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REVIVAL ADDRESSES 



By R. A. TORREY, D.D. 

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1SI 



REVIVAL 
ADDRESSES 



R. A. TORREY 

AUTHOR OF 

"What the Bible Teaches," "How to Work for Christ," 
"How to Pray," etc. etc. 




CHICAGO NEW YORK TORONTO 
FLEMING H. REVELL COMPANY 
LONDON AND EDINBURGH 



:>!,-3.-<N 



THE NEW ^RK 



P 






Copyright, 1903 
by Fleming H. Eevell Company 



chicago: 125 no. wabash avenue 
new york: 158 fifth avenue 
toronto: 25 richmond street, w. 
London: 21 paternoster square 
Edinburgh: 100 princes street 



CONTENTS 



CHAP. PAGE. 

Introduction i 

I. God 5 

II. "God is Love" 17 

III. "Found Wanting" 30 

IV. The Judgment Day 49 

V. Every Man's Need of a Refuge 62 

VI. The Drama OF Life IN Three Acts 76 

VII. A Question that should Startle every Man 

WHO is not a Christian 89 

VIII. A Solemn Question for those who are re- 
jecting Christ that they may Obtain the 

World 102 

IX. Refuges of Lies "2 

X. The Way of Salvation made as Plain as 

Day 130 

XI. What it Costs not to be a Christian 145 

XII. The most important Question that any 

Man ever Asked or Answered 161 

XIII. One of the Saddest Utterances that ever 

Fell from the Lips of the Son of God 183 

XIV. "What are You Waiting for?" 196 

XV. Excuses 218 

XVL Heroes and Cowards 236 

XVIL Three Fires 253 



INTRODUCTION 



Bequests have come from many quarters for the pub- 
lication of some of the sermons which God has been 
pleased to so greatly use in Japan, China, Australia, 
Tasmania, New Zealand, India, England, and Scotland. 
This volume is published in response to this request. 
The author hopes that the sermons may be used as 
greatly in their printed form as they have been when 
spoken. The sermons when delivered, as here pub- 
lished, were taken down in shorthand, but have been 
carefully revised by the author. Each one of them has 
many sacred memories connected with it. When one 
of these sermons was delivered through an interpreter 
in a Japanese city, eighty-seven Japanese came forward 
and declared publicly their acceptance of Christ. After 
the delivery of another in Shanghai, a large number of 
Chinese men and women walked out from their places 
among their heathen companions and publicly pro- 
fessed their acceptance of Christ. On some occasions 
in Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand, hundreds of 
men and women came forward and with their own lips 
publicly confessed their acceptance of Christ as their 

i 



ii INTRODUCTION 

Saviour and their Lord. Reports of some of these ser- 
mons have been given in religious and secular papers, 
but these reports have been necessarily fragmentary and 
inaccurate, as they have never been revised by the 
author. I have abundant proof that even these unsatis- 
factory reports have done good, but it seems desirable 
that a full and accurate report of what I have said be 
given to the public. 



REVIVAL ADDRESSES 



GOD 

"The fool hath said in his heart. There is no God." — Psalm 
xiv. 1. 

I have taken, or rather God has given me, for my 
text to-night a very short one. I do not think you ever 
heard a sermon from a shorter text. I will not tell you 
where to find the text. It occurs several hundred times 
in the Bible. Indeed, open your Bible at random almost 
anywhere and you will find my text somewhere on the 
page. It consists of but one word; but it would take 
all eternity to exhaust its meaning, and then it will 
not be exhausted. It is "God" — a word the height and 
depth and length and breadth of whose meaning no phil- 
osopher has ever fully apprehended. 

I. God Is 

The first thing the Bible teaches us about God is that 
God is. "God is" — two short words. Tremendous 
significance ! "God is." If that simple truth gets hold 
of your mind and heart it will move and mould your 
entire life. It will determine your science, it will de- 
termine your philosophy, it will determine your daily 

f 



e EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

life, it will determine your eternity. "God is." The 
psalmist tells ns in Psalm xiv. — ^^The fool hath said 
in his heart, There is no God." Please note where he 
says it — ^^in his heart." That is, he says there is no God 
simply because he does not wish to believe that there 
is a God. 'Now, there is a God, and a man that denies 
a fact simply because he does not wish to believe it is a 
fool. 

There is abundant proof of the existence of God, so 
abundant that no man can sit down and consider the 
proof thoroughly and candidly without acknowledging 
the existence of God. Nature proves the existence of 
God. All through iN'ature there are marks of creative 
intelligence. Everywhere in Nature you find order, 
symmetry, law. You can study Nature in the minute, 
or you can study Nature in the vast, it makes no differ- 
ence; everywhere you find the marks of intelligence and 
creative design. You may take your microscope and turn 
it down upon the minutest forms of life; ever}^here 
there is adaptation to end, to purpose, to design. The 
man of science will tell you that in the minutest struc- 
ture discernible by the most powerful microscope he 
finds perfect beaut}^, and most perfect adaptation of 
means to end. Or take your telescope and turn it 
towards the vaster Nature. Everywhere you see order, 
symmetry, law, intelligence, design, all proving an in- 
telligent Creator of the material universe in which we 
live. Suppose I show you my watch, and ask, "Do you 
believe it had a maker ?" you would say„ "Certainly." 
"But why? Did you see it made?" "No." "Did you ever 



GOB X 

see a watch made ?" '^No." '^hy, then, do you believe it 
had a maker ?" ^'Because everything about it indicates 
an intelligent maker — hands, figures upon the face, 
case, winding apparatus, everything about the watch 
proclaims that it had an intelligent maker. Suppose I 
replied, "You are mistaken ; the watch had no intelligent 
maker; the watch came to be by accident; by a fortui- 
tous concurrence of atoms dancing around through 
endless ages, until at last, in the age in which you find 
it, they danced into the present form; thus the watch 
came to be." Your remark would be, "That man may 
think he is highly educated, but he talks like a fool;'' 
and you would be right. Yet there are no such marks 
of intelligent design in that watch as in this material 
universe. One very small part of Nature, your own 
eye, is a far more wonderful structure than any watch. 
But if some man should stand up and say that this won- 
derful universe in which we live came into being by a 
fortuitous concurrence of atoms which danced around 
through the endless ages until they danced into their 
present form, many would call him a philosopher. In 
the ordinary affairs of life he would be called a foolos- 
opher. 

But, some one may say, "The doctrine of evolution 
does away with the whole force of the argument from 
design.'^ Not at all. I formerly believed that the doc- 
trine of evolution was true, but gave up the belief, not 
from theological but from scientific reasons, because it 
was absolutely unproven; there is not a single proof of 
the hypothesis of evolution. People talk about the 
missing link; they are all missingj there is not a single 



8 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

link. There is not a single place where one species 
passes over into another species. There is not one 
single observed instance of the evolution of a higher 
species from a lower. Development of varieties there 
has been, but of evolution of a higher species from a 
lower not one single case. The hypothesis of the evo- 
lution of species, and especially of the highest forms 
of life from the lowest, is a guess pure and simple, 
without one scientifically observed fact to build upon. 
But suppose the doctrine of evolution were true, it 
would not for a moment militate against the argument 
from design. If there were originally some unorganised 
protoplasm that developed into all the forms of life 
and beauty as we see them to-day, it would be a still 
more remarkable illustration, in one way, of the wis- 
dom and power of the Creator, for the question would 
arise. Who put into the primordial protoplasm the 
power of developing into the universe as we see it to- 
day? It would take a more wonderful man to make 
a watch-hand which would develop into a watch than it 
would to make a watch outright. And, in one way, 
it would be a more marvellous illustration of the creat- 
ive wisdom and power of God, if God had created some 
primordial protoplasm that developed into the world 
we now see than if God had made the world at once 
as we now see it. Nature proves that there is a God. 

History proves that there is a God. You take one 
little patch of history, the history of a single nation or 
of a few nations, for a few years, and it sometimes 
seems like a jangle without meaning, only portraying 
the conflicting ambitions and greeds of men. Might, 



GOD 91 

right, and the weakest going to the wall. But take his- 
tory in a large way, the history of centuries, take all 
history, and you will see that back of the jarring and 
conflicting passions, ambitions, combats and struggles 
of men, there is an all-governing, all-superintending, 
all-shaping Providence. You see that throughout all 
history ^^one increasing purpose runs," '^a power, not 
ourselves, which makes for righteousness." History 
proves that there is a God. 

But there is one special history that proves that there 
is a God, that is the history of Jesus of Nazareth as re- 
corded in the gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and 
John. Great efforts have been put forth to disprove the 
authenticity of that history; men of the most remark- 
able genius, of the profoundest scholarship, of untiring 
activity, have struggled to pull to pieces the history of 
Jesus Christ, as recorded in the four gospels, and every 
effort of that kind has met with utter failure. The 
strongest, the ablest, the most remarkable and scholarly 
effort ever made was that of David Strauss, in the Leben 
Jesu. It seemed to some for awhile, as if David Strauss 
had succeeded in taking out of the life of Jesus of 
Nazareth many things commonly believed. But when 
the life of Jesus Christ by the great German rational- 
ist was itself subjected to criticism, it went to pieces, 
until there was nothing left. It was utterly discredited. 
It would not bear careful and candid examination. Ee- 
nan, with rare subtlety and literary deftness, endeav- 
oured to succeed where Strauss had failed. But his 
own attempt to eliminate the supernatural from the 
life of Jesus was less able in almost every way than 



10 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

that of his German predecessor, and failed completely. 
And every other similar effort to pull to pieces and 
discredit the life of Jesus Christ, as recorded in the 
four gospels, has failed absolutely. And to-day it 
stands established beyond the possibility of candid ques- 
tion that Jesus lived and acted, at least substantially — 
I believe far more than that — as recorded in the four 
gospels. It is absolutely impossible for a man to sit 
down before the four gospels with an unbiassed and 
honest mind, determined to find out the truth, and come 
to any other conclusion than that this four gospel record 
of the life and words and works of Jesus is substantially 
accurate history. 

If Jesus lived as this Gospel says He did, if He 
wrought as this Gospel says He wrought, healed the 
sick, cleansed the leper, raised the dead, fed the five 
thousand with five loaves and two small fishes, and 
if, above all, having been put to death. He was raised 
from the dead, it proves to a demonstration that back 
of the works He performed, back of the resurrection 
of Jesus Christ, is God. There is a God. 

The history of the individual Christian proves the 
existence of God. I do not depend upon the argument 
from design or from history — I once did; I do not 
depend even upon the argument from the life of Jesus 
Christ — I once did. I know there is a God because I 
have personal dealings with Him every day of my life. 
Some subtle philosopher might construct a very spe- 
cious argument to prove to me that there is no such 
person as Charles Alexander; but after all is said I 
still know that there is, for I have the most intimate 



GOD n 

relations with him every day of my life. But I have 
had more intimate dealings with God than with Mr. 
Charles Alexander. I know that there is a God before 
I know that there is such a person as Mr. Charles 
Alexander. I started out years ago on the hypothesis 
that there was a God, and that God acted as the Bible 
records that He acts. I determined to put this hypothe- 
sis to the most rigid test to see if it worked. I have put 
that hypothesis to the test during a quarter of a century, 
and it has never failed. If there had not been a God, or 
if there had been a God different from the one of whom 
the Bible tells us, I should have made shipwreck of 
everything years ago. But the hypothesis has never 
failed; I have risked my life, reputation, work, every- 
thing upon the fact that the God of the Bible is. And, 
friends, I risked and won. There is a God. There- 
fore the man who says that there is no God is a fool; 
for any man who denies a fact is a fool. He who 
denies the supreme fact is a supreme fool. Not only 
is there a God; but He is the supreme fact of nature, 
of history, of science, of philosophy, of personal life. 
Look at the first four words of the Bible, and you will 
read the profoundest philosophy. "In the beginning, 
God." In the beginning of nature, God; in the be- 
ginning of science, God; in the beginning of human 
history, God ; in the beginning of individual experience, 
God; in the beginning of everything, God. That is 
the supreme fact; and he who denies it merely because 
he does not want to believe it is the supreme fool. 



13 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

II. God is Great 

God is great. That thought comes out in the Bible, 
from the first verse to the last. Oh, the majesty of God, 
the infinite greatness of God! This whole universe, 
about which we are learning such wonderful things 
every day, is His creative work. The supreme difference 
between the teaching of the Bible and the teaching of 
modern thought is this — the teaching of the Bible is 
an infinite God and an infinitesimal man, except as 
God's goodness makes him great. The teaching of 
modern literature and modern thought is — an infinite 
man and an infinitesimal god. We live in a day that 
has a very great man and a very small god. Stop and 
think. There are one billion four hundred million 
people like you on this earth to-day. You are just one 
out of that vas't number. Not very big — are you ? But 
wait. Take the whole earth on which these one billion 
four hundred millions live; it is a very small part of 
the universe. If the sun were hollow and a hole bored 
into it, one million four hundred thousand earths 
could be poured into the sun, and still leave room for 
them to rattle around. But the sun is only one sun 
out of many suns. Our whole solar system is but one 
out of many. I was reading an article the other day, 
on my way from India, in which an eminent man of 
science said that there are probably at least a million 
suns as large as ours. Wait a moment ! You are only 
one out of one thousand four hundred million persons 
on this earth. Of earths such as this upon which we 
live it would take more than one million four hundred 
thousand poured into the sun to fill it. Yet the sun is 



GOD 13 

only one out of a million suns. And there may be a 
million universes such as ours. And God made them 
all. That God whose name you dared take upon your 
lips in vain last night ; that God whom you dare philoso- 
phise about and say how He ought to act. Take one 
and divide it by fourteen hundred million multiplied 
by one million four hundred thousand multiplied by 
one million multiplied by many millions and that is 
you. Multiply fourteen hundred million by one million 
four hundred thousand, and that by one million, and 
that by many millions, and that by infinity, and that is 
God. And yet you venture to say how God ought to act. 
If ever a man appears like a consummate idiot, it is 
when he tries to tell you how God ought to act. God is 
infinite, and no number of finites will ever equal the 
infinite, and the Infinite God is of immeasurably more 
importance than the whole race of infinitesimal men 
who inhabit this little globe. Yet you venture to say 
how God ought to act. Thou fool! 

III. God is Holy. 

God is holy. How the Bible in every page brings 
that out! How it labors with all its types, sacrifices, 
ceremonies, explicit teaching, to impress upon men 
and women that God is holy. Take the supreme ex- 
pression of it in 1 John i. 5, '^God is light and in Him 
is no darkness at all."^ In the Scripture lesson to-night 
I read a passage from Isaiah in which he gives us a 
bit of his own biography. He was, perhaps, the best 
man of his time, but when he got one glimpse of God 
in His holiness, when he saw even the seraphim (the 



14 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

burning ones, glowing in their own holiness) covering 
their faces and their feet in the presence of the infinitely 
Holy Jehovah, he was overwhelmed, and cried, "Woe 
is me, for I am undone, because I am a man of unclean 
lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean 
lips, for mine eyes have seen the King, the Lord of 
Hosts." Men and women of London, if there should 
burst upon this audience to-night a real vision of 
God in His holiness, this whole great gathering would 
fall on their faces and cry, "Woe is me, for I am un- 
done." Not one of you could keep your seats. 

IV. We Must All Meet God 

Last thought. You and I some day must meet this 
holy God. The prophet Amos cries, "Prepare to meet 
thy God" (Amos iv. 12). Every man and woman here 
must some day meet God. The rich man must meet 
God ! The beggar must meet God ! The scholar must 
meet God! The illiterate man must meet God! The 
nobleman must meet God ! The king must meet God ! 
The emperor must meet God! Every one must meet 
God! The supreme question of life, then, is this: Are 
you ready to meet God? None of us can tell how soon 
it may be that we shall meet God. The king of Spain, 
as the bulletins flashed across the wires to-night, has 
been very near meeting his God to-day. Some of us 
may meet Him within the next twenty-four hours; more 
within the year; many more within five years; and 
within forty years almost ever man and woman in this 
audience will have met God. Are you ready ? If not, I 
implore you to get ready before leaving this hall to- 
night. 



GOD 15 

How can we meet God with joy and not with dismay? 
There is only one ground upon which man may meet 
God with Joy and not with despair. That ground is the 
atoning blood of Jesus Christ. God is infinitely holy, 
and the best of us is but a sinner. The only ground 
upon which a sinner can meet the holy God is on the 
ground of the shed blood, the blood of Christ. Any 
one of us, no matter how outcast or vile, can go boldly 
into the Holy of Holies on the ground of the shed 
blood, and the best man or woman that ever walked 
this earth can meet God on no other ground than the 
shed blood. There is only one adequate preparation 
for the sinner to meet God, that is the acceptance of 
Jesus Christ as our personal Saviour, who bore all our 
sins on the Cross of Calvary, and as our risen Saviour 
who is able to set us free from the power of sin. 

Men and women, are you ready to meet God? If it 
be the will of God, I am ready to go up into His pres- 
ence, and meet Him face to face to-night. Do you say. 
Have you never sinned? Alas, I have. Sinned so 
deeply as none of you will ever know, thank God. But, 
thank God still more, when Jesus Christ was nailed to 
yonder Cross of Calvar}^, all my sins were settled. I 
like a sheep had gone astray. I had turned to my own 
way, but God laid on Him my sin (Isaiah liii, 6), and 
the sacrifice God provided I have accepted. I am 
ready to meet God face to face to-night and look into 
those eyes of infinite holiness, for all my sins are cov- 
ered by the atoning blood. 

Are you ready to meet God ? Let me sum up. There 
is a God. God is great. God is holy. You and I must 



16 EEVIVAL ADDEESSES 

meet Him. There is only one adequate preparation — 
the acceptance of Christ as our Sin-bearer, our Saviour, 
Deliverer from the power of sin. Will you accept 
Christ to-night? 



n 



THE GREATEST SENTENCE THAT WAS EVER 
WRITTEN 

"God is Love."— I John iv. 8. 

My subject is the greatest sentence that was ever writ- 
ten. Of course, that sentence is in the Bible. All the 
greatest sentences are in the one Book. The Bible has 
a way of putting more in a single sentence than other 
writers can put in a whole book. Yet there are some 
who would tell us that the Bible is no more God's Book 
than other books. Either they have not read the 
Bible, or they have read it with their eyes closed. 

This sentence has in it but three words. Each word 
is a monosyllable. One word has four letters, one three, 
and one only two ; yet these nine letters, forming three 
monosyllables, contain so much of truth that the world 
has been pondering it for eighteen centuries, and has 
not got to the bottom of it yet. Whole volumes are dedi- 
cated to the exposition of this wonderful sentence — ^thou- 
sands of volumes. 

1 John iv. 8, "God is love." That is the greatest 
sentence that was ever written. That sentence is 
the key-note of the mission that begins to-day. 
Everything that you will hear in song or in word for 
the next four weeks in this mission revolves round that 
one central truth, "God is love." That sums up the 

11 



18 EEYIVAL ADDRESSES 

whole contents of the Bible. If I were asked for a sen- 
tence to print in letters of gold on the outside of our 
Bible, a sentence that summed up the whole contents 
of the Book, it would be this one, "God is Love." That 
is the subject of the first chapter of Genesis, it is the 
subject of the last chapter of Kevelation, and it is the 
subject of every chapter that lies in between. 

The Bible is simply God's love story, the story of the 
love of a holy God to a sinful world. That is the most 
amazing thing in the Bible. People tell us the Bible is 
full of things that it is impossible to believe. I know 
of nothing else so impossible to believe as that a holy 
God should love a sinful world, and should love such 
individuals as you and me, as the Bible says He does. 
But impossible as it is to believe, it is true. There is 
mighty power in that one short sentence, power to break 
the hardest heart, power to reach individual men and 
women who are sunk down in sin, and to lift them up 
until they are fit for a place beside the Lord Jesus 
Christ upon the Throne. 

When Mr. Moody organized the church in Chicago, 
of which I am pastor, he was so anxious that everybody 
should always hear this one truth, and was so afraid 
that some preacher might come and forget to tell it, 
that he had it put on the gas jets right above the pulpit, 
so that the first thing you would see when you went in 
there on an evening was that text shining out in letters 
of fire. 

One stormy night, before the time of the meeting, 
tte door stood ajar. A man partly intoxicated saw it 
open, and thought he might go in and get warm. He 
did not know what sort of a place it was, but when he 
pushed the door open he saw the text blazing out, ''God 



^'GOD IS LOVE" 10 

is love." He pulled the door to, and walked away mut- 
tering to himself. He said, ^'^God is not love. If God is 
love. He would love me. God does not love a wretch like 
me." But it kept on huming down into his soul, "God 
is love! God is Love! God is Love!" After a while 
he retraced his steps, and took a seat in a corner. When 
Mr. Moody walked down after the meeting, he found 
the man weeping like a child. "What is the trouble?" 
he asked. "What was it in the sermon that touched 
you ?" "I didn't hear a word of your sermon." "Well, 
what is the trouble?" "That text up there." Mr. 
Moody sat down and from his Bible showed him the 
way of life, and he was saved. 

I hope it will break some of your hearts. I am not 
going to tell you what I think of the love of God. I am 
going to give you the Bible's plain statements about it. 
There are people who start out with this text as a foun- 
dation, and build a superstructure of speculation that 
contradicts the plain teaching of the very Book from 
which they have taken their foundation-stone. Now, 
nothing can be more illogical than that. One of two 
things is certainly true. Either the Bible is true, or it is 
not true. If the Bible is not true, we have no proof that 
God is love, so that all these universalist schemes, built 
on the foundation that "God is love," crumble away. If 
the Bible is true, these schemes which contradict its 
plain teaching are false. You can take whichever horn 
of the dilemma you please. Whichever you take, the 
shallow universalism of the present day crumbles away. 

What does the Bible tell us as to how God shows His 
love? 

1. That God shows His love ly 'pardoning Sin. 
—Isaiah Iv. 7 : "Let the wicked forsake his way, and the 



20 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

unrighteous man his thoughts : and let him return unto 
the Lord, and He will have mercy upon him ; and to our 
God, for He will abundantly pardon." God tells us 
plainly in His Word that He is willing to forgive any 
sinner that lives, no matter how deep down he has gone, 
if he will only turn from sin and turn to Him ; and He 
will forgive him the very moment he does so. Of course, 
God cannot forgive a man while he holds on to his 
sin, and retain His own moral character. 

I have a boy. I love that boy, and I would give a 
great deal to see him now. I believe there is nothing 
that boy could do but, if he repented and turned from 
it, I would forgive him. But I could not forgive him 
if he held on to his evil way. I could continue to love 
him and seek to save him, but I could not forgive him. 
And God cannot forgive us, and remain what He is — a 
holy God — ^until we are ready to quit our sin. But the 
moment we are, He will have mercy upon us, and He 
will abundantly pardon. If the wickedest man or wo- 
man in Edinburgh should have come in to-night — and 
I hope they have — and should here and now turn from 
sin, the moment they did so, God would blot out every 
sin they ever committed. 

I knew a millionaire in New York City who turned 
his back on all his business and money-making to save 
the perishing. When he was going down one of the 
streets one night, a poor woman came out of an under- 
ground den of infamy and groaned as he passed. My 
friend stepped up to her and told her of the love of 
God. At first she would not believe, but he persuaded 
her that God loved her. He gave her a shelter. She 
did not live long — only about two years — but before she 
died, Nellie Conroy stood up before a great audience in 



''GOD IS LOVE" 21 

the Cooper Institute, and told them how God had saved 
her. Tears were streaming down the faces of all. A 
little while after she lay dying, and, as my friend 
came into the room, she said: "Uncle Charlie — ^he 
was not her uncle, but she called him so for the love 
she bore — "I will soon see, in a few hours, little 
Florence, and I will see Jesus." And Nellie Conroy, 
the pardoned and blood-washed sinner, went up to be- 
hold the King. There is not a man or woman in 
Edinburgh that God will not save the moment they 
turn from their sin. 

2. God shows His Love hy taking account of Sin, and 
punishing it. — Hebrews xii. 6: "For whom the Lard 
loveth He chasteneth, and scourgeth every son whom 
He receiveth." People think God will allow sin to go on 
unchecked, unrebuked, unpunished. "God is love," and 
therefore He takes account of and punishes sin. There 
are fathers who are so selfish that they will not punish 
their children when it is necessary for their good. It 
hurts their feelings, as it does to all true fathers; and 
they are so selfish that they sacrifice the welfare of the 
children in order to spare their own feelings. That 
is not love but consummate selfishness. 

One of my children disobeyed me. I said to myself, 
"That child must be punished.'^ Oh, how I studied 
to find some way out, but I could not do it. I knew 
that for the child's highest welfare, punishment must 
be administered, and the child was punished. I suf- 
fered a great deal more than the child, but I loved the 
child enough to sacrifice my feelings for the child's 
welfare. God suffers when you and I are punished; 
but He loves us so much, that when we need to suffer 
He administers the suffering Himself. 



22 EEVIVAL ADDEESSES 

A gentleman with wHom I was staying said to me 
one day, "Would you like to take a drive?" We went 
out to a cemetery, and came to a place where there were 
three graves. One was long; it was an adult one, and 
in it his wife was buried. In the two short graves 
were the bodies of his two daughters, all he had except 
a baby boy. We knelt and prayed by the side 
of the graves. As we were driving back to town the 
gentleman said, "I pity the man that God has not 
chastened." What did he mean? He meant that he 
had been a man of the world, an upright man, but not 
a Christian. One night when he came home his wife 
said, "Porter, one of the children is sick." In a few 
days she was cold and dead; and, as she lay in the cas- 
ket, he knelt down and promised God to take Christ as 
his Lord and Master. But he lied to God, and forgot 
all about his resolution. Some time after he came 
home again, and his wife said, "Porter, the other child 
is sick." In a few days she also lay cold and dead. 
Once more he knelt down and promised God that he 
would become a Christian, and Jcept his word. All the 
holiest, deepest, purest joys of life had come from his 
great sorrow. 

Are you in sorrow? It is because God loves you. 
Are there some here resisting the entreaties of God's 
mercy and grace ? I beseech you to repent. I tremble 
for some men and women, for those who know the way 
of life, with whom God is striving by His holy Spirit, 
but who will not come to Him. I tremble for them, be- 
cause I know that God loves them. You think that is a 
very strange reason for trembling for a man. No, I 
know God loves you, and so loves you that, if He 



^'GOD IS LOYE" 23 

cannot bring you in any other way, He will bring you 
by sorrow and heart-ache. 

A friend of mine in Chicago, Colonel Clark, spent 
his fortune in saving the lost. He went down every 
night to preach the Gospel in a mission. There was 
one man who had been attending and resisting God's 
entreaties of mercy for a long time; and one night as 
he came along Col. Clark said, "George, if you do 
not turn from sin pretty quick, I believe God will take 
away your wife and child from you, and will lock you 
up." The man was very angry, and said, "Colonel 
Clark, you mind your own business ; I will mind mine." 
One month from that night George woke up on the 
floor of Eochester Jail. His wife was dead, his child 
had been taken away from him to be put into better 
hands than his. Eight there he took Christ as his 
Saviour, and now he is a preacher of the Gospel. Ee- 
member, God loves you, and "whom the Lord loveth He 
chasteneth." 

3. God shows His love for tis by sympathizing with 
us. — Isaiah Ixiii. 9: "In all their affliction He was 
afflicted." That is one of the wonderful sentences of 
this book. The prophet is speaking about the children 
of Israel. Their afflictions were appalling, and the 
direct consequence of their own sin, a Judgment sent 
by the hand of God, and yet the prophet said God 
suffered with them in their sorrow. It is true. There 
is not a man or woman here who is in trouble but 
God sympathizes with you. It may have come in any 
way, but if you have any trouble God sympathizes with 
you in it. 

Some of you know what it is to have a child sick for 
a long time. At first friends came and sympathized 



U KEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

with you, but their sympathy has grown cold; and, as 
you have watched day and night by that fading life 
you have said : "There is no one who sympathizes with 
me/' Yes, there is. God sympathizes with you. 
There are men and women who have a sorrow of such 
a character that they cannot confide it to any human 
ear; and they say: "Nobody knows it. Nobody sym- 
pathizes with me.'' Yes, there is One who knows, and 
He sympathizes with you — God. 

4. God shows His Love ly His Gifts. — I cannot 
dwell upon that. I just want to speak of one gift. 
1 John iii. 1, 2: "Behold, what manner of love the 
Father hath bestowed upon us, that we should be called 
the sons of God." Oh, that wondrous gift that God be- 
stowed upon you and me, that men and women like us 
should be called children of God ! Oh, what love ! Sup- 
pose on his coronation day King Edward, after all the 
the ceremonies were over, had taken his carriage of 
state, and had ridden down to the East End of London, 
and had seen some ragged, wretched, profane boy, utter- 
ly uneducated and morally corrupt. Suppose his great 
heart of love had gone out to that boy, and, stepping 
up to that poor wanderer, he had said: "I love you. I 
am going to take you in my carriage to the palace. I 
am going to dress you fit to be a king's son, and you 
shall be known as the son of King Edward the Sev- 
enth." Would it not have been wonderful? But it 
would not have been so wonderful as that the in- 
finitely holy God should have looked down upon you 
and me in our filthiness and rags and depravity, and 
that He should have so loved us that He should have 
bestowed upon us to be called the sons of God. 

5. God shows His Love hy the Sacrifice He has made 



*'GOD IS LOVE" 25 

for us, — Sacrifice ; after all that is the great test of love. 
People tell you that they love you, but you cannot tell 
whether they really love you till the opportunity comes 
for them to make a sacrifice for you. I had a friend in 
the university. We thought a good deal of each other; 
but I did not know how much he loved me. Years 
after, one night when I was away preaching, this friend 
turned up at my house and got to talking with my 
wife. He asked a good many leading questions, and 
finally got out of her that I was in a position in which I 
needed fifteen hundred dollars. He did not say any 
more at the time, but next day he came to me and said: 
"You think of doing so and so." 'TTes." "That costs 
money .^' "I have a scheme to get it." "What is it?" 
"I have plans." "Well, what are they?" I did not 
think it was his business, but finally I told him. 
He said: "It will not work at all. See here. Just 
let me give you that fifteen hundred dollars." "Well," 
I said, "I am not going to let any man give me fifteen 
hundred dollars." "Oh, you can pay it back." "I don't 
know about that." 'TL will take my chances." He in- 
sisted, and would not take "No" for an answer; he 
gave me that fifteen hundred dollars, and I have paid 
it back, but he did not know I would. I knew then 
that man loved me. God has proved His love. "God 
60 loved the world that He gave" — gave what? — "His 
only begotten Son" — the best He had, the object of his 
eternal love — gave Him to suffer and die upon the 
cruel cross for you and me. 

God looked down upon this lost world, upon you and 
me. He saw that there was only one price that could 
save us ; and He did not stop at that sacrifice. He "so 
loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, 



26 EEVIVAL ADDEESSES 

that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish, but 
have everlasting life." That is the most amazing thing 
in the Bible. You and I sometimes dwell upon the love 
of Christ, to give up Heaven for us. We look at Him 
in the courtyard of Pilate, fastened to the whipping- 
post, with His bare back exposed to the lash of the 
Roman soldier. We look at Him as the lash cuts into 
His back again and again, and again, till it is all torn 
and bleeding. Oh, how He loved us! But looking 
down from yon throne in heaven was God; and every 
lash that cut the back of Christ cut the heart of God. 
We see the soldiers with the crown of thorns, pressing it 
on His brow, and we see the blood flowing down. Oh, 
how he loved us! But every thorn that pierced His 
brow pierced also the heart of God. 

Through the dusk of that awful day we see Him 
on the cross. We hear the last cry, "My God, My God, 
why hast Thou forsaken Me?" We see how He loved 
us. But yonder, looking down from the throne of light 
and glory, was God; and every nail that pierced His 
hands and feet pierced the heart of God, because He 
loved you, and you, and you, every one of you. "God so 
loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son." 
Oh, it was wonderful ! What are you going to do about 
this love? 

I once heard a story which brought me such a glimpse 
of God's love as I never had before. I do not know 
whether it is true or not. A man was set to watch a 
railway drawbridge over a river. He threw it open 
and let vessels through. He heard the whistle of a 
train up the track, and sprang to the lever to bring the 
bridge back into place, and as he was doing so he 
accidentally pushed his boy into the river. He heard 



"GOD IS LOVE" 27 

the cry, "Father, save me; I am drowning." What 
should he do? The man stood at the post of duty, 
brought the bridge back so that the train could pass 
over in safety. Then he jumped into the river to save 
his boy, but it was too late. He sacrificed his boy to do 
his duty. When I heard that story I wondered, if it 
had been my boy, what I would have done. That man 
owed it to those on the train to do what he did. God 
owed you and me nothing. We were guilty rebels 
against him, but "God so loved the world that He gave 
His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him 
ehould not perish, but have everlasting life." 

What are you going to do with His love ? Accept it, 
or trample it under foot? Accept Christ, and you ac- 
cept that love ; reject Christ, and you trample that love 
under foot. I cannot understand how any man or wom- 
an in their right senses can harden their hearts against 
the love of God. 

I remember one night at the close of our service we 
had an after-meeting. The choir were still sitting, and 
the leading soprano was unconverted — a thoroughly 
worldly girl. Her mother rose in the meeting, and said, 
"I wish you would pray for my daughter." I did not 
look around, but I knew intuitively how that girl looked 
at that moment. I made it my business to meet her as 
she was passing out, and said, "Good evening, Cora." 
Her e3^es flashed and cheeks burned; she was very an- 
gry. She said, "My mother ought to have known bet- 
ter. She knows it will only make me worse." I said, 
"Sit down" ; and I turned to Isaiah liii. 5 : "He was 
wounded for our transgressions, He was bruised for our 
iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon 
Him; and with His stripes we are healed." I did not 



28 EEVIVAL ADDEESSES 

eay another word. It was not necessary. The anger 
faded out of those eyes, and burning tears of penitence 
ran down her cheeks. I went from home next day, and 
when I came hack some one said, "Cora is sick.^' I 
found her very sick, but rejoicing in Jesus. A few days 
after her brother came and said, "We think Cora is 
dying." I went at once, and looked on the whitest face 
I ever saw. She had not opened her eyes all the morn- 
ing ; but, after I had finished praying, there came from 
those lips — still without opening her eyes — the most 
wonderful prayer I ever heard. She thanked God for 
giving His son to die for her. She told Him how she 
longed to live to sing to His glory, as she had sung in 
the past for herself; but "if it be not Thy will that 
I live and sing for Christ, I shall be glad to depart 
and to be with Christ." And depart she did, with a 
heart conquered, transformed, by the love of God. What 
are you going to do with the love of God? 

I have here a story cut from a paper to-day. Mrs. 
Bottome, of New York City, says that she had a friend 
in her girlhood of whom she lost sight completely for 
eighteen years. Going back to New York she was pass- 
ing along a street, and up in a second story window 
she saw her friend's face, surrounded by prematurely 
grey hair. She ran up to the door of the house, and 
said to the maid, "Take that card to your mistress." 
''She is not at home," was the answer. "Oh yes, she is: 
I saw her at the window"; and Mrs. Bottome rushed 
past the maid up into the room, and they fell into one 
another's arms. "What has become of you for all these 
years?" asked Mrs. Bottome. The answer was, "Come 
into the other room, and I will show you." In a room 
magnificently fitted up there sat an idiot boy of seven- 



'^GOD IS LOVE" 29 

teen years of age, scarcely able to talk — a driveling 
idiot. His mother said, "My duty lies here, with my 
darling boy." Mrs. Bottome says that in a moment of 
thoughtlessness she asked, "How can you endure it ? I 
do not wonder you are prematurely grey." I knew you 
would not understand my love for my sweet boy," said 
her indignant friend. "It is no burden, no care, to live 
and serve my boy; and if, some day, he will only give 
one sign that he recognizes me as his mother, I will feel 
repaid for all the years of love I have lavished on him." 
That was but a faint image of the love of God. What 
are you going to do with this love of God? That boy 
did not repay his mother's love; for, as Mrs. Bottome 
says, he was an idiot and did not know any better. You 
are not idiots. You know God's Iovq: how are you 
going to repay it? 



Ill 

"FOUND WANTING" 

"Tekel; Tliou art weighed in the balances, and art found 
wanting." — Daniel v. 25. 

Any one who loves the drama should read the Bible, 
for the Bible is the most dramatic book that was ever 
written. There is nothing to compare with it in 
Eschylus or Sophocles or Euripides among the an- 
cients, or in Shakespeare among the moderns, in strik- 
ing situations, in graphic delineation, and in startling 
denouement. 

One of the most intensely interesting and at the same 
time suggestive scenes in the Bible is that described 
in Daniel v. — Belshazzar's feast. Belshazzar was not 
the supreme king of Babylon. Nabonidus, his father, 
was king, and had associated him with himself on the 
throne; Belshazzar was second ruler in the kingdom. 
The critics used to tell us there never was such a king 
as Belshazzar ; but Sir William Kawlinson dug up a tab- 
let from Nabonidus himself, on which he speaks of his 
son Belsharuzzar ; and again the critics, as so often 
before, were brought to grief by the discoveries of mod- 
em archaeology. 

But now Belshazzar was in supreme command in the 
city. His father Nabonidus had been shut outside the 
city walls by the forces of Cyrus. Puffed up by the 
pride of his newly-gotten power, Belshazzar makes a 



'^rOUND WANTING" 31 

great banquet. The palace is a blaze of light. The 
long tables are set for more than a thousand guests. 
They are brilliant and dazzling with plates and cups 
and tankards of silver and gold, many- jewelled, reflect- 
ing back the light from countless candelabra. Re- 
clining at the tables are the guests, with fingers and 
arms ringed and jewelled. The air is heavy with per- 
fume and tremulous with the music of harp and dulci- 
mer and sackbut. Between the tables the oriental wom- 
en weave through the contortions and distortions of 
the Asiatic dance. Back and forth across the tables 
fly jest and repartee. 

In the midst of this hilarity a strange and daring 
conceit enters the mind of the royal entertainer. Bel- 
shazzar whispers to his chief steward a secret command. 
The guests are all agog with curiosity to know what 
the mysterious mandate may be. Their curiosity is 
soon gratified; for the chief steward, followed by a 
host of retainers, comes in bearing in their arms the 
cups of gold and silver which Nebuchadnezzar had car- 
ried away from the temple of Jehovah after the sack of 
the city of Jerusalem. Belshazzar commands that the 
cups be filled with Babylonian wine, and passed from 
lip to lip — ^while he and his guests sing the praises of 
the gods of gold and of silver, of brass, of iron, of 
wood, and of stone. 

The hilarity becomes more boisterous. Louder and 
louder thrum the instruments, faster and faster spin 
the feet of the dancers, swifter and swifter fly jest and 
repartee. Suddenly a hush like death falls upon the 
banqueting hall. One of the revellers, lifting his eyes 
to the wall, sees the fingers of a man's hand writing. 
As he gazes in wonder he becomes the centre of obser- 



33 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

vation, and all eyes turn in the same direction. Now 
the king turns and looks also. There, writing in char- 
acters of fire, are the mysterious fingers of an armless 
hand. Terror freezes Belshazzar to the very soul. In 
the graphic language of the prophet Daniel, "the king's 
countenance was changed, and his thoughts troubled 
him, so that the joints of his loins were loosed, and his 
knees smote one against another." In a few moments 
Belshazzar pulls himself together, and hoarsely cries, 
"Bring hither the astrologers, the Chaldeans, and the 
soothsayers." 

In come the magi of Babylon, splendidly apparelled, 
with proud and stately tread. Expectation rises high in 
their hearts. They think that by their cunning arts 
they can deceive the king, and gain new emoluments; 
but only for a moment. The look of confidence fades 
from their faces. The writing is beyond Mieir art. 

Again terror lays hold on Belshazzar. Again his 
countenance was changed in him. The queen-mother 
hears the confusion. She walks in with stately tread, 
and tries to reassure her royal son. "0 king, live for 
ever: let not thy thoughts trouble thee, nor let thy 
countenance be changed : there is a man in thy kingdom, 
in whom is the spirit of the holy gods." And she pro- 
ceeds to sing the praises of Daniel. "Let Daniel be 
called, and he will show the interpretation." Daniel 
is summoned. Belshazzar turns to him, and says, '^0 
Daniel, I have heard of thee, that the spirit of the gods 
is in thee, and that light and understanding and ex- 
cellent wisdom is found in thee. And I have heard of 
thee, that thou canst make interpretations, and dissolve 
doubts: now if thou canst read the writing, and make 
known to me the interpretation thereof, thon shalt be 



"FOUND WANTING*' 33 

clothed with scarlet, and have a chain of gold about thy 
neck, and shalt be the tliird ruler in the kingdom." 

Daniel, with noble pride, scorns the proffered gifts. 
'Iiet thy gifts be to thyself, and give thy rewards to 
another. I will have none of them; but I will read 
yonder writing, and make known to thee the interpre- 
tation." But first Daniel proceeds to rebuke the blas- 
phemous daring of Belshazzar. He recalls the history 
of Nebuchadnezzar, his grandfather, and how God had 
humbled his stout-hearted pride. Then he says, "The 
God in whose hand thy breath is, and whose are all thy 
ways, hast thou not glorified though thou knewest all 
this: then was the part of the hand sent from Him; 
and this writing was written. And this is the vsriting 
that was written, Mene^ Mene, Tekel^ Uphaksin. 
This is the interpretation of the thing : 

"Mene; God hath numbered thy kingdom, and fin- 
ished it. 

"Tekel; Thou art weighed in the balances, and art 
found wanting. 

"Peres; Thy kingdom is divided, and given to the 
Medes and Persians." 

Belshazzar calls for the royal robe, and it is placed 
on Daniel. A chain of gold is cast about his neck, and 
he is proclaimed next to Belshazzar, third ruler in the 
kingdom. The royal banquet goes on. The hilarity in- 
creases; but, hark! the tramp, tramp, tramp, tramp of 
soldiers' feet in the streets of Babylon. The armies of 
Cyrus have turned the waters of the Euphrates, and 
have come in by the river-bed and the two-leaved gates 
of Babylon. 

There is a crashing sound at the gate. The guests 
look round for a place to flee. But it is too late. 



34 EEVIYAL ADDRESSES 

Tramp, tramp, tramp, up the palace stairs, with a 
crash and a rush, the Persian and Median soldiers come 
in. Swords flash in air for a moment. Belshazzar looks 
up, and sees che sword over his head. It falls. Bel- 
shazzar is a corpse. '^That night was Belshazzar the 
king of the Chaldeans slain." I call your attention to 
one word on the wall: 

^Tekel; Thou art weighed in the balances, and 
art found wanting." 

In whose balances was Belshazzar weighed? The 
balances of God. Not in the balances of his own esti- 
mation of himself: he would never have been found 
wanting there. Not in the balances of public opinion: 
the men of Babylon would have said, "Belshazzar is the 
greatest of our statesmen, and the coming man." Not 
in the balances of human philosophy. In the balances 
of God. 

Every man and woman here to-night is to be weighed 
in the same balances, the balances of God. How much 
do you suppose that you weigh in the balances of God ? 
I do not ask you how much you weigh in your own 
opinion of yourself. That is of no consequence, for 
many a man who thinks most of himself is of least 
account in the mind of God. I do not ask how much 
you weigh in the balances of public opinion. You may 
be a leading citizen and a chief magistrate, whom all 
delight to honour; but oftentimes that which is highly 
esteemed among men is abomination in the sight of 
God. 

How much do you think you weigh in the balances of 
God? There are some of us who set much store by 
our morality, our culture, and our refinement; but if 
we knew how little we weighed in the balances of the 



"FOUND WANTING'' 35 

eternal and all holy God, we would fall on our knees 
and cry, "God be merciful to me a sinner." 

Is there any way in which we can tell how much we 
weigh in the balances of God? There is. God has 
given to us the weights wherewith He weighs us. 

Turn to Exodus xx. and you will get the first ten 
weights by which God weighs men — the well-known Tten 
Commandments. Let me read them. 

"Thou shalt have no other gods before me." What is 
a man's god ? A man's god is the thing he thinks most 
of. If a man thinks more of money than anything else, 
money is his god; and many a citizen of Edinburgh 
worships Plutus, the god of wealth. Many a man is 
sacrificing conscience, sacrificing honour, sacrificing 
obedience to God, to gain money. You do things 
in business that you know are not according to the 
teachings of the Bible, things that you know are not 
pleasing to a holy God, because there is money in 
them. Gold is your god, and you are found wanting 
by the first of God's commandments. There are men 
who worship gold just as really as if they had a 
sovereign hung up in their bedchamber, and said their 
prayers to it. 

Many worship social position. How many are doing 
things in matters of dress and in matters of social life 
that are disapproved by conscience ! But it is what so- 
ciety does; and they think that if they do not do the 
same they will lose their position in society. You are 
putting society before God. Society is your god. You 
are weighed and found wanting by the first of God's 
laws. 

Major Whittle once went, in Washington, to call upon 
a man who had been prominent in public and church 



36 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

life. He was showing Major Whittle over his heautiful 
new house. They came to a large and beautiful room, 
and Major Whittle asked, "What is this for?" The 
man was silent at first. '^What is this for ?" asked Ma- 
jor Whittle again. The man hung his head, and said, 
*^Well, Major, if you must know, this is a ball-room." 
'^Vhat ! a ball-room. Do you mean to tell me that you 
have sunk so low that you have a ball-room in your 
house?" "Well, Major, I never thought I would come 
to this; but my wife and daughter said we were in so- 
ciety now, that this was the thing in Washington, and 
that we must have it to keep our position in Washing- 
ton society." Social position was their god; and that 
man paid for it dearly in the wreck and ruin of his 
home. 

Many a man worships whisky. How many a man 
is sacrificing his brain-power, his business capacity, the 
respect of his fellow-citizens, the reverence of his wife 
and children, in devotion to the cursed whisky. I saw 
many a hideous god when I was traveling in India, all 
sorts of beastly images which men bow down before and 
worship, but I know no god more beastly, no god more 
disgusting than this god of whisky, upon the altar of 
which men are offering as a sacrifice their children and 
their interests. 

How many a young man and young woman worships 
the god of pleasure. They are doing things for pleasure 
that their conscience disapproves of, things that hinder 
communion with God. They are sacrificing everything 
that they may have amusement and pleasure. Amuse- 
ment is their god. Weighed and found wanting by the 
first weight of the ten commandments. 

I have no time to dwell upon the second command: 



''FOUND WANTING" 37 

*'Thou shalt not make uiito thee any graven image, or 
any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or 
that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water un- 
der the earth ; thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, 
or serve them, for I the Lord thy God am a jealous God, 
visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children 
unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate 
Me, and showing mercy unto thousands of them that 
love Me, and keep My commandments." 

The Third Command — "Thou shalt not take the 
name of the Lord thy God in vain; for the Lord will 
not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain." — 
How much do you weigh when you are weighed by that 
law ! Oh, how many a man on your streets breaks that 
law! And men not only break it, but they think it a 
light matter. They think that law is of no consequence. 
When you approach men and speak to them about 
Christ, they will say, "Well, but I do not know that I 
need Christ. I am not a very bad man. I have never 
stolen anything. I have never killed anybody. I have 
never committed adultery. Oh, I do swear occasion- 
ally." They think it a light matter, but God does not 
regard it so. "Thou shalt not take the name of the 
Lord thy God in vain ; for the Lord will not hold him 
guiltless that taketh His name in vain." 

If there is any sin which shows that the very 
foundations of a man's character are honey-combed and 
rotten, it is the sin of profanity. You cannot trust a 
profane swearer anywhere. A profane swearer is ripe 
for any crime. What is the only foundation for a sound 
character? Eeverence for God; and when that is gone 
the foundation of character is gone. Character may not 
crumble away at once^ as a building does not always 



38 BEVIYAL ADDRESSES 

fall the moment its foundation is rotten, in a, measure, 
but it will fall. The foundation is gone. ISTo man 
can swear profanely until he has gotten very, very low 
in the moral scale. A man has to go down pretty low 
(has he not?) to speak disrespectfully of his mother. 
We have seen men go pretty far into sin, and yet have 
so much manhood left that, when others spoke insult- 
ingly about their mother, they would resent it. A man 
has fallen very low who will speak lightly of his 
mother; but a man has got immeasurably lower before 
he will speak profanely of God. The purest mother is 
nothing to the all holy One. Xo mother ever loved a 
child, no mother ever sacrificed for a child, as God has 
loved you and made sacrifices for you; and if you can 
take God's name upon your lips in profanity you are 
a vile wretch. I beseech of yon get on your face before 
the eternal God before you sleep, and cry to Him for 
mercy. 

But there are other ways of taking God's name in 
vain besides profane swearing. Much that we call pray- 
ing is taking God's name in vain. Every time you have 
knelt down to pray and have had no thought of God 
in your heart while you take His name upon your lips, 
you have taken God's name in vain. In the Church of 
England yon go through those marvelously beautiful 
prayers in the ritual, but when you do it as a mere mat- 
ter of form, with no thought of Grod in your mind, you 
have taken God's name in vain. You repeat that won- 
derful prayer that the Master Himself taught ns: 
'•'Our Father which art in heaven, hallowed be Thy 
name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth 
a? it is done in heaven. Give us this day our daily 
bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those 



'^FOUXD WANTING" 39 

that trespass against us. And lead us not into temp- 
tation^ but deliver us from evil. For thine is the king- 
dom, and the power, and the glory, for ever and ever/' 
All the time you recite it you have not one thought what 
you are saying. It is downright appalling profanity. 

The Fourth Command — "Eemember the Sabbath 
day, to keep it holy. Six days shalt thou labour, and 
do all thy work, but the seventh day" — not the seventh 
day of the week, as some men say, daring to put into 
God's Word what He did not put in, but the seventh 
day for rest after six days of work, without specifying 
which day of the week it should come. Of course it 
was the seventh day of the week with the Jew, in com- 
memoration of the old creation; but with the Christian 
it is the first day of the week, in commemoration of the 
new creation through a Risen Lord. "The seventh day 
is the Sabbath of the Lord thy God; in it thou shalt 
not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, 
thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, 
nor the stranger that is within thy gates: for in six 
days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all 
that in them is, and rested the seventh day; wherefore 
the Lord blessed the Sabbath day, and hallowed it.'' 
There was a day when Scotchmen kept that law. It 
may be you do now; but, alas, in India I saw a thing 
that stirred my blood and sickened my heart. I saw 
Scotchmen — not merely Englishmen and Irishmen — I 
saw Scotchmen, from the land of the Covenanters, on 
God's holy day, not in the house of God, but off playing 
golf, riding on their wheels, engaging in all manner of 
amusement. I do not know whether you do it at home 
or not; but the land, the city, the individual who for- 



40 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

gets the Sabbath day has undermined the foundations 
of God's favour and its own prosperity. 

Th» Fifth Command — "Honour thy father and thy 
mother : that thy days may be long upon the land which 
the Lord thy God giveth thee." — I wish I had time to 
dwell upon that; for we are getting into a day when 
the young think they know more than their parents, 
speaking lightly about " the old man" and "the old 
woman." They think father and mother are old fogies, 
and that the young people know it all. They disobey 
their parents. The child who disobeys a parent will 
bring upon his own head the curse of God. There is 
only one law superior to the law of father and 
mother; and that is the law of God. Even those 
who are grown up, and do not treat the father and 
mother with the respect and consideration which they 
should, will reap what they sow. God have mercy upon 
the one, young or old, who breaks that commandment. 

The Sixth Command— "Thou shalt not kill." — How 
much do you weigh by that law? You say, "I am all 
right by that law. We have no murderers here." Are 
you absolutely sure? "Why, certainly. Where do you 
think you are talking? Down in the Grassmarket ?" 
No, I am talking in the Synod Hall ; but there are other 
ways of killing people besides driving a dagger into 
their heart or firing a bullet into their brain. A hus- 
band can kill his wife by neglect, and cruelty, and un- 
faithfulness. How many a woman is hastening to an 
early grave, with a broken heart, because she has learned 
that the man who swore to be true to her is unfaithful. 

One day I was talking with a very brilliant man, 
who was under the influence of liquor. I said to him, 
^'John, you ought to take Jesus Christ." "Oh," was 



''FOUND WANTING'^ ^1 

his reply, ''you know I do not believe as 3wu do. 
I am one of these new theologians. I have a broader 
theology than you have. I am one of those believers in 
the eternal hope. You do not believe that old-fashioned 
theology, do you? Now, honestly, suppose I should 
drop right down here now, what would become of me?'' 
I said, "John, you would go straight to hell, and you 
would deserve to go." "What have I done?" "I will tell 
you. You have got your wife's heart under your heel, 
and you are grinding the life out of it. What is worse, 
you are trampling under foot the Christ of God, who 
died on the Cross of Calvary to save you." 

How many a son is killing his mother by his wild, 
dissolute life. I remember staying in a beautiful home, 
where there was everything that wealth could buy. One 
would have thought that the mistress of that home must 
be a perfectly happy woman. But she would rise in the 
middle of the night, and walk up and down the halls of 
her beautiful home with a breaking heart. A few 
months after she died. Why? She had a wandering 
boy. She did not even know where he was; and as I 
stood by her grave, with that wandering boy, who had 
come to her dying bed, I thought in my heart, "Mur- 
dered by her wayward son." 

Some of you are hastening your mother's footsteps to 
the grave. You have not written your mother for six 
months. In Melbourne a man came rushing down the 
hall and said, "Oh, I have killed my mother." He 
rushed into the inquiry room, and was led to Christ. Is 
there a man here who is killing his mother? Repent, 
take Christ ; write to your mother to-night that you are 
eaved. 

There are other ways of murdering people. I do not 



42 KEYIVAL ADDRESSES 

know whether it is common in Scotland. I think, and 
I certainly hope, not. But it is common where Scotch- 
men have gone. How shall I describe it? The most 
appalling kind of murder in the world. Mothers mur- 
dering their own helpless babes, to escape the responsi- 
bility of what is one of the greatest privileges in the 
world, a large family. If there is any hand in the world 
that is scarlet with the blood of murder, it is that of 
the woman who murders her own unborn babe; and 
there are men who call themselves physicians who will 
act as helpers in this hellish business. Such a one ought 
not to put "M.D." after his name, but "D.M."— damn- 
able murderer. In our country they hang them, which 
is just. Alas, they do not always catch them. I said 
this in an Australian city, and the wife of a physician 
was very indignant about it. But her indignation did 
not alter the truth of what I said. It only exposed 
a guilty party. 

The Seventh Command — "Thou shalt not commit 
adultery." — ^I cannot dwell on that. It needs to be 
dwelt upon, but not here. Simply let me say that there 
is no class of sins upon which God has set the stamp 
of his disapproval in a plainer way, by the fearful con- 
eequences that immediately follow the sins covered by 
this commandment. The woman untrue to her hus- 
band, the husband untrue to his wife : the curse of God 
always follows them. It may be done by legal means, 
under the cover of divorce laws that controvert God's 
laws, but it does not lessen the sin. The meanest scoun- 
drel that walks the earth, the meanest man alive, is the 
man who steps in, under any circumstances, between a 
man and his wife; and the meanest woman on earth 
ie the one who steps in between another woman and 



"FOUISTD WANTING" 43 

her husband. Eemember, furthermore, that our Saviour 
interpreted this law as applying not only to the overt act, 
but to the secret thought of the heart, when He said, 
"Whoso looketh on a woman to lust after her hath com- 
mitted adultery with her already in liis heart." 

The Eighth Command — "Thou shalt not steal." — 
How much do you weigh, weighed by that law? Wait 
a moment. What is it to steal? To steal is to take 
property from another without giving an adequate 
equivalent in either property or money. For example, 
every man who sells goods under false pretenses is a 
thief. The man who sells a piece of cloth as being "all 
wool" when it is part cotton, is a thief. The man who 
employs labour, and takes advantage of the poor man's 
necessity, and does not give him in pay a full equiva- 
lent for his labour, is a thief. Every labouring man 
who does not give to his employer, in good honest work, 
a fair equivalent for the wages paid to him, is a thief. 
The gambler who gambles and wins is a thief. Every 
time you bet on cards, on a horse race, on a boat race, 
every time you invest in pools or in a lottery, whether it 
be a public lottery or a church lottery, and win, you 
are a thief. The man who gambles and wins is a thief; 
the man who gambles and loses is a fool. So every 
gambler is either a thief or a fool. 

The Ninth Command — "Thou shalt not bear false 
witness againt thy neighbour." — I know you do not like 
what I am saying, but that does not alter it; and you 
will not escape God by trying to forget what I say. But 
if you do not pay attention to my words, as far as they 
are true, they will rise up against you in the day of 
judgment. 

How much do you weigh, weighed by that command- 



M REVIVAL ABDEESSES 

ment? "Well," you say, "I am all right by that, be- 
cause I was never in court." Does it say anything about 
court? Every time you tell anything about another that 
is derogatory to them, and is not true, you have broken 
this law of God. You hear a story, and do not take 
pains to find out whether it is true or not. Perhaps 
you add a bit to it, and go on and tell it, and it is not 
true. You have broken the law of God. You say, "I 
thought it was true." It is not what you think : it is the 
fact. Whenever you hear anything against a neighbor, 
do not believe it until it is proven absolutely to be true; 
and even when it is, keep it to yourself, unless duty 
clearly demands the telling of it, which is very seldom. 

Some of you say, "Did you hear that awful story 

about Mrs. ? I was awfully sorry." You lie. You 

were glad to hear it, or you would have kept it to your- 
self. The gossip, the slanderer, is viler than the vilest 
thief that walks your streets. The thief only steals 
money: the slanderer steals what money cannot buy — 
reputatioLl. 

The Tenth Command — "Thou shalt not covet thy 
neighbour's house, thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's 
wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidservant, nor his 
ox, nor his ass, nor anything that is thy neighbour's." — 
God's law covers not only the overt act, but the covert 
thought of the heart as well. Many of you would not 
steal your neighbour's horse, but you wish it was yours. 
You would not run off with your neighbour's wife, but 
you wish she were yours. You would not rob your 
neighbour of his money, but you wish it was your 
money. You have broken the law of God. 

How much do you weigh, weighed by the law of God ? 

There are two other weights heavier than these. 



"FOUND WANTING" 45 

Matthew vii. 12 : ''All things whatsoever ye would that 
men should do to you, do ye even so to them." The so- 
called Golden Eule. How many talk about it, and how 
few keep it. 

One day I was talking to a sea-captain. I asked him, 
''Captain, why are you not a Christian ?" "The Golden 
Rule is a good enough religion for me," he replied. 
"Do you keep it?" He dropped his head. He talked 
about it, but he did not keep it. Talking about it will 
not save you. Do you do it ? Mind it does not merely 
put it negatively, "^Do not do to others whatsoever ye 
would not that they should do to you." That is Con- 
fucianism. The Christian rule is positive. "Do these 
things to them." Sell goods to other people just the 
way you want other people to sell goods to you. Talk 
about other people behind their backs just as you want 
them to talk about you behind your back. Do you do 
it ? Always ? Then you are weighed and found wanting. 

The heaviest weight of all is in Matthew xxii. 37, 38 : 
"Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, 
and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is 
the first and great commandment." How much do you 
weigh by that law? Put God first in everything — in 
business, in politics, in social life, in study, in every- 
thing. Do you do it ? Have you always done it ? No, 
you say, I have not. Then you are weighed and found 
wanting, not only by breaking a law of God, but this is 
"the first and great command;" you have broken the 
first and greatest of God's laws. 

A minister asked me to talk to a young man who 
wanted to go into the ministry. He was a splendid- 
looking fellow. When he came to me, I said, "You 
want to go into the ministry. Are you a Christian?'' 



ae REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

*^hy, of course I am. I was brought up a Christian, 
and I am not going back on the training of my par- 
ents." ''Have you been born again ?" "What ?" "Jesus 
says, 'Except a man be born again, he cannot see the 
kingdom of God.' " "Well," he said, "I have never 
heard of that before." "Did you know that you had 
committed the greatest sin a man can commit ?" "No, 
I never did." "What do you think it is?" "Murder." 
"You are greatly mistaken. Let us see what God 
says." I turned to Matthew xxii. 37, 38, and read: 
"Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, 
and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is 
the first and great commandment." "Which com- 
mandment is it?" I asked. "The first and greatest-." 
"Have you kept it ? Have you loved God with all your 
heart, and all your soul, and all your mind? Have 
you put God first in everything — in business, in pleas- 
ure, in social life, in politics?" "No, sir, I have not." 
"What have you done then ?" "I have broken this com- 
mandment." "Which commandment is it ?" "The first 
and greatest." "What have you done then?" "I have 
broken the first and greatest of God's commandments. 
I have committed the greatest sin a man can commit. 
But I never saw it before." 

How much do we weigh, every one of us, including 
the preacher? Every one of us is weighed and found 
wanting. What shall we do then? This is where the 
Gospel comes in. I have preached up to this point 
nothing but law. God has weighed the whole world in 
the balances and found it wanting, and in Christ He 
provided salvation for a wanting world. 

God sent His Son, who kept that law, and then died 
for pu and me who have broken itj and all you and I 



^'FOUND WANTING'' '47 

have to do is to take Christ into the balances with us. 
Christ can weigh up all the weights. When we take 
Christ into the balance with us, then we are weighed, 
and found not wanting. 

Will you take Jesus Christ into the balances with 
you to-night? Woe to the man who is weighed in the 
balances of God for the last time without having Jesus 
Christ with him. This may be the last opportunity for 
some ; it may at all events be the last opportunity which 
you will ever take. The time will come when you will 
be weighed and found wanting; and you will look back 
and say, "Oh, why did I not listen to the preacher?" 
You will remember this sermon and the text ; and you 
will say, "Oh, if I only had improved the opportunity." 

Mr. Moody told a story I shall never forget. A man 
was set to watch a drawbridge. He had orders not to 
open the draw until a special train passed. Boat 
after boat came up and urged him to open the bridge 
and let them through. "No, I have my orders to wait 
till the special passes." At last a friend came up and 
over-urged him, and he allowed himself to be persuaded. 
He threw the draw open. No sooner was the bridge 
well open and the vessels beginning to enter, than he 
heard the whistle of the special. He sprang to the 
lever, but he was too late. The train came on with 
lightning speed. He looked on as it dashed into the 
open chasm, he heard the shrieks of the injured and 
saw the corpses of the dead, and went mad. He never 
recovered his senses, but walked up and down the padded 
cell of the asylum, crying, "Oh! if I only had; oh! if 
I only had." Had what? Obeyed orders. Men and 
women, reject Christ for the last time, and you will 



W EEVIVAL ADDEESSES 

walk up and down the eternal madhoiise wringing your 
hands, and saying, "Oh! if I only had; oh! if I only 
had !^' Had what ? Obeyed God, and accepted His Son 
as your Saviour. Will you do it now? 



lY 

THE JUDGMENT DAY 

"God now commandeth all men everywhere to repent; be- 
cause He hath appointed a day, in the which He will judge 
the world in righteousness by that man whom He hath or- 
dained; whereof He hath given assurance unto all men, in that 
He hath raised him from the dead." — Acta xvii. 30, 31. 

There are two events in the future which are absolutely 
certain. First of all, it is absolutely certain that Jesua 
Christ is coming again to receive His people unto him- 
self, and to reward them according to their works ; and 
in the second place, it is absolutely certain that Jesus 
Christ is coming again to judge the world. When I 
was on the ocean some months ago a man asked me one 
night, as we were walking the deck of the great steamer 
together, *'What will be the outcome of this tendency 
towards great trusts and monopolies in business?" And 
I replied, "I do not know." Men often come to me 
with the question, "What will be the outcome of these 
great combinations of laboring men to resist the en- 
croachments of capital ?" And again I reply, "I don't 
know." 

But I will tell you what I do know, and it is infinite- 
ly more important. I know that some day the Lord 
Jesus Christ will come back again, and receive His wait- 
ing and faithful people unto himself, and I know that 
there is going to be a judgment day for the w^3^1d, and 
that judgment day is the subject of our thought to-night. 



m EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

There are five things about the judgment day that are 
set forth in our text: first, the certainty of it; second- 
ly, the universality of it ; thirdly, the basis of it ; fourth- 
ly, the administrator of it ; and, lastly, the issues of it. 

I. First, the Certainty of it. — It is absolutely certain 
that there is to be a judgment day. "God hath ap- 
pointed a day in which He will judge the world in right- 
eousness." Men who are living in sin may laugh at it ; 
they cannot laugh it away. In the days of Noah men 
laughed at Noah's predictions that there was to be a 
flood, but the flood came and swept them all away. In 
the days of Lot the men of Sodom laughed at the idea 
that God would rain fire and brimstone out of heaven, 
and destroy Sodom and Gomorrah and the other cities 
of the plain; but the fire and brimstone fell, and these 
cities were blotted out. In the days of Jeremiah the 
people of Jerusalem laughed at Jeremiah's predictions 
that Nebuchadnezzar would come and lay Jerusalem in 
the dust and destroy their temple. But it all came to pass 
just as God said, and just as Jeremiah believed and 
predicted. In the days of Jesus Christ men laughed at 
Christ's prediction that the armies of Rome under Titus 
and Vespasian would lay Jerusalem's walls even with the 
ground, and that calamity would overtake that city such 
as the world had never seen; but historians outside the 
Bible tell us that it all came to pass just as Christ pre- 
dicted, and that Jerusalem was overtaken with the most 
appalling siege in the world's history. All of God's 
predictions about judgment on individuals and nations 
in the past have come true to the very letter in spite of 
all the false hopes that were held out by false prophets. 

If we are to judge the future by the past^ — and there 
is no other way to judge it — God's predictions about 



THE JUDGMENT DAY 51 

the future with regard to judgment upon individuals 
and nations will come true to the very letter, in spite of 
all the false hopes held out by the false prophets ; that 
is, by the 'liberal preachers" of the day. It is absolute- 
ly certain that there is to be a judgment day for the 
world. 

God has given us a special guarantee of the judg- 
ment day, and that special guarantee is the resurrec- 
tion of Christ from the dead. As we read in the text, 
"God will judge the world in righteousness by that man 
whom He hath ordained; whereof He hath given as- 
surance unto all men, in that He hath raised Him from 
the dead." The resurrection of Jesus Christ from the 
dead is an absolutely certain fact of history. It is not 
a theological fiction; it is not a poet's dream: it is an 
established fact of history. If I had time to-night to go 
into the evidence, I could prove to every fair-minded, 
thinking; man that, beyond question, Jesus Christ rose 
from the dead. When we were in the city of Sydney 
I was talking to the business men of Sydney and Mem- 
bers of both Houses of Parliament there for four hours, 
to prove to them that Christ did rise from the dead, 
and many an Agnostic, Deist, Unitarian, and Higher 
Critic had his views utterly shattered, and turned to the 
risen Christ. There is no time, however, to-night to go 
into the evidence of the resurrection of Jesus Christ. I 
simply want to say to you that the evidence for the 
resurrection of Jesus Christ is so overwhelming that it 
is impossible for any honest man to sit down and thor- 
oughly sift the evidence, and come to any other conclu- 
sion than that Chirst did rise from the dead. 

Years ago there were two eminent lawyers, one 
named Lyttleton and the other West. These two men 



52 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

were Deists; that is, they had faith in a Supreme Be- 
ing, but did not believe in revelation, or in inspiration, 
or in the miraculous. One day they got to talking about 
their views, and finally one said to the other, "Well, 
we cannot maintain our position until we disprove two 
things; first, the reputed conversion of Saul of Tarsus, 
and secondly, the reputed resurrection of Jesus Christ 
from the dead." Said Lyttleton to West, "I will write 
a book to prove that Saul of Tarsus was never convert- 
ed in the way which the Acts of the Apostles record." 
And said West to Lyttleton, "I will write a book to 
prove that Jesus Christ did not rise from the dead as 
the evangelists say." Well, they wrote their books, and 
when they met afterwards. West said to Lyttleton, 
"How have you got on?" "I have written my book," 
said Lyttleton, ^l^ut as I have studied the evidence from 
a legal standpoint, I have become convinced that Saul 
of Tarsus was converted in just the way the Acts of the 
Apostles say he was, and I have become a Christian. 
How have you got on?" '^ell," said West, "I have 
sifted the evidence for the resurrection of Jesus Christ 
from the legal standpoint, and I am satisfied that Jesus 
of Nazareth was raised from the dead just as Matthew, 
Mark, Luke, and John record, and I have written my 
book in defence of Christianity." And these two books 
can be seen in our libraries to-day. It is absolutely 
impossible for any man with a legal mind, and accus- 
tomed to sift evidence, to sit down and thoroughly in- 
vestigate the evidence for the resurrection of Jesus 
Christ, and come to any other conclusion than that 
Jesus of Nazareth rose from the dead. Well, that res- 
urrection of our Lord Jesus Christ is a guarantee that 
a judgment day is coming. When Jesus Christ cam« 



TKE JUDGMENT DAY 53 

upon the earth. He claimed in John v. 22, 23, "The 
Father judgeth no man, but hath committed all judg- 
ment unto the Son ; that all men should honor the Son, 
even as they honor the Father. He that honoreth not 
the Son honoreth not the Father which hath sent Him." 
He claimed that there was a judgment day coming and 
that He was to be the Judge. Men hated him for mak- 
ing the claim, and the other claim involved in it, the 
claim of Deity. They put Him to death for making 
this claim, but before they put Him to death He said, 
"My Father will set His seal to the claim for which you 
put Me to death." And when the third day came, the 
breath of God swept tlirough the sleeping clay, and God, 
by the resurrection of Christ, set his seal to Christ's 
claims, and said in accents that cannot be mistaken and 
that are a message to all ages, "There is a judgment day 
coming." The indisputable resurrection of Jesus 
Christ in the past points with unerring finger to a 
certain judgment in the future. If there is any man 
here to-night that flatters himself that there is to be no 
judgment day; if there is any man here that fancies 
that he can go on in sin, and never be called to ac- 
count for it ; if there is any man here that believes he 
can go on trampling under foot the Son of God, and 
not have to suffer for it, oh, man, throw that hope 
away to-night, for it is baseless. It is absolutely cer- 
tain that there will be a day in which Jesus Christ 
will judge the world in righteousness. 

II. The Universality of the Judgment. — In the sec- 
ond place please note the universality of the judgment 
day. "God hath appointed a day in which He will 
judge the world/* It will be no class judgment; every 
man and woman on the face of thii earth will hav« to 



54 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

face the Judge in that day. Of course all who are Chris- 
tians, all who have accepted Christ as their Saviour, and 
surrendered to Him as their Lord, will have been caught 
up to meet Him in the air. But all the rest will have 
to face the Judge in that day. There will be no es- 
caping that day. Men often escape human courts. 
There is many a tliief that has never been arrested, 
there is many a murderer that remains unhung; but 
when God sends forth His officers to gather the people 
for that judgment day, they will have to come, and 
they will have to stay right there until their case is set- 
tled. Men have often escaped me when I am preaching. 
When the preaching becomes too pointed, they get up 
and go out, and thus they escape me. You can't escape 
God that way. You will have to come there, and you 
will have to stay there until your case is decided. He 
is going to judge the world in righteousness. How you 
would rejoice if every infidel in London were at this 
meeting to-night. But most infidels would not dare to 
come to this meeting. But there will be a meeting that 
every infidel will be at. There wdll be one meeting that 
every hypocritical church member will be at. There 
will be a meeting where every unpenitent sinner will 
be present — the meeting with Jesus Christ at the judg- 
ment bar of God. That man who is sitting in this 
meeting to-night trying to make light of everything I 
am sa3dng — ^you will be at that meeting, and you will 
not make light of it ; you will be there face to face with 
Jesus Christ. That woman who has come to this meet- 
ing to-night for any purpose but a good one, you will 
meet Christ there at the judgment bar of God. 

III. The Basis of the Judgment, — ^In the third place 
note the basis of judgment. 



THE JTJDGMENT DAY 55 

1. ''The deeds done in the body." In 2 Corinthians, 
chapter v., verse 10, are the words, "For we must all ap- 
pear before the judgment seat of Christ ; that every one 
may receive the things done in his body according to 
that he hath done, whether it be good or bad." The 
deeds done in the body are the basis of that judgment. 
There are preachers who tell us that a man can die in 
Bin, and after he is dead can have another probation, 
another chance to repent, that he may repent after his 
death and turn to God and be saved. The Old Book 
does not hold out any such hope. That kind of teaching 
contradicts the plain teaching of the Word of God, 
which says distinctly that "the deeds done in the body," 
in the life that now is, are to determine the issues of 
Eternity. 

That man to-night who is living in drunkenness, who 
is squandering his time, squandering his money, squan- 
dering his manhood in a life of dissipation; you will 
have to answer for in that day. That woman to-night 
who is living a life of frivolity and pleasure instead of 
living for the God who made her, and the Christ who 
died for her ; you will have to answer for it in that day. 
That man here who professes to be a Christian but lives 
like the world; you will have to answer for it in that 
day. That man who has made gold his god, over- 
reaching his neighbour in business, oppressing his em- 
ployee, turning a deaf ear to the cry of the vridow and 
orphan; you will have to answer for it in that day. 
That man who knows the truth, but will not heed it 
because it will hurt him in business or politics; you will 
have to answer for it in that day. That man who is a lib- 
ertine, living in lust, living like a beast, scattering ruin 
wherever he goes ; you will have to answer for it in that 



56 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

day. The deeds done in the body — they will all come 
up, things that have been forgotten for years. There is 
a man here who years ago did a base, nefarious deed, 
and to-night he is very comfortable in the thought that 
no one on earth knows of it. Man, the whole world will 
know about it in that day unless you repent, and Jesua 
Christ will know about it and will pass judgment 
upon it. There is a woman here to-night who has a very 
black page in her past history, but of late years she has 
been very comfortable over that black page. No one 
now knows anything about it ; it is all forgotten ; there 
is no one to bring it up. The whole world will know 
about it in that day unless you repent and turn to 
Chrigt. 

2, "The secret things" will be judged. In Romans ii. 
16, we read : "In the day when God shall Judge the se- 
crets of men by Jesus Christ." The secret things, the 
things done in the dark, the things done under the 
cover of night, the things that nobody saw but God; 
all will be brought to light on that day. 

I remember hearing years ago of an incident that 
happened here, in your own country. A woman had 
killed her husband by driving a nail into his skull, and 
so successfully had she covered up the wound that 
he was buried without any suspicion being cast upon 
her. After several years the woman flattered herself 
that she would never be found out. One day, however, 
the grave-digger was at work in the cemetery, and 
threw up this man's skull, and there he saw the nail. 
I do not know that he suspected the woman, but he took 
it to her and said, 'T:.ook there." She threw up her 
hands and cried, "My God! Found out at last." It 
will all be found out at last, the secret things, the 



THE JUDGMENT DAY 57 

thoughts and imaginations of the heart. Oh, you men 
who are boasting of your morality, how would you like 
to have the thoughts and fancies and desires and the 
imaginations of the last twenty-four hours photo- 
graphed and thrown upon a screen before this audience 
to-night? The whole world will see those secret things 
in that day, not those of twenty-four hours only, but 
those of a lifetime, unless you repent. You, madam, 
who have boasted of your purity and your nobility of 
character above others, and fancied that you ought to 
be saved because of your goodness ; how would you like 
to have the hidden things of the chambers of imagery 
and imagination and desire photographed and thrown 
on a screen before all this audience? But the whole 
world will see it in that day, unless you repent. The se- 
cret things will all come to light. 

3. The Lord tells us again that the basis of judg- 
ment will be our words. In Matthew xii. 36 I read, 
"But I say unto you that every idle word that men shall 
speak, they shall give account thereof in the day of 
judgment." Our careless, thoughtless, unstudied words 
reveal what we are at heart. Our studied speeches do 
not reveal what we are, but what we would like to be; 
but our idle words, that we drop accidentally, they are 
the best revelation of what there is in our hearts. Your 
impure words, your unkind words, your harsh words, 
your words of gossip and slander; you will give account 
thereof. 

On one occasion, at a service in Minneapolis, one of 
my workers came to me and said, ^'Here is an infidel ; 
will you come and speak to him?" I went to him, and 
in reply to my question, he said, "Yes, I am an infidel." 
I said, "Why are you an infidel?" He replied, "Be- 



58 KEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

cause the Bible is full of contradictions." "Full of con- 
tradictions ?" I said. "Yes," he said. "Will you please 
show me one?" I asked. "Oh," said he, "it is full of 
them." "Well, " I said, "if there are so many you ought 
to be able to show me one." "Oh, it is just full of 
them," he said. "Well," I insisted, "please show me 
one." Then he replied, "Well, I don't pretend to know 
as much about the Bible as you do." I said, "Then 
what are you talking about it for in this way?" Them 
I looked him right square in the eye and I told him what 
Jesus said of the idle words that men speak. "Now," 
I said, "this is God's Word. God is the author of this 
book, and you lightly and thoughtlessly have been slan- 
dering the Word of God, and thus you have been slan- 
dering God, the author of it. I want to say to you, 
sir, that you will have to give account of your words in 
the day of judgment." The man turned pale, and well 
he might. I want to say to you men to-night that are 
pulling the Word of God to pieces because you have 
been told that some German scholar says so and so ; you 
men that dare to criticise the book you don't know 
anything about; you men that are taking up the idle 
talk of newspapers and reviews and retailing it, slan- 
dering God's Word and God, the author of it ; you will 
have to give an account thereof in the day of judgment. 
Well may you tremble. I want to say to you men 
who have taken the name of the glorious Son of God, 
in whom dwells all the fullness of the Godhead, lightly 
on your lips, and have been saying flippantly, "I don't 
believe that Jesus is divine, I don't believe that Jesus 
is the Son of God;" you men who have been robbing 
the glorious Son of God of what is His due, you will 
have to give an account of this in the day of judgment. 



THE JUDGMENT DAY 59 

4. But the great basis of the judgment day will be 
what we do with Jesus Christ. We are told in John 
iii. 18, 19, "He that believeth in him is not condemned; 
but he that believeth not is condemned already, be- 
cause he hath not believed in the name of the only 
begotten Son of God." God has sent one down into this 
world to be our Saviour. He has sent His only Son. The 
rejection of Jesus Christ, the Son of God, whom God 
has appointed to be our Saviour, our King and our Lord, 
is the most daring and damning of all sins. Light has 
been sent into the world and men have loved darkness 
rather than light because their deeds are evil. There 
is nothing that reveals what is in the human heart so 
clearly as what a man does with Christ. Christ is God 
incarnate, the light of God come into the world, and 
the rejection of Jesus Christ proves a wicked heart. 
The great question in the judgment day will be, "What 
did you do with Jesus Christ?" Oh, I can imagine 
some people in that day. That man who sits in yonder 
gallery trying to make light of what I am saying to- 
night, he will be there; I see him standing before the 
judgment bar, and the throng falls back, there is pro- 
found silence. Then comes rolling forth, like the sound 
of many waters, the majestic voice of the Judge, "What 
did you do with Jesus Christ?" 

lY. The Judge. — We now come to the fourth point. 
Who is to be the judge in that day ? Jesus Christ him- 
self. ^^God hath appointed a day in the which He will 
Judge the world in righteousness ly that Man whom He 
hath ordained; whereof He hath given assurance unto 
all men in that He hath raised Him from the dead." 
Jesus Christ is to be the Judge. That same Christ whom 
you are rejecting is to be the Judge. That same Christ 



60 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

whom you are robbing of the honor which is His due 
is to be the Judge. That same Christ whose divinity 
you are denying, not that you have any reason for de- 
nying it, but simply you don't want to have to believe 
it, and want comfort in your sin — that same Christ 
whom you are trampling under foot will sit as Judge 
in that day. That will be a very dark day for some 
people. It will be a dark day for Annas and Caiaphas, 
who robbed Jesus of every form of justice. Now 
they stand before the bar, and Christ sits upon the 
throne. I can imagine Pontius Pilate in that day, 
who knew that Jesus Christ was innocent, and yet 
condemned Him to appease the Jewish mob. Pilate 
will stand at the bar, and the Christ he so basely 
wronged will be on the throne. I can imagine the 
soldiers who spat upon Him, and mocked Him, and 
crowned Him with thorns. The Christ they spat upon, 
buffeted and crowned with thorns, sits upon the throne 
and they stand at the judgment bar. I can imagine 
Judas Iscariat, who for thirty pieces of silver sold his 
Master after three years of close association with Him ; 
now he stands before the bar, and the Christ he be- 
trayed sits upon the throne. I can imagine that man 
and woman in this audience to-night who have 
been telling their friends that they do not believe that 
Jesus is divine, who have been trampling the Son of 
God under foot, who have been resisting the invitations 
of mercy it may be for years; you stand before the 
throne, and the Christ whom you have defamed, slan- 
dered, rejected and trampled under foot, sits as Judge. 
V. The Issues of the Judgment Day. — Once more, 
please notice the issues of the judgment day. They 
will be eternal. They will be either eternal joy and 



THE JUDGMENT DAY 61 

life and glory, or eteraal death, eternal darkness, eter- 
nal despair and eternal shame. Oh! men and women, 
I would that I had it in my power to-night so to pic- 
ture to you that great judgment day that every man and 
woman in this audience would go out from here with 
the judgment day of Christ before them as a great 
reality; but it surpasses my power. There is the judg- 
ment throne; its blazing glory, its overwhelming splen- 
dor, I cannot describe. There is the Christ upon the 
throne. His face shining with a glory above the glory of 
the noonday sun. His eyes like flames of fire piercing 
men through and through. And there you stand before 
that awful judgment bar, the eyes of Christ upon you 
like a flame of fire, piercing you through and through, 
your whole life laid bare and your secret thoughts 
revealed. 

Oh, men and women, repent, repent, REPENT! 
"God now commandeth all men everywhere to repent, 
because He hath appointed a day in the which He will 
judge the world in righteousness by that Man whom 
He hath ordained; whereof He hath given assurance 
unto all men in that He hath raised Him from the 
dead.'^ 

Eepent, repent. EEPENT ! 



EVERY MAN'S NEED OF A REFUGE 



"And a man shall be as an hiding-place from the wind and 
a covert from the tempest; as rivers of water in a dry place; 
as the shadow of a great rock in a weary land." — Isaiah 
xxxii. 2. 



I have a very precious Old Testament text to-night — 
I love the Old Testament, it is full of Christ — Isaiah 
xxxii. 2 : "And a man shall be as an hiding-place from 
the wind and a cQvert from the tempest; as rivers of 
water in a dry place; as the shadow of a great rock in a 
weary land." 

A good many years ago I was traveling on the con- 
tinent visiting some of the art galleries of Germany, 
and I saw a picture in the new art gallery in Munich 
that made a very deep impression on my mind. It rep- 
resented the approach of a storm; the thunder clouds 
were rolling up thick and ominous; the trees were 
bending before the first approach of the oncoming tem- 
pest. Horses and cattle were scurrying across the fields 
in fright, and a little company of men, women and 
children, with bowed forms, blanched faces, and terror 
depicted in every look and action, were running before 
the storm in search of a hiding-place. I do not sup- 
pose it was the artist's intention, but it has always 
seemed to me that this picture was an accurate repre- 
sentation of every human life. Every man and woman 

62 



EVERY MAN'S NEED OF A REFUGE 63 

needs a hiding-place. You say a hiding-place from 
what? A hiding-place from four things. 

I. A Hiding-Place needed from an accusing Con- 
science. — First of all, every one of us needs a hiding- 
place from the accusations of our own conscience. Every 
man and woman here to-night has a conscience, and 
every man and woman here to-night has sinned against 
their own conscience. There is no torment like the 
torment of an accusing conscience. We do not have to 
go to the Word of God to find that out. We find it in 
heathen literature as well. It was not a Christian poet, 
but a heathen of about the time of Christ, the Latin 
poet Juvenal, who said: 

"Trust me, no torture that the poets feign 
Can match the fierce, unutterable pain 
He feels, who, night and day, devoid of rest, 
Carries his own accuser in his breast." 

rt was another heathen poet, though he lived in a 
Christian land, the poet Lord Byron, who wrote: 

"Thus the dark in soul expire 
Or live like scorpion, girt with fire, 
Thus writhes the soul remorse hath riven. 
Unfit for earth, undoomed for heaven; 
Darkness above, despair beneath,* 
Around him gloom, within him death." 

But we do not need to go to the poets to find out 
the torments of an accusing conscience. We find them 
round about us every day in actual life and experience. 
One night at the close of a service, at the church of which 
I am now pastor in Chicago, there came to me a woman 
with a haunted face and said, "I would like to see you 
in private." I replied, "If you will come to my office to- 
morrow at 2 p.m., I will have the pastor there; and 
if you have anything to say we shall be glad to listen/' 



64 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

The next day at 2 o'clock the woman came to my office, 
and Mr. Hyde, the pastor, was present, and I said to 
the woman, "Now what is the trouble?" She made an 
effort to speak, and failed. Again I said, "What is the 
trouble?" Now she made an effort, and again failed. 
For the third time I said, "What is the trouble? We 
cannot help you unless you tell us your trouble." Then 
she gasped out, "I have killed a man. It was fourteen 
years ago, across the Atlantic Ocean, in the Old Coun- 
try, in the darkness of a forest, I drove a dagger into 
a man's throat, and dropped the dagger and ran away. 
He was found in the forest with the dagger by his 
side. Nobody suspected me, but everybody thought he 
had committed suicide. I stayed there two years, and 
nobody ever suspected me; but I knew I had done it, 
and was wretched, and at last I came to America to 
see if I could find peace here. First I went to New 
York and then came to Chicago, and I have been here 
twelve years, but have not found peace. I often go to 
the lake, and stand on the pier and look into the dark 
waters beneath, and I would jump in if I were not 
afraid of what may lie beyond death." Haunted and 
hunted by her own conscience for fourteen years ! Hell 
on earth! Well, some one says, I can very readily see 
how a person who has committed so awful a deed as 
that, staining her hands with human blood, should be 
haunted by her conscience. But I have never done a 
thing like that. That may be, but you have sinned; 
and when conscience points at us the finger of accusa- 
tion, we do not so much balance up the greatness or 
th© smallness of our sin. But you say, "My con- 
science does not trouble me." That may be, for it is a 
well-known psychological fact that conscience some- 



EVERY MAN'S NEED OF A REFUGE 65 

times sleeps; but conscience never dies. The day is 
coming when that sleeping conscience of yours will 
awaken, and your conscience will point at you the fin- 
ger of accusation, and woe be to the man whose con- 
science wakes up, who has no hiding place from his 
own conscience. In the city of Toronto years ago there 
was a young girl who had drifted there from the coun- 
try. She had heard of the gaieties of the place, and had 
left her home and come there for a life of pleasure, 
going to theatres and dances and amusements of that 
sort, and like many another that goes to the great city 
with the same object, she was caught in the maelstrom 
of the city's sin, and had gone down, down, down into 
a life of shame. Her conscience did not trouble her; 
but one night the Fiske Jubilee Singers were singing 
in Toronto, and some friends asked the girl to go and 
hear them, and she did. At last they came to that 
hymn with the weird refrain: 

"My mother once, my mother twice, 
My mother she'll rejoice; 
In heaven once, in heaven twice, 
My mother she'll rejoice." 

The poor girl was sitting up in the gallery, and as 
she heard the strains of that chorus floating up to 
her, all the memory of her childhood came back; she 
was a child, and at home again, in the old home. It 
was evening; the lamp stood upon the table, and her 
sweet-faced mother sat there with open Bible on her 
lap, and she a little girl of four, with golden hair, 
was kneeling at her mother's knee, learning to pray. 



66 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

It all came back again to her. Again the Jubilee 
Singers came to that refrain*. 

"M7 mother once, my mother twice. 
My mother she'll rejoice; 
In heaven once, in heaven twice, 
My mother she'll rejoice." 

And as those words came floating np again, the hot 
blood came to the girl's cheeks, she sprang to her feet, 
and rushed down the stairs out into the streets of the 
great city. On, on, on, as fast as her feet, now growing 
weary, could take her, out beyond the gaslights into 
the country; and next morning, when a certain farmer 
came to his farm-house door, there was the poor girl, 
clutching the threshold, dead ! Hunted to death by her 
own conscience. 

Oh, there are men and women here to-night whose 
consciences are asleep, but whose consciences will some 
day awaken, and woe be to the man or woman whose 
conscience wakes up and who has no hiding-place 
from it. 

II. A Hidmg-Place needed from the Power of Sin 
within Ourselves. — In the second place, we need a hid- 
ing-place from the power of sin within ourselves. N"ow 
every man and woman here to-night who know them- 
selves at all well know that there are powers of evil resi- 
dent within themselves which are more than they can 
master in their own strength. If there is any man or 
woman who thinks they have a complete mastery over 
themselves, if there is any man who thinks he has 
power to break away in his own strength from the sin 
that is within, he is a sadly deceived man. There are 
some people here to-night with the overmastering appe- 
tite for strong drink. There are others who do not care 



EVEBY MAN'S NEED OF A EEFUGE 67 

for it at all, but are enslaved by other sins. Others 
have a passion for gambling. Others care for neither 
of these, but have a love for other things. With an- 
other it is an ungovernable temper; with others it is 
a sharp, unkind, censorious tongue. With some it is 
one thing and with some another. But with every man 
and woman of us within these four walls there is the 
power of sin within ourselves, which is more than we 
can master in our own strength. We need a hiding-place 
from the power of sin within. 

I remember one night a young man came to me at 
the close of a meeting like this, in Minneapolis, in 
America, and he said, "I heard you speaking in the 
street to-night, and I said to myself, ^that man can 
help me,' and I have come here and stayed through the 
service. Will you now help me?" I said I would be 
very glad to do so if I could. He said : "Listen ; I was 
employed down in Pennsylvania, and I got to leading 
a fast life. Now," he said, "you know that a fast life 
costs money. It cost more than I earned, and I put 
my hand into my employer's money-till and took his 
money. Of course I was caught, but my employer was 
a good man. He might have sent me to prison; in- 
stead of that, he said, 'You must go to the Northwest. 
It is a new country; begin life anew up there.' They 
Bent me here, and I have now got a good position, as 
you see by my uniform," and he pointed to it. "But," 
he said, "I am going just the same way in Minneapolis 
that I went in Pennsylvania. I am afraid to leave this 
hall to-night. Before I get a block from this hall, I shall 
meet some one who knows me, and just as sure as I 
do I am lost." 

You may have no weakness in the direction that this 



68 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

young man had, and again you may have; but every 
man and woman here has the power of sin within that 
is more than they can master in their own strength. 
We need a hiding-place from the power of sin within. 
III. A Hiding-Place needed from the Power of the 
Devil. — In the third place, we need a hiding-place from 
the power of the devil. Over in our country there are 
a great many people who are too wise to believe in the 
existence of a personal devil. I believe in the existence 
of a personal devil. I will tell you why. In the first 
place, because the Old Book says so, and I have found 
that the man who believes in the Bible always comes 
out ahead in the long run, and that the man who is too 
wise and too advanced to believe the Word of God comes 
out behind, in the long run, every time. Now, there 
was a time when I was so wise that I believed so much 
of the Bible as was wise enough to agree with me. Thank 
God, that time has passed. Thank God, he has opened 
my eyes and ears until I have come to the place where 
I know — I wish I had time to tell you how I know — 
that that Book, from the first chapter to the last, is 
the very Word of God. Now this Book teaches us that 
there is a personal devil. Turn to 1 St. Peter v. 8 : '^Be- 
cause your adversary, the devil, as a roaring lion, walk- 
eth about, seeking whom he may devour." Ephesians 
vi. 11,12: 'Tut on the whole armour of God, that ye 
may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil. 
For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against 
principalities, against powers, against the rulers of 
the darkness of this world, against spiritual wicked- 
ness in high places." But, friends, there is another rea- 
son why I believe in a personal devil, and that is, be- 
cause of the teaching of my own experience and my 



EVERY MAN'S NEED OF A l^EFUGE 69 

common sense. Years ago a great French man of sci- 
ence was crossing the Arabian desert under the leader- 
ship of an Arab guide. When the sun was setting in 
the west, the guide spread his praying-rug down upon 
the ground and began to pray. When he had finished 
the man of science stood looking at him with scorn, 
and asked him what he was doing. He said, ^'I am 
praying." "Praying! praying to whom?" "To Allah, 
to God." The man of science said, "Did you ever see 
God?" "No." "Did you ever hear God?" "No." "Did 
you ever put out your hands and touch God and feel 
Him?" "No." "Then you are a great fool to believe 
in a God you never saw, a God you never heard, a God 
you never put out your hand and touched." The Arab 
guide said nothing. They retired for the night, rose 
early the next morning, and a little before sunrise they 
went out from the tent. The man of science said to 
the Arab guide, "There was a camel round this tent 
last night." With a peculiar look in his eye, the Arab 
said, "Did you see the camel ?" "No." "Did you hear 
the camel ?" "No." "Did you put out your hand and 
touch the camel?" "No." "Well, you are a strange 
man of science to believe in a camel you never saw, a 
camel you never heard, a camel you never put out your 
hands and touched." "Oh, but," said the other, ^Tiere 
are his footprints all around the tent." Just then the 
sun was rising in all its oriental splendour, and with a 
graceful wave of his barbaric hand, the guide said, 
"Behold the footprints of the Creator, and know that 
there is a God." I think the untutored savage had the 
best of the argument. Friends, we see everywhere in 
this magnificent universe the footprints of th« Creator. 



70 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

But, alas! we see everywhere in human society the 
footprints of the enemy. Why, you have only to walk 
the streets of London and you see the footprints of 
Satan; you see them in your dens of infamy, in the 
faces of the men and women on the streets, and, alas ! 
alas! you see the footprints of Satan in the homes of 
culture and refinement. What means it that men and 
women of education, men and women of refinement, 
fall under the power of all these strange delusions, of 
Christian Science, Theosophy and all that sort of non- 
sense? It means that there is a devil — cunning, subtle, 
masterly, marvelous — more than a match for you and 
me in cunning and power. We need a hiding-place 
from the subtlety, the cunning, the power, of the devil. 

IV. A Hiding-Place needed from the Wrath to come. 
— In the fourth place, we need a hiding-place from 
the wrath to come. There are a great many peo- 
ple who do not believe that there is "a wrath to come." 
I do. Why ? Again, because the Old Book says so. The 
Old Book says, as I showed you last night, that "God 
has appointed a day in the which He will judge the 
world in righteousness," and God has given assurance 
of this by raising Jesus Christ from the dead. The 
Old Book says: "There is to be a day of wrath and 
revelation of the righteous judgment of a holy and 
outraged God." I believe this because the Bible says so. 

Another reason why I believe that there is "a wrath 
to come" is that my common-sense says so. Look here, 
here is a man who grows rich by overreaching his 
neighbours, grows rich by robbing the widow and the 
orphan. He does it by legal means. Oh, yes, he is too 
cunning to come within reach of the law. But he grows 
rich by making other people poor. He increases in 



EVERY MAWS NEED OF A REFUGE 71 

wealth and is honoured and respected. When he goes 
down the streets in his magnificent equipage, the gen- 
tleman on the street turns and says to liis son : "There 
goes Mr. So-and-so, a man of rare business ability, a 
man who is now one of our leading men of capital. I 
hope, my boy, when you grow up, you will be as suc- 
cessful as he.'^ He lives in honour, dies in honour, dies 
respected by everybody — almost. And the victims of 
his rapacity, the victims of his oppression, the victims 
of his dishonesty lie yonder, bleaching in the potter's 
field, where they have gone prematurely because of his 
robbery. Do you mean to tell me that there will not 
be a day when these men who have lived on wealth 
wrung from the poor widow and orphan will not have to 
go before a righteous God and answer for it, and receive 
what they never received in this world, the meet reward 
of their dishonesty? Of course there is a judgment 
day; of course there is a hell. If there is not, then 
there ought to be. Look here, here is a man who goes 
through life, never giving God one thought from one 
year to another. He leaves God out of his business, 
leaves God out of his social life, leaves God out of his 
study, leaves God out of his pleasures, and makes God^s 
day a day of pleasure, God's book never opened, God's 
Son trampled under foot. And thus the man lives, and 
thus he dies, going through the world ignoring the 
God that made him and gave His Son to die upon the 
cross to save him. Do you mean to tell me that there 
will not be a day when that man will have to go up 
before a righteous God and answer these questions: 
*'What did you do with My day?" "What did you do 
with My laws?" "What did you do with My Word?" 
*'What did you do, above all, with My Son ?'' Of course 



72 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

there is a judgment day. And you and I need a hiding- 
place from it, every one of us, for every one of us has 
sinned and come short of the glory of God. There are 
then these four things from which we need a hiding- 
place — our own conscience, the power of sin within, 
the power and suhtlety of the devil and the wrath to 
come. 

Is there a hiding place? I read my text again: "A 
man shall he as a hiding-place from the wind and a 
covert from the tempest, as rivers of water in a dry 
place, as the shadow of a great rock in a weary land.'' 
A man shall be — ^who is that man? There is just one 
man that is a hiding-place — tlie God-man, Jesus Christ. 
He is a hiding-place from conscience. I have told you 
part of a story, and I will now tell you the rest. When 
that woman came and told me how she had been haunt- 
ed by her conscience for fourteen years, I took the Bible 
and said to her, "Do you believe what is written in this 
book?" She said, "Yes, sir, I believe it all. I was 
brought up in the Lutheran Church." "All right," I 
said, "listen" (Isaiah liii. 6) : "^All we like sheep have 
gone astray.'" I said, "Is that true of you?" "Oh, 
sir," she said, "it is." " ^We have turned every one to 
his own way.' " "Is that true of you?" "Oh, yes, that 
is the trouble. It is true." I said, "What are you?" 
She said, "I am lost'* "Very well, listen to the rest 
of it : 'And the Lord hath laid on Him the iniquity of us 
all.' Now," I said, "who is the Him r She said, "It is 
Jesus Christ." "Well, listen: 'And the Lord hath laid 
on Jesus Christ the iniquity of us all.' I^ow," I said, 
"let my Bible represent your sin, let my right hand 
represent you, and my left hand Jesus Christ." I 
closed the Bible and repeated the text: ''All we like 



EVERY MAN'S NEED OF A REFUGE 73 

sheep have gone astray. We have turned every one to 
his own way.'^ And I laid my Bible in my right hand 
and said, ^^Where is your sin now?'' She said, "It is 
on me." "Well, listen : ^The Lord hath laid on Him the 
iniquity of us all.' " And I laid the Bible over on the 
other hand, '^here is your sin now ?" She hesitated 
and then said, "It is on Jesus Christ." "Right!" I 
said. "Is it on you any longer, then?" It was a few 
moments before she spoke, and then she burst out 
with a cry of joy : "No, it is on Jesus Christ !" That 
woman, who had been haunted by her conscience for 
fourteen years went from my office that day with the 
peace of God in her heart. Is there a man or woman 
here haunted with the memory of the past? Christ is 
a hiding-place and there is peace to-night for you in 
Him. 

Christ is a hiding-place from sin within. I knew 
a young man belonging to a good family, highly edu- 
cated, with noble aspirations, but completely overmas- 
tered by sin in one of its most loathesome forms. He 
tried to break away, tried to be a man, but failed, and 
he went down, deeper and deeper and deeper, until at 
last he was in despair and on the verge of a suicide's 
grave, and one awful night when despair had settled 
on his soul, he cried to God for Christ's sake, and Christ 
set him free. And never once did he fall into that sin 
again. 

Thirdly, Christ is a hiding-place from the power of 
sin. I know a man in our home country — ^I think I 
never knew a man in my life more completely in the 
power of Satan than he was— ^a man of brilliant intel- 
lectual gifts, the most remarkable orator I ever heard. 
And yet he had gone down, and had fallen into the 



,74 EEVIVAL ADDKESSES 

power of Satan, gone down until his friends had all 
left him, until his wife and children were wanderers, 
and he was a tramp on the streets. The man had gone 
down so low that on one occasion I was told he threw his 
poor wife down on the floor (one of the noblest wom- 
en who ever stood by a fallen husband), and stamped 
on her with his heel. I said to him, ''John, you ought 
to be repentant." He said, "Well, I don't believe as 
you do. I do not believe in God or in your Bible." 
"But," I said, "John, that does not make any differ- 
ence ; if you will take Jesus Christ as your Saviour, He 
will save you, and if you do not take Him, you are lost." 
A few months afterwards, in another city, he went to 
his wretched garret, and threw himself upon Christ, 
and Jesus Christ met him and saved him and trans- 
formed him, and to-day he is one of the most honoured 
men in our land. There is no mere speculation about 
the religion of Jesus Christ. It is a present-day de- 
monstrable reality. It is not merely that Christ saved 
people nineteen hundred years ago; he is saving them 
to-day in London. 

Once more, Christ is a hiding-place from the wrath 
to come. Now, of course, I cannot prove that from ex- 
perience, for it lies in the future ; but I can prove it by 
an argument that is unanswerable. That argument is 
this: the Christ that has power to save men from the 
power of sin now certainly has power to save them 
from the consequences of sin hereafter. Is not that a 
good argument? Let me add, that any religion that is 
not saving you from the power of sin to-day will not 
save you from the consequences of sin in eternity. 
There is a lot of religion in this world that is abso- 
lutely worthless. People tell jou that they are Chris- 



^ EVERY MAN'S KEED OF A REFUGE 75 

tians and that they are religious. They are saying 
their prayers, and doing all sorts of things. I will ask 
yon a question: '^Have you got that kind of faith in 
Jesus Christ that is saving you from the power of sin 
to-day?" If you have, you have that kind of faith 
in Jesus Christ that will save you from the conse- 
quences of sin hereafter. But if you have that kind of 
faith in Jesus Christ which after all is not faith, which 
is not saving you now, you have that kind of faith in 
Jesus Christ that won't save you from the penalty of 
sin hereafter. 

Friends, Jesus Christ is a refuge, a hiding-place from 
conscience and its accusations, from the power of sin 
within, from the power of Satan, from the wrath to 
come, from all that man needs a hiding-place from. 
Who will come to this hiding-place to-night ? 



VI 

THE DRAMA OF LIFE I^ THREE ACTS 
"A certain man had two sons." Luke xv. II. 

My subject to-night is the Drama of Life in Three Acts. 
The Lord Jesus Christ is the author of the Drama, and 
it surpasses anything that was ever put on the stage 
in conciseness, in point, in height and depth, and full- 
ness and beauty of meaning, in pathos and in power. 
The Dramatis Personae of the drama are four — God, 
two men and the Devil. There are three acts in the 
drama: the First Act, Wandering; the second Act, Des- 
olation; and the Third Act, The ^Yanderer3 Return. 
There is a Fourth Act, but with that we have nothing 
to do to-night. 

Act I. — Waxdebing; or The Nature of Sin". 

In the first act there are two scenes : 

Scene 1. — A beautiful home, a spacious mansion, 
with everything to meet every desire of the hearts of 
its occupants. An aged father, whose countenance is 
full of nobility, and wisdom, and kindness, a remark- 
able blending of strength and tenderness. He is in 
earnest conversation with the younger of his two sons. 
This younger son is tired of the restraints of home. He 
has heard of the gaiety in a distant country, and he 
longs to break the trammels of his father's guardian 
care, and to see the sights and enjoy the pleasures of 
this new land. And he cries impatiently, "Father, give 

76 



THE DRAMA OF LIFE 77 

me the portion of thy goods that falleth to me." A look 
of inexpressible pain passes over the gentle face of the 
aged father, but he grants the son's request. 

Scene 2. — A leave-taking, a home-leaving. The 
younger son has gathered all his property together, got 
it into as portable a form as possible, and is taking his 
journey to the far country. It is a beautiful spring 
morning, the birds are singing sweetly, the air is fra- 
grant with the perfume of spring flowers, the young 
man's voice is full of gladness and good cheer, and with 
light and tripping step he wends his way down the 
avenue from the old home, little thinking of the father 
who watches him with moist eyes and lonely heart as 
he leaves the front gate and goes out into a false and 
cruel world. 

In these two scenes we have a picture of the nature, 
beginnings and growth of sin. The father in the drama 
is God; the son, man wandering from God. The son 
wished to have his own way; he was tired of the re- 
straints of his father's control. He desired to get away 
from his father that he might do as he pleased. That 
is where sin begins — in a desire to be independent of 
God, in a desire to have our own way, in a desire to do 
as we please. The essence of sin is in a desire to do 
what we please, rather than be constantly looking to 
God and asking Him what pleases Him. Is there any 
man or woman here to-night who wishes to do as they 
please ? They have the beginnings of sin in their heart. 
Now, what you please to do may be upright, may be 
moral, may be very refined, but the desire to do your 
own will is the heart and essence and substance of sin. 
There are differeat classes of sinners and different 
forms of sin. There is sin that is coarse, and there is 



78 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

sin that is refined. There is sin that is low and vulgar, 
and there is sin that is genteel and elegant. But all 
sin is alike in essence. It is man seeking to be inde- 
pendent of God, man seeking to have his own way; 
that is where sin begins, that is the very essence of sin. 

The second scene represents to us the growth of sin. 
The son did not leave home at once. His heart was in 
the far country already, but he still stayed at home. 
But not very long. Not many days after his feet fol- 
lowed where his heart had already gone. That is the 
story of sin in every instance. When a man starts out 
in the path of sin, starts out to have his own way, he 
does not give up all communion with God at once. He 
still goes to church occasionally, reads his Bible occa- 
sionally, prays now and then, but less and less as the 
days go by, until at last he begins to wonder whether 
there is any God, begins to listen to voices that say 
there is no God, and last of all, blatantly cries, "No 
God, no divine Christ, no inspired Bible, no God!" 

How far have you got on that path of sin ? Are you 
just starting out? Are you seeking your own pleasure, 
but still keeping up some form of communion with 
God, still attending the House of God now and then, 
opening the Bible now and then, praying now and then, 
but less and less; or have you got farther down that 
road, down where you are never found in the House 
of God, never read your Bible, never go to God in 
prayer? Or have you got away off into the far coun- 
try, where you say, "There is no God, the Bible is not 
the Word of God, Jesus Christ is not the Son of God ?" 
How far have you got down the path of sin ? 

Will you notice before we leave this Act that the 
father granted the younger son's request? He knew 



THE DRAMA OF LIFE 79 

how the boy would use the money, but he also knew 
that the only way for him to learn wisdom was in the 
bitter school of experience. That is precisely the way 
that God deals with us. If a man desires to live in- 
dependently of God, God lets him do it. God does not 
force a man into a life of communion with Himself, 
and conscious dependence on Himself; He gives us our 
choice and gives us our powers to make a living, and 
if we wish to live without communion with Him, He 
allows us to do it. If we can only learn the folly of liv- 
ing away from God by bitter experience, God lets us 
have the experience. 

Act II. — Desolation ; or, The Fruits of Sin. 

Bcene 1. — It is a gay one. The young man has 
reached the far country, and life is one constant round 
of pleasure; balls, wine suppers, races, card parties, 
theatres, operas, all kinds of amusements, innocent and 
sinful, are the order of the day. Every day is a day of 
gaiety and every night a night of dissipation, and the 
young fellow is having a right royal time. Oftentimes 
he looks back on the quiet home life. Ah! how hum- 
drum it was; how he pities his elder brother staying 
home there in all that dull life ! 

Scene 2. — The scene shifts. He is still in the city, 
but the boom has burst; hard times have come, men 
are out of work, famine stalks the street. On every 
corner there are little groups of men in ragged clothes, 
with pinched faces, with starvation looking out of their 
eyes, standing around trying to earn a chance penny by 
doing odd jobs, and our friend is among the company. 
''There arose a mighty famine in that land, and he be- 
gan to be in want." 



80 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

Scene S. — ^A rural scene, but not a pleasant one. A 
great pasture, but not a blade of grass. In the pro- 
longed drought every spear of grass has withered. In 
the midst of the field stands a lonely carob tree, from 
which hang the long pods covered with dust; a herd 
of gaunt, hungry swine are nosing about in the sand 
looking for stray carob beans. Our friend stands un- 
derneath the tree looking eagerly up at the carob beans, 
for 'Tie would fain have filled his belly with the husks 
that the swine did eat." At last, driven by hunger, but 
at the same time weakened by it, he wearily climbs the 
tree, and shakes it until the pods fall from its branches, 
but the hogs have devoured them before he can reach 
the ground. Again and again he climbs the tree, 
but with the same result, and at last he falls upon 
the ground in despair, starving, '^'^and no man gave unto 
him.'^ In these scenes of the parable, we gave a pic- 
ture of the fruits of sin. The first fruit of sin is pleas- 
ure; the young man had a good time at first. There 
are those who tell us that there is no pleasure in sin, 
but I will not tell you that; first, because you would 
not believe me if I did. You have tried sin and found 
pleasure in it. I will not tell you that there is no 
pleasure in sin, because I know it is not true. I tried 
sin and found pleasure in it. I will not tell you there 
is no pleasure in sin, because the Bible does not say 
so. It is true that the Bible says ^''there is no peace 
for the wicked," and you know that is true, or, if you 
don't know it now, you will before very long. But the 
Bible does not say that there is no pleasure in sin. On 
the contrary, the Bible speaks in Hebrews xi. of "the 
pleasures of sin." Of course it adds that they are only 
"for a season," very short lived. There is pleasure in 



THE HEAMA OF LIFE 81 

sin. Some one has said, I think it was Mark Guy 
Pearse, that the devil is not such a fool as to go fishing 
without bait. The pleasures of sin are the devil's bait. 
But, mind you, the devil's bait always has a hook in 
it. He is dangling his bait before some of you here 
to-night. ^^Oh," he says, "don't become a Christian; 
you will have to give up this; the ball-room, look at 
this; the theatre, look at this; the card-party and its 
pleasures, look at this." And to-night, if you will 
snatch the devil's bait, the first you know you will have 
the devil's hook in your gills, and you will be on the 
bottom of the devil's boat, beneath a pitiless sun, float- 
ing out over the sea of a hopeless eternity. 

The second fruit of sin is want. "He began to be in 
want." That is always the second result of sin — want, 
famine, starvation. Oftentimes they come in a very lit- 
eral form. How many men there are in London to- 
night without a decent coat to their backs, without a 
meal in their stomachs, without a place to lay their 
heads, who once had plenty. A friend of mine pointed 
out to me a man one night in Chicago. He said, "Do 
you see that poor fellow there all curled up near the 
stove, with his uncombed hair and ragged clothes? 
That man used to be a Congressman of this district.'' 
Fast times followed by hard times. But it does not 
always come that way. There is many a man living in 
sin who has plenty of money, plenty to eat, plenty to 
drink, plenty to put on, plenty of all material things; 
nevertheless, want comes. There is other famine be- 
sides temporal famine. There is other starvation besides 
physical starvation. A man has a soul as well as a 
Belly, though a good many men in London live as if 



82 EETIVAL ADDRESSES 

they did not believe it; but it is a fact. The human 
soul is so large, so vast, so glorious that God only can 
fill it, and away from God there is starvation. Augus- 
tine was right when he said, "Thou, Lord, hast made 
us for thyself, and our soul is never satisfied until it 
resteth in thyself." Away from God there is barren- 
ness, away from God is an aching void, away from God 
is the bottomless abyss of insatiable desire; away from 
God is woe, woe, woe ! Look at that young fellow as he 
sits there in his tatters and with uncombed hair, the 
hunger of his stomach looking out of his half-crazy 
eyes, and see in that wretched prodigal a picture of your 
soul, a picture of every soul in this hall to-night that 
is away from God. 

How well I remember a day and a night in my own 
life. I had started out one afternoon to have an aft- 
ernoon and night of pleasure. With a little company 
of chosen companions I was in a hall that had been 
fitted up at great cost for pleasure. For a few mo- 
ments I had left my gay companions, and I stood in 
the distance leaning against a pillar and looking at 
them yonder. And oh, there was such a cry, such an 
aching void, such a mysterious despair in my heart, 
that I leaned up against the pillar of that magnificent 
hall and I groaned in the agony of my spirit. I was 
starving. What do you think I did? I shook it all off 
and went right back to spend the afternoon and night 
as I had started out to spend it. What a fool I was ! 

The third fruit of sin is degradation and slavery. 
'Tie went and joined himself to a citizen of that coun- 
try, and he sent him into his fields to feed swine ; and 
he would fain have filled his belly with the husks that 
the swine did eat, and no man gave unto him." Jesus 



THE DRAMA OF LIFE 83 

was speaking to Jews, and if there is any position 
low and degrading in the sight of a Jew it is that of 
a swine-herd. Christ meant this, that you and I have 
our choice hetween being God's sons and hog-tenders to 
the devil. That is the choice open to every man here 
to-night. That young man might have been a son 
in his father's home, in glad, ennobling and well-re- 
quited service, but instead of that he is hog-tender to 
a stranger. It is open to you to be a child of God in 
full and joyous surrender to His will, in glad and en- 
nobling and well-requited service, or to be hog-tender 
to the devil. Men say, "I will not be a Christian. I want 
my own way." You cannot have it ; no man has his own 
way. It is either God's way or the devil's. You can't 
have your own way — ^unless you make God's way your 
own. Young man, which will you choose to-night ? To 
be a child of God, or to be a swine-herd for Satan? 

Act III. — The Wanderer's Return; or. The Rem- 
edy FOR Sin. 

We come now to the third and last act of the drama. 
There are two scenes. The first scene is the same lone- 
ly field. The young man sits beneath the carob tree 
with his face in his hands and in despair. He begins 
to think. Visions of the old home come before him. 
He sees his noble father; he sees the well-laden table; 
he sees the well-fed servants, and bitterly he cries, ''^How 
many hired servants of my father's have bread enough 
and to spare, and I (his son) perish with hunger!'* 
and his face sinks deeper into his hands. Then he lifts 
his head with the light of a new hope in his eyes, and 
he cries, ^T. will arise and go to my father, and will saj 



84 KEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

unto him. Father, I have sinned against Heaven and 
before thee, and am no more worthy to be called thy 
son; make me as one of thy hired servants." And he 
arose and came to his Father. This is God's picture 
of the remedy for sin. Notice what it is. In the first 
place he began to think — that is where salvation be- 
gins, in thinking. People say that Christianity is blind 
faith; not a bit of it. Christianity is a rational faith 
that comes from honest, candid, close thought. He 
began to think. Men often say to me, "I am not a 
Christian, because I think for myself." My dear friend, 
you are not a Christian because you don't think for 
yourself. You don't think, and you know you don't. 
For every man who is not a Christian because he thinks 
for himself, I will show you a hundred who are not 
Christians because they don't and won't think for them- 
selves. What is the trouble with you who are out of 
Christ? The simple trouble is that you won't think. 
You are bound not to think. You deliberately refuse 
to read every book that would make you think. You 
go down to hear some infidel lectures because you think 
that will prevent you thinking, because they stuff you 
with irrational nonsense. At a meeting like this you 
will go out when the preaching becomes too pointed 
and you are compelled to think; some of you would 
do it now if you dared. If I could get you men and 
women who are out of Christ to think for thirty con- 
secutive minutes, I would get you saved. The trouble is 
you are bound not to think. A stubborn refusal to 
think is sending tens of thousands of the men of Great 
Britain down to perdition. 

He thought about the comparative lots of his father's 
servants and of himself in this far country. The com- 



THE DRAMA OF LIFE 85 

parative positions of a child, or even a servant, of God 
and a servant of the devil; that is the thing to think 
about. I wish I could get a good and faithful servant 
of Christ and a faithful servant of the devil to stand 
together on this platform to-night and just let you 
look at the two. Pick out the best servant of the devil 
you know in London, and then pick out the most faith- 
ful and devoted servant of Jesus Christ that you know; 
then make a call on them the same day, and study 
their faces. If this does not make a Christian of you, 
it is because you are not willing to give up sin. Com- 
pare the lot of the child of God and that of the servant 
of the devil. 

But, friends, he did not stop with thinking; his 
thought brightened into resolution. He said, "I will 
arise and go." It is not enough to think, you must re- 
solve; there are people here to-night who have thought 
of this question often and who know just as well as 
I do that they ought to be Christians, but they never 
come to the point of resolution. In my first pastorate 
there was one of our leading men in business and pol- 
itics whom I know very well. I said to him, "John, 
you ought to be a Christian." *'I know it," he replied. 
'H would give everything in the world if I were a Chris- 
tian. I know you have got the right of it, and the best 
of it, and I would like to be a Christian !" "Then," I 
said, "John, give me your hand on it, and take Jesus 
Christ right now." But he never would come to the 
point of resolution. Don't only think; resolve! What 
are you to resolve ? "I will arise and go to the Father." 
That is the thing; come to God, to your Father. Come 
right to Him. 

But notice How to come; come witH a confession, and 



Be EEYIVAL ADDRESSES 

say, "I have sinned." That is the only way a sinnei 
can come to God — with a confession. God is willing to 
receive the vilest sinner on earth that will come with 
a confession on his lips. 

The last step is "He arose and came to his Father." 
He turned his back on husks and hogs and hunger and 
turned his face towards hom;e. Now we come to the 
last scene. The boy is nearing home. I don't know 
what his thoughts may have been by the way. He may 
have had doubts and fears, he may have wondered how 
he would be received, he may even have thought, "I 
wish I could fix myself up better before going home." 
But he had sense enough to come just as he was, and 
he kept trudging right along on his journey, and now 
he is within a few miles of home. Away off yonder on 
the hilltop, as the sun is setting, stands a man, an old 
man, in the last rays of the setting sun, peering off 
into the west. He has often been there before ; it is the 
father looking out into the west for the home-coming 
of the boy that never came. The loving father is there 
again, for love never wearies, looking out into the west. 
Away down yonder towards the horizon he sees a 
speck. Can it be the boy ? It grows larger and larger ; 
it assumes the proportions and form of a man, but not 
at all the boy who left his home; no longer is it that 
rotund form, no longer is there the bright glow of 
youth in his face, no longer is there the light, tripping 
step. It is the figure of a man prematurely old, with 
sunken cheeks and emaciated form, clothed in rags and 
Bore-footed, limping slowly along the road. But those 
old eyes, though dim with age, are sharp with love. Hear 
that cry, "My son, my son !" The aged feet forget their 
feebleness. The old man runs and falls on the neck of 



THE DEAMA OF LIFE 87 

his son and kisses him. The son hegins to stammer ont 
his confession: "Father, I have sinned against Heaven 
and before thee, and am no more worthy to be called 
thy son." But the father won't hear another word. 
He cries : "Bring forth the best robe and put it on him, 
and put a ring on his hand and shoes on his feet; and 
bring hither the fatted calf and kill it; and let ns eat 
and be merry, for this my son was dead and is alive 
again; he was lost and is found.'' Of what is this a 
picture? God — God's attitude towards the sinner. Al- 
though the son had forgotten the father, the father had 
never forgotten the son. For many years you have for- 
gotten God, but God has never forgotten you. You 
have not thought of God for many a long day, but there 
has not been a day in which God has not thought of 
you, waiting to see some sign of your home-coming. 
If you turn your back on your sin to-night, if you turn 
your back on husks, hogs and hunger, turn you face 
towards God; while you are still a great way off, God 
will run to meet you; and there will be the best robe 
of God's own righteousness in Christ to put on you, a 
ring for your finger, a pledge of your sonship; a kiss 
of reconciliation for your cheek, shoes of the prepara- 
tion of the Gospel of Peace for your feet, and the fat- 
ted calf, typical of the great feast of joy and gladness 
in Jesus Christ. Men and women, come home to-night. 
I heard years ago a story which I have never for- 
gotten. A girl had gone astray and had left her home 
for the great city. For some time she had continued 
to write to her mother, but after a while her letters 
became less frequent and at last they ceased alto- 
gether. The mother suspected the worst, and came up 
to the city to search for the lost girl. She went to a 
gentleman who worked in the lower parts of ihf^ t>\hr. 



88 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

and asked him, ^^Can you get my daughter for me?" 
*^^Well/' he replied, "I think I can, but you will have 
to do just what I tell you/' "I will do anything to 
get my daughter," she replied. "Then," said the mis- 
sionary, "go to a photographer and have your picture 
taken; have it taken large size, and have a hundred of 
them, and bring them to me." After a while the moth- 
er came, bringing the hundred photographs. "Now," 
he said, "sit down and write underneath each photo- 
graph just these two words, ^Cbme home,' " and the 
mother sat down and wrote. "Now," said the mission- 
ary, "may I take these photographs down into the low 
parts of the city and put them up in the saloons and 
places of infamy?" It was a hard thing to ask of a 
pure woman, that her picture should be put up to the 
gaze of the outcast and the vile. But the mother's love 
eaid "Yes" — anything to win the girl. The man took 
them and put them up in a hundred dens of infamy. 
Then he said to the mother, "Now go right home and 
wait." A few nights after, a group of revellers came 
into one of the places where the mother's picture hung; 
among the group was the lost daughter; who, looking 
across the saloon, saw that picture on the wall. It 
looked familiar. Stepping over to it, she saw in her 
mother's handwriting the two words, "Come home." 
She knew what it meant; it broke her heart; she fled 
from the saloon and took the first train for home, and 
in a few hours she was wrapped in her mother's arms. 

That is what God has done in this fifteenth chap- 
ter of Luke. He has sent down a picture of Himself, 
a picture of His heart of love, of His love for you and 
me, and underneath it God has written, as it were in 
His own handwriting, these two words, "Come home.'* 

Will you come to-night? 



VII 



A QUESTION THAT SHOULD STARTLE EVERY 
MAN WHO IS NOT A CHRISTIAN 

"How shall we escape, if we neglect so great «alvation?"— 
Hebbews, ii, 3. 

I have a text to-night which I believe God has given 
me for this hour, a text that ought to startle every 
man and woman in this building who has not accepted 
the Gospel of Christ. You will find it in Hebrews 
ii. 3 : "How shall we escape if we neglect so great sal- 
vation?" I wish that that text would burn itself into 
the heart of every man and woman in this house who is 
out of Christ, "How shall I escape if I neglect so great 
salvation?" I wish that every man and woman that 
may go away from this place to-night without definitely 
having received Christ as their Saviour and Lord and 
Master would hear it ringing in their ears as they go 
down the street, "How shall we escape if we neglect 
60 great salvation ?" I wish that every one that may lie 
down to sleep to-night without a definite assurance of 
sins forgiven through the atoning blood of Jesus Christ 
and of acceptance before God in Him, would hear it all 
through the night, "How shall we escape if we neglect 
60 great salvation?" Our text sets forth the folly and 
guilt of neglecting the salvation that God has sent to us 
in and through His Son Jesus Christ, and that is my 
subject to-night. My sermon is all in the text — ^the 
folly and guilt of neglecting the salvation that God the 



90 EEVIVAL ADDEESSES 

Father has sent through His Son and in His Son 
Jesus C^ist. 

YoTi notice I say not merely the folly hut the guilt. 
There is many a man who thinks that perhaps it may 
be a foolish thing not to accept Christ, and admits the 
folly of it, but he has never realized the guilt of it. 
But I shall endeavour to show you to-night in the un- 
folding of this text that it is not merely an egregiously 
foolish thing, but that it is an appalling wicked thing 
to neglect this salvation. 

I. The Greatness op the Salvation. 

We see the folly and guilt of neglecting this salva- 
tion, in the first place, by a consideration of the great- 
ness of the salvation. "How shall we escape if we neg- 
lect so great salvation?" 

1. We see the greatness of the salvation first of all 
\n the way in which the salvation was given. God sent 
His Son, His only Son, down into the world to pro- 
claim this salvation. As we read in the preceding chap- 
ter, "God, who at sundry times and in divers man- 
ners, spake in time past unto the fathers by the proph- 
ets, hath in these last days spoken unto us by His Son, 
whom He hath appointed heir of all things, by whom 
also He made the worlds ; who, being the brightness of 
His glory and the express image of His person, and 
upholding all things by the word of His power, when 
He had by Himself purged our sins, sat down on the 
right hand of the Majesty on high." Have you ever 
thought of it in the light of the context, that when God, 
in infinite condescension, the great and infinitely holy 
God, sent down His own Son to proclaim pardon to the 
vilest sinner, if you and I neglect this salvation we are 



K STARTLING QUESTION" 91 

pouring contempt upon the Son of God, and upon the 
Father that sent Him? If God had spoken this salva- 
tion hy the lips only of inspired prophets, it would have 
a right to demand our attention. If God had gone 
ahove prophets, and had spoken this salvation by the 
lips of angels sent down from Heaven, it would have 
a still greater right to demand our attention. But 
when God, in His infinite condescension, sent not mere- 
ly prophets or angels, but sent His own Son, the only 
begotten one, the express image of His person, God 
manifest in the flesh, to proclaim this salvation, and 
you and I do not heed it, we are guilty of the most ap- 
palling presumption and defiance of God. "He that de- 
spised Moses' law died without mercy under two or 
three witnesses," but how much sorer punishment you 
and I shall receive if we neglect this greater salvation. 
2. In the second place, the greatness of this salvation 
is seen in the way in which it w.as purchased. This is 
a costly salvation. It was purchased by the shed blood, 
by the outpoured life of the incarnate Son of God. Ah, 
friends, when God in wondrous love went to that ex- 
tent that He sacrificed His very best, when God went 
to that extent that He gave His own and only Son to 
die on the cross at Calvary, that He might purchase 
your salvation and mine, if you and I neglect so great 
salvation we are pouring contempt on the precious 
blood of the Son of God. "He that despised Moses' 
law died without mercy under two or three witnesses,'' 
but how much greater punishment shall he merit who 
tramples under foot the Son of God, and counts the 
blood of the covenant wherewith He was sanctified an 
unholy thing, and insults the Spirit of Grace (Hebrews 
X. 28, 29). 



92 EEVIVAL ADDKESSES 

3. Again, the greatness of this salvation is seen in 
the third place by a consideration of what it brings. 
It brings pardon for all our sins, it brings deliverance 
from sin, it brings union with the Son of God in His 
resurrection life, it brings adoption into the family of 
God, it brings an inheritance incorruptible and unde- 
filed and that fadeth not away, laid up in store in 
Heaven for us, who are kept by the power of God, 
through faith, unto a salvation ready to be revealed in 
the last time. When you think that God has put at 
our disposal in Jesus Christ all His wealth, and is 
ready to make us heirs of God and joint heirs with Je- 
sus Christ, who can measure the guilt of neglecting and 
of turning a deaf ear to this wonderful salvation ? Sup- 
pose that on his coronation day King Edward had rid- 
den down to thQ East End of liondon, and seeing some 
wretched little boy on the street, clad in rags, with 
filthy face and hands, his great heart of love had gone 
out to that wretched boy, and he had stopped the royal 
carriage and said, ''Bring that boy here," and they had 
brought the boy, and he had said, "I want to take you 
out of your poverty, out of your squalor and rags and 
wretched home; I am going to take you to the royal 
palace and adopt you as my son." Then suppose the 
boy had turned and said, "Go along, I don't want to 
be adopted as your son; I would rather have my 
wretched crust of bread, I would rather have my rags 
and filthy home than live in your old palace; I don't 
want to go to be your son." 

But when the great Kjng of Glory, the King of Kings 
and Lord of Lords, the great Eternal Son of God 
comes to you and me, in our filth and rags and sin, 
and wants to take us out of our filth and sin and rags 



'K STAETLING QUESTION" '93 

of unrighteo-asness, and says, "I want to adopt you 
into my family and make yon an heir of God and a 
joint-heir with Me/' there are some of yon men and 
women in this building to-night who, by your actions, 
are saying, '^Go away with yonr salvation, go away with 
yonr adoption into the family of God; I would rather 
have the cmst of the world's pleasure and the rags of 
my sin than all the royal apparel of righteousness and 
glory which you offer me." Oh, the daring, damning 
guilt of any man or woman who neglects so great salva- 
tion! 

II. The Only Salvation. 

K second thought which the text suggests is that 
our folly is great in neglecting this great salvation be- 
cause it is the only salvation that is open to us. As Peter 
puts it in Acts iv. 13 : "There is none other name under 
Heaven given among men whereby we must be saved." 
It is salvation in Christ, or it is no salvation at all. A 
man is in a burning building. If there were one way 
of escape by a fire-escape, and another by a great broad 
stairway, he would have a perfect right to neglect the 
fire-escape for the easier escape by the stairway. But 
suppose there was no way of escape but the fire-escape, 
how great would be his folly in neglecting it. Men and 
women, you are in a burning building, in a doomed 
world. There is just one way of escape; that is by 
Christ. In Christ any one can be saved ; out of Christ 
no one shall be saved. By Christ, or not at all. There 
is a class of men to-day who say, "Give up your Bible, 
give up your Christ of the Bible," and we turn to them 
and say, ^^What have you got to give us in place of our 
Bible; what have you got to give us in place of the 



P4 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

Christ of our Bible?" Now we know by personal ex- 
perience that the Bible and Christ bring forgiveness of 
sins and peace of heart, for they have brought them to 
us. We know that they bring deliverance from sin's 
power, for they have brought it to us. We know that 
they bring joy unspeakable and full of glory, for they 
have brought it to us. We know that they bring par- 
don and a firm assurance of eternal life, for they have 
brought them to us. We know that Christ makes us 
sons of God, and if sons, then heirs of God, and joint 
heirs with Himself. What have you got that will bring 
us the same, that will bring us pardon and peace and 
set us free from the power of sin? What have you got 
that will bring us joy unspeakable and full of glory? 
What have you got that will bring us the assurance of 
eternal life? Have you anything? No, you have not. 
Well, then, please, we are not quite so great fools as to 
give up a book and a Saviour that bring us all these for 
nothing. Salvation in Christ, or salvation not at all. 
Point me to one saved man in London that was not 
saved by Christ. I have been away round this round 
earth. I have been in every latitude and almost every 
longitude, north and south ; I have talked with all kinds 
of people, of all races and all classes, but I have never 
yet found a saved man, who had a glad assurance of 
salvation and practical deliverance from sin's power, 
that was not saved by Jesus Christ; neither has anybody 
else. 

III. To Miss Salvation All That is Necessary is 
Merely to Neglect It. 

In the third place, this text teaches us that to miss 
this salvation, and to bring upon ourselves the just and 



'A STAETLING QUESTION" 95 

awful displeasure of a holy God for our light and con- 
temptuous treatment of a salvation so wonderful, given 
and purchased at so great a cost, all that is necessary 
is simply to neglect it. ^*^How shall we escape if we 
neglect — ^just neglect, so great salvation?" In order to 
bring upon your head the awful displeasure of God, and 
to be lost forever, it is not necessary that you go into 
any outrageous immoralities; it is not necessary that 
you should be an arrant and blatant blasphemer; it is 
not necessary that you should abuse churches and 
preachers of the Gospel; it is not necessary that yon 
should even positively refuse to accept Jesus Christ; 
all that is necessary is that you simply neglect. More 
people are lost in Christian lands by neglecting than in 
any other way. There are millions in England to-day 
who are going through life neglecting, drifting into 
their graves neglecting, drifting into eternity neglect- 
ing, drifting into hell neglecting. That is all that is 
necessary to be lost. Here is a dying man, there stands 
a table by the dying man's bedside, within easy reach, 
and standing on that table there is a tumbler in which 
there is a medicine that has power to save the dying 
man's life. The man has strength enough to put out 
his hand and take the tumbler and drink the medicine. 
N'ow what is all that is necessary for that man to be 
saved? All that is necessary is simply for him to 
put out his hand and take the tumbler and drink the 
medicine. What is all that is necessary for that man 
to be lost and die? It is not necessary that he should 
cut his throat or blow out his brains ; it is not necessary 
that he shonld throw the medicine out of the window ; 
it is not necessary that he should assault or insult 



96 EE^aVAL ADDEESSES 

the doctor or tlie nurse; it is not necessary that He 
should positively refuse to taJ^e the medicine; all that 
is necessary for that man to die is to neglect to take the 
medicine. 

Men and women out of Christ, you are dying. Eternal 
death is at work in your souls to-night, but on that 
table, in that Book, in the Christ of that Book, there 
is a medicine that will save you, and save you to-night 
if you will take it. The medicine is within the reach 
of anybody in this building. Christ is nearer to you 
than the man or woman that sits next to you in that pew. 
All you have to do to-night to be saved is to put out 
your hand and take Christ. ^'To as many as received 
Him to them gave He power to become the sons of 
God." What is all that is necessary to you to perish 
eternally? Not to commit moral suicide; not to com- 
mit to-night some awful act of immorality; not to get 
up and curse Christ and the Bible; not loudly to pro- 
claim that you are an infidel; not to refuse blatantly 
to take Christ; all that is necessary for you to be lost 
is simply to neglect. Here is a boat on the Niagara 
Eiver, away above the Falls, towards Lake Erie, where 
there is scarcely any current. A man sits in the boat, 
being carried on very slowly by the gentle current. 
There is a good pair of oars in the boat, and the man 
could take them and pull up the river towards the lake, 
or to either bank, if he liked; but the man sits there and 
is carried on, almost imperceptibly at first, and then 
faster and faster, until, before he knows it, he is in the 
swift current just upon the rapids, and he is being 
carried on towards the Falls. The oars are no good 
to him now, the current is too swift; he could not save 



A STAETLING QUESTIOIT 9« 

himself if he would — but on the shore there are men 
who have seen his peril ; they have run along the bank 
and have thrown a line good and strong. It falls right 
into the boat, at the man's very feet. What is all that 
the man has to do to be saved? All he has to do is to 
lay hold of the rope and they will pull him ashore, as has 
been done more than once on that river. What is all 
that he has to do to be lost? It is not necessary that 
he should take up the oars and pull with the current; 
it is not necessary that he should throw the oars over- 
board; it is not necessary that he himself should jump 
into the river ; all that is necessary is simply for him to 
neglect to lay hold of the rope that lies before him, and 
the swift current of the river will carry him on to abso- 
lutely certain death over the cataract. 

Men and women, that is a picture of every man and 
woman in this building out of Christ. You are in a 
boat in a perilous stream, being carried towards the cat- 
aract of eternal perdition. There is no man who has 
the power to take the oars in his own strength and pull 
against that awful current; there is no man on earth 
who can save himself ; but God has seen your peril, and, 
in the Gospel of His Son, has thrown out a rope. It 
has fallen at your feet to-night; all you have to do is 
to lay hold, and He will pull you safely on to the glori- 
ous shore. But what is all that you have to do to 
be lost? It is not necessary that you should jump 
inio the current or pull with the stream, or refuse to ac- 
cept Christ. All that is necessary is that you simply 
neglect, and that awful current that you are already 
in will sweep you over the cataract to eternal death 
and ruin. 



98 EEYIVAL ADDKESSES 

Some one put a little card into my hand one day, a 
short, narrow card, and on the one side were these words, 
"What must I do to be saved?" Underneath was 
written God's answer in Acts xvi. 31 : "Believe on the 
Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt be saved." Then it 
said "Over," and I turned it over. On the other side 
of the card was this question, "What must I do to be 
lost?" and there was the answer in just one word: 
"Nothing." "Nothing!" You don't have to do any- 
thing to be lost. You are lost already; if you do not 
do something, and do it quickly, you will be lost for- 
ever. "How shall we escape if we neglect so great 
salvation ?" To sum it all up, friends, all that is neces- 
sary to be lost to-night, all that is necessary to bring 
upon our heads the awful wrath of God for our light 
and contemptuous treatment of a Gospel proclaimed by 
the lips of His own Son and purchased by the atoning 
death of His own Son, all that is necessary is simply 
to neglect. 

Years ago in Minneapolis, the leading paper was the 
Minneapolis Tribune, published in a magnificent six or 
seven-story building, the finest newspaper building at 
that time in the Northwest. I had occasion very fre- 
quently to go into the upper stories of that building to 
see editorial friends. There was one great defect in that 
great building which I had never noticed. The defect 
was this, that the stairway went right round the elevator 
shaft, so that if a fire broke out in the elevator shaft 
escape by the stairway was cut off as well. There was, 
however, a fire-escape outside. That very thing hap- 
pened. There broke out a fire in the elevator shaft, 
and it commenced to sweep up the shaft, story by story, 



S STABTLIIN^G QUESTTON" 99 

cutting off escape by the elevator and cutting off escape 
by the stairway as well. But they had a brave elevator 
boy, who went up a number of times until he got a 
large number of men down from the upper stories, and 
almost all the rest escaped by the fire-escape outside the 
building. But away up in the sixth story there was 
a man, a despatcher for the Associated Press, which is 
the largest news-gathering agency in the United States. 
He was urged to escape, but he refused to move. There 
he sat by his instrument, telegraphing to all parts of 
the country that the building was on fire. He could 
have gone out of the building by the fire-escape, and 
across the road to an instrument there, and could have 
done just as well ; but, like a typical newspaper man, he 
wanted to do something sensational, and so there he sat 
telegraphing the news. There had been a similar case 
above Johnstown in the time of the Johnstown flood, 
when the dam of the river was breaking. A woman 
sat in a telegraph office at the bottom of the dam tele- 
graphing down to the people at Johnstown that the dam 
was breaking and that they had better flee for their lives. 
But she sat there, because duty required her, until the 
dam burst, and she was swept down in the flood. This 
man, however, sat there quite unnecessarily, merely be- 
cause of his desire for notoriety. "I am in the Tribune 
building," he telegraphed, ^^in the sixth story, and the 
building is on fire. The fire has now reached the sec- 
ond story; I am in the sixth." In a little while he 
sent another message: "The fire has now reached the 
third story." Soon he telegraphed: "The fire has 
reached the fourth story; I am in the sixth." Soon 
again the message went over the wires: "The fire has 

rv I A n ^. ^^ 



100 EEVIVAL ADDEESSES 

reached the fifth story; I am in the sixth." Then he 
thought it was about time to leave; but, in order to do 
this, he had to cross the hallway to a window to reach 
the fire-escape. He went to his door and opened it, 
and, to his dismay, found that the fire had not only 
reached the fifth story, but the sixth story, and that 
the hallway was full of smoke and flame, which, the 
moment he opened the door, swept into the room. He 
shut the door quickly. What was he to do? The 
stairway, the elevator and the fire-escape were all cut 
off ; but he was a brave man, and he went to the window 
and threw it up. Down below stood a great crowd, 
six stories down. There was no means of catching him 
if he jumped, and he stood there on the window sill, 
not knowing what to do. But presently he looked up. 
Above his head was a long wire guy-rope that passed 
from the Tribune building to the roof of a building 
across an opening. Below him was a chasm six stories 
deep, but he caught hold of the guy-rope and began 
to go hand-over-hand across that chasm. The people 
down in the street looked on in breathless suspense. 
On and on he went, and then he stopped. The people 
below could hardly breathe. Would he let go? No. 
On and on he went, and again he stopped, and again the 
crowd below gasped, but only for a moment. His 
strength was gone; he was now obliged to let go, and 
down he came tumbling through those six stories of 
space, crushed into a shapeless mass below. All through 
mere unnecessary neglect ! 

Men and women, you are in a burning building to- 
night, you are in a doomed world; but, thank God, 
there is a way of escape, and one way only, in Christ 



A STARTLmG QUESTION 101 

Jesus. No one knows how long that way will be left 
open. But, I beg of you, do not neglect it, and then 
when it is too late lay hold on some poor guy-rope of 
human philosophy, and go a little way, and then let go 
and plunge, not six stories down, but on and on and on 
through the awful unfathomable depths of the gulf of 
eternal despair. Men and women, turn to Christ to- 
night! "How shall we escape if we neglect so great 
salvation?'^ 



m 



VIII 

A SOLEMN QUESTION FOR THOSE WHO ARE 
REJECTING CHRIST THAT THEY MAY OB- 
TAIN THE WORLD. 

"What shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole 
world, and lose his own soul?" Mark, viii, 36. 

That question ought to set thinking every man and 
woman here to-night, who, because of love of the world, 
is refusing Jesus Christ. 

I. Will you please notice in the first place the two 
things that are contrasted in the verse ? The two things 
contrasted are not the present and the future. The 
question is not what shall it profit a man if he gain the 
present and lose the future. That would be an impor- 
tant question. If a man were to gain the fleeting pres- 
ent and thereby lose the eternal future, it would be a 
very foolish bargain ; but that is not the question of the 
text. The man who loses his soul does not gain the 
present. It is true he loses the future, the eternal 
future; but he does not gain the present. The man 
living in sin, the man living away from Christ, does not 
get the most out of the life that now is. He gets the 
least out of it. On the other hand, the man that saves 
his soul dopn not lose the present. It is true that he 
gains the fv.ure, the eternal future; but he does not 
lose the present. The man whose soul is saved gets 
the most out of the life that now is. The two things 

102 



A SOLEMN" QUESTION 103 

put in contrast are these, the world and the soul, or 
life — the world, that is, the tangible world and all it 
contains, wealth, honour, power, pleasure, everything 
that appeals to the senses, the lust of the flesh and the 
lust of the eye, and the vainglory of life {cf. 1 John 
ii. 16). That is the world. That which is put into con- 
trast with it is the soul or life, the inner, real man. To 
gain the world is to get all the wealth there is, and all 
the honour there is, and all the social position there is, 
and all the power there is, and all the worldly pleasure 
there is. To lose the soul is to lose your real manhood, 
to fall short of that for which God created you, to miss 
the divine image, to have the divine image blotted out 
and the image of the devil stamped in its place. 

To lose the soul is to come short of the knowledge 
of God, to lose communion with God and likeness to 
God, to "fall short of the glory of God." Now the ques- 
tion is this. What shall it profit you to gain all that this 
world has, all its wealth, all its honour, all its pleasures, 
all its power, and lose your true selves, lose that for 
which God created you, lose communion with God and 
likeness to God, and the glory of God ? 

II. For any man to gain the whole world at the cost 
of forfeiting his soul would be a bad bargain. If one 
could get the whole world by forfeiting his soul, it would 
be an idiotic exchange. Why ? 

1. First of all, because the world does not satisfy. 
The world never satisfied a human soul. Tlake wealth. 
Was ever any man satisfied with wealth? Did any 
amount of money ever bring satisfaction and lasting joy 
to any man or woman on earth? You had 
a man here in England a few years ago who 



104 EEYIVAL ADDEESSES 

was very successful in making money. He made 
millions of pounds sterling, but so little did 
it satisfy him that he Jumped overboard from 
the deck of an ocean steamer and drowned himself. I 
remember one day that the heir to one of the largest 
fortunes in the world invited me to dinner, and I went 
to dinner with him. After the dinner was over he opened 
his heart to me, and confessed his dissatisfaction with 
life. All the millions — and there were a great many 
millions that that young man was heir to— did not give 
him satisfaction and joy. 

Did honour ever satisfy any man? I have known 
men and women in the highest positions of honour in 
politics and social life, in culture and in all spheres of 
life, but I never knew a man or woman yet that was 
satisfied with honour. Does power satisfy any man? 
Was any king or emperor or czar, no matter how large 
his power, satisfied with the possession of power? Do 
the pleasures of life satisfy any man? Does the ball- 
room satisfy? Does the card party satisfy? Does the 
theatre satisfy? Does the race-course satisfy? Does 
gambling satisfy? Is there any form of the world's 
pleasure that satisfies the human soul ? How mad then 
to forfeit your soul to gain money, honour, power, po- 
sition, glory, pleasure, or anything that this world con- 
tains, when we know that they never satisfied anybody. 

2. But in the second place it is a mad bargain to 
forfeit your soul to gain the world, hecause the world 
does not last. As the Apostle John says in 1 John ii. 17, 
''The world passeth away." How well we know it. Take 
wealth. How long does wealth last? With many a man 
it does not las? even a few years. A man is a millionaire 



A SOLEMlSr QUESTIO]^ 105 

to-day, and by a turn of the wheel of fortune He is prac- 
tically penniless to-morrow. I was talking about a man 
of your city only to-day to a friend of his, and he told 
me how wealthy this man used to be. But there was a 
little change in the line of production in which this man 
was interested, and your country ceased to be the coun- 
try that supplied that market, and that man's fortune 
dwindled from millions to practically nothing. I remem- 
ber when I was a boy, one night we five children were in 
the sitting-room at home, and we asked our father to tell 
us what his properties were. We were going to figure 
them up and see how much we were going to be worth 
when he was gone. He was rather amused at the idea, 
and he began to tell us what he thought he was worth ; 
and when he told us of all the possessions he could think 
of, we all of us added them up, and divided them by 
five to see how much each of us would be worth when my 
father saw fit to hand things over to us. This looked 
splendid on paper, and I felt quite rich that night ; but 
there came a financial crash in America in 1873 which 
affected my father's properties, and little by little, by 
the year '77, when my father was called away, practi- 
cally the last vestige of all that he possessed was taken 
from his hands, and he left only a few thousand dollars. 
And that was mismanaged, and in a few months not a 
penny was left. All I had was a matchbox and a pair 
of sleeve-buttons, one of which I have lost, and I don't 
know what became of the other. "The world passeth 
away." I thank God that that money did pass away. 
It was one of the best things that ever happened to me. 
Take honours. How long do they last ? I remember 
a man in our country who stood pre-eminent among 



106 EEVIVAL ADDKESSES 

tHe statesmen of America. I think beyond all question 
he was the first statesman of America of his day. He 
might have become President, but he was a little too 
much of a statesman to become President. England had 
an unpleasant experience once with this man's states- 
manship, when he represented the United States Govern- 
ment at the Geneva Commission on the Alabama claim, 
and carried the day. He was the most highly honoured 
I think of any man of his day in America, but after a 
while this man dropped out, and we almost forgot there 
had been such a man. I remember I was thinking of 
this man one day, and I said to myself, ^1 guess So- 
and-so's dead. I have not seen his name in the papers 
at all lately," and a day or two afterwards I saw in 
the papers that the Hon. So-and-so was living in such 
a street of New York, that he never went out in public, 
but sat by his open window looking out upon the pass- 
ing crowds and thinking of his old-time successes. That 
man was utterly forgotten, yet at one time he was almost 
the unquestioned leader of political life in America. 
In a few months more I took up the paper and read 
that he was dead, and when he died there was nothing 
said. He had dropped out of sight. Honour does not 
last. Take your most honoured statesmen, whose names 
are in every mouth, no one will be speaking of them or 
thinking of them a few years hence. "The world 
passeth away." Suppose honour and money do last 
until a man dies. How long will they last? Twenty 
years, thirty years, forty years, possibly fifty or sixty 
years, and then — gone ! One of our wealthiest men in 
America, the wealthiest man of his day, died. Two men 
on 'Change in this city, New York, met the next day, 



A SOLEMN QUESTION 107 

and one of them said to the other, "How much did So- 
and-so leave?" and the other one replied, "He left it 
all." So he did. Of his one hundred and ninety-six 
millions of dollars which he was worth, he didn't take 
one penny with him. 

Pleasure, how long does it last ? Take the ball ; how 
long does the pleasure of the ballroom last? Some- 
where from two to seven hours ; then you go home with 
weary feet and throbbing brain, blaming yourself for 
having been such a fool. The card party; how long 
does it last ? Oh, two or three hours, four or five hours ; 
and then you go home with a lighter purse and a heavier 
heart. The champagne party; how long does it last? 
A few hours, and you go home with an aching head, 
a nauseated stomach, thinking what a fool you have 
been, and saying, "I will never be such a fool again." 
Ah, friends, "the world passeth away." 

The joys of friendship ; how long do they last, if it is 
worldly friendship? A few brief years, and then we 
look into the casket on the beloved form and face, and 
the coffin-lid is locked down, and all is over. "The world 
passeth away." But the soul lasts. "He that doeth the 
will of the Lord abideth for ever." So I say that to 
forfeit your soul to gain the world is a mad bargain, 
for the world does not satisfy while you have it, and it 
does not last at all. 

III. Now, then, if any one here to-night could get 
the whole world as the price of selling his soul it would 
be a foolish bargain; but who ever got the whole world? 
Who ever had all the world's wealth? No one. The 
richest man has but a small portion of all the world's 
wealth. Who possesses all the world's honour? The 



108 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

most honoured man on earth to-day has but a small por- 
tion of all the world's honour. Who possesses all the 
world's pleasure? The greatest devotee of pleasure has 
but a very small portion of all the world's pleasure. Who 
possesses all the world's power? The mightiest man on 
earth has but a small portion of all the world's power. 
But even if you could get it all, it would be a bad bar- 
gain; and what a mad bargain to sell your soul to get 
so small a portion of the world as any of you are get- 
ting I 

I asked a man one night at a meeting like this — ^he 
looked a bright, intelligent fellow for a man of his class : 
''Why are you not a Christian?" He replied, "I am 
deeply moved, and I would like to become a Christian. 
You have made me perfectly wretched. Yes, I would 
like to become a Christian." "Then why not become one 
to-night ?" He said, "My business forbids it. I would 
have to give up my position to-night if I became a Chris- 
tian." I asked what was liis business and he replied, 
"A bartender." He didn't look it; he looked more re- 
spectable. I said, "Will you please tell me how much 
you get a week for tending the bar?" If I remember 
correctly it was six dollars, that is 24s. ; and that man 
was selling his soul for 24s. a week. Some of you are 
selling your souls at almost as cheap a price. I asked 
another young fellow why he did not become a Chris- 
tian. He said, "I believe in it, and I hope I may some 
day. But I am in a business of my own, and I have my 
best business on the Sabbath; I cannot be a Christian 
and do Sabbath work." Then I said, "You had better 
give up your Sabbath work." "jSTo," he said, "I can- 
not do that. It is the biggest day's profit I have in the 



A SOLEMI^ QUESTION 109 

week." And that man was selling his soul for the profit 
of one day's business a week. 

Why, there are some of you here to-night selling your 
immortal souls, for which Jesus Christ died, and which 
shall live for ever, in Heaven and glory, or in hell and 
shame, for some single form of pleasure. It may be 
the dance, it may be the card party, it may be the horse 
race, it may be the theatre, it may be some other form of 
pleasure to wliich you are a slave, and for one single 
form of worldly pleasure you are forfeiting your souls. 
Why, man, you are mad ! "What shall it profit a man, if 
he gain the whole world and lose his own soul ?" 

Friends, while I am talking here to-night, and offer- 
ing Christ to you, and salvation in Him, all unseen but 
none the less present, there is another preacher here to- 
night and that is Satan. He stands right by some of 
you as you sit in yonder pews, and while I offer you 
Christ and salvation and life eternal in Him, Satan 
offers you money, a little larger income in your business, 
or the social position that he tells you you will 
have to forfeit if you come out and out for Christ, or 
some form of worldly pleasure. He says, "Take this. 
Give me your souls and I will give you money. Give me 
your souls and I will give you these pleasures that you 
will have to give up if you become real Christians. Give 
me your souls and I will give you social position. Give 
me your souls and I will give you the world.'^ Why, 
men and women, if he should offer you the whole world, 
you would be mad to accept his offer; but when he 
offers to you such a little trifle — the consummate folly 
of it — that for this little piece of the world you forfeit 



110 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

your soul ; you forfeit life eternal for a world that never 
satisfies and does not last ! 

I have known many men and women that gave up the 
world for Christ, that gave up money for Christ, men 
that gave up much money for Christ, gave up high hon- 
our for Christ, gave up social position, high so- 
cial position for Christ, gave up pleasures that 
had been the passion of a lifetime for Christ, but 
I have yet to find the first man or woman who regretted 
it, and I have known people who gave up Christ for the 
world, and when the hour came in which the eternal 
realities were opening upon them, they bitterly regret- 
ted it. 

One day in New York City one of the wealthiest men 
that America ever produced, the first man that estab- 
lished a family name now famous, lay dying, with all his 
millions in the bank, and with all his railway stock of no 
use to him. And as he lay there, he said, "Bring in the 
gardener." The gardener was a godly man, and when he 
came in to see his dying master, the rich man said to the 
gardener, "Get down, and pray for me." The gardener 
did so, and when he had finished his prayer, the rich 
man said, "Sing, 

'Come, ye sinners, poor and needy, 
Weak and wounded, sick and sore."* 

Ah, men and women, a time is coming when we shall 
no longer see through eyes that are blinded by the glam- 
our of this world ; the time is coming when every man 
and woman here to-night will have the scales taken from 
their eyes, and face to face with death, face to face with 
God, face to face with eternity, you will see as God sees. 
You will say, "What a fool I was to forfeit my never- 



A SOLEMN QUESTION 111 

9ying soul to get the world that has not satisfied, and 
that is now slipping out of my grip." ^^What shall it 
profit a man, if he gain the whole world, and lose his 
own soul?" 

The story is told of Rowland Hill, the great preacher. 
Lady Ann Erskine was passing hy in her carriage, and 
she asked her coachman who that was that was drawing 
such a large assembty. He replied that it was Rowland 
Hill. "I have heard a good deal about him," she said ; 
*'drive up near the crowd." Mr. Hill soon saw her, and 
saw that she belonged to the aristocracy. He suddenly 
stopped in the midst of his preaching, and said : "My 
friends, I have something for sale." His hearers were 
amazed. 'TTes, I have something for sale ; it is the soul 
of Lady Ann Erskine. Is there any one here that will 
bid for her soul? Ah, do I hear a bid? Who bids? 
Satan bids. Satan, what will yon give for her soul? 
'I will give riches, honour, and pleasure.' But stop! 
Do I hear another bid ? Yes, Jesus Christ bids. Jesus, 
what will you give for her soul ? 'I will give eternal life.' 
Lady Ann Erskine, you have heard the two bids — 
which will you have?" And Lady Ann Erskine fell 
down on her knees and cried out, "I will have Jesus." 
Man and woman, two are bidding for your soul to-night, 
Satan and Jesus. Satan offers you the world, the world 
that does not satisfy, and that does not last. Jesus offers 
you life, real life, eternal life. To which will you 
listen? '^hat shall it profit a man, if he gain the 
whole world, and lose his own soul ?" 



IX 

REFUGES OF LIES 

"The hail shall sweep away the refuge of lies." — Isaiah 
Xiviii. 17. 

We have seen in a former address that every man 
needs a refuge from four things — from the accusations 
of his own conscience, from the power of sin within, 
from the power of Satan, and from the wrath to come. 
Almost every man has a refuge, that is, he has some- 
thing in which he has put his trust to comfort him. 
The diflBculty with most men is not so much that they 
have not a refuge, as that they have a false refuge, 
a refuge that will fail them in the hour of crisis and 
need; what our text characterizes as a ^^refuge of lies." 
It was just so in Isaiah's time; the men of Israel knew 
there was a coming day of judgment, and that they 
needed a hiding-place from that coming judgment of 
God, and they made lies their refuge, and Isaiah 
— God's messenger — proclaimed, '^the hail shall sweep 
away your false refuge, the refuge of lies," and I come 
to you with the same message, you men and women 
that have a refuge, hut a false one. ^^The hail shall 
sweep away the refuge of lies." 

I. How TO Detect a Refuge of Lies. 
Is there any way in which we can tell a true refuge 
from a false one, a refuge that will stand the test of 
the coming day of God from a refuge that the hail 

112 



EEFUGES OF LIES 113 

will sweep away? There are four tests that will com- 
mend themselves to the reason and common-sense of 
every intelligent and candid man here to-night, where- 
by he can tell a true refuge from a false one, a refuge 
that will save from a refuge that will ruin; a refuge 
of truth from a refuge of lies. The first test is this : — 
1. A true Refuge is one that meets the highest De- 
mands of your own Conscience. — If that in which you 
are trusting does not meet the highest demands of 
your own conscience, it certainly is not a hiding-place 
from the accusations of conscience. Furthermore, it 
is not a hiding-place from the wrath of God, for if 
our own hearts condemn us, God is greater than our 
hearts, and knoweth all things. 

2. The second test is this : Every true Refuge is one, 
trust in which is maVing you a letter man or woman 
to-day. — If you are trusting in something which is 
not making you a better man or woman to-day, it 
is not a hiding-place from the power of sin within, 
it is not a hiding-place from the power of Satan, it 
is not a hiding-place from the wrath to come; for a 
refuge that does not save you from the power of 
sin here on earth, very certainly will never save you 
from the consequences of sin hereafter. 

3. In the third place : A true Refuge is one that will 
stand the Test of the Dying Hour, — If you are trusting 
in something that simply brings you comfort when 
you are well and strong, but will fail you in that 
great hour that we have all got to face, when we lie 
face to face with death and eternity, it is absolutely 
worthless. 

^. In the fourth place : A true Refuge is one that 



iU REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

will stand the Test of the Judgment Day. — If you are 
trusting in something that will not stand the test of 
that great Judgment Day, when we have to pass up 
before the judgment bar of God to give an account 
of the deeds done in the body, it is absolutely worth- 
less. There are men here in London indicted for 
murders and about to be tried. Now suppose you 
went down to see one of these men, and you found 
him in a very peaceful frame of mind, without a fear, 
and you said to him, "Well, you seem very cheerful 
for a man charged with murder." "Oh, yes," he says, 
"I am; I have no anxiety whatever about that trial." 
And you say, "What, no anxiety about it ?" "No, none 
whatever," he replies. "Why not?" you say. "Be- 
cause," says he, "I have an answer to make." "Well, 
is your answer one that will satisfy the judge and 
jury?" you ask. "No," he replies, "I do not think 
it will satisfy the judge and jury, but it satisfies me." 
"Why," you would say, "what good is it if your answer 
satisfies you, if it will not satisfy the judge and jury 
before whom the case is to be tried." The question is 
not whether your hope satisfies you; will it satisfy 
God? I might add a fifth test: will it stand the test 
of the Word of God? 

Here then are the four tests: first. Is it meeting 
the highest demands of your own conscience? second, 
Is it making you a better man or woman ? third. Will it 
stand the test of the dying hour? fourth. Will it 
stand the test of the judgment day? 

II. Refuges of Lies Examined and Exposed. 

Now we are going to apply these four tests to the 
things in which men are trusting. 



EEFUGES OF LIES 115 

1. The first is their own morality. How many men 
in London there are, who, if you go up and speak with 
them, and ask them to come to Christ, say, "No, I will 
not come ; I do not need Him." You ask, "Why not ?" 
And they reply, "Because I am a good man; my life 
and character are such that I do not feel the need of a 
Saviour, and I am trusting in my life and character to 
gain acceptance before God." Let us apply the tests. 
You are trusting in your own goodness. Does your own 
goodness meet the highest demands of your own con- 
ecience? Is there a man here to-night that will say, 
^*My life and character are such that they meet the high- 
est demands of my own conscience"? Is there a man 
out of Christ here to-night who will say that? I have 
never met but two men who have said it. You will say, 
"They must have been remarkably good men." No, they 
had remarkably poor consciences. The first one was a 
man I once met while crossing the Atlantic Ocean. I 
approached him on the subject of becoming a Christian. 
He said, "I do not need any Saviour." I said, "Do you 
mean to tell me your life has been such, and your char- 
acter from childhood up to this moment, as to satisfy 
the highest demands of your own conscience ?" He said, 
"Yes, they have." But so far from being an exception- 
ally good man, he was the most unpopular man on the 
boat before we reached New York City. 

Second, Is trust in your goodness making you a better 
man? As you go on from month to month and from 
year to year, do you find that you are growing more 
kind, more gentle, more self-sacrificing, more thoughtful 
of others, more considerate^ more tender, more humble, 
more prayerful ? Now I have knowp a great many men 



116 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

who trusted in their own goodness but I have j'et to 
meet the first one who, while trusting to his own good- 
ness, grew better. As far as my experience goes, these 
men grow hard, grow censorious, grow harsh, grow 
selfish, grow more and more inconsiderate of others, 
grow more proud, and more bitter. 

Third, Will it stand the test of the dying hour? Oh, 
how many a man has gone through life boasting of his 
morality, and trusting in his morality to save him in 
the life to come ; but when that dread hour comes, when 
he lies upon his dying bed face to face with God and 
eternit}^, all his trust in his morality leaves him, in that 
illumination that comes to the soul as eternity draws 
nigh. I remember a man in one of my pastorates who 
was very, very self-confident. He had no use for the 
church, no use for the Bible, no use for Jesus Christ. 
He was very well satisfied that he was about the most 
exemplary man there was in the community, and he 
needed no Saviour. But the time came when there was 
a cancer eating into that man's brain. It was eating 
through the skin, eating through the flesh, it was eating 
into the sknll, and eating so far into the skull that 
there was only a thin film left, and you could see the 
throbbing of the brain underneath. And when that 
man saw that he had but a few days, and possibly but 
a few hours, to live, his trust in his morality fled, and 
he said, "I wish you would go and call Mr. Torrey to 
come here and see me." I came to the bedside, and as 
he lay there in agony he said to me, "Tell me what to 
do to be saved ?'^ I eat down by that bed, and tried to 
show him from the Word of God what he must do to bs 
saved. And as night came on I said to his family, ^^Do 



REFUGES OF LIES 117 

not sit up through the long hours of the night ; I will 
stay up with him, and perform all that is necessary." 
And all through the hours -of the night I sat beside 
that d}dng man's bed. Sometimes I had to go out of 
the room to get something for him/ and whenever I 
came back there was always one groan from the bed 
over in the comer. It was this : '"^Oh, I wish I was a 
Christian! I wish I was a Christian! I wish I was 
a Christian!" And so he died. His morality did not 
stand the test of the dying hour. 

Will it stand the test of the Judgment Bay, when you 
stand face to face with an infinitely holy God who knows 
you through and through? Will you look up into His 
face and say, ^^0 God, I stand here on my merits, on 
my character and life! Thou knowest my life; Thou 
knowest me through and through; Thou knowest my 
every secret thought and act; Thou knowest my life 
is pure, and I stand here before an infinitely holy God, 
and am proud of my morality." 

Will it stand the test of God's word? Turn to 
Romans iii. 20: "Therefore by the deeds of the law 
there shall no flesh be justified in His sight." Turn to 
Galatians iii. 10: "For as many as are of the works 
of the law are under the curse: for it is written, 
Cursed is every one that continueth not in all things 
which are written in the Book of the Law to do them." 

2. There is a second refuge of lies, and that is, trtist 
in other peoples badness. Some men trust in their own 
goodness ; other men trust in other folk's badness. You 
go to them and talk about Christ, and they say, "Well, 
I am just as good as other folks. I am just as good as 
a lot of your professing Christians/' Oh, I know 80 



118 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

many hypocrites in the church. Instead of making 
their boast of, and putting their trust in, their own 
goodness, they make a boast of, and put their trust in, 
other people's badness. Let us apply the tests. Does 
that mean the highest demands of your conscience? 
When your conscience comes to you with its lofty de- 
mands, does it satisfy your conscience to say, "Well, I 
am just as good as a great many professing Christians" ? 
If it does, you have a conscience of a very low order. 
Is trust in other people's badness making you a better 
man ? Now, I have known a good many people, just as 
you have known them, who were all the time talking 
about the badness of other people. I have yet to meet 
the first one that grew better by the process. Show me 
the man or woman that is all the time dwelling upon 
the badness of other people, and I will show you a man 
or woman that is bad themselves, every time. Show me 
the man that is always talking about another man's 
adultery, and you show me a man that is an adulterer 
himself. Show me the woman that is always having a 
suspicion about other women, and I will show you a 
woman you cannot trust. Show me a man that says 
every other man is dishonest, and I will show 3''ou a 
man who is a knave himself. I once had a Bible- 
class, and in that class there was a woman who was in 
business, one of those women who was always talking 
about the faults of others ; and one day this woman pro- 
pounded this question to me; she said: "Mr. Torrey, 
is it not true that every person in business is dis- 
honest?" I looked at her and said, "When any person 
in business comes to me and asks if every one in business 
is not dishonest, they convict at least one person." She 



REFUGES OF LIES 119 

was angry, but I was only telling her the truth. Show 
me the man or woman who is always dwelling upon the 
{faults of Christians, or the faults of anybody else, and 
I will show you a man or woman that is rotten to the 
core. I made that remark in my church when I was 
pastor in an American city, and at the close of the 
meeting a lady came and said to me, "I do not like 
what you said; you said, 'If you show me any man or 
woman that is always talking about the faults of others, 
you would show me some one that was bad.' " "Yes," I 
said, "and I mean it." "Well, there is Miss So-and-so. 
Now you must admit that she is always talking about 
the faults of others." I had to admit that this was a 
well-known fact. "You do not mean to say that she is 
bad herself ?" I did not answer, for I did not care to be 
personal; but if I had told her all the truth, I would 
have told her that that very week I had forbidden that 
very woman to sing in the choir any more because of 
certain revelations of her character which had been 
made to me, and to which she had confessed. 

Will it stand the test of the dying hour? When you 
come to lie on your dying bed, will it give all the com- 
fort you need to be thinking about the faults of others ? 
No. This very woman who accused every person in 
business of being dishonest, who was always dwelling 
upon the faults of others — ^the time came for her to 
die ; and as she lay dying, the doctor came in and said : 
"Mrs. So-and-so, it is my duty to tell you that you must 
die." The woman shrieked, "I cannot die; I won't 
die ', I am not ready to die" ; but she did die. 

Will it stand the test of the Judgment Day? When 
you go into the presence of God to answer to Him, will 



120 REVIVAL ADDEESSES 

you look up into His face with the same confidence as 
you look up into mine, and say, "0 God, I do not pre- 
tend to have been very good, but I was just as good as a 
great many in the churches"? Will you do it, manf 
Will you do it, woman? Ah, the blessed Book tells 
you, in Romans xiv. 12: "So then every one of us 
shall give an account of himself to God." Not an ac- 
count of somebody else. In the judgment day you will 
forget everybody but yourself. In that judgment day 
all other sin will vanish but your sin. 

3. The third refuge of lies is Universalism. There 
are a great many men in every city, who, if you approach 
them on the subject of becoming Christians and giving 
up sin, say, "Oh, no, I will not do that; I believe in a 
God of Love; I believe God is too good to damn any- 
body. A man does not need to forsake sin in order to 
take Christ. God is good, and there is not any hell. Do 
you mean to tell me God would permit a hell; that a 
good God would damn any one ? No, I do not need to 
forsake sin. I am trusting in the goodness of God, and 
I believe all men will at some time or other be saved." 
Now, let us just try this. Does that meet the highest 
demands of conscience? When your conscience comes 
to you and points out your sin and demands your re- 
nunciation, does it satisfy your conscience to say, "Yes, 
I am doing wrong, but God is so good I can just as 
well go on sinning, I can just as well go on trampling 
God's laws underfoot. He is so good He will not punish 
me. He gave His Son to die for me ; I can go on sin- 
ning as I please"? Does that satisfy your conscience? 
Well, then, you have a mighty mean conscience. What 
would you think of a boy and girl, brother and sister. 



EEFUGES OF LIES 121 

whose mother lies sick in the house. The boy was sick 
a little time before, and the mother had watched over 
him so faithfully and tenderly that she had caught his 
sickness ; she had brought him back to health, but she 
was lying very sick and almost at the point of death. 
She had told the children that they could go out into 
the garden, and said, "There are some flowers out there 
about which I am very careful. I do not want you to 
pick them." So Johnny and Mary go out, and Johnny 
goes to work to do just what he was asked not to do. His 
sister expostulates, and says, "Johnny, did you not hear 
mother tell us not to pick those flowers, that they were 
very precious and that she did not want them picked?" 
"Oh, yes," says Johnny. "Then why pick them?" asks 
the sister. "Because," says Johnny, "she loves me so, 
Mary. Don't you know how she loves me, how when I 
was sick mother gave up sleep and everything, and 
watched over me through the nights ? Don't you know 
that she is sick there now because she loves me so ? And 
so I am now going to do the very thing she told me 
not to do." What would you think of a boy like that, 
and what do you think of the man or woman that makes 
their boast of the love of God, and because God loves 
them with such a wonderful love, make His love an 
excuse for sin, make God's love an excuse for rebellion 
against Him, make God's love a reason for a worldly 
and careless life ? I should think you men and women 
would despise yourselves. Oh, the baseness of it; oh, 
the contemptible ingratitude of it; oh, the black- 
hcartedness of it, making God's wondrous love, that gave 
Jesus to die on the Cross of Calvary, an excuse for 
sinning against Him ! 



122 EEVIVAL ABDEESSES 

Is your universalism making you a better man or 
woman ? Oh, how many men grow careless, grow worldly, 
grow sinful, grow indifferent, because somebody has in- 
oculated them with the pernicious error of eternal hope. 
How many men there are alive now, once earnest in the 
service of God, who are indifferent about the condition 
of the lost, the worldty, and the careless, because they 
have read some books undermining, or trying to under- 
mine, the doctrines of Jesus and the Apostles. With 
what honeyed words the professing Church to-day is 
promulgating the doctrine of eternal hope, which is an 
infernal lie. Will it stand the test of the dying hour? 
Oftentimes it does not. Dr. Ichabod Spencer, one of 
the most able and faithful pastors America ever had, 
tells how, when pastor of a Presbyterian church in 
Brooklyn, he was called to see a young man who was 
dying. His wife and mother were members of the 
church, but this young man was not. The doctor went to 
see him, and tried to lead him to Christ ; but he turned 
and said, "It is no use; I have had many chances, but 
I have put them all away and I am dying, and shall 
soon have to go ; it is no use talking to me now." And 
he was in great agony and distress of soul. Then the 
father came in and heard him talking and groaning, and 
he said, "My boy, there is no reason for you to take on 
so. There is no reason for you to feel so bad. You 
have not been a bad man; you have nothing to fear." 
The dying young man turned round and said to his 
father, "You are to blame for me being here. If I had 
listened to mother when she tried to lead me to a good 
life, instead of listening to you, I should not be in 
this strait. Mother tried to get me to go to Sunday 



REFUGES OF LIES 123 

school and to church, but you said God was so good it 
did not matter; and when mother tried to take me to 
church you took me fishing and hunting and pleasuring ; 
you told me there was not a hell, and I believed you; 
you have deceived me up to this moment, father, but 
you can't deceive me any longer. I am dying and I 
am going to hell, and my blood is on your soul/' Then 
he turned his face to the wall and died. Men, you turn 
people into sin by preaching a doctrine that contradicts 
the teaching of the Son of God. It means that you are 
deceiving the men you are rocking to sleep in sin, and 
they will live to curse you some day. And you men 
who are in health and strength are building upon a 
false hope. Death will tear away the veil that blinds 
your eyes to-night. 

Will it stand the test of the judgment day? When 
you go up into the presence of God will you look up, and 
when He asks about your sin, will you answer, "Yes, 
Father, I did sin; I did trample Thy laws under foot; 
I did neglect prayer, neglect the Bible, neglect the 
House of God, neglect obedience to Thee; I was worldly 
and careless, but I have a good answer. Father, my 
answer is this : I knew Thou wert a God of love,' and 
gave Thy Son to die for me on the Cross of Calvary, 
and as I knew Thou wert so loving, I just went on 
trampling Thy laws under foot"? Will you do that? 
It won't stand the test. 

4. A fourth refuge is infidelity. How many men 
there are, who, when asked to become Christians, turn 
and say, "I do not believe that the Bible is the Word 
of God. That is an old superstition that is worn out. 
I do not believe that Jesus of Nazareth was the Son of 



124: EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

God. In fact, I am not quite sure that there is a God. 
I am not a Christian, and you can call me what you 
like. Call me an infidel, an agnostic, what you please; 
but I do not need any Christ, and do not believe in 
Him." He tries to comfort himself with infidelity. 
Hundreds of thousands are doing this in London to- 
night. Apply the tests. Does that meet the highest 
demands of your own conscience? When conscience 
asserts itself, and comes to you with its majestic de- 
mands, does it satisfy your conscience to say, "I do not 
believe in the Bible or in Jesus Christ ; I do not believe 
in God" ? Is your infidelity making you a better man ? 
I have yet to find the first man or woman made better 
by infidelity. I have known men to be made adulterers 
by infidelity; I have known men and women to be 
made suicides by infidelity; I have known men to be 
robbed of business integrity by infidelity ; I have known 
men who were made deceivers by infidelity and ran away 
from their wives and went with other women. I could 
stand here by the hour and tell you of the characters I 
have known to be shipwrecked by infidelity. I have yet to 
find the first man that was made upright or moral or 
clean by infidelity. I stood up one night in my church 
in Chicago. The church was full, and a great many 
infidels were there. I had invited them to be there, as 
I was talking about "Infidelity: Its Causes, Conse- 
quences and Cure." I stopped in my sermon and said, 
^^I want every man in this audience to-night that can 
honestly testify before God and this audience that he 
has been saved from drunkenness by the Gospel of 
Jesus Christ to stand up"; and two or three hundred 
men stood up as having been saved from drunkenness 



REFUGES OF LIES 12S 

by the Gospel of Christ. I said, ''That will do. Now 
we are going to be fair and give the other side a 
chance, and I want to ask any infidel in this audience 
to-night that has been saved from drunkenness by in- 
fidelity in any form to stand up." I looked round; at 
first I thought there wasn't any one standing up. At 
last, away under the gallery, I saw one, a very ragged- 
looking sort of a Senegambian, and he was drunk at 
the time; that is an actual fact. Thank God, he went 
down into the inquiry-room afterwards, and thought it 
over. Men and women, infidelity undermines character, 
infidelity robs men and women of purity, infidelity 
makes your clerks and cashiers unsafe. You know it. 

Will your infidelity stand the test of the dying hour ? 
A great deal of infidelity does not. A friend of mine 
who took part in the American Civil War, and fought 
for the North, told me a story about a man in his regi- 
ment who had been boasting in camp of his unbelief. 
On the second day of the battle of Pittsburg Landing 
this man said to his comrades of his company, while 
waiting for the word of command to go forward, "I 
fear I am going to be shot this day; I have an awful 
feeling." "Oh, that's nonsense," they said, "it's just 
a premonition, a superstition, and there's nothing in it." 
Soon the command came, "Forward !" and that company 
marched up the hill, and just as it went over the crest 
there was a volley from the enemy's guns. The first 
one sent a bullet through his chest near his heart, and 
he fell back, and as they carried him to the rear, he 
cried, "0 God, give me time to repent!" It took only 
one bullet to take the infidelity out of him. It would 
take less than that to take the infidelity out of most 



126 KEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

of you here to-night Will it stand the test of the 
judgment day ? Will you go up into God's presence, and 
when asked to answer for your sin_, will you say : "Well, 
oh God, Thou knowest I did not quite believe You 
existed; I did not believe the Bible was Thy Word, and 
that Jesus Christ was Thy Son. I was an infidel ; that 
is my answer^' ? Will you do this ? I will tell you how 
to try it. Go home to-night, and go down on your 
knees, and look up into God's face, and tell Him you 
are an infidel, and that you do not believe in Him, or 
in His Son, or in the Bible, and that you are willing 
to stand the judgment test. I went down in a meeting 
like this one night to the last row of seats at the back 
of the hall, and I said to a man there, *^^Are you a 
Christian?" "I should think not," he said; "I am an 
infidel." I said, "Do you mean to tell me you do not 
believe Jesus Christ is divine?" He said, "No, I do 
not." I said, "Just kneel down here and tell God that." 
He turned pale. And I say to you to-night who profess 
to be infidels, "Go and tell that to God alone, not when 
you are trying to brave it out in the presence of others, 
but alone; meet God alone. Get down before Him, 
and tell Him what you tell me." 

5. There is one more refuge of lies — religion. Ee- 
ligion is a refuge of lies. Religion never saved anybody. 
You say, "What do you mean?" I mean just what I 
eay — religion never saved anybody. Trust in religion 
is one thing; trust in the personal Christ is another 
thing. There is many a man who trusts in his religion 
and yet he is not saved. You go to men, and they say, 
''Yes, I am religious; I go to church every Sunday; I 
read my prayer-book, and say prayers regularly every 



KEFUGES OF LIES 127 

3ay; I read my Bible; I have been baptized; I have 
been confirmed or united to the Church; I have taken 
the Sacrament regularly, and that is what I am trusting 
in." Is it ? Then you are lost. Let us apply the tests. 
Does your religion satisfy the highest demands of your 
conscience? Does it satisfy your conscience, when it 
points out your sin, to say, "I go to church ; I read the 
Bible; I have been baptized and confirmed"? Does it 
really give your conscience peace? Is your religion 
making you a better man or woman? There is a great 
deal that is called religion that does not make men and 
women better. There is many a man who is very re- 
ligious, and goes to mass or to church every Sunday in 
the year; he goes to Confession very frequently, says 
his prayers regularly, reads his Bible, and partakes of 
the Communion ; he has been baptized, he has been con- 
firmed, and yet he is just as dishonest as any other man 
in the community. There is many a man who is very 
religious, and yet oppresses his employees in the matter 
of wages, or robs his servants in his home. Many a most 
religious man is a perfect knave. Such religion will 
not save him, but damn him with a deeper damnation. 

Thirdly, will it stand the test of the dying hour? 
There is a great deal of religion that does not. How 
many people have been very religious, and yet when 
they come to die they tremble with fear. 

Will it stand the test of the judgment day? Jesus 
Christ says it will not. In Matthew vii. 22, we read: 
^'Many shall say unto Me in that day, Lord, Lord, have 
we not prophesied in Thy name? and in Thy name 
cast out devils ? and in Thy name done many wonderful 
works?" — ^that is, they have been very religious; and 



128 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

Jesus says, "I will say unto them, I never knew you; 
depart from Me, ye that work iniquity/' Friends, if 
you have nothing to trust in but religion you are lost; 
it is a refuge of lies. 

Well, then, is there any refuge ? There is. The verse 
before my text gives it, Isaiah xxviii. 16: "Therefore 
thus saith the Lord God, Behold, I lay in Zion for a 
foundation a stone, a tried stone, a precious corner stone, 
a sure foundation." That foundation stone is Jesus 
Christ. "Other foundation can no man lay than that 
which is laid, which is Christ Jesus." As I said be- 
fore, it is one thing to trust in religion, and it is an en- 
tirely different thing to trust in Christ. Oh, friends, if 
your trust is in Christ it will stand the test, it will meet 
the highest demands of your conscience. When my 
conscience accuses me of sin, I say — 

Jesus paid my debt. 

All the debt I owe; 
Sin had left a crimson stain. 

He washed it white as snow. 

"He who had no sin was made sin for me, that I might 
be made the righteousness of God in Him. He Himself 
bore my sin in His own body on the Cross" ; and that 
Satisfies the conscience. The blood of Jesus Christ 
gives the guilty conscience peace. Trust in Jesus Christ 
makes me a better man. It has completely transformed 
my life, my outward life and my inward life. It will 
stand the test of the dying hour. Oh, how often I have 
gone to the room of the dying man who was trusting 
in Jesus, and he has looked up into my face with radiant 
confidence, without a tremor of fear, trusting in Jesus. 



EEFUGES OF LIES 139 

I remember one day I was told that one of the former 
members of my Bible class was dying, and I went to his 
house. I walked in and he sat there propped up in 
bed. He was dying very fast. I said, "Mr. Pomeroy, 
they tell me you probably cannot live through the 
night." "No/' he said; "I suppose this day is my 
last.'' I said, "Are you afraid ?" He said, with a smile 
of perfect peace, "Not at all." I said, "Mr. Pomeroy, 
are you ready to go ?" He said, "I shall be glad to de- 
part, and be with Jesus Christ." When Mr. Moody 
was facing the other world there was no fear. At six 
o'clock in the morning his son was by his bedside and 
heard him whisper, "Earth is receding; Heaven is 
opening; God is calling." Then later, "Is this death? 
This is not bad, this is bliss, this is glorious." Still 
later, some one began to cry to God to raise him from 
his bed of sickness, and he said, "No, do not ask that. 
This is my coronation day; I have long been looking 
forward to it. Don't call me back ; God is calling me." 
Oh, friends, a living faith in Jesus Christ, the crucified 
and risen Saviour, will stand the test of the dying hour. 
It will stand the test of the judgment day. If it is 
the will of God, I am ready to go and meet Him at the 
judgment bar to-night, and, when He asks me to answer, 
I have but one answer, the all-sufficient answer, "Jesus.'' 
That will satisfy God. 

Throw away your refuges of lies to-night. The hail 
will soon come and sweep them away; "the hail shall 
sweep away the refuge of lies." Throw them away to- 
night. Take the only sure and true refuge, Jesus 
Christ. 



THE WAY OF SALVATIOX MADE AS 
PLAI^ AS DAY 

''Then he called for a light, and sprang in. and came trem- 
bling, and fell down before Paul and Silas, and brought them 
out, and said. Sirs, what must I do to be saved? And they 
said. Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and thou shalt be saved, 
and thy house." — Acts xvi. 29-31. 

The Philippian goaler, by a train of circumstances, 
wliich I have read in the Scripture lesson to-night, had 
been brought to a realization of the fact that he was a 
lost sinner, and had a deep yearning for salvation, and 
he put to Paul and Silas this direct question, ''What 
must I do to be saved ?" and Paul answered him in the 
words of the text, "Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ 
and thou shalt be saved." Xothing could be plainer, 
nothing could be more direct, notliing could be more 
positive than that. The way of salvation is to believe 
on the Lord Jesus Christ, and the moment any man or 
woman or child really believes on the Lord Jesus Christ 
they are saved. If the most utterly lost man or woman 
in London should come into this hall to-night, and 
should here, or in the after-meeting, or after they have 
gone out, believe on the Lord Jesus, the moment they 
did it they would be saved. Some one may say, '^ut 
this was a word simply spoken to one man ; what right 
have you to say that any man will be saved the same 
way?" Because the same thing is said over and over 

130 



THE WAY OF SALVATION 131 

again in the Bible. For instance, you read in Acts x. 
43 : "To Him give all the prophets witness that through 
His name whosoever believeth in Him shall receive 
remission of sins." There isn^t a man or a woman in 
this building to-night that needs to go out of it without 
all their sins being forgiven and blotted out. It is just 
one act, "Believe on the Lord Jesus and thou shalt 
be saved." 

I. What It Meaxs to Believe on the 
Lord Jesus. 

What does it mean to believe on the Lord Jesus ? We 
need to be very careful in our answers to that question, 
for there are many answers to it that are inaccurate and 
untrue. There are men who say and think that they 
believe on the Lord Jesus, and yet they do not. What 
does it mean to believe on the Lord Jesus ? I have given 
a very careful and thorough study to this subject; I 
have gone all through my Bible looking up the word 
"believe," and all words related to it, and I have found 
out what I suspected to be the fact when I began, viz., 
that "believe" means in the Bible just exactly what it 
means in modern speech. What is it to believe on a man ? 
To believe on a man means to put confidence in him as 
what he claims to be. To believe on a physician means 
to put confidence in him as a physician, resulting in 
your placing your case in his hands. To believe in a 
teacher is to put your confidence in him as a teacher 
and accept what he teaches; to believe in a banker 
means to put your confidence in him as a banker and to 
put your money in his bank. And to believe on th« 



132 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

Lord Jesus means to put your confidence in Him as 
what lie claims to be. 

To put confidence in the Lord Jesus as what? As 
all that He claims to be, and all that He offers Himself 
to be. What does the Lord Jesus claim to be, and what 
does He offer Himself to be? 

1. In the first place, the Lord Jesus offers Him- 
self to every one of us as a Sin-hearer. In Matthew 
XX. 28, He says, "The Son of Man came not to be min- 
istered unto, but to minister, and to give His life a 
ransom for many." He offers Himself as a ransom for 
all. That thought runs all through the Bible, in the 
Old Testament as well as in the New. If you want to 
find it in the Old Testament, turn to Isaiah liii. 6 : '^All 
we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every 
one to his own way; and the Lord hath laid on Him 
(that is, on the Lord Jesus) the iniquity of us all." If 
you want to find it in the New Testament turn to 1 
Peter ii. 24: "Who His ovm self bare our sins in His 
own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should 
live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were 
healed.'' Christ offers Himself to every man as a Sin- 
bearer, and to believe on the Lord Jesus is to put con- 
fidence in Him as your Sin-bearer. 

2. In the second place, the Lord Jesus offers Him- 
self to us as a Deliverer from the power of sin. He 
says in John viii. 34, "Whosoever committeth sin is 
the servant of sin." And we all know that is true; 
for we have all committed sin, and become the bond- 
servants of sin, and no man is able to break away from 
sin in his own strength. He says, in John viii. 36, "If 
the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free 



THE WAY OF SALVATION 133 

indeed." The Lord Jesus offers Himself to each one 
of us as One who has power to set us free from the 
power of sin. He says that Satan is the strong man 
armed, but that Himself is stronger than Satan. To 
believe on the Lord Jesus is to put confidence in Jesus 
as One who has power to set you free from sin. 

3. In the third place, Christ offers Himself to us as 
a divinely taught and absolutely infallible Teacher. In 
John xiv. 10, He says, "Believe Me that I am in the 
Father, and the Father in Me : or else believe Me for the 
very works' sake. The words that I speak unto you 
I speak not of Myself : but the Father that dwelleth in 
Me, He doeth the works." He offers Himself to you 
as the Teacher who speaks to you the words of God, 
who speaks no words of His own; as the Teacher who 
dwells in God, and in whom God dwells, a divinely 
taught and absolutely infallible Teacher; and to be- 
lieve on Christ is to put confidence in Hi'm as such. 

4. In the fourth place, the Lord Jesus offers Him- 
self to us as our Master^ who has the right to the entire 
control of our lives. In John xv. 14, He says, "Ye are 
My friends if you do whatsoever I command you." To 
believe on the Lord Jesus is to put confidence in Jesus 
as a Master who has the right to have the entire and 
absolute control of your life. 

5. Again, the Lord Jesus Christ offers Himself to 
us as a light and guide. He says in John viii. 
12, "I am the Light of the world; he that followeth Me 
shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the Light of 
life." To believe on Jesus is to put confidence in Him 
as the Light of the world, as the One to follow wherever 
He leads. 



134 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

6. And lastly, the Lord Jesus offers himself to us 
as our Divine Lord. He says in John xiii. 13: "Ye 
call me Master and Lord : and ye say well ; for so I am." 
And we read in John xx. 28, 29, that when Thomas saw 
Jesus Christ after His resurrection, and was convinced 
at last that He really was raised from the dead, he 
threw up his hands and said to Jesus, "My Lord and my 
God !" And Jesus commended Thomas for this confes- 
sion, saying to him, "Thomas, because thou hast seen 
Me, thou has believed: blessed are they who have not 
seen, and yet have believed." Jesus offers Himself to 
us as our divine Lord. To believe on Jesus is to put 
confidence in Him as our divine Lord. 

So, to sum it all up, to believe on the Lord Jesus 
Christ is to put confidence in Him as your Sin-bearer, 
as your Deliverer from the power of sin, as your divinely 
taught and absolutely infallible Teacher, as your Mas- 
ter, who has the right to the entire control of your life, 
as your Light and Guide whom you will follow wherever 
He leads, and as your divine Lord. The moment you 
thus put your confidence, your absolute confidence in 
Jesus Christ, that moment you are saved. "Believe on 
the Lord Jesus Christ and thou shalt be saved." 

II. How Faith Manifests Itself. 

But how will we show our faith? In other words, 
if we really have believed on the Lord Jesus Christ 
and really have been saved, how will we show it ? 

1. In the first place, we will show it by an assurance 
that our sins are all forgiven. If I really put my trust 
in Jesus as my Sin-bearer, put my trust in Him as One 
who has borne all my sin, past, present, and future, tha 



THE WAY OF SALVATION 135 

moment I put confidence in Him as tliat, I know I don't 
bear them any longer, and I have assurance that every 
sin I have ever committed is forgiven. In Luke vii. we 
read of a woman who was a sinner. She was an outcast. 
But she came into a house where Jesus was reclining 
at the table, and men thought Jesus could be no prophet 
because He allowed her to touch Him. But Jesus, when 
He saw her faith, said, "Thy sins are forgiven, thy 
faith hath saved thee ; go in peace." When that woman 
went out of that place she knew that her sins were for- 
given. If you had met her on the street and had said, 
"Do you know your sins are forgiven?" she would have 
said "Yes, I know it ; I am sure of it.'' "Why are you 
sure?" "Because He told me so, and I therefore know 
it." "But do you feel it; do you feel as if your sins 
were forgiven?" Very likely she would reply, "I don't 
feel it yet; the news is so good I cannot realize it, but 
I am sure it is so ; I know it, for He said so." "Well," 
you might have said, "you must not be so sure unless 
you feel it." And she would have replied, "Oh, I am 
sure/' But you will say, "How can you be sure if you 
don't feel it?" And she would say, "Because He said 
so." 

2. Secondly, if you have believed on the Lord Jesus 
Christ, it will show itself in your looking to Him and 
trusting Him for victory over sin. If you put confidence 
in Him as the Deliverer from the power of sin, you will 
certainly look to Him, and trust Him to set you free 
from the power of sin. You will not say, "My sins are 
so great that He cannot deliver me." You will not look 
at the greatness of your sin at all. You will look at the 
greatness of 3^our Saviour. 



136 EEVIVAL ADDEESSES 

A man came to me one day in Chicago, and said, 
"Mr. Torrey, I want to speak to you alone"; so I took 
him up to Mr. Moody's office — Mr. Moody was away 
at the time. He said, "I want to tell you my story." 
So I said, "Very well; sit do^^n"; and he began to tell 
me his life-story. He said: "Away over in Scotland, 
when I was but seven years of age, I started to read 
the Bible through," (a good thing for a boy to do) 
"and I got as far as Deuteronomy. Eeading there I 
found that if a man kept the whole law for a hundred 
years, and then broke the law at any point, he was under 
a curse. Is that right?" I said, "Well, that is not an 
exact quotation, but it is about the substance of it." 
He continued, "I was only a boy of seven, but I was 
overwhelmed with the sense that I was under the 
curse of God, and that lasted for nearly a j^ear. Then 
I got to the N'ew Testament, and I read John iii. 16: 
'God so loveth the world that He gave His only begot- 
ten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not 
perish but have everlasting life.' Then I saw that the 
Lord Jesus had borne all my sin, and my burden rolled 
away." He said, "Was I converted?" I replied, "That 
sounds like an evangelical conversion." Then he said, 
"Wait a moment ; let me tell the rest of my story. After 
some years I came to Chicago, and I am now working 
down in the stockyards. You know the stockyards 
neighbourhood; it is a very hard neighbourhood. I 
have got into drinking habits, and every little while I 
fall under the power of strong drink. I try to break 
away, but I cannot. What I have come to ask you is 
this, is there any way to get victory over sin ?" I said, 
^TTou have come just to the right man ; I can tell you 



THE WAY OF SALVATION 137 

that." "I wish you would," he said. I opened my Bible 
at 1 Corinthians xv., and I read the first four verses: 
"Moreover, brethren, I declare unto you the Gospel 
which I preached unto jovl, which also ye have re- 
ceived, and, wherein ye stand; By which also ye 
are saved, it ye keep in memory what I preached 
unto you, unless ye have believed in vain. For I 
delivered unto you first of all that which I also re- 
ceived, how that Christ died for our sins according to 
the Scriptures; and that He was buried, and that He 
rose again the third day according to the Scriptures." 
"Now," I said, "you believed that Jesus Christ died 
for your sins." He said, "I did." "You found peace 
in believing." "I did." I said, "But you only believed 
half the Gospel, that Christ died for our sins according 
to the Scriptures, and was buried. Will you now believe 
the other half of the Gospel? Will you believe that 
He rose again?'' He said, "I do believe; I believe 
everything that is in the Bible." I said again, "Do you 
really believe that Jesus rose again?" and he said, "I 
do." I said, "Do you believe what Jesus Christ says 
in Matthew xxviii. 18, "All power is given unto me 
in Heaven and on earth?" "Yes." "Then He has got 
power to set you free from the power of sin. Do you 
believe it?" He said, "I do." I said, "Will you put 
your trust in Him right now, to do it?" He said, ^T 
will." "All right," I said, '^et us kneel down," and 
then I prayed, and he followed with a prayer some- 
thing like this: "Oh God, I believed that Jesus died 
for my sins on the Cross, and I found peace through be- 
lieving, and now I believe that Jesus rose again, and 
that He has all power in Heaven and on earth, and 



138: REVIVAL ADDEESSES 

He has got power to set me free to-day. Lord Jesus, 
Bct me free from the power of drink and the power of 
sin." When he had prayed, I said to him, '"Will you 
trust Him to do it?" He said, "I will/' and he did. 
In a few weeks I received a letter from that man in 
which he said, '1 am so glad I came over to see you. 
It worhsT 

Christ not only died, but He rose again, and is a 
living Saviour to-night. He has all power in Heaven 
and on earth, and the devil is no match for Him; the 
risen Christ has power to snap the fetters of strong 
drink, to snap the fetters of opium, to snap the fet- 
ters of lust, and of every sin; and if you will trust 
Him to do it for you. He will do it. To believe on the 
Lord Jesus Christ means to look to Him itud trust 
Him to give you victory over sin. 

3. In the third place, it will show itself in your 
'unquestioning acceptance of the infalVible and absolute 
truth and authority of everything Jesus says. — If I put 
confidence in Jesus as a divinely taught and absolutely 
infalHble Teacher, whatever I find in the Bible that 
Jesus says, I will believe it. I may not understand it, 
it may seem impossible, and the scholars may be against 
me, but I believe in the Lord Jesus, and what He says 
I accept absolutely in all its height, depth, length, and 
breadth. Many people to-day claim to believe in the 
Lord Jesus, but if they find Jesus teaching one thing, 
and men tell them that the consensus of the latest 
scholarship teaches something else, they accept the con- 
Bensus of the latest scholarship, and throw overboard 
the teaching of Christ. Gentlemen, I affirm that those 
men do not believe in the Lord Jesus. They believe in 



THE WAY OF SALVATION 139 

"tHe consensus of the latest scholarship/' and believing 
in the consensus of the latest scholarship never saved 
any one. It has ruined many. How can you say you 
believe in Jesus if you don't believe Him? Belief in 
the Lord Jesus means to put confidence in Him, to put 
absolute confidence in Him, as what He claims to be; 
and He claims to be a divinely taught Teacher, that 
speaks only the words of God. 

It is a critical time in which we live, and the ques- 
tion is, shall we believe German scholarship so called, 
or the Lord Jesus Christ? Well, in answer to that 
question, I say the Lord Jesus Christ has stood for 
nineteen centuries, and German scholarship never 
stands for fifteen years consecutively; and I prefer to 
believe the Lord Jesus. 

4. Our belief in Him will be shown by studying His 
Word. — If I believe in the Lord Jesus, I shall study 
His word over and over again. Suppose some man 
should come to London claiming to be a divinely taught 
and absolutely infallible teacher, and that you believed 
in him. Would you not read every word that he uttered ? 
We have a man in America who claims not only to 
be a divinely taught and absolutely infallible teacher, 
but a messenger sent direct from God. Suppose I be- 
lieved he really was a teacher sent from God, I would 
study every word he said, as hundreds do in Chicago. 
They spend more time reading his words than they do 
reading their Bibles. Just so, if I believe in Jesus as 
what He claims to be, a divinely taught and absolutely 
infallible Teacher, what I shall study above all else will 
be the words of Jesus Himself. 

5. Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ will show itself 



140 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

by a surrender of the entire life to His control. — 
If I put confidence in Jesus as what He claims to be — ' 
my Lord, having right to the absolute control of my 
life — I will put my whole life in His control. Have 
you done it ? You say you are a Christian, you believe 
in the Lord Jesus Christ. Are you proving it by put- 
ting your entire life in His control. 

6. In the next place, you will show your belief in 
the Lord Jesus Christ by ohedience to Him in daily 
life, in whatever He tells you to do. — In Luke vi. 46, 
He says, ^^Why call ye Me Lord, Lord, and do not the 
things which I say?" I believe He is saying the same 
thing to the Christians of London, the professing Chris- 
tians. You call Him "Lord, Lord," every Sabbath day 
in your lives and then you go through every day of the 
week living just as He tells you not to live, and you 
refuse to do what He plainly tells you to do. Now when 
the Lord Jesus was here on earth and healed men. He 
demanded faith as a condition precedent to healing, and 
He demanded that they should show their faith by their 
acts. He demands faith to-day as a condition precedent 
to salvation, and, having been saved, He demands that 
you show your faith by your acts, that you do what He 
tells you. That makes some of you look very uncom- 
fortable. I am glad of it; it is a good sign. Some of 
you professed Christians need to be brought under con- 
viction of sin. You have been praying that outsiders 
may be convicted of sin, but a whole lot of you need to 
be convicted of sin yourselves; and when you get con- 
victed of sin more of the outsiders will be convicted of 
sin. 

7. Faith on the Lord Jesus Christ will show itself 



THE WAY OF SALYATIOl^ 141 

again in following Him wherever He leads. — If I put 
confidence in Jesus Christ as the Light of the World, 
I will follow Him that I may "not walk in darkness, 
but have the Light of Life." "He that saith he abideth 
in Him ought himself so to walk even as lie walked.'* 
Are you following in His steps, in your business, in 
your social life, in your personal life, in your indi- 
vidual life everywhere ? 

8. Belief on the Lord Jesus Christ will show itsolf in 
confessing Him before the world, and in witnessing for 
Him to men. — We read in Romans x. 9, 10: "If thou 
shalt confess with thy mouth Jesus as Lord, and shalt 
believe in thy heart that God raised Him from the dead, 
thou shalt be saved. For with the heart man believeth 
unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is 
made unto salvation." 

I received a letter to-day from a man who said it was 
a very hard thing to expect people to stand up to con- 
fess Christ in the way I ask them to, and he went on 
to tell me an easier way to get at it. But I am not 
looking for an easier way. I abominate these easy ways. 
I believe in getting people converted. I could pass 
around cards and get them to sign their names, sa}dng 
that they hoped to go to heaven; but a month after 
I had gone the effect would be nothing, or worse than 
nothing. I do not take any stock in any faith that does 
not lead to an open confession of Christ before the world, 
and I do not take any stock in the Christianity of your 
professed Christians unless it leads you to go out into 
the world and witness for the One who saved you. "Out 
of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh." 

Now I put to you a question. Do you believe on the 



142 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

Lord Jesus Christ? You thought you did when you 
came in, but do you? I asked God in my prayer that 
He would sweep away false hopes to-night. Do you be- 
lieve on the Lord Jesus Christ ? It is one thing to say 
you believe, and another thing to believe. If you do 
not, will you believe on Him now, this moment? Will 
you put confidence in Jesus Christ this moment as your 
Sin-bearer, as a Deliverer from the power of sin, as 
a divinely taught and absolutely infallible Teacher, as 
the Lord who has the right to the absolute control of 
your life, as the Light of the World, as your Divine 
Lord? Will you do it? It takes but one instant to be- 
lieve on the Lord Jesus Christ. It can be done in a 
moment. But it will take a whole lifetime to show that 
you have believed on Him after you have done it. The 
act of faith in instantaneous, the fruits of faith are life- 
long. Will you put your trust in Him to-night? If 
you do, the results will follow, and if you never did it 
before, you can do it now. You can do it before Mr. 
Alexander sings. 

And you men and women who never professed to be- 
lieve in the Lord Jesus Christ, will you put your con- 
fidence in the Lord Jesus Christ now ? The moment you 
do it, you will be saved. I will tell any man or woman 
who is utterly unsaved, that in the next moment you 
may be saved. I will tell any man or woman who is 
utterly unsaved, who wishes to flee from underneath! 
the wrath of God and come underneath the full sun- 
light of God's favour, that you can do it in an instant. 
How ? Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ ; put confidence 
in the Lord Jesus Christ as what He claims to be. If 
the vilest outcast in London should be in this room 



THE WAY OF SALVATION 143 

now and should here and now put confidence in Jesus 
as all He claims to be, the moment he did it God would 
blot out all his sin, and set to his account all the right- 
eousness of Christ; and set him free from the power 
of sin, and transform him into a child of God. Old 
things in a moment would pass away and all things 
would become new. Oh, the miracle of regeneration! 
I have seen a man one moment a drunkard, half drunk 
at the time, get his eyes open enough to see the truth 
about the Lord Jesus and put his trust in Him, and 
the next moment I was looking into the eyes of a child 
of God. 

One night in Chicago, in the Pacific Garden Mission, 
there came in a poor fellow, a complete physical and 
moral wreck. He had been in a railroad accident and 
was a total cripple, helpless on both feet, dragging him- 
self along on crutches. For fourteen years he had 
been a victim of whisky and alcohol in all its forms, and 
of opium as well. He was an opium fiend and an alco- 
hol fiend. My friend Colonel Clark spoke to him and 
told him the Gospel of Jesus Christ, but he refused to 
believe. But on La Salle street, one of our busiest 
commercial streets, next day. Colonel Clark saw this 
same man dragging himself along on his crutches, and 
as he got to the entrance of an alley-way, Colonel Clark 
drew him into the alley-way and said to him, "My 
friend, Jesus has power to save you," and after talking 
to him a while, there and then the man got down as 
best he could on his crutches, beside the strong man of 
God, and put his trust in Jesus Christ. And when that 
man came out of that alley-way he came out a child of 
God, and he is to-day a preacher of the Gospel. Thank 



144 EEVIVAL ADDEESSES 

God for a Gospel that can save anybody. You cannot 
find me a man in all London that Jesns Christ has not 
power to save if he will only believe on Him. Put 
confidence in Him. Will you believe on the Lord Jesus 
Christ to-night? 



XI 

WHAT IT COSTS NOT TO BE A CHRISTIAN 

"I thought on my ways, and turned my feet unto Thy testi- 
monies." — Psalm cxix. 59. 

A good many years ago I was talking to a young so- 
ciety lady in the city of New Haven in America, and 
suddenly she stopped me and said, "Don't talk that way ; 
it makes me think, and I hate to think." The world 
is full of people who hate to think, and because they 
hate to think they go into things blindfolded, and come 
out with blighted hope and broken hearts and blasted 
lives. It is so in business. How many a business man 
there is in this city to-night who a few years ago had 
a business proposition made to him, and instead of sit- 
ting down, as any long-headed business man would do, 
and thinking it all over, and figuring it all out as to 
how much money he would have to put into that invest- 
ment before he realized, how many years it would be 
before there was any adequate return, and what inter- 
est on his money there would be, just because it prom- 
ised well on the surface he accepted the proposition 
without sufficient thought regarding it, he just put his 
money into that project and left it there, and that man's 
life ever since has been a wretched drag for a bare 
existence. Simply because he hated to think! It is 
the same way in social life. How many a young woman 
has met at some social gathering a handsome, attractive 

145 



146 EEVIYAL ADDRESSES 

young man, a young fellow of pleasant manners, who 
knows how to do a thousand and one little acts that 
mean so little and yet so easily gain the hearts of women, 
a young fellow who is a fine waltzer, and popular and 
attractive in all his ways; and one night that young 
man makes a proposal of marriage to her, and instead 
of sitting down, as any sensible girl would do, and ask- 
ing herself whether that man has the mental and moral 
qualities that fit him to be a companion for life, just 
because he is handsome, because he is attractive and 
popular, because he is a beautiful waltzer, that young 
woman accepts his proposal of marriage and marries 
him ; and after a few months she wakes up one day to find 
that she has married a fool, or, what is worse, a rascal. 
And all that woman's future life is wretched beyond 
description, just because she hated to think. But there 
is no place where that mistake is made so often and 
where it is so fatal as in the matter of being, or not 
being a Christian. Men and women go into a Christ- 
less life, or, being in a Christless life, drift on in it, 
without even once sitting down to give the question 
thirty minutes' honest consideration. What it Costs to 
Live and Die without Jesus Christ. Now I am going 
to ask you to do some thinking to-night, some hard, 
6erious, honest thinking. What I am going to ask you 
to think about is this: what it costs not to be a Chris- 
tian, what it costs to live and die without Jesus Christ. 
And if when I get through you think you are willing to 
pay the price of a Cliristless life, I have nothing more 
to say. But if, when you have thought it all out, you 
come to the conclusion that it costs too much to live and 
die without Christ, I am going to ask you to do the only 



WHAT IT COSTS 147 

intelligent thing there is to do in the circumstances, 
that is, to stand up here to-night and declare your pur- 
pose to accept Jesus Christ right now. 

What does it cost not to be a Christian? First of 
all, what is it to be a Christian? By a Christian, I 
understand, any man, woman, or child, that comes to 
God as a lost sinner, takes Jesus Christ as their per- 
sonal Saviour, surrenders to Him as their Lord and 
Master, confesses Him as such publicly before the world, 
and strives to live to please Him in everything day by 
day. Let me repeat that definition. A Christian is any 
man, woman or child that comes to God as a lost sin- 
ner, takes Jesus Christ as their personal Saviour, sur- 
renders to Him as their Lord and Master, confesses 
Him as such publicly before the world, and strives to 
live to please him in everything day by day. 

What does it cost not to do it? 

1. In the first place, not to he a Christian costs the 
sacrifice of peace. — A Christian has peace: "Being 
justified by faith, ive have peace with God through the 
Lord Jesus Christ." — Komans, v. 1. And having peace 
with God we have peace in our hearts, but no man out 
of Christ has peace. "There is no peace for the wicked, 
saith my God." One night in Chicago, after a meeting 
like this, when the congregation had gone out, I went 
and sat down in a seat by the side of a gentleman about 
thirty-five years of age, and I said, "My friend, why 
are you not a Christian?" "Oh," he said, with a shrug 
of his shoulders, "I am very well satisfied as I am." 
I said, "You haven't peace." He said, "How do you 
know that ?" I said, "Because God says so ; 'There i3 
mo peace for the wicked, saith my God'" The man 



148 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

dropped his head, and said, '^You are right, sir, I 
haven't peace." And there is not a man or woman 
in this audience to-night out of Christ that has peace. 
Money won't give you peace; the pleasures of this life 
won't give you peace ; no number of good earthly friends 
will give you peace ; not to be a Christian costs the sac- 
rifice of peace. 

2. In the second place, not to he a Christian costs 
the sacrifice of the highest, deepest, purest, holiest, most 
overflowing joy that can he Icnown right here on earth. 
— As we read in the Scripture lesson to-night, in 1 
Peter i. 8 : '^Though now ye see Him not, yet believing 
in Him ye rejoice with joy unspeakable and full of 
glory." That was Peter's testimony. That is the ex- 
perience of every true Christian. A real living faith 
in Jesus Christ gives a man joy unspeakable and full 
of glory. Nobody out of Christ has joy unspeakable 
and full of glory. "Oh," but you say, "I know many a 
Christian that has not joy unspeakable and full of glory." 
A real Christian? You know there are two kinds — pro- 
fessing Christians and real Christians. Now I will admit 
that there are a great many people in the world that 
call themselves Christians, who have just enough re- 
ligion to make themselves miserable. They are holding 
to the world with one hand, generally the right hand, 
and to Jesus Christ with the other. Of course they 
have not joy unspeakable and full of glory. But show 
me a Christian who has dropped the world with both 
hands, and laid hold of Jesus Christ with both hands, 
and I will show you a man or woman that has joy un- 
speakable and full of glor}^, every time. But nobody out 
of Christ has joy unspeakable and full of glory. How 



WHAT IT COSTS 149 

Satan deceived me along that line for many years when 
I was a mere lad ! I went one day up to the third story 
of our home, where we had a great store-room where 
we put away the old hooks out of the library, and as a 
boy I loved to go and sit on the floor of that room, 
and get the books around me and look through them, 
and one day I came across the covenant of the church 
of my mother, and commenced to read it, and I said 
to myself, "I wonder if I cannot be a Christian?" I 
can say "Yes" to that, and can say "Yes" to that, and 
that, and after a time I came to a place where it said 
something to this effect, "If I became a Christian I was 
to be willing to do anything God said, and go anywhere 
He said." I shut up the book and said, "No, just as 
likely as not 1^11 have to be a preacher if I say 'Yes' 
to that, and then life won't be worth living." And I 
threw that book away and deliberately refused to take 
Jesus Christ, and deliberately refused to think about it 
any more. Then I said to myself, "I am going in for 
all the pleasure I can get"; and I had a good oppor- 
tunity to get it. My father was well off in this world's 
goods; and as a boy of fifteen I was sent off to the 
university and matriculated for a degree, and my father 
sent me up all the money I wanted. Now, if you put a 
boy into a university, who learns easily and has no trou- 
ble to keep up with his class, a boy with a rich father, 
who does not ask him how he spends his money — I have 
often thought it would have been a good thing for me 
if he had — if anybody can have a good time, he can, 
and I went in for a good time. Did I find it? You 
know whether I did or not. I did not. And I went 
deeper, deeper, deeper, deeper into dissipation and sin 



150 KEVIVAL ADDEESSES 

to find joy to satisfy my nnsatisfied heart. I did not 
find it, and one awful night, a mere boy still, with all 
hope gone, with life desolate and bare, life so barren 
that there was just one step between me and hell, in 
fact, that very night I started to take that awful step, 
to take my life by my own hand. I sprang out of bed 
and drew open a drawer to take out the instrument that 
would end my life. For some reason or other I could 
not find it. God did not let me find it, and I dropped 
upon my knees, and said, "0 God, if you will take this 
awful burden from my heart, I will preach the Gospel ;" 
and God not only removed the burden, I found a joy I 
had never dreamed of in this world, and all the years 
since it has gone on increasing, with the exception of a 
short time when I fell under the blighting power of 
scepticism and agnosticism; all the rest of the time all 
these years the joy has grown brighter, brighter, brighter 
every year. Young men and women, if you want the 
deepest, sweetest, purest, most overflowing joy there 
is to be known on earth, come to Jesus Christ. 

3. In the third place, not to be a Christian costs 
the sacrifice of hope. A Christian has hope. — As we 
read in Titus i. 2, "In hope of eternal life, which God, 
that cannot lie, promised." Oh, how magnificent that 
hope is, hope of eternal life! How sure it is, resting 
on the Word of God, who cannot lie. The world has 
no hope like that. The world holds out no hope that 
has any foundation. Hope for the future is more im- 
portant than present possession. "Oh," some one says, 
'*! do not believe that ; give me the present and I will 
let the future take care of itself." Yes, you do believe 
it. There is not a man or womiin here to-night that 



WHAT IT COSTS 151 

does not believe that hope for the future is more im- 
portant than present possession. A man says, ^^I do 
not believe it." Yes, you do ; I will prove it to you in 
five minutes. Suppose you had your choice to-night 
between being a millionaire and having all that money 
can buy for to-night, with no hope for to-morrow, but 
with the rising of to-morrow's sun and the open- 
ing of to-morrow's banks to be proved to be an embez- 
zler, and all your money swept away, and you cast into 
prison to spend the rest of your life there; or to be 
absolutely penniless to-night, but with the absolute 
certainty that with the rising of to-morrow's sun and 
the opening of to-morrow's banks you were to be a mil- 
lionaire all the rest of your life, which would you 
choose? *^0h!" you say, "that's very easy; I would 
choose to be penniless to-night, with the certainty that 
to-morrow and all the rest of my life I was to be a mil- 
lionaire." So would 1, but that only shows that you 
believe that hope for the future is more important than 
present possession; and I would rather be the poorest 
child of God in the world to-night, with the absolute cer- 
tainty that with the dawning of eternity I was to be for 
all eternity an heir of God and joint-heir with Jesus 
Christ, than to be the richest man on earth to-night 
out of Christ, with no outlook for all eternity but to be 
cast into God's eternal prison-house of hell. A man 
out of Christ has no hope, even from the life that now 
is, that is at all sure. You say, "That is too strong; 
a man out of Christ may have no hope for the future, 
but if he is rich he has for the present life." You are 
mistaken. Come with me to ISTew York City. We walk 
up Fifth Avenue; we stop before one of the most ele- 



153 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

gant mansions there ; we go up the steps and are ushered 
through the hall down to the library at the end of the 
hall. You and I stand there on the threshold and look 
into the library. In it there are two men deep in earn- 
est conversation. This is not an imaginary case, but an 
actual one. One of these men is worth one hundred 
and ninety-six millions of dollars, by an actual inven- 
tory of his property taken a few days after the time of 
which I am speaking. The other man is one of Amer- 
ica's greatest financiers. You and I stand there and 
look in, and you say, "Well, I would like to be in that 
man's shoes. One hundred and ninety-six million dol- 
lars ! I do not know anything about his religious con- 
victions, I do not know anything about his eternal 
prospects, but he is well fixed for many years to come 
so far as this life is concerned." You are mistaken. 
While you and I are looking in, that man falls out of hia 
chair on his face on the floor, and when Quincey Gar- 
rett picks Wm. H. Vanderbilt from the floor he is a 
corpse. For all his one hundred and ninety-six millions 
he had no hope for five minutes. Friends, we all of us 
here to-night are like men standing on the seashore 
looking out over the boundless ocean of eternity, and as 
we look out, there comes towards some of us — those 
of us who have a living faith in Jesus Christ — gallant 
vessels laden with gold and silver and precious stones, 
with every sail set, wafted swiftly towards us by the 
breezes of the divine favour. But toward the rest of us 
— ^those out of Christ — as we look out over the bound- 
less ocean of eternity, there come no vessels, but dis- 
mantled wrecks, with no cargoes but the livid corpses 
of lost opportunities, over which are hovering the vul- 



WHAT IT COSTS 153 

tures of eternal despair, driven madly towards us by the 
fast-rising blasts of the indignation of a holy and an 
outraged God. That is what it costs not to be a Chris- 
tian. 

4. In the next place, not to he a Christian costs the 
sacrifice of the highest manhood and the highest tvoman- 
hood. — Have you ever thought of it, that we have all 
fallen away from God's ideal of manhood and woman- 
hood through sin ? Paul puts it in his tremendous way, 
"We have all sinned and come short of the glory of 
God/\ all fallen short of God's ideal of manhood; and 
the only way back to it is by the acceptance of those 
regenerating and transforming powers that there are in 
Jesus Christ; or, to put it into ordinary language, by 
regeneration through Christ. And the best that any 
man or woman can attain to out of Christ is to be a 
mere caricature of manhood or womanhood as God cre- 
ated men and women to be. Is there a man in this au- 
dience to-night so lost to all that is noble, to all that is 
good, to all that is truly manly, that he is willing to be 
a mere caricature of manhood as God created man to 
be? Is there a woman here to-night so lost to all that 
is true, to all that is womanly, that she is willing to be 
a mere caricature of womanhood as God created woman 
to be ? That is what it costs not to be a Christian ; and, 
men and women, if there were no other argument but 
that, I would come to Christ to-night. 

5. In the next place, not to he a Christian costs the 
sacrifice of God's favour. — We have all sacrificed God's 
favour through sin. The only way back to God's fa- 
vour is by the acceptance of the Sin-bearer whom God 
has provided. How plain the Bible makes that. Turn 



154 EEVIVAL ADDKESSES 

to John iii. 36: "He that believeth on the Son hath 
everlasting life : and he that believeth not the Son shall 
not see life; hut the wrath of God abideth on him." 
^'Oh/' but some man says, "I do not know that I care 
about that. The favour of God? God is not real to 
me. He is so far away. If I have the favour of my 
neighbour, the favour of my employers, the favour of 
my friends in the club, the favour of my constituents 
in politics, I do not know that I care whether I have 
the favour of this far-away being that you call God 
or not." Wait a moment ; when you go out of this place 
to-night, look up at the stars over your head, and say 
to yourself, "The great God that made those stars, the 
great God that made those wonderful worlds of light, 
about which the astronomers are telling such wonder- 
ful things in these days, the God that holds them in 
the hollow of His hand as they go whirling through space 
with such incredible momentum, that God loves me, but 
He is displeased with me." When you get home to-night 
and lie down to sleep, and cannot — for I trust, in the 
kind mercy of God, some of you will not sleep when you 
get home to-night through thinking of what you have 
heard here — when you get home and cannot sleep, and 
all the rest of the house is asleep, and you lie there 
alone, alone with God, looking up into the face of God, 
and God looking down not into your face only but also 
into your heart, say to yourself, "The great God into 
whose face I am now looking up, and who is looking 
down not into my face only but also into my heart, 
that God loves me, but He is displeased with me." 
Men and women, if I had to face that thought to- 
night, if there were any way to find peace with God — 



WHAT IT COSTS 155 

and thank God there is! — I would not rest till I had 
found it. 

6. In the next place, not to le a Christian costs the 
sacrifice of Christ's achnoioledgment in the world to 
come. — How plain the Word of God is about that. Turn 
to Jesus' own words in Matthew x. 32, 33 : "Whosoever 
therefore shall confess Me before men, him will I con- 
fess also before My Father which is in Heaven ; but who- 
soever shall deny Me before men, him will I also deny 
before My Father which is in Heaven." You will often 
hear men say this : "If a man believes in Christ in the 
secrecy of his heart, even if he never confesses Him or 
says anything about it, God yet knows what is in his 
heart, and will accept him on the ground of the faith 
which he never confesses." I challenge any man to show 
me one line in this book that countenances such a state- 
ment. That Word says as plainly as day, in Romans 
X. 10, "For with the heart man believeth unto right- 
eousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto 
salvation/' That Word says as plainly as day, and the 
Master Himself said it, in Mark viii. 38, "Whosoever 
therefore shall be ashamed of Me and of My words in 
this adulterous and sinful generation, of him also shall 
the Son of Man be ashamed when He cometh in the 
glory of His Father with the holy angels." That word 
says as plainly as day, "Whosoever shall confess Me be- 
fore men, him will I also confess before My Father 
which is in Heaven, but whosoever denieth Me before 
men, him will I also deny before My Father which is in 
Heaven." You say, "Does not faith save?" Yes, and 
faith confesses ; and the faith that does not lead to con- 
fession is no faith, and the faith that does not lead to 



156 REVIVAL ADDEESSES 

confession will not lead to salvation. I can imagine 
that great day, when the Lord Jesus summons all His 
own before the bar of God. There we stand in bright 
and glorious array, the Lord Jesus Christ at our head, 
and He turns to His Father and says, '^Tather, all these 
are Mine; they confessed Me upon earth before men, 
and I now confess them before Thee My Father in 
Heaven.^' But look, away over on the outskirts of that 
crowd is a man who hung upon the outskirts of the 
Church of Christ on earth. His sympathies were with 
the Church, his associations were with the Church, but 
he was a coward, and had not the courage of his con- 
victions. He was afraid of his business partner, of his 
associates in politics or in society, and he never came 
out and confessed Christ openly before men. But he 
thinks that because he hung upon the outskirts of the 
Church of Christ on earth, that he can hang upon the 
outskirts up there. The Lord Jesus Christ now turns 
to him — I do not believe it will be so much in anger as 
in unutterable pity — and with a sad wave of His hand 
He says, "Depart, depart ; you did not confess Me upon 
earth before men; I cannot confess thee before My 
Father which is in Heaven." Men and women, that 
is what it costs not to be a Christian. Not to be an 
open, confessed, out-and-out follower of Jesus Christ. 

7. Once more, not to he a Christian costs the sacri- 
fice of eternal life, and means to perish for ever. — • 
How plain the Word of God is about that. Take the 
words of Jesus Christ Himself in John iii. 14, 15, ^^And 
as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even 
so must the Son of Man be lifted up: that whosoever 
believeth in Him should not perish, but have eternal 



WHAT IT COSTS 167 

life." How plain it is. Believe — have everlasting life; 
not believe — perish. John iii. 16 : "For God so loved 
the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that 
whosoever believeth in Him should not perish, but have 
everlasting life." How plain it is; believe — ^have 
everlasting life ; not believe — perish. Once more, John 
iii. 36 : "He that believeth on the Son hath everlasting 
life: and he that believeth not the Son shall not see 
life; but the wrath of God abideth on him." How plain 
it is ; believe — have everlasting life ; not believe — "shall 
not see life; but the wrath of God abideth on him." 

Do you ask me what eternal life means? I cannot 
tell you. I can tell you what its beginnings are, for, 
thank God, I have them in my own heart to-night. But 
what eternal life means in all its fulness, in its eternal 
outworkings, no human language can describe, and no 
human fancy can conceive. I will tell you what to do. 
Take that moment of your life whose joy was purest, 
deepest, highest, holiest, divinest, multiply it by infinity, 
and carry it out to all eternity, and you will have some 
faint conception of what eternal life means. Do you 
ask me what it means to perish? I cannot tell you. 
You and I sometimes see the beginnings of it in the man 
or woman who has gone down through sin, in the de- 
pravity of their lives, in the corruption of their charac- 
ters, in their wretchedness and despair. But what it 
means to perish in all the eternal outworkings of a de^ 
praved character, what it means to perish in that end- 
less vista that lies ahead of us, no human language can 
describe, no human fancy can conceive. But I will tell 
you what to do. Take that moment in your ovm. life 
whose degradation was deepest, whose corruption was 
completest^ whose despair was the most blank and the 



158 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

most utter, and whose agony was tlie most appalling, 
multiply it by infinity, and carry it out to all eternity, 
and you have some faint conception of what it meana 
to perish. And that is what it costs not to be a Chris- 
tian. 

Men and women, I put to you then this question: 
Are you willing to pay the price of a Christless life? 
If you are, I have nothing more to say. If not, I ask 
you to stand right up and profess your acceptance of 
Christ like men and women. Now I will admit that you 
may gain something by not becoming Christians. I will 
admit that it will cost you something to become real 
Christians. It will in all probability cost you the loss 
of friends that you hold very dear. I never knew a 
man to step out of the world without losing friends. 
It will cost you the loss of money, for real Christianity 
touches a man's pocketbook. I am willing to admit 
that. You cannot do some things in business if you 
become a Christian that add to your income and which 
you do to-day. I will admit that. I want you to know 
this. I do not want you to come out under false pre- 
tenses. It will cost you very likely the loss of pleasures 
of which you are very fond, and not for one day only, 
but for weeks and months and years to come. When 
I gave my heart to Christ I had to give up everything 
I was most addicted to in the days gone by, the things 
without which, it seemed to me, life would not be worth 
living. I want you to know this to-night. We want 
real conversion here. But I also want to ask you a ques- 
tion: Are you willing, for the sake of a few godless 
companions that you are better off without, are you will- 
ing, for the sake of a few hundred or a few thousand 



WHAT IT COSTS 159 

or a hundred thousand, if need be, of pounds sterling, 
are you willing, for the sake of foolish, godless pleas- 
ures that are unworthy of a thinking being anyhow, and 
unworthy of your brain and your feet and hands, that 
men and women ought to be ashamed of even if they 
are not Christians, like the dance, the card table, the 
theatre, that intelligent people ought to be ashamed 
of even if they are not Christians, are you willing, for 
the sake of such things as these, to sacrifice peace and 
joy and hope and manhood and womanhood and God's 
favour and Christ's acknowledgment and eternal life, 
and perish for ever ? Are you willing to make so great 
a sacrifice for so paltry gain? One night in New York 
,City, at the close of a sermon by Dr. MacArthur, a 
gentleman came to him and said, "Dr. MacArthur, I 
want to ask 3^ou a question; if I become a Christian 
must I give up my money ?" Dr. MacArthur was a wise 
man, and answered, "If you become a Christian, and 
Jesus Christ asks you for your money, you must be will- 
ing to give it up, every penny of it." The man said, 
"Dr. MacArthur, I will take a week to think about that." 
D*r. MacArthur knew it was no good pressing the 
man just then, and he said, '^ery well.'^ The man 
came back after a week, and said, "Dr. MacArthur, I 
have settled it; I will hold on to my money till death, 
and if Christ and Heaven must go, they must go." 
That was an awful decision, but it was an intelligent 
one. Are you ready to say that to-night ? "I will hold 
on-to my money till death; I will hold on to godless 
companions till death; I will hold on to my godless 
pleasures till death; and if Christ and Heaven must 
go, and peace and joy and hope and manhood and 



160 EEVIVAL ADDEESSES 

go, and peace and joy and hope and manhood and 
womanhood and God's favour and Christ's acknowledg- 
ment and eternal life must go, and eternal ruin come, 
let them go and let it come." Are you ready to say 
that, men and women? That is what you do say, prac- 
tically, if you go out of this place to-night without 
Jesus Christ. 



XII 



THE MOST IMPORTANT QUESTION THAT ANY. 
MAN EVER ASKED OR ANSWERED 

"What shall I do then with Jesus which is called Christ?"— 
Matthew xxvii. 22. 

You will remember that it was the Roman governor 
Pilate who asked this question, and he answered it 
wrongly, and brought eternal ruin and infamy down 
upon his own head. I trust that many in this great 
audience will answer it right to-night, and bring to 
themselves eternal life, eternal joy, and eternal glory. 
That question is the most important question that any 
man ever asked or answered, for if you do the right 
thing with Jesus Christ you will get everything that 
is worth having for time and for eternity; and if you 
do the wrong thing with Jesus Christ you will lose 
everything that is worth having for time and for 
eternity. 

I. Some Things that Depend on What 
WE DO WITH Jesus Christ 

I want to call your attention first of all to some 
of the things that depend on what we do with Jesus 
Christ. 

1. In the first place, our acceptance he fore God de- 
pends upon what we do with Jesus Christ. — If you 

161 



163 KEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

accept Jesus Christ God will accept you ; if you reject 
Jesus Christ God will reject you. We read in John iii. 
18 and 19 : "He that believeth is not condemned, but 
he that believeth not is condemned already, because 
he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten 
Son of God; and this is the condemnation, that light 
is come into the world, and men loved darkness rather 
than light because their deeds were evil/' Our accept- 
ance before God does not depend on the good works we 
perform. In order to be accepted before God on the 
ground of our good works, our good works must be 
perfect; and no man's works are perfect. For it is 
written in the Law of God, "Cursed is every one that 
continueth not in all things which are written in the 
book of the Law, to do them"; and no one has kept 
the whole law, and therefore no man can be accepted 
on the ground of his works. Again, our acceptance 
before God does not depend on the character we have 
built up. In order to be accepted before God on the 
ground of character, our character must be absolutely 
holy, for God is an infinitely holy God; and there is 
no one who has not sinned. 

Our acceptance before God depends upon our accept- 
ance of Him who lived a perfectly holy life Himself, 
and then died as the substitute for those who have 
led unholy lives. If the vilest man or woman in Lon- 
don should come into this gathering to-night and should 
here and now accept Jesus as their Sin-bearer and 
Saviour, the moment they did it God would blot out 
every sin they ever committed, and their record would 
be as white in God's sight as that of the purest saint 
in Heaven. 



A MOST I^^IPORTANT QUESTION 163 

I remember preaching one morning in my own 
church in Chicago on Romans viii. 1, "There is there- 
fore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ 
Jesus"; and I was led to make this remark: "If the 
wickedest woman in Chicago should come into Chicago 
Avenue Church this morning, and should here and now 
put her trust in Jesus Christ as her personal Saviour, 
the moment she did it God would blot out all her sins, 
and her record would be as white in God's sight as 
that of the purest woman in this building." Now quite 
unknown to me a true Christian woman, a member of 
my congregation, had gone out that morning, and had 
gone into one of the lowest dens of infamy in the city, 
and there she had asked a woman living in sin to 
come and hear me preach. But the woman answered: 
"No, I never go to church; church is no place for a 
person like me." But the good woman replied : "Our 
church is; the vilest sinner is welcomed at our church." 
"Ko, no," this outcast woman said, "I could never go." 
"But I will go with you." "No, that will never do,'' 
said the woman; "the people on the street know me; 
the policemen know me; the very boys on the street 
know me, and sometimes they throw stones at me when 
I go down the street; and if they saw you walking with 
me they would take you to be like me." But the lady 
replied, "I don't care what they think about me; you 
come along with me, and I will go with you to the 
House of God." But the woman still refused, and said, 
"I cannot do that; but," she added, "you go a little 
way ahead, and I will follow you up the street." So 
the lady consented, and this woman who was a sinner 
followed her. They came to the comer where my 



1^ KEVIVAL ADDRESSES. 

cliurch stands, and mounted up the steps at the en- 
trance into the vestibule, and when they got inside the 
church this poor woman who was a sinner dropped 
down into the very last seat, at the back of the church. 
I was preaching when she entered, and just as she got 
to that seat I uttered the words, "If the wickedest 
woman in Chicago should come into the Chicago Avenue 
Church this morning, and should here and now put 
her trust in Jesus Christ as her personal Saviour, the 
moment she did it God would blot out all her sins, and 
her record would be as white in God's sight as that of 
the purest woman in this building." My words went 
floating down over the heads of that audience and 
dropped down into the heart of that woman. She be- 
lieved it, and accepted Christ, and God met her and 
blotted out all her sins, and washed her record white 
right then and there. And after that service the 
woman came down the aisle of the church to me, the 
tears streaming down her face, and told me how God 
had blessed her that morning. 

2. In the second place, our finding peace of consciencQ 
depends entirely on ivliat we do with Jesus Christ. — In 
Eomans, v. 1, we read, "Therefore, being justified by 
faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus 
Christ." 

We can never get peace of conscience by good works ; 
we can never get peace of conscience by prayers and 
penances. How many have tried to get peace that way 
and have failed! Martin Luther, after his wild uni- 
versity life, roused to the sense of the fact that he was 
a sinner, tried to find peace by good works, by long 
nights of prayer, by penances^ but failed ! At last he 



A MOST IlVrPORTAlSrT QUESTIOK" 165 

went to Eome, and started to climb np the steps at St. 
Peter's on his knees, hoping to find peace that way, but 
failed. At last, the words of God came ringing in his 
ears, "The just shall live by faith," and Martin Luther 
put his faith in the finished work of Christ, and 
found peace instantly. I have a friend over in Amer- 
ica, and in the days before I made his acquaintance 
he was a very vicious man. He was a professional 
gambler, one of the most desperate gamblers on the 
Mississippi River in the old days of the Mississippi 
gamblers. One night he was at the gaming table, and 
a man across the table accused him of dishonesty at 
cards, and Stephen Holcombe, who is now my friend, 
drew his revolver and shot at his accuser. The bullet 
went into the man's neck, and when he saw what he 
had done Stephen Holcombe sprang to the man's side, 
lifted his head on to his knee, and tried to staunch 
the flow of blood in the gaping wound; but the man 
bled to death then and there. Stephen Holcombe was 
arrested for murder; he was tried, and was acquitted 
on the ground that he had shot the man in self-defense. 
But, though acquitted by a human court, he was not ac- 
quitted before the bar of God, nor before the bar of 
his own conscience. He tried every way to find peace. 
He gave up gambling, and he gave up all his evil 
ways to find peace, but he did not find it. He even 
united himself to a church, and went to the Communion 
table, but he did not find peace. Two years after that 
awful night he was in his room alone in misery, his 
face buried in his hands, and the memory of that day 
was haunting him, and as he knelt there he cried : "O 
God^ can anything blot out the awful memory of what 



166 EEVIVAL ADDEESSES 

I have done and give me peace?" And tHe strains of 
the old familiar hymn came singing through his heart — 

What shall wash away my sin? 

Nothing but the blood of Jesus; 
What shall make me whole again? 

Nothing but the blood of Jesus. 

'And then and there Stephen Holcombe saw Christ on 
the Cross for his sin. He saw all his sins, the murder 
and all, laid on Christ. Then and there Stephen Hol- 
combe found peace, and from that day he has gone up 
and down our country preaching Christ and the atoning 
blood that gave him peace. 

Is there some man or woman here to-night haunted 
with the memory of the evil you have done? Men and 
women, there is a way to find peace, only one way — ^by 
simple faith in a Christ that was crucified on the Gross 
of Calvary for your sin. 

3. In the third place, finding deep and abiding joy 
'depends on what we do with Jesus Christ. — As the 
Apostle Peter says in 1 Peter i. 8, "Though now ye see 
Him not, yet, believing, ye rejoice with joy unspeakable 
and full of glory." A man can never get joy through 
the accumulation of wealth. Many have tried it, but 
no one has ever succeeded. A man cannot get joy 
through seeking the world's honours; many have tried 
it, but no one has ever succeeded. A man cannot get 
joy through indulging in the world's pleasures; mil- 
lions have tried it, but no one has ever succeeded. But, 
friends, the wretchedest heart in this world can find joy 
to-night through believing in Christ crucified and 
risen. 



A MOST IMPORTANT QUESTION 167i 

Some years ago I remember a noblewoman of your 
country was studying at our Bible Institute in Chi- 
cago, and on the day she left the Institute she told us 
these two incidents that happened over here in Eng- 
land. She said, "I had a letter from a dear friend of 
mine, a lady, and she asked me to come at once to see 
her. I hurried to her home, and, as I went up the 
elegant marble stairway and saw the costly paintings 
on the walls and the magnificent statues that lined 
the hall, I said to myself, ^I wonder if all this wealth 
and splendour makes my friend happy.' I did not have 
to wait long to find out, for presently the lady came 
hurrying into the room, and, after greeting me, dropped 
into a seat and burst into tears. All the wealth, honour 
and dignity of her position had not given her joy. 
After this I went to visit a poor blind woman in an 
humble cottage. It was a dark rainy day, and the 
rain was dripping through the badly thatched roof, 
gathering in a pool before the chair where the woman 
sat. When I saw the poverty of that blind woman I 
was driven to turn to her and say, ^Maggie, are you 
not miserable?' ^What, lady?' and she turned her 
sightless eyes to me in surprise. ^What, lady? I 
miserable; I, the child of a King, and hurrying on 
to the mansion He has gone to prepare for me? I 
miserable ? No, no, lady, I am happy !' " Wealth had 
not brought joy to the one, but a living faith in Jesus 
Christ had brought joy to the other in the midst of her 
poverty and misfortune. 

4. In the fourth place, our obtaining eternal life 
'depends entirely on what we do with -Testis Christ. — 
We read in 1 John v. 11, 12, ^^God hath given to us 



168 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

eternal life, and this life is in His Son. He that 
hath the Son hath life ; and he that hath not the Son 
of God hath not life." What strange; ideas even 
Christian people have about how to obtain eternal life. 
If I could come to some of you to-night and say, "How 
do you think people get eternal life?" some of you 
would answer something like this, "If a man leads a 
very good life, and fights against sin, and overcomes 
it, and is faithful in his service to God, at the end of a 
life of struggling and victory and service perhaps 
God will give him eternal life." Thank God, that is 
not the doctrine of that Book. The doctrine of that 
Book is, that when God sent His Son Jesus Christ 
down to this world. He sent eternal life in Him, and 
the moment you take Christ you have the eternal life 
that is in Him; and if the worst outcast in London 
should here and now take Christ, the moment he did 
it he would have eternal life. 

II. What we Must do with Jesus Christ. 
^ow, I want to call jout attention to a second line 
of thought, and that is, What we must do with Jesus 
Christ; and let me say at the outset that every one of 
us will have to do something with Jesus Christ to- 
night. You don't want to. Many a man here to- 
night does not want to do anything with Jesus Christ. 
You do not want to accept Him or reject Him. You 
do not want to confess Him or deny Him. You 
just want to get Him off your hands. You can't do 
it! Pontius Pilate, who asked the question of our 
text, tried to get Christ off his hands ; first he turned 
to the Jews and said, "Judge Him according to your 
laV; but they said, '^e cannot do it; by our law 



A MOST IMPOETANT QUESTION 169 

He ought to die, but we have not the power to put 
Him to death.'^ Pilate then sent Him to Herod, and 
said, "You take Him and judge Him," and then Pilate 
said to himself, "I have got rid of Him now; I have 
put the responsibility on Herod/' But look, what is 
that coming down the street? They are the returning 
soldiers of Herod, and Herod has sent Christ back to 
Pilate; so Pilate has Him on his hands again. Then 
Pilate says, "What shall I do? I do hot want to 
crucify this Man, because I know he is innocent, and 
I do not want to release Him, because it will make 
the Jews angry. I know what I will do," and he 
went to face that great Jewish mob, and said to them, 
"This is the time of Passover, and you know we have 
a custom at this time of the year that there should be 
released to you one of the criminals in custody, who- 
soever you may choose. Now I am disposed to be 
gracious to-day, and I will let you have whom you 
like; which will you have, Jesus or" — (and he put up 
against Jesus the meanest criminal he had, a murderer 
and a robber, and he said to himself, they will never 
choose him, in the world) "will you have Jesus or 
Barabbas?" But the men of Jerusalem were like you 
men of London, and they cried, "We will have Barab- 
bas"; and Pilate had Jesus on his hands again. He 
could not get Him off his hands — neither can you. 
Every man and every woman in this building will do 
something with Jesus Christ to-night. Now let me 
tell you what you must do. 

1. You must either accept Him or reject Him. 
Jesus Christ is here, and now offers Himself to every 
man and every woman in this building as your Saviour 



170 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

and Lord and Master, and unless you definitely accept 
Him as such you definitely reject Him. Every man 
and woman will go out of this building to-night either 
having definitely accepted Christ or definitely rejected 
Him. 

I said to a gentleman going out of a meeting like 

this one night, "Mr. , are you going to accept 

Christ to-night?" He replied, "I am not going to 
accept Him to-night, but I want you to understand 
that I do not reject Him." I said, "I understand 
nothing of the kind; Jesus Christ offers Himself to 
you, and if you do not accept Him, your refusal to 
accept Him is to reject Him," and every man and 
woman in Mildmay Hall will go out of the building 
to-night either having accepted Jesus Christ or having 
rejected Jesus Christ. 

2. Secondly, we must either confess Him or deny 
Him. He Himself said so in Matthew x. 32, 33: 
"Whosoever therefore shall confess Me before men, 
him will I confess also before My Father which is in 
Heaven; but whosoever shall deny Me before men, 
him will I also deny before My Father which is in 
Heaven." You will do one or the other. There are 
just two parties in the world to-day, the confessed 
followers of Christ and the deniers of Christ, and you 
belong to one or the other. Which do you belong to? 
Are 3^ou a confessor of the Son of God, or are you a 
denier of the Son of God ? 

3. In the third place, you mfust either let Him into 
your heart or shut Him out. The Lord Jesus Christ 
eays in Revelation iii. 20: ^'Behold I stand at the 
floor and knock; if any man hear My voice and open 



A MOST IMPORTANT QUESTION 171 

the door, I will come in to him and will sup with 
him, and he with Me." The Lord Jesus is in Mildmay 
Hall to-night, knocking, knocking! Who is it knock- 
ing? The Son of God — knocking at your heart and 
mine. Will you throw your heart wide open and say, 
"Come in. Lord Jesus?" or will you shut your heart 
and har it and say, "Stay out. Lord Jesus"? Every 
one of us will say one or the other to-night. 

4. In the next place, we must either he for Christ 
or against Him. He Himself says so. In Matthew 
xii. 30, He says, "He that is not with Me is against 
Me." Every man that is not with Him is against 
Him. Every man that is not openly, decidedly, con- 
fessedly, out and out for Christ is against Christ. 
You either have to take your stand with John, the 
beloved Apostle, and Peter the warm-hearted, and Paul 
the heroic, and all the noble band of confessors and 
martyrs and servants of the Son of God, or you have 
to take your stand with Pontius Pilate, with Herod, 
with Annas and Caiaphas, with Judas Iscariot. Where 
do you take your stand to-night? I could run a line 
through this building, and, if I knew you all to-night 
as God knows you, I could put every man and woman 
in the building on one or the other side of the line. 
On one side those who are for Christ, whole-heartedly 
for Christ; on the other side, those who are against 
Christ. Suppose I did it ; which side would you be on ? 

III. Who this Jesus is with Whom we 
HAVE TO do'. 

Now one other line of thought, and that is who this 
Jesus is with whom we have to do. Who is He ? 



172 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

1. In the first place. He is One wliom God hath ap' 
pointed and anointed to he your King. We read in 
Acts ii. 36, "This same Jesus, whom ye have crucified, 
God hath made both Lord and Christ" (that means 
"anointed King"). Yon have a way of saying here in 
England that King Edward is your divinely appointed 
king, and I beliove it. I believe he is, but in an in- 
finitely higher sense Jesus of Nazareth is your divinely 
appointed and divinely anointed King. If you reject 
Jesus Christ you reject your divinely appointed King; 
if you deny Jesus Christ, you deny your divinely ap- 
pointed King; if you shut Jesus Christ out of your 
heart, you shut your divinely appointed King out of 
your heart; and if you take your stand against Jesus 
Christ, you take your stand against your divinely ap- 
pointed King. And you are guilty of — listen — high 
treason ! There closed a trial in London the day before 
yesterday in which a man was tried and convicted of 
high treason, and sentenced to death. Whether or not 
they will carry out the sentence into execution I do 
not know; but I do know that if the man was guilty, 
as the jury found, then according to the English law, 
and the law of any well-organized government, he is 
worthy of death. But, men and women, I charge every 
man and woman in this building to-night — I care not 
what position in society you hold — I charge you, I 
indict you, every man and woman, every man and 
woman in the building out of Christ, of high treason 
against Heaven's King, and if you got your just 
deserts you would die. 

One day in Maryborough, over in Australia, a fine- 
looking man came to see me, an unusually fine-looking 



A MOST IMPOKTANT QUESTION 173 

man^ with splendid physique and dome-like forehead. 
He said, "I want a talk with 3^ou/' and I said, "Very 
well, take a seat, sir." He said, "I don't know about 
your preaching. Now I am a moral, upright man, and 
no one can deny it. Now," he said, "I would like you 
to tell me what you have against me." I said, "Are 
you a Christian?" "No, sir," he replied. "Have you 
taken Jesus Christ as your personal Saviour, and sur- 
rendered your life to Him as your Lord and Master, 
and confessed Him as such before the world, and given 
your life to Him?" "No, sir," he replied. "Then," 
I said, "I charge you, sir, with high treason against 
your King. Jesus Christ is your King; God made 
Him so; and I charge you, sir" — and I looked him 
right in the eye — "I charge you, sir, with the crime 
of high treason against your King." And a dark 
cloud came over the man's face as he got up, and, 
going out of my room, he said, "Good afternoon," and 
walked away. 

Months passed away ; we had been over to Tasmania 
and conducted a mission there, and had returned, and 
I was preaching in Ballarat, about forty miles away 
from Maryborough. After the service, a fine-looking 
man came to me, and said, "Do you remember me?" 
I knew his face, but I could not remember where I 
had seen him. I said, "I have seen you somewhere,, 
but I cannot place you." He said, "Do you remember 
ever charging a man with high treason?" I said, "I 
have charged many a man with high treason." "Yes," 
he said; "but do you remember charging any specific 
man with high treason ?" Then he began to tell me his 
story, and I conmienced to gather who he was. He 



174: KEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

said, '^1 am the man, and I have come to Ballarat, sir, 
to tell you that you will never charge me with high 
treason again ;'^ and he held out his hand, and I held 
out mine, and he took mine in his mighty grip — and 
it was a mighty grip ! — and he said "Down V and he 
dropped on his knees, and I dropped on to mine, and he 
said, ^TLord Jesus, I hand in my allegiance; I give up 
my treason ; I take Thee as my King." 

You men ought to do it to-night. He is your King, 
and every man and woman among you that does not 
accept Him and acknowledge Him as such to-night I 
charge you with high treason against Heaven's King. 

2. But He is more than your King — He is the Son 
of God. He is a divine Person, and if you reject Him 
you are guilty of rejecting the Son of God ; if you deny 
Him you are guilty of denying the Son of God; if 
you shut Him out of your hearts you are guilty of shut- 
ting the Son of God out of your hearts; if you take 
your stand against Him you are guilty of taking your 
stand against the Son of God. 

"Oh, hut," some may say, "we don't believe He is 
the Son of God. Don't you know there are some people 
in these advanced days that don't believe that Jesus is 
the Son of God?" I know it just as well as j^ou do; 
and I know something else that you will know in a 
minute — that is, that denying a fact does not alter 
the fact. In this superficial twentieth century we have 
a very easy way of disposing of the facts we don't like 
to believe. We say, "I don't believe this," and we 
think that does away with the fact. Men who do not 
want to believe in hell say, "I don't believe in 
hell," and they think that they have shut the gates of 



A MOST IMPORTANT QUESTION 175 

hell by saying that. Men who don't want to believe 
in the Bible say, "I don't believe in the Bible/' and 
they think that they annihilate the Book that has stood 
for nineteen centuries by saying that. Men who do 
not want to believe in Christ say, "I do not believe 
that Jesus Christ is the Son of God/' and they think 
by their not believing it He ceases to be the Son of 
God. Has it never occurred to you that a fact is a fact 
whether you believe it or not? We have got some 
people in America that have become so possessed with 
the idea that denying a thing is quite sufficient to 
annihilate it, that they declare that there is no such 
thing as pain. They tell you not to believe there is such 
a thing as pain, and then you won't feel it. But when 
they go to the dentist's and get into the chair they 
jump just as much as any one else ! And in this fool- 
ish belief they are dying by the score ; by the miserable 
madness of Christian Science, that dares to deny sick- 
ness, which exists all the same, and sweeps them into 
premature graves. Denying a fact does not alter a 
fact, and denying that Jesus is the Son of God does 
not alter the fact that He is the Son of God. It only 
makes you guilty of robbing a divine Person of the 
honour that is His due. Listen: There are five in- 
disputably divine testimonies to the deity of Jesus 
Christ. In the first place, there is the testimony of the 
divine life He lived, for He lived as never man lived. 
Napoleon Bonaparte said, "I know men, but Jesus Christ 
was no (mere) man." In the second place, there is the 
testimony of the divine words He spoke, for He spoke 
as never man spoke. In the third place, there is the 
testimony of the divine works He wrought, for He 



176 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

wrought as never man wrought ; not merely healing the 
sick, but cleansing the lepers, stilling the tempest, rais- 
ing the dead, and feeding the five thousand by a cre- 
ative act with &ve small loaves and two small fishes. 
In the fourth place, then, is the divine attestation of 
the resurrection from the dead. The resurrection of 
Christ from the dead is the best proven fact of history ; 
it is proved by such indisputable evidence that I wish 
I had time to do in London what I did in Sydney, 
meet the skeptics and agnostics of the city, and prove 
to them that Jesus rose from the dead; and I believe 
I should see in some of your agnostics and skeptics 
the honesty which some of the Sydney skeptics showed, 
in owning their arguments beaten and coming right 
out and acknowledging the truth of the resurrection of 
Jesus Christ. Jesus did rise from the dead. Before 
they crucified Him He said, "You will crucify Me, but 
God will set His seal on My claims by raising Me from 
the dead." They did not believe Him; the Unitarians 
of the day crucified Him for claiming to be the Son 
of God. They laid Him in a sepulchre, and put the 
seal of the Roman Government on the stone, which 
no one dared to break. But on the third day the Spirit 
of the living God breathed through the sleeping clay, 
and the crucified Christ rose from the dead, and God 
proclaimed in unmistakable tones to all ages, "This is 
My beloved Son." In the fifth place, there is the 
testimony of His divine influence upon all subsequent 
history. There is no question that Jesus Christ claimed 
to be divine; no competent student will deny that He 
claimed to be divine. Well, then, He was one of three 
things; He was either divine, as He claimed to be. 



A MOST IMPORTANT QUESTION 177 

or else He was the most audacious impostor the world 
has ever seen, or else He was the most hopeless lunatic 
the world has ever seen. He must have been one of 
these three. Of all the irrational systems of philosophy 
that of Unitarianism is the most irrational. It says 
that Jesus Christ was not divine, but was a good man, 
perhaps the best man that ever walked the earth. I 
say if He was not divine He was not good, for He 
was an impostor. You had a man in this city a few 
months ago who claimed to be divine, and you all de- 
cided that he was either an impostor, or most of you, 
perhaps, took the more charitable view that he was 
a lunatic. Jesus Christ was either divine, as He 
claimed to be, or else He was the most audacious im- 
postor the world has ever seen, or else He was the 
greatest lunatic. Take your choice. Is there any man 
here to-night that will say that Jesus Christ was a 
lunatic, and that His influence on history has been 
the influence of a lunatic? Nobody but a lunatic 
will say so. Will any man here dare to say that the 
influence of Jesus Christ on the history of the world 
has been the influence of an impostor ? No one but an 
impostor would say so. Then if not a lunatic or an 
impostor, what ? The Son of God ! Jesus Christ is the 
Son of God, and every man or woman that goes away 
from here to-night rejecting Christ will go away re- 
jecting the Son of God. Every man or woman that 
goes away from here to-night denying Christ will go 
away denying the Son of God. Every man or woman 
that goes away from here to-night shutting Christ 
out of his heart will go away shutting the Son of God 
out of his heart. Every man or woman that goes awaj 



178 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

from here to-night taking his stand against Christ will 
go away taking his stand against the Son of God. Men, 
if you were not Winded by sin to the thought of your 
awful guilt, you would fall on your faces now and 
cry, "God be merciful to me, so awful a sinner !" I 
trust some of you will do it before you go away. 

3. Jesus Christ is not only your King; He is not 
only divine; He is something more yet. You say. 
What? Your Saviour, the One who was wounded for 
your transgressions, bruised for your iniquities, upon 
whom the chastisement of your peace ivas laid; and 
oh, men and women, if you reject Him, if you deny 
Him, if you take your stand against Him, if you shut 
Him out of your hearts, you will be guilty of the 
most awful ingratitude. Xever mother loved her son, 
never mother suffered for her child, as Christ has 
loved us and suffered for us. "Though He was rich, yet 
for our sakes He became poor, that we through His 
poverty might become rich. Being in the form of God, 
He thought it not a thing to be grasped to be equal 
with God, but He emptied Himself and took upon 
Himself the form of a servant, and was made in the 
likeness of man, and became obedient unto death, yea, 
the death of the Cross." For you and me! Will you, 
will you reject Him, will you deny Him, will you shut 
Him out of your hearts, and will you take your stand 
against Him? Oh, men and women, what are you 
made of? 

A man came to me one night and said: "I don't 
believe in your Christianity." I said, "Why not?" 
He said, "It is irrational." I asked why. "Why," he 
said, "you teach, don't you, that if a man leads a moral 



A MOET IMPORTANT QUESTIOX 179 

life and does his duty by his neighbour and in business^ 
treating his employees fairly, he will be lost for ever 
for nothing worse than the one thing of rejecting Jesus 
Christ. That is not just/' he said. I said, "Hold on 
a minute; suppose you have a mother who is one of 
the purest women who ever lived. Suppose your moth- 
er loved you even as few mothers loved their sons. 
Suppose your mother if necessary was ready to lay 
down her life for you to save yours." He said, "She 
would." "Suppose you should do your duty," I said, 
"by your wife and children and by your neighbour, and 
in your place of business, and treat everybody honestly ; 
suppose you were upright in all the relations of life, 
and treated every person right but one, and that one 
your mother, who, you say, is so good, who, you 
say, would be ready to die for you, who, you say, loves 
you so. Suppose you should turn her out of doors 
on to the street, leaving her there naked and to starve. 
What would you think of yourself ?" He said, "I would 
be a scoundrel." "Well," I said, "Jesus Christ loves 
you more than a mother ever did, and Jesus Christ 
would not only die for you, but He did die for you. 
Jesus Christ has done more for you than any mother 
ever did for her child. And now, while you say you 
are doing your duty by everybody else, you are 
trampling under foot Jesus Christ." I said, "What do 
you think of yourself?" He saw it, that he was a 
scoundrel. And he was. And so are you, and so are 
you, every one of you, that is rejecting Jesus Christ. 
Supposing you had a man here in London who did 
his duty to his wife and children, who did his duty by 
his neighbour, who did his duty in politics, in business, 



180 EEVIVAL ADDEESSES 

and by every person but one, and that one his mother, 
who loved him and brought him up, who had wasted 
her life upon him, and was now feeble and decrepit 
simply because she poured her life out for him. And 
while he did his duty by everybody else, he turned 
that mother, to whom he owed everything, out into 
the street to starve. Would his doing his duty towards 
his wife cover the infamy of his treatment to his 
mother? Would his doing his duty towards his neigh- 
bour cover the infamy of that treatment; would the 
doing of his duty in politics, in business, cover the 
infamy of his treatment of his mother ? Never ! And 
will your doing your duty by your wife, mother, father, 
children, brothers, sisters, and neighbours, cover the 
infamy, the hideous black ingratitude of your treatment 
of the Christ who gave up Heaven and died on the 
Cross for you? Never ! You are rejecting the one that 
was wounded for your transgressions, bruised for your 
iniquities, upon whom the chastisement of your peace 
was laid; you are denying every day of your lives 
the One who was wounded for your transgressions, 
bruised for your iniquities, upon whom the chastise- 
ment of your peace was laid; you are shutting out of 
your heart the One who was wounded for your trans- 
gressions, bruised for your iniquities, upon whom the 
chastisement of your peace was laid; you are taking 
your stand against the One who was wounded for your 
transgressions, bruised for your iniquities, upon whom 
the chastisement of your peace was laid. 

Oh, men and women of London, in the light of what 
depends on your choice, in the light of what Jesus 



A MOST IMPORTANT QUESTION 181 

Christ is, what are you going to do with Christ to- 
night ? 

It was an awful crisis in the life of Pontius Pilate 
when he asked the question of the text. There sat 
Pontius Pilate in all the dignity and power of a 
Eoman governor; and there stood Jesus Christ in 
all the beauty of His perfect manhood, in all the dig- 
nity and glory of His perfect Deit}^, in all the won- 
drousness of His matchless love ; and there sat Pontius 
Pilate deep in thought, deciding what to do. There 
were two kinds of voices speaking in Pilate's heart — 
higher voices and lower voices; heavenly voices and in- 
fernal voices. Listen to the higher voices. The voice 
of reason said, "Pilate, release Him; He is innocent." 
The voice of conscience said, "Pilate release Him; He 
is innocent." The voice of the Spirit of God, whispering 
in Pilate's heart, said, "Pilate, release Him." The 
voice of common decency said, "Pilate, release Him; 
He is innocent." Everything that was noble and true 
and just in Pilate's heart said, "Release Him." But, 
alas, there were other voices, infernal voices, speak- 
ing, and Pilate is listening to them. There was the 
voice of cowardice, of fear of what the Jews will say, 
that whispered, "Pilate, crucify Him." There was 
the voice of avarice, the greed for gold, saying, "Pilate, 
crucify Him." There was the voice of low political 
policy whispering, "Pilate, crucify Him." And Pilate 
sits there deep in thought. At last, he decides, and 
he decides wrong; and his name has come down to 
everlasting infamy. 

It is a more solemn moment and a more awful 
crisis for you to-night, for you know better who Jesus 



18^ EEVITAL ADDEESSES 

is. There you sit, and there stands Jesus again, un- 
seen, but there He surely stands, in all the dignity 
and beauty of His perfect manhood; there He stands 
in all the glory of His perfect Deity ; there He stands in 
all the wondrousness of His matchless love, crowned 
with thorns, and with pierced hands. And there you 
sit, tr}dng to decide what to do with Him. In your 
heart there are higher voices and lower voices. There 
is the voice of the Spirit of God which says, "Accept 
Him; confess Him; take your stand on His side to- 
night." There is the voice of conscience which says, 
"Accept Him." There is the voice of gratitude which 
says, "Accept Him." Everything that is noble and 
good and true in you says, "Accept Him ; confess Him ; 
let Him into your heart ; take your stand on His side." 
But, alas, there are lower voices in your heart to-night. 
There is in 3^our heart the voice of cowardice, the 
fear of what people will say, which says, "Reject Him 
to-night; take your stand against Him." There is 
the voice of avarice, the greed for gold that might slip 
through your fingers if you became a real Christian, 
and that says, "Reject Him." There is the voice of 
lust, low and beastly that says, "Reject Him." There 
is the voice of low political trickery, which says it 
will rob you of influence in your political party if you 
become a Christian, and that says, "Reject Him." 
Everything that is low and base and mean and devilish 
in your heart says, "Reject Him ; deny Him ; shut Him 
out of your heart; take your stand against Him." 

Men and women, which are you going to listen to? 
What are you going to decide ? God help you to decide 
right to-night. 



XIII 

ONE OF THE SADDEST UTTERANCES THAT 
EVER FELL FROM THE LIPS OF THE SON 
OF GOD 

"Ye will not come to Me, that ye might have life." — John v. 40. 

That is one of the saddest utterances that our Saviour 
ever spoke. I wish I could reproduce His tender 
tones and His loving look when He uttered the words. 
I believe it would break your heart. He came down 
from Heaven with its glory to earth with its shame, 
to bring life to men. He went up and down among 
men proclaiming that life could be obtained by simply 
coming to Him, but men would not come. And at 
last He turned round upon the men who had not come 
to Him, and with a heart aching with disappointment, 
and with tones full of yearning pity He said : "Ye will 
not come to Me, that ye might have life." 

I. Why any Man is Lost. 

Those words contain the explanation why any man 
is lost. If any man is lost it will be because he will 
not come to Christ. If any man or woman goes out 
of this hall to-night unsaved, that will be the reason. 
Jesus Christ offers life to every man and woman here 
on the simple condition that you come to Him, and if 

183 



184: REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

you go out of tliis hall to-niglit without it, it is simply 
because you would not come to Him. 

1. No man is lost because he needs to be lost. No 
man needs to be lost. God has provided salvation for 
everybody. The atonement of Jesus Christ covers the 
sins of every man. He tasted death — as we are told 
in the Word of God — for every man, and the offer of 
salvation is made to every man. If any man does 
not take it, it is because he will not come and get it. 
No man is lost because of any purpose or decree of 
God. It is the will of God, we are told expressly in 
His word, that all men should be saved, and He ^'^is 
not willing" — as we read in 2 Peter iii. 9 — "that any 
should perish, but that all should come to repentance." 
And if any man is lost, it is solely because He will not 
come. 

2. No man is lost because he has gone down so 
deeply into sin. Indeed it is true that all of us have 
gone dowTi into sin so deeply that we deserve to be 
lost. But "this is a faithful saying, and worthy of 
all acceptation, that Christ Jesus came into the world 
to save sinners" — even the chief. He can do it. He 
is doing it every day. Christ did save the chief of 
sinners — Saul of Tarsus — and He has power to-night 
to save any man or woman in London. No man or 
woman is lost because they have gone down so deeply 
into sin, but simply because they will not come to that 
only Saviour who has power to save them from their 

sins. 

3. No man is lost because he is too weak to lead 
the Christian life. It is true that every one of us 
is too weak to lead a true Christian life in our own 



ONE OF THE SADDEST UTTERANCES 185 

strength; but, thank God, we have a Saviour who 
"is able to keep us from falling, and to present us 
faultless before the presence of His glory with ex- 
ceeding joy." If any man is lost, it is solely because 
he will not come to Christ. If any man or woman or 
young person goes out of this hall to-night unsaved 
it is no one's fault but your own, and the whole rea- 
son will be that you will not come to Christ and obtain 
life. 

II. Why Men will not come to Christ. 

But why will not men come to Christ? There are 
many things that keep them from coming. 

1. The first one is sin. I believe that sin is keep- 
ing more men and women from coming to Christ than 
almost anything else. There are a great many men 
in this world who know their need of a Saviour, who 
long for a Saviour, who have a deep desire to take 
the Lord Jesus Christ, but they know if they come 
to Him they must leave their sins behind. A man 
cannot come to Christ and retain his sin. You have 
to choose between Jesus Christ and sin. Men know 
that, but they are not willing to give up their sins. 
At one of Mr. Moody's services in Chicago, after he 
had preached on the "Prodigal Son," a fine-looking 
young fellow came to me and said, "That was a good 
sermon to-night. He pictured my case exactly. I am 
that prodigal son." I said, "Don't you want to come 
home to the Father to-night, then?" He said, "I do." 
I said, "And the Father wants you to come." He said, 
"I know it." I said, '^ill you come?" He said, "I 
will not." I asked, "Why not?" He replied, "I am 



186 KEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

entangled in the meshes of a disgusting sin." ^'Then/' 
I said, ^Vill you not give it np to-night?" '^No, sir," 
he said, "I will not." That young man went out of 
that place where he had been brought face to face 
with God's love, deliberately choosing a vile sin and 
death instead of Jesus Christ and eternal life. I dare- 
say there are men and women who will go out of this 
hall to-night with a clear view of the fact that they can 
come to Christ and be pardoned, but you will not come 
because there is some definite sin in your life or heart 
that you are not willing to give up. 

2. The love of money Tceeps many men from combing 
to Christ. Many a man knows that if he came to 
Christ he would lose money by it. There are things in 
his business that would need to be given up. But he 
is not willing to sacrifice the profits he gets in crooked 
ways. He is deliberately choosing a larger income and 
eternal death instead of Jesus Christ and eternal life. 
How many a young fellow has come to me and when 
I have urged him to come to Christ he has said, "I 
believe it is a good thing, but I should have to give 
up my situation if I did." Two young ladies said to 
Mrs. Torrey at one of our services in Australia, when 
they seemed to be very near decision, "We cannot come 
to Christ. We are employed in a large shop, and our 
employer requires? us to misrepresent the goods. We 
cannot do that and be Christians, can we?" "No, 
you cannot," Mrs. Torrey replied; and the young 
ladies said, '^If we don't, then we lose our positions." 
God pity the man or the merchant who requires his em- 
ployees to lie ! And yet there are such who profess to 
be Christians. God have mercy on such hypocrites. 



ONE OF THE SADDEST UTTERANCES 187 

who are hurrying on fast to an eternal hell — every one 
of them. How sad it is that those young women were 
ready to choose their position and small salary in the 
place of Jesus Christ and life eternal! 

3. Love of pleasure is keeping many a man and 
woman from coming to Christ. How many young 
men and young women there are in London who know 
they need Christ and would like to be Christians, but 
they say if they come to Christ they will have to 
give up this or that pleasure — the dance or the card 
party or the theatre. "I can never do it/' they say, 
and they are choosing the dance or card party or thea- 
tre or some other form of worldly amusement and 
death instead of Jesus Christ and life. Dr. John Hall, 
of New York City, was at one time pastor of perhaps 
the wealthiest church in New York City. There came 
to him one day a young lady who was a most beautiful 
waltzer, and she said, "If I become a Christian will I 
have to give up my dancing?'' He replied, "If you 
become a Christian and Jesus Christ asks you to give 
up your dancing, you must be ready to do it." She 
replied, "If I must choose between Jesus Christ and 
dancing, I will hold on to my dancing and let Jesus 
Christ go." What an awful choice ! You have not 
said it; perhaps you never thought it so definitely; 
but some of you to-night are making that very choice. 
You feel you could not be a real Christian and hold 
on to your worldly pleasure, and you reject Jesus 
Christ rather than give up your worldly pleasure. You 
are saying by your action, "if I must choose between 
Jesus Christ and my dancing or card-playing or thea- 
tre, or this or that and the other thing, I will hold on 



188 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

to my dancing, or whatever it be, and let Jesus Christ' 

go." 

4. The fear of man is keeping many a man and 
woman in London from coming to Christ and obtain- 
ing eternal life. How many there are who when the 
invitation is given would like to stand up, but they say 
if I should do it my friends in business or society 
would hear about it, and what would they say? You 
keep your seat and you reject Jesus Christ for fear 
of what they would say. In Proverbs xxix. 25, we 
read: "The fear of man bringeth a snare." It is 
bringing a snare that is landing many in a path that 
leads to eternal ruin instead of to Jesus Christ and life 
eternal. I would a great deal rather that men would 
laugh at me down here for doing a wise thing, than 
that the devils in hell should laugh at me for all eter- 
nity for doing a foolish thing. We have in our coun- 
try a very foolish custom. I think you have it to a 
certain extent in your country also, but perhaps not 
to the same extent as we have it in ours. It is called 
"April Fools' Day." On the jSrst day of April all the 
fools in America try to make fools of all the other 
fools. One custom is to bore a hole in a silver coin, 
and after attaching a string to it, put it on the side- 
walk. When any one comes along and stoops to pick 
it up, the coin is pulled away, and they cry "April 
fool." Another joke is to take a wallet and fill it with 
dust and dirt and chips and throw it on the sidewalk, 
and when any one picks it up and opens it to cry 
"April fool!" One day a farmer went to his bank in 
Baltimore and drew some money, which he put for 
safe-keeping into his wallet. After walking some dis- 



ONE or THE SADDEST UTTERANCES 189: 

tance, lie felt in his pocket and found the wallet had 
gone. Retracing his steps, he had not gone many 
blocks when he saw a circle of people round a wallet, 
no one daring to touch it, thinking it was full of saw- 
dust and shavings. When the farmer entered the 
circle and picked up the wallet, all cried "April fool !" 
but when he opened it and counted the money to see 
if it were all there, they felt that they were the fools. 
I tell you that a day is coming for those men and 
women who laugh at you, because you choose Christ 
and eternal life, when they will say that you have 
made a wise choice and they were the fools. Don't 
let them laugh you out of life eternal. At one of my 
missions I asked a woman how she was getting on. 
She replied, ''I am not getting on at all ; I am perfectly 
miserable." ''mij is that?" I said. "I don't know," 
she replied. Another said, "I can tell you why it is, 
she has never told her husband she has accepted Jesus 
Christ." "Is that so?" I asked her. "It is," she re- 
plied. "But you stood up in the meeting?" I said. 
"Yes, but not when he was present." "Well, you must 
tell him." "I can't tell my husband; he would laugh 
at me," she answered. "Never mind how much he 
laughs," I said. "I can't do it," was all she would 
reply. The next Sunday night the lady and gentleman 
were sitting together in one of the front seats. I 
stopped in the midst of my address and said, "Every 
woman in the house who will say that from this 
time on my husband shall have an out-and-out Chris- 
tian for his wife, please rise." This woman imme- 
diately rose to her feet. "Now," I said, "every man 
who will say from this time my wife shall have a 



190 REVIVAL ADDEESSES 

hue Christian onan for her husband, please rise." That 
man was the first man in the house on his feet. Show 
people the beauty and power of a living faith in 
Jesus Christ, and you will bring them with you. 

5. An unforgiving spirit is another thing that is 
keeping men and women from coming to Jesus Christ, 
"fhey know they cannot come, and bring a heart full 
of hate, and so they choose bitterness and hatred and 
death instead of Christ and life. One afternoon at 
Cleveland, after Mr. Moody had been speaking, he 
brought me to a lady to show her the way of life- I 
had been speaking to her trying this and that passage 
to see what was in the way of her accepting Christ, 
when suddenly I turned to her and said, "Is there 
somebody you cannot forgive?" She looked quickly 
at me, and said, "Who told you?" I said, "Nobody 
told me, and I have never seen you before to-night." 
That was her trouble, and that is the trouble with 
some of you. Some one has done you an injury, or 
you think they have, and you will not come to Jesus 
Christ because you want to cherish this bitter grudge 
in your heart. I once talked about two hours to a 
young lady, trying to lead her to Christ, but at last 
she said, "There is somebody I cannot forgive." I told 
her, "You must, or be lost for ever." But she replied, 
"I cannot; they have done me a wrong." I said, "If 
they had not done you a wrong, there would not be 
anything to forgive. Have they wronged you as much 
as you have wronged Jesus Christ ?" In the eighteenth 
chapter of Matthew, commencing at the twenty-third 
verse, we have the parable of the servant who was 
forgiven a large debt, and then would not forgive his 



ONE OF THE SADDEST UTTERANCES 191 

fellow-servant a trifling sum. That is a picture of the 
unforgiving one to-day. I said to her,^ ^'Kead that in- 
cident; you must forgive." But she said, '^I can't.'' 
"Are you willing," I then asked her, "that God should 
take the bitterness out of your heart?" She replied, 
"I am." Then I said, "Kneel down and ask Him;" 
and she knelt down, and scarcely had her knees touched 
the floor, when she burst into tears, as she felt the feel- 
ing of hate taken away. Are you going to reject Jesus 
Christ and eternal life for the sake of hating some- 
body ? God have mercy upon you. 

6. Self-will stands between many a person and 
Christ and eternal life. There are a great many people 
in this world who are not willing to surrender their 
wills to anybody, not even to God. They are bound to 
have their own way. A woman told me that on Friday 
night. She said, "I cannot give Iny will up to any- 
body." What foolishness! Who is this God to whom 
we ask you to surrender your will? God is love. Is 
it not wisdom to surrender our wills to infinite love 
and wisdom ? Oh, the folly of those who will not sur- 
render their wills to God and His lo-ve. 

7. There is one more thing that is keeping people 
from coming to Jesus Christ, and that is pride. I 
believe that there are thousands and tens of thousands 
of people in London to-night that are kept from Him 
because of the pride in their hearts. Pride manifests 
itself in many ways. It makes men and women, who 
have led moral and respectable lives, unwilling to admit 
that they are lost sinners, and must come into the 
kingdom of God through the same door as the thief 
or the harlot or the drunkard. You will all have to 



190 REVIVAL ADDEESSES 

get into the kingdom in that way. Look at Christ's 
parable of the publican and sinner. First there came 
the Pharisee to the temple to pray, a moral, upright, 
prominent citizen. But what is his prayer? It is 
Just a parade of his own virtues. "God, I thank thee, 
that I am not as the rest of men, extortioners, unjust, 
adulterers, or even as this publican. I fast twice in the 
week; I give tithes of all that I possess." Do you 
know what Jesus Christ says about him? He says that 
this man went down to his house unforgiven. Then 
came the publican — an outcast, despised by everybody, 
but a man who had been brought to the consciousness 
of his sin. He '^Svould not lift up so much as his 
eyes unto Heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, 
*God be merciful to me a sinner' " — the sinner. Do 
you know what Jesus Christ says? "I tell you, this 
man went down to his house justified rather than the 
other; for every one that exalteth himself shall be 
abased ; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted.'' 
I believe that very many people are being kept from 
Christ and eternal life by the pride of their hearts. 
In Chicago I was once telling the story of a woman 
who had been away down in sin and been saved; and 
afterwards a refined lady came to me and said, "You 
do not mean to say that that woman was saved?" 
The strange thing was that the lady was a TJniversalist, 
and believed that everybody could be saved. I told 
her "the woman was saved, and what is more, she was 
saved in precisely the same way that you will be save3 
if ever you are saved." That is God's truth. Ah! 
but some of you people are not willing to lay your 
pride in the dust. You are not willing to throw your 



ONE OF THE SADDEST UTTERANCES 193 

pride to the winds, and go to God and seek pardon 
through the atoning blood of the Son of God. You 
will never be saved any other way. A lady once 
came to me and said, "My Christian experience is not 
satisfactory." I said, "I don't think you have any 
Christian experience.'' *^hy," she said, "I have. I 
am the widow of a minister and a member of a church.'^ 
"Well," I responded, "I don't think that you ever were 
saved in your life. No, you never were, for you never 
saw yourself as a lost sinner in your life." She said, 
"I never did, because I am not." I replied, "Let me 
deal frankly with you. You are just full of conceit. 
Unless God opens your eyes to see that you are not 
essentially better than the vilest sinner, and unless 
you come to God and cry for mercy, through the 
atoning blood of Christ, you will never be saved." 
She said, "You are cruel." "No," I said, "I am kind. 
You are a physician, I believe?" She replied, "Yes." 
Then I said, "Suppose a patient had a tumor, and you 
cut it out to save her life. Would you call that cruel ?" 
"No," she said, "I should say that was the kindest 
thing I could do." "Well," I said, "you have a tumor. 
Your pride and conceit are blinding your eyes so that 
you cannot see that you are a poor, vile, worthless sin- 
ner, and Jesus Christ died for you on the Cross." The 
woman had the good sense at last to see it, but that 
is more than some of you have. I tell you among 
the people who are in this hall there are a lot of people 
who are being kept away from Christ by spiritual 
pride. 

But pride operates in another way. Oh, that by the 
help of God I could tear these awful scales from your 



194 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

eyes. Pride makes people set themselves not to do 
certain things which they are asked to do. ^^I am not 
coming/' they say, "to the meeting," or "I am not 
going to the front seats," or "I am not going to the 
inquiry room. A person can be saved without that." 
They can, beyond a doubt; but if you make it a point 
that you won't do something of that kind, you won't 
be saved until you do. In Mr. Finney's day many 
people found salvation under a certain tree. One 
prominent man said he would not go out there. It 
was not necessary, of course. He did all sorts of 
things, but he would not do that. He got no peace, 
however, and one day he stole out of the town the 
back way, and made his way to the place where the 
tree was, and climbed the fence around it. When he 
went to kneel down the wind shook a leaf and fright- 
ened him. But as soon as he knelt down and asked 
God, He saved him right there. There are some of 
you men and women like that. Do not misunderstand 
me. I want to make it as clear as day. It is not neces- 
sary for you to do anything except to believe in the 
Lord Jesus Christ, but if you say^I won't do a thing, 
you will never be saved until you do. You have got 
to lay your pride in the dust before you can find Jesus 
Christ. I remember the first time I went to hold a 
mission. The last meeting had come, and the last 
person had stood up, and I got up to dismiss the 
meeting, when a lady rose. She was the leading so- 
ciety woman in the town. She rose slowly to her feet 
and said, "Before you dismiss this meeting, may I 
say something?" And then, turning round to face 
the audience, she said, "When Mr. Torrey came, I 



ONE OF THE SADDEST UTTERANCES. 195 

said lie would never get me to stand up, but I now 
wish to most humbly take it all back, and ask you to 
pray for me." The power of God fell on that meeting. 
Some of you men and women think your position in 
society is too exalted for you to come up to the front 
with common folks and accept the Saviour just as 
ordinary men and women do, but if you think that, you 
will never be saved until you humble your pride in the 
dust, and are willing to go anywhere to find peace 
and pardon. Let us throw away everything that stands 
between us and Jesus Christ. He stands in this build- 
ing to-night with outstretched hands. Oh, see Him! 
Hear the tender tones that fall from His lips, the 
heart-breaking tones: "Ye will not come to Me, that 
ye might have life.'' The Lord Jesus Christ, who died 
on the Cross of Calvary, is standing here, with His 
thorn-crowned brow and pierced hands, saying, "Ye 
will not come to Me that ye might have life.'' Men 
and women rise and say, "I will come. Lord Jesus; 
I come now" 



XIV 

^^HAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR?" 

"And now why tarriest thou ? Arise and be baptized, wash- 
ing away thy sin, calling on the name of the Lord" (especially 
the first part of the Terse, "Why tarriest thou?"). — Acts 
xxii. 16. 

It was God who asked the question, through His servant 
Ananias, of Saul of Tarsus; and I believe that God 
is asking that same question to-night through ime of 
every man and woman and child in this building that 
is not an openly confessed, out-and-out follower of Jesus 
Christ. God is saying to you to-night, "Why tarriest 
thou? What are you waiting for? Why do you not 
come out to-night on the side of Jesus Christ?'^ You 
remember that Saul of Tarsus hated Jesus Christ. 
Saul of Tarsus thought that Jesus of Nazareth was 
an impostor; he did not believe that He was the 
Christ and the Son of God as He claimed to be. 
But away down in the depths of his heart Saul of 
Tarsus had an uneasy feeling that perhaps He was 
the Christ, perhaps He was the Son of God, but he 
never admitted it even to himself. As far as his 
admitted convictions were concerned, Saul of Tarsus 
thought Jesus was an impostor, and he hated Jesus with 
a very intense hatred; and he said, "I am going to 
stamp out this religion of the followers of Jesus." And 
he not only hated Jesus Christ, but he hated everybody 
that bore the name of Christ, and whenever he saw 

196 



"WHAT AEE YOU WAITING FOE?" 197 

a man or woman or child that believed in Jesus and 
followed Him, he hated them. He did everything in 
his power to stamp out the religion of Jesus. He went 
from house to house in Jerusalem, and arrested men 
and women and children, sparing neither age nor sex, 
and dragged them before the courts to be tried; and 
when they were sentenced to death, he gave his vote 
for their execution. But at last Saul of Tarsus had 
exhausted all the opportunities for murder in Jeru- 
salem, but he had not exhausted the hatred of his 
heart. He breathed an atmosphere of murder and 
slaughter, and hearing that a hundred and more miles 
away, in the city of Damascus, there were followers 
of Jesus, he went, with a heart full of hatred, to the 
High Priest, and said, "Give me letters to Damascus, 
and I will go and do in Damascus what I have done 
in Jerusalem. I will arrest all the Christians, whether 
men or women or children, and I will bring them 
down here to Jerusalem to be punished." His request 
was quickly granted. 

It was a long journey across the barren, desolate, 
dreary desert, whether on foot or on horseback, but 
day after day Saul of Tarsus presses on, not even stay- 
ing for the burning heat of the noonday sun. At last 
he has almost reached Damascus, and he stands on the 
last hilltop, and there Damascus lies before him, in 
all its beauty, a city of olive groves, a city of vineyards, 
a city of gardens, and of flashing fountains, a city of 
glittering palaces and dashing rivers, a city of whicH 
poets loved to sing, and of which one Persian poet says, 
"Damascus is a diamond in a setting of emeralds." 
But as Saul looks down on Damascus in all its far- 



198 KEVIVAL ADDEESSES 

famed beauty, he has no eye for its beauty; his only 
thought is that in that city are some of these accursed 
Christians, and he adds to himself as he stands there, 
^^I will soon have them in my power, and be dragging 
them back to be punished at Jerusalem." He starts 
to press on towards the city, to do the hellish work for 
which he has come, when suddenly there shines round 
about him a marvelous light with a brightness, above 
that of the noonday sun, and there in the midst of 
it he beholds the most wondrous face and form his 
eyes had ever gazed upon, the face and form of the 
glorified Christ. He is blinded by the glory of it, 
and falls on his face to the ground. He hears a voice 
speaking to him, "Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou 
Me ?" and the humbled man cries back from the ground, 
''Who art Thou, Lord?" and back comes the crushing 
and overwhelming answer, "I am Jesus whom thou 
persecutest." Then, thoroughly subdued and awed, 
he cries back, "What wilt Thou have me to do. Lord ?" 
And the answer comes, "Arise, stand upon thy feet, 
and go into Damascus, and there it shall be told you 
what thou must do." He rises to his feet, but every- 
thing is black. He turns his eyes liither and thither, 
but he sees nothing. He has to hold out his hand and 
be led like a helpless child into the city he expected 
to enter as a conqueror. He goes to the house of 
Judas, and there for three days and three nights he 
shuts himself up and sees no one, neither eating, sleep- 
ing, nor drinking; but still he does not yield himself 
to Christ. At last, God, weary of waiting, sends His 
servant Ananias with the message, "Why do you not 



"WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FORr 199 

come out openly and confess Him whom you know to 
be the Christ?" 

Men and women, God is putting the same question 
to you: "Why tarriest thou? Why do you not come 
out openly and accept Christ, and confess Him before 
the world as your Saviour and Lord and Master?" I 
wish it were possible for me to go down from this 
platform, and to go from seat to seat, and from man 
to man, and put to every man and woman out of 
Christ this question: What are you waiting for be- 
fore you come out on the side of Christ? I would 
have you tell me your real reason. I would have you 
give me an honest answer, and then I would sit down 
beside you with the Word of God, and show you how 
little there is in your reason. If I could do that I 
believe I could get almost every man and woman in 
this building that is out of Christ to accept Him to- 
night. But there is no time of course for that, it would 
take days and weeks and months, so I am going to ask 
you to do the next best thing. I am going to ask every 
man and woman who is not a Christian to forget abou-E 
every one else, and not to look at me as preaching a 
sermon to a multitude, but to think of you and me as 
being here alone in personal conversation together, face 
to face. Will you put to yourself this question before 
we begin our conversation, "What am I waiting for? 
Why do I not come out on the side of Christ to-night ?" 
iSTow we are going to have a few moments of silence 
and prayer, and I am going to ask every Christian 
man and woman in the room to pray that every one may 
be honest, and I am going to ask all of you who are not 



200 REYIVAL ADDRESSES 

Christians to put this question to yourselves, "What am 
I waiting for?" Let us have silence. 

Will every man and woman put to themselves the 
question, "What is the real reason that I do not 
accept and confess Christ to-night; what am I v^ait- 
ing for ?" N'ow I will take up your answers one by one. 

1. Some of you have said to-night, '7 am waiting 
until I shall he convinced; just as soon as I am con- 
vinced that the Bible is the Word of God and Jesus 
is the Son of God, I will accept Christ as my Saviour, 
and confess Him before the world." IN'ow, I want to 
make an offer to every man and woman who has made 
that answer. If you will come to me at the close 
of this meeting, I will show you the way to find out 
that, beyond all peradventure, the Bible is God's Word, 
and Jesus Christ is God's Son. lN"ow, if you are an 
honest skeptic, you will accept that offer, and if you 
do not accept it, never say again that jou are a skeptic. 
You are a humbug. Of course, if you are only a trifler 
I have no time to waste upon you, but if you are a 
sincere doubter, I would rather speak with you than 
anybody else in the building, for I have yet to find the 
first sincere doubter, the first sincere agnostic, the first 
sincere atheist, the first spiritualist, the first Christian 
Scientist, the first Theosophist, who really wanted to 
know the truth, that I could not show the way to find 
it. All over the world to-night there are men who 
used to be agnostics and doubters whom it has been 
my privilege to lead to Jesus. If you are an honest 
skeptic, you will accept that offer, and if you do not, 
at least one good result will come of it— you will know 
when you go out of this hall that you are not an honest 



'^HATAKE YOU WAITING FOR r 201 

skeptic. I went to a man one night during my first 
pastorate; he was standing away at the end of the 
hall between the two doors, and I stepped up to him 
and said, "Mr. B.," (I knew him very well, he was one 
of the most prominent business men in the place and 
one of the most highly esteemed) "why are you not 
a Christian?" ^^ell/' he replied, "I don't boast about 
it, but I don't believe an}i;hing." I said, "Don't you 
believe there is a God?" And he said, "I have never 
given up faith that there is a supreme Being." "Well," 
I said, "if there is a God, you ought to surrender your 
will to Him. Will you do it ? Will you take your stand 
upon the will of God, and follow it wherever it carries 
you?" He replied, "I try to live now as near right 
as I know how" (I believe he did, for he was one of 
the most upright men in the community). But I 
said, "That is not what I asked; will you take your 
stand upon the will of God, and follow it wherever 
it carries you ?" He said, "I have never put it in quite 
that way." I said, '^ill you put it that way to-night ?" 
He said, "I will." Then I said, "One more thing; do 
3^ou believe God answers prayer?" "No," he said, "I 
do not." He said, "I have often lain awake at night 
thinking about that, and I have come to the conclu- 
sion that God does not answer prayer." "Well," I said, 
"I know He does, and you can test it to-day. Pray 
this prayer: ^Oh, God, show me if Jesus Christ is 
Thy Son or not, and if You show me that He is, I 
promise to accept Him as my Saviour, and confess Him 
before the world.'" He said, "I will." That same 
week I saw that gentleman come in to the prayer 
meeting at the church, a very unusual thing for him 



202^ EEVIYAL ADDRESSES 

to do, and as soon as I threw open the prayer meeting, 
I saw this man rise to his feet. He said, "Friends, I 
doubted everything; I was in a perfect mist; I did 
not know what I believed ; I did not know as I believed 
anything." Then he told us what he had done. He 
had been honest with himself and with God and with 
truth, and he had done what he had promised to do. 
**And now," he said, "my mists have all gone, and I do 
not know where they have gone." You sa}^, "I doubt 
that story." Well, try it for yourselves. 

Another man in that same community lived across 
the street from my house, and I went to see him one 
evening; the sun was just setting, and I was standing 
on his front lawn, talking with him, for, though he was 
an agnostic and I was a Christian minister, we were 
good friends. Christians ought not to get off some- 
where where nobody of an ordinary kind can touch 
them. The Word says, "Ye are the salt of the earth." 
You cannot preserve meat by putting meat in one 
barrel and salt in another. Well, I was standing on 
this man's lawn; suddenly he turned to me — the sun 
had gone down and there followed a peculiar glow in 
the sky, and I think he felt a strange influence from 
it— he said to me suddenly, "Mr. Torrey, I am sixty- 
six years of age, and I have no one to leave my money 
to" (and he had a good amount to leave). "I cannot 
take a penny of it with me, and I would give every 
penny of it, if T could believe as you do." I said, 
"I can tell you how." He said, "I wish you would." 
I said, ^Tjet us go in." We stepped into the house and 
I asked his wife for a sheet of paper, and I wrote on 
it something like this : "I believe there is an absolute 



'WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FORP' 203 

difference between right and wrong" — I did not say 
"I believe there is a God;" he did not affirm or deny 
that, and I began just where he was — "I believe there 
is an absolute difference between right and wrong, 
and I hereby take my stand on the right to follow it 
wherever it carries me. I promise to make an earnest 
search to find if Jesns Christ is the Son of God; and 
if I find that Jesus Christ is the Son of God, I promise 
to accept Him as my Saviour and confess Him before 
the world." When I had written that, I said, "Mr. H., 
read that." He read it. "N"ow," I said, 'Vill you 
sign that ?" "Why, anybody ought to be willing to sign 
that," he replied. "Well, will you sign it?" I said. 
"All you ask me to sign is what my own conscience 
tells me I ought to do. Anybody ought to be willing to 
sign that." "Yes," I said, "but will you sign it?" 
And he said again, "Anybody ought to be willing to 
sign that." "Will you sign it?" "I will think about 
it." 

He never signed it, and he died as he had lived, 
without God and without hope. He went out into 
the darkness of a Christless etemit}^, and I ask you, 
"Whose fault was it?" Away out in the darkness a 
light had been shown to him, and he confessed that 
his own conscience told him that he ought to be 
willing to follow it, and he would not follow it. Will 
you follow it? You say you are skeptics and agnos- 
tics; so I used to be, but I was an honest man, and 
when a way was pointed out I tried to see where it 
led, and thank God, it led out of the barrenness and 
desolation and darkness of utter nihilism into a clear 
faith that cannot be shaken, that that blessed Book 



204 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

is God's Word, and that the Christ of that Book is the 
Son of God. 

2. Well, some one else may say. My case is dif- 
ferent. I believe in the Bible just as much as you do, 
but I am waiting till I have enjoyed the world enough/' 
There are a great many people of that kind in London. 
Some of them have grown old and grey in that condi- 
tion. They make the mistake of thinking that when 
they grow tired of the world, they can turn to Christ 
without any sacrifice; they think that after a while 
a man will grow tired of the world and give it up 
without an effort. What a great mistake ! The longer 
you live for the world the less enjoyment you get out 
of it, but the tighter its grip becomes upon your shrivel- 
ling soul. There will never be another night when 
it is so easy to give up the world as it is to-night. You 
know that is true in the case of the drinking man. 
When a man begins to drink, there is pleasure in it; 
the first glass of beer or of wine or of champagne 
has joy in it, and exhilaration in it — a man feels like 
two men; but as a man goes on drinking there is less 
and less joy, but the more complete his slavery be- 
comes, until at last a man reaches a place, which thou- 
sands of men and women in London have already 
reached, where they hate alcohol as much as any pro- 
hibitionist, but are utterly unable to give it up. They 
know it is robbing them of their brains, they know 
it is robbing them of their manhood, of the respect 
of the community, of the affection of their wives, and 
the confidence of their children. They know it is 
taking the bread out of their children's mouths, and 
the clothes from their wives' backs; yet, hating it as 



"WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR?" 205 

they do, tliey will take up their glass filled with liquid 
damnation, and drink it. to the dregs. You say, "That 
is true." It is just as true of the love of money. The 
slavery of money is as complete and as degrading as 
the slavery of strong drink. I would rather under- 
take to save ten drunkards than one money fiend, any 
day. When a man begins, there is pleasure in it; the 
first ten pounds, or the first hundred pounds, or per- 
haps the first thousand pounds that he lays by gives him 
joy; but as a man goes on accumulating, there is less 
and less pleasure, and at last there is no pleasure at 
all, but the man is the slave of the degrading lust 
for gold. I was visiting a man in the State of Ohio, 
when I was living in Minneapolis, in the Boom days, 
when men were making fortunes in a day. The man to 
whom I refer had a comfortable fortune of about £100,- 
000, and was now upwards of seventy years of age. 
One foot was in the grave, and the other foot almost 
over the edge. Only a few weeks before I came to see 
him, they had to send post-haste for the doctor to coone 
and pull the man's other foot away from the edge of 
the grave. After everybody else had gone to bed, he 
said to me in a low tone of voice — ^what do you think? 
"Oh," you say, "something about Heaven, something 
about eternity; a man with one foot in the grave and 
the other almost over would wish to talk about the 
future and what it meant for him." But no, he leaned 
over and said : "Do you know any place up in Minne- 
apolis where I could invest my money where it would 
bring big interest?" Oh, some of you men are going 
very fast that same road, selling your souls for damning 
gold. It is just the same way with the love for pleas- 



206 EEVIVAL ADDEESSES 

ure. The first dance, the first card party, the first 
theatre, oh, the excitement of it and the pleasure of it 
and the exhilaration of it; but as one goes on the 
pleasure of these things becomes less and less, and 
more and more complete does the slavery to them be- 
come. The time will never come when you have en- 
joyed the world enough. Furthermore, there is more 
joy in Jesus Christ in twenty-four hours than there is 
in the world in 365 days. I have tried them both. 

Further, suppose while you are waiting until you 
have enjoyed the world enough you are called out of 
the world, '^hat shall it profit a man if he gain the 
whole world and lose his own soul?" One night I 
went down the aisle almost to the far end of it, and 
the people were standing up singing, and I turned to 
a young lady and I said to her, "Why don't you be- 
come a Christian?" "Oh," she said, "I enjoy the 
world too much." I simply quoted God's word to her, 
"What shall it profit a man if he gain the whole world 
and lose his own soul?" and passed on. Tlie meetings 
went on, and the last night came. The last meeting 
had finished, and, after I had returned to the house 
where I was staying, my hostess came to me and said, 
"Two young ladies want to see you; they are waiting 
in the other room." I went in, and one of them was 
the young lady of whom I am speaking. I said to her, 
"Why do 3^ou want to see me?" "Oh," she said, "I 
do not enjoy the world any more ; since you spoke to me 
your words have been ringing in my ears : 'What shall 
it profit a man if he gain the whole world and lose 
his own soul?' And I have come to-night, and have 
brought my friend with me, so that you may tell us 



'^VHAT AEE YOU WAITING FOR?" 207 

what to do to be saved." Oh, that those words would 
ring in the ears of some of you men and women until 
you cannot rest, until you come to the Son of God for 
rest and joy, which is rest and joy indeed. 

3. ''I am waiting for my friend/' says another. 
That is true of a great many persons. Young men 
are waiting for their friends, and young ladies are 
waiting for their lady friends, women are waiting for 
their husbands, lovers are waiting for their sweet- 
hearts — one is waiting for another. What I say to you 
is. You come to Christ first, and bring your friends 
along. If your friends love you as much as you love 
them, when you come to Christ they will come too. It 
is better that you should take them to Heaven with 
you than that they should take you to hell with them. 

I was staying at one time with a minister, and he 
told me this story. He said: "After my wife and I 
had been married for fourteen and a half years she 
turned to me one night and said, 'Husband, I have 
made up my mind to be a Christian and to unite with 
the Church.' " He said, "I was very angry ; I was the 
principal of the schools in that town and held a prom- 
inent position, and I said to her, ^hy, you must not 
do it; you and I have lived very happily together for 
fourteen and a half years, but if you become a Christian, 
I have no intention of becoming one, and that will 
just separate us for ever.' But she said to me, 'I must 
be a Christian. I love you, and would do almost any- 
thing to please you, but I feel I must first please God.' 
'Well,' I said, 'you become a Christian, if you feel that 
you want to, but you must not unite with the Church.' 
"She regarded my wishes in this respect, and so we went 



308 EEVIVAL ADDEESSES 

on for six months, she a Christian, and I not. Then 
she said to me, 'Husband, I must become a member of 
the Church of Jesus Christ.' '' (Of course, if a per- 
son is converted they will never be happy out of the 
Church.) "Then," her husband said, "I was very angry, 
and said to her, 'If you do join the Church, I want 
you to understand that you are nothing more to me. 
We have lived happily together now for fifteen years, 
but if you unite yourself with the Church from this 
time on you go your way, and I shall go mine, and 
you will be nothing more to me.' She said, 'Husband, 
I love you, and I would do all I could to please you, 
but I must first of all please God, and I have made 
up my mind to unite with the Church to-morrow.' She 
went to her room, and I went to mine. I was very 
angry with her. I was getting angrier all the time. I 
could not sleep. I heard eleven o'clock strike, and I was 
very angry; I heard twelve o'clock strike, and I was 
more angry still ; I heard one o'clock, and I was angrier 
still; but when two o'clock came, I called out to my 
wife, 'Wife, I am converted.' " The husband and wife 
went into the Church together. He became a minister 
of the Gospel, and to-day he is in Heaven. If that 
wife had waited for him, they would have gone down to 
a Christless grave and a Christless eternity together. 
Oh, men and women, come to Christ and bring your 
friends with you. Even if they do not C(Ane, you 
come to Christ. I would start for Heaven to-night, 
even if I had to start alone. I would rather go to 
Heaven alone than go to hell in company. I believe 
that one of the darkest experiences of that dark world 



"WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR?" 209 

will be when a husband that goes there is met by the 
wife whom he dragged there. 

In one of my pastorates a solemn thing occurred; 
before I had gone there, in the neighbouring town- 
ship there had been a great awakening, and many 
people had come out on the side of Christ, and one 
night, when the preacher extended an invitation for all 
those who would accept Christ to come to the front, a 
lady rose from her place to do so. But her husband, 
sitting back of her, laid his hand on her shoulder, 
and forced her back into her seat. She yielded to 
him, and she drifted away from her conviction into 
skepticism and blank infidelity. That is the way peo- 
ple become infidels, by resisting the Spirit of God. 
Show me a hundred infidels, and I will show you in 
ninety-nine cases men who were under conviction of 
sin at some time or other, but who have resisted the 
Spirit of God. Tliis lady became an utter atheist. 
Some time afterwards there was a revival in the town. 
It caused the infidels of the town to be greatly stirred 
up. When we get a revival, it stirs up the infidels won- 
derfully. They said, "This cannot go on. We will 
send off and get one of our infidel lecturers ;" and they 
got their lecturer, a follower of Ingersoll. Thank God, 
they did have that lecturer. People went to hear him ; 
and when they had heard him, they said, "If that is 
infidelity, we do not want any of it." While waiting for 
this professor, this lady said, "I can hardly wait for 

Professor to get here." She did not wait. There 

was a little card party being held on the Saturday 
night, and this lady and her friends were among the 
party. Eleven o'clock on Saturday night came, and 



210 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

they were still playing cards; at twelve o'clock they 
were still playing; and at one o'clock on Sunday morn- 
ing — on the Lord's Day — they were still playing cards. 
Sabbath-hreaking and card-playing go hand in hand, 
you know. About one o'clock in the morning this 
woman sprang to her feet, clapped her hand on her 
head, and cried, "Oh!" and dropped dead beside the 
table. I shall never forget my meeting with her hus- 
band after that awful day. I had never spoken to him 
before ; but I happened to walk into the post-office, and 
this man came in at the same time, and he came 
across the post-office and held out his hand, and, with a 
grip of despair, he took my hand in his. He knew he 
had sent his wife into a Christless eternity. Oh, don't 
wait for others; come yourself, and bring the others 
with you. 

4. "Well," some one else says, "that is not what I 
am waiting for; I am waiting for feeling/* I believe 
that is true of a great many. There is many an earnest 
soul that would really like to be a Christian, but they 
think they have not got the right kind of feeling. Some 
are waiting for the joy and peace that Christians talk 
about. I went to a young lady once in a meeting like 
this, and said to her, "Why are you not a Christian?" 
She replied, "I have not the right kind of feeling. 
These people have been talking about the joy and peace 
that they have ; I have not any joy like that, and I can- 
not come to Christ until I get it." I said, "But that is 
the result of coming. You don't expect the result, do 
you, before you take the step?" Suppose I should go 
and see a very sick man, and I said to him, "What is 
the matter with you ?" and he said, "Influenza.'^ Then I 



"WHAT ABE YOU WAITING FOR?" 211 

might say, ^'I had the influenza some time ago, and I 
took such and such a remedy, and it cured me com- 
pletely." Then he would say, "What is that remedy?" 
Tlien, when I tell him what it is, he calls for his man, 
and tells him to run down to the chemist's at once 
and buy it; and when he brings the bottle back, the 
sick man hands it to me and says, "Is that it?'' and 
I say, "Yes, that is the medicine." And he says to me, 
"You say you took it, and it made you better right off ?" 
and I say, "Yes." Then he says, "Thank you for telling 
me of it; I am so much obliged." Then a few days 
afterwards I go to see that man, and expect to find him 
up and well ; but instead of that, I find him still in bed 
and sicker than ever. I say to him, "I don't understand 
this. Are you not any better?" "No," he says, "I am 
worse." "Why, how is that?" I ask; "did you not get 
that medicine which cured me ?" "Yes, of course I got 
it," he says ; "were you not in the room when my man 
brought it to me from the chemist's ?" "Well, did you 
take it ?" I ask. "Oh, no, I didn't take it," he says ; "you 
said it made you a great deal better right off. But I 
did not feel any better, so I did not take it!" You 
would say, "What a foolish man." Is he any more 
foolish than you ? You cannot espect to have the result 
of accepting Christ until you take the step ; take Christ 
and confess Him, and you will get all the joy you need. 
A woman once came to me in one of our missions and 
said, "I want to be a Christian." I said, "Become 
one now." She said, "How?" I said, "It is just as 
simple as it is to walk home." "Oh, but," she said, "I 
don't feel any better." I said, "Of course you don't. 
You haven't done the thing to make you feel better." 



312 REVIVAL ADDRESSES. 

"But all the other folks talk about their joy," she said. 
I said, 'TTes, because they have taken the step that leads 
to joy. Don't you know you are a sinner, and that 
Christ died for your sins, and that He is your rightful 
Lord and Master?" She said, "Yes, I know that." 
"Well," I said, "will you take Him for your Saviour, 
and yield to Him as your Lord and Master now ?" She 
said, "I will." "Then let us get down and pray," I 
said. When we had prayed, I said, "Now it is too late 
to confess Christ publicly in the meeting, for the people 
have nearly all gone, but you confess Christ the first 
chance you get." "But I don't feel any better," she 
said. "I did not suppose you would," I said ; "you have 
not gone far enough yet. You must confess Christ be- 
fore the world, and then the joy and peace will come to 
you." The next day, when I went to the town hall, 
before I went on to the platform to address the busi- 
ness men's meeting, I received a note from this lady, 
which said : "Oh, Dr. Torrey, I feel so grateful to you ; 
I am so happy. Fifteen minutes after leaving the hall 
last night I had all the joy I could contain. When I 
got outside I met my brother, and went home with him ; 
and on the way I told him that I had given myself to 
Christ ; and as I told him, the joy came into my heart, 
and has been there ever since." 

Other people are ivaiting for conviction of sin. They 
feel that they cannot come to Christ, because they have 
not shed tears, and are not overwhelmed with the bur- 
den of sin. I like to see conviction of sin, but there is 
no passage in the whole Bible that says you have got to 
feel sorry before you are saved. In Isaiah Iv. 7 we read, 
"Let the wicked forsake his way" (not be sorry about it) 



"WHAT AEE YOU WAITING FOK?'^ 213 

"and tKe imrigliteous man his thoughts, and let him re- 
turn unto the Lord, and He will have mercy upon him ; 
and to our God, for He will abundantly pardon." It 
doesn't say "feel sorry for your sin ;" it says, "quit your 
sin and turn to God." I have seen people very sorry 
over their sins; they just weep and weep, and then go 
right out and do the same thing again for which they 
have professed to be sorry. I have known people just 
as stolid as a man could be, but they turned from their 
sin and took Christ in cold blood, as it were, and God 
kept His word and saved them. And He will keep His 
promise to-night. 

On one occasion in Chicago I went to preach for a 
Baptist minister. In the second meeting I sat down by 
a man and his wife, aged about forty years, and I said 
to him, ^^hy are you not a Christian?" He said, "I 
would like to be; I hope to be a Christian some day. 
My father was a Baptist minister, and my mother is one 
of the best women that ever lived on earth." "Well," I 
said, "come right now." He said, "I want to." I said, 
"Then why don't you?" He said, "I have not got the 
right kind of feeling." I said, "What do you think 
is the right kind of feeling?" He said, "I don't feel 
sorry for my sins. Don't you think a man ought to 
have conviction of sin?" I said, "I think you ought, 
but I do not read in my Bible anything that says a 
man has to feel sorry to be saved. My Bible says, 'Turn 
from sin and take Christ'; my Bible says, *^Keceive 
Christ.' 'As many as received Him' — not to as many 
as wept over their sin — 'as many as received Him to 
them gave He power to become sons of God.' Don't 
you know you are a sinner ?" I said. "I know I am a 
sinner," he said, "but I don't feel it." I said, "Don't 



214 REVIVAL - ADDEESSES. 

you know that Jesus Christ is your Saviour?" ^TTes," 
he said. "Don't you know it would be the best thing 
you could do to take Him as j^our Saviour?" "Yes, I 
do." Then I said, "Take Him as your Saviour now." 
He said, "Without feeling sorry ?" I said, "Never mind 
the feeling. Will you take Him?" He said, "I have 
not any feeling." I said, "See here, what business are 
you in?" He said, "I am in the real estate business." 
I said, "Suppose that I should come down to your office 
to-morrow morning and offer to sell you a corner lot 
for five thousand dollars, and you knew it was a lot that 
you could sell in twenty-four hours for ten thousand 
dollars, but, for some reason or other, you didn't feel 
like buying it — Would you buy it ?" He said, "I would 
buy it quick, feeling or no feeling." "My friend/' I 
said, "show the same commonsense in religion that 
you do in business. Don't you know it would be the 
best paying investment you could make to take Jesus 
Christ as your Saviour?" He said, "Yes, I do." "Will 
you do it, then, feeling or no feeling?" He said, "Is 
that all?" I said, "That is all to start with." "Then," 
he said, "I will do it." I said, "Will you kneel down 
and seal the bargain right now?" and we knelt, and he 
and his wife took Christ. I went back to that church 
in a few months, and that man had come along so finely 
that they had made him a trustee of the church. 

Men and women, Christ is a Saviour. God offers Him 
to you; you take Him and it is done. Feeling or no 
feeling, will you take Him to-night ? 

ISTo one has a good reason for not coming to Christ. 
There are a thousand reasons why you ought to come. 
Every year that you have lived has brought you one 
year nearer to eternity, and is a reason for coming to 



'^WHAT AEE YOU WAITING FOR?" 215 

Christ to-niglit ; every year that you have still to live 
and that might be a year of service is a reason for 
coming to Christ to-night. Every saved friend you have 
is a reason for coming to Christ to-night, that you may 
spend eternity with him in Heaven. Every unsaved 
friend that you have is a reason why you 
should come to Christ to-night, that you may 
bring him with you. Every thorn in the Sa- 
viour's crown, every nail in the Saviour's hands and 
feet, every stroke laid upon the Saviour's back, when 
He was wounded for your transgressions and bruised 
for your iniquities, and the chastisement of your peace 
was laid upon Him, is a reason for accepting Christ to- 
night. Will you do it? Oh, there is an awful risk in 
delay. 

A quaint old preacher of the olden days in our coun- 
try, the Rev. Dan Baker, puts it in the way of a story. 
He tells of a man who was crossing the ocean. He was 
leaning over the side of the vessel ; it was a bright sunny 
day, and not a wave broke the surface of the water, just 
a little ripple here and there kissed by the rays of the 
sun. And the man, as he leaned over the rail of the 
vessel, was tossing something in the air, something 
which, when it fell through the sunlight, sparkled with 
singular radiance and glory; and he watched it so 
eagerly as he tossed it up and caught it as it fell. He 
tossed it up again and again and again, and it threw out 
its marvellous light as it fell. At last an onlooker came 
and said, "May I ask what that is that you are tossing 
up so carelessly?" He replied, "Certainly; look at it, it 
is a diamond." "Is it of much value?" asked the onlook- 
er. "Yes, of very great value. See the colour of it, see the 
size of it. In fact, all I have in the world is in that 



ai6 BEVIVAL ADDRESSES. 

diamond. I am going to a new country to seek my 
fortune, and I have sold everytliing I have, and have 
put it into that diamond, so as to get it into a portable 
shape." "Then if it is so valuable, is it not an awful 
risk you are running in tossing it up so carelessly?" 
was the next question. "No risk at all. I have been do- 
ing this for the last half-hour," said the man. "But 
there might come a last time," said the onlooker; but 
the iman laughed and threw it up again, and caught it 
as it fell, and again and again, and once more, and it 
flashed and blazed, and looked like a burning coal in 
the sunlight, and he watches it so eagerly as it falls 
the last time. Ah, but this time it is too far out. He 
reaches as far as he can over the rail of the vessel, but 
he cannot reach far enough. There is a little plash in 
the ocean. For a moment he stands aghast, and then 
he cries, "Lost! lost! lost! All I have in the world, 
lost!" 

You say, "No man would be so great a fool as that; 
that story is not true." That story is true, and the 
man is here to-night. Thou art the man ! That ocean 
is eternity ; that vessel you are on is life ; that diamond 
is your soul, of priceless value, that soul that Christ 
put great enough value upon to die for it, to save it. And 
you have been trifling with it ! I come to you to-night 
and say, "My friend, what is that in your hand which 
you are playing with so carelessly?" You say, "It is 
my soul." "Is it worth much ?" "More than the whole 
round earth, 'for what shall it profit a man if he gain 
the whole world and lose his own soul ?' " "But don't 
you think you are taking an awful risk?" "Oh, no," you 
say, "I have been doing this for the last five years, for 
the last ten, fifteen, or twenty years." "Yes, but you 



^^WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR?" 217 

might do it once too often." '^Oh, no," you say, and 
to-night once more you throw it up. But you may throw 
it up once too often ; it will fall too far out, beyond your 
reach; there will be a plash, and you will try to look 
after it; not in the impenetrable depths of the blue 
ocean, but in the unfathomable depths of the bottomless 
pit it sinks and sinks and sinks, and you cry, 'T^ost! 
lost ! lost ! my soul is lost !" That may be your cry some 
day. Come to-night, before it is too late, and put your 
soul where it will be everlastingly safe, in the keeping 
of the Son of God. 



XV 

EXCUSES 



"And they all with one consent began to make excuses."—* 
Luke xiv, 18. 



In these words our Lord Jesus Christ sets forth the 
manner in which God's invitation of love and grace and 
mercy would be received, and that is precisely the way 
in which God's invitation of mercy is being received 
by the people of London to-night. When you come to 
men and extend to them God's wonderful invitation 
of grace to His royal banquet, one and all, instead of 
accepting it with glad alacrity, begin to make excuses 
for not coming. In the parable from which the text 
is taken our Lord Jesus Christ represents that the Gos- 
pel invitation is an invitation to a banquet. So it is. 
Never was there such a glorious banquet spread on 
earth as this which God spreads for you and me in the 
Gospel of His Son, Jesus Christ. God's table is just 
groaning with good things. N'ow, when men are invited 
to a royal banquet they begin to cast about for some 
way to get to it. But when the great King of Kings 
spreads His table and invites His guests, so great is 
the blindness and madness of the human heart that 
men try to find some excuse for not going. If at the cor- 
onation, a few months ago, King Edward had given a 
great banquet in this city, and sent out invitations to 
his guests, every person who was honoured by an invi- 

218 



EXCUSES 219 

tation would have moved Heaven and earth to get to 
that banquet, because they were so honoured that the 
king had sent them an invitation. But when the great 
King, the Lord God Almighty, sends out His invita- 
tion by His Gospel messengers to His royal banquet, in 
the desperate wickedness of the human heart, and in 
your stubborn rebellion against the Lord who loves you 
and gave His Son to die for you, instead of trying to 
come to the banquet, you try to find some excuse for 
not coming. Our Lord Jesus Christ, in the parable, 
gives us three illustrative excuses, and each one of 
these excuses is perfectly absurd; and that is the point 
of it. Our Lord Jesus wants us to see how utterly irra- 
tional and absurd are all the excuses that men make 
for not coming to Christ. 

The first excuse was this : "I have bought a piece of 
ground, and I must needs go and see it.'^ How utterly 
absurd! It sounds rational at the first hearing, and 
looks rational at the first glance, but when you look at 
it, how absurd it is. If the man had already bought the 
ground, where was the need of hurry in going to see it ? 
He could have waited until the banquet was over. Fur- 
thermore, who ever heard of going out at supper-time, 
after dark, to see land. He was just making up an ex- 
cuse, and his excuse, like most of yours, was a lie. If 
the man had been a real sensible business man he would 
have gone and seen the ground before he bought it. 
The idea of a man buying a piece of ground and then 
going to see it ! I know of a man in America who did 
that once. It was up in Minneapolis. The man bought 
some real estate in that city, and instead of going to see 
it first, or sending some one to see it, he had bought it, 
and months after he thought he would go and see it. 



220 KEYIVAL ADDEESSES 

He went up there and found his land was at the bottom 
of Lake Harriet. Very good soil, but too wet ! 

The second excuse was equally absurd. The man 
said: ^^I have bought five yolk of oxen and I go to 
prove them." How absurd! There is no hurry; the 
oxen were already purchased; he might go to the ban- 
quet first and try the oxen afterwards, and if he had 
been a real sensible business man he would have tried 
the oxen first, and bought them afterwards. Anyway, 
day-time is far better than night-time to try oxen. 

The third man's excuse was the most absurd of all. 
He said, "I have married a wife, and therefore I cannot 
come." I would like to know why not ? If it had been 
a funeral there would have been some sense in his ex- 
cuse, but it was a feast. Who ever saw a bride that was 
not willing to go to a feast ? Why did he not bring her 
with him ? There was plenty of room at the feast. 

You laugh at those excuses, but I want to ask if there 
is any one here to-night with a better excuse? I am 
going to take up the excuses men bring forward to-day 
for not coming to Christ, and show you the utter ab- 
surdity and unreasonableness of every one of them. 

The first excuse is this: there is too much to give 
up. That is absolutely unreasonable. You say, "Do 
you mean to say there is nothing to give up if one comes 
to Christ?" No, I say nothing of the kind. I never 
knew any one to come to Christ yet that did not have 
to give up something. The drunkard has to give up his 
drunkenness, the gambler his gambling; people who are 
following the frivolities of the world have to give them 
up. I am not saying there is nothing to give up, but 
still that excuse is absurd. You say, "Why?" For 



EXCUSES 221 

three reasons. In tlie first place, the only tilings God 
asks you to give up are the things that are doing you 
harm. We read in Psalm ixxxiv. 11 : "The Lord God 
is a Sun and Shield: the Lord will give grace and 
glory : no good thing will He withhold from them that 
walk uprightly." God has given to each one of us a 
guarantee that He will never ask us to give up anything 
that is for our good, and that guarantee is His own 
Son. As we read in Eomans viii. 32 : "He that spared 
not His own Son, but delivered Him up for us all, how 
shall He not with Him also freely give us 
all things ?" I do not think if God has given His Son 
to die for us. He is going to ask us to give up anything 
that is good for us. I remember once in an after-meet- 
ing, I was talking to a young lady about coming to 
Clirist. She said, "Well, I would like to be a Christian.'' 
"Then become one now." "Oh, no," she replied. "Why 
not?" "There is too much to give up." I said, "See 
here, do you think God loves you ?" "Why, I know He 
does." "How much do you think God loves you?" 
"God loved me enough to give His Son to die for me." 
"Well," I said, "do you think that God, if He loved 
you enough to give His Son to die for you, will 
ask you to give up anything that is for your good to 
keep?" She said, "No, He will not." I said, "Do you 
want to keep anything that is not for your highest 
good?" She replied, "No." "Then do you not think 
you would better come to Christ right now ?" She said, 
"I will," and she did. 

The second reason why the excuse is absurd is this : 
what you give up is nothing to what you get. It is very 
easy to give up tin when you get gold, and it is very 
easy to give up sin when you get God. It is very easy 



222 EEVIVAL ADDEESSES 

to give up painted glass wlieii you get diamonds and 
rubies and emeralds and pearls instead. And it is 
very easy to give up the baubles of the world when you 
get the real jewels of Heaven in exchange. I do not 
think that anybody ever gave up more for Christ than 
did Paul, and yet, when he was sore tried and in prison, 
writing about what he gave up, he said, "What things 
were gain to me those I counted loss for Christ. Yea, 
doubtless, and I count all things but loss for the ex- 
cellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord, for 
whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and do 
count them but dung, that I may win Christ." He 
said, '"What I gave up is nothing to what I gained." 
You cannot find a Christian on the face of the earth 
that will not tell you that what he gave up for Christ 
was nothing to what he got. Suppose there was some 
young woman in this town with a pretty face ; a bright 
girl, but without very good sense after all, with a good 
deal of vanity, and being poor and unable therefore to 
buy real jewelry, she bought imitation. She had a brass 
ring, which she thought people would think was gold, 
but no one ever thought so. Then she had another 
ring, with two bits of green glass and a bit of white 
glass in the middle, and thought people believed it 
was a diamond and emeralds, but they did not. Then 
she had a string of white beads round her neck, and 
thought people believed they were real pearls, but no 
one ever dreamed it. Then she had a pair of earrings 
made of brass, with two bits of white glass, and wished 
people to believe that they were real diamonds ; nobody 
ever thought of such a thing. After a while a fine, in- 
telligen'f, bright, sensible young fellow falls in love with 
her. You say that no sensible fellow would fall in love 



EXCUSES 823 

with a girl like that. But you cannot tell what a man will 
do when he falls in love. One night, after they have be- 
come well acquainted, he says to her, "Mary, I wish 
you would throw away that brass ring, and that ring 
with the bits of glass in it, and that white bead neck- 
lace, and those pieces of brass and glass in your ears. 
To tell you the truth, I am ashamed of them when 
I go out with you, and I wish you would throw them 
away.'' She says, "Oh, John, I think ever so much of 
you, and would do a good many things for you, but I 
cannot do that. They are the best I have, and I really 
think people believe they are genuine." "No, no, Mary, 
they do not; they make you a laughing stock, and I 
wish you would throw them away.'' But she says, 
"Well, John, I love you, but I really cannot do it." A 
few nights after John comes again. He has a big 
Eussian leather box; he presses a spring, the cover 
falls back, and inside it is lined with the very best of 
satin, and there is a real gold ring with two beautiful 
emeralds, and a beautiful diamond, there is a necklace 
of real pearls, and there is also a pair of real diamond 
earrings. "Look there, Mary;" and, oh, how her eyes 
sparkle ! "Why, John, are they not beautiful ! Who are 
they for?" "Well, Mary, they are for you if you will 
throw away that brass and glass of yours." How long do 
you think it would take Mary to throw away her imita- 
tion jewels? Oh, men and women, cast all the baubles 
of this word's pleasures into the fire, and receive the 
gold and emeralds and rubies and diamonds and pearls 
of Heaven. 

In the third place, the excuse is absurd, because what 
we give up for Christ is nothing to what Jesus Christ 
gave up for us. Oh, friends, when we stop to think 



224 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

what Jesus Christ gave up for us, how He left Heaven 
and its glories and came down to earth and its shame, 
how He left the songs of praise of angels, and the arch- 
angel, and cherubim, and seraphim, and came down 
here to be despised and rejected of men, to be spat upon 
and buffeted, to wear a crown of thorns, and to bear the 
nails in His hands and feet for you and me, how un- 
grateful, how unreasonable, how base, how black it is 
for you and me to talk about what we give up for Jesus 
Christ when we think of what He gave up for us. 

2. Another man says, "I have an excuse and a good 
one. There are so many hypocrites in the church/' 
What shall I say to that excuse ? I say without hesita- 
tion that that is the most absurd excuse a man can 
tmake. "What," you say, "are there no hypocrites in 
the church?" Of course, there are. The Bible tells us 
that there will be hypocrites in the church. In the pas- 
sage which I read to-night Jesus said that there would 
be hypocrites right up to the judgment day. "Many 
will say unto Me in that day, 'Lord, Lord, have we not 
prophesied in Thy name, and in Thy name have cast 
out devils, and in Thy name done many wonderful 
works?' And then will I profess unto them, I never 
knew you: depart from Me ye that work iniquity." 

Of course there are hypocrites in the church, but I 
would like to know how that is an excuse for your 
trampling under foot the Son of God. The fact that 
another man is a hypocrite is no reason why you should 
trample under foot the Son of God, God's own Son, 
Jesus Christ. What would you think of a man here 
in London refusing his allegiance to King Edward, 
and saying, "No, I will not have him for king; I have 
got a good reason." "What is it?" "Because there 



EXCUSES S25 

are so many people that profess to be loyal to King 
Edward who are not/' What would you think of that 
for an excuse? You would think of that man as a fit 
subject for a lunatic asylum. But that is the way you 
reason. There are so many people that pretend to be 
loyal to Jesus who are not, that it excuses you from 
even professing to be loyal. Bah ! 

Then again, if there are hypocrites in the church 
(and I have no doubt of it), there are a great many 
good people in the church. Of course I use the term 
church not meaning any one denomination, but the 
whole body of believers in Jesus Christ. There are a 
great many good people in the church; in fact, all the 
best people are there. But if there were a church or 
chapel consisting of a hundred members, and ninety- 
nine were good, straight, upright, downright. Christian 
men and women, and there w^as one poor, miserable 
hypocrite, you would overlook the ninety-nine good 
straight members, and fix all your attention on the one 
poor, miserable hypocrite. Yes, you would! And do 
you know why that is? It is because you are a hypo- 
crite yourself. You are a hypocrite outside the church, 
and therefore you are looking for hypocrites inside the 
church to hide behind. Did it ever occur to you that 
you cannot hide behind a thing which is smaller than 
yourself ? You must be a mighty small man or wopnan 
to be able to hide behind such a mean hypocrite as that. 
God will have you out of that hiding-place. Do you 
know w^hat He says about these men who are always 
talking about h3^ocrites in the church? Turn to 
Eomans xiv. 12: ^^So then, every one of us shall give 
account of himself to God." You won't have to an- 
swer for the hypocrite, but you will have to . an- 



226 REVIVAL APDRESSES 

swer for yourself. A friend of mine was walking in 
Chicago one night when a young fellow of about thirty 
walked up, and my friend said to him, "Are you a 
Christian?" He replied, "No, sir, I am not." "Well, 
why are you not ?" He said, "Because there are so many 
hypocrites in the church." My friend said, "I want to 
show you something," and he opened the Bible at Ro- 
mans xiv. 12, and said, "Read that." The man read, 
"and every one of us shall give account of himself to 
God." My friend said, "Who have you got to give ac- 
count of?" The man replied, "Of myself." He said, 
^'To whom have you to give account?" The man re- 
plied, "To God." He said, "Are you ready to give an 
account of yourself to God?" and the man sank down 
on his knees in one of the busiest streets of Chicago, 
and did what some of you here to-night ought to do ; he 
cried, "God be merciful to me, a sinner." 

One more word before I leave this matter. All the 
hypocrites are going to hell. The Bible says so, and if 
you keep on rejecting Christ you are going there, too. 
Now I will ask you a question: Which is better, to 
spend a few years with the hypocrites in the church 
here on earth (and with all the good people at the 
same time), or spend eternity with the hypocrites in 
hell, with all the bad people? "Well," you say, "that 
excuse is absurd, and I will never make it again." I 
hope you never will. You will not if you have any com- 
mon sense. 

3. But another man says, "I have a good excuse. I 
am a pretty good sort of a man; I do not profess to be 
perfect, but I think the good in my life will imore than 
balance the evil in my life, and I think God will accept 
me on the ground of the good I have done and the 



EXCUSES 2%r 

character I have maintained." What shall I say to 
that man? I say this to every man and woman in this 
building to-night who is out of Christ, "You are a very 
wicked man ; you are a very sinful woman." I know you 
will say, "I am not at all." Yes, you are; and I will 
prove it to you. I will prove to you that you are so 
sinful that you have broken the very first and greatest 
of God's commandments. You may differ from some 
of your fellow-men and women on the minor morali- 
ties, thank God you do. Some men swear, and you do 
not; some men lie, and you do not; some get drunk, 
and you do not ; some commit adultery, and you do not. 
On these minor moralities you differ from some of your 
fellow-men and women, and are better than they. But, 
on the great question of the treatment of the infinite 
God, before which all the minor moralities of our treat- 
ment of men sink into utter insignificance, you are all 
on the same plane, you have broken the first and great- 
est of God's commandments. Turn to Matthew xxii. 
37 and 38 : "And Jesus said unto him. Thou shalt love 
the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy 
soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great 
commandment." Have you kept it? Have you loved 
God with all your heart and soul and mind? Have 
you put God first in everything, God first in business, 
God first in pleasure, God first in politics, God first in 
social life, God first in study, God first everywhere. 
Have you done this ? You say, "No, I have not." Then 
you stand convicted before God of having broken the 
first and greatest of God's commandments, of having 
committed the very worst sin that a man or woman 
can commit. One night after a meeting like this, 
a friend of mine, a pastor in Chicago, came 



228 KEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

to me and said, "I have a young man wHo wanta 
to enter the ministry. I want you to talk to him." He 
brought up the young man, and I said to him, "The 
pastor says you want to be a minister." He said, '^es, 
I do." I said, ''Are you a Christian?" He answered, 
"Why, of course I am. I was brought up as a Chris- 
tian, and I am not going back on the training of my 
parents." I said, "Have j^ou ever been born again?" 
He said, "What?" I said, "The Word of God says 
^except a man be bom again, he cannot see the King- 
dom of G od.' Have you been born again ?" He replied, 
"I never heard of that before in all my life." I said, 
"Do you know that you have committed the greatest 
sin a man can commit?" He said, "No, I never have." 
"What do you think is the greatest sin?" He said, 
"Murder, of course." I said, "You are greatly mis- 
taken. See what the Lord Jesus Christ says about it." 
And I opened the Bible at Matthew xxii. 37, 38, and 
he read: "Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all 
thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. 
This is the first and great commandment." I said, 
"Which commandment is that ?" He replied, "It is the 
first and great commandment." I said, "Have you 
kept it? Have you loved God with all your heart 
and soul and mind ? Have you put God first in every- 
thing, God first in business, God first in study, God 
first in pleasure, God first in everything?" He an- 
swered, "No, sir, I have not." "Well, what have you 
done?" "I have broken this commandment." "Which 
commandment is it?" "It is the first and great com- 
mandment." "What have you done?" He said, "I 
have committed the greatest sin a man can possibly 



EXCUSES 229 

commit; I have broken the first and greatest of God's 
commandments, but I never saw it before in all my life/*' 

Probably you never saw it before, but you see it to- 
night. There is no difference. Every man and woman 
out of Christ has broken the first and greatest of God's 
commandments, and there is no hope for you outside the 
atoning blood of Jesus Christ, shed on the Cross of 
Calvary. When I was in Sydney, I said that at a 
meeting, and the next day I received a note from a 
lady, who said, ^'1 wish you would pray for me. I have 
been trusting in my morality, but you showed me last 
night that I was a very wicked woman." Oh, may God 
grant that some of you here to-night, that have been 
trusting in your goodness, may see that in God's sight 
you are very wicked men, very sinful women, for you 
have broken the first and greatest of God's laws. 

4. Another man says, "That excuse is not a good 
one. I wonder that any intelligent man should ever 
make it. But I have a good one. I am too great a 
sinner to come to Christ," Now, I believe people make 
that excuse honestly. I believe there are a great many 
people who would like to come, but think they are too 
bad. What shall I say to them ? What God sa}:s in 1 
Timothy i. 15 : "This is a faithful saying, and worthy 
of all acceptation, that Christ Jesus came into the world 
to save sinners ; of whom I am chief." I remember one 
Sunday morning in my church, one of the deacons 
walked down the aisle to a man of about thirty-five 
years of age, who was standing up. My deacon turned 
to him and said, "Are you a Christian?" "No," he 
said, "I am not." "Why not become one now?" He 
replied, "I am too great a sinner to be saved." My 
deacon said^ 'Thank God." Then he turned to me and 



230 EEYIVAL ADDKESSES 

said, "Come here. Brother Torrey. Here is a man who 
is too great a sinner to be saved, thank God." The man 
stood in amazement, wondering what it all meant. But 
I understood, and I went down and said, "Is that 
true?'^ He said, "Yes, I am too great a sinner to be 
saved." I said, "Let me show you what God says," 
and I opened the Bible at 1 Timothy i. 15 : "This is a 
faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation, that Christ 
Jesus came into the world to save sinners, of whom I 
am chief." "Well," he said, "I am chief." He was a 
hardened sinner; he had run away from his wife, and 
gone up to the jSTorth-West ; had gone in for gambling, 
had laid down 35,000 dollars just a week before, and 
was a desperate man. "Well," he said, "I am chief." 
I said, "It means you, then." I said, "Will you accept 
Jesus Christ right now ?" and he said, "I will," and he 
dropped down on his knees and accepted Christ then 
and there. He stayed with us about two weeks, and 
went up to the North- West, and came back again, and 
every night was in the meeting leading others to Christ, 
sent for his wife, set up a new home, and was so happy 
that he adopted a little child out of the orphan asylimi 
to make his home complete. He was "too great a sin- 
ner to be saved," but he was saved in five minutes. 

5. Another man says, "My excuse is different. I 
cannot hold out." Well, that excuse is perfectly ab- 
surd. "Why is my excuse absurd?" Because God 
does not ask you to hold out. Holding out is not your 
business. That is the business of the Lord Jesus Christ. 
We read in Jude, verse 24: "He is able to keep you 
from falling and to present you faultless before the 
presence of His glory with exceeding joy." Ah, men 
and women, there is not a man who is able to hold 



EXCUSES g81 

out in his own strength. But, thank God, there is not 
a man or woman so weak that Jesus Christ cannot keep 
him or her. A man in New York one night was on the 
verge of delirium tremens. He had had it again and 
again. He had committed 139 forgeries, all against 
one man. He went to the Cremorne Mission, and heard 
Jerry M'Auley tell how the Lord Jesus Christ had saved 
him; and when Jerry said, "If there is any one wants 
to he saved to-night, let them come to the front," he 
went up the aisle, and said, "Pray for me." Jerry said, 
"Pray for yourself," but he did not know how to pray ; 
he had forgotten how; the man had gone away down 
through drink, and was an outcast. Jerry said, "Pray 
for yourself." And Sam Hadley cried out, "God be 
merciful to me a sinner,'^ and before he got up he was 
a transformed man. Some years after I was in Washing- 
ton, presiding at a conference. Mr. Wanamaker, then 
Postmaster-General of the United States of America, 
was there, and he said to me, "I want you to come 
round to my house to dinner," and I went round. And 
when I was ushered into the drawing-room, who 
should I see sitting there but Sam Hadley and his wife, 
honoured guests in the home of the Postmaster-General 
of the United States of America — the former forger! 
And there is not a more honoured man in New York 
City to-day than Mr. Samuel Hadley, as he is nom 
called. 

Oh friends, thank God there is not a man or woman 
so weak, so helpless and hopeless, but Jesus Christ can 
hold them if they put their trust in Him to-night. 

6. Just one more excuse. Another man says, "My 
excuse is a little different. God won't receive me if I 
cmne." People make this excuse in different ways. 



232 KEVIVAL 'ADDEESSES 

"I have sinned away the day of grace, I have com- 
mitted the unpardonahle sin, and He won^t receive me 
if I come." What shall I say to this? I will say that 
excuse is just as absurd as any. Why? Because it is 
contradicting God's plain statement in John vi. 37, 
"Him that cometh to Me I will in no wise cast out." 
Thank God, there is not a man or woman on the face 
of the earth, not a man or woman in London, or in this 
building to-night, but if you come to Jesus Christ He 
will take you and save you. At one time in Chicago I 
received a letter something like this: "I have a son 
who thinks he has committed the unpardonable sin. 
He has been for months in despair, has attempted sui- 
cide five times. I wish you would take him at the Bible 
Institute." That was very touching. Xevertheless, I 
felt it to be my duty, as the superintendent of the 
Institute, to write : "I sympathize with you deeply, but 
I cannot take your son. That is not the purpose of 
the Institute, which is for the training of men and 
women for Christian work." He replied, and said, 
"You must take him; if you do not, we do not know 
what to do." I wrote again that I had the deepest 
sympathy with him, but was entrusted with the funds 
of the Institute, and it was not right to take his son." 
Then some one else wrote to me — a personal friend — 
and said, "I want you to take him for my sake." He 
had been a great friend of the Institute, and I now 
felt that I was warranted in taking the young man, 
and wrote telling the father to send him. They sent 
him under guard — for they dared not trust him alone 
— and he was brought to me. Mr. Lyon said, "This is 
Mr. So-and-so. I suppose I can go now." "Yes," I 
said, "leave him alone with me." I said, "Sit down" 



EXCUSES «33 

He looked at me and said, "I am possessed of the devil." 
I said, "I guess you are. But Jesus Christ came to 
cast out devils." He said, "I mean that the devil has 
entered into me as he did into Judas Iscariot." I 
said, "That's very likely, but Jesus Christ is mightier 
than the devil, and can set you free from the power 
of the devil." He said, "I have committed the un- 
pardonable sin." I said, "Jesus said, ^Him that com- 
eth unto Me I will in no wise cast out.' " He said, "I 
was once enlightened and tasted the gift, I fell away, 
and it is impossible to renew me again." He knew 
his Bible, you see ! But I said, "Jesus says, 'Him that 
cometh unto Me I will in no vdse cast out.' " He said, 
"I have sinned willfully after having received the 
knowledge of the truth." I said, "But Jesus says, 'Him 
that cometh unto Me I will in no wise cast out.' Will 
you come?" Well, he did not come then. Days and 
weeks passed, and then one day I met him in the Insti- 
tute, where he was stopping, in the hall-way on the 
second floor, and I thought the time had come to have 
it out. I said, "Sit down," and he sat down beside me. 
I said, "Do you believe the Bible?" "Yes," he said, 
"I do, everything in it." "Do you believe John vi. 
37?" He said, "Yes, and I can quote it: Tlim that 
cometh to Me I will in no wise cast out.'" I said, 
"Do you believe that?" "Of course I do; I believe 
everything in the Bible." "Why do you not come?" 
He said, "I am possessed with the devil." I said, "The 
Bible does not say 'Him that is not possessed with the 
devil if he cometh unto Me I will in no wise cast him 
out.' It says, 'Him that cometh unto Me I will no wise 
cast out.' " He said, "I mean that the devil has entered 
into me as he did into Judas Iscariot." I said, "It does 



234 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

not say 'Him that the devil has not entered into, if he 
Cometh unto Me, I will in no wise cast out.' It says 
'Him that cometh I will in no wise cast out.' " He said, 
''I have been once enlightened, and have tasted the 
heavenly gift, and have fallen away, and it is impos- 
sible to renew me unto repentance." I said, "It does 
not say, ^If you have not been once enlightened, and 
tasted the heavenly gift, and fallen away, I will in no 
wise cast you out.' It says, 'Him that cometh unto Me 
I will in no wise cast out.' " He said, "I have sinned 
wilfully after I have received the knowledge of the 
truth." I said, "It does not say 'If you have not sinned 
wilfully after receiving the knowledge of the truth, if 
you come unto Me, I will in no wise cast you out.' It 
sa3^s, 'Him that cometh unto Me I will in no wise cast 
out.' " He said, "My heart is as hard as the floor." 
I said, "It does not say 'If your heart is soft and ten- 
der, and you come unto Me, I will in no wise cast you 
out;' but 'Him that cometh unto Me I will in no wise 
cast out.' " He said, "I do not feel like coming." I 
said, "It doesn't say 'If you feel like coming, and come 
unto Me, I will in no wise cast you out.' It saj^s, 'Him 
that cometh unto Me I will in no wise cast out.' " He 
said, "I don't know that I will come the right way." I 
said, "It does not say 'If 5^ou come the right way I will 
in no wise cast you out.' It says 'Him that cometh unto 
Me I will in no wise cast out.' " And the young man 
had got to the end of his rope! 'Now, I said, "Will 
you come? Get down," and I put my hand on his 
shoulder and helped him down. I said, "None of your 
foolishness; do you believe in the Bible?" He said, 
"I do." Then I said, "Follow me," and I looked up 
and said, while Ee repeated the words after me, sen- 



EXCUSES 235 

tence by sentence, *^0 God, I am a miserable sinner, 
and do not deserve Thy mercy. My heart is as hard as 
this floor; I do not feel like coming; but Jesus says, 
*Him that cometh to Me I will in no wise cast out,' and 
I believe that, just because Jesus says it. Lord Jesus, 
the best I know, I come/' I said, "Did you come ? Did 
you mean it?" He said, "I did." I said, "Follow me 
again," and he again repeated the words after me, sen- 
tence by sentence. "Lord Jesus, Thou hast said, ^Him 
that cometh to Me I will in no wise cast out.' I have 
come, therefore Thou hast received me, and I thank 
Thee." I said, "Has He received you?" He said, "I 
don't feel it." I said, "I did not ask what you felt; 
what does Jesus say?" He said, "Him that cometh 
unto Me I will in no wise cast out." "Did you come ?" 
"I did." "What has Jesus done?" "He has received 
me." "Now," I said, "go right to your room. The 
devil will give you an awful fight, I have no doubt. 
But you kneel right down with both knees on John vi. 
37, and fight the devil with it, and you believe what 
God says, no matter what the devil whispers." He 
went to his room, and the devil gave him an awful 
time, but he kept both his knees on John vi. 37, and 
came out with the light of Heaven on his face. He 
soon began to preach and teach the Bible, and is to-day 
one of the most useful men on earth. 

God's Word is pure, in spite of the devil, in spite of 
your fear, in spite of everything. And, standing on 
God's Word, I proclaim to every man and woman in 
this room that if you come to Jesus Christ He will take 
you to-night. Will you come? 



XVI 

HEROES AND COWARDS 

•*The fear of man bringeth a snare." — Proverbs xxix. 25. 

I have a long text to-night, in fact three texts. The 
text is the best part of the sermon. If a sermon is 
better than the text it is a poor sermon. A good ser- 
mon is simply an exposition of the text. You will find 
the first text in Proverbs xxix. 25 : "The fear of man 
bringeth a snare." Whatever your views about the 
inspiration of the Bible may be, you know that this 
verse is true enough, anyhow. How many times we 
have seen that statement of God's Word fulfilled. How 
many a man and woman in London to-night has been 
snared by the fear of man, and ruined for time and 
eternity. For example, how many a young man has 
come up to London, a pure, innocent, upright, temper- 
ate young fellow, and intended to lead a sober, honest, 
industrious life in this great city. He knew some- 
thing about the perils of drink, and was wise enough 
not to touch it; and he comes to London intending 
to be what every man and woman ought to be, a total 
abstainer. One night this young man goes out to din- 
ner, and the gentleman at the head of the table urges 
him to take a glass of wine. But this young man re- 
fuses; he says, "I never drink." The gentleman laughs 
at him, the other people at the table chaff him, some say 
that He is insulting the host or hostess by not drink- 

286 



HEROES AND COWAEDS 237 

ing to their health, and the fear of man brings him 
into the snare. He takes his first glass of wine, and 
that leads on to another and another and another, and 
to-night he is a drunkard on the streets of London, 
because of the fear of man, reputation gone, manhood 
gone, brain power gone, business capacity gone, every- 
thing gone; the fear of man has proved his temporal 
and eternal ruin. How many a young fellow comes up 
to this great city of London, an honest young man, 
who has never gambled in his life. He plays an oc- 
casional friendly game of cards; but one night, after 
work, he is out in the company of a few friends and 
they are playing cards as usual, and some one of the 
group suggests that they should put up a little stake, 
only a smjall amount, just to make the game interest- 
ing. The young man hesitates, but they say, "You 
don't need to gamble, it is only threepence or sixpence 
either way; we are not going to play for high stakes." 
He says, "I never gamble; I believe it is dishonest." 
But they laugh at him, and chaff him, and tell him 
he should go along to Sunday School; and he cannot 
stand their chaff, and he puts up his first threepenny 
bit on a game of cards. The passion of the gambler, 
which is a more consuming passion than that of strong 
drink and more ruinous, takes possession of him; he 
robs his employer, and to-day he is in prison, because 
the fear of man led him to gamble, and ruined him 
utterly. 

How many a young girl has come up here from the 
country, a modest, innocent girl, but without firm 
Christian principles. She lives in very poor lodgings; 
and, seeking for a little gaiety and a little brightness 
in her humdrum life, she goes occasionally to the 



238 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

theatre, goes to dances and gatherings of that sort. 
She becomes quite infatuated with the dance, and one 
night, a very pleasant and attractive ;young fellow, 
with whom she has become acquainted at the dance, 
makes a subtle suggestion to her that she does not ex- 
actly understand, but at which her modesty revolts, 
and she repels it with indignation. But he laughs at 
her. "Why," he says, "you don't understand. I don't 
mean any harm at all; it is quite a common thing." 
And that girl has learnt to permit familiarity which 
no modest girl would allow herself to permit — for the 
ballroom admits of familiarity which is permitted by 
decent people nowhere outside of the ballroom. It 
is the first step to a blasted life, and that girl to-night 
is an outcast on the streets of London. The fear of 
man has brought a snare which has ruined her. 

My next text is in John xii. 42 and 43: "Never- 
theless among the chief rulers also many believed on 
Him, but because of the Pharisees they did not confess 
Him, lest they should be put out of the synagogue. 
For they loved the praise of men more than the praise 
of God." Now that was written about Jerusalem in 
Christ's time, but it sounds just as if it were written 
about London to-day. Hov/ many men there are in 
London, leading men, just like these chief rulers of 
Jerusalem, who believe in Jesus Christ in their hearts, 
but they do not confess Him with their mouths for fear 
of what men will say of them, for they love the praise 
of men more than the praise of God. It is moral cow- 
ardice. There are hundreds and thousands and tens 
of thousands of men and women just as fully con- 
vinced as T am that Jesus Christ is the Son of God, 



HEROES AND CaWAEDS 239 

and yet holding back from open, public confession of 
Christ because of moral cowardice. 

Now turn to the third text, in 2 Corinthians xii. 
10. It is a very different picture. In the two texts 
thus far we have a picture of the moral coward; now 
we get to the glorious picture of the moral hero; 
"Therefore I take pleasure in infirmities, in reproaches, 
in necessities, in persecutions, in distresses, for Christ's 
sake.'' Ah, there is a picture worth looking at! A 
man who was reproached for the name of God, perse- 
cuted for his loyalty to the truth, but although they 
heaped all manner of infamy on him, he looked up with 
a smiling face and said, "I take pleasure in infamy/' 
Paul went down to Lystra, and because of his loyalty 
to the truth and his outspoken defence of the truth, 
they stoned him, after they had almost worshipped him ; 
and they dragged him outside the city. His disciples 
stood round thinking he was dead. But after a while 
he rose up again, and went back to Lystra. Then he 
went to Derbe. Some of the cautious Christian breth- 
ren at Derbe, remembering what had occurred at Lys- 
tra, doubtless said: "Now, Paul, it is all right to be 
loyal and to believe on Jesus Christ, but you must be 
a little more politic. It is no use running so directly 
against people's prejudices. Now, Paul, don't you be 
quite so outspoken here, or they will treat you in 
Derbe just the same as they treated you in Lystra. 
Now, Paul, be a little more politic and compromise a 
little bit." And that magnificent man looked up and 
said, "I take pleasure in infirmities and distresses for 
Christ's sake." Men and women, what you need in 
London more than anything else is a few men like 
Paul, and a few women with the same spirit, men and 



240 BEVIVAL ADDEESSES 

women who will stand for Christ and stand for God's 
kingdom without compromise, no matter whom it hurts 
or what people say. ISTow my subject to-night, derived 
from these three texts, is "Heroes and Cowards." 

I wish to say right here at the beginning that it 
takes courage to be a Christian, to be a real, true, 
outspoken follower of Jesus Christ. You and I live 
in a God-hating world ; we live in a compromising age 
— an age in which men professing to be Christians 
are trying to please the world and carry on the Church 
of Christ so that there will be no difference between 
the church and the world. Now in a God-hating world 
like this, and in a compromising age like this, it takes 
courage to be an out-and-out soldier of Jesus- Christ. 
It takes more courage than a great many of you have 
got. Many a man to-day who has great courage, who 
has courage enough to be a soldier, who has courage 
enough to go to war, courage enough to go to the front, 
courage enough to stand on the firing line, and stand in 
the face of a galling fire from the enemy's guns, has 
not courage enough to go back to the barracks at night 
and kneel down and say his prayers, and endure the 
chaff of his fellow-soldiers. It takes courage, the 
sublimest courage to be an out-and-out Christian. 

But I will give you to-night five reasons why every 
man and woman should publicly confess Christ before 
the world. 

1. In the first place, lecause He is such a glorious 
Lord and Master. There is nothing to be ashamed 
of in Jesus Christ. A young fellow got up in a 
meeting (he had been recently converted), and he 
tried to give a little testimony for Jesus Christ. But 
he was ine:sperieneed in public testimony and could 



HEROES AND COWARDS 241 

not talk very well; and, after lie had sat down, an old 
gentleman got up and said, "Young man, you ought 
to be ashamed of yourself. You cannot preach, and 
you ought not to try; you ought to be ashamed of 
yourself." Then the young man rose again and said: 
"Well, I am ashamed of myself, but I am not ashamed 
of my Lord." Ah, the trouble with some of you gen- 
tlemen is that you are not ashamed of yourselves, 
though you ought to be, but you are ashamed of the 
Lord Jesus. I never met an Englishman who was 
ashamed of Queen Victoria. I would have been ashamed 
of him if I had met one, she was such a glorious Queen. 
I have never met an Englishman who was ashamed 
of King Edward. But glorious a Queen as Queen Vic- 
toria was (and though I am an American citizen I 
believe she was the most glorious Queen that ever 
reigned on earth), and glorious a King as we expect 
King Edward to become, the glory of Queen Victoria 
and the glory of King Edward pales into utter insig- 
nificance before the glory of Jesus Christ. Oh, men 
and women, there is nothing to be ashamed of in Jesus 
Christ. It is the noblest thing a man can say, "I am 
a follower of the perfect Man; I am a follower of the 
Son of God; I am a follower of the One infinitely 
glorious, Jesus Christ of Nazareth." 

2. In the second place, eveiy man and woman 
should confess the Lord Jesus puhlidy before the world 
for the sake of their influence. Every man has an 
influence. There is no man in London that has not 
an influence. Every one here has an influence, either 
for Jesus Christ or against Jesus Christ. There is no 
man or woman or child here to-night who, if they con- 
fessed Jesus before the world as their Lord, and lived in 



m2 HEVIYAL ADDRESSES 

accordance with that confession, would not have an in- 
fluence to bring somebody else to Christ. On the other 
hand, there is no man, woman, or child here to-night, 
who if he does not confess Christ, no matter how well 
he lives, has not an influence against Christ; and the 
better he lives the more his influence is against Christ, 
for people look at him and say, "Look at that man; 
as far as I can see he lives just as well as these pro- 
fessed Christians, and he is not a Christian, does not 
profess faith in Christ, I don't see the need of becom- 
ing a Christian." Oh^ every one of you men that are 
not openly, decidedly, constantly confessing Christ be- 
fore the world, you have an influence against Jesus 
Christ. 

At one time, when Horace Bushnell was a tutor in 
Yale College, they had a great revival throughout the 
college. Horace Bushnell was the most popular tutor 
in Yale, but he was not a Christian. And the fact 
that he was not a Christian was a stumbling-block in 
the way of many of the students. Horace Bushnell 
knew it, and was greatly disturbed by it. He went 
home one night in great uneasiness. Something said 
to him, "You stand right in the way of this work; if 
you were a Christian there are dozens of the young 
men of Yale College that would come to Christ." 
*^ut," said he to himself, ^^ow can I come to Christ? 
I don't believe in the Bible, and I don't believe that 
Jesus Christ is the Son of God. I cannot play the 
hypocrite, just so as not to stand in the way of 
others." He was very uneasy, and walked up and down 
his room thinking about it. Finally, a voice said to 
him in his heart, "Horace Bushnell, what do you 
believe anyhow?" ^Well, one thing I believe is liiat 



HEROES AND COWAEDS 243 

there is an absolute difference between right and 
wrong." "Well, have you taken your stand on that 
which you do believe? You talk about what you do 
not believe, think about what you do believe. Have 
you ever taken your stand on right, to follow it wher- 
ever it carries you, even if it carries you over the 
Niagara Falls ?'^ He said, "No, I never have, but I 
will." And he prayed, "0 God, if there is any God, 
show me if Jesus Christ is Thy Son, and if you will 
show me that I will promise to accept Him as my 
Saviour and confess Him before the world," and in a 
short time the light burst in upon Horace Bushnell's 
darkened soul, and he came out on the side of Christ, 
and almost every young man in Yale College was con- 
verted. 

Oh, friends, if you say you are agnostics, if you 
say you are sceptics, have you ever made an honest 
attempt to get out of your agnosticism? If you have 
not your agnosticism is no excuse, none whatever. Ah, 
if some of you men and women of London occupying 
prominent places and positions, if you took your stand 
where you ought to take it to-night, on the side of truth, 
scores of others would come to Christ. 

When Mr. Charles G. Finney was preaching at 
Rochester, New York, in the thirties, a great many 
lawyers came to hear him, and one night, away up in 
the gallery, sat the Chief-Justice of the Court of Ap- 
peals of the State of New York. As he sat there 
listening to Mr. Finney's tremendous logic, the Chief- 
Justice of the Court of Appeals of New York State 
became satisfied of the truth of what Mr. Finney 
preached. Then the question came to him, '^ill you 
come forward like the other ordinary men and women 



2U KEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

to the ^anxious seat ?' '^ Something in him* said, "It 
will never do in the world. You occupy the most ex- 
alted legal position in New York State; you are the 
Chief- Justice of the Court of Appeals; it would never 
do in the world for you to walk down in front, and 
seek salvation kneeling down at the ^anxious seat."^ 
He sat there thinking for a while; then he said to 
himself, "Why not? I am convinced of the truth of 
that man's position. I know my duty; why should 
I not do it like any other man?" He got up frota. his 
place in the gallery, and went down the stairway, and 
came up the stairs back of where Mr. Finney was 
preaching, and Mr. Finney, in the midst of his sermon 
felt some one pulling on the skirts of his coat. He 
turned round, and there stood the Cliief -Justice of the 
Court of Appeals of New York State. He asked, "What 
is it?" The Chief -Justice replied, "Mr. Finney, if 
you will call for people to come to the '^anxious seat,' 
I will come." Mr. Finney stopped his sermon and said, 
"The Chief-Justice of the Court of Appeals of New 
York State says if I will call for anxious ones to come 
to the 'anxious seat,' he will come. I call for anxious 
ones now"; and the Chief- Justice of the Court of Ap- 
peals went down and took his seat on the "anxious 
seat," and almost every lawyer and barrister in Roches- 
ter was converted, and it is said 100,000 people were 
converted in twelve months in that district. 

Ladies and gentlemen, there are some of you here 
to-night who, if you had the courage of your convic- 
tions and cam^ to Christ, not secretly as some of you 
want to, but walked right out and took your seat down 
here in front when I called you to do it, it would shake 
London. Are you men enough to do it? Are yoi£ 



HEROES AND COWARDS 245 

wolmeii enough to do it? Your influence may not Ioq 
as great as that, but all of you have an influence. Will 
you exert it for Jesus Christ when the time comes 
to-night ? 

3. In the third place, every one should publicly con- 
fess Christ before the world, because it is the only way 
to obtain the fulness of blessing that there is in Jesus 
Christ. In Matthew x. 32, 33, are the words of the 
Master himself: "Whosoever shall confess Me before 
men, him will I also confess before My Father which 
is in Heaven ; but whosoever shall deny Me before men, 
him will I also deny before My Father which is in 
Heaven." Oh, friends, think of it — ^to have Jesus 
Christ confessing you before Jesus Christ the Father in 
Heaven. A little fellow, a wee little fellow, got up at 
a meeting one night, with the tears running down his 
cheeks — he was a little white-haired Swedish boy — 
and said, "Friends, if I confess Jesus on earth down 
here, then will He also confess me up there before the 
Father," and sat down. That was the best speech that 
was made that night. Oh, to think of it — to have the 
Lord Jesus confess your name before the Father in 
Heaven ! In our great Civil War, when one of our gen- 
erals won a great victory, it was the custom of the 
Member of Congress for his district to propose a vote 
of thanks to him on the floor of the American Congress. 
It was the highest ambition of generals to be thus 
mentioned upon the floor of Congress. I remember 
that grand old hero. General Howard, once saying to 
me, "Torrey, there was one proud day of my life, and 
that was when a vote of thanks was moved to me 
on the floor of Congress by the whole Congress for my 
stand at Gettysburg." But what is it to be mentioned 



246 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

on the floor of any Parliament or Congress down here 
to Being mentioned in the court of Heaven bj the Lord 
Jesus Himself? And the men and women who con- 
fess Christ down here in Mildmay Hall, Jesus Christ 
will confess you before God in Heaven. 

Moreover, when Christ does confess you before the 
Father, then you will get the fulness of the blessing. 
When He confesses you then God sends His Holy Spirit 
into your heart. I remember one night in a mission 
at Atlanta, Georgia, at the close of the meeting, a 
young man of about thirty to thirty-five years of age, 
was brought to me. Some one said to me, "This is one 
of the leading advocates of Atlanta. He took all the 
oratorical honours in his university. I wish you would 
lead him to Christ." I stood a few moments talking 
to him, then I said to him, "Are you not a Christian?" 
He said, "No, sir. I am a church member; in fact, I 
am the superintendent of a Sunday School, but I am 
not a Christian." "Well," I said, "why don't you 
become a Christian?" He said, "I have no feeling." 
I said, "It is not a question of feeling. Do you be- 
lieve you are a sinner?" He said, "I know I am." I 
said, "Do you believe Jesus Christ died for you?" He 
said, "I know He did." I said, "Then will you take 
Him for your own Saviour to-night?" He said, "Can 
I do it without feeling?" I said, "Certainly; it is not 
a question of feeling, but of common sense. Will you 
take Him?" He said, "I will ; if I can I will." I said, 
"Let us pray together." We knelt and prayed, and 
when we got up he said, "I don't feel any different." I 
said, "I didn't think you would." "But," he said, "a 
lot of these people say they have such joy." I said, 
"You have not gone far enough; you have to confess 



HEROES ANH COWAEDS 24^ 

your Lord publicly before the joy comes." Almost 
everybody had gone out of the big Tabernacle; but he 
said to the few who were remaining, "Friends, I have 
decided to-night to be a Christian; I have taken the 
Lord Jesus Christ to be my Saviour/' and with a few 
more words he said, "Good-night" and went out. Next 
morning a leading merchant of the town came to me 
and said, "You ought to have seen what I saw last 
night when I left this building. I had gone only a 

short way down the street when I saw leaning 

up against a lamp-post. I knew he did not drink; 
I knew he was not intoxicated. I went up to him and 
asked him what was the matter and why he was shout- 
ing. He said, ^I am so happy, I can hardly stand up.' " 
I saw him that day, and I told him what my friend had 

told me. I said, "Mr. said he saw you leaning 

against a lamp-post and shouting, and when he asked 
you what was the matter, you said you were so happy 
you could not stand up. Is that so?" He said, "It 
was literally true. Ten minutes after I left you last. 
night, such a joy came over my soul that literally I 
had to lean against the lamp-post and shout for joy." 

I don't know if it will affect you just that way; it 
never did me; but I will guarantee one thing — that 
if you will accept Jesus Christ with all your heart 
and surrender your whole life to Him, and His con- 
trol, and publicly confess Him before the world, God 
will send His Holy Spirit into your heart, filling it 
with a joy that you never knew before. 

4. In the fourth place, every man and woman should 
confess Christ, because it is the only way to he saved. 
In Eomans x. 9 and 10 we read : "If thou shalt confess 
with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in 



248 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

thine heart that God hath raised Him from the dead, 
thou shalt be saved. For with the heart man believeth 
unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is 
made unto salvation/' People say to me in some places 
where we go, "I don't believe in this standing up and 
confessing;" but I don't care what you believe; the 
question is, "What does God say?" And God says, 
"With the mouth confession is made unto salvation." 
There are a great many people who will tell you if a 
man or woman believe in Christ in the secrecy of their 
own hearts they need never say anything about it, for 
God sees the heart. He does see your heart, and if you 
do not confess Christ, He sees you have not got any real 
faith. You say, "Is not a man saved by faith?" Yes, 
but by real faith, and real faith always leads to mouth 
confession. We read in the very next verse of this 
chapter, Eomans x. 11 : "Whosoever believeth on Him 
shall not be ashamed." If you are ashamed to con- 
fess Him you do not believe on Him. A faith that does 
not lead to confession will never lead to Heaven. There 
will be no sneaks and cowards in Heaven. Jesus Christ 
says in Mark viii. 38: "Whoso shall be ashamed of 
Me and of My words, of him also shall the Son of Man 
be ashamed, when He cometh in the glory of His 
Father with the holy angels." 

5. Once more, every man and woman should con- 
fess Christ for common decency's saTce and self -respect's 
saJce. When you and I stop to think what Christ has 
done for us; how He left Heaven with all its glory 
and came down to earth with all its shame; how He 
was scourged and crowned with thorns; how He bore 
shame and reproach; how He was spat upon and 
buffeted and nailed to the Cross for you and me ; how. 



HEEOES AND COWAKDS 249 

although He was rich, yet for our sakes He became poor, 
that we through His poverty might become rich; how, 
though being in the form of God, He thought it not 
a thing to be grasped to be equal to God, but humbled 
Himself and took upon Himself the form of a servant, 
and was obedient even unto death, yea, the death of the 
Cross; how He was wounded for our transgressions, 
and bruised for our iniquities — if, men and women, 
knowing that, you will not confess Jesus Christ be- 
cause of the fear of man, or fear of loss in business, 
or fear of loss of caste in society, then you are a cow- 
ard, a poltroon, an ingrate of the basest and blackest 
kind. You cannot get around it; you know it is God's 
truth. I cannot see how any intelligent man or woman 
can bear in mind what Jesus has done for them, and 
then not confess Him, and still retain their self-re- 
gpect. 

We have some things we are proud of in America, 
and some things we are ashamed of. One of the things 
we are proud of in America is this, that all boys and 
girls in America can get a university education; that 
the son of the farmer and the day labourer and the 
washerwoman can get a university education as well as 
the child of the millionaire. Any boy or girl that is 
worth educating can go through all degrees of learning 
in America. Since I have been in Chicago, the grandson 
of a man who used to work for us at home as our gar- 
dener, when I was a boy, has been the mayor of the city 
of Chicago ; and the son of a woman who used to do the 
cooking in our kitchen has occupied another high posi- 
tion in the city. I rejoice in it; it is one of the 
things that make me glad to be an American. In 
North Carolina, one of the poorer States — ^poor finan- 



250 EEVIYAL ADDEESSES 

cially, but ricli in men — there was a farmer who had 
a bright boy. He had a poor farm, but he said, "My 
boy is going to get just as good an opportunity as a 
millionaire's son;" and that poor farmer worked and 
scraped until he was able to send that boy to the State 
university. The boy did well, and his letters home 
delighted his father's and mother's hearts, and they 
felt well paid for all their sacrifice. But after awhile 
the father's heart grew lonely, and he said to his wife, 
"Mother, I cannot stand it any longer; I just must see 
the boy." It was a long way from the farm to the 
university, and he loaded his wagon and started on 
his long drive, and as he drew near to the town he 
said to himself: "Well, won't the boy be surprised! 
He don't know I'm coming. Won't he be delighted to 
see his old father?" He whipped up the old team and 
hurried on, and entered the town. He was driving up 
the hill to the college, and as he went, whom should 
he see coming down but his boy with some gay college 
companions. The old man was driving slowly, for it 
was up hill, but when he saw the boy he jumped out 
and rushed up to him and said, "Oh, my boy, my son !" 
The son was ashamed of his poor old father, and he 
straightened himself up and said, "There must be some 
mistake, sir; you are not my father. I don't know 
you." I am told — I don't know it to be positively true 
— but I am told that father turned round with a broken 
heart and went home to die. I can well believe it. It 
would break my heart for my boy to treat me that 
way. 

Men and women, what do you say to a boy like that? 
I say he ought to be horsewhipped. I say he was 
an infamous ingrate. But I want to say that he was 



HEROES AND COWARDS 251 

not so infamously ungrateful as you men and women 
in this hall to-night, who know that Jesus Christ 
poured out His life unto death on the Cross of Calvary, 
and who are so mean and contemptible and cowardly 
that you won't stand up and confess Him. 

I am not going to stop with that story. It is too 
dark. I am going to tell you another story — and thank 
God it is true — of our home land. A poor woman in 
one of our towns, who had to work for her living, for 
she was a widow — she took in washing, I think — had 
a boy, and he was a bright boy and proved a bright man. 
I think some of you have heard him. She sent her 
boy to school. He went through the schools, did well, 
came out at the very top of his class, and was vale- 
dictorian of his class, the highest position, and took a 
gold medal for special excellence in study. The day 
he was to graduate he said to his mother : "You know, 
I graduate to-day, mother." She said, "Yes, I know.'' 
"Well, get ready," he said, "it is time to get off to the 
church" — where the graduating exercises were to be 
held. "Oh, my boy, I cannot go up there," she said; 
"I haven't anything fit to wear. Why, all the finest 
people in the town will be there. You would be 
ashamed of me if I went." "Ashamed of you, mother ?" 
he said ; "never ! I owe all I have in the world to you. 
What is more, mother, I cannot graduate unless you 
do go; and I won't!" And he helped his mother to 
get ready, and pinned the old faded shawl round her, 
and made it look as good as possible, and put on her 
plain old bonnet, and took her on his arm, and walked 
down the main street with the plain old mother on his 
arm to the church. When they got there he took her 
up the centre aisle, and sat her among the finest people 



252 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

in town. When the time came, he went up to deliver 
his valedictory address and to receive the gold medal 
amid the applause of his companions ; and when he had 
received it he walked straight down to where his mother 
sat, and pinned it on her old faded shawl, and said, 
"Mother, that belongs to you ; you earned it." 

That is a boy worth having. Now, ladies and gentle- 
men, I want to ask a question : Do you mean to-night 
to be like that rascally, scoundrelly ingrate, that was 
ashamed of his old father and broke his heart, and be 
ashamed of that glorious Christ that died for you; or 
will you be like the other boy, and, knowing that you 
owe everything to Jesus Christ, stand up and confess 
Him to-night, and pin all your honours where they 
belong, on Jesus Christ ? 



XVII 

THREE FIRES 

"Ha shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost, and with fire/* 
—Matthew iii. 11. 

One night, years ago, I was sitting at my desk in my; 
study late at night, and the work of the day was done. 
There was a great deal of confusion ahont my study 
table, for I had just moved that day, and had not had 
time to rearrange my papers. The work of the day 
being done, I fell into a reverie, and as I came out 
of that reverie I found myself gently waving back and 
forth in my right hand a little four-page leaflet. I do 
not know how it got into my hand. I suppose I took 
it off the table; but I don't even know how it got on 
io the table, for I had never seen it before. I looked 
at that leaflet, and I noticed these words across the 
top of the leaflet in large print, "Wanted, a Baptism 
with Fire." It immediately fastened my attention. 
I said, "That is precisely what I do want; if there is 
anybody on this earth that seeds fire, it is I," for I 
was born, and had grown up cold as an iceberg. So I 
read the leaflet. There was not much in the leaflet 
that impressed me, except one text, "He shall baptize 
you with the Holy Ghost and with fire;" and that not 
only impressed me, it kept ringing in my mind and 
heart, by day and by night. I could not get away from 
it: "He shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost and 
with fire" The following Saturday evening, when I 

253 



254: REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

went to a little gathering for prayer held at my church, 
I said to the janitor of the church, when the prayer 
meeting was over. "The promise says, 'He shall baptize 
you with the Holy Ghost and with fire,'" A sweet 
smile passed over the janitor's face, and there was 
something about his look which made me think, "Well, 
the janitor seems to know all about it. I wonder ff 
he has got something his pastor has not got." During 
the days of the next week, when I sat down in my 
study, when I walked the streets, that kept ringing in 
my ears : "He shall baptize you with the Holy Ghos^ 
and with fire." Thursday night came, and at the close 
of my day's work I knelt down before God, and asked 
Him for a text or for a subject for Sunday evening's 
sermon. A brother from London was going to preach 
for me in the morning. The only text I could see in 
the whole Bible was, "He shall baptize 3^ou with the 
Holy Ghost and with fire," and I said, "Father, I am 
not to preach on Sunday morning; that is a Sunday 
morning text, and I don't preach in the morning. Mr. 
Inglis is going to preach then." I generally preach in 
the morning to Christians, and to the unsaved in the 
evening. "I want an evening text." But I could not 
see anything, but just that one text, "He shall baptize 
you with the Holy Ghost and with fire." "Well," I 
said, "Father, if that is the text you want me to preach 
on^ evening or morning, I will preach on it; but I 
want to know." Just then there came looming up out 
of the Bible two other texts, and both of these texts 
had "fire" in them ; and while I was on my knees God 
just opened the three texts, and I had my sermon. The 
next Sunday night I went to my church and preached 
that sermon. When I had finished it I said, "Now all 



THREE FIRES 255 

the friends who want to be baptized with the Holy 
Ghost and fire to-night, and all who want to be saved, 
come downstairs." The rooms downstairs were jammed, 
and when all who replied to the invitation had found 
room, I asked all who wanted to be baptized with the 
Holy Ghost and fire to go into the kindergarten room, 
and those who wished to be saved to go into another 
room, the inquiry room, and the rest to stay where they 
were. They began to go into both rooms ; I went into 
the kindergarten room, where the people were sitting 
in the little bits of kindergarten chairs, and so closely 
packed that I literally had to step over their heads to 
get to the platform. Oh, what a time we had in that 
room that night ! When I came out I asked my assist- 
ant, who was in charge of the inquiry room, what sort 
of a time he had had, and he said, "The Spirit of God 
was there : and many people came out into the light." I 
asked Professor Towner, the choir-master, who was left 
in charge of the third meeting, composed of those 
who had not entered either of the two rooms, and He 
said, "We had no meeting at all; I could not say a 
word ; the people got right down on their knees before 
God, and talked to Him." T hope God will bless the 
Word the same way to-night. I believe He will. 

I. The Baptism with Fire 

You will find the first of the three fires in Matthew 
iii. 11: "I indeed baptize you with water unto re- 
pentance; but He that cometh after me is mightier 
than I, whose shoes I am not worthy to bear: He 
shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost and with fire/' 
That is the first of the three fires, the baptism with 



256 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

fire — ^what does it mean ? Now we know what it means 
to be baptized with water — we have seen that — but what 
does it mean to be baptized with fire? You will get 
your answer by asking two things: first, what is fire 
said to do in the Bible? and, second, what happened 
to the Apostles at Pentecost when they were baptized 
with the Holy Ghost and fire? 

1. The first thing that the Bible says that fire 
does is, fire reveals. In 1 Corinthians iii. 13, we read: 
"Every man's work shall be made manifest ; for the day 
shall declare it, because it shall be revealed by fire." 
And the first thing that a baptism with fire does is to 
reveal what a man really is, to show us to ourselves as 
God sees us. I remember the night before I preached 
that sermon, late on Saturday night after the sermon 
was all arranged, I got down and said, "Heavenly 
Father, I think I have a sermon for to-morrow night, 
but I donH believe I have got that of which the ser- 
mon speaks. I am going to preach on the baptism with 
the Holy Ghost and fire, and how can I preach on it 
if I have not had it ? Now, in order that I may preach 
an honest sermon, baptize me with fire right now." 
God heard the prayer, and the first thing that came 
to pass was that I had such a revelation of myself as I 
never had before in all my life. I had never dreamed 
that there was so much pride, so much vanity, so much 
personal ambition, so much downright meanness in my 
heart and life as I saw that night. And men and 
women, if you get a baptism with fire, I believe one of 
the first things that comes to you will be a revelation 
of yourself as God sees you. Is not that just what we 
need, a revelation of ourselves to-day that will spare 
us the awful humiliation of the revelation of self in 



THREE FIEES 257 

that day when we stand before tHc judgment seat of 

Christ? 

2. The second thing that fire does is, fire refines, or 
purifies. In Malaehi iii. 1-3, we are told of the purify- 
ing power of fire. There is nothing that purifies like 
fire. Water will not cleanse as fire does. Suppose I 
have a piece of gold, and there is some filth on the 
outside of it; how can I get it off? I can wash it off 
with water. But suppose the filth is inside it, how will 
you get it out? There is only one way: throw it into 
the fire. And, men and women, if the filth is on the 
outside it can be washed away with the water of the 
Word ; but the trouble is that the filth is on the inside, 
and what we need is the fire of the Holy Ghost pene- 
trating into the innermost depths of our being, burn- 
ing, burning, burning, cleansing. What a refining came 
to the apostles on the day of Pentecost ! How full of 
self-seeking they had been up to the very last Supper ! 
At the Last Supper, they had a dispute as to who should 
be the first in the Kingdom of Heaven, but after Pen- 
tecost they no longer thought of self, but of Christ. 
How weak and cowardly they had been right up to the 
crucifixion ! They all forsook Him and fled, and Peter 
denied Him, at the accusation of a servant maid, with 
oaths and curses. But after the day of Pentecost, that 
same Peter that cursed and swore and denied Christ 
when the servant maid accused him of being a follower 
of Jesus, faced the very council that condemned Him, 
and said, ''If we this day be examined of the good deed 
done to the impotent man, by what means he is made 
whole, be it known unto you all, and to all the people 
of Israel, that by the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, 
whom ye crucified; whom God raised from the dead^ 



g58 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

even hj Him doth this man stand here tefore ycm 
whole." Ah, friends, cleansing is a very slow process 
by ordinary methods, but a baptism with fire does 
marvels in a moment. 

3. In the third place, the Bible teaches ns that fire 
consumes. In Ezekiel xxiv. 11-13, we are told of the 
consuming power of fire, the fire of judgment that will 
consume the filth and dross of Jerusalem. And the bap- 
tism of fire consumes, in fact it cleanses by consuming; 
it burns up all dross, all vanity, all self-righteousness, 
all personal ambition, all ungovernable temper. 

We had once at the Bible Institute in Chicago, a 
young woman who was much that a Christian should 
not be. When we heard she was coming, all of us in 
Authority thought she never ought to have come to the 
Bible Institute. I thought so when I heard she was 
coming, for I had known her in the school from which 
she came, and I knew she was one of the most un- 
manageable scholars they ever had in the school. She 
was stubborn, wilful, proud, quick-tempered, boisterous, 
loud, and pretty much everything a girl ought not to 
be. When I heard she was coming to the Bible Institute, 
I said, "So-and-so coming to the Bible Institute ! What 
in the world does she want at the Bible Institute?" 
But her uncle was one of the best friends the Institute 
ever had, and so, out of consideration for her uncle, 
we admitted her. Now, we require of every student 
in that Bible Institute that some definite work to save 
the lost should go hand in hand with Bible study; for 
Bible study, unless it is accompanied with actual work 
for the salvation of souls, will dry up a man's soul 
quicker than almost anything else. We required the 
young woman to go into the tenements, the homes of 



THREE FIRES 259 

tlie poor and the outcast. One afternoon tHs girl had 
been visiting in Milton Avenue and Townsend Street, 
two of the poorest streets of Chicago. After a time 
she became very tired with climbing up and down the 
stairs, and going in and out of the filthy homes; and 
instead of returning to the Institute, she walked on 
in a very rebellious frame of mind, and went down to 
the Lake Shore Drive, the finest avenue in Chicago, 
along the shore of the lake. As she passed by those 
magnificent mansions there, she looked up at them with 
an eye that danced with pleasure, and said, *This is 
what I like. I have had enough of Milton Avenue; I 
have had enough of climbing stairs and going into 
tenements. This is what I like, and this is what I 
am going to have.'^ She came back to the Institute, 
and went straight to her room, still in a very bitter and 
rebellious frame of mind. The tea-bell rang before the 
battle was over, and she went to the table and took her 
place, and sat down, and there at the tea-table the fire 
of God fell right where that girl was sitting. She 
sprang from her seat and rushed over to a friend at 
another table, and threw her arms around her, and ex- 
claimed, "I am a volunteer for Africa!" and the fire 
of God in a moment burned, and burned, and burned, 
until that young woman was so changed, her actions 
were so changed, her views of life, her tastes, her am- 
bitions, her very face was so changed in a moment, that 
when her old friends saw her and heard her they could 
hardly believe their own eyes and ears. Later on she 
went back to that same school down in Massachusetts, 
where she had been such a hindrance, and with burning 
words poured out her heart to the girls there, and 



260 KEVIVAL ADDEESSES . , 

with mighty power led them to the Lamh of God which 
taketh away the sins of the world. 

Is not that what we need to-night, a fire that will 
burn up this pride of ours, this selfishness of ours, this 
vanity of ours, this worldliness of ours, burn up all these 
things that hinder the world from coming to Christ, 
because we make men think that Christianity is unreal ? 
You women with unconverted husbands, is not that 
what you need, a baptism with fire, transforming your 
life and clothing it with beauty, so that your husbands 
will say, "I must have what my wife has got ?'^ 

4. In the next place, -fire illuminates. Oftentimes 
when in Chicago I look off towards the north-west of 
the city, suddenly I see the heavens lit up and then 
grow dark again, then they are illuminated once more 
and then darkened. The great foundry doors had been 
opened and shut, and opened and shut, and this light 
in the heavens was the glow from the furnaces. Fire 
illuminates, but no fire illuminates like "the baptism 
with the Holy Ghost and fire." When a man is baptized 
with the Holy Ghost and fire, truth that was dark to 
him before becomes instantly as bright as day; pas- 
sages in the Bible that he could not understand before 
becouLe as simple as ABC, and every page of God's 
Holy Word glows with heavenly light. A baptism with 
fire will do more to take the infidelity and scepticism 
and false doctrine out of a man than any university 
education. How many a young fellow comes out of a 
theological education more than half an infidel, but the 
great day comes when that half-infidel preacher is bap- 
tized with the Holy Ghost and fire, and his doubts 
and his questionings and his criticisms go to the winds. 
How many an untaught or half-taught man has so 



THKEE FIRES 261 

wonderful an acquaintance with the truth of God that 
men who are scholars sit at his feet with profound 
astonishment, because he has been illuminated with the 
baptism with the Holy Ghost and fire ! 

Take the case of this girl again. I was away when 
the event I described happened, and the first thing 
I heard when I returned was what had taken place with 
her. I was going from the men's side of the institute, 
and was passing between the church and the women's 
department when this young girl turned into the gate 
and met me. She looked up into my face, and said, 
*'0h, Professor Torrey, have you heard?" *^Yes, Jack, 
I have heard," I said, and, by the way, that is an indi- 
cation of her character that she should be called Jack; 
"I have heard what has happened," and then she just 
tegan to pour out her soul. She fairly danced on the 
side-walk as she told me, and I knew for once what it 
meant to dance before the Lord ! Then she closed about' 
this way : "One of the best things about it is that the 
Bible is a new book. The Bible used to be just the 
stupidest book I ever read, and I didn't believe it was 
the Word of God at all. I did believe in the divinity of 
Jesus Christ, because your lectures compelled me. But 
the Bible was a stupid book. But oh, now God is show- 
ing me such wonderful things in the Bible." 

Now be honest. Are there not some of you to-night 
that profess to be Christians, to whom the Bible is a 
stupid book ? If you would tell the honest truth, would 
you not rather read a novel than the Bible? You do 
read the Bible, because you think you ought to: but 
you get no enjojonent out of it. What you need is a 
baptism with the Holy Ghost and fire, and that would 



262 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

make the Bible a new book; glory would shine from 
every page. 

5. The next thing that fire does is, fire makes warm, 
it makes to glow. You stand before a furnace door, 
behind which is a glowing fire. You have in your hand 
a bar of iron ; it is cold, and black, and forbidding, and 
there is no beauty in it. But you take that cold, dark, 
forbidding bar of iron, and you open the furnace door 
and thrust it into the glowing fire. Soon it is warm, 
then it becomes red hot and glows with marvellous 
beauty, and you have the cold bar of iron glowing with 
fire. You and I are cold — oh, how cold we are! and 
the Lord Jesus takes us and He plunges us into the fire 
of the Holy Spirit. We begin to grow warm, and 
soon we glow, glow with love to God, glow with love 
to Christ, glow with love to the truth, glow with love 
for perishing souls. Men and women, the great need 
of the day is men and women on fire. Brethren, that 
is what we need in the pulpit, ministers on fire. What 
cold men most of us preachers are ! Orthodox enough, 
it may be, and we present the most solemn truth with 
great force of reason and great beauty of rhetoric and 
most convincing eloquence; and our audiences sit there 
and admire our strong preaching, but they do not re- 
pent of their sins. Why not? Because we are not on 
fire. We convince the intellect, but we do not melt 
the heart. But put a minister who is on fire in the 
pulpit. Wesley was such a man, Whitefield was such 
a man; Charles G. Finney was such a man — ^put a 
man on fire in the pulpit, and the audience will melt. 
But we need that kind of people in the choir as well. 
What beautiful choirs we have nowadays. Why, they 



THREE FIRES 363 

sing almost like angels, and people sit there admiring 
them, but nobody is converted by their singing. But 
when we get a man on fire to sing, or a woman on 
fire to sing, or a choir on fire to sing, something is 
brought to pass. That is what we need in our Sunday 
School classes. We set a young man or a young 
woman to teach a Sunday School class, and they know 
the lesson capitally and study all the latest "helps," 
and make the lesson tremendously interesting, but the 
boys and girls and men and women in their classes are 
not converted, because the teachers are not on fire. Oh, 
men and women of London, the need in London more 
than anything else to-night is a baptism with fire on 
the minister, a baptism with fire on the elders, a 
baptism with fire on the deacons, a baptism with firo 
on the choir, a baptism with fire on the Sunday School 
teachers, a baptism with fire on the personal work- 
ers, and a baptism with fire upon the men and women 
in the congregation. We sang a hymn just now, pray- 
ing that the fire of God might fall in Mildmay. Con- 
ference Hall to-night. If it does, men and women, if 
it does, London will be shaken. 

6. The next thing that fire does is, fire imparts en- 
ergy. The men of science tell us that every form of 
energy can be transmuted into fire, and that given fire 
you can generate any form of force or energy. When 
a baptism with fire comes then comes power. That 
was the principal manifestation at Pentecost. The 
fire of God fell, and with the energy of that fire men 
went out from that upper room, and 3,000 people were 
converted. A man takes me to his factory. He says^ 
"This machinery is the best in the world." He takes 



264 KEVIVAL ADDKESSES 

me down into tlie engine-room, and says, 'Tiook at 
that great engine, it is so many horse-power, and there 
is power in that engine to move every wheel in this 
great factory." Then I go back to the factory and I 
look around. There is nothing doing at all. "It is very 
strange," I say; "did you not tell me that this was the 
best machinery in the world for this purpose, and that 
that engine downstairs could move every wheel in the 
factory? Well, I notice the connections are all made, 
and everything is in gear, and the lever is carried the 
right way, but there is not a wheel moving in all the 
factory. What is the matter?" "Don't you know?" 
he says. "Come downstairs, and I will show you," 
and he takes me down again to the engine-room to the 
engine, and he throws open the door and says, "Look in 
there." And lo ! there is no fire in the fire-box. I go 
off to the railway. There is a great engine standing on 
the rails, and I am told it is the finest engine that was 
ever turned out from the locomotive works. It can 
drag a heavily freighted train up a hundred-foot grade. 
The engine has been coupled on to about half-a-dozen 
unloaded cars. I look at the engine and say, "What 
did you tell me? Can it draw a heavily loaded train 
up a hundred-foot grade? Then wiU you please ex- 
plain something to me? That engine has only six 
empty cars behind it, the coupling is made, the throttle 
is open, and yet it is not moving, and cannot puU a 
car, and yet you say it can pull a hundred. What is 
the matter?" I am taken on to the engine, and the 
door of the furnace is thrown open, and when I look 
in I see there is no fire in the fire-box. That is what 
is the matter. 



THREE FIRES 265 

Friends, I go into churclies to-day, and oh, what 
beautiful organization I see, what magnificent archi- 
tecture, what eloquent preaching I hear, what mar- 
vellous singing! And yet not a wheel in the whole 
institution moving for God. What is the matter? 
There is no fire in the fire-box. What we need to- 
day is the fire of God in the fire-box, and thank God 
the promise is "He shall baptize you with the Holy 
Ghost and fire." 

7. One thing more about this fire — fire spreads; 
nothing spreads like fire. I remember hearing some 
years ago, before I went to live in Chicago, about an 
old Irish woman, who had a little shanty in the city, 
with a little shed back of it, in which she kept a cow. 
And one night she was milking her cow, and the cow 
suddenly kicked and knocked over her lantern. The 
lantern fell on a wisp of straw, which caught fire, and 
set the shed afire. The shed set the shanty afire, and 
the shanty next to it caught fire, and the shanty next 
to that, and the one next to that, and soon the fire 
leaped over the south branch of the Chicago river to 
the east side, and on and on it swept, and in forty- 
eight hours it had cleared an area of one mile wide and 
three miles long, and there were but two buildings left 
in all that section of Chicago. Fire spreads. If a 
fire is kindled here to-night it will sweep all over Lon- 
don, and all over Great Britain, and Ireland. 

That night I spoke of at the beginning of my ser- 
mon, we had a stranger from London in Chicago, who 
came to hear me preach. He came downstairs in re- 
sponse to my invitation, and he told us, "I am just in 
Chicago to-day from London, and I want this baptism 



2Q6 REVIVAL ADDRESSES 

of fire;" aud he got it. When he left the church he 
went to his room, and sat down and wrote a letter to 
the Bible class of which he was a member in London. 
The teacher read it to the class, and the fire of God 
came into that class, and in about two weeks after he 
had sent the letter he got word from London that the 
fire which fell in Cliicago had been kindled in that 
church in London. Nothing spreads like fire. Do we 
not need the baptism with this fire to-night? 

IL The Fire of Judgment that will try the 
Believer's Works. 

The second fire you will find in 1 Corinthians iii. 13, 
15: "Every man's work shall be made manifest: for 
the day shall declare it, because it shall be revealed by 
fire; and the fire shall try every man's work of what 
sort it is. If any man's work shall be burned, he shall 
suffer loss : but he himself shall be saved ; yet so as by 
fire." This second fire is the fire of judgment, testing 
our works at the judgment seat of Christ. Now you 
notice the judgment here is not the judgment regarding 
our salvation. These are saved people v/hose works are 
burnt up. All the work we do for Christ is to be put 
to the test, is to be put to the severest kind of test, the 
fire test ; and, friends, there is a great deal the Church 
of Christ is doing professedly for Christ, and a great 
deal individual Christians are doing, that will never 
stand the fire test. Do you think that these church fairs 
and bazaars and all that sort of tomfoolery by which 
the Church of Christ is brought down to the level of the 
dime museum, into which so many professed Christians 
are putting their best energies, do you think that these 



THREE FIRES 267 

will stand the fire test? ISTever! they will all go up 
in smoke. You may be saved, but you will lose your 
reward. You will Be saved so as by fire. A great deal 
of work that is good, but that is done not to God's 
glory but for personal ambition — the good sermon, per- 
fectly orthodox, severely logical, beautifully rhetorical, 
the sermon that even good people applaud, but that is 
preached not that God may be glorified in the sal- 
vation of sinners, but that the preacher may be ap- 
plauded. Do you think that will stand the fire test? 
Never! it will go up in smoke. The beautiful solos 
sung, the philanthropic work done, the personal souL- 
saving work done, not for God's glory but for the exalta- 
tion of self — ^will these stand the fire test ? Never ! they 
will all go up in smoke. 

On the night of which I have been speaking in my 
church, the two leading singers went down into that 
second meeting, and the leading soprano said — a beauti- 
ful singer, one of the most beautiful singers I have 
ever heard, "I never thought of it before. I don't believe 
I have sung a solo in my life for God. I sang it for 
self." Thank God the fire of God came upon my lead- 
ing soprano and my leading contralto, and I lost them 
both, for they became missionaries. I would like to 
lose the whole choir, if I could lose them in the same 
way ! 

Furthermore, let me say, good work, work done for 
a good purpose, but done in our own strength and not 
done in the power of the Holy Ghost, will not stand 
the fire test. The sermon preached to glorify God, but 
preached with the enticing words of man's wisdom and 
not in demonstration of the spirit and power of God, 



268 EEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

will it stand the fire test? Never! So, men and women, 
our work is to be tried regarding its character, regard- 
ing its motive, regarding its power in which it is done. 
Will your work stand the fire? 

III. The Fire of Eternal Doom. 

We come now to the third fire. We read of it in 2 
Thessalonians i, 7-9: "The Lord Jesus shall be re- 
vealed from Heaven with His mighty angels, in flaming 
fire, taking vengeance on them that know not God, and 
that obey not the Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ. 
Who shall be punished with everlasting destruction 
from the presence of the Lord, and from the glory of 
His power." The third fire is the fire of eternal doom. 
Every one of us must meet God in fire somewhere. 
Some of us, I hope, to-night will meet Him in the fire 
of baptism with the Holy Ghost and fire; some of us, 
I know, will meet Him in that great judgment day, 
when the fire will try our work, of what sort it is; 
and oh, friends, some of us, I fear — God grant it may be 
very few — may meet Him in the fire of eternal doom. 
Some one says, "Do you think it is literal fire?" I 
will not stop to discuss that. Take it as a figure if you 
will, but remember that figures always stand for facts. 
Some people, if they find anything in the Bible that 
they do not like, say "It is figurative," and they think 
that has swept it all away. Remember, who uses the 
figures; they are God's figures; and God's figures stand 
for facts, and God is not a liar, so God's figures never 
overstate the facts they represent. And how terrible 
must be the mental and spiritual agony described by 



THKEE FIRES 2691 

that figure, if figure it be! Were you ever severely 
burnt? Did you ever see any one severely burnt? I 
have been. And hovs^ awful must be the spiritual or 
physical agony, whichever it is, that is represented by 
such a terrible figure as this. 

The superficial thinker says, *^0h, I cannot believe 
that ; I cannot believe that a, merciful God is going 
to let men go on suffering day after day, week after 
week, month after month, and year after year, with 
no hope." Open your eyes. Look at what is going on 
right around you in London. Is not God permitting 
men and women who sin, especially in certain specific 
forms of sin, to suffer most awful agonies day after day, 
month after month, year after year, without one hope 
of relief unless they repent ; and when the time of pos- 
sible repentance is passed — and it must pass some time 
— when the time of possible repentance is passed, and 
this goes on and on and on, ever worse and worse, 
what have you got but hell ? You don't get rid of hell 
by getting rid of the Bible, or by getting rid of God; 
hell is here; hell is a fact in London to-night. The 
only change the Bible and God make is that they open 
a door of hope, and when you banish God and the Bible 
the only change you make is that you shut the only door 
of hope. The infidels are guilty of the amazing folly of 
trying to close hell by shutting the only door of hope. 
Hell is here. It is a present-day fact, and unless there 
is repentance and acceptance of Christ it will be an 
eternal and endless fact. You say, "For whom?" Lis- 
ten : '^Eendering vengeance to them that know not God, 
and to them that obey not the Gospel." 

First, "to them that know not God." That is plain 



370 KEVIVAL ADDRESSES 

English for agnostics. Do you know what "agnostia*' 
means ? A great many people are proud of saying, '*| 
am an agnostic." Well, agnostic means "know not" or 
"know nothing"; it is used of those who "know not 
God." So our text says God will render vengeance to 
agnostics. Some one says, "That is not just." I cannot 
help that : it is a fact. But it is just. You ought to know 
God; you have no excuse for not knowing God. The 
most solemn duty that lies upon every man is to find 
out about God, and there is a way to know God. The 
trouble is you don't want to know God. Any agnostic 
that wants to know God will soon get acquainted with 
Him. I was once an agnostic, but I was an honest 
one, and I did not take long to find God. 

Only the other night a man said to me, "I am an ag- 
nostic." I pointed him to a way out of agnosticism, a 
reasonable way, and asked, "Is not that reasonable?" 
and he said, "Yes." Then I said, "Will you try it?" and 
he said, "No, I won't." His agnosticism is not his mis- 
fortune; it is his sin. The first and most solemn obli- 
gation resting on the creature is to know and worship 
and serve the Creator. You ought to know God, and if 
you refuse to know Him, the Lord Jesus will be re- 
vealed at last rendering vengeance to you and other 
agnostics. 

But not only to agnostics, but ^^to them that obey 
not the Gospel." Many a man is not an agnostic, but 
he does not obey the Gospel. There are many of you 
people who would support what I say about agnosticism, 
but you do not obey the Gospel. You do not believe 
with real faith, which means absolute surrender to and 
confidence in the Lord Jesus Christ. You do not obey 



THEEE FIEES. 271 

Jesus Christ as your Lord and Master. You do not 
openly confess Him as the Gospel eoniniands. He will 
render vengeance to you; you shall be '^punished with 
everlasting destruction from the presence of the Lord 
and from the glory of His power." 

Men and women, every one of us must mee^ God in 
fire. Oh, to-night do you not want to meet Him in the 
glorious fire of the Holy Ghost, refining you from sin, 
cleansing the dross and filth, illuminating you with 
God's glorious truth, warming the cold heart until it 
glows with holy love, energising you with the power of 
God, and spreading wherever it goes? Or do you wish 
to meet God in fire at that judgment day, that will 
try your work as to character, motive, the power that 
wrought it, and send all your works up in smoke, and 
leave you there stripped, saved '^so as by fire?" Or 
will you meet God in that awful fire of eternal doom, 
when the day comes that the same Christ whom you 
have rejected and trampled under foot comes back 
again in the glory of the Father, with His mighty 
angels, '^rendering vengeance to them that know not 
God and obey not the Gospel ?'' 



TSE BNa 



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Mr. Gordon halts his reader here and there, at some pre- 
cious text, some outstanding instance of God's tenderness, 
much as a traveller lingers for refreshment at a wayside 
spring, and bids us hearken as God's wooing note is heard 
pleading for consecrated service. An enheartening book, and 
a restful. A book of the winning Voice^ of outstretched 
Hands. 

ROBERT F. HORTON, P.P. 

The Springs of Joy and Other Addressed 

i2mo, cloth, net $i.oo. 

"Scholarly, reverent, penetrating, human. The product of 
& mature mind and of a genuine and sustained religious ty 
perience. The message of a thinker and a saint, which wiil 
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BISHOP IF ALTER R. LAMBUTH 

Winning the World for Chri^ 

A Study of Dynamics. Cole Lectures for 1915. 
l2mo, cloth, net $1.25. 

Tbis Lecture-Course is a spirited contribution to the dy- 
namics of Missions. It presents a study of the sources of in- 
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foreign, who with supreme abandon gave themselves utterly 
to '^he work to which they were called. 

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The New Personality and Other Sermons 

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Mr. Shannon, pastor of the Reformed Church on the 
Heights, Brooklyn, is possessed of lofty ideals, is purpose- 
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gifts of felicitous and epigrammatic expression. This new vol- 
ume by the popular preacher is a contribution of distinct value 
to current germonic literature. 



EARLIER WORKS IN DEMAND 

WAYNE WHIPPLE 

The Story-Life of the Son of Man 

8vo, illustrated, net $2.50. 

"A literary mosaic, consisting of quotations from a great 
number of writers concerning all the events of the Gespels. 
The sub-title accurately describes its contents. That sub- 
title is 'Nearly a thousand stories from sacred and secular 
sources in a continuous and complete chronicle of the earth 
life of the Saviour.' The book was prepared for the general 
reader, but vrill be valuable to minister, teacher and student. 
There are many full-page engravings from historic paintings 
and sacred originals, some reproduced for the first time."— 
Christian Observer, 

GAIUS GLENN ATKINS^ D.D. 



Pilgrims of the Lonely Road 

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"A rare book for its style, its theme and the richness of 
its insight. Seldom is seen a book of more exquisite grace 
of diction — happy surprises of phrase, and lovely lengths of 
haunting prose to delight the eye. Each of the great pil- 
grim's studies is followed step by step aleng the lonely way 
of the soul in its quest of light, toward the common goal of 
all — union with the eternal." — Chicago Record-Herald, 

S, D. GORDON 

Quiet Talks on Following The Chri^ 

i2mo, cloth, net 75c. 

"This volume is well calculated to aid in Christian life, to 
give strength, courage and light on difficult problems. It 
grips one's very life, brings one face to face with God's 
word, ways of understanding it and, even its every day ap- 
plication. It is plain, clear, direct, no confusion of dark 
sentences." — Bapt. Observer. 

G. CAMPBELL MORGAN, D.D, 

The Teaching of Chri^ 

A Companion Volume to "The Crises of The 
Christ." 8vo, cloth, net $1.50. 

"One does not read far before he is amazed at the clear and 
\ogical grasp Dr. Morgan has upon divine truths. Gould a 
•copy of this book, with its marvelous insight, its straightfor- 
wardness, its masterly appeal, be placed in the hands of our 
church leaders, it would go far toward negativing the spir- 
itual barrenness of destructive criticism. Here is a work 
that may profitably occupy a prominent place in the minister's 
library." — Augsburg Teacher. 

ZEPHTNE HUMPHREY 

The Edge of the Woods And other Papers 

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"Sane optimism, an appreciation of the beautiful and a 
delicate humor pervades the book which is one for lovers ol 
real literature to enjoy." — Pittsburgh Post. 



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