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Full text of "Revised report made to the legislature of Pennsylvania, relative to the Soldiers' National Cemetery at Gettysburg"

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TO BE ERECTED AT 

GETTY S B U R G , PA, 



REVISED REPORT 



MADE TO THE 



Legislative of Pennsylyainia, 



RELATIVE TO THE 



MM Mntmwl ®mttm> 



A.T GETTYSBURG, 



EMBRACING AN ACCOUNT OF THE ORIGIN OE THE UNDERTAKING ; 

ADDRESS OF HON. EDWARD EVERETT, AT ITS CONSECRATION, 

WITH THE DEDICATORY SPEECH OF PRESIDENT LINCOLN, 

AND THE OTHER EXERCISES OF THAT EVENT ; 

TOGETHER WITH THE 

ADD&ESS OF MAJ. GEN. 0. 0. HOWARD, 

Delivered July 4, 1866, 

UPON THE DEDICATION OP THE SOLDIERS' NATIONAL MONUMENT, AND 
THE OTHER PROCEEDINGS UPON THAT OCCASION. 



HAEEISBUKG: 

SINGERLY & MYE'RS, STATE PRINTERS, 

1867. 



INTRODUCTION. 



[EXTEACT FEOM GOVEENOE CUETIN'S ANNUAL MES- 
SAGE, JANUAEY 7, 1864.] 



After the battle of Gettysburg', in which loyal volunteers from 
eighteen States, including Pennsylvania, were engaged, it ap- 
peared to me proper that all those States should unite in estab- 
lishing a Cemetery, on the spot in which then? soldiers who had 
fallen in that conflict, should be honorably interred. I accord- 
ingly appointed David Wills, Esq., of Gettysburg, my agent, 
and through him, a site was purchased at a cost of $2,475 87, and 
the conveyances made to the Commonwealth. On communicat- 
ing with the authorities of the other States, they all readily agreed 
to become parties to the arrangement, and on the 19th day of No- 
vember last, the Cemetery was dedicated, with appropriate cere- 
monies, in the presence of the President of the United States, the 
Governors of the States concerned, and other high officers, State 
and National. On the 19th day of December, on the invitation 
of Mr. Wills, commissioners representing, the States interested 
in the Cemetery, met in Harrisburg, and agreed upon a plan for 
its improvement and care in the future, and the apportionment of 
the sum of money required, to the several States, which is here- 
with communicated. The expenses attending' the establishment 
of this Cemeter3 T , including the cost of the site and of removing 
the bodies of the slain, have thus far amounted to $5,209 38, and 
an appropriation will be required to pay these expenses, and to 
meet our portion of those attending its future maintenance. It 
will appear by the proceedings of the commissioners, that their 
due proportion of the expenses already incurred, are to be refunded 
by the States on whose account they were made. It is just to say, 
that Mr. Wills has discharged his delicate and important duties 
with fidelity and to my entire satisfaction. 



REPORT OF DAVID WELLS, 

[MADE TO THE COMMITTEE OF THE LEGISLATURE OF THE SESSION OF 1864.] 



To the Honorable, the Committee of the House of Representatives of 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, on the Soldiers'' National 
Cemetery at Gettysburg: 

Gentlemen : — In obedience to your request, I have the honor 
to submit the following report on the subject of the Soldiers' 
National Cemetery, at Gettysburg: 

The design of locating a place for the decent interment of the 
remains of our soldiers who fell in defence of the Union, in the 
battle of Gettysburg, was originated soon after that bloody con- 
flict, in July last ; but was not consummated by the purchase of 
the grounds for the purpose until August. A persistent effort 
was made by persons here, to have the soldiers buried in grounds 
controlled by the local cemetery association of this place. The 
plan proposed having the burials made at a stipulated price, to be 
paid the cemetery association. Failing in this project, these per- 
sons endeavored to connect the two cemeteries, so that they should 
both be in one enclosure, and all under the control, supervision 
and management of the local cemetery association. As the agent 
of his Excellency, the Governor of Pennsylvania, I was in com- 
munication, by letter, and personally, for some time, with the rep- 
resentatives and citizens of other States, in reference to this pro- 
posed plan, and all were of the decided opinion that the Soldiers' 
Cemetery should be entirely distinct and disconnected from the 
local cemetery; that, to ensure success in obtaining concert of 
action among all the States, it must be made an independent 
cemetery, and the control and management of it be retained by 
the States interested. This whole matter was very thoroughly 
and impartially canvassed and discussed, and this conclusion ar- 
rived at and adopted. The grounds were subsequently laid out, 



6 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

and the burials made in view of the National character of the 
project. 

His Excellency, Gov. CuETEsr, having authorized me to buy 
grounds, and invite the other States interested to unite in the re- 
moval of the dead, and improving the grounds, I immediately 
endeavored to purchase land on Cemetery Hill, and, after much 
difficulty, succeeded in buying five different lots lying on Ceme- 
tery Hill, on the west side of the Baltimore turnpike, adjoining 
the local cemetery on the north and west. It is the ground on 
which the centre of our line of battle rested July 2d and 3d, and 
one of the most prominent and important positions on the whole 
battle field. The lots were purchased for different prices per acre, 
according to their location, but all at a very reasonable market 
price. Two lots were bought at the rate of $225 per acre ; one 
for $200 per acre; one for $150 per acre, and one for $135 per 
acre. The whole embraces about seventeen acres, and for the 
exact area and amount in each purchase, I refer you to the deeds 
on file in the Auditor General's office. 

The Cemetery having assumed a National character, by being 
independent of any local controlling influences, the Governors of 
all the States having soldiers lying on this battle field, after much 
correspondence and conference through commissioners sent here 
for the purpose, committed their States to the project. I then 
made arrangements with Mr. William Saunders, an eminent 
landscape gardener, to lay out the grounds in State lots, appor- 
tioned in size according to the number of marked graves each 
State had on this battle field. This number was obtained by hav- 
ing a thorough search made for all the graves, and a complete list 
of the names accurately taken. The grounds were accordingly 
very neatly and appropriately laid out, and I refer you to the map 
of them. 

To x>reserve their identity, I deemed it very important to have 
the removals of the dead made as soon as possible. The marks 
at the graves were but temporary ; in many instances, a small 
rough board, on which the name was feintly written with a lead 
pencil. This would necessarily be effaced by the action of the 
weather, and the boards were also liable to be thrown down and 
lost. The graves which were unmarked were in many instances 
level with the surface of the earth, and the grass and weeds were 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 7 

growing over them ; and in the forests, the fall of the leaves in 
the autumn would cover them so that they might be entirely lost. 
I, therefore, issued proposals for giving out the contract for disin- 
terring, removing and burying in the National Cemetery, all the 
Union dead on this battle field. Thirty-four bids were handed in, 
varying, in amount, from $1 59 to $8. I awarded the work to F. 
W. Bieseckek, the lowest bidder, for $1 59 per body. His duties 
are fully set forth in the specifications, which are embodied in the 
contract. I take pleasure in saying, that the work under this 
contract has been done with great care and to my entire satisfac- 
tion. This is owing in part to the great care and attention be- 
stowed by Mr. Samuel Weaver, whom I employed to superin- 
tend the exhuming of the bodies. Through his untiring and 
faithful efforts, the bodies in many unmarked graves have been 
identified in various ways. Sometimes by letters, by papers, re- 
ceipts, certificates, diaries, memorandum books, photographs, 
marks on the clothing, belts, or cartridge boxes, &c, have the 
names of the soldiers been discovered. Money, and other valua- 
bles, have frequently been found, which, where the residence of 
the friends is known, have been immediately sent to them. Those 
not returned to the friends are carefully packed up and marked, 
and every effort will be made to find the friends of the deceased 
and place these articles in their possession. Words would fail to 
describe the grateful relief that this work has brought to many a 
sorrowing household ! A father, a brother, a son has been lost on 
this battle field, supposed to be killed, but no tidings whatever 
have the bereaved friends of him. Suddenly, in the progress of 
this work, his remains are discovered by sure marks, letters pro- 
bably, photographs, &c, and they are deposited in a coffin with 
care, and buried in this very appropriate place, on the battle field 
where he fell, the Soldiers' National Cemetery. There his 
grave will be properly cared for and permanently marked. The 
friends, who have probably written me several letters of inquiry, 
are immediately informed of the discovery. What a relief from 
agonizing hope and despair such certain information brings ! 

After purchasing the grounds, I made application to the Secre- 
tary of War for cofiins for the burial of these dead, and he at once 
approved of the application, and directed the Quartermaster Gen- 
eral to furnish the number required for the purpose. 



8 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETEEY. 

These Cemetery grounds were solemnly dedicated to their pre- 
sent sacred purpose, by appropriate and imposing ceremonies, on 
Thursday, the 19th of November last. The public prints of that 
week contained full accounts of the proceedings. I refer you, 
also, to the accompanying proceedings embraced in this volume. 

I requested the Governors of the several States, having lots in 
the Cemetery, to appoint commissioners to assemble at Harris- 
burg, on the 17th of December last, to adopt some uniform plan 
for the action of the Legislatures of the different States. Twelve 
States were represented, and the other five signified, in advance, 
their assent to any reasonable action of the convention. I here- 
with refer you to the report of the proceedings of the convention. 
The estimated expenses of finishing the Cemetery, are $63,500, and 
it is proposed to divide this sum among the different States hav- 
ing lots in the Cemetery, in the ratio of their representation in 
Congress. 

The Legislatures of the other States are acting in this matter, 
and making the appropriations in the proportions as above indi- 
cated. Besides making this appropriation, an additional duty de- 
volves upon the Legislature of Pennsylvania. For the manage- 
ment and care of the grounds, and the completion of the work, 
it is necessary to .have a corporate body, and the State of Penn- 
sylvania is requested, through her Legislature, to establish, by her 
letters patent, this corporation of "The Soldiers' National 
Cemetery. This should be done without delay. It will neces- 
sarily require some time for the board of managers to meet and 
organize, and in the meantime the work which should be pro- 
gressing is delayed. It is especially desirable that the Legislature 
act upon this matter at once, so that the organization may be per- 
fected. Upon this board of managers, composed of one from each 
State having soldier-dead here, will devolve the completion of the 
project, and the future care of the grounds. 

I herewith submit a list of the names of the soldiers buried in 
the Pennsylvania lot. The whole number is five hundred and 
thirty-four (534.) The total number buried in the Cemetery, is 
thirty-five hundred and sixty-four (3,564.) I also submit a list 
giving the number buried in each State lot, and in the ground set 
apart for the Eegulars and the Unknown. 

I also submit, herewith, for your satisfaction, the following in- 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 9 

teresting reports : First — that of Mr. William Saunders, the de- 
signer of the grounds. Second — the report of Samuel Weaver, 
the superintendent of the exhuming of the bodies. Third — the 
report of Joseph S. Townsend, the superintendent of interments 
in the Cemetery, and the surveyor. I also transmit the names of 
persons upon whose bodies articles were found, referred to in Mr. 
Weaver's report, containing a description of the articles obtained. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

DAVID WILLS, 
Agent for A. G. Curtin, Governor of Penrta. 
Gettysburg, March 21, 1864. 



10 SOLDIEES' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF DAVID WILLS, 

[MADE TO THE COMMITTEE OP THE LEGISLATURE OF 1S65.] 



To the Honorable, the Committee of the House of Representatives of 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, appointed to revise the report 
of the Committee relative to the Soldiers' National Cemetery, 
made March 31, 1864 : 



-3 



Gentlemen : — At your suggestion, I take pleasure in submit- 
ting the following additional facts in reference to the Soldiers' 
National Cemetery : 

In the month of April last, (1864,) the commissioners (one from 
each State) met and organized, in accordance with the provisions 
of the act of Assembly of this Commonwealth, incorporating the 
Soldiers' National Cemetery, and elected David Wills, of 
Pennsylvania, President, and John E. Baetlett, of Ehode Is- 
land, Secretary. 

Arrangements were then made for commencing the work of en- 
closing the grounds, and an Executive Committee was appointed, 
to whom was referred the details of the work. * 

The Board met again in June, and a large number of designs 
for a monument, to be erected in the Cemetery, was submitted to 
them. These designs were obtained from the best artists in the 
country, by a committee appointed for that purpose, who adver- 
tised for them through the press. After mature deliberation, the 
board adopted the design proposed by J. G. Batterson, of Hart* 
ford, Connecticut. I herewith submit a lithograph, together with 
an artistic description of the adopted design. The board has not 
yet entered into a contract for the construction of this monument, 
but expect to do so during this year. 

The enclosure around the Cemetery grounds is nearly completed. 
It consists of a well built stone wall, surmounted with heavy dress- 
ed capping stone. This wall extends along the south, west and 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 11 

north sides of the grounds. The division fence between the Sol- 
diers' National Cemetery and the local cemetery, is of iron, 
and is already put up complete. The front fence and gate way is 
of ornamental iron work, and ready to put up, as soon as the 
weather will admit of it. The gate lodge is also built. 

The grounds have been graded and prepared for the planting 
of the trees, in part, this spring. They cannot all be planted, until 
the work of constructing the monument and headstones is finished. 
A contract has been entered into for putting up the headstones, 
and the work has been commenced. It is a large contract, cost- 
ing over $20,000 00, and will take a year to complete. When 
finished, it will make a most permanent and durable piece of work. 
The report of William Saunders, accompanying my report-made 
to the committee last winter, explains the manner of putting up 
these headstones. 

The amount of money drawn from the different States, up to 
the 30th of last November, was $28,045 95, and the amount ex- 
pended to the same date, was $23,851 09. A detailed report of 
the receipts and expenditures was made by the Board, and a copy 
thereof sent to each of the Governors of the several States, repre- 
sented in the Cemetery. I refer you to this report, on file in the 
Executive Chamber, for further details. 

I herewith furnish you with a complete list of the names of the 
dead, buried in the Soldiers' National Cemetery, so far as the 
bodies were identified. After a laborious correspondence, and 
through the aid of the different members of the Board, I have 
made many corrections in the spelling of the names, and in the 
number of the regiment and letter of the company of the deceased 
soldier; but there are doubtless still some inaccuracies in the 
list. I respectfully suggest that you have this whole list printed 
in your report. These men came here from the east and from the 
west, stood side by side, and fought and fell in one common cause 
and for one common country, irrespective of State organizations 
or geographical lines, and their dust is now in common, mould- 
ering together on this National Battle Field. Then let their names 
all be published together in your report, and make one record. — 
Well was it said by the lamented Everett, as he stood over these 
honored graves, "All time is the millenium of their glory." Their 



12 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

names and the record of their deeds, will make one of the 
brightest pages of the history of this great struggle ; and they 
are worthy of all being written in letters of gold. 

DAVID WILLS, 
Commissioner for Pennsylvania, 
Gettysburg, March 6, 1865. 



SOLDIEES' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 13 



MEMBERS 

Of the Board of Managers of the Soldiers' National Ceme- 
tery, for 16G5. 

Stephen Coburn, Maine. 
Ira Perley, New Hampshire. 
Paul Dillingham, Vermont. 
Henry Edwards, Massachusetts. 
John E. Bartlett, Ehode Island. 

A. G. Hammond, Connecticut. 
E. H. M' Curdy, New York. 
Levi Scobey, New Jersey. 
David Wells, Pennsylvania. 
William Townsend, Delaware. 

B. Deford, Maryland. 

C. D. Hubbard, West Virginia. 
Gordon Lofland, Ohio. 
James Blake, Indiana. 

C. E. Carr, Illinois. 

T. W. Ferry, Michigan. 

W. Y. Selleck, Wisconsin. 

Alexander Eamsey, Minnesota, 

OFFICERS. 

President — David Wills, Pennsylvania. 
Secretary — John E. Bartlett, Ehode Island* 
Treasurer— S. E. Eussell, Pennsylvania* 



14 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



SPECIFICATIONS 

For proposals invited to be handed in at my office, in Gettysburg, up 
to the 22d inst, at 12 tfclocli, noon, for the two contracts referred 
to in the advertisement of this date, (Oct. 15, 1863J 

First. — For the exhuming and removal to the Soldiers' Na- 
tional Cemetery, of the dead of the Union army, buried on the 
Gettysburg battle field, and at the several hospitals in the vicinity : 
The party taking this contract shall receive the coffins at the 
railroad station, in Gettysburg, and only take them to the field as 
fast as used each day. 

He shall go upon the premises where the dead are buried, under 
the direction of the person having the superintendence — doing as 
little damage as possible — and where an enclosure is thrown open, 
he shall re-place it. He shall open up the grave or trench where 
the dead are buried, and carefully take out the remains and 
place them in a coffin, and screw down the lid tight, and nail the 
head-board, where the grave has been maiked, carefully on the 
lid of the cotfiD. He shall then re-place all blankets, &c, that 
may have been taken out of the grave and not put around the body, 
back in the grave, and close it up, neatly leveling it over. 

He shall transport the remains thus secured to the grounds se- 
lected for their burial, on the south side of the borough of Get- 
tysburg, and deposit them at such a place on the grounds as may 
be designated by the person having the superintendence of the 
removals and re-interments. 

He shall remove as many bodies to the grounds per day as shall 
be ordered by the person in charge, not exceeding one hundred 
bodies per day. 

He shall exhume all bodies designated by the person in charge, 
and none others ; and when ordered, he shall open up the graves 
and trenches for personal inspection of the remains, for the pur- 
pose of ascertaining whether they are bodies of Union soldiers, 
and close them over again when ordered to do so. 



SOLDIEES' 5TATIOXAL CEMETERY. 15 

He shall stipulate the price per body, at which he will contract 
to perform the work as above set forth. Payment will be made 
on Saturday evening of every week for the full amount of the 
work done. 

Bonds will be required in the sum of three thousand dollars, for 
the faithful performance of the contract, with two or more sure- 
ties, to be approved by David Wiles. 

He will commence the work on the 26th of October, inst., pri- 
vilege being reserved to order a postponement of the time to a 
day not later than Nov. 1st, next. The right is also reserved to 
order a total suspension of the work at the time of the consecra- 
tion of the grounds, and on Thanksgiving day. 

Second. — For the digging of the graves in the Cemetery, putting 
in the bodies, building a stone foundation for the headstones, and 
burying the bodies : — 

The graves shall be dug where designated by the superintend- 
ent in charge. They shall be dug in trenches, and the coffins 
placed in them side by side, of the number in each trench desig- 
nated by the plot of the grounds. They shall be three feet in 
depth from the surface of the ground, and of the length of the 
coffin. At the head of each trench there shall be an offset dug 
in the earth of the width of twenty inches, and of the depth of 
, two feet from the surface of the ground. On this offset a stone 
wall, of dry masonry, shall be substantially built of stone found 
on the ground, at such places as may be designated by the person 
in charge, eighteen inches in height, or within six inches of the 
surface of the ground. 

The coffins shall then be placed in the grave, side by side, as 
ordered by the superintendent — the head board of each one nailed 
upright against the head of the coffin, and of sufficient height 
above the ground not to conceal the lettering when the grave is 
rilled up. The grave must then be filled up a sufficient height, in 
the opinion of the superintendent, to prevent settling below the 
surface. 

He shall bury as many per day as may be brought to the Ceme- 
tery, not to exceed one hundred bodies ; and no bodies shall be 
left unburied over night. 

The work shall be commenced on the 26th of October, inst., 
privilege being reserved to order a postponement of the time to 



16 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETEEY. 

a day not later than November 1st, next. The right is also re- 
served to order a total suspension of the work at the time of the 
consecration of the grounds, and on Thanksgiving day. 

The person proposing to take this contract shall stipulate the 
price per body at which he will contract to perform the work as 
above set forth. Payment will be made on Saturday evening of 
every week, for the full amount of the work done. 

Bonds will be required in the sum of three thousand dollars for 
the faithful performance of the contract, with two or more sure- 
ties, to be approved of by David Wills. 

DAVID WILLS, 
Agent for A. G. Cubtin, Gov. of Penn'a. 

Gettysburg, October 15, 1863. 

Note. — The two contracts above referred to were united in one, 
at $1 59 for the whole. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 17 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Harrisburg, December 17, 1863. 

Tlie Commissioners appointed by the Governors of the different 
states, which have soldiers buried in the Soldiers' National 
Cemetery,, at Gettysburg, Pa., met at the Jones House, in Har- 
risburg, Pa., at 3 o'clock, P. M., on the 17th of December, 1863. 

The following named Commissioners were present, viz : 

Hon. B. W. Norris, of Maine. • 
Hon. L. B. Mason, of New Hampshire. 
Mr. Henry Edwards, of Massachusetts. 
Mr. Alfred Coit, of Connecticut. 
Hon. 'Levi Scobey, of New Jersey. 
Mr. David Wills, of Pennsylvania. 
Col. James Worrall, of Pennsylvania. 
Col. John S. Berry, of Maryland. 
Mr. L. W. Brown, of Ohio. 
Col. Gordon Lofland, of Ohio. 
Col. John G. Stephenson, of Indiana. 
Mr. W. Y. Selleck:, of Wisconsin. 

On motion of Col. Lofland, of Ohio, Mr. David Wills, of 
Pennsylvania, was elected Chairman of the Convention. 

On motion of Col. Stephenson, of Indiana, Mr. W. Y. Selleck, 
of Wisconsin, was elected Secretary of the Convention. 

After some discussion by the members of the Convention, Col. 
Stephenson, of Indiana, moved that a committee of four, of 
which the President of this Convention be one, be appointed for 
the purpose of preparing and putting in appropriate shape the 
details of the plan in reference to the Soldiers' National Ceme- 
tery, at Gettysburg, Pa., to be presented to the Convention for 
their action, which was carried. The committee was appointed 
as follows : 
2 



18 SOLDIEES' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

Chairman, Col. John G. Stephenson, of Indiana; Mr. Henry 
Edwards, of Massachusetts, Hon. Levi Scobey, of New Jersey, 
Mr. David Wills, of Pennsylvania. 

On motion of Mr. Alfred Ooit, of Connecticut, the Conven- 
tion took a recess to await the action of the committee. 

The Convention met again at 5 o'clock, P. M., to hear the re- 
port of the committee. 

The committee made the following report : 

Whereas, In accordance with an invitation from David Wills, 
Esq., agent for His Excellency, A. G. Ourtin, Governor of Penn- 
sylvania, the Governors of the several States appointed Commis- 
sioners, who met at Harrisburg, December 17, 1863, to represent 
the States in Convention, for the purpose of making arrangements 
lor finishing the Soldiers' Rational Cemetery ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, By the said Commissioners, in Convention assembled, 
that the following be submitted to the different States interested in 
the " Soldiers' National Cemetery," through their respective 
Governors : 

First. That the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania shall hold the 
title to the land which she has purchased at Gettysburg for the 
Soldiers' National Cemetery, in trust for States having sol- 
diers buried in said Cemetery, in perpetuity, for the purpose to 
which it is now applied. 

Second. That the Legislature of the Commonwealth of Penn- 
sylvania be requested to ereate a corporation, to be managed by 
trustees, one to be appointed by each of the Governors of the 
States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Ehode 
Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Mary* 
land, Delaware, West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, 
Wisconsin, Minnesota, and of such other States as may hereafter 
desire to be represented in this corporation, which trustees shall, 
at their first meeting, be divided into three classes. The term of 
office of the first class to expire on the first day of January, 186a. 
The second class on the first day of January, 1866. The third 
class on the first day of January, 1867. The vacancies thus oc- 
curring to be filled by the several Governors, and the persons thus 
appointed to fill such vacancies, to hold their office for the term 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 10 

of three years. This corporation to have exclusive control of the 
Soldiers' National Cemetery. 

Third. The following is the estimated expense of finishing the 
Cemetery : 

Enclosing grounds $15,000 00 

Burial expenses and superintending (5,000 00 

Headstones 10,000 00 

Laying out grounds and planting trees 5,000 00 

Lodge 2,500 00 

Monument 25,000 00 

Total 03,500 00 



Fourth. That the several States be asked to appropriate a sum 
of money, to be determined by a division of the estimated ex- 
penses according to representation in Congress, to be expended in 
defraying the cost of removing and re-interring the dead, and 
finishing the Cemetery, under the directions of the Cemetery cor- 
poration. 

. Fifth. When the Cemetery shall have been finished, the grounds 
are to be kept in order, the house and enclosure in repair, out of 
a fund created by annual appropriations made by the States which 
may be represented in the Cemetery corporation, in proportion to 
their representation in Congress. 

On motion of Col. Berry, of Maryland., the report of the com- 
mittee was accepted, and the committee discharged. 

It was moved by Col. Berry, of Maryland, that the report of 
the committee be considered seriatim, which was concurred in, 
and report was then adopted in detail. 

Letters from the Governors of the following States were re- 
ceived by Mr. Wills, Chairman of the Convention, which were 
not represented by Commissioners, expressing their disposition to 
approve any reasonable action of the Convention in reference to 
the completion of the Cemetery, at Gettysburg, Pa., viz : 

Hon. Horatio Seymour, of New York. 

Hon. Austin Blair, of Michigan. 

Hon. James Y. Smith, of Ehode Island. 

Hon. William Cannon, of Delaware. 

Hon. Henry G. Swift, of Minnesota. 



20 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

On motion of Mr. Scobey, of New Jersey, the following com- 
mittee was appointed by the Chairman, with the view to procure 
designs of a monument to be erected in the Cemetery : 

Hon Levi Scobey, of New Jersey. 

Hon. B. W. Morris, of Maine. 

Mr. D. W. Brown, of Ohio. 

Col. J. G. Stephenson, of Indiana. 

Col. John S. Berry, of Maryland. 

On motion of Mr. Alfred Coit, of Connecticut, the plans and 
designs of the Soldiers' National Cemetery, as laid out and 
designed by Mr. William Saunders, were adopted by the Con- 
vention. 

A motion was made by Mr. Coit, of Connecticut, returning 
thanks to Mr. William Saunders, for the designs and drawings 
furnished gratuitously for the Soldiers' National Cemetery, at 
Gettysburg, Pa. ; which was unanimously adopted. 

Mr. Brown, of Ohio, offered the following, which was adopted : 

Resolved, That Mr. William Saunders be authorized to furnish 
forty photographs of the plan of the Soldiers' National Ceme- 
tery, for the use of the States having soldiers buried therein. 

DAVID WILLS, President, 

W. Y. Selleck, Secretary. 



LIST OF NAMES 



OP SOLDIERS BURIED IN THE SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY, 

GETTYSBURG, PA. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 



Section A. 



No. of 
.grave. 



1 

2 

o 
O 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 



Names. 



Robert Loekhart 

Theodore Saylor 

Lieut. J. D. Gordon. . 
Alexander Creighton . 
Serg. R. H. Oowpland 
J. J. Finnefroek. 
Samuel Finnefroek. 

Corp. 0. Walters 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Corp. J. S. Gutelius . . 

Nathan H 

Unknown 



F. E. Northrop 

Unknown 

Unknown. 

William H. Harinan . 

Unknown 



Comp. 



K. 
C . 
B. 
F . 



C . 



D 
A 
F 



I.. 



Regiment. 



29th Regiment, P. V. 
72d Regiment, P. V. 
56th Regiment, P. V. 
148th Regiment, P. V. 
121st Regiment, P. V. 



142d Regiment, P. V. 
149th Regiment, P. V. 
149th Regiment, P. V. 
150th Regiment, P. V. 
149th Regiment, P.V. 
149th Regiment, P. V. 
150th Regiment, P. V. 
149th Regiment, P. V. 

149th Regiment, P. V. 
149th Regiment, P. V. 



22 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Pennsylvania. — Section A — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 

19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
2p 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 



Names. 



Corp. James Logan 

Bobert M'Guire 

Berg. Daniel Harrington. . 

0. Herbster 

Franklin Myers 

Thomas Hand 

Josiah Butterworth 

Thomas Burns 

Thomas M. Savage 

Col. Serg. Jno. Greenwood, 

J. Bainbridge 

G. Deisroth 

Corp. Abraham Crawley. . 

Serg. John Wogan 

James M'Intyre 

James Clary 

James Coyle 

James Bice 

William Kiker 

John Hope 

Nelson Eeaser 

Bobert Lesher 

Washington Lininger 

William Conly 

Lieut. G. H. Finch 



Comp. 



G 

F. 

F. 



D 

K 

E. 

B 

H 

I. 

F 

F 

A 

G 

G. 

G 

G 

G. 

K 

H. 



D 
B 



Regiment. 



E 



149th Begiment, P. Y. 
53d Begiment, P. Y. 
53d Begiment, P. Y. 
69th Begiment, P. Y. 
99th Begiment, P. Y. 
99th Begiment, P. Y. 
114th Begiment, P. Y. 
2d Begiment, P. B, C. 
2d Begiment, P. E. CL 
109th Begiment, P. Y. 
147th Begiment, P. Y. 
147th Begiment, P. Y. 
68th Begiment, P. Y. 
69th Begiment, P. Y. 
69th Begiment, P. Y. 
69th Begiment, P. Y. 
69th Begiment, P. Y. 
09th Begiment, P. V. 
72d Begiment, P. Y. 
71st Begiment, P. Y. 
151st Begiment, P. V. 
71st Begiment, P. Y. 
145th Begiment, P. Y. 
140th Begiment, P. Y. 
145th Begiment, P. V. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



2?> 



Pennsylvania. — Section A — Continued. 



Names. 



Isaac E. Dorman 

John Stockton 

Eobert W.Bell 

Unknown 

John E. White 

Matthew Smith 

Lieut. Michael Mullin 

Samuel W. Barnett 

J. Rich 

Frederick Gillhouse. 

R. J. Akan 

John M'Casland 

Harrison Long 

John Kunkle 

t 

John Weidner 

Thomas B. M'Oullough. . . 

Jeremiah Dermandy 

William Munsen 

Charles Caririer 

Corp. Martin Berry 

Absalom Link 

Serg. J. Hunter 

Lawrence Bennet 

J. Rhodes 

Unknown. 



Comp. 



A.. 
I... 
I... 
B .. 
D.. 
G.. 
G.. 
H.. 
H.. 



I. 
D 
I. 
E 
B 
I. 
G 



A 
D 
G 
B 
B 
C 



Regiment. 



145th Regiment, P. V. 
71st Regiment, P. Y. 
56th Regiment, P. Y. 
149th Regiment, P. Y. 
53d Regiment, P. Y. 
1st Reg. California brig. 
69th Regiment, P. Y. 
140th Regiment, P. Y. 
106th Regiment, P. Y. 

145th Regiment, P. Y. 
72d Regiment, P. Y. 
148th Regiment, P. Y. 
148th Regiment, P. Y. 
68th Regiment, P. Y. 
148th Regiment, P. Y. 
19th Regiment, P. Y. 
1st Penn'a Artillery. 
57th Regiment, P. Y: 
140th Regiment, P. Y. 
64th Artillery. 
57th Regiment, P. Y. 
141st Regiment, P. Y. 
105th Regiment, P. Y. 



24 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Pennsylvania. — Section A — Continued. 



No. of 

grave. 

69 

70 
71 

72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
90 
92 
93 



Names. 



George Howard 

Serg. Francis M. Burley. . 
Corp. Geo. W. Ingraham. . 

Cor}). David Stoup 

John Devon 

William Callan 

J. Hayinan 

Win. H. Knichenbecher . . 
Corp. W. (Gordon 



Comp. 



John 0. Downing. 
J.J.Wood 



Serg. Yonderfeer 
A. Delinger 



Joseph A. Furgeson. 
Benjamin Hassiler . . 

James Kay 

G.W. Stalker 

Lieut. P. Morris 

CD. Coyle 

Stephen Kelley 

T. P. Swoop 

Unknown 

D. Hanna 

Patrick Fury 

Benjamin Slavach. . 



I... 
A.. 
A.. 
E.. 
F.. 
0.. 
A.. 
K.. 
I... 
.. 
I... 
H.. 
K.. 
A.. 
D.. 
E .. 
I... 
D.. 
D... 
E .. 
H.. 



Regiment. 



A.. 

F ... 



111th Eegiment, P. V. 
110th Eegiment, P. V. 
68th Regiment, P. V. 
63d Regiment, P. V. 
26th Regiment, P. V. 
26th Regiment, P. Y. 
26th Regiment, P. V. 
141st Regiment, P. Y. 
26th Regiment, P. Y. 
57th Regiment, P. Y. 
114th Regiment, P. Y. 
71st Regiment, P Y. 
71st Regiment, P. Y. 
139th Regiment, P. Y. 
93d Regiment, P. Y. 
91ft Regiment, P. Y. 
83d Regiment, P. Y. 
62d Regiment, P. Y. 
83d Regiment, P. Y. 
91st Regiment, P. Y. 
111th Regiment, P. Y. 
26th Regiment, P. Y. 
29th Regiment, P. Y. 
115th Regiment, P. Y. 
I53d Regiment, P. Y. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



25 



Pennsylvania. — Section A — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


94 
95 


Corp. Uriah M'Cracken. . . 
James Irving 


G... 

G... 
H... 
H... 

E ... 


153d Eegiment, P. V. 
73d Eegiment, P. V. 


9G 


Joliri Beimel 


153d Eegiment, P. V. 


97 


Fritz Smittle 


74th Eegiment, P. V. 


98 


Emil Preifer 


27th Eegiment, P. V. 







Section B. 



:no. of 

grave. 


Names. 


Comp. Regiment. 


1 

2 


Capt. A. J. Sofield 

Unknown 


A... 


149th Eegiment, P. V. 
149th Eegiment, P. Y. 


3 


Unknown 




149th Eegiment, P. Y. 


4 


Unknown 




149th Eegiment, P. Y. 
149th Eegiment, P. Y. 


5 


George Seip 




6 


Unknown 




149 th Eegiment, P. Y. 


7 


Unknown Corporal 




149th Eegiment, P. Y. 


8 


Unknown 




149th Eegiment, P. V. 




Unknown 




149th Eegiment, P. V. 
149th Eegiment, P. V. 


10 


D. G 




11 


Unknown 




149th Eegiment, P. Y. 


12 


Tin known 




149th Eegiment, P. V. 


13 


Unknown 




149th Eegiment, P. Y. 
149th Eegiment, P. Y. 


14 


Unknown 




15 


David 0. Kline 


H... 
F ... 
A... 


149th Eegiment, P. V. 


1 
17 


Serg. Philip Peckens 

Eobert Morrison 


141st Eegiment, P. Y. 
69th Eegiment, P. Y. 



26 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Pennsylvania. — Section B — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


18 


Corp. Samuel Hay burn... 


B... 


106th Eegiment, P. Y. 


19 


Samuel E. Garvin 


E... 


72d Eegiment, P. V. 


20 


John M'Hngh 


K... 
D... 


72d Eegiment, P. Y. 


21 


Ira Corbin 


145th Eegiment, P. Y. 
145th Eegiment, P. Y. 


99 




I 


23 


S. Tavlor 


G... 


145th Eegiment, P. Y. 


24 


S. Shoemaker. 




25 


Corp. William H. Myers. . 


E ... 


62d Eegiment, P. Y. 


26 






26th Eegiment, P. Y. 


27 


James Hill 


T 


142d Eegiment, P. Y. 


,28 


Thomas D. Allen 


A... 


157th Eegiment, P. Y. 


29 




D... 


81st Eegiment, P. Y. 


30 


Charles M'Carty 


K... 


72d Eegiment, P. Y. 


31 


Joseph ISTewton 


D... 


81st Eegiment, P. Y. 


32 


Alexander Mills 


E... 


72d Eegiment, P. Y. 


33 


D. A. Ammerman 


B... 


148th Eegiment, P. Y. 


34 


James S. Lynn 


G... 


140th Eegiment, P. Y. 


OK 

do 


William Van Buskirk .... 


K... 


142d Eegiment, P. Y. 


36 


Henry A. Oomwell 


A... 


121st Eegiment, P. Y. 


37 


George Young 


F ... 


150th Eegiment, P. Y. 


38 


Albert Dustiin 


75th Eegiment, P. Y. 


39 


Serg. Almond M. Chesbro, 


G... 


53d Eegiment, P. Y. 


40 


Joseph Kile 


G... 


53d Eegiment, P. Y. 
145th Eegiment, P. Y. 


41 


E.A.Allen 


I 


42 


Bichard Miller 


0... 


140th Eegiment, P. Y. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



27 



Pennsylvania. — Section B — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


43 


M. Charrity 


A... 
D... 


71st Regiment, P. V. 


44 


Louis Dille 


140th Regiment, P. V. 
141st Regiment, P. V. 


45 


Ethiel A. Wood 


B... 


46 


Serg. Maj. Joseph G. Fell, 


141st Regiment, P. V. 


47 


Robert Michaels 


A ... 


145th Regiment, P. Y. 


48 


Peter Hilt 


G... 
H... 


68th Regiment, P. Y. 


49 


Ord. Sergt. Herriek 


110th Regiment, P. Y. 


50 


J. W. Guthrie 


B ... 


105th Regiment, P. Y. 


51 


Moses Miller 


B ... 
K... 
C ... 


110th Regiment, P. Y. 


52 


George Rowand 


26th Regiment, P. Y. 


53 


George Osman T . 


148th Regiment, P. Y. 


54 


Sergt. Peter Hilgers 


D... 


73d Regiment, P. Y. 


55 


Frederick Heinley 


K... 


74th Regiment, P. Y. 


56 


W. Cragle 


D... 


143d Regiment, P. Y. 


57 


Corp. B.F.Ulrich. ., 


B ... 


153d Regiment, P. Y. 


58 


Charles Clyde 


I.... 


150th Regiment, P. Y. 


59 


Jacob Mauch 


I.... 

G... 


150th Regiment, P. Y. 


60 


Corp. William Holmes . . . 


150th Regiment, P. Y. 


61 


William S. Stamm 


G... 


150th Regiment, P. Y. 


62 


J. Joues _.... 


A... 
B... 


142d Regiment, P. Y. 


63 


Samuel Kramer 


142d Regiment, P. Y. 


64 


John W. Crusan 


B... 


56th Regiment, P. Y. 


65 


Solomon Shirk 


B... 

E... 


10th Regiment, P. 7Y. 


m 


James Lukens 


150th Regiment, P. Y. 


67 


M.Kelley 


E... 


106th Regiment, P. Y. 



28 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Pennsylvania. — -Section B — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 



68 
69 
70 
71 

72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 



Names. 



Serg. John O. Lorner 

John Harrington 

James Keatings 

Isaac Jenkins . . 

J. Euppins 

William Beaumont 

James Ainsley 

J. KBurr 

James W. Taft 

Joseph Montange 

Alfred Boyden 

Unknown. 

Charles E. Webster 

J. H. Bendools . _ 

Alonzo M'Call 

O. Serg. J. W. Molineaux, 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

James S. Butter 

Unknown P. V. 

B. E. True...... 

Unknown. 
Unknown. 



1st Serg. T. J. Belton . . . 



Comp. 



G... 
K... 
H... 
G... 
B... 
A... 
H... 



D. 
D. 
A. 

0. 



Unknown. 



B 
B 



B 



B 



B. 



Regiment. 



69th Eegiment, P. V. 
69th Eegiment, P. V. 
90th Regiment, P. V. 
107th Eegiment, P. V. 
107th Eegiment, P. V. 
88th Eegiment, P. V. 
107th Eegiment, P. V. 
147th Eegiment, P. V. 
142cl Eegiment, P. V. 
143d Eegiment, P. V. 
149th Eegiment, P. V. 

26th Eegiment, P. V. 
68th Eegiment, P. V. 
10th Eegiment, P. E. C. 
91st Eegiment, P. V. 



1st Eegiment, P. E. C. 



83d Eegiment, P. V 



Bucktail Eegiment. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



29 



Pennsylvania — Section B — Continued, 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


93 

94 


Unknown, 

James Wallace 


G... 


29th Eegiment, P. V. 







Section 0. 



No. of 
scrave. 



Names. 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

34 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 



Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

H. M. Kinsel.. 

Charles T. Gardner 

Hiram Woodruff 

P. O'Brian 

John Hurley * 

George Dunkinfield 

William Evans 

David Stainbrook. 



H. 
H. 
G. 
A. 
H. 
I.. 
I.. 
E . 



149th Eegiment, P. V. 
149th Eegiment, P. V. 
149th Eegiment, P. V. 
149th Eegiment, P. Y. 
149th Eegiment, P. V. 
149th Eegiment, P. Y. 
149th Eegiment, P. Y. 
149th Eegiment, P. V. 
149th Eegiment, P. V. 
149th Eegiment, P. V. 
149th Eegiment, P. V. 
149th Eegiment, P. Y. 
110th Eegiment, P. V. 
111th Eegiment, P. Y. 
1st Bucktail Eegiment. 
69th Eegiment, P. Y. 
69th Eegiment, P. Y. 
72d Eegiment, P. V. 
71st Eegiment, P. Y. 
71st Eegiment, P. Y. 



m 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Pennsylvania. — Section C — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 



Names. 



Comp. 



l\egiment. 



21 

22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
50 
31 
32 1 

OO 

34 

35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 



William W. Clark . . j A . 

William Brown D . 



Robert L. Piatt. 



D. Bumgardner. 



George Hiies 

Serg. John Loughery . . . 

G. T. Bishop 

Corp. Robert Thompson . . 

Serg. J. Myers 

Joseph Sherran 

J. Simonson 



Gideon F. Borger 

Gotfried Hamman 

William L. Miller 

2d Lt. John O'H. Woods, 
Serg. William Reynolds . 

Amos P. Sweet 

Serg. Lorenzo Hodges. . . 
1st Lieut. F. Keimpel . . . 
Unknown. 

James O'JSTeil 

Lieut. William H. Smith. . 
Unknown — Orel. Sergeant. 
Serg. James M. Shea 



C .. 
A.. 

6 .. 

E .. 
I... 
I... 
G.. 
F ... 
[... 
EL. 



F. Gallagher 



E .. 
D.. 
I... 
EL. 
G.. 
E .. 

B .. 
B .. 

B.. 
B .. 



I 72d Regiment, P. V. 
I 71st Regiment, P. Y. 
| 149th Regiment, P. Y. 
| 141st Regiment, P. Y. 
i 68th Regiment, P. Y. 
j 26th Regiment, P. V. 
| 141st Regiment, P. Y. 
I 83d Regiment, P. Y. 
j 62d Regiment, P. Y. 

62d Regiment, P. Y. 

28th Regiment, P. Y. 

153d Regiment, P. Y. 

74th Regiment, P. Y. 

153d Regiment, P. Y. 

11th Regiment, P. R. C 

142d Regiment, P. V. 

150th Regiment, P. V. 

150th Regiment, P. V. 

27th Regiment, P. V. 

69th Regiment, P. Y. 
106th Regiment, P. V- 

69th Regiment, P. Y 
69th Regiment, P/Y 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



31 



Pennsylvania. — Section G — Continued. 

Regiment. 



Names. 



Comp. 



John Heneison 

Serg. E. ST. Somercanrp . . . 
Unknown. 

William Douglass 

George W. Wilson 

Patrick J. O'Connor 

E. Berlin 

Unknown. 

Kobert Griffin 

Unknown. 

Unknown, (with two gold 

Unknown. 

Unknown — Corporal. 

Unknown. 

L. F 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown — Sergeant. 

Ord. Serg. M. G. Isefct . . . 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown Ord. Serg., (with 



C. 
I.. 

B. 
I.. 
D. 
G... 

A... 

ear rin 



153d Eeginient, P. V. 
29th Eeginient, P. V. 

155th Eeginient, P. Y. 
155th Eeginient, P. V. 
91st Eeginient, P. V. 
83d Eeginient, P. K 

83d Eeginient, P. V. 
g s -) 



E 



53d Eeginient, P. V. 



C 



knife 



53d Eeginient, P. V 



and screw driver.) 



m 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Pennsylvania. — Section C — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 

71 

72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 



90 



Names. 

Unknown, (with medal, hy 
Unknown, (with knife and 

John K. Inery 

Isaac Eaton 

Patrick Hunt. 

William Danchy 

Thomas Shields 

John Lusk 

J. Kleppinger 

Lieut. Wni. H. Beaver. . 

J. Quinn 

William Thomas 

D. Hemphill 

H. Purdy 

James E. Beals 

F. Bordenstedt 

William J. Strause 

Serg. James Parks 

James Kelly 

Jacob Frey 



Comp. 



inn bo 
penci 
0... 
D... 
F... 
H... 
H... 
I.... 
D... 
D... 
H... 
E... 
E... 
... 
H... 
A... 
H... 
0... 
0... 

c... 



Regiment. 



ok, &c. 

1.) 

2d Eegiinent, P. E. 0. 
10th Eegiment, P. E. C. 
99th Eegiment, P. V. 
1st Eegiment, P. E. C. 
99th Eegiment, P. Y. 
1st Eegiment, P. E. C. 
153d Eegiment, P. V. 
153d Eegiment, P. V. 
99th Eegiment, P. Y. 
110th Eegiment, P. Y. 
72d Eegiment, P. Y. 
Hampton's Battery. 
148th Eegiment, P. Y. 
69th Eegiment, P. Y. 
151st Eegiment, P. Y. 
139th Eegiment, P. Y. 
69th Eegiment, P. Y. 
105th Eegiment, P. Y. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



33 



Pennsylvania — Section D. 



Names. 



Unknown 

Unknown 

Calvin Potter „ 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Corp. Samuel M. Caldwell, 

Frederick Shoner 

Serg. Jeremiah Boyle.. . 

George Herpich. 

Corp. James M'Manus. . 

James Gallagher 

Serg. J. Gallagher 

S. S.Odare 

Corp. William Shultz 

William Simpson 

Anthony Stark. 

Charles Trisket 

Charles F. Loby 

Unknown, (with 3 ambrot 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

G.H.Allen 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



H. 



Charles M. Connel. 
3 



D... 
E... 
H... 
H.._ 
D... 
H... 
D... 
F ... 
I... 
D... 
G.. 
G... 
I... 
ypes.) 



C. 
R.. 



149th Eegiment, P. V. 
149th Eegiment, P. V. 
149th Eegiment, P. V. 
149th Eegiment, P. V. 
149th Eegiment, P. V. 
118th Eegiment, P. V. 
72d Eegiment, P. V. 
69th Eegiment, P. V. 
71st Eegiment, P. V. 
69th Eegiment, P. Y 
71st Eegiment, P. V. 
69th Eegiment, P. V. 
71st Eegiment, P. V. 
71st Eegiment, P. V. 
145th Eegiment, P. V. 
106th Eegiment, P. V. 
140th Eegiment, P. V. 
118th Eegiment, P. V. 



59th Eegiment, P. V. 
11th Eegiment, P. V. 



34 



SOLDIEES' NATIONAL CEMETEKY. 



Pennsylvania. — Section D — Continued. 



No. of 

grave. 

27 



29 
30 
31 

32 
33 

34 
35 
36 

37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 



Names. 



Jolm Aker. 

Unknown 

Jacob Keirsh 

Unknown, (with silver wat 
J. Graves 



Comp. 



ch.) 

C. 



Unknown, (with an order, 
signed John Kramer,) . . 
Unknown, (with rings, pnrs'e,pinb 

Unknown, (with books, and. 2 lette 

Unknown, (with $5 in Confedera 

Unknown, (with inkstand, cross, 



Kegiment. 



George Moyer 

Oordillo Collins 

A. J. Bittinger 

Milton Campbell 

Samuel Zeckman 

A. S. Davis 

George Stewart 

Serg. Eob't Sensenmyer . . 

F. Smith.., r . r --... 

Unknown. 

James Binker 

Henry W. Beegel 

James S. Puryne 

O. S. Campbell 

J. Watson 



F ... 
D ... 
C... 
C ... 
E... 
G... 
E ... 
E... 
I 

B ... 
H... 



K 

i: 



26th Eegiment, P. V. 
Hampton's Battery., 

1st Eegiment, P. V. 

6th Eegiment, P. V. 
ox, &c.) 

rs from Mary Ann.) 

te money.) 

book, &c.) 

2d Eegiment, P. E. C. 

1st Eegiment, P. E. C. 

11th Eegiment, P. E. C. 

11th Eegiment, P. E. 0. 

6th Eegiment, P. E. a 

1st Penn'a Eifles. 

2d Eegiment, P. E. C. 

2d Eegiment, P. E. C. 

20th Eegiment, P. V. 

106th Eegiment, P. V. 
110th Eegiment, P. V. 
Battery F, 1st Artillery. 
111st Eegiment, P. V. 
29th Eegiment, P. V. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



35 



Pennsylvania. — Section D — Co ntiniied. 



Names. 



Thomas Acton 

James Morrow . , 

Corp. James D. Butcher . . 

John Riehandson 

Charles Miller 

G. B. Wireman 

Corp. John S. Pomeroy. 

T.Miller 

S.D. Campbell 

John Metz '. 

E. T. Green 

S. BT. Warner 

A. P. M'Clarey 

N. P. Govan 

Elisha Bond 

I. Beider 

KM'Witkin 

Corp. Hugh Farley 

H.H.Hay 

Mager Sorber 

Mark Beary 

John Harvey 

Joseph Werst 

John Boyer, (with ambroty 
S.M. Little 



Comp. 



B. 
I.. 
D. 
B. 
B . 
E. 



A... 
A... 

E... 
H... 
B ... 

C ... 



Regiment. 



F ... 
A... 

H... 
A... 
B... 
D... 
A... 
C ... 
pe and 
F... 



29th Regiment, P. V. 
29th Regiment, P. V 
28th Regiment, P. V. 
111th Regiment, P. V. 
111th Regiment, P. V. 
107th Regiment, P. V. 

Bat. G, 1st Art, P. R.a 
142d Regiment, P. V. 
68th Regiment, P. V. 
14th Regiment, P. V. 
83d Regiment, P. V. 
63d Regiment, P. Y. 
150th Regiment, P. V. 
27th Regiment, P. Y. 
1st Regiment, P Y. 
loth Regiment, P. V. 
57th Regiment, P. V. 
145th Regiment, P. Y. 
143d Regiment, P. V. 
1st Regiment, P. V. 
69th Regiment, P. Y. 
153d Regiment, P. V. 
letter.) 
62d Regiment, P. V. 



30 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Pennsylvania. — Section D — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment, 


76 

77 


William H. Dunn 

J. A. Walker 


F... 
D... 
H... 
A... 
L ... 
L... 
I.... 
I.... 
B... 
D... 


62d Eegiment, P. Y. 
62d Eegiment, P. V. 
62d Eegiment, P. V. 
62d Eegiment, P. V. 
62d Eegiment, P. V. 
62d Eegiment, P. Y. 
62d Eegiment, P. V. 
140th Eegiment, P. Y. 


78 
79 


T. E. Woods. . 


80 


John Mathers 


81 


George M'Tntosh 


82 
83 


Serg. J. S. Osborn 

E. M'Mahon 


84 


John Buckley 


140th Eegiment, P. V. 


85 


John Long .......... 


62d Eegiment, P. V. 



No. of 
grave. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



Section E. 



Names. 



Eeuben Miller 

Jsfcob Christ 

Eobert Johnson 

Auton Frank. 
John W. Buchanan. 

K". Townsend 

W. H. Burrel 

William Orr 

Serg. K. Doty 

David Winning 

Jacob Harvey 

William Crawford. . 



Comp. 



D.. 
G-. 

A.. 

C. 
F .. 



Regiment. 



F . 

D 

M 

C. 



1st Eegiment, P. V. 
56th Eegiment, P. Y. 
28th Eegiment, P. V. 

1st Eegiment, P. R. Co 
1st Eegiment, P. E. 0, 
148th Eegiment, P. Y. 
62d Eegiment, P. Y. 
105th Eegiment, P. V. 
18th Cavalry. 
18th Cavalry. 
18th Cavalry. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



37 



Pennsylvania. — Section E — Continued. 



Names. 



W. K Williams 


K... 
I 


Jacob Zimmerman 


A. H. Fish 


I.... 


A. Lees „ . 


A... 


Wilson Miller 




J. Stroble 


I 



Comp. 



C. B. Ling 


B... 


Wendell Dorn 


I.... 


Unknown 




Samuel Dearmott 


C... 


John Stot+arcL. . 


A... 


Francis Merrian Hansel . . 


E ... 


Orel Serg. Joseph EL Core, 


A... 


J. D. Campbell .......... 





T. J. Carpenter 


K... 


Tobias Jones, (removed) . . 


B... 


Unknown. 




Jesse Coburn. . . « 





John W. M'Kimiev - 


K... 


Grd. Serg. H. M'Carty. . . . 


K... 


Unknown. 




Unknown Zouave. 




Unknown. 




Unknown Zouave. 




Unknown. 





Regiment. 



143d Eeghnent, P. V. 
151st Eegiment, P. V. 
150th Eegiment, P. V 
150th Eegiment, P. V 
90th Eegiment, P. V. 
11th Eegiment, P. V. 
56th Eegiment, P. V. 
139th Eegiment, P. V 
148th Eegiment, P. V 
62d Eegiment, P. Y. 
110th Eegiment, P. V 
140th Eegiment, P. Y 
110th Eegiment, P. Y 
140th Eegiment, P. Y 
140th Eegiment, P. Y 
153d Eegiment, P. Y. 

142d Eegiment, P. Y. 
1st Eegiment, P. E. C. 
114th Eegiment, P. Y. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY,, 



Pennsylvania. — Section E — Continued, 



No. of 
grave. 

38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 



Names. 



Unknown. 

John Walker 1 

Unknown. 

William Growl 

Eobert Eobinson 

Guy South wick 

J. G. Coyle, with diary & 86, 

F. Hubbard, with ainbrotyp e. 
Unknown. 

William Vosburg 

Unknown P. V. 

G. Wm. 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



.. 

K.. 

L .. 
L .. 

.. 



Unknown. 

Serg. George O. Fell.. . . 
Supposed P. V. 
Supposed P. V. 
Supposed Serg., (with letter 
Supposed P. V. 
Supposed P. V. 
Supposed P. Y; 
Unknown Ord. Sergeant. 
Supposed P. V. 
Supposed P. V. 
Supposed P. V. 
Supposed P, Y h 



A 



B .. 



s.) 



110th Regiment, P. V. 

141st Eegiment, P. V. 
4th Eegiment, Cavalry. 
16th Eegiment, Cav. 



75th Eegiment, P. V. 



[Cavalry- 
2dDiv. 2d Cor., Buford's 



With knife and comb. 



143d Eegiment, P. V. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETEEY. 



39 



Pennsylvania. — Section E — Continued. 



Names. 



Coinp. 



Regiment. 



Supposed P. Y. 

Supposed P. Y. 

Unknown P. Y. 

Corp., unknown P. Y. 

Serg., unknown P. Y. 

Unknown P. Y. 

Unknown P. Y. 

Unknown, (with shawl pin.) 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Sergeant, supposed P. Y. 

Supposed P. Y. 

Supposed P. Y. 

Supposed P. Y. 

Supposed P. Y. 

Supposed P. Y. 

Supposed P. Y. 

Supposed P. Y. 

2d Lieut. John F. Cox. . . 



I.... 



57th Begiment, P. Y. 





Sectio 


5fF. 




No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 

2 
3 

4 


Unknown. 
Unknown P. Y. 
Supposed P. Y. 
Supposed P. Y. 







40 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Pennsylvania. — Section F — Continued. 



No. of 
grave 

5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 



Names. 



Supposed P. V. 
Supposed P. V. 
Supposed P. V. 
— Barr 



Unlmowu Zouave. 
Unknown Zouave. 
Unknown Zouave. 
Unknown Zouave, (burned 
Unknown Zouave, (burned 
Unknown Zouave, (burned 
Unknown Zouave. 
—— ■ — — Oxford. 

William M'Grew 

Unknown Sergeant, P. V. 

Charles Martin 

Unknown P. V„ 



A. K. Coolbaugh . 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



B. 



n dest ruction of Sherfy's bam.) 

it ruction of Sherfy's barn.) 

t dest ruction of Sherfy's barn.) 



Joshua M. Hider 

Unknown Sergeant, P. V. 

Matthew Johnston 

Unknown Zouave, P. V. 
G. M. S., with knife and c 
Jo.Conner, Garner or Carver 

John M'Nutt 

Francis A. Osborne 



K... 

C ... 

C ... 
I.... 

H... 

omb. 
C... 
G... 
E ... 



105th Eegiment, P. V. 



1st Eegiment, P. E. C. 

107th Eegiment, P. V. 

141st Eegiment, P. V. 
106th Eegiment, P. V. 

11th Eegiment, P. V. 



148th Eegiment, P. V. 
140th Eegiment, P. V. 
16th Cavalry. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



41 



Pennsylvania. — Section F — Continued. 



Names. 



Unknown. 
Unknown. 

George Cogswell 

John Bunn 

William Kelley 

Unknown P. V., with knife 
Supposed P. V. 
S. Brookmeyer. 

J. Little 

Unknown P. V. 
Unknown, 2 knives and co 

Corp. Peter M'Mahon 

Okas. Kelly, with letter, &c. 

E. H. Brown 

Supposed P. V. 
Supposed P. V. 
John Zouwell, letter. 
Supposed P. V. 

William M'Neil 

Supposed P. Y. 
Supposed P. V. 
Corp. Samuel Fitzinger. . . 
Supposed P. V. 

H. C.Tafel 

Supposed P. Y. 



Comp. 



A. 

C . 

A. 

and 



sp 



B .. 

mb. 
E.. 

K.. 



I. 



Regiment. 



156th Eegiment, P. V. 
26th Eegiment, P/Y. 
126th Eegiment, P. Y. 
oon. 



26th Eegiment, P. Y. 



26th Eegiment, P. Y. 



26th Eegiment, P. V. 



26th Eegiment, P. V. 

106th'Eeginieut, P. V 
62d Eegiment, P. V. 



42 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Pennsylvania. — Section F — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 



55 
56 

57 

58 

59 

60 

61 

62 

63 

64 

65 

66 

67 

68 

69 

70, 

71 

72 

73 

74 

75 

76 

77 

78 

79 



Names. 



Comp. 



David W. Boyd 

Supposed P. V., (small man 
Supposed P. Y. 
Supposed P. V. 
Supposed P. V. 
Supposed P. V. 

Harry Evans 

Supposed P. V. 
Supposed P. V. 
Supposed P. V. 
Supposed P. V. 

G. Mickle 

Supposed P. V. 

Supposed P. V. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

S. B. Stewart 

Welsh. 

Unknown. 

Walter S. Briggs, Adjutant, 



G. 
with 1 



140th Eegiment, P. V. 
arge black whiskers.) 



B.. 



C 



Regiment. 



88th Regiment, P. V. 



72d Eegiment, P. V. 



F.. 



2d Eegiment, P. E. 0. 



27th Eegiment, P. V. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



43 



Pennsylvania. — Section F — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


80 


W. D. Millard 


¥ ... 


149th Eegiment, P. V. 
21st Cavalry. 


81 





Section G. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Samuel James 


B ... 
D... 


106th Eegiment, P. V. 
12th Eegiment, P. V. 


2 


A. F. Strock 


3 
4 
5 


Unknown. 
Unknown. 
Unknown. 



Total, 534. 



MAINE. 



Section A. 



No. of 

grave. 



Names. 



Corp. Frank. Devereux. 

Unknown 

George D. Marston 

Unknown — Supposed.. . 
E. Bishop. 

W. H. Lowe 

Alfred P. Watterman.. . 



Comp. 



K.. 



I... 



E 
D 



Regiment. 



16th Eegiment, M. V. 
16th Eegiment, M. V. 
16th Eegiment, M.Y. 
16th Eegiment, M. V. 

19th Eegiment, M. V. 
19th Eegiment, M. V. 



44 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Maine. — Section A — Continued 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


8 

9 

10 


Serg. William E. Barrows, 
Unknown 


c... 
I 


19th Eegiment, M. V. 
19th Eegiment, M. V. 
19th Eegiment, M. V. 
19th Eegiment, M. V. 
19th Eegiment, M. V. 
19th Eegiment, M. V., 


11 
12 
13 


Serg. Chandler F. Perry . . 

Louira A. Kelley 

Unknown 


I.... 

D... 


14 
15 
16 


Charles W. Collins 

Isaiah V. Eaton 


A... 
F ... 
D... 
G... 
D... 


19th Eegiment, M. V., 
17th Eegiment, M. V. 
4th Eegiment, M. V. 
16th Eegiment, M. V. 
19th Eegiment, M. V. 


17 
18 


Frank. Fairbrother 

Eobert T. Newell. 



Section B. 



No. of 
grave. 



Names. 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 



Samuel L. Dwelley 
Frank. Coffin 
James T. Neal 



Loring C. Oliver. 



Samuel B. Shea 

Corp. Hollis F. Arnold. . 
Sergt. Jesse A. Dorman. 

George E. Hodgdon 

Charles J. Carroll 

Euel Nickerson 

Henshai C. Thomas 



D.. 
B.. 
K.. 
K.. 
K.. 
EL. 
H.. 
C .. 
G.. 
E .. 
D.. 



17th Eegiment, M. V. 
19th Eegiment, M. V. 
19th Eegiment, M. V. 
19th Eegiment, M. V. 
19th Eegiment, M. V. 
19th Eegiment, M. V. 
19th Eegiment, M. V. 
19th Eegiment, M. V. 
19th Eegiment, M. V. 
19th Eegiment, M. V. 
19th Eegiment, M. V. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



45 



Maine. — Section B — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 

• 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


12 


John F. Carey 


I.... 


19th Regiment, M. V. 


13 


Moses D. Emery 


B ... 


17th Regiment, M. V. 


14 


Fessenden M. Mills 


0... 


17th Regiment, M. V. 


15 


Joseph A. Roach 


D... 
E ... 


3d Regiment, M. Y. 


16 


Allen H. Sprague 


3d Regiment, M. V. 


17 


John S. Gray 


D ... 


4th Regiment, M. V. 









Section 0. 



No. of 
grave. 



Names. 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 



George F. Johnson.. 
ickels.. . . 



Corp. George W. Jones . . . 
Eben S. Allen, Ord. Sergt., 

Ira L. Martin 

John F. Shnman 

Unknown 

Corp. Bernard Hogan 

Lieut. George M. Bragg . . 
1st Sergt. Thos. T. Rideout, 

James Robbins 

Sergt. Enoch C. Dow. . . 

Sergt. W. S. Jordon 

Frank. B. Curtis 

Elfin J. Foss 

Lieut. W. L. Kendall... 



K.. 
G.. 
B.. 
D.. 
H.. 
K.. 



D.. 
F .. 
F .. 
D.. 
E.. 
G.. 
F.. 
F.. 
G.. 



4th Regiment, M. V. 

7th Regiment, M. V. 
3d Regiment, M. V. 
11th Regiment, M. Y. 
4th Regiment, M. Y. 
3d Regiment, M. Y. 
17th Regiment, M. Y. 
4th Regiment, M. Y. 
19th Regiment, M. Y. 
19th Regiment, M. Y. 
19th Regiment, M. Y. 
20th Regiment, M. Y. 
20th Regiment, M. Y. 
20th Regiment, M. Y. 
20th Regiment, M. Y. 



46 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Maine. — Section D. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Saniuel 0. Hatch 


K... 


17th Regiment, M. V. 




1st Serg. Isaac IsT. Lathrop 


H... 


20th Regiment, M. V. 


3 


Benjamin W. Grant 


F ... 


20th Regiment, M. V. 


4 


Corp. Samuel 0. Davis 


B... 


17th Regiment, M. V. 


5 


Royal Rand 


H... 


17th Regiment, M. V. 
19th Regiment, M. V. 


6 


Charles E. Herriman 


E... 


7 




H... 


19th Regiment, M V. 


8 


Wm. H. Huntingdon 


B... 


16th Regiment, M. V. 


9 


Harrison Pullen 


G... 
L.... 


16th Regiment, M. V. 


10 




1st Cavalry. 


11 


M. Quint 


B... 
F ... 


17th Regiment, M. V. 


12 


Alshurv Luce 


3d Regiment, M. V. 


13 


Corp. Eben Farrington . . . 


H... 


3d Regiment, M. V. 


14 


Unknown 




20th Regiment, M. V. 









Section E. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Unknown 




20th Regiment, M. V. 


2 
3 


Goodwin S. Ireland 

Unknown 


H... 


20th Regiment, M V. 
20th Regiment, M. V. 


4 


Orrin Walker 


K... 


20th Regiment, M. V. 


5 


Unknown 


20th Regiment, M. V. 


6 


Unknown 




20th Regiment, M. V. 
20th Regiment, M. V. 


7 


Unknown 




8 


Corp. Wm. S. Hodgdon. . . 


F... 


20th Regiment, M. V. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



47 



Maine. — Section E — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


9 
10 
11 


Corp. Mellville C. Day 

1st Serg. Charles W. Steel- 
Unknown 


G... 
H... 


20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiinent, M. V. 


12 


Unknown 




to ' 

20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 


13 


Unknown 




14 


Unknown 




20th Eegiment, M. V. 











Section F. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. : Regiment. 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 


Oapt, G. D.Smith 

Joseph D. Simpson 

Moses Davis 

Samuel C. Brookings 

Corp. W. K 

Ord. Serg. Geo. "S. Noyes . . 
Unknown 


I 

A... 
C... 
H... 

K... 


19th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
19th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 


8 


Michael Eariden 


K... 


4th Eegiment, M. V. 


9 


Sullivan Luce. 


5th Battery. 


10 


W. H. Smith 


K... 
F.... 
E.... 
G... 


7th Eegiment, M. V. 
17th Eegiment, M. V. 
17th Eegiment, M. V. 
4th Eegiment, M. V. 


11 
12 
13 


Wm. H. Day 

E. Finch 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Maine. — Section G. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Albion B. Mills 


E.... 
D... 


16th Eegiment, M. Y. 


2 


Corp. John Merriam 


19th Eegiment, M. Y. 


3 


Abijah Crosby 


C . 


19th Eegiment, M. Y. 
7th Eegiment, M. Y. 


4 


Corp. Eichard Sculley 


K... 


5 


Corp. A. H. Cole 




3d Eegiment, M. Y. 
3d Eegiment, M. Y. 


C 


John W. Jones 


B.... 


7 


Serg. Maj. Henry S. Small, 


3d Eegiment, M. Y. 


8 


Corp. J. L. Little 


A... 


3d Eegiment, M. Y. 


9 


Calvin H. Burdin 


I.... 


3d Eegiment, M. Y. 


10 


Capt. John C. Keen 


K... 


3d Eegiment, M. V. 


11 


Serg. Nelson W. Jones 


I.... 


3d Eegiment, M. Y. 


12 


J. Bartlett. 







Total, 104. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



Section A. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 

2 

3 


William H. Spring 

Charles A. Moore 

E. J. Plummer 


A... 

a... 

A... 

I. 

E... 


2d Eegiment, It. H. Y. 
2d Eegiment, K H. Y. 
2d Eegiment, ,S- H. Y. 
2d Eegiment, IS". H. Y. 
2d Eegiment, N. H. Y. 


f 

4 

5 


Stephen H. Palmer 

Charles Y. Buzzell 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



49 



New Hampshire. — Section A — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


6 


Eoland Taylor . 


G... 

A... 
F ... 
E ... 
F ... 
G... 
D... 


5th Eegiment, N. H. V. 
5th Eegiment, K H. V. 


7 


S. E. Green.. 


8 


John Henderson 


2d Eegiment, 1ST. H. V. 


9 
10 
11 
12 
13 


Serg. G. A. Jones 

George S. Vittum 

Lieut. E. Dascomb 

Charles W. Taylor 

Cornelius Cleary ......... 


2d Eegiment, N". H. V. 
2d Eegiment, HT. H. V. 
2d Eegiment, N. H. V. 
2d Eegiment, K H. V. 
2d Eegiment, K H. V. 


14 

15 


James S. Hawkins 

John Totten 


C ... 
A... 
E ... 


12th Eegiment, N. H. V. 
2d Eegiment, N". H. V. 
2d Eegiment, N. H. V. 
2d Eegiment, K H. V. 


1G 

17 


Joseph M. Chesley 

Unknown 


18 


Unknown. 








Sectio 


nB. 





No. of 

grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Unknown. 






2 


Unknown. 






3 


Unknown. 






4 


Unknown. 






5 


Unknown. 






6 


Unknown. 






' 7 


Unknown, with red chin wh 


iskers. 


2d Eegiment, N". H. T. 


8 


Unknown 




2d Eegiment, gf. H. V. 


9 


Unknown. 





SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



New Hampshire.— Section B — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


10 


Unknown _.... 




2d Eegiment, N. H. V. 
2d Eegiment, N. H. V. 


11 


Unknown . = .. 




12 


Unknown. 






13 


Unknown. 






14 


Unknown. 






15 


Unknown. 






16 


Unknown. 







Section 0. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 

2 
3 

4 


Unknown. 
Unknown. 
Unknown. 
Unknown ... 




2d Eegiment, JT. H. Y. 
2d Eegiment, 1ST. H. V. 


5 


Unknown 




6 


Unknown 




2d Eegiment, K". H. V. 


7 


John Taylor 


E ... 


12th Eegiment, ET. H. V. 
2d Eegiment, JS". H. T. 
5th Eegiment, X. H. Y. 
5th Eegiment, X. H. Y. 

12th Eegiment, 2JT. H. T. 


8 


Kendall H. Oofren 


9 


Joseph Bond, Jr 


E ... 
E ... 

H... 

E ... 

<- 


10 


Oscar D. Allen 


11 
12 
13 
14 
15 


Supposed. 
Supposed. 

Charles T. Kelley 

Unknown. 

Bartlett Brown 



Total, 49. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



31 



VERMONT 



Section A. 



No. of 
grave. 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 



9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 



Names. 



Unknown . . 

Joseph Ashley 

Charles W. Eoss 

Corp. Charles E. Mead. . . . 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Martin J. Cook .......... 

Joseph M, Martin. ....... 

William E. Green 

Unknown » 

Unknown 

Dyer Eogers i 

Unknown 

Albert A, Walker 

Corp. Charles Morse, Jr . . . 

Garrett L. Eoseboom 

Ira Emery, Jr., (removed). 

William O. Donbleday 

Andrew E. Osgood 

Corp. George L. Baldwin . . 

G. E. Simmons , 

Sylvanus A. Winship 



Comp. 



c ... 
G... 
G... 



D.. 

G.. 



D 



Regiment. 



V. M. M. 
16th Eegiment, 
14th Eegiment, 
14th Eegiment, 
14th Eegiment, 
14th Eegiment, 
14th Eegiment, 
16th Eegiment, 
16th Eegiment, 
14th Eegiment, 
14th Eegiment, 
14th Eegiment, 
14th Eegiment, 
14th Eegiment, 
14th Eegiment, 



D... 
A... 

D . . . I 14th Eegiment, 



16th Eegiment, 



A. 



16th Eegiment, 



H . . . 14th Eegiment, 



H.. 



C 



13th Eegiment, 
14th Eegiment, 
13th Eegiment, 
16th Eegiment, 



Y. V. 

V. V. 
Y. Y. 
Y. Y. 
Y.V. 
Y.V. 
Y.V. 
V. Y. 
Y. Y. 
Y.V, 
V. V. 
Y.V. 
Y. V. 
Y.V. 
V. V. 
Y.V. 
V. V. 
V. V. 
Y.V. 
V. V. 
V. Y. 
Y.V 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Vermont,— Section A—Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Nainea. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


24 


Serg. Moses P. Baldwin . . . 


.... 


16th Eegiment, V. V. 


25 


Serg. Maj. Henry H. Smith, 




13th Eegiment, V. T. 


26 


Corp. Ira E. Sperry ....... 


L ... 


1st Cavalry. 


27 


John L. Marshall ........ 


K... 


4th Eegiment, V. V. 


28 


Serg. Thomas Blake. ..... 


A... 


13th Eegiment, V. V. 


29 


Corp. Michael M'Enemy. J A . . . 


13th Eegiment, V. V. 



Section B. 



No. of 
grave. 



<Uomp. 



Regiments 



3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 



Lieut. Wm. H. Hamilton . 
William G. Jeffrey ...... 

W. Fletcher... ......... 

William March ......... 

Orson S. Carr. .......... 

Pliny F.White......... 

Antoine Ash 

Charles W. Whitney 
Benjamin IS". Wright ... . 
L. L. Baird, (with $3 35). 

Eichard C. Archer 

Corp. Henry C. White. . . 

Zenal C. Lamb ..... 

John Dyer ......... 

Unknown ..... 

Unknown. 



D 

I) 
E 
E 
C 
E 
I. 
H 
B 
E 
C 
f D 



14th Eegiment, V, V. 
1st Regiment,, V. V, 
13th Eegiment, V. Y. 
13th Eegiment, Y Y. 
13th Eegiment, Y. V. 
14th Eegiment, Y. Y, 
2d Eegiment, Y. Y. 
. 13th Eegiment, Y, V. 



13th Reg 



sent, Y. Y. 



14th Eegiment, Y. Y. 
14th Eegiment, Y. Y, 
16th Eegiment, Y. Y. 
16th Eegiment, Y, Y. 
16th Regiment, Y. Y. 
1st Cavalry. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



53 



Vermont. — Section B — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


17 


Unknown 




1st Cavalry. 
1st Cavalry. 
1st Cavalry. 
1st Musician. 
1st Cavalry. 
1st Cavalry. 
1st Cavalry. 


18 


Corp. _ Warren ..... 




19 
20 

21 


Eufus D. Thompson. 
Supposed, Charles Curley, 
Joel J. Smith. ........ 


L ... 

C ... 


22 


Unknown .... .. 


23 


Unknown ...„.._........ 




24 


Unknown ..... ....... 




1st Cavalry. 


25 
26 

27 


Unknown. 
Unknown. 
Willard M. Pierce 


I 


16th Eegiment, V. V. 



Section C. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 

2 


Unknown. 

Unknown ....... 




M.M. 


3 


Unknown 




M. M. 


4 

5 


Edmond P. Davis. ....... 

Philip Howard 


H... 
A... 


16th Eegiment, V. V. 
16th Eegiment, V. V. 









Total, 61. 



54 



SOLDIERS* NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



Section A. 



No. of 
grave. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 



Names. 



Arthur Murphy. 
John W. Verity 



Edward Frothinghain 



John Orasson 

Henry C. Burrill ....... 

Thomas Kelly. . ....... 

George Lucas ......... 

Alios Kraft ....... 

T.E. Gallivan......... 

M. Kinarch 

E. Barry 

Serg. George Joekel. _ . . 
Patrick O'Keefe ....... 

Thomas Downey ....... 

Corp. James Somerville. 

William Inch 

Augustus Deitling 
Serg. George F. Cake . . 
Clemens Wiessensee . . . 
Patrick Quinlin. ...... 

G.C. Plant.. 



Hugh Blain 



Patrick Manning 



Comp. 



H 
A 
D 

C 

F 

H 

G. 

B 

F 

E , 

E 

D 

C 

A 

B 

F 

A 

H 

D 



Regiment. 



9th Battery. 
5th Battery. 
5th Battery. 
9th Battery. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. Y. 
20th Eegiment, M. V.. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20fch Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. Y. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 



SOLDIERS 1 NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



55 



Massachusetts. — Section A — Continued. 



Names. 



John M' Clarence 

John Dippolt 

Hiram B. Howard 

Eugene M'Laughlin 

Corp. John Burke 

Alexander Aiken 

James Lane 

Geo. F. Fales, of Boston. 
George S. Wise 



Michael Laughlin 

Edwin Field 

John M. Brock 

Frank A. Gould 

Corp. Prince A. Dunton. 
John Flye 



Serg. Edgar A. Fiske 



Comp. 



F ... 

B ... 

D... 

F ... 

K... 

D... 

F ... 

D... 

D... 

K... 

B ... 

H... 

K.. 

H.. 

K.. 

E .. 



Regiment. 



20fch Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
20th Eegiment, M. V. 
Excelsior, of N". Y. 
13th Eegiment, M. V. 
13th Eegiment, M. V. 
13th Eegiment, M. V. 
13th Eegiment, M. Y. 
13th Eegiment, M. V. 
13th Eegiment, M V. 
13th Eegiment, M. V. 
13th Eegiment, M. V. 



Section B. 



Names. 



Charles Traynor... 
William T. Bullard. 

John Joy 

PhiloH. Peck 

Stephen Cody 

Eichard Sea vers . . . 



Comp. 



I... 

A. 
H. 
G. 
I.. 
I.. 



Regiment. 



2d Eegiment, M. V. 
2d Eegiment, M. V. 
2d Eegiment, M. V. 
2d Eegiment, M. V. 
2d Eegiment, M. V. 
2d Eegiment, M. V. 



56 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Massachusetts. — Section B — Continued. 



No. of 
grave 


Names. 


Comp, 
I.... 


Regiment. 


7 


George Bailey 


2d Eegiment, M. V. 


8 


Andrew Nelson 


D... 
D... 
G... 


2d Eegiment, M. V. 


9 


John Deer 


2d Eegiment, M. V. 


10 


Corp. Gordon S. Wilson . . 


2d Eegiment, M. V. 


11 


Joseph Furbur 


G... 


2d Eegiment, M. V. 


12 


Bup. J. Saddler, Gol. Corp. 


D ... 


2d Eegiment, M. V. 


13 


Frederick Maynard 


D... 


2d Eegiment, M. V. 


14 


Patrick Hoey 


A... 


2d Eegiment, M. V. 


15 


Serg. Leavitt 0. Durgin. . 


A... 


2d Eegiment, M. V. 


16 


Corp. William Marshall . . . 


C... 


2d Eegiment, M. V. 


17 


Corp. Enel Whittier 


B.... 


2d Eegiment, M. Y. 


18 


James T. Edmands 


I.... 


2d Eegiment, M. V. 


19 


John E. Farrington 


H... 


2d Eegiment, M. V. 


20 


Peter Conlan 


B ... 
A... 


2d Eegiinent, M. Y. 


21 


Sidney S. Prouty 


2d Eegiment, M. Y. 


22 


F. Goetz 


C... 


2d Eegiment, M. Y. 
2d Eegiment, M. Y. 


23 


Gorp. Theodore S. Butters, 


I.... 


24 


David B. Brown 


I.... 


2d Eegiment, M. Y. 


25 


William H. Ela 


D... 

p.... 

F... 
F... 
E ... 


2d Eegiment, M. Y. 


26 


James A. Chase 


2d Eegiment, M. Y. 


27 


Charles Keirnan 


2d Eegiment, M. Y. 


28 


And. Moore 


1st Eegiment, M. V. 


29 


Lieut ; Henry Hartley 


1st Eegiment, M. Y. 


3@ 


Frederick S. Kettel 


E... 


1st Eegiment, M. Y. 


31 


George Golden 


B... 


1st Eegiment, M. Y. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



57 



Massachusetts. — Section B — Continued. 



Names. 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



David H. Eaton 

Jacob Kesland 

Serg. Edward J. M'Ginnis, 

J. Matthews 

Berg. William Kelreu 

Corp. Henry Evans 



B 
B 

C 
B 
E. 
A 



1st Eegiment, M. V. 
1st Eegiment, M. V. 
1st Eegiment, M. Y. 
1st Eegiment, M. V. 
1st Eegiment, M. V. 
1st Eegiment, M. Y. 



Section 0. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


J. L. Johnson 


K... 
K... 


11th Eegiment, M. V. 


2 


Joseph Marshall 


11th Eegiment, M. V. 


3 


James E. Butler 


D... 
A... 


11th Eegiment, M. V. 


4 


Michael Doherty 


11th Eegiment, M. V. 


5 


Lucius Staples 


A... 


11th Eegiment, M. V. 
11th Eegiment, M. V. 


6 


Corp. Edwin F. Trufant . . 


F... 


7 


Corp. C. E. T. Knowlton . . 


H... 


11th Eegiment, M. V. 


8 


Serg. William Sawtell. 


E... 


11th Eegiment, M. V. 


9 


J. S. Eice 


K... 
K... 


11th Eegiment, M. V. 


10 


Sumner A. Davis 


11th Eegiment, M. V. 


11 


Francis T. Flint 


H... 


11th Eegiment, M. V. 


12 


John Brodie. 






13 


Serg. William Carr 


I.... 


12th Eegiment, M. Y. 


14 


George F. Lewis 


H... 
K... 


12th Eegiment, M. Y. 


15 


Hardy P. Murray 


12th Eegiment, M. Y. 


1G 


Corp. T. H. Fenelon 


G... 


32d Eegiment, M. Y. 



58 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Massachusetts. — Section — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


17 


Wm. D. Hudson 


H... 


32d Eegiment, M. Y. 
32d Eegiment, M. V. 


18 


Barney Clark 


G... 
A... 


19 


Serg. James M. Haskell . . 


32d Regiment, M. V. 


20 


Alvin W. Lamb 


A... 


32d Eegiment, M. Y. 
32d Eegiment, M. Y. 


21 


William F. Baldwin 


B ... 


22 


Henry T. Wade 


E ... 


32d Eegiment, M. Y. 
32d Eegiment, M. Y. 


23 


Corp. Wm. L. Gillman 


K... 


24 


Daniel Stoddard 


F ... 


32d Eegiment, M. Y. 


25 


Corp. Nathaniel Mayo 


F ... 


32d Eegiment, M. Y. 


26 


T. J. Healey 


G... 


32d Eegiment, M. Y. 


27 


James H. Leavens 


I.... 


32d Eegiment, M. Y. 


28 


Serg. Gorham Coffin 


A... 


19th Eegiment, M. Y. 


29 


Serg. Joseph Ford 


K... 


19th Eegiment, M. Y. 


30 


Edward Roche 


E ... 
I 


19th Eegiment, M. Y. 


31 


Corp. Thomas W. Tuttle. . 


19th Eegiment, M. Y. 


32 


Jeremiah Wells 


H... 


19th Eegiment, M. Y. 


33 


Charles Gurney 


E ... 


37th Eegiment, M. Y. 


34 


E. Bassamunson 


B ... 


37th Eegiment, M. Y. 
37th Eegiment, M. Y. 


35 


Elisha Covill 


E ... 


Section D. 


No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Serg. Henry C. Ball 


F ... 


15th Eegiment, M. Y. 


2 


John Marsh 


B ... 
G... 


15th Eegiment, M. Y. 


3 


Michael Flinn 


15th Eegiment, M. Y. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

* 

Massachusetts. — Section D — Continued. 



5!) 



Names. 



Conip. 



Regiment. 



O. Stevens 

George W. Oro^s 

Joseph Bardsley 

Francis Santuin 

Frances A. Lewis 

George E. Burns 

George L. Bass 

Serg. Edward B. Eollins . . 

John Grady 

KB.Bicknell 

Pierce Harvey 

G. Lambert 

Oalvin S. Field 

John Hickey 

John Caswell 

Serg. Edward Mooney 

Joseph Beal 

0. H. Pierce 

Unknown. 

Geo. Hills, of New Bedford. 

Corp. Patrick Scannell 

Serg. Alonzo J. Babcock. . 

Corp. Jules B. Allen 

Oalvin Howe 

E. Howe. 



D 
E 
I. 
I. 
A 
G 
B 
A 
I. 




F 
B 

G 
D 
I. 
E 



B .. 
H.. 
D.. 
I... 
H.. 



15th Eegiment, M. V. 
15th Eegiment, M. V. 
15th Eegiment, M. V. 
15th Eegiment, M. Y. 
15th Eegiment, M. V. 
15th Eegiment, M. V. 
15th Eegiment, M. Y. 
15th Eegiment, M. Y. 
I 15th Eegiment, M. Y. 
11th EegimeDt, M. Y. 
15th Eegiment, M. Y. 
15th Eegiment, M. Y. 
22d Eegiment, M. Y. 
28th Eegiment, M. Y. 
28th Eegiment, M. Y. 
28th Eegiment, M. Y. 
33d Eegiment, M. Y. 
33d Eegiment, M. Y. 



19th Eegiment, M. Y. 
2d Eegiment, M. Y. 
33d Eegiment, M. Y. 
33d Eegiment, M. Y. 
33d Eegiment, M. Y. 



60 



SOLDIERS 5 NATIONAL CEMETERY. 
i 

Massachusetts. — Section D — Continued. 



No. of 

grave. 


Names. 




Cornp. 


Regiment. 


29 


Jeremiah Danforth 




c ... 

K... 
K... 
D... 

C... 
H... 
A... 


19th Eegiment, M. V. 


30 


Charles A. Trask 


13th Eegiment, M. V. 


31 

32 


Charles H. Wellington . . . 
Daniel Holland 


13th Eegiment, M. Y. 
19th Eegiment, M. V. 


33 


P. W. Price 


28th Eeginient, M. Y. 


34 


George Lawton 


16th Eegiment, M. Y. 
19th Eegiment, M. Y. 


35 


J. Coakley 











Section E. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 

2 


G. P. Eoundey, Massach'ts 
J. B. Mncent 


G... 

K... 
K... 
H... 
H... 


22d Eegiment, M. Y. 

3d Eegiment, M. Y. 
22d Eegiment, M. Y. 
15th Eegiment, M. Y. 
15th Eegiment, M. Y. 
15th Eegiment, M. Y. 


3 
4 
5 


Unknown. 

James Crampton 

John F. Moore 


6 


C. H. Eeed 


7 


John T. Bixby 


8 


S. Hindeman 


9 


G. F. Leonard 




13th Eegiment, M. V. 



Section F. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 

2 
3 


1st Lieut. Sumner Paine. . 

Lieut. J. H. Parkins 

Lt. Sherman S. Eobinson, 


E ... 


20th Eegiment, M. Y. 
37th Eegiment, M. Y. 
19th Eegiment, M. Y. 



Total, 158. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



61 



RHODE ISLAND. 



Section A. 



No. of 
grave. 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 



Names. 



Ira Bennett * 

David B. King 

John Zimmila 

Ernest Simpson 

John Greene 

John Higgins ...... 

Alvin Hiltonf 

Francis H. Martini. 
Patrick Lonnegan . . 
Charles Powers. 



Battery.; 



Regiment. 



B. 
B . 
A. 

E . 
B. 
A. 

E. 

E... 
A... 

Co.C 



1st Regiment, E. I. Art, 
1st Regiment, R. I. Art. 
1st Regiment, R. I. Art, 
1st Regiment, R. I. Art. 
1st Regiment, R. I. Art. 
1st Regiment, R. I. Art. 
1st Regiment, R. I. Art. 
1st Regiment, E. I. Art. 
1st Regiment, R. I. Art. 
2d Regiment, E» I. V. 



Section B. 


No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Battery. 


Regiment. 


1 


William Beard 


E... 
B... 


1st Regiment, E. I. Art. 
1st Regiment, R. I. Art. 


2 


Corp. Henry H. Ballon . . . 


Total, 12. 



* Temporarily transferred from the 19th Maine Regiment of Infantry. 

t Was temporarily attached to this Battery, from 20th Regiment, Indiana Volunteers, 

I Was temporarily attached to this Battery, from 99th Pennsylvania Volunteers. 



62 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



CONNECTICUT 



Section A, 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 


Corp. William E. Wilson . . 

Corp. Joseph Puffer 

William D. Marsh 

Moses G. Clement 

S. Carter 


D... 

I 

G... 
G... 
A... 
F ... 
F ... 
F ... 
I.... 
... 
... 


27th Eegiment, 0. Y. 
14th Eegiment, 0. Y. 
14th Eegiment, 0. Y, 
14th Eegiment, C. Y. 
15th Eegiment, 0. Y. 
27th Eegiment, 0. Y. 
27th Eegiment, C. Y. 
20th Eegiment, 0. Y. 
20th Eegiment, 0. Y. 
17th Eesciment, C. Y. 


G 


Edward B. Farr 


7 


Michael Confrey 


8 


John D. Perry 


9 

10 


Bernard Mulvey . 

Frank J. Benson 


11 


Joseph Whitlock 


17th Eegiment, 0. Y. 



Section B. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 


Alfred H. Dibble.... 

Iselson Hodge 

James Cassidy 

Corp. Joel 0. Dickerman . . 

Charles H. Eoberts ... 

Daniel H. Prudy 


G... 
I.... 
C ... 
I.... 
F ... 
C ... 
E ... 
D... 
F ... 


14th Eegiment, 0. Y. 
14th Eegiment, C. Y. 
20th Eegiment, C. Y. 
20th Eegiment, C. Y. 
20th Eegiment, C. Y. 
17th Eegiment, 0. Y. 
17th Eegiment, C. Y. 


7 


James Flvnn 


8 

9 

10 


Oorp. Williams 

John W. Metcalf 

William Cannells. 


20th Eegiment, C. V. 
17th Eegiment, C. Y. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



r>s 



Connecticut — Section 0. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Cotnp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Patrick Dunn 


D... 


27th Regiment, 0. V. 






Total, 22. 







NEW YORK 



Section A. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


1 


L. Vangorder ..... 


E... 
E... 
K... 
D... 
F ... 


2 


G. H. Babcock 


3 


Easter 


4 


E. B. Miller 


5 


William Millard 


6 


Unknown 


7 


Unknown 




8 


Unknown 


. 


9 


Unknown 




10 


Unknown 




11 


Unknown 




12 


Unknown 




13 


Unknown 




14 
15 


George A. Atkin .... 

Unknown „ 


D... 


16 







Regiment. 



20th Eeg't, N. Y. S. M. 
20th Eeg't, F* Y. S. M. 
14th Eeg't, K Y. S. M. 
146th Eeg't, K. Y. Y. 
14th Eeg't, K Y. S. M. 
14th Eeg't, N. Y. S. M. 
14th Eeg't, K Y. S. M. 
14th Eeg't, N. Y. S. M. 
14th Eeg't, X. Y. S. M. 
14th Eeg't, N. Y. S. M. 
14th Eeg't, OS", Y. S. M. 
14th Eeg't, N. Y. S, M. 
14th Eeg't, N. Y. S. M. 
14th Eeg't, M, Y. S. M. 
147th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
147th Eeg'fc N. Y. V. 



64 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



New York. — Section A — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 

17 

18 

.19 
20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 

38 

39 

40 

41 



Names. 



Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

John Wood 

Unknown 

Serg. Lawrence Hennessy, 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Henry Kellog 

Joseph Pliarett 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

J. A. Oasad 

Unknown 

Yenerabie Wesley 

Ira Martin, Jr 

John Mckels 

William Besimer 

Corp. William Miller... 
Unknown. 

John Barrey 

Serg. Benj. F. Elliott... 
L. W. M'Olelland. ..... 



Comp. 



B . 



F 



G 
E 



B 
K 
B 
D 



Kegiment. 



B 
F 
D 



147th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
147th Eeg't, IS. Y. Y. 
147th Eeg't, 1ST. Y. Y. 
76th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 
147th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
94th Eeg't, IS. Y. Y. 
157th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
157th Eeg't, JT. Y. Y. 
157th Eeg't ; K Y. Y. 
157th Eeg't, K. Y. Y. 
157th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 
157th Eeg't, IS T . Y. Y. 
157th Eeg't, Ni, Y. Y. 
157th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
137th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 
K Y. Y. 

137th Eeg't, !N\ Y. Y. 
137th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
149th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
137th Eeg't, N. Y. M. 
137th Eeg't, K Y. M. 

1st N Y. Artillery 
2d Eeg't, K Y. S. M. 
20th Eeg't, N. Y. S. M. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



65 



New York. — Section A — Continued. 



Names. 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



Thomas James 

I. Heimbacker ...» 

E. Snyder . 

John K. Philips 

Marx Englert L 

Unknown, _ . _ . 

H. Burch 

Unknown . 

Ed. Stone, Jr., color bearer, 

Francis W. Howard. . 

Lieut, Julius Ferretzy. 

Chester Smith 

Eowland L. Ormsby 

James F. Joloph ....„,„.. 

Ei chard Oorcoran. ....... 

Frederick Eempmir. 

Patrick Martin 

John O'Brian ........ 

Corp. George Dalgleish . . 

Corp. Peter Junk 

L. A. Godfrey ..... . . 

W. A.G. .. 

Z. C. Wiggins ... 

Elias Gage 

Arzy West. .......... . . - 



A. 

B 

E 

F 

I. 



K 



J) 
D 
D 
A 

G 
G 

G 
B 
D 

C 
K 

E 



A 
D 
B 
H 



42d Eeg't, K". Y. V. 
39th Eeg't, N". Y. V. 
125th Eeg't, N". Y. V. 
126th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
108th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
111th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
111th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 
111th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
64th Eeg't, K. Y. Y. 
64th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 
119th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
44th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
64th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
66th Eeg't, Vtl Y. Y. 
2d Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
52d Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 
61st Eeg't, K. Y. V. 
63d Eeg't, STJ Y. Y. 
2d Eeg't. K. Y. Y. 
119th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 
9th Eeg't, ST. Y. Cav. 
125th Eeg't, ST. Y. Y. 
136th Eeg't, K". Y. Y. 
136th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 
136th Eeg't, tit. Y. V. 



5 



SOLDIEES' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



New York. — Section A — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 

67 

68 
69 
70 
71 

72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 



Names. 



John Salsbury 

Serg. Piatt 

Mike Cady, Color Sergeant, 
Lieut. Ool. Max A. Thonian, 

Corp. George S. Smith. 

Myron H. Yan Winkle 

H. Williams. 

Serg, J. B. Wilson „ 

Serg. James M, Martin . . - 

George Shaffer 

J. D. Slattery 

E.A.Potter 

A. Krappinan ■. 

Thomas Sebring 

1st Lt. Theo. 0. Pausch. . j 

Conrad Schuler 

Jacob Yan Pelk 

2d Lieut. C. A. Foss 

John C. Curren 

Edwin A. Hess 

Corp. Henry Burk 

Eldridge G. Thompson . . . 

Daniel O'Hara 

C. J. Crandell 

A. B. Usher 



Comp. 



E 



G 

E . 

F 

C 

H 

A 

K 

I. 

A 

I. 



T> .. 
B .. 
C .. 
E .. 
F .. 
B .. 
G.. 
G.. 
K.. 
D.. 



Regiment. 



64th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
86th Eeg't, K Y. S. M. 
42d Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 
59th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
64th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 
111th Eeg't, m Y. T. 
2d Eeg't, & Y. Y. 
2d Eeg't, X. Y. S. M. 
59th Eeg't, $. Y. S. M, 
39th Eeg't, y, Y. S. M. 
40th Eeg't, X. Y. Y. 
40th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
40th Eeg't, X. Y. Y. 
126th Eeg't, X. Y. V. 
39th Eeg't, X. Y. Y. 
2d Excelsior. 
11th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
12th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
4th Excelsior. 
5th Excelsior 
5th Excelsior. 
86th Eeg't, X. Y. Y. 
40th Eeg't, X. Y. Y. 
125th Eeg't, K Y. V, 
125th Eeg't, K Y. V. 



SOLDIERS' STATION AL CEMETERY. 



"67 



New York. — Section A — Continued. 



"No. of 
grave. 



92 
93 
94 
95 

97 

98 

99 

100 

iei 

102 
103 

104 
105 
108 
107 

108 
109 

no 
in 

112 
113 
114 
115 
116 



Names. 



Cemp. 



Regiment. 



-*fo 



Stephen Baldwin 

Serg. I. L. Decker 

Philip Banseli ..*.... 

DavM Knapp .....».__-_ 
Unknown. 

John G. Bigg 

Unknown. 

Frederick Feight ...... 

E. Bryant..., ...... . 

Unknown. 

J. Dore . . . . 

H. Moore ............. 

Thomas Gannon .... 

Samuel Stills . . 

Frederick W entz 

Color Corp. Albert Miracle, 
Henry Rhoades. ....... 

Serg. Lewis Bishop 

Jeremiah Barry ....... 



B . 

F . 

B . 



F .. 

K.. 

B .. 
H.. 



William Weight. 



Horace Anguish . . . 
Corp. J. B. Thomas 
Thurston Thomas. . 
Samuel Hague .... 
Philip Baney . 



F .. 
I.. 
H. 
B . 

C . 
E . 
K. 
I.. 
E . 
D. 
B . 
E . 



122d Reg't, K Y. V. 
70th Reg't, N. Y. V. 
10th Reg't, N". Y. C. 
111th Reg't, K Y. V. 

5th K Y r . Lid. Bakery. 

140th Reg ? t, ST. Y. V. 
137th Reg't, Bf. Y. V. 

137th Reg't, K Y. V, 
149th Reg't, N. Y. Y. 
6th K Y. Cavalry. 
40th Reg't, ET. Y. V. 
41st Reg't, N. Y. V, 
154th Reg't, 1ST. Y. Y. 
108th Reg't, N. Y. V. 
154th Reg't, K Y..T. 
134th Reg't, N. Y. V. 
84th Reg't, K. Y. V. 
157th Reg't, K". Y. Y. 
134th Reg't, K Y; T. 
134th Reg't, ^. Y. Y. 
119th Reg't, K. Y. V. 
134th Reg't, K Y. Y. 



68 



SOLDIERS 7 NATIONAL CffitfEXBRT, 



New York. — SBOTrcw A—C(mtiirme3, 



No. of 
graye. 

117 
118 
119 
120 

121 

122 

123 

124 

125 

126 

127 

128 

129 

130 

131 

132 

133 

134 

135 

136 

137 

138 

139 

140 

141 



Naraesv 



GfoWpy 



P. O.Wilber ...... 

Th addons Reynolds . 

Lewis Frento 

Charles F. Webber 

Henry Miller. ... . 

George A. Douglass . . - 
Serg, F. Leafflecl ....... 

Albert D„ Wilson. ..... 

Serg. W. Shea-. ........ 

J. Lohross ............ 

Mortinior Garrison ..... 

Corp. Geo. W, Forrester 

Unknown. 

Unknown, 

Unknown ............. 

Unknown, with Testament, 

P. Lappen 

Mar. E, Hiseox, 2d Serg . . 

John Bell . ........... 

W.W.Scott.... 

D. Welch. 

W. Pooke. . 

1st Serg. Thos. J. Curtis 
Serg. H. Eoberts 
Chauncey Snell. 



I.... 
G ... 
A... 
B ... 
F... 
D... 
E ... 



C. 



154th 
76th ] 



147th 
14th : 



157th 
104th 
104th 
126th 
14th ] 



Beg.% JJfr Y. Y. 
Eeg't, X, Y. V. 
leg% Jfj, Y.. V. 
Begt, K Y, S. I 
Eeg't, IS. Y. V. 
Reg't, K Y, S. 1 
Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 
Eeg't, K f J V. 
Eeg't, N, Y. V. 
Eeg't, KIV, 
Eeg't, K Y. V. 
le&% m. Y. V. 



H. 
D. 

E . 
C. 
E. 
G. 
A. 
C. 
F . 



134th Eegt, K. Y. V. 
134th Eeg?t y K Y,V, 
2d Eeg't, Uf Y. V. 
125th Eeg't, K-Y.V. 
123d Eeg't, pi, Y. V. 
145th Eeg't, N, Y. V. 
147th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
76th Eeg't, K. Y. V. 
104th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
104th Eeg't, JST, Y. V. 
147th Eeg't, K f Y. V. 



SOLDIERS* NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



69 



New York.— Section A — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Camp. 


w 
Regiment. 


142 


Elias Hannis. i -. -, -, . ,i- - - * 


c... 

c ... 


147th Eeg't, IS: Y. V. 


143 


Unknown . 


144 


Lieut. Theodore BInme. : . 


2d K Y. Battery. 



Section B. 



No. of 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 



II 
12 
.13 

i4 

15 
16 

17 



Nao2.es. 



William Cranston. 

Unknown . 

Unknown ... 

Unknown ........ 

Unknown 

Serg. Carey ..__.. 

Unknown 

Am^sa Topping . . 

Unknown 

Unknown ..„._... 
Unknown ..... 



Corp. Philander Stone. . . 

Unknown . . — .. 

Sergt, Amos Hummiston. 

Charnburg. ...... 

Unknown . ...... 

Edward Van Dyke. 

Levi Carpenter 

Harris Henschell. ------ 



Conip. 



P 



D 



Regiment. 



K 



€... 



0. 
D 

E 



76th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
76th Eeg't, K". Y. V. 
76thEeg%K Y. i. 
76th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
76th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
9th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
157th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
157ih Eeg't, it. Y. V. 
157th Eeg't; H. Y. V. 
157th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
157th Eeg't, IS. Y. V. 
157th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
157th Eeg't, ft Y. V. 
154th Eeg't, tf. Y. V. 
134th Eeg't, 8*. Y. V. 
134th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
134th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
164th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
140th Eeg't, IS. Y. V. 



zmi 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL' CEMETESY. 



New York.— Section B — Continued. 



N& of 
gra^e. 



Names. 



Camp. 



20 

21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 



Jolm P. Van Altype . . 

John P. Wing. . . . . 

G. Ulmer ... . 

Corp. W. Foster 

Sergt. 0. Gray 

P. Ayres 

James H. Mullin . 

John Oarnine ........ 

Benjamin Clark ...... 

Sergt. Henry Johnson. 
Hannibal Dorset 

Hugh Murphy 

Peter Brentzel ........ 

Unknown. 

Lieut. E. P. Holmes. . . 

Unknown. 

A. M'Gillora ......... 

G. Bemis .. . 

Albert Bruner ........ 

Franklin Cole 

John F„ Fanssen ...... 

Unknown . 

Daniel Mahoney 

John Burns 

William M. Stewart... 



A... 

A... 
B...._ 
C... 

I 

K... 
B... 
E... 
K... 
E... 
F... 
G... 
I..-. 

G... 

G... 

K... 



G 
K 



B 

I. 
0. 



150th Eeg't, H". Y„ Y. 
150th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
149th Eeg't, S. Y. Y„. 
137th Eeg't, ST. Y. Y. 
60th Eeg't, ¥. Y. Y. 
60th Eeg't, N. Y. Y.. 
127th Eeg't, K". Y. V. 
137th Eeg't, 1ST. Y. V. 
137th Eeg't, Jf. Y. Y. 
137th Eeg't, 1S.Y. Y. 
60th Eeg't, K Y. V.. 
42d Eeg't, H". Y. V. 
42d Eeg't, 2$. Y. V. 

126th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 

111th Eeg't, K Y. T. 
111th Eeg't„K Y. Y. 
2d K Y. Battery. 
61st Eeg't, K Y. V. 
2d Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
K. Y. Artillerist. 
69th Eeg't, K.Y V.. 
59th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
2d Eeg't, H". Y„ $.. 1L 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

New York. — Section B — Continued. 



71 



Names. 



Daniel L. Confer 

John Stowell 

0. 0. Elwell 

James Doran 

Sergt. William Hoover 

David Eeed 

William Bryan 

O. Sergt. Sigm. Webb. 

Thomas J. Boyd 

John King 

J. B. Morse 

T. Harrigan 

Timothy Kelly 

Benjamin F. Atkins 

William Peisdale 

Simon Freer 

Frank Staley 

W. M. M'Aboy 

J. Galliger 

J. J.Oohniff 

David Maywood 

Sergt. Thomas King . . . 

Sergt. Ira Penoyar 

John J. Dunning 

J. K. Saulspaugh 



Comp. 



H.. 
K.. 
H.. 
E .. 
G.. 
A.. 
K.. 



H.. 
K.. 
E .. 
A.. 
D._ 
F .. 
.. 
F .. 
A.. 
G.. 
I... 
K.. 
E ... 
E ... 
D.. 
D... 
E ... 



Regiment. 



136th Eeg't, M Y. V. 
136th Keg't, % Y. V. 
136th Eeg't, if. Y. V. 
136th Eeg't, H"! Y. Y. 
136th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
59th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
42d Eeg't, K Y. V. 
52d Eeg't, IS". Y. V. 
2d Eeg't, N". Y. S. M. 
2d Eeg't, if. Y. S. M. 
124th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
40th Eeg't, N Y. V. 
40th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
40th Eeg't, K. Y. V. 
68th Eeg't, N"! Y. V. 
40th Eeg't, W. Y. V. 
40th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
4th Eeg't, X. Y. Ex. 
4th Eeg't, #. Y. Ex. 
4th Eeg't, N". Y. Ex. 
5th Eeg't, W. Y. Ex. 
2d Eeg't, K". Y. Ex. 
111th Eeg't, if. Y. Ex. 
111th Eeg't, ST. Y. Ex. 
126th Eeg't, U. Y. Ex. 



72 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



New York. — Section B — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 



Names. 



Comp. 



Regiment, 



70 

71 

72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
94 



P.D'Vos 

B. Conrad 

Ambrose Paine 

George Nicholson 

Dennis M'Carthy 

John Norton 

William Marks 

Unknown. 
Unknown. 
Unknown. 
Unknown. 
1st Lieut. M. Stanley . 

T. Wood 

W. H. Keyes._. 



J. Kough 



Serg. S. A. Smith 
W. Johnson 



G. W. Strong. 



J. Bowie 

James E. Homan . 
Bernard Germann . 
Daniel V. Hull . . . 

Albert Hatch 

William Schumne. 
J. E. Jayner 



E .. 



K. 

. 
E ; 



111th Eeg't, K Y. Ex. 
125th Eeg't, N". Y. Ex. 
42d Eeg't, N. Y. Ex. 
126th Eeg't, N. Y. Ex. 
122d Eeg't, K Y. Ex. 
60th Eeg't, K. Y. V. 
140th Eeg't, E\ Y. V. 



E 
O 
G 
G 
B 
B 
G 



H 
D 

G 
E 
D 
E 



60th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
150th Eeg't, 1ST. Y. V.. 
78th Eeg't, K". Y. V. 
102d Eeg't, 1ST. Y. V. 
337th Eeg't, N. Y. V, 
60th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
137th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
102d Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
124th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
119th Eeg'fc, K Y. V. 
136th Eeg't, N. Y. V 
157th Eeg't, 1ST. Y. V. 
54th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
157th Eeg't, K Y. V. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



New York. — Section B — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 



95 
96 
97 
98 
99 
100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 



Names. 



Sergt. J. 0. Weisensal. 
G. M. Beagles 



Lieut. L. Dietrick 

John Cassidy 

Morgan L. Allen 

H. F.Morton 

George W. Lampheart. . . . 

Corp. Ellas A. Norris . 

Francis A. Chapman 

Corp. William M'Kendry, 

D. Lines 

Sergt. John Stratton . . . 

John Kurk 

Charles A. Hyde 

P. Sheets 

W. S. Besey 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown. 
Unknown. 
Unknown. 

Chamberlain. 

d ngton 



Oomp. 



E ... 
H._ 



D 

C 
F 
E 
B 
K 
G 



Frank Dieeenroth. 
John Hofer. 



A 
H 

B 
G 

C 



Regiment. 



A. 



45th Eeg't, TSf. Y. V. 
134th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
58th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
108th Eeg't, ST. Y. V. 
147th Eeg't, S", Y. V. 
147th Eeg't, N". Y. V. 
76th Eeg't, #. Y. V. 
126th Eeg't, iki Y. V. 
76th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
94th Eeg't, m Y. V. 
76th Eeg't, W. Y. S. M. 
94th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
97th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
76th Eeg't, N Y. V. 
147th Eeg't, N". Y. V. 
104th Eeg't, W. Y. V. 
134th Eeg't, ¥. Y. V. 
134th Eeg't, Bf. Y. V. 



K. Y. Y. 

108th Eeg't, Nl Y. V 



74 



SOLDIERS' SATIO^AL CEMETERY. 



New York. — Section B — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 



Names. 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 



George Clark 

Patrick Burns 

N". A. Thayer 

Serg. M. Buckingham 
Samuel G. Spencer. . . 

John M. Dawson 

Unknown. 
Unknown. 
James Montgomery. . 

Dennis Brady 

Supposed Excelsior. 

Eobert Shields 

John Allen 

Unknown. 

John Zubber 

Sanford Webb 

Unknown. 
Unknown. 
Lieut. Charles Clark . 



B .. 
H.. 
K.. 
C .. 
D.. 
H.. 



E . 



C . 
c . 

B . 
G. 



B . 



65th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
9th Eeg't, N. Y. S. M. 
123d Eeg't, K Y. S. M. 
104th Eeg't, N . Y. S. M. 
76th Eeg't, K". Y. S. M. 
76th Eeg't, N". Y. S. M. 



1st JJ, Y. Excelsior. 
15th I. B. 

140th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
140th Eeg't, IS". Y. Y. 

140th Eeg't, % Y. Y. 
140th Eeg't, S". Y. Y. 



9th Eeg't, K". Y. S. M. 



Section C. 



No. of 

grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 

o 


Unknown 

Unknown 





K Y. Y. 

N. Y. Y. 


3 


Unknown 




ST. Y. Y. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



v> 



New York. — Section C — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


4 


Tin known . ;^ , 




157th Eeg't, BT. Y. T. 


5 


Unknown 




157th Eeg't, JT. Y. V. 


6 


Unknown 




157th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 


7 
8 
9 


Sergeant, unknown 

Orderly Serg't, unknown 
Levi Busk 


A... 
G... 

D... 

A... 
H... 
H... 
F ... 
D... 
D... 
K... 
... 
K... 
F ... 
G... 
E ... 
E ... 
G... 
E ... 


N". Y. V. 

1ST. Y. Y. 

150th Eeg't, JT. Y. V. 

150th Eeg't, H". Y. V. 

Bfi. Y. V. 

137th Eeg't, 1ST. Y. Y. 


10 


B. 0. Blunt 


11 
12 


Chase Wingate 

George Mabee 


13 
14 


Unknown. 

A. Wallace 


111th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
111th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 


15 


W. Brown 


16 


J. Morgan 


111th Eeg't, IS. Y. V. 


17 


James Oullen 


42d Eeg't, N. Y. V. 


18 


John Smith 


42d Eeg't, 1ST. Y. Y. 
42d Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
59th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 


19 


Thomas Barren 


20 


John Enosense .' 


21 


Serg. M. Dicker 


20th Eeg't, N. Y. S. M. 


22 

23 
24 


Serg. L. H. Dicker 

James Gallagher 

J. L. Halleck 


20th Eeg't, N. Y. S. M. 
2d Eeg't, 1ST. Y. S. M. 
20th Eeg't, N. Y. S. M. 
111th Eeg't, W. Y. V. 
111th Eeg't, ST. Y. Y. 


25 
26 


T. D. Hawkin 

H. W. Eoberts 


27 
28 


Corp. George Blackall 

William Whitmore 


136th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 
111th Eeg't, tf. Y. Y. 



76 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



New York. — Section — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


29 


John Oripps 


A... 


111th Eeg't, '&. Y. V. 


30 


Unknown. 




31 


Corp. A. G. M'Afee 




111th Eeg't, j$. Y. V. 


32 


D.M'Gill 


A... 
G... 


10th Battalion m Y. 


33 


William H. Cross 


61st Eeg't, W. Y. V. 


34 


Conrad 


C ... 
A... 


2d Eeg't, N". Y. Y. 


35 


2d Lt. Frank K. Garland. . 


71st Eeg't, K Y. V. 


36 


Corp. Amos Cogswell 


F ... 


71st Eeg't, N. Y. T. 


37 


John H. Philips 


E ... 


95th Eeg't, IS: Y. V. 

u. y. y. 


38 


Unknown 




39 


Unknown. 






40 


Serg. P. Einboldt 


B ... 


39th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 


41 


August Ellenberger 


H... 


59th Eeg't, ft! Y. Y. 


42 


Serg. John Larkins 


E ... 


2d Eeg't, W. Y. Y. 


43 


Peter West 


K... 
K... 


42d Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 


44 


William L. Stuart 


80th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 


45 


John Blockman 


I.... 
H... 


86th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 


46 


James Partington 


124th Eeg't, Wi Y. Y. 


47 


John Oarrigan 


I 


186th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 


48 


Ira W. Ross 


B ... 
K... 
K... 


86th Eeg't, m Y. Y. 


49 


Walter Gloobson 


40th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 


50 


William Morgan 


126th Eeg't, IS. Y. V. 


51 


G Huskey 


3d N". Y. Excelsior. 


52 


Wilson M. Molloy 


C ... 


4th 1ST. Y. Excelsior. 


53 


Lieut. George Dennen . 


o... ! 


4th N. Y. Excelsior. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



i i 



New York. — Section C — Continued. 



Names. 



George Andrews. 

Alfred G. Armes 

1st. Serg. Geo. E. Smith . . 

Daniel Oauty 

Corp. J. A. Thompson 

James Higgins ... 

Jacob Baish 

J. F. M'Oormick 

William H. Norris 

Unknown 

Joseph Laroost 

Ezra Hyde. 

Unknown. 

P. Tilbury 

Oapt. J. N. Warner, rem'd, 

Charles Eosebill 

John Paugh „ 

Henry Miller 

M. A. Culver 

Peter Linck 

George EodelofY ..... 

J. F. Chace 

Benjamin Bice 

Corp. Peter Berrer 

Ord. Serg. Aug. Wilman. . 



Comp. 



B .. 
H.. 
G.. 

C .. 



Regiment. 



I.... 
I 

D... 

C ... 



H. 
B . 

B . 
K. 
H. 



B 

C 

K 

E 

D 

A 

K. 

F 



4th H. Y. Excelsior. 
2d N. Y. Excelsior. 
120th Eeg't, HP. Y. V, 
2d Hi Y. Excelsior. 
4th H. Y. Battery. 
1st N. Y. Excelsior. 
125th Eeg't, H. Y. V. 
10th Eeg't, H. Y. V. 
44th Eeg't, 1ST. Y. V. 
64th Eeg't, m Y. V. 
140th Eeg't, H. Y. V. 
146th Eeg't, H. Y. V. 

137th Eeg't, 1ST. Y. V. 
86th Eeg't, X. Y. V. 
119th Eeg't, M Y. V. 
154th Eeg't, H. Y. V. 
141st Eeg't, H. Y. V. 
157th Eeg't, Ml Y. V. 
134th Eeg't, F. Y. V. 
119th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
154th Eeg't, H. Y. V. 
134th Eeg't, H. Y. V, 
134th Eeg't, H. Y. V. 
54th Eeg't. 1ST. Y. V. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



New York.— Section C^-Contimied. 



No. of 
grave. 



79 

80 
81 

82 
83 
84 
85 
SO 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
94 
95 
96 



Names. 



Thomas Haley , 

George Conner . -_ 

Broughton Hough . . , 
George Halbring . . . 
Henry Limerick .... 
Corp. Jerry Johnson 

J. B. Church 

0. E, Day 

Serg. A. W. Swart . . 
J. Glair, Jr. ........ 

John Glair 



Horace Burgess. 



Serg. F. E. Munsun 



James Mahoney 
Serg. Henry Sanders. 

J. M. Bouren 

Unknown 

Unknown. 



97 Unknown 



98 
99 
100 
101 
102 
103 



Unknown 

Unknown ...... 

0. W. Eadeu . . . 
Unknown, 
John Fitzner . . . 
Hem^ J. Davis. 



Comp. 



E ... 
D... 
K... 
G.. 

F ... 
C .. 
F .. 
D.. 
I... 
D.. 
B .. 
D.. 
D .. 
B .. 
C .. 
c .. 



Regiment. 



B . 

F . 
B . 



157th Eeg't, m Y. V. 
157th Eeg't, m. Y. Y. 
157th Eeg't, K. Y. V, 
119th Eeg't, Hi Y. V. 
136th Eeg't, Wt. Y. Y. 
157th Eeg't, JSi Y. Y. 
147th Eeg't, m Y. Y. 
94th Eeg't, K. Y. Y. 
20th Eeg't, EI Y. S. M. 
94th Eeg't, m Y. Y. 
104th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
104th Eeg't, M Y. Y. 
97th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
147th Eeg't, BT. Y. V, 
94th Eeg't, Ni Y. Y. 
154th Eeg't, Mi K V. 
154th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 

154th Eeg't, $T. Y. Y. 
154th Eeg't, m Y. Y. 
134th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 
1st N. Y. Artillery. 

108th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 
125th Eeg't, IK Y. V. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



'79 



New York. — Section C— Continued. 



Names. 



Edward Bereri 

J. O'Brien 

D. Hammond 

Lafayette Burns 

Unknown. 
Corp. D. Casey 
William Eaymond . . 



Asa Pettingill. 



Jo. Stowtenger 



Comp. 



James Pfeiffer 

Unknown. 
Unknown. 

James Gray 

Edward Peto 

E. Eliot 

Ord. Serg. Thos. Devine . . 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown, supposed Ex. 

K. E. Clafiin, Testament. . 

Unknown, letters 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 



I... 
A.. 

I... 

G.. 
B.. 
F .. 

G .. 

E .. 



Regiment. 



K. 



125th Eeg't, JS". Y. V. 
2d ET. Y. Excelsior. 
K. Y. V. 
2d N. Y. Excelsior. 

122d Eeg't, H"'. Y. V. 
126th Eeg't, K Y. V, 
147th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
147th Eeg't, m Y. V, 
145th Eeg't, tf. Y. V. 



Cowan's Battery. 
1st Mi Y. Battery, 
2d Eeg't, M Y. S. M. 
2d Eeg't, N. Y. S. M. 



N. Y. V. 

N. Y. V. 

K. Y. Excelsior. 

N. Y. Excelsior. 

IS". Y. Excelsior. 

K, Y. Excelsior. 



80 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



New York. — Section — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


129 


Ord. Serg. Edw. F. Krause, 


K... 


19th Eeg't, m Y. Y. 


130 


Unknown. 






131 


Unknown. 






132 


Unknown. 







Section D. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 

2 


Frederick D. Clark 

Unknown 


K... 


78th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 
S". Y. Y. 


3 

4 


William 0. Marsh. ....... 

Loren Eaton 


H... 
D ... 

C ... 

I 

c ... 
B ... 

B... 


78th Eeg't, 1ST. Y. Y. 
149th Eeg't, Sfc Y. V. 


5 
6 

7 


Frederick Phelps 

William Murphy 

Michael Moloy 


137th Eeg't, E". Y. Y. 
60th Eeg't, mi Y. Y. 
149th Eeg't, If. Y. Y. 


8 


E. B. Roberts 


14th Eeg't, ft Y. Y. 

59th Eeg't, W. Y. V. 
N. Y. Y. 


9 
10 
11 
12 


Unknown Cavalryman. 
Unknown Cavalryman. 
Ord. Sergt. James P. Cush, 
Unknown 


13 


N. Southerd 


K... 
E ... 
E ... 
K... 
B ... 


20th Eeg't, N. Y. S. M. 


14 


John Capper 


2d Eeg't, K Y. S. M. 


15 


Patrick M'Marra 


43d Eeg't, N. Y. S. M. 


16 


Frederick Tybal 


42d Eeg't, N. Y. S. M. 
1st £L Y. Battery. 


17 


Sergt. Darvoe 


18 


H.Wood 


111th Eeg't, ft Y. Y. 



soldiers' national cemetery. 



81 



New York. — Sectiox B — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


19 


Unknown 





K". Y. V. 


20 


Unknown 




H". Y. V. 


21 


James H. Griswald ...... 


E ... 


11 1th Eeg't, K. Y. V. 


22 


J. J. Beck 


B... 
B ... 


45th Eeg't, W: Y. V. 


23 


Henry C. Bunnell 


1st 1ST. Y. Excelsior. 


24 


Serg. Patrick Farrington, 


G... 


2d Eeg't, ft. Y. S. M. 


25 


Corp. Albert H. Edson . . . 


A ... 


8th K Y. Cavalry. 


26 


Unknown Cavalryman. 






27 


Patrick M'Bonald. ....... 


. . . — 


H". Y. V. 


28 


Wm. Kreis 


I 


52d Eeg't, k Y. Y. 


29 


Casper Bonn ell. 


C ... 


66th"Eeg't, tf. Y. V. 
59th Eeg't, Hf. Y. V. 


30 


Elisha Allen 


A... 

E ... 


31 


Wessel Whitbeck 


o ' ... 

111th Eeg't, W. Y. Y. 


32 


Serg. Edw. G, Aylesworth, 


G ... 


147th Eeg't, K Y. V. 


33 






20th Eeg't, & Y. V. 


34 George M'Oonnell 


I.... 


14th Eeg't, S". Y. S. M. 


35 Francis Chapman 


K... 


76th Eeg't, K Y. S. M. 


36 j Serg. James Harrigan. . . . 


E... 


136th Eeg't, N.Y.S.I 


37 

38 


Thomas Hurley 


G... 
I.... 


2d Eegt, K Y. S. M. 


David B. Johnson 


2d Eeg't, K Y. S. M. 


39 I Philip Martyler .L 


...... 


39th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 


40 ! George Shumdeher 


B ... 


39th Eeg't, K Y. V. 


41 Sergt. L. Stone 


G... 


42d Eeg't, N. Y. V. 


42 
43 


J. W. Cresler 


K... 


1st N. Y. Excelsior. 




1st X. Y. Excelsior. 



82 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



New York. — Section D— Continued, 



No. of 
grave. 

44 

45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
•58 
S9 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 

m 

67 
68 



Names. 



Unknown 

F. Piatt 

Patrick Lynch 

Serg. J. Murphy 

W. M.Brown 

Corp. Samuel Lambert . 

H. Eose 

Joseph Battel 

J.D.B 

Corp. N. W. Winship . . . 

Jabez Fisk 

Matthew Bryan 



Serg. 0. Farnsborth. 

William M'Oort 

E. Whitmore 

William Danice 



John Furgeson 



Serg. Carlton Sanders. 

John Cain 

C. H. Carpenter 

Unknown. 
Unknown. 

H. M'Dowell 

J.Walton 

James Ivers 



Comp. 



E ... 
D.. 
B .. 
G.. 
F ._ 
F ._, 
A.. 
I... 
K.. 
K._ 
C .. 
G.. 
C .. 
E .. 



E . 
H. 
K. 
I.. 



C . 
H. 
A. 



Regiment. 



1st N". Y. Excelsior. 
72d Eeg't, U. Y. S. M. 
4th N. Y. Excelsior. 
4th N. Y. Excelsior. 
4th IS". Y. Excelsior. 
1st BT. Y. Excelsior. 
111th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
2d K Y. Excelsior. 
129th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
86th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
86th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
2d Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
126th Eeg't, IS". Y. V. 
39th Eeg't, K. Y. V. 
111th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
39th Eeg't, N". Y. Y. 
39th Eeg't, K. Y. Y. 
120th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
122d Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
44th Eeg't, K Y. V. 



60th Eeg't, K. Y. V. 
14th Eeg't, N. Y. S. M. 
14th Eeg't, 1", Y. S. M 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



83 



New York.—SECTION D— Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


69 


Jacob Eiser . „ . . . , 


A... 


134th Reg't, IK. Y. V. 


70 


— — Heyden : . . 




147th Reg't, K T. V. 


71 


Unknown, 




72 


Unknown. 






73 


<L Finlin. .._..„..„.. 




15th Indep't N. Y. Bat. 
14th Reg't, Brooklyn. 
14th Reg't, Brooklyn. 


74 


Unknown Zouave. ....... 




75 


Unknown Zouave Serg . 




76 


Unknowi? ..„» ....... 




JS. Y. Excelsior. 


77 


Unknown ............... 




N". Y. Excelsior, 


78 


Unknown ........... 




U. Y. Excelsior, 


79 


Robert Blair ......... 


D ... 
ok of 


140th Reg't, K Y. V. 


SO 


Unknown, (with Prayer Bo 


Fr. Deisenroth.) 


81 


Daniel Casey ........ 


D... 


44th Reg't, K Y. V. 


82 


Josephus Simmons ....... 


E ... 


44th Reg't, N. Y. V. 


83 


James Look 


A... 


44th Reg't, $L Y. V. 


84 


diaries Speisberger. 


D... 


140th Reg't, N". Y. V. 


85 


Philip Beekner .......... 


D... 


140th Reg't, ST. Y. V. 


86 


Jastice Eisenberg. .... 


D.... 


140th Reg't, K Y. V. 


87 


David Nash » 


F ... 
F ... 


44th Reg't, K Y. V. 


88 


George Lervy 


44th Reg't, ffi, Y. V. 


89 


Serg. Sidney S. Skinner . . 


D ... 


44th Reg't, 1ST. Y. V. 


90 


Jesse White ......... 


G... 

A... 


44th Reg't, X. Y. V. 


91 


Corp. William 0. Crafts . . 


44th Reg't, K Y, V. 


92 


George Strobridge 


E... 


140th Reg't, m Y. V. 


93 


Ross Thomas. ....... 


E.... 


140th Reg't, If. Y. V. 



SOLDIERS' RATIONAL CEMETERY, 



New York.— Section D— Continued 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


COEflp. 


94 


Corp. Good mam „ 


H... 


95 


George Kole „ . . . 


E ... 


90 


Leander T, Bnrnhani . . 


E ... 


97 


K. M'Elligot ,. 


C ... 
C ... 
B ... 
E... 
K... 


98 


IP. Griswald L . . . 


99 


Peter Beers 


100 


John M. Irons ._.__.„.... 


101 




102 


Unknown, 




103 


Unknown, 




104 


Unknown, 


' 


105 


Joseph Sneebeeker 


P... 


106 


Unknown, with anibrotype 


and pa 


107 


Unknown Cavalryman, 




108 


Unknown. 




109 


Martin Boe 


K... 


110 


H. W.D.. 


111 


J. C.K 


. o _ o a ■> 


112 


Charles Johnrid ......... 


H... 


113 


Unknown Cavalry Se-rgt. 


114 


Unknown. 




115 


Unknown. 




116 


Unknown. 




117 


Unknown. 




118 


W. L. Bort.. ........ 


B ... 



Regiment. 



44th Beg't, K Y. Y. 
44th Beg't, K". Y. TJ 
44th Beg't, 1ST. Y. Y. 
44th Beg't, Iff. Y. Y. 
44th Beg't, 1ST. Y. V. 
44th Beg't, IS. Y. Y. 
44th Beg't, N. Y. V. 
34th Beg't, N. Y. V. 



146th Beg't, K Y. V„ 



111th Beg't, Bi Y. V. 
111th Beg't, N. Y. Y, 
N". Y. Y. 
5th N, Y. Excelsior, 



157th Beg't, BT. Y. V. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



85 



New York. — Section D — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


119 


J. 0. Kent 


K... 
B ... 
A... 


136th Eeg't, BT. Y. V. 


120 


W. W. Clark 


<50th Eeg't, W. Y. V. 


121 


T. Manly .... _ 


63d Eeg't, BT. Y. Y. 


122 


D. Sinith._ 


I.... 


57th Eeg't, H". Y. Y. 


123 


George S. Moss 


C ... 


125th Eeg't, IS. Y. V. 


124 


William Wyer . . ...J 


A... 


119th Eeg't, X. Y. V. 


125 


¥. M, Stowell.... 


D ... 


I. Y. Excelsior. 


126 


H.Dale..... ._ 


C ... 


135th 1ST. Y. Excelsior. 


127 


Unknown Cavalryman. 





Section E. 



No. of 

grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


James Gray. . .... 


c ... 


2d Eeg't, K Y. S. M. 


2 


Unknown .. 


2d Eeg't, N. Y. S. M 

medal, purse and 75 cts.) 
49th Eeg't, BR Y. Y. 


3 
4 

5 


Unknown. 

Unknown, (with knife, ink 

Mcholas Paqoet. 


stand, 
E ... 


6 

7 


Charles Eoot. 

John P. Conn 


Battery L, 1st Artillery. 
40th Eeg't, X. Y. V. 
60th Eeg't, IS. Y. V. 
137th Eeg't, US'. Y. Y. 
137th Eeg't, K. Y. V. 


8 
9 

10 
11 


Frederick Blackstein 

A. R Townsend 

Charles Manning 

BLW. Nichols 


A... 
I 

... 

E ... 

0... 
A... 


12 
13 


E. Yan Tassel 

P- Stevenson ........ 


60th Eeg't, BE. Y. V. 
60th Eeg't BT. Y. V. 



86 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETEKY- 

New York. — Section E — Continued- 



No. of 
grave. 



Names. 



Comp. 



14 
15 
16 
17 

18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
SO 
31 
32 

oo 
OO 

34 
35 

36 
37 
38 



P. M'Donald .... 

Corp- W. W- Band ...... 

Corp- L, Vinning . 

Sergt. Charles F. Fox . . , 

Malilon J- Pardee. 

Oliver English 

F. A. Archibald ..... 

Sergt. J. W. Broekham. . 

William W. Wheeler. 

Richard W- Ensh. ...... 

A- Stanton ... ....... 

Peter Hill 

Dean Swift. ............ 

Sergt. Daniel Corbett . . . 
Sergt. Hiram G. Hilts. . . 

P. Fanning ...... 

W» P* Huntingdon ...... 

James W. Wickham .... 

J. Vandyke . ........ 

E. Gandley . ... ...... 

G. Christanna 

Daniel Cook, U. S- Ambul 
Sergt. F. Jell...... .... 

E. T. Myers 

Felix M'Crani 



35egim©nt. 



E.., 
A.. 
A.. 
F .. 
A.. 
C -. 
c .. 



e ., 
A.. 
A.. 
B.. 
O .. 
O J. 
c .. 
M... 
K.. 



I... 
K„. 
K.. 



Eeg%. m Yi V- 
102d Eeg't, $- Y. V. 
137th Eeg't, IS". Y. f - 
137th Eeg't, if. Y.. V- 
137th Eeg't, S". Y. V. 
13.7th Eeg't, $T. Y. V~ 
137th Eeg't, IT. Y. V- 
137th Eeg ? t, E". Y. V.. 
137th Eeg r t, JTi Y. V. 
137th Eeg't, IS". Y. V. 
137th Eeg't, H". Y. V- 
137th Eeg't, N.Y.V. 
137th Eeg't, K- T. V.. 
60th Eeg't, USTv Y. V. 
122d Eeg't, K. Y.V~ 
122d Eeg't, W*. Yi V.. 
123d Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
122d Eeg't, BDl Y. V- 
107th Eeg't, 5T- Y. V. 
44th Eeg't, K". Y. V- 
120th Eeg't, 3ST. Y. V. 
river. 

95th Eeg't, HI Yi V~ 
111th Eeg't, H. Yi V- 
42d Eeg't, K . Y. Y. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



87 



New York. — Section E — Continued. 



Names. 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



Josepkus Gee 

A. J. Chafee 

William J. Sutliff. 

Jokn Jolloff 

Eliska Looniis 

Mickael Burns 

James Giles 

Serg. S. Lasage 

John Sloven 

Heinrick Droeber . 
Jokn Eiley. ...... 

H. Hawkins 

Jacob Dilber 

Josepk Ootrell 

Orin Skepkercl 



Lieut. A. Wagner, 



P. Newman 

Jokn M. Wastrant 

A. S. Yan Volkenburg 

Tyler J. Snyder 

Unknown, (on cap) .... 

Hendrick Haynian 

J. Clegg 

Corp. A. Ealpk 

J. E. Bailey 



G.. 

E .. 
B.. 
F .. 
.. 
.. 
I... 
A.. 
I... 
C .. 
B .. 



G 
A 
A 
F 
K 
G 
G 
G 
D 



I. 

C 
I. 



137th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
44tk Eeg't, IS'. Y. Y. 
137tk Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
Excelsior Brigade. 
137tk Eeg't, H 1 . Y. Y. 
140tk Eeg't, K. Y Y. 
104tk Eeg't, k. Y. Y. 
147tk Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 
61st Eeg't, 1ST. Y. Y. 
119tk Eeg't, #. Y. Y. 
145th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
94tk Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
119th Eeg't, 35". Y. V. 
43d Eeg't, SF. Y. Y. 
60tk Eeg't, ST. Y. Y. 
39tk Eeg't, W. Y. Y. 
73d Eeg't, JT. Y. Y. 
111th Eeg't, IT. Y. V. 
64th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
126th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
157th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
39th Eeg't, k Y. Y. 
Excelsior. 
62d Eeg't, If. Y. Y. 
111th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 



88 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



New York. — Section E — Continued, 



No. of 
gra^e. 

64 
65 

66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 



Names. 



F. Sweney 

Thomas Smith 

Serg. S. Vanderpool 

Unknown Captain 

Unknown 

1st Lieut. J. Eoss Horner. . 

H. Berman 

Unknown. [ambrotype. 
— -Delxnot, $2 75, diary & 



Unknown Corporal 

Solomon Lesser, ($36, &c.,) 

Corporal Bollinger. . . . 

Klebenspies 



Corporal Conrad Waelde. 

Albert Spitz 

Eiershan 



Corporal Woell . . 

J. Smith ; 

C. A. Caldwell . . 
EL C. Eosegrant. 
Timothy Kearns. 

P. Owens 

G. W. Secose 

Unknown 

P. Trainer 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



D. 
K. 
I.. 



K 

E 

E 
E 
E 
E 
E 
K 
H 
B 
B 



E 
B 
A 
A 
F 



D 



40th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
1st 1ST. Y. Excelsior. 
125th Eeg't, BF. Y. V. 
X. Y. Y. 
ET. Y. Excelsior. 
20th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
41st Eeg't, K Y. V. 

41st Eeg't, K". Y. V. 
41st Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
41st Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
41st Eeg't, E". Y. Y. 
41st Eeg't, K Y. V. 
41st Eeg't, K". Y. V. 
41st Eeg't, IS. Y. V. 
41st Eeg't, 1ST. Y. V. 
41st Eeg't, IS, Y. V. 
4th K Y. Battery. 
64th Eeg't, 3ST. Y. V. 
1st Eeg't, K Y. V. 
1st 1ST. Y. Excelsior. 
61st Eeg't, K Y. V. 
4th N. Y. Cavalry. 
4th K Y. Cavalry. 
4th K Y. Cavalry. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



89 



New York. — Section E — Continued. 



Names. 



John Kenton 



Comp. 



John Smith 



Serg. William H. Ambler. 
John Lanegar 



1st Serg. Seklen D. Wales, 

Adjutant Gaulk 

J. B. Oowill 

John P. Wells 

William Franklin 

A. K Post... 

John Ferry 



1st Sergeant — unknown 



James M'Bride . 
Unknown. 
Patrick Kenney 



Charles Hogan 



Henrv Hitchcock 



George Clax 



Amos Otis 

Serg. Samuel Fuller 

Unknown 

E. Develin 

J. Baetchner 

Unknown Zouave. 

Corporal Eichard Sheridan,; E . . 



D.. 
D.. 
D.. 
A.. 



E . 
E . 
H. 
A. 
I.. 



A... 

B ... 
A... 



C .. 
K.. 
G.. 



A. 



Regiment. 



4th tf. Y. Cavalry. 
57th Beg't, Kl Y. V. 
57th Beg't, 1ST. Y. V. 
5th K. Y. Cavalry. 
5th K. Y. Cavalry. 
5th N. Y. Cavalry. 
108th K. Y. Cavalry. 
104th K". Y. Cavalry. 
13Gth X. Y. Cavalry. 
43d K Y. Cavalry. 
88th Beg't, X. Y. V. 
HGth Beg't, K Y. V. 
88th Beg't, K". Y. V. 

63d Beg't, K Y. Y. 
63d Beg't, K". Y. V. 
1st Ind't 1S T . Y. Battery 
111th Beg't, X. Y. Y. 
146th Beg't, K Y. V. 
105th Beg't, N. Y. Y. 
Excelsior. 
4th Beg't, 1ST. Y. Y. 
Excelsior. 

2d Beg't, N. Y. S. M. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETEEY. 



New York. — Section E — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Conip. 


Regiment. 


114 
115 
116 
117 


D. C, (with Bible.) 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unkuown 




Excelsior. 


118 


Unknown 


Excelsior. 


119 


Unknown ' 


Excelsior. 


120 


Unknown ' 


Excelsior. 









Section F. 



No. of 

crave. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 



Names. 



Capt. J. S. Corbin 

Oicero Tolls 

A. D. Tice 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



F . . . 20th Eeg't, K Y. V. 

A.. 

E .. 



134th Eeg't, 1ST. Y. V. 



Serg. Frederick Derbin... I. 

Thomas Dawson A 

Alfred Trudell A 

Fred. Hei- 



Elbert Traver. 

Unknown 

William Lacy 



E 



H 



20th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
147th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
147th Eeg't, X. Y. V. 
147th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
76th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 
76th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
76th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
78th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
78th Eeg't, ST. Y. V. 
78th Eeg't, ;N T . Y. V. 
K Y. Y. 

44th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
N". Y. Y. 
4th K". Y. Excelsior. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



01 



New York. — Section F — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


17 


J. Siinond 


D... 
K... 


4th IT: Y. Excelsior. 


18 


Serg. T. Lally 


4th N". Y. Excelsior. 


19 


Unknown 




Excelsior. 


20 


Unknown ' 


Excelsior. 


21 


1 
Unknown ! 


Excelsior. 


22 


Unknown ' : ' 


Cavalry. 


23 


Unknown. 




24 


Unknown 




Cavalry. 


25 


David Holland, with medal, 


F ... 


2d Excelsior. 


26 


Unknown 




Excelsior. 


27 


Michael Flanegan 


B ... 


1st N. Y. Excelsior. 


28 


Ord. Serg. Patrick Sullivan, 


K... 


4th ]*r. Y. Excelsior. 


29 


K. H.P 




126th Eeg't, K Y. V. 


30 


Unknown . 




K. Y. Y. 


31 


Unknown, (with ring,) 




K". Y. Y. 


32 


Charles W. Gaylord 


B ... 


126th Eeg't, K". Y. V. 


33 


Unknown 




Excelsior. 


34 


Chas. Welden, (with diary,) 


D... 


111th Eeg't, 2JT. Y. Y. 


35 


Unknown Corporal 





TSt. Y. Y. 


30 






Cavalry. 


37 


Unknown. 






38 


Unknown. 






39 


Lieut. A. W. Estes 


H... 


2d H". Y. Excelsior. 


40 


Unknown 




Excelsior. 


41 






1st Division 5th Corps. 



92 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL, CEMETERY. 



New York. — Section F — Continued. 



No. of 

grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


* 

42 


Unknown 




1st Division 5th Corps. 


43 


Unknown. 






44 


Unknown. 






45 


Unknown. 






46 


Unknown. 






47 


Unknown, (with knife) . 





]S T . Y. V. 


48 


Unknown 


E ... 


5th Corps. 


49 


Unknown. 




50 


John Kapp 


K... 


1st Excelsior. 


51 


Michael Evan 


C ... 


1st Excelsior. 


52 


Unknown. 






53 


Unknown. 






54 


Charles M'Kenney 


B ... 


1st Excelsior. 


55 


Unknown. 






56 


Unknown. 






57 


Unknown . 




2d Brig. 2d Div. 5th Cor. 


58 


Unknown Corporal, (with p 


ipe.) 




59 


Unknown. 






60 


James Brady 


" 


2d Excelsior. 


61 


Unknown. 




/ 


62 


UnknowiJ. 






63 


Unknown. 






64 


Unknown 





W, Y. V. 


65 


Unknown 




N. Y. Y. 


66 


Charles Gorman 


E ... 


2d Excelsior. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



93 



New York. — Section F — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 



Names. 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



67 

G8 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 



Unknown . 

Patrick Olvany 

Alonzo Henstreat, (with po 

Supposed 

George W. Douglass . . . 

Supposed . . 

Supposed 

Supposed 

Supposed , . i 

Supposed 

Supposed 

Supposed 

Supposed 

Supposed 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown Orderly Sergt. 
Unknown, with ambrotype 

Supposed 

Supposed 

Supposed 

Jacob Jones, (with letter.) 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown ............. 



A... 

cket b 



E . 



2d Excelsior. 

2d Excelsior, 
ook and 50 cents.) 

N. Y. 

1st Excelsior, 

K. Y. 

W. Y. 

K.Y. 

K". Y. 

SF. Y. 

N. Y. V. 
J K Y. V. 
J K Y. V. 

K Y. V. 

K Y. V. 

K Y. V. 

Excelsior. 

5tli Corps. 

ST. Y. V. 

Excelsior, 

Excelsior. 



lltli Corps 



94 



SOLDIERS^ NATIONAL CEMETERY, 



New York,— Section F — Continued* 



75m. of 
grave. 



Names. 



92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 

102 

103 

104 

105 

106 

107 

108 

109 

110 

111 

112 

113 

114 

115 



Unknown . ..... 

William M'Clellan ...... 

Unknown. 

P. J. Hopkins 

Unknown. 

Unknown Corporal ..... 

Lieut. Ei. D. Lower 

Unknown ... 

Supposed .... 

Unknown 

Unknown 

G. M'Oleary.. 

Unknown ........... 

Unknown 

Edmund Holmes 

T. Tetworth 

Adam Shaw 

Supposed 

Supposed 

William H.Bell........ 

Corp. James M. Delaney, 
Corp. Andrew De Wit. . 
Supposed 



Theo. Bogart, with medal 
and breastpin 



Comp. 



Regiment, 



G... 



H 



P 



F ... 
D ... 



P 
I. 
H 



I.. 



Artillerist. 

88th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 

126th Eeg't, j& Y. V. 

126th Eeg't, m Y. V. 

157th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 

157th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 

Excelsior. 

Excelsior. 

Excelsior. 

4th Excelsior, 

Excelsior. 

Excelsior.. 

4th Excelsior- 

4th Excelsior. 

4th Excelsior. 

Excelsior. 

Excelsior. 

120th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 

120th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 

120th Eeg't, K, Y. Y. 

ST. Y. V. 

120th Eeg't, N. Y. Y. 



soldiers' national cemetery. 



95 



New York. — Section G. 



Names. 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



2d Lieut. F. F ... 

Supposed, with ambrotype, 

Supposed 

Supposed 



Daniel Smith 

Supposed, with watch chain 
Corporal Gilbert Myer. . . . 

Supposed 

Theodore Van Deborgert. . 

R. M. W ........... 

Supposed 

Supposed 

Supposed 

Supposed 

Supposed ,. 

Supposed 



E 



Supposed 

Supposed 

Supposed 

Supposed 

Supposed 

W. H. Ackernian . . 

Supposed 

Supposed \ 

Corporal, supposed. 



I.. 



I. 



I. 



K. Y. V. 
K Y. V. 
K Y. V. 

120th Reg't, K. Y. V. 
120th Eeg't, $, Y. V. 
3d Excelsior. 
120th Reg% K Y. V. 
Excelsior. 

120th Reg't, K Y. V. 
Supposed X. Y. Y. 
Excelsior. 
Excelsior. 
Excelsior. 
Excelsior- 
Excelsior. 
Excelsior. 
Excelsior. 
Excelsior. 
Excelsior. 
Excelsior. 
Excelsior. 
1st Excelsior. 
Excelsior. 
Excelsior. 
Excelsior. 



96 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



New York. — Section G— Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 

26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 



■ Names. 



Supposed 

Supposed 

Supposed 

Supposed : . •: 

Supposed 

Supposed 

Corporal Lewis Solomon. 

Supposed 

Supposed 

Ord. Serg. P. Earrel 

Eufus Thomson 

Seth Harpell . 

Henry Wilson 

Alexander Gacon ...... 

W. H. Piper 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



Sergeant Bie- 



Charles Gorman 

Serg. Washington Knight, 
George Buggins ......... 



Michael Eiley 

Elbert Brown. ......... 

John Carey 

Unknown. 
Unknown. 
Unknown, (2 knives trad: co'mb) . 



Excelsior. 
Excelsior. 
Excelsior. 
Excelsior. 
K Y. V. 

k y. v. 

1st Eeg't, K. Y. Y. 

H> Y. Y. 

kl Y. V. 

4th Excelsior, 

120th Eeg't, ST; Y. V. 

5th Excelsior. 

126th Eeg't, ft! Y. V. 

5th !N". Y. Excelsior. 

1st N". Y. Excelsior. 

1st N. Y. Excelsior. 

2d 1ST. Y. Excelsior. 

5th K Y. Excelsior. 

1st K". Y. Excelsior. 

42d Eeg't, X. Y. Y. 

111th Eeg't, S". Y. Y. 



D.. 

C .. 
C .. 
E .. 
B .. 
H.. 
A.. 
B:: 
C .. 
I... 
G.. 
G.. 
H.. 



5th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 



K Y. Y. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



97 



New York. — Section G — Continued. 



Names. 



Unknown . 

Unknown 

Unknown J. 

Unknown 

Unknown 

O. W. Hotchkiss, breastpin, 
William Shuly, ambrotype, 

Supposed 

Supposed 

Just, Warner, with snuffbox 

Supposed 

Unknown Corporal 

Unknown. 

Unknown, supposed 

Serg. John Knox 



John ISTolan . 

Serg. J. H. Mead 

Supposed 

Supposed 

Geo. Washington Sprague, 

Serg. L. H. Lee 

Corp. Luke Kelly. .... 

Thomas Murphy 

Henry Irvin „ 

Henry Diemer ........... 



Comp. 



F . 



K 
K 



G 
B 
F 
F 
F 
F 



Regiment. 



K Y. V. 
N. Y. V. 

H". Y. Y. 

5T. Y. Y. 

ET, Y. Y. 

120th Eeg't, W, Y. Y. 

JSfi Y. Y. 

B\ Y. Y. 

K Y. Y. 

120th Eeg't, 1ST. Y. V. 

1ST, Y. Y. 

Excelsior. 

H\ Y. V. 

5th N. Y. Excelsior. 

1st W. Y. Excelsior. 

K Y. Y. 

Excelsior. 

Excelsior. 

2d Eeg't, H". Y. Y. 

2d Eeg't, K Y. V. 

2d Eeg't, BT. Y. S. M. 

2d Eeg't, IT. Y. S. M. 

2d Eeg't, K Y. S. M. 

2d Eeg't, N. Y. S. M. 



98 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



New York. — Section G— Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 

76 

77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 



90 
91 



Names. 



Supposed 

H. Thompson 

Adam 0. Oadmus 

Jacob Frey 

M. Stout 

Charles Jones 

Sergt. James Melchen . 

Thomas Hunt 

Supposed 

Robert Laning 

John Sloat. . i 

Sergt. George Baker . . . 

Supposed 

Joshua Pursel 

Daniel Day , 

Charles T. Harris 



Comp. 



I.. 
I.. 

B . 

F . 
C. 
H.. 
H. 



K. 
E. 
A. 

C. 
B .. 
G. 



Regiment. 



K Y. S. M. 
111th Eeg't, HL Y. V. 
126th Eeg't, m Y. T. 
149th Eeg't, m Y. T. 
136th Eeg't, M Y. Y. 
9th Eeg't, H. Y. Cav. 
2d Eeg't, m Y. S. M. 
2d Eeg't, aSG. Y. S. M. 
3ST, Y. V. 

86th Eeg't, M, Y. V. 
126th Eeg't, JS". Y. Y. 
40th Eeg't, dSi Y. V. 
ST. Y. V. 

126th Eeg't, m Y. f J 
126th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
126th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 



Total, 867. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



99 



NEW JERSEY. 





Section A. 




No. of 1 

grave. Names. 


i Comp. 


-t- 

Regiment. 


1 2d Li. Rich. H. Townsend 




— tftk> 

12th Regiment, N. J. V. 


2 1st Serg. T. Sutphin. . . 


. E ... 


5th Regiment, K J. V. 


3 


I. L. T. 






4 


L. Kreisel 




Battery A, 1st N. J. V. 
Battery A, 1st K". J. V. 
12th Regiment, K. J. Y. 


5 


G. Cutter 




6 


Isaac H. Copeland 


' E ... 


7 


John Albright. 






8 


Joseph Spacious .... 




12th Regiment, K J. V. 
12th Regiment, K J. V. 


9 


George Martin 


1 

! A... 


10 


O.S.Piatt 1 


b;v. 


12th Regiment, I.j.t. 


11 


Unknown. 






12 


Daniel Hierman . 


H 


12th Regiment, N. X Y. 


13 


Unknown. 




14 


George W. Adams ... 


F ...| 


12th Regiment, N". J. V. 


15 


William Redrow. 




12th Regiment, 1ST. J. V. 








16 


William Spencer. 






■17 


Unknown, 






18 


Unknown, 






19 


Jacob Sheik 


I.... 


4th Regiment, fe. J. V. 


20 


— — — - Creamer. . . 




12th Regiment, K £fc Y. 
5th Regiment, N, J. V. 


21 


J. W. Button. . . 


K..J 






22 


R. S, Price . 




Bat. B., 1st IS T . J. Art. 
11th Regiment, R.J. Y. 


23 


Swart Perew . 


G... 



100 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY, 



New Jersey. — Section B„ 



No. of 
grave. 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 



Names. 



Patrick Kyan ... . 

Sergeant John M'lver. . . , 

Thomas Van Oleaf 

B. 0. Jackson 

John Eue : 

James Fletcher. ...._.„.. 

Michael Goff . ............. 

Joseph Burroughs ....... 

Henry Elberson 

Sergt. Samuel Stockton . . 

William Preser ....... 

Henry Danmiig 

Charles B. Yearkes ...... 

Daniel Shuk . . r ....... . 

J. Parliament 

John Smith, with pocket b 

W. T.Hawkins 

■ Biley 



J.B. .............. ..-.- 

J. H., with comb 

H.B 

Unknown,with Testament. 



Comp. 



A. 
B . 
F . 
B . 
B . 
G. 
G. 
B . 
G. 
K. 



G.. 
B .. 



0. 

ook,15 

H... 

E ... 

F ... 

F ... 
F ... 



Keariment. 



5 th Begiment, B. J. Y- 
5th Begiment, H". J. Y.. 
8th Begiment, £L J. Y. 
11th Begiment, 1ST. J. V. 
11th Begiment, IS. J. V. 
7th Begiment, 1ST. J. Y. 
11th Begiment^K J. Y, 
8th Begiment, IS.. J. V. 
N. J. V. 

5th Begiment, N". J. V, 
Egg Harbor City Gav. 
13th Begiment, 2J. J. Y. 
Gth Begiment, 35T. J. Y, 
3d Begiment, N. J. Y. 
13th Begiment, 33* J. V, 
cents* &c 

12th Begiment, H". J. V, 
2d Begiment, IS. J. V. 
7th Begiment, IS,. J. Y. 
7th Begiment, 1ST. J. V. 
7th Begiment, 1ST. J. Y. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



lUi 



New Jersey. — Section C. 



Names. 



Cornp. 



Regiment. 



W. A.E . 

Unknown, with knife. . . 

Unknown 

Unknown L 

John Eyan. „ 

J.F I 

Unknown, with blanket s 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown, 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Thomas Flanagen , 

M. V. 

George W. Berry 



I.. 



.. 

A.. 

hawL 



G 
A 
B 



7th Eeginient, ST. J. V. 
7th Regiment, N. J. V. 
K J. Y 

7th Eegiment, K J. V. 
5th Eegiment, N. J. V. 
7th Eegiment, 5T. J. V. 



7th Eegiment, K J. V. 
7th Eegiment, N". J. V. 
7th Eegiment, F. J. V. 



Section D. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Unknown 




7th Eegiment, K. J. V. 


2 


! Unknown, with needle case 







102 



SOLDIERS* NATIONAL CEMETERT, 



New Jersey.— Section D — Continued 



No. of 
graye. 

3 

4 
5 
6 

7 



10 

11 

~12 



Names. 



Unknown 

Supposed 

Supposed 

Corp. William H. Eay. 
Serg. James B. Eister . 

E. Baner 

Supposed 

Supposed 

J. WIS .. 

Unknown. 

P. Weene 



Compv 



E 

H 



P 



H. 



Regiment. 



K. J. V. 

W. J. V. 

K. J. V. 

12th Eegiment, N. J. V. 

11th Eegiment, H. J. V. 

11th Eegiment, JS". J. V. 

K. J. V. 

K J. V. 

7th Eegiment. 1ST. J. Y, 

0th Eegiment, .N . J. V. 



Total, 78. 



DELAWARE 



Section A. 



NWof 
graye. 



Names. 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



Corp. William Strong 

Serg. Thomas Seymore. . . 

William Dorsey 

John B. Sheets 

T. P. Carey 

John S. Black 

Serg. Michael Cavanagh. . 



D. 
B. 
D. 
D. 
E . 
K. 
G. 



2d Eegiment, D. V. 
1st Eegiment^ D. Y. 
1st Eegiment, D. V.. 
1st Eegiment, B. Y. 
1st Eegiment, D. Y. 
1st Eegiment, D. Y. 
2d Eegiment, D. Y. 



SOLDIERS NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



103 



Delaware.— Section B. 



No. ©f 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Peter Boster 


A... 
A... 
B ... 
E ... 
A... 
E ... 


2d Begiment, D. T. 


2 


Jacob Stiles 


2d Begiment, D. V. 
1st Begiment, D. V. 
2d Begiment, D. V. 
1st Begiment, D. V. 


3 
4 
5 


Serg. Jacob Boyd 

A. Huhn ^ 


6 


Lient. George G-. Plank . . . 


2d Begiment, D. V. 



Section C. 



No. of 
grave. 



Names. 



James Dougherty. 
Stephen Carey 



Comp. 



I.. 

A. 



Regiment. 



1st Begiment, D. Y. 
2d Begiment,, D. V. 



Total, 15. 



MARYLAND. 



Section A. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Southey Stirling 


K... 

B ... 
B ... 

... 


1st Begiment, Md. V. 

1st E. Shore Md. V. 
1st Begiment, Md. Y. 

1st Begiment, P. H. B. 


2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 


Unknown. 

William P. Jones 

Edward Pritchaifd 

Unknown. 
Unknown. 
Unknown. 
H.Miller 









104 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Maryland. — Section B. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Wm. H. Eaton 


E... 
H... 
I.... 
B ... 

E ... 

D... 


1st E. Shore Md. V. 


2 


G. H. Barger 


1st Beginient, Md. V. 


3 
4 


A. Saterfield 

Joseph Bailey 


1st E. Shore Md. V. 
1st Beginient, Md. V. 


5 


Teter French 


1st Beginient, P. H. B. 


6 

7 


Unknown. 

Stephen Ford 


1st Beginient, Md. V. 



Section 0. 



No. of 
grave. 



Names. 



G. W. Lowry 

John Conner 

David Krebs 

M. F. Knott 

Frank Baxter 

John W. Stockman 



Comp. 



K. 
F . 
G. 
F . 
D. 



Regiment. 



1st Beginient, P. H. B. 
1st Beginient, P. H. B. 
1st Beginient, P. H. B„ 
1st Beginient, Md. V. 
1st Beginient, Md. V. 
1st Brigade. 



Section D. 



No. of 
grave. 



Names. 



Comp. 



1 Unknown, killed at Hanov er, Pa 
Total, 22. 



Regiment. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



105 



WEST VIRGINIA. 



Section A. 



No. of 
grave. 



Names. 



Corup. 



Simon Maine F 

John Brown 



Aaron Austin 

Theodore Stewart 

George Berger 

Martin L. Scott 

Capt. William BT. Harris. 



E . 

C . 

c . 

B . 

E . 



Regiment. 



7th Eegiment, Va. V. 
7th Eegiment, Va. V. 
7th Eegiment, Ya. V. 
7th Eegiment, Ya. Y. 
7th Eegiment, Ya. Y. 
7th Eegiment, Ya. Y. 
1st Cavalry. 



Section B. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 

F ... 
L... 
C ... 
E ... 


Regiment. 


1 

2 
3 
4 


Sergt. Garret Selby 

Sergt. George Collins 

Charles Lacey 

William Bailey 


1st Eegiment, Ya. Cav. 
1st Eegiment, Ya. Cav. 
1st Artillery. 
1st Cavalry 



Total, 11. 



106 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



OHIO. 



Section A. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


COHip. 


1 


Enoch M. Detty 


G... 


2 


2d Lt. Geo. W. M'Gary. . . 




3 


William Folk 


D ... 


4 


Martin Jacob 


D... 


i 


John Wiser 


D... 


6 


Richard Bradler 


D ... 


7 


E. A. Ham 


H... 


8 


Busk 


H... 


9 


J. Warner 


H... 


10 


Elmer L. Ross 


0... 


11 


Francis H. Blough 


C ... 


12 


Unknown. 




13 


Unknown. 




14 


Unknown. 




15 


John M'Oleary 


D... 


16 


George K. Wilson 


B ... 


17 


Orville A. Warren 


K... 


18 


Ozro Moore 


I.... 


19 


William Brown 


B ... 


20 


Serg. John K. Barclay 


C ... 


21 


Frank Shaffer 


D... 


22 


Danford Parker 


K... 


23 


Jeremiah ST. Crabaugh . . . 


C ... 



Regiment. 



73d Regiment, O. Y. 
82d Regiment, O. V. 
82cl Regiment, O. V. 
82d Regiment, O. V. 
82d Regiment, 0. V. 
82d Regiment, O. Y. 
82d Regiment, O. Y. 
82d Regiment, O. Y. 
82d Regiment, O. Y. 
82d Regiment, O. V. 
82d Regiment, O. V. 



66th Regiment, O. Y. 
8th Regiment, O. Y. 
8th Regiment, O. Y. 
8th Regiment, O. Y. 
8th Regiment, O. V. 
8th Regiment, O. Y. 
8th Regiment, O. Y. 
8th Regiment, O. V. 
75th Regiment, O. Y. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



107 



Ohio. — Section A — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 

24 
25 

26 

27 



Names. 



John Edmunds 
Frederick Meyer. . . 

A. Houck 

Joseph Klinefelter. 



Comp. 



H 



F .. 
F .. 



Regiment. 



1st Begiinent, O. Y. 
Battery 1st, O. Y. 
82d Begiment, O. V. 
55th Begiment, O. V. 



Section B. 



No. of 
grave. 



Names. 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 



Edward T. Lovett . 
William Williams . 

Henry Ophir 

William Aekerman 
John B. Meyer 



Sergt. Caleb Dewees. 

Ai Maddox . „ 

Ozias C. Ford 

William Whitby 

Joseph B. Blake 

Andrew Miller 

William M'Olue 

Corp. James H. Lee. . 
William E. Haynes . . 

Allen Yaple 

A. M.Campbell 

Henry Stark 

James W. Harl 



I... 
I... 
E .. 
D.. 
C .. 
F .. 
G.. 
A.. 
H.. 
I... 
I... 
B.. 
H.. 
B .. 
A.. 
E .. 
I... 
A.. 



25th Begiment, O. V. 
73d Begiment, O. Y. 
55th Begiment, O. V. 
72d Begiment, O. V. 
55th Begiment, O. V. 
73d Begiment, O. V. 
73d Begiment, O. Y. 
55th Begiment, O. Y. 
73d Begiment, O. Y. 
73d Begiment, O. Y. 
73d Begiment, O. Y. 
13th Begiment, O. V. 
73d Begiment, O. Y, 
73d Begiment, O. Y. 
73d Begiment, O. Y. 
185th Begiment, O. V. 
4th Begiment, O. Y. 
4th Begiment, O. V. 



.106 



.SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Ohio. — Section B — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 



19 

20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 



Names. 



Bernard M'Guire 

John M'Kellips 

George H. Martin 

Serg. Philip Tracey 

Color Corp. Win. Welch . 

Samuel Mowery 

Corp. Edward G. Eanney . 
Unknown 



Comp. 



B 


G 
G 
I. 



r> 



Regiment. 



8th Eegiinent, O. V. 
8th Eegiment, O. V. 
4th Eegiment, O. V. 
8th Eegiment, O. V. 
30th Eegiment, O. V. 
107th Eegiment, O. V. 
61st Eegiment, O. V. 
1st Ohio Battery. 



Section 0. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Anthony Mervale 


G... 


5th Eegiment, O. V. 


2 


J. Senard 


D... 


5th Eegriment, O. V. 


3 


Charles Ehinehart 


Battery 1, 1st Artillery. 


4 


George Nixon 


B ... 
F ... 


73d Eegiment, 0. V. 


5 


August Eaber 


107th Eegiment, 0. V. 
73d Eegiment, 0. V. 
107th Eegiment, 0. V. 


6 


Elisha L. Leake 


G... 
A... 
K... 


7 


Lucas Struble 


8 


John Davis 


75th Eegiment, 0. V. 


9 


Thomas Gilleran 


F ... 


61st Eegiment, 0. V. 
73d Eegiment, 0. V. 


10 


Corp. George B. Greiner. . 


G... 


11 


Jacob Swackhamer 


G... 


73d Eegiment, 0. V. 


12 


Isaac J. Sperry 


G... 
C ... 
F ... 


73d Eegiment, 0. V. 


13 


Jacob Mitchell 


55th Eegiment, 0. V. 


14 


Chauncey Haskell 


82d Eegiment, 0. V. 


15 


William E. Pollock 


C ... 


55th Eegiment, 0. V. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



100 



Ohio. — Section — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


16 


Benjamin F. Hartley 


E ... 


75th Regiment, 0. V. 


17 


Sergt. Thomas H. Eice . . . 


B ... 


73d Regiment, 0. V. 


18 


Joseph Barrett 


G ... 


73d Regiment, O. V. 
107th Regiment, O. V. 


19 


Andrew Samiller 


A... 


20 


William R. Call. 


B ... 

A... 
H... 


73d Regiment, 0. V. 


21 


Isaac Richards 


82d Regiment, 0. V. 


22 


Adam Snyder 


107th Regiment, 0. V. 


23 


Corp. Jas. H. Goodspeed. . 


D ... 


75th Regiment, 0. V. 


24 


William Miller 


G... 
H... 


25th Regiment, 0. V. 


25 


Nathan Heald 


73d Regiment, (X V. 







Section D. 



Names. 



Sergt. Charles Ladd . 

Caspar Bohrer 

Jacob Hoff. 

Joseph W. Cunningham. 

John Aigle 

Baits Beverly 

George Richards 

Sergt. Philip Shiplin 

Samuel L. Conner 

Joseph Gasler 

William M'Vey 

Asa Hines ............. 



Comp. 



E . 

G. 

E 

I. 

K 

C 

D 

F 

E 

K 

H 



Regiment. 



25th Regiment, O. V, 
107th Regiment, O. V. 
107th Regiment, O. V, 
25th Regiment, O. V. 
107th Regiment, O. V. 
107th Regiment, O. V, 
75th Regiment, O. V. 
75th Regiment, O. V. 
82d Regiment, O. V. 
107th Regiment, O. T. 
73d Regiment, O. V. 
11th Corps. 



110 



SOLDIERS^ NATIONAL CEMETERY, 



Ohio. — Section D — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment, 


13 


Serg. W. Norton Williams, 


0... 


108th Regiment, 0. V. 


14 


David W. Oallins .... 


G... 


4th Eegiment, 0. V. 


15 


William Bain. . 


G... 


4th Eegiment, 0. V. 


16 


Lieut. Addison Edgar .... 


G... 


4th Regiment, 0. V. 


17 


Andrew Myers 


E ... 


4th Regiment, 0. Y. 


18 


1st Lt. George Hay ward. . 


29th Regiment, O.Y. 


19 




G... 


74th Regiment, 0. V. 


20 




G... 


75th Regiment, 0. V. 


21 


Ira L. Brighain . . . . 


H... 


8th Regiment, 0. Y. 
82d Regiment, 0. V. 


22 


G. Walker 


F ... 
H... 


23 


John Glouchlen. ... . . 


25th Regiment, 0. V. 



Section E» 



No. of 

grave. 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 



Names. 



Thomas t)urm , ...... 

B. F» Pontious . 

George IL Thompson . 

B. F. Sherman . „ 

Corp. John Debolt. . . 

Haskell Farr ...... 

Corp. William Myers 

J. Lareden. ..,,..„'..,... 

Perry Taylor 

T.M'Oain 

George Case ............. 



Comp. 



K 



D.. 
G.. 

G.. 
B .. 
G.. 
A.. 
E.. 
G.. 
E.. 
.. 



Regiment. 



25th Regiment, O. V. 
29th Regiment, O. V. 
5th Regiment, O. V. 
61st Regiment, O. V. 
4th Regiment, 0. V. 
55th Regiment, O. Y> 
8th Regiment, 0. Y. 
75th Regiment, O. Y> 
75th Regiment, O. V. 
29th Regiment, O. V. 
5th Regiment, O. Y. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Ill 



Ohio. — Section E — Continued. 



No. of 

grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. J 


12 
13 


Corp. Isaac Johnson 

Asa 0. Davis 


K... 
G... 

I 

D... 

... 
H... 
G ... 
G ... 
G... 
K... 
H... 


1st Artillery. 

4th Eegiment, 0. V. 


14 
15 


William Overholt. 

Lewis Davis 


73d Eegiment, 0. V. 
75th Regiment, 0. Y. 


16 
17 


1st Sergt. John W. Pierce, 
Hiram Hughes 


25th Eegiment, 0. V. 
25th Eegiment, 0. V. 


18 


to .... - - 

Wesley Rakes 


75th Eegiment, 0. V. 


19 
20 


Samuel P. Bauglmian. . . . 
Joseph Juchem 


75th Eegiment, 0. V. 
107th Eegiment, 0. Y. 


21 


Jacob Bise. 


107th Eegiment, O. Y. 


22 


H. Schram 


1st Eegiment, 0. Y. 









Section F. 



Names. 



Sergt. -Jasper 0. Briggs 
Sergt. John 0. Kisska. 

Andrew J. Dildine 

Jacob I. Eanch ....... 

Josiah D. Johnson 

Sergt. Isaac Willis 

Daniel Palmer 

James Bay. 



Comp. 



G .. 
A.. 
A.. 
A.. 

F .. 

G.. 
D .. 
G.. 



Regiment. 



73d Eegiment, O. V. 
8th Eegiment, O. Y. 
8th Regiment, O. Y. 
8th Eegiment, O. Y. 
29th Eegiment, O. Y. 
73d Eegiment, O. Y. 
73d Eegiment, O. Y. 
73d Eegiment, O. Y. 



Total, 131. 



112 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



INDIANA. 



Section A. 



No. of 

grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Lieut. R. Jones 


B ... 


19th Eegiment, I. V. 
19th Eegiment, I. Y. 


2 


Serg. Dougherty 


3 


James Sticklep 


... 
... 
... 
c ... 
F ... 

... 
E ... 


19th Eegiment, I. V. 


4 
o 


W. Hoover, (or Houer) . . . 
Alexander Burk 


19th Eegiment, I. Y. 
19th Eegiment, I. Y. 
19th Eegiment, I. Y. 


6 


E. Clark 


7 


A % Sulgroof .'. 


19th Eegiment, I. Y. 


8 
9 


Unknown. 

Peter L. Faust 


19th Eegiment, I. Y. 
19th Eegiment, I. Y. 
19th Eegiment, I. Y. 


10 


Wm. Simmons 


11 


Sere\ Ferguson 


12 


Wesley Smith 


A... 
A... 
A... 


20th Eegiment, I. V. 


13 


Amos D. Ashe 


20th Eegiment, I. V. 


14 


John Sager 


20th Eegiment, I. Y. 









Section B. 



No. of 

grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 

2 
3 


F.H.K..... 

Joshua Eichmond 

George Sylvester 


H... 
B.... 


6th Eegiment, I. Y. 
20th Eegiment, I. V. 
20th Eegiment, I. Y. 


4 


.Unknown 




20th Eegiment, I. Y. 


5 


Unknown 




20th Eegiment, I. Y. 
20th Eegiment, I. Y. 


6 







SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



113 



Indiana.— Section B — Continued. 



Uo. of 

grave. 


Names. 


Oomp. 


Regiment. 


7 


Unknown ,_..„„..„.. 




20th Eegiment, I. V. 


8 


Unknown ...„„ 




20th Eegiment, I. V. 


9 


Unknown ...._.„........ 


A... 


20th Eegiment, I. V. 


10 


Unknown ............... 


20th Eegiment, I. V. 
20th Eegiment, I. V. 
20th Eegiment, I. V. 
20th Eegiment, I. V. 


11 


Unknown 




12 


Unknown - ._..__ - . .. 




13 


Unknown .».„.. ... 











Section 0. 



No. of 
grave. 



3 
4 
5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



Names. 



P* Umphill „.„...- ... 
J. Gilinore ........ 

E. Stallup. ... . 

J. Gardner .... 

Silas Upham 

John E. Weaver . . . 
Sererfc. A. 0. Lamb. 



Serg. G. H. Eedrick. 



P. A, Bassard. 
J. Williams . . . 
C Showalter . . 
E. Holt...... 



Comp. 



D 
I. 
H 
K 
G 
A 
E 
F 
K 
B 
A 
G 



Regiment. 



27th Eegiment, I. V. 
27th Eegiment, I. V. 
27th Eegiment, I. V. 
27th Eegiment, I. V. 
19th Eegiment, L V, 
3d Eegiment, Ind. Gar, 
120th Eegiment, I. V. 
20th Eegiment, I. V„ 
20th Eegiment, I. V. 
20th Eegiment^ I. V. 
27th Eegiment, I. V. 
27th Eegiment, I. V 



114 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY, 



Indiana. — Section D. 



No. of 
grave. 



Names. 



1 

2 
3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



John Shehan, (Orderly for 
A. G. Wright... ....... 

0. E. Wishmyer 

L. 0. Antrim 

D. C. Calvin ...... 

John Tice 

Orel. Sergt. E. Tumey. . 

Levi Bulla 

James W. Whitlow 

Jesse Smith 



Comp. 



George Bales. 
T. Hunt 



Gen.G 
A.. 

A.. 
C .. 
., 
A.. 
D .. 
.. 
B .. 
D .. 
A.. 
A.. 



Regiment. 



ibbons. 

20th Eeginient 7 1. V. 
27th Eegiment, I. Y, 
27th Eegiment, I. V. 
27th Eegiment, I. V. 
20th Eegiment, I. Y. 
27th Eegiment, I. Y. 
20th Eegiment, I. Y. 
19th Eegiment, I. Y. 
3d Eegiment Cavalry, 
27th Eegiment, I. Y. 
27th Eegiment, I. Y. 



Section E. 



No. of 
grave. 



Names. 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



1 

2 

3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 



J. K. Fletcher . . . 

Jesse Wills 

Samuel E. Lewis 
John D. Noble . . 
James Chapman. 

J. D. Lynn 

Thomas J. Lett. . 
W. H. Wilson . . . 
Unknown 



E. M'Knight 
D. T. David. 



F . 

. 

D. 

K. 

Eli 

D. 

H. 

E . 

K. 

F . 

G. 



27th Eegiment, I. Y. 
27th Eegiment, I. Y. 
27th Eegiment, I. V. 
27th Eegiment, I. V. 
27th Eegiment, I. Y. 
27th Eegiment, I. Y. 
27th Eegiment, I. V. 
27th Eegiment, I. V. 
27th Eegiment, I. Y. 
27th Eegiment, I. Y. 
27th Eegiment, I. Y. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



115 



Indiana.— Section F. 



Names. 



Serg. Jeremiah Davis . . . 
Unknown, 

F. W. .... 

R. Pavy ...... ..... 

J, Eobinson 

F.W.Smith.... ........ 

H. Ambrose .. ........... 

A. J. Crabb .... .... 

Serg. Geo. W. Batclielor. 
Wm. Tillottson .... 



Comp. 



H.. 



K 

K 
H 
D 
H 
I. 



Regiment. 



20th Eegiment, I. V. 

14th Eegiment, I. V. 
3d Eegiment, I. V. 
7th Eegiment, I. V. 
27th Eegiment, I. V, 
20th Eegiment, I, V. 
20th Eegiment, I. V. 
27th Eegiment, I. V. 
14th Eegiment, l^V. 



Section G, 



Corp.. EUS.B........ 

Unknown, with letter, 
A. Lister. ........... 

Supposed 
Supposed. 
Supposed. 
Supposed. 
Thomas J, Wasson, . . 



Comp. 



F 



B 



Regiment. 



14th Eegiment, I. V. 
27th Eegiment, I. Y. 



19th Eegiment, I. V. 



Total, 80. 



116 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY, 



ILLINOIS 



Section A. 



No. of 
grave. 



Names. 



J. Wallikeck 

John Ellis... . ..... 

Charles Wm, Miner. 
David Dieffenbaugh. . . . 
Corp. John Ackerman. 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



H 

G 



K. 



Supposed, comb & very light hair 



82d Beginient, 111. V. 
12th Eegiment, 111. V. 

8th Eegiment, HI. Cav, 
82d Eegiment, 111. V. 
8th Eegiment, HI. Y.. 



Total, 6. 



MICHIGAN 



Section A. 



Not of 
grave. 



1 

2 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 



Names. 



George Colburn ........ 

Edward B. Harrison 

Erson H. SnriMi 

Silas E. Thurston 

Serg. George Pettinger. . 

Charles B. Burgess 

Lieut. G. A. Dickey 

James O'Neil. 

E. K. Horman . 

Corp. Otis Southworth. . 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



G . . . 24th Eegiment, M. V. 
K . . . 24th Eegiment, M. V. 
A . . . 3d Eegiment, M. V. 
G ... 3d Eegiment, M. Y. 
G . . . 24th Eegiment, M. T. 
A . . . 3d Eegiment, M. V. 
G . . - 24th Eegiment, M. V. 
H . . . 3d Eegiment, M. V. 
H . . . 24th Eegiment, M. Y. 
C . . . 24th Eegiment, M. Y. 



SOLDIERS 1 NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



117 



Mchigaja. — Section A — Continued. 



No. of 

grave. 

11 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 



Names. 



Charles Phelps 

Corp. F. P. Worden. . 
Corp. Wm. A. Pryor . 

Charles A. Bouse 

Charles A. Thurlach . 
Charles W. Gregory . 
James H. Pendleton. . 

George Purely ... 

Joseph Brink 



Sergt. Mcholas Gosha. 

Edwin Beebe 

A. E. Evans 

James T. Bedell 

George W. Lundy 



Comp. 



B 

C. 

D 

D 

A 

H 

H 

H 

H 

F 

E 

A 

F 



Regiment. 



4th Regiment, M. V. 
4th Regiment, M. V. 
4th Regiment, M. V. 
4th Regiment, M. V. 
4th Regiment, M. V. 
4th Regiment, M. Y. 
4th Regiment, M. Y. 
4th Regiment, M. Y. 
4th Regiment, M. Y. 
7th Regiment, M. Y. 
7th Regiment, M. Y. 
5th Cavalry. 
7th Michigan Cavalry. 
7th Michigan Cavalry. 



Section B. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


John Durre 


D.._ 
A... 
G... 
G... 

I 

G... 
G... 
B ... 


24th Regiment, M. Y. 


2 


A. Jenks 


24th Regiment, M. V. 


3 
4 


Corp. W. H. Luce 

William H. Cole.... 


24th Regiment, M. Y. 
5th Regiment, M. Y. 


5 

43 


Herson Blood 

E. B. Browning 


3d Regiment, M. Y. 
24th Regiment, M. V. 


7 


Corp. J. T. Falls 


24th Regiment, M. Y. 
24th Regiment, M. Y. 


8 


Sergt. George Kline 



118 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Michigan. — Section B — Contiwued. 



■ — #H 

Nov of 
grave. 


Names. 


C&mp. 


Regiment. 


9 
10 
11 


Serg. John Powell ... 

Corp. Norinan King. . . 

Ellis Comstock 


H... 
D... 
D... 

F ... 
A... 
F ... 
B ... 
A... 
K... 
K... 
K... 
A... 
H... 
A... 
C ... 


24th Eegiment, M. Y, 
4th Eegiment, M. V. 
4th Eegiment, M.'Y. 
24th Eegiment; M. Y, 
24th Eegiment, M. Y.. 
4th Eegiment,. M. Y. 


12 


A. Hoisington 


13 
14 


Corp. Charles H. Ladd. 

H. B. Fountain 


15 
16 


Corp. Jerome Shook 

Corp. A. Benson 


5th Eegiment, M. Y. 
4th Eegiment, M. Y„ 


17 


Eobert Sligh 


3d Eegiment, M. Y. 
3d Eegiment, M. Y. 
3d Eegiment, M. Y.. 
5th Eegiment,. M. Y. 
1st Cavalry. 
4th Eegiment, M. Y. 


18 


Oliver N. Culver 


19 

20 
21 

22 


Serg. Eeuben Power 

1st Serg. Daniel A. Yodria, 
Thomas Shanahan ...__.. 
D. C. Laird 


23 


C. Pease 


4th Eegiment, M. Y. 







Section 0. 



Nd» of 
grave. 


Names. 


Camp, 


Regiment. 


1 


S. Bisonette 


A... 
B ... 
K... 
... 
G... 
F ... 


4th Eegiment, M, Y. 
5th Eegiment, M. Y. 
5th Eegiment, M. Y* 
5th Eegiment, M. Y. 
7th Eegiment, M. Y. 
7th Eegiment, M. V. 


2 
3 


Corp. Charles A. Turner . . 
Charles Jelioke. . = . 


4 
5 
6 

7 


1st Serg. James Hazzard. . 

Serg. John Sholes 

Win. Underwood 

— Almas. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



119 



Michigan. — Section C — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


8 


1st Sergt. Thomas J. Divit 


D... 


5th Michigan Cavalry. 


9 


John Lavaby 


A... 


5th Michigan Cavalry. 
5th Regiment, M. V. 


10 


John Roberts 


C ... 

A... 


• 11 


Frank Barbour 


O 7 

5th Michigan Cavalry. 
5th Regiment, M. Y. 


12 


Samuel Christopher 


D ... 


13 


Andrew R. Evans 


A... 


5th Michigan Cavalry. 


14 


Nelson A. Allen 


A... 


5th Michigan Cavalry. 
5th Michigan Cavalry. 
5th Michigan Cavalry. 


15 


Charles Masters 


A... 


16 


Corp. Horace Barse 


E ... 


17 


Frank Anderson 


D... 


5th Regiment, M. V- 


18 


Unknown — Supposed .... 


3d or 5th Michigan Cav. 
7th Michigan Cavalry. 


19 


Sergt. Charles E. Miner 




20 


L. Gibbs 


C ... 


5th Michigan Cavalry. 


21 


J. Falketts 


H... 


5th Michigan Cavalry. 


22 


W. B. Hunt 


I.... 


16th Regiment, M. Y. 



Section D. 



No. ®f 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Henry Butler 


I 


5th Regiment, M. Y. 


2 


Sergt. Charles Ballard. 


E ... 


5th Michigan Cavalry. 


3 


Christopher Miller 


E ... 


5th Michigan Cavalry. 


4 


Edward A. Warner 


I. ... 


5th Michigan Cavalry. 


5 


Sergt. Henry Bicker 


F ... 


5th Michigan Cavalry. 


6 


Richard Alwayra 


E ... 


5th Regiment, M. Y. 


7 


Henry Riolo 


F ... 


5th Michigan Cavalry. 



120 



SOLDIEES 7 NATIONAL CEMETEKY. 



Michigan.— Section D — Continued. 



No. of 

grawe. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Eegiment. 


8 


D. M. Merefield 


F ... 

G... 
G... 
G... 

... 
K... 
G... 
A... 
C... 
C ... 
B ... 
I.... 
K... 
I 


5th Michigan Cavalry. 
5th Michigan Cavalry. 
5th Michigan Cavalry. 
5th Michigan Cavalry.' 
7th Michigan Cavalry. 
3d Michigan Cavalry. 
5th Michigan Cavalry. 
3d Eegiment, M. Y. 
5th Eegiment, M. Y. 
5th Eegiment, M. Y. 
7th Eegiment, M. Y. 
16th Eegiment, M. V. 
16th Eegiment, M. V. 
16th Eegiment, M. V. 


9 


Francis E. Kent ...... 


10 


J. M. Skinner ........... 


11 


Artemus Clark .... 


12 
13 


Corp. Delos Harris. 

John M. Brown 


14 
15 


Corp. Wm. A. Cole 

James M. Pierce 


16 

17 


George Lawrence. ....... 

John Eoberts ............ 


18 
19 


2d Serg. E. B. Godfrey.. . . 
J. K. Beagle . 


20 


Isaac H. Scott 


21 


Serg. Henry Eaw 



Section E. 



No. of 

grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Eegiment. 


1 


Mason Palmer 


B ... 


24th Eegiment, M. Y. 
5th Eegiment, M. Y. 


2 


Luther Franklin 


C ... 


3 


Eichard Aylward 


E ... 


5th Eegiment, M. V. 


4 


Peter E. Eoy 


C ... 


5th Eegiment, M. V. 
5th Eegiment, M. Y 


5 


1st Lieut. John P. Thelan, 


A... 


6 


1st Serg. James Hazzard. . 


C ... 


5th Eegiment, M. Y. 


7 


D. Zimmerman 


D... 
D... 


4th Eegiment, M. Y. 


8 


G.W.Stevens .../. 


16th Eegiment, M.V. 



soldiers' national cemetery. 



121 



Michigan — Section E — Con tinned. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


9 


Sergt. E. Trip 


H... 
G... 
H... 
I.... 
B ... 
B ... 
H... 
K... 
D... 
I.... 
G ... 
K... 


4th Eegiment, M. V. 


10 


J. Geiner 


16th Eegiment, M. V. 


11 


G. W. Ervey 


16th Eegiment, M. V. 


12 
13 
14 
15 


Sergt. Hiram Hopkins . . . 

Sergt. D. C. Kimbal 

Sergt. Joseph Mallenbre. . 
C. H.Wilson 


7th Eegiment, M. V. 
4th Eegiment, M. V. 
4th Eegiment, M. V. 
4th Eegiment, M. V. 


16 


E. Moody 


4th Eegiment, M. V. 


17 

18 


Sergt. Fred. Sheets 

J. Bags 


4th Eegiment, M. V. 
16th Eegiment, M. V. 


19 
20 


J. Hart 


16th Eegiment, M. V. 


Edward Burton 


16th Eegiment, M. V. 









Section F. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


C.W.Martin 


c ... 
G... 

A... 
G... 
A... 
L ... 
I.... 
E ... 
E ... 
G... 


16th Eegiment, M. V. 
7th Eegiment, M. V. 
5th Cavalry. 


'2 


C. H. Hulmer 


3 


Peter La Valley 


4 


Thomas Motley 


7th Cavalry. 


5 


Kelson Walters 


7th Cavalry. 


6 


Philip Wilcox 


1st Cavalry. 


7 


Eohert Hastv 


7th Cavalry. 
5th Cavalry. 
5th Cavalry. 
5th Cavalry. 


8 
9 


George Ketchler 

Philip HiU 


10 


W. A. Crowell ;• 



122 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Michigan. — Section F — Continued. 



No. of 

grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


11 

12 


Miles A. Webster 

A. S. Morris 


G... 
G... 

I 

I 

K... 
D ... 
A... 
B ... 


5th Cavalry. 

5th Cavalry. 

5th Cavalry. 

5th Cavalry. 

5 th Eegiment, M. V. 

16th Eegiment, M. V. 


13 


John Nothing 


14 


Moses Cole 


15 
16 


John G. Folkerts 

J. Mason 


17 

IS 


Corp. J. M. Weston 

Emery Tuttle 


16th Eegiment, M. V. 
16th Eegiment, M. V. 







Section G. 



No. of 
grave. 



5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 



Names. 



Carlisle Bennett 


I 


Corp. Eenben Hone 


C ... 


S. G. Harris 


B ... 


J. S. Eider 


B ... 


W. Williams 


B ... 


J. M'Msh 


F ... 


Col. Serg. E. Moore 


E ... 


Corp. Albert Smith 


D ... 


Capt. Peter Generous 


B ... 


Chester W. Alex 


D ... 


Joseph Sutter 


E ... 


Serg. Alexander Moore 




2d Lieut. Albert Slafter . . . 


E ... 


John W. Barber 





Comp. 



Regiment. 



1st Cavalry. 
5th Eegiment, M. V. 
7th Eegiment, M. V. 
24th Eegiment, M. V. 
24th Eegiment, M. V. 
24th Eegiment, M. V. 
7th Cavalry. 
5th Eegiment, M. V. 
5th Eegiment, M. V. 
5th Eegiment, M. V. 
5th Eegiment, M. V. 
7th Eegiment, M. V. 
7th Eegiment, M. V. 
1st Artillery. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



123 



Michigan. — Section G — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


15 
16 


Sergt. J. M. Stevens 

J. R.Hall 


E ... 
D... 
I 


16th Regiment, M. V. 
16th Regiment, M. V. 


17 


Corp. Beck 


16th Regiment, M. V. 



Section H. 



Names. 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



Lient. B. Brown 

Lieut. W. Jewett 

Corp. Charles M'Brahmie, 

Orin D. Wade 

J.Hyde 

Asher D. Artley 

Corp. Charles Thayer 

George H. Miller 

John Dover 

Charles Sits 

William Brennan 

Joseph Tucker 

Lieut. M'llhenny 

Corp- Josiah G. Bond 

Sergt. H. H. Rarret 

Corp. H. Hart 



E . 
K. 
D. 
D. 
D. 
F . 
I.. 



K 
L 
B 
I. 



F 
B 

C 



16th Regiment, M. V. 
16th Regiment, M. V. 
16th Regiment, ML V. 
3d Regiment, M. V. 
4th Regiment, M. Y. 
5th Regiment, M. T. 
5th Regiment, M. V. 
5th Regiment, M. V. 
5th Regiment, M. V. 
1st Cavalry. 
5th Cavalry. 
5th Regiment, M. V. 
1st Cavalry. 
16th Regiment, M. V. 
15th Regiment, M. V. 
6th Cavalry. 



124 



soldiers' national cemetery. 



Michigan. — Section I. 



No. of 

grave. 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 

6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 



Names. 



0. J. Pattin 

L. W, Lampinan 

Unknown. 

Corp. Thomas Sugget 

Charles Buff 

Corp. David Rounds 

Serg. W. H. Jackson, Detr 

Corp. R. Howe 

Charles Grouse 

Corp. Win. C. Harlan . 



Comp. 

E ... 
K... 

G... 
D... 
D... 
oit. 

C ... 
A... 

F ... 



Maj. Noah H. Ferry, (remolved.) 



Regiment. 



24th Regiment, M. Y. 



4th Regiment, M. V. 



20th Regiment, M. V. 
24th Regiment, M. V. 
24th Regiment, M. V. 

5th Regiment, M. V. 
6th Cavalry. 
5th Regiment, M. V. 
5th Cavalry. 



Total, 172. 



WISCONSIN. 



Section A. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Unknown. 






2 


Unknown. 






3 


Unknown. 






4 


Corp. Edward H. Heath . . 


H... 


2d Regiment, W. V. 


5 


Unknown. 






6 


Unknown. 






7 


Unknown. 






8 


Lieut. Wm. S. Winnegan. . 


H... 


2d Regiment, W. V. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



125 



Wisconsin. — Se ction A — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 



10 

11 

12 

13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
28 



Names. 



Unknown. 
Unknown. 
Unknown. 
Unknown. 
Unknown. 
Unknown. 
Unknown. 
Lieut. Charles Broket . . „ 

Christian Stier 

Corp. James Kelly 

Corp. William E. Evans . 

Sergt. George W. Sain . . 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



I. 

F 
B 
B 

C. 



26th Eegiment, W. V. 
26th Eegiment, W. V. 
6th Eegiment, W. V. 
6th Eegiment, W. V. 
7th Eegiment, W. Y. 



Section B. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Unknown. 






2 


Unknown. 






3 


Marcellus Chase ......... 


A... 


7th Eegiment, W. V. 


4 


Unknown. 




5 


Unknown. 






6 


Corp. John T. Christie . . . 


F ... 


2d Eegiment, W. V. 


7 


Corp. Frank M. Bull 


D... 


7th Eegiment, W. V. 



126 



SOLDIERS' national cemetbet. 



Wisconsin. — Section B — Continued. 



No. of 

grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


8 


Edward Learaan 


E ... 
A... 


6th Regiment, W, V. 
2d Regiment, W. V. 


9 


1st Berg. Fred. A. Nichols, 


10 


Corp. John M'Donald 


A... 


2d Regiment, W. V. 


11 


Charles Branstetter 


A... 


2d Regiment, W. Y. 


12 


1st Serg. James Gow 


... 


2d Regiment, W. Y. 


13 


Henry E. M'Collmn. 


H... 


2d Regiment, W. V. 


14 


Hanford C. Tupper 


G... 


2d Regiment, W. V. 


15 


Serg. William Gallup 


D... 


6th Regiment, W. V. 


16 


Henry Anderson 


B... 


6th Regiment, W. V. 


17 


Peter Kraescher 


... 

G... 

... 


26th Regiment, W. V. 


18 


Peter Kuhn 


26th Regiment, W. Y. 


19 


Joseph Balmes .......... 


26th Regiment, W. Y. 


20 


Mathias Scheivester 


E ... 


26th Regiment, W. Y. 


21 


Leion Stedoman 


... 


6th Regiment, W. Y. 









Section 0. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Corp. Abraham Fletcher. . 


K... 


6th Regiment, W. Y. 


2 


Corp. "William H. Barnum, 


K... 


7th Regiment, W. Y. 


3 


George H. Hawes. . 


B ... 


7th Regiment, W. Y. 
7th Regiment, W. Y. 


4 


John B. Straight 


E... 


5 


William Rampthen 


K... 


2d Regiment, W. Y. 


6 


Silas Castor 


B ... 
F ...- 


7th Regiment, W. Y. 


7 • 


Philip Bennetts 


7th Regiment, W. Y. 
7th Regiment, W. Y. 


8 


John W. Scott 


D... 



soldiers' national cemetery. 



127 



Wisconsin. — Section C — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 

9 
10 
11 
12 
IS 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 



Names. 



Comp. 



William D. M'Kinney. 
A. Fowler 

Corp. Ernst Slmhart . . 

William Wagner 

Thomas Barton 

Philonas Kinsman 

Lewis H. Eggleson . . . 

Corp. John Krauss 

Frank King 

James O. Perrine 

Frantz Benda ........ 



K... 
A... 
K... 
F ... 
F ... 
K... 
H... 
A... 
E ... 

I 

F ... 



Regiment. 



7th Eegimeiit, W. V. 
7th Begiment, W. V. 
2d Eegiment, W. V. 
3d Eegiment, W. V. 
3d Eegiment, W. Y. 
7th Eegiment, W. V. 
6th Eegiment, W. V. 
26tti Eegiment, W. V. 
6th Eegiment, W. V. 
2d Eegiment, W. V. 
26th Eegiment, W. V. 



Section D. 



No. of 

grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


1st Lieut. Martin Young. . 


A... 


26th Eegiment, W. V. 


2 


Sergt. Spencer M. Train. . 


C ... 


2d Eegiment, W. Y. 


o 
O 


Uriah Palmer 


A... 
E ... 


6th Eegiment, W. Y. 


4 


Ord. Sergt. W. S. Bouse . . 


2d Eegiment, W. Y. 


5 


1st Sergt. Andrew Miller. . 


I.... 


6th Begiment, W. Y. 


6 


1st Serg. Albert E. Tarbor, 


K... 


6th Eegiment, W. Y. 


7 


2d Lt. Orin D. Chapman. . 


C... 


6th Eegiment, W. Y. 


8 


Fritz Zilsdorf 


G... 
F ... 


26th Begiment, W. V. 


9 


Charles Hasse 


6th Eegiment, W. Y. 
2d Eegiment, W. Y. 


10 


Lt. Col. George H. Stevens, 





Total, 73. 



128 



soldiers' national cemetery. 



MINNESOTA. 



Section A. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Joseph Y. Sisler 


G... 
D... 
D... 
G... 
I.... 
B ... 
A... 

ill'.. 

Kill 

F ... 
F ... 
F... 


1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. V. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 


2 
3 
4 
5 
6 


Alonzo C. Hay den ....... 

George W. Grands 

Oapt. Nathan S. Messick. . 

Corp. Wm. N. Peck 

Charles H. Gove 


7 
8 
9 


Freder Glave 

Corp. Wilber F. Wellman, 
Israel Durr 


10 
11 


Serg. Philip Hamlin 

Unknown 


1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. V. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 


12 


Unknown 


13 


Unknown 


14 


Unknown 




15 


Unknown 




1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 


16 


Unknown 




17 


J. H. Prime 


D... 


1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 


18 




1st Eegiment, Minn. Y» 



Section B. 



No. of 
grave. 



Names. 



Comp. 



Regiment. 



Supposed 
Supposed 
Supposed 



1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



129 



Minnesota. — Section B — Con tinned. 



£S£ 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


4 

5 


Sergt. Frederick Diehr . . . 
John Ellsworth 


H... 

C ... 


1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. V. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. V. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 
1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 



7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 


Clark Brandt 

Corp. Timothy Crowley . . 

Corp. Peter Marks 

Capt. Joseph Periam 

Charles Baker ....... 

Bvron Welch . 

Unknown 


A... 
A... 
A ... 
K... 
D... 
I.... 


13 


Unknown - 


14 
15 


Lieut. Waldo Farcer 

W. Moore ... ......... 


I.... 


16 


Henry Nickels 


A... 

E . 


i 
17 1 


John M'Kenzie 









Section C. 



No. of 
grave. 

1 
o 

3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 



Names. 



Edward P. Hale 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Sergt. Wade Luf kin 

Serst. Oscar Woodward . . 



Comp. 



I. 



c 

I. 



Regiment. 



1st Eegiment, Minn. Y 

Minn. Y. 

Minn. Y. 

Minn. Y. 

Minn. Y. 

Minn. Y. 

1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 

1 st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 



130 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Minnesota.— Section — Continued. 



No. of 

grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


9 


Unknown ... ^ ^ ......... . 




Minn. V. 


10 


Unknown 




Minn. V. 


11 


Unknown Orderly Serg't. - 




Minn. Y. 



Section D. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Edwin Pari 


I 


1st Regiment, Minn. V. 


2 


Corp. Phineas L. Dunham, 


G... 


1st Regiment, Minn. V. 


3 


Ervine Lawrence 


D... 


1st Regiment, Minn. V. 


4 


Corp. L. J. Squires 


F ... 


1st Regiment, Minn. V. 


5 


Corp. Peter Welm 


E ... 


1st Regiment, Minn. V. 


6 


Hans Simonson 


A... 


1st Regiment, Minn. T. 







Total, 52. 



UNITED STATES INFANTRY. 





Section A. 




No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


T. E. Sheets 


G... 
B ... 
B ... 
B ... 
B ... 
B ... 


14th Regiment, U. S. I. 
2d Battalion, U. S. I. 


2 


Unknown 


3 


Unknown 


2d Battalion, U. S. I. 


4 
5 


Unknown 

Unknown 


2d Battalion, U. S. I. 
2d Battalion, U. S. I. 


6 


Unknown 


2d Battalion. U. S. I. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



131 



TJ. S. Infantry. — Section A — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


7 


Unknown 


B... 
B ... 
B ... 


2d Battalion, U S 1. 


8 


Unknown 


2d Battalion, U. S. I 


9 


Unknown Sergeant . . 


2d Battalion, U S. I. 


10 


Sergt. D. W. Clock 




11th U. S. I. 


11 


Unknown 


B ... 
H... 


2d Battalion, U. S. I. 


12 


Christian Engers 


4th Battalion, U. S. I. 


13 


Peter M'Manimus 


H... 


4th Battalion, U. S. I 


14 


Corp. Barrington . . . _ ; 


B ... 


4th Battalion, U. S. I. 


15 


Peter Robinson 


F ... 
H... 
H... 
K... 


4th Battalion, U. S. T. 


16 


Roger M'Denald 


4th Battalion, U. S. I. 


17 


Christian Aibett 


4th Battalion, U. S. I. 


18 


Sergt. John Reilly . . „ 


4th Battalion, U. S. J. 


19 


Unknown 




2d Battalion, U. S. I. 


20 


W. Mare 




4th Battalion, U. S. 1. 


-21 


Unknown 


A... 
A... 
B ... 


Battalion, U. S. I. 


22 


T. H. Mulligan 


14th Battalion, U. S. L 


23 


John Creridon 


11th Regiment, U. S. I. 
6th Regiment, U. S. I. 


24 


Ransom B. Russell 


F ... 


25 




D ... 


17th Regiment, U. S. I. 


26 


William Curtis 


A ... 
A... 


7th Regiment, U. S. J 


27 


John Keenan ... 


7th Regiment, U. S. I. 


28 


Corp. John Fallbright. . . . 


B ... 


2d Regiment, U. S. 1. 


29 


William D. Hammond . . . 


F ... 


14th Regiment, U. S. I. 


30 


Sergt. S. B. Blanchard . . . 


B ... 


17th Regiment, U S. I. 


31 


C. H. Whitney 


C... 


17th Regiment, U. S. I. 



132 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETEEY. 



U. S. Infantry.— Section A — Continued. 



N6. of 

grave. 


NameSi 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


32 


William Duffy 


D... 


17th Regiment, 
11th Regiment, 


U. 
U. 


s. 


L 


33 




I. 


34 


Thomas Murry ..... 


J f ... 


14th Regiment, 


u. 


s. 


L 


35 


Charles Horton .... ... 


.. G... 


11th Regiment, 


X7i 


s. 


I. 


36 




.. E ... 


14th Regiment, 


u. 


s. 


L 


37 


Lieut. Roekford 




11th Regiment, 
11th Regiment, 


u. 

u. 


s. 
s. 


T. 


38 


Capt. Thomas O'Barre. . 




I. 



Section B. 



No. of 
grave. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 



Names. 



Thomas Whitford 

Amest Fassette 

Unknown : 

John Porter 

Martin Slograt 

Thomas Padgett 

Joseph W. Erwin 

William Patton ... 

James Murphy . . 

John Marklein 

William Becker 

Serg. Charles Giles 

Serg. Judas Thetart. . . 
Pla} ford Woods ...... 



Comp. 

! 

.Bat.F 

\ A... 
J A... 
JBat.C. 
.Bat. A. 
. Bat, I. 



Regiment. 



15 I Wm, Byrne 



.A. 
Bat.A, 
Bat.H. 

K.. . 

B . . . 

I 

B ... 

1) ... 



IT. S'. Artillery, 
4th IT. S. Artillery. 
XL S. Infantry. 
5th U. S. Artillery.- 
IT. S. Artillery. 
1st XL S. Artillery*. 
4th IT. S. Artillery, 
4th XT: S. Artillery. 
4th IT. S. Artillery. 
1st IT. S. Artillery. 
4th Regiment, XT. S. 11 
11th Regiment, Vi S. L 
ffih Regiment, IT. S, I. 
14th Regiment, IT. S-. I. 
1 7th Regiment,. IT- S. I, 



30L1>IEES' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



to- 



TJ. S. Infantry. — Section B — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 



16 
17 

18 
19 

20 
21 
■22 
23 

:24 
25 
26 
21 
28 
29 
30 
31 

32 
33 

55 

36 

37 



Names. 



Benjamin Way ....... 

John Willis c 

Corp. Mills Jamson 

Corp. Frank Berehard. 

J. Reenian . . _ . ....... 

John Pine . ....... 

John Hare 

M. Carroll 

G. Moran 

Sullivan ...... 

Unknown. 

Lieut. Win. Chamberlain, 

Patrick Tighe ........... 



L. Griswold 
E. Brower . . 



■Comp. 



A. 
K. 

G. 
G. 
G. 
I.. 
I.. 



Regiment. 



O. F. Drake, detailed from 
16th Reg. Mich. Vols . . . 



G. H. White . . . . . 

Sergt. J. Gray 

Sergt. Henry Lye. 
Benjamin Hamlet 
Eli S. B. Vincent . 



I.... 

Bat.D, 
Bat.D, 

Bat.D. 

G... 
D... 
G... 
A.... 
G... 



Charles Thatcher j E 



14th Eegiment, U. S. I. 
2d Regiment, U. S. I. 
2d Bat., 14th U. S. 1. 
14th Eegiment, U. S. I. 
6th Regiment, U. S. I. 
3d Regiment, U. S. I. 
2d Regiment, U. S. I. 
14th Regiment, TJ. S. I. 
12th Regiment, U. S. I. 
5th Corps, TJ. S. I. 

1st Bat., 7th Keg- , U.S. I. 
3d U. S. Artillery. 
5th U. S. Artillery. 
5th U. S. Artillery. 

5th U. S. Artillery. 
2d U. S. S. S. 
2d U. S. S. S. 
1st U. S. S. S. 
1st U. S. S. S. . 
1st U. S. S. S. 
1st U. S. S. S. 



134 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY, 



U. S. Infantry.- — Section 0. 



No. of 

grave. 


Nanies, 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


1 


Levi G. Strickland 


c ... 


11th Eegiment, U. S. I. 


2 


James Agin 


D... 


14th Eegiinent, U. S. I. 


3 


Unknown. 






4 


Unknown. 






5 


Unknown. 






G 


Unknown. 






7 


Charles Wilson 


G... 


11th Eegiment, U. S. I. 


8 


Charles Schmidt . . 


E ... 


14th Eegiment, U. S. I. 


9 


D A M'Kean 


11th Eegiment, U. S. I. 


10 


Unknown. 






11 


Unknown. 






12 


Unknown. 






13 


Unknown. 






14 


M. Kennedy 


D... 


10th Eegiment, U. S. L 


15 


W. E. Davis 


H... 

A... 
A... 


10th Eegiment, U. S. I. 


16 


S. Coriell 


2d Battery, 17th U. S. I. 


17 


Julius Fergeson 


7th Eegiment, U. S. I. 


18 


B. M. M. 






19 


Unknown.. 






20 


E. M. Williams 


I.... 


3d Eegiment, U. S. I. 


21 


Casper Kupferly ......... 


G... 


3d Eegiment, U. S. I. 


22 


.Robert Furlong; 


C ... 


3d Eegiment, U. S. I. 


23 


Unknown. 




• 24 


W. F. M 




7th Eegiment, U. S. I. 


25 


Daniel Kinnev 


C ... 


1st Battery, 12th U. S. I 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



135 



U. S. Infantry. — Section — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 


Names. 


Oomp. 


Regiment. 


26 

27 


Sergt. EL Rogers 

Robert Morrison ......... 


D... 
Bat.O. 
Bat. I. 


12th Eegiment, U. S. I. 
4d Eegiment, U. S. I. 


28 
29 


Unknown, on cap 

Unknown 


U- S. Infantry. 

6th Eegiment, U. S. Oa. 

6th Eegiment, U. S. Oa. 


30 


Unknown _ . 




31 


Unknown 




6th Regiment, U. S. Oa. 
6th Eegiment, U. S. Oa. 
6th Eegiment, U. S. Oa. 


32 
33 


1st Lieut. Christian Balder, 
Unknown . 




34 


J. Moles 


... 
Bat.D. 
Bat.D. 


12th Eegiment, U. S. I. 
4th U. S. Artillery. 
4th U. S. Artillery. 


35 


C. T. Bidder 


36 


E. Dennis 



Section D. 



No. of 
sxave. 



10 



Naro.es. 



Comp. 



Silas A. Miller 




H. Gaertner. 




Unknown 




William Reynolds 


... 


Augustus ISTelson 


E ... 


William S. Mottern 


H... 


John Pattinson 




Unknown, with diary and 
handkerchief 




Unknown 




Unknown 





Regiment. 



12th Regiment, U. S. I. 

6th Regiment, U. S. Oa. 
6th Regiment, U. S. Oa. 
6th Regiment, U. S. % Oa, 
6th Regiment, U. S. Oa. 
6th Regiment, U. S. Oa. 

6th Regiment, U. S. Oa. 
6th Regiment, U. S. Oa. 
6th Regiment, U. S. Oa. 



136 



SOLDIEBS* NATIONAL OEMETEEr. 



U. S. Infantry.— Section D — Continued. 



No. of 
grave. 



11 

12 
13 
14 

15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
6 
24 
25 
26 
27 



Names. 



Comp. 



Unknown 

Charles Bodman 

0. F. Srnetzer 

J. Conway 

James Stanton 

D. Wallace 

George Smith 

C. Miller , 

P. M'Grinity . 

F. Rovey 

Serg. Alfred E. Cook 

Unknown 

2d Lieut. GU W. Sheldon. . 
William H. Woodruff. 
George Van Buskirk 
Edmund W. Howard ..... 

Unknown 

1st Lt. Wesley F. Miller,* 



G... 

G... 
P ... 
H... 
Bat. I, 
I.... 

E ... 
I. ..... 

G... 
C ... 



I.. 
G. 



C. 



Regiment. 



6th Regiment, U. S. Ca. 
11th Regiment, U. S. I. 
6th Regiment, U. S. I, 
11th Regiment, U. 8. I, 
11th Regiment, U. S. L 
5th U. S. Artillery. 
7th Regiment, U. S. I. 
7th Regiment, U. S. I. 
1st U. S. Artillery. 
14th Regiment, U. S. I. 
11th Regiment, U. S. I. 
U. S. I. 
U. S. S. 8. 
1st U. S. S. S. 
11th Regiment, U. S. I. 
14th Regiment, U. S. I. 
13thEeg.,2dDiv.,U.S.I. 
7th Regiment, U. S. I. 



*Son of Gov. Miller, of Minnesota, removed to Harrisburg, 

Total, 138. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



List of Dead whose Residences are Unknown, and who are Buried in the 

Unknown Lots. 



No. of 
grave. 

30 

18 
41 
18 
37 
43 
2 

24 
12 
22 

4 
44 
22 
35 
38 
29 
34 
35 
23 
27 

2 



Names. 



Section. 



J. H., on bone ring j 

Jeremiah Chadwick | F 

Orderly Sergt. Michael ... F . . 
Hooker, on cap G . . 

Hutchkins ; G . . 

I 
Unknown, with gold watchj G . . 

Serg. 0. M. Hall, paper on 
coat, child's likeness, &o.,1 H . . 

M. Eiggs i H._ 



William Martin 

G. W. Miley 

Corp. I. Hilton 

Unknown, " 4 F," on belt, 

E. Gilbert 

H. Irwin 

I. D. H 

John Morrison 

S. J. Braddock 

Isaac Cavalry 

Cyrus A. Drot 

W. M' 



Oley P. Thompson 
H. E. Clark 



H. 
A. 
B . 

C . 
F . 
F . 
F . 
G. 
G. 
G . 
L . 
L . 
K. 
K. 



South. 



South. 
South. 
South. 

South. 
South. 
South. 
North. 
North. 
North. 
North. 
North. 
North. 
North. 
North. 
North. 
North. 



138 



SOLDIEES' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



List of Names of Soldiers Buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Gettysburg, Pa. 



Names. 




Regiment. 



Edward Stinson 

Aaron A. Clark 

Lieut. Herman Donarth . . . 

George Kelley 

Samuel Blew 

Cornelius S. Baley 

John E. Dougall 

0. P. Le Clear 

liobert C. Burns 

Henry Comstock 

Albert E. Dixon 

John B. Owen 

L. Willie Hobart 

James H. Bump 

8. Potter 



Serg. A. E. Banta. 



Corp. Wentworth E. Dudley 

Arthur M' Alpine 

Jeremiah Bigelow 

Benjamin Van Wirt 

Capt. J. K. Backus 

Edward Grinnell 

Capt. A. J. Sofield 

James M'Cleary 

A. P. Alcorn 



E 

G 

K 

K 

E 

K 

A 

Bat, B. 
Bat. B. 



5th New Hampshire Vol. 
14th Connecticut Vol. 
19th Massachusetts Vol. 
126th New York Vol. 
126th New York Vol. 
126th New York Vol. 
134th New York Vol. 
New York Vol. 
144th New York Vol. 
108th New York Vol. 
94th New York Vol. 
157th New York Vol. 
126th New York Vol. 
111th New York Vol. 
147th New York Vol. 
140th New York Vol. 
64th New York Vol. 
111th New York Vol. 
111th New York Vol. 
111th New York Vol. 
157th New York Vol. 
111th New York Vol. 
149th Eegiment, P. V. 
1st Penn'a Artillery. 
1st Penu'a Artillery. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



139 



Evergreen Cemetery — Con tinned. 



Names. 


Company. 


Regiment. 


Evan Edwards, Phila. 






Sidney E. Breidninger 


E 


15th Eegiment, P. V. 


Charles Gibbs 


K 


62d Eegiment, P. V. 
140th Eegiment, P. V. 


Corp. L. S. Greenlee 


A 


Jacob F. Strottse 


C 

K 


143d Eegiment, P. V. 


George W. Wood . „ 


26th Eegiment, P. V. 


Robert Otterson 


F 


62d Eegiment, P. V. 


George Stuart 


C 


72d Eegiment, P. Y. 


A. Graw 


F 


68th Eegiment, P. Y. 
62d Eegiment, P. Y. 


Sergt. William Shaffer .... 


Corp. J. M. Young 


I 


83d Eegiment, P. Y. 


Hiram H. Hartman 


F 


1st Eegiment, Maryland V. 


Serg. Alpheas M' Vickers . . 


E 


7th Eegiment, Virginia Y. 


George W. Stuart 


H 


55th Eegiment, Ohio Y. 


Lewis A. Sanford 


C 


73d Eegiment, Ohio Y. 


Corp. William Gridley .... 


D 


8th Eegiment, Ohio Y. 


Lieut. S. H. Shoub 


I 


4th Eegiment, Ohio Y. 


Corp. J. S. Allison ...... 


K 


75th Eegiment, Ohio Y. 


Mathias Frev 




Cleveland, Ohio. 


E. Welsh 


I 

E 


14th Eegiment, Indiana Y. 


Sergt. William Park 


3d Eegiment, Indiana Cav. 


Marcus A. Past 


D 


1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 


W. K. Allen 


1st Eegiment, Minn. Y. 


Lieut. A. J. Barber 




11th U. S. Infantry. 


Sergt. Frank Littinger .... 


K 


3d Eegiment, U. S. I. 



140 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



Evergreen Cemetery. — Continued. 



Names. 



Company. 



Regiment. 



Joseph A. Campbell Bat. C.J 4th. U. S. Artillery. 



Charles Long F 

Unknown 

Unknown. 

! 

Unknown. 

J. S. Hopping. 

i 

Unknown. 



3d Regiment, U. S. I. 
134th. 



Matthew M'Grow 


E 


1st X. Y. Excelsior. 


Serg. Jeremiah Gallagher, 


D 


COtli Regiment, P. V. 


Thomas C. Diver 


I 

G 


G9th Eegiment, P. V. 


Charles Ausrust 


2d Regiment, Del, V. 


Unknown. 


Unknown. 






Unknown. 






Unknown. 






Unknown. 


. 





Total, 66. 



List of Karnes of Soldiers Buried in the United Presbyterian Burying Ground, 

Gettysburg, Pa. 



Names. 



Company. 



Regiment. 



William W. Story ! F ■ 3d Regiment, Ind. Cav. 

Ebenezer H. James ! A 1 122d Regiment, P. V. 

Total, 2. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



141 



List of Men Buried at York, Pa,, who Died at the U, S. A, General Hospital, York, 
Pa., from Wounds Eeceiyed at the Battle of Gettysburg. 



Names. 



Sergt. Vincent A. Keiflin* K 

D. L. Wade* . ' 

Sergt. James M. Ooroden, 

D. Zinunerman „ . ... 

Sergt Samuel Lamb ..... 

Charles 0. Holmes 

Henry Brehl 

Michael Donovan J D 

Franklin A. Rollins J D 



August Stein 



Comp. 



B . 

C . 
K. 
A. 



Regiment. 



Michael Hagden ......... B . . . 

Thomas A. Reedy* A . . . 

Sergt, Winslow A. Morril, A . . . 

Thomas Moriartz B . . . 

Ira Hunt , I . 

William H. Dinsmore. ... F ... 

Charles Groesot B . . . 

Corp. Henry J. Smith* . . J G . . . 

William H. Heise B . . . 

George Werner A . . . 



105th Regiment, P. V. 
2d Regiment, Mass. V. 
149th Regiment, P. v. 
9th Eeg't, K Y. S. M. 
3d Ind. Cavalry. 
149th Eeg't, 1S T . Y. V. 
44th Eeg't, K Y. Y. 
12th Regiment, IT. S. L 
1st Regiment, Minn, V. 
1st IT. S. Artillery. 
6th Regiment, Wia. V. 
73d Regiment, Ohio Y. 
16th Eeg't, Maine Y. 
22d Regiment, Mass. V. 
27th Regiment, Ind. Y. 
140th Regiment, P. Y. 
83d Regiment, P. Y. 
12th Eeg't, TS. H. Y. 
107th Eeg't, Ohio V. 
12th Regiment, IT. &. I. 



William Patent A . . . 107th Regiment, P. Y. 

Sylvester L. Brown ' 5th Maine Battery. 

William H. Batcheldor ... I lGt.h Eeg't, Maine Y. 

Corp. Emet Kneirin. . E . .. ! 143d Regiment, P. Y. 



i * Removed, 



142 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



York Hospital — Continued. 



No. of 

grave. 


Names. 


Comp. 


Regiment. 


25 

20 
27 
28 


Michael Vogelbach ...... 

John Cooley - 

Serg. Charles Herbstritt . . 
Job B. Flagg 


F ... 
B ... 
D... 

B ... 

G-V-- 

A... 

E ... 
D... 


5th Eegiment, Ohio V. 
2.d Eegiment, U. S. I. 
74th Eegiment, Va. V. 
19th Eegiment, Me. V. 


29 
30 


Corp. Simeon Cooper 

Adam Eckler. 


111th Eeg't, N. Y. V. 
74th Eegiment, P. V, 
136th Eeg't, K Y. V. 
151st Eegiment, P. V. 


31 

32 


Nicholas Conner* 

Ephraini Gnyer „ 



• Removed. 



SOLDIERS' national gemetery. 



143 



SYNOPSIS 



Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Khode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

Delaware 

Maryland 

West Virginia 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

U. S. Regulars 

Unknown — Lot North 
Do Lot South. 



Do Lot Inner circle 



104 
49 
61 

159 

12 
22 

867 
78 

534 
15 
22 
11 

131 



73 
52 
138 
411 
425 
143 



Total buried in the Soldiers' National Cemetery, 3,564 



144 SOLDIERS 5 NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



LIST OF ARTICLES 

TAKEN PROM THE BODIES OP THE SOLDIERS REMOVED TO THE SOLDIERS' NATIONAL 
CEMETERY, BY WHICH MANY UNKNOWN WERE RECOGNIZED, AND WHICH ARE IN POS- 
SESSION OF THE CEMETERY ASSOCIATION AT GETTYSBURG, PENN'A. 

MAINE. 

William S. Hodgdon, Company F, 20th Eegiment, letter and 
iish hook. 

Unknown, 20th Eegiment, Testament, and letter signed Anna 
Grove. 

Eichard Shuley, Company K, 7th Eegiment, bugle off cap. 

M. Davis, Company G, 20th Eegiment, Thanksgiving' book. 

E. Cunningham, Co. L, 1st Eegiment, $3 95, comb and postage 
stamps. 

S. E. White, Company C, 20th Eegiment, stencil plate and two 
cents. 

Capt. G. 1), Smith, Co. I, 19th Eegiment, gold plate with artifi- 
cial tooth. 

J. I). Sampson, Company 0, 20th Eegiment, gold ring. 

Gordin Ireland, Co. F, 20th Eegiment, Testament, purse, glass, 
.and letters. 

Hugh 0. W. Hall, Company B, 17th Eegiment, pencil. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Joseph Bond, 5th Eegiment, comb. 

VERMONT. 

M. M'Kartney, Company A, 13th Eegiment, gun wiper, 

M. P. Baldwin, Company C, 10th Eegiment. 

0. Whiting, Company E, 13th Eegiment, two rings. 

L. L. Baird, Company H, 14th Eegiment, $3 35 and two combs. 

E. Archer. Company B, 14th Eegiment, ring. 

CONNECTICUT. 

James Monterth, Testament. 

William Cannell, letters, $8 rebel money, diary, &c. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 145 

NEW YORK. 

R. Burinan, Company E, 41st Regiment, comb. 

Sergeant Hiram Hilts, Company C, 122d Regiment, diary, like- 
ness, &c. 

A. Stanton, Company C, 137tli Regiment, ring and Testament. 

Charles Manning, Co. C, 137th Regiment, knife, comb and gun 
wiper. • 

Theodore Bogart, Company 1, 120th Regiment, medal, breastpin, 
comb and pencil. 

P. Fanning, Company C, 122 d Regiment, match and tobacco 
box. 

H. W. Mchols, Company F, 137th Regiment, letters off cap, 
knife. 

Theophilus Bascarick, Testament. 

Unknown, supposed New York, ambrotype of mother and two 
daughters. 

Albert D. Traver, Company E, 44th Regiment, S. M., diary, Tes- 
tament and pencil. 

E. Yan Tassel, Company A, 60th Regiment, ring and glass. 

Unknown, Company D, 137th Regiment, letters cut off cap. 

G. W. Sprague, the grape shot that killed him, two knives, two 
rings and comb. 

Frank Deisenroth, Company A, 108th Regiment, book, "Path 
to Pardon." 

Amos Otis, Company K, 146th Regiment, diary. 

Alonzo Henstreat, pocket book, small Bible, and fifty cents. 

Charles Weden, Company D, 111th Regiment, diary, letter, &c. 

P. M'Donald, Company F, 137th Regiment, twenty-seven cents, 
piece of silver, ''quarter." 

Unknown, Excelsior, knife and spoon. 

Lieut. Charles Clark, Company B, 9th Regiment, S. M., two 
cents. 

Tyler J. Snyder, order for $20 on U. S. Treasury, $7 15 in green- 
backs. 

George W. Lecase, Company F, 4th Excelsior, knife. 

Corp. Andrew DeWitt, Company H, 120th Regiment, bullet 
moulds and screw driver. 
10 



146 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

2d Lieut. John F. Box, Company I, 57th Beginient, letter arid 
Testament. 

George W. Douglass, Company 1, 1st Excelsior, pipe. 

Solomon Lisser, $30 in gold, $6 in greenbacks, and certificates 
of deposit for $300 in German Savings Bank, New York. 

J. Smith, 4th New York Battery, comb. 

James Gray, Company C, 2d Eegiment, S. M.-, ring. 

James W. Wickham, Company E, 122d Eegiment, diary and 
Testament. 

O. W. Hotchkiss, Company F, 120th Eegiment, breast-pin. 

Corp. Delmont, supposed New York, $2 75, diary, like- 
ness and inkstand. 

Justus Warner, snuff box. 

F. Sweeney, Company D, 40th Eegiment, gun pivot. 

Charles Hagan, Company A, 63d Eegiment, forty cents. 

David Holland, Company F, 22d Excelsior, M'Clellan pin, medal 
an<i diary. 

Serg. Bel , (balance obliterated,) Company A, 1st Eegiment, 

pipe, comb, &c. 

W. H. Piper, Company H, 1st Excelsior, comb and gun wiper. 

Albert Brown, Company G, 111th Eegiment, spoon and "11" off 
cap. 

Jacob Jones, letter. 

Corp. Walde, Company K, 4th Eegiment, $12 85, comb and 
knife. 

J. E, Bail, or Bailey, Company 1, 111th Eegiment, ring. 

John M'Kenney, Excelsior, water purifier. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Sergeant E. N. Somercamp, Company I, 29th Eegiment, like- 
ness, letter and diary. 

Sanford Boy den, Company A, 149th Eegiment, letter. 

Charles Webster, letter. 

Matthew Johnson, diary, express receipt and comb. 

Samuel Finnifrock, letter. 

J. J. Finnifrock, letter. 

Corporal W. H. Burrill, Company F, 149th Eegiment, Bible. 

Lieut, William H. Beaver, Company D, loth or 150th Eegiment, 
shoulder straps and paper. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 147 

B. E. True, glass, &c. 

G. EL Allen, Company 0, 57th Regiment, Testament and letter. 

James Morrow, Company I, 29th Regiment, pipe. 

Unknown, diary, with name Agnes Jones, Pittsburg, Pa. 

John Harvey, Company A, 69th Regiment, medal and comb. 

James Kelley, Company K, 69th Regiment, ambrotype, sixty 
cents, comb, medal. 

T. Miller, Company G, 1st Cavalry, diary. 

William Crowl. Company K, 1st Regiment, needle case, pencil, 
&c. 

J. Kleppinger, Company D, 153d Regiment, comb and bullet. 

Peter M'Mahon, Company E, 26th Regiment, name on envelope. 

Thomas Shields, Company H, 99th Regiment, medal. 

Patrick O'Conner, CompanyD, 91st Regiment, $1 50, gun wrench, 
•cross, medal, gimblet, &c. 

Isaac Eaton, Company D, 10th P. R. C, ring with two red sets. 

John O'Conner, Company G, 69th Regiment, medal. 

Milton Campbell, Company C, 11th P. R. €., ring. 

Tobias Jones, (removed,) letter, diary, &c. 

John C. Coyle, $6, diary, &c, (sent to wife.) 

John Aker, pipe. 

Charles M'Connell, Company K, 11th Regiment, handkerchief, 
diary and letter. 

Henry Adams, 83d Regiment, book and glass. 

William Orr, Company I, 62d Regiment, watch case. 

George M'Intosh, Company L, 62d Regiment, book cut out oi 
wood, and letter A. 

W. K. Williams, Co. K, 143d Regiment, diary, needle case, comb 
and handkerchief. 

John Long, Company D, 62d Regiment, cornb, &c. 

William Kelly, Company A, 121st Regiment, Testament, fifty- 
five cents, comb, pencil, medal. 

John M'Kutt, Company G, 140th Regiment, key, two watch 
keys. 

M. Townsend, Company C, 1st Regiment, case knife, tooth brush. 

NEW JERSEY. 

J. M., Company F, 7th Regiment, comb. 

J. Parliament, Company C, 13th Regiment, comb. 



148 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

W. F. Harkins, Company H, 12th Beginient, Testament. 
Thomas Flanagan, Company G, 7th Eegiment, medal and comb. 
J. F., 7th Eeginient, knife, fork and spoon. 
John Smith, purse, fifteen cents, knife and comb. 

Biley, Company E, 7th Eegiment, letter and needle case, 

W. A. E., Company I, 7th Eegiment, table spoon. 

MARYLAND, 

David Krebs, Co. G, 1st P. H. B., twenty-five cents, tassel, 
smoker, &c. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

Capt. W. N. Harris, 1st Cavalry, shoulder straps. 

William Bailey, 1st Cavalry, letters, comb, &c. 

George Berger, Company G, 7th Infantry, comb and glass, 

L. Lacey, Battery 0, 1st Va., glass and comb. 

Martin L. Scott, Company B, 7th Infantry, silver watch. 

P. Stewart, Company C, 7th Cavalry, pencil. 

OHIO. 

Lewis Davis, Company D, 75th Eegiment, Testament and let- 
ters. 

John 0. Owens, Company C, 75th Eegiment, book. 

B. F. Pontious, Company D, 25th Eegiment* letter, ring, diary, 
book and glass. 

Louis A. Sanford, Company H, 73d Eegiment, Testament and 
letters. 

Samuel Baughman, Company C, 75 Eegiment, pencil. 

J. D. Johnson, Company F, 29th Eegiment, knife. 

Asa O. Davis, Company G, 4th Eegiment, gun wrench, comb 
and ring. 

Thomas Doman, Company K, 25th Eegiment, $4 and gold 

locket. 

Jacob Bies, Company K, 107th Eegiment, handkerchief. • 

A. Myers, Company G, 4th Eegiment, Testament. 

Daniel Palmer, Company D, 107th Eegiment, ambrotype and 
Testament. 

B. F. Sherman, Company G, 61st Eegiment, match box. 
Serg. John Pierce, Company C, 25th Eegiment, pipe. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 149 

INDIANA. 

Levi Bulla, Company G, 20th Begiment, medal. 
Win. Tillottson, letter. 

ILLINOIS. 

Unknown eavalrynian, very light hair. 

MICHIGAN. 

Peter Le Valley, letter and anibrotype. (Sent to wife.) 

Win. Brennan, Company B, 3d Cavalry, hair. 

James F. Bedel, Company F,7th Begiment, muster roll list, and 
certificate for back pay from April to July, diary, &c. 

Scott, Company K, lGth Begiment, needle case, comb 

and letters. 

WISCONSIN. 

Philip Bennets, Company F, 7th Begiment, glass, photograph, 
pencil, diary, letters and knife. 

F. C- Seibentral, Company D, 6th Begiment, medal. 

MINNESOTA. 

Solomon Moore, Company 1, 1st Begiment, diary and letters. 

U. S. REGULARS. 

C. Schmidt, Company E, 4th U. S. A., pipe. 

M. Kennedy, Company D, 10th Infantry, knife. 

S. Cornell, Company A, 2d Bat. 7th Infantry, two pictures, two 
knives, two gun wrenches. 

Peter G. Febery, Company G, 6th XL S. Cavalry, diary < letter 
and handkerchief, &c. 

UNKNOWN. 

Unknown, two rings and small book cut of wood. 

Unknown, jet heart. 

Unknown, ring. 

Unknown, knife with three white sets on handle. 

Unknown, gun wrench. -- 

Henry Dieman, gun wiper. 



150 SOLDIERS' XATIOKAL CEMETERY 

Unknown, knife, fork and spoon. 

Unknown, knife, fork and spoon. 

Unknown, gun wrench. 

Unknown, knife. 

Luke Kelly, medal and small bag. 

Unknown-, large diary and papers. 

G. Turner, Bible, Testament and needle case. 

Unknown, knife, postage stamps, pocket book and water puri- 
fier. 

Unknown, pocket book, fifty-one cents, knife, two bones and. 
comb. 

Jolm Boyer, ambrotype and letter. 

Unknown, knife and comb. 

Unknown, glass inkstand and spoon. 

Unknown, twenty cents. 

William Yasberg, small vice, comb and pencil. 

Unknown, two ambiotypes. 

Unknown, gun wrench-. 

William Sheley, two handkerchiefs, letters and comb; 

Unknown, two purses, gun wrench, gun pivot. 

T. D. Allen, diary, glass and letters. 

Unknown, piece plaid blanket — colors, white, blue and green- 
Sullivan Syes, purse, ring and comb. 

Unknown, twenty cents. 

Unknown, knit woollen cap for head, with tassel. 

Unknown, two knives and coml>. 

Unknown, two knives and comb. 

Corporal, W. K., glass, comb and knife. 

Unknown, handkerchief and gun wrench. 

Unknown,, Testament. 

Unknown, letter, Testament and pocket book.,. 

Unknown, knife. 

Orderly Sergeant, knife and gun wrench. 

G. M. S., knife, comb and four slides. 

Unknown, needle case and pencil. 

Unknown, black thread, ring, pin cushion and pipe- 
Unknown, knife, gun wrench, comb and glass*. 

J. K. Beagle, knife and comb. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 151 

Unknown, knife, 
G. W. Penn, marked on knife. 
Unknown, handkerchief. 
Unknown, tooth brush, &c. 
Unknown, pipe, tooth brush and pencil. 
Unknown, three pipes. 
Unknown, glass, comb and sundries. 

Unknown, two cents, and parts of five and ten cent notes. 
Unknown, pipe. 
•Unknown, table knife. 
Unknown, pocket knife. 
K. E. Claffen, 1ST. Y., Testament. 
Unknown, shawl pin. 

Unknown, pocket book, $l,pin cushion, gun wrench, knife, &c. 
Unknown, needle case. 
Samuel Ault, inkstand, keys, and .cross. 
Unknown, inkstand and tooth brush. 
Unknown, hand vice. 
Unknown, match box. 

Charles Sets, pocket book, and hair of father, mother, sister and 
brother. 

Unknown, knife, handkerchief and pencil. 

Unknown, pipe. 

Corporal Samuel Fitzinger, Pa., corps badge off cap,. 

Unknown, two combs and ambrotype. 

Unknown, snuffbox. 

Unknown, hankerchief and comb. 

Henry Irvin, pipe. 

Unkown, ring and small candlestick. 

George M'Cleary, 1ST. Y., flag breast pin. 

Unknown, with inkstand. 

Unknown, diary. 

Timothy Kears, book, "Key of Heaven." 

Unknown, gun wrench. 

Unknown, plate with V. M. N". 

Unknown, ambrotype of woman. 

Unknown, German Testament from Catharine Detaupafer. 

Unknown, ambrotype, knife, two pipes, keys, inkstand, &c. 



152 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

Unknown, hymn book, medal and gun wiper. 

Unknown, letter from Oarrisa Smith. 

Corp. J. J. Bond, needle case, comb and letter. 

Unknown, book, "Morning Exercises." 

Unknown, with likeness on which is marked Charles Keller, 
July 4, 1859. 

Unknown, ring, three buttons, with hooks, and water purifier. 

Unknown, ornamental affair, consisting of a cross, figure of the 
Saviour, Virgin Mary, Apostles, &c. 

Unknown, snuffbox. 

Unknown, handkerchief. 

Unknown, ambrotype. 

Unknown, knife. 

Unknown, gun wrench. 

Serg. S. Vandertool, K". Y., letters. 

Unknown, two rings. 

Unknown, gold ring and steel watch keys. 

B. W.Laigh, $10, "Beb" money. 

Unknown, $25. 

Thomas Shanahik, rosary. 

Unknown, gold ear rings. 

Unknown, anibrotype of young lady, and letter. 

Unknown, match box, spoon and Minnie ball. 

Unknown, ring. 

Unknown, bone ring marked I. H. 

Unknown, silver watch. 

Unknown, gold watch. 

Unknown, purse, $5 30, knife and tobacco box. 

Unknown, pocket book and seven cents. 

Unknown, razor and brush. 

Unknown, pipe. 

Unknown, book, ambrotype and pipe. 

Unknown, handkerchief, which was spread over his face 

Unknown, pipe. 

Unknown, pipe stem. 

Unknown, (supposed Minnesota,) Bible. 

Unknown, sick list. 

Unknown, two gun wrenches. 



SOLDIEES' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 153 

Unknown, pipe. 

Unknown, three anibrotypes. 

Charles Kelley, Pa, letter, Testament, knife, keys, fifteen cents. 

Unknown, sniiif box. 

Unknown, Testament. 

Melville 0. Day, diary, letters, &c. 

Edmond F. Grouse. 

Unknown, watch chain, gun wiper, salve box and keys. 

Unknown, comb. 

John , pipe. 

Corporal W. W. W., from old Cemetery, pipe. 

Unknown, pipe. 

Joseph Wentworth, letter. 

Byron Welch, j>aper, diary and pencil. 

Unknown, knife. 

Unknown, knife. 

James Wallace, Pa., purse and twenty-five cents. 

Unknown, inkstand, knife, letter and seventy-five cents. 

A. Calhoun, diary. 

Unknown Corporal, ambrotype of female. 

Unknown, "Soldier's Pocket Book." 

Unknown, pipe. 

Sergeant L. H. Lee, two combs, diary, and bullet that killed him, 



154 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



LIST OF REGIMENTS, 

IN THE DIFFERENT CORPS OF THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, IN 
THE BATTLE OE GETTYSBURG. 



MAINE. 



Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


3d 


3d 


6th 


6th 


17th 


3d 


4th 


6th 


7th 


6th , 


19th 


2d 


5th 


16th 


1st 




5th 


NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



Regiment. 



Corps. 



2d, 



3d, 



Regiment. 



Corps. 



5th. 



2d 



Regiment. 



12th., 



Corps. 



3d. 



VERMONT. 



Regiment. 


Corps. 
J 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


2d 


.. 6th 

.. 6th 

..! 6th..... 

..| 6th 


6th 


6th 


14th 


1st 


3d 


1st 


2d 


14th 

16th...'.. 

19th 


1st 


4th 


12th 


1st 


1st 


5th 


13th 


1st 


2d 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


1st 


1st 


12th 


1st 


20th 


2d 


2d 


12th 


13th 


1st 


22d 


5th 


7th 


6th 


15th 


2d 


28th 


2d 


9th 


5th 


16th 


3d 


32d 


5th 


10th 


6th 


18th 


5th 


33d 


11th 


11th 


3d 


19th 


2d 


37th 


6th 











CONNECTICUT. 



Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


5th 


12th 


17th 


11th 


20th 


12th 


14th 


2d 


27th 









soldiers' national oemeter- 



155 



NEW YORK. 



Regiment. 


Carps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regimont. 


Corps. 


9th 


1st 


64th 


2d 


108th 


2d u.. 


14th 


1st 


65th 


6th 


111th 


2d 


20th 


1st 


66th .. 


2d 


119th 


11th 


30th 


1st 


67th..... 


6th" 


120th 

121st 


3d 


33d 


6th 


68th 


11th 


6th 


39th 


2d. . 


69th .. 


2d 


122d 


6th 


40th 


3d 


70th 


3d 


123d 


12th.... 


41st 


nth 


71st 

72d 

73d 


3d 

3d 


124th 


3d 


42d 


2d 


125th 

126th 


2d 


43d 


6th 


3d 


2d 


44th 


5th 


74th 


3d 


137th..... 

140th 


12th 


45th 


11th 

6th 

2d 

11th 

2d 

nth 

2d 

12th 

2d 

6th 

2d 


76th 


1st 


2d 


49th 


77th 


6th 


145th 


12th 


52d 


78th 


12th 


146th 


5th 


54th 


82d 


2d 


147th 


1st 


57th 


86th 

88th 


3d 


149th 


12th 


58th 


2d 


150th 


12th 


59th 


94th 


1st 


153d 


11th 


60th 


95th 


1st 


154th 


11th 


61st 


97th 


1st 


157th 


11th 


62d 


104th.. . 


1st 






63d 


107th 


12th 


:::::::::::::::::::: 















PENNSYLVANIA. 



Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


P. R. V. C 


5th 


75th 

81st 

82d 

84th 

88th 

90th 

91st 

93d 

95th 

96th 

9Sth 

99th 

102d 

105th 

106th 

107th 

109th 

110th 

111th 

114th 


nth 


115th 


3d 


11th , 


1st 

6th 


2d 


116th 

118th 


2d 


23d 


6th 

5th 


5th 


26th 


3d 


119th 

121st 


6th 


27th 


nth 


3d 


1st 


28th 


12th 


1st 


134th 


nth 


29th 


12th 


1st 


139th 


6th 


46th... 


12th 


5th 


140th 


2d 


49th 


6th 


6th 


141st 


3d 


53d 


2d 

1st ... 


6th 


142d 


1st 


56th 


6th 


143d 


1st 


57th 


3d 


6th 


146th 


5th 


61st 


6th 

5th 




147th 


12th 


62d 


6th 


14Sth 


2d 


63d 


3d 


3d 


149th 


1st .*... 


68th 


3d 


2d 


150th 


1st 


69th 


2d 


1st 


151st 


1st 


71st 


2d 


12th 


154th 


11th 


72d 


2d 

11th . 


3d. 


155th 


5th 


73d 


12th 




74th 


11th 


3d 


















NEW JERSEY. 



Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


1st 




7th 




12th 




2d 




8th.. 








3d 




5th 








6th 













156 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



DELAWARE. 



Regiment. 



1st. 



Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


1st 


2d 


2d 


2d 






MARYLAND. 



Corps. 



12th. 



Regiment. 



3d, 



Corps. 



12th.. 



Regiment. 



Corps. 



7th Regiment, 2d Corps. 



VIRGINIA. 



OHIO. 



Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


5th 


12th 

12th 

2d 

2d 


J 23d 


11th 


75th 


11th 


7th 


..j 29th 


12th 


82d 


11th 


4th 


..! 61st 


11th 


107th 


11th. . 


8th 


.. ! 66th 


12th 







82d Regiment, 11th Corps. 



ILLINOIS. 



INDIANA. 



Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


7th 


1st 


19th 


1st 


27th 


12th 


14th 


2d 


20th 


1st 







MICHIGAN. 



Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


1st 


5th 


4th 


5th 


16th .. 


5th 


5th 


3d 


7th 


12th 


24th 


1st 



WISCONSIN. 



Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


2d.. 


1st 


5th 


6th 


7th 


11th 


3d 


12th i 6th 


1st 







SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



157 



1st Regiment, 2d Corps. 



MINNESOTA. 
UNITED STATES. 



Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment. 


Corps. 


Regiment, i Corps. 


2d Sharp S 


3d 


4th Infantry. 
6th do 

10th.. ..do 


5th 


I 


3d 


5th 

5th 

5th 


12th.. ..do 5th... 


2d Infantry ... 
3d do 


5th 


14th.. ..do 1 5th 


5th 


17th. ...do | 5th 



CAVALKY CORPS. 



Maine. — 1st Regiinent. 

Vermont. — 1st Eegiinent. 

Massachusetts. — 1st Regiment. 

Rhode Island. — 1st Regiment. 

New York.— 2d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th, 9th and lOtli Regiments. 

New Jersey. — 1st Regiment. 

Pennsylvania.— 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, 6th, 8th, 16th, 17th and 18th 
Regiments. 

Virginia — 1st and 3d Regiments. 

Ohio — 6th Regiment. 

Indiana. — 3d Regiment. 

Illinois. — 8th and 12th Regiments. 

Michigan — 1st, 5th, 6th and 7th Regiments. 

Wisconsin. — 1st Regiment. 

United States. — 1st, 2d, 5th and 6th Regiments. 

ARTILLERY RESERVE CORPS. 

Massachusetts. — 5th and. 9th Regiments. 

New York. — 1st Regiment, B and G, 7th Independent, 15th 
Independent, 30th Independent, 32d Independent and 1st Inde 
pendent. 

New Jersey. — 1st Regiment, (A.) 

Pennsylvania. — 1st Regiment, (0,) 4th Regiment, Indepen- 
dent. 

Maryland. — 1st and 6th Regiments. 

Virginia, — 1st Regiment. 

Ohio. — 1st Regiment, (H.) 

United States. — 1st Regiment, (H,) 3d Regiment, (K,) 4th 
Regiment, (0,) 4th Regiment, (K.) 



158 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY, 



REMARKS 

OX THE DESIGN FOE THE SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY, GET- 
TYSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA. 

In constructing a design for the Gemete^y, the following con- 
siderations and details suggested themselves, as objects of para- 
mount importance : 

First. — The great disparity that exists, with reference to the 
space required for the interments of each State, necessitates a 
discrimination as to position and extent, while the peculiar sol- 
emnity of the interest attached by each State to each interment, 
allows of no distinction. Therefore, the arrangement must be of a 
kind that will obviate criticism as to position, and at the same 
time possess other equally important requirements and relations 
to the general design, (a) 

Second. — The principal expression of the improvement should 
be that produced by simple grandeur and propriety. (&) 

Third. — To arrange the roads, walks, trees and shrubs, so as to 
answer every purpose required by utility, and realize a pleasing 
landscape and pleasure ground effect, at the same time paying 
due regard to economy of construction, as well as to the future 
cost of maintenance and keexung the grounds, (c) 

Fourth. — To select an appropriate site for the monument, (d) 

(a) In order to secure the conditions embraced in the first of the 
above propositions, a semi-circular arrangement was adopted for 
the interments. By referring to the plan, the propriety of this 
mode will, I think, be conceded without further explanation. The 
ground appropriated to each State, is part, as it were, of a common 
centre ; the position of each lot, and indeed of each interment, is 
relatively of equal importance, the only difference being that of 
extent, as determined by the number of interments belonging to 
each State. The coffins are deposited side by side, in parallel 
trenches. A space of twelve feet is allowed to each parallel, 
about five feet of which forms a grass path between each row 
of interments. The configuration of the ground surface is singu- 
larly appropriate at the points selected, falling away in a gradual 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 159 

and regular slope in every direction, from the centre to the cir- 
cumference, a feature alike pleasing and desirable. Tu order to 
secure regularity, the head-stones are precisely alike throughout 
the entire area of lots, and are constructed so as not to detract 
from the effect and prominence of the monument. The head- 
stones form a continuous line of granite blocks, rising nine inches 
above the ground, and showing a face or width of ten inches on 
their upper surface. The name, company and regiment being- 
carved in the granite, opposite each interment, thus securing a 
simple and expressive arrangement, combined with great perma- 
nence and durability. 

(b) The prevailing expression of the Cemetery should be that 
of simple grandeur. Simplicity is that element of beauty in a 
scene that leads gradually from one object to another, in easy 
harmony, avoiding abrupt contrasts and unexpected features. 
Grandeur, in this application, is closely allied to solemnity. Sol- 
emnity is an attribute of the sublime. The sublime in scenery 
may be defined as continuity of extent, the repetition of objects 
in themselves simple and common place. We do not apply this 
epithet to the scanty tricklings of the brook, but rather to the 
collected waters of the ocean. To produce an expression of gran- 
deur, we must avoid intricacy and great variety of parts, more 
particularly must we refrain from introducing any intermixture 
or meretricious display of ornament. 

(c) The disposition of trees and shrubs is such that will ulti- 
mately produce a considerable degree of landscape effect. Ample 
spaces of lawn are provided ; these will form vistas, as seen from 
the drive, showing the monument and other prominent points. Any 
abridgment of these lawns by planting further than is shown in 
the design, will tend to destroy the massive effect of the group- 
ings, and in time would render the whole confused and intricate. 
As the trees spread and extend, the quiet beauty produced by 
these open spaces of lawn will yearly become more striking ; de- 
signs of this character require time for their development, and 
their ultimate harmony should not be impaired or sacrificed to 
immediate and temporary interest. Further, to secure proper 
hreadtli of scene, few walks or roads are introduced. A main road- 
way or drive of sufficient width courses round the grounds ; a few 
paths or walks are also provided for facilitating the inspection of 



160 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

tlie interment lots. Eoads and walks are exclusively objects of 
utility; their introduction can only be justified by direct necessity. 
(d) The centre of the semi-circle is reserved for the monument. 
An irregularly shaped belting of dwarf shrubbery borders partially 
isolate it from the lots. It may be suggested that the style of 
the monument should be in keeping with the surrounding im- 
provements, showing no effort to an exhibition of cost or ostenta- 
tious display on the one hand, and no apparent desire to avoid 
reasonable expense on the other. 

The gateway and gatehouse should also be designed in the same 
spirit, massive, solid, substantial and tasteful. 

With regard to the future keeping of the ground, the walks 
should be smooth, hard and clean, the grass kept short, and main- 
tained as clean and neat as the best pleasure ground in the country. 
No effort should be wanting to attain excellence in this respect. 

WILLIAM SAUNDEES. 

Dfp't of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 



g g 



a ? s 



£ w 



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SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 161 



REPORT OP SAMUEL WEAVER. 



Gettysburg, March 19. 1864. 

To David Wills, Esq., 

Agent for A. G. Curtin, Gov. ofPenn'a: 

Sir: — Therewith submit the following brief report of the results 
of my labors as the Superinteud ent of the exhuming of the bodies 
of the Union soldiers that fell on the battle field of Gettysburg: 

The contractor commenced the work of exhuming on Tuesday, 
the 27th of October last, and finished yesterday. The work has 
been protracted much beyond our original anticipations, by reason 
of the ground being frozen for a long time during the winter, thus 
entirely suspending the work, and also by the number of bodies 
exceeding our first calculations. 

The number taken up and removed to the Soldiers' National 
OEMETERYis thirty-three hundred and fifty-four (3,354,) and to these 
add the number of Massachusetts soldiers taken up by the authori- 
ties of the city of Boston, by special contract, amounting to one 
hundred and fifty-eight, (158,) makes the total number of removals 
thirty-five hundred and twelve (3,512) bodies. Of these, nine 
hundred and seventy-nine were bodies nameless, and without any 
marks or surroundings to designate the State from which they 
volunteered. The rest were, in most instances, marked with 
boards, on which the name, company, and regiment, were written 
in pencil, or cut, by their comrades who buried them. In some 
instances, the regiment to which the soldier belonged was dis- 
covered, and sometimes only the State from which he volunteered; 
and in these cases they were buried in their appropriate State 
lot. 

There was not a grave permitted to be opened or a body searched 
unless I was present. I was inflexible in enforcing this rule, and 
here can say, with the greatest satisfaction to myself and to the 
friends of the soldiers, that I saw every body taken out of its tem- 
porary resting place, and all the pockets carefully searched ; and 
11 



:m:-a.:p oif 1 
THE OKOUHOS 

AND 

DESIGN FOR THE IMPROVEMENT 

OF THE 

SOLDIER'S NATIONAL CEMETERY, 

GETTYSBURG, PA. 

18 S3. 

WILLIAM SAUNDERS, 
Landscape Gardener, Germantown, Penn. 




1. UNE 

2. ILLINOIS. 

3. VIRGINIA. 

4. DELAWARE. 

5. RHODE ISLAND. 

6. NEW HAMPSHESE. 

7. VEBMONT. 

8. NEW JERSEY. 

9. WISCONSIN. 

10. CONNECTICUT. 

11. MINNESOTA. 

12. MARYLAND. 

13. U. S. REGULARS. 

14. UNKNOWN. 



16. MICHIGAN. 

17. NEW YORK. 

18. PENNSYLVANIA 

19. MASSACHUSETTS. 

20. OHIO. 

21. INDIASA. 

22. UNKNOWN. 

23. MONUMENT 

24. GATE-HOUSE. 

25. FLAGSTAFF. ETC. 



SOLDIERS' national cemetery. 161 



REPORT OP SAMUEL WEAVER. 



Gettysburg, March 19, 1864. 

To David Wills, Esq., 

Agent for A. G. Curtin, Gov. ofPemCa: 

Sir: — Therewith submit the following brief report of the results 
of my labors as the Superintendent of the exhuming of the bodies 
of the Union soldiers that fell on the battle field of Gettysburg : 

The contractor commenced the work of exhuming on Tuesday, 
the 27th of October last, and finished yesterday. The work has 
been protracted much beyond our original anticipations, by reason 
of the ground being frozen for a long time during the winter, thus 
entirely suspending the work, and also by the number of bodies 
exceeding our first calculations. 

The number taken up and removed to the Soldiers' National 
Cemetery is thirty- three hundred and fifty-four (3,354,) and to these 
add the number of Massachusetts soldiers taken up by the authori- 
ties of the city of Boston, by special contract, amounting to one 
hundred and fifty-eight, (158,) makes the total number of removals, 
thirty-five hundred and twelve (3,512) bodies. Of these, nine 
hundred and seventy-nine were bodies nameless, and without any 
marks or surroundings to designate the State from which they 
volunteered. The rest were, in most instances, marked with 
boards, on which the name, company, and regiment, were written 
in pencil, or cut, by their comrades who buried them. In some 
instances, the regiment to which the soldier belonged was dis- 
covered, and sometimes only the State from which he volunteered; 
and in these cases they were buried in their appropriate State 
lot, 

There was not a grave permitted to be opened or a body searched 
unless I was present. I was inflexible in enforcing this rule, and 
here can say, with the greatest satisfaction to myself and to the 
friends of the soldiers, that I saw every body taken out of its tem- 
porary resting place, and all the pockets carefully searched j and 
ll 



162 SOLDIERS' NATION AIj CEMETERY. 

where the grave was not marked, I examined all the clothing and 
everything about the body to find the name. I then saw the body, 
with all the hair and all the particles of bone, carefully placed in the 
coffin, arid if there was a head-board, I required it to beat once nailed 
to the coffin. At the same time I wrote the name, company, and 
regiment, of the soldier, on the coffin, and numbered the coffin, and 
entered in my book the same endorsement. This book was re- 
turned to your office every evening, to copy and compare with 
the daily return inade by the Superintendent of the interments in 
the Cemetery. In these scrutinizing searches, the names of a 
number of lost soldiers were found. They were discovered in 
various ways. Sometimes by the pocket diaries, by letters, by 
names in Bible, or Testament, by photographs, names in pocket- 
books, descriptive list, express receipts, medals, names on some 
part of the clothing, or on belt, or cartridge-box, &c, &c. 

There were some articles of value found on the bodies ; some 
money, watches, jewelry, &c. I took all relics, as well as articles 
of value, from the bodies, packed them up and labelled them, 
so that the friends can get them. There are many things, valueless 
to others, which would be of great interest to the friends. I here- 
with submit a list of names of persons and articles found upon 
them, and you will, no doubt, take means to get information to 
the friends, by advertisement or otherwise, so that they may 
give notice where, and to whom, these things shall be forwarded. 
I have two hundred and eighty-seven such packages. 

Before we commenced our work, the battle field had been over- 
run by thousands of sorrowing friends in search of lost ones, 
and many of the graves opened and but partially or carelessly 
closed. Many of the undertakers who were removing bodies, also 
performed their work in the most careless manner, invariably 
leaving the graves open, and often leaving particles of the bones 
and hair lying scattered around. These things are frequently 
to be sesn on every part of the battle field ; and persons going 
over it might attribute such work to the contractors, but there 
cannot be one instance pointed out of such kind of work done by 
them. Every particle of the body was gathered up by them, and 
the grave neatly closed over and levelled. 

The bodies were found in various stages of decomposition. On 
the battle field of the first day, the rebels obtained possession 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 163 

before oiir men were buried, and left most of them unburied from 
Wednesday until Monday following, when our men buried them. 
After this length of time, they could not be identified. The con- 
sequence was, that but few on the battle field of July 1st, were 
marked. They were generally covered with a small portion of 
earth dug up from along side of the body. This left them much 
exposed to the heat, air, and rains, and they decomposed rapidly, 
so that when these bodies were taken up, there was nothing re- 
maining but the dry skeleton. 

Where bodies were in heavy clay soil, or in marshy places, they 
were in a good state of preservation. Where they were in sandy, 
porous soil, they were entirely decomposed. Frequently our men 
were buried in trenches — a shallow ditch — in which they were 
laid side by side. In several instances the numbers in a trench 
amounted to sixty or seventy bodies. 

In searching for the remains of our fallen heroes, we examined 
more than three thousand rebel graves. They were frequently 
buried in trenches, and there are instances of more than one hun- 
dred and fifty in a trench. In one place it is asserted by a reliable 
farmer who saw them buried, that there are over two hundred in 
one trench. I have been making a careful estimate, from time to 
time, as I went over the field, of the rebel bodies buried on 
this battle field and at the hospitals, and I place the number at 
not less than seven thousand bodies. 

It may be asked how we could distinguish the bodies of our own 
men from those of the rebels. This was generally very easily 
done. In the first place, as a general rule, the rebels never went 
into battle with the United States coat on. - They sometime^ stole 
the pantaloons from our dead and wore them, but not the coat. 
The rebel clothing is made of cotton, and is of a grey or brown 
color. Occasionally I found one with a blue cotton jean round- 
about on. The clothing of our men is of wool, and blue ; so that 
the body having a coat of our uniform on was a pretty sure indi- 
cation that he was a Union soldier. But if the body wereVithout 
a coat, then there were other infallible marks. The shoes of the 
rebels were differently made from those of our soldiers. If these 
failed, then the underclothing was the next part examined. The 
ebel cotton undershirt gave proof of the army to whic h he be- 



164 SOLDIERS 5 NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

longed. In no instance was a body allowed to be removed which 
had any portion of the rebel clothing on it. Taking all these 
things together, we never have had much trouble in deciding, with 
infallible accuracy, whether the body was that of a Union soldier 
or a rebel. And I here most conscientiously assert, that I firmly 
believe that there has not been a single mistake made in the re- 
moval of the soldiers to the Cemetery by taking the body of a 
rebel for a Union soldier. 

All which is respectfully submitted. 

SAMUEL WEAVER. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 165 



REPORT OF JAMES S. TOWNSEND. 



To David Wills, Esq., 

Agent for A. G. Curtin, Governor of Pennsylvania : 

Sir : — The interments of all the Union soldiers on the battle 
field of Gettysburg, in the Soldiers' National Cemetery, 
'have been completed in a very satisfactory manner, and accord- 
ing to the terms and specifications of the contract. There has 
been much delay, for weeks at a time, during the winter, in prose- 
cuting the work, on account of the ground being frozen too hard 
to dig. Then, occasionally, the wet weather and the snows would 
stop the work, so that it has been protracted much beyond the 
time we at first anticipated having it completed. 

I surveyed and laid out the grounds as designed by Mr. Wm. 
Saunders, and have since superintended the burials, personally 
measuring the depths of every grave and the proper distance for 
each coffin. I, also, took the name, comj>any, and regiment of 
each body, as soon as placed in the ground, personally superin- 
tending the proper marking of the grave, with the appropriate 
head-board. 

The graves are all numbered, and the list of interments of each 
day was returned to your office for comparison with the list of 
those taken up in the field, and to be registered daily in a per- 
manent register. The total number of burials in the Cemetery is 
thirty-five hundred and twelve. 

I herewith refer you to the registers you have made in your 
office, for the number buried in each State lot, and in the lots set 
apart for the United States Eegulars, and the Unknown. 
All which is respectfully submitted. 

JAS. S. TOWNSEND, 
$ivrveyer and Sup't of Burials. 



168 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



DESCRIPTION OF THE GETTYSBURG MONUMENT, 



The design of the Gettysburg monument Is adapted for execu- 
tion either in marble, or in granite and bronze, as may be deemed 
expedient, the material being of course controlled entirely by the 
amount appropriated. The whole rendering of the design is in- 
tended to be purely historical, telling its own story, with such sim- 
plicity that any discerning mind will readily comprehend its mean- 
ing and purpose. 

The superstructure is sixty feet high, and consists of a massive 
pedestal, twenty-five feet square at the base, and is crowned with 
a eolossal statue, representing the genius of liberty. Standing 
upon a three-quarter globe, she raises with her right hand the 
victor's reath of laurel, while with her left she gathers up the folds 
of our national flag under which the victory has been won. 

Projecting from the angles of the pedestal are four buttresses,, 
supporting an equal number of allegorical statues, representing, 
respectively, war, history, peace and plenty. 

War is personified by a statue of the American soldier, who t 
resting from the conflict, relates to History the story of the battle 
which this monument is intended to commemorate. 

History, in listening attitude, records with stylus and tablet,, 
the achievements of the field, and the names of the honored dead. 

Peace is symbolized by a statue of the American mechanic, 
characterized by appropriate accessories. 

Plenty is represented by a female figure, with a sheaf of wheat 
and fruits of the earth, typifying peace and abundance as the sol- 
dier's crowning triumph. 

The panels of the main die between the statues are to have in- 
scribed upon them such inscriptions asmiay hereafter be deter- 
mined. 

The main die of the pedestal is octagonal inform, panelled upon 
each face. The cornice and plinth above are also octagonal., 
and are heavily moulded. Upon this plinth rests an octagonal 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 1G7 

moulded base bearing upon its face, in high relief, the National 
arms. 

The upper die and cap are circular in form, the die being en- 
circled by stars equal in number with the States whose sons con- 
tributed their lives as the price of the victory won at Gettysburg. 



168 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY., 



AN ACT 

TO INCORPORATE THE SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

Whereas, The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has purchased 
seventeen acres of land on Cemetery Hill, on the Gettysburg battle 
field, in the county of Adams, for a Cemetery for the burial of the 
remains of the soldiers who fell in the battle of Gettysburg, and 
the skirmishes incident thereto, in defence of the Union, or died 
thereafter from wounds received in that battle and the skirmishes; 
therefore, 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa- 
tives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly 
met, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That 
the titles to the said lands purchased, as set forth in the foregoing 
preamble, are hereby ratified and confirmed, and shall vest and re- 
main in said Commonwealth, in fee simple, in trust for all the States 
having soldiers buried in said grounds ; and the said grounds shall 
be devoted in perpetuity to the purpose for which they were pur- 
chased, namely : for the burial and place of final rest of the re- 
mains of the soldiers who fell in the defence of the Union, in the 
battle of Gettysburg ; and, also, the remains of the soldiers who 
fell at other points north of the Potomac river, in the several en- 
counters with the enemy during the invasion of Lee, in the sum- 
mer of one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, or died there- 
after, in consequence of wounds received in said battle and during 
said invasion. 

Section 2. That B. W. Norris, of the State of Maine, , of 

the State of New Hampshire, Paul Dillingham, of the State of 
Vermont, Henry Edwards, of the State of Massachusetts, John 
E. Bartlett, of the State of Ehode Island, Alfred Coit, of the 
State of Connecticut, Edward Cooper, of the State of New York, 

, of the State of New Jersey, David Wells, of the State 

of Pennsylvania, Benjamin Deford, of the State of Maryland, 

John G. Latimer, of the State of Delaware, , of the 

State of West Virginia, Gordon Lofland, of the State of Ohio, 
John B. Stephenson, of the State of Indiana, Clark E. Carr, 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 169 

of the State of Illinois, W. Y. Selleck, of the State of Wiscon- 
sin, Thomas White Ferry, of. the State of Michigan, , 

of the State of Minnesota, being one Commissioner from each 
State, having soldiers buried in said Cemetery, be and they and their 
successors are hereby created a body politic inlaw, under the name, 
style and title of the Soldiers' National Cemetery, and by 
that name, style and title shall have perpetual succession, and be 
able and capable in law to have and use a common seal, to sue, 
and be sued, plead and to be impleaded, in all courts of law and 
equity, and to do all such other things as , are incident to a cor- 
poration. 

Section 3. The care and management of the grounds referred 
to in the preamble and first section of the act, are hereby entrusted 
solely to the commissioners named in the second section of the 
same, and those hereafter appointed to represent the States therein 
named, and their successors in office ; the said commissioners shall 
constitute a board of managers, whose duty it shall be, out of funds 
that may be in the hands of the treasurer of the corporation, by 
State appropriations, or otherwise, to remove the remains of all 
the soldiers referred to in the first section of this act, that have not 
already been removed to the Cemetery, and have them properly 
interred therein ; and, also, to lay out, fence and ornament, to 
divide and arrange into suitable plots, and burial lots, establish 
carriage-ways, avenues and foot-ways, erect buildings, and a mon- 
ument or monuments, and suitable marks to designate the graves, 
and generally to do all other things in their judgment necessary 
and proper to be done to adapt the ground and premises to the 
uses for which it has been purchased and set apart. 

Section 4. The business of the corporation shall be conducted 
by the commissioners aforesaid, and their successors in office ; the 
said commissioners shall meet within sixty days after the passage 
of this act, and organize by electing one of their number president ; 
they shall also appoint a secretary and treasurer, and shall have 
power to employ such other officers and agents as may be needful ; 
they shall require of the treasurer to enter into bonds, to the cor- 
poration, in double the probable amount of money that may be 
in his hands at any one time during his term of office, with two or 
more sufficient sureties, conditioned for the faithful discharge of 
his duties, and the correct accounting for and paying over of the 



170 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

money ; which said bond or bonds, shall be approved by the court 
of common pleas of Adams county, and recorded in the office of 
the recorder of deeds, in and for said county ; the term of office of 
the officers of the board of commissioners aforesaid shall expire on 
the first day of January, of each and every year, or as soon there- 
after as their successors may be duly chosen and qualified to act. 

Section 5. At the first meeting of the commissioners hereto- 
fore named, they shall be divided, by lot, into three classes, and 
the term of office of the first class shall expire on the first day of 
January, Anno Domini one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five; 
the second class, on the first day of January, Anno Domini one 
thousand eight hundred and sixty-six, and the third class on the 
first day of January, Anno Domini one thousand eight hundred 
and sixty-seven ; the vacancies thus occurring shall be filled by 
the Governors of the States which the said commissioners repre- 
sented ; and the persons thus appointed to fill such vacancies, shall 
hold their office, as commissioners aforesaid, for the term of three 
years. In case of the neglect, or failure, of the Governor of any 
State, having burial lots in the Cemetery, to fill such vacancy, 
the board of commissioners may supply the place by appointing a 
citizen of the particular State which is not represented in the board 
by reason of such vacancy ; any vacancies not yet filled, or here- 
after occurring, in the board of commissioners, by death, resigna- 
tion, or otherwise, shall be filled, by appointment, for the unex- 
pired term, by the Governor of the State which the person rep- 
resented, or in case of failure by such Governor to make said 
appointment, then the place shall be supplied as last above indi- 
cated ; such other States of tlie Union, not having burial lots in said 
Cemetery, but that may at any time hereafter desire to be repre- 
sented in this corporation, shall have the privilege of nominating 
a Commissioner to represent them severally in the board of com- 
missioners, and thereafter pay their proportionate share of the ex- 
pense of maintaining said Cemetery. 

Section 6. The board of commissioners shall annually, at the 
end of each fiscal year, make a report of the condition and man- 
agement of the Cemetery ; which report shall contain a detailed 
statement of the receipts and expenditures of the corporation, 
and a copy thereof shall be forwarded to the Governor of each 
State represented in the corporation. The expenses incident to 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 171 

the removal of the dead, the enclosing and ornamenting the Ceme- 
tery, and all the work connected therewith, and its future main- 
tenance, shall be apportioned among the States connecting them- 
selves with the corporation, according to their population, as 
indicated by their representation iu the House of Eepresentatives 
of the United States. 

Section 7. The board of commissioners shall adopt such by- 
laws, rules and regulations, as they may deem necessary for their 
meetings and government, and for the government of their officers, 
agents and employees, and for the care and protection of the ceme- 
tery grounds, and the property of the corporation : Provided, Said 
by-laws, rules and regulations, be not inconsistent with the Consti- 
tution and laws of the United States, the Constitution and laws 
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and this act of incorpora- 
tion. 

Section 8. The board of commissioners shall have no power 
to appropriate any of the funds of the corporation as a compensa- 
tion for their services as commissioners. 

Section 9. The grounds and property of said Cemetery shall 
be forever free from the levy of any State, county, or municipal 
taxes ; and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania hereby releases, 
and exempts, the corporation created by this act of Assembly, 
from the payment of any enrolment tax, or any tax, or taxes 
whatever, that might be imposed by existing laws ; all the laws 
of this Commonwealth now iu force, or which may hereafter be 
enacted, for the protection of cemeteries, burial grounds, and 
places of sepulture, shall apply with full force and effect to the 
Soldiers' National Cemetery, hereby incorporated, immedi- 
ately from and after the passage of this act. 

Section 10. The corporation of the Soldiers' National Ce- 
metery shall have power to receive appropriations from the United 
States, and from the State Legislatures, and also devises and be- 
quests, gifts, annuities, and all other kinds of property, real and 
personal, for the purposes of the burial of the dead, enclosing and 
ornamenting the grounds, the maintaining the same, and erecting 
a monument, or monuments, therein. 

Approved March 25, 1804. 



CORRESPONDENCE, 



ADDRESSES AND CEREMONIES, 



CONSECRATION 






Gettysburg, November 19, 1863, 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 175 



THE NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



A few days after the terrific battle of Gettysburg, His Excel- 
lency, A. G. Curtin, Governor of the State of Pennsylvania, has- 
tened to the relief of the sick and wounded soldiers, visited the 
battle field, and the numerous hospitals in and around Gettysburg, 
for the purpose of perfecting the arrangements for alleviating the 
sufferings and ministering to the wants of the wounded and dying. 
His official duties soon requiring his return to Harrisburg, he au- 
thorized and appointed David Wills, Esq., of Gettysburg, to act 
as his special agent in this matter. 

In traversing the battle field, the feelings were shocked and the 
heart sickened at the sights that presented themselves at every step. 
The remains of our brave soldiers, from the necessary haste with 
which they were interred, in many instances were but partially 
covered with earth, and, indeed, in some instances were left wholly 
unburied. Other sights, too shocking to be described, were occa- 
sionally seen. These appearances presented themselves promis- 
cuously over the fields of arable land for miles around, which 
would, of necessity, be farmed over in a short time. The graves, 
where marked at all, were only temporarily so, and the marks were 
liable to be obliterated by the action of the weather. Such was 
the spectacle witnessed on going over the battle field — a field made 
glorious by victory achieved through the sacrifice of the lives of 
the thousands of brave men, whose bodies and graves were in such 
exposed Condition. And this, too, on Pennsylvania soil! Hu- 
manity shuddered at the sight, and called aloud for a remedy. 
The idea, accordingly, suggested itself of taking measures to 
gather these remains together, and bury them decently and in 
order in a cemetery. Mr. Wills submitted the proposition and 
plan -for this purpose, by letter July 24th, 1863, to his Excel- 
lency, Governor Curtin ; and the Governor, with that profound 
sympathy, and that care and anxiety for the soldier, which have 
always characterized him, approved of the design, and directed a 
correspondence to be entered into at once by Mr. Wills with the 



17G SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

Governors of the other States having soldiers dead on the battle 
field of Gettysburg. The Governors of the different States, with 
great promptness, seconded the project, and the details of the ar- 
rangement were subsequently agreed upon. Grounds favorably 
situated were selected by the Agent, and Governor Curtin directed 
him to purchase them for the State of Pennsylvania, for the spe- 
cific purpose of the burial of the soldiers who fell in defence of the 
Union, in the battle of Gettysburg, and that lots in this Cemetery 
should be gratuitously tendered to each State having such dead 
on the field. The expenses of the removal of the dead, of the lay- 
ing out, ornamenting, and enclosing the grounds, and erecting a 
lodge for the keeper, and of constructing a suitable monument to 
the memory of the dead, to be borne by the several States, and as- 
sessed in proportion to the population, as indicated by their repre- 
sentation in Congress. The Governor of Pennsylvania stipulated 
that the State of Pennsylvania would subsequently keep the grounds 
in order, and the building and fences in repair. 

Seventeen acres of land on Cemetery Hill, at the apex of the 
triangular line of battle of the Union army, were purchased by 
Pennsylvania for this purpose. There were stone fences upon these 
grounds, which had been advantageously used by the infantry. 
On the elevated portions of the ground many batteries of artillery 
had been planted, which not only commanded the view of the whole 
line of battle of the Union army, but were brought to bear almost 
incessantly, with great effect, upon every position of the Eebel lines. 
We refer the reader to the excellent map of this battle field and its 
hospitals, in the front of this pamphlet. It was prepared by the 
Eev. Andrew B. Cross, who is one of the most active and zealous 
members of the Christian Commission, and who labored faithfully 
for months in the hospitals at Gettysburg, ministering to the tem- 
poral and spiritual wants of the wounded and dying soldiers. This 
map gives the locality of the National Cemetery, as well as many 
other points of interest connected with the battle field. 

The Cemetery grounds were plotted and laid out in the original 
and appropriate style indicated by the plate accompanying this 
description, by the celebrated rural architect, Mr. William Saun- 
ders. 

Such was the origin of this final resting place for the remains of 
our departed heroes, who nobly laid down their lives a sacrifice 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 177 

on their country's altar, for tlie sake of Universal Freedom and the 
preservation of the Union. Who can estimate the importance to 
us and all prosterity of their valor and heroism ? Their remains, 
above all others, deserve the highest honor that a grateful people 
can bestow on them. Their deeds will live in history long after 
their bodies have mouldered into dust; and the place where they 
now lie will be honored, protected, and preserved as a sad, but 
sacred memento of their brave conduct. 

The design contemplates the erection of a monument to the mem- 
ory of the dead ; and the situation which seems to meet with the 
greatest favor is in the centre of the semi-circle of graves. It has 
been suggested, that each State having dead here should contribute 
a slab or stone tablet, to be placed in the monument, with the 
names engraved upon it of those whose graves are not identified, 
and who consequently are interred in the lots set apart for the un- 
known. 

The grounds are laid off in lots for each State, proportioned in 
size to the number of marked graves on the Gettysburg battle field. 
There is also a lot set apart for the burial of the remains of those 
who belonged to the regular service. The graves of about one- 
third of the dead were unmarked ; but these bodies are deposited 
in prominent and honorable positions at each end of the semi-cir- 
cular arrangement of the lots. The grounds naturally have a gra- 
dual slope in every direction from the centre of the semi-circle to 
the circumference. Each lot is laid off in sections, with a space of 
four feet for a walk between each section! The outer section is 
letter A, and so on in alphabetical order. As the observer stands 
in the centre of the semi-circle, facing the circumference, the burials 
are commenced at the right hand of the section in each lot, and the 
graves are numbered from one up numerically. A register is made 
of the nnrnber, name, regiment and company of the occupant of 
each grave. Two feet space is allotted to each, and they are laid 
with their heads toward the centre of the semi-circle. At the head 
of the graves there is a stone wall, built up from the bottom as a 
foundation for the headstones, which are to be placed along the 
whole length of each section, and on which, opposite each grave, 
will be engraved the name, regiment and company of the deceased. 
These headstones will be all alike in size, the design being wholly 
adapted to a symmetrical order, and one which combines simplicity 
12 



178 SOLDIERS' NATIOXAL CEMETERY. 

and durability. No other marks will be permitted to be erected. 
There will be about twenty-nine hundred burials in the Cemetery. 

An application was made by Mr. Wills to Hon E. M. Stanton, 
Secretary of War, for coffins for the interment of the dead, and th« 
Quartermaster General was promptly ordered to furnish them. 
The Secretary of War, also, with a liberal considerateness, afforded 
many facilities for the proper and honorable solemnization of the 
exercises of the 19th of November. The removals and burials are 
made with the greatest care, and under the strictest supervision. 
Every precaution is taken to identify the unmarked graves, and 
and also to prevent the marked graves from losing their identity, 
by the defacement of the original temporary boards, on which the 
names were written or cut by comrades in arms. The graves being- 
all numbered, the numbers are registered every evening in a record 
book, with the name, company and regiment. This register will 
designate the graves, should the temporary marks become defaced 
by the action of the weather, or be otherwise lost before the' per- 
manent headstones are put in place. After the burials are all 
made, the graves are all permanently marked, and the style of 
monument determined upon, a map will be prepared and litho- 
graphed, showing the number of each grave in each section, and 
a key be published with the map, giving the full inscription on the 
headstone, corresponding with the number. 

A few of the States sent agents to Gettysburg to superintend 
the removal and burial of their dead, while the most of them en- 
trusted the arrangements for that purpose to the Agent of the State 
of Pennsylvania. The Boston city authorities, in concert with 
the Governor of Massachusetts, sent an efficient committee to 
Gettysburg, who made the removals of the Massachusetts dead by 
their own special arrangemeut. 

The consecration of these Cemetery grounds was, in due time, 
suggested by Governor Curtin. The name of Hon. Edward 
Everett was submitted to the Governors of all the States inter- 
ested, as the orator to deliver the address on that occasion, and 
they unanimously concurred in him as the person eminently suit- 
able for the purpose. A letter of invitation was accordingly ad- 
dressed to him, inviting him to deliver the oration. He accepted 
the duty, and the 19th of November was fixed upon as the day. 
Hon. W. M. Lamon, the United States Marshal for the District of 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 170 

Colombia, was selected as the Chief Marshal of the civic procession, 
and to Major General D. ST. Couch, commanding the Department 
of the Susquehanna, were committed the arrangements for the 
military. To all of these gentlemen great credit is due, for the 
admirable manner in which they discharged the duties of the po- 
sition assigned them. Birgfield's Brigade Band, of Philadelphia, 
was invited to furnish the music for the ceremonial of consecration, 
which was done gratuitously, and in a very acceptable manner. 
The Presidential party was accompanied by the Marine Band, from 
the Navy Yard at Washington, and the military detachment was 
attended by the Brass Band from Fort M' Henry, Baltimore. 

The public generally were invited to be present and participate 
in these solemn exercises, and special invitations were sent to the 
President and Vice President of the United States, and the 
members of the Cabinet — to Major General Geoese G. Meade, 
commanding the army of the Potomac, and, through him, to the 
officers and privates of that army which had fought so valiantly, 
and gained such a memorable victory on the Gettysburg battle 
field — and to Lieutenant General Wixeield Scott and Admiral 
Charles Stewart, the distinguished and time honored represen- 
tatives of the Army and Navy. The President of the United 
States was present, and participated in these solemnities, deliv- 
ering a brief dedicatory address. The occasion was further made 
memorable by the presence of large representations from the army 
and navy, of the Secretary of State of the United States, the Min- 
isters of France and Italy, the French Admiral, and other distin- 
guished foreigners, and several members of Congress, also, of the 
Governors of a large number of the States interested, with their 
staffs, and, in some instances, large delegations, besides a vast 
concourse of citizens from air the States. 

Letters were received, in reply to the invitations addressed to 
them, from Major General Meade, Lieutenant General Scott, Ad- 
miral Charles Stewart, and the Secretary of the Treasury, Hon. 
S. P. Chase, regretting their inability to be present, and expres- 
sive of their appoval of the project. 

One of the most sad and impressive features of the solemnities 
of the 19th of November was the presence, in the procession and 
on the grounds, of a delegation of about fifty wounded soldiers of 
the army of the Potomac, from the York hospital. These men had 



180 30LDXERS' XATIOXAL CEMETEKY. 

been wounded in the battle of Gettysburg, and were present in a 
delegation to pay this just tribute to the remains of their fallen 
comrades. During the exercises, their bronzed cheeks were fre- 
quently suffused with tears, indicative of their heartfelt sympathy 
in the solemn scene before them. From none others could tears 
of unfeigned grief fall upon these graves with so much sad appre- 
ciation. These scarred veterans came and dropped the tear of sor- 
row on the last resting plase of those companions by whose sides 
they so nobly fought, and, lingering over the graves after the 
crowd had dispersed, slowly went away, strengthened in their 
faith in a nation's gratitude. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 181 



CORRESPONDENCE. 



Gettysburg, August 17, 1863. 

To his Excellency, A. G. Curtin, 

Governor of Pennsylvania: 

Sir : — By virtue of the authority reposed in me by your Excel- 
lency, I have invited the co-operation of the several loyal States 
having soldier-dead on the battle field around this place, in the noble 
project of removing their remains from their present exposed and 
imperfectly buried condition, on the fields for miles around, to 
a, cemetery. 

The chief executives of fifteen out of the seventeen States have 
already responded, in most instances, pledging their States to unite 
in the movement ; in a few instances, highly approving of the 
project, and stipulating to urge upon the Legislatures to make ap- 
propriations to defray their proportionate share of expense. 

I have, also, at your request, selected and purchased the grounds 
for this Cemetery, the land to be paid for by, and the title to be 
made to, the State of Pennsylvania, and to be held in perpetuity, 
devoted to the object for which it was purchased. 

The grounds embrace about seventeen acres on Cemetery Hill, 
fronting on the Baltimore turnpike, and extending to the Taney- 
town road. It is the ground which formed the apex of our triangu- 
lar line of battle, and the key to our line of defences. It embraces 
the highest point on Cemetery Hill, and overlooks the whole bat- 
tle field. It is the spot which should be specially consecrated to 
this sacred purpose. It is here that such immense quantities of 
our artillery were massed, and during Thursday and Friday of the 
battle, from this most important point on the field, dealt out 
death and destruction to the Eebel army in every direction of their 
advance. 

I have been in conference, at different times, with agents sent 
here by the Governors of several of the States, and we have ar- 



182 SOLDIEES' NATIONAL CEMETEEY, 

ranged details for carrying ont tills sacred work. I herewith en- 
close yon a copy of the proposed arrangements of details, a copy 
of which I have also sent the chief executive of each State hav- 
ing dead here. 

I have, also, at your suggestion, cordially tendered to each State 
the privilege, if they desire, of joining in the title to the land. 

I think it would be showing only a proper respect for the health 
of this community not to commence the exhuming of the dead, 
and removal to the Cemetery, until the month of November ;. and 
in the meantime the grounds should be artistically laid out, and 
consecrated by appropriate ceremonies. 
I am, with great respect, 

Your Excellency's obedient servant, 

DAVID WILLS. 



Pennsylvania, Executive Chamber, > 
Haeeisbueg^ August 31, 1863. £ 

Deae Sie : — Yours of the 26th instant was duly received, and 
ought to have been answered sooner, but you know how I am 
pressed. 

I am much pleased with the details for the Cemetery which you 
have so thoughtfully suggested, and will be glad, so far as is in my 
power, to hasten their consummation on the part of Pennsylvania. 
It is of course probable that our sister States, joining- with us in 
this hallowed undertaking, may desire to make some alterations and 
modifications of your proposed plan of purchasing and managing 
these sacred grounds, and it is my wish that you give to their views 
the most careful and respectful consideration, Pennsylvania will 
be so highly honored by the possession within her limits of this 
Soldiers' mausoleum, and so much distinguished among the other 
States by their contributions in aid of so glorious a monument to 
patriotism and humanity, that it becomes her duty, as it is her 
melancholy pleasure, to yield, in every reasonable way, to the 
wishes, and suggestions, of the States who join with her in dedi- 
cating a portion of her territory to the solemn uses of a National 
sepulchre. 

The proper consecration of the grounds must claim our early 
attention; and, as soon as we can do so, our fellow-purchasers 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 183 

should !>e invited to join with us in the performance of suitable 
ceremonies on the occasion. 

I am, very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

A. G. CURTIN. 
David Wills, Esq. 



Gettysburg, Pa., September 23, 1863. 
Hon. Edward Everett ; 

Sir: — The several States having soldiers ia the army of the 
Potomac, who fell at the battle of Gettysburg, in July last, gal- 
lantly lighting for the Union, have made arrangements here for 
the exhuming of all their dead, and their removal and decent burial 
in a Cemetery selected for that purpose, on a prominent part of 
the battle field. 

The design is to bury all in common, marked with headstones, 
with the proper inscription, the known dead, and to erect a suita- 
ble monument to the memory of all these brave men, who have 
thus sacrificed their lives on the altar of their country. 

The burial ground will be consecrated to this sacred and holy 
purpose on Thursday, the 23d day of October next, with appro- 
priate ceremonies ; and the several States interested, have united 
in the selection of you to deliver the oration on that solemn occa- 
sion'. I am therefore instructed, by the Governors of the different 
States interested in this project, to invite you cordially to join 
with them in the ceremonies, and to deliver the oration for the 
occasion. 

Hoping to have an early, and favorable reply from you, 
I remain, sir, your most obedient servant, 

DAVID WILLS, 
Agent for the Governor of Pennsylvania. 



Boston, September 26, 1863. 

My Dear Sir : — I have received your favor of the 23d instant, 
inviting me, on behalf of the Governors of the States interested 
in the preparation of a Cemetery for the soldiers who fell in the 



184 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

great "battles of July last, to deliver an address at the consecra- 
tion. I feel much complimented by this request, and would cheer- 
fully undertake the performance of a duty at once so interesting 
and honorable. It is, however, wholly out of my power to make 
the requisite preparation by the 23d of October. I am under en- 
gagements which wiU occupy all my time from Monday next to 
the 12th of October, and, indeed, it is doubtful whether, during 
the whole month of October, I shall have a day at my command. 

The occasion is one of great importance, not to be dismissed 
with a few sentimental or patriotic commonplaces. It will demand 
as full a narrative of the events of the three important days as the 
limits of the hour will admit, and some appropriate discussion of 
the political character of the great struggle, of which the battle 
of Gettysburg is one of the most momentous incidents. As it will 
take me two days to reach Gettysburg, and it will be highly desirable 
that I should have at least one day to survey the battle field, I 
cannot safely name an earlier time than the 19th of November. • 

Should such a postponement of the day first proposed be ad- 
visable, it will give me great pleasure to accept the invitation. 
I remain, dear sir, with much respect, 
Very truly yours, 

EDWAED EVERETT. 
David Wills, Esq., 

Agent for the National Cemetery. 

Note. — In compliance with Mr. Everett's suggestions, as expressed in the forego- 
ing letter, Thursday, the 19th of November, was appointed for the ceremonial of the 
consecration. 



Gettysburg, November 25, 1863. 

Hon. Edward Everett : 

Dear Sir : — On behalf of the Governors of the several States 
interested in the National Cemetery, I request of you for publi- 
cation a copy of your Address delivered at the consecration of 
the grounds on Thursday, the 19th of this month, the proceeds 
of the sale to be added to the fund for the erection of a monu- 
ment to the memory of the heroes whose remains are deposited 
in the Cemetery. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETEIir. 185 

In performing this official duty, allow uie as a citizen of Get- 
tysburg, and in behalf of my fellow citizens, to express our pecu- 
liar satisfaction at that part of your Address, which is devoted to 
a narrative of the all-important events, that have at once raised 
this place into permanent importance and celebrity. Knowing 
as we do that you used great diligence and care to procure as ac- 
curate an account as possible of the movements of the two armies 
in this vicinity, and their positions in the battle on the .different 
days, we regard that portion of your Address as very important 
and valuable. Whilst its delivery commanded the closest atten - 
tion of the vast assembly who listened to it — thus giving evidence 
of their intense interest and entire appreciation — this portion of 
the Oration, preserved in an authentic form, will descend to pros- 
terity as a production of permanent historical value. 

Allow me, also, to express my gratification at the tribute paid 
by you to Major General Reynolds, in ascribing "to his fore- 
thought and self-sacrifice the triumph of the two succeeding days." 
In that well-deserved tribute the historian, who shall do justice to 
the battle of Gettysburg, will undoubtedly concur, pointing to 
him as the individual to whom our glorious success was in a great 
degree due. He was in the advance on the extreme left of the 
army of the Potomac, and in command of the First Army Corps. 
On Wednesday morning, July 1st, when pressing his corps forward 
to meet and retard the progress of the enemy, whose position and 
movements were beginning to be developed to him, he told one 
of his aides, as they approached Gettysburg and examined the 
face of the country, that Cemetery Hill must be held for our army 
at all hazards ; that he would advance his corps rapidly to Semi- 
nary Ridge, west of the town, and temporarily occupy that posi- 
tion; that he would there engage the enemy, who was .advancing, 
and delay his further progress, so as to give time for the whole 
of the army of the Potomac to concentrate on Cemetery Hill 
and the ridges running out either way from it ; that, if pressed 
too hard, he would gradually fall back, contesting the ground step 
by step, and, if necessary to delay the enemy, would fight from 
house to house, through the town. He fell, the victim of a rebel 
sharpshooter, so soon in the action of Wednesday morning, as 
he was carrying out these designs, that but few persons are 
cognizant of his real plans. When the facts are fully made known, 



186 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

history and an impartial world will accord to hint the highest 
praise. His great foresight and brave conduct on that occasion 
will forever endear him to those who love to worship at the shrine 
of true patriotism. He was truely a soldier — always with his men 
in the camp and in the field, sharing their hardships, toils and 
dangers. He loved his profession, and devoted himself exclu- 
sively to it ; and in the vigor of manhood he nobly laid down his 
life, a sacrifice on his country's altar, on the soil of his native 
State, at the head of his brave corps, that the rest of the army of 
the Potomac might the more successfully reach the position of 
his own selection for its defence. This place of his choice proved 
to be the true position on which to meet and check the onward 
march of the rebellious invaders. 

Not doubting that you will take an interest in this confirmation 
of the estimate placed by you on General Beynolds's services, 

I remain, dear sir, 

Yours, with great respect, 

DAVID WILLS. 



Boston, December 14, 18G3. 

My Dear Sir : — I have this day received your letter of the 25th 
of November, requesting, on behalf of the Governors of the sev- 
eral States interested in the National Cemetery, a copy, for publi- 
cation in a permanent form, of the address delivered by me at the 
consecration. I shall have great pleasure in complying with this 
request, the rather as it is proposed that the proceeds of the publi- 
cation shall be added to the fund for the erection of a monument 
to the raeniqry of the brave men whose remains are deposited in 
the Cemetery. 

You will be pleased to accept my thanks for the obliging manner 
in which you spea"k of the historical portion of my Address. It 
was, of course, impossible to compress within so small a compass 
a narrative of the three eventful days, which should do exact jus- 
tice to every incident or every individual. On some points, as in 
most narratives of battles, the printed accounts, and even the offi- 
cial reports, differ. In revising my address for publication in this 
form, I shall correct one or two slight errors of the first draught' 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 187 

and take advantage of sources of information not originally acces- 
sible. 

I am much gratified with your concurrence with me in the esti- 
mate I had formed of the character of General Reynolds, and of 
his very important services in determining the entire fortunes of 
this ever memorable battle. 

I remain, dear sir, with great regard, 
Very truly yours, 

EDWARD EVERETT. 
David Wills, Esq., 

Agent for the National Cemetery. 



Head- Quarters Army oe the PotoMxVC, \ 
November 13, 1863. J 

David W t ills, Esq., 

Agent for the Governor of Pennsylvania, etc.: 

Sir: — I have the honor to acknowledge the invitation which, 
on behalf of the Governor of Pennsylvania and other States in- 
terested, you extend to me and the officers and men of my com- 
mand, to he present on the 19th instant, at the consecration of the 
burial place of those who fell on the field of Gettysburg. 

It seems almost unnecessary for me to say that none can have 
a deeper interest in your good work than comrades in arms, 
bound in close ties of long association and mutual confidence and 
support with those to whom you are paying this last tribute of 
respect ; nor could the jjresence of any be more appropriate than 
that of those who stood side by side in the struggle, shared the 
peril, and the vacant places in whose ranks bear sad testimony to 
the loss they have sustained. But this army has duties to per- 
form which will not admit of its being represented on the occa- 
sion; and it only remains for me in its name, with deep and grate- 
ful feelings, to thank you and those you represent, for your tender 
care of its heroic dead, and for your patriotic zeal, which, in hon- 
oring the martyr, gives a fresh incentive to all who do battle for 
the maintenance of the integrity of the government. 
I am, very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

GEORGE G. MEADE, 
Major General Commanding. 



188 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

New York, November 19, 1863. 
David Wills, Esq., Agent, etc.: 

Dear Sir: — I have had the honor to receive your invitation, 
on the part of the Governors of the loyal States, to be present at 
the consecration of the Military Cemetery at Gettysburg this day. 

Resides the determination, on account of infirmities, never again 
to participate in any public meeting or entertainment, I was too 
sick at the time to do more than write a short telegram in reply to 
His Excellency, Governor Curtix. 

Having long lived with, and participated in the hardships and 
dangers of our soldiers, I can never fail to honor 

"the brave who sink to rest, 
By all their country's wishes blest." 

None deserve this tribute from their countrymen, more than 
those who have fallen in defence of the Constitution, and the 
Union of the thirty-four United States. 

I remain yours, 

Most respectfully, 

WINFIELD SCOTT. 



Bordentown, 1ST. J., November 21, 1803. 

My Dear Sir : — I regret extremely, that, in consequence of the 
invitation you did me the honor to send me, remaining for several 
days among the advertised letters in the Philadelphia post office, I 
was not able to accept the same by appearing in person at the in- 
teresting- consecration of the National Cemetery, at Gettysburg, 
on the nineteenth of this month. 

On an occasion so solemn, awakening every patriotic emotion 
of the human heart, I cannot but deplore that I was not able to 
be present, to shed a tear over the remains of those gallant men, 
who gave back their lives to their God, in defence Of their country. 

Accept for yourself, my dear sir, and be pleased to present to 
the committee, my thanks for your kind invitation, and believe 
me, with great respect, 

Tour obedient servant, 

CHABLES STEWART. 
To David Wills, Esq, Agent, etc. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 189 

Treasury Department, November 16, 1883. 

Bear Sir : — It disappoints me greatly to find that imperative 
public duties make it impossible for me to be present at the con- 
secration of the grounds, selected as the last resting- place of the 
soldiers, who fell in battle for their country at Gettysburg. It con- 
soles me to think what tears of mingled grief and triumph will 
fall upon their graves, and what benedictions of the country, saved 
by their heroism, will make their memories sacred among men. 

Very respectfully yours, 

S. P. CHASE. 
David Wills, Esq., 

Agent for the Governors of tlie Slates. 



In the afternoon of the 18th, the President and the distinguish- 
ed personages accompanying him, arrived at Gettysburg by a 
special train. In the course of the evening, the President and 
Secretary of State were serenaded, and the following remarks 
were made by Mr. Seward, in response to the call : — 

Fellow Citizens : — I am now sixty years old and upwards ; 
I have been in public life practically forty years of that time, and 
yet this is the first time that ever any people, or community, so 
near to the border of Maryland, was found willing to listen to my 
voice ; and the reason was that I saw, forty years ago, that sla- 
very was opening before this people a graveyard that was to be 
filled with brothers, falling in mutual political combat. I knew 
that the cause that was hurrying the Union into this dreadful 
strife was slavery ; and when, during all the intervening period, I 
elevated my voice, it was to warn the people to remove that cause 
while they could, by constitutional means, and so avert the catas- 
trophe of civil war which has fallen upon the nation. I am thank- 
ful that you are willing to hear me at last. I thank my God that 
I believe this strife is going to end in the removal of that evil, 
which ought to have been removed by deliberate councils and 
peaceful means. (Good.) I thank my God for the hope that this 
is the last fratricidal war which will fall upon the country which 
is vouchsafed to us by Heaven, — the richest, the broadest, the 
most beautiful, the most magnificent, and capable of a great des- 



190 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

tiny, that lias ever been given to any part of the human race. 
(Applause.) And I thanls him for the hope that when that cause 
is removed, simply by the operation of abolishing it, as the origin 
and agent of the treason that is without justification, and with- 
out parallel, we shall thenceforth be united, be only one country, 
having only one hope, one ambition and one destiny. (Applause.) 
To-morrow, at least, we shall feel that we are not enemies, but 
that we are friends and brothers, that this Union is a reality, and 
we shall mourn together for the evil wrought by this rebellion. 
We are now near the graves of the misguided, whom we have 
consigned to their last resting place, with pity for their errors, and 
with the same heart full of grief with which we mourn over a 
brother by whose hand, raised in defence of his government, that 
misguided brother perished. 

When we part to-morrow night, let us remember that we owe 
it to our country and to mankind that this war shall have for its 
conclusion the establishing of the principle of democratic govern- 
ment — the simple principle that whatever party, whatever portion 
of the community, prevails by constitutional suffrage in an elec- 
tion, that party is to be respected and maintained in power until 
it shall give place, on another trial and another verdict, to a dif- 
ferent portion of the people. If you do not do this, you are drift- 
ing at once and irresistibly to the very verge of universal, cheerless 
and hopless anarchy. But with that principle this government of 
ours — th e purest, the best, the wisest, and the happiest in the world — 
must be, and, so far as we are concerned, practically will be, im- 
mortal. (Cheers.) Fellow citizens, Good-night. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 191 



ORDER OF PROCESSION 



FOR THE 



CONSECRATION OF THE NATIONAL CEMETERY AT GETTYSBURG, PA. 
ON THE 19TH OF NOVEMBER, 18G3. 



Military, under command of Major General Couch. 

Major General Meade and Staff, and the Officers and Soldiers of 

the Army of the Potomac. 

Officers of the Navy and Marine Corps of the United States. 

Aids. Chief Marshal. Aids. 

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Members of the Cabinet. 

Assistant Secretaries of the several Executive Departments. 

General-in-chief of the Army, and Staff. 

Lieutenant General Scott and Bear- Admiral Stewart. 

Judges of the United States Supreme Court. 

Hon. Edward Everett, Orator of the day, and the Chaplain. 

Governors of the States, and their staffs. 

Commissioners of the States on the Inauguration of the Cemetery. 

Bearers with the Flags of the States. 
VrcE President of the United States and Speaker of the House 

of Representatives. 

Members of the two houses of Congress. 

Officers of the two houses of Congress. 

Mayors of Cities. 

Gettysburg Committee of Arrangements. 

Officers and members of the United States Sanitary Commission. 

Committees of different Religious Bodies. 

United States Military Telegraphic Corps. 

Officers and representatives of Adams Express Company. 

Officers of different Telegraph Companies. 

Hospital Corps of the Army. 



192 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

Soldiers' Belief Associations. 

Knights Templar. 

Masonic Fraternity. 

Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Other Benevolent Associations. 

Literary, Scientific and Industrial Associations. 

The Press. 

Officers and Members of Loyal Leagues. 

Fire Companies. 

Citizens of the State of Pennsylvania. 

Citizens of other States. 

Citizens of the District of Columbia. 

Citizens of the several Territories. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 193 



PROGRAMME OF ARRANGEMENTS, 

&KD ORDER OP EXERCISES FOR THE CONSECRATION OF THE NA- 
TIONAL CEMETERY, AT GETTYSBURG, ON THE 19TH OF NOVEM- 
BER, 186-3. 



The military will form in Gettysburg at nine o'clock, A. M., on 
-Carlisle street, north of the square, its right resting- on the square, 
opposite M'Olellan's hotel, under the direction of Major General 
Couch. 

The State Marshals and Chief Marshal's aids will assemble in 
the public square at the same hour. 

All civic bodies, except the citizens of States, will assemble, 
according to the foregoing printed programme, on York street, at 
the same time. 

The delegation of Pennsylvania citizens will form on Chambers- 
burg street, its right resting on the square; and the other citizen 
delegations, in their order, will form on the same street, in the 
rear of the Pennsylvania delegation. 

The Marshals of the States are charged with the duty of form- 
ing their several delegations so that they will assume their appro- 
priate positions when the main procession moves. 

The head of the column will move at precisely ten o'clock, 
A. M. 

The route will be up Baltimore street to the Emmitsburg road; 
thence to the junction of the Tanneytown road; thence, by the lat- 
ter road, to the Cemetery, where the military will form in line, as 
the General in command may order, for the purpose of saluting 
the President of the United States. 

The military will then close up and occupy the space on the 
left of the stand. 

The civic procession will advance and occupy the area in front 
of the stand, the military leaving sufficient space between them 
and the line of graves for the civic procession to pass. 
13 



194 SOLDIERS 5 NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

The ladies will occupy the right of the stand, and it is desirable 
that they be upon the ground as early as ten o'clock, A. M. 

The exercises will take place as soon as the military and civic 
bodies are in position, as follows : 

Music, by Birgfield's Band. 

Prayer, by Eev. T. H. Stockton, D. D. 

Music, by the Marine Band. 

Oration, by Hon. Edward Everett. 

Music, Hymn composed by B. B. French, Esq. 

Dedicatory Remarks, by the President of the United States. 

Dirge, sung by Ohoir selected for the occasion. 

Benediction, by Eev. H. L. Batjgher, D. D. 

After the benediction the procession will be dismissed, and the 
State Marshals and special aids to the Chief Marshal, will form on 
Baltimore street, and return to the court house in Gettysburg, where 
a meeting of the Marshals will be held. 

An appropriate salute will be fired in Gettysburg on the day of 
the celebration, under the direction of Major General Couch, 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 195 



PRAYER OF REV. DR. STOCKTON. 



O God our Father, for the sake of Thy Son our Saviour, inspire 
us with Thy Spirit, and sanctify us to the right fulfilment of the 
duties of this occasion. 

We come to dedicate this new historic centre as a National 
Cemetery. If all departments of the one government which Thou 
hast ordained over our Union, and of the many governments which 
Thou has subordinated to our Union, be here represented — if all 
classes, relations, and interests of our blended brotherhood of 
people stand severally and thoroughly apparent in Thy presence — 
we trust that it is because Thou hast called us, that Thy blessing 
awaits us, and that Thy designs may be embodied in practical re- 
sults of incalculable and imperishable good. 

And, so, with Thy holy Apostle, and with the Church of all 
lands and ages, we unite in the ascription, "Blessed be God, even 
the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies, and 
the God of all comfort, who comforteth us in all our tribulation, 
that we may be able to comfort them which are in any trouble, by 
the comfort wherewith we ourselves are comforted of God." 

In emulation of all angels, in fellowship with all saints, and in 
sympathy with all sufferers, in remembrance of Thy works, in reve- 
rence of Thy ways, and in accordance with Thy word, we laud 
and magnify Thine infinite perfections, Thy creative glory, Thy 
redeeming grace, Thy providential goodness, and the progressively 
rich and fairer developments of Thy supreme, universal and ever- 
lasting administration. 

In behalf of all humanity, whose ideal is divine, whose first 
memory is Thine image lost, and whose last hope is Thine image 
restored, and especially of our own nation, whose history has been 
so favored, whose position is so peerless, whose mission is so sub- 
lime, and whose future is so attractive, we thank Thee for the un- 
speakable patience of Thy compassion and the exceeding greatness 
of Thy loving kindness. In contemplation of E len, Calvary, and 



196 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

Heaven, of Christ in the Garden, on the Cross, and on the Throne ; 
nay, more, of Christ as coming again in all-subduing power and 
glory, we gratefully prolong our homage. By this Altar of Sac- 
rifice ; on this Field of Deliverence, on this Mount of Salvation, 
within the fiery and bloody line of these "munitions of rocks," look- 
ing back to the dark days of fear and trembling, and to the rapture 
of relief that came after, we multiply our thanksgivings, and con- 
fess our obligations to renew and perfect our personal and social 
consecration to Thy service and glory. 

Oh, had it not been for God ! For lo ! our enemies, they came un- 
resisted, multitudinous, mighty, flushed with victory, and sure of 
success. They exulted on our mountains, they revelled in our 
valleys ; they feasted, they rested ; they slept, they awaked, they 
grew stronger, prouder, bolder, every day ; they spread abroad, they 
concentrated here ; they looked beyond this horizan to the stores of 
wealth, to the haunts of pleasure, and to the seats of power in, our 
capitol and chief cities. They prepared to cast a chain of Slavery 
around the form of Freedom, binding life and death together for- 
ever. Their premature triumph was the mockery of God and man. 
One more victory, and all was theirs! But behind these hills 
was heard the feebler march of a smaller, but still pursuing host. 
Onward they hurried, day and night, for God and their country. 
Foot-sore, wayworn, hungry, thirsty, faint — but not in heart — they 
came to dare all, to bear all, and to do all that is possible to heroes. 
And Thou didst sustain them 1 At first they met the blast on the 
plain, and bent before it like the trees in a storm. But then, led 
by Thy hand to these hills, they took their stand upon the rocks 
and remained as firm and immovable as they. In vain were they 
assaulted. All art, all violence, all desperation, failed to dislodge 
them. Baffled, bruised, broken, their enemies recoiled, retired, and 
disappeared. Glory to God for this rescue ! But oh, the slain ! 
In the freshness and fulness of their young and manly life, with 
such sweet memories of father and mother, brother and sister, wife 
and children, maiden and friends, they died for us. From the coasts 
beneath the Eastern star, from the shores of Northern lakes and 
rivers, from the flowers of western prairies, and from the homes 
of the Midway and Border, they came here to die for us and for man- 
kind. Alas, how little we can do for them! We come with the 
humility of prayer, with the pathetic eloquence of venerable wisdom , 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 197 

with the tender beauty of poetry, with the plaintive harmony of 
music, with the honest tribute of our Chief Magistrate, and with 
all this honorable attendance ; but our best hope is in thy blessing, 
O Lord, our God ! O Father, bless us ! Bless the bereaved, whether 
present or absent ; bless our sick and wounded soldiers and sailors ; 
bless all our rulers and people ; bless our army and navy : bless 
the efforts for the suppression of the rebellion ; and bless all the 
associations of this day and place and scene forever. As the trees 
are not dead though their foliage is gone, so our heroes are not 
dead, though their forms have fallen. In their proper personality 
they are all with Thee. And the spirit of their example is here. It 
tills the air : it fills our hearts. And, long as time shall last, it will 
hover in the skies and rest on this landscape ; and the pilgrims of 
our own land, and from all lands, will thrill with its inspiration, 
and increase and confirm their devotion to liberty, religion, and 
God. 

Our Father, who art in Heaven, Hallowed be Thy name. Thy 
kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in Heaven. 
Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our debts, as 
we forgive our debtors. Lead us not into temptation, but deliver 
us from evil. For Thine is the kingdom, the power, and the glory, 
forever. Amen. 



198 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



ADDRESS OF HON. EDWARD EVERETT. 



Standing beneath this serene sky, overlooking these broad fields 
now reposing from the labors of the waning year, the mighty Al- 
leghenies dimly towering before us, the graves of our brethern 
beneath our feet, it is with hesitation that I raise my poor voice 
to break the eloquent silence of God and Nature. But the duty 
to which you have called me must be performed ; — grant me, I 
pray you, your indulgence and your sympathy. 

It was appointed by law in Athens, that the obsequies of the 
citizens who fell in battle should be performed at the public ex- 
pense, and in the most honorable manner. Their bones were 
carefully gathered up from the funeral pyre, where their bodies 
were consumed, and brought home to the city. There, for three 
days before the interment, they lay in state, beneath tents of honor, 
to receive the votive offerings of friends and relatives, — flowers, 
weapons, precious ornaments, painted vases, (wonders of art, 
which after two thousand years adorn the museums of modern 
Europe,) — the last tributes of surviving affection. Ten coffins of 
funeral cypress received the honorable deposit, one for each of the 
tribes of the city, and an eleventh in memory of the unrecognized, 
but not therefore unhonored, dead, and of those whose remains 
could not be recovered. On the fourth day the mournful proces- 
sion was formed ; mothers, wives, sisters, daughters led the way, 
and to them it was permitted by the simplicity of ancient manners 
to utter aloud their lamentations for the beloved and the lost ; 
the male relatives and friends of the deseased followed; citizens 
and strangers closed the train. Thus marshalled, they moved to 
the place of interment in that famous Oeramicus, the most beau- 
tiful suburb of Athens, which had been adorned by Oimon, the son 
of Miltiades, with walks and fountains and columns, — whose groves 
were filled with altars, shrines, and temples, — whose gardens were 
kept forever green by the streams from the neighboring hills, and 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 199 

shaded with the trees sacred to Minerva and coeval with the foun- 
dation of the city, — whose circuit enclosed 

"the olive Grove of Academe, 
Plato's retirement, where the Attic bird 
Trilled his thick-warbled note the summer long,"— 

whose pathways gleamed with the monuments of the illustrious 
dead, the work of the most consummate masters that ever gave 
life to marble. There, beneath the overarching plane-trees, upon a 
lofty stage erected for the purpose, it was ordained that a funeral 
oration should be pronounced by some citizen of Athens, in the 
presence of the assembled multitude. 

Such were the tokens of respect required to be paid at Athens 
to the memory of those who had fallen in the cause of their country. 
For those alone who fell at Marathon a special honor was reserved. 
As the battle fought upon that immortal field was distinguished 
from all others in Grecian history for its influence over the for- 
tunes of Hellas, — as it depended upon the event of that day 
whether Greece should live, a glory and a light to all coming time, 
or should expire, like the meteor of a moment; so the honors 
awarded to its martyr-heroes were such as were bestowed by Athens 
on no other occasion. They alone of all her sons were entombed 
upon the spot which they had forever rendered famous. Their 
names were inscribed upon ten pillars, erected upon the monu- 
mental tumulus which covered their ashes, (where after six hun- 
dred years, they were read by the traveler Pausanias,) and al- 
though the columns, beneath the hand of time and barbaric vio- 
lence, have long since disappeared, the venerable mound still 
jnarkes the spot where they fought and fell, — 

"That battle-field where Persia's victim horde 
First bowed beneath the brunt of Hellas' sword." 

And shall I, fellow citizens, who, after an interval of twenty- 
three centuries, a youthful pilgrim from the world unknown to 
ancient Greece, have wandered over that illustrious plain, ready 
-to put off the shoes from off my feet, as one that stands on holy 
ground, — who have gazed with respectful emotion on the mound 
which still protects the dust of those who rolled back the tide of 
Persian invasion, and rescued the land of popular liberty, of let- 
ters and of arts, from the ruthless foe, — stand unmoved over the 
graves of our dear brethern, who so lately, on three of those all- 



2@0 SOLDIEBS' NATIONAL CEMETEET* 

important days which decide a nation's history,— days on whose 
issue it depended whether this august republican Union, founded 
by some of the wisest statesmen that ever lived, cemented with 
the blood of some of the purest patriots that ever died, should 
perish or endure, — rolled back the tide of an invasion, not less 
unprovoked, not less ruthless, than that which came to plant the 
dark banner of Asiatic despotism and slavery on the free soil of 
Greece ? Heaven forbid ! And could I prove so insensible to 
every prompting of patriotic duty and affection, not only would 
you, fellow citizens, gathered many of you from distant States, 
who have come to take part in these pious offices of gratitude — 
you, respected fathers, brethern, matrons, sisters, wjio surround 
me — cry out for shame, but the forms of brave and patriotic men, 
who fill these honored graves, would heave with indignation be- 
neath the sod. 

We have assembled, Mends, fellow citizens, at the invitation of 
the Executive of the great central State of Pennsylvania, seconded 
by the Governors of seventeen other loyal States of the Union, to 
pay the last tribute of respect to the brave men, who, in the hard- 
fought battles of the first, second and third days of July last, laid 
down their lives for the country on these hill sides and the plains 
before us, and whose remains have been gathered into the Cemetery 
which we consecrate this day. As my eye ranges over the fields 
whose sods were so lately moistened by the blood of gallant and 
loyal men, I feel, as never before, how truely it was said of old, 
that it is sweet and becoming to die for one's country. I feel, as 
never before, how justly, from the dawn of history to the present 
time, men have paid the homage of their gratitude and admira- 
tion to the memory of those who nobly sacrificed their lives, that 
their fellow men may live in safety and in honor. And if this 
tribute were ever due, when, to whom, could it be more justly 
paid than to those whose last resting place we this day commend 
to the blessing of Heaven and of men ? 

For consider, my friends, what would have been the consequence 
to the country, to yourselves, and to all you hold dear, if those 
who sleep beneath our feet, and their gallant comrades who sur- 
vive to serve their country on other fields of danger, had failed in 
their duty on those memorable days. Consider what, at this mo- 
ment, would be the condition of the United States, if that noble 



SOLDIEES' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 201 

army of the Potomac, instead of gallantly and for the second 
time beating back the tide of invasion from Maryland and Penn- 
sylvania, had been itself driven from these well contested heights, 
thrown back in confusion on Baltimore, or trampled down, dis 
comfitted, scattered to the four winds. What, in that sad event, 
would not have been the fate of the Monumental city, of Harris- 
burg, of Philadelphia, of Washington, the capital of the Union, 
each and every one of which would have lain at the mercy of the 
enemy, accordingly as it might have pleased him, spurred by pas- 
sion, flushed with victory, and confident of continued success, to 
direct his course ? 

For this we must bear in mind, it is one of the great lessons of 
the war, indeed of every war, that it is impossible for a people 
without military organization, inhabiting the cities, towns, and 
villages of an open country, including, of course, the natural pro- 
portion of non-combatants of either sex, and of every age, to 
withstand the inroad of a veteran army. What defence can be 
made by the inhabitants of a village mostly built of wood, of 
cities unprotected by walls, nay, by a population of men, however 
high toned and resolute, whose aged parents demand their care, 
whose wives and children are clustering about them, against the 
charge of the war-horse whose neck is clothed with thunder — 
against flying artillery and batteries of rifled canon planted on 
every commanding eminence — against the onset of trained vet- 
erans led by skilful chiefs? No, my friends, ariny must be met by 
army, battery by battery, squadron by squadron; and the shock 
of organized thousands must be encountered by the firm breasts 
and valiant arms of other thousands, as well organized and as 
skilfully led. It is no reproach, therefore, to the unarmed popu- 
lation of the country to say, that we owe it to the brave men who 
sleep in their beds of honor before us, and to their gallant surviv- 
ing associates, not merely that your fertile fields, my friends of 
Pennsylvania and Maryland, were redeemed from the presence of 
the invader, but that your beautiful capitals were not given up to 
threatened plunder, perhaps laid in ashes, Washington seized by 
the enemy, and a blow struck at the heart of the nation. 

Who that hears me has forgotten the thrill of joy that ran through 
the country on the 4th of July — auspicious day for the glorious 
tidings, and rendered still more so by the simultaneous fall of 



202 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

Vicksbiirg — when the telegraph flashed through the land the as- 
surance from the President of the United States that the army of 
the Potomac, under General Meade, had again smitten the in- 
vader? Sure I am, that, with the ascriptions of praise that rose 
to Heaven from twenty millions of freemen, with the acknow- 
ledgments that breathed from patriotic lips throughout the length 
and breadth of America, to the surviving officers and men who had 
rendered the country this inestimable service, there beat in every 
loyal bosom a throb of tender and sorrowful gratitude to the 
martyrs who had fallen on the sternly contested field. Let a na- 
tion's fervent thanks make some amends for the toils and suffer- 
ings of those who survive. Would that the heartfelt tribute could 
penetrate these honored graves ! 

In order that we may comprehend, to their full extent, our ob- 
ligations to the martyrs and surviving heroes of the army of the 
Potomac, let us contemplate for a few moments the train of events, 
which culminated in the battles of the first days of July. Of this 
stupendous rebellion, planned, as its originators boast, more than 
thirty years ago, matured and prepared for during an entire gene- 
ration, finally commenced because, for the first time since the 
adoption of the Constitution, an election of President had been 
effected without the votes of the South, (which retained, however, 
the control of the two other branches of the government,) the occu- 
pation of the national capital, with the seizure of the public ar- 
chives and of the treaties with foreign powers, was an essential 
feature. This was, in substance, within my personal knowledge, 
admitted, in the winter of 1860-61, by one of the most influential 
leaders of the rebellion ; and it was fondly thought that this object 
could be effected by a bold and sudden movement on the 4th of 
March, 1861. There is abundant proof, also, that a darker project 
was contemplated, if not by the responsible chiefs of the rebellion, 
yet by nameless ruffians, willing to play a subsidary and murderous 
part in the treasonable drama. It was accordingly maintained by 
the Eebel emissaries in England, in the circles to which they found 
access, that the new American Minister ought not, when he ar- 
rived, to be received as the envoy of the United States, inasmuch 
as before that time Washington would be captured, and the capi- 
tal of the nation and the archives and muniments of the govern- 
ment would be in possession of the Confederates. In full accord- 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 203 

ance also with this threat, it was declared, by the Eebel Secretary 
of War, at Montgomery, in the presence of his Chief and of his 
colleagues, and of five thousand hearers, while the tidings of the 
assault on Sumter were traveling over the wires on the fatal 12th 
of April, 1861, that before the end of May "the flag which then 
flaunted the breeze," as he expressed it, "would float over the dome 
of the Capitol at Washington." 

At the time this threat was made, the rebellion was confined to 
the cotton-growing States, and it was well understood by them, 
that the only hope of drawing any of the other slaveholding States 
into the conspiracy, was in bringing about a conflict of arms, and 
"firing the heart of the South" by the effusion of blood. This 
was declared by the Charleston press, to be the object for which 
Sumter was to be assaulted ; and the emissaries sent from Eich- 
mond. to urge on the unhallowed work, gave the promise, that, 
with the first drop of blood that should be shed, Virginia would 
place herself by the side of South Carolina. 

In pursuance of this orignal plan of the leaders of the rebellion, 
the capture of Washington has been continually had in view, 
not merely for the sake of its public buildings, as the capital of 
the Confederacy, but as the necessary preliminary to the absorption 
of the border States, and for the moral effect in the eyes of Europe 
of possessing the metropolis of the Union. 

I allude to these facts, not perhaps enough borne in mind, as a 
sufficient refutation of the pretence, on the part of the Eebels, that 
the war is one of self-defence, waged for the right of self-govern- 
ment. It is in reality, a war originally levied by ambitious men 
in the cotton-growing States, for the purpose of drawing the slave- 
holding border States into the vortex of the conspiracy, first by 
sympathy — which, in the case of South-Eastern Virginia, North 
Carolina, part of Tennessee and Arkansas, succeeded — and then 
by force and for the purpose of subjugating Maryland, West Vir- 
ginia, Kentucky, Eastern Tennessee and Missouri ; and it is a most 
extraordinary fact, considering the clamors of the Eebel chiefs on 
the subject of invasion, that not a soldier of the United States 
has entered the States last named, except to defend their Union- 
loving inhabitants from the armies and guerillas of the Eebels. 

In conformity with these designs on the city of Washington, and 
notwithstanding the disastrous results of the invasion of 1862, it 



204 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

was determined by the Rebel Government last summer to resume 
the offensive in that direction. Unable to force the passage of the 
Rappahannock, where General Hooker, notwithstanding the re- 
verse at Chancellorsville, in May, was strongly posted, the Con- 
federate general resorted to strategy. He had two objects in view. 
The first was by a rapid movement northward, and by manoeuver- 
ing with a portion of his army on the east side of the Blue Ridge, 
to tempt Hooker from his base of operations, thus leading him to 
uncover the approaches to Washington, to throw it open to a raid 
by Stuart's cavalry, and to enable Lee himself to cross the Po- 
tomac in the neighborhood of Poolesville and thus fall upon the 
capital. This plan of operations was wholly frustrated. The de- 
sign of the Rebel general was promptly discovered by General 
Hooker, and, moving with great rapidity from Fredericksburg, he 
preserved unbroken the inner line, and stationed the various corps 
of his army at all the points protecting the approach to Washing- 
ton, from Oentreville up to Leesburg. From this vantage-ground 
the Rebel general in vain attempted to draw him. In the mean 
time, by the vigorous operations of Pleasanton's cavalry, the 
cavalry of Stuart, though greatly superior in numbers, was so 
crippled as to be disabled from performing the part assigned it in 
the campaign. In this manner, General Lee's first object, namely, 
the defeat of Hooker's army on the south of the Potomac and 
a direct march on Washington, was baffled. 

The second part of the Confederate plan, which is supposed to 
have been undertaken in opposition to the views of General Lee, 
was to turn the demonstration northward into a real invasion of 
Maryland and Pennsylvania, in the hope, that, in this way, Gen- 
eral Hooker would be drawn to a distance from the capital, and 
that some opportunity would occur of taking him at disadvantage, 
and, after defeating his army, of making a descent upon Baltimore 
and Washington. This part of General Lee's plan, which was 
substantially the repetition of that of 1862, was not less signally 
defeated, with what honor to the arms of the Union the heights 
on which we are this day assembled will forever attest. 

Much time had been uselessly consumed by the Rebel general 
in his unavailing attempts to out-manoeuvre General Hooker. 
Although General Lee broke up from Fredericksburg on the 3d of 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 205 

June, it was not till the 24th that the main body of his army en- 
tered Maryland. Instead of crossing the Potomac, as he had in- 
tended, east of the BlueKidge, he was corbelled to doit at Shep- 
herdstown and Williamsport, thus materially deranging his entire 
plan of campaign north of the river. Stuart, who had been 
sent with his cavalry to the east of the Blue Bidge, to guard the 
passes of the mountains, to mask the movements of Lee, and to 
harass the Union general in crossing the river, having been severely 
handled by Pleasonton at Beverly Ford, Aldie, and Upperville, 
instead of being able to retard General Hooker's advance, was 
driven himself away from his connection with the army of Lee, 
, and cut off for a fortnight from all communication with it — a cir- 
cumstance to which General Lee, in his report, alludes more than 
once, with evident displeasure. Let us now rapidly glance at the 
incidents of the eventful campaign. 

A detachment from Swell's corps, under Jenkins, had pene- 
trated, on the 15th of June, as far as Chambersburg. This move- 
ment was intended at first merely as a demonstration, and as a 
marauding expedition for supplies. It had, however, the salutary 
effect of alarming the country ; and vigorous preparations were 
made, not only by the General Government, but here in Pennsyl- 
vania and in the sister States, to repel the inroad. After two days 
passed at Chambersburg, Jenkins, anxious for his communications 
with Ewell, fell back with his plunder to Hagerstown. Here he 
remained for several days, and then having swept the recesses of 
the Cumberland valley, came down upon the eastern flank of the 
South mountain, and pushed his marauding parties as far as 
Waynesboro'. On the 22d, the remain der of Swell's corps crossed 
the river and moved up the valley. They were followed on the 
24th by Longstreet and Hill, who crossed at Williamsport and 
Shepherdstown, and pushed up the valley, encamped at Chambers- 
burg on the 27th. In this way the whole rebel army, estimated 
at 90,000 infantry, upwards of 10,000 cavalry, and 4,000 or 5,000 
artillery, making a total of 105,000 of all arms, was concentrated 
in Pennsylvania. 

Up to this time no report of Hooker's movements had been 
received by General Lee, who, having been deprived of his cavalry, 
had no means of obtaining information. Eightly judging, however, 
that no time would be lost by the Union army in the pursuit, in 



206 SOLDIERS 5 NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

order to detain it on the eastern side of the mountains in Mary- 
land and Pennsylvania, and thus preserve his communication by 
the way of Willianisport, he had, before his own arrival at Cham- 
bersburg, directed Ewell to send detachments from his corps to 
Carlisle and York. The latter detachment, under Early, passed 
through this place on the 26th of June. You need not, fellow 
citizens of Gettysburg, that I should re-call to you those moments 
of alarm and distress, precursors as they were of the more trying 
scenes which were so soon to follow. 

As soon as Gen. Hooker preceived that the advance of the 
Confederates into the Cumberland valley was not a mere feint to 
draw him away from Washington, he moved rapidly in pursuit. 
Attempts, as we have seen, were made to harass and retard his 
passage across the Potomac. These attempts were not only alto- 
gether unsuccessful, but were so unskilfully made as to place the 
entire Federal army between the Cavalry of Stuart and the army 
of Lee. While the latter was massed in the Cumberland valley, 
Stuart was east of the mountains, with Hooker's army between, 
and Gregg's cavalry in close pursuit. Stuart was accordingly 
compelled to force a march northward, which was destitute of 
strategical character, and which deprived his chief of all means 
of obtaining intelligence. 

Not a moment had been lost by General Hooker in the pur- 
suit of Lee. The day after the Eebel army entered Maryland, 
the Union army crossed the Potomac at Edward's Ferry, and by 
the 28th of June lay between Harper's Ferry and Frederick. The 
force of the enemy on that day was partly at Chambersburg, and 
partly moving on the Cashtown road in the direction of Get- 
tysburg, while the detachments from Ewell's corps, of which men- 
tion has been made, had reached the Susquehanna opposite Har- 
risburg and Columbia. That a great battle must soon be fought, 
no one could doubt ; but in the apparent and perhaps real absence 
of plan on the part of Lee, it was impossible to foretell the pre- 
cise scene of the encounter. Wherever fought, consequences the 
most momentous hung upon the result. 

In this critical and anxious state of affairs, General Hooker 
was relieved, and General Meade was summoned to the chief 
command of the army. It appears to my unmilitary judgment to 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 207 

reflect the highest credit upon him, upon his predecessor, and 
upon the corps commanders of the army of the Potomac, that a 
change could take place in the chief command of so large a force 
on the eve of a general battle — the various corps necessarily- 
moving on lines somewhat divergent, and all in ignorance of the 
enemy's intended point of concentration — and that not an hour's 
hesitation should ensue in the advance of any portion of the en- 
tire army. 

Having assumed the chief command on the 28th, General Meade 
directed his left wing, under Beynolds, upon Emmitsburg, and 
his right upon New Windsor, leaving General French with 11,000 
men to protect the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and convoy the 
public property from Harper's Ferry to Washington. Buford's 
cavalry was then at this place, and Kilpatrick's at Hanover, 
where he encountered and defeated the rear of Stuart's cavalry, 
who was roving the country in search of the main army of Lee. 
On the Eebel side, Hill had reached Fayetteville on the Cash- 
town road on the 28th, and was followed on the same road by 
Longstreet on the 29th. The eastern side of the mountain, as 
seen from Gettysburg, was lighted up at night by the camp-fires 
of the enemy's advance, and the country swarmed with his foraging 
parties. It was now too evident to be questioned, that the thun- 
der-cloud, so long gathering blackness, would soon burst on some 
part of the devoted vicinity of Gettysburg. 

The 30th of June was a day of important preparation. At 
half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, General Bueord passed 
through Gettysburg, upon a reconnoissance in force, with his 
cavalry, upon the Ohambersburg road. The information obtained 
by him was immediately communicated to General Beynolds, 
who was, in consequence, directed to occupy Gettysburg. That 
gallant officer accordingly, with the First Corps, marched from 
Emmitsburg to within six or seven miles of this place, and en- 
canped on the right bank of Marsh's creek. Our right wing, 
meantime, was moved to Manchester. On the same day the corps 
of Hill and Loncstreet were pushed still further forward on 
the Ohambersburg road, and distributed in the vicinity of Marsh's 
creek, while a reconnoissance was made by the Confederate Gene- 
ral Pettigrew up to a very short distance from this place. Thus 



208 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

at nightfall, on the 30th of June, the greater part of the Rebel 
force was concentrated in the immediate vicinity of two corps of 
the Union army, the former refreshed by two days passed in com- 
parative repose and deliberate preparation for the encounter, the 
latter separated by a march of one or two days from their support- 
ing corps, and doubtful at what precise point they were to expect 
an attack. 

And now the momentous day, a day to be forever remembered 
in the annals of the country, arrived. Early in the morning, on 
the 1st of July, the conflict began. I need not say that it would 
be impossible for me to comprise, within the limits of the hour, 
such a narrative as would do anything like full justice to the all- 
important events of these three great days, or to the merit of the 
brave officers and men, of every rank, of every arm of the service, 
and of every loyal State, who bore their part in the tremendous 
struggle— alike those who nobly sacrificed their lives for their 
country, and those who survived, many of them scarred with 
honorable wounds, the objects of our admiration and gratitude. — ■ 
The astonishingly minute, accurate, and graphic accounts con- 
tained in the journals of the day, prepared from personal observa- 
tion by reporters who witnessed the scenes, and often shared the 
perils which they describe, and the highly valuable "notes" of Pro- 
fessor Jacobs, of the University in this place, to which I am 
greatly indebted, will abundantly supply the deficiency of my 
necessarily too condensed statement.* 

*Besides the sources of information mentioned in the test, I have been kindly favored 
with a memorandum of the operations of the three days, drawn up for me by direction 
of Major General Meade, (anticipating the promulgation of his official report,) by one 
of his aids, Colonel Theodore Lyman, from whom, also, I have received other impor- 
tant communications relative to the campaign. I have received very valuable docu- 
ments relative to the battle from Major General Halleck, Commander-in-Chief of the 
army, and have been much assisted in drawing up the sketch of the campaign, by the 
detailed reports, kindly transmitted to me in manuscript from the Adjutant General's 
office, of the movements of every corps of the army, for each day, after the breaking 
up from Fredericksburg commenced. I have derived much assistance from Colonel 
John B. Bachelder's oral explanations of his beautiful and minute drawing (about 
to be engraved) of the field ,of the three days' struggle. With the information derived 
from these sources, I have compared the statements in General Lee's official report of 
the campaign, dated 31st July, 1863, a well-written article, purporting to be an account 
of the three days' battle, in the Richmond Miqiiirer of the 22d of July, and the article 
on "The Battle of Gettysburg and the Campaign of Pennsylvania," by an officer, ap- 
parently a colonel in the British army, in Blackwood s Magazine for September. The 




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SOLDIEES' NATIONAL CEMETEEY. 209 

General Eeynolds, on arriving at Gettysburg', in the morning of 
the 1st, found Bufoed with his cavalry warmly engaged with the 
enemy, whom he held most gallantly in check. Hastening him- 
self to the front, General Eeyxolds directed his men to be moved 
over the fields from the Emmitsburg road, in front of M'Millan's 
and Dr. Schmuckee's, under cover of the Seminary Eidge.— 
Without a moment's hesitation, he attacked the enemy, at the same 
time sending orders to the Eleventh Corps (General Howard's) to 
advance as promptly as possible. General Eeyxolds immediately 
found himself engaged with a force* which greatly outnumbered 
his own, and had scarcely made his dispositions for the action 
when he fell mortally wounded, at the head of his advance. — 
The command of the First Corps devolved on General Dotjbleday, 
and that of the field on General Howard, who arrived at 11.30, 
with Schuez's and Baelow's divisions of the Eleventh Corps, 
the latter of whom received a severe wound. Thus strengthened, 
the advantage of the battle was for some time on our side. The 
attacks of the Eebels were vigorously repulsed by Wadswoeth's 
division of the First Corps, and a large number of prisoners, in- 
cluding General Aechee, were captured. At length, however, 
the continued reinforcement of the Confederates from the main 
body in the neighborhood, and by the division of Eodes andEAELY, 
coming down by separate lines from Heidlersberg and taking post 
on our extreme right, turned the fortunes of the day. Our army, 

value of the information contained in this last essay may be seen by comparing the 
remark under date 27th June, that "private property is to be rigidly protected," with the 
statement in the next sentence but one, that "all the cattle and farm horses having been 
seized by Ewell, farm labor had come to a complete stand still." He, also, under 
date of 4th July, speaks of Lee's retreat being encumbered by "Ewell's immense 
train of plunder.'" This writer informs us, that, on the evening of the 4th of July, he 
heard "reports coming in from the different Generals, that the enemy [Meade's army] 
was retiring, and had been doing so all day long." At a consultation at head-quarters 
on the 6th, between Generals Lee, Longstreet, Hill, and Wilcox, this writer was 
told by some one, whose name he prudently leaves in blank, that the army had no in- 
tention, at present, of retreating for good, and that some of the enemy's dispatches had 
been intercepted, in which the following words occur: "The noble, but unfortunate 
army of the Potomac has again been obliged to retreat before superior numbers!" He 
does not appear to be aware, that in recording these wretched expedients, resorted to in 
order to keep up the spirits of Lee's army, he furnishes the most camplete refutation 
of his own account of its good condition. I much regret that General Meade's official 
report was not published in season to enable me to take fuU advantage of it, in prepar- 
ing the brief sketch of the battles of the three days contained in the address. It reached 
me but the morning before it was sent to the press. 
14. 



210 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

after contesting' the ground for five hours, was obliged to yield to 
the enemy, whose force outnumbered them two to one ; and to- 
ward the close of the afternoon General Howard deemed it pru- 
dent to withdraw the two corps to the heights where we are now 
assembled. The greater part of the First Corps passed through 
the outskirts of the town, and reached the hill without serious 
loss or molestation. The Eleventh Corps and portions of the First, 
not being aware that the enemy had already entered the town 
from the north, attempted to force their way through Washington 
and Baltimore streets, which, in the crowd and confusion of the 
scene, they did with a heavy loss in prisoners. v 

General Howard was not unprepared for this turn in the for- 
tunes of the day. He had, in the course of the morning, caused 
Cemetery Hill to be occupied by General Steinwehr, with the 
Second division of the Eleventh Corps. About the time of the 
withdrawal of our troops to the hill, General Hancock arrived, 
having been sent by General Meade, on hearing of the death of 
Eeynolds, to. assume the command of the field till he himself 
could reach the front. In conjunction with General Howard, 
General Hancock immediately proceeded to post the troops and 
to repel an attack on our right flank. This attack was feebly made 
and promptly repulsed. At nightfall, our troops on the hill, who 
had so gallantly sustained themselves during the toil and peril of 
the day, were cheered by the arrival of General SloCitm with the 
Twelfth Corps and of General Sickles with a part of the Third. 

Such was the fortunes of the first day, commencing with de- 
cided success to our arms, followed by a check, but ending in the 
occupation of this all-important position. To you, fellow citizens 
of Gettysburg, I need not attempt to portray the anxieties of the 
ensuing night. Witnessing, as you had done with sorrow, the 
withdrawal of our army through your streets, with a considerable 
loss of prisoners — mourning as you did over the brave men who 
had fallen — shocked with the wide spread desolation around you,' 
of which the wanton burning of the Harmon House had given 
the signal — ignorant of the near approach of General Meade, 
you passed the weary hours of the night in painful expectation. 

Long before the dawn of the 2d of July, the new Commander- 
in-Chief had reached the ever-memorable field of service and glory. 
Having received intelligence of the events in progress, and in- 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 211 

formed by the reports of Generals Hancock and Howard, of the 
favorable 'eharacter of the positions, he determined to give battle 
to the enemy at this point. He accordingly directed the remain- 
ing corps of the army to concentrate at Gettysburg with all pos- 
sible expedition, and breaking up his head-quarters at Taney- 
town at ten P. M., he arrived at the front at one o'clock in the 
morning of the 2d of July. Few were the moments given to sleep, 
during the rapid watches of that brief midsummer's night, by officers 
or men, though half of our troops were exhausted by the conflict 
of the (lay, and the residue wearied by the forced marches which 
had brought them to the rescue. The full moon, veiled by thin 
clouds, shone down that night on a strangely unwonted scene. 
The silence of the grave-yard was broken by the heavy tramp of 
armed men, by the neigh of the war-horse, the harsh rattle of the 
wheels of the artillery hurrying to their stations, and all the in- 
describable tumult of preparation. The various corps of the army, 
as they arrived, were moved to their positions, on the spot where 
we are assembled and the ridges that extend south-east and south- 
west j batteries were planted and breastworks thrown up. The 
Second and Fifth Qorps, with the rest of the Thud, had reached 
the ground by seven o'clock A. M. ; but it was not till two o'clock 
in the afternoon that Sedgwick arrived with the Sixth Corps. 
He had marched thirty-four miles since nine o'clock on the even- 
ing before. It was only on his arrival that the Union army ap- 
proached an equality of numbers with' that of the Rebels, who 
were posted upon the opposite and parallel ridge, distant from a 
mile to a mile and a half, overlapping our position on either wing, 
and probably exceeding by ten thousand the arrny of General 
Meade.* 

And here I cannot but remark on the providential inaction of 
the Eebel army. Had the contest been renewed by it at day- 
light on the 2d of July, with the First and Eleventh Corps ex- 
hausted by the battle and the retreat, the Third and Twelfth weary 
from their forced march, and the Second, Fifth and Sixth not yet 

*ln the Address as originally prepared, judging from the best sources of information 
then within my reach, I assumed the equality of the two armies on the 2d and 3d of 
July. Subsequent inquiry has led me to think that I underrated somewhat the strength 
of Lee's force at Gettysburg, and I have corrected the text accordingly. General 
Halleck, however, in his official report accompanying the President's messages, states 
the armies to have been equal. 



212 SOLDIERS 7 FATIOKAL CEMETERY. 

arrived, nothing but a miracle conlcl have saved the army from a 
great disaster. Instead of this, the day dawned, the sirn rose, the 
cool hours of the morning passed, the forenoon and a considerable 
part of the afternoon wore away, without the slightest aggressive 
movement on the part of the enemy. Thus time was given for 
half of our forces to arrive and take their place in the lines, while 
the rest of the army enjoyed a much needed half day's repose. 

At length, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the 
work of death began. A signal gun from the hostile batteries was 
followed by a tremendous cannonade along the Rebel lines, and 
this by a heavy advance of infantry, brigade after brigade, com- 
mencing on the enemy's right against the left of our army, and 
so onward to the left centre, A forward movement of General 
Sickles, to gain a commanding position from which to repel the 
Bebel attack, drew upon him a destructive fire from the enemy's 
batteries, and a furious assault from Loxgstreet's and Hill's 
advancing troops. After a brave resistance on the part of his corps 
he was forced back, himself falling severely wounded. This was 
the critical moment of the second day ; but the Fifth and part of 
the Sixth Corps, with portions of the First and Second, were 
promptly brought to the support of the Third. The struggle was 
fierce and murderous, but by sunset our success was decisive, and 
the enemy was driven, back in confusion. The most important 
service was rendered towards the close of the day, in the memo- 
rable advance between Bound Top and Little Bound Top, by Gen- 
eral Crawford's division of the Fifth Corps, consisting of two 
brigades of the Pennsylvania Beserves, of which one company 
was from this town and neighborhood. The Bebel force was driven 
back with great loss in killed and prisoners. At eight o'clock in 
the evening a desperate attempt was made by the enemy to storm 
the position of the Eleventh Corps on Cemetery Hill ; but here, 
too, after a terrible conflict, he was repulsed with immense loss. 
Ewell, on our extreme right, which had been weakened by the 
withdrawal of the troops sent over to support our left, had suc- 
ceeded in gaining a foothold within a portion of our lines, near 
Spangler's spring. This was the only advantage obtained by the 
Bebels to compensate them for the disasters of the day, and of 
this, as we shall see, they were soon deprived. 

Such was the result of the second act of this eventful drama, — 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 21 3 

a day hard fought, and at one moment anxious, but, with the ex- 
ception of the slight reverse just named, crowned with dearly 
earned but uniform success to our arms, auspicious of a glorious 
termination of the final struggle. On these good omens the night 
fell. 

In the course of the night, General Geary returned to his po- 
sition on the right, from which he had hastened the day before to 
strengthen the Third Corps, He immediately engaged the enemy, 
and, after a sharp and decisive action, drove them out of our lines, 
recovering the ground which had been lost on the preceding day. 
A spirited contest was kept up all the morning on this part of the 
line : but General Geary, reinforced by Wheaton's brigade of 
the Sixth Corps, maintained his position, and inflicted very severe 
losses on the'Bebels. 

Such was the cheering commencement of the third day's work, 
and with it ended all serious attempts of the enemy on our right. 
As on the preceding day, his efforts were now mainly directed 
against our left centre and left wing. From eleven till half-past 
one o'clock, all was still — a solemn pause of preparation, as if both 
armies were nerving themselves for the supreme effort. At length 
the awful silence, more terrible than the wildest tumult of battle, 
was broken by the roar of two hundred and fifty pieces of artil- 
lery from the opposite ridges, joining in a eannonade of unsurpassed 
violence — the Rebel batteries along two-thirds of their line pouring 
their fire upon Cemetery Hill, and the centre and left wing of our 
army. Having attempted in this way for two hours, but without 
success, to shake the steadiness of our lines, the enemy rallied 
his forces for a last grand assault. Their attack was principally 
directed against the position of our Second Corps. Successive 
lines of Rebel infantry moved forward with equal spirit and steadi- 
ness from their cover on the wooded erest of Seminary Eidge, 
crossing the intervening plain, and, supported right and left by 
their choicest brigades, charged furiously up to our batteries. 
Our own brave troops of the Second Corps, supported by Double- 
day's division and Stannard's brigade of the First, received the 
shock with firmness; the ground on both sides was long and fiercely 
contested, and was covered with the killed and the wounded ; the 
tide of battle flowed and ebbed across the plain, till, after "a de- 
termined and gallant struggle," as it is pronounced by general 



214 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

Lee, the Kebel advance, consisting of two-thirds of Hill's corps, 
and the ~whole of Long-street's — including Pickett's division, 
the elite of his corps, which had not yet been under fire,' and was 
now depended upon to decide the fortune of this last eventful 
day — was driven back with prodigious slaughter, discomfitted and 
broken. While these events were in progress at our left centre, 
the enemy was driven, with a considerable loss of prisoners, from 
a strong position on our extreme left, from which he was annoying 
our forces on Little Bound Top. In the terrific assault on our 
centre, Generals Hancock and Gibbon were wounded. In the 
Eebel army, Generals Armistead, Kemper, Pettigrew, and 
Trimble were wounded, the first named mortally, the latter also 
made prisoner, General Garrett was killed, and thirty-five hun- 
dred officers and men made prisoners. 

These were the expiring agonies of the three days' conflict, and 
with them the battle ceased. It was fought by the Union army 
with courage and skill, from the first cavalry skirmish on Wed- 
nesday morning, to the fearful route of the enemy on Friday 
afternoon, by every arm and every rank of the service, by officers 
and men, by cavalry, artillery, and infantry. The superiority of 
numbers was with the enemy, who were led by the ablest com- 
manders in their service ; and if the Union force had the advantage 
of a strong position, the Confederates had that of choosing time 
and place, the prestige of former victories over the army of the 
Potomac, and of the success of the first day. Victory does not 
always fall to the lot of those who deserve it; but that so decisive 
a triumph, under circumstances like these, was gained by our troops, 
I would ascribe, under Providence, to the spirit of exalted pat- 
riotism that animated them, atid the consciousness that they were 
fighting in a righteous cause. 

All hope of defeating our army, and securing what General 
Lee calls "the valuable results" of such an achievement, having 
vanished, he thouglit only of rescuing from destruction the re- 
mains of his shattered forces. In killed, wounded and missing., 
he had, as far as can be ascertained, suffered a loss of about 37,- 
000 men — rather more than a third of the army with which he is 
supposed to have marched into Pennsylvania. Perceiving that 
Ms only safety was in rapid retreat, he commenced withdrawing 
his troops at daybreak on the 4th, throwing up field works in fr©nt 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 215 

of our left, which, assuming the appearance of a new position, 
were intended probably to protect the rear of his army in their 
retreat. That day — sad celebration of the 4th of July for an army 
of Americans — was passed by him in hurrying off his trains. By 
nightfall, the main army was in full retreat upon the Oashtown 
and Fairfield roads, and it moved with such precipitation, that, 
short as the nights were, by day-light the following morning, not- 
withstanding a heavy rain, the rear guard had left its position. 
The struggle of the last two days resembled, in many respects, 
the battle of Waterloo; and if, in the evening of the third day, 
General Meade, like the Duke of Wellington, had had the as- 
sistance of a powerful auxiliary army to take up the pursuit, the 
route of the Rebels would have been as complete as that of Napo- 
leon. 

Owing to the circumstances just named, the intentions of the 
enemy were not apparent on the 4th. The moment his retreat 
was discovered, the following morning, he was pursued by our 
cavalry on the Oashtown road and through the Emmitsburg and 
Monterey passes, and by Sedgwick's corps on the Fairfield road. 
His rear guard was briskly attacked at Fairfield ; a great number 
of wagons and ambulances were captured in the passes of the moun- 
tains ; the country swarmed with his stragglers, and his wounded 
were literally emptied from the vehicles containing them into the 
farm houses on the road. General Lee, in his report, makes re- 
peated mention of the Union prisoners whom he conveyed into 
Virginia, somewhat overstating their number. He states, also, 
that "such of his wounded that were in a condition to be removed," 
were forwarded to Williamsport. He does not mention that the 
number of his wounded not removed, and left to the Christian 
care of the victors, was 7,540, not one Of whom failed of any at- 
tention which it was possible, under the circumstances of the case, 
to afford them, not one of whom, certainly, has been put upon 
Libby prison fare — lingerin g death by starvation. Heaven forbid, 
however, that we should claim any merit for the exercise of com- 
mon humanity. 

Under the protection of the mountain ridge, whose narrow 
passes are easily held even by a retreating army, General Lee 
reached Williamsport in safety, and took up a strong position 
opposite to that place. General Meade necessarily pursued with 



216 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

the main army by a flank movement through Middletown, Turner's 
Pass having been secured by General French. Passing through 
the South mountain, the Union army came up with that of the 
Eebels on the 12th, and found it securely posted on the heights 
of Marsh run. The position was reconnoitred, and preparations 
made for an attack on the 13th. The depth of the river, swollen 
by the recent rains, authorized the expectation that the enemy 
would be brought to a general engagement the following day. 
An advance was accordingly made by General Meade on the 
morning of the 14th ; but it was soon found that the Eebels had 
escaped in the night, with such haste that Ewell's corps forded 
the river where the water was breast-high. The cavalry, which 
had rendered the most important service during the three days, 
and in harrassing the enemy's retre at, was now sent in pursuit, 
and captured two guns and a large number of prisoners. In an 
action which took place at Falling Waters, Gen. Pettigrew was 
mortally wounded. General Meade, in further pursuit of the 
Eebels, crossed the Potomac at Berlin. Thus again covering the 
approaches to Washington, he compelled the enemy to pass the 
Blue Eidge at one of the upper gags ; and in about six weeks from 
the commencement of the campaign, General Lee found himself 
again on the south side of the Eappahannock, with the probable 
loss of about a third part of his army. 

Such, most inadequately recounted, is the history of the ever- 
memorable three days, and of the events immediately preceding 
and following. It has been pretended, in order to diminish the 
magnitude of this disaster to the Eebe] cause, that it was merely 
the repulse of an attack on a strongly defended position. The 
tremendous losses on both sides are a sufficient answer to this 
misrepresentation, and attest the courage and obstinacy with which 
the three days' battle was waged. Few of the great conflicts ot> 
modern times have cost victors and vanquished so great a sacrifice. 
On the Union side there fell, in the whole campaign, of generals 
killed, Eeynolds, Weed and Zook, and wounded, Barlow, 
Barnes, Butterfield, Doubled ay, Gibbon, Graham, Hancock, 
Sickles and Warren ; while of officers below the rank of Gen- 
eral, and men, there were 2,834 killed, 13,709 wounded, and 6,643 
missing. On the Confederate side, there were killed on the field 
or mortally wounded, Generals Armistead, Barksdale, Garnett, 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 217 

Pender, Pettigrew and Semmes, and wounded, Hetii, Hood, 
Johnson, Kemper, Kimball and Trimble. Of officers below 
the rank of general, and men, there were taken prisoners, includ- 
ing the wounded, 13,G21, an amount ascertained officially. Of 
the wounded in a condition to be removed, of the killed and the 
missing, the enemy has made no return. They are estimated, 
from the best data which the nature of the case admits, at 23,000. 
General Meade also captured 3 cannon, and 41 standards ; and 
21,978 small arms were collected on the battle-field. 

I must leave to others, who can do it from personal observation, 
to describe the mournful spectacle presented by these hill-sides 
and planes at the close of the terrible conflict. It was a saying 
of the Duke of Wellington, that next to a defeat, the saddest 
thing was a victory. The horrors of the battle field, after the 
contest is over, the sights and sounds of woe, — let me throw a pall 
over the scene, which no words can adequately depict to those 
who have not witnessed it, on which no one who has witnessed it, 
and who has a heart in his bosom, can bear to dwell. One drop 
of balm alone, one drop of heavenly, life-giving balm, mingles in 
this bitter cup of misery. Scarcely has the cannon ceased to roar, 
when the brethren and sisters of Christian benevolence, ministers 
of compassion, angles of pity, hasten to the field and the hos- 
pital, to moisten the parched tongue, to bind the ghastly wounds, 
to soothe the parting agonies alike of friend and foe, and to catch 
the last whispered message of love from dying lips. "Carry this 
miniature back to my dear wife, but do not take it from my bosom 
till I am gone." "Tell my little sister not to grieve for me ; I am 
willing to die for my country." "Oh, that my mother were here !" 
When, since Aaron stood between the living and the dead, was 
there ever so gracious a ministry as this ? It has been said that 
it is a characteristic of Americans to treat woman with a defer- 
ence not paid to them in any other country. I will not undertake 
to say whether this is so ; but I will say, that since this terrible 
war has been waged, the woman of the loyal States, if never be- 
fore, have entitled themselves to our highest admiration and grati- 
tude, — alike those who at home, often with fingers unused to the 
toil, often bowed beneath their own domestic cares, have perform- 
ed an amount of daily labor not exceeded by those who work for 
their daily bread, and those who, in the hospital and the tents of 



218 • SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

the Sanitary and Christian Commissions, have rendered services 
which millions could not buy. Happily, the labor and the service 
are their own reward. Thousands of matrons and thousands of 
maidens have experienced a delight in their homely toils and ser- 
vices, compared with which the pleasures of the ball room and the 
opera house are tame and unsatisfactory. This, on earth, is reward 
enough, but a richer is in store for them. Yes, brothers, sisters of 
charity, while you bind up the wounds of the poor sufferers — the 
humblest, perhaps, that have shed their blood for the country — 
forget not Who it is that will hereafter say to you, "Inasmuch as 
ye have done it unto one of the lea'st of these my brethren, ye 
have done it unto me." 

And now, friends, fellow citizens, as we stand among these 
honored graves, the momentous question presents itself: AYhich 
of the two parties to the war is responsible for all this suffering, 
for this dreadful sacrifice of life, the lawful and constitutional 
government of the United States, or the ambitious men who have 
rebelled against it? I say "rebelled" against it, although Earl 
Bussell, the British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, in 
his recent temperate and conciliatory speech in Scotland, seems to 
intimate that no prejudice ought to attach to that word, inasmuch 
as our English forefathers rebelled against Charles I. and James 
II. , an d our American fathers rebelled against George III. These, 
certainly, are venerable precedents, but they prove only that it is 
just and proper to rebel against oppressive governments. They 
do not prove that it is just and proper for the son of James II. to 
rebel against George L, or his grand-son Charles Edward to 
rebel against George II. ; nor, as it seems to me, ought these 
dynastic struggles, little better than family quarrels, to be com- 
pared with this monstrous conspiracy against the American Union. 
These precedents do not prove that it was just and proper for the 
"disappointed great men" of the cotton-growing States to rebel 
against "the most beneficent government of which history gives 
us any account,"' as the Vice President of the Confederacy, in 
November, 18(50, charged them with doing. They do not create 
a presumption even in favor of the disloyal slaveholders of the 
South, who, living under a government of which Mr. Jefferson 
Davis, in the session of 1860-61, said that it "was the best govern- 
ment ever instituted by man, unexceptionably administered, and 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 219 

under which the people have been prosperous beyond comparison 
with any other people whose career has been recorded in history," 
rebelled against it because their aspiring politicians, himself among 
the rest, were in danger of losing their monopoly of its offices. 
What would have been thought by an impartial posterity of the 
American rebellion against George III., if the colonists had at 
all times been more than equally represented in parliament, and 
James Otis, and Patrick Henry, and Washington, and Frank- 
lin, and the Adamses, and Hancock, and Jefferson, and men 
of their stamp, had for two generations enjoyed the confidence 
of the sovereign and administered the government of the empire? 
What would have been thought of the rebellion against Charles 
I., if Cromwell, and the men of his school, had been the respon- 
sible advisers of that prince from his accession to the throne, and 
then, on account of a partial change in the ministry, had brought 
his head to the block, and involved the country in a desolating 
war, for the sake of dismembering it and establishing a new govern- 
ment south of the Trent? What would have been thought of the 
Whigs of 1688, if they had themselves composed the cabinet of 
James II., and been the advisers of the measures and the promo- 
ters of the policy which drove him into exile? The puritans of 
1640, and the Whigs of 1688, rebelled against arbitrary power in 
order to establish constitutional liberty. If they had risen against 
Charles and James because those monarchs favored equal rights, 
and in order themselves, ''for the first time in the history of the 
world," to establish an oligarchy ''founded on the corner-stone of 
slavery," they would truly have furnished a precedent for the 
Eebels of the South, but their cause would not have been sus- 
tained by the eloquence of Pym, or of Somers, nor sealed with 
the blood of Hampden or Eussell. 

I call the war which the Confederates are waging against the 
Union a "rebellion," because it is one, and in grave matters it is 
best to call things by their right names. I speak of it as a crime, 
because the Constitution of the United States so regards it, and 
puts "rebellion" on a par with "invasion." The Constitution 
and law not only of England, but of every civilized country, re- 
gard them in the same light ; or rather they consider the rebel in 
arms as far worse than the alien enemy. To levy war against 
the United States is the constitutional definition of treason, and 



220 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

that crime is by every civilized government regarded as the highest 
which citizen or subject can commit. Not content with the sanc- 
tions of human justice, of all the crimes against the law of the 
land it is singled out for the denunciations of religion. The lit- 
anies of every church in Christendom whose ritual embraces that 
office, as far as I am aware, from the metropolitan cathedrals of 
Europe to the humblest missionary chapel in the islands of the sea, 
concur with the Church of England in imploring the Sovereign 
of the Universe, by the most awful adjurations which the heart 
of man can conceive or his tongue utter, to deliver us from ''se- 
dition, privy conspiracy and rebellion." And reason good; for 
while a rebellion against tyranny — a rebellion designed, after 
prostrating arbitrary power, to establish free government on the 
basis of justice and truth — is an enterprise on which good men and 
angels may look with complacency, an unprovoked rebellion of 
ambitious men against a beneficent government, for the purpose — 
the avowed purpose — of establishing, extending and perpetuating 
any form of injustice and wrong, is an imitation on earth of that 
first foul revolt of "the Infernal Serpent," against which the Su- 
preme Majesty of Heaven sent forth the armed myriads of his 
angels, and clothed the right arm of his Son with the three-bolted 
thunders of omnipotence. 

Lord Bacon, in "the true marshalling of the sovereign degrees 
of honor," assigns the first place to "the Conditores Imperiorum, 
founders of States and Commonwealths ;" and, truly, to build up 
from the discordant elements of our nature, the passions, the in- 
terests and the opinions of the individual man, the rivalries of 
family, clan and tribe, the influences of climate and geographical 
position, the accidents of peace and war, accumulated for ages — 
to build up from these oftentimes warring elements a well-com- 
pacted, prosperous and powerful State, if it were to be accom- 
plished by one effort or in one generation, would require a more 
than mortal skill. To contribute in some notable degree to this, 
the greatest work of man, by wise and patriotic council in peace 
and loyal heroism in war, is as high as human merit can well rise, 
and far more than to any of those to whom Bacon assigns the 
highest place of honor, whose names can hardly be repeated with- 
out a wondering smile — Romulus, Cyrus, Cesar, Ottoman, 
Ismael — is it due to our Washington, as the founder of the Ameri- 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 221 

can Union. But if to achieve or help to achieve this greatest 
work of man's wisdom and virtne gives title to a place among 
the chief benefactors, rightful heirs of the benedictions, of man- 
kind, by equal reason shall the bold, bad men who seek to undo 
the noble work, JSversores Imperiorum, destroyers of States, who 
for base and selfish ends rebel against beneficent governments, 
seek to overturn wise constitutions, to lay powerful republican 
Unions at the foot of foreign thrones, to bring on civil and foreign 
war, anarchy at home, dictation abroad, desolation, ruin — by equal 
reason, I say, yes, a thousandfold stronger shall they inherit the 
execrations of the ages. 

But to hide the deformity of the crime under the cloak of that 
sophistry which strives to make the worse appear the better reason, 
we are told by the leaders of the Eebellion that in our complex 
system of government the separate States are "sovereigns," and 
that the central power is only an "agency" established by these 
sovereigns to manage certain little affairs — such, forsooth, as Peace, 
War, Army, Navy, Finance, Territory, and Eelations with the na- 
tive tribes — which they could not so conveniently administer them- 
selves. It happens, unfortunately for this theory, that the Federal 
Constitution (which has been adopted by the people of every 
State of the Union as much as their own State constitutions have 
been adopted, and is declared to be paramount to them) nowhere 
recognizes the States as "sovereigns" — in fact, that, by their names, 
it does not recognize them at all ; while the authority established 
by that instrument is recognized, in its text, not as an ''agency," 
but as "the Government of the United States." By that Consti- 
tution, moreover, which purports in its preamble to be ordained 
and established by "the People of the United States," it is ex- 
pressly provided, that "the members of the State legislatures, and 
all executive and judicial officers, shall be bound by oath or affir- 
mation to support the Constitution." Now it is a common thing, 
under all governments, for an agent to be bound by oath to be 
faithful to his sovereign ; but I never heard before of sovereigns 
being bound by oath to be faithful to their agency. 

Certainly, I do not deny that the separate States are clothed 
with sovereign powers for the administration of local affairs. It 
is one of the most beautiful features of our mixed system of gov- 
ernment ; but it is equally true, that, in adopting the Federal Con- 



222 SOLDIERS' XATIONAIi CEMETERY. 

stitution, the States abdicated, by express renunciation, all the 
most important functions of national sovereignty, and, by one 
comprehensive, self-denying clause, gave up all right to contra- 
vene the Constitution of the United States. Specifically, and by- 
enumeration, they renounced all the niost important prerogatives of 
independent States for peace and for war, — the right to keep trpops 
or slnps of war in time of peace, or to engage in war unless ac- 
tually invaded ; to enter into compact with another State or a for- 
eign power ; to lay any duty on tonnage, or any impost on exports 
or imports, without the consent of Congress ; to enter into any 
treaty, alliance, or confederation ; to grant letters of marque and 
reprisal, and to emit bills of credit — while all these powers and 
many others are expressly vested in the General Government. To 
ascribe to political communities, thus limited in their jurisdiction — 
who cannot even establish a post office on their own soil — the 
character of independent sovereignty, and to reduce a national 
organization, clothed with all the transcendent powers of govern- 
ment, to the name and condition of an "agency" of the States, 
proves nothing but that the logic of secession is on a par with its 
loyalty a,nd patrotisin. 

Oh, but ' 'the reserved rights ! " And what of the reserved rights ? 
The tenth amendment of the Constitution, supposed to provide 
for "reserved rights," is constantly misquoted. By that amend- 
ment, "the powers not delegated to the United States by the Con- 
stitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the 
States respectively, or to the people." The "powers" reserved 
must of course be such as coukl have been, but were not delegated 
to the United States, — could have been, but were not prohibited 
to the States ; but to speak of the right of an individual State to 
secede, as a poiver that could have been, though it was not dele- 
gated to the United States, is simple nonsense. 

But waiving this obvious absurdity, can it need a serious argu- 
ment to prove that there can be no State right to enter into a new 
confederation reserved under a constitution which expressly pro- 
hibits a State to "enter into any treaty, alliance, or confedera- 
tion," or any "agreement or compact with another State or a for- 
eign power !" To say that the State may, by enacting the per- 
liminary farce of secession, acquire the right to do the prohibited 
things — to say, for instance, that though the States, in forming 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 223 

the Constitution, delegated to the United States and prohibited 
to themselves the power of declaring war, there was by implica- 
tion reserved to each State the right of seceding and then declar- 
ing war ; that, though they expressly prohibited to the Spates and 
delegated to the United States the entire treaty-making power, 
they reserved by implication (for an express reservation is not 
pretended) to the individual States, to Florida, for instance, the 
right to secede, and then to make a treaty with Spain retroeeding 
that Spanish colony, and thus surrendering to a foreign power the 
key to the Gulf of Mexico, — to maintain propositions like these, 
with whatever affected seriousness it is done, appears to me egre- 
gious trifling. 

Pardon me, my friends, for dwelling on these wretched* sophis- 
tries. But it is these which conducted the armed hosts of rebel- 
lion to your doors on the terrible and glorious days of July, and 
which have brought upon the whole land the scourge of an aggres- 
sive and wicked war — a war which can have no other termination 
compatible with the permanent safety and welfare of the country, 
but the complete destruction of the military power of the enemy. 
I have, on other occasions, attempted to show that to yield to his 
demands and acknowledge his independence, thus resolving the 
Union at once into two hostile governments, with a certainty of 
further disintegration, would annihilate the strength and the in- 
fluence of the country as a member of the family of nations; 
afford to foreign powers the opportunity and the temptation for hu- 
miliating and disasterous interference in our affairs: wrest from 
the Middle and Western States some of their great natural out- 
lets to the sea, and of their most important lines of internal com- 
munication ; deprive the commerce and navigation of the country 
of two-thirds of our sea coast and of the fortresses which protect 
it ; not only so, but would enable each individual State — some of 
them with a white population equal to a good sized Northern 
county — or rather the dominant party in each State, to cede its 
territory, its harbors, its fortresses, the mouths of its rivers, to any 
foreign power. It cannot be that the people of the loyal States — 
that twenty-two millions of brave and prosperous freemen — will, 
for the temptation of a brief truce in an eternal border war, con- 
sent to this hideous national suicide. 

Do not think that I exaggerate the consequences of yielding to 



224 SOLDIEKS' NATIONAL CEMETEEY. 

the demands of the leaders of the rebellion. I understate theni. 
They require of us not only all the sacrifices I have named, not 
only the cession to them, a foreign and hostile power, of all the 
territory of the United States at present occupied by the Eebel 
forces, but the abandonment to them of the vast regions we have 
rescued from their grasp — of Maryland, of a part of Eastern Vir- 
ginia; and the whole of Western Virginia ; the sea coast of North 
and South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida ; Kentucky, Tennessee, 
and Missouri ; Arkansas, and the larger portion of Mississippi, 
Louisiana, and Texas — in most of which, with the exception of 
lawless guerillas, there is not a Eebel in arms, in all of which the 
great majority of the people are loyal to the Union. We must give 
back, too, the helpless colored population, thousands of whom are 
perilling their lives in the ranks of our armies, to a bondage ren- 
dered tenfold more bitter by the momentary enjoyment of free- 
dom. Finally, we must surrender every man in the Southern 
country, white or black, who has moved a finger or spoken a word 
for the restoration of the Union, to a reign of terror as remorseless 
as that of Eobespierre, which has been the chief instrument by 
which the Eebellion has been organized and sustained, and which 
has already filled the prisons of the South with noble men, whose 
only crime is that they are not the worst of criminals. The South 
is full of such men. I do not believe there has been a day since 
the election of President Lentcolx, when, if an ordinance of seces- 
sion could have been fairly submitted, after a free discussion, to 
the mass of the people in any single Southern State, a majority 
of ballots would have been given in its favor. No, not in South 
Carolina. It is not possible that the majority of the people, even 
of that State, if permitted, without fear or favor, to give a ballot 
on the question, would have abandoned a leader like Petigetj, 
and all the memories of the Gadsdens, the Eutledges, and the 
Coteswoteh Pestcejseys of the revolutionary and constitutional 
age, to follow the agitators of the present day. 

ISTor must we be deterred from the vigorous prosecution of the 
war by the suggestion, continually thrown out by the Eebels and 
those who sympathize with them, that, however it might have 
been at an earlier stage, there has tyeen engendered by the opera- 
tions of the war a state of exasperation and bitterness which, in- 
dependent of all "reference to the original nature of the matters 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 225 

in controversy, will forever prevent the restoration of the Union, 
and the return of harmony between the two great sections of the 
country. This opinion I take to be entirely without foundation. 

No man can deplore more than I do the miseries of every kind 
unavoidably incident to war. Who could stand on this spot and 
call to mind the scenes of the first day of July with any other 
feeling *? A sad foreboding of what would ensue, if war should 
break out .between North and South, has haunted me through life, 
and led me, perhaps too long, to tread in the path of hopeless 
compromise, in the fond endeavor to concilitate those who were 
predetermined not to be concilitated. But it is not true, as is pre- 
tended by the Eebels and their sympathizers, that the war has 
been carried on by the United States without entire regard to 
those temperaments which are enjoined by the law of nations, 
by our modern civilization, and by the spirit of Christianity. It 
would be quite easy to point out, in the recent military history of 
the leading European powers, acts of violence and cruelty, in the 
prosecution of their wars, to which no parallel can be found among 
us. In fact, when we consider the peculiar bitterness with which 
civil wars are almost invariably waged, we may justly boast 
of the manner in which the United States have carried on the 
contest. It is of course impossible to prevent the lawless acts of 
stragglers and deserters, or the occasional unwarrantable proceed- 
ings of subordinates on distant stations; but I do not believe 
there is, in all history, the record of a civil war of such gigantic 
dimensions where so little has been done in the spirit of vindic- 
tiveness as in this war, by the government and commanders 
of the United States ; and this notwithstanding the provocation 
given by the Rebel Government by assuming the responsibility of 
wretches like Quantrell, refusing quarter to colored troops and 
scourging and selling into slavery free colored men from the North 
who fall into their hands, by covering the sea with pirates, refus- 
ing a just exchange of prisoners, while they crowded their armies 
with paroled prisoners not exchanged, and starving prisoners of 
war to death. 

In the next place, if there are any present who believe that, in 

addition to the effect of the military operations of the war, the 

confiscation acts and emancipation proclamations have embittered 

the Rebels beyond the possibility of reconciliation, I would re- 

15 



\ 

226 SOLDIEKS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

quest them to reflect that the tone of the Rebel leaders and Rebel 
press was just as bitter in the first months of the war, nay, before 
a gun was fired, as it is now. There were sjjeeches made in Con- 
gress in the very last session before the outbreak of the Rebellion, 
so ferocious as to show that their authors were under the influence 
of a real frenzy. At the present day, if there is any discrimina- 
tion made by the Confederate press in the affected scorn, hatred 
and contumely with which every shade of opinion and sentiment 
in the loyal States is treated, the bitterest contempt is bestowed 
upon those at the North who still speak the language of compro- 
mise, and who condemn those measures of the administration which 
are alleged to have rendered the return of peace hopeless. 

jSTo, my friends, that gracious Providence which overrules all 
things for the best, ''from seeming evil still educing good," has 
so constituted our natures, that the violent excitement of the pas- 
sions in one direction is generally followed by a reaction in an 
opposite direction, and the sooner for the violence. If it were not 
so — if injuries inflicted and retaliated of necessity led to new 
retaliations, with forever accumulating compound interest of re- 
venge, then the world, thousands of years ago, would have been 
turned into an earthly hell, and the nations of the earth would 
have been resolved into clans of furies and demons, each forever 
warring with his neighbor. But it is not so ; all history teaches 
a different lesson. The Wars of the Roses in England lasted an 
entire generation, from the battle of St. Albans in 1455, to that of 
Bosworth Field, in 1485. Speaking of the former, Hume says : — 
"This was the first blood spilt in that fatal quarrel, which was not 
finished in less than a course of thirty years ; which was signalized 
by twelve pitched battles ; which opened a scene of extraordinary 
fierceness and cruelty ; is computed to have cost the lives of eighty 
princes of the blood ; and almost entirely annihilated the ancient 
nobility of England. The strong attachments which, at that time, 
men of the same kindred bore to each other, and the vindictive 
spirit which was considered a point of honor, rendered the great 
families implacable in their resentments, and widened every mo- 
ment the breach between the parties." Such was the state of 
things in England under which an entire generation grew up ; 
but when Henry VII., in whom the titles of the two Houses were 
united, went up to London after the battle of Bosworth Field, to 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 227 

mount the throne, he was everywhere received with joyous accla- 
mations, "as one ordained and sent from Heaven to put an end to 
the dissensions," which had so long afflicted the country. 

The great rebellion of England of the seventeenth century, 
after long and angry premonitions, may be said to have begun 
with the calling of the Long Parliament in 1640, and to have ended 
with the return of Charles II., in 1660 — twenty years of discord, 
conflict and civil war ; of confiscation, plunder, havoc ; a proud 
hereditary peerage trampled in the dust ; a national church over- 
turned, its clergy beggared, its most eminent prelate put to death ; 
a military despotism established in the ruins of a monarchy which 
had subsisted seven hundred years, and the legitimate sovereign 
brought to the block ; the great families which adhered to the king 
proscribed, impoverished, ruined ; prisoners of war — a fate Worse 
than starvation in Libby — sold to slavery in the West Indies; in 
a word, everything that can embitter and madden contending 
factions. Such was the state of things for twenty years ; and yet, 
by no gentle transition, but suddenly, and "when the restoration 
of affairs appeared most hopeless," the son of the beheaded sov- 
ereign was brought back to his father's blood-stained throne, with 
such "unexpressible and universal joy," as led the merry monarch 
to exclaim, "he doubted it had been his own fault he had been 
absent so long, for he saw nobody who did not protest he had 
ever wished for his return." "In this wonderful manner," says 
Clarendon, "and with this incredible expedition did God put an 
end to a rebellion that had raged near twenty years, and had been 
carried on with all the horrid circumstances of murder, devasta- 
tion and parracide that lire and sword, in the hands of the most 
wicked men in the world," (it is a royalist that is speaking,) "could 
be instruments of, almost to the desolation of the two kingdoms, 
and the exceeding defacing and deforming of the third. , . . . By 
these remarkable steps did the merciful hand of God, in this short 
space of time, uot only bind up and heal all those wounds, but 
even made the scar as undiscernable as, in respect of the deep- 
ness, was possible, which was a glorious addition to the deliver- 
ance." 

In Germany, the wars of the Eeformation and of Charles V., 
in the sixteenth century, the Thirty Years' war in the seventeenth 
century, the Seven Years' war in the eighteenth century, not to 



228 soldiers' national cemetery. 

speak of other less celebrated contests, entailed upon that country 
all the miseries of intestine strife for more than three centuries. 
At the close of the last named war — which was the shortest of all, 
and waged in the most civilized age — "an officer" says Archen- 
holz, "rode through seven villages in Hesse, and found in them 
but one human being." More than three hundred principalities, 
comprehended in the Empire, fermented with the fierce passions 
of proud and petty States ; at the commencement of this period 
the castles of robber counts frowned upon every hill-top ; a dread- 
ful secret tribunal, whose seat no one knew, whose power none 
could escape, froze the hearts of men with terror throughout the 
land ; religious hatred mingled its bitter poison in the seething 
caldron of provincial animosity; but of all these deadly enmities 
between the States of Germany scarcely the memory remains. 
There are controversies in that country, at the present day, but 
they grow mainly out of the rivalry of the two leading powers. 
There is no country in the world in which the sentiment of na- 
tional brotherhood is stronger. 

In Italy, on the breaking up of the Roman Empire, society 
might be said to be resolved into its original elements — into hostile 
atoms, whose only movement was that of repulsion. Euthless 
barbarians had destroyed the old organizations, and covered the 
land with a merciless feudalism. As the new civilization grew 
up, under the wing of the church, the noble families and the wall- 
ed towns fell madly into conflict with each other ; the secular feud 
of Pope and Emperor scourged the land; province against pro- 
vince, city against city, street against street, waged remorseless 
war with each other from father to son, till Dante was able to fill 
his imaginary hell with the real demons of Italian history. So 
ferocious had the factions become, that the great poet-exile him- 
self, the glory of his native city and of his native language, was, 
by a decree of the municipality, condemned to be burned alive if 
found in the city of Florence. But these deadly feuds and hatred 
yielded to political influences, as the hostile cities were grouped 
into States under stable governments ; the lingering traditions of 
the ancient animosities gradually died away, and now Tuscan and 
Lombard, Sardinian and Neapolitan, as if to shame the degene- 
rate sons of America, are joining in one cry for a united Italy. 

In France, not to go back to the civil wars of the League, in 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 229 

the sixteenth century, and of the Fronde, in the seventeenth ; not 
to speak of the dreadful scenes throughout the kingdom, which 
followed the revocation of the edict of Nantes ; we have, in the 
great revolution which commenced at the close of the last cen- 
tury, seen the blood-hounds of civil strife let loose as rarely be- 
fore in the history of the world. The reign of terror established 
at Paris stretched its bloody Briarean arms to every city and vil- 
lage in the land, and if the most deadly feuds which ever divided 
a people had the .power to cause permanent alienation and hatred, 
this surely was the occasion. But far otherwise the fact. In 
seven years feom the fall of Bobespierre, the strong arm of the 
youthful conqueror brought order out of this chaos of crime and 
woe ; Jacobins whose hands were scarcely cleansed from the best 
blood of France met the returning emigrants, whose estates they 
had confiscated and whose kindred they had dragged to the guil - 
lotine, in the Imperial antechambers; and when, after another 
turn of the wheel of fortune, Louis XVIII. was restored to his 
throne, he took the regicide Fouche, who had voted for his brother's 
death, to his cabinet and confidence. 

The people of loyal America will never ask you, sir, to take to 
your confidence or admit again to a share in the government the 
hard-hearted men whose cruel lust of power has brought this deso- 
lating war upon the land, but there is no personal bitterness felt 
even against them. They may live, if they can bear to live after 
wantonly causing the death of so many thousands of their fellow- 
men ; they may live in safe obscurity beneath the shelter of the 
government they have sought to overthrow, or they may fly to 
the protection of the governments of Europe — some of them are 
already there, seeking, happily in vain, to obtain the aid of for- 
eign powers in furtherance of their own treason. There let them 
stay. The humblest dead soldier, that lies cold and stiff in his 
grave before us, is an object of envy beneath the clods that cover 
him, in comparison with the living man, I care not with what 
trumpery credentials he may be furnished, who is willing to grovel 
at the foot of a foreign throne for assistance in compassing the 
ruin of his country. 

But the hour is coming and now is, when the power of the 
leaders of the Eebellion to delude and inflame must cease. There 
is no bitterness on the part of the masses. The people of the 



230 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

South are not going to wage an eternal war, for the wretched pre- 
text by which this BebeHion is sought to be justified. The bonds 
that unite us as one people — a substantial community of origin, 
language, belief, and law, (the four great ties that hold the so- 
cieties of men together ;) common national and political interests ; 
a common history; a common pride in a glorious ancestry; a 
common interest in this great heritage of blessings ; the very 
geographical features of the country ; the mighty rivers that cross 
the lines of climate and thus facilitate the interchange of natural 
and industrial products, while the wonder-working arm of the 
engineer has levelled the mountain-walls which separate the East 
and West, compelling your own Alleghenies, my Maryland and 
Pennsylvania friends, to open wide their everlasting doors to the 
chariot- wheels of traffic and travel ; these bonds of union are of 
perennial force and energy, while the causes of alienation are 
imaginary, factitious and transient. The heart of the people, 
North and South, is for the Union. Indications, to plain to be 
mistaken, announce the fact, both in the East and the West of 
the States in rebellion. In North Carolina and Arkansas the fatal 
charm at length is broken. At Raleigh and Little Rock the lips 
of honest and brave men are unsealed, and an independent press 
is unlimbering its artillery. When its rifled cannon shall begin to 
roar, the hosts of treasonable sophistry — the mad delusions of the 
day — will fly like the Rebel army through the passes of yonder 
mountain. The weary masses of the people are yearning to see 
the dear old flag again floating upon their capitols, and they sigh 
for the return of the peace, prosperity, and happiness, which 
they enjoyed under a government whose power was felt only in 
its blessings. 

And now, friends, fellow citizens of Gettysburg and Pennsyl- 
vania, and you from remoter States, let me again, as we part, in- 
voke your benediction on these honored graves. You feel, -though 
the occasion is mournful, that it is good to be here. You feel that 
it was greatly auspicious for the cause of the country, that the 
men of the East and the men of the West, the men of nineteen 
sister States, stood side by side, on the perilous ridges of the battle. 
You now feel it a new bond of union, that they shall lie side by 
side, till the clarion, louder than that which marshalled them to 
the combat, shall awake their slumbers. God bless the Union ; 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 231 

it is dearer to us for the blood of brave men which has been shed 
in its defence. The spots on which they stood and fell ; these plea- 
sant heights; the fertile plain beneath them ; the thriving village 
whose streets so lately rang with the strange din of war; the fields 
beyond the ridge, where the noble Beynolds held the advancing 
foe at bay, and, while he gave up his own life, assured by his 
forethought and self-sacrifice the triumph of the two succeeding 
days ; the little streams which wind through the hills, on whose 
banks in after-times the wondering ploughman will turn up, with 
the rude weapons of savage warfare, the fearful missiles of modern 
artillery ; Seminary Eidge, the Peach Orchard, Cemetery, Culp, and 
Wolf Hill, Eoimd Top, Little Bound Top, humble names, hence- 
forward dear and famous — no lapse of time, no distance of space, 
shall cause you to be forgotton. "The whole earth," said Pericles, 
as he stood over the remains of his fellow citizens, who had fallen 
in the first year of the Peloponnesian war, ' : the whole earth is the 
sepulchre of illustrious men." All time, he might have added, is 
the millenium of their glory. Surely I would do no injustice to 
other noble achievements of the war, which have reflected such 
honor on both arms of the service, and have entitled the armies 
and navy of the United States, their officers and men, to the 
warmest thanks and the richest rewards which a grateful people 
can pay. But they, I am sure, will join us in saying, as we bid 
farewell to the dust of these martyr-heroes, that wheresoever 
throughout the civilized world the accounts of this great warfare 
are read, and down to the latest period of recorded time, in the 
glorious annals of our common country, there will be no brighter 
page than that which relates The Battle of Gettysburg. 



232 SOLDIERS 5 NATIONAL cemetery. 



HYMN 

COMPOSED BY B. B. FRENCH, ESQ., AT GETTYSBURG. 

'Tis holy ground — 
This spot, where, in their graves, 
We place our country's braves, 
Who fell in Freedom's holy cause, 
Fighting for liberties and laws ; 

Let tears abound. 

Here let them rest ; 
And summer's heat and winter's cold 
Shall glow and freeze above this mould — 
A thousand years shall pass away — 
A nation still shall mourn this clay, 

Which now is blest. 

Here, where they fell, 
Oft shall the widow's tear be shed, 
Oft shall fond parents mourn their dead ; 
The orphan here shall kneel and weep, 
And maidens, where their lovers sleep, 

Their woes shall tell. 

Great God in Heaven ! 
Shall all this sacred blood be shed ? 
Shall we thus niourn our glorious dead ? 
Oh, shall the end be wrath and woe, 
The knell of Freedom's overthrow, 

A country riven? 

It will not be ! 
We trust, O God ! thy gracious power 
To aid us in our darkest hour. 
This be our prayer — "O Father ! save 
A people's freedom from its grave. 

All praise to Thee !" 



SOLDIERS' UATIOXAL CEMETEBY. 233 



DEDICATORY ADDRESS 



PBESIDENT LINCOLN". 



Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth upon 
this continent a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated 
to the proposition that all men are created equal. 

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that 
nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long en- 
dure. We are met on a great battle field of that war. We are 
met to dedicate a portion of it as the final resting-place of those 
who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is alto- 
gether fitting and proper that we should do this. 

But in a larger sense we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, 
we cannot hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, 
who struggled here have consecrated it far above our power to add 
or detract. The world will little note nor long remember what 
we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for 
us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work 
that they have thus far so nobly carried on. It is rather for us to 
be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that 
from these honored dead we take increased devotion to the cause 
for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion — that we 
here highly resolve that the dead shall not have died in vain ; that 
the nation shall, under God, have a new birth of freedom, and that 
the government of the people, by the people, and for the people, 
shall not perish from the earth. 



234 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



BENEDICTION 

BY 

EEV. H. L. BAUGHER, D. D., 

PRESIDENT OF PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE, GETTYSBURG. 



O Thou King of kings and Lord of lords, God of the nations of 
the earth, who, by Thy kind providence hast permitted us to en- 
gage in these solemn services, grant us thy blessing. 

Bless this consecrated ground, and these holy graves. Bless 
the President of these United States, and his Cabinet. Bless the 
Governors and the Representatives of the States here assembled 
with all needed grace to conduct the affairs committed into their 
hands, to the glory of thy name, and the greatest good of the 
people. 

May this great nation be delivered from treason and rebellion 
at home, and from the power of enemies abroad. And now may 
the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God our Heavenly 
Father, and the fellowship of the Holy Ghost, be with you all. 
Amen. 



INCIDENTAL TO THE LAYING OP THE 



§mut Mm of tie §||0iittfe 



SOLDIERS 5 NATIONAL CEMETERY 



-A.X GETTYSBURG, JULY *3= 3 1865, 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 237 



ORDER OF THE PROCESSION 



CEREMONIES OF LAYING THE CORNER STONE OF THE MONUMENT 
IN THE SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY, JULY 4, 1865. 



Aids. Chief Marshal, Aids. 

Major-General John W. Geary, 

Cavalry. 

Artillery. 

Infantry. 

Major-General Meade and Staff, 

Escorted by First City Troop of Philadelphia. 

Officers and Soldiers of the army of the Potomac. 

Ex-Officers and Soldiers of the Army of the Potomac. 

Officers and Soldiers of the other Armies of the United States, 

Ex-Officers of the other armies of the United States. 
Officers and Ex-Officers of the Navy and Marine Corps of the 

United States. 

Marines. 

Soldiers of the War of 1812. 

The President. 

Lieutenant-General Grant and Staff. 

Vice- Admiral Farragitt and Staff. 

The Cabinet Ministers. 

The Diplomatic Corps. 

Ex-Presidents. 

Lieutenant- General Scott and Eear- Admiral Stewart. 

The Chief Justice and Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of 

the United States. 

The Orator, Chaplains and Poet. 

The Committee of Arrangements. 

The Governors of the several States and Territories and their 

Staffs. 



238 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

The Senate of the United States preceded by its Officers. 
The House of Eepresentatives of the United States preceded by 

its Officers. 
The Heads of the Departments of the Several States and Terri- 
tories. 
The Legislatures of the several States and Territories. 
The Board of Managers of the Soldiers' National Cemetery. 
The Board of Managers of the Antietam Cemetery. 
The Federal Judiciary and the Judiciary of the several States and 

Territories. 
The Assistant Secretaries of the Departments of the National 

Government. 

Officers of the Smithsonian Institution. 

Committee of Arrangements of the Borough of Gettysburg. 

The Press. 

Sanitary and Christian Commissions. 

Masonic Fraternity. 

Knights Templar. 

Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Other Benevolent Associations. 

Corporate Authorities of Cities. 

Society of the Cincinnati. 

The National Union Musical Associations of Baltimore. 

The Clergy. 

Beligious, Literary, Scientific and Industrial Associations. 

Loyal Leagues. 

Fire Companies. 

Citizens. 



\ 

SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 239 



PROGRAMME OF ARRANGEMENT, 

AND 

ORDER OF EXERCISES 



CEREMONIES OF LAYING THE CORNER STONE OF THE MONUMENT 
EST THE SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY, JULY 4, 1865. 



The Marshals and Chief U^arshal's Aids will assemble at the 
Court House, at half-past eight o'clock, A. M. 

The military will form in Gettysburg at nine o'clock, A. M., on 
Carlisle street, its right resting on the railroad. 

All civic bodies, except citizens, will assemble according to the 
foregoing printed programme, on York street, at the same hour. 
All citizens will form on Chambersburg street, with .the right 
resting on the square, at the same time. 

The head of the column will move at precisely ten o'clock, A. M. s 
up Baltimore street to the Cemetery Grounds. 

The military will form in line as may be directed, and present 
arms, when the President of the United States and all who are to 
occupy the stand will pass to the same. 

Ladies will occupy the left of the stand, and it is desirable that 
they be upon the ground as early as ten o'clock, A. M. 

The exercises will take place as soon as the entire procession is 
in position on the ground, as follows : 

Music — Band. 

Prayer by the Eev. Stephen H Tyng, D. D, 

Music — " French's Hymn" — Union Musical Association. 

Introductory Bemarks by the President of the United 

States. 

Music — "Hayward'-s^Qde" — Union Musical Association. 

Laying of the Corner Stone by the Grand Master of 'the 

Grand Lodge of Masons of Pennsylvania. 



240 SOLDIERS' KATICXJTAL CEMETERY. 

ADDRESS BY THE GOVERNOR OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

Music — Band. 

Oration by Major-General O. O. Howard, 

Music— Band. 

Poem by Ool. 0. G. H alpine. 

Music — Union Musical Association. 

Benediction — By Rev. D. T. Carnahan. 

Music — Band. 

After the benediction, the procession will be dismissed and the 
Marshals and Chief Marshal's Aids will form and return to the 
Court House. 

Salutes will be fired at sunrise, during the movement of the 
procession, at the close of the exercises, and at sunset. 

JOHN W. GEARY, 

Marshal-in -Chief, and Brevet Major-General Commanding. 



SOLDIEKS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 241 



MILITARY PARTICIPATING IN THE CEREMONIES. 



CAVALBY. 

One Battalion of the 1st Connecticut Cavalry under Command 
of Col. B. Ives, and composed of the following companies : 
Company A, commanded by Lieut. Ford. 
Company C, commanded by Capt. Neville. 
Company D, commanded by Capt. Tuttle. 
Company E, commanded by Capt. Spellnian. 
Company F, commanded by Capt. Phillips. 
Company M, commanded by Capt. Thompson. 

INFANTRY. 

The 50th Regiment of Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, under 
the following officers : 

Colonel — William H. Telford. 
Lieutenant Colonel — Samuel K. Schwenk. 
Major — George W. Brumm. 
Adjutant — Lewis Crater. 
Quartermaster — John S. Eckel. 
Assistant Surgeon — Frank P. Wilson. 
Chaplain — Halleck Armstrong. 

Company A — 1st Lieutenant, John A. Herring. 

2d " William Blanchford. 

Company B — Captain, Frank H. Barnhart. 

1st Lieutenant, Alfred J. Stephens, 
2d " Lucien Plucker. 

Company C — Captain Charles E. Brown. 

2d Lieutenant Augustus Mellon. 

Company D — 1st Lieutenant William H. Wilcox. 
2d , " Hugh Mitchell. 

W 
Company E — 1st Lieutenant Samuel A. Losch. 

2d " Frank H. Forbes. 

16 



242 SOLDIEES' NATIONAL CEiVIETEEY. 

Company F — Captain Jacob Paulus. 

1st Lieutenant Samuel Hess. 
2d " Thomas P. Davis. 

Company G — Captain Charles Forbes. 

1st Lieutenant Henry J. Christ. 
2d " A. P. Kinney. 

Company H — Captain John A. Snyder. 

1st Lieutenant Joseph Y. Kendall. 
2d " Henry S. Francis. 

Company I — Captain James H. Levan. 

Company K — Captain George V. Myers. 

2d Lieutenant George W. Merithew. 

No:n-Commissioi!Jed Staff. 

Sergeant Major — Alexander P. Garret. 

Quartermaster Sergeant Clauser. 

Commissary Sergeant — Alfred W. Gift. 
Hospital Stewart — Alexander Schaeffer. 

The following officers accompanied the Eegiment as addition 
staff: 

Captain Thomas F. Foster, of Co. D., 50th Eegt. Pa. Vet. Vol., 
Assistant Adjutant General, 2d Brigade, 1st Division, 9th Army 
Corps. 

1st Lieutenant John C. Chance, Quartermaster 9th Eegt., Ve- 
teran Eeserve Corps. 

The Eegiment was accompanied by the Band of the 9th Eeg't. 
Veteran Eeserve Corps, under the leadership of Mr. Joseph Win- 
ters; and the Band of the 56th Mass. Vols., under the leadership 
of Mr. Markland. 

Col. W. H. Telford commands the 2d Brigade, 1st Division, 9th 
Army Corps. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel K. Schwenk commanded the Eegi- 
ment. 

Colonel Telford was appointed Chief of Staff toMaj. Gen. Geary, 
during the ceremonies of July 4th, IP "5. 

Eegiment organized at Harrisburg, September 30th, 1861, under 
B. C. Christ. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 243 

Colonel Telford, Lieutenant-Colonel Schwenk and Major Brumm , 
are the only original officers left with, the Eegiment. Kegiment 
numbered 700 men. 

The Eegiment was in 32 battles, and 16 different States. 

AETILLEEY. 

The Artillery which participated in the ceremonies was detach- 
ments of one gun from each battery of the Horse Artillery Brigade 
of the Army of the Potomac, and a section of Battery A, of the 
4th U. S. Artillery, which formerly belonged to the Brigade. 

The Brigade which these guns represents, has served with the 
Cavalry Corps throughout the entire war, and has been with it in 
ail its battles and raids. All the guns but one were at the battle 
of Gettysburg. 

The order of march was as follows : 

1. Brevet Brig. Gen. J. M.\Eobertson, Captain 2d U. S. Artillery, 

Commanding Brigade. 
Brevet Captain J. G. Tumbull, 3d Artillery, Acting Assistant 

Adjutant General. 
Assistant Surgeon Scheets. 

2. Colors and Color Guard. 

3. Buglers. 

4. Captain M. P. Miller, Battery C. and E., 4th IT. S. Artillery 

Commanding Guns. 

5. Battery C. and E., 4th U. S. Artillery. 

6. Battery C, 3d U. S. Artillery, Lieut. J. E. Kelley. 

7. Battery 1, 1st U. S. Artillery, Lieut. E. L. Garvin. 

8. Battery L, 5th U. S. Artillery, Lieut. Samuel Peoples. 

9. Battery M, 2d U. S. Artillery, Lieut. William Egan. 

10. Battery D, 2d U. S. Artillery, Lieut. W. T. Yose. 

11. Battery B and L, 2d U. S. Artillery, Lieut M. E. Loucks. 

12. Battery A, 2d U. S. Artillery, Lieut. Kinney. 

13. Battery A, 4th U. S. Artillery, ) j., R - K - 

14. Battery A, 4th U. S. Artillery, J - Lieut ' «™s -Krag- 

After the procession reached the stand in the Cemetery, and 
order had been restored, the Band played a piece of music, which 
was followed by devotfonal exercises by the Eev. Stephen H 
Tyng, D. D., as follows: 



244 SOLDIEES' NATIONAL CEMETEBY, 



REMARKS AND PRAYER, 



BEV. STEPHEN H TYNG, D. D. 



Feiends and Beetheen: 

We are assembled on an occasion of great solemnity. We in- 
voke the presence and the blessing of the all-seeing God. We 
acknowledge Him as the God of onr fathers, and of their chil- 
dren — we confess him as the God of our nation and of its posterity — 
we acknowledge His power and His wisdom — His mercy and His 
providence — as displayed in the whole government of our land. 
He has defended us in danger. He has been our shield in the day 
of battle. He has given us the victory. He is our strength. He 
has become our salvation. 

We meet this day under His protection, and with His guidance, 
to erect a monument of our gratitude for His Goodness ; and to 
the honor of the faithful men whom He has been pleased to make 
the glorious agents of our security and success. By their fidelity 
unto death, He has restored peace to our nation, given stability to 
our government, established union among our people, and renewed 
the prosperity and happiness of our homes and our households. 
To God we owe the gift of such noble children of our common 
country. To them we owe the tribute, under Him, of the highest 
earthly honor, and the most abiding and reverend recognition. 

We are gathered here this day to proclaim, with humble, but 
glad hearts, our common obligations, to Him whose inspiration 
gave them fidelity, and to them, whose deeds and sacrifices, we 
hold in everlasting remembrance. 

We confess Him this day as the Gracious Giver of divine revela- 
tion to us, in those Holy Scriptures, which we acknowledge to have 
been given by inspiration of God. That sacred book we receive, 
as the foundation and rule of all religious truth. The glorious 
redemption which it proclaims — the gra/nous promises which it 
contains — the immortal hopes which it imparts — the holy rules 
which it impresses — the sanctifying power and guidance which it 



soldiers' national cemetery. 245 

exercises, as the infallible word of the living God, we humbly, 
gratefully confess — we honor the mighty Saviour whom it an- 
nounces — we ask the teaching and guidance of the Holy Spirit, 
whom it has promised. 

Under this guidance we assemble, with solemn prayer and 
harmony, to vindicate the memory, and to declare the honor of our 
exalted dead — to testify our unchanging loyality and love, to the 
country for which they died — to erect a monument which shall 
stand a perpetual witness of their glorious achievements, and of 
our fellowship with them, in the great principles of Union, Loy- 
alty and Liberty, for which their costly sacrifice was so willingly 
and so nobly made. 

Let me call you first to a few appropriate utterances from this 
Holy word of God: "Eemember the days of old, consider the 
years of many generations ; ask thy Father and he will shew thee ; 
thy elders and they will tell thee. When the Most High divided 
to the nations their inheritance, when he separated the sons of 
Adam, he set the bounds of the people, according to the number 
of the children of Israel. For the Lord's portion is his people, 
Jacob is the lot of his inheritance." Dent. 32 : 7 — 9. 

"We have heard with our ears, O God, our fathers have told us, 
what work thou didst in their days, in the times of old. How 
thou didst drive out the heathen with thy hand, and plantedst 
them : how thou didst afflict the people, and cast them out : For 
they got not the land in possession, by their own sword, neither 
did their own arm save them ; but thy right hand, and thine arm, 
and the light of thy countenance, because thou hadst a favor unto 
them." Ps. 44 : 1—3. 

"Ha,ppy art thou O Israel ; who is like unto thee, O people, saved 
by the Lord, the shield of thy help, and who is the sword of thine 
excelleney ! And thine enemies shall be found liars unto thee ; 
and thou shalt tread upon their high places." Deut. 33 : 29. 

"The Eternal God is thy refuge, and underneath are the ever- 
lasting arms ; and he shall thrust out the eneiny from before thee, 
and shall say, Destroy them." Duet. 33 : 27. 

"All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn unto the 
Lord ; and all the kindreds of the nations shall worship before 
thee. For the kingdom' is the Lord's, and he is the Governor 
among the nations. A seed shall serve him ; it shall be accounted 



246 SOLDIEES' NATIONAL CEMBTBEY. 

to the Lord for a generation. They shall come, and shall declare 
his righteousness unto a people that shall be born, that he hath 
done this." Psa. 22 : 27—31. 

"Instead of thy fathers, shall be thy childern whom thou mayest 
make princes in all lands. I will make thy name to be remembered 
in all generations ; therefore shall the people praise thee forever 
and ever." Psa. 45: 16, 17. 

"If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her 
cunning ; if I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the 
roof of my mouth ; if I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy." 
Psa. 137: 5, 6. 

"Unto the upright there ariseth light in the darkness. Surely 
he shall not be moved forever ; the righteous shall be in everlasting 
remembrance." P.sa. 112: 4, 6. 

"Also the sons of the stranger that join themselves to the Lord 
to serve him, and to love the name of the Lord, to be his servants ; 
Even them will I bring to my holy mountain, and make them 
joyful in my house of prayer. Even unto them will I give in mine 
house and within my walls, a place and a name be'tter than of sons 
and of daughters ; I will give them an everlasting name that shall 
not be cut off." Isaiah 56 : 5 — 7. 

"And many that sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake. 
And they that be wise, shall shine as the brightness of the firma- 
ment; and they that turn many to righteousness as the stars, 
forever and ever." Dan. 12 : 2, 3. 

"Jesus said, I am the resurrection and the life ; he that believeth 
in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live ; and whosoever 
liveth and believeth in me, shall never die." St. John 11 : 25, 26. 

''Verily, verily I say unto you, the time is coming, and now is, 
when the dead shall hear the voice of the Son of God, and they 
that hear shall live." St John 5 : 25. 

"For if we believe that Jesus died, and rose again, even so them 
also which sleep in Jesus, will God bring with Him." 1 Thess. 
4:14. 

"To him that overcometh, will I give to sit with me in my throne, 
even as I also overcame, and am set down with my Father in his 
throne." Eev. 3: 21. 

"These are they which came out of great tribulation, and have 
washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the lamb. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 247 

Therefore are they before the throne of God, and serve him day 
and night in his temple, and he that sitteth on the throne shall 
dwell among them ; and God shall wipe away all tears from their 
eyes." Eev. 7 : 14—17. 

"And I heard a voice from Heaven saying unto me, Write, blessed 
are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth : Yea, saith 
the Spirit, that they may rest from their labors ; and their works 
do follow them." Eev. 14: 13. 

Under the guidance of these words of God let us unite in 

PEAYEE. 

O God, whose days are without end, who art from everlasting 
and inhabitest eternity, we bow homage before Thy throne. 

To Thee belong the kingdom, and the power, and the glory 
forever. In thine hand our breath is, and thine are all our ways. 

We behold Thee in the glories of thy creation, and adore the 
wisdom with which thou hast made them all. The heavens de- 
clare Thy glory. The earth is filled with thy goodness. All crea- 
tures wait upon Thee, and Thou givest them their meat in due 
season. 

We acknowledge Thy love in the redemption which Thou hast 
revealed to sinful men in Thy Word ; removing their condemna- 
tion by a divine sacrifice and ransom ; unfolding to their accept- 
ance glorious and sustaining hopes of eternal life ; displaying the 
victory of pardoning grace over human sin, and of everlasting life 
over mortal death in the triumphant resurrection of Thy dear Son ; 
presenting an assurance of glory to all who believe in Him, though 
they die, in His ascension to the throne and kingdom, and through 
His all-sufficient merit, and His unceasing intercession. 

We praise Thee for that Holy Spirit whom Thou hast sent in 
His name, and for His sake, to be the Comforter of Thy people, 
and to lead them there, whither our Saviour Christ has gone before. 
We bless Thee for this new and living way of access for sinners 
to Thy throne of grace. 

Cheered by this hope which Thy glorious gospel gives, and ador- 
ing the grace which has bestowed it upon us, we are gathered 
here this day to offer our united praise to Thee for Thy gracious 
providence and governii-v-nt over our nation ; and to commemorate 
before Thee the glorious and inspiring record of the noble dead, 



248 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

by whose energy and faithfulness the security of our country has 
been maintained, its peace restored, and its cherished Union and 
integrity preserved. 

The memories of this day lead us, O God, in every year to Thee. 
Wanderers ready to perish, were our fathers, when Thou didst pro- 
tect them, in the origin of their history here. Contending for 
liberty and life, for themselves and their. children, against oppres- 
sion and superior power, were they, in the early struggles of our 
nation's childhood, where Thou didst maintain their right, and gave 
them the victory. 

Thy grace adorned them with the virtues, in the record of which 
we rejoice. Thy watchful care and guidance carried them through 
a warfare, displaying a patriotism, an earnestness of sincerity, a 
devotion to their country's welfare, and a love for the rights and 
liberty of man, which have been the highest honor to our nation. 

It is Thou, O God, who didst give them wisdom in counsel, 
courage in war, endurance in depression and distress, patience 
amidst protracted disaster, and final victory over the hosts of their 
opposers. It was Thou who didst teach them to establish a na- 
tion in peace, and a government in wise, righteous and equitable 
operation, over the people whom Thy Providence collected be- 
neath it. 

In all the past years of this favored nation, Thou hast been our 
fathers' God and our God. Thou hast guarded us in foreign wars, 
defended us by land and by sea, multiplied upon us the blessings 
of civilization and advancement, of religious freedom and truth. 
Thou hast given to every class of our people their due measure 
of prosperity ; and hast secured for them, under wise and equal 
laws, the hopes and rights of all. Thou hast made a little one to 
become a strong nation, and hast here poured out the treasures 
of Thy mercy, in every varied shape of blessing, upon the mil- 
lions who have here fed upon Thy goodness, and acknowledge 
Thee as the God of our salvation. 

To Thee, O God, we owe these long succeeding years of peace, 
prosperity, and social exaltation. To Thee we owe that long suc- 
cession of wise and honored men, whom thou hast raised up to be 
the rulers of this people. To Thee we owe that ruling in justice, 
and in the fear of the Lord, which has sf honorably, and habitu- 
ally distinguished our national history. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 249 

The distinction and exaltation which our fathers have attained 
for us, among the nations of the earth, by the success of their ad- 
ministration, and the fidelity of their personal government, we 
acknowledge still to be wholly Thy gift, who rulest as the Gov- 
ernor over all the earth, and puttest down one and settest up an- 
other. 

As we survey the whole history of our nation, in peace and war ; 
in its government and its people ; in its intellectual advancement 
and social exaltation ; in its religious privileges and material gains ; 
in the great principles which it has established ; and in the ex- 
ample of power acting in justice and forbearance, which it has 
displayed in all relations, and toward all people; we confess, O 
God, that all which we have enjoyed and possessed has been Thy 
gift ; and not unto us, but unto Thy name, O Lord, our God, be 
all the praise. 

Each year, O Lord, has justly brought us, on this day, to offer 
unto Thee the tribute of our thanksgiving and the homage of our 
praise. Generation after generation have thus adored Thee, as 
the God who alone has brought salvation unto them. 

But we are gathered on a day which calls for very peculiar ac- 
knowledgments of our gratitude to Thee; and in a place, and 
for an especial occasion, which x^resent new and impressive de- 
mands for our humble thanksgiving, our submissive penitents, our 
chastened but rejoicing memory, our sympathizing and benevolent 
tenderness, our renewed fidelity to our country's welfare, and our 
fixed and indomitable purpose to maintain the authority which 
Thou hast established for us, and the liberty and order which Thou 
hast arranged and appointed. 

We are this day, a nation, free, united, independent and at 
peace — because Thou, O our gracious God, hast defended us from 
a violent and ungodly conspiracy — hast preserved us through a 
terrific warfare — hast given us unlimited victory, and hast set up 
Thy dominion over us, in overturning the wickedness of man's 
rebellion, and taking the violent in their own craftiness ; in break- 
ing the oppressor's yoke, in giving liberty to the prisoner, and 
freedom to the bruised and suffering slave ; in opening to all the 
children of sorrow a door of hope in the midst of trial, and a day 
of promise and of glory after a long night of weeping and despair. 

O let this day bring this rejoicing nation to the footstool of 



250 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

Thy throne. Wide as the triumphs of the assembling people may- 
spread, may the higher triumphs of Thy grace and mercy be still 
more gracefully acknowledged, and thankfully enumerated and 
called to mind. 

O God, it is thy patience and bounty which have placed us this 
day where we are, and made us what we are. Suffer us not to say 
that our wisdom, or the mightiness of our hand, have gained this 
triumph ; or that anything in us has deserved its bestowal. In 
the very degree in which Thou hast exalted us, enable us to humble 
ourselves before Thee ; and while Thou art speaking unto us, in 
language of amazing encouragement, may we sincerely speak to 
Thee, in the language of self-renouncing penitence, and deeper 
earnestness of desire and purpose, in everything to do Thy will. 

As we look back this day, over all this conflict ended — this 
journey through deep waters completed — we bless Thee anew, O 
God, for the great and faithful men whom Thou hast raised up 
among us, in civil, military and naval life, mighty in counsel, 
triumphant in battle, and glorious in contests on the deep. But 
above all, we praise Thee for that beloved and exalted ruler, whom 
Thou didst set over us, under whose shadow we rejoiced, whose 
example in life was our faithful guide ; whose gentle and forbearing 
administration was an honor to humanity, and in whose death, 
though it leaves him enshrined in our hearts, in the grateful affec- 
tion of millions of Ms fellow-citizens, we have felt bereaved be- 
yond the common example of mankind. 

With our thanksgiving for all the past, we offer this day, O God, 
our earnest prayers for the abiding welfare, prosperity and peace 
of our beloved country. We pray Thee to maintain the govern- 
ment which Thou hast given us, against all assaults, and to mul- 
tiply upon every generation of our people, the social and personal 
blessings which it is adapted to bestow and secure. May it ever 
be administered in righteousness, and wise and upright rulers be 
given to this people. Defend the nation from the violence of re- 
bellion, and rescue them from the mutual recriminations of party 
spirit. Guard and direct the President of the United States in 
the faithful discharge of his responsible duties; and pour Thy 
gracious blessings, both spiritual and temporal, for time and for 
eternity, upon him and his household.*,, Give to all who are in 
office under him, the spirit of wisdom and fidelity, in the execu- 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 251 

tion of their various trusts. And ever raise up men fearing God 
and working righteousness, to administer the government over 
Thy people, in all the branches and relations of its responsibility. 
Thus, under the shadow of thy wing, may our land abide and our 
people dwell, seeking the good of this nation, and speaking peace 
to all the inhabitants thereof. 

And now O Lord, who art especially the God of the suffering, of 
the widow and the fatherless, we unite to pray for all whom this 
bitter warfare hath bereaved, or reduced to condition of want or 
suffering. We are assembled to lay the corner-stone of a monu- 
ment to soldiers who freely poured forth their blood upon this 
spot, in their country's defence. The bodies of many who were 
dear and cherished in the households of our nation, lie buried 
around us here. While we honor their memory, and would per- 
petuate the record of their renown, their widows and their orphans 
we commend to Thee. Their many wounded companions, the 
charge upon their country's gratitude and kindness, we present, 
also, before Thee. Awaken a spirit of liberal kindness and just 
remuneration toward them all, among this whole people; and 
bless, prosper, and reward every effort which may be made for 
their comfort and relief. Spread the influence and power of that 
gospel which teaches love to God and love to man, as the duty 
and privilege of all who hear it, in every portion of our land, and 
make this nation an example and an agent of its influence in 
blessing throughout all the earth. 

May all the exercises of this day be made to awaken a spirit of 
union, loyalty and love, among those who are here assembled, 
and all the inhabitants of this land. And may this monument, 
and this ground, consecrated by the honored dead, be, in years to 
come, a token and a witness to all who shall ever visit this place, of 
Thy blessing upon this people, and of all the interests which Thou 
hast preserved for them, and an admonition to every coming gene- 
ration, that Thy favor is life, and Thy loving kindness is better 
than life. 

Thus, O God, do we look up unto Thee in praise and prayer, 
and ask Thine acceptance and favor in the name of our glorious 
Lord and Saviour Jesus ^hrist. Amen. 

The National Union Jlusical Association of Baltimore, then 
sung " French's Hymn." 



252 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



THE PRESIDENT'S LETTER. 



His Excellency, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, 
having been prevented from being present, by reason of severe ill- 
ness, sent the Marshal of the District of Columbia, Judge Good- 
ing, as his special" messenger, who presented the following com- 
munication from His Excellency : 

Executive Mansion, \ 

Washington, D. 0., July 3, 1885. S 

Mr. David Wills, Chairman, &c, Gettysburg, Pa.: 

Dear Sir: — I had promised myself the pleasure of participat- 
ing in person in the proceedings at Gettysburg to-morrow. That 
pleasure, owing to my indisposition, I am reluctantly compelled to 
forego. I should have been pleased, standing on that twice con- 
secrated spot, to share with you j T our joy at the return of peace, 
to greet with you the surviving heroes of the war who came back 
with light hearts, though heavy laden with honors, and with you 
to drop grateful tears to the memory of those that will never re- 
turn. 

Unable to do so in person, I can only send you my greetings, 
and assure you of my full sympathy with the purpose and spirit 
of your exercises to-morrow. Of all the anniversaries of the Dec- 
laration of Independence, none has been more important and sig- 
nificant than that upon which you assemble. 

Four years of struggle for our nation's life have been crowned 
with success ; armed treason is swept from the land ; our ports are 
re-opened ; our relations with other nations are of the most satis- 
factory character; our internal commerce is free; our soldiers and 
sailors resume the peaceful pursuits of civil life ; our flag floats 
in every breeze ; and the only barrier to our national progress — 
human slavery — is forever at an end. Let us trust that each re- 
curring Fourth of July shall find our nation stronger in numbers — 
stronger in wealth — stronger in the hLrmony of its citizens — 
stronger in its devotion to nationality and freedom. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 253 

As I have often said, I believe that God sent this people on a 
mission among the nations of the earth, and that when He founded 
our nation He founded it in perpetuity. That faith sustained me 
through the struggle that is past. It sustains me now that new 
duties are devolved upon me and new dangers threaten us. I feel 
that whatever the means He uses the Almighty is determined to 
preserve us as a people. 

And since I know the love our fellow- citizens bear their coun- 
try, and the sacrifices they have made for it, my abiding faith 
has become stronger than ever that a "government of the people" 
is the strongest as well as the best of governments. 

In your joy to-morrow, I trust you will not forget the thousands 
of whites, as well as blacks, whom the war has emancipated, who 
will hail this Fourth of July with a delight which no previous 
Declaration of Independence ever gave them. Controlled so long 
by ambitious, selfish leaders, who used them for their own un- 
worthy ends, they are now free to serve and cherish the govern- 
ment against whose life they, in their blindness, struck. I am 
greatly mistaken if in the States lately in rebellion we do not 
henceforward have an exhibition of such loyalty and patriotism as 
were never seen nor felt there before. 

When you have consecrated a National Cemetery, you are to 
lay the corner-stone of a- national monument, which, in all human 
probability, will rise to the full height and proportion you de- 
sign. Noble as this monument of stone may be, it will be but a 
faint symbol of the grand monument which, if we do our duty, 
we shall raise among the nations of the earth, upon the founda- 
tion laid nine and eighty years ago in Philadelphia. Time shall 
wear away and crumble this monument, but that, based as it is, 
upon the consent, virtue, patriotism and intelligence of the peo- 
ple, each year shall make firmer and more imposing. 

Your friend and fellow- citizen, 

ANDREW JOHNSON. 



254 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

The Gettysburg Monumental Ode was then sung by the 
National Union Musical Association, in the following words : 

This battle-field — our nation's glory, — 
Where sweetly sleep our fallen braves, 

Proclaims aloud the tragic story — 
The story of their hallow'd graves ! 

Yes ! here on Gettysburg's sad plain, 

This monument the tale will tell, 
That thousands for their flag was slain — 

Whilst fighting for the Union — fell ! 

Here red artillery's deadly fire 
Mow'd squadrons down in dread array ; 

Here Meade compelled Lee to retire, 
And Howard held his ground that day. 

Then let those tatter'd banners wave — 

Forever sacred be this ground ! 
Sing paeans to those warriors brave, 

And be their deeds with glory crown'd ! 

Wives, mothers, sisters, orphans dear, 
Shall gather round each clay-cold bed, 

And mourn their lov'd ones buried here — 
Their husbands, fathers, brothers dead. 

Now on this consecrated ground, 
Baptiz'd with patriots' sacred blood, 

We dedicate each glorious mound 
To the Union Battle-Flag and God ! 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 255 



. LAYING OF THE CORNER-STONE. 



The foundation of the Monument was then laid with appropriate 
ceremonies, by the Society of Free Masons, under the auspices of 
the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania. 

The following is a list of the articles deposited in the Corner- 
stone. 

UNITED STATES. 

Declaration of Independence. 

Articles of Confederation. 

Constitution of the United States. 

Washington's Farewell Address. 

Barnes of the Presidents and Vice Presidents of the United 
States. 

Names of the members and officers of the Senate and House 
of Representatives of the United States. 

Karnes of the members of the Cabinet. 

Names of the Ministers of the United States at foreign courts. 

Messages of President Lincoln. 

Reports of the Secretary of War and Lieutenant General Grant. 

Major General Geo. G. Meade's report of the battle of Gettys- 
burg. 

Copies of President Lincoln's emancipation proclamations and 
last inaugural address. 

Coins of the United States. 

MAINE. 

Copy of the Constitution of the State of Maine. 
Messages of the Governors of Maine, from 1861 to 1864. 
Adjutant General's reports, 1861 to 1864. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Copy of the Constitution of the State of New Hampshire. 
Adjutant General's report. 



256 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

VERMONT. 

Messages of the Governors of Vermont, from 1861 to 1864. 
Adjutant General's reports, 1861 to 1864. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Copy of the Constitution of the State of Massachusetts. 
Messages of Governors of Massachusetts, 1861 to 1864. 
Adjutant General's report, 1861 to 1864. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

Copy of the Constitution of the State of Bhode Island. 

Proclamation of His Excellency James Y. Smith, on the death 
of President Lincoln. 

Eesolutions of the Legislature of Ehode Island in relation to 
the re-construction of the States recenty in rebellion. 

4 

CONNECTICUT. 

Copy of the Constitution of the State of Connecticut. 

1st. Medallion medal with the State Coat-of-Arms on the one 
side, and on the other the number of soldiers furnished for the 
war by Connecticut, with the inscription, " In Honor of Soldiers 
of Connecticut," who aided in the cause of liberty, 1861 to 1865. 

2d. The complete catalogue of the volunteer force of Connecti- 
cut, their organization and casualties. 

3d. Proclamation of Governor Buckingham, issued in April, 
1864. 

4th. Messages of Governor Buckingham since May, 1861. 

5th. Legislative and State Government statistics for sixteen 
years, ending with 1865. 

NEW YORK. 

Copy of the Constitution of the State of New York, 
Copy of His Excellency E. E. Fenton's message, 1865. 
Copy of the Adjutant General's reports for 1864 and 1865. 
Copy of letters of General Meigs, Quartermaster General, U. S. A. 
Copy of act to provide a suitable repository for the records of 
the war. I 

Eeport of Bureau of Military Eecord, 1865. 



SOLDIERS* NATIONAL CBMETEEY. 257 

NEW JERSEY. 

Oopy of the Constitution of the State of New Jersey;. 

List of names of the State officers, members of the Senate and 
Assembly. 

Messages of the Governor of New Jersey, from 1861 to 1864, 
inclusive. 

Register of the commanding officers of the New Jersey vol- 
unteers. 

Report of the Adjutant General, from 1861 to 1865, inclusive. 

Report of the Quartermaster General, of New Jersey, from 
1861 to 1864, inclusive. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

1st. A Oopy of the Constitution of the State of Pennsylvania. 

2d. Inaugural address of Governor Andrew G. Curtin, on the 
15th of January, 1861. 

3d. Special message of Governor Orfrtin to the Legislature. 
April 9th, 1861, recommending the establishment of a Military 
Bureau at the Capital of the State, and asserting the fidelity of 
Pennsylvania to the Constitution and Union. 

4th. Proclamation of Governor Curtin, issued April 20th, 1861, 
convening the Legislature in extra session. 

5th. Message of Governor Curtin to the Legislature at extra 
session, on the 30th of April, 1861, recommending, inter alia, the 
immediate organization of the Pennsylvania Reserve Volunteer 
Corps. 

. 6th. Act of the Legislature, approved 15th May, 1861, " to create 
a loan and to provide for arming the State," and authorizing 
the organization of the Pennsylvania Reserve Volunteer Corps. 

7th. Pamphlet, containing the military laws of Pennsylvania, 
passed at the sessions of the Legislature of 1861. 

8th. Message of Governor Curtin to the Legislature at regular 
session, January 8th, 1862. 

9th. Message of Governor Curtin to the Legislature at regular 
session, January 7th, 1863. 

10th. Proceedings of commissioners appointed by the Gover- 
nors of the different Stages, which have soldiers buried in the Sol- 
17 R 



258 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

diers' National Cemetery at Gettysburg, at a meeting held in 
Harrisburg, Pa., December 17tli, 1863. 

11th. Message of Governor Curtin to the Legislature at regular 
session, January 7th, 1864. 

12th. Pamphlet, containing second inaugural address of Gov- 
ernor Curtin, January 19th, 1864, and inaugural ceremonies, as 
published by order of the Legislature. 

13th. Report of special committee of the Legislature, March 
31st, 1881, to whom was referred so much of the Governor's an- 
nual message, read January 7th, 1864, as relates to the Gettysburg- 
Cemetery, together with the report of David Wills, Esq., of 
Gettysburg, Agent for A. G, Curtin, Governor of Pennsylvania, 
made to said committee. March 21st, 1864. 

14th. Copy of an act of the Legislature of Pennsylvania, to 
incorporate the Soldiers' National Cemetery, approved March 25th, 
1864. 

15th. Copy of an act of the Legislature of Pennsylvania, to 
incorporate the Gettysburg Battle-field Memorial Association, ap- 
proved May 4th, 1864. 

16th. Proclamation of Governor Curtin, issued August 1st, 1864, 
convening the Legislature of Pennsylvania in extra session. 

17th. Message of Governor Curtin to Legislature at extra ses- 
sion, August 9th, 1864. 

18th. Message of Governor Curtin to Legislature at regular 
session, January 4th, 1865. 

19th. Complete file of General Orders, issued from Head- Quar- 
ters Pennsylvania Militia, from 1861, to January, 1865, inclusive. 

20th. Eeports of Adjutant General, from 1861 to 1864, inclusive. 

21st. Eeports of Quartermaster General, from 1861 to 1864, in- 
clusive. 

22d. Eeports of Commissary General, from 1861 to 1864, inclu- 
sive. 

23d. Eeports of Surgeon General, from 1861 to 1864, inclusive. 

24ik. Specimen of commission, in blank, with an impression 
of the Great Seal of the State, issued by Governor Curtin to 
officers in service during the rebellion. 

The foregoing are contained in a copper box, marked "Penn- 
sylvania." 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 259 

DELAWARE. 

Copy of the Constitution of the State of Delaware. 
Messages of Governor of Delaware, 1861 to 1864. 
Adjutant General's reports, 1861 to 1864. 

MARYLAND. 

Copy of the Constitution of the State of Maryland. 
Messages of Governor of Maryland, 1861 to 1864. 
Adjutant General's reports from 1861 to 1864. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

Copy of the Constitution of the State of West Virginia. 
Acts of the Legislature of the State of West Virginia, since 
its formation to 1865. 
Message of the Governor of West Virginia. 
Reports of the Governor of West Virginia. 

OHIO. 

Copy of the Constitution of the State of Ohio: 

Copy of the military laws of Ohio. 

Army Register of Ohio volunteers in the service of the United 
States. 

Annual report of the Surgeon General of the State of Ohio. 

Annual report of the Quartermaster General of Ohio. 

Annual report of the Adjutant General of Ohio for 1885. 

Annual message of the Governor of Ohio to the fifty-sixth 
General Assembly, January, 1865. 

Biographical sketches of the fifty-sixth Senate and House of 
Representatives of Ohio. 

INDIANA. 

Copy of the Constitution of the State of Indiana. 
Message of the Governor of Indiana, 1861 to 1864 
Adjutant General's reports from 1861 to 1864. 

i 

ILLINOIS. 

Copy of the Constitution of the State of Illinois. 
Messages of Governor j»f Illinois from 1861 to 1864. 
Adjutant General's reports, 1861 to 1864. 



260 soldiers' national cemetery. 

michigan. 

Silver inadallion with State Ooat-of-Arins on one side and on 
the other the number of soldiers furnished by Michigan for the 
war, (91,193,) with this inscription, u In honor of the 91,193 Michi- 
gan soldiers, who aided in perpetuating American liberty, 1861 — 
1865." 

The names on parchment of the Michigan officers and soldier* 
killed at Gettysburg, prepared by Hon. Thomas W. Ferry, Com- 
missioner for the State in the board of managers of the Gettys- 
burg National Cemetery. 

List on parchment of Michigan regiments, companies and bat- 
teries sent to the field during the war. 

Adjutant General's reports as far as published, 1861, '62 and '63, 
full bound in leather ; 2 vols. 

Two commissions such as have been issued by this State for 
commissioned officers. 

Michigan resolutions on the state of the Union, February 2d, 
1861. 

Proclamation of Governor Blair, April 16th, 1861. First call 
for troops. 

Governor Blair's message to extra session, May 1861. 

An Act to provide a military force, approved May 10th, 1861. 

Governor Blair's message to extra session, January 2d, 1862. 

Governor Blair's message to regular session, January 7th, 1863. 

Governor Blair's message to extra session, January 19th, 1864. 

Governor Blair's message to regular session, January 4th, 
1865. 

Governor Crapo's message to regular session, January 4th, 
I6ij5. 

Michigan resolutions on the state of the Union, March 18th, 
1865. 

Proclamation of Governor Crapo, June 14th, 1865. Welconi- 
the returning troops — (above documents bound in one volume.) 

"Legislative Manual of Michigan," contents as follows: Cal- 
endar 1865-6-7. Constitution of the United States. 

Constitution of the State of Michigan; counties, cities and 
townships in Michigan, with census of 1845-50-54-60 and 64. 



SOLDIEKS' NATIONAL CEMETEEY. 261 

Representative districts of Michigan and the names of mem- 
bers of State Senate and House of Representatives for 1865. 

Soldiers' vote 1864. 

State officers and deputies and State military officers 1865. 

Judicial circuits, with names and residences of Judges. 

Federal officers of Michigan, 1865, 

Governors of Michigan Territory, from 1805, to include 1835. 

Governors and Lieutenant Governors of the State of Michigan, 
from 1835, to include 1865. 

Speakers of the House of Representatives of the Legislature of 
Michigan from 1835, to include 1865. 

United States Senators from Michigan, from 1836, to include 
1865. 

Representatives in Congress from Michigan, 1836, to include 
1865. 

The above are all contained in a small copper box, marked 
" State of Michigan, 1865," which is 9 by 5 by 4 inches. 

WISCONSIN. 

Copy of the Constitution of the State of Wisconsin. 
Governor's message and accompanying documents, 1865. 
Legislative Manual for 1865. 
Copy of the Adjutant General's report of Wisconsin, 1864. 

MINNESOTA. 

Copy of the Constitution of the State of Minnesota. 

Copy of the Roll of Honor of Minnesota troops at the battle 
of Gettysburg. 

Statement of troops furnished by the State of Minnesota during 
the present war. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Copies of charter and proceedings of the board of managers 
of the "Soldiers' National Cemetery," at Gettysburg. Pa. 

Copy of proceedings at the consecration of the "Soldiers' Na- 
tional Cemetery," at Gettysburg,' Pa. 

A list of the nani^s of the soldiers buried in the "Soldiers' 
National Cemetery.* 



262 SOLDIERS' nattottal cemetery. 

Tabular list of carps and regimental organizations of the Army 
of the Potomac, in the battle at Gettysburg. 

Colonel Batchelder's drawing of the battle field of Gettysburg. 

Copy of the Constitution, of the different States of this Union 
not heretofore mentioned, contained in a book, entitled "Ameri- 
can Constitutions." 

A large Silver Medal of President Lincoln, with appropriate 
inscriptions ; presented by Col. John S. Warner, of the war of 
1812. 

Copy of reports of the United States Christian Commission, 
accompanied with its silver badge. 

Copy of the report of the United States Sanitary Commission. 

Copy of the design of the monument for the "Soldiers' Na- 
tional Cemetery," together with an artistic description. 

Copy of programme of ceremonies of laying the Corner-Stone, 
with a copy of the Masonic ceremonies of the Grand Lodge of 
Pennsylvania, A. T. M., together with a full list of the Grand 
officers who officiated in laying the Corner-Stone, and a copy of 
arrangements of Masonic procession on said occasion. 

Copy of Ahimon Kezon. 

Proceedings of Grand Lodge and Masonic Eegister. 

Copy of music sung by the Union Musical association of Bal- 
timore, at the ceremonies of laying the Corner-Stone. 

Manuscript list of articles deposited in Corner-Stone. 

This ceremony was followed by a piece of music played by one 
of the military bands. 



| 
I 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETEItY. 263 



ORATION. 



As I stand hear to-day before a peaceful audience, composed as 
it is of beautiful ladies, joyous childern, and happy citizens, and 
think of my last visit to this place, two years ago, and of the 
terrible scenes in which it was my lot to bear apart, I cannot 
help exclaiming, "How changed! how changed!" 

It is the same rich landscape, broad and beautiful, covered with 
every variety of natural objects to please the eye. 

The same wooded ridges and cultivated fields ; the same neat 
little town clinging to the hill-side; the same broad avenues of 
approach; the same ravines and creeks — but, thank God! the 
awful magnificence of hosts arrayed against each other in deadly 
strife is wanting. 

Yonder heights are no longer crowned with hostile cannon ; the 
valleys do not reverberate with their fearful roar ; the groves and 
the houses do not give back the indescribable peal of the mus- 
ketry fire. 

And oh ! how like a dream to-day seems that sad spectacle of 
broken tombstones, prostrate fences, and the ground strewn with 
our wounded and dead companions! 

Then follows, after battle, the mingling of friends and ene- 
mies, with suffering depicted in all possible modes of portraiture. 

The surgeons, with resolute hearts and bloody hands; the pale 
faces of relatives searching for dear ones, the busy Sanitary and 
Christian workers — all pass before my mind in group after group. 

My friends, my companions, my countrymen, suffer me to con- 
gratulate you anew to day * this 4th day of July, 1855, that this 
sad work is completely d&ne, and that sweet peace has really 
dawned upon us. 

On the 19th of November, 18G3, this National Cemetery, a pious 
tribute to manliness and virtue, was consecrated. 

The Hon. Edward Everett delivcrd an address in his own rich 
clear, elegant, style, which, having been published, has long 



264 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

ago become historical, and affords ns a complete and graphic ac- 
count of the campaign and battle of Gettysburg. I am deeply 
grateful to this noble patriot for his indefatigable industry in se- 
eming facts, and for the clear narrative he has left us of this 
battle, in which every living loyal soldier who fought here, is now 
proud to have borne a part. 

He, joining the patriotic band of those that are honored by his 
eloquence, has gone to his reward ; and let his memory ever be 
mingled with those here, upon whose graves he so earnestly in- 
voked your benediction. 

Mr. Everett was followed by the few remarkable words of 
President Lincoln. 

While Mr. Lincoln's name is so near and dear to us, and the 
memory of his work and sacrifice so fresh, I deem it not inappro- 
priate to repeat his own words : 

"Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth upon 
this continent a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated 
to the proposition that all men are created equal. 

"Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that 
nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long en- 
dure. We are met on a great battle field of that war. We are 
met to dedicate a portion of it as the final resting-place of those 
who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is alto- 
gether fitting and proper that we should do this. 

"But in a larger sense we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, 
we cannot hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, 
who struggled here have consecrated it far above our power to add 
or detract. The world will little note nor long remember what 
we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for 
us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work 
that they have thus far so nobly carried on. It is rather for us to 
.be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that 
from these honored dead we take increased devotion to the cause 
for which they here gave the last fullf treasure of devotion — that 
we here highly resolve that the dead sliull not have died in vain — 
that the nation shall, under God, have a new birth of freedom, 
and that the government of the people, hj the people, and forth© 
people, shall not perish from the earth." 

The civil war is ended; the test was complete. He, Abraham 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 265 

Lincoln, never forgot his own dedication till the work was fin- 
ished. 

He did display even increased devotion if it were possible. 

The dead did not die in vain, and the nation has experienced 
already the new birth of freedom of which he spoke. 

Oh that in the last throes of darkness and crime God had seen 
it good to have spared us that great heart, out of which proceed- 
ed such welcome words of truth and encouragement ! 

How very much of grateful recollection clusters around the 
name of Abraham Lincoln, as we pronounce it here among the 
. dead who have died that our nation might not perish from the- 
earth ! 

These grounds have already been consecrated, and are doubly 
sacred from the memory of our brethren who lie here, and from 
the association with those remarkable men, Mr. Everett and Mr. 
Linco ln, who gave tone to the exercises of consecration two years 
ago, whose own bodies are now resting beneath the sod, but whose 
spirit is still living, and unmistakably animating every true Ameri- 
can heart this day. 

We have now been called to lay the corner-stone of a monu- 
ment. 

This monument is not a mere family record, not the simple me- 
morial of individual fame, nor the silent tribute to genius. 

It is raised to the soldier. It is a memorial of his life and his 
noble death. 
» It embraces a patriotic brotherhood of heroes in its inscriptions, 
and is an unceasing herald of labor, suffering, union, liberty, and 
sacrifice. 

Let us then, as is proper on such an occasion as this, give a few 
thoughts to the American soldier. 

We have now embraced under this generic name of soldier, the 
dutiful officer, the volunteer soldier, the regular, the colored, and 
the conscript; but in my remarks I will present you the private 
volunteer as the representative American soldier. 

In the early part of .1861, the true citizen heard that traitors at 
Washington had formed a conspiracy to overthrow the Govern- 
ment, and soon after\ -that the stars and stripes had been fired 
upon and had been hauled down at the bidding of an armed ene- 



266 . SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

my in South Carolina; that the Capital of the nation was threat- 
ened, and that our new President had called for help. 

How quickly the citizen answered the call! 

Almost like magic he sprang forth a soldier. 

His farm or his bench, his desk or his counter, was left behind, 
and you find him marching through the then gloomy, flagless, de- 
fiant streets of Baltimore, fully equipped for service, with uniform 
gray/blue, red, or green — it then mattered not; with knapsack, 
cartridge-box, musket and bayonet, his (outfit was all that was re- 
quired. 

He was a little awkward, his accoutrements much awry, his will 
unsubdued. 

He did not keep step to music, nor always lock step with his 
companions. He had scarcely ever fired a musket, but he had be- 
come a soldier, put on the soldier's garb, set his face towards the 
enemy, and, God willing, he purposed never to turn back till the 
soldier's work was done. 

You meet him at Washington, (on Meridian Hill perhaps;) dis- 
cipline and drill seize upon him, restrain his liberty, and mould 
his body. Colonels, Captains, Lieutenants, and Sergeants, his 
former equals, order him about, and he must obey them. Oh what 
days! and oh what nights! Where is home and affection? Where 
is the soft bed and the loaded table? Change of climate, change 
of food, want of rest, want of all kinds of old things, and an influx 
of all sorts of new things, make him sick — yes, really sick in body 
and soul. 

But, in spite of a few doses of quinine and a wholesome hospital 
bed and diet, (as the soldier of '61 remembers them,) his vigorous 
constitution and indomitable heart prevail, so that he is soon able 
to cross the Long Bridge and invade the sacred red clay of Vir- 
ginia, with his companions in arms. Yet, perhaps, should you 
now observe him very closely, you will perceive his enthusiasm 
increasing faster even than his strength. 

He is on the enemy's side of the riveiv now for strict guard 
duty ; now lor the lonely picket amid th$> thickets, where men 
are killed by ambushed foes. 

How the eye and the ear, and may IT *ay it, the heart, are 
quickened in these new and trying vigils 
Before long, however, the soldier is inured to these things; he 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 267 

becomes familiar with every stump, tree, and pathway of approach, 
and his trusty gun, and stouter heart, defy any secret foe. 

Presently you find him on the road to battle; the hot weather 
of July, the usual load, the superadded twenty extra rounds of 
cartridges, and three days rations strung- to his neck, and the long 
weary march, quite exhaust his strength during the very first day. 
He aches to leave the ranks and rest, but no ! no ! He did not 
leave home for' the ignominious name of "straggler" and "skul- 
ker." Cost what it may, he toils on. 

The Acotink, the Cub Eun, the never-to-be-forgotten Bull Bun 
are passed. Here, of a sudden, strange and terrible sounds strike 
upon his ear, and bear down upon his heart ; the booming of shot- 
ted cannon ; the screeching of bursted shell through the heated 
air, and the zip, zip, zip, of smaller balls; everything produces a 
singular effect upon him. Again, all at once he is thrown, quite 
unprepared, upon a new and trying experience; for now he meets 
the groaning ambulance and the bloody stretcher. He meets 
limping, armless, legless, disfigured, wounded men. To the right 
of him and to the left of him are the lifeless forms of the slain. 

Suddenly a large iron missile of death strikes close beside him, 
and explodes, sending out twenty or more jagged fragments, which 
remorselessly maim or kill five or six of his mates, before they 
have had the opportunity to strike one blow for their country. 

His face is now very pale; and will not the American soldier 
flinch and turn back? 

There is a stone wall; there is a building; there is a stack of 
hay ; it is so easy to hide. 

But no! He will not be a coward! "Oh God, support and 
strengthen me !" 'Tis all his prayer. 

Soon he is at work. Yonder is the foe. "Load and fire;" 
''Load and fire." 

But the cry comes, "Our flank is turned!" "Our men retreat!" 
With tears pouring down his cheek, he slowly yields, and joins 
the retreating throng. Without any more nerve and little strength, 
he struggles back from a lost field. 

x Now he drinks the dregs of suffering. Without blanket for the 
night, without food, without hope, it is no wonder that a panic 
seizes him, and he runs demoralized away. 

This disreputable course, however, is only temporary. The sol- 



268 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

dier before long forgets his defeat and his sufferings, brightens 
up his armor, and resumes his place on the defensive line. 

He submits for weary days to discipline, drill, and hard fare ; 
he wades through the snows of winter and the deep mud of a Vir- 
ginia spring. 

He sleeps upon the ground, upon the deck of transport steamer, 
and upon the floor of the platform car. He helps load and unload 
stores ; he makes fascines and gabions ; he corduroys quicksands, 
and bridges creeks and bogs. Night and day he digs, or watches 
in the trenches. 

What a world of new experience! What peculiar labor and 
suffering he passes through, the soldier alone can tell you. 

He now marches hurriedly to his second battle; soon after he 
is in a series of them. Fight and fall back ! Fight and fall back ! 
Oh those days of hopelessness, sorrow, toil, and emaciation. How 
vividly the living soldier remembers them, those days when he 
cried from the bottom of his heart, " Oh God, how long ! how long !" 

Would you have patience to follow him through the comming- 
ling of disasters from the battle of Cedar Mountain to the same 
old Bull Bun, you would emerge with him from the chaos and be- 
hold his glistening bayonet again on the successful field of An- 
tietam, where a glimmer of hope lighted up his heart. 

Would you go with him to the bloody field of Fredericksburg, 
staunch his wounds in the wilderness of Ohancellorsville, and 
journey on with him afterwards to this hallowed ground of Get- 
tysburg, and could you be enabled to read and record his toils, 
his sufferings, and all his thoughts, you might be able to appre- 
ciate the true American soldier. You might then recite the first 
chapter of the cost of the preservation of the American Union. 
In September, 1863, after the battle of Gettysburg, the Govern- 
ment sends two army corps to reinforce our brethren in the West. 

The soldier is already far from home and friends, but he is sud- 
denly apprised that he must go two thousand miles further. He 
cannot visit his family to take leave of them. He has scarcely 
the opportunity of writing a line of farewell. 

The chances of death are multitudinous as they appear before 
his imagination, and the hope of returning is very slender. 



Yet again the soldier does not faiter. With forty others he 



uniin 
alter. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 2G9 

crowds into the close, unventilated freight car, and speeds away, 
night and day, without even the luxury of a decent seat. 

With all the peculiar discomforts of this journey, the backings 
and the waitings at the railroad junctions, the transfers from car 
to car, and from train to train ; being confined for days without 
the solace and strength derived from his coffee, there is yet some- 
thing compensative in the exhilerating influence of change. And 
there is added to it, in passing through Ohio and Indiana, a re- 
newed inspiration as the people turn out in masses to welcome 
him and to bid him God-speed ; as little girls throw wreaths of 
flowers round his neck, kiss his bronzed cheek, and strew his car 
with other offerings of love and devotion. 

Such impressions as were here received were never effaced. — 
They touched the rough heart anew with tenderness, and being a 
reminder of all the old home affections, only served to deepen his 
resolution sooner or later, by the blessing of God, to reach the 
goal of his ambition; that is to say, with his compatriots, to se- 
cure to his childern, and to other childern, enduring peace, with 
liberty and an undivided country. 

He passes on through Kentucky, through the battle-fields of 
Tennessee, already historical. 

The names, Nashville, Stone Eiver, Murfreesboro' and Tulla- 
homa, reminded him of past struggles and portended future con- 
flicts. 

He is deposited at Bridgeport, Alabama, a house-less, cheer-less, 
chilly place, on the banks of the Tennessee ; possessing no inter- 
est further than that furnished by the railroad bridge destroyed, 
and the yet remaining rubbish and filth of an enemy's camp. 

Before many days the soldier threads his way up the valley of 
the great river which winds and twists amid the rugged mountains, 
till he finds himself beneath the rock-crowned steeps of Lookout. 

Flash after flash, volume after volume of light-colored smoke, 
and peal on peal of cannon, the crashing sound of shot and the 
screaming of shell, are the ominous signs of unfriendly welcome 
sent forth to meet him from this rocky height. 

Yet on he marches, in spite of threatening danger, in spite of 
the ambush along his route, until he has joined hands with his 
Western brother, who had come from Chattanooga to meet and to 
greet him. 



270 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

This is where the valley of Lookout joins that of the Tennessee. 
i At this place the stories of Eastern and Western hardship, suf- 
fering, battling, and danger, are recapitulated and made to blend 
into the common history and the common sacrifice of the Ameri- 
can soldier. 

Were there time, I would gladly take you, step by step, with 
the soldier, as he bridges and crosses the broad and rapid river; 
as he ascends and storms the height of Mission Ridge; or as he 
plants his victorious feet, waves his banner, and flashes his gun 
on the top of Lookout Mountain. 

I would carry you with him across the death-bearing streams 
of Chickamauga. I would have you follow him in his weary, 
barefooted, wintry march to the relief of Knoxville and back to 
Chattanooga. 

From this point of view I would open up the spring campaign, 
where the great General initiated his remarkable work of genius 
and daring. 

I could point you to the soldier pursuing his enemy into the 
strongholds of Dalton, behind the stern, impassable features of 
Rocky Face. 

Resaca, Adairsville, Oassville, Dallas, Xew Hope Church, 
Pickett's Mill, Pine Top, Lost Mountain, Kenesaw, Gulp's Farm, 
Smyrna, Gamp Ground, Peach Tree Greek, Atlanta, from so 
many points of view, and Jonesboro', are names of battle-fields 
upon each of which a soldier's memory dwells! 

For upwards of a hundred days he scarcely rested from the 



He skirmished over rocks, hills and mountains; through mud, 
streams and forests. 

For hundreds of miles he gave his aid to dig that endless chain 
of entrenchments which compassed every one of the enemy's 
fortified positions. He companied with those who combatted the 
obstinate foe on the front and on the flanks of those mountain 
fastnesses which the enemy had deemed impregnable, and he had 
a right at least to echo the sentiment of his indefatigable leader, 
"Atlanta is ours, and fairly won." 

Gould you now have patience to turn back with him and fight 
these battles over again, behold his communications cut, his rail- 
road destroyed for miles and miles ; enter, the bloody fight of Ala- 

1 : 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 271 

toona, follow him through the forced inarches, via. Eome, Ga., 
away back to Resaca, and through the obstructed gaps of the 
mountains into Alabama, you would thank God for giving him a 
stout heart and an unflinching faith in a just and noble cause. 

Weary and worn, he reposed at Atlanta, on his return, but one 
single night, when he commenced the memorable march toward 
Savannah. 

The soldier has become a veteran ; he can march all day with 
his musket, his knapsack, his cartridge-box, his haversack and 
canteen upon his person ; his muscles have become large and rigid, 
so that what was once extremely difficult he now accomplishes 
with graceful ease. 

This fact must be borne in mind when studying the soldier's 
marches through Georgia and the Caiolinas. 

The enemy burned every bridge across stream after stream; the 
rivers, bordered with swamps — for example, the Ocmulgee, the 
Oconee, and the Ogechee — were defended at every crossing. 
That they were passed at all by our forces, is due to the cheerful, 
fearless, indomitable private soldier. 

Oh that you had seen him, as I have done, wading creeks a half 
mile in width, and water waist deep, under fire, pressing on through 
wide swamps, with-out one faltering step, charging in line upon 
the most formidable works, which were well defended ! You could 
then appreciate him and what he has accomplished as I do. You 
could then feel the poignant sorrow that I always did feel when 
I saw him fall bleeding to the earth. 

I must now leave the soldier to tell his own tale amongst the 
people, of his bold, bloody, work at M'Allister, against the tor- 
pedoes, aba ttis, artillery, and musketry; of his privations at Sa- 
vannah; of his struggle through the swamps, quicksands, and 
over the broad rivers of the Oarolinas ; of the fights, fires, explo- 
sions, doubts, and triumphs suggested by Griswoldville, Elvers' 
and Binnaker's bridges, Orangeburg, Congaree creek, Columbia, 
Oheraw, Fayetteville, A.verysboro', and Benton ville. 

I will leave him to tell how his hopes brightened at the reunion 
at Goldsboro'. How his heart throbbed with gratitude and joy as 
the wires confirmed the rumored news of Lee's defeat, so soon to 
be followed by the capture of the enemy's Capital and of his en- 
ti re army. I will leave him to tell to youisel ves and your chiidrei) , 

; 



272 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

how he felt and acted ; how proud was his bearing ; how elastic 
his step, as he marched in review before the President of the 
United States at; Washington! I would do the soldier injustice 
not to say that there was one thing wanting to make his satis- 
faction complete, and that was the sight of the tall form of Abra- 
ham Lincoln, and the absence of that bitter recollection which he 
could not altogether exclude from his heart — that he had died by 
the hand of a traitor assassin. 

I have given you only glimpses of the American soldier, as I 
have seen him. To feel the full force of what he has done and 
suffered, you should have accompanied him for the last four years. 
You should have stood upon the battle-fields during, and after, 
the struggle; and you should have completed your observation in 
the army hospitals, and upon the countless grounds peopled with 
the dead. The maimed bodies, the multitude of graves, the his- 
toric fields, the monumental stones like this we are laying to-day, 
after all are only meagre memorials of the soldier's work. 

God grant that what he planted, nourished, and has now pre- 
served by his blood — I mean American liberty — may be a plant 
dear to us as the apple of the eye, and that its growth may not be 
hindered till its roots are firmly set in every State of this Union, 
and till the full fruition of its blessed fruit is realized by men of 
every name, color and description, in this broad land. 

Now, as I raise my eyes and behold the place where my friend 
and trusted commander, General Reynolds, fell, let me add iny 
own testimonial, to that of others, that we lost in him a true pa- 
triot, a true man, a complete General, and a thorough soldier. 

Upon him, and the others who died here for their country, let 
there never cease to descend the most earnest benediction of every 
American heart. 

Let me congratulate this noble Keystone State that it was able 
to furnish such tried and able men as Reynolds who fell, and 
Meade who lived to guide us successfully through this wonderful 
and hotly contested battle. 

In the midst of all conflicts, of all sorrows and triumphs, let 
us never, for an instant, forget that there is a God in Heaven 
whose arm is strong to help — whose balm is sweet to assauge every 
pain — and whose love embraces all joy. 

I 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 273 

To Him, then, let us look in gratitude and praise that it has been 
/ His will so greatly to bless our nation; and may this Monument 
ever remind us and our prosterity, in view of the fact that we pre- 
vailed against our enemies, "that righteousness exaltetha nation, 
but sin is a reproach to any people." 

One of the Military Bands then played a piece of music, which 
was followed by the reading of the following original Poem, by 
the author: 



18 



; 



274 SOLDIBES' XATIOXAL CEMETERY, 



POEM, 

by chas. g. halpine, ("Miles , Rcilly, ,,s ) 



As men beneath some pang of grief 
Or sadden joy will dumbly stand, 

Finding no words to give relief — 

Clear, passion-warm, complete, and brief- 
To thoughts with which their souls expand; 

So here to-day — these trophies nigh— 
Our trembling lips no utterance reach; 

The hills around, the graves, the sky — 

The silent poem of the eye 
Surpasses all the art of speech I 

To-day, a Nation meets to build 

A Nation's trophy to the dead 
Who, living, formed the sword and shield — 
The arms she sadly learned to wield 

When other hope of peace had fled. 
And not alone for those who lie 

In honored graves before us blent, 
Shall our proud column, broad and high, 
Chmb upward to the blessing sky, 

But be for all a monument. 

An emblem of our grief, as well 

For others as for these, we raise ; 
For these beneath our feet who dwell, 
And all who in the Good Cause fell 

On other fields, in other frays. 
To all the self-same love we bear 

Which here for marbled memory strives; 
No soldier for a wreath would care 
Which all true comrades might not share — 

Brothers in death as in their lives! 

On Southern hill-sides, parched and brown, 

In tangled swamp, on verdant ridge, 
Where pines and broadening oaks look down, 
And jasmine weaves its yellow crojpn, 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 275 

And trumpet-creepers clothe the hedge; 
Along the shores of endless sand, 

Beneath the palms of Southern plains, 
Sleep everywhere, hand locked in hand, 
The brothers of the gallant hand, 

Who here poured life through throbbing veins. 

Around the closing eyes of all 

The same red glories glared and flew — 
The hurrying flags, the bugle call, 
The whistle of the angry ball, 

The elbow- touch of comrades true ! 
The skirmish-fire — a spattering spray; 

The long, sharp growl of fire by file, 
The thickening fury of the fray 
When opening batteries get in play, 

And the lines form o'er many a mile. 

The foeman's yell, our answering cheer, 

Eed flashes through the gathering smoke, 
Swift orders, resonant and clear, 
Blithe cries from comrades tried and dear, 

The shell-scream and the sabre-stroke ; 
The rolling, fire from left to right, 

From right to left, we hear it swell ; 
The headlong charges, swift and bright, 
The thickening tumult of the fight 

And bursting thunders of the shell. 

Now, deadlier, denser grows the strife, 

And here we yield, and there we gain ; 
The air with hurtling missiles rife, 
Volley for volley, life for life — 

No time to heed the cries of pain ! 
Panting as up the hills we charge, 

Or down them as we broken roll, 
Life never felt so high, so large. 
And never o'er so wide a marge 

In triumph swept the kindling soul ! 

New raptures waken* in the breast 

Amid this hell of scene and sound; 
The barking batteries never rest, 
And broken foot I by horsemen pressed, 

f 



276 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

Still stubbornly contest their ground. 
Fresh waves of battle rolling in 

To take the place of shattered waves ; 
Torn lines that grow more bent and thin — 
A blinding cloud, a maddening din — 

'Twas thus were filled these very graves ! 

Mght falls at length with pitying veil — 

A moonht silence deep and fresh; 
These upturned faces stained and pale, 
Yainly the chill night dews assail — 

For colder than dews their flesh ! 
And flickering far through brush and wood 

Go searching-parties, torch in hand — 
"Seize if you can some rest and food, 
At dawn the fight will be renewed, 

Sleep on your arms!" the hushed command. 

They talk in whispers as they lie 

In line — these rough and weary men ; 
" Dead or but wounded?" then a sigh 5 
"No coffee either !" " Guess we'll try 

To get those two guns back again." 
"We five flags to their one ! oho !" 

"That bridge — 'twas hot there as we passed !" 
" The colonel dead ! It can't be so ; 
Wounded and badly — that I know ; 

But he kept saddle to the last." 

"Be sure to send it if 1 fall — " 

"Any tobacco? Bill have youF 
"A brown-haired, blue-eyed, laughing doll — " 
" Good-night, boys, and God keep you all!" 

"What! sound asleep? Gess I'll sleep too. " 
" Yes, just about this hour they pray 

For Dad." "Stop talking! pass the word !" 
And soon as quiet as the clay 
Which thousands will but be next day 
The long drawn sighs of sleep are heard. 

Oh, men ! to whom this sketch, though rude, 
Calls back some scene of pain and pride : 
Oh, widow ! hugging close your brood, 
Oh, wife ! with happiness renewed. 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 277 

Since lie again is at your side ; 
This trophy that to-day we raise 
Should be a mouument for all ; 
Aud on its sides no niggard phrase 
Coufine a generous Nation's praise 

To those who here have chanced to fall. 

But let us all to-day combine 

Still other monuments to raise ; 
Here for the Dead we build a shrine ; 
And now to those Avho, crippled, pine, 

Let us give hope of happier days : — 
Let homes for these sad wrecks of war 

Through all the land with speed arise ; 
Tongues cry from every gaping scar, 
"Let not our brother's tomb debar • 

The wounded living from your eyes." 

A noble day, a deed as good, - 

A noble scene in which 'tis done, 
The Birthday of our Nationhood: 
And here again the Nation stood 

On this same day — its life rewon ! 
A bloom of banners in the air, 

A double calm of sky and soul ; 
Triumphal chant and bugle blare, 
And green fields, spreading bright and fair, 

While heavenward our Hosannas roll. 

Hosannas for a land redeemed, 

The bayonet sheathed, the cannon dumb 5 
Passed, as some horror we have dreamed, 
The fiery meteors that here streamed, 

Threatening within our homes to come ! 
Again our banner floats abroad, 

Gone the one stain that on it fell — 
And, bettered by His chastening rod, 
With streaming eyes uplift to God 

We say, "He doeth all things well." 



278 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

The following Hymn was then sung to the memory of our fallen 
heroes at the Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st, 2d and 3d, by 
the National Union Musical Association of Baltimore : 

Hark ! a nation's sighs ascend ! 

Hark ! a thousand voices blend, 
From your thrones of glory bend, 
Sons of Liberty ! 

From each dark empurpled field, 

Where your blood the Union sealed, 
Spirit-tongues to-day have peal'd, 
The Soldier's Eequiem ! 

Where the smoke of battle curl'd, 

Where the bolt of death was harl'd, 
Ye out starry flag unfurl'd 

Floating o'er the free ! 

In the dark and trying hour, 

Putting forth your steady power, 
Caused the Eebel hordes to cower, 
Just two years ago ! 

Flashing sword and burning word, 

Southrons felt and Southrons heard — 
Plum'd our country's banner -bird, 
Just two years ago ! 

Martyr'd sons of trying days, 

While the world resounds your praise, 
Hear the songs your childern raise, 
Sons of Liberty ! 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 279 



SPEECH OF A. G. CTJRTTN, 

GOVERNOR OF PENNSYLVANIA. 



The programme for the exercises of the occasion having been 
fulfilled, calls were made by all the people present for Governor 
Curtin, who spoke in substance as follows : 

Having learned last week that my name occurred on the 
programme, for the ceremonies of this occasion, I immediately 
asked that it should be omitted. There did not seem to be time 
for such preparation as would be proper for a ceremonial like this. 
I am deeply grateful for your hearty and enthusiastic request that 
I should be heard,. and I will draw upon the inspirations of the 
time and the place, the connection between the event of this 
Sabbath day of American Freedom, and the hallowed precincts 
within which we all stand. 

It would seem to be proper for me to express the thanks of the 
people of Pennsylvania to the citizens of the United States, who 
join with us to-day, and who have hitherto contributed their influ- 
ence and means to the erection of this place of sepulture, for the 
remains of those who perished in the great battles of Gettysburg, 
and who, this day, surround the foundation stone of a monument 
to their memory. We thank the citizens of the eighteen States, 
who have given valuable and voluntary service, as trustees of the 
association, representing their respective States. We thank the 
people, who have come up here in multitudes to participate in 
these solemnities. We thank that patriotic and benevolent brother- 
hood, so well represented here to-day by its chiefs, for their ancient 
rites and ceremonies, for theis words of fraternit}^ and love, con- 
tributed and pronounced upon the corner-stone of this structure, 
which is to be the monument of the devotion and fidelity to coun- 
try of their brothers and ours. And we are fortunate in having 
here with us, my fellow-citizens, the Great chief who commanded 
the historic Army of the Potomac, on the signal day which made 
his fame and that of his army, forever illustrious in the annals 
of American history ; ai d we exjn'ess with one voice our thanks 



280 * SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

to Mm and his brave companions, so many whom remain to sur- 
round him here, and honor us with their presence. But more than 
all, my fellow-citizens, let us all unite in our expressions of grati- 
tude to the sublime heroism and unselfish patrotism of the private 
soldiers of the Republic ; for to them, above all others, we owe 
the safety of our Free Government, and the return of the blessings 
of peace and tranquility to our distressed country. I could not 
but feel the unselfishness of the words of the chosen Orator of 
the day ; and the armless sleeve of the maimed General, seemed 
of itself eloquent, when he forgot the statesmen and generals of 
the war, and gave credit to the private soldier for all the glories, 
which now surround the blood-stained, but forever stable Institu- 
tions of American liberty. 

Our monument should be the choicest work of art on this con- 
tinent; it should be made beautiful and strong; this place will 
forever be attractive ; the statesman can here meditate on the 
sacrifices made for liberty and civilization ; the soldier can study 
the faultless plan of battle ; and all can count here, the cost to 
this generation of maintaining the principles of Freedom, trans- 
mitted to us from our ancestors ; but no work of art can express 
our feelings of gratitude for the soldiers of the Republic, living 
or dead ; he has his memory enshrined in the hearts of a grateful 
people, "there a monument that needs no scroll." 

But why should I speak to you to-day? It is but two years 
since the death-.struggle of rebellion and treason filled this valley, 
now so peaceful, with bloodshed and carnage ; and the thunders 
of the artillery of that eventful strife will speak to man for his 
freedom and individuality, until time shall be no more. 

Stronger than logic, sweeter than poetry, the orators of this 
occasion lie in their graves around you; no living lips can reach 
your hearts, as does the mute eloquence which comes up from the 
graves of the heroic dead. We are all of one family, my fellow- 
citizens, the living and the dead ; those who lie around us shed 
benefactions upon us by the good they didj let us this day draw 
inspiration from their sublime virtues, and strive like them, to be 
faithful to the Government they died to save. 

We people of Pennsylvania give Praise to God, that it was of 

His mysterious Providence, that the blood of the people of eighteen 

V 



SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 281 

States, here represented, should seal a covenant, made in the hour 
of the nation's deepest agony, that this Great Republic shall be for- 
ever sacred to Union and fraternity, and pray him that the lessons, 
of Gettysburg shall sink deeply into the American heart. 

The remarks of Governor Curtis; were uttered with a fervor 
and earnestness, that fastened the attention of the whole audience, 
and from their impassioned effect, the reporters failed to take them 
down as fully as delivered. 



29 



} 



282 SOLDIERS' NATIONAL CEMETERY. 



BENEDICTION, 



EEV. D. T. OARXAHAN. 



May the blessing of Almighty God rest upon the exercises of 
this day; and upon what has been done, and shall yet be done, 
to perpetuate and hallow the memory of the noble deeds and he- 
roic virtues of our patriot-soldiers who here offered up their lives 
upon the altar of their country, in defence of the dearest rights 
of man, and to preserve and perpetuate our national Union and 
integrity. 

May the Divine blessing rest upon our land and nation, upon 
our rulers, and upon the people, upon our army and navy, and 
upon all our public interests, and issue in a greater degree of 
prosperity and happiness than we have yet enjoyed. 

May the God of our fathers, who hath given us the victory over 
armed and organized rebellion, be our God forever and ever — our 
Guide, our Rock, our Refuge, and our Glory. 

The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God, and the 
communion of the Holy Ghost, be with you all now and forever. 
Amen. 



* 



s 



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7- 



♦ 



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