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Full text of "Review of the Methodist Federation for Social Action formerly the Methodist Federation for Social Service"

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32d Congress, 2d Session 



Union Calendar No. 523 



House Report No. 1661 



REVIEW OF 



THE METHODIST -FEDERATION 
FOR SOCIAL ACTION 



FORMERLY 



THE METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL SERVICE 




FEBRUARY 17, 1952 
(Ordinal re'-ease date) 



MARCH 27, 1952. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
State of the Union and ordered to be printed 



Prepared and released by the 

COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES, U. S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON ; 1952 



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COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
United States House of Representatives 

JOHN S. WOOD, Georgia, Chairman 
FRANCIS E. WALTER, Pennsylvania HAROLD H. VELDE, Illinois 

MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri BERNARD W. KEARNEY, New York 

CLYDE DOYLE, California DONALD L. JACKSON, California 

JAMES B. ERAZIER, Jr., Tennessee CHARLES E. POTTER, Michigan 

Frank S. Tavenner. Jr., Counsel 
Louis J. Russell, Senior Investigator 
John W. Carrinoton, Clerk of Committee 
Raphael I. Nixon, Director of Research 

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CONTENTS 



Pace 

Introduction 1 

Background and history of the Methodist Federation for Social Service. _ 1 
Annual meetings of the Methodist Federation for Social Service and the 

Methodist Federation for Social Action, 1936 3 

1937 4 

193S 4 

1939 5 

1947 G 

Articles and editorials in full Irom New York World-Telegram. _ 7 

1948_ -. 22 

1950 30 

1951 32 

Do the actions and deeds of the Methodist Federation for Social Service 
and the Methodist Federation for Social Action parallel the objectives of 

the Communist Party? 37 

Criticism of the Methodist Federation for Social Service and the Methodist 

Federation for Social Action 45 

Comments on the Methodist Federation for Social Service and the Method- 
ist Federation for Social Action by its vice president 66 

Summary 68 

Appendix 70 

ILLUSTRATIONS 

Exhibit 

1. Methodist Federation for Social Service, letterhead, dated October 

24, 1928 2 

2. Methodist Federation for Social Service, letter, dated January 7, 

1935 71 

3. Social Questions Bulletin, November 1939 (p. 4) 72 

4. Methodist Federation for Social Service, undated letter 41 

5. Social Questions Bulletin, October 1940 (p. 4) 73 

6. Methodist Federation for Social Service, letter, dated April 12, 

1946 42 

8, parts 1-8. Methodist Federation for Social Service, 1945 Ballot 74 

9, parts 1-4. Methodist Federation for Social Service, 1947 Ballot 82 

10, part 1. Social Questions Bulletin, June 1950 (p. 27) 86 

10, part 2. Social Questions Bulletin, June 1950 (p. 28) 87 

in 



Union Calendar No. 523 

) HOUSE OF REPBESENTATIVES j Report 
f "i No. 1661 



82d Congress ) HOUSE OF EEPBESENTATIVES 
2d Session 



REVIEW OF THE METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL 

ACTION 



March 27, 1952. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
State of the Union and ordered to be printed 



Mr. Walter, from the Committee on Un-American Activities, 

submitted the following; 

o 

REPORT 

[Pursuant to Public Law 601, 79th Cong.] 

IV 



REVIEW OF 
THE LIETKODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

FORMERLY 

TEE METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL SERVICE 

INTRODUCTION 

In recent months the demand on the House Committee on Un- 
American Activities for information regarding the Methodist Federa- 
tion for Social Action by Members of Congress has been of such volume 
as to require a careful and studied review of the information regarding 
this organization and its predecessor, the Methodist Federation for 
Social Service, that is available to the committee. 

This review is merely a compilation of the record showing activities 
and policies of these organizations as reflected by their own documents 
and letters, articles and statements of their officials, as well as articles 
appearing in the public press concerning these organizations. 

Since the original release of this report, it has come to the attention 
of the committee that some individuals have had the misunderstanding 
that this report is directed at the Methodist Church and its members 
in the United States. This committee has never attacked a church 
group as such and has no intention of doing so now. 

The sole purpose of the committee in the preparation of this report 
is to show the activities of an organization which has chosen to use the 
name of the Methodist Church in its title and which has been repudi- 
ated by outstanding clergymen and laymen of the Methodist Church. 

BACKGROUND AND HISTORY OF THE METHODIST 
FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL SERVICE 

While the Methodist Federation for Social Service was founded in 
1907, information in the files of this committee begins with the year 
of 1928. 

The April 15, 1928, issue of the Social Service Bulletin has the follow- 
ing to say on the history of the organization: 

The Methodist Federation for Social Service was organized in 1907. The 
General Conference of 1908 assigned to it certain questions for study. The 
General Conference of 1912 approved certain measures of social reform and 
principles of social progress presented in the Federation's report, and declared the 
organization to be the executive agency to rally the forces of the church in support 
ofthose measures. The General Conference of 1924 said: "Whereas, It is im- 
perative that there be some authorized agency in the Methodist Episcopal Church 
for the purpose of raising before the Church the question of the social implications 
of the gospel of Jesus; therefore "Resolved, That we commend the Methodist 
Federation for Social Service for its splendid activities in carrying on the work 
specified herein." 

The Federation is governed by an executive committee of five and a general 
council of fifty-six widely representative of the church. These bodies are elected 
by the membership. A small office is maintained in New York. Harry F. Ward 
and Winifred L. Chappell are the secretaries. There is one office assistant. The 
work is financed by membership fees and voluntary contributions. An "optional 
apportionment plan" has been adopted by several annual conferences in accord- 
ance with winch any church in the conference may make an appropriation to this 

1 



2 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

work from its benevolence fund of an amount equal to one-half of one per cent of 
the preacher's salary, including house rent. Where this plan is effective as in 
Rock River, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, it is because a local group has promoted it. 

* * * 

The Methodist Federation for Social Service is celebrating its twentieth anni- 
versary. A national committee of 63, with Ernest F. Tittle as chairman and G. 
Bromley Oxnam as executive secretary, is sponsoring the celebration. The 
occasion is being used to promote churchwide discussion of such issues as war, 
property, labor, civil liberties, and to extend membership in the Federation. 

Groups and individuals across the country are spontaneously and energetically 
promoting this program. The church press is giving it publicity. A week of 
celebration at General Conference May 21st to 27th will end this initial campaign 
and launch a wider program of discussion and activity. 

Items in the Kansas City program will be a platform meeting on the evening 
of May 21st, one or more get-together dinners, a mass meeting on the church and 
labor, on May 27th, a handbook giving a brief picture of twenty years of social 
service. 

A letterhead of the organization dated October 24, 1928, is repro- 
duced here. 

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Methodist Federation for Social Service, letterhead, dated October 24, 1928. 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 3 

The Social Service Bulletin for November 15, 1931, reflects the 
names of Harry P. Ward, and Winifred L. Chappell as editors and 
contains the following: 

The general policies of this publication are determined by the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Methodist Federation for Social Service, subject to approval by the 
General Council of the Federation. The selection of topics and material is com- 
mitted to the Secretaries, who are responsible to the Federation and to the public 
for its accuracy. 

In the April 15, 1932, issue of the Social Service Bulletin will be 
found the following: 

The Federation has continued to cooperate with boards and agencies within 
our own church and with many groups outside the church working definitely for 
a new social order. Among these may be mentioned several departments of the 
Federal Council of Churches, the American Civil Liberties Union, the League for 
Industrial Democracy, Labor Research Association, International Labor Defense, 
Committee on Militarism in Education, Fellowship of Reconciliation. It is par- 
ticipating in a joint council of organizations concerned with civil liberties, and a 
joint council of organizations dealing with unemployment. 

The Social Questions Bulletin for November 1939 contains an article 
by Dr. Harry F. Ward. In discussing the cause and effect of the 
Nazi-Soviet Pact, Dr. Ward says: 

The question of the outcome of the moral emotions now being aroused against 
the Soviet also has another bearing. Here they are being translated into anti- 
Communism, and this is being used under the leadership of Dies in a new red 
hunt which promises, under other leadership, to be more intelligent, as well as 
more ruthless, than that under Mitchell Palmer after the last war. The founda- 
tions of our democracy are being assailed under the cry of saving it from the reds. 
Even if we manage to stay out of the war it is clear that we have a continuous 
and difficult job to protect our democratic rights from the massed attack of 
reaction, using war-time feelings for its dynamic. A later Bulletin will deal with 
this question. 

The Social Questions Bulletin for October 1940 carries the following 
on the masthead: 

Social Questions Bulletin of the Methodist Federation for Social Service 
(unofficial), an organization which rejects the method of the struggle for profit 
as the economic base for society; which seeks to replace it with social-economic 
planning in order to develop a society without class distinctions and privileges. 

ANNUAL MEETINGS OF THE METHODIST FEDERATION 
FOR SOCIAL SERVICE AND THE METHODIST FEDERA- 
TION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

Reports of the annual meetings, conferences, conventions, or 
sessions of the Methodist Federation for Social Service and the 
Methodist Federation for Social Action have been the sources of 
much material and information concerning those matters advocated 
or supported by the Federation and its officials. 

1936 

The Washington News of January 7, 1936 contains the following 
news item, date line Chicago: 

The "radical nature" of a program to be discussed January 14 at a regional 
session of the Methodist Federation of Social Service today was expected to bring 
vigorous objections from a laymen's conference of the church. 

Arthur M. Hyde of Missouri, former U. S. Agriculture Secretary, said that 
executive of the laymen's group have a copy of the program of the social service 
conference and are preparing a formal statement. 



4 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

An invitation accompanying the program says: 

"The present capitalistic order, with its profit motive, has outlived its useful- 
ness and should be replaced by an order capable of providing abundant life, 
physical and cultural, for all." 

1937 

The Chicago Herald-Examiner of May 6, 1937, contains the fol- 
lowing news item on the annual convention of the Methodist Federa- 
tion for Social Service, held at Evanston, Illinois: 

Alliance of the pulpit with communism was voted by the unofficial Methodist 
Federation for Social Service at its annual convention yesterday in the Evanston 
Y. M. C. A. 

Resolutions were adopted indorsing the action of the Red-dominated American 
Civil Liberties Union in demanding freedom of speech for all clergymen. 

Voted also was a resolution to ask the Civil Liberties Union to name a com- 
mittee to investigate instances where preachers have been removed from their 
pulpits for radical utterances. 

Last Spring the quadrennial conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
repudiated the social service group after the Methodist Laymen's League charged 
that five of its leaders were also members of Moscow-directed organizations. 

A year ago the federation also voted, 53 to 10, to affiliate with the American 
League Against War and Fascism, known as "the Red front." 

Included in the latest action was a protest to the board of bishops against 
penalizing ministers "who express liberal, social and economic views." 

All the resolutions were sent to the floor by a committee headed by the 
Rev. George Tucker, D. D., pastor of the Indianola Methodist Church of 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Another resolution opposed legislation for compulsory arbitration of labor 
disputes. It was reported out by a committee headed by the Rev. A. A. He^st 
of the Lawrence Methodist Church, Los Angeles. He declared: 

"We are also opposed to the incorporation of labor unions. If they are com- 
pelled to incorporate, then all employers' groups should be forced to do so and make 
public their financial status." 

John L. Lewis and the Committee for Industrial Organization were lauded in 
a third resolution for unionizing workers in mass production industries. 

Among members of Dr. Heist's committee are Professor John C. Lazenby of 
the Milwaukee State Teacher's College, and the Rev. W. B. Waltmire of the 
Humboldt Park Community Church. The latter was one of the five "Reds" 
named last year by the laymen's organization. 

Bishop Francis J. McConnell of New York, president of the federation, who 
was also named among the five radicals, was the honored guest at a dinner com- 
memorating the twenty-fifth anniversary of his elevation. 

The American League Against War and Fascism, with which the 
Methodist Federation for Social Action was allegedly affiliated, has 
been classified by the Attorney General of the United States as a 
Communist organization and has also been cited by the Special 
Committee on Un-American Activities. The American Civil Liberties 
Union has not been investigated by the House Committee on Un- 
American Activities and the inclusion of the foregoing news item in 
this report should not be construed as an expression of opinion by this 
committee as to whether that organization was "red-dominated" in 
1937 or at any subsequent date. 

1933 

The Bureau County Republican, a newspaper of Princeton, Illinois, 
in the October 13, 1938 issue, at page 1, contains the following front 
page article regarding the Methodist Federation for Social Service: 

The Methodist Federation for Social Service, an organization seeking the over- 
throw of the profit or private ownership system, has a strong organization in the 
Rock River Conference, according to a circular letter distributed to the ministers 
and lav delegates at the annual conference in Chicago last week. The Federation 
is organizing in every district conference of the church. The one for this district 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 5 

is termed "The Rock River branch" and is a subsidiary of the national organiza- 
tion which has its main offices in the .Methodist Episcopal church building at 150 
Fifth Avenue, New York City. The Federation terms the "Soviet system" as 
"the most perfect yet devised by any nation." 

According to the circular letter passed out last week the Rock River branch 
has 24 ministers acting either as officers of the Federation, chairman of various 
committees or members of the advisory committee. 

The circular lists the officials as follows: 

President — Armand Guerrero. 

Vice President — Rural, II. P. Buxton; women, Esther Bjornberg; youth, 
Herman Will. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Ralph Kofoed, Route 3, Woodstock, 111. 

The following are chairmen of various committees: 

Civil Liberties — Fred J. Schnell. 

Cooperatives — Wade C. Barclay. 

Labor Organization — Reynold L. Hoover. 

Peace — Raymond H. Lowry. 

Rural Construction — E. L. Stanton. 

Social Education — John Irwin. 

State Legislation — Ray Bond. 

Temperance and Reform — A. C. Nesmith. 

Unemployment Relief — W. B. Waltmire. 

The following are named as members of the "advisory committee": 

Warren N. Clark, Will L. Collin, Charles R. Goff, Harris Franklin Rail, Ernest 
Fremont Tittle, Mary Randolph Bloomquist, Merle L. English, R. L. Semans, 
Earl Whitchurch. 

Rev. Ernest Fremont Tittle, named as a member of the advisory committee, 
is the pastor of the First Methodist Church of Evanston, one of the largest 
churches of the district. He is also a trustee of Northwestern University. 

The Civil Liberties Committee is an organization protecting the right of radicals 
on the basis of free speech. The cooperative committee is working on a program 
to put local retail merchants out of business. The labor organization demands 
more legislation for labor unions. It is not content with having the National 
Labor Relations Board and the labor department. The peace committee is an 
organization whose purpose is to influence beginners in the "right" general direc- 
tion on social problems. What it turns [terms] a turn in the "right" direction is 
in reality a turn to the left. Meetings are held under emergency peace, military 
disarmament and other titles. The social committee has to do with the youth 
movement to train the youth in the "right direction." The social legislative 
committee has to do with the overthrow of the profit system. The reform and 
unemployment committees take up class and other controversial subjects that 
promote discontent. 

The circular letter appeals to the ministers and laymen to aid in a financial 
way through the church in keeping Dr. Charles C. Webber in the field and honor- 
ing their national leader, Bishop Francis J. McConnell. Dr. Webber is a co- 
secretary of the Methodist Federation for Social Service with offices at 150 
Fifth Avenue, New York City. Dr. Webber, at the annual conference of the 
Rock river district a year ago at Rockford, was the speaker on the occasion at 
the noon-day dinner in the Court Street church, who brought a special message 
from the Federation headquarters in New York City. His message at that time 
was that the steel industry would be the first one seized in taking over private 
property, to be operated under the communal plan. At that time he said he did 
not know when the movement would start. It might be in a month or it might 
be a year or even longer. 

1939 

The Bureau County Republican, issue of May 18, 1939, carries a 
front page story on a meeting of the Methodist Federation for Social 
Service that was held in Kansas City, simultaneously with the Uniting 
Conference of the Methodist Church. The article, in part, is: 

Five bishops of the new unified Methodist church in session at Kansas City last 
week aligned themselves with the radical Methodist Federation for Social Service 
which conducted a conference running simultaneously with the Uniting Con- 
ference. Three other bishops, at meetings of the Federation, were declared to 
be in sympathy with the organization, making eight bishops favoring their cause 
out of a total of more than 40 bishops present at the Uniting Conference. While 
the number of bishops endorsing the radical organization was small in proportion 



G REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

to the total number, yet their influence was tremendous over the entire session. 
It was so strong that no objection to their activities was expressed from any 
quarter. The Federation suffered only one defeat and that was when the Uniting 
Conference passed a motion to delete a pronouncement in favor of social economic 
planning from the discipline of the united church. 

The five bishops endorsed the Federation's platform for the overthrow of the 
present capitalistic system in the United States and favored its replacement with 
a social planning order. The pamphlets of the Federation, distributed at the 
session, declare that under the new social order private ownership of property is 
to come to an end. Under their system there are to be no capitalists. Private 
property, according to the pamphlets, is to be taken over without compensation 
to the owners and operated by "useful social workers." 

Four prominent bishops of the Methodist church attended the dinner of the 
Methodist Federation for Social Service held at the Y. M. C. A. building. The 
bishops occupied seats at the speakers' table and made addresses. A fifth bishop, 
Edgar Blake, of the Detroit area, sent word that he was unable to be present on 
account of conference work, but extended his best wishes for the success of the 
Federation of which he is a member of the executive committee. The four 
bishops who made speeches eulogizing the Federation are: 

Bishop Francis J. McConnell, of the New York City area, president of the 
American Federation for Social Service. 

Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam, formerly of the Omaha area, assigned last week to 
the Boston area. 

Bishop James C. Baker, of the San Franc'sco area. 

Bishop Paul B. Kern, of the Nashville, Tenn., area. 

Bishop Cxne.m, who as a student got his training from Dr. Harry F. Ward, at 
the Theological Institute, was the first speaker on the program. He was intro- 
duced by Bishop McConnell as a man who comes out flat-footed on any principle 
for which he stands and does it without mincing words. Bishop McConnell said 
Bishop Oxnam reminds him of a railroad train which starts rather idly, but steams 
up as it goes along and gradually makes high speed at the climax. 

Bishop Oxnam said he thoroughly endorses the Methodist Federation for Social 
Service and the things for which it stands. He read from the masthead of the 
Federation's literature the following statement, which outlines the Federation's 
purposes: 

"The Methodist Federation for Social Service is an organization which rejects 
the method of the struggle for profit as the economic base for society; which seeks 
to replace it with social, economic planning in order to develop a society without 
class distinction and privilege." 

The economic plan referred to by Bishop Oxnam is further elucidated in the 
pamphlet containing the platform of the Federation. 

On page 11 the pamphlets declare "social economic planning can give everybody 
plenty and security." 

On page 12: "Under social ownership there won't be any capitalists and all the 
returns will go direct to the people." 

Page 10: "The only country that has a complete social economic plan is the 
Soviet Union." 

On page 13 the plan of the Soviet Union of Russia is again commended. On a 
dozen pages the pamphlets declare private property will be taken from the present 
owners without compensation. The owners, however, are to be given jobs by 
the useful social workers and it is said they ought to feel grateful to be permitted 
to become a part of the planning scheme. 

Bishop Oxnam paid a high tribute to the Federation and to its secretary, Dr. 
Ward, whom he regarded as one of the greatest leaders in the new industrial, 
social, economic planning movement. Bishop Oxnam said that as a student he 
took dictation from Dr. Ward in the writing of some of his books known to all 
radical leaders. 
1 1947 

The New York World-Telegram and the Scripps-Howard news- 
papers assigned staff writer Frederick Woltman to cover the annual 
conference of the Methodist Federation for Social Action, held in 
Kansas City, December 27-29, 1947. Mr. Woltman wrote an article 
in advance of the conference and filed two newspaper dispatches from 
Kansas City. 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 7 

As a result of tlie Woltman articles and certain editorials appearing 
in the New York "World-Telegram and other newspapers, Prof. 
( Jlyde R. Miller, a delegate to the conference, wrote the trustees of 
Columbia University demanding that they rescind the Pulitzer Prize 
awarded Mr. Woltman in 1947. Professor Miller accompanied his 
letter with a 15-page mimeographed "Report on Kansas City Meet- 
ing" which was prepared by the Methodist Federation for Social 
Action and purported to be in answer to the Woltman art'cles and 
editorials. Among the charges raised by Professor Miller were pre- 
conceived bias, deliberate distortion, misrepresentation and falsifica- 
tion. The New York World-Telegram prepared a point-by-point 
reply. Because of the importance of the Woltman articles, editorials 
and the New York World-Telegram reply, they are inserted herein 
and as are follows: 

Articles and Editorials in Full From the Net- York World-Telegram 

methodist minority group gives reds sounding board for their tarty line 

Ey Frederick Woltman, World-Telegram Staff Writer 

The prestige of the Methodist Church will be used in Kansas City, Mo. this 
week end to furnish a national sounding board for Communists and fellow travelers 
to expound the gospel of the Communist line. 

The occasion is the annual conference of the Methodist Federation for Social 
Action, an unofficial but politically-powerful adjunct of the Methodist Church 
which, for years, has closely followed the Communist party line on many issues. 

Small— But Loud 

Although representing only a small minority of the nation's 11,000.000-odd 
Methodists, it's the only organized social action body in the church. It speaks 
in the name of 17 Methodist bishops and 4000 Methodist clerics and laymen. 
And it's highly articulate. 

Most of the federation's rank and file members and officials are non-Com- 
munists. Many are pacifists. 

The Party Line 

Yet, 'f the federation and its scheduled speakers run true to form in Kansas 
City, the Soviet dictatorship will be extolled, America's entire foreign policy will 
be castigated, Yugoslavia's Communist dictator Tito will be greatly whitewashed 
and Chiang Kai-shek will be denounced. 

One beneficiary of this religious sounding board is to be Carl Marzani, the 
Communists' own pet martyr. The federation's program describes him as "a 
victim of the present government loyalty purge." 

Actually, ^larzani was convicted by a federal jury and sentenced to one to 
three years in prison for concealing his Communist party membership in order to 
retain a key post in the Department of State. 

Liberties Issues Ra'sed 

His subject is "The Christian Church and Civil Liberties." 

A scheduled guest of honor is Feng Yu-hsiang, whom the program labels 
"Christian General." 

A former Chinese war lord, Gen. Feng has been calling for the overthrow of 
Chiang Kai-shek and a coalition with the Chinese Communists. Earlier this 
week he defied Chiang's order to return at once from a government mission in the 
U. o. 

The federation favors Gen. Feng's solution for China. 

More of the Same 

Its April, 1946, Social Problems Bulletin featured— as an authoritative com- 
mentary—a blistering attack on American policv in China. The author, Chu 
lang, was described as "editor of the China Daily News, New York City." 



8 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

What the bulletin neglected to mention is that Chu Tang has for long been an 
apologist for the Chinese Communists and that the China Daily News is the 
Chinese version of the Daily Worker. 

The convention's expert on American-Soviet relations is to be Dr. Jerome Davis, 
long an admirer of the Soviet system. 

In the June, 1947 bulletin, under the title, "The Acid Test— The Soviet Union," 
Dr. Davis summed up his views thus: 

"Is it not probable that the greatest event of the 20th century thus far is the 
Soviet Revolution and all that it has meant to human welfare?" . . . 

Eclipse of Individual 

In the article, Dr. Davis sought to justify Russia's denial of individual liberties, 
one-party monopoly, bureaucracy, concentration camps and firing squads. 

Accepting the official Soviet version, which holds all Stalin critics to be Fascists, 
he defended the firing squads and concentration camps in this grisly manner: 

"Russia believes it is wiser to destroy the enemies of the people from within 
rather than wait until they foment war from without." 

An even more fervent admirer of the Soviet system, Dr. Harry F. Ward, will be 
presented as an expert on minority rights and American-Soviet relations. The 
program describes him as "Honorary Chairman, Civil Rights Congress." 

CRC is the current legal defense arm of the Communist party. Attorney 
General Tom C. Clark recently included it in the Department of Justice's list of 
subversive Communist organizations. 

Intimate of Communist leaders and a plugger for the party for more than 20 
years, Dr. Ward sets the pace for the federation's stand on foreign affairs in a 
regular column in its printed bulletin. It reads like the Communist party's 
official "America's always wrong; Russia's always right" statements. 

America's foreign policy, wrote Dr. Ward last May, "is the Hitler program all 
over again." 

Case of Dr. Shipler 

As an expert on "The Christian Church and Europe" the federation invited 
Dr. Guy Emery Shipler, editor of The Churchman, who is listed as "head of 
Protestant delegation to Yugoslavia." 

Supporter of many Communist fronts, five of which were listed as subversive 
by Attorney General Clark, Dr. Shipler last summer took six other Protestant 
clergymen on a whirlwind tour of Yugoslavia, which was productive of glowing 
interviews about the Tito Communist regime. 

Tito paid the bill. 

The program for the Kansas City convention, which runs from tomorrow to 
Monday, includes bishops, ministers, church workers and other speakers with no 
leftist political record. One of them is Kermit Eby, CIO research and education 
director, a non-Communist. 

Militant Clergyman 

Its political tone, however, is set by the speakers mentioned above as well as 
by the Rev. Jack McMichael, executive secretary and sparkplug of the Methodist 
Federation for Social Action. 

Former youth leader in the Young Communist League and a constant Com- 
munist backer, Mr. McMichael has backed five fronts listed as Communist and 
subversive by the attorney general. Among the five, he was vice chairman of 
American Peace Mobilization, created by the Communist party to sabotage 
President Roosevelt's defense program during the Hitler-Stalin peace pact. And 
he was national chairman of the American Youth Congress which attacked the 
late President as a "warmonger" and booed him on the White House lawn. 

It was under Mr. McMichael that the federation last year officially sponsored 
the formation of the National Committee to Win-the-Peace, also listed a sub- 
versive by the Attorney General. 

Party Line 

Its Social Questions Bulletin, a survey shows, closely follows the party line. 
i While unofficial and not a spokesman for the Methodist Church, the federation 
has its national offices in Methodist Church headquarters here; and it uses the 
Methodist Church telephone switchboard. 

A booklet reporting its activities from 1907 to 1947 says: "Today, the Feder- 
ation's Social Question Bulletin, its influence going far beyond Methodism, is 
a definite force in moulding the social thought of American Protestantism." 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 9 

MINORITY GROUP IN METHODIST CHURCH LAUDS RED POLICY 

By Frederick Woltman, ]Yorld-Telegra7n Staff Writer 

Kansas City, Dec. 29. — The spirit of Christmas and the Sermon on the Mount 
were invoked here this week end as justification for an all-out attack on America's 
foreign policies and a glowing defense of the Soviet Union in both her foreign and 
domestic affairs. 

Keynote speakers denounced the Marshall Plan and the Truman Doctrine, 
our atomic energy stand and our China policy at the annual meeting of the 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, a minority but highly articulate unoffi- 
cial adjunct of the Methodist Church. 

Had they been present, V. M. Molotov and William Z. Foster would have 
applauded enthusiastically. For what the speakers said, the Communists have 
been tellins; us all along. 

But here religion was made the basic argument before about 75 delegates, 
including Methodist bishops, clergymen and church workers. 

Charges U. S. Falsehoods 

The keynoter on American-Soviet relations was Jerome Davis, long an ardent 
Soviet apologist. He accused American "capitalistic interests" and newspapers 
of "perpetuating falsehoods about the Soviet Union." 

Mr. Davis urged that "America be the good Samaritan to Russia.' 

"The Christmas story, the story of Mary," declared another speaker, "means 
not the improvement of the present social order but its revolutionary abolition 
and replacement anew." He was the federation's executive secretary, the Rev. 
Jack McMichael, 30, who was once active in the Young Communist League and 
has been a diligent supporter of Communist fronts to date. 

He accused the United States of backing "the rich and privileged of the world, 
the princes on their thrones, the grafters and the rich exploiters in China." 

"The greatest moral and spiritual problem facing the American people," 
Mr. Davis told the delegates, "is not the struggle between Communism and democ- 
racy; that is a spurious issue. It is the struggle between reaction, the old order, 
the control of property and an emerging new order pushing its way up through 
blood, tears and strife." 

The subject of the conference was "The Christian Church and Present Day 
Tensions." The Social Action program formulated here, according to Mr. 
McMichael, will be presented to the Methodist Church for its formal adoption. 

What the meeting's planners had in mind for the federation's stand on inter- 
national affairs was evident from their literature display. It contained many 
books and pamphlets on the Soviets but not one by a critic. 

On the contrary, there was "Soviet Russia Since the War." by the Dean of 
Canterbury, England's leading apologist for tha Stalin dictatorship. 

Display Red Pamphlets 

Scattered throughout the display were pamphlets from the National Council of 
American-Soviet Friendship, which the Department of Justice recently termed a 
subversive, Communist group. One item from the council, the foremost pro- 
Soviet propaganda agency in America, was entitled "Bibliography, Recommended 
Readings of the Soviet Union." 

While the speakers on foreign affairs spoke a line that paralleled the Com- 
munists, those on labor and agricultural problems did not. One was the Rev. 
Kermit Erby [Eby], CIO research and education director, who praised Walter 
Reuther, United Auto Workers president and chief foe of the Communists in the 
CIO. 

Mr. Erby [Eby] called for "Christian social action in co-operation with labor to 
conquer poverty and eliminate substandard conditions." 

The guest of honor was the former Chinese war lord and so-called Christian 
general. Feng Yu-hsiang, who last week defied his government's order to return 
to China. 

Feng Assails Chiang 

Through an interpreter, Gen. Feng, who claimed to speak "in the name of 
450, 000. 000 Chinese." attacked Chiang Kai-shek as a dictator. Under Chiang 
today the general said, "anybody who uses the word 'democracy' or 'peace' will 



10 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

immediately be condemned as a Communist and put into a concentration camp or 
thrown into a river and drowned." 

"The Communist side," Feng said, "is really the army of the people, the 
peasants." 

To escape concentration camps under Chiang, according to Feng, the wealthy 
have to pay 5,000,000 Chinese dollars and the poor "are told to sell their daughters 
to the bank to raise $5,000,000." He did not explain what the banks do with 
the daughters. 

Following Dr. Davis' speech there was some skepticism expressed from the floor 
about his all-out defense of the Soviet Union. One delegate said: 

"The crowd in control in Russia seems to me as totalitarian as Hitler. How 
can I stand up in my pulpit and make the speech you did?" 

Answers Questions 

"Russia isn't perfect," replied Dr. Davis. "But we, too, have some people 
who occasionally make some mistakes. We have all sorts of restrictions on 
Communists here." 

He was asked about labor camps in Russia and replied: "They are simply places 
to keep criminals." He was asked about Russia's seizure of Estonia, Latvia, and 
Lithuania and replied she was entitled to them. 

"It is true," said Dr. Davi-, "that you can't attack socialism in Russia or Stalin 
personally and say Stalin should be hung. But the average Russian doesn't 
want to. 

"If Russia sends innocent people to concentration camps and is tightening up 
on its civil liberties," he declared, "that is the fault of America- — the terrific cam- 
paign of war talk in the United States." 

Asks More Missionaries 

"It's possible the Americans will come to their senses and realize they've got to 
get along with Russia," he stated. "I don't think we're absolutely bound to have 
Fascism in this country." 

Bishop Lewis O. Hartman of Boston, president of the federation, called for more 
social missionaries in the opening address. 

Bishop Hartman warned against "the blind alley of partisanship" in the federa- 
tion and remarked: 

"The totalitarians — both Fascist and Communist — seek, by stifling freedom of 
the press, assemblage and discussion, and by calling down fire from heaven in the 
form of secret police, to impose the millenium at once upon the ignorant masses of 
mankind." 

There are times, he said, however, when Christians, Fascists, Communists, 
atheists and Republicans might be found supporting "some common program for 
humanity," but that does not mean all should be classified in the same bracket. 

PRO-RUSSIAN STAND OF MINORITY CONDEMNED BY METHODISTS 
THREAT OF RED IMfERALISM IGNORED BY FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

By Frederick Woltman, World-Telegram Slatf Writer 

Kansas City, Dec. 30. — The threats of Russian imperalism, of the revived 
Communist International and of Communist infiltration tactics in America were 
ignored completely by the Methodist Federation of Social Action at its annual 
conference just ended here. 

In a series of eight, lengthy "social action" declarations, the federation, a power- 
ful but unofficial adjunct of the Methodist Church tackled virtually every prob- 
lem of consequence to America and the world today. 

The resolutions contained not one single direct or implied criticism of the roles 
played by the Soviet dictatorship in the international scene or by the Communist 
party in the local scene. Nor was there the slightest hint of a conflict between 
world Communism and the remaining democracies of the world. 

AH Aimed at U. S. 

The resolutions, which will eventually be presented to the Methodist Church, 
itself, for adoption, directed their fire solely at United States policies, either at 
home or abroad. 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 11 

Dodging the question of whether the government has a right not to employ 
Communists who take their orders from Moscow, the conference asked an end to 
the President's recent order for loyalty tests; urged a withdrawal of the Executive 
order authorizing the Attorney General to make public a list of subversive Com- 
munist groups and opposed any law requiring members of the Communist party 
to register as foreign agents. 

It asked an end to the Truman Doctrine for Greece, calling it a "perversion of 
the American democratic tradition." It attacked (without naming it) the 
Marshall Plan for European recovery as "a means of political pressure." 

And it called for an embargo on United States military aid to the Chinese 
Nationalists and for a coalition Chinese government which would include the 
Communists. Although the question of Soviet military aid to the Chinese Com- 
munists was raised from the floor, it was left out of the resolutions. Ignored also 
was the resulting possibility of a Communist, Soviet-dominated China. 

Baruch Plan Ignored 

The Methodist Federation's American-Soviet relations report "appealed to the 
leaders of our government to surrender the methods of war." It opposed com- 
pulsory military training and demanded we stop manufacturing atomic bombs. 

But no mention was made of the official Baruch plan for world atomic control, 
which the Communists oppose; or of Russia's insistance on the veto power and 
her basic opposition to any form of atomic inspection by a world agency — the 
crux of international atomic control. 

Deny They A>re Fronts 

To an outsider, these omissions were hard to understand. The 75-odd dele- 
gates — Methodist clergymen, missionaries and other workers — are sincere believers 
that Christianity has a major responsibility for eradicating the ills of humanity. 
And that it's their job to do something about it. 

While liberal or leftish in their viewpoints, most of them it was evident, have no 
use for Communism. A few delegates were industrialists. 

Indeed, the delegates unanimously and with vigor went on record declaring 
that the federation "proposes the Christianization of society, nothing more or 
less. It 'fronts' neither for Communism nor for capitalism. Its 'ism' is Christi- 
anity." 

Among the active leaders were such distinguished Methodist bishops as Bishop 
Lewis O. Hartman of Boston, retiring president of the federation; Bishop Robert 
N. Brooks of New Orleans, the federation's new Negro president; Bishop W. Earl 
Ledden, Syracuse; Bishop Edward Kelly and Bishop Charles Brashares, Iowa 
City, Iowa. Although not present, Bishop Francis J. McConnell, Portland, 
Oreg., and Bishop Louis T. Watkins, Louisville, were elected vice presidents. 

One possible explanation for the glaring omission of Communism and the 
Soviet Union as a factor in today's world crisis may be the fact that the cards 
were stacked against the delegates. 

On the controversial issues of Russia, European recovery, China and civil 
liberties in America, they heard only one side of the story. 

Long Record of Sympathy 

Thus, the keynote speaker on civil liberties who masterminded that resolution 
was Dr. Harry F. Ward. Dr. Ward has worked closely with the Communist 
party and its leaders for many years. He has written for the party's official organ, 
the Daily Worker, praising Marxism. 

In 1940 Dr. Ward resigned as chairman of the American Civil Liberties Union, 
protesting its membership referendum banning Communists from the ACLU's 
board of directors. He is now co-chairman of the Civil Rights Congress, the 
legal defense arm of the Communist party. His sympathy with the Communists 
is widely known. 

His keynote address might have come straight out of the Daily Worker. 

In it, Dr. Ward declared: "All departments of the government, from the Presi- 
dent down, are now engaged in destroying the Constitution." He proposed that 
the loyalty standards for federal employees be set by the United Public Workers 
(CIO), which is almost completely under Communist control. 

His cospeaker was Carl Marzani, recently sentenced by a federal jury to a year 
in prison for concealing his Communist partv membership in order to retain a'kev 
post in the OSS and later the State Department. 



12 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

Denying he was a Communist party member, Mr Marzani told the delegates, 
nevertheless, that he was "very sympathetic to it." 

"I did not join the Communist party," he said, "for the simple reason that I 
could not have kept my job as instructor at New York University." 

No Critics Heard 

The Soviet-American expert was Dr. Jerome Davis, long a fervent and uncom- 
promising apologist for the Soviet Union. No critic of Russia spoke. 

Mainspring of the convention was Dr. Jack McMichael, the federation's 
executive secretary. Dr. McMichael denied a statement, published by this re- 
porter and elsewhere, that he was once a member of the Young Communist 
League. For years he has supported a succession of Communist fronts, including 
the Civil Rights Congress, American Peace Mobilization (vice chairman) and 
American Youth Congress (chairman), all of which are on Attorney General Tom 
Clark's list of subversive Communist organizations. 

Shortly before the conference adjourned yesterday, one of its leaders and a 
strong anti-Communist, the Rev. Leland C. Spurrier, Celina, Tex., remarked 
to this reporter: 

"There is a death struggle going on in the world today between Communism 
and Democracy." 

Asked why that was never once mentioned before this Methodist gathering, 
Dr. Spurrier looked genuinely startled. 

"Well," he replied, "we first want to make sure that democracy works." 



AFFRONT TO A CHURCH 

An Editorial 

The great Methodist Church of this country with its 11,000,000 patriotic 
members, has been subjected to a notable indignity over the week end. Its 
enormous prestige has been used by an unofficial adjunct of the church, the so- 
called Methodist Federation for Social Action, as a national sounding board for 
Communists and fellow travelers to expound the gospel of the party line. 

This has occurred in a Kansas City conference of the federation. Accounts of 
the meeting have been given to the World-Telegram by Frederick Woltman, a 
reporter who has won the Pulitzer Prize for competency in ferretine; out the efforts 
of fellow travelers to operate in the guise of unreproachable American organiza- 
tions. 

We are sure that Methodists, in general, are quite as shocked as we are to read 
Mr. Woltman's disclosures of what went on at that conference, representing only a 
small minority of the church. Appealing in the name of religion and using the 
stories of Mary and Jesus, the Sermon on the Mount and the Good Samaritan, 
speakers made strong attacks on America's foreign policies while praising those of 
the Soviet Union. 

One speaker saw in the Christmas story "not the improvement of the present 
social order but its revolutionary abolition and replacement anew." And 
another forecast "an emerging new order pushing its way up through blood, tears 
and strife." There was even defense of Russian concentration camps — on the 
ground, of all things, that "war talk in America" was forcing the Soviets "to 
tighten up on civil liberties." 

We can recall no other instance of so flagrant abuse and misuse of the name of a 
great church. None but insidious, unprincipled leftists would have such unsur- 
passed gall. But there is reassurance in the fact that the "social action" program 
formulated at Kansas City is to go before the Methodist Church as a whole. 
And we are confident that the rank and file of clergy and laymen, once they have 
learned the facts, will lose no time in disavowing this curious offshoot. To that 
end, we commend the dispatches of Mr. Woltman for laying bare the facts. 

LOYAL METHODISTS CONDEMN 

An Editorial 

Distinguished Methodist preachers and leaders have been quick to condemn 
the blatantly pro-Communist rantings and resolutions of the Methodist Federa- 
tion of Social Action at Kansas City. 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 13 

But prompt and firm as their repudiation has been, these Methodist leaders 
voice it with a dignity and a proper regard for freedom of speech that reflects 
hiffh credit on themselves and their great church. , . 

After all even churches have their loud-speaking, trouble-making minorities. 
No one is going to lose respect for 11,000,000 Methodists just because a mere 
unofficial group of 5,000, under cover of the Methodist name, choose grotesquely 
to mix Christianity with pro-Communism and make a conspicuously disloyal 

snectacle of themselves. , , „ r , , 

This group's doings and declarations at Kansas City, as reported by World- 
Telegram staff writer, Frederick Woltman, not only followed the Communist 
partv line in dutifullv denouncing each and every American policy distasteful to 
Moscow, but also showed plain signs of astute Commie tactics and training. Itie 
final resolutions, for example, were contrived to be completely Communist 
without even mentioning the word. 

All such Commie borings into churches should be promptly made known to 
both the churches and the public. The mask of religion is not only the most 
hypocritical but also one of the most dangerous of all the disguises behind which 
the Commies plan and plot. . . . , * .■ u r 

Methodist leaders need not fear this Federation of Social Action has so far 
don« their church serious harm. But they should continue emphatically to repu- 
diate its pro-Communist declarations now. They should also prepare at their 
next general conference, to detach it definitely and officially from the Methodist 
Church and deny it the protection and prestige of that name. 

MILLER LETTER 

Here are the claims and charges in the letter of Clyde R. Miller, followed by a 
statement of the facts in each case: 

1. Mr. Miller called upon the trustees of Columbia University to rescind the 
1947 Pulitzer Prize awarded Mr. Woltman. He based his request on Mr. Wolt- 
man 's coverage of the Kansas City convention. 

The Facts^ The Kansas City meeting occurred more than a year after the 
prize-winnins articles appeared (throughout 1946). The former could have no 
possible bearing on the latter. Mr. Miller was merely using Columbia University 
as a springboard for publicity. His request was promptly rejected by Dean Carl W. 
Ackerman of Columbia's School of Journalism. Such a step, the dean notified 
him, "would be incompatible with our academic heritage." 

2. In his letter Mr. Miller claimed to be acting "as a faculty member of Colum- 
bia's Teachers College and as a lifelong Methodist," interested primarily in the 
good name of Columbia University. 

The Facts: Many who saw or "heard of his letter got the mistaken impression 
that the complaint originated at Teachers College, obviously an unbiased source. 
This is completely false. Mr. Miller has not taught at Teachers College since 
before Pearl Harbor. He is on lea ve-of -absence status. He was actually acting as 
a national executive committee member of the MFSA and co-chairman of its New 
York branch, and had been a delegate, scheduled speaker and spirited leader in the 
Kansas City convention. Not a single one of these connections was even hinted 
at in the Miller letter. Instead, the prestige of Teachers College was used to 
conceal the self-serving nature of Mr. Miller's gesture. 

3. In his letter, Mr. Miller used such general expressions as "deliberate distor- 
tion of facts," "malicious propaganda," "misleading." "deliberately false," 
"hypocritical," "unsurpassed gall," "Woltman falsehoods," "unscrupulous 
journalism" and "bear false witness" . . . 

The Facts: Except for citing two headlines and one editorial, the Miller letter 
gives no specific proof to justify his characterizations. The headlines and edi- 
torial mentioned are cited in the MFSA's Report and will be taken up in that 
connection. 

Only a small fraction of the three Woltman articles are challenged in the 
federation's own report, most of which dealt with headlines, which are of necessity 
generalizations, and with one editorial. The report generally ignored the specific, 
documented material on which the headlines were based. Out of a total of 622 
lines of text, the MFSA's purported point-by-point analysis questioned but 56 
lines of the Woltman articles. This is 11 percent of the total wordage. Actually, 
91 percent of the printed Woltman text is not even questioned by the MFSA. 
In the final article, summarizing the events at Kansas City, the report raised 
objections involving only eight lines out of 213 written by Mr. Woltman. 

'.17252°— 52 2 



14 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

4. The Miller letter sought to link Scripps-Howard to a far-fetched plot "to 
make 'Communist' an evil word" and "to create an hysterical fear of anything 
which they choose to label 'Communist.' " 

The Facts: Here the issue is not the use of the word "Communist" but the 
misuse of it. A careful reading of the text of the Woltman articles will show the 
word, as used, was applied correctly. Mr. Miller's hypersensitivity over the word 
"Communist" may arise from the fact that for ten years at least he has been an 
active apologist for both the Communist party and Gommunist front organiza- 
tions. 

In March, 1941, Mr. Miller signed a statement defending the Communist party. 
This was at the very peak of the Communist party's campaign to inspire defense 
plant strikes, to discredit President Roosevelt as a "warmonger" and "Wall 
Street imperialist" and to sabotage lend lease, selective service, aid-to-Britain and 
all other parts of the nation's defense program. He reached the astonishing con- 
clusion that the Communist party "upholds the democratic achievement of the 
American people . . ." Dr. Miller's involvements in Communist front enter- 
prises are documented further in his biography at the end of this report. They 
extend right down to the present. 

5. Referring to the Scripps-Howard articles, he asserted that "Today's cam- 
paign is obviously to condition the American people for war." 

The Facts: This is Mr. Miller's own conclusion, for which he offers no evidence. 
It is the argument now being raised by the Communists and their mouthpiece, the 
Daily Worker, against President Truman, Gen. Marshall, Gen. Eisenhower, 
Bernard Baruch, Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, the top leadership of the American 
Federation of Labor and the Congress of Industrial Organizations and anyone 
else who does not accept their program. 

The Federation's "Report on Kansas City Meeting" 

Following is a point-by-point discussion of the charges made in the report, 
which was prepared in the office of the MFSA: 

1. The report charged "there is clear evidence" that Mr. Woltman was sent to 
Kansas City "with a predetermined bias against the federation and a precon- 
ceived idea of how the meeting should be reported." As "evidence," it quoted 
this excerpt from Woltman 's advance story on the convention with its own 
emphasis : 

"The Soviet dictatorship will be extolled, America's foreign policy will be 
castigated, Yugoslavia's Communist dictatorship will be gently white- 
washed * * *." 

The Facts: By giving only part of the sentence and omitting a conditional 
clause, the authors of the report distorted its meaning. The actual quote follows: 

"Most of the federation's rank and file members and officials are non-Com- 
munists. Many are pacifists. Yet, if the federation and its scheduled speakers 
run true to form, the Soviet dictatorship will be extolled, America's entire foreign 
policy will be castigated, Yugoslavia's Communist dictator Tito will be gently 
whitewashed and Chiang Kai-shek will be denounced." 

The decision to cover the Kansas City convention was based on the advance list 
of key speakers, namely Messrs. Ward, Davis, Marzani, Fen Yu-hsiang and 
McMichael, and on a study of their background and that of the federation which 
indicated the Communist point of view on vital issues of the day would prevail. 
A reading of Mr. Woltman's first article, published on Dec. 26, before the con- 
vention, shows his prediction was thoroughly justified by the documentation 
cited therein. 

2. As a general refutation to the Scripps-Howard articles, the report cited the 
federation's respectable origin and listed, as past and present officers, estimable 
figures in Methodism. 

The Facts: The articles nowhere attempted to dispute this state of facts. On 
the contrary, in his Dec. 30 article, Mr. Woltman stated that the delegates "are 
sincere believers that Christianity has a major responsibility for eradicating the 
ills of humanity"; and that, "while liberal or leftish in their viewpoints, most of 
them, it was evident, have no use for Communism." 

At the same time, the articles pointed out that the MFSA had for several dec- 
ades been dominated by Dr. Ward and in recent years by M \ McMichael, the 
former's successor, and that both were key speakers in the Kansas City sessions. 
Mr. McMichael's record will be discussed later. The significance of Dr. Ward's 
influence on the federation may be gathered from the following statement he made 
on May 21, 1946, in a radio forum with William Z. Foster, secretary of the Com- 
munist party: 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 15 

"Mr. Foster and I, in different approaches, have shown that both in theory and 
practice Communism is thoroughly democratic. We have shown that the Soviet 
Union has a highly democratic regime, and that its postwar foreign policy makes 
for democracy and peace." , „,,.„, 

More recently, on Dec. 11, 1947, Dr. Ward told an audience at Public School 3, 
Queens, N. Y.,*that he had sat in on policy-making sessions of the Communist 
Party. ' This information is supplied by Dr. L. M. Birkhead, national director 
of the Friends of Democracy, who debated him. 

3. The report charged falsification in a headline, "MINORITY SINGS RED 
HYMNS," on the grounds that all the hymns sung in Kansas City were from the 
Methodist Hymnal. 

The Facts: This headline ran on one day, in World-Telegram alone. It was 
not the main headline but appeared above the carry-over part of the text, con- 
tinued from Page One. The copyreader was writing figuratively, using the 
Webster Dictionary definition of a "hymn" as a "song of praise or adoration." 
The text nowhere suggested that the delegates sang other than Methodist hymns. 
The use of "hymn" in this connection was unfortunate, but it has been magnified 
out of all proportion in the light of the vast accumulation of facts about the 
Kansas City convention. 

4. The report took exception to the editorial published on Dec. 30, 1947, 
particularly to its statement that the MFSA's 5000 members "choose grotesquely 
to mix Christianity with pro-Communism, and make a conspicuously disloyal 
spectacle of themselves." The only mention of Communism, according to the 
report, said: "It (the MFSA) 'fronts' for neither Communism nor capitalism. 
Its 'ism' is Christianitv." 

The Facts: The Dec. 30 editorial is reprinted above. The Dec. 29 and 30 
dispatches by Mr. Woltman show conclusively that, whatever their motives or 
professions of political faith, the delegates to Kansas City adopted a social action 
program which gave aid and comfort to the Communist party and the Soviet 
Foreign Office on vital issues of the day. There was no dissenting or opposing 
viewpoint advanced. In the absence of a minority report, the editorial writer 
could only accept the Kansas City results as representing the entire membership. 

5. The report challenged the headline and lead of Woltman's Dec. 26 article, 
emphasizing it as follows: 

"METHODIST MINORITY GIVES REDS SOUNDING BOARD FOR PARTY LINE" 

"The prestige of the Methodist Church will be used ... to furnish a national 
sounding board for Communists and Fellow-Travelers to expound the gospel of the 
Communist line." 

As a refutation, the report declared: a. "Not one Communist at any time" 
helped plan the convention, b. Not a single speech or resolution "praises Com- 
munism in the slightest degree." c. There were other speakers who were clearly 
non-Communists and worship services were ignored. 

The Facts: Reference to the Woltman articles will show that none of them said 
or implied that Communists had a hand in planning the conference, or that 
Communism was indorsed as such. The individuals referred to as Communists 
or fellow-travelers were named specifically in the Dec. 26 article, which gave the 
reasons for including them in those categories. One of them, Carl Marzani, was a 
secret member of the Communist party, a federal jury decided. The Dec. 29 and 
30 articles show how they were given a sounding board. 

The articles nowhere implied that all the speakers or a majority of them were 
Communists or party liners. On the contrary, the Dec. 26 article pointed out 
that the program "includes bishops, ministers, church workers and other speakers 
with no leftist political record." Obviously, there were many issues, such as 
religion, labor, human rights and agriculture, which involved no question of 
Communism. The Dec. 30 article stated that Kermit Eby, key speaker on labor, 
was a "chief foe of the Communists in the CIO." 

But it was on the controversial issues, which do involve a conflict with Com- 
munism or USSR policy, that the sounding board was supplied to the pro- 
Communist viewpoint. On the problems of the Far East, the Marshall Plan, 
Soviet imperialism, the infiltration tactics of the Communists in the United 
States, there were no speakers for the opposing, or middle-of-the-road or liberal 
points of view. 

6. The report attacked as "completely false" this quote from the Dec. 26 
Woltman article: "The Methodist Federation for Social Action for years has 
closely followed the Communist line on many issues." 



1G REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

The Facts: "On many issues" does not mean "on all issues." Nor does it 
necessarily mean "on most issues." Yet the report is able to cite but one occa- 
sion — in 1939 — -when the federation deviated from the party line. That was its 
call for an embargo on Russia after the USSR attacked Finland. 

The World-Telegram has made a thorough study of the Social Questions 
Bulletin, the federation's official organ, since 1935. It revealed a continuous 
series of instances in which the MFSA took a stand strictly in accord with that 
of the Communist party. 

Even in the case cited by the report, a resolution for an embargo on Russia, 
there was no criticism whatsoever of the Soviet attack on Finland. On the con- 
trary, the resolution, published in the December, 1939, Bulletin, was accompanied 
by a defense of the USSR initialed by Dr. Harry F. Ward. Three months later, 
the Bulletin criticized aid to Finland. 

Here are a few highlights of the federation's party line record: 

The MFSA officially affiliated with the American League Against War and 
Fascism and the American League for Peace and Democracy. The Bulletin 
carried plugs for the American Peace Mobilization, created by the Communist 
party to undermine President Roosevelt's defense program and foreign policy of 
aid-to-the-Allies during the period of the Hitler-Stalin Non-Aggression Pact. In 
April, 1946, it officially sponsored the conference which set up the National Com- 
mittee to Win-the-Peace, successor to the APM. All of these organizations were 
included last December in the Department of Justice list of subversive and 
Communist groups. The May, 1941, Bulletin castigated the Rapp-Coudert 
Legislative Inquiry Into Communists operating under cover in New York City's 
schools. 

Over the years the Bulletin carried numerous articles eulogizing the Soviet 
system, most of them by Dr. Ward. The November, 1940, Bulletin fell right in 
behind the Nazi peace offensive which Moscow and the Communist party were 
pushing. It called for "a conference of all interested nations to arrange a demo- 
cratic peace," — in other words, a democratic peace with the Nazis! There were 
scores of such cases in the files of the World-Telegram. 

7. The report quoted Woltman's Dec. 26 article: "One beneficiary of this 
religious sounding board is to be Carl Marzani, the Communists' own pet martyr." 
In reply, it declared: "Mr. Marzani was not an invited speaker, but came as one 
of the many resource people . . ." 

The Facts: The MFAS's [sic] own program, mimeographed and distributed 
weeks before the Kansas City meeting, read as follows: 

"commissions 

"L. The Christian Church and Civil Liberties . . . 

Resource Leaders: . . . Carl Marzani, victim of the present government 
loyalty purge." 

At the convention itself, Marzani was finally invited to address the entire 
assemblage of delegates on the grounds that his message was so important. Thus, 
the convention second main speaker on civil liberties and the Communists (Dr. 
Ward being the first) was a convicted perjurer and a Communist. 

8. The report charged that the press failed to report that "a special invitation 
to speak" had been sent Rep. Walter Judd, strong supporter of Chiang Kai-shek 
and severe critic of Marshal Feng. 

The Facts: Rep. Judd was not invited to speak prior to the convention. The 
invitation was sent during the Kansas City sessions, as a last-minute gesture, with 
little likelihood that he could accept. Any imputation that the invitation was a 
move to balance the speakers' list is false. It came up over an entirely different 
issue. 

9. The report charged that the press failed to report that "Mr. Frederick 
Woltman himself was unanimously invited ... to speak." 

The Facts: This also was a last-minute gesture, made on the day of adjourn- 
ment. Mr. Woltman explained that, as a newspaperman, it was not his function 
to address the convention and thanked the delegates for the courtesy. 

10. The report denied flatly Mr. Woltman's statements that the Rev. Jack 
McMichael was a "former youth leader in the Young Communist League" and 
"was once a member" of it. Declared the report: "Mr. McMichael was never a 
member of the Young Communist League and never attended one of its meetings." 

The Facts: To give him his say, Mr. Woltman's Dec. 30 article carried Mr. 
McMichael's denial. At the same time the World-Telegram knows individuals 
who were members of the American Youth Congress and the Young Communist 
League when Mr. McMichael was a member of both and who are willing to say so. 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 17 

Over the past eight years at least, Mr. McMichael has fronted for the Com- 
munists in numerous front enterprises; his record runs down to date. Part of it 
is set forth in a biography at the end of this pamphlet. _ 

Mr. McMichael was active in the following organizations characterized as 
subversive and Communist by the Department of Justice last December: 

American Youth Congress, president from July 6, 1939, until it expired late in 
1941. 

American Peace Mobilization; one of its seven vice chairmen. 

National Federation for Constitutional Liberties, set up as a rival to the 
American Civil Liberties Union after the latter by membership referendum 
barred Communist party members from its board of directors; member of its 
provisional committee. 

Civil Rights Congress, current legal defense arm of the Communist party; a 
sponsor. 

National Committee to Win-the-Peace ; committee member. 

United May Day Committee; 1947 sponsor. 

11. The report charged that "Mr. McMichael told the delegates that Mr. 
Woltman had described him in a recent article as a former leader of the Young 
Communist League. This Mr. Woltman promptly and unequivocally denied." 

The Facts: This is an inaccurate version of what occurred. What Mr. Mc- 
Michael actually told the delegates was that Mr. Woltman had described him as 
"former chairman of the Young Communist League." That characterization 
had been carried by a Kansas City paper and a national press service, not in any 
of the Woltman articles. Knowing it to be incorrect, Mr. Woltman made a 
prompt denial. 

12. The report quoted the Dies Committee in an attempt to prove tha,t the 
American Youth Congress, of which Mr. McMichael was chairman from 1939 to 
its demise in 1941, was not Communist-controlled. In a report to Congress in 
January, 1940, according to the MFSA report, the House Un-American Activities 
Committee found the American Youth Congress to consist of "the largest possible 
number of organizations of American young people, the vast majority of 
whom have no connection with Communism, Nazism or any movement of that 
sort . . ." 

The Facts: The report gave only half of the quotation. It omitted the last 
half in which the Dies Committee declared: "The Young Communist League, as 
well as certain other organizations in which Communists have played an important 
part" have "exerted an influence in the American Youth Congress out of all 
proportion to its size." 

It is inconceivable that the report's authors are unaware of the Dies Com- 
mittee's subsequent report to Congress, 1944, page 525: 

"For a period of seven years, from 1934 to 1941 — the American Youth Congress 
was one of the most influential front organizations ever set up by the Communists 
in this country ... In the end ... it was all but universally recognized that 
the Communists were in complete control." 

13. The report challenged as completely untrue the lead paragraph of Mr. 
Woltman's Dec. 29 article. That paragraph stated that the spirit of Christmas 
and the Sermon on the Mount were invoked at Kansas City to justifv "an all-out 
attack on America's foreign policies and a glowing defense of the Soviet Union in 
both her foreign and domestic affairs." 

The Facts : The only specific refutation made was : a. that "no one had any word 
of praise" for the USSR; and b. the Rev. McMichael, in his opening address, 
declared that the Soviet Union had "committed sins" and is "by no means 
perfect," — a view expressed also by Dr. Jerome Davis, the keynote speaker on 
Soviet-American relations. 

The two speakers did put themselves on record as conceding that the Soviet 
system was not yet perfect. Its most ardent admirer could scarcely do less. 
To set the record straight, we are including excerpts of their speeches which for 
lack of space could not be used in Mr. Woltman's dispatches of Dec. 29 and 30. 
Vv hether they bear out the lead objected to may be judged by the reader. 

Mr. McMichael on Dec. 27 said, among other things: 

"Let the Christmas spirit be a manifesto on behalf of the poor ... It would 
mean not the improvement of the social order but its revolutionary abolition and 
replacement anew and end the conflict between the classes. The authors of the 
Christmas story ask that there be an end to all imperialism, etc. . . . 

"Let us apply the Christmas story and song of Mary. Suppose the writers of 
American foreign policy did that, come weal, come woe, suppose those who are 
dedicated to the rich and privileged, the princes on their thrones in Greece the 



18 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

grafting, rich exploiters in China, suppose they defended the poor and the op- 
pressed instead . . . 

"The civil war in China ... is in decisive measure due to our U. S. foreign 
policy. Nor is Moscow responsible ... In Greece and China the Communists 
are not, by far, a majority of the opponents. 

"Our foreign policy is clothed in the most humanitarian and democratic garb. 
Most people around the world refuse to be fooled. Practically the only ones 
fooled are we Americans . . . billions across the earth see the result of our 
government's foreign policy. And we still profess to be disciples of the Christmas 
spirit . . . 

"The Christmas myth is very safe, of course. The same is true of our policy 
toward colonial peoples. . . . Drastic steps are needed in behalf of the poor. 
Yet, in case after case, we stood by the colonial powers . . . "There is disturb- 
ing evidence about the European Recovery Program. Its architects are not in- 
terested in the transformation of society, but in the ma'ntenance of the prewar 
society ... I doubt if we, who take seriously the Christmas story, can believe 
any such program (the Marshall Plan) is adequate for the common people today. 
It is all tied up with the Christmas story. Any approach to the Marshall Plan 
that is calculated toward a tragic, cold war and splitting the East from the West 
in Europe will be harmful to the East and disastrous to the West . . ." 

"The Christmas story is to be true to Jesus . . ." U. S. foreign policy "is 
Pharisaic, self-righteous, double-standard, with the Soviet Union pictured as the 
devil incarnate and Washington as the source of all good . . ." This "is hardly 
in harmony with one who gets his roots from the song of the poor, the Christmas 
•story, the story of Mary . . ." 

Our government "is taken over by people who cannot be too concerned about 
the. poor — the businessmen and military men." 

The Federal Council of Churches of Christ in America is "taking increasingly 
the attitude of the Pharisee and decreasingly recognizing the need for a funda- 
mental change in our foreign policy." 

Dr. Davis, the only speaker, according to the MFSA report, who "actually 
dealt with the Soviet Union," said in part: 

The question of American-Soviet relations "is the greatest moral and spiritual 
problem facing the American people." 

"The struggle is not between Communism and democracy. This is a spurious 
and false conception. The struggle is between reaction, the old order, the control 
of property and an emerging new order pushing its way up from blood and tears 
and strife. And unfortunately the forces of the United States are lined up with 
the forces of reaction. The problem is how we can be the good Samaritan to 
Russia . . ." 

Here Dr. Davis told of the evil and corruption of Russia under the Czar, then 
painted a glowing picture of the Soviet Union. 

"I'm not here to say that there aren't evils in Russia. The Soviets are people 
like us. And you know we have plenty of evils in the United States . . . 

"We must not judge Russia on the basis of hypocrisy. . . . Look at the 
peace record of Russia as against that of the United States. The United States 
invaded Russia after World War I. . . . Between the two wars, Soviet Russia 
had the best peace record of any nation in the world. . . . 

"We must deal with Russia on the basis of the Prophets of the Old Testament, 
the Sermon on the Mount, not on the basis of American profits. . . . Russia 
smashed cartels; we promoted them." 

In his speech, Dr. Davis made no mention of Russia's slave labor camps, the 
totalitarianism of the regime, suppression of free speech, her insistence on the veto 
power in the U. N., her turn-down of the Baruch atomic control plan or her ex- 
panding imperialism. 

His talk brought several skeptical questions from the floor. One delegate said: 
"The crowd in control in Russia seems to me to be as totalitarian as Hitler. How 
can I stand in my pulpit and make the speech you did? I am referring to the 
attitude of Molotov, the thought police and all that . . ." Dr. Davis replied: 

"Russia isn't perfect. We too have people who occasionally make mistakes. 
There are a great many restrictions on the Communists here . . . Because of 
the terrific campaign in the United States, the warlike talk, Russia is tightening 
up. My surprise is that Russia has so few restrictions." 

Another skeptical delegate asked: "What shall we tell our parishioners about 
Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania?" He replied: 

"Just follow the road Jesus laid out. I think Russia is entitled to Latvia, 
Lithuania, and Estonia . . . It's possible Americans will come to their senses 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 19 

and realize they've got to pet along with Russia. I don't think we're absolutely 
bound to have Fascism in this country." 

A third delegate asked: "Would you say there is as much freedom of speech in 
America as in Russia?" Dr. Davis answered: 

"We have some good things they have and vice versa. They have racial equal- 
ity ... Of course, in Russia you can't attack Socialism, or Stalin personally, or 
say that Stalin should be hung. But the average Russian doesn't want to." 

The fourth delegate said: "What about slave labor camps in Russia?" Dr. 
Davis replied: 

"First we should ask, 'What is a concentration camp?' It is simply a place 
where vou keep criminals. We call them prisons in this country. Don't get 
excited' about concentration camps. They're simply places where criminals are 
sent . . . 

"No doubt there are some so-called innocent people in concentration camps in 
Russia. But there are innocent people sent to jail here . . . 

"The more our present policy exists, the more innocent people will be sent to 
concentration camps in Russia." 

1-1. Concerning the resolutions — namely, the social action program — adopted 
by the convention, the reports asserted: "There was no wholesale flaying of our 
government in the resolutions." 

The Facts: The Woltman articles neither said nor implied that the resolutions 
flayed the United States government. It was the speakers who did. Mr. Wolt- 
man's final article, of Dec. 30, dealt with the resolutions. Its first three paragraphs, 
which summed them up, were nowhere questioned or challenged in the entire 
report of the MFSA. Indeed, the report raised objections to but eight lines of the 
text out of the 213 altogether. 

What Mr. Woltman actually wrote about the program adopted in Kansas City 
and what the MFSA itself did not deny, folio— s: 

"The threats of Russian imperialism, of the revived Communist International 
and of Communist infiltration tactics in America were ignored completely by the 
Methodist Federation for Social Action at its annual conference just ended here. 

"In a series of eight lengthy 'social action' declarations, the fedpration . . . 
tackled virtually every problem of consequence to America and the world today. 

"The resolutions contained not one single direct or implied criticism of the roles 
played by the Soviet dictatorship in the international scene or by the Communist 
party in the local scene. Nor was there the slightest hint of a conflict between 
world Communism and the remaining democracies of the world." 

An analysis of the resolutions shews conclusively a pattern which conforms 
closely to the Communistdine on these issues: Marshall Plan, Yugoslavia, Greece, 
Turkey, Great Britain, Korea, American colonial policy, China, American-Soviet 
relations and civil liberties and the Communist party in the United States. The 
Worla-Telegram is in possession of ample corroborating material. 

15. The report challenged as incorrect this statement in the Dec. 29 article: 
"What the meeting's planners had in mind . . . was evident from their litera- 
ture display. It contained many books and pamphlets on the Soviet, but not 
one by a critic." 

The Facts: Publications on the Soviet Union and related subjects had the 
largest and most conspicuous spot on the literature table. There was not a single 
piece of literature by a critic of the Soviet or Communist point of view, such, 
for instance, as "I Want To Be Like Stalin," by Dr. George Counts of Teachers 
College, Columbia University; "I Chose Freedom," by Kravchenko or "Forced 
Labor in Soviet Russia," by David Dallin. 

On the contrary, the following predominated: 

Publications by the National Council of American-Soviet Friendship, foremost 
pro-Soviet propaganda agency in America, including a bibliography on the 
USSR. 

"Soviet Democracy," by Dr. Harry F. Ward. 

"Behind Soviet Power," by Dr. Jerome Davis. 

"Soviet Russia Since the War," by the Dean of Canterbury. 

Soviet Russia Today, monthly pro-Soviet propaganda magazine. 

Literature from the Committee for a Democratic Far Eastern Policy, a Com- 
munist front which promotes Soviet foreign policy in the Far East. 

"The Church and the Chinese Communists," by Dr. James C. Endicott, Jr. 
of Toronto, Canada, who recently gave up his missionary post to join the Chinese 
Communists. 

16. The report challenged a sentence in Mr. Woltman's Dec. 30 dispatch to the 
effect that the convention dodged "the question of whether the government has a 



20 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

right not to employ Communists who take their orders from Moscow." It 
declared: 

"On the contrary, it was stated at the meeting, with no disagreement, that 
Americans who are agents of any foreign governments should be prosecuted for 
not registering as foreign agents . . ." 

The Facts: During the discussion of the civil liberties resolution, which was 
steered throughout by Dr. Harry F. Ward, a delegate (the Rev. Leland C. Spurrier 
of Celina, Tex.), arose and asked why the convention should not go on record 
naming the Communists as agents of a foreign government. Dr. Ward quickly 
brushed him aside with an offhand remark that it was up to the couits to decide 
that question. That ended the discussion. There was no such recommendation 
in the resolution. On the contrary, the resolution itself expressed opposition to 
the principle of "requiring members of any political party" to register as foreign 
agents. 

In contrast to the convention's failure to take a stand on Communists as foreign 
agents, the delegates unanimously resolved to "request the Department of Justice 
to conduct an investigation to determine whether or not agents of a foreign power, 
namely the Vatican State, are violating the Foreign Agents' Registration Act." 
This resolution was introduced by Clyde R. Miller. 

17. The report reiterated its charge that Mr. Woltman falsely reported the 
MFSA was providing Communists and fellow travelers with a sounding board 
for the Communist line. 

The Facts: The two main speeches on civil liberties were not a discussion of 
civil liberties but a plea for the Communists by two of their most ardent advocates, 
Dr. Ward and Carl Marzani. There was no spokesman for the liberal point of 
view — that of the American Civil Liberties Union or the Workers Defense League, 
of which Bishop Francis J. McConncll, a vice president of MFSA, is an official. 
Dr. Ward was introduced as honorary national chairman of the Civil Rights 
Congress. But the delegates were not told that the CRC is the current legal 
defense arm of the Communist party. 

Dr. Ward made the startling proposal that the government let the United Public 
Workers Union (CIO) determine the loyalty of all federal employees. This would 
be equivalent to handing the problem over to the Communist party. For the 
UPW is completely Communist dominated. CIO President Philip Murray recog- 
nized this when he selected Abram Flaxer, its president, to represent the pro- 
Communist viewpoint in the 1946 CIO convention. 

Mr. Marzani also presented the Communist party's viewpoint on civil liberties. 
He explained his conviction — for concealing his party membership while a State 
Department employee — thus: "Trial by jury represents a minimum of justice." 

The resolutions called for the abolition of the House Committee on Un-American 
Activities; asked the President to cancel loyalty tests as now constituted; called 
on the President to withdraw his order authorizing the Attorney General to publish 
lists of Communist, Nazi, Fascist, subversive organizations. In neither the 
speeches nor the resolutions was the slightest recognition given to the problems of 
the Communists in American life, their infiltration into labor and other organiza- 
tions and their primary loyalty to a totalitarian, anti-democratic concept. 

18. The report charged that "the press has seemed to try to convey the impres- 
sion that the MFSA claims to speak for the Methodist Church." 

The Facts: The Woltman articles and editorials stressed the unofficial, minority 
nature of the MFSA. The fact remains, however, that MFSA's headquarters is 
that of the Methodist Church, 150 Fifth Ave., New York City, and its switch- 
board is the same. Moreover, the report boasts that the 1944 General Conference 
of the Methodist Church put its official blessing on the federation. 

19. Ending with a plea for "moral support" from the 1948 General Conference 
of the Methodist Church, the report charged the World-Telegram and Scripps- 
Howard with interfering in the affairs of the Methodist Church. It declared: 

"The General Conference, we are sure, will not accept this outside interference 
in its affairs. . . . The Methodist Church does not take orders from outsiders. 
It will not be intimidated." 

The Facts: No question of religion or church organization was raised in any 
of the articles or editorials. 

Shortly after his return from Kansas City, Mr. Woltman received a letter from 
Dr. Charles E. Schofield, editor of the Methodist World, a delegate to the Kansas 
City meeting and chairman of its Commission on Soviet-American Relations. 
It read, in part: 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 21 

The Methodist Church 

Editorial Division — Board of Education 

Nashville 2, Tenn. 
Adult Publications 
Charles E. Schofield, Editor 

Jan. 5, 1948. 
Mr. Frederick Woltman, 

New York World-Telegram, New York City, N. Y. 

Dear Mr. Woltman: I read with very careful attention the report of the 
Kansas City meeting which you put on the wire at the close of the session. It 
seems to me that you have done a very fair job in reporting the closing day's 
session and interpreting the whole meeting. ... I just wanted you to know 
that I appreciate your kind of reporting. With best wishes for the New Year, 
I am 

Cordially yours, 

Charles E. Schofield 

At the time of the appearance of the Woltman articles, Methodist 
preachers and leaders in New York were polled by the New York 
World-Telegram concerning the Kansas City meeting of the Methodist 
Federation for Social Action. The results of that poll will be found 
in the December 30, 1947, issue of the New York World-Telegram, 
at pages 1 and 20. Dr. Arthur B. Moss, pastor of the John Street 
Methodist Church, the oldest Methodist Church in America, sum- 
marized the feelings of most of the followers of John Wesley as follows: 

The Methodist Federation for Social Action is an entirely un-official group in 
the Methodist Church. Its membership is less than 5,000 in a denomination 
that numbers well over 8 million. Despite its tiny status, however, it is highly 
articulate and knows how to make the best use of publicity. Naturally it speaks 
only for itself. The attitude of the Church as a whole will be determined at the 
next general conference in Boston in May. 

Bishop G. Bromley Oxuam, of the New York area of the Methodist 
Church said: 

I resigned the Vice-Presidency of the organization because I thought their 
attacks on Mr. Dulles [John Foster Dulles] unconscionable and un-Christian. 
I hold Mr. Dulles in very high esteem and think him one of the ablest statesmen 
active today. The Federation never tried to get in touch with him personally to 
hear his side of the story when he opposed the Soviet program. 

During the last year or so the Federation has departed from its ancient reputa- 
tion for accuracy in issuing reports and studies and apparently is going down the 
pro-Communist line . . . 

Rev. Alpheus C. Robbins, pastor of the Calvary Methodist Church 
in the Bronx said: 

I deplore the fact it uses the name Methodist when it doesn't represent the 
church as a whole at all. It is a small group, boring from within, in the typical 
pro-Communist manner. 

It's a shame they use the Christmas story and the time of the birth of Christ 
to support the Soviet way of life when we know that the Soviets do not recognize 
Christianity. 

This group is wholly unofficial and it is no more representative of the Methodist 
Church than a group of subway riders picked at random would be. 

Rev. Charles S. Geiger, pastor of the Union Methodist Church in 
Brooklyn says: 

I might agree with some criticism of the way we have handled things, and we 
have made some mistakes, but I certainly would not go along with the hot-head 
element in its all-out approval of the Soviet Union. It seems to me the people in 
Kansas City have taken an unnecessarily critical view of our own system and an 
overly favorable one of the Russian system. 



22 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

Dr. Lewis E. Christian, pastor of the Washington Square Methodist 
Church, was somewhat less critical of the Methodist Federation for 
Social Action. He said: 

I believe that the Methodist Federation for Social Action has a right to express 
its convictions concerning the new social order, and to redefine Christianity in 
its attack on a secular world. 

Other comments on the 1947 meeting of the federation are: 
The Washington Post of December 30, 1947, at page 16, in a news 
item datelined Kansas City, Mo., Dec. 29, reports, in part, as follows: 

The Methodist Federation for Social Action — which declares it fronts neither 
for communisn nor capitalism but seeks Christianization of society — today 
demanded that the United States approach its relationships with Russia with 
understanding and good will. 

Dr. Charles E. Schofield, Nashville, Tenn., editor of The Methodist Church, 
obtained adoption of a resolution which condemned universal military training as 
tending "only to inflame the present critical international situation.' It also 
demanded an immediate end to United States manufacture of atomic bombs and 
destruction of the United States bomb stockpile on concurrence of other major 
powers. 

Lest federation be listed as a subversive organization, because of the attention 
columnists have given to it, a resolution was adopted declaring the organization 
represents "the effort of honest men and women to find a truly Christian solution 
to the pressing problem of our times." 

In other resolutions, the federation: 

Demanded immediate withdrawal of American military advisory groups from 
China and an embargo on shipments of munitions to that country. 

Urged recall of Myron Taylor, Presidential envoy to the Vatican, contending 
that "propaganda emanating from the Vatican" tended to lead to a "full holy war 
on Russia." 

Urged Congress to repeal the public order which denies the right of appeal to 
persons dismissed from the State, War and Navy Departments for alleged sub- 
versive activity. 

Asked the President to revoke an Executive order requiring the oath of loyalty 
as a qualification for holding Federal office. 

Demanded Russia and the United States immediately evacuate Korea and 
that this Nation recognize the Republic of Indonesia. 

The New York Times of December 30, 1947, at page 18, in a news 
item datelined Kansas City, Dec. 29, reports that a resolution adopted 
by the Federation on the last day of the convention denied any support 
of communism. The resokition stated in part: 

The Methodist Federation For Social Action proposes the Christianization of 
society, nothing more nor less. It fronts neither for communism nor capitalism. 
Its "ism" is Christianity. 

In another resolution the Federation called on the United States 
Government to press for joint action between the United States and 
Russia for the evacuating of Korea and the free election in that coun- 
try. 

1948 

The report of the Executive Secretary at the annual meeting of the 
Methodist Federation for Social Action held at Oskaloosa, Iowa, 
December 28-30, 1948, makes reference to the following questions and 
answers appearing in a pamphlet issued by the House Committee on 
Un-American Activities, entitled "100 Things You Should Know 
About Communism and Religion:" 

92. What is the Methodist Federation for Social Action? 

A tool of the Communist Party, denounced by numerous loyal American 
Methodists. It claims to speak for 17 Methodist Bishops and 4,000 clerics and 
laymen. Not an official church organization. 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 23 

93. Where is it located and what is it trying to dot 

150 Fifth Avenue, New York. New York. Although strictly unofficial as a 
"church" organization, it is trying to use the prestige of the Methodist Church to 
promote the line of the Communist Party. 

The Executive Secretary, in a report to the annual meeting included 
the following: 

The Un-American Committee's charges against the Methodist Federation for 
Social Action are ridiculous and untrue. The Methodist Federation is a demo- 
cratic fellowship of Methodist bishops (more than 20). and 5,571 pastors, church 
men and women, founded in 1907 and the original source of the Social Creed of 
the Methodist Church and of the Churches. The Federation's policies and pro- 
gram are formulated and carried out by Methodist bishops, pastors, lay men and 
lay women loyal to the Gospel of Jesus to the principles of American democracy, 
ant. to tha Social Creed and positions of the Methodist Church. These constitute 
our onlv "party line." Federation members seek to develop attitudes and actions 
which conform to the principles of Jesus, John Wesley, and Thomas Jefferson. 
Obviously they cannot at the same time satisfy men like J. Parnell Thomas and 
John Rankin of the Un-American Committee. 

Further in the report to the annual meeting the Executive Secretary 
savs : 

When the Methodist Federation for Social Action makes a move, it does so on 
the basis of decisions carefully considered and discussed at the Annual Meeting 
or in the meetings of the strong and annually elected Executive Committee or 
Administrative Committee. We nationally make plenty of study and action 
recommendation to our increasing number of local and Conference chapter. But 
each chapter is autonomous and makes its own decisions. 

We in the Federation were not alarmed b3' attacks last year from a particularly 
immoral, irresponsible segment of the press or more lately by the reactionary House 
Committee on Un-American Activities. W T e might be alarmed indeed if our 
program proved satisfactory or conformed to the tenets and approach of those 
who abhor the democratic, brotherly world which the Federation has sought and 
which is the sure outcome of prophetic religion. 

We welcome any examination of Federation program, statements, and actions, 
not from the standpoint of the tenets and procedures of the Un-American Com- 
mittee which we repudiate and reject, but from the standpoint of: the ethical 
religious, objective validity of these positions; the democratic and objective 
procedures by which they are reached; or the Christian character of the men and 
women who formulate Federation program, and their loyalty to the Gospel of 
Jesus and the prophets as well as to American democracy and the Church. 

It is to be noted that throughout his report the Executive Secretary 
uses the term "Un-American Committee," a misnomer, coined and 
applied to the House Committee on Un-American Activities by the 
Communists and the Communist Party. 

However, there is one matter that the executive secretary does not 
explain. He stated that "when the Methodist Federation for Social 
Action makes a move, it does so on the basis of a decision carefully 
considered and discussed at the annual meeting or in the meetings of 
the strong and annually elected executive committee or administrative 
committee," yet in their condemnation of the government's loyalty 
program, the federation apparently based their conclusions on 
newspaper reports. Support for tins is found in a statement of the 
federation wherein they say, "We are greatly disturbed over the 
reports which constantly reach the public" and "these reports are 
so numerous in the press ..." 

In his criticism of the House Committee on Un-American Activities, 
the executive secretary of the federation in his report says "The 
committee does claim to have certain unverified newspaper clippings 
in its file telling of a meeting of our organization in Kansas City last 
December." " It thus appears that the federation condemns any 



24 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

conclusion of the House Committee on Un-American Activities that 
is based on newspaper reports, yet finds that it is perfectly proper for 
the Federation to condemn the Government's loyalty program on the 
strength of press reports. 

The New York Times of December 28, 1948, on page 3, contains an 
item regarding a report to be presented at the opening session of the 
annual meeting of the Methodist Federation for Social Action at 
Oskaloosa. The report, prepared by the Federation's Commission 
for Propaganda Analysis, of which Clyde R. Miller was chairman, is 
as follows: 

In the light of the headline hysteria featuring Whittaker Chambers, pumpkin 
patches, the "conversion" to Roman Catholicism of Louis Budenz and Elizabeth 
Bentlcy, the denuncation in the clerical press of Bishop G.- Bromley Oxnam for 
his rejection of the "holy War" and his part in organizing Protestants and Other 
Americans United for Separation of Church and State, it seems not unlikely that 
the authoritarian philosophy of the Vatican state is seeking to attain not without 
some degree of success its objective of the destruction of Protestantism, destruc- 
tion of separation of church and state and of free public schools. Surely in the 
House Committee on Un-American Activities it has found a Government agency 
to further its claims. 

An examination of the anti-Protestant propaganda which has come from the 
House Committee and has been ardently exploited by the Roman Catholic 
hierarchy confirms that this propaganda is intended to make the word "com- 
munist" as potent a stimulus to automatic reection [sic] as the word -, heretic" 
was during the Holy Inquisition — as potent a stimulus as the word "Jew" was in 
the Hitler regime in Germany. 

More, by linking communism with Protestantism and with the defense of pub- 
lic schools and the constitutional guarantee of separation of church and state, 
these twin propaganda groups dearly hope to succeed in making Protestantism, 
separation of church and state and public schools as odious from the propaganda 
standpoints as the word "communism" — in short, to establish complete identifi- 
cation of these terms. This does not mean the abandonment of the Jew-Com- 
munist propaganda weapon so effectively used by Goebbels and Father Coughlin 
but only an addition to the arsenal of forces fighting for American fascism. 

In the last ten years, the report added, the House Committee has "issued 
propaganda which has tended to reinforce the hierarchy's political position, par- 
ticularly with respect to American foreign policy." 

"For example," it added, "the House committee never investigated Father 
Charles Coughlin or the general identity of his propaganda with that of Joseph 
Goebbels and the effect of spreading anti-Semitism in America and transferring 
to it the blessing of Almighty God." 

At the same annual membership meeting, the Methodist Federation 
for Social Action revised its "Program of Study and Action." The 
revised program is as follows: 

The METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION is an organization 
which seeks to deepen within the Church the sense of social obligation and oppor- 
tunity to study from the Christian point of view, social problems and their solu- 
tion; and to promote social action in the spirit of Jesus. It rejects the method 
of the struggle for profit as the economic base for society, and seeks to replace it 
with social and economic planning in order to develop a society without class or 
group discriminations and privileges. It seeks the establishment of full democ- 
racy and unreserved brotherhood in our political, economic, and social life. This 
calls for complete eradication of fascism — its vestiges and threats — throughout 
the world and in the U. S. A. in particular. 

Through a concrete immediate program, the METHODIST FEDERATION 
FOR SOCIAL ACTION works to make peace secure and, ultimately, to attain 
a society in which the people themselves cooperatively and democratically plan 
and provide the production and distribution of goods and services with the motive 
and to the end, not of profits for the few, but of service for all; and in which 
frustrating and unbrotherly barriers of inequality, whether grounded on class 
distinction or on race or national or sex discrimination, have been ended, sup- 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 25 

planted by brotherhood full and unreserved, and by equal opportunity for maxi- 
mum personal development. 

In the light of this overall goal we seek to bring the impact of prophetic religion 
to bear upon our society and its institutions — economic, political and social. 
Our program seeks: 

I. TO EXTEND, STRENGTHEN, AND COOPERATE WITH: 

a. The Democratic Trade Union Movement Which Is: 

(1) An indispensable tool through which the workers, themselves, 
through collective bargaining, can have a direct, democratic voice in 
the imperative process of expanding people's purchasing power, which 
serves as a stimulus to more production and employment; 

(2) Essential to extension of industrial democracy as a necessary 
bulwark of political democracy; 

(3) An enemy of fascism, which has everywhere sought to curb and 
destroy democratically organized labor. 

This program emphasis leads to such specifics as — 

(1) Return to the principles of the Wagner National Labor Relations 
Act. 

(2) Repeal Taft-Hartley and similar repressive anti-labor legislation. 

(3) Thwart persisting state and federal legislative attacks on labor's 
rights. 

(4) Strengthen the Department of Labor and all Federal and State 
conciliation services. 

(5) Extend Church-labor cooperation n all possible ways. In partic- 
ular — 

(a) Expose NAM attempts to further isolate the Church from 
labor in its Church and Industry Conferences which exclude union 
representatives. 

(b) Espouse fair labor standards and democratic collective bar- 
gaining in the Nashville Plant and other institutions of the Church. 

(c) Support a training program among churchmen in the field of 
religion and labor through: 

(1) Setting up more Students-in-Industry groups; 

(2) Helping in the formation of local Religion-Labor Fellow- 
ships for the development of understanding; 

(3) Recruiting, training and dedicating young people for 
participation in the labor movement; 

(4) Special courses in colleges and theological seminaries; 

(5) Inviting labor leaders to address annual conferences; 

(6) Setting up trips for young people and adults in the church 
for studies in industry and conferences with labor leaders; 

(7) Taking student and minister groups to observe labor 
conventions. 

(d) Support the Church in assigning specialized ministers to work 
with organized labor. 

(6) Cooperate in promoting these ends with progressive employers. 

b. The Cooperative Movement, both rural and urban as: 

(1) A democratic vehicle for increasing real income and thus purchas- 
ing power and employment; 

(2) Another force for democracy's preservation and extension. 

This program emphasis leads to such specifics as — 

(1) Expose and frustrate legislative attacks on the power and growth 
of cooperatives, as the campaign of the National Tax Equality Associa- 
tion to secure unfair taxation of the savings returns of cooperatives. 

(2) Continue education about, and on behalf of, cooperatives. 

(3) Seek extension of participation by churchmen and churches in the 
Cooperative Movement, e. g., help realize as a Federation goal the organi- 
zation of at least thirty parish credit unions. 

II. TO ESTABLISH AND EXTEND FULL ETHNIC DEMOCRACY 

a. Repudiate, in word and deed, the myth of racial and national superiority 
and corresponding practices of racial and national discrimination and segrega- 
tion; 

b. Seek to end these practices wherever manifest (including the Church'). 

c. Seek complete realization of democratic promise of equal opportunity. 



26 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

This program emphasis leads to such specifics as — 

a. Support strong, permanent federal Fair Employment Practices Commit- 
tee, and parallel state FEPC's, aimed at the elimination of all racial and relig- 
ious discrimination in industry (remembering that discrimination plays into 
the hands of those who favor a "pool" of unemployed to keep down mass 
living standards and strengthen economic autocracy, and who find racial and 
religious minorities convenient supply sources for such a "pool"). 

b. Seek abolition of white primaries, restrictive housing covenants, segre- 
gation in divine worship, transportation, education, (especially Methodist 
institutions of learning), hotel and eating and recreational facilities, armed 
forces, etc. — whether applied against Negroes, Jews, Japanese-Americans, 
Spanish-speaking Americans, or any other racial, national, or religious 
minorities. 

c. End all discrimination and segregation in our nation's capitol. 

d. Help establish or develop inclusive, interracial churches. 

e. Secure non-discriminatory employment policies in and by all church 
institutions. 

f. Develop inclusive, interracial MFSA chapters. 

g. Expose and eradicate anti-Semitism. 
h. Abolish Oriental exclusion laws. 

i. Support and implement the Methodist General Conference resolution on 
race. 

III. TO EXTEND AND UNIVERSALIZE DEMOCRATIC SUFFRAGE 
(of which fascism makes a mockery). 

This program emphasis leads to such specifics as — 

a. Abolish the poll tax, white primary, etc. 

b. Lower the voting age to 18. 

c. Fully enfranchise the American Indians and citizens of the District of 
Columbia, Puerto Rico, Hawaii, Alaska, etc. 

d. Support such democratic gains as: 

(1) Supreme Court ruling on white primaries. 

(2) Georgia's abolition of poll tax and reduction of voting age to 18. 

(3) Extension of suffrage to women (as in France, Jugoslavia, etc.). 

e. Help get out the vote in all local state, and federal elections; and help 
find socially conscious candidates to run for office. 

IV. TO ESTABLISH, PRESERVE, AND UNDERGIRD CIVIL LIBER- 
TIES AND MINORITY RIGHTS (remembering how fascism destroyed civil 
liberties and attacked rights of one minority after the other: Jews, Communists, 
pacifists, Socialists, trade unionists, Catholics, Protestants, women). 

This program emphasis leads to such specifics as — 

a. Stand guard for the liberties, rights, and equal opportunity of all these 
groups, e. g., seek adequate financial support within Methodism for Methodist 
conscientious objectors, oppose proposals to outlaw the Communist or other 
minority political parties, contribute to the legal defense of communists or 
others brought to trial simply for their political views. 

b. Support academic freedom (for example, as menaced by the Thomas- 
Rankin Committee's attempt to tell students what organizations they shall 
join and the University presidents what organizations and what faculty mem- 
bers they shall tolerate). 

c. Support freedom of the church press and of the pulpit. 

d. Support Federal anti-lynching legislation and the Civil Rights legislative 
program as a whole. Change Senate rules to end filibuster. 

e. Abolish the House Committee on Un-American Activities. 

f. Strengthen the Civil Rights Work of the Federal Government through 
a stronger Civil Rights section in the Department of Justice, a permanent 
President's Committee on Civil Rights, and a joint Congressional Civil 
Rights Committee. 

g. End the blacklisting of legal and peaceful organizations by the Attorney 
General under Presidential directive. 

h. Repeal the Smith Act as an abridgement of free speech and free assembly, 
i. Study, support and implement the United Nations Declaration of Human 
Rights. 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 27 

V. TO CONTEST ALL POLITICAL, ECONOMIC, AND MILITARY 
IMPERIALISM (a particularly brutal manifestation of which has been given 
to the world by fascism). 

This program emphasis leads to such specifics as — 

a. Seek to expand peoples' power (democratic rule) and raise the standard 
of living (mass purchasing power) throughout the world, remembering that a 
strong, democratic trade union movement is one of our chief allies in seeking 
these goals. 

b. Promote political and economic independence for all colonial peoples — 
in the Far East, Near East, Oceania, Latin America, Africa. Defend the 
invaded Indonesian Republic by strong United Nations action and by with- 
drawing from the Netherlands all American ERP and other aid, until all 
aggressive troops are withdrawn and Indonesia is completely free. 

c. Support United Nations administration and trusteeship over still 
dependent territories, such as those formerly mandated to Japan. Develop 
civilian control of U. S. Pacific dependencies, with promotion of the peoples' 
social and educational advance. 

d. Oppose American economic imperialism as basic to the struggle against 
British, French, Dutch political colonialism. 

e. Urge self-determination for Puerto Rico and statehood for Alaska and 
Hawaii. 

VI. TO SEEK FULL, SOCIALLY USEFUL EMPLOYMENT IN THE 
DAYS, AND FOR THE NEEDS, OF PEACE (The widespread lack of which in 
the past brought fascism to Germany and other lands — and the lack of which in 
the future could bring fascism again to the same and new nations, including the 
U. S. A.). Full, useful, employment, within the framework of American democ- 
racy constitutes, therefore, a basic and immediate goal of the Federation. 

This program emphasis leads to such specifics as — 

a. Encourage international economic cooperation (vs. imperialist com- 
petition) to promote economic expansion, higher living standards, more 
world trade, implemented by: 

(1) A world-wide reconstruction plan operated by and through the 
L T nited Nations to replace UNRRA and to fight starvation and devasta- 
tion everywhere on a non-political basis. 

(2) Reciprocal trade extension, etc. 

b. Support and promote overall social-economic planning to meet crying 
human needs, implemented by: 

(1) Nationally integrated systems of socially owned and operated 
TVA s, MVA's, CVA's, and a St. Lawrence waterway in order to develop 
great potential resources for human enrichment and betterment. 

(2) A vast public and private housing program to end all rural and 
urban slums, and to make healthful housing available to all. 

(3) Full peacetime use of the plant and equipment built for war under 
social control and for the social good. 

(4) Increased unemployment compensation and expansion of Social 
Security benefits and extension of coverage to workers in ecclesiastical 
and other non-profit institutions, domestic workers, farmers, etc. 

(5) Expansion of educational facilities and opportunities without dis- 
crimination, including e. g., support of Federal Aid to Public (not 
private) Education. 

(6) Expansion of recreational and health facilities, to include adequate 
medical care for all, as in the Wagner-Murray-Dingell Bill. 

(7) Constructive public works giving employment to those unable to 
find jobs through private channels. 

(8) Extension and support of Farm Security Administration, Rural 
Electrification Administration, and other programs to lift living stand- 
ards. 

(9) Return to price controls under a democratic form of organization, 
and with participation by the local community, to keep living costs 
down and mass purchasing power up. 

(10) Acceptance and application of the principle of an annual living 
wage and increased minimum wage. 

(11) A stronger "full employment" bill. 



28 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

c. Support a progressive program to meet rural needs, including such 
specifics: 

(1) A thorough study of cooperative ownership of farm machinery 
that all farmers may have access to the implements of farming. 

(2) Guaranteed floor under farm prices of at least 90 per cent of parity. 

(3) Continued low-interest government loans to family-type farmers. 

(4) Expansion of rural electrification, telephone, road building; health, 
welfare, and cultural programs that the good things of life might be 
enjoyed by all alike. 

(5) Demands for legislation to curb the alarming expansion of large 
scale and corporation-farm systems and protect the family-type farmer 
who represents a substantial percentage of the American population. 

(6) Urge our Government to give full support to the original program 
of the International Food and Agriculture Organization, which contem- 
plated a world program to seek a methodical solution for the age-old prob- 
lem of reconciling hunger and surpluses, the specific objectives of the pro- 
gram being: to improve the level of nutrition and standard of living of all 
people; to improve the efficiency of agricultural production and distribu- 
tion; to better the condition of the rural population of the world; to 
stabilize the prices of agricultural commodities on the world market; to 
establish a world food reserve adequate for any emergency that might 
arise through the failure of crops; and to provide funds for financing the 
distribution of surplus agricultural crops. 

(7) Extend more federal employment services to farm labor groups. 

(8) Enlarge and expand the program of federal aid to migrant labor, 
including more adequate housing. 

(9) Expansion and extension of soil conservation with direct payments 
to farmers for soil conservation practices. 

(10) An ever-normal granary program on a much expanded basis with 
emphasis on federal aid and loans to REA-type of cooperatively-owned 
storage facilities. 

(11) Federal crop insurance for all essential crops against hazards 
beyond control of the farmers. 

d. Continue and extend labor-management committees and the coopera- 
tion developed during the war to the end of a cooperative endeavor to secure 
maximum employment. 

e. Remove discrimination against economically disadvantaged areas 
(especially the South) to promote industrial and economic expansion — (the 
recent ICC ruling on freight rate discrimination being a definite victory in 
this direction). 

f. Support a progressive tax program to stimulate sound economic expan- 
sion and increase purchasing power at the bottom (where emphasis is more on 
consumption than on saving). This involves: 

(1) Abolition of sales taxes. 

(2) Levying of stiff inheritance taxes, steeply graduated income 
taxes, etc. 

(3) Opposition to any "across the beard" reduction of income taxes, 
which violates the graduation principle. 

g. Accept nationally the proposition that labor-saving machinery and all 
technological advancement shall serve the community as a whole, not merely 
the privileged few who own and control the machines (which points to the 
ultimate ownership and control of the basic means of production by the people 
as a, whole). 

VII. TO COMBAT THE EVILS OF MONOPOLY CAPITALISM BY 
SEEKING NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL CURBS ON MONOPO- 
LIES AND CARTELS. (These do a disservice to the common weal by restrict- 
ing the production of needed goods and services.) Accepting the ultimate goal 
of people's ownership and control of the primary sources of power, we urge: 

a. Public or social civilian ownership and control of atomic power. 

b. United Nations control to insure the constructive (vs. destructive) 
production and use of atomic power. 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 29 

VIII TO PROMOTE AN AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY AIMED AT 
LASTING PEACE AND PROGRESSIVE CHANGE IN THE WORLD 
THROUGH THE EXTENSION OF PEOPLES' POWER. 

This program emphasis leads to such specifics as — 

a. Support and implement the Methodist General Conference position on 
War and Peace. Cooperate to that end with the Commission on World 
Peace, the Methodist Committee for Overseas Relief, the Woman's Division 
of Christian Service, and other concerned agencies. 

b. Support and implement the United Nations Charter, and seek whole- 
hearted participation in all of its important agencies, such as the Economic 
and Social Council. 

c. Cease manufacture and stockpiling of atom bombs and destroy existing 
stockpiles. 

d. Outlaw the atom bomb and other weapons of mass destruction (e. g., 
for biological warfare) through the U. N. 

e. Oppose peacetime military conscription in the U. S. A., and seek its 
abolition throughout the world as part of a bold, world-wide disarmament 
program. Repeal the Selective Service Act of 1948. 

f. Substantially reduce national military budget. 

g. Oppose further militarization of the "Marshall Plan" as in proposed 
military alliance with Marshall Plan countries. 

h. Engage in friendly cooperation with the Soviet Union. End the Cold 
War. Solve problems through negotiations. 

i. Engage in friendly cooperation with the new regimes of Europe (both 
East and West) and Asia, treating them all as equals and refraining from 
self-righteousness or a "double standard" of ethical judgment in our dealings 
with them or with the Soviet Union. Secure prompt recognition of the 
developing new people's government in China and large-scale peaceful 
cooperation and aid. 

j. End existing economic, political and military support of colonial 
regimes, of fascist regimes in Spain and Argentina and of reactionary and 
proto-fascist forces in Greece, China and elsewhere. 

k. Return to a progressive, democratic, reform program in Japan. 

1. Promote a peaceful, unified, democratic Germany, free to develop its 
own peaceful economic S3 r stem. Internationalize the Ruhr for the benefit 
of all Europe's people. 

m. End diplomatic representation with the Vatican in any guise, in keep- 
ing with the principle of separation of Church and State and with the need 
for a progressive peace policy. 

n. Curb the power and influence of international cartels through the kind 
of intergovernment cooperation in peace, which the war has proved possible. 

This report is given additional publicity by William Henry Cham- 
berlin, writing in the January 22, 1949, issue of the New Loader. 
Mr. Chamberlin's article is — 

The Methodist Federation for Social Action, which has an irrepressible yearning 
to give publicity to pro-Soviet and anti-American views at its meetings and in its 
publication, Social Questions Bulletin, is at it again. In what seems to be an 
effort to divert attention from criticism of its persistent fellow-traveler line by 
appealing to sectarian bigotry it has alleged a new "Popish plot" so fantastically 
unreal that it might excite the envy and admiration of Titus Oates. 

The Federation's "commission for propaganda analysis," of which Clyde R. 
Miller is chairman, makes the following allegation in a recent public statement: 

"It seems not unlikely that the authoritarian philosophy of the Vatican State is 
seeking to attain, not without some degree of success, its objective of the destruction 
of Protestantism, destruction of separation of church and state and of free public 
schools. Surely in the House Committee on Un-American Activities it has found a 
government agency to further its claims." 

The statement continues with allegations to the effect that "anti-Protestant 
propaganda" has been emanating from the Un-American Activities Committee 
and that the Roman Catholic hierarchy wants to make the word communist "as 
potent a stimulus to automatic rejection as the word 'heretic' was durinn the 
Holy Inquisition." 



b~-r<-r— 52- 



30 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

The irrationality of this curious imaginative concoction can easily be exposed. 
Is there a single community in the United States where Protestantism is being 
"destroyed" or where free public schools have ceased to function? As for separa- 
tion of church and state, this principle has been strengthened, not weakened by 
recent decisions of the Supreme Court. The horrific "Popish plot" which the 
Federation tries to conjure up turns out to be only a dud shell. 

STILL SILLIER is the attempt to press the Un-American Activities Com- 
mittee, the majority of whose members are not and never have been Catholics, 
into the service of the supposed sinister designs of the Vatican. The only "anti- 
Protestant propaganda" that has been published by the Committee is a well- 
documented exposure of Communist infiltration into the Protestant churches. 
Had there been similar infiltration into the Catholic Church there is not the slight- 
est reason to suppose the Committee would not have given it full publicity. 

As for automatic negative rejection of the word "Communist" this would cer- 
tainly be the logical consequence if all Americans were aware of such invariable 
features of Communist systems as brutal proscription of great numbers of people 
on class lines and wide-spread employment of forced labor indistinguishable from 
slavery. Unfortunately not all Americans are familiar with the organized 
brutality and tyranny which, on the basis of the historical record, may be con- 
sidered synonymous with Communism. If they were, such an organization as 
the Federation for Social Action would expire for lack of clients and certainly 
would not be permitted to use the name Methodist as a screen for its activities. 

A Methodist correspondent who jointed the Federation in ignorance of its real 
character expresses amazement that some Bishops of that church lend the au- 
thority of their names to its activities. He continues: 

"Social Questions Bulletin gets no better. The whole slant is to discredit our 
foreign policy and to hold us responsible for the threat of war. Our government 
is always wrong, and Soviet Russia right. I need only refer to the lengthy article 
in each issue by Harry F. Ward called Behind the Headlines." 

The name of Harry F. Ward is indeed a banner for the Federation. He is 
perhaps the nearest American equivalent of the Dean of Canterbury and his 
writings and speeches reveal a sympathy with Soviet Communism that is positively 
fanatical. 

1950 

The Daily Worker of July 20, 1950, at page 9, reports Rev. Jack R. 
McMichael at the meeting of the Methodist Federation for Social 
Action at Wilberforce University as condemning the United States 
intervention in Korea and saying that the United States was "the 
only foreigner in what apparently is nothing more than a civil war." 

Rev. McMichael is further reported to have condemned America's 
refusal to recognize the Chinese People's Republic, and "keeping alive 
the myth that any other Chinese Government exists." 

He is quoted as saying, "We are here to speak for peace. We must 
stop competing in an armament race, and start competing in service 
to the people." 

The meeting held at Wilberforce University in July 1950 was the 
annual conference of the Methodist Federation for Social Action. 
The Knoxville News Sentinel of July 21, 1950, at page 18, reports 
in a news item date lined Wilberforce, Ohio, July 21 — that the con- 
ference urged a general presidential pardon for the 11 convicted 
Communist Party leaders; called for the defeat of the Mundt-Nixon 
Communist control bill; called for presidential amnesty for "political 
prisoners," including conscientious objectors, the Hollywood Ten, 
the Executive Committee of the Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Com- 
mittee, and the director of the National Council of American-Soviet 
Friendship. 

It was further reported that the Federation condemned Russian 
propaganda which "pictures America as a warmongering nation, and 
itself as the chief exponent of peace." 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 31 

Proof of this will be found in the Social Questions Bulletin of June 
1950 which contains a summary of the minutes of the 1950 meeting by 
Betty Alport, secretary pro tem. Under the heading of ''Prophetic 
Religion and the Struggle for Democratic Liberties" Miss Alpcrt 
quotes from the minutes as follows: 

Many of our hard-won liberties have become casualties of the Cold War. 
Today, for the first time since the Alien and Sedition Act of 1798, American citizens 
are in prison because of their political ideas. While these citizens are in prison, 
we are not free. 

Many Americans, in high places and low, are being persecuted on the basis of 
guilt by association, which is utterly foreign to our tradition, and which deprives 
citizens of their livelihood and reputation. Latest evidences of violations of our 
freedoms are the passage of a law in Birmingham, Alabama, banning the presence 
of any Communist Party member within the city limits, and which in effect may 
outlaw communication or any private association with any Communist Party 
member, as well as distribution of Communist Party literature or Communist 
Front literature. Likewise, it is now illegal to seU the Communist Party paper on 
the streets in Detroit, Michigan. We must protect the liberties of those with 
whom we disagree, or face the loss of our own liberties. 

We implore our people to call upon their Congressman to defeat the Mundt- 
Nixon Bill, which threatens to establish thought-control and a police state here, 
and which threatens every teacher, lawyer, trade union organizer, and minister 
in our country. The alleged target of this bill is world communism; the real 
victim will be our American Democracy. 

The right of any individual to speak his mind as to what is right or wrong is 
democracy's best safeguard. We therefore call for repeal of the Smith Act as 
being unconstitutional, and designed to suppress any unpopular political philoso- 
phies. We appeal for Presidential amnesty for all convicted under the Smith 
Act. 

Since the secret ballot is basic to our democratic form of government, we do 
not believe people should be jailed for refusing to divulge their political convic- 
tions, or for refusing to give information which would jeopardize the employment 
or life of other people not directly connected with individuals being "investigated." 
We ask Presidential amnesty for these political prisoners: Conscientious Objectors 
to War; The Hollywood Ten; the executive committee of the Joint Anti-Fascist 
Refugee Committee; Richard Morford of the National Council for American- 
Soviet Friendship; George Marshall of the National Federation for Constitutional 
Liberties. 

We believe government practices in loyalty oath procedures are undermining 
our civil liberties. 

There must be no arbitrary dismissal of government employees without pre- 
sentation of charges against them, opportunity to face and cross-examine accusers, 
and to plead their case in a court of their peers. 

We oppose loyalty oaths to officers of trade unions, in schools and colleges, and 
wherever they infringe American rights. 

We believe freedom of movement is basic. We deplore the refusing of visas 
to visitors from other lands because of race or ideas. We call for repeal of the 
Oriental Exclusion Act. We protest the campaign of deportation of aliens for 
their ideas or associations. Over one hundred such cases are pending. We ask our 
members and chapters to give help in such cases as come to their attention. 

Y\ e protest wire-tapping for evidence as infringement on personal privacy. 

M e protest a developing pattern of judicial punishment of lawyers who defend 
politically unpopular persons. 

Issuance of lists of "subversive" organizations by the Un-American Activities 
Committee, the U. S. Attorney General, and other agencies, without hearing the 
organizations concerned, is unjust, unfair, unconstitutional, and destructive of 
our liberties. 

We condemn the New York State Feinberg Law, and similar thought-control 
laws. 

We point out the increasing tendency toward monopoly control of press and 
radio making these media of information propaganda agencies, instead of impar- 
tial disseminators of news. We protest the ban of The Nation from New York 
City schools. 

We commend the U. S. Supreme Court's recent decisions against segregation. 
W e need to be alert to see that these decisions are carried out. 



32 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

1351 

The committee received considerable literature in the form of books, 
pamphlets, circulars, etc., obtained at the recent meeting of the Metho- 
dist Federation for Social Action held at the First Methodist Church, 
Evanston, Illinois, September 4-6, 1951. This material is all stamped 
"Disbursed or sold by the Methodist Federation for Social Action at 
National Membership Meeting, First Methodist Church, Evanston, 
Illinois, September 4-6, 1951." Included in the collection will be 
found pamphlets issued by the American Institute of Pacific Relations; 
Committee for a Democratic Far Eastern Policy; Civil Rights Con- 
gress; Fellowship of Reconciliation; as well as pamphlets written by 
Albert E. Kahn, Corliss Lamont, and Dalton Trumbo. The book 
"Peekskill U. S. A." by Howard Fast was similarly stamped. Howard 
Fast and Dalton Trumbo have been identified as being members of 
the Communist Party. Corliss Lamont is associated with the 
National Council of American-Soviet Friendship, which has been 
officially cited as a Communist-front organization. 

The Committee for a Democratic Far Eastern Policy and the Civil 
Rights Congress have been classified as Communist organizations by 
the Attorney General of the United States. 

The 1951 meeting of the Methodist Federation for Social Action 
was the subject of considerable news items in the press. 

The Washington Daily News of August 30, 1951, at page 29, in a 
news item datelined New York, August 30, reports that an attempt 
will be made to unseat the Rev. Jack McMichael as executive secre- 
tary of the Methodfst Federation for Social Action when the Federa- 
tion meets in Evanston, Illinois. It was further reported that: 

Three prominent signers of the statement resigned from the Federation after 
Rev. McMichael was reelected to a two-year term last June. They were Bishop 
Lewis O. Hartman of Boston, retiring president and keynote speaker at the 
Kansas City convention; Dean Walter G. Muelder of the Boston University 
School of Theology, a Federation vice president, and Dr. Emory S. Bucke, editor 
of Zion's Herald. 

The Boston University Chapter has announced it will withdraw automatically 
if the McMichael reelection is confirmed by the 1951 convention in Evanston 
Sept. 4-6. 

The chapter charged Rev. McMichael with running an undemocratic and 
irresponsible organization and with using Federation machinery to promote 
"ideologies repugnant to the membership." 

Last year the "Methodist Council of Bishops urged that the Federation drop the 
word "Methodist" from its name. "We deplore and sharply disagree with certain 
positions taken and statements published of late in the Federation's official bulle- 
tin," declared the Bishops. 

Rev. McMichael refused to eliminate the word "Methodist." 

As a result, on Sept. 14, 1950, the Methodist Board of Publications, owner of 
the church's property, unanimously directed the Federation to vacate its na- 
tional headquarters in the Methodist Church building in New York City. But 
so far Rev. McMichael has refused to move. 

Meanwhile, the National Conference of Methodist Youth has asserted that it 
will withdraw its backing unless Rev. McMichael is removed from control next 
week. 

For months Zion's Herald, oldest Methodist publication in this country, has 
been attacking Rev. Mc Michael's leadership. His failure to exercise "independ- 
ent Christian perspective," it said, tends to aid "that Communist imperialism of 
the Soviet Union which threatens both the peace and freedom of many lands." 

Rev. McMichael's staunchest defender is Bishop Francis J. McConnell, retired 
elder statesman of the Methodist Church. Another defender, following the 1947 
Kansas City convention, was Bishop James C. Baker of California, presiding 
Bishop of the Council of Bishops. 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 33 

The Chicago Daily Tribune of September 5, 1951, at page 8, con- 
tains the following article on the 1951 meeting of the Methodist 
Federation for Social Action: 

Delegates to a conference of the Methodist Federation of Social Action in 
Evanston yesterday heard speakers extol socialism, pacifism, and world govern- 
ment, denounce communism and war, and urge them to action in the political 
arena. No one spoke a good word for capitalism. 

The conference was the annual meeting of the federation, which has been de- 
scribed by the house un-American activities committee as a conspicuous communist 
front. The three-day meeting is being held in the First Methodist Church of 
Evanston, altho the federation has no official connection with the Methodist 
church. 

The Cook county council of the American Legion, acting at the request of 
Evanston post 42 and Garnet post 785, had urged the governing board of the 
Evanston church to withdraw permission for use of the church for the meeting. 
In a letter to The Tribune's Voice of the People, however, R. A. Page, chairman 
of the board of trustees, said the governing board had no intention of revoking 
its permission. 

Some GO delegates found the Sunday school hall where they met equipped with 
a long table laden with scores of pamphlets, tracts, and books, for sale or free 
issue. They ranged from rabid advocac}' of communism and life in the soviet 
union, thru denunciations of the Korean war, approval of the Red Chinese gov- 
ernment, support of convicted American communist leaders and Hollywood 
Communists, dissertations on labor problems by the Congress of Industrial 
Organizations, to the social creed of the Methodist church. 

Last year the federation met at the Negro university in Wilberforce, O. Yes- 
terday the federation president, Bishop Francis J. McConnell, retired, asserted 
the federation should be grateful to Evanston's "middle class" church for giving 
the federation a meeting place. 

McConnell also ridiculed a Tribune editorial which asserted that the federation 
usually shows a fondness for meeting behind closed doors, as indicated in this 
newspaper's files. Yesterday's meeting was open to the press. 

Drawing a distinction between soviet communism and communism, McConnell 
said he knew none in the federation who professed adherence to Stalin's brand, 
altho some members might advance ideas for a better society "which might 
seem like communism." 

He denounced soviet communism for not including in it any Christian ideals, 
particularly the Christian belief in the value of the human soul. 

An English Socialist, Dr. Donald O. Soper, who established a reputation as an 
orator on the soap boxes of Hyde Park in London, also denounced communism 
in all forms, and urged American Methodists to accept socialism. 

"We must match communism in political action," said Dr. Soper, who described 
himself as a leftwing member of the British Labor party. "I cannot imagine how 
any Christian can avoid socialism." 

One of Methodism's leading preachers, Dr. Henry Hitt Crane of Detroit, urged 
support of a sovereign world federation, denounced the "insanity" of the inter- 
national arms race, and asserted Americans are controlled by the ghosts of outworn 
ideas, beliefs, and convictions. 

The Rev. Jack R. Mc Michael, federation executive secretary, said that the 
organization believes in the right of all people to hear all sides of all arguments. 
McMichael also denounced the war in Korea. 

Both McMichael and McConnell have been listed by the un-American activities 
committee as supporters of numerous communist fronts. Thev and the federa- 
tion have denied being "communist tools." 

The 1951 meeting was reported by the Chicago Daily Tribune of 
September 6, 1951, at page 9, as follows: 

A committee of the Methodist Federation of Social Action, meeting in the First 
Methodist church of Evanston, recommended yesterdav that the United States 
recognize immediately Red China and that the Red Chinese delegates be seated 
in the United Nations. 

The committee vote on recognition was 19 to 2, and on the seating of delegates, 
13 to 6. The committee's recommendations are expected to be adopted by the 
conference today. 



34 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

The Rev. Kenneth M. Smith of Colorado Springs was chairman of the commit- 
tee. The only opposition came from Arthur W. Sanders of Mill Valley, Cal., a 
Methodist layman whose son is in the army. 

"I could not conscientiously vote for immediate recognition of Red China while 
we have our boys in Korea giving their lives and limbs in this war," he said. 

The committee's action was taken after a defense of the Red regime in China by 
a former Congregational missionary, Dr. Lucius Porter, ex-professor at Yenching 
university. Dr. Porter predicted that Christianity would continue to grow under 
the communist regime of Mao Tze-tung altho the role of foreign missionaries would 
diminish. 

He reported that he had lived under the Red regime in China for eight months. 
The courtesy and thoughtfulness of Mao's "liberating armies" in not upsetting 
the village life of the common people, he said, was "very impressive." 

Dr. Porter pointed out that in the first council of GOO set up to guide the new 
government, religious groups had been given representation — five Buddhists and 
two Christians. 

He quoted from a letter he had received from a Chinese Christian scholar as 
follows, "I can conscientiously testify that we live under a government that wants 
to help the people." 

The former missionary asserted that he was sure the communist revolution in 
China was a "popular movement." It was distinguished from the Red revolution 
in Russia, he said, because the emphasis had been upon the efforts of individuals 
to seek a better life, whereas the revolution in Russia had been a throwback to 
"mass, institutional living." 

The Rev. Sumpter M. Riley, Jr., Negro, Chicago district superintendent of the 
Lexington conference of the Methodist church, assailed The Tribune's account of 
the opening day's session, which noted that none of the speakers had a good word 
for capitalism. 

"Capitalism is opposed to democracy," he said. "We want a democratic 
America, not a capitalist America." 

He also spoke against what he described as the color barrier in the Methodist 
church. 

The conference session yesterday, second of the three day meeting, was enlivened 
by an incipient revolt among the delegates. Resolutions were circulated demand- 
ing the resignation of the Rev. Jack R. McMiehael, executive secretary of the 
organization. 

Mc Michael hp,s been listed by the un-American activities committee as a sup- 
porter of numerous communist fronts. The federation itself also has been 
described as a communist front. Dissenters from the administration of 
McMiehael asserted that they were "tired of apologizing" for his soft attitude 
toward communism. The revolt was expected to come to a head at the business 
meeting of the federation last night. 

The meeting is being held in the First Methodist church altho the federation 
is not an official agency of the church. The use of the church for the meeting 
was protested by American Legion posts in Evanston. 

The Chicago Daily News of September 6, 1951, reports the meeting 
in the following words: 

The general assembly of the Methodist Federation for Social Action Thursday 
rejected a resolution urging the United States to recognize Red China. 

The Methodist ministers and laymen also turned down a resolution urging 
the United Nations to seat a delegation of Chinese Communists. 

Instead the assembly adopted by a 22 to 15 vote a resolution stating that the 
Chinese Communists should be granted a U. N. seat only if a truce is negotiated 
in Korea. 

THE ASSEMBLY'S action was regarded as a rebuff to some delegates con- 
sidered leftists. 

The vote came in the closing session of the assembly's three-day annual meeting 
in the First Methodist Church of Evanston. 

THE RESOLUTIONS urging U. S. recognition and a U. N. seat for the Reds 
had been approved Wednesday by the federation's peace commission, with the 
backing of Jack McMiehael, executive secretary. of the federation. 

Despite criticism from some delegates, the assembly on Wednesday endorsed 
his re-election. 

Roger Ragen of the Boston University chapter said his group would withdraw 
if McMiehael stayed on. 



REVIEW OF .METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 35 

THE DELEGATES also voted to delete from a resolution a section on the 
preamble that read: 

"We are supporting a corrupt government rejected by the people of China; 
we have backed the French in a police action against the people of Indochina; 
we are planning large-scale remilitarization of Japan and West Germany; we have 
supported moneyed oil interests in Iran, and repressive measures in other areas 
of Asia and Africa." 

BISHOP EMERITUS Frank J. McConnell of Lucasville, Ohio, federation 
president, said: 

"I question whether we have all the knowledge requisite to making these broad 
statements in the preamble.' 

Later a resolution was adopted urging U. N. troops be pulled back to the 38th 
Parallel pending truce negotiations. 

The federation has no direct connection with the Methodist church. 

The Chicago Tribune of September 7, 1951, carries a front page 
article regarding the final session of the Methodist Federation's an- 
nual meeting. The article, in part, is as follows: 

The Methodist Federation for Social Action, in its final session yesterday in the 
First Methodist Church of Evanston, refused to condemn the soviet union by 
name, but adopted a brief resolution opposing all dictatorships. It also con- 
demned the errors of communism and "laissez faire capitalism," favoring a 
socialist type of economy. 

In a heated debate with a minority attempting to soft pedal any apparent pro- 
communist actions, the leftist group also associated itself with defense of Dr. E. B. 
DuBois, Negro author, under indictment as a foreign agent in connection with an 
alleged communist front peace movement. 

The federation, which is not an official Methodist group, also called for the 
seating of Red China in the United Nations but "on the condition of a negotiated 
peace." In a close vote the delegates defeated a move to demand immediate 
recognition of the Reds by the United States. * * * 

Various prominent Methodist clergymen have resigned from its membership 
which is reported to be 3,000 among the 11 million American Methodists. Fifty- 
six members attended the three day meeting. 

The nearest the federation came to criticism of soviet Russia was in a peace 
resolution. It stated that the "soviet Union and its allies share in the responsi- 
bility for the present international debacle" and that both "east and west" share 
the guilt of the current crisis and the responsibility to secure peaca. 

* * * 

Dr. Albert Barnett, professor at the Candler school of theology, Emory college, 
Atlanta, and a member of the federation's executive committee, tried repeatedly 
with a few others to disassociate the federation from any tinge of communism. 

"You are going out of your way to expound a justification for communism," 
he warned. "I am a great admirer of DuBois, but I oppose his name being men- 
tioned in any resolution." 

The federation came to the support of the 83 year old Negro educator by assert- 
ing that "we demand the right of people to work for peace according to the dictates 
of their consciences without the danger of imprisonment as foreign agents, as in 
the case of Dr. W. E. B. DuBois, whose reputation has long been established as a 
defender of civil liberties." 

The Daily Worker of September 10, 1951, features a four-column 
headline front page story on the meeting of the Methodist Federation 
for Social Action at Evanston, Illinois. It was reported that the 
delegates devoted most of their time to preparing four reports: dealing 
with peace, the struggle for democratic liberties, the struggle for racial 
equality, and a balanced co-operative economy. It was also reported 
that the federation recommended the seating of U. N. delegates of 
the People's Republic of China on the condition of a negotiated truce 
with the cessation of hostilities and withdrawal of troops to the 38th 
Parallel during negotiations. 

According to a news item in the September 10, 1951, issue of the 
Chicago Daily Tribune, at page 22, the Rev. Charles M. Crowe of the 



36 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

Wilmette Parish Methodist Church, Chicago, though not mentioning 
the Methodist Federation for Social Action, said: 

"It is regrettable that the true social concerns of the church shou'd be obscured 
and negated by the left-wing pronouncements of this strictly unofficial body," 
Dr. Crowe declared. "Such views do not represent the voice of the Methodist 
church. This small group has done a great disservice to Methodism. 

"Because of the wide publicity about this meeting, the propaganda effort of the 
Evanston meeting should be challenged and repudiated." 

* * * 

"It is rather a struggle for the soul of man and for power over the human spirit 
and the human mind," he warned. "In their essence, the issues are spiritual. 
With them, no Christian can be neutral. Behind all political and economic 
questions, the fact remains that the sickle and hammer have challenged the cross 
of Christ for the allegiance of the hearts of men." 

The social service federation refused to condemn communism as such, but only 
"errors" in the soviet union's setup. It also condemned "laissez faire" capitalism. 
It asked for recognition of China. 

"There can be no compromise with communism," Dr. Crowe said. "Chris- 
tianity and communism represent two diametrically opposed philosophies of life 
and society. They never can be reconciled and are basically antagonistic. They 
cannot live side by side in the same world for the reason that the very nature of 
communism itself will not permit that to do so. The assertion that the Christian 
church is permitted to operate freely in communist dominated countries is simply 
not so." 

Dr. Crowe said this of Dr. Donald O. Soper of London, Hyde Park soap box 
orator who attended the Evanston meeting: "When the English left-wing socialist 
preacher said at Evanston that no one can be a Christian and not be a socialist, 
he is wrong. Considering the present state of the British economy, such a 
statement to an American audience is an ironical absurdity." 

The Washington Daily News of September 17, 1951, at page 19, 
carries a news item datelined New York, September 17, on the 1951 
meeting. In this item it was reported: 

For some years now, the federation, claiming 4,000 members, including a few 
influential bishops, has been a pivot of controversy within the 11,000,000-member 
Methodist Church. Staunch supporters have turned against the McMichael 
leadership, including the National Conference of Methodist Youth, the Christian 
Advocate (The Voice of Methodism) and the influential Zions Herald. Important 
chapters, such as Boston University's, had announced his re-election would mean 
their automatic withdrawal. 

Yet all this was disregarded in Evanston. And 56 delegates made high pro- 
nouncements of social and political policy under the Methodist label. 

Many of them were right up the Communist alley. 

For instance, the delegates called for the seating of Red China in the United 
Nations "on the condition of a negotiated peace." 

They passed a resolution condemning all dictatorships but refused to name the 
Soviet Union specifically. 

The conference urged the repeal of the McCarran internal security law and the 
Smith Act, under which the 11 Communist chiefs were convicted. 

According to an article in the October 1, 1951, issue of the Chicago 
Daily Tribune, organized opposition within the Methodist Church to 
the activities of the Methodist Federation for Social Action was 
launched at a meeting of delegates from sixteen states in Chicago on 
September 30. An organization to be known as the Circuit Riders 
was formed. According to the article, membership in the organization 
will be confined to members of the Methodist Church who oppose 
extreme liberal and subversive elements attempting to use the Method- 
ists to promulgate their theories. The Methodist Federation for 
Social Action was condemned for inculcating hate, arraying class 
against class, and defying authority of the Methodist Church. 

According to an article in the Daily Worker of April 24, 1951, at 
page 3, datelined Portland, Oreg., April 23, the Northwest regional 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 37 

conference of the Methodist Federation for Social Action urged the 
repeal of the McCarran Act and that deportation proceedings against 
eight Portland, Oreg., residents be dropped. 

DO THE ACTIONS AND DEEDS OF THE METHODIST 
FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL SERVICE AND THE METHOD- 
IST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION PARALLEL THE 
OBJECTIVES OF THE COMMUNIST PARTY? 

The Epworth Herald of March 3, 1934, contains an article by 
Winifred L. Chappell, identified therein as secretary of the Methodist 
Federation for Social Service. This article, a plea to draftees to sabo- 
tage war and the preparations for war, requires no comment by this 
committee. The reader can determine for himself whether such advice 
to young men of draft age is giving aid and comfort to the enemies of 
our county. Miss Chappell's article follows: 

Young church fellows of draft age must decide something when war breaks out. 
I say when rather than if, for though the pending war could even yet be stopped if 
enough people did the necessary thing about it, the fact is that today the peace 
forces are doing almost nothing, while the war makers are as busy as bees and the 
forces that make for war are running forward headlong. 

In general these youth have four choices instead of two as most of them think. 
First they can conform, yield to the draft, play the game of the war makers, be 
cannon fodder, get shot or gassed or blinded or delegged or de-armed — but, if 
possible, beat "the enemy" to it and shoot, gas, blind, de-arm the fellows od the 
other side first. 

In the eecond place, they can be conscientious objectors, and go to prison. A 
few score did that during the World War; a few hundred or thousand will do it 
next time. That takes even more courage than to go over the top. It takes just 
as much physical courage — the C. O.'s (Conscientious Objectors) in some prisons 
during the World War were subjected to extremely cruel treatment. And, in 
addition, it takes moral courage of a type and degree impossible in peace time to 
measure or comprehend. When the country is suddenly set toward war — when 
movie by persuasive picture and radio by persuasive voice, when the press, the 
pulpit, the schoolroom, the conversation of all the people, the enticements of the 
blonde or the brunette beauty, are for "patriotism," for defense of one's country, 
for bayoneting the enemy, what unspeakably clear thinking and brave doing 
it takes to be a C. O.! 

If the fellow's parents are with him it helps some — unless the burden of having 
them held traitors onsets the help it gives. His preacher must be with him. If 
you will be a C. O., insist that your pastor stand back of you. Our church has 
spoken. Just now, while peace is still here, the tide in the church is running 
pretty strongly in the direction of refusal to bear arms. Also in the schools that 
point of view is getting something more than a hearing. Several Methodist youth 
at this very hour are forfeiting their greatly desired college courses, because they 
refuse preparation to participate in the war game. In at least one or two of our 
universities some students and faculty members are preparing to see to it that the 
resources of the public speaking, the literature, the chemical, and technological 
departments are not used for war, not, at least, without the public knowing all 
about it. In Great Britain the famous Oxford Union has publicly stated that it will 
not, in the event of war, defend king and country. 

But now a third choice, hardly so much as even heard of during the World War, 
appears in this possibility: Stay out of jail — why thus separate yourself from the 
masses? Why thus let yourself be put out of the game? Accept the draft, 
take the drill, go into the camps and onto the battlefield, or into the munitions 
factories and transportation work — but sabotage war preparations and war. Be 
agitators for sabotage. Down tools when the order is to make and load munitions. 
Spoil war materials and machinery. 

If, thinking realistically of this third way, you shrink violently back because you 
see that it means deceit, lies, by word and deed, the answer is that if you choose 
the first way, the "honorable" way of patriotism, then also will you have to lie and 
deceive — that's part of war. Nor will you wholly escape these ungodly practices 



38 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

if you make the second choice. Very likely, for instance, you will be called on 
to give evidence against other C. O.'s. Will you do it or will you lie in their 
behalf? 

The fourth choice is really a further development of the third. It calls for 
sabotage but with the deliberate, conscious, informed intent to get rid of the 
present economic system, of which war is a part, and to build a new world to the 
existence of which peace is a necessity. 

If you will make this choice, make it now and begin to meet, before wai breaks, 
with others of like purpose and of iron will to carry out the purpose. This means 
knowing what selfish capitalism is like, not just in general, but in particular — not 
flinching even from knowing by name and specific deed the big profit takers who 
have betrayed the people — how they have profited from the starvation of children; 
how they have called upon police and militia, club and gas bomb, and machine 
gun to put down the workers when they have cried for bread. 

And it is not enough to know about capitalism. Also you must know with 
mind and emotion and will to achieve, the kind of new society you want. Those 
who would build the new world must look with wide, appraising eyes at the good 
earth's resources and at man's brilliant achievements in converting the resources 
into usable and beautiful forms, and at man's organizational power and knowl- 
edge to transport the things garnered and made to meet the needs of the remotest 
peoples. They must want desperately that all the peoples of the world should 
be set free forever from poverty and given a chance at culture, beauty and 
spirituality. 

Youth in the Christian church must wake up, or they are not going to be the 
leaders in the programs here described. We church folk are getting little or no 
teaching or training in the hard matter of turning the war situation, when it is 
here, into a deliberate program for a new social order. It is well, then, for the 
fellows who are ear-marked for cannon fodder and for aiming their targets (targets 
being a soft word for the most diabolical equipment for killing that an age of 
science and technology can devise) at the boys in the enemy camp, to begin to 
make contact with others with the same ideals, and begin to study these possi- 
bilities — and others 3 r ou may think of — in the light of Christian teachings. 

High ideals will give zest to the task — but it is a grim way. Perhaps church 
boys (and though I write of boys, the girls have almost precisely the same choices 
to make) are right in thinking that for them there are but two choices — war or 
jail. 

On March 30, 1934, the House of "Representatives adopted House 
Resolution 198. This resolution provided for the appointment of a 
special committee to conduct an investigation of the extent, character, 
and objects of Nazi propaganda activities in the United States, and 
the diffusion within the United States of subversive propaganda 
that is instigated from foreign countries and attacks the principle 
of the form of Government as guaranteed by our Constitution, and 
all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress in 
any necessary remedial legislation. Representative John W. Mc- 
Cormack was appointed chairman. The committee conducted public 
and executive hearings in several cities. On February 15, 1935, the 
committee filed its report to Congress, with the following recom- 
mendations: 

1. That the Congress should enact a statute requiring all publicity, propa- 
ganda, or public-relations agents or other agents or agencies, who represent in 
this country any foreign government or a foreign political party or foreign indus- 
trial or commercial organization, to register with the Secretary of State of the 
United States, and to state name and location of such foreign employer, the 
character of the service to be rendered, and the amount of compensation paid 
or to be paid therefor. 

2. That Congress should enact a statute conferring upon the Secretary of 
Labor authority to shorten or terminate the stay in this country of any visitor 
admitted here under temporary visa, whenever in the judgment of the Secretary 
such visitor shall engage in the promotion or dissemination of propaganda or 
engage in political activity in the United States. 

3. We recommend that the Department of State, in collaboration with the 
Department of Labor, negotiate treaties and agreements with foreign nations by 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 39 

which such nations shall agree to receive back any person entering this country 
from such foreign nation at any time such immigrant shall become subject to 
deportation under our laws. 

4. That Congress should make it unlawful to advise, counsel, or urge any 
member of the military or naval forces of the United States, including the reserves 
thereof, to disobey the laws or regulations governing such forces. 

5. That Congress should enact necessary legislation so that the United States 
attorneys outside of the District of Columbia can proceed against witnesses who 
refuse to answer questions, or refuse to produce documents and records, or refuse 
to appear or who in any other manner hold in contempt the authority of any 
Congressional committee vested with the powers herein described, at any time 
during the official life of the committee. 

G. That Congress should make it an unlawful act for any person to advocate 
changes in a manner that incites to the overthrow or destruction by force and 
violence of the Government of the United States, or of the form of government 
guaranteed to the several States by article IV, section 4, of the Constitution of 
the United States. 

On January 7, 1935, Winifred L. Chappell, as secretary of the 
Methodist Federation for Social Service, addressed a letter to the 
Honorable John W. McCormack, House of Representatives, enclosing 
the following resolution that had been adopted by a group of Methodist 
preachers on December 31, and which Miss Chappell had been 
instructed to forward to Congressman McCormack: 

Whereas, proposals have been made to the Congressional Committee investi- 
gating un-American activities to enact a federal sedition bill penalizing mere 
utterances, a bill to exclude from the mails all Communist publications, the 
reestablishment of a secret service section in the Department of Justice aimed at 
radical organizations, and even more stringent regulations of immigration for 
the purpose of setting up an inquisition into political opinions, and 

Whereas, these proposals and others similar are aimed at freedom of speech 
and press contrary to the provisions of the Constitution and American tradition, 

Therefore Be" It Resolved, that we the undersigned ministers of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church oppose the enactment of any and all laws penalizing mere 
utterances in the absence of overt acts, increasing the powers of censorship over 
the mails exercised by the Post Office Department, creating any agency in the 
federal government to deal with any activities because of their political or eco- 
nomic character, or adding to the present severe restrictions on political opinion 
in controlling immigration and deportation. 

We condemn all such proposals as un-American and wholly unnecessary in the 
interest of protecting public safety or order. Present legislation is more than 
adequate. If legislative action is needed, it is rather in the direction of repealing 
existing restrictive statutes than in enacting new ones. 

(Signed) Lee H. Ball 

Archey D. Ball 
Charles C. Webber 
Albert Allinger 
Lester W. Auman 
Hartley J. Hartman 
Ralph B. Urmy 
C. Lloyd Lee 
Dorr Diefendorf 
Wayne White 



4U REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

The following editorial, appearing in the February 13, 1935, issue 
of the Washington News, also indicates that the Methodist Federa- 
tion for Social Service was opposed to legislation intended to suppress 
radicalism: 

A timely warning is issued by the Methodist Federation for Social Service 
against proposed measures to suppress radicals. 

Speaking for the Federation, Dr. Harry F. Ward said : 

"If American citizens let these laws pass, they will wake up and find they have 
lost all the freedom guaranteed them by the Constitution. . If the Communists 
are denied their constitutional rights, We shall soon see the order of events that 
was followed in Europe. First the Communists are repressed; then the Socialists, 
then the labor unions, then the others. 

"If this legislation is passed big business will have the legal machinery to put 
out of business any organization that opposes capitalism or war or that conducts 
a strike. It will not be necessary to subsidize Fascist storm troops. They will 
kill democracy in the name of democracy, and they will trample upon every 
sacred principle of Christianity." 

To appreciate the logic of Dr. Ward's statement. Americans have only to recall 
the tyranny of the Federal spy system under Attorney Generals Palmer and 
Daugherty. 

In January 1939, the Methodist Federation for Social Service issued 
a pamphlet entitled, "The Boycott Question." The inside front cover 
is devoted to listing books, pamphlets, and articles. Among the 
pamphlets appears one by the American League for Peace and Democ- 
racy and another by the American Committee for Non-Participation 
in Japanese Aggression. Articles appearing in the then current issue 
of the following publications are mentioned: 

Amerasia, that now defunct magazine which figured so promi- 
nently in the disappearance of confidential papers from the State 
Department and other Government agencies; 

Far Eastern Survey, an official publication of the Institute of 
Pacific Relations, an organization presently under the scrutiny of 
a Senate committee; 

China Today, a publication of the American Friends of the 
Chinese People. 

Writers of the several articles include Frederick V. Field, Civil 
Rights Congress official recently remanded to jail for his failure 
to reveal the source of funds used to furnish bail for convicted 
Communists; W. W. Lockwood and Ch'ao-ting Chi, of the Insti- 
tute of Pacific Relations. 

Ch'ao-ting Chi is well known for his Communist-front activities. 
He was one of the editors of Amerasia; a speaker at the joint 
meeting of the American League Against War and Fascism and 
of the American Friends of the Chinese People; a speaker for 
New Masses; a speaker for the United Student Peace Committee 
of the American Student Union; a speaker for the American 
League for Peace and Democracy; a member of the Executive 
Committee of the China Aid Council; and a member of the 
Advisory Council of the Theater Arts Committee. 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 



41 



The following undated letter is reproduced to illustrate that Harry 
F. Ward, as one of the secretaries of the Methodist Federation for 
Social Service, used the stationery of the Federation to promote the 
cause of the American League for Peace and Democracy: 



Exiiirit 4 




Methodist Federatio: 



u LOT OOClai 



service, undated letter. 



On April 4, 1946, members of the executive board of the Joint Anti- 
Fascist Refugee Committee appeared before the Committee on Un- 
American Activities in response to subpenas. As a result of their 
refusal to respond to questions, they were cited for contempt. The 
Methodist Federation for Social Service addressed the following 
letter to members of Congress, urging that the contempt citations 



42 REVIEW OP METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 



against the members of the executive board of the Joint Anti-Fascist 
Refugee Committee be rejected: 

Exhibit 6 




Methodist Federation for Social Service, letter, dated April 12, 1946. 

The Methodist Federation for Social Service issued a series of un- 
dated circulars, each entitled Crisis Leaflet. Produced in part in 
catechistical form, these circulars are an illustration of some of the 
things advocated by the Methodist Federation for Social Service, 
an example, Crisis Leaflet No. 9 contains the following: 

Jobs for all? 

The only country that has a complete social-economic plan is 
Soviet Union, and they have no unemployment. This is not because 
their industry is expanding. We had plenty of unemployment when we 
were expanding. They got rid of it because they planned to get rid of it. 
Their plan provides for everybody to take part. .... 



As 



the 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 43 

Under the profit system, share-the-work means share-the-misery. 
Under a planned society, sharc-the-work means share-the-leisure and the 
cultural opportunities. 

Crisis Leaflet No. 12 berates capitalism, as follows: 

Freedom Under Capitalism? 

Did you ever figure out how much freedom you have under the profit 
system? Or how long it will last? 

' In the attempt to save the profit system the capitalist countries are 
all abandoning democracy. All of them are developing the Fascist 
state, with its centralized control. 

Democracy is proclaimed a failure in capitalist countries because they 
tried to get political freedom without economic freedom. They let a 
few own and run the essential property of the nation. So the big interests 
became able to control the Government and destroy our liberties. 

The Methodist Federation for Social Action issued a circular en- 
titled, "Methodist Bishops Unanimously Protest Un-American Prac- 
tices of our Government." The full text of the protest is: 

We are greatly disturbed over the reports which constantly reach the public, of 
un-American and unconstitutional practices by governmental authorities in the 
attempts to rid public offices of employees alleged to be engaged in "subversive" 
efforts against our nation. 

These reports are so numerous in the press, and so freely admitted and defended 
by governmental agencies, that we cannot doubt that, while the reports of each 
governmental procedure may be exaggerated, there is enough of fact in them to 
warrant serious alarm among our citizens. 

We admit the right of any agency, governmental or other, to scrutinize carefully 
the fitness of any applicant for public post but we insist that the examination of 
employees already chosen by the government should itself not be conducted in 
un-American ways. By such ways we mean the dismissal of employees without 
informing them of the charges against them and without granting them oppor- 
tunity of facing their accusers. 

We protest against judging men by vague and unsubstantiated assertion of their 
holding subversive views, or of associating with so-called suspicious characters. 
We maintain that such methods are not calculated to secure a high type of public 
servants, and we declare our judgment that the methods arc themselves violations 
of constitutional guarantees, and are therefore un-American. 

This protest was undoubtedly aimed at the program inaugurated 
by the President of the United States in an effort to rid the Govern- 
ment of employees of questionable loyalty. According to the above- 
quoted text, it is the judgment of the Methodist Federation for Social 
Action that the methods adopted by the President of the United States 
are themselves violations of Constitutional guarantees, and are there- 
fore un-American. It is interesting to compare the judgment of the 
Methodist Federation for Social Action with that of the judiciary. 

The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia 
Circuit decided the case of Dorothy Bailey vs.. Seth W. Richardson, 
et al., on March 22, 1950. Miss Bailey, employed by the Federal 
Security Agency, was advised on November 1, 1948, by the Fourth 
Regional Loyalty Board "that, on all the evidence, reasonable grounds 
exist for belief that you are disloyal to the Government of the United 
States." On February 9, 1949, the Loyalty Review Board sustained 
the finding. Miss Bailey brought action in the United States District 
Court for the District of Columbia for a declaratory judgment and for 
an order directing her reinstatement in Government employ. The 
District Court granted a defense motion for judgment. An appeal to 
the United States Court of Appeals followed. The appellate court 
said: 

. . . We cannot ignore the world situation in which not merelv two ideologies 
but two potentially adverse forces presently exist, and certainly we cannot require 



44 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

that the President and the Congress ignore it. Infiltration of government service 
is new a recognized technique for the overthrow of government. We do not 
think that the individual rights guaranteed by the Constitution necessarily mean 
that a government dedicated to those rights cannot preserve itself in the world as 
it is. This case presents a small segment of that momentous question. In the 
light of all that is well known, much of which is recited in opinions of the Supreme 
Court, we cannot say that a policy of caution in respect to members of the Com- 
munist Party in the Government service under current circumstances is forbidden 
by any restriction in the Constitution. The risks are for the President to esti- 
mate, and the assumption of risk is for him to decide. If he thinks that under 
present circumstances only those whose loyalty is beyond suspicion should be 
employed by this Government, the policy is his to make. The responsibility in 
this field is his, and the power to meet it must also be his. The judiciary cannot 
dictate that he must either retain in Government service those whom he reason- 
ably suspects or else reveal publicly the means and methods by which be detects 
disloyalty. 

Upon the contention that suspicion of disloyalty has characteristics distinguish- 
ing it from suspicion of other offenses, we conclude that the differences tend to 
solidify rather than to weaken the application of the doctrine that the President 
and the Congress are responsible for the qualifications, ability, judgment and 
loyalty of Government employees and that removal from Government employ- 
ment is within their discretion. 

It is our clear opinion that the President, absent congressional restriction, may 
remove from Government service any person of whose loyalty he is not completely 
convinced. He may do so without assigning any rea,son and without giving the 
employee any explanatory notice. If, as a matter of policy, he chooses to give 
the employee a general description of the information which concerns him and to 
hear what the employee has to say, he does not thereby strip himself of any 
portion of his constitutional power to choose and to remove. 

We conclude that the Executive Order 1 before us and the proceedings under 
it violated no congressional limitation upon the executive power of removal; 
that no constitutional right was involved in this non-appointment or dismissal; 
and that, insofar as the circumstances imposed hardship upon the individual, the 
exigencies of government in the public interest under current conditions must 
prevail, as they always must when a similar clash arises . 

The Pacific Northwest Chapter of the Methodist Federation for 
Social Action issued the following statement regarding the Can well, 
Committee (Washington State Joint Legislative Fact-Finding Com- 
mittee on Un-American Activities): 

The joint resolution passed by the Washington State Legisl ature in March 
1947, looks to be extremely un-American and un-democratic. 

The resolution states that its purpose is to investigate persons and groups 
operating "Under cover of the protection afforded by the Bill of Rights." This 
is an indirect admission that those to be investigated are acting within their con- 
stitutional rights as American citizens. 

This committee is given almost unlimited powers: "All the powers conferred 
upon legislative committees . . . , (and) all powers necessary or convenient to 
accomplish the objects and purposes of this resolution ... To adopt and from 
time to time amend such rules governing its procedure ... as it may to it appear 
appropriate ... to summon and subpoena witnesses, ... to administer oaths 
. . . every department ... of the state government, including the attorney 
general . . . shall furnish the committee . . . any and all such assistance . . . 
as the committee or subcommittee deems proper . . . ; and BE IT FURTHER 
RESOLVED that the Washington State Patrol and all officers and members 
thereof shall furnish such assistance to the committee as the chairman may 
direct. 

In both Seattle newspapers there was a combined announcement by the com- 
mittee of a future public hearing and a list of the things it will establish by said 
hearing. This, indeed, is an overt perversion of justice which holds the person 
to be guilty before the hearing has even started. 

Let us do all in our power as Christian citizens to explain to our fellow citizens 
the shocking nature of this bill and the committee it establishes. 

'Executive Order 9335, March 21, 1947 [committee footnote]. 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 45 

CRITICISM OF THE METHODIST FEDERATION FOR 
SOCIAL SERVICE AND THE METHODIST FEDERATION 
FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

Over a period of years, there has been considerable criticism of the 
pronouncements and activities of the federation, both from within 
and without the Methodist Church. Those criticisms coming from 
within the church and its membership should be entitled to more con- 
sideration than those from other sources. They indicate in many in- 
stances a definite disagreement with the objectives of the federation. 

The February 1932 Issue of the National Republic contains an article 
by George B. Lockwood, entitled, "The Enemy Within the Gates of 
Methodism." The article states: 

Every Methodist in the country, and indeed every member of the Protestant 
Church, for all denominations are to some extent showing similar symptoms, 
should send to the Methodist Federation for Social Service, 150 Broadway, New 
York City, for a copy of the November 15th issue of the Social Service Bulletin. 
Perhaps to avoid imposing undue expense on this organization and ensure receipt 
of a copy, a two-cent stamp should be enclosed, and if copies of this issue are no 
longer available, some other issue should be asked for. 

This suggestion is made because the National Republic does not believe that 
many Methodists, or Protestants generally, know how far this and other churches 
are being committed to the socialist and even to the atheist-communist movement. 
The evidence is clear enough in the releases of this publication. Fully ninety-five 
per cent of the rank and file of the Methodist and of other Protestant churches are 
not in sympathy with communism, socialism, or the resistance to the Constitution 
and laws of the federal government of the several states, involved in defiance of the 
laws making every citizen a member of the unorganized militia subject to call in 
case of invasion or insurrection. 

The Methodist Federation of Social Service, it has been stated, is not an official 
bureau of the Methodist Episcopal Church (North), but it is permitted to use the 
name of the church in its propaganda, which circulates widely, especially among 
ministers with semi-official sanction. The use of the name could be stopped if 
the will to do it existed. 

The first article in the November 15th "Social Service Bulletin" is entitled 
"From Some Fall Conference." A memorial of the Michigan conference asking 
Congress to withdraw all support of military defense training in civilian education 
institutions is recorded. The report of the social service commission of the Ohio 
conference, said to have been unanimously adopted by the conference, is quoted, 
with this comment: "The press gave it wide publicity. A reporter eagerly taking 
the copy said: 'Does the church generally stand for things like this? That's 
socialism.' " The comment of the Social Service Bulletin is: "So be it." Resolu- 
tions of the social service commission of the Pittsburgh conference are also quoted 
including the statement: "To apply the word democracy to the system under' 
which we live is a ghastly joke." It is declared that the action of the American 
government in not joining the League Court is a "disgrace." "Preachers are 
invited to unite with those Christian leaders who have publicly declared to the 
President and to Congress that THEY OWE DUTY TO A HIGHER MORAL 
POWER THAN THE STATE." This was the charge made against the Roman 
Catholic Church in the campaign of 1028. The report suggests that churches 
supplement their appeals for disarmament with the GANDHI METHOD OF 
DISCIPLINE in the methods of non-violence." Gandhi, be it remembered is 
resisting the government under which he lives. Declarations have been made 
even from the pulpit that the policy of prohibition should be resisted as immoral. 
The adoption by foes of prohibition, on such grounds, of the Gandhi means of 
resistance to law proposed by this conference would cause millions of people out 
of svmpathy with the law to erect stills in public, collect great crowds of sympa- 
thizers to obstruct the execution of the law by "peaceful" means, and so crowd the 
jails, obstruct traffic, and render the police power so helpless that the execution 
of the law would be made impossible without great bloodshed. 

The Rock River Conference, it is stated, adopted resolutions asking the Presi- 
dent to acquire the hatred of France and others of the allies by trying to bring 
about a revision of the "war guilt" clause of the Versailles treaty, which the 

01-2o2° — o2 1 



46 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

United States did not sign, and urging Congress to so revise the laws that aliens 
declining to consent to defend this country in time of insurrection or invasion may 
be admitted to American citizenship. It also resolved in favor of the church giv- 
ing moral support to those of its members who refuse to defend the United States 
in case of invasion or insurrection. The General Conference is asked to urge the 
United States to take the initiative in the "total abolition of national armies and 
navies," including the insignificant military force which is maintained in this 
country to quell armed insurrection should it be undertaken in fulfillment in this 
country of the proclaimed policies of powerful insurrectionary elements, com- 
mitted to the overthrow of our government by violence. 

An encouraging item is the one which tells what befell a report prepared by 
radicals for "submission to the Wisconsin Conference. The statement was "in- 
advertently released to the press ahead of time. Scare heads riled up some of 
the preachers. The upshot was that the commission was not even allowed to 
read the report on the floor." The report denounced President Hoover for 
"childish chatter that the 'American way of life must bo preserved,' " which it 
said "indicates an incompetency and ignorance which borders on the immoral in 
its evasion of responsibility." The report praised the British dole system. This 
repsrt also dealt with many political questions in characteristic socialist fashion, 
including "freedom of conscience without bounds," the Macintosh case, pacifism, 
internationalism, birth control, prison reform, the radio industry, the motion 
picture industrv, etc., etc. 

Harry F. Ward, moving spirit of the Methodist Social Service Federation, 
according to this bulletin, is visiting in Moscow. He writes that opposition to the 
Communist dictatorship is practically ended in Soviet Russia. "The grade is 
made," lie says, "and the intelligentsia are accommodating themselves to it and 
even beginning to be proud of it." The Social Service Bulletin says that one of 
its exchanges, the Moscow News, English bolshevik daily, comments on Dr. 
Ward's visit: "Dr. Ward, who is author of 'Our Economic Morality,' a book on 
capitalist ethics in economics, plans to write a parallel volume on communist 
ethics in economics." And doubtless Dr. Ward will find plenty of ethics in 
atheism, wholesale slaughter of political dissenters, and ruthless suppression of all 
independence of thought in the red fatherland, where the theory of socialism, as 
promoted by the Social Service Bulletin, is in full flower. 

The Social Service Bulletin deplores the discontinuation of "Labor's News," 
organ of the Federated Press, which has long been engaged, under communist and 
socialist direction, in distributing propaganda to sympathetic journals. The 
Bulletin announces that subscribers will receive instead the New Leader, socialist 
organ, the American Guardian, radical weekly or the Labor Age, organ of the 
Conference for Progressive Labor Action, socialist organization. 

Miscellaneous items in the Social Service Bulletin are of significance. Henry 
Ford, who has made millions out of his communist commercial connections, is 
quoted as praising the work done by the bolsheviks' Leningrad factory in producing 
tractors. Roy Burt, of the Epworth League office, has visited Tom Mooney in 
prison and "ranks him with the four or five outstanding personalities he has met 
in a generation." Mooney's correspondence with the Moscow masters, showing 
his affiliation with their conspiracy to overthrow the American government by 
violence, extirpate religion and destroy family life, has recently been published. 
Ralph Chapman, "L W. W. poet" is quoted in condemnation of the imprisonment 
of the I. W. W. leaders who were convicted of killing members of the American 
Legion in Contralia, Wash. Readers are urged to write to the American Civil 
Liberties Union about a test case they are making in New Jersey of the right of an 
atheist to refuse to testify under an oath, recognizing the existence of a God, 
and an attempt is made to show that Thomas Edison, who lived in New Jersey 
and testified under oath there, would have been refused permission to testify in 
that state because he was an atheist, which he was not. Three pro-Soviet books 
are commended to the attention of the readers. The United States is accused of 
being in the same boat with Japan because of its intervention in Latin American 
countries at the request of constitutional authorities, without seizing territory, 
although Japan is in China over the violent p-otest of the Chinese government and 
is seizing sovereignty over vast territory for itself. Such a statement indicates 
violent bias against America. 

Dan B. Brummitt is quoted as saying that communists in Soviet Russia know 
all about American wickedness, injustice and tyranny, as cited by revolutionary 
radicals in the Scottsboro, Dayton, Sacco and Vanzetti, Mooney and Billings 
cases, and "as to unemployment, how they rub that in." 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 47 

Members of the church are urged "to use the church as an instrument in getting 
rid of capitalism and inaugurating a decent, humane society," and it quotes 
Norman Thomas, socialist leader, as saying in the Christian Century that the 
Christian religion "which in the main has been an opiate, yet carries in its sacred 
books so much dynamite." This echoes the bolshevist-atheist slogan: "Religion 
is the opium of the people." _ . _ . 

Reference is made to the fact that the Methodists Social Service Federation 
"is participating with a group of liberal organizations working on an unemploy- 
ment program." The animus of this movement is understood when the declara- 
tion is quoted, in deprecation of the relief program carried on in this country 
during a period of depression unparalleled for generosity in world history: "No 
industrial nation has been so derelict as ours . . . the (present) plan of relief is 
the most fruitless and degrading plan ever undertaken by any nation," etc., etc. 
The nation in which wages and standards of living are and long have been from 
two to ten times as high as those maintained in any European, Asiatic or Latin- 
American country, and so far beyond those in favored Soviet Russia that poverty 
in the United States is a more desirable condition than affluence among the serfs 
of oriental socialism, is described as the most backward in the world, which of 
course helps to explain why this publication is so strongly in favor of every effort 
to persuade the youth of the land not to be willing to defend it when threatened 
bv revolutionary violence. 
'Harry F. Ward, head of the Methodist Federation for Social Service, now in 
Moscow drinking deep from the headsprings of bolshevism, has been active as a 
director of the American Civil Liberties Union, which chiefly occupies itself with 
the defense of revolutionary radicals who fall within the toils of the law. Oa 
this board he sat alongside some of the revolutionary communist leaders of the 
country. The executive spirit and guiding spirit of this A. C. L. U. is Roger 
Baldwin, who calls himself a "philosophical anarchist." He was a delegate to 
the communist controlled International Anti-Imperialist League at its convention 
in July, 1930, in Frankfort, Germany. He admitted helping New York commu- 
nists frame a telegram to Count Karolyi which induced him to refuse to appear in 
New York City under the auspices of the socialists, on the ground that they 
were not sufficiently revolutionary. The American Civil Liberties Union has 
accepted subsidies from the communist-socialist controlled Gardland [sic] fund, 
which spent a million and a half dollars financing the I. W. W., the revolutionary 
communist party and its official journals, the Lane pamphlet which has been 
used to foment opposition to military training in American schools and colleges, 
and even handed $250 to the Wyoming conference of the Methodist Episcopal 
church to ur^e the disarming of America in the face of the open threats by the 
revolutionary organizations to wdiich it gave most of its money, to overthrow 
American government by force and violence. Ward is connected also with Union 
Theological Seminary, of New York. 

The author of this article was reared in a Methodist home and graduated from a 
Methodist college. His father, far from believing that there was anything in- 
consistent about being a Methodist, and at the same time being loyal to the 
American government under which Methodism grew to be one of the most 
numerous and powerful religious organizations in the world, in his youth turned his 
back on college to shoulder a musket, fight for his country, and with other Meth- 
odists receive the thanks of Abraham Lincoln for the loyalty of the Methodist 
Church to the nation in time of peril. This soldier-father was for many years 
a volunteer choir leader and trustee of the Methodist Church in his home town. 
His closest friends were the several Union soldiers who long served as pastors of 
that church, sturdy men who would have knocked down any pantaletted pacifist 
who had suggested that thereby they had done anything un-Christian, or that the 
"copperhead" draft-resisters who shot them in the back were worthy of "moral" 
support of their church. In comparative poverty he denied himself in order to 
give money to support the Methodist Church, and to send eight of his children 
to a Methodist college. Not to protest the effort now being made to use the 
Methodist Church to betray the principles and undermine the government for 
which he fought, would be to dishonor my father's memory. To stand by without 
protest, while the foundations of the church he loved are undermined by men out 
of sympathy with the historic traditions a,nd beliefs of Methodism, and propa- 
gandists for alien rather than American political creeds would be to be false to his 
memorj' and to the ideals of true Methodism. It is clear that the use of church 
publications to preach grossly materialistic state socialism and of pulpits to pro- 
claim state socialist despotism rather than religion and human liberty as the 
effective means of human regeneration is responsible for the obvious fact that the 



48 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

people are losing interest in religion, and that by the time of the red dawn, if we 
proceed along present lines, these churches will be sufficiently depopulated to make 
their conversion into cinemas and communist schools of atheism easy of ac- 
complishment. 

The following news item, date-lined Columbus, Ohio, April 29, and 
appearing in the April 30, 1936, issue of the Los Angeles Examiner 
indicates the existence of a movement of laymen and ministers in 
opposition to the Methodist Federation for Social Service: 

After a day of wrangling over "strategy," 75 members of the so-called Methodist 
Federation for Social Service today accepted a memorial to submit to the quad- 
rennial conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church on which they purpose to 
defend themselves against a vigorous movement of laymen and ministers who 
have branded the Federation "Red." 

The Federation group, which claims 2,500 members, was presided over by 
Bishop Francis J. McConnell, of New York. The memorial which the church 
conference, opening Friday in Columbus, is asked to approve as an expression of 
the Methodist Church, was drafted by the Federation secretary, Dr. Harry F. 
Ward, well-known as the chairman of the Communist-dominated American 
League Against War and Fascism. 

The declaration has as its main theme: 

"We urge members of our church and our fellow citizens to abandon the profit- 
seeking economy and substitute an economic method which does not violate the 
divine law, which leads humanity to a more abundant life . . . 

"As a substitute for the profit-seeking economy we urge a planned and planning 
social economy . . . 

"Planning by the people depends upon ownership by the people." 

Dr. Ray Allen, of Buffalo, N. Y., criticized the memorial as a "waste of breath" 
because, he said: 

"The general conference may go ahead some, but they won't go ahead a long 
way and anything that has the earmarks of Harry Ward on it they'll turn down." 

Dr. Ralph B. Urmey, of Westfield, N. J., pointing out that the purpose of the 
Federation was to make the general conference "take a step in advance," urged 
adoption of the memorial on the plea: 

"Let's get all we can." 

Doctor Ward, arguing against change of the memorial, declared: 

"The strategy behind the regional conferences was to combat two things: 
First, an organized reaction in the conference to attack this Federation; second, 
a general reaction throughout the whole country." 

The "reaction" to which Doctor Ward referred is a move headed by laymen 
conferences of the church which are expected to ask the general conference to 
purge the church of Communism and to refuse the Federation the right to use 
the word "Methodist" in its name. 

That this movement is appreciated by the Federation was seen in a long dis- 
cussion today over use of the term "profit" in the memorial. Under pressure 
from the floor at the morning session, Bishop McConnell appointed a committee 
to rephrase the memorial. Doctor Ward was named one of the committee. 

Additional evidence that Methodist laymen objected to the program 
and activities of the Methodist Federation for Social Service will be 
found in the following article appearing in the Washington Herald of 
April 23, 1936: 

Gradually but inexorably THE TRUTH is becoming known about SNEAK 
COMMUNISM in the educational, religious and cultural institutions of America. 

It required the patriotic and persistent delving of a subcommittee of the House 
of Representatives to show how Professors Charles A. Beard 9,nd George S. 
Counts, of the "Social Frontier" group at Columbia University, have perverted 
the purposes of the American Historical Association as a means of bootlegging 
Marxism into PUBLIC SCHOOLS of the country. 

Now, due to the courage and convictions of certain preachers and loyal laymen, 
the hypocritical work of the socalled METHODIST FEDERATION FOR 
SOCIAL SERVICE is being "shown up" to the eight million members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Moreover, there is a strong probability that, before another month goes by, this 
group of collectivist conspirators will be officially forbidden to misuse any longer 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 49 

the name of this CHRISTIAN communion as an instrument for propagation of 
ATHEIST communism. 

The Methodist Federation for Social Service PURPORTS to be an "author- 
ized agencv of the Methodist Episcopal Church." 

At the head of it is BISHOP FRANCIS J. McCONNELL, of New York, a 
Marxist. 

One of its secretaries is DR. HARRY F. WARD, professor of CHRISTIAN 
ETHICS at the Union Theological Seminary; associated with Beard and Counts 
in a number of "movements;" chairman of the American Civil Liberties Union — 
the director of which Roger Baldwin, says "Communism is the goal;" and national 
chairman of the American League Against War and Fascism, of which Earl 
Browder, secretary of the Communist Party, is vice chairman, and which — so says 
M. J. Olgin. Russian-born revolutionist, in this book, "Why Communism?" — 
was FORMED BY THE COMMUNISTS as a "front for propaganda." 

The other secretary of the federation is WINIFRED L. CHAPPELL, who on 
March 3, 1934, published in the "Epworth Herald" an article advising American 
youth in event of war, to enter the army in order to be able to SABOTAGE THE 
NATION'S DEFENSE FROM WITHIN. 

This self-constituted "Federation" isuues a monthly publication, "The Social 
Questions Bulletin," edited by Ward and Winifred Chappell, which in its mast- 
head describes the federation as — "An organization which seeks to abolish the 
profit system in order to develop a classless society based upon the obligation of 
mutual service." 

Just what that "program" has to do with the religion of John and Charles 
Wesley is, of course, far from obvious. 

Last year, this federation began laying out strategy to capture the official 
indorsement of the Methodist Episcopal Church, which it has NEVER HAD. 

In the June, 1935, issue of its bulletin Ward and Miss Chappell proposed to hold 
a preliminary "conference" of the federation group prior to the general conference 
of the entire church, aimed at taking the general conference by storm. 

The preliminary conference would be simply a "packed" gathering. As the 
Ward-Chappell bulletin said of a preceding "preliminary conference": 

"It was agreed that time would be saved and confusion avoided in the discussion 
if this gathering called together ONLY THOSE WHOSE THINKING AND 
ETHICAL JUDGMENT HAD REACHED THE POINT OF REJECTING 
THE CAPITALIST SYSTEM. Thus the conference could center on planning 
and action." 

Now the campaign is about to be executed. 

The general conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church will begin at Colum- 
bus, Ohio, on May 1 (Europe's Labor Day!) 

Accordingly — we now quote from "the Literary Digest" of April 18, 1936 — 

"The Federation for Social Service will be first on the field. It has called a 
meeting in Columbus for April 29, w r here it is intended to map the campaign for 
the general conference two days later." 

But hold! Methodists have been waking up to what BISHOP McCONNELL 
and HARRY F. WARD and WINIFRED CHAPPELL are doing. 

At the general conference in Columbus will be representatives of the conference 
of Methodist laymen organized two years ago by Methodist business men in 
Chicago; also of an interstate group of which former Gov. Arthur M. Hyde, of 
Missouri, is a distinguished member; and also of the laymen of the New York 
conference. 

These patriotic Methodists arc going to FIGHT the Ward-Chappell outfit. 

In fact, war was formally declared last Thursday night by the New York 
laymen at a dinner at Kingston, New York. 

This group, representing 300 local churches with 60,000 members, heard the 
subversive activities of the Methodist federation vigorously denounced, and 
adopted UNANIMOUSLY a resolution declaring: 

"That this body protests the use of the name Methodist UNDER ANY CIR- 
CUMSTANCES bv the Methodist Federation for Social Service, since it DOES 
NOT HAVE A LEGAL OR A MORAL RIGHT TO DO SO." 

However, laymen will not have to wage the battle alone. 

Numerous Methodist bishops and clergymen are also in arms. 

Attending the general conference, for example, will be the Rev. Rembert 
Gilman Smith, D. D., sometime professor in Emory College, Atlanta, and now 
pastor of the Methodist Church at Pryor, Okla. 

Dr. Smith has made an intensive study of the Methodist Federation. 

He has likewise DESCRIBED IT in a 19-page booklet called "Methodist 
Reds," which is being widely distributed among Methodists by such outstanding 



50 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION" 

members of the church as John W. Davis, former ambassador to Great Britain 
and one-time Democratic nominee for President. 

In his pamphlet, Dr. Smith makes these startling charges: 

"There is proof, growing almost daily stronger, that a group of prominent and 
powerful Methodist leaders desire to make their denomination a totalitarian 
church, controlling the social, economic and international life. They are seeking 
to do this by aggressive propaganda. . . . 

"They prefer that these changes be made by voting rather than violence, but 
some of the more radical of these Methodist leaders are not quite sure that ballots 
will suffice, and are admitting into their minds with tolerance, if not with hospi- 
tality, the possibility that BULLETS, as well as BALLOTS, may be necessary 
before the existing system is destroyed. . . 

"No laborious research is necessary to find out that there is a group of influen- 
tial Methodist leaders who have joined 'the trek to Moscow,' and that they are 
using their church influence to get others to join them. . . 

"WHAT THESE METHODIST REDS WISH IS AN APPROXIMATION 
OF THE RUSSIAN SYSTEM. 

"They favor communism, with the atheism left out, but there is reason to infer 
that they wish it, even with the allied atheism, if that is the only way it can be 
gotten, hoping, perhaps, to destroy the atheism as soon as possible." 

The following article appearing on the front page of the Octoher 13, 
1938, issue of the Bureau County Republican indicates a growing 
dissension among Methodists over the activities of the Methodist 
Federation for Social Service: 

The Methodist Laymen's Organization of the Rock River Conference of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, at its annual convention in Chicago Friday, adopted 
resolutions denouncing the Methodist Federation for Social Service, an organiza- 
tion which is supporting Communism. The resolutions declare the laymen's 
organization is loyal to the American Constitution and to the principles of repre- 
sentative government, and is opposed to any organization whose activities are 
subversive to those principles. The resolutions criticize the conference for having 
given the Methodist Federation for Social Service a place on the official program 
of the conference [and] requested that no such action be repeated in the future. 
The resolutions also declare that no part of the funds of the church should be ap- 
portioned to the Methodist Federation for Social Service of New York City, as 
has been requested. 

A thing that aroused the ire of the laymen was the fact that a place on the official 
program of the church had been assigned to the Methodist Federation for Social 
Service, the radical organization which turned the meeting over to the C. I. O. 
The objectionable assignment was set on the official program for 5:30 o'clock 
Thursday evening and entitled "Methodist Social Service Dinner." At the dinner 
Rev. Armand Guerrero of the Forest Park Church of Chicago, president of the 
Methodist Federation, who wrote letters to the Republican supporting sit-down 
strikes, and criticizing the courts, officiated, and the speaker of the evening was 
Van A. Bittner, an organizer for the C. I. O. Bittner, who started with the coal 
miners' organization, has figured conspicuously as a C. I. O. leader and associate of 
John L. Lewis in the steel and automobile industries. Bittner occupied the entire 
time set apart for the speaking program. 

The resolutions adopted by unani mous vote of the lay delegates, follows: 

"We (the lay delegates) express our allegiance to the American Constitution 
and to the principles of representative government therein contained. We de- 
clare ourselves as opposed to any organization whose activities are subversive of 
those principles. 

"Since the Rock River branch of the Methodist Federation for Social Service is 
not an official organization of our church, we regard the inclusion on the official 
program of the conference of a meeting under the auspices of that organization, to 
imply an official recognition contrary to the action of the last General Conference. 
We accordingly request that such action be not repeated in the future. 

"We also regard as contrary to the action of the last General Conference, the 
special apportionment plan of "the Rock River and other Conferences under which 
any church may apportion a part of its benevolence fund to the Methodist Fed- 
eration for Social Service of New York City." 

The dinner and program assigned to the radicals was held on the second floor 
of the Child's restaurant, half a block from the Temple church at the corner of 
Clark and Washington Streets, where the main sessions were held, and close to 
the Terrace Garden of the Morrison Hotel, where the sessions of the laymen's 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 51 

organization were conducted. After the dinner Rev. Guerrero, late of the Forest 
Park Church, officiated as toastmaster. Rev. Guerrero is president of the Rock 
River branch of the Methodist Federation for Social Service and accompanying 
him were Rev. A. A. Whitmeyer of the Humboldt Park Church, Rev. Fred J. 
Schnell of Palatine, and other officers of the association. Present also was Rev. 
Horace Smith, president of the Garrett Biblical Institute, and several hundred 
ministers and laymen. 

Rev. Guerrero made a brief announcement in introducing the speaker of the 
evening. He said that the ministers probably were giving too much attention to 
theological matters and perhaps too little to industrial and social questions. 
Therefore he said he had selected as the speaker of the evening, Van C. Bittner, 
an organizer of the C. I. O. Bittner has frequently been mentioned in labor 
negotiations in the steel and automobile industries the last year. 

Bittner, in his address, said that he started in his career with organized labor 
with the United Mine Workers. Later he was promoted and the last year or two 
his activities have been connected with labor organization in the steel and auto- 
mobile industries. He told of the development of the labor movement the last 
few years and spoke of the contest the C. I. O. is having with the American 
Federation of Labor of which William Green is president. He said he was not 
concerned so much about carrying on a fight with the American Federation of 
Labor as he was in extending the scope of activities of the C. I. O. The difference 
between the two organizations, he said, is that the American Federation of Labor 
believes in craft unions; that is in the organization of each trade in a separate 
body, such as the engineers, electricians, machinists, etc., while the C. I. O. 
advocates organization by industries; that is to take into one union all of the 
employees of an entire company from top to bottom. 

Bittner told of the aid the C. I. O. is receiving from the Federal government. 
He said he frequently hears the complaints that the National Labor Relations 
Board is prejudiced in favor of the C. I. O. as against the employers. 

"Of course it is prejudiced," said Bittner, "the National Labor Relations 
Board is the only official support we have ever had. Its purpose is to protect 
labor. That is why it is created. We never had a tribunal before." 

Bittner made no reference to the charges of William Green that the NLRB is 
unjust to the American Federation of Labor, nor of those of the employers who 
complain that the decisions of the board are uniformly against them, the manu- 
facturers claiming that the labor board is supposed to have judicial functions and 
to conduct a fair and impartial handling of the relations between employers and 
labor. The labor board originates charges, conducts prosecutions and renders 
decisions. 

Bittner said it is frequently charged by an antagonistic employer that the labor 
unions are not responsible. He said he was not going to say anything about that 
himself but he would call attention to the fact that employers are dealing with the 
C. I. O. He said that although some employers are claiming they are irrespon- 
sible, yet thev are still dealing with the unions. "Do you think they would deal 
with us if thej' thought we were not responsible under our contracts'-"' said 
Bittner. The NLRB requires employers to deal with labor unions. 

Bittner said it is also charged that the C. I. O. is honeycombed with Communism 
and that a large number of paid Communists are at the head of their various 
groups of organizers. "I am not going to say anything on that question," said 
Bittner. "1 will leave it to you ministers and you laymen to decide for yourselves. 
I will point out church authority. You will not have to go outside of your own 
denomination. I will refer you to Bishop Francis J. McConnell of your church, 
who is at the head of the New York area. Ask the bishop if he thinks we are 
Communists." Bishop McConnell is the president of the Methodist Federation 
for Social Service which is advocating the overthrow of our present form of 
government in the United States, and the setting up of a government by social 
workers as is done in the soviet union . . . 

. . . H. U. Bailey of Princeton, addressed the convention on the issue of radi- 
calism. He said, "Many of the nations of the world are now confronted with an 
issue pertaining to the form of government which is to prevail. Established forms 
of one kind or another have been overthrown and something new set up in their 
stead. Some countries have gone radical or Communist and others ultra con- 
servative or Fascist. The seeds of discontent are being planted in this country 
and are active in industrial and educational circles and are even spreading to the 
churches. It is now manifest in many Protestant denominations. In our own 
church we have the Methodist Federation for Social Service, an organization which 
is concerned with one topic only and that is the form of government we are to have. 
The Federation does not concern itself with social, educational, entertainment or 



52 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

other features as its name might imply. It has to do only with materialism and 
politics. It seeks the control of property and the control of human lives. The 
atmosphere is surcharged with many devices to get something for nothing. The 
newspapers are full of C. I. O. and other activities. It is the subject of conversa- 
tion wherever people meet. 

Mr. Bailey said the platform of the Methodist Federation for Social Service 
stands primarily for the overthrow of the "profit system" which has prevailed in 
the world since the time of Abraham. The "profit system" means the private 
ownership of property which sometimes is known as the "competitive system." 
The setting up of communal committees selected by "social workers" is proposed 
to succeed the profit system. To bring about this change of conditions the Feder- 
ation advocates the following: 

To do away with political parties. 

To do away with elected public officials from the President down to the lowliest 
office. 

To do away with legislative bodies. 

To do away with courts and judges. 

To do away with competition among individuals in the earning of a living. 

The working plans of the Federation, he said, are outlined in a series of 18 
Crisis leaflets which are known as the platform of the Methodist Federation for 
Social Service. The new order to be set up, is termed "social economic planning," 
terms which in the last few years have been adopted by the Federal government. 
The platform says that the Federation program means "a planned society built 
upon the principle of everybody working on some job necessary to the well being 
of society." It adds that people under this plan, who refuse to do the work set 
up for them by the social committee, will automatically be deprived of supplies; 
that everybody must work according to the job set out for them and at the com- 
pensation stipulated. This program is termed "a planned society." The Fed- 
eration platform says: 

"The only country which has a complete social, economic plan is the Soviet 
Union and they have no unemployment. It is not because their industry is ex- 
panding. We had plenty of unemployment when we were expanding. They got 
rid of it because they planned to get rid of it. Their plan provides for everybody 
to take part." 

In another part of the platform the Federation again commends the Russian 
system. It says: "the only country in the world that has a big scale social eco- 
nomic plan is the Soviet Union." 

Another part of the platform argues that the taking over of property through a 
change in the laws or the Constitution would take too much time. Under the 
Federation plan, it says it "wouldn't take long to write 'transfer from private 
property to social ownership'." This is if a right interpretation is given to the 
Constitution. 

In carrying out such a plan the platform says it can be expected that difficulties 
may be encountered from property owners, policemen, sheriffs, and soldiers with 
clubs, tear gas and machine guns; also prisons and electric chairs and judges who 
interpret laws and constitutions in terms of the property rights of the people they 
have grown up with. The platform adds, "Yes, it is a man-size job, but when were 
Americans — pioneers and children of pioneers — in a big land, afraid of a big job?" 

The Federation has a clever interpretation for the use of the word "violence." 
The social planners claim they will not institute violence. They say that when the 
attempt is made to take over the property, the owners will probably use violence 
in defending it. In such case people have a right to defend themselves and the 
social planners hold that personal rights are greater than property rights . . . 

The proceedings at the convention of the lay delegates demonstrated that the 
members of the Methodist church as a body, are almost a unit in opposition to 
the activity of the radicals. It was mentioned some time ago that the Methodist 
church in Princeton is, as far as known, 100 percent against such activities and 
it was suggested that the same percentage may prevail among the membership of 
the Methodist churches throughout Bureau county. The attitude of the lay 
delegates at the conference in Chicago last Friday demonstrated that the lay 
delegates of the churches represented at the conference are against the "social 
planning" scheme of the Methodist Federation for Social Service. The activities 
in its behalf are confined largely to college professors and ministers mostly in the 
larger cities. . . . 

Disagreement with the policies of the Methodist Federation for 
Social Action spread to the Methodist church in Alabama, as is re- 
flected by the following news item appearing in the Washington Daily 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 53 

News of January G, 1948, page 1G, and datelined Birmingham, January 
6: 

Methodist ministers of the Birmingham district, in a meeting here, denounced 
the pro-Russian stand of the Methodist Federation for Social Action in its recent 
meeting in Kansas City. 

A resolution adopted at the meeting here said: 

"We denounce as a misrepresentation of Methodism and the membership of 
the Methodist Church the reported plans, programs and purposes of the alleged 
Methodist Federation for Social Action purported to have been held in Kansas 
City Dec. 20, and renounce the action of the leaders of such organization in using 
the name of the Methodist Church for the advancement of their individual 
theories." 

A copy of the resolution is to be sent to the College of Bishops. It called for 
action to prevent any further misrepresentation of Methodism. 

Dr. John D. Hunter, superintendent of the Birmingham district, said he had 
checked the minutes of the Church's General Conference and found no authoriza- 
tion for such a committee to speak for the Methodist Church. 

Several newspapers carried a statement by Bishop A. Frank Smith, 
titular head of the three Methodist Church Conferences in North and 
East Texas. The news item, as it appeared in the New York Times 
of January 4, 1948, datelined Houston, Texas, January 3, is, in part, 
as follows: 

. . . The statement was released to clarify newspaper reports which indicates that 
the Federation for Social Action, which recently met in Kansas City, Mo., was 
an agency of the Methodist Church. 

The Federation reportedly was addressed by speakers with communistic leanings 
and passed resolutions attacking United States foreign policy without a con- 
demnation of Russian tactics. 

In disclaiming any connection between the Federation and the Methodist 
Church Bishop Smith attacked what he called efforts to discredit American 
democracy and exalt "atheistic communism." 

"Any word spoken or action taken by individuals calling themselves Methodists 
that might discredit American democracy and exalt commuuism or any other 
totalitarian philosophy has my unreserved condemnation," the Bishop said. 

"It will receive the emphatic and instant condemnation of Methodists." 

After releasing the statement Dr. Jones disclosed that the Methodist Pastors 
Conference had unanimously endorsed Bishop Smith's stand on the federation. 

The Bishop's statement said in part: 

"The Methodist Church imposes no restrictions upon the social, economic and 
political views of its members. The Church will never deny its members the 
inalienable right of absolute freedom of thought and expression. What they say 
as individuals is the personal affair of those concerned. 

"No Methodist or group can speak for the Methodist Church save the delegated 
General Conference. 

"The Methodist Federation for Social Action is an organization maintained by 
people primarily interested in social and economic questions and has existed for 
forty years. It is not now and never has been an agency or adjunct of the Metho- 
dist Church, draws no support from the Methodist Church and its opinions are 
those of its members. 

"The federation has never claimed to speak for the Methodist Church. Any 
effort to make it appear that it represents the Church is wholly unwarranted. 

"The Methodist Church in belief and practice is arrayed unitedly against 
atheistic communism and ever}- other form of Godless selfish control of human 
relations that impoverish life or interferes with the highest human development 
and happiness." 

The Reader's Digest of February 1950, contains an article by 
Stanley High entitled "Methodism's Pink Fringe." Because of the 
action taken by Methodist churches in various parts of the country 
as a result of Mr. High's story, the article is included herein and is as 
follows: 

With its base of operations in America's largest and most powerful Protestant 
church, the Methodist Federation for Social Action sets forth its economic objec- 
tive on the masthead of its regularly published Social Questions Bulletin: 



54 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

"The Federation rejects the method of the struggle for profit as the economic 
base for society and seeks to replace it with social-economic planning to develop 
a society without class or group discriminations and privileges." 

"Thus," writes the Rev. Jack Mc Michael, the Federation's executive secretary, 
"we seek not merely to patch up but fundamentally to transform an economic 
system which has only been able to 'solve' the acute moral and social problem 
of mass unemployment by an economy for war. And we reject a foreign policy 
which assures temporary profit for a few but growing insecurity, deprivation of 
liberty and the increasing threat of atomic death for the many." 

"The Christmas story, the story of Mary," said Mr. McMichael in a Christmas 
message to the Federation, "means not the improvement of the present social 
order but its revolutionary abolition and replacement anew." 

In his address last year as Federation president, Methodist Bishop Robert N, 
Brooks declared that in our society "decay and putrification have truly set in." 

A former Federation secretary, the Rev. Harry F. Ward, recently wrote: "The 
profit-seeking economy cannot much longer defy the moral law." 

A vice-president of the Federation and Dean of Boston University School of 
Theology, Methodism's most influential divinity school, is Dr. Walter G. Muelder, 
who has thus described postwar America: 

"Catastrophe and calamity on a giant scale face the nation. The great oppor- 
tunity to build an economy of full production, full employment, economic 
democracy, security and personal freedom is being devct?d to autocratic con- 
centrations of economic, political and military power. These are sinister days 
when Christian possibilities are being betrayed for Fascist realities. The strangu- 
lation of the labor movement, the repression of minority parties, peacetime con- 
scription, the militarization of education, repression of civil servants and teachers, 
and the refusal to implement racial brotherhood provide a cumulative threat to 
spiritual values and an invitation to the coming of God's righteous judgment in 
doom." 

Such views are unquestionably contrary to the convictions of a great majority 
of Methodists, yet they are being zealously promoted by a powerful and growing 
minority in the name of Methodism. I believe this to be a threat to the prophetic 
tradition of the church and a serious liability for Protestantism as a whole. That 
such a left-wing minority is officially tolerated is, in itself, an indication of the 
success of their tactics in concealing their real aims behind a humanitarian facade. 

Here are quotations from representative articles in the Federation's Bulletin 
which further reveal the ideas on America and Soviet Russia which it seeks to 
advance. 

From "Behind the Headlines," a regular editorial feature: "The picture is not 
merely decadence. It is degeneracy. Capitalist society led by the United States, 
trying to stop the advance of social democracy, is destroying the democracy it 
brought into being." 

From an article by the Rev. Alson J. Smith, until last year editor of the Bulletin: 
"What the European Recovery Program seeks is not the rebuilding of Europe but 
the rebuilding of a particular kind of Europe — a capitalist Europe, safe for in- 
vestment and exploitation." 

From a published report by Mr. McMichael: "More than all other outside 
foreign factors put together, it is the foreign policy of the United States which 
feeds and stimulates the costly, tragic civil wars in Greece and China, and which 
undergirds their hopelessly reactionary, anti-poor, pro-status-quo and anti- 
democratic governments. And this reaction-supporting war-feeding U. S. foreign 
policy has been clothed all along in the most democratic and humanitarian garb." 

From an article by Dr. Jerome Davis: "In the light of the record of the past 
30 years, in the light of the actual facts, the Soviet Union certainly has a record 
as a force for peace the equal of that of the United States." 

From "Behind the Headlines": Back of the actions of all our leaders since 
Roosevelt died "is evident fear of the demonstrated success of socialist planned 
economy, first in the Soviet Union and now in Poland-Czechoslovakia where U. N. 
reports show a greater gain in production under joint planning than in Western 
Europe." 

An article in the Bulletin quotes, with approval, this statement of Professor 
Harold J. Laski: "Russia is not the greatest threat to peace, it is the United States. 
Stalin does not want war and will do anything to keep the country from war. The 
same cannot be said for America." 

Since, in a church of nearly nine million members, the Federation has only about 
5,800, some Methodists with whom I have talked minimize its importance and 
influence. But its membership is rapidly increasing. It is organized in chapters 
in most of the annual conferences in which, administratively, Methodism is 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 55 

divided It has units, led by faculty members, in Methodist theological schools. 
"If you're not a pacifist or a socialist or both," one Methodist theologue told me, 
"you feel pretty foolish around here." . 

The president of the Federation is a Methodist bishop— as were his two prede- 
cessors. Five of its six vice-presidents are bishops. Its recording secretary is 
the head, for work among Methodist women, of the Department of Christian 
Social Relations. Its treasurer is associate secretary of the Missionary Education 
Movement. Its assistant treasurer is editor of the Ptistor's Journal, a Methodist 
publication for preachers. 

The Federation's membership rolls include 16 — or nearly half — of the church s 
active bishops and the ministers of some of the country's largest Methodist 
parishes. The heads of the church's four leading theological schools are members. 
So are the editors of three Methodist papers and several Sunday-school publica- 
tions, the executive secretary and associate secretary of the Methodist Board of 
Foreign Missions, the executive secretary of the National Conference of Methodist 
Youth, the three top executives of the "Methodist Peace Commission, the super- 
intendent of the Department of Negro Work, and many others who hold positions 
of influence in the church and, through numerous interdenominational agencies, 
in Protestantism. 

Two vears ago the Federation called a national conference in Kansas City, Mo., 
to discuss "The Christian Church and Present-Day Tensions." Its guest of honor 
and headlined speaker on China was "Christian General" Feng Yu-hsiang, who, 
having gone over to the Communists, was reputedly in the United States as their 
emissary. "The Communist side," he said, "is really the army of the people, the 
peasants." Though Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek is, himself, a Methodist and 
though his government was officially recognized by the United States, no speaker 
was scheduled to present the pro-government, anti-Communist point of view. 

Headlined speaker and consultant on American-Soviet Relations at Kansas 
City was Dr. Jerome Davis, one of the country's foremost apologists for Russia, 
a member of some 40 organizations officially listed as Communist fronts. 

Dr. Davis's book, Behind Soviet Power, is one of the cleverest, most all-out 
pro-Soviet books yet published in America. It was sent, free of charge, to all the 
22,000 ?\Iethodist preachers in the United States by two prominent Federation 
members. With the book went a letter, signed by these high officials, and 
written on the official stationery of the Methodist Board of Foreign Missions and 
Church Extension, recommending that the book be read. 

"The greatest moral and spiritual problem facing the American people," said 
Dr. Davis at Kansas City, "is not the struggle between Communism and de- 
mocracy. That is a spurious issue. It is the struggle between reaction, the old 
order, the control of property and an emerging new order pushing its way up 
through blood, tears and strife." 

SVhen someone asked him about Russia's concentration camps, Dr. Davis 
replied: "They are simply places to keep criminals." Asked about Russia's 
conquest of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, he declared that Russia was entitled 
to them. Asked about reports of the jailing of innocent people, he said: "If 
Russia sends innocent people to concentration camps and is tightening up on it^ 
civil liberties, that is the fault of America — the terrific war talk in the United 
States." 

No speaker with contrary views was scheduled. 

A scheduled "resource leader" for the discussion of "The Christian Church and 
Civil Liberties" was Carl Marzani. For concealing his Communist Party member- 
ship in order to retain his post in the U. S. Government, Marzani had recently 
been indicted, found guilty and sentenced to a year in jail. On the program at 
Kansas City he was officially described as a "victim of the present Government 
loyalty-purge." 

In defending the Methodist Federation for Social Action, some of its spokesmen 
lay great stress on its status as an "unofficial" agency of the Methodist Church. 
But there is nothing unofficial about the Methodist dignitaries who grace its 
letterhead, constitute its membership and make an official place for it and its 
message on the program of so many official Methodist conferences. Whereas the 
church has official agencies to speak for it on peace, temperance and other issues, 
the Federation, though "unofficial," is the only church-wide agency which speaks 
in the name of Methodism on economic and related questions. 

The Federation's national offices are housed in the official Methodist building 
in New York City. Its telephone number is the Methodist number. Though 
having no church, the Rev. Jack McMichael maintains his standing as a Methodist 
minister by virtue of the official approval of his position as Federation secretary 



56 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

by the presiding bishop at every meeting of the annual conference to which ne 
belongs. 

Mr. McMichael, whose duties as Federation secretary are a full-time job, is 
young, personable, and dynamic. Much in demand as a speaker, particularly 
among young people and students, he travels the length and breadth of the 
country, carrying the Federation message to Methodism and beyond it. Prior 
to becoming Federation secretary in 1945, he was chairman of the American 
Youth Congress — one of the Communists' most notorious fronts, identified by 
the U. S. Attorney General as subversive. He has been associated with 36 
organizations listed as Communist fronts — 1G of them, according to the Attorney 
General, subversive. 

Fully as influential in leading the Federation and shaping its policies is Dr. 
Harry F. Ward, its "grand old man" and former secretary. Few Americans not 
admitted party members have a longer, more inclusive record of fronting for the 
Communists. He has been affiliated with at least 70 organizations and under- 
takings officially listed as Communist fronts. He has written extensively for 
Communist Party publications including the Daily Worker and the A 7 cty Masses. 

To discredit America at home and abroad, to condemn the American economic 
system as un-Christian, to promote conclusions which give aid and comfort to the 
Communists are, undoubtedly, the right of any American. To promote them 
in the name of a great Protestant church is, I believe, to misrepresent it and to 
bring its ministry into disrepute. Predominantly, the faith of Methodism and 
the faith of Protestantism are of an order far different from that and far more 
conducive to Christian progress. For those of that church to fail to reassert 
their faith against this growing, aggressive minority will be to fail both America 
and the church. 

An editorial in the Christian Advocate, issue of February 9, 1950, 
pages 12 and 13, is in form and content a reply to Dr. High's article. 
Inasmuch as Dr. High's article is included in this report, the editorial 
of the Christian Advocate is also presented herein. It is as follows: 

In the current issue of Reader's Digest, Stanley High; who was once a probationer 
for a Methodist Annual Conference but was never admitted into membership, 
and who ran, unsuccessfully, for the editorship of The Epworth Herald, official 
youth publication of The Methodist Episcopal Church, has written an article 
titled, "Methodism's Pink Fringe." It is clever and half-convincing — only half- 
convincing to careful readers because the facts are fractional facts. 

Throughout the article Dr. High descends to the level of the kind of reporting 
we have done in the first sentence of this editorial. There we have set down two 
unpleasant and uncomplimentary facts about Dr. High's relationshijjs with the 
Methodists, among whom his father was a distinguished minister. We might 
have enumerated many complimentary facts, and we hereby apologize to Dr. 
High for following, for the moment, the bad example he has set throughout 
"Methodism's Pink Fringe." We would do this personally but Dr. High has 
just left for Australia. 

That piece of writing, in which he has been so scrupulously selective in his 
choice of facts to support his thesis, concerns the sinning and sinned-against 
Methodist Federation for Social Action. The article is only the most recent of a 
series of attacks that began in 1007, when the organization started as the Metho- 
dist Federation for Social Service, then as now an unofficial critic of political, 
economic, and social ideas and actions. Because its leaders have never cared 
much for safety and security, it has been an embarrassment to many Methodists, 
and it has been attacked as persistently inside as outside the church. 

"Communist" is onlv the last of the bad names that have been hurled against 
the federation. It has been called "modernist" and "Pacifist" and "socialist" 
and much else that cannot be printed in THE CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 
But name-calling, cheapest trick in the propagandist's bag, has never cowed the 
federation. Rightly or wrongly — and the reader ought not to judge without 
examining the federation's principles in their entirety, and not Dr. High's excerpt — 
this group has gone on, championing the rights of the workers when Stalin was 
still the Czar's exile in Siberia, opposing the Oriental exclusion act when Chiang 
Kai-shek's party was still in league with the Russian Communists, calling for an 
embargo on scrap-iron shipments to Japan before Pearl Harbor, demanding a like 
embargo on Russia for its attack on Finland while the men of Berlin and Moscow 
were still allies. The federation even opposed certain New Deal policies when Dr. 
High was still on the White House staff, writing publicity for the Roosevelt 
administration. 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 57 

Understandably, Dr. High has made no effort to compile a history of the federa- 
tion, which the Methodist General Conference of 1014 called "a history of achieve- 
ment." He has made no attempt to describe the federation's work. He has 
taken a few fractional facts and, after the manner of the astute debater he is, has 
based his argument on them. On several occasions THE CHRISTIAN ADVO- 
CATE has been at variance with the policies and programs of the federation, but 
we think that Dr. High is a long way from proving his case. 

For instance, there is the much-debated Kansas City meeting of 1947 on the 
topic, "The Christian Church and Present-Day Tensions." General Feng Yu- 
hsiang spoke there, as he had spoken a few days previously before the Methodist 
Boarc of Missions and as he spoke before other groups, inside and outside the 
churches. Jerome Davis, author of "Behind Soviet Power." also spoke; and his 
book was sent to all Methodist ministers, but not by the federation. Carl 
Marzani, whom Dr. High singles out of a score of resource persons, was also present. 

These are facts, but they are not the definitive facts about the meeting. The 
keynote address was not that of General Feng or Dr. Davis, but of Bishop Lewis 
O. Hartman, past president of the federation, who warned against "the totali- 
tarians — both Fascists and Communists." The opening worship message was 
given by a staff member of the Board of Evangelism. The list of invited speakers 
included President Louie D. Newton of the Southern Baptist Convention; Rev. 
Eds;ar Wahlberg, whose community work was highly praised in Reader's Digest 
and who served with the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration 
in China and Greece; Dr. L. N. Palar, chief of the Indonesian delegation to the 
United Nations; and manv others. 

Only a small portion of time was given to the speakers. Most of the schedule 
was devoted to the delegates themselves — and the list included several lawyers, 
an editor, a shoe manufacturer, a clothing manufacturer and others from the com- 
mercial and industrial world — who discussed the relationship of the church to 
American-Soviet affairs, colonization and the Far East, Europe, labor, agriculture, 
community, and civil liberties. Mr. Marzani was a resource person in this last- 
named group, but so was Arthur Garfield Hays, counsel for the American Civil 
Liberties Union. 

Except for Dr. Davis' statement, no speaker actually dealt with the Soviet 
Union, and there was no praise for its policies. Nor was there any praise of Russia 
in any resolution adopted, including that on Soviet-American relations. Rev. 
Jack McMichael. federation secretary who receives a considerable budget of space 
in Dr. High's article, said at Kansas City: "The Soviet Union has not only made 
mistakes in its history, but has committed sins. The Soviet Union is by no means 
a Utopia. And the United States has certainly made many and great contribu- 
tions to the peoples of the world. But both of these great nations are human and 
sinful ; both have potentialities for evil, but also for good. Neither has a monopoly 
of virtue and neither a monopoly of sin." 

Of course, this Kansas City meeting was about as badly reported as any in 
recent years. The New York World- Telegram headlined: "Minority Sings Red 
Hymns." All were from the Methodist Hymnal and included "Faith of Our 
Fathers" and "In Christ There Is No East or West." But Dr. High is a respon- 
sible journalist, who ought not to be willing to take newspaper accounts of a 
conference which one newspaper man condemned in advance, before a speech was 
made or a discussion held or a report heard, as "a national sounding board for 
Communists and fellow travelers to expound the gospel of the Communist line." 

Furthermore, Dr. High ought to know Methodists well enough to realize that 
they have the maturity to consider other points of view besides their own. When 
Board of Missions officials sent out Dr. Davis' book, "Behind Soviet Power," 
they did urge that it be read. They also sent with it opposing statements from 
the Federal Council of Churches of Christ in America; and the suggestion that 
these be read, too. If Methodists are to be missionaries against secularism, 
materialism, and militarism in Communism and other false religions, they need 
to know what thev are fighting. Dr. Davis' book is a clear, if easilv challenged 
statement. THE~ CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE would be interested in having 
Dr. High, or anyone else, cite the name of one Methodist who was converted to 
Communism by the study mentioned. 

Despite all that has been written here, and much more that might be written 
on the weaknesses in Dr. High's case, THE CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE maintains 
that there should be an end to the anomalous situation in which any group, no 
matter what its principles or purposes, can make unofficial pronouncements and 
take unofficial actions that are regarded as official. Only the General Conference 
has the right to speak for Methodism; but non- Methodists, and many Methodists, 
do not know that. Because many of us do not agree with the positions taken by 



58 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

the Methodist Federation for Social Action, that group ought, voluntarily, to 
drop the word "Methodist" from its name. 

Furthermore, we believe that the General Conference of 1952 should set up a 
board of social action that would be responsible for studies and activities in this 
area of interest that has always been close to the heart of a reforming church. We 
made this suggestion before t'h« General Conference of 1948. Bishop G. Bromley 
Oxnam made it 20 years before that, in 1928. We believe that it is an idea whose 
time has come. 

But, whether or not Methodists have an official social-action body, with duties 
outlined in the "Discipline" and officers responsible to the General Conference, we 
hope that there will always be room in the fellowship of the church for persons and 
groups who disagree with most of us on political and economic, as well as ecclesi- 
astical doctrine. No church has a more complete plan for bringing both min- 
isters and laymen to trial, if they are guilty of conduct that is "un-Methodistic." 
But we Methodists have never "taken the position that disagreement means dis- 
union, or dissent signifies disloyalty. 

Dr. High has not proved that any Methodist is a Communist; he has not even 
said it. Furthermore, we doubt that he will, or can. 

Without going into the merits or demerits of either Dr. High's 
article or the editorial in the Christian Advocate, there is one matter 
mentioned in both that requires some explanation. Dr. High said: 

A scheduled "resource leader" for the discussion of "The Christian Church and 
Civil Liberties," was Carl Marzani. 

The editorial said: 

Carl Marzani, whom Dr. High singles out of a score of resource persons, was 
also present . . . Mr. Marzani was a resource person in this last-named 
group, but so was Arthur Garfield Hays, counsel for the American Civil Liberties 
Union. 

The term "resource leader" was apparently used by the federation 
in the preparation of its scheduled speakers at the annual conference 
held in late December 1947, but no definition of the words was offered. 
It was not claimed that Marzani was a member of the Methodist 
church, and the only apparent reason for his presence was to discuss 
"The Christian Church and Civil Liberties." It can not be said that 
the federation was without knowledge of Mr. Marzani's background, 
inasmuch as he was described in the federation's program as a "victim 
of the present Government lo3 r alty purge." 

It would have required but little effort on the part of some official 
of the Methodist Federation for Social Action to have ascertained 
that Marzani was indicted on January 17, 1947, on 11 counts of fraud, 
including denial that he was ever a member of the Communist Party; 
that he was convicted on May 22, 1947 ; and that the "present Govern- 
ment loyalty purge" was authorized by Executive Order 9835 on 
March 21, 1947, or subsequent to the time of Marzani's dismissal 
from Government employment and his indictment. 

It is a little difficult to understand why a church group selected a 
convicted Communist perjurer to address them on the subject of the 
church and civil liberties. 

A news item appearing in the April 22, 1950, issue of the Washington 
Post, page 9, datelined Cleveland, April 21, reflects the answer of the 
Council of Bishops of the Methodist Church to the article by Stanley 
High. The news item is as follows: 

The Methodist Church's Council of Bishops today answered a magazine article 
titled "Methodism's Pink Fringe" by applauding a proposal to take "Methodist" 
from the name of the Methodist Federation for Social Action. 

"It is a voluntary and independent organization,' ' said the Council. "It is 
not responsible to the church. It does not speak for the church, and over it 
neither the General Conference nor the Council of Bishops has jurisdiction." 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 59 

The article, written by Stanley High in Reader's Digest, said the federation 
has opposed the American capitalist system and has shown sympathy for some 
Communist theories. 

In New York, the Rev. Jack McMichael, executive secretary of the federation, 
called the article a "slanted and unfair piece of propaganda," that "is wholly 
unfounded." 

Concerning the bishops' statement the federation does not officially represent 
the church, the Rev. Mr. McMichael said this is true of the federation, as well as 
many other Methodist organizations, including the Bishops' council. 

The only body authorized to speak officially for the church, he said, is the 
General Methodist Conference. 

The Rev. Mr. McMichael said the article quoted material "out of context" 
and omitted material showing the group strongly opposes communism. 

Another article datelined Cleveland, April 18, and appearing in the 
April 19, 1950, issue of the New York Times, page 3, says in part: 

The Methodist Council of Bishops meeting in closed session today considered 
methods to refute charges that there is a "pink fringe" in American Methodism. 

The council discussed reports on an article in the February issue of Reader's 
Digest, "Methodism's Pink Fringe," by Stanley High, a staff writer. . . . 

The Methodist Federation for Social Action was organized in 1907, rents 
quarters in the Methodist Headquarters Building on 155th [sic] Street in New 
York and has never been given any official recognition by the Methodist church. 
It is reported to have a membership of approximately 6,000 out of a total Metho- 
dist church membership of 9.000,000. 

According to several Bishops, the federation's utterances or actions are ac- 
cepted by most Americans as coming from the Methodist Church itself. The 
Bishops believe that the church must make itself clear in regard to the federa- 
tion. . . . 

More repercussions from the High article will be found in the fol- 
lowing news item datelined Rome, Georgia, February 10, and appear- 
ing in the New York Times of February 11, 1950, at page 1G: 

The board of managers of the First Methodist Church announced here today 
that it had petitioned the denomination's Council of Bishops to conduct an im- 
mediate investigation into "organization and activities" of the Methodist Fed- 
eration for Social Action. 

The petition said that the federation was "apparently an organization within 
the Methodist Church taking the stand and promulgating certain highly question- 
able theories of government and social and political relations." 

It noted that the federation was the subject of an article entitled "Methodism's 
Pink Fringe," in the current issue of The Reader's Digest. The article was 
written by Dr. Stanley High. 

According to a news item appearing in the Washington Star of 
June 4, 1950, page 2, and datelined Westminster, Maryland, June 3, 
the Baltimore Conference of the Methodist Church introduced a 
resolution asking that the Methodist Federation for Social Action be 
disassociated from the Methodist Church. The resolution was 
referred to the Committee on Memorials to the General Conference 
which will be held in 1952 at San Francisco. 

The Washington Post of August 7, 1950, carries a news item on 
page 11, datelined Atlanta, August 6, regarding the statement unani- 
mously adopted by the Methodist Federation for Social Action at its 
annual meeting at Wilberforce University the previous July. The 
statement is as follows: 

We believe the right of any individual to speak his mind as to what is right or 
wrong is democracy's best safeguard. We therefore call for repeal of the Smith 
Act as being unconstitutional and designed to suppress any unpopular (at the 
time) political philosophy. We appeal for Presidential amnesty for all who have 
been convicted under the Smith Act. 

The article further relates that eight bishops accused the Methodist 
Federation for Social Action of misusing "the name of a great church" 



CO REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

in defiance of "our traditions and deep convictions." It was reported 
that Bishop Arthur J. Moore, for himself and other bishops of the 
church's Southeastern jurisdiction, released a statement to the effect 
that the church's Council of Bishops had disowned the federation in 
April as an official organization authorized to speak for the church, 
and, in reference to the statement released by the Methodist Federa- 
tion for Social Action, asserted: 

We regard such statements from any source as aid to the Communist propa- 
ganda and program. We stand unalterably opposed to such statements and posi- 
tions, and we are assured that the public will not hold the church responsible for 
the action of any official, or some 60 persons who met on their own initiative and 
expressed their personal views in open defiance of the will and convictions of the 
great body of the church. 

The New York Times of September 15, 1950, carries a news item 
on page 27, datelined Dallas, Texas, September 14, to the effect that 
the Board of Publications of the Methodist Church voted unani- 
mously at its annual meeting to evict the Methodist Federation for 
Social Action from the Methodist Building at 150 Fifth Avenue in 
New York City. It was further reported that the Council of Bishops, 
by resolution adopted April 20, 1950, asked the federation to drop the 
word "Methodist" from its name, which the federation failed to do. 

In his book, "Moscow Over Methodism," 1950 revised edition, at 
pages 58 and 59, the Reverend Rembert Oilman Smith says: 

The Methodist Federation for Social Service, under the leadership of Bishop 
F. J. McConnell and Dr. Harry F. Ward, has been nearly 30 years, the spearhead 
of church socialism in the United States. It has steadily moved to the left until, 
during the last four years, some of its proposals have been shocking not only to 
Methodists, but alarming also to patriots. It has advocated the confiscation of 
property, and the giving to property holders nothing but jobs. It has opposed 
the adoption by the federal Congress of a law to prohibit incitement to violence. 
It has prophesied that an inter-class war is near, and it has opposed it just about 
like Mark Anthony opposed the punishment of the assassins of Caesar by the mob. 

Until 1936, this federation has been endorsed by the General Conference every 
four years. Bishop McConnell has said that it was twice endorsed in 1932. 
However, in 1936, it was not endorsed at all, and the General Conference treated 
it almost as though it were a skeleton in the closet, but it was allowed to continue 
the use of the name "Methodist". 

Throughout the releases, statements, and other pronouncements of 
the Methodist Federation for Social Action will be found the oft- 
repeated denunciation of fascism. Only one denunciation of com- 
munism has been noted. This, as well as other matters advocated 
by the federation, is the subject of articles appearing in the May and 
June 1950 issues of the National Republic. Because of the importance 
of these articles, they are included herein and are as follows: 

Part I (May 1950): 

There has been considerable publicity concerning one of our strangest pro- 
Communist organizations — the Methodist Federation for Social Action (formerly 
the Methodist Federation for Social Service) — once branded as "a tool of the 
Communist Party" by the Congressional Committee on Un-American Activities. 
Of course, we have come to expect subversive groups in our society today — 
it's all part of the pattern of Communist infiltration — but somehow we don't 
expect to find them taking root and growing up under the very wing of the 
church — in this instance, the largest and most influential Protestant denomination 
in America. Some of Methodism's nine million members have been shocked by 
these recent revelations — and that is encouraging. But unfortunately the great 
majority of Methodists, apparently through lack of knowledge of the facts, have 
remained indifferent to what is happening within their church, refusing to believe 
that some Methodist clergymen, dedicated and consecrated to Christian principles, 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 61 

would ever align themselves with any atheistic followers of Karl Marx. In their 
pious indignation these insist that anyone, who states otherwise, is spreading anti- 
Protestant propaganda or is for some reason trying to discredit the church. This 
attitude on the part of so many churchmen, this refusal to face facts, permits the 
saboteurs to continue their boring from within — and that is dangerous. 

Let's put the record straight right at the start in order that there may be no 
misunderstanding. This writer was brought up in the Methodist Church, comes 
from a family of long standing in the Methodist Church, and believes whole- 
heartedly in the spiritual mission of the church in American life. This writer 
believes that all churches should be strengthened, not weakened, encouraged, not 
discredited, in order that they may not only fulfill their spiritual mission, but that 
they may become a principal bulwark against the rising tide of Communism. 
The church must be our fortress as we face today's great challenge, and if it is 
to be impregnable, the weak spots in its structure must be exposed now. With 
that in mind, we must agree that it is pertinent for every Methodist — and every 
xVmerican, too — to know the facts concerning the "Methodist Federation for 
Social Action," and to act on those facts immediately before our largest Protestant 
denomination is undermined. 

In this instance, it is not necessary for us to distort the facts in order to "make" 
a case. On the contrary, in this article we are merely going to let the Federation 
convict itself. For this organization has obliged us with its own "Program of 
Study and Action," a lengthy, Marxist-inspired document that should leave no 
doubts in anyone's mind as to its real purpose. Most Methodists probably 
have never seen or heard of this strange "program"; certainly few have ever 
taken the trouble to read it from start to finish. But it can be stated without 
exaggeration that few pamphlets printed on Communist presses follow the Com- 
munist Party Line more closely than does this one, and it's hard to conceive that 
a church, and especially a great institution like the Methodist Church, would 
tolerate such an organization and such a program. As Walter Trohan, writing 
recently in the Chicago Tribune, expressed it, this document "reveals its (the 
Federation's') pro-Communist aims, which are embedded in the midst of a welter 
of typical 'liberal' praises for trade unions, denunciations of 'fascism', diatribes 
against the Taft-Hartley law, and espousals of civil liberties laws." 

Who is responsible for this subversive pamphlet? The guilt must be shared by 
many. Sixteen Methodist bishops, including the president and five vice-presidents, 
are members of the Federation, and it is certainly safe to assume that they had 
something to do with it. The Rev. Jack McMichael is Federation secretary. 
Prior to 1945 he was chairman of the American Youth Congress, cited as sub- 
versive by the U. S. Attorney General, and has been associated with numerous 
other Communist fronts. His hand can definitely be seen in the writing of this 
document. Many prominent Methodist clergymen belong to the Federation, 
and the}', too, must know what it's all about. The "program" was revised by 
"the annual membership meeting", and, therefore, the membership must take 
part of the blame. The Federation occupies quarters in the Methodist Building, 
150 Fifth Avenue, New York City, and the Church, therefore, cannot disclaim 
responsibility. In fact, everyone of Methodism's nearly nine million members will 
be considered in some measure guilty as long as he does not raise his voice against 
this insidious, un-American organization which has established itself in the hard 
center core of his church. But first let's take a look at the document itself. 

Since we cannot in this limited space cover this lengthy "Methodist Manifesto" 
in detail, we must be content with hitting just the high spots. But even in capsule 
form it is a program that should arouse every Methodist, who believes in his 
church, and every American, who loves his countrv, for neither church nor country 
could long survive the achievement of the objectives stated therein. 

Unlike most Communist propaganda media, little or no subtlety is employed in 
this document. The preamble itself is a tip-off on what is coming. One sentence 
in this opening paragraph reads as follows: 

"It (the Federation) rejects the method of the struggle for profit as the economic 
base for society, and seeks to replace it with social and economic planning in 
order to develop a society without class or group discriminations and privileges." 

\\ hat exactly does this mean? Obviously, it means that the socalled Methodist 
Federation rejects the free enterprise system and proposes a Socialistic State. It 
means that it would scrap our opportunity society, which has been the corner- 
stone of America's greatness, and would replace it with a new social-economic 
order wherein industry would be nationalized and individuals regimented. As 
we proceed, we shall discover that the Federation endorses virtually the same 
97252°— 52 5 



62 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

program as that originally adopted by the Fabian Socialists a program which 
has already taken England to the brink of insolvency and which is only the first 
step to the Communist State. 

Of course, we all know that our society as presently constituted is not perfect; 
no one has ever claimed it was. But there are two things for us to remember. 
First, we have all the means of bettering it within the framework of our Con- 
stitution. Second, our social and economic system, imperfect though it is, has 
given us the highest standard of living and the freest way of life in history. The 
dividends from this system are all that are keeping a large part of the world free 
and solvent today. From our own working man with his automobile and electric 
refrigerator and television set to the French farmer with his tractor and the 
Greek peasant with his loaf of bread, millions upon millions of people in the 
world today are deeply indebted to our way of life. And yet the socalled Metho- 
dist Federation, following the Moscow formula, would discard this time-honored 
system and consign the American people to totalitarianism, which pauperizes as 
it regiments. A strange mission, indeed, for socalled churchmen to embark 
upon. 

Continuing the preamble, we learn that the Federation "seeks the establishment 
of full democracy and unreserved brotherhood in our political, economic and social 
life. This calls for complete eradication of Fascism — its vestiges and threats — 
throughout the world and in the U. S. A. in particular." 

We can find no fault with the goal as expressed in this statement; we all seek 
"full democracy" — if we are agreed on the definition of that term. But we must 
be pardoned if we raise an eyebrow at that tell-tale word "Fascism", which appears 
repeatedly throughout this "Methodist Manifesto." We, too, hate Fascism and 
the whole Fascist philosophy of course; we fought a war because of it. But the 
truth is that Fascism is a relatively impotent force in today's world, that Commu- 
nism is the present threat that ?talinis unquestionably a greater over-all menace 
to mankind than Hitler and Mussolini ever were, or than Franco and Peron are 
now. Why, then, does the Federation continually use Fascism as its convenient 
whipping-boy while always ignoring Communism? The reason becomes more 
obvious as we proceed; it's the same reason that Fascism is used as the "come-on" 
for so many Communist-front organizations — the Joint Anti-Fascist Refuge [sic] 
Committee, the American Friends of Spanish Democracy, and the American 
League Against War and Fascism, to mention only a few. 

The first section of the Federation's program covers the trade union movement, 
which is described as "an enemy of Fascism". Again that word! And again no 
hint or suggestion that Labor might well be an enemy of Communism too! The 
proposed steps in this part of the program include repeal of the Taft-Hartley law 
and "similar repressive anti-labor legislation", thwarting State and Federal at- 
tacks on Labor's rights", extending church-labor cooperation, promoting "indus- 
trial democracy", recruiting, training and dedicating young people for participa- 
tion in the Labor movement, and supporting an educational campaign amony 
churchmen in this field. 

Here, as elsewhere throughout this amazing document, are some provisions to 
which all right-thinking Americans can and do subscribe. They are the sugar 
coating designed to make the bitter pill of Marxism more palatable. They are 
the bait dangled in front of clergymen and church members to tempt them to 
swallow the hook. They are the come-on to lure Labor into the fold. But care- 
fully inserted between these pro-Labor statements are whole phrases and sen- 
tences lifted almost intact out of Communist teaching. Only the most naive could 
be deceived — but unfortunately too many of our churchmen are naive. 

The Federation also backs the cooperative movement, and would "expose and 
frustrate legislative attacks on the power and growth of cooperatives, as the cam- 
paign of the National Tax Equality Association to secure unfair taxation of the 
savings returns of cooperatives." It should be explained that by "unfair taxation" 
the Federation means any taxes against cooperatives. It would also "seek exten- 
sion of participation by churchmen and churches in the cooperative movement, 
e. g., help realize as a Federation goal the organization of at least thirty parish 
"credit unions." This is a familiar left-wing tactic, and needs no explanation 
for those who understand that this proposal, if adopted, would undermine the 
American free enterprise system, would destroy private business, large*and small, 
and would even make the church itself a favored competitor in every field of 
economic activity. 

Section III deals with the extension of "democratic suffrage," of which, so 
reads the document, "fascism makes a mockery". Yes, we remember all too well 
the phony elections that used to take place in Hitler's Germany; they were 
"mockeries". But the important point is that the very same kind of "elections" 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 63 

arc hold in the Soviet Union in this yeaT 1950, and in the Russian satellite nations — 
elections in which there is only one slate of candidates and in which the people 
vote "yes, or else". One of the most important goals facing us today is to find 
some way' of bringing a real, secret ballot to the Russian people, as we are now 
bringing it to the people of Japan and Western Germany. Why does not the 
Methodist Federation mention this on its agenda? Why does it ignore the one- 
slate ballot behind the Iron Curtain, while at the same time volunteering to 
"help find sociallv conscious candidates to run for office" in America? Yes, 
believe it or not, this organization, harbored by a great religious denomination, 
presided over by a respected bishop, flaunts the traditional American principle of 
separat ion of church and state, repudiates our priceless theory of po.itical freedom, 
and brazenlv plans to pick our candidates for us, Moscow style. It sounds in- 
credible, but it's all down in black and white in this church-sponsored, and 
Marxist-inspired "Program of Study and Action." 

But this is only part of the story of how some leaders of a great Christian church 
have been duped into becoming "missionaries for an atheistic cause. More facts 
concerning the "Methodist Federation for Social Action" and its infamous program 
will be revealed in the National Republic next month. 

Part II (June 1950) : 

In the National Republic last month we turned the spotlight on an infamous 
document which is officiallv known as the "Program of Study and Action of the 
Methodist Federation for "Social Action," but which we believe could be more 
fittingly termed "The 'Methodist' Manifesto". For it is so obviously Marxian- 
inspired that it constitutes practically a restatement of Communist Party aims. 
And while church leaders may deny that there is any official connection between 
the Methodist Church and the Methodist Federation, the fact is that the ties are 
embarrassinglv close — a point which we will bring out more fully later. 

In the installment last month we exposed the first part of this eurious document, 
issued by an organization which bears the name of our largest Protestant denom- 
ination, "but which has already been called "a tool of the Communist Party" by 
the House Committee on un-American Activities. On these pages now w-e shall 
briefly cover the second portion of the documents, more startling than the first 
perhaps, and shall then propose a program wmich Methodists should follow if 
they wish to save their church from complete left-wing domination. 

Section IV of the Methodist Federation's platform, dealing with civil liberties 
and minority rights, merits the closest scrutiny. Here again is something that 
all right-thinking Americans endorse — the preservation of civil liberties and 
minority rights — if only we understand the meaning and limitations of those 
terms, if only we tackle the. problems in a pro-American, not a pro-Communist, 
fashion. But here again the Federation reveals its Marxian leanings when it 
calls attention to "how fascism destroyed civil liberties and attacked rights of 
one minority after the other" — while on the very same page it lists Communists 
as a minority to be protected! Yes, that's right, fascists are ruthless tyrants, 
except presumably during the brief duration of the Stalin-Hitler Pact, and are 
to be given no consideration — no liberties and no rights — in the strange world 
the Methodist Federation is blueprinting for us, but Communists, we are told, 
are to be pampered and coddled! Let's look at the principal proposals, in the 
Federation's own language, for achieving this "Communist paradise" — a Soviet 
America. 

(a) "Stand guard for the liberties, rights and equal opportunity of all these 
groups, e. g., seek adequate financial support within Methodism for Methodist 
conscientious objectors, oppose proposals to outlaw the Communist or other 
minority political parties, contribute to the legal defense of Communists or others 
brought to trial simply for their political views." In other words, w r e are urged 
to shelter, support and defend the very men who are determined to overthrow our 
government and destroy the American way of life. And destroy the church too. 
It sounds incredible — coming from men who allegedly speak in the name of a 
great religious body! 

(b) "Support academic freedom." This is a familiar refrain to those of us who 
know Communist tactics. For it is aimed, of course, at those who would oust 
Communist teachers from our schools and colleges, since apparently the Federa- 
tion, like the Communist Party, defines academic freedom, not as the encourage- 
ment of the free-roaming mind, but merely as the license to teach -sedition and 
treason — in America, not, of course, in Russia. 

(c) "Support freedom of the church press and of the pulpit." Since such free- 
dom is already enjoyed here, this, obviously, is a bald proposal to convert church 



64 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

publications into organs of unadulterated propaganda on the pattern of the exist- 
ing pro-Red sheet, "The Protestant," and to encourage clergymen to take their 
texts from the Communist Manifesto, as, indeed, more of them than we realize 
are already doing, wittingly or unwittingly. What the "Methodist" Federation 
apparently seeks for the church is what it seeks for the school — the license to 
preach Marxian philosophy. 

(d) "Abolish the House Committee on Un-American Activities." The Meth- 
odist Federation applauds any and all action taken against fascists, but wants no 
exposure of Communists. And it wants, of course, no exposure of its own organiza- 
tion or its members. We must remember that the House Committee has already 
placed on the records that the Methodist Federation "is trying to use the prestige 
of the Methodist Church to promote the line of the Communist Party." That 
explains everything. 

(e) "Fnd the blacklisting of legal and peaceful organizations by the Attorney 
General under Presidential directive." This is another instance of following the 
Communist Party Line, another example of dictation from Moscow. The Fed- 
eration reserves for itself the right to attack fascists and anti-Communists, but 
wants no besmirching of those who follow the godless ideology of Uncle Joe. 

(f) "Rereal the Smith Act as an abridgement of free speech and free assembly". 
The Smith Act is the one under which eleven Communist leaders were recently 
tried and convicted on the charge of "conspiring to teach and advocate overthrow 
of the government by force and violence." This is the Methodist Federation's 
definition of free speech — advocating revolution. This is the Federation's idea 
of a "legal and peaceful" organization — the Communist Party. 

Section V of the Federation's "Program of Study and Action" is entitled: "To 
Contest All Political, Economic and Military Imperialism, a particularly brutal 
manifestation of which has been given to the world by fascism". 

It is did' cult to explain the mental processes of Communists and fellow-travelers. 
In this instance, the comrades of the Federation are trying to tell us that it was 
brutal for Hitler to invade Poland, bvit not for Stalin, that Germany's attacks on 
Czechoslovakia, Holland, and Belgium were evil, but Russia's conquest of Latvia, 
Fsthonia, and Lithuania was benevolent. Aggression is aggression, whether it is 
committed by men marching under the Swastika or under the Hammer and Sickle; 
the people of little Finland know that. But how would the Federation curb this 
"imperialism"? 

The "Methodist Manifesto" gives the answer. By promoting "political and 
economic independence for all colonial peoples" and by opposing "American eco- 
nomic imperialism as basic to the struggle against British, French, Dutch political 
colonialism". Apparently the "reverend" gentlemen of the Federation read 
nothing but what comes off the Kremlin's presses. Consequently they do not 
know that since the close of World War II the Philippines, India, and Indonesia 
have been granted independence. Can they list any territory that has been freed 
by the Soviet Union? 

In its projDOsal "to seek full, socially useful employment in the days, and for 
the needs, of peace" the Federation points out that the widespread lack of such 
employment in the past "brought fascism to Germany and other lands, and the 
lack of which in the future could bring fascism again to the same and new nations, 
including the U. S. A." And to protect us against this imaginary fascist infiltra- 
tion, they propose the whole program of social and economic planning — govern- 
ment owned and operated water power, nationally financed public housing, 
nationalized industry, cradle-to-grave security, federal aid to education, socialized 
medicine, a vast public works program, price controls, cooperative farming, in- 
creased farm subsidies, higher inheritance taxes, steeply graduated income taxes, 
and public "ownership and control of the basic means of production". This pro- 
gram, needless to say, would spell the doom of our opportunity society, would kill 
individual incentive and initiative, and would launch the totalitarian state in 
which men would goosestep at the whim of bureaucrats. We would have squan- 
dered the priceless American heritage. 

But the final section in this amazing Marxian-inspired program of the Methodist 
Federation — the one dealing with American foreign policy — would strip America 
of the last remaining vestige of her once great strength and unlock the door for the 
Kremlin's commissars. Just glance at the following proposals urged on us by the 
Federation — in the face of Russia's frantic re-arming, in the face of the constantly 
mounting threat to peace and freedom on the part of Communism's advancing 
hordes : 

"Cease manufacture and stockpiling of atom bombs and destroy existing 
stockpiles". 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 05 

"Outlaw the atom bomb and other weapons of mass destruction." 

"Oppose peacetime military conscription in the U. S. A." 

"Substantially reduce national military budget". 

"Oppose further militarization of the Marshall Plan". 

"Engage in friendly cooperation with the Soviet Union. End the cold war. 
Solve problems through negotiation". 

"Engage in friendly cooperation with the new regimes of Europe (both East and 
West) and Asia, treating them all as equals and refraining from self-righteousness 
or a 'double standard' of ethical judgment in our dealings with them or with the 
Soviet Union. Secure prompt recognition of the developing new people's govern- 
ment in China and large-scale peaceful cooperation and aid." 

"End existing economic, political and military support of colonial regimes, of 
fascist regimes in Spain and Argentina and of reactionary and pro-fascist forces 
in Greece, China and elsewhere." 

"Return to a progressive, democratic reform program in Japan". 

"Promote a peaceful, unified, democratic Germany, free to develop its own 
peaceful economic system". 

"End diplomatic representation with the Vatican in any auise. in keeping with 
the principle of separation of Church and state and with the need for a progressive 
peace policv". 

Is this what vou as an American want? And yet the Methodist Federation for 
Social Action, in presenting this program, poses as the representative of America's 
largest Protestant denomination. This is a matter that concerns every American 
directlv, but since this is America, we must largely rely on Methodists to clean out 
their own house. And since those, who occupy the pulpits, do not seem disposed 
to do anvthing about it, it is up to those, who sit in the pews, to take the broom in 
hand. As one who was brought up and raised in the Methodist Church, as one 
who believes that the Christian Church — Protestant and Catholic — is our one best 
hope of combating the combined forces of Communism and atheism, this writer 
suggests the following 12-point program to every man, woman and child who 
believes in the theology of John Wesley: 

1. Force the Federation to drop the word "Methodist" from its official title. 

2. Evict the Federation from its present quarters in the Methodist Building at 
150 'Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

3. Deny the Federation the right to establish units in Methodist congregations. 

4. Deny the Federation the right to solicit funds in Methodist conferences. 

5. Deny spokesmen of the Federation the right to address Methodist gatherings. 

6. Unfrock the Rev. Jack McMichael and send him back to the American Youth 
Congress. 

7. Demand the resignation of all Methodist bishops and ministers from the 
Federation or bar them from Methodist pulpits. 

8. Order all Methodist clergymen to disassociate themselves from all groups 
and organizations cited as subversive by the Attorney General or listed as Com- 
munist fronts by the House Committee on Un-American Activities. 

9. Remove left-wing faculty members from all Methodist theological schools. 
Stop feeding divinity students Marxian propaganda and give them something 
that will stick to their spiritual ribs. 

10. Re-embrace the spirit of religious tolerance, and realize that Christianity's 
No. 1 enemy is not the Vatican, but the Kremlin. 

11. Reaffirm the Methodist Church's belief in the principle of the separation 
of Church and State. 

12. Disavow all purportedly Methodist connections with atheistic Communism 
and re-dedicate the Church to Christian principles and the American heritage. 

Only by adopting such a program can Methodism eventually save itself from 
complete disintegration. Only in this way can the Methodist Church regain its 
rightful place in the Nation and help a strong America to create the better, finer 
world about which we dream. As Hallett Abend has stated in his book, "Half 
Slave, Half Free" (Bobbs-Merril') : 

"Unsought world leadership has devolved on the United States of America. 
The free world looks to us to be strong and wise enough to protect man's essential 
freedoms now under assault. The slave world has no other nation to turn to for 
mighty deliverance from thralldom". 

These are trying times. Is the Methodist Church going to accept the chal- 
lenge or is it going to surrender? Are Methodists going to follow their brave 
destiny, or are they going to listen to the misguided ravings of the Methodist 
Federation? The decision must be made now, an4 it is up to Methodism's 
nearly nine million members to speak up and act. As Senator Karl E. Mundt, 



66 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

of South Dakota, recently expressed it, in today's world the church "must be on 
the march, not on the run". 

The Washington Star of June 3, 1951, at page 3, reports that the 
Baltimore Annual Conference of the Methodist Church advocated by 
memorial, appointment of an official Commission on Social Action to 
represent the Methodist Church as a part of a memorial calling on the 
General Conference of the Methodist Church to take steps toward 
having the Methodist Federation for Social Action drop the word 
"Methodist" from its title. 

COMMENTS ON THE METHODIST FEDERATION FOR 
SOCIAL SERVICE AND THE METHODIST FEDERATION 
FOR SOCIAL ACTION BY ITS VICE PRESIDENT 

Dr. Walter G. Muelder, Dean of the Boston University School of 
Theology, and vice president of the Methodist Federation for Social 
Action, came to the defense of the federation in the following article 
entitled, "What About the Methodist Federation?" It appeared in 
the April 7, 1948, issue of Zion's Herald, pages 315-318: 

The Methodist Federation for Social Action is as indispensable to the Methodist 
Church as the prophetic movement in the seventh century B. C. was to the Deuter-" 
onomic Reform. Most readers know that in 1907 the Methodist Federation for 
Social Service originated in Worth M. Tibby's study at Epworth Memorial Church 
in Cleveland, Ohio. In the more than forty years of its prophetic activity the 
Federation has made outstanding contributions to the church. I shall list these 
in fifteen brief paragraphs. 

The first contribution is the organization itself, a potent, though unofficial 
conscience of the church. The Federation's objectives have now been largely 
accepted as the church's own goal. Articl II of the original constitution adopted 
Dec. 3, 1907, declared: "The objects of the Federation shall be to deepen within 
the church the sense of social obligation and opportunity, to study social problems 
from the Christian point of view, and to promote social service in the spirit of 
Jesus Christ.'' As the instrument of this social purpose the Federation has blazed 
the trail of social concern and action in the church, accepting the risks of radical 
adventure, and pointing the way to social justice and Christian responsibility. 
The widespread popularity of the Bishop's Crusade for a New World Order reveals 
the distance The Methodist Church has travelled since 1907. 

At the time of its founding the Federation confronted a type of piety which was 
badly warped through its emphasis on individualism. The need was to save the 
whole person in all his relationships; the very principle of personality was at stake. 

Leaders in the Federation have helped the church to recognize the whole range 
of divine judgment and redemption, developing a theology in which the salva- 
tion of the persons includes the whole interdependent social nexus in which he 
participates. Today, theologians throughout the world confess that the excessive 
individualism of Christianity in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was 
itself the product of secularism. Social Christianity has given back to the church 
a whole gospel which had temporarily been obscured and even lost. 

In restoring the entire range of Christian responsibility and salvation to the 
gospel message, the Federation overcame the alleged autonomy of the economic 
sphere. By bringing the economic, social and political orders under the judgment 
of Christ, the church saves civilization from the practical atheism of amoral 
social institutional life. There is no atheism more dstructive than that which 
seeks to make either the state or the market place exempt from moral criticism 
and control. The notion that the economic sphere is autonomous means social 
godlessness; and the doctrine that the church should present a "simple"gospel 
which leaves the social system undisturbed only heightens the barriers to the 
kingdom of God. 

From the above discussion we conclude that the MFSA has contributed to the 
cause of Christian responsibility. Religion is irresponsible when, as Richard 
Niebuhr says, it condones either worldliness or false prophecy. The church 
promotes worldliness when it substitutes human society itself for God-in-Christ. 
Instead of the question, "What doth the Lord require?" the worldly church asks 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION G7 

"What does the nation or civilization require?" The irresponsible church is 
"more concerned about social approval and disapproval than about the divine 
judgment." The church preaches false prophecy when it "seeks to supply the 
societies upon whose approval it depends with supernatural grace or with religious 
aid of one sort or another." It may endeavor to persuade men, as some opponents 
of the MFSA do, that the order which is in effect has divine sanction. Through 
forty years the Federation has proclaimed true responsibility and prophecy in 
the church against worldlincss and false prophecy. 

By facing the common problems of pergonal and social life with a responsible 
gospel, the churches have found their greatest practical basis for cooperation 
and ecumenicity. When the Assembly of the World Council of Churches meets 
in Amsterdam next summer, it will look back on the foundations of ecumenicity 
laid in the great series of Life and Work Conferences which culminated in Oxford 
in 1937. The official pronouncements of the Oxford Conference point in the same 
direction as those of any annual convention of the MFSA. It was the practical 
ecumenicity of social Christianity in America which brought the Federal Council 
into being. Great significance attaches to the fact that at its first meeting in 
1908 the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America adopted with 
only minor changes the Social Creed which the Methodists had just formulated. 
Not creedal, but prophetic Christianity holds the promise for growing ecumenicity. 

When the Protestant churches first awoke to the realities of the labor problem, 
they were shocked by the fact of the wide gulf which separated the masses of the 
working class in the cities from the churches. The bridge from misunderstanding 
and hostility to understanding and cooperation has been difficult to build, but 
the Federation has spanned the gulf. Today a significant percentage of gain- 
fully employed Methodists are members of trade unions. Labor has recognized 
the work of many of our Federation leaders. On the other hand, as Bishop 
Oxnam said to the C. I. O. Convention in 1942, "The Church has long since seen 
that the ethical ideals of our faith must be translated into the realities of economic 
and social justice. The extraordinary service of the C. I. O. in bringing economic 
justice to the workers of this nation is one in which the church rejoices." 

In 1940 the General Conference instructed that all future editions of the 
Discipline include the Social Creed. This action gives the whole church a 
magnificent social focus. Moreover, the church discovered that the historical 
focus of the "interest of The Methodist Church in social welfare springs from the 
labors of John Wesley, who ministered to the physical, intellectual, and social 
needs of the people. . . ." Applying the Social Creed and its spirit to the 
crises of the ever-changing social scene has been the constant vocation of the 
MFSA. In par. 2023 of the 1944 edition of the Discipline it says that the Federa- 
tion "has a history of achievement in stimulating thought and action of which 
the church is proud." The fact that twenty-three pages of the Discipline were 
given over to social questions proves that the work has been fruitful. 

Anyone who reads through the file of The Social Service Bulletin and it successor, 
The Social Questions Bulletin will be reminded afresh of the tremendous educational 
and forum service which the Bulletin has rendered the church. The standards 
have been amazingly high, the information accurate, the issues clearlv stated, and 
consequences of social policy boldly indicated. The leadership of the church has 
been given guidance throughout a succession of national and world crises in a way 
which has made it possible to deal with secular forces in a competent way. The 
Bulletin has been a medium through which the best thought of the denomination 
and of ecumenical Christianity has come to the attention of thousands of preachers 
and laymen. 

Although the names of Methodism's greatest leaders in social thought and action 
read like a Who's Who of the MFSA, it has not therefore escaped bitter and often 
malicious attack. Indeed, criticism has been its meat and drink through many 
turbulent years. The smear campaigns of the mid-thirties and of the present 
have been met by truth and equanimity. Leaders in the Federation have known 
how to lay bare the social causes of the abuse and thev have been able to meet the 
onslaughts of falsification with clarifying facts. Melhodists have learned to re- 
spect it for its high level of scientific truth, even when they disagree with particular 
recommendations for social action. 

Opposition to the point of view and program of the MFSA has come not only 
from the "kept press," entrenched privilege, and super-patriots, it has also come 
from sincere colleagues who are devoted to building the City of God. Through 
decades of often fierce opposition courageous men have been sustained in their 
militant faith by the nation-w'de fellowship o" the Federation. The consciousness 
that others were carrying on the struggle in other conferences, cities, and country- 



GS REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

sides has overcome the temptation to isolation and defeatism. Though numeri- 
cally the group has been relatively small, both the national leaders and the grass- 
roots members have maintained a wonderful morale. Since this quality could 
easily have been dissipated except for the prophetic comradeship, one of the 
greatest contributions of the society has been its sustaining fellowship. 

Anyone who reads the social action record of The Methodist Church must be 
impressed by the annual productivity of the conferences. The Federation has 
served as a clearing house of resolutions and pronouncements. Here again the 
Bulletin has brought into editorial focus the conscience of the church as it ex- 
presses itself across the land. Nuclei of Federation members at dinners, luncheons, 
and committee meetings have assured the entering of important resolutions on the 
agenda of the conferences. Conferences which have led out on the great issues 
have frequently been marked by the presence of Federation influences. Occa- 
sionally a bishop has stated his conviction that every member of the annual 
conference should support and join the Federation. More chapters in annual 
conferences are needed if the ideal of the Episcopal Address (1944) is to be 
realized: "The people of God must develop a militant faith which will keep them 
alive in every fiber of their being and imbue them with an impulse to action that 
will make them implacable foes of injustice and iniquity and enthusiastic cham- 
pions of whatever promises to hasten the coming of the kingdom of God on earth. 

The Federation has not only defended the rights of women workers and pro- 
moted their social security, but it has influenced and advanced concern for social 
justice among the women's societies of the church. The Bulletin has carried 
news and editorial comment of women's organizations for years. In March, 1942, 
it carried a dynamic article by Miss Thelma Stevens on "Methodist Women in 
Action" and showed how constructive activities were being promoted on many 
fronts. Again in Dec. 1944 Miss Stevens, who is active both in the Federation 
and as executive secretary of the Department of Christian Social Relations, 
offered a significant program of action which is in line with the best Federation 
thinking. In March 1945, Mrs. J. D. Bragg reported on a decade of progress 
not only in the field of study but in the field of action. 

From its inception the MFSA has seen social issues in the perspective of the 
total world order. History is all too tragically vindicating the continuing analyses 
of imperialism, fascism, autarchy [sic], and militarism which have marked the 
Federation's work especially since World War I. Those who wish to renew their 
perspectives on the present international crisis will be well instructed by the 
criticisms which were made of Pope Pius's Quadragesimo Anno in the early thirties 
as well as his participation in the Spanish Civil War. During the World War II 
the Federation challenged policies which have had dire consequences. Read 
aiain the December 1943 article, "Are We Winning the Peace?" On the other 
hand, those bishops most respected for their international statesmanship have 
been leaders also in MFSA. 

Some persons have the erroneous impression that the Federation has given 
simple support to the labor movement and socialism. Nothing could be farther 
from the truth. In May, 1943, John I,. Lewis was sharply rebuked for his 
methods. Repeatedly the A. F. of L. and the C. I. O. have been scored for their 
short-sighted and expedient philosophies. Frequently, radical political parties 
have been taken to task. From a Christian perspective all isms fall short of the 
right to command complete allegiance. Such loyalty belongs to God alone. 

The social crisis has so completely threatened the whole structure of modern 
civilization that patch-work reforms and one-cause panaceas must be set aside 
for a social program which is all-inclusive. One of the greatest contributions of 
the Federation to Methodism has been its demand that this be done. On its 
economic side this calls for democratic socialism. America's failure to distinguish 
the tactics of the Politbureau from social democracy and her apparent incapacity, 
in time, to develop economic democracy at home or to cooperate with it abroad 
may drive us into World War III. Some day, I believe, the church will be grateful 
that its unofficial gadfly had taught her to reject the method of the struggle for 
profit as the economic base for society and had pointed the way to the union of 
freedom and planning. 

SUMMARY 

Information in the files of this committee is not too clear as to when 
the Methodist Federation for Social Service became the Methodist 
Federation for Social Action. However, a letterhead for the year 1046 
identified the organization as the Methodist Federation for Social 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 69 

Service and the 1947 annual conference, held in Kansas City, refers to 
the organization as the Methodist Federation [or Social Action. 

The record of these two organizations as presented herein may h>3 
of some aid to those who are interested in determining; whether the 
Federation has been favorable to, or supported Communist objectives. 

The Federation advocates a social-economic planning in order to 
develop a society without class distinctions and privileges. William Z. 
Foster, in testifying before the Committee on Un-American Activities 
said: "Socialism is the first stage of Communism." 

The Federation advocates the confiscation, without compensation, 
of private property from the present owners. Marx and Engels, in the 
Communist Manifesto, said: 

. . . The theory of the Communists may be summed up in the single sentence: 
Abolition of private property. 

The following was taken from the October 1940 issue of the Social 
Questions Bulletin, a publication of the Methodist Federation for 
Social Service: 

The Methodist Federation for Social Service (is) an organization which rejects 
the method of the struggle for profit as the economic base for society; which seeks 
to replace it with social-economic planning in order to develop a society without 
class distinctions and privileges. 

The Communist Manifesto was written by Karl Marx and Friedrich 
Engels in 1848, and in 1888 Engels wrote "By then, the Manifesto has 
become a historical document which we have no longer any' right to 
alter." And so it remains today, the same as written more than 100 
years ago. 

The following was taken from the Communist Manifesto: 

When, in the course of development, class distinctions have disappeared, and 
all production has been concentrated in the hands of a vast association of the 
whole nation, the public power will lose its political character. Political power, 
properly so-called, is merely the organized power of one class for oppressing the 
others. If the proletariat during its contest with the bourgeoisie is compelled, by 
the force of circumstances, to organize itself as a class; if, by means of a revolution, 
it makes itself the ruling class, and, as such sweeps away by force the old condi- 
tions of productions, then it will, along with these conditions, have swept away 
the conditions for the existence of class antagonisms, and of classes generally, 
and will thereby have abolished its own supremacy as a class. 

In the place of the old bourgeois society, with its classes and class antagonisms, 
we shall have an association, in which the free development of each is the condition 
for the free development of all. 



APPENDIX 

The content of the appendix is presented only as information as to 
who were officers and committee members of the Federation over a 
period of years. The record is far from complete, but represents what 
is known to this committee at this time. 

1. Letterhead of the Methodist Federation for Social Service, dated 
October 24, 1928. (Reproduced on p. 2.) 

2. Letterhead of the Methodist Federation for Social Service, dated 
January 7, 1935. (Reproduced on p. 71.) 

3. Social Questions Bulletin of November 1939, page 4. (Repro- 
duced on p. 72.) 

4. Un-dated letterhead of the Methodist Federation for Social 
Service (probably in 1938 or 1939). (Reproduced on p. 41.) 

5. Social Questions Bulletin for October 1940, page 4. (Repro- 
duced on p. 73.) 

6. Letterhead of the Methodist Federation for Social Action dated 
April 12, 1946. (Reproduced on p. 42.) 

7. The following is taken from the report of the Executive Secretary 
to the annual meeting of the Methodist Federation for Social Action, 
held in Oskaloosa, Iowa, December 28-30, 1948: 

Officers of the Methodist Federation are: 

President, Bishop Robert N. Brooks, bishop of the TSTew Orleans area of the 

Methodist church. 
Vice Presidents: 

Bishop James C. Baker, bishop of the Los Angeles area of the Methodist 
Church, former chairman of the International Missionary Council, 
President of the Council of Bishops of the Methodist Church. 
Bishop Lewis O. Hartman, Boston. 
Bishop W. Earl Ledden, bishop of the Syracuse area of the Methodist 

Church, President of the New York State Council of Churches. 
Bishop Francis J. McConnell, Ohio, former President of the Federal 

Council of Churches of Christ in America. 
Dean Walter G. Muelder, dean of the Boston University School of 
Theology. 
Recording Secretary: Miss Thelma Stevens, Executive Secretary of the 
Department of Christian Social Relations of the Woman's Division of 
Christian Service of the Methodist Church. 
Treasurer: Dr. Gilbert Q. LeSourd, Associate Secretary of the Missionary 

Education Movement. 
Associate Treasurer: Mr. William W. Reid, Methodist layman and editor 
of the Pastor's Journal, an official Methodist publication. 

8. Methodist Federation for Social Service, 1945 ballott, (eight 
pages), pp. 74-81. 

9. Methodist Federation for Social Service, 1947 ballot (four pages), 
pp. 82-85. 

10. Social Questions Bulletin, June, 1950, pages 27 and 28. (Re- 
produced on pp. 8G and 87.) 

70 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 71 



ExniniT 2 



THE METHOOIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL SERVICE 
»?0 FIFTH AVBNUC. MffW YO«K CITY 



OFFICERS 

»>«M<»- rr.ANCll' J. MCCOHNZ1X. 
«»V»e*T (J, LrtOURO. 



SSCBETAmire 



#4Aft»V R. WAftO 






EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

FRANCIS J MCCOHNCLU 
>ilhi;ivl n. GN£NFO* 

RAt-PH e. u»my 

HAUPORO f. UUCCOCK 
CMAR1.C6 C V. r . "r- 
ROOT ;:ofJHr^ ; jc«£R 

ctce&Rr e cox 



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Methodist Federation for Social Service, letter, dated January 7, 1935. 



72 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 



Exhibit 3 
Social Questions Bulletin 



November, 1939 



News from 
the Field 

Social Planning and the Social 
Creed. The Social Ideals of the 
Churches, as adopted at the Quad- 
rennial Meeting of the Federal 
Council of the Churches of Christ 
in America, December 8, 1932 (be- 
fore the New Deal came into be- 
ing), contained this statement: "The 
churches should stand for social 
planning and control of the credit 
and monetary systems and the eco- 
nomic processes for the common 
good." The Social Creed of the 
former Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, as found in the 1938 Disci- 
pline, has the same statement on 
social planning as given above, yet 
the Social Creed of the Methodist 
Church, adopted at Kansas City, 
Mo., on May 9, 1939, makes no 
reference to this vital subject. 

In order to rectify this situation 
the New York East Annual Confer- 
ence, at its Special Session on Octo- 
ber 27, 1939, memorialized the Gen- 
eral Conference of 1940 to add to 
the Social Creed of the Church the 
following: "The Methodist Church 
stands for social planning and demo- 
cratic control of the economic proc- 
esses for the common good." 

Federation members, will you do 
your part? If your Annua! Con- 
ference meets before General Con- 
ference, will you endeavor to get it 
to adopt this memorial, and to in- 
struct its delegates to ask for the 
adoption of the memorial by the 
General Conference? If your An- 
nual Conference has already met, 
will you ask your delegates to sup- 
port this memorial? 



Conscription and Silver Shirts. 

"We stand opposed to the various 
conscription bills such as the May 
bill offered in the last Congress, 
which would clamp down upon us 
any sort of military dictatorship, and 
would destroy those democratic lib- 
erties upon which our national se- 
curity rests; and we oppose all na- 
tional defense bills which deny men 
the rights guaranteed under the 
Constitution. Against all hate pro- 
voking, race insulting groups, be 
they Bund or Silver Shirt, Method- 



ism hurls the titanic forces of its 
witness of the spirit. We have 
neither part nor parcel in any Chris- 
tian Front that turns its back on the 
Christian faith in brotherhood and 
democracy." — Ohio Conference, Sep- 
tember, 1939. 



Freedom. "We want freedom 
of speech, freedom of the press, free- 
dom of assembly, freedom of the 
pulpit and academic freedom. With- 
out these Democracy itself goes. 
We are alarmed by violations of 
these freedoms even when committed 
by our own representatives in our 
communities and at our own institu- 
tions." — Iowa-Des Moines Confer- 
ence, September, 1939. 



Profits and Living Standards. 

"We believe that profit as the domi- 
nant motive and driving force of 
industry is incompatible with our 
Christian ideal of sacrificial service. 
We are opposed to the putting of 
profit above personality. We believe 
in the abundant life for all people. 
Moreover, we think that no one is 
entitled to the luxuries of life while 
many are deprived of the very ne- 
cessities. We are our brother's 
keepers. 

"All workers should have a living 
annual wage. The principles of con- 
ciliation and arbitration should be 
applied in industrial disputes. Peace- 
ful picketing should be permitted. 
We believe that the worker has a 
property right in his job and a re- 
sponsibility to the industry by which 
he makes a living. We are opposed 
to the use of violence by either the 
employee or the employer. The 
church must champion the cause of 
the underprivileged and the dispo- 
sessed, and insist that the good 
things of life must be provided 
for all of God's children." — Iowa- 
Des Moines Conference, September, 
1939. 



The Mail Bag 

"The Federation was never more 
needed than now." — C. S. (Ohio). 

"We are glad to have the Federa- 
tion representing us at the forefront 
of the struggle."— C. H. P. (Michi- 
gan). 



"I want to commend you on your 
work and on your little paper. I 
enjoy it very much and give it to 
another Methodist living nearby — 
also a believer in what you stand 
for.".— D. H. M. (Washington). 

"I sincerely hope the (financial) ■ 
campaign will be a success, for there 
will be greater need than ever for 
the Federation in the new Church." 
— R. B. T. (New York). 

"Every progressive Methodist 
should be a member of the Federa- 
tion. I certainly want to be a mem- 
ber and so enclosed is my application 
blank."— G. M. H. (New York). 



Federation Finances 

Our deficit is still around 
tlfiOOl How can we meet itf 

C. R. M. (New York) writes: "I 
don't know how the deficit of $1,000 
can be met, but here is my check for 
$50 to help." 

R. F. W. (Iowa), who sent $20, 
writes: "If you had 49 people who 
would give $20 apiece you would 
have your $1,000." Will you be one 
of the 49? 



Social Questions 

BULLETIN 

Issued monthly, except July and August, 
The general policies of this publication 
•re determined by the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Methodist Federation for 
Social Service, subject to approval by the 
National Committee of the Federation. 
The selection of topics and material la 
committed to the Secretaries, who are 
responsible to the Federation and to the 
public for its accuracy. 

Membership $1.00 per year 
Special rate to student groups. 

SECRETARIES 

Harry F. Ward 

Charles C Webber 

OFFICERS 

Bishop Franeta J. McConndl, Prtridtn* 

Harris Franklin Rail, VtfPrttidtni 

Gilbert Q. LeSourd, Sterttary-Trtaiurtr 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
E. Raymond Attebery Juanita Jackson 
Lester W. An man David D. Jones) 

James C. Baker John C. Laaenby 

Hayes Real! Hal ford E. Luccock 

Edgar Blake Chester A. Smith 

Gilbert S. Cox Ralph B. Urmy 

Margaret Forsyth Edgar M. Wahlberg 

The METHODIST FEDERATION 

for SOCIAL SERVICE 
150 Fifth Avenue, New York City- 
Entered as second-class matter January 
21, 1919, at the Poatoffice at New York, 
N. V., under Act of August 24, 1912. 
»J12 



Social Questions Bulletin, November 1939, page 4. 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 



73 



Exhibit 5 



Social Questions Bulletin 



October, 1910 



Ward Book Offer 

Harry F. Ward's latest book 
"Democracy and Social Change" 
(Just off the press. Modern Age. 
Price $2.50) can be secured through 
the Federation office by sending 
$1.50 plus at least a $1.00 member- 
ship fee in our organization. 

Included in the book are chapters 
entitled: "What Kind of Change?"; 
"Democracy — What Kind ?" ; "Cap- 
italism and Democracy" ; "The Fas- 
cist Threat" ; "The Task of the In- 
tellectuals" ; "The Role of Religion" 
and "The Shadow of War." 

Place your order now ! 



Pamphlet 
Recommendations 

Compulsory Military Service. 
Woman's Press, 600 Lexington 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. 7c. 

Compulsory Military Conscrip- 
tion. National Council of Jewish 
Women, 1S19 Broadway, New 
York. N. Y. 5c. 

The Pacifist Handbook. Fellow- 
ship of Reconciliation, 2929 
Broadway, New York, N. Y. 10c. 

What About the Conscientious 
Objector? American Friends 
. Service Committee, 20 South 12th 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 15c. 



News from the Field 

Charles C. Webber conducted the 
Fifth Annual Traveling Economic 
Seminar of the Religion and Labor 
Foundation through the South dur- 
ing July. 

Twenty-five educators, physicians 
and religious leaders .under his di- 
rection studied the operation of the 
National Labor Relations Board and 
other national agencies in Washing- 
ton, D. C. ; the Resettlement Admin- 
istration projects of our government 
in West Virginia, Tennessee and Ar- 
kansas ; the class struggle in the Har- 
lan, Ky. coal fields ; the develop- 
ment of the TVA throughout the 
Tennessee Valley and King Cotton 
and his sharecropper slaves in the 
delta lands of the Mississippi. 

In Arkansas he found Winifred 
Chappcll, former Secretary of the 
Federation, and Claude Williams 
directing the People's Institute of 
Applied Religion — "an organization 
that is conducting a program of edu- 
cation and action for work-a-day 



preachers and leaders among the 
sharecroppers and rural workers of 
the South." (For further informa- 
tion write Miss Chappell in care of 
the Federation.) 

During August he participated, in 
Mexico City, in the "Mexican Hor- 
izons Seminar," which made an an- 
alysis of Mexican political, social, 
economic and agrarian conditions. 

He also addressed Mexican Meth- 
odists on the work of the Federation. 



Wisconsin Conference. Excerpts 
from the report of the Social Ser- 
vice Commission to the Wisconsin 
Conference of the Methodist 
Church, August 27, 19-10. 

"The Negro Problem. The com- 
mittee recommends active opposi- 
tion to segregation and other forms 
of discrimination against negroes. 
We should actively work to secure 
for them equal opportunities to live 
where they please, to work in all 
industries, to enjoy all the privi- 
leges and opportunities offered to 
any group in any community. . . . 

"The Church and Peace. We stand 
unalterably opposed to military con- 
scription in peace times. We be- 
lieve that conscription is a denial of 
the civil and religious rights guar- 
anteed by the Constitution; that it 
disrupts our social and economic 
life; that it places vast power in the 
hands of a few men; that it is a 
method of escape from facing the 
crucial problems of unemployment, 
poor housing/r'onditions, low pay for 
workers and other ills which affect 
our economic and social life, and 
which need to be frankly faced and 
solved ; that it is a step in the direc- 
tion of dictatorship; and that it 
ought therefore to be condemned in 
democratic America. . . . 

"We reiterate the position, of our 
church in regard to those who are 
conscientious objectors to military 
service as approved by the General 
Conference of our church in May, 
1940: 'We ask and claim exemp- 
tion from all forms of military prep- 
aration or service for all consci- 
entious objectors who may be mem- 
bers of the Methodist Church. In 
this they have the authority and sup- 
port of their church.' " 



Conference held in LaCrosse, men 
and women interested in world peace 
and social service formed a Confer- 
ence Federation for Social Service 
to function as an auxiliary to the 
Methodist Federation for Social 
Service, and to cooperate with simi- 
lar groups in neighboring confer- 
ences. 

Officers elected were: Chairman, 
J. Pierce Newell. Superior, Wis. ; 
Secretary, Arthur Maynard, Chetek, 
Wis! 



Appreciation 

Federation Members: As Chair- 
man of the National Finance Com- 
mittee I wish to express my appre- 
ciation of your sacrificial giving 
which made possible the reduction of 
the deficit on October first to $461. 

I know that I can count on you to 
support our 1940-41 program! 

How about having your Confer- 
ence Federation members elect a 
finance chairman to conduct an ev- 
ery-member canvass? The New 
York East Conference Federation 
members have just elected Rev. 
Louis H. Davis of Seymour, Conn., 
to do this for them. 

— Amos B. Horlacher. 



New M.F.S.S. Unit. At the re- 
cent session of the West Wisconsin 



Social Questions 

BULLETIN 

Issued months, except July and August Th« 
general poIlclM of ihli publlcatlrn aro doter- 
ratneil by tha Executive CominJUto of lbs 
MethodUt Ftn:;.-atIon for Soclol Service, subject 
to anproTsJ. b7 Ujo National Commltteo of tto 
Federation. Tiio celectton of trcrtcn cr.l material 
is commttlea to the Secrctsrlej who cro resKQ- 
stole to tbo Federation and to Lue public for 
Us accuracy. 

Membership $1.00 per year 
Special rate to student groups. 

SECRETARIES 

Harry F. Wird 

Charles C. Webber 

OFFICERS 

Bishop PraErfe J. McConnall. President 

Harris Franklin Bill, Vlcu-lTealdcot 

Gilbert Q. LeSourd, Secretary- Treasurer 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

P. Raymond Atlaborr Dmrtd D. Jenea 

Lester W. Auaian Jcfcn c. Lsseoly 

Jin-M C. Baker EaUord B. Lu<rr<£ 

Wado C Ruc-ltf o«rr5 L. Poor 

Mary oidcot, Itothuo* H. »L IU'Jia" 

nUMC BJcn&erg Ulrttn m-A'jio 

J-'&u Blsfco ChMttr A. Smith 

Gilbert 8. Cox Ralph D. Fray 

Maroroi Forsyth Etfsar II. Wuhlbe™ 

Amos D, Horlacher Buth F. WelcoU 

The METHODIST FEDERATION 

for SOCIAL SERVICE 
ISO Fifth Avenue, New York City 

Entered as sr<-ond-cliui matter January 21,1919 
■t the Posto-Bco st New York, N. T.. under Act 
of August 24, 1812. 



Social Questions Bulletin, October 1940, page 4. 



74 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 



Exhibit 8 (Part 1) 

BALLOT 

METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL SERVICE 



NOMINATIONS FOR EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

(Vote for 30 only, including officers) 

Officers : 

President (vote for 1) 

n Bishop Lewis 0. Hartman, Pres., MFSS; Bishop, the 
Boston Area, the Methodist Churcti; Chairman, American 
Committee for Spanish Freedom; President, Massachusetts 
Council of Churches; Former Editor, Zicn's Herald. 



Vice President (vote for 2) 

B Bishop James C. Baker, Vice Pres., MFSS; Bishop, the 
>9 Angeles Area, the Methodist Church; Chairman, Inter- 
national Missionary Council; Member, American Section, 
World Council of Churches. 

□ Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam, Vice Pres., MFSS; Bishop, 
the New York Area, the Methodist Church; President, the 
Federal Council of Churches of Christ in America; Chair- 
man, National Council, Service Men's Christian League. 

□ 

□ 



according Secretary (vote for 1) 



rn Miss Thelma Stevens, Recording Secretary, MFSS; 
Executive Secretary, Department of Christian Social Rela- 
tions, Woman's Division for Christian Service. 

□ • 



Treasurer (vote for 1) 

□ Dr. Gilbert 0- LeSourd, Treasurer, MFSS; Secretary, 
Business Division, Missionary Education Movement. 

a 

Members-at-Large (vote for 25) : 

ri ■ Dr. Wa2e Crawford Barclay, Chairman, Administrative 
Committee, MFSS; currently editing Social Questions 
Bulletin; long-time Executive Secretary, Joint Committee 
on Religions Education in Foreign Fields, the Methodist 
Church. 

rn Rev. Samuel J. Beers, President, Wisconsin Conference 
Chapter, MFSS; pastor, Wesley Church, Sheboygan, 
Wisconsin. 

n Mr3. Theodore Berry, Secretary of Literature and Pub- 
lications, Women's Division of Christian Service, Central 
Jurisdiction, the Methodist Churoh. 

□ Bishop Charles W. Brasharcs, the Des Moines Area, 
the Methodist Church. 

rj Rev. J. George Butler, Pastor, South Park Methodist 
Church, Hartford, Conn. 

□ Dr. Harold C. Case, Pastor, First Methodist Church, 
Pasadena, California; Member, Commission on Home and 
Family, Federal Council of Churches of Christ in America, 
rn Rev. Alva I. Cox, Executive Secretary, the Board of 
Education, Northeast Ohio Conference, the Methodist 
Church. 



pj Dr. Gilbert S. Cox, Pastor, First Methodist Church, 
Waterloo, Iowa. 

Q Dr. Henry Hitt Crane, Pastor, Central Methodist 
Church, Detroit, Michigan. 

Q Rev. Earl Downs, President, Samuel Huston College, 
Austin, Texas. 

rj Miss Ann Fitzpatrick, student, Garrett Biblical Insti- 
tute, Evanston, Illinois; Chairman, Student Section, Na- 
tional Conference of the Methodist Youth Fellowship. 

fj B « v - Owen M. Geer, Pastor, Mt. Olivet Methodist 
Church, Dearborn, Michigan; Chairman, Executive Com- 
mittee, Detroit Conference MFSS. 

[J Dr. Corliss P. Hargraves, Executive Secretary, the Inter- 
board Committee on Missionary Education, the Methodist 
Church. 

□ Dr. John W. Haywood, President, Gammon Theological 
Seminary, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Q Rev. Robert C. Howe, Pastor, Simpson-Grace Methodist 
Church, Jersey City, N. J*.; member, Administrative Com- 
mute, MFSS. 

Q Dr. David D. Jones, President, Bennett College, Greens- 
boro. Xo. Carolina. 

□ Rev. Franklin H. Littell, Director, the Student Religious, 
Association, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; 
former president, National Council for Methodist Youth. 

rj Bishop W. Earl Ledden, the Syracuse Area, the Metho- 
dist Church; President, New York State Council of 
Churches. 

□ Dr. Edgar A. Love, Superintendent, Dept. of Negro 
Work, Board of Missions and Church Extension, the Meth- 
odist Church; member, Administrative Committee, MFSS. 

□ Chaplain James W. May, former Executive Secretary, 
YMCA, Georgia School of Technology. 

□ Dr. C. C. McCown, President, Social Action Fellowship 
(Conf. MFSS) California Conference; Professor, Pacific 
School of Religion. 

□ Dr. Walter Muelder, Dean, School of Theology, Boston 
University, Boston, Mass. 

□ Mrs. Floyd Mulkey, Chicago, Illinois Clinin., Dept. of 
Christian Social Relations, Roek River Conference; active in 
League of Women Voters. 

Q Rev. George L. Poor, President, Pacific Northwest 
MFSS; Pastor, the Methodist Church, Camas, Washington. 

□ Rev. Robert R. Powell, Professor, Mt. Union College, 
Alliance, Ohio, under Crusade for Christ program; former 
Executive Secretary, Board of Education, New Jersey Con- 
ference, the Methodist Church. 

□ Rev. H. M. Ratliff, Executive Secretary, Board of Edu- 
cation, the Southwest Texas Conference, the Methodist 
Church, Austin, Texas. 

□ Dr. Charles E. Schofield, Editor, Adult Publications, 
Board of Education, the Methodist Church, Nashville, 
Tennessee. 

r] Mrs. M. E. Tilly, Secretary, Christian Social Relations 
and Local Church Activities, Southeastern Jurisdiction, 
Woman's Division of Christian Service, the Methodist 
Church, Atlanta, Georgia. 



MetLoJist Federation for Social Service 194i Ballot, rage 1. 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 75 



Exhibit 8 (Part 2) 



Q Rev. Andrew S. Turnipseed, Pastor, Dexter Ave. □ 
Methodist Church, Montgomery, Alabama; President, Ala- 
bama Conference MFSS. □ 

B Bishop William T. Watkins, the Louisville Area, the □ 



ethodist Church. 



D 



n Rev. C. C. Webber, Secretary, Amalgamated Clothing 

Workers of America; former Executive Secretary, MFSS. LJ 

Q Mr. Charles E. Wegner, Secretary-Treasurer, Minnesota *-l 

Conference MFSS. Executive Secretary, St. Paul Goodwill p. 
Industries, St. Paul, Minn. 

0Rev. Wayne White, Pastor. Westchester Methodist 

lurch, New York, N. Y.; member, Administrative Cora- □ 
mittee, MFSS. 

□ 
Q Dr. Ruth P. Wolcott, Spirit Lake, Iowa, President, 

Northwest 1. era MFSS. □ 

□ Dr. Lloyd F. Worlcy, Pastor, First Methodist rhureh, Q 

Stamford, Conn.; Presiucnt, New York East Conference 

MFSS. □ 

□ a 

d □ 

□ □ 

□ □ 

D D 

D □ 



According to action taken by the Executive Committee on July 3, 1045, as follows: "Conference Chapters 
■which have qualified by meeting Conference Chapter Standards may elect a member to the Executive 
Committee immediately," elections as listed below are hereby announced: 

Alabama Conference 
Rev. J. B. Nichols 
Georgiana, Alabama 



NOMINATIONS FOR NATIONAL COMMITTEE 

According to action taken by the Executive Committee on July 3, 1945, as follows: "Annual Conference 
Chapter presidents shall be members of the National Committee. Conference Chapters which have qualified 
by meeting Conference Chapter Standards may elect up to five members to the National Committee immedi- 
ately. Local Chapters which have qualified by meeting Local Chapter Standards may elect up to two members 
to the National Committee immediately," elections as listed below are hereby announced: 

flection by Standard Chapter: Election as Conference Chapter President: 

Alabama Conference West Wisconsin Conference 
Rev. D. C. Whitsett Rev. Oscar M. Adam 

Marjanna, Florida Madison, Wisconsin 

Rev Wclton Gregory Q Conference 

vtw^°Z?'rrtit »"■ Mat " Chamberlia 

Miss Trances Grant Gre -lr m Or ™ n 

Huntingdon College, Montgomery, Alabama ' ° 

Rev. L. P. McLeod N €w York Conference 

Grove Hill, Alabama Rev. George M. Cordner 

Rev. Joel McDavid Dover Plains, New York 

Grand Bay, Alabama Central Kansas Conference 

Rev. F. W. Dieterich 

Georgia State College for Women Local Chapter— ililledge- Mt - Uc T c '. Kansas 

ville, Georgia £ . California-Arizona Conference 

Miss Betty Berenthiea Dr. James E. Dunning 

Miss Ann Hutchesoa Los Angeles, California 



2 

Methodist Federation for Socia. Sirvice, 1G45 Ballot, page 2 



76 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 



Exhibit 8 (Part 3) 



West Oklahoma Conference 
Rev. Forrest Fields 
Lawton, Oklahoma 

New Jersey Conference 
Rev. Paul Friedrich 
New Brunswick, N. J. 

Minnesota Conference 
Rev. Wilbur D. Grose 
St. Paul, Minnesota 

Dakota Conference 
Rev. Edwin 0. Hessel 
Webster, South Dakota 

Wyoming State Conference 

Rev. j. Clyde Keepan 

Sheridan, Wyoming 

Northwest Indiana Conference 

Dr. Blaine E. Kirkpatrick 

Indianapolis, Indiana 

Illinois Conference 

Rev. Donald R. Lemkau 
Henry, Illinois 

Erie Conference 

Rev. M. E. Lindstrom 

New Wilmington, Pennsylvania 

Central New York Conference 
Dr. C. C. Noble 

Syracuse, New York 

Northern New York Conference 
Rev. A. Leslie Potter 
Massena, New York 
Colorado Conference 

Rev. Kenneth M. Smith 
Denver, Colorado 

Michigan Conference 
Rev. Jack Steele 

Kalamazoo, Michigan 

Southwest Texas Conference 
Rev. Ewart Watts 
Cuero, Texas 

South Georgia Conference 
Rev. J. R. Webb, Jr. 
St. Simons, Georgia 

Montana State Conference 
Rev. M. J. Wilcox 
Laurel, Montana 

Genesee Conference 
Rev. Earl Winters 
Rochester, New York 

and any other such Presidents who are nominees for the 
Executive Committee, but fail to be elected on this ballot. 

Members-at-Large (vote for up to 150 from those listed or 
others you write in) 

□ 3 . Rev. Merrill R. Abbey, Pastor. First Methodist 

Church, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

□ 

□ 2, Rev. Gro^ Alexander, Pastor, The Methodist Church, 

Tucumcari, New Mexico. 

a 

p 3. Rev. Albert Allinger, Pastor, The Methodist Church, 
Cranford, New Jersey; Corresponding Secretary, 
Newark Conference MFSS. 

D 



□ 4. Judge W. A. Anderson, District Court, Minneapolis, 

Minnesota; former mayor of Minneapolis. 

□ 

Q 5. Rev. Robert M. Atkins, Methodist Pastor, Madison, 
Wisconsin. 

a 

Q 6. Rev. Lester Ward Auman, Pastor, Jackson Heights 
Church. Long Island. New York; member, ad interim 
committee of MFSS during reorganization. 

■ 

Q 7. Rev. DeWitt C. Baldwin, Director, The Liale Fel- 
lowship, New York, New York. 

□ ' 

Q 8. Rev. Archey D. Ball, Pastor, The Methodist Church, 
Leonia, New Jersey. 

□ 

□ 0. Rev. Lee H. Ball, Pastor, The Methodist Church, 

Lake Mahopac, New York; member, Executive Com- 
mittee, New York Conference MFSS. 

□ 

B 10. Dr. Albert E. Barnett, Professor, Garrett Biblical 
Institute; Vice President, Alabama Conference 
MFSS. 

□ 

gj 11. Rev. Hayes Beall, Methodist Pastor, Salem, Oregon. 

□ 

□ 12. Rev. Robert E. L. Bearden, Pastor, The Methodist 

Church, Walnut Ridge, Arkansas. 

□ 

Q 13. Professor Irwin R. Beiler, Allegheny College, Mead- 
vile. Penn.; Chairman, Executive Committee, Erie 
Conference MFSS. 

n 

□ 14. Rev. John F. Bender, Professor, University of Okla- 

homa; Vice President, West Oklahoma Conference 
MFSS. 

□ 

rj 15. Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune, President, National 
Council of Negro Women, Washington, D. C. 

D 

□ 16. Dr. Henry L. Bibby, physician, Kingston, New York. 
D 

□ 17. Mrs. C. A. Bloomquist, Chicago, Illinois; Dist. Pres., 

Woman's Society for Christian Service. 

D 

B 18. Dr. Hiel D. Bollinger, Secretary, Dept. of Student 
Work, The Board of Education, The Methodist 
Church, Nashville, Tennessee. 

□ 

Q 19, Rev. Charles F. Boss, Jr., Executive Secretary, Com- 
mission on World Peace, The Methodist Church, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

□ 



Methodist Federation for Social Service, 1945 Ballot, page 3. 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 77 



Exhibit 8 (Part 4) 



□ 20. 



Mr. E. R. Bowen, General Secretary, Cooperative 
in of the U. S. A., Chicago, Illinois. 



n 




□ 


21. 


□ 




□ 


22. 


a 




D 


23. 


□ 




a 


24. 


□ 




a 


25. 


a 




a 


26. 


□ 




a 


27. 


□ 




a 


28. 


a 




a 


29. 


D 




□ 


30. 


a 




a 


31. 


a 




a 


32. 


n 




a 


33. 


□ 




a 


34. 


a 




a 


35. 



President James P. Brawley, Clark College, Atlanta, 
Georgia. 



Dr. Edgar S. Brightman, Prnf.-ssnr of Philosophy, 
Boston University School of Theology, Doston, Mas3. 



Dr. Edwin A. Brown, Methodist Pastor, Urbana, 
Ohio. 



Rev. Jesse Bunch, Pastor, First Methodist Church, 
Corvallis, Oregon. 



Rev. George A. Burcham, Associated Cooperatives, 
Inc., Oakland, California. 



Mr. Harold Burns, Editor and Publisher, New Wil- 
mington, Pennsylvania. 



Rev. Wendell R. Carter, Pastor, The Methodist 
Church, Beaver Falls, New York; Secretary -Treas- 
urer, Northern New York Conference MFSS. 



Miss Winifred Chappell, P.^-pl^s' Institute of Applied 
Religion, Baltimore, Maryland. 



Rev. Don Chase, Methodist Pastor, Redding, Cali- 
fornia; Editor, Social Informant, organ of California 
Conference MFSS. 



Rev. James Chubb, Asst. Secretary, General Board 
of Evangelism, The Methodist Church, Baldwin City, 
Kansas. 



Rev. George Clary, St., Chmn., Georpia Interracial 
Commission; Pastor, Trinity Methodist Church, 
Savannah, Georgia. 



Dr. George A. Coe, Professor Emeritus of Religious 
Education) Union Theological Seminary, living in 
Claremont, California. 



Chaplain Elbert Cole, Norman, Oklahoma. (Member 
St. Louis Conference.) 



Dr. Wilson G. Cole, Methodist Pastor, Syracuse, New 
York. 



Rev. Elbert M. Canover, Director, Interdenomina- 
tional Bureau of Architecture, New York, N. Y. 



□ 30. Professor Russell M. Cooper, University of Minne- 
sota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

□ 



Q 37. Rev. Albert J. Copellnd, Pastor, First Methodist 
Church, E. Motine, Illinois. 

□ 



□ 38. Dr. Clarence T. Craig, Professor of New Testament, 
Graduate School of Theology, Oberlin College, 
Oberlin, Ohio. 



□ 

□ 30. Rev. Harold Cramer, Methodist Pastor, Necdham 

Heights, Mass. 

D 

Q 40. Mr. Gloster B. Current, Sce'y, National Association 
for the Advancement of Colored People, Detroit, 
Michigan. 

□ 

Q 41. Rev. Albert Curry, Pastor, Friendship Park Meth- 
odist Church, Pittsburgh, Pcnn.; Social Service 
Director, Pittsburgh Goodwill Industries. 



□ 42. Rev. Mark A. Dawber, Executive Secretary, Home 
Missions Council of North America, New York, N. Y. 



fj 43. Rev. Mark Depp, Tastor, Centenary Methodist 
Church, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 

□ 



[j 44. Rev. James Dombrowski, Executive Secretary, 
Southern Conference for Human Welfare, Nashville, 
Tennessee. 



Q 45. Rev. M. E. Dorr, Pastor, Grace Methodist Church, 
Dayton, lowar Chmn., Social Action Committee, 
Northwest Iowa Conference MFSS. 



□ 

q 46. Rev. Paul DuBois, Methodist Pastor, Bristol, 
Connecticut. 



□ 

rj 47. Rev. L. L. Dunnington, Methodist Pastor, Iowa City, 
Iowa. 



a 

□ 48. Rev. Harold Ehrensperger, Editor, Motive, Magazine 
of the Methodist Student Movement, Nashville, 
Tennessee. 



□ 49. Mr. R. B. Ellis, Naval Officer, Miami, Florida. 



Q 50. Mrs. Merle L. English, Director of Religious Educa- 
tion, First Methodist Church, Decatur, Illinois. 



Q 51. Dr. Guy Fox, Administrator, Denver Public Schools, 
Denver, Colorado; Chmn., Social Action Commission, 
Denver Council of Churches. 



□ 



Methodist Federation for Social Service, 1945 Ballot, page 4. 



97252*— 52- 



78 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 



Exhibit 8 (Part 5) 



rl 52. Rev. Everett H. Gardner, Methodist Paator, North n 67. Chaplain Amos B. Hotlacheiv Pan Diego, California 



Bend, Oregon 



(member New York East Conference). 



□ 

a 

D 

□ 

a 
a 

□ 

a 

D 

a 

a 

D 

□ 

D 

a 

D 

a 
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a 

D 

D 
D 

a 
a 

a 

a 

D 

a 



Rev. Edwin Garrison, Methodist Pastor, Wabash, D 68 - Mr. George A. Home, consulting engineer, New York, 



Indiana. 



N. Y. 



04. Mrs. P. M. Gibbes, President, WSCS, South Carolina 
(Central) Conference, South Carolina. 



55. Rev. Victor V. Goff, Director, Wesley Foundation, 
University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. 



56. Rev. M. J. Gordanier, Pastor, The Methodist Church, 
Markcsan, Wisconsin ; Vice President, Wisconsin 
Conference MFSS. 



07. Rev. Albert Green, Director of 'Youth Work, Board 
of Education, Smith Carolina Conference, The Meth- 
odist Church, Florence, South Carolina. 



58. Rev. Armand Guerrero, Methodist Pastor, Chicago, 
Illinois; Member, Exec. Com in., Rock Giver Confer- 
ence MFSS. 



59. Mr. Carey Kaigler, Regional Director, CIO, Binning 
ham. Alabama. 



61. Dr. Royal Hall, Professor of History and Chairman, 
Division of Social Sciences, Albion College, Albion, 
Michigan. 



64. Rev. A. A. Heist, Director. American Civil Liberties 

Union, Los Angeles, California. 



65. Rev. Chester E. Hodgson, Methodist Pastor, Newark., 
New Jersey; on editorial stall. The Protectant. 



66. Dr. Mary Alice Hoover, osteopathic physician, 
Tacoma, Washington. 



D 

Q 69. Mr. I. H. Hull, Secretary, Indiana Farm Bureau 
Cooperative Assn., Indianapolis, Indiana. 



Q 70. Professor Harold Hutson, Dept. of Religion, Birming- 
ham-Southern College, Birmingham, Alabama. 

□ ; 



rj 71. Mrs. Mary C. Hyde, President, League of Women 
Voters, Omaha, Nebraska. 



□ 72. Miss R. Elizabeth Johns, Secretary, Student Christian 
Movement, New England Region, Boston, Mass. 



rj 73. Professor Emmett S. Johnson, Candler School of 
Theology, Atlanta, Georgia. 



q 74. Mrs. J. D. Kilgore, Tracyton, Washington. 

□ 

Q 75. Rev. Harry F. King, Pastor, Thomson Methodist 
Church, Wheeling, West Virginia. 



L~] 76. Rev. George S. Lackland, Pastor, Indianola Methodist 
Church. Columbus, Ohio. 



60. Rev. William Hairston, Methodist Pastor, Reidsville, LJ 

Noith Carolina. ,— , 



Dr. Harold Lancaster, P.i-toi, Euclid Avenue Meth- 
odist Church, Cleveland, Ohio; Member, United Chris- 
tian Council for Democracy National Committee 
for MFSS. 



□ 78. Professor John C. Lazenby, Wisconsin State Teach- 
ers College, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 



62. Rev. Paul G. Hayes, Pastor, McCabe Methodist □ 

Church, Bismarck, North Dakota. 



q 70. Rev. Nat G. Long, Pastor, Penrhtree Road Methodist 
Church, Atlanta, Georgia. 



63. Rev. L. B. Hazzard, Prof, of Religious Education, □ 

Illinois Wcsleyan Univ., Bloomingtoii, Illinois. 



□ 30. Mrs. Ford H. Longsdorf, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 

□ 

Q 81. Dr. Halford E. Luccock, Professor, Yale Divinity 

School, New Haven, Conn. 



P 62. Mr. Jesse Mall, locomotive engineer, Hoisington, 
Kansas. 



a 83. Dr. Samuel W. Marble, Pastor, Trinity Methodist 
Church, Denver, Colorado. 

□ 



Methodist Federation for Social Service, 1045 Ballot, page 5. 



REVIEW nv METHODIST FEDEH \TION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 79 



Exhibit 8 (Part 6) 



a 

a 
a 

a 
a 

a 
a 

n 
a 



84. Mr. William P. Mason, shoo manufacturer, St. Louis, 
Missouri; District Lay Leader, The Methodist 
Church. 



85. Bishop Francis J. McConnell, retired. New York, 
N. Y.; former President. MFSS. 



86. Rev. Stanley S. McKee, Methodist Pastor, Riverside, 
California. 



87. Rev. Henry A. Meyer, Methodist Pastor, Indianapo- 
lis, Indiana. 



88. Miss Ethel K. Millar, Librarian, Hendrix College, 
Conwav, Arkansas. 



89. Professor Clyde Miller, Teachers College, Columbia 
University, New York, X. Y. 



90. Dr. John C. Millian, Pastor, Petworth Methodist 
Church, Washington, D. C.; served as tempo- 
ray chmn., Washington MFSS Chapter during 
organization. 



91. Mr. William Mitch, United Mine Workers of Amer- 
ica, Birmingham, Alabama. 



02. Miss Helen G. Murray, former Secretary, MFSS, 
Tionesta, Pennsylvania. 



93. Rev. John V. Murray, Jr., Pastor, The Methodist 

Church, Bethune, South Carolina, 



94. Rev. Jesse Murrell, Methodist Pastor, Covington, 

Kentucky. 



95. Miss Eleanor Neff, Associate Secretary, Department 
of Christian Social Relations and Local Church 
Activities, Woman's Division of Christian Service, 
The Methodist Church, New York, N. Y. 



a 

a 

a 

a 
a 
a 

n 
□ 



96. Miss Candis Nelson, D^an Emeritus, Seattle Pacific 
College, Seattle, Washington. 



98. Miss Marian L. Norris, New York, N. Y.; Secretary, 
Wesleyan Service Guild, Woman's Division of Chris- 
tian Service, The Methodist Church. 



99. Rev. Spencer B. Owens, District Superintendent, The 
Methodist Church, Albion, Michigan. 



q 100. Rev. Elbert M. Parkhurst, Pastor, The Methodist 
Church, Chazy, New York. 

□ ••"• 



□ 101. Mrs. G. W. Pomeroy, La. Conf. Secy. <>f Christian 
Social Relations, WSCS, Minden, Louisiana. 



□ 102. Rev. Fred G. Poole, Executive Secretary, Board of 
Education, Detroit Conference, The Methodist 
Church, Detroit, Michigan. 



Q 103. Mrs. Fred G. Poole, social worker, Division Chairman, 
Christian Social Relations for Wesleyan Service 
Guild, Detroit, Michigan. 



□ 104. Dr. Harris F. Rail, Professor, Garrett Biblical Insti- 
tute, Evanston, Illinois; former Vice President, 
MFSS. 



*q 105. Mrs. W. H. Ratliff, Sherard, Mississippi. Prominent 
in State Fublic Welfare Circles. 



106. Rev. W. Neal Raver, Chmn., Social Action Comm., 
New Jersey Conference, The Methodist Church. 



a 



107. Rev. Ensworth Reisner, Pastor, Richmond Avenue 
Methodist Church, Buffalo, New York; Secretary, 
Genesee Conference MFSS. 



p-j 108. Dr. Lloyd H. Rising, Pastor, University Methodist 
Church, Lincoln, Nebraska. 



djj 109. Miss Miriam V. Ristine, Executive Secretary, Bureau 
of Social Welfare, Woman's Division of Christian 
Service, The Methodist Church. 



Q 110. Dr. Lester Rumble, Pastor, St. Mark's Methodist 
Church, Atlanta, Georgia. 



□ 111. Dr. John W. Rustin, Pastor, Mt. Vernon Place Meth- 
odist Church, Washington, 1>. C. ; Chairman, Legisla- 
tive Subcommittee MFSS. 



Q 112. Rev. Don Schooler, Pastor, Epworth Methodist 
Church, Chickasha, Oklahoma. 



97. Rev. G. Sam Nichols, Methodist Pastor, Ames, Iowa, «-l 



□ 113. Rev. E. Kendall Scouten, Pastor, The Methodist 
Church, Minetto, New York; Vice President, North- 
ern New York Conference MFSS. 

D 

Q 114. Dr. Harvey Seifert, Professor, Graduate School of 
Religon, University of Southern California, Los 
Angeles, California; Chairman, Labor Subcommittee, 
MFSS. 



Methodist Federation for Social Service, 1945 Ballot, page 6. 



so 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 



Exhibit 8 (Part 7) 



115. Rev. James W. Sells, Executive Secretary, South- 
eastern Jurisdictional Council, The Methodist 
Church, Atlanta, Georgia; co-Chairman, Rural Sub- 
committee, MFSS. 



Q) 
□ 

a 
.□ 

□ 



116. Rev. Claude Singleton, Director, Wesley Founda- 
tion, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. 



117. Dr. W. A. Smart, Professor, Candler School of 
Theology, Atlanta, Georgia. 



118. Rev. Alson J. Smith, Pastor, St. Paul's Methodist 
Church, Brooklyn, New York. 



119. Mr. Chester A. Smith, member, Executive Committee, 
New York Conference, MFSS, Peekskil, New York. 



p 129. Rev. Frank Toothaker, Methodist Pastor, Oakland, 
California. 



Q 130. Rev. Willard Uphaus, Director, Religion and Labor 
Foundation, New Haven, Connecticut. 

a 



□ 131. Dr. Ralph B. Urmy, retired, St. Petersburg, Florida; 

member, ad interim Committee, MFSS, during 
reorganization. 

□ 

□ 132. Dr. Edgar M. Wablberg, associated with UNRRA in 

China. 



D 

Q 133. Rev. W. E. Waltmire, member, Nebraska Confer- 
ence, The Methodist Church, on sabbatical leave in 
Seattle, Washington. 



y 

J B 

f IB 

/ ■ 



120. Rev. Eugene L. Smith, member, National Committee, 
United Christian Council for Democracy, Jersey City, 
New Jersey. 



121. Rev. Vaughn Smith, Director, Wesley Foundation, 
University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, West Oklahoma Conference MFSS. 



122. Rev. Everett M. St owe, Faculty member, Fukien 
University, China; Committee on Friendly Relations 
among Foreign Students, New York, N. Y. 



123. Rev. Samuel H. Sweeney, Pastor, St. Mark's Meth- 
odist Church, New York, N. Y. 



124. Rev. Daniel E. Taylor, Methodist Pastor, Vancouver, 
Washington; Secretary -Treasurer, Pacific North- 
west Conference MFSS. 



D 
D 



125. Miss Mildred Thomson, social worker; Secretary, 
Minnesota Conference Wesleyan Service Guild, St. 
Paul, Minnesota. 



126. Dr. Joseph W. Thompson, Methodist Pastor, St. 
Joseph, Missouri. 



127. Dr. Donald E. Tippett, Pastor, First Methodist 
Church, Los Angeles, California. 



128. Dr. Ernest F. Tittle, Pastor, First Methodist Church, 
Evanston, Illinois; member, Executive Committee, 
Rock River Conference MFSS. 



gj 131. Dr. Harry F. Ward, Professor Emeritus of Social 
Ethics, Union Theological Seminary; longtime Sec- 
retary, MFSS; Palisade, New Jersey. 



g| 135. Rev. Bradford G. Webster, Pastor, The Methodist 
Church, Gowanda, New York. 



a 



130. Mr. Paul Wengert, farmer, Idaho Falls, Idaho. 



137. Dr. John Clark Williams, Chairman, Social Service 
Commission, Ohio Conference, The Methodist Church; 
Pastor, The Methodist Church, Sabina, Ohio. 



138. Rev. Morgan Williams, Pastor, First Methodist 
Church, Kankakee, Illinois; Vice President, Illinois 
Conference MFSS. 



□ 139. Mrs. William H. Willson, Jr., temporary membership 
chairman in initiation of Southwest Texas Confer- 
ence MFSS, San Antonio, Texas. 



a 

Q 140. Rev. Elwin L. Wilson, District Superintendent, The 
Methodist Church, Portland, Maine. 



□ 

Q 141. Mr. R. S. Wimberley, attorney-at-law, !Lumpkin, 
Georgia; member, Commission on World Peace, The 
Methodist Church; Treasurer, South Georgia Con- 
ference MFSS. 



The following are youth and young adults: 
Q 142. Mr. David Ash, Des Moines, Iowa. 



. D 



Methodist Federation for Social Service, 1C45 Ballot, page 7. 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 



81 



Exhibit 8 (Part S) 



Q 143. Mr. Robert Bobilin, Adrian College, Adrian, Michi- 
gan; former Chairman, Youth Section, MFSS. 



G 



Q 144. Miss Emily Britton, Wesleyan College, Macon, 
Georgia; Secretary, South Georgia Conference MFSS. 



145. Miss Helen Crotwell, member. Executive Committee, 
South Georgia Confi-rc-nee MESS; Gcurcia State 
College for Women, MiUedgeville, Georgia. 



Q 146. Mr. John Paul Jones, University of Oklahoma, Nor- 
man, Oklahoma; President, local MESS unit; 
Chairman, United Student Christian Council of 
Oklahoma. 



Q 147. Mr. Harry Jurey, employed with Los Angeles Co. 
Probation Office, Los Angeles, California"; former 
chairman, Young Adult Fellowship, East Oklahoma 
Conference. 



□ 

D 



148. Mr. Richard V. Kendall, Senior at Union Theological 
Seminary, New York, New York; So. Calif. -Ariz. 
Conference. 



Q 149. Mr. Don Marietta, Jr., Acting Secretary, Youth Unit 
MFSS, Birmingham -Southern College, Birmingham, 
Alabama; Member, Conference MFSS Exec. Comm. 



150. Mr. George Morel, Emory University, Georgia; Cor» 
responding Secretary, local MESS unit. 



The minimum annual contribution for voting- membership is $5.00 for adults and $2.00 for youths 

(25 years of age or under) 



(Sigttalnrc) 

Methodist Federation for Social Service, 1945 Ballot, page 8. 



82 REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

Exhibit 9 (Part 1) 
METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

BALLOT 

SEMINATIONS FOR EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
These officers were elected by the Natipnal Membership Meet- 
ing In Kansas City, December £7-23, 1347. Yaur confirmation 
Is requested. 
PRESIDENT (Vote for 1) Check one. 

Bishop Robert N. Brooks, New Orleans Area; former editor, 

Central Christian Advocate. 



VICE PRESIDENTS (Vote for 6) Check six. 

Bishop James C. Baker, Vice President, MFSA; Eishop, Los 

Angeles Area. 
Bishop Lewis 0. Hartman; former President, MFSA; Bishop, 

Boston Area. 
Bishop W, Earl Ledden, President, New York State Council of 

Churches; Bishop, Syracuse Area. 
Bishop Francis J. McConnell, Eishop, Portland Area; former 

t.'FSA President. 
Dean Walter C. Muelder, Boston University School of Theology. 
Bishop William T. Watkins, Bishop, Louisville Area. 
RECORDING SECRETARY (Vote for 1) Check one. 

Miss Thelma Stevens, Recording Secy. MFSA; Exec. Secy. Department 

of Christian Social Relations, Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

TREASURER (Vote for 1] Check one. 

Dr. Gilbert Q. LeSourd, Assoc. Seey. Missionary Educ. Movement. 



ASSISTANT TREASURER (Vote for 1) Check one. 
William .W. Reld, editor The Pastor magazine. 



(Officers are automatically members of the Executive Committee.) 
These were nominated by the National Membership Meeting. If 
you wish to make a substitution, please cross out the names you 
wish deleted and add the substitutes. 

Members-at-Large (Vote for 40) Check forty. 

1. Dr. Wade C. Barclay, member HFSA Administretlve Committee; 
past editor Social Questions Bulletin. 

2. Rev. Lee Ball, member, MFSA Administrative Committee; 
Lake Mahopac, N. Y. 

S. Dr. Albert Barnett, Professor Garrett Biblical Institute; 
vice president Alabama MFSA. 

4. Rev. Samuel G. Beers, Waterloo, Wisconsin. 

5. Mrs. Theodore Eerry, Comm. on Economic Relations, Central 
Jurisdiction, Dept. Christian Social Relstions, WDCS. 

6. Dr. Charles F. Eoss, Jr., Executive Secretary, Commission 
on World Peace, Chicago. 

7. Bishop Charles W. Brashares, Des Moines Area. 

8. Dr. James P. Brawley, President, Clark College, Atlanta, Ga. 

9. Mr. Harold Burns, Editor end Publisher, New Wilmington, pa. 

10. Dr. Gilbert S. Cox, President, Upper Iowa MFSA; Waterloo. 

11. Dr. Henry Hitt Crane, Central Methodist Church, Detroit. 

12. Dr. Ralph Dif fendorfer, Fxecutlve Secretary, Dept. of 
Foreign Missions, Bofrd of Missions. 

'15. Dr. Karl Downs, President, Samuel Huston College, Austin. 

14. Rev. Paul DuBols, President, New York East Conference MFSA. 

15. Mr. E. J. Frlcke, President, Indiana State Conference, MFSA. 

16. Rev. Paul Friedrich, member MFSA Administrative Comm.; 
New Brunswick, New Jersey. 

17. Rev. Owen Geer, Vermont Square Methodist Church, Los 
Angeles, California. 

18. Dr. Corliss P. Hargraves, Executive Secretary, Inter- 
board Committee on Missionary Education. 

19. Rev. Robert Hone, Pittsfleld, Massachusetts. 

20. Dr. Devld Jones, President, Bennett College, N. C. 

21. Mrs. J. D. Kilgore, Tracyton, Washington. 

22. Mr. Chester KlngEbury, President, Pacific Northwest 
Conference MFSA; printer, Seattle, Weshlngton. 

2J. Rev. Franklin H. Llttell, Director, Student Religious 
Association, University of Michigan. 

24. Dr. Edgar Love, member MFSA Administrative Committee; Sup't. 
Dept. of Negro Work, Bo^rd of Missions 5 Church Extension. 

25. Rev. James May, former Exec. Secy., YMCA, Georgia Tech., Go. 

26. Dr. Clyde Miller, Teacher6 College, Columbia University; Co- 
President, New York City MFSA. 

27. Mrs. Floyd Mulkey, President, Chicago MFSA. 

28. Dr. C. C. McCown, Prof. Emer., Pacific School of Religion. 

29. Rev. G. S. Nichols, President, Ioi.a-Des Moines Conf. MFSA. 

30. Bishop G. Bromley Oxnnm, Bishop, New York Area. 

51. Rev. Edward Peet, officer , Greater Hartford, MFSA. 
52.. Dr. Arthur Raper, economic analyst, U.S. Dept. »f Agriculture. 
55. Rev. H. M. Ratllff, Mission, Texas. 

•4. Miss Matilda Sexton, Secretary, Central Jurisdiction, Tept. 
Christian Social Relations, WDCS. Trenton, N.J. 

Methodist Feduat.on lor Social Service, 1147 Ballot, page 1. 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION S3 

Exhibit 9 (Part 2) 

*"SS. Dr. Charles Schofleld, Editor, Adult Publications, Board of 
Education, Nashville. 

56. Miss Mildred Thomson, social worker) President St. Paul MPSA. 

57. Mrs. M. E. Tilly, member president's Committee on Civil Rights; 
Secy., Dept. Christian Social Relations, WDCS, Southeastern. 

88. Rev. Andrew S. Turnlpseed, President, Alabama Conference MFSA. 
59. Dr. Wlllard Dphaus, Director, Religion and Labor Foundation. 

40. Rev. Charles Webber, Secretary, Amalgamated Clothing Workers. 

41. Rev. Wayne White, New lork City; member MFSA Administrative 
Committee. 

42. Dr. Elwin Wilson, District Superintendent, Portland, Maine 
45. Dr. Ruth Wolcott, Spirit Lake, Iowa. 

Touth Members 

44. Mr. George Rarper, Director, Natl. Conference Kethoaist Youth. 

45. Mrs. Ann Fitzpetrick Klein, Garrett Biblical Institute, 111. 

46. Miss Shippy Sharpnack, Mt. Union College, Alliance, Ohio. 
(Every Standard Conference Chapter elects one member to the 

Executive Committee.) 

* We are sorry to announce the death of our friend, Dr. Downs. 

NOMINATIONS FOR NATIONAL COMMITTEE 

(Annual Conference Chapter presidents ere automatically members 
of the National Committee. Standard Conference Chapters elect 
five members to the National Committee. Standard Local Chapter* 
elect t»o members to the National Committee.) 

Membere-at-Large (Vote for 150) 

These were nominated by the National Membership Meeting. If 
you"wlsh to make a substitution, please crbss out the names you 
wish deleted and add the substitutes 

1. Rov. Merrill R. Abbey, First Methodisi Church, Madison, rise. 

2. Pev. Albert Allinger, Methodist Church, Cranford, New Jersey. 
5. Rev. Lester Ward Auman, Jackson Heights Methodist Church, N.Y.; 

member Ad-lnterim Committee of the MFSA. 

4. Rev. DeWitt C. Baldwin, Director, Lisle Fellowship, N. Y. C. 

5. Rev. Archey D. Ball, Pastor, Peterson, New Jersey. 

6. Professor Irwin R. Seller, Allegheny College, Mendvllle, Pa. 

7. Professor John F. Pender, Dnlv. of Oklahoma, Norman, Okla. 

8. Mr. J. E. Perry, Clothing Manufacturer, Columbus, Kansas. 

/ 9. Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune, President, National Council of Negro 
Women, Washington, D. C. 
10. Dr. Henry L. Fitby, physician, Kingston, New York. 
V' 11. Dr. Hlel D. Bollinger, Secretary, Dept. of Student Work, Eoard 

of Education, Nashville. 
• 1?. Dr. Harold Posley, Dean, Duke University School of Theology. 
V* 13. Mr. E. P. PoTien, General Secretary, Cooperetlve League of U.S.A. 

14. Dr. Edgar S. Brlghtnan, Professor of Philosophy, Boston Univer- 
sity School of Theology. 

15. Dr. Fdwln A. Brown, Methodist Church, Urbane, Ohio. 

16. Dr. Emory Pucke, Editor, Zlon's Herald, Eoston, Massachusetts. 

17. Rev. George A. Purchem, Methodist Church, Modesto, California. 

18. Mr. A. M. Butler, ettorney-at-law, Dows, Iowa. 

19. Pev. J. George Eutler, South Park Methodist Church, Hartford. 

20. Rev. Wendell R. Carter, Methodist Church, Beaver Falls, N. Y. 
V* 21. Miss Winifred Chappell, Peoples' Institute of Applied Religion. 

22. Rev. Don Chase, Methodist Church, Redding, California. 
*/ 25. Rev. James Chubb, Asst. Secy., General Eoard of Evangelism, 
Ealdn-tn City, Kansas. 
24: Pev. George Clary, Sr., Trinity Methodist Church, Savannah, Ga. 

25. Dr. George A. Coe, Professor Emeritus of Religious Education, 
Union Theological Seminary; now residing in California. 

26. Rev. Elbert Cole, Director Religious Education, Univ. Chicago. 

27. Rev. Elbert M. Conover, Director, Interdenominational Bureau 
of Architecture, New York City. 

28. Dr. Russell M. Cooper, Professor, University of Minnesota. 
£9. Rev. Alva I. Cox, Exec. Secy., Eoerd of Education, Northeast 

Ohio Conference. 

50. Dr. Clarence T. Craig, Professor of New Testament, Graduate 
School of Theology, Oberlin College, Ohio. 

51. Pev. Albert Curry', Friendship Park Methodist Church, Pittsburgh. 

52. Mr.Gloster E. Current, Secy., National Association for the 
Advancement of Colored People, Detroit, Michigan. 

• 55. Mrs. J. W. Curry, Christian Social Relations Secretary, South 
Carolina Conference. 

Rev. Mark A. Dawber, Exec. Secy., Home Missions Council 
Rev. Harry Penman, Eoard of Evangelism, Nashville, Tenn. 
Miss Doris P. Dennison, Dept. of Christian Education of Adults, 
General Eoard of Education, Nashville, Tennessee. 
Rev. Mark Depp, Centenary Methodist Church, Winston-Salem, N.C. 
Pev. James Dombrowski, Exec. Secy., Southern Conference Educa- 
tional Fund, New Orleans, Louisiena. 

Rev. Coxton Doggett, Director of Student Work, Eoord of Missions.' 
Fev. V. E. Dorr, Grace I'ethodlst Church, Dayton, Iowa. 
Rev. James E. Dunning, First Methodist Church, Los Angeles. 
Rev. L. L. Dunnington, Methodist Church, Iowa City, Iowa. 

Methodist Federation for Social Service, 1947 Ballot, page 2. 



• 


54. 

55. 
56. 


s 


57. 
58. 


• 


59'. 




40. 




41. 




42. 



84 



• 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 

Exhibit 9 (Part 3) 

43. Miss Clara Dutrow, Secretary-Treasurer, West Oklahoma MFSA. 
S 44. Fev. Harold Ehrensperger, Editor, Motive Magazine, Nashville. 

45. Dr. Guy Fox, Administrator, Denver Public Schools, Colorado. 

46. Fev. Edwin Garrison, Methodist Church, Wabash, Indiana. 

47. Pev. Victor V. Goff, Director, Wesley Foundation, Dnlversityof 
California, Berkeley. 

V 48. Rev. Albert Green, Methodist Church, Lamar, S. C. 

49. Mr. John H. Grove, Frederick, Maryland. 

EO. Rev. Armand Guerrero, Methodist Pastor, Chicago, Illinois. 

£1. Mr. Carey Haigler, Regional Director, CIO, Birmingham, Alabama. 

52. Rev. William Halrston, Methodist Churoh, Reldsvllle, N. C. 

53. Mr. Martin Hall, suthor and lecturer, Los Angeles, California. 

54. Dr. Royal Hall, Chrmn, Division of Social Sciences, Albion College. 

55. Rev. Paul G. Hayes, McCabe Methodist Church, Bismarck, N. D. 

56. Dr. John Haywood, President, Gammon Theological Seminary, Atlanta* 

57. Rev. L. P. Hazzard, Professor of Religious Education, Illinois 
Wesleyan University. 

58. Pev. P. K. Heacock, Pastor, Methodist Church, Llano, Texas. 

59. Pev. A. A. Heist, Director, American Civil Liberties Onion, 
Los Angeles, California. 

60. Rev. Myron Herrell, Methodist Church, Hayward, California. 

61. Rev. Chester Hodgson, Methodist Pastor, Newark, New Jersey. 

62. Dr. Mary Alice Hoover, physician, Tacoma, Washington. 

63. Mr. George A. Home, consulting engineer, New York City. 

64. Miss Elizabeth Howe, Bellevue, Pennsylvania. 

65. Mr. I. H. Hull, Secretary, Indiana Farm Bureau Cooperative 
A3en., Indianapolis, Indiana. 

66. Dr. Harold Kutson, ProfeEsor, Ohio Wesleyan University. 

67. Dr. Charles Wesley Iglehart, Professor, Union Theological Semin- 
ary, New York. 

68. Mrs. Grace Jenkins, President, Portland District MFSA, Oregon. 
V* 69. Kiss R. Elizabeth Johns, Secretary, Student Christian Move- 
ment, New England Region, Eoston. 

V 70. Professor Effimett S. Johnson, Wesleyan College, Mecon, Ga. 
. 71. Fev. Andrew Juvinall, Methodist Church, Stockton, Calif. 

V 72. Eishop Paul J. Kern, Nashville Area. 

V 73. Pev. Elaine Klrkpatrick, Methodist Church, Indianapolis. 

74. Rev. John Klrby, Methodist Church, Falrhaven New Jersey. 

75. Rev. George S. Lackland, Pastor, Indianola Methodist Church, 
Columbus, Ohio. 

76. Professor John C. Lazenby, Wisconsin State Teachers College, 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

77. Professor C. F. Llttell, Cornell College, Mt. Vernon, la. 

78. Rev. Nat G. Long, Methodist Church, Atlanta, Ga. 

79. Mrs. rord H. Longsdorf, officer, Louisiana Conference MFSA. 

80. Dr. Halford Luccock, Professor, Yale Divinity School, 
New Haven, Connecticut. 

81. Mr. Jesse Mall, locomotive engineer, Holslngton, Kansas. 

82. Rev. Ray F. Magnuson, Pastor, Waverly, Nebraska. 

83. Mr. William P. Mason, shoe manufacturer, St. Louis, Mo.; 
District Lay Leader. 

84. Miss Ethel K. Millar, Librarian, Hendrlx College, 
Conway, Arkansas. 

85. Dr. John C. Millian, Petworth Ueth. Ch., Washington, D.C. 

86. Rev. Theodore Miner, Methodist Church, Flshklll, N. T. 

87. Mr. William Mitch, United Mine Workers, Birmingham, Ala. 

88. Rev. Dr. Alfred Moore, Exec. Secy. Committee on World 
. Literacy and Christian Literature, Foreign Missions Conf. 

V 89, Pev. John V. Murray, Jr., Pastor, Eethune, South Carolina. 

90. Miss Eleanor Neff, Assoc. Secy., Dept. of Christian Social 
Relations, Wotan' s Division of Christian Service, N. Y. 

91. Miss Candis Nelson, Dean Emeritus, Seattle Pacific College. 

92. Rev. J. Pierce Newell, District Superintendent, Madison, 
Wisconsin. 

93. Dr. Charles Noble, Dean, Syracuse University, New York. 

94. Miss Marian L. Norris, Secy., Wesleyan Service Guild, 
Woman's Division of Christian Service, N. I. 

95. P.ev. Spencer B. Owens, District Superintendent, Albion, 
Michigan. 

96. Rev. James Pless, Methodist Church, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

97. Mrs. G. W. Pomeroy, Louisiana Conf., Secy, of Christian 
Social Relations, Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

98. Rev. Fred G. Poole, Exec. Secy., Board of Education, 
Detroit Conference. 

99. Mrs. Fred G. Poole, social worker. Division Chrmn, Chris- 
tian Social Relations for Wesleyan Service Guild* Detroit. 

100. Rev. George Poor, Methodist Pastor, Seattle, Washington. 

101. Rev. Robert Powell, Mt. Union College, Alliance, Ohio. 

102. Dr. Karl Qulmby, Rldgewood, N. J. 
1/ 103. Dr. Harris F. Rail, Prof. Emer. Garrett Biblical Institute, 

Evenston, Illinois. 
tf 104. Mrs. W. H. Ratliff, Slierard, Mississippi; President, 
Southeastern Jurisdiction, Woman's Division. 

105. Fev. W. Neal Raver, Chrmn, Social Action Comn., N.J. Coaf, 

106. Rev. Ensworth Reisner, Pastor, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

107. Dr. Lloyd H. Rising, University Meth. Ch., Lincoln, Neb. 

108. Miss Miriam V. Rlstine, Exec. Secy., Bureau of Social 
Welfare, Women's Division of Christian Service; N. Y. 

Methodist Federation lor Social Service, 1947 Ballot, page 3. 



• 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 85 

Exhibit 9 (Part 4) 

109. Dr. John Rustic, Mt. Vernon PI. Meth. Ch., Washlrgton.D.C. 

110. Rev. Eon Schooler, Epworth Keth. Ch., Chlcta.ha, Okla. 

111. Dr. Harvey Selfert, Profeeeor, Craduate School of Religion, 
University of Southern California, Los Argolee. 

• 112. Rev. Claude Singleton, Director, Wesley Foundation, Univ. 

of Georgia, Athens. 

• IIS. Dr. W. A. Smart, Professor, Candler School of Theology,. 

Emory University, Georgia. 
114. Prof. Huston Smith, Washington University, St. Louis, Ho. 
11 * Mr. Chester A. Smith, Exec. Comm. member, N. Y. Conf. MFSA. 

116. Rev. Eugene L. Smith, St. Mark's lleth. Ch., Brooklyn, ». I. 

117. Rev. Kenneth Smith, Colorado Springs; Exec. Conns, meober, 
Colorado Conference MFSA. 

118. Rev. Vaughn Smith, Director, Wesley Foundation, University 
or Oklahoma, Norman. 

119. Dr. Ralph Sockman, Christ Methodist Church, New York City. 

120. Rev. Elgar Soper, New rindor, Maryland; President, Baltlnore 
and Washington, D.C. MFSA Chapters. 

121. Rev. Carl Soule, World Peace Commission, Chicago, 111. 

122. Mies Martha Stewart, Secy-Treas. Texas Conference UFSA. 
^. 125. Miss Elizabeth Stlnson, Macon, Georgia. 

124. Rev. Everett M. Stowe, Comm. on Friendly Relations Among 
Foreign Students, New York City. 

125. Dr. Samuel H. Sweeney, St. Mark's Meth. Ch., N. I. C. 

126. Rev. Daniel Taylor, Methodist Pastor, Vancouver, Wash. 

127. Dr. Joseph W. Thompson, St. Joseph, Missouri. 

1?8. Rev. D. W. Throckmorton, Pastor, Modesto, California. 
129. Dr. Ernest F. Tittle, First Meth. Ch., Evanston, 111. 
/ 150. Rev. Frank Toothaker, Pastor, Oakland, California. 
V 151. Dr. Edgar M. Wahlberg, Pastor, Daartorn, Michigan; 
Chairman, MFSA Labor Commission. 

• 152. Dr. Harry F. Ward, Professor Emeritus of Social Ethics, 

Union Theological Seminary; Former Secretary, MFSA. 
155. Rev. Bradford C. Webster, Pastor, Gowanda, New York. 
154. Mr. Charles E. Wegner, Exec. Secy., Goodwill Industries, 

St. Peul, Minnesota. 
\ 135. Rev. Wilson Weldon, Methodist Pastor, High Point, H. C. 
116. Rev. Bruce Wendt, Methodist Pastor, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

157. Mr. Paul Weajert, farmer, Idaho Falls, Idaho. 

158. Dr. John Clark Williams, Pastor, Sablna, Ohio. 

159. Rev. Morgan Williams, First Meth. Ch., Kankakee, 111. 

140. Dr. P.. S. Wlmberley, attomey-at-law, Lumpkin, Ga., 
officer, South Georgia Conference MFSA. 

141. Dr. Loyd Worley, First Methodist Church, Stamford, Conn. 

142. Bev. Nelson Kurgler, Methodist Pastor, Marfa, Texae. 

youth Members 
145. Mr. Robert F. Barker, Vice Pres., Wesley Foundation, 
Ohio University. 

144. Mr. Robert Bobllln, Adrian College, Michigan, former 
Chairman, Youth Section, MFSA. 

145. Mrs. Dorothy Burnham, Southern Negro Congress,Blrmingham. 

146. Mr. George Crawford, Founder, Austin local chapter, Texas. 

147. Miss Helen Crotwell, teacher. Fort Valley, Georgia. 

148. Mr. Robert Eddy, President, Troy Conference MFSA; N. Y. 

149. Mr. Harry Jurey, former chrmn, Young Adult Fellowship, 
East Oklahoma Conference; now in California. 

150. Mr. Richard 'Stein, Yale Cniverslty, New Haven, Conn. 



The minimum annual contribution for voting member?hip is fS.OO for 
adults and $2.00 for youths (25 years of a^e or under). 

I vote for all nominees except where otherwise indicated. 



(Signature) 



(address) 



(City) (State) 

Methodist Federation .'or Sock! Service, 1917 Baliot, page 4. 



86 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 



Exhibit 10, part 1 

Methodist Federation for Social Action 
BALLOT 

Only paid o p voting mrmben may vote. If in arrears. |l«a«» 
Mod dues in with the ballot. 

Komi%at%otis for Executive Committer 
These officers and exe-eotive committee nomin.es were rKft**! 
by the National Membership Meeting at \\ ilNrfurer. ^'«•-^^ 
confirmation is requested; you nay sul'stitute nauw s ttir>mi;liMUl 
the ballot if you wi&h. Officers are automata-ally on tin hum- 
tire Committee. 

PRESIDENT (rote for 1) 

Q Bishop Francis J. McConnell 

VICE PEE8IDENT8 (vote for 5) 
Q Bishop James C. Raker 

□ Bishop Lewis O. Hsrtman 

□ Dean WtJtar Mnelder 
fj Bishop Donald Tippett 

□ Rev. Edgar Wmhlberg 

BECORDING SECRETARY (vole for 1) 

□ Dr. Edgar Love 

TREASURER (vote for 1) 

□ Dr. Gilbert Q. Le Sourd 

A88I8TANT TREASURER (vote for 1) 

□ Mr.WUli&m W. Reid 

Membtrt-at Large (Vote for So) 

□ 1. Dr. Wado C. Barclay, post editor, Hoc. (jt'RS. Urn. 

□ 2. Rev. Leo Ball, New Palts, N. Y. ; MF8A Admini*. CVmni. 

□ 3. Dr. Albert Harnett, Prof., Candler School of Theology. 

□ 4. Dr. Theo. Bcbilin, Diet. Sapt., New York East Conferrm-i . 
] 5. Bishop J. W. E. Bowen, Atlanta Area. 

rj 6. Bishop Charles W. Braahares, Deo Moines An'.i. 

q 7. Dr. James P. Brawler, Pres., Clark College, Atlanta, (in. 

Q 8. Rov. Burns Brodhccd, Phila. Conf. Com. on World I Van*. 

Q 9. Rev. William T. Brown, Commission mi Wurlil I*r:i»v, Nl"'. | 

□ 10. Rev. Mark Cbambeiiin, Ex. 8ecy., Portland Area MESA. 

□ II. Dr. Gilbert G. Cor, North Iowa MFSA. 

□ 12. Dr. Henry H. Crane, Cent. Meth'. Church, Detroit, Midi. 
Q 13. Miss Doria Dennison, Bd. of Educ, Nashville, Tenn. 

□ 13a. Prof. Harold de Wolf, B. U. School of Thiol. 

□ 14- R« 7 - Paul DoBois, New York East MF8A. 

n 15. Mr. E. J. Fricke, President, Indiana State MF8A. 

j 16. Rev. Paul Friedrich, MF8A Ad. Com., Long Brandt, X. J. 

fj 17. Rev. Armand Guerrero, Chicago MF8A. 

Q 18. Dr. Corliss P. Hargraves, MF8A (Admin. Committee). 

□ 10. Rev. George Harper, Editor, Concert* 

□ 20. Rev. Chester Hodgson, Pres., Newark Conference MFKA. 
Q 21. Dr. Russell Humbert, N. E. Ohio Conference MFNA. 

Q 22. Rev. Edgar Jackson, N.Y.E. Conf. Social Serv. Cumin, 

p 23. Mrs. J. D. Kilgore, Pac. N. W. MFSA; Tracylon, Wash. 

□ 24, Rev. Jack Klein, Wisconsin MF8A. 
Q 25. Bev. Fred MacKenrie, South Dakota. 

Q 26. Mr. Jesso Mall, locomotive engineer, Hoisington, Kan. 

□ 27. Ecv. Edward S. Martin, St. Paul MFSA. 

□ 28. Dr. Clyde Mdler, MF3A Con. on Propaganda Analysis. 

□ 29. Mrs. Floyd Mulkey, Member, Comm. on Crtiicnship, etc. 

□ 30. Rev. J. Pierce Newell, West Wisconsin MFSA. 
rj 31. Miss Dorolhy Nyland, Board of Missions. 

Q 32. Rev. Spencer B. Owens, Dist. Supt., Michigan Coiifemirr. 

□ 33. Rev. Edward Peet, Mill Valley, Calif. 
Q 3*- Re*. Warren Peters, Lebanon, III. 

□ 35. Rev. Roy Pfaf?, Pres., Iowa, Des Moines MFSA. 
Q 36. Rev. George Poor, Pres., Pacific Northwest MF8A. 
Q 37. Bishop Glenn Phillips, Denver Area. 

12 38. Mr. Darrell Randall, Board of Missions. 
fj 39. Bev. H. M. Bailiff, 8. W. Teiaa MFSA. 



27 



Social Questions Bulletin, June 1950, ra^e 27. 



REVIEW OF METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL ACTION 



87 



Exhibit 10, part 2 



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58. 


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59. 


n 


60. 


n 


61. 


n 


OS. 


n 


63. 


a 


64. 



Mrs. W. B. IUtliff, Pre*., &E. Jarisl!«tloa, WBCS. 

Miae Matilda Saxton, Dept. of Chrictian Social WnlaHfrma, 

Dr. Eugene Seubert, Pros., St. Louia KF8A. 

Dr. Ralph Sockman, Pastor, Christ Church, N. T. Citj. 

Dr. Carl Foule, Methodist Commicaion on World Peace. 

Mies Thclma Stevens, Woman 'a Di». of Christian Service. 

Rot. Jamea Rhincsmitb, MF8A Adm. Comm., Long Island. 

Dr. Samuel Sweeney, St. Mark 'a Church, N. Y. City. 

Dr. Dillon W. Throckmorton, Diet. Supt., Calif.Nev. Conf. 

Mrs. M. K. Tilly, 8.E. Jurisdiction. 

Rev. FranS Toothaker, Diat. 8upt., 80. Calif.-Arla. Conf. 

Dr. Willard Uphaua, Natl. Rclig. 4 Labor Foundation. 

Mr. Jamea Wendell, Washington 8q. Meth. Church, NTC. 

Rev. Bruce Wendt, Oxford, Ohio. 

Rev. Weyno White, Chairman, Admin. Com., MF8A. 

Rev. Elwin Wilson, Orono, Maine. 

Dr. Loyd Worloy, Firat Meth. Church, Rlaraford, Conn. 

Dr. Ruth Wokott, physician, Spirit Lake, Iowa. 

Foul* Uembtri 
Mr. Cheater Chambers, Free., Oarrett MF8A. 
Mr. Jameson Jones, Prea., Natl. Conf. of Methodist Tooth. 
Mr. Howard Linnard, Austin, Texas MF8A. 
Mr. Mark Rouch, Boaton TJniv. School of Theology MF8A. 
Mr. Jamea Cox, Baldwin-Wallace College, Berea, Ohio. 
Shirley Reece, College of the Pacific, Stockton, Calif. 
Mr. Jamea M. Lawson, Baldwin Wallace Coll., Berea, Ohio. 



Nominations for National Committee 

1. Rev. Leon Adkine, Troy Conference MFSA. 

2. Rev. Charles Aldrich, Erie MF8A. 

3. Rev. Albert Allinger, Cranford, N. J. 

4. Rev. Leater Ward Auman, Diat. Supt., NTE Conference. 

5. Rev. George C. Baker, Dallas, Texas. 

6. Rev. Rufua C. Baker, Diet. 8upt., Colorado Conference. 

7. Rev. Archey Ball, Pateraon, N. J. 

8. Rev. Robert Bergmark, Sooth West Texas MFSA. 

9. Dr. Irwin I. Beiler, Miami University, Florida. 

10. Mr. J. E. Berry, manufacturer, Columbus, Kan. 

11. Dr. Charles F. Boss, Jr., Comm. on World Peace, Chicago. 

12. Mr. A. M. Bottorft, farmer, Nebraska. 

13. Mr. Harold Burns, Editor and pub., New Wilmington, Pa. 

14. Dr. Edwin A. Brown, pastor and labor reia. expert, Ohio. 

15. Dr. Emory Bucke, Editor, Zion 'a 17 erald. 

16. Rev. Donald Campbell, Idaho Conference MTflA. 

17. Mr. A. M. Carter, leading layman, Savannah Conference. 

18. Rev. Eugene Carter, Iowa Dee Moines MF8A. 

19. Miss Winnif red Chappell, former office eeey. MF8A. 

20. Rev. Don Chase, California-Nevada MFSA. 

21. Rev. Jamea Chubb, Board of Evangelism, Nebraska. 

22. Rev. George Clary, 8r., Savannah, Ga. 

23. Dr. George A. Coe, Prof. Emeritus, Union Theol. Seminary. 

24. Dr. Russell Compton, Religion Prof.. Hamline Univ., St. Paul. 

25. Rev. Earl Oampton, Delaware Conf. (Philadelphia). 

26. Mr. Harry Denman, Bd. of Evangelism, Nashville. 

27. Mr. Carl Davis, cooperative leader, Wisconsin. 

28. Dr. Jamea Dunning, Firat Methodiat Church, Los Angeles. 

29. Rev. L. L. Dunnington, Iowa City. 

30. Rev. Forrest Fields, Oklshoma City. 

31. Rev. Gaston Foote, Grace Methodiat Church, Dayton, Ohio. 

32. Rev. Hugh Fouke, Northeast Ohio MFSA. 

33. Rev. Victor Qoff, Wesley Foundation Dir., Univ. of Calif. 

34. Prof. Eldredge Brewster, Sallaa, Kansas. 

35. Rev. M. E. Dorr, North Iowa MT8A. 

36. Rev. Clayton C. Adkina, Prea., Pittsburgh MF8A. 

37. Mrs. Robert K. Gordon, W8C8 leader. South Carolina. 

38. Bev. A. Raymond Grant, California-Nevada MF8A. 



89. 
40. 
41. 
42. 
43. 
44. 
45. 
46. 
47. 
48. 
49. 
60. 
61. 
62. 
63. 
64. 
65. 
56. 
67. 
68. 
69. 
60. 
61. 
62. 
63. 
64. 
66. 
66. 
67. 
68. 
69. 
70. 
71. 
72. 
73. 
74. 
75. 
76. 
77. 
78. 
79. 
80. 
81. 
82. 
83. 
84. 
86. 
86. 
87. 
88. 
89. 
90. 
91. 
92. 
93. 
94. 
95. 
96. 
97. 
98. 
•9. 
100. 



Bar. WDbsjr Grsew, 8t. Pari. 

Mr. Join U. Grave, Dir. of Bible Class Work, BelUxeori. 

Mr. Oaroy Haigbr, labor leader, BlrxeJBgaaaa. 

Bev. Frank A. fiasnilton, Eranoville, Ind. 

Her. Tbermea Harrta, New Maxleo MFSA. 

Her. Paul G. Hayes, Minaeeota. 

Dr. John Haywood, Comm. on World Peace, Waahingtoa. 

Ber. It. K. He&eoek, South r-cat Texas MFSA. 

Bev. Naylasd Heater, Dallas, Texas, 

Mies Sadie Hill, C&ies^o EiFSA. 

Rev. Bobert C. Howe, PittcAald, Mass. 

Mra. Mary C. Hyde, League of Women Voters, Nebraska. 

Ber. Herbert Jaekman, Nobraaka MFSA. 

Prof. Emmett 8. Johnson, Wetleyan College, Macon, GaV 

Dr. David Jones, President, Bennett College, N. a 

Biohop Bobert E. Jones, GuJfeide, Miss. 

Bev. Andrew Juvinall, Stockton, Calif. 

Ber. J. Clyde Keegan, Diat. 8upt-, Wyoming Bute Conf. 

Bishop Gerald Kennedy, Portland Area. 

Mr. Cheater Kingabury, printer, Seattle. 

Bev. Herbert Lowe, afooat Vernon, N. T. 

Prof, a F. LrttelL Cornell College, Iowa. 

Bev. W. E. Loxuratreth, Missouri Conf. MFSA. 

Mr. William P. Mason, retired shoe manufacturer, St Louia. 

Bev. B. S. Moaby, Diat. Supt., West Texas Conf., Ft. Worth. 

Prof. Arthur Muck, Wesley College, N. Dak. 

Bev. Josae Murrell, Kentucky Conf. MFSA. 

Bev. Clarence T. B. Nelson, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Miss Marian Norris, Secy., Weeleyan Serv. Guild, N. Y. City. 

Bev. Eatel I. Odle, North Weet Indiana MFSA. 

Bev. Jamea Perry, Montpelier, Vt. 

Dr. Lyndon Phifer, Bd. of Education, NaehviUe. 

Dr. Harris F. Ball, Prof. Emeritus, Garrett Biblical Inst. 

Bev. Bobert Bankin, Dir. of Belig. Activ., Oberlin Coll., Ohio. 

Bishop Marshall Beed, Detroit Area. 

Dr. Arthur Baper, U. 8. Dept. of Agriculture. 

Bev. Henry Lee Robiaon, Jr., Virginia. 

Rev. John Buatia, Washington, D. C. 

Bev. Rodney Shaw, United World Federaliat leader, Wia. 

Bev. Gilbert Sherman, Salem Methodiat Church, N. Y. City. 

Mr. Cheater A. Smith, New York Conf. MFSA. 

Bev. Kenneth Smith, Colorado MFSA. 

Bev. Sumpter M. Riley, Jr., Lexington Conf. MFSA, Cbicage. 

Bev. Henry A. Simmons, Ohio Conf. MFSA. 

Bev. LeUnd Spurrier, South Weat Area MFSA. 

Bev. Jamea Stovall, Louiaiana Conf. MFSA. 

Bev. Everett Stowe, World Council of Chriatian Edu., NYC. 

Dr. Joeeph Thompson, Missouri Conf. Board of Education. 

Mlas Mildred Thomaon, Social Worker, 8t. Paul MFSA. 

Rev. Albert E. Tuck, Utehneld, Minn. 

Bev. Andrew Turnipeeed, Alabama Conf. MFSA. 

Mrs. A. L. Voigt, W6CS, 8an Antonio, Texas. 

Bev. W. B. Waltmire, Modiaon, Wia. 

Dr. Harry F. Ward, Prof. Emer., Union Theological Sem. 

Bev. William Campbell Waster, Colorado MFSA. 

Miss Dorothy Weber, Woman 'e Div. of Christian Service. 

Rev. Bradford G. Webster, Genesee Conf. MFSA. 

Bev. M. J. Wilcox, Montana MFSA. 

Mr. James Wilson, Missionary Teacher, Nagaaakl, Japan. 

Mr. B. 8. Wimberly, lawyer, Lumpkin, Oa. 

Mrs. Frank L. Wright, active lay woman, St. Louia, Mo. 

Bev. Nelson Wurgler, Marfa, Texas. 



SIGNATURE 



(Tear off pages 27-28 and mail in.) 



28 



Social Questions Bulletin, June 1950, page 28. 



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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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