with trouble caused by the growth of mussels on the inner 
surface of pipes carrying sea-water. The matter was immediately 
concerned with the erection of a large electricity-supply power- 
house near Edinburgh. 

An inquiry from the Commonwealth of Australia as to the kinds of 
fish which could be properly described as " Sardines" without infring- 
ing the Merchandise Marks Act having been referred to the Museum 
by the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries, the Board were informed 
that in the opinion of the Museum, in this country the term Sardine is 
restricted to Sardina pilclim'dus, of the Atlantic and Mediterranean, 
a fish known as the Sardine in its immature condition and as the 
Pilchard when adult. 

Bequests. 

A pair of splendid Buffalo horns, said to be of record length, 
have been bequeathed to the Museum by the late Mr. Arthur 
Forbes, C.S.I., subject to the condition that the horns might re- 
main in the custody of his son, Barre Cassels Forbes, during his 
life-time. 

A collection of drawings of Algae, comprising 1,796 sheets, 
representing not only the British flora but many foreign species, has 
been bequeathed to the Museum by the late Prof. G. S. West, of 
Birmingham University. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 8l 

The mounted specimens received during the year from the 
Trustees of the Rowland Ward Bequest include examples of a fine 
specimen of the Lado race of the White Rhinoceros, a Tibetan 
Argali from Ladak, and a Reedbuck from N.E. Rhodesia. 

Presents. 

Lt.-Colonel G. P. Cosens has generously placed a sum of money 
at the disposal of the Museum for continuing the work of collecting 
in ex-G!erman East Africa (now Tanganyika Territory) commenced 
in the previous year out of funds provided by Lord Swaythling. 

The total number of presents received during the year by the 
several departments of the Museum was 1,712. Many of these 
comprised large numbers of individual specimens. 

The gifts of special interest or value were unusually numerous 
and important. The most noteworthy was the great collection of 
big game trophies of the late Captain F. C. Selous, D.S.O., the 
famous African hunter, explorer and naturalist, presented by his 
widow, Mrs. Selous. 

This collection consists of 550 specimens of a very high average 
standard of size and perfection. Prominent among the specimens 
are the following mounted heads : — 

6 Moose, 10 Wapiti, 18 Caribou, 3 Giraffes, 8 Kudu, 6 

Buffaloes, 11 Eland, 13 Waterbuck, 30 Hartebeest, 10 

Tiang, 4 Bontebok, 6 Zebra, 7 Gerenuk, 18 Impala, 20 

Gemsbuck, 3 Situtunga, 4 Lesser Kudu, 22 Dik-diks, 16 

Sable Antelope, 10 Roan Antelope, and 18 Grant's Gazelle. 

The collection also contains some fine skulls and horns of the 

Black and White Rhinoceros, a pair of large Elephant tusks, and 

mounted specimens of tlie following : — 

an African Lion and Leopard, a Sable Antelope, a Roan 
Antelope, a Serval Cat, 19 Dik-diks, and 2 Colobus 
Monkeys. 
In addition there is a fine series of 18 Lion skins and a repre- 
sentative collection of mounted heads of the smaller African 
Antelopes, such as Duikers, Oribis, Reedbucks and Bushbucks. 

A catalogue of the sporting trophies will be prepared for publi- 
cation, and the specimens vv^ill be kept together as a single collection 
for a period of twenty years. 

Mrs. Selous' generous gift to the nation also included the very 
fine collection of Birds' eggs formed by her husband, every clutch 
in which was collected by himself and bears his labels in his own 
handwriting. 

By Deed of Gift Mr. E. Dukinfield Jones has made over to the 
Museum his -valuable collection of Brazilian Lepidoptera, consisting 
of nearly 20,000 specimens of which 300 are types, contained in 
3 cabinets and 239 boxes, the only conditions imposed being that 
the collection be kept intact during his life-time and that he be per- 
mitted to have access to it for purposes of study, &c. 



82 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Among the other gifts of special importance may be mentioned 
those from : — 

Mr. J. C. DoUman — The collections of insects made by his 
son, the late Hereward C. Dollman. The two cabinets con- 
taining the collection of Lepidoptera from North-Western 
Rhodesia will be kept separate as a whole for a period of 
fifteen years. 

The Governor of the Falkland Islands — A zoological collection, 
including parts of whales and a Weddell's Seal, made by 
Mr. A. G. Bennett at Deception Island, South Shetlands. 

Mrs. Brewitt-Taylor — A collection of butterflies of the genus 
Parnassius formed by her husband, the late Major R. 
Brewitt-Taylor. 

Mrs. May F. Ogilvie — The valuable collection of British 
Birds, consisting of 1,789 skins, made by her husband, 
the late F. M. Ogilvie, formerly surgeon at the Oxford 
Eye Hospital. 

M. Fernand Lataste — A large and valuable collection of 
mammals, reptiles, and batrachians, forming the basis of 
the descriptive work produced by him from 1875 to 1890. 

Mr. Gregory M. Mathews — A collection of 318 birds from 
Norfolk and Lord Howe Islands. 

Mr. Robert P. Page — A fine mounted specimen of a King 
Salmon, weighing 62 lbs., caught by him by rod and line 
in the Campbell River, British Columbia. 

Mr. H. C. Robinson and Mr. C. Boden Kloss — An important 
series of specimens representing the vertebrate fauna of the 
Oriental region, collected in South Annam and Cochin China. 

Mrs. E. S. Gregory — Her herbarium of British plants. 

Mr. F. C. Adams — A fine collection of British Diptera, 
together with the two mahogany cabinets in which the 
specimens are contained. 

Major S. S. Flower — The skull and horns of a Black-faced 
Highland Ram, bred on the Glencasley Estate, Suther- 
land ; also a number of manuscripts, scientific papers, &c., 
of his father, the late Sir William Flower, K.C.B. 

Addo Bush Elephants. 
The Trustees are in communication with the Government of the 
Union of South Africa with a view to obtaining for the Museum a 
male and female specimen (hide and skeleton) from the herd of 
Elephants in the Addo Bush, near Port Elizabeth, almost the last 
survivors of the South African Elephant, the extermination of which 
for economic reasons has been decided on by the Cape Provincial 
Council. 

Expeditions. 
The following collecting expeditions, for the benefit of the 
Museum, were arranged: — 

(a) Capt. Guy Shortridge — in Rhodesia. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 83 

(h) Mr. W. J. Potter — a zoological exploration of ex-German 
New Guinea and New Britain. 

(c) Mr. Willoughby P. Lowe — a zoological exploration of 
the West Coast of Africa. 

(d) Mr. H. C. Robinson, Director of the Federated Malay 
States Museums — assistance in a collecting expedition to 
the mountains of North Luzon and Mindoro, Philippine 
Islands. 

Pwxhases. 

The grant-in-aid for Purchases has been restored to the pre-war 
amount, namely, 6,5001. 

The principal purchases made during the year include the skuU 
and tusks of an African male elephant shot by Major C. Christy in 
the Belgian Congo ; seven complete skeletons of gorillas ; 158 bird- 
skins from the Canary Islands and Cape Verde Archipelago 
(Bannerman collection) ; a collection of isopod crustaceans, including 
many type specimens ; an exceptionally fine specimen of a large 
vase-shaped sponge, from Greece ; types of marine, land and fresh- 
water mollusca ; 3,532 British specimens of minute parasitic 
Hymenoptera of the family Mymaridse, collected by the late C. 0. 
Waterhouse, I.S.O. ; 5,000 specimens of Rhynchota and Coleoptera, 
including 250 types, being the ninth instalment of the Distant 
collection of insects ; a collection of 93 microscope-slides taken from 
successive levels in the shallow seam of coal in Staffordshire, with 
67 mounted micro-photographs of the same ; fossil corals and 
brachiopods from the carboniferous limestone of Britain and 
Belgium collected by the late Dr. Arthur Vaughan ; vertebrate 
fossils from the collection of the late W. E. Balston ; various minerals, 
including specimens of copper and uranium ores from the Congo ; 
scheelite (in large crystals) from Arizona ; slices of a meteoric iron 
found in 1894 at Sams Valley, Jackson Co., Oregon, U.S.A. ; a 
meteoric stone, weighing 2,797 grams, found near Plainview, Hale 
Co., Texas, in 1913 ; and a number of botanical specimens, including 
ferns from New Zealand and the South Sea Islands, and 1,094 
flowering plants and ferns from Central Paraguay. 

Lantern Slides. 

Series of lantern-slides illustrating protective coloration and 
economic zoology have been acquired, the negatives being the 
property of the Trustees. These are frequently lent to approved 
persons for lecture purposes. 

Exchanges and Gifts of Duplicates. 

Exchanges and gifts of duplicate specimens have been made 
with various institutions and persons. 

Permission has been given to Lord William Percy to store 
temporarily in the Museum, at his own risk, nine cabinets of his 
collection of ducks. 



84 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Puhlications. 

The following new works on natural history have been published 
during the year : — 

British Antarctic ("Terra Nova") Expedition, 1910. 
Natural History Report. Zoology. Vol. v.. No. 2. 
Coelenterata, Pt. II. Madreporaria. (a) On Favia 
Conferta, Verrill, with notes on other Atlantic species of 
Favia. By Q. Matthai, m.a. Pp. 69 — 96 : 2 text- 
figures, 4 plates. 4to. 9^. 
Report on Cetacea stranded on the British coasts, No. 6. 
Cetacea stranded during 1918. By S. F. Harmer, sc.D., 
F.R.s. Pp. 24 : 2 text-figures and 1 map. 4to. 3^. 6d. 
Studies on Acari. No. 1. The Genus Demodex, Owen. 
By 8. Hirst. Pp. (vi.) 44 ; 13 plates, 4 text-figures. 
Roy. 8vo. 105. 
Economic Series : — 

No. 9. — Birds beneficial to Agriculture. By F. W. 

Frohawk. Pp. vi., 47 : 22 plates. 8vo. 2s. 
No. 10. — Marine Boring Animals injurious to submerged 
structures. By W. T. Calm.an, D.sc. Pp. 34 : 21 
text-figures. 8vo. 1^. 

New editions have been issued of the following Guide-books and 
pamphlets : — 

Guide to the Exhibited Series of Insects. Third edition. 

Pp. v., 65 : 62 text and full-page illustrations. 8vo. 25. 

Guide to the Gallery of Birds. Pt. II. Nesting series of 

British Birds. Third Edition. Pp. 62 : 4 plates. 4to. 

Is. 

Guide to the British Mycetozoa. Fourth edition. Pp. 62 : 

52 text-figures. 8vo. Is. 
Special Guide No. 7. — Guide to the Specimens and En- 
larged Models of Insects and Ticks . . . illustrating their 
importance in the spread of Disease. Second edition. 
Pp. 46 : 14 text-figures. 8vo. Is. 
Instructions for Collectors : — 

No. 1. — Mammals. Fifth edition. Pp. 8 : 4 text-figures. 

8vo. 6d. 
No. 4. — Insects. Sixth edition. Pp. 12 : Text illust. 

8vo. 6d. 
No. 5. — Diptera (Two-winged Flies). Fourth edition. 

Pp. 16 : Text illust. 8vo. 6d. 
No. 6. — Mosquitoes (Culicidse). Fourth edition. Pp. 
8 : 1 plate. 8vo. 6d. 

The undermentioned works are in preparation : — 

" Terra Nova " Antarctic Report. Further sections, inclu- 
ding Birds, by Percy R. Lowe, O.B.E. ; Ostracoda, by 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 85 

R. W. D. Burney ; Pteropoda, by Miss A. L. Massy ; 
Anatomy of Peleeypoda, by R. H. Burne ; Amphineura 
and Heteropoda, by T. J. JdJvans ; Larvae of Echinoderma, 
by Prof. E. W. MacBride, f.r.s. ; Sponges, Antarctic, by 
R. Kirkpatrick, Non -Antarctic, by Prof. A. Dendy. 

Monograph of Lacertidse, by G. A. Boulenger, f.r.s. 

Catalogue of Moths, Supplement, Vol. ii., by Sir G. F. 
Hampson, Bart. 

Handbook of British Culicidse (Mosquitoes), by W. D. 



Lang, sc.D. 



Demonstrations. 



With the sanction of the Trustees, a series of five demonstrations 
on the subject of Vertebrate Animals was given at the Museum by 
Mr. W. S. Rowntree, b.sc, f.l.s., on Saturday afternoons, fort- 
nightly, during the Lent term, under arrangements made by the 
University of London Extension Board. 

General Library. 

The additions to the General Library during the year have 
been : — 

By purchase - 92 volumes. 
By transference 
from other 

Departments - 2 A^olumes. 

By donation - 431 volumes, 17 maps, and 23 photographs. 

Total - - 525 17 23 

All the volumes and maps have been catalogued, press-marked 
and put in their places, while 310 volumes have been bound in 194, 
and 2 have been repaired. 

The extent of the collection on the 31st of December, 1919, was 
47,758 volumes, 5,948 maps, and 1,105 photographs (not including 
those in the Owen collection of drawings, &c.). 

The accessions to the Departmental Libraries have also been 
catalogued as they came in, and duplicate transcripts of the titles 
have been returned with the books. 

Altogether 1,943 title-slips have been written, 138 re-written, 
and 2,381 revised (independently of those prepared for printing). 

There are now, on a rough estimate, 105,127 volumes (exclusive 
of continuations and minor separata) and 6,289 maps in the whole 
building. 

The number of visits paid to the General Library during the 
year 1919 by Students and others (irrespective of the Staff and 
persons to whom the use of a key is granted) was 1,418. 

Donations have been received from a great number of Museums, 
Academies, and other corporate bodies, as well as from personal 
donors. 



86 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The printing o£ the Supplement to the Library Catalogue has 
been continued, title-slips to the end of " FYS " have now been 
set up in type and printed off as far as " FOUR," and the first 
three sheets of the " Addenda and Corrigenda " have been also 
printed off. 

Index of the Genera and Species of Animals. 

During the past three years considerable progress has been 
made with this Index, under Mr. 0. Davies Sherborn's charge, and 
some 90,000 references have been added to the manuscript. The 
letter " T " of authors has now been reached. The manuscript has 
been continuously and extensively consulted by the staff and by 
students, whilst many enquiries have been answered by Mr. Sherborn 
in correspondence, which has been greatly increased owing to the 
many practical uses to which natural science is now applied, 
necessitating accurate nomenclature of the animals referred to. 

Further publication by Mr. Sherborn of bibliographic data has 
not been necessary during the past year ; but a large draught has 
been made upon his manuscript by Mr. Gregory Mathews and 
Mr. Tom Iredale for their '* Birds of Australia " and " Mollusca of 
Australia." 

Index Museum and Morphological Collections. 

From the Summer of 1917 to the Spring of 1919, the Index 
Museum suffered an entire depletion of its staff, owing to the 
exigencies of Military Service or service in connection with the 
war. During this time, however, two table-cases containing exhibits 
and diagrams dealing with the subject of Food Economy, and 
showing the nutritive values of foods derived from Plants and 
Animals, respectively, were placed in the Central Hall. The work 
entailed in connection with these two cases was done by the Museum 
Lecturer and Guide, Mr. J. H. Leonard. At this time also, the 
Army Biscuit Enquiry case — the result of research work by Mr. J. 
H. Durrant (Entomological Department) and Col. W. 0. Beveridge, 
R.A.M.C. — was re-exhibited at the special request of the War Office. 

February, 1919, saw the return of one member of the Index 
Museum staff, and immediate steps were taken to inspect all the 
si)irit preparations in the Bays of the Central Hall that might have 
suffered evaporation or damage during the five years of war. Of 
these, 200 jars containing specimens and dissections were re-spirited, 
and, in several cases, repairs and re-sealings were also carried 'out. 
A valuable collection of specimens showing several species of the 
Pterobranch Ceplialodiscus, obtained by the "Terra Nova" Antarctic 
Expedition, was also transferred for more careful preservation from 
the original storage-jars to cylindrical museum-jars, and was re- 
spirited. Attention was then given to the Mammalian Dentition 
case in Bay I of the Hall, and three small skulls of Insectivores, 
needed to complete the series, were prepared, and placed on 
exhibition. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 8 7 

0£ the progress o£ Index Museum work for the current year 
(1919), the following is a summary : — A model of the Human Body 
Louse (Pediculus humanus), enlarged 100 diameters, has been placed 
on exhibition in the Pathogenic Insect case in the Central Hall. 
This model is of special interest, as the late war has shown the 
Louse to be the disseminating agent of Trench Fever, as well as of 
Typhus, and of European Relapsing Fever. It is intended to add 
to the case other enlarged models of the adult mouth-parts, and of 
the eggs and larva respectively. 

A general dissection of a young Porpoise (Phoccena pJioccena), 
showing the skeleton and viscera in situ, also the relationship of the 
urinogenital organs to the vestigial pelvic bones, has been made for 
Bay II of the Index Museum ; and an additional exhibit has been added 
to the Mimicry Case in the form of the egg-cocoons of a Scale Insect 
(Naiacocciis serpentinus), which closely resemble the droppings of 
birds. 

Much time and thought has been given to the completion of 
details for an index case dealing with the elements of structure in 
Vertebrates generally, which is intended to form one of four table- 
cases as an introductory series to Animals, Plants, and Rocks. 

All labels for this case are now in the printer's hands, and 
certain additional preparations and drawings have been made ; so 
that it is hoped that very shortly the final fitting up can be done, 
and the case be duly exhibited in the Central Hall. 

The necessary work of re-camphoring all cases in charge of the 
Index Museum has been undertaken. 



Sidney/ F. Harmer, 

Director, 



British Museum (Natural History), 
1 April, 1920. 



88 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Department of Zoology. 

I. — Arrangement and Conservation. 
Mammalia. 

Mammal Galleries. 

No special alterations in the arrangement of the Mammal 
Galleries have been made during the year ; and work has been 
confined in the main to the installation of new specimens, and the 
rewriting and printing of such labels as required modification in 
order to bring them up to date. 

The additions to the exhibited series in the Mammal Galleries 
and Corridors include many specimens presented by the Rowland 
"Ward Trustees, among them : — In the Primates : an Indian Langur 
Monkey (Pithecus entellu.s), a Guereza (^Colobus abyssinicus), a 
Miritiba Howling Monkey (Alouatta ululata), a Capuchin (Celms 
apelld), a Lion Marmoset {Leontocebus rosalia), a Sifaka (^Pro pithecus 
deckeni), and a small-toothed Lemur (Lepidolemur microdon). In 
the Chiroptera : three interesting additions, a Philippine Fruit Bat 
(Acei odon jubatus), an East Australian Fruit Bat (Pteropus polioce- 
phalus), and a Javelin Vampire Bat {Phyllostowa hastatum). In 
the Carnivora : a Bay Lynx (Pelis [Lyii,v] r"fa), a Fishing Cat 
(^Felis viverrina), a Striped Hysena (Hi/cena striata schilling/si), a Kit 
Fox {Vulpes velox), a Chinese Fox (^Vnlpes hoole), an adult and 
young Venezuelan Fox (Cerdoct/on aquilus), a Crab-eating Raccoon 
(Procyon cancrivora'), a Stoat {Alvstela erminea stabilis'), an East 
Himalayan Paguma (^Paguma grayi), a ISepal Manoori (^Paradoxurus 
strictus), a Panama Kinkajou (Potos flavus megalotus), a Coati 
(JVasva narica^, a Marsh Mungoose (Mungo!< palvdinosus), and an 
adult and young specimen of the Merida Skunk (Conepatus 
mapurito). In the Rodentia : a Russian Dormouse (Ih/romi./s 
nitedula'), two British Bank Voles (Evotomys glareolus britannicvs), 
a Field Vole (^Microtus agrestis), a Tree Porcupine (Coendou 
pruinosus), and a group of Harvest Mice (^Micromys minutus), adult, 
young, and nest. In the Ungulata : a Northern White Rhinoceros 
{Rhinoceros simus cottoni') from the Lado Enclave, a very important 
addition ; also a fine specimen of Hodgson's Argali (Ovis ammon 
hodgsoni), a Merida Brocket (Alazama bricenii^, and a Reed Buck 
(^Cervicapra ariindinuni). In the Edentata : a Two-toed Sloth 
(^Choloepus didactylus), and a Three-toed Sloth (^Bradypus tridartylus). 
In the Marsupialia and Monotremata : two specimens of Cuscus 
(Phalanger maeulati(s), and a Spiny Anteater (Echidna andeata). 

Other additions to the Mammal Galleries include the mounted 
heads of two Red Deer (Cervus elaphus scoticus) from New Zealand, 
presented by Miss A. Blewitt ; a newly born calf of the European 
Bison (Bos bonasus'), presented by the Zoological Society of London; 
and two skulls of the Pamir Argali (Ovis ammon poli) belonging to 
the collection of the late Mr. A. 0. Hume, c.b., presented by Mrs. 
Ross Scott. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 89 

The younjD- Malay Elephant has been removed temporarily from 
the Central Hall, where it was unprotected from dust, to one of the 
Giraffe cases in the Eastern Corridor on the first floor. 

Whale Room. — To the series of Cetacean casts have been added 
paddles of the North Atlantic Right Whale (Balaena glacialis) and 
of a Killer Whale (^Orcinus orca), showing the paddles both before 
and after dissection ; and the cast of a White-sided Dolphin 
(Lagenorhynchus acutus). A model of Cavier's Beaked Whale 
(Ziphius cavirostris) was presented by Mr. A. H. Bishop. 

Study Series. — During the earlier months of the year prepara- 
tions were made for the return of the part of the collection which 
had been carried to Exeter for safety during the war. The removal 
from Exeter to London took place in April. Much material stored 
temporarily in special places of safety within the Museum was also 
brought out and unpacked. 

The disturbances due to the war have necessitated re-arrangement 
of the whole collection. This work was proceeded with continuously 
throughout the months April to December, and complete order has 
now been restored in all groups other than the Marsupials. 

It is desirable to save " type " specimens from all unnecessary 
wear and tear. Therefore, during the work of re-arrangement, 
all the types of the smaller species have been extracted from the 
general collection and they have been placed in certain cabinets 
now reserved exclusively for the accommodation of types. 

The numerous accessions received during the year have been 
punctually dealt with ; and the usual work of skull preparation, 
re-making of skins (when necessary), labelling, registering, and 
incorporating in the collection has been performed. 

The thanks of the Trustees are due to the large number of 
voluntary workers whose combined efforts have rendered possible 
the performance of so much work by this section of the department 
during the past year. Among these vohmteers mav be mentioned 
Mr. R. C. Wroughton, Mr. T. B. Fry, Miss W. M. Davidson, Major 
R. E. Cheesman, Captain Kershaw, Mr. Hugh Smith, Mr. Larkin, the 
Hon. Ivor Montague, Miss C. Janson, Miss Owen, and Miss Stevens. 

In addition to his work in connexion with the Mammal Survey 
of India by the Bombay Natural History Society, Mr. Wroughton, 
with the assistance of Mr. Fry and Miss Davidson, has been 
engaged upon the preparation of a list of the types in the collection. 
Major Cheesman has given invaluable help in working out the large 
collections received from Persia and Mesopotamia. Capt. Kershaw 
and the Hon. Ivor Montague have given much assistance in con- 
nexion with African mammals. 

A number of casts of Cetacean heads, paddles and valves of 
the spiracle have been made, The arrangement of the skeletons 
has been rendered difficult by the want of sufficient cabinet- 
accommodation. 

Abnormalities and hybrids. — To this series have been added the 
mounted head of a cross between a male Wapiti [Cervus canadensis^ 



90 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

and a female Red Deer (^Cervus elaphus scoticus) ; and two pairs 
of cast antlers belonging to the same animal, born at Craig Lodge, 
Dalmally, Scotland, all presented by Walter Jones, Esq. 

AVES. 

The cabinets containing the collections of birds and eggs haA^e 
now been moved from the Bird Gallery, where they had been placed 
for greater safety during the war. They have been reinstated in 
the Bird Room, and the groups of the Nesting Series have been 
re-transferred from the Shell Grallery to the Bird Gallery. 

The most important addition to the Bird Gallery was a mounted 
female of the Northern Ostrich (Sti^uthio camelus) presented by the 
Rowland Ward Trustees. 

Owing to the greatly increased growth of the collection of bird 
skins and the consequent congestion in the cabinets, it has been 
found necessary to add a further portion of the Shell Gallery to 
the Bird Room. This measure provides space for about forty extra 
cabinets, which are now urgently required owing to the excessive 
amount of crowding of the specimens. This lack of space is not 
only very detrimental to the skins but it renders it impossible to 
arrange the collection so as to bring it into line with recent advances 
in ornithological work. 

During the year the study collection has been consulted by the 
following visitors, who have been occupied in systematic work on 
various groups : — Mr. H. F. Witherby, Major R. E. Cheesman, 
Mr. H. Kirke Swann, Capt. H. Lynes, R.N., Mr. C. Mackworth 
Praed, Mr. E. C. Stuart Baker, Mr. G. M. Mathews, Dr. B. 
Hartert, Mr. W. L. Sclater, Lord Rothschild, f.r.s., Mr. T. Iredale, 
Miss Annie Jackson, Dr. F. M. Chapman of New York, and 
Francis Harper of Washington, d.c. 

The following artists, engaged in preparing drawings for forth- 
coming works, have also made use of the collection : — Mr. G. E. 
Lodge, Major H. Jones, Mr. H. Gronvold, and Mr. Roland Green. 

Domesticated Animals. 
The additions by presentation to the series of Domesticated 
Animals include the following : — The skull and horns of a Black- 
faced Highland Ram from the Glencasley Estate, Sutherland, 
presented by Major S. S. Flower ; three interesting Domestic Rats, 
including a specimen showing the " Dutch-headed " marking, pre- 
sented by H. C. Brooke, Esq. ; the mounted head of a Bloodhound 
Champion " Colonel of Brighton," presented by the late Commander 
J. Haggerston ; a plaster cast of the skull of " Kilburn Duke," 
Champion Bull Dog, presented by Messrs. Rowland Ward, Ltd. ; 
and the head of an Indian Fighting Ram (Barwal Breed) presented 
by the Zoological Society of London. 

Reptilia and Batrachia. 
All the accessions have been registered and incorporated, with 
the exception of a large and important collection presented by Mons. 
F. Lataste. 



department of zoology. 91 

Pisces. 

In the Spirit Building the bottles of specimens that formerly 
covered the table-cases have not been brought back in view of the 
fact that they will again have to be removed if the proposed exten- 
sion of the iron gallery is carried out ; other specimens are now 
accumulating on the table-cases, and it is urgently necessary that 
some steps be taken to relieve the congestion. The work of 
replenishing the collection with spirit has been carried on. 

The most notable addition to the Exhibition Gallery is a large 
King Salmon (^Onco^hynclius quinnat) from British (;olumbia, pre- 
sented by liobert Page, Esq. The taxidermist has been principally 
engaged in preparing casts and models from specimens in the sj^irit 
collection . 

Tunic AT A. 

193 bottles of Plankton (including pelagic Tunicala) collected 
by the " Discovery " and " Terra Nova " Antarctic Expeditions 
have been sent to Prof. W. Grarstang for determination and report. 

Pterobranchia. 

Additional specimens have been exhibited and the whole series, 
comprising 12 specimens, has been re-labelled in a uniform manner. 

MOLLUSCA. 

The cases of shells which were removed to the Bird Gallery 
during the war haA^e been replaced in the Shell Gallery. wing- 
to part of the latter having been added to the Bird Room, certain 
exhibition cases have been dispensed with and some of the cabinets 
have been placed in the Coral Gallery immediately south of the 
Shell Gallery. As the systematic arrangement of the series of cases 
was thus interfered with, a key to the exhibited collection has been 
prepared for the guidance of students. 

The study series of several genera has been re-arranged and some 
attention paid to the exhibited specimens. 

The collection of microscopical preparations has been re-arranged 
and a card-index prepared. The examination, registration and 
incorporation of accessions received daring the war have been 
continued and are now practically completed, special attention 
having been given to collections from South Georgia, Madagascar, ' 
Peru and W. Africa. The study of the Opisthobranchiata obtained 
by the " Terra Nova " Antarctic Expedition has been continued, and 
some time has been devoted to the distribution of other parts of the 
Molluscan collection formed by that expedition among specialists for 
study and report, and to the registration of parts of the collection 
already worked out. The anatomy and distribution of British 
Hydrobiidae have been studied in connection with the discovery of 
parthenogenesis in Pa'udestrina jenkinsi, and accounts of the 
anatomy and habits of the latter have been prepared. 



92 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The deposition of eggs and the care of eggs and young in the 
Mollusca have been studied with a view to preparing an exhibit for 
the gallery. 

Features of the year's work reflecting post-war conditions have 
been the numerous consultations of the Assistant in charge of the 
collection by persons anxious to dispose of conchological collections 
and by medical officers engaged in the study of Bilharziosis. 

Lieut.-Col. H. H. Godwin-Austen, F.R.S., has continued his 
work upon the arrangement of the Blanford and Godwin-Austen 
collections ; and the Department is indebted to Mr. J. R. le B. 
Tomlin for working out and reporting upon a collection from 
Anguilla. 

Myriopoda and Arachnida. 

Special attention was again given to the forms of Arachnida 
injurious to domesticated animals and to vegetation. The English 
species of "Red Spiders" (T'etranychus and Paratetranychus) in- 
jurious to various plants and trees were collected and determined, 
and a paper on the group prepared for publication. The spirit 
collection has been almost entirely respirited, and fresh naphthalene 
was placed in the drawers containing the dry collection. 

Crustacea and Pycnogonida. 

All the accessions received during the year have been in- 
corporated, and some progress has been made with the registration 
of the Norman collection. A little preliminary work has been done 
towards the arrangement of the Budde-Lund collection. 

ECHINODERMA. 

A great deal of time has been devoted to remounting and 
respiriting the exhibited collection of Echinoderms. 

Valuable specimens removed from the gallery, for protection 
during the war, have been returned. 

The Starfish gallery has been repainted, and the brackets 
containing the exhibited series of Stalked Crinoids have been 
renovated. 

Worms. 

With the help of Dr. Cognetti de Martiis and Mr. W. A. 
Harding, all the Oligochaetes and Leeches received during the year 
have been determined and incorporated. 

Specimens of the exhibited series of worms have, when 
necessary, been remounted. 

The case referring to the Miners' Worm Disease has been 
overhauled, and the specimens remounted. 

The slide-collection of Cestodes, which is constantly growing, 
has been transferred to certain cabinets which formerly contained 
part of the Norman collection (Crustacea). This allows room for 
additional species to be placed in systematic order as required. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 93 

The crowded condition o£ the cupboards in the Spirit Building 
now makes it practically impossible to deal satisfactorily with the 
arrangement of additions to the spirit collections. 

POLYZOA. 

The exhibited series of Polyzoa has been removed from the 
Shell Gallery to the Coral Gallery, and re-arrangement of the 
specimens is being carried out. 

Hydrozoa. 

Several important collections have been labelled, registered, and 
incorporated. The bottles of the Norman collection of Hydroida 
have been replenished with spirit. Upwards of 600 microscopic 
slides of Hydroida have been prepared, to facilitate the examination 
of specimens. A scheme has been designed and adopted for the 
better preservation of the dried Hydroida. The large accumulations 
of unnamed Hydroida have been worked at, and numbers of very 
interesting species, which were hitherto not known to be represented 
in the collections, have been brought to light. 

The sorting and determination of the Hydroida of the British 
Antarctic ("Terra Nova") Expedition, 1910, have been carried on. 

PORIFERA. 

The acquisition and exhibition of a large and very fine cup- 
shaped example of Spongia op.cmalis, var. Lamella, led to the re- 
arrangement of the exhibited series of Horny Sponges. 

The restoration of type collections, important specimens and 
exhibited specimens, which had been removed to places of safety 
during the war, was completed at the beginning of the year. 

II. — Duplicates and Exchanges, 

(a) Duplicates. 

Du})licates have been distributed to museums, scientific institu- 
tions, and individuals as follows : — 

Miscellaneous. — Incorporated Froebel Educational Institute ; 
Dundonald School, Wimbledon. 

Mammalia. — Buenos Aires Museum. 

Aves. — Oxford University Museum. 

Mollusca. — Oxford University Museum ; Mr. F. B. Jennings ; 
Col. A. J. Peile, R.A. 

Crustacea. — Prof. C. Chilton. 

Coelenterata. — Public Library, Museum, and Art Gallery, 
Worthing. 



94 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

(b) Exchanges. 

Exchanges have been made with the following miisenms and 
individuals : — 

Mammalia. — Museo Civico, Genova ; Castle Museum, Norwich ; 
Museam d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris ; Congo Museum, Tervueren ; 
Frere ApoUinaris-Maria, Bogota. 

Aves. — Major A. Brooks ; Lord William Percy ; Dr. L. C. 
Sanford . 

Reptilia. — ) Dr. T. Barbour ; Frere Apollinaris-Maria ; Dr. 
Batrachia. — J Malcolm Smith. 

Pisces. — Indian Museum, Calcutta ; Museum d'Histoire 
Naturelle, Paris. 

Polyzoa. — Dr. R. S. Bassler. 
Porifera. — National Museum, Dublin. 

III. — Departmental Library. 

The acquisitions to the Library of the Departments of Zoology 
and Entomology, including the Walsingham Library, during the 
year, obtained by purchase, presentation and exchange, consist of 58 
separate works and pamphlets in 113 volumes, and 1,567 parts of 
periodicals and works in progress. 

The work of collating, stamping, press-marking, and entering all 
additions in the Catalogue has been performed as usual. 

The Museum Clerk in the Library, with the aid and supervision 
of an Assistant, has checked all the entries of Zoological works in 
the portion of the General Catalogue of Books which has been 
printed during the year. 

The following donations are worthy of special mention : — 
Mathews, G. M., "The Birds of Australia," Vol. VII., part 5, 
jjresented by G. M. Matliews, Esq. ; Oberthur, Ch., " Etudes de 
Lepidopterologie comparee," Fasc. XVI., presented by M. Ch. 
Oberthur ; MS. note-books, pencil-sketches, and water-colour draw- 
ings, made by the late Sir W. H. Flower, k.c.b., f.r.s., formerly 
Director, and a collection of Zoological pamphlets by various 
authors, bound in 48 volumes, presented by Major S. S. Flower. 

The following is a list of Donors to the Departmental Library 
during the year 1919 : — 

Agricultural Research Institute, Pusa, Behar, British India. 
American Museum of Natural History. 
Avicultural Society. 
Bergen Museum. 

Board of Agriculture and Fisheries. 
British Ornithologists' Union. 
British Waterworks Association. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 95 

Bureau o£ Fisheries, Department of Commerce, Washington. U.S.A. 

Bureau o£ Science, Manila. 

Caziot, Omdt. 

Champion, Gr.C. 

Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Trade and Customs. 

Conchological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. 

Conseil permanent International pour I'Exploration de la Mer. 

Cooper Ornithological Club, California. 

Deinse, A. B. Van. 

Departement van Landbouw, Nijverheid en Handel ; Buitenzorg, 

Java. 
Department of Agriculture, Federated Malay States. 
Department of Agriculture, India. 
Department of Agriculture, Madras. 
Department of Agriculture, Industries and Commerce, Wellington,, 

New Zealand. 
Department of Agriculture, New South Wales. 
Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, Canada. 
Department of Agriculture, Union of South Africa. 
Department of Agriculture, Victoria, Australia. 
Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. 
Department of Agriculture, Wisconsin. 
Department of Fisheries, Natal. 
Distant, W. L. 
Domaniewski, J. 
Donald, C. H. 
Eecke, R. van. 

Entomological Society of London. 
Entomological Society of Nova Scotia. 
Entomological Society of Ontario, (Canada. 
Escomel, Dr. E. E. 
Fernald, H. T. 
Field, Editor of. 
Flower, Major S. S. 
Foreign Bird Club. 
Godman, Dame Alice, D.B.E. 
Hamlyn, J. D. 
Hampson, Sir G. F., Bart. 
Herdman, Prof. W. A., C.B.E., For. Sec. R.S. 
Imperial Bureau of Entomology. 

Imperial Department of Agriculture, Bridgetown, Barbados. 
Indian Museum, Calcutta. 

Indian Research Fund Association, Simla, India. 
Janet, Ch. 
Janini, R. J. 

Junta para Ampliacion de Estudios, Madrid. 
Jurriaanse, J. H. 

Kansas State Agricultural College. 
Kennard, A. S. 
Kommissionen for Havundersogelser, Kobenhavn. 



96 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Kunz, G. F. 

Laboratorio di Zoologia Generale e Agraria della R. Scuola d'Agri- 

coltrua in Portici. 
Lansdowne, Marquess of, K.G. 
Linnean Society of London. 
Lord, C. E. 
Mathews, G. M. 
Miyake, T. 
Moore, A. 
Morice, Rev. F. D. 
Museum of C'omparative Zoology, Harvard College, Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Navas, 11. P. Longiuos. 

Nederl mdsche Entomologische Yereeniging. 
New York State College of Agriculture, Ithaca, N.Y. 
Norske Hvalfangerforening, Sandefjord, Norway. 
Oberthilr, Ch. 
Ohara Instituts fiir landwirtschaftliche Forschungen in Kuraschiki, 

Provinz Okayama, Japan. 
Pavlovic, Prof. P. S. 
Port Elizabeth Museum, The Director of 
Ritchie, Dr. J. 

Rockefeller Foundation, New York. 
Royal Microscopical Society. 
Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. 
Royaume de Belgique, Ministere des Colonies. 
Secretarv of State for India. 
Sclater, W. L. 
Sherborn, C. D. 
Shufeldt, Dr. R. W. 
Societe Entomologique de France. 
Stationery Office. 
Swann, H. Kirke 
Tropical Diseases Bureau, London. 
Turner, R. E. 
Universidade de Lisboa. 
University of Montana. 

University of Wyoming, Agricultural Experiment Station. 
Wintle, W. J. 

Woodward, B. B. ■ ' 

Zoological Museum, Copenhagen. 
Zoological Society of London. 
Zoological Society of New York. 
Zoological Society of Philadelphia. 

lY. — Publications. 

In addition to the otBcial Catalogues and other volumes pub- 
lished by the Trustees (see pp. 84-85), various reports and des- 
-criptive papers have been prepared in connexion with the different 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 97 

branches of the collection ; and have been published for the most 
part in scientific journals. 

For the convenience of reference the following list is appended: — 

Mammalia. 
By Oldfield Thomas, F.R.S. : — 

" On some small Mammals from Catamarca." Ann. Mag. Nat. 

Hist. (9), iii., p. 115. 
"The White-toothed Shrew of Palestine." i/>., p. 32. 
" On small Mammals collected by Sr. E. Budin in North- 

Western Patagonia." 76., p. 199. 
"Two new Argentine species of Akodbn." lb., p. 213. 
" Notes on Gerbils referred to the genus Meriones, with des- 
criptions of new species and sub-species." lb., p. 263. 
" On small Mammals from Otro Cerro, Catamarca, collected by 

Sr. E. Budin." lb., p. 489. 
" Two new Gerbils from Sinai." Ih., p. 559. 
" On a small Collection of Mammals from Lumbo, Mozam- 
bique." Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (9), iv., p. 29. 
"A new species of Euneomys from Patagonia." lb., p. 127. 
" List of Mammals from the Highlands of Jujuy, North 

Argentina, collected by Sr. E. Budin." lb., p. 128. 
" Two new Rodents from Tartagal, Salta, North Argentina." 

lb., p. 154. 
" The method of taking the Incisive Index in Rodents." lb., 

p. 289. 
" The Types of the Mammals described by M. Fernand 

Lataste." lb., p. 350. 
" A Synopsis of the True Mice found within the Indian 

Empire." Journ. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc, xxvi., p. 417. 
" A new species of Nesohia from Mesopotamia." lb., p. 422. 
" Note on the genus Clieliones.'" lb., p. 705. 
" Some new Mammals from Mesopotamia." lb., p. 745. 
By Martin A. C. Hinton : — 

" Report on the House Rats of India, Burma and Ceylon." 

Journ. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc, xxvi., pp. 59, 384 and 

716. 
"The Zoology of Rats and Mice, with special reference to the 

future control of the Rat population." Journ. Royal San. 

Inst., xL, p. 44. 
" Notes on the genus Cricetomys, with descriptions of four new 

forms." Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (9), iv., p. 282. 
"The Field Mouse of Foula." Scottish Nat., 1919, p. 177. 
By R. C. Wroughton : — 

" Summary of the Results from the Indian Mammal Survey of 

the Bombay Natural History Society." Journ. Bombay 

NaL Hist. Soc, xxvi., pp. 338, 776. ' 
" Change of coat in the Common Palm-Squirrel — an appeal." 

lb., p. 727. 
"On the genus Tadarida (Wrinkle-^ip Bats)." lb., p. 731. 



98 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

By R. (J. Wroughton and Miss W. M. Davidson : — 

" Two new forms o£ the ' Funamhulus fristriatus ' group." lb., 

p. 728. 

Aves. 
By C. Chubb : — 

" Descriptions of one new species and one new sub-speci'S of 
South American Birds." Bull. B.O.C, xxxix., p. 51. 

"A new Genus and five new sub-species of South American 
Birds." lb., p. 59. 

" New South American forms." lb., p. 70. 

" A new species from Bri'tish Guiana." lb., p. 78. 

" Exhibition of the first British killed example of the Needle- 
tailed Swift." lb., p. 90. 

" A new species from British Guiana." lb., p. 90. 

" Notes on the family Dendrocolaptidae, with suggestions for 
its division." Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (9), iii, 1919, p. 273. 

" New forms of South American Birds." Op. cif.., iv., 1919, 
p. 301. 

" Notes on collections of birds in the British Museum from 
Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia and Argentina." Part I, 
" Tinamidae-Rallidae," Ibis, 1919, p. 1. Part II, p. 256. 

Reptilia and Batrachia. 
By G. a. Boulenger, F.R.S. :— 

" On the Madagascar Frogs of the genus Mantkladijlus. P.Z.S. 

1918, p. 257. 
" Descriptions of two new Lizards and a new Frog from the 

Andes of Colombia." Op. cit., 1919, p. 79. 
" A List of the Snakes of West Africa, from Mauritania to the 

French Congo." lb., p. 267. 
" A List of the Snakes of North Africa." lb., p. 299. 
" Synopsis of the American species of Bana.'' Ann. Mag. 

Nat. Hist. (9), iii., p. 408. 
"On the genus Lejndobatrachus, Budgett." lb., p. 531. 
" Description of a new Dyscophid Frog from Yunnan." lb., 

p. 548. 
" On a new variety of Acantliodaetylus boskianus, Daud., from 

the Euphrates." 76., p. 549. 
" On Rana ornatiss'ima, Bocage, and R. ruddi., Blgr." Tr. R. 

Soc. S. Afr. viii., p. 33. 
" On a new Lizard of the genus Latastia from Southern 

Rhodesia." lb., p. 39. 
" Descriptions of three new Batrachians from the Garo Hills, 

Assam." Rec. Ind. Mus. xvi., p. 207. 
" An interesting Addition to the Batrachian Fauna of Kashmir 

(^Aeluropliryne mammaia).''^ lb., p. 469. 
" Un cas d'evolution ontogenique a rebours chez un Lezard 

africain (Eremias lugubris, A. Smith)." (IR.Ac. Sci. 

Paris, clxviii., p. 78. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 99 

" Un cas interessant de dimorphisme sexuel chez un Serpent 

africain (Bothrolt/cus ater, Glinther)." lb., p. 666. 
" Sur le genre Saphceosaurus, Rhynchocephalien du Kim- 

meridgien de Cerin," Op. cit., clxix., p. 605. 
" Batraciens et Reptiles recueillis par le Dr. C. Christy an 

Congo beige dans les districts de Stanleyville, Haut-Uele 

et Ituri en 1912-1914." Rev. Zool. A£r. vii., p. 1. 
" Descriptions d'un Ophidien et d'un Batracien nouveaux du 

Congo." lb.; p. 186. 
"Sur les Lezards du genre Acanthodacfi/his, Wiegm." Bull. 

Soc. Zool. France, xliii., p. 143. 
" Sur 1' Agama tour?ievillei, Lataste, du Sahara algerien." 

Op. cit., xliy., p. 111. 
" Le Lezard vert de la Peninsule iberique, ses variations et sa 

distribution." Bol. Soc. Espan. Hist. Nat., xix., p. 59. 
" Sur le Pelobates wilsoni Bosca." lb., p. 293. 

Pisces. 
By G. a. Boulenger, F.R.S. : — 

" On a collection o£ Fishes from Lake Tanganyika, with 

descriptions of three new species." P.Z.S. 1919, p. 17. 
" On some new Fishes from near the West Coast of Lake 

Tanganyika." lb., p. 399. 
" A List of the Freshwater Fishes of Sierra Leone." Ann. 

Mag. Nat. Hist. (9), iv., p. 34. 
" L'evolution est-elle reversible ? Considerations au sujet de 

certains Poissons." C. R. Ac. Sci. Paris, clxviii., p. 41. 
" La distribution en Afrique des Barbeaux du sous-genre 

Labeobarbus.^' Op. cit., clxix., p. 1016. 
" Descriptions de Poissons nouveaux du Congo." Rev. Zool. 

Afr., vii., p. 158. 

By C. Tate Regan, F.R.S. :— 

" Note on Chaudliuria cavdata, a Teleostean Fish of the 
order Opisthomi." Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (9), iii., p. 198. 

" Fishes from Durban, Natal, collected by Messrs. H. W. Bell 
Marley and Romer Robinson." Ann. Durban Museum, 
ii. (4), p. 197. 

Mollusca. 
By A. H. Cooke, 8c. D. :— 

"TheRadulaof Thais, Drupa . . . and allied genera." Proc. 
Malac. Soc, xiii., 1919, p. 91. 

Arachnlda. 

By A. S. Hirst :— 

" Two new Parasitic Mites {Myocoptes Idntoni and Psoroptes 
natalensis.'' Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (9), iii., p. 524. 



100 ACCOITNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Crustacea. 

By W. T. Calman, D.Sc. :— 

" Cumacea and Phyllocarida." Australasian Antarctic 

Expedition Scientific Reports, Series C, V^ol. V., part 6. 
" On Barnacles of the Genus Mef/alasma from Deep-sea 
Telegraph Cables." Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (9), iv., p. 361. 

Platyhelminthes and Nemathelminthes. 
By H. A. Baylis, M.A. :— 

" A remarkable Cysticercus from a rare Dolphin." Ann. Mag. 
Nat. Hist. (9), iii., p. 417. 

" Some new Entozoa from Birds in Uganda." lb., p. 457. 

" A collection of Entozoa, chiefly from Birds, from the Murman 
Coast." Ih., p. 501. 

" A new species of the Nematode genus Crossocephalus from the 
Rhinoceros." Ih., p. 94. 

" On a curious Malformation in Taenhi saf/inafa.'" Oj.>. cit. (9), 
iv., p. 114. 

" Crossophorns coUaris, Hcmprich and Ehrenberg, a little- 
known Nematode Parasite of the Hyrax." Ih., p. 343. 

" On two new Species of the Cestode genus (hchoristica from 
Lizards." Parasitology, xi., p. 405. 

V. — Acquisitions.'^ 
Mammalia. 

The accessions during the past year have been both numerous 
and important. Chief among them is the Lataste collection, most 
generously presented by M. Fernand Lataste. This great collection 
contains about 1,500 mammals, mostly from Europe, North Africa, 
and South America ; and it formed the basis of M. Lataste's well- 
known researches in mammalogy. Of the total number received, 
about 1,000 specimens, including the types of 21 species and sub- 
species described by M. Lataste, have now been registered and 
incorporated in the collection. 

Another important accession is the large collection of heads, 
horns, stuffed specimens and skins of Big Game, formed by the late 
Captain F. C. Selous, D.S.O., and presented to the Museum by his 
widow. Although naturally African game-mammals predominate 
in this collection, it contains specimens from other regions, including 
many fine heads of Moose and Caribou from North America. 

Special attention may be drawn to the following acquisitions, 
arranged in geographical order : — 

Europe. 

8 Sousliks (Citellus cit ellus) horn Salonika ; presented by Lieut. 
Cecil Worssam. 

* A table showing the number of specimens ad led during the year 1919 is given 
on page 112. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 101 

GO .small niammals from Switzerland ; pt'esented by the Hon. 
N. Charles Rothsi-hild. 

A Souslik (CifeUns riteUas) from Macedonia, collected by the 
late Lieut. P. D. Montague ; presented hy Mrs. Montague. 

Mounted head of a Norwegian Elk ; presented hy Col. Pitt-Taylor. 
12 Bank Vole.s (^Ecoto'nys caesarius) from St. Aubins, Jersey ; 
presented hy E. Hollis, Esq. 

A senn'-albino Water Shrew from the River Chelmer ; presented 
hy A. Brazier, Esq. 

Tooth of a Sperm Whale {Physeter ratodon) : jtresented by Walter 
Bon wick, Esq. 

Tooth of a Sperm Whale (Physeter catodon) with diseased fang, 
from Norway ; presented hy Jolian Rasmussen, Esq. 

Tooth of a Sowerby\s Whale (Mesoplodon hidens) from Moray 
Firth ; presented hy W. Taylor, Esq. 

Tympanic bone of a Sibbald's Rorqual (Balaenoptera mvscvlus) 
from Colonsay Island ; presented hy Philip Mair, Esq. 

Parts of Cetacca stranded on the British Coasts during 1919, 
and particularly : — 

Common Porpoises (Phocaena phocaena) from Suffolk, Kent, 

and Lincolnshire. 
Common Dolphin (I)elphinus delphis) from Co. Cork. 
White-sided Dolphin (Laqenorhi/nchus acvtus) from the 

Shetland Islands. 
Risso's Grampus (Grampus fjriseus) from the River Forth. 
]jesser Rorquals (Balaenoptera aaitorostrata) from Kincar- 
dine and Durham. 
C'ominon Rorqual (B. physalus) from Pembroke. 
Presented hy the Board of Trade. 
Head of a European Bison Calf (Bos honasns^ ; presented hy the 
Zoological Society. 

A Human skull '" from the old Whitechapel bui'ial ground " ; 
presented hy C. F. HoUoicay, Esq. 

Skeleton of a Siamese Cat ; presented hy W. K. Taunton, Esq. 
Thirteen Eskimo ]nippy skins ; presented by the Sabellvm Trading 
(Jompani/. 

Cast of the skull of a Bull-dog " Kilburn Duke " ; presented hy 
Messrs. Rowland Ward, Ltd. 

Skeletons of Bull-dogs " Rowland Queenie "' and " Rowland 
Hex"; presented by Mrs. P. R. Griffiths. 

Asia. 

26 small mannnals from Asia Minor, collected by the donors 
during their captivity after the fall of Kut ; presented hy Capt. 
W. W. A . Phillips and Capt. P. J. Patmore. 

3 voles of the sub-genus Arhusticola from Tiiiis ; presented hy 
Dr. Shidlovsky. 

29 mammals from Palestine ; presented hy Major Maurice Portal. 

36 small mammals from N.W\ Persia ; nresented by Capt. P. A. 
Buxton. 



■102 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

A Fox from the River Tigris ; presented hi/ Major Cuthhert 
Christy. 

18 Desert Gerbils (Cheliones Jmrriaiiae) from Gujerat, Kathiawar 
and Sind, and the types of a new Hedgehog, a new Gerbil, and two 
new Bats from Mesopotamia ; presented hy the Bombay Natural 
History Society. 

150 mammals from the Deccan and the Nilgiri Hills, India, 
including the types of two new Squirrels ; collected and presented 
by Capt. P. H. Gosse, R.A.M.C. 

146 small mammals collected in Baluchistan and Persia by Col. 
E. J. Hotson ; presented by the Bombay Natural History Society.. 

Head of a Swamp Ueer (Rucerviis dvvavcelii) with horns 
approaching the record in length ; pi-esented by J. S. C. Davis, Esq. 

20 mammals from Siam ; presented by T. H. Lyle, Esq. 

An Isabelline Bear (Ursus arctos isabellinvs) from Kashmir, 
which lived for many years in the gardens of the Zoological Society ; 
presented by Mrs. Whatman. 

118 small and 43 larger mammals from Korinchi, Sumatra ; 
presented by Herbert (\ Robinson and (\ Boden Kloss, Esqrs. 

11 skulls of Babirnsa from Taliaboe Island ; presented by W. 
Frost, Esq. 

21 small mammals from China, including a new species of 
Tadarida ; collected and presented hy J. D. La Touche, Esq. 

2 Shrews and a Vole from Bering Island ; presented by Lord 
Rothschild, F.R.S. 

Africa. 

41 small mannnals from Sinai and Egypt, including the types of 
two new Gerbils ; presented by the Egyp)tian Zoological Service. 

A Shrew and a Mouse from the White Nile ; presented by the 
Rev. A. Shaw. 

A Barbary Ape (^Macaca sylvana) and a Fox ( Vvlpes atlantica) 
from the Atlas Mountains ; collected and presented btj Capt. H. 
Lynes, R.N., C.B., C.M.G. 

Skull of a Leopard and skin of a Clawless Otter from Abyssinia; 
presented by C. A. Willis, Esq. 

An Anomalure (Anomalvrns beecrofti) from Sierra Leone ; pre- 
sented by Gilbert Blaine, Esq. 

2 Jumping Hares {Pedetes) from Bihe, Angola ; presented by 
E. Sanders, Escp 

Horns and a piece of skin of a Sitatunga {Limnotragns grains) 
from Sofnyama Creek, R. Gambia ; presented by E. Hopkinson, Esq. 

Skins of four Monkeys from the Upper St. Paul's River, 
Liberia ; p)resented by Sir A. Sharpe. 

Mounted specimen of a rare Antelope (Cephalophus anchietae) 
from the Cavaka River, Benguolla, Angola ; presented by G. W. 
Penrice, Esq. 

6 mammals from the Gold Coast and Nigeria ; collected and 
presented hy Major C. H. Armitage, C.M.G. , D.S.O. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 103 

13 small mammals from the Ja River, South Oameroons, col- 
lected by Mr. G. L. Bates ; purchased. 

The type of Deomys ferruffhieus from the Lower Congo ; received 
in exchange. 

164 small mammals from the Ituri Forest and Welle Basin, 
Upper Congo, collected by Major C. Christy ; presented by the 
Congo Museum, Tervueren. 

4 small mammals from the Upper Congo, collected by Major C. 
Christy, ; received in exchange. 

Skull with large tusks of an African Elephant from the Upper 
Congo, collected by Major C. Christy ; purchased. 

Potamogale velox from the Congo ; presented hy George S. 
Young, Esq. 

35 small mammals from Inkongo, Sankuru, South (Jongo, col- 
lected by Mr. H. Wilson ; purchased. 

16 small mammals from British East Africa ; presented hy Dr. 
V. G. L. van Some re n. 

4 mammals from the Mabira Forest, Uganda ; presented hy Dr. 
V. G. L. van Someren. 

A Shrew (^Crocidura) from Uganda ; presented hy Dr. R. van 
Someren. 

6 small mammals and a Duiker from Grerman East Africa ; col- 
lected and presented by Major C. II. B. Grant. 

6 skins of a rare Duiker (^Cephaloplms spadix) from Magamba 
Woods, Usambara ; presented hy A. C. Hollis, Esq. 

Skin of a rare Duiker (^Cephalophus spadix) from Magamba 
Woods, Usambara ; presented hy Major H. C. Stiehel. 

A rare Duiker (Cephalophus harveyi), with photographs of a 
living specimen, from Usambara ; presented hy Sir H. A. Byatt, 
K.C.M.G. 

Skin of a young lion from German East Africa ; p)resented by 
Major A. L. Cooper. 

Skin of a new-born Kudu (^Strepsiceros strepsiceros) from Lake 
Baringo, British East Africa ; p)resented hy Dr. Lyon Falkener. 

Skins and skulls of two antelopes (^Cephalophus grimmi and 
Nesotragus livingstonianus) from Chiromo, South Nyasaland ; pre- 
sented by A. 0. Hodgson, Esq. 

An unusually pale-coloured leo})ar(l from Rhodesia ; presented 
hy Dr. Walter Fisher. 

A Bat (Chaerephon limhatus) from Zanzibar ; presented by Com- 
mander Smart, R.jy. 

6 mammals from Zanzibar and Pemba, including two specimens 
of the new Zanzibar Duiker (Cephalophus adersi) ; presented hy Dr. 
W. M. Aders. 

32 mammals collected by Mr. H. H. Swinny in the Island of 
Zanzibar, including a rare monkey {Colobus kirki) and a new Crice- 
tomys ; presented hy Colonel G. P. Cosens. 

9 small mammals from Pondoland ; col led ed and presented hy 
H. H. Swinny, Esq. 

14 gorilla skeletons from the French (!ongo ; purchased. 



104 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

A foetus of the Fin-whale (Balaenoptera physaliis) from Saldanha 
Bay : presented hy Dr. J. D. F. Gilchrist. 

America, North. 

An Arctic Fox, an Arctic Hare, and a Lemming brought home 
from Parry's expedition to the North-west of Baffin's Bay, 1818, 
by Midshipman Joseph Nias, of H.M.S. Alexander ; presented hy 
Miss Caroline JVias. 

7 mammals collected by Sir A. H. Markham, K.C.B., in Grant 
Land and Grinnell Land during the voyage of H.M.S. Alert, 1875- 
1876 ; presented hy Lady Markham. 

Head of an Elk (^Alces aires americanus) from Nova Scotia ; 
presented hy Lady Inglis. 

6 Bats from Goleta, California ; presented hy W. S. M. L/ Urhan., 
Esq. 

America, South, 

3 Agoutis from British Guiana ; purchased. 
6 manmials from Bogota ; received in exchange. 
10 rodents from Santa Cruz and Bolivia, including the type of 
Euneoniys dahheni ; presented hy the Buenos Aires Masevm. 
The following specimens collected by Sr. S. Budin : — 

68 mammals from Patagonia, including the types of two new 

species ; 
62 small mammals from Otro Cerro, Catamarca, including 

the types of 8 new species. 
6 small mammals from Jujuy and 8 from Salta, North 

Argentina. 
78 small mammals from Abrapampa and 44 from Jujuy, 
North Argentina ; presented hy Oldjield Lhomas, Esq.. 
F.E.S. 
The head of a Javiro Indian from Amazonian Peru ; presented 
hy E. Kanthark, Esq. 

Australasia. 

50 Bats from New Caledonia, collected by the late Lieut. P. D. 
Montague ; presented hy Mrs. Montague. 

A native Mouse (Pseudomys ( Thetomys) <irarilicauda) from 
Queensland : presented hy H. BatcJielor, Esq. 

An immature skull of Cuvier's Beaked Whale (Ziphius caviros- 
tris) from New Zealand ; purchased. 

Ayes. 
The acquisitions number twelve thousand three hundred and 
ninety-four. Of these the most noteworthy are as follows : — 

Europe. 

12 birds, 99 nests and 7,010 eggs, collected by the late Capt. 
F. C. Selous, D.S.O. : presented hy Mrs. F. C. Selous. 

1,759 British birds, collected by the late Mr. Fergus Menteith 
Ogilvie ; pre.'iented hy Mrs. Menteith Ogilvie. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 105 

53 birds from Somei'setshire ; collected and pret^enfed by Robin 
Kemp, Esq. 

116 nests, chiefly from Spain and the British Islands ; presented 
by Capt. H. Lynes, R.N., CB., CM.G. 

Asia. 

265 birds from the Deccan, Southern India : presented by (\tpt. 
P. H. Gosse.R.A.M.C, 

100 birds from Palestine : colJerfed and presented by Colonel R. 
Meinertzhayen. 

12 birds from North-east Sil)eria ; received in exchange from 
Lord William Percy. 

139 birds from Java ; roUerted and presented by Herbert C. 
Robinson. Esq. 

525 birds from Annam ; r.ollected and presented by Herbert C. 
Robinson and C. Boden Kloss, Esqrs. 

44 nests and 510 eggs from North China; collected and pre- 
sented by J. D. La Touche^ Esq. 

13 birds from Java ; presented, by Airs, i^liaplin. 

Africa. 

31 birds from Somaliland, including the type specimen of 
Columba olivce ; collected and presented by Geoffrey F. Archer, Esq. 

118 birds from the Bahr-el-Ghazal district ; presented by Major 
C. Christy. 

163 birds from the Canary Islands, collected by D. A. 
Bannerman, Esq. ; purchased. 

253 birds from the Belgian l*ongo, including the type specimen 
of Crateropus tenebrosus claudei ; presented by the Tervueren Museum. 

92 birds from the Sudan ; presented by H. H. King, Esq. 

A mounted female of the Northern Ostrich (Stridhio Qamelus 
Einn.) from north-west Africa ; presented by the Trustees of the 
Rowland Ward Bequest. 

26 specimens from East Africa : j) resented, by Major C. H. B. 
Grant. 

The type specimens of Seriniis sharpei from Lake Naivasha and 
( Idorophoneus andaryce from Uganda ; presented bij Sir Frederick 
Jackson, K.C.M.G.,'C.B. 

211 birds from the Middle Atlas Mountains ; collected and pre- 
sented by Capt. H. Lynes, R.iV., C.B., C.M.G. 

95 eggs from the Canary Islands ; collected and presented by D. 
A. Bannerman, Esq. 

America. 

10. birds from th<' North-west of Baffins Bay, collected by 
Midshipman J. Nias during the Parry Expedition, 1818 ; presented 
by Lady Nias. 

8 birds, including recently described new forms, from San 
Domingo ; received in exchange from Dr. Leonard C. Sanford. 



106 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



30 birds from Arctic America, collected by Admiral Sir A. H. 
Markham, K.C.B., daring the voyage o£ H.M.S. " Alert," 1875-76 ; 
presented hy Ladij Markham. 

102 birds from Jamaica ; presented hy Mrs. Harvey. 

9 birds from Queen (Jharlottc Islands, British Columbia, includ- 
ing species which had been desiderata to the collection ; received in 
exi3hange from Major Allan Brooks. 

85 oggs from the Falkland Islands ; presented Ity Mrs. Julia 
Cohh. 

Australasia. 

318 birds from Lord Howe and Norfolk Islands ; presented by 
Gregory M. Mathews, Esq. 

Reptilia. 

312 specimens were added to the collection, 272 by presentation, 
40 by exchange. 

The following deserve notice : — 

Europe. 

4 snakes from Salonica. Presented hy ('aj)t. J. Waterston. 
Asia. 

16 Reptiles from Sinai and Palestine. Presented hy Major E. 
E. An St en, JJ.S.O. 

38 Reptiles from Mesopotamia, including a snake, Naia morgani, 
new to the collection : presented hy the Bombay Natural History 
Society. 

34 Reptiles from Mesopotamia, including a remarkable Lizard, 
Acanthodadylns boskiaints, var. enphratiriis ; /-resented by Dr. C. L. 
Eoulenc/er. 

11 Reptiles from Mesopotamia ; presented by Major C. Christy. 

5 Reptiles from Mesopotamia ; presented by Capt. P. A. Buxton. 
3 Lizards from the South (Joast of the ('aspian Sea ; presented 

by ('apt. P. A. Buxton. 

31 Reptiles from Persia and Baluchistan, including a Viper, 
Pseudocerastes persieus, new to the collection, and the type of a new 
Snake, < 'ontia condoni ; j)resented }>y the Bombay Natural History 
Society. 

A rare Tortoise, Test ado impressa, and 7 specimens of a little- 
known Sea Snake, HydropJus brookii, from Siam ; presented by Br. 
Malrolm Smith. 

Africa. 

59 specimens selected from the collection made by Major C. 
Christy for the Belgian Grovernment in the Belgian Congo, including 
examples of a Chameleon, Rhampholeon boulengeri, new to the 
collection ; presented by the Congo Museum, Tervueren. 

11 specimens from the Belgian Congo, including a Lizard, 
Bedriagaia tropidopholis, new to the collection, and the type of a 
new Snake, Glauconia kafubi ; presented by the Congo Museum, 
Tervueren. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 107 

Co-types of two new Lizards, Eremias garamhensis and Mahuia 
sudanensis, and of two new Chameleons, Chameleon etiennei and C. 
ittiriensis ; presented hy the American Museum of Natural History^ 
New York. 

14 specimens from the West Coast of Lake Tanganyika ; 
presented hy Mo)is. G. Dhont-De Bie. 

America. 

An example of a new Alligator Terrapin, i'helydra osceola, and 
a Lizard, Sceloporus cookii, new to the collection, from Florida ; 
received in exchange from the Museum of Comparative Zoology, 
Cambridge, U.S.A. 

A remarkably large skin of a Battlesnake, Crotalvs dvrissus, 
from Florida ; presented hy Mrs. Vans Corhett. 

An Amphisbsena, Cadra palirostrata^ from Cuba, new to the 
collection : received in exchange from the Museum of Comparative 
Zoology, Cambridge, U.S.A. 

31 Reptiles from the Andes of Colombia, including types of two 
new Lizards, Anolis apollinaris and Proctoporus hogotensis ; received 
in exchange from Bro. Apollinaris-Maria. 

Batrachia. 

The accessions numbered 194, of which 139 were presented and 
55 received in exchange. 

The following deserve special mention : — 

Asia. 

A rare Frog, type of a new genus, Aelurophryne mammata, from 
the Ladak Valley, Kashmir ; presented hy Dr. C. L. Boulenger. 

The type of a new Frog of the genus Nyctihatraehus, from the 
Coorg Forest, India ; presented hy C. JR. Narayan Rao, Esq. 

5 Frogs from Siam, including the type of a new species, Rana 
cuhkalis ; presented hy iJr. Malcolm Smith. 

Africa. 

44 specimens selected from the collection made by Major C. 
Christy for the Belgian Government in the Belgian Congo, including 
types of 3 new species, Rana christyi, Phrynohatrachus discodactylus, 
Arthroleptis dendrohates ; presented hy the Congo Miiseum, Tervueren. 

27 Frogs from the West Coast of Lake Tanganyika ; presented 
hy Mons. G. Dhont-De Bie. 

The type of a new Frog (Plethodontohyla tuherifera) from 
Madagascar ; presented hy the Hon. P. A. Methuen. 

America. 

30 specimens from North America, including four Salamanders 
{PletJiodon metcalU, P. jordani, P. dorsalis, and Spelerpes melano- 
plevra) new to the collection ; received in exchange from the Museum 
of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, U.S.A. 



108 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

9 specimens from North America, including a Salamander 
(Plethodon yonaldossa) new to the collection ; presented hi/ the 
American Museum of Natural Historj/. 

The type specimens o£ two Frogs {Lepidobatrachvs asper and 
L. Icevis) from Paraguay ; received in exchange from the Univer- 
sity Museum of Zoology, Cambridge. 

16 specimens from the Andes of Colombia, including a Frog 
(Hi/lodes a^nis) new to the collection, and the type of a now 
species (Uf/lixalus (franulivenfris) ; received in exchange from Bro. 
Apollinaris- Maria. 

Pisces. 

The accessions number 830 ; 7 75 presented, <> purchased, and 49 
received in exchange. 

The following deserve special mention : — 

A very large Roach (Rutilus rutilus) from Saffron Walden : 
presented by H. T. Sherim/ham, Esq. 

48 Fishes from Africa, including several co-types : received in 
exchange from the Paris Museum. 

8 Fishes from the Shari River, including the types of two new 
species (Barbus baudoni and Andersoma peUegnni) ; presented by 
Mons. A. Baudon. 

18 Fishes from Sierra Leone ; presented by A. F. Winf/ate, Esq. 

24 Fishes from the Congo, including the types of four new 

species {Barbus uellensis, AmjylnJius )naesii, A. opisthophfhalnius^ 

and Allabenchelys manyanc/a) ; presented by the Conc/o Museum. 

Tervuer'en. 

319 Fishes from the Congo, collected by Major C. Christy, 
including the types of a number of new species ; presented by the 
Congo Museum., Tervueren. 

34 Fishes from Dar-es-Salaam ; presented by J. Fouteroy, Esq. 
92 Fishes from the Coast of Natal, including the types of seven 
new species (^Apogon polylepis, Diagramma chubbi, I.^o natalensis, 
Callionymus marleyi, Amblyapistus marleyi, Plagusia robinsoni, and 
Tetrodon pleurospilus) ; collected and presented by II. W. Bell Marley. 
Esq.., and Romer Robinson, Esq. 

Co-types of a Gobioid Fish (Eleotris legendrii) from Madagascar : 
presented by Dr. J. Legendre. 

8 Fish(3s of the genus Discognathus, including co-types of T). 
phryne, I), elegans, and D. adiscus, from India and Baluchistan : 
presented by the Indian Museum, Calcutta. 

18 Cyprinoid Fishes from Mysore, co-types of five new species 
(Biscognathus hicornutus, D. platycephalus, I), brevimentalis, Botia 
striata, and NemacUlicMhys sbiomogensis), described by the donor ; 
presented by Prof. C. R. Narayan Rao. 

A King Salmon (Oncorhynchus qninnat) from British Columbia, 
weight 62 lbs. ; presented by Robert Page, Esq. 

2 specimens of a Lamprey (Ichthyomyzon fossor) new to the 
collection, from Michigan ; presented by Br. A. G. Ruthven. 
6 Fishes from British Guiana ; purchased. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 109 

A salmon (Salmo salar), weight 7 lbs., from New Zealand; 
presented hj II. T. Sheringham, Esq. 

MOLLUSCA. 

The total number of specimens received during the year is 
1,968. Of these 1,637 were presented, 107 purchased, and 224 
obtained by the " Terra Nova " Expedition. The most noteworthy 
accessions are enumerated below : — 

From various Localities. 

One hundred and twenty-five microscopical preparations of 
Lamellibranch anatomy, nineteen preparations and eighty specimens 
of Cephalopoda, obtained by the " Terra Nova." 

Sixty-seven specimens (including ten types) of Nudibranchs ; pre- 
sented (^icit/i the concurrence of the original oivners) hy T. J. Evans, Esq. 

63 types of marine, fresh-water, and land MoUusca ; purchased. 

Europe. 

-25 examples of Paludestrina jenkinsi from Randers Fjord, 
Denmark ; presented by Dr. A. C. Johansen. 

3 microscopical preparations of a parthenogenetic Paludestrina 

jenkinsi from Elstree, Herts ; presented hij Dr. A. E. Boycott, F.R.S. 

21 shells of Buccinifni undatum and Fusus antiquus shewing 

teratological resemblance to shells of other genera, from various 

British localities ; presented by the Rev. G. Henslow. 

9 microscopical preparations and 7 complete examples of 
Cocculina galeola from -the Irish Atlantic Slope ; presented by the 
Department of Agricidture and Technical Instruction for Ireland. 

71 Fresh- water Mollusca from North Russia ; presented by 
ISurgeon-Lieut. R. Buddie, R.JS. 

Asia. 

14 Land Mollusca from North Persia ; presented by Capt. 
P. A. Buxton. 

96 Land and Fresh-water Mollusca from Palestine ; presented 
by Major E. E. Austen, D.S.O. 

A figured specimen of Haliotis japonica from- Japan ; presented 
by H. C. Fulton, Esq. 

10 shells of land Gastropoda from Penang and Torres Straits ; 
presented by Dr. R. F. Scharff. 

5 Nudibranchs from the Andaman Islands ; presented by the 
Director of the Zoological Survey of India. 

86 shells of Gastropoda and Lamellibranchiata from alluvium at 
Nasiriyah, Mesopotamia ; presented bii Capt. R. W. Hingston. 

9 shells of Septaria, Theodoxus, and Melania from the Soela 
Archipelago, all bearing the egg-capsules of Theodoxus pulligera ; 
presented by G. C. Robson, Esq. 

Africa. 

4 shells (3 types and 1 co-type) of Gastropoda from South 
Africa ; pjresented by Major M. Connolly. 

168 Land shells from Algeria ; presented bij Lord Rothschild, 
F.R.S. 



110 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

America. 

11 shells of Flano7'his antrosus from various localities ; presented 
hy Prof. H. A. Pilshry. 

2 shells (co-types) of Brachi/podella nidkostatus from Venezuela ; 
presented hy G. C. Spenee, Esq. 

Myriopoda. 
The additions number 55 specimens, none of which are of special 
importance. 

Prototracheata. 

The only specimens added during the year are examples of 
Typhloperipatus williamsoni, collected by the Abor Expedition ; 
presented hy the Indian Museum, Calcutta. 

Arachnida. 

The accessions number 635, the following being of special 
interest : — 

230 specimens of " Red Spiders" {Tetranychus and Paratetrany^ 
chus), including the types of 3 new species, from various English 
plants and trees ; presented hy A. S. Hirst, Esq. 

69 specimens of Arachnida (mostly Ixodidse) from various 
localities ; presented hy the Imperial Bureau of Entomology. 

34 Arachnida from South Palestine ; presented hy Major E. E. 
Austen, D.S.O. 

Specimens of an alleged poisonous spider (Lathrodectus mactaus, 
var.) from Arequipa, Peru ; presented hy the Wellcome Bureau of 
Scientific Research. 

Crustacea. 

The most important addition made during the year was a collec- 
tion of Marine and Terrestrial Isopoda containing 543 specimens, 
including types of five recently described species and many species 
new to the collection ; purchased. 

The other additions number 453, and include : — 

126 specimens of Indian Crustacea, being nearly all co-types of 
recently described species ; presented hy the Director of the Zoological 
Survey of India. 

42 specimens of marine Boring Crustacea from Australia and 
New Zealand ; presented hy Prof. C. Chilton. 

37 specimens of Crustacea taken from Deep-sea Telegraph 
Cables ; presented hy the Eastern and Associated Telegraph 
Companies. 

41 Crustacea from various" localities ; presented hy the Imperial 
Bureau of Entomology. 

16 Crustacea from Africa ; presented hy Monsieur E. iJhont-de 
Bie. 

6 Co-types of a species of boring Isopod from Florida ; presented 
hy the U.S. National Museum, Washington. 

3 additional specimens of the very rare and remarkal)l6 
Bathynella natans from Basle ; presented hy Dr. P. A. Chappuis. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. Ill 

16 specimens of freshwater and terrestrial Crustacea from Sinai 
and Palestine ; iiresented by Major E. E. Austen, D.S.O. 

4 Mysidacea from the Yorkshire Coast ; presented htj ]V. P. 
Pi/ craft, Esq. 

4 Crustacea from Dar-es-Salaam ; presented hi/ Commander 
Smart, R.N. 

15 specimens of the Fairy shrimp {^Cldroeepliahis diaplianus) 
from Buckinghamshire ; /presented hij (lias. Oldliam, Esq., and by 
J. F. G. Seltman, Esq. 

91 specimens of freshwater and terrestrial Crustacea (including 
the holotype of a new species) from Mesopotamia ; presented b// 
Capt. C. L. Botilenfjer. 

4 Crustacea from Basra ; presented Itij Major C. Christ//. 

5 specimens of a parasitic Crustacean from the Transvaal ; 
presented b/j the Hon. P. A. Methnen. 

ECHINODERMA. 

8 specimens collected in the China Sea, including 2 specimens of 
a Stalked Crinoid {Metacrinus interriipti(s) ; presented b/j the Eastern 
and Associated Telearaph Companies. 

Worms. 

Among the earthworms attention should be called to Dichoyaster 
stuhlmanni, from the Sudan ; presented b/j Major S. S. Flower ; and 
to a luminous species, Chilota ak/oensis, from Table Mountain ; 
presented Dr. J. D. F. Gilchrist. 

A collection of 73 Polychaetes, etc., determined and presented h/j 
H. A. Baylis, Esq. 

An interesting collection of 14 British Leeches ; presented bi/ 
W. N. Blair, Esq. 

The total number of specimens of parasitic worms registered 
during the year was 570. Among these the following were the 
more important additions to the collection : — 

A considerable number of Entozoa, chiefly from birds (including 
5 new species), from the Murman Coast, collected and presented by 
Dr. E. A. Cockayne. 

A collection of Entozoa from birds, chiefly new species, from 
Uganda, collected by Mr. C. C. Gowdey, and presented by the 
Imperial Bureau of Entomoloyy. 

Co-types of the parasitic Turbellarian, Avagina incola, from 
Scotland ; presented by Dr. R. T. fjciper. 

Examples of 7 species of parasitic worms (including type 
specimens of 4 species) from India ; presented by Lt.-Col. Claijton 
Lane, I. M.S. 

A very remarkable specimen of Taenia sayinata (from a patient 
in London), showing a hitherto undescribed malformation of the 
segments ; /iresented by Dr. W. T. Hillier. 

Various collections of parasitic worms from Africa and from. 
South America ; presented by tlie Imperial Bureau of Entomoloyy . 



112 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BKITISH MUSEUM. 



Brachiopoda. 

The total number of specimens received during the year is 
211, of which 12 were presented and 199 obtained b}- the "Terra 
Nova." 

Hydrozoa. 

The most important addition is a collection of microscopic slides 
of Hydroida, mostly co-tvpes, representing 50 species : presented hi/ 
W. M. Bale, Esq. 

Summarv of the Acquisitions in the Department of Zoology 
durino- 1919. 





Donations. 


Purchases. 


Exchanges. 


Totals. 




y General Collection 
Osteological Collection:— 
Mammalia-^ Anthropolo-y ... 
\ Cetacea 


2,014 

2 
13 


66 


11 


2,091 

2 
13 


/Skins 

Ws^ 

^^«« -j Nests 


4,170 

7,720 

265 


210 


29 


4,409 

7,720 
265 


(skeletons 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


Domesticated Animals 


24 


— 


— 


24 


Reptilia 

Batrachia 


272 
139 


— 


40 
55 


312 
194 


Pisces 


775 


6 


49 


830 


Tunicata 


7 


— 


— 


7 


Pterobranchia 


3 


_ 


_ 


3 


Mollusca 

Myriopoda 

Prototracheata 


1,861 
55 
8 


107 


I 


1,968 
3 


Arachnida 


635 


— 


— 


635 


Crustacea 


452 


544 


_ 


996 


Pycnogonida 

Echinoderma 


13 


— 


- 


13 


J Chaetopoda. etc 

^^^"^^ \ Parasitic Worms 


93 
570 


— 


— 


93 

570 


Brachiopoda 

Polyzoa 

Anthozoa 


211 
57 

18 


- 


- 


211 
57 
18 


Hydrozoa 

Porifera 


162 
21 


1 


5 


162 
27 


Protozoa 


8 


— 


— 


8 


Totals 


19,563 


934 


189 


20,686 



The following donors* presented specimens to the Department 
of Zoology during the year J 919 : — 
Adams, F. i\ ^ Archer, G. F. 

Adams, Lionel Armitage, Major C. H., c.m.g., 

Aders, Dr. W. M. D.s.o. 

Aldous, Lieut. F. G. Austen, Major E. E., d.s.o. 



* A list of donors of books, etc.. is 
" Departmental Library." 



riven on pp. 94—96, under the heading 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 



113 



Bale, W. M. 

Bannerman, D. A. 

Baring, The Hon. C. 

Batchelor, H. 

Bateson, Prof. W., f.r.s. 

Baylis, H. A. 

Beck, R. 

Bennett, A. G. 

Bishop, A. H. 

Blair, W. N. 

Blewitt, Miss A. 

Blyth, Capt. W. B. 

Board of Trade 

Bombay Natural History Society 

Bonwick, W. 

Boulenger, Dr. C. L. 

Boiilenger, G. A., F.R.S. 

Box, H. E. 

Boycott, Dr. A. E., f.r.s. 

Branwhite, Lieut. H. 

Brazier, A. 

Brooke, H. 0. 

Brown, G. F. 

Brown, Horace 

Bryan, B. 

Bryden, H. A. 
Buchanan, Capt. A. 
Buddie, Surg.-Lieut. R., r.n. 

Buenos Aires Museum 
Buxton, Capt. P. A., r.a.m.c. 
Byatt, Sir H. A., k.c.m.g. 
Calcutta, Indian Museum 
Carter, C. S. 
Chabanaud, P. 
Chaplin, Mrs. 
Chapman, S. 
Chappuis, P. A. 
Cheesman, Major R. E. 
Cheeseman, Miss 
Chilton, Prof. C. 
Christy, Major C. 
Cleland, Dr. J. Burton 
Cobb, Mrs. J. 
Cockayne, Dr. E. A. 
Connolly, Major M. 
Cooper, Major A. L. 
Cooper, Brig.-Gen. R. 
Corbett, Mrs. Vans 
Cosens, Col. G. P. 
Dale, G. H. 



Dalton, Messrs. W. & Son 

Davis, J. S. C. 

Denny, Prof. A. 

Department of Agriculture and 
Technical Instruction for 
Ireland 

Dhont de Bie, G. 

Dick, W. 

Digby, B. 

Drayton, E. E. 

D'Urban, W. M. S. 

Dymes, T. A. 

Edinburgh, Royal (Dick) Veteri- 
nary College 

Egyptian Zoological Service 

Evans, T. J. 

Falkener,'Dr. Lyon 

Fisher, Dr. Walter 

Flower, Major S. S. 

Forbes, Dr. H. 0. 

Frohawk, F. W. 

Frost, W. 

Fulton, H. C. 

Gibbs, Miss 

Gilchrist, Dr. J. D. F. 

Gosse, Capt. P. H., R.A.M.C. 

Gowdey, C. C. 

Graham, Major C. 

Grant, Major C. H. B. 

Gregory, A. G. 

Griffiths, Mrs. F. R. 

Haggerston (the late), Com- 
mander T. 

Harmer, Dr. S. F., f.r.s. 

Harvey, Mrs. 

Henslow, Rev. G. 

Heron-Allen, E., f.r.s. 

Hillier, Dr. W. T. 

Hinde, Mrs. 

Hingston, Capt. R. W. 

Hodgson, A. 0. 

Holland, Col. T. C. B. 

Hollis, A. C. 

Hollis, E. 

Holloway, C. T. 

Hopkinson, E. 

Hurrell, H. E. 

Imperial Bureau of Entomology 

Inglis, Lady 

Jackson, Sir Frederick, k.c.m.g. 



114 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Jackson, J. W. 

Jaderholm, Dr. E. 

Jobson, W. P. 

Johansen, Dr. A. C. 

Johnson, W. B. 

Jones, Walter 

Kanthack, E. 

Kemp, Robin 

King, H. H. 

Kirkpatrick, R. 

Kloss, C. Boden 

Kuala Lumpur, Federated Malay 

States Museum 
Kiirsteiner, C. W. 
Laing, Miss E. 

Lane, Lieut.-Col. Clayton, i.M.s. 
Lang, Dr. W. D. 
Lataste, Fernand 
La Touche, J. D. 
Legendre, Dr. J. 
Leiper, Dr. R. T. 
Lynes, Capt. Hubert, r.n. 
Lyle, T. H. 
Mackworth-Praed, C. 
Mair, P. 
Markham, Lady 
Marley, H. W. Bell 
Martin, Prof. A. 
Mathews, G. M. 

Meinertzhagen, Col. R. 

Methuen, Hon. P. A. 

Montague, Mrs. 

Morton, W. 

Muir, F. 

Hunt, H. 

New York, American Museum o£ 
Natural History 

Nias, Miss Caroline 

Nias, Lady 

Ogilvie, Mrs. F. Menteith 

Oldham, C. 

Oliver, A. M. 

Pare, Robert 

Patmore, Capt. F. J. 

Penrice, G. W. 

Percival, A. Blayney 

Percy, Lord William 

Phisalix, Mme. M. 

Phillips, Capt. W. W. A. 

Pilsbry, Dr. H. A. 



Pitt-Taylor, Colonel 
Pomeroy, J. 
Power, Bro. G. H. 
Portal, Major Maurice 
Pycraft, W. P. 
Quick, Dr. H. E. 
Rao, Prof. C. R. Narayan 
Rasmussen, Capt. J. 
Renouf, L. P. W. 
Ritchie, Dr. J. 
Robinson, H. C. 
Robinson, Romer 
Robson, G. C. 

Rothschild, Hon. N. Charles 
Rothschild, Lord, f.r.s. 
Ruthven, Dr. A. G. 
Sabellum Trading Company 
Sanders, E. 
Scharff, Dr. R. F. 
Scott, Mrs. Ross 

Selous, Mrs. F. C. 
Seltman, J. F. G. 

Sendall, Lady 

Sharpe, Sir A., k.c.m.g. 

Shaw, Rev. A. 

Sheringham, H. T. 

Sheppard, T. 

Shidlovsky, Dr. , 

Shroff, K. D. 

Smart, Commander, r.n. 

Smedley, A. S. Marsden 

Smith, A. 

Smith, Dr. H. Hammond 

Smith, Dr. Malcolm 

Someren, Dr. R. van 

Someren, Dr. V. G. L. van 

Spence, G. C. 

Stallard, G. 

Sterki, Dr. V. 

Stevenson-Hamilton, Major 

Stiebel, Major H. C. 

Swinny, H. H. 

Taylor, F. 

Taylor, Capt. F. W. 

Taylor, J. W. 

Taylor, W. T. 

Taunton, W. K. 

Telegraph Companies, Eastern 
and Associated 

Tervueren, Congo Museum 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 115 

Thomas, Oldfield, f.r.s. Wellcome Bureau o£ Scientific 

Thompson, H. Research 

Thompson, Major W. A. Wells, F. E. 

Thomson, R. M. Willis, C. A. 

Totton, Capt. A. K., m.c. Whatman, Mrs. 

Walton, Mrs. Whyte, Capt. H. W. 

Ward Bequest, Trustees o£ the Woodward, B. B. 

Rowland Woolward, Miss F. 

Ward, Rowland, Ltd. Worssam, Lieut. Cecil 

Waterston, Capt. J. Young, G. S. 
Washington, D.C., National Zoological Society of London 

Museum Zoological Survey of India 

VI. — Economic Zoology. 
I. Mammalia. 

The Falkland Islands Committee, on which the Museum was 
represented by the Keeper, has completed its labours. The Report, 
which deals specially with the Whaling problem and the protection 
of Elephant Seals, is ready for publication. 

Whaling and Sealing operations in the Southern Hemisphere, 
particularly off South Georgia, the South Shetlands and South 
Africa, have continued to receive much attention, and have formed 
the subject of frequent communications with the Colonial Office. 
The acclimatization of animals, and specially the Reindeer, in South 
Georgia, has also given rise to a good deal of correspondence with 
the same Government Department. 

The protection of Mammals in various parts of the world has 
received consideration. The threatened extermination of the 
Elephants in the Addo Bush near Port Elizabeth — practically the 
last remnant of the elephants of Cape Colony — has led to the 
passage of a number of letters between the Museum and various 
writers. 

During 1919, rats and mice, in relation to the public health and 
general economics, have again received much attention. Information 
and advice have been given in response to requests received from 
many public bodies and private individuals. In July Mr. M. A. C. 
Hinton, as the delegate of the Museum, attended the Congress of the 
Royal Sanitary Institute at Newcastle-upon-Tyne, where the rat and 
mouse problem was discussed from various points of view. 

II. AVES. 

The protection of Birds in British Colonies and Protectorates has 
continued to be the subject of communications with the Colonial 
Office. 

The special exhibit of Birds Beneficial to Agriculture has been 
completed and a guide-book has been issued. 

III. Pisces. 

Throughout the year Mr. Regan has served on the Freshwater 
Fish Committee, and he also acted as secretary of a committee 



116 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BKITISH MUSEUM. 

formed by the British Science Guild to consider scientific research 
in relation to fisheries. At the request o£ the R.A.M.C. officer in 
charge of Anti-Malaria work at Sheppey, Mr. Regan went to 
Sheppey on March 5th to inspect the marshes and advise with regard 
to fishes that eat mosquito larvae. 

In connexion with enquiries from the Colonial Office as to 
poisonous Fishes in the West Indies, arrangements have been made 
for Mr. P. Lechmere Guppy to collect for the Museum, in order 
that fishes reputed poisonous may be accurately determined. 

IV. MOLLUSCA. 

Advice has been given on the following subjects : — Choking of 
water-mains carrying sea-water, by mussels in a large power-station 
at Portobello, N.B. 

Means of determining Mollusca that are recognised as inter- 
mediate hosts of Bilharzia (many enquiries). Determination of 
Mollusca suspected of transmitting Fasciola liepatica (Liver Fluke) 
in North Rhodesia and of Bilharzia on the Gold Coast. 

Determination of Mollusca habitually eaten by Australian and 
New Zealand food-fishes. 

Following on an enquiry from the Chief Engineer of the 
Metropolitan Water Board, investigations were made on the subject 
of the " Dreissensia " nuisance in waterworks, on remedial measures, 
and on means of prevention. The fresh water mollusc Dreissensia 
polymorpha frequently gives rise to serious trouble in waterworks by 
causing obstruction in the supply-system, and by pollution due to 
death and decay of the animals. The area of distribution of this 
prolific mollusc has been extending during the last fifty years, and 
the trouble arising from its presence in waterworks may tend to 
increase rather than diminish unless due precautions are taken. 

V. Arachnida. 

1. Mites from domestic animals, especially poultry, determined 
for the United States Bureau of Agriculture. 

2. A mite (^Actineda vitis) feeding on aphides, especially woolly 
aphis, determined. 

3. An alleged poisonous spider (Latlirodedus mactans, var.) 
named for the Wellcome Bureau of Scientific Research. 

4. A species of " Red Spider " (^Paratetranyclius simplex) 
damaging date-palms in Mesopotamia, described. 

5. " Red Spiders " injurious to peaches, vines, etc., named for 
a correspondent. 

6. A species of mite of the genus Tarsonemus, supposed to 
damage ferns, determined. 

VI. Crustacea. 

The Assistant in charge of Crustacea has been largely occupied 
with the study of Marine Boring Animals (including Mollusca and 
Worms as well as Crustacea) submitted for examination by the 
Committee of the Institution of Civil Engineers on the Deterioration 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 117 

o£ Structures exposed to Sea-action. An exhibit illustrative o£ this 
subject has been arranged in one of the cases in the Central Hall ; 
and a pamphlet, forming No. 10 of the " Economic Series," has 
been published. 

VII. Platyhelminthes and Nemathelminthes. 

On numerous occasions parasitic worms inhabiting man or other 
animals have been named for correspondents, and more particularly 
at the request of the Imperial Bureau of Entomology, for corres- 
pondents abroad. 

Enquiries on the subject of parasitic worms have also been 
answered for the Queen's Hospital for Children, Hackney, and for 
the Infant Welfare Centre, Soiithall, as well as enquiries from 
private correspondents. 

VIII. Hydrozoa. 

On the question of the " Sea Moss " Fishery a correspondence 
has passed between a member of the Trade and the Museum, with a 
view to expanding the industry in home waters. 

IX. PORIFERA. 

Enquiries concerning the economics of Sponge-cultivation in the 
West Indies (Bahamas, Turks Islands, and Virgin Isles) were made, 
and samples of commercial sponges were named and reported on 
from the point of view of their suitability for exploitation. 

VII. — Students and Visitors. 

The number of visits paid to the Zoological Department during 
the year 1919 by Students and other persons requiring assistance or 
information amounted to 7,459. This number includes the visits 
paid by Students holding tickets entitling them to do special work 
in the Exhibition Galleries. 

In the 10 previous years the numbers were as follows. From 
1909 to 1912 inclusive the present Department of Entomology was 
included in the Department of Zoology : — 

5,553 in the year 1918. 



6,314 




1917. 


7,018 




1916. 


8,020 




1915. 


9,235 




1914. 


9,982 




1913. 


12,564 




1912. 


12,175 




1911. 


12,443 


?9 


1910. 


11,461 


5? 


1909. 



Sidney F. Harmer. 



118 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Department of Entomology. 

I, Arrangements and Conservation. 

Exhibition Series. — The revision of the series of economic 
specimens exhibited in the North Hall has been continued and an 
exhibit dealing with lac and wax has been added. Owing to the 
evaporation o£ the spirit, several of the jars containing preparations 
in spirit have had to be refilled, and where necessary re-sealed ; 52 
jars in the economic series and 22 in the Insect gallery have thus 
been dealt with. 

Study Series. — The Department is, as in former years, greatly 
indebted for the assistance of voluntary workers in the identification 
of species and in the arrangement of certain parts of the collections. 
Daring the course of the year the members of the stafE absent on 
War Service returned to duty at varying intervals and the 
arrangement and incorporation of specimens in the sections for 
which they are severally responsible much more nearly approach 
pre-war conditions. 

In the Coleoptera the expansion and re-arrangement of the 
C'arabidae have been continued, Mr. H. E. Andrewes having, as on 
many former occasions, rendered valuable help in the determination 
and description of new species of Oriental genera. The greater 
part of the Central American (Godman-Salvin) Collection has been 
incorporated. The large collection of Hawaiian Ptinidse formed 
and named by Dr. Perkins has been incorporated. The re-arrange- 
ment of the Endomychidae has been completed and many new genera 
and species described. Many species of Melolonthidse, including 
various important pests of crops have been worked out and described. 
The Brenthidse of Madagascar have been sent for determination to 
M. Pouillaude. The re-arrangement of the Phytophaga has been 
continued, the Cryptocephalinse having been completed, and the 
Halticinge begun, all types of ih^ latter having been incorporated. 
Mr. Gr. E. Bryant has again generously placed his services at 
the disposal of the Department for this purpose. The family 
Pythidse has been revised and new genera and species described, 
and revisions of various genera, including Cestrinus, Cissites, 
Pala'stra, &c., have been prepared. The extensive collection of 
Heteromera made and presented by Mr. G. E. Bryant has been 
determined and in great part incorporated, as has a part of the 
Nevinson Collection and numerous smaller collections from various 
regions, particularly from M. Vi talis de Salvaza from Indo-China, 
and from Prof. C. F. Baker, from the Philippine Islands. Mr. 
G. C. Champion has continued work on the Malacodermata, and 
re-arranged and incorporated material in those groups which he has 
studied. 

In the Lepidoptera Rhopalocera the re-arrangement of the 
Hesperidse has been continued and all accessions, especially the 



DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY. 119 

(jrodnian-Salviii Collection, incorporated. A certain amount of 
work of the same kind has been done on the Erycinidse. Mis- 
cellaneous collections, small and large, have been worked out and 
incorporated ; in this connection mention may be made of the 
Wickham, Godfrey, Avinoff, Rybot, Phillips, and Selous collections, 
while a final selection has been made from the papered specimens 
of the Neave Coll(;ction for setting. In addition the arrangement 
of the duplicate collections has been overhauled, named and made 
more accessible, while a systematic card catalogue and index has 
been started for the Hesperidse. 

In the Heterocera the (/atalogue of Lepidoptera Phalaense Supple- 
ment, Volume II, has been passed through the press (except the 
indicesj. In the Catalogue of Noctuidse work has been continued on 
the sub-family Hypeninse, while in the Pyralidse the classification of 
the Anerastianae has been continued anil is approaching completion. 

In the Tineina the determination and arrangement of unincor- 
porated material belonging to various families has been continued, 
the whole of the Dodd Collection from Queensland has been 
mounted up and types and typical specimens have been identified 
and labelled. A great part of the Doubleday Collection has also 
been transferred to the standard Museum Cabinets. 

In the Diptera a large number of Nematocera, chiefly British, 
have been mounted and labelled. The collection of British Culicidse 
has been expanded, recent accessions being incorporated, and the 
same has been done with a large part of the British Chironomidae, 
while numerous collections of mosquitoes from various sources, have 
been determined. A handbook of the British Mosquitoes is on its 
way through the press. The undetermined Psychodidse have been 
lent to M. A. Tonnoir, of Brussels, and the African Tipulidse to Mr. 
C. P. Alexander, of Urbana, Illinois. The Tabanidse of Palestine 
have been worked out, described, and incorporated ; the Tabanidse 
of the Percy Sladen Trust Expedition to the Western Indian Ocean 
liave been similarly dealt with. Dipterous material from various 
localities has been determined and incorporated. Large series of 
Tropical African Tachinidte and Ortalidse, have also been incorpor- 
ated, while, preparatory to a revision of the Museum Pamphlet, 
"The House-Fly as a Danger to Health," for a new edition, the 
Musca domestica group in the General collection of Diptera has been 
worked at ; previous determinations were revised, and much fresh 
material determined and incorporated. 

The undermentioned Museum Pamphlets were revised and the 
revisions seen through the press. 

" Special Guide No. 7. Guide to the Specimens and Enlarged 
Models of Insects and Ticks exhibited in the Central Hall, illustrating 
their importance in the Spread of Disease." (2nd edition). 

" Instructions for Collectors, No. 5 — Diptera (Two-Winged 
Flies.") (4th edition). 

" Instructions for Collectors, No. 6 — Culicidse." 



120 ACCOUNTS, P:TC., of the BRITISH MUSEUM, 

In the Hymenoptera Mr. R. E. Turner has again devoted his 
whole time to the work o£ the Department, and has continued his 
re-arrangement o£ the Braconidse. Numerous collections have been 
determined and incorporated, in especial collections from Upper 
Mekong, Palestine, and Tonkin, while the Australian Ichneumonidae 
belonging to the genus Labium^ have been revised. The Rev. 
F. D. Morice has continued the re-arrangement o£ the Tenthredinidse, 
all the African species now being incorporated, and the whole group 
arranged according to the "Genera Insectorum." Mr. J. Waterston 
has continued his work on the Chalcididse. 

In the Rhynchota large additions of Heteroptera and Homoptera 
from Indo-China, India, and New Caledonia, and Cicadidse from 
the Belgian Congo Region and British Central Africa, have been 
identified, incorporated, and described when new. The incorporation 
of the Distant Collection has been continued and brought nearly to 
completion. Large additions have also been made to the collections 
of Aphidse and Coccidse, and the re-arrangement of the latter 
group begun. 

In the Neuroptera and Orthoptera many identifications have been 
made and types compared, for enquirers. 

Imperial Bureau of Entomology. 

The work of the Imperial Bureau of Entomology has continued, 
as in past years, to be carried on to a great extent in the Entomo- 
logical Department, and with considerable advantage to both. With 
the return to normal conditions after the war, the need of additional 
space to afford sufficient accommodation for the staffs of both the 
Imperial Bureau and the Department of Entomology, has again 
become very pressing. 

II. Duplicates and Exchanges. 

(a). Duplicates. 

Duplicates have been presented to the following institution : — 
The Royal Scottish Museum. Duplicates have also been presented 
to the following gentlemen, who have rendered service by naming 
specimens : — Mr. H. E. Andrewes ; Dr. Malcolm Cameron ; Dr. R. 
Jeannel ; Lieut. R. Ley ; and Col. Winn Sampson. 

(6). Exchanges. 

Exchanges have been made with the following museum and 
individuals : — The Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge ; 
and with Mr. G. Arnold ; M. G. Babault ; M. A. Boucomont ; 
M. A. Bourgoin ; Mr. P. Preston Clark ; Dr. F. H. Gravely ; 
M. Maurice Pic ; Lord Rothschild ; and Mr. W. R. Sherrin. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY. 121 

III. Departmental Library. 

As the Library has continued to be worked in conjunction with 
that o£ the Zoological Department, particulars in reference to it 
will be found included under the corresponding head, in the return 
made by the Keeper of Zoology. 

IV. PuhUcations. 

In addition to the official publications issued by the Trustees 
(see pp. 84, 85), the following papers have been published in 
connection with the different branches of the collection. 

By G. J. Arrow : — " A remarkable new Ball-rolling Beetle 
(Fam. Scarabaeidse)." — Ann. and Mag. Nat. Hist. (9) iii, pp. 
433-435. 

" Systematic Notes on a few Melolonthine Coleoptera." — Ih, 
(9) iv, pp. 21-29. 

" Notes on Ruteline Coleoptera and Descriptions of a few New 
Species in the British Museum." — Ih., pp. 379-385. 

By K. G. Blair : — " Coleoptera Heteromera, collected in 
Korinchi, West Sumatra, by Messrs. H. C. Robinson and C. Boden 
Kloss." — Jour. Fed. Malay States Museums, viii. 

" Synonymic Note."— Ent. Mon. Mag. (3) v, pp. 101-103. 

" Notes on the Pvthidse, with descriptions of New Species." — 
lb., pp. 112-124. 

" Some Notes on Cetonia aurata.^'' — lb., pp. 200-203. 

By G. C. Champion : — " Notes on various Species of the Genus 
Chalchas, Blanch." — Ent. Mon. Mag. (3) v, pp. 1-3. 

" The Malacoderm Genera Prionoceri(s and Idgia, and their 
Sexual Characters [(^oleoptera]." — Ann. and Mag. Nat. Hist. (9) 
iii, pp. 325-372. 

" Notes on the African and Asiatic Species of Melyris, Fab. 
(sensu lato), with an account of their Sexual Characters." — lb. (9) 
iv, pp. 157-219. 

By Sir G. F. Hampson : — " A Classification of the ^geriadse 
of the Oriental and ^Ethiopian Regions." — Nov. Zool. xxvi, pp. 
46-119. 

"■ Descriptions of new Pyralida^ of the Families Crambinse and 
Siginae."— Ann. and Mag. Nat. Hist. (9) iii, pp. 275-292 ; 437- 
475 ; 533-547 ; lb. (9), iv, pp. 53-68 ; 137-154 ; 305-326. 

By F. W. Edwards : — " Diptera collected in Korinchi, West 
Sumatra, by Messrs. H. C. Robinson, and C. Boden Kloss " — Jour. 
Fed. Malay States Museum, viii. 

" A note on the Egg-burster of Eucephalous Fly-larvse" — Ann. 
and Mag. Nat. Hist. (9) iii, p. 372 — " Some Parthenogenetic 
Chironomidse"— i&. (9) iii, p. 222. 

"The Larva and Pupa of TceniorhyncJius richiardii Fit:'' — Ent. 
Mon. Mag. (3) v, p. 83— "A new British Heteropezine Fly"— //>., 
p. 103. 

*'■ GnopJiomijia tripudians, Bergr., a new British FIv " — 7 A., 
p. 176. 



122 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



By E. E. Austen : — " Anti-Mosquito Measures in Palestine, 
during the Campaigns o£ 1917-1918." — Trans. Soc. Trop. Med. and 
Hygiene xiii, 1919, pp. 47-60. 

By W. L. Distant : — " The Heteroptera o£ Indo-China." — The 
Entomologist, Jan., July, Sept. 1919. 

" Description of a New Genus and Species of Cicadidte." — Ann. 
and Mag. Nat. Hist. (9) iii, p. 43. 

"On a New Species of Heteroptera, Fam. Pyrrhocoridae." — //>., 
p. 218. 

" Ethiopian Heteroptera (Reduviidse)." — 7/>., p. 466. 

"British Indian Reduviidse." — lb. (9) iv, p. 71. 

" C'icadidse from Tropical Africa." — //>., p. 136. 

" Ethiopian Cicadidse." — Rev. Zoolog. Africain, vii, p. 155. 

"A New Lygseid Bug found amongst Stored Rice in Java." — 
Bull. Ent. Research x, p. 41. 

By R. E. Turner: — "On the Hymenoptera collected in New 
Caledonia by P. W. Montague in 1914." — Ann. and Mag. Nat. 
Hist. (9) iii, pp. 229-239. 

"Notes on Fossorial Hymenoptera, XXXVII. On some 
Sphecinse in the British Museum."— JA., pp. 393-397. "XXXVIII. 
On New Ethiopian Species."— 7 />., (9) iv, pp. 44-50. "XXXIX. 
New Sphecoidea collected in Palestine by Major E. E. Austen." 
//>., pp. 69-70. 

" New Australian Diplopterous Hymenoptera." — Ih. (9) iii, pp. 
398-399. 

" On Indo-Chinese Hymenoptera collected by R. Vitalis de 
Salvaza."— /i., pp. 425-433, 483-487. I h. (9) iv, 385-395. 

" Notes on the Ichneumonidce in the British Museum." — Ih. 
(9) iii, pp. 550-558. Ih. (9) iv, pp. 36-44. 

By the Rev. F. D. Morice : — " Notes on Australian Sawfiies, 
especially the " Authors' Types," and other specimens in the British 
Museum Natural History and the Hope Collection of the Oxford 
University Museum, with diagnostic Synopses of the Genera and 
Species, and photographs illustrating their structural characters." — 
Trans. Ent. Soc, London, 1919, pp. 247-333. 

V. — Acquisitions. 

The number of specimens added to the Insect Collection during 
the year is 154,244, made up as shown in the following table : — 





Donations. 


Purchases. 


Exchanges. 


Totals. 


Coleoptera... 


73,540 


1,000 


293 


74,833 


Lepidoptera 


32,004 


— 


221 


32,225 


Hymenoptera 


7,526 


3,532 


33 


11,091 


Diptera 


20,187 


— 




20,187 


Rhynchota 


5,968 


4,000 


105 


10,073 


Orthoptera 


500 


— 


— 


500 


Neuroptera 


200 


— 


— 


201) 


Other Orders 


532 


— 




532 


Larvae, Pupas, &c 


4,603 


— 




4,603 


Totals ... 


145,060 


8,532 


652 


154,244 



DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY. 123 

The most important of these accessions are the following : — 

rrom various localities. 

52,749 Insects, comprising 4,801 Lepidoptera, and 47,298 
Coleoptera, from Britain and Rhodesia, collected by the late Mr. 
Hereward C. Dollman ; presented hij J. C. DoUman, Esq. 

19,000 Lepidoptera, chiefly from Brazil ; presented bij E. 
Duki afield- J ones, Esq. 

16,975 specimens, mainly Coleoptera, chiefly Oriental and 
Australian ; presented hi/ G. E. Bryant, Esq. 

9,158 specimens of various orders ; presented IJJ/ the Imperial 
Bnreav of Entomolof///. 

4,284 Hymenoptera, being the collection of the late Dr. Harold 
Swale ; presented hi/ Mrs. Harold Swale. 

1,313 specimens of various orders, chiefly from Britain and 
Algeria ; presented hij Lord Rothschild. 

492 specimens, mainly Lepidoptera, chiefly from the Cameroons; 
presented by Capt. F. H. FitzRoy. 

156 specimens of various orders ; presented by Capt. H. W. 
Whyte. 

The ninth instalment of the Distant Collection, containing 4,000 
specimens of Rhynchota, and 1,000 Coleoptera. 

The Waterhouse Collection of Mymarid?e (Hymenoptera) 
containing 3,532 specimens. 

Prom Europe. 

9,382 British insects, chiefly Diptera ; presented by F. C. 
Adams, Esq. 

4,282 British Diptera ; p/resented by F. W. Edwards, Esq. 

3,463 British Homoptera, set, named, and systematically 
arranged ; presented by W. West, Esq. 

350 Lepidoptera from Macedonia ; presented by W. Blanchard, 
Esq. 

249 specimens of British Insects ; presented bij G. C. Champion, 

190 British Diptera ; presented by W. R. Ogilvie- Grant, Esq. 
162 European Coleoptera ; presented by Dr. R. Jeannel. 

Prom Asia. 

2,109 specimens of various orders collected in Palestine and Mt. 
Sinai by the donor ; presented by Major E. E. Austen, D.S.O. 

1,417 specimens of various orders from Mesopotamia ; presented 
by Mrs. R. Brewitt-Faylor. 

634 Lepidoptera from Asia Minor ; presented by Capt. W. W. A. 
Phillips. 

501 Coleoptera from Borneo, Singapore, and Philippine Islands ; 
presented by Prof. C. F. Baker. 

447 Lepidoptera from Asia Minor ; presented bi/ Major N. V. L. 
Rybot, D.S.O. 

188 Coleoptera from Sikkim ; presented by H. Stevens, Esq. 



124 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

162 specimens of various orders from Syria and Palestine ; 
presented hy CoJ. E. P. Sewell, C.M.G., D.S.O., R.A.M.C. 

From Africa. 

538 Lepidoptera from the Gold Coast ; presented hy Capt. 
J. W. G. Saunders. 

251 specimens of various orders from Nigeria ; presented hy 
Lady Strathcona. 

230 Coleoptera from Uganda ; presented hy Prof. E. B. Poidton. 

From Australasia. 

266 specimens of various orders from New Zealand ; presented 
hy ^\. E. Br'ookes, Esq. 

260 Coleoptera from Australia, Norfolk Island, and Lord Howe 
Island ; presented hy the S. Australian Mxiseinn. 

VI. — Economic Entomology. 

Enquiries on matters of importance from an economic point of 
view have continued to come in and in increasing numbers. Signs 
are evident that as the public become more fully aware of the 
facilities that are provided for them, this side of museum work 
will become increasingly important. The homeland and the colonies 
and possessions have taken advantage of these facilities. During 
the year the instructions for the collection of mosquitoes have been 
revised, and the pamphlet dealing with the Housefly has been in 
great part re-written, while work in connection with the investiga- 
tion of insect pests of grain (Royal Society War Committee) has 
been continued. 

Amongst the subjects on which information or advice has 
been sought and as far as possible given, the following may be 
mentioned : — 

Coleoptera. 

(1) Heterohostry chits cequalis Waterh. : larva; burrowing in 

the sides of a wooden box. 

(2) Lyctus brunneus causing frequent damage to furniture. 

(3) Anohium striatum damaging antique furniture, and other 

species of Aiiohium boring in wood — numerous enquiries, 

(4) Carpophihis hemipterus Cr. breeding in dates in a grocer's 

shop. 

(5) Ptinus tectus Boield, infesting a grocer's shop. The 

source of infestation was traced to dog biscuits. 

(6) Sitodrepa panicea, breeding freely in dry soup pre- 

parations. 

(7) Mezium a fine breeding in macaroni. 

(8) Dermestes vidpinus F., and Necrohia rufipes De G., 

damaging wrappings of goods from the Argentine, and 
then the goods themselves. 

(9) Ptinus sexpunctatus Pz., damaging lead on the roof of 

a house. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY. 125 

(10) Tetropium gahrieli, perforating lead lined wooden vats. 

(11) Wire worms. 

(12) Phi/Uojyertha horticola L., constituting a plague in several 

parts of the country. 

(13) Apoderus coryli Oliv., rendering the leaves of Hazel trees 

unsightly in a garden suburb. 

(14) Psylliodes afinis injuring potato leaves. 

(15) Hylastes palliatas Gryll., and Tomicus laricis Fabr., 

damaging Scots pine. 

(16) Xylehorus saxeseni Ratz., and Platypus cylindrus Fabr., 

boring in Chestnut trees. 

(17) Antlirenus pimpinellce Fabr., larvse attacking the long 

cloth upholstery of a motor car and ruining it. 

Lkfidoptera. 

(18) Hepialus lupulinus caterpillars feeding on the roots of 

Iris and other garden plants. 

(19) Lycia Jmiaria — caterpillars in very large numbers in 

various districts in and near London. 

(20) Caterpillars of Clisiocampa neustria Linn., and Hyhernia 

defoliaria, damaging Cherry trees. 

(21) Tortrix viridana : complaints as to the damage to Oak 

trees caused by the caterpillars of this moth received 
from all over the country. 

(22) Larvae of Borkhausenia pseiuiospretella Stn., found in 

bedding. 

(23) Clothes moths — the usual yearly budget. 

Hymenoptera. 

(24) Pteromalifs deplanatus Nees. A very large amount of 

correspondence has been entailed through the annoyance 
which this insect causes by its presence in great numbers 
in houses during the winter. 

(25) Cremastogaster gerhonensis Emery, doing very great damage 

to cocoa plantations in West Africa. 

(26) Phymatocera aterrima — larvae seriously injuring tlie 

leaves of Solomon's Seal. 

(27) Sirex gigas, S. cyaneus, and S. noctilio : Numerous 

enquiries regarding these species have been dealt with. 

(28) Bees and bee-culture — literature on the subject. 

Other Orders. 

(29) A species of Thrips has been causing very great damage to 

cocoa plantations in Uganda. 

(30) Aspidiotus destructor Sign., devastating the foliage of 

cocoanut palms in Belgian Congo. 

(31) Chlorita flavescens seriously injuring the leaves of apple 

trees in different districts. 

(32) Myzus ribis and ScMzoneura fodiens damaging currants in 

a large garden. 



126 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

(33) Phorodon hunwii Schr. information as to the effect of 

weatlier on its multiplication. 

(34) Cockroaches — methods of extermination — the usual bulky 

correspondence. 

(35) Linognathis piliferxs (Burm.). a louse infesting a dog. 

Miscellaneous. 

(36) The common names in French and Spanish of certain 

insects of economic importance — for trade catalogues. 

(37) Lepidopterous larvse in sauce. 

(38) Corks of champagne bottles being damaged. 

(39) Locusts, their control in Borneo and elsewhere. 

(40) The pollination of Scarlet Runners by humble bees. 

(41) The parasites of the furniture beetle and the possibility of 

introducing them into New Zealand. 

(42) Shellac, methods of production, habits and life history of 

the Lac Insect (two enquiries). 

(43) Sericulture, its possibility of introduction into Britain, &c. 

(44) Insects in drinking water as an index of its contamination. 

(45) Mites on pear and walnut trees. 

VII. — Stifdents and Visito7's. 

The number of visits paid to the department during the year by 
students and other persons seeking information or assistance was 
3,306. 



(\ J. Gahan. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 127 



Department of Geology. 
I. — Arrangement and Conservation. 

Mammalia (Galleries 1 and 2). — The unexhibited collection o£ 
Primates and Carnivora in the drawers of table-cases 2, 2a, has been 
arranged and labelled to incorporate recent acquisitions. 

The rostra of Ziphioid whales have been arranged and labelled 
in pier-case 4. 

Number of specimens of Mammalia registered, 27. 

Aves (Gallery 2). — Bones of birds from a cavern near Chud- 
leigh, Devon, have been labelled and incorporated. 
Number of specimens of Aves registered, 41. 

Reptilia and Batracliia (Galleries 3, 4, 5, 11). — Th& arrange- 
ment and labelling of the Anomodontia exhibited in wall-case 10 
have been completed. 

A large collection of (jhelonian remains from Mauritius has been 
labelled and incorporated, and a slip-catalogue of the whole collec- 
tion of Chelonia has been prepared. 

The large skeleton of Ichthyosaurus plati/odon, from the Lias of 
Stockton, has been repaired and so far as possible freed from decay- 
ing pyrites. 

Number of specimens of Reptilia and Batrachia registered, 241. 

Pisces (Gallery 6). — Wall-cases 1, 2, containing Elasmobranchii, 
have been renovated, with many new labels, and several skulls of 
Hyhodus^ from the Wealden of Sussex, have been added to the 
exhibited collection. 

The collection of Palaeozoic Elasmobranchii has been revised and 
partly re-labelled, and the specimens exhibited in the table-cases 2, 
3, 4 have been re-arranged. 

Various Tertiary Fishes and Jurassic Fishes from Australia 
have been labelled and incorporated. 

The preparation of the fish-remains in drawers, to reduce the 
specimens in size, is still in progress. 

Number of specimens of Pisces registered, 229. 

Mollusca (Galleries 7 and 8, and Workroom). — The determina- 
tion of the Eocene Mollusca from Nigeria has been continued, and 
various small collections of Tertiary and Cretaceous Mollusca from 
other localities, offered as gifts, have been reported on. 

Tertiary Lamellibranchia and Gastropoda from Egypt have been 
labelled and incorporated. 

Triassic Ammonites from Bosnia have been arranged and pre- 
pared for study. 

The Cephalopoda registered, labelled and incorporated, include : 
Carboniferous Nautiloids and Permiian Ammonoids from Malay 
Peninsula (Scrivenor coll.) ; a Carboniferous Goniatite, Glyphioceras 
diadema, from Belgium, figured by A. Vaughan, 1915, Quart. 
Journ, Geol. Soc, vol. Ixxi, pi. v., f . 6 (Vaughan coll.) ; Liassic 



128 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Aiiitnonites from Somerset (Mockler coll.), and from Dorset des- 
cribed and figured by A. E. Trueman, 1919, Q.J.Q.S., vol. Ixxv 
(W. D. Lang coll.) ; Upper Jurassic Ammonoids from the Balearic 
Islands (D. M. A. Bate coll.) ; Cretaceous Ammonoids and Nauti- 
loids from Aston Rowant, Oxon. (Withers coll.) ; a Cretaceous 
Nautiloid from Egypt (Dudgeon coll.) ; Eocene Nautili from Essex 
(Hazzledine Warren coll.) ; Miocene Nautiloids from Malta (J. C. 
Walton coll.). 

A Triassic Ammonite, Discophyllites cf. ehneri, from New 
Zealand, described by C. T. Trechmann, 1917, Quart. Journ. Geol. 
Soc, vol. Ixxiii, p. 184, pi. xvii, fig. 7, (Trechmann coll.) ; and 
a Nautilus from the Chalk Rock of Aston Rowant, have been 
mounted and exhibited in wall-cases 12 and 2. 

Number of Mollusca registered : — Cephalopoda, 294 ; Gast- 
ropoda, 779 ; Lamellibranchia, 616. Total, 1,689. 

Arthropoda (Gallery 8 and Workroom). — The acquisitions 
registered, labelled, and incorporated include Lower Silurian 
Ostracods from Horderley, Salop (Bather coll.) ; Silurian Anatifopsis 
from Otisville, N.Y. ; Coal Measures Xiphosura and other arthropods 
from Rochdale, Lanes. (Sutcliffe coll.) ; Cretaceous crabs from 
Dakota (Over coll.) ; Decapods from the London Clay of Essex 
(Hazzledine Warren coll.). 

The registration of the Insects in Amber and Gum Copal, 
transferred from the Zoological Dept., has been completed. The 
Insects from Gurnet Bay have been partly re-arranged as their 
study progresses. 

Insects from the Carboniferous, Rhaetic, and Lower Eocene, 
and the fossil Millipedes, have been checked and re-registered where 
necessary, in connection with loans to specialists for determination. 
An insect wing, the type of Hypermegethes northunibrice, Bolton, 
(Eltringham don.), and the type-specimens of the Xiphosura, 
Euproops amice and Belinurtis treeJimanni, have been placed on 
exhibition. 

Additions have been made to the exhibited series of Cirripedia 
and of Cambrian Trilobites. 

The slip-catalogues of exhibited specimens, of amber insects, 
of new genera, and of various additions, have been continued. 

Number of specimens of Arthropoda registered, 595. 

Echinoderma (Gallery 8). — The acquisitions registered, labelled, 
and incorporated include squeezes of Ordovician Cystids from 
Girvan ; Cystids from the Devonian of Virginia (Greger coll.) ; 
Carl)oniferous Crinoids from the Morrow Group of Oklahoma, and 
the Chouteau Limestone and Fern Glen formation of Missouri 
(Greger coll.) ; Eugeniacrinids from the Portlandian of Stramberg 
(Trechmann coll.) ; Balanocrinus from the London Clay of Essex 
(Hazzledine Warren coll.) ; Blastoids from the Morrow Group of 
Oklahoma and the Burlington Limestone of Illinois (Greger coll.) ; 
Asteroids from the Devonian of Bundenbach and North Devon ; 
Jurassic Echinoids from various European localities (T. Wright 



DEPARTMENT OP GEOLOGY. 129 

coll.) ; a large series o£ Collyrites and other Echiiioids from the 
Oxford Clay of St. Ives (Jesson coll.) ; Echinoids from the Cretace- 
ous of Eastern England (Bower coll.) ; Fihularia from the Eocene 
of Nigeria, described by H. L. Hawkins (Kitson coll.) ; Echinoids 
from the Lenham beds, described by R. B. Newton (Prestwich and 
Wallas colls.). 

The slip-catalogues of specimens studied or exhibited, of all 
genera and species of other classes, have been continued. 

Number of specimens of Echinoderma registeretl : — Echinoidea, 
394 ; Asteroidea, 11 ; Crinoidea, 300 ; Blastoidea, 31 ; Cystoidea, 
206 ; Total, 942. 

Annelida (Gallery 8 and Workroom). — Specimens of " Terehella 
'caneellata " from the Eocene near St. Omer (Lowe coll.), and the 
Chalk Rock near Aston Rowant (Withers coll.), have been labelled 
and incorporated. 

Number of Annelida registered, 15. 

Brachiopoda (Gallery 8 and Workroom). — The collection of 
Carboniferous Brachiopoda has been revised and rearranged, and a 
new selection has been arranged for exhibition, with printed labels, 
in table-case 18. 

Number of specimens of Brachiopoda registered, 176. 

Polyzoa (Gallery 8 and Workroom). — Progress has been made 
with determining and cataloguing the Cretaceous Polyzoa. 
Number of specimens of Polyzoa registered, 82. 

Anthozoa and Hydrozoa (Gallery 10 and Workroom). — Carboni- 
ferous Corals from the A. Vaughan collection have been registered, 
labelled, and incorporated. 

Number of specimens of Anthozoa and Hydrozoa registered, 47. 

Porifera ami Protozoa (Gallery 10). — Specimens from the G. J. 
Hinde collection have been registered, labelled, and incorporated. 
Number of specimens of Porifera and Protozoa registered, 116. 

Plantce (Gallery 10). — Cretaceous plants from Dakota, U.S.A., 
and Tertiary plants from the Arctic regions have been examined, 
labelled, and incorporated in the collection. 

Sections have been made of fossil wood from Kerguelen Island 
for study and determination. 

A selection of the Antarctic fossil plants has been exhibited, with 
printed labels, in wall-case 14. An exhibition of Arctic Tertiary 
plants has been planned in wall-case 10, which has been re-fitted. 

Number of specimens of Plantse registered, 667. 

Rock-specimens ami Tracks (Gallery 11). — The unexhibited 
specimens of rocks and tracks have been arranged in drawers, and a 
slip-catalogue of the collection has been made. 

Number of specimens of rocks and tracks registered, 131. 



130 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

II, — Duplicates and Kxchanyes. 

Duplicate fossils have been presented to the Geological Museum, 
University of Liverpool, and to the University Museum, Oxford. 

Exchanges of duplicate fossils and plaster casts have been made 
with the Zoological Museum, University of Cambridge, and with 
Mr. W. H. Over, University of South Dakota, U.S.A. 

III. — Departmental Library. 

The additions to the Library which have been registered, 
stamped, catalogued, and press-marked, comprise 132 new works 
and pamphlets, of which 21 were purchased and 111 presented ; 
316 parts of serials in progress, of which 107 were purchased, 168 
presented, and 41 obtained through H.M. Stationery Office. 36 
sheets of maps were acquired, 4 by purchase and 32 presented. 18 
photographs were presented and 100 purchased. 7 original draw- 
ings were presented and 3 volumes of manuscript were purchased. 
15 volumes and pamphlets were obtained by transfer from other 
Departments. 

lOG volumes have been bound, press-marked and returned to the 
shelves. 675 geological maps have been mounted on linen and 72 
pamphlets have been put into covers. 

1,449 visits were made to the Library by students and others. 

The following is a list of personal donors to the Library : — 
Bather, Dr. F. A. Lang, Dr. W. D. 

Bell, Prof. J. Newton, R. Bullen. Esq. 

Broom, Dr. R. Osborn, Prof. H. F. 

Butler, Mrs. . Pontier, G., Esq. 

Clarke, Dr. W. E. Pratt, Joseph H., Esq. 

Dibley, G. E., Esq. Rendle, Dr. A. B. 

Ellis, Dr. David. Richardson, L., Esq. 

Etheridge, R., Esq., Jun. Schuchert, Prof. C. 

Falconer, Dr. J. D. Scott, Dr. D. H. 

Faura-y-Sans, Dr. M. Sherborn, C. Davies, Esq. 

Flower, Capt. S. Springer, Frank, Esq. 

Gregory, Prof. J. W. Stefanescu, Prof. S. 

Hayashi, Prof. T. Stopes, Dr. M. C. 

Henderson, Dr. J. Thomas, H, H., Esq. 

Hughes, G. R., Esq. Tomlin, J. R., Esq. 

Hutton, Miss H. Mary. Windhausen, Dr. A. 

Jackson, J. Wilfrid, Esq. Wintle, W. J., Esq. 

Jongmans, Dr. W. J. Woodward, Dr. A. S, 

Keith, Sydney, Esq., F.R.P.S. Woodward, B. B., Esq. 
Kennard, A. S., Esq. Woolnough, Dr. W. G. 

Kilgour, W. Archer, Esq. 

IV. — Puhlications. 

The MS. of the third volume of the Catalogue of Cretaceous 
Polyzoa has been completed, and progress has been made with the 
Supplement to the Catalogue of Fossil Fishes. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 131 

Apart from the official publications of the Trustees, the follow- 
ing descriptive papers dealing with different parts of the collection 
have been contributed to scientific journals during 1919 : — 

By Dr. A. S. Woodward. 

1. Notes on the Fish-remains from the Pickwell Down Sand- 
stones. Gaol. Mag. (G), vol. 6, pp. 102, 103. 

2. On two new Elasmobranch Fishes (^Crossorhhnts jurassicus, 
sp. nov., and Protospiiiax aimectans, gen. et sp. nov.) from the 
Upper Jurassic Lithographic Stone of Bavaria. Proc. Zool. Soc. 
1918 (1919), pp. 231-235, pi. i. 

3. The Fossil Fishes of the English Wealden and Purbeck 
Formations. Part iii, pp. 105-148, pis, xxi-xxvi. Palaeont. Soc^ 

By Dr. F. A. Bather. 

1. Notes on Yunnan Cystidea, part iii. Geol. Mag. (6), 
vol. vi, pp. 71-77, 110-115, pi. iii, pp. 255, 262, pi. vi, pp. 
318-325. 

2. Cupressocrinns c/ihher, n. sp., du Devonien suporieur de 
Belgique. Bull. Soc. Beige Greol., etc., vol. xxviii, pp. 129-13^). 

3. The antiquity of parasitic disease. Geol, Mag. (6) vol. vi, 
pp. 276, 277. 

4. The distribution of " Terehdla'' rancellata. Ibid., p. 466. 

By Mr. R. B. Newton. 

1. On Raetomya, a new genus of Pelecypoda, from the 
Tertiary rocks of Egypt and Southern Nigeria. Proc. Malac. Soc». 
vol. xiii, pp. 79-84, pi. i, 

2. On a sandstone cast of Aturia atari (Basterot), froui the 
Miocene of Western Australia. Proc. Malac. Soc, vol. xiii, pp. 
160-167, pis. V, vi. 

By Dr. W. D. Lang. 

1. The Kelostominas : a Sub-family of Cretaceous Cribrimorph 
Polyzoa. Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. Ixxiv, pp. 204-220. 

2. The Evolution of Annnonites. Proc. Geol. Assoc, vol. xxx, 
pp. 49-65. 

3. Old Age and Extinction in Fossils. Ibid., pp. 102-113. 

By Dr. B. Petronibvics. 
1. Note on the Pectoral Fin of Eustlienopterou. Ann. Mag. 
Nat. Hist. (9) vol. ii, pp. 471-476. 

By Prof. T. D. A. Gockerell, 

1. The Oldest Mosquitoes. Nature, vol. ciii, p. 44. 

2. Insects in Burmese Am})er, Entomologist, vol. Iii, pp. 
193-195, 241-243, 

By Mr. H. Bekker. 
1. New Bryozoa from the Kuckers Stage in Esthonia. Ann. 
Mag. Nat. Hist.'^(9) vol, iv, pp. 327-335, pi. vii. 



132 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

V. — Acqiiiiitions. 
A. — Bt/ Donation. 

Mammalia. — A Sirenian tooth from the Eoccnie, Mokattani 
quarries, Cairo. G. Foster Smith, Esq. 

Three plaster casts of the dentition of Hyopotamus, from the 
Oligocene of Hempstead, I. of Wight. ('. Forster Cooper, Esq. 

Natural cast of the brain of Antilope melonii ; portion of mandible 
of Ovis ammon ; mandibular rami of Myohfti's sa7-dus ; plaster casts 
of lower molar and premolar and the third right lower molar of 
Opht]ialmome<jfas lamormao'a', descr. and figd. by the donor in his 
work, Mater. Hist. Zool. et Palaeont. Isles Corse et Sardaigne, 
fasc. V (1914), p. 77, pi. ii, fig. 4 ; all from a Pleistocene breccia at 
Cape Figari, Sardinia. Mons. E. G. Dehavt. 

Portions of mandible and limb-bone of ElepJias, and two portions 
of mandible of Rhinoceros, from a sandy deposit at Kandahar, 
Afghanistan. Lieid.-Gen. H. H. Eyster. C.B., V.C. 

Tooth of Elejjhas from the marsh Karigeul, near Andremedi, 
about 30 m. N.E. of Salonica. ('apt. H. St. J. Kenny. 

Portion of human mandible from the black mud in the Bor 
district, Sudan. Major J. Stevenson-Hamilton. 

Reptilia. — A photograph of Igvanodon-iooi^Ymt from the 
Wealden of Bexhill. /. C. Thompson Esq. 

Two Chelonia from the London Clay of Essex. S. Hazzledine 
Warren, Esq., F.G.S. 

Chelonian bone from the Barton Clay. //. Eliot Walton, Esq. 

One Chelonia ovata from the Oligocene of Canton Glarus, 
Switzerland, descr. and figd. by A. Wettstein, Fisch-fauna Tert. 
Glarnerschief. ; Mem. Soc. Palaeont. Suisse, 1886, p. 93, pi. viii., 
fig. 7. Bequeathed by the Revd. F. St. John Thackeray, M.A., 
F.G.S., per Miss Thackeray. 

Portions of skull, mandible and scutes of a Crocodile found by 
the donor at Tel-el-Ahmar, Sinai. Mr. P. Stammioitz. 

Pisces. — Fourteen fish-remains collected by the donor from the 
Pickwell Down Sandstones, Woolacombe Bay, N. Devon ; noticed 
by the donor and A. S. Woodward, Geol. Mag., 1919, pp. 100-103. 
Inkerman Rogers, Esq., F.G.S. 

Four Elasmobranch teeth from the Carboniferous Limestone of 
the North of England. Prof. E. J. Garwood, F.R.S. 

Eight teeth of Lamnidse from the Kentish Upper Greensand 
and Chalk ; six teeth of Lamnidse from the Woolwich and Reading 
Beds of Essex ; sixty teeth of Lamnidse and other fish-remains from 
the London Clay of Essex. S. Hazzledine Warren, Esq., F.G.S. 

Two fish-remains from the Eocene, Mokattam quarries, Cairo. 
G. Foster Smith, Esq. 

Ten Selachian teeth, five other fish-remains and a new Chimse- 
roid mandibular tooth from the Barton Clay, Barton, Hants. 
H. Eliot Walton, Esq. 



DEPAKTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 133 

Two slabs of fossil herrings from a diatomaeeous deposit of 
Tertiary age, 4 miles S. of Lompoc, Santa Barbara Co., California. 
F. L. Bosqui, Esq. 

Mollu,Hca. — Two Lamellibranchs from the base of the Llandovery, 
near Hill End Farm, Horderley, Salop ; and one Tentaculite from 
the top of the Wenlock shale, Lincoln Hill, Ironbridge, Salop. 
Dr. F. A. Bather, FR.S. 

Twelve Lamellibranchs from the Coal Measures (Low-Main 
Seam), near Newcastle-on-Tvne. S. Hazzledine Warren, Esq., 
F.G.S. 

Three Molluscs from Upper Carboniferous Ironstone nodules, 
Coseley, Staffs. *S'. Priest, Esq., F.G.S. 

An Ammonite {Disco'plu/llites) from the Trias of Mount 
Heslington, Nelson, New Zealand, descr. and figd. by the donor in 
Quart. Journ. Geol, Soc, vol. Ixxiii (1918), p. 184. pi. xvii, fig. 7. 
Dr. C. T. Treclimann, F.G.S. 

Twenty Ammonites, two Nautili and five Belemnites from the 
Lias of Somerset. F. J. Mockler, Esq. 

Eleven Ammonites from the Charmouth Lias, namely, two 
Coroniceras ; Oxijnotireras and C_//mhites figured in the donor's paper, 
Proc. Geol. Assoc, vol. xxx, ])'. 108, fig. 20 (1919) ; the type- 
specimen of ^Egoceras dcedalicosta ; a paratype specimen of 
Liparoceras ohtusinodum ; and five other Ammonites collected by the 
donor and figured by A. E. Trueman, Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. 
Ixxiv (1919), pi. xxii, fig. 4, pi. xxiii, figs. 3, 4, and text-figures 5, 
6 and 13 ; and a specimen of Deroceras hispinigerum, of which the 
suture-line is figured by S. S. Buckman, Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc. 
vol. Ixxii (1918), p. 294. Dr. W. D. Lang, F.G.S. 

Body-chamber of Ammonite (^^Egoceras latoicosta), showing 
malformation of shell due to injury of the soft parts, obtained by 
the donor from the Lower Lias, Stonebarrow Cliff, Charmouth, 
Dorset. Dr. W. T. Caiman. 

One Plioladomya from the Kimmeridge (Jlay (a derived fossil), 
Cottenham, Cambs. T. H. Sherhorn, Esq. 

Mollusca from the Jurassic of central Arabia. //. St. J. B. 
PUlhif, Esq., CLE., l.C.S. 

Eight portions of Jurassic Ammonites and two Cretaceous 
Lamellibranchs from Peru. W. F. H. Rosenberg, Esq. 

An Ammonite {Simbirskites) from the Tealby Limestone, North 
Willingham, Lines. Prof. P. F. Kendall, F.G.S. 

Two s])ecimcns of Belemnites minimus from the Red Chalk, 
Millington Springs, near Pocklington. Read. C. R. Bower. 

A Hippurite and four Ammonites from the Upper Greensand 
and Chalk of Kent. S. Hazzledine Warren, Esq., F.G.S. 

S(^ven Belemnites from the Cenomanian of Liineberg, Hanover. 
F. J. Mockler, Esq. 

One Nautilus from the Chalk Rock of Aston liowant, Oxon. 
T. LL Withers, Esq., F.G.S. 



134 ACCOUNTS. ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

•Seven Lamellibranchs (Corhieula, &c.) from the Upper Cretaceous 
(Fox Hills Group), Monarch, Alta., Canada. Mr. William E. Cutler, 
F.G.S. 

Twelve opalised fossils (mostly Molluscs) from the Upper 
Cretaceous of New South Wales, descr. and figd., R. B. Newton, 
Proc. Make. Soc. London, vol. xi (1915), p. 217, pi. vi. Be- 
queaflml hii the Revd. F. St. John Thackeray, M.A., F.G.S., per 
Mi.'<.^ Tliackeray. 

Twenty imprints of Lamellibranchs, apparently Cretaceous and 
proba})ly collected in India Ijy R. B. Foote, being the collection of 
the late Lieut. Henry N. Lechlor. S. H. W. Foote, Esq. 

A hundred and thirty fossils (Mollusca, Echinoidea, &c.) from 
the Cretaceous and Tertiarv rocks of Persia. Lieut. B. K. N. 
Wyllie^R.E.. F.G.S. 

Two Nautili and two Lamellibranchs from the London Clay of 
Essex. S. Hazzlediiie Warren, Esq., F.G.S. 

Five valves of Ostrea multirostata associated with Nummulites 
from the Lower Eocene of Locre, R.W. of Ypres, Flanders. 
M\ Camphell Smith, Esq., M.C., F.G.S. 

A valve of Ostrea from the Barton Clay. H. Eliot Walton, Esq. 

An ostreiform shell from the Eocene, Mokattam quarries, Cairo. 
G. Foster Smith, Esq. 

Two chambers of a fossil Nautiloid from the Kharga Oasis, 
Egy}>t. Ma.'iter John R. N. C. Dvdf/eon. 

Four specimens of Aturia from the Miocene of Malta. Lieut. 
J. ('. Walton. 

Mollusca from the Upper Pliocene or Pleistocene deposits of 
Taranto, Italy. James Wright, Esq. 

One Cardivm from the Miocene of Jamacia. Miss Agnes Crum- 
Ewiiig, 

Tertiary Mollusca from near Jask, Persian Gulf. Lieut. B. K. 
N. WglliejR.E., F.G.S., and Lieut. J. V. Jlarrison, R.E. 

A piece of Tertiary rock with remains of a small species of 
Cardita from between Bushire and Rushire, Persian Gulf. Mr. G. 
Gadsden. 

Eight MoUuscan shells from a Pleistocene de])osit at Cape Figari, 
Sardiniji. Mon.neur E. G. Dehaut. 

About three hundred Upper Tertiary and Recent Gastropoda 
labelled by the donor to illustrate his Monograph of the Pliocene 
Mollusca of Great Britian, vol. i. F. \V. Harmer, Esq., M.A., 
F.G.S. 

About fifty Mollusca collected by the donor from a raised beach 
in Peru. Dr. H. 0. Forbes. 

Arthropoda. — Fourteen Ostracods (Leperditia) from the base of 
the Llandovery near Hill End Farm, Horderley, Salop ; and six 
Ostracoda and one Trilobite from the top of the Wenlock Shale, 
Lincoln Hill, Ironbridge, Salop. Br. F. A. Bather, F.R.S. 

Nine specimens of the supposed Arthropod (A nati/opsis ivardelli) 
from the Silurian, Longwood Shales, of Shawangunk Mts., Otisville, 
New York. Director of the State Museum, New York. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 135 

Twenty-seven Arthropods from the Upper Carboniferous, Iron- 
stone nodules, Coseley, Staft's. S. Priest, Esq., F.G.S. 

Two squeezes of the type-specimen of the Carboniferous Blattoid 
Insect, Etohlattina peacJii. Ilerhert Bolton, Esq., M.Sc, F.G.S. 

The type-specimen of Hyper me getUes northamhriw (H. Bolton, 
Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. Ixxii, 1917, p. 55, pi. iv, figs. 2, 3, 
text-fig. 5), an insect-wing from the Coal Measures, Crawcrook, 
Co. Durham. William Eltrincfham, Esq. 

Nine Decapod Crustacea from the London Clay of Essex. 
S. Hazzledine Warren, Esq., F.G.S. 

Two Cirripede valves (^Sralpellnm sp.); from the Barton Clay. 
H. Eliot Walton, Esq. 

An enlarged photograph oii'ulex winrhesteri, Cockerell, from the 
Eocene of Colorado. Prof. T. D. A. Cockerell. 

Twenty specimens of red amber (Burmite) from the Miocene 
Clay in Burma, containing the types of fossil insects described 
by Prof. T. D. A. Cockerell, in "Psyche ' (1917) and " Annals 
Entomol. Soc. America" (1917). Rodwaij (\ J. Swinhoe, Esq. 

Tertiary Cirripedes from near Jask, Persian Gulf. Lieut. B. K. 
N. Wyllie, R.E., F.G.S., and Lieut. J. V. Harrison, R.E. 

A Balanus obtained by the donor from n Raised Beach in Peru. 
Dr. H. 0. Forbes. 

ErJdnoderma. — A specimen of Crinoid-conglomerate from a 
fissure in the Lepta;na-^ix\\i of Kalholn, Dalecarlia, Sweden. Herr 
Orvar Lsherg. 

A Crinoid (Ci/athocrinus) from the Wenlock Limestone of Much 
Wenlock. Miss Doris Pose Llole. 

Two Crinoids from the top of the Wenlock Shale, Lincoln Hill, 
Ironbridge, Salop. Dr. F. A. Bather, F.R.S. 

Four fragments and one microscope-section of a Carboniferous 
Crinoidal rock. Revd. G. Warren. 

A hundred and thirteen Crinoids and twenty-one Blastoids from 
the Carboniferous of Oklahoma, U.S.A. ; seventeen Crinoids from 
the Carboniferous of Missouri ; eighty-nine Crinoids from the Car- 
boniferous of Texas ; ten Blastoids from the Carboniferous of 
Illinois ; and- three Cystids from the Lower Devonian of Virginia. 
Mr, Darling K. Greger. 

A hundred and sixty-four (Jrinoids from the Portlandian of 
Stramberg. Dr. C. T. Treclimann, F.G.S. 

Echinoidea from the Jurassic of Central Arabia. H. St. J. B. 
PUlhy, Esq., C.L.E., PCS. 

Two masses of Chert filled with Echinoids (Cardiaster and 
Epiaster) from the Upper Greensand, Charmouth. A. B. Hann, 
Esq. 

Three Crinoids (Marsupites and Uintacrinus) from the Chalk of 
the South Coast. C. D. Sherhorn, Esq., F.G.S. 

Seventeen specimens of Micraster arranged to show evolution 
through zones of the EngHsh Chalk. T. H. Withers, Esq., F.G.S. 

A rare form of Echinocorys scutatvs from the Chalk of Chipstead, 
Surrey. William Wright, Esq., F.G.S. 



136 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The stem of a Crinoid (Balanocrinus) from the London Clay at 
Baker Street Station. Miss L. M. Devonshire. 

Fifty-eight Crinoid-stems and one Echinoid radiole from the 
London Clay of Essex. S. Hazzledine Warren, Esq., F, G.S. 

An Ophiuroid ossicle from the Barton Clay. H. Eliot Walton, 
Esq. 

A specimen of Cidaris from the Miocene of Malta. Lievt. 
J. C. Walto7i. 

Echinoids from the Tertiary of Jask, Persian Gulf. Lieut. 
B. K. N. Wyllie, R.E., F.G.S., and Lieut. J. V. Harrison, R.E. 

Annelida. — Borings of Teredo from the Bracklesham Beds, 
Selsey, Sussex. Edward Heron-Allen, Esq., F.B..S. 

Brachiopoda. — Eight Brachiopods from the top of the Wenlock 
Shale, Lincoln Hill, Ironbridge, Salop. Dr. F. A. Bather, F.R.S. 

Sixty Brachiopods from the Carboniferous Limestone of the 
North of England. Prof. E. J. Garwood, F.R.S. 

Nineteen characteristic Brachiopods from the Carboniferous 
Limestone of the Bristol district. Prof. S. H. Reynolds. Sr.D., 
F.G.S. 

A piece of siliceous rock containing Brachiopods (^Productus and 
Spirifer) of Carboniferous age, from the bed of the river Dwina, 
about 200 miles S. of Archangel, Russia. Private K. A. T. 
Westerherg. 

Brachiopoda from the Jurassic of Centra Arabia. H. St. J. B. 
Philhy, Esq., CLE., LC.S. 

Polyzoa. — Eleven Ordovician Polyzoa from Esthonia. H' 
Bekker, LJsq. 

Fifteen Polyzoa from the top of the Wenlock Shale, Lincoln 
Hill, Ironbridge, Salop. Dr. F. A. Bather, F.R.S. 

Polyzoa from the Jurassic of Central Arabia. H. St. J. B. 
Philby, Esq.. CLE., LC.S. 

Sixty Chalk Polyzoa from Surrey and Sussex. C T. A. 
G aster, LJsq. 

Six Polyzoa from the Upper Chalk of Kent. G. E. Dihley, 
Esq., F.G.S. 

Anthozoa and Hydrozoa. — Twenty-eight Corals and two Hydrozoa 
from the top of the Wenlock Shale, Lincoln Hill, Ironbridge, Shrop- 
shire. Dr. F. A. Bather, F.R.S. 

Two specimens of the Carboniferous Coral Cryptophyllvm 
hihernicum, one being in six serial sections. R. G. Carrnihers, 
Esq., F.G.S. 

Corals from the Jurassic of Central Arabia. H. St. ./. L. 
Philhy, Esq., CLE., LC.S. 

A Tertiary Graphtdaria. Rev. Donald Miller, D.D. 

A Coral obtained by the donor on his journey across- Northern 
Arabia from Koviet to Suez (Geogr. Journ,, vol. xliv, p. 96, 1914). 
Captain W. H. T. Shakespear. 

Corals from the Upper Pliocene or Pleistocene of Taranto, Italy. 
.Lames Wright, LJsq. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 137 

Porifera. — A sponge {Plocosc.ypJda) from the ( luilk Rock, Aston 
Rowant; Oxon. T. H. Withers,' Esq., F.G.S. 

Protozoa. — A piece, o£ Numniulitic Limestone, from Menton, 
France. F. Poss Thouison, Esq. 

A Foraminifer {Scliwagerma) infilled with asphalt, obtained by 
the late Upfield Green at Batraci in Samara, Russia. C. D. Slier- 
horn, Esq., F.G.S. 

Plantce. — Thirteen specimens illustrating eight species of the 
supposed Algge — (■ollenia, Grejfsonia, Neiclandia, Camasia, Gallatina 
and Copperia — from the Algonkian (Pre-(,^ambrian) rocks of 
Montana, described by Dr. C. D. Walcott, Smithsonian Miscellaneous 
(^oll., vol. Ixiv, no. 2 (1914). The United States National Museum. 

Four Plants collected by the late Prof. H. G. Seeley in the 
Ordovician of Esthonia. Mrs. H. G. Seeley. 

A leaf-scar of Bothrodendron pundatum, from the (Jarboniferous 
Pennant Grit, ('hewton Mendip. W. T. Hanman, Esq., and A. T. 
Warren, Esq., M.A. 

A plaster cast of the Stigmarian, Dictyophloios minor, Foerste, 
from the Carboniferous (Chester Group) of Pope Co., Illinois, U.S.A. 
Dr. Aug. F. Foerste. 

Four plants from the Carboniferous, Ironstone Nodules, Coseley, 
Staffs. S. Priest, Esq., F.G.S. 

An impression in coal of Megaphyton. H. Bnrch, Esq. 

Eighteen plants with six invertebrate fossils from the Upper 
(.'oal Measures of Ssu-Tao-Chang Mine, 1^ degrees E. of Mukden, 
Manchuria ; collected by G. T. Hollowav, Esq. H. A. Allen, Esq., 
F.G.S. 

Forty plants from the Coal Measures (Low-Main Seam) near 
Newcastle-on-Tyne. S. Hazzledine Warren, Esq., F.G.S. 

Two micro-sections of Bennettites maximus from the Lower 
Greensand, Shanklin, I. of Wight, made from the type-specimen, 
and described by Dr. Marie Stopes in Phil. Trans., 1918. Ihe 
Director of the Geological Survey. 

One Nipadites from the Eocene, Mokattam quarries, (^airo. G. 
Foster Smith, Esq. 

Nullipores from the Upper Pliocene or Pleistocene of Taranto, 
Italy. James Wright, Esq. 

A specimen of peat from Peru. W. F. H. Rosenberg, Esq. 

Tracks. — A slab with tracks (^Climatichnites), four specimens 
illustrating wind-action, and two fragments of limestone, obtained 
by the donor on his journey across Northern Arabia from Koweit to 
Suez (Geogr. Journ., vol. xliv, p. 96 ; 1914). (apt. W. H. T. 
Shakesj)ear. 

Rock-specimens. — Three dreikanten from the Bunter Sandstone 
of Nottingham. Robert l"" Anson, Esq. 

Six micro-slides of iiints from the Wallich collection. The 
Royal Microscopical Society. 

Seventy micro-slides chiefly of flints from the Wallich collection. 
E. Hei'onr- Allen, Esq., F.R.S., and A. Earland^ Esq. 



138 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Eighty-six wind-facetted pebbles and one weathered rock-surface 
from the Eastern Desert, Egypt. F. W. Moon, Esq., B.E., F.G.S. 

Two pitted pebbles and ten facetted wind-worn pebbles from 
Bir Mabeuik, Sinai. Major N'. V. L. Rt/bot. 

Five specimens of soundings from Kingston, Jamaica, taken 
after the great earthquake of Jan. 14th, 1907. Capt. John A. 
Rupert Jones. 

B. — Bi/ Purcliase. 

Plaster casts of a fossil human skull from Talgai, Darling 
Downs, Queensland, described by Prof. S. A. Smith, Phil. Trans., 
1918. 

Skull of Potainotherktm and six small mammalian jaws from the 
Miocene of France. 

Jaw of Epanorthxs and five jaws of allied genera from the 
Santa (Vuz Formation of Patagonia. 

Skulls of the two Labyrinthodonts, Capitosaurus, from the 
Trias of Germany, and CochJeosaurus^ivomihe Permian of Bohemia. 

Three microscope-sections of jaws of the shark, Sphenacanthvs 
hihodoides, from the Coal Measures of Shore, Lancashire. 

About fifty fossils from the Wealden and Cretaceous of Sussex, 
and from the Rhaetic of Linksfield, Elgin, collected by the late 
Major Lambart Brickendcn. 

About 50 fossil Invertebrata from the Chalk Rock of Aston 
Rowant, Oxon. 

Twenty-five fossil Corals and Brachiopods, and thirty-five micro- 
scope-sections of fossil Corals, from the Carboniferous Limestone, 
descr. and figd. by the late Dr. Arthur Vaughan. 

Twenty-nine vertical and sixty-nine horizontal microscope- 
sections of the Shallow Seam of coal. South Staffordshire, with 
sixty-scn^en micro-photographs of the same (J. Lomax). 

Vj. — By Exchange. 

A collection of about 500 Chelonian remains, with a few 
Lacertilian remains, from superficial deposits in Mauritius, obtained 
by Thirioux, Sauzier, and the Newtons, partly described by Giinther 
(Gigantic Land Tortoises), Gadow (Trans. Zool. Soc), and Haddon 
(Trans. Linn. Soc.) : University Museum of Zoology, Cambridge. 

Six specimens of the crab, Dakoticancer overana, from Upper 
Cretaceous, S. Dakota, U.S.A. 

The total accessions during 1919 are as follows : — 





Donations. 


Purchases. 


Exchanges. 


Total. 


Vertebrata 


132 


67 


500 


699 


Invertebrata 


1730 


126 


6 


1862 


Plantse 


86 


93 


— 


179 


Rocks 


189 


— 


— 


189 




2137 


286 


506 


2929 



The total number of specimens registered is 4998. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 139 



VI. — Students and Visitors. 



The number o£ visits paid to the Department by students and 
other persons for the purpose of consultation or study during 1919 
was 4,648. 

YII. — Lectures and Demonstrations. 

Seven parties were received in the Galleries of the Department 
of Geology, and demonstrations were given as follows : — 
Jan. 18th — Geologists' Association (27 members) : Dr. Woodward. 
Feb. lat — Battersea Field Club (13 members) : Dr. Woodward. 
Feb. 8th — Students' Association of North London (8 members) : 

Dr. Woodward. 
Feb. 8th — Geologists' Association (35 members) : Dr. Lang. 
Feb. 22nd— S.W. Polytechnic Geological Field Club (24 members) : 

Dr. Woodward. 
Nov. 1st — Wimbledon Natural History Society (11 members) : 

Dr. Bather. 
Dec. 13th — St. Peter's Church, Cranley Gardens (28 members) : 

Dr. Lang. 

Artliur Smith Woodward. 



140 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Department of Mineralogy. 
I . — A rrangemevt. 

The Church Collection o£ Precious Stones has been re-arrang(>d 
and placed in an exhibition case under the archway leading to the 
Pavilion, and a special electric light has been provided lor the 
over-head illumination o£ the stones. The Bible-Minerals case has 
at the same time been removed from its former position in the 
Pavilion and placed under the archway, opposite the Church Col- 
lection case, and is similarly illuminated. 

The large series of topaz and beryl and the smaller neigh- 
bouring species (andalusite, kyanite, fibrolite, allophane, pilolite, 
halloysite, &c.) have been re-arranged in the case-tops and in the 
drawers, the specimens of each species being brought together into 
one case (instead of breaking across the centre of the gallery), and 
the arrangement has been made topographical as far as is consistent 
with the effective display of the specimens. Many of the single 
isolated smaller crystals have been removed from the pedestals, 
labelled, and placed in the drawers. 

The specimens of spodumene, tremolite, and actinolite have been 
re-arranged in the case-tops. 

Rock specimens have been transferred from the Gallery to the 
Rock room. 

Forty-two boxes of mineral and rock specimens have been 
received, unpacked, and examined, and forty-eight boxes have 
been packed and despatched. 

II. — Rer/istration, Inde;vin;f, dini Catalof/uiiu/. 

All the specimens of minerals, rocks, and meteorites acquired 
during the year have been registered, numbered, provided with 
permanent labels, and incorporated in the collection. In this con- 
nection many specimens have been examined and determined- and 
localities checked. 

The preparation of the slip-catalogues of the mineral specimens 
in the collection, species by species, and of permanent labels giving 
all available information for each specimen, has been continued 
for the Divisions of the Oxides and Carbonates. In this connection 
permanent labels liave been written, checked, and placed with the 
specimens of thorite, rutile, anatase, brookite, baddeleyite, mela- 
nophlogite, cristobalite, tridymite, chalybite, rhodochrosite, calamine, 
chessylite, and malachite ; the permanent labels which had- already 
been written for the species cassiterite have been placed with the 
specimens ; the writing of labels for the large group including 
quartz, chalcedony, and agate, has been in progress ; and slips and 
labels have been written for the specimens of limonite not included 
in the main Collection. 



DEPARTMENT OF MINERALOGY. 141 

The minerals of the Geological Society's collection have been 
all provided with permanent labels and incorporated in the General 
Collection. 

Papers relating to the large round table of antique marbles 
have been placed together in a drawer specially constructed under 
the table, and a label has been printed and framed for the table. 

A scheme has been considered for a complete and detailed topo- 
graphical index of all the localities represented in the mineral 
collection. 

An alphabetical list of rock names represented in the collections 
has been compiled, and a copy has been placed for public use in 
the Gallery. 

The topographical index of the rock-collections has been brought 
up to date. 

Letters received during 1918 have been arranged for reference. 

III. — Prepartion . 

155 micro-sections of minerals, meteorites, and rocks have been 
prepared ; three meteorites have been cut ; and six pieces of 
meteoric iron have been polished for etching. 

I V . — Investuiat'wii . 

A crystallographical inv(\stigation of the series of crystals of 
lead and copper minerals from Red Gill, Cumberland, and Leadhills, 
Lanarkshire, in the Trechmann Collection has been in progress, and 
many crystals of linarite and caledonite have been measured. 

The crystalline form and physical characters of the new Spanish 
mineral villamaninite have been determined, and a description has 
been written. 

The crystallographic constants of other apparently new minerals 
have been determined, viz., a blue copper-zinc phosphate from 
Rhodesia and a uranium-lead silicate from the Belgian Congo. 

Artificially-produced crystals of tin arsenide have been measured 
and described : and in this connection a study has been made of the 
question of curvature in crystals, a general account of which has 
been prepared. 

New crystal-forms have been determined on calcite, pyrites, and 
e))idote, and these have been described and figured. 

Specimens collected and presented by F. N. Ashcroft from 
Derbyshire, Cumberland, and Renfrewshire have been examined and 
determined. 

Among other species which have been examined for purposes of 
identification or other reasons may be mentioned stibnite and 
bournonite from Spain, scorodite from Cornwall, tarbuttite and 
hopoite from Rhodesia, allophane from British Columbia, and 
fibrolite from Scotland. 

The investigation of the metamorphic rocks represented in the 
coll(>ctions of the " Terra Nova " Antarctic Expedition has been in 



142 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

progress, and descriptions have been written of the cordierite- and 
sillimanite-gneisses, epidote-rocks, graphitic and mica-schists, and 
some of the gneisses. 

Rock-specimens collected by Captain Lynes in Morocco have 
been examined. 

In the Chemical Laboratory complete quantitative analyses have 
been made of the meteorites Adare and Mt. Ayliff, and quantitative 
determinations have been made of the amount and composition of 
the nickeliferous iron in the meteorites Ensisheim, Felix, Henderson- 
ville, and Simondium. Many minerals, including specimens of 
tinstone from Nigeria, have been qualitatively analysed. 



V. — Departmental Library. 

<Jatalo(jiiin</ and Press-marking. — All the accessions, including 
395 plates, have been catalogued and stamped ; 686 volumes have 
been pressmarked or re-pressmarked. 

Proofs of the General Library Catalogue (Supplement) have 
been read and checked against the slip-catalogue in the Department. 

Accessions. — 2S volumes of separate works, 12 parts of continua- 
tions,. 24 periodicals (in 311 volumes and parts), 53 memoirs and 
pamphlets, and 58 mining and survey reports have been added to the 
Library. 

Binding. — 75 volumes have been bound. 



VI. — Publications. 

A new edition of the Student's Index to the Collection of 
Minerals has been prepared for press. 

The following papers relating to specimens in the Collection have 
been published in the Mineralogical Magazine and Journal of the 
Mineralogical Society, 1919, vol. xviii : — 

A method for the quick determination of the approximate amount 
and composition of the nickeliferous iron in Meteorites, and its 
application to seventeen meteoric stones : by G. T. Prior (xviii, 
p. 349). 

Mineralogical characters of Turite (= turgite) and some other 
iron-ores from Nova Scotia : by L. J. Spencer (xviii, p. 339). 

Eighth list of new mineral names ; L. J. Spencer (xviii, 
p. 373). 

On Sartorite and the problem of its crystal-form : G. F. Herbert 
Smith and R. H. Solly (xviii, p. 259). 

On the use of the gnomonic projection in the calculation of 
crystals : G. F. Herbert Smith (xviii, p. 317). 

Semseyite from Dumfriesshire. With a chemical analysis by 
G. T. Prior : G. F. Herbert Smith (xviii, p. 354). 

A Students' Goniometer : G. F. Herbert Smith (xviii, p. 366). 

A lead-grey fibrous mineral from the Binn valley, Switzerland. 
With a Chemical Analysis by G. T. Prior : R. H. Solly. 



DEPARTMENT OF MINERALOGY. 143 

Acquisitions. 

759 specimens have been acquired, namely : — 

311 minerals (including crystallized furnace products), 16 
meteorites (and casts), and 432 rocks. 

Exchanges of specimens have been arranged with the Field 
Museum of Natural History at Chicago, the United States National 
Museum at Washington, Dr. J. E. Stead, F.R.S., of Middlesbrough, 
and Monsieur H. Buttgenbach, of Brussels. 

The following names added to the Museum List were previously 
not represented by specimens in the collection : — 

Cornetite, crestmoreite, ektropite, ferrierite, katoptrite, margaro- 
sanite, ponite, riversideite, stevensite, villamaninite ; also the follow- 
ing from crystallized furnace products : — Hilgenstockite, silico- 
carnotite, steadite, vogtite. 

The specimens acquired by presentation (arranged alphabeti- 
cally according to donors) and by exchange, and a selection of the 
more important obtained by purchase are as follows : — 

Minerals. 
By Presentation. 

A further selection from the donor's collection of zeolites, 
namely, 14 specimens representing five localities in Bohemia and 12 
specimens from West Paterson, New Jersey. A series of 72 
selected specimens collected by the donor in 1919 in Derbyshire, 
Cumberland, and Dumfriesshire, including fiuor, calcite, dolomite, 
barytes, greenockite, calamine, cerussite, pyromorphite, wolframite, 
scheelite, pilolite, hausmannite, &c. A large specimen of analcite 
from County Antrim. A crystal of hacked quartz from North 
Wales. Various American specimens, including margarosanite, 
crestmoreite, and riversideite (three species new to the collection), 
powellite from Utah, pyrites crystals from Colorado, and, as part 
presentation, a fine group of large crystals of scheelite from Arizona. 
Also a fine crystal of apatite from Ontario, leucite with melanite 
from Rome, and pyrites crystals from Japan : hy F. N. Ashcroft, 
Esq. 

Fluor from Derbyshire, collected by the donor : Miss /:. M. 
Ashcroft. 

Coal from Thessaly, Greece : by the University of Athens. 

Magnesite from near Bulawayo, Rhodesia : hy A. V. Ballhifchet, 
Esq. 

Fibroferrite from Cyprus : hy C. E. Barrs, Esq. 

Wolframite with scheelite, molybdenite, &c., from Zinba mine, 
Tavoy district, Burma : by J. Morrow Campbell, Esq. 

Chromite from New Caledonia, Baluchistan, and Rhodesia : h// 
the Chrome Company, Ltd. 

Gahnite and chrysocolla from Broken Hill, New South Wales : 
by Arthur Combe, Esq. 



144 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Psittacinite from Belgian Congo : />// H. Cooksoii, Esq. 

Artificial minerals (cristobalitc, fayalite, rhodonite, apatite, 
spinel, willemite, vogtite, silico-carnotite, hilgenstockite, steadite, 
&c.) from furnace slags : by Allan B. Dick., Esq. 

Coal from Yampupata mine, Bolivia : by A. L. Dan, Esq. 

Fibrolite from Clattering Bridge, Kincardineshire : by W. 
Duncan, Esq. 

Siliceous sinter and micaceous haematite from Lustleigh, Devon- 
shire : by A. B. Edr/e, Esq. 

Ferrierite, a new species, from British Columbia : by Br. W. F. 
Ferrier. 

Geikielite crystal from Ceylon : by Sir L. Fletcher, F.E.S. 

Retinite in coal from Alger, Wyoming : by Thomas French, Esq. 

Lepidolite, a transparent pale-lilac cleavage slab, from Western 
Australia : by Rev. J. M. Gordon. 

Dioptase on malachite from Bwana M'Kubwa, North-West 
Rhodesia ; faceted haematite from Crowgarth mine, Cleator Moor, 
Cumberland : by Albert 6r. F. Gregory, Esq. 

Artificial anorthic metasilicate of iron, calcium, manganese, and 
magnesium (vogtite) from acid steel-furnace slag : by A. F. 
Hallhnond, Esq. 

Native copper and anthophyllite in serpentine from the Lizard, 
Cornwall : by Arnold G. Hansard, Esq. 

Pyrites with graphite from Ceylon : by Messrs. Henderson Sf Co. 

Tourmaline, a large crystal, from Minas Geraes, Brazil : by 
Lieut.- Commander B. I), ffolberton, R.JV. 

Demantoid with fibrous enclosures : by E. Hopkins, Esq. 

Chalcedony nodule enclosing water (enhydros) : by Miss M. V. 
Jessup. 

Cassiterite in pegmatite, spodumene, &c., from Winnehah 
district, Gold Coast, West Africa : by TF. H. Kenny, Esq. 

Tarbuttite, a large isolated crystal, from Broken Hill, North- 
West Rhodesia : by F. P. Mennell, Esq. 

Muscovite in serpentine from Rumania : by Prof. G. Murgoci. 

Cassiterite, compact, white, from Bolivia : by Dr. Richard Pearce. 

Corundum from Palmeitfontein farm, Zoutpansberg district, 
Transvaal : by Dr. A. W. Rogers, F.R.S. 

Witherite from Ushaw Moor Colliery, Durham ; stibnite from 
Co. Monaghan ; tetrahedrite from Co, Galway : by Arthur Russell, 
Esq. 

Yillamaninite, a new species from Villamanin, Spain ; rutile 
(var. nigrine), two large water-worn crystals from Brazil : bij Dr. 
W. R. Schoeller. 

Euxenite crystals from Titi, Negri Sembilan, Federated Malay 
States : by J. B. Scrivenor, Esq. 

Apatite crystals from basic slag : by Dr. J. E. Stead, F.R.S. 

Calcite with barytes, and dolomite with fluor, from Force Crag 
mine, Braithwaite, Cumberland : />// H. T. Stretton, Esq. 



DEPARTMENT OF MINERALOGY. 145 

Asphaltum from Horns, Syria : by CorpL J. S. M. Thomson^ 
A.I.F. 

Cubes of blende from Lerui'n Kano ; magnetic cassiterite, 
orange-yellow cassiterite, rutile, wolframite, columbite, wood-tin, 
and cadmium sulphide, all from Northern Nigeria ; and scorodite 
from Devonshire : by A. Stanley Williams, Esq. 

Mica, cut sheets, from Aidin, Asia Minor : by Mrs. Wilson. 

Hornblende from Welwitsch, Damaraland, South Africa : by W. 
C. Worsdell, Esq. 

By Excliange : 

Three specimens of the new species cornetite from the Belgian 
Congo. 

Cut and polished samples of an artificial tin-arsenic-antimony 
alloy showing curious crystalline growths with the form of spherical 
shells. 

By Purcliase : 

A series of copper and uranium ores from Katanga, Congo, 
including fine specimens of plancheite, dioptase, malachite, chryso- 
colla, &c., and an undetermined uranium-lead silicate. 

A series of tin, bismuth, and other ores froni Bolivia, including 
a fine group of blende crystals, wolframite, chalybite crystals, 
bournonite, &c. 

A series of specimens from Madagascar including good crystals 
of columbite, monazite, ampangabeite, and citrine. 

A series of specimens from the asbestos mines of Val Malenco, 
Lombardy, including artinite, andradite, and uvarovite. 

Dioptase, a fine group of crystals, and achtaragdite from Siberia. 

Wollastonite, as large crystals, and erubescite from Mexico. 

Ektropite, katoptrite (two new species), and margarosanite and 
allactite from Sweden. 

Anthophyllite, actinolite, pyromorphite, limonite, and a specimen 
showing cone-in-cone structure, from Scotch localities. 

Sphene with axinite from Cornwall. 

Fluor, cerussite, quartz, calcite, scheelite from the north of 
England. 

Wolframite, native copper, and tourmaline in quartz from 
Rhodesia. 

Cassiterite from Swaziland, South Africa, a group of crystals, 
and a transparent deep brown specimen faceted as a gem-stone. 

Tourmaline, a large crystal from Hazaribagh, Bengal. 

Cristobalite from California ; manganosite and a fine large 
crystal of franklinite from New Jersey : a fine group of large 
crystals of scheelite (part presentation by F. N. Ashcroft, Esq.) 
and connellite from Arizona ; tellurium and pyrites from Colorado. 

Realgar from China. 



146 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Bocks. 

By Presentation : 

15 specimens collected by the donor in Fifeshire, Edinburghshire 
and Renfrewshire : In/ F. N. Ashcroft, Esq. 

11 specimens collected by the donor in tho Canary Islands and 
Cape Verde Islands : hy David A. Bannerman, Esq. 

A large mass of plumasite, containing crystals of corundum, 
from Bandolier Kop, Transvaal : by Messrs. A. W. Collett and 
Snerti'tu/. 

Felsite fnmi Avoca, (Jo. Wicklow : hy H. F. Collins, Esq. 

A small collection of rocks and ores from the copper mines of 
Montecatini, Tuscany : hy Col. D. H. Cohiacflvi. 

A series of 140 specimens collected by Mr. Franklin White in 
iyi9 in Madagascar from the graphite deposits and in a traverse 
across the island to the oil-bearing district in the east : hy Edmund 
Davis, Esq. 

Australites from Charlotte Water. Northern Territory, South 
Australia : hy J. Halliday, Esq. 

A series of polished specimens of serpentine from the Lizard, 
Cornwall : by Arnold G. Hansard, Esq. 

A series of 120 specimens collected by the donor in 1911 in 
Mozambique, East Africa, and described l)y him : hy Dr. Arthur 
Holmes. 

4 specimens from the Winnebah district, Gold Coast, West 
Africa : by W. H. Kenny, Esq. 

A small lot collected by the donor in 1919 in the Lesser Atlas, 
Morocco : by Capt. H. Lynes, R.N. 

Specimens from Karakoram Himalayas, collected by the late 
Capt. Cosmo Grant Peterkin, surveyor on the Bullock Workman 
Expedition, 1911-12 : /)// Miss K. M. Grant Peterkin. 

" Toadstones " and altered limestone collected by the donor from 
near Matlock, Derbyshire, 1919 : % i>r. (r. T. Prior, F.R.S. 

A series of 7 specimens collected by the donor in 1914 in the 
islands of the Grecian Archipelago : by Arthur Russell, Esq. 

Leucite-tephrite from Trebizond, Asia Minor : by Dr. Felix 
Oswald. 

A series of 30 specimens collected by the donor in 1913-14 from 
the neighbourhood of the Nairobi-Mombasa, Railway and from Mt. 
Elgon, British East Africa : by E. Storey, Esq. 

A series of 5 specimens collected by the donor at Solwezi, 
Kasempa district. Northern Rhodesia : hy Guy A. Taylor, Esq. 

A series of 40 specimens collected by the donors in 1911-12 in 
the eastern Karakoram Mtns,, Himalayas, and described by W. 
Campbell Smith in their book, 1917 : hy Mrs. F. Bullock Workman 
and Dr. W. Hunter Workman. 

By Purchase : 
Garnet-hornblende-felspar rock from Val Malenco, Lombardy. 



DEPARTMENT OF MINERALOGY. 147 

Meteorites. 
By Presentation : 
Appley Bridge, Wigan, Lancashire, fragments weighing 3 grams 
of the 3i5 lb. mass which fell on 13 October^ 1914 : hy the Municipal 
School of Technology J Manchester. 

Pseudo-meteorite from Nyasaland : hy Major F, B. Pearce. 

By Exchange : 

Felix J Perry Co., Alabama, a partly crusted fragment weighing 
37 grams of the stone which fell on May 15, 1900. 

Hendersonville, Henderson County, North Carolina, a slice 
weighing 132 grams of the stone found in 1901. (Probably fell 
about 1876). 

Mount Vernon, Christian ( -o., Kentucky, a polished slice weigh- 
ing 1,250 grams of the stony iron found about 1870. 

Plainvieiv, Hale Co., Texas, a crusted fragment weighing 35 
grams of one of the stones found in 1917. 

San Emigdio Movntains, San Bernardino Co., California, several 
fragments weighing together 33 grams of the stone known in 1887. 

Scoff City, Scott Co., Kansas, a crusted slice weighing 130 
grams of the stone found in 1911. 

Y((nhnitlan, Oaxaca, Mexico, an etched slice weighing 305 grams 
of the iron known before 1825. 

Jjy Purchase : 

Blifhfield, Renfrew Co., Ontario, Canada, cast of the stone found 
in 1910.' 

Kilhourn, Columbia Co., Wisconsin, fragments weighing alto- 
gether 1 gram of the stone which fell on June 16, 1911. 

Mount Edith, Ashburton, Western Australia, a slice weighing 
145 grams of the iron found in 1913 ; also a cast of the whole 
mass. 

Plainvieiv, Hale Co., Texas, a complete stone weighing 2,793 
grams found in 1917. 

Sants Valley, Jackson Co., Oregon, U.S.A., a slice weighing 
94 grams of the iron found in 1894. 

Skookum Gulch, Bonanza Creek, Klondike, Yukon, Canada, a 
slice weighing 362^ grams of the iron found in 1905 at a depth 
of 65 feet in auriferous gravel of Pliocene age. 

VIII. — -Donations of JJuplicates. 

Duplicate specimens of minerals have been given to the Red 
Cross Camp at Netley, Hants, the Canon bury Church Schools, and 
mineral ores from Peru and gold-quartz from Australia to the Geo- 
logical Department of the Imperial College of Science and Techno- 
logy. 

9 duplicate Meteorite casts have been given to the Public 
Library, Museum, and Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, 
and fragments of various silver, copper, and lead minerals to the 
Department of Scientific Research and Experiment of the Admiralty. 



148 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

IX. — Demonstrations. 

A demonstration on Meteorites was given to the Geological 
Association. 

X. — Students and Visitors. 

The number of visits recorded as made to the Department for 
purposes of consultation or study is 915. Many specimens of 
minerals and rocks have been determined for visitors and correspon- 
dents. 



G. T. Prior 



department of botany. 149 

Department of Botany. 

I. — Arranffement and Conservation. 

During the past year 13,475 specimens have been incorporated 
with the Herbarium. This number includes 12,825 Flowering 
Plants, 270 Mosses, 80 Hepatics, 134 Lichens, 4 Algae, and 162 
Fungi. 

The restoration to the Herbarium and Library o£ types and 
other specimens and volumes of unique interest which had been 
removed from the Department for greater security during the War, 
has occupied part of the time of the Staff ; the type-specimens have 
been indicated by a special label, and the opportunity was taken for 
some work of revision and rearrangement. The large series of 
specimens from the Hortus Cliffortianus have been correlated with 
the published volume by Linnaeus of the same title, and re-arranged. 

Flower'mci Plants. — Collections acquired during the year have 
been mounted and incorporated wholly or in part ; and also out- 
standing specimens of various collections from Australia, and 
generally, in various families, especially (Jommelinaceae, Aracese, 
Cyperacese, Graminese, Anonacese, Myrsinaceae, Urticacese, and 
Cupuliferse. Work of revision and re-arrangement has been done 
in various families and genera. The European Herbarium of the 
late R. P. Murray has been partly incorporated. The collection of 
hand-specimens of woods used in commerce has been re-arranged, 
and progress has been made in making and fitting trays in the 
cabinets of the general collection of woods, for the better arrange- 
ment of the specimens for consultation. 

Cryptogams. — Work preliminary to incorporation has been done 
in the various groups, progress has been made with the sorting and 
selection of the Stirton collection of Lichens, and with the 
determination and classification of unnamed British Lichens. 

Exhihition Series. — The several series in the Public Grallery have 
been maintained, and additions have been made in various families. 
The family Cornacese has been re-arranged. British and cultivated 
specimens have been collected and prepared for exhibition. 

Catalogues and Guides. — The preparation of Volume IV of the 
Flora of Jamaica by Mr. Fawcett and Dr. Rendle has been 
completed and in great part printed, a new edition of the Guide 
to the Mycetozoa has been prepared and published, and progress has 
been made with the preparation of a new edition of the List of 
British Seed Plants and Ferns. 

II . — Investigation . 
Collections have been investigated and determined from the 
following localities and collectors : — Archangel, Benches de Rhone 
(Lowe), Malta, Macedonia (Blackett, Ramsbottom and others), 



150 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Palestine (White), Sinai (Stammwitz), Mesopotamia (Whitehead), 
Annam (Kloss), New Guinea (White), Cameroons and Nigeria 
(Bates), Rhodesia (Eyles), Belgian Congo (Vanderyst and others), 
Brazil (Moss) and New Caledonia (Compton). 

Work ()£ investigation has been done in the genera Acacia, 
AllopJii/llus, Baphia, Domheya, Erodivm, Vellozia, and in other genera 
of various families especially Euphorbiacese, Rubiaeefje, Compositse, 
Acanthacese, and in genera from the Balkan Peninsula, Also in 
various families and genera of Mosses, Red Seaweeds, Fungi and 
Lichens. Various fungi of economic importance have been investi- 
gated. Numerous small collections have been determined for 
students and collectors. 

In connection with the work done in the Department specimens 
have been generously lent by the Government of Jamaica, the 
Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew, of the Herbarium of the Museum 
d' Histoir(^ Naturelle, Paris, of the Jardin Botanique de I'Etat, 
Brussels, and of the Naturhistoriska Riks-Museum at Stockholm, the 
Regius Keeper of Botany, Edinburgh, and the Curator of the Bristol 
Museum. 

Material has been lent for determination and critical study as 
follows : — 263 specimens of British Lichens to Mr. Thomas Hebden ; 
15 specimens of Potamof/eton from various localities to Mr. Arthur 
Bennett ; 10 species of BapJiia from tropical Africa to Mr. L. V. 
Lester-Garland ; 118 specimens of Qvercus from Malaya to Mr. J. 
S. Gamble ; and 47 Mosses from Uganda and Rhodesia to Mr. H. 
N. Dixon. 

Ill . — Departmental Librari/. 

1. Arrangement, Catalogvhig, and Pressmarking. The register- 
ing, stamping, and cataloguing of additions to the library and other 
routine work has been carried out. Departmental assistance in con- 
nection with the Official Catalogue of the Library has been continued. 
A new press has been placed in the Cryptogamic Herbarium. 

2. Accessio)n<. 18 volumes and 23 pamphlets were acquired by 
donation and 56 volumes and 3 pamphlets by purchase, in all 74 
volumes and 26 pamj)hlets ; th(^se numbers include 14 volumes of 
periodicals in parts presented and 38 volumes of periodicals in parts 
purchased, in all 52 volumes of periodicals. The following is a list 
of the principal donors : — 

Kolonial Institut, Amsterdam. Director, Roval Botanic Gardens, 

Prof. L. H. Bailey. Calcutta. " 

R. T. Baker, Es(j. Director, Gray Herbarium, ( -am- 

Lady Barkly. bridge, Mass. 

Dr. F. A. Bather, F.R.S. Mademoiselle A. Camus, 

Royal Botanical Society, Bel- Director, Field Museum, Chicago, 

gium. Director, Botanical Museum, 

Dr. Georg Bitter. University of Copenhagen. 

James Britten, Esq. Parke, Davis & Co., Detroit, Mich. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY, 



151 



Elmer D. Merrill, Esq. 

Editor, Philippine Agricultural 
Review, Manila. 

Director, Missouri Botanic Gar- 
don, St. Louis. 

H. W. Monckton, Esq. 

Spencer Moore, Esq. 

Nederlandsche Botanisclie Ver- 
cenigino. 

L. H. Newman, Esq. 

Dircictor, Agricultural Uesearcli 
Institute, Pusa. 

Dr. E. Reys Prosper. 

Dr. A. B. Rendle, F.R.S. 

Director Jardin Botanico, Rio de 
Janeiro. 

Director, Botanic Gardens, Singa- 
pore. 

Botanical Institute, Tokyo. 

Tokyo Botanical Society. 

Director, Department oi' Agricul- 
ture, Union of South Africa. 

Director, Botaniska Institutionen, 
Upsala. 

Director, U.S. National Museum. 
Washington. 

Watson Botanical Exchange Club. 

Director, Botanic Garden and 
Museum, Zurich. 

The donations also include 2 watercolour drawings of Cijp/ipe- 
diam papuanum Ridl., presented by Hon. Charles Rothschild and 
70 plates of plants, presented by Miss Tissart. 

The following have been acquired by purchase — 44 coloured 
jjlates from Curtis's Botanical Magazine and 13 drawings of British 
Plants by Miss B. Corfe. 

3. Bindimj. 75 volumes have been bound and others repaired. 
Indexes have been prepared to a number of bound volumes of 
original drawings, and of manuscript, and to several printed books. 



M. T. Dawe, Esq. 

Director of Botanical School, 

Trinity College, Dublin. 
Regius Keeper, Royal Botanic 

Garden, Edinburgh. 
W. Fawcett, Esq. 
Dr. Hassler. 
Dr. Bunzo Hayata. 
Dr. Augustine Henry. 
Dr. Marshall A. Howe. 
Royal Hortioultural Society. 
Director, University of Illinois. 
Secretary of State for India. 
Director, Board of Agriculture, 

India. 
Director, Dept. van Landouw in- 

verheid en Handel Buitenzorg 

(Java). 
Director, Royal Botanic Gardens, 

Kew. 
Secretary, Kew Guild. 
Prof. Henri Lecomte. 
Dr. Bernt Lynge, Kristiania. 
C. C. Lacaita, Esq. 
Director, Rijks Herbarium. 

Leiden. 
Linnean Society, London. 
C. G. Lloyd, Esq. 
J. H. Maiden, Esq. F.R.S. 



IV. — Publications. 

(1) Issued by the Trustees. — Guide to the British Mycetozoa. 
Edition 4. By Miss G. Lister. 

(2) Issued by the permission of the Irustees. — Notes on Jamaica 
Plants ; Euphorbiacece. By Dr. Rendle and Mr. W. Fawcett. 
(Journal of Botany.) 

The African species of Allophyllus. By Mr. E. G. Baker. 
(Journal of Botany.) 



152 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Barharea rivularis in Britain, By Messrs. A. B. Jackson and 

A. J. Wilmott. (Journal of Botany.) 

Rubiacese Batesianse. By Dr. Wernham. (Journal of Botany.) 
The genus Manettia. By Dr. Wernham. (Journal of Botany.) 
Alabastra diversa. Parts XXX. and XXXI. By Mr. Spencer 

Moore. (Journal of Botany.) 

(3) By Students of tJie Collections other than. Members of the 
Staff. — The Cryptogams of Andrew's Herbarium. By Mr. G. S. 
Boulger. (Journal of Botany.) 

Madeira Flowers. By Mr. James Britten. (Journal of Botany.) 

Miscellanea Bryologica IV. By Mr. H. N. Dixon. (Journal of 
Botany.) 

Notes on L/jcJinothamnus. By Mr. J. Groves. (Journal of 
Botany.) 

A Revision of some critical species of Echiani. By Mr. C. 0. 
Lacaita. (Journal of the Linnean Society.) 

Notes on British Euphrasiese I. By Mr. H. W. Pugsley. 
(Journal of Botany.) 

A Revision of the genera Famar'm and Rapkapnos. By Mr. 
H. W. Pugsley. (Journal of the Linnean Society.) 

A hybrid Stachys. By Mr. C. E. Salmon. (Journal of 
Botany.) ' ^- 

V. — A cqaisitions. 
(1) By Donation. 

Additions to the British Herbarium have been rec( ived from the 
following donors : — W. C. Barton, Esq., 148 Phanerogams ; Mrs. 
C. J. Godfrey, 4 Volumes of plants, being the herbarium of Rev. 
W. Bingley, author of " A Tour Round North Wales " (1800) ; Mrs. 
E. S. Gregory, Herbarium, containing 3,600 sheets ; Miss L. Lyle, 
12 Algse ; Rev. E. S. Marshall, 70 Phanerogams ; W. C. Newton, 
Esq., 3 Phanerogams : C. E. Salmon, Esq., 14 Phanerogams ; W. R. 
Sherrin, Esq,, 2 specimens of Mosses ; J. W. White, Esq., 116 
Phanerogams : and single specimens from Col. M, J. Godfery : 
C. P. Hurst, Esq. ; Rev. W. Johnson ; H. H. Knight, Esq. ; and 

C. C. Lacaita, Esq. 

The following donations have been made to the General 
Herbarium : — 

Europe. 

W. S. Goodhew, Esq., 52 Phanerogams from Archangel district ; 

D. Grantham, Esq., 160 Phanerogams from Archangel ; C. C. 
Lacaita, Esq., 9 Phanerogams from Italy ; Oapt. P. R. Lowe, 49 
Phanerogams from Rognac, Bouches du Rhone, and 95 Phanerogams 
from Fieri, Val Challant ; C. E. Salmon, Esq., 6 Phanerogams from 
France ; J. W. White, Esq., 195 Phanerogams chiefly from the 
Balearic Isles and the Pyrenees. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 153 

Asia. 

Li. F. G. Aldous, 54 Phanerogams from Syria ; Prof. L. H. 
Bailey, 3 species of Chinese grasses ; Miss G. E. Benham, 125 
specimens from Kashmir, India • The Director, Botanic Gardens, 
Brisbane, 47 species of Papuan Rubiacese and 30 specimens of 
Papuan Acanthacese ; Rev. Preb. H. E. Fox, 719 Phanerogams and 
47 Cryptogams from Japan ; C. Boden Kloss, Esq., 257 Phanero- 
gams and 4 Cryptogams from South Annam ; C. C. Lacaita, Esq., 
661 Phanerogams and 276 Ferns from Sikkim, India ; Lt. P. 
Stammwitz, 56 Phanerogams from Sinai Desert ; Lt.-Col. M. F. 
White, I.M.S., 137 specimens from Palestine ; H. Whitehead, Esq., 
14 Phanerogams from Mesopotamia. 

Africa. 

G. L. Bates, Esq., 253 Phanerogams from Bitye, Cameroons ; 
R. A. Dummer, Esq., 114 Phanerogams and 77 Cryptogams from 
Uganda ; F. Eyles, Esq., 364 Phanerogams and 55 Cryptogams 
from Rhodesia ; Capt. H. Lynes, R.N., 79 Specimens from Azrou, 
Middle Atlrs ; Ven. Archdeacon Rogers, 72 Phanerogams from 
Tropical an^ South Africa ; Mrs. C. Shinn, 72 Phanerogams from 
Nyasaland. 

^ istralasia. 
, H. N. Dixon, Esq., Sample of Diatomaceous earth from New 
Zealand and one Lichen from Fiji ; Mrs. Alfred Fowler, small 
collection of Hawaiian Ferns ; Miss L. S. Gibbs, 137 Phanerogams 
and 7 Cryptogams from Tasmania. 

America. 

Mrs. B.endix Koppel, G Volumes of A. Lindig's New Granada 
Ferns and 1 Volume of Mosses ; Capt. P. R. Lowe, 1 Volume of 
Dominica Ferns; Rev. E. S. Marshall, 109 Phanerogams and 6 
Cryptogams from Quebec Province, Canada, collected by Brother 
Victorin ; Rev. A. Miles Moss, 35 Phanerogams from Para, Brazil ; 
A. E. Persand, Esq., 13 Fungi and 1 Lichen from Demerara ; and 
single specimens from Miss M. Xavier de Bibadh Kosha and M. L. 
Fernald. 

Cultivated Plants. 

E. A. Bowles, Esq., 1 4 species of Galanthus and 1 Crocus ; Hon. 
N. C. Rothschild, 3 species of Orchids and 78 species and varieties 
of Iris ; Douglas Robertson, Esq., Fasciated inflorescence of Lilium 
If enrt/i with, photos. 

General. 

Lady Barkly, 4,100 Ferns, Foreign and British ; Miss 
Biddulph, 2 specimens of double Coconut ; E. B. Evans, Esq., 
3 sections of stem of Chestnut (showing wound healing) ; Prof. A. 
Henry, 9 species of Platanus ; H. W. Archer Kilgour, Esq., 2 
pieces of petrified Conifer wood and photos ; Major C. F. Krabbe 
Stem bearing "Wooden Roses" from Brazil ; the late Prof. G. S. 



154 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

West, 1,475 sheets o£ original drawings o£ British and Foreign 
Freshwater Algse and 30 packets of original drawings illustrating 
his scientific papers. 

(2) By Purchase. 
British Isles. 

The Botanical Exchange Club (through W. G. Barton), 176 
Phanerogams ; D. McArdle, Esq., 152 Mosses and 302 Hepatics. 

Europe. 

C. Mereschkovsky, 235 Lichens from Switzerland, including 
Fasc. I-IV, Nos. 1-129, Lichenes Ticinenses ; F. Petrak, 375 
specimens Fungi from Bohemia and Moravia. 

Africa. 

J. Gossweiler, 1,272 Phanerogams and 483 Cryptogams from 
Portuguese Congo and Angola. 

America. 

Dr. E. Hassler, 1,047 Phanerogams and 47 Cryptogams from 
Paraguay ; T. 0. Weigel, 121 Phanerogams and 79 Cryptogams 
from Bolivia, collected by Dr. 0. Buchtien. 

Australasia. 

Mrs. Hodges, 200 Ferns from New Zealand and South Sea 
Islands, collected by Surgeon W. Fasken. 

(3) By Exchange of Duplicates. 

Prof. F. J. Lewis, University of Alberta, Edmonton South, 
Canada, 100 specimens of Canadian plants ; Director, Universitetets 
Bot. Museum, Copenhagen, 612 Danish plants and 52 Mexican 
plants ; Director, Museu Goeldi, Para, Brazil, 229 specimens from 
Para ; Curator, Gray Herbarium, Cambridge, Mass., 200 specimens 
Cent. II, III, PL Exsicc. Grayanse, 597 specimens, including 50 
Cryptogams from Newfoundland, and 48 specimens from Labrador ; 
Dr. Merrill, Bureau of Science, Manila, Philippine Islands, 400 
specimens ; Dr. N. L, Britton, Bot. Gardens, New York, 285 West 
Indian plants ; Chief, Division of Botany, Pretoria, 27 South 
African plants and 32 South African species of Aloe ; Director, 
Bot. Gardens, Singapore, 153 Malayan plants ; Director, Botanic 
Gardens, Sydney, 87 Australian plants ; Curator, U.S. National 
Museum, Washington, 161 specimens from New Mexico, Surinam, 
&c., 468 specimens from Mexico, and 2^& Cryptogams ; Director, 
Botanisches Museum, Zurich, 531 South African plants, and 6 
European plants. 

VI. — Students and Visitors. 

The number of visits to the Department for consultation and 
research was 3,170. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 155 

VII. — Demonstrations. 

Demonstrations on the collections have been given by Dr. Rendle 
to members of the Quekett Microscopical Club, of the Selborne 
Society, of the Lambeth Field Club, and of the Walthamstow 
Natural History Society, 



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Bridgewater 3 

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Charles Drtjry Edward Fortnum ... ... ... ... ... ... 5 

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NUMBERS OF PERSONS ADMITTED.- 

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Visitors 12 

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Principal Acquisitions 13 

Department of Printed Books 15 

„ Manuscripts 22 

„ Oriental Printed Books and MSS 27 

„ Prints and Drawings 31 

Sub-Department of Oriental Prints and Drawings ... ... ... 44 

Department op Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities 48 

,, Greek and Roman Antiquities 57 

„ British and Mediaeval Antiquities and Ethno- 
graphy 63 

„ Coins and Medals 74 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 

Page 
GENERAL STATEMENT OF PROGRESS: 

Visitors, &c. ... ... ... •■. ••• ••• ••• ••• ••• 87 

The Staff 87 

Swiney Lectures ... ... ... ... ••• ... ... ... 87 

Selous Memorial 88 

New Spirit Building ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 88 

Murray Oceanographical Collection 88 

Whaling and Sealing in Southern Waters 88 

Investigations : 89 

DiNO saurian Fossils in Tanganyika Territory 90 

Marine Fauna op South Africa 90 

Bequests and Gifts 90 

Purchases 92 

Publications • 92 

General Library 94 

' Index of the Genera and Species of Animals ... 95 

Index Museum and Morphological Collections 95 

Departmknt op Zoology ... ... ... ••• ••• ... ... ... 97 

„ Entomology 128 

„ Geology 140 

„ Mineralogy 154 

Botany 163 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



I.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 
BEIDGEWATER FUND, from the 1st April 1920 to the 31st March 1921. 



To Balakces on the 1st April, 1920 

„ Dividends received on £13,659 3s. 2d. Stock in 
2| per cent. Consols, bequeathed by 
the Earl of Bridge water, viz. 



On the 5th April, 1920 
„ 5th July, 1920 .. 
„ 5th October, 1920 
„ 5th January, 1921 



£85 
85 
85 
85 



Rent of a Real Estate, Whitchurch, bequeathed 
by the Earl of Bridge water (less charges) 



By One Year's Salaky of the Egerton Librarian' ... 

,, Amount expended in purchase of Manuscripts ... 

^, Balances on the 31st March, 1921, carried to 

Account for 1921-1922 



Cash. 



£ s. 
200 10 



341 9 
23 7 



Cash. 



£ 

175 
50 



340 7 5 



Stock, 
2|% Consols. 



£ 
13,659 



3 2 



£565 7 5 £13,669 3 2 



Stock, 
2|% Console. 



13,659 3 2 



£565 7 5 £13,659 3 2 



II.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 
FARNBOROUGH FUND, from the 1st April 1920 to the 31st March 1921. 

Stock, 
Cash. 2^% Consols. 



To Balances on the 1st April, 1920 

„ Dividends received on £2,879 10s. Id. Stock in 

2| per cent. Consols, bequeathed by 

Lord Earnborough, viz. : 

On the 5th April, 1920 ... £17 19 11 

„ 5th July, 1920 ... 17 19 11 

„ 5th October, 1920. 17 19 11 

„ 5th January, 1921 17 19 11 



By Amount expended in purchase of Manuscripts ... 

„ Balances on the 31st March, 1921, carried to 

Account for 1921-1922 



£ s. d. 
35 12 1 



71 19 8 



107 11 9 



Cash. 



£ s. d. 
52 10 



55 1 9 



£ 5. d. 
2,879 10 7 



£2,879 10 7 

Stock, 
2|% Consols. 



2,879 10 7 



£107 11 9 £2,879 10 7 



a2 



(1368.) Wt. 12066 C. 309-750. 8/21. J. T. & S., Ltd. Q. 14. 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



III.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure 

of the SWINEY FUND, from the Isfc April 1920 to the 3lsfc March 1921. 

Stock, 
Cash. 21% Consols. 



To Balances on the 1st April, 1920 

„ Dividends received on £5,744 05. 8d. Stock in 

2| per cent. Consols, bequeathed by 

Dr. George Swiney, for Lectures on 

Geology, viz. : 

On the 5th April, 1920 .. 

„ 5th July, 1920 .. 

„ 5th October, 1920 

,, 5th January, 1921 



£35 18 





35 18 





35 18 





35 18 






By Amount paid to Dr. J. D. Falconer, for Lectures 

on Geology in 1920 

,, Balances on the- 31st March, 1921, carried to 
Account for 1921-1922 



143 12 

£153 3 1 

Cash. 

£ 5. d. 

140 

13 3 1 

£153 3 1 



£ s. 
5,744 



£5,744 




5,744 8 
£5,744 8 



IV.— AN ACCOUNT of the Eeceipts and Expenditure of 
the BIRCH FUND, from the 1st April 1920 to the 31st March 1921. 

Stock, 



Cash. 



To Balance on the 1st April, 1920 

,, Dividends received on £565 35. 9d. Stock m 21 

per cent. Consols, bequeathed by 

Dr. Birch in 1766, for the three 

Under Librarians of the British 

Museum, viz. .•" 

On the 5th April, 1920 ., 

„ 5th July, 1920 .. 

„ 5th October, 1920 

,, 5th January, 1921 



By Legacy paid to the three Under Librarians of the 
British Museum, whose offices existed in 1766, 
viz., the Keepers of the Departments of Printed 
Books, Manuscripts, and Natural History 
„ Balance on the 31st March, 1921, carried to 
Account for 1921-1922 ... 



14 2 



£14 2 8 



2|% Consols. 



£ 
565 



3 9 



£3 10 
3 10 
3 10 
3 10 


8 
8 
8 
8 


14 2 8 












£14 2 8 


£565 3 9 




Cash. 


Stock, 
21% Consols. 



£ s. d. 



565 3 
565 3 



ACCOUjN'T.S, etc., of the BRITISH MUSEUM. 



y. — AN" AOOOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the bequest of 

the late MR. CHARLES DRURY EDWARD FORTtfUM, from the 

1st April 1920 to the 31st March 1921. 

Stock, 
Cash. 5% War Loan. 



To Balances on the 1st April, 1920 

„ Net Proceeds of Sale of £1,307 95. Id. 5% War 

Loan Stock 
„ Interest on War Loan 



By Stock sold as above 

,, Amount expended in aid of the Parliamentary 

Vote, 1920-1921 :. 

„ Balances on the 31st March, 1921, carried to 

Accomit for 1921-1922 



£ s. 
118 11 


d. 

1 


£ s. d. 
2,100 


1,130 
105 








£1,353 11 


1 


£2,100 


Cash. 




Stock, 
5% War Loan. 


£ s. 


d. 


£ s. d. 
1,307 9 7 


1,350 







3 11 


1 


792 10 5 


£1,353 11 


1 


£2,100 



VI.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 

OARCHEMISH EXCAVATIONS FUND, from the 

1st April 1920 to the 31st March 1921. 

Cash. 

£ s. d. 
To Balance on the 1st April, 1920 , ... .,. 534 1110 

,, Donation (further anonymous contribution) ... ... ... 4,000 



£4,534 11 10 



Cash. 

£ s. d. 

By Expenditure on Excavations 3,525 8 6 

„ Balance on the Slst March, 1921, carried to Account for 1921-1922 1,009 3 4 



£4,534 11 10 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



VII.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the bequest 

of the late MR. HENRY LOUIS FLORENCE, from the 

Ist April 1920 to the 31st March 1921. 

Stock. 
Cash. 5% War Loan. 



To Balances on the 1st April, 1920 ... 
„ Interest on 5% War Loan, 1929-47 



By Amount expended in purchase of Prints and 

Drawings 

„ Balances on the 31st March, 1921, carried to 
Account for 1921-1922 



£ s. 
45 
62 12 



d. 



£ 5. d. 
1,052 12 6 



£97 13 





£1,052 12 6 






Stock. 


Cash. 




• 5% War Loan. 


£ s. 


d. 


£ s. d. 


84 17 


7 




12 15 


5 


1,052 12 6 


£97 13 





£1,052 12 6 



YIIL— AN ACCOUNT of the JOHN A. ROEBLING FUND, from the 
1st April 1920 to the 3 1st March 1921. 



To Balance on the 1st April, 1920 
„ Interest on War Loan 



By Balances on the 31st March, 1921, carried to 
Account for 1921-1922 



Cash. 




Stock. 
5% War Loan. 


£ s. 
52 9 
52 9 


d. 
6 
6 


£ s. d. 
1,049 8 10 


£104 19 





£1,049 8 10 


Cash. 




Stock. 
5% War T-oa,n. 


£ s. 


d. 


£ s. d. 


104 19 





1,049 8 10 


£104 19 





£1,049 8 10 



Ut April, 1921. 



Frederic G. Kenyon, 
Director and Principal Librarian. 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



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ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITIvSH MUSEUM. 





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ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 9 

The British Museum, Bloomsbury (including the Departments 
of Printed Books and Maps, Manuscripts, Oriental Printed Books 
and Manuscripts, Prints and Drawings, Egyptian and Assyrian 
Antiquities, Greek and Roman Antiquities, British and Mediaeval 
Antiquities and Ethnography, and Coins and Medals), is open free 
to the public on week-days (except on Good Friday and Christmas 
Day and days of Public Fast or Thanksgiving) from 10 a.m. to 
6 p ni. 

But after 4 p.m. in January, February, November, December, and 
after 5 p.m. in March and October, some only of the Galleries 
remain open, viz. : — 

'Exhibitions of Manuscripts and Printed Books ; 

Prehistoric, British, Anglo-Saxon, Oriental, 

Religious and Ethnographical Collections ; 

Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Egyptian Rooms ; 

Assyrian and Babylonian Rooms ; Glass, China, 
. and Mediaeval Collections. 

Egyptian, Assyrian, Greek and Roman Collec- 
tions ; Prehistoric, Terra-cotta, Gold Ornament, 
Greek and Roman Life, Bronze and Vase 
Rooms ; Mummy Rooms ; Prints and Drawings 
Exhibition Gallery. 



On Mondays, 
Wednesdays, 

and 
Fridays. 



On Tuesdays, 
Thursdays, 

and 
Saturdays. 



The Museum is open also on Sunday afternoons — 

From 2 to 4 p.m. in January, February, November, December. 
„ 2 to 5 p.m. in March and October. 
„ 2 to 6 p.m. April to September, inclusive. 

The Reading Room is open to Students from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., the 
Newspaper Room and Manuscript Students' Room from 10 a.m. to 
5 p.m., on every week-day except Good Friday, Christmas Day, and 
the first four week-days in March and September. 



British Museum, \ 
1st April, 1921. / 



Frederic G. Kenyan, 
Director and Principal Librarian 



10 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BKITISH MUSEUM. 



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January .. 
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September .. 
October .. 
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1i 
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3Q 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



11 



The Exhibition Galleries of the British Museum (Natural 
History), Cromwell Road, South Kensington, including the 
Departments of Zoology, Entomology, Geology and Palaeon- 
tology, Mineralogy, and Botany, are open to the public, free 
daily, except Good Friday and Christmas Day, and days of Public 
Fast or Thanksgiving. 

The Hours of Admission are as under : — 



On Week-Days, throughout the year from 10 a.m., in 

January and February 

March ... 

April to September ... 

October, November and December ... 



to 5 
,, 5.30 



p.m. 



On Sundays, in 


' 




January 


from 2 


to 4 


February 1st to 14th 


„ 2 


„ 4.30 


„ 15th to end ... 


,. 2 


„ 5 


March ... 


„ 2 


„ 5.30 


April 


2 


„ 6 


May to August 


,',' 2.30 


„ 7 


September 


„ 2 


„ 6 


October 


„ 2 


„ 5 


November and December 


„ 2 


., 4 



p.m. 



Persons are admitted to study in these Departments every week- 
day from 10 till 4 o'clock. 



On Sundays the following galleries are open, namely : — Central 
Hall, North Hall, Bird Gallery, Mammal Galleries (including 
Whale Room), Fossil Mammal Gallery, Fossil Reptile Gallery, and 
Mineral Gallery. 



British Museum (Natural History), 
Ist April, 1921. 



Sidney F. Harmer, 

Director of the Natural 

History Departments. 



12 ACCOUiYTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



X. — General Progress at the Museum, Bloomsbury. 

The evacuation of the Musiexiin by the Departments installed 
in some of the galleries during the war was completed in the 
course of the first months of 192U. The Medical Research Commit- 
tee quitted the Sub-ground Floor of King Edward the Seventh's 
Galleries on February 6th, and the Registry of Friendly Societies 
completed their removal from the galleries belonging- to the 
Departments of Prints and Drawings and Egyptian and 
Assyrian Antiquities on March 2Dth. The work of cleaning these 
galleries and replacing the collections in them was taken in hand 
at once. The three Mummy Rooms were reopened to the public 
on May 24th, the Phoenician and Himyaritic Rooms on June 21st, 
the Fourth Egyptian Room, the exhibition gallery of Prints and 
Drawings and half the Gallery of Ceramics and Mediaeval Col- 
lections on July 15th, the Babylonian Room on July 31st, the 
Students' Room of the Department of Prints and Drawings on 
August 3rd, and the Fifth and Sixth Egyptian Rooms on De- 
cember 6th. At the end of the year the only portions of the 
Museum remaining unopened were two small rooms of the 
Egyptian and Assyrian Department, and half the Ground Floor 
Gallery in King Edward the Seventh's Galleries, in which the 
collections of Oriental Ceramics, Glass, and a portion of the 
Mediaeval collections were being installed. 

Sundaj^ opening of the galleries was resumed on November 7th. 

The total number of visitors to the Museum was 851,483, 
composed of 843,803 on week-days and 7,680 on the Sundays in 
November and December. The figure for week-days is consider- 
ably higher than in any previous year except 1913, and is more 
than 150,000 in excess of the total for 1919 (691,650), when, 
however, the galleries were only gradually reopening in the 
course of the year. On the other hand the number of readers 
visiting the Reading Room has not yet reached the pre-war 
standard. The total of 147,145, though an increase on the 
130,198 of 1919, is lower than the figure for 1915, while before 
the war, ever since the beginning of the century, the total in- 
variably exceeded 200,000 (except when the Room was closed 
for cleaning), and in 1913 reached 243,659. Students visiting 
other Departments amounted to 35,229, about double the number 
in 1919 (when, however, several of the Students' Rooms were not 
open), and only a little less than in 1915. Had the Print Room 
been open throughout the year the 1915 total would no doubt 
have been exceeded. 

The parties of the Guide Lecturers were well attended. Exact 
fio-ures cannot be given, since visitors join or leave the parties in 
the course of the lectures, but the approximate figure is 35,670. 

The number of separate objects incorporated in the several 
Departments during 1920 is as follows : — 

Printed Books : 

Books and Pamphlets - - . - - - 29,397 

Serials and Parts of Volumes . _ - - 83,447 
Maps and Atlases ------ 1,812 



GENEKAL PROGRESS OE THE MUSEUxM. 13 

Printed Books — continued — 

Music .-----..- 10,843 

Newspapers (single numbers) - - _ - 282,692 

Misceilaneous 1,862 

Manuscripts and Seals ------ 460 

Oriental Printed Books and MS S. - - - - 1,890 

Prints and Drawings -_.___ 4,773 

,, (Oriental) - - . . 878 

Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities - - - - 2,347 

Greek and Roman Antiquities ----- 66 

Britjsli and Mediaeval Antiquities - - - - 1,614 

Coins and Medals - - 7,919 



Tbtal 429,990 

Of the total increase of 96,000, nearly tke whole is accounted 
for by an increase of 81,500 in the number of newspapers, but 
most Departments show increases except the Department of 
Egyptian and Assjrrian Antiquities. 

Among the accessions described in the Departmental reports 
that follow, a few of the most notable may be mentioned here. 
The Department of Printed Books made considerable acquisitions 
of early English and Spanish books — two branches of biblio- 
graphical research to which considerable attention is now being 
paid. The Department of M,SS. acquired at the Yates Thompson 
sale a very valuable and early illuminated Life of St. Cuthbert, 
written at -Durham a,t the end of the 12th century ; and jit 
received a gift of special interest in the volume of Middle English 
verse presented by a group of teachers of English in America, 
as a mark of their sympathy with England during the war, and 
of the assistance which they had derived from the British 
Museum. 

In the Department of Prints and Drawings the most important 
single accessions were the album of drawings by a North Italian 
artist (formerly supposed to be Mantegna), presented by Lord 
Rosebery, and the very early portrait of Yoritomo, the first 
Shogun of Japan. 

The Department of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities 
acquired a very fine papyrus roll, nearly 60 feet in length, con- 
taining a late recension of the Book of the Dead, in a fuller 
form than in any other kno^vn manuscript. The Department of 
Greek and Roman Antiquities received by bequest from Lord 
Astor a most attractive half-length bronze statue of a young 
priestess, which was at one time stated, but without authority, 
to be a portrait of Drusilla, Caligula's sister, and to have been 
dredged up from Lake Nemi. The Department also acquired a 
particularly fine rock crystal gem, formerly in the Cockerell col- 
lection ; and it was fortunate in securing several interesting 
Greek vases. 

The Department of British and Mediaeval Antiquities was 
enriched by a speciallv interesting gift, Mr. G. Eumorfopoulos 
(a frequent and munificent benefactor of the Museum) having 
elected to commemorate the completion of forty years' service by 



14 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

tke Keeper, Sir Hercules Read, by presenting- to the Museum a 
rare and beautiful example of Chiin stoneware, of wkicli the 
existing specimens are few in number and proportionately 
valuable. Another addition to the Chinese collections was a 
wooden statue, more than life-size, of a Bodhisatva with remains 
of the original paint and gilding, dating probably from the 12th 
century. This was obtained through the good offices of the 
National Art Collections Fund and other friends. 

The Department of Coins and Medals secured a further 
portion of the Weber collection of Greek Coins, but the most 
interesting accessions were two single pieces; one being an 
example (only six others are known) of the silver decadrachm 
supposed to have been struck at Athens in commemoration of the 
victory over Persia, while the other is the second known example 
of the Crown of the Rose, struck by Henr}«VIII., but withdrawn 
after two months. 

Publications issued during 1920 : — 

Guide to the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities 
in the British Museum. Fifth edition, with illustrations, maps 
and plans. 8vo. 2*. Qd. 

A Guide to the Exhibition illustrating Greek and Roman 
Life. Second Edition. 8vo. 2s. Qd. 

How to Observe in Archaeology. Suggestions for travellers 
in the Near and Middle East. 8vo. 2s. Qd. 

Grains and Grammes. A Table of Equivalents for the use of 
Numismatists. Svo. 35. 

Rules for compiling the Catalogues in the Department of 
Printed Books in th© British Museum. Svo. 2^. 6^. 

Cliinese Pottery STatue of a Lohan. 7 pp. text, with coloured 
plate. 4to. Is. 

Guide to the Antiquities of the Bronze Age in the Depart- 
ment of British and Mediaeval Antiquities. Second Edition, with 
10 plates and 195 illustrations. Svo. 2s. 6^. 

Summary Guide to the Exhibition Galleries of the British 
Museum. Fourth Edition. With plans and ilustrations. Svo. 
4.d. 

The Book of the Dead. Monograph by Sir E. A. W. Budge. 
Svo. 1^. 6^. 

The Babylonian Story of the Deluge and the Epic of 
Gilgamish. With an account of the Royal Libraries of Nineveh. 
With IS illustrations. Svo. Is. Qd. 

Hittite Texts in the Cuneiform Character from Tablets in 
the British Museum. 50 plates. Foolscap folio. 15^. 

Cuneiform Texts from Babylonian Tablets in the British 
Museum. Part XXX. 50 plates. Foolscap folio. 12^. 

Guide to an Exhibition of Japanese Colour-Prints (from the 
end of the ITth century to 1S5S). Svo. 6^. 

Frederic G. Kenyon, 

Director and Principal Librarian. 
British Museum., 
1st April, 1921. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTED BOOKS. 15 



XI. — PROGRESS made in tke Arrangement and Description 
OF the Collections and Account of Objects added 
TO them in the year 1920 (Bloomsbury) . 



Department of Printed Books. 

I. Arrangement. — The works added to the collection during 
the past year have, as far as possible, been placed on the shelves 
of the Library according- to the system of classification adopted in 
the Museum. 

The press-marks, indicating their respective localities, have 
been marked on the inside and affixed to the back of each volume. 

The total number of these press-marks amounts to 64,735; in 
addition to which 36,092 press-marks have been altered on books 
and in the catalogues, in consequence of changes and re-arrange- 
ments carried out in the Library ; 34,364 labels have been affixed 
to books and volumes of newspapers, and 48,389 obliterated labels 
been renewed. 

The number of stamps impressed upon articles received is 
406,456. 

10,885 presses of books have been dusted in the course of the 
year. 

II. Cataloguing. — 46,957 titles have been written for the 
General Catalogue and for the Catalogue of Maps and Music. 

Printing. — 34,450 titles and index-slips for the General, and 
1,428 for the Map, Catalogue have been printed during the yea^. 

Incorporation. — General Catalogue. — 32,998 title-slips and 
index-slips have been incorporated into each of the three copies 
of the Catalogue. This has rendered it necessary, in order to 
maintain as far as possible the alphabetical arrangement, to re- 
arrange 54,723 title-slips and index-slips in each copy and to add 
to each copy 461 new leaves. 

May Catalogue. -—2,017 titles have been written for this Cata- 
logue, and 1,734 title-slips have been incorporated into each of 
three copies of it. This has rendered it necessary to re-arrange 
2,691 title-slips in each copy and to add to each copy 21 new 
leaves. 

Music Catalogue. — 8,096 titles have been written for this 
catalogue; 30,294 title-slips have been relaid on 2,207 new leaves. 

Shelf Catalogue. — For this catalogue, in which the title-slips, 
mounted on cards, are arranged in order of press-marks, 23,364 
have been so mounted and 27,880 have been incorporated in their 
proper order. 

Special Catalogues. — Work has been continued on the Cata- 
logue of Books printed in the XVth Century and progress made 
with the Venetian Presses, which will occupy Part V. 



16 ACCOL'NTS, ETC., OF THE KEITISH MUSEUM. 

A short-title catalogue of Spanisli Books to the end of the 
XVIth century has also been prepared, 

III.- — Binding. — The number of volumes and sets of volumes 
sent to be bound in the course of the year was 12,186, including 
4,512 volumes of newspapers. In consequence of the frequent 
adoption of the plan of binding two or more volumes in one, the 
number of volumes returned wa,s 9,738. In addition, 1,989 
volumes have been repaired in the binders' shops. 

Besides this, the following binding work has been done in the 
Library itself :■ — 4,173 volumes have been repaired, 8,761 cleaned 
and polished and 4,608 volumes bound in a light style of binding. 

The following maps, etc., have also been bound or mounted 
during the year: — 13 atlases and 14 volumes of the 25-inch 
Ordnance Survey have been bound ; in addition, 395 general maps, 
in 957 sheets, have been mounted on linen, 10 maps, in 186 sheets, 
mounted on cards, and 147 Admiralty Charts mounted on linen. 

49,490 numbers of Colonial newspapers have been made up 
into 1,095 parcels and the parcels tied up and labelled. 

109 volumes of the General Catalogue have been broken up 
and rebound, and 10 volumes of the Music Catalogue. 

IV. — Reading Room Service. — The number of volumes re- 
placed in the General Library after use in the Reading Room was 
481,475; in the King's Library, 14,364; in the Grenville Library, 
2,140 ; in the Map Room, 3,566 ; in the presses in which books are 
kept from day to day for the use of readers, 659,246; and in the 
Oriental Department, 1,910; making a total of 1,162,701 volumes 
supplied to readers during the year, exclusive of those to which 
the readers have personal access on the shelves of the Reading 
Room. The number of readers during the year was 147,145, 
giving an average of 484 daily — the room having been open on 
304 days. 

Nemsyayer Room. — The number of readers during the year 
was 10,880, giving a daily average of 36 — the room having been 
open on 304 days. The number of volumes replaced after use was 
49,492, giving a daily average of 163, not reckoning volumes taken 
from the shelves by the readers themselves. In addition, 1,372 
country newspapers; were brought up to the Library from the 
Repository at Hendon for the use of readers. 

Maip Room.. — 317 students were admitted to the Map Room. 

Plioto graphy . — There were 296 applications for leave to photo- 
graph from books in the Library and 787 volumes were supplied 
for this purpose. 

V. Accessions. — General Library. — 29,397 complete volumes 
and pamphlets have been added to the General Library during the 
year. Of these, 7,818 were presented, 14,501 received by Copy- 
right, 687 by Colonial Copyright, 1,133 by International Ex- 
change, and 5,858 acquired by purchase. 

83,447 parts or volumes of serial publications and of works in 
progress have been added to the General Library. Of these, 6,435 



DEOPARTMENT OF PRINTED BOOKS. 



IT 



were presented, 53,463 received by Copyright, 601 by Colonial 
Copyright, 1,647 by International Exchange, and 21,301 acquired 
by purchase. 

Ma'ps. — 59 atlases, 178 parts of atlases, and 1,575 maps in 
3,991 sheets have been added to the collection during the year. 
Of these, 15 atlases, 24 parts and 976 maps were presented; 27 
atlases, 81 parts of atlases and 482 maps received by Copyright ; 
13 atlases and 18 maps by Coloniol Copyright ; 2 parts of atlases 
and 1 map by International Exchange ; and 4 atlases, 69 parts of 
atlases and 976 maps acquired by purchase. 

Music. — 10,843 musical publications have been added to the 
collection during the year. Of these, 1 book was presented, 9,890 
books and 1,251 parts received by Copyright, 774 books by 
Colonial Copyright, and 178 books and 128 parts acquired by 
purchase. 

Neivs'pa'pers. — The number of newspapers published in the 
United Kingdom and received under the provisions of the Copy- 
right Act during the year was 3,079, comprising 204,665 single 
numbers. Of these newspapers, 1,141 were published in London 
and its suburbs, 1,439 in other parts of England and Wales, 284 
in Scotland, and 215 in Ireland. 39 sets, comprising 11,422 
single numbers, were received by Colonial Copyright ; 1 set, com- 
prising 434 single numbers, by International Exchange ; 353 sets, 
comprising 50,116 single numbers, have been presented; and 90 
sets, comprising 16,055 single numbers, acquired by purchase. 

Miscellaneous. — 1,852 articles not included in the foregoing 
2>aragraphs have been received, consisting of single sheets, photo- 
graphs and postage stamps. 

Acquisitions of Special Interest. 
The following is a list of the most important and interesting 
books, maps and music, acquired by presentation or purchase 
during the year: — 

Books printed in the Ibth century. 

Mapheus Vegiu&, Carmen de morte Astyanactis. Robertus de 
Fano and Bernardinus de Bergamo, Cagli, 1475. The first book 
printed at Cagli, and a very rare tract. 

S. Francis of Assisi, Fioretti. Giovanni Lionardo Longo, 
Yicenza, 1476. The first edition of the Fioretti and the first 
known product of Longo's press. 

Augustinus Datus, Eloquentise prsecepta. Leonardus 

[Pachel] and Henricus [Scinzenzeler], Milan, 1478. The 
only book known to have been produced by this partnership. 

Zeichen der falschen Gulden. [Anton Sorg, Augsburg, about 
1480.] A placard, with woodcuts of base coin in circulation. 
No sheet of this kind was previously represented in the Museum 
collection, 

Psalterium cum canticis. Bartholomseus Ghotan, Magdeburg, 
1481. A fine copy of one of two dated books known to belong 
to this press, both of which are very rare. Presented by Major 
George Anson. 



18 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Heinricli Miintzinger, Das Pater noster mit der Gloss, etc. 
Anton Sorg, Augsburg, 1482. A rare collection of devotional 
tracts and a good specimen of Augsburg vernacular printing. 

Diogenes Laertius, Vita de'filosofi. Jacobus Caroli and Petrus 
Honofrii, Florence, 1489. The work done by these printers 
jointly was not previously represented in the Museum collection, 
and specimens of it rarely occur. 

Year Books, 1 and 3-8, Edward IV. [Richard Pynson, 
London, about 1492 and 1495.] Of most of these seven Year 
Books only one other copy is known to exist. The first is a 
variant issue of an edition already represented in the Museum. 

Ofhcium pro festo Visitationis B. V. Marise. [Richard 
Pynson, London, about 1492.] An apparently hitherto un- 
recorded product of Pynson' s press. Presented by Major George 
A nso7i. 

Votiuale Missarum. Valentin Fernandez, Lisbon, 1496. The 
only known copy of this service book, the existence of which had 
not previously been recorded. 

English Books of the l^th and 11th centuries. 

The Kalendar of Shyppars. Antoine Verard, Paris, 1503. A 
Scots translation of the " Kalendrier des bergers," with fine 
woodcuts. Only two other copies are known, one of which, like 
the present, is imperfect. 

Terentii Comoedise a Guidone luuenale illustratse. Josse 
Bade, Paris, for Wynkyn de Worde, Michael Morin and Joannes 
Brachius, London, 1504. The only book known to have been 
printed for De Worde in conjunction with these two partners. 
Presented by Major George Anson. 

Nicholas Udall, Floures for Latine Spekynge selected oute of 
Terence. T. Berthelet, London, 1533. The first edition. 

Sir Geofirey Fenton, Monophylo. W. Seres, London, 1572. 

R. S. [Robert Smythe], Straunge, lamentable and tragicall 
Hystories. H. Jackson, London, 1577. 

^ The Mirror of Princely Deedes and Knighthood, translated 
by M. T. [Margaret Tyler]. T. East, London [1578]. The first 
part only. 

John Lyly, Euphues and his England. T. East for G. 
Cawood, London, 1580. Belonging to one or other of the first 
three editions. Presented, by S. R. Christie-Miller, Esq. 

Thomas Howell His Denises, London, 1581. "Wanting the 
title and two following leaves. Only one perfect copy is known. 

Arthur of Little Britaine [translated by Lord Berners]. 
T. East, London [1582]. 

Palmerin d'Oliva, turned into English bv Anthony Munday. 
The first part. I. Charlewood for W. Wright, London, 1588. 
The first edition. 

Claude Colet, The famous Historie of Palladine of England, 
translated bv Anthony Mundav. E. Allde for J. Perin, London, 
1588. 

Thei History of Palmendos, translated by Anthony Munday. 
T. C. for S. Watson, London, 1589. 



DKPARTMENT OF PRINTED BOOKS. 19 

H. E,. [Henry Roberts], A Defiance to Fortune proclaimed by 
Andrugio. I. Proctor, London, 1590. 

Henry Barrow, A brief Discoverie of the false Churcb. 
[Dort.P], 1590. 

Etienne de Maison Neuve, Gerileon of England, translated by 
Antbony Munday. C. Burbie, London, 1592. 

Barnaby Rich, The Adventures of Brusanus, Prince of Hun- 
garia. T. Adames, London, 1592. 

The first Book of Primaleon of Greece. C. Burby, London, 
1595. 

Henry Roberts, Pheander, the May den-Knight. T. Creede, 
London, 1595. The only known copy. 

Richard Johnson, the second Part of the History of the Sea- 
uen Champions of Christendome. C. Burbie, London, 1597. 

Heroicall Adventures of the Knight of the Sea, Prince 
Oceander. W. Leake, London, 1600. 

William. Browne, Britannia's Pastorals. T. Snodham for 
G. Norton, London, 16[13]-16. The first part is of the rare first 
issue, afterwards freely altered by the author and reprinted for 
publication with the second part. 

Sir Richard Beling, A sixth Booke to the Countesse of Pem- 
broke's Arcadia. Society of Stationers, Dublin, 1624. 

John Cameron, A Tract of the Soveraigne Judge of Contro- 
versies. W. Turner for H. Curteine, Oxford, 1628. Presented 
hy Falconer Madan, Esq. 

The Famous History of George, I/ord Fauconbridge. I. B. 
for J. Wright, London, 1635. 

T. D. [Thomas Deloney], The Gentle Craft. The fifst part. 
R. Bird, London, 1637. Believed to be unique. 

Thomas Godwin, Romanse historise anthologia. L. Lich- 
field for H. Crypps, Oxford, 1638. Presented hy Falconer 
Madan, Esq. 

John Prideaux, Bishop of Worcester, Tabulae ad grammatica 
grseca introductorise. L. Lichfield for E. Pearse and T. Allam, 
Oxford, 1639. Presented hy Falconer Madan, Esq. 

The Noble. Birth and Gallant Atchievements of Robin Hood. 
T. Vere and W. Gilbertson, London, 1662. Presented hy S. R. 
Christie-Miller, Esq. 

[Gauthier de Costes, Seigneur de la Calprenede], Pharamond 
or the History of France, rendered into English by John Davies 
of Kidwelly. N. Brook anid S. Speed, London, 1662. 

[John Wilson, Recorder of Londonderry], The Cheats, a 
comedy. G. Bedell, T. Collins, C. Adams, London, 1664. 

The true and admirable History of Patient Grissel. J. Wright, 
J. Clarke, etc., London, 1682. 

Sir Josiah Child, A new Discourse of Trade. J. Everingham, 
London, 1693. 

[Sir Richard Steele], The Procession, a poem on Her 
Majesties Funeral. By a Gentleman of the Army. T. Bennet, 
London, 1695. Steele's first published work. 

b2 



20 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Early Spanish Books. 

Las Epistolas de Seneca en romance. P. Hagembach, Toledo^ 
1502. Witk woodcuts. 

Antoninus, Summa de confession llamada Defecerunt. P. 
Hagembacli, Toledo, 1504. 

E-amon Lull, Arbor scientiae. P. Posa, Barcelona, 1605. 
With woodcuts. 

Fasciculusi myrrhe nueuamente corregido. J. Varela, Seville, 
1518. 

Ramon Lull, Blanquerna. J. Joffre, Valencia, 1521. A speci- 
men of a very rare edition, in the original Valencian, of this 
famous work. 

Cristobal de San Antonio, Triumphus lesu Christi contra 
infideles. Salamanca, 1524. A very rare edition. 

Gamaliel nueuamente tradujzido. D. de Eobertis, Seville^ 
1536. With woodcuts. 

Martin Cortes, Breve compendio de la sphera y de la arte de 
navegar. A. Alvares, Seville, 1551. The first edition of a famous 
treatise on navigation. With maps. 

La Historia de los dos nobles cavalleros Oliveros de Castilla y 
Artus de Algarve. P. de Santillana, Burgos, 1553. 

Recibimiento que la Ciudad de Toledo hizo a la Reyna Ysabel. 
Toledo, 1561. A very rare historical work. 

Relacio delo sucedido ala Armada de Su Magestad desde que 
entro enel Canal de Inglaterra. C. de Lara, Seville [1588]. A 
hitherto undescribed report, printed at an otherwise unknown 
press, on the operations of the Spanish Armada. 

Henrique Visorio, Anagramma de la vida humana. A. 
Alvares and A. Lopei, Lisbon, 1590. An otherwise unknown 
Spanish poem. 

Later Books. 

Yergil, Traductieou de I'Eneido [books 1, 2, 4, 6]. Besies, 
1682. A translation into the dialect of the Narbonnais. 

A collection of over 200 German hymnological works, including 
numerous hymn-books for local use, the earliest dating from the 
17th century. 

A collection of fifty-nine works, complete in seventy-two 
volumes, printed by or under the superintendence of Mr. Bruce 
Rogers, mostly at the Riverside Press, Cambridge, Mass. 

A complete set, including all the supplements, of " La Libre 
Belgique," published in Belgium during the German occupation. 

A copy of the Shelley Society's reprint of " Adonaisi " bound 
in brown morocco with gold tooling by T. J. Cobden-Sanderson in. 
1888. Presented hy T . J . Cobden-Sanderson, Esq. 

A volume of photographs of an early Greek manuscript of the 
Psalms now in the Freer Collection at Washington. Presented 
by Charles Lang Freer, Esq. 

Music. 

T'heobaldus Billicanus, De partium orationis inflexionibu8» 
[Wittenberg], 1526. With specimens of musical settings of 
Horatian Odes, a very early instance of such settings. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTED BOOKS. 21 

Claude Gervaise, Quart liure contenant xxvj. chansons 
musicalles a troys parties. Paris, 1550. 

John Adson, Courtly Masquing Ayres composed to 5 or 6 
parts. T.S, for John Brown, London, 1621. Six partsi in one 
volume. 

Walter Porter, Madrigales and Ayres. W. Stansby, London, 
1632. The only perfect copy known. 

John Gamble, Ayres and Dialogues, London, 1656, and the 
Second Book of the same, London, 1659. With a power of 
attorney signed by the composer inserted. Of the Second Book 
only two other copies appear to be on record. 

A volume of compositions by Bach and Mendelssohn, once in 
Mendelssohn's possession and with his autograph, also a volume 
of first editions of compositions by Schumann with autograph 
inscriptions by him. 

Maps. 

The first and second issue of Le Theatre Frangois par Maurice 
Bouguereau, Tours, 1594, and three editions (Paris, 1621, 1626, 
1637) of the Theatre geographique du Royaume de France, these 
additions makinig the Museum set of early French atlases excep- 
tionally complete. Preseiited by Sir H. George Fordham. 

A collection of 102 maps, containing some very fine specimens 
of 18th-century cartography, among them a number of excellent 
English county maps. Presented by R. Holland Martin, Esq., 

A collection of thirty-nine maps and plans of Western 
Flanders, of the period around 1850, including Ypres, Dixmude, 
Nieuport, etc., of interest as giving in great detail the land 
on which many battles were fought during the War. 

Alfred W. Pollard. 



22 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THp BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Department of Manuscripts. 

1. Catalogue of Additions. — Egerton MS. 2901, acquired in 
1913, lias been described and indexed. 

Of the MSS. acquired in 1914, Additional 38,988-38,996, 
39,021-39,048, 39,060, 39,064-39,066, 39,068, 39,069, 39,072- 
39,075, 39,079, 39,080, 39,091-39,096, 39,098-39,119, 39,121- 
39,164; of those acquired in 1915, Additional 39,218-39,252; of 
those acquired in 1916, Additional 39,259-39,264; of those 
acquired in 1917, Additional 39,569, 39,625-39,628, 39,658, and 
Egerton 2,973, 2,977; of those acquired in 1918, Additional 
39,757, Egerton 3,018; of those acquired in 1919, Additional 
39,840-39,842, 39,848-39,859, 39,865, 39,866. 39,907; and of 
those acquired in 1920, Additional 39,929-39,936, 39,954, 39,955 
have been described and indexed. 

The Charters and Detached Seals acquired in 1911-1915 have 
been described and indexed for the quinquennial Catalogue of 
Additions. 

2. Catalogue of Greek Pa'pyri. — The Papyri acquired in 1911- 
1915 have been described and indexed for the quinquennial Cata- 
logue of Additions. 

Papyri 2,103-2,182, acquired in 1920, have been provisionally 
transcribed. 

For the projected Catalogue of Literary Papyri, Papyri 272, 
273, 486, 736, 886, 1,545, 1,862, 1,873, and 2,037 have been tran- 
scribed. 

3. Catalogue of the Royal and King's MSS. — Sheets Z — Pp of 
Vol. III., completing the general index and the index of Greek 
initia, and beginning that of Latin initia, have been printed off, 
and sheet Qq is in type. The introductions to Vols. I. and III. 
are in type. The revision of the index of initia has been con- 
tinued. 

4. Catalogue of Irish MSS. — The revision of the section 
Theology is nearly completed, and that of the sections Poetry and 
Tales is in progress. 

5. Catalogue of Charters. — Additional Charters 57,769-57,805, 
58,271-58,335, acquired in 1913, have been described and indexed. 

6. Miscellaneous. — A list of original Papal Bulls and Briefs 
in the Department has been compiled. 

7. Binding. — One hundred and twenty-three Additional MSS., 
newly acquired, and ninety-eight MSS. of the old collections have 
been bound, repaired, or lettered, together with seventy-seven 
Books of Peference and Catalogues. Three Charters and Rolls 
have been repaired. 

8. Verification. — The entire collection of MSS. has been veri- 
fied by comparison with the Shelf-lists. 



DEPARTMEOSTT OF MANUSCRIPTS. 23 

9. Rejrroductions. — Three reproductions of miniatures in 
colours (Royal MS. 15 D. II., f. 3, and Additional MSS. 18,850, 
f. 65, and 25,698, f. 8) and one set of Pictorial Postcards (Life 
of St. Cuthbert) have been issued ; and two further sets of Pic- 
torial Postcards (Calendar-pictures from Queen Mary's Psalter) 
have been passed. 

Part III. (English, 1300-1350) of Schools of Illumination is 
in preparation. 

10. Stamping, folioing, and placing. — 128 Additional MSS., 
344 Charters and Rolls, 124 Books of Reference and 161 Post- 
cards bave been stamped. The total number of impressions made 
was 9,169. 

180 MSS. have been folioed, with a total of 43,832 folios. 

4,290 slips have been numbered. 

50 newly acquired MSS. and 26 Papyri have been placed, and 
7 MSS. and 11 Papyri have been re-placed. All have been press- 
marked and entered in Hand- and Shelf-lists. 168 Additional 
Charters and Rolls have been placed, and have been entered in 
the Hand-list. 85 seals and casts have been provided with boxes, 
placed, and entered in Hand- and Drawer-lists. 

11. Boohs of Reference. — 125 volumes and parts, together with 
161 postcards and 2 reproductions, have been received, catalogued 
and placed. 

Seven volumes and parts have been added tO' the series of 
Facsimiles placed in the Department and available for the use of 
readers. These include a noteworthy addition in an unpublished 
photographic reproduction of the text of Euripides in the 
Laurentian MS. (Plut. xxxii. 2), presented hy J . A. Spranger, 
Esq. 

12. Consultation of i/^^.— 19,827 MSS. and 2,632 Charters 
and Seals have been consulted in the Students' Room. The 
number of Students was 7,340. 

13. MSS. photographed. — 631 MSS. "{including Papyri, Char- 
ters, and Seals) were allowed to be photographed, with a total of 
7,906 photographs taken. 

14. Acquisitions. — The number of Manuscripts and Docu- 
ments, etc., acquired during the year has been : — 

Additional MSS. ----- 93 

Egerton MSS. - . _ - - 4 

Charters and Rolls _ - _ _ 162 

Papyri ------- 138 

Detached Seals and Casts - - - 63 

The most interesting acquisition of the year is the illuminated 
Life of St. Cuthbert, written at Durham at the end of the 12th 
century. This important work of North of England art, which 
came up in the second sale of Mr. Yates Thompson's MSS., was 
beyond the unaided reach of the Museum funds, and appeals were 
necessary, not only to the National Art Collections Fund, which 
provided £1,000, but also to the generosity of individuals. Mainly 



24 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

through the help of Dr. F. W. Dendy of Newcastle, this appeal 
raised from fourteen donors a further £2,000, and the Trustees 
provided the rest of the purchase-money. 

Another acquisition, of importance in itself and of great 
interest irom. the circumstances of its presentation, is a volume 
of Middle English religious verse written in the 15th century, 
including several unique and unpublished pieces. It was selected 
and purchased (by private arrangement with the owners) 
from, the Phillipps collection at Cheltenham by Dr. Carleton 
Brown, Professor of English in the University of Minnesota, 
acting on behalf of a number of teachers of English in American 
Colleges and Universities. These subscribers, to use their own 
words, having " enjoyed the privilege of reading in the British 
Museum, desire to convey to the authorities of the Museum our 
grateful appreciation of the courtesies so generously accorded to 
students from abroad," with the hope that this gift " may have 
its influence in strengthening the cordial bonds which unite 
British and American scholars." It is to be known as " The 
American Testimonial MS." 

The Gospel-Book of Thorney Abbey, written, perhaps on the 
Continent, in the 10th century, has been used as a " Liber Vitae," 
to record long lists of benefactors and others whose names were 
commemorated in the monks' prayers in the 11th and 12th cen- 
turies. It was purchased at Lord Mostyn's sale. 

Other monastic records acquired are the Chartulary of Brid- 
lington Priory, 13th-14th centuries ; a portion (D-J) of the large 
15th century coucher-book of Fountains Abbey, of which two 
other volumes were already in the Museum ; a rental and an 
accompt-book of the same monastery ; and a 14th century chartu- 
lary of the collegiate church or chantry of Shottesbrooke in 
Berkshire. The last was purchased from the Farnhorough Fund. 
Also an inventory and rental of Pershore Abbey, 1376, presented 
hy R. Steele, Esq. 

A copy of the minor works of thei historian Ralph de Diceto, 
purchased at Sir W. Ingilby's sale, is apparently the original 
presentation-copv to William Longchamp, the Chancellor, about 
A.D. 1195. 

A Spanish sacramentary of the early part of the 13th century- 
is a notable addition to the representation of Spanish illumination 
in the Museum. 

A 13th-century Latin Bible is valuable from its correctorium- 
notes in the margin. 

A small roll-calendar of the late 13th century has English 
illuminated ornament. 

A volume of French romances of the cycle of Fierabras, of the 
middle of the 14th century, and a well-drawn armorial of English 
nobility, about 1440, with some Flemish additions, were both 
bought from, the Bridgeicater Fund. 

Other mrnnuscripts worthy of mention are : — 

Catullus, Tibullus and Propertius, 15th century. Purchased 
froTTi the Farnhorough Fund. 

A small expense-roll of Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, 1294. 



DEPARTMENT OF MANUSCRIPTS. 25 

Justiee-book of Philippe de la Crux, 1469-1476. Presented 
by R. Steele, Esq. 

Visitation of Cheshire, 1566, with a chronicle of the mayors of 
Chester. 

Formularj-book for the Courts Palatine of Chester and Lan- 
caster, 18th century. 

Narrative of voyages to Guinea and parts of the West Indies, 
&c., 1714-1716. 

" Aristides," an anonymous pamphlet against Lord St. 
Vincent's naval administration, 1804. 

Diary and papers of William Erskine (1773-1852), translator 
of Baber's Memoirs. Presented by Mrs. H. Beveridge. 

Minute-book of the National Union of the Working Classes, 
1831. Presented by Professor Edioin Gay. 

Manual of Artillery, copied at Woolwich R.M.A. by CoUing- 
wood Dickson, afterwards V.C., in 1835. Presented by Lt.-Col. 
J. H. Leslie. 

Specifications for the re-erection of the Crystal Palace at 
Sydenham, 1852. Presented by Rev. H. Chadwick. 

Vocabulary of the Romany language by Rev. R. N. Sander- 
son. Presented by E . J . Beaumont Nesbitt, Esq. 

Holograph letter of Louis XIV. to Charles II. relating to the 
secret treaty of 1676. 

Oorrespondenae (50 lettlers) of George Macken25i6, Earl of 
Cromarty, chiefly with Lord Treasurer (iodolphin, 1703-1708. 

Collection of about 80 letters, chiefly relating to the Jacobites, 
from the Hodgkin collection. 

Correspondence of the Twining family, especially Rev. 
Thomas Twining^ translator of Aristotle, 1735-1804, etc. 

Letters (21) of Lieut. Robert Knowles, 7tli Fusiliers), during 
the Peninsular War, 1809-1813. Presented by Sir Lees Knoivles, 
Bart. 

Supplementary letters to the Huskisson Papers, chiefly letters 
addressed to William Huskisson' s widow. Tw^o volumes. 

Select correspondence, other than scientific, of Sir Richard 
Owen. Presented by C. D. Sherborn, Esq. 

Autograph poems by George. Meredith and Sir William 
Watson, and letters of Swinburne, Matthew Arnold, A. H. 
Clough and others. Bequeathed by Sir E. T . Cook. 

Autograph letter of Dr. Isaac Watts, 1745. Presented by 
Mrs. E. K. Drummond. 

Autograph letter of William Hogarth, 1758. Presented by F. 
Tessier, Esq. 

Autograph letters of Horace Walpole (to Chatterton), Gilbert 
Elliot (Lord Minto), Henri Murger, Bernardin de St. Pierre, 
Ivan Tourgeneff and others. 

Situation-map of the Western Front in the Great War, 25th 
September, 1918, signed by F.M. Earl Haig. Also a memoran- 
dum concerning operations on that front during his command. 
The latter is sealed up, and not to be opened till 1940. Pre- 
sented by Earl Haig. 



26 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Collections relating to Hampsliire and Berksliire by F. J. 
Baigent. 34 vols, and two series of rolls. Presented by H. E. 
Cardinal Gasquet. 

Collections by Daniel Howard on the history of Portsmoutb. 
Presented hy Mrs. E. R. Howard. 

Twenty-five rubbings of monumental brasses by Rev. P. E. 
Scott. Presented hy Mrs. Scott. 

Plans of ancient eartbworks in co. Monmonth, by Rev. E. A. 
Downman. 

Harpsichord solos by Dr. Arne, Handel and otters, in Dr. 
Ckarles Bnrney's band, 1744. Presented hy A. Hughes-Hughes , 
Esq. 

About 138 Greek papyri, chiefly of the Roman and Byzantine 
periods, and mainly from Oxyrhynchus. 

Early deeds from Spain, a remarkable series of seventy-nine, 
from the neighbourhood of Barcelona, mostly dated in the 10th 
and 11th centuries. 

A document with signatures of Gian Galeazzo and Ludovico 
Maria Sforza-Visconti, 1480. Presented hy Dr. A. S. Woodward. 

Deeds (53) relating to Eudworth and the Lumley family, from 
the 13th century onwards. 

J. P. Gilson. 



DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL PRINTED BOOKS AND MSS. 27 



Department of Oriental Printed Books and MSS. 

Arrangement and Cataloguing. — Tlie number of the sheets of 
the Catalogue of Persian Printed Books sent to press in 1920 
was 25. 

The number of titles written for the Catalogues is : — 
Arabic, 723; Armenian, 3; Assamese, 24; Bengali, 272 
Brahui, 2; Burmese, 54; Chin, 8; Chinese, 111; Coptic, 2 
Gujarati, 124; Hebrew and Samaritan, 694; Hindi, 300; Hindu 
stani, 184; Japanese, 25; Kachin, 6; Kanarese, 89; Karen, 12 
Kashmiri, 44; ]^hasi, 6; Kond, 3; Malay, 188; Malayalam, 10 
Mandaean, 8; Manipuri, 3; Marathi, 144; Mikir, 6; Naga, 3 
jN'orth Arvan (Khotanese), 2; Oriya, 71; Pali, 23; Panjabi, 87 
Persian, 664; Prakrit, 64; Pushtu, 4; Sanskrit, 435; Santali, 3 
Siamese, 9; Sindhi, 16; Sinhalese, 11; Syriac, 40; Talaing, 8 
Tamil, 328; Telugu, 266; Tibetan, 58; Total, 5,137. 

One thousand one hundred and thirteen Chinese MSS. have 
been catalogued for the Hand-list of the Stein Collection. 

One hundred and thirteen short descriptions of MSS. have 
been entered in the Descriptive List, the Register, and the 
Classed Inventory. 

Three hundred and eighty-nine MSS. (71,779 folios) and seven 
printed books (1,017 folios) have been folioed. 

Binding. — The number of Printed Books and MSS. sent to 
the binders is: — Arabic, Persian and Hindustani Books, 57; 
Chinese Books, 9; English Books, 4; French Books, 1; Hebrew 
Books, 146 ; Malay Books, 1 ; Books in Sanskrit and other' Indian 
languages, 124; Siamese Books, 25; Uighur Books, 2; MSS., 
379. Total, 748. 

Students. — The number of visits of Students to the Oriental 
Students' Room attached to this Department during the year is 
1,926. The number of Oriental MSS. used by them is 2,295, and 
the number of Oriental Printed Books used by them is 12,357. 
1,910 Oriental Printed Books were used in the Reading Room. 

Photography. — One hundred and thirty-two applica'tions have 
been made to photograph books and MSS. in this Department. 

Additions. — The number of volumes, etc., added to the col- 
lections of the Department during the year is 1,890, of which 
1,817 are Printed Books and 73 are MSS. 

Of the Printed Books, 327 were bought; 1,295 were received 
under the India Copyright Act ; 21 were received under the 
Colonial Copyright Act from Ceylon; and 184 were presented. 
Of the MSS., 57 were bought and the remainder presented. 



28 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



The MSS. are as follows: — 



Arabic 


?5 


Armenian 


I 


Chinese ... 


2C 


Coptic ... ... .... 


1 


Hebievv ... 


3 


Hindustani 


i 


Manchu and Chinese . . . 


1 


Persian ... 


3 


Sanskrit 


3 


Sanskrit and Khotanese 


3 


Sjriac 


2 


Syriac and Arabic 


1 


Tibetan 


3 


Total 


... 73 



The most important acquisitions are : — 

Arabic MSS. — 1. A fragment on vellum containing an Arabic 
version (apparently unknown) of the Epistles from Ephesians ii., 
10, to II. Timothy ii., 12, in a fine early hand, perhaps of the 
9th century. 12°. 

2. A MS. containing a detailed criticism of Islam, apparently 
from the Jewish standpoint; incomplete at the beginning and 
end. 11th or 12th century. 8°. Apparently unique. 



3. A letter in Jewish- Arabic 
Samuel to Abu Ishak Ibrahim. . 



from Semah 
..D. 1151. 



Hakk5hen ben 



4. Ijtima'at al-falasifah fi buyut il-hikmab, sayings of the 
Greek philosophers, by Hnnain b. Ishak. Nearly the first quarter 
of the work, two quires being lost at the beginning. 12th 
century. 12°. Only one other copy is on record. 

5. A Jewish- Arabic commentary by Sa'adyah Gaon on the 
two Songs of Moses. Followed by translations of parts of the 
Jewish liturgy. 12th century. 12°. Apparently otherwise un- 
known. 

.6. A MS. containing four grammatical works, viz., al-Anbari's 
Mizan al-'arabiyah and Asrar al-'arabiyah, al-Jurjani's al-Jumal, 
and al-Murtajal, a commentary on the last by ' Abd Allah b. 
Ahmad al-Khassab. "With an ijdzah in tke handwriting of 
Ahmnd b. 'All b. Ahmad al-Kiifi, called Ibn al-FasIh. Copied 
A.H. 661 (a.d. 1263).' 8^ 

7. A letter in Jewish-Arabic to Ibn al-Rabi' Sulaiman 
Hakkohen b. Abi Zakarlya. 13th century? 

8. Al-Ilisalat al-mukni'ah, a work on the recitation of the 
hismillah formula at prayers, by Abu '1-Fath Salim b. Aiyub 
al-Razi; transmitted by the author's disciple Abu '1-Fath Nasr 
b. Ibrahim al-Makdisi, and collated with a MS. corrected from 
the author's holograph. Copied a.h. 737 (a.d. 1836-37). 12«>. 
No other copy seems to be recorded. 

9. .Part 2 of al-Ihatah fi akhbar il-Ghirnatah, a biographical 
dictionarv of famous men of Granada, by Lisan al-Dm Ibn al- 
Khntib. 'Copied a.h. 780 (a.d. 1378)? 4°. An important 
work: MSS. are rare. 



DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL PRINTED BOOKS AND MSS. 29 

10. Al-Tabyin fi ansab il-kurashiyin, genealogies of tke 
Prophet Muhammad and his descendants and followers of the 
tribe of Kuraish, by Muwaffik al-Din 'Abd Allah b. Ahmad ibn 
Kudamah al-MakdisL Copied a.h. 795 (a.d. 1393). i2«. 

11. A work on ethics, apparently the -Akabat of al-Ghazzali. 
15th century. 12*^. Not otherwise known. 

12. Fath rabb al-barriyah, a commentary by Ahmad b. Hasan 
al-Sandiibi on al-Kas, at ai-makariyah, an elegy on the kings of 
Spain, by Ahmad b. Muh. al-Makari. 15th-16th century. 8°. 

13. Matali' al-anzar, a commentary by Mahmiid b. 'Abd al- 
Eahman al-Isfahani on al-Baidawi's metaphysic Tawali' al- 
anwar. 16th century. S°. Presented by Colonel R. H. Whit- 
well. 

14. A MS. containing part of Ta'wilat al-Kur'an, tke com- 
mentary of Hasan b. Muh. al-Nishaburi on the Kur'an (viz., on 
Surah 78 to the end), 'etc., XVIIth-XVIIIth century. 8«. 
Presented by Colonel R. H. Whitwell. 

15. The Old Testament in the Jewish- Arabic dialect of the 
Aleppo district. XVIIIth-XIXth centuirjr. 8°. 

16. A collection of Egyptian folk-songs, compiled by 'Abd 
al-Malik b. 'Abd al-Wahhab al-Fitni. 2 vols. XlXth century. 
8°. 

Chinese MSS. — 1. " The Old Drunkard's Arbour," a com- 
position written in 1048 a.d. by Ou-yang Hsiu ; copied in calli- 
graphic style by Su Shih (1036-1101). With many notes of 
appreciation by various scholars, the first dated a.d. 1348. Roll. 

2. An essay on the art of handwriting, written by the artist 
and calligrapher Mi Fei, and dated a.d. 1080. Roll. 

3. Facsimiles of writing by the poet Ts'ao Tzu-chien (a.d. 
192-232) and by Ssu-t'u Chung-yu. Roll. 

4. An ink-rubbing of a specimen of writing by the calli- 
grapher Ou-yang Hstin (a.d. 557-645). 

5. Black-and-white drawings and calligraphy, with notes of 
appreciation by various scholars. Roll. 

6. Pen-and-ink drawings of orchids, etc., with calligraphy. 
Roll. 

7. Specimens of calligraphy by the artis'ts Chao Meng-fu 
(A.D. 1310) and Tung Ch'i-ch'ang (a.d. 1582). 

8. An album of calligraphy by the Ming artist Tung Ch'i- 
ch'ang, with a specimen by the poet Lo Pin-wang (7th century). 

9. A volume of specimens of Ming calligraphy . 

10. A volume of specimens of calligraphy by 26 artists under 
the reigns of Shun Chih and K'ang Fsi (a.d. 1644-1722). 

11. A volume of calligraphy on silk, by various artists. 

12. The P'i p'a hsing, written in calligraphic stymie by the 
Ming artist Tung Ch'i-ch'ang. 



30 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



13. A voluniQ of calligraphy in cursive style by Liang Skan- 
cho'U. 

14. Ch'in ting kuo shih to ch'en lieli clman, vol. 121 of the 
Manchu dynastic records, containing biographies. 

15. Vol. II., ch. 6-10 of Ta ch'ing mu tsung i huang ti sheng 
hsiin, Imperial edicts. In an embroidered case. 

16. Ping ling fang liieh, a collection of works on the military 
art. 6 parts, in brocaded cover. 

17. Hno lung shen ck'i, a work on military weapons, etc. 3 
parts, in brocaded cover. 

18. Yii t'u pien Ian, a geography of China, with maps. 4 
vols. 

19. Chien cha hui ts'un, an album of letters. 

20. A collection of seal-impressions with decipherment. 4 
vols. 

21. A collection of seal-impressions. 2 vola. 

22. An examination of the Japanese " Spirit Character," 
believed to be identical with the ancient ** Tadpole Script " of 
China. Translated into Chinese by Shen Wen-ying, and revised 
by his brother Shen Wen-wei. 4°. Presented hy Colonel R. H. 
Whitwell. 

Hehretv MSS.—l. Gan Yehoshua', i.e. pt. 3 of the -Ase 
Lebhonah, a commentary on the section Nashim of 'En Yisra'el 
by Joshua Segri. Autograph copy, in an Italian cursive hand. 
XYIIIth century. 4". 

2. Discourses of Israel Benjamin Basan. Autograph copy. 4 
vols., in an Italian cursive hand. Copied a.d. 1740-93. Fol. 

3. A vellum strip containing (1) a contract of marriage and 
(2) a bill of divorce, of a.d. 1065. 

Manchu and Chinese MS. — 1. Part of a collection of Imperial 
seals of the Ching d3masty with decipherment. 

Persian MS. — 1. A fragment of a Jewish-Persian commen- 
tary in the Book of Joshua. Xllth century. 12°. 

Syriac and Arahic MSS. — 1. A collection of letters of Tusuf 
Odo, Chaldean Patriarch of Babylon. XlXth century. 



L. D. Barnett. 



departmeistt of prints and drawings. 31 

Department of Prints and Drawings. 
I. — Arrangement and Cataloguirig, Sfc. 

Arrangement. — 212 drawing's and 2,481 prints recently- 
acquired kave been incorporated witk the divisions of the collec- 
tion to which tliey severally belong. 

82 books of drawings and prints have been placed. 
Much preliminary work has been done on the engravings pre- 
sented by Lady Lucas, before incorporating them with the main 
collection. 

The whole of the select mezzotints of the Cheylesmore collec- 
tion, now completely mounted in royal, imperial and atlas size, 
have been incorporated with the mounted select mezzotints of the 
old Museum collection, to complete the engravers' works. The 
arrangement is now alphabetical under engravers' names, and 
each case is arranged according to Chaloner Smith or other 
standard catalogues. An alphabetical list of the engravers repre- 
sented in the select English mezzotints has been drawn up. The 
new references have been added to the Cheylesmore catalogue and 
the catalogue of select English mezzotints. The " royal" mezzo- 
tints now occupy 79 cases, th« imperial 48, and the atlas 44. In 
addition, 15 mezzotints from the Cheylesmore collection have been 
incorporated with the series of early mezzotints. A selection has 
been made for special mounting from the mezzotints presented by 
Lady Lucas, and 32 mezzotints by S. W. Reynolds have been 
added to the special series. The work of indexing mezzotints 
placed with portraits and masters' works has been continued. 

Catalogue references have been printed on the mounts of the 
drawings by Eembrandt and his school. 

The whole engraved work of the Master E.S. has been col- 
lected and re-arranged according to the catalogue by Max Lehrs 
(Vol. II.), 19 engravings being re-mounted for tliis purpose. The 
work of this engraver is now placed in four solandetr cases follow- 
ing that which contains the engravings described in Lehrs, Vol. I. 
The work of arranging the engravings described in Yol. III. has 
been begun, but they are not yet fully mounted or lettered. 

The work of re-arranging the engravings by Marcantonio 
Raimondi in the order of Bartsch has been completed, and 
references have been inserted in Bartsch, vol. XY. 

The complete etched work of G. B. Tiepolo has been arranged 
according to the catalogue of De Vesme, and detailed instructions 
have been given for mounting it. 

The reproductions of drawings by Clouet, Dumonstier and 
Lagneau have been re-arranged. 

The works of J. Perrissin and J. Tortorel have been marked 
off in Robert-Dumesnil's catalogue. 

References to engravings by W. Faithorne have been inserted 
in the catalogue by Eagan. 

The collection of duplicate engravings available for loan has 
been thoroughly revised, many specimens being eliminated and 



32 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

others added. A new systematic list of the loan collection, which 
will occupy 284 frames, has been drawn up and prepared for 
press. 

Catalogues and Indexes. — Work has been continued on the 
catalogue of Dutch and Flemish Drawings, and study of the 
drawings by Rubens, Van Dyck and their followers is in progress. 

Work has been continued on the catalogue of British engraved 
portraits, and the preparation of the fifth volume is advanced, 
with a view to printing some sheets in 1921. 

The work of indexing foreign portraits contained in books of 
prints has been continued. 

The work of inserting the new references to case, shelf and 
number in the indexes of artists has been completed, and is being 
methodically kept up as new acquisitions are placed. 

Exhibition. — The gallery was re-opened to the public on July 
15th, with a large and varied exhibition of prints and drawings, 
in which the principal features, apart from the Oriental section, 
were as follows: — 174 drawings by old masters of the various 
foreign schools ; 165 drawings by British artists, all acquired since 
1914 ; 37 drawings of the War by Muirhead Bone ; a first selection, 
146 in number, of the engravings presented by Lady Lucas, chiefly 
of the British school, 1780-1820, and including many printed in 
colours ; select prints illustrating the processes of engraving, and 
new acquisitions, both old and modern, including some early 
illustrated books, MSS. containing 15th-century engravings, and 
sketch books. In the autumn some portions of this exhibition were 
modified, 22 drawings of the work of the Egyptian Expeditionary 
-Force being exhibited in place of those by Bone, while in con- 
nection with the Spanish Exhibition at Burlington House, 16 
Spanish drawings and a large selection of etchings and lithographs 
by Goya were placed on view. Many changes have been made in 
the section of recent acquisitions. 

Registration. — 2,801 items have been entered in the Register 
of Acquisitions. 

Stamping and Mounlting. — 6,271 drawings, prints, etc.. 
recentlj'' acquired, have been impressed with the departmental 
stamp and references to the Register. 

800 prints and drawings have been permanently mounted and 
lettered with artists' names and references to register and cata- 
logues, and about 200 prints have been temporarily mounted for 
exhibition. 

Numerous prints and drawings have been cleaned and 
mounted. 

Students. — The total number of visitors admitted to the Print 
Room during the year ended December 31st, 1920, was 5,439. The 
Students' Room was re-opened under normal conditions on 
August 3rd. 

Photographing. — 291 applications were made for leave to 
photograph, and 1,192 photographs were taken. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 33 

II. — Acquisitions. 

The total number of prints, drawings, books, &c., acquired 
during the year was 4,773, no acquisition of outstanding impor- 
tance being included in this number, except the book of Paduan 
drawings presented by Lord Rosebery. The chief acquisitions are 
mentioned, as follows, under the various schools. 

Italian School. 

Drawings. 

Anonymous, Paduan school, second half of 15th century. 
B.ook of 26 leaves of vellum with drawings in pen and ink on 
both sides, representing sacred and mythological subjects, scenes 
from contemporary court life, groups of children, and heads 
wearing fantastic helmets. This book, when discovered at Padua 
in the I8th century, was attributed for the first time to Mantegna, 
on the analogy of the " Tarocchi" wrongly ascribed to that artist. 
All the drawings were engraved in 1790 by I'rancesco Novelli. 
Presented by the Earl of Rosebery, K.G., K.T . 

Anonymous, probably Sienese school, influenced by Haphael. 
The Virgin and Child with SS. Bernardine and Catherine of 
Siena; pen and ink. Richardson and Northwick collections. 

Angolo (or Angeli), Battista (del Moro). Sketch for a decora- 
tion in fresco with the Resurrection and two Prophets. The Body 
of Christ beneath the Cros»s, with St. Catherine and a sainted 
bishop. Red and violet wash over black chalk upon yellow paper, 
heightened with white. Northwick collection. 

Bassano, Jacopo. Sketch for a picture of Dives and Lazarus; 
black chalk. 

Bernini, Giovanni Lorenzo. Allegorical composition, with 
figures of Time, Health, Medicine, etc. ; pen and ink. 

Canuti, Domenico Maria. Coronation of the Virgin; pen and 
bistre, and bistre wash. 

Castello) Valeric. The Finding of Moses; pen and bistre. 
Northwick collection. 

Caula, Sigismondo. A figure kneeling before a crucifix ; wash, 
heightened with white. Prince de Ligne collection. Presented 
by Prof. W. Bateson, F.R.S. 

Cl-espi, Daniele. Head of a negro ; red chalk. Northwick 
collection. 

Creti, Donato. The Virgin crowned by two angels; pen and 
ink. Worthwick collection. 

Feti, Domenico. A man being shaved by torchlight; pen and 
bistre, and bistre wash. ISTorthwick collection. 

Ricci, Sebastiano. The Adoration of the Shepherds, and two 
single figure studies; pen and sepia, with Indian ink wash. 
Presented by Mr. F. R. Meaty ard. 

Sacchi, Andrea. A draped figure standing, highly finished; 
red chalk. F. Abbott collection. 

Tiarini, Alessandro. St. Lucy; black chalk. Presented by F ^ 
Wellesley, Esq. 

c 



34 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Vanni, Francesco. Death of a monastic saint; pen and bistre, 
and bistre wash. North wick collection. 

Zampieri, Domenico. Study, over life size, for the head of 
St. Luke in the fresco of the Four Evangelists in S. Andrea della 
Valle, Eome ; black chalk. Lawrence and Labouchere (Lord 
Taunton) collections. 

Engravings. 

Anonymous, Florentine, 15th century (" Fine Manner"). The 
Annunciation, from the Life of the "Virgin and of Christ. 
Coloured, with ornamental border, having been used as part of 
an altar-piece (no example of a Florentine engraving thus treated 
was hitherto in the Mu'seum). Poynter collection. Presented by 
the National Art-Collections Fund, with the aid of a contribution 
from Prof. W . H. Woodward. 

Anonymous, School of Marcantonio. Twenty engravings of 
the ruins and antiquities of Eome. 

Beatrizet, Nicolas. Laocoon, B. 90, first state; Castello di 
S. Angelo, B. 101, first state. 

Francia, Jacopo (attributed to). Three boys. Presented by 
G. T . Clough, Esq. 

Novelli, Francesco. Disegni del Mantegna; complete set of 
52 plates and title after the drawings recently presented to the 
Department by the Earl of Rosebery. Presented by Arthur Kay, 
Esq., through the National Art-Collections Fund,. 

Woodcuts. 

Campagnola, Domenico. Landscape, B. 5. Presented by Y. 
Urushibara, Esq. 

Carpi, Ugo da. Hercules and the Nemean lion, chiaroecuro, 
B. 15; fine impression, printed in blue. 

Hercules driving out discord, after B. Peruzzi, chiaroscuro, 
B. 12; early state. 

Coriolano, Bartolommeo. St. Jerome, after Reni; fine im- 
pression in yellow. 

Fantuzzi, Antonio (da Trento). The Martyrdom of SS. Peter 
and Paul, chiaroscuro; two impressions in diiferent colours. 

Zuccaro (after, by unknown engraver). Silenus, Pass. VI. 237. 
72. Presented by G. T. Clough, Esq. 

Prints arranged to illustrate the works of masters. 

Cignaroli, G. B. Joseph and Potiphar's wife. Mezzotint by 
J. Clarot. 

Errant©, Giuseppe. " Quidquid Amor jussit." Mezzotint 
by G. Bigatti. 

Reni, Guido. The Adoration of the Shepherds. Mezzotint 
by J. P. Pichler, from the picture in 'the Liechtenstein Gallery. 

German School.. 
Drawings. 
Beham, Hans Sebald. Christ crowned with thorns. St. Peter 
denying Christ. Round pen and ink drawings, designs for glass 
painting, both dated i522. Fairfax Murray collection. 



DEPARTMEiNT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 35 

Elsheimer, Adam. Jupiter and Mercury entertained by 
Philemon and Baucis ; pen and ink, with Indian ink wash. North- 
wick collection. 

Scholderer, Otto. Seven black chalk drawings, including- a 
study for a portrait of the artist's wife, various figure isubjects, 
and studies of still life. Presented hy J . F. Scholderer, Esq. 

Winterhalter, Franz Xaver. Four small portrait heads; red, 
black and white chalk. 

Engravings. 

Master of the Mount of Calvary. An armed knight, Lehrs 9 
(the only impression known). TraTisf erred froTn the Department 
of Printed Books. 

Olmtitz, Wenzel von. The Virgin with an apple, after Schon- 
gauer, Lehrs 13, first .state (only two impressions were hitherto 
known, in two states). Curzon collection. Presented hy Major 
G. H. Anson. 

Schongauer, Martin (after). The Nativity; undescribed 
anonymous copy. 

Beham, Hans Sebald. St. Bartholomew, P. 50, fourth state; 
St. Matthew, P. 52, first state; Justice, P. 134, third state. Pre- 
s&nted hy Frank Madan, Esq. "Night," P. 154, first state. 
Lanna and Heseltine collections. Presented by T. D. Barlow, 
Esq. 

Monogrammist I. W., 1598. Ornament. 

Clarot, Joseph. Hercules and Alcestis (after G. B. Cig- 
naroli?). Mezzotint, before letters. 

Clerck, Jacob Friedrich. Death of Semiramis, after J. 
Platzer. Mezzotint, before letters. 

Hampeln, Carl von. Holy Family, aft^r Jan van Hoeck. 
Mezzotint. 

Kininger, V. G. The Holy Family, after Batoni. Mezzotint, 
before letters. 

Pichler, J. P. Ferdinand lY, King of the Two Sicilies, after 
J. B. Lampi. Melchior Birkenstock. Baron von Sperges, after 
J. B. Lampi, Mezzotints; the first two proofs before letters. 

Unterberger, Ignaz. The bust of Kaunitz crowned by Immor- 
tality. Allegory of Death and Eternity. Mezzotints, 

Wrenk, Franz. The Magdalen in the desert, after 0. 
Gentileschi. Caritas, after B, Franceschini, Mezzotints, before 
letters. 

Etchin^gs. 

Scholderer, Otto. Ten, of various figure subjects, several in 
more than one state. Presented hy J . Y . Scholderer, Esq. 

Welti, Albert, Hochzeitszug, Teufelsbriicke, Der Ehehafen^ 
Gliick und Ungliick, and five other subjects, including two book- 
plates. Presented hy M. Alhert J. Welti, son of the artist. 

Woodcuts. 
Anonymous, 15th century. Four coloured illustrations from 
Leben der Heiligen (Winterteil), printed at Augsburg by Giinther 
Zainer, 1471. (The first illustrated book printed at Augsburg; 
not in the British Museum.) 

c2 



36 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Beck, Leonkard. Twenty-three woodcuts [sia; presented by 
Charles Shannon, Esq., R.A.) from the series of Saints con- 
nected with the House of Habsburg ; early impressions. 

Cranach, Lucas. Eleven out of fourteen woodcuts of the 
Passion, B. 8, 9, 12-20, printed on vellum. Presented by Major 
G. H. Ansun. 

St. Mary Magdalen, B. 72; good impression, surrounded by 
a border. Heseltine collection. 

Diirer, Albrecht (after). St. John swallowing the book; copy 
by H. Greff, 1502, with German text, completing a set of the 
copies in which this subject was wanting. 

Traut, Wolf. St. Stephen between two bishops, from the 
Passau Missal of 1514; first state. E. Schultze and Y. Mayer 
collections. 

Schools of the Netherlands. 
Drawings. 

Berchem, Nicolaes. Small oblong sketch-book of 158 leaves, 
with original parchment cover, containing drawings of animals 
and landscape in black and red chalk. Woodburn and Mayer de 
llothschild collections. Presented by the Earl of Rosebery, 
K.G., K.T. 

Bol, Ferdinand (attributed to). Study for a lady's portrait; 
red chalk drawing of the school of Rembrandt, about 1640. 

Bol, Hans. The Lamentation beneath the Cross. Pen and 
ink and purple wash; signed and dated 1570. 

Breughel, Pieter 1. Avarice. Pen and bistre, signed and 
dated 1556. One of a series of the Seven Deadly Sins; 
"Avarice " was engraved in 1558 by P. Yan der Heyden (Petruft 
a Merica). Denon and Fairfax Murray collections. 

Claesz, Aert. Christ taken captive. Christ before Pilate. 
Round designs for glass-painting ; pen and ink and Indian ink 
wash. Lawrence, Woodbum and F. Abbott collections. 

Koninck, Philips de. Two studies of a ragged man. Pen and 
sepia. ISTorthwick collection. 

Lingelbach, Johannes. A I^evantine or Italian sea-port, 
signed. Pen and ink and water-colours. Northwick collection. 
Scene in a harbour; a Chinaman and a man seated, smoking. 
Black chalk and bistre wash. 

Maes, Nicolaes. Cottagers entertaining a satyr. Pen and 
sepia and sepia wash. Richardson, Reynolds and Northwick col- 
lections. 

Momper, Joos de. Harbour with shipping. Black chalk, pen 
and ink, and indigo wash. Fairfax Murrav collection. 

Yisscher, Cornelis. Half-length portrait of a lady, 1649 ; lead 
point on vellum. Presented by F.'J. Wellesley, Esq. 

Yos, Paulus de fby or after). A woman selling fruit and 
vegetables. Pen and ink and wash. 

Engravings. 
Muntinck, Adriaen, Six prints of ornament with fruit. 
Yalck, Gerard. Series of the Twelve Months, each with four 
verses in Dutch and French. 



•DEPARTMEiNT OF PEJNTS AND DRAWINGS. 37 

Etchings. 

Bauer, Marius. Eleven etchings of Oriental subjects, scenes 
in Cairo, Stamboul and Jerusalem. 

Nieuwenkamp, W. 0. J. Constantine. Verona. Presented 
by J. de Graaff, Esq. The Fisherman. Indian bullock cart. 
Death and the Fisherman. Presented by the Artist. The 
picturesque Sluice. Arab quarter at Java. 

Woodcuts. 
Key, Adriaen Thomas. The death of Absalom, chiaroscuro. 
IN'ieuwenkamp, W. 0. J. Verona. Mill at Bruges. Pre- 
sented by the Artist. 

Prints arranged to illustrate the works of Masters. 
Rubens, P. P. Lion and boar hunt; etched by W. P. van 
Leeuw. 

French School. 
Drawings. 

Carriere, Eugene. Mother and child ; black chalk. Presented 
by C. Dodgson, Esq., C.B.E. 

Degas, Edgar. Horse galloping; slight sketch in red chalk. 
Presented by C. Dodgson, Esq., C.B.E. Study of nude woman; 
black chalk. Study of head of jockey; black chalk. Bought 
from the H. L. Florence fund. 

Gericault, J. L. A. Theodore. Woman standing with her 
arms above her head ; brush drawing in Indian ink on brown 
paper, heightened with white. A fight between soldiers and 
civilians; pencil and red chalk. Both from the His de la Salle 
and Fairfax Murray collections. Bought from the H. L. Florence 
fund. 

Leu, Thomas de. Portrait of Etienne Tabourot, poet 
(Seigneur des Accords) ; black chalk. Fontette and Northwick 
collections. 

Marilhat, Prosper. View of Toledo ; pen and ink. 

Matisse, Henri. Study of the nude; black chalk. Presented 
by R. E. A. Wilson, Esq. 

Miller, Jean-Frangois. The good Samaritan; pen and ink. 
Presented by Denys Hague, Esq. 

Pils, Isidore A. A. Study of a Zouave trumpeter; black and 
red chalk. His de la Salle and Fairfax Murray collections. 

Pissarxo, Camille. Landscape sketch at Eragny, 1890; water- 
colour. Presented by Charles Ricketts, Esq. Three studies of 
peasant women; pastel. Woman seen from the back; charcoal 
and pastel. Purchased from, the H. L. Florence funU. 

Ribot, Theodule. Four pencil drawings of boys. Purchased 
from, the H . L. Florence fund. 

Rousseau, Theodore. Three sketches of trees and cottages; 
pen and ink. J. Staats Forbes collection. 

St. Aubin, Augustin de. Nine small portrait drawings; black 
and red chalk. W. Basevi Sanders and Fairfax Murray col- 
lections. 



38 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

St. Aubin, Gabriel de. Portrait of Simon-Nicolas-Henri 
Linguet; black chalk. Nortkwick collection. 

Tliomon, Tkomas de. Architectural composition; palatial 
buildings seen through an arch; pen and ink and water-colour, 
signed and dated 1785. Purchased from the II. L. Florence fund. 

Toulouse-Lautrec, Henri de. Head of a woman; blue chalk. 

Engravings. 

Alix, P. M. La promenade du Soir, after Demarne; 
aquatint, printed in colours. Phipson collection. 

Daulle, Jean. Louis Cazeau de Nestier (equestrian portrait), 
after Delarue ; unfinished proof. 

Levachez. Napoleon I ; large equestrian portrait, after Carle 
Vernet; aquatint, printed in colours. Phipson collection. 

Morel. La promenade du Matin, after Demarne; aquatint, 
printed in colours. Phipson collection. 

E-ide. Louis XVI, after Benard; aquatint, printed in colours. 

Sergent-Marceau, A. F. Clovis 1^'; aquatint, printed in 
colours. Louis Philippe, Due d'Orleans; printed in two colours. 
Presented hy H. W . B. Jose'ph, Esq. Jean Jouvenet ; aquatint, 
printed in colours. 

Etchings. 

Bracquemond, Felix. Twenty-five decorative etchings of 
birds, fish, flowers, etc., intended for transfer to china and 
known as the " Service de table de la Maison Rousseau " 
(Beraldi 530-554). 

Bresdin, Rodolphe. Repos de la Sainte Famille. 

Heyman, Charles. Train de Marchandise. Presented hy 
John Murray, Esq., M.P. 

Meryon, Charles. Le Ministere de la Marine, Paris (W. 26, 
L.D. 45 I) ; the rare first state, dated in Meryon's writing, from 
the Wasset and Macgeorge collections. L'ancien Louvre (W. 60, 
L.D. 53 I) ; the rare first state, dated in Meryon's writing, from 
the Macgeorge collection. 

Pissarro, Camille. Ten etchings (recent impressions, 1920), 
including figure subjects, landscapes and a portrait of Cezanne. 
Presented hy the Widoiv and Sons of the Artist. 

Lithographs. 

Anquetin, Louis. Les Courses ; printed in colours. Pre- 
sented hy C. Dodgson, Esq., C.B.E. 

Bresdin, Rodolphe. La Comedie de la Mort. 

Courbet, Gustave. L'Apotre Jean Journet. 

Pissarro, Camille. Gardeuse d'oies. Baigneuse le soir. 
Groupe de baigneuses le soir. Theorie de baigneuses. 
Baigneuses (L'estampe originale). Presented hy C' Ricketts, 
Esq. 

Toulouse-Lautrec, H. de. Les Vieilles Histoires. Cover for 
L'estampe originale. Desastres de la guerre. Tvette Guilbert, 
1898 (set of seven, with frontispiece and cover). Treize Litho- 
graphies : Tirage special pour les XX (two impressions of each 
subject). Presented hy C. Dodgson, Esq., C.B.E. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS, 39 

Woodcuts. 

Bischoff, Henri. Seven of various subjects, coloured by hand. 
Presented by Oskar Reinhart, Esq. Susanna and the elders ; 
coloured by hand. 

Busset, Maurice. Le Yieux Pays d'Auvergne; En Avion. 
Two albums of woodcuts, partly printed in colours. Presented hy 
the Artist. 

Carlegle, F. Copa, witb an extra set of proofs of the illustra^ 
tions. Presented by C. Dodgson, Esq., C.B.E. 

Morin-Jean. Suite domestique en dix tableaux. Presented by 
C. Dodqson, Esq., C.B.E. 

Paul, Hermann. Cbansons de France ; set of six ballad sheets 
with, woodcuts. Presented by C. Dodgson, Esq., C.B.E. 

■ Prints arranged to illustrate the works of masters. 
Decamps, Alexandre. Episode de la defaite des Cimbres. 
Samson turning the mill. Lithographs by Eugene Le Roux. Pre- 
sented by the Hon. Walter James. 

Spanish School. 
Drawings. 

Cano, Alonso. Four angels; pen and bistre and bistre wash. 
A Miracle of St. Anthony of Padua; pen and bistre and bistre 
wash. 

Carducho, Vincenzo. Christ on the Cross; black chalk. 

Roelas, Juan de las. The Infant Christ ; pen and bistre and 
indigo wash. 

Zurbaran, Francisco. A saint in glory in the clouds; red 
chalk on blue paper. 

All of the above are from the Northwick collection. 

Greek School. 

Zarokilli, Nicholas Panagioti (Nikolaki). Sixteen dry point 
portraits, some in more than one state, including those of H.M. 
the Queen of Spain, the Infantas Maria Christina and Beatriz, 
the Grand Duchess Alexander Mikhailovitch, Feodor Alexandro- 
vitch, Andre xilexandrovitch, the Grand Duchess Marie Paulovna, 
Prince and Princess Youssoupoff, the Archbishop of Canterbury, 
and others; also a study of the nude, '' Biblis," in two states. 
Presented by the Artist. 

American School. 

Drawing. 
Whistler, J. A. McN. The Thames at Battersea ; water-colour 
(monochrome), from the collection of Sir Wm. Eden, Bart. Pre- 
sented by Miss Hague. 

Etchings. 

Brown, Benjamin C. Six soft-ground etchings printed in 
colours (views of Yenice and California) . 



40 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Whistler, J. A. McN. Jo's bent head ; dry point, Kennedy 
78 II. Presented by Mortimer Menpes, Esq. Boats, Dordrecht, 
Kennedy 244. Presented by C. Dodgson, Esq., C.B.E. 

Litho gra'phs . 

Brown, Bolton. Thirty-nine, chiefly of landscape subjects. 
Presented by the Artist. , 

Oakley, Thornton. ^Fifteen lithographs of shipbuilding in 
Hog Island shipyard. Presented by the Artist. 

Foreign Artists Resident in England. 
Drawings. 

Brandoin, Michel- Vincent (wrongly called "Charles" by 
some anthorities) . North view and West view of the Castle of 
Grignan in Provence, a pair ; pen and ink and water-colour. Pre- 
sented by A. E. Anderson, Esq. 

Goupy, Joseph. Sir Bobert Walpole, K.G., addressing a meet- 
ing of the Cabinet {ca. 1730-40) ; gouache. Presented by the 
National Art-Collections Fund. 

Griffier, Jan. Mountain landscape with travellers; black 
chalk and sepia wash on blue paper. Northwick collection. 

Loutherbourg, P. J. de, R.A. Cattle and a boy piping, signed 
and dated 1766; pen and sepia. Northwick collection. 

Roubiliac, Louis-Francois. Design for a statue of a physician, 
emblems of ^sculapius; pen and ink. Fairfax Murray collection. 
Presented by Mr. Frank T . Sabin. 

Yan Dyck, Anthony. Study for Venus rising from the sea; 
on the back, sketch of figures dancing, both suggested by com- 
positions of Rubens; pen and ink. Fairfax Murray collection. 

Zoffany, John, R.A. Two designs for the decoration of a 
ceiling with Apollo driving the Chariot of the Sun, and a third 
design with nude figures; black and white chalk. From the 
collection of Sir Frederick Gore-Ouseley. 

Engravings. 

Geminus, Thomas. Two engravings of arabesque ornament 
(duplicate) from the book " Morysse and Damashin renewed and 
increased," London, 1548, of which the only copy known (26 
leaves, omitting these two duplicates and title page) is in the 
Landesmuseum at Miinster in Westphalia. These are the only 
line engravings at present known to have been published in 
England during the reign of Edward VI. 

Schiavonetti, Luigi. Archduke Charles of Austria, after 
Kellerhoven ; stipple, unfinished proof. 

Swertner, John. View of London from the North ; coloured 
aquatint, published at Bristol, 1802. 

British School. 
Draivings. 
liarlow, Francis. Ostrich, peacock and other birds; pen and 
ink and Indian-ink wash ; etched by John Grifiier. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 41 

Callow, William. View of a lake ; water-colour, signed and 
dated 1834. Poynter collection. 

Cameron, D. Y., R.A. Tlie Hills of Morvern; water-colour 
(monoclirome) . Presented by the Artist. 

Crane, Walter. Una and the Lion; unpublished illustration 
to Spenser's "Faerie Queene " ; pen and ink. 

Evershed, Arthur. A book containing 27 drawings in gold 
and silver point. Presented by Mrs. Evershed. 

Gill, Eric. The original designs (1914) for the Stations of the 
Cross in Westminster Cathedral; pen and ink, enriched with 
water-colour and gold, and heightened with white. Presented by 
the Contemporary Art Society. 

Gooden, James Chisholm. Six water-colour sketches, chiefly of 
marine subjects. Presented by Arthur Phillips, Esq., and J. 
Walters, Esq. 

Hunt, William Henry. View in a park; water-colour, from 
the collections of Dr. Thomas Monro and Lord North wick. Pre- 
sented by Captain E. G. Spencer-Churchill. Sawyers working 
at Bushey, with Dr. Monro on horseback as a spectator. North- 
wick collection. 

Lessore, Therese. Stalls, the Euston Palace; pen and ink 
and water-colour. Presented by J . L. Rayner, Esq. 

MacColl, D. S. The Fishers' Church, Honfleur ; water-colour. 
Dordrecht; pencil. Presented by the Artist. 

May, Phil. Thirty-one humorous drawings; chiefly pen and 
ink, but including specimens in pencil and water-colour. Pre- 
sented by Arthur Morrison, Esq. 

Nasmyth, Patrick. Cottages near Maidenhead; black chalk. 
North wick collection. 

Nollekens, Joseph, R.A. Six sketches for monuments, includ- 
ing that of Jonathan Shipley, Bishop of St. Asaph. Indian ink 
and water-colour. 

Parry, John Orlando. The twelfth passenger; black, red and 
white chalk, signed and dated 1865. Presented by E. E. Leggatt, 
Esq. 

Paton, Frank. Four studies of dogs, ducklings and chickens; 
Avater-colour and body colour on tinted papers. Presented by 
Mrs. Paton. 

Eeynolds, Sir Joshua, P.R.A. Four sheets of pen and sepia 
sketches of portraits after Sir J. Kneller, including those of 
Edward and Lady Elizabeth Southwell. Northwick collection. 

Eiviere, Briton, E.A. A wolf; charcoal and wash; study for 
the picture " Vse victis ! " Three studies of a collie dog. Studies 
of wolves and wolves' heads; charcoal. Presented by Mrs. Briton 
Riviere. 

Lithographs. 

Belleroche, Albert. Woman seated in a chair. Presented by 
C. Dodgson, Esq., C.B.E. 

Conder, Charles. Beatrix et Conti ; unpublished and very 
rare, only two other impressions being known. Presented by C. 
Dodgson, Esq., C.B.E. 



42 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Nasmytk, James. Seven pen litliograplis, minutely finished, 
of tke years 1854-55. 

Rothenstein, William. Twelve portraits of Americans. Pre- 
sented by the Artist. 

Woodcuts. 

Batten, Jokn Dickson. Book-plate of J. D. Batten, 1894 
(tkree impressions). Book-plate of J. Piatt (two impressions). Tke 
Mermaid, 1894 (tkree impressions). Eve, 1895 (ten impressions, 
from separate blocks, combinations of blocks and trial proofs, tke 
finisked work in different colour sckemes). Tke Harpies (outline 
and colour print). Constance (trial proof and finisked colour 
print). Tke Tiger (finisked colour print). Presented by the 
Ai'tist. 

Fletcker, Frank Morley. Eve; colour print (1895). 

Gardner, W. Biscombe. George Mereditk, after Watts, and 
two subjects after J. W. Edwards and F. Wilfred Lawson. Pre- 
sented by Mrs. Gardner. 

Giles, William. Midsummer Nigkt ; colour print from six 
relief blocks of metal. Presented by C. Dodgson, Esq., C.B.E. 

Mackie, Ckarles Hodge. Five progress proofs of tke colour- 
printed woodcut, "Picardy Poplars." Presented by Mrs. 
Mackie. 

Moore, Thomas Sturge. Book-plates of Mrs. W. B. Yeats, 
W. S. Kennedy (two states), and Sibyl Pye. Presented by the 
Artist. 

Pilkington, Margaret. Six original woodcuts (kens, geese, 
goats, mountains), 1916-19. Presented by the Artist. 

Piatt, Jokn Edgar. Snow in summer; colour print. Pre- 
sented by the Artist. 

Eooke, N'oel. Tke Edge of tke Wood fin black and in colours). 
Presented by the Artist. 

Soper, George. Tke Skepkerd. Tke Hay Cart. Introduction. 
Presented by the Artist. 

Prints arranged to illustrate the Works of Masters. 

Herring, J. F. Tke Eeturn from tke Derby; coloured aqua- 
tint by J. Harris, 1862. 

Landseer, Sir Edwin, E.A. Fifteen engravings by T. Land- 
seer and otkers, kitkerto wanting in tke collection of Landseer's 
engraved work. 

Portraits. 

Tke 1,383 Englisk and 354 foreign portraits acquired during 
tke year include 1,591 portraits selected from tke duplicates in a 
large collection of small engraved portraits, formed by tke late 
Mr. Jokn Doyle Fry ; tkese duplicates were presented by kis son, 
Mr. H. R. Fry. Tkey also include 11 recently issued portraits 
of members of tke Grillion Club (^presented by the Rt. Hon. Sir 
George H. Murray, G.C.B.), 61 foreign portraits, ckiefly Frenck, 
of tke Revolution period (presented, by H. W . B. Joseph, Esq.), 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 43 

a number of Austrian and German mezzotints, and a large etching 
by Ferdinand Scbmutzer of tlie Archduke Francis Ferdinand 
(d. 1914). 

Book-Plates. 

These include a collection of 71, in proof state, by the Spanish 
artist, A. de Eiquer [presented by Messrs. Bromhead and Cutis), 
six by Ludovic E-odo {presented hy the Artist), and a few Ameri- 
can specimens, by W. F. Hopson and others. 

Collections and Sets. 

A collection, formed by the engraver's daughter, of 148 mezzo- 
tints and line engravings by Charles Algernon Tomkins (1821- 
1905), pupil of Henry Quilley. Presented by W . M. Newton, 
Esq. 

The first eight " Jahresmappen " (1898-1904) of the Gesell- 
schaft fiir Yervielfaltigende Kunst, Vienna, containing 69 
modern engravings, etchings, lithographs and woodcuts of various 
schools, but chiefly Austrian and German. Presented hy Campbell 
Dodgson, Esq., C.B.E. 

Books of Prints and Books of Reference. 

Leonardo da Vinci. Quademi d'Anatomia, 6 vol., Chris- 
tiania, 1911-16. 

J. Veth and S. Muller. A. Diirer's Niederlandisch© Reise, 
2 vol., 1918. 

G. Gliick. Niederlandische Gemalde aus der Sammlung des 
Herrn Dr. L. Lilienfeld in Wien, 1917. Presented by Dr. 
Lilienfeld. 

Gustav Klimt. Fiinf-und-Zwanzig Handzeichnungen. Vienna, 
1920. Presented by C. Dodgson, Esq., C.B.E. 

J. Meder. Die Handzeichnung, ihre Technik und Entwick- 
lung, Vienna, 1919. Presented hy Victor Koch, Esq. 

G. Keller. Die drei gerechten Kammacher (six etchings by 
A. Cossmann). Vienna, 1915. 

Le Nouvel Imagier. Published by La Societe de la gravure 
sur bois originale. Paris, 1914. 

P. de Nolhac and L. Demonts. Quarante Dessins de Claude 
Lorrain. Paris, 1920. 

Adam E. M. Paff. Etchings and dry-points by F. W. Benson, 
vol. 2, 1919. Presented by the Author. 

C. Dodgson. Catalogue of the etchings of Augustus John, 
1920. Presented by Messrs. Charles Chenil ^' Co., Ltd. 

L. Delteil. Le Peintre-Graveur illustre. Tome 11, 12. Tou- 
louse-Lautrec. Presented by M . Loys Delteil. 



Campbell Dodgson. 



44 accounts, etc., of the british museum, 

Sub-Department of Oriental Prints and Drawings. 

I. — Arrangement and Cataloguing, Sfc. 

Tlie framed Chinese and Japanese pictures intended for per- 
manent exhibition at the 'western end of the exhibition gallery- 
were re-hung, and a series of Chinese paintings (including a 
number of Buddhist paintings from the Stein collection), with a 
selection of Indian drawings, were arranged in cases and on 
screens for the re-opening of the gallery on July 15th. This 
exhibition remained on view till about the end of November. 

On December 3rd a new exhibition of Japanese Colour-Prints 
was opened to the public. This is intended to be the first of a 
series, to be held in successive winters, illustrating the various 
phases of the Ukijo-ye School and the whole history of the colour- 
print in Japan, A Guide to this exhibition has been printed and 
is on sale. 

The entire collection of Japanese paintings has been re- 
arranged. The Morrison collection has been incorporated with 
the older Museum Series (chiefly from the Anderson collection) 
and the whole arranged chronologically within the several schools, 
and continuously numbered. The series now contains between 
three and four thousand items, A list of the paintings, in their 
new order, with the subjects and the artists' names, has been 
written in duplicate. The necessary re-labelling has been done. 

The Index of Chinese Artists has been revised for publication. 
New matter has. been incorporated, and over three hundred cross- 
references have been added. 

The reproductions of Chinese and Japanese paintings have 
been arranged in twelve portfolios. 

A case-list of the Oriental collections has been prepared. 

Twelve albums containing Indian and Persian drawings and 
paintings have been transferred from the Department of Oriental 
Printed Books and MSS. to the Sub-Department. Most of these, 
being of a miscellaneous character, are in process of being broken 
up, so that the drawings may be separately mounted and arranged 
according to school and period. Ten drawings detached from 
albums remaining in the Library have also been transferred. 

A small selection of duplicate Japanese Colour-Prints has been 
mounted and framed, to form a loan collection. 

All corrections of references in the indexes, rendered necessary 
by recent re-arrangements, have been made. 

Three books of reference, recently acquired, have been cata- 
logued, placed and labelled. 

The work of entering corrections and additions in an inter- 
leaved copy of the Catalogue of Japanese Woodcuts has been 
begun. 

A record has been begun, in slip form, of all Japanese wood- 
cuts acquired since the printing of the Catalogue. 

Three hundred and thirty-two prints, paintings, etc, have 
been incorporated with the divisions of the collection to which 
they belong. * 



SUB-DEIPAIITMENT OF ORIENTAL PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 45 

Registration. — 651 items have been entered in tlie Register of 
Acquisitions. 

Stamping and mounting. — 1,019 prints, paintings, etc., re- 
cently acquired, have been impressed with the departmental 
stamp and references to the Register. 

Two large paintings from the Stein collection have been 
mounted with silk borders. 

One Chinese painting has been mounted and five repaired. 

Two Persian drawings and one Indian drawing have been 
mounted on sunk mounts. 

Two hundred and six Japanese prints have been mounted on 
sunk mounts. 

Fifty Persian and Indian drawings have been removed from 
albums and backed. 

II . — A cquisitions . 

The total number of paintings, prints, etc., acquired during 
the year was 878, of which the following are the most impor- 
tant : — 

Chinese. 
Paintings. 

Lang Shih-ning [i.e., the Jesuit Giuseppe Castiglionej. Hunt- 
ing scene. Kakemono, painted in colours. 

Leng Mei. A lady at a window. Kakemono, painted in 
colours. 

Wu Li. Twelve landscape designs in an album, made with 
a " fire pencil " (heated stylus). 

Woodcuts. 

Anonymous. " All Nations Coming to Court." Printed in 
colours. 

Japanese, 

Paintings. 

Mitsuoki, Tosa. Five makimono illustrating the Ise Mono- 
gatari. Painted in colours. Presented hy G. B. Dodwell, Esq. 

Sanraku, Kano, attributed to. Ch'ao Fu and Hsti Tu : two- 
fold screen, painted in colours and gold. 

Takanobu, after. Portrait of Toritomo, the first Shogun. A 
fine and very ancient copy after the portrait of Yoritomo pre- 
served in Japan and attributed to Takanobu. Kakemono, painted 
in colours. Purchased with the aid of the National Art-Collec- 
tions Fund and a contribution from G. Eumorfopoulos , Esq. 

Yusho, Kaihoku. Birds on a willow in winter. Kakemono 
painted in ink. 

Woodcuts. 

Buncho. Actor playing in a woman's part. Presented hy 
R. N. Shaw, Esq. 



46 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Fujinobu. A man talking- to a girl. Presented by R. N. 
Shaw, Esq. 

Hiroshige. White heron among reeds. Presented by R. N. 
Shaw, Esq. 

Hokusai. Long surimono; Toshitsune and the princess. 
Men dragging nets ; Hundred Poems series, No. 3. Presented by 
R. N. Shaw, Esq. Three prints from the Hundred Poems series, 
Nos. 5, 37 and 97. 

Jakuchiu. Set of six prints of birds and flowers on black 
ground. 

Kiyonaga. Girls on a verandah by the sea. Girls and children 
near a temple gateway; diptych. Presented by R. N. Shaiv, Esq. 
Evening by the sea. 

Kiyoshige. Michizane holding plum-blossom. Presented by 
R. N. Shaw, Esq. 

Koriiisai. Tea-house scene. 

E-iukoku. Girl with scroll. 

Shuncho. Girls and cat. 

Utamaro. Girl painting her lips. Girl tying a poem to a 
blossoming tree. Presented by R. N. Shaw, Esq. An actor in a 
woman's part (very early print). Two lovers under an umbrella, 

Yeisui. Three girls. Presented by R. N. Shaw, Esq. Lovers 
eloping. 

Book of Woodcut Designs'. 

Mincho Seid5 Gwayen. Printed in colours after Shunboku, 
2 vol., 1746. The first edition, of which no other copy appears 
to be known, of one of the earliest examples of colour printing in 
Japan. Presented by Arthur Morrison, Esq. 



KoREAisr. 

The God of the North; The God of the South. Two large 
paintings in colours. 



Indian. 

Paintings and Drawings. 

The paintings and drawings, approaching 500 in number, 
acquired by transference from the Department of Oriental Printed 
Books and MSS., make a very important addition to the Indian 
collections. They are mostly of the Mogul School. A few are 
of the time of Akbar, but the finest paintings are of the time of 
Jahangir and Shah Jahan, and include signed examples of the 
work of Hiinhar, Chitarman, Anupchatar, Govardhan, Muham- 
mad Nadir and other distinguished artists of the J. 7th century. 

Group of young prince and maidens; water-colour copy by 
Mukul Dey after one of the most ancient of the Ajanta Frescoes. 

Kangra School. Lovers on a terrace. Presented by Ernest 
Debenham, Esq. 



sub-department of oriental prints and drawings. 47 

Persian. 

About 50 drawings and paintings, mostly of the IGtk and 17th 
centuries. Transferred from the Department of Oriental Printed 
Books and MSS. 



Tibetan. 

Mahakala. Banner painting, in colours. Presented by Arthur 
Morrison, Esq. 

Books of Prints and Books of Eeference. 

Hiroshige Memorial Exhibition, Tokyo, 1918. Presented by 
Laurence Binyon, Esq. 

JSTakamura. Catalogue of National Treasures in Japan. Pre- 
sented by H. F . Visser, Esq. 

Liang Chang-Chu Collection : illustrated catalogue. Pre- 
sented by Laurence Binyon, Esq. 

Otani, Count. Sai-iki Koko Zufu ; Central Asian Antiquities. 
2 vol. Presented by Sei-ichi Taki, Esq. 

Petrucci, Raphael. Encyclopedic de la Peintur© Chinoise; 
traduction et commentaires. 

Streelneek, F. A. Chinese Pictorial Art (Streelneek collec- 
tion). Presented by E. A. Streelneek, Esq. 



Laurence Binyon. 



48 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Department of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities. 

I. — Arrangement, Cataloguing, 8fc. 
Egyptian Antiquities : — 

The general re-arrangement of tlie Egyptian Galleries and 
Vestibule lias been continued, and a number of portrait figures, 
statues, etc., have been incorporated and provided with pedestals 
or plinths, and wooden cases. The washing and cleansing of the 
hard stone statues have been continued. 

The predynastic pottery and other antiquities, and the objects 
of the Archaic and Early Dynastic Periods have been removed 
from the cases on the north-west staircase and re-arranged in the 
Sixth Egyptian Room. Descriptive labels have been attached to 
the painted casts in the Vestibule and in the Eifth Egyptian 
Room . 

Metal tubes, with perforated ends and filled with cotton wool, 
have been fixed in all the wall-cases for the purposes of ventila- 
tion, and holes have been drilled in the glass coverings of painted 
frescoes to prevent condensation of moisture. 

The collections of mummies and coffins and large funerary 
furniture have been arranged in Egyptian Rooms I.-III., which 
were re-opened to the public on May 24th (Whit Monday). The 
Fourth Egyptian Room, containing the smaller funerary objects, 
scarabs, shabti figures, jewellery, etc., was re-opened to the public 
on July 15th, and the Fifth and Sixth Egyptian Rooms on 
December 5th. 

The Egyptian, Nubian and Meroitic pottery and earthenware 
objects have been grouped and arranged, each object -having a 
distinguishing letter painted upon it. 

A selection from the funerary, historical, legal, and magical 
papyri in the hieroglyphic, hieratic and demotic characters has 
been made and exhibited in the Sixth Egyptian Room. 

The collection of Royal scarabs has been amplified and classi- 
fied and re-arranged in chronological order ; and one hundred and 
ninety-seven scarabs have been re-mounted. 

Ten frames for miscellaneous objects have been made; several 
hundreds of feet of mahogany slips for labels have been prepared 
for ebonizing; fifty-eight pedestals for mummies and coffins and 
seventy-seven bearers have been made ; three hundred dividing 
slips for scarabs and twenty-three for pottery have been prepared 
and either distempered or covered with cloth ; one box and a 
number of stands for boats have been made; new shelves and 
bearers have been prepared and fixed in Egyptian Rooms IV. -VI. ; 
five coffins have been re-dowelled, and a large house-door has been 
removed from the Vestibule and fixed in Room V. Three hundred 
and forty-three figures of gods ha.ve been refixed. 

About five hundred objects have had numbers painted upon 
them ; one hundred and ninety-one labels have been written and 
painted and fixed; four hundred and thirty-one objects have been 



DEPARTMENT OF EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 49 

registered ; ten inscriptions liave been copied and several copies 
revised, and the plates for Part VI. of Egyptian Texts; liave been 
checked over. 

A set of twenty-two postcards with coloured representations 
of coffins and mummies has been printed, descriptive labels have 
been written for them, and short introductions dealing with the 
Book of the Dead and mummification have been written and 
printed. 

A. monograph on the Book of the Dead has been written. 

Three hundred and forty-four slips for the Catalogue of 
Scarabs have been written. 

Assyrian Antiquities : — 

Tiie general re-arrangement of the Babylonian Eoom and the 
Phoenician and Semitic Rooms in the Second Northern Gallery 
has been completed, and the Rooms were re-opened to the public 
on July I5th. 

The collection of Sumerian and early Babylonian antiquities 
has been amplified, and all objects bought during the year have 
been incorporated. 

Thirty-one cases of antiquities have been brought from the 
Docks to the Museum, and their contents unpacked and examined. 
The collection of Hittite sculptures has been brought upstairs, 
and the bas-reliefs and sculptures have been placed in the wall- 
cases on the North- West Staircase. 

Twenty Babylonian bricks, twelve miscellaneous Babylonian 
objects (ovoids, plaques, etc.), one seated figure, and one Kufi 
gravestone, have been mounted on stone plinths; eight table-cases 
have been covered with cloth. 

Thirty tablets, twenty figures, thirty-one terra-cotta vases, 
twenty-one bowls and dishes, etc., have been repaired, and five 
tablets have been cleaned. 

The restoration of the bronze masks from the heads of animals 
from Babylonia has been continue