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Full text of "Rice University General announcements"










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NOTE: This catalog represents the most accurate information available at the time of 
publication. The university resei-ves the right to correct or otherwise change any such 
information without notice at its sole discretion. With respect to course offerings, the 
departments have attempted to anticipate which courses will be offered, and by whom 
and when such courses will be taught. However, course offerings may be affected by 
changes in facult}', student demand, and funding. Although efforts have been made to 
indicate these uncertainties, course offerings are subject to change without notice. 

William Marsh Rice University 

Physical Address: 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005 

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas 77251-1892 

Telephone: Campus Operator 713-348-0000 

Homepage Address: http://www.rice.edu 

2003-2004 General Announcements online: http://www.rice.edu/catalog/ 

Please address all correspondence to the appropriate office or department followed 
by the university mailing address given above. 



Admission, Catalogs, Applications 



Office of Admission 

109 Lovett Hall; 713-348-4036 



Business Matters 



Office of the Cashier 

110 Allen Center; 713-348-4946 



Career Services, Part-time 
Employment off Campus 

Credits, Transcripts 



Career Services Center 

Rice Memorial Center; 713-348-4055 

Office of the Registrar 

1 16 Allen Center; 713-348-4999 



Financial Aid, Scholarships, 
Part-time Employment on Campus 

Graduate Study 



Undergraduate and 
Graduate Students, 
Undergraduate Curricula 



Student Financial Services 

116 Allen Center; 713-348-4958 

Chair of the appropriate 
department (see pages 76-79) 

Office of the Vice President for 

Student Affairs 

101 Lovett Hall; 713-348-4996 



Rice University is committed to equal opportunit}' in education and employment. It is the 
policy of Rice Universit}' to attract qualified individuals of diverse backgrounds to its 
facility, staff and student body. Accordingly, Rice University does not discriminate 
against any individual on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, 
national or ethnic origin, age, disability, or veteran status in its admissions, its 
educational programs, or employment of faculty or staff In employment, the university 
seeks to recruit, hire, and advance women, members of minority groups, individuals with 
disabilities, Vietnam-era veterans, and special disabled veterans. 



Rice University 
General Announcements 
2003-2004 




RICE 



Contents 



University Addresses and Phone Numbers IFCB 

Message from the President vii 

Academic Calendar 2003-2004 viii 

The University and Campus 2 

Board of Trustees 3 

Rice University Campus Map 4 

General Information for All Students 7 

Student Responsibility 8 

Faculty Grading Guidelines 9 

Fondren Library 10 

Computing, Networking, and Telephone Resources 1 1 

Student Health and Counseling Services 13 

Student Resource Centers 15 

Sports 16 

Student Automobiles 17 

Information for Undergraduate Students 19 

Introduction 20 

Graduation Requirements 20 

Undergraduate Majors 23 

Other Academic Undergraduate Options 24 

Academic Regulations 30 

Academic Advising 44 

Summer School for College Students 44 

Admission of New Students 45 

Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 51 

Financial Aid 55 

Honor Societies 58 

Undergraduate Student Life 58 

Information for Graduate Students 63 

Introduction 64 

Admission to Graduate Study 64 

Graduate Degrees 65 

Academic Regulations 70 

Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 79 

Financial Aid 81 

Graduate Student Life 83 

Class III Students in Nondegree Programs 84 



Departments and Interdisciplinary Programs 87 

Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations 88 

Anthropology 91 

Architecture 93 

Art History 100 

Asian Studies 102 

Bioengineering 107 

Biosciences Ill 

Biochemistry and Cell Biology Ill 

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Ill 

Center for the Study of Languages 118 

Chemical Engineering 120 

Chemistry 124 

Civil and Environmental Engineering 129 

Classical Studies 136 

Cognitive Sciences 138 

Computational and Applied Mathematics 141 

Computer Science 145 

Earth Science 149 

Economics 155 

Education 162 

Education Certification 163 

Electrical and Computer Engineering 167 

English 172 

Environmental Analysis and Decision Making 175 

Environmental Studies 178 

French Studies 179 

German and Slavic Studies 182 

Hispanic Studies 184 

History 186 

Kinesiology 189 

Lifetime Physical Activity Program 192 

Linguistics 193 

Management and Accounting 197 

Managerial Studies 208 

Mathematics 210 

Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 212 



ui 



Medieval Studies 216 

Military Science 219 

Music 222 

Nanoscale Physics 226 

Naval Science 228 

Neurosciences 230 

Philosophy 231 

Physics and Astronomy 233 

Policy Studies : 238 

Political Science 242 

Psychology 245 

Religious Studies 247 

Sociology 250 

Statistics 252 

Subsurface Geoscience 254 

The Program for the Study of Women and Gender 257 

University Courses 260 

Visual Arts 261 

Courses of Instruction 263 

ACCO (Accounting) 265 

AMC (Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations) 265 

ANTH (Anthropology) 265 

ARAB (Arabic) 279 

ARCH (Architecture) 280 

ARTS (Studio Art, Film, and Photography) 292 

ASIA (Asian Studies) 299 

ASTR (Astronomy) 303 

BIOE (Bioengineering) 305 

BIOS (Biosciences) 311 

CAAM (Computational and Applied Mathematics) 318 

CENG (Chemical Engineering) 322 

CEVE (Civil and Environmental Engineering) 326 

CHEM (Chemistry) 331 

CHIN (Chinese) 337 

CLAS (Classical Studies) 340 

COMP (Computer Science) 342 

CSCI (Cognitive Sciences) 348 

ECON (Economics) 348 

EDUC (Education/Education Certification) 354 

ELEC (Electrical and Computer Engineering) 356 

ENGI (Engineering) 367 

ENGL (English) 368 

ENST (Environmental Studies) 380 

iv 



ESCI (Earth Science) 380 

FLAG (Foreign Languages Across the Curriculum) 387 

FREN (French Studies) 388 

FSEM (Freshman Seminar) 396 

GERM (German) 398 

GREE (Greek) 405 

HART(History of Art and Architecture) 405 

HEAL (Health Sciences) 416 

HEBR (Hebrew) 419 

HIND (Hindi) 420 

HIST (History) 421 

HONS (Honors Courses) 442 

HUMA (Humanities) 442 

ITAL (Italian Language and Culture) 445 

JAPA (Japanese) 446 

KINE (Kinesiology) 447 

KORE (Korean) 450 

LATI (Latin) 451 

LING (Linguistics) 453 

LPAP (Lifetime Physical Activity Program) 461 

MANA (Managerial Studies) 461 

MATH (Mathematics) 462 

MDST (Medieval Studies) 465 

MECH (Mechanical Engineering) 471 

MGMT (Management) 479 

MILI (Military Science) 498 

MSCI (Materials Science) 499 

MUSI (Music) 503 

NAVA (Naval Science) 519 

NEUR (Neurosciences) 520 

NSCI (Natural Sciences) 522 

PFDV (Professional Development) 523 

PHIL (Philosophy) 524 

PHYS (Physics) 530 

PLSH (Polish) 534 

POLI (Political Science) 535 

PORT (Portuguese) 544 

PSYC (Psychology) 545 

RELI (Religious Studies) 551 

RUSS (Russian) 561 

SANS (Sanskrit) 562 

SLAV (Slavic Studies) 563 

SOCI (Sociology) 564 

V 



SOSC (Social Sciences) 569 

SPAN (Spanish) 570 

STAT (Statistics) 580 

THE (Theatre) 584 

TIBT (Tibetan) 586 

UNIV (University Courses) 586 

WGST (The Program for the Study of Women and 

Gender) 588 

Administration and Staff 597 

Administration 598 

Administrative Offices 598 

College Masters 599 

Emeritus Faculty 600 

Faculty 605 

Professional Research Staff 646 

University Standing Committees for 2003-2004 655 

Index 656 



VI 



Message from the President 



The General Announcements of Rice University is an indispensable resource in the 
academic life of Rice University. It presents the people, the programs, and the practices 
that make this university a singular center of higher education. The General Announce- 
ments serves as a reminder of the high standards to which Rice has always aspired. These 
standards are as vital and robust as they were when the first students matriculated in 1 9 1 2 . 

We welcome your interest in Rice and your attention to the General Announcements . 
I encourage you to familiarize yourself with the information presented here: the 
distinctive academic backgrounds of our faculty; the rules and responsibilities of student 
life, both undergraduate and graduate; the diverse scope of our degree programs; and the 
richness of our curriculum. 



Malcolm Gillis 

President 

William Marsh Rice University 



Academic Calendar 2003-2004 



Fall 2003 

Friday, August I Deadline: Tuition due for entering freshmen 

Monday, August 1 1 Deadline: Tuition due for returning undergraduate 

students 

Friday, August 15 Deadline: Tuition due for graduate students 

Sunday-Friday, 

August 17-22 Orientation week for new students 

Monday, August 25 FIRST DAY OF CLASSES 

Monday-Friday, 

August 25-August 29 Registration continues for undergraduate and graduate 

students 

Monday, September 1 Labor Day (holiday) 

Friday, September 5 Deadline: Adding courses without a fee 

Deadline: Withdrawing with 100% refund of tuition 
and fees or dropping to part-time with 100% refund of 
tuition 

Friday, September 12 Deadline: Withdrawing or dropping to part-time with 

70% refund of tuition 

Friday, September 19 Deadline: Late registration or adding courses 

Deadline: dropping courses without a fee 
Deadline: Withdrawing or dropping to part-time with 
60% refund of tuition 

Last day anticipated aid for fall shows as a credit on 
student accounts 

Friday, September 26 Deadline: Changing Spring 2003 'Tass/Fail" to a 

grade 

Deadline: Instructors submitting final grades to clear 
"Incompletes" from Spring 2003 semester 
Deadline: Withdrawing or dropping to part-time with 
50% refund of tuition 

Friday, October 3 Deadline: Withdrawing or dropping to part-time with 

40% refund of tuition 

Friday, October 10 Deadline: Mid-semester grades for first-year under- 
graduate students due from instructors 
Deadline: College course plans due to Vice President 
for Student Affairs 

Deadline: Withdrawing or dropping to part-time with 
30% refund of tuition 

Monday-Tuesday , 

October 13-14 Midterm recess 



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Wednesday, October 15 All classes normally held on Monday meet; all 

Wednesday classes canceled (to equalize holidays by 
days of the week during the semester) 

Friday, October 17 Deadline: Withdrawing or dropping to part-time with 

20% refund of tuition 

Friday, October 24 Deadline: Withdrawing or dropping to part-time with 

10% refund of tuition 

Friday, October 31 Deadline: Last day to drop courses - graduate 

students and returning undergraduate students 
Deadline: Changing course status to "Pass/Fail" 
Deadline: Filing of: 

• Thesis master's candidacy petitions 

• Certification of nonthesis master's 

• Form for automatic master's 

in the Office of Graduate Studies for mid-year 

conferral of degree 

Deadline: Filing Ph.D. candidacy petitions in the 

Office of Graduate Studies for mid-year conferral of 

degree 

Monday, November 3 Deadline: Filing application for mid-year conferral of 

degree 

Friday, November 14 Last day to complete financial aid application for fall 

2003 

Monday-Friday 

November 17-21 Registration begins for currently enrolled undergradu- 
ate, graduate, and fifth year students for the Spring 
2004 semester 

Monday-Wednesday , 

November 17-19 5:00 p.m. Deadline, Wednesday, November 19: Self- 
scheduling of final exams in undergraduate courses 

Friday, November 21 Deadline: Filing application for May 2004 conferral 

of degree 

Thursday-Friday , 

November 27-28 Thanksgiving recess 

Monday, December 1 Last day to complete loan application for fall 2003 

loans 

Friday, December 5 LAST DAY OF CLASSES 

Deadline: last day to drop courses (first semester 
undergraduate students only) 

5:00 P.M. Deadline: submitting theses in the Office of 
Graduate Studies for mid-year conferral of degree 
Deadline: Disenrollment date for failure to pay 
amounts owed the university 

Saturday-Tuesday , 

December 6-9 Self-scheduled final examinations ONLY 



Wednesday-Wednesday 

December 10-17 Scheduled and self-scheduled final examinations 

continue 

Wednesday. December 17 .... 5:00 p.m. Deadline: Take-home final examinations 

and course assignments due 

Friday, January 2 Deadline: All final grades due in the Office of the 

Registrar 

Spring 2004 

Monday, January 5 Deadline: Tuition due for all students 

Monday, January 12 FIRST DAY OF CLASSES 

Monday, January 19 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (holiday) 

Monday-Friday, 

January 12-16 Registration continues for undergraduate and graduate 

students 

Friday, January 16 Deadline: resolving grades of "Other" from Fall 2003 

semester 

Friday, January 23 Deadline: Adding courses without a fee 

Deadline: Withdrawing with 100% refund of tuition 
and fees or dropping to part-time with 100% refund of 
tuition 

Friday, January 30 Deadline: filing of the following: 

• Thesis master's candidacy petitions 

• Certification of nonthesis master's 

• Form for automatic master's 

in the Office of Graduate Studies for May 2004 

conferral of degree 

Deadline: filing Ph.D. candidacy petitions in the 

Office of Graduate Studies for May 2004 conferral of 

degree 

Deadline: Withdrawing or dropping to part-time with 

70% refund of tuition 

Friday, February 6 Deadline: Late registration or adding courses 

Deadline: Dropping courses without a fee 
Deadline: Withdrawing or dropping to part-time with 
60% refund of tuition 

Last day anticipated aid for spring shows as credit on 
student accounts 

Friday, February 13 Deadline: changing Fall 2003 "Pass/Fail" to a grade 

Deadline: instructors submitting final grades to clear 
"Incompletes" from Fall 2003 semester 
Deadline: Withdrawing or dropping to part-time with 
50% refund of tuition 

Monday, February 16 Financial aid application materials available to 

returning students to apply for need-based aid for 
2004-05 



Friday, February 20 Deadline: Withdrawing or dropping to part-time with 

40% refund of tuition 

Friday, February 27 Deadline: Mid-semester grades for first-year under- 
graduate students due from instructors 
Deadline: College course plans due to Vice President 
for Student Affairs 

Deadline: Withdrawing or dropping to part-time with 
30% refund of tuition 

Monday-Friday, 

March 1-5 Midterm recess 

Friday, March 5 Deadline: Withdrawing or dropping to part-time with 

20% refund of tuition 

Friday, March 12 Deadline: Withdrawing or dropping to part-time with 

10% refund of tuition 

Friday, March 19 Deadline: Sophomores filing majors with the Office 

of the Registrar 

Monday, March 29 Deadline: Last day to drop courses — graduate 

students and returning undergraduate students 
Deadline: Changing course status to "Pass/Fail" option 

Monday-Friday , 

March 29-April 2 Registration begins for currently enrolled undergradu- 
ate, graduate, and fifth-year students for the Fall 2004 
semester 

Thursday, April 1 Last day to complete financial aid applications for 

spring 2004 

Friday, April 9 Summer term aid applications available 

Monday- Wednesday , 

April 12-14 5:00 p.m. Deadline: Self-scheduling of final examina- 
tions in undergraduate courses 

Thursday, April 15 Last day to complete loan application for spring 2004 

loans 

Priority Deadline for returning students to submit 

financial aid application materials for 2004-05 

Friday, April 23 LAST DAY OF CLASSES 

Deadline: last day to drop courses (for January 2004 
undergraduate student admits only) 
Noon Deadline: submitting theses in the Office of 
Graduate Studies for May 2004 conferral of degree 

Saturday-Thursday , 

April 24-April 29 Final examinations for all degree candidates 

Wednesday- Wednesday , 

April 28-May 5 Final examinations for nongraduating students 

Friday, April 30 Disenrollment date for failure to pay amounts owed to 

the university 

Deadline to submit summer financial aid applications 



Saturday, May 1 9:00 a.m. Deadline: grades for all degree candidates 

due in the Office of the Registrar 

Saturday, May 8 NINETY-FIRST COMMENCEMENT 

Monday-Friday 

May 10-14 Registration for 2004 summer semester for under- 
graduate and for summer research for graduate 
students 

Wednesday, May 12 9:00 a.m Deadline: All remaining grades for 

nongraduating students due in the Office of the 
Registrar 

Friday, June 4 Deadline: resolving grades 

of "Other" from Spring 2004 semester 

Summer 2004: 

Early Session (May 11-28) 

Friday, April 9 Summer term aid applications are available 

Wednesday, April 14 2:30 p.m. Deadline: Early application discount- 
summer school 

Friday, April 30 2:30 p.m. Deadline: Application to Early Session 

courses 

Deadline to submit summer financial aid applications 

Tuesday, May 4 Notification sent to applicants who submitted 

applications by April 30 

Monday, May 10 2:00 p.m. Deadline: Final tuition payment and 

registration 

Tuesday, May 1 1 FIRST DAY OF CLASSES-EARLY SESSION and 

summer research for graduate students 

Thursday, May 13 3:00 p.m. Deadline: Adding courses 

3:00 p.M. Deadline: Late registration 

Monday, May 17 Deadline: Visiting and Class III students to submit 

official transcripts (must be received by this date) 

Wednesday, May 19 Deadline: Submitting refund requests (must be 

received by this date. Please refer to section on 
Withdrawal Penalty and Tuition Refund.) 

Friday, May 21 3:00 p.m. Deadline: Dropping courses without 

academic penalty (no refunds) 

3:00 P.M. Deadline: Designating pass/fail option 

Friday, May 28 LAST DAY OF CLASSES-EARLY SESSION 

Monday, May 3 1 Memorial Day (holiday) 



Friday, June 4 Deadline: Completion of all Early Session course 

work, including final examinations. Exam schedule 
determined by instructor. 

Friday, June 1 1 3:00 p.m. Deadline: Submitting grades to the School 

of Continuing Studies Summer School Office 

Summer 2004 

General Session (June 1-July 23) 

Friday, April 9 Summer term aid applications are available 

Wednesday, April 14 2:30 p.m. Deadline for early application discount 

Friday, April 30 Deadline to submit summer financial aid applications 

Friday, May 14 2:30 p.m. Deadline: Application to General Session 

courses 
Thursday, May 20 Notification sent to applicants who submitted 

applications by May 14 

Friday, May 28 2:00 p.m. Deadline: Final tuition payment and 

registration 

Monday, May 31 Memorial Day (holiday) 

Tuesday, June 1 FIRST DAY OF CLASSES-general session 

Friday, June 1 1 3:00 p.m. Deadline: Adding courses or late registra- 
tion 

Monday, June 14 Deadline: Visiting and Class III students to submit 

official transcripts (must be received by this date) 

Monday, June 21 Deadline: Submitting refund requests (please refer to 

section on Withdrawal Penalty and Tuition Refund)* 

Monday, July 5 University holiday 

Wednesday, July 7 3:00 p.m. Deadline: Dropping courses without 

academic penalty (no refunds) * 

3:00 P.M. Deadline: Designating Pass/Fail option* 

Friday, July 23 LAST DAY OF CLASSES-GENERAL SESSION 

Tuesday, July 27 Deadline for completion of all General Session 

course work, including final examinations 

Friday, July 30 3:00 p.m. Deadline: Submitting grades to School of 

Continuing Studies Summer School Office 

Friday, August 6 Final grades mailed from the Office of the Registrar 

Friday, August 27 LAST DAY OF CLASSES-summer research for 

graduate students. (Note: This date is subject to final 
faculty approval of the 2004-05 academic calendar.) 



* For some courses, different deadlines will apply. Students enrolled in these 

courses will receive separate deadline schedules. 






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2 

The University and Campus 



Rice is a private, independent university dedicated to the "advancement of letters, 
science, and art." Occupying a distinctive, tree-shaded, nearly 300-acre campus only a 
few miles from downtown Houston, Rice attracts a diverse group of highly talented 
students with a range of academic studies that includes humanities, social sciences, 
natural sciences, engineering, architecture, music, and business management (graduate 
study only). The school offers students the advantage of forging close relationships with 
members of the faculty and the option of tailoring graduate and undergraduate studies to 
their specific interests . Students each year are drawn to this coed, nonsectarian university 
by the creative approaches it historically has taken to higher education. 

One of the unique features of Rice is its residential colleges. Before matriculating, 
each of the university's 2,700 undergraduates becomes a member of one of nine 
residential colleges, which have their own dining halls, public rooms, and dorms on 
campus; most of the first-year students and close to 80 percent of all undergraduates 
reside at their associated colleges. Because each student is randomly assigned to one of 
the colleges and maintains membership in the same college throughout the undergraduate 
years, the colleges are enriched by the diversity of their students' backgrounds, academic 
interests and experiences, talents, and goals. A faculty master, who is assigned to each 
college and lives in an adjacent house, helps cultivate a variety of cultural and intellectual 
interests among the students, as well as supporting an effective system of self-govern- 
ment. Other faculty or members of the community serve as associates to individual 
colleges. The experience of college residence is indispensable to conveying the rich 
flavor of academic life at Rice, allowing students to combine their usual studies with an 
array of social events , intramural sports , student plays , lecture series , innovative college- 
designed courses, and an active role in student government. 

Graduate students come to Rice for the chance to work closely with eminent 
professors and researchers who are seeking to extend the horizons of current knowledge. 
Although most of the approximately 1,850 graduate students live off campus, taking 
advantage of the city's readily available and affordable housing, space is also available 
in the university-owned Graduate Apartments. Graduate students have a voice within the 
university community through the Graduate Student Association, which organizes and 
funds regular social events. 

Rice offers students the pleasures and challenges of academic life within the 
peaceful enclosure of a campus widely acclaimed for its beauty. Campus buildings, 
including an extensive computer center and the 2 million-volume Fondren Library, form 
graceful groupings under spreading live oaks. Recent additions include the architectur- 
ally stunning Anne and Charles Duncan Hall, a state-of-the-art building for computa- 
tional engineering; James A. Baker III Hall, which houses the Institute for Public Policy 
and the School of Social Sciences; and E. Dell Butcher Hall, home to the Center for 
Nanoscale Science and Technology. Additionally, Rice boasts the largest open-air 
stadium in the city . 

Rice students also enjoy all the commercial and cultural advantages of a major 
metropolitan center. The school maintains extensive technological links to the area's 
many colleges and universities, the acclaimed Texas Medical Center, and other 
resources. And both students and faculty enjoy Houston's panoply of cultural offerings, 
from opera to blues clubs and from a renowned collection of post-impressionist art 
to alternative art spaces. Rice and Houston together provide an ideal learning and 
living environment. 



Board of Trustees 



TRUSTEES 

E. William Bamett, Chair 
J. D. Bucky Allshouse 
D. Kent Anderson 
Teveia Rose Barnes 
Alfredo Brener 
Robert T. Brockman 
Albert Y. Chao 
James W. Crownover 
Edward A. Dominguez 
Bruce W. Dunlevie 
James A. Elkins, III 
Lynn Laverty Elsenhans 
Karen Ostrum George 
Susanne Glasscock 
K. Terry Koonce 
Cindy Lindsay 
Michael R. Lynch 
Robert R. Maxfield 
Burton J. McMurtry 
Steven L. Miller 
W. Bernard Pieper 
Karen Hess Rogers 
Marc Shapiro 
WilHam N. Sick 
L. E. Simmons 



TRUSTEES EMERITI 

Josephine E. Abercrombie 
J. Evans Attwell 
James A. Baker, III 
Raymond Brochstein 
Harry J. Chavanne 
John L. Cox 
Janice G. Doty 
Charles W. Duncan, Jr. 
Matt F. Gorges 
C.M.Hudspeth 
Lee Hage Jamail 
Edward^W.Kelley,Jr. 
Albert N. Kidd 
Frederick R. Lummis. Jr. 
Robert C.McNair 
Ralph S. O'Connor 
Bob Parks 
Harry M. Reasoner 
Jack T. Trotter 



TRUSTEE ADVISERS 

Judy Ley Allen 

Richard A. Chapman 

Stephen C. Cook 

Thomas H. Cruikshank 

J. Thomas Eubank 

William S.Farish, III 

Catherine Cobum Hannah 

Joyce Pounds Hardy-McDonald 

James W. Hargrove 

Gerald D. Hines 

William P. Hobby 

A. L. Jensen 

T. Robert Jones 

Baine P. Kerr 

William F. Kieschnick 

Neal T. Lacey, Jr. 

William M. McCardell 

Jerry McCleskey 



J. W. McLean 
G. Walter McReynolds 
James R. Meyers 
Pat H. Moore 
S.I. Morris 
Paula Meredith Mosle 
M. Kenneth Oshman 
J. Howard Rambin 
David L. Rooke 
Frank B. Ryan 
Louisa Stude Sarofim 
Gus A. Schill, Jr. 
Stephen J. Shaper 
Stephen B. Smith 
Louis D. Spaw, Jr. 
Selby W. Sullivan 
Helen Saba Worden 



Rice University Campus Map 



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PARKING KEY 

L_l Faculty/Staff Parking 

Resident Student Parking 
Commuter Parking 
Visitor Parking ( 1 free lot-G) 
Accessible Parking 



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FE 

G 

GA 

H 

K 

L 

M 

N 

NC 

SC 

SS 

W 



Facilities & Engineeiing Lot 

Greenbriar Lot 

Greenbriar Annex 

Hess Court Lot 

Keck Lot 

Lovett Lot 

Main Street Lot 

Nortli Lilt 

North Colleges Residents Lot 

South Colleges Residents Lot 

Soutli Stadium Lot 

West Lot 



Parking Lots: 

A Abercrombie Lot 

APB Alice Pratt Brown Hall Un 

B Baker College-Housing & Dining 

Ix)t 

BG BiologN'-Geologj' Lx)t 

C c:anipanile Lot 

CG Central ("anipus Garage (Paid) 



Parking Rates: 

West (West ot'Entrance 12): $1.00/hour 
East (East of Entrance 12); S2.00/hour 

Payment Methods: 

Central Campus Garage: cash or credit 

card. 

Founder's Court, Nortli, and West 

Lots Visitor Section: credit card. 



BUILDING KEY 

1. U)vettH.ill 

Admission, President, Provost, 
Vice President for Student Affairs, 
Vice President for Public Affairs, 
Vice President for Enrollment 

2. Sew all Hall 

3. Herzstein Hall 

4. Anderson Hall 
Dean of Architecture 

5. Rayzor Hall 

6. Fondren Library 

Vice Provost &■ Librarian 



:NT I ASHBY 




7. 



Humanities Building 
Demi of Humanities 
Herring Hall 
Rice Memorial Chapel 
Rice Memorial Center 
Bookstore, Alumni Office 
Ixx Snident Center 
12. lames A. Baker III HaU 

Dean of Social Sciences, Director 
of Baker Institute for Public Policy 
.Mice Pratt Brown Hall 
Dean of Music 
DcU Butcher Hall 

1 5. Space Science Building 

16. Keith- Wiess Geological Laboratories 

17. M.D. Anderson Biological 
Laboratories 

18. George R. Brown Hall 

19. Haniman Hall 

20. Hicks I-utchen 

21. Mudd Building 



8. 
9. 
10. 



11. 



13, 



14. 



v^ 



22. 
23. 

24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 



30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 



z:^^ 


39. 


James A. Baker College 


/^^ 


40. 


Edgar Odell Lovett CoUege 


^^ 


41. 


Lo\ett House 




42. 


Will Rice CoUege 




43. 


Baker House 




44. 


\VU1 Rice House 


IVCGREGOR 


45. 


Richardson House 




46. 


Sid W. Richardson CoUege 




47. 


Hanszen House 




48. 


Harr\' C. Hanszen CoUege 




50. 


Wiess House 


Herman Brown Hall 


51. 


Ham' C. Wiess CoUege 


Ho« ard Keck HaU 


52. 


Gymnasium & xAutr\' Court 


Dean of Natural Sciences 


53. 


Rice Media Center 


Mechanical Engineering Building 


54. 


Speros P. Manel Center for 


Ryon Engineering Laboratory 




Continuing Studies 


Facilities and Engineering 




Dean of Continuing Studies 


Mechanical Laboratory' 


55. 


Rice Unixersitx' PoUce Department 


Abercrombie Engineering 


56. 


Na\y ROTC 


Laboratory' 


57. 


Post Office 


Anne & Charles Duncan Hall 


58. 


Cox Fitness Center 


Dean ofEnirinecrinji 


59. 


Rice Stadium 


Mattel House 


60. 


Athletic Offices & "R" Room 


Manan & Speros B. Mattel College 


61. 


Greenbriar Building 


Man- Gibbs Jones College 




Office of Public Affairs, Buy/Pay 


New Jones Master House 


62. 


Rice Graduate Apartments 


Brown House 


63. 


RfckUng Park at Cameron Field 


Marearett Root Brown College 


65. 


Jesse H. Jones Graduate School 


Ralph S. O'Connor House 




of Management 


Cohen House 




Dean of Graduate School of 


Faculn Club 




Mnnajiement 


Allen Center for Business Acti\'ities 


66. 


New Jones Commons 


Renistrnr, Casliier, Vice President for 


67. 


New BrowTi Commons & 


Finance &■ Administration, 




Residences 


Conti-ollcr, Vice President for 


68. 


New North Servery 


Resource Devclopnent, Vice 


69. 


New South Servers' 


President for Investments & 


70. 


Track/Soccer Stadium 


Treasurer 


71. 


Obsenaton' 



8 GENERAL INFORMATION FOR ALL STUDENTS 

Student Responsibility 

The university expects all Rice students to exercise personal responsibility over 
their actions. Their behavior should reflect a respect for the law and for their contractual 
obligations, a consideration for the rights of others, and shared standards of considerate 
and ethical behavior. 

Students are responsible for knowing and following all information, policies, and 
procedures listed in this General Announcements . Questions should be directed to the 
appropriate office or administrator. 

Rice encourages self-discipline, recognizing that effective student government, 
including judicial processes, and the integrity of the honor system depend on the 
willingness of all students to meet community standards of conduct. 

The university , however, reserves the right to insist on the withdrawal of any student 
whose conduct it judges to be clearly detrimental to the best interests of either the student 
or the university. The appropriate authorities take such action only after careful 
consideration. 

No individual or group may use the name of the university or one of its colleges 
without prior approval of the university or the college. 

The Honor System 

The honor system, one of the oldest and proudest traditions at Rice, is administered 
by the Honor Council , whose student members are elected each year by the student body . 
Adopted by a student vote in 1916. the honor system has remained essentially the same 
since that time but for changes in the procedures and membership of the Honor Council. 

Students take all written examinations and complete any specifically designated 
assignments under the honor system. By committing themselves to the honor system, all 
students accept responsibility for assuring the integrity of the examinations and assign- 
ments conducted under it. The Honor Council is responsible for investigating reported 
violations and for conducting a hearing when the facts warrant. The assistant dean of 
Student Judicial Programs, who reviews the resuUs of the investigations and hearing, 
considers the council's recommendations when issuing penalties. 

The Honor Council conducts an ongoing program to acquaint new students and 
faculty with the honor system. The Honor Code and other related information and 
resources are located at the homepage of the Honor Council: http://www.ruf.rice.edu/ 
-honor/. 

The Code of Student Conduct 

With regard to nonacademic disiplinary matters, the assistant dean of Student 
Judicial Programs and the University Court— a court of student peers— enforce the Code 
of Student Conduct that governs the administration of student order and discipline. The 
Code of Student Conduct applies to all undergraduate students, transfer students, 
graduate students, and professional students registered at Rice University, as well as to 
visiting students. Class III students, second degree students, and auditors from the time 
they arrive on campus for orientation until they have completed their studies or degrees 
and physically left campus. Organizations also are subject to this Code. All enrolled 
students also are subject to Rice University policies, rules, and regulations. The assistant 
dean of Student Judicial Programs oversees the judicial system under the auspices of the 
vice president for Student Affairs , who has general authority over the student disciplinary 
system. The Code of Student Conduct and other related information and resources are 
located at the homepage of the University Court: http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~ucourt/ 
table.html. 



GENERAL INFORMATION FOR ALL STUDENTS 9 

Faculty Grading Guidelines 

The Committee on Examinations and Standing has drawn up the following guide- 
lines on grading. Additional infonnation is available on pages 36-39. 

• The evaluation of the student's perfonnance in a course and a decision on the 

appropriate grade is the responsibility of the designated instructor or instructors 
in the course. 

• No student should be given an extension of time or opportunities to improve a 

grade that are not available to all members of the class, except for verified 
illness or justified absence from campus. Students who have three scheduled 
final examinations in two consecutive calendar days may, however, take one 
of the examinations at another time. Except for scheduled exams, no course 
assignments may be due between the last day of classes and the last day of the 
final examination period. 

• Students in independent study courses are not to be allowed an extension beyond 

the time when grades are due. Faculty are to submit grades at the end of the 
semester for such students based on work completed during the semester. The 
instructor directing the independent study assumes responsibility with the 
student for ensuring that the work undertaken is appropriate to the span of a 
semester and for detemiining the degree credit to be received. 

• The basis for grading and the expectations on all written assignments or tests 

should be clearly explained to the class in advance, preferably in writing at the 
beginning of the semester. The instructor should explain clearly which assign- 
ments or homework are covered by the honor system and which are not. To 
prevent allegations of plagiarism on written assignments, students should be 
warned that all direct and indirect quotations from other sources should be 
properly acknowledged. The instructor should explain the extent to which the 
student's paper is expected to be independent of the references and clearly 
distinguishable from them. 

• Instructors should be willing to give any student an explanation of his or her grade 

as consistent with the grading for the rest of the class. For this reason, the 
committee urges the faculty to preserve all examinations and written material 
not returned to students, as well as grade records, for at least the following 
semester so that students may, if they wish, review with their instructor the basis 
for the grade received. 

• Instructors may not change a semester grade after the grade sheet has been 

submitted to the registrar, except when there is a clerical error in calculating the 
grade. This is a long-standing university rule of which the faculty are reminded 
by the registrar at the end of each semester. It is designed in part to protect the 
faculty from student pressure for grade changes. All other grade changes, 
including retroactive change to withdixnval or incomplete, must be approved by 
the Committee on Examinations and Standing on the basis of a written petition 
from the student and on information from the instructor. 

• There is no university requirement that a final examination be given in a course. 

It is university policy that final examinations that cover more than the material 
since the last examination, that are the only exam in the course, or that are 
comprehensive of the entire course may be given only during the final 
examination period. Such examinations may not, for example, be labeled 
"tests" and administered during the last week of classes. Final examinations are 
normally of 3-hour duration. Faculty who, under exceptional circumstances, 
wish to give longer examinations may do so only if the exam is scheduled as 
take-home. Under no circumstances may final exams exceed five hours. The 
"due date" for all take-home final exams is the end of the examinafion period. 



10 GENERAL INFORMATION FOR ALL STUDENTS 

• First-year students receive mid-semester grades around the eighth week of the 

fall and spring semesters so that they can, if advisable, enroll in tutoring or 
drop a class for which they may not be prepared. Faculty who teach first- 
year students in any of their classes will be asked to submit grades of 
standing for these students during the seventh week of the semester and 
should schedule the grading of tests, quizzes, or homework assignments 
accordingly. These grades are not recorded on the student's transcript nor 
calculated in the grade point average, but they are important indicators for 
students and their faculty advisers. 

• Departments using teaching associates, adjunct professors, or visiting faculty of 

any kind should make sure these teachers are familiar with Rice grading 
procedures. A regular faculty member who is well-versed in the grading 
guidelines should be assigned to assist such instructors. 
The chair of the Committee on Examinations and Standing or the vice president for 
Student Affairs will be glad to advise any faculty member faced with exceptional 
circumstances that may justify special consideration. Students may petition the commit- 
tee concerning the application of these guidelines. Suspected or possible violations of the 
honor system should be submitted to the Honor Council. 

Fondren Library 

Fondren Library provides a wealth of resources for study and research. Its perma- 
nent collection numbers 2.2 million volumes, almost 3 million microforms, 33,000 
current periodical and serial titles, and more than 55,000 titles in audio, video, and 
computer formats. The library is well-equipped to meet the needs of students and faculty. 

Students exploring the library's extensive holdings can take advantage of its 
networking systems. With Macintosh, PC, and UNIX workstations scattered throughout 
the first floor of the library, students looking for information have their choice of print 
or electronic media. Wireless networking is available on the first floor. 

If they want to postpone a trek to the library , students may access the library's online 
catalog from the web at http://www.rice.edu/fondren. Fondren's website also links 
students to a wide variety of indexes and a growing collection of full-text reference 
sources, as well as primary literature. 

The library staff is committed to the use of evolving information technologies, 
whether in helping to develop collections of applications, resources, and tools tailored to 
a particular subject or need or in facilitating user access to networked information 
sources. The library's electronic resources also include multimedia packages and large 
data sets, and students will find many specialized research tools available, such as 
computer programs for text analysis and geographic information systems software. 

Fondren Library provides a home for a number of separate collections. It is a federal 
depository for U.S. government publications, patents, and trademarks. The Woodson 
Research Center holds the library ' s rare books , manuscripts , and university archives . The 
library also houses the Alice Pratt Brown Fine Arts Library. The Electronic Resources 
Center supports the creation and use of digital resources for teaching, learning, and 
research by providing Rice students, faculty, and staff access to electronic texts and 
scholarly databases, Web development tools, and expert consultation. The Business 
Information Center is in the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Management. 

The library has an open-shelf policy that encourages creative browsing. Students 
may use a host of special facilities, including individual study carrels, group-study 
rooms, audiovisual equipment, electronic workstations, and microform reading carrels. 
Photocopiers are available in the library. 



GENERAL INFORMATION FOR ALL STUDENTS 1 1 

Fondren Library operates on the philosophy that a Ubrary is more than a collection 
of books. It is an essential campus resource with a knowledgeable staff and up-to-date 
technologies— an inviting place that introduces students and faculty to a range of rich 
possibilities as they pursue their independent inquiries. 

Computing, Networking, and Telephone Resources 

The four departments of the Information Technology (IT) division provide both 
centralized and distributed services and resources to the entire Rice campus, including: 
•Computing support 
•Educational labs 
•Multimedia classrooms 
•Campus networking 
•Internet connectivity 
•Campus telephone service 

Computing and Networking Resources 

The resources of particular interest to students include: 

•Accounts for coursework, e-mail, Internet access, and computer lab access 

•Computing help from residential college consultants 

•Network connection ports in each residential college room 

•Wireless network access in the library and other campus common areas 

•Remote network access 

•Free training classes on computing topics 

Educational Computing: Owlnet. Owlnet is an educational computing environ- 
ment that provides e-mail services, computer labs , specialized software, data storage , and 
network access for academic use by students and faculty. Using Owlnet, students can 
fulfill coursework requirements, store their academic data, print, browse the web, create 
their own webpages, and use electronic mail to communicate with professors, class- 
mates, friends, and family. All undergraduate and graduate students are eligible for an 
Owlnet account. Students can apply for accounts online (http://apply.rice.edu). Graduate 
students may have access to other computing resources within their department as well. 

Campus Labs. Owlnet computing labs are located across the campus , including one 
in each residential college. Most Owlnet labs are available 24 hours a day with a Rice ID 
card and proper authorization. Some labs are limited to the building's hours of operation 
and some labs are used as classrooms during certain posted hours. Lists of available 
hardware and software are available on the web (http://www.rice.edu/IT/labs.html). 
Some of the larger labs are: 

Fondren Library ( 1 st and 2nd floor) 

Mudd Building (1st floor) 

Anderson Hall 2 1 8 

Ryon Lab 102 

Student-Owned Computers. Each residential college dorm room has one active 
network port for every occupant, providing a direct connection from a student's computer 
to the campus network and the Internet. Students can get assistance from the college 
computing associates (see Help below) for most of their computing needs on campus. 



12 GENERAL INFORMATION FOR ALL STUDENTS 

Students connecting to Rice from an outside Internet access service, such as 
commercial dialup, ADSL, or cable modem service can apply to use Rice's Virtual 
Private Networking system (VPN) online (http://apply.rice.edu). VPN allows the secure 
exchange of data between Rice University and a remote system connected to the Internet 
outside of Rice. For more information, look online (http://www.rice.edu/Computer/ 
Dialup/VPN/RemoteAccess/vpn). 

Help. For undergraduates, each college has two resident student college computing 
associates (CCAs) who can help with questions about using personal computers and Rice 
computing facilities. CCAs are listed on the website (http://www.rice.edu/Computer/ 
student.html). The CCAs can be reached by calling 713-348-4983, via e-mail to 
problem@rice.edu, via http://problem.rice.edu, or by stopping by their rooms during 
their office hours. 

For graduate students, computing assistance is provided by divisional computing 
teams, who also provide assistance to the faculty and staff in each academic division . The 
contact information for divisional team members can be found online (http://www.rice.edu/ 
Computer/dialup/vpn/). 

Publications about computing services and how to use supported systems and 
software are available in the Mudd building or on the web (http://www.rice.edu/ 
Computer/Documents). Students can learn more about computing by taking a variety of 
short courses covering many of the programs and operating systems used at Rice (http:/ 
/www.rice.edu/Computer/Short_Courses/). Short courses are two to three hours long 
and are free. 

Policies. Students using Rice computing facilities and services are required to 
observe Rice and Owlnet policies and procedures, as well as state and federal laws 
governing computer use. View these policies online (http://www.rice.edu/Computer/ 
Policy/ and http://www.owlnet.rice.edu/policy). 

For More Information. Students can find more information about computing 
resources on the Information Technology computing webpages (http://www.rice.edu/ 
Computer/). 

Telephone Service for College Residents 

College residents do not need to sign up for local and campus telephone service. 
Telephone services will be working when students arrive on campus. The telephone 
services provided to the residential colleges include: 

•Local and campus calls 

•Voicemail 

•Call waiting 

•Caller ID 

•Hold 

•Call transfer to a campus extension 

•Three-party conference calls 

•Four-digit dialing for campus calls 

Telephone. College residents will need to supply the telephone for their room/suite. 
Each college room/suite has only one telephone jack to connect a telephone. Telephones 
should be analog. Students wishing to use caller ID should select a telephone with this 
capability. 

Phone Number. Each room/suite has an assigned number (71 3-348-xxxx) that can 
receive direct-dial calls from outside Rice University. As part of the campus telephone 



GENERAL INFORMATION FOR ALL STUDENTS 1 3 

system, rooms can make or receive calls within Rice using only four-digit extensions 
(e.g., x5555 for Telecommunications). 

Cost. A fee of $69 per semester is included in the required fees for each college 
resident (see Tuition, Fees, and Expenses on pages 51-52). This fee is for local calling 
service only. 

Long-Distance and International Service. Long-distance service is not provided 
by Telecommunications. Rice Telecommunications negotiates with vendors to obtain a 
rate plan for students. Information on the discount program is available when students 
move in. 

Students can opt to use a Rice discount plan with a national long-distance carrier. 
Or, students can choose a carrier (e.g., AT&T, MCI, Sprint, etc), and use long distance 
services through their assigned tollfree numbers or calling cards. Prepaid calling cards 
can be purchased at local retailers. 

Help. Students can contact Telecommunications at 7 1 3-348-5555 with questions or 
look on the web (http://www.rice.edu/telephone). 

Telephone Service for Off-Campus Students 

Off-campus students will not be charged the Rice Telecommunications Fee. 
Students who live off-campus will need to contact local telephone service providers for 
service in their residences and make any needed long-distance and international arrange- 
ments. 

Student Health and Counseling Services 

student Health Fee 

By paying an annual student health service fee, all students gain access to both the 
Student Health Service and the Rice Counseling Center. Detailed information on the care 
and services each provide is available from both centers. 

Student Health Service 

As of late fall semester of 2003, the Student Health Service, an outpatient primary 
clinic, should be relocated to a new Student Health and Wellness Center in the former 
Brown College commons. Until then, it will remain in the north wing of Hanszen College. 
Two primary care physicians and two nurses staff the clinic. 

Clinic hours are from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.. Monday through Friday , during fall and 
spring semesters . For after-hours and weekend medical care , students may choose among 
a number of local hospitals. Students must pay for all medical care outside the clinic's 
purview, including blood tests, x-rays, and outside physician consultations. Should such 
medical care be necessary , students are urged to review their insurance coverage and pick 
the best available option. 

In serious emergencies, students should call the Student Health Service (713-348- 
4966 during work hours) or the Rice University Police Department (713-348-6000). 

The clinic is open full time from the first day of Orientation Week until the day 
before commencement. It is closed during the Christmas break and the Thanksgiving and 
Easter weekends, but it remains open in the mornings during midterm breaks. The clinic 
is also open for reduced hours during the summer months. 



14 GENERAL INFORMATION FOR ALL STUDENTS 

The Student Health Service provides the following: 

• Primary care for illness and injury with referrals to specialists when needed 

• Maintenance of health records for all students 

• Immunizations 

• Contraceptive counseling and routine Pap smears 

• Allergy shots (students must provide serum after a specialist allergy workup) 

• Physical examinations (e.g., for employment, transfer to another school, or 

scholarship expeditions) 

Confidentiality. The Student Health Service physician-patient relationship is a 
confidential one, and medical records will not be released except as required by law, or 
when the patient poses a significant risk to herself or himself or another person. 

Health Insurance. All Rice students must have health insurance of their choice , and 
must enter details of their health insurance online at http://studenthealthinsurance.rice.edu 
by August 1 5 . Failure to do so will result in automatic billing for insurance . Students may 
purchase insurance through the university, as described online. Dependent coverage is 
also available. For questions about the Rice student health insurance plan, students 
should contact the Rice Counseling Center at rucc@rice.edu. Rice's group coverage for 
2003-2004 is effective from 12:01 a.m., August 15, 2003, until 12:01 a.m., August 15, 
2004. 

Rice Counseling Center 

Rice Counseling Center, in 301 A Lovett Hall, addresses students' psychological 
needs with various programs and services. The center is open year-round except for 
scheduled holidays and occasional all-day staff retreats. Office hours for counseling and 
consultations are 8:30 a.m. to noon and 1 :00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. 
Students can make appointments by calling 713-348-4867 or by visiting the center. 

Typically, most students who use the counseling services bring with them very 
common concerns: roommate problems, breakup of a relationship, academic and/or 
interpersonal anxiety , family problems , difficulties adjusting to Rice , or confusion about 
personal goals, values, and identity. Counselors are equipped to handle a variety of 
issues, including substance abuse, eating disorders, sexual assault/abuse/date violence, 
depression, and the coming-out process. Rice Counseling Center offers both individual 
and group counseling as well as educational workshops and programs. 

When students need prolonged or specialized counseling or treatment, counselors 
refer them to an outside provider. The students, or their health insurance, must pick up 
those costs. All students who have paid the Health Service Fee are eligible for initial 
assessment sessions, consultations, crisis intervention, and educational programming. 
Individual or group counseling may also be available, if appropriate. 

The Rice Counseling Center provides the following services: 

• Initial assessment 

• Short-temi individual and couples counseling 

• Group therapy and support groups 

• Medication consultations with the center's consulting psychiatrist 

• Other consultations (e.g., how to make a referral or how to respond to a friend 

in distress) 

• Educational programming (e.g., various presentations on mental health issues) 

• Crisis intervention on a walk-in emergency basis during regular office hours; 

students may call 7 13-348-4867 for assistance with emergencies after hours or 
on weekends 



GENERAL INFORMATION FOR ALL STUDENTS 1 5 

College Assistance Peer Program (CAPP). In this peer educator program, 
students who have been carefully selected and trained in listening skills and mental- 
health education serve as supportive listeners and referral sources for other students. 
They also assist the center with its educational programming. 

Students with Disabilities. Because students who have physical limitations may 
find it difficult to reach the Rice Counseling Center's third-floor location in Lovett Hall, 
staff will arrange to see those students in a more accessible location on campus. Students 
should call the center to make these arrangements. 

Confidentiality . Counseling services are confidential: information about a student 
is not released without that student's written permission. By state law, confidentiality 
does not extend to circumstances where ( 1 ) there is risk of imminent harm to the student 
or others; (2) the counselor has reason to believe that a child or an elderly or handicapped 
person is, or is in danger of, being abused or neglected; (3) a court order is issued to 
release information; (4) the student is involved in a criminal lawsuit; or (5) the counselor 
suspects that the student has been the victim of sexual exploitation by a former health 
provider during the course of treatment with that provider. 

Student Resource Centers 

Rice Memorial Center/Ley Student Center 

The Rice Memorial Center/Ley Student Center provides a base for a range of 
student-centered activities. It is also an informal place where students, faculty, and staff 
can congregate. Individuals meet over casual meals at Sammy's Cafeteria and drinks at 
the Coffeehouse and Willy's Pub, which also offers pizzas, sandwiches, and Smoothees 
as lunch and dinner options. Others browse through the Rice Campus Store. Located 
within the group of buildings, students find an array of offices, programs, and resource 
centers, including the Career Services Center, the Community Involvement Center, the 
Office of Academic Advising, the Rice Program Council, and the assorted student, 
international student, and graduate student associations. The campus radio station 
KTRU has offices there, in addition to the Thresher (the campus newspaper) and the 
Campanile (the yearbook). The Rice Memorial Chapel anchors one end of the two- 
center complex, which also houses the Association of Rice Alumni. On any given 
evening, the larger rooms may be busy with meetings or catered dinners, and members 
of the Rice community regularly tap the facilities for special events, from parties and 
concerts to weddings. 

Career Services Center 

The Career Services Center is open to everyone in the university community. 
Undergraduates unable to decide on a major, career, or graduate program, or those who 
lack direction in the path they have chosen, may benefit from career counseling; testing 
is also available for those interested in a more analytical approach . Peer counselors assist 
both undergraduate and graduate students with resume or vita writing, interviewing, and 
job search strategies. 

The center sponsors workshops, career panels, and various career fairs each year. 
Students will find details on individual events publicized throughout the campus and in 
Career News, a center newsletter. The Career Library also has a substantial collection of 
resources, including literature on a broad range of occupations, material on locating and 
securing employment, and information on summer jobs, individual companies, and 
graduate schools. 



16 GENERAL INFORMATION FOR ALL STUDENTS 

Representatives from business, industry , and other institutions visit the center each 
year, seeking both summer workers and full-time employees. Any interested student may 
schedule interviews with these representatives. Students looking for full-time, part-time, 
or summer jobs should also check out the listings in the Career Library. 

Undergraduate liberal arts majors seeking to parlay their B.A. degrees into a 
business career may want to consider the Rice Joint Venture Program , which is sponsored 
by the Career Services Center. Students accepted into the program undertake internships 
with Houston-area businesses during one semester. 

Office of Multicultural Affairs 

Located in the cloisters of the Rice Memorial Center, the Office of Multicultural 
Affairs responds to the academic and social needs of ethnic minority students at Rice. 
Primarily providing counseling and support, the office maintains its own library of 
information on graduate schools, jobs, fellowships, internships, and other opportunities 
available to minority students once they leave Rice. The office encourages cross-cultural 
programming on campus and attempts to promote a general awareness of issues related 
to cultural diversity. The Office of Multicultural Affairs is central to the university's 
continuing efforts to recruit and retain more minority students. 

Health Education Office 

Also lodged in the cloisters of the Rice Memorial Center, the Health Education 
Office runs programs on such issues as sexual health awareness, substance abuse 
prevention, nutrition and diet, and acquaintance rape. The office provides students with 
private consultations and a resource room containing health-related literature, including 
brochures, journals, and posters. Student volunteers with the Health Education Office 
participate in groups such as Students Organized Against Rape (SOAR) and serve as 
health representatives for their colleges. 

Disability Support Services 

Located in the Ley Student Center, Disability Support Services coordinates campus 
services for individuals with documented disabilities. For academic accommodations, 
adaptive equipment, or disability-related housing needs, the Disability Support Services 
Office is the campus resource for students with disabilities. Information is maintained on 
scholarships, internships, and other programs specific to students with disabilities. 
Counseling and advocacy are available as well as consultation on the Americans with 
Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1 973 . For more information, 
see the Disability Support Services website at http://www.dss.rice.edu. 



Sports 



Intercollegiate Athletics 

Rice is a member of the Western Athletic Conference and a Division I-A member 
of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The university fields teams for men in 
football, basketball, baseball, tennis, golf, cross-country, and indoor and outdoor track. 
Women team sports include basketball, volleyball, soccer, swimming, tennis, cross- 
country, and indoor and outdoor track. Home football games are played in the beautiful 
70,000-seat Rice Stadium . The rest of the university ' s extensive athletic facilities include 
Autry Court and Fox Gymnasium for basketball and volleyball. Reckling Park for 



GENERAL INFORMATION FOR ALL STUDENTS 17 

baseball, the Jake Hess Tennis Stadium, the Rice Track/Soccer Stadium (Wendel D. Ley 
Track), and the John L. Cox Fitness Center. Encouraging its student-athletes to pursue 
high goals. Rice prides itself on its dual goal of excellence in both academics and 
athletics; the rigors of one may not serve as an excuse for less than high-quality 
performance in the other. 

Intramural Sports 

The Recreation Center in Student Affairs offers a supervised program of intramural 
sports for all students, faculty, and staff. Anyone may participate in individual, dual, or 
team sports; swim meets; and track and field events. Interested students , faculty , and staff 
may also form teams to compete in the wide variety of tournaments available. While all 
students may take part in the university intramural tournaments, undergraduates may also 
represent their respective colleges in the college team sports tournaments that follow 
intramural play. In the past few years. Rice has seen more than 6,000 entries in 53 
tournaments. Students are reminded, though, that they participate at their own risk. 

Sports Clubs 

In addition to the intramural program, the Department of Student Activities 
administers a sports club program. A sports club is a special-interest group organized by 
students who want to play , and promote interest in, a particular sport. Club organization 
depends on student interest. In recent years, clubs have included badminton, cricket, 
cycling, dance, fencing, field hockey, frisbee, lacrosse, martial arts, rowing, rugby, 
sailing, shooting, soccer, Softball, and volleyball. Students join these groups to increase 
both individual and team skills through a dual program of instruction and competition. 
They support the clubs with individual contributions, membership dues, solicitation of 
university funds, and various fund-raising activities. Again, students participate in the 
different sports at their own risk. 

Student Automobiles 

All students must register their vehicles with the Traffic Division of the Rice 
University Police Department. Students must park in assigned areas and observe 
university regulations. Illegally parked or unregistered vehicles are subject to towing 
and/or fines by the university. Copies of University Trojfic and Parking Regulations, a 
publication giving a detailed account of student privileges and responsibilities, are 
available from the Traffic Division or online at http://rupd.rice.edu/parking. 
Students must inform all guests of parking regulations; vehicles belonging to visitors 
who repeatedly violate these rules also may be towed or booted. 



18 GENERAL INFORMATION FOR ALL STUDENTS 



INFORMATION FOR 
UNDERGRADUATE 

STUDENTS 



\ 



^nsoss 



20 

Introduction 



The undergraduate experience at Rice is one of intense personal interactions. The 
close sense of community created by individual placement in residential colleges is 
extended to warm intellectual and personal relationships with members of the Rice 
faculty . "Behind the hedges," the beautifully designed, spacious campus is small enough 
to encourage a sense of belonging even as students engage with the lively cultural 
currents of one of the country's largest cities. 

The academic philosophy at Rice is to offer students beginning their college studies 
both a grounding in the broad fields of general knowledge and the chance to concentrate 
on very specific academic and research interests. By completing the required distribution 
courses , all students gain an understanding of the literature , arts , and philosophy essential 
to any civilization, a broad historical introduction to thought about human society, and 
a basic familiarity with the scientific principles underlying physics, chemistry, and 
mathematics. Building on this firm foundation, students then concentrate on studies in 
their major areas of interest. 

Rice University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS), the recognized regional accrediting body 
in the eleven U.S. Southern states. 

Rice grants the two undergraduate degrees, the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and the 
Bachelor of Science (B.S.), in a range of majors. The majority of undergraduates earn 
the B.A. degree, though students may elect to pursue the B.S. degree, offered at Rice in 
some science fields and in various fields of engineering accredited by the Accreditation 
Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). Undergraduates may major in any of 
the numerous fields provided by the various schools of architecture, humanities, music, 
social sciences, science, and engineering. To accommodate the full range of individual 
student interests, specific interdepartmental majors are also available, as are selectively 
approved area majors. In certain departments, students also have the option of overlap- 
ping the upper-level course work of their undergraduate degree with those basic 
requirements necessary to earn a higher degree in the field, considerably reducing the 
time required to complete their graduate studies. The Shepherd School of Music offers 
a joint degree in music (B .Mus ./M .Mus) that may be completed with a fifth year of study . 

Through Rice's Education Certification Program, students interested in teaching in 
secondary schools may complete a program of teacher training, leading to certification 
in the state of Texas, together with the B.A. degree. Students interested in satisfying the 
requirements for admission to medical, dental, or law school should consult with the 
Office of Academic Advising for completing these programs in conjunction with the 
various majors. 



Graduation Requirements 



Degree Requirements for All Bachelor's Degrees 

Students are responsible for making certain that their plan of study meets all degree 
and major requirements. To graduate from Rice University, all students must: 

• Be registered at Rice full time for at least four full fall and/or spring semesters 

• Complete the requirements of at least one major degree program 

• Complete at least 1 20 semester hours (some degree programs require more than 

120 hours) 

• Complete at least 60 semester hours at Rice University 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 21 

• Complete at least 48 hours of all degree work in upper-level courses (at the 300 

level or higher) 

• Complete more than half of the upper-level courses in degree work at Rice 

• Complete more than half of the upper-level courses in their major work at Rice 

(certain departments may specify a higher proportion) 

• Complete all Rice courses satisfying degree requirements with a cumulative grade 

point average of at least 1 .67 or higher 

• Complete all Rice courses that satisfy major requirements (as designated by the 

department) with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00 or higher 

• Satisfy the English composition requirement (see below) 

• Satisfy the Lifetime Physical Activity Program (LPAP) requirement (see below) 

• Complete courses to satisfy the Distribution Requirements (see below) 

• Complete at least 150 hours for double degree consideration 

• Otherwise be a student in good academic and disciplinary standing 

To satisfy the English composition requirement, students must pass an English 
composition examination given during Orientation Week. Those receiving grades of 
"not satisfactory" on the exam must complete ENGL 1 03 Introduction to Argumentation 
and Academic Writing, a one-semester course carrying degree credit. 

To satisfy the LPAP requirement, students must complete 2 courses in LPAP. 
Although 2 courses are required, they do not carry degree credit and do not count toward 
the total semester hours at graduation. Students with disabilities may make special 
arrangements to satisfy this requirement. 

Distribution Requirements 

Each student is required to complete at least 12 semester hours of designated 
distribution courses in each of Groups I, H, and III. The 12 hours in each group must 
include courses in at least two departments in that group. (Divisional or interdisciplinary 
designations, e.g., HUM A or NSCI, count as departments for this purpose.) Interdivi- 
sional courses approved for distribution credit may count toward the 1 2 semester hours 
in any relevant group; however, students may not count any one such course toward the 
12 required hours in more than one group, and may count no more than one such course 
toward the 12 required hours in any one group. 

Students must complete the distribution requirements in each group by taking 
courses that are designated as a distribution course at the time of course registration, as 
published in that semester's Schedule of Courses Ojfered. 

The distribution system presupposes that every Rice student should receive a broad 
education along with training in an academic specialty. This goal is achieved by courses 
that are broad based, accessible to nonmajors, and representative of the knowledge, 
intellectual skills, and habits of thought that are most characteristic of a discipline or of 
inquiry across disciplines. 

Group I. These courses have one or more of the following goals. They develop 
students' critical and aesthetic understanding of texts and the arts; they lead students to 
the analytical examination of ideas and values; they introduce students to the variety of 
approaches and methods with which different disciplines approach intellectual prob- 
lems; and they engage students with works of culture that have intellectual importance 
by virtue of the ideas they express, their historical influence, their mode of expression, 
or their critical engagement with established cultural assumptions and traditions. 

Group II. Three types of courses fulfill this requirement. The first are introductory 
courses which address the problems, methodologies, and substance of different disci- 
plines in the social sciences. The second are departmental courses that draw upon at least 
two or more disciplines in the social sciences or that cover topics of central importance 



22 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

to a social science discipline. The third are interdisciplinary courses team-taught by 
faculty from two or more disciplines. 

Group III. These courses provide explicit exposure to the scientific method or to 
theorem development, develop analytical thinking skills and emphasize quantitative 
analysis, and expose students to subject matter in the various disciplines of science 
and engineering. 

Bachelor of Arts 

The specific requirements of individual majors leading to the Bachelor of Arts 
degree vary widely. No department may specify more than 80 semester hours (required 
courses, prerequisites, and related laboratories included) for the Bachelor of Arts. To 
qualify for the Bachelor of Arts: 

• All students must complete at least 120 hours of course work. 

• Students in the humanities and social sciences must complete between 18 and 80 

hours in course work within the major (including required courses, prerequi- 
sites, and related laboratories) 

• Students in the sciences and engineering must complete between 24 and 80 hours 

in course work within the major (including required courses, prerequisites, and 
related laboratories) 

• Students in all fields except architecture must complete at least 60 hours in course 

work outside the major 

• Students in architecture must complete at least 36 hours in course work outside 

the major 

Bachelor of Science in the School of Natural Sciences 

The Bachelor of Science degree is offered in astrophysics, chemistry, chemical 
physics, geology, and physics. The specific degree requirements vary from field to field 
and differ from those of the Bachelor of Arts in that there are greater technical 
requirements. No department may specify more than 80 semester hours (required 
courses, prerequisites, and related laboratories included) for the Bachelor of Science. To 
earn a B .S . degree in one of these fields , students must complete at least 60 hours in course 
work outside the major. 

Bachelor of Science Degrees in Engineering: Bachelor of Science in Chemical 
Engineering (B.S.Ch.E.), Computer Science (B.S.C.S.), Electrical and Com- 
puter Engineering (B.S.E.E.), Materials Science (B.S.M.S.), Mechanical 
Engineering (B.S.M£.)> and Bioengineering (B.SJ5.) 

The Bachelor of Science degree in a given engineering field is distinct from the 
Bachelor of Arts degree in that it must meet greater technical requirements. In establish- 
ing a departmental major for the degree of Bachelor of Science in electrical and computer 
engineering , material s science , and mechanical engineering , the department may specify 
no more than 92 semester hours (required courses, prerequisites, and related laboratories 
included). In establishing the departmental major for the B.S. in chemical engineering, 
the department may specify no more than 100 semester hours (required courses, 
prerequisites, and related laboratories included). The bioengineering department speci- 
fies 94 semester hours for the B.S. degree (required courses, prerequisites, and related 
laboratories included) . To earn a B .S . degree , students must meet the following minimum 
semester hour requirements in course work: 

• All majors except chemical engineering and computer science — a total of at least 

134 hours 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 23 

• Chemical engineering majors — a total of at least 132 hours , depending on areayp to 

137 hours 

• Computer science majors — a total of at least 128 hours 

Other Bachelor's Degrees 

The professional Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.) degree requires a fifth year of 
study and a one-year preceptorship. The Bachelor of Fine Arts (B .F.A.) degree requires 
a fifth year of concentrated study and advanced courses in addition to the core course 
requirements . The Bachelor of Music (B .Mus . ) degree requires advanced courses in aural 
skills in addition to the core music curriculum. 

Undergraduate Majors 

Students must declare a major before preregistration for the junior year, if not 
sooner . according to the deadline in the Academic Calendar ( see Declaring Departmental 
Majors on page 32). Within some departmental majors, students have the choice of a 
particular area of concentration. Students also may opt for more than one major; such 
majors do not necessarily need to be in related fields. More detailed information on the 
departmental majors briefly described below may be found in the Undergraduate Degree 
chart (see pages 27-29) in the section "Departments and Interdisciplinary Programs" and 
by contacting the department chairs or faculty advisers. 

Departmental Majors 

School of Architecture. Students admitted to the university as architecture majors 
must first complete 4 years of the B. A. program (architecture major) before applying to 
the B.Arch. program in their senior year. If admitted, they are assigned a preceptorship 
with an architectural firm for a one-year period, after which they return to Rice to 
complete the B.Arch. degree program. 

George R. Brown School of Engineering. Rice offers, through eight departments, 
majors in bioengineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computational and 
applied mathematics, computer science, electrical and computer engineering, mechani- 
cal engineering, materials science and engineering, and statistics. Students may elect a 
double major by combining environmental science with another science or engineering 
field. These programs lead to either the B .A . or the B .S . degree and may qualify students 
for further graduate study . 

School of Humanities. Students may declare majors in art history , classics, English, 
French studies, German and Slavic studies (includes Russian), Hispanic studies, kinesi- 
ology, history, linguistics. philosophy, religious studies, and visual arts. Interdisciplirmry 
majors are available in ancient Mediterranean civilizations, Asian studies, medieval 
studies, and the study of women and gender, while an interdepartmental major in policy 
studies combines courses from the School of Humanities and the School of Social 
Sciences. 

Shepherd School of Music. Music students may opt for either a B .A . or a Bachelor 
of Music (B. Mus.) degree in performance, composition, music history, and music theory. 
Students who pass a special qualifying examination may elect an honors program that 
leads to the simultaneous awarding of the B .Mus. and Master of Music (M.Mus.) degrees 
after five years of study. 



24 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 



Wiess School of Natural Sciences. All natural sciences departments, including 
biochemistry and cell biology, chemistry, ecology and evolutionary biology, earth 
science, mathematics, and physics and astronomy offer programs leading to the B.A. 
degree. B.S. degrees are offered in some departments. Majors include astronomy, 
biochemistry, biology, biophysics, chemical physics, chemistry, geology, geophysics, 
mathematics, and physics. Students may also elect double majors combining one of the 
programs in natural sciences with another science, a humanities discipline, or an 
engineering field. 

School of Social Sciences. Rice offers majors in anthropology, economics, math- 
ematical economic analysis, political science, psychology, and sociology. Both the 
interdepartmental policy studies major and the cognitive studies major include sciences, 
engineering, and humanities courses, while the managerial studies major incorporates 
course work in the Schools of Engineering and Management. 

Interdepartmental Majors 

Interdepartmental majors combine courses taught by faculty from more than one 
department; they are listed separately in the Undergraduate Degree Chart (pages 27-29). 

Other Academic Undergraduate Options 

Rice/Baylor College of Medicine Medical Scholars Program 

The Medical Scholars Program is for talented and motivated students who are 
scientifically competent, socially conscious, and capable of applying insight from the 
liberal arts and other disciplines to the study of modern medical science. Up to 15 
graduating high school seniors are admitted to Rice and Baylor College of Medicine 
concurrently: The traditional four years at Rice are followed by four years at Baylor. 
Applications for the program are sent to those who indicate their interest on their Rice 
applications. However, students must have applied under the Early Decision or Interim 
Decision plans (see pages 48^9). Interviews are scheduled in late March, and decisions 
are made in April. Early Decision applicants must have Rice as their first-choice school, 
regardless of the Baylor decision to be made later in the spring. Applicants not admitted 
to the Medical Scholars Program are still eligible for admission to Rice and may still 
apply to Baylor upon graduation from Rice. 

W. M. Keck Center for Computational Biology Research Training Program 

Undergraduates may take advantage of research training opportunities in computa- 
tional biology offered by this joint project of Rice, Baylor College of Medicine, and the 
University of Houston. Students in biophysics, cell biology, evolutionary biology, 
computer science, statistics, mathematics, physics, chemistry, computational and 
applied mathematics, and engineering may apply for a summer program that provides 
hands-on research under faculty mentorship in lab settings , seminars and workshops , and 
access to the advanced computational and analytical resources offered by the center. 

Leadership Rice 

Leadership Rice develops the leadership capacities of undergraduates from all 
disciplines. The program links theory to practice and analysis to action with experiential 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 25 

opportunities and classes. It encourages students to look beyond how to get a good 
education and good grades and to begin to consider how they can use their great education 
to make a positive contribution to the world. 

The program is especially recommended for second semester sophomores, who are 
invited to begin with UNIV 309 and then to participate in all aspects of the program, but 
it is open to all students— including freshmen. 

The core component of Leadership Rice is the Summer Mentorship Experience. 
Students accepted into the program work under the tutelage of experienced mentors for 
eight weeks during the summer and are given a $3,000 stipend. Mentorships are in the 
private, nonprofit, and public sectors in U.S. and abroad. Students also are invited to take 
on leadership roles in the administration of the program. Recent mentorships as well as 
more information on Leadership Rice are posted on the web at www.rice.edu/leadership. 

Currently, Leadership Rice offers several courses for academic credit. UNIV 309, 
Creating and Managing Change: Principles of Leadership, introduces students to 
leadership ideas in the context of diverse disciplines. This course, offered only in the fall 
semester, includes a team project along with discussion on what makes effective teams, 
as well as work on writing clearly and persuasively. It is required to apply to Leadership 
Rice's Summer Mentorship Experience. UNIV 310, Creating and Managing Change: 
From Theory to Action, follows the mentorship and is open to select students invited to 
participate in the Leadership Certificate program. A fall seminar on Entrepreneurship 
is also offered. 

Leadership Rice also sponsors the Rice-on-Board program, which places students 
on nonprofit community boards as participant observers for a year. It also oversees the 
Envision Program and the Janus Award. Envision funds, offered three times each year, 
provide seed money to students for first-time projects of benefit to the community , either 
on campus or beyond. The Janus Award offers one undergraduate the opportunity to 
research an environmental or science-related issue from multiple perspectives. 

Leadership Rice believes that every Rice student is capable of creating positive 
change. The program aims to help students develop the confidence and commitment as 
well as the skills to achieve this end. Visit http://www.rice.edu/leadership to learn more 
about opportunities for developing leadership capacity. 

Premedical, Prelaw, and Prebusiness Programs 

In addition to the preprofessional and professional programs offered by Rice in 
architecture, business management, engineering, and music, students may pursue 
programs that satisfy the admission requirements for graduate schools in business, 
dentistry, diplomacy and foreign affairs, health science, law, and medicine. Interested 
students may contact various advisers with offices in the Ley Student Center, including 
health professions advisers for premedical or predental studies and other professional 
programs in the health sciences, a prelaw adviser for prelegal studies, and a prebusiness 
adviser for business, finance, and accounting. 

Junior-Year Admission. Students who plan to enter medical school or any other 
professional or graduate school at the end of their junior year at Rice can arrange to 
receive a Rice four-year bachelor's degree by submitting to the Committee on Examina- 
tions and Standing a degree plan that fulfills all normal university and departmental 
requirements for the bachelor's degree. Students must submit a degree plan before they 
begin graduate or professional training. The Committee on Examinations and Standing 
then reviews the degree plan submitted by each student and gives final approval. 

Students who want to take advantage of this junior-year admission may apply no 
more than 30 to 40 semester hours (10 courses) in transfer credit (courses must be 
acceptable to the student's major department and the registrar). 



26 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 



Premedical and Predental Programs. The entrance requirements for U .S . medical 
and dental schools include one year each of general chemistry, organic chemistry, 
physics, mathematics, biology, and English, plus laboratories required by the science 
courses . Because medical and dental schools seldom favor any one area of study , students 
may choose their majors according to their interests and capabilities. Their degree plans 
should provide them with both a broad cultural background and the necessary skills for 
an alternative career. Science or engineering majors will automatically satisfy most of the 
entrance requirements for medical or dental school, but students majoring in the 
humanities will need to make some adjustments in their study plans. Premedical and 
predental students should discuss their degree plans with the health professions advisers . 

Prelaw Program. All degree programs offered at Rice satisfy the academic 
requirements for admission to law school. While many prelaw students major in social 
sciences, no law school specifies particular courses or curricula as prerequisites to 
admission , and students majoring in humanities , sciences, engineering , or other areas are 
regularly admitted to law schools. Most schools require only a baccalaureate degree and 
the completion of the Law School Admission Test. When selecting a major, students 
should keep in mind the provision in The Official Guide to U.S. Law Schools (published 
by the Law School Admission Council/Law School Admission Services in cooperation 
with the American Bar Association and the Association of American Law Schools) that 
prelegal education should develop oral and written comprehension and expression, as 
well as creative thinking and critical understanding of human values. While no particular 
discipline is paramount, the prelaw adviser usually recommends that students take 
expository writing courses and beginning accounting and economics courses. Interested 
students should contact the prelaw adviser. The guide to law schools cited above, 
reference books, and the catalogs of many leading law schools are available in the prelaw 
office in the Office of Academic Advising, Ley Student Center. 

Prebusiness Program. Business schools consider the following when admitting 
students to their Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) programs: 

• Scholastic aptitude , as evidenced by undergraduate grades and performance on the 

Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) 

• Extracurricular activities 

• Work experience 

• Effective oral and written communication 

While no specific undergraduate major is preferred, students should select a major 
(or majors) where their academic performance is likely to be the strongest. The 
prebusiness adviser recommends that students take ECON 211/212 Principles of 
Economics I and II and ACCO 305 Introduction to Accounting as courses helpful 
for graduating seniors seeking employment in the private or public sector. Most 
business schools prefer students with full-time work experience. Calculus has 
become increasingly important to business schools as well. Because business 
schools differ in their objectives, curricula, teaching methods, job placement 
possibilities, and admission standards, students should be familiar with the pro- 
grams of different schools before applying. The prebusiness adviser can also 
suggest the kinds of work experience that schools typically prefer. 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) Programs 

Rice hosts a Naval ROTC program, and students may participate in Army ROTC 
through a cross-enrollment program with the University of Houston. These programs 
train select college students who, upon graduation, receive reserve commissions as 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 27 

officers in the United States Army, Navy, or Marine Corps. 

Most students enroll in the ROTC programs at Rice at the beginning of the fall term. 
While courses in naval science and military science are open to any student, they count 
as free electives and cannot satisfy a student's distribution requirements or departmental 
major requirements. The provost determines the credit assigned to each course in 
consultation with the Committee on the Undergraduate Curriculum. Performance in 
ROTC courses, however, weighs in the determination of probation, suspension, course 
load, and grade point average. Students suspended by the university for academic failure 
or other reasons are immediately discharged from the ROTC programs, as are students 
producing unsatisfactory course work and those lacking sufficient officer-like qualities, 
regardless of their academic performance. 

For additional information on the ROTC programs and available scholarships, see 
both military science and naval science in the Departments and Interdisciplinary 
Programs and Courses of Instruction sections. 



UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE CHART 



School 
Department 



Undergraduate 
Degrees Offered 



Additional Options or Areas of 
Concentration (within majors) 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 

B.A.,B.Arch. 



B.A. majors in architecture and in architectural 
studies 



GEORGE R. BROWN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Bioengineering B.S.B. 



Areas of concentration in cellular and 
molecular engineering, biomedical 
instrumentation and imaging, and biomaterials 
and biomechanics 



Chemical Engineering 


B.A., 


B.S.Ch.E. 


Focus areas in bioengineering, environmental 
science and engineering, materials science and 
engineering, and computational engineering 


Civil and 

Environmental 

Engineering 


B.A. 




Civil engineering 

Environmental engineering: B.A. as double 
major with any other Rice major; see also 
chemical engineering for B.S. options 


Computational and 
Applied Mathematics 


B.A. 




Numerical analysis, operations research, 
optimization, differential equations, and 
scientific computation 


Computer Science 


B.A., 


B.S.C.S. 


Areas of concentration in architecture, 
artificial intelligence, computational science, 
foundations, human-computer interaction, and 
software systems 


Electrical and 


B.A.. 


.B.S.E.E. 


Areas of concentration in bioengineering; 


Computer hngmeenng 






computer engineering; systems: control, 
communications, and signal processing; 
electronic circuits and devices; and quantum 
eletronics and photonics 


Mechanical Engineering 
and Materials Science 


B.A. 


,B.S.M.E.,B.S.M.S. 


Mechanical engineering: areas of concentration 
in biomechanics, computational mechanics, fluid 
mechanics and thermal science, solid mechanics 
and materials, and system dynamics and control 


Statistics 


B.A. 




Theoretical and applied training orientations; 
engineering, scientific, and business applications 
of probability and statistics; joint work in related 
departments 


SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES 

Art History B.A. 




History of art 



28 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 



School 
Department 



Undergraduate 
Degrees Offered 



Additional Options or Areas of 
Concentration (within majors) 



Classical Studies 


B.A. 


Classics. Greek. Latin 


Education 


No undergraduate 
degree offered 


Leads to secondary teaching certificate in 
conjunction with B.A. in major field. See 
Education Certification. 


English 


B.A. 




French Studies 


B.A. 




German and 
Slavic Studies 


B.A. 


German and German cultural studies, and 
Russian/Slavic studies 


Hispanic Studies 


B.A. 


Spanish language and literature, Latin American 
studies, and Portuguese 


History 


B.A. 




Kinesiology 


B.A. 


Areas of concentration in exercise science, 
sports medicine, and sports management 


Linguistics 


B.A. 


Areas of concentration in language, cognitive 
science, second language acquisition, and 
language, culture, and society 


Philosophy 


B.A. 




Religious Studies 


B.A. 


Areas of concentration in religious traditions and/ 
or methodology 


Visual Arts 


B.A..B.F.A. 


Studio art and special fifth-year courses for 
B.F.A. candidates 


JESSE H. JONES GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT 

No undergraduate Four accounting courses open to all under- 
degree offered graduate students 



SHEPHERD SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

B.A.,B.Mus. 



B.A. in music; B.Mus. in composition, music 
history, music theory, and performance: joint 
B.Mus./M.Mus. with fifth year of study 



WIESS SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCES 

Biochemistry and B.A. 

Cell Biology 



Part of an intesrated biosciences curriculum 



Chemistry 



B.A..B.S. 



Chemical physics major offered jointly with 
Physics and Astronomy department and resulting 
in a B.S. degree 



Ecology and 
Evolutionary Biology 



B.A. 



Part of an integrated biosciences curriculum 



Earth Science 



B.A. , B.S. 



Majors in geology, geophysics, and earth science 



Mathematics 



B.A. 



300-level courses oriented toward problem 
solving and applications and 400-level and above 
oriented toward theory and proofs: preparation 
for graduate studies or high school teaching or 
other areas: ample opportunity for double- 
majoring, especially with CAAM, COMP. ELEC, 
PHYS, or STAT: abundance of courses in 
analysis, topology, geometry, algebra, etc. 



Majors in physics with specific options in applied 
physics, biophysics, computational physics, 
astrophysics, and astronomy: interdepartmental 
major in chemical physics 



Physics and Astronomy B . A . , B .S . 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Anthropology B.A. 



Areas of concentration in archaeology and social/ 
cultural anthropology 



Economics 



B.A. 



Majors in economics and in mathematical 
economic analysis 



Political Science 



B.A. 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 29 



School 
Department 



Undergraduate 
Degrees Offered 



Additional Options or Areas of 
Concentration (within majors) 



Psychology 



B.A. 



Sociolosv 



B.A. 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 

Area Majors B.A. 



Policy Studies 



B.A. 



Requires approval of two or more departments, 
the Office of Academic Advising, and the 
Committee on Undergraduate Curriculum (see 
page 33) 



Ancient Mediterranean 
Civilizations 


B.A. 




Anthropology, classical studies, Greek, Latin, 
history, history of art, linguistics, philosophy, 
and religious studies 


Asian Studies 


B.A. 




Anthropology, art, history of art, Hindi, history, 
humanities, linguistics, Chinese, Japanese, 
Korean, Sanskrit, political science, and 
religious studies 


Cognitive Sciences 


B.A. 




Linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy, and 
psychology 


Education Certification 


No undergraduate 
degree offered 


Leads to secondary teaching certificate in con- 
junction with B.A. in major field 


Managerial Studies 


B.A. 




Accounting, economics, political science, 
psychology, and statistics 


Medieval Studies 


B.A. 




History of art, classics, English, French, 
German, history, humanities, linguistics, 
Spanish, music, philosophy, political science, 
and religious studies 



Environmental policy, government policy and 
management, healthcare management, 
international affairs, law and justice, business 
policy and management, and urban and social 
change 



Study of Women 
and Gender 



B.A. 



Anthropology, classics, English, French studies, 
German, history, humanities, linguistics, music, 
philosophy, religious studies, and sociology 



Teacher Certification 

Students in the teacher education program earn Texas state teacher certification at 
the secondary level. Subjects include art, English, French, German, health science, 
history, Latin, life science, mathematics, physical education, physical science, Russian, 
science, social studies, and Spanish. For more information on teacher certification 
programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels, see Education Certification in the 
Departments and the Interdisciplinary Programs and Courses of Instruction sections. 

Study Abroad and Exchange Programs 

Rice-affiliated and Rice-sponsored programs provide students with opportunities to 
study throughout the world. Direct exchange programs allow Rice students to change 
places with university students from another country. Rice is affiliated with nearly 400 
program sites worldwide, representing a range of program formats. Some offer direct 
enrollment in foreign universities, while others specialize in intensive language instruc- 
tion, field research, or internships. 

Each year more than 200 undergraduates from across the disciplines study away 
from campus and then apply the transfer credit earned toward their degrees. The study 
abroad advisers, in cooperation with the faculty advisers in each department, assist 
students in identifying the best programs for their individual interests and academic 
needs. To assure proper enrollment and transfer of credits and financial aid, students 
planning to study abroad must make their arrangements through the Department of 



30 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

International Programs. This includes arranging prior approval for transfer credit 
through the relevant academic department(s) and the registrar. 

Detailed information on affiliated programs, including application forms, is avail- 
able from the Department of International Programs (first floor, Ley Student Center). 

Academic Regulations 

All undergraduate students are subject to the academic regulations of the university. 
Students are responsible for making certain they meet all departmental and university 
requirements and academic deadlines. The Committee on Examinations and Standing 
administers the rules described below. Under unusual or mitigating circumstances, 
students may submit a written petition requesting special consideration to the committee . 
Students should address all correspondence to the committee in care of the vice president 
for student affairs. 

Registration 

Currently enrolled students register in April for the fall semester and in November 
for the spring semester. They complete registration at the beginning of each semester. 
Entering students complete their registration during Orientation Week before classes 
begin in August. Students must obtain approval from their adviser for registration. To 
be properly registered, new students must complete, sign, and return a matriculation card. 
New students may not register or attend classes until they return a properly completed 
health data form and meet immunization and TB screening requirements. Immunizations 
required for admission are diphtheria/tetanus, measles, rubella, and mumps, with 
immunizations against hepatitis B and chicken pox recommended. The Mantoux 
tuberculin skin test is also required. A late fee of $30 is charged for failure to submit a 
fully completed health data form by the required date. Each year, the Office of the 
Registrar publishes the specific deadlines for the semesters of that year. 

Unless students elect a special payment plan, they must pay all tuition and fees for 
the fall semester by the end of the second week in August and for the spring semester by 
the end of the first week in January. Any student in arrears and therefore not registered 
as of the last day to drop classes will not be allowed to live on campus the next semester, 
nor will such students be allowed to receive credit for the nonregistered semester. 
Appeals to this policy must be addressed to the vice president for enrollment. 

Students who do not register and who fail to request from the registrar an extension 
of the deadline in the Academic Calendar (pages viii-xiii) are considered withdrawn 
from the university by default. To be readmitted, students must be in good standing and 
must pay a late registration fee of $100. 

After the fourth week of classes and until the end of the eighth week of classes, 
students may request approval for readmission from the vice president for Student 
Affairs. After the eighth week of classes, students may request approval for readmission 
from the Committee on Examinations and Standing 

Drop/Add. During the first two weeks of the semester, students may add courses to 
their registration without penalty with appropriate adviser's approval. During the first 
four weeks, students may drop courses without penalty with appropriate adviser's 
approval . After the second week of the semester, the following conditions apply for adds 
and drops: 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 31 

Undergraduate students in their first semester at Rice: 

• Must obtain instructor's permission and the adviser's approval to add a course 

between the beginning of the third week of classes through the end of the fourth 
week (a $10 fee will be assessed) 

• May not add courses after the fourth week of classes, except with the approval of 

the Committee on Examinations and Standing (a $50 fee will be assessed) 

• May drop courses up to the last day of classes with appropriate advisor's approval 

(a fee will be assessed as described below) 

All other students: 

• Must obtain instructor's permission and the adviser's approval to add a course 

between the beginning of the third week of classes through the end of the fourth 
week (a $10 fee will be assessed) 

• May not add courses after the fourth week of classes, except with the approval of 

the Committee on Examinations and Standing (a $50 fee will be assessed) 

• May drop courses after the fourth week up to the eleventh week with the 

appropriate advisor's approval (a $10 fee will be assessed) 

• May not drop courses after the end of the tenth week of classes, except with the 

approval of the Committe on Examinations and Standing (a $50 fee will be 
assessed) 

For courses with start and end dates not coinciding with the normal Rice semester 
calendar, the registrar will consult with the instructor and set: 

• The add deadline approximately one-third of the way into the course 

• The drop deadline approximately two-thirds of the way into the course 

Students may not drop courses where the Honor Council has ruled a loss of credit. 

Schedule of add fees:* 

Weeks 3-4 $10 From Week 5 $50 

Schedule of drop fees for undergraduate students in their first semester at 
Rice:* 

Weeks 1-^ $0 Weeks 5-15 $10 

Schedule of drop fees for all other students:* 

Weeks 1-4 $0 Weeks 5-10 $10 

*Note: Weeks are defined as academic instruction; thus, midterm recess is not 
included in this calculation. 

Course Load. Students at Rice normally enroll for 15 to 17 semester hours each 
semester. For most students, this allows them to complete the requirements for gradua- 
tion in 8 semesters. Students must secure permission in writing from the vice president 
for student affairs before registering for courses, if they want to: 

• Register for more than 20 credits 

• Register for or drop below 12 credits 

• Register concurrently at another university 

No student may receive credit for more than 20 credits in a semester, including courses 
taken elsewhere, without this prior written approval. 

Students should also be aware that the registrar's office must report a student's part- 



32 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

time status to various groups, such as loan agencies, scholarship foundations, insurance 
companies, etc. It is in the student's best interest to determine if he or she will be affected 
in any way by part-time status. 

Students may not register for more than I course at the same hour unless they receive 
permission from the instructors involved. 

Repeated Courses 

Students may not repeat courses for which they have received either advanced 
placement or transfer credit. Credit will not be counted twice for students who repeat 
these types of courses. 

Some Rice University courses may be repeated for credit. They are specifically 
noted in the General Announcements and on the registrar's website. 

A matriculated student may repeat all other courses; however, both grades will be 
factored into the term and cumulative grade point average. Credit for these courses will 
only be counted once. For example, a student took HIST 1 17 and received a grade of B. 
The student repeated this course and received a grade of A . Both grades — the A and B — 
are included in his/her GPAs; however, he/she only receives three credits toward his/her 
degree. Both courses will appear on the transcript— one course marked "R." 

Declaring Departmental Majors 

To receive a bachelor's degree, a student must complete the requirements for at least 
one major. Students declare their major using a form provided by the registrar. The 
department chair or designee must sign the form acknowledging the declaration. It is 
expected that the department will counsel the student about the requirements that must be 
met and the likelihood the student will be able to meet them. If the department believes a 
student is not well prepared for success in its major, it may express its reservations on the 
form . No department or program may , however , refuse to admit an undergraduate as a major, 
with the exception of the School of Architecture and the Shepherd School of Music or in the 
case of limitations of resources. In such cases, departments must publish criteria they will 
use to limit the number of majors together with their major requirements. 

Students must declare a major before registration for the junior year. They will not 
be permitted to register for the fall semester of the junior year without having declared 
a major. The deadline for notifying the Office of the Registrar of the major declaration 
is listed in the Academic Calendar for each year. 

Students are free to declare a major at any time before this deadline and are always 
free to change the major declaration by completing the appropriate form with the 
registrar's office. However, such a change may entail one or more additional semesters 
at the university. Area majors are an exception to this rule and must be declared by the 
fourth semester before graduation (see Area Majors below). 

Once a student declares a major, the department or title of the major is noted on the 
student's transcript, and a faculty adviser in the major department is assigned. Students 
and their advisers should regularly review progress towards their degrees. Introductory 
courses taken before formal designation of a major may be counted in fulfilling the major 
requirements. 

For information on the specific requirements for any departmental major, students 
should consult the departmental listings and seek the advice of a faculty member in 
the department. It is the responsibility of the student to meet regularly with their advisers 
to review progress toward their degrees. 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 33 

Area Majors 

Should the traditional departmental majors or programs not meet their exact needs, 
students may develop an area major closer to their particular interests and career goals. 
Area majors differ from double majors in that the latter must conform to the requirements 
of both departments while the former is a single major: It may combine courses from two 
or more departments, but it maintains its own specific major requirements. Area majors 
are limited by the available academic resources and must be distinct from other majors 
offered at Rice . Students who elect to declare an area major may not use it to form a double 
major, and they must still meet all the other university graduation requirements. 

Students are usually the ones to initiate an area major, working it out in conjunction 
with advisers from the Office of Academic Advising and with faculty advisers from each 
of the departments involved. After designing a comprehensive and substantial course of 
study and deciding on an appropriate title, all parties sign off on the plan. The chairs of 
the involved departments and the Committee on the Undergraduate Curriculum deter- 
mines final approval. At that point, the Office of Academic Advising officially certifies 
the approved plan to the registrar and goes on to oversee the major on behalf of the faculty 
advisers. Any change in the proposed requirements requires the approval of both the 
faculty advisers and the Committee on the Undergraduate Curriculum. 

Interested students who are unsure which departments to approach should check 
with the Office of Academic Advising during their sophomore year. Students may not 
propose an area major if they are within three semesters of graduation unless the 
Committee on Examinations and Standing rules that exceptional circumstances warrant 
this action. Under no circumstances may students declare an area major in their final 
semester before graduation. 

Second Four- Year Bachelor's Degree 

Currently enrolled undergraduates. Rice graduates with a bachelor's degree, and 
graduates from other universities with a bachelor's degree have the option of earning a 
second four-year bachelor's degree at Rice in a different discipline. This degree must be 
a different bachelor' s degree from the one already held; for example , the holder of a B . A . 
degree may pursue course work leading to the B.S. or B.Mus. degree. Rice students 
should note that they can apply courses they completed at Rice as Class III students to 
the second degree only with the approval of the major department for that degree . (Class 
III students are students who already have college degrees and are taking courses for 
credit outside of a Rice degree program.) 

Students Already Enrolled at Rice. To earn a second four-year bachelor's degree, 
also known as a dual degree, currently enrolled undergraduates who have not yet 
completed their first bachelor's degree must: 

• Be accepted for the second major by the major department 

• Fulfill all requirements for the second degree 

• Complete at least 30 additional semester hours at Rice beyond the hours required 

for their first degree (these hours are applied to the second degree) 
Students seeking admission to this program should apply to the registrar. The application 
should include a written statement identifying both proposed majors and specifying an 
approved course program for each. It should also contain a statement from the chair or 
undergraduate adviser of each department involved, indicating that the proposed course 
program satisfies all major degree requirements. 

Students with a Bachelor's Degree from Rice. Rice graduates who wish to earn 
a different four-year bachelor's degree must: 



34 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

• Be accepted for the major by the major department 

• Fulfill all requirements for the second degree 

• Complete at least 30 additional semester hours at Rice beyond their first bachelor' s 

degree (these hours are applied to the second degree) 

• Attend Rice full time for at least two semesters during the fall and/or spring terms 

beyond their first bachelor's degree 
The entire undergraduate record for these students continues cumulatively. Those 
seeking admission to this program should apply to the registrar. The application should 
include a written statement specifying the proposed major and course program for the 
second degree, a supporting letter from the chair of the major department, and an 
explanation of the student's reasons for seeking a second degree. 

Students with a Bachelor's Degree from Another School. Other graduates who 
wish to earn a four-year bachelor's degree in a different major from Rice must: 

• Be accepted for the major by the major department 

• Fulfill all requirements for the second degree 

• Complete at least 60 semester hours at Rice (these hours are applied to their 

Rice degree) 

• Attend Rice full time for at least four fall and/or spring semesters 
Interested students should apply for admission through the Office of Admission, 
following procedures and meeting criteria similar to that for transfer applicants (see 
page 49) . A complete application file includes the $35 application fee , official transcripts 
of all undergraduate and graduate work, two letters of recommendation from the most 
recent college attended, and standardized test scores (the SAT, SAT I, or ACT). 

Financial Aid and Housing. Students seeking information about financial aid 
available to participants in the second degree program should contact the Office of 
Student Financial Services. Students admitted to the second degree program may request 
assignment to a college, but they will have lower priority for on-campus housing than 
students enrolled for a first four-year bachelor's program. This means that housing will 
probably not be available. 

Honors Programs 

To enroll in the two-semester Rice Undergraduate Scholars Program, students 
register for HONS 470-471 Proposal Development and Research. This program is for 
juniors and seniors in all disciplines who are considering graduate study and an academic 
career after graduation. Students enroll in the program plan and execute independent 
research under the supervision of a sponsoring faculty member (they may apply for 
funding to cover expenses related to their projects). They meet once a week to discuss 
each other's work and to hear a range of presentations on life in academia. Students may 
apply in the spring of each year. For more information, contact the program's faculty 
co-director. 

Individual departments may offer undergraduates the option of honors program 
enrollment. These programs enable students to receive advanced training or to deepen 
their understanding of a given discipline through an intensive program of independent 
supervised research. Customary procedure is for students to submit a proposed project 
to their department's Undergraduate Committee, which helps them rework it, as needed, 
into a substantial but feasible proposal. Once accepted, students are assigned a faculty 
adviser to guide their research. The project concludes in an honors thesis, which the 
adviser and two readers evaluate, and an oral examination. Departments also use honors 
programs to formally recognize students who have shown outstanding work through their 
individual projects. Acceptance into a departmental honors program is at the discretion 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 35 

of the faculty. For specific requirements and procedures, students should contact the 
individual departments. 

Transfer Credit 

Courses taken at another college or university that are appropriate to the Rice 
curriculum may be approved for transfer credit toward a Rice undergraduate degree . This 
includes credit for summer school courses not taken at Rice, though no more than 14 
semester hours of transfer credit taken in summer schools other than Rice may be applied 
to any Rice degree. Students must have taken the course at a U.S. academic institution 
accredited by a regional accrediting agency or with a study abroad program approved by 
the Department of International Programs and must have earned a grade of C- or the 
equivalent or better. Students may not transfer courses taken pass/fail or on a similar basis 
at other institutions. Courses that meet these requirements will be transferred to Rice by 
the Office of the Registrar as general credit with the designation TRAN. The Office of 
the Registrar will distinguish between credits that are upper-level and credits that are not 
upper level. TRAN credit will count toward the general hours needed for graduation 
under university requirements and for upper-level credit needed if it is designated by the 
Office of the Registrar as upper-level credit. 

The Office of the Registrar, in conjunction with the academic departments, deter- 
mines whether courses are appropriate for transfer to Rice as Rice equivalent courses. 
Individual departments may place additional restrictions on particular courses and/or 
institutions. Similarly, various majors and degree programs may limit the amount of 
transfer credit that students may apply to them. If courses transferred to Rice as TRAN 
credit are subsequently granted Rice equivalent course credit by the Office of the 
Registrar and academic department, the TRAN credit is reduced by the number of credit 
hours of the Rice equivalent course. The Rice equivalent is then listed on the student's 
transcript and satisfies the university and major requirements the Rice course satisfies. 
Courses may be evaluated for transfer directly as Rice equivalent courses , if appropriate , 
if the student completes the forms required by the Office of the Registrar. Students also 
may have to obtain departmental approval. 

Because of these restrictions, students are strongly advised to seek prior approval 
from the registrar for courses for which students plan to receive Rice equivalent credit. 
The Office of the Registrar may require that students secure approval from the major 
department to receive Rice equivalent credit. Without prior approval, students cannot be 
certain that credit taken at another institution will be transferred as a Rice equivalent 
course and therefore count for major or specific university requirements. 

If approved , the equivalent Rice course or the general TRAN credit , as the case may 
be, is entered on the student's record after the Office of the Registrar receives an official 
transcript from the other college or university. For credits obtained while studying 
abroad, the Office of the Registrar also must receive the necessary approval paperwork 
from Rice International Programs before transfer credit may be granted. Students may 
appeal to Rice International Programs to have credit granted from nonapproved study 
abroad programs. Such appeals generally should be justified by the curricular needs of 
the student. In addition, credit from non-U. S. degree-granting universities not part of a 
study abroad program must be approved by Rice International Programs. Credit is 
generally determined on a pro rata basis. No grade is entered, and transferred courses 
have no effect on a student's Rice grade point average. 

Students with much transfer credit should be aware of the general graduation 
requirements (listed on pages 20-23) that they must complete at least 60 semester hours 
at Rice, complete more than half of their upper-level degree work and more than half of 
their upper-level major work at Rice (students also should check their specific depart- 
mental major requirements). 



36 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Excused Absences 

Students are expected to be in attendance at all of the classes for which they are 
registered during the entire course of the academic semester for which they are enrolled. 
The university understands, however, that students participating in university-sponsored 
extracurricular activities may , on rare occasions , need to mi ss a class session . As a matter 
of course, students should inform their instructors in advance of absences resulting from 
participation in university-sponsored activities, and faculty will normally give a reason- 
able opportunity to make up work missed on such occasions. Absences for activities other 
than university-sponsored events may also be negotiated on an informal basis between 
the student and the faculty member. Alternatively , absences may be formally excused on 
a case-by-case basis if a petition explaining the nature of the event, accompanied by 
suitable documentation, is submitted to the Committee on Examinations and Standing at 
least two weeks before the event. 

Final Examinations 

Most courses include final examinations, but the decision to give a final exam as a 
required part of the course rests with the instructor and the department. All tests and 
examinations are conducted under the honor system (see page 8). 

Examinations are considered final examinations when they: 

• Cover more than the material learned since the last test, or 

• Are the only exam in the course, or 

• Require comprehensive knowledge of the entire course 
Such exams may be given only during the final examination period. 

Final examinations are normally three hours long. When instructors, for exceptional 
reasons, wish to give a longer examination, they schedule it as a take-home exam; even 
then, they may not exceed five hours. The "due date" for all take-home finals is the end 
of the final examination period. 

University-sponsored events at which student attendance is required may be 
scheduled in or outside of Houston during the period from Monday through Saturday 
during the last week of classes, so long as no more than one day of classes and one night 
would be spent out of Houston from the previous Sunday night through Friday afternoon. 
Events scheduled on Saturday may involve travel on Friday evening and on Sunday. 
However, no events may be scheduled on Sunday and thereafter until the conclusion of 
the final examination period. Exceptions may be authorized only by the Committee on 
Examinations and Standing. 

Grades (See also Faculty Grading Guidelines on pages 9-10.) 

The Pass/Fail Option. Undergraduates may register for courses on a pass/fail basis. 
Such students: 

• May not take more than 1 course as pass/fail per semester for each full year of 

residence (students studying in off-campus programs through Rice are consid- 
ered to be in residence for the purpose of this rule) 

• May not take more than 4 courses total as pass/fail (even if they are in a five-year 

degree program) 

• May not take more than a total of 1 4 semester hours total as pass/fail 

• May register for only 1 course as pass/fail in a semester 

• May not take as pass/fail those courses specifically required for the major or 

courses falling within the major department or major area. If students take 
such courses pass/fail, the registrar will replace the P with the grade earned. 

• Must file the proper fomi for a course to be taken pass/fail no later than the posted 

deadline, usually the end of the 1 0th week of the semester 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 37 

Students may convert a pass/fail course to a graded course by filing the proper form 
with the registrar. The deadHne is by the end of the fifth week of the following semester. 

Students should be aware that v.hile a grade of P does not affect their grade point 
average, a grade of F is counted as a failure and is included into their GPA. Students 
who take a course during the Rice summer session as pass/fail should also be aware that 
this counts toward their allowable total of 4 courses. 

Grade Symbols. Instructors are required to report a grade for all students (except 
auditors) whose names appear on the class list. They grade their students using the 
following conventional symbols: A+, A, A-,B+,B,B-.C+,C,C-.D+,D,D-.F. Students 
successfully completing a course pass/fail receive a P. and students successfully 
completing a course satisfactory/fail receive an S; in both cases, failure to complete the 
course successfully is indicated by an F. 

Satisfactory/fail courses are those that do not use traditional grading procedures. 
Such courses or labs are designated by the instructor. While an S does not affect the grade 
point average, an F does. 

Students may repeat courses previously taken, but the record of the first attempt 
(and grade) remains on the transcript, and both grades are included in grade point average 
calculations. If students repeat courses previously passed, credit is awarded only once 
unless the course description states that students may repeat it for additional credit. In 
the latter case, each grade appears on the permanent record and is included in the grade 
point average. 

Grade Designations. Under certain circumstances, special designations accom- 
pany the student's grade. These designations do not affect the grade point average. The 
special designations include the following: 

INC ("Incomplete")— Instructors report this designation to the registrar when a student 
fails to complete a course because of verified illness or other circumstances beyond 
the student's control that occur during the semester. Students must complete the 
work, and instructors must submit a revised grade, by the end of the fifth week of 
the next semester; otherwise, the registrar's office records the grade originally 
submitted. Students with an "incomplete" must be certain that tests, papers, and 
other materials affecting their grade or essential to completing a course requirement 
are delivered by hand to the appropriate professor or office with ample time for the 
instructor to grade the documents and submit the final grade to the Office of the 
Registrar by the end of the fifth week of the following semester. LobS or lateness 
because of mail service is not an acceptable excuse for failing to meet academic 
deadlines. A student who receives two or more "incompletes" in a semester may not 
enroll in the next semester for more than 1 4 semester hours. Students should also be 
aware that they may be placed on probation or suspension when the "incomplete" 
is changed to a grade, either by an instructor or by default. 

## ("Other")— Instructors report this designation to the registrar when a student fails to 
appear for the final examination after completing all the other work for the course. 
Students must resolve the matter, and instructors must submit a revised grade. by the 
end of the first week of the second semester or by the end of the fourth week after 
commencement, whichever is applicable. If the registrar's office does not receive 
a revised grade, the original grade submitted is recorded. A designation of "other" 
is also used if an accusation has been made to the Honor Council. As noted above, 
students should be aware that they may go on probation or suspension when the 
"other" is changed to a grade, either by an instructor or by default. 



38 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

W ("Official Withdraw from University") — Students who officially withdraw from 
the university during the last five weeks of the semester will receive a final grade 
of "W" for each course in which they were enrolled that semester. In addition, 
the professors of those students who withdraw during that time will submit a 
grade based on the student's academic achievement at the time of withdrawal to 
the registrar. This grade will not be included in the student's official transcript, 
but will be stored in the student's file to be used solely in determining the 
student's eligibility for readmission. See Voluntary Withdrawal and Readmis- 
sion (page 40). 

Students who officially withdraw from the university before the last five weeks 
of the semester will not receive the grade of "W" for any courses in which they 
were enrolled for that semester. These courses will not be included on the 
official transcript. 

W ("Late Drop with Approval") - A student who drops a class with special 

approval from the Committee on Examinations and Standing after the designated 
drop deadline will receive a grade of "W" for that course. When requests for late 
drops are denied by the Committee, the registrar records the submitted grade. 

If a student drops a class before the designated drop deadline for the semester, 
the course will not be included on his/her official transcript. Students in their 
first semester at Rice may drop a class up until the last day of classes, and the 
course will not be included on the student's official transcript. 

NG ("No Grade")— This designation indicates that the instructor failed to report a 
grade. Instructors are responsible for resolving this situation as quickly as possible. 

NC ("No Credit")— This designation signals that no credit was granted for the course. 
It is only used for people auditing the course. 

Grade Points. To compute grade point averages, letter grades are numbered 
as follows: 



Grade Grade Points 


Grade Grade Points 


A+ 4.33 


C+ 


2.33 


A 4.00 


C 


2.00 


A- 3.67 


c- 


1.67 


B+ 3.33 


D+ 


1.33 


B 3.00 


D 


1.00 


B- 2.67 


D- 


0.67 




F 


0.00 



Grade Point Average Calculation. For each course, the credit attempted in 
semester hours and the points for the grade earned are multiplied. Then these products 
(one for each course) are added together, and the sum is divided by the total credit hours 
attempted. Grade point averages are reported each semester on the student's grade report 
and appear on unofficial transcripts. However, grade point averages are not included on 
official transcripts nor, like class ranks, are they reported to any external agency. 

President's Honor Roll. This honor roll, published each semester, recognizes 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 39 

outstanding students. To be eligible, students must have earned grades in a total of 12 or 
more semester hours without receiving a grade of F. (Pass/Fail courses may not be 
counted.) Approximately 30 percent of the top undergraduates receive recognition each 
semester. While undergraduates enrolled in a four-year bachelor's degree program are 
always eligible for the President's Honor Roll, students enrolled in five-year bachelor's 
or master's programs are eligible only during their first 8 semesters. 

Academic Discipline and Other Disciplinary Matters 

Academic Probation. Students are placed on academic probation at the end of any 

semester if: 

• Their grade point average for that semester is less than 1 .67 

• Their cumulative grade point average is less than 1 .67 (this requirement is waived 

if the grade point average for that semester is at least 2.00) 
The period of probation extends to the end of the next semester in which the student is 
enrolled. Students on probation (academic or disciplinary) may not be candidates for, or 
hold, any elected or appointed office, nor are they allowed to enroll in more than 
17 semester hours. 

Academic Suspension. Students are suspended from the university at the end of any 

semester if they: 

• Earn grades that will place them on academic probation a third time 

• Have a grade point average for the semester that is less than 1 .00 (exceptions are 

made for students completing their first semester at Rice) 
Students readmitted after a period of academic suspension will be suspended again if, in 
any succeeding semester, they fail to achieve either of the following requirements: 

• A cumulative and semester grade point average of at least 1 .67 

• A semester average of at least 2.00 

The first suspension period is normally one semester; the second suspension period is at 
least two semesters. Students are not readmitted after a third suspension. 

Students who are going to be suspended for academic performance are notified by 
the registrar after all final grades have been received by the faculty and posted to their 
record. Suspension is lifted the first day of class of the semester when the student returns 
to the university. When students serve the nominal term of suspension but do not intend 
to return to Rice, suspension is lifted after permission from the Committee on Examina- 
tions and Standing is granted. 

For students facing a first or second academic suspension who verify with the 
registrar and their department that they will complete their degree requirements in one 
semester if allowed to return, may have their suspension reduced to probation. Students 
may invoke this ruling only once for a given academic degree plan. 

Students who graduate at the end of a semester under academic circumstances that 
would normally place them on probation or suspension will not have the terms "academic 
probation" or "suspension" placed on their transcript for that semester. 

Disciplinary Probation and Suspension. The assistant dean of student judicial 
programs may place students on probation or suspension for an honor system violation 
or for other disciplinary reasons. Students on disciplinary suspension (including for an 
honor system violation) may not receive their degree even if they have met all academic 
requirements for graduation. They must leave the university within 48 hours of being 
informed of the dean's decision, though in cases of unusual hardship, the college master 
and assistant dean of student judicial programs may extend the deadline to one week. Any 
tuition refund will be prorated from the official date of suspension, which is determined 
by the registrar. While on disciplinary suspension, students may not run for, or hold, any 



40 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

elective or appointed office in any official Rice organization, nor may they serve as an 
Orientation Week adviser once they return to the university. Participation in student 
activities on and off campus and use of Rice facilities, including the student center, 
the colleges, the playing fields, the gym, and the computer labs, are limited to 
enrolled students. 

Readmission after Suspension. Students seeking readmission after academic 
suspension should address a letter of petition to the Committee on Examinations and 
Standing , in care of the vice president for Student Affairs , which must be received by July 
1 for readmission in the fall semester and December 1 for readmission in the spring 
semester. The petition should include two supporting letters from persons for whom the 
student has worked during the suspension period as a student or an employee. If the 
problems causing the previous difficulty appear to be resolved, the student generally is 
readmitted. Students returning from a second suspension must submit an academic 
program approved by the Office of Academic Advising before they are readmitted. These 
students must also maintain regular contact with that office throughout the semester. In 
some instances, the committee may postpone approval of readmission or rule that 
suspension is permanent. 

Students seeking readmission after leaving the university because of disciplinary 
or other nonacademic action should submit a petition in writing for review by the 
assistant dean of student judicial programs. 

Rice Summer Scliool. Although it may do so at its discretion, the Committee on 
Examinations and Standing does not nomially place on probation or suspension students 
who perform poorly in the Rice Summer School . Students should be aware, however , that 
Rice Summer School grades are included in their grade point averages. 

Withdrawals and Leaves 

Voluntary Withdrawal and Readmission. Students may withdraw voluntarily 
from the university at any time during the semester up until the last day of classes. If they 
are in good academic standing at the time of their withdrawal, students are considered for 
readmission after they submit a written application to the vice president for student 
affairs. If students withdraw within five weeks of the last day of classes, they must submit 
the written application to the vice president for Student Affairs, who, at his discretion, 
will submit it to the Committee on Examinations and Standing. If students withdraw for 
major medical or psychological/psychiatric reasons, however, they must meet the 
readmission conditions for an involuntary withdrawal (see below). 

Students wishing to withdraw should inform their college master in person and give 
written notification to the vice president for student affairs, who notifies other offices of 
the university as necessary. If students withdraw within five weeks of the last day of 
classes, the Committee on Examinations and Standing takes into account their grades 
(which reflect their performance up to the day of withdrawal) when ruling on their 
readmission. Students whose grades would have led to suspension had they not with- 
drawn are treated, for purposes of readmission, as if they had been suspended. Such 
students must meet the requirements for Readmission after Suspension (see above). 

Students who fail to give notice of withdrawal should expect to receive failing 
grades. 

Involuntary Withdrawal. The university may insist on a student's involuntary 
withdrawal if, in the judgment of the vice president for student affairs, the student: 

• Poses a threat to the lives or safety of him/herself or other members of the Rice 
community 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 41 

• Has a medical or a psychological problem that cannot be properly treated in the 

university setting 

• Has a medical condition or demonstrates behavior that seriously interferes with the 

education of other members of the Rice community 

Students should submit written petitions for readmission after involuntary with- 
drawal to the vice president for student affairs, providing evidence that they have 
resolved the problems leading to their withdrawal. 

Students who withdraw for psychological reasons within the last five weeks of the 
fall semester will not be able to petition for readmission for the spring semester 
immediately following the semester from which they withdrew. They can appeal no later 
than June 1 to be considered for readmission for the upcoming fall semester. 

Some cases may require an interview with the director of the Rice Counseling 
Center, with the director of Student Health Services, or with their designees. 

Unauthorized Withdrawal. Students who leave the university without first obtain- 
ing permission to withdraw are considered to have resigned. Although students who 
resign are not normally considered for readmission , they may petition first the Committee 
on Examinations and Standing, then the vice president of student affairs. Withdrawal 
without permission is noted on the transcript, but readmitted students may petition to 
have this notation expunged from their record by following the procedures described in 
the Code of Student Conduct. 

Leave of Absence. Students may request a leave of absence from the university by 
applying in writing to the vice president for student affairs at any time before the first day 
of classes in the semester for which they are requesting leave. A leave of absence taken 
after the first day of classes is considered a voluntary withdrawal. 

To gain readmission following an approved leave of absence of not more than four 
semesters, students need only notify the vice president for student affairs at least one 
month before the beginning of the semester that they intend to end their leave. After a 
leave of more than four semesters, they should apply in writing to the Committee on 
Examinations and Standing as if the leave were a voluntary withdrawal (see page 40). 

Approval of a leave of absence is always contingent on the student's satisfactory 
completion of course work in the semester preceding the leave. Students performing 
poorly may have their approved leave converted to suspension. 

Military Leave of Absence. Students who require a leave of absence because of 
being called to active military duty should contact the vice president for student affairs. 

Applicable Academic Graduation Requirements 

Students enrolled in four- (or five-) year bachelor's programs may decide whether 
to follow the graduation requirements in effect when they first registered at Rice or those 
in effect when they graduate. If they graduate more than seven (or eight) years after their 
initial registration, they must graduate under the regulations in effect at the time of their 
last readmission or those in effect when they graduate. Also, departments may review 
courses completed in a major more than seven (or eight) years before the student's 
anticipated graduation. If the department concludes that a course no longer satisfies the 
requirements of the major, it is not credited toward the major program, although it 
remains on the student's record. 

Departmental major requirements may vary from year to year during the period 
between a student's matriculation and graduation. The department may , at its discretion. 



42 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

make any of these variations available to a student for completion of the major 
requirements. If a new degree program or major is created during the student's time at 
Rice, the new program will be available to a student as if the program appeared in the 
General Announcements at the time of matriculation. 

Name Changes 

To comply with a number of government agencies' reporting requirements, the 
university must record the name of each student who is a U.S. citizen as the student's 
name appears on his or her Social Security card. Students who need to change their names 
on Rice University records and who are U.S. citizens must notify the Office of the 
Registrar and present a Social Security card, marriage license, divorce decree, or court 
order and picture identification when submitting the form. After the change is 
implemented, the name on the Rice University transcript will read as printed on the 
supporting document(s). 

Change in Enrollment 

The academic calendar lists deadlines for dropping or adding a class or section. 
This schedule is binding for all students. Adding or dropping a course, including 
transferring from one section to another or changing credit status in a course must be 
accomplished through completion of the appropriate forms and submission to the Office 
of the Registrar. Changing a course to/from audit must be done within the first four weeks 
of the semester. 

Transcript Policies 

Transcripts are issued only at the request of the student. Transcript requests should 
be made at least three working days before the desired date of issue . A $7 fee per transcript 
must be received before a transcript is issued. 

Transcripts that have been presented for admission or evaluation of credit 
become a part of the student's permanent record and are not reissued. Transcripts from 
other institutions, if needed, must be sent to Rice University directly from the original 
issuing institution. 

Student Records 

Rice University assures the confidentiality of student educational records in 
accordance with state and federal laws, including the Family Educational Rights and 
Privacy Act. Student academic records are maintained primarily in the Office of the 
Registrar and in the academic department of the student's major, as well as various other 
offices around campus. All students have the right to review their records to determine 
their content and accuracy , to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable informa- 
tion as defined by law, and to file complaints with the Department of Education. Parents 
of dependent students, as defined by the Internal Revenue Code, who give evidence of 
the dependent status, have the same rights. 

Release of Student Information from Educational Records 

The disclosure or publication of student information is governed by policies of Rice 
University and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. 

A student's consent is required for the disclosure or publication of any informational 
which is a) personally identifiable and b) a part of the educational record. However, 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 43 

certain exceptions to tliis general rule, both in types of information which can be 
disclosed and in access to that information, are allowed by the regulations of the Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act. Rice may allow access to personally identifiable 
information without a student's prior consent to its faculty or staff who legitimately 
require this information to perform their instructional, supervisory, advisory, or admin- 
istrative duties. 

In accordance with the law, a student's prior consent is not required for disclosure 
of portions of the educational record defined by the institution as directory information. 
The following directory information may be released by the university: 

1 . Name, local and permanent address, and telephone number(s) 

2. Date and place of birth and sex 

3. Classification and major and minor fields of study 

4. Participation in officially recognized activities and sports 

5 . Weight and height of members of athletic teams 

6. Dates of attendance, degrees and awards received 

7. The most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the 

student 

8. Photographic image 

The information above, designated by the university as directory information, may 
be released or published by the university without a student ' s prior written consent unless 
exception is made in writing by the student or the parents of a dependent student . Students 
who prefer to avoid access to or release of directory information must notify 
the registrar in writing before the end of the second week of fall classes, and the university 
will withhold access to, or release of, directory information until further written 
instruction is received. 

Students have a right to challenge the accuracy of their educational records and may 
file written requests to amend these records. The Office of the Registrar should be 
contacted for further information regarding the procedure to follow for questions or 
problems. 

For complete information regarding the policies outlined above, please contact: 

Rice University Registrar 

Rice University 

Office of the Registrar - MS 57 

6100 Main Street 

Houston, TX 77005-1892 

Email: reg@rice.edu 

Veterans Information 

At Rice University , the Office of Veterans Affairs is managed through the Office of 
the Registrar. This office assists all veterans and their dependents who wish to receive 
VA educational benefits. The office also provides personal counseling, fee deferments, 
tutorial assistance, and work-study jobs. 

Veterans who are planning to attend the university should contact the Office of 
Veterans Affairs at least two months before the date of entry. Such time is required to 
expedite the processing of paperwork for educational allowances from the Veterans 
Administration. 

For certification of benefits, the student must be enrolled according to the following 
schedule: 

Full Time 12 Credits 1/2 Time 6 Credits 

3/4 Time 9 Credits Less than 1/2 Time 5 Credits 

For rate of monthly payment of educational allowances for veterans and dependents , 
please contact Office of Veterans Affairs. 



44 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

For additional informational regarding other Veterans Educational Programs 
contact the Office of the Registrar at 713-348-8031 or reg@rice.edu. 

Application for Graduation 

All students must complete an Application for Graduation Form available in the 
Office of the Registrar. This form is required for all students who plan to complete their 
degree requirements at the end of the fall or spring semester. 

Academic Advising 

Rice University is dedicated to providing the information, advising, resources, and 
support needed for our students to set goals for academic achievement and to design plans 
to succeed in reaching those goals. Rice is committed to a long tradition of academic 
advising by the faculty, primarily through the colleges and the departments and with the 
support of the Office of Academic Advising. Rice is further committed to providing 
academic assistance to students who need tutoring in difficult classes. 

Academic advising for most new students at Rice occurs primarily in the residential 
colleges, provided by faculty associates. New students are assigned a divisional adviser 
based on their general areas of academic interest or proposed majors. There are four 
major undergraduate divisions— humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and 
engineering. Architecture and music majors have advisers within those schools. Until a 
major is declared, the divisional adviser must approve registration and add/drop forms. 

Students must declare a major before preregistration for the junior year, if not 
sooner, according to the deadline in the Academic Calendar (see Declaring Departmental 
Majors on page 32). Once a major is declared, the primary source of academic advice is 
a faculty member who is a designated major adviser in the department or program. All 
students are strongly encouraged to consult with major advisers at any time before 
declaring the major. 

The Office of Academic Advising, located in the Ley Student Center, is a source of 
advice for all students. In addition to providing support, resources, and training for 
divisional and major advising, the Office of Academic Advising provides guidance to 
students planning careers in the health professions and law , to students planning to attend 
graduate school, and to any student needing general academic advice. 

The Rice Tutoring Program 

Through the Office of Academic Advising, every student at Rice is entided to free 
tutoring assistance, both individually and in small groups, on a limited basis. Details of 
the Rice Tutoring Program are available from the Office of Academic Advising. 

Summer School for College Students 

Rice Summer School for College Students, administered by the School of Continu- 
ing Studies, offers courses for credit to Rice students, visiting undergraduates, graduate 
students, and Class III students (see pages 84-85). Two summer sessions are offered: in 
May and June-July. See Academic Calendar, pages viii-xiii. Taking 6 to 8 semester 
hours in one session is considered a full load. Interested students should complete the 
application form found on the summer school website at http://scs .rice .edu/summercredit . 
Admission is automatic for any Rice undergraduate or graduate student in good standing. 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 45 

Visiting students in good standing should send official transcripts, including spring 
semester grades, (mailed directly from their universities and colleges to the School of 
Continuing Studies) as well as the completed application. Acceptance in the Rice 
Summer School carries no implications for regular admission to Rice. 

All applicants, including Rice students, should submit their applications to the Rice 
Summer School Office with the application fee and a tuition deposit. The remaining 
tuition is due in full at registration before the beginning of classes. Auditors of summer 
school courses, who are considered visiting students, must pay full tuition and fees. 
Limited financial aid is available for Rice students only. 

It is essential that students apply by the deadlines listed on the summer school 
website. Courses that do not generate enrollments sufficient to cover their costs may be 
canceled. Students may apply after the deadline (but before the start of classes) by paying 
a late fee. 

For more information, including tuition and registration information, students 
should contact the Rice Summer School Office at 713-348-4803. via e-mail at 
scsummer@rice.edu. or online at http://scs.rice.edu/summercredit/. 

Admission of New Students 

From its beginning. Rice University has sought to maintain an academic program 
of the highest excellence for a small body of students. While the university's resources 
and programs have expanded over the past years, the total number of students who 
matriculate remains relatively small, approximately 700 students in each first-year class. 

We seek students of keen intellect who will benefit from the Rice experience. Our 
admission process employs many different means to identify these qualities in appli- 
cants . History shows that no single gauge can adequately predict a student ' s preparedness 
for a successful career at Rice. For example, we are cautious in the use of standardized 
test scores to assess student preparedness and potential. In making a decision to admit or 
to award financial assistance, we are careful not to ascribe too much value to any single 
metric, such as rank in class, grade point average, or standardized test score. 

We use a broader perspecti\e that includes such qualitative factors as the overall 
strength and competitive ranking of a student's prior institution and the rigor of his or 
her particular course of study. Taken together with a student's test scores and 
academic record, these additional factors provide a sound basis to begin assessing the 
applicant's potential. 

Beyond these objective tests of academic competence, we look for other, more 
subjective qualities among applicants, such as creativity, artistic talent, and leadership 
potential. We believe that students who possess these attributes in combination with 
strong academic qualifications will benefit most from a Rice education. Through their 
contributions and interactions with others, they will enrich the educational experience of 
all students. These qualities are not revealed in test scores but are manifest in the breadth 
of interests and the balance of activities in their lives. 

Rice University seeks to create on its campus a rich learning environment in which 
all students will meet individuals whose life experiences and world views differ 
significantly from their own. We believe that an educated person is one who is at home 
in many different environments, at ease among people from many different cultures, and 
willing to test his or her views against those of others. Moreover, we recognize that in this 
or any university, learning about the world we live in is not by any means limited to the 
structured interaction between faculty and students in the classroom but also occurs 
through informal dialogue between students outside the classroom. 

To encourage our students' fullest possible exposure to the widest possible set of 
experiences, Rice seeks in its admission policies to bring bright and promising students 



46 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

to the university from a range of socioeconomic, cultural, and geographic origins. We 
seek students whose parents did not attend college, as well as students from families with 
a well-established history of college-level education. Rice places a premium on recruit- 
ment of students who have distinguished themselves through initiatives that build bridges 
between different cultural, racial, and ethnic groups. In so doing, we endeavor to craft a 
residential community that fosters creative, intercultural interactions between students, 
a place where prejudices of all sorts are confronted squarely and dispelled. 

In assessing how well an applicant can contribute to enlivening the learning 
environment at Rice, we also try to determine the relative challenges that he or she may 
have faced. For economically disadvantaged students, this may mean achieving a high 
level of scholastic distinction while holding down a job in high school. For a first- 
generation college student, this might mean achieving high standards for academic 
success within an environment relatively indifferent to intellectual attainment. Or it 
might mean overcoming a disability to excel in sports, music, or forensics. For students 
who do not have particular disadvantages, we also look at whether they chose a more 
challenging road than the normal path through high school. This might mean an 
especially strenuous course of study, prolonged and in-depth engagement in a school 
project, or a particularly creative and wide-ranging set of extracurricular activities. 

Our admission process precludes any quick formula for admitting a given applicant 
or for giving preference to one particular set of qualifications without reference to the 
class as a whole. An inevitable consequence of this approach is that some otherwise 
deserving and well-qualified students will not be admitted to Rice. By selecting a wide 
range of matriculants of all types, the admission process seeks to enrich the learning 
environment at Rice and thus increase the value of a Rice education for all students. 

Due to the nature of the Rice education. Rice enrolls undergraduate degree 
candidates on a full-time basis only. First-year applicants, architecture applicants, 
and international students may apply for the fall semester only. Other applicants may 
apply to enter either the fall or spring semester. 

Applicants are selected on a competitive basis in six academic divisions: architec- 
ture, engineering, humanities, music, natural sciences, and social sciences. Candidates 
should give careful consideration to the category under which they wish to be considered. 
However, once enrolled, most students are able to move freely among most divisions 
after consultation with their advisers. Music students must pursue the music program for 
at least the first year before changing divisions. The Schools of Music and Architecture 
maintain limited enrollments; all majors are subject to faculty approval. 

Those offered admission are expected to complete the remainder of their high school 
courses with the same superior performance that led to their admission. 

First- Year Applicants 

There are four areas of focus generally used in evaluation of first-year candidates for 
admission: scholastic record as reflected by the courses chosen and the quality of 
academic performance, recommendations from high school, the application presentation 
of personal information and essays, and standardized testing (SAT I or ACT and three 
subjects from the SAT II). 

The High School Record. Students must complete at least 16 college preparatory 
units as follows: 

English 4 Laboratory science (e.g., biology. 

Social studies 2 chemistry, physics) 2 

Mathematics 3 Additional credits in any of the 

A foreign language 2 categories above 3 

The natural science and engineering divisions require trigonometry (pre-calculus) 
or other advanced mathematics courses and both chemistry and physics. Students may 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 47 

substitute a second year of chemistry or biology for physics. 

Students admitted with academic deficiencies will be asked to complete the required 
work by taking high school or college-level courses during the summer before enrollment 
at Rice. 

Note: Because of the admission competition to enter Rice, successful applicants 
generally have taken 20 or more college preparatory courses, many at the 
college level. Therefore, only those students who have more than 20 college 
preparatory courses may have the registrar consider for Rice credit their 
college courses taken in high school. 

Transfer of Coursework Taken During High School. College-level courses 
taken during high school years may be considered for credit at Rice University on receipt 
of the following documentation: 

1 . An official transcript of all college courses sent directly from the college(s) 
attended. No college-level courses that appear only on the high school transcript 
will yield credits at Rice. 

2. From each college attended, official verification that all courses were taken on 
the college campus . were taken together with students at that college , were taught 
by regular members of the college faculty, and were a part of the normal 
curriculum of the college. This type of documentation is normally obtained from 
the registrar's office of each college. 

3. Official notification by letter from the high school principal or guidance 
counselor that the credit earned was not used to meet high school diploma 
requirements. 

Recommendations. Candidates must submit evaluations from their guidance 
counselor and one teacher. The necessary forms are included in the application. 

The Application. The application provides the committee with important informa- 
tion on the student's background and gives the applicant an opportunity to provide 
statements on his or her interests, experiences, and goals. Both the Rice application and 
the Common Application are accepted. The application fee is $40. Students for whom 
this fee creates a hardship may apply for a waiver. Freshman applicants should provide 
proof of a fee waiver for the SAT I or ACT test or eligibility for the school lunch program. 
In any case, a letter from the student's high school counselor is required. Financial stress 
created by application fees to other institutions is not considered a valid reason to grant 
a fee waiver. 

Standardized Testing. The SAT I or ACT and three subject exams from the SAT 
II are required for admission . All applicants must submit three SAT II tests: one in writing 
and two others in fields related to the candidate's proposed area of study. 

These exams are administered by the College Board and the American College 
Testing Program. Bulletins and test registration forms are available from high school 
counseling offices . The applicant is responsible for arranging to take the tests , and official 
score reports must be submitted before the student can be considered for admission. The 
College Board code for Rice is 6609. The ACT code is 4152. 

Personal Interview. Although a personal interview is not a requirement, we 
recommend an interview for first-year applicants as an excellent opportunity to discuss 
the applicant's interests, needs, and questions. On-campus interviews are conducted by 
the admission staff and a select group of Rice senior students. Also, off-campus 
interviews are conducted throughout the United States by Rice alumni. Please consult the 



48 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

university web site or the application packet, or call the admission office for details. 

Music Audition. Candidates to the Shepherd School of Music must arrange for an 
audition with a member of the music faculty. 

Architecture Portfolio and Interview. Architecture applicants must submit a 
portfolio. An interview with a faculty member from the School of Architecture is strongly 
recommended. 

Bachelor of Fine Arts PortfoHo. Applicants to the Bachelor of Fine Arts program 
must submit a portfolio to the Department of Visual Arts for faculty review before 
admission is finalized. 

Decision Plans 

Early Decision Plan. Early Decision is designed for students who have selected 
Rice as their first choice. Students may initiate applications to other colleges but may 
make a binding Early Decision application to one college only. 

Early Decision applicants must complete the required standardized testing on or by 
the October testing dates in the senior year. All other materials should be postmarked by 
November 1. Admission notices will be mailed by December 15. The committee will 
admit, defer, or deny Early Decision applicants. Deferred applicants are considered with 
the Regular Decision pool, and seventh-semester grades and additional standardized test 
scores will then be considered. 

It is important to note that if admitted under Early Decision a candidate 
must withdraw all other college applications, may not submit any additional 
applications after accepting the offer, and must accept Rice's offer of admission 
by submitting a $100 nonrefundable deposit by January 2. An additional $50 
housing deposit is required of those desiring on-campus accommodations. 

Those accepted under Early Decision may receive an estimate of need-based 
financial aid by registering for the College Scholarship Service (CSS) PROFILE by 
October 1 , and sending the PROFILE packet to CSS by November 1 . Register for CSS 
PROFILE by calling 1-800-778-6888 or by visiting their website at 
www.collegeboard.com. CSS will mail you the PROFILE; complete and return it to CSS . 
Students may also complete the PROFILE online. The PROFILE number for Rice is 
6609. Note that official financial aid offers may be made only after the Office of 
Student Financial Services has received the following documents: 

• CSS PROFILE, priority date February 1 

• Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). priority date February 1 

• Student and parent 2003 income tax and W-2 forms, priority date March 1 

Interim Decision Plan. First-year applicants who complete their standardized 
testing on or before the December testing dates and who postmark all other materials by 
December 1 may be considered under the Interim Decision Plan. Decisions are mailed 
by February 10. The committee will admit, defer, or deny Interim Decision applicants. 
Deferred applicants are considered with the Regular Decision pool, and seventh- 
semester grades and additional standardized test scores will then be considered. 

Interim Decision applicants who are offered admission must pay a $ 100 registration 
deposit by May 1 to reserve a place in the incoming class. After May 1 , deposits are not 
refundable. Those who desire a room on campus must pay an additional $50 deposit. 

Regular Decision Plan. Students who apply Regular Decision must postmark their 
materials by January 10 to receive notification by April 1. Candidates who miss the 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 49 

deadline must do so in full knowledge that they are in a less competitive position. Regular 
Decision applicants must complete their standardized tests by February. 

Regular Decision applicants who are offered admission should submit a $100 
registration deposit by May 1 to reserve their places in the incoming class. After May 1 , 
deposits are not refundable. Those who desire a room on campus must pay an additional 
$50 deposit. 

Accelerated Students 

Rice University will accept applications from students who are completing high 
school in less than four years. It is important to note that these students will compete with 
other candidates who will be completing four years of high school. Therefore, it is the 
candidate's responsibility to demonstrate that he or she has exhausted all college 
preparatory course work at his or her school . Further, because of the residential focus and 
commitment to student self-governance at Rice, candidates must also demonstrate the 
maturity and personal development that would allow them to participate fully and 
responsibly in campus life. Because of the unique circumstances surrounding the 
accelerated student, it is strongly recommended that these candidates have an on-campus 
interview with a member of the admission staff before the application deadline. 

Home-Schooled Applicants 

The Committee on Admission and Financial Aid recognizes that each home- 
schooled applicant is in a unique educational program. To ensure that our evaluation 
process is fully informed, each home-schooled applicant is encouraged to provide clear, 
detailed documentation of his or her curriculum of study, assessment tools, and learning 
experiences. Rice requires two academic letters of recommendation from all applicants, 
and at least one of these letters must come from someone who is not related to the 
applicant. 

Transfer Students 

Students with superior records from two-year or four-year colleges or universities 
may apply as transfer candidates. Applicants for transfer admission must file the 
following with the Office of Admission: 

• The written application 

• Official transcripts of all high school and college work completed to date as well 

as courses in progress 

• Two faculty recommendations 

• A recommendation from the dean of students 

• SAT I or ACT scores 

• A $40 application fee 

Applications with the appropriate documents must be postmarked by March 15 for 
fall term admission and October 15 for spring term admission. Notification of the 
admission decision is mailed by June 1 and December 15, respectively. The criteria used 
in evaluating transfer applications are similar to those applied to applicants for the first- 
year class, except that special emphasis is given to periformance at the college level. 
Because of the highly competitive nature of transfer admission, it is recommended that 
applicants have a minimum 3 .20 (4.00 scale) grade point average on all college work. The 
SAT I or ACT must be taken by April 1 for fall application and November 1 for spring 
application. The SAT II is not required. 

Students for whom the $40 application fee creates a hardship may apply for a waiver. 
Transfer applicants must send a copy of the Student Aid Report that they receive after 



50 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFS A) along with a request 
for a fee waiver to the Office of Admission. Financial stress created by application fees 
to other institutions is not considered a valid reason to grant a fee waiver. 

Transfer students must be registered in residence at Rice for at least four full 
semesters during the fall or spring terms and must complete no fewer than 60 semester 
hours before earning a Rice degree. 

Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate/Placement Tests 

Students who score a 4 or 5 on the applicable Advanced Placement College Board 
examinations taken before matriculation at Rice are given university credit for corre- 
sponding Rice courses. 

Students who receive a score of 6 or 7 on a higher-level International Baccalaureate 
exam will also receive course credit for the appropriate course. 

Furthermore, during Orientation Week, entering students may take placement tests 
administered by various departments at Rice. On the basis of these tests, students may be 
advised to register for courses beyond the introductory level. In most cases, credit is not 
given for these tests. 

Other Students 

Please note that financial assistance is not available for visiting. Class III, second 
degree, dual enrollment, or auditing students. 

Visiting Students. Students who wish to spend a semester or a year at Rice taking 
courses for credit to be applied toward their undergraduate degree at another school may 
apply for admission as visiting students through the Office of Admission. The student's 
application should be accompanied by the $40 application fee, an official high school 
transcript, an official transcript of college work to date, an SAT I (SAT) or ACT score, 
and recommendations from the dean of students and a faculty member who has taught 
the student within the past academic year. Visiting student applications should be 
postmarked by March 15 for the fall semester and October 15 for the spring semester. 

Visiting students are assigned membership to one of the residential colleges during 
their stay and are charged the same fees as other undergraduates. In a few classes where 
enrollment is limited because of space or other considerations, candidates for Rice 
degrees have priority over visiting students for registration. 

Visiting students may apply to transfer to Rice only after having left Rice for 
at least one semester. 

Class III Students. Students with Class III standing at Rice have an undergraduate 
or graduate degree from an accredited college or university and are taking courses at Rice 
for credit but not in a specific degree program. Students interested in this program should 
contact the Office of Graduate Studies. 

Second Degree Students. An individual who has a bachelor's degree from another 
institution and desires another degree in a different area of focus may apply as a second 
degree student on a space-available basis. Students may only pursue a second degree that 
is different from their first degree. The application, a $40 application fee, official 
transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work, two faculty letters of recommenda- 
tion and a recommendation from the dean of students from the most recent college 
attended, and standardized test scores (the SAT, SAT I. or ACT) are required to complete 
an application file . The deadline for fall semester admission is March 1 5 and the deadline 
for spring is October 15. 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 5 1 

Second degree applicants with a prior bachelor's degree from Rice should apply to 
the registrar. The application should include a written statement specifying the proposed 
major and course program for the second degree, a supporting letter from the chair of the 
major department, and an explanation of the student's reasons for seeking a second 
degree. 

Dual Enrollment Students. Accelerated high school juniors and seniors who have 
taken all the courses in a given discipline available to them in high school may request 
admission to Rice for the purpose of taking one or more university-level courses as dual 
enrollment students. The written application, application fee of $40. high school 
transcript, a teacher and a counselor recommendation from the applicant's high school, 
and an SAT I or ACT score should be sent to the Office of Admission by June 1 for the 
fall semester or by December 1 for the spring semester. Home-schooled students must 
demonstrate that they have exhausted all other community resources before applying for 
dual enrollment at Rice. All dual enrollment students are limited to two courses per 
semester at Rice. 

Tuition for new students is $786 per semester hour plus a $ 1 05 registration fee, the 
total not to exceed $9,425. Tuition for returning dual enrollment students would be the 
rate (plus inflation) at which they first took dual enrollment courses at Rice. These 
charges are for the 2003-2004 school year and are subject to change in subsequent years. 
Financial assistance is not available for this program. 

Auditors. Any interested person, including currently enrolled students, may audit 
one or more courses at Rice by securing permission of the instructor and by registering 
as an auditor with the registrar. The university grants no academic credit for such work. 
Audit credit does not appear on transcripts . Currently enrolled students may audit courses 
without charge. Rice alumni are charged a fee of $265 per course per semester. All others 
are charged $520 per course per semester for the privilege of auditing. Request to audit 
a class or to change from audit to credit or vice versa must be done by the end of the fourth 
week of the semester. 



Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 

Charges for tuition, fees, and room and board are billed to students each semester. 
Students may pay the charges in full by the due date or in installments over the course 
of the semester. The fall semester due date is August 1 for freshmen and mid-August for 
all others, and the spring semester due date is the first week of January. The following 
costs apply to undergraduates in the 2003-2004 school year: 

Tuition 

Entering first-year and transfer students' 
Students matriculating in 2002-03 
Students matriculating in 2001-02 
Students matriculating in 2000-01 
Students matriculating in 1999-2000 
Students matriculating in 1998-99 

' Tuition indexed for five years 
- By special permission only 



Annual 


Semester 


Hour^ 


$18,850 


$9,425 


$786 


$17,950 


$8,975 


$748 


$17,250 


$8,625 


$719 


$17,150 


$8,575 


$716 


$16,950 


$8,475 


$707 


$16,450 


$8,225 


$686 



52 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 



Required Fees 



Fall 



Spring Annual 



Student activities'* 

Athletic events 

College 

Student health 

Shuttle 

Information technology (on-campus) 



$ 84 
$110 
$ 50 
$165 
$ 46 
$200 



$165 



Total fees 



$655 



$165 



$767 



Information technology (off-campus) 

Newspaper 



100 
9 



Fifth-year students in professional degree programs and students working toward a second bachelor's 
degree may pay a reduced student activities fee of $13.70, which covers the Student Association, 
Student Organizations Activity, University Court, and Honor Council portions of the activity fee, and 
elect not to pay the college fee. 



Room and Board 



Annual 



Semester 



Room 


$ 4,800 


$2,400 


Board 


$ 3,080 


$1,540 


Telecommunication 


$ 138 


$ 69 



Any undergraduate who withdraws or takes an approved leave of absence and then 
gains readmission to the university pays the tuition applicable at their matriculation, plus 
annual Consumer Price Index increases for a period not to exceed six years. Starting with 
fall 200 1 matriculants, the index period is not to exceed five years. After five/six years, 
students pay the tuition applicable to the entering class. 



Refund of Tuition and Fees 

Students who withdraw during the first two weeks of the semester are not charged 
tuition or fees for that semester. Students who withdraw during the third week must pay 
30 percent of the semester's tuition, receiving a 70 percent refund. The amount of the 
refund drops by 10 percent at the beginning of each successive week that passes before 
withdrawal until the ninth week, after which no refund is made. Federal regulations 
require a refund calculation for all students receiving Title IV funds. The length of time 
during which a refund must be calculated is up to 60 percent of the payment period 
(seinester). If a student withdraws on or before the 60 percent point in time, a portion of 
the Title IV funds awarded to a student (Pell Grant, Federal SEOG. Federal Perkins Loan, 
Federal Direct Subsidized, Unsubsidized, and Federal PLUS Loans, and the Texas LEAP 
Grant) must be returned, according to the provisions of the Higher Education Act as 
amended. The calculation of the return of these funds may result in the student owing a 
balance to the university and/or the Department of Education. 

For students withdrawing after the second week of classes in a semester, fees or 
special charges (see pages 53-54) are not refunded. Similarly, students withdrawing or 
taking leaves of absence in the spring semester do not receive a partial refund of fees paid 
for the full year. Students withdrawing at any time forfeit the $100 enrollment deposit 
they paid as incoming students. 

Students who receive approval to enroll with a course load of fewer than 12 hours 
during the first nine weeks of the semester may be entitled to a tuition rebate based on 
the same refund schedule used for withdrawing students. Any such rebate depends on the 
actual date by which the registrar's office processes the relevant drop form. 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 53 

Students unable to resolve with the cashier's office any request for special consid- 
eration in connection with waivers, refunds, or adjusted payments on tuition, fees, and 
other charges should forward their appeals to the vice president for student affairs. 
Exceptions are granted by the vice president of Student Affairs only under extraordinary 
circumstances . Resolution of waivers and refunds for room and board charges require the 
approval of the vice president for finance and administration. 

Living Expenses 

Residence fees cover dining hall costs and residence maintenance. They are 
established each year as needs dictate . For 2003-2004, the annual room and board charge 
for residence in a residential college is $7,880. This charge includes the room and all the 
meals eaten during the year. 

Housing. About 77 percent of Rice undergraduates live in the on-campus residential 
colleges. Information about the residential colleges and room application forms accom- 
pany the notice of admission sent to each new undergraduate. Room reservations cannot 
be made before notification of admission. Further information on housing in the 
residential colleges is available from the Office of Student Affairs, and information on 
off-campus housing is provided by the Office of Academic Advising. 

When they receive their residential college room assignments for the academic 
year to follow, students must sign a housing agreement. To reserve their space, current 
students must sign a housing agreement by the date established in their respective 
colleges but no later than April 15. New students must make a $50 deposit before 
May 1 . These nonrefundable deposits are applied to the following semester's room and 
board charges. 

Board. Meals are served cafeteria-style and are all-you-care-to-eat. The colleges 
provide three meals per day Monday through Friday, breakfast and lunch on Saturday, 
and lunch and dinner on Sunday . Meals are not served during the Thanksgiving holiday , 
at the mid-year break, over the fall and spring mid-term recesses, and during spring 
holidays. More information is available from the Residential Dining web site (http:// 
food.rice.edu/index.html). 

Payments and Refunds. Students may pay their residence fee in installments. The 
exact amounts and due dates appear in the Residential Housing Agreement. Students 
moving out of the college for any reason receive a refund (or a credit) of the reduced 
balance of room and board charges but must still pay a termination processing fee. 
Possible exceptions such as academic suspension. Rice-sponsored study abroad, and 
family emergencies are treated on a case-by-case basis. 

Special Charges 

The following charges are separate from the regular fees . For charges because of late 
registration or course changes made after the deadlines, see Registration (pages 30-32). 

Preceptorship per semester $ 1 90 

Internship per semester $190 

Enrollment continuance fee (Study Abroad) per semester $ 125 

Newspaper fee $ 9 

Telecommunications fee (on-campus students) per semester $ 69 

Late payment penalty $ 1 25 

Undergraduate application fee $ 40 



54 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Part-time registration fee $ 105 

Orientation Week room and board $215 

Orientation Week room and board (coordinators) $ 160 

Late registration fee $100 

Failure to register fee $ 50 

Deferred payment plan late fee $ 30 

College withdrawal: suspension $225 

College withdrawal: breaking of lease $625 

Diploma fee: sheepskin $ 90 

Diploma fee: parchment $ 30 

Diploma fee: facsimile $ 10 

Diploma mailing fee: domestic $ 20 

Diploma mailing fee: air mail $ 25 

Transcript fee $ 7 

Replacement ID $ 10 

Freshman parking permit (minimum) $250 

Health Insurance 

All Rice students must have health insurance. Students may purchase insurance for 
the 2003-2004 school year through the university program developed for Rice students 
at a yearly premium of $1 ,335 (Plan A) or $975 (Plan B). Coverage is effective from 
12:01 A.M., August 15, 2003, until 12:01 a.m., August 15,2004. Dependent coverage is 
also available. A description of the policy, application form, and waiver form can be 
found on the Web at http://studenthealthinsurance .rice .edu . Student should submit either 
the application or waiver by August 1 5 each year. 

Education Certification Program Fees 

Students enrolling in the student teaching apprenticeship or internship plans must 
pay a $190 registration fee for each semester. An additional $25 fee (paid to the School 
of Continuing Studies) is due for each summer school session 

Delinquent Accounts 

No student in arrears of any financial obligation to Rice as of the last day of 
registration for any semester can register for classes. The university will not issue 
certificates of attendance , diplomas , or transcripts at any time for a student whose account 
is in arrears. 

Students who have not made satisfactory arrangements with the cashier for payment 
of current charges or who have moved on campus without a proper room contract may 
be dismissed from the university. 

Transcripts 

Transcripts are issued on written request to the Office of the Registrar. The registrar 
does not issue transcripts without the consent of the individual whose record is 
concerned. The charge of $7 for each copy is payable in advance. Those requesting 
transcripts by mail should include payment with the request. 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 55 

Financial Aid 

The financial aid programs at Rice provide assistance to meet demonstrated need for 
university attendance for all admitted students. Through grants, endowments, low- 
interest loans, campus work opportunities, or a combination of these programs. Rice 
makes every effort to provide students and families sufficient assistance to meet their 
educational expenses. The financial aid program receives funding from many sources. 
Rice uses contributions from alumni and friends to establish and maintain scholarships 
and loan funds. Federal and state grants and work and loan programs also provide funds. 
Awards are based primarily on financial need and a computed Expected Family 
Contribution (EFC), although there are also attractive loan opportunities for students and 
families who have no need. 

The university determines need for first-time students by having them register for 
the College Scholarship Service (CSS) PROFILE, and sending the PROFILE packet to 
CSS. Register for CSS PROFILE by calling 1-800-778-6888 or by visiting their 
website at www.collegeboard.com. CSS will mail you the PROFILE; complete and 
return it to CSS. Students may also complete the PROFILE online. The PROFILE 
number for Rice is 6609. First-time students also complete the Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid (FAFS A) and submit copies of student and parent income tax and 
W-2 forms. 

The university determines need for continuing students by having them complete the 
FAFS A and the Rice Financial Aid Application; continuing students also submit student 
and parent 2002 income tax and W-2 forms. Returning students are not required to 
complete a PROFILE form. 

"Need" is the amount required to meet the difference between each student's total 
educational expenses and his or her family 's resources . Parents are expected to contribute 
according to their financial means, taking into account income, assets, home equity, 
number of dependents, and other relevant factors. Students are expected to contribute as 
well from their own assets and earnings, including appropriate borrowing against future 
earnings. 

The brochure Financing Your Education explains the assistance programs in detail. 
Copies are available from the Office of Admission or the Office of Student Financial 
Services . The university also publishes budgets that realistically summarize basic student 
expenses. 

Need-Based Application Process 

Rice University is a need-blind school. Applicants are admitted to the university 
regardless of their family's ability to pay for college. Rice will meet 100% of financial 
need as determined by university calculations. 

Rice considers applicants for all appropriate assistance administered by the univer- 
sity, including grants, scholarships, loans, and work. Students receive notification of an 
offer once their financial aid file is complete. Student Financial Services provides 
financial assistance only for course work sponsored through Rice University. 

To apply for financial assistance, first time students (including Early Decision 
students) must submit the following: 

• CSS PROFILE, priority date February 1 

• Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), priority date February 1 

• Student and parent 2003 income tax and W-2 forms, priority date March 1 



56 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Continuing students must submit the following: 

• FAFSA, priority date April 15 

• Rice Financial Aid Application, priority date April 15 

• Student and parent 2003 income tax and W-2 forms, priority date April 15 

Decision 

Financial aid offers are made annually . Award amounts are specified in the Financial 
Aid Offer Letter. Because financial circumstances change from year to year, Rice 
conducts an annual review of need and offers need accordingly. For this reason, 
continuing students must complete and return the Rice University Application for 
Financial Aid to the university and file the FAFSA every year that they seek assistance. 

The university, from time to time, may adjust its methods of computing financial 
need or its policies regarding the types of financial assistance that it offers so as to meet 
the financial needs of the largest possible number of students. Therefore, the amount and 
type of financial aid may change from year to year, even when the student's financial 
situation appears to remain relatively stable. 

Types of Financial Aid and Assistance 

Student Loan Funds. To assist students and parents with educational financing, the 
Office of Student Financial Services participates in the following programs: 

• Stafford Student Loans. These are low-interest loans made to students attending 

school on at least a half-time basis. Subsidized Stafford loans require need- 
based financial aid eligibility, but unsubsidized Stafford loans are available to 
all students. 

• Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS loan). The PLUS loan is a 

low-interest loan to parents or legal guardians of dependent undergraduate 
students. Eligibility is not based on demonstrated financial need. 

• Federal Perkins Loan Program. The Federal Perkins Loan Program provides 

federal loans for U.S. citizens and permanent residents. The amounts offered 

vary according to financial aid eligibility. 

A few endowments for student loans have been established at Rice primarily as 

memorial tributes. These funds exist separately from the normal financial aid program. 

Rice uses them to make small emergency loans to students experiencing unexpected 

financial problems or showing additional need beyond regular eligibility. 

All applications for these loans must be submitted to the Office of Student 
Financial Services. 

Student Employment Programs. Opportunities for employment are available to 
students , either on or off campus , during the academic year. Students are eligible to work 
under the Federal Work-Study Program or the Rice University Work Program. Students 
interested in employment should access the Student Financial Services webpage at 
http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~fina/employment.htm. 

Deferred Payment Plan. Rice offers a deferred payment plan to enable families to 
finance students' educational costs. This plan divides each semester's charge over four 
installments. Applications and details are available to eligible students each semester at 
the time of billing. Students arrange for deferred payment through the Cashier's Office. 

Vocational Rehabilitation 

The Texas Rehabilitation Commission (TRC) provides assistance in paying tuition 
and nonrefundable fees for students who have certain disabling conditions. Once a TRC 
counselor approves their vocational objectives , students affected by orthopedic deformi- 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 57 

ties, emotional disorders, diabetes, epilepsy, heart problems, and other disabling 
conditions are eligible for assistance. The TRC offers a range of services to help 
handicapped students become employable. Interested students should apply to the 
Texas Rehabilitation Commission. 

Students with visual handicaps should contact the Texas State Commission for 
the Blind. 

Financial Aid Eligibility 

Undergraduate students are eligible to apply for need-based Rice sponsored and 
federal/state aid during the first 8 semesters at Rice; for transfer students the number of 
semesters is prorated based on the number of hours transferred. If a student is enrolled 
beyond eight semesters, the student may only apply for federal/state aid for an additional 
two semesters. (Architecture students may apply for Rice sponsored aid for two 
semesters following their preceptorship to complete the Architecture degree.) If a 
student attends part-time during a semester or withdraws during a term, the semester is 
counted towards the number of semesters Rice sponsored aid is available. 

Students who do not earn a bachelor" s degree within 120 hours of attempted credits 
will need to appeal to the Director of Student Financial Services for continued financial 
assistance. 

Satisfactory Academic Progress 

The Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended by Congress, mandates that 
institutions of higher education require minimum standards of "satisfactory academic 
progress" for students to be eligible to receive financial aid. 

To remain in good standing, an undergraduate student must meet the following 
qualitative and quantitative standards: 

Qualitative — A student must earn a minimum term GPA of 1.67 for each term 

enrolled at Rice University. 
Quantitative— By the end of each academic year, a student must have earned a 
minimum of 24 credits. If a student were enrolled for only one term, the 
student must have earned a minimum of 12 credits. 

If a student fails to meet either standard, the next term the student is enrolled the 
student will be granted aid on a probationary status. During a term in which a student is 
on financial aid probation, the student must complete a minimum of 1 2 credits and must 
earn a term GPA of 1 .67 to be considered in good standing and to be eligible to receive 
aid for the next term enrolled. If a student on financial aid probation does not complete 
these requirements, then the student's financial aid eligibility is terminated. 

Appeal. A student whose aid eligibility has been terminated after one semester of 
financial aid probation may submit an appeal in writing to Student Financial Services for 
a second term of financial aid probation. If during that second probation term the student 
fails to complete 12 credits and earn a term GPA of 1 .67, the student's aid eligibility is 
terminated, and the student may not appeal for another probationary aid term. In order 
to regain aid eligibility , the student must complete 1 2 credits with a 1 .67 term GPA using 
resources other than aid offered through Rice University to pay affiliated charges. 

Financial Aid After Suspension. Students who have been suspended by the 
University for academic reasons need to be aware that if they are readmitted by the 
Committee on Examinations and Standing they may not be eligible for financial aid based 
on their prior academic performance. Students who are petitioning for readmission are 
advised to contact Student Financial Services to determine their aid eligibility. 



58 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Return of Title IV Funds 

Students who receive federal funds as part of their aid packages and do not complete 
the academic term may be subject to returning a portion of those funds. Contact Student 
Financial Services for information about "Return of Title IV Funds" policies and 
procedures. 

Honor Societies 

Honor societies at Rice include the following: 

Phi Lambda Upsilon— national honorary chemical society promoting high schol- 
arship and original investigation in all branches of pure and applied chemistry 

(Rice chapter: 1926) 
Phi Beta Kappa— founded in 1 776 at the College of William and Mary to recognize 

intellectual achievement and the love of learning among students in the liberal 

arts and sciences (Rice chapter: March 1, 1929) 
Pi Delta Phi— organized to interest French students in competing for high standing 

in scholarship (Theta chapter at Rice: May 1930) 
Society of Sigma Xi— for the promotion of research in science (Beta of Texas 

chapter at Rice: March 23, 1938) 
Tau Beta Pi Association — organized to interest engineering students in competing 

for high standing in scholarship (Gamma of Texas chapter at Rice: December 

18, 1940) 
Delta Phi Alpha— to promote an interest in the German language and literature 

(Gamma Xi chapter at Rice: April 1949) 
Sigma Delta Pi —to promote an interest in the Spanish language and literature (Rice 

chapter: May 14, 1953) 
Tau Sigma Delta— national honor society in architecture and applied arts (Tau 

chapter at Rice: May 7. 1961) 
Eta Kappa Nu— founded in 1904 at the University of Illinois for electrical 

engineering students, to stimulate and reward scholarship as well as assist and 

encourage its members to grow professionally throughout their lives (Rice 

chapter: January 1981) 
Omicron Delta Epsilon— to promote study in economics (Rice chapter: 1981) 
Psi Chi— founded in 1929 at Yale University to encourage, stimulate, and maintain 

excellence in scholarship and to advance the science of psychology (Rice 

chapter: April 23, 1990) 

Undergraduate Student Life 

Residential Colleges 

All undergraduate students at Rice, whether they live on campus or not , are members 
of one of nine residential colleges. All colleges are coeducational. 

Each college has faculty masters who live in a house next to the college. Reporting 
to the vice president for student affairs, the masters have overall responsibility for all 
aspects of student life in the college, especially for encouraging broad cultural and 
intellectual interests and for promoting self-discipline and effective self-government 
within the college . Upon agreement , the students and masters invite other members of the 
Rice faculty to become resident and nonresident associates of the college. Faculty 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 59 

associates act as advisers to the students and participate in the various activities of the 
college. Colleges also have nonfaculty university associates and community associates 
drawn from various professions in the Houston area. 

Each college exists as a self-governing group of students. The elected officers and 
representatives are responsible to the masters and to the college membership for: 

• Directing the college's cultural, social, and athletic activities 

• Expenditure of college funds 

• Maintaining order in the college 

While uniformity among the colleges has never been sought and each college has 
developed its own particular interests and character, all seek to foster fellowship among 
their members and a mature sense of honor, responsibility, and sound judgment. 

College Assignment. Each undergraduate, upon acceptance by the university, is 
designated a member of one of the colleges. Two students entering Rice for the first time 
may request assignment to the same college, but they may not designate which college. 
New students may also request membership in the same college as a close relative . Except 
for these cases, students have no individual choice of college. 

Room and Board. College buildings include a dining hall and public rooms , which 
are available to both resident and nonresident members, and living quarters for approxi- 
mately 215 students from all classes and all academic disciplines. 

At present. Rice has room in its on-campus residential colleges for about 75 percent 
of its undergraduate students. Although most of the students who want to live in the 
colleges can be accommodated, demand usually exceeds the available number of rooms. 
The university makes every effort to provide housing in the colleges for all incoming 
first-year students who wish to live on campus, but space cannot be guaranteed. 
Continuing students draw for rooms according to the priority system established in each 
college. No student is required to live on campus; however, those members of the 
colleges who live off campus are encouraged to eat in their colleges and to participate in 
college activities. 

The College Food Service provides a la carte meals, with the exception of prepaid 
dinners. Its other services include: 

• Assistance with special diets prescribed by a physician 

• Sack lunches for students who must miss a meal due to a job conflict 

• Sick trays for students when requested by the Student Health Service 

• Alternate menu entrees, whenever possible, to accommodate students' religious 

practices 
For more information on room and board, see pages 52-53. 

College Courses. One of the colleges' important activities is their sponsorship of 
courses and workshops open to all students. By expanding course offerings outside the 
traditional departments, college courses promote the academic involvement of the 
colleges while introducing students to interdisciplinary topics of particular interest. 

Students propose college courses during the semester before they are offered. Once 
approved by the masters and faculty associates of the college and by the vice president 
for Student Affairs and the provost, these college courses are offered for academic credit 
on the same basis as departmental courses . The registrar provides a list of college courses 
each semester during preliminary registration. 

Student Government 

All undergraduates are members of the Rice Student Association , which is governed 
through the Student Senate. The senate includes the president, two vice presidents, the 
secretary, the treasurer, the nine college presidents, and nine college senators. 



60 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Alleged violations of university or college rules are handled in accordance with the 
Code of Student Conduct. In most cases, original jurisdiction belongs to student courts. 
Students may appeal verdicts to the college masters or the assistant dean for student 
judicial programs, as appropriate with a final appeal to the vice president for student 
affairs. The student-staffed Honor Council conducts hearings and trials for alleged 
offenses against the honor system (see page 8). Rice retains ultimate authority in all 
matters of discipline and over all actions that affect its educational function or the safety 
and well-being of members of the university community. 

Award Presentations. The Rice Student Association presents two coveted awards 
annually , one to a student and one to a faculty or staff member. The Rice Service Award, 
a memorial to Hugh Scott Cameron , first dean of students at Rice . is awarded to cuiTently 
enrolled or former members of the association who have rendered distinguished service 
to the student body . The Mentor Recognition Award recognizes extraordinary service to 
the student body by a current member of the faculty or staff. A committee of faculty and 
students appointed by the association makes the selections. 

Office of Student Activities 

The Office of Student Activities, located in the Rice Memorial Center cloisters, 
oversees the activities of various campuswide student organizations. It also handles 
student requests for facilities and party permits, and it coordinates leadership develop- 
ment programs, including the annual leadership retreat and symposium. 

Principal student organizations include the following: 

• Rice Student Association, the student governing body 

• Rice Program Council, which sponsors various events of current interest to the 

student body as well as social functions 

• KTRU, the student-run radio station, operating 24 hours, seven days a week, on 

91.7 FM 

• Student publications (e.g.. Rice Thresher, the student newspaper; Campanile, the 

yearbook; The Rice Undergraduate: The Annual Academic Review, a collec- 
tion of peer-reviewed student papers; and University Bhie, a literary and visual 
arts publication) 

A large number of student organizations address special student interests, such as 
the Black Student Association . the Hispanic Association for Cultural Education at Rice, 
the Chinese Student Association, Rice Young Democrats, and Rice Republicans. There 
also are numerous clubs for such sports as sailing , rugby , lacrosse, volleyball , and soccer. 
Other special-interest groups include a premed society, forensic society, juggling club, 
and vegetarian club. 

Many organizations are associated with special academic and professional disci- 
plines, such as foreign language clubs, honor societies, and student affiliates of the 
American Chemical Society , the American Society of Civil Engineers , and the American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers. 

The Rice Players, an extracunicular theater group of Rice students, faculty, and 
staff, present at least four productions each year and welcome participation by anyone 
interested in any aspect of theater production or management. 

Rice students also maintain affiliations with a number of religious organizations. 
These include, but are not limited to, the Baptist Student Union, Canterbury Association, 
Catholic Student Association, Christian Science Organization, Hillel Society, Lutheran 
Student Association, Intervarsity Christian Fellowship, and the Wesley Foundation. 
Many of these clubs are assisted by local clergy who form the Joint Campus Ministry. 



INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 61 

The Office of Student Organizations on the second floor of the Ley Student Center 
houses mailboxes for all student organizations. There is a student organization work 
space in the basement of the Rice Memorial Center that has office space, storage, and 
computers for student organization use. 

Community Involvement Center/Rice Student Volunteer Program 

Housed in the cloisters of the Rice Memorial Center, the Community Involvement 
Center works to develop a culture of service within the university by functioning as an 
advocate for community service, social responsibility, and an increased awareness of 
social and community issues. The center acts as a clearinghouse for resources and 
referrals involving local, national, and international community agencies and service 
opportunities. By making educational programs and information available, the center 
fosters a lifelong commitment to service among students, faculty, and staff. It also 
organizes alternative semester break service trips, volunteer fairs, beach cleanups, and 
other activities. The 10 student service organizations supported by the Community 
Involvement Center include Rice Habitat for Humanity, youth mentoring and tutoring 
programs, tutoring in English as a second language. Best Buddies, and the Rice Student 
Volunteer Program. 

By heightening student awareness of community needs and generally raising 
social consciousness, the Rice Student Volunteer Program (RSVP) has organized 
volunteer projects for Rice students, faculty, and staff since 1985. The largest event of 
each semester is Outreach Day, a Saturday when approximately 500 students volunteer 
with more than 30 nonprofit agencies throughout the Houston area, learning how to 
take thoughtful action to build a stronger, more just community. With an office in the 
cloisters of the Rice Memorial Center, RSVP invites each student's involvement as an 
officer, a college representative, a committee member, a project organizer, or an 
interested participant in any RSVP event. 

Intercollegiate Speech and Debate 

Consistently ranked in the top 10 nationally , the George R. Brown Forensic Society 
sponsors competition in the categories of Individual Events, Lincoln-Douglas, and 
Parliamentary Debate. The society provides students with the chance to hone their public 
speaking skills and to qualify for competition both at the American Forensic Association 
National Individual Events Tournament and at the National Parliamentary Debate 
Championships. Recognizing the importance of developing strong communication 
skills, the society has an open admissions policy, inviting students with little or no 
previous experience as well as those with extensive high school backgrounds to become 
members of one of the most successful teams at Rice. For more information on speech 
and debate, please go to http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~forensic/eventinfo/. 



62 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 










•■f^ 



IN FORMAT 
FORGRA 



[ 



STUDENTS 



64 

Introduction 



Since Rice opened in 1912, the university has recognized the importance of 
graduate study and research as a principal means of advancing knowledge. The first 
Doctor of Philosophy degree was awarded in 1918 in mathematics. Since that time, the 
graduate area has expanded to encompass the schools of architecture, engineering, 
humanities, management, music, natural sciences, and social sciences, as well as 
interdepartmental areas. The graduate program has steadily increased over time; Rice 
now enrolls approximately 1 ,900 graduate students and offers advanced degrees in 29 
fields of study. 

Graduate programs lead to either research or professional degrees. Research 
programs generally require the completion of a publishable thesis that represents an 
original and significant contribution to the particular field of study. Research degrees 
include the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Doctor of Architecture (D.Arch.), Master of 
Arts (M.A.), and Master of Science (M.S.). 

Professional programs provide advanced course work in several disciplines but 
do not generally include independent research. These programs lead to degrees in most 
of the major schools including many engineering disciplines. (See the Graduate Degree 
Chart and the Interdepartmental and Cooperative Programs Chart on pages 66-70 for a 
complete listing of degrees offered.) 

All degrees conferred by the university are awarded solely in recognition of 
educational attainments and not as warranty of future employment or admission to 
other programs of higher education. 

For additional information on graduate programs and requirements, please go to 
http://rgs.rice.edu. 



Admission to Graduate Study 



Graduate study is open to a limited number of extremely well-qualified students 
with a substantial background in their proposed field of study (this usually, though not 
always, means an undergraduate major in the field). Each department determines 
whether applicants have enough preparation to enter a given program, emphasizing the 
quality of their preparation rather than the particular academic program they completed 
or the credits they earned. 

Applicants for admission to graduate study should either contact the chair of the 
appropriate department for application forms and relevant information about the pro- 
gram or visit the department's website for on-line application information. The Gradu- 
ate Studies website, http://rgs.rice.edu, also has links to the graduate departments' 
websites. The Department Information Chart (pages 76-79) lists department chairs 
with department phone/fax numbers and e-mail addresses. Applicants should send all 
application materials, including transcripts and test scores, to the department chair. 

Application Process. An application for graduate study should include the com- 
pleted application form, the application fee, transcript(s), recommendations, and writ- 
ing samples, if required. Some departments require scores on the aptitude portion of the 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Graduate Management Admission Test 
(GMAT) and an appropriate advanced test; these should be sent directly to the admit- 
ting department. See individual departmental listings for specific requirement informa- 
tion. 

To make sure scores are available when admission decisions are normally made, 
applicants should take the GRE by the December before the fall for which they are 



INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 65 

applying. The application deadline for the fall semester is February 1. Some depart- 
ments, however, may specify an earlier deadline, and departments may occasionally 
consider late applications. 

Admission depends on students' previous academic records, available test scores, 
and letters of reference from scholars under whom they have studied. Writing samples, 
portfolios, or statements of purpose may also be required. In general, applicants should 
have at least a 3.00 (B) grade point average in undergraduate work. Applicants whose 
native language is not English must take the TOEFL test and should score at least 600 
on the paper-based TOEFL or at least 250 on the computer-based TOEFL. For those 
students who choose to take the lELTS in lieu of TOEFL, the minimum score is 7. The 
TOEFL and lELTS may be waived for an international student who has received a 
degree from a university in which English is the official language of communication. 

Graduate Degrees 

Research Degrees 

Research degrees are offered in six of the seven schools at Rice (the School of 
Management offers professional degrees only), with some degrees combining studies 
in more than one school. For general information on advanced degree work at Rice, see 
Requirements for Graduate Study (pages 70-72). Specific requirements for advanced 
research degrees in each field of study appear in the appropriate departmental pages 
(pages 87-262). Students seeking additional material should contact the appropriate 
department chair (see Department Information Chart on pages 76-79). 

PhJD. Programs. The Ph.D. degree is awarded for original studies in the depart- 
ments listed in the Graduate Degree and Interdepartmental and Cooperative Programs 
Charts (pages 66-70); in architecture, the equivalent degree is the D.Arch. Candidates 
receive a Ph.D. degree after successfully completing at least 90 semester hours of 
advanced study and concluding an original investigation that is formalized in an 
approved thesis. As final evidence of preparation for this degree, the candidate must 
pass a public oral examination. (See also Candidacy, Oral Examinations, and the 
Thesis Regulations on pages 72-74.) The residency requirement for the doctorate is 
four semesters of full-time study at the university. 

Master's Programs. The M.A. degree is available in the departments listed in the 
Graduate Degree and Interdepartmental and Cooperative Programs Charts (pages 66- 
70), including certain scientific fields of study. The M.S. degree is offered in the 
engineering and science fields also listed in the chart. Candidates may undertake the 
M.Arch., M.Arch. in Urban Design, and M.Mus. degrees as research degrees by 
adopting the thesis option. Candidates receive a master's degree after completing at 
least 30 semester hours of study (including thesis hours), 24 hours of which must be 
taken at Rice. Master's programs require original work reported in a thesis and a public 
oral examination. Most students take three or four semesters to complete a master's 
degree (some programs may require more time). Students receiving a master's degree 
must be enrolled in a graduate program at Rice University for at least one semester. 

Students may also pursue a nonthesis degree in certain departments. This degree 
would be based on alternative departmental requirements and would include, but not 
be limited to, the following: 

• 30 semester hours of study 

• 24 semester hours must be at Rice University 

• Minimum residency is one semester of full-time study 



66 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

• At least 15 hours of course work must be at or above the 500 level 

• All courses must be in the relevant field 

In certain departments, students may receive a master's degree (called an Auto- 
matic Master's) when they achieve candidacy for the doctoral degree. Students seeking 
a master's degree in this manner must submit a petition for the degree, signed by their 
department chair, to the Office of Graduate Studies by February 1 of the year in which 
the degree is to be awarded. (See also Candidacy , Oral Examinations, and the Thesis on 
pages 72-74.) 

Professional Degrees 

Rice University offers advanced degree programs to prepare students for positions 
in a number of professional fields. The professional degrees listed in the Introduction 
(page 64) appear in the Graduate Degree and Interdepartmental and Cooperative 
Programs Charts (pages 66-70). In some departments, the professional degree also 
prepares the student for a doctoral-level program. All professional degrees are master's 
degrees with one exception: candidates earn the D.M.A. after concluding a program of 
advanced music study. 

Requirements for professional degrees include the successful completion of 30 
semester hours or more of upper-level courses (at the 300 level or higher) with at least 
24 hours taken at Rice. Specific information and requirements for individual degrees 
appear in the Graduate Degree Chart (pages 66-69). Program information and applica- 
tion materials are also available from the department chairs (see Department Informa- 
tion Chart on pages 76-79). For general information on advanced degree work at Rice, 
see Requirements for Graduate Study (pages 70-71). 

Admission into a professional program is granted separately from admission into a 
research or thesis program. Students who wish to change from a thesis program to a 
professional degree program must petition their department in writing. Upon recom- 
mendation of the department and approval by the dean's office, the request is sent to 
the Office of Graduate Studies for consideration and final approval. If approved, 
students who received tuition waivers while enrolled in the thesis program will be 
expected to repay the tuition before their professional degrees are awarded. Profes- 
sional degree programs terminate when the degree is awarded. Students who wish to 
continue graduate study after completing a professional program must reapply for 
admission into a research program. 

GRADUATE DEGREE CHART 



School 
Department 



Graduate 
Degrees Offered 



Additional Options or Areas of 
Concentration (within majors) 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 



M.Arch.. M.Arch. in Urban 
Design, D.Arcli. 



GEORGE R. BROWN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 



Bioens^ineerinii 



M.S., Ph.D. 



Biochemical engineering, biological 
systems modeling, biomaterials, biomedical 
lasers, cellular and molecular engineering, 
controlled release technologies, metabolic 

engineering, phytoremediation, spectroscopy, 
systems engineering and instrumentation, 
thrombosis, tissue engineering, and transport 
processes. 



Chemical Engineering M.Ch.E., M.S., Ph.D. 



Thermodynamics and phase equilibria, chemical 
kinetics and catalysis, optimization and process 
control, rheology and fluid mechanics, polymer 
science, biomedical engineering, enhanced oil 
recovery and cleanup of groundwater aquifers, 
and biochemical reactor engineering 



INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 67 



School 
Department 



Graduate 
Degrees Offered 



Additional Options or Areas of 
Concentration (within majors) 



Civil and 

En%'ironmental 

Engineering 



M.C£.,M.E.E..M.E.S. 
M.S.,Ph.D. 



Civil engineering: structural dynamics and 
control, structures and mechanics, reinforced and 
prestressed concrete, geotechnical engineering, 
computer-aided engineering, probability and 
random \ ibrations, reliability of systems, and 
solid mechanics 

Environmental science: environmental biology, 
chemistry, toxicology, geology, and planning: 
surface and groundwater hydrology; water and 
wastewater treatment: and urban and regional air 
quality. Environmental engineering: hydrology 
and water resources engineering: water and 
wastewater treatment, design, and operation; 
and numerical modelins 



Computational and M .C .A .M . , M .C .S .E . 

Applied Mathematics M .A . , Ph .D . 



Numerical analysis, operations research, and 
differential equations: additional program in 
computational science and engineering (see 
Interdepartmental and Cooperative Programs) 



Computer Science M.C.S.. M.S., Ph.D. Algorithms and complexity, artificial intelligence 

and robotics, bioinfomiatics. compilers, distri- 
buted and parallel computation, graphics and 
visualization, operating systems, and 
programming languages 



Electncal and M.E.E., M.S., Ph.D. 

Computer Engineering 



Bioengineering. communication and signal 
processing, computer architecture and 
networking, electro-optics, and device physics 



Mechanical Engineering M .M .E . , M .M .S . , M .S . 
and Materials Science Ph.D. 



Mechanical engineering; mechanics, computa- 
tional mechanics, stochastic mechanics, fluid 
dynamics, heat transfer, dynamics and control, 
robotics, biomedical systems, and aerospace 
sciences. Materials science: nanotechnology, 
metals physics, statistical mechanics, metallic 
solid thermodynamics, materials chemistry, 
asjjects of composites, coatings and thin films, 
and interface science 



Statistics 



M.Stat.. M.A., Ph.D. Applied probability. Bayesian methods. 

bioinformatics, biomathematics. biostatistics, 
data analysis, data mining, density estimation, 
epidemiology, environmental statistics, financial 
statistics, image processing, model building, 
nonparametric function estimation, quality 
control, risk management, spatial temporal 
statistics, statistical computing, statistical 
genetics, statistical visualization, stochastic 
processes, and time series analysis 



SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES 

English M.A.. 


, Ph.D. 


British and Amencan literature and literary 
theory 


French Studies 


M.A.. 


,Ph.D. 


French literature, language, and culture 


Hispanic Studies 


M.A. 




Spanish language and literature 


History 


MA., 


, Ph.D. 


U.S.. European, and other history 



Linguistics 



M.A.,Ph.D. 



Anthropological, applied, cognitive, field, 
functional or discourse, and English. German, 
or Romance linguistics; second language 
acquisition; and language typology and 
universals 



Philosophy 



M.A., Ph.D. 



Specialization in medical ethics 



Religious Studies 



MA., PhD. 



Religion and contemporary cultures; scriptural 
interpretation; ethics and philosophy of religion; 
mysticism, psychology, and religious practices 



68 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 



School 
Department 



Graduate 
Degrees Offered 



Additional Options or Areas of 
Concentration (within majors) 



JESSE H. JONES GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT 



M.B.A., M.B.A. is a general management degree; 

M.B. A ./Master of Engineering however, students may have informal 
M.B.A./M.D. (with Baylor concentrations in the following areas: 
College of Medicine) accounting, entrepreneurship, finance, 

M.B.A. for Executives general management, international business, 

information technology, marketing, operations 
management, organizational behavior and 
human resource management, healthcare 
management, and strategic management and 
planning; joint nonthesis degree option with 
all engineering disciplines 



SHEPHERD SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

B.Mus./M.Mus., M.Mus. 



D.M.A. 



Composition, choral and instrumental 
conducting, historical musicology, performance, 
and music theory 
Composition and selected areas of performance 



WIESS SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCES 

Biochemistry and M.A.. Ph.D. 

Cell Biology 



Biochemistry, biophysics, developmental 
biology, cell biology, genetics, molecular 
biology, neurobiology, structure and function of 
nucleic acids and proteins, regulatory processes, 
biochemistry of lipids, enzymology , NMR and 
crystallography, cellular regulation, oxygen and 
electron transport, molecular genetics of plants, 
animals, fungi, bacteria, and bacteriophage 



Chemistry 



M.A.,Ph.D. 



Organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, 
physical chemistry, nanotechnology, 
biological chemistry, theoretical 
and computational chemistry, materials 
chemistry, bio-organic chemistry, and 
bioinorganic chemistry 



Ecology and 
Evolutionary Biology 



M.A.,Ph.D. 



Biogeochemistry, wetland ecology, plant 
community and population ecology, insect 
diversity and community structure, behavioral 
ecology, sociobiology, and molecular evolution 



Earth Science 



M.A.,Ph.D. 



Marine geology and geophysics; sedimentology, 
stratigraphy, paleoceanography. paleoclimatol- 
ogy, evolution of continental margins and 
carbonate platforms; tectonics, neotectonics, 
tectonophysics, geodynamics, mantle processes, 
planetology, and space geodesy; remote sensing, 
potential fields, reflection and lithospheric 
seismology, global seismology, wave propaga- 
tion and inverse theory; kinetics of fluid-solid 
interactions, low T aqueous geochemistry, 
petrology, and high T geochemistry 



Mathematics 



M.A..Ph.D. 



Differential and algebraic geometry, ergodic 
theory, partial differential equations, probability 
and combinatorics, real analysis, complex 
variables, and geometric and algebraic topology 



Physics and Astronomy M.A., M.S., Ph.D. 



Atomic and molecular physics, biophysics, 
particle physics, condensed matter physics, 
surface physics, space physics, astronomy, 
astrophysics, and theoretical physics 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Anthropology M.A.,Ph.D. 



Archaeology and social/cultural anthropology 



Economics 



M.A.,Ph.D. 



Econometrics, economic development, economic 
theory, industrial organization and regulation, 
international trade and finance, labor, 
macroeconomics/monetary theory, and 
public finance 



INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 69 



School 
Department 


Graduate 
Degrees Offered 


Additional Options or .Areas of 
Concentration (within majors) 


Political Science 


M.A..Ph.D. 


American go\emment. comparative government. 
and international relations 


Psychology 


M.A.. Ph.D. 


Cognitive-experimental psychology and 
industrial-organizational/social psychology, with 
tracks in engineering psychology, human- 
computer interaction, and neuropsychology 



Interdepartmental and Cooperative Programs 

Opportunities for graduate study are available in a number of interdisciplinary 
areas. The advanced degree programs listed in the Interdepartmental and Cooperative 
Programs Chart (below) are administered by the participating Rice departments. They 
represent fields of study in rapidly developing areas of science and engineering or those 
areas subject to multiple investigations and interests. Rice has also established ties with 
other Houston universities and the Texas Medical Center to enable graduate students to 
receive training in computational biology research, to earn separate degrees simulta- 
neously, or to focus their doctoral study on the specialized field of medical ethics. 

INTERDEPARTMENTAL AND COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS CHART 



Program 



Degrees Offered 



Departments/Areas of Concentration 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS 

Applied Physics Master's. Ph.D. 



Departments in physics and astronom\ . 
chemistry, electrical and computer engineering, 
mechanical engineering and materials sciences, 
bioengineering, computational and applied 
mathematics, and civil and environmental 
engineering: sciences that underlie important new 
and emerging technologies. Contact: Rice 
Quantumlnstitute. 713-348-6356 or 
quantum® rice .edu. 



Computational Science 
and Enaineerina 



Master's. Ph.D. 



Modem computational techniques and use of 
powerful, new computers in research, develop- 
ment, and design involving the following 
departments: computational and applied 
mathematics, biochemistr}' and cell biology, 
geology and geophysics, computer science, 
chemical engineering, electrical and computer 
engineering, and statistics. Contact: 
713-348-4805 or caam@caam.rice.edu. 



Education Certification M.A.T. 



Secondary teaching certification in conjunction 
with B.A. in major field 



Environmental Analysis M.S. 
and Decision Makina 



Departments in computational and applied math- 
ematics, statistics, civil and environmental 
engineering, chemistry, earth science, ecology 
and e\olutionary biology, mechanical 
engineering and materials science, chemical 
engineering, sociology, electrical and computer 
engineering, management, and natural sciences. 
Contact Professional Master's Program: 713-348- 
3 1 88 or profms@rice.edu. 



Materials Science and 
Engineering 



Master's. Ph.D. 



Departments in chemistry, electrical and 
computer engineering, mechanical engineering 
and materials sciences, chemical engineering, 
and physics. Contact: 713-348-4906 or 
mems@rice.edu. 



70 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Program 



Degrees Offered 



Departments/Areas of Concentration 



Nanoscale Physics M.S. 



Departments in physics and astronomy, electrical 
and computer engineering, chemistry, 
management, and natural sciences. Contact 
Professional Master's Program: 713-348-3188 or 
profms@rice.edu. 



Subsurface Geoscience M.S. 



Departments in earth science, chemistry, 
statistics, management, sociology, and natural 
sciences. Contact Professional Master's Program: 
713-348-3188 orprofms@rice.edu. 



Systems Theory Master's, Ph.D. 



Departments in chemical engineering, 
mechanical engineering and materials sciences, 
economics, electrical and computer engineering, 
and mathematics. Contact: 713-348-4020 or 
elec@rice.edu. 



COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS 

Joint Programs in M.A., Ph.D. 

Biomedical Ethics 



Religious studies degree with the University 
of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. 
Contact: 713-348-5201 orreli@rice.edu 
Philosophy degree with the Baylor College of 
Medicine and the Institute of Religion. Contact: 
713-348-4994 or phil@rice.edu. 



Joint Program in Training opportunities 

Computational Biology for Ph.D. students 



Research in a lab setting, seminars and work- 
shops, and access to advanced resources of 
W.M. Keck Center for Computational Biology 
(fellowships available); with Baylor College of 
Medicine and the University of Houston. 
Contact: 713-348-4752 or bioc@rice.edu. 



Joint Programs with M.D./Ph.D., M.D./M.A. 

Medical Colleges M.D./M.S. 



Combined M.D. and advanced research degree 
for research careers in medicine; with Baylor 
College of Medicine. Contact: 713-348-5869 
or bioeng@rice.edu. 



Academic Regulations 



Requirements for Graduate Study 

Graduate students must meet the following minimums, deadlines, and course or 
grade requirements to graduate in good standing from the university. Some depart- 
ments may have stricter policies and/or requirements. 

Residency— Master's students must complete at least one semester enrolled in a 
graduate program at Rice University. Ph.D. students must be enrolled at least 
four semesters in full-time study at Rice University. 

Full-time study — Semester course load for full-time students is 9 hours, or more as 
required by specific departments. Graduate programs at Rice generally require 
full-time study. 

Part-time study— Admission of part-time students requires departmental permis- 
sion, and students must register for at least 3 hours in a semester. All time-to- 
degree requirements apply to part-time students. 

Time to degree— Ph.D. students are required to complete their program, including 
thesis defense, within ten years of initial enrollment in the degree program. 
Master's students are required to complete their program, including thesis 
defense, within five years of initial enrollment. In both cases, students have a 
limit of six additional months from the date of defense to submit their theses to 
the Office of Graduate Studies. These time boundaries include any period in 
which the student was not enrolled or enrolled part-time, for whatever reason. 



INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 7 1 

Time to candidacy— Ph.D. students must be approved for candidacy before the 
beginning of the ninth semester of their residency at Rice. Masters students 
must be approved for candidacy before the beginning of the fifth semester of 
their residency at Rice. 

Time to defense— Ph.D . students must defend their theses before the end of the 1 6th 
semester of their residency at Rice. Masters students must defend their theses 
before the end of the eighth semester of their residency at Rice. 

Time to thesis submission— After candidates successfully pass the oral examina- 
tion in defense of the thesis, they must submit two signed copies of the thesis 
to the Office of Graduate Studies no later than six months from the date of the 
examination. 

Credit for previous degrees— For students who enter a doctoral program with a 
master's degree, completed at Rice or elsewhere, departments should deter- 
mine the amount of previous work, if any. that will be counted from the 
master's degree at issue toward the doctoral degree. Any such credit of 
one semester or more toward doctoral requirements will result in an equal 
reduction of the time allowed for (1) the achievement of candidacy, (2) the 
defense of the Ph.D. thesis, and (3) the total time to the doctoral degree. The 
maximum credit allowed for students with master's degrees from Rice will be 
six semesters, and the maximum credit allowed for students with master's 
degrees from outside Rice will be two semesters. 

Minimum hours— Students must register for at least 3 hours in a semester. 

Course registration— Students may register for courses of study and drop or add 
courses only with the approval of their adviser or the department chair. 

Deadlines— Students must observe all deadlines listed in the Academic Calendar 
(pages viii-xiii). 

Grades— To graduate, students must achieve at least a B- (2.67) grade point 
average in courses counted toward the graduate degree. Some programs and 
departments have more stringent standards. To compute grade point averages, 
the credits attempted in semester hours for each course and the points for the 
grade earned (from A+ =4.33toF = .00) are multiplied , then the products (one 
for each course) are added together and the sum is divided by the total credits 
attempted. See also Probationary Status (page 75). 

Pass/Fail— All students, except Class III students, may take course(s) Pass/Fail 
outside their department. They must file a course as Pass/Fail no later than the 
end of the 10th week of classes; however, they may later convert a Pass/Fail 
to a graded course by filing the appropriate paperwork with the registrar. 
Students should be aware that while a grade of P does not affect their Grade 
Point Average, a grade of F does. 

Satisfactory /Unsatisfactory— Some departments may assign a grade of S or U. 
Students should be aware that while a grade of S or U does not affect their Grade 
Point Average, no credit will be awarded if a grade of U is received. 

Departmental duties— In most research degree programs, students must under- 
take a limited amount of teaching or perform other services as part of their 
training. Assigned duties should not entail more than 10 hours per week, 
averaged over the semester, or extend over more than eight semesters. 

Employment— Students receiving a stipend may accept employment only with the 
approval of their home academic department. Students working for more than 20 
hours per week are not normally eligible for full-time status. 

Continuous enrollment— Students must maintain continuous program involve- 
ment and enrollment unless granted an official leave of absence. See Leaves or 
Withdrawals (page 74) for more information. 



72 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Candidacy, Oral Examinations, and the Thesis 

Approval of Candidacy. Candidacy marks a midpoint in the course of graduate 
education. Achieving candidacy for the Ph.D. implies that a graduate student has: 
(a) completed required course work, (b) passed required exams to demonstrate his/her 
comprehensive grasp of the subject area, (c) demonstrated the ability for clear oral and 
written communication, and (d) shown the ability to carry on scholarly work in his/her 
subject area. Requirements for achieving candidacy for the thesis Masters degree are 
determined at the departmental level. Students enrolled in research degree programs 
submit their petitions for candidacy for a master's or doctoral degree through the 
department chair to the vice provost for research and graduate studies. In the petition 
sent to the vice provost, the department chair identifies the student's thesis director, 
recommends a thesis committee, certifies that the applicant has fulfilled the departmen- 
tal requirements, and provides a course transcript as evidence that work completed 
within the department is of high quality. 

Students must file their applications for approval of Ph.D. and M. A ./M.S. candidacy 
in the Office of Graduate Studies on or before November 1 for mid-year conferral and on 
or before February 1 for May commencement . Students may take the final oral examination 
in defense of their thesis only after the vice provost for research and graduate studies 
approves their candidacy. Ph.D. students must be approved for candidacy before the 
beginning of the ninth semester of their residency at Rice. Master's students must be 
approved for candidacy before the beginning of the fifth semester of their residency at Rice . 

Thesis Committee. The thesis committee administers the oral examination for the 
student's thesis defense and has final approval/disapproval authority and responsibility 
for the written thesis. 

A thesis committee is composed of at least three members. Two, including the 
committee chair, must be members of the student's department faculty; in doctoral 
thesis committees, one member must be from another department within the university. 
At least three members of the committee must meet one of the following requirements: 

• Tenured or tenure-track members of the Rice faculty 

• Research faculty holding the rank of faculty fellow, senior faculty fellow, or 

distinguished faculty fellow 

• Faculty who have been certified as thesis committee members by the vice provost 

for research and graduate studies 
The committee chair need not be the thesis director. The chair, however, must be either 
a tenured or tenure-track member of the major department or a research faculty member 
of the major department. Additional members of the committee, who may or may not 
meet the above criteria, may be selected with the approval of the department chair. 
These would be in addition to the three required members. 

Candidates are responsible for keeping the members of their committee informed 
about the nature and progress of their research. They also must establish a schedule for 
thesis completion and review. The members of the committee, in turn, should review 
the thesis in a timely manner, approving a preliminary form of the thesis before 
scheduling the oral examination. 

Oral Examination in Defense of Thesis. The public oral defense of a thesis is 
intended to be an examination of a completed body of work and should be scheduled only 
when the dissertation is essentially completed. The defense should be scheduled by the 
student after consultation with the thesis adviser, who agrees that the thesis is completed 
and ready to be defended. All members of the thesis committee must be present for the oral 
defense. A candidate must be enrolled in the semester in which his or her oral examination 
is held. For the purpose of the oral defense only, enrollment in a semester is considered 



INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 73 

valid through the Friday of the first week of class of the following semester. 

At least one copy of the thesis must be available in the departmental office not less 
than two calendar weeks prior to the date of the oral defense. Oral examinations for the 
doctoral degree must be announced in Rice News at least one week in advance. Oral 
examination announcements can be submitted to Rice News by entering the informa- 
tion into the Rice Info online events calendar. (Specific instructions and the password 
needed for a calendar submission should be requested by sending e-mail to 
graduate@rice.edu when the student has set the date for the defense. The words "Rice 
News defense announcement" need to appear in the subject line of the e-mail.) When 
the event is entered into the events calendar, an automatically generated e-mail will be 
sent to Rice News with the infonnation for the Rice News calendar. 

Students should note that material printed in Rice News must be submitted at least 
two weeks before publication; the Rice News calendar editor can provide specific 
submission dates. Ph.D. candidates therefore should begin scheduling their oral de- 
fenses at least three weeks in advance. Should an oral examination for the Ph.D. fall 
during the summer, the posting of a notice in the Ricelnfo events calendar, at least one 
week prior to the defense, suffices as a public announcement. 

Oral examinations for the master's degree require only that public notice of the 
oral defense be posted on the department bulletin board one week in advance. 

The length of the oral examination and the subject matter on which the candidate 
is questioned are left to the judgment of the committee. After candidates successfully 
pass the oral examination in defense of the thesis, they must submit two signed copies 
of the thesis to the Office of Graduate Studies no later than six months from the date of 
the examination. If the thesis is not ready for final signature by the end of the six-month 
period, the "pass" will be revoked and an additional oral defense will need to be 
scheduled. Extensions of this six-month period for completion without reexamination 
will be granted only in rare circumstances. Applications for an extension must be made 
by the candidate with the unanimous support of the thesis committee and approved by 
the Office of Graduate Studies. Students passing the oral examination on or before the 
end of the first week of classes of any semester do not have to register for that or any 
subsequent semester even though they may be continuing to make minor revisions to 
the final copy of their thesis. 

Should a candidate fail, the committee chair may schedule a second examination. 
Students who fail a second time must withdraw from the university. 

Students must send a copy of their approval of candidacy form, signed by the 
thesis committee signifying successful defense of the thesis, to the Office of Graduate 
Studies within one week after the oral examination. The original approval of candidacy 
form must be turned in when the thesis is submitted. 

Ph.D. students must defend their theses before the end of the 16th semester of their 
residency at Rice. Master's students must defend their theses before the end of the 
eighth semester of their residency at Rice. 

Thesis Regulations and Procedures. The thesis is the principal record of a 
student's work for an advanced degree. It is permanently preserved in the library. 
Instructions for thesis submission and guidelines for thesis formatting are provided by 
the Office of Graduate Studies at the time of approval of candidacy. Additional copies 
of these instructions are available from the graduate studies office and can also be 
accessed on the Rice website at: http://rgs.rice.edu/grad/policies/thesis. 

Students must have the original signatures of their thesis committee on two title 
pages of their dissertation. Students submitting a dissertation for the Ph.D., D. Arch., or 
D.M.A. must fill out a Survey of Earned Doctorates form. All students submitting 
theses, whether for master's or doctoral degrees, must complete a University Microfilm 
contract. Students must pay their fees for microfilming and binding their theses to the 



74 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

cashier before submitting the two copies to the Office of Graduate Studies for approval. 
The thesis may be submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies at any time; however 
students must meet the deadline for the thesis submission listed in the Academic 
Calendar (pages viii-xiii). 

Leaves or Withdrawals 

Leave of Absence. A leave of absence is granted only by the Office of Graduate 
Studies upon the recommendation of the department chair and only to graduate students 
in good standing with the university . Students must obtain approval for a leave before the 
academic semester in question. These requests, approved by the department, must be 
received in the Office of Research and Graduate Studies prior to the first day of classes. 

Leaves are not granted after students register for courses or after the registration 
period passes. Normally, students may take a leave of absence for no more than two 
consecutive semesters. Students must pay a reinstatement fee of $85 upon their return 
from an official leave. 

Withdrawal and Readmission. Students who wish to withdraw from Rice during 
the semester, for any reason, are to notify the chair of their academic department in 
writing (see Refund of Tuition and Fees, pages 52-53). Failure to register for any 
period without a leave of absence granted by the Office of Graduate Studies constitutes 
a de facto withdrawal. 

The university may insist on a student's involuntary withdrawal if. in the judge- 
ment of the vice provost for research and graduate studies, the student; 

• Poses a threat to the lives or safety of him/herself or other members of the Rice 

community 

• Has a medical or psychological problem that cannot be properly treated in the 

university setting 

• Has a medical condition or demonstrates behavior that seriously interferes with the 

education of other members of the Rice community 

Students who later wish to resume study, whether after voluntary or involuntary 
withdrawal, must reapply to the university. Readmission requires the recommendation 
of the department chair and the approval of the vice provost for research and graduate 
studies. Accepted students must pay a readmission fee of $290. 

Students who withdraw for medical reasons must meet certain conditions when 
applying for readmission. They must submit a written petition for readmission to the 
Office of Graduate Studies at least one month before the start of the semester in which 
they wish to resume their work at Rice. They must also provide evidence from a health 
professional that they have resolved the problems leading to their withdrawal. Some 
cases may require an interview with the director of the Rice Counseling Center, with 
the director of Student Health Services or their designees. 

Nonenrollment. Students may not do degree work at Rice or work involving Rice 
faculty or facilities during any period of nonenrollment, except during the period 
following successful oral defense prior to submission of the final thesis. 

Drop/Add 

During the first two weeks of classes, all students may change their registration 
without a penalty fee by adding or dropping courses with the appropriate adviser's 
approval. Students must obtain the instructor's permission and the adviser's approval 
to add a course after the second week of classes. Students may not add courses after the 
fourth week of classes without the permission of the Office of Graduate Studies. 



INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 75 

Students may not drop courses after the end of the 10th week of classes, except by 
approval of the Office of Graduate Studies (a $50 fee is assessed for courses dropped 
after the 10th week by non-first-semester students). The student is to prepare a written 
petition that must be approved by the student's adviser and department chair and then 
forwarded to the vice provost for consideration. 

Students who add or drop courses after the second week but before the deadlines 
noted above are charged for each drop/add form submitted according to the fee 
schedule (see page 31). 

Academic Discipline 

Probationary Status. Students whose cumulative grade point average or the 
average for the most recently completed semester falls below 2.33 are placed on 
probationary status; some departments may have more stringent standards. Although 
the department in most cases sends the student a letter of warning, probationary status 
applies whether or not a letter has been issued. A second semester of probationary 
status leads to automatic dismissal by the Office of Graduate Studies unless the 
student's department presents a plea for exception that is approved by the vice provost 
for research and graduate studies. Departments are free to dismiss a student in the first 
semester of probationary status if they issue a warning before taking action. 

Dismissal. Reasons for student dismissal include unsatisfactory progress as deter- 
mined by the student's department or behavior judged by Rice to be disruptive or 
otherwise contrary to the best interests of either the university or the student. 

Appeal 

Students may petition the Office of Graduate Studies regarding the application of 
any academic regulation. Petitions should go through department chairs and divisional 
deans, who will be asked to comment on their merits. In some cases, the vice provost 
will seek the advice of the Graduate Council. For appeals regarding nonacademic 
matters, see the following section on problem resolution. 

Other Disciplinary Sanctions 

Additionally, the assistant dean of Student Judicial Programs may place students 
on probation or suspension for violating the Honor Code or Code of Student Conduct or 
for other disciplinary reasons. Students on disciplinary suspension (including for an 
Honor System violation) may not receive their degree even if they have met all 
academic requirements for graduation. They must leave the university within 48 hours 
of being informed of the dean's decision, though in cases of unusual hardship, the 
assistant dean of Student Judicial Programs may extend the deadline to one week. Any 
tuition refund will be prorated from the official date of suspension, which is determined 
by the registrar. While on disciplinary suspension, students may not run for, or hold, 
any elective or appointed office in any official Rice organization. Participation in 
student activities on and off campus and use of Rice facilities are limited to enrolled 
students. Students seeking admission after leaving the university because of a sanction 
imposed by the assistant dean should submit a petition in writing for review by the 
assistant dean. 

Procedures for Resolution of Problems 

Problems or conflicts may arise during a student's graduate education. Students 
should take responsibility for informing the appropriate faculty of any such problem. 



76 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

All parties involved should work together amicably with the goal of resolving the 
problem informally if at all possible. When attempts to resolve a problem informally do 
not meet with success, the following grievance procedure should be adopted. 

1 . The student should submit the grievance in writing to the departmental chair, 
who will then attempt to resolve the problem. 

2. If the student remains unsatisfied, the problem should be presented to a depart- 
mental committee for resolution. This committee should be a standing committee and 
not the student's own review or dissertation committee. Both the student and the chair 
should submit a written record of their views to this committee. 

3. If the student remains unsatisfied, the problem should be referred to a standing 
subcommittee designed at Graduate Council and composed of three faculty members 
(representing diverse disciplines within the university), one graduate student and the 
associate dean for graduate studies. A written report of proceedings at stage two should 
be presented to the chair of graduate council, for forwarding to the subcommittee, 
together with all other written materials generated during the investigation. The deci- 
sion of this subcommittee will be considered final. 

DEPARTMENT INFORMATION CHART 



Department Chair 



Phone, Fax, E-Mail, URL Faculty Research Interests 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 

Lars Lerup (Dean) 713-348-4044 

fax:713-348-5277 
John J. Casbarian arch@rice.edu 

(Associate Dean) 713-348-5152 

www .arch .rice .edu/flash/ 



Architecture design, urbanism. theory, 
and practice 



Bioengineering: 
David Heliums 



GEORGE R. BROWN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

713-348-5869 Biochemical engineering, biological systems 

fax: 713-348-5877 modeling, biomaterials, biomedical lasers, 

bioeng@rice.edu cellular and molecular engineering, controlled 

dacnet.rice.edu/~bioe/ release technologies, metabolic engineering, 

spectroscopy, systems engineering and 
instrumentation, thrombosis, tissue engineering, 
and transport processes 



Chemical Engineering: 
Kyriacos Zygourakis 



713-348-4902 

fax:713-348-5478 

ceng@rice.edu 

www .ruf .rice .edu/~che/ 



Transport and interfacial phenomena, 
thermodynamics, catalysis and reactor design, 
optimization and process control, rheology and 
fluid mechanics, polymer science, biomedical 
engineering, enhanced oil recovery and cleanup 
of ground- water aquifers, biochemical reactor 
engineering 



Civil and 
Environmental 
Engineering: 
Herb Ward 



713-348-4949 
fax:713-348-5268 
civi@rice.edu 
www.nif.rice.edu/~ceedept/ 



Structural and foundation dynamics 
(e.g., earth-quake and offshore engineering), 
structural control, reinforced and prestressed 
concrete structures, application of probability 
theory to structural dynamics, experimental 
studies of structures, geotechnical engineering, 
and computer-aided engineering 

Surface and groundwater hydrology, biochemical 
process engineering, aquatic chemistry, environ- 
mental microbiology, physical-chemical pro- 
cesses, membrane processes, colloid chemistry, 
GIS and contaminant transport modeling, urban 
and regional air quality, earth systems, and 
environmental law 



Computational and 713-348-4805 Operations research, mathematical program- 

Applied Mathematics: fax: 713-.M8-5318 ming, discrete and continuous optimization. 

Bill Symes caam@rice.edu numerical liner algebra, inverse problems, 

www.caam.rice.edu/ computational seismology, optimal design, partial 

differential equations, and numerical analysis 



INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 77 



Department Chair 



Phone, Fax, E-Mail, URL Faculty Research Interests 



Computer Science: 
Keith Cooper 



713-348-4834 
fax:713-348-5930 
comp@rice.edu 
www.cs.rice.edu/ 



Algorithms and complexity, artificial intelli- 
gence and robotics, compilers, distributed and 
parallel computation, graphics and visualization 
operating systems and programming languages 



Electrical and 
Computer Engineering: 
Don H.Johnson 



713-348-4020 
fax: 713-348-5686 
elec@rice.edu 
www .ece .rice .edu 



Bioengineering, communications and signal 
processing, computer architecture and net- 
working, electro-optics, and device physics 



Mechanical Engineering 
and Materials Science: 
Tayfun Tezduyar 



713-348-4906 Mechanical engineering: mechanics, computa- 

mems@rice.edu tional mechanics, stochastic mechanics, fluid 

www.mems.rice.edu/ dynamics, heat transfer, dynamics and control, 

robotics, biomedical systems, and aerospace 
sciences. Materials science: nanotechnology, 
metals physics, statistical mechanics, metallic 
solid thermodynamics, materials chemistry, 
aspects of composites, coatings and thin films, 
and interface science 



Statistics: 
Katherine B. Ensor 



713-348-6032 
fax:713-348-5476 
stat@rice.edu 
www .Stat .rice .edu/ 



Applied probability, Bayesian methods, 
bioinformatics, biomathematics, biostatistics, 
data analysis, data mining, density estimation, 
epidemiology, environmental statistics, financial 
statistics, image processing, model building, 
nonparametric function estimation, quality 
control, risk management, spatial temporal 
statistics, statistical computing, statistical 
genetics, statistical visualization, stochastic 
processes, and time series analysis 



SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES 

Education: 713-348-4826 

WW .dacnet .rice .edu/Depts 
/Education/ 



Secondary education 

(See Education Certification below) 



English: 
Susan Wood 



713-348-4840 
fax:713-348-5991 
engl@rice.edu 
english.rice.edu/ 



Medieval through 20th-century English 
literature, American literature, and theoretical 
bases of literary criticism and genre theory 



French Studies: 
Michel Achard 



713-348-4851 

fax:713-348-5951 

fren@rice.edu 

www .ruf .rice .edu/~fren/ 



Medieval through contemporary literature, 
French literary theory, philosophy, and French 
cultural history 



Hispanic Studies 
Maarten Van Delden 



713-348-5451 
fax:713-348-4863 
span@rice.edu 
hispanicstudies.rice.edu 



Medieval, golden age, and modem peninsular 
Spanish literature, modem Spanish American 
literature, Hispanic linguistics, second language 
acquisition, and semiotics and literary theory 



History: 

Peter Carl Caldwell 



Religious Studies: 
William B. Parsons 



713-348-4948 
fax: 713-348-5207 
hist@rice.edu 
history.rice.edu/ 



Ancient, medieval history, modem British, 
French. German, and Balkan history, American 
Colonial history. Old and New South and Civil 
War history, legal, constitutional, intellectual, 
and recent history, military history, history of 
science, and East Asian and Latin 
American history 



Linguistics: 713-348-6010 General and cognitive-functional linguistics, 

Masayoshi Shibatani fax: 713-348-4718 syntax and semantics, discourse analysis, 

ling@mf.rice.edu typology, language description and change, 

linguistics.rice.edu/ and computational linguistics 

Philosophy: 7 1 3-348-4994 History of philosophy, metaphysics, ethics, 

Steven Crowell philos@rice.edu medical ethics, social and political philosophy. 

philosophy.rice.edu and philosophy of law, language, and science 



713-348-5201 
fax:713-348-5486 
reli@rice.edu 
reli.rice.edu/ 



Theological and medical ethics. New Testament 
and early Christianity, Indo-Tibetan thought and 
practice, history of Christianity, contemporary 
continental philosophy of religion, and 
psychology of religion, Judaism, and Islam 



78 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Department Chair 



Phone, Fax, E-Mail, URL Faculty Research Interests 



JESSE H. JONES GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT 

Gilbert R. 713-348-4838 Earnings management, change communication, 

Whitalcer, Jr. (Dean) fax: 7 1 3-348-525 1 financial reporting, accounting standard setting 



Robert A. Westbrook 
(Associate Dean) 
Wilfred C. Uecker 
(Associate Dean) 



ricemba@rice.edu 
jonesgsm.rice.edu/ 

713-348-5396 

fax:713-348-5251 

713-348-6060 

fax:713-348-5131 

oed@rice.edu 



in different countries, stock market volatility, 
corporate governance, strategic management, 

decision making, corporate finance, securities 
markets, marketing strategy, customer satis- 
faction, corporate performance measurement, 
customer choice and attitude models, new 
product diffusion models, service operations, 
management, computer-human interaction, 
international business and trade, business- 
government relationships, leadership, firm 
valuation, brand equity, and business ethics 



SHEPHERD SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Robert Yekovich 7 1 3-348-4854 

(Dean) fax:713-348-5317 

musi@rice.edu 
www.ruf.rice.edu/~musi/ 



Orchestral studies, performance, conducting, 
composition, theory, and music history 



WIESS SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCES 

Biochemistry and 7 1 3-348-40 1 5 

Cell Biology: fax:713-348-5154 

Frederick Rudolph bioc@rice.edu 

dacnet .rice .edu/~bioc/ 



Biochemistry, biophysics, developmental 
biology, cell biology, genetics, molecular 
biology, neurobiology, structure and function of 
nucleic acids and proteins, regulatory processes, 
biochemistry of lipids, enzymology, NMR and 
crystallography, cellular regulation, oxygen and 
electron transport, and molecular genetics of 
plants, animals, fungi, bacteria, and bacteriophage 



Chemistry: 713-348-5650 Synthesis and biosynthesis of organic natural 

Kenton Whitmire fax: 713-348-5155 products, synthesis of small cycloalkanes, 

chem@rice.edu molecular recognition and biological catalysis, 

www.chem.rice.edu/ bioinorganic and organometallic chemistry, main 

group element and transition metal chemistry, 
high-pressure and high-temperature cheinistry, 
fluorine chemistry, chemical vapor deposition, 
design of nanophase solids, molecular photo- 
chemistry and photophysics. infrared kinetic 
spectroscopy, laser and NMR spectroscopy, study 
of oriented molecular beams, theoretical and 
computational chemistry, and study of giant 
fullerene molecules, carbon nanotubes and 
their derivatives, polymer synthesis and 
characterization, molecular electronics, and 
molecular machines 



Ecology and 
Evolutionary Biology: 
Ronald Sass 



713-348-4919 
fax:713-348-5232 
eeb@rice.edu 
eeb.rice.edu/ 



Biogeochemistry, wetland ecology, plant 
community and population ecology, behavioral 
ecology, sociobiology, molecular evolution, 
insect diversity, and community structure 



Earth Science: 
Alan Levander 



713-348-4 
fax:713-348-5214 
geol@rice.edu 
earthscience .rice .edu/ 



Marine geology and geophysics; sedimentology, 
stratigraphy, paleoceanography. palioclimatol- 
ogy, evolution of continental margins and 
carbonate platforms; tectonics, neotectonics, 
tectonophysics, geodynamics, mantle processes, 
planetology, and space geodesy; remote sensing, 
potential fields, reflection and lithospheric 
seismology, global seismology, wave propagation 
and inverse theory; kinetics of fluid-solid 
interactions, low T aqueous geo-chemistry, 
petrology, and high T geochemistry 



Mathematics: 713-348-4829 Differential and algebraic geometry, ergodic 

Robin Forman fax: 713-348-5231 theory, partial differential equations, probability 

math@rice.edu and combinatorics, real analysis, complex 

math.rice.edu/ variables, and geometric and algebraic topology 



INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 79 



Department Chair 



Phone, Fax, and E-Mail 



Faculty Research Interests 



Physics and Astronomy: 
F. Barry Dunning 



713-348-4938 
fax:713-348-4150 
physics@rice.edu 
www .physics .rice .edu/ 



Atomic and molecular physics, biophysics, 
condensed matter and surface physics, nuclear 
and particle physics, theoretical physics, obser- 
vational astronomy of star-forming regions, 
nebulae and galaxies, solar system studies, 
theoretical astrophysics and space plasma 
physics, and earth systems science 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Anthropology: 713-348-4847 

George Marcus fax:713-348-5455 

anth@rice.edu 
www.ruf.rice.edu/~anth/ 



Archaeology, anthropological linguistics, 
social/cultural anthropology, theory, history, 
and global change 



Economics: 
Peter Hartley 



713-348-4875 

econ@rice.edu 

WW w .ruf .rice .edu/~econ/ 



Applied microeconomics, economic theory, 
econometrics, public finance, industrial 
organization, game theory, monetary economics, 
labor economics, and micro foundations of 



macroeconomics 



Political Science: 
T. Clifton Morgan 



713-348-4842 
poli@rice.edu 
www .ruf .rice .edu/~poli/ 



Comparative government and political 
development in Western Europe, American 
government including public policy. Congress 
and intergovernmental relations, and international 
relations and conflict 



Psychology: 


713-348-4856 


Cognitive psychology, cognitive neuro- 


Randi Martin 


fax:713-348-5221 


psychology, human factors, and industrial/ 




psyc@rice.edu 


organizational psychology 




www.ruf.rice.edu/~psyc/ 





EDUCATION CERTIFICATION 

Meredith Skura 713-348-4826 

Fax:713-348-5459 
educ@rice.edu 
education .rice .edu/ 



Secondary Education 



T\iition, Fees, and Expenses 



The tuition and fees for graduate students in this section are for the 2003-2004 
academic year only and are subject to change in subsequent years. Current tuition and 
fees for all graduate students, full time and part time: 



Annual Semester Hour 



Tuition — 












all schools except Jones School 
Jones School M.B.A. 


$19,700 


$ 


9,850 


$1,096 


Start 2003 
Start 2002 
Jones School E.M.B.A. 


$28,000 
$24,500 


$14,000 

$12,250 


$1,556 
$1,362 


Start 2003 (2-year rate) 
Start 2002 (2-year rate) 
Fees 


$72,000 
$65,000 








Health service 


$ 


330 


$ 


165 




Graduate Student Association 


$ 


20 


$ 


10 




Shuttle 


$ 


46 








Honor Council 


$ 


42 








Student Organizations Fund 
Infonnation technology 


$ 
$ 


2 
100 








Jones School activities (Jones School only) 


$ 


70 









80 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 
Jones School materials (Jones School only) $ 600 

Away Status. Students pursuing their studies outside of the Houston area (stu- 
dents on "away" status) must be registered and pay tuition but are not required to pay 
the fees listed above, with the exception of the information technology fee. 

Reduced Tuition. After six semesters of full-time study in one degree program 
(excluding the summer semesters), continuing students enter a reduced-tuition cat- 
egory of $1,096 per year ($548 per semester). Students who are admitted with a 
relevant master's degree, i.e., a master's degree that counts toward a doctoral program 
at Rice, may become eligible for reduced tuition earlier than those entering a doctoral 
program without a relevant master's degree. Semesters credited toward reduced tuition 
will be limited to one degree program. In extraordinary circumstances, the Office of 
Graduate Studies may consider petitions for exceptions. 

Health Insurance. All students, full time or part time— including those on away 
status— must carry health insurance (see page 84). 

Other Fees. Unless students elect a special payment plan, they must pay all 
tuition and fees for the fall semester by the middle of August, and for the spring 
semester by the end of the first week of January. Past these deadlines, a late payment 
penalty of $125 will be assessed. 

Other fees applicable under special circumstances: 

Preceptorship (per semester) $ 1 90 

Internship (per semester) $190 

Enrollment continuance fee (Study Abroad) (per semester) $125 

Graduate application fee $ 35 

Jones School application fee: M.B.A. $100 

Jones School application fee: E.M.B.A. $100 

Part-time registration fee $105 

Late registration fee $100 

Failure to preregister fee $ 50 
Late course change fee 
Adds: 

Week 1-2 Free 

Week 3-4 $ 10 

Week 5 and after $ 50 
Drops: 

Weeks 1-4 Free 

Weeks 5-10 $ 10 

Week 1 1 and after $ 50 

Deferred Payment Plan late fee $ 30 

Diploma fee: sheepskin $ 90 

Diploma fee: parchment $ 30 

Diploma fee: facsimile $ 10 

Diploma mailing fee: domestic $ 20 

Diploma mailing fee: air mail $ 25 

Transcript fee $ 7 

Class III registration fee $105 

Class III late application fee $ 70 

Class III late registration fee $100 



INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 8 1 

Intramural fee $ 15 

Readmission fee: graduate students only $290 

Reinstatement fee: graduate students only $ 85 

Replacement ID $ 10 

For more information, see Refund of Tuition and Fees (pages 52-53). 

For $ 100 each , graduate students and their spouses may purchase from the Cashier' s 
Office an athletic events sticker, which admits them to all regularly scheduled Rice 
Athletic events. 



Financial Aid 

Fellowships, Scholarships, and Assistantships 

A range of fellowships, scholarships, and assistantships are available at Rice. Most 
graduate students in degree programs requiring a thesis are supported by fellowships or 
research assistantships. 

Rice Graduate Fellowships. Doctoral students with high academic records 
and strong qualifications receive support through Rice fellowships. In most cases, 
these fellowships provide a stipend plus tuition for the nine-month academic period. 
Departments may nominate particularly outstanding entering students for a Rice 
Presidential Fellowship. 

Rice Graduate Tuition Scholarships. Students whose previous records show 
marked promise but for whom no graduate fellowships are available may receive full or 
partial graduate tuition scholarships, which do not include a stipend. 

Research and Teaching Assistantships. Usually funded from grants and con- 
tracts, research assistantships are available in many departments. Qualified students 
(usually second-year or later) receive these awards to provide assistance on faculty 
research projects, work that usually contributes to the student's own thesis. In some 
departments, a limited number of teaching assistantships may be available to advanced 
students. 

Eligibility. Fellowship, scholarship, and assistantship recipients are selected 
by the individual departments, subject to the approval of the Office of Graduate 
Studies. Students should send their applications for such awards directly to the depart- 
ment involved. 

To receive Rice fellowships, graduate tuition scholarships, or assistantship aid, 
students must be engaged in full-time graduate study; part-time students and students 
who are not enrolled are not eligible for such aid. 

Students receiving stipends from fellowships or assistantships may not accept any 
regular paid employment on or off campus without the explicit permission of the 
department. Full-time students, whether receiving stipend support or not, may not 
accept paid employment in excess of 20 hours per week. 

Loans and Work-Study Financial Aid 

In addition to fellowships, scholarships, and assistantships, the Office of Student 



82 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Financial Services offers assistance in the form of loans and federal work-study 
employment. Interested students must file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid 
(FAFSA) and a Rice Graduate Financial Aid Application. 

To be eligible to apply for loans and federal work-study employment, graduate 
students must maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined by their departments. 
Should a graduate student fail to make satisfactory academic progress, the student's aid 
eligibility will be terminated. Graduate students who enroll for less than 5 hours in a 
term will not be eligible for financial aid. 

Stafford Student Loans. These are low-interest loans made to students attending 
the university at least half-time. Subsidized Stafford loans require need-based financial 
aid eligibility, but unsubsidized Stafford loans are available to all students. Stafford 
loan eligibility is subject to annual and lifetime borrowing limits. 

Federal Work-Study Employment. Federal work-study employment funding is 
available to students who meet eligibility criteria set by the federal government. 
Earnings are limited to the amount shown on the award letter. A limited number of 
awards are offered to graduate students. 

Private Loan Programs. Private loans are available to graduate and MBA stu- 
dents. These loans are not based on need but do require credit approval from the lender 
and cannot exceed the student's cost of education, as determined by Rice, minus other 
resources. 

Special Loan Programs. A Gulf Oil Corporation Foundation Loan Fund and the 
Benjamin S. Lindsey and Veola Noble Lindsey Memorial Loan Fund are available to 
help students working toward a degree meet their educational expenses, but funds are 
limited. Interested students may contact the Office of Student Financial Services. 

The Mary Lyn and Niles Moseley Loan Fund and the Professor John A. S. 
Adams, Sr., Memorial Graduate Student Loan Fund. These funds provide financial 
assistance, in the form of loans, to graduate students at Rice University. Students 
wishing to apply for such a loan should obtain an application from the Office of Student 
Financial Services and return the completed application to that office. Guidelines for 
the program are: 

• Individual loans are made for an amount not to exceed $1 ,500. 

• Loans are made for a period of up to one year and, upon request, may be renewable 

annually. 

• The interest rate applicable to these loans is determined by the university. 

• Graduate students must be enrolled on a full-time basis to be eligible to apply for 

a loan and must maintain full enrollment during the full term of the loan. 

• Upon completion, applications are submitted to the vice provost for research and 

graduate studies for approval. 

• Loans are available during the full course of the academic year. 

• Loans must be repaid before graduation. 

Emergency Loan Fund. Established through gifts from the Graduate Wives Club 
of 1972-73, the Graduate Student Association, and various faculty members, this fund 
makes available emergency loans to help graduate students at Rice with short-term 
needs. Loans are limited to $250 and must be repaid within three months. In lieu of 
interest, a charge of $5 per loan is assessed to maintain the fund. 

Other Fellowships, Honors, and Prizes. Provisions are made for a variety of 



INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 83 

fellowships, scholarships, and prizes available to graduates of this and other universi- 
ties. Memorial fellowships that have been founded and endowed by gift or bequest on 
the part of friends of Rice University provide stipends enabling the holders to devote 
their time to study and research in their chosen fields. There are also several industrial 
fellowships maintained by companies interested in the development of technical fields 
and the training of competent scientists, engineers, and business executives. 

Persons desiring consideration for appointment as fellows should consult with the 
department in which they wish to do research. However, not all fellowships are 
available every year. 

Return of Title IV Funds. Students who receive federal funds as part of their aid 
packages and do not complete the academic term may be subject to returning a portion 
of those funds. Contact student Fianancial Services for information about policies and 
procedures regarding the return of Title IV funds. 

Graduate Student Life 



Graduate Student Association 

All full-time students in the graduate program are members of the Graduate 
Student Association, which is the sole organization representing graduate students as a 
body. The governing body of this organization is the Graduate Student Association 
Council, consisting of a representative from each department offering graduate study 
and a president, vice president, secretary , and treasurer elected by the council. Graduate 
students also participate in university affairs through their representatives on many 
standing and ad hoc university committees, such as the Graduate Council, the Research 
Council, and various department committees. 

One of the functions of the Graduate Student Association is to encourage social 
interaction among graduate students from different departments. To that end, the 
association organizes a variety of social activities open to all members of the graduate 
student body. 

Housing for Graduate Students 

The Rice Graduate Apartments are housed in a garden-style complex located on a 
2.7-acre site just north of campus. The project features attractive landscaping and good 
lighting in all common areas, designed to enhance both the security and the aesthetics 
of pedestrian, bike, auto paths, parking, and recreational areas. Electronically con- 
trolled gates for both pedestrian and vehicular paths are provided. Handicap accessibil- 
ity also is an important feature. A shuttle bus travels back and forth between the 
apartments and campus. 

There are 112 units, including one-bedroom, two-bedroom, four-bedroom, and 
efficiency apartments. The complex is designed with a centrally located space for 
social activities, a laundry room on each floor, a study room equipped with computers, 
enclosed areas with locks for bike racks, and two courtyards. Every apartment has a 
living area, a fully equipped kitchen, cable TV connection, and a network drop for a 
personal computer. Housing is assigned on a space-available basis. Call 713-348- 
GRAD (4723) for further information. 

The Morningside Square Apartments are two-story 1950s-vintage units located in 
a quiet neighborhood adjacent to Rice Village, they are within a short walking distance 
to campus, restaurants, and shopping areas. The complex is attractively landscaped and 



84 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

offers gated and covered parking. 

There are 53 units, including one-bedroom, two-bedroom, and three-bedroom 
apartments. The common hallways, bedrooms, and living rooms feature oak hardwood 
flooring. Kitchens are equipped with a refrigerator and gas range. All units have ceiling 
fans, a gas furnace, and window air conditioners. Basic cable TV is provided, and a 
coin-operated laundry is available on site. Apartments are assigned on a space-avail- 
able basis. Call 713-524-1 275 for further information. 

The Information Desk, the Office of Student Activities, and the Graduate Student 
Association keep records of available rooms and apartments listed with the university 
by area landlords. The daily newspaper and a weekly Greensheet are other sources of 
rental housing information. Incoming graduate students should arrive in Houston 
several days early to allow themselves time to find suitable housing. 

Health Insurance Requirements for Graduate Students 

Paying the student health service fee gives graduate students access to both the 
Student Health Service and Rice Counseling Center (see pages 13-15). New graduate 
students may not register for or attend classes until they have completed and returned 
the health data form to Rice and have met the immunization and TB screening 
requirements. 

All graduate students must have health insurance purchased through Rice or 
provided by an outside source. Students may purchase insurance through the university 
at two levels of coverage. Rice's group coverage for the 2003-2004 academic year is 
effective from 12:01 a.m., August 15, 2003, until 12:01 a.m. August 15, 2004. Depen- 
dent coverage is also available. A description of the policy and the application form can 
be found on the Web at http://studenthealthinsurance.rice.edu. A waiver form, if 
outside insurance is provided, also can be found at this site. Students should submit 
either the application or waiver by August 15 each year. 

Class III Students in Nondegree Programs 

Students with a 3.00 (B) or better grade average and an undergraduate or graduate 
degree from an accredited college or university may apply for admission as Class III 
students. These students may take courses for credit without being admitted to a 
specific degree program. Registration requires the permission of the instructor and 
approval by the vice provost for research and graduate studies. All Class III applica- 
tions to accounting and management courses require approval of the Jesse H. Jones 
Graduate School. Class III students must register for at least 3 hours and cannot take 
courses on a pass/fail or satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Class III students must 
receive at least a B for all classes taken or they will not be allowed to remain in the 
Class III program. 

Students may not use courses taken under this arrangement to fulfill the require- 
ments for a Rice degree unless and until they have been accepted into a degree program 
by an academic department (as well as, in the case of graduate students, by the vice 
provost for research and graduate studies) and received department approval; students 
are responsible for obtaining the proper approvals. Students may request that the 
department allow up to 3 courses taken as Class III to count toward their graduate degree. 

Applications for Class III 

Applications and course request forms are available from the Office of Graduate 
Studies. Official transcripts from all colleges and universities the student has attended 



INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 85 

should be mailed directly by the institutions to the Office of Graduate Studies. Students 
who were previously Class III students must complete a new application (without 
transcripts) for each such semester. All application materials are due by the workday 
closest to August 1 for fall semester courses and December 1 for spring semester 
courses. Late applications are not considered after classes have begun. Individuals 
applying as Class III students for the summer tenn should apply to the Summer School 
for College Students (see pages 44-45). 

Tuition and Fees for Class III 

The tuition for 2003-2004 is S 1 ,096 per semester hour, plus a $105 registration fee 
each semester. All fees are payable during registration, which students must complete 
during the second week of class. Students failing to submit their applications by the 
deadline must pay a late application fee of $70, and students registering after the second 
week of class must pay a $100 late registration fee and may also have to pay a late 
payment fee. For some courses, students may be charged for computer time. If a class 
fills with degree students, instructors may drop Class III students up to the end of the 
third week of class. In that case, the tuition (less $30 of the registration fee) will be 
refunded. Please see pages 44-45 for information pertaining to summer school. 



86 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 



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Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations 
The School of Humanities 



Director and Adviser 

Michael Maas 



Professors Assistant Professors 

James D. Faubion David Cook 

Werner H. Kelber Eva Haverkamp 

Michael Maas Matthias Henze 

Roderick J . Mcintosh Scott McGill 

Susan Keech Mcintosh Caroline Quenemoen 

Donald Ray Morrison Lecturer 

Harvey E. Yunis Kristine Gilmartin Wallace 

Associate Professors Andrew W, Mellon Postdoctoral 

Hilary S. Mackie Fellow 

Carol E. Quillen Michael Decker 

Paula Sanders 



Degree Offered: B.A. 

This interdisciplinary major in the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome, Judaism, 
early Christianity , and early Islam, as well as their antecedents, explores these traditions 
both for their intrinsic interest and for the contributions each has made to contemporary 
Western society . This combined focus on ancient cultural history in its broadest sense and 
on perspectives offered by cultural criticism enables students to examine the beginnings 
of the civilization in which they now participate. 

Courses for this major address common questions about the transmission and 
transformation of cultures in the ancient Mediterranean world. Students examine 
sources, such as texts, artifacts, and institutions, that illuminate the process. They study 
how shifting cultural centers and frontiers in this world are delineated, and they explore 
the general integration and disintegration of specific ancient cultures. This major also 
offers opportunities for archaeological fieldwork and study abroad. 

Rice is a sponsor of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, the 
American School of Oriental Research, and the Intercollegiate Center for Classical 
Studies in Rome. Students majoring in Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations are encour- 
aged to study in these programs as well as in the College Year in Athens program. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations 

For general university requirements, see General Graduation Requirements (pages 
20-23). Majors in Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations must compete at least 30 
semester hours ( 1 courses) . Students must take a core course ( AMC 200 , CLAS 207 , or 
CLAS 208) near the beginning of their studies , and may select from the following courses 
to fulfill their requirements for the major. 



Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations 89 

Students must take one course from three of the five following categories: 1) 
Graeco-Roman Civilization, 2) Islamic Civilization, 3) Jewish Civilization, 4) Christian 
Civilization, and 5) Archaeological Methods & Theory. In addition, students must take 
one course that addresses the creation, transmission, and reception of traditions in the 
Mediterranean world. Courses that meet this requirement are designated as "Themes 
Across Time." 

Students must also fulfill a comparative requirement by taking either one course 
that, in and of itself, treats two different cultural traditions (designated "Comparative") 
or two separate courses on similar themes but from different cultures (e.g.. Women in 
Greece & Rome, Women in the Islamic World). Although not required, courses in ancient 
languages are recommended. A minimum of five courses must be taken at the 300 level 
or above. 

Please note that not all courses listed below will be offered during the academic year. 
For a current list of all AMC courses that will be offered in fall 2003 and spring 2004, 
please visit the AMC web site at http://amc.rice.edu. 



Core Courses 

AMC 200 Origins of Western Civiliza- 
tion 

CLAS 207 Greek Civilization: From 
Homer to Alexander the Great 

CLAS 208 Roman Civilization 

Graeco-Roman Civilization 

AMC 200 Origins of Western Civiliza- 
tion 
ANTH 325 Self Sex, and Society in 

Ancient Greece 
ANTH 363 Early Civilizations 
ANTH 377 The Ancient City 
CLAS 101 First-Year Seminar: Socrates: 

The Man & His Philosophy 
CLAS 207 Greek Civilization : From Homer 

to Alexander the Great 
CLAS 208 Roman Civilization 
CLAS 209 Greek & Roman Drama 
CLAS 212 Classical Civilization: Rome 
CLAS 220 The Novel in Classical Antiq- 
uity 
CLAS 222 Perspectives on Greek Tragedy 
CLAS 225 Women in Greece & Rome 
CLAS 312 Greek Art & Architecture 
CLAS 3 1 5 Roman Art & Architecture 
CLAS 316 Democracy & Political Theory 

in Ancient Greece 
CLAS 318 The Invention of Paganism in 

the Roman Empire 
CLAS 335 Myth & Storytelling: Ancient, 

Medieval, & Modern Traditions 
CLAS 337 Epic & Novel 
CLAS 35 1 Epic & Saga 



GREE 101 Introduction to Ancient Greek 

I 
GREE 102 Introduction to Ancient Greek 

II 
GREE 20 1 Intermediate Greek I: Prose 
GREE 202 Intermediate Greek II 
GREE 301 Advanced Greek I 
HART 205 Architecture & the City I: 

Antiquity through the 17"" Century 
HART 310 The First Civilizations 
HART 3 1 2 Greek Art & Architecture 
HART 3 1 3 The Discovery of the Mind 
HART 315 Roman Art & Architecture 
HART 4 1 7 Buried Cities: The Art & Archi- 
tecture of Akrotiri, Pompeii, & 
Herculaneum 
HIST 113 God, Time & History 
HIST 1 5 1 First Seminar: The Hero & His 
Companion from Gilgamesh to Sam 
Spade 
HIST 200 Origins of Western Civilizations 
HIST 202 Introduction to Medieval Civili- 
zation I: The Early Middle Ages 
HIST 207 Greek Civilization : From Homer 

to Alexander the Great 
HIST 289 Greek & Latin Readings 
HIST 307 Imperial Rome from Caesar to 

Diocletian 
HIST 308 The World of Late Antiquity 
HIST 3 1 6 The Invention of Paganism in the 

Roman Empire 
HIST 325 Introduction to Medieval Civili- 
zation I: The Early Middle Ages (en- 
riched version) 



90 DEPARTMENTS / Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations 



HIST 460 Advanced Seminar in Ancient 

History 
LATI 101 Elementary Latin I 
LATI 102 Elementary Latin n 
LATI 201 Intermediate Latin I: Prose 
LATI 202 Intermediate Latin II 
LATI 30 1 Advanced Latin I: Literature of 

Exile in the Roman Tradition 
LATI 302 Advanced Latin: Roman Epic 
LATI 303 Advanced Latin: Cicero & 

Catullus 
LATI 310 Advanced Latin: Virgil 
LATI 3 1 1 Latin Pastoral Poetry 
LATI 3 1 2 Advanced Latin: Ovid 
LATI 313 Advanced Latin: Literature & 

Society in the Latin Republic & 

Catullus 

Islamic Civilization 

HIST 281 Pre-Modern Middle East His- 
tory: The Middle East from the Prophet 
Muhammad to Muhammad Ali 
RELI 141 Introduction to Islam 
RELI 221 The Life of the Prophet 

Muhammad 
RELI 350 Scriptures in Monotheistic Faiths 
RELI 354 Asian Apocalyptic Movements 
RELI 441 Popular Religion & Magic 

Jewish Civilization 

HIST 445 Jews & Christians: Perceptions 

of the Other 
RELI 350 Scriptures in Monotheistic Faiths 

Christian Civilization 

HIST 445 Jews & Christians: Perceptions 

of the Other 
RELl' 122 The Bible & Its Interpreters 
RELI 125 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew 

I 
RELI 1 26 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew 

II 
RELI 1 27 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew 

Hebrew III 
RELI 128 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew 

Hebrew IV 
RELI 200 The Bible in Western Tradition 



RELI 223 Qu 'ran & Commentary 
RELI 308 Canonical Gospels: Narrative 

& Social Setting 
RELI 350 Scriptures in Monotheistic Faiths 
RELI 354 Asian Apocalyptic Movements 
RELI 383 The Dead Sea Scrolls 
RELI 410 Apocalypse Then & Now 

Archaeological Methods & Theory 

ANTH 203 Human Antiquity: An Intro- 
duction to Physical Anthropology & 
Prehistory 

ANTH 205 Introduction to Archaeology 

ANTH 345 The Politics of the Past: Ar- 
chaeology in Social Context 

ANTH 362 Archaeological Field Tech- 
niques 

ANTH 363 Early Civilizations 

ANTH 377 The Ancient City 

ANTH 425 Advanced Topics in Archaeol- 
ogy 

ANTH 460 Advanced Archaeological 
Theory 

ANTH 474 Advanced Seminar on the Pre- 
historic Landscape 

Themes Across Time 

AMC 200 Origins of Western Civilizations 
ANTH 363 Early Civilizations 
HART 310 The First Civilizations 

Comparative 

CLAS 225 Women in Greece & Rome 
HIST 445 Jews & Christians: Perceptions 
of the Other 

Other Courses 

HART 101 Introduction to the History of 

Western Art: Prehistoric to Gothic 
PHIL 201 History of Philosophy I 
PHIL 30 1 Ancient & Medieval Philosophy 
PHIL 307 Social & Political Philosophy 
PHIL 327 History of Social & Political 

Philosophy 
PHIL 501 Seminar in Ancient & Medieval 

Philosophy 



See AMC in the Courses of Instruction section. 



91 

Anthropology 

The School of Social Sciences 



Chair 

George E. Marcus 

Professors Stephen A. Tyler 

James D. Faubion Associate Professor 

Benjamin Lee Eugenia Georges 

Roderick J. Mcintosh ' Assistant Professors 

Susan Keech Mcintosh Christopher Kelty 

Julie M.Taylor Hannah Landecker 



Degrees Offered: B. A., M. A., Ph.D. 

The major in anthropology has 2 areas of concentration: cultural anthropology and 
archaeology. The focus in cultural anthropology is on contemporary theoretical issues. 
By reading primary sources, students gain an exposure to the styles of argument and 
reasoning of a broad range of theorists. They can then engage in the ongoing discussion 
and definition of central problems within the field. Fieldwork and ethnography are 
important in the doctoral research. 

In archaeology, the focus is on research skills in the library, the field, and the 
laboratory. Most students also develop at least one analytical skill, such as remote 
sensing, archaeological statistics, osteology, or geomorphology, drawing on the 
university's extensive laboratory and computer facilities. 

Students may organize a major in one or both fields or combine a major in 
anthropology with one in another discipline. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Anthropology 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students majoring in anthropology must: 

• Complete a total of 30 semester hours of departmental courses ( 1 courses), at least 

18 of which should be at the 300 level or above 

• Have a plan of study approved by the undergraduate adviser 

With department approval, students may substitute for departmental courses at most 6 
hours of courses from outside the major that are related to their plan of study. The 
department recommends that students intending to pursue graduate study acquire a 
reading knowledge of 1 or 2 European languages. 

Honors Program. Majors considering a career in anthropology should apply to the 
honors program, as should those who wish to include advanced training and an intensive, 
individual research project in their undergraduate education. Anthropology faculty 
determine acceptance into the program. More information is available from the depart- 
ment office; see also Honors Programs (page 34). 



92 DEPARTMENTS / Anthropology 

Degree Requirements for M.A. and Ph.D. in Anthropology 

Because each field of specialization offers different opportunities for training and 
different research orientations, the department seeks applicants with a defined interest in 
either cultural anthropology or archaeology; an undergraduate background in anthropol- 
ogy is desirable but not required. Entering students devise a detailed first-year plan of 
study and provisional plans for succeeding years in consultation with an adviser . The plan 
should emphasize broad training in the selected field before the eventual definition of a 
project for dissertation research. For general university requirements, see Graduate 
Degrees (pages 65-70). 

M.A. Program. Graduate students may earn the M.A. after obtaining approval of 
their candidacy for the Ph.D. For the M.A. as a terminal degree, students must complete: 

• 30 semester hours of approved course work 

• 1 of the 3 special papers required for the Ph.D. 

• A thesis 

Ph.D. Program. For the Ph.D. degree, students must accomplish the following: 

• Complete 3 substantial papers, each emphasizing an analytical, research, and 

writing skill appropriate to their field of specialization (should be completed 
during the first two years of study) 

• Demonstrate reading competency in 1 foreign language 

• Prepare a satisfactory proposal for dissertation research, based in substantial part 

on field research 

• Complete and defend the dissertation 

Special Options. The department will arrange seminars and tutorials on any topic 
relevant to a student's training; these seminars may be conducted in supervisory 
consultation with scholars in other disciplines as well as with adjunct faculty. Students 
interested in the specialized field of medical anthropology may take advantage of the 
extensive resources of the Texas Medical Center through ties established with the 
University of Texas School of Public Health and Graduate School of Biomedical 
Sciences; students may earn degree credit for formal courses taken at both schools. 

Financial Support. All first-year students receive the same level of support: a 
combination of graduate fellowships and tuition scholarships. These awards are renewed 
for a further two years of study . 



See ANTH in the Courses of Instruction section. 



Architecture 



93 



The School of Architecture 



Dean 

Lars Lerup 
Associate Dean 

John J. Casbarian 



Professors 

William T. Cannady 
Albert H. Pope 
Gordon G. Wittenberg, Jr. 
Associate Professors 
John Biln 
Fares el-Dahdah 
Carlos Jimenez 
Sanford Kw inter 
Spencer W. Parsons 
Assistant Professors 
David Brown 
Dawn Finley 
Christopher Hight 
Keith Krumwiede 
Nana Last 
Lecturers 
Louis DeLaura 



Alan Fleishacker 
James Fun^ 
Nonya Grenader 
Tom Lord 
Mark Oberholzer 
Frank S.White 
Adjunct Lecturer 
Stephen Fox 
Visiting Critics 
David Guthrie 
Doug Oliver 
William Williams 
Visiting Professor 
Danny M. Samuels 
Mark Wamble 

Wortham Fellow in Architec- 
ture 
Sean Lally 



Degrees Offered: B.A., B.Arch.. M.Arch., M.Arch. in Urban Design, D.Arch. 

The principal goal of the School of Architecture is to contribute to a more humane 
environment. The school focuses on teaching and research, the development of a broad 
liberal education for undergraduates in the allied sciences and arts of architecture, and 
professional graduate and postgraduate education in architecture and urban design. 
Intimate student-faculty interaction, academic freedom, and unrestricted institutional 
cooperation within and outside the university are distinctive qualities of the architecture 
degree programs at Rice. 

"In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an 
accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National 
Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit 
U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes two types of degree: the 
Bachelor of Architecture and the Master of Architecture. A program may be granted a 
six-year, three-year, or two-year term of accreditation, depending on its degree of 
conformance with established educational standards. 

Masters degree programs may consist of a pre -professional undergraduate degree 
and a professional degree, which, when earned sequentially, comprise an accredited 
professional education. However, the professional degree is not, by itself, recognized os 
an accredited degree." —National Architectural Accrediting Board 



94 DEPARTMENTS / Architecture 

The undergraduate programs maintain a balance between academic studies and 
professional practice. Lectures and other public programs, visiting faculty, scholarly 
presentations, and the Preceptorship Program, which provides a one-year internship in 
outstanding architectural offices throughout the U.S., Europe , and Japan , all complement 
the school's core of distinguished teachers and practitioners. 

The graduate programs have three areas of emphasis: architectural design, with 
particular attention paid to history , theory , and practice; urban design, where the concern 
is the emerging form of the American city; and research in computer visualization, which 
uses the resources of the state-of-the-art Rice Advanced Visualization Lab. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Architecture or Architectural Studies 

For general university requirements , see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23) . The 
conditions specified here for each major also satisfy the university distribution requirements . 

B.A. in Architecture. The curriculum for architecture majors is divided into a 
foundation sequence taken in the freshman and sophomore years and a preprofessional 
sequence taken in the junior and senior years. The foundation sequence consists of four 
semesters of design studios and other related courses in architecture. The first-semester 
studio develops basic design skills through directed explorations and problem-solving 
exercises in form, texture, color, material, and structures. In the subsequent 3 studios, 
through a carefully sequenced series of exercises , students are introduced to a broad range 
of architectural design issues, processes, and methods. Students are required to take 
4 courses in the history and theory of art and architecture during the freshman and 
sophomore years in addition to two semesters of architectural technology. They must 
also complete university distribution requirements. It is recommended that students 
take an introductory drawing course during their first two years of study to develop 
visual skills. 

Students who satisfactorily complete the foundation sequence may, upon approval 
of their major, enter the junior and senior year preprofessional sequence. The fall studios 
for the third and fourth years are organized around the workshop model and emphasize 
complex building/computer applications and urban design issues, respectively. The 
spring studios are vertically integrated, allowing students to select offerings emphasizing 
specialized design topics such as technology , landscape, historical precedent, and urban 
design. During the third and fourth years, students are required to take 2 additional 
technology courses and to fulfill all remaining school or university distribution require- 
ments. Students wishing to pursue the professional degree in architecture may apply for 
admission to the Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.) degree program during the second 
semester of the fourth year. 

B.A. in Architectural Studies. Students who have been admitted as architecture 
majors and who have successfully completed the two-year foundation program may 
choose the architectural studies curriculum. The first four semesters of the curriculum are 
identical to the foundation sequence of the architecture major except for the omission of 
1 technology course. Subsequent requirements are the completion of 1 additional studio 
and 4 elective courses in architecture. The program provides basic preparation for later 
professional study while allowing students to pursue other academic interests in depth. 



Architecture 95 



Typical Curriculum for B.A. in Architecture 



First Semester 

ARCH 101 Principles of Architecture I 
HART 101 Introduction to History of Art 
PHYS 101 Mechanics (with lab) 
LPAP 101 Lifetime Physical Activities 
Approved architecture-restricted distribu- 
tion course in humanities 



Second Semester 

ARCH 102 Principles of Architecture I 
ARCH 1 32 Freshman Seminar 
HART 102 Introduction to History of 

Art 
LPAP 102 Lifetime Physical Activities 
MATH 101 Single Variable Calculus 
Approved architecture-restricted 

distribution course in humanities 



Third Semester 

ARCH 201 Principles of Architecture II 

ARCH 207 Introduction to the Design of 

Structures 
ARCH 345 Architecture and the City I 
Studio Art Elective* 
Elective* 



Fourth Semester 

ARCH 202 Principles of Architecture II 
ARCH 214 Design of Structures II 
ARCH 346 Architecture and the City II 
Approved architecture-restricted 

distribution course in social sciences 
Elective* 



Fifth Semester 

ARCH 301 Principles of Architecture III 

ARCH 315 Building Climatology 

Architectural Theory Elective 

Elective* 

Elective* 



Sixth Semester 

ARCH 302 Principles of Architecture III 

ARCH 316 Design of Structures III 

Elective* 
Elective* 
Elective* 



Seventh Semester 

ARCH 40 1 Principles of Architecture IV 

Elective* 

Elective* 

Elective* 



8th Semester 

ARCH 402 Principles of Architecture IV 

Elective* 

Elective* 

Elective* 



*A11 courses must be selected to satisfy both architecture major requirements and 
university distribution requirements. 



Degree Requirements for a Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.) 

The Bachelor of Architecture program is only open to students who have completed 
the undergraduate preprofessional architecture program at Rice. Upon admission, 
students are assigned a preceptorship, which takes place immediately after receipt of the 
Bachelor of Arts in Architecture degree. The preceptorship program balances academic 
learning with professional experience. Qualified students who have been admitted to the 
B.Arch. degree program are assigned to work for a year in the United States or abroad 
with leading architectural offices designated by the school as preceptors. The B.Arch. 
degree requires the successful completion of the B.A. in architecture, completion of the 
two-semester preceptorship, and completion of 2 graduate studios and 5 approved lecture 
or seminar courses. 



96 DEPARTMENTS / Architecture 



Preceptors 

Allied Works 
Portland 

Backen Arrigoni & Ross, Inc. 
San Francisco 

Cambridge Seven Associates 
Cambridge 

Gensler 

Houston, London, Los Angeles. San 

Francisco 

Michael Graves Architects 
Princeton 

Kohn Pedersen Fox, Architects 
London. New York 

Lake/Flato Architects 
San Antonio 

Machado-Silvetti Associates 
Cambridge 

Richard Meier and Partners 
Los Angeles 

Mitchell Giurgola 
New York 

NBBJ 

Seattle 



Office dA, Inc 
Boston 

Ong & Ong Architects 
Singapore 

Pei, Cobb, Freed & Partners 
New York 

Cesar Pelli & Associates 
New Haven 

Renzo Piano Building Workshop 
Genoa, Paris 

Robert A.M. Stern Architects 
New York 

Rogers Marvel Architecture 
New York 

SOM 

San Francisco 

Venturi Scott-Brown & Associates 
Philadelphia 

Weiss/Manfredi Architects 
New York 

Zimmer Gunsul & Frasca 
Los Angeles 



Master of Architecture 

The Master of Architecture (M.Arch.) program prepares graduates for a full range 
of professional activities in the field of architecture. It is offered to individuals who 
possess a bachelor's degree. Students follow a course of study in all four areas of the 
curriculum: design; history, theory, and criticism; structures, practice, and environ- 
ments; and computing, logic, and representation. These areas of study are sustained by 
groups of courses from which students may choose offerings according to the require- 
ments of their particular program. Strong emphasis is given to developing design skills, 
logic, and imagination through an intensive series of design studio courses. Students are 
also required to prepare an independent thesis before graduating. A potential exists for 
dual degrees. 

The Master of Architecture program is accredited by the National Architectural 
Accrediting Board (NAAB). It leads to the degree of Master of Architecture, which 
qualifies graduates to take the state professional licensing examination after completing 
the required internship in an architectural office. 

Programs of Study. Three program options are available at the Master of Architec- 
ture level. Options 1,2, and 3 differ according to the bachelor's degree received before 
entering the graduate program. 

Option 1: Seven-Semester Program. Option 1 is offered to individuals who hold 
a four-year undergraduate degree with a major in a field other than architecture. 
Preference for admission is given to those who have completed a balanced education in 



Architecture 97 

the arts, sciences, and humanities. A minimum of two semesters of college-level courses 
in the history of art and/or architecture are recommended; so is a minimum of one 
semester of college-level courses in mathematics and physics. Previous preparation in 
the visual arts is also desirable and so are courses in philosophy, literature, and 
economics. 

To graduate, students must complete a four-semester core curriculum 
(76 credit hours), which is followed by a three-semester advanced curriculum 
(57 credit hours). Course work in both core and advanced curricula consists of 7 studios 
(including thesis) and 20 distribution courses (133 credit hours). 



Core Curriculum 

First Semester 

ARCH 501 Core Design Studio I 

ARCH 507 Introduction to Design of 

Structures II 
ARCH 633 Introduction to Computer 

Applications in Architecture 
ARCH 685 Architecture and Sociery I 

Third Semester 

ARCH 503 Core Design Studio III 
ARCH 515 Design of Structures III 
ARCH 683 20th-century History of 

Ideas in Architecture 
Dist. Elective (Comp., Log., and Repr.) 



Second Semester 
ARCH 502 Core Design Studio II 
ARCH 514 Design of Structures II 
ARCH 636 Computer Aided Design in 

Architecture 
ARCH 686 Architecture and Society' II 



Fourth Semester 

ARCH 504 Architectural Problems 
ARCH 5\6 Building Climatology 
ARCH 623 Professionalism and 

Manag. in Architecture 
Dist. Elective (Hist., Theory, and Crit.) 



Advanced Curriculum 

Fifth Semester 

ARCH 601 Arcliitectural Problems 

Dist. Elective (Hist., Theory, and Crit.) 

Dist. Elective (Comp., Log., and Repr.) 

Elective 

Seventh Semester 

ARCH 703 Thesis Studio or equivalent 

Elective 

Elective 



Sixth Semester 

ARCH 602 Architectural Problems 

ARCH 702 Pre-Thesis Preparation 

Dist. Elective (Struct., Pract., and Env. ) 

Elective 



Option 2: Five-Semester Program. Option 2 is offered to individuals who hold a 
four-year undergraduate degree with a major in architecture. Preference for admission is 
given to those who have successfully completed between four and six semesters of 
undergraduate design studio as well as undergraduate courses that are analogous to those 
given in the first year of Option 1 . A minimum of two semesters of college-level courses 
in the history of art and/or architecture are recommended; so is a minimum of one 
semester of college-level courses in mathematics and physics. 

Students in this program enter into the second year of the core curriculum 
(two semesters, 38 credit hours), followed by the advanced curriculum (three semesters, 
57 credit hours). Course work in both core and advanced curricula consists of 5 studios 
(including thesis) and 14 distribution courses (95 credit hours). 



98 DEPARTMENTS / Architecture 



First Semester 

ARCH 503 Core Design Studio III 
ARCH 515 Design of Structures HI 
ARCH 683 20th-century History of Ideas 

in Architecture 
Dist. Elective (Comp., Log., and Repr.) 



Second Semester 

ARCH 504 Architectural Problems 
ARCH 5 1 6 Building Climatology 
ARCH 623 Professionalism and Manag. 

in Architecture 
Dist. Elective (Hist., Theory, and Crit.) 



Advanced Curriculum 

Third Semester 

ARCH 601 Architectural Problems 

Dist. Elective (Hist., Theory, and Crit.) 

Dist. Elective (Comp., Log., and Repr.) 

Elective 



Fourth Semester 

ARCH 602 Architectural Problems 

ARCH 702 Pre-Thesis Preparation 

Dist. Elective (Struct., Pract., and Env.) 

Elective 



Fifth Semester 

ARCH 703 Thesis Studio* 

Elective 

Elective 

*or an approved alternative 



Option 3: Three-Semester Program. Option 3 is offered to individuals who hold 
a professional degree in architecture (B.Arch.), or its equivalent from a foreign univer- 
sity . Preference for admission is given to those who have significant practical experience 
in architecture and who have demonstrated high achievement in design. 

To graduate, students must complete a three-semester advanced curriculum of 
elective courses. Course work consists of 3 studios (including thesis) and 8 distribu- 
tion courses (57 credit hours). 



First Semester 

ARCH 601 Architectural Problems 

Dist. Elective (Hist., Theory, and Crit.) 

Dist. Elective (Comp., Log., and Repr.) 

Elective 



Second Semester 

ARCH 602 Architectural Problems 

ARCH 702 Pre-Thesis Preparation 

Dist. Elective (Struct., Pract., and Env.) 

Elective 



Third Semester 

ARCH 703 Thesis Studio* 

Elective 

Elective 

*or an approved alternative 

Thesis Requirement. All M.Arch. candidates are required to develop a thesis in 
partial fulfillment of graduate degree requirements. Students are asked to demonstrate 
their ability to independently undertake research and analysis as well as develop a 
hypothesis and a thorough demonstration of the thesis. This must take the form of either 
a research thesis (written thesis) or a thesis with a design demonstration (design thesis). 
Both thesis formats must address architectural consequences that may be derived from 
within or outside conventional boundaries of the architectural discipline. 

Thesis preparation begins in the next-to-last semester with a 3-hour independent 
study course leading to the submission of a thesis proposal and the selection of a thesis 
director plus two faculty members as readers. While the thesis is independent work 
carried out by the student under the direction of a chosen adviser, it is organized as a 
studio in the fall term of the academic year. The thesis studio provides a support setting 



Architecture 99 

for both formal and informal review processes throughout the thesis semester. In early 
January, thesis projects are reviewed by a panel of guest critics and publicly presented 
in the Parish Gallery. 

Master of Architecture in Urban Design 

The Master of Architecture in Urban Design (MAUD) program prepares graduates 
for a full range of professional activities in the field of urban design. It is offered to 
individuals who already hold a professional degree qualifying them for registration as 
architects or landscape architects. The MAUD program makes extensive use of Houston 
as a setting for case studies and design problems. During the first year, strong emphasis 
is given to developing design skills, logic, and imagination through an intensive series 
of urban design studio courses. Three additional courses in urban history, planning, and 
design are required each semester. Students are also required to prepare an independent 
thesis during their third semester. 

Doctor of Architecture 

Admission to the Doctor of Architecture program requires either a bachelor's or 
master's degree in architecture and a detailed statement of research concerns and 
anticipated array of investigation. A student entering with a master's degree normally 
takes three semesters of course work before the qualifying examination. A student with 
a bachelor's degree normally requires two to five semesters of course work before the 
qualifying examination. Preparation for doctoral candidacy may include a foreign 
language or computer skills. Specific course requirements are established individually 
when a student is admitted to the program. 

After successful completion of all required course work, students may apply to 
take the qualifying examination after submitting a prospectus outlining their research 
programs for the doctoral dissertation. The dissertation must represent an original 
contribution to knowledge in the field of architecture. Completion and successful 
defense of the dissertation will take a minimum of one year. University requirements 
for thesis (dissertation) preparation and defense must be carefully followed. The time 
limit for successful defense of the dissertation is established by university policy. 
Students should not expect to complete the Doctor of Architecture program in less than 
four years of full-time study. 



See ARCH in the Courses of Instruction section. 



100 



Art History 

The School of Humanities 



Chair 

Hamid Naficy 



Professors 

Joseph Manca 
Hamid Naficy 
Associate Professor 
Linda E. Neagley 
Assistant Professors 
Marcia Brennan 
Vittoria DiPalma 
Shirine T. Hamadeh 
Hajime Nakatani 
Caroline Quenemoen 



Distinguished Lecturer 

Thomas McEvilley 

Adjunct Lecturer 

Charles Dove 

Andrew W. Mellon Post 

Doctoral Fellow 

(Center for the Study of 

Cultures and The Department 

of Art History) 

Nancy Deffebach 



Degrees Offered: B.A. 

Department of Art History majors are students who declare a major in art history 
(focusing on either art history or film and media studies). Students are asked to keep the 
degree requirements listed below in mind. Students are asked to discuss with the 
department faculty advisor their selection of courses and any other matters of concern in 
their academic life, such as study and travel abroad, scholarships and internships, career 
goals, graduate school applications, etc. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Art History 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 

Single Major Track in Art History (12 courses required) 

•HART 101 Introduction to the History of Western Art I: Prehistoric-Gothic 
•HART 102 Introduction to the History of Western Art II: Renaissance-Present 
•1 course in non-Western art history 
•1 seminar course 
•Distribution courses 

-At least 1 course focusing on a period before 1 750 

-At least 1 course focusing on a period after 1750 
•1 course outside the department may be taken for credit toward the major when 

approved in advance by the art history adviser. 
•1 intern class may be taken for credit toward the major. 
•All students are strongly encouraged to take HART 390 Theoretical Perspectives 

on Visual Arts and to study a foreign language. 
•2 courses in visual arts (ARTS, open selections-qualified by course prerequisites 

and consultation with art history faculty adviser) 



Art History 101 

Double Major Track (10 courses required) 

•HART 101 Introduction to the Histoiy of Western Art I: Prehistoric-Gothic 
•HART 102 Introduction to the History of Western Art II: Renaissance-Present 
•1 seminar course 

•2 courses in the visual arts (ARTS, open selections-qualified by course prerequi- 
sites and consultation with art history faculty adviser). 
•Electives 

-A variety of courses to include diversity in cultures and chronology as well as 

foreign languages. 
- 1 intern class may be taken for credit toward the major. 

Honors Program 

An honors program is available in art history . Requirements are somewhat different 
for this program, including HART 407/408 Senior Thesis. Interested students should 
consult with the art history faculty adviser. 

Transfer Credit 

See Transfer Credit in the Information for Undergraduate Students (page 34). 

Exhibitions and Arts Programs at Rice 

Exhibitions and related activities organized by Rice University Art Gallery (Kim- 
berly Davenport, director) enrich the teaching program of the Department of Art History 
as well as the larger university and Houston community . The Department of Visual Arts 
mounts several art and photography exhibitions each year and sponsors Rice Cinema, a 
public alternative film program. Rice Cinema is intimately connected with the curricu- 
lum both in film and media studies (HART) and in film and photography production 
(ARTS), and includes frequent guest lecturers, panel discussions, and media events. 

The department enjoys an ongoing close relationship with local museums and 
galleries. The department offers opportunities for students to work and study with local 
museums, galleries, and alternative art spaces by way of internships, research opportu- 
nities, and collaborative events. In addition, special lectures, symposia, and talks are 
sponsored through Scholars" Forum and the Department of Art History Brown Bag 
Lunch Series. These events are designed to bring local, national, and international 
scholars, critics, and artists to campus to speak on a broad range of topics and current 
interests. 

The Department of Art History houses the Visual Resources Center , which currently 
holds a broad and extensive collection of approximately 300,000 slides and digital 
images related to the arts for teaching and research, serving both the department and 
university at large. 



See HART and ARTS in the Courses of Instruction section. 



102 

Asian Studies 



The School of Humanities and the School of Social Sciences 



Director 

Jeffrey J. Kripal 

Professors Sarah Thai 

Anne C. Klein Kerry Ward 

Benjamin Lee Senior Lecturers 

Masayoshi Shibatani Lilly C. H. Chen 

Richard J. Smith Hiroko Sato 

Stephen A. Tyler Guatami Shah 

Professor Emeritus Lecturers 

Fred R. von der Mehden Hyung-Jin Lee 

Associate Professors Marshall McArthur 

Suchan Chae E. Douglas Mitchell 

Jeffrey J. Kripal Nam Van Nguyen 

William Parsons Steven Lewis 

Nanxiu Qian Chao-Mei Shen 

Assistant Professors Rina V. Williams 

David Cook Meng Yeh 

Hajime Nakatani Postdoctoral Fellow 

Elora Shehabuddin David Gray 

Degree Ojfered: B.A. 

Asian Studies is an interdisciplinary major that explores the complex interaction 
between political, social, religious, and other important spheres of human life in Asia. 
Emphasis is placed not only on the diversity and achievements of Asian civilizations but 
also on the ways an understanding of Asia may shed new light on Western cultural 
traditions. The major is built around courses in the humanities and social science 
divisions and a team-taught interdisciplinary core course. Introduction to Asian Civili- 
zations. Some residential college courses may qualify for Asian studies credit. 

Requirements: The undergraduate Asian Studies major will consist of 30 hours or 
more of course work. All majors must take the core course, ASIA 211, and 
9 additional courses drawn from at least three of the departments offering courses in 
Asian studies. (See specific guidelines below.) 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Asian Studies 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students majoring in Asian studies must complete 30 semester hours or more of major 
course work, including: 

• ASIA 2 1 1 Introduction to Asian Civilizations 

• 9 additional courses drawn from at least three of the departments or programs that 

offer courses with predominantly Asian content. In the case of cross-listed 
courses, any one of the departments or programs appearing in the cross-listing can 
be used to satisfy this particular requirement. See courses listed below. 



Asian Studies 103 



• 6 courses at the 300 level or above 

• 2 years of a single Asian language (this may include an Asian language other than 
those offered by Rice), though students may count no more than four semesters 
of Asian languages toward the major. Students who have placed into the third year 
(300-leveI) or higher of an Asian language at Rice will have satisfied our 
proficiency requirement for the Asian Studies major. Such students may continue 
with the same Asian language or another and receive up to four semesters of credit 
toward the major for this additional language coursework. 

Any changes in the requirements for the major must be approved by the director of 
Asian Studies. 

One or more independent reading courses (ASIA 401 for the fall and ASIA 402 for 
the spring) taught by Asian Studies faculty in these departments may be counted toward 
the major. Students may also use certain residential college courses to fulfill their major 
requirements, subject to the approval of the director of Asian Studies. 

The following courses, not all of which are taught every year, may be used to satisfy 
the major requirements. Note that a number of these courses are cross-listed. 

Anthropology 



ANTH 220 Contemporary China (also 

offered as HIST 220) 
ANTH 310 Contemporary China 

(enriched version of ANTH 220; 

also offered as HIST 310) 
ANTH 353 Cultures of India 

Art and Art History 

HART 170 The Arts of China 

HART 470 Visual Culture in Revolution- 
ary & Post-revolutionary China (ca. 
1949-present) (also offered as ASIA 
470) 

HART 472 Japanese Animation (also 
offered as ASIA 472 and HIST 472) 

HART 371 The Brush & the Stroke in 
Traditional Chinese Painting (also 
offered as ASIA 371) 

Asian Studies 

ASIA 139 Introduction to Indian 

Religions (also offered as RELI 1 39) 
ASIA 140 Introduction to Chinese 

Religions (also offered as RELI 140) 
ASIA 179 The Arts of China 
ASIA 2 1 1 Introduction to Asian 

Civilizations (Also listed as HIST 

206) 
ASIA 221 The Life of the Prophet 

Muhammad (also offered as RELI 

221) 
ASIA 231 The Enlightenment of the Body 

(also offered as RELI 231) 
ASIA 240 Gender and Politicized 

Religion (also offered as WGST 

240) 



ASIA 250 Meditation, Mysticism, and 
Magic (also offered as RELI 250) 

ASIA 280 The Asian American Experi- 
ence 

ASIA 299 Women in Chinese Literature 
(also offered as CHIN 299 and 
WGST 299) 

ASIA 323 The Knowing Body: Bud- 
dhism, Gender, and the Social World 
(also offered as WGST 323 and 
SOCI 323) 

ASIA 330 Introduction to Traditional 
Chinese Poetry (also offered as 
CHIN 330) 

ASIA 332 Chinese Films and Modern 
Chinese Literature (also offered as 
CHIN 332) 

ASIA 333 Taiwan Literature and Film 
(also offered as CHIN 333) 

ASIA 334 Introduction to Traditional 
Chinese Novels (also offered as 
CHIN 334) 

ASIA 335 Introduction to Classical 
Chinese Literature (also offered as 
CHIN 335) 

ASIA 340 Gender and Politicized Religion 
(also offered as WGST 340) 

ASIA 344 Korean Literature (also offered 
as HUMA 344 and KORE 344) 

ASIA 345 Origin and Development 
of Korean and Related Languages 
in East Asia (also offered as 
HUMA 345 and KORE 345) 

ASIA 346 Korean Culture and History 
(also offered as KORE 346) 



104 DEPARTMENTS / Asian Studies 



ASIA 354 Asian Apocalyptic Movements 
(also offered as RELi 354) 

ASIA 355 Religion and Social Change in 
South Asia (also offered as RELI 
355) 

ASIA 360 China and the Chinese 
Diaspora 

ASIA 361 The Oriental Renaissance 
(also offered as RELI 361) 

ASIA 363 Marriage of Heaven and Hell 
(also offered as RELI 363) 

ASIA 365 Mysticism and Meditation in 
China (also offered as RELI 365) 

ASIA 366 Topics in American Litera- 
ture: The Asian American Novel 
(also offered as ENGL 366, only 
when the topic is The Asian Ameri- 
can Novel) 

ASIA 369 Film, Literature, and the 

Japanese Past (also offered as HIST 
369) 

ASIA 372 Survey of Asian American 
Literature (also offered as ENGL 
372) 

ASIA 380 The Asian American Experi- 
ence 

ASIA 399 Women in Chinese Literature 
(also offered as WGST 399) 

ASIA 401/402 Independent Reading 

ASIA 432 Islam in South Asia (also 
offered as HIST 432 and WGST 
432) 

ASIA 441 Popular Religion in the 
Middle East (also offered as RELI 
441/525) 

ASIA 470 Visual Culture in Revolution- 
ary & Post-revolutionary China (ca. 
1949-present) (also offered as 
HART 470) 

ASIA 472 Japanese Animation (also 
offered as HART 472, HIST 472) 

ASIA 473 Topics in Asian American 
Literature (also offered as ENGL 
473) 

ASIA 489 Migrations and Diasporas 

Chinese 

CHIN 101/102 Introductory Chinese I 

and// 
CHIN 201/202 Elementary Chinese I and 

II 
CHIN 211/212 Accelerated Elementary 

Chinese I and // 



CHIN 203/204 Accelerated Chinese I 

and II 
CHIN 301/302 Intermediate Chinese I 

and // 
CHIN 311/312 Accelerated Intermediate 

Chinese I and // 
CHIN 3 1 3 Advanced Intermediate 

Chinese: Media Chinese 
CHIN 321 Structure of Chinese Syntax & 

Semantics (also offered as LING 

321) 
CHIN 330 Introduction to Traditional 

Chinese Poetry (also offered as 

ASIA 330) 
CHIN 332 Chinese Films and Modern 

Chinese Literature (also offered as 

ASIA 332) 
CHIN 334 Introduction to Traditional 

Chinese Narrative (also offered as 

ASIA 334) 
CHIN 335 Introduction to Classical 

Chinese Literature (also offered as 

ASIA 334) 
CHIN 346 History of the Chinese 

Language (also offered as LING 346) 
CHIN 399 Chinese Teaching Practicum 
CHIN 41 \/4l2 Advanced Chinese 

Language and Culture I and // 

English 

ENGL 270 Aspects of Modern Litera- 
ture: Contemporary Themes in Asian 
American Literature 

ENGL 366 Topics in American Litera- 
ture: The Asian American Novel 
(cross-listed with ASIA 366 only 
when the topic is "The Asian 
American Novel") 

ENGL 372 Survey of Asian American 
Literature (also offered as ASIA 
372) 

ENGL 473 Topics in Asian American 
Literature (also offered as ASIA 
473) 

Hindi 

HIND 101/102 Elementary Hindi I and // 
HIND 201/202 Intermediate Hindi I and 

// 
HIND 335 South Asian Literature 
HIND 398/399 Hindi Teaching 

Practicum 



Asian Studies 105 



History 

HIST 206 Introduction to Asian Civiliza- 
tions 
HIST 219 Patterns of the Chinese Past 
HIST 220 Contemporary China (also 

offered as ANTH 220) 
HIST 221 Japan in the World Until 1800 
HIST 222 Japan in the World Since J 800 
HIST 250 Traditional Chinese Culture 
HIST 310 Contemporary China (enriched 

version of HIST 220; also offered as 

ANTH 310) 
HIST 341 Pre-niodern China 
HIST 342 Modern China 
HIST 352 The Comparative Moderniza- 
tion of China and Japan 
HIST 369 Film, Literature and the 

Japanese Past (also offered as ASIA 

369) 
HIST 405 Issues in Comparative Historx 
HIST 421 Japan in the World Until 1800 

(enriched version of HIST 22 1 ) 
HIST 422 Japan in the World Since 1800 

(enriched version of HIST 222) 
HIST 432 Islam in South Asia (also 

offered as ASIA 432 and WGST 

432) 
HIST 448 Creating Modern Japan: 

The Meiji Restoration 
HIST 449 Nation, Empire, and War: 

Japan in the 1930s 
HIST 450 Traditional Chinese Culture 

(enriched version of HIST 250) 
HIST 472 Japanese Animation (also 

offered as ASIA 472 and HART 

472) 
HIST 485 Comparing Histories: 

Modernization, War, and Society- in 

Germany and Japan 

Japanese 

JAP A 101/102 Introduction to Japanese I 

and// 
JAPA 201/202 Intermediate Japanese I 

and II 
JAPA 30 1 /302 Advanced Japanese 

Reading and Composition I and // 
JAPA 398/399 Japanese Teaching 

Practicum 
JAPA 498/499 Independent Study 



Korean 

KORE 101/102 Introduction to Korean 

Language and Culture I 

and // 
KORE 201/202 Intermediate Korean 

Language and Culture I and // 
KORE 301/302 Advcmced Korean I and 

// 
KORE 344 Korean Literature and 

Culture (also offered as ASIA 344 

and HUMA 344) 
KORE 345 Origin and Development of 

Korean and Related Lcmguages in 

East Asia (also offered as LING 345 

and ASIA 345) 
KORE 346 Korean Culture and History 

(also offered as ASIA 346) 

Vietnamese 

JONE 131 Elementary Vietnamese 

Language and Culture 
JONE 279 Intermediate Vietnamese 

Language and Culture 

Linguistics 

LING 321 Structure of Chinese Syntax & 

Semantics (also offered as CHIN 

321) 
LING 345 Linguistic Structure of Korean 

(also offered as KORE 345) 
LING 346 History of the Chinese 

Language (also offered as CHIN 346) 
LING 351/352 Introduction to Sanskrit I 

and // (also offered as SANS 301 

and 302) 
LING 45 1/452 Advanced Sanskrit I and 

II (also offered as SANS 401 and 

402) 

Political Science 

POLI 351 Politics of Southeast Asia 
POLI 460 Seminar in Comparative 
Government 

Religious Studies 

RELI 132 Classical and Colloquial 

Tibetan (also offered as TIBT 1 32) 
RELI 1 39 Introduction to Indian 

Religions (also offered as ASIA 139) 
RELI 140 Introduction to Chinese 

Religions (also offered as ASIA 140) 



106 DEPARTMENTS / Asian Studies 



RELI 221 The Life of the Prophet 

Muhammad (also offered as ASIA 

221) 
RELI 231 The Enlightenment of the Body 

(also offered as ASIA 231) 
RELI 250 Meditation, Mysticism, and 

Magic (also offered as ASIA 250) 
RELI 322 Introduction to Buddhism 
RELI 325 Buddhism and the Female 
RELI 354 Asian Apocalyptic Movements 

(also offered as ASIA 354) 
RELI 355 Religion and Social Change in 

South Asia (also offered as ASIA 

355) 
RELI 361 The Oriental Renaissance 

(also offered as ASIA 361) 
RELI 363 The Marriage of Heaven and 

Hell (also offered as ASIA 363) 
RELI 365 Mysticism and Meditation in 

China (also offered as ASIA 365) 
RELI 441/525 Popular Religion in the 

Middle East (also offered as ASIA 

441) 
RELI 470 Buddhist Wisdom Texts 
RELI 47 1 Buddhist Meditation Theory: 

Women and Men 

Sanskrit 

SANS 301/302 Elementary Sanskrit I and 

// (also offered as LING 351 and 

352) 
SANS 401/402 Advanced Sanskrit I and 

// (also offered as LING 45 1 and 

452) 

Sociology 

SOCI 323 The Knowing Body: Buddhism, 
Gender, and the Social World (also 
offered as ASIA 323 and WGST 

323) 



Tibetan 

TIBT 1 32 Tibetan Language and Culture 

/ (also offered as RELI 132) 
TIBT 133 Tibetan Language and Culture 

II (also offered as RELI 133) 
TIBT 33 1 Advanced Tibetan Language 

and Culture 

University and Residential College 

Courses 

JONE 1 35 Vietnamese Language & 

Culture 
JONE 279 Intermediate Vietnamese 

Language and Culture 
JONE 3 1 1 Indian Society and Politics 
UNIV 118 The Classic of Changes (I 

Ching) in Asian and World Culture 

Women and Gender Study 

WGST 240 Gender and Politicized 

Religion (also offered as ASIA 240) 

WGST 299 Women in Chinese Literature 
(also offered as ASIA 299 and CHIN 
299) 

WGST 323 The Knowing Body: Bud- 
dhism, Gender, and the Social World 
(also offered as ASIA 323 and SOCI 
323) 

WGST 340 Gender and Politicized 

Religion (also offered as ASIA 240) 

WGST 399 Women in Chinese Literature 
(also offered as ASIA 399 and CHIN 
399) 

WGST 432 Islam in South Asia (also 
offered as ASIA 432 and HIST 432) 



See ASIA in the Courses of Instruction section. 



Bioengineering 



107 



George R. Brown School of Engineering 



Chair 

David Heliums 



Professors 

Kyriacos Athanasiou 
John W. Clark 
Antonios G. Mikos 
Ka-Yiu San 
Kyriacos Zygourakis 
Associate Professors 
Bahman Anvari 
Fathi Ghorbel 
Lydia Kavraki 
Jennifer L. West 
Assistant Professors 
Michael A. Barry 
Rebekah Drezek 
Michael Liebschner 
Jianpeng Ma 
Nikolaos Mantzaris 
Robert Raphael 

Lecturer/Director of Labora- 
tory Instruction 
Ann Saterbak 
Adjunct Professors 
William Brownell 
Gregory R. D. Evans 



Craig J. Hartley 

Jose A. Lopez 

Joel L. Moake 

David Sears 

Jacqueline Shanks 

C. Wayne Smith 

Kenneth Wu 

Adjunct Associate Professors 

David W. Chang 

Michael H.Kroll 

Michael Miller 

Charles W. Patrick 

Peter Saggau 

MarkM. Udden 

Mark E. K. Wong 

Alan W. Yasko 

Michael Yaszemski 

George Zouridakis 

Adjunct Assistant Professors 

Daniel E. Epner 

Karen K. Hirschi 

Rex A. Marco 

Rolando E. Rumbaut 



Degrees offered: B.S.B., M.S., Ph.D. 

Graduate and undergraduate programs in bioengineering offer concentrations in 
areas that include cellular and molecular engineering; bioinstrumentation, imaging, and 
optics; or biomaterials and biomechanics. Research areas include biochemical engineer- 
ing, biological systems modeling, biomaterials, biomedical lasers, cellular and molecu- 
lar engineering, controlled release technologies, metabolic engineering, spectroscopy, 
systems engineering and instrumentation, thrombosis, tissue engineering, and transport 
processes. 

Undergraduate Program. The bioengineering undergraduate program will pre- 
pare students for careers in rapidly developing areas of biomedical engineering and 
bioprocessing. Our unified and comprehensive program leading to the B.S. degree in 
bioengineering will: 

• Provide students with a fundamental understanding of the life and medical sciences 

• Teach students to apply engineering principles in the life and medical sciences 

• Develop their critical problem solving skills in bioengineering 



108 DEPARTMENTS / Bioengineering 

• Develop their ability to communicate effectively and participate in interdiscipli- 

nary teams 

• Expose students to a broad education that prepares them for diverse careers 

Undergraduates in bioengineering will then have the training to pursue further 
education in graduate school or medical school and will have strong preparation for a 
career in the biotechnology industry. 

The B.S.B. degree is organized around a core of required courses and a selection of 
elective courses from three specialization areas. The specialization electives provide a 
flexibility that can be used to create a focus in cellular and molecular engineering; 
bioinstrumentation. imaging, and optics; or biomaterials and biomechanics. Because of 
the number of options, students should consult early with departmental advisers to plan 
a program that meets their needs. 

Degree Requirements for B.S. in Bioengineering 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
The curriculum for a B .S . degree in bioengineering requires 94 credit hours, which count 
toward the total of 134 hours required to graduate. 

Preparation. As freshmen , students considering a major in bioengineering should take 
MATH 101 and 102,CHEM 121 and 122,PHYS 101 orPHYS 125,PHYS 102orPHYS 
1 26, and CAAM 2 1 or CAAM 211. Sophomore students should take MATH 2 1 1 and 2 1 2, 
CHEM 211,212,215, BIOS 201 , and MECH 211. BIOE 252 should be taken in the first 
semester of the sophomore year. BIOE 320 and BIOE 322 should be taken the second 
semester of the sophomore year. 

Specialization Areas. Students in the B.S.B. program will choose courses from 
one of the three specialization tracks: 

• Cellular and molecular engineering 

• Bioinstrumentation, imaging, and optics 

• Biomaterials and biomechanics 

Students majoring in bioengineering must complete the following courses. 
Core Courses 
Bioengineering 

BIOE 252 Bioengineering Fundamentals BIOE 444* Tissue Engineering Labora- 

BIOE 320 Systems Physiology Lab tory Module 

Module BIOE 445* Advanced Bioinstrumentation 

BIOE 322 Systems Physiology Laboratory Module 

BIOE 332 Thermodynamics BIOE 45 1 Bioengineering Design I 

BIOE 342 Tissue Culture Laboratory BIOE 452 Bioengineering Design II 
BIOE 372 Introductory Biomechanics/ 

Biomaterials Biosciences 

BIOE 383 Biomedical Instrumentation BIOS 201 Introductory Biology 

BIOE 391 Nimierical Methods and BIOS 301 Biochemistry 

Statistics BIOS 311 or 3 1 2 Biosciences Laboratory 

BIOE 420 Biosy stems Transport and Module 

Reaction Processes BIOS 341 Cell Biology 
BIOE 442* Biomechanical Testing 

Laboratory Module Computational and Applied Mathematics 

BIOE 443* Bioprocessing Laboratory CAAM 2 10 or CAAM 2 1 1 Introduction 

Module to Engineering Computation 



Bioengineering 109 

Chemistry MATH 21 1 ODEs and Linear Algebra 

CHEM 1 2 1 General Chemistry MATH 2 1 2 Miiltivariahle Calculus 

CHEM 122 General Chemistry 

CHEM 2 1 1 Organic Chemistry Mechanical Engineering 

CHEM 2 1 2 0/gfl/n"c Chemistry MECH 2 1 1 &7g///£'£'n;/g Mechanics 

CHEM 215 Organic Chemistry 

Laboratory Physics 

PHYS 101 or PHYS 1 1 1 or PHYS 125 
Math Mechanics 

MATH 101 Single Variable Calculus I PHYS 1 02 or PHYS 1 1 2 or PHYS 1 26 
MATH 1 02 Single Variable Calculus II Electricity and Magnetism 

*Students must take the senior laboratory module in their specialization area: BlOE 
443 forCellular and Molecular Engineering, BIOE 442 for Biomaterials and Biomechan- 
ics, and BIOE 445 for Bioinstrumentation, Imaging and Optics. Students must take one 
other senior laboratory module for a total of two of the four listed modules (BIOE 442, 
443, 444, and 445). 

Please note that some of these courses may not be listed in the Courses of Instruction 
section of this publication. As these courses become available, they will be listed in the 
schedule of courses. 



Specialization Areas 

Four specialization-area elective courses, at least 2 of which must be at the senior 
level, will be required in one of the three areas: 

• Cellular and molecular engineering 

• Bioinstrumentation, imaging, and optics 

• Biomaterials and biomechanics 

The elective courses in these concentration areas will be announced in future course 
listings. 

Graduate Program. The bioengineering graduate program at Rice educates its 
students so that they can directly interact with physicians and cell and molecular 
biologists, while still excelling in the quantitative capabilities so important for engi- 
neering applications. 

Degree Requirements for M.S. and Ph J), in Bioengineering 

For general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). 

M.S. Program. Candidates for the M.S. degree must: 

• Complete at least 18 semester hours of foundation, supporting, and advanced 

courses with high standing 

• Fulfdl a teaching requirement 

• Submit an original research thesis 

• Defend the thesis in a public oral examination 



1 10 DEPARTMENTS / Bioengineering 

Ph.D. Program. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree must: 

• Complete at least 36 approved semester hours of foundation, supporting, andl 

advanced courses, with high standing. With departmental approval, the course 
requirements may be reduced to not less than 22 hours for students already 
holding an M.S. degree. 

• Fulfill a teaching requirement. After their first semester in residence, students may 

be asked to spend the equivalent of 6 to 10 hours per week for a total of 
three semesters on teaching assignments. 

• Submit a thesis proposal. Ph.D. students must submit and successfully defend' 

their thesis proposals by the end of their fourth semester in residence. 

• Complete a three- to six-month industrial internship. This requirement may be 

waived for those with adequate previous industrial experience. 

• Submit a thesis that provides evidence of their ability to carry out original 

research in a specialized area of bioengineering. 

• Defend the thesis in a public oral examination. 

Graduate students take required courses and electives in the following areas: 

• Cellular and molecular engineering 

• Bioinstrumentation, imaging, and optics 

• Biomaterials and biomechanics 

See BIOE in the Courses of Instruction section. 



Ill 



Biosciences 



Biochemistry and Cell Biology 



The Wiess School of Natural Sciences 



Chair 

George N. Bennett 



Professors 

Kathleen Beckingham 
George N. Bennett 
Zenaido Camacho 
Raymon M. Glantz 
Richard H. Gomer 
Jordan Konisky 
Kathleen Shive Matthews 
John Steven Olson 
Ronald J. Parry 
Frederick B. Rudolph 
Charles R. Stewart 
Professors Emeriti 
James Wayne Campbell 
Graham Palmer 
James B . Walker 
Associate Professors 
Bonnie Bartel 
Janet Braam 
Michael C. Gustin 
Seiichi P.T. Matsuda 
Edward P. Nikonowicz 
Michael Stem 



Assistant Professors 

Mary Ellen Lane 

Kevin R. MacKenzie 

James A. McNew 

Yousif Shamoo 

Yizhi Jane Tao 

Lecturers/Laboratory 

Coordinators 

Beth Beason-Armendarez 

David R. Caprette 

M. Susan Gates 

Adjunct Professors 

James Armstrong 

Richard Dixon 

Daniel Feeback 

Roberto. Fox 

Susan Gibson 

Kendal Hirschi 

Neal Pellis 

George N. Phillips. Jr. 

Florante A. Quiocho 

Clarence Sams 

Peggy Whitson 

Faculty Fellow 

Marian Fabian 



Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 


The Wiess School of Natural Sciences 






Chair 






Ronald L. Sass 




Professors 




Stephen Subtelny 


Paul A. Harcombe 




Assistant Professors 


David C. Queller 




J. Nathaniel Holland 


Joan E. Strassmann 




Lisa Meffert 


Calvin H.Ward 




Evan Siemann 


Professors Emeriti 




Adjunct Assistant Professors 


Frank M. Fisher, Jr. 




Nancy Grieg 


Charles Philpott 




Rosine Hall 



1 1 2 DEPARTMENTS / Biosciences 

Steven Pennings 
Huxley Fellows 
Saara DeWalt 
Kevin Foster 
Lecturer/Laboratory 



Coordinator 

Barry Sullender 
Faculty Fellow 

William Rogers 



Degrees Offered: B. A., M. A., Ph.D. 

The undergraduate curriculum in the biosciences is administered jointly by two 
departments: the Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology and the Department of 
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. This curriculum offers majors in biochemistry and 
in biology. Courses in the biosciences include animal behavior, animal biology, bio- 
chemistry, biophysics, cell biology, developmental biology, ecology, endocrinology, 
evolutionary biology, genetics, immunology, microbiology, molecular biology, neuro- 
biology, plant biology, and structural biology. 

The graduate programs in biochemistry and cell biology focus on topics in 
biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, development, genetics, molecular biology, 
neurobiology, and enzymology. In the ecology and evolutionary biology program, the 
focus is on behavior, biogeochemistry, molecular evolution, plant community ecology, 
population biology, sociobiology. and wetland ecosystems. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Biosciences 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students majoring in biosciences must complete at least 48 semester hours of courses at 
the 300 level or higher . The total semester hours at graduation should be at least 1 29 hours 
(128 hours if students choose the PH YS 101/102 option , and 1 32 hours if they choose the 
MATH 111/112 option). All biosciences majors must complete the following: 



Mathematics 

MATH 101/102 Single Variable Cal- 
culus I and // 

MATH 21 1 Ordinary Differential 
Equations and Linear Algebra 

Chemistry 

CHEM 121/122 General Chemistry! with 

Laboratory 
CHEM 211/212 Organic Chemistry 
CHEM 215 Organic Chemistry Lab 

Physics 

PHYS 125/126 General Physics 1 and // 

Biosciences 

BIOS 201/202 Introductory Biology 

BIOS 301 Biochemistry 

BIOS 21 1 Introductory Lab in Biological 

Sciences (2 credit hours) 
BIOS 213 Introductory Lab in Ecology 

and Evolutionary Biology 
BIOS 3 1 1 Lab in Protein Purification 



Any 2 of the following advanced 

laboratory courses: 
BIOS ?>\2Lab Module in Molecular 

Biology I 
BIOS 3 1 3 Lab Module in Molecular 

Biology II 
BIOS 314 Lab in Cell and 

Developmental Biology 
BIOS 3\5 Lab in Physiology 
BIOS 3\6Uib in Ecology 
BIOS 3\1 Lab in Behavior 
BIOS 3 1 8 Lab in Microbiology 
BIOS 319 Tropical Field Biology 
BIOS 320/BIOE 342 Lab in Tissue 

Culture 
BIOS 530 NMR Spectroscopy and 

Molecular Modeling 
BIOS 532 Spectroscopy 
BIOS 533 Computational Biology 
BIOS 535 Practical X-Ray 

Crystallography 



Biosciences 113 



Options. One of the advanced laboratory course requirements may be satisfied by 
taking any of the following: ( 1) STAT 305 (if used to satisfy a lab requirement, this may 
not also be used to satisfy a lecture course requirement); or (2) BIOS 310, if taken for at 
least 2 credits; or (3) HONS 470/471, if the research supervisor is from one of the 
biosciences departments or if the research is biological in nature and preapproved by the 
student's adviser; or (4) BIOS 401/402, one semester may be used to meet an advanced 
laboratory course requirement, and the other semester may be used to meet the 
requirement for a group A or B course. Students may substitute MATH 1 1 1 Fundamental 
Theorem of Calculus SLXidMATH \ 12 Calculus at^d its Applications (otMATU 101 .They 
may substitute CHEM 151/152 Principles ofChemistiy for CHEM 121/122. Although 
PHYS 125 and 126 are the preferred physics courses for biosciences majors, students 
who want to keep open the option of a different major may satisfy the physics requirement 
by taking PHYS 101 or 1 1 1 Mechanics mdPHYS 102 or \\2 Electricity and Magnetism 
(with their respective labs). 

Course Sequence. Students should take the 100-level mathematics and chemistry 
courses in the freshman year, the 1 00-level physics courses and the 200-level biosciences 
courses in either the freshman or the sophomore year, and the 200-level chemistry 
courses in the sophomore year. Those with a limited background in chemistry should 
complete CHEM 121/122 before taking BIOS 201/202. Taking BIOS 201/202 in the 
freshman year gives students earlier access to upper-level courses, and is recommended 
for students with sufficient chemistry preparation. 

Undergraduate Research. Undergraduate majors are encouraged, but not 
required, to pursue independent supervised research in BIOS 401/402 Undergraduate 
Honors Research; those who do must register concurrently in BIOS 41 1/412 Under- 
graduate Research Seminar and complete a thesis. Students may also undertake research 
projects in BIOS 310 Undergraduate Independent Study and HONS 470/471. See 
Honors Programs (page 34). 

Biochemistry Major. Students majoring in biochemistry must take the following 
in addition to those required of all biosciences majors. 

• BIOS 352 Physical Chemistrv for Biosciences 

or CHEM'3 11/312 Physical Chemistry 

• BIOS 302 Biochemistry 
•BIOS 341 Cell Biology 

• BIOS 344 Molecular Biology and Genetics 

• 1 additional bioscience course from Group A 

• 1 additional course for 3 or more hours at the 200 level or higher in mathematics, 

physics, computer science, statistics, or computational and applied mathemat- 
ics; or BIOS 322, BIOS 325, or BIOS 334 

• 1 additional course for 3 or more hours at the 300 level or higher in chemistry or 

Group A biosciences 
Students may substitute 1 semester of honors research, BIOS 401 or 402, for 1 of the 
elective courses from Group A if their faculty supervisor is from the Department of 
Biochemistry and Cell Biology. NEUR 51 1 and 512 may be substituted for one Group 
A course. Biochemistry majors are assigned an adviser from the biochemistry and cell 
biology department. 



1 14 DEPARTMENTS / Biosciences 

Biology Major. Students majoring in biology must take the following in addition 
to the courses that are required of all biosciences majors: 

• 2 biosciences courses from Group A 

• 1 biosciences course from Group B 

• 4 additional biosciences courses from Groups A and/or B 

Students may substitute STAT 305 Introduction to Statistics for Biosciences for one of 
the last 4 courses provided that STAT 305 has not been used to satisfy a lab requirement. 

Students may also substitute 1 semester of honors research, BIOS 401 or 402, for one 
of the courses from Group A, if their faculty supervisor is from the Department of 
Biochemistry and Cell Biology, or from Group B, if their supervisor is from the 
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. NEUR 51 1 and 512 may be substi- 
tuted for one Group A course. The recommended courses for those taking a limited 
number of Group A courses are BIOS 302 Biochemistry, BIOS 341 
Cell Biology, BIOS 344 Molecular Biology and Genetics, and BIOS 352 Physical 
Chemistry for Biosciences. 

Students who choose to specialize in ecology and evolutionary biology should 
choose their 4 additional biosciences courses from Group B. Students who choose cell 
and molecular biology for their specialization should choose their 4 additional bio- 
sciences courses from Group A. Specialization is not required, and students may switch 
from one to the other if they wish. Biology majors are assigned an adviser from one of 
the two biosciences departments according to their specialization; those electing a 
general biology program may request advisers from either department. Students inter- 
ested in environmental careers should consult with the ecology and evolutionary 
biology department for a list of recommended courses. See also Environmental Studies 
listings and Environmental Science Double Major. 

Admission Requirements for Accelerated B.AyPh.D. Program in 
Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

Qualified undergraduates at Rice may apply for admission to the biochemistry and 
cell biology graduate program in their senior year. This allows them to complete certain 
course requirements for graduate studies at the same time as their upper-level under- 
graduate degree requirements; laboratory research performed as part of their undergradu- 
ate thesis project can serve as the initial phases of their Ph.D. thesis work. Students thus 
should be able to obtain their Ph.D. degree more quickly — approximately three years 
after earning their B. A. degree. 

Criteria for admission include academic performance (grade point average of 3.30 
or higher), high scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), motivation, 
previous research experience, and personal qualities. The department Graduate Admis- 
sions Committee makes the selection. 

Interested students must complete two and one-half years (or their equivalent) of 
undergraduate studies at Rice before applying for enrollment in the accelerated B.A./ 
Ph.D. program. To continue in the program, they must: 

• Take the GRE before receiving the B.A. degree and earn scores greater than 

80 percent in the analytical and quantitative tests 

• Maintain a B average in all courses in their senior year 
The usual graduate requirements will apply for continuation in the program. 



Biosciences 115 



Degree Requirements for M.A. and Ph X). in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

Admission. Applicants for graduate study in the Department of Biochemistry and 
Cell Biology must have: 

• B.A. degree in biochemistry, biology, chemistry, chemical engineering, physics, 

or some equivalent 

• Strong ability and motivation, as indicated by academic record. Graduate Record 

Examination (GRE) scores, and recommendations 

Although the department offers an M.A. degree in biochemistry and cell biology, 
only on rare occasions are students who do not intend to pursue the Ph.D. degree admitted 
to the graduate program. The department provides a program guide titled "Graduate 
Program for Biochemistry and Cell Biology," which is updated annually. For general 
university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). 

Both Ph.D. and M.A. Programs. Most of the formal course studies will be 
completed in the first year of residence to allow the students to commence thesis research 
at the end of their second semester at Rice . During the first year, all graduate students will 
be advised by the Graduate Advisory Committee (current composition: Braam, Gustin, 
MacKenzie, and Stem). This committee will determine the foraial course program to be 
taken during the first year in residence. Students are required to have training in 
biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and physical chemistry or biophysics. If students 
lack formal training in these subjects, they are required to take the equivalent background 
courses during their first year. The corresponding courses at Rice include 
the following: 



BIOS 301 Biochemistry 
BIOS 302 Biochemistry 
BIOS 311,312,313 Laboratories for 

the Biosciences 
BIOS 341 Cell Biology 
BIOS 344 Molecular Biology and 

Genetics 
BIOS 352 Physical Chemistry for the 

Biosciences 

All PhD. students are required to take 
the following graduate-level courses: 

BIOS 575 Introduction to Research 
BIOS 581 , 582 Graduate Research 

Seminars 
BIOS 583 Molecular Interactions 



BIOS 587 Research Design, Proposal 

Writing, and Professional 

Development 
BIOS 594 The Ethics of Bioscience and 

Bioengineering 
BIOS 800 Graduate Research (rotations 

in first year) 

Students must also take 2 units from the 
following set of advanced courses: 
BIOS 525 Plant Molecular Biology 

(1 unit) 
BIOS 530, 532, 533, 535 Graduate 
Laboratory Modules in Molecular 
Biophysics (1/2 unit each) 
BIOS 545 Advanced Molecular Biology 

and Genetics ( 1 unit) 
BIOS 588 Advanced Cell and Develop- 
mental Biology ( 1 unit) 



Students should complete BIOS 583 and BIOS 587 in their first and second years, 
respectively , and they will be responsible for the content of those course programs in their 
admission to candidacy examination (see below) . Students also gain teaching experience 
by serving as discussion leaders and graders in undergraduate sections during their 
second year. Safety and ethics presentations are provided for first-year students. 



116 DEPARTMENTS / Biosciences 

Evaluation of Progress in Graduate Study. The Graduate Advisory Committee 
evaluates each student's undergraduate record and identifies any deficiencies to be 
coiTected (usually in the first year). Thesis advisers may require additional course work 
of a more specialized nature. Students must complete all additional courses before taking 
the admission to candidacy examination. 

At the end of each semester, the department chair, in consultation with the 
committee and faculty, reviews student performance in the formal course work; after 
students complete two semesters at Rice, the faculty conducts a review. Students must 
maintain at least a B average and demonstrate outstanding motivation and potential 
for research. 

Evaluation after the first year includes: 

• Ongoing review of research progress by the thesis research adviser 

• A research progress review examination given each year by the student's Research 

Progress Review Committee 

• Presentation of research progress at least once a year after the second year until 

submission of a complete doctoral thesis 

• Completion of an oral admission to candidacy examination before the beginning 

of the student's sixth semester 

• Defense of the Ph.D. thesis research and text in a final public seminar presentation 

and oral examination attended by the student's Thesis Committee 

M.A. Program. All the above requirements and evaluation procedures apply to 
M.A. candidates with the following exceptions. The research progress review examina- 
tion held during the M.A. student's second full year, which is identical in format to that 
for Ph.D. students, replaces the admission to candidacy examination; no other prelimi- 
nary examination is held before the final oral defense of the master's thesis. M.A. 
candidates must complete a thesis and make a public oral defense of their research work 
to their Thesis Committee and other interested parties. 

Degree Requirements for M.S., M.A., and Ph.D. in Ecology and 
Evolutionary Biology 

Admission. Applicants for graduate study in the Department of Ecology and 
Evolutionary Biology must have: 

• B.A. degree or equivalent 

• Scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), including the advanced 

examination in biology 

• Strong background in biology 

• Completed course work in physics, mathematics (including calculus), and chem- 

istry (including organic chemistry) 
These requirements do not preclude admission of qualified applicants who have majored 
in areas other than biology. Deficiencies should be made up during the first year of 
residence; some may be waived at the discretion of the student's faculty adviser and 
the department chair. 

Entering students will meet with a faculty adviser to form a course of study for the 
first year. All first-year students will demonstrate basic proficiency in ecology and 
evolutionary biology EITHER by completing one ecology course (from the following 
choices: BIOS 322, BIOS 324, BIOS 325, BIOS 329, or BIOS 336) and one evolutionary 
biology course (from the following choices: BIOS 321 or BIOS 334) OR by performing i 
satisfactorily on a written examination that tests basic knowledge in both ecology and 
evolutionary biology. 



Biosciences 117 

All graduate students are required to complete the following graduate-level courses: 
BIOS 561 Topics in Evolution, BIOS 562 Topics in Behavioral Biology. BIOS 563 
Topics in Ecology, BIOS 568 Topics in Biological Diversity, BIOS 585/586 Graduate 
Seminar in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Students may substitute BIOS 432 
Advanced Evolutionaty Biology for BIOS 561 or BIOS 562. Students are required to 
complete two semesters of BIOS 591 Graduate Teaching. Students typically complete 
a Ph.D. in no less than 3 and no more than 5 years. 

M.S. Program. In addition to the general university requirements and those listed 
above, the Master of Science in Ecology and Evolutionar}' Biology requires 10 hours of 
research credit. 

M.A. Program. In addition to the general university requirements and those listed 
above, the Master of Arts in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology requires the completion 
and public defense of a thesis embodying the results of an original investigation. 

Ph.D. Program. In addition to the general university requirements and those listed 
above, applicants for the Ph.D. degree in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology must: 

• Maintain a grade average of B or better in courses taken in the department and 

satisfactory grades in courses taken outside the department 

• Pass the admission to candidacy examination given by the Graduate Advisory 

Committee (this examination may be oral and/or written) 

• Complete an original investigation and a doctoral thesis worthy of publication in 

a scientific journal 

• Present a departmental seminar on the research 

• Publicly defend the doctoral thesis 

See BIOS in the Courses of Instruction section. 



118 



Center for the Study of Languages 



The School of Humanities 



Director 

Andrew Lian 
Associate Director 

Claire Bartlett 



Senior Lecturers 

Aman Attieh (Arabic) 

LiWy C.Chen (Chinese) 

Evelyne Datta (French) 

Raquel Gaytan (Spanish) 

Jonathan Ludwig (Russian) 

Marcela Salas (Spanish) 

Hiroko Sato (Japanese) 

Gautami Shah (Hindi) 

Jane Verm (Spanish) 

Lecturers 

Veronica Albin (Spanish) 

Tiqva Baron (Hebrew) 

Suzana Bloem (Portuguese) 

Patricia Brogdon-Gomez (Spanish) 



Brigitte Crull (French) 
Hyung-Jin Lee (Korean) 
Christa Gaug (German) 
Robin Martinez (Spanish) 
Marshall McArthur (Chinese) 
Peggy Patterson (Spanish) 
Jose Narbona (Spanish) 
La Nelle Riga (Italian) 
Harry Roddy (German) 
Chao-mei Shen (Chinese) 
Dariusz Skorzewski (Polish) 
Richard Spuler (German) 
Victoria Surliuga (Italian) 
Meng Yeh (Chinese) 
Elsa Zambosco-Thomas (Spanish) 



Degrees Offered: None 



Foreign language classes are popular among Rice University students who wish to 
enhance their knowledge of world languages and cultures. The Center for the Study of 
Languages (CSL) was founded in 1 997 to promote and enhance the study of languages 
at Rice University. The role of the center is to establish innovative approaches to 
language acquisition, expand opportunities for language learning across the curriculum, 
and increase Rice students' participation in study and work abroad. The Language 
Resource Center (LRC), technology division of the CSL, provides resources such as 
specialized computer software and enhanced videos to supplement the traditional 
approach to teaching and learning languages. In addition to creating an innovative 
learning environment , the CSL is responsible for teaching 1 3 languages through the third 
year of instruction. The CSL also offers courses on cross-cultural awareness. 

The CSL does not offer degree programs itself, but students are able to pursue 
language degrees from language departments. Some of those degrees include: B.A. in 
Asian Studies (Asian Studies), B.A. in Classical studies (Classical studies), B.A, M.A., 
and PhD. in French Studies (French Studies), B.A. in German Studies, B.A. in Slavic 
Studies (German and Slavic Studies), and B .A, M.A. in Spanish (Hispanic Studies). See 
the respective department for degree requirements. 



I Center for the Study of Languages 1 19 

Placement Testing 

Students who have some background in the language they intend to study are 
required to take a placement test to ensure that they are placed in the appropriate course. 
Placement tests can be taken online before matriculation or during orientation week. 
Additional information regarding language placement tests can be found on the Lan- 
guage Resource Center webpage at www.ruf.rice.edu/~lrc. 

Transfer Credits 

The CSL will determine equivalency for foreign language classes taken at other 
colleges or universities and approve them for transfer credit. University transfer credit 
guidelines (see page 35) as well as requirements of the degree-granting department still 
apply . Students who study abroad should have their transfer credits approved before they 
commit to a study-abroad program. 

Scliolarships 

Two scholarships are offered yearly through the CSL. The Donne Di Domani 
donates money to be awarded to outstanding Rice University students. This scholarship, 
to be used for tuition and books, is awarded to students committed to study of the Italian 
language and is based on need and merit. The Ministry of Education, Republic of China 
in Taiwan also offers a scholarship to study Mandarin Chinese in Taiwan for one year. 
Students interested in applying for either of these scholarships should contact the CSL 
at the beginning of the spring semester. 



See ARAB, CHIN, FREN, GERM, HIND, HEBR, ITAL, JAPA, KORE, 
PLSH, PORT, RUSS, SPAN, and UNIV in the Courses of Instruction 
section. 



I 



120 

Chemical Engineering 



The George R. Brown School of Engineering 

Chair 

Kyriacos Zygourakis 

Professors Associate Professor 

Constantine Armeniades Vicki Colvin 

Walter G. Chapman Paul E. Laibinis 

George J. Hirasaki Jennifer L. West 

Larry V. Mclntire Assistant Professors 

Antonios G. Mikos Nikolaos Mantzaris 

Clarence A. Miller Matteo Pasquali 

Marc A. Robert Michael S. Wong 

Ka-Yiu San Adjunct Professor 

MarkWiesner G.D.Fisher 

Professors Emeriti Adjunct Associate Professors 

William W. Akers Thomas W. Badgwell 

Sam H.Davis Waylon V. House 

Derek C. Dyson Glenn A. Taylor 

Joe W. Hightower Adjunct Assistant Professors 

Riki Kobayashi Jacqueline L. Goveas 

Research Professor Lecturers 

Jesse David Heliums Kenneth R. Cox 

Herbert C. McKee 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S.Ch.E., M.Ch.E., M.S., Ph.D. 

This major gives undergraduates a sound scientific and technical grounding for 
further development in a variety of professional environments. Courses in mathematics, 
chemistry, physics, and computational engineering provide the background for the 
chemical engineering core , which introduces students to chemical process fundamentals, 
fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, thermodynamics, kinetics, reactor design, 
process control, and process design. Course electives may be used to create a focus area 
in one of the following four disciplines: bioengineering, environmental engineering, 
materials science/engineering, and computational engineering. Upon completing either 
the flexible B.A. requirements or the more scientific and professional B.S.Ch.E. 
requirements , students may apply for a fifth year of study leading to the nonthesis Master 
of Chemical Engineering (M.Ch.E.) degree. A joint M.B. A ./M.Ch.E. degree is also 
available in conjunction with the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Management. 

Students admitted for graduate studies leading to the M.S. or Ph.D. degrees must 
complete a rigorous program combining advanced course work and original research that 
must be formalized in an approved thesis. Graduate research is possible in a number of 
areas, including thermodynamics, interfacial phenomena, complex fluids, polymer 
science and rheology, process control and optimization, reaction engineering and 
catalysis, reservoir engineering, biotechnology, and biomedical engineering. 



Chemical Engineering 1 2 1 



Degree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
The B.S. degree is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology (ABET). Through careful selection of other engineering and science 
courses, a student can develop a focus (or concentration) area in any of the following 
4 engineering disciplines: environmental science/engineering, bioengineering, materi- 
als science/engineering, and computational engineering. These elective programs can 
be completed within the framework of a B.S. in chemical engineering. Students 
majoring in chemical engineering must complete 96 hours in specified courses for a 
minimum of 132 hours at graduation. They must complete the following courses. 



Chemistry 

CHEM 121/122 General Chemist^ 

with Laboratory 
or CHEM \5\l\52 Honors Chemistry^ 

with Laboratoiy 
CHEM 211/212 Organic Chemistry 
CHEM 217 Organic Chemistry Lab 
CHEM 31 1/312 Physical Chemistry 
Any 2 of CHEM 2 12, CHEM 311, 

or CHEM 312 

Chemical Engineering 

CENG 301 Chemical Engineering 

Fundamentals 
CENG 303 MATLAB, FORTRAN and 

MAPLE for Chemical Engineers 
CENG 305 Computational Methods for 

Chemical Engineers 
CENG 343 Chemical Engineering Lab I 
CENG 390 Kinetics and Reactor Design 
CENG 401/402 Transport Phenomena I 

and// 
CENG 403 Equipment Design 
CENG 404 Process Design 
CENG 411/412 Thermodynamics I and // 
CENG 443 Chemical Engineering Lab II 
CENG 470 Process Dynamics and 

Control 



Mathematics 

MATH 101/102 Single Variable 

cuius I and // 
MATH 21 1 Ordinary Differential 

Equations and Linear Algebra 



Cal- 



MATH 212 Multivariable Calculus 
or equivalent honors courses 
CAAM 336 Differential Equations in 

Science and Engineering 
or MATH 381 Introduction to Partial 

Differential Equations 

Physics 

PHYS 101 or 1 1 1 Mechanics 
PHYS 102 or 1 12 Electricity and 
Magnetism 

Mechanical Engineering 

MECH 21 1 Engineering Mechanics 

Other Courses 

1 approved basic science course 

3 courses from the following: 

ELEC 243 Electrical Circuits 

MSCI 30 1 Materials Science 

CEVE 300 Mechanics of Solids 

CEVE 434 Chemical Transport and Fate 

in the Environment 
BIOE 420 Biosy stems Transport and 

Reaction Processes 
BIOE 460 Biotechnological Processes 
CEVE 41 1 Air Resource Management 
or see requirements for focus areas in 
environmental science/engineering, 
bioengineering, materials science/ 
engineering, and computational 
engineering 



The undergraduate curriculum is designed so that outstanding students interested 
in careers in research and teaching may enter graduate school after earning either 
bachelor's degree. 



1 22 DEPARTMENTS / Chemical Engineering 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Chemical Engineering 

Students pursuing the B.A. degree in chemical engineering must meet all of the 
requirements for the B .S.Ch.E. degree except for the following courses: CENG 404 and 
CENG 470, the additional "basic science" course, and the 3 "other engineering" courses. 
Free electives may be substituted for these 6 courses to reach at least 1 32 semester hours 
for graduation. 

Prerequisites for Chemical Engineering Courses. Before undergraduates may 
register for courses in chemical engineering at the 300 level and above, they must satisfy 
the following prerequisites. 

For CENG 301 For CENG 403 

Math 101/102 CENG 390, 402, and 412 

CHEM 121/122 or CHEM 151/152 Co/Prerequisites: CENG 470 and 

Corequisite: CENG 303 MECH 2 1 1 

For CENG 390 For CENG 404 

CENG 30 1 , 303 , and 305 CENG 403 

MATH 21 1/212 

For CENG 411 
For CENG 401 CENG 301 and 303 

CENG 411 

MATH 211/212 For CENG 412 

PHYS 101/102 CENG 411 

Co/Prerequisite: CENG 305 

For CENG 470 
For CENG 402 CENG 390, 402, and 412 

CENG 401 

Co/Prerequisites: CAAM 336 or 
MATH 381 

With the written consent of the instructor, students may register for a course without 
completing the required prerequisite(s). Waivers, however, are not transferrable. 

Degree Requirements for M.ChJE., MJS., and Ph J), in Chemical Engineering 

For general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). 

M.Ch.E. Program. For the M.Ch.E. degree, students must complete at least 30 
hours of courses beyond those counted for their undergraduate degree. At least 6 of the 
courses taken must be upper-level courses in chemical engineering and 1 must be an 
approved mathematics course. The chemical engineering courses selected should 
include process design (two semesters) and process control, unless courses in these 
subjects were taken during the student's undergraduate studies. 

M.S. Program. Candidates for the M.S. degree must: 

• Complete at least 1 8 approved semester hours with high standing 

• Submit an original research thesis 

• Defend the thesis in a public oral examination 



Chemical Engineering 1 23 

PhD. Program. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree must: 

• Demonstrate competence in the areas of applied mathematics, thermodynamics, 

transport processes, and chemical kinetics and reactor design by passing 
qualifying examinations, usually during the first year of study 

• Complete at least 36 approved semester hours with high standing (with department 

approval, the course requirements may be reduced to 24 hours for students 
already holding an M.S. degree) 

• Submit a thesis that provides evidence of their ability to carry out original research 

in a specialized area of chemical engineering 

• Defend the thesis in a public oral examination 



See CENG in the Courses of Instruction section. 



124 

Chemistry 

The Wiess School of Natural Sciences 



Chair 

Kenton H. Whitmire 



Professors 

Andrew R. Barron 
W. Edward Billups 
Philip R. Brooks 
Robert F. Curl, Jr. 
Paul S. Engel 
Graham P. Glass 
Naomi Hal as 
John S. Hutchinson 
James L. Kinsey 
John L. Margrave 
Ronald J. Parry 
Ronald L. Sass 
Gustavo E. Scuseria 
Richard E. Smalley 
James M. Tour 
R. Bruce Weisman 
Kenton H. Whitmire 
Lon J. Wilson 
Associate Professors 
Vicki L. Colvin 
Seiichi P. T. Matsuda 
Boris I. Yakobson 
Assistant Professors 
Victor Behar 



Cecilia Clementi 

Jason H. Hafner 

Jeffrey Hartgerink 

Anatoly Kolomeisky 

Michael S. Wong 

Adjunct Professors 

Marco Ciufolini 

Tohru Fukuyama 

Peter Harland 

Michael Metzker 

Graham Scott 

M. Robert Willcott 

Instructor 

Melanie Thoms 

Lecturers 

Lawrence B. Alemany 

Mary E. R.McHale 

Distinguished Faculty Fellow 

Robert H. Hauge 

Senior Faculty Fellow 

Bruce R. Johnson 

Faculty Fellow 

Valery Khabashesku 

Visiting Professor 

Raphael Levine 



Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Recognizing the wide range of studies encompassed by chemistry, the department , 
encourages undergraduates to explore offerings in other departments such as mathemat- 
ics . computational and applied mathematics , biochemistry , and physics as well as upper- 
level courses in chemistry. An interdepartmental major is offered in chemical physics. 
Taking advantage of the department's extensive facilities, each B.S. degree candidate 1 
caiTies out a program of individual research under the supervision of a faculty member. 

Graduate studies emphasize individual research, together with a fundamental 
understanding of chemistry beyond the students' specific interests. Faculty research 
interests include the synthesis and biosynthesis of organic natural products: the synthesis 
of small cycloalkanes, molecular recognition, and biological catalysis; bioinorganic and 
organometallic chemistry; main group element and transition metal chemistry; the 
chemistry of group 13 (III) elements; high-pressure and high-temperature chemistry; 
fluorine chemistry; chemical vapor deposition; the design of nanophase solids; molecu- 
lar photochemistry and photophysics; infrared kinetic spectroscopy, laser and NMR 



Chemistry 125 



spectroscopy; the study of oriented molecular beams; theoretical and computational 
chemistry; and the study of fullerene molecules . carbon nanotubes , and their derivatives; 
polymer synthesis and characterization; molecular electronics; and 
molecular machines. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Chemistry 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students choosing to receive a B.A. in chemistry must have a total of at least 
1 20 semester hours at graduation , including the following courses required of all majors . 



Core Courses 
Chemistry 

CHEM \2\l\22 General Chemistry with 
laboratory or CHEM 151/152 
Honors Chemistry with laboratory 
CHEM 211/212 Organic Chemistry 
CHEM 215 Organic Chemistry Lab 
CHEM 311/312 Physical Chemistry 
CHEM 35 1 Introducton Module in 

Experimental Chemistry I 
CHEM 352 Introductory Module in 

Experimental Chemistry II 
CHEM 353 Introductory Module in 

Analytical Methods 
CHEM 360 Inorganic Chemistry 

Mathematics 

MATH 101/102 Single Variable Cal- 
culus I and // or MATH 121/122 

MATH 21 1 Or-dinary Dijfer-ential 
Equations and Linear Algebr'a 

MATH 212 Multivariable Calculus or 
MATH 221/222 Horrors Calcidus III 
and IV 

Physics 

PHYS 101 or 111 Mechanics 
PHYS 102 or 1 12 Electricity and 
Magnetism 

Other 

NSCI 230 Computation in the Natural 
Sciences (or equivalent) 



Advanced Courses 

Additional Lecture Courses 

At least 1 course from the following: 

CHEM 401 Advanced Organic 

Chemistry 
CHEM 430 Quantum Chemistry 
CHEM 495 Transition Metal Chemistry 

Additional Laboratory Courses 
At least 3 advanced laboratory module 
credit hours from the following list: 
CHEM 373 Advanced Module in 

Fullerene Chemistry 
CHEM 374 Advanced Module in 

Syrrthetic Chemistry 
CHEM 375 Advanced Module in 

Ncmochemistry 
CHEM 376 Advanced Module in 

Materials Chemistry 
CHEM 377 Advanced Module in Catalysis 
CHEM 381 Advanced Module in 

Physical Chemistry, A 
CHEM 382 Advanced Module in 

Physical Chemistry, B 
CHEM 383 Advanced Module in 

Instr-umental Analysis, A 
CHEM 385 Advanced Module in 

Polymer Chemistry 
CHEM 391 Advanced Module in Catalysis 
CHEM 435 Methods of Computational 

Quantum Chemistry 



To ensure that students receive suitable breadth in their laboratory experience, 
advanced module selections must be approved by the student's major committee. Other 
advanced laboratory courses from chemically related disciplines (biochemistry, 
materials science, environmental engineering, etc.) may be substituted for these 
advanced modules, with approval of the committee. Chemistry majors may also 
substitute 2 advanced organic laboratoiy module credit hours for CHEM 215, with 
approval of the committee. Three hours of CHEM 49 1 (taken for one entire semester) may 
be substituted for 1 advanced laboratory module if no other CHEM 491 credit is taken in 
the same semester. 



126 DEPARTMENTS / Chemistry 

Students in the chemistry B.A. major must satisfy the university distribution 
requirements and complete no fewer than 64 semester hours in addition to the 
departmental requirements for the chemistry major, giving a minimum total of 1 20 hours 
for graduation. 

Degree Requirements for B.S. in Chemistry 

The core chemistry, math, physics, and NSCI 230 requirements for the B .S . degree 
are the same as those for the B.A. degree. PHYS 201 Waves and Optics and PHYS 202 
Modern Physics are recommended but not required. 

In addition to the core requirements, the B.S. degree requires the following 
course and laboratory work: 

• 2 courses total from the Additional Lecture Courses list 

• 3 advanced modules from the Additional Laboratory Courses list. As with the 

B.A. degree , 2 advanced laboratory modules may be substituted for CHEM 2 1 5 
with departmental approval. 

• At least 3 semester hours in undergraduate research (CHEM 491) in no less than 

2-hour segments. With departmental approval, students may satisfy this 
requirement with HONS 470/47 1 , which requires participation in CHEM 491 
meetings. Students may also satisfy 3 of the 6 required hours in upper-level 
courses with additional research. 

• 6 hours credit in upper-level courses (300 level or higher) in chemistry , mathemat- 

ics, computational and applied mathematics, physics, biochemistry, or other 
subjects with adviser approval. 

Students in the chemistry B.S. major must satisfy the distribution requirements 
(see pages 20-23) and complete no fewer than 60 semester hours in addition to the 
departmental requirements for the chemistry major, giving a minimum total of 128 
hours for graduation. 

American Chemical Society Certification. The Rice Department of Chemistry is 
on the approved list of the Committee on Professional Training of the American 
Chemical Society and so can certify that graduates have met the appropriate standards. 
The B.A. degree is not certifiable. For certification, students must complete: 

• All degree requirements for the B.S. degree listed above 

• CHEM 495 Transition Metal Chemistry as one of the additional lecture courses 

• A department-approved course in biochemistry 

• 9 hours total in upper-level courses from chemistry, physics, mathematics, 

computational and applied mathematics, biochemistry, or other courses in 
science or engineering with the approval of the department. The required 
course in biochemistry listed above counts toward this total. 

A foreign language, preferably German, is recommended. 

Chemical Physics Major. The chemical physics major leading to a B.S. degree is 
offered in conjunction with the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Students take 
upper-level courses in both chemistry and physics, focusing on the applications of 
physics to chemical systems. Students majoring in chemical physics must complete the 
following courses: 



Chemistry 127 



Core Courses 
Chemistry 

CHEM 121/122 General Chemistn 

with Loboratoiy or CHEM 151/152 
Honors Chemistry with Laboratory 
CHEM 21 1 Organic Chemistry 
CHEM 311/312 Physical Chemistry 

Physics 

PHYS 101 or 111 Mechanics 
PHYS 102 or 1 12 Electricity and 

Magnetism 
PHYS 201 Waves and Optics 
PHYS 202 Modern Physics 
PHYS 231 Elementary Physics Lab II 
PHYS 301 Intermediate Mechanics 
PHYS 302 Intermediate Electrodynamics 



Mathematics 

MATH 101/102 Single Variable 

cuius I and // 
or MATH 121/122 



Cal- 



MATH 21 1 Ordinary Differential 
Equations and Linear Algebra 

MATH 212 Multivariable Calculus or 
MATH 221/222 Honors Calculus III 
and/V 

Additional Courses 

1 course from CHEM 212 or CHEM 360 

2 courses from PHYS 311, PHYS 312, 

CHEM 430, or CHEM 415 
6 hours from CHEM 215, CHEM 35 1 , 
CHEM 352, CHEM 373-391 , 
CHEM 435 , PHYS 33 1 , or PHYS 
332. Up to 2 hours of independent 
research (CHEM 491 or PHYS 491/ 
492 may be counted toward this 
requirement.) 
2 courses from NSCI 230. CAAM 211, 
CAAM 212. or mathematics or 
computational and applied math- 
ematics at the 300 level or above 



Admission Requirements for Accelerated B.SyPh J). Program in Chemistry 

The high level of training provided in the Rice B.S. program enables certain 
specially qualified undergraduates to enter an accelerated program that allows them to 
complete a Ph.D. degree within two or three years after receiving their B.S. degree. 
Students electing this option must begin their research during the summer follow ing their 
junior year and continue the research by taking CHEM 491 during their senior year. 

Degree Requirements for M.A. and Ph J), in Chemistry 

For general university requirements , see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70) . Students 
who have completed course work equivalent to that required for a B.A. or B.S. in 
chemistry may apply for admission to the Ph.D. program. For more infomiation, see 
Admission to Graduate Study (pages 64-65). 

M.A. Program. Students are NOT normally admitted to study for an M.A. degree. 
However, this degree is sometimes awarded to students who do not wish to complete the 
entire Ph.D. program. Candidates for the M.A. degree must: 

• Complete 6 one-semester courses 

• Produce a thesis that presents the results of a program of research approved by 

the department 

• Pass a final oral examination 



Students who are admitted to Ph.D. candidacy may apply for an automatic 
master's degree. 



128 DEPARTMENTS / Chemistry 

Ph.D. Program. The Ph.D. is primarily a research degree. Graduate education is 
aimed at developing each student's ability to conduct independent, creative research and 
to develop habits of inquiry that will ensure continuing intellectual development 
throughout their careers. The completion of the Ph.D. program is expected to take no 
more than five years of full-time study. Ph.D. students must: 

• Complete 6 one-semester graduate-level courses. No courses are specified. 

Courses are chosen with the approval of the student's advisory committee 
and/or faculty adviser. Courses should be at the 400 level or higher. Certain 
300 level courses in other departments may be acceptable with depart- 
mental approval. 

• Pass an examination involving a written and oral presentation of an original 

research proposal. The written proposal must conform to the format and 
guidelines established by the department. The guidelines are available in the 
department office. The proposal must be given to the committee at least one 
week before the date of the examination. The examination, including any 
follow-up work deemed necessary by the committee, must be completed within 
two months of the end of the student's fourth semester. 

• In addition to the course work listed above, the student must participate in CHEM 

600, 601, or 602 each semester that the student is in residence. 

• The student is required to participate in CHEM 700 Teaching Practicum for 

four semesters. 

• Submit and defend a publishable thesis that represents an original and significant 

contribution to the field of chemistry. 



See CHEM in the Courses of Instruction section. 



129 



Civil and Environmental Engineering 



The George R. Brown School of Engineering 





Chair 






Herb Ward 




Professors 


Associate Professors 


Adjunct Assistant 


Philip B.Bedient 


Satish Nagarajaiah 


Professor 


Ahmad J . Durrani 


Assistant Professors 


Charles J. Newell 


Arthur A. Few, Jr. 


Matthew P. Fraser 


Lecturers 


Mason B. Tomson 


Michael Terk 


Joseph Cibor 


Pol D. Spanos 


Adjunct Professors 


John Grounds 


Anestis S. Veletsos 


James B. Blackburn 


Moyeen Haque 


Calvin H. Ward 


Jean-Yves Bottero 


Stergios Liapis 


Mark R. Wiesner 


Pat H. Moore 


John E. Merwin 


Professors Emeriti 


Can-oU Oubre 


John M. Sedlak 


Ronald P. Nordgren 


Baxter Vieux 


Ed Segner, III 


John E. Merwin 




Tauqir Sheikh 
Christof Spieler 


Degrees Offen 


?d: B.A., M.C.E., M.E.E., M.E.S. 


,M.S.,Ph.D. 



Civil and environmental engineering (C&EE) is a broad and diverse field of study 
that offers students an education with several degree options. The most flexible degree 
options are at the bachelor's level, where students can major in civil engineering or 
complete a double major with any other Rice University major. The double major has two 
tracks , one in environmental engineering sciences ( EES ) , and the other in environmental 
sciences (ES). Three nonthesis graduate degrees (M.C.E., M.E.E., and M.E.S) are 
available to students who desire additional education and specialization in civil engineer- 
ing, environmental engineering, or environmental sciences. Joint M.B.A./Master of 
Engineering degrees are also available in conjunction with the Jesse H. Jones Graduate 
School of Management. 

Students admitted for graduate study leading to M.S. or Ph.D. degrees must 
complete a rigorous course of study that combines advanced course work with scholarly 
research culminating in the public defense of a written thesis. Graduate research is carried 
out in a range of areas reflecting the interests of the department's faculty. Examples 
include structural engineering and mechanics, earthquake engineering, geotechnical 
engineering, computer-aided design, hydrology, water resources and water quality 
engineering, air pollution and its control, and hazardous waste treatment. 



Degree Requirements for B.A. in Civil Engineering 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
For the B.A. degree, students majoring in civil engineering must have a total of at least 
120 semester hours at graduation. The B.A. is not accredited as a professional degree. 



1 30 DEPARTMENTS / Civil and Environmental Engineering 
Specific requirements include: 

MATH 101 and 102 Single Variable BIOS 122 Fundamental Concepts in 

Calculus I and II Biology 

MATH 2 1 1 Ordinary Dijferential PHYS 20 1 Waves and Optics 

Equations and Linear Algebra PHYS 202 Modern Physics 
MATH 212 Multivariable Calculus 

PHYS 101 Mechanics (with Lab) Any two of the following: 

PHYS \Q2 Electricity and Magnetism MECH 200 Classical Thermodynamics 

(with Lab) ELEC 242 Fundamentals of Electrical 
CEVE 2 1 1 Engineering Mechanics Engineering II 

CEVE 300 Mechanics of Solids I CAAM 2 1 1 Introduction to Engineering 
CEVE 302 Strength of Materials Lab Computation 

CEVE363 Applied Fluid MSCI301 Materials Science 

Mechanics ESCI451 Analysis of Environmental 

Data 
Any two of the following: 

CHEM 1 2 1 General Chemistry with Lab Any five additional CEVE courses, 

I or CHEM 122 General Chemistry selected in consultation with an 

with Lab 2 advisor 

ESCI 10 1 The Earth or ESCI 102 

Evolution of the Earth 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Environmental Science and Engineering 

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers the B .A. as a double 
major with any other major at Rice University. The double major has two tracks: one in 
environmental engineering sciences (EES), and one in environmental sciences (ES). 
Faculty from the Wiess School of Natural Sciences work with C&EE faculty in offering 
courses, advising, and administering the ES track of this double major. The double major 
is designed to accommodate: 

• Students wishing to obtain a solid preparation for later graduate study in environ- 
mental engineering, environmental science, or other careers as environmental 
professionals (e.g., environmental economics or environmental law), and 
•Students pursuing nonenvironmental careers (e.g., historians, lawyers, mechanical 
engineers, chemists) who will nonetheless benefit from a knowledge of the 
environmental dimensions of problems and issues they will confront. 

The 68-semester-hour (minimum) double major in environmental science and 
engineering may be taken in conjunction with any stand-alone major offered in any 
school of the university. The EES track is highly recommended for students wishing to 
pursue graduate study in environmental engineering. Students choosing the ES track are 
encouraged to select one of the following participating faculty members from the Wiess 
School of Natural Sciences as their adviser: 

John Anderson (Earth Science) 

Andre Droxler (Earth Science) 

Arthur Few (Physics and Astronomy and Environmental Science) 

F. M. Fisher (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) 

P. A. Harcombe (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) 

William Leeman (Earth Science) 

D. Queller (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) 

R. L. Sass (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) 

Dale Sawyer (Earth Science) 

J. E. Strassmann (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) 

A. Thomhill (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) 



Civil and Environmental Engineering 131 

The key components of the double major include: 

• Foundation course work in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology, re- 

quired in both tracks. 

• A set of 5 undergraduate core courses, required of all double majors, that acquaint 

undergraduates with a range of environmental problems encountered by 
scientists, engineers, managers, and policy makers. Core courses in the EES 
track cover the breadth of water, soil, and air media within the context of 
engineering technologies and approaches to problem solving, and stress 
quantitative analytical tools used to address environmental problems. Core 
courses in the ES track stress the components of the global environment and 
their interactions. 

• 24 semester hours of environmental electives, in both tracks, from four categories: 

(1) social sciences and business, (2) humanities and architecture, (3) natural 
sciences, and (4) engineering. Students may petition to have electives, in 
addition to those currently listed, apply toward the double major. 

Specific Course Requirements for a Double Major (B A.) in Environmental 
Science and Engineering 



General Prerequisites 

CHEM 121 or 151 General Chemistry 

with Laboratory 
CHEM 122 or 152 General Chemistry 

with Laboratory 
MATH 101 Single Variable Calculus I 
MATH 102 Single Variable Calculus II 
PHYS 101 or 125 or 1 1 1 Mechanics 
PHYS 102 or 126 or 1 12 Electricity and 

Magnetism 
BIOS 201 Introductory Biology 
BIOS 202 Introductory Biology 
(Environmental sciences track only) 

1 of the following 2 courses: 
NSCI 230 Computation in Natural 

Science (Environmental sciences 

track only) 
MATH 211 Ordinary Differential 

Equations and Linear Algebra 

(Environmental engineering sciences 

track only) 



Core Courses: Environmental 
Sciences Track 

BIOS 325 Ecology 
GEOL 326 Environmental Geology 
PHYS 443 Atmospheric Science 
or CEVE 41 1 Air Resource 
Management 

2 of the following 3 courses: 
CEVE 401 Introduction to 

Environmental Chemistry 
CEVE 412 Hydrology and 

Watershed Analysis 
GEOL 451 Analysis of 

Environmental Data 
Core Courses: Environmental 

Engineering Sciences Track 
CEVE 401 Introduction to 

Environmental Chemistry 
CEVE 403 Principles of 

Environmental Engineering 
CEVE 41 1 Air Resource 

Management 
CEVE 412 Hydrology and 

Watershed Analysis 
CEVE 434 Chemical Transport and 

Fate in the Environment 



132 DEPARTMENTS / Civil and Environmental Engineering 



Sample Curriculum in the Environmental Engineering Sciences Track 
Freshman Year Sophomore Year 

Fall 



MATH 101 Single Variable Calculus I 

PHYS 101 Mechanics 

CHEM 1 2 1 General Chemistry with 

Laboratory 
Electives 
HPER 101 

Spring 

MATH 102 Single Variable Calculus II 
PHYS 102 Electricity and Magnetism 
CHEM 122 General Chemistry with 

Laboratory 
Electives 
HPER 102 



Fall 

MATH 21 1 Ordinary Differential 

Equations 
BIOS 201 Introductory Biology 
Environmental Elective* 
Environmental Elective 

Spring 

Environmental Elective 
Environmental Elective 

*CEVE 20 1 Introduction to Environ- 
mental Systems recommended as 
environmental elective 



Junior Year 



Senior Year 



Fall 

CEVE 40 1 Introduction to 

Environmental Chemistry 
Environmental Elective 
Environmental Elective 

Spring 

CEVE 41 1 Air Resource Management 



Fall 

CEVE 403 Principles of Environmental 

Engineering 
CEVE 434 Chemical Transport and Fate 

in the Environment 
Environmental Elective 

Spring 

CEVE 4 1 2 Hydrology and Watershed 

Analysis 
Environmental Elective 



24 semester hours of environmental electives are required, with at least 6 semester 
hours of course work from each of four categories. Consult the faculty adviser or 
Department of Environmental Science and Engineering for a list of approved electives. 

Sample Curriculum in Environmental Sciences Track 
Freshman Year Sophomore Year 

Fall 

MATH 101 Single Variable Calculus I 

PHYS 101 Mechanics 

CHEM 121 General Chemistry with 

Laboratory 
Electives 
HPER 101 

Spring 

MATH 102 Single Variable Calculus II 
PHYS 102 Electricity and Magnetism 
CHEM 1 22 General Chemistry with 

Laboratory 
Electives 
HPER 102 



Fall 

NSCI 230 Computation in the Natural 

Sciences 
BIOS 201 Introductory Biology 
Environmental Elective 
Environmental Elective 

Spring 

BIOS 202 Introductory Biology 
Environmental Elective 
Environmental Elective 



Civil and Environmental Engineering 133 

Junior Year Senior Year 

Fall Fall 

BIOS 325 Ecology GEOL 451 Analysis of Environmental 

GEOL 326 Environmental Geology Data or ENVI 401 Introduction to 

Environmental Elective Environmental Chemistry 

Environmental Elective 
Spring Environmental Elective 

PHYS 443 Atmospheric Science 
or ENVI 411 Air Resource Management Spring 

Environmental Elective CEVE 412 Hydrology and Watershed 

Analysis 

24 semester hours of environmental electives are required, with at least 6 semester 
hours of course work from each of four categories. Consult the faculty adviser or 
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering for a list of approved electives. 

Degree Requirements for M.C j:., M£^., M£JS., MJS., and Ph.D. 

Admission. Applicants pursuing graduate education in structural engineering, 
structural mechanics, and geotechnical engineering should have a B.S.C£. with a 
significant emphasis on structural engineering, but students with other undergraduate 
degrees may apply if they have adequate preparation in mathematics, mechanics, and 
structural analysis and design. Courses such as engineering technology or construction 
technology, however, do not represent adequate preparation. Applicants for the M.E.E. 
and the M.E.S. must have a B.S. or B.A. in related areas of science and engineering. 
Successful applicants typically have at least a 3.00 (B) grade point average in under- 
graduate work and high Graduate Record Examination (GRJE) scores. For general 
university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70) and Admission to Gradu- 
ate Study (pages 64-65). 

M.C£. Program. The Master of Civil Engineering (M.C.E.) is a professional 
nonthesis degree requiring 30 hours of study. Students with a B.S. in Civil Engineering 
are eligible to apply. Areas of study include structural dynamics, offshore technology, 
reinforced concrete and prestressed concrete, reliability of systems, random vibrations, 
soil dynamics, soil-structure interaction, and structural control. For general university 
requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). To earn an M.C.E. degree, students 
must: complete 30 semester hours of approved courses 

M.Bj\yM.C£. Program. For general university requirements, see Graduate 
Degrees (pages 65-70) . See also Management and Accounting (pages 1 97-207) . To earn 
a M.B.AyM.C.E. degree, students must: 

• Complete 24 semester hours of civil engineering courses 

• Complete 52 semester hours of business administration courses 

M££. Program. The Master of Environmental Engineering (M.E.E.) is a profes- 
sional nonthesis degree requiring 30 hours of study. Students who have a B.S. degree in 
any field of engineering may apply. Areas of study include hydrology and water 
resources engineering, water treatment, water chemistry, air pollution and its control, 
and hazardous waste treatment. Although the program is open to all qualified appli- 
cants, candidates usually are completing undergraduate programs in environmental 
engineering and wish to extend their education into a fifth year of specialized study. 



134 DEPARTMENTS / Civil and Environmental Engineering 

M.E.S. Program. The Master of Environmental Science (M.E.S.) is a professional 
nonthesis degree requiring 30 hours of study. To enter the M.E.S. program, applicants 
must have a B .A . or B .S . degree in any of the natural or physical sciences. Areas of study 
include hydrology and water resources engineering, water treatment, water chemistry, 
air pollution and its control, and hazardous waste treatment. Although the program is 
open to all qualified applicants, candidates typically are completing undergraduate 
programs in environmental science and wish to extend their education into a fifth year 
of specialized study. 

M.S. Program. The Master of Science degree is offered in both civil engineering 
and environmental engineering. For general university requirements, see Graduate 
Degrees (pages 65-70). To earn a M.S. degree, students must: 

• Complete at least 24 semester hours of approved courses. For students studying 

Environmental Engineering this must include one course each in environmen- 
tal chemistry, water treatment, hydrology, and air quality (comparable course 
work completed previously may be substituted for the core courses) 

• Select a thesis committee according to department requirements and conduct 

original research in consultation with the committee. 

• Present and defend in oral examination an approved research thesis. 
Students take the oral exam only after the committee determines the thesis to be in 

a written format acceptable for public defense. Normally, students take two academic 
years and the intervening summer to complete the degree. 

Students intending to extend their studies into the Ph.D. degree program should note 
that the department does not grant an automatic M.S. degree to candidates who have not 
written a satisfactory master's thesis. 

Ph.D. Program in Civil Engineering. For general university requirements, 
see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). To earn a Ph.D. degree in civil engineering, 
students must: 

• Complete at least 48 semester hours of approved courses with high standing. 

• Pass a comprehensive preliminary examination testing the candidate's knowledge 

of the field and ability to think in a creative manner. 

• Pass an oral qualifying examination on the proposed thesis research and related 

topics. 

• Complete a thesis that constitutes an original contribution to knowledge. 

• Pass a final public oral examination on the thesis and related topics. 

PhJ). Program in Environmental Engineering. To earn a Ph.D. degree in 
environmental engineering sciences, candidates must successfully accomplish the fol- 
lowing (spending at least four semesters in full-time study at Rice): 

• Complete 90 semester hours of approved course work with high standing. 

• Pass a preliminary written examination on the field of environmental engineering 

sciences. 

• Pass a qualifying examination on course work, proposed research, and related 

topics. 

• Complete a dissertation indicating an ability to do original and scholarly research. 

• Pass a formal public oral examination on the thesis and related topics. 



Civil and Environmental Engineering 1 35 

Ph.D. candidates in environmental engineering sciences take the preliminary exam, 
administered by department faculty , after two semesters of course work. Candidates who 
pass this exam then form a doctoral committee according to department requirements. 
The qualifying examination administered by the doctoral committee after candidates 
develop a research proposal evaluates their preparation for the proposed research and 
identifies any areas requiring additional course work or study. 

See CEVE in the Courses of Instruction section. 



136 

Classical Studies 



The Schoo! of Humanities 



Chair 

Hilary S. Mackie 

Professor 

Harvey Yunis 
Assistant Professor 

Scott McGill 
Lecturer 

Kristine Gilmartin Wallace 



Degree Offered: B.A. 

The classical studies major offers instruction in the Greek and Latin languages, in 
Greek and Roman literature (studied in the original and in translation), in the classical 
civilizations surveyed as a whole, and in particular themes, genres, and periods of 
classical culture and its influence through subsequent ages. 

We recognize that students come to the study of ancient Greece and Rome with a 
whole spectrum of different kinds of interest. Some will want to concentrate on learning 
the ancient languages and reading the classical texts in the original Greek or Latin. Others 
will desire a broader introduction to the cultures of Greece and Rome and their legacy. 
Still others will be looking for some combination of these two approaches. With this in 
mind, the classical studies major provides maximum flexibility without sacrifice of 
focus. We cater to students who wish to prepare for graduate school in classical studies 
and also to students who are interested in Greek and Roman culture for other reasons and 
who wish to take a less specialized approach. Students will be able to explore ancient 
Greece and Rome from a variety of different angles and with whatever emphasis best 
suits their individual needs and goals. 

To satisfy the requirements for the classical studies major, students must complete 
30 semester hours of courses listed under "Greek," "Latin," and "Classics." Courses 
listed under "Greek" and "Latin" concentrate on the acquisition of language skills and 
on the reading and interpretation of texts in the original languages. Courses listed under 
"Classics" explore, in translation, the literature, history, philosophy, art, and other 
aspects of Greek and Roman civilization and also the effect that Greece and Rome have 
had on literature and other traditions in the West. These courses in translation regularly 
include freshman seminars. 

Classical Studies majors will also, if they wish, have the opportunity to engage in 
research . In the final semester of study , a student majoring in Classical Studies may enroll 
in CLAS 493 , in which the student writes a senior thesis on a topic of the student's choice 
in close consultation with a particular faculty member. 

Further information on the classical studies major is available from faculty mem- 
bers. Faculty also help students arrange travel to Greece or Italy, whether to work on a 
dig or to study at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. 



Classical Studies 137 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Classical Studies 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-22). 

The requirements listed here are effective for students declaring a classical studies 
major in 2002-03 or later. Others should consult the General Announcements for 200 1 - 
02. or talk to the undergraduate coordinator. 

Students majoring in classical studies must complete at least 30 semester hours (10 
courses) listed under "Greek." "Latin," or "Classics." The precise combination of Greek, 
Latin, and Classics courses is to be determined by the student in consultation v^'ith the 
undergraduate coordinator, to ensure an individual course of study that is tailored to the 
student's own interests and goals. 

Some courses offered by the departments of History and Philosophy also satisfy 
requirements for the classical studies major. For advice on which courses do this, consult 
any member of the classical studies faculty. 

See CLAS, GREE, and LATI in the Courses of Instruction section. 



138 



Cognitive Sciences 



The School of Social Sciences 



Director 

Eric Margolis 



Professors 

John W.Clark, Jr. 
Philip W. Davis 
Richard E. Grandy 
Stephen L. Klineberg 
Mark Kulstad 
Randi C. Martin 
James Pomerantz 
David J. Schneider 
Devika Subramanian 
Stephen A. Tyler 
Michael Watkins 
James F. Young 
Professor Emeritus 
Sydney M. Lamb 



Associate Professors 

Michel Achard 
Suzanne E. Kemmer 
David M. Lane 
Eric Margolis 
Tony Ro 

Assistant Professors 
Michael Barlow 
Darcy Burgund 
Michael Byrne 
Denise Chen 
Robert Englebretson 
Nancy Niedzielski 
Geoffrey Potts 
Sherrilyn Roush 



Degree Offered: B.A. 

The cognitive sciences provide a multidisciplinary study of the mind. Researchers 
in this field seek to understand such mental phenomena as perception, thought, memory, 
the acquisition and use of language, learning, concept formation, and consciousness. 

Research projects in the cognitive sciences may involve observing the development 
of mental skills in children, programming computers to engage in complex problem 
solving, or analyzing the nature of meaning. Methods include observation and analysis, 
model building, experimentation, and the computer simulation of mental structures and 
processes. Some investigators focus on relations between brain structures and behavior, 
some work with computer simulation, and others work at more abstract philosophical 
levels. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Cognitive Science 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students majoring in cognitive sciences must complete 7 core courses and 5 additional 
courses (see below). Among the 5 additional courses, at least 3 and no more than 4 must 
be in a single area of concentration— linguistics, philosophy, psychology, or neuro- 
science. 



Introductory Courses 

Because the major is interdisciplinary, no single course introduces the full range of 
the subject. However, students who are interested in majoring in cognitive sciences 
should take one or more of the following courses during their first and second years: 
LING 2(X), PHIL 103, PSYC 101 , or PSYC 203. 



Cognitive Sciences 139 

Honors Program 

Students with a 3.5 GPA in cognitive sciences and 3.3 overall GPA may apply for 
the cognitive sciences honors program. Students in the honors program are expected to 
conduct an independent research project of either one or two semesters under the 
guidance of a member of the cognitive sciences faculty. Students who wish to enter this 
program should consult with prospective advisors during their junior year and submit a 
proposal by the end of the semester preceeding the initiation of the project. Typically, this 
means submitting a proposal by the end of the junior year and beginning the project 
during the fall of the senior year. Proposals will be reviewed by both the supervisor and 
the program director. Students who undertake a two-semester project will be allowed to 
continue into the second semester only if their advisor judges that sufficient progress has 
been made during the first semester. At the end of a project, honors students are expected 
to submit a detailed final report to both their advisor and the program director and make 
an oral presentation. For more details, contact the program director. 

Core Courses 

The core courses are divided into seven groups. Majors must take one course from 
each group. 



Computer Science 

COMP 200 Elements of Computer 

Science 
COMP 210 Introduction to Principles 

of Scientific Computation 

Psychology 

PSYC 203 Introduction to Cognitive 
Psychology 

Linguistics 

LING 200 Introduction to the Scientific 

Study of Language 
LING 300 Linguistic Analysis 

Advanced Linguistics 

LING 306 Language and the Mind 

LING 3 1 5 Semantics 



Philosophy 

PHIL 103 Philosophical Aspects of 

Cognitive Science 
PHIL 312 Mathematical Logic 
PHIL 305 Philosophy of Mind 

Advanced Psychology 

PSYC 351 Psychology of Perception 

PSYC 362 Biopsychology 

Miscellaneous 

COMP 440 Artificial Intelligence 
LING 3 1 7 Language and Computers 
PSYC 430 Computational Modeling of 
Cognitive Processes (formerly cross- 
listed as CSCI 410) 
PSYC 352 Formal Foundations of 
Cognitive Sciences 



Additional Courses 

Note: you may not use a single course to satisfy both a core course requirement and 
an additional course requirement. 



Cognitive Sciences 

CSCI 390 Supervised Research in 

Cognitive Science 
CSCI 48 1 Honors Project 
CSCI 482 Honors Project 



Computer Science 

COMP 200 Elements of Computer 

Science 
COMP 210 Introduction to Principles of 

Scientific Computation 
COMP 212 Intermediate Programming 
COMP 440 Artificial Intelligence 
COMP 450 Algorithmic Robotics 



140 DEPARTMENTS / Cognitive Sciences 



Linguistics 

LING 200 Introduction to the Scientific 

Study of Language 
LING 300 Linguistic Analysis 
LING 301 Phonetics 
LING 306 Language and the Mind 
LING 311 Phonology 
LING 3 1 5 Semantics 
LING 317 iMnguage and Computers 
LING 402 Syntax and Computers 
LING 403 Modern Linguistic Theory 
LING 4 1 1 Neurolinguistics 
LING 4 1 2 Language and Intelligence 
LING 467 Computational Projects 
LING 490 Discourse Analysis 

Neuroscience 

Many of the neuroscience courses are 
taught by Baylor College of Medicine 
faculty. For more information, see http:// 
www .ruf .rice .edu/~neurosci/. 

BIOS 421 Neurobiology 

ELEC 48 1 Furulamentals of Systems 

Physiology and Biophysics 
LING 41 1 Neurolinguistics 
PYSC 362 Biopsychology 
PSYC 432 Brain and Behavior (formally 

cross-listed as CSCI 420) 
NEUR 500 Functional Neuroanatomy 

and Systems Neuroscience 
NEUR 50 1 Cognitive Neuroscience I 
NEUR 502 Cognitive Neuroscience II 
NEUR 503 Molecular Neuroscience I 

and II 
NEUR 504 Cellular Neurophysiology I 

and II 
NEUR 505 Optical Imaging in 

Neuroscience 
NEUR 506 Learning and Memory 
NEUR 5 1 1 Integrative Neuroscience 

Core Course (first semester) 



NEUR 5 1 2 Integrative Neuroscience 

Core Course (second semester) 
NEUR 5 1 5 Neural Development 

Philosophy 

PHIL 1 03 Philosophical Aspects of 

Cognitive Science 
PHIL 303 Theory of Knowledge 
PHIL 305 Mathematical Logic 
PHIL 3 1 2 Philosophy of Mind 
PHIL 353 Philosophy of Language 
PHIL 357 Incompleteness, 

Undecidability, and Computability 

Psychology 

PSYC 308 Memory 
PSYC 309 Psychology of Language 
PSYC 340 Research Methods 
PSYC 351 Psychology of Perception 
PSYC 352 Formal Foundations of 

Cognitive Science 
PSYC 360 Thinking 
PSYC 362 Biopsychology 
PSYC 370 Introduction to Human 

Factors 
PSYC 409 Methods in Human-Computer 

Interaction 
PSYC 411 History of Psychology 
PSYC 430 Computatiorml Modeling of 

Cognitive Processes 
PSYC 432 Brain and Behavior (formally 

cross-listed as CSCI 420) 
PSYC 44 1 Human-Computer Interaction 
PSYC 465 Olfactory Perception 

Other Departments 

ANTH 406 Cognitive Studies in 

Anthropology and Linguistics 
ELEC 20 1 An Introduction to 

Engineering Design 
ELEC 498 Introduction to Robotics 
STAT 300 Model Building 



See CSCI in the Courses of Instruction Section. 



141 



Computational and Applied Mathematics 
The George R. Brown School of Engineering 



Chair 

William W. Symes 



Professors 

John Edward Akin (joint: MEMS) 

Michael M. Carroll (joint: MEMS) 

Steven J. Cox 

Danny C. Sorensen 

William W. Symes 

Richard A. Tapia 

Yin Zhang 

Professors Emeriti 

Robert E. Bixby 

Sam H. Davis (joint: CENG) 

John E. Dennis 

Angelo Miele (joint: MEMS) 

Paul E. Pfeiffer 

Henry Rachford 

Chao-Cheng Wang (joint: MEMS) 

Associate Professors 

Liliana Borcea 

Matthias Heinkenschloss 

Assistant Professors 

Mark Embree 

Petr Kloucek 

Adjunct Professors 



J. Bee Bednar 

Richard Carter 

Evin Joyce Cramer 

Elmer Eisner 

Roland Glowinski 

Emilio J. Nuiiez 

Donald W. Peaceman 

Michael B.Ray 

Jacques R. Tabanou 

Phuong A. Vu 

Adjunct Associate Professors 

Amr El-Bakry 

Michael W. Trosset 

Adjunct Assistant Professors 

Charles Audet 

Aladin M. Boriek 

Cassandra M. McZeal 

Research Professors 

Robert E. Bixby 

John E. Dennis 

Faculty Fellows 

Alan Carle 

Michael Fagan 



Degrees Offered: B.A., M.C.A.M., M.C.S.E., M.A., Ph.D. 

Courses within this major can provide foundations applicable to the many fields 
of engineering, physical sciences, life sciences, behavioral and social sciences, and 
computer science. Undergraduate majors have considerable freedom to plan a course of 
study consistent with their particular interests. 

The professional degree (M.C.A.M.), for persons interested in practicing within 
this field, emphasizes general applied mathematics, operations research and optimiza- 
tion, and numerical analysis, while the M.A. and Ph.D. programs concentrate on 
research. Faculty research interests fall in the four general areas of numerical analysis 
and computation, physical mathematics, operations research and optimization, and 
mathematical modeling in physical, biological, or behavioral sciences. 

A further advanced degree program in computational science and engineering 
(C.S.E.) addresses the current need for sophisticated computation in both engineering 
and the sciences. Such computation requires an understanding of parallel and vector 
capabilities and a range of subjects including visualization, networking, and program- 
ming environments. An awareness of a variety of new algorithms and analytic 
techniques is also essential to maximizing the power of the new computational tools. 



142 DEPARTMENTS / Computational and Applied Mathematics 

A joint M.B.A./Master of Engineering degree is also available in conjunction with 
the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Management. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Computational and Applied Mathematics 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students majoring in computational and applied mathematics are required to complete 
the 51 semester hours spelled out in the following program of study. 

Introductory Courses: Typically completed during the first two years 
MATH 101 Single Variable Calculus I* CAAM 210 Introduction to Engineering 
MATH 102 Single Variable Calculus II Computation 

MATH 2 1 2 Multivariable Calculus CAAM 335 Matrix Analysis 

COMP 1 10 Computation in Science and 
Engineering* 

^Students with prior experience with calculus and/or computational science may 
petition the department for a waiver. 

Entering students should enroll in the most advanced course commensurate with 
their background; advice is available from the CAAM department during Orientation 
Week. 

Intermediate Courses: Typically completed by the end of the third year 

CAAM 336 Differential Equations in CAAM 378 Introduction to Operations 
Science and Engineering Research and Optimization 

(or STAT 3 1 Probability and Statistics MATH 40 1 Analysis I 

or STAT 33 1 Applied Probability) MATH 402 Analysis II 

Advanced Courses: Typically completed during the fourth year 

CAAM 453 Numerical Analysis I 
CAAM 454 Numerical Analysis II 

Electives: 5 Courses at 300 level or above; 2 of which must be at the 400 level or 
above. (Chosen in consultation with the CAAM undergraduate advisor.) 

Highly Recommended Electives 

CAAM 4 1 5 Theoretical Neuroscience MATH 423 Partial Differential Equa- 

CAAM 420 Computational Science I tions 

CAAM 436 Partial Differential Equa- MATH 425 Real Analysis 

tions of Mathematical Physics MATH 427 Complex Analysis 

CAAM 460 Optimization Theory STAT 43 1 Mathematical Statistics I 

STAT 432 Mathematical Statistics II 

Degree Requirements for M.C.A.M., M.A., and Ph.D. in Computational 
and Applied Mathematics 

Admission. Admission to graduate study in computational and applied mathemat- 
ics is open to qualified students holding bachelor's or master's degrees (or their 
equivalent) in engineering, mathematics, or the physical, biological, mathematical, or 
behavioral sciences. Department faculty evaluate the previous academic record and 
credentials of each applicant individually. For general information, see Graduate 
Degrees (pages 65-70) and Admission to Graduate Study (pages 64-65). 



Computational and Applied Mathematics 143 

Applicants should be aware that it normally takes two years to obtain a master's 
degree and an additional two to four years for the doctoral degree. 

M.C.A.M. Program. This professional degree program emphasizes the applied 
aspects of mathematics. The M.C.A.M. degree requires satisfactory completion of at 
least 30 semester hours of course work approved by the department. 

M.A. Program. For an M.A. in computational and applied mathematics, 
students must: 

• Complete at least 30 semester hours at the graduate level, including 5 courses 

in computational and applied mathematics, in addition to thesis work 

• Produce an original thesis acceptable to the department 

• Perform satisfactorily on a final public oral examination on the thesis 

For students working toward the Ph.D., successful performance on the master's 
thesis may fulfill the Ph.D. thesis proposal requirements upon approval by the thesis 
committee. 

Ph.D. Program. For a Ph.D. in computational and applied mathematics, 
students must: 

• Complete a course of study approved by the department, including at least 

2 courses outside the major area 

• Perform satisfactorily on preliminary and qualifying examinations 

and reviews 

• Produce an original thesis acceptable to the department 

• Perform satisfactorily on a final public oral examination on the thesis 

Financial Assistance. Graduate fellowships, research assistantships, and graduate 
scholarships are available and are awarded on the basis of merit to qualified students. 
Current practice in the department is for most doctoral students in good standing to 
receive some financial aid. 

Degree Requirements for M.C.S.E. and Ph.D. in Computational Science 
and Engineering 

C.S.E. Program Area. Recognizing the increasing reliance of modem science and 
engineering on computation as an aid to research, development, and design, the 
Department of Computational and Applied Mathematics, in conjunction with the 
Departments of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Earth Science, Computer Science, 
Chemical Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Environmental Science 
and Engineering, and Statistics, has established an advanced degree program in compu- 
tational science and engineering (C.S.E.). The program focuses on modem computa- 
tional techniques and provides a resource for training and expertise in this area. 

The program is administered by a faculty committee chosen by the deans of 
engineering and natural sciences, with ultimate oversight by the provost. The Computa- 
tional Science Committee (CSC) helps students design an appropriate course of study 
and sets the examination requirements. 

Students may enter the C.S.E, program either directly or indirectly through one of 
the participating departments (see list above). In all cases, however, students must fulfill 
the admissions requirements of one department, which is their associated department. 
Students then meet the normal requirements for graduate study within that department 
in every way (including teaching and other duties) except that the curriculum and 
examination requirements are set by the CSC. 



144 DEPARTMENTS / Computational and Applied Mathematics 



M.C.S.E. Program. This program's intent is to produce professional experts in 
scientific computing able to work as part of an interdisciplinary research team. Training 
is concentrated in state-of-the-art numerical methods, high-performance computer 
architectures, use of software development tools for parallel and vector computers, and 
the application of these techniques to at least one scientific or engineering area. For 
general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). 

For the M .C .S .E . degree, students must complete at least 30 semester hours of course 
work approved by the CSC; no more than 2 of the courses may be taken at the 300 level, 
taken outside the C.S.E. program area, or satisfied by transfer credit. Each student's 
program of study must meet the requirements listed below. Modification of requirements 
can be requested by petition. 

Required Courses 

COMP 4 1 2 Compiler Construction Computational Science Electives 

(or ELEC 425 Computer Systems 4 courses selected from an approved 

Architecture) list of COMP or CAAM courses (at least 

CAAM 420 Computational Science I 2 courses at the 500 level) 

(taken as soon as possible) 
CAAM 520 Computational Science II Open Electives 

(taken as soon as possible) 2 approved courses other than CAAM or 

COMP courses at the 300 level or above 
/ course from the following: (a computational project taken within a 

CAAM 452 Computational Methods for participating department also satisfies this 

Differential Equations requirement) 

CAAM 453 Numerical Analysis I 

CAAM 454 Numerical Analysis II Application Areas 

CAAM 464 Numerical Optimization An appropriate sequence of courses from 

CAAM 55 \ Numerical Linear Algebra a participating application area at the 

300 level or above 

PhD. Program. Study at the doctoral level seeks to advance the field through 
original research. For general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 
65-70). For the Ph.D. in computational science and engineering, students must: 

• Complete a course of study approved by the CSC, including at least 2 courses 

outside the major area 

• Perform satisfactorily on preliminary and qualifying examinations and reviews 

• Complete 2 courses or a reading examination on an approved foreign language 

• Produce an original thesis acceptable to the CSC 

• Perform satisfactorily on a final public oral examination on the thesis 

See CAAM in the Courses of Instruction section. 



145 



Computer Science 



The George R. Brown School of Engineering 



Chair 

Keith Cooper 



Professors 

Robert S. Cartwright. Jr. 

Peter Druschel 

Ronald N. Goldman 

G. Anthony Gorry 

Kenneth W. Kennedy, Jr. 

Moshe Y. Vardi 

Joe D. Warren 

Devika Subramanian 

Adjunct Professors 

Jack Dongarra 

Geoffrey Fox 

Charles Henry 

S. Lennart Johnsson 

Associate Professors 

Alan L. Cox 

Dave Johnson 

Lydia Kavraki 

Adjunct Associate Professors 

P. Read Montague 

Scott K. Warren 

Assistant Professors 

Eugene Ng 

Scott Rixner 



Walid Taha 

Dan Wallach 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Vikram Adve 

Senior Faculty Fellow 

John Mellor-Crummey 

Research Scientists 

Bradley Broom 

Zoran Budimlic 

Robert Fowler 

Richard Hanson 

Guohua Jin 

Charles Koelbel 

Linda Torczon 

Lecturers 

Ian Barland 

John Greiner 

Dung "Zung" Nguyen 

Stephen Wong 

Postdoctoral Research 

Associate 

Doron Bustan 

Mark Moll 



Joint Appointments 



(with Electrical and 
Computer Engineering) 
Professor 

J. Robert Jump 
Associate Professors 

Joseph Cavallaro 
Edward Knightly 
Peter Varman 
Assistant Professor 
Vijay Pai 



(with Psychology) 
Professor 

Daniel N. Osherson 

(with Chemistry) 
Professor 

James Tour 



Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S.C.S., M.C.S., M.S., and Ph.D. 



146 DEPARTMENTS / Computer Science 

Computer science is concerned with the study of computers and computing, 
focusing on algorithms, programs and programming, and computational systems. The 
main goal of the discipline is to build a systematic body of knowledge, theories, and 
models that explain the properties of computational systems, and to show how this body 
of knowledge can be used to produce solutions to real- world computational problems. 
Computer science is the intellectual discipline underlying information technology, 
which is widely accepted now as the ascendant technology of the next century. Students 
in computer science at Rice benefit from the latest in equipment and ideas as well as the 
flexibility of the educational programs. The research interests of the faculty include 
algorithms and complexity, artificial intelligence and robotics, compilers, distributed 
and parallel computation, graphics and visualization, operating systems, and program- 
ming languages. 

The department offers two undergraduate degrees: the Bachelor of Arts degree 
(B.A.) and the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science degree (B.S.C.S.). The 
department offers two master's degrees: the professional Master of Computer Science 
degree (M.C.S.) and the research-oriented Master of Science degree (M.S.). The 
department also offers a doctoral degree (Ph.D.). 

A joint M.B.A./Master of Engineering degree is also available in conjunction with 
the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Management. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Computer Science 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
The undergraduate program in computer science has been designed to accommodate a 
wide range of student interests. The program is sufficiently flexible for a student to 
customize it to his or her interests. A student can develop a broad educational program 
that couples computer science education with a variety of other fields in engineering, 
natural sciences, the humanities, or social sciences. Alternatively, a program might be 
designed for a student preparing for graduate study in computer science or for a career 
in computing and information technology. 

The undergraduate program consists of required core courses, which are introduc- 
tory courses covering material required of all majors; required breadth courses, which are 
upper-level courses ensuring knowledge in a broad range of areas; and electives, which 
give students the freedom to explore specific interests. Students majoring in computer 
science must complete between 58 and 60 semester hours of courses in these three 
categories. Students graduating with a B.A. in computer science must have at least 120 
semester hours. 

Core Courses: 8 courses for a total of 28 hours, required for all majors, usually 
taken in the freshman and sophomore years 

MATH 101/102 Single Variable Cal- COMP 320 Introduction to Computer 

cuius I and // Organization 

COMP 210 Introduction to Principles of 

Scientific Computation 1 course from the following: 

COMP 2 1 2 Intermediate Programming MATH 2 1 1 Ordinary Differential 
COMP 280 Mathematics of Computer Equations and Linear Algebra 

Science MATH 22 1 Honors Calculus III 

COMP 3 1 4 Applied Algorithms and *Preferred choice 

Data Structures 



Computer Science 147 

Breadth Courses: 7 courses for a total of 23 hours, required for all majors, usually taken 

in the junior and senior years 
STAT 33 1 * or 3 1 Probability COMP 3 1 1 or 4 1 2 Programming 

CAAM 353 Numerical Analysis Languages 

MATH 355* or CAAM 335 Linear COMP 481 or 482 Theoiy 

Algebra COMP 42 1 Operating Systems 

ELEC 220 Computer Engineering 
Fundamentals 

Electives: 2 courses for a total of 6 to 8 hours in computer science at the 300 level 
or higher. One of these may be an independent study project. 

Degree Requirements for B.S. in Computer Science 

The B .S . degree is designed for students who are interested in a more in-depth study 
of computer science to prepare themselves for a professional career in the computing 
industry. To receive a B.S. degree, a student must complete all the requirements of the 
B.A. degree (i.e., core, breadth, and electives), with the addition of PHYS 101/102 (or 
PHYS 111/112) (7 hours) to ensure a strong scientific background. In addition, the 
student must complete the depth component. This component consists of a coherent set 
of four or five courses specializing in some area of computer science. The same course 
cannot satisfy both the breadth requirement and the depth requirement. Students can 
adopt a preset depth component or design their own components, consisting of at least 
1 5 hours .B.S. degree plans have to be approved by departmental advisers by no later than 
the end of the junior year. Sample curricula are listed on the departmental website; more 
information is available from department advisers. The computer science requirements 
of the B.S. degree total 79 to 81 semester hours. For a B.S. degree in computer science, 
a total of 128 semester hours is required. 

Degree Requirements for M.C.S. and M.S. in Computer Science 

For general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). The 
professional M.C.S. degree is a terminal degree for students intending to pursue a 
technical career in the computer industry. To earn the M.C.S. degree, students must 
successfully complete 30 semester hours of course work approved by the department 
and following the plan formulated in consultation with the department adviser. 

Areas of concentration for the M .C .S . include algorithms and complexity , artificial 
intelligence, compiler construction, distributed and parallel computing, graphics and 
geometric modeling, operating systems, and programming languages. The professional 
program normally requires three semesters of study. 

The M.C.S. degree with a concentration in Bioinformatics is for students intending 
to pursue a technical career in the biotechnology industry. Students learn to integrate 
mathematical and computational methods to analyze biological, biochemical, and 
biophysical data. This program requires prior background in computer science, bio- 
sciences, and mathematics. To earn this degree, students must successfully complete 
40 hours of approved course work meeting departmental requirements. This program 
normally requires four semesters of study. 

The M.S. degree is a research degree requiring a thesis in addition to course work. 



1 48 DEPARTMENTS / Computer Science 

Degree Requirements for Ph.D. in Computer Science 

The Ph.D. degree is for students planning to pursue a career in computer science 
research and education. The doctoral program normally requires four to six years of 
study. To earn a Ph.D. in computer science, students must: 

• Meet departmental course requirements 

• Complete a COMP 590 project by the end of the third semester 

• Complete a master's thesis by the end of the fifth semester, if a previous master's 

thesis has not been approved by the graduate committee 

• Pass a qualifying examination in an area of specialization within seven semesters 

after entering the Ph.D. program 

• Conduct original research, submit an acceptable Ph.D. thesis proposal, 

and successfully defend the thesis proposal 

• Submit an acceptable Ph.D. thesis that reports research results and pass a final 

oral defense 

Students who successfully meet the first three requirements are awarded the Master of 
Science degree. Students successfully meeting all requirements, plus any departmental 
and university requirements, are awarded the Ph.D. degree. 

Financial Assistance. Fellowships and research assistantships are available to 
students in the Ph.D. program. Both provide a monthly stipend for the academic year 
and cover all tuition expenses. More substantial monthly stipends may be available , 
during the summer for students working on departmental research projects. In all cases, 
continued support is contingent on satisfactory progress in the program. Ph.D. students 
also are expected to assist in the teaching and administration of undergraduate and 
graduate courses. 

Additional Information. For further information and application materials, write 
the Department of Computer Science-MS 132, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, 
Houston , Texas 7725 1-1892. 

See COMP in the Courses of Instruction section. 



149 



Earth Science 



The Wiess School of Natural Sciences 



Chair 

Alan Levander 



Professors 

John B . Anderson 
Hans G. Ave Lallemant 
Richard G.Gordon 
William P. Leeman 
Dale S. Sawyer 
Manik Talwani 
Associate Professors 
Gerald R. Dickens 
Andre W. Droxler 
Andreas Luttge 
Colin A. Zelt 
Assistant Professors 
Cin-Ty Lee 
Adrian Lenardic 
Julia Morgan 
Fenglin Wiu 
Adjunct Professors 
K. K. Bissada 



Carlos A. Cramez 

Stephen H. Danbom 

Jeffrey J. Dravis 

Robert B . Dunbar 

Paul M. Harris 

Garry D. Jones 

M. Turhan Taner 

John C. Van Wagoner 

Gerard M. Wellington 

James L. Wilson 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

W.C. Rusty Riese 

Adjunct Assistant Professors 

Vitor Abreu 

Alan D. Brandon 

Robert Herrick 

Paul D. Spudis 

Gabor Tari 

Robert W. Wellner 

Yitian Xiao 



Degrees Ojfered: B.A., B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

All undergraduate majors in earth science take a 4 -course core sequence, typically 
in the sophomore and junior years, on earth processes, materials, observations, and 
history. Majors also take introductory courses in mathematics, chemistry, and in many 
cases, physics and biology. 

The selection of upper-division courses and additional science courses depends on 
which major, B .A. or B .S ., and, for the B .5. major, which of five tracks are chosen by the 
student: geology, geochemistry, geophysics, environmental earth science, or a track 
designed by the student subject to the approval of the department undergraduate adviser. 
The program of study typically includes experience with analytical equipment, computer 
systems, and fieldwork. 

The B.S. in earth science degree should be chosen by students planning a career or 
further study in earth science or a related field. The B .A . in earth science degree has fewer 
requirements and might be a good choice for students planning a career or further study 
to which earth science is incidental. 



For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 



1 50 DEPARTMENTS / Earth Science 



Degree Requirements for B.S. in Earth Science 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
B.S. majors must also complete the "Additional Requirements" for one track 
(described below). 

The following courses are required for all tracks: 

MATH 101/102 Single Variable Calculus ESCI 321 Earth System Evolution and 

Cycles 
ESCI 322 Earth Chemistry and Materials 
ESCI 323 Earth Structure and Deforma- 
tion with lab 

ESCI 324 Earth 's Interior 



I and II 
CHEM 121/122 or \5\/l52 General 

Chemistry I and II with lab 
PHYS 101/102 or 11 \ I \\2 Introductory 

Physics I and II with lab 



Additional Requirements for the Geology Track 



The following courses are required: 

MATH 21 1 Ordinary Differential 
Ecjuations and Linear Algebra 

ESCI 334 Geological and Geophysical 
Techniques 

ESCI 390 Field Camp 

Choose one of the following courses: 
COMP 1 10 Computation in Natural 

Science 
CAAM 210 Introduction to Engineering 

Computation (FORTRAN) 
CAAM 21 1 Introduction to Engineering 

Computation (C ) 
COMP 210 Principles of Computing and 

Programming 

Choose one of the following courses: 
ESCI 412 Advanced Petrology 
ESCI 430 Principles of Trace-Element 

and Isotope Geochemistry 



Choose one of the following courses: 
ESCI 427 Sequence Stratigraphy 
ESCI 52 1 Seminar in Applied Micropal- 

eontology 

Choose one of the following courses: 
ESCI 504 Siliciclastic Depositional 

Systems 
ESCI 506 Carbonate Depositional 

Systems 
ESCI 42 1 Paleoceanography 

Choose one of the following courses: 
ESCI 446 Solid Earth Geophysics 

ESCI 442 Exploration Geophysics I 

Choose one of the following courses: 
ESCI 463 Advance Structural Geology 
ESCI 428 Geologic Interpretation of 

Reflection Seismic Profdes 
ESCI 464 Global Tectonics 



Additional Requirements for the Geochemistry Track 

The following courses are required: 

• BIOS 201 Introductory Biology I 

• A 6 hour field-based course or equivalent, approved by the department undergradu- 

ate adviser. 



Choose 9 hours from the following: 
ESCI 412 Advanced Petrology 
ESCI 421 Paleoceanography 
ESCI 458 Thermodynamics/Kinetics for 

Geoscientists 
ESCI 203 Biogeochemistry 
ESCI 430 Principles of Trace-Element 

and Isotope Geochemistry 



Choose 9 hours from the following: 
All upper division ESCI courses 
CEVE 40 1 Introduction to Environmen- 
tal Chemistry 
CEVE 403 Principles of Environmental 

Engineering 
CEVE 434 Chemical Transport and Fate 

in the Environment 
CEVE 532 Physical-Chemical Processes 
in Environmental Engineering 



Earth Science 151 



CEVE 534 Transport Phenomena and 

Environmental Modeling 
CEVE 550 Environmental Organic 

Chemistry 
BIOS 202 Introductory Biology 
BIOS 211 Introductory Lab Module in 

Biological Science 
CHEM 211/212 Organic Chemistry 
CHEM 311/312 Physical Chemistry 
CHEM 415 Chemical Kinetics and 

Dyrmmics 



CHEM 495 Transition Metal Chemistry 
MATH 2 1 1 Ordinary Differential 

Equations and Linear Algebra 
MATH 2 1 2 Multivariable Calculus 
COMP 1 10 Computation Science and 

Engineering 
CAAM 210/21 1 Introduction to Engi- 
neering Computation 
COMP 210 Introduction to Principles of 
Scientific Computing 



Additional Requirements for the Geophysics Track 

The following courses are required: 

• MATH 21 1 Ordinary Differential Equations and Linear Algebra 

• MATH 212 Multivariable Calculus 

• PHYS 201 Waves and Optics 

• PHYS 23 1 Elementary Physics Lab II 

In addition, the student must complete a field experience, equivalent to 6 semester 
hours, approved by the department undergraduate advisor. 

Choose one of the following courses: 

• COMP 1 10 Computation in Natural Science 

• CAAM 210 Introduction to Engineering Computation (FORTRAN) 

• CAAM 21 1 Introduction to Engineering Computation (C ) 

• COMP 210 Principles of Computing and Programming 



Choose 6 hours from the following: 

ESCI 440 Geophysical Data Analysis: 
Digital Signal Processing 

ESCI 441 Geophysical Data Analysis: 
Inverse Theory 

ESCI 442 Exploration Geophysics I 

ESCI 444 Exploration Geophysics II 

ESCI 450 Remote Sensing 



ESCI 454 Geographic Information 

Science 
ESCI 461 Seismology I 
ESCI 462 Tectonophysics 
ESCI 464 Global Tectonics 
ESCI 532 Advanced Global Tectonics 
ESCI 542 Seismology II 



Choose 6 hours from the immediately preceding or following lists: 

• Any 3- or 4- hour course in ESCI with a number between 4 1 1 and 475 , except for 

research and special studies 

• Any 300- or 400-level MATH, CAAM, OR PHYS class 

• CHEM 311 Physical Chemistry 

• CEVE 412 Hydrology & Watershed Analysis 

Additional Requirements for the Environmental Earth Science Track 

The following courses are required: 

• MATH 2 1 1 Ordinary Differential Equations and Linear Algebra 

• BIOS 201 Introductory Biology I 



1 52 DEPARTMENTS / Earth Science 

Choose one of the following courses: 

• COMP 1 10 Computation in Natural Science 

• CAAM 210 Introduction to Engineering Computation (FORTRAN) 

• CAAM 21 1 Introduction to Engineering Computation (C ) 

• COMP 210 Principles of Computing and Programming 

Choose 14 hours from the following, including at least two courses in ESCI: 

ESCI 45 1 Analysis of Environmental CEVE 434 Chemical Transport and Fate 

Data in the Environment 

ESCI 353 Environmental Geochemistry CEVE 4 1 2 Hydrogeology and Watershed 
ESCI 442 Exploration Geophysics Analysis 

ESCI 454 Geographic Information CEVE 40 1 Environmental Chemistry 

Science CHEM 211 Organic Chemistry 

ESCI 463 Advanced Structural Geology I CHEM 3 1 1 Physical Chemistry 

ESCI 504 elastics CHEM 360 Inorganic Chemistry 

ESCI 506 Carbonates PHYS 201 Waves and Optics 

ESCI 568 Paleoclimates and Human PHYS 23 1 Elementary Physics Lab II 

Response BIOS 202 Introductory Biology II 
CEVE 306 Global Environmental Law 

and Sustainable Development 

Additional Requirements for the Self-Designed Track 

The department recognizes the interdisciplinary nature of modem earth science and 
the opportunity for students to specialize in nontraditional and emerging fields. There- 
fore, students can design their own specialty track, normally in close consultation with 
one faculty member and followed by approval from the department undergraduate 
adviser. In addition to required earth science courses and related courses, these tracks will 
generally comprise 1 5 additional hours that target a coherent theme from an approved list 
of 300- or higher-level courses, from inside or outside the department. Interested students 
are expected to submit a statement of rationale by the beginning of their third year. 

Choose 9 hours from the following: 

BIOS 20 1 Introductory Biology I cHEM 311/312 Physical Chemistry I 
COMP 1 10 Computation in Natural ^^^ // 

Science MATH 2 1 1 Ordinary Differential 
CAAM 2 1 Introduction to Engineering Equations and Linear Algebra 

Computation (FORTRAN) MATH 2 1 2 Multivariable Calculus 

CAAM 2 1 1 Introduction to Engineering pH YS 20 1 Waves and Optics 

Computation (C ) PHYS 203 Atmosphere, Weather, and 
COMP 2 1 Principles of Computing and Climate 

Programming 

• Complete a field experience, equivalent to 4 semester hours, approved by the 

department undergraduate adviser. 

• Choose 15 hours of additional courses numbered 300 or higher targeting a 

coherent theme selected with approval of the department undergraduate 
adviser. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Earth Science 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
The following courses are required: 



Earth Science 153 



MATH 101/102 Single Variable 
Calculus I and 11 

CHEM l2l/\22 or l5\/\52 General 
Chemistry I and II with lab 

ESCI 321 Earth System Evolution and 
Cycles 

ESCI 322 Earth Chemistry and Materi- 
als 

ESCI 323 Earth Structure and Deforma- 
tion with lab 

ESCI 324 Earth 's Interior 

ESCI 334 Geological and Geophysical 
Techniques 



Choose 6 hours from the following: 
BIOL 201/202 Introductory Biology I 

and II 
BIOL 211,213 Biology Lab Modules 
MATH 2 1 1 Differential Equations 
PHYS 101/102 or 125/126 Introductory 

Physics 
COMP 1 10 Computation in Natural 

Science or CAAM 210 Introduction 
to Engineering Computation 
(FORTRAN) or CAAM 2 1 1 
Introduction to Engineering 
Computation (C ) or COMP 210 
Principles of Computing and 
Programming 



• Choose four upper division ESCI courses, approved by the department under- 

graduate advisor. 

• Choose 6 hours in science and engineering (including ESCI) courses at the 200 

level or above approved by the department undergraduate advisor. 

Undergraduate Independent Research 

The department encourages, but does not require, earth science undergraduate 
majors to pursue independent supervised research in ESCI 481 Research in Earth 
Science. See also Honors Programs (page 34). 

Degree Requirements for M.A. and Ph.D. in Earth Science 

All incoming students should have a strong background in physics, chemistry, and 
mathematics and should have, or should acquire, a broad grounding in fundamental earth 
science. The department encourages applications from well-qualified students with 
degrees in the other sciences and mathematics. For general university requirements, see 
Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). The requirements for the M.A. and Ph.D. in earth 
science are similar, but the Ph.D. demands a significantly higher level of knowledge, 
research skills , and scholarly independence . Most students need at least two years beyond 
the bachelor' s degree to complete the M .A . and at least two years beyond the M .A . degree 
for the Ph.D. 

Candidates determine, with their major professor and advisory committee, a course 
of study following the Guidelines for Advanced Degrees in the Department of Earth 
Science distributed to all incoming students. For both degrees, candidates must: 

• Complete 20 semester hours of course work at the 400 level and above (or other 

approved courses), not including research hours 

• Pass a written preliminary exam 

• Maintain a grade point average of 3.00 (B) or better 

• Prepare a written thesis 

• Produce a publishable thesis that represents an original contribution to science 

• Defend the research and conclusions of the thesis in an oral examination 
Students of exceptional ability with a bachelor's degree and department approval 

may work directly toward the Ph.D., in which case the course of study is equivalent to 
that required for both degrees; performance on the examinations and the thesis, however, 
should be at the level required for the Ph.D. 



154 DEPARTMENTS / Earth Science 

Because the graduate programs require full-time study and close interaction with 
faculty and fellow students, the department discourages students from holding full (or 
nearly full) time jobs outside the university. Outside employment must be approved by 
the chair. 

See ESCI in the Courses of Instruction section. 



Economics 

The School of Social Sciences 



155 



Chair 

Peter Hartley 



Professors 

Dagobert L. Brito 
Bryan W. Brown 
James N. Brown 
John B. Bryant 
Mahmoud El-Gamal 
Malcolm Gillis 
Simon Grant 
Peter Mieszkowski 
Herve Moulin 
Joon Park 
Robin C. Sickles 
Ronald Soligo 
George R. Zodrow 



Professors Emeriti 

Donald L. Huddle 
Gordon W. Smith 
Associate Professors 
Suchan Chae 
Yoosoon Chang 
Marc Peter Dudey 
Assistant Professors 
Anna Bogomolnaia 
Juan Carlos Cordoba 
Adjunct Professors 
Bruce M. Lairson 
John Michael Swint 
Adjunct Associate Professor 
Charles E. Begley 



Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduates may major in either economics or mathematical economic analysis. 
The latter is recommended for students who intend to continue on to graduate work in 
economics or pursue a business or governmental job in which analytical and quantitative 
skills are required. 

The eight major fields available for graduate study are econometrics, economic 
development, economic theory, industrial organization and regulation, international 
trade and finance, labor, macroeconomics and/or monetary theory, and public finance. 

Degree Requirements for B A. in Economics or Mathematical 
Economic Analysis 

Economics Major. All economics majors must complete a minimum of 
10 courses with a grade point average of at least 2.00. 

(1) These courses include 9 economics courses and 1 course in quantitative analysis 
as specified in (4) below. Major requirements are not reduced for multiple majors, 
although some courses can satisfy the requirements for more than one major. (Please note 
that students may not pursue a double major in economics and mathematical economic 
analysis.) 

(2) The following courses are required for all economics majors: 

• ECON 211 Principles of Economics I 

• ECON 212 Principles of Economics II 

• ECON 370 Microeconomic Theory 



156 DEPARTMENTS / Economics 



• And either ECON 355 Financial Markets and Institutions, ECON 375 Macro- 
economic Theory, or ECON 455 Money and Financial Markets. 

We suggest that economics majors take ECON 2 1 1 and 2 1 2 in the freshman year and 
take ECON 370 in the first semester of their sophomore year, leaving the junior and 
senior years for advanced electives. This plan is optional, but please note that failure to 
take prerequisite courses in earlier years may cause scheduling problems in later years. 

(3) Given that item (2) has been satisfied, at least 3 of the remaining 5 required 
economics courses must be selected from the following courses in applied 
economics. 



ECON 301 History of Economic Analysis 
ECON 355 Financial Markets 

and Institutions 
ECON 375 Macroeconomic Theory 
ECON 4 1 5 Labor Economics 
ECON 416 Economic History of the 

U.S., 1700-1945 
ECON 417 Comparative History of 

Industrialization 
ECON 420 International Economics 
ECON 42 1 International Finance 
ECON 430 Comparative Economic 

Systems 
ECON 435 Industrial Organization 
ECON 436 Government Regulation 

of Business 
ECON 437 Economics of Information , 

Common Property Resources, and 

Public Goods 
ECON 438 Economics of Law I 
ECON 439 Economics of Law II 
ECON 440 Risk, Uncertainty and 

Information 
ECON 445 Managerial Economics 
ECON 448 Corporation Finance 



ECON 449 Basics of Financial Engineer- 
ing 
ECON 450 World Economic and 

Social Development 
ECON 45 1 The Political Economy 

of Latin America 
ECON 452 Principles of Islamic 

Economics 
ECON 455 Money and Financial 

Markets 
ECON 46 1 Urban Economics 
ECON 472 Introduction to Game Theory 
ECON 480 Environmental and Energy 

Economics 
ECON 481 Health Economies 
ECON 482 Distributive Justice— 

A Microeconomic Approach 
ECON 483 Public Finance -Tax Policy 
ECON 484 Public Expenditure Theory 

and Social Insurance 
ECON 485 Contemporary 

Economic Issues 
ECON 486 Contemporary 

Economic Issues 
ECON 495 Senior Seminar 



Please note that if you count ECON 355 , 375 , or 455 as 1 of the required courses in 
item (2), you may not also count that course as 1 of the 3 courses satisfying item (3). 

(4) The quantitative methods course may be selected from the following, or an 
equivalent or higher-level course approved in advance by the chairman of the under- 
graduate committee may be taken. 



ECON 382 Probabilitx- and Statistics 

ECON 400 Econometrics 

ECON 446 Applied Econometrics and 

Economic Modeling 
ECON 475 Integer and Combinatorial 

Optimization 
ECON 477 Mathematical Structure of 

Economic Theory 
ACCO 305 Introduction to Accounting 
C AAM 2 1 Introduction to 

Engineering Computation 



C AAM 2 1 1 Introduction to 

Engineering Computation 
CAAM 321 Introduction to Real Analysis 
CAAM 322 Introduction to Real 

Analysis II 
CAAM 335 Matrix Analysis 
CAAM 336 Differential Equations 

in Science and Engineering 
CAAM 353 Computational 

Numerical Analysis 



Economics 157 



CAAM 376 Introduction to 

Management Science 
CAAM 378 Introduction to 

Operations Research 
CAAM 400 Case Studies in 

Applied Mathematics 
CAAM 435 Ordinary 

Differential Equations 
CAAM 436 Partial Differential 

Equations I 
CAAM 437 Partial Differential 

Equations II 
CAAM 45 1 Numerical Linear Algebra 
CAAM 452 Computational Methods for 

Differential Equations 
CAAM 453 Numerical Analysis and 

Ordinary Differential Equations 
CAAM 454 Optimization Problems 

in Computational Engineering 

and Science 
CAAM 460 Optimization Theory 
CAAM 47 1 Linear Programming 
CAAM 474 Theory of Linear Inequalities 
CAAM 475 Integer and Combinatorial 

Optimization 



CAAM 483 Markov and Martingale 

Sequences— Renewal Processes 
COMP 212 Intermediate Programming 
COMP 3 1 2 Program Construction 
COMP 314 Applied Algorithms and 

Data Structures 
COMP 440 Artificial Intelligence 
COMP 480 Concrete Mathematics 
COMP 482 Design and Analysis 

of Algorithms 
STAT 305 Introduction to Statistics 

for Biosciences 
STAT 310 Probability and Statistics 
STAT 331 Applied Probability 
STAT 381 Introduction to Applied 

Probability 
STAT 400 Econometrics 
STAT 410 Introduction to Statistical 

Computing and Linear Models 
STAT 42 1 Introduction to Time 

Series Analysis 
STAT 43 1 Mathematical Statistics 
STAT 450 Practicum in Statistical 

Modeling 
STAT 486 Market Models 



(5) We strongly recommend that students take two semesters of calculus (MATH 
101/102 or MATH 111/112) and a course in probability and statistics (ECON 382/ 
STAT 310). Failure to take these courses will limit the range of electives available to 
the student. 

(6) No more than 3 of the 9 economics courses may be transferred from other 
schools. Additional transfer credits in economics may count toward meeting university 
graduation requirements but not toward fulfillment of the departmental major require- 
ments. The required course in quantitative analysis may also be transferred. AP credits 
do not count as transfer credits. In order to transfer either ECON 2 1 1 or ECON 2 1 2, the 
student must pass a qualifying examination. Students wishing to take either the ECON 
211 or ECON 212 qualifying examination must apply to the economics department 
office in Baker Hall 266B. For additional information on transfer credits, consult 
"Procedures for Transfer Credit," available in the economics department office. 

(7) Students may graduate with "Honors in Economics" by achieving a B+ (3.33) 
average in all economics courses and doing two semesters of independent research. For 
details, consult ECON 403/404 Senior Independent Research, available in the Econom- 
ics Department Office. 

(8) For additional course information, consult "Economics Course Descriptions," 
compiled by the Rice chapter of the Omicron Delta Epsilon National Economics 
Honor Society. 

(9) Please note that it is primarily the responsibility of the student to satisfy all degree 
requirements , including the general degree requirements (see pages 20-23) . Consult with 
the appropriate departmental adviser, who must sign all registration forms for each 
major. 

(10) Students who are considering either graduate work in economics or a business 
or governmental job in which analytical and quantitative skills are required should 
seriously consider obtaining the alternative major in mathematical economic analysis. 



158 DEPARTMENTS / Economics 



Mathematical Economic Analysis Major. Students majoring in mathematical 
economic analysis must take at least 16 courses. 

(1) The major in mathematical economic analysis is designed for students who are 
interested in graduate work in economics or a business or governmental job in which 
analytical and quantitative skills are required. 

(2) Students must choose between the 2 majors offered by the economics depart- 
ment; that is, students may not double major in economics and mathematical economic 
analysis. Major requirements are not reduced for students with multiple majors. 

(3) A minimum of 16 courses in 6 areas is required. These courses must include: 



(a) 5 courses in Economic Principles: 
ECON 21 1 Principles of Economics I 
ECON 212 Principles of Economics 11 
ECON 370 Microeconomic Theory 



ECON 477 Mathematical Structure of 

Economic Theory 
ECON 375 Macroeconomic Theory 



(b) 3 courses in Applied Economics, selected from the following: 



ECON 301 History of Economic Analysis 
ECON 355 Financial Markets 

and Institutions 
ECON 4 1 5 Labor Economics 
ECON 416 Economic History of the 

U.S., 1700-1945 
ECON 417 Comparative History of 

Industrialization 
ECON 420 International Economics 
ECON 42 1 International Finance 
ECON 430 Comparative 

Economic Systems 
ECON 435 Industrial Organization 
ECON 436 Government Regulation 

of Business 
ECON 437 Economics of Information, 

Common Property Resources, and 

Public Goods 
ECON 438 Economics of Law 1 
ECON 439 Economics of Law II 
ECON 440 Financial Theory 
ECON 445 Managerial Economics 
ECON 446 Applied Econometrics and 

Economic Modeling 



ECON 448 Corporation Finance 
ECON 449 Basics of Financial Engineer- 
ing 
ECON 450 World Economic and Social 

Development 
ECON 45 1 The Political Economy of 

Latin America 
ECON 452 Principles of Islamic 

Economics 
ECON 455 Money and Financial Markets 
ECON 46 1 Urban Economics 
ECON 472 Introduction to Game Theory 
ECON 480 Environmental arui Energy 

Economics 
ECON 48 1 Health Economies 
ECON 482 Distributive Justice— 

A Microeconomic Approach 
ECON 483 Public Finance— Tax Policy 
ECON 484 Public Expenditure Theory 

and Social Insurance 
ECON 485 Contemporary 

Economic Issues 
ECON 486 Contemporary 

Economic Issues 



(c) I additional 400 -level course in Applied Economics as listed in (b) or a course 
in advanced analysis, selected from the following: 



ECON 475 Integer and Combinatorial 

Optimization 
CAAM 451 Numerical Linear Algebra 
CAAM 452 Computational Methods for 

Differential Equations 
CAAM 453 Numerical Analysis and 

Ordinary Differential Equations 



CAAM 454 Optimization Problems 
in Computational Engineering 
and Science 
CAAM 460 Optimization Theory 
CAAM 47 1 Linear Programming 
CAAM 474 Theory of Linear Inequalities 
CAAM 475 Integer and Combinatorial 
Optimization 



Economics 159 

CAAM 483 Markov and Martingale STAT 450 Practician in Statistical 

Sequences— Renewal Processes Modeling 

STAT 42 1 Introduction to Time STAT 486 Market Models 

Series Analysis 

(d) 1 course in Econometrics: ECON 400 Econometrics 

(e) 5 courses in Mathematics and Statistics: 

• MATH 1 1 Single Variable Calculus I 

• MATH 1 02 Single Variable Calculus II 

• MATH 2 1 1 Ordinary Differential Equations and Linear Algebra 

• MATH 355 Linear Algebra or CAAM 335 Matrix Analysis 

• MATH 212 Multivariable Calculus or MATH 221 Honors Calculus III 

• ECON 382/STAT 310 Probability and Statistics 

or STAT 410 Introduction to Statistical Computing and Linear Models 
or STAT 43 1 Mathematical Statistics 

(f) 1 Senior Seminar or Senior Research: ECON 495/496 Senior Seminar or 

ECON 403/404 Senior Independent Research 

(4) No more than 3 of the required economics courses and 2 of the required 
Mathematics (or computational and applied mathematics or statistics) courses may be 
transferred from other schools. Additional transfer credits in economics, mathematics, 
computational and applied mathematics or statistics may count toward meeting univer- 
sity graduation requirements but not toward fulfillment of the departmental major 
requirements. AP credits do not count as transfer credits. In order to transfer either 211 
or 212, the student must pass a qualifying examination. Students wishing to take either 
the 2 1 1 or 2 1 2 qualifying examinations must apply to the economics department office 
in Baker Hall 266B. For additional information on transfer credits, consult "Procedures 
for Transfer Credit," available in the economics department office. 

(5) Students may graduate with "Honors in Mathematical Economic Analysis" by 
achieving a B+ (3.33) average in the 16 courses required for the major and any other 
economics electives taken. 

(6) For additional course information, consult "Economics Course Descriptions," 
compiled by the Rice chapter of the Omicron Delta Epsilon National Economics 
Honor Society. 

(7) Please note that it is primarily the responsibility of the student to satisfy all degree 
requirements , including the "University Credit Requirements" and "University Distribu- 
tion Requirements" specified in the General Announcements . Consult with the appropri- 
ate departmental adviser, who must sign all registration forms for each major. 

Substituting Economics Graduate Courses for Undergraduate Courses. 

Undergraduate majors satisfying the course prerequisites may, subject to the approval of 
the instructor and of the departmental undergraduate program chair, substitute certain 
graduate courses for undergraduate courses. Only highly motivated students with 
excellent aptitudes for economics and a strong background in mathematics should 
consider making such substitutions. Typically, but not necessarily , such students will be 
majors in mathematical economic analysis. Permitted substitutions are as follows: 

• ECON 501 for ECON 370 (if student has completed ECON 21 1 at Rice) 

• ECON 502 for ECON 375 (if student has completed ECON 212 at Rice) 

• ECON 504 for ECON 382 

• ECON 510 for ECON 400 



160 DEPARTMENTS / Economics 

• Furthermore, ECON 505 and ECON 508 also may be taken by undergraduates and 
may be used toward satisfying MTEC requirements. Specifically, ECON 505 
could be used as 1 of the courses in the applied economics category or in the 
advanced analysis category, while ECON 508 could be used only in the 
advanced analysis category. 

Note that this set of substitutable graduate courses includes 6 of the 7 courses 
required during the first year of the Ph.D. program at Rice. Accordingly, such advanced 
course work would be excellent preparation for graduate study in economics or in 
some related field such as finance. Taking such graduate courses should also open 
more opportunities for the student who will be seeking employment immediately 
after graduation. 

The Five- Year M.A. Program 

Advanced undergraduate students can, subject to the approval of the departmental 
five-year M .A . adviser , enter our five-year M .A . program . In this program , a student who 
has taken advantage of the full menu of graduate course substitutions available could, 
with an additional year of study at Rice, earn an M.A. in economics. 

To obtain the M.A. degree, students must satisfy all of the requirements for Ph.D. 
candidacy. In particular, students must pass general examinations in microeconomic 
theory and in macroeconomic theory and econometrics, must pass an examination in a 
specialized field of study in economics, and must complete an original research project 
(a dissertation prospectus) that could be developed into a Ph.D. dissertation under the 
supervision of a faculty member. This work could be an extension of a paper written as 
a senior independent research project (ECON 403/404). In some cases, at the discretion 
of the independent research adviser, the paper produced in ECON 403/404 may fulfill 
this requirement. Finally, the first-year graduate requirement to take ECON 507 
Mathematical Economics would be waived with the approval of the departmental five- 
year M.A. adviser. 

Note that any student who subsequently decides to enter the economics Ph.D. 
program at Rice would be given graduate credit for all 500 level economics courses 
completed while an undergraduate. The completion of the Ph.D. dissertation typically 
requires at least one additional year of research (but no additional courses) beyond the 
M.A. degree. 

Students who opt for the five-year M.A. degree program will have different 
backgrounds and interests on entering Rice and will choose to pursue this option at 
different stages in their academic careers. The following illustrates two (of many) 
possible paths to satisfying the MTEC major requirements, while at the same time 
completing all of the requirements for the M.A. degree over a five-year period. 

Courses: Sample Path One 

The student enters with AP credit for ECON 2 1 1/2 1 2 and MATH 101/102, and has 
an early interest in the five-year M.A. program. 

Freshman Year Junior Year 

ECON 370, 375, 477, and MATH 211/ ECON 502, 504, 505, 510, and 1 course 
212 from Applied Economics category 

Sophomore Year Senior Year 

ECON 50 1 ; 1 course from Applied ECON 403/404 and ECON 508 

Economics category; and MATH 

355orCAAM310 



Economics 161 

Fifth Year (Note that with AP credit for MATH 101/ 
Complete all remaining graduate courses 1 02 . but not for ECON 2 1 1 /2 1 2 , the 

and pass all remaining examinations student could substitute ECON 211/ 

required 2 1 2 for ECON 370 and ECON 375 

to achieve Ph.D. candidacy. in the freshman year.) 

Courses: Sample Path Two 

The student has no relevant AP credit and/or decides to enter the five-year M.A. 
program only near the end of the sophomore year. 

Freshman Year Senior Year 

ECON 2 1 1 /2 1 2 and MATH 101/102 ECON 504 , 5 1 , 403/404 , and 1 course 

from applied economics category 

Sophomore Year 

ECON 370, 375, 477, and 1 course from Fifth Year 

applied economics category; Complete all remaining graduate courses 

MATH 211/212 and pass all remaining examinations 

required to achieve Ph.D. candidacy. 

Junior Year 

ECON 501, 502. 505, 508; 

MATH 355 or CAAM 3 10 



Degree Requirements for Ph J), in Economics 

Preparation for Ph.D. Program. Applicants to the Ph.D. program should have had 
at least two semesters in calculus and one in linear algebra. Students who have not met 
these requirements may complete these prerequisites as Class III students (pages 84-85) 
before being admitted to the graduate program. All applicants are required to take the 
Graduate Record Exam. 

Requirements. For general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 
65-70). Candidates for the Ph.D. degree usually spend from two to two and one-half 
years in full-time course work and at least one year writing the dissertation; four to five 
years is a reasonable goal for completing the program. For the Ph.D., students must: 

• Complete an approved program of at least 1 4 courses not including ECON 593/594 

Workshop in Economics I and ECON 595/596 Workshop in Economics II 

• Complete an approved program of at least 4 sections of ECON 593/594 Workshop 

in Economics I and ECON 595/596 Workshop in Economics II 

• Perform satisfactorily on written general examinations in economic theory and 

econometrics 

• Demonstrate proficiency in a major field by taking the relevant courses in that field 

and performing satisfactorily on a written examination 

• Complete and defend orally a doctoral dissertation setting forth in publishable 

form the results of original research 

See ECON in the Courses of Instruction section. 



162 

Education 

The School of Humanities 



Professor 

Linda M. McNeil 



No degree is offered through the Education Department. This department offers 
opportunities for students to explore the background, purposes, and organization of 
American schools as well as the major issues facing education today . Research seminars 
allow students to engage in projects in a wide range of topics significant to education. 
Most courses require observation in the classroom. 

Please see the section on Education Certification for information on the three teacher 
education plans offered at Rice: 

( 1 ) A secondary teaching certificate in combination with the undergraduate degree 

in the elected subject field(s) 

(2) A Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) 

(3) A postbaccalaurete plan for Class III students that involves taking those courses 

and state examinations needed for certification but that does not confer a degree 



Education Certification 



Education Certification 163 



Chair 

Meredith Skura 
Director 

Lissa Heckelman 



i 



Professor 

Linda M. McNeil 
Adjunct Professor 

Roland B. Smith, Jr. 
Lecturers 

Jean Ashmore 
Eileen Coppola 
Diana Norcross 



Judy Radigan 
Carolynne White 
Heidi Ziemer 
Adjunct Lecturers 

Wallace Dominey 
Elnora Harcombe 
Anne Papakonstantinou 



Degrees Offered: 
Secondary Teaching Certificate in conjunction with B.A. in major field, M.A.T. 

Students in the teacher education program at Rice show a commitment to teaching, 
a strong record of scholarship in their subject areas, and promise as thoughtful , engaging 
teachers. The program emphasizes a sound liberal arts education; extensive knowledge 
of the subject(s) or area(s) to be taught; professional knowledge, including the relevant 
historical, philosophical, social, and psychological bases of education; and skills in 
classroom teaching, which include working with both children and adults. Graduates 
emerge from the program fully prepared for the teaching profession, trained in a 
multitude of teaching styles and methods to meet the needs of the diverse student 
population in schools today. 

Rice offers three teacher education plans: (1) a secondary teaching certificate in 
combination with the undergraduate degree in the elected subject field(s), (2) a Master 
of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.), and (3) a postbaccalaureate plan for Class III students 
that involves taking those courses and state examinations needed for certification but that 
does not confer a degree. All three plans include student teaching in the Rice Summer 
School for Grades 8-12. While maintaining its academic integrity, the Rice program 
complies with state of Texas certification requirements. Students seeking additional 
information about the teacher education program are encouraged to meet with education 
faculty. 

Texas Teaching Credential. Rice is approved by the state of Texas to offer teacher 
preparation programs in the following fields: art, English, French, German, health science, 
history, Latin, life sciences, mathematics, physical education, physical science, Russian, 
science, social studies, and Spanish. 

After satisfactory completion of the Rice program, which includes the state-mandated 
TExES examinations, students are recommended for a Texas teaching credential. The Texas 
Education Agency then awards a Texas Provisional TeacWng Certificate (Grades 8-12). 



164 

Student Teaching. Apprenticeship (Plan A) and Internship (Plan B) programs 
are available. Unpaid apprenticeships are for undergraduates who wish to complete the 
teacher education program in four years and two six-week summer sessions. Candidates 
enroll for the summer sessions following theirjunior and senior years. Apprentices create 
and teach courses under the supervision of experienced mentor teachers and university 
faculty in the Rice Summer School for Grades 8-12. 

Paid internships are undertaken by Master of Arts in Teaching candidates, by some 
Class III students, and by undergraduates who begin earning certification in their senior 
year. Under this plan, students serve one apprenticeship in the Rice Summer School and 
are then supervised through their first semester of a full-time, paid internship in a 
neighboring , cooperating school system . Permission for the internship is contingent upon 
completing a successful apprenticeship. 

Requirements for Secondary Teaching Certificate 

Admission. Students may apply to the Rice University Education Certification 
Office for admission to the teacher education program if they show: 

• Attainment of junior standing at Rice (bachelor's degree for M.A.T. candidates) 

by the semester of admission to the program 

• Grades of C- or better in all semester hours attempted in their teaching field(s) , with, 

an overall grade point average of 2.5 or better 

• Evidence of adequate physical vigor to perform as a teacher in a classroom 

• Exemption or satisfactory scores on all required preprofessional skills tests 

• A completed Plan of Study approved by department representatives and the major 

field adviser is required before admission to the program is complete 

Completion of Program. To complete the program, students must: 

• Be exempted from or pass the state's Texas Academic Skills Program (TASP) 

exam prior to enrolling in any education courses 

• Complete the courses specified by the major field adviser(s). Lists of courses for 

each subject are available in the Education Certification Office 

• Complete 18 hours in professional education courses as follows: 

either: EDUC 301/501 Philosophical, Historical, and Social Foundations of 

Education or EDUC 330/530 The American High School 
EDUC 305/505 Educational Psychology 
EDUC 420 Curriculum Development 
3 hours in the appropriate seminar(s) in teaching methods 
6 hours in student teaching (see following) 

• Satisfy a state requirement for computer literacy by completing one course in 

computer use. EDUC 340 Computers in Education is recommended 

• Complete all university and program requirements specified for undergraduates, 

M.A.T. candidates, or nondegree (Class III) candidates 

• Make grades of C- or better in all teaching field courses and education courses 

(B- or better for M.A.T. students) 

• Pass appropriate TExES exams 



Education Certification 165 



Apprenticeship Plan (Plan A) 

(For students beginning certification in 
junior year and for some Class III students) 



Junior Year 

EDUC 30 1 Philosophical, Historical, and 

Social Foundations of Education 
or EDUC 330 The American High School 
EDUC 305 Educational Psychology 
EDUC 410^16 Relevant seminar(sj in 

teaching methods 
EDUC 420 Curriculum Development 
EDUC 440 Superx'ised Teaching: 
Summer School 

Senior Year 

EDUC 420 Curriculum Development 



After Graduation 
EDUC 440 Supen'ised Teaching: 
Summer School 

Requirements for M.A.T. 



Internship Plan (Plan B) 

(For students beginning certification in 
senior year, for some Class III 
students, and for M.A.T. students) 

Before Graduation 

EDUC 301/501 Philosophical, 

Historical, and Social Founda- 
tions of Education 

or EDUC 330/530 The American 
High School 

EDUC 305/505 Educational Psychology 

EDUC 410-416 Relevant seminar(s) in 
teaching methods 

EDUC 420 Curriculum Development 

After Academic Year 

EDUC 440 Supen'ised Teaching: 

Summer School 
EDUC 540 Internship (paid internship 

in the fall in a local, accredited 

secondary school) 



Admission. Applicants must have a bachelor's degree, scholarly ability, and an 
interest in teaching, and they must have taken the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 
aptitude test. Education faculty review each application. A limited number of tuition 
waivers is available. See Admission to Graduate Study (pages 64-65). Admitted 
students must pass or be exempted from the state's Texas Academic Skills Program 
(TASP) exam prior to enrolling in any education courses. 

Degree Requirements. For general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees 
(pages 65-70). The M.A.T. is a professional degree program for students who want to 
qualify for secondary school teaching following a liberal arts education . Most candidates 
entering the program have had no professional education courses. By completing the 
program, candidates fulfill all requirements for a Texas Provisional Teaching Certificate 
for grades 8-12. To earn the professional M.A.T. degree, students must complete, with 
grades of B- or higher, at least 33 semester hours (the need to remove deficiencies may 
require additional courses for certification). Requirements are as follows: 

• Courses in secondary school educational theory, teaching strategies, educational 

practice, and evaluation 

• Graduate or upper-level courses in the relevant teaching field(s) taken at Rice 

• Supervised full-time teaching for one summer in the Rice Summer School for 

Grades 8-12, including design and implementation of courses, teaching, and 
evaluation 

• Approval to begin an internship, based on a successful summer school teaching 

experience 

• Super\'ised teaching internship for one semester in a cooperating secondary 

school, including the accompanying seminar 



1 66 DEPARTMENTS / Education Certification 

The cooperating school districts pay a regular salary for internship teaching, which 
covers the small cost of graduate tuition. 

Requirements for Class III Certification 

A nondegree (Class III) plan leading to secondary teacher certification is available 
for those who have earned a B.A. but do not choose to pursue a graduate degree. 
Candidates complete all requirements for secondary teacher certification, including 
professional education courses and courses in their selected fields. Interested students 
should direct their queries to the Education Certification Office. 

Higher Education Act Title II Reports 

The Higher Education Act (HEA) of the U.S. Congress requires each institution of 
higher education with a teacher preparation program enrolling students receiving federal 
assistance under this Act to report annually "to the State and the general public" certain 
information. This information consists of the pass rate of program completers on 
assessments required by the state for teacher licensure or certification, the statewide pass 
rate on those assessments, and other basic information on the teacher preparation 
program. 

Rice University's Teacher Education program is accredited by the State of Texas. 
The first year pass rate for program completers on assessments required by the state for 
2000-01 was 100% compared with 88% for the overall state pass rate. The combined 
cumulative pass rate for program completers on assessments required by the state for 
1999-2001 was 100% compared to 93% for the overall state pass rate. A total of 26 
students were enrolled in the program in 2001-02. The students spent an average of 40 
hours per week in supervised student teaching with a student/faculty ratio of 3-to- 1 . Rice 
teacher education program graduates are regularly recruited by school districts in the 
Houston and surrounding areas because of their innovative ideas, leadership abilities, and 
dedication to the teaching profession. 

See EDUC and PFDV in the Courses of Instruction section. 



167 



Electrical and Computer Engineering 
The George R. Brown School of Engineering 



Chair 

Don H. Johnson 



Professors 

Behnaam Aazhang 
Athanasios C. Antoulas 
Richard G. Baraniuk 
Joseph R. Cavallaro 
John W. Clark, Jr. 
Naomi J. Halas 
Don H. Johnson 
Erzsebet Merenyi 
Michael Orchard 
Frank K. Tittel 
William L.Wilson, Jr. 
James F. Young 
Professors Emeriti 
J. Robert Jump 
James Boyd Pearson, Jr. 
Thomas A. Rabson 
Associate Professors 
Edward W. Knightly 
Peter J. Varman 
Assistant Professors 
Kevin Kelly 
Junichiro Kono 
Yehia Massoud 
Daniel Mittleman 



Kartik Mohanram 

Vijay Pai 

Adjunct Professors 

Richard Barton 
Akhil Bidani 
John Byrne 
Scott Cutler 
Anand Dabak 
Wayne Giles 
Thomas Harman 
Dirar Khoury 
T. Randall Lee 
Jorma Lilleberg 
Peter Saggau 
Steve Sheafor 
Markus Sigrist 
Michael Smayling 
Faculty Fellows 
Hyeokho Choi 
Ashutosh Sabharwal 
Lecturers 
Richard P. Massey 
James B. Sinclair 
James D. Wise 



Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S.E.E.. M.E.E., M.S., Ph.D. 

The electrical and computer engineering department strives to provide high quality 
degree programs that emphasize fundamental principles, respond to the changing 
demands and opportunities of technology, challenge the exceptional abilities of Rice 
students, and prepare these students for roles of leadership in their chosen careers. 

In support of this goal, the electrical and computer engineering department's 
objectives are to provide its undergraduate students with: 

• A solid foundation in the fundamentals of electrical and computer engineering, 

mathematics, and science, enabling them to adapt easily to technological 
developments that will occur during their careers 

• An in-depth exposure to one area of electrical and computer engineering , empha- 

sizing its relationship to the basic framework of the discipline and to other 
appropriate topics outside that framework 

• Courses and projects that actively involve them in their own education and 

enhance their ability to formulate and solve real-world design and research 
problems 



168 DEPARTMENTS / Electrical and Computer Engineering 



• A broad education outside of engineering and science that emphasizes the role ol 
electrical and computer engineering in society and builds the leadership skills 
necessary to deal with the increasing impact of technology 

Graduate and undergraduate programs in electrical and computer engineering offer 
concentrations in areas that include system and control theory , bioengineering, commu- 
nications, quantum electronics and lasers, computer systems, and electronic materials, 
devices, and circuits. Bioengineering is primarily a graduate program, although under- 
graduates may take introductory courses in this field as electives or as part of their 
specialization area courses. 

Undergraduate Program. The department offers two undergraduate degrees, the 
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (B.S.E.E.). 
The B.A. program is highly flexible, permitting a student to tailor the program to his or 
her interests, be they broad or highly focused. The B.S.E.E. degree is approved by the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET); requires more scientific 
and professional courses, for a total of at least 134 semester hours; and has fewer 
electives. Outstanding students interested in careers in research and teaching may enter 
graduate school after either bachelor degree. Both degrees are organized around a core 
of required courses and a selection of elective courses from five specialization areas. 
Each student's program must contain a depth sequence in one area and courses from at 
least two areas to provide breadth. The specialization electives provide a flexibility that 
can be used to create a focus, such as optical communications, that crosses traditional 
areas. Because of the number of options, students should consult early with departmental 
advisers to plan a program that meets their needs. 

The B.A. degree provides a basic foundation in electrical and computer engineering 
that the student can build upon to construct a custom program. Because of its flexibility 
and large number of free electives, the B.A. can be combined easily with another major 
to create an interdisciplinary program. This may be particularly appropriate for students 
planning further study in law, business, or medicine. 

The B.S.E.E. is the usual degree taken by those students planning a career of 
engineering practice. It is accredited by ABET and can reduce the time required to 
become a licensed professional engineer. Accreditation and professional licensing are 
important for some careers, and many states require licensure for those providing 
engineering services directly to the public, for example, as a consultant. The program for 
the B.S.E.E. degree requires greater depth than the B.A. degree but still provides 
considerable flexibility. Students who place out of required courses but who do not have 
credit must substitute other approved courses in the same area. 

The requirements for the two degrees are grouped into four categories, listed below. 
The specific courses required for each degree are listed in the section for that degree. 



Basic Mathematics and 
Science Courses 

MATH 101 Single Variable Calculus I 
MATH 102 Single Variable Calculus II 
CAAM 335 Matrix Analysis or MATH 

355 Linear Algebra 
MATH 212 Multivariable Calculus 
PHYS 101 Mechanics 
PHYS 102 Electricity and Magnetism 
CHEM 121 General Chemistry 



Core Courses 

ELEC 220 Fundamentals of Computer 

Engineering 
ELEC 241 Fundamentals of Electrical 

Engineering I 
ELEC 242 Fundamentals of Electrical 

Engineering II 
ELEC 261 Introduction to Waves and 

Photonics 
ELEC 30 1 Introduction to Signals 
ELEC 305 Introduction to Physical 

Electronics 



Electrical and Computer Engineering 169 



Core Courses (cont.) 

ELEC 326 Digital Logic Design 
ELEC 391 Professional Issues in 

Electrical Engineering 
ELEC 331 Applied Probability 

Restricted Electives 

One from Computation 

CAAM 210 Introduction to Engineering 

Computation 
CAAM 2 1 1 Introduction to Engineering 

Computation 
COMP 210 Introduction to Principles of 

Scientific Computation (COMP 210 

is a prerequisite for many other 

computer courses.) 



One from Laboratory 

ELEC 201 Introduction to Engineering 

Design 
ELEC 303 Systems Laboratory 
ELEC 327 Digital Logic Design 

Laboratory 
ELEC 423 VLSI Design II 
ELEC 433 Communications Systems Lab 
ELEC 465 Physical Electronics Lab 
ELEC 490 Electrical Engineering 

Projects 



Specialization Areas. The following groups of courses focus on specific areas 
within electrical and computer engineering. The systems area involves the study of 
processing and communicating signals and information through systems of devices, 
control and robotics, signal and image processing, and communications. The computer 
engineering area provides a broad background in computer systems engineering, 
including computer architecture, hardware engineering, software engineering, and 
computer systems performance analysis. The physical electronics area encompasses 
studies of electronic materials, semiconductor and optoelectronic devices, lasers, 
and photonics. 



Computer Engineering 
COMP 212 Intermediate Programming 
COMP 3 1 1 Programming Languages 
ELEC 322 Applied Algorithms and 

Data Structures 
ELEC 42 1 Operating Systems and 

Concurrent Programs 
COMP 410 Software Construction 

Methodology 
COMP 413 Distributed Program 

Construction 
COMP 422 Parallel Computing 
ELEC 422 VLSI Design 
ELEC 424 Computer Systems Design 
ELEC 425 Computer Systems 

Architecture 
ELEC 426 Digital Systems Design 
ELEC 428 Computer Systems 

Performance 
ELEC 429 Introduction to Computer 

Networks 



Bioengineering 

ELEC 48 1 Computational Neuroscience 
ELEC 482 Physiological Control Systems 
ELEC 483 Introduction to Biomedical 

Instrumentation arui Measurement 

Techniques 

Systems: Control, Communications, 
and Signal Processing 
ELEC 301 Introduction to Sigrmls 
ELEC 302 Introduction to Systems 
ELEC 430 Communication Theory 

atui Systems 
ELEC 43 1 Digital Signal Processing 
ELEC 436 Control Systems I 

Electronic Circuits and Devices 
ELEC 342 Electronic Circuits 
ELEC 427 Pulse arui Digital Circuits 
ELEC 435 Electromechanical Devices 

arui Systems 
ELEC 442 Advanced Electronic Circuits 
ELEC 443 Power Electronic Circuits 
ELEC 462 Semiconductor Devices 



1 70 DEPARTMENTS / Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Quantum Electronics 

PHYS 202 Quantum Mechanics ELEC 462 Semiconductor Devices 

ELEC 306 Electromagnetic Fields ELEC 463 Lasers and Photonics 

and Devices ELEC 465 Physical Electronics 
ELEC 361 Electronic Materials and Practicum 

Quantum Devices ELEC 563 Introduction to Solid-State 

Physics 

The department may add or delete courses in the areas . In addition , graduate courses 
and equivalent courses from other departments may be used to satisfy area requirements 
with permission; consult with departmental advisers for the latest information. A course 
can satisfy only one program requirement. ELEC 491/492 may be used to satisfy 
requirements in any area, depending on the nature of the design project. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Electrical and Computer Engineering 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students completing the B.A. program must have a total of at least 120 semester hours 
at graduation. 

Basic Mathematics and Science. Students in the B.A. program must take all of the 
courses listed above under basic mathematics and science courses, with the following i 
exceptions: CHEM 121 is not required, and MATH 355 Linear Algebra. MATH 381 
Introduction to Partial Differential Equations, or CA AM 353 Computational Numerical 
Analysis may be taken instead of ELEC 33 1 . 

Core Courses. All of the courses listed above under core courses are required for 
the B.A. degree, except for COMP 212, ELEC 301 , and ELEC 391 . Students also have 
the following options: CAAM 353 Computational Numerical Analysis may be taken 
instead of MATH 2 1 2 , and CHEM 1 2 1 General Chemistry may be taken instead of PHYS 
201. 

Restricted Electives. Students must take 1 computation course and 1 laborator 
course listed above. 

Specialization Areas. Students must take 2-course sequence in 1 area and coursei 
from at least 2 areas listed above. 



Degree Requirements for B.S. in Electrical Engineering 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students completing the B .S .E .E . program must have a total of at least 1 34 semester hours 
to graduate. 

Basic Mathematics and Science. Students must take all of the courses listed above 
under basic mathematics and science courses. They must also take additional math and 
science courses, approved by the department, to bring their total to 32 hours. 

Core Courses. Students must take all of the courses listed above under core courses. 

Restricted Electives. Students must take 1 computation course and 1 laboratory 
course listed above. 

Specialization Areas. Students in the B.S.E.E. program choose courses from 2 or 
more specialization areas listed above. Students must take at least 7 specialization 



Electrical and Computer Engineering 1 7 1 

courses, including at least 4 courses in one area and courses from at least 2 different areas. 
Because of the number of options, students should consult early with department advisers 
to plan a program that meets their needs. Students going on to a technical career or 
graduate school may need to use unrestricted electives to create a coherent program. 

Design Component. At least 1 of the specialization area courses must be an 
approved design course. 

Degree Requirements for M.E.E., M.S., and Ph.D. in Electrical and 
Computer Engineering 

For general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). Students 
should also consult department advisers for specific courses of study. 

Master's Degree Programs. A candidate for the professional M.E.E. degree must 
complete an approved sequence of 10 advanced courses, totaling at least 30 hours. At 
least 4 of these must be technical courses at the 500 level or higher. At least 7 of the 
courses must be technical courses at the 400 level or higher. All 1 courses must be at the 
300 level or higher and 2 credit hours or more. Specialization is possible in the general 
areas of bioengineering, signal processing, communication and control theory , electro- 
optics and physical electronics, and computer science and engineering. 

The M.S. degree is not a terminal degree but part of the Ph.D. program. A candidate 
for the M.S. degree must complete both an approved course of study and an approved 
research program, culminating in an acceptable thesis. 

A joint M.B.A./Master of Engineering degree is also available in conjunction with 
the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Management. 

Ph.D. Program. Candidates should expect to spend a minimum of three academic 
years of graduate study in this program. Normally, candidates complete the requirements 
for an M.S. degree as part of the Ph.D. program. For the Ph.D., students must: 

• Obtain high standing in an approved course program 

• Perform satisfactorily on qualifying examinations 

• Complete a satisfactory dissertation of independent and creative research 

• Pass a final oral examination 



See ELEC in the Courses of Instruction section. 



172 

English 

The School of Humanities 



Chair 

Susan Wood 



Professors 

Jane Chance 
Terrence Arthur Doody 
Linda P. Driskill 
J. Dennis Huston 
Walter Whitfield Isle 
Helena Michie 
Wesley Abram Morris 
Robert L. Patten 
Meredith Skura 
Edward A. Snow 
GaryS. Wihl 
Cary Wolfe 
Professors Emeriti 
Max Apple 
Edward O. Doughtie 
Alan Grob 
John Meixner 
David Lee Minter 
William Bowman Piper 
Associate Professors 
Jose F. Aranda, Jr. 



Justin C. Cronin 
Scott S. Derrick 
Lucille P. Fultz 
Betty Joseph 
Colleen R. Lamos 
Caroline Levander 
Susan Lurie 
Assistant Professors 
Krista Comer 
Elizabeth A. Dietz 
Sarah Ellenzweig 
Kirsten Ostherr 
Writer in Residence 
Marsha Recknagel 
Lecturers 
Jill "Thad" Logan 
Mary L. Tobin 
Lecturers on Theatre 
Mark Ramont 
Trish Rigdon 



Degrees Offered: B. A., M. A.. Ph.D. 

The undergraduate program offers opportunities for students to improve theii 
expository writing skills and explore literature while learning to appreciate it critically 
The department also offers a variety of courses in creative writing, including poetry 
fiction, and creative nonfiction. In addition, it is home to the Theatre Program, whicl' 
offers courses in theatre and dramatic literature .The graduate program in English offers 
concentrations in all fields of British and American literature and literary theory. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in English 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23) 
Students majoring in English must complete 36 semester hours in English with at leas 
24 hours in courses at the 300 level or above. A double major requires 30 hours in Englisl 
with at least 18 hours in the upper-level courses. HUMA 101 and 102 may be counte( 
toward the English major. All English majors must take the following: 

• ENGL 200 Seminar in Literature and Literary Analysis 

• ENGL 300 Practices in Literary Study 

• 9 hours at the 300 level or above in periods before 1900 a.d.; 6 of the 9 hours mus 

be in periods before 1800 a.d., but only one may be a Shakespearean course 



[English 173 
• 3 hours at the 200 level or above in a course that focuses on noncanonical traditions, 
such as courses in women, African American, Chicano/a, Asian American, 
: ethnic, global, and diasporic writers 

The department recommends that all English majors take courses in British and 
American history and, if they plan to do graduate work, at least 6 hours of upper-level 
courses in a foreign language. 

Degree Requirements for M.A. and Ph.D. in English 

For general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). As part 
of their training, graduate students participate in both the teaching and research activities 
of the department. Upon entering, students will be assigned a Program Advisory 
Committee (PAC), consisting of two or three faculty members. In consultation with their 
PAC, students will design their own individualized program structured by the minimal 
requirements listed below. For more detailed information, please ask for a copy of the 
Department's Program Outline. 

M.A. Program. The English department does not have an M.A. program, but offers 
the M.A. degree to those Ph.D. students who have achieved candidacy and are in the 
process of completing their doctorate and to qualified Ph.D. students who leave the 
program before completing their doctorate. To receive an M.A. students must: 

• Satisfactorily complete at least 30 hours of graduate work in English at Rice 
University. Courses must be those that count towards the Ph.D. in English. 
K. These include courses numbered in the 500s and 600s in the English depart- 

ment excluding 510, 601/602, 603/604; up to 2 approved graduate or equiva- 
lent courses taken in other departments; and up to 2 approved courses in the 
English department numbered 400 and above. Courses taken to fulfill the 
language requirement are excluded. Students must satisfactorily complete 
ENGL 600 and distribution requirements for the Ph.D. (see below). 
' Satisfactorily complete two teaching assistantships (ENGL 601/602). These do 
not count toward the 30-hour requirement. 
1 

I Ph.D. Program. To gain admission to Ph.D. candidacy, students must satisfy the 
first seven of the following requirements, and they must receive approval for their 
lissertation prospectus from the Department's Graduate Committee. To earn a Ph.D. in 
English, candidates must also complete the last 2 requirements. Students must: 

(1) Satisfactorily complete at least 33 hours of course work plus ENGL 510, 
exclusive of the thesis. Courses can include: graduate courses in the English 
department numbered 500 to 600, excluding 510, 601/602, 603/604; up to 2 
approved undergraduate courses in the English department; and up to 2 approved 
courses in another department. 

(2) Satisfactorily complete the following 2 required courses: ENGL 600 
Professional Methods, and ENGL 605 Third-Year Writing Workshop. These 
count toward the 3 3 -hour requirement. 

(3) Satisfactorily complete the distribution requirement, which consists of 
2 approved courses on literature before 1 800 and 2 after 1 800. These count toward 
the 33-hour requirement. 

(4) Satisfactorily complete the teaching requirement by serving twice as a teaching 
assistant, by completing ENGL 510/511 Pedagogy, and by teaching a lower-level 
course designed in conjunction with the instructor of ENGL 5 1 0. ENGL 5 1 does 
not count toward the 3 3 -hour requirement. 



174 DEPARTMENTS / English 

(5) Pass a six-hour written preliminary examination focusing on two lists of book 
one representing the full range of a literary period as defined by the student anc 
his or her preliminary committee, the other representing a second literary period 
a single author, a genre traced over a period of time more comprehensive thar 
that covered by the first list, or a particular theoretical or critical approach studiet 
with reference to its own history and traditions as well as to the historical field o 
the first exam. 

(6) Complete a dissertation prospectus that proposes a topic and an approach, offe 
a context to the topic in terms of work already done, offers an outline of chapter: 
or sections, and includes a substantial bibliography. 

(7) Complete a dissertation that demonstrates a capacity for independent and origin 
work of high quality. 

(8) Pass an oral exam on the dissertation and related fields of study. 

Financial Support. Within the limits of available funds, qualified students ma^ 
receive graduate scholarships or fellowships for up to four years. To qualify for thii 
continuing financial aid, students must be approved for candidacy for the Ph.D. by th( 
beginning of their seventh semester at Rice (fifth semester for those entering with ai 

M.A.). 

See ENGL and THEA in the Courses of Instruction section. 



175 



Environmental Analysis and Decision Making 
The Wiess School of Natural Sciences 



Director 

Katherine B. Ensor 



Professors 

Andrew R. Barron 
Neal F. Lane 
Erzsebet Merenyi 
Dale S. Sawyer 
Tayfun E. Tezduyar 



Associate Professors 

Vicki L. Colvin 
Matthias Heinkenschloss 
Assistant Professors 

Michael B . Heeley 



Degrees Offered: M.S. 

Rice University introduced a professional master's degree in environmental analy- 
sis and decision making in fall 2002. This degree is geared to teach students rigorous 
methods that are needed by industrial and governmental organizations to deal with 
environmental issues. As an interdisciplinary program, it aims to give students the ability 
to predict environmental problems, not just solve them. It emphasizes core quantitative 
topics such as statistics, remote sensing, data analysis, and modeling. In addition, it 
teaches laboratory and computer skills and allows students to focus their education by 
taking electives in relevant fields. 

The environmental analysis and decision making degree is one of three tracks in the 
new Professional Master's Program at Rice housed in the Wiess School of Natural 
Sciences. These master's degrees are designed for students seeking to gain further 
scientific core expertise coupled with enhanced management and communications skills . 
These degrees instill a level of scholastic proficiency that exceeds that of the bachelor's 
level, and they create the cross-functional aptitudes needed in modem industry. This 
program will allow students to move more easily into management careers in consulting 
or research and development, design, and marketing of new science-based products. 

Degree Requirements for M.S. in Environmental Analysis and Decision Making 

The 21 -month professional master's program begins with two semesters of course 
work at Rice followed by a six-month industrial internship. After the internship, students 
return to Rice for a final semester of course work. In addition to taking technical courses, 
students in the Environmental Analysis and Decision Making Program will take two 
management courses, one science policy and ethics course, and a seminar jointly with 
the students involved in the other professional master's tracks. No thesis is required; 
however, students are required to present their internship projects in both oral and written 
form in the Professional Master's Seminar. Students also are required to attend events 
organized by the Rice Alliance for Technology and Entrepreneurship and will be guided 
in courses by the efforts of the Cain Project in Engineering and Professional Communi- 
cation. Working professionals my be considered for part-time enrollment. 

For general university requirements for graduate study, see pages 65-70, and see 
also Professional Degrees, page 66. 



176 DEPARTMENTS / Environmental Analysis and Decision Making 

To ensure that all students obtain an excellent quantitative background , each student 
will be required to take the core courses listed below. If a student can demonstrate that 
s/he has learned the material elsewhere, s/he may be exempted. Students pursuing this 
degree part-time will meet with their assigned advisor to determine their coursework 
schedule. 

Yearl 

Fall Semester 

1 or 2 electives* 

STAT 305 Introduction to Statistics for Biosciences with 1 hour environmental 

lab** 
STAT 410 Introduction to Statistical Computing and Linear Models 

Or STAT 385 Methods for Data Analysis (offered in spring) 
CEVE 401 Introduction to Environmental Chemistry with lab 
MGMT 750 Maruigement for Science and Engineering 
NSCI 501 Professiorml Master's Seminar 
* Dependent on the choice of STAT 410 or STAT 385 
** Only required for students with no statistical background 

Spring Semester 

1 or 2 electives* 

CEVE 412 Hydrology and Watershed Analysis 
CEVE 512 Hydrology and Watershed Analysis lab 
NSCI 501 Professional Master's Seminar 
STAT 685 Quantitative Environmental Decision Making 
♦Dependent on the choice of STAT 410 or STAT 385 

Summer Semester 

Industrial Internship 

Year 2 

Fall Semester 

NSCI 510 Industrial Internship 

Spring Semester 

2 electives 

NSCI 511 Science Policy and Ethics 
ESCI 450 Remote Sensing 
NSCI 501 Professional Master's Seminar 

Elective Courses: In addition to taking the core courses, the student will choose 5 
electives from the list below. We recommend that three of the electives be in one 
of the focus areas: sustainability, biological sciences, chemistry, fluids and 
transport, engineering, or advanced computation. At least one should be from the 
management and policy area. 

Sustainable Development CEVE 406 Introduction to Environmental 
XXXX Introduction to Sustainable Law 

Development CEVE 411 Air Resource Management 

BIOS 322 Global Ecosystem Dynamics CEVE 434 Chemical Transport and Fate 
BIOS 325 Ecology in Environment 



Environmental Analysis and Decision Making 177 



ECON 480 Environmental Economics 
ESCI 353 Environmental Geochemistry 
MGMT 6 1 7 Managerial Decision 

Making 
MGMT 66 1 International Business Law 
MGMT 674 Production and Operations 

Management 
MGMT 676 Project Management/ Project 

Finance 
MGMT 72 1 General Business Law 
SOCI 367 Environmental Sociology 

Management and Policy 

CEVE 406 Introduction to 

Environmental Law 
ECON 480 Environmental Economics 
ENGI 303 / CEVE 322 Engineering 

Economics for Engineers 
MGMT 72 1 General Business Law 
MGMT 661 International Business Law 
MGMT 6 1 7 Managerial Decision 

Making 
MGMT 75 1 New Venture Creation in 

Science and Engineering 
MGMT 674 Production and Operations 

Management 
MGMT 676 Project Management I 

Project Finance 
MGMT 636 Systems Analysis and 

Database Design 
SOCI 367 Environmental Sociology 

Biological Sciences 

BIOS 322 Global Ecosxstem Dynamics 

BIOS 324 Wetland Ecosystems 

BIOS 325 Ecology 

BIOS 424 Microbiology and 

Biotechnology 
BIOS 425 Plant Molecular Biology 
CEVE 536 Environmental 

Biotechnology 
ESCI 468 Paleoclimate and Human 

Response 

Chemistry 

CENG 630 Chemical Engineering of 

Nanostructured Materials 
CEVE 5 1 1 Atmospheric Chemistry and 

Physics 
CEVE 550 Applied Water Chemistry 
ESCI 353 Environmental Geochemistry 



Fluid Dynamics and Transport 
CENG 571/671 Flow & Transport in 

Porous Media I & II 
MECH 371/372 Fluid Mechanics I & II 
MECH 454/554 Finite Element Methods 

in Fluid Mechanics 
MECH 673 Advanced Fluid Mechanics I 

Engineering 

CEVE 41 1 Air Resource Management 

CEVE 434 Chemical Transport and Fate 

in the Environment 
CEVE 530 Physical/Chemical Processes 

in Environmental Engineering 
CEVE 640 Advanced Topics in 

Environmental Engineering 

Advanced Computation 

CAAM 378 Advanced Computation 
CAAM 420 Computational Science I 
CAAM 45 1 Numerical Linear Algebra 
CAAM 452 Computational Methods for 

Differential Equations 
CAAM 454 Optimization Problems in 

Computational Engineering and 

Science 
COMP 361 Visual Methods for Science 

and Engineering 
ESCI 441 Geophysical Data Analysis 
ESCI 454 Geographic Information 

Systems 
MECH 454/554 Finite Element Methods 

in Fluid Mechanics 
MECH 343 Modeling of Dynamic 

Systems 
MECH 417/517 Finite Element Analysis 
MECH 420 Feedback Control of 

Dynamical Systems 
MECH 563/ CAAM 563 Engineering 

Approach to Mathematical 

Programming 
MECH 679 / CIVI 679 Applied Monte 

Carlo Analysis 
STAT 42 1 Methods in Computational 

Finance II 
STAT 422 Bayesian Data Analysis 
STAT 43 1 Mathematical Statistics 
STAT 540 Practicum in Statistical 

Modeling 
STAT 541 Multivariate Analysis 
STAT 546 Design and Analysis of 

Experiments and Sampling Theory 
STAT 553 Biostatistics 



178 

Environmental Studies 



Directors 

Paul A. Harcombe (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) 
Walter W. Isle (English) 

Professors Gordon G. Wittenberg (Architecture) 

Arthur A. Few (Physics and Environ- Kyriacos Zygourakis (Chemical 

mental Science) Engineering 

Neal Lane (University Professor) Associate Professor 

Ronald J. Parry (Chemistry) Gerald R. Dickens (Earth Science) 

Ronald L. Sass (Ecology and Evolu- Lecturer 

tionary Biology) Donald Ostdiek (Political Science) 
Mark R. Wiesner (Civil and Environ- 
mental Engineering) 



The Environmental Studies Program offers several introductory couses for students 
interested in broadening their understanding of environmental issues. These courses are 
often team-taught by faculty from various areas of study. 

Students wishing to major in an environmental program have three options: 
environmental science, environmental engineering (see Civil and Environmental Engi- 
neering), or environmental policy (see Policy Studies). 

Students seeking advice regarding environmental programs may contact Dr. Isle, 
Dr. Harcombe, or Megan Wilde (Center for the Study of Environment and Society) for 
advice or more information. 

Rice is a partner with Columbia University at Biosphere 2 Center, where Columbia 
offers a semester's course in environmental studies, credit for which may transfer to Rice. 
Interested students should apply to the Environmental Studies Program directors.. 

Courses: 

ENST 101 The Sustainable Environment 

ENST 1 13 Environmental Crisis Seminar 

ENST 200 Introduction to the Environment 

ENST 303 Environmental Issues— Rice into the Future 

ENST 400 Independent Study 



See ENST in the Courses of Instruction section. 



French Studies 



179 



The School of Humanities 



Chair 

Michel Achard 



Professors 

Madeleine Alcover 
Bernard Aresu 
Jean- Joseph Goux 
Lynne Huffer 
Deborah Nelson-Campbell 



Associate Professors 

Deborah A. Harter 

Philip R. Wood 

Assistant Professor 

Louisa Shea 

Visiting Assistant Professor 

Jean-Luc Robin 



Degrees Offered: B. A., M. A., Ph.D. 

Courses in this department hone language skills in French while placing a diverse, 
generalized knowledge of French literature within a broad spectrum of cultural, histori- 
cal, philosophical, and theoretical concerns. Students are also urged to take courses in 
fields closely related to French studies, including European and English history, 
literature, and philosophy. The department encourages students to spend time studying 
in a francophone country and to that end the French Studies department and Office of 
Student Advising will help students select an appropriate program. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in French Studies 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students majoring in French studies must complete at least 30 semester hours in upper- 
level courses (at the 300 or 400 level). A double major or an area major must complete 
24 hours in upper-level courses. 



Required Courses 

FREN 3 1 1 Major Literary Works and 

Artifacts of Pre-Revolutionary 

France 
FREN 3 1 2 Major Literary Works and 

Artifacts of Post-Revolutionary 

France: The Romantic Legacy 
FREN 336 Writing for the Major 



Electives 

7 additional courses (for single majors)— 
at least 3 courses at the 400 level and 
at least 1 course from Group III 
(culture, history, and civilization) 

5 additional courses (for double majors)— 
at least 2 courses at the 400 level and 
at least 1 course from Group III 
(culture, history, and civilization) 



As many as 2 French courses taught in English may count toward a major in French 
studies. Students who have taken 300- and 400-level French courses (except those 
taught in English) cannot enroll simultaneously or afterward in 200-level French courses 
for credit. At least half of the courses for the major must be taken at Rice University . The 
department normally requires that the basic courses for the major (FREN 311, 
312, and 336) be taken at Rice. Students who matriculate before 2003 may choose to 
graduate with the requirements listed in the General Announcements of the year of their 
matriculation or of their graduation. 



1 80 DEPARTMENTS / French Studies 

Students with diplomas from French-speaking institutions must consult with the 
department before enrolling in courses, and all majors and prospective majors must have 
their programs of study approved by an undergraduate adviser. Students wishing to 
complete the honors program in French studies should also consult one of the advisers. 

Campus Activities. To acquaint students with French language and culture, the 
department sponsors a weekly French Table that meets at lunch in a college. The Club 
Chouette also organizes outings to French movies, sponsors guest lectures, and, in 
cooperation with the department, helps to produce a play during the spring semester. 
Students who maintain at least a B average in 2 or more advanced French courses and 
have a GPA of at least B, are invited to join the Theta chapter of the honorary Pi Delta Phi. 

Travel Abroad. The department encourages majors to spend time living and 
studying in a francophone country. The Alliance Frangaise of Houston offers a summer 
scholarship of $3,000 each year to a qualified sophomore or junior for six weeks' study 
in France. The Clyde Ferguson Bull Traveling Fellowship, awarded each year to one 
graduating senior with a major or double major in French studies, permits the recipient 
to spend an entire year in France. Information about study abroad is available from the 
department faculty and in the Office of Academic Advising. 

Degree Requirements for M.A. and Ph.D. in French Studies 

Admission to graduate study in French, granted each year to a limited number of 
qualified students, requires a distinguished undergraduate record in the study of French 
literature or a related field and a capacity for independent work. All candidates should 
have a near-native command of the French language. For general university require- 
ments, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). 

M. A. Program. In most cases students take two years to complete work for the M. A. 
degree in French studies. While graduate students normally take 500-level courses, as 
many as 2 courses at the 400 level may count toward fulfillment of the following course 
requirements. M.A. candidates must: 

• Complete with satisfactory standing 27 semester hours (in addition to B.A. course 

work) of upper-level courses, plus 6 hours of independent study in the 
preparation of three advanced research papers to be defended before their M.A. 
committee . The selection of the paper topics must receive preliminary approval 
from the examination committee. 

• Complete LING 6 1 OTop/cs in Language Methodology, a course normally re- 

quired for all graduate teaching assistants 

• Perform satisfactorily on a reading examination in one department-approved 

language other than French or English 

• Perform satisfactorily on preliminary written and oral examinations conducted in 

French on works specified on the department reading list 

Ph.D. Program. Candidates normally take 500-level courses, but students entering 
with a B.A. may count toward their Ph.D. degree as many as 3 courses at the 400 level; 
those entering with an M.A. may count 2 such courses. Graduate student enrollment in 
a course listed only at the 400 level, however, is subject to the instructor's approval. 
Candidates for the Ph.D. degree must meet the following criteria, ensuring that they 
complete the language requirement and their preliminary exams one year before they 
submit a dissertation: 



French Studies 181 

• In a program approved by the department, complete with high standing at least 

57 semester hours of course work plus 36 thesis hours (for those already holding 
an M.A. degree, the requirement is 39 hours of course work plus 36 thesis hours). 
Six of these units may be fulfilled with a 600-level independent study course. 

• In addition , complete LING 6 1 (Topics in Language Methodology , a course normally 

required for all graduate language teaching assistants. Students entering with an 
M.A. who have completed the equivalent course are exempt from this require- 
ment. 

• Satisfactorily complete 1 course at the 300 level or above in a language other than 

French or English. With the permission of the graduate committee, this 
requirement may also be met through satisfactory performance on a written 
language examination or by such other means as the graduate committee may 
direct. 

• Perform satisfactorily on preliminary written and oral examinations based on 

readings comprising both required and individually selected texts, including 
readings in French literature from all major periods and readings in philosophy 
and theory; history, cultural studies, and film; and postcolonial and gender 
studies. The oral exam can be taken only after successful completion of the 
written exam. 

• Complete a dissertation, approved by the department, that represents an original 

contribution to the field of French studies. 

• Perform satisfactorily on a final oral examination on the dissertation. 

See FREN in the Courses of Instruction section. 



182 

German and Slavic Studies 



The School of Humanities 



Chair 

Klaus Weissenberger 

Professors Uwe Steiner 

Peter Caldwell Sarah Westphal 

Steven Crowell Assistant Professor 

Margret Eifler Christian Emden 

Ewa M.Thompson Visiting Assistant Professor 

John Zammito Florian Kreutzer 

Associate Professors Lecturer 

Maria-Regina Kecht Dariusz Skorczewski 

Degrees Ojfered: B.A. in German Studies, B.A. in Slavic Studies 

German 

The department offers instruction in the German language, in German literature 
(studied in the original and in translation), and in the achievements of German culture 
surveyed as a whole and in particular themes, genres, and periods. The department 
stresses linguistic competence, interdisciplinary study, and the role of German culture 
within the broad context of European history. Studies in film, cultural theory , and gender 
complement traditional studies of German literature, philosophy, history, and art. 

The B .A. in German prepares students for graduate study in German, as well as for 
careers in law, business, international affairs, economics, and other academic fields. Our 
language acquisition courses maximize linguistic proficiency and prepare students for 
study abroad. Our freshman seminars are conducted in small groups and stress written 
and oral communication. Culture courses under the rubric "Mapping German Culture" 
are taught in English and consider major cultural and literary topics. For students who 
have some proficiency in German, the Mapping German Culture courses are accompa- 
nied by sections that conduct discussions and study sources in German. Upper-level 
literary courses and special topics seminars both polish linguistic skills and offer 
intensive study at a high level. 

The department encourages and, by means of the Mitchell Fellowships, facilitates 
study abroad in Germany and Austria. There are weekly German tables in the colleges. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in German Studies 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students who have German as their only major must complete at least 27 semester 
hours above the 200 level. These 27 semester hours must include the following: 

•GERM 302 (bridge course in German literary language) 

•3 Mapping German Culture courses (GERM 321-360) with attached one- 
hour FLAC sections 



German and Slavic Studies 183 

•GERM 411,412 (basic German literature courses) 
•GERM 421 , 422 (special topics seminars) 

•Option: GERM 301 Composition and Conversation I may be substituted for 
any one of the above courses except 302 ,411, and 412. 

Students who have German as a double major must complete at least 20 semester 
hours above the 200 level. These 20 semester hours must include the following: 

•GERM 302 (bridge course in German literary language) 

•2 Mapping German Culture courses (GERM 321-360) with attached one- 
hour FLAG sections 

•GERM 411.412 (basic German literature courses) 
•Either GERM 421 or 422 (special topics seminars) 

•Option: GERM 301 Composition and Conversation I may be substituted 
for any one of the above courses except 302. 411, and 412. 

Honors. Outstanding students are presented annually with the Max Freund Prize. 
The department also offers an honors program for majors excelling in their studies. 
Honors work consists of readings and research leading to a substantial honors essay 
under the supervision of a department faculty member (GERM 403). Students should 
consider this work to enhance preparation for graduate school. 

Slavic 

In the B.A. program in Slavic Studies, students acquire a proficiency in Russian 
and Eastern European languages, culture, and literature. A three-year study plan in 
Russian language is available. A variety of Russian literature courses are taught in English, 
including courses devoted to Tolstoy and Dostoevsky. 

The department encourages and, by means of the Mitchell Fellowships, facilitates 
study abroad in a Slavic speaking country. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Slavic Studies 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Single majors in Slavic studies must complete 24 semester hours at the 300 level or 
above. Double majors must complete 18 semester hours at the 300 level or above. At 
least one of these courses must cover the entire Slavic area (e.g., SLAV 320 Slavic 
Cultures, RUSS 41 1 Contemporary Russia, or SLAV 412 Contemporary- Eastern and 
Central Europe). 

Courses in Polish are offered subject to availability of an instructor. Students may 
take two Slavic studies-related courses from outside the department, subject to approval 
by the Slavic studies advisor (Professor Thompson). 

See GERM, PLSH, RUSS, and SLAV in the Courses of Instruction section. 



184 

Hispanic Studies 



The School of Humanities 



Chair 

Maarten van Delden 



Professors J. Bernardo Perez 

James A. Castafieda Rafael Salaberry 

Beatriz Gonzalez-Stephan Assistant Professor 

Associate Professors Kate Jenckes 
Robert Lane Kauffmann 

Degrees Offered: B.A. and M.A. in Hispanic Studies 

The department offers courses on the literatures and cultures of the Spanish- 
speaking nations of the world, and on Spanish linguistics. The department stresses 
linguistic competence, interdisciplinary study , and a transnational perspective on Span- 
ish and Spanish American literature and culture. In addition to courses on the novel, 
poetry , and the essay , the department also offers the opportunity to study f ilm , art , cultural 
theory, translation, and gender. Our freshman seminars are conducted in English and 
stress written and oral communication. Qualified students may undertake independent 
work. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Hispanic Studies 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Both single and double majors must take at least one course in Hispanic linguistics, one 
course in Spanish literature and/or culture, and one course in Latin American literature 
and/or culture. No more than two courses taught in English may count toward the major 
in Hispanic studies. At least half of the courses for the major must be taken at Rice 
University. 

Single Majors: Students majoring in Hispanic studies must complete at least 30 
semester hours in upper-level courses (SPAN 330 and above) as follows: 

• 1 course between SPAN 330-SPAN 359 

• 4 courses between SPAN 360-SPAN 399 

• 4 courses at the 400 level 

• 1 elective course 

Double Majors: Students double majoring in Hispanic Studies must complete at 
least 24 semester hours in upper-level courses (SPAN 330 and above) as follows: 

• 1 course between SPAN 330-SPAN 359 

• 3 courses between SPAN 360-SPAN 399 

• 3 courses at the 400 level 

• 1 elective course 

For a list of recommended elective courses, please see department coordinator. 



Hispanic Studies 185 

Honors. Every year, the depaitment presents the Cervantes Award for Outstand- 
ing Seniors to its top students. The department also offers an honors program for 
majors excelUng in their studies. Honors work consists of an independent 
research project leading to a substantial essay. It is undertaken in close coopera- 
tion with a departmental faculty member, who must first approve the thesis 
proposal. 

Degree Requirements for M.A. in Hispanic Studies 

For general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). For the 
M.A. degree, candidates must: 

• Complete with high standing an approved program that nonnally includes 

24 semester hours in advanced courses, plus 6 hours of thesis work 

• Pass a reading examination in one foreign language (other than Spanish) that has 

been approved by the department 

• Perfonn satisfactorily on a written comprehensive examination in Spanish, which 

tests students' competence in Hispanic literamre and linguistics 

• Take 1 semester of college Latin (or equivalent) 

• Take SPAN 507 Teaching College Spanish 

• Complete an acceptable thesis 

• Perform satisfactorily on a final oral examination on the thesis 

See SPAN in the Courses of Instruction section. 



186 

History 

The School of Humanities 



Chair 

Peter C.Caldwell 



Professors 

John B. Boles 
Peter C.Caldwell 
Ira D. Gruber 
Thomas L. Haskell 
Michael Maas 
Allen J. Matusow 
Atieno Odhiambo 
Patricia Seed 
Richard J. Smith 
Gale Stokes 
Martin J. Wiener 
John H. Zammito 
Professors Emeriti 
Katherine Fischer Drew 
Harold Hyman 
Albert Van Helden 



Associate Professors 

Edward L. Cox 
Alex Lichtenstein 
Ussama Makdisi 
Carol E. Qui Hen 
Paula A. Sanders 
Lora Wildenthal 
Joel W. Wolfe 
Assistant Professors 
Alexander X. Byrd 
G. Daniel Cohen 
Eva Haverkamp 
Allison Sneider 
Sarah Thai 
Kerry R.Ward 
Lecturer 
Laura Baker 



Degrees Offered: B. A., M. A., Ph.D. 

The undergraduate program offers courses in the four main areas of ancient- 
medieval history , modem European history , U.S . history , and the histories of Asia. Latin 
America, and Africa. Faculty interests range from ancient Greek and medieval Jewish 
history to modern British and German; from areas in American history that include 
Colonial America, the Old and New South, the Civil War, and intellectual history to 
world military history; and from general global history to specific areas such as East 
Asian, Caribbean, and Middle Eastern. The department encourages its majors to 
acquaint themselves with other humanistic disciplines, such as literature, fine arts, and 
philosophy; the contributions of political science, sociology, economics, and anthropol- 
ogy also are vital to historical studies. The graduate program, which trains a limited 
number of carefully selected students, offers studies in American history, intellectual 
history, and global/world comparative history. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in History 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students majoring in history must complete at least 30 semester hours (10 courses) in 
history, with 1 8 hours (6 courses) at the 300 or 400 level. Students may apply advanced 
placement credit to no more than 6 of these hours (2 courses). Majors should select 2 of 
the required upper-level courses from a departmental list of seminars devoted mainly to 
writing and discussion. Departmental distribution requirements are as follows (students 
may not use advanced placement credit for these requirements): 



History 187 

Ancient medieval history — at least 1 course 

Modem European history— at least 2 courses 

U.S. history— at least 2 courses 

Asian, Latin American, and African history— at least 2 courses 

Some foreign language proficiency is desirable, and the department highly 
recommends that students who are contemplating graduate work in history study at 
least 1 foreign language in some depth. 

Transfer Credit and Advanced Placement Credit. The Department of History 
grants transfer credit on a case-by-case basis to enrolled undergraduates (the registrar 
determines the hours to be credited). However, history majors must take at least 
18 semester hours (6 courses) of the required 30 hours in history at Rice. No more 
than 4 courses may be satisfied through advanced placement and transfer credit. 
Advanced placement credit may not be used to satisfy departmental distribution 
requirements for a history major. 

Rice students who wish to take classes for credit at another U.S. university should 
allow sufficient time to get advance confirmation from the department that the course 
is eligible: courses are eligible only if taken at a four-year institution. Rice students 
planning to study at a foreign university also must get course approval from the Office 
of International Programs. 

After completing an approved course from either a domestic or a foreign university , 
students should submit a request for transfer credit, including evidence of the scope and 
work requirements of the course to be transferred (e.g., a syllabus, reading lists, and 
copies of exams and papers), to the department's director of undergraduate studies. 

Honors Program. Qualified undergraduates may enroll for 6 semester hours of 
directed honors research and writing, completing an honors thesis in their senior year 
(these 6 hours are in addition to the 30 hours required for the major). Students must 
complete both semesters of HIST 403/404 to receive credit; the grade for the final project 
applies to the full 6 hours. Interested students who have a grade point average of at least 
3.50 in their history courses should submit a substantial historical essay, an honors 
thesis proposal, and recommendations from the instructor to whom the paper was 
submitted and from their proposed adviser. Financial assistance is available for honors 
students to conduct research on their honors theses during the summer between their 
junior and senior years. After their admission to the program, a periodic workshop 
allows honors students to share problems and ideas . Once the adviser and another reader 
have evaluated the completed thesis, the director of the honors program determines 
whether to award honors. Students who miss the final thesis deadline (which is well 
before the end of their senior year) will receive a grade and credit for completed work, 
but no honors. 

Degree Requirements for M.A. and Ph.D. in History 

The Rice University graduate program in history is primarily a Ph.D. program. 
Students who have a B .A. in history (or its equivalent) from an acceptable institution are 
eligible to apply to the Ph.D. and M. A. programs. Although many successful candidates 
to the Ph.D. program have an M.A. or other advanced degree, advanced study is not a 
requirement for admission. Graduate degrees are offered in U.S., European, intellectual, 
and other areas of history. Further information is available on request from the 
department. For general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). 



1 88 DEPARTMENTS / History 

The department awards graduate tuition waivers and fellowship stipends, within 
the limits of available funds, to qualified Ph.D. candidates with demonstrated ability. 
University funding is not available for masters program study only. All graduate 
students in the history department are expected to participate in the professional 
activities of the department as part of their training. These include, but are not limited 
to, assisting with the Journal of Southern History or the Papers of Jefferson Davis and 
serving as research assistants or teaching assistants for department members. Insofar as 
possible, these assignments are kept consistent with the interests of the students. 

M. A. Program. The department gives priority to applicants for the Ph.D. Comple- 
tion of the M.A. degree usually takes two years; no more than three years may elapse 
between graduate admission and the completion of the degree unless the department 
Graduate Committee approves an extension. M.A. degrees are awarded in two ways: 
( 1 ) completion of one year of course work (24 credit hours) and a thesis written and 
defended in an oral examination during the second year; and (2) completion of two years 
of course work (48 credit hours), normally including at least 2 seminar research papers. 

Ph.D. Program. Doctoral candidates must prepare themselves in three fields of 
history: two in their major area of concentration, whether European, U.S., or other 
history, and a third in an area outside of that concentration (e.g., if the major area is 
European history, the third field must be in U.S. or other non-European history, and if 
the major area is U.S. history, the third field must be in European or other non-U .S. 
history, and so on). Students who wish to pursue a third field in an area outside the 
department should petition the Graduate Committee by the end of their second semester. 

The requirements for completing the degree will be administered as flexibly as 
possible within the bounds of the general university regulations. These requirements 
state that the Ph.D. degrees "will be awarded after successful completion of at least 90 
semester hours of advanced study and an original investigation reported in an approved 
thesis." Passing the qualifying exam and receiving approval of a dissertation prospectus 
allows the student to apply for formal admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. 

For the Ph.D., candidates must: 

• Prepare themselves thoroughly in three examination fields. 

• Take 8 graduate seminars, including Introduction to Doctoral Studies. 

• Pass reading examinations in the principal language of research (unless it is 

English) and one other language (not English). 

• Perform satisfactorily on written and oral examinations. For students entering 

with a B.A., those examinations will normally be taken before the beginning 
of the fifth semester and no later than the beginning of the sixth semester. 
Students entering with an M.A. may take their examinations earlier, with 
departmental approval. 

• Complete a dissertation presenting the results of original research. 

• Defend the thesis in a public oral examination. 

See HIST in the Courses of Instruction section. 



Kinesiology 

The School of Humanities 



Chair 

Bruce Etnyre 



189 



Professors 

Bruce Entyre 
Nicholas K. lammarino 
Professors Emeriti 
Eva J. Lee 

Hally B.W. Poindexter 
Dale W. Spence 
Associate Professor 
James G. Disch 
Assistant Professors 
Brian T. Gibson 
Clark Haptonstall 
Peter G. Weyand 
Adjunct Professors 
William J. Bryan 
Becky Gorham 
Mark Jenkins 



David Melville 
George Steve Morris 
Daniel O'Connor 
Ray Skaggs 
Armin D. Weinberg 
Lecturers 
Marlene A. Dixon 
John F. Eliot 
Cynthia A. Lanier 
Part-time Lecturers 
Gwendolyn Adam 
Roberta Anding 
Cassius B. Bordelon, Jr. 
Karen Lafleur 
Joseph Pogge 
Kristy Vandenberg 



Degree Offered: B.A. 

The department was one of the first of its kind in the nation to institute an academic 
program structure that allows students to concentrate their efforts on a specific 
subdiscipline. Academic programs include sports medicine, sport management, and 
health science. Detailed requirements of each program can be obtained on the depart- 
mental webpage at http://kinesiology.rice.edu. 

Degree Requirements for the B.A. in Kinesiology 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
A minimum of 120 semester hours is required for a bachelor of arts degree in 
kinesiology. Because of the interdisciplinary and diverse nature of the field of kinesi- 
ology , each student is required to specify an academic program concentration within the 
major. 

Sports Medicine Program 

Director: Dr. Brian Gibson 

Students who choose the sports medicine program of the kinesiology department 
typically continue their education at the graduate level or plan on attending medical 
school or other medically related professional schools such as physical therapy. 
Graduates may also be directly employed in medical and corporate settings, which 
include both preventative and rehabilitative programs. Graduates who choose not to 



190 DEPARTMENTS/Kinesiology 

seek post-baccalaureate education are generally encouraged to obtain certification for 
exercise testing, physical fitness evaluation, or exercise prescription through the Ameri- 
can College of Sports Medicine at http://www.acsm.org/. 

The sports medicine curriculum intends to provide a strong natural science founda- 
tion and to interface this foundation with application to the human body. Prerequisite 
courses in chemistry and physics, elective courses in biology and biochemistry, as well 
as an array of required and elective courses offered within the department provide this 
foundation. The sports medicine program is the only academic specialization on campus 
that provides detailed exposure to human anatomy and human physiology. In addition, 
students receive a solid foundation in nutrition , biomechanics , sports psychology , motor 
learning, measurement and statistics, exercise physiology, and sports medicine. Practical 
experience is afforded through several academic labs. Other elective courses include 
writing for professional communication, epidemiology, case studies in human perfor- 
mance, motor control, advanced exercise physiology and preventative medicine, re- 
search methods, and muscle physiology and plasticity. During advising sessions, 
students are encouraged to select from these electives according to their respective career 
goals . Students in the sports medicine program are expected to develop a strong scientific 
knowledge base as well as adept critical reading, writing, and oral communication skills. 

Qualified students of the sports medicine program will be encouraged to participate 
in an independent study. This independent study allows integral involvement in basic or 
applied research directed by a faculty adviser. The application (proposal) process for 
independent studies is outlined in the webpage listed below. Qualified students are also 
encouraged to apply for any one of a variety of highly competitive internships. The 
internships generally provide students with an opportunity to experience the application 
of preventative and rehabilitative sports medicine concepts and practice at a health care 
or corporate setting. 

Sport Management Program 

Director: Dr. Clark Haptonstall 

Sport management is an interdisciplinary field of study of fairly modem develop- 
ment. It first appeared in the curricula of American universities under a variety of 
designations in the early to mid- 1 980' s. Rice University became a pioneer institution in 
integrating this field into the traditional academic area known as kinesiology by making 
sport management one of the original programs when the department was reorganized 
into its present configuration. 

As a distinct body of knowledge and field of study, sport management draws from 
a wide range of academic disciplines: economics, sociology, political science, psychol- 
ogy, law, communication, and managerial studies. Each discipline can be applied to the 
business enterprise of amateur and professional sport, as well as the management of 
highly effective teams in sport, corporate America, or other management related 
professions. While public and private sector sport operation is the topic of a large segment 
of the curriculum, the thoroughly interdisciplinary emphasis aims at educating students 
in the skills and theory necessary to assume responsible leadership roles in and out of 
sport. 

Career preparation for leadership and entrepreneurial positions is the ultimate goal 
of sport management at Rice. Students will acquire a solid foundation in public speech, 
professional writing, and leadership and thus will be competitive for opportunities at the 
country's best law and business schools, as well as with journalism programs and premier 
consulting corporations. 

Students wishing to gain employment in the sport industry should pay particular 
attention to practical experience. Networking and out-of-class development often plays 
the most significant role in obtaining jobs and promotions along high profile career paths 
such as those in collegiate or professional sports organizations. Students interested in 



Kinesiology 191 

careers in public relations, media, event direction, or promotion, office management, 
management of coaching and scouting, human resources, business development, sports 
information, or advertising will therefore need to demonstrate a commitment to securing 
and completing internships. Membership in national sport societies, specifically the 
North American Society for Sport Management (NASSM)— the leading academic 
association in this field and governing body from which Rice is in the process of obtaining 
national accreditation— is strongly recommended. 

Highly qualified students will also be encouraged to seek an honors major, a double 
major, and/or consider pursuit of an advanced degree in business, law, sport manage- 
ment, or organizational psychology. 

Health Sciences Program 

Director: Dr. Nicholas K. lammarino 

The goal of the health science program is to provide students with a fundamental 
background in health promotion and disease prevention. This background will enable 
them to understand the complexities of maintaining an optimal level of personal health 
while also considering the role that health promotion plays in society and the mechanisms 
that affect community health. The health science program is viewed as an excellent 
option for undergraduate students who are preparing to enter graduate school in health 
education, health promotion, or public health, as well as other health-related graduate or 
professional programs such as medicine or dentistr\'. 

Students must complete a total of 42 semester hours in addition to the general 
university requirements (see pages 20-23). Six lecture courses are required for a total of 
1 8 required hours. These required courses cover the structure and function of the human 
body (Human Anatomy), an introductory' course designed to acquaint students with the 
fundamental concepts of health and models of health promotion (Concepts of Health 
Science), understanding and assessing community health needs (Principles of Commu- 
nity Health) , methods of understanding the disease process (Epidemiology) , a course that 
introduces statistics and measurement (Measurement and Statistics), and a professional 
preparation course (Foundations of Health Promotion/Health Education) that introduces 
students to the profession. 

The remaining 24 semester hours are drawn from elective courses that are both 
within the kinesiology department and, at present, more than 20 courses from other 
academic departments. In keeping with the university's interest in an interdisciplinary 
approach to undergraduate education, this allows students to choose health-related 
courses within the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities divisions. 

See HEAL and KINE in the Courses of Instruction section. 



192 

Lifetime Physical Activity Program 



Student Affairs 



Director 

Dr. Daniel N. McMasters 

Instructors 

Mauro Hamza 

Tracy King 

Christine Lidvall 

Rebecca Vails 

Scott Wray 
Makyba Lyons 



The mission of the Lifetime Physical Activity Program (LPAP) is to provide a 
multifaceted learning experience via a program of physical activity to foster physical, 
social, and emotional wellness. The ultimate goal of the LPAP is to provide each 
student with: 

• Knowledge of health-related concepts of physical activity 

• Cognitive and behavioral skills 

• An understanding of physical activity as a mode of improved quality of life 

throughout the life-span 

• A sense of emotional well-being 

• Satisfying social interaction 

• Knowledge of rules and strategies 

• An opportunity to learn an activity which is not necessarily mainstream in 

U.S. culture 

• Professional instruction specific to the course material 

• An introduction to intramural sports, sport clubs, dance theatre, and recrea- 

tional programs 

• Improved quality of life at Rice University 

Lifetime physical activity classes are strongly recommended for all first-year 
students, including transfers who have not had an equivalent course elsewhere. Satisfac- 
tory completion of LPAP 101 and 102 is a requirement of the baccalaureate degree. 
Student should not repeat an activity in LPAP 102 that was taken in LPAP 101 . 

The LPAP offers approximately 40 sections each semester. Within scheduling 
constraints, a student may select a section which offers activities that satisfy his/her 
interests. The LPAP offers a variety of activities. Some of the current activities offered 
include racquet sports (tennis, racquetball, badminton), fitness activities (aerobics, 
personal fitness, weight training, cycling), aquatics, dance (Latin ballroom, ballroom, 
modern, ballet, country western. Middle Eastern, classical Indian), martial arts, team 
sports (flag football, basketball, volleyball, soccer, softball), and other activities such as 
fencing, self defense for women, golf, disc golf, yoga, nutrition, and wellness. 

See LPAP in the Courses of Instruction section. 



193 



Linguistics 

The School of Humanities 



Chair 

Masayoshi Shibatani 

Professor Assistant Professors 

Stephen A. Tyler Michael Barlow 

Professors Emeriti Robert Englebretson 

James E. Copeland Nancy Niedzielski 

Philip W. Davis Adjunct Associate Professor 

Sydney M.Lamb Spike Gildea 

Associate Professors Lecturer and Playwright in 

Michel Achard Residence 

Suzanne E. Kemmer E. Douglas Mitchell 

Nanxiu Qian Lecturer 

Rafael Salaberry Claude Mauk 

Post-Doctoral Fellow 
Gail Coelho 



Degrees Ojfered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
B.A. in Linguistics 

The department offers both a major program in linguistics and a Certificate in 
Teaching English as a Second Language, which may be earned with or without a 
linguistics major. For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements 
(pages 20-23). In addition, students must satisfy the distribution requirements and 
complete no fewer than 60 semester hours for a total of at least 120 semester hours. 

Because human language is a muhifaceted object of study, linguistics is, by its 
nature, an interdisciplinary field. The undergraduate major in linguistics provides both 
an in-depth grounding in the field as well as cross-disciplinary breadth. Students 
beginning a linguistics major should take LING 200, which is a prerequisite for many 
upper-level courses in the department. All majors are required to take at least 8 courses 
(24 semester hours) in linguistics at the 300 level or above, including 4 core courses listed 
below: 

Core Courses 

LING 300 Linguistic Analysis 
LING 301 Phonetics or LING 3 1 1 Phonology 

LING 402 Syntax and Semantics or LING 416 Linguistic Universals and Typology 
LING 305 Historical Linguistics or LING 315 Semantics: Introduction to the Study of 
Meaning or LING 415 Sociolinguistics 

No more than 1 independent study course may be counted toward the major 
requirements. In addition, competency in 1 language other than English is required. This 
requirement may be satisfied by 2 courses in a foreign language at the 200 level or above 
or equivalent, or at the 100 level or above for non-European languages. The general 



1 94 DEPARTMENTS / Linguistics 

linguistics major requires, in addition to the 4 core courses and the language requirement, 
at least 4 upper-level linguistics electives. 

Students may elect either a general linguistics major or one of four areas of 
concentration. Majors who plan to pursue graduate training in linguistics are recom- 
mended to choose one of the areas of concentration. These students also are urged to 
apply for admission to the honors program by the end of their junior year. The 
requirements for the various concentrations include additional courses, as follows. 

•Language Concentration. In addition to the basic language competency required 
of all majors, the language concentration requires an advanced level competency 
in a different language. This can be satisfied by 2 language courses taught in a 
language other than English at the 300 level or above, or equivalent. In addition 
to the core courses, 4 advanced linguistics electives also are required, which 
should be chosen in consultation with the linguistics adviser. Courses in the 
structure or history of the languages studied are especially appropriate. 

•Cognitive Science Concentration. This concentration requires 3 additional courses 
focused on the cognitive aspects of human language, selected from LING 306, 
315,317,411, and 412; 2 courses from cognitively related disciplines (psychol- 
ogy, computer science, anthropology, philosophy) as approved by the major 
adviser; and 2 other advanced linguistics electives. 

•Language, Culture, and Society Concentration. For an in-depth grounding in a 
particular language and culture, this concentration requires 2 language courses at 
the 300 level or above. The language may be the same as that used to satisfy the 
basic language competency. Besides the 4 core courses, the student must select 2 
courses from LING 3 13, 406, or 415; and 2 more linguistics electives. Finally, 2 
courses in sociocultural studies outside the department are required, and the 
selection must be approved by the major adviser. Examples of appropriate courses 
are ANTH 353, PSYC 202, RELI 393, or HIST 250. 

•Second Language Acquisition Concentration. Two language courses at the 300 
level or above are required; the language may be the same as that used to satisfy 
the basic language competency. In addition to the linguistics core courses, 4 
additional courses are required as follows: LING 340 and LING 417, LING 394 
or a foreign language equivalent (e.g.. Structure of Spanish, Structure of German, 
etc.) as approved by the major adviser, and one of the following: LING 309, LING 
313, LING 415, or LING 490. 

Honors Program. The departmental honors program provides selected under- 
graduate majors with the opportunity to conduct supervised research within their area of 
specialization in the major. Majors planning to pursue graduate training in linguistics or 
a related field are strongly encouraged to apply, as well as others who wish to add the 
experience of an intensive, individualized research project to their undergraduate 
education. 

Application to the honors program should be made in person to the undergraduate 
adviser in the second semester of a student's junior year. In support of the application, 
the student should prepare a brief description of the proposed project signed by the faculty 
member who is to supervise the work. Acceptance into the program is by agreement of 
the linguistics faculty. On acceptance, the student will enroll in LING 482, with the J 
supervising faculty member named as instructor. * 

The honors program framework is designed to facilitate the development of a 
mentoring relationship between student and faculty member. Students are thus expected 
to consult with the project supervisor periodically regaiding their progress; the supervi- 
sor will provide research guidance and general support. 



Linguistics 195 

With the appropriate completion of major requirements and the honors project or 
thesis , the student will graduate with departmental honors as follows: "With Distinction ," 
"With High Distinction ," or "With Highest Distinction ," as determined by the hnguistics 
faculty. 

Certificate in Teaching English as a Second Language. This program is designed for 
students who plan to teach English to nonnative speakers in the U.S. or abroad. The 
Certificate in Teaching English as a Second Language provides undergraduate-level 
training in applied linguistics and the English language, as well as some practical 
preparation for English language teaching. It can be easily combined with a major in 
linguistics, education, or English. To enroll in the program, see the director of the ESL 
Certificate Program or the linguistics undergraduate adviser. 

The program consists of 4 required courses and a practical component. 

Required Courses 

LING 200 Introduction to the Scientific Study of Language 
LING 340 Theory and Methods of Teaching ESL 
LING 394 Structure of the English Language 

LING 205 Language and Society or LING 309 Psychology of Language or LING 313 
Language and Culture or LING 4 1 5 Sociolinguistics 

Practical Component. The practical component consists of a total of 20 contact hours 
of language teaching/tutoring experience. This requirement may be filled by 
tutoring in the Rice Student Volunteer Program or by teaching in a high school or 
community ESL program. Students will be expected to write a short report on their 
teaching experience. 

Successful completion of the certificate program must be certified by the director of 
the ESL Certificate Program and will be indicated on the Rice transcript upon completion 
of degree requirements. 

Ph.D. in Linguistics 

The doctoral linguistics program at Rice emphasizes the study of language use and 
functional/cognitive approaches to linguistic theory . Areas of particular research strength 
in the department include field studies of particular languages (e.g., languages of North 
and South America; Austronesia; Africa; Europe; and East Asia) , typology , language and 
mind (cognitive linguistics, neurolinguistics, schema-based theories, lexical semantics), 
language change (diachronic typology, grammaticalization theory, semantic change, 
language classification, and Indo-European linguistics), and discourse analysis, includ- 
ing corpus linguistics. Additional research areas represented are second language 
acquisition and applied linguistics. 

The program only admits students planning to study for the Ph.D. degree full time. 
Undergraduate preparation should ideally include language study and course work in 
linguistics or disciplines related to linguistics, such as anthropology , applied linguistics, 
psychology, or computational modeling. Interdisciplinary interests are encouraged. A 
master's degree may be earned during progress to the Ph.D. degree. Admission to the 
program is competitive, and an advanced degree is not required. Students admitted to the 
program are generally offered financial support in the form of tuition scholarships and/ 
or stipends for living expenses. 



196 DEPARTMENTS / Linguistics 

During the first year of residence, eacli entering student works closely with the 
graduate adviser to choose a plan of study congruent with the demands of the program 
and the student's interests. Emphasis throughout the program is on a close working 
relationship with faculty. Students should select areas of specialization that fit well with 
faculty research interests and activities. See the departmental homepage at 
http://linguistics.rice.edu. 

Students with a master's degrees in linguistics will normally progress through the 
degree program in four years; those without in five . With no prior linguistics background, 
course work in the first two years will generally include: 

•2 courses in the area of phonetics/phonology 

•2 courses in the area of syntactic/semantic analysis 

•1 two-course sequence in field methods 

•1 problem-solving course in linguistic analysis 

•2 courses in other subfields of linguistics 

Prior preparation in linguistics will be assessed with regard to its equivalence to 
particular Rice courses. Students are also normally expected to serve as teaching 
assistants for 1 course per year during the time they are receiving departmental support; 
such service is included in the normal course load. Graduate students are required to 
register for at least 12 hours credit per semester before advancing to candidacy. 

At the end of the first year of study , students undergo an oral qualifying examination 
to assess their progress in the doctoral program . Continuation to the second year requires 
successful performance on this examination and in first-year course work. In each of the 
second and third years, in addition to their course work, students prepare an in-depth 
research paper on a topic chosen in consultation with a committee of faculty. These 2 
papers will represent different areas of the field, and at least 1 should be on the structure 
of a non-Indo-European language. Students should work toward establishing a close 
working relationship with various faculty such that multiple faculty members are closely 
familiar with the student's work. After the second research paper is accepted, a 
dissertation adviser is selected and a doctoral committee formed, by mutual agreement 
of the student and the relevant faculty members. 

Before advancing to candidacy, students must demonstrate reading competency in 
2 research languages other than English. It is also expected that students will submit their 
work for presentation at one or more professional meetings and publish such work in 
conference proceedings and/or journals. Funds may be available to defray the cost of 
travel to such meetings. 

During the fourth year, students present to their doctoral committee a third research 
paper consisting of a substantial dissertation proposal and a comprehensive bibliogra- 
phy. This proposal, ideally building on their previous research, may take the form of a 
grant proposal to an external funding agency, particularly where fieldwork abroad is 
proposed. The proposal is also presented orally in a departmental forum. On acceptance 
of the proposal, the student formally advances to Ph.D. candidacy. 

The doctoral research project may require fieldwork in residence or abroad before 
writing the dissertation. The student is expected to consult regularly with faculty 
members during the writing process. After a complete draft of the dissertation is 
submitted, the student defends the dissertation publicly. When the final version of the 
dissertation is accepted by the doctoral committee and filed with the university, and all 
other requirements are certified as filled, the degree is then granted. 

See LING and SANS in the Courses of Instruction section. 



197 



Management and Accounting 



The Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Management 



Professors 

Richard P. Bagozzi 
BalaG. Dharan 
Jennifer M. George 
G. Anthony Gorry 
George Kanatas 
H. Albert Napier 
Ronald N. Taylor 
Wilfred C. Uecker 
Robert A. Westbrook 
Gilbert R. Whitaker, Jr. 
Edward E. Williams 
Duane Windsor 
Stephen A. Zeff 
Research Professors 
Bob Bixby 
Marc J. Epstein 
Associate Professors 
Shannon Anderson 
Richard R. Batsell 
Steven C. Currall 
Jeff Fleming 
Trichy Krishnan 
Karen Nelson 
Barbara Ostdiek 
Douglas A. Schuler 
D. Brent Smith 
Jing Zhou 

Assistant Professors 
Sharad Borle 
Maragret Cording 
Utpal Dholakia 
Jill Foote 
Gustavo Grullon 
Michael B. Heeley 



Dean 

Gilbert R. Whitaker, Jr. 

Lisa R. Klein 
Sharon F. Matusik 
Thomas Moeller 
Andrew Perkins 
Larry Robinson 
Francisco Roman 
Brian R. Roundtree 
Siddharta Singh 
Christodoulos Stefanadis 
Fu-Kuo Albert Wang 
Masahiro Watanabe 
Carmen Wigelt 
James P. Weston 
Sally Widener 
Yuhang Xing 
Yeosun Yoon 
Yan Anthea Zhang 
Rui Zhu 
Instructor 
Deborah J. Barrett 
Adjunct Professors 
Roberto Abib 
Anne Marie Ainsworth 
Paul S.Allen 
Stephen J. Banks 
Marc Boom 
Cheyenne Currall 
Rodney Eads 
Jerry E. Finger 
Robert N. Flatt 
Joseph R. Gagliardi 
Jack M.Gill 
Terry Hemeyer 
Vincent Kaminski 
Robert Lesnick 



Leo Linbeck III 
Dennis Loughridge 
Shahid Malik 
Upendra Marathi 
Timothy Nash 
Robert B.Parke, Jr. 
Nicholas R. Rasmussen 
David Ross, 111 
Armand Shapiro 
Joan E. Shook 
Robert B. Stobaugh 
Laurence Stuart 
Stephen Whitney 
Lecturers 
Shahid Ansari 
W. Clifford Atherton 
David M. Austgen 
John A. Baker 
Lovett Baker 
E. Scott Crist 
Lawrence Hampton 
John Kehoe 
Pamela Kennedy 
Steven F. Koch 
Pilar Llusa 
James P. Mandel 
Dennis E. Murphree 
Elizabeth O'Sullivan 
Phaedon Papadopoulos 
Elizabeth A. Peters 
James R. Sowers 
V. Richard Viebig, Jr. 
Stuart Wagner 
Alan Westheimer 
Gale Wiley 



Degrees Ojfered: M.B.A, M.B. A ./Master of Engineering 



198 DEPARTMENTS / Management and Accounting 

The Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Management was estabhshed in 1974 
through a gift from Houston Endowment, Inc. The school provides its highly select 
graduate students with unique opportunities for professional training in management. 
The master of business administration (M.B.A.) program includes elective offerings in 
accounting, entrepreneurship, finance, international business, information technology, 
marketing, operations management, organizational behavior and human resource man- 
agement, healthcare management, and strategic management and planning. 

The M.B.A. is also offered in a format designed for executives who do not wish to 
interrupt their careers while they pursue their degrees. Meeting every other weekend, the 
M.B.A. for Executives Program features the same content and faculty as the traditional 
two-year M.B.A. program, and is completed in 21 months. This general management 
program offers no tracks for specialization; however, much of the content of elective 
courses in the two-year M.B.A. has been incorporated into the course modules for the 
executive format. The M.B.A. for Executives Program offers 4 electives at the end of the 
21 -month period. 

A joint M.B.A./master of engineering degree offered by the Jones Graduate School 
and the George R. Brown School of Engineering, in any of the departments of 
engineering or in statistics, prepares students to become managers in organizations 
requiring a high level of technical expertise and management skills. 

A joint M.B.A./M.D. offered by the Jones Graduate School and Baylor College of 
Medicine prepares students to become both physicians and managers in institutions 
involved in the delivery of high-quality health care, as well as biotechnology-focused 
industries, health insurancGe/managed healthcare firms, and pharmaceutical and medi- 
cal supply and equipment companies. 

Although no undergraduate major is offered, undergraduate accounting courses 
are available. 

Admission Requirements for Jones Graduate School 

For general information, see Admission to Graduate Study (pages 64-65). Appli- 
cants to the M.B.A. program must submit scores on the Graduate Management Admis- 
sion Test (GM AT) rather than the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) , and, unless they 
received an undergraduate degree from a U.S. college or university, foreign nationals 
whose native language is not English must submit recent scores on the Test of English 
as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Admission to the Jones Graduate School is open to 
students regardless of their undergraduate major, but it is highly selective and limited to 
those who have performed with distinction in their previous academic work and on 
the GMAT. 

M.B.A. Program. Although the M.B.A. program has not established specific 
prerequisite courses for admission, students may find it beneficial to have a background 
that includes undergraduate course work in principles of accounting, principles of 
microeconomics, and mathematics. Because spreadsheet and word-processing software 
are used extensively in course work, students should have a thorough understanding of 
these types of software packages before enrolling. 

M.B.A. for Executives. In addition to meeting the standards for admission to 
the M.B.A. program, students admitted to the executive program typically have at least 
10 years of relevant work experience. 

Joint M .B .A TMaster of Engineering Program. To enter the joint degree program , 
applicants must be accepted by both the Jones Graduate School and the engineering 
department in which they wish to enroll . The program requires the Jones Graduate School 



Management and Accounting 199 

application and the GRE, rather than the GMAT. Some engineering departments require 
advanced tests as well. 

Joint M^A/MJ). Program. To enter this joint degree program, applicants must 
first be accepted by Baylor College of Medicine and then apply separately to the Jones 
Graduate School. The MCAT is accepted rather than the GMAT. Two years of medical 
school are required before starting M.B.A. classes. 

Degree Requirements for M^ A. 

For the M.B.A degree, students must: 

• Spend at least 2 academic years in residence at Rice 

• Complete at least 60 semester hours in course work 

• Register for no fewer than 1 5 hours and no more than 1 8 hours each semester (any 

other registration requires special permission) 

All registration and drop/add forms require the signature of the M.B .A. program director 
or a designee. The school, which must approve all courses, specifies the sequence of 
required first-year courses at registration for each entering class. 

Waivers and Transfers of Credit. At its sole discretion, the school may allow 
students to transfer credits (up to 6 hours). This does not necessarily reduce the residence 
requirement, but it does make additional elective courses available. Students otherwise 
must follow the prescribed curriculum of study and are not allowed to waive any core 
requirements. 

First- Year Courses. Students must complete at least 32 approved credit hours. The 
modular core curriculum includes financial accounting, data analysis, business ethics, 
information technology, marketing, finance, managerial economics, organization be- 
havior, competitive strategy, managerial and leadership skills, managerial communica- 
tion, economic environment of business, globalization of business, cost management, 
operations management, business-government relations, organization theory and change 
management, and 2 electives. During the second semester, teams of students participate 
in an action learning project in which they work at a company to solve a specific 
problem. This project allows them to integrate the business disciplines they studied and 
to turn knowledge into action. The core courses serve as prerequisites for required and 
elective courses taken in the second year. 

Second-Year Courses. Students must complete at least 28 credit hours that include 
required courses in entrepreneurship and strategy formulation and implementation, and 
25 credit hours of electives. 

Areas of Interest. Although M.B.A. students are not required to select a formal 
elective concentration for degree purposes, they may wish to choose 1 or more areas of 
interest from among the following: accounting, entrepreneurship, finance, general manage- 
ment, international business, information technology, marketing, operations management, 
organizational behavior and human resource management, healthcare management, and 
strategic management and planning. The M.B.A. program director and individual faculty 
members offer students advice on course selection. Students may also take upper-level or 
graduate courses from other departments at Rice. Students may not credit basic foreign 
language courses toward the M.B.A. degree, but advanced language courses may qualify 
with approval from the M.B.A. program director. 



200 DEPARTMENTS / Management and Accounting 

Degree Requirements for M^.A. for Executives 

This degree requires completion of 1 1 mini-semesters totaling 56 credits, including 
Extended Learning Labs. The program is a lock-step progression in which all students 
take required courses in an identical sequence, except for the 4 elective courses at the end 
of the 2 1 -month period. 

Degree Requirements for Joint M-BATMaster of Engineering 

Students may earn this nonthesis engineering degree in the fields of chemical 
engineering, civil engineering, computational and applied mathematics, computer 
science, electrical and computer engineering, environmental science and engineering, 
mechanical engineering and materials science, and statistics. Ordinarily, the engineer- 
ing degree takes one academic year to complete, whereas the M.B.A. requires two. 
Joint-degree candidates, however, can fulfill requirements for both degrees in 
two academic years. 

For the joint M.B.A./master of engineering degree, students must complete: 

• At least two academic years in residence at Rice 

• 63 semester hours in approved course work: 

— 24 hours in an engineering discipline 

— 39 hours in business administration 

Students plan their course schedules in consultation with the engineering department in 
which they are enrolled and with the M.B.A. program director. 

Degree Requirements for the Joint M.B.AyM.D. Program 

Students may earn both M.B.A. and M.D. degrees in five years. They divide their 
time as follows: 

• Years one and two— medical training at Baylor College of Medicine 

• Year three — core M .B . A . courses at Rice 

• Year four— M.B.A. courses at Rice, including 3 semester hours of required! 

courses and 12 semester hours of healthcare electives during the fall semester, 
and medical training at Baylor College of Medicine during the spring semester 

• Year five— medical training at Baylor College of Medicine 

Students use the summer between the third and fourth years to perform healthcare 
research programs or extemships. Students receive their M.B .A. degree from Rice after 
they have completed 47 hours of approved management course work; they receive their 
M.D. degree after they have completed the requirements specified by Baylor College 
of Medicine. 

Academic and Professional Standards 

Students must meet both academic and professional standards to continue academic 
work and to graduate. In accepting admission to the M.B .A. degree program, all students 
agree to be governed by the standards and procedures for dismissal or disciplinary action 
stated below. 

Academic Standards. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00 (B) is 
required for graduation. All courses taken for the M.B.A. degree (including approved 
courses taken at the university but outside the Jones Graduate School) are counted in the 
cumulative grade point average calculation. 

Students with a cumulative grade point average lower than 3.00 at the end of any 



Management and Accounting 20 1 

semester will be notified of dismissal and may no longer register for courses. A student 
who has been notified of dismissal may appeal to the Academic Standards Committee of 
the Jones Graduate School . The committee will decide , based on the circumstances of the 
appeal , whether the student ( 1 ) may resume studies on probation, (2) is to be suspended 
for one semester or an academic year, or (3) is to be dismissed from the M.B .A. program. 

Students proposing to return after a period of academic suspension must apply to the 
Academic Standards Committee and receive permission to be readmitted. 

Only grades of C and higher are counted for credit toward graduation. If students 
receive a grade lower than C in a course required for graduation, they must repeat the 
course . If students receive a grade lower than C in an elective course , they need not repeat 
the specific course, but they must make up the hours. 

Students may retake a failed course only once and then only if their cumulative grade 
point average is 3.00 or higher, or they have received the permission of the Academic 
Standards Committee to do so. Students who fail a course twice will be notified of 
dismissal. (Students may not take any course for which the failed course is a prerequisite 
until they pass the prerequisite course.) 

Students on academic probation cannot be candidates for student offices, cannot 
graduate or drop courses , and must complete all future courses with a grade of C or above . 
Students are removed from probation only upon achieving a cumulative grade point 
average of at least 3.00 at the end of the following semester of work. 

Students who have completed the required number of hours for the M .B .A . degree , 
the joint M.B .A ./master of engineering degrees, or the joint M.B.A./M.D. degree, but 
who have a cumulative grade point average lower than 3.00, are dismissed without 
graduation. If, in an appeal to the Academic Standards Committee, a student can 
substantiate a claim of extenuating circumstances, i.e., those beyond the student's 
control, the student will be permitted to take additional course work at the university 
within the next year to raise his or her grade point average to 3.00. 

Professional Standards. M.B .A. students are held to the high standards of pro- 
fessional conduct expected of managers — standards substantially exceeding those 
expected of them simply as students. Students may be dismissed or suspended for 
failure to meet professional standards, as defined in the University Code of 
Conduct. The dean may place a student on disciplinary probation for unacceptable 
conduct, giving oral and written notice that future misconduct will lead to filing of 
specific charges . (This probationary notice , however, is not required as a precondition for 
filing specific charges.) 

Academic Regulations 
Grading Policy 

For All Courses: 

• The grade of A+ should be given only as an exceptional grade reflecting 

extraordinary achievement by a student. 

• Only grades of C and higher are counted for credit toward graduation. If students 

receive a grade lower than C in a (core) course required for graduation, they 
must repeat the course. If students receive a grade lower than C in an elective 
course, they need not repeat the specific course, but they must make up the 
hours. 

• Grades are considered final and are rarely, if ever, changed for any reason other 

than calculation errors. 



202 DEPARTMENTS / Management and Accounting 

• Jones School students may not take courses pass/fail to count toward their degree 

requirements. 

• Jones School students may audit course with departmental approval. The course 

will not count towards the M.B.A. or appear on the transcript. 

For Core Courses: 

• No more than half of all grades assigned by an instructor may be an A- or above. 

• A course GPA (combining multiple sections where necessary) between 3.30 and 

3.50 should be used as a "target" for assigning grades. 

• Instructors in multi-section courses should coordinate the assignment of final 

grades such that they reflect a consistent grading philosophy for the overall 
course. 

For Elective Courses: 

• Regardless of class size, instructors "target" the course GPA (combining multiple 

sections where necessary) to fall between 3.50 and 3.80. 

• To the extent that such course exists, instructors in multi-section electives should 

coordinate the assignment of final grades such that grades reflect a consistent 
grading philosophy for the overall course. 

Guidelines for Appealing Academic Dismissal 

The Process. A student who wishes to appeal a dismissal should address the 
following issues in a letter to the Academic Standards Committee. The student must send 
the letter to the chairman of the Academic Standards Committee. The following 
questions should be answered in the appeal letter. 

1 . What circumstances led to your academic performance last semester and to what 

degree were those circumstances beyond your control? 

2 . If your performance in a particular course(s) last semester was below par, describe 

any circumstances specific to that course that explain your performance. 

3. Do you expect the circumstances that created the problems for you last semester 

to change next semester? If so, how? 
You may include any other information that you deem relevant in your appeal letter. 

Timing. Timing is critical in the appeals process because classes start immediately 
after the grades are distributed in January. The student must inform the director of the 
M .B .A ./E . program (by email or written note) immediately of the intention to appeal . The 
appeal letter to the committee must be filed expediently, within or sooner than the first 
week of classes. If a student plans to appeal, he/she should attend classes in January 
without registering . It is important to keep up in his/her studies during the appeal process. 
If his/her appeal is accepted, the student may register later with a letter from the M.B.A. 
program office. 

Grades are considered final, and are rarely changed for any reason other than 
calculation errors. 

Appeals. Appeals beyond the Academic Standards committee must go to the dean 
of the Jones Graduate School, who may seek guidance from the Dean's Advisory 
Council. All decisions rendered by the dean are final. 

Confidentiality. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 and 
amendments govern the records of actions related to appeals. 



Management and Accounting 203 

Grade Appeal Process 

The procedure below outlines the process by which a student may appeal a grade in 
a course. 

1 . The student should first pursue any grading question with the professor following 

whatever formal or informal process the professor has outlined for the course. 

2. If the matter is not resolved in step 1 above, the student must file a written appeal 

to the professor and send a copy to the director of the M.B .A./E. program. This 
written appeal must be filed no later than 45 days after the last day of finals for 
the module (mini-semester) in which the course was offered. 

3. The professor must schedule a meeting with the student within two weeks of 

receiving the written appeal to further discuss the appeal with the student. 
Notice of the appeal time and date will be provided by the professor to the 
director of the M.B.A./E. program. 

4. If step 3 does not resolve the issue to the satisfaction of both parties, the student 

may appeal to the Dean's Advisory Committee by sending a written notice 
describing the grounds for the appeal within 2 weeks of the date of the 
scheduled meeting in step 3. 

5. The Dean's Advisory Committee will seek out information on the appeal from the 

professor and the student and , at its discretion , hold a hearing to further consider 
the matter. The decision of the Dean's Advisory Committee will be rendered 
within 6 weeks of receiving a written notice of appeal (step 4). 

6. In the event that the protested grade is necessary for the student to graduate, an 

accelerated schedule will be followed. 

7. All decisions rendered by the Dean's Advisory Committee are final. 

8. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 and amendments govern 

records of these actions. 

lALP Grade Appeal Policy for Individual Student 

! The procedure below outlines the process by which an individual student may 
lappeal a grade in the ALP course. 

1 . The student must send a letter of intent to appeal the grade to the director of ALP. 
This written appeal must be filed no later than 30 days after the last day of 
module 6. A copy of the letter must be sent to the director of the M.B .A. 
program. 

2 . The director of ALP must schedule a meeting with the student and director of the 
M.B .A. program by the end of module 1 during the following year to discuss 
the appeal with the student further. The purpose of the meeting is to review with 
the student the basis for the individual grade. The director of ALP will provide 
the meeting time to the director of the M.B .A. program. 



204 DEPARTMENTS / Management and Accounting 

2a. Up until this time, all information relevant to the case is confidential. If the 
student desires to talk with the ALP faculty or ALP team members about the 
matter, this will require the student to waive confidentiality with respect to the 
matter of the downgrade status. The student must notify the director of ALP 
about his/her preference to waive confidentiality. Upon receiving the request 
to waive confidentiality from the student, the director of ALP will apprise all 
related parties that an appeal is underway , that they are not obligated to discuss 
the matter with the appealing student, and that their confidential peer evalua- 
tions have not been shared with the appealing student. The student must wait 
for permission from the director of ALP before contacting team members and/ 
or faculty liaisons. 

3. If step 2 does not resolve the issue to the satisfaction of both parties, the student 

may appeal to the director of ALP by sending a written notice describing the 
grounds for the appeal within 2 weeks of the date of the scheduled meeting in 
step 2 . A copy of the letter must be sent to the director of the M .B . A . program . 
The director of ALP will render a decision within 3 weeks of receiving the 
written notice. j 

4. If step 3 does not resolve the issue to the satisfaction of both parties, the student 

may appeal to the Dean's Advisory Committee by sending a written notice 
describing the grounds for the appeal within 2 weeks of the decision rendered 
by the director of ALP in step 3 . A copy of the letter must be sent to the director 
of ALP and the director of the M.B.A. program. 

5 . The Dean's Advisory committee will seek out information on the appeal from the 

professor and the student and at its discretion hold a hearing to further consider 
the matter. The decision of the Dean's Advisory Committee will be rendered 
within 6 weeks of receiving a written notice of appeal (step 4). 

6. All decisions rendered by the Dean's Advisory Committee are final. 

7. In the event that the protested grade is necessary for the student to graduate, an 

accelerated schedule will be followed. 

8. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1 974 and amendments govern 

records of these actions. 

ALP Grade Appeal Policy for Student Team 

The procedure below outlines the process by which an individual student may 
appeal a grade in the ALP course. 

1 . The student team must send a letter of intent to appeal the grade to all members 

of the faculty team. This written appeal must be filed no later than 30 days after 
the last day of module 6. All team members must sign the letter. A copy of the 
letter must be sent to the director of ALP and to the director of the M.B.A. 
program. 

2. The faculty team must schedule a meeting with the student team by the end of 

module 1 during the following year to further discuss the appeal with the 
student team. The professors will provide the meeting time to the director of 
ALP and to the director of the M.B.A. program. 



Management and Accounting 205 



3. If the matter is not resolved in step 2 above, the student team must file a written 

appeal to the direcor of ALP within 2 weeks of the date of the scheduled meeting 
in step 2. All team members must sign the letter. The director of ALP must 
schedule a meeting with the student team within 2 weeks of receiving the 
written appeal to further discuss the appeal with the student team. The director 
of ALP will provide the meeting date to the director of the M.B.A. program. 

4. If step 3 does not resolve the issue to the satisfaction of both parties, the student 

team may appeal to the Dean ' s Advisory Committee by sending a written notice 
describing the grounds for the appeal within 2 weeks of the date of the 
scheduled meeting in step 3. All team members must sign the letter. A copy of 
the letter must be sent to the director of ALP and to the director of the M .B .A . 
program. 

5. The Dean's Advisory committee will seek out information on the appeal from the 

professors,, the director of ALP, and the student team and, at its discretion , hold 
a hearing to further consider the matter. The decision of the Dean's Advisory 
Committee will be rendered within 6 weeks of receiving a written notice of 
appeal (step 4). A copy of the decision must be sent to the director of ALP and 
to the director of the M.B.A. program. 

6. All decisions rendered by the Dean's Advisory Committee are final. 

7. In the event that the protested grade is necessary for the student to graduate, an 

accelerated schedule will be followed. 

8 . The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1 974 and amendments govern 

records of these actions. 

Drop/Add Policy 

If student is taking a ONE-MODULE class: 

• May drop/add a class without penalty during the first week of class with director 

of M.B.A. program's approval 

• Must attend first class, and may not miss more than one class during the first week 

of class 

• Must obtain director of M.B.A. program and instructors' permission to add class 

after the first week 

• May not drop courses after the first week of class 

If student is taking a TWO-MODULE class: 

• May drop/add a class without penalty during the first week of class with director 

of M.B.A. program's approval 

• Must attend first class, and may not miss more than two classes during the first two 

weeks of class 

• Must obtain director of M.B.A. program and instructors' permission to add class 

after the second week 

• May not drop courses after the second week of class 

• Students may not drop courses where the honor council has ruled a loss of credit 



206 DEPARTMENTS / Management and Accounting 

If student is taking a THREE-MODULE class: 

• May drop/add a class without penalty during the first week of class with director 

of M.B.A. program's approval 

• Must attend first class, and may not miss more than three classes during the first 

two weeks of class 

• Must obtain director of M.B.A. program and instructors' permission to add class 

after the second week 

• May not drop courses after the third week of class 

• Students may not drop courses where the honor council has ruled a loss of credit 

Independent Study 

Minimum Hours Requirement. Each 1-unit credit for independent study should 
contain approximately as much time content as a 1 -module course at JGSM, which is 1 2 
hours of class time, plus an average of at least 24-36 outside-class hours, for a minimum 
total of 36-48 hours of work. Most independent study projects can probably be 
accommodated in a 1- or 2-unit independent study; 3-unit independent study projects 
should be less frequent. Occasionally, a group independent study project may arise, 
though most independent studies will be undertaken by individual students. 

The number of credits for an independent study should be negotiated at the 
beginning of a project. Increases to the number of project credit hours after the project 
overview has been filed with the M.B.A. program office must be approved by the 
Academic Standards Committee. The committee will rely on input from sponsoring 
faculty in making its decision about ex post credit increases. Requests to increase the 
number of project credit hours must be made before the end of the second week of classes 
in the module in which the project begins, except when a student is in their last semester, 
in which case such requests must be made before the end of the second week of the 
semester. 

Restrictions. No student may take more than 3 credit hours of independent study 
without the approval of the Academic Standards Committee. 

Independent study projects are work for academic credit, not for hire. Students may 
not earn credit for paid research assistance. 

Independent study projects may not duplicate existing courses, or portions thereof. 
Independent study projects may not focus on topics or projects available to the student 
through the established curriculum. Questions regarding whether an independent study 
duplicates existing coursework available to a specific student should be addressed to the 
M.B .A ./E. program director; appeals to the program director's decision will be sent to the 
Academic Standards Committee. 

Faculty Sponsorship. Independent study projects are normally sponsored only by 
full-time JGSM faculty . Students wishing for sponsorship by an adjunct faculty member 
must submit a project overview to the Academic Standards Committee and obtain the 
committee's approval, before the module(s) in which the project is to begin. 

Common Requirements. The goal of independent study projects is to advance or 
deepen a student's knowledge or competency in a business disciphne or activity. 

To facilitate these goals, independent study projects generally fall into two broad 
categories: (1) directed reading and study resulting in a research paper, or (2) an 
experiential or hands-on project resulting in an outcome such as an empirical analysis or 
a webpage/site with an executive summary of the "deliverable." 



Management and Accounting 207 

While the content of individual independent study projects are at the discretion of 
a student and the sponsoring faculty member, JGSM would like to ensure relatively equal 
workloads per unit of independent study credit . and some common requirements between 
independent study projects. To that end. students and/or sponsoring faculty should: 

1. Prepare and submit to the M.B. A. program office an overview of the independent 

study project with number of project credits, anticipated final results and a 
broad timeline of anticipated project milestones. 

2. Meet to discuss the project . after the initial agreement on the project scope . at least 

once every 2-3 weeks. 

3. Prepare a final paper (in the case of directed reading and research projects), or 

complete a concrete deliverable (for example , a completed webpage . computer 
program, survey results, empirical analyses, etc.) together with an executive 
summary of the project (in the case of experiential projects). 

4. File a copy of each student's final paper, or executive summary , with the M.B .A. 

program office. 

Class Attendance Policy 

Students are expected to be in class on the first day of each module. The faculty 
reserves the right to exclude students from their courses who do not show up on the first 
day. For special circumstances, see faculty and/or director of M.B .A. program immedi- 
ately. 

Withdrawal Policy 

A Jones School student may voluntarily withdraw from school at any time. Rice 
University applies a sliding scale to tuition and fees, so early action to withdraw saves 
money. 

Jones School Student Handbook 

Generally, the Jones School adheres to the academic regulations of Rice University. 
However, the Jones School has unique policies and procedures that vary from the Office 
of Graduate Studies regarding, but not limited to. leave of absence, withdrawals and 
readmission, drop/add. academic discipline, dismissal, procedures for resolution of 
problems, and appeal of academic regulations. All Jones School students are responsible 
for adhering to policies and procedures listed in the Jones School Student Handbook 
given to students during pre-term. A copy of the handbook may also be obtained from the 
M.B .A. program office. 

Financial Aid 

Financial assistance by the Jones Graduate School is awarded only for a given 
semester or year. Continuation of assistance depends upon satisfactory academic 
performance, professional behavior, and availability of funds. Academic or disciplinary 
probation, suspension, or more than three grades below B- result in the removal of all 
forms of school financial assistance, whether scholarship, loan, or employment. Schol- 
arships are awarded for a combination of need and academic merit. 

See ACCO and MGMT in the Courses of Instruction section. 



208 

Managerial Studies 



The School of Social Sciences 



Program Director 

Ronald Soligo 



Degree Offered: B.A. 

The major in managerial studies is an interdepartmental, nonprofessional program 
designed to provide undergraduates with an understanding of the environment in which 
businesses and other organizations exist today, and of some of the tools employed by 
management in the commitment of its financial and human resources . All students taking 
the managerial studies major must also complete at least one of the established 
departmental or interdepartmental majors, other than an area major. Managerial studies 
is not the equivalent of an undergraduate business major at other universities. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Managerial Studies 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
For the B.A. degree, students majoring in managerial studies must complete the 
following 1 1 core courses in addition to satisfying all the requirements for their second 
departmental or interdepartmental major: 

ACCO 305 Introduction to Accounting 1 course from the following: 

ECON 2 1 1 Principles of Economics I ECON 355 Financial Markets and 

(microeconomics) Institutions 

ECON 2 1 2 Principles of Economics II ECON 435 Industrial Organization 

(macroeconomics) ECON 436 Regulation 

ECON 448 Corporation Finance or ECON 438 Economics of the Law I 

ENGI 303 Engineering Economics POLI 335 Political Environment 

and Management of Business 

MANA 404 Management Communica- POLI 338 Policy Analysis 

tions in a Consulting Simulation j course from the following: 

PS YC 101 Introduction to Psychology ACCO 406 Management Accounting 

PSYC 23 1 Industrial and Organizational ACCO 409 Financial Reporting and 

Psychology Analysis 

*STAT 280 Elementary Applied Statis- ECON 370 Microeconomic Theory 

tics 
**STAT 385 Methods for Data Analysis 

and System Optimization 

* Psychology, sociology, and political science majors may satisfy this requirement with 
PSYC 339/STAT 339, SOCI 398, or POLI 395 respectively. Students with a calulus 
background should take STAT 305, STAT 310/ECON 382, or STAT 331/ELEC 331. 

* *or CAAM 378, STAT/ECON 400, STAT 410, 421 , 486 

MANA 404 is a capstone course that may not be taken until 8 of the 1 other required 
courses in the major have been completed. 



Managerial Studies 209 

Honors Program. To apply for admission to the honors program, students must 
have completed eight of the regular managerial studies courses and have a B+ (3.33) 
average in those courses. All applications must be approved by the Director of Manage- 
rial Studies. 

A student in the honors program must take 2 additional courses from: 

MANA 497/498 Independent Research STAT 486 Methods in Computational 

ECON 440 Risk, Uncertainty, and Finance I: Market Models 

Information STAT 42 1 Methods in Computational 

ECON 445 Managerial Economics Finance II: Time Series 

ECON 449 Basics of Financial Engineer- 
ing 

MANA 497/498 are offered in collaboration with select faculty in the Jesse H . Jones 
Graduate School of Management. Admission to these courses must be approved by 
a participating faculty member. A list of participating faculty and their research 
interests is available from the director of Managerial Studies. 

For more information, students should consult the program director in 268 Baker 
Hall. 

See MANA in the Courses of Instruction section. 



210 

Mathematics 



The Wiess School of Natural Sciences 



Chair 

Robin Forman 

Professors Professor Emeritus 

Michael Boshernitzan F. Reese Harvey 

Tim D. Cochran Associate Professor 

Robert M. Hardt Brendan Hassett 

John Hempel Zhiyong Gao 

Frank Jones Instructors 

John C. Polking Pralay Chatterjee 

Stephen W. Semmes Donghoon (David) Hyeon 

Richard A. Stong Taehee Kim 

William A. Veech Joung (Jaime) M. N. Song 

Michael Wolf Tamas Wiandt 



Degrees Offered: B. A., M. A., Ph.D. 

The program in mathematics provides undergraduates with a spectrum of choices, 
from nontheoretical treatments of calculus and courses in modem algebra, combinato- 
rics, elementary number theory, and projective geometry to a broad variety of sophisti- 
cated mathematics, including real and complex analysis, differential geometry, abstract 
algebra, algebraic and geometric topology, algebraic geometry, and partial differential 
equations. 

Faculty research interests range from differential geometry, ergodic theory, group 
representation, partial differential equations, and probability, to real analysis, math- 
ematical physics, complex variables, algebraic geometry, combinatorics, geometric 
topology, and algebraic topology. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Mathematics 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students majoring in mathematics may choose between the regular math major and the 
double major. Regular math majors must complete: 

• MATH lOfand 102 Single Variable Calculus I and // 

• MATH 2 1 1 Ordinary Differential Equations and Linear Algebra and MATH 2 1 2 

Multivariable Calculus 
or MATH 221 and 222 Honors Calculus III and IV 

• At least 24 semester hours (8 courses) in departmental courses at the 300 level or 

above (in many instances, the math department will waive the 100- and 200- 

level courses for a math major) 
The requirements for the double major are the same except that students may substitute 
approved mathematics-related courses for up to 9 of the 24 hours required at the 300 level 
or above. 

Students receive advanced placement credit for MATH 10 1 by achieving a score of 

4 or 5 on the AP AB-level test and for MATH 101 and 102 by achieving a score of 4 or 

5 on the BC-level test. Students who have had calculus but have not taken the AP test may 



Mathematics 211 

petition the department for a waiver of the calculus requirements. Entering students 
should enroll in the most advanced course commensurate with their background; advice 
is available from the mathematics faculty during Orientation Week. 

Degree Requirements for M.A. and Ph.D. in Mathematics 

Admission to graduate study in mathematics is granted to a limited number of 
students who have indicated an ability for advanced and original work. Normally, 
students take one or two years after the B.A. degree to obtain an M.A. degree, and they 
take four or five years to obtain a Ph.D. An M.A. is not a prerequisite for the Ph.D. For 
general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). 

A number of graduate scholarships and fellowships are available, awarded on the 
basis of merit. As part of the graduate education in mathematics, students also engage in 
teaching or other instructional duties, generally for no more than 6 hours a week. 

M.A. Program. Candidates for the M.A. in mathematics must: 

• Complete with a grade of B or better a course of study approved by the 

department (students may transfer credits from another university only with 
the approval of both the department and the University Graduate Council) 

• Perform satisfactorily on an examination in at least 1 approved foreign 

language (French, German, or Russian) 

• Either complete all requirements for qualification as a candidate for the Ph.D. 

(see below) or present, and provide an oral defense of, an original thesis 
acceptable to the department 

Ph.D. Program. Candidates for the Ph.D. in mathematics must: 

• Complete with a grade of B or better a course of study approved by the 

department (students may transfer credits from another university only with 
the approval of both the department and the University Graduate Council) 

• Perform satisfactorily on qualifying examinations (see below) 

• Perform satisfactorily on examinations in 1 approved foreign language 

(French, German, or Russian) 

• Write an original thesis acceptable to the department 

• Perform satisfactorily on a final oral examination on the thesis 

Qualifying Examinations. The qualifying examinations in mathematics consist of 
the general examinations and the advanced oral examination. 

To complete the general examinations, students must take 3 exams, 1 each in 
algebra, analysis, and topology . Exams are offered every August and January. First-year 
students may take any combination of exams at any time. After two semesters of study, 
students must attempt to pass all remaining exams at each offering. Students must 
perform satisfactorily on all 3 by the start of their fifth semester. Students may take an 
exam several times. 

To complete the advanced oral examination, students must select a special field 
(e.g., homotopy theory , several complex variables, or group theory) and submit it to the 
department Graduate Committee for approval. The committee schedules an advanced 
examination in the selected field, normally six to nine months after the student completes 
the general examinations . While students failing the advanced examination may , with the 
approval of the committee, retake it on the same or possibly on a different topic, they 
generally are not allowed to take the advanced examination more than twice. 

See MATH in the Courses of Instruction section. 



212 



Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 
The George R. Brown School of Engineering 



Chair 

Tayfun E. Tezduyar 



Professors 

John E. Akin 
Andrew R. Barron 
Yildiz Bayazitoglu 
Michael M.Carroll 
Rex B.McLellan 
Pol D. Spanos 
James Tour 
Professors Emeriti 
Franz R. Brotzen 
Alan J . Chapman 
Angelo Miele 
Ronald P. Nordgren 
Chao-Cheng Wang 
Associate Professors 
Enrique V. Ban"era 
Fathi Ghorbel 
Andrew J. Meade 
Boris I. Yakobson 



Assistant Professors 

ChadM.Landis 

Marcia E. O'Malley 

Adjunct Associate Professors 

Jeffrey D. Reuben 

Keith Stein 

Adjunct Professor 

Thomas J.R. Hughes 

Adjunct Assistant Professors 

Sarmed Adnan 

Nazareth S. Bedrossian 

Aladin Boriek 

James B . Dabney 

Visiting Assistant Professors 

Catherine G. Ambrose 

Lecturers 

Robert Cunningham 

David M. McStravick 



Degrees Ojfered: B.A., B.S.M.E., B.S.M.S., M.M.E., M.M.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Studies in mechanical engineering may lead to specialization in one of several areas, 
including mechanics, computational mechanics, stochastic mechanics, fluid dynamics, 
heat transfer, dynamics and control, robotics, biomedical systems, and aerospace 
sciences. Studies in materials science may lead to specialization in one of several areas, 
including nanotechnology, metals physics, statistical mechanics, metallic solid thermo- ' 
dynamics, materials chemistry, aspects of composites, coatings and thin films, and 
interface science. 

The graduate program offers professional degrees in both materials science and; 
engineering, which is based on undergraduate preparation in a number of related fields,! 
and mechanical engineering, which permits specialization in the areas mentioned in the ' 
previous paragraph. Graduate students may also pursue research degrees. Faculty 
research areas are indicated in the previous paragraph. A joint M.B. A ./Master of 
Engineering degree is available in conjunction with the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School 
of Management. Also, a combined M.D. and advanced research degree for research j 
careers in medicine is available with Baylor College of Medicine. 

The graduate program collaborates with other departments in its comprehensive 
educational and research activities. The Department of Computational and Applied 
Mathematics supports research in applied analysis and computational mathematics. 
Work on expert systems and robotics is done in cooperation with the Departments of ; 
Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science. Computer graphics re- 



Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 213 

search involves the cooperation of the Department of Computer Science and the School 
of Architecture. The campus-wide Rice Quantum Institute is also active in the research 
of electronic materials and other aspects of materials science. Finally , biomechanics and 
biomaterials research involves several institutions in the Texas Medical Center. 



Degree Requirements for B.A., B.S.M.E. in Mechanical Engineering or B.A., 
B.S.M.S. in Materials Science and Engineering 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
The B .A. program in either mechanical engineering or materials science and engineering 
is highly flexible, involves less technical content than the B.S., and allows students 
greater freedom to pursue areas of interest outside of engineering. 

The two B.S. programs prepare students for professional practice of engineering. 
During their senior year, mechanical engineering students in the B.S. program take 
courses in design application while completing a major design project, and materials 
science and engineering students in the B .S . program work on a design problem in an 
industrial setting. The B.S.M.E. program is accredited by the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology (ABET). Departmental goals and objectives are available 
at http://mems.rice.edu/undergraduate/goals.html. 

B.S.M£. Program. Lists of representative undergraduate courses and the usual 
order in which students take them are available from the department for either the B.A. 
or B .S . programs in both mechanical engineering and materials science and engineering. 
The B.S.M.E. degree contains a core of required courses and selected electives from 1 
of 6 specialization areas. The requirements (for a total of 131 hours) are: 



Basic Mathematics and Science 

(26 hours) 
CHEM 121 Chemistry 
MATH 101 Single Variable Calculus I 
MATH 102 Single Variable Calculus II 
MATH 211 Ordinai-y Dijferential 

Equations and Linear Algebra 
MATH 212 Multivariable Calculus 
,MSCI 301 Materials Science 
PHYS 101 Mechanics 
PHYS 102 Electricity and Magnetism 

Computational and Applied 
Mathematics (12 hours) 

COMP 1 10 Computation in Science 
and Engineering 

CAAM 2 1 1 Engineering Computation 
'. CAAM 335 Matrix Analysis 

CAAM 336 Dijferential Equations in 
Science and Engineering 

Senior Design (7 hours) 
MECH 407 Mechanical Design 
j Project I 

MECH 408 Mechanical Design 
Project II 



Labs (3 hours) 
MECH 33 1 Mechanics Lab 
MECH 332 Thermo/Fluids Lab 
MECH 431 Senior Lab 

Mechanical Engineering (32 hours) 
MECH 200 Classical Thermodyimmics 
MECH 2 1 1 Engineering Mechanics 
MECH 3 1 1 Meclmnics-Deformable 

Solids 
MECH 340 Industrial Process Lab 
MECH 343 Modeling of Dynamic 

Systems 
MECH 371 Fluid Mechanics I 
MECH 401 Machine Design 
MECH 412 Vibrations 
MECH 420 Feedback Control of 

Dynamic Systems 
MECH 481 Heat Transfer 

Limited Electives: 3 hours in any 300- 
level or higher MATH, CAAM, 
STAT, or MECH course 

Distribution Electives (24 hours) 

Free Electives (15 hours) 



214 DEPARTMENTS / Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 

Specialization Area Options: The specialization area can be 1 of the following 5 
clusters. Students must take at least 2 of the following required cluster courses for their 
selected cluster and 2 from the departmental list of the suggested cluster elective courses, 
for a total of not less than 12 hours. The cluster advisors will maintain updated lists of ! 
electives in the department. The choices for the required cluster courses are: ! 

1 . Biomechanics 4. Solid Mechanics and Materials j 
BIOE 372 Intro Biomechanics CEVE 400 Mechanics of Solids II 
MECH 380 Tissue Mechanics MSCl 402 Mech. Properties of Materials 

2. Computational mechanics 5. System dynamics and control i 
MECH 4 1 7 Finite Element Analysis MECH 498 Intro to Robotics 

MECH 454 Finite Elements in Fluids MECH 435 Electromechanical Systems 

or ELEC 243 Intro to Electronics 

3. Fluid mechanics and thermal science 

MECH 372 Fluid Mechanics, II 6- General mechanical engineering 

MECH 47 1 App. of Thermodynamics Any 4 required courses listed above may 

be taken to define a general cluster. 

B.A. in Mechanical Engineering Program. Students seeking the B .A. degree with 
a major in mechanical engineering must complete 120 hours with at least 66 semester 
hours in courses specified by the department along with 24 hours of university distribu- , 
tion electives and 30 hours of free electives. Lists of courses, including general university 
requirements and the usual order in which students take them are available from the 
department. The B.A. program mirrors the B.S.M.E. program in the freshman and 
sophomore years with the exceptions that MECH 340 and MECH 331 are not required. 
Specific major requirements are completed in the junior and senior years along with 
electives. A summary appears below: 

Freshman Year: Same as B.S. with 23 major and 9 elective hours for 32 hours, i 

Sophomore Year: Same as B.S. (except MECH 340 and 33 1 are not required) with 
18 major and 15 elective hours for 33 hours. 

Junior and Senior Years: 25 major and 30 electives for 55 hours. The following 
courses are required in junior and senior years: 

CAAM 335 Matrix Analysis (3) MECH 40 1 Machine Design (3) 

C AAM 336 Differential Equations in MECH 4 1 2 Vibrations (3 ) 

Science and Engineering (3) MECH 420 Feedback Control of 
MECH 343 Modeling of Dynamic Dynamic Systems (3) 

Systems (4) MECH 48 1 Heat Transfer (3) 
MECH 37 1 Fluid Mechanics I (3) 

B.A. in Materials Science and Engineering Program. Students seeking the B.A. 
degree with a major in materials science and engineering must complete at least 52 hours I 
in courses specified by the department plus additional hours for a total of 120 hours at 
graduation. 

B.S.M.S. Program. Students seeking the B.S.M.S. must complete at least 91 
semester hours in courses specified by the department within the total requirements of 
134 hours. Basic departmental course requirements for the B.S.M.S. are as follows: 



Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 215 



CHEM 121-122 General Chemistry 
MATH 101 and 102 Single Variable 

Calculus I and // 
MATH 21 1 Ordinary Differential 

Equations and Linear Algebra 
MATH 212 Multivariable Calculus 
MECH 2 1 1 Engineering Mechanics 
MSCI 301 Materials Science 
PHYS 101 Mechanics 
PHYS 102 Electricity and Magnetism 

Specific requirements 

CAAM 2 1 1 Introduction to Engineering 

Computation 
CAAM 335 Matrix Analysis 
CIVI 300 Mechanics of Solids 
ELEC 241 Fundamentals of Electrical 

Engineering I (or ELEC 243 

Introduction to Electronics) 
MSCI 301 Materials Science 
MSCI 303 Materials Science Junior Lab 
MSCI 3 1 1 Introduction to Design 
MSCI 401 Thermodynamics and 

Transport Phenomena in 

Materials Science 
MSCI 402 Mechanical Properties 

of Materials 



MSCI 404 Materials Engineering 

and Design 
MSCI 406 Physical Properties of Solids 
. (or MSCi 415 Ceramics and 

Glasses) 
MSCI 41 1 Metallography and Phase 

Relations (or MSCI 415 Ceramics 

and Glasses) 
MSCI 500/501 Materials Science 

Seminar 
MSCI 535 Crystallography and 

Diffraction 
MSCI 537 Materials Science Senior Lab 
MSCI 594 Properties of Polymers 

I course from the following 

PHYS 201 Waves and Optics 
CHEM 21 1 Organic Chemistry 
CHEM 311 Physical Chemistry 

Electives 

1 approved science elective (at the 200 

level or higher) 
1 approved engineering science elective 

(not MSCI) 
1 approved technical elective 



Degree Requirements for M.M.E., M.M.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in Mechanical 
Engineering or Materials Science and Engineering 

Professional Degree Programs. The professional degrees offered by this depart- 
ment, the Master of Mechanical Engineering (M.M.E.) and the Master of Materials 
Science (M.M.S.), involve a fifth year of specialized study , which is integrated with the 
four undergraduate years leading to either the B.A. or the B.S. degree in the same areas 
of interest. The professional degree programs are open to students who have shown 
academic excellence in their undergraduate studies. 

For general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70) . For both 
the M.M.E. and M.M.S. degrees, students must complete 30 semester hours of course 
work. Lists of suggested courses are available from the department. Students should 
develop a specific plan of study based on their particular interests. 

I Research Degree Programs. The programs leading to the M .S . and Ph .D . degrees 

I are open to students who have demonstrated outstanding performance in their under- 

I graduate studies. The granting of a graduate research degree presupposes academic work 

I of superior quality and a demonstrated ability to do original research. 

!■ For general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). Course 

\. requirements for the research degrees vary, depending on the extent of individual 

undergraduate preparation as well as each student's performance in graduate courses and 

on qualifying examinations. For both the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, students must present 

a thesis that comprises an original contribution to knowledge and defend it in a public oral 

examination. 



See MECH and MSCI in the Courses of Instruction section. 



216 

Medieval Studies 



The School of Humanities 



Director and Adviser 

Honey Meconi 

Professors Assistant Professors 

Jane Chance David Cook 

Gilbert Morris Cuthbertson Eva Haverkamp 

Michael Maas Scott McGill 

Donald Ray Moirison Lecturer and Playwright in 

Deborah Nelson-Campbell Residence 

Associate Professors E. Douglas Mitchell 

Linda E. Neagley 

Nanxiu Qian 

Carol E. Quillen 

Paula Sanders 

Sarah Westphal 

Degree Offered: BA. 

This interdisciplinary major enables students to compare medieval cultures, noting 
both their differences and their common traditions, in the period between 500 and 1500 
A.D. The program combines a broad background in various aspects of medieval culture 
with more specialized study in a selected field. These fields of emphasis include art 
history, history, medieval literature (English, French, or Latin), music, philosophy, or 
religion. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Medieval Studies 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students majoring in medieval studies must complete at least 30 semester hours (10 
courses); the minimum for double majors is 30 hours. All majors must complete five (5) 
of these medieval studies courses at the 300 or 400 level. 



Required and recommended courses include the following: 

lA minimum of 30 semester hours (10 semester courses), of which at least five 
courses must be at the 300/400 level . Double majors must complete a minimum 
of 24 semester hours. 

SOne course in medieval literature OR medieval art OR medieval music 

Recommended Courses: MDST 414 Literature & Culture of the 

MOST 3 1 6 Chaucer Middle Ages: Saints & Sinners 

MDST 3 1 7 Arthurian Literature MDST 425 Courtly Love in Medieval France 

MDST 368 Mythologies MDST 330 Early Medieval Art from 5th 

Century to the Romanesque Period 



MDST 331 Gothic Art & Architecture in 
Northern Europe, 1140-1300 

MDST 332 Late Gothic Art & Architecture 
in Northern Europe, 1300-1500 

MDST 222 Medieval & Renaissance Eras 

MDST 429 Music in the Middle Ages 



Medieval Studies 217 

One of the following courses: 
MDST 201 History of Philosophy I 
MDST 257/357 Jews & Christians in Me- 
dieval Europe 
MDST 382 Classical Islamic Culture 



•Two semesters of foreign language study , determined in consultation with the medieval 
studies advisor. 

•Three courses (at least two at the 300 or 400 level) in the student's chosen field of 
emphasis— one of these may be a directed reading course 

Recommended Courses: 

•MDST 202 Introduction to Medieval Civilization I: The Early Middle Ages 
•MDST 203 Introduction to Medieval Civilization II: The High Middle Ages 
•MDST 315 Introduction to Medieval Culture 



For single majors, 3 additional courses in the medieval period, one of which may be 
a senior thesis (1 semester) on atopic in the student's field of emphasis; for double majors, 
1 additional course in the medieval period. 

Students work out their programs of study in consultation with the program director. 
Those contemplating graduate work in medieval studies should study at least one foreign 
language in some depth (as most graduate schools require a reading knowledge or French 
and German for the Ph.D.) 

Students may select from among the following to fulfill the course requirements for 
the major in medieval studies. 

Please note that not all courses listed below will be offered during the academic year. 
For a current list of courses that will be offered in fall 2003 and spring 2004, please visit 
the Medieval Studies web site at http://medieval.rice.edu. 



Classical Studies 

MDST 101 Elementary Latin I 
MDST 102 Elementary Latin II 
MDST 211 Intermediate Latin I 
MDST 2 1 2 Intermediate Latin II 

English 

MDST 300 Medieval Women Writers 

MDST 310 Dante in Translation 

MDST 311 Old English 

MDST 312 Surx'ey of Old English Litera- 
ture: Gender & Power in Old English 

MDST 314 Survey of Middle English Lit- 
erature 

MDST 315 Introduction to Medieval Cul- 
ture 

MDST 316 Chaucer 

MDST 317 Arthurian Literature 

MDST 318 J. R. R.Tolkien 

MDST 368 Mythologies 

MDST 406 Christine de Pizan in 15"- 
Century England 



French Studies 

FREN 416 Literature & Culture of the 

Middle Ages: King Arthur 
MDST 410 The Literary & Historical 

Image of the Medieval Woman 
MDST 414 Literature & Culture of the 

Middle Ages: Saints & Sinners 
MDST 425 Courtly Love in Medieval 

France 

German Studies 

GERM 1 26 Freshman Seminar: The Leg- 
end of King Arthur in the Middle Ages 

GERM 330 Mapping German Culture: 
Courtship, Love & Marriage in the 
Age of Chivalry 

History of Art 

MDST 108 Art in Context: Late Medieval 
& Renaissance Culture 



2 1 8 DEPARTMENTS / Medieval Studies 



MDST 1 1 1 Introduction to the History of 
Western Art I: Prehistoric to Gothic 

MDST 238 Special Topics in Medieval Art 

MDST 239 Independent Study in Medieval 
Art 

MDST 330 Early Medieval Art from the 
5th Century to the Romanesque Pe- 
riod 

MDST 331 Gothic Art & Architecture in 
Northern Europe. 1140-1300: 

The Age of Cathedrals 

MDST 332 Late Gothic Art & Architecture 
in Northern Europe, 1300-1500 

MDST 430 The Gothic Portal 

MDST 440 Jan van Eyck: Problems of 
Interpretation 

MDST 45 8 Special Topics in Medieval Art 

MDST 459 Independent Study in Medieval 
Art 

History 

MDST 202 Introduction to Medieval Civi- 
lization 1: The Early Middle Ages 

MDST 203 Introduction to Medieval Civi- 
lization II: The High Middle Ages 

MDST 257 Jews & Christians in Medieval 
Europe 

MDST 28 1 Pre-Modern Middle East His- 
tory: The Middle East from the Prophet 
Muhammad to Muhammad Ali 

MDST 303 Undergraduate Independent 
Reading 

MDST 304 Undergraduate Independent 
Reading 

MDST 308 The World of Late Antiquity 

MDST 32 1 Directed Readings in Medieval 
History 

MDST 322 Directed Readings in Medieval 
History 

MDST 325 Introduction to Medieval Civi- 
lization I: The Early Middle Ages (en- 
riched version) 

MDST 326 Introduction to Medieval Civi- 
lization II: The High Middle Ages 

(enriched version) 



MDST 345 Renaissance Europe: Human- 
ism & Expansion 

MDST 357 Jews & Christians in Medieval 
Europe (enriched version) 

MDST 358 European Intellectual History 
from Augustine to Descartes 

MDST 382 Classical Islamic Cultures 

MDST 384 The Crusades: Holy War in 
Medieval Christendom & Islam 

MDST 385 Christians & Jews in the Medi- 
eval Islamic World 

MDST 387 Life on the Nile: Egyptian 
Politics, Culture, & Society, 

Medieval to Modern Times 

MDST 438 Women & Gender in Medieval 
Islamic Societies 

MDST 444 Memory & Commemoration in 
the Middle Ages 

MDST 446 Jewish & Christian Communi- 
ties in the Middle Ages 

MDST 447 The Age of the Crusades 

MDST 455 Guide to the Sources of Medi- 
eval History 

MDST 465 Jews & Christians: Percep- 
tions of the Other 

MDST 488 Topics in Medieval History 

Linguistics 

MDST 311 Old English 

Music 

MDST 222 Medieval & Renaissance Eras 
MDST 429 Music of the Middle Ages 
MDST 44 1 Hildegard ofBingen 
MDST 456 Collegium 
MDST 486 Illuminated Music Manuscripts 

Philosophy 

MDST 201 Histoty of Philosophy I 

MDST 301 Ancient & Medieval Philoso- 
phy 

MDST 481 Seminar in Ancient & Medi- 
eval Philosophy 

Religious Studies 

RELI 443 Maimonides' Guide for the 
Perplexed 



See MDST in the Courses of Instruction section. 



219 

Military Science 



Chair and Professor 

Lieutenant Colonel Brian Whalen 
Assistant Professors 

Sergeant First Class Tol Avery 

Captain Dexter Caston 

Captain Renee Russo 

Master Serseant Thomas Braaten 



Degrees Offered: None 

The goal of the U.S. Army ROTC program is to develop technically competent, 
physically fit. and highly motivated men and women for positions of responsibility as 
commissioned officers in the active army, the army reserve, and the National Guard. 
Upon completion of the curriculum, students will have an understanding of the funda- 
mental concepts and principles of the military as an art and as a science. The leadership 
and managerial experience gained through ROTC provides great benefit for students in 
both their civilian endeavors and in their military careers. 

Degree Requirements 

Rice does not offer a bachelor's in Military Science. However, interested students 
can obtain a degree in any of the other programs offered by Rice , with a minor in Military 
Science obtained by attending courses at the University of Houston. The financial aid 
available to a ROTC student may be used for Rice courses as well as the University of 
Houston ROTC courses. 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
For requirements for a specific degree program, see the pages for that degree program. 
Further details on ROTC programs at Rice are available on page 27. For more 
information on the Army ROTC program in particular, contact the military science 
department at the University of Houston by calling 713-743-3875. 

Statutory Authority. General statutory authority for establishment and operation 
of the ROTC program , including the scholarship program, is contained in Title 1 0, United 
States Code, Chapter 103 (Sec. 2102-21 11). Specific rules and procedures are found in 
U.S. Army Regulation 145-1. 

Course Credit. ROTC classes may be taken for elective credit toward any degree 
plan at the University of Houston or Rice University. Freshman- and sophomore-level 
classes are open to all students, regardless of age or physical condition. No military 
obligation is incurred as a result of enrollment in these courses. Junior- and senior-level 
courses are more restrictive and do require a military obligation. ROTC scholarship 
students also incur a military obligation. 

Four- Year Program. The four-year program is divided into two courses: the basic 
course, which is normally attended by students during their freshman and sophomore 
years, and the advanced course, attended during the junior and senior years. Advanced 
course students attend a six- week advanced camp in Fort Lewis, Washington, normally 
between their junior and senior years. 



220 DEPARTMENTS / Military Science 



The Basic Course. The basic course consists of four semesters of military science, 
which include MILl 121, MILl 122, MIL! 201, and MILI 202. These freshman- and 
sophomore-level classes are open to all students without obligation. 

The Advanced Course. Students entering the advanced course must enter into a 
contract to pursue and accept a commission in the active Army , the Army Reserve , or the 
National Guard. To be considered for contracting into the advanced course, the student 
must be a full-time student in a course of instruction that leads to a degree in a recognized 
academic field, have a minimum of two years of academic work remaining in a 
curriculum leading to a baccalaureate or advanced degree, be under age 30 when 
commissioned, and pass a physical examination. 

Two-Year Program. The two-year program is designed for students who did not 
take the basic course but are otherwise eligible to enroll in the advanced course. This 
program allows students completing their sophomore year to attend a five-week 
Leader's Training Course during June and July at Fort Knox, Kentucky , in lieu of taking 
the first two years of ROTC. There is no military obligation for attending Leader's 
Training Course. The army provides transportation, room, and board. Students are paid 
approximately $700 for the five-week period. 

Laboratory Requirements. A military science laboratory is required for students 
enrolling in MILI 121. MILI 1 22, MILI 20 1 , MILI 202. MILI 30 1 . MILI 302, MILI 401 , 
and MILI 402. This laboratory provides opportunities for marksmanship training, 
rappelling. drill and ceremonies, communications training, and other activities. 

Veterans. Veterans who have served on active duty or in the army reserve or 
National Guard are also eligible for the ROTC program. Although veterans are not 
required to take the basic course, they are encouraged to do so. All students, including 
veterans, must have a minimum of 60 credit hours prior to enrolling in the advanced 
course. 

National Guard and Army Reserve Members. Students enrolled in ROTC may 
also be members of the Army Reserve/National Guard. Through the Simultaneous 
Membership Program (SMP), those students enrolled in the advanced course will be 
placed in a leadership position as a cadet and will receive pay and entitlements from the 
National Guard or Army Reserve in the pay grade of Sergeant (E-5). 

Financial Assistance. The United States Army offers, on a competitive nationwide 
basis, four-, three-, and two-year scholarships. The scholarships cover up to $20,000 of 
tuition . Recipients also receive benefits for educational fees (to include lab fees), a book 
allowance, and a subsistence allowance of $350 per month. Applicants must be U.S. 
citizens and must be under age 27 on the anticipated graduation date. Applications are 
available from the military science department. Veteran applicants can extend the age 
limit up to a maximum of three years, based on prior active duty service. 

Other Financial Aid. All students enrolled in the advanced course will receive a 
subsistence allowance of $350 per month. For more information, contact the military 
science department. GI Bill recipients still retain benefits. 

Tuition. Members of the Army or the Army Reserve, National Guard, Texas State 
Guard, or other reserve forces may be exempted from the nonresident tuition fee and 
other fees and charges. 



DEPARTMENTS / Military Science 22 1 

Special Training. Basic- and advanced-course students may volunteer for and may 
attend the U.S. Army Airborne and Air Assault courses during June, July, and August. 
Cadet Troop Leadership training positions are also available to advanced-course cadets 
during the summer months. 

Miscellaneous. Cadets in the advanced course are paid an allowance of $350 per 
month during the school year. Military textbooks and uniforms are furnished to all cadets. 

The Corps of Cadets sponsors an annual military ball in addition to other social 
events throughout the school year. The Department of Military Science sponsors 
extracurricular activities such as the University of Houston Color Guard and the Ranger 
Challenge Team. 

Minor in Military Science. To qualify for a minor in military science, students 
must complete a minimum of 18 semester hours of course work, of which 12 must be 
advanced. Nine semester hours must be completed in residence, of which 6 must be 
advanced. Students must also attend advanced camp. Students must attain a 2.00 grade 
point average or higher in military science courses attempted at this university. Stu- 
dents may receive credit for 100- and 200-level courses based on prior militaiy training, 
completion of ROTC Basic Camp, completion of JROTC training, or completion of 
one year at a service academy. 

See MILI in the Courses of Instruction section (these are University of 
Houston listings). 



222 




Music 




The Shepherd School of Music 




Dean 




Robert Yekovich 




Professors 


Honey Meconi 


Robert Atherholt 


Paula Page 


Richard Brown 


Timothy Pitts 


Leone Buyse 


Karen Ritscher 


Marcia J. Citron 


David L. Waters 



James Dunham 
Paul V. H. Ellison 
Joyce Harwell 
Norman Fischer 
Kenneth Goldsmith 
Arthur Gottschalk 
Lynn Harrell 
Clyde HoUoway 
Benjamin C. Kamins 
Kathleen Kaun 
Stephen King 
Richard Lavenda 
Sergiu Luca 
Jon Kimura Parker 
Larry Rachleff 
Robert Roux 
Anne Schnoebelen 
Marie Speziale 
William Ver Meulen 
Kathleen Winkler 
Professor Emeritus 
Raphael Fliegel 
Associate Professors 
Walter B.Bailey 
Thomas 1. Jaber 
Pierre Jalbert 
David E. Kirk 



Michael Webster 
Assistant Professors 

Karim Al-Zand 

Gregory Barnett 

Anthony K. Brandt 

Shih-Hui Chen 

David Ferris 

Kurt Stallmann 

Instructor 

Joan DerHovespian 

Artist Teachers 

Brian Connelly 

Jan de Chambrier 

Debra Dickinson 

Jeanne Kierman Fischer 

Michael Franciosi 

Christopher French 

Hans Graf 

Janet Rarick 

C. Dean Shank, Jr. 

Lecturer 

Nancy Gisbrecht Bailey 

Susan Dunn 

Phillip Kloeckner 

Adjunct Lecturers 

Robert Simpson 

C. Richard Stasney 

Pieter A. Visser 



Degrees Offered: B.A., B.Mus.. B.Mus./M.Mus.. M.Mus., D.M.A. 

At the undergraduate level, the Shepherd School of Music offers both professional 
training and a broad liberal arts curriculum. Degree programs include a B.A. degree in 
music and a B.Mus. degree in performance, composition, music history, and music 
theory. Acceptance into a five-year honors program leads to the simultaneous awarding 
of the B.Mus. and M.Mus degrees. 



Music 223 

At the graduate level, the school offers professional music training for qualified 
students who concentrate on music composition, performance, or research that is 
supported by lab or performing ensembles. This training includes theory and history 
seminars. Advanced degree programs include a M.Mus. degree in composition, choral 
and instrumental conducting, historical musicology, performance, and music theory and 
a D.M.A. degree in composition and selected areas of performance. 

Requirements for All Music Majors 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
All students majoring in music must participate in core music, applied music, and other 
required music courses, as well as in chamber music and large ensembles, plus 
electives. They are entitled to one hour of private lessons each week of each semester 
they are enrolled as a music major; private or group lessons beyond this may result in 
additional fees. Students in the B.A. program who wish to continue taking private 
lessons beyond the required four semesters of instrumental or vocal study must obtain 
permission from the dean of the Shepherd School. 

Examinations. At the end of each semester, a jury examination in applied music is 
given over the material studied during the semester. (All degree candidates except B.A. 
students must demonstrate keyboard proficiency in an examination. If students have little 
or no knowledge of the keyboard, they should enroll in secondary piano at the beginning 
of their first semester and continue study until they can meet the examination requirements .) 

Performance. Students are expected to perform frequently during their residence 
at Rice. Performance majors must present at least 2 full recitals. Composition and 
conducting students should present recitals as specified by their degree programs. 
Students are expected to attend both faculty and student recitals. In addition, all music 
majors must participate in the school's conducted ensembles as assigned. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Music, B.Mus., and B.MusyM.Mus. 

Admission. An audition, either in person or on tape, is required of each undergradu- 
ate applicant. The Shepherd School faculty and the university's Committee on Admis- 
sion jointly determine admission, the latter basing its evaluation upon successful 
academic achievement and other standards of college admission. Transfer applicants 
from other colleges, conservatories, and universities must also provide an audition, 
personal or taped, and take placement exams in both music history and music theory. 
Once admitted, their prior preparation in music is assessed, which may reduce the 
required period of study at Rice. 

B.A. and B.Mus. Program. For general university requirements, see Graduation 
Requirements (pages 20-23). 

For either bachelor' s degree , students majoring in music must have a total of at least 
120 semester hours at graduation. The complete curriculum for each major in music is 
available in the Shepherd School Student Handbook or in the undergraduate music 
! office on the second floor of Alice Pratt Brown Hall. While the number of required hours 
vary according to major area, all music students must take the following core courses 
(those in the B.A. program are not required to take MUSI 331 , 332 and 431). 

• Music Theon-: MUSI 21 1, 212, 311, 312, and a theory elective chosen from 
MUSRlK 512, 513, or613. 

• Music History ■■ MUSI 222, 321, 322, and 421 

• Aural Skills and Performance Techniques: MUSI 23 1 , 232, 331, 332, and 43 1 



224 DEPARTMENTS / Music 

B.MusyMJVIus. Honors Program. The same general university requirements 
apply, but students seeking the combined B.Mus./M.Mus. degree must complete a total 
of at least 150 semester hours by graduation. The number of required hours varies 
according to major area. 

The first five semesters of course work in this program parallel the core curriculum 
of the bachelor's degrees. The sixth semester is a transitional semester during which 
students qualify for admission to the combined program. For further information, 
including application procedures, see the Shepherd School Student Handbook. 

Degree Requirements for M.Mus. and D.M.A. in Music 

Admission. For instrumental, voice, and conducting applicants, an audition is 
required. Composition majors must submit portfolios, and musicology and theory 
majors must provide samples of their written work. The Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE) is required of graduate applicants in musicology, theory, and composition. 
Musicology applicants must also complete the advanced music tests. 

Requirements. For general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 
65-70). For the M.Mus. degree, candidates must complete at least two semesters of 
full-time study at Rice. Semester hour minimums for the M.Mus. degree vary accord- 
ing to major area. For the D.M.A., candidates must complete a total of 90 hours beyond 
the bachelor's degree, attending Rice full time for at least four semesters after receiving 
their M.Mus. degree. 

Thesis. A thesis is required of both music history and music theory majors. In lieu 
of a thesis, composition majors must produce an original work of extended scope, and 
conducting majors must present an extended composition or project. 

Academic Standards 

Curriculum and Degree Requirements. Further information on curricular re- 
quirements for all majors and degree programs is available from The Shepherd School 
of Music. 

Grading Policy. A// music students must achieve at least a B- in course work in their 
major applied area. Students who receive a C+ or lower in their major applied area are j 
placed on music probation. Music probation signifies that the work of the student has 
been sufficiently unsatisfactory to preclude graduation unless marked improvement is 
achieved promptly. While on probation, they may not be absent from class except for 
extraordinary reasons, and they may not represent the school in any public function that 
is not directly part of a degree program. After receiving a second C+ or lower in their 
major area, whether in consecutive semesters or not, students are discontinued as music 
majors. 

Leaves of Absence and Voluntary Withdrawal. Music majors must obtain , 
permission in writing from the dean of the Shepherd School before requesting a leave of 
absence from the university. Requests must be in the dean's office before the first day of 
classes in the semester for which leave is requested. 

Music majors taking voluntary withdrawal from the university are not guaranteed 
readmission into the Shepherd School and may be asked to reapply/reaudition. Students 
should explain the reasons for their withdrawal to the dean before leaving campus. 



Music 225 

Other Musical Opportunities 

For Nonmajors. Students who are not music majors may take the following courses 
designed for the general student (other music courses require the permission of the 
instructor and the approval of the dean of the Shepherd School). 



I 



MUSI 1 17/118 Fundamentals of Music I and // 

MUSI 307 Composition for Nonmajors 

MUSI 317/318 near}' for Nonmajors I and // 

MUSI 327/328 Music Literature for Nonmajors I and // 

MUSI 334/335 Campanile Orchestra and Rice Chorale 

MUSI 141-197 for individual instruction in all instruments 

MUSI 340 Concert Band 

MUSI 342 Jazz Ensemble 

MUSI 345 Jazz Improvisation 

MUSI 415 Band Arranging 

Lectures and Performances. A visiting lecturer series, a professional concert 
series, and numerous distinguished visiting musicians contribute to the Shepherd School 
environment. The Houston Symphony Orchestra, Symphony Chorus, Houston Grand 
Opera, Texas Opera Theater, Houston Ballet, Houston Oratorio Society, Da Camera, 
Context, and Houston Friends of Music, as well as the activities of other institutions of 
higher learning in the area, also provide exceptional opportunities for students to enjoy 
a wide spectrum of music. 

See MUSI in the Courses of Instruction section. 



226 




Nanoscale Physics 




The Wiess School of Natural Sciences 1 




Director 




F. Barry Dunning 


Professors 


Assistant Professors 


Andrew R. Barron 


Jason H. Hafner 


Neal F. Lane 


Michael B. Heeley 


Associate Professor 


Thomas C.Killian 


Vicki L. Colvin 


Douglas A. Natelson 




Alexander J. Rimberg 




Frank R. Toffoletto 




Degrees Offered: M.S. 



Rice University introduced a professional master's degree in Nanoscale Physics in 
fall 2002 .This program combines a strong component in quantum theory , which govemsi 
the behavior of systems at the nanoscale , with the study of practical nano- and mesoscale 
devices. The program provides the student with the knowledge required to successfully 
navigate the emerging field of nanotechnology. New courses cover cutting-edge areas 
such as quantum behavior of nanostructures, quantum nanotechnology, nanoscale 
imaging , and the fabrication of nanostructures . In addition , a year-long course in methods 
of experimental physics ensures that students obtain the advanced practical skills 
valuable to industry. 

The Nanoscale Physics degree is one of three tracks in the new Professional Master's 
Program at Rice housed in the Wiess School of Natural Sciences. These master's degrees 
are designed for students seeking to gain further scientific core expertise coupled with 
enhanced management and communication skills. These degrees instill a level of 
scholastic proficiency that exeeds that of the bachelor's level and creates the cross- 
functional aptitudes needed in modem industry. This will allow students to move more 
easily into management careers in consuhing or research and development, design, and 
marketing of new science-based products. 

Degree Requirements for the M.S. in Nanoscale Physics 

The 21 -month professional master's program begins with two semesters of course 
work at Rice followed by a six-month industrial internship. After the internship, students 
return to Rice for a final semester of course work. In addition to taking technical courses, 
students in the Nanoscale Physics program will take management courses, a science 
policy and ethics course, and a seminar jointly with the students involved in the other 
professional master's tracks. No thesis is required; however, students are required to 
present their internship projects in both oral and written form in the Professional Master's 
Seminar. Students also are required to attend events organized by the Rice Alliance for i 
Technology and Entrepreneurship and will be guided in courses by the efforts of the Cain 
Project in Engineering and Professional Communication. Working professionals may be 
considered for part-time enrollment. 

For general university requirements for graduate studies, see pages 65-70, and see 
also Professional Degrees, page 66. 



Nanoscale Physics 227 

To ensure that all students obtain an excellent quantitative background, each student 
will be required to take the core courses listed below. If a studnet can demonstrate that 
s/he has learned the material elsewhere, s/he may be exempted. Students pursuing this 
degree part-time will meet with their assigned adviser to determine their coursework 
schedule. 

Yearl 

Fall Semester 

NSCI 501 Professional Master's Seminar 

MGMT 750 Management for Science and Engineering 

PHYS 533 Nanostructures and Nanotechnology I 

PHYS 537 Methods of Experimental Physics I 

PHYS 539 Characterization and Fabrication at the Nanoscale 

Spring Semester 

Elective 

NSCI 501 Professional Master's Seminar 

PHYS 534 Nanostructures and Nanotechnology II 

PHYS 538 Methods of Experimental Physics II 

PHYS 416 Numerical Methods and Modeling 

Summer 

Industrial Internship 

Year 2 

Fall Semester 

NSCI 510 Industrial Internship 

Spring Semester 

3 electives 

NSCI 5 1 1 Science Policy and Ethics 

NSCI 501 Professional Master's Seminar 

Elective Courses: In addition to taking the core courses, the student will choose 4 
electives from the list below. We recommend that at least 2 of the electives be science 
or engineering courses at the 500 level or above. 

CAAM 378 Introduction to Operations MGMT 636 Systems Analysis and Data- 
Research base Design 

CHEM 630 Molecular Spectroscopy and MGMT 661 International Business Law 

Group Theory MGMT 674 Production and Operations 

ELEC 568 Laser Spectroscopy Management 

ELEC 595 Microlithography MGMT 676 Project Management! Project 

ELEC 603 Nano-Optics and Finance 

Nanophotonics MGMT 721 General Business Law 

ELEC 645 Thin Films MGMT 75 1 New Venture Creation in Sci- 

ELEC 685 Fundamentals of Medical Im- ence and Engineering 

aging PHYS 569 Ultrafast Optical Phenomena 

ENGI 303 Engineering Economics and or other courses as specified by the program 
Management director and approved by the Over- 

MGMT 6 1 7 Managerial Decision Making sight Committee 



228 

Naval Science 



Chair 

James K. York 

Associate Professor 

James R. Wallace 
Assistant Professors 

Kelley A. Frederickson 

Morris D. Hale 

Paul J. Kane 



Degrees Offered: none 



Students enroll in the Navy Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) program as 
scholarship or nonscholarship students. Sophomores may apply for the optional two- 
year program. The Department of Naval Science is administered by a senior U.S. Navy 
officer, assisted by officers and enlisted personnel of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. 

Degree Requirements 

Rice does not offer a bachelor's in Naval Science. However, interested students 
can obtain a degree in any of the other programs offered by Rice, with a minor in Naval 
Science. Financial aid may be available to a Navy ROTC student . 

For university requirements for a specific degree, see Graduation Requirements 
(pages 20-23) and the section pertaining to that degree. For further details on ROTC 
programs at Rice, see page 27. Program requirements differ slightly depending on the 
student's scholarship status. 

Scholarship Navy ROTC students are appointed midshipmen, U.S. Naval Reserve, , 
on a nationwide competitive basis. They receive retainer pay of $250-$400 per month 
for a maximum of four academic years, with all tuition, fees, and equipment paid for by 
the government. Additionally, students receive $275 per semester for books. Midship- 
men must complete the prescribed naval science courses and participate in drills and 
three summer cruises. After graduating with a bachelor's or graduate degree, they 
accept a commission as an ensign in the U.S. Navy or as a second lieutenant in the U.S. 
Marine Corps. 

Nonscholarship Navy ROTC students enter into a mutual contract with the Secre- 
tary of the Navy to take naval science courses and to participate in drills and one 
summer training cruise. On a competitive basis, students may apply to continue in the 
Navy ROTC program through their junior and senior years. The U.S. Navy pays these 
continuing students $300-$400 per month during their junior and senior years, offering 
them a commission in the U.S. Navy or Marine Corps upon graduation. The program 
chair may recommend nonscholarship students, on a local competitive basis, for 
scholarship status. 

Two- Year Program Option. In their sophomore year (junior year for five-year 
Rice students), students may apply for the two-year Navy ROTC program, competing 
nationwide for available scholarships. If selected, they attend the six- week Naval 



229 

Science Institute (NSI) at Newport, Rhode Island, during July and August. NSI pro- 
vides students with course material and training normally covered during the first two 
years of the regular Navy ROTC program. Successful completion of NSI qualifies 
students for enrollment in the advanced Navy ROTC program on an equal footing with 
the four-year students. Usually about 15 percent of the nonscholarship students finish- 
ing NSI are offered two-year Navy ROTC scholarships. Additional scholarships occa- 
sionally may be awarded to others upon the recommendation of the program chair. 

U^. Marine Corps Program. Navy ROTC students, either scholarship or 
nonscholarship, may apply for the U.S. Marine Corps program. Students selected for 
that program are referred to as "Marine Corps option students" and attend separate 
classes under a U.S. Marine officer instructor during their junior and senior years. 

See NAVA in the Courses of Instruction section. 



230 

Neurosciences 



The School of Social Sciences 



Director 

James R. Pomerantz 

Professors Rick K. Wilson 

Steven J. Cox Professor Emeritus 

John W.Clark Sydney M.Lamb 

Raymon M. Glantz Associate Professors 

Don H.Johnson Tony Ro 

Randi C. Martin Michael Stem 

James R. Pomerantz Assistant Professors 

Devika Subramanian Darcy Burgund 

Moshe Y. Vardi Geoffrey F. Potts 



Degrees Offered: None 

In the 1999-2000 academic year. Rice University began offering a new set of 
courses in the area of Neuroscience to supplement a set of courses already offered by 
various departments in closely allied areas. These courses, which carry the designation 
NEUR, are offered in part by faculty associated with the Division of Neurosciences at 
Baylor College of Medicine and in part by faculty at Rice in several different depart- 
ments (including biochemistry and cell biology; computer science, electrical and 
computer engineering, linguistics, and psychology.) They are intended primarily for 
Rice graduate students but, with pennission, are available to advanced undergraduates. 
Some of these classes are taught at the nearby Baylor campus, and some are taught 
according to Baylor's academic calendar, which is different from Rice's. For further 
information on what courses are available and for instructions on how to apply to enter 
these classes, consult Rice's neuroscience website at http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~neurosci/. 



See NEUR in the Courses of Instruction section. 



231 



Philosophy 

The School of Humanities 



Chair 

Steven G. Crowell 

Professors Associate Professors 

Baruch Brody Eric Margolis 

Hugo Tristram Engelhardt, Jr. Alastair Norcross 

Richard E. Grandy Assistant Professors 

Mark Kulstad Sherrilyn Roush 

Donald Ray Morrison Rachel Zuckert 

George Sher Adjunct Professor 

Laurence McCullough 



Degrees Offered: B. A., M. A., Ph.D. 

Philosophy is best described as the attempt to think clearly and deeply about the 
fundamental questions that arise for us as human beings. What is the nature of knowledge 
(epistemology)? How are we to distinguish between what really is and what only seems 
to be (metaphysics)? What is the right thing to do (ethics)? Is there any meaning to 
existence? To study the history of philosophy is to study the best, most enduring answers 
that have been given to these questions in the past. Because every other field of study 
adopts some stance toward these questions, though often implicitly , philosophical issues 
arise in the natural and social sciences, history, linguistics, literature, art, and so on. 
Special courses in philosophy deal with each of these. Characteristic of philosophy are 
commitments to the construction and evaluation of arguments, to expressing thoughts 
clearly and precisely , and to defending one ' s ideas and evaluating the ideas of others . The 
study of philosophy thus provides resources for critical participation in all realms of 
human endeavor. 

The graduate program trains students to teach and pursue research in the main areas 
of department concentration: ethics (especially bioethics) and social and political 
philosophy , history of philosophy, continental philosophy, and core portions of contem- 
porary analytic philosophy. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Philosophy 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students majoring in philosophy must complete 30 semester hours (10 departmental 
courses); at least 18 hours (6 courses) must be at the 300 level or above. A double major 
must complete 27 hours (9 departmental courses) with all other requirements remaining 
the same. 

Majors must take the following courses: 

•PHIL 201 History of Philosophy I 

•PHIL 202 History of Philosophy II 

•Either PHIL 106 Logic or PHIL 305 Mathematical Logic 



232 DEPARTMENTS / Philosophy 

In addition, majors must take at least one course from each of the following area lists: 

History PHIL 3 1 2 Philosophy of Mind 

PHIL 30 1 Ancient and Medieval PHIL 3 1 3 Philosophy of Science 

Philosophy PHIL 353 Philosophy of Language 

PHIL 302 Modern Philosophy Value Theory 

PHIL 308 Continental Philosophy PHIL 306 Ethics 

PHIL 32 1 /i:«nr and 1 9th Century pHiL 307 Social & Political Philosophy 

Philosophy PHIL 326 History of Ethics 

Core Analytic PHIL 327 History of Social & Political 
PHIL 303 Theory of Knowledge Philosophy 

PHIL 304 Metaphysics 

Degree Requirements for M.A. and Ph.D. in Philosophy 

For general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). Students 
have the additional option of applying for a doctoral program specializing in bioethics 
(see below). 

For the M.A. in philosophy, candidates must: 

• Complete with high standing at least 30 semester hours in advanced courses 

approved by the department 

• Complete a written thesis on a subject approved by the department 

• Perform satisfactorily on a final oral examination (not limited to the student's 

special field of study) 

For the Ph.D. in philosophy, candidates must: 

• Complete with high standing 42 hours of course work approved by the department 

(including logic) 

• Demonstrate competence in logic 

• Pass a qualifying examination 

• Perform satisfactorily on an oral defense of their thesis proposal 

• Complete a written thesis on a subject approved by the department (at least one year 

of thesis research must be spent in residence) 

• Perform satisfactorily on a final oral examination (not limited to the student's 

special field of study) 
Bioethics Program. The Ph .D. in philosophy with a specialization in medical ethics 
is offered in cooperation with the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Baylor 
College of Medicine. Applicants to this special program must have enough background 
in philosophy to complete two and a half years of strong general training in philosophy 
at the graduate level. After completing their general training, students receive instruction 
in clinical bioethics at Baylor College of Medicine and then write a dissertation drawing 
upon their philosophical and clinical training. Further information about this program is 
available from the Department of Philosophy. 

Continental Philosophy Program 

The Ph.D. program in Continental philosophy allows graduate students to take 
advantage of resource faculty in history, French studies, philosophy, and religious 
studies, all of whom have done distinguished philosophical work in the Continental 
tradition. Students master the basic fields of analytic philosophy while doing a substantial 
amount of their course work with resource faculty. Further information is available from 
the Department of Philosophy. 

See PHIL in the Courses of Instruction section. 



233 



Physics and Astronomy 



The Wiess School of Natural Sciences 

Chair 

F. Barry Dunning 



Professors 

Stephen D. Baker 

Billy E. Bonner 

Paul A. Cloutier 

Marjorie D. Corcoran 

Michael W. Deem 

Ian M. Duck 

Reginald J. Dufour 

Arthur A. Few, Jr. 

James P. Hannon 

Thomas W. Hill 

Huey W. Huang 

Randall G. Hulet 

Neal Lane 

Eugene H. Levy 

Edison P. Liang 

Hannu E. Miettinen 

Gordon S. Mutchler 

Peter Nordlander 

Carl Rau 

Patricia H. Reiff 

Jabus B. Roberts, Jr. 

Richard E. Smalley 

Paul M. Stevenson 

Professors Emeriti 

John W. Freeman 

William E. Gordon, Distinguished 

F. Curtis Michel 
Ronald F. Stebbings 

G. King Walters 
Richard A. Wolf 
Associate Professors 
David Alexander 
Anthony A. Chan 
Stanley A. Dodds 



Patrick M. Hartigan 
Qimiao Si 
Assistant Professors 

Matthew G. Baring 

Kedar S . Damle 

Jason H. Hafner 

Christopher Johns-Krull 

Ching-Hwa Kiang 

Thomas C. Killian 

Douglas A. Natelson 

Uwe Oberlack 

B.PaulPadley 

HanPu 

Alexander J. Rimberg 

Frank R.Toffoletto 

Adjunct Professors 

David C. Black 

James L. Burch 

Franklin R. Chang-Diaz 

James H. Newman 

Carolyn Sumners 

J. David Winningham 

Adjunct Associate Professors 

HuiLi 

Tomasz F. Stepinski 

Instructor 

Gary A. Morris 

Senior Faculty Fellows 

William J. Llope 

Pablo P. Yepes 

Faculty Fellows 

Giovanni Fossati 

Bernard G. Lindsay 

Ian A. Smith 



Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

The Department of Physics and Astronomy offers undergraduate and graduate 
programs for a wide range of interests. The bachelor of arts degrees in physics and in 



234 DEPARTMENTS / Physics and Astronomy 

astronomy are suitable for students who wish to obtain a broad liberal education with a 
concentration in physical science. The bachelor of science degrees in physics, in 
astrophysics, and in chemical physics provide preparation for employment or further 
study in physics and related fields. Research facilities and thesis supervision are available 
for M.S. and Ph.D. students in atomic, molecular, and optical physics; biophysics; 
condensed matter and surface physics; earth systems science; nuclear and particle 
physics; observational astronomy; solar system physics; space plasma physics; and 
theoretical physics and astrophysics. 



Undergraduate Degree Requirements 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Major requirements consist of a common core of basic physics and mathematics courses, 
with additional course work specific to each degree program. Students may obtain credit 
for some courses by advanced placement, and the department's Undergraduate Commit- 
tee can modify requirements to meet the needs of students with special backgrounds. 



All physics majors must complete the 
following courses: 

PHYS 101 or 1 1 1 Mechanics (with Lai?) 
PHYS 102 or 112 Electricity and 

Magnetism (with Lab) 
PHYS 201 Waves and Optics 
PHYS 202 Modern Physics 
PHYS 231 Elementary Physics 

Laboratory II 
PHYS 30 1 Intermediate Mechanics 



MATH 101/102 Single Variable 

Calculus I and // 
MATH 211 Ordinary Differential 

Equations and Linear Algebra 
MATH 212 Multivariable Calculus 
(MATH 221/222 Honors Calculus III 

and IV may substitute for MATH 

211/ MATH 212) 



Additional courses for the B.S. degree in physics: 



PHYS 302 Intermediate Electrodynamics 
PHYS 311/312 Introduction to Quantum 

Phxsics I and // 
PHYS 331/ 332 Junior Physics Labora- 
tory I and // 
PHYS 41 1 Introduction to Nuclear and 

Particle Physics 
PHYS 412 Solid-state Physics 
PHYS 425 Statistical and Thermal 

Physics 
PHYS 491/492 Undergraduate Research 
PHYS 493/494 Undergraduate Research 
Seminar 



(The Undergraduate Research course 
and seminar must be taken 
concurrently.) 

MATH 381 Introduction to Partial 
Differential Equations and 
MATH 382 Complex Analysis 
or 

CAAM 335 Matrix Analysis and 
CAAM 336 Differential Equations 
in Science and Engineering 

CHEM 121/122 General Chemistry with 
Laboratory 
or 

CHEM 151/152 Honors Chemistry 
with Laboratory 



Additional courses for the B.S. degree in physics with option in applied physics: 



PHYS 302 Intermediate Electrodynamics 
or ELEC 306 Electromagnetic 
Fields and Devices 



PHYS 3 1 1 Introduction to Quantum 
Physics I 

PHYS 312 Introduction to Quantum 
Physics II or ELEC 361 Electronic 
Materials and Quantum Devices 



Physics and Astronomy 235 



2 of PHYS 33 1/332 Junior Physics 
Laboratory I and //, ELEC 327 
Digital Logic Design Laboratory, 
ELEC 342 Electronic Circuits, and 
ELEC 465 Physical Electronics 
Practicum 
PHYS 412 Solid-state Physics 

or Approved substitute in applied 
physics 
PHYS 425 Statistical and Thermal Physics 
PHYS 491/492 Undergraduate Research 
PHYS 493/494 Undergraduate Research 

Seminar 
(The Undergraduate Research course and 
seminar must be taken concurrently.) 



ELEC 242 Fundamentals of Electrical 

Engineering II or ELEC 243 

Introduction to Electronics 
ELEC 305 Introduction to Physical 

Electronics 
MATH 381 Introduction to Partial 

Differential Equations 

or 

CAAM 336 Differential Equations 

in Science and Engineering 
CHEM 121/122 General Chemistry with 

Laboratory 

or 

CHEM 151/152 Honors Chemistry 

with Laboratory 



Additional courses for the BS. degree in physics with option in biophysics: 



PHYS 302 Intermediate Electrodynamics 
PHYS 311/312 Introduction to Quantum 

Physics I and // 
PHYS 425 Statistical and Thermal 

Physics 
BIOS 201/202 Introductory Biology 
BIOS 301 Biochemistry 



CHEM 121/122 General Chemistiy with 

Laboratory 

or 

CHEM 151/152 Honors Chemistry 

with Laboratory 
CHEM 211/212 Organic Chemistry 
CHEM 215 Organic Chemistry Laboratory 



Additional courses for B.S. degree in physics with option in computational physics: 



PHYS 302 Intermediate Electrodynamics 
PHYS 311/312 Introduction to Quantum 

Physics I and // 
PHYS 416 Computational Physics 
PHYS 425 Statistical and Thermal 

Physics 
PHYS 491/492 Undergraduate Research 
PHYS 493/494 Undergraduate Research 

Seminar 
(The Undergraduate Research course and 

seminar must be taken concurrently.) 
MATH 381 Introduction to Partial 

Differential Equations and MATH 

382 Complex Analysis 

Additional courses for the B.S. degree in astrophysics: 

PHYS 302 Intermediate Electrodynam- ASTR 350/360 Introduction to 



or CAAM 335 Matrix Analysis and 
CAAM 336 Differential Equations 
in Science and Engineering 

CAAM 210 or 21 1 Introduction to 
Engineering Computation 

CAAM 353 Computational Numerical 
Analysis 

CAAM 420/421 Computational Science I 
and// 

CHEM 121 General Chemistry with 
Laboratory or CHEM 1 5 1 Honors 
Chemistry with Laboratory 



PHYS 3 1 1 Introduction to Quantum 

Physics I 
PHYS 425 Statistical and Thermal 

Physics 
ASTR 230 Astronomy Laboratory 



Astrophysics— Stars, Galaxies, 
and Cosmology 
3 courses from: 

ASTR 450 Experimental Space 

Science 
ASTR 45 1 Solar and Stellar Astro- 
physics 



236 DEPARTMENTS / Physics and Astronomy 



ASTR 452 Galaxies and Cosmol- 
ogy 
ASTR 470 Solar System Physics 
PH YS 3 1 2 Introduction to 

Quantum Physics II 
PHYS 480 Introduction to Plasma 
Physics 
PHYS 491/492 Undergraduate 

Research 
PHYS 493/494 Undergraduate 
Research Seminar 



(The Undergraduate Research course and 
seminar must be taken concurrently.) 

NSCI 230 Computation in Natural 
Science or CAAM 210 or 21 1 
Introduction to Engineering 
Computation 

CAAM 336 Differential Equations in 
Science and Engineering 

CHEM 1 2 1 General Chemistry with 
Laboratory 



Additional courses for the BA. degree in physics: 



PHYS 302 Intermediate Electrodynam- 
ics 

PHYS 3 1 1 Introduction to Quantum 
Physics I 

PHYS 33 1 Junior Physics Laboratory I 

PHYS 425 Statistical and Thermal 
Physics 



1 additional PHYS or ASTR course 
(3 credit hours) at 400 level 

NSCI 230 Computation in Natural 
Science or CAAM 210 or 21 1 
Introduction to Engineering Compu- 
tation or 1 MATH or CAAM course 
(3 credit hours) at or above 300 level 



Additional courses for the BA. degree in astronomy: 



PHYS 331 Junior Physics Laboratory I 

or 

NSCI 230 Computation in Natural 

Science 
PHYS 425 Statistical and Thermal 

Physics 

or 

CHEM 3 1 1 Physical Chemistry 
ASTR 100 Exploring the Cosmos 



ASTR 230 Astronomy Laboratory 
ASTR 350/360 Introduction to 

Astrophysics— Stars, Galaxies, 
and Cosmology 
ASTR 470 Solar System Physics 
1 of: ASTR 430 Teaching Astronomy 
Laboratory, ASTR 450 Experimen- 
tal Space Science, or PHYS 443 
Atmospheric Science 



Additional courses for the B.S. degree in chemical physics: 



CHEM 121/122 General Chemistry or 

CHEM \5\ I \52 Honors Chemistry 

with Laboratory 
CHEM 2 1 1 Organic Chemistry 
CHEM 2 1 2 Organic Chemistry 

or 

CHEM 360 Inorganic Chemistry 
CHEM 31 1 /3\2 Physical Chemistry' 



PHYS 302 Intermediate Electrodynamics 

2 of: PHYS 3 1 1 or 3 12 Introduction to 
Quantum Physics I or //, CHEM 415 
Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics, 
and CHEM 430 Quantum Chemistry 



Physics and Astronomy 237 
6 credit hours from: 

CHEM 215 Organic Chemistry Laboratory. CHEM 351 or 352 Introductory 
Module in Experimental Chemistry, CHEM 373-391 , CHEM 435 Advanced 
Module in Chemistry, and PHYS 33 1 or 332 Junior Physics Laboratory I or //; 
up to 2 hours of CHEM 491 Research for Undergraduates or PHYS 491/492 
Undergraduate Research may be counted toward this requirement. 

6 credit hours from: NSCI 230 Computation in Natural Science, CAAM 210, or 21 1 
Introduction to Engineering Computation , and MATH, or CAAM courses at or 
above 300 level 



Requirements for Advanced Degrees 

For general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). More 
detailed information on courses and requirements is available from the Department of 
Physics and Astronomy. 

The master of science is a research degree, normally undertaken as the first stage of 
doctoral study. The M.S. requires at least 30 credit hours of approved graduate-level 
studies, including a thesis performed under the direction of a departmental faculty 
member. 

To be eligible for the Ph.D. degree, graduate students must demonstrate to the 
department their ability to engage in advanced research. This is normally accomplished 
by successfully completing the work for the M.S. Students must also complete 60 credit 
hours of approved graduate-level study at Rice and produce a research thesis under the 
direction of a departmental faculty member. At least two years of graduate study are 
required for the Ph.D. 



See ASTR and PHYS in the Courses of Instruction section. 



238 

Policy Studies 



The School of Social Sciences 



Director 

Donald Ostdiek 

Degree Ojfered: B.A. 

This interdisciplinary major focuses on policy issues that are of public interest. 
Students in policy studies evaluate and analyze both the determinants and the effects of 
policy decisions, gaining an understanding of the policy-making process and acquiring 
an intellectual base for policy-making skills. The course of study addresses theoretical 
issues as well as applied and prescriptive policy questions. 

Students may take policy studies only as a second major. It complements majors in 
any university department. For instance, engineering or science majors who are contem- 
plating careers in business or government can investigate how technical innovations or 
regulations are adopted and implemented as matters of public policy, and humanities 
majors can explore career options where language skills are particularly valuable. 

Students are encouraged to investigate research opportunities with Rice faculty. 
Students may also elect to participate in the Washington Semester Program at American 
University, which includes both course work and an internship within the federal 
government. See the policy studies director for more information. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Policy Studies 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students may take the policy studies major only as a second major (their first major 
cannot also be in an interdepartmental program). The major contains 1 1 courses divided 
into the following elements: a basic curriculum, an area curriculum, and a research 
requirement. 

The policy studies basic curriculum introduces students to the basic concepts and 
tools needed to understand and study policy , regardless of the policy area they choose to 
focus on. The four courses ensure that all policy studies majors have a common 
professional vocabulary and conceptual frame of reference. The policy studies area 
curriculum provides specialized training that builds on students' work in the basic 
curriculum. 

Students are required to take 6 courses from one of the following areas of 
specialization: 

• Environmental policy 

• Government policy and management 

• Healthcare management 

• International affairs 

• Law and justice 

• Business policy and management 

• Urban and social change 

Policy studies students must also engage in a research project in their area of interest. 
In consultation with the policy studies director, each student must select a research 
seminar or complete an approved research project through independent study or other 
credit. The Policy Studies Research Seminar (SOSC 400) also counts for this require- 
ment. 



Policy Studies 239 



4 Basic Curriculum Courses 

POLI 338/SOSC 301 Policx Analysis 

ECON 21 1 or 212 Principles of 
Economics I or // 

POLI 337 Public Policy and Bureau- 
cracy or SOSC 300 Social Science 
and Public Policy or POLI 436 
Politics of Regulation 

1 advanced analysis or methods course 
approved by the policy studies 
director 

6 Area Curriculum Courses 
6 courses from one of the following 
seven groups: 

Core Courses (Choose at least 3) 

1 . Environmental Policy 

ECON 480 Environmental and Energy- 
Economics I 

POLI 331 Environmental Politics 
and Policy 

SOCI 367 Environmental Sociology 

ENVI 306 Global Environmental Law 
and Sustainable Development 

ENVI 406 Introduction to 
Environmental Law 

HIST 330 U.S. Environmental History 

Electives (Choose up to 3) 

ARCH 3 1 3 Sustainable Architecture 

ANTH 468 Palaeoclimate and Human 

Response 
BIOS 322 Global Ecosystem Dynamics 
BIOS 324 Wetland Ecosystems 
BIOS 325 Ecology 
ENGL 478 Literature and the 

Environment 
ENVI/HPHS 201 Introduction to 

Environmental Systems 
ENVI 445 Natural Environmental 

Factors 
GEOL 326 Environmental Geology 
GEOL 341 The Oceans 
GEOL 345 Geology of National Parks 
POLI 336 Politics of Regulation 
RELI 362 Environmental Ethics 
SPAC 203 Atmosphere, Weather, 

and Climate 
SPAC 443/ENVI 443 Atmospheric 

Science 
UNIV 303 Environmental Problem 

Solving 



2. Government Policy and Management 

ECON 436 Government Regulation 

of Business 
ECON 461 Urban Economics 
ECON 483 Public Finance 
POLI 300 Federalism and 

Intergovernmental Politics 
POU 301 State Politics 
POLI 332/432 Urban Politics 
POLI 436 Politics of Regulation 
ANTH 344 City/Culture 
ECON 438 Economics of the Law 
ECON 480 Environmental and Energy 

Economics I 
HIST 337 Gender and Politics in the West 
POLI 330 Minority^ Politics 
POLI 331 Environmental Politics 

and Policy 
POLI 335 Political Environment 

of Business 
POLI 458 Property- Rights and 

Privatization 
ENVI 406 Introduction to 

Environmental Law 
HIST 468 Women and the Welfare State 
SOSC 330 Healthcare Reform in the 

50 States 
SOSC 430 TTie Shaping of Health Policy 

in the United States 
SOCI 308 Houston: Tlie Sociology of a City 
SOCI 33 1 Politics and Society in Texas 
SOCI 370 Sociology of Education 
SOCI 350 Sociological Approaches 

to Poverty 
SOCI 399 Immigration and Public Health 
SOCI 41 1 Social Change 
SOCI 441 Minorities in the Schooling 

Process 

3. Healthcare Policy and Management 

(Choose 6) 

ANTH 381 Medical Anthropology 

ANTH 386 Human Nutrition 

ANTH 388 Life Cycle: A Biocultural View 

HEAL 212 Consumer Health 

HEAL 350 Understanding Cancer 

HEAL 407 Epidemiology 

HEAL 410 Program Development in 

Health Education 
PHIL 315 Ethics, Medicine, and 

Public Policy 
RELI 462/463 Medical Ethics and 

American Values I and // 



240 DEPARTMENTS / Policy Studies 



SOSC 330 Healthcare Reform in the 

50 States 
SOSC 420 Healthcare: Competition 

and Managed Care 
SOSC 430 The Shaping of Health Policy 

in the United States 
SOCI 334 Sociology of the Family 
SOCl 345 Sociology of Medicine 
SOCI 399 Immigration and Public Health 
SOCI 433 Sociology of the Life Cycle: 

Death and Dying 
SPAN 307/308 The Language of 

Healthcare 

Core Courses (Choose at least 2) 
4. International Affairs 
ECON 420 International Economics 
POLI 372 American Foreign Policy 
POLI 376 International Political Economy 
POLI 378 The Politics of American 

National Security Policy 
POLI 462 Comparative Public Policy 

Electives (Choose up to 4) 
ANTH 360 Modernity and Social Space 
ECON 421 International Finance 
ECON 430 Comparative Economic Systems 
ECON 451 Political Economy of 

Latin America 
HIST 232 The Making of Modern Africa 
HIST 353 The Cold War 
HIST 394 War in the Modern World 
HIST 464 Foreign Policy of Nixon 

and Kissinger 
HIST 469 US-Latin America Relation 
POLI 354 Latin American Politics 
POLI 355 Government and Politics of 

the Middle East 
POLI 356 Politics of Latin American 

Economic Development 
POLI 360 West European Democracies 
POLI 361 Comparative Post-Communist 

Systems 
POLI 373 International Conflict 
POLI 376 International Political Economy 



POLI 464 Political Economy of 
Development 

5. Law and Justice (Choose 6) 
ANTH 326 Anthropology of Law 
ANTH 4 1 9 Law and Society 
ECON 438/439 Economics of the 

Law I and // 
ENVI 406 Introduction to 

Environmental Law 
HIST 297/298 American Legal 

History I and // 
PHIL 307 Social and Political Philosophy 
PHIL 316 Philosophy of Law 
POLI 32 1 American Constitutional Law 
POLI 458 Property Rights and 

Privatization 
SOCI 321 Criminology 

Core Courses (Choose at least 3) 

6. Business Policy and Management 
ECON 436 Government Regulation 

of Business 
ECON 445 Managerial Economics 
ECON 435 Industrial Organization 
POLI 335 Political Environment of Business 
POLI 336 Politics of Regulation 
PSYC 23 1 Industrial and Organizational 

Psychology 

Electives (Choose up to 3) 
ACCO 305 Introduction to Accounting 
ECON 355 Money and Banking 
ECON 370 Microeconomic Theory 
ECON 375 Macroeconomic Theory 
ECON 415 Human Resources, Wages, 

and Welfare 
ECON 420 International Economics 
ECON 42 1 International Finance 
ECON 448 Corporation Finance 
HIST 331 Labor in America 
POLI 376 International Political Economy 
POLI 458 Property Rights and 

Privatization 



Policy Studies 241 



POLI 464 Political Economy of 
Development 

7. Urban and Social Change 
ANTH 344 City/Culture 
ANTH 360 Modernity and Social Space 
ARCH 311 Houston Architecture 
ARCH 313 Sustainable Architecture 
ARCH 321 Economics of the Built 

Environment 
ARCH 346 19th- and 20th-century 

Architectural History 
ARCH 35 1 Social Issues and Architecture 
ARCH 455 Housing and Urban Programs 
ECON461 Urban Economics 
ECON 480 Environmental Ecoitomics 



HIST 377 The Ancient City 

HIST 429 Technologies of Nationalism 

HART 325 Art and Architecture in the 

Middle East 
PHIL 307 Social and Political Philosophy 
SOCI 30 1 Social Inequality 
SOCI 308 Houston: The Sociology 

of a City 
SOCI 309 Race and Ethnic Relations 
SOCI 310 Urban Sociology 
SOCI 3 1 3 Demography 
SOCI 411 Social Change 
POLI 332 Urban Politics 
POLI 438 Race and Public Policy 
POLI 44 1 Common Property Resources 



242 

Political Science 



The School of Social Sciences 



Chair 

T. Clifton Morgan 

Professors Fred R. von der Mehden 

Earl Black Associate Professors 

Paul Brace John R. Alford 

Gilbert Morris Cuthbertson Brett Ashley Leeds 

Keith Edward Hamm Randolph T. Stevenson 

William P. Hobby Assistant Professors 

Robert M. Stein Regina P. Branton 

Richard J. Stoll Debra Javeline 

Rick K. Wilson Melissa J. Marschall 

Professor Emeriti William Reed 

Johns. Ambler Lecturer 

Chandler Davidson C.M.Hudspeth 



Degrees Offered: B. A., M. A., Ph.D. 

Students majoring in political science are encouraged to achieve both a broad 
understanding of the field and a specialized knowledge of one or more aspects of political 
science, including American and comparative politics, international relations (see also 
majors in managerial studies and public policy). Graduate study is grounded in the areas of 
American government (public policy. Congress, and intergovernmental relations), com- 
parative government (Western Europe, Latin America, and political development), and 
international relations (international conflict). 

Degree Requirements for B A. in Political Science 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students majoring in political science must complete 30 semester hours (10 courses) 
in the field of political science, plus 6 hours (2 courses) of upper-level work in any of 
the following fields: anthropology, economics, history, philosophy, psychology, or 
sociology. Students select these upper-level courses in consultation with the 
department adviser. 

For students who entered Rice in fall 1999 and thereafter, political science 
degree requirements are as follows: 

• At least 1 course in each of the following fields: American government, compara- 

tive politics, international relations, theory and methods. 

• At least 2 of the 4 introductory courses 

• A concentration of at least 4 courses in one of the following fields: American 

government, comparative politics, international relations. These 4 courses 
must include the introductory course and a seminar. 

• A statistics course offered by the Department of Political Science 

• 2 seminars, at the 400 or 500 level, with different instructors 



Political Science 243 

Students who entered Rice before fall 1999 may choose to satisfy the above 
requirements, or they may satisfy requirements in force at the time of their 
enrollment at Rice, which usually will be as follows: 

• At least 1 course in any four of the following areas: American political institutions 

and behavior, comparative politics, international relations, political philoso- 
phy and legal theory , empirical theory and method , and American public policy 

• 2 seminars, at the 400 or 500 level, with different instructors 

Double majors in one of the related disciplines named above may automatically 
substitute 6 hours (2 courses) in upper-level studies (at the 300 level or above) from their 
second field for 6 of the required 30 hours of political science courses. Double majors 
whose second major is managerial studies or policy studies may automatically substitute 
3 hours ( 1 course) . Double majors whose second major is in a field other than those listed 
above normally must take the full 30 hours (10 courses) in political science. They may 
petition to substitute a course from another field for a political science course, but this is 
permitted only when the course to be substituted has a significant relationship to political 
science. Note: The reduction of political science course requirements for double majors 
is eliminated for students who entered in and after fall 1999. 

Introductory Courses. POLI 209 Introduction to Constitutionalism and Modern 
Political Thought, POLI 210 American Government cmd Politics. POLI 21 1 Interna- 
tional Relations, and POLI 212 Introduction to Comparative Politics constitute the 
introductory courses in political science. Students entering in the fall 1999 and after 
must take at least 2 of these, including the 1 in the field of specialization. Students 
should note, however, that POLI 210 is the course that meets the Texas state licensing 
requirements in political science for teachers. Students who entered Rice before fall 1999 
and choose to stay with the old plan may count no more than 2 of the introductory courses 
toward their major requirements. 

Directed Readings Courses. Directed readings courses are intended for students 
who have completed a substantial number of political science courses and who seek to 
explore a subject not covered in regular courses. They are available only if an appropriate 
faculty member agrees to supervise. The faculty member supervising a directed readings 
course must have a full-time appointment, and a student may not take more than 1 readings 
course from him or her. Students should submit a brief, one-page description of the work to 
be conducted in the readings course (including the name of the faculty supervisor) to the 
department director of undergraduate studies no later than two weeks into the semester in 
which they intend to take the course . Readings courses do not count toward the department ' s 
distribution requirement. 

Honors Program. Admission to the honors program requires the approval of the 
department director of undergraduate studies. During the first semester of the two- semester 
program, students take a readings course that provides them with a basis for drawing up a 
thesis prospectus. At the end of the first semester, a thesis committee composed of two full- 
time members of the political science department reviews and approves the prospectus. 
During the second semester, students write their honors thesis, which also must meet with 
committee approval. Students may not combine the 2 honors courses into one semester. 
Those who successfully complete the honors program may substitute it for one of the 
seminars required for the major. See also Honors Programs (page 34). 



244 DEPARTMENTS / Political Science 

Degree Requirements for M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science 

For general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). Students 
in the Ph.D. program must complete 48 semester hours in advanced courses or seminars 
before candidacy and conclude the degree program with the oral presentation of a 
dissertation displaying original research. Normally, students take the specified core 
courses in the three general fields of American government, comparative government, 
and international relations, completing additional course work and comprehensive 
examinations in two of those three fields. Before taking the comprehensive examina- 
tions, students must: 

• Complete courses in statistical analysis 

• Demonstrate some familiarity with traditional political theory 

• Satisfy the language or skill requirement in their major field 

• Complete all course requirements 

Students select specific courses for graduate study in consultation with the faculty 
adviser. 

The master of arts degree can be obtained with 36 semester hours of course work, 
all of which must be taken at the graduate level (400 level or above), and the completion 
of 2 research papers in seminars taken over the course of study. A minimum G.P.A. of 
3.0 is required for awarding the M.A. 

The political science department requires that not more than three years elapse 
between the time the student is admitted to graduate study and the completion of the M .A. 
degree, unless an extension is approved by the department graduate committee. 

See POLI in the Courses of Instruction section. 



Psychology 

The School of Social Sciences 



245 



Chair 

Randi C. Martin 



Professors 

Richard Bagozzi 
Robert L. Dipboye 
Jennifer George 
Randi C. Martin 
H.Albert Napier 
James Pomerantz 
David J. Schneider 
Ronald N.Taylor 
Michael J. Watkins 
Rick K. Wilson 
Professors Emeritus 
John Brelsford 
Kenneth R. Laughery 
Associate Professors 
Richard R. Batsell 
Sarah A. Burnett 
Steven C.Currall 
David M. Lane 
Miguel A. Quiiiones 
Tony Ro 

Assistant Professors 
Darcy Burgund 
Michael Byrne 
Xiaohong Denise Chen 
Mikki Hebl 
Geoff Potts 
Brent Smith 



Adjunct Professors 

John H. Byrne 

J. Maxwell Elden 

William C.Howell 

Dick Jeanneret 

Katherine A. Loveland 

John E. Overall 

Anthony A. Wright 

Adjunct Associate Professors 

Jocelyne Bachevalier 

Lindley E. Doran 

Mort McPhail 

Deborah A. Pearson 

Kevin C. Wooten 

Adjunct Assistant Professors 

Janice Bordeaux 

Ronald Fisher 

Betty S.Sanders 

Anne Bibiana Sereno 

Mihriban Whitmore 

Heidi Ziemer 

Adjunct Instructors 

Roberta M. Diddel 

Mark H. McManis 

Anne Victoria Wilkinson 

Visiting Scholars 

Mary Newsome 

Henry Trueba 



Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

The undergraduate program offers the core preparation recommended by the 
nation's leading graduate schools of psychology, with advanced courses and research 
opportunities to fit individual needs. Programs of study may be structured around 
prospective careers in medicine, law, business, and education. Program emphasis in 
graduate study is on doctoral training, which requires course work in memory , cognition, 
engineering and industrial/organizational psychology, social psychology, and method- 
ology. Faculty research interests include cognitive psychology (human memory, 
psycholinguistics, perception, and information processing), cognitive neuropsychology 
(memory , perception , and language disorders) , and industrial/organizational psychology 
(personnel selection, training, work motivation, discrimination, and group processes). 



246 DEPARTMENTS / Psychology 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Psychology 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students majoring in psychology must complete 29 semester hours in departmental 
courses, including the following required courses. 

Core Courses At least 1 course from each block* 

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology Block 1 

PSYC 202 Introduction to Social Psy- pgyc 308 Memory 

^c.jj!^l?Pr . • ^ • • „ PSYC 309 Psychology of Language 

PSYC 203 Introduction to Cognitive Psy- pgyc 350 Psychology of Learning 

r^c.r^J^.^Pr. ..,..,. r. PSYC 35 \ Psychology of Pcrccption 

PSYC339 Statistical Methods- Psy- psYC 360 Thinking 

r.r...^&Pr. , ,. , . PSYC 362 Biopsychology 

PSYC 340 Research Methods ^ ^ *-^ 

(no substitutions or transfer credits Block 2 

allowed for PSYC 339 or 340 ) PSYC 329 Psychological Testing 

PSYC 330 Personality Theory 
PSYC 331 The Psychology of Gender 
PSYC 332 Abnormal Behavior 
PSYC 460 The Psychology of Motivation 

*No substitutions or transfer credits allowed to fulfill Block I and II requirements. ' 

Honors Program. Qualified students may apply to the honors program during 
preregistration in the spring semester of their junior year. A written proposal for the 
project must be submitted by the end of the second week of classes in fall of the senior 
year, and the faculty will decide on final admission to the honors program by the end of 
the fourth week of classes. Admission to the honors program requires a psychology 
GPA of 3.5 and an overall GPA of 3.3, completion of PSYC 339, and completion or 
concurrent enrollment in PSYC 340. To graduate with departmental honors, students 
must complete the requirements for the psychology major, a written honors thesis 
approved by a faculty committee , and other requirements as determined by their honors 
committee (see Honors Program, page 34). Detailed information about the honors 
program is available from the instructor of the course or the departmental office. 

Degree Requirements for M.A. and Ph.D. in Psychology 

Students must complete an admission-to-candidacy procedure that should establish 
their expertise in their chosen specialty. For general university requirements, see 
Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). For both M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, students must 
complete a research thesis, including a public oral defense, and accumulate 30 semester 
hours for the M.A. and 60 hours for the Ph.D. Course work includes required courses in 
certain areas, plus whatever offerings are available in the student's specialty area, either 
cognitive/experimental, industrial/organizational/social, or engineering psychology. 
Competence in a foreign language is not required. 

See PSYC in the Courses of Instruction section. 



247 



Religious Studies 



The School of Humanities 



Chair 

William B. Parsons 

Professors Assistant Professors 

Werner H. Kelber David Cook 

Anne C. Klein Matthias Henze 

John M. Stroup Gregory Kaplan 

Professor Emerita Adjunct Professor 

Edith Wyschogrod Stanley J. Reiser 

Associate Professors Adjunct Associate Professor 

Elias K. Bongmba Elizabeth Heitman 

Jeffrey J. Kripal Lecturer 

Beverlee Jill Carroll 



Degrees Offered: B. A.. Ph.D. 

The undergraduate major includes courses in methodology (textual, historical, 
normative, and sociocultural approaches to the study of religion) and religious traditions 
(African religions, Buddhism, Christianity, comparative religions. Hinduism, Islam, and 
Judaism). For research degrees in the graduate program, see below. Within these clearly 
defined fields, students acquire a broad knowledge of religious studies with enough 
flexibility for interdisciplinary pursuits. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in Religious Studies 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
In addition, students must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no 
fewer than 60 semester hours outside the departmental requirements for a program 
totaling at least 120 semester hours. See Distribution Requirements (pages 21-22) and 
Majors (pages 23-24). 

Students majoring or double-majoring in religious studies must complete: 

•30 hours for majors 

•24 hours for double majors 

•24 hours for majors at 200, 300, or 400 level 

•18 hours for double-majors at 200, 300, or 400 level 

•No more than 2 courses outside the Department of Religious Studies 

To ensure breadth and depth to the major, students are encouraged to work out a 
program of study with the undergraduate advisor. The 30 hours (24 for double-majors) 
must include the following requirements: 
•RELI 101 Introduction to Religion 

•2 introductory courses in religious traditions (one Western; one non- Western) 
•At least 3 courses concentrated in one of the following fields: Judaism, Christianity, 
African religion. Buddhism, comparative studies, cross-cultural studies, meth- 
odological studies, or ethics/philosophy of religion 



248 DEPARTMENTS / Religious Studies 

Honors Program. Qualified undergraduates may choose the option of writing a 
senior thesis. To complete a thesis, the student must enroll for 6 hours in addition to the 
30 hours (24 for double majors) required for the major. Students are expected to have at 
least a 3.50 average in their religious studies courses before undertaking thesis work and 
must obtain the permission of a faculty advisor who will supervise the project, usually 
during the second semester of the junior year and first semester of the senior year. Any 
additional supervisors and readers of the completed thesis (if any) will be arranged in 
advance by the primary faculty advisor in consultation with relevant faculty. 

Degree Requirements for Ph.D. in Religious Studies 

The graduate program accepts a limited number of qualified students. A distin- 
guished undergraduate record and high scores on the Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE) are essential and an advanced degree in the humanities is desirable. For general 
university requirements , see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70) . Students admitted into the 
program will normally receive financial assistance in the form of a tuition waiver and a 
stipend. As part of their training and in return for their stipends, students in their second 
year and beyond are expected to serve as research assistants or teaching assistants. 
Students receiving stipends may also be asked on occasion to assist the department in 
other ways. 

The Ph.D. in religious studies is normally a five-year program. Requirements are 
as follows: 

• 18 courses (54 hours required): 

I — 6 courses in the major field 

— 3 courses in each of two minor fields (see list of fields below) 

— 2 department seminars (one or more of which may count as a major or 
minor course) to be taken in each of the first two years 

— 4 to 6 elective courses chosen in consultation with the student's adviser 

• Passing grades on reading examinations in 2 foreign languages, at least 1 of which 

must be a language of scholarship in the student's chosen field 

• Passing grades in 5 qualifying examinations: 3 in the student's major field, 1 in 

each of the students 2 minor fields. (In place of examinations, the student may, 
in consultation with the faculty member, substitute papers that demonstrate a 
thorough grasp of the field.) The nature and content of the examinations or 
papers will be determined one year prior to the date the student expects to write 
them, which is ordinarily the end of the third or beginning of the fourth year in 
the program. 

• Oral discussion of dissertation proposal 

• Satisfactory completion of dissertation and oral defense 

Reading Lists. Students should become broadly familiar with the literature of their 
majors and minors; reading lists will be provided. Students are expected to familiarize 
themselves with this material enough that they draw on it on their exams and the 
dissertation itself. The graduate seminar is, in part, an introduction to areas of the reading 
list and to the techniques for engaging in deep, independent reading. 

Fields of Study. Religion and contemporary cultures, scriptural interpretation, 
ethics and philosophy of religion, mysticism, psychology, and religious practices are 
fields of study in this program. These fields will include courses covering one or more 
of the following traditions: African and African-based religions, Buddhism, Christianity, 
Hinduism, Judaism, and new and alternative religions. Students may concentrate in one 
or more of these traditions in the context of their major and minor fields. 



Religious Studies 249 

Professional Development 

Opportunities may be available to teach undergraduate courses in the department or 
in local colleges and universities. Limited funds are also available for students to attend 
conferences to present their research. The department encourages these and other efforts 
to prepare students for academic careers. 

See RELI in the Courses of Instruction section. 



250 

Sociology 

The School of Social Sciences 



Professors 

Michael Emerson 
Stephen L. Klineberg 
Professors Emeriti 
Chandler Davidson 
Chad Gordon 
Associate Professors 
Katharine Donato 



Chair 

William Martin 



Elizabeth Long 
Assistant Professors 

Bridget K. Gorman 
Holly Heard 
Scott Phillips 
Lecturer 
Florian Kreutzer 



Degree Ojfered: B.A. 

This undergraduate major fosters an analytic approach to the study of human 
societies, whether as a preparation for graduate work in sociology and related fields, or 
as the foundation for a variety of occupations. It is also an important component of a 
liberal arts education and as such, can serve as effective preparation for professions such 
as law or medicine . The program provides students with considerable latitude in pursuing 
personal interests while ensuring familiarity with basic theoretical approaches and 
research methods. 



Degree Requirements for the B.A. in Sociology 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students majoring in sociology must complete at least 33 semester hours ( 1 1 courses) in 
sociology. Requirements for the major normally include the following. 



SOCI 203 Introduction to Sociology 
*SOCI 398 Social Statistics 

1 of the following: 

SOCI 390 Research Methods 
SOCI 421 Craft of Sociology 



At least 1 theory course, such as: 

SOCI 3 1 7 Contemporary Sociological 

Theory 
SOCI 359 Individual and Society 
SOCI 395 Feminist Social Thought 

Any other sociology courses to reach a 
total of 11 

Sociology majors are not required to take a foreign language, but those planning 
graduate study should be competent in at least one such language. Some sociology 
courses listed in the Courses of Instruction section may not be offered every year, and 
courses among the regular offerings are occasionally added or dropped. Students are 
responsible for making sure they satisfy all the requirements for their degree. One of the 
sociology faculty, preferably department adviser Professor Long, should sign each 
major's registration. 

*This requirement may be waived, and only 10 other courses required for the major, 
if a student passes the departmental statistics exam. 



Sociology 25 1 

Honors Program. For general information, see Honors Programs (page 34). 
Students who have maintained an A- average in all sociology courses beyond the 
introductory level may apply to enter the honors program. They should submit their 
research proposals: 

a) by November 15 of the first semester of their junior year, in which case they will 

research and write their thesis during the second semester of their junior year 
and the first semester of their senior year 

b) by March 15 of the second semester of their junior year, in which case they will 

complete their thesis during the two semesters of their senior year. 

Since departmental awards for seniors are usually determined around March 1 , and 
the honors thesis is often taken into consideration in this determination, students who 
wish to be considered for these awards are advised to begin their thesis in the spring of 
their junior year. Research proposals must be carefully thought out and discussed with 
at least one professor before being submitted. Once submitted, they will be considered 
by the department faculty as a whole and, if acceptable, the student will be assigned a 
faculty adviser. 

Students in the honors program register for two successive semesters in Directed 
Honors Research (SOCI 492 and 493). The first of the 2 courses is typically devoted to 
a thorough review of the relevant literature, the formulation of hypotheses growing out 
of the literature review, and a proposal consisting of a research design that clearly 
describes how the data are to be collected and analyzed. To receive a grade for the first 
semester, the student must submit a paper to the primary thesis adviser by the last day of 
classes. This paper must contain the literature review, hypotheses, and research design, 
along with a bibliography . The research itself is usually carried out in the second semester 
(and sometimes in the summer following the junior year) and is analyzed, written up, and 
defended as a completed Honors Thesis during that semester. 

All honors students should complete SOCI 390 Research Methods or SOCI 421 
The Craft of Sociology before beginning the second semester of the program. If their 
project requires statistical analysis, students should also complete SOCI 398 Social 
Statistics before beginning the second semester of their research. 

See SOCI in the Courses of Instruction section. 



252 




Statistics 




The George R. Brown School of Engineering 


Chair 




Katherine B . Ensor 




Professors 


Barbara Ostdiek (joint appoint- 


Bryan W. Brown (joint appoint- 


ment: Jones Graduate School 


ment: Economics) 


of Management) 


Dennis Cox 


Assistant Professor 


Mahmoud El-Gamal (joint 


Rudolph H. Riedi 


appointment: Economics) 


Adjunct Professors 


Don H. Johnson (joint appoint- 


E. Neely Atkinson 


ment: Electrical and Computer 


Donald A. Berry 


Engineering) 


Barry W. Brown 


Marek Kimmel 


Thomas D. Downs 


Javier Rojo 


Ralph F. Frankowski 


David W. Scott 


Richard Heydorn 


Robin Sickles (joint appointment: 


Gary Rosner 


Economics) 


Howard D. Thames, Jr. 


James R. Thompson 


Robert A. White 


Edward E. Williams (joint 


Stuart Zimmerman 


appointment: Jones Graduate 


Adjunct Associate Professors 



School of Management) 
Rick K. Wilson (joint appoint- 
ment: Political Science) 
Associate Professors 
Steven Currall (joint appoint- 
ment: Jones Graduate School 
of Management) 
Rudy Guerra 

David M. Lane (joint appoint- 
ment: Psychology) 



Joaquin Diaz-Saiz 
Kim-Anh Do 
Carl S. Hacker 
Kenneth Hess 
Yu Shen 
Lecturers 
L. Scott Baggett 
Peter Olofsson 
Faculty Fellow 
Janet Siefert 



Degrees Offered: B.A.. M.Stat.. M. A., Ph.D. 

Course work in statistics acquaints students with the role played in the modern 
world by probabilistic and statistical ideas and methods. Students grow familiar with 
both the theory and the applications of techniques in common use as they are trained in 
statistical research. The flexibility of the undergraduate program allows students to 
concentrate on theoretical or applied training, or they may link their studies in statistics 
to work in other related departments (see majors in economics, education, electrical and 
computer engineering, computational and applied mathematics, managerial studies, 
mathematics, political science, and psychology). Graduate study has concentrations in 
applied probability, bioinformatics, biomathematics, biostatistics, computational fi- 
nance, data analysis, density estimation, epidemiology, image processing, model build- 



p Statistics 253 

ing, quality control, statistical computing, spatical processes, stochastic processes, and 
time series analysis. A joint M.B. A ./master of engineering degree is also available in 
conjunction with the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Management. 

Degree Requirements for B A. in Statistics 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
Students majoring in statistics normally complete the following: 

• MATH 101/102 Single Variable Calculus I and // 

• MATH 2 1 1 Ordinary Differential Equations and Linear Algebra 

• CAAM 210 or 21 1 Introduction to Engineering Computation 

• STAT 300 Model Building 

• STAT 310 Probability and Statistics 

• STAT 410 Introduction to Statistical Computing and Regression 

• 5 elective courses from the statistics department (or other departments with 

approval from their adviser) at the 300 level or higher 

Mathematically oriented students should also take MATH 2\2 Multivariable Calculus 
and MATH 355 Linear Algebra (or CAAM 335 Matrix Analysis). 

Degree Requirements for MJStat., M.A., and Ph J), in Statistics 

For general university requirements, see Graduate Degrees (pages 65-70). Admis- 
sions applications should include scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 
in the quantitative, verbal, and analytical tests. Financial support is available for 
well-qualified doctoral students. Course work for all degree programs should be at the 
400 level or above, although 2 approved 300-level courses may be accepted. 

Master's Programs. Candidates for the nonthesis M.Stat, degree must complete 30 
semester hours of approved course work. Candidates for the M.A. degree in statistics 
must complete 30 semester hours of approved course work as well as one of the 
following: (1) complete an original thesis and defend it in a public oral examination; or 
(2) perform satisfactorily on the second-year Ph.D. comprehensive examinations. 

Ph.D. Program. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree in statistics must: 

• Complete at least 90 semester hours of approved course work beyond the 

bachelor's degree and a minimum of 60 hours beyond a master's degree 

• Perform satisfactorily on preliminary and qualifying examinations 

• Complete an original thesis with a public oral defense 

See STAT in the Courses of Instruction section. 



254 



Subsurface Geoscience 



The George R. Brown School of Engineering 



Director 

Alan Levander 



Professors 

John B . Anderson 
Andrew R. Barron 
Katherine B. Ensor 
Hans G. Ave Lallemant 
Neal F. Lane 
Dale S. Sawyer 
Manik Taiwan! 
Associate Professors 
Gerald R. Dickens 



Andre W. Droxler 
Colin A. Zelt 
Assistant Professor 
Michael B . Heeley 
Julia Morgan 
Adjunct Professor 
Stephan H. Danbom 
Lecturer 
W. C. Rusty Riese 



Degrees Offered: M.S. 

Rice University will introduce a professional master's degree in subsurface 
geoscience for the 2003-2004 academic year. This degree is designed for students whc 
wish to become proficient in applying geological knowledge and geophysical methods 
to finding and developing reserves of oil and natural gas. Students can specialize in one 
of three focus areas: information technology , geology , and geophysics. The information 
technology focus area prepares students to apply IT principles to the rapidly growing 
industry need to store, access, and interpret very large and diverse geological, geophysi- 
cal . cultural , and infrastructural datasets . The geology focus area prepares students to be 
explorationists, with strong skills in using seismic and other geophysical methods along 
with geological principles to find oil and natural gas. The geophysics focus area prepares 
students to become technical experts in aspects of exploration seismology. 

The subsurface geoscience degree is one of three tracks in the new Professional 
Master's Program at Rice housed in the Wiess School of Natural Sciences. These 
master's degrees are designed for students seeking to gain further scientific core 
expertise coupled with enhanced management and communication skills. These degrees 
instill a level of scholastic proficiency that exceeds that of the bachelor's level, and they 
create the cross-functional aptitudes needed in modem industry. This program will allow 
students to move more easily into management careers in consulting or research and 
development, design, and/or marketing of new science-based products. 

Degree Requirements for M.S. in Subsurface Geoscience 

The 21 -month professional master's program begins with two semesters of 
coursework at Rice followed by a six-month industrial internship. After the internship,; 
students return to Rice for a final semester of coursework. In addition to technical 
courses, the students in the Subsurface Geoscience program will take management 
courses, one science policy and ethics course, and a seminar jointly with the students, 
involved in the other professional master's tracks. No thesis is required; however,: 
students are required to present their internship project in both oral and written form in 



* Subsurface Geoscience 255 

the Professional Master's Seminar. Students also are required to attend events organized 
by the Rice Alliance for Technology and Entrepreneurship and will be guided in courses 
by the Cain Project in Engineering and Professional Communication. Working profes- 
sionals may be considered for part-time enrollment. 

For general university requirements for graduate study, see pages 65-70, and see 
also Professional Degrees, page 66. 

To ensure that all students obtain an excellent quantitative background, each student 
will be required to take the core courses listed below. If a student can demonstrate that 
s/he has learned the material elsewhere, s/he may be exempted. Students pursuing this 
degree part-time will meet with their assigned adviser to determine their course work 
schedule. 

Yearl 

Fall Semester 

1 elective 

ESCI 441 Geophysical Data Analysis 

ESCI 442 Exploration Geophysics I 

MGMT 750 Management for Science and Engineering 

NSCI 501 Professional Master's Seminar 

Spring Semester 

2 electives 

ESCI 417 Petroleum Industry Economics and Management 
ESCI 444 Exploration Geophysics II 
NSCI 50 1 Professional Master 's Seminar 

Summer 

Industrial Internship 

Year 2 

Fall Semester 

NSCI 510 Industrial Internship 

Spring Semester 

2 electives 

XXXX ### Modern Industrial Exploration Techniques 

NSCI 5 1 1 Science Policy and Ethics 

NSCI 501 Professional Master's Seminar 

Elective Courses: 

In addition to the core courses, the student will choose 5 electives from the list below. 
We recommend that three of the electives be in one focus area (Information Technology, 
Geology, or Geophysics). 

Information Technology 

COMP 429 Introduction to Computer Net- STAT 3 1 Probability and Statistics 

works STAT 4 1 Introduction to Statistical Com- 
ESCI 454 Geographic Information Sci- puting and Computer Models 

ence 



256 DEPARTMENTS/ Subsurface Geoscience 



Geology Focus Area 

ESCI 415 Petroleum Geology 

ESCI 427 Seismic Sequence Stratigraphy 

ESCI 428 Interpretation ofReflection Seis- 

mograms 
ESCI 450 Remote Sensing 
ESCI 463 Advanced Structural Geology 
ESCI 504 Clastic Sedimentary Environ- 
ments, Processes, and Fades 
ESCI 505 Applied Sedimentology 
ESCI 506 Carbonate Depositional Sys- 
tems 

Geophysics Focus Area 

CENG 57 1 Flow and Transport through 
Porous Media I 

ESCI 427 Seismic Sequence Stratigraphy 

ESCI 428 Interpretation ofReflection Seis- 
mograms 

ESCI 454 Geographic Information Sci- 
ence 

ESCI 461 Seismology I 



ESCI 542 Seismology II 
STAT 3 10 Probability and Statistics 
XXXX Advanced Statistics for Geoscien- 
tists 

Additional Elective s 

CAAM 378 Introduction to Operations 
Research 

ECON 486 Energy Economics 

ENGI 303 / CIVI 322 Engineering Eco- 
nomics and Management 

MGMT 6 1 7 Managerial Decision Making 

MGMT 636 Systems Analysis and Data- 
base Design 

MGMT 66 1 International Business Law 

MGMT 674 Production and Operations 
Management 

MGMT 676 Project Management / Project 
Finance 

MGMT 72 1 General Business Law 

MGMT 75 1 New Venture Creation for 
Science and Engineering 



257 



The Program for the Study of Women and Gender 



Director and Adviser 

Lynne Huffer 



Professors 

Peter C.Caldwell 
Jane Chance 
Marcia J. Citron 
Margret Eifler 
James D. Faubion 
Beatriz Gonzalez-Stephan 
Lynne Huffer 
Anne C. Klein 
Susan Keech Mcintosh 
Helena Michie 
Deborah Nelson-Campbell 
Meredith Skura 
Ewa M. Thompson 
Associate Professors 
Jose F. Aranda. Jr. 
Elias K. Bongmba 
Scott S. Derrick 
Katharine M. Donato 
Lucille P. Fultz 
Eugenia Georges 
Deborah A. Harter 
Betty Joseph 
Colleen R. Lamos 
Caroline F. Levander 



Elizabeth Long 
Susan Lurie 
Honey Meconi 
Nanxiu Qian 
Carol E. Quillen 
Paula Sanders 
Julie M. Taylor 
Sara Westphal 
Lora Wildenthal 
Assistant Professors 
Regina Branton 
Marcia Brennan 
Krista Comer 
Elizabeth Dietz 
Sarah Ellenzweig 
Holly Heard 
Michelle R. Hebl 
Nancy A. Niedzielski 
Kirsten Ostherr 
Sherrilyn Roush 
Flora Shehabuddin 
Allison Sneider 
Rachel Zuckert 
Lecturer 
Thad Logan 



Degrees Offered: B.A. 

This undergraduate major takes an interdisciplinary approach in its exploration of 
women's experiences and the role that ideas about sexual differences have played in 
human societies. Areas of inquiry include women's participation in social and cultural 
production; the construction of gender roles and sexuality; the relationship between ideas 
about gender and concepts inherent in other social, political, and legal structures; and the 
implications of feminist theory for philosophical and epistemological traditions. Stu- 
idents acquire an understanding of how adopting gender as a significant category of 
lanalysis challenges existing disciplines. They also gain proficiency in the methods used 
ito study and compare cultural constructions of gender and sexuality, and they become 
ifamiliar with the ongoing fundamental debates in women's and gender studies. 

Degree Requirements for B.A. in the Study of Women and Gender (SWG) 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 
iStudents majoring in the study of women and gender must complete: 

• 36 semester hours of departmental course work (30 hours if this is a second major) 



258 DEPARTMENTS / Study of Women and Gender 



• WGST 101 Introduction to the Study of Women and Gender OR WGST 20 b 

Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies 

• WGST 499 and WGST 500 (capstone courses in fall and spring respectively) 

• At least 1 approved non-Western studies course 

• At least 1 approved critical race studies course 

• At least 1 approved theory course 

Of the remaining required courses, no more than 4 courses may be from a single 
department. All students must work out their individual courses of study with their 
faculty advisers. Each student's course of study must be approved by the director of the 
major. Major tracking forms are available in the SWG office for declared SWG majors. 

The following courses are among those that can be used to fulfill requirements for 
the major. As course offerings may vary from year to year, students are urged to consult 
with their faculty advisers or with the director at the beginning of each semester. 

Please note that not all courses listed below will be offered during the academic year. 
For a current list of courses that will be offered in fall 2003 and spring 2004, please visit 
the SWG website at http://www.swg.rice.edu. 

III. Courses that satisfy the Critical 
Race Studies Requirement 

WGST 234 U.S. Women 's History I: 

Colonial Beginnings to the Civil ' 

War 
WGST 235 U.S. Women 's History II: 

Civil War to the Present 
WGST 370 Survey of African American 

Literature 
WGST 38 1 U.S. Women 's History I: 

Colonial Beginnings to the Civil 

War (enriched version) 
WGST 382 U.S. Women 's History II: 

Civil War to the Present (enriched 

version) 
WGST 387 Cultural Studies: Race, 

Gender, & the Politics of Represen- 
tation 
WGST 387 Cultural Studies: Mexican & 

Mexican- American Literature, 

1 848-1 950 
WGST 415 Sociolinguistics 
WGST 453 Topics in African American 

Literature: Black Women in Culture 

& Society 
WGST 462 20th-21st-Century American 

Literary Studies 
WGST 468' Women & the U.S. Welfare 

State: Sexual Politics & American 

Poverty 



I. Courses that Satisfy the 
Core Requirements 

WGST 101 Introduction to the Study of 

Women & Gender 
WGST 201 Introduction to Lesbian, 

Gay, Bisexual, & Transgender 

Studies 
WGST 499 Capstone: Research in the 

Study of Women & Gender (fall) 
WGST 500 Capstone: Research in the 

Study of Women & Gender (spring) 

II. Courses that Satisfy the Non- 
Western Studies Requirement 

WGST 210 Islam & Politics 
WGST 240 Gender & Politicized 

Religion 
WGST 250 International Political 

Economy of Gender 
WGST 283 Women in the Islamic World 
WGST 323 The Knowing Body: 

Buddhism, Gender, & the Social 

World 
WGST 328 Latin American Genders 
WGST 340 Gender & Politicized 

Religion (enriched version) 
WGST 399 Women in Chinese Litera- 
ture 
WGST 432 Islam in South Asia 
WGST 455 Women & Gender in 

Medieval Islamic Societies 



Study of Women and Gender 259 



rV. Courses that Satisfy the Theory 
Requirement 

WGST 339 Feminist Philosophy 
WGST 39 1 Producing Feminist 

Knowledge: Methodology & Visual 

Culture 
WGST 407 Feminist Literary Theory & 

Criticism 
WGST 430 Studies in Literary Theory: 

Queer Theory 
WGST 434 French Feminist Theory 
WGST 460 Feminist Social Thought 
WGST 480 Feminist Literary Theory 
WGST 482 Problems in Contemporary 

Feminist Theory 

V. Other Courses 

WGST 205 Language & Society 
WGST 225 Women in Greece & Rome 
WGST 300 Medieval Literature: 

Medieval Women Writers 
' WGST 30 1 Arthurian Literature 
WGST 303 Women 's Stories & Legal 

Change 
WGST 305 Chaucer & the Subversive 

Other: Women, Gender, Nation, 

Class 
WGST 3 1 2 Survey of Old English 

Literature: Gender & Power in Old 

English 
WGST 317 Mapping German Culture: 

Women & National Socialism 
WGST 324 Sociology of Gender 
WGST 325 Sociology of the Family 
WGST 327 20th-century Women 

Writers: Sex, Gender, & Modernism 
WGST 329 Literature of the American 

West: Women in the West 
WGST 33 1 The Psychology of Gender 
WGST 332 Self Sex, & Society in 

Ancient Greece 
WGST 333 Masculinities 
WGST 335 The Lifecycle: A Biocultural 

View 
WGST 336 History as a Cultural Myth 
WGST 337 Feminist Issues: Witches, 

Saints, Soldiers & Shrews - 

Women 's Voices in the Renaissance 



WGST 338 Gender & Society in Early 

Modern Europe 
WGST 341 Gender & Politics 
WGST 349 Survey of British Women 

Writers from 1400-1900 
WGST 350 Gender & Symbolism 
WGST 358 Mapping German Culture: 

European Women Filmmakers 
WGST 365 Gender, Subjectivity, & the 

History of Photography 
WGST 367 American Ecofeminism 
WGST 368 Mythologies 
WGST 369 Seminar on Beaut}' & 

Fragmentation in Modern Art 
WGST 372 Sun'ey of Victorian Fiction: 

The 19th-century Novel 
WGST 388 Generation X in Literature 

& Culture 
WGST 390 Hispanic Cinema 
WGST 400 Constructing Identities in 

Modern Fiction 
WGST 405 Austen Only 
WGST 406 Christine De Pizan in 15th- 

Centwy England 
WGST 408 Topics in Literature: Sex & 

Class in the British 18th Century 
WGST 410 The Literary & Historical 

Image of the Medieval Woman 
WGST 412 Women & Women's Voices 

in French Literature 
WGST 420 Women & Gender in 19th- 

Centwy Europe 
WGST 440' Women in Music 
WGST 441 Hildegard ofBingen 
WGST 442 Women in Russian Litera- 
ture 
WGST 448 The Body in Visual Culture 
WGST 477 Race, Class, & Gender in 

Mexican Art 
WGST 485 Gender & Hollywood 

Cinema in the 1950s 
WGST 496 Applied Women 's & Gender 

Studies 
WGST 497 Directed Reading 
WGST 498 Independent Study 
WGST 499 Research in the Study of 

Women & Gender (fall semester) 
WGST 500 Research in the Study of 

Women & Gender (spring semester) 



See WGST in the Courses of Instruction section. 



260 

University Courses 



University courses provide opportunities for dialogue across disciplinary anc 
departmental boundaries. They are an experiment in curriculum development, directec 
toward students interested in interdisciplinary subjects beyond their electee 
major. 

See UNIV in the Courses of Instruction section. 



261 



Visual Arts 



The School of Humanities 





Chair 






Karin Broker 




Professors 




Darra Keeton 


Karin Broker 




John Sparagana 


Basilios N. Poulos 




Artist Teacher 


George Smith 




Paul Hester 


Geoff Winningham 




Prince Thomas 


Associate Professors 




Adjunct Artist Teacher 


Brian M. Huberman 




Heather Logan 



Degrees Offered: B.A., B.F.A. 

i, Department of Visual Arts majors are students who declare a major in the studio arts 
(drawing, digital video and film production, painting, photography, printmaking, or 
sculpture). Each student will discuss with the faculty advisor the selection of courses and 
any other matters of concern in the student's academic life, such as study and travel 
abroad, scholarships and internships, career goals or options, etc. 

Degree Requirements for B A. in Visual Arts 

For general university requirements, see Graduation Requirements (pages 20-23). 

Single Major Track in Visual Arts (12 courses required) 

•ARTS 225 Drawing I 

•ARTS 205 Photography I or ARTS 311 Intaglio I or ARTS 327 Documentary 

Production 
•ARTS 30 1 Painting I or ARTS 325 Life Drawing or ARTS 337 Color Drawing or 

ARTS 425 Advanced Drawing 
•ARTS 365 Sculpture I 
•6 ARTS electives 
•2 courses in art history-open selections qualified by course prerequisites and 

consultation with the studio art faculty adviser 

double Major Track in Visual Arts (10 courses required) 

•ARTS 225 Drawing I 

•ARTS 205 Photography I or ARTS 311 Intaglio I or ARTS 327 Documentary 

Production 
•ARTS 301 Painting I or ARTS 325 Life Drawing or ARTS 337 Color Drawing or 

ARTS 425 Advanced Drawing 
•5 ARTS electives 
•2 courses in art history-open selections qualified by course prerequisites and 

consultation with the studio art faculty adviser 



262 DEPARTMENTS / Visual Arts 

Degree Requirements for the Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) 

Students with a B.A. degree in art from Rice or an equivalent degree from another 
university may apply for admission to the Bachelor of Fine Arts (B .F.A.) program, which 
consists of a fifth year of intensive study in the creative arts. Students with a B.A. in a 
major other than art may, in exceptional cases, be admitted. Interested students should 
complete a special degree application in the Admissions Office and submit a portfolio of 
artwork for review by department faculty. Students will not be admitted into the program 
until after the portfolio review process. Information about application forms, deadlines, 
and admission standards is available from the Admissions Office. 

For the B.F.A. degree, students must complete 30 semester hours in approved 
courses, or the equivalent in approved major electives at the 300 level or above. In 
addition to the usual departmental upper-level courses, special 500-level courses are 
offered for B.F.A. candidates only. 

Transfer Credit 

No more than 2 courses may be transferred out of 10 for a single visual arts major, 
or 8 for the double major. The two transfer credit courses must be studio practice courses 
required for all majors . Advanced placement credit may not be used by art majors to fulfill 
department requirements. The 2 required art history classes may be transfer credits. 

Exhibitions and Arts Programs at Rice 

The Department of Visual Arts mounts several art and photography exhibitions each 
year and sponsors Rice Cinema, a public alternative film program. Feature films include 
classic and contemporary titles, independent and experimental films, documentaries, 
international, foreign, and alternative cinema programs. Rice Cinema, which is inti- 
mately connected with the curriculum both in film and media studies and in film and 
photography production, hosts frequent guest lecturers, panel discussions, and media 
events. 

Exhibitions and related activities organized by Rice University Art Gallery (Kim- 
berly Davenport, director) enrich the teaching program of the Department of Visual Arts 
as well as the larger university and Houston community. 



See ARTS and HART in the Courses of Instruction section. 





r~< ' r-': r^^ 




264 

Courses of Instruction 



Courses are listed in this section alphabetically by their letter code. 

For complete details of courses, including descriptions, pre/corequisites,crosslistings,j 
class/lab/credit hours, and instructor, visit: 



http://www.rice.edu/catalog/ 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 265 

ACCO (Accounting) 

The Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Management 

ACCO 305 (F) INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING (3) 

Survey of basic accounting theory and practice with emphasis on the primary problems of asset 
valuation and income determination . Not open to first-year students (freshmen) . Enrollment limited 
to 65. Instructor(s): Zeff 

ACCO 406 (F) COST ACCOUNTING (3) 

Uses of accounting data to plan and evaluate long-run investment and financing decisions and short- 
run price, costing, output, and financing decisions of the business firm or public entity. /nirrMctorf'^j; 
Mandel 

ACCO 409 (F) CORPORATE FIN REPORTING (3) 

Using a case and readings format, this course deals with controversial issues in financial accounting 
and the analysis and interpretation of companies' financial statements. 

ACCO 411 (F) ASSET ACCOUNTING (3) 

Deals with the major questions of asset valuation and income determination in the context of 
accounting theory and the evolving financial, economic, and political factors that have shaped the 
existing standards. The standard-setting process is discussed. 

ACCO 497 (F) INDEPENDENT STUDY (3) 

Independent study on an approved project under faculty supervision. 

ACCO 498 (F) INDEPENDENT STUDY (3) 

Continuation of ACCO 497. 

AMC (Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations) 

The School of Humanities 

AMC 200 ORIGINS OF WESTERN CIVILIZATIONS (3) 

How were the great empires of the ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean worlds organized? This 
introductory course will explore the development of imperial systems from the Bronze Age to the 
Roman Empire and pay special attention to how subject peoples participated in the imperial systems 
of multi-ethnic states. Aspects of the art, law, economics, religions, and literature of the empires of 
the Hittites , Assyrians, Persians , Greeks and Romans will be examined . Consideration will be given 
to the strengths and weaknesses of these empires along with discussions of their contributions to 
the modem world. Also offered as HIST 200. Not offered 2003-2004. Instructor: Maas 

For more information on courses that may be taken for AMC credit, refer to (pages 86-88). 

ANTH (Anthropology) 

The School of Social Sciences/Department of Anthropology 

ANTH 200 INTRODUCTION TO THE SCIENTIFIC STUDY OF 

LANGUAGE (3) 

Introduction to concepts and terminology in the scientific study of language. Includes sound 
systems (phonology), construction of words (morphology), organization of words in the sentence 
(syntax), meaning (semantics), and information flow (pragmatics), as well as a survey of interdis- 
ciplinary uses of linguistics such as historical linguistics (archaeology), dialectology (sociology), 
and language acquisition (psychology, cognitive sciences, and language teaching). Also listed as 
LING 200. Enrollment limited to 80. Instructor(s): Englebretson 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



266 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ANTH 201 (F) INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL/CULTURAL ANTHRO- 
POLOGY (3) ji 
Introduction to the history , methods , and concepts of social/cultural anthropology , which is devoted 
to the systematic description and understanding of cultural diversity in human societies . Instructor(s): 
Georges 

ANTH 203 (F) HUMAN ANTIQUITY:AN INTRODUCTION TO PHYSI- 
CAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND PREHISTORY (3) 

This course offers a broad introduction to the human past as revealed by evolutionary studies of both 
biochemical and fossil evidence, and by archaeological studies of human cultural behavior. 
Instructor(s): Mcintosh, S. 

ANTH 205 (F) INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY (3) 

An introduction to the elementary concepts of the discipline through a series of case studies. 
Instructor(s): Mcintosh, R. 

ANTH 210 (S) TECHNOLOGY, CULTURE, AND COGNITION (3) 

An examination of the history of information technologies perceived as media transfers from oral 
to written, to print, and to electronic communication, and as multiple media interfaces. In that 
context, the course explores the categorization and organization of knowledge. Explores the 
construction of self, national identities, education, authority, censorship, etc. Also listed as HIST 
210, UNIV 210, and LING 210. Instructor s): Kelber, Henry 

ANTH 290 (F) THE HISTORY AND ETHNOGRAPHY OF THE (TO BE 
NAMED) (3) 

This course focuses intensively on the history and ethnography of a single people, the selection of 
which changes from year to year. Using all available materials, this course provides an introduction 
to the approaches of the discipline and how they have changed, registered by the different ways 
anthropologists and others have represented the same subjects over time. Instructor(s): Marcus 

ANTH 298 (S) BIOTECHNOLOGY, 1900 TO NOW (3) 

The technical manipulation of living matter from humans, animals and plants is both a scientific and 
a social undertaking .This course is designed for humanities and science students who want to know 
more about how biotechnology came into existence, and the questions, controversies, and changes 
which come with the ability to engineer living things. A series of case studies of contemporary 
events in cloning, patenting, genetically modified organisms, and stem cell research will be set in 
the context of the 20th century history of biotechnology. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): 
Landecker 

ANTH 300 (S) LINGUISTIC ANALYSIS (3) 

Language as an object of scientific analysis, focused on how different languages organize semantic 
and pragmatic information into simple sentences. Topics: morphology, syntactic categories and 
constituency, propositional semantics, tense-aspect-modality, pragmatic information status, gram- 
matical relations, and voice systems. Also listed as LING 300. Prerequisite(s): LING 200 or 
permission of instructor. Instructor(s): Englebretson 

ANTH 301 (S) PHONETICS (3) 

Introductory study of sound as it relates to speech and sound systems in the world's languages. 
Speech sounds are examined in terms of production mechanisms (articulatory phonetics), propa- 
gation mechanisms (acoustic phonetics), and perception mechanisms (auditory phonetics). In- 
cludes a basic introduction to Digital Signal Processing. Prerequisite(s): LING 20() or permission 
of instructor. Also listed as LING 301 . Instructor(s): Stajf 

ANTH 305 (S) HISTORICAL LINGUISTICS (3) 

Exploration of the nature of language change in its phonological, morphological, syntactic, 
semantic, and sociocultural aspects, using the perspective of language acquisition. Includes 
techniques of internal and comparative reconstruction of proto-languages. Required for linguistic 
majors; may substitute LING 315. Prerequisite(s): LING 200, 300, or 301 or pennission of 
instructor. Also listed as LING 305. Not offered 2003-^4. 

(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



I COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 267 

ANTH 306 (F) HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL IDEAS (3) 

An introduction to the history of anthropology, its theories, and methods. The emphasis is upon 
social and cultural anthropology. Instructor(s): Faubion 

ANTH 307 (S) ANTHROPOLOGICAL DIRECTIONS FROM THE SEC- 
OND WORLD WAR TO THE PRESENT (3) 

As a sequel to ANTH 306/506. this course explores turns and trends in sociocultural research and 
critique during the past half-century. Special attention is paid to the rise and fall of structuralism, 
the problematization of the primitive, and the proliferation of theories of practice. Instructor(s): 
Faubion 

ANTH 308 (S) HISTORY AS A CULTURAL MYTH (3) 

Explores ideas of histor>' and attitudes toward the past as culturally conditioned phenomena. 
Emphasizes history as a statement of cultural values as well as conceptualizations of cause, change, 
time, and reality. Also listed as WGST 336. Not offered 2003-04. Instnictoris): Taylor 

ANTH 309 (S) GLOBAL CULTURES (3) 

This course will examine specific cultural debates and issues that have overflowed national 
boundaries. Topics will include student movements, democracy and citizenship, and the interna- 
tionalization of professional and popular culture. 

ANTH 310 (S) CONTEMPORARY CHINA (3) 

This introductory course is designed to encourage ways of thinking about Cultural China— abroad- 
ranging concept that includes the People's Republic of China, the newly established Special 
Administrative Region (SAR) of Hong Kons. the Republic of China on Taiwan, and overseas 
Chinese communities throughout the world. Also listed as ANTH 220, HIST 220, and HIST 3 10. 
Instructor(s): Lewis. Smith 

ANTH 311 (S) MASCULINITIES (3) 

This course deals with masculinities in the West, concentrating on concepts of masculine 
protagonism and personhood. Readings explore identities constructed in realms such as law, 
politics, finances, art, the home, and war. Also listed as WGST 333. Not offered 2003-04. 
Instructor(s): Taylor 

ANTH 312 (F) AFRICAN PREHISTORY (3) 

Thematic coverage of developments throughout the continent from the Lower Paleolithic to 
medieval times, with emphasis on food production, metallurgy and the rise of cities and complex 
societies. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Mcintosh, R. 

ANTH 313 (F) LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (3) 

Investigates the relation between language and thought, language and world view, language and 
logic. Also listed as LING 313. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Tyler 

ANTH 314 (F) GENETICS: BIOLOGICAL, CULTURE-HISTORICAL, 
AND ETHICAL PERSPECTIVES (3) 

The course uses an interdisciplinary perspective to examine the claims and counter-claims made 
regarding genetics and new technologies for identifying and manipulating genetic material. The 
course will cover biological basics of genes. DNA. and sequencing techniques; cultural and 
historical aspects of approaches to genetics, including essentialism and eugenics past and present; 
ethical issues arising from new genetic technologies; and policy issues. Also listed as UNIV 314 
and BIOS 307. Not offered 2003-04. Instnictoris): Georges; Mcintosh, S.: Novotny 

ANTH 315 (F) INTRODUCTION TO THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF INFOR- 
MATION AND NETWORKS (3) 

History and social study of information and network technologies. Thematic focus on communi- 
cation , exchange , information/knowledge production , and institutions of property and contract law. 
Empirical topics include networking technologies, money and financial institutions, free software 
and open source, cryptography, standards bodies, history of the internet, patents, copyright, 
trademark, and contract law. Includes North America, Europe, and South Asia. Instructor(s): Kelty 

(#) = credit hours per semester 



268 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ANTH 316 (F) CULTURAL ANALYSIS (3) 

This course is specifically intended for lower-level undergraduates as a means of gaining familiarity 
with the analytical tradition of cultural anthropology from the beginning of the 20th century. This 
course is intended to provide students with background for upper-level courses in the department. 

ANTH 318 (F) GRAPHING, COUNTING, FILMING: REPRESENTATION , 
IN SCIENCE AND ANTHROPOLOGY (3) | 

Cinema originated in the inscription of physiology on film; this was quickly followed by biology/ 
ethology and ethnology done by cinematography . This course examines the historical, critical, and 
methodological relations between film as medium or method of visual investigation and cinema as 
site of cultural analysis. Also listed as HART 381 . Instructor(s): Landecker 

ANTH 319 (S) SYMBOLISM AND POWER (3) j 

This course will use both traditional and contemporary readings to emphasize the trend in cultural? 
analysis from a view of culture as monolithic and static to perceptions that any culture is internally! 
varied and contradictory as well as changing and complex. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): 
Taylor 

ANTH 320 (F) PUBLIC SPHERES AND PUBLIC CULTURES (3) 

This course will discuss some of the basic issues surrounding civil society and the public sphere. 
It will look at specific contemporary debates in public culture, such as multiculturalism, identity 
politics, and the crisis of contemporary liberalism. Not offered 2003-04. Instnictor(s): Lee 

ANTH 321 (S) TEXT AS PROPERTY, PROPERTY AS TEXT: ACROSS 
THE AGES (3) 

Examines forms and norms of authorship and ownership from antiquity to the present. What is an 
author? Is a text public or private property? What are the licit/illicit forms of rewriting and 
appropriating a text, and how are those forms defined? This class investigates historically these and 
other issues. Instructor(s): Kelty, McGill 

ANTH 322 (S) CULTURES AND IDENTITIES: RACE, ETHNICITY AND 
NATIONALISM (3) 

How do cultural conceptions of race, ethnicity , and nationalism shape who we think we are? How 
are these ideas related to Western views of the relations between nature and society, and how do 
these differ from those in other cultures? Instructor(s): Lee 

ANTH 323 (F) PHONOLOGY (3) 

Introduction to sound patterns in the languages of the world and to interpretation of these patterns ! 
in four theoretical traditions: distribution of holistic segments(Phonemic Theory), process-oriented 
feature models (Generative and Austosegemental models), constraint-based models (Optimality 
Theory), and cognitive approaches! Natural Generative Phonology and Cognitive Phonology). 
Prerequisite ANTH 200 or ANTH 301 or permission of instructor. Also listed as LING 311. 
Instructor(s): Coelho i 

ANTH 325 (F) SEX, SELF, AND SOCIETY IN ANCIENT GREECE (3) 

An introductory venture into conducting fieldwork in the past. The course treats a wide range of 
artifacts , from philosophical essays to vase paintings . It derives its focus from a rich corpus of recent 
research into the ancient problemization of desire and self-control. Also listed as WGST 332. Not 
offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Faubion 

ANTH 326 (F) THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF LAW (3) 

Social conflict and methods of dispute management in Western and non-Western societies. 
Comparison of legal institutions in band, tribal, early state, and complex industrial societies. Not 
offered 2003-04. 

ANTH 327 (S) GENDER AND SYMBOLISM (3) 

Examinations of beliefs concerning men, women, and gender in different cultures, including the 
West, relating to issues of symbolism, power, and the distribution of cultural models. Also listed 
as WGST 350. Instructor(s): Taylor 

(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 269 

ANTH 328 (F) VIOLENCE, TERROR, AND SOCIAL TRAUMA (3) 

This course addresses the central place of violence in our society and its relations with social and 
political terror in other cultures. Readings, film, and theatre probe everyday violence as well as 
spectacular events ofour times. Aftermaths, including cross-generational trauma, will be explored. 
Instructor{s): Taylor 

ANTH 329 (S) BODIES, SENSUALITIES & ART (3) 

Cross-cultural approaches to art and the senses. Students may engage any medium. Emphasis to be 
placed on issues generated from performance in the arts rather than from academia. Contrasts art 
and academic knowledge to explore alternative epistemologies and aesthetics. Not offered 2003- 
04. Instnictor(s): Taylor 

ANTH 335 (S) ANTHROPLOGY AS CULTURAL CRITIQUE (3) 

The critical assessment and interpretation of Euroamerican social institutions and cultural forms 
have always been an integral part of anthropology's intellectual project. This course will explain 
the techniques, history, and achievements of such critique. It will also view the purpose in the 
context of a more general tradition of critical social thought in the West, especially the U.S. Not 
offered 2003-04. Instriictor(s): Marcus 

ANTH 338 (F) READING POPULAR CULTURE (3) 

The course examines a number of cases from popular genres-romance, novels, television sit-coms, 
tourist sites, movies, rock music and submits them to a variety of theoretical approaches from 
disciplines such as anthropology, sociology, literary studies, and philosophy 

ANTH 343 (S) NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS IN AFRICA (3) 

Study of the religious, sociological, and political factors leading to the rise of religious movements 
in Africa, as well as missionary and colonial reactions to them. Includes the movements' 
relationship to indigenous religions, political praxis, and the focus on this-worldly salvation in light 
ofpolitical and economic marginality.Prerequisite(s): permission ofinstructor. Also listed as RELI 
342. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Bongmba 

ANTH 344 (S) CITY/CULTURE (3) 

The course treats both the theorization and the ethnographic exploration of the urban imaginary; 
urban spaces and practices; urban, suburban, and post-urban planning; city-states, colonial cities, 
and capital cities; and the late 20th century metropolis. 

ANTH 345 (F) THE POLITICS OF THE PAST: ARCHAEOLOGY AND 
SOCIAL CONTEXT (3) 

An examination of the way that archaeological evidence of the past has been used and viewed by 
particular groups at different times. Using case studies, the course considers issues of gender, race, 
Eurocentrism, political domination, and legitimacy that emerge from critical analysis of represen- 
tations of the past by archaeologists, museums, and collectors. Instructor(s): Mcintosh, S. 

ANTH 347 (F) THE U.S. AS A FOREIGN COUNTRY (3) 

This course looks at selected aspects of American culture and society from an anthropological point 
of view. Readings derive from the works of both foreign and native observers, past and present. 
Instructor(s): Faubion 

ANTH 351 (S) CULTURES OF NATIONALISM (3) 

This course will examine the cultural dimensions of nationalism, particularly around the creation 
of forms of peoplehood that seem to be presupposed by almost all nation-building projects. Texts 
to be analyzed will include the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution, and 
the Declaration of the Rights of Man. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Lee 

ANTH 353 (S) CULTURES OF INDIA (3) 

Summary of the prehistory, ethnography, and ethnology of the Indian subcontinent. Special 
emphasis on Hinduism, Buddhism, and Indian philosophy. Instructor(s): Tyler 



{#) = credit hours per semester 



270 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ANTH 358 (F) THE FOURTH WORLD: ISSUES OF INDIGENOUS 
PEOPLES (3) 

In contrast with people self-identified within political structures of the First, Second, and Third 
Worlds, Fourth World peoples are, generally speaking, stateless peoples. In this course we will 
examine both how this unofficial status affects their struggle for self-determination and how native 
peoples engage traditional beliefs and practices for self-empowerment. Through readings, films, 
and speakers we will examine current conflicts facing indigenous peoples in North and South 
America, the Soviet Union, Europe, Asia and Australia. Not offered 2003-04. 

ANTH 362 (S) ARCHEOLOGICAL FIELD TECHNIQUES (3) 

Methods used in field work, laboratory analysis, and interpretation of archaeological data from a 
local site excavated by the class. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 205. Instructor(s): Mcintosh, R. 

ANTH 363 (F) EARLY CIVILIZATIONS (3) 

A comparative study of the civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus, China, and the Maya, 
emphasizing the causes and conditions of their origins. Instructor(s): Mcintosh, R. 

ANTH 367 (S) HUMAN EVOLUTION (3) 

Covers the fossil evidence for the evolution of primates an hominids, insights into early hominid 
behavior from comparative studies in primate ecology and behavior, and how evolution has shaped 
contemporary human diversity and behavior. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 203 or BIOS 202 or BIOS 334. 
Instructor(s): Mcintosh, S. 

ANTH 371 (F) MONEY AND EVERYDAY LIFE (3) 

Money is such a part of everyday modem life that it is hard for us to imagine living without it. Yet 
in many pre-modern societies, gift-exchange was as important as money is in our own . This course 
will look at the cultural dimensions of systems of exchange, ranging from gift-giving among 
Northwest Coast Indians to foreign currency exchanges between financial institutions. Along with 
the classic work of Marx and Simmel on money and capital, we will also cover some of the 
anthropological work on gifts and exchange, such as that of Mauss, Levi-Strauss, and Bourdies, as 
well as some of the contemporary debates initiated by Bataille and Derrida. Not offered 2003-04. 
Instructor(s): Lee 

ANTH 372 (S) CULTURES OF CAPITALISM (3) 

Most of us think of capitalism as primarily an economic phenomenon . Yet , it also has a profoundly 
cultural dimension that includes culturally specific forms of risk taking, speculation, and even 
money and capital . This course will explore contemporary phenomenon such as speculation , booms 
and busts, and the stock market, and use them to discuss some of the classic work on the cultures 
of capitalism, including Marx, Simmel, Kracauer, and contemporary writers such as Jameson. 
DeBord, and Virillio. This is not an introductory course in economics but will look at how people 
talk and write about culture and capitalism. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Lee 

ANTH 373 (F) THE LINGUISTIC TURN: LANGUAGE, NARRATION, 
AND MODERNITY (3) 

This course will look at the role of narration and the construction of some of the basic forms of 
modernity and post-modernity, ranging from nationalism to performative approaches to identity. 
The first half of the course will introduce the basic linguistic tools necessary to analyze a variety , 
of cultural materials, and the second half will be devoted to analyzing specific texts and student j 
presentations. The course does not presuppose any technical training in linguistic or literary 
analysis. Also listed as LING 373. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Lee 

ANTH 375 (S) ABRACADABRA: LANGUAGE AND MEMORY IN 
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (3) 

The history of language , writing , and formal notational systems in science and technology . Includes 
ancient and renaissance arts of memory, universal languages and the development of the calculus, 
secret writing and cryptography, the graphical method, the rise of the "scriptural' mode of DNA, 
the development and use of programming languages, and psychoanalysis. No technical knowledge 
is assumed. Not offered 2003-04. Instrnctor(s): Kelty 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 271 

ANTH 377 (F) THE ANCIENT CITY (3) 

Compare the historian's and social scientist's approach to the emerging pre-industrial city. Cities 
are the products of an interaction of physical and social environments and their histories may reflect 
their enormous symbolic weight. We use the comparative method to explore general principles of 
development lurking behind the different faces of ancient urbanism. Also listed as HIST 377. Not 
offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Maas, Mcintosh, R. 

ANTH 379 (F) GIFTS AND CONTRACTS (3) 

This course uses philosophical, literary , and economic approaches to examine the role that gifts and 
contracts play in everyday life and in constructing society and culture. Authors discussed include 
Derrida, Marx, Mauss, David Lewis, Schelling, Von Neumann and Morgenstem. Not offered 
2003-04. Instrucror(s): Lee 

ANTH 381 (S) MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) 

Cultural , ecological , and biological perspectives on human health and disease throughout the world . 
Instructor(s): Georges 

ANTH 383 (F) HUMAN ADAPTATION (3) 

Explanations for the range and patterns of human biological differences in the context of theories 
of adaptation . Integrates themes from human genetics , physiology , and cultural studies . Not offered 
2003-04. 

ANTH 388 (S) THE LIFE CYCLE: A BIOCULTURAL VIEW (3) 

The human life cycle from conception to death. Focus is on the interaction between biological 
processes and culture. Also listed as WGST 335. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Georges 

ANTH 390 (F) CULTURE, NARRATION, AND SUBJECTIVITY (3) 

This course examines how linguistic and narrative structures interact to produce specific cultures 
of interpretation. The focus will be on linguistic and literarj' representations of subjectivity. This 
course will use novels by Western authors, such as Virginia Woolf and Dostoevsky, and some 
Chinese materials as comparison. Not offered 2003-04. Instriictor(s): Lee 

ANTH 395 (F) CULTURE AND COMMUNICATION (3) 

Investigates the relations between different forms of communication — speech, print, and film— 
and cultural constructions such as audiences, publics, and communities. Instructor(s): Lee 

ANTH 402 SYNTAX AND SEMANTICS (3) 

Study of semantic categories and their formal expression in morphological, syntactic, and lexical 
units and patterns. Also listed as LING 402. 

ANTH 403 (F) ANALYZING PRACTICE (3) 

A critical review of work informed by what has sometimes been deemed the key concept of 
anthropological theory and research since the 1960s. Special attention will be devoted to the 
analytics of practice developed by Foucault, by Bourdieu, and by de Corteau. Not offered 2003- 
04. Instriictor(s): Faubion 

ANTH 404 INDEPENDENT STUDY (3) 

^ Directed reading and preparation of written papers on anthropological subjects Not offered in the 
curriculum and advanced study of subjects on which courses are offered. 

ANTH 406 (F) COGNITIVE STUDIES IN ANTHROPOLOGY AND 
LINGUISTICS (3) 

Relations between thought, language, and culture. Special emphasis given to natural systems of 
classification and the logical principles underlying them. Also hsted as LING 406. Not offered 
2003-04. Instructor(s): Txler 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



272 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ANTH 407 (F) FIELD TECHNIQUES AND ANALYSIS (3) 

Techniques and practice in the observation, analysis, and the recording of a human language. 
Includes discussion of ethical issues in working with indigenous peoples. Enrollment limited. 
LING 300, 301 , and 402 recommended. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. Also listed as 
LING 407. Course may be repeated for credit. Instructor(s): Shibatani 

ANTH 408 (S) FIELD TECHNIQUES AND ANALYSIS (3) 

Continuation of ANTH 407/LING 407. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. Also listed as 
LING 408. Instructor(s): Shibatani 

ANTH 409 (S) AUTHORSHIP AND OWNERSHIP (3) 

A course on the relations that bind persons to particular things or ideas as property. Looks at forms 
of ownership as embodied by patents, copyrights, brand names, and trademarks, and explores how 
such laws, marks, and names function as useful anthropological objects. Not offered 2003-04. 
Instructor(s): Lxindecker 

ANTH 410 (F) THE ETHNOGRAPHY OF DEVELOPMENT (3) 

This course suggests the necessity of a solid ethnographic grounding for both practical development 
work and for further intellectual growth of the discipline. Offered occasionally. 

ANTH 4 11 (S) NEUROLINGUISTICS (3) 

Study of language and the brain. Includes the organization of the brain (e.g., the localization of 
speech, language, and memory functions), hemispheric dominance, and the pathologies of speech 
and language associated with brain damage. Also listed as LING 411. Instructor(s): Lamb, Achard 

ANTH 412 (S) RHETORIC (3) 

Overview of classical theories. Intensive discussion of contemporary theories and applications in 
a wide variety of disciplines. Also listed as LING 410. Instructor(s): Tyler 

ANTH 414 (S) HERMENEUTICS AND LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY 

(3) 

Application of linguistic theory and method in the analysis of cultural materials. Includes discourse 
analysis and the structure and interpretation of texts and conversation . Also listed as LING 4 1 4. Not 
offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Tyler 

ANTH 415 (F) THEORIES OF MODERNITY/ POSTMODERNITY (3) 

An advanced course for graduate students and undergraduate majors with interests in the 
interdisciplinary field of cultural studies. Readings in the work of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim, 
Saussure, Gadamer, Derrida, Bahktin, Foucault, and others. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): 
Faubion 

ANTH 418 (S) CAN HUMANS THINK? ANTHROPOS, HUMANISM AND 
TECHNOLOGY (3) 

An upper level reading and research seminar that combines readings in the history of humanism 
with empirical and theoretical issues from the present. Texts and topics from Kant to JCR Licklider 
on anthropos and humanism , and examples from current debates: genetic engineering, environmen- 
talism, interfaces and networking technologies, testing technologies, and intellectual property 
regimes. Emphasis on the three R's. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Kelty 

ANTH 419 (S) LAW AND SOCIETY (3) 

In addition to focusing on works associated with critical legal studies and its antecedent legal 
realism, this course will examine a number of cases in the international domain that challenge 
concepts of civil society arising with the modem nation-state. Instructor(s): Hamilton 

ANTH 423 (S) AFRICAN MYTHS AND RITUAL (3) 

Explore and analyze specific myths and rituals that provide legitimization for community 
ceremonies and that serve as a basis for the negotiation of power and ideology for members within 
that community. Readings from classic theorists: Durkheim, Levi-Strauss,Edmond Leach, Gennap 
and Turner, and contemporary theorists: Werbner , Heusch, Comaroff , and Ray . Also listed as RELI 
423. Instructor(s): Bongmba 

(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 273 

ANTH 425 (F) ADVANCED TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) 

Seminar on selected topics in archaeological analysis and theory. The course will variously focus 
on ceramic analysis and classification, archaeological sampling in regional survey and excavation, 
and statistical approaches to data analysis and presentation. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 205 and 362. 
Not offered 2003-04. lustrucror(s): Mcintosh, S. 

ANTH 430 (F) EXPERIMENTAL WRITING AND ANTHROPOLOGY (3) 

Explores relationships between ethnography and other genres. Emphasizes experimental styles, 
including combinations of ethnographic and personal material, and problems of writing to 
communicate experiences such as violence and art. Instructor(s): Taylor 

ANTH 440 (F) BIOTECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE (3) 

This course focuses on anthropology of the life sciences. We will examine how this work takes 
contemporary bioscience as a site for cultural analysis, and also the allied proposals that this 
represents an opportunity to renovate classic anthropological analyses and categories of kinship, 
reproduction, the body, life, death, and identity. Instructor(s): Landecker 

ANTH 446 (S) ADVANCED TOPICS IN BIOMEDICAL ANTHRO- 
POLOGY (3) 

Seminar on contemporary research on the biomedical aspects of human health and disease . Includes 
topics from medical ecology and epidemiology. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 381 or pemiission of the 
i instructor. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Georges 

ANTH 447 (F) MODERN ETHNOGRAPHY AND THE ETHNOGRAPHY 
OF MODERNITY (3) 

The course explores the strategies of representation, the methodologies, and the diagnostic 
categories to which anthropologists have resorted in coming to terms with such phenomena as 
rationalization , economic and informational globalization , and the commodification of culture . Not 
offered 2003-04. Instriictor{s): Faubion 

ANTH 450 (S) ANTHROPOLOGY IN THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD: 
A SEMINAR FOR MAJORS (3) 

This seminar is designed specifically for juniors and seniors who have declared anthropology as a 
major, and is intended as an opportunity for them to survey the various applications and points of 
relevance of anthropology in the rapid transformations of contemporary societies and cultures. It 
is meant to both assess and challenge the forms of knowledge that anthropology has produced since 
its inception as a discipline. Instnictor(s): Marcus 

ANTH 455 (F) INTRODUCTION TO SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 
STUDIES (3) 

Introduction to the historical and social aspects of science and technology. Directed towards 
providing social scientists ways to understand the role of science and technology in their field sites 
and research projects; with additional emphasis on the use of media and internet technologies for 
qualitative social science research. Enrollment limited. Instriictor(s): Kelty 

ANTH 458 (S) HUMAN OSTEOLOGY (3) 

Introduction to the analysis of human skeletal material from archaeological sites. Instructor(s): 
Mcintosh. S. 

ANTH 460 (S) ADVANCED ARCHAEOLOGICAL THEORY (3) 

History and analysis of the major currents of archaeological theory from the Encyclopaedist origins 
of positivism, through cultural evolutionism and historical particularism, to the New Archaeology 
and current trends. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 205. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor{s): Mcintosh, R. 

ANTH 463 (F) WEST AFRICAN PREHISTORY (3) 

Seminar providing in-depth consideration of the later prehistoric archaeology (late Stone Age and 
Iron Age) of the West African subcontinent. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Mcintosh, S. 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



274 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ANTH 468 (S) PALAEOCLIMATE & HUMAN RESPONSE (3) 

Paleoscientists have records extending through the Holocene of forcing processes, such as climate, 
that influence humans. We examine these records and their impact on past and present society. We 
explore the concept of social memory, used to understand how past communities use information 
about climate change and past responses in long term adaptive strategies. Also listed as ESCI 468. 
Instructor(s): Droxler; Mcintosh, R. 

ANTH 474 (S) ADVANCED SEMINAR ON THE PREHISTORIC LAND- 
SCAPE (3) 

The interaction of human geography (cultural ecology) and the physical landscape (geomorphology 
and physical geography) as applied to past and present settlement on major floodplains. Not offered '. 
2003-04. Instructor{s): Mcintosh, R. 

ANTH 475 (S) PLIO-PLEISTOCENE CLIMATE CHANGE & HOMINID 
ADAPTATION (3) 

Junctures in the evolution of the hominids appear to coincide with shifts in the earth's climate 
record. We will explore the current status of our knowledge of global climate in the Plio-Pleistocene 
and of the hominid record from the end of the Miocene to the appearance of H. sapiens. Also listed 
as ESCI 475. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Droxler: Mcintosh, R. 

ANTH 482 (F) NON-WESTERN CINEMA: THIRD-WORLD CINEMA (4) 

Study of significant national cinemas, film movements, and filmmakers of the Third World from 
Africa to Latin America and from the Middle East to China. Includes colonial and postcolonial 
discourses. Enrollment limited. Also listed as HART 482. Instructor(s): Naficy 

ANTH 483 (S) DOCUMENTARY & ETHNOGRAPHIC FILM (4) 

Overview of the history of documentary and ethnographic cinema from a worldwide perspective. 
Includes both canonical and alternative films and film movements, with emphasis on the shifting 
and overlapping boundaries of fiction and nonfiction genres. Enrollment limited. Also listed as 
HART 483. Not offered 2003-04. Instrnctor(s): Naficy 

ANTH 484 (S) CULTURE, MEDIA, SOCIETY: EXILE & DIASPORA 
CINEMAS (4) 

Examination of cultural productions as vehicles for communication across national, cultural, and 
other boundaries, using contemporary theories of culture and media. Includes the creation of 
meaning and cultural capital, the representation of minority and alternative views, and the 
construction of individual and group identities. Also listed as HART 484. Instructor(s): Naficy 

ANTH 490 (F) DIRECTED HONORS RESEARCH (3) 

A two-semester sequence of independent research culminating in the preparation and defense of an 
honors thesis. Open only to candidates formally accepted into the honors program. 

ANTH 491 (S) DIRECTED HONORS RESEARCH (3) 

A two-semester sequence of independent research culminating in the preparation and defense of an 
honors thesis. Open only to candidates formally accepted into the honors program. 

ANTH 506 (F) HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL IDEAS (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 306. 

ANTH 507 (S) ANTHROPOLOGICAL DIRECTIONS FROM SECOND 
WORLD WAR TO PRESENT (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 307. 

ANTH 508 (S) HISTORY AS A CULTURAL MYTH (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 308. 

ANTH 509 (S) GLOBAL CULTURES (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 309. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 275 

ANTH 511 (S) MASCULINITIES (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 311. 

ANTH 512 (F) AFRICAN PREHISTORY (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 312. 

ANTH 513 (F) LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 313. 

ANTH 515 (F) INTRODUCTION TO THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF INFOR- 
MATION AND NETWORKS (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 315. 

ANTH 518 (F) GRAPHING, COUNTING, FIL^^NG: REPRESENTATION 
IN SCIENCE AND ANTHROPOLOGY (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 318. 

ANTH 519 (S) SYMBOLISM AND POWER (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 319. 

ANTH 520 (F) PUBLIC SPHERES AND PUBLIC CULTURES (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 320. 

' ANTH 522 (S) CULTURES AND IDENTITIES: RACE, ETHNICITY & 
NATIONALISM (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 322. 

ANTH 525 (F) SEX, SELF, AND SOCIETY IN ANCIENT GREECE (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 325. 

ANTH 527 (S) GENDER AND SYMBOLISM (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 327. 

ANTH 528 (F) VIOLENCE, TERROR AND SOCIAL TRAUMA(3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 328. 

ANTH 529 (S) BODIES, SENSUALITIES, AND ART (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 329. 

ANTH 535 (S) ANTHROPOLOGY AS CULTURAL CRITIQUE (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 335. 

ANTH 538 (F) READING POPULAR CULTURE (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 338. 

ANTH 544 (S) CITY/CULTURE (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 344. 

ANTH 545 (F) THE POLITICS OF THE PAST: ARCHAEOLOGY IN 
SOCIAL CONTEXT (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 345. 

ANTH 547 (F) THE U.S. AS A FOREIGN COUNTRY (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 347. 

ANTH 551 (S) CULTURES OF NATIONALISM (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 351. 

(#) = credit hours per semester 



276 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ANTH 553 (S) CULTURES OF INDIA (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 353. 

ANTH 558 (F) THE FOURTH WORLD: ISSUES OF INDIGENOUS 
PEOPLES (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 358. 

ANTH 562 (S) ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD TECHNIQUES (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 362. 

ANTH 563 (F) EARLY CIVILIZATIONS (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 363. 

ANTH 571 (F) MONEY AND EVERYDAY LIFE (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 371 . 

ANTH 572 (S) CULTURES OF CAPITALISM (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 372. 

ANTH 573 (F) THE LINGUISTIC TURN: LANGUAGE, NARRATION, 
AND MODERNITY (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 373. 

ANTH 575 (S) ABRACADABRA: LANGUAGE AND MEMORY IN SCI- 
ENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 375. 

ANTH 577 (F) THE ANCIENT CITY (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 377. 

ANTH 579 (F) GIFTS AND CONTRACTS (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 379. 

ANTH 581 (S) MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 38 1 . 

ANTH 583 (F) HUMAN ADAPTATION (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 383. 

ANTH 588 (S) THE LIFE CYCLE: A BIOCULTURAL VIEW (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 388. 

ANTH 590 { F) CULTURE, NARRATION AND SUBJECTIVITY (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 390. 

ANTH 595 (F) CULTURE AND COMMUNICATION (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 395. 

ANTH 600 INDEPENDENT STUDY (3) 

ANTH 601 (F) GRADUATE PROSEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGY (3) 

Mapping the cunent fields of anthropological discourses, examining the debates in and between 
each of these fields, and discussing how these debates are conducted in the domains of fieldwork, 
ethnographic writing, and in the construction of careers in anthropology. Insrnictor(s): Marcus 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 277 

ANTH 602 (F) ANTHROPOLOGY PROPOSAL WRITING SEMINAR (3) 

This seminar prepares anthropology graduate students to write a successful grant proposal. Basic 
elements of proposal writing, including problem conceptualization, literature reviews and methods 
will be covered. Instnictor(s): Georges 

ANTH 603 (F) ANALYZING PRACTICE (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 403 . 

ANTH 605 (F) FIELDWORK (4) 

Fieldwork— In which students pursue ethnographic research, learn to manage information and 
create presentations using a variety of tools and technologies. Topics and themes change. Not 
offered 2003-04. InstTuctor(s): Kelt}- 

ANTH 606 (F) COGNITIVE STUDIES IN ANTHROPOLOGY AND 
LINGUISTICS (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 406. 

ANTH 607 (F) FIELD TECHNIQUES AND ANALYSIS (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 407. 

ANTH 608 (S) FIELD TECHNIQUES AND ANALYSIS (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 408. 

ANTH 609 (S) AUTHORSHIP AND OWNERSHIP (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 409. 

ANTH 610 (F) THE ETHNOGRAPHY OF DEVELOPMENT (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 410. 

ANTH 611 (S) NEUROLINGUISTICS (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 411. 

ANTH 612 (S) RHETORIC (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 412. 

ANTH 614 (S) HERMENEUTICS AND LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY 

(3) 
Graduate version of ANTH 414. 

ANTH 615 (F) THEORIES OF MODERNITY/ POSTMODERNITY (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 415. 

ANTH 618 (S) CAN HUMANS THINK: ANTHROPOS, HUMANISM AND 
TECHNOLOGY (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 418. 

ANTH 619 (S) LAW AND SOCIETY (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 419. 

ANTH 625 (F) ADVANCED TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) 

■ Graduate version of ANTH 425 . 

ANTH 630 (F) EXPERIMENTAL WRITING & ANTHROPOLOGY (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 430. 

ANTH 640 (F) BIOTECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 440. 

(#) = credit hours per semester 



278 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ANTH 646 (S) ADVANCED TOPICS IN BIOMEDICAL ANTHRO- 
POLOGY (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 446. 

ANTH 647 (F) MODERN ETHNOGRAPHY AND THE ETHNOGRAPHY 
OF MODERNITY (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 447. 

ANTH 650 (F) PEDAGOGY (3) 

Training in the basic elements of teaciiing in anthropology to be taken in conjunction with applied 
graduate student training in ANTH 316. Prerequisite(s): third year and above graduate students. 
Instnictor(s): Marcus 

ANTH 655 (S) INTRODUCTION TO SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 
STUDIES (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 455. 

ANTH 658 (S) HUMAN OSTEOLOGY (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 458. 

ANTH 660 (S) ADVANCED ARCHAEOLOGICAL THEORY (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 460. 

ANTH 663 (F) WEST AFRICAN PREHISTORY (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 463. 

ANTH 668 (S) PALAEOCLIMATE & HUMAN RESPONSE (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 468. 

ANTH 674 (S) ADVANCED SEMINAR ON THE PREHISTORIC LAND- 
SCAPE (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 474. 

ANTH 675 (S) PLIO-PLEISTOCENE CLIMATE CHANGE AND HOMI- 
NID ADAPTATION (3) 

Graduate version of ANTH 475. 

ANTH 682 (F) NON- WESTERN CINEMA: THIRD WORLD CINEMA (4) 

Graduate version of ANTH 482. 

ANTH 683 (S) DOCUMENTARY & ETHNOGRAPHIC FILM (4) 

Graduate version of ANTH 483. 

ANTH 684 (S) CULTURE, MEDIA, SOCIETY: EXILE & DIASPORA 
CINEMAS (4) 

Graduate version of ANTH 484. 

ANTH 800 RESEARCH AND THESIS (3) 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 279 

ARAB (Arabic) 

The School of Humanities / Center for the Study of Languages 

ARAB 101 (F) INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ARABIC LANGUAGE 
AND CULTURE I (5) 

This course introduces students to the Modern Standard Arabic Language as well as some cultural 
aspects related to the Arab world. The students will develop listening and speaking skills through 
communicative exercises. They will also learn the writing system and will use it to express simple 
ideas and topics. Each lesson includes conversation practice and writing. Language lab required. 
Instructor(s): Attieli 

ARAB 102 (S) INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ARABIC LANGUAGE 
AND CULTURE II (5) 

This is the continuation of ARAB 101 . Using the direct method and an interactive approach, this 
course attempts to balance the four language skills seasoned with a strong cultural content. Students 
will be exposed to additional basic structures, a wider range of vocabulary for daily life use and 
cultural aspects related to the Arab world. Most of the content focuses on the self, college, home, 
and work environments in both the American and Arab contexts. Audio and Video media are 
required. For more details on the course content and approach, please check with the instructor. 
Instructor(s): Attieh 

ARAB 201 (F) INTERMEDIATE MODERN ARABIC LANGUAGE AND 
CULTURE I (4) 

In this second-year Arabic class students will develop proficiency in reading and writing. They will 
be introduced to more complex semantic and syntactic structures. They will practice class 
presentations as well as writing about a variety of topics . There is also emphasis on etymology , and 
students will be introduced to the use of the Arabic dictionary . Language lab xt(\\x\K(\.Instructor{s}: 

Attieh 

ARAB 202 (S) INTERMEDIATE MODERN ARABIC LANGUAGE AND 
CULTURE II (4) 

This is the fourth sequel of the Arabic language courses. In balancing the four language skills, the 
assignments and activities center on a variety of text types of historical , geographical , social , and 
literary nature as well as current topics and issues of the Arab world. Students will acquire additional 
forms, structures and expressions that help them communicate their thoughts and discourse at the 
Intermediate High level. Instnictoris): Attieh 

ARAB 301 (F) SEMINAR IN ARABIC (3) 

Advanced readings and discussions focus on literary and cultural topics, ranging from classical to 
contemporary. This course integrates advanced grammatical constructions with comprehension 
and conmiunication skills. Instriictor(s): Attieh 

ARAB 302 (S) SEMINAR IN ARABIC (3) 

Advanced readings and discussions focus on literary and cultural topics ranging from the classical 
to contemporary. This course integrates advanced grammatical constructions with comprehension 
; and communication skills. Instructor(s): Attieh 

ARAB 333 THE CULTURE OF CONTEMPORARY 

ARAB SOCIETIES (3) 

I Using a topical approach, this course attempts to make students gain insight into the rich cultural 
■ heritage and fabric of contemporary Arab societies within the context of tradition and change. The 
course will cover a variety of topics such as the political and economic systems, social, ethnic, 
language and religious groups, family and kinship, status of women and minorities, national 
identity and immigration. The format of the class will be a combination of lecture, class discussion, 
film viewing, and guest presentations. Students will be expected to do interactive reading (resulting 
in written work), active class participation, and some experiential projects (for example, commu- 
nication with Arab/Arab Americans or related organizations in the Houston area). Course 
conducted in English. No knowledge of Arabic required. Not offered 2003-04. 

(#) = credit hours per semester 



280 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ARAB 398 (F) INDEPENDENT STUDY (3) 

ARAB 399 (S) INDEPENDENT STUDY (3) 

ARAB 401 DIRECTED READING (3) 

Permission of instructor required. 

ARAB 402 DIRECTED READING (3) 

Permission of instructor required. 

ARCH (Architecture) 



The School of Architecture 

ARCH 101 (F) PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE I (4) 

Visual studies using simple tools and materials to develop an awareness of the environment and a 
vocabulary to describe it. Requisite for architecture majors. Insrnictor(s): Grenader, Samuels 

ARCH 102 (S) PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE I (4) 

A development of communication of formal information from further investigation of visual 
structures and their order. Requisite for architecture majors. Instrucror(s): Grenader, Samuels 

ARCH 132 (S) FRESHMAN SEMINAR ON ARCHITECTURAL ISSUES (2) 

Introductory tutorial. Readings, field trips, and seminar discussions. Exploration of the role of the 
architect and architecture in the metropolis. Instructor(s): Casbarian 

ARCH 201 (F) PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE II (6) 

Introduction to concepts of beginning architectural design. Design process as problem solving with 
emphasis on conscious method. Requisite for architecture majors. Instructoris): Oliver, Williams 

ARCH 202 (S) PRINCIPLES OF ARCH II (6) 

See ARCH 20 1 . Instructoris): Williams, Wittenberg 

ARCH 207 (F) INTRO TO DESIGN OF STRUCTURES (3) 

The course will introduce students to historical and contemporary structures through multi-media 
presentations, computer-based visualizations, field trips and hands-on experiments with materials 
of construction and physical models of structures. This is an introductory interactive course on the 
art and science of designing engineered structures and in intended for freshmen and sophomores 
interested in both civil engineering and architecture. Also listed as CEVE 207. Instructoris): 
Wittenberg 

ARCH 214 (S) DESIGN OF STRUCTURES II (3) 

Application of materials & construction (wood, masonry, concrete & steel). Case studies & field 
trips. Instructor. Oberholzer 

ARCH 301 (F) PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE HI (6) 

Intermediate level design problems with emphasis on building technology, programming and 
formal design. Requisite for paraprofessional major in architecture. 

ARCH 302 (S) PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE HI (6) 

Variety of intermediate level problems for developing comprehensive experience in design 
methods and processes . Requisite for paraprofessional major in architecture . Instructoris): Cannady 
isection 1 ); Finley isection 2); Guthrie isection 3); Parsons isection 4) 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 281 

ARCH 303 (S) SEMINAR IN SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT 
ANALYSIS (1) 

Engineering students will work with architecture students in analyzing basic design principles of 
sustainable design. Students analyses will be incorporated in the final design projects and culminate 
in a semester final report. Instnicror(s): Cannady 

ARCH 310 (F) BUILDING WORKSHOP: THEATER RENOVATION (3) 

In conjunction with the Rice Building Design Workshop, students enrolled in this class will design 
a community arts facility at the site of the Old Delux Theater. Programmatic elements will include 
a galler)\ a reno\'ated theater and space for local artists. We will design and produce construction 
documents alons with overseeing the bidding process. Construction is expected to begin this fall. 
Not offered 2003-04. 

ARCH 311 (F) HOUSTON ARCHITECTURE (3) 

This course consists of a series of illustrated lectures and walking tours that describe and analyze 
the architecture of Houston from the city's founding in 1 836 to the present. Characteristic building 
types and exceptional works of architecture are identified; tours stimulate an awareness of the 
historical dimension of urban sites. Instructor(s): Fox 

ARCH 313 (F) SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE (3) 

This course will explore sustainable design from initial sustainable facility concepts and team 
organizations, to enlisting community support and process assessment. The course will develop 
into details about sustainable design, lessons learned, processes and outcomes. Instritctor{s): 
Taylor 

ARCH 315 (S) DESIGN OF STRUCTURES III (3) 

Application of principles of analysis to construction of steel & concrete framed structures. 
Continuation of ARCH 213, 214. Instructor(s): Oberholzer 

ARCH 316 (F) ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS (3) 

An introduction to the thermal performance of buildings. Course is divided into 2 parts: Building 
Climatology and Air Conditioning Systems. Instructor(s): Oberholzer 

ARCH 317 (F) LANDSCAPE AND SITE STRATEGIES FOR HOUSTON (3) 

This course is a workshop in site planning, with Houston as its focus. It will allow students to gain 
practice assessing, cataloging, and communicating the many complex issues that go into plugging 
a building into a site. We will navigate the networks created by natural environments, the build and 
legal environments, and access. The final product of this course is a site plan. Enrollment limited 
to 15. Instructor(s): Albert, Wliitehead 

ARCH 321 (F) ECONOMIC OF THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT (3) 

In relation to the built environment, the course define basic economic terms and systems, outline 
conflicting economic perspectives of stakeholders, explain different investment valuation methods 
& provide students with an initial set of economic tools. Not offered 2003-04. Instructoris): Barry 

ARCH 322 (F) METHODS OF MAKING (3) 

The intent of the class is to saturate the design process with direct experience, to make fabrication 
synonymous with design. The focus is on identifying and developing an awareness of the 
underlying principles manifest in joining materials. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor(s): 
Guthrie 

ARCH 324 (F) ARCHITECTURAL THEORY&PRACTICE (3) 

Taught by the faculty in the School of Architecture. Each professor presents one project and 
explains how theory entered into this practical project. A short paper is required at mid-term on one 
of the faculty presentations. The final will consist of questions composed by each faculty 
participant. Not offered 2003-04. 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



282 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ARCH 327 (F) RICE BUILDING WORKSHOP I (3) 

The Rice Building Workshop involves students in the design and construction of real projects at 
various scales. Elective courses and course sequences will be formatted to a address the specific 
requirements of each project as required. Please consult postings for further information. Instruc- 
tor: Samuels 

ARCH 330 (S) METHODS OF MAKING II (3) 

Continuation of ARCH 322/622. Enrollment limited. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Guthrie 

ARCH 334 (S) BUILDING WORKSHOP II (3) 

Real-life problems dealing with design and construction. Instructor(s): Grenader, Samuels 

ARCH 343 (F) CITIES AND HISTORY (3) 

Cities conform to general historical trends, yet all cities are bound to particular geographic and 
cultural circumstances that make the history of each unique. In each lecture a single city will be 
examined in terms of its formal and geographical particulars and the consequence it has had on 
social and cultural history . The architecture of each city is a unique expression of a mixture of desire 
and habit, making it a complex cultural artifact with legions of authors and just as many interpreters. 
Not offered 2003-04. 

ARCH 344 (F) CONSTRUCTION & DESIGN (3) 

A seminar in which the relationship between the construction of an object and its usefulness is 
explored. The premise in the course is that the way things are made can be one credible point of 
departure for the architectural design process. Iiistructor(s): Parsons 

ARCH 345 (F) ARCHITECTURE AND THE CITY I (3) 

This course will trace the development of Renaissance and Baroque architecture in Italy and France 
with reference to the dialectic of license and rule. The first part, which covers the period from 1400- 
1600, will focus on the civil, domestic and ecclesiastical architecture of the chief protagonists of 
the Italian Renaissance: Brunelleschi, Alberti, Bramante, Giulio Romano, Michelangelo and 
Palladio. Their buildings and urban initiatives will be interpreted in terms of continuities & 
discontinuities between an emerging theoretical tradition & the demands of actual practice. Also 
listed as HART 205. Instructor(s): Stajf 

ARCH 346 (S) ARCHITECTURE AND THE CITY II (3) 

This course is an overview of modem architecture with reference to related issues in cultural 
modernity. The course will consider important work of the 19th and 20th century, although 
reference will be made to earlier material where it bears on the issues under discussion. The course 
begins with the claim that the architecture of modernity has historically been conceived and 
developed in relation to Utopian ideals, and that architectural modernism cannot be adequately 
understood unless attention is paid to its various Utopian and dystopian 'moments'. Also listed as 
HART 206. Instructor(s): Wittenberg, staff 

ARCH 350 (F) URBAN IDENTITY, UTOPIA AND REFUSAL (3) 

This course is intended to function as a small research seminar. Interested students will participate 
in exploring a related set of concerns involving the development of historical urban Utopia 
conditioned by desires both to express social resistance and to produce new social identities. Not 
offered 2003-04. 

ARCH 353 (F) PHOTOGRAPHY FOR ARCHITECTS (3) 

Exploration of a variety of photographic techniques for architectural research, design, and 
presentation. Instructor(s): White 

ARCH 358 (S) CAST MODERNITY (3) 

This seminar will look at concrete's role as a facilitator of the conceptual and theoretical agendas 
of the architecture of the 20th century. Just as the Domino system enabled a new architecture at the 
beginning of the century , the current interests in topological and nontreated form are again arguing 
for concrete's unique properties. Instructor(s): Oliver 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 283 

ARCH 360 (F) CRISIS AND COMMUNICATIONS (3) 

As the demands for design today shift toward social, economic and technological concerns, the 
group/crisis model is re-emerging in both corporate and popular and radical milieus. We will study 
the history of these developments, form our own collective operation and produce a publication that 
reflects this emerging new approach to design culture. This is both a history and research course 
and a hands-on course in communications design. Instritctor(s): Staff 

ARCH 362 (F) THE PHILOSOPHY OF MATTER, FORCE AND EVENT (3) 

A lecture course on the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze will deal with the metaphysical foundations 
of contemporary space and time. Readings will include Deleuze's analyses of Spinoza, Leibniz, 
Nietzsche, and Bergson. Strong emphasis will be placed on reading, writing, as well as on design 
applications of principles from the work. Instructor(s): Staff 

ARCH 363 (F) ARCHITECTURAL REPRESENTATION: FREEHAND 
DRAWING WORKSHOP (3) 

A semester long workshop designed to impart skills in free-hand drawing, with an emphasis on 
architectural subjects. The course will consist of in-class sketching exercises and out-of-class 
drawing assignments. Instructor(s): DeLaura 

ARCH 368 (F) TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY (3) 

History and philosophy of technology in the 20th century with emphasis on the postwar years. This 
course will focus on actually doing history and philosophy of technology by developing programs 
(fonnal studies, books, documentary films) on everyday objects or innovations (nylon stockings, 
the running shoe, the l.Q. tests, etc.) that have had invisible but profound effect on postwar society. 
Instructor(s): Kwinter 

ARCH 372 (F) SILENCE/SOUND/NOISE (3) 

This course will examine the sonorous dimensions and implications of architecture. While the 
course will provide and overview of basic principles of acoustics and architecture's materiality in 
relation to sound, the primary focus will be the architectural implications of sound-dominant rather 
than vision-dominant modes of thought. Enrollment limited. Not offered 2003-04. 

ARCH 374 (S) THE JOY OF MATERIALS (3) 

An investigation of how m.aterials influence and inspire the making of works of architecture. 
Instructor(s): Jimenez 

ARCH 375 (F) CULTURAL CRITICISM IN ARCHITECTURE (3) 

This seminar explores the relationship between architecture and culture. Course readings include 
Cornel West, bell hooks, and Bill Goode. Specifically, we will study the effects of advanced 
capitalism, identity politics and latent biases which form the foundation of the architecture 
profession. Enrollment limited. Instructor. Williams 

ARCH 376 (S) COMING TO AMERICA (3) 

This seminar will explore the impact of American methods and practices on 20th century 
architectural theory and practice in Europe. The course will focus primarily on a critical examina- 
tion of several primary texts which will include readings from Mendolsohn, A-i-P, Smithson, 
Archigram, Banham, Koolhaas, and others. Enrollment limited. Instnictor(s): Krumwiede 

ARCH 382 (S) REPOSITIONING THE SEAM (TECHNOLOGY 
SEMINAR) (3) 

This class will explore through the use of surface modeling software and CAD modeling tools how 
various techniques of articulating form , in relation to programmatic performance, affects the visual, 
formal and spatial organization of the places we inhabit. Instructor(sj: tally 

ARCH 384 (S) CONCEPTUAL ART AND ARCHITECTURE (3) 

The first part of the course will examine the conceptual art practices that began in the 1960s, 
including Bochner, Kosuth, art and language, LeWitt, Haacke, Kelly, and Smithson. The second 
part of the course will focus on the question of what constitutes a conceptual architecture by 
interrogating a series of potential practices including: Super Studio, Anchigram, Eisenman, 
Libeskind, Shinohara, Hejduf, Tschumi, and others. Also listed as HART 392. Instructor(s): Last 

(#) = credit hours per semester 



284 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ARCH 386 (S) ARCHITECTURE AND SOCIETY II (ENLIGHTENMENT- 
POSTMODERNITY) (3) 

Through a series of case studies, this course will examine the socio-cultural consequences of 
exemplary buildings from the Enlightenment through Postmodernity. Instructor(s): Biln 

ARCH 388 (F) GRAY SPACE: INVESTIGATIONS INTO THE DOMESTIC 
CLOSET (3) 

The closet as we know it is a late- 18th century invention. Prior to this time, storage was relegated 
to objects-figures against the ground of an architectural space. We will investigate and utilize 
various techniques in diagramming to develop and synthesize our storage research. Enrollment 
limited to 15. Not offered 2003-04. lnstructor{s): Staff 

ARCH 401 (F) PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE IV (6) 

Upper level architectural design problems with an emphasis on urban issues and site planning, and 
complex building organization. Required for pre-professional major in architecture. Instructor(s): 
Jimenez 

ARCH 402 (S) PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE IV (6) 

See ARCH 302. Instructor(s): Cannady {section I): Finley (section 2); Guthrie (section 3); 
Parsons (section 4) 

ARCH 412 (F) ADV DESIGN-STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS (3) 

Advanced course in structural design. Topics include factors controlling structural design of 
buildings, floor systems, building systems, facade treatments, long span structures, pneumatic and 
cable structures , and new structural systems and materials . Case studies will also be conducted . Not 
offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Staff 

ARCH 414 (F) EXTRA-ARCHITECTURE (3) 

This seminar will serve as a forum to research zones of cultural production wherein architecture is 
implicated but not necessarily sustained. Cinema, theater, fashion, music , media, land art , industrial 
design and even adaptive computation will be considered as disciplines in which one finds 
undeclared complicities with architecture. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Staff 

ARCH 419 (F) MAKING IT: THE CULTURE OF CONSTRUCTION (3) 

In the principal part of the course, small teams of students (2-3) will be assigned to one of several 
projects now being built around Houston. The teams will follow the course on construction in detail 
during the semester, talking with the architects, the engineers, the contractors, the craftsmen of the 
job, attending job meetings, etc. In parallel seminar sessions, we will try to place construction in 
a broader context. We will view the building not so much as a singular static object, but more as 
a dynamic system that develops, evolves and adapts over time to a changing environment. Not 
offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Staff 

ARCH 423 (S) PROFESSIONALISM & MGMT IN ARCH PRACTICE (3) 

An introductory survey of the characteristics of the deliver}' of architectural services by profes- 
sional design organizations. Through readings and lectures, students become familiar with the 
social, technical, legal, ethical, and financial milieu of modem architecture practice. lnstriictor(s ): 
Fleishacker, Furr 

ARCH 425 (S) SHAPE AND SUBSTANCE (3) 

This course will consider certain key relationships between architecture and film in the 20th 
century. Our focus will be on the ways that one particular 'filmic' genealogy —that of the 'haunted 
house ' — at once negotiates, defines, and unsettles popular notions architecture and its various debts 
and responsibilities to its social and cultural worlds. Instructor(s): Biln 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



» COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 285 

ARCH 426 (F) DESIGNING THE LOW-COST HOUSE (3) 

The spring course begins tlie sequence to produce a small house under the auspices of the Rice 
Building Workshop. The history and development of the small house will be examined, followed 
by an analysis of the proposed mid-town site and it's context. Construction technologies, materials, 
costs, climate conditions, and code issues will be considered. Each student will develop a design 
approach in some detail, and a single proposal (or merging of proposals) will be selected and 
documented for permitting and construction. All phases of the project will incorporate collabora- 
tion with the larger community , from neighborhood organizations to local contractors . Instructor(s): 
Grenader, Samuels 

ARCH 429 (F) BUILDING LOW COST HOUSE H (3) 

This elective course will continue student involvement in the hands-on process of constructing a 
new structure for Project Row Houses, a noted grass-roots art project promoting neighborhood 
revitalization and community service in the Third Ward. Insrructor(s): Grenader. Samuels 

ARCH 432 (S) INTRO TO COMPUTER APPL IN ARCH (3) 

This course is designed as a general introduction to computing in the context of architectural design. 
Emphasis is on the use of digital media as design tools and the appropriate use of these tools in the 
varying processes of design. This course includes exposure to a broad spectrum of design, drafting, 
modeling and presentation software. Instructor(s): DeLaura 

ARCH 433 (F) INTRO TO COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN ARCHITEC- 
TURE (3) 

This course is designed as a general introduction to computing in the context of architectural design . 
Emphasis is on the use of digital media as design tools and the appropriate use of these tools in the 
varying processes of design. This course includes exposure to a broad spectrum of design, drafting, 
modeling and presentation software. InsTructor(s): DeLaura 

ARCH 434 (F) DRAWING: PENCILS, COMPUTERS & THE CLASSICAL 
LANGUAGE (3) 

This seminar investigates the relationship and potentials between traditional and electronic modes 
of architectural representation with an emphasis placed on the role of drawing as a primary 
communicator of architectural intention. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Staff 

ARCH 435 (F) COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN IN ARCH (3) 

This course is intended as a systematic introduction to Computer- Aided Design in an Architectural 
context. Although the course will expose the student to several CAD packages, it will primarily 
promote the mastery of a specific CAD software (AutoCAD). Other relevant topics will include 
project development, professional procedures, development of job standards, and system 
customization. Prerequisite(s): ARCH 433/633 or equivalent. Instructoris): DeLaura 

ARCH 436 (S) COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN IN ARCH (3) 

Advanced computer graphic techniques using CAD in architecture as a design and presentation 
medium. Instructoris): DeLaura 

ARCH 437 (F) VIDEO 1 , 2, 3 (3) 

Production of architectural space through the use of video, scale physical models, installations , and 
the urban environment. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor(s): Heiss 

ARCH 438 (F) FOUND IN THE TRANSLATION (3) 

Advanced computer workshop investigating the translation of physical objects and space into and 
out of the digital environment. Independent research will be encouraged on new devices and 
methods. Enrollment limited to 5. Not offered 2003-04. Instructoris): Staff 

ARCH 439 (F) THREE DIMENSIONAL COMPUTER GRAPHICS (3) 

A workshop in three dimensional computer modeling and its theoretical implications for architec- 
ture and design. One class session each week will be a how to lecture covering the technical side 
of modeling. The other sessions will consist of group discussion through which we will explore the 
theoretical implications of the medium and test the limits of its use as architectural representation. 
Permission of instructor required. Instructoris): Lally 

(#) = credit hours per semester 



286 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ARCH 440 (S) ANIMATING ARCHITECTURE (3) 

The goal of this class will be the production of a short animated film whose central theme will be 
an unbuilt work of caconic architecture. Modeling and rendering skills in any 3dsoftware package 
are required for this course. Although we will primarily be using 3DS MAX, general knowledge 
of a wide range of supporting software will be very helpful. Enrollment limited to \2.Instriictor(s): 
Heiss 

ARCH 441 (F) CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS (3) 

This course is offered to a limited number of students to develop a complete and detailed 
instructional package (step-by-step construction drawings, shop drawings , didactic framing model) 
for the projected duplex , to be used by the construction trainees . AutoCAD skills will be very useful. 
These students would have the option of continue their involvement during the construction phase 
in the spring and summer. Not offered 2003-04. Instntctor(s): Staff 

ARCH 454 (F) 20TH-CENTURY NORTH AMER ARCH (3) 

A seminar in history and criticism. In this course we will consider the establishment of a canon of 
20th century architecture in North America (US & Canada). Each week we will take apart the 
various criteria that qualify buildings for history including aesthetic and stylistic quality, techno- 
logical invention, architectural careerism, urban contributions, stylistic quality, technological 
invention,architecturalcareerism, urban contributions, geographic influence, typology, theory, art 
movements, and social implications. The goal of the course is to investigate the way texts relate to 
build reality. Not offered 2003-04. Instriictor(s): Staff 

ARCH 455 (F) HOUSING AND URBAN PROGRAMS: ISSUES IN 
POLICY (3) 

This course will explore current issues in the formulation and implementation of housing and urban 
development programs in the U .8 . An oral presentation and written paper on a specific topic within 
a general policy area required. Instructor. Lord 

ARCH 461 SPECIAL PROJECTS (3) 

Independent research or design arranged in consultation with a faculty member. Subject to approval 
of faculty advisor and director. Enrollment very limited. Instriictor(s): Staff 

ARCH 469 (F) CASE STUDY IN URBAN DESIGN: BRASILIA (3) 

Starting with two principal documents describing the city of Brasilia, the original hand drawn 
competition entry in 1 957 and a digital survey of 1 997 , this seminar will study modem urban design 
in relation to the 1 950 ' s project for a new Brazilian capital . The project of Brasilia, and its inevitable 
transformation over time, will be looked at historically, politically, culturally, foraially and 
esthetically. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor(s): el-Dahidah 

ARCH 470 (F) TAUTNESS AND PARTICULATES (3) 

The research of underlying regulatory systems — material, theoretical, legislative — leads to the 
development/proposal of new system strands that attempt to redefine the built and economic 
environment at multiple scales of invention. Conducted in three parts, the seminar begins with a 
series of presentations, followed by individual research, leading to the innovative collective: 
particulates of the metropolis. Instriictor(s): Staff 

ARCH 472 (F) BYPRODUCTS (3) 

Through case studies, the seminar will identify and examine the processes, financial structures, and 
physical components shaping the design of retail architecture and retail space today. Investigations 
will extend form markets, regulations, and technology to organizational strategies, proximity, 
counters, and transactions. This is a research-based seminar with an emphasis on communication 
and infomiation design. Research gathered by individual students will be structured through 
drawing and writing assignments, to be presented in graphic form. The collective outcome will be 
the production of a document. Students will be asked to cross-reference and index the collective 
bodies of research in an opportunistic manner. The seminar will not attempt to be conclusive or 
definitive, but will be valuable in the potentials, the dilemmas, and the question it raises, and in the 
development of informed and productive methods of working. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): 
Staff 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 287 

ARCH 481 (F) THE IDEA OF HOUSING (3) 

In the 1920"s, the architectural idea of housing and the philosophical idea of existentialism emerged 
simultaneously in presumably unrelated intellectual circles. Being andTime was published in 1 927, 
the same year the Weissenhof Settlement opened to the public in Stuttgart. One need only 
emphasize the fact that Martin Heidegger is precisely the same age as both Le Corbusier and Mies 
to suggest an exploration of the possible connections between the two seemingly disparate 
intellectual trends. Whether this shared history represents only a coincidence or the overlap of 
significant content is an open question. The first part of the seminar will examine this question. The 
second part will catalogue the institutionalization of these ideas through the 1950s using a series 
of case studies. Not offered 2003-04. Iiisrnictor(s): Staff 

ARCH 483 (F) 20TH-CENTURY HISTORY OF IDEAS OF 
ARCHITECTURE (3) 

This course will examine 20th centun. architectural discourse in abroad intellectual context. Course 
material will cover the period between 1900 and the present, focusing on 1965-1995. Special 
attention will be paid to relationships among philosophy . critical theory , cultural criticism, and the 
objects and theories of architecture . The following topics are covered: Anticipation and Reflection, 
Formalist Aesthetics. Architecture and Form.Cufture and Modernity. Culture and Depth Analysis, 
Psychoanalytic Interpretation. Architecture and Desu-e, Culture and Politics. Marxism and Neo- 
Historicism. Architecture and Political Critique , Phenomology and Reception , Architecture and the 
Life-Worid. Culture after Modernism. Semiotics and Structuralism. Discourse and Discipline, 
Deconstruction and Textuality, Deconstruction (Re)constructed, Feminism and Gender Theory, 
Architecture and Difference. Instriictor{s): Last 

ARCH 485 (F) ARCHITECTURE AND SOCIETY I (3) 

Through a series of case studies, this course will examine the socio-cultural consequences of 
exemplary buildings from Antiquity through the 17th century. Instriictor(sl: el-Dahdah 

ARCH 486 (S) ARCHITECTURE AND SOCIETY II (ENLIGHTENMENT- 
POSTMODERNITY) (3) 

Through a series of case studies, this course will examine the socio-cultural consequences of 
exemplary buildings from the Enlightenment through Postmodemity. Instructor(s): Biln 

ARCH 492 (S) PROBLEMS IN RESEARCH AND DESIGN (3) 

This course will focus on the contemporary mutations emerging within the American context with 
emphasis on social and economic factors. Research oriented, workshop style with a view to 
developing materials for pubUc display and information design. Instructor(s): Kwinter 

ARCH 493 LINES OF ESCAPE FROM FUNCTIONALISM (3) 

Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Staff 

ARCH 500 PRECEPTORSHIP PROGRAM (15) 

Full time internship for nine to twehe months under guidance of appointed preceptor. Required for 
all recipients of Rice B. A. degrees in pre-professional program of area majors who seek admission 
to graduate studies in Architecture. Instructor{s}: Casbarian 

ARCH 501 (F) CORE DESIGN STUDIO I (10) 

Requisite for admission to graduate professional program options in architecture or urban design 
for students with nonarchitectural bachelor's degree. Lectures, seminars, laboratories, and design 
studio projects adjusted to individual needs. Prerequisites determined by the Graduate Affairs 
Committee in the School of Architecture. Instnictor(s): Knimwiede, Staff 

ARCH 502 (S) CORE DESIGN STUDIO II (10) 

This studio emphasizes the impact of building systems and protocols on the spatial and formal 
organization of architecture with a final project focused on the design of a public building in a 
metropolitan context. The studio focuses equally on the development of conceptual rigor and 
technical expertise. Instriictor{s): Oliver 



(#) - credit hours per semester 



288 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ARCH 503 (F) CORE DESIGN STUDIO III (10) 

Design studio to follow ARCH 501 , 502. Preparation for entering studios in the regular graduate 
programs in architecture and urban design in the following semester. Instructor(s): Finley, 
Wittenberg 

ARCH 504 (S) ARCHITECTURAL PROBLEMS (10) 

Exploration of abstract thought and design capabilities relevant to systematic processes of 
designing specific buildings and facilities. Course content is topic oriented and varies section to 
^Qchon. Instructor{s}: Pope, tally (section 1): Jimenez (section 2); Might (section 3); Last (section 
4): Brown (section 5) 

ARCH 507 (F) INTRO TO DESIGN OF STRUCTURES (3) 

See ARCH 207. Instriictor(s): Wittenberg 

ARCH 514 (S) DESIGN OF STRUCTURES II (3) 

See Arch. 2 14. Course in structures for students in the Qualifying Graduate Program. I nstructor(s): 
Oberholzer 

ARCH 515 (S) DESIGN OF STRUCTURES HI (3) 

A second course in structures for students in the Qualifying Graduate Program. Topics include: 
additional topics in the behavior, analysis, and design of structural elements; synthesis of structural 
elements into structural systems; integration of structural systems with other building systems. 
Instructor(s): Oberholzer 

ARCH 516 (F) ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS (3) 

See ARCH 316. Instritctor(s): Oberholzer 

ARCH 532 (S) INTRO TO DIGITAL VISUALIZATION & COMMU- 
NICATION (3) 

Provides an introduction to digital visualization and communication in the context of architectural 
design. Emphasis is placed on working methods that engage specific issues of the complex 
assemblies in architectural practice, coordinating various software and graphic techniques through 
composite methods. Instructor(s}: Finley 

ARCH 600 M. ARCH. I INTERNSHIP (3) 

Practical work experience for students who have completed at least four semesters in the Option 
I Program prior to their entrance into the regular Master of Architecture studio sequence. 
Permission of instructor required. Enrollment very limited. Instritctor(s): Staff 

ARCH 601 (F) ARCHITECTURAL PROBLEMSiSTUDIO (10) 

Emphasis on abstract thought and design capabilities relevant to systematic processes of designing 
specific buildings and facilities. Instriictor(s): Cannady (section 1); Guthrie, tally (section 2); 
Wamble (section 3): RSAParis (section 4) 

ARCH 602 (S) ARCHITECTURAL PROBLEMS (10) 

Emphasis on abstract thought and design capabilities relevant to systematic processes of designing 
specific buildings and facilities. Instriictor(s): Pope, tally (section 1); Jimenez (section 2); Might 
(section 3): tast (section 4); Brown (section 5) 

ARCH 605 ARCH PROBLEMS: STUDIO (10) 

Studio conducted in a workshop format with exercises in such topical areas as program develop- 
ment, energy analysis and design, building system integration, and financial analysis. Course may 
be repeated for credit. Instructor(s): Stajf 

ARCH 610 HISTORY, THEORY AND STRUCTURE/RSA PARIS 

PROGRAM (6) 

Special seminars, lectures and site visits relevant to history .urban theory , and structure of Paris and 
other European centers. Instructor(s): Fitzsimons, Staff 

(F) = Eall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 289 

ARCH 611 (F) HOUSTON ARCHITECTURE (3) 

See ARCH 311. Instructor(s): Fox 

ARCH 612 (F) ADV DES OF STRUC SYSTEM (3) 

See ARCH 412. Not offered 2003-04. Instnuwr(s): Staff 

ARCH 613 (F) SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE (3) 

See ARCH 313. Instructor(s): Taylor 

ARCH 614 (F) EXTRA-ARCHITECTURE (3) 

See ARCH 414. Not offered 2003-04. Insrructor(s): Staff 

ARCH 617 (F) LANDSCAPE AND SITE STRATEGIES FOR HOUSTON (3) 

See Arch. 317. Instructor (s): Albert, Whitehead 

ARCH 619 (F) MAKING IT: THE CULTURE OF CONSTRUCTION (3) 

See ARCH 419. Instructor(s): Staff 

ARCH 620(F&S) ARCHITECTURAL PROBLEMS: STUDIO/RSA PARIS 
PROGRAM (10) 

Advanced issues in building design and urban infrastructure using Paris as context. Exploration of 
compound design processes resulting in the development of complex building typologies. 
Instriictor(s): Casbarian, Pope, Fitzsiinons, Visitors 

ARCH 621 (F) ECONOMICS OF THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT (3) 

See ARCH 321 . Not offered 2003-04. Instructor. Barry 

ARCH 622 (F) METHODS OF MAKING (3) 

See ARCH 322. Instructor! s): Guthrie 

ARCH 623 (S) PROFESSIONALISM & MGMT IN ARCH PRACTICE (3) 

See ARCH 423. Instructor(s): Fleishacker. Furr 

ARCH 625 (F) SHAPE AND SUBSTANCE (3) 

See Arch. 425. Instructor(s): Biln 

ARCH 626 (F) DESIGNING THE LOW-COST HOUSE (3) 

See ARCH 426. Instructor(s): Grenader, Samuels 

ARCH 627 (F) RICE BUILDING WORKSHOP I (3) 

See ARCH 327. Instructor(s): Samuels 

ARCH 629 (F) BUILDING LOW COST HOUSE II (3) 

See ARCH 429. Instructor(s): Grenader, Samuels 

ARCH 632 (S) INTRO TO COMPUTERS IN ARCHITECTURE (3) 

See ARCH 432. Instructor(s): DeLaura 

ARCH 633 (F) INTRO TO COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN ARCHITEC- 
TURE (3) 

' See ARCH 433. Instructor(s): DeLaura 

ARCH 634 (F) BUILDING WORKSHOP II (3) 

Repeatable for credit. See ARCH 334. Instructor(s): Grenader, Samuels 

ARCH 635 (F) COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN IN ARCHITECTURE (3) 

See ARCH 435. Instructor(s): DeLaura 

(#) = credit hours per semester 



290 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ARCH 636 (S) COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN IN ARCH (3) 

See ARCH 436. Insrnictor(s): DeLaiira 

ARCH 637 (F) VIDEO 1 ^3 (3) 

See ARCH 437 . Iiutntctor(s): Heiss 

ARCH 638 (F) FOUND IN THE TRANSLATION (3) 

Graduate version of ARCH 438. Enrollment limited to 5. 

ARCH 639 (F) THREE DIMENSIONAL COMPUTER GRAPHICS (3) 

See ARCH 439. Iustnictor(s): Lally 

ARCH 640 (S) ANIMATING ARCHITECTURE (3) 

See Arch. 440. Instructor(s): Heiss 

ARCH 641 (F) CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS (3) 

See ARCH 441 . Instructor{s): Staff 

ARCH 643 (F) CITIES AND HISTORY (3) 

See ARCH 343. Not offered 2003-04. liistnictor(s): Stajf 

ARCH 644 (F) CONSTRUCTION & DESIGN (3) 

See ARCH 344. InstnicTor{s): Parsons 

ARCH 645 (F) ARCHITECTURE AND THE CITY I (3) 

See ARCH 345. Iiistructoiis): Staff 

ARCH 646 (S) ARCHITECTURE AND THE CITY II (3) 

Graduate level of Arch. 346. Also listed as HART 646. Instructor(s): Wittenberg, Staff 

ARCH 650 (F) URBAN IDENTITY, UTOPIA AND REFUSAL (3) 

See ARCH 350. Not offered 2003-04. fnstructor(s): Staff 

ARCH 653 (F) PHOTOGRAPHY FOR ARCHITECTS (3) 

See ARCH 353. Instructor(s): White 

ARCH 654 (F) 20TH-CENTURY NORTH AMER ARCH (3) 

See ARCH 454. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Staff 

ARCH 655 (F) HOUSING AND URBAN PROGRAMS: ISSUES IN 
POLICY (3) 

See Arch. 455. 1)istriictor(s): Lord 

ARCH 658 (S) CAST MODERNITY (3) 

See ARCH 358. Instriictor(s): Oliver 

ARCH 660 (F) CRISIS AND COMMUNICATION (3) 

See ARCH 360. Instructor(s): Staff 

ARCH 662 (F) THE PHILOSOPHY OF MATTER, FORCE AND EVENT (3) 

See ARCH 362. Instrnctor(s): Staff' 

ARCH 663 (F) ARCHITECTURAL REPRESENTATION: FREEHAND 
DRAWING WORKSHOP (3) 

See ARCH 363. Instructor(s): DeLcntra 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 291 

ARCH 665 (F) CONVERSATIONS: VISITING CRITIC SEMINAR (3) 

Seminars structured around topics dealing with design theoi7, with special emphasis on participa- 
tion by visiting critics and professors. Instructor(s): Staff 

ARCH 667 (F) GRADUATE SEMINAR: CRITICISM AND ARCHITEC- 
TURE (3) 

The seminar will examine the history of critical writings on architecture from the 1 8th century to 
the present, consider the various categories used to criticize, such as aesthetics, politics, and 
technology , and analyze the role that architectural criticism has played in a general cultural context, 
keeping an eye on parallel trends in the theory of criticism in other disciplines. Instructor s): Staff 

ARCH 668 (F) TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY (3) 

See ARCH 368. Instructor(s): Kwinter 

ARCH 669 (F) CASE STUDY IN URBAN DESIGN: BRASILIA (3) 

Graduate version of ARCH 469. Instructor(s): el-DaMah 

ARCH 670 (F) TAUTNESS AND PARTICULATES (3) 

An examination of the textual background of one of the most influential sources of modern design 
in the 20th century, the Bauhaus. Writings of three directors will be examined: Walter Gropius, 
Hannes Meyer, and Mies van der Rohe, and others. Models for an exhibition on the work of a 
bauhausler who emigrated to Israel in the mid 1 930s and applied the political , technical , and formal 
lessons of his schoofin the production of several hundred projects. Instructor(s): Staff 

ARCH 671 ISSUES IN COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN (3) 

The class will produce an interactive creative multimedia CD-ROM project about the City of 
Houston: an investigative multi-dimensional map of the city and its population. We will explore 
various issues such as content creation and its presentation, interface design, and ease of use. 
Students will conceive the structure, do the investigative research with the city, write, direct, and 
edit content (text, images, video, computer graphics, etc. Instructor(s): Staff 

ARCH 674 (S) THE JOY OF MATERIALS (3) 

See ARCH 374. Instructor(s): Jimenez 

ARCH 675 (F) CULTURAL CRITICISM IN ARCHITECTURE (3) 

See ARCH 375. Enrollment limited. Instructor(s): Williams 

ARCH 676 (S) COMING TO AMERICA (3) 

Graduate level of ARCH 376. Instructor(s): Krumwiede 

ARCH 681 (F) THE IDEA OF HOUSING (3) 

See ARCH 481 . Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Staff 

ARCH 682 (S) REPOSITIONING THE SEAM (TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR) 

See ARCH 382. Instructor(s): Lally 

ARCH 683 (F) 20TH-CENTURY HISTORY OF IDEAS OF ARCHITEC- 
TURE (3) 

See ARCH 483. Instnictor(s): Last 

ARCH 684 (F) CONCEPTUAL ART AND ARCHITECTURE (3) 

See ARCH 384. Instructor(s): Last 

ARCH 685 (F) ARCHITECTURE AND SOCIETY I (3) 

Graduate level of Arch. 485. Instructor(s): el-Dahdah 

ARCH 686 (S) ARCHITECTURE AND SOCIETY II (ENLIGHTENMENT- 
POSTMODERNITY) (3) 

Graduate level of Arch. 486. Cross-listed with HART 506. Instructor(s): Biln 
(#) = credit hours per semester 



292 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ARCH 688 (F) GRAY SPACE: INVESTIGATIONS INTO THE DOMESTIC 
CLOSET (3) 

See ARCH 388. Not offered 2003-04. [nstructor(s): Staff 

ARCH 692 (S) PROBLEMS IN RESEARCH AND DESIGN (3) 

Graduate level of Arch. 492. Instructor(s): Kwinter 

ARCH 693(F&S) LINES OF ESCAPE FROM FUNCTIONALISM (3) 

Not offered 2003-04. lustriictor(s): Staff 

ARCH 700(F&S) PRACTICUM (3) 

Full-time internship service in approved local offices under interdisciplinary supervision. Empha- 
sis on real world design, planning, or research experiences. Special tuition. May be taken in any 
semester or in summer. Instriictor(s): Staff 

ARCH 702 (S) PRETHESIS PREPARATION (3) 

lnstinct(ir(.s): Staff' 

ARCH 703 (F) DESIGN THESIS STUDIO (13) 

Instructor(s): Brown. Staff' 

ARCH 706 (F) WRITTEN THESIS (13) 

Instnictoi(s): Staff 

ARCH 711 (SECTION 1) SPECIAL PROJECTS (3) 

Independent research or design arranged m consultation with a faculty member subject to approval 
of the student's faculty advisor and director. Instructor(s): Staff 

ARCH 711 (SECTION 2) SPECIAL PROJECTS (3) 

Independent reseaich or design arranged in consultation with a faculty member subject to approval 
of the student's faculty advisor and director. Instmctor(s): Staff 

ARCH 714 INDEPENDENT DESIGN PROJECTS (3) 

Instructor(s): Staff 

ARCH 800 GRADUATE RESEARCH (3-12) 

Instructor(s): Staff' 

ARTS (Studio Art, Film, and Photography) 

The School of Humanities / Department of Visual Arts 

ARTS 102 (F) CREATIVE 3-D DESIGN (3) 

Study of the elements and principles of design . Three-dimensional problems are introduced. ARCH 
102 accepted as equivalent. Also listed as ARCH 102. Instructor(s): Smith 

ARTS 205 (F) PHOTOGRAPHY I (3) 

Exploration of the basic materials and processes of the photographic medium. Includes viewing, 
analysis, and discussion of the medium's history and current trends. Instructor(s): Winningham, 
Hester 

ARTS 206 (S) PHOTOGRAPHY H (3) 

Continuation of ARTS 205. Exploration of the basic materials and processes of the photographic 
medium. Includes viewing, analysis, and discussion of the medium's history and current trends. 
Instriutor{s): Winningham, Paul Hester 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 293 

ARTS 216 35MM PHOTOGRAPHY (3) 

Introduction to 35mm photography. Prerequisite(s): permission of the instructor. Instructor(s): 
Winningluini 

ARTS 225 DRAWING I (3) 

This course introduces the student to techniques and materials, processes of drawing, and the use 
of drawing to explore the visual language of line, tone, composition, and linear and atmospheric 
perspective. Emphasis on learning to articulate form in space through observational studies using 
both wet and dry media. Instnictor(s): Keeton, Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 291 SPECIAL PROB: 3-D DESIGN (3) 

Special Problems in Design: Creative 3-D. Study of problems at the introductory level in creative 
art. May be used in awarding transfer credit. Instructor(s): Smith 

ARTS 292 (F) SPECIAL PROB: DRAWING (3) 

Special Problems in Drawing. Study of problems at the introductory level in creative art. May be 
used in awarding transfer credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of the instmctor. Instmctor(s): Keeton, 
Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 293 (S) SPECIAL PROB: DRAWING (3) 

Special Problems in Drawing. Study or problems at the introductory level in creative art. May be 
used in awarding transfer credit. Instriictor(s): Keeton, Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 294 SPECIAL PROB: STUDIO ART (3) 

Special Problems in Studio Art. Study of problems at the introductory level in creative art. May be 
used in awarding transfer credit. 

ARTS 295 SPECIAL PROB: PHOTO (3) 

Special Problems in Photography. Study of problems at the introductory level in creative art. May 
be used in awarding transfer credit. 

ARTS 296 SPECIAL PROB: FILM & VIDEOTAPE (3) 

Special Problems in Film & Videotape Making. Study of problems at the introductory level in 
creative art. May be used in awarding transfer credit. 

ARTS 301 PAINTING I (3) 

Study of problems in painting, both traditional and experimental, in various opaque media. 
Instructor(s): Keeton, Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 303 (S) INTERMEDIATE PAINTING (3) 

Continuation of studies of problems in painting, both traditional and experimental, in various 
opaque media. Instructor(s): Keeton, Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 305 (F) PHOTOGRAPHY III (3) 

Study of advanced problems in photography, with emphasis on independent pursuit of projects 
submitted by the students. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. Instructor(s): Winningham 

ARTS 306 (S) PHOTOGRAPHY IV (3) 

Study of advanced problems in photography, with emphasis on the independent pursuit of projects 
submitted by the students.Continuationof ARTS 305.Prerequisite(s): permission of the instructor. 
Instructor(s): Winningham 

ARTS 310 (S) COLLABORATIVE PRINTMAKING (3) 

This course is designed to interactively educate the student about the collaborative print process 
beyond artistic dialog, allowing each student to work as artist-printmaker, economist, and business 
planner. The course will examine the process of taking artwork from the beginning concept to the 
finished product to the marketplace-all the while staying within a budget. Enrollment limited to 10. 
Instructor(s): Broker 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



294 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ARTS 311 INTAGLIO I (3) 

Instruction in black and white etching and photo etching. Instructor(s): Broker 

ARTS 312 RELIEF 1 (3) 

Instruction in black-and-white linoleum prints. Includes advanced color methods. Prerequisite(s): 
ARTS 225 and permission of the instructor. Instructor(s): Broker 

ARTS 313 LITHOGRAPHY I (3) 

Introduction in stone lithography in black-and-white and color. Instntctor(s): Broker 

ARTS 320 MONOTYPE I (3) 

Introduction to Monotype. Includes black-and-white and color Monotype printing. Instructor(s): 
Broker 

ARTS 325 LIFE DRAWING (3) 

Instruction in drawing from the model in various media. Instructor(s): Keeton, Poiilos, Sparagana 

ARTS 327 (F) DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION (3) 

Study of the expressive possibilities of documentary production using digital syii^ms. Instructor(s): 
Huherman 

ARTS 328 FILMMAKING I (3) 

Continuation of ARTS 327. Includes the completion of one major film project by the class using 
16mm film and synchronous sound equipment. Instructor(s): Hiiberman 

ARTS 329 (S) FILM FORUM (3) 

Viewing, analysis, and discussion of modern and classic films. Prerequisite(s): permission of the 
instructor. Instntctor(s): Huberman 

ARTS 337 COLOR DRAWING (3) 

Introduction to color using still lifes and employing various media (pastel and watercolor). 
Instructor(s): Keeton, Poiilos, Sparagana 

ARTS 345 (F) COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY I (3) 

Study in the fundamental techniques of color photography. Includes special problems in color 
camera work, color negative and transparency processing, and color printing. Prerequisite(s): 
ARTS 205, ARTS 206, and permission of the instructor. Continuation of ARTS 345. Instructor(s): 
Winningham 

ARTS 346 (S) COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY II (3) 

Study in the fundamental techniques of color photography. Includes special problems in color 
camera work, color negative and transparency processing, and color printing. Continuation of 
ARTS 345. Instructor(s): Winningham 

ARTS 349 PRINTMAKING I (3) 

Study of the problems and techniques in printmaking at the beginning level. Both traditional and 
experimental forms of printmaking will be examined. Instriictor{s): Broker 

ARTS 350 SPECIAL PROB: PRINTMAKING (3) 

Special Problems in Printmaking. Study at the introductory level of the problems in the creative art 
of printmaking. May be used in awarding transfer credit. 

ARTS 365 (F) SCULPTURE I (3) 

Exploration of sculpture in wood, metal, and other sculptural media. Instructor(s): Smith 

ARTS 366 (S) SCULPTURE STUDIO (3) 

Exploration of sculpture in wood, metal, and other sculptural media. Continuation of ARTS 365. 
Instri(ctor(s): Smith 

(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 295 

ARTS 381 (F) DIGITAL IMAGING I (3) 

This course is designed as an introduction to electronic media as a tool for artistic production. 
Students will learn the foundations of Adobe Photoshop as it relates to production of image making 
and new media applications. This course will address, among other things, constructing images, 
color correction and duo tones, using layers, Bezier curves, use of text, and issues of input/output. 
InsTructor(s): Thomas 

ARTS 382 (S) DIGITAL IMAGING II (3) 

A continuation of ARTS 381. this course will introduce electronic media as a tool for artistic 
production. Students will learn more advanced uses of Adobe Photoshop as it relates to production 
of image making and new media applications. Instructor(s): Thomas 

ARTS 390 INVESTIGATING DRAWING (3) 

Investigating Drawing: Theory & Practice. Examination of the basic principles of drawing and 
representation, with emphasis on studio practice, art histor}\ and theory. Includes categories of 
representation (e.g., still life, landscape, and figure) and the process of making drawings, as well 
as related readings, group discussions, and writing assignments. May substitute ARTS 390 for 
ARTS 225 as a studio prerequisite. Prerequisite(s): permission of the instructor. Corequisite HART 
390. 

ARTS 391 SPECIAL PROB: DRAWING (3) 

Special Problems in Drawing. Study of problems in creative art. May be used in awarding transfer 
credit. 

ARTS 392 SPECIAL PROB: LIFE DRAWING (3) 

Special Problems in Life Drawing. Study of problems in creative art. May be used in awarding 
transfer credit. 

ARTS 393 SPECIAL PROB: PAINTING (3) 

Special Problems in Painting. Study of problems in creative art. May be used in awarding transfer 
credit. 

ARTS 394 SPECIAL PROB: PRINTMAKING (3) 

Special Problems in Printmaking. Study of problems in creative art. May be used in awarding 
transfer credit. 

ARTS 395 SPECIAL PROB: PHOTO (3) 

Special Problems in Photography. Study of problem in creative art. May be used in awarding 
transfer credit. 

ARTS 396 SPECIAL PROB: FILM & VIDEO (3) 

Study of problems in creative art. May be used in awarding transfer credit. 

ARTS 397 SPECIAL PROB: SCULPTURE (3) 

Special Problems in Sculpture. Study of problems in creative art. May be used in awarding transfer 
credit. 

ARTS 411 INTAGLIO II (3) 

Black-and-white etching and photoetching at the advanced level. Instriictor(s): Broker 

ARTS 412 RELIEF II (3) 

Instruction in black-and-white linoleum prints at the advanced level. Includes advanced color 
methods. Instructor(s): Broker 

ARTS 413 LITHOGRAPHY II (3) 

Instruction at the advanced level in stone and plate lithography in black-and-white and color. 
Instructor(s): Broker 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



296 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ARTS 420 MONOTYPE II (3) 

Advanced monotype processes: emphasis on color and drawing techniques. Prerequisite(s): ARTS 
225, 320, and permission of the instructor. Instructor(s): Broker 

ARTS 423 SPECIAL PROB: PAINTING (3) 

Special Problems in Painting. Study of problems in creative art. May be used in awarding transfer 
credit. Instrucror(s): Keeton, Poulos. Sparagana 

ARTS 425 ADVANCED DRAWING (3) 

An advanced level course for experiencing the art of drawing by working in an expansive format. 
By using, but not limited to, traditional materials, students will be encouraged to explore the 
language of drawing in contemporary art making. Emphasis will be on individual project 
development and staying with ideas to observe, investigate, and document evolutions in the work. 
Instructor(s): Keeton, Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 426 (F) STUDIO SUBJECTS (3) 

Studio Subjects: Life/Self- Portraiture. A studio class with in-depth exploration of still life and self- 
portraiture painting problems. The students will be expected to develop a body of work using water- 
based mediums, collage, and different surfaces. There will be discussions/critiques of the students' 
work using historical concepts of past masters of both studio subjects. Instriictor(s): Poulos 

ARTS 427 (F) FILM & VIDEO II (3) 

Film & Videotape Making II. Completion of one major film project by each student, using either 
video or 16 mm film. Instructor(s): Huberman 

ARTS 428 (S) FILMMAKING II (3) 

Completion of one major film project by each student, using either video or 16mm film. 
Instructor(s): Huberman 

ARTS 432 FILM GENRE: THE WESTERN (3) 

Survey of the essential American film experience spanning all the years of U.S. cinema, with 
emphasis on the western and its mythic function in society. Instructor(s): Huberman 

ARTS 443 SPECIAL PROB: DESIGN (3) 

Special Problems in Design. Study of advanced problems in creative art. May be used in awarding 
credit. Instructor(s): Smith 

ARTS 445 (F) SPECIAL PROB: DRAWING (1) 

Special Problems in Drawing. Study of advanced problems in creative art. May be used in awarding 
transfer credit. Instructor(s): Keeton, Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 446 (S) SPECIAL PROB: DRAWING (1) 

Special Problems in Drawing. Study of advanced problems in creative art. May be used in awarding 
transfer credit. Instructor(s): Keeton, Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 447 (F) SPECIAL PROB: LIFE DRAWING (3) 

Special Problems in Life Drawing. Study of advanced problems in creative art. May be used in 
awarding transfer credit. Instructor(s): Keeton, Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 448 (S) SPECIAL PROB: LIFE DRAWING (3) 

Special Problems in Life Drawing. Study of advanced problems in creative art. May be used in 
awarding transfer credit. Instructor(s): Keeton, Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 449 PRINTMAKING STUDIO (3) 

Exploration of etching, lithography, photogravure, and monoprinting. Prerequisite(s): ARTS 225 
and permission of the instructor. Instructor(s): Broker 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



* COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 297 

ARTS 450 SPECIAL PROB: PRINTMAKING (3) 

Special Problems in Printmaking. Study of advanced problems in creative art. May be used in 
awarding transfer credit. Instructor(s): Broker 

ARTS 451 (F) SPECIAL PROB: PAINTING (3) 

Special Problems in Painting. Study of advanced problems in creative art. May be used in awarding 
transfer credit. Instructoris): Keeton, Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 452 (S) SPECIAL PROB: PAINTING (3) 

Special Problems in Painting. Study of advanced problems in creative art. May be used in awarding 
transfer credit. Instritctor(s): Keeton, Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 453 (F) SPECIAL PROB: PHOTOGRAPHY (3) 

Special Problems in Photography. Study of advanced problems in creative art. May be used in 
awarding transfer credit. Instructoris): Winningham 

ARTS 454 (S) SPECIAL PROB: PHOTOGRAPHY (3) 

Special Problems in Photography. Study of advanced problems in creative art. May be used in 
awarding transfer credit. Instructoris): Winningham 

ARTS 455 SPECIAL PROB: FILM & VIDEO (3) 

Special Problems in Film and Videotape Making. Study of advanced problems in creative art. May 
be used in awarding transfer credit. Instructoris ): Huberman 

ARTS 456 SPECIAL PROB: FILMMAKING (3) 

Special Problems in Filmmaking. Study of advanced problems in creative art. May be used in 
awarding transfer credit. Instructoris): Huberman 

ARTS 457 (F) SPECIAL PROB: SCULPTURE (0-1-1) 

Special Problems in Sculpture. Study of advanced problems in creative art. May be used in 
awarding transfer credit. Instructoris): Smith 

ARTS 458 (S) SPECIAL PROB: SCULTPURE (3) 

Special Problems in Sculpture. Study of advanced problems in creative art. May be used in 
awarding transfer credit. Instructoris): Smith 

ARTS 465 (F) SCULPTURE I (3) 

Study of advanced problems in various sculptural media. Instructoris): Smith 

ARTS 466 (S) SCULPTURE STUDIO (3) 

Study of advanced problems in various sculptural media. Instructoris): Smith 

ARTS 475 ADVANCED PAINTING (3) 

Study of advanced problems in painting, with emphasis on independent development and partici- 
pation in class critiques. Instructoris): Keeton, Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 494 SPECIAL PROB: PRINTMAKING (3) 

Special Problems in Printmaking. Study at the advanced level of the problems in the creative art of 
printmaking. May be used in awarding transfer credit. Prerequisite(s): ARTS 225 and permission 
of instructor. Instructoris): Broker 

ARTS 501 STUDIO I: PAINTING (3) 

Individual work in painting under the direction of one or more faculty members. This class is for 
B.F.A. candidates only. Instructoris): Keeton, Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 503 STUDIO I: SCULPTURE (3) 

Individual work in sculpture under the direction of one or more faculty members. This class is for 
B.F.A. candidates only. Instructor(s): Smith 

(#) = credit hours per semester 



298 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ARTS 505 STUDIO I: DRAWING (3) 

Individual work in drawing under the direction of one or more faculty members. This class is for 
B.F.A. candidates only. Instnictor(s): Keeton, Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 507 STUDIO I: LIFE DRAWING (3) 

Individual work in life drawing under the direction of one or more faculty members. This class is 
for B.F.A. candidates only. Instnictor{s): Keeton, Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 509 STUDIO I: DESIGN (3) 

Individual work in design under the direction of one or more faculty mem.bers. This class is for 
B.F.A. candidates only. Instructor(s): Smith 

ARTS 5 1 1 STUDIO I: PRINTMAKING (3) 

Individual work in printmaking under the direction of one or more faculty members. This class is 
for B.F.A. candidates only. Instnictor(s): Broker 

ARTS 513 STUDIO I: PHOTOGRAPHY (3) 

Individual work in photography under the direction of one or more faculty members. This class is 
for B.F.A. candidates only. Instructor(s): Winningham 

ARTS 515 STUDIO I: FILMMAKING (3) 

Individual work in filmmaking under the direction of one or more faculty members. This class is 
for B.F.A candidates only. Instructor(s): Hiiberman 

ARTS 520 STUDIO II: PAINTING (6) 

Individual work in painting under the direction of one or more faculty members. This class is for 
B.F.A. candidates only. Instnictor(s): Keeton, Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 522 STUDIO II: SCULPTURE (6) 

Individual work in sculpture under the direction of one or more faculty members. This class is for 
B.F.A. candidates only. Instructor(s): Smith 

ARTS 524 STUDIO II: DRAWING (6) 

Individual work in drawing under the direction of one or more faculty members. This class is for 
B.F.A. candidates only. Instructor(s): Keeton, Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 526 STUDIO II: LIFE DRAWING (6) 

Individual work in life drawing under the direction of one or more faculty members. This class is 
for B.F.A. candidates only. Instructor{s): Keeton, Poulos, Sparagana 

ARTS 530 STUDIO II: PRINTMAKING (6) 

Individual work in printmaking under the direction of one or more faculty members. This class is 
for B.F.A. candidates only. Instructor(s): Broker 

ARTS 532 STUDIO H: PHOTOGRAPHY (6) 

Individual work in photography under the direction of one or more faculty members. This class is 
for B.F.A. candidates only. Instructor(s}: Winningham 

ARTS 534 STUDIO II: FILMMAKING (6) 

Individual work in filmmaking under the direction of one or more faculty members. This class is 
for B.F.A. candidates only. Instructor(sj: Huberman 

ARTS 546 STUDIO III: PHOTOGRAPHY (9) 

Individual work in photography under the direction of one or more faculty members. This class is 
for B.F.A. candidates only. Instructor(s): Winningham 

ARTS 548 STUDIO III: FILMMAKING (9) 

Individual work in filmmaking under the direction of one or more faculty members. This class is 
for B.F.A. candidates only. Instructor(s): Huberman 

(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 299 

ASIA (Asian Studies) 

The School of Humanities / Asian Studies Program 

ASIA 139 (F) INTRO INDIAN RELIGIONS (3) 

This course will survey the four major religions which originated in India, namely Hinduism, 
Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism. Emphasis will be placed on the study of the scriptures of these 
religions. Also listed as RELI 139. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Gray 

ASIA 140 (S) INTRO CHINESE RELIGIONS (3) 

This course will survey the major Chinese religious traditions of Confucianism, Daoism and 
Buddhism. Readings will include both philosophical texts, historical and anthropological studies, 
as well as popular literature. (Cross-listed with RELI 140.) Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): 
Gray 

ASIA 170 (F) THE ARTS OF CHINA (3) 

Introduction to history of the visual arts in China in the Bronze Age to the present. We will pay 
special attention to the artworks' physical and social contexts (e.g., tomb, temple, court, literati's 
garden and studio, city, nation-state). Topics include: funerary art and the imagination of the 
afterlife, art and imperial cosmology, the rise of literati aesthetics, relationship between landscape 
painting and calligraphy , and the emergence of propaganda and avant-garde in Modem China. Also 
listed as HART 170. Instructor(s): Nakatani 

ASIA 21 1 (F) INTRO TO ASIAN CIVILIZATIONS (3) 

Introduction to the great cultural traditions of Asia, past and present, with emphasis on evolving 
religious and philosophical traditions, artistic and literary achievements, and patterns of political, 
social, and economic change. Also listed as HIST 206. Instructoris): Klein, Shehabuddin, Thai 

ASIA 221 (F) LIFE OF THE PROPHET MUHAMMAD 

This course will examine the life of the Prophet Muhammad, focusing on its significance for 
Muslims and for non-Muslims. Readings in the Qur'an, Ibn Hisham, and Haykal. Also listed as 
RELI 221 . Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Cook 

ASIA 231 (F) THE ENLIGHTENMENT OF THE BODY (3) 

Beginning with a historical survey of the American metaphysical tradition, this course turns to a 
close study of the Esalen Institute in Big Sur, California, as a unique window into some of the 
different ways the tradition has appropriated Asian religions, psychological models of the 
unconscious, and contemporary scientific paradigms. Also listed as RELI 231. Instructor(s): 
Kripal 

ASIA 232 (S) RELIGIONS FROM INDIA (3) 

This course will survey the four major religions which originate in India, namely Hinduism. 
Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism. Emphasis will be placed on the study of scriptures of these 
traditions and their continuins alobal relevance, particularly in American history and culture. Also 
listed as RELI 232/500. Not offered 2003-04. Iiistriictor(s): Kripal 

ASIA 240 (S) GENDER & POLITICIZED RELIGION (3) 

This course examines the emergence of religion-based politics in various Asian countries- 
particularly Hindu and Muslim-focusing on the women participants in these movements as well as 
the movements' concern with gender roles in society. We will investigate, for instance, the extent 
to which women participants have been willing or able to reshape the central ideas of such 
movements. Also listed as WGST 240. lnstructor(s): Shehabuddin 

ASIA 250 (F) MEDITATION, MYSTICISM, AND MAGIC (3) 

The course moves between Buddhist religious and Western psychological literature, analyzing 
these as models of human development, as guides to a meditative life or critiques of it, and above 
all as expressions of deeply rooted cultural proclivities. Reading Freud, Khakar, Milarepa, Norbu, 
Obeyesekere. Sutric and Tantric literature, Taylor and Wangyal. Also listed as RELI 250. Not 
offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Klein, Parsons 

(#) = credit hours per semester 



300 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ASIA 280 (F) THE ASIAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE (3) 

This course will investigate the diverse cultural traditions and shared experiences of Asian 
Americans in the United States, with an emphasis on people ofChinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, 
Southeast Asian, and South Asian ancestry . We shall explore the history of Asian immigration into 
the United States, as well as contemporary issues such as ethnic identity, racism, model minority 
stereotyping, inteiracial conflict, family structure, gender roles and relationships, and generational 
differences. We will analyze and discuss historical, social and literar}' texts, as well as documentary 
and feature films. Students are expected to gain from this course an appreciation of the cultural 
complexity of the Asian American community as well as a sense of its common interests and shared 
experiences. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Yeh 

ASIA 323 (F) THE KNOWING BODY (3) 

Western thought tends to regard mind and body dualistically, a view with significant impact on 
religious, cultural, gender, and social processes. This course juxtaposes received Western assump- 
tions with Buddhist perspectives (especially Tibetan Buddhist), mapping Western and Buddhist 
categories onto each other to better understand the implications of each. Also listed as RELI 323/ 
577, WGST 323, and SOCI 323. Not offered 2003-04. Instmctor(s): Klein, Long 

ASIA 330 (S) INTRO TRAD CHINESE POETRY (3) 

The most elite literary form in classical Chinese literature, traditional poetry also enjoys large 
readership among common folks. This seeming contradiction emerges from its terse, single- 
syllabic language and rich, perceptible imagery that offer easy access to highly condensed 
messages. This course seeks to decode enchanting features of traditional Chinese poetry through 
examin ing the transformation of poetic genres , the interaction between poetic creation and political , 
social, and cultural changes, and the close association of poetry with art. Thus, this course also 
serves to understand Chinese culture and history through poetic perspectives. All readings in 
English translation. No previous knowledge ofChinese literature or language required. Also listed 
as CHIN 330. Instriicror(s): Qian 

ASIA 332 CHINESE FLM & MODERN CHINESE LIT (3) 

Designed to approach modern Chinese literature through visual images (Chinese films, subtitled 
in English), this course analyzes movie adaptations in comparison with their original texts. The 
approach is intended to examine how and why different time periods and different media affect the 
theme of a story. Discussion focuses on literary and cultural history, with attention given to 
narratology and movie theories as well. Topics include: China's modernity and the formation and 
cinematic visualization of modern Chinese literature ; self, state , and nation ; sex , gender, and power; 
etc. All readings in English translation. Also listed as CHIN 332. Instnutor(s): Qian 

ASIA 335 (F) INTRO CLASCL CHINESE NOVELS (3) 

Examination of the basic characteristics of classical Chinese novels, primarily through six 
important works from the 1 6th to 1 8th centuries: Water Margin, Monkey , Golden Lotus, Scholars, 
Romance of the Three Kingdoms, and Dream of the Red Chamber. Also listed as CHIN 335. 
Instructor(s): Qian 

ASIA 340 (F) GENDER & POETICIZED RELIGION (ENRICHED 
VERSION) (3) 

This course examine the emergence of religion-based politics in various Asian countries-particu- 
larly Hindu and Muslim-focusing on the women participants in these movements as well as the 
movements' concern with gender roles in society. We will investigate, for instance, the extent to 
which women participants have been willing or able to reshape the central ideas of such movements. 
Also listed as WGST 340. Instructor(s): Shehabuddin 

ASIA 344 (F) KOREAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE (3) 

Exploration of selections from modern Korean literature and watching Korean films. Includes 
background survey of Korean history, philosophy and religion. All texts and films in English 
translation. No previous knowledge of Korean required. Also listed as KORE 344 and HUMA 344. 
Not offered 2003-04. Instnictor(s): Lee 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 301 

ASIA 345 (F) LINGUISTIC STRUCTURE OF KOREAN (3) 

This course focuses on the origin of Korean and related languages. It explores the way the Korean 
language evolved and interacted with other East Asian languages, including Chinese and Japanese. 
The socio-linguistic aspect of these languages will be studied, including the difference in male and 
female language usage and the honorific systems. Also listed as KORE 345 and LING 345. Not 
offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Lee 

ASIA 346 (F) KOREAN CULTURE AND HISTORY (3) 

This course will introduce students to the important elements of Korean history and culture through 
a reading of modem Korean literature. The class will concentrate on the period from the early 20th 
century to the present. Special attention will be given to topics such as Korean religion, family life, 
and literature. Films will be used in conjuction with lectures and class discussions to provide 
students with a better understanding of the basic elements of Korean society. Also listed as KORE 
346. All readings in English translation. Instructor(s): Lee 

ASIA 354 (S) ASIAN APOCALYPTIC MOVEMENTS (3) 

This course will focus upon the rich and neglected apocalyptic and millenarian tradition of Asia, 
discussing Hinduism, Buddhism, Zoroasterianism, Manichaeism and Eastern Christianity as each 
of these faiths interact with and react to each other. Readings will be from scriptures and translations 
covering approximately the period between the first and 19th centuries. Also listed as RELI 354. 
Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Cook, Gray 

ASIA 360 (F) CHINA AND THE CHINESE DIASPORA (3) 

Exploration of the political, economic, and social forces changing the lives of nearly a quarter of 
humanity, the 1.4 billion people of Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore and the 
diasporic Chinese communities of East and Southeast Asia. Topics include political and economic 
liberalization, nationalism and urban identity, privatization and consumerism, environmentalism 
and public goods, and the globalization of communication technologies and Chinese cultural 
media. Instructor(s): Lewis 

ASIA 361 THE ORIENTAL RENAISSANCE (3) 

This course will explore the European and American encounters with India from 17th-century 
France to 20th-century America. Particular attention will be given to the translation of Sanskrit 
texts, the English and German Romantic traditions, the depth psychology of C.G. Jung, and the 
American New Age. Also listed as RELI 361/501 . Instructor(s): Kripal 

ASIA 363 (F) MARRIAGE OF HEAVEN AND HELL (3) 

This history of mysticism is marked by symbolic systems and ritual practices suffused with erotic 
and ethical paradoxes. This course examines such themes in a wide variety of historical contexts, 
from Plato's dialogues and Blake's poetry to Christian mysticism. Hindu, and Buddhist Tantric 
traditions, and the modem study of religion. Also listed as RELI 363. Not offered 2003-04. 
' Instructor(s): Kripal 

ASIA 365 (F) CHINESE MYSTICISM AND MEDITATION 

This course will investigate the major mystical and meditative traditions in Taoism, Buddhism and 
Neo-Confucianism. Focus will be placed upon the inner and outer traditioris of Taoist alchemy, 
Buddhist meditation traditions (primarily Chan/Zen and Pure Land techniques), and the influence 
of these traditions upon Chinese intellectual discourse and the creative arts . Also listed as RELI 365 . 
Not offered 2003-04. 

ASIA 366 TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE -THE ASIAN 

AMERICAN NOVEL 

This course surveys the thematics and historical contexts of Asian American literary traditions. We 
read of range of texts, from the late 19th century to the present, emphasizing the novel but also 
including some short fiction. We start in Gold Rush Califomia, move to early Chinese America, 
then to mid-century Chinatown, and World War II and Japanese interment. The largest part of the 
course deals in Civil Rights inspired literatures, and this backdrop also informs the course's 
concluding look on recent texts that work from new and different political and literary paradigms. 
Also listed as ENGL 366. Instructor(s): Comer 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



302 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ASIA 369 (F) FILM, LIT & JAPANESE PAST (3) 

Every day , we retel 1 our past to find meaning in our present . Authors and film directors in Japan have 
shaped national identities, created moral ideas, made sense of the horrors of war, and articulated 
new visions of the future— all through artistic reinterpretations of historical themes. In this class, 
we will examine both these allusions to the past and the uses to which they have been put in Japanese 
film and literature over the years. Also listed as HIST 369. Instructor(s): Thai 

ASIA 380 (F) THE ASIAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE (3) 

This course will investigate the diverse cultural traditions and shared experiences of Asian 
Americans in the United States , with an emphasis on people of Chinese , Filipino , Japanese , Korean, 
Southeast Asian, and South Asian ancestry . We shall explore the history of Asian immigration into 
the United States, as well as contemporary issues such as ethnic identity, racism, model minority 
stereotyping, interi'acial conflict, family structure , gender roles and relationships, and generational 
differences . We will analyze and discuss historical, social and literary texts, as well as documentary 
and feature films. Students are expected to gain from this course an appreciation of the cultural 
complexity of the Asian American community. Not offered 2003-04. histriictor(s): Yeh 

ASIA 399 (F) WOMEN IN CHINESE LITERATURE (3) 

This course examines women's roles in Chinese literature as writers, readers, and characters, 
focusing particularly on the tension between women's lived bodily experiences and the cultural 
experiences inscribed on the female body and how, in the process, women have contrarily gendered 
patriarchal culture into their own. It will also touch on Chinese women's incorporation of the 
Western Tradition. Also listed as WGST 399. lusrnictor(s): Qian 

ASIA 401 (F) INDEPENDENT STUDY (3) 

Reading or research project to be determined by discussions between student (S) and faculty 
member (S). 

ASIA 402 (F) INDEPENDENT STUDY (3) 

Reading or research project to be determined by discussions between student (S) and faculty 
member (S). 

ASIA 432 (S) ISLAM IN SOUTH ASIA (3) 

Seminar on Islamic history, politics, and culture in the South Asian subcontinent. Topics will 
include emergence of Indian Muslim society; Muslim responses to colonialism and the movement 
for Pakistan; and the role of Islam in politics in contemporary India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. 
Requires no prior knowledge of Islam or South Asia . Also listed as HIST 432 and WGST 432 . Not 
offered 2003-04. Instnictor(s): Shehabuddin 

ASIA 441 (F) POPULAR RELIGION IN THE MIDDLE EAST (3) 

This course will examine the popular religion in the Middle East from Late Antiquity until the 19th 
century, focusing on healing practices, astrology, protection, amulets, seasoned/life-cycle rituals, 
and other popular beliefs common to Islam , Judaism and Christianity. Also listed as RELI 44 1 . Not 
offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Cook 

ASIA 470 (S) VISUAL CULT IN REV & POSTREV CHINA 

Exploration of the deployment of socialist , critical , and avant-garde art in modem Chinese visual 
culture. The course will cover a wide range of materials from painting and installation art to 
propaganda posters and film. Issues addressed will include: the notion of the avant-garde (social 
and aesthetic), the structure of authoritarian art, art as a social movement, and the paradox of 
counter-discourse. The course will maintain a global and comparative frame of analysis, drawing 
on scholarship on Soviet and Nazi Germany visual cultures. Also listed as H/KKY 410 .Instnictor{s): 
Nakatani 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 303 

ASIA 472 (F) JAPANESE ANIMATION (3) 

Japanese Animation: Narrative. History & Society. Since the 1980s, animation has become a major 
force in Japanese popular culture, serving as a medium to address the diverse concerns of a high- 
tech media-focused society. This seminar explores the social, historical, and aesthetic significance 
of Japanese animation. Topics include gender and sexuality . ecological consciousness and religious 
animation, folklore and history, viewership and fandom. the centrality of the fantastic and the 
grotesque, visions of a media- and technology-saturated society, and the prevalence of apocalyptic 
motifs and conspiracv theory. Also listed as HIST 472 and HART 472. Insrriutoiis): Nakatani, 
Thai 

ASIA 473 TOPICS IN ASIAN AMERICAN LIT (3) 

Topics will vary from year to year. Also listed as ENGL 473. Not offered 2003-04. 

ASIA 489 (F) MIGRATIONS & DIASPORAS (3) 

The Indian Ocean presents an enormously varied arena of cultural exchange and interaction 
spanning coastal regions of Africa, the Middle East, South and Southeast Asia and Australia. This 
seminar introduces students to this fascinating region by examining societies and empires shaped 
by voyages of exploration, religious pilgrimages, trading diasporas and forced migration. Also 
listed as HIST 489. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Ward 



ASTR (Astronomy) 

The Wiess School of Natural Sciences / Department of Physics and Astronomy 

ASTR 100 (F) EXPLORING THE COSMOS ( 1 ) 

Introduction to concepts and methods used in astronomy and astrophysics, with a theme of 
Astrobiology — Life in the Universe . Will include student presentations and webpage development. 
For first-year students intending to major in science or engineering. Corequisite: PHYS 102 or 
PHYS 112. Instnictor(s): Ditfour 

ASTR 201 STARS , GALAXIES , AND THE UNIVERSE (3) 

An introductory course for students in academic programs. The formation, evolution, and death of 
stars; the composition and evolution of galaxies; the structure and evolution of the universe. 
Instructor(s): Oberlack 

ASTR 202 EXPLORATION OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM (3) 

An introductory course for students in academic programs, surveying the sun, planetary motions, 
interplanetary fields and plasmas, the planets, their satellites and rings, and comets. The purposes 
and methods of manned and unmanned solar system exploration are also discussed. Instriictor(s): 
Reiff, Oberlack 

ASTR 205 FROM SPACE AND TIME TO SPACE-TIME (3) 

Introduces nonscience students to major transformation in our views of space and time precipitated 
by Einstein's special theory of relativity (SR). We will build a space-time framework and then use 
it to introduce the essential results of SR. We will also discuss the historical circumstances and 
philosophical and cultural implications surrounding the invention of SR. Not offered 2003-04. 

ASTR 221 (F) OBSERVING THE NIGHT SKY (1) 

Use of small telescopes and binoculars to study constellations, bright stars, planets and the sun at 
the campus observatory and at dark-sky sites. Modem analog and digital techniques will be used 
along with direct visual observation. Intended for students in academic programs. Prerequisite(s): 
One of ASTR 100. ASTR 201 . ASTR 202. Instructor(s): Diifour 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



304 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ASTR 230 (S) ASTRONOMY LAB (3) 

A hands-on introduction to modem teciiniques of observational astronomy. Students use tele- 
scopes , CCDs , and computers to obtain and analyze their own images of solar system , galactic , and 
extragalactic objects. This course involves field trips to dark sky observing sites such as George 
Observatory and makes extensive use of state-of-the-art data analysis software . Prerequisite(s): any 
one of the following courses plus consent of the Instructor(s): ASTR 100, ASTR 201 , ASTR 350. 
ASTR 360. Instructor(s): Johns-Krull 

ASTR 350 (F) INTRODUCTION TO ASTROPHYSICS - STARS (3) 

An introduction to celestial mechanics, radiative transfer, stellar structure, and stellar remnants 
(including black holes and neutron stars). Aspects of planetary science and solar system foraiation 
may also be explored. Together, ASTR 350 and ASTR 360 provide a comprehensive survey of ' 
modem astrophysics needed for senior research and graduate study in astronomy . Either ASTR 350 
or 360 may be taken first. Prerequisite(s): MATH 21 1. Corequisite: PHYS 202 or CHEM 312. 
Instriictor(s): Baring 

ASTR 360 (S) INTRODUCTION TO ASTROPHYSICS -GALAXIES AND 
COSMOLOGY (3) 

Morphology, kinematics, and dynamics of the Milky Way and extemal galaxies, including 
interstellar matter and evidence for dark matter. Peculiar and active galaxies, including interacting 
systems and evidence for supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei such as quasars. Large , 
scale stmcture and expansion of the universe, including various cosmologies ranging from the 
inflationary big bang theory to steady-state and anthropic concepts. Either ASTR 350 or 360 may 
be taken first. Prerequisite(s): MATH 211. Corequisite: PHYS 202 or CHEM 312. Instnictor(s): 
Dufour 

ASTR 400 UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR IN ASTROPHYSICS(l) 

Seminar on cunent research topics in astronomy, astrophysics, and space physics for juniors and 
seniors. Students will be expected to give one oral presentation each semester. May be repeated for 
credit. Instructor(s): Johns-Krull 

ASTR 402 (S) TEACHING EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE (3) 

Overview of the earth and the solar system , their stmcture , evolution . and dynamics . Fundamentals 
of earth and space science topics as taught in 6th grade. Includes mathematics of solar motion at 
level of algebra and simple trigonometry. Includes teaching in use of earth and solar system 
software and weather station software. This course is designed for science and math teachers 
(grades 6-12) but is also available for a general audience. One hour of lab per week. Also listed as 
EDUC 588. Instructor(s): Reiff 

ASTR 403 (S) ASTRONOMY FOR TEACHERS (3) 

Leam how to teach astronomy concepts as specified by the state of Texas. This class provides the 
most basic concepts and what is necessary for students to master them, following the development 
specified in the TEKS. Lab activities suitable for replication in K-9 classrooms and as local field 
trip experience. Also listed as EDUC 589. Instructor(s): Reiff 

ASTR 430 (S) TEACHING ASTRONOMY LABORATORY (3) 

Methods and facilities of observational astronomy for public education. Students will help train 
beginners in the use of telescopes and carry out a modest observational program of their own. The 
course requires one public talk to a nontechnical audience and internship work at the George 
Observatory and the Houston Museum of Natural Science. Prerequisite(s): ASTR 230, ASTR 350 
or 360, or permission of instmctor. Instriictor(s): Reiff 

ASTR 450 EXPERIMENTAL SPACE SCIENCE (3) 

Study of instruments and methods used in space physics and astronomy. May include the 
electromagnetic spectrum , cosmic ray s , neutrinos, magnetic fields, and particles in the solar system, 
as well as discussion of special techniques for remote sensing or for the analysis of massive 
astronomical data sets. Prerequisite(s): ASTR 230 and 350, or permission of the instmctor. Not 
offered 2003-04. 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 305 

ASTR 451 (F) SOLAR AND STELLAR ASTROPHYSICS (3) 

Undergraduate version of ASTR 551. Prerequisite(s): ASTR 350 or ASTR 360 and PH YS 30 1 and 
302. Insrnictor(s): Johns-Krull 

ASTR 470 (F) SOLAR SYSTEM PHYSICS (3) 

The Sun, solar-terrestrial relationships, solar wind: planetary atmospheres, ionospheres and 
magnetospheres. Prerequisite(s): ASTR 350 or ASTR 360 and PHYS 301 and 302. Instnictor(s): 
Cloutier 

ASTR 500 GRADUATE SEMINAR (1) 

A presentation of current research programs in the department. Course may be repeated for credit, 
Instructor(s): Johns-Krull 

ASTR 505 PROCESSES IN COSMIC PLASMAS (3) 

Study of plasma phenomena that occur widely in nature. May include quasi-static equilibrium, 
masnetic equilibrium, masnetic reconnection, particle acceleration, plasma winds and jets, and 
interchange instabilities. Prerequisite(s): ASTR 470 and PHYS 480. Not offered 2003-04. 

ASTR 542 (F) NEBULAR ASTROPHYSICS (3) 

The physics of emission nebulae, including radiative transfer, photoionization. and thermal 
equilibi ia and internal gaseous dynamics . Physical processes in the interstellar mQAxum. Instructoiis}: 
Hartigan 

ASTR 551 (F) ASTROPHYSICS I: SUN AND STARS (3) 

Ph\sics of stellar interiors and atmospheres: solar phenomena. Concepts of stellar evolution. 
Instnictoris): Johns-Krull 

ASTR 552 (S) ASTROPHYSICS II: GALAXIES & COSMOLOGY (3) 

The physics of interstellar matter: structure of the Milky Way and other normal galaxies; physical 
cosmology and high-redshift phenomena. InsTrucTor(s): Boring 

ASTR 565 COMPACT OBJECTS (3) 

Selected topics involving white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes and their environments, e.g., 
pulsars, supernova remnants, and accretion disks. Not offered 2003-04. 

ASTR 600 (S) ADVANCED TOPICS IN ASTROPHYSICS (3) 

Lecture/seminars which treat topics of departmental interest. Not offered every year. Course may 
be repeated for credit. Instructor(s): Liang 



BIOE (Bioengineering) 



The George R. Brown School of Engineering / Department of Bioengineering 

BIOE 252 (F) BIOENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS (3) 

Introduction to material, energy, charge and momentum balances in biological systems. Steady- 
state and transient conservation equations for mass, energy , charge and momentum will be derived 
and applied using basic mathematical principles, physical laws, stoichiometry , and thermodynam- 
ics properties. Required for students intending to major in bioenaineering. Offered only in the Fall 
semester. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 125 and ]26"orPHYS 101 and102.CHEM 121 and l'22.MATH 
101 and 102, CAAM 21 1 or 210. Corequisite: Math 21 1 001 . Instntctorisj: San, Saterbak 

BIOE 320 (S) SYSTEMS PHYSIOLOGY LAB MODULE ( 1 ) 

Exploration of common biomedical equipment including EEC ECG, pulmonary function test. etc. 
Students w ill explore concepts through computer simulations and data collection and analysis. 
Enrollment limited to 9 per section. EriroUment in BIOE 322 is expected. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 322 
and BIOE 252. Instructor(s): Saterbak 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



306 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

BIOE 321 (F) CELLULAR ENGINEERING (3) 

Introduction to engineering principles and modeling at the cellular level. Topics include 
cytomechanics. receptor/1 igand binding, genetic engineering, enzyme kinetics, and metabolic 
pathway engineering, Prerequisite(s): BIOE 252 or permission of instructor. Instruclor(s): 
Athanasiou. Mclntire, San 

BIOE 322 (S) FUNDAMENTALS OF SYSTEMS PHYSIOLOGY (3) 

This course will teach the fundamentals of physiology at the organism, tissue, and cellular levels. 
Emphasis will be on engineering aspects of physiology. Prerequisite(s): Intro Biology and 
Differential Equations. Instructor(s): West 

BIOE 332 (S) THERMODYNAMICS (3) 

This course will be mathematically rigorous coverage of the fundamentals of thermodynamics with 
applications drawn from contemporary bioengineering problems. Topics covered include thermo- 
dynamics of self assembly, the hydrophobic effect, polymer and membrane phase transitions, 
membrane transport, cell mechanics, electromechanical coupling in biological systems, 
nonequilibrium thermodynamics, open systems and statistical mechanics. Instructor(s): Raphael 

BIOE 342 (S) LAB MODULE IN TISSUE CULTURE (1) 

Introduction to tissue culture techniques, including cell passage, cell attachment and proliferation 
assaya, and a transfection assay. Sections 1 and 2 are taught during the first half of the semester. 
Sections 3 and 4 are taught during the second half of the semester. Enrollment limited to 12 per 
section . Section sign-up is required by the instructor in Keck 1 08 during preregistration week . Also 
listed as BIOS 320. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 211 or CHEM 214 or permission of instructor. 
Itistructor(s): Saterbak 

BIOE 372 (S) INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICS AND 
BIOMATERIALS (3) 

Introduction to the fundamentals of biomechanics including force analysis, mechanics of deform- 
able bodies, stress and strain, multiaxial deformations, and viscoelasticity. Biomechanics of soft 
and hard tissues. Physical and chemical properties of biomaterials. Materials covered include both 
natural and synthetic ones intended to function in the biological environment . Prerequisite(s): BIOE 
252 or permission of instructor. Instnictor(s): Athanasiou, Liebschner 

BIOE 381 (F) FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY (3) 

Introduction to cellular electrophysiology. Includes the development of whole-cell models for 
neurons and muscle (cardiac, skeletal and smooth muscle) cells, based on ion channel currents 
obtained from whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments. Ion balance equations are developed, as well 
as, those for chemical signaling agents such as "second messengers." The construction of small 
neuron circuits are discussed. Volume conductor boundary-value problems frequently encountered 
in electrophysiology are posed, and solutions obtained based on adequate descriptions of the 
bioelectric current source and the volume conductor (surrounding tissue) medium. This course 
provides a basis for the interpretation of macroscopic bioelectric signals such as the electrocardio- ■ 
gram (ECG),electromyogram (EMG) and electroencephalogram (EEC). Also listed as ELEC 381. 
Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. Instriictor(s): Clark 

BIOE 383 (F) BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING INSTRUMENTATION (3) 

This is an introductory level course on fundamentals of biomedical engineering instrumentation 
and analysis. Topics include measurement principles; fundamental concepts in electronics includ- 
ing circuit analysis, data acquisition, amplifiers, and A/D converters; temperature, pressure, and 
flow measurements in biological systems. Also listed as ELEC 383. Laboratory sections will be 
offered 2-5pm on M,T,W.TH. Prerequisite(s): MATH 21 1/2 12,PHYS 126 or equivalent, CHEM 
122, BIOS 201 , and BIOE 252. Instructur{s): Anvari 

BIOE 384 (F) BIOPHOTONICS INSTRUMENTATION AND 
APPLICATIONS (3) 

Introduction to fundamentals of biophotonics instrumentation related to coherent light generation, 
transmission by optical components such as lenses and fibers, and modulation and detection. 
Interference and polarization concepts and light theories including x-ray and wave optics will be I 
covered. Biomedical applications in optical sensing and diagnosis will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): 
MATH 21 1/212, PHYS 126 or equivalent, and BIOS 201 . Instructor(s): Drezek 

(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring ' 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 307 

BIOE 391 (F) NUMERICAL METHODS & STATISTICS (3) 

Required for bioengineering majors. Numerical methods include solutions to ordinary differential 
equations. Statistics includes hypothesis testing, ANWA, and regression. Prerequisite(s): CAAM 
2 10 or 2 11 . Instructor(s): Staff 

BIOE 400 (S) UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (VAR, MAX 3) 

Instructor(s): Son 

BIOE 420 (F) BIOSYSTEMS TRANSPORT AND REACTION 
PROCESSES (3) 

The principles of reaction kinetics and transport phenomena will be used to quantitatively describe 
biological systems . Cell biology , physiology . anatomy , and materials science topics will be covered 
as background for the study of cell membrane transport, receptor-ligand interactions, and normal 
organ function. Models will be introduced to describe pathological conditions, drug pharmaco- 
kinetics, and artificial organ designs. Also listed as CENG 420. Prerequisite(s): Math 211/212. 
Instructor(s): Mikos 

BIOE 425 (S) PHARMACEUTICAL ENGINEERING (3) 

This course will examine how pharmaceutical active agents function in the body and how they are 
delivered to the body. Topics to be covered include the kinetics of drug absorption and tissue 
distribution along with the transport phenomena associated with the release bioacti ve agents . Focus 
will be placed on mathematical modeling of pharmacokinetic and diffusional processes. 
Prerequisite(s): BIOE 420 or permission of instructor. Insmictor(s): Nichol 

BIOE 440(F) STATISTICS FOR BIOENGINEERING (1) 

Course covers application of statistics to bioengineering. Topics include descriptive statistics, 
estimation, hypothesis testing, ANOVA, and regression. Required for students not taking BIOE 
391 . Prerequisite(s): CAAM 210 or 21 1 . Instnictor(s): Saterbak 

BIOE 441 (F) ADVANCED BIOENGINEERING LAB AND STATISTICS 

(4) 
Laboratory modules include biomaterial synthesis and characterization, systems physiology, 
ethics, mechanical testing of bone and skin, laser tweezers. Lectures focus on application of 
statistics in bioengineering. Required for students majoring in bioengineering. Prerequisite(s): 
BIOE 342, BIOE 252, and^BIOE 372. Instriictor(s): Saterbak 

BIOE 452 (S) BIOENGINEERING DESIGN (4) 

Instructor(s): Liebschner 

BIOE 454 (F) FINITE ELEMENT OF METHODS IN FLUID MECHAN- 
ICS (3) 

Fundamental concepts of finite element methods in fluid mechanics, including spatial discretization 
and numerical integration in multidimensions, time-integration, and solution of nonlinear ordinary 
differential equation systems. Advanced numerical stabilization techniques designed for fluid 
mechanics problems . Strategies for solution of complex , real-world problems . Topics in large-scale 
computing, parallel processing, and visualization. Also listed as CEVE 454 and MECH 454. 
Prerequisite(s): MECH 371 or consent of instructor. Instructor(s): Tezduyar 

BIOE 460 (S) BIOCHEMICAL ENGINEERING (3) 

Design, operation, and analysis of processes in the biochemical industries. Topics include enzyme 
kinetics, cell growth kinetics, energetics, recombinant DNA technology, microbial, tissue and plant 
cell cultures, bioreactor design and operation, down stream processing. Also listed as CENG 460. 
Instnictor(s): San 



(#) - credit hours per semester 



308 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

BIOE 472 (F) EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUES IN BIO- 
ENGINEERING (3) 

Introduction to experimental techniques used in bioengineering to assess biomaterials and tissues. 
This course will primarily concentrate on basic concepts of measurement methods, experimental 
design, signal analysis, and the development of experimental protocols. In laboratory modules 
focusing on mechanical testing of non-Newtonian materials, parameter extraction out of signal data 
sets, and electronic circuits the theoretical concepts covered in class will be implemented hands- 
on. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 372 or consent of instructor. Instructor(s): Liebschner 

BIOE 482 (S) PHYSIOLOGICAL CONTROL SYSTEMS (3) 

Nervous system control of biological systems can be represented utilizing techniques common to 
the field of linear, nonlinear or adaptive control theory . This course begins with a review of the basic 
aspects of control theory, followed by detailed discussion of the structure of several biological 
systems including the visual, cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. Specific examples of neural 
control are developed for each system utilizing modeling and simulation techniques. Parameter 
sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation techniques are likewise brought to bear on some of 
these models to achieve good least-squares fits to experimental data. Also listed as ELEC 482. 
Instnictor(s): Clark 

BIOE 485 (F) FUNDAMENTALS OF MEDICAL IMAGING (3) 

The course will introduce basic medical imaging modalities, such as x-ray, CT, and MRI, used to 
identify the anatomy of human organs , as well as other modalities , such as PET, SPECT, fMRI , and 
MEG, specifically developed to localize brain function. The course includes visits to clinical sited. 
Also offered as ELEC 485 and COMP 485. Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor. Iiistructor(s): 
Mawlawi 

BIOE 486 (S) FUNDAMENTALS OF MEDICAL IMAGING II (3) 

See description of ELEC 486. Instriictor(s): Mawlawi 

BIOE 492 (F) SENSORY NEUROENGINEERING I 

This course will explore how bioengineering techniques and principles are applied to sensory 
systems, with a focus on the auditory, vestibular, and retinal systems. The interaction between the 
electrical , mechanical and optical aspects of these systems , and ways to modulate these interactions , 
will be explored. Design and cunent technologies used as auditory and visual prosthetics will be 
covered. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 322, BIOE 332, or permission of 
instructor. Instriictor(s): Raphael 

BIOE 493 (S) SENSORY NEUROENGINEERING II (1) 

In this seminar course, the topics introduced in Sensory Neuroengineering 1 will be explored in 
greater depth. The emphasis will be on critical review or recent scientific literature relating to 
applications of bioengineering principles to sensory systems. Students will be expected to lead class 
discussions. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Instriictor(s): Raphael 

BIOE 500 (F) GRADUATE RESEARCH (VAR, NO MAX) 

Instritctor(s): Staff 

BIOE 500 (S) GRADUATE RESEARCH 

[nstnictor(s): Mikos 

BIOE 520 (F) BIOSYSTEMS TRANSPORT PHENOMENA (3) 

The principles of transport phenomena will be used to quantitatively describe biological systems. 
Prerequisite{s): Permission of instructor. Iiistriictor(s): Mcliitire, R. 

BIOE 522 (S) GENE THERAPY COURSE (3) 

This course will review the principles and strategies underlying gene therapy approaches in animal 

models and human beings. The current methods for gene delivery to cells ex vivo and in vivo will 

be discussed along with current cutting-edge approaches for improving the specificity and 

persistence of gene expression. The course will also cover current disease applications of gene 

therapy and the strategies taken to produce therapeutic results. Regulatory issues concerning 

biomaterials will also be addressed. Prerequisite(s): organic chemistry and hio\ogy . Instructor(s): 

Barry 

(F) = Fall; (S) = Spnng 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 309 

BIOE 531 (F) BIOMATERIALS ENGINEERING (3) 

Emphasis will be placed on issues regarding design and synthesis of materials to achieve specific 
properties and biocompatibility. An overview of significant biomaterials application will be given, 
including topics such as opthalmicbiomaterials, orthopedic applications, cardiovascular biomaterials, 
and drug delivery systems. Regulatory issues concerning biomaterials will also be addressed. 
Prerequisite(s): organic chemistry and biology. InsTructor(s): West 

BIOE 551 (F) INTRODUCTION TO BIOENGEVEERING (1) 

Seminar/tutorial introducing current research in bioengineering and biotechnology to acquaint 
students with activities of various labs at Rice and the Texas Medical Center. Also listed as CENG 
551 . Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or instructor's approval. Instructor(s): Mclntire 

BIOE 554 (F) FINITE ELEMENT METHODS IN FLUID MECHANIC (3) 

Graduate version of BIOE 454. Additional work required. Prerequisite(s): MECH 37 1 and MECH 
517 or consent of instructor. Instriictor(s): Tezduyar 

BIOE 572 (S) FUNDAMENTALS OF SYSTEMS PHYSIOLOGY (3) 

This course will teach the fundamentals of physiology at the organism., tissue, and cellular levels. 
Emphasis will be on engineering aspects of physiology. Prerequisite(s): introductory biology and 
differential equations. Instructor(s): Drezek 

BIOE 575 ADVANCED BIOMECHANICS (3) 

Biomechanical models at an advanced mathematical level. Selected topics in tensor analysis, 
continuum biomechanics, mixture theories, elasticity, and viscoelasticity . Applications in soft and 
hard tissues. Not offered in 2003-04 academic year. Not offered 2003-04 academic year. 
Prerequisite(s): BIOE 372 or permission of instructor. Instructor(s): Staff 

BIOE 581 (F) CARIO VASCULAR DYNAMICS (4) 

Analysis of properties and functions of the cardiovascular system. Includes detailed study of 
cardiac electrophysiology, ventricular mechanics, arterial hemodynamics, coronary and cerebral 
circulations , heart rate control , and imaging methods for determining ventricular volume and output 
flow, as well as therapeutic devices and computer-controlled drug delivery systems with their 
mathematical models. Internship project with engineer or life scientist working in the Texas 
Medical Center required. Also listed as ELEC 58 1 . Not offered every year. Prerequisite(s): ELEC 
481 ,482, and 507 or equivalent. Instructor(s): Clark 

BIOE 584 (S) LASERS IN MEDICINE AND BIOENGINEERING (3) 

This course will provide an overview of various types of interactions between lasers and biological 
tissues. Methods of optical properties measurements, mathematical modeling of light propagation, 
and selected therapeutic applications of lasers will be addressed. Optically based diagnostic 
procedures, including absorption and scattering-based techniques, will be introduced. Physics of 
optical tweezers and their applications in biomedical sciences will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): 
differential equations, introductory physics, and engineering computation. Instructor(s): Bahman 

BIOE 589 (F) COMPUTATIONAL MOLECULAR BIOENGINEERING (3) 

This is a course designed for students in computationally-oriented biomedical and bioengineering 
majors to introduce the principles and methods used for the simulations and modeling of 
macromolecules of biological interest. Protein conformation and dynamics are emphasized. 
Empirical energy function and molecular dynamics calculations, as well as other approaches, are 
described. Specific biological problems are discussed to illustrate the methodology. Classic 
examples such as the cooperative mechanism of hemoglobin and more frontier topics such as the 
motional properties of molecular motors and ion channels as well as results derived from the current 
literature are covered. Other potential topics are protein folding/predictions, the nature of reaction 
rate enhancement in enzyme catalysis, physical chemistry properties of biologically relevant nano- 
materials, simulations of free energy changes in mutations, electrostatic properties of protein, 
molecular recognition, and the properties of binding sites. Particular emphasis is also given to the 
applications of molecular graphics. During the final reading period, each student carries out an 
original research project that makes use of the techniques and grading is based on the written and 
oral presentations of the results from the final projects. Suggested I*rerequisite(s): college-level 
calculus, undergraduate level physical chemistry and biochemistry, entry-level thermodynamics 
and statistical mechanics. Also listed as BIOS 589. Instructor(s): Ma 

(#) = credit hours per semester 



3 10 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

BIOE 592 (F) SENSORY NEUROENGINEERING I (2) 

Graduate version of BIOE 492. This course will explore how bioengineering techniques and 
principles are applied to sensory systems, with a focus on the auditory, vestibular, and retinal 
systems. The interaction between the electrical, mechanical and optical aspects of these systems, 
and ways to modulate these interactions, will be explored. Design and current technologies used as 
auditory and visual prosthetics will be covered. Enrollment limited to 15. Ifistructor(s): Raphael 

BIOE 594 (F) THE ETHICS OF BIOSCIENCES AND BIOENGI- 
NEERING (I) 

This course will consider ethical issues involving human and animal subjects, record keeping, 
publications, potential conflict of interest, and behavior toward colleagues, research fellows, 
students, and employees. Also listed as BIOE 594. Enrollment limited to 40. GRADUATE 
STUDENTS ONLY. Instructor(s): Staff 

BIOE 594 (S) THE ETHICS OF BIOSCIENCES AND BIO- 
ENGINEERING (1) 

This course will consider ethical issues involving human and animal subjects, record keeping, 
publications, potential conflict of interest, and behavior toward colleagues, research fellows, 
students, and employees. Also listed as BIOE 594. Enrollment limited to 40. GRADUATE 
STUDENTS ONLY. Instnictor{s): Novotny 

BIOE 620 (S) TISSUE ENGINEERING (3) 

Study of cell-cell interactions and the role of the extracellular matrix in the structure and function 
of normal and pathological tissues. Includes strategies to regenerate metabolic organs and repair 
structural tissues , as well as cell-based therapies to deliver proteins and other therapeutic drugs , with 
emphasis on issues related to cell and tissue transplantation such as substrate properties , angiogen- 
esis, growth stimulation, cell differentiation, and immunoprotection. Also listed as CENG 620. 
Instructor(s): Mikos 

BIOE 625 (S) PHARMACEUTICAL ENGINEERING (3) 

This course will examine how pharmaceutical active agents function in the body and how they are 
delivered to the body. Topics to be covered include the kinetics of drug absorption and tissue 
distribution along with the transport phenomena associated with the release bioactive agents. Focus 
will be placed on mathematical modeling of pharmacokinetic and diffusional processes. //ufrMctorf^j.- 
Nichol 

BIOE 690 (S) SPECIAL TOPICS COURSE: INTRODUCTION TO BIO- 
MECHANICS AND BIOENGINEERING (3) 

Introduction to the fundamentals of Biomechanics including force analysis, mechanics of deform- 
able bodies, stress and strain, multiaxial deformation, and viscoela.sticity . Biomechanics of soft and 
hard tissues. Physical and chemical properties of biomaterials. Materials covered include both 
natural and synthetic one inteded to function in the biological environment. Instriictor(s): 
Athanasioii , Liehschner 

BIOE 695 (S) ADVANCED MODELING OF TISSUE MICRO- 
MECHANHCS (3) 

Continuation of MECH 595/BIOE 595 with emphasis on advanced modeling the micromechanics 
of biological tissues. Independent study and seminar/discussion course. Data from experiments will 
be used to refice the predictions of mathematical models. Designed for juniors, seniors, and 
graduate students. Laboratory work performed at Baylor College of Medicine and Computer work 
at Rice University. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 595. Insrnuror(s): Boriek 

BIOE 698 (F) GRADUATE SEMINAR (1) 

BIOE 699 (S) GRADUATE SEMINAR (1) 

Instructor(s): Drezek 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



i COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 311 

BIOS (Biosciences) 

The Wiess School of Natural Sciences / Department of Biochemistry and Cell 
Biology / Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 

BIOS 113 (F) ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS SEMINAR: WATER (1) 

Water— one of the most basic and important components of the environment. But how is the water 
cycle changing and what are the current issues? In this semester's course we will discuss the water 
from an interdisciplinary perspective, from reservoirs and flow, through life and uses, to pollution 
and rights. Enrollment limited to 20. Also listed as ESCI 1 13 and ENST 1 13. 

BIOS 122 (S) FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS IN BIOLOGY (3) 

Current topics in biological research with an emphasis on human health. Topics include the Human 
Genome Project , transgenic plants, cancer, heart disease , viruses, and others . Papers from scientific 
journals covering novel techniques and advances in medicine will be discussed. Instructor(s): 
Bondos 

BIOS 201 (F) INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY (3) 

The first in an integrated sequence of four courses (Bios 201, 202, 301, 302). Chemistry and 
energetics, cell physiology, cell biology, genetics, plant physiology, and animal physiology. 
Insrructor(s): Giistin 

BIOS 202 (S) INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY (3) 

The second in an integrated sequence of four courses ( B ios 20 1 , 202 ,301, 302) . Molecular genetics , 
DNA technology , antibiotics and antivirals , behavior, evolution, ecology , diversity , and conserva- 
tion biology. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 201 or permission of instructor. Instructor(s): Gomer, Meffert 

BIOS 2 1 1 INTRODUCTION TO EXPERIMENTAL BIOSCIENCES (2) 

INSTRUCTOR'S SIGNATURE REQUIRED. See http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~bioslabs/bios211/ 
for office hours and course information. Introduction to the scientific method, principles of 
experimental design, selected research strategies, record keeping, and technical communication as 
related to biological science. Taught in the first half of each semester. Lab day choices are T, W, 
TH. or P. Prerequisite(s): Bios 201 or equivalent. Instriictor(s): Caprette 

BIOS 213 INTRO LAB MODULE IN ECOLOGY & 

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY (1) 

Experimental, laboratory, and field studies of natural history, ecology, evolution, and animal 
behavior . Computer simulations of population genetics . Course will begin after mid-semester break 
in the Fall semester and after mid-term recess in the Spring semester. Instructor(s): Sullender 

BIOS 301 (F) BIOCHEMISTRY (3) 

The third in an integrated sequence of four courses ( Bios 20 1 , 202, 30 1 , 302) . Structure and function 
of proteins, enzymes, and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics; glycolysis, aerobic metabolism, and 
energy coupling. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 21 1/212 and BIOS 201/202 Instructor(s): Olson, Shamoo 

BIOS 302 (S) BIOCHEMISTRY (3) 

The final in an integrated sequence of four courses (Bios 201, 202, 301, 302). Introduction to 
metabolism, membranes, electron transport, oxidative phosphorylation, and regulation. Group A 
course. Prequisites: BIOS 301 or permission of instructor. Instructor(s): McNew, Rudolph 

BIOS 305 (F) WRITING AND VISUAL DESIGN IN THE 
BIOSCIENCES (1) 

Course works with a single biosciences topic of current interest to develop skills in designing 
visuals (posters, report figures. PowerPoint), structuring arguments, writing about visual evidence 
(for example: Northern blots, graphs, photographs), and editing for style. Helps prepare students 
for moving from BIOS 2 1 1 to BIOS 3 1 1 . No oral presentations. Offered second half of the semester. 
Instriictor(s): Pitrugganan. Zeleznik 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



3 1 2 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

BIOS 307 (F) GENETICS: BIOLOGICAL, CULTURE-HISTORICAL, 
AND ETHICAL PERSPECTIVES (3) 

The course uses an interdisciplinary perspective to examine the claims and counter-claims made 
regarding genetics and new technologies for identifying and manipulating genetic material. The 
course will cover biological basics of genes, DNA, and sequencing techniques; cultural and 
historical aspects to genetics, including essentialism and eugenics past and present; ethical issues 
arising from new genetic technologies; and policy issues. Also listed as UNIV 3 14 and ANTH 3 14. 
Not open to freshmen. Instriictor(s): Mcintosh, Novotny 

BIOS 309 SEMINAR IN RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (2) 

A course based on laboratory research done outside the university which will use seminars, 
discussion and papers to develop communication skills in research. Permission of instructor to 
enroll. Students interested in this course should contact the department chair. Iiistructor(s): Staff 

BIOS 310 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR UNDERGRADUATES (3) 

Program of independent study for students with previous training in the biosciences. Includes a 
research paper and presentation of a poster in the Undergraduate Symposium in the spring. Students 
are expected to spend at least three hours per week in the laboratory for each semester hour of credit. 
If taken for 2 or more hours, counts as one required lab course but not as a Group A or B course. 
Permission of Department Chair to enroll. Inst?-uctor(s): staff 

BIOS 311 ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL BIOSCIENCES (1) 

INSTRUCTOR'S SIGNATURE REQUIRED. See http://www.owlnet.rice.edu/~bios311/bios311/ 
bios311.html for office hours and course information. Introduction to biochemical laboratory 
techniques with an emphasis on studies of proteins. Taught first half of the semester for 7 weeks. 
Enrollment limited to 24 per section. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 21 1 and BIOS 301 or consent of 
instructor. Instructor(s): Beason 

BIOS 312 EXPERIMENTAL MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (1) 

INSTRUCTOR"SSIGNATUREREQUIRED.Seehttp://www.owlnet.rice.edu/~bios311/bios31I/ 
bios3 1 2/ bios3 1 2.html for office hours and course information. Introduction to molecular biology 
techniques. Taught second half of the fall semester and first half of the spring the for 3-1/2 weeks. 
Enrollment Hmited to 28 per section. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 31 lor consent of instructor./^^rrwctorf^J.- 
Beason 

BIOS 313 (S) ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL MOLECULAR 
BIOLOGY (1) 

INSTRUCTOR'S SIGNATURE REQUIRED.See http://www.owlnet.rice.edu/~bios311/bios3 11/ 
bios3 1 3/bios3 1 3 .html for office hours and course information . Introduction to microarray s . Taught 
second half of the semester for 3 1/2 weeks. Enrollment limited to 15 per section. Prerequisite(s): 
BIOS 312 or consent of instructor. Instnictor(s):: Beason 

BIOS 314 EXPERIMENTAL CELL BIOLOGY (1) 

Application of transmission electron microscopy to research in cell biology . Students will interview 
a faculty investigator and design and conduct an experiment involving preparation and examination 
of samples for the electron microscope. A written protocol will be submitted and the completed 
work presented in seminar form. Recommended for students interested in a research career. Starts 
the second week of the semester. Enrollment limited. Contact the instructor first week of classes. 
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 301 , 31 1, and 341 . Instructor(s): Caprette 

BIOS 315 (S) EXPERIMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY (1) 

An instrumentation-intensive short course in membrane electrophysiology and vertebrate nerve 
and muscle physiology. Research reports require interpretation of laboratory data in terms of 
concepts at the molecular level. Starts the second half of the semester. Enrollment limited. 
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 301 or equivalent. Instnictor(s): Caprette 

BIOS 316 (F) LAB MODULE IN ECOLOGY (1) 

Field and lab experiments in ecology. Course taught for 1/2 semester. Instructor(s): Siemann, 
Harcombe 

(F) = Fall: (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 3 1 3 

BIOS 317 (S) LAB MODULE IN BEHAVIOR (1) 

Field experiments in behavior. Work in teams to solve the mystery of breeding systems in wild 
mockingbirds and grackles. Instrucror(s): Strassmanii 

BIOS 318 (F) LAB MODULE IN MICROBIOLOGY (1) 

Training in the isolation , culture, observation, and assay of bacteria. Qualitative analysis of a mixed 
culture. Starts the second half of the semester, self-scheduled after the first four formal meetings. 
Requires daily attention to cultures during the week. Enrollment limited. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 2 1 1 
or equivalent. Instructor(s): Caprette 

BIOS 319 (S) TROPICAL FIELD BIOLOGY (3) 

The course consists ofweekly meetings involving lectures and discussion of readings. Immediately 
following commencement, a 3-week field trip to southern Mexico will conclude the class. Class 
size: between 9 and 1 1 students. Selection of students for the course is determined through an 
interview with the instructor. While a background in biology is desirable (minimally including the 
following courses: BIOS 201/202 and 213), individuals lacking this background but having a 
special interest in the tropics are encouraged to enroll. Instritctor(s): Sitllender 

BIOS 320 (S) LAB MODULE IN TISSUE CULTURE (1) 

Introduction to tissue culture techniques, including cell passage, cell attachment and proliferation 
assays, and a transfection assay. Taught in first and second halves of spring semester. Also listed 
as BIOE 342. See BIOE 342 for preregistration procedure. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 2 1 1 or CHEM 214 
Instructor(s): Saterbak 

BIOS 321 (F) ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (3) 

Evolutionary theory is used to evaluate behavioral adaptations of organisms to their environment. 
Group B course. Instructor(s): Strassmann 

BIOS 322 (S) GLOBAL ECOSYSTEM DYNAMICS (3) 

A systems analysis of the earth from a biological perspective stressing biogeochemical cycles and 
global change. Group B course. Insrnictor(s): Sass 

BIOS 323 (F) CONSERVATION BIOLOGY (3) 

The course is designed to give students a broad overview of conservation biology. Lectures and 
discussions will focus on conservation issues such as biodiversity, extinction, management, 
sustained yield, invasive species and preserve design. Group B course. Instnictor(s): Siemann 

BIOS 324 (S) WETLAND ECOSYSTEMS (3) 

A study of coastal wetland systems including floodplains, freshwater brackish and saline marshes 
and consideration of estuaries and riverine interaction with coastal marine waters. Group B course. 
Instnictor(s): Fisher 

BIOS 325 (S) ECOLOGY (3) 

Analysis of population dynamics, species interactions, plant and animal community organization, 
and ecosystem function. Group B course. Iiistructor(s): DeWalt 

BIOS 329 (F) ANIMAL BIOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY (3) 

The evolution and systematics of the animal kingdom with consideration of functional anatomy, 
comparative physiology, behavior, medical implications and resource management. Group B 
course. Instructor(s): Fisher 

BIOS 332 (F) FUNDAMENTALS OF SYSTEMS PHYSIOLOGY (3) 

This course will teach the fundamentals of physiology at the organism, tissue, and cellular levels. 
Emphasis will be on engineering aspects of physiology. This course includes several projects and 
written assignments. Also listed as BIOE 322. Prerequisite(s): Intro. Biology and Differential 
Equations. Instructor(s): West 

BIOS 334 (F) EVOLUTION (3) 

Principles of biological evolution. Topics include natural selection, adaptation, molecular evolu- 
tion, formation of new species, the fossil record, biogeography, and principles of classification. 
Group B course. Iiistnictor(s): Que Her 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



3 1 4 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

BIOS 336 (S) PLANT DIVERSITY (3) 

The evolution and systematics of plants , with emphasis on flowering plants and biodiversity . Group 
B course. Instructor(s): Harcombe 

BIOS 341 (F) CELL BIOLOGY (3) 

Molecular mechanisms of the processes common to all cells, including exposition of structure, 
function, and biogenesis of all subcellular organelles. Emphasis will be on cytoplasmic events; 
molecular studies of transcription will be taught in Bios 344. Group A course . Prerequisite(s): BIOS 
201/202. Instriictor(s): McNew, Ullmann 

BIOS 343 (F) DEVELOPMENT (3) 

Analysis of the processes and principles of development as seen in a broad spectrum of eukaryotic 
organisms. Group A course. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 201/202 Instructor(s): Novotny 

BIOS 344 (S) MOLECULAR BIOLOGY & GENETICS (3) 

Mendelian genetics, population genetics, mapping, gene expression and regulation, genetic 
engineering, DNA replication and recombination, human genetics, genetic disease and gene 
therapy. Group A course. Prequisites: BIOS 20 1/202 and 301 or consent of instructor. //j5/rwc?orf5J; 
Stewart 

BIOS 352 (S) PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY FOR THE BIOSCIENCES (3) 

Study of selected aspects of physical chemistry as it relates to the biosciences. Includes thermody- 
namics , reaction rate theory , quantum mechanics , and atomic and molecular structure . Required for 
biochemistry majors and graduate students in biochemistry & cell biology. Group A course. 
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 211/212, PHYS 125/126, and BIOS 301 or permission of instructor. 
Instructor(s): MacKenzie, Olson 

BIOS 390 TRANSFER CREDIT IN BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL 

BIOLOGY (3) 

For transfer of courses which have no current equivalent in the Rice curriculum, but which can be 
counted as Group A Biosciences courses in satisfying requirements for the biochemistry or biology 
major. Group A course. 

BIOS 391 TRANSFER CREDIT IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTIONARY 

BIOLOGY (3) 

For transfer of courses which have no current equivalent in the Rice curriculum, but which can be 
counted as Group B Biosciences courses in satisfying requirements for the biology major. 

BIOS 401 (F) UNDERGRADUATE HONORS RESEARCH (5) 

Open only to undergraduate majors who meet specific requirements and with the permission of the 
research supervisor and chair. Registration for Bios 401 and 402 implies a commitment to 
participate in research for at least 2 semesters. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 201/202, 301/302, and 
concurrent enrollment in BIOS 411. Instructor(s): Staff 

BIOS 402 (S) UNDERGRADUATE HONORS RESEARCH (5) 

See BIOS 401 . Concunent enrollment in Bios 412. Instnictor(s): Staff 

BIOS 411 (F) UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SEMINAR (1) 

Discussion of current research in area under investigation. Instructor(s): Glantz 

BIOS 412 (S) UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SEMINAR (1) 

See BIOS 411. In.stnictor(s): Braam 

BIOS 421 (F) NEUROBIOLOGY (3) 

Cellular and molecular mechanisms of nervous system function. Emphasis on membrane and 
synaptic biophysics, sensory and motor systems, neuronal plasticity, and development. Open to 
juniors and seniors. Group A course. Not offered 2003-04 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 315 

BIOS 422 (S) ENDOCRINOLOGY (3) 

Study of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of hormone synthesis and of target cell responses. 
Includes hormonal interactions in mammalian homeostasis. Enrollment limited to 50. Group A 
course. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 201 , 202, 301 , and 302. Instritctor(s): Staff 

BIOS 423 (S) IMMUNOBIOLOGY (3) 

Cellular and molecular basis of immune function in mammals. Group A course. Prerequisite(s): 
BIOS 201/202 and 301/302. Instructor(s): Novotny. 

BIOS 424 (S) MICROBIOLOGY & BIOTECHNOLOGY (3) 

Structure and functions of microorganisms with emphasis on their environmental, industrial and 
medical importance. Group A course. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 201/202 and 301 or consent of 
instructor. Instructor(s): Bennett 

BIOS 425 (F) PLANT MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (3) 

Novel aspects of plant biology and development with emphasis on molecular and genetic 
mechanisms. Plant responses to the environment and the use of bioengineering and other means to 
develop new plant products will also be covered. Group A course. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 201/202 
and 301 or permission of instructor. Instructor(s): Bartel, Zolman 

BIOS 432 (S) ADVANCED EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY (3) 

Develop a critical understanding of evolutionary theory through lectures and discussion across a 
wide range of evolutionary topics. With the instructor's help, students will use current papers to 
stimulate debate on the theories, philosophies and methods of the study of evolution. Instructor(s): 
Foster 

BIOS 440 (F) ENZYME MECHANISMS (3) 

Enzymology is a biological extension of organic chemistry. This course will survey examples of 
enzyme-catalyzed reactions with emphasis on mechanisms. Enzymes that use catalytic cofactors 
(vitamins) will be covered, as will those that rely on amino acid side chains. By the end of the course, 
students should be able to deduce a reasonable mechanism for any enzyme-mediated reaction . Also 
listed as CHEM 440.Group A course. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 212. Not offered 2003-04. 

BIOS 443 (F) DEVELOPMENT (3) 

Analysis of the processes and principles of development as seen in abroad spectrum of eukaryotic 
organisms. Group A course .Prerequisite(s): BIOS 201/202. Not offered 2003-04. 

BIOS 445 (F) ADVANCED MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND 
GENETICS (3) 

Molecular and genetic aspects of the regulation of gene expression as seen in simple prokaryotic 
systems and the model eukaryotic systems used for studies of development. Group A course. 
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 201/202, 301, and 344. Instructor(s): Bartel, Stern 

BIOS 481 (F) MOLECULAR BIOPHYSICS (3) 

Examination, at an intermediate level, of the interactionof light with matter. Includes UV-visible 
absorption, natural optical activity, fluorescence, EXAFS, EPR, NMR of biomolecules, x-ray 
diffraction and crystallography, neutron scattering, electron microscopy, and theoretical protein 
dynamics. Group A course. Prerequisite{s): BIOS 301 and 352 or permission of instructor. 
Instructor(s): Gates, MacKenzie, Nikonowicz 

BIOS 525 (F) PLANT MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (3) 

Novel aspects of plant biology and development with emphasis on molecular and genetic 
mechanisms. Plant responses to the environment and the use of bioengineering and other means to 
develop new plant products will also be covered. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 201/202 and 301, or 
permission of instructor. Instriictor(s): Bartel. Zolman 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



3 1 6 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

BIOS 530 (S) LAB MODULE IN NMR SPECTROSCOPY & MOLECU- 
LAR MODELING (2) 

The students will learn to set up, acquire, and process one-dimensional and basic two-dimensional 
NMR experiments. Spectral interpretation (resonance assignment and extraction of structural 
information) for nucleic acids and proteins using homonuclear and heteronuclear data will be 
performed. Molecular modeling using NMR derived structure information will also be included. 
This course is designed to provide an overview of the utility of NMR spectroscopy as it relates to 
the structure and dynamics of biologically relevant macromolecules . Enrollment limited to 1 2 , with 
priority to graduate students. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 352 and 481 or permission of instructor. 
Instructor(s): Nikonowicz 

BIOS 532 (S) LABORATORY MODULE IN OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY 
AND KINETICS (2) 

Students learn the principles behind fluorescence, circular dichroism, analytical ultracentrifuga- 
tion, spectroscopy and rapid kinetics by carrying out experiments with genetically engineered 
proteins and state-of-the-art equipment. Data will be interpreted and manipulated using curve- 
fitting and graphics software. The course will provide basic and experimental training in protein 
chemistry and biophysics. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 352 and 481 or permission of instructor. 
Instructor(s): Gates, Olson 

BIOS 533 (S) BIOINFORMATICS & COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY (2) 

An introduction to the emerging field of bioinformatics. A series of lectures, combined with hands- 
on exercises will introduce the student to various biologically relevant databases, methods to 
effectively search the databases, and an overall view of the various aspects of computation biology. 
The topics to be discussed include sequence comparison, structure analysis, phylogenetics, 
database searching, microarrays and proteomics. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 301 and knowledge of 
computer operation or permission of instructor. Instructor(s): Gates 

BIOS 535 (F) PRACTICAL X-RAY CRYSTALLOGRAPHY (2) 

This is an introduction to macromolecular crystallography with emphasis on crystallization 
methods, data acquisition, processing and molecular model-building. Approaches to solving 
structures will be discussed, as well as refinement of molecular models. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 481 
(can be taken simultaneously). Instructor(s): Gates 

BIOS 541 (F) SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTIONARY 
BIOLOGY (3) 

BIOS 542 (S) SPEC. TOPS IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION BIOLOGY (3) 

BIOS 543 (S) SECONDARY METABOLISM (3) 

A survey of the biosynthetic pathways leading to the major classes of natural products. Topics 
covered include the use of radioactive and stable isotopes, the synthesis of isotopically labeled 
organic compounds, mechanistic investigations of secondary metabolic enzymes, and the cloning 
and characterization of secondary metabolic genes— same course as CHEM 543. Suggsted 
prerequisite(s): BIOS 440. Instructor(s): Parry 

BIOS 545 (F) ADVANCED MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 
AND GENETICS (3) 

Molecular and genetic aspects of the regulation of gene expression as seen in simple prokaryotic 
systems and the model eukaryotic systems used for studies of development. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 
201/202, 301 , and 341 or consent of instructor. Instructor(s): Bartel, Stern, 

BIOS 561 (F) TOPICS IN EVOLUTION (2) 

Review and discussion of the literature on current research in evolution. Instructor(s): Meffert, 
Queller, Strassmann 

BIOS 562 (S) TOPICS IN BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY (2) 

Review and discussion of the literature on current research in animal behavior. Instructor(s): 
Meffert, Queller, Strassmann 

(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 3 1 7 

BIOS 563 (F) TOPICS IN ECOLOGY (2) 

Review and discussion of the literature on current research in forest and grassland ecology. 
Instriictor(s): Siemann, Har combe 

BIOS 568 (S) TOPICS IN BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY (2) 

Review and discussion of literature on current research in biological diversity. Instriictor(s): 
Siemann, Harcomhe 

BIOS 575 (F) INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH (1) 

Introduction of first-year graduate students to the research programs and laboratories of individual 
faculty members. Instructor{s}: Staff' 

BIOS 581 (F) GRAD SEMINAR IN BIOCHEMISTRY & 
CELL BIOLOGY (1) 

Introduction of first-year graduate students to the research programs and laboratories of individual 
faculty members. Required of all biochemistry and cell biology graduate students. Instructor(s): 
Staff 

BIOS 582 (S) GRAD SEMINAR-BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL BIOLOGY (1) 

See BIOS 581 . InsTmctor(s) .Staff 

BIOS 583 (F) MOLECULAR INTERACTIONS (3) 

Review of literature on current biosciences research. Prerequisite(s): graduate status in biochem- 
istry and cell biology. Instructor(s): Lane, Stern, Tao 

BIOS 585 (F) GRAD SEM IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTIONARY 
BIOLOGY (1) 

Faculty and student presentations on current research. Required of all ecology and evolutionary 
biology graduate students. 

BIOS 586 (S) GRAD SEM IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTIONARY 
BIOLOGY (1) 

Continuation of BIOS 585. 

BIOS 587 (F) GRAD SEM FOR 2ND YR GRADUATE STUDENTS IN 
BIOCHEM&CELL BIOL (3) 

Preparation and presentation of research proposals. Instritctor(s): Beckingham. Nikonowicz, 
MacKenzie 

BIOS 588 (F) ADVANCED CELL BIOLOGY (3) 

Review of literature on current biosciences research. Instnictor(s): Beckingham. Gainer 

BIOS 589 (S) COMPUTATIONAL MOLECULAR BIOPHYSICS (3) 

This is a course designed for students in computationally-oriented biomedical and bioengineering 
majors to introduce the principles and methods used for the simulations and modeling of 
macromolecules of biological interest. Protein conformation and dynamics are emphasized. 
Empirical energy function and molecular dynamics calculations, as well as other approaches, are 
described. Also listed as BIOE 589. Instriictor(s): Ma 

BIOS 590 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL 

BIOLOGY (1) 

Development of specific topic areas at the graduate \e\e\.Instructor(s): Staff 

BIOS 591 (F) GRADUATE TEACHING (3) 

Supervised instruction in teaching ecology and evolutionary biology. Instriictor(s): Staff 

BIOS 592 SEMINAR IN COMPUTATIONAL BIOL (1) 

A discussion of selected research topics in computational biology. Instructor(s): Staff 

(#) = credit hours per semester 



3 1 8 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

BIOS 593 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL BIOL- 

OGY (1) 

Discussion of selected research topics in current plant biology literature. Course may be repeated 
for credit. Instructor(s): Barrel 

BIOS 594 (F) THE ETHICS OF BIOSCIENCES AND BIOENGI- 
NEERING (1) 

This course will consider ethical issues involving human and animal subjects, record keeping, 
publications, potential conflict of interest, and behavior toward colleagues, research fellows, 
students, and employees. Also listed as BIOE 594. Enrollment limited to 40. GRADUATE 
STUDENTS ONLY. Instnictoris): Novotny 

BIOS 61 1 (F) RESEARCH SEMINAR (3) 

Discussion of individual laboratory research or current topics in particular areas. /rt5m<ctorC5).- Staff 

BIOS 612 (S) RESEARCH SEMINAR (3) 

Continuation of BIOS 611. Instritctor{s}: Staff 

BIOS 621 (F) THESIS SEMINAR (1) 

[nstructor(s): Staff 

BIOS 622 (S) THESIS SEMINAR (1) 

Instructor(s): Staff 

BIOS 800 GRADUATE RESEARCH (3) 

Course may be repeated for credit. 

CAAM (Computational and Applied Mathematics) 

The George R. Brown School of Engineering/Computational and Applied 
Mathematics Department 

CAAM 210 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING COMPUTATION (3) 

Introduction to engineering and scientific computation: Engineering workstations, programming, 
software systems, and numerical methods . Laboratory to illustrate the application of computational 
and visualization methods to problem analysis. Matlab serves as the primary computational and 
display tool. Optional supplemental instruction is available in C and/or Fortran. Prerequisite(s): 
Math 101 . Instnictoris): Staff 

CAAM 335 MATRIX ANALYSIS (3) 

Equilibria and the solution of linear and linear least squares problems. Dynamical systems and the 
eigenvalue problem with the Jordan form and Laplace transform via complex integration. 
Prerequisite(s): MATH 212 and CAAM 210. Instnictoris): Staff 

CAAM 336 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS IN SCIENCE AND ENGI- 

NEERING (3) 

Green's functions, exponential and series solutions, and numerical methods for initial and boundary 
value problems of mathematical physics. Dynamics of mass-spring systems and circuits, equilibria 
of solids, fluids and electromagnetic fields, heat flow. Prerequisite(s): MATH 2 1 2 and CAAM 2 10. 
Instructoris): Staff 

CAAM 353 (S) COMPUTATIONAL NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3) 

An introductory course in numerical analysis with computer applications. Prerequisite(s): MATH 
210. Instnictoris): Staff 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 319 

CAAM 378 (F) INTRODUCTION TO OPERATIONS RESEARCH AND 
OPTIMIZATION (3) 

Formulation and solution of mathematical models in management, economics, engineering and 
science applications in which one seeks to minimize or maximize an objective function subject to 
constraints including models in linear, nonlinear and integer programming; basic solution methods 
for these optimization models; problem-solving using a modeling language and optimization 
software. Prerequisite(s): MATH 212. and any one of the following: MATH 211. Instructor(s): 
Staff 

CAAM 401 (F) ANALYSIS I (3) 

Real numbers completeness , sequences and convergence . compactness , continuity , the derivative , 
the Riemann integral, fundamental theorem of calculus. Vectors spaces, dimension, linear maps, 
inner products and norms, operative norms. Prerequisite(s): MATH 211/212 or permission of 
instructor. Iijstriictor(s): Staff 

CAAM 402 (S) ANALYSIS II (3) 

Continuation of Analysis I. Vector spaces of functions, sequences and series, convergence. 
Continuity and differentiability of functions of several variables, the derivative's a linear map, the 
contraction mapping principle, inverse and implicit function theorems, fundamental theorems on 
differential equations, multivariable integration, Stoke's theorem and relatives. Prerequisite(s): 
CAAM 40 1 . Instnictor(s): Staff 

CAAM 415 (S) THEORETICAL NEUROSCIENCE (3) 

This course introduces current theoretical methods used to model the properties of nerve cells and 
the processing of information by neuronal networks. Concrete examples that can be implemented 
using Matlab will be emphasized. The starting point is the passive cable properties of single neurons 
and the Hodgkin-Huxley model of action potential generation. Subsequently, models of synaptic 
transmission and active properties of dendritic trees will be considered. This will be followed by 
stochastic properties of single neurons and information encoding using mean and instantaneous 
firing rate in visual neurons. Finally, methods to analyze phase-locking and activity in populations 
of cells as well as learning algorithms will be considered. Prerequisite! s): MATH 21 1 or CAAM 
335. Instructor(s): Staff' 

CAAM 420 (F) COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE I (3) 

Scientific programming using high-level languages, including C, Fortran, and C-i-i-. Emphasis on 
use of numerical libraries. Basic techniques of project planning, source management, documenta- 
tion, program construction, i/o, visualization. Object-oriented design for numerical computation. 
Prerequisite(s): CAAM 210; CAAM 335 or 353, or permission of instructor. Instritctor(s): Staff 

CAAM 436 (F) PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS OF MATH- 
EMATICAL PHYSICS (3) 

Derivation and properties of solutions of the partial differential equations of continuum physics. 
Basic concepts of continuum mechanics, ideal fluids, Navier-Stokes equations, linear elasticity, 
acoustics, basic principles of thermodynamics, Newtonian heat flow, porous flow. Maxwell's 
equations,electrical circuits. Prerequisite(s): CAAM 336 orpermission of instructor. //(5rn(rro7-f5J.- 
Staff 

CAAM 452 (S) NUMERICAL METHODS FOR PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL 
EQUATIONS (4) 

Structure and properties of the finite element method for statistics problems in mechanics, 
electromagnetism, and other field theories. Finite difference methods for initial/boundary value 
problems of fluid flow, heat transfer, and wave motion. Prerequisite(s): CAAM 336 or permission 
of instructor. CAAM 436 recommended. Computer prosrammins in Matlab is required. Not 
offered 2003-04. 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



320 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

CAAM 453 (F) NUMERICAL ANALYSIS I (3) 

Construction and analysis of numerical algorithms for root finding, interpolation and approxima- 
tion of functions, quadrature, and the solution of differential equations; fundamentals of computer 
arithmetic; solution of linear systems, least squares problems, and eigenvalue problems via matrix 
factorizations; the singular value decomposition (SVD) and basic sensitivity analysis. Prerequisite(s): 
CAAM 335 or permission of the instructor. Computer programming in Matlab is required. 
lustnictor(s): Staff 

CAAM 454 (S) NUMERICAL ANALYSIS II (3) 

Iterative methods for linear systems of equations including Krylov subspace methods; gradient 
method for unconstrained optimization; Newton and Newton-like methods for nonlinear system of 
equations, unconstrained optimization and nonlinear least squares problems; techniques for 
improving the global convergence of these algorithms. Theoretical and practical considerations for 
these algorithms will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): CAAM 453 or permission of the instructor. 
Computer programming in Matlab is required. Instrifctor(s): Staff 

CAAM 460 (F) OPTIMIZATION THEORY (3) 

Derivation and application of necessity conditions and sufficiency conditions for constrained 
optimization problems. Prerequisite(s): MATH 212 and CAAM 335 or MATH 355. Instnictor(s): i 
Staff 

CAAM 464 (F) NUMERICAL OPTIMIZATION (3) 

Numerical algorithms for constrained optimization problems in engineering and sciences, includ- 
ing simplex and interior-point methods for linear programming, penalty, barrier, augmented; 
Lagrangian and SQP methods for nonlinear programming. Prerequisite(s): CAAM 454 or permis- 
sion of instructor. CAAM 460 recommended (may be taken concuixently). Instriictor(s): Staff 

CAAM 475 (S) INTEGER AND COMBINATORIAL OPTIMIZATION (3) 

Modeling and solving optimization problems with discrete components, graphs and networks; 
network flow problems; minimum spanning trees; basic polyhedral theory; the knapsack problem; 
the plant location problem; the set packing problem; computational complexity; branch and bound; 
cutting planes; Lagrangian relaxation and Bender's decomposition. Prerequisite(s): CAAM 378 or ; 
464 or permission of the instructor. Also listed as ECON 475. Not offered 2003-04. Instriictor(s): 
Staff 

CAAM 490 (F) INDEPENDENT STUDY (VAR) 

Instructor(s): Staff 

CAAM 491 (S) INDEPENDENT STUDY (VAR) 

Instritctor(s): Staff 

CAAM 500 GRADUATE RESEARCH SEMINAR (1) 

Presentations of ongoing projects by CAAM students and faculty. Required of all graduates. 
Instnictor(s): Staff 

CAAM 508 (S) ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (3) 

Review of the fundamental properties of nonlinear systems , includes nonlinear ordinary differential 
equations (e.g., the existence and uniqueness of solution), Lyapunov stability (e.g., stability 
definitions, Lyapunov's direct method, invariance theory, stability of linear systems, Lyapunov's 
linearization methods, and converse theorems), and input-output stability (e.g., the small gain 
theorem and passivity theorem), as well as case studies showing applications to nonlinear and 
adaptive control and robotics. Also listed as MECH 508 and ELEC 508. Instructor(s): Staff 

CAAM 520 (S) COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE II (3) 

Vector shared-memory, and message-passing parallel computer architectures. Numerical linear 
algebra for these architectures. Memory hierarchy issues, analysis and enhancement of perfor- 
mance, and use of programming tools and environments. Portable parallel scientific programming 
concepts using OpenMP and MPI. Introduction to component software architectures. Parallel 
numerical algorithms and scientific visualization. Prerequisite(s): CAAM 420. lnstructor{s): Staff 

(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



\ COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 321 

CAAM 540 (S) APPLIED FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS (3) 

Hilbert spaces, Banach spaces, spectral theory, and weak topologies with applications to signal 
processing, control, and partial differentia! equations. Prerequisite(s): CAAM 402 or permission of 
instructor. Instructor(s): Staff 

CAAM 551 (F) NUMERICAL LINEAR ALGEBRA (3) 

Direct methods for large, sparse linear system; regularization of ill-conditioned lest squares 
problems; backward error analysis of basic algorithms for linear equations and least squares, 
condition estimation . Preconditioned iterative methods for linear systems (CO , GMRES , BiCGstab, 
QMR); matrix theory including spectral decompositions, Schur form, eigenvalue perturbations, 
and the geometry of subspaces. Eigenvalue algorithms, Sylvester's equation, the implicitly shifted 
QR algorithm, computation of the SVD, generalized eigenvalue problems. Introduction to large 
scale eigenvalue algorithms and multigrid. Prerequisite(s): CAAM 454 or permission of the 
instructor. Computer programming in Matlab and one or more of C, F77, C++, F90 is required. 
Instructor(s): Staff 

CAAM 552 (F) PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (3) 

Analysis of boundary and initial value problems. Dirichlet problem for Laplace's equation, 
variational formulation, Rayleigh-Ritz principle, Sobolev spaces, weak solutions, convergence of 
the finite element method, interior and boundary regularity , heat equation and the Gaussian kernel, 
energy estimates, maximum principle, stability, consistency, and convergence of numerical 
methods, the Fourier transform, Fourier synthesis of Green's functions for the wave equation, von 
Neumann analysis of finite difference methods for waves. Prerequisite(s): CAAM 402 and CAAM 
436. Not offered 2003-04. 

CAAM 583 (F) INTRODUCTION TO RANDOM PROCESSES AND 
APPLICATIONS (3) 

Review of basic probability and the formulation, analysis, representation, and application of some 
random standard random processes. Include sequences of random variables, random vectors and 
estimation, basic concepts of random processes, random processes in linear systems, expansions 
of random processes, wiener filtering, spectral representation of random processes, and white-noise 
integrals. Prerequisite(s): STAT 381 (STAT 581 recommended). Also listed as ELEC 533 and 
STAT 583. Instructor s): Staff 

CAAM 590 (F) INDEPENDENT STUDY (VAR) 

Instructor(s): Staff 

CAAM 591 (S) INDEPENDENT STUDY (VAR) 

Instructor(s): Staff 

CAAM 640 OPTIMIZATION WITH SIMULATION CONSTRAINTS (3) 

Nonlinear programming techniques for the case that the primary constraints are varying fidelity 
simulations of complex systems. Nonlinear programming approaches studied will include very 
large-scale trust-region sequential quadratic programming techniques. Prerequisite(s): CAAM 460 
and 454 or permission of the instructor. Instructor(s): Staff 

CAAM 641 (S) TOPICS IN INVERSE PROBLEMS (3) 

Theoretical, computational and practical issues for inverse problems in science and engineering. 
Selected topics will vary depending on instructor and student interests. May be repeated for credit. 
Instructor(s): Staff 

CAAM 651 (S) TOPICS IN NUMERICAL LINEAR ALGEBRA (3) 

Selected topics will vary depending on instructor and student interests. Derivation and analysis of 
Krylov and subspace iteration methods for large eigenvalue problems (Lanczos, Amoldi, Jacobi- 
Davidon algorithms); preconditioning for linear systems and eigenvalue problems (incomplete LU, 
domain decomposition, multigrid); convergence analysis including potential theory and 
pseudospectra. Applications: regularization of discrete inverse problems; dimensions reduction for 
large dynamical control systems; linear stability of dynamic applications involving nonnormal 
matrices. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): CAAM 551 or permission of instructor. 
Instructor(s): Staff 

(#) = credit hours per semester 



322 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

CAAM 652 TOPICS IN NUMERICAL DIFFERENTIAL 

EQUATIONS (3) 

Content varies from year to year. Instructor(s): Staff 

CAAM 654 TOPICS IN OPTIMIZATION (3) 

Content varies from year to year. Instriictor(s): Staff 

CAAM 664 (F) TOPICS IN NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING (3) 

Content varies from year to year. Instructor{s): Staff 

CAAM 685 (F) MESO-SCALE NUMERICS SEMINAR (3) 

Introduction to practice/continuum coupling numerical techniques. Instructor(s): Staff 

CAAM 800 THESIS (VAR) 

Instntctor(s): Staff' 

CENG (Chemical Engineering) 

The George R. Brown School of Engineering / Department of Chemical 
Engineering 

CENG 301 (F) CHEMICAL ENG'G FUNDAMENTALS (3) 

Use of basic mathematical concepts, physical laws, stoichiometry, and the thermodynamic 
properties of matter to obtain material and energy balances for steady and unsteady state systems. 
Required for sophomores intending to major in chemical engineering. Instructor(s): Davis, 
Zygourakis 

CENG 303 (F) MATLAB AND MAPLE FOR CHEMICAL ENGINEERS (2) 

Teaches students how to use workstations and the computer languages MATLAB and MAPLE that 
are applied extensively in CENG 30 1 and other courses . Course is a corequisite for students enrolled 
in CENG 301. 5ra/f 

CENG 305 (S) COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN CHEMICAL ENGI- 
NEERING (3) 

Introduction to modem practice and chemical engineering applications of scientific computing: 
linear algebra (review); computer-aided solution of systems of linear equations:(direct, iterative); 
evaluation of integrals; systems of nonlinear algebraic equations; systems of ordinary differential 
equations; one-dimensional boundary value problems; stability and accuracy of computational 
methods; computational software libraries. Principles illustrated through chemical engineering 
examples. Instructor(s): Pasquali 

CENG 343 (S) CHEMICAL ENGINEERING LAB (3) 

Experiments demonstrating the principles presented in CENG 301, 302, and 390. Instructor(s): 
Staff 

CENG 390 (F) KINETICS & REACTOR DESIGN (4) 

Principles and significance of chemical kinetics; procedures for evaluating kinetic parameters from 
reaction rate data; application of these methods to design and predict the performance of various 
types of ideal and nonideal chemical reactors. Instructor(s): Wong 

CENG 401 (F) TRANSPORT PHENOMENA I (3) 

Fundamental principles of heat, mass, and momentum transport applied to the continuum; analysis 
of macroscopic physical systems based on the continuum equations; applications in chemical 
engineering practice. Instructor(s): Miller 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



{ COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 323 

CENG 402 (S) TRANSPORT PHENOMENA II (3) 

Continuation of CENG 401 . lnstnictor{s): Davis 

CENG 403 (F) EQUIPMENT DESIGN (4) 

Design and economic analysis of chemical process equipment. Use of computer design packages 
in the analysis of chemical equipment. Instructor(s): Cox 

CENG 404 (S) PROCESS DESIGN (4) 

Optimal design of chemical processes; industrial economic principles; special process design 
projects in small groups. Instriictor(s): Cox 

CENG 411 (S) THERMODYNAMICS I (3) 

Development and application of the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Instnictor(s): Staff 

CENG 412 (F) THERMODYNAMICS II (3) 

Advanced treatment of chemical and phase equilibria in multicomponent systems. Includes a 
detailed study of nonideal solutions. Iiistructor(s): Chapman 

CENG 420 (F) BIOSYSTEMS TRANSPORT AND REACTION PRO- 
CESSES (3) 

Application of the basic principles of transport and reaction to analyze momentum, heat, and mass 
transport, and reaction processes in the human body. Includes mathematical modeling to describe 
physiologic function , to understand pathological conditions , and to design bioartif icial organs with 
emphasis on the quantification of biomedical systems in relation to underlying molecular mecha- 
'nisms and cellular behavior. Also listed as BIOE 420. Iiistriictor(s): Mikos 

CENG 443 (F) CHEMICAL ENGINEERING LAB II (3) 

Experiments demonstrating transport coefficient measurements, forced and free convection 
transfer operations, and thermodynamic principles as covered in CENG 40 1,402, 4 11. //75rn<rror(5).' 
Staff 

CENG 460 (S) BIOCHEMICAL ENGINEERING (3) 

Design, operation, and analysis of processes in the biochemical industries. Topics include enzyme 
kinetics, cell growth kinetics , energetics , recombinant DN A technology , microbial , tissue and plant 
cell cultures, bioreactor design and operation, down stream processing. Instructor(s): San 

CENG 470 (F) PROCESS DYNAMICS & CONTROL (3) 

Modeling of dynamic processes. Response of uncontrolled systems. Transfer functions. Feedback 
controllers; response and stability of controlled systems; frequency response. Design of feedback 
controllers. Cascade, feed-forward and multivariable control systems. Introduction to computer 
control. Use of simulators to design feedback controllers. Required for B.S. majors in chemical 
engineering. Instructor(s): Mantzahs 

CENG 500 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (3) 

Independent investigation of a specific topic or problem in modern chemical engineering research 
under the direction of a selected faculty member. Prerequisite(s): permission of the department. 
Course may be repeated for credit. Instructor(s): Robert 

CENG 501 (F) FLUID MECHANICS AND TRANSPORT PROCESSES (3) 

Advanced study in fluid mechanics and transport processes including analytical and numerical 
approximation methods, boundary layer theory, and potential flow theory . Instructor(s): Hirasaki 

CENG 503 (S) CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PROCESSES: AIR POLLU- 
TION CONTROL (3) 

Examines sources, characterization, and effects of atmospheric pollutants 03, CO, HC, VOC, 
NOX, SOX, and particulates; regulatory issues and pollution standards; dispersion models and 
meteorology; and techniques, with emphasis on those employing catalysts, used in pollution 
control. Instructor(s): McKee 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



324 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

CENG 540 STATISTICAL MECHANICS (3) 

A development of the principles of statistical mechanics with application to problems of chemical 
interest. Not offered 2003-04. 

CENG 551 (F) INTRODUCTION TO BIOENGINEERING (1) 

A seminar course introducing current research areas in Bioengineering and Biotechnology. Taught 
in a tutorial manner to help acquaint students with the research activities of various laboratories at 
Rice and the Texas Medical Center. Instructor(s): Staff 

CENG 560 INTERFACIAL PHENOMENA (3) 

Interfacial tension, wetting and spreading, contact angle hysteresis, interaction between colloid 
particles, stability of interfaces, flow and transport near Interfaces. Not offered 2003-04. 

CENG 571 (S) FLOW AND TRANSPORT THROUGH POROUS MEDIA I 

(3) 
Study of the geology, chemistry, and physics of multicomponent, multiphase fluids in porous 
media. Includes hydrostatic and hydrodynamic properties of fluids in soils and rocks and the 
simulation of fundamental transport processes in one dimension. Instructor(s): Hirasaki 

CENG 590 (S) KINETICS, CATALYSIS, AND REACTOR 
ENGINEERING (3) 

Review of kinetics and reactor design equations; heterogeneous catalysis; catalyst preparation, 
characterization, testing; catalytic reaction mechanisms; diffusion and reaction in catalyst pellets; 
conservation equations; reactor analysis. Instructor(s): Hightower 

CENG 593 (F) POLYMER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING (3) 

Basic concepts in macromolecular chemistry and their application in the synthesis and chemical 
modification of polymers. Instructor(s): Armeniades 

CENG 594 (S) PROPERTIES OF POLYMERS (3) 

Molecular organization and physical properties of polymeric materials; elastomeric, semicrystal- 
line, and glassy polymers; processing and technology of polymeric systems. Instructor(s): 
Armeniades 

CENG 600 MASTER OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH (3) 

Independent investigation of a topic or problem in modem chemical engineering research under the 
direction of a selected faculty member. Insrructor(s): Zygourakis 

CENG 601 FLUID MECHANICS &TRANSPORT (3) 

Advanced study in one of several areas of fluid mechanics or transport, including tensor analysis, 
continuum mechanics, rheology, and mathematical methods of special interest in fluid mechanics. 
Not offered 2003-04. Instnictor(s): Staff 

CENG 602 (S) PHYSICO-CHEMICAL HYDRODYNAMICS (3) 

Topics in hydrodynamics including areas such as waves on liquid surfaces, convection and 
diffusion in liquids, motion of drops and bubbles, and electrophoresis. Instructor(s): Miller 

CENG 603 (F) RHEOLOGY (3) 

Calculus and time derivatives of directed quantities. Elastic solid, Newtonian liquid. Shear and 
extensional flows. Linear Viscoelasticity. Nonlinear viscoelasticity: rate- and time-dependent 
shear and extensional viscosity, normal stresses in shear. Elementary theories of nonlinear 
viscoelastic behavior. Isotrophy , objectivity , frame-indifference . Shear and extensional rheometry . 
Special topics: thermodynamics of microstructured materials; fine-grained theories of polymer 
dynamics; computational rheology. Instructor(s): Pasquali 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 325 

CENG 611 (F) ADVANCED TOPICS-THERMODYNAMICS (3) 

An advanced treatment of the thermodynamics of pure and muhicomponent systems. Topics range 
from classical thermodynamics to a discussion of modem developments. Insmictor(s): Robert 

CENG 615 (S) APPL OF MOLECULAR SIMULATION AND STATISTI- 
CAL MECHANICS (3) 

Introduction to molecular simulation techniques and applications of statistical mechanics-based 
theory to engineering problems. Projects involve topics of current research interest. Students are 
expected to know thermodynamics and to have had some introduction to statistical mechanics. 
Instriictor(s): Chapman 

CENG 620 (S) TISSUE ENGINEERING (3) 

This course will focus on cell-cell interactions and the role of the extracellular matrix in the structure 
and function of normal and pathological tissues. Includes strategies to regenerate metabolic organs 
and repair structural tissues, as well as cell-based therapies to deliver proteins and other therapeutic 
drugs, with emphasis on issues related to cell and tissue transplantation such as substrate properties, 
angiogenesis, growth stimulation. cell differentiation, and immunoprotection. /ns/rwcrorf 5 j.- Mikos 

CENG 630 (S) CHEMICAL ENGINEERING OF NANOSTRUCTURED 
MATERIALS (3) 

Overview of materials with structural features on the nanometer scale. Discussion of general 
concepts of synthesis, characterization and applications. Highlight advances found in recent 
literature. Instructor{s): Wong 

CENG 661 (F) GRADUATE SEMINAR (1) 

Instructor{s): Staff 

CENG 662 (S) GRADUATE SEMINAR (1) 

Instructor(s): Staff 

CENG 671 (S) FLOW AND TRANSPORT THROUGH POROUS 
MEDIA II (3) 

Calculation of multicomponent-multiphase transport in one to three dimensions using finite 
difference methods. Includes development of multidimensional models of systems and represen- 
tation and estimation of geological heterogeneity. Instructor(s): Hirasaki 

CENG 672 (F) APPLIED MATHEMATICS I (3) 

Vector Spaces . Linear Transformations . Existence and uniqueness of solutions for linear equations . 
Numerical solution of linear equations. Gauss elimination, band matrices, finite differences. 
Determinants. Inner products, norms, orthogonality. Instructor(s): Staff 

CENG 692 (S) NUMERICAL METHODS FOR DIFFERENTIAL EQUA- 
TIONS IN ENGINEERING AND BIOLOGY (3) 

The class focuses on the numerical analysis of various times integration techniques for ordinary 
differential equations, as well as spatial and temporal discretization methods for hyperbolic and 
parabolic partial differential equations that describe processes in engineering and biology, home- 
work and projects aim at the comparative evaluation of the various schemes discussed in class. 
Ins true tor ( s ) : Man tzar is 

CENG 700 M.S. RESEARCH AND THESIS (3) 

Course may be repeated for credit. Instructor(s}: Staff 

CENG 720 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (3) 

A course which covers various special topics in chemical engineering. Offered at irregular intervals 
on demand. Enrollment requires approval of the instructor. Instrnctor(s): Staff 

CENG 760 BAYLOR/RICE MD/PHD PROGRAM 

Departmental permission required. Course may be repeated for credit. Not offered 2003-04. 

(#) = credit hours per semester 



326 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

CENG 800 GRADUATE RESEARCH (3) 

Course may be repeated for credit. Instructor(s): Staff 

CENG 801 (S) SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (1) 

Summer internship in an area related to thesis research or professional broadening. Pemiission or 
thesis advisor and department chair required. Instructor(s): Staff 

CEVE (Civil and Environmental Engineering) 

The George R. Brown School of Engineering / Department of Civil and 
Environmental Engineering 

CEVE 201 (F) INTRO-ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS (4) 

The chemical, physical, and biological components of the natural environment as resources and 
their utilization and interaction in environmental control engineering and technology. Also listed 
as HEAL 201. Lecture (TTH 10:50 a.m.-12:05 p.m.) and laboratory (W 2-5 p.m.) are required. 
Instructor(s): Ward 

CEVE 211 ENGINEERING MECHANICS (3) 

Also offered as MECH 211. Instructor(s): Staff 

CEVE 300 (S) MECHANICS OF SOLIDS I (3) 

Analysis of stress and deformation of solids with applications to beams, circular shafts, and 
columns. Study of engineering properties of materials. Applying equilibrium, compatibility, and 
force-deformation relationships to structural elements. Prerequisite(s): CEVE 21 1 Instructor(s): 
Nagarajaiah 

CEVE 302 (S) STRENGTH OF MATERIALS LAB (1) 

Instruction in standard tension, compression, and torsion tests of ferrous and nonferrous metals. 
Includes experimental techniques and the behavior of structural elements. Enrollment limited. 
Preference given to civil engineering majors. Instructor(s): Nagarajaiah 

CEVE 304 (S) STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS I (3) 

Analysis of statically determinate structures; stability and determinacy; influence lines and moving 
loads. Calculation of deflections. Introduction to analysis of indeterminate structures. /n^m/ctorf^j; 
Veletsos 

CEVE 305 (F) STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS II (3) 

Study of force and displacement methods used in the analysis of indeterminate structures. Includes 
influence lines, energy methods. Introduction to stiffness method of analysis of structures. Required 
for B.S.C.E. (not required for environmental engineering) Instructor(s): Staff 

CEVE 306 (S) STEEL DESIGN (3) 

Design of steel members, connections, and assenblies. Behavior of a member as related to design. 
Instructor(s): Terk 

CEVE 308 (S) GLOBAL ENVIRON LAW & SUSTAINABLE DEV (3) 

Examination of emerging trends toward sustainable development and global environmental 
protection. Includes international treaties on management of the oceans, global warming, ozone 
depletion, biodiversity and development pattern; impact of treaties such as NAFTA and GATT. 
Instructor's): Blackburn 

CEVE 322 (F) ENGINEERING ECONOMICS FOR ENGINEERS (3) 

Introduction to the evaluation of alternative investment opportunities with emphasis on engineering 
projects and capital infrastructure. Time value of money concepts are developed in the context of 
detailed project evaluation and presentations. Instructor's ): Segner 



} COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 327 

CEVE 363 (F) APPLIED FLUID MECHANICS (3) 

Study of fluid properties, fluid statics, and incompressible fluid steady flow. Includes energy and 
momentum equations with many applications, similitude and dimensional analysis, and viscous 
fluid flow in pipe networks. Required for B.S.C.E. Itistnictorfs): Liapis 

CEVE 400 (F) MECHANICS OF SOLIDS II (3) 

Analysis of stress and strain in two and three dimensions. Stress-strain relations for elestic, elastic/ 
plastic, and viscoelastic materials. Material failure criteria. Analysis of bending and torsion of 
cylinders, plane problems, large deflections of beam beams, curved beams, beams of elastic 
foundations, and plates. Solutions by analytical, numerical, and energy methods, including an 
introduction to the finite element method. Does not count toward graduate degree requirements in 
civil engineering. Instructoris): Merwin 

CEVE 401 (F) INTRO ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (4) 

Principles and significance of measurements used to assess environmental quality. Hands-on 
measurements of both classical titration, and modem instrumental methods of measuring both bulk 
and trace level pollutant concentrations. Instructoris): Tomson 

CEVE 403 (F) PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING (3) 

Water quality engineering, air pollution control, and solid and hazardous waste management. 
Instructoris ): Adamson 

CEVE 406 (S) INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (3) 

Legal techniques used by societies to plan and regulate the use of environmental resources. Not 
bffered in 2004. Instructoris): Blackburn 

CEVE 407 (S) EINFORCED CONCRETE DESIGN (3) 

Instruction in tests of materials and reinforced concrete members. Corequisite: CEVE 408. 
Instructoris): Durrani 

CEVE 408 (S) CONCRETE LABORATORY ( 1 ) 

Instruction in tests of materials and reinforced concrete members. Corequisite: CEVE 407. 
Instructoris): Durrani 

CEVE 411 (S) AIR RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3) 

Introductory principles necessary for understanding air quality and the sources and control of air 
pollution. Instructoris): Fraser 

CEVE 412 (S) HYDROLOGY & WATERSHED ANALYSIS (3) 

Fundamentals of the hydrologic cycle, hydrograph techniques, flood routing, and open channel 
flow. Includes hydrologic design and local watershed application. Instructoris): Bedient 

CEVE 434 (F) CHEMICAL TRANSPORT AND FATE IN THE ENVIRON- 
MENT (3) 

Principles of mass balance, chemical partitioning, transport, and transformation in surface waters, 
ground waters, and the atmosphere. Instructoris ): Staff 

CEVE 443 (F) ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE (3) 

This course emphasizes the science of the atmosphere. Subjects studied include: radiation: climate 
dynamics: energy balance models: structure and stability: water cloud, and precipitation physics: 
atmosphere dynamics: storms and special systems: and atmosphere. Instructoris): Fraser 

CEVE 451 (S) INTRODUCTION TO TRANSPORTATION (3) 

Surrey of the operational characteristics of transport modes, the elements of transportation 
planning, and the design of stationary elements. Required for B.S.C.E. (not required for environ- 
mental engineering option). Instructoris): Staff 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



328 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

CEVE 454 (F) FINITE ELEMENT METHODS IN FLUID MECHANICS (3) 

Fundamental concepts of finite element methods in fluid mechanics, including spatial discretization , 
and numerical integration in multidimensions, time-integration, and solution of nonlinear ordinary | 
differential equation systems. Instnictor(s): Tezduyar 

CEVE 470 (F) BASIC SOIL MECHANICS (4) 

Introduction to geotechnical engineering, formation of soil , properties and behavior, soil classifi-i 
cations, water flow through soil, consolidation and settlement, strength characteristics, soilt 
stabilization. Instructor(s): Cibor 

CEVE 479 (F) INTRODUCTION TO PROJECT DEVELOPMENT (1) 

Introduces students to the design issues and practices in civil and environmental engineering. 
Includes the methods, references and computer tools used in engineering design practice . Emphasis ' 
on topics that influence the design in civil engineering facilities, including existing built environ- f 
ment, natural environment, economic and social factors, and long expected lifespan. Instructor(s): 
Terk 

CEVE 480 (S) SENIOR DESIGN (TBA) 

Synthesis and application of engineering knowledge of the design of projects. Instructor(s): 
Grounds 

CEVE 490 SPECIAL STUDY AND RESEARCH (TBA) 

Open to environmental science or engineering majors with permission of chairman. Written thesis 
required. Instructor(s): Staff 

CEVE 499 SPECIAL PROBLEMS (TBA) 

Study of selected topics including individual investigations, special lectures, and seminars. Offered 
upon mutual agreement of faculty and student. Instructor(s): Staff' 

CEVE 508 (S) GLOBAL ENVIRON LAW & SUSTAINABLE DEV (3) 

graduate version of CEVE 308 ( one additional paper required). Instmctor(s): Blackburn 

CEVE 511 (S) ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS (3) 

Study of the principal chemical and physical processes affecting trace gases and particles in the 
atmosphere. Overview of the atmospheric transport, transformation and dispersion of air pollutants 
on the urban, regional and global scale; atmospheric photo. Instructor(s): Fraser 

CEVE 512 (S) HYDROLOGIC DESIGN LAB (3) 

Use of hydrologic models for design and analysis of water resources. Instructor(s): Bedient 

CEVE 513 (F) THEORY OF ELASTICITY (3) 

Advanced topics in the linear and nonlinear theory of elasticity. Also offered as MECH 513. Not 
offered every year. Instructor(s): Staff' 

CEVE 516 (F) PLATES AND SHELLS (3) 

Introduction to theories of plates and cylindrical shells with applications to practical problem. Not 
offered every year. Instructor(s): Veletsos 

CEVE 518 (F) GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY AND CONTAMI- 
NATION (3) 

Contaminant transport in aquifer systems, biodegradation, reaction, numerical models, and 
groundwater remediation systems. Instructor(s): Bedient 

CEVE 521 (F) STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS I (3) 

Dynamics of force-excited discrete linear systems with applications to design. Instructor(s): 
Veletsos 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 329 

CEVE 522 (S) STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS II (3) 

Dynamics of force-excited continuous linear systems and ground-excited linear and yielding 
structures. Fundamentals of earthquake engineering Instnictor(s): Veletsos 

CEVE 525 (F) STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS III (3) 

Study of special topics in structural dynamics . Includes problems of wave propagation , the response 
of structures to waves, the dynamics of foundations, and soil-structure and fluid-structure 
interaction. Instnictor(s): Veletsos 

CEVE 526 (S) STRUCTURAL STABILITY 

General analysis of stress and strain , linear elastic , thermo-elastic stress-strain relations . Aproximate 
solutions by energy methods and finite element method. lustriictor(s): Nordgren 

CEVE 527 (F) COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN STRUCTURAL ME- 
CHANICS (3) 

Introduction to differential and integral formulations, variational principles, weighted residuals, 
and principle of virtual work. Simple boundary, initial, and eigenvalue problems. Finite element, 
boundary element, and finite difference methods for structural mechanics. //!5rn/cror(5J.-A^flgfl/(7/a/o/! 

CEVE 530 (F) CONCRETE BUILDING DESIGN (3) 

Design of reinforced concrete building structures and floor slab systems. Case histories will be 
discussed, [nstnictor(s): Hague 

CEVE 531 (F) BEHAVIOR OF REINFORCED CONCRETE MEMBERS (3) 

Study of the moment-curvature relationship for beams and columns, biaxally loaded columns, 
slenderness effects, interaction diagrams, shear and torsion in members, shear wall-frame interac- 
tion , and behavior under large load reversals . Includes extensive use of microcomputers . Instnictor(s): 
Durrani 

CEVE 532 (S) PHYSICAL-CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN ENVIRON (3) 

Introduction to colloid and surface chemistry, precipitation, settling, packed bed filtration, other 
operations used in environmental pollution control and potable water treatment. bistructor{s}: 
Wiesner 

CEVE 534 (F) TRANSPORT PHENOMENA & ENVIRONMENTAL 
MODELING (3) 

Principles of fluid flow, mass transport and transformation processes in natural and engineered 
systems. Iiistructor(s): Wiesner 

CEVE 536 (S) ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY (3) 

Theory and application of biochemical processes in environmental engineering. lustructor(s): 
\damson 

CEVE 540 (S) STEEL BUILDING DESIGN (3) 

Exploration of practical design from conceptual stage to final analysis. Includes design parameters 
and serviceability limitations. Prerequisite(s): CEVE 305/306, and 407. Instructor(s): Shiek 

CEVE 550 (S) ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3) 

A course covering parameter estimation methods, thermodynamics, and kinetic needed to predict 
the fate, transport, and reactivity of organic compounds in air, water, and soils. Instructor(s): 
Tomson 

CEVE 554 (F) FINITE ELEMENT METHODS IN FLUID MECHANICS (3) 

graduate version of CEVE 454. Additional work required. Instructor{s): 

CEVE 555 (S) INTERNET-ENABLED ENGINEERING (1) 

Introduction to the Internet and the Internet's impact on engineering activities. This course will 
concentrate on issues involved in creating websites that support engineering activities. //;.sr/-//f?c>r(5J.' 
Terk 

l#) = credit hours per semester 



330 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

CEVE 559 (S) PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS IN COMPUTER-AIDED 
ENGINEERING (3) 

Provides an introduction to fundamental issues in computer-aided engineering (CAE); control of 
the complexity of developing large-scale CAE software; decompositions and abstraction strategies 
used to produce modular programs. Instnictor(s): Terk 

CEVE 570 (S) FOUNDATION ENGINEERING (3) 

Soil exploration , bearing capacity . and settlements of foundations; soil improvement; geotechnical 
analysis and design of spread and special footings. Prerequisite(s): CEVE 52 1 Instnictor(s): Cibor 

CEVE 571 (S) SOIL DYNAMICS (3) 

Introduction to vibrations, wave propagation in elastic media, in situ soil properties, the behaviorl 
of soil subjected to dynamic and cyclic loading, and engineering applications. Instructor(s): Staff 

CEVE 590 (S) M.E.E. AND M.E.S. SPECIAL STUDY AND 
RESEARCH (TBA) 

Independent investigation of a specific topic or problem in environmental engineering under the 
direction of a selected faculty member. Preparation of a formal report and oral presentation of 
results are required. Instriictor(s): Stajf 

CEVE 601 (F) SEMINAR (3) 

Continuing seminar on environmental research. Instructor(s): Staff 

CEVE 602 (S) SEMINAR (3) 

See CEVE 601 . Instructor(s): Staff 

CEVE 610 (S) STRUCTURAL DYNAMIC SYSTEMS AND CONTROL (3) 

Elements of linen systems and control theory, transform methods, state space methods, feedback 
control, and Lyapunov's method. Analytical modeling of structures, control algorithms, and 
response to dynamic loading. Base isolation, smut materials anddev'ices. Instructor(s):Nagarajaiak 

CEVE 630 (S) CHARACTERIZATION, TRANSPORT AND TREATMENT 
PARTICLES IN WATER (3) 

Fundamentals of membrane processes, theory and methods for characterizing aquasols, colloid 
chemistry , particle transport in porous media and simple flows, particle aggregation, aggregate and : 
deposit morphology, and other special topics. Instructor(s): Wiesner 

CEVE 631 ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS ANALYSIS (3) 

Formulation of optimization models. Offered in alternate years. In.stnictor(s): Wiesner 

CEVE 635 (F) ADV TOPICS IN WATER CHEMISTRY (3) 

Formal lecture and assigned reading in topics such as redox kinetics and thermodynamics,! 
adsorption and desorption , and the associated mathematics . An advanced topics course . Instnictor(s): 
Tomson 

CEVE 635 ADV TOPICS IN WATER CHEMISTRY (TBA) 

Advanced topics in graduate study. Instnictor(s): Tomson 

CEVE 636 (S) ADV TOPICS IN WATER CHEMISTRY (TBA) 

Advanced topics in graduate study. Instnictor(s): Tomson 

CEVE 640 (F) ADV TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 
SCIENCES (3) 

Special topics in graduate study Instructor(s}: Staff 

CEVE 641 (S) ADV TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 
SCIENCES (TBA) 

Advanced topics in graduate study. Instriictor(s): Staff 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 331 

CEVE 651 (F) M.S. RESEARCH AND THESIS (TBA) 

Thesis. Instriictor(s): Staff 

CEVE 652 (S) M.S. RESEARCH AND THESIS (TBA) 

Thesis. Instriictor(s): Staff 

CEVE 678 (F) ADVANCED STOCHASTIC MECHANICS (3) 

Nonlinear random vibrations. Statistical Linearization. ARMA filters modeling. Monte Carlo 
Simulation, Wiener-Volterra series, time-variant structural reliability, and Stochastic Finite Ele- 
ments are presented from a perspective of usefulness to aerospace. Instructor(s): Spanos 

CEVE 679 (F) APPLIED MONTE CARLO ANALYSIS (3) 

Probability density and power spectrum based simulation concepts and procedures are discussed. 
Scalar and vectorial simulation are addressed. Spectral decomposition and digital filter algorithms 
are presented. See MECH 679. Instriictor(s): Spanos 

CEVE 698 (F) SPECIAL PROBLEMS (TBA) 

Study of selected topics including individual investigations under the direction of a member of the 
civil engineering faculty. Offered upon mutual agreement of faculty and student. Instructor(s): 
Staff 

CEVE 699 (S) SPECIAL PROBLEMS (TBA) 

Study of selected topics including individual investigations under the direction of a member of the 
civil engineering faculty. Offered upon mutual agreement of faculty and student. Instructor(s): 
Staff 

CEVE 800 (F) PH.D. RESEARCH AND THESIS (TBA) 

Thesis. Instnictor{s): Staff 

CEVE 801 (S) PH.D. RESEARCH AND THESIS (TBA) 

Thesis. Instructor(s): Staff 



CHEM (Chemistry) 



The Wiess School of Natural Sciences / Department of Chemistry 

CHEM 121 (F) GENERAL CHEMISTRY WITH LAB (4) 

***Hour exams 8 AM TTH *** Introduction to chemical phenomena emphasizing problems and 
methods in chemistry . includes a laboratory that meets once per week for 2.5 hours. Instriictor(s): 
Colvin, Whitinire, Thorns, McHale 

CHEM 122 (S) GENERAL CHEMISTRY WITH LAB (4) 

*** HOUR EXAMS 8 AM TTH *** See CHEM 121 . Either CHEM 122 or 152 may be taken as 
prerequisite for advanced study in chemistry, but only one of these two may be taken for credit. 
Includes a laboratory that meets once per week for 2.5 hours. Instructor(s): Whitmire, Colvin, 
Thorns, McHale 

CHEM 151 (F) HONORS CHEMISTRY WITH LAB (4) 

An introduction to chemical phenomena emphasizing principles and theories in chemistry. 
Recommended strongly for students who plan to major in chemistry or have a strong high school 
background. Includes a laboratorj' that meets once per week for 2.5 hours. Instructor(s): Weisman, 
Brooks, McHale 

CHEM 152 (S) HONORS CHEMISTRY WITH LAB (4) 

See CHEM 151 . Either 122 or 152 may be taken as prerequisite for advanced study in chemistry, 
but only one of these two may be taken for credit. Includes a laborator>' that meets once per week 
for 2.5 hours. Instructor(s): Weis?nan, Brooks. McHale 

(#) = credit hours per semester 



332 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

CHEM 157 (F) LABORATORY SKILLS REVIEW (0) 

A laboratory refresher course for students who received AP credit for CHEM 121 and 122. 
Pennission of instructor required. Instnictor(s): Weisman, McHcile 

CHEM 211 (F) ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3) 

Aliphatic and aromatic organic chemistry with emphasis on structure, bonding, and reaction 
mechanisms. Instntctor(s): Billups, Parry 

CHEM 212 (S) ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3) 

Continuation of CHEM 2 1 1 with a greater emphasis on the chemistry of various functional groups. 
Iiistri(ctor(s): Billups, Parry 

CHEM 213 (F) ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LAB (1) 

Synthesis, purification, and characterization of organic compounds. Experiments related to topics 
covered in CHEM 21 1 and 212. Second semester includes identification of unknown organic 
compounds. (One hour lecture precedes each lab.) One lab per week. Not offered fall 2003. 

CHEM 215 (S) ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LAB (1) 

Synthesis, purification, and characterization of organic compounds. Experiments related to topics 
covered in CHEM 211, 212. Second semester includes identification of unknown organic 
compounds. (One hour lecture precedes each lab. ) One lab per week . Inslriictor(s): Billups, McHale 

CHEM 217 (F) ORGANIC LABORATORY FOR CHEMICAL ENGINEERS 

Organic laboratory designed for chemical engineering majors. Emphasis placed on the synthesis 
and the characterization of organic compounds. This laboratory does not satisfy requirements for 
science majors or premedical students. Billups, McHale 

CHEM 311 (F) PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (3) 

An introduction to the fundamental principles of physical chemistry , including quantum chemistry, 
chemical bonding, molecular spectroscopy, statistical thermodynamics, and kinetic theory of 
gases. Instructor(s): Kolomeisky 

CHEM 312 (S) PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (3) 

A continuation of CHEM 311, including the principles of thermodynamics, statistical thermody- 
namics, kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics, and the structures of 
liquids, solids, and macromolecules. Instructor(s): Clemcnti, Kinsey 

CHEM 351 (F) INTRODUCTORY MODULE IN EXPERIMENTAL 
CHEMISTRY 1(1) 

Experiments illustrating techniques in synthetic inorganic chemistry and instrumental methods of 
analysis . Required for chemistry majors . Taught in the first half of the semester. Freshman may take 
the course with permission from instructor. lustructor(s): Wilso?i 

CHEM 352 (F) INTRODUCTORY MODULE IN EXPERIMENTAL 
CHEMISTRY Hd) 

Experiments illustrating techniques in synthetic organic chemistry and instrumental methods of 
analysis. Required for chemistry majors. Taught in the second half of the semester. Instructor(s): 
Thorns 

CHEM 353 (S) INTRODUCTORY MODULE IN ANALYTICAL 
METHODS (1) 

Experiments illustrating techniques in analytical chemistry, data analysis, data precision and 
accuracy . Quantitative measurements will be stressed including volumetric techniques . liistructor(s): 
Thorns 

CHEM 360 (S) INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3) 

Survey of the periodic table; atomic and molecular structure; bonding in covalent, ionic, and 
electron deficient systems; thermochemical principles and experimental techniques for analysis, 
structure determination, and synthesis. Iiistructor(s): Barron, Margrave 

(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



' COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 333 

CHEM 373 (S) ADV MODULE IN FULLERENE CHEM (1) 

A mixture of fullerenes is extracted, separated, and purified. Spectroscopic, kinetic, and electro- 
chemical properties of C60 and C70 are then measured and interpreted. Offered first half of the 
semester. Instructor(s): Weistruin 

CHEM 374 (F) ADV MODULE IN SYNTHETIC CHEM (1) 

Advance techniques in organic synthesis are presented. Offered the second half of the semester. 
Instnictor(s): Parry 

CHEM 375 (F) ADVANCED MODULE IN N ANOCHEMISTR Y ( 1 ) 

Students explore synthesis and structure of nanoparticles and their physical characterization. 
Instructor(s): Thorns 

CHEM 381 (F) ADVANCED MODULE IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (1) 

Study of experimental physical chemistry. Offered in first half of semester . Some knowledge of 
MATLAB required. Not offered fall 2003. 

CHEM 382 (F) ADVANCED MODULE IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (1) 

Study of experimental physical chemistry. Offered in first half of semester. Some knowledge of 
MATLAB required. The labs are offered M, T, W, or TH from 1-7 p.m. every other week. 
Instriictor(s): Brooks 

CHEM 383 (F) ADV MODULE IN INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS (1) 

Principles and application of modem instrumental methods to inorganic and physical chemistry. 
Offered in the first half of the semester. Not offered fall 2003. 

CHEM 384 (S) ADV MODULE IN INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS ( 1 ) 

Principles and application of modem instmmental methods to inorganic and physical chemistry. 
Offered in the second half of the semester. Instructor(s): Thorns 

CHEM 385 (F) ADVANCED MODULE IN POLYMER CHEMISTRY (1) 

Students explore the svnthesis and physical properties of conducting polymers. Not offered fall 
2003. 

CHEM 391 (F) ADVANCED MODULE IN CATALYSIS (1) 

Preparation and study of a homogeneous catalytic system. Not offered 2003-04. 

CHEM 401 (F) ADV ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3) 

The synthesis of complex organic compounds are described using the basic outline of retrosynthetic 
analysis. An overview of numerous classical organic ad organometallic methods is utilized. 
Instructor(s): Behar 

CHEM 411 (S) SPECTRAL METH. IN ORGANIC CHEM (3) 

Elucidation of organic stractures by physical techniques. Interpretation of infrared, ultraviolet, 
nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectra. Instructor(s): Engel 

CHEM 413 (F) NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IN CHEMISTRY (3) 

This course is designed to bring the practicing scientist to a sufficient level of competence in nuclear 
magnetic resonance (NMR) to understand multi-dimensional NMR techniques and the current 
literature. The course covers the mathematical and physical basis of NMR as well as the 
experimental aspects, which will lead to the selection of experiments appropriate to the class 
participants' research projects. Chem. 41 3 assumes a fundamental knowledge of 1 3C and 1 H NMR 
Instructor(s): Willcott 

CHEM 414 (F) MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR HIGH RESOLUTION 
NMR SPECTROSCOPY (3) 

Rigorous development of the density matrix methodology for analysis of high resolution NMR 
Spectroscopy. Includes two and three dimensional NMR techniques for liquid phase samples. 
Product operator formalism gradient enhanced spectroscopy and methods for rapid analysis of 
NMR spectra will be presented . 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



334 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

CHEM 415 (F) CHEMICAL KINETICS & DYNAMICS (3) 

Description and analysis of the rates of unimolecular, bimolecular and composite chemical 
reactions in gas and solution phases. Both macroscopic kinetics and microscopic reaction dynamics 
are covered. Instructor(s): Brooks, Glass 

CHEM 430 (F) QUANTUM CHEMISTRY (3) 

Quantum mechanical principles, atomic structure and chemical bonding. Instructor(s): dementi 

CHEM 435 (S) METHODS OF COMPUTATIONAL QUANTUM CHEMIS- 
TRY (1) 

Methods of quantum chemistry will be examined with projects to explore the application of these 
techniques in solving questions about chemical structure, bonding and reactivity. Offered the 
second half of the semester. Enrollment limited to 6. Instructor(s): Scuseria 

CHEM 440 (F) ENZYME MECHANISMS (3) 

A survey of organic reactions catalyzed by enzymes, with an emphasis on arrow-pushing 
mechanisms. Both enzymes that use cofactors and those that do not will be covered. Also listed as 
BIOS 440. Instructor(s): Matsuda 

CHEM 445 (F) PHYSICAL ORGANIC CHEM (3) 

Organic reaction mechanisms, substituent and medium effects, linear free energy relations and 
acidity functions. Instructor(s): Engel 

CHEM 491 (F) RESEARCH FOR UNDERGRADUATES (3) 

Open only to chemistry majors unless approved by the department chair. Written report required. 
Instructor(s): Margrave 

CHEM 494 (F) UNDERGRADUATE LITERATURE RESEARCH (3) 

Students conduct literature research under the direction of a chemistry faculty member. The 
research project will culminate in a substantial written work describing the results of the project. 
Approval of the department chair required. Not offered 2003-04. 

CHEM 495 (F) TRANSITION METAL CHEMISTRY (3) 

Structure, bonding and reactivity of coordination and organometallic compounds; ligand field 
theory; electronic spectroscopy; magnetism; reaction mechanisms; catalysis. //i5frHc/orfi\).'Bfl/To/j, 
Wilson 

CHEM 515 (F) CHEMICAL KINETICS & DYNAMICS (3) 

Description and analysis of the rates of unimolecular, bimolecular. and composite chemical 
reactions in gas and solution phases. Both macroscopic kinetics and microscopic reaction dynamics 
are covered. Not offered 2003-04. 

CHEM 520 (S) CLASSICAL & STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS (3) 

A review of the principles of classical thermodynamics and an introduction to the theories and 
methods of statistical thermodynamics with applications to problems in chemistry. Instructor(s): 
Kolomeisky 

CHEM 530 (F) MOLECULAR QUANTUM MECHANICS I (3) 

Quantum mechanical principles, atomic structure, and chemical bonding. Not offered fall 2003 

CHEM 531 (S) QUANTUM MECHANICS II (3) 

A development of the elements and techniques of quantum mechanics with applications to atomic 
and molecular systems. Instructor(s): Scuseria 

CHEM 533 (F) INTRODUCTION TO NANOCHEMISTRY (3) 

An introduction to the basic principles of nanoscience and nanotechnology size dependent physical 
properties of nanoscopic solids will be described using solid state physics and molecular orbital 
theory as a foundation. Wet chemical techniques that produce nanoscale materials (e.g., carbon 
nanotubes, semiconductor and metallic nanocrystals,dendrimers.) will be introduced in the second 
half of the semester. Also listed as PHYS 533. Instructor(s): Colvin 

(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 335 

CHEM 543 (S) SECONDARY METABOLISM (3) 

A survey of the biosynthetic pathways leading to the major classes of natural products. Topics 
covered include the use of radioactive and stable isotopes, the synthesis of labeled organic 
compounds mechanistic investigations of secondary metabolic enzymes, and the cloning and 
characterization of secondary metabolic genes. Instriictor(s): Parry 

CHEM 544 (F) ORGANIC CHEM (3) NOT OFFERED 03-04 

An in-depth introduction to synthesis, characterization, and physical properties of polymers. 

CHEM 547 (F) SUPRAMOLECULAR CHEMISTRY (3) 

An examination of noncovalent interactions and their impact in biology, chemistry, and engineer- 
ing. Topics will include self-assembly, molecular recognition, protein folding and structure, 
nucleic acid structure , polymer organization, crystallization and applications of the above for the 
design and synthesis of nanostructured materials. lnstriictor{s): Hartgeriuk 

CHEM 561 (F) ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEM (3) 

The disconnection approach to organic synthesis. Heavy emphasis on reactions, reagents, and 
mechanisms. Not offered fall 2003. 

CHEM 562 (S) ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3) 

Continues in the same vein as CHEM 561 but with emphasis on very recent advances in 
stereoselective synthesis. Instructor(s): Behar 

CHEM 566 (F) SURFACE PHYSICS (3) 

An introduction to Surface Physics covering thermodynamics, chemical analysis, electronic 
structure, crystal structure, phase transitions, surface magnetism, elementary excitations, and 
optical properties. Includes a discussion of modem surface spectroscopies including photo-electron 
and scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy . Also listed as PHYS 566. Not offered fall 2004. 

CHEM 570 (S) CONNECTING NANOSCIENCE TO 9TH GRADE IPC 
CURRICULUM (2) 

Seminar with a team of university faculty to refresh and enhance high school Integrated Physics and 
Chemistry (IPC) teachers understanding of course material. This material will then be connected 
to ongoing nanotechnology research to act as a stimulating and effective context for teaching 
scientific concepts. Enrollment limited to 35. Instructor(s): Kulinowski 

CHEM 575 (S) PHYSICAL METHODS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3) 

A survey course of research techniques used in modem inorganic chemistry. Topics covered will 
include X-ray diffraction, calorimetry. matrix isolation, mass spectrometry, magnetism, electro- 
chemistry , and various spectroscopies (IR , Raman , UV- Vis . nmr , epr . XPS , EXAFS , and Mossbauer) . 
Open to undergraduates by special permission only. Instriictor(s): Whirmire 

CHEM 595(F) SPECIAL TOPICS-INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3) 

Rotation of topics include: solid-state chemistry, organometallic chemistry, bioinorganic chemis- 
try, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Open to undergraduates by special permission only. Not 
offered 2003-04. 

CHEM 596(F) CHEMISTRY OF ELECTRONIC MATERIALS (3) 

A review of the chemical processes involved in the manufacture of microelectronic chips, 
including; crystallization, purification, oxidation, thin film methods, lithography and ceramic 
processing. Usually alternates with CHEM 595. Open to undergraduates by special permission 
only. Not offered 2003-04. 

CHEM 600 (F) INORGANIC SEMINAR (1) 

Selected topics in current research and literature. Intended for graduate students; undergraduate 
students must obtain consent of the instmctor. Instnictoris): Margrave 

CHEM 600 (S) INORGANIC SEMINAR (1) 

Selected topics in current research and literature. Intended for graduate students; undergraduate 
students must obtain consent of the instmctor. Instructor(s): Barron 

(#) = credit hours per semester 



336 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

CHEM 601 (F) PHYSICAL SEMINAR (1) 

Selected topics in current research and literature. Intended for graduate students; undergraduate 
students must obtain consent of instructor. Iiistructor(s): Kinsey 

CHEM 601 (S) PHYSICAL SEMINAR (1) 

Selected topics in current research and literature. Intended for graduate students; undergraduate 
students must obtain consent of instructor. Iiistriictor(s): Kinsey 

CHEM 602 (F) ORGANIC SEMINAR (1) 

Selected topics in current research and literature. Intended for graduate students; undergraduate 
students must obtain consent of instructor. InsTnictor(s): Tour 

CHEM 602 (S) ORGANIC SEMINAR (1 ) 

Selected topics in current research and literature. Intended for graduate students; undergraduate 
students must obtain consent of instructor. Instructor(s): Engel 

CHEM 603 (F) TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT FOR SCIENTISTS AND 
ENGINEERS (3) 

This course is intended for graduate students in science and engineering who are interested in 
gaining an understanding of the business of technology. Particular emphasis is placed on the 
financial and human resources management, business strategy, patents, trademarks and licenses, 
as well as new business start-up and development. Not offered fall 2003. 

CHEM 606 (F) EFFECTIVE PRESENTATIONS FOR CHEMISTS ( 1 ) 

Students learn to plan effective technical seminars with applications to chemical conferences such 
as the national and regional meetings of the American Chemical Society, as well as job interview 
presentations. Open to undergraduates by special permission only. Not offered fall 2003. 

CHEM 611 (F) HI TEMP&HI PRESS CHEM (3) 

The techniques for generation and measurement of high temperature and high pressures and of the 
nature of phenomena under extreme conditions. lnstructor{s): Margrave 

CHEM 630 (F) MOLECULAR SPECTROSCOPY & GROUP THEORY (3) 

The spectra of simple molecules, including microwave, infrared, visible, ultraviolet, and Raman 
spectra; introductory aspects of molecular symmetry and group theory; resonance spectroscopy. 
Instructor(s): Curl 

CHEM 700 (F) TEACHING PRACTICUM (2) 

Open to graduate students in chemistry and only in exceptional circumstances to undergraduates. 
Instructor(s): McHale 

CHEM 700 (S) TEACHING PRACTICUM (2) 

Open to graduate students in chemistry and only in exceptional circumstances to undergraduates. 
Instructor(s): McHale 

CHEM 750 (F) MANAGEMENT FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS (3) 

This course is designed for science and engineering students who want to understand the 
management of new and/or small technology based businesses. The course is taught in modular 
format to give students insights into how technology oriented firms manage intellectual property, 
marketing, organization behavior, strategy, accounting and finance. Concepts covered will be 
particularly relevant to students interested in careers in technology or entrepreneurial ventures. This 
course is part of a two-class sequence and provides the foundation for students taking NEW 
VENTURE CREATION for SCIENCE and ENGINEERING which is offered in the spring. Also 
listed as MGMT 750 and MSCI 750. Jnstructor(s): Barron 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 337 

CHEM 751 (F) NEW VENTURE CREATION FOR SCIENCE AND ENGI- 
NEERING (3) 

This course deals with the concepts and theories relevant to new venture creation . Our primary focus 
is the start-up process with particular emphasis being placed on market issues, intellectual property 
and entrepreneurial finance. As part of the course we will evaluate the commercial potential of a 
live technology drawn from the Rice engineering/science community. The concepts covered will 
be particularly relevant to students who are interested in careers in technology or entrepreneurial 
venture. The course is offered to seniors and graduate students only . Also listed as MGMT 75 1 and 
MSCI 751. Not offered fall 2003. 

CHEM 800 (F) GRADUATE RESEARCH (3) 

CHIN (Chinese) 

The School of Humanities / Center for the Study of Languages 

CHIN 101 (F) INTRODUCTORY CHINESE I (5) 

For students with no background in Chinese. Introduction to the Pinyin writing system, and 
emphasis on the fundamental vocabulary and structure of Chinese required for basic conversation. 
Students will learn to write approximately 100 Chinese characters, and be able to perform 
communicative tasks appropriate to this range of characters. Elements of Chinese culture will be 
introduced through the language. Weekly attendance at the language laboratory and participation 
in a weekly tutorial are required to receive full credit. Instructor(s):Yeh 

CHIN 102 (S) INTRODUCTORY CHINESE II (5) 

Continuation of Chinese 101 . More attention will be paid to the Chinese writing system (Chinese 
characters) while conversation skills still receive priority. Weekly attendance at the language 
laboratory and participation in a weekly tutorial required to receive full credit. At the conclusion 
of 102, students will be able to write approximately 200 Chinese characters, and be able to perform 
communicative tasks appropriate to this range of characters. Instructor(s): Yeh 

CHIN 201 (F) ELEMENTARY CHINESE I (5) 

Continuation of Chinese 102. Increasing emphasis will be paid to cultivating reading and writing 
skills in Chinese, as related to basic personal needs. The class is conducted primarily in Chinese. 
Weekly attendance at the language laboratory and participation in a weekly tutorial required to 
receive full credit. At the completion of 201, students will be able to write approximately 300 
Chinese characters, and be able to perform communicative tasks appropriate to this range of 
characters. Iiistnictor(s): Mc Arthur 

CHIN 202 (S) ELEMENTARY CHINESE II (5) 

Continuation of Chinese 201 . At the completion of this course, students should be able to converse 
at an intermediate level, and will be able to approach native language materials with the aid of 
Chinese language dictionaries. The class is conducted primarily in Chinese. Weekly attendance at 
the language laboratory and participation in a weekly tutorial required to receive full credit. 
Instructor(s): Shen 

CHIN 203 ACCELERATED CHINESE LANGUAGE AND 

CULTURE I (4) 

Emphasis will be on oral skills and writing. Students will learn to write 200 characters and read 400. 
Supplementary reading materials such as restaurant menus, lyrics of popular songs are also 
included. Not offered 2003-04. 

CHIN 204 ACCELERATED CHINESE LANGUAGE AND 

CULTURE II (4) 

Continuation of CHIN 203. Emphasis on reading and writing. Not offered 2003-04. 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



338 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

CHIN 211 (F) ACCELERATED ELEMENTARY CHINESE I (4) 

For students with some background in spoken Chinese but with Umited writing ability. 211 
introduces the Chinese writing system including the use of Chinese dictionaries, and writing skills 
necessary for basic personal needs. At the completion of 211, students will be able to write 
approximately 200 Chinese characters, and be able to perform communicative tasks appropriate to 
this range of characters. Reading tasks will also be geared towards this range of characters. 
Instructor(s): McArthur 

CHIN 212 (S) ACCELERATED ELEMENTARY CHINESE II (4) 

More attention will be paid to reading narrative texts. Writing will be focused on skills necessary 
for basic personal needs, with some introduction to writing more advanced social correspondence. 
At the completion of 2 1 2 , students will be able to write approximately 400 Chinese characters, and 
be able to perform communicative tasks appropriate to this range of characters. Instructor(s): 
McArthur 

CHIN 301 (F) INTERMEDIATE CHINESE I (4) 

Oral skills cultivated through discussion of narrative texts. Writing skills focused on skills 
necessary for basic personal needs. At the completion of 301, students will be able to write 
approximately 550 characters and be able to perform communicative tasks appropriate to this range 
of characters. Instriictor(s): Chen 

CHIN 302 (S) INTERMEDIATE CHINESE LANGUAGE AND 
CULTURE II (4) 

Continuation of CHIN 30 1 . By the end of CHIN 302, students should be able to study Chinese on 
an independent basis, as more native language materials will be used in this course. Students will 
have reading knowledge of approximately 800 Chinese characters. Instructor(s): Shen 

CHIN 31 1(F) ACCELERATED INTERMEDIATE CHINESE (4) 

Emphasis on reading narrative texts, and understanding authentic oral texts. Writing assignments 
stress skills necessary for basic personal needs and tasks necessary for writing social correspon- 
dence. At the completion of 311, students will be able to write approximately 700 Chinese 
characters, and be able to perform communicative tasks appropriate to this range of characters. 
Instriictor(s): Shen 

CHIN 312 (S) TEXTS FROM POPULAR CULTURE: ADVANCED 
INTERMEDIATE CHINESE (3) 

Presents the Chinese language through media such as film, popular songs, and short excerpts of 
popular fiction . Students will learn to distinguish between colloquial Chinese and the more formal 
language of written Chinese. Students are expected to gain in sophistication of expression in both 
speaking and writing. Reading/writing practice will be directed from written versions of oral texts 
and written texts such as plays or short-stories. Students will do regular writing assignments which 
reinforce reading/listening abilities. Instriictor(s): McArthur 

CHIN 313 (F) ADVANCED INTERMEDIATE CHINESE: MEDIA 
CHINESE (3) 

This course is designed to familiarize students with the language of print and broadcast media, with 
a focus on news media. Students will learn strategies and tactics applicable to newspaper reading, 
both skimming Chinese texts for basic content and reading intensively for complete comprehen- 
sion. Students will also learn essential skills for understanding television, internet and radio 
broadcasts . Contents for discussion include sociopolitical news , economic news , cultural news, and 
sports news. Regular writing assignments and task-based activities help reinforce reading and 
listening abilities. Prerequisite(s): CHIN 302 or 31 1 , or permission of instructor. Ability to write 
700 characters assumed. Instructor(s): Shen 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 339 

CHIN 314 (S) COMMERCIAL CHINESE: ADVANCED INTERMEDIATE 
CHINESE (3) 

This course is designed for students who will use Chinese in business and professional settings. The 
class aims to develop students ' language proficiency in business communication, as well as to focus 
on the current socio-economic situations of Greater China. The primary emphasis will be placed 
on listening comprehension, speaking fluency and reading competence. The task-based class 
activities provide students with the opportunities to practice Chinese and familiarize them with the 
proper etiquette in the business world . The key topics include the development of private enterprise , 
the emergence of banking reforms, the Chinese stock market, the trends in marketing, and the 
changing Chinese management practices, and foreign trade initiatives. Students also will learn to 
use a Chinese word processor to complete their assignments in this class . Prerequisite( s): CHIN 302 
or 311, or permission of instructor. Ability to write approximately 700 characters assumed. 
Instructor(s): Yeh 

CHIN 321 (F) STRUCTURE OF CHINESE: SYNTAX & SEMANTICS (3) 

Examination of syntactic and semantic features of Chinese with special attention to contrastive 
analysis of selected topics of Chinese and English, including expressions of tense and aspect, 
conditional and counterf actual, word formation (morphology), the notion of syntactic category , etc. 
Taught in English. Also listed as LING 321 . Instructor(s): Chen 

CHIN 322 (S) TAIWANESE LANGUAGE & LITERATURE (3) 

This course contains two parts running concurrently every week. Part One focuses on language 
acquisition: students learn to speak Taiwanese. Online textbook is Taiwanese on Campus, written 
and recorded for the Web by L. Chen. Emphasis is on daily, practical expressions. Teaching 
materials include Taiwanese songs. Part Two is examination of Taiwanese nativist literature with 
special attention to its language/cultural and political/historical background. Instructor(s): Chen 

CHIN 330 (S) INTRO TRAD CHINESE POETRY (3) 

The most elite literary form in classical Chinese literature, traditional poetry also enjoys large 
readership among common folks. This seeming contradiction emerges from its terse, single- 
syllabic language and rich, perceptible imagery that offer easy access to highly condensed 
messages. This course seeks to decode enchanting features of traditional Chinese poetry through 
examining the transformation of poetic genres , the interaction between poetic creation and political , 
social, and cultural changes, and the close association of poetry with art. Thus, this course also 
serves to understand Chinese culture and history through poetic perspectives. All readings in 
English translation. No previous knowledge of Chinese literature or language required. Also listed 
as ASIA 330. Instructor(s): Qian 

CHIN 332 (F) CHINESE FLM&MODRN CHINESE LIT (3) 

Designed to approach modem Chinese literature through visual images (Chinese films, subtitled 
in English), this course analyzes movie adaptations in comparison with their original texts. The 
approach is intended to examine how and why different time periods and different media affect the 
theme of a story. Discussion focuses on literary and cultural history, with attention given to 
narratology and movie theories as well. Topics include: China's modernity and the formation and 
cinematic visualization of modem Chinese literature; self, state, and nation; sex , gender, and power; 
etc. All readings in English translation. Also listed as ASIA 332. Instructor(s): Qian 

CHIN 335 (F) INTRO TO CLASCL CHINESE NOVELS (3) 

Examination of the basic characteristics of classical Chinese novels, primarily through six 
important works from the 1 6th to 1 8th centuries : Water Margin , Monkey , Golden Lotus , Scholars . 
Romance of the Three Kingdoms, and Dream of the Red Chamber. Also listed as ASIA 335. 
Insrntctor(s): Qian 

CHIN 346 HISTORY OF THE CHINESE LANGUAGE (3) 

This course investigates major developments in the history of Chinese, emphasizing stmctural 
changes from Archaic to Modem Chinese. We will examine pattems of thought and cultural 
perceptions as reflected in vocabulary change. Introduction to sound changes in Chinese and the 
evolution of the writing system. Students are required to have basic knowledge of Chinese or have 
taken an introductory linguistics course. Not offered 2003-04. 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



340 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

CHIN 399 (F) CHINESE TEACHING PRACTICUM (3) 

This course gives students with advanced proficiency in Chinese the opportunity to acquire 
teaching experience in tutorial format. Regular meetings with supervising faculty member. 
Enrollment limited to 20. Instructor(s): Yeh 

CHIN 411 ADVANCED CHINESE I (3) 

This course aims at improving student's reading, writing and speaking skills. Readings are 
authentic texts: chapters or excerpts from Dream of the Red Chamber, Soul Mountain by Gao 
Xingjian, works by Ba Jin, etc. Compositions and in-depth oral presentations are required. 
Classroom activities include access to online Chinese news and discussion. Instructor(s): Chen 

CHIN 412 (S) ADVANCED CHINESE LANGUAGE AND CULTURE H (3) 

Continuation of CHIN 411. Read native Chinese language materials and develop oral and writing 
skills to express opinions, make comments and critique social issues. Homework includes writing 
collaborative scripts to perform in class. Instructor(s): Chen 



CLAS (Classical Studies) 



The School of Humanities / Department of Hispanic and Classical Studies 

CLAS 101 FRESHMAN SEMINAR: SOCRATES: THE MAN AND HIS 

PHILOSOPHY (3) 

Socrates is often considered the first moral philosopher. Yet he was tried for impiety , convicted, and | 
executed by his fellow citizens. His influence on Western thought and literature has been immense, 
even though he left no writings of his own. In this discussion-style seminar we will consider how 
Socrates practiced philosophy, how Plato represented Socrates and Socratic philosophy in writing, 
and what effect Socrates had on Athens and his fellow Athenians. Readings will consist mainly of 
Plato's Socratic dialogues, with emphasis on the Apology and Gorgias. In addition to papers, each 
participant will make one presentation and lead one discussion. Cross-listed as FSEM 101 . Not 
offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Yunis 

CLAS 207 GREEK CIVILIZATION: FROM HOMER TO 

ALEXANDER THE GREAT (3) 

Overview of the literary, artistic, and intellectual monuments of classical Greek civilization from 
Homer and the Bronze Age through the golden age of classical Athens to the spread of Greek culture 
in the Hellenistic world. Includes historical background and readings in primary sources. Also listed 
as HUMA 109 and HIST 207. Not offered 2003-04. 

CLAS 208 ROMAN CIVILIZATION (3) 

This course will consider the period in Roman history between 3 1 BC and 1 4 AD, when the emperor 
Augustus restored stability to the Roman world, oversaw the expansion of the empire, and rebuilt 
Rome as a capital city . The Age of Augustus witnessed an unparalleled flowering in the literary arts 
and a revolution in art and architecture whose legacy persists to this day. We will examine in detail 
the political events and cultural life of this vital time, paying particular attention to the continuity 
between the late Republic and the Augustan period, Augustus' construction of his public identity, 
imperial and nonimperial patronage in poetry and the visual arts, and the role of literature, art, and 
architecture in the formation of Augustan ideology in Rome and in the provinces. The course offers 
a thorough picture of one of the most significant, yet in some ways most elusive, periods in antiquity. 
Also listed as HART 320. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): McGill 

CLAS 209 (F) GREEK AND ROMAN DRAMA (3) 

GREEK: A reading and dramatic analysis of Aeschylus's OresteiaiihxQe, plays), Sophocles's 
Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Coloniis. Electro and Entigone; of Euripides's Medea, Orestes, and 
Electra. LATIN: A reading and analysis of the Menaechmi and the Miles Gloriosus of Plautus, the 
Phormio of Terencen and the Medea of Seneca. Also listed as ENGL 209. Instructor(s): Mitchell 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 341 

CLAS 212 CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION: ROME (3) 

Introductory survey of the various aspects of Roman civilization, including the rise of Christianity, 
political and social history, art and architecture, religion, philosophy, and literature. Not offered 
2003-04. 

CLAS 220 THE NOVEL IN CLASSICAL ANTIQUITY (3) 

The course will take as its subject the ancient Greek and Roman novels, selections from which will 
be read in translation. As they encounter some of the more charming and curious stories in the 
western tradition, students will examine the origins of the novel, seek to identify first readers of the 
texts , consider whether the novel was a recognized and recognizable genre in antiquity , analyze the 
narrative techniques of the novelists, and consider how modem conceptions of the novel are 
applicable to ancient examples of the form. Not offered 2003-04. fnstriictor(s): McGill 

CLAS 222 PERSPECTIVES ON GREEK TRAGEDY (3) 

Introduction to Greek tragedy, with emphasis on the performance culture of democratic Athens, 
contemporary philosophical issues and the Greek traditions of poetry and myth. All plays in English 
translation. Not offered 2003-04. Instructoi-(s): Yimis 

CLAS 225 (F) WOMEN IN GREECE AND ROME (3) 

Survey of the depiction of women in Greek and Roman mythology, literature, and art. Includes a 
study of the lives of Greek and Roman women as evidenced by archaeological as well as literary 
materials. Also listed as WGST 225. Instructor(s): Wallace 

CLAS 311 (S) TEXT AS PROPERTY, PROPERTY AS TEXT: ACROSS 
THE AGES (3) 

Examines forms and norms of authorship and ownership from antiquity to the present. What is an 
author? Is a text public or private property? What are the licit/illicit forms of rewriting and 
appropriating a text, and how are those forms defined? This class investigates historically these and 
other issues. Instructor(s): McGill 

CLAS 312 (F) GREEK ART AND ARCHITECTURE (3) 

A survey of the art and society of Greece from its formative periods through the Hellenistic era. Also 
listed as HART 312. Instructor(s): Qiienemoen 

CLAS 315 (S) ROMAN ART AND ARCHITECTURE (3) 

A chronological survey of Roman sculpture, painting, and architecture from its Etruscan begin- 
nings to the late Empire. Art and architecture of Rome and the provinces considered within their 
larger social, political, and urban contexts. Particular attention given to patronage, the relation 
between Roman and Greek art, and Rome's position as an artistic center. Insrnictor(s): Qiienemoen 

CLAS 316 DEMOCRACY & POLITICAL THEORY IN ANCIENT 

GREECE (3) 

Democracy and political theory are two of the greatest legacies of the ancient Greeks. This course 
will consider how democracy first arose in Athens from its roots in the sixth century BCE until the 
full-fledged democracy of the fifth and fourth centuries. Democracy in Athens was a direct 
democracy , which is considerably different from democracy in modem western nation states. The 
course will consider how Athenian direct democracy functioned and what are the differences 
between ancient and modem democracy. Not offered 2003-04. Instnictor(s): Yunis 

CLAS 318 THE INVENTION OF PAGANISM IN THE ROMAN 

EMPIRE (3) 

This interdisciplinary course examines the development of the concept of paganism during the 
Roman empire, during the first through seventh centuries AD. We will examine the mutually 
tolerant character of the many religions of the Roman world and see how the category of paganism 
was invented and applied by Christians to all the polytheists of the empire and beyond. Also listed 
! as HIST 316 and RELI 316. Not offered 2003-04. Instriictor(s): Maas. McGill 

CLAS 322 WOMEN IN GREECE AND ROME (3) 

A survey of the depiction of women in Greek and Roman mythology , literature and art together with 
study of the real lives of Greek and Roman women as evidenced by archaeological as well as literary 
materials. Not offered 2003-04. 



(#) - credit hours per semester 



342 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

CLAS 335 MYTH AND STORYTELLING: ANCIENT, MEDIEVAL 

AND MODERN TRADITIONS (3) 

This class will focus on myths of voyage and return-traveler's tales. Primary texts will include 
examples of this type of tale as it appears in ancient, medieval, and modern storytelling traditions. 
The course will address questions of the following kind. How are travelers' tales from various parts 
of the world and from various historical periods alike, and in what ways do they differ? Who are 
the typical tellers and audiences of such tales? What is involved in the act of telling such a tale , and 
what hangs on it? What is the purpose of such stories- how do they function both in their immediate 
and in their broader cultural contexts? In addition to the primary texts, secondary readings will be 
assigned that explore these and related questions from the disciplinary perspectives of folklore 
studies and anthropology , addressing such issues as tale types, storytelling, performance, and oral 
tradition. Not offered 2003-04. Instriictor(s): Mackie 

CLAS 336 THE ORIGIN OF THE LANGUAGES OF EUROPE (3) 

Languages as superficially different as English, Greek, Latin, and Sanskrit in fact all developed 
from a single proto-language. This course will explore the following questions: What was this 
proto-language like? How do we know what it was like? What can we learn about its speakers on 
the basis of the words that have survived in the various daughter languages? Not offered 2003-04. 

CLAS 337 EPIC AND NOVEL (3) 

Why did novelists of the 1 8th , 1 9th , and 20th centuries allude to and imitate classical epic , and how 
did they transform the genre? In this course, we will read the Homeric poems and other ancient epics 
alongside such novels as Fielding's Tom Jones, Eliot's Middlemarch, and Joyce's Ulysses. The 
course will address questions of the following kind: how do epic heroes differ from novelistic 
heroes? In what ways does the novel parody epic? How do the language and narrative style of the 
two genres differ? What role does the past play in either genre? In different years, this course will 
focus on different texts; the texts for Spring 2003 will be Iliad, the Odyssey, and George Eliot's 
Middlemarch. Not offered 2003-04. Instructor(s): Mackie 

CLAS 351 EPIC AND SAGA (3) 

A comparison of ancient and medieval epics. All works read in translation. Not offered 2003-04. 
Instrnctor(s): Mackie 

CLAS 491 (F) SPECIAL TOPICS (3) 

Independent work. Open to qualified juniors and seniors. 

CLAS 492 (S) SPECIAL TOPICS (3) 

Independent work. Open to qualified juniors and seniors. 

CLAS 493 (S) SENIOR THESIS (3) 

Open to classics majors in the final semester of study . Thesis, to be written on a topic of the student's 
choice in consultation with a member of the faculty. 



COMP (Computer Science) 



The George R. Brown School of Engineering / Department of Computer 
Science 

COMP 100 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTING & INFORMATION 

SYSTEMS (3) 

Introduction to computer organization, operating systems, programming languages, artificial 
intelligence, and programming. Not intended for science-engineering students. May not be taken 
for credit after any other programming course. Enrollment limited to 35. 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



I COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 343 

COMP 110 COMPUTATION IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING (3) 

The course introduces basic techniques for problem solving and visualization using computational 
environments such as Mathematica and Matlab. Class will consist of a mixture of traditional 
lectures held in classrooms and self-paced modules covering topics in science and engineering that 
will be completed in Symonds II. No previous experience is required or expected. Also listed as 
NSCI 230. Iiistructor(s): Goldman 

COMP 210 PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTING & PROGRAMMING (4) 

Programming methodology and problem solving in a functional programming language. Data 
abstraction , procedural abstraction , reduction rules , use of control and state . Students will learn the 
practical skills to write and modify programs. A student may not receive credit for COMP 2 1 1 after 
taking COMP 210. 

COMP 21 1 (F) INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING (3) 

For AP credit only. NOTE: Only ONE of Comp 211 or 212 may be counted for distribution. 

COMP 212 INTERMEDIATE PROGRAMMING (4) 

Programming methodology and problem solving in an object oriented programming language. 
Recursion , data structures , introduction to analysis of algorithms , sorting techniques . NOTE: Only 
one of 211 or 212 may be counted for distribution. 

COMP 280 (S) MATHEMATICS OF COMPUTATION (3) 

Mathematical induction, recursive definitions and recurrence equations, finite state machines, 
computability, logic. Also listed as BIOE 280. 

COMP 290 (F) COMPUTER SCIENCE PROJECTS (3) 

Theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction. 

COMP 300 (S) ORGANIZATIONS IN THE INFORMATION AGE (3) 

We will review the remarkable technology of the Information Age and examine some of its effects 
on businesses and institutions. Information technology is re-shaping the structure of organizations 
and markets and challenging business leaders to re-think the ways in which businesses will prosper 
in the years ahead. We will explore these challenges and also speculate about the ways in which 
advancing information technology might further transform organizations. 

COMP 311 (F) PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES (4) 

The design, definition and abstract implementation of programming languages including methods 
for precisely specifying syntax and semantics. Instnictor(s): Cartwright 

COMP 312 (S) PROGRAM CONSTRUCTION (4) 

Introduction to methods and tools of programs by teams; pattern-based design: modules; safe 
programming. 

COMP 314 (F) APPLIED ALGORITHMS AND DATA STRUCTURES (4) 

Design analysis of computer algorithms and data structures useful for applied problems. Laboratory 
assignments will use these techniques in conjunction with advanced programming methods. Also 
listed as ELEC 322. 

COMP 320 (F) INTRO TO COMPUTER ORGANIZATION (4) 

Microprocessor architecture, including the memory hierarchy, pipelining, I/O devices, and inter- 
rupts and concurrency. Computer representation of and operations on basic data such as instruc- 
tions, integers, floating point numbers, and pointers. Low-level programming in C and assembly 
language. Basic system software. Performance issues. 

COMP 326 (S) DIGITAL LOGIC DESIGN (3) 

Gates, flip-flops, combinational and sequential switching circuits, registers, logical and arithmetic 
operations. Instnictor(s): Jump 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



344 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

COMP 360 (F) COMPUTER GRAPHICS (4) 

D graphics techniques including fast hne and curve drawing and polygon filling. 3D graphics 
problems including representation of solids, shading, and hidden surface elimination. Fractals, 
graphics standards. Instnictor(s): Goldman 

COMP 390 (F) COMPUTER SCIENCE PROJECTS (3) 

See COMP 290. 

COMP 409 (S) LOGIC IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (3) 

Set theoretical concepts. Propositional and first-order logic. Soundness and completeness, incomn 
pleteness, undecidability. Functional programming as an extension of first-order logic. Logical 
issues in computer science. 

COMP 410 (S) SOFTWARE ENGINEERING METHODOLOGY (4) 

Designing software for effective implementation and maintenance. Formal techniques for program 
specification and correctness proofs. Case studies examining what works, what doesn't and why. 
Programming assignments will include maintenance exercises and team projects. 

COMP 41 1(F) ADVANCED PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES (4) 

The design, definition and abstract implementation of programming languages including methods 
for precisely specifying syntax and semantics. 

COMP 412 (F) COMPILER CONSTRUCTION (4) 

Topics in the design of programming language translators, including parsing, run-time storage 
management, error recovery, code generation and optimization. Instructor(s): Kennedy 

COMP 413 (F) DISTRIBUTED PROGRAM CONSTRUCTION (4) 

This course focuses on modem principles for the construction of distributed programs, with an 
emphasis on design patterns, modern programming tools, and distributed object systems. The 
material will be applied in a substantial software design/construction project. Instriictor(s): 
Dnischel 

COMP 421 (S) OPERATING SYSTEMS & CONCURRENT PROGRAM- 
MING (4) 

Introduction to the design, construction, and analysis of concurrent programs with an emphasis on 
operating systems, including filing systems, schedulers, and memory allocators. Specific attention 
is devoted to process synchronization and communication within concurrent programs. Also listed 
asELEC421. 

COMP 422 (F) PARALLEL COMPUTING (4) 

Need for parallel computing; Models of parallel computations; Basic algorithms on PRAM 
machines; Architectures of parallel computing; Mapping and scheduling in parallel computers; 
Program design for parallel computations. The course includes an extensive programming 
component. 

COMP 425 (F) COMPUTER SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE (4) 

Design of advanced uniprocessor system architecture and basics of parallel architectures. Ad-, 
vanced pipelining, including dynamic scheduling and precise inteiTupt handling. Advanced' 
techniques for exploiting instruction level parallelism, including superscalar and VLIW architec- 
tures. Case studies of several recent high-performance microprocessors. Vector processors. 
Memory system design — techniques to improve cache performance , virtual memory systems , main 
memory enhancements. I/O systems — disk arrays and graphical interfaces. An overview of parallel 
computers. Also listed as ELEC 425. Instructor(s): Ri.xner 

COMP 429 (S) INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER NETWORKS (3) 

Network architectures and basic protocols. Routing and flow control. Access methods. Transmis- 
sion media, error management. Network performance. The course will cover several types of 
networks, including CSMA/CD, token ring, and ATM. Also listed as ELEC 429. 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring ' 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 345 

COMP 430 (F) INTRO TO DATABASE SYSTEMS (4) 

Survey of database system design and implementation. Physical data organization. Relational 
databases. Object-oriented databases. Query languages. Query optimization. Transaction process- 
ing. Concurrency control. Recovery. Instructor(s): Vardi 

COMP 440 (F) ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (4) 

Techniques for simulating intelligent behaviorby machine, problem solving, game playing, pattern 
perceiving, theorem proving, semantic information processing, and automatic programming. Also 
listed as ELEC 440. Instructor(s): Siibramanian 

COMP 450 (S) ALGORITHMIC ROBOTICS (4) 

An introduction to computing object motion in application domains such as robotics, manufacmr- 
ing . animation , and pharmaceutical drug design . Topics covered include motion planning in known 
and partially known environments, uncertainty, manipulation, and assembly planning. 

COMP 460 (S) ADVANCED COMPUTER GRAPfflCS (4) 

Advanced topics in computer graphics and geometric modeling, including B-spline curves an 
surfaces, solid modeling, radiosity, morphing, animation, simulation, subdivision, fractals, wave- 
lets, and other selected topics as time permits. Not offered every year. 

COMP 481 (S) AUTOMATA, FORMAL LANGUAGES, AND COMPUT- 
ABILITY (3) 

Finite automata, regular expressions, regular languages, pushdown automata, context-free lan- 
guages, Turing machines, recursive languages, computability, and solvability. 

COMP 482 (F) DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS (3) 

'Methods for designing and analyzing computer algorithms and data structures. The focus of this 
course will be on^he theoretical and mathematical aspects of algorithms and data structures. Also 
listed as ELEC 420. Instructor(s): Kavraki 

COMP 485 (F) FUNDAMENTALS OF MEDICAL IMAGING I (3) 

Fundamentals of various medical imaging modalities (e.g., x-ray, CT, and MRI) used to identify 
the anatomy of human organs, as well as other modalities (e.g., PET, SPECT, fMRI, and MEG) 
specifically developed to identify the function of the brain. Also listed as BIOE 485 , BIOE 685 , and 
ELEC 485. Instructor(s): Mawlawi 

COMP 486 (S) FUNDAMENTALS OF MEDICAL IMAGING II (3) 

This course is directed towards graduate and senior undergraduate students interested in acquiring 
an in depth knowledge of Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The course will focus on PET 
physical principles, image formation, and processing. The course will also cover the various 
correction techniques used to quantify PET images as well as lay the foundations for understanding 
tracer kinetic modeling. A field trip to MD Anderson's PET facility will be organized to provide 
the students with hands on experience of PET imaging and data analysis. The use of PET imaging 
in various medical applications will also be covered. Also listed as BIOE 486 and ELEC 486. 

COMP 490 (F) COMP SCIENCE PROJECTS (3) 

Theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction. 

COMP 491 (F) COMPUTER SCIENCE TEACHING (3) 

A combination of in-service teaching and a seminar. 

COMP 492 (F) COMPUTER SCIENCE HONORS PROJECT (3) 

COMP 502 (S) NEURAL NETWORKS AND INFORMATION 
THEORY I (3) 

Review of major Artificial Neural Network paradigms. Analytical discussion of supervised and 
unsuper\'ised learning. Emphasis on state-of-the-art Hebbian (biologically most plausible) learning 
paradigms and their relation to information theoretical methods. Applications to data analysis such 
as pattern recognition , clustering , classification , blind source separation , nonlinear PC A , projection 
pursuit, independent component analysis. Also listed as ELEC 502. Enrollment limited to 20. http:/ 
/www .ece .rice .edu/~erzsebet/ ANNcourse .html . 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



346 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

COMP 511 (F) MULTI-STAGE PROGRAMMING (4) 

Multi-stage programs can generate other programs at runtime, compile them, and execute them. 
Such programs can be significantly faster than single-stage ones .This course introduces multi-stage 
languages, their applications, theory, and implementation techniques. Coursework includes read- 
ing assignments, discussions, and various kinds of programming exercises using one such language 
(MetaOCaml). Insriiictor(s): Taha 

COMP 512 (F ) ADVANCED COMPILER CONSTRUCTION (4) 

Advanced topics in the design and implementation of programming language translators. Data flow 
analysis and optimization, code generation and register allocation, attribute grammars and their 
evaluation, translation within programming environments, the implementation of advanced lan- 
guage features, lnsrriictor(s): Cooper 

COMP 515 (S) ADVANCED COMPILATION FOR VECTOR PARALLEL 
PROCESSORS (4) 

Advanced compilation techniques for vector and parallel computer systems, including the analysis 
of program dependence, program transformations to enhance parallelism, compiler management 
of the memory hierarchy, interprocedural data flow analysis, and parallel debugging. 

COMP 520 (F) DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS (4) 

Distributed systems: workstations, local area networks, server machines. Multiprocess structuring 
and interprocess communication. File access and memory management. User interfaces: window 
systems and command interpreters. Case studies of selected distributed systems. Emphasis on 
performance aspects of system software design. Instriictor(s): Cox 

COMP 524 (F) MOBILE AND WIRELESS NETWORKING (3) 

Study of network protocols for mobile and wireless networking, particularly at the media access 
control, network, and transport protocol layers. Focus is on the unique problems and challenges 
presented by the properties of wireless transmission and host or router mobility . Also listed as ELEC 
524. Instructoris): Johnson 

COMP 525 (S) ADVANCED MICROPROCESSOR ARCHITECTURE (4) 

Exploration of the current trends and future directions of microprocessor architecture. Includes 
topics such as technology trends that affect microprocessor architecture, modem microprocessor 
design, techniques for statically and dynamically maximizing parallelism, memory system issues, 
and proposed future microprocessor architectures. Also listed as ELEC 525. 

COMP 526 (F) HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTER 
ARCHITECTURE (4) 

Design of high performance computer systems, including shared-memory and message-passing 
multiprocessors and vector systems. Hardware and software techniques to tolerate and reduce 
memory and communication latency. Case studies and performance simulation of high-perfor- 
mance systems. Also listed as ELEC 526. Instructoris): Pai 

COMP 527(F) COMPUTER SYSTEMS SECURITY (4) 

This class will focus on computer security in real systems. We will cover theory and practice for 
the design of secure systems (formal modeling, hardware and compiler-enforced safety, software 
engineering processes, tamper-resistant and tamper-reactive hardware, firewalls, cryptography, , 
and more). Instruc!or(s): Wallach 

COMP 540 (S ) ADAPTIVE SYSTEMS (4) 

Multi-disciplinary methods of designing and analyzing adaptive systems. Discussion of recent 
research in the areas of planning, scheduling and control as well as machine learning. 

COMP 590 (F) COMPUTER SCIENCE PROJECTS (3) 

Advanced theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction. 

COMP 600(F) GRADUATE SEMINAR (1) 

A discussion of selected topics in computer science. 

(F) = Fall: (S) = Spring 



■ COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 347 

COMP 602 (F) NEURAL NETWORKS AND INFORMATION 
THEORY II (3) 

Advanced topics in ANN theories, with a focus on Self-Organizing Maps and unsupervised 
learning. The course will be a mix of lectures and seminar discussions with active student 
participation, based on most recent research publications. Students will have access to professional 
software environment to implement theories. Enrollment limited to 10. Also listed as ELEC 602 

COMP 607 (F) AUTOMATED PROGRAM VERIFICATION ( 1 ) 

Methods, tools and theories for the computer-aided verification of concurrent systems. 

COMP 610 (F) GRADUATE SEMINAR IN PROGRAMMING 
LANGUAGES (1) 

A discussion of programming language semantics in computer science. 

COMP 612 (F) GRADUATE SEMINAR IN DISTRIBUTED 
COMPUTING (2) 

Topics in construction of programming language translators. 

COMP 613 (F) GRAD SEMINAR IN ADVAN LANGUAGE 
IMPLEMENTATION (3) 

Topics in advanced language implementation. 

COMP 615 (F) PARALLEL PROGRAMMING SYSTEMS (2) 

This course will explore topics in parallel programming environments and compilers for parallel 
computers. 

COMP 617 (F) GRADUATE SEMINAR IN RESOURCE AWARE 
PROGRAMMING (RAP) LANGUAGES (3) 

While high-level programming languages can be very helpful for general-purpose programming, 
they can be unsuitable for programming systems that interact directly with the physical world. Such 
systems include real-time and embedded systems. This seminar explores the design space for high- 
level languages that can support the more specialized task of resource-aware programming (RAP). 
Enrollment limited to 20. 

COMP 620 (F) GRAD SEM IN DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING (1) 

Content varies at discretion of instructor. 

COMP 625 (F) GRADUATE SEMINAR ON COMPUTER 
ARCHITECTURE (3) 

Subjects covering virtual memory and security structures, pipelines and vector processing, 
instruction set definitions, multi-threading, will be discussed. Both contemporary and Ancient 
systems will be analyzed. 

COMP 630 (F) MULTITIER WIRELESS NETWORKS (3) 

Topics in multitier wireless networks 

COMP 650 (F) GRADUATE SEMINAR ON PHYSICAL COMPUTING (1) 

Algorithmic issues related to physical problems of all scales, from the molecular to the astrophysi- 
cal. 

COMP 661 (F) GRAD SEMrGEOMETRIC COMPUTATION (3) 

COMP 685 (F) FUNDAMENTALS OF MEDICAL IMAGING (3) 

The course will introduce basic medical imaging modalities, such as x-ray. CT. and MRI, used to 
identify the anatomy of human organs, as well as other modalities, such as PET, SPECT, fMRI. and 
MEG. specifically developed to localize brain function. The course includes visits to clinical sites. 
Also listed as ELEC 685 and BIOE 685. 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



348 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

COMP 690 (F) RESEARCH AND THESIS (3) 

COMP 800 (F) GRADUATE RESEARCH (3) 

CSCI (Cognitive Sciences) 



The School of Social Sciences / Cognitive Sciences Program 



CSCI 390 SUPERVISED RESEARCH IN COGNITIVE SCIENCES (3) 

Supervised research on topics relevant to tlie cognitive sciences. Limited to majors in Cognitive 
Sciences. Permission of instructor required. 

CSCI 481 (F) HONORS PROJECT (3) 

Independent directed research toward preparation of an undergraduate honors project or thesis. 
Approval of program director required. 

CSCI 482 (S) HONORS PROJECT (3) 

Independent directed research toward preparation of an undergraduate honors project or thesis. 
Approval of program director required. 



ECON (Economics) 



The School of Social Sciences / Department of Economics 



ECON 211 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I (3) 

Introduction to the nature of economics. Includes price systems, household decisions, cost and 
supply, marginal productivity and capital theory, industrial organization and control, economic 
efficiency, externalities, and public goods. Required for economics and mathematical economic 
analysis majors. May also be offered in the summer. Students (both majors and nonmajors) enrolled 
at Rice who wish to transfer this course from another institution must pass a departmental qualifying 
examination. Enrollment unlimited for section taught by professor. Enrollment limited to 25 in 
other sections. lustriictor(s): Soli go 

ECON 212 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS II (3) 

Includes the measurement and determination of national income; money, banking, and fiscal 
policy; business cycles, unemployment , and inflation; international trade and balance of payments, 
and other contemporary economic problems. Required for economics and mathematical economic 
analysis majors. Prerequisite(s): ECON 211. May also be offered in the summer. Students (majors 
and nonmajors) enrolled at Rice who wish to transfer this course from another institution must pass 
a department qualifying examination. Enrollment unlimited for section taught by professor. 
Enrollment limited to 25 in other sections. Instnictor(s): (F) Sickles (S) B. Brown 

ECON 355 (S) FINANCIAL MARKETS AND INSTITUTIONS (3) 

Study the principles of U .S . and international equity and debt markets , and the interactions between 
such markets and various countries" monetary and exchange rate policies. The role of financial 
markets and institutions in the allocation and transfer of credit and risk is highlighted, and various 
existing and suggested regulatory frameworks are discussed. Prerequisite(s); ECON 21 1 and 212. 
Instriictor(s): El-Ganial 

ECON 370 MICROECONOMIC THEORY (3) 

Intermediate level analysis of markets, firms, households, income distribution, and general 
equilibrium. Required for economics and mathematical economic analysis majors. May also be 
offered in the summer. Instnictor(s): (F) Grout, (S) J. Brown 

(F) = Fall; (S) = Springs 



1 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 349 

ECON 375 (F) MACROECONOMIC THEORY (3) 

Micro-foundations of macroeconomic theory. Required for mathematical economic analysis 
majors. Prerequisite(s): ECON 211/212. 370, and MATH 101/102, or equivalents. Instriiaor(s): 
Cordoba 

ECON 382 (F) PROBABILITY & STATISTICS (3) 

Study of probability theory and the central concepts and methods of statistics with applications to 
economics, marketina. and finance. Required for mathematical economic analysis majors; may 
substitute STAT410 or 43 1 . Also listed as STAT 310. Prerequisite(s): ECON 2 1 1 and MATH 102. 

ECON 400 (S) ECONOMETRICS (3) 

Survey of estimation and forecasting models. Includes multiple regression time series analysis. 
Prerequisite{s): ECON 382 (STAT 310) or STAT 381. and MATH 355 or CAAM 310, or 
permission of instructor. A good understanding of linear algebra is highly desirable. Required for 
mathematical economic analysis majors. Instnictorls): Chang 

ECON 403 SENIOR INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (3) 

Independent research project for seniors on an approved topic of their choice. Prerequisite(s): 
PeiTnission of instructor. 

ECON 404 SENIOR INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (3) 

Independent research project for seniors on an approved topic of their choice. Prerequisite(s): 
Permission of instructor. 

ECON 415 (S) LABOR ECONOMICS (3) 

Covers a number of topics relating to labor supply, labor demand, and equilibrium in the labor 
market . The course presents theoretical and empirical work in each of the subject areas covered . The 
presentation requires that students have a firm foundation in microeconomic theory . and it requires 
that students be willing to improve, over the course of the semester, their ability to apply the basic 
tools of microeconomic analysis. Though ECON 415 requires no prior courses in statistics or 
econometrics, some elementary knowledge of these subjects will be necessary for an understanding 
of the empirical work discussed in the course. Consequently, students in this course should be 
prepared to study some of the empirical techniques used by labor economists. Prerequisite{s): 
ECON 211. 370.' and MATH 101/102 (or equivalent). Instnictor{s): Brown, J. 

ECON 420 (F) INTERNATIONAL TRADE (3) 

Study of the economic relationships between countries . Includes trade theory . tariffs and other trade 
restrictions, international finance, trade and development, and current policy issues. Prerequisite(s): 
ECON 21 1/212. and 370. Not offered every year. 

ECON 421 (F) INTERNATIONAL FINANCE (3) 

Analysis of foreign exchange and international capital markets and linkages between exchange 
rates, interest rates, and prices. Includes an overview of historical and institutional developments, 
and current policy issues. Prerequisite(s): ECON 370, 375. STAT 280 or ECON 382. Not offered 
every year. 

ECON 435 (S) INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION (3) 

Study of market structure, concentration, barriers to entry, and oligopoly pricing. Includes the 
application of micro theory to industry problems. Prerequisites ECON 211. MATH 101/102 or 
permission of instructor. Instructor(s): Dudey 

lECON 436 (F) GOVERNMENT REGULATION OF BUSINESS (3) 

Analysis of governmental regulatory activities under antitrust law s and in such regulated industries 
. as communications . energy . and transportation . Prerequisite(s): ECON 211. ECON 370 and 435 are 
recommended. Instructor] s): Chae 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



350 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ECON 438 ECONOMICS OF THE LAW I (3) 

Section I: Exploration of the role of economics in understanding the legal system. Includes 
applications to contracts, property, rights, and torts and crime. Prerequisite(s): ECON 211, 370. 
Enrollment limited to 50. Instriictor(s): Soligo. 
Section 2: The course will address the role of economics in understanding the legal system, in 
particular, understanding how the law allocates entitlements and risk in property, tort and contract 
law. This course is primarily intended for students who are considering attending law school and 
uses instruction methods appropriate for that goal. Grading will be based substantially on a major 
paper, as well as, class participation. Prerequisite(s): ECON 21 1, 370, and permission of the 
instructor. Students wishing to enroll in this course should submit a one-page statements to 
instructor explaining their interest in the course. Enrollment limited to 25. Instructor(s): Brito 

ECON 440 (S) RISK AND UNCERTAINTY (3) 

Microeconomic foundations of finance and insurance and other economic decisions involving risk 
and uncertainty. Prerequisite(s): MATH 212, calculus and algebra, and some familiarity with 
probability theory. Instructor(s): Grant 

ECON 445 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (3) 

Application of economics to decision making with the firm. Includes organization theory, cost, 
pricing, and problems of control. Prerequisite(s): ECON 211. ECON 212 is recommended. Not 
offered every year. 

ECON 446 APPLIED ECONOMETRICS (3) 

Applied econometrics methods; focus will be on the application of econometrics and complemen- 
tary measurement methodologies to modeling, forecasting, and hypothesis testing. ApplicationS| 
will include firm decision-making, testing for discrimination in the workplace, competition policy, 
portfolio management, and macroeconomic forecasting. Prerequisite(s): ECON 211/212 and 382 
or permission from instructor. Some knowledge of calculus is required. Not offered every year. 

ECON 448 CORPORATION FINANCE (3) 

Study of financial analysis, planning, and control in modern corporations. Includes valuation, cost 
and allocation of capital , and capital markets. Prerequisite(s): ECON 2 1 1 and ACCO 305 . May also , 
be offered in the summer. Instructor(s): (F) Hartley, (S) Bryant 

ECON 449 (F) BASICS OF FINANCIAL ENGINEERING (3) 

The course will cover the following: mathematical background for continuous time stochastic 
modeling in finance and financial engineering; statistical methodologies to estimate and test the 
models commonly used in finance and financial engineering; and applications which will include, 
Black-Scholes option pricing and term structure models for interest rates. Prerequisite(s): ECON 
400 or STAT 421 and 431 or equivalent; and MATH 221 and 222, or equivalencies. //z^rn/fforf 5 j.- 
ECON 450 WORLD ECONOMIC /SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT (3) 
Examines past and future development in advanced and poor countries, emphasizing resources, 
population, entreperneurship, education, and planning. Prerequisite(s): ECON 211/212. Not 
offered every year. 

ECON 451 POLITICAL ECONOMY OF LATIN AMERICA (3) 

4Examination of economic and political development, as well as, current policy, in contemporary 
Latin America. Includes a comparative analysis of selected countries, with emphasis on the 
interaction between public policies and economic outcomes. Prerequisite(s): ECON 211. Not 
offered every year 

ECON 452 ISLAMIC LAW, ECONOMICS, AND FINANCE (3) 

Introduction to Islamic law. Islamic legal theory and Islamic jurisprudence of financial transac- 
tions. Economic analysis of Islamic financial jurisprudence, and the growing Islamic finance 
industry. Not offered every year. 

ECON 455 (F) MONEY AND FINANCIAL MARKETS (3) 

Micro-foundation of monetary, fiscal and financial theory. Prerequisite(s): ECON 21 1/212, 370,. 
and MATH 101/102 or equivalents. Not offered every year. Instructor(s): Bryant 

(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 351 

ECON 461 URBAN ECONOMICS (3) 

Economic analysis of the development and problems of urban areas, with emphasis on current 
policy issues. Prerequisite(s): ECON 211 or permission of instructor. Not offered every year. 

ECON 472 (S) INTRODUCTION TO GAME THEORY (3) 

Study of solution concepts for different games (e.g., strategic form game, coalition form game and 
extensive form game). Includes elementary application to economics and political science. 
Instnictoiis): Chae 

ECON 475 INTEGER & COMB. OPTIMIZATION (3) 

Modeling and sohing optimization problems with discrete components, graphs and networks; 
network flow problems: minimum spanning trees; basic polyhedral theory; the knapsack problem; 
the plant location problem; the set packing problem; computational complexity . branch and bound; 
cutting planes; Lagrangian relaxation and Bender's decomposition. Also listed as CAAM 475. 
Prerequisite(s): CAAM 471. 

ECON 477 (F) MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS (3) 

Exploration of competitive economics from a mathematical perspective, unifying calculus, matrix 
algebra, and set-theoretic approaches. Concentrates on the individual optimization tools. 
Prerequisite(s): MATH 212 or 22 1 , and MATH 355 or CAAM 335 or MATH 21 \.Instructor(s): 
Bogomolnaia 

ECON 480 (S) ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS (3) 

The economic theories of externalities and common property resources are used to analyze 
lenvironmental problems. Regulation, taxes and subsidies, transferable pollution rights and legal 
solutions to environmental problems are evaluated. Environmental and other aspects of alternative 
energy sources are considered and the pricing of depletable energy resources is analyzed. 
Prerequisite(s): ECON 211. Not offered every year. Insrn<ctor(s): Mieszkowski 

ECON 481 (F) HEALTH ECONOMICS (3) 

Study of determinants of health, including behavioral, economic and social factors and access to 
health care. Analysis of the medical care industry, production, cost, demand and supply factors. 
Effectsof regulation and methodsof payment. Prerequisite(s): ECON 2 ll./«5f//((:rfv/Y5j.-M/>icA'ow5/:/ 

ECON 482 DISTRIBUTIVE JUSTICE (3) 

Methodological individualism and social contract theories; private versus public contracts; division 
according to claims/liabilities; sharing joint costs and surplus; shapely value; managing the 
commons: increasing or decreasing returns: fair trade and the competitive equilibrium; fair division 
according to taste: cardinal welfarism; utilitarianism, equlitarianism; social choice: aggregation of 
performance; and voting. Prerequisite(s): ECON 211, 370 or permission from instructor. Not 
offered every year. 

ECON 483 (F) PUBLIC FINANCE: TAX POLICY (3) 

Analysis of tax policy, primarily at the federal level; emphasizes efficiency and equity issues and 
evaluation of tax reform proposals. Prerequsites: ECON 211, 370. Instructor(s): Zodrow 

ECON 484 PUBLIC FINANCE EXPENDITURE (3) 

Public goods theor>' including nonrival and congestible public facilities, theory of local public 
goods including the economics of education. The problem of preference revelation and the 
fundamentals of benefit-cost analysis. Analysis of the effects of social security. old age retirement, 
and the role of government in financing healthcare — Medicare and Medicaid. Prerequisite(s): 
lECON 211. Not offered every year. 

ECON 485 CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC ISSUES (3) 

Analysis of urgent and significant economic problems, with emphasis on the evaluation of policy 
remedies. Content will vary year to year. Not offered every year. 

ECON 486 (S) CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC ISSUES (3) 

Analysis or urgent and significant economic problems, with emphasis on the evaluation of policy 
remedies. Content varies from year to year. Not offered every year. Instnicror(s): Medlock 



352 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ECON 495 SENIOR SEMINAR (3) 

Comprehensive analysis of economic issues related to a specific topic. Content will vary year tc 
year. Not offered every year. 

ECON 496 SENIOR SEMINAR (3) 

Comprehensive analysis of economic issues related to a specific topic. Content will vary year tc 
year. Not offered every year. 

ECON 501 (F) MICROECONOMIC THEORY I (5) 

Theory of the firm, the theory of consumer behavior, duopoly, bilateral monopoly, imperfed 
competition, capital theory, and the theory of income distribution. Instructor(s): Grant 

ECON 502 (F) MACROECONOMICS/MONETARY THEORY I (5) 

Macroeconomic theory of output, consumption, investment, interest rates, inflation and employ- 
ment. Instructor(s): Bryant 

ECON 504 (F) ADVANCED ECONOMIC STATISTICS (5) 

Statistical inference and the testing of hypotheses multiple and partial correlation analysis; analysis 
of variance and regression. Also listed as STAT 604. Instructor(s): Chang 

ECON 505 (S) MACROECONOMIC/MONETARY THEORY II (5) 

More detailed discussion of selective macroeconomic and monetary topics. Instriictor(s): Cordobc 

ECON 506 (F) TOPICS IN MACROECONOMICS (5) 

Discussion of selected topics of current interest. Not offered every year. Instructor(s): Cordoba 

ECON 507 (F) MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS I (5) 

Theory of household, firm; activity analysis; set theory, matrix algebra, vector calculus, metric 
spaces, separation theory, constrained optimization. Instructor(s): Bogomolnaia 

ECON 508 (S) MICROECONOMIC THEORY II (5) 

Continuation of ECON 507. Set theoretic approach to general equilibrium; aggregate linear anc 
nonlinear production models; existence, stability, optimality. Instructor(s): Chae 

ECON 509 (F) MICROECONOMICS III (5) 

Social choice and preference aggregation; cardinal welfarism, bargaining: axiomatic and strategic 
models; cooperative games: core stability and coalition formation; Shapley value, cost and surplus 
sharing, mechanism design: dominant strategy, strategy-proof voting, fair division, and cosi 
sharing; implementation in nash, strong, and bayesian equilibrium. Prerequisite(s): ECON 501 
508. Instructor(s): Moulin 

ECON 510 (S) ECONOMETRICS I (5) 

Estimation and inference in single equation regression models, multicollinearity, autocorrelated 
and heteroskedastic disturbances, distributed lags, asymptotic theory, and maximum likelihood 
techniques. Emphasis is placed on the ability to analyze critically the literature. Also listed as STAT 
610. Prerequisite(s): ECON 504. Instructor(s): Brown, B. i 

ECON 511 (F) ECONOMETRICS II (5) I 

Topics in linear and nonlinear simultaneous eijuations estimation, including qualitative and 
categorical dependent variables models and duration analysis. Applied exercises use SAS and the 
Wharton Quarteriy Econometric Model. Also listed as STAT 611. Prerequisite(s): ECON 510 
Instructor(s): Sickles 

ECON 512 INTERNATIONAL TRADE THEORY (5) 

Exploration of classical, neoclassical, and modem trade theory. Includes welfare aspects of trade 
such as the theory of commercial policy, with emphasis on applications. Not offered every year. 

ECON 514 INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION/CONTROL (5) 

Industrial markets and public policy. Not offered every year. 

(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 353 

ECON 515 LABOR ECONOMICS (5) 

Exploration of the economics of the labor market and the economic implications of trade unions, 
with emphasis on major public policy issues. Not offered every year. 

ECON 518 INTERNATIONAL MACROECONOMICS (5) 

Effects of fiscal and monetary policies on exchange rates and the current account and balance of 
payments. Includes exchange market efficiency, exchange rates and prices, LDC debt, and policy 
coordination. Not offered every year. 

ECON 519 ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (5) 

Analysis of theory and policy questions relating to the level and rate of economic development . Not 
offered every year. 

ECON 521 (S) PUBLIC FINANCE I (5) 

Theory of public goods and externalities, political mechanisms and public choice, theory of local 
public goods, cost-benefit analysis and project evaluation issues of income redistribution. 
Instriictoris): Mieszkowski 

ECON 522 (F) PUBLIC FINANCE II (5) 

Study of the effects of taxation on individual and firm behavior, general equilibrium tax incidence 
analysis, optimal taxation theory, optimal implementation of tax reform, analysis of comprehensive 
income, and consumption taxes. Iiistructor(s): Zodrow 

ECON 523 DYNAMIC OPTIMIZATION (5) 

Study of dynamic optimization in discrete and continuous time. Not offered every year. 

ECON 565 HEALTH ECONOMICS (5) 

Study of economic aspects of health. Includes production, cost, demand and supply factors; 
methods of payment and effects of regulation. Not offered every year. 

ECON 577 TOPICS IN ECONOMIC THEORY I (5) 

Discussion of topics in advanced economic theory. Not offered every year. May repeat for credit. 

ECON 578 TOPICS IN ECONOMIC THEORY II (5) 

Discussion topics in advanced economic theory. Not offered every year. May repeat for credit. 

ECON 579 TOPICS IN ECONOMETRICS (5) 

Discussion of selected topics in advanced econometrics. Prerequisite(s): ECON 511. Not offered 
every year. May repeat for credit. 

ECON 591 TOPICS IN POLICY/APPLIED ECONOMICS (5) 

Discussion of selected topics and applied economics. Not offered every year. May repeat for credit. 

ECON 592 (S) TOPICS IN POLICY/APPLIED ECONOMICS (5) 

Discussion of selected topics and applied economics. Not offered every year. May repeat for credit. 
Instn<ctor(s): Brito 

ECON 593 (F) WORKSHOP IN ECONOMETRICS (5) 

Seminars on advanced ttipics in macroeconomics, microeconomics, econometrics and applied 
microeconomic theory, presented through guest lectures by leading researchers. Open to graduate 
jStudents only. Includes preparation of a research paper over the course of the year and its 
■presentation in the workshop. May repeat for credit. Instntctor(s}: Section 1 : Hartley: Sectiofi 2: 
Moulin: Section 3: Park: Section 4: Brown, J. 

ECON 594 (S) WORKSHOP IN ECONOMICS I (5) 

Continuation of ECON 593 . Instructor{s): Section 1 : Hartley: Section 2: Moulin: Section 3: Park: 
Section 4: Brown. J. 



354 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ECON 597 (F) READINGS IN ADVANCED TOPICS (5) 

Not offered every year. 

ECON 598 (F) READINGS IN ADVANCED TOPICS (5) 

Not offered every year. 

ECON 800 (F) GRADUATE RESEARCH (5) 

EDUC (Education/Education Certification) 

The School of Humanities / Education/Education Certification Department 



EDUC 201 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN EDUCATION (3) 

Exploration of current issues and controversies in education through research and primary 
experience. Requires a minimum of 14 hours of service or experience in K-12 schools, to be 
arranged individually. Directed to all students interested in issues of K-12 education, and 
recommended for those interested in entering the teacher preparation program. Instructor(s): Staff 

EDUC 301 (F) PHILOSOPHICAL, HISTORICAL, AND SOCIAL FOUN- 
DATIONS OF EDUCATION (3) 

Analysis of events and ideas that have shaped the philosophy and practice of American schools 
today. Requires at least 1 5 hours of observation in secondary schools. May be required for students 
earning teacher certification, but also appropriate for all students interested in the influences and 
stresses that have created a unique educational system in our culturally diverse country. Required 
in junior or senior year for certification unless EDUC 330 is substituted. Instructor(s): Radigan 

EDUC 305 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3) 

Formerly EDUC 312. The goal of this course is to introduce students to a psychological 
understanding of teaching and learning through an overview of principles, issues, and related 
research in educational psychology. The course will examine theories of learning, complex 
cognitive processes , cognitive and emotional development , motivation , and the application of these 
constructs of effective instruction, the design of optimum learning environments, assessment of 
student learning, and teaching in diverse classrooms. It is a general overview of the field and 
requires no prior preparation. Required for certification. Instnictor(s}: Norcross 

EDUC 310 (S) INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION (3) ! 

Introduction to special education with emphasis on various types of students with exceptionalities, 
ranging from visible to invisible; gifted students; pertinent legislation in the field; social issues; and 
educational approaches. Instructor(s): Ashmore 

EDUC 330 (F) THE AMERICAN HIGH SCHOOL (3) 

Survey of the background, purposes, and organization of modern secondary schools and their 
students and curricula. Includes the policy and administration of secondary schools as well as 
introductory educational research. 15 hours of observation in schools required. Can be substituted 
for EDUC 301 to satisfy certification requirements. Instructor(s): McNeil 

EDUC 335 (S) URBAN EDUCATION: ISSUES, POLICY, AND 
PRACTICE (3) 

Major issues facing urban education, including poverty, the implications of racial and ethnic 
diversity for educational institutions, and strategies for improving academic achievement in urban 
schools. We will examine sociological, political, cultural and educational research and theory, as 
well as explore strategies for improvement of urban education at the classroom, school, and policy 
levels. Instructor(s): Coppola 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 355 

EDUC 340 (S) COMPUTERS IN EDUCATION (3) 

Formerly EDUC 367. Technology is and will continue to be deeply involved in the education 
process. In this course, students will investigate and use computer applications to enhance 
classroom teaching and facilitate administrative tasks. Additionally , the Internet will be utilized as 
a teacher and student resource. Recommended for certification. Instructor(s): White 

EDUC 410 (F) THEORY AND METHODS: ART (3) 

Study of methods for putting theory into practice in the classroom. Includes multiple methods for 
educating students in our diverse society, reflection on, and practice of the skills of teaching 
applicable to the discipline. Required for certification. Instructor(s): Heckelman 

EDUC 411 (F) THEORY AND METHODS: ENGLISH (3) 

Study of methods for putting theory into practice in the classroom. Includes multiple methods for 
educating students in our diverse society, reflection on, and practice of the skills of teaching 
applicable to the discipline. Required for certification. Instructor(s): Heckelman 

EDUC 412 (F) THEORY AND METHODS: FOREIGN LANGUAGE (3) 

Study of methods for putting theory into practice in the classroom. Includes multiple methods for 
educating students in our diverse society, reflection on, and practice of the skills of teaching 
applicable to the discipline. Required for certification. Instructor(s): Heckelman 

EDUC 413 (F) THEORY AND METHODS: MATHEMATICS (3) 

Study of methods for putting theory into practice in the classroom. Includes multiple methods for 
educating students in our diverse society, reflection on, and practice of the skills of teaching 
applicable to the discipline. Required for certification. Instructor(s): Heckelman 

EDUC 414 (F) THEORY AND METHODS: PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3) 

Study of methods for putting theory into practice in the classroom. Includes multiple methods for 
educating students in our diverse society, reflection on, and practice of the skills of teaching 
applicable to the discipline. Required for certification. Instructor(s): Heckelman 

EDUC 415 (F) THEORY AND METHODS: SCIENCE (3) 

Study of methods for putting theory into practice in the classroom. Includes multiple methods for 
educating students in our diverse society, reflection on, and practice of the skills of teaching 
applicable to the discipline. Required for certification. Instructor(s): Heckelman 

EDUC 416 (F) THEORY AND METHODS: SOCIAL STUDIES (3) 

Study of methods for putting theory into practice in the classroom. Includes multiple methods for 
educating students in our diverse society, reflection on, and practice of the skills of teaching 
applicable to the discipline. Required for certification. Instructor(s): Heckelman 

EDUC 420 (S) CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT (3) 

Integration of theory with practice as students observe a mentor teacher, identify issues of 
developing and implementing curriculum with a diverse student body , and create curriculum for the 
Summer School for Grades 8 through 12. Students must be admitted to the Teacher Preparation 
Program and committed to student teaching in Summer School. Required for certification. May be 
repeated for credit. Instructor(s): Heckelman 

EDUC 440(SM) SUPERVISED TEACHING: SUMMER SCHOOL (3) 

Field-based practicum for secondary teachers, with accompanying seminar. May be repeated for 
credit. Instructor(s): Heckelman 

EDUC 489 (S) ADOLESCENT LITERATURE (3) 

Cultural, literary, and developmental issues in literature written to engage middle and high school 
students. Instructor(s): McNeil 

EDUC 491 INDEPENDENT STUDY AND RESEARCH (VAR) 

Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. Instructor(s): Staff 



(#) = credit hours per semester 



356 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

EDUC 501 (F) PHILOSOPHICAL, HISTORICAL, AND SOCIAL FOUN- 
DATIONS OF EDUCATION (3) 

Graduate level equivalent of EDUC 301 . Instructor(s): Radigan 

EDUC 505 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3) 

Graduate level equivalent of EDUC 305. Instructor(s): Norcross 

EDUC 530 (F) THE AMERICAN HIGH SCHOOL (3) 

Graduate level equivalent of EDUC 330. Instructor (s): McNeil 

EDUC 540 (F) INTERNSHIP (3) 

Field practice for secondary teachers, with accompanying seminar. Instructor(s): Heckelman 

EDUC 591 INDEPENDENT STUDY AND RESEARCH (VAR) 

Graduate equivalent of EDUC 491 . Instructor(s): Staff 

EDUC 596 (S) FIELD-BASED STUDIES IN TEACHING AND LEARNING 
(VAR) 

Study of field-based ethnographic research on teaching and learning. Includes seminar, indepen- 
dent research projects, ethnographic research methods, and directed case studies. Open to 
upperclassmen and graduate students , particularly those in education , sociology , anthropology , and 
psychology. Enrollment limited to 15. Listed as needed. Instructor(s): McNeil 

ELEC (Electrical and Computer Engineering) 

The George R. Brown School of Engineering / Department of Electrical and 
Computer Engineering 



ELEC 201 (F) INTRO TO ENGINEERING DESIGN (4) 

This is a hands-on introduction to engineering design. Using skills developed in the course, teams 
of students will design and construct a functional robot, and program this robot to perform simple 
tasks. The course is completely self-contained, assumes no prerequisites, and is intended for both 
engineering majors and nonmajors. Instructor(s): Young 

ELEC 220 (S) FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER ENGINEERING (4) 

An overview of fundamental topics in computer engineering, including bits, logic, state machines, 
instruction sets , assembly language , linkage conventions , pipeline , storage , hierarchies , interrupts, 
I/O, DMA, and networking. Intended for ECE/CS majors. Instructor(s): Pai 

ELEC 241 (F) FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING I (4) 

The creation, manipulation, transmission, and reception of information by electronic means, 
elementary signal theory; time-and frequency-domain analysis; sampling theorem. Digital infor- 
mation theory; digital transmission of analog signals; error-correcting codes. Laboratory demon- 
strating the principles of information management by electronic means. Instructor(s): D.Johnson 

ELEC 242 (S) FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTRICAL 
ENGINEERING II (4) 

Form.ulation and solution of equations describing electric circuits and electromechanical systems. 
Behavior of dynamic systems in the time and frequency domains. Basic electronic devices and 
circuits, including diodes, transistors, optoelectronics, gates, and amplifiers. Introduction to 
feedback control and digital systems. Instructor(s): Wise 



(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



' COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 357 

ELEC 243 (S) INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONICS (4) 

Introduction to analog and digital circuit analysis and design . Basic circuit elements , transistors , OP 
Amps, digital devices and systems. Intended for nonmajors. InsTructor(s): Wilson 

ELEC 261 (F) INTRODUCTION TO WAVES AND PHOTONICS (3) 

Introduction to the concepts of waves and oscillatory motion , with a particular focus on electromag- 
netic waves and their interaction with dielectric materials , and on the use of these ideas in the fields 
of optical fiber communications, laser design, nonlinear optics, and Fourier optics. Instructor(s): 
Mittleman 

ELEC 301 (F) INTRODUCTION TO SIGNALS (3) 

Analytical framework for analyzing signals and systems. Time and frequency domain analysis of 
continuous time signals and systems, solution of differential equations, convolution, and the 
Laplace transform. Fourier analysis. Instructor(s): Baraniuk 

ELEC 302 (S) INTRODUCTION TO SYSTEMS (3) 

A study of linear dynamical systems based on state-space representation. Includes the structural 
properties of systems such as controllability and observability. About one third of the course is 
devoted to the study of linear algebraic concepts , like range , null space , eigenvalues diagonalizability . 
Applications to control problems. 

ELEC 303 (S) SYSTEMS LAB (1) 

To be taken concurrently with ELEC 302. 

ELEC 305 (F) INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL ELECTRONICS (3) 

Study of transmission lines and pulse propagation: basic semiconductor devices; waves; and lasers. 
Instriictor(s): Wilson 

ELEC 306 (S) ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND DEVICES (3) 

A course to introduce students to various electrical engineering aspects and devices based on 
electromagnetic field theory. Includes basic concepts of waveguides, resonators, optical fibers, 
waveguide devices, a survey of antennas, and a discussion of radar, lidar, and remote sensing 
principles. Instructor(s): Tittel 

ELEC 322 (S) APPLIED ALGORITHMS AND DATA (4) 

See description of COMP 314. 

ELEC 326 DIGITAL LOGIC DESIGN (3) 

Gates, flip-flops, combinational and sequential switching circuits, registers, logical and arithmetic 
operations. Instriictor(s): Jump 

ELEC 327 (S) DIGITAL LOGIC DESIGN LAB (2) 

The design, construction and test of projects built from digital integrated circuits using design 
techniques presented in ELEC 326. 

ELEC 331 (F) APPLIED PROBABILITY (3) 

See description of STAT 33 1 . 

ELEC 342 (S) ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS (4) 

Models of diodes, bipolar and field effect transistors. Biasing methods, distortion analysis, two-port 
analysis, single-stage and multistage amplifiers, frequency domain characteristics, feedback, 
stability, and power amplifiers. Lab culminates in the design and testing of a low-distortion audio 
frequency power amplifier. Instritctor(s): Massey 

ELEC 361 (S) ELECTRONIC MATERIALS AND QUANTUM 
DEVICES (3) 

This course provides the background in quantum mechanics and solid state physics necessary for 
further studies in device physics (ELEC 462) and quantum electronics (ELEC 463). Instructor(s): 
Kono 

(#) = credit hours per semester 



358 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ELEC 381 (F) COMPUTATIONAL ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY (3) 

Introduction to cellular electrophysiology. Includes the development of whole-cell models for 
neurons and muscle (cardiac, skeletal and smooth muscle) cells, based on ion channel currents 
obtained from whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments. Ion balance equations are developed, as well 
as, those for chemical signaling agents such as second messengers. The construction of small 
neuron circuits is discussed. Volume conductor boundary-value problems frequently encountered 
in electrophysiology are posed, and solutions obtained based on adequate descriptions of the 
bioelectric current source and the volume conductor (suiTounding tissue) medium. This course 
provides a basis for the interpretation of macroscopic bioelectric signals such as the electrocardio- 
gram (ECG), electromyogram (EMG) and electroencephalogram (EEC). Also listed as BIOE 381 . 
Instructor(s): Clark 

ELEC 383 (F) BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING INSTRUMENTATION 
AND ANALYSIS (3) 

This is an introductory course on fundamentals of biomedical engineering instramentation and 
analysis. Topics will include measurement principles; fundamental concepts in electronics includ- 
ing circuit analysis, data acquisition, amplifiers, A/D converters, and electrical safety; temperature, 
pressure, flow , and optical sensing techniques in cardiovascular, pulmonary , and nervous systems; 
and measurements of molecular and cellular properties. Additionally, basic methods in statistical 
inference and linear regression will be covered. Also listed as BIOE 383. Instriictor(s): Anvari 

ELEC 391 (S) PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN ELECTRICAL 
ENGINEERING (1) 

Issues related to engineering professional practice and other career choices for electrical engineer- 
ing graduates. Topics will include intellectual property rights, engineering ethics, technical 
presentations , entrepreneurship , venture capitalism, career paths , and graduate study . Instructor(s): 
Jump, Sinclair. Wilson 

ELEC 420 (F) DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS (3) 

See description of COMP 482. 

ELEC 421 (S) OPERATING SYSTEMS AND CONCURRENT 
PROGRAMS (4) 

See description of COMP 42 1 . 

ELEC 422 (F) VLSI DESIGN I (4) 

A study of VLSI technology and design. MOS devices, characteristics and fabrication. Logic design 
and implementation. VLSI design methodology, circuit simulation and verification. Course 
includes group design projects. Instnictor(s): Cavallaro 

ELEC 423 (S) VLSI DESIGN II (2) 

Testing and evaluation of VLSI circuits designed in VLSI Design I, ELEC 422. Efficient test 
methodologies. Topics in computer aided design. Instriictor(s): Cavallaro 

ELEC 424 (F) HIGH-SPEED AND EMBEDDED SYSTEMS DESIGN I (4) 

The specification, design, and implementation of high-speed DSP and microcontroller-based 
systems, taking into account cost constraints available technology, and other factors. Includes 
instruction on high-speed design theory , hardware/software interface, and approaches to designing 
practical hardware systems. Major hardware design project required. Enrollment limited to 25. 
Must complete ELEC 427 to receive credit for ELEC 424. Instructor(s): Frantz 

ELEC 425 (F) COMPUTER SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE (4) 

Design of advanced uniprocessor system architecture and basics of parallel architectures. Ad- 
vanced pipelining, including dynamic scheduling and precise interrupt handling. Advanced 
techniques for exploiting instruction level parallelism, including superscalar and VLIW architec- 
tures. Case studies of several recent high-performance microprocessors. Vector processors. 
Memory system design — techniques to improve cache performance , virtual memory systems , main 
memory enhancements. I/O systems— disk arrays and graphical interfaces. An overview of parallel 
computers. Also listed as COMP 425. Instructor(s): Rixner 

(F) = Fall; (S) = Spring 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 359 

ELEC 426 (F) DIGITAL SYSTEMS DESIGN (4) 

Design elements of modem computer and microprocessor systems. Emphasis upon state machine 
based design and microcontrollers. Use of VHDL and graphical simulation software to model 
complex digital systems. Laboratory implementation of a system involving high-speed arithmetic 
techniques. 

ELEC 427 (S) HIGH SPEED AND EMBEDDED SYSTEMS DESIGN H (3) 

PERMSSION OF INST